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Full text of "Working plan report of Ankola high forest, blocks XXIX & XXV"

i 



WORKING PLAN REPORT 



UC-NRLF 




ANKOLA HIGH FOREST 



BLOCKS XXIV & XXV 



BY 



E. S. PEAESON, I. F. S., F. L. S., 

Deputy Conservator of Forests, 

WORKING PLANS, S. C. 



1908- 



BOMBAY 

PBINTKD AT THE GOVERNMENT CENTRAL PRESS 
1910 



A f; R T ruT,' T 'T T ^ IT T. 




WORKING PLAN REPORT 



or 



ANKOLA HIGH FOREST 



BLOCKS XXIV & XXV 



E. S. PEARSON, I. F. S., F. L. S., 

Deputy Conservator of Forettt, 

WORKING PLANS, S. C. 



1908 



BOMBAY 

PMHTBD AT THB GOVERNMENT CENTRAL PKE3B 
1910 



, 









' 



CONTENTS. 



Particulars. 


Paragraphs. 


Page. 


Introduction ... ... 


... 


1 


PART I. 






SUMMARY OF THE FACTS ON WHICH THE PROPOSALS ARE BASED. 






A. "Description of the tract dealt with." 






Name and situation ... ... ... ... ... 


1-2 


1 


Configuration of the ground 


34 


2 


l\.ock *. . ... *' 


56 


2 


Soil ... ... ... 


7-8 


2 


Climate ... ... ... ' 


9-11 


2 


Agricultural wants of the population ... ... 


12 


3 


B. " Composition and condition of the crop." 






Distribution of area ... ... ... ... 


13 


3 


State of the boundaries ... ... ... ... 


14 


8 


Legal position (a) Rights ... ... ... . 
Do. (b) Concession ... ... 


15 
16 


3 

3 


Composition and condition of the crop ... ... 


17 


4 


Regeneration 


is 


4 


Injuries to which the crop is liable 


19 


5 


C. " System of Management." 






Past and present system of management ... 


20 


5 


Special works of improvement undertaken ... ... 


21 


5 


Past revenue and expenditure ... ... 


22 


5 


D. " Utilization of the Produce." 






Marketable produce ; requirements to be met... 


23 


fi 


Lines of export ... ... 


24 


6 


Mode and cost of extraction 


2527 


7 


Centres of consumption ... ... 


28 


7 


Net value of each class of produce 


2J 


7 


E. " Miscellaneous facts." 






Forest starl ... ... ... ... 


30 


7 


Labour supply ... ... ... ... 


31 


7 


PART II. 






FUTUKE MANAGEMENT DISCUSSED AND PRESCRIBED. 






A. " Basts of -proposals." 






Working Circles how composed ; reasons for their formation ... 


32 


8 


Sub-division of the area in blocks and compartments 


3S&34 


8 


Analysis of the crop ; method of valuation employed ... ... 


35 


8 


B." Method of treatment." 






Object sought to be attained ... ... ... ... 


36 


8 


Method of treatment adopted ... ... 


37 


8 


The exploitable size ... ... ... ... ... 


38-40 


9 



B O0'> 



394752 



Particulars. 


Paragraphs. 


Page. 


C. " The fellings" 






The general working scheme 


41&42 


9 


The yield or possibility 


4351 


10 


Period for which fellings are prescribed 


52&53 


12 


Mode of executing the fellings ... ... 


5458 


14 


Forecast of the condition of the crop at the end of the cutting period. . 


59-65 


15 


D. " Supplementary provisions." 






The improvement fellings 
Statement of improvement fellings 


66-70 
71 


16 
18 


Fire protection ... ... . 


72 


20 


Regulation of grazing ... . 


73 


20 


Keeping the compartment boundaries clear . 


74 


20 


Roads and buildings ... 


75&7G 


20 


E. " Miscellaneous." 






Changes proposed in the forest stafl 


77-79 


21 


Forecast of financial results ... 


80 


22 


Control Books to be kept 


81 


22 


/'. " Appendices." 







THE WORKING PLAN FOB THE ANKOLA HIGH FORESTS OF 
THE WESTERN DIVISION OF NORTH KA'NARA DISTRICT. 

BLOCKS 2X1 V AND XXV. 
INTRODUCTION. 

The data on which the following plan is based were collected during the 
months of March and part of April 1907, when work 
had to be stopped owing to the staff being much 

reduced by sickness ; it was started again on the 1st December 1907 and com- 
pleted by the end of May 1908. 

Mr. P. E. Aitchison was in charge of the work during March and April 

1907, while the writer of this Report carried on the 
>mployed. work from December 1907 to May 1908. The 
establishment employed consisted of 5 Surveyors, of whom three were in charge 
of the enumeration parties ; one was employed on internal demarcation ; and 
one on the survey and demarcation of the outer boundaries. Two and at times 
three complete enumerating parties were employed, each consisting of one 
recorder, five enumerators and eighteen coolies : 

Us, a. p. 

Cost of Field Work ... ... ... 13,5521211 

Pay and Travelling Allowance of Superior Officer ... 6,380 5 5 

Pay and Travelling Allowance of Office Establishment ... 294 1 2 

Pay of Surveyors, Head Clerk and Travelling Allowance. 1,749 14 6 

Pay of Coolies for Enumeration, Survey and line cutting. 6,731 11 9 

Miscellaneous ... ... ... ... 396 12 1 



Grand Total ... Rs. 13,552 12 11 



In the above the pay of the Superior Officer and office establishment is 
given for the time spent on the field work only. The cost per square mile works 
out to Rs. 188 annas 3 pies 0. 



PART I. 

SUMMARY OF THE FArrrs ON WHICH THE PROPOSALS ABE BASED. 
A. Description of the tract dealt with. 

1. This plan has been prepared for what is known as the " Ankola High 

Forests." These are situated in the east of the Ankola 
Name and situation. . . 

laluka, in the upper reaches of the valley formed by 
the Gangavali River, the centre of the area being some 30 miles from the sea 

coast. 

Boundaries of the Working Circle. 

2. North and South. The north and south boundaries are not formed for 
the most part by any natural lines, but have been fixed and demarcated so as to 
divide, as far as possible, the deciduous from the ever-green forests. This line 
as a rule does not extend above the 1,000 feet contour line. 

East. The area dealt with is a continuation of the tract already organised 
under the Arbail Slopes Working Plan, so that the west boundaries of Arbail 
Plan and the east boundaries of the area now organised are identical. 

West. The west boundary north of the Gangavali River runs from the 
P. W. D. bridge crossing the Handimadi Nalla, along the western slopes of the 
Marugudda Valley, dividing the deciduous from the ever-green forest, while the 

B990 1 






boundary to the south of the river, along the Pattanpur Local Fund Road, has 
been fixed with a view to exclude the less valuable forests towards the west. 

3. The area to be brought under systematic working comprises a strip of 

country lying in the valley formed by the Gangavali 
Configuration, of the ground. t>- no -i i i.v. j -, , 

River, some 18 miles in length and varying m breadth 
from 3 to 10 miles. 

4. The general configuration of the ground is hilly. On each side of the 
river, at a distance varying from 3 to 6 miles, run parallel lines of hills, rising to 
1,800 feet and with individual peaks considerably higher. These hills are in 
reality a continuation of the Sahyadri Hills, out of which the Gangavali River 
has cut the valley. These ranges are further cut into by four tributary streams 
to the north and two on. the south of the main stream, while from the crest of 
the hills and running down into the main valley are innumerable spurs, in some 
cases with very steep gradients. Between the slopes on each side of the Ganga- 
vali River the ground is undulating, with here and there hills rising to 500 and 
600 feet above the surrounding country, generally detached or semi-detached 
portions of the main ranges. 

5. The geological formation of the Ankola Valley varies greatly in charac- 

ter throughout the area. Round the Gangavali River 
and in most of the low-lying localities laterite covers 

the greater portion of the area. The small hills, semi-detached spurs and slopes 
are either igneous or metamorphic rocks. Laterite is again found capping the 
tops of the highest hills, though such places are generally outside the organised 
area. It is remarkable to find the laterite both on the tops of the hills and also 
in the valleys, with crystalline rocks of older origin lying between them on the 
slopes. 

6. On the hill sides a great variety of crystalline rocks occur, consisting 
of gneiss, schists, inferior granite, and in places, basalts much intersected with 
veins of milky quartz. Though no visible signs of foliation are present, the 
rocks appear to have been subjected to intensities of heat, pressure and sheering 
stress, resulting in various degrees of metamorphism. On the slopes above Konal 
a rook resembling shale, and in places approaching true slate, is to be found, 
while on the western slopes above the Kodalgudda village the rock is largely 
formed of milky quartz. The slopes are nearly everywhere covered with 
fragments of rock which have been broken off from the scarps above and 
rolled down the steep hill-sides. 

7. Generally speaking, in the valleys, the disintegration of the igneous and 

metamorphic rocks from the slopes mixed with the 
wearing of the laterite rocks in the valleys has formed 

a deep, rich, fertile soil, very suitable to the Forest vegetation found in these 
localities. A tract of low-lying land containing somewhat poor soil exists on 
either side of the Gangavali River, reaching from mile 39 on the Yellapur Road, 
to the Dongri Village. Here it stops on the north bank, but extends on the 
south side, at a little distance from the river and runs past Hegarni Village down 
the Chandgar Valley to the village of Mabge. 

8. The hill-sides are much exposed to denudation by the heavy rains, 
especially the upper slopes where in places the rock appears on the surface, as 
for instance on the south slopes of the Bidralli ridge, the western slopes of the 
Ujralli valley, and again on the south side of the Hillurbail range. The soil 
formed by the disintegration of crystalline and metamorphic rocks on these 
slopes, though generally speaking not deep, is by no means of poor quality, as 
may be seen from the growth of Teak, Kindal, Nana and other species in places 
where the rock comes very near the surface. 

9. There is no meteorological station within the area, the nearest being at 

Ankola, some 12 miles from the western boundary 
of these forests. Here the average rainfall for the 

last 5 years is 124*33 inches, which is probably considerably lower than the 
average at Ramanguli, a village lying on the eastern boundary of the area. 

10. The maximum temperature can rarely be much over 105 in April and 
May but, owing to the shut-in nature of the country and the heavy rainfall, 



3 

especially up the narrow side valleys, the climate is very humid and close for a 
great part of the year. 

11. These forests have a very bad reputation as being feverish and 
unhealthy, especially at the foot of the ghats and, judging from the way the 
establishment suffered, this is no doubt true. In consequence of the bad climate 
labour is always a difficulty and work in the forest is often delayed. 

12. The population living within these forests is not large being limited 

to cultivators who have settled near the banks of the 

o En Iar 8 er rivera aud often in verv out of the wav . P laces 

up small valleys where they cultivate small rice and 

sugarcane fields, while directly round their huts are situated their Supari (betel- 
nut) and cocoanut gardens. Their requirements consist of small timber for 
house building, for their sugar mills and canoes, firewood, fencing material and 
twigs and green leaves for manuring their " Supari " gardens. They further 
require grazing for a very limited head of cattle. There is no difficulty in 
supplying the population with timber and fuel, while, under the revised settle- 
ment which has been submitted for the sanction of Government, four acres of 
forest to an acre of Supari garden has baen proposed to meet the supply of 
green leaf manm*e for these gardens. The grazing question will be dealt with 
hereafter. There is, besides the local demand, a considerable amount of 
timber and building material required by sea coast villages, arrangements for 
which will have to be made. 

B. Composition and condition of the crop. 

13. The area forms an elongated block of forests containing 49,643*7 acres, 

divided lengthways down the centre by the Ganga- 

)area * vali River. Of this area 41,875*8 acres are Reserved 

Forest (shown green on the map), 3,131*2 acres Minor Forest (shown purple 

on the map), 1,106'9 acres Soppin Betta (where green leaf manure may be cut, 

shown brown on the map), and 3,529'8 acres under cultivation (not coloured). 

The 45,007*0 acres of Reserved and Minor Forests comprise 3,105 acres of 
teak-bearing deciduous forest (shown by the letter " T " in red on the map), 
37,697 acres of non-teak deciduous forest (shown dark and light green according 
to 1st and 2nd quality) and 4,205 acres of evergreen forest (shown by deep 
green lines on the map). 

14. The main object in view while fixing the outer boundaries of the 

blocks was to separate the deciduous from the ever- 
green forests. So as to keep the outer boundary as 

regular as possible and also so as not to exclude semi-evergreen areas containing 
some fine deciduous species scattered here and there in them, it was found 
occasionally necessary to include evergreen areas of considerable extent within 
the plan. The external boundary fixed has been demarcated by deeply blazing 
all trees within 10 feet of it on each side. The internal lines demarcating the 
compartments have generally been taken along roads or nalas, the trees on the 
sides and banks of which have been heavily blazed ; where natural features 
could not be taken as boundaries, they have been demarcated by a cut line 25 
feet broad. 

15. Under the original forest Settlement made in 1880, part of the area 

was constituted Reserved Forest and part Protected 
Rlghts * Forest. In 1906 the work of re-settlement was 
undertaken resulting in the whole area being constituted Reserved Forest with 
the exception of 1,106 - 9 acres left as Protected Forest for the purpose of provid- 
ing green-leaf manure for the spice gardens. 3,131*2 acres of Reserved Forest 
have been classed as Minor Forest in which the villagers are allowed to exercise 
the privileges sanctioned by Government from time to time, the remaining area 
being classed as " Forest Proper. " The area now consists of 41,875*8 acres of 
forest proper, 3,131*2 acres of minor forest and 1,106*9 acres of Soppin-betta or 
protected forest. 

16. The exercise of privileges under the Kanara Forest Rules is permitted 
. - in the Minor Forests, from which the cultivators may 

cut their brushwood, fencing material, firewood and 



timber for agricultural purposes, while they get their green leaf manure from 
the soppin-betta areas assigned to them. According to the rules they graze 
their cattle at 2 annas per head. 

17. A detailed description of the crop is given under Appendix III, so that 

only a brief general description of the growing stock 

Composition and condition { nece ssary owing to the varying conditions of the 
of the crop. .. *. ., , .. , , . 

locality, such as altitude, aspect, soil and underlying 

rock, together with the former treatment to which the crop has been subjected. 
The forest has assumed five somewhat distinct types : - 

(a) In the east and, therefore, in the forests farthest removed from 
the sea, on the upper slopes of the hills and spurs coming down from the 
Arbail ghats, true deciduous forests containing Teak are found. There 
the height growth is about 70 feet a'ad the forest is fairly well stocked, 
containing, besides Teak, good Nana, Kindal, scattered Sissum, Heddi, Honui, 
Jamba, a few Matti, inferior species and Bamboos. 

(b) The second type of forests is found on the lower-lying ground, 
along the main stream and up the larger valleys. Here the ground is 
covered with moist deciduous forests, with generally speaking a height of 
80 to 100 feet and a full stocking of large Matti, Nana, Kindal, Jamba, 
Dhamni, Womb, a few Sissum, Honni, Heddi, inferior species, many Bam- 
boos and a heavy growth of Karvi, but practically no Teak. From the 
more accessible areas in this class of forests the fellings of Matti, Jamba, 
Nana and in places Heddi, have been very heavy in the past. Thus in the 
Kolga, Kendga and Marugudda valleys, north of the Gangavali River, and 
again in and around Shavkar village and in the Halvalli-Kuntgani valley 
south of the river, most of the large trees of these species have been ex- 
ploited, leaving good young growth and many large misshapen trees. 

(c) In the small narrow valleys and on the upper slopes above the 
1,000 feet contour line, especially on north and north-east aspects, evergreen 
forest appears, forming a very marked contrast to the deciduous forests 
below. In places the deciduous and evergreen forests gradually merge 
from one type of forest into the other, and only where former " Kumri " 
cultivation has upset the balance of nature is the line distinctly marked. 

(d) The fourth type of forest is very local, being chiefly confined to 
the Dongri and Hegarni plain, where a species of exaggerated scrub jungle 
has come into existence containing stunted Matti, Kindal, Hirda, Khair and 
thorny bushes. This type of forest is the result of former cultivation which 
impoverished the soil by laying it bare and when reduced to such a state 
that even a meagre crop could no more be raised, it was allowed to lie 
fallow and has since produced this poor class of forest. 

(e) Lastly, a very distinct feature of the growing stock, but one which 
does not form an altogether different type of forest is the growth which 
has come into existence on the former " Kumri " areas. At the higher 
elevations the forest so produced is a crop of nearly pure Jamba, now in 
the pole stage, which is sparsely intermixed with well grown Nana and Kindal 
but few other species. Lower down the slopes the percentage of Jamba in 
the crop becomes less, while that of the better deciduous species increases, 
till, in the valley, the result of this clearing of the forest growth has resulted 
in very promising Matti pole woods mixed with other valuable species. 

18. Regeneration. Regeneration from coppice has probably played but 
a very small part in the origin of these forests, by far the greater portion of the 
growing stock having originated from seed. It may at once be stated that the 
natural regeneration is good and in some places excellent. In a forest contain- 
ing such a variety of species and in which the production of seed of most of the 
species is assured, the distribution of the species must depend largely on their 
powers to withstand shade in the struggle for existence and it is on this point 
that the future of these forests depends. 

The Teak producing area is small as compared with the rest of the forest, 
so it is the other more valuable species that we must chiefly take into consider- 
ation. Of these, in order, Matti, Nana, Kindal and Jamba are those for which 
there is at present the greatest demand. Matti is without doubt the greatest 



light demander of the four, seedlings of this species beiug found only in fairly 
open places in the forest, along cut lines and on the edge of old cultivations, 
while it is often found suppressed under shade. Kindal comes next ou the list 
as a light demander and its natural regeneration is everywhere good. Nana 
stands lateral shade, especially in youth. Jamba is a heavy shade bearer and 
so profuse is the seedling crop that it requires no encouragement. 

It will be readily understood that as three of the most valuable species are 
light demanding the future growth of the natural regeneration of the better 
species will depend on the treatment adopted. 

19. Owing to the configuration of the ground and to the limited population 

in these forests, the damage done bv man and cattle 

is HaTe r P is confined to sfcri P s of forest nf Hmite"d extent round 

the cultivated areas. In certain of the flat areas 

round the villages of Shavkar, Konal, Hegarni and Kuntgani to the south of the 
river, and to a less extent round Sunksal and up the Kolga and Marugadda 
valleys north of the river, overgrazing has retarded natural regeneration, other- 
wise the damage caused by cattle is not great. The forests round Dongri and 
Hegarni have been badly treated in the past but now appear to be gradually 
recovering, while " Kurnri '' cultivation which did much damage in the past 
has long been stopped. Fire plays a relatively small part in these moist forests, 
and it is very questionable if the encroachment of the evergreen on the more 
valuable deciduous forests is not in a large measure due to fire protection in tho 
past. By far the greatest damage to which the principal species, namely, Matti, 
is exposed is the " water blister." This abnormal growth is found on quite 
30 per cent, of the growing stock and ruins some 10 to 12 feet in the centre of 
many otherwise fine logs. 

Creepers and climbers are plentiful, especially in the moist deciduous 
forests, and do much local harm. Lastly, the excessive growth of Bamboo is 
no doubt the cause of the lack of natural regeneration in certain localities, such 
as in the Eotha forest and also south of Ramanguli on the south side of the 
river, otherwise the Bamboo growth, where moderate, is beneficial to the 
growing stock, 

C. System of Management. 

20. These forests have never been worked under any system, fellings 

having been carried on where the best trees could be 
present systems exploited with a m i n i mum amou nt of labour. The 
of management. i, ,1 < .1 -, i ,1 

result is that most of the low-lying areas near the 

road or river have been heavily exploited for sound Matti, Jamba, Nana and Heddi, 
leaving in such areas a number of large somewhat faulty trees, while on the 
slopes and in the more inaccessible places large sound trees of these species are 
still found. As stated above certain areas have been over exploited, but it 
cannot be said that these fellings have ruined the forest, as the exploitable girth 
of Matti and Heddi was kept high and only mature trees taken out while the 
number of trees taken out annually as compared with the total yield of these 
forests was not excessive. Kindal has only found a market in recent years, and 
the number of mature trees of this species now standing in the forest is very 
large. 

21. No planting or sowing has been undertaken in the past. The protec- 

tion from cattle has been somewhat lax, while spas- 
toeufuuderTa'ken. mPr Ve " modic creeper-cutting has been carried on by the 

establishment from year to year. Fire-protection has 

been rigidly enforced, but whether this was conducive to improving the natural 
regeneration is open to doubt. 

22. From the following statement of revenue and expenditure for the last 

ten years, compiled from the records of the Range 

Jet r6VenUe 63pendl ' Office > Ankola and Hattikeri Dep6t daftar, it will be 

seen that Matti, Nana and Jamba are the chief species 

which have been sold and that it is only recently that Kindal has been exploited 
to any extent. In prepariiH' this statement only the trees extracted from the 
area under organization are given and not from other portions of the 

B 990-r2 



Range, while it has only been found possible to give the grazing returns for the 
whole Range. The firewood, which is chiefly procured from other forests of the 
Range, has been omitted. A detailed statement under this head is given in 
Appendix IX : 

Revenue and Expenditure for the past ten years. 



Year. 


Species. 


Num- 
ber 
of 
trees 
felled. 


Logs 
pre- 
partd. 


Cubic feet. 


Other 
dead wood 
Cubic feet. 


Under 

Permit. 


Amount 
realized. 


Expenditure. 


Net amount 

realized. 


Gnuting. 


Minor Forest 
produce. 


Total rerenuc, 
10, 11 and 12. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


6 





7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 
















Rs. a. p. 


KB. a. p. 


Ru. *. p. 


Kt, a. |>. 


Ks. a. p. 


Rs. a. p. 




Teak 


** 


18 


678-60 






V 














Black wood ... 




14 


146-0 




















.1 


1 


1 


1-68 




















Matti, green 


3,867 


8,275 


227,386-93 




















., dead 


160 


817 


10.3S8-56 


















| 


Naiia, preen ,,, 
., dead 


2,316 
209 


3,868 
382 


110,430-58 
7,741-07 


77,669-36 


34,860-98 


2,07,391 60 


29,681 11 6 


1,77,806 


24,706 1 


11,010 14 


2,16,561 6 


3 
s 


Klndal, green 
Jamba, green ... 


196 

a 


298 
64 


12.001-38 
1,277-37 


















1 


Sleepers 12.127 


... 


m 


... 




















Hoddi 


76 


113 


1,878-00 




















Jungle wood ... 
Total ... 
10 years' Average... 




300 


7.652-91 


















7.201 


14,150 


3,86,59m 


77.660-35 


34,860-08 


2,07,391 6 


20,681 11 6 


1,77,808 6 6 


24,705 1 6 


11,049 11 


2,16,561 6 


720 


1,415 


38,659- 9 


7,768 


3,185 


20,780 2 


2,968 7 10 


i7,rao 10 o 


2,170 8 2 


1.101 11 


21,656 2 



Marketable produce ; 
quirementa to be met. 



re- 



D. Utilization of the Produce. 

23. The amount of large Teak and Sissum available is limited and every 

log forthcoming will procure a ready sale. Matti is 
the most valuable species found in large quantities, 
the demand for it has been annually increasing and all 
the logs these forests can supply will find a market and give a useful profit on 
the expenditure incurred on their extraction. The timber is chiefly exported to 
Goa, Bombay, Bhdvnagar, Mangalore and Cochin. 

Nana is a species that has only of late years afforded sufficient profit on 
the cost of extraction to guarntee its exploitation in any quantity especially from 
difficult localities. It will, however, probably be possible to work out the full 
yield of Nana from these forests at once. Fifty tons of this species are 
supplied yearly to the Southern Mardtha Railway. The number of mature 
Kindal is large, and at present the yield will exceed the demand, but this state of 
things will probably improve as the price of Teak and other species increases, 
and it may be reasonably expected that the demand for Kindal will equal the 
supply in years to come. Fifty tons of this wood are annually sent to the 
Southern Maratha Railway from these forests. Jamba was in fair demand for 
Railway sleepers in the near past, but has of late been rejected for that purpose. 
The demand for Jamba for other purposes is small and is chiefly confined to the 
local requirements, but may again improve. At the same time the supply of 
large timber of this species from these forests is by no means great. For other 
species the demand is not great ; Heddi is required for preparing dug-outs, and 
to a small extent as timber by merchants in BhaVnagar and Goa. Honni is not 
abundant but will always find a sale. Sagdi is in small demand for sugar mills, 
while Bharnigi and Dhamni are used locally for building. 

24. Up to the present the timber exploited from the north side of the 
T . river has been taken to the Hattikeri Dep6t along 

the high road by bullock carts. When exploited from 

the Konal, Shavkar and Halvalli forests, south of the river, it has been floated 
down from 3 miles above the Ramanguli ferry to a place 2 miles below that 



C 8t 



point, where it is put on carts and taken by the same road to Hattikeri. From 
west of the Halvalli valley and south of the river, the exploited material has 
been dragged and carted to Gundbala and floated down to the Gangavali 
bunder, at the mouth of the river, and brought round to Kodiba*g Depdt. 

25. In future it will probably be best to continue bringing the timber from 

Block XXIV, north of the river, and also all material 
from Block X * V ' compartment numbers 41 to 51, 
south of the river, down the main road by carts to 
Hattikeri Dep6t. For the timber from Block XXV, compartments 52 to 70, south 
of the river, it will be more advantageous to bring it also to Hattikeri Dep6t, 
instead of to Kodibag. To do this it will be necessary to extend the present 
Chandghar-Hossakumbi forest road, some 8 miles to Kankanhalli, which will 
make it a simple matter to cart wood vid the Pattanpur or Yekeguli crossings, 
down the main road to Hattikeri Depot. 

The benefit for sale purposes of collecting all the material at one depdt 
instead of dividing it between two is obvious. 

26. Another possible method instead of constructing a road from Hossa- 
kumbi to Dongri might be to clear the bed of the Gangavali River of rocks 
between Kotha and Gundbal and so make floating possible. It is, however, a 
long stretch of some 16 miles and as the state of the river bed is bad, the 
initial cost of such an undertaking would hardly justify the result obtained. 

27. The cost of felling and carting logs from Ramanguli and the 
surrounding forests, namely, from the forests situated furthest from the dep6t, 
some 29 miles distant, comes to Rs. 20 per ton or annas 11 per ton per mile. 

28. Timber sold at Hattikeri Dep6t is taken to Goa, Bombay, BhaVnagar, 

Mangalore and Cochin, while timber sold on permit 
Centres of consumption. ^ consumed locally. 

29. The following statement indicates the average gross and net prices 
realized for each class of produce during the last ten years : 



Year. 




Cost of 










working 


Price 


Net 




Species. 


depart- 
mentally 


realized 
per 100 C. ft. 


profit per 
100 C. ft. 


Remarks. 




per ton. 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 








Es. a. p. 


Ks. a. p. 


Eg. a. p. 






^ 


Teak (dead) 


* 


48 


48 


-> 






Matti (green) 


4 


43 12 


43 12 




1898 to 1906 .... 




(dead) 

Naua (green) 


* 



24 11 
27 


24 11 

27 


Sold standing. 






(dead) 


HHt 


20 4 


20 4 






. 


Jamba 


Not 


shown separa 


tely. 




1906-07 





Teak 





...... 


* 


I 


jy 




Matti (green) 


25 if 6 


56 11 8 


31 2 




1907-08 




* 


Naua (green) .. 

Kiudal .. 


22 
22 12 


56 
56 


34 
33 4 


} Departmental Agency. 
j } Sold to 8. M. Bailway. 



* Average price of sale. 

E. Miscellaneous facts. 

30. The staff at present is chiefly employed on departmental work 

extracting the logs marked by selection, executing 
permits given free or on payment, and on general 

protection of the forests. The area is divided into three Rounds in charge of 
3 Round Officials and 13 Beat Guards. This staff has been found sufficient for 
the proper protection of the forests and to carry on the work in the past. 

31. It has generally been found possible to procure contractors to carry on 
r v^ j the fellings and carting, the present system being to 

give contracts for exploiting the logs to Hattikeri 

Dep6t at a fixed rate per ton. The question of coolie labour is not difficult, as 
men come readily from Karwar and Ankola to work, the chief trouble being to 
keep them together owing to sickness. 



8 
PART II. 

FUTURE MANAGEMENT DISCUSSED AND PRESCRIBED. 
A. Basis of Proposals. 

32. The whole area contains a crop suitable for working under one 

system, the material forthcoming being extracted 
Work'ng Circl f j| !* to one depot. The forests are administered by one 

foSol ; reaS n8 Ban .g? r and fornl one of the unit9 of the Western 

Division, Ksinara, so that there is no reason for 

splitting the area into more than one Working Circle. 

33. Owing to the irregularity in the stocking, it will be necessary to 

divide the area into two blocks to facilitate the regu- 
l*>n of the annual yield. The forests are approxi- 
tnately divided into two equal parts by the G-angavali 
River, so that the portion north of the river will constitute Block XXIV, 
containing 24,096*8 acres and that south of the river will constitute Block XXV 
containing 20,910'2 acres. For facility in supervision it would have been 
better only to have one block and one cutting series, but this would make it 
difficult to regulate the yield, and would restrict permit-holders, who will 
procure their wood from the improvement felling areas, to cutting in one place 
and thus cause them considerable inconvenience. 

34. Each block has been sub-divided into compartments ; Block XXIV 
containing 40 and Block XXV 39 compartments. Each compartment is 
approximately one square mile in extent though the areas vary somewhat in 
size, owing to the boundaries having been taken as much as possible along 
rivers, nallas, roads and other natural lines. Generally speaking, each compart- 
ment consists of an area contained between two definite streams running from 
the crest of the hills down to the main stream. As the forest is to be worked 
by the method of selection fellings, and the exploitable trees are growing 
scattered over the area, a more minute sub-division has not been deemed 
necessary. 

35. The estimation of the growing stock was made by counting and 

measuring all trees on 10*25 per cent, of the area of 

Analysis of the crop ; each comparfcment> The enumeration work consisted 
method or valuation . . r . , .. 1rio . , . 

employed. m running enumeration lines 198 feet broad in all 

directions through each compartment, thus forming 

areas containing 24 acres to the lineal mile. Fifteen species were separately 
recorded, according to inch classes, of which Matti was further divided into 
classes of sound and unsound trees, while the remaining species were recorded 
in lump as " accessory species." The results of these valuation surveys, which 
were carried out under the constant supervision of the controlling officer, are 
given in Appendix IV-a. At the same time as the valuation surveys were in 
progress, stock maps of each compartment were prepared, showing the Teak 
producing area, those containing deciduous forest without Teak, and evergreen 
forests. 

B. Method of Treatment. 

36. The object of the plan is two-fold. First, to produce for export 

... . large Matti, Nana, Kindal and Jamba timber and as 

attamed. maQy bgg ^ ^ available of Teak> Sissum5 Honni 

and other species. Secondly, to meet the demand for small building timber, 
firewood, fencing material and grazing made by the local inhabitants and sea- 
coast villagers of the Ankola Taluka. 

37. The crop as it now stands contains a large variety of species of all 

ages and is essentially of the character of high forest, 
Method of treatment L mu i c 

adopted. containing many mature trees. I he struggle for 

existence in these moist deciduous forests is keen 
and the natural regeneration fully secured, its future composition being 



9 



governed chiefly by the amount of light admitted to the undergrowth. Were 
the crop untouched by man the system would develop into that of " Jardinage 
Nature! " or true selection system and, as this system in practice produces the 
class of timber required it is without doubt the system that should be adopted. 
As mentioned above the regeneration and therefore the future constitution of 
the growing stock is principally governed by the amount of light admitted to 
established seedlings and, as many of the valuable species require varying 
amounts of light and shade, it will be further necessary to introduce improve- 
ment fellings based on the requirments of the various species. 

38. To frame a Working-plan in which calculations are to be made for 

all 15 species would in this instance involve calcula- 
tions productive of no value in practice. Teak and 

Blackwood are found only in small quantities, so may be neglected for the 
purpose of arriving at the possibility. It is proposed to base the calculations 
of the rotation and yield on the four most largely represented and valuable 
species, '. e., Matti, Nana, Kindal and Jamba, and to place a check to over- 
cutting of the remaining species by fixing a minimum girth limit, to which 
will be added a check by area. 

39. As set out in paragraphs 7 and 17 (d) the soil varies considerably, 
For the most part it is fair to good, though in certain areas it is poor. The 
area has therefore been divided into two quality classes for which different 
exploitable sizes have been adopted. From careful examination of many trees 
cut from both 1st and 2nd quality areas and, taking into consideration the rate 
of growth shown on prepared sections, also the fact that logs of large dimen- 
sions realize far better prices than those of moderate size, the following 
dimensions have been fixed as the minimum exploitable girths of the various 
species : 



Class. 


Species. 


On first quality 
areas. 


On second 
quality areas. 


1st 


Heddi 


8 feet. 


7 feet, 


2nd ...J 


Matti 
Nana 
Kindal . ... 


>7 feet. 




f 


Jamba 


> 






Teak 
Sissum 




6 feet. 


3rd 


Ilonni 
Jam bul 


}-6 feet. 

i 






Bharnigi . ... ... 
Womb 
Accessory species . ... 


J 




4th ..J 


Dhamni 

J\. p to 

Kharsing . ... ... 


U'-6' 


) 



40. Matti and Nana can reach the girth of 7 feet, without becoming in 
any way unsound, while Kindal owing to the fluted nature of the stem in mature 
trees cannot be put in a lower class, otherwise the squared log would be below 
its best marketable price. The rate of growth of Jamba after it has reached 
6 feet in girth is so slow that it would not be justifiable to put it into the 
2nd class. As regards Teak, in the adjoining areas of Arbail it is worked 
under a 7 feet girth, but here, owing to its proximity to the sea together with 
the low elevation at which it is found, it is thought better to place it in the 
3rd class. 

C. The fellings. 

41. It is proposed to exploit Matti, Naua, Kindal and Jamba as the 

principal species and Teak, Sissum, Heddi, Honni, 
Jambul, Bharnigi, Dhamni, Apta, Womb and Kharr 



The general working- scheme. 



B 990-9 



10 



sing as secondary species, according to the number of mature stems available 
and the demand. Of the less valuable species in the second group it may not 
be found possible to exploit them in the major fellings, though some may be 
disposed of at a profit on permit in the improvement fellings. 

42. The period of felling is fixed at 40 years, during which time two 
major felling series will be in progress, one on either side of the river, supple- 
mented by four series of improvement fellings, two in each block, so that 
during the felling period of 40 years each series of improvement fellings will go 
over half the area of each block twice. 

43. To arrive at the age at which the four principal species attain their 

.,.,., respective exploitable girths, a large number of 

The yield or possibility. . , 8 m , ' , , f , 

sections was examined. The tabulated results are 

given in Appendix V. Great difficulty was experienced in counting the annual 
rings of all these species, especially those in advanced age, so that it will be 
necessary to leave throughout the calculations a margin of safety. 

44. One inch has been allowed on diameter for the bark of all species. 
This is not actually correct for each individual species, as Matti would be more 
than that. For Kindal and Nana it is about right, while the bark of Jamba, 
especially of old trees, is less than an inch in diameter. However, if each 
species were treated separately throughout, the calculations would be far too 
complicated for practical application. A tree of 24 inches diameter with bark or 
23 inches without bark will constitute a 6 feet girth tree with bark, and 27 inches 
with bark or 26 inches without bark will constitute a 7 feet girth tree, the 
measurements being taken 4| feet from the ground. 

45. From Appendix V it will be seen that the following are the rates of 
growth of the four species : 



From 


To 


Matti 


Nana 


Kindal 


Jamba 


inches. 


inches. 


years. 


yeaiB. 


year. 


years. 


0" 


2" 


9 


7 


9 


11 


2" 


5" 


17 


14 


16 


18 


5" 


8" 


17 


16 


17 


19 


8" 


11" 


20 


18 


17 


18 


11" 


14" 


26 


20 


18 


19 


14" 


17" 


22 


21 


18 


22 


17" 


20" 


24 


29 


20 


.31 


20" 


23" 


25 


35 


22 


35 


23" 


26* 


35 


45 


38 







Total ... 


195 


205 


175 


173 



The time taken by the first three species to pass from 6 feet to 7 feet girth 
varies somewhat. It takes Jamba, which is to be felled at 6 feet girth, 
35 years to pass from 5 feet to 6 feet in girth. The average time it takes for 
all four species to pass from their respective penultimate to their ultimate 
classes is 38*2 years, and for safety's sake this figure is raised to 40 years. The 
number of years it takes Matti, Nana and Kindal to reach 7 feet in girth is 
respectively 195 years, 205 years, 175 years, and for Jamba to reach 6 feet in 
girth 173 years. 

46. From the above figures it has been thought advisable to fix the 
rotation, at 200 years, which is approximately that of Matti and Naua. If put 
lower so as more nearly to sait Kindal and Jamba a certain number of the 
other two more important species would not reach maturity within the rotation. 
The effect on the possibility of Kindal and Jamba by raising the rotation will be 
to slightly reduce the yield on paper of these two species. The effect in 
practice will be very trifling and will constitute a margin of safety against over- 
cutting. The 1st felling period has therefore been fixed at 40 years, and the 
rotation at 200 years, which gives 5 cutting periods during the rotation. The 
above calculations are based on rates of growth of trees in 1st quality areas ; for 
the 2nd quality area, which covers only a small portion of the whole and where 



11 



Matti, Nana and Kindal are to be felled with a 6 feet girtli limit, no separate 
figures of rate of growth were taken, as the number of mature trees is very 
limited. Here the possibility will be based on the assumption that a 6 feet 
girth tree on 2nd quality soil takes the same period to reach maturity as does 
a 7 feet girth tree on 1st quality soil. This may not be quite correct but it is 
a safe assumption to make. 

47. The normal annual yield of each species is the number of trees in the 
penultimate class plus, in certain cases, a portion of the antepenultimate class, 
minus the number lost during the transition period into the ultimate class, 
divided by 40. Without going into calculation on this point it is clear that 
there is a surplus growing stock, as, in every case except that of Jamba, the 
ultimate class shows a greater number of trees than the penultimate class, while 
in the case of Jamba it is about normal. 

48. It is not possible to ascertain the number of trees lost in the mature 
class which disappear during the felling period ; it will be about 5 per cent. In 
the same way the number lost from the penultimate class while passing into the 
mature class is put at 10 per cent., it being impossible to estimate it accurately 
owing to the numbers in the ultimate classes being abnormal. It will ba seen 
in the case of Matbi that the number of unsound trees is very great as compared 
with the sound trees. Now the amount is excessive in this species owing to 
the occurrence of the "Water blister" mentioned in paragraph 19 of the 
Report, but in spite of no water blister occurring in the other species moderate 
allowances will have to be made for faulty trees. Thus 30 per cent, of the 
ultimate classes and 20 per cent, of the penultimate classes of Nana, Kindal and 
Jamba will be considered as unsound and left out of account. 

From observations made as to the extent to which the damage of the " water 
blister " on Matti reached up the stem, it was found that in many cases fair 
logs can be cut out of the non-affected parts of a blemished tree, so that in 
calculating the yield 40 per cent, of the unsound trees of this species will be 
included as capable of producing timber. 

49. Owing to the difficulty experienced in fixing the rate of growth of the 
species in advanced age it is deemed advisable not to cut more than 50 per cent, 
of the number of trees which it is possible to fell in the penultimate classes, and 
which come over in front of the fellings into the ultimate class during the felling 
period, or in other words to cut th of the trees as at present shown in the 
penultimate class. 

The number of trees belonging to the four principal species included in the 
two highest classes is shown in the following table ; 



Matti O'ound). 


Matti (Unsound). 


Nairn. 


Kindal. 


Jambi. 


25" 27" 


28"? 


25" 27" 


28"? 


25" 27" 


28"? 


25"- 27" 


28"? 


25" 27" 


28"? 


8,448 


9,909 


8,172 


13,318 


7,262 


11,053 


20,951 


32,130 


15,678 


11,658 



50. The exploitable size of three out of the four species varies in the 
two quality classes, therefore separate calculations will have to be made 
in each case. As 77 per cent, of the area is 1st quality and 23 per cent, is 
second quality, we get the following yield of Matti for the full period : 

On 1st quality soil. 



-10%) } =13,175. 

On 2nd quality soil. 

(9.909-5T) + (8,448-10%) } + ^ | (8,172- 6/ ) + (13,318 - 



23 

iuo 



'id / ) J 



= 5,731. 



12 

(In the calculation of 2nd quality yield the antepenultimate class is left out 

of account.) 

, 13,175 + 5,731 18,906 

The annual yield of Matti, therefore, comes to r ^ 4Q 

472 stems, which is taken in round figures as 470. 
The yield for Nana will be as follows : 

On 1st quality soil. 

' 11>05 3-(30 / + 5/ ) + i (7,262-(2C/ + 10/ ) ] =6,511. 



lOo 

On 2nd quality soil. 

11,053-(30/ + 5 %) + 7,262-(20 / + 10/ ) =2,822. 



6,511+2,822 9,333 _ 9 
The annual yield of Nana, therefore, comes to- ^- -^- 

stems, which is taken in round figures as 230. 
The yield for Kindal will be as follows : 

On 1st quality soil. 

ZL / S2,130-(30/ + 5/ ) + J (20,951-(207 + 10/ ) } = 18,904. 
10U\ 

On 2nd quality soil- 

32 > 130_(30/ (> + 6/o) + 20,951-(20/ + 10/ ) J = 8,177. 



18,904 + 8,17 7 _ 27,081 _ 
The annual yield of Kindal, therefore, comes to 4Q 4l> 

676 stems, which is taken in round figures as 670. 
The yield of Jamba will be as follows : 

On 1st quality soil. 

T7_ f 1])658 _(30 / + 5/ ) + i (15,678-(20 e / + 10/ ) } = 7,948. 

On 2nd quality soil, 
11>658 _ (3 0/ q + 5'/ ) + 15,678-(20/ + 10/ ) } =4,268, 



_ 

7,948 + 4,268_ 
The annual yield of Jamba, therefore, comes to- ^~ 

304 stems, which is taken in round figures as 300. 

The total annual yield of the four species works out to : 
Matti . 




. 

Kindal ... 67U 

Jamba ... 2 

Total ... 1,670 stems. 



52 The period during which the area will be worked over is 40 years. 

Owing to the irregular distribution of the species, not 

Period for which fellings on j j n re ] a ti n to their own units but also in rela- 
aro prescribed. tion to Qne anoi ,her, it is necessary to group the 

fellings into sub-periods and nob to restrict the felling to a given number < 
trees Ind to a given area in one year. Four years is taken as ^ e sub - fellm 8 
period thus dividing the felling period of 40 years into 10 sub-periods. 

53 The areas to be worked over during each sub-period and the number 
of trees' available forfeningjnjhe^ame^re^ven below ; 



13 



Serial 
No. 


Sub-period 


Block. 


Compart- 
ments 
included in 
sub-period. 




Number of trees of different species available 
for felling during the sub-period. 


Matti. 


Nana. 


Eindal. 


Jamba. 


Teak. 


Sissmn. 


I 


Prom 


XXIV. 


1 to 7 


Number 


1,431. 


4*4 


1,821 


857 


676 


145 




1909-10 






Yearly average.. 


358 


121 


480 


214 


169 


36 




to 






















1912-13. 
























XXV. 


44 to 43 ... 


Number ,. 


431 


375 


1,274 


634 


460 


96 










Vearly average.. 


108 


94 


318 


158 


115 


24 






XXIV 




Total for sub 


1,865 


859 


3,195 


1,491 


1,136 


241 






and 




period. 


















XXV. 




Total yearly aver 


466 


215 


798 


372 


281 


60 










age. 














II 


1913-14 


XXIV. 


8 to 11 ... 


Number .. 


741 


398 


78 D 


213 


314 


145 




to 






Yearly average... 


185 


49 


395 


53 


78 


36 




1916-17. 
























XXV. 


47, 51 and 


Number .. 


1,118 


596 


1,437 


1,024 


84 


26 








62. 


Yearly average.. 


280 


149 


359 


256 


21 


6 






XX IV 




Total for sub- 


1,860 


794 


2,217 


1,237 


398 


171 






and 




period. 


















XXV. 




Total yearly aver- 


465 


198 


551 


3C9 


99 


42 










age. 














III 


1917-18 


XXIV. 


15 and 16 ... 


Number ... 


625 


207 


608 


167 


10 


29 




to 






Yearly average... 


158 


52 


152 


42 


2 


7 




1920-21. 
























XXV. 


48, 49, SO ... 


Number 


1,376 


610 


1,935 


923 


11 


48 










Yearly average... 


344 


152 


484 


231 


3 


12 






XXIV 




Total for sub- 


2,001 


817 


2,543 


1,092 


21 


77 






and 




period. 


















XXV. 




Total yearly aver- 


500 


204 


636 


274 


5 


19 










age. 














IV 


1921-22 


XXIV. 


17 to 19 ... 


Number 


1,423 


414 


1,982 


462 




111 




to 






Yearly average... 


356 


103 


495 


315 


t * 


28 




1924-25. 
























XXV. 


53 to 55 ... 


Number ... 


623 


151 


942 


430 


196 


149 










Yearly average... 


156 


38 


235 


102 


49 


37 






XXIV 




Total for sub 


2,046 


565 


2,924 


872 


196 


260 






and 




period. 


















XXV. 




Total yearly aver- 


512 


141 


730 


217 


49 


65 










age. 














V 


1925-26 


XXIV 


20 to 23 ... 


Number 


1,280 


382 


2,389 


501 


11 


29 




to 






Yearly average... 


320 


95 


597 


125 


3 


7 




1928-29. 
























XXV. 


64 and G5 ... 


Number 


431 


465 


454 


188 


* t 


8 










Yearly average... 


108 


116 


118 


47 





2 






XXIV 




Total for snb- 


1,711 


847 


2,843 


689 


11 


37 






and 




peiiod. 


















XXV. 




Total yearly aver- 


428 


212 


710 


172 


3 


9 










age. 














VI 


1929-30 


XXIV. 


24 to 28 ... 


Number 


1,326 


564 


2,078 


512 


347 


135 




to 






Yearly average... 


331 


141 


519 


128 


87 


84 




1932-33. 
























XXV. 


61 to 63 ... 


Number 


356 


349 


960 


431 


* 


36 










Yearly average... 


89 


S7 


240 


108 


... 


9 






XXIV 




Total for sub 


1,683 


913 


3,038 


943 


347 


171 






and 




period. 


















XXV. 




Total yearly aver- 


420 


228 


759 


236 


87 


43 










age. 














VII 


1933-34 


XXIV. 


29 and 32 ... 


Number 


263 


556 


599 


672 


131 


10 




to 
1936-37. 






Yearly average... 


66 


139 


150 


143 


33 


2 






XXV. 


56 to 60 ... 


Number 


3,680 


234 


1,086 


445 


166 


22 










Yearly average... 


420 


58 


271 


111 


39 


6 






XXIV 




Total for sub 


3,943 


790 


1,685 


1,017 


287 


32 






and 




period. 


















XXV. 




Total yearly aver- 


486 


197 


421 


266 


78 


8 










age. 














B 9904 



14 



Ferial 

No. 


Sub-period . 


Block. 


Compart- 
ments 
included in 
sub-periods. 




Number of trees of different speeies available 
for felling during the sub-period. 


Matti. 


Nana. 


Kindal. 


Jamba. 


Teak. 


Sis sum. 


VIII 


1837-33 


XXIV. 


33 and 40 ... 


Number 


1,063 


589 


893 


561 


207 


141 




to 






Yearly average... 


266 


147 


223 


140 


52 


35 




194 U- 41. 
























XXV. 


41 to 43 ... 


Number 


656 


287 


1,488 


731 


261 


56 










Yearly average ... 


164 


72 


372 


183 


65 


14 






XXIV 




Total for sub- 


],719 


876 


2,381 


1,292 


468 


197 






and 




peri ad. 


















XXV. 




Total yearly aver- 


430 


219 


595 


323 


117 


49 










age. 














IX 


194142 


XXIV. 


30, 31, 34, 


Number 


Su7 


060 


1,721 


657 


19 


31 




to 




35, 36, 37. 


Yearly average... 


227 


165 


430 


364 


5 


8 




1944-4,5. 
























XXV. 


66 and 67 ... 


Number 


761 


748 


1,2*7 


831 


... 


20 










Yearly average... 


190 


187 


322 


233 


... 


5 






XXIV 




Total for sub- 


1,668 


3,408 


3,008 


1,588 


19 


51 






and 




period. 


















XXV. 




Total yearly aver- 


417 


352 


752 


397 


5 


13 










age. 














X 


1945-46 


XXIV. 


12 to 14 and 


Number ... 


1,531 


3,025 


1,824 


995 


144 


157 




to 




38 and 39. 


Yearly average... 


382 


256 


456 


249 


36 


39- 




3948-49. 
























XXV. 


08 to 70 ... 


Number 


546 


266 


631 


263 


... 


31 










Yearly average... 


136 


66 


158 


66 


... 


8 






XXIV 




Total for sub- 


2,077 


1,291 


2,455 


1,253 


144 


188 






and 




period. 


















XXV. 




Total yearly aver- 
age. 


519 


322 


614 


315 

| 


36 


47 



Mode 
fellings. 



of executing the 



It is not necessary to fell daring any given sub-period exactly!- of 
the area each year or to cut -j of the Matti, Nana, 
Kindal and Jamba available ; they can be cut ail in 
one year, if necessary ; the only restrictions being 
that the number of trees felled during any one sub-period should not exceed the 
number provided for felling within that sub-period and that no trees of girth 
less than the minimum fixed should ever be felled. 

55. The fellings of Matti, Nana, Kiudal and Jamba in each sub-period 
will, generally speaking, begin in the east of the area and work westwards. It 
will be necessary first to go over approximately ^th of the area marking all the 
largest trees sound and unsound ; if in the 1st marking the prescribed number is 
not realized, it will be necessary to go over that area again with a view to 
selecting sufficient trees of the exploitable girth to make up the required 
number. If after the 2nd marking the trees are in deficit a rough survey of a 
further area should be made and the necessary number added. Similarly in 
the 2nd year of the sub-period. In the 3rd year the whole remaining area 
should be carefully inspected, so as to form an idea of what is left to be cut 
during the sub-period and so as to spread the yield as evenly as possible over 
the last two years. 

56. Teak and Black-wood should be girdled 3 years before felling. As 
regards the other four principal species the value of girdling has not yet been 
fully established, but from experience gained in Yelldpur and also in these forests 
during the last season (1907-08) girdling would appear to be beneficial. It 
will be better therefore to leave this question open, merely stipulating that until 
the question is definitely settled trees shall be girdled two years in advance of 
the fellings. 

All girdled trees should be inspected six months after the operation to 
ascertain whether the work has been properly done. 

67. In marking Matti it should be remembered that the " Water Blister " 
causes only local damage to the affected portion and that fine logs can often be 
cut from the non-affected parts of the tree. 



15 



58. As regards all species other than the four above enumerated, the 
exploitable trees should generally be cut in the main fellings, the only restriction 
being as regards the minimum girth provided for each species. 

Forecast of the condition 59. Turning to Appendix IV we have at present 

of the crop at the end of the the following number of trees in the 1st four 
cutting period. classes : 



Species. 


Class V 
15" to ]S". 


Class IV 
19" to 21". 


Class III 
22" to 24". 


Class II 
25" to 27". 


Class I 
28". 


Matti 












(a) Sound ... 


* ! 


21,303 


14,623 


8,418 


9,909 


(6) Unsound ... 


* * 


10,184 


9,847 


8,172 


13,318 


Nan a ... ... 


* 


13,158 


10,019 


7,262 


11,058 


Kindal 





35,682 


27,658 


20,951 


32,130 


Jamba 


23,239 


15,678 


7,194 


4,464 






We have no means of estimating the loss of trees of each species while 
passing from the II to the I class, as class I is abnormal, it is therefore taken as 
20 per cent, for all species. For the lower classes the percentages of loss are 
deducted from 



the actual figures as follows : 



Sound Matti while passing from class Til to class II 12 per cent. 

HI 31 

n-i7 

III 30 

11-27 

111-24 

11-24 

111-22 

111-54 



Do. 
Unsound 

Do. 
Nana 

Do. 
Kiudal 

Do. 

Jamba 
. Do. 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



do 

do. 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



IV 
III 

IV 

III 

IV 

III 

IV 
IV 
V 



IV 44 



60. The periods it takes the various species to pass from class III to class 
II and from class IV to class III, given in Appendix V, are as follows : 

Time taken for Matti to pass from III to class II 25 years. 

Do. do. do. IV III -24 

Do. Nana do. Ill 11-35 >, 

Do. do. do. IV III -29 

Do. Kindal do. Ill II 22 

Do. do. do. IV III 20 

Do. Jamba do. IV III 31 

Do. do. do. V IV 22 

01. Now at the end of the present felling period of 40 years we shall have 
removed all class I -|- ^ of class II, that is all mature trees and half the 
number of trees of class II which come over in front of the fellings, and as only 
half tlie total number of class II do come over in front of the fellings, we shall 
have cut | of class II as stated above. As it takes 40 years approximately for 
class II trees to become class I, at the end of the felling period we shall 
have f of the present class II, minus the number lost during transition, 
i. e., 20 per cent. 

62. If the 2nd felling period is again fixed at 40 years the number of stems 
available for felling during that period will be all the mature trees, namely, | of 
the present class II minus 20 per cent, which will then have become class I as 
well as the trees that come over in front of the fellings from the lower 
classes. 

63. As all the Matti, Nana and Kindal of class III and all the Jamba class 
IV. become class II and class III respectively during the next 40 years, and as 



16 

the period taken in transition by each species is less than 40 years, a portion 
of the lower class will also pass over to class II, the actual proportion being 
regulated by the period taken by each individual species to pass from the lower 
to the higher class. 

64. Deducting the percentage of trees lost in transition and taking 40 per 
cent, as the number of unsound Matti that will produce timber, the following will 
be the number of stems of each species available during the 2nd felling period: 

15 

Sound Matti ... | (8,448 20%) +(14.623 42%) +24 (21,303 31%)=13,904. 

2 



Unsound Matti^[|(8,l72 20%) +(9.847 17/ ) +24(1 0.184 3l/ o | =4,831 



Nana f (7,262 2Q / Q )+(10,019 27/ )+29' (13,158 24/ a )=8,877. 

2 

18 

Kindal ...g (20,95120%) + (27.658 24/ H20 (35.682-2^)^36,609. 

2 



Jamba ...f (7,194 20%)+ (15,678 54/ )+2a (28 > 239-44/ c> )=ll > l57. 

2 

65. In comparing the yield estimated for the 1st felling period with that 
of the 2nd we get the following results : 



Species. 


Number of trees to be 
cut daring the first 
felling period. 


Number of trees which 
will be available in the 
2nd felling period. 


Matti 


18,906 


18,735 


Nana 


9,333 


8,877 


Kindal 


27,081 


36,609 


Jamba ... 


12,216 


11,157 



The calculation for the first three species may be taken as more or less 
correct, while the calculation for Jamba cannot be relied upon, because the 
percentage of loss during transition as calculated from actual figures does not 
represent normal conditions, Jamba being the species of which much small wood 
under exploitable girth has been cut in past years, thus increasing the percentage 
to be deducted from the actual figures. Otherwise the number shown in column 
3 would have been much higher. 

Z>. Supplementary Provisions. 

66. The improvement fellings will be carried out in four different places ; 
thus one improvement felling in each block will follow closely after the major 

fellings, and the other two improvement fellings will 
The improvement fellings. start in ^ Q centre of each block and proceed in advance 

of the major fellings. In this way when the major fellings have progressed for 
20 years, the two advance improvement fellings will have reached the end of each 
block. By starting again from where they began they will fall in line behind 
the major fellings, while the other two improvement fellings which followed the 
major fellings during the first half of the felling period will re-start at the 
beginning and go over the first half of the area a second time, 



17 

67. It must be remembered, however, that, owing to the irregular group- 
ing of the compartments in the major fellings in forming sub-periods, the areas 
to be taken up for improvement-fellings will not follow in every case one year 
after the major fellings, though they have been so arranged as to do so when- 
ever possible. In no case will they be more than four years behind the major 
fellings. 

68. As stated in paragraph 12 there is a fairly large demand for small 
building material made by people living in the forest and the villages lying between 
these forests and the sea-coast. A good deal of material marked and cut out in 
the improvement fellings could be disposed of to permit-holders or sold standing 
to local purchasers. It is, therefore, proposed to restrict permit felling and 
free grants of timber entirely to the improvement felling areas, a rule that 
could not be enforced without hardships to the permit-holders were the improve- 
ment fellings not evenly distributed over the whole area. 

69. The privilege holders have been assigned minor forests by the Forest 
Settlement Officer, in which they may cut certain species according to the Kanara 
Protected Forest Rules. In these areas, though they have been included in the 
"Working: Plan, the privilege holders must be allowed to exercise their privileges 
as they like irrespective of the improvement-felling series. Further they may be 
allowed to cut and remove Strobilanthes free of charge from any portion of 
the forest not specially closed : also barren sago and other palms and canes on 
permits issued free by the Forest authorities. 

70. Enough stress cannot be laid on the importance of the improvement 
fellings, the whole future of the forest crop being bound up in these operations. 
No hard and fast rules can be laid down as regards the mode of executing such 
fellings as each locality must be treated according to its requirements. In 
executing the improvement fellings the following points should, however, be 
borne in mind : 

(a) That where the existing seedling crop is fairly well represented, as 
is generally the case, the object should be to improve this rather than to 
attempt to bring new seedlings into existence. 

(b) That Teak and Matti are 'par excellence' light deinanders requiring 
light both for germination and when established. Kindal is not far behind 
them in this respect, Nana and Black-wood will stand lateral shade in 
youth, while Jamba is a heavy shade-bearer. 

(c) That Jamba reproduces itself profusely, a fact which together 
with its shade-bearing habits forms a danger to the more valuable species, 
in that it has a tendency to crowd them out. As a nurse under established 
growth it is of great value. 

(d) That the existing patches of Teak, which are often found surrounded 
by other deciduous forest, can be enlarged and materially improved by 
judicious fellings round the perimeter of the groups. The freeing of even 
poorly grown Teak seedlings will be advantageous, in that the number of 
8eed-bearers on the perimeter of the Teak-bearing areas will be increased. 
Outlying Teak away from the main group should be carefully preserved. 

(e) That the fear of denuding the slopes of soil under the selection 
system is not great, so that improvement fellings may be carried out both 
on the level ground and on the hill-sides. 

(f) That there are a great number of faulty trees in these forests, 
especially of Matti. If absolutely unsaleable those of the better species 
should generally be left unless they endanger advance-growth. It will, 
however, probably be possible to sell standing or to give on permit the 
less faulty trees marked in the improvement fellings, while if, for sylvicul- 
tural reasons, inferior unsaleable species are required out of the way they 
should be girdled, otherwise they should be left standing. 

(g) It may be laid down as a strict rule for all localities that creeper 
cutting should be rigidly enforced. 

B 9905 



18 



(h) That there are many blanks in the forest where former cultivation 
existed ; to dibble up these areas with the more valuable species is neces- 
sary. To do so with success without temporary Bamboo fencing is out of 
the question, as cattle and deer continually graze over such areas. 

() That the growth of Karvi (Sirobilanthes callosus} in many places 
is very heavy and is a direct check on natural regeneration. To get rid of 
this weed is difficult, though probably not impossible. In the Jaunsar 
Division areas were successfully treated in 1906 by cutting S. Wallichi 
when the flowers were fully out and the fruit had begun to form, but was 
not actually ripe. The Strobilanthes callosus flowers every seventh or 
eight year in North Kanara and then dies down, so that, at the period of 
flowering, it might be treated in a similar way with advantage. It should 
be borne in mind that cutting off the heads of Karvi when it first com- 
mences to flower is useless, as it then puts out sideshoots which flower 
later ; it can therefore only be treated when the flowers begin to fall. The 
time of flowering is given as September and October. 

(j) That in many compartments the growth of Bamboos is very 
heavy ; where the crop is mature they are, no doubt, a benefit ; but where 
young growth exists they are very much the reverse, that is, individual 
clumps shading advance-growth. Bamboos should b sold on permit 
as much as possible from all parts of the forest, especially from the sub-period 
under exploitation. Individual culms endangering young trees of the 
better species should be removed whenever possible. 

Statement of Improvement fellings. 



Block. 


Compart- 
ment. 


Area 
in 
acres. 


Years in which improvement 
fellings will be made. 


Remarks. 


XXIV. Improve- 


1 


426-4 


1910-11 and 1930-31. 




in e n t-fell ing, 


2 


656-2 


1911-12 and 1931-32. 




Series A. 


3 


276-8 


19 12-13 and 1932-33. 






4 


674-4 


1913-14 and 1933-34. 






5 


382-8 


1914-15 and 1934-35. 






6 


554-8 


1915-16 and 1985-36. 






7 


674-8 


1916-17 and 1936-37. 






8 


620-0 


1917-18 and 1937-38. 






9 


618-0 


1918-19 and 1938-39. 






10 


516-4 


1919-20 and 1939-40. 






11 


480-8 


1920-21 and 1940-41. 






16 


434-8 


1921-22 and 1941-42. 






16 


524-4 


1922-23 and 1942-43. 






17 


429-2 


1923-24 and 1943-44, 






18 


719-6 


1924-25 and 1944-45. 






19 


737-2 


1925-26 and 1945-46. 






20 


729-2 


1926-27 and 194t>47. 






21 


759-0 


1927-28 and 1947-48. 






22 


633-2 


1928-29 and 1948-49. 






23 


786-4 


1929-30 and 1949-50. 




XXIV. Improve- 


24 


730-4 


1910-11 and 1930-31. 




ment-f e 1 1 i n g , 


25 


585-6 


1911-12 and 1931-32. 




Series B. 


26 


798-0 


1912-13 and 1932-33. 






27 


467-2 


1913-14 and 1933-34. 






28 


577-2 


1914-15 and 1934-35 


In this compartment the 










second improvement- 











fellings are advanced 










by one year to make 










up the loss which will 










occur in compartments 










30 and following. 




29 


566-4, 


1915-16 and 1935-36. 






32 


7o5-6 


1916-17 and 1936-37. 






33 


750-8 


19 17-18 and 1937-38. 






40 


666-0 


1918-19 and 1938-39. 





19 



Block. 


Compart- 
ment. 


Area 
in 
acres. 


Years in which improvement 
fellings will be made. 


Remarki. 


XXIV. Improve- 


30 


614-8 


1919-20 and 1941-42 


In these five compart- 


ment-fel lings, 








ments the second 


Series B. 


31 


39 2 '0 


1920-21 and 1942-43 


improvemen t-f e 1 1- 










ings are retarded all 




34 


566-8 


1921-22 and 1943-44 


through by two 










years to allow the 




35 


578-2 


1922-23 and 1944-45 


major fellings to 










pass through the 




35 


612-4 


1923-24 and 1945-46 


area in front of them . 




37 


500-0 


1924-25 and 1945-46. 






12 


618-0 


1925-26 and 1946-47. 






13 


803-6 


1926-27 and 1947-48. 






14 


344-4 


1927-28 and 1948-49. 






88 


385-6 


1928-29 and 1948-49 


In this compartment the 










second improvement- 




| 






fellings are advanced 










by one year to make up 


1 








the loss which occurred 










in compartments 30 










and following. 




39 


910-4 


1929-30 and 1949-50. 




XXV. Improve- 


44 


562-8 


"| From 19 10-11 and 1930-31 


Three compartments 


ment -felling, 


45 


775-0 


}> to 


have been grouped 


Series C. 


46 


553-2 


J From 19l3.l4and 1933-34 


together for working 










during four years to 




47 


740-0 


^ From 19 14-15 and 1934-35 


prevent the improve- 




51 


694-8 


} to 


ment-fellings getting 




52 


657-6 


J From 1917-18 and 1937-38 


ahead of the major 










fellings. 




48 


605-2 


) From 1918-19 and 1938-39 






49 


79S-0 


to 






50 


607-6 


J From 1921-22 and 1941-42 






53 


730-0 


) From 1922-23 and 1942-43 






54 


590-0 


to 






55 


642-8 


j From 1925-26 and 1945-46 






64, 


641-2 


) From 1926-27 and 1946-47 










> to 






65 


729-2 


) From 1929-30 and 1949-50 




XXV. Improve- 
ment-f e 1 1 i n g, 


61 
62 


656-8 
634-4 


) From 1910-11 and 1930-31 
to 


Three compartments 
have been grouped 


Series D. 


63 


542-4 


) From 1913-14 and 1933-34 


together for working 










during four years to 










prevent the improve- 










ment-fellings getting 










ahead of the major 










fellings. 




56 


793-2 


1914-15 and 1934-3-5. 






57 


792-4 


19 15-16 and. 1935-36. 






58 


624-4 


1916-17 and 1936-37. 






59 


720-8 


1917-18 and 1937-38. 






60 


732-8 


1918-19 and 1938-39. 






41 


442-8 


1919-20 and 1939-40. 






42 


610-0 


1920-21 and 1940-41. 






43 


706-0 


1921-22 and 1941-42. 






66 


959-2 


) From 1922-23 and 1942-43 










to 






67 


1210-0 


J From 1925-26 and 1945-46 






68 


644-0 


) From 1926-27 and 1946-47 






69 


794-4 


to 






70 


659-2 


J From 1929-30 and 1949-5C 




i 







20 

72. In these moist deciduous forests fires are not frequent except in the 

drier Teak-bearing areas, which form but a small 
part of the whole. The benefit derived from fire pro- 
tection in the greater part of the area is somewhat doubtful. The geueral 
tendency of these forests is to pass gradually from moist deciduous to a state 
of evergreen forest. The process is without doubt very slow, and, provided the 
forests are kept fairly open of undergrowth and natural regeneration of Jamba, 
the more valuable light-demanding species such as Teak, Matti, Kindal, ISana, 
etc., will continue to form the greater part of the growing stock. The fires 
that occur in these areas are by no means severe, but are of sufficient intensity 
to check the heavy growth of weed and, though they no doubt damage seedling 
growth also, the amount of damage done is probably relatively less than the 
benefit derived by the checking of the growth of weeds. In support of the 
above rather unorthodox theory it may be stated that where fires most often 
occur, namely near cultivation and along road-sides, the regeneration of Teak, 
Matti and Kindal is very much in evidence. 

73. There are no good grazing grounds in the Working Circle composed 

of Blocks XXIV and XXV. The cattle are poor 
animals picking up a precarious livelihood on the old 

cultivated fields along the nallas and in areas adjoining cultivation. The 
number of cattle for which grazing is allowed and the area put aside for their 
grazing has been fixed by the Forest Settlement Officer. The area allotted to 
each village has, generally speaking, been fixed at 3 acres for each head of 
cattle and comprises the waste lands, Betta areas and minor forest, while in 
the event of the total area of these three classes of land being insufficient a 
portion of Reserved forest has been allotted. The areas of Reserved forest to 
be put aside for grazing will have to be given in the neighbourhood of the 
villages to which the cattle belong. 

A detailed statement showing the name of the village, the number of cattle, 
the areas available in waste lands, Betta areas, and minor forest and the further 
area of Reserved forest required for grazing and the locality of such areas is 
given in Appendix VII. From this statement it will be seen exactly how the 
requirements of each village have been met, both inside and outside the 
organized area. The figures are those given by the Forest Settlement Officer and 
are not the scaled areas obtained by the Working Plan Officer. The number of 
cattle brought into these forests for grazing from outside is very limited, chiefly 
owing to the want of grass and the unhealthiness of the climate. If, at any 
time, attempts were made to bring large herds of cattle into these forests from 
outside, strong measures to stop them should be taken by the Divisional Forest 
Officer with the approval of the Collector. 

74. The compartment boundaries which are demarcated by cut lines 

25 feet broad should be kept clear of undergrowth, 

Keeping the compartment while tfa t ral boundaries which have been marked 
boundaries clear. . . . . . , ,. . ,. 

by blazing the trees oa either side or the line should 

be reblazed at intervals of not less than 8 years. 

75. On the north of the river in Block XXIV, along the Karwar 

Yellapur road, there are rest-houses, and with the 
exception of two small feeder roads in the Sunksal 

and Marugadda valleys nothing is wanted to facilitate exploitation work and 

inspection. 

South of the river in Block XXV there are no roads, rest-houses or even 
country tracks except in the extreme west near Hossakumbi, where a good forest 
road exists running up the Chandgar valley. It will be necessary to open out 
this area by making a fair-weather road starting from a point a mile up the 
Ch&ndgar road from Hossakumbi, and running more or less parallel to the rivefr 
to Dongriand so over the Malgaon saddle to Kankanballi, a distance of about 
8 miles. Another road will be necessary from Kotha, on the river to Unchalli, 
running through compartments 45, 47, 48, 49 and 50, so as to tap the Halvalli 
valley, the distance being some 5 miles. These two roads will meet near 
Kankanhalli and so join up the South Block vid the Yekeguli and Pattanpar fords 



21 



with the main road to Hattikeri Depot and also with the Ankola-Kumta road at 
Madangeri. The proposed alignment of these two roads is shown on the index 
map. 

76. There are no inspection bungalows in Block XXV, while the camping 
grounds are very poor. There is a Public Works Department inspection 
bungalow at Madangeri, some 12 miles from Hossakumbi, a village just inside 
the organized area. Again from Hossakumbi to Kankanhalli is 10 miles, so 
that, provided the Hossakumbi-Kankanhalli road is constructed, an inspection 
bungalow should be made somewhere near Hossakumbi and a second at Kankan- 
halli, which would enable Inspecting Officers to completely supervise the South 
Block, a work which at present is extremely difficult and can only be done by 
moving one's kit by headloads, owing to the want of cart tracks. Besides the 
above buildings a Bound Forester's house will be necessary at Kankanhalli. 



E. Miscellaneous. 



77. 



The area at present is controlled by a Ranger who has also forests 
outside the organized area of the Ankola Range in 
Changes proposed iu the hig cnarge< Within the area there are two Bound 

Foresters' charges and a portion of a third, while the 

beat guards number 13 in all. It will be necessary to re-arrange the distri- 
bution of the staff in the whole Range and somewhat increase the same to ensure 
an efficient working of the plan. 

78. The following is a statement of the present staff and that proposed : 

Present Establishment. 





Round 






Name of Round. 


Forester or 


Name of Beat. 


Beat Guards. 




Guard. 






I. Ramangulli 
Do. 


1 


Ramangulli 
Do. 


2 
1 personal guard. 


II. Honalli 


" 1 


Honalli 


2 


Do. 


f 


Do. 


1 personal guard. 


Do. 





Sunksal 


2 


III.- Hossakumbi 
Do. 


1 


Hossakumbi 
Do. 


2 
1 personal guard. 


Do. 


... 


GUI id bill a 


2 




3 




13 



Proposed Establishment. 



Name of Round. 


Round 
Forester or 
Guard. 


Name of Beat. 


Beat Guards. 


I. Ramangulli 
Do. 


1 




Ramangulli 
Do. 


2 
1 personal guard. 


Included in Ramangulli 


f * 


Kodalgadda 


2 


II. Honnalli 
Do. 


1 

* 


Honnalli 
Do. 


2 
1 personal guard. 


Do. 





Sunksal 


2 


III. Hossakumbi 
Do. 


1 




Hossakumbi 
Do. 


2 

1 personal guard. 


Do. 




Gundbala 


9 


IV. Kankanhalli 


1 


Kankanhalli 
Do. 


2 
1 personal guard. 




4 




18 











* 9006 



79. The Hossakumbi round is partly within the organized area and 
partly outside it. This round official will not have his jurisdiction changed 
under the new proposals as regards the portion outside the organized area. 
The new proposals resolve themselves into having two more guards up the 
Kodalgadda valley and the formation of a new round in Block XXV to control 
the Shavkar and Halvalli valleys which are at present under the nominal charge 
of the Bamanguli Round Official, whose head-quarters and work up the 
Kodalgadda valley take him far away from these forests. 

80. It is extremely difficult to frame an estimate 
of the probable revenue. 

From the past fellings covering a period of 10 years, given in paragraph 22 
of this report, we get the following figures : 



Forecast of financial results. 



Species. 


Number of trees 
felled both green 
and dead. 


Number of cubic 
feet produced by 
these logs. 


Average sub- 
contents of each 
tree. 


In tons per 
tree. 






Cubic feet. 


Cubic feet. 




Matti 


4,327 


243,774 


56 


M2 


Nana ... ... 


2,555 


118,174 


46 


92 


Kindal 


196 


12,004 


61 


1-22 


Jamba* ... ... 


47 


1,277 


29 


58 



Not including sleepers. 



Taking the above figures as the normal volume of each species and putting 
the value of the wood at a somewhat low figure we get the following results : 



Species. 


Annual number of 
trees to be 
exploited. 


Tons. 


Present market 
value per ton. 


Cost of extraction 
per ton. 


Net profit in 
Rupees. 








Rs. a. p. 


Rs. a. p. 




Matti 


470 


1-12 


56 


20 


18,950 


Nana ... 


230 


92 


36 


20 


8,886 


Kindal ... 


670 


1-22 


32 


20 


9,809 


Jamba 


800 


58 


32 


20 


2,088 




1,670 





...... 


* 


34,233 



It is probable that it will not be possible to sell all the 670 Kindal at 
present, though there seems every prospect of it being possible to do so in the 
near future. 

To the above must be added the other trees to be felled, such as Teak, 
Sissum, Heddi, Houni, etc., together with the wood sold from the improvement 
fellings, which should fetch a net profit of at least Rs. 5,800 a year, bringing 
the total up to Rs. 40,000 net profit per annum, which figure will probably' 
greatly increase in the near future. 

81. Forms 2, 3 and 4 as prescribed in the Forest Department Code must 

be carefully kept. Special notes should be kept of 
*** the number of Matti trees felled which are affected by 
the " water-blister " and the cubical contents of the same. Remarks should 
also be recorded as to whether the prescribed number of trees are easily found 
or not. Care should be taken to record correctly what work has been under- 
taken in each compartment under the improvement fellings. 

It would be well to fix half a dozen experimental sample plots well distri- 
buted over the area in which annual measurements of each tree should be taketK 
so as to fix the rate of growth of the more important species, especially in 
advanced age. 

RALPH S. PEARSON, I.F.S., F.L.S., 

Divisional Forest Officer, 
Working Plans, S. C. 



23 
JP. Appendices. 

The following appendices accompany the report: 

I. 4" stock maps showing quality, areas, growing stock, blocks and 
compartments. (.Not embodied in the report). 

II. 1" Index Map. 

III. Description of compartments. 

IV. (a) Record of valuation surveys, and number of trees in each com- 

partment. 

(6) The estimated number of trees each compartment -will produce 
as it comes under felling. 

V. Record of rate of growth of the various species, showing the incre- 
ments for periods of 5 years, 

VI. Area statement. 

VII. Statement showing the population, number of cattle of each village 
and grazing arrangements made for the same. 

VIII. Names of the more common species found in these forests. 

IX. Statement of revenue recovered for all produce removed from the 
area during the last 10 years. 

(Signed) R. S. PEARSON, I.F.S., F.L.S., 

Divisional Forest Officer, 
Kdrwdr, 10th November 1908. Working Plans, S. C. 

Approved, 

(Signed) L. SWIFTS, 

Collector of Kanara. 

i 

Approved, Countersigned, 

H. MURRAY, W. A. TALBOT, 

Conservator of Forests, S. C. Conservator of Forests, C. C., 

Approved, and Superintendent, Working Plans. 

G. MONTEATH, 

Acting Collector. 

Approved, 
M. C. GIBB, 

Commissioner, S. D. 



24 
APPENDIX III. 

Description of Compartments. 
BLOCK No. XXIV. 



Com- 
















part- 
ment 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks 


No. 
















1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


1 


426-4 


North. Compart - 


(a) Configuration. The 


(a) Growing Stock. Generally 


1 Matti 




The extraction of 






inent 2 and a 


whole compartment has 


speaking this compartment 


(a) Sound ... 


11-6 


timber will be 






blazed line up to 


a western aspect, with 


contains growth of the 2nd class. 


(b) Unsound . 


7 


found difficult 






Uzar Nalla. 


a fairly steep gradient, 


Teak is found scattered over the 


2 Nana 


1-3 


from this com- 






East. Compa r t - 


rising from 200 feet at 


northern half of the area, but 


3 Kindal 


14-9 


partment owing 






meats 2 and 4. 


the bed of the river to 


is nowhere of exploitable size. 


4 Jamba ... 


10-5 


to the configura- 






Soiith. A smal' 


1,670 feet on the crest 


Some fair Matt.i trees occur 


6 Teak 


3 


tion of tha 






nalla dividing 


of the ridge. 


north of thoKodalgaclda, Mavin- 


6 Sissum 


3'9 


ground, and the 






compartments 1 


(6) Rock and Soil. The 


mani footpath, standing in 


7 Honni 


1 


semi-ever green 






and 11. 


rock is quartzite, and 


Femi-evergreen forest. Along 


8 Heddi 


... 


character of part 






West. The Uzar 


granite of poor quality 


and above the nalla is found a 


9 Dhamni ... 


ri 


of the forest. 






Nalla. 


turning in places to 


fair growth of Kindal, Matti, 


10 Apta 


3 










basalt. The soil is 


Jamba mixed with a few Nana, 


11 Jambul 


6 










deep in the north and 


Sissum, Dhamni and inferioi 


12 Womb 


1 










poorer up the hill 


species, while on the higher 


13 Karsing 


... 










sides. The surface of 


slopes the growth falls off, 


14 Bharnigi 


4 










the ground is covered 


becoming more open towards the 


15 Other species . 


54-2 










with fragments of rock 


crest of the ridge. 














which have been 


(b) Regeneration. Fair through- 














broken off on the ridge 


out except in the evergreen 














and rolled down the 


rtches. 














slopes. 


Undergrowth. In places 
















evergreen, and where the forest 
















assumes a more deciduous 
















character, patches of Karvi, 
















Chiva and bamboos appear. 
















(d) Grazing. The area is little 
















subjected to grazing except by 
















a few head of cattle from the 
















villages of Chavdi in the north 
















and of Saternani in the south. 








2 


6552 


North. A small 


(a) Configuration. The 


(a) Growing Stock. The lower 


1 Matti 




The urea, which 






tributary of the 


whole compartment has 


half of the compartment is good 


(a) Sound ... 


12-2 


contains many 






Kod a 1 g a d d a 


an east aspect, the 


forest containing much well 


(b) Unsound... 


1-7 


exploitable tree-, 






Nalla, and a cut 


gradient being in most- 


grown Matti, Kindal, Sissum 


2 Nana 


2-1 


will be difficult 






lice up the east 


places, very steep, 


and Jamba mixed with some 


3 Kindal 


14-0 


to work owing to 






ridge of the 


except in the north- 


Nana, Womb, Bharnigi and a 


4 Jamba 


14-1 


the steep nature. 






1,777 feet hill, 


west and south-west 


few Apta, Dhamni and in pbtces 


5 Teak 


1-8 


of the ground. 






east of Mavin- 


corners ; rising from 


many inferior species. Teak 


6 Sissum 


1-8 








mani village. 


200 feet on the bed of 


up to a fair size is scatteredj 7 Honni ... ... 








Eist. A tributary 


the river tc 1,S50 feet 


throughout these lower slopes, 


8 Heddi 








of the Kodaf 


on the crrst of the 


and is in places of a very pro- 9 Dhamni ... l - 8 








gadda Nalla and 


ridge. The slopes are 


mising nature. To the south-' 10 Apta ... '3 








Kandarmani or 


everywhere intersected 


west occurs a patch of ever 11 Jambul ... '7 








Advi Nalla. 


by small streams run- 


green forest situated on some-: 12 Womb ... '9 








South. Compart - 


ning west to east. 


what flat ground, while most of 


13 Kursing ... 








ment 4. 


(b) Rock and S-nl.~ The 


the north-west gently sloping 


14 Bharuisi ... : -7 








West. Comp a r t- 


rock conies to the sur- 


ground is covered with a stunted 1 15 Other species . 47'9 








ment 1 and a cut 


face in many places, 


growth of Matti and Kindal 












line along the 


being nearly every- 


intersected with patches of ever- 












ridge between the 


where milky quartz 


green forest. 












1,850 feet and 


The soil is fair on the 


(b) Kegeneration. Up to about 












1,777 feet hills 


lower slopes and in the 


the 1,200 feet contour line seed- 












east of Mavin- 


depressions, becoming 


lings of Jamba, Kindal and 












uiani village. 


shallow on the uppei 


Sissum are found in abundance, 














slopes. Fragments o: 


and Teak seedlings are numerous 














rock cover the soi 


in Teak bearing localities. 














everywhere. 


Scattered here and theie may 
















also be seen seedlings of the 
















more inferior species such aa 
















Karmal, Knmbia and Joting. 
















(e) Undergrowth. For the mosl 
















part in the better stocked areas 
















the undergrowth except seedlings 














./ 


is nil, while on the upper slope.- 
















Karvi, Cbiva and evergreen 
















patches are found to exist 
















Bamboos are only found locally. 
















(d) Grazing is restricted to the 
















edge of the cultivation and is 
















nowhere heavy. 









25 



APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
part- 
ment 
No. 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


3 


276-8 


North. K o d a 1 - 


(a) Configuration. The 


(a) Growing Stock. In the south- 


1 Matti - 




There should be no 






gad da Nalla. 


compartment contains 


east, along the Local Fund 


(a) Sound .. 


2-8 


great difficulty 






East. K o d a 1 - 


two hills rising to 878 


Road, poor very much hacked 


(b) Unsound 


ri 


in exploiting this 






gadda Nalla and 


and 959 feet respect- 


forest exists containing poor 


2 Nana 


9'8 


compar t m e n t, 






cultivation. 


ively, joined by a 


Matti, Kindal, Heddi, Hirda, 


3 Kindal 


23-0 


with one of its 






South. Compart - 


ridge, the gradient in 


Jamba, Sissum and a few 


4 Jamba .. 


22-2 


boundaries being 






merit 5. 
West. Compart- 


places steep, facing all 
aspects. 


Honni together with inferioi 
species. On the slopes of the 


5 Teak 
6 Sissum .. 


3-2 
3-5 


the Local Fund 
road and the 






ment 2. 


(b) Rock and Soil On 
the lower situations 


hills are found fine Kindal, 
Nana, Matti, Jamba, some 


7 Honni .. 
8 Heddi 


. 1-1 
4 


gradients favour- 
ing such work. 








laterite is found, turn- 


Sissnm, patches of Teak and 


9 Dhamni 


15 










ing to metamorphosed 


small Karsing. 


10 Apia 


4 


. 








sand stone, und crysta- 


Round the tops of the hills the 


11 Jambnl 


3 










line shales on the upper 


forest is more open and on 


12 Womb. 


27 










slopes, the latter rocks 


a small plateau in the centre of 


13 Karsing .. 


2-7 










being intersected with 


the compartment are some large 


14 Bharnii 


* 










narrow views of milky 


Teak, Heddi and Jamba, a patch 


15 Other species 


25-3 










quartz. The soil is 


of Teak is to be f ound^along the 














deep at the south end 


stream in the south-west of the 














of the compartment 


compartment. 














becoming shallow on 


(b) Regeneration. Seedlings of 














the slopes, the surface 


Jamba and Kindal are found 














of the ground being 


here and there but are not nu- 














covered with fragments 


merous owing to the heavy 














of rock. 


K-irvi growth. 
















(c) Undergrowth. Heavy Karvi 
















growth covers nearly the whole 
















area, and bamboos occur spario- 
















dically aloves the compartment. 
















(d} Grazing. Grazing is nol 
















heavy being confined to the 
















Southern portion near the culti- 
















vation and along the road side. 








4 


674-4 


North. The Ko 
. dalgadda Mavin- 
rnani foot-path. 


(a) Confg n ratio n. 
Aspei-t east through- 
out, the gradient mode- 


(a) Growing Stock. 1 he whole 
area is covered with scatterec 
Teak some of considerable size 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound. ... 
(6) Unsound ... 


9-8 
1-7 


There may be 
some difficulty 
in extracting 






East. The Adv 


rate to steep, the whole 


being denser on the lower slopes 


2 Nana 


2-5 


trees from the 






Nalla. 


hill side being inter- 


near the cultivation, than higher 


3 Kindal 


16-8 


top of the ridge 






S'.uth. A nalla 


sected by small nallas 


up the hill. The lower anc 


4 Jamba 


22-4 


but as the ma- 






and a cut line 


running west to east 


upper slopes contain gooc 


5 Teak 


4-6 


terial is good on 






dividing compart 
ments 4 and 7- 


into the main stream. 
(b) Bock and SoU. The 


growth of Matti, Kindal, Jamba 
both of advanced growth anc 


6 Sissum 
7 Honni ... 


3-4 
4 


the upper slopes 
it will be possi- 






West. Outline on 


rock is composed oJ 


mature trees. 


8 Heddi 


3 


ble to do so at a 






crost of ridge 


crystaline schists, 


With the above species are fount 


9 Dhamni ... 


1-6 


profit. 






dividing com 


hales and granite of 


some Sissum and Dhamni thongh 


10 Apta 


3 








partments 1 anc 


inferior quality. The 


not of large size, Womb, Kar- 


11 Jambul 











4. 


upper and lower slopes 


sing and Nana mixed with in- 


12 Womb 


1-2 










being less steep are 


ferior species. 


13 Karsing ... 


9 










covered with fairly 


The middle slopes are well stock- 


14 Bharnigi ... 


1 










deep soil, while on the 


ed but the growth is less favour- 


15 Other species . 


34-0 


/ 








middle and steeper 


able than on the less steep 














slopes the soil is shal- 


gradients. 














low. The area is 


(b) Regeneration. The regenera- 














covered with loose 


tion of Matti in the open glades 














stones broken off from 


is fair, being chiefly confined to 














the readily disintegrat- 


the upper and lower more level 














ing soft granites. 


portions of the compartment 
















Seedlings of Teak, Jamba, Kin- 
















dal and Kharsing are found 
















scattered here and there, hut are 
















not abundant, probably owing 
















to the full stocking of the area. 
















(e) Undergrowth. B a m b o o s 
















abound nearly all over the area, 
















and in such places where they 
















do not occnr patches of Karvi 
















are to he found. Towards the 
















ridge small patches of Karvi 
















and Chiva ocsur ; with the 
















exception of the bamboos the 
















undergrowth may be said not to 
















be heavy. 
















(d) A few head of cattle graze in 
















the east portion of the compart- 
















ment, otherwise the area is free 
















from grazing. 









B 9907 



26 



APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
part- 
ment 
No. 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


6 


382-8 


North. A cut line 
dividing compart- 


(a) Configuration. The 
south-east half of the 


(a) Growing Stock. Along the 
Local Fund road and east to the 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound ... 


7-0 


E xtraction from 
this compart- 






ments 8 and 5. 


compartment lies on 


main stream, good Teak, Mutti, 


(b) Unsound... 


2-1 


ment should be 






East The Kodal- 


fairly level ground. 


Kindal and Jamba forest occurs, 


2 Nana 


2-4 


easy with a good 






gadda Nalla. 


In the north-west half 


mixed with large bamboos. To 


3 Kindal 


22-5 


J.ocal Fund Koad 






South. A cut line 


occurs a hill rising to 


the west of the compartment 


4 Jamba ... 


27'5 


through it, and 






dividing compart- 


668 feet, giving all 


along the cultivation is another 


5 Teak 


4 


no real steep 






ments 5 and 6. 


aspects, the gradients 


patch of Teak. On the lower 


6 Sissum ... 


38 


gradients. 






West. The Advi 


of which are fairly 


and southern side of the hill 


7 Honni ... 


b' 








Nalla. 


steep. 


fine sound Matti, Kindal and 


* Heddi 


1 










(6) Boek and Soil. On 


Jamba forest exists, mixed with 


9 Dhamui ... 


2-2 










the lower ground, in 


a few Kana, Sissum, Womb, 


10 Apia 


1 










south-west of the com- 


Dhamni and inferior species. 


11 Jambul 


1 










partment laterite oc- 


In the north-west of the com- 


12 Womb 


3-1 










curs, while on the hil 


partment the growth is some- 


13 Karsing ... 


1-3 










are found soft granites 


what inferior to the rest of the 


14 Bharnigi 


1.. 










highly admixed with 


growing stock, inferior species 


15 Other species... 


26-8 










quartz. 


and bamboos predominating. 














The soil is deep and rich 


(b) Natural regeneration. Ex- 














at lower elevations 


cept of Jamba is rather scarce, 














becoming somewhat 


Teak seedlings being noticeable 














poor on the upper 


by their absence. On the hill 














slopes. 


side some few seedlings of 
















Sissum, Dhamni, Kindal and 
















Womb occur. 
















(c) Undergrowth. Between the 
















Local Fund Eoad and the river 
















many large Bamboo clumps 
















occur, becoming scarcer on the 
















hill side. Besides bamboos, the 
















undergrowth is not dense. 
















(d) Grazing. Light grazing is 
















carried on all over the area, 
















being more common in the 
















north-east of the compartment 
















than elsewhere. 








6 


554-8 


North. A cut line 
between compart- 


(a) Configuration. To 
the south and east o: 


(a) Growing Stock. Teak is 
found in small quantities all over 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound .. 


3-6 


This compartment 
being easily ac- 






ments 5 and 6. 
East. The Ganga 
Nalla Kiver. 
South and South- 
West. An old 


the compartment the 
land slopes gently down 
to ths Advi and Ganga 
Nallas, respectively 
To the north-west is a 


the area, few trees being of 
exploitable girth. The forest 
is good throughout ; in the 
south, on lowlying ground, it 
contains excellent Matti and 


(b) Unsound 
2 Nana 
3 Kindal 
4 Jamba . 
5 Teak 


1-9 
6-3 

17'8 
27-7 
1-2 


cessible will 
afford no difficul- 
ty for exploita- 
tion. The forest 
growth is here 






Public Works 


hill rising with mode- 


Nana of all ages, mixed with 


6 Sigsum 


2-5 


very favourable, 






Road. 


rate gradients to 583 


Kindal, Dhamni, Jamba, Sissnin 


7 Honni 


3 


trees of all ages 






West. The Kan- 


feet. 


and many Kumbia and Karcnal. 


8 Hecldi 


... 


exist, and pro- 






darmani or Advi 


(b) Bock and Soil. In 


On the east side of the hill the 


9 Dhamni 


4-6 


vided some of the 






Nalla. 


the low lying ground 


forest is rather open, matters, 


10 Apta 


5 


undergrowth can 








laterite occurs, while 


however improve towards the 


11 Jambul 


6 


be got rid of 








the hill is formed oi 


top where a few scattered Teak 


12 Womb 


4-9 


there will be no 








basalts intersected with 


exist, mixed with many Womb 


13 Karsing 


1-2 


harm if the ex- 








views of milky quartz 


Nana, Kindal, Jamba, and a 


14 Bharnigi 


1 


ploitation is of a 








The soil is deep near 


few Matti. Between the Local 


15 Other species . 


26'8 


somewhat heavy 








the rivers, being com- 


Fund Eoad and the river is a 






nature, as much 








posed of disintegrated 


belt of Teak, Matti and Nana 






advanced growth 








laterite, intermixed 


jungle, which together with 






is present. 








with fragments oi 


large bamboos forms good 














crystalline rock. The 


forest. 














soil on the hill side is 


(6) Natural regeneration. Re- 














shallow. 


generation is good in the more 
















open portions to the east anc 
















practically nil under the dense 
















Karvi and bamboo growth. 
















(e) Undergrowth. Many large 
















bamboo clumps exist on the level 
















gi-ound, while on the hill side, 
















a high growth of Karvi is found. 
















Patches occur here and there 


; 














with no undergrowth except 
















seedlings of Kiiidal, Jamba and 
















Womb. 
















(d) Grazing. -The grazing is 
















practically nil. 









27 
APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
part- 
ment 
No. 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 

1 


7 


8 


7 


674-8 


North. A pmall 
tributary of the 
Advi or Kandar- 


(a) Configur at i o n. 
Aspect south-east 
throughout. The com- 


(a) G-i'oteing Stock. Teak is 
found scattered throughout the 
compartment, especially on the 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound ... 
(b) Unsound .. 


9-6 
1-8 


Exploitation will be 
somewhat diffi- 






inani Nalla. 


partment is situated 


upper slopes of the ridge, some 


2 Nana 


3-6 


cult in this com- 






East. The Advi 


on the east slope of the 


trees being of exploitable size 


3 Kindal 


14-6 


partment owing 






or Kandannani 


U jralli-Koda 1 g a d d a 


though of no great height 


4 Jamba 


22-0 


to the steep 






Nalla. 


ridge. The gradients 


growth. At the base of the hill, 


5 Teak 


6-6 


nature of the 






South. B e d t i 


are gently at first 


on what was probably old culti- 


6 Sissum . 


27 


ground. 






River. 


starting from about 


vation, is fair young growth of 


7 Honni . 


1-8 








South- West. A 


200 feet on the Advi 


Matti, mixed with Jamba, 


8 Heddi 


2 








small tributary 


River, become heavier 


Kiudal and many inferior 


9 Dhamni . 


1-8 








of the Gangavali 


on rising up the slopes, 


species. On the first slope the 


10 Apta 


8 








or Bedti Elver. 


until near the top of 


forest is good, containing ex- 


11 Jambul 


... 








West. A cut line 


the ridge, at an 


ploitable Matti and Kindal, 12 Womb 


1-3 








along the crest of 


altitude of 1,606 feet, 


while the Nana, Sissum, Honni, 13 Karsing . 


8 








the Ujra'i-Kodal- 


they become precipi- 


Dhamni and Womb is of smaller 14 Bharnigi 











gadda ridge. 


tous. The whole hill 


size. Most of the mature 15 Other species 


82-6 










side is drained by 


Jamba has been exploited for! 












small torrents which 


sleepers. Towards the top of the 














run into the Advi 


ridge the* forest is somewhat 














River. 


open though the growth is by 














b) Bock and Soil. 


no means of inferior quality. 














The ridge is composed 


(6) Natural regeneration. The 














of crystalline rock, 


regeneration is practically nil 














chiefly granites and 


on the slopes, where heavy 














olivine schists. The 


Karvi growth exists. On the 














rock crops out towards 


lower ground seedlings of 














the top of the slopes, 


Matti, Kindal, Womb, etc., are 














while the lower slopes 


to be found, while towards the 














are covered with frag-j crest of the ridge Sissum, 














raents of rock broken 


Womb, a few Teak, Jamba and 














off from nbove. The 


Kindal seedlings have appeared. 














soil is fair and good at 


(c) Undergrowth. Dense Bam- 














the base of the ridge 


boo on the lower slopes turning 














and poor on the slopes. 


to Karvi on the middle slopes, 
















and Chiva and a few Bamboos 
















towards th ridge. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is con- 
















fined to the level ground rounc 
















the Kodalgadda footpath. 








8 


620-0 


North. Co in pa r t- 
ment 7, the 
boundary bein<_ 
formed by a smal 


(a) Configuration. As- 
pect south turning 
south-east. The com- 
partment is situated on 


(a) Growing Stock. Teak occurs 
in fair quantities on the upper 
slopes, attaining exploitable 
size. It is also found in other 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound 
(6) Unsound 
2 Nana 


127 
3-2 
1-9 


Exploitation should 
present little 
difficulty with 
the Karwar-Yel- 






nalla falling into 
the Bedti River. 
East. The Bedt 


the south-eastern 
slopes of the Ujrali- 
Kodalgadda ridge. 


portions of tha compartment 
but only in small quantities 
Above the road and on the 


3 Kindal 
4 Jamba 
5 Teak 


131 
20-0 
2-1 


lapur Road run- 
ning at the foot 
of the slopes. 






River. 
South. The Bedt 


Between the road and 
the Bedti River the 


middle slopes the growth is poor 6 Sissum 
and somewhat open, while on 7 Honni 


2-0 

6 


The crop is a 
mixed one and 






River. 
West. A cut line 


ground is practically 
flat. C raising the 


the upper slopes and south ol 
the road, good Matti, Kindai 


8 Heddi 
9 Dhamni 


4 
1-1 


in places open, it 
will be possible 






running from the 


road to the north the 


and Jamba forest exists. Nana 


10 Apta 


3 


to do a good deal 






main road to the 
crest of the ridge 


gradient rises sharply 
from 180 feet on the 


and Sissum is found in fair 
quantities but does not often 


11 Jambul 
12 Womb 



2 


by forcing ad- 
vanced Teak and 






and a small nalla 


road to l,54t> feet on 


attain the 1st class quality 


13 Karsine 


3 


Matti growth. 






running into the 


the ridge, the slopes 


while Honni, Dhamni and Haddi 14 BharniSi 


2 








Bedti River o.i 
the south o 


towards the crest oi 
the ridge being near 


are poorly represented. Bam- 
boos are very plentiful west o\ 


.15 Other species 


413 








road. 


precipitous. The 


the road but do not attain a 














whole area is drained 


great size. 














by small nallas run- 
















ning into the main 


(J) Natural regeneration. The 














stream. 


upper slopes contain scatterec 
















regeneration of Jamba, Teak 














(b) Eock and Soil.T^u 


i Sissnm, Kindal, whila round the 














underlying rock ii 


i cultivated plots and in more 














crystalline, being com 


open places on the flat grounc 














posed of granites 


, Matti, Teak, Jamba and Kinda 














basalts and olivim 


> seedlings have established them- 














schists. The soil i 


> selves. Throughout the com- 














deep on the lowei 


partment advanced growth if 














ground, fair on the to; 


> noticeable. 














of the ridge and ban 


I 














and shallow on th 


) (c) Undergrowth. Heavy Bam 














slopes. The surface o 


- boo growth occurs north of th< 














the ground on th 


J road. Karvi and Bamboo inter 














slopes is covered wit: 


i mixed exists on the lower slope 


^ 












fragments of rock am 


[ and Chiva and high Karvi pre 














pieces of milky quart? 


vails on the upper slopes am 
















ridce. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is confine< 


1 












to the area between the roai 


I 







28 
APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
part- 
ment 
No. 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


618-0 


North and West. 


(a) Configuration. As- 


(a) Growing Stock. Essentially 


1 Matti 




Exploitation should 






A cut line up the 


pect south-east. The 


deciduous forest. The area 


(a) Sound ... 


12-4 


present few diffi- 






Ujrali-K o d a 1- 


compartment is situ- 


north of the road is covered 


(A) Unsound . 


2'8 


culties. The 






gadda ridge, and 


ated on the east slopes 


with scattered Teak, which on 


2 Nana 


2-1 


warm hill-side 






part of main road, 


at the south end of the 


the upper slopes attain a fair 


3 Kindal 


13-5 


is suited to Teak, 






and Ujar Nails. 


Ujrali-Kodal gadda 


size ; mixed with these are fair 


4 Jamba . 


16-5 


Sissura and Hon- 






East.- A cut line 


ridge. It risps from 


Matti, especially in the south- 


5 Teak 


2' H 


ni and the lower 






between compart- 


15i) feet at the river to 


west of the compartment ; at 


6 Hissum . 


1-5 


portions to Matti, 






ments 8 and 9 


about 1,500 feet in the 


lower elevations Nana and 


7 Honni 


1-9 


all of which spe- 






and a small 


extreme north. The 


Kindal, which are fairly repre- 


8 Heddi 


2 


cies should be 






Nalla. 


gradient is gentle on 


sented, reach further up the 


9 Dhamin . 


l-l 


encouraged as 






South. The Bedti 


the lower slopes be- 


slopes than Matti, Jamba is 


10 Apta 


3 


much as possible 






or Gangavali 


coming nearly preci- 


present but not trees of large 


11 Jambnl 





when improve- 






Kiver. 


pitous at the ridge, 


size. Of other species Honni, 


1-2 Womb 


4 


ment fellings 








while the whole drains 


Dhamni and Sissum are not in- 


13 Karsing 


3 


take place. 








directly into the main 


frequently found, while of the in- 


14 Bharnigi 


1 










stream. 


ferior species, with the exception 


15 Other species 


446 










(ft) RM -k and Soil. The 


of Karmal, they are not plenti- 














rock near the river 


ful. Generally speaking the 














is metamorphic, on 


height bf growth is poor though 














rising up the slopes it 


the forests on the lower and 














changes to granite and 


upper slopes are well stocked. 














Bemi-metamorph o s e d 


while those of the middle slopes 














shales, being inter- 


are somewhat open. 














sected with veins of 


(ft) Natural regeneration. The 














quart/ The surface 


regeneration of Sissum is fair 














of the slopes are cover- 


and good on the upper slopes. 














ed with boulders and 


Kindal and Nana seedlings are 














fragments . of rock. 


also present but in less quan- 














The soil near the rivei 


ti>-s, while Teak seedlings arc 














is alluvial, rich and 


found scattered here and there 














favourable to tree 


On the whole the regeneration 














growth. The slopes 


is not so good as it should be. 














are covered with shal- 


(e) Undergrowth. On the lower 














low soil, for.ned by the 


slopes especially to the south- 














de-composition of the 


west, Karvi predominates, while 














crystalline rocks. 


higher up the bill side Chiva is 
















plentiful. Bamboos occur 
















throughout the area, being 
















especially dense juut north o 
















the main road. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is confinec 
















to an area on each side of the ro u 
















and down to the river, being 
















heavy round the fallow cultiva 
















tion of Dugganbail. 








10 


5164 


North. A suial! 
nalla dividing 
compartments 1C 


(a) Configuration . As 
pect north-west, turn 
ing to south-west in 


(a) Growing Stock The charac 
ter of the forest is essential!} 
deciduous and growth o 


1 Matti 
(o) Sound .. 
(b) Unsound.. 


7'3 
1-3 


There may be gome 
difficulty in ex- 
ploiting the trees 






and 11. 


the southern corner 


advanced age except for a sinal 


2 Nana 


4-2 


as the ground 






East. The cut 


The compartment is 


evergreen patch in the north 


3 Kindal 


10-3 


is rugged and 






line up the Ujrali 
Koaal gadda 


situated on the north 
west slopes at the soutl 


east corner. Fair quantities o 
Teak are found all over this com 


4 Jamba 
5 Teak 


19-0 
5-7 


steep. Young 
Teak, Sissum, 


t 




ridge. 
South. The main 
road. 


end of the Ujrali 
Kodalgadda ridge 
rising from 180 fee 


partment, in places attaining ex 
ploitable dimensions. The fores 
is very fairly stocked through 


6 Sissum 
7 Honni .. 
8 Heddi 


5-9 
6 

4 


Matti and Nana 
should bs freed 
when carrying 






Weft. The Ujral 


at the cultivation to 


out, fine Sissum and Nana 


9 Dhamni .. 


8-4 


out the improve- 






Nalla. 


about 1,500 feet in the 


reacli from top to bottom of th 


10 Apta 


6 


ment felling, as 








north-east corner. The 


slopes, the larger Matti is con 


11 Jambul 


... 


there is much to 








first slopes are steep 


fined to the lower slopes and i 


12 Womb 


5 


do in this respect, 








while the top of the 


only found as a small tree on 


13 Karsing 


5 


particularly as 








spur is rounded and the 
gradient more gentle 


the ridge. Jamba, though wel 
represented, is not so plentifu 


14 Bharnigi 
15 Other species 


35-3 


the locality is 
most suitable to 








The whole area dra'n.. 


as in other areas, Dhamni exist 






the growth of 








into the Ujrali Nalla. 


in fair quantities but is still o 






these species. 










small size, while Womb am 














(ft) Bock and Soil. The 


Honni are scarce except on th 














underlying rock is 


ridge line. Amongst the infe 














crystalline, forming, 


rior species Karmal, Kumbia 














granites with large 


and Sagadi are the most notice 














crystals, and imper 


able though the percentage o 














feotly formed schists 


inferior species nowhere predo 














The surface of the 


minates. 














ground is rugged am 


(ft) Natural Regeneration. The 














covered with man; 


regeneration of Sissum, Kindal 














fragments of rock 


Nana and Karmal is fair, while 














The soil is fairly dee] 


seedlings of Dhamui, Teak am 














and very suitable to 


Honni on the upper slopes are 














forest growth. 


found scattered here and there 
















Advanced growth is poorly re 
















presented, probably owing to the 
















full stocking of the wood. The 
















place is suitable to regeneration 
















and the final and improvemen 
















fellings should do much to 
















improve the regeneration. 









29 
APPENDIX III continued. 





\ 












>art- 
nent 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, roek 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


No. 
















1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 

(. 


7 


8 


10 


516-4 






(c) Undergrowth. The under- 








ontd. 








growth is not heavy, Chiva and 
















small Karvi is found on the 
















upper slopes, and bamboos and 
















patches of Karvi have established 
















themselves, especially round the 
















small n alias. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is con- 
















fined to the edge of the cultiva- 
















tion and to the banks of the 
















Ujralli Nalla. 








11 


480-8 


North. A. small; (a) Configuration. As- 


(a) Growing Stock, The com- 


1 Matti 




A difficult and at 






Nalla dividing 


pect north-west 


partment contains much ever- 


(a) Sound 


10-0 


the same time 






compartments 1 


throughout. The com- 


green arid semi-evergreen forest, 


(6) Unsound .. 


5 


poor compart- 






and 11. 


partment is situated; especially to. the south-east. 


2 Nana 


H 


ment from an 






East. A cut line 


on the east slopes of! Mixed with this evergreen forest 


3 Kindal 


5-9 


exp loitation 






along the Ujrali- 


the Ujrali valley, rising 


are a few large Matti, Nana and 


4 Jamba 


4 


point of view. 






Kodalgadda 


from al)ont 200 feet at 


Ktndal and Bharnigi. To the 


5 Teak 





Fire in such a 






ridge. 


the nalla to 1,600 feet 


north and north-east the forest is 


6 Sissum ... 


1 


comp ar t in e n t 






South. A small 


on the ridge. The 


of a somewhat more deciduous 


7 Honni 


1 


would probably 






Nalla dividing 


gradient is steep at the 


character, containing Matti of 


8 Heddi 





do more good 






compartments 10 


south end of the com- 


small size, mixed with small 


9 Dhamni 


* 


than harm to 






and 11. 


partment and moderate 


Kindal, Jambul and many in- 


10 Apta 


1 


further regene- 






West. The Ujrali 


elsewhere. The wholej ferior species. 


11 Jambul 


4-3 


ration. 






Nalla. 


area drains into the 


(b) Natural regeneration. The 


12 Womb 


... 










Ujrali Nala. 


regeneration is very fair, espe- 


13 Karsing 


... 










(b) Rock and Soil The 


cially of Matti and Kindal in 


14 B'>arnigi 


2-5 










rock is of basalt, 


the north. Jamba is conspi- 


15 Other species... 


75-5 










granite and igneous 


cuous by its absence. 














rock. The surface of 


(c) Undergrowth. On the lower 














the soil is rugged and 


slopes Karvi prevails, while 














covered with fragments 


laurels and other evergreen 














of rock boulders. The 


shrubs occur in the non-decidu- 






' 








soil is fairly deepl ous portions of the forest. 














especially on the lower 


Towards the top of the hill 














slopes. 


patches of small bamboos and 
















Karvi are found. 
















(d) Grazing. Nil. 








12 


618-0 


North-West. A 
tributary of the 


(a,) Configuration. As- 
pect south-east turning 


(a) Growing Stock, The . slopes 
contain deciduous forest 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound ... 


6-9 


Exploitation will 
be difficult from 






Ujar Nulla and a 
25 ft. blazed line 
on the orest of 


to south and south- 
west ' in the south. 
The compartment lies 


throughout, while on the 
plateau are patches of evergreen 
intermixed with poor deciduous 


(6) Unsound... 
2 Nana 
3 Kindal 


8 
3-6 
1.V1 


the north end of 
the compartment. 
On the other 






the hill. 
East. The Ujrali 

VT 11 


at the junction of the 
Ujrali and B^r Nallas 


forest and Maidan. To the 
south Teak occurs, but few trees 


4 Jamba 
5 Teak 


7-6 
21 


hand the number 
of exploitable 






Nalla. 
South- West The 
Hakalguli Nalla 


and stretches up the 
west side of the former 
valley. The gradient 


are of exploitable size. Here 
also on the lower slopes is found 
a good forest of Sissum, Matti, 


6 Sissum 
7 Honni ... 
8 Heddi 


4-1 
4 



trees is small in 
that locality. 
The most strik- 






and the Bar 

v* n 


throughout the area is 


Kindal and Nana, amongst 


9 Dhamni ... 


1-8 


ing feature of the 






Nalla. 


moderately steep 


which are many largo trees, 


10 Apta 


4 


growing stock is 








except where it reaches 


especially of Kindal. To the 


11 Jambul 


2 


the absence of 








the top of the hills. 


north along the river the crop 12 Womb 


1-1 


natural regenera- 








Here the configuration 


is chiefly composed of Kindal, 13 Kharsing 


3 


tion. On the 








of the ground forms a 


Nana, big Bharnigi and inferior 


14 Bharnigi ... 


1-1 


upper slopes, to 








precipitous scarp, 


species, while the upper slopes 


15 Other species... 


54-5 


bring new 








over which the upland 


throughout contain very poor 






growth into exist- 








plates.ii commences. 


forest and offer blanks of consi- 






ence, will be 








(6) Sock and SoU. 


derable size. Bamboos are 






difficult owing to 








The underlying rock is 


scattered all over the area, being 






the poorness of 








granite and schists, 


most frequently found on the 






the soil. On the 








intermixed veins of 


lower slopes. 






lower slopes 








quartz. The top scarp 


(6) Natural regeneration. The 






heavy improve- 








is formed by a cap of 


jegeneration is very poor every- 






ment felling will 








laterite. The surface 


where, even in the more open 






have to take 








of the soil is covered 


places. What there is to be 






place. 








with fragments of rock 


found of seedling growth is con- 






r 








and boulders. The 


fined to the plateau where the 














soil is deep and rich 


conditions are not favourable to 














on the lower slopes, 


the production of larga timber. 














becoming poor on the 


(c) Undergrowth. The under- 














upper slopes, where 


growth on the lower slopes con- 














sheet rock often 


sists of Chiva, where high Karvi 














appaars 011 the surface. 


does not exist, small patches of 
















Karvi occur on the upper slopes, 
















and evergreen shrubs on the 
















plateau. 
















(d) Grazing, Nil. 









91)08 



30 
APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
part- 
ment 
No. 


Area 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


Genecal character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age 


Remarks. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


13 


893-6 


North. A blazed 


(a) Configuration. Al 


(a) Growiny\Stock. The growth 


1 Matti 




Expl citation 






line starting on 
the Bar Nalla at 


aspects are found in 
this area, the prevailing 


is essentially deciduous and of no 
great age. The south-east of 


(a) Sound ... 
(6) Unsound . 


fi-7 
1-8 


should present 
few difficulties. 






a point opposite 


one being east. The 


the compartment contains poor 


2 Nana 


50 


The growth ig 






the taluka bound- 


compartment comprises 


open forest. The whole hillside 


8 Kindal 


14-8 


generally young 






ary corner and 


the summit and slopes 


to the cast contains Teak in fair 


4 Jamba 


lO'O 


and not so dense 






rising west. 


of the Kantanmuli 


quantities, but few of exploi- 


5 Teak 


64 


that the improve- 






East. The Bar 


bill, rising to 1,530 ft. 


table size. Mixed with the Teak 


6 Sissum ... 


4'6 


ment fellingsneec 






and Uirali Nal- 


In the south-east the 


on the lower and middle slopes 


7 Honni 


2 


be heavy. Many 






las. 


gradients are gentle, 


are Matti, Nana, Kindal, the 


8 Heddi 


1 


seedlings have 






South. The Bedti 


rising more steeply 


latter two species better grown 


9 Dhamni 


7 '5 


established them- 






or Gangavali 


towards the top of the 


than the former, much Sissum, 


10 Apta 


3 


selvog and they 






river. 


hill, where on the easl 


some Dhamni, Womb and Apta. 


11 Jambul 


2 


will require at- 






West. H e g a r- 


side they form a 


while the upper slopes are more 


12 Womb 


7 


tention. 






manigadda Nalla 


scarp some few fur- 


open ^containing stunted Teak 


13 Karsing ... 


t> 








and a blazed line. 


longs short of the 


and a few inferior species. The 


14 Bharnigi 


1 










summit. In the north 


crest of the hill and plateau, 


15 Otner species... 


33-0 










and above the scarp a 


though open forest, contain some 














gently sloping plateau 


large Nana. To the north is a 














exists. 


good deal of bare rock and in 














(b) Rock and Soil. The 


consequence no tree growth, 














underlying rock is 


while the west slopes contain little 














chiefly basalt and 


Teak but many Kindal and 














shaley trap, often com- 


Jamba and towards the stream 














ing to the surface, 


the forest becomes evergreen in 














intersected with veins 


character. 














of quartz. The soil is 


(4) Natural regeneration. The 














poor and shallow for 


seedling growth throughout is 














the most part, except 


good, favouring Sissum, which is 














on the more level 


present in large quantites mixed 














ground on the plateau. 


with Jamba, Teak in places, 
















Womb, Ap'a and a few Kindal. 
















(c) Undergrowth. The under- 
















growth is very light for the 
















most part, comprising smal! 
















bamboos, Karvi in patches anc 
















grass towards the top of the hill 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is con- 
















fined to the more level groune 
















and is somewhat heavy between 
















the Kasamakki old cultivation 
















and the road. 








u 


,U4't 


North A 25 feet 


(a) Configu ration. 


(a) Growing Stock. The growing 


1 Matti 




Exploitation easy, 






blazed line run- 


Aspect south in tlie 


stock is of deciduous character, 


(a) Sound ... 


5-8 


this area seems to 






ning south and 


south of the compart- 


containinir many large trees. 


(6) Unsound . 


3-5 


have escaped 






west of the Geral 


ment and turning easl 


Between the road and the Nalla 


2 Nana 


7-4 


exploitation in 






cultivation. 


in the north portion. 


the best trees have been exploit- 


3 Kindal 


16-4 


past years, except 






East. The Hegar 


The compartment 


ed, leaving the old faulty 


4 Jamba 


25-5 


the portion south 






Nalla. 


slopes gently down to 


trees. Above the road Teak oi 


6 .Teak 


2-9 


of the road. The 




% 


South. The Bedti 


the river in the south 


young age is found spnrseh 


6 Sissnm ... 


2-9 


natural regenera- 






or Gangavali 


and rises with mode- 


scattered in the lower portions 


7 Honni 


1 


tion is most pro- 






River. 


rate gradient* in its 


of the area, while in the north n 


8 Heddi 


1 


mising in places. 






West. The Mule- 


upper limits towards 


group of Teak exists containing 


9 Dhamni ... 


4'5 








mani Nalla. 


the Geral cultivation. 


exploitable trees. The compart- 


10 Apta 


7 










(b) Bock and Soil. The 


ment as a whole contains many 


11 Jambul 


1 










underlying rock is 


fine straight Matti, Nana anc 


12 Womb 


11 










composed of basalts Rnd 


Kindal mixed with Jamba, a few 


13 Karsing ... 


7 










shales, intermixed with 


Sissum, Dhamni, Apta, Womb 


14 Bhamigi 


2 










veins of quartz. The 


inferior species and liamboos. Ir 


16 Other species... 


281 










soil is very fair every- 


the north-east corner, a smal 














where, being best to- 


semi-evergreen patch of forest 














wards the south. In 


is to be found. 














many places the surface 
of the soil is coverec 


j (V) Natural regeneration. In 
the lower portion of the com 














with boulders and frag- 


partment the Sissum regenera- 














ments of rock. 


tion is excellent, as good as any 
















elsewhere. With the Sissum are 
















found Kindnl, Jamba, Apta ant 
















a few Teak seedlings, while at 
















the foot of the hill, above Hegar 
















Khair Seedlings are plentiful. 
(') Vnritr growth. Small bam- 
















boos and Karvi are found every- 
















where. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is confined 
















to the vicinity of the Hegar 








| 






cultivation. 









81 
APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
















part- 
ment 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil* 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


No. 
















1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


15 


424-8 


North. A blazed 


(a) Configuration. As- 


(a) Growing Stock. With the 


1 Matti 




Exploitation should 






line and a branch 
of Muiemani nalla 


pect touth and east. 
The compartment com- 


exception of a small seini-ever 
green patch in the north these 


(a) Sound .. 
(b) Unsound.. 


8-3' 
2-3 


present no diffi- 
culties. The 






north of theMul- 


prises a narrow gtrip oi 


forests are of a desidnous char- 


2 Nana 


8-8 


natural regenera- 






man if allow land. 


land between the Muie- 


acter. The only teak that occurs 


3 Kindal 


18-3 


tion will require 






East Che Muie- 


mani and Karalkod 


is a small patch between the road 


4 Jamba 


30-5 


aid by heavy im- 






mani nulla. 


nallas, the configuration 


and the river. Towards the 


5 Teak 


... 


provement fell- 






South-East. The 


being outlined in the 


Muiemani cultivation in ttr 


6 Sissum ... 


11 


ings. 






Bedti OT Ganga- 


south by a spur which 


south-east, most of the larger 


7 Honni ... 


1 








valli Eiver. 


gradually merges into 


trees of the more valuable spacies 


8 Heddi 


2 








West. The Karal- 


the western slopes of 


have been exploited. Generally 


9 Dhamni 


6 








kod nail* and a 


the Muiemani valley. 


speaking the crop cent-tins very 


10 Apta 


4 








25 feat blazed 


The gradient is mode- 


fair Matti, Nana and Jamba of 


11 Jambul 


4 








1.118. 


rate, rising from 105 


large size, tjie Matti being con- 


12 Womb 


8 










feet on the river to 965 


fined cliiefly to the lower slope*. 


13 Karsing 


I'l 










feet in the north of the 


mixed with the above are alargt 


14 Bharnigi .. 













compartment. 


percentage of Jamba, a few 


15 Other species 


^7*1 










(4) Buck and Soil. The 


Honni. Dhamni, Apta, small 














underlying rock in the 


Kbaning and inferior species 














north is granite and 


The compartment is well stocked 


' 












schist, with some iron 


except on the east ed-re where 














stone round the nallas, 


the quality and stock falls off. 














in the south laterite 


(b) Natural rege neratio n. 














occurs. The soil is rich 


Jamba seedlings are plentiful 














especially in the south 


everywhere, mixed with a few 














though everywhere 


Matti on the lo-^er tlopes and 














favourable to tree 


Nana and Kindal on the upper 














growth. 


slopes. The crop is generally 
















too dense for the production ol 
















seedlings of light demanding 
















species. 
















(c) Undergrowth. Bamboos anc 
















heavy Karvi in the south anc 
















Karvi and evergreen shrubs 
















in the north of the compart- 
















ment. 
















(d) Grazing. The grazing is 
















moderate in the south and easi 
















of the compartment and nil else- 

















where. 








16 


524-4 


North. A 25 feet 
blazed line. 


(a) Configuration. A s- 
pect south and south- 


(a) Growing Stock. In the north- 
east of the compartment is a 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound ... 


7-0 


No difficulty should 






East The Karal- 


east- The compartment 


patch of old " Kumri " land now 


(b) Unsound.. 


3-3 


be found in ex- 






kod nalla and the 


is situated on the 


covered with Jamba poles mixec 


2 Nana 


2-4 


ploiting the com- 






Bedti river. 


south-east slopes of the 


with scattered Kindal and Nana 


3 Kindal 


25-1 


partment. The 






South. The Main 


Solmani-Snnksal spur 


In the south-west corner is a 


4 Jamba 


29-0 


natural regene- 






road and the 


being drained by two 


former cultivation, now coverec 


5 Teak 


1 


ration is on the 






Sunksal nalla. 


patty rallas running 


with Matti, Kindal and Nana 


6 Sissum 


8 


whole unsatisfac- 






West. The Sunk- 


into the main stream. 


poles in patches and of pooi 


7 Honni 


* 


tory in this area, 






sal cultivation 


The gradients in the 


quality. The rest of the com- 


8 Heddi _ 


2 


owing to the 






and a 25 feet cut 


south are gentle 


partment contains good forest oi 


9 Dhamni .. 


4 


excessive growth 






line. 


becoming steeper to- 


Matti, Kindal, some Nana, 


10 Apta 


3 


of Karvi. In a 








wards the north where 


many small Jamba ; the large 


11 Jambul 


1-0 


year of general 








the compartment at- 
tains a height oi 


Matti being confined to the 
lower slopes. Mixed with the 


12 Womb 
13 Karsing 


7 
1 


flowering, the 
Karvi might with 








1,200 feet. 


above species are small Jambul, 


14 Bharnigi 


*. 


advantage be 








(b) Bock and Soil. The 


Heddi, Dhamni and. inferior 


15 Other species . 


29-6 


burnt. 








underlying rock in the 


species. 














lower portion of the 


(b) Natural regeneration. Mufti 














compartment is laterite, 


and Kindal seedlings are plenti- 














higher up soft granites 


ful around the edge of the culti 















and schists occur. The 


vation, and in the more open 














soil is deep and rich 


places in low lying areas, while 














especially in the low 


higher up owing to the dense 














lying areas. 


growth of Kaivi regeneration is 
















practically nil. 
















(c) Undergrowth. Patches of 
















Karvi and Bamboos occur at 
















lower elevations, while higher 
















p the undergrowth is dense 
















Karvi with scattered Bamboo 
















clumps. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is common 
















in the south being practieall}' 
















nil on the slopes. In places it 
















is excessive, i.e., near the road. 









32 
APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
part- 
ment 
No. 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuratior, rock 

and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Bemarks. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


17 


429-2 


North. A blazed 


(a) Configuration. As- 


(a) Growing Stalls. The whole 


1 Matti 




Exploitation should 






line 25 feet broad. 


pect south and south- 


area contains good deciduous 


(a) Sound 


9'0 


present no great 






East. A cut line, 


east in the south of t lie 


forest from 60 to 90 feet in 


(fc) Unsound 


4-2 


difficulties, per- 






Alkona cultiva- 


compartment. The 


height, the height growth being 


2 Nana 


4-2 


haps in the north 






tion and a smal 


area is situated on the 


less on the upper slopes than in 


3 Kindal 


20-4 


of the compart- 






bit of out line 


east slopes of a spur 


the south-east of the compart- 


4 Jamba 


16-5 


ment owing to the 






from the fields to 


which forms the east 


ment. Many fine Matti occur 


5 Teak 


... 


steepness of the 






the road. 


end of the Sunksul- 


at the lower elevations, mixed 


6 Sissum 


1-5 


ground, it may 






South. The Kar- 


Katinhakal valley. 


with large Kindal, Nana and 


7 Honni 


1 


be somewhat 






war-Ye 1 1 a p u r, 


The gradients for the 


Sisgum, the latter species being 


8 Heddi 


5 


expensive. The 






road and Sunksa! 


most part are steep, 


found more frequently on the 


9 Dhamni 


1-fl 


compartment con- 






nalla. 
West. A. 25 feet 


rising from 120 feet on 
the road to 1,227 feet 


upper slopes. Jamba is very 
plentiful towards the ridge, while 


10 Apta 
11 Jambnl 


4 
5 


tains much ma- 
ture wood, with 






out line. 


in the north-west cor- 


young Kharsing, Honni, Heddi. 


12 Womb 


1-2 


a good deal of 








ner. The slopes arc 


Womb, phamni and Apta are 


13 Karsing 


4 


faulty Matti. 








drained by innumera- 


found scattered in the north 


14 Bharnigi 


... 


The regeneration 








ble small nallas falling 


centre of the compartment. Of 


15 Other species 


39'5 


except of Jamba 








into the Sunksal Nlla. 


the inferior species a fair num- 






is not so good as 








(I) Bock and Soil. The 


ber of large Goting, Karmal. 






it should be, 








underlying rock is ;i 


Kumbia, Satwaii are present, the 






owing to the 








grey granite turning in 


whole intermixed with many 






heavy growth of 








places to schists. The 


Bamboos. Close to the river 






Karvi. 








soil is fair and good- 


semi-evergreen forest occurs. 














espeoially in the south- 


(6) Natural regeneration. 














east. 


Seedlings of Womb and Sisum 
















are noticeable on the middle 
















slopes, Jamba regeneration is 
















plentiful on the upper slopes, 
















while on the more level ground 
















Matti, Kindal and Dhamni 
















seedlings are scattered in the 
















more open places and round the 
















cultivation. 
















{c) Undergrowth. Thick Karvi, 
















especially on th slopes and crest 
















of the hill mixed everywhere 
















with Bamboos. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is heavy 
















on the lower ground and round 
















th hillock in the south centre 
















of the compartment. 








18 


719'6 


North. A foot- 
path going up the 


(a) Configu ratio n. 
A spect west and slight- 


(a) Growing Stock. The com 
partment contains deciduous 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound 


4-5 


Exploitation shonld 
present no diffi- 






hill from Kotepal 


ly south. The compart- 


forest to the south and on the 


(6) Unsound . 


2 


culties especially 






which is blazed 


ment is situated on 


lower northern slopes. The 


2 Nana 


6-5 


as most of the 






25 feet broad- 


the lower eastern 


upper edge of the area and the 


3 Kindal 


23-8 


large timber is 






East. A blazed 


slopes of the Sunksal- 


extreme north are semi-evergreer 


4 .lamba 


317 


found on the 






line starting from 


Katinhakal valley, 


or true evergren forests, being 


5 Teak 


* 


lower slopes. 






the 1,227 feet 


rising from the liver 


probably the result of former 


6 Sissum 


1-2 


Fire might pos- 






contour in the 


at about 300 feet to 


" Kumri " cultivation. The 


7 Honni 


1 


sibly check the 






east and rising 


about 1,200 feet on 


crop is characterised by the pre- 


8 Heddi _ 


... 


encroaching ever- 






north-west along 


the upper boundary. 


sence of many Jamba, large 


9 Dhamni 


7 


green, heavy 






the side of the 


The gradients are mode- 


mature Matti on the lower 


10 Apta 


2 


improv e m e n t 






hill and a cut line 


rate in the north and 


elevations, while large Kindal, 


11 Ja.nbnl 


1-6 


fellings would 






dividing compart- 


iteep in the centre and 


Nana are found everywhere. 


12 Womb 


1-1 


probably encour- 






ment 17. 


south of the area. Tha 


The height growth is" well 


13 Karsing 


5 


age it. 






South. A 25 feet 


whole compartment is 


maintained everywhere excspt 


14 Bharnigi 


1 








cut liae. 


drained by many smal] 


in the north-east corner where it 


15 Other species . 


27-8 








West. The Sunk- 


nallas running into the 


falls off. Honni, Womb, Khir- 












sal nalla. 


Sunksal nalla. 


sing and Bharnigi are sparsely 






- 








(6) Rock and Soil. The 


scattered all over the area, the 














underlying rook is 


latter species being found near or 














chiefly laterite with 


in the evergreen belt. Many 














outcrops of granite and 


large trees of inferior specie* 














shales on the upper 


are common in this compart- 














edge. The soil is good, 


ment. 














especially on the lower 


(b) Natural regeneration With 














slopes. 


the exception of Jama the natu- 
















ral regeneration is poor. 
















(<) U'lidtrgrowth. Karvi appears 
















everywhere except in the ever- 
















green portions, while large 
















Kamboo clumps cover the slope* 
















of th deciduous portion of the 
















compartment. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is practi- 
















cally nil, except just round the 
















Biroli cultivation. 









33 



APPENDIX III continued. 





Com- 

p:irt- 
ment 

No. 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rook 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stoek. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


19 


737-2 


North. The old 
main road. 
East. The Ganga 
nalla from its 
crossing with the 
main road, just 
west of the 44-th 
mile stone down 
to its junction of 
Bedti river. 
South. The Bodti 


(a) Configuration. As- 
poct on the Hoskop- 
gudda hill is east and 
west. The compartment 
includes the above hill 
and the narrow strip 
of jungle between the 
road and the Bedti 
river. The ground is 
hilly between the two 
roads and is somewhat 


(a) Growing Stock. This is a very- 
good Teak producing area, but it 
has been much overworked owing 
to the facilities of export. There 
are a few Teak poles left but no 
trees above 16' diameter, the 
majority being in the pole stages. 
The height growth is good and 
Teak if allowed to grow will 
reach a great size. There are 
many large Kindal, Matti. 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound . 
(6) Unsound... 
2 Nana 
3 Kindal 
4 Jamba 
5 Teak 
6 Sissum 
7 Houni ... 
8 Heddi 
9 Dhamni ... 


8-2 
2-1 
5-9 
31-4 
17-5 
1-8 
3-4 





No Teak should be 
cut in this com- 
partment for 
some years- Na- 
tural regeneration 
of Teak should be 
attended to and 
the compartment 
should be strictly 
closed- both to the 
cutting of timber 






or Gangavali 
river from the 


level, lowlying and 
damp below the new 


Jamba, Nana and jungle wood 
in the area of from 90 to lOOfeet 


10 Apta 
11 Jambul ... 


" 


of any kind and 
to grazing. There 






junction of the 
Ganga nalla to 


road. A small hilly 
portion with southern 


high. The density is poor owin^ 
to overcutting about 55 to 60 


12 Womb 
13 Kharsing ... 


* 


is no difficulty 
about export. 






the junction of 
Kandarmani 


aspect lies close along 
the Bedti river. 


per cent, of the growing stock. 
(b) Natural regeneration. The 


14 Bharnigi ... 
15 Other species . 


'29-7 








nalla. 


(h) Rock and Soil The 


generation is generally fair, that 














soil on the lower ground 


of Blackwood. Teak and Jamba 














is mostly alluvial 


is promising. 














deposit, and is very deep 
and rich. The hilly 


(c) Undergrowth. There are 
many large Dowgi BambooswHoli 














portion is laterite of 


form the undergrowth over the 














inferior quality. 


whole area. A few open grassy 
















patches occur here and there. 
















and Karvi appears in patches on 
















Hoskopgudda hill. 
















(rf) Grazing. Cattle do a pood 
















deal of damage by trampling 
















down the seedlings which have 
















grown up in the open grassy 
















patches. 








20 


729-2 


North.? h e 
Snnksal nalla. 
East. The Gan- 
gavali river. 
South. A. 25 feet 
cut line and part 
of a small nalla 
running into the 
Bedti river. 
West. The Kar- 
war-Yell ap u r 
road. 


(a) Configuration. The 
compaitment lies be- 
tween the main road 
and the river on un- 
dulating hillocky 
ground. It is drained 
by two small nalhvs 
running into the Gan- 
gavalli. The altitude 
of the compartment 
varies between 80 feet 
and 150 feet above 


(a) Growing Stock. With th< 
exception of old cultivated pat- 
ches, here and there, the crop 
constitutes old 90 to 100 feet 
high forest, in places somewhat 
open, out of which most of the 
sound large Matti has been cu1 
leaving many large unsound 
trees. Of Nuna and Jamba some 
fair trees still remain, while 
Kindal, which has practically been 
untouched, shows a high percent- 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound ... 
(b) Unsound . 
2 Nana 
3 Kindal 
4 Jamba 
5 Teak 
6 Sissum 
7 Honni 
8 Heddi 
9 Dhamni 
10 Apta 


4'4 
5-4 
6-9 
206 
16-6 

M 

7 

" -1 
2-2 
6 


Exploitation ia 
very easy, hence 
the former whole- 
sale fellings of 
Matti and other 
species. Karvi is 
the difficulty 
here, with care it 
should be burnt 
directly after 
flowering. Seed- 








M. S. L. 


age of matnretrees. Theyounger 


11 Jambul 


2 


lings will suffer 








(6) Bock and Soil Ike. 
underlying rock is 
laterite With fragments 


classes are poorly re- presented 
except on the old cultivated 
areas mentioned above, where 


12 Womb 
13 Karsing 
14 Bharnigi 


2-0 

4 
8 


relatively little 
by burning as 
they have only 








of quartz and crystal- 
line rock lying on the 


fair pole woods of Kindal, Matti, 
Sissum, Heddi have established 


15 Other species . 


39-1 


appeared in the 
patches where 








surface, having pro- 


themselves mixed with the above 






Karvi is absent. 








bably been brought 


species are many Goting, Karmal 














there from the higher 


Kumbia, Mohi, Saver, Bbarnigi, 














ground by the action 


Kajra, etc., some of which havp 














of water. The soil is 


grown into enormous trees. 














deep and fertile. 


(fc) Natural regeneration. In 
















the somewhat open places seed- 
















lings of Jamba abound, in more 
















open places Kindal with a few 
















Apt a. Womb and Nana bav, 
















established themselves. Were r, 
















not for the dense Karvi in thi& 
















compartment, there can be no 
















doubt the regeneration would be 






* 










excellent. 
















(c) Undergrowth. Dense Karvi 
















nearly everywhere, with scatter- 
















ed small Bamboos. 
















(d) Grazing. L'he grazing if 
















very limited, except of Bison, 
















whn do more good than harm 
















by clipping off the Karvi. 









B 9909 



34 



APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
part- 
ment 
No. 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


21 


759-0 


North. A 25 feet a) Configuration. Very 


Similar to compartment 20 


1 Matti 




The notes on com- 






cut line and part 


similar to compartment 




(a) Souud ... 


9-6 


partment 20 






of a small ualla, 


20, but slightly more 




(b) Unsound... 


1-5 


apply with equal 






dividing it from 


undulating. 




2 Nana 


4-9 


force to this 






compartment 20. 


[b) Bock. Similar to 




3 Kindal 


I!v8 


compartment. 






East. The Ganga- 


compartment 20. 




4 Jamba 


17-6 








vali River. 






5 IVak 


... 








South. A nalla. 






6 Sissum ... 


9 








West. The Kar- 






7 Honni ... 


3 








wa r-Y e 1 1 a p u r 






8 Heddi 


2 








road. 






9 Dhamni 


2-0 














10 Apta 


7 














11 Jambul 


1 














12 Womb 


2-2 














13 Kharsing 


3 














14 Bharnigi 














. 


15 Other species . 


39-5 




22 


633-2 


North. A. nalla. 
East. The Gan- 
gavali River. 
South. A 25 feet 
cut line and a 


[a) Configuration. As- 
pect generally north- 
east turning to east in 
the oast of the compart- 
ment. The grounc 


(a) Growing Stock. The area is 
covered with mature forest of a 
truely deciduous character. The 
Matti, Jamba and even Naua 
have been heavily exploited in 


1 Matti - 
(a) Sound 
(b) Unsound .. 
2 Nana 
3 Kindal 


138 
J-0 

3-8 
lii-8 


The notes given in 
compartment 20 
apply to this 
compartment also. 






nalla. 


rises in the north anc 


the past, leaving many large 


4 Jamba 


23-1 








West. The Kar- 


east from a small nalla 


unsound trees. Kindal on the 


5 Teak 


1 








war-Ye 1 1 a p u r 


and the Gangavali 


other hand has not been exploit- 


6 Sissuni 


1-1 








road. 


River, respectively at an 


ed, so that the whole area is co- 


7 Honni 


2 










elevation of about 65 


vered with many large trees of 


8 Heddi 


2 










feet to a small ridge ol 


this species. Teak is found in 


9 Dhamni 


3-4 










hills 500 feet high in 


very small quantities as a young 


10 Apta 


9 










the south-west. The 


tree in the west, and round the 


11 Jambul 


2 










area is much intersect- 


old cultivations, of which seve- 


12 Womb 


9 










ed with small nallas 


ral patches exist. In the south- 


13 Kharsing 


5 










which run generally 


ern half of the compartment, the 


14 Bharnigi ... 












eastwards into main 


younger classes of Matti, Jamba 


15 Other species... 


34-0 










stream. 


Kindal and to a less extent of 














(b) Rock and Soil The 


Nana are well represented. 














underlying rock is late 


Mixed with the above species 














rite with out crops o 


are some Dhamni, Apta, Womb, 














crystalline rock on the 


Honni and Kharsing, the former 














small hills. The sur 


three species being most com- 














face of the ground is 


mon, while of inferior species 














covered with fragments 


many large trees occur every- 














of rock. The soil is 


where. 














deep and fertile. 


(b) Natural Regeneration. The 
















seedling growth is confined to 
















the edges of the cultivation and 
















more open places. The dense 
















growth of Karvi and Bamboos 
















has, however, completely stopped 
















natural regeneration in mosl 
















places. 
















(e) Undergrowth. Heavy Karv 
















intermixed with patches of dense 
















Bamboo clumps. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing goes on al 
















over the north and east portion 
















of the compartment and also 
















round the old cultivations. 








23 


736-4 


North A. 25 feet 
cut line and a 


(a^ Configuration. To 
the west more or les 


(a) Growing Stock. With the 
exception of a small patch o: 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound .. 


6-2 


Exploitation should 
present no diffi- 






small nalla. 


level ground with a 


evergreen on the south-eas 


(b) Unsound . 


26 


culties. The 






Hast. The Gan 
gavali River. 
South. A. 25 fee 
cut line. 


south and west aspect 
the areii draining ink 
the Hebul Nalla. Tht 
central and easterr 


boundary and another on the 
west, the whole of the area ol 
the compartment . is of a deci- 
duous character, being of better 


2 Nana 
3 Kindal 
4 Jamba . 
5 Teak 


5'7 
11-3 
170 


heavy Karvi 
growth will have 
to be dealt with 
by burning. The 






West. The Kar 
war-Yellapur ant 
Hebul-Pattanpai 


portions of the com 
partment form a smal 
valley, with hills rising 


quality in the east than in the 
west. Some of the large Matt 
' and Jamba have been exploited 


6 Sissuni 
7 Honni 
8 Heddi 


"8 


fallow areas could 
be dibbled over 
with advantage. 






roads. 


to about 500 feet or 


though in places mature trees 


9 Dhamni 


2'5 










each side and draining 


are st.ill to be found. Gooc 


10 Apta 


8 










into the Gangaval 


Kindal is plentiful and to n 


11 Jambul 


6 










River direct. The gra 


lesser extent Nana. Sissum 


12 Womb 


3 










dients throughout tht 


Dhamni, Jambnl, Apta, Khar- 


13 Kharsing .. 


4 










area are moderate. 


sing, Womb, Bharnigi are re- 









35 
APPENDIX Illcontinued. 



Com- 
part- 
ment 
No. 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
aud soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
giowing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 6 


7 


8 








(6) Rock and Soil The 


presented in fair quantities, but 


14 Bharnigi 


6 




- 






underlying rock is la- 


not as large trees, while a large 


15 Other species... 


481 










terite. The soil in the 


percentage of the crop is made 














west is poor, improving 


up of inferior species. The area 














in the catchment area. 


i much intersected by patches 
















of cultivation and on the top of 
















the hill to the north-east there 
















exists a . patch of forest that 
















appears to have been cut over 10 
















or 1 5 years ago. 
















(fc) Natural Regeneration. In 
















the more open places on the 
















lower ground and round the cul- 
















tivation seedling growth of 
















Jambul, Kindal and Matti is 
















very fair, while on the upper 
















slopes and tops of the hills it is 
















practically nil. 
















(c) Undergrowth. Patches of 
















Bamboos and Karvi appear scat- 
















tered on the lower ground, while 
















the hill sides contain a dense 
















growth of high Karvi. 
















(rf) Grazing. In the west, on 














. 


the flat ground and round the 
















fallow land in the centre of the 
















compartment, grazing is heavy, 
















but little elsewhere. 








24 


730'4 


North. A 25 feet 
cut line dividing 
compartments 2; 


(a) Configuration, As- 
pect south. The 
ground, which is inter- 


(a) Growing Stock. A fairly 
large patch of evergreen forest 
occurs in the east but not reach- 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound 
(6) Unsound .. 


16-5 
0-1 


The Local Fund 
Road will make 
extraction easy. 






and 24. 
East and tiouth. 


sected by small nallas, 
slopes gently down 


ing down to the river, otherwise 
the area containsdeciduous forest 


2 Nana .. 
3 Kindal 


4'5 
134 


The presence of 
the evergreen belt 






The Gangaval 
River. 

West. The Hebul 


southwards to the Gan- 
gavali, only in the ex- 
treme east there is a 


averaging 90 feet in height. 
Matti is fairly represented every- 
where, though not in so great 


4 Jamba 
5 Teak 
6 SidSum 


11-4 

"1-2 


in the compart- 
ment is difficult 
to explain aud 


| 




Pattanpar road. 


small hill, the highest 
point of which does not 
exceed 250 feet about 
M. S. L. 
(5) Rock and Soil. The 
underlying rock ig la- 
terite on the lower 
ground with out crops 
of crystalline rock con- 


quantities as Kindal and Nana, 
that is, as far as exploitable trees 
are concerned. Jamba is not 
found here in so great quantities 
as is the case in the more hilly 
compartments. Heddi, Jambul 
and Dhamni are lairly repre- 
sented, even in the higher 
classes, while Sissum as a large 


7 Honni 
8 Heddi 
9 Dhamni 
10 Apta 
11 Jambul 
12 Womb 
13 Kharsing 
14 Bharnigi 
15 Other species.. 


"1-3 

1-4 
3 
6 
3 
3 
3 
48'4 


does not increase 
the value of the 
area. Matti 
growth should be 
encouraged as the 
soil and locality 
are most favour- 
able for its deve- 
lopment. 








taining a high admix- 


tree is conspicuous by its absence. 














ture of quartz on the 


The inferior species are largely 














hillock. The soil is 


represented by big tall trees of 














everywhere deep and 


Goting. Karmal, Kajra and on 














fertile. 


the river banks by Hole-Kawli 
















and Arjun. 
















(6) Natural Regeneration. Short 
















of the evergreen belt and again 
















in the extreme east, the natural 
















regeneration of the better spe- 
















cies is fair, while in the west, 
















where the Karvi growth is heavy, 
















it is poor. 
















(c) Underqroivth. Thick Karvi is 
















found ail along the north bound- 






, 










ary, Bamboos occur on the lowei 
















ground, becoming dense towards 
















the main stream and round the 
















nallas, while evergreen bushes 
















are found in the evergreen belt. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is carried 
















on near the main road and round 
















the Kanjanguli cultivation. 









36 
APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
part- 
ment 
No. 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


S 


25 


585-6 


North. The Va- 
ranjola Nalla. 


(a) Conflgu ratio n. 
Aspect turning from 


(a) Growing Stock. Round the 
old cultivated fields of Sunksal, 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound ... 


12-4 


Exploitation pre- 
senU no diffi- 






East. The Kar- 


north-east to south-east 


in the east of the compartment, 


(b) Unsound . 


4-9 


culties. The 






wai-- Y e 1 1 a p u r 


The compartment lies 


the forests are poor, having been 


2 Nana 


3-4 


grazing will have 






read. 


between two nalllas, 


formerly very badly treated, and 


3 Kindal 


12-4 


to be stopped for 






South. The Sun- 
ksal Uhaimashala 


divided by a spur, 
which forms the west- 


any good Matti there might have 
been has been exploited. On 


4 Jamba 
5 Teak 


20-0 


a cycle ot years 
after fellings have 






Nalla and culti- 


ern half of the area. 


the hill sides deciduous forest is 


6 Sissum 


"i-6 


gone over this 






vation. 


The gradients on the 


found, containing fair Matti, 


7 Honni 





area so as to 






West. A 25 feet 


spur are moderately 


Kindal, Jamba and a few Nana 


8 Heddi 


2 


allow the young- 






blazed line, join- 


steep, while in the east 


Heddi, Jamlml, etc. On the 


9 Dhamni 


8 


er classes to 






ing the north and 


the ground is of an 


upper slopes Jamba is found in 


10 Apta 


8 


become better 






south nallas. 


undulating nature with 


great q uantities, while the crop 


11 Jambtil 


8 


represented. The 








gentle slopes. The 


towards the top of the bill turns 


12 Womh 


3 


Karvi growth 








highest point in the 


to pure' evergreen forest. 


13 Kharsing 


2 


should be reduced 








compartment lies on 


(b) Natural Kegeneration. On 


14 Bharnigi 


t t 


by burning at the 








the western boundary 


the loweii ground in the belts of 


15 Other species... 


427 


proper time, i.e., 








and is 1,300 feet abovt 


forest between the cultivation, 






directly after 








M. S. L. 


plentiful regeneration is strugg- 






flowering. 








(6) Bock and Soil. The 


ling against over grazing, while 














underlying rock is 


the fallow lands have not a 














granite and schists, wif- 


chance of producing seedlings. 














laterite coming to thi 


Locally, in spots less grazed 














surface locally. The 


over the fores-t is gradually 














soil on the lower 


filling up these areas. On the 















ground is deep and 


spur regeneration is extremely 














rich, becoming poorer 


poor owing to the heavy growth 














on the higher eleva- 


of Karvi. 














tions. 


(c) Undergromlli. On the lower 
















ground Karvi is found only in 

















patches, while on the bill side it 
















appears as a dense crop. Bam- 
















boos are scattered sparsely all 
















over the area. 
















(d) Grazing. The grazing is very 
















heavy all over the east of the 
















compartment. 








26 


7980 


North. The Sunk- 
sal Dharmashala 
Nalla and cultiva- 
tion. 
East and Souih. 


(a) Confiffurati o . All 
aspects occur in this 
area. The centre of the 
compartment, is formed 
by a 59 3 feet hill, with 


(a) Growing Stock. The com- 
partment comprises a very 
varying growing stock. On the 
both sides of the 784 feet hill, 
above Hebul, true deciduous 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound 
(h) Unsound . 
2 Nana 
3 Kindal 


4-6 
1-4 
4-6 
175 


Exploitation may 
be somewhat 
expensive owing 
to the hilly nature 
of the ground. 






The Karwir- 


moderate gradients 


forests are found containing a 


4 Jamba 


24-4 


Much could be 






Yellapur road. 
West. The Hebul 


Another hill occurs in 
the south-west rising to 


j. r ood percentage of sound Teak, 
some of exploitable size This 


5 Teak 
6 Sissum 


17 
1-1 


done by improve- 
ment fellings 






Nalla and a 


784 feet and a little hill 


Teak area stretches as far as the 


7 Honni 


1 


with a viow of 






blazed lino in the 


of 388 feet lies in the 


583 feet hill. On the north and 


8 Heddi 


1 


increasing the 






north-west corner. 


angle formed by the 


north-west boundary patches 


9 Dhamni ,. 


1-1 


area under Teak. 








bend of the main road. 


of evergreen forest occur. Along 


10 Apta 


2 










The gradients of the 


the north nnlla fine Matti are to U Jarnbul 


5 










largest hill are in places 


be found, while Kindal, Jamba, 12 Womb 


12 










somewhat steep. The 


Womb. Dhiimni and Nana form 13 Kharsing 


1 










area is drained by 


true high forest of good quality 14 Bharingi 


2 










innumerable small 


nearly all over the area. In the 


15 Oinea species . 


41-2 










nallas running in all 


north-east corner near Sunksal 














directions. 


there is an area of poor forest, 














(b) Bock und Soil. 


formed of Bamboos, Zizyphus, 














The underlying rock is 


and old faulty Matti trees. 














laterite in the north- 


(b) Natural Keyeneration. Re- 














east and schists of 


generation is very fair in the 














varying quality and 


deciduous portions of the 














basalt elsewhere, inter- 


forest especially of Matti, in the! 












cepted with veins of 


lower areas and Kindul, Jamba, 















quartz. The soil is fair 


Womb and Teak on the slopes. 














to good and generally 


(e) Undergrowth. Dense Karvi 














suitable to tree growth. 


occurs on the upper slopes and 
















tops of the hills, the growth 
















being lighter lower down the 
















slopes. Bamboos arc scattered 
















all over the area. 






* 










(d) Grazing. Grazing is chiefly 












. 




confined to the north-east of the 
















compartment, being practically 
















nil elsewhere. 









37 
APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
part- 
ment 
No. 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Kemarka. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


27 


467-2 


North. A 25 feet 


(a) Configuration. As- 


(a) Growing Stock. In the south 


1 Matti 




Exploitation should 






blazed line run- 


pect east turning round 


of the compartment the forest 


(a) Sound 


9'4 


present few diffi- 






ning over the 


the spur to due west. 


is of a rather open deciduous 


(b) Unsound ... 


2'8 


culties. Teak 






summit of the 


The compartment lies 


character and of somewhat poor 


2 Nana ... 


3'4 


wants attention 






858 feet hill. 


on the spur which 


quality. North of Hebul and 


3 Kindal 


W6 


as does the Kum- 






JEWt.-The Hebul 


joins up the southern 


again in two places on the west 


4 Jamba 


14-8 


ri patch on tho 






Nalla and the 


end of the Varanjola 


boundary Teak up to exploitable 


5 Teak 


2'2 


west, where im- 






Karwar-Yellapur 
road. 


ridge and which runs 
down the centre of the 


size occurs. Between the two 
Teak producing areas on the 


6 Sissum 
7 Honni ... 


3-9 


provement fell- 
ings will do much 






South. The Kar- 


compartment. Thf 


west boundary occurs an old 


8 Heddi 





good. 






war-Y e 1 1 a p u r 


south end of the spur, 


" Kunari " area, containing a fine 


9 Dhamni 


3'2 








road. 


touching the main road, 


crop of young Matti. The 


10 Apia 


4 








West. The Ai- 


is about 100 feet above 


slopes of the spur in the centre 


11 Jambul ... 


3 








matti Nalla. 


M. S. level and rises 


of the compartment contain 


12 Womb 


6 








m 


by moderate to steep 


good deciduous forest of Matti, 


13 Kharsing 


8 










gradients to 858 feet 


Nana, Sissuni, Jamba, Kindal, 


14 Bharnigi 













on the northern limit 


mixed with Small quantities of 


15 Other species . 


43'6 










of the compartment. 


Dhamni, Jambul, Womb, small 














The area is drained by 


Kharsing and an average per- 














many small nallas, on 


centage of inferior species. The 














the east into the Hebul 


north of the compartment con- 














Nalla, and on the west 


tains nearly pure Jamba of even 














into the Armatti nalla. 


age, turning in places to ever- 














(6) Rock aiid Soil. The 


green forest. 














underlying rock is of a 


(b) Natural Regeneration. Teak 














crystalline character 


seedlings occur in small quanti- 














containing gneisses 


ties in the Teak producing areas. 














formed under varying 


In more open low lying situa- 














amounts of pressure 


tions Matti seedlings abound, 














and heat, in some cases 


while on the slopes Kindal, Kar- 














approaching shale. 


mal and Womb are the com- 














Quartz veins occur 


monest species in the seedling 














throughout the rock, 


stages. 














while the surface of 


(f) Undergrowth. In the south 














the ground is covered 


little or 110 undergrowth, else- 














with fragments of 


where Karvi occurs excepting in 














stone. The soil is deep 


the north, under the Jamba. 














and suitable to the 


Bamboos are scattered every- 














growth of deciduous 


where, specially on the lower 














species. 


slopes 
















(d) Grasing. Grazing is confined 
















to the sides of the nallas and to 










I 






round the Hebul cultivation. 








28 


577-2 


North. The Kar- 


(a) Configuration. Low- 


(a) Growing Stock. In the east 


1 Matti 




A very easy locali- 






war-Ye 1 1 & p u r 
. road. 


lying undulating 
ground in no case ris- 


fair deciduous forest occurs con- 
taining mature Nana and Kindal, 


(a) Sound ... 
(6) Unsound .. 


3-4 
1-6 


ty to exploit. 
Attempts should 






JSast.-'Ihe Hebul - 
Pattanpur Local 


ing above 150 feet 
above M. S. L. without 


while Matti in the younger 
classes is well represented and in 


2 Nana 
3 Kindal 


9-1 
13-1 


be made to bum 
the Karvi as it 






Fund road. 


any definite aspect. 


older classes by large onsound 


4 Jamba 


13-6 


finishes flowering 






South. The Gan- 


The compartment lies 


trees only. Mixed with the 


5 Teak 


* 


and before the 






gavali River. 


between the main road 


above are a few large Heddi and 


6 Sissum 


T4 


seed ripens. 






West. The Badi- 


and the banks of the 


many large Jamba, Karmal, 


7 Honnl 


1 








gnne or Chattar- 


river, being of a suffi- 


Kumbia, Kosum and other spe- 


8 Heddi 


8 








gadda west Nal- 


ciently undulating cha- 


cies. In the centre of the com- 


9 Dhamni .. 


11-5 








la. 


racter to be well drain- 


partment are many old " Kumri " 


10 Apta 


6 










ed. 


areas and old cultivated patches 


11 Jambnl 


1 










(6) Bock and SoilThe 


now covered with promising 


12 Womb 


2-3 










underlying rock is 


young growth of Matti, Nana, 


13 Kharsing 


1-2 










chiefly laterite, while 


Jamba, Dhamni and Womb. 


14 Bharnigi 


3 










the raised hillocks are 


To the west the forest is 


15 Other species . 


48-9 










composed of a fine 


rather open and contains scatter- 














grained schistose rock. 


ed large trees of the abovenun- 














The soil is deep, especi- 


tioned species, under which 














ally in the depressions. 


many young Jamba have appear- 
















ed. 
















(b) Natural "Regeneration. The 
















seedling stages are, with the BXT 
















ception of Jamba, but poorly 
















represented. 
















(c) Undergrowth. Karvi is plen-r 


. 














tiful everywhere, except in the 
















old cultivated areas in the cintre 
















of the compartment. Bamboos 
















are scattered all over the area, 
















especially along the river. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing in carried 
















on all over the area, but not 
















heavily except perhapi in the 
















vicinity of the roads. 









B 99010 



33 
APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
















part- 
ment 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Confignration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


No. 
















1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


29 


566-4 


North. Karwar- 


(a) Configuration. 


[a) Growing Stock. To the south- 


1 Matti 




Note similar to 






Yellapur road. 


Similar to compart- 


east along the river the forest is 


(a) Sound . 


1-4 


compartment 28. 






East and West. 


ment 28 of which it is 


decidedly poor in places, com- 


(i) Unsound . 


1-2 








The Chuttar- 


a continuation. 


posed of many small Bamboos 


2 Nana 


14-4 








gadda Nalla. 


(b) Rock and Soil. 


and inferior species. To the 


3 Kindal 


9-1 








South. The Gan- 


Similar to compart- 


north-east of the Yekiguli culti- 


4 Jamba 


16-4 








gavali River. 


ment 28. 


vation is a patch of high ever- 


5 Teak 


3 








Wat. A. small 




green forest, which on going 


6 Sissum 


1-2 








nolla and a cut 




towards the east centre turns to 


7 Honni . 











line. 




Jamba and then into fair de- 


8 Heddi 


7 












ciduous forest of Nana, Kindal, 


9 Dhamni . 


7-7 












Jamba, many of which attain a 


10 Apta 


4 












large size. Matti is below the 


11 Jambnl 


1 












average in quantity in this 


12 Womb 


8 












compartment. Sissum, Womb 
and a good deal of Dhamni are 


13 Kharsing 
14 Bharnigi 


5 

3 












found scattered over the area, 


15 Other species 


45-5 












but not of large size. Two 














' 


small patches of Teak occur, one 
















in the centre and the other on 
















the west boundary of the com- 
















partmeut. 
















\l) Natural Regeneration. Teak 
















seedlings are fairly plentiful in 
















the Teak patches, while Jamba 
















seedlings are common in the 
















centre of the compartment, other- 
















wise the seedling growth is nol 
















noticeable. 
















(c) Undergrowth. Karvi is 
















found in the east and west, bu 
















not noticeable elsewhere. Bom 
















boos occur especially in the 
















south-east and all along the 
















river. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is fairly 
















heavy in the south-east anc 
















round the Yekiguli cultivation. 








SO 


614-8 


North. The Kar 
war Yellapu 
road. 


(a) Configuration. The 
compartment lies in th 
angle formed by th 


(a) Growing Stock, The growing 
stock is entirely of a decidnou 
character. Generally speaking 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound .. 
(6) Unsound 


8'8 
1-5 


There is very little 
to exploit from 
this compartment 






East. A smal 
nalla and a en 


junction of the Ganga 
vali and Handimad 


the crop forms promising youn; 
woods of Nana, Kindal an( 


2 Nana 
3 Kindal 


lb'-4 
16-8 


at present. 
Much can be done 






line. 


Rivers. The area has 


Jamba ; Matti is not so we! 


4 Jamba 


10-3 


in freeing the 






South. The Gan 
gavali River. 
West. The Han 
dinaadi Nalla. 


no definite aspect beinj, 
situated on a ridge o 
low hills, the highes 
of which is 178 fee 


represented while Sissum 
Dhamni, Apta, Heddi, etc., arc 
scattered over the area in smal 
quantities, mixed with som 


5 Teak 
6 Sissnm 
7 Honni 
8 Heddi 


14 

3-4 

'"3 


suppressed Teak, 
especially with si 
view of increasing 
the Teak pro- 








above M. S. L. or abou 


large trees of inferior species 


9 Dhamni 


6-3 


ducing nrea. 








100 feet above the river 


Teak occurs all along the sout 


10 Apta 


7 










Towards the east th 


slopes above the Gangavali whic 


11 Jambnl 


1 










ground is practically 

flat. 


together with the Nana poles in 
other places gives the crop a very 


12 Womb 
13 Kharsing 


3 

8 










(6) Bock and SoilT\i 


promising future. A few 


14 Bharnigi 


1 










underlying rock i 


straight Teak of more advancet 


16 Other species 


32-3 










laterite and on th 


age are to be found in the wes 














higher ground muc' 


along the Handimadi River anc 














milky quartz occurs 


a patch of fallow cultivatiot 














The soil is deep an< 


occurs along the main road ant 














fertile. 


another down the centre of th 
















area, innocent of tree growth. 
















(6) Natural Regeneration, Ir 
the Teak producing area manj 
















half suppressed and suppressed 
















seedlings are to be found. Nana 
















Kindal and Jamba seedling 
















occur all over the area. 
















(c) Undergrowth. Ihe under 

















growth is nowhere heavy, patche 
















of Karvi occur here and ther 
















especially in the north and easl 
















while small Bamboos are founc 
















in the south-east of the compart 
















ment. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is confinec 
















to the fallow lands, along th 
















banks of the Handimadi Rive 
















and to along the edge of the roac 









. 

39 


APPENDIX Illcontinued. 


Com- 
















part- 
ment 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


Genera! character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


No. 
















1 


I 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


31 


892-0 


North and West. 


(a) Configuration. The 


(a) Growing Stock. The growth 


1 Matti 




The compartment 






The Handiinadi 


compartment is wedge 


is all deciduous, except for a 


(a) Sound ... 


5-6 


contains few ex- 






Nalla. 


shaped, lying between 


small evergreen patch _of forest 


(6) Unsound ... 


2-0 


ploitable trees, 






East, The 


the Handimadi Nalla 


in the north-west of the area. 


2 Nana 


7-7 


it chiefly requires 






Kendga-Yekiguli 
foot-path. 


and the main road, the 
apex of the wedge 


The growing stock is, generally 
speaking, not yet mature, though 


3 Kindal 
4 Jamba .. 


12-4 

16-1 


time to recoupe 
itself after ex- 






South. The Kdr- 


being at the Han- 


some few large trees of Matti, 


5 Teak 


3 


cessive fellings of 






war- Y a 1 1 a p u r 


dimadi Bridge and the 


Kindal and Sana are scattered 


6 Sissum 


2-0 


large trees and 






road. 


base against the Chat- 


here and there, the best trees 


7 Honndi .. 


... 


trees given on 








tragadda Hill. The 


having already been exploited. 


8 Heddi 


5 


permit, etc. 








ground is flat in the 


The quality of the growth is, 


9 Dhamni .. 


3-7 










west and slightly un- 


however, good, except in the 


10 Apta 


d 










dulating in the east. 


centre of the compartment. The 


U Jambul 


4 










The whole area drains 


percentage of Matti, Kindal 


12 Womb 


1-3 










into the Handimadi 


and Nana is not high, especially 


13 Kharsing .. 


1 










River and therefore 


in the lower 'classes, where it is 


14 Bharnigi 


1 










slightly elopes from 


in defect. Heddi and Jambul are 


15 Other species 


47-2 










south to north-west. 


common on the river banks. 














(J) Roclc and Soil. The 


Inferior species are largely re- 














underlying rock is 


presented, especially in the 














laterite and " murum". 


younger classes. A few scattered 














The soil is good except 


Teak exist on the east boundary. 














in the centre of the 


Old patches of cultivation are to 














compartment where it 


be found here and there in this 














is only of middling 


compartment. 














quality. 


(b) Natural S (generation. The 
















seedling crop is fair to good, 
















Matti seedlings being found ir 
















the more open places, Nana and 
















Kindal in small openings and 
















Jamba nearly everywhere. 
















(e) Undergrowth. The growth 

















of Karvi is nowhere heavy beinj 
















confined to the northern half ol 
















the compartment. Small Bam- 
















boos occur in the east where Teak 
















is found, elsewhere the under- 
















growth is confined to a few 
















shrubs such as Flemingia ant 
















Helisteres Isora. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is carriec 
















on to a small extent all over tht 
















area, and especially in the 










p 






vicinity of the road in the west. 




. 




32 


765-6 


North. T h e 
Kendga Nalla 


(a) Configur atio n. 
Aspect generally north 


(a) Growing Stock. The snutl 
and centre of the compartmen' 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound ... 


1-3 


Exploitation should 
be easy. Much 






and a cut line. 


east except roune 


contain deciduous forest, while 


(b) Unsound . 


5 


can be done by 






East. A nalla 


Chattargadda Hil 


to the north and north-west the 


2 Nana 


6-1 


freeing the 






crossing the main 
road at mileage 
30/3 and a cut 
line 25 feet broad 


where all aspects occur 
In thesonth-west of the 
compartment is situatoc 
the Chattargadda HiL 


growth is semi-evergreen, ap- 
proaching true evergreen. The 
height growth throughout the 
compartment is not over 80 feel 


3 Kindal 
4 Jamba 
5 Teak 
6 Sissum 


7-8 
24-9 
1'7 
1-6 


advanced teak 
seedlings on the 
hill. Creepers 
are doing much 






South. The Kdr- 


rising to 503 feet, the 


and therefore below that of the 


7 Honni 




harm to the 






war- Y e 1 1 6, p u t 


lowest point in the 


lest quality areas. On the 


8 Heddi 


'"1 


growing stock 






road. 


compartment being 


slopes of the Chattargadda Hil 


9 Dhamni ... 


2-7 


and should be 






West. -The Keri 


140 feet above M. S L. 


is a fair amount of Teak contain- 


10 Apta 


a 


cut out at an 






Kendga foot- 


With the exception ol 


ing a few large trees, with thi.- 


11 Jambul 


2 


early date. 






path (cut and 


the hill the rest of the 


species are mixed Sissum 


12 Womb 


1-0 








blazed) and the 
Kendga Nalla. 


compartment is un- 
dulating, ground drain- 


Kindal, Nana, inferior species 
and Bamboos. The compart- 


13 Kharsing 
14 Bharnigi 


1 
2 










ing in the west in to the 


ment contains a fair quantity oi 


15 Other species . 


51-6 










Kendga Nalla and in 


large Nana, though not of great 














the east into a small 


height, Kindal is fairly re- 














nalla which rises 


presented, and Jamba is very 














straight into the Gan- 


plentiful in the north and north- 














gavali River. 


west of the area, where it is 














(b) Rock and Soil. On 


found near as pure forest. 














the lower ground 


The inferior species are largely 












\ 


laterite is found, while 


represented, the most common 














the hill is composed ol 


being Karmal and Knmbia. 














granite and gneiss anc 


(6) Natural Regeneration. The 














veins of milky quartz. 


seedlings are found on the hil 














The soil is fair to good 


sides, in rather larger quantities 














ou the undulating 


than in other similar areas 









40 
APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
















part- 
ment 
No. 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 








ground, heing rather 


Matbi regeneration is good 














shallow and of poor 


locally while Nana and Jamba 














quality on the hill side 


are well represented in the 
















younger stages of growth, 
















especially the latter species. 
















(c) Undergrowth. Karvi growth 
















is not excessive anywhere, 
















small Bamboos are found especi- 
















ally on the hill side and ever- 

















green shrubs, such as laurels, 
















are plentiful in the evergeen area 
















in the north, Creeper growth 
















is heavy everywhere. 
















(d) Grazing GraziEg is not heavy 
















anywhere, being confined to the 
















north boundary and close to the 
















road in the south of the com- 
















partment. 








33 


760-8 


North. A blazed 
line crossing the 
south spur of the 


(a) Configuration' As- 
pect west turning 
round the spur to east 


(a) Growing Stock. With the 
exception of a large patch ol 
evergreen and an old kumried 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound .. 
(6) Unsound 


7-8 
3-9 


The compartment 
contains much 
mature wood, and 






1,009 feet hill. 
East. The Arm- 


The compartment com- 
prises a ridge of hills 


area containing nearly pure 
Jamba on the north-west slopes 


2 Nana 
3 Kindal 


5-3 
13-0 


exploitation 
should not be 






atti Nalla. 


rising down the centre 


and another kumried area on 


4 Jamba .. 


21-6 


very difficult or 






South. The Kar- 


of the area and rising in 


the top of the ridge, the whole 


5 Teak 


4-8 


expensive. If 






war- Y e 1 1 & p u r 


the south from 120 feet, 


of the rest compartment con- 


6 Sissum 


4-4 


burning of Karvi 






road. 


on the main road, to 


tains deciduous forest, the 


7 Honni 


* 


could be taken in 






West. A nalla 
crossing the road 


1,000 feet on the 
north boundary. The 


growth on the east slopes right 
to the top of the ridge is of a 


8 Heddi 
9 Dhamni 


1 

2-4 


hand at the pro- 
per time it would 






at mileage 30/3 
and a cut line 25 


gradients are moderate 
to steep, especially 


very promising nature. In the 
south-west is an old cultivated 


10 Apta 
11 Jambnl 


2 
1 


do enormous good. 
Much can be 






feet broad. 


on the eastern slopes, 


area, above which occurs a patch 


12 Womb 


1-1 


done here in free- 








the area draining east 


of fair Teak forest, another Teak 


13 Kharsing 


4 


in g advanced Toak 








into the Armatti Nalla 


area exists in the north-east 


14 Bharnigi 


* 


growth. 








and west into a small 


corner of the compartment. 


16 Other species 


34-9 










nalla which runs 


The rest of the area is covered 














direct into the Ganga- 


with fine Matti, Nna, Kindal, 














vali Eiver. 


Jamba and Sissum, many 














(b) Sock and Soil. 


of the trees being of large size. 














Laterite is found on the 


(b) Natural Regeneration. The 














top of the hill, which 


natural regeneration of Matti, 














is not a common feature 


Sissum, Kindal and Teak is fair 














in these parts. Else- 


on the lower slopes, in the more 














where gneiss and 


open places. In certain places. 














granite is found, with 


especially in the north-west, 














a large admixture of 


Jamba seedlings are found in 














quartz. The soil is 


great numbers. 














fair to good in quality, 


(c) UndergrowtL Karvi occupies 














even on the tops of the 


a large portion of the area, being 














hills. 


in places very dense. Bamboos 
















are scattered all over the area. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is 
















restricted to in and round the 
















fallow lands in the south of the 












i 




compartment. 








84 


566-8 


North. A 25 feet 


(a) Configu ratio n. 


(a) Growing Stock. The crop 


1 Matti 




There will be little 






cut line. 
Eatt. The Kend- 


Aspect if anything 
south. The compart- 


found in this compartment is 
entirely deciduous. The height 


(a) Sound .. 
(6) Unsound 


7-7 
2-2 


to exploit in this 
compartment for 






ga Nalla. 
South and West. 
The Handimadi 


ment lies on slightly 
undulating ground be- 
tween the area formed 


growth of the older trees indi. 
cates a moderate depth of soil in 
the centre of the area, while the 


2 Nana 
3 Kindal 
4 Jamba 


21 

9-8 
8-8 


some years. 
Natural Rege- 
neration is poor 






Naila. 


by the junction of the 


height growth in the south falls 


5 Teak 


... 


owing to heavy 








Handimadi and Kendga 


considerably below normal, and 


6 Sissum 


4 


Karvi and want 








rivers, the highest 


in places in the north-east Khair 


7 Honni 


t** 


of light, which 








point being 145 feet in 


appears, which in these forests 


8 Hcddi 


1 


could be let in by 








the east centre of the 


at once indicates a poor locality. 


9 Dhamni 


1 


improvement fell- 








area. 


Kindal is plentiful and though 


10 Apta 


1 


ings of inferior 








(l)Eoek and Soil. The 


growing to a fair girth does not 


11 Jambul 


7 


species. 








underlying rock is 


show great height growth. 


12 Womb 


3 










laterite, which comes 


Most of the large sound Matti 


13 Kharsing 


1 










to the surface locally 


and Nana has been exploited. 


14 Bharingi .. 


2-0 










in the south of the 


leaving a large percentage of 


15 Other species . 


656 





41 
APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
















part- 
ment 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Kemarks. 


No. 
















1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 








compa r t m e n t. The 


mature but unsound trees. The 














soil is generally fairly 


inferior species make up a large 














deep though in the 


percentage of the growing 














south and again in a 


Stopk. 














small area on the north 


5) Natural Regeneration. The 














boundary it is very 


natural regeneration of Matti 














shallow. 


is moderate in the north and 
















centre of the area, being poor in 
















the south on account of the 
















heavy growth of Karvi. 
















\c) Undergrowth. The area is 
















covered with Karvi, and Dowgi 
















Bamboos. 
















d) Grazing. Grazing is carried 
















on around the Bellargadda culti- 
















vation and on each side of 
















Shurukbyl? Makigadda track. 








35 


678-2 


North. The 

Handimadi and 


(a) Configuration. The 
western half of the 


a) Growing Stock. The growing 
stock is of deciduous character 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound ... 


8-1 


There is little to 
exploit in this 






Hegar Nallas. 
East. The Handi- 


compartment is formed 
by a small hill rising 


all over the area. In the south 
centre is the Math cultivation. 


(b) Unsound . 
2 Nana 


2-5 
8-2 


compar t m e n t. 
Natural regenera- 






madi Nalla. 


to a height of 460 feet 


while the villages of Honalli 


3 Kindal ... 


16'6 


tion is very good, 






South. The 


while the eastern half 


and Hegar lie on the north-west 


4 Jamba 


19-7 


what the area 






Handimadi Nalla 


of the compartment is 


and south-west boundaries 


5 Teak 


2-7 


requires is strict 






and Honalli culti 


on level ground. 


respectively. The presence ol 


6 Sissum 


6-9 


conservancy. 






vation. 


(b) Bock and Soil 


habitation in and round the 


7 Honni 


... 








West. A blazec 


The underlying rock 


compartment has resulted in 


8 Heddi 


8 








line running 


in the east is laterite. 


continual hacking all over this 


9 Dhamni 


3-8 








straight from the 


The hill, in the west, 


area. 


10 Apta 


1-1 








north-west corner 


is composed of basall 


The crop is generally speaking 


11 Jambul 


5 








of the Honall 


on the lower slopes and 


young. Above the Honall 


12 Womb 


3 








cultivation to the 


soft quartzite anc 


cultivation on the slopes of the 


13 Kharsing .. 


2 








Hegr cultiva- 


hornblende towards the 


hill, occurs a patch of Teak con- 


14 Bharnigi .. 


1 








tion. 


summit. The soil is 


sisting of young trees anc 


15 Other species 


28-5 










poor in the east, where 


seedlings. On the northern slopes 














the laterite in places 


is some fair Nana forest, mixec 














comes to the surface. 


with many Jamba, a few Kinda 














On the hill slopes it is 


and many inferior species. The 














fair especially on the 


east slopes of the hill contain 














northern side. 


some fair young Matti anc 
















Sissnm growth, with many 
















seedlings and small Bamboos 
















The east of the compartment is 
















generally poor, containing younj 
















deciduous forest many Dowg 
















Bamboos and patches of olc 
















cultivation. 
















(b) Natural Regeneration. The 
















natural regeneration in this 
















compartment is in places ven 
















promising. It consists of Matti 
















Sissnm,Teak where Teak occurs 
















in the more open places. Jamba 
















seedlings are plentiful on the 
















top of the hill and on the 
















northern slopes. 
















(e) Undergrowth. The under- 
















growth of Karvi is only loca 
















and not heavy, except in the 
















north-west. Small Bamboos are 
















scattered all over the area. 
















(d) Grazing. The eastern leve 
















portion is heavily grazed. 








36 


612-4 


North and East. 
The HandilLftd 
Nalla. 


(a) Configura t ion. 
Aspect east. Situated a 
the foot of the Siddu 


(a) Growing Stock. The greate 
portion of the area contain 
semi-evergreen, turning in th 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound 
(6) Unsound.. 


6-0 

9 


The area has been 
heavily exploited 
in the past. It 






South. The He 


gadda hill (1,333 feet 


north-eas^ to true evergreen 


2 Nana .. 


6'2 


now wants time 






gar Nalla. 


and stretching down t 


forest, which were probabl 


3 Kindal 


13-9 


to recover. The 






West. A 25 fee 


the Handimadi River 


old cultivated areas. The centr 


4 Jamba 


36'4 


great danger to 






blazed line am 


The elevation at ti 


and north-west of the com 


5 Teak 


... 


this forest is the 






Makigadda cul 

ti vat ion. 


river is 100 feet risin 
by gentle incline to 26 


partment contain pure Jamb 
forest, with a few Nana, Kinda 


6 Sissum 
7 Honni 


4 


ever 1 encroaching 
evergreen growth, 



B 990 11 



42 



APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
















part- 
ment 
No. 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 

* 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 








feet en its eastern 
boundary. The whole 


and some Bharnigi trees scattere< 
here and there and a few large 


8 Heddi 
9 Dhamni .. 




1-1 


which to guard 
against is diffi- 








area drains outwards 


Matti on the banks of the srnal 


10 Apta 


7 


cult. 








into tbe main stream. 


nallas. To the south there occur 


11 Jambul 


7 










(b) Rock and Soil. On 


young deciduous forest of a 110 


12 Womb 


2 










the lower ground near 


unpromising character. To the 


13 Kharsing 


* 










the river the rock is late- 


east along the river, are patches 


14 Bharnigi 


1-3 










rite, while on the wesl 


of evergreen and semi-ever 


15 Other species... 


322 










boundary soft granite 


green intermixed with deciduous 














intersected with veins 


forest. Here some large Matti 














of milky quartz 


Nana, Kindal and many Jamba 














appear. 


trees are iound mixed with 














The soil is deep in the 


inferior species and many Bam- 














east becoming some- 


boos. All sound Ma.ti, Nana 














what shallower to- 


and Jamba hava been exploitec 














wards the west. The 


from these forests. 














soil, however, is 


(b) Natural Regeneration. The 














thronghout favourable 


seedling growth in this area is 














for tree growth. 


chiefly of Jamba, only Matti 
















Kindal, Nana, appearing in the 
















more open places in the centre 
















and east. On the west boundary 
















besides the above species a few 
















Apta, Bharnigi and Dhamni 
















seedlings have established them- 
















selves. 
















(c) Undergrowth. Many small 
















Bamboos occur in the more 












f 




deciduous portions of the forest. 
















Whi re these do not occur Karvi 
















exists, while in the evergreen 
















areas laurels and other shrubs 
















cover the gi ound. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is not 
















heavy being confined to near the 
















Hegar and Makigadda cultiva- 
















tions. 








37 


500-0 


North and East. 
A blazed line and 
the Handimudi 
Nalla. 
South. The Hare- 
guli Nalla. 
WestA 25 feet 
blazed line, a 
branch of Cban- 


(a) Configuration. As- 
pect east and south- 
west above Mafugadda 
cultivation. The com- 
partment forms a 
narrow strip of land 
lying on the lower 
slopes and spur of the 
Torasige Hill, rising 


(a) Growing Stock. The grow- 
ing stock varies considerably in 
composition in this area. Sound 
Matti has been exploited, though 
some Kood trees have been left. 
To the south occurs a patch oi 
evergreen forest containing 
much fine Bharnigi, large Mango, 
Howga, Goting, Kindal and 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound ... 
(V) Unsound ... 
2 Nana ... 
3 Kindal 
4 Jamba 
5 Teak 
6 Sissum ... 
7 Honni 


33 
1-1 
70 
6-8 
2b'5 




Ex ploitation 
should present 
few difficulties. 
In the old Kum- 
ri lands which 
are extensive in 
this compartment 
much can be done 






kani Nalla and a 


from 130 feet at the 


Nana. Between Todasalibail 


8 Heddi 




to improve the 






demarcation line. 


river to 4CO feet up 
the hill side. The 
gradients are gentle in 
the south and some- 
what steep in the 


and Marugadda is some very 
fair high forest and old kumri 
lands, the former containing 
good Bharnigi, Nana, Kindal 
and Jamba, while the latter is 


9 Dhamni 
10 Apta 
11 Jitmbul 
12 Womb 
13 Kharsing 


4 
2 

4 


prospects of the 
partly suppressed 
Nanaaiid Kindal 
poles. If these 
and other valu- 








north, before passing 
through the gorge 
to Chankhani. The 
area is drained by 


covered with young Jamba 
growth intermixed with excel- 
lent Nana poles on tha slopes 
and Matti and Kindal near the 


14 Bharnigi 
15 Other species... 


"2-9 

54-4 


able species re 
not favoured in 
these areas the 
forest will turn 








many small nallas run- 
ning eastwards into 


small nallas. In the Chankhati 
basin are fair Matti, Kindal and 






in time to pure 
Jamba which is 








the main stream. 


a few Nana, of the former 






a stepping stone 








(6) Rock and Soil. The 
underlying rock near 


species many have been already 
exploited. Bound the edge of 






to evergreen 
forest. 








the river is laterite and 


the cultivation evergreen forest 














basalt and quartzite oil 


occurs. 














the slopes. The soil is 


(b) Natural Regeneration. The 














deep along the river 


forest is well stocked and little 














and in the Chankhani 


light let iu so that only shade 














basin and fair on the 


bearers, such as Jamba and 














lower slopes. 


Nana have regenerated. 
















(e) Undergrowth. The under- 




j 












growth is not heavy in this area 
















being restricted to patches of 
















Karvi and a few evergreen shrub?. 
















(rf) Grazing. Grazing is limited 
















to the vicinity of the cultiva- 
















tions of Marugadda and the 
















Chankani basin. 









43 
APPENDIX III continued. 



j.Jom- 
|;part- 
j.:nent 
| No. 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


F 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


I 33 


5 85 '6 


North and East. 


(a) Configuration. As 


(a) Growiny Stock. The grow- 


1 Matti 




Exploitation will 






A 25 feet bluzec 


pect west turning to 


ing stock in the north and on 


(a) Sound ... 


3-5 


present no great 






line. 


south-west in the soutl 


the upper slopes, is semi-ever- 


(5) Unsound ... 


2-0 


difficulties. The 






South. TheHandi 


of the area. Situatei 


green containing many Jamba 


2 Nana 


5-0 


deciduous species 






madi Nalla and a 


on the lower slopes anc 


The stocking is full except for a 


3 Kindal 


7-8 


should be encour- 






small nalla. 


spurs of the Shemi Hil 


bare patch of ground above 


4 Jamba 


40-4 


aged in the Jam- 






West. The Handi 


rising by moderat 


Kanchibail and an area to the 


5 Teak 


... 


ba area, even if 




- 


madi Nalla. 


gradients from 100 fee 


south of the 507 feet hilL In 


6 Sissum . 


'4 


the species have 








in the south to 507 fee 


the south-west and on the lower 


7 Honni 





no present value. 








in the centre of the east 


slopes the forest is of more 


8 Heddi 





The blanks should 








ern boundary. The 


deciduous character, containing 


9 Dhamni 


5 


be dibbled up with 








whole area is drained by 


especially along the small nallas 


10 Apta 


3 


seed of the better 








many small nallas risin| 


and on the more level ground 


11 Jambul 


6 


species. 








westwards to the mail 


some large Matti, Kindal and tc 


12 Womb 


2 










stream. 


a lesser extent Nana. The 


13 Kharsing 













(6) Bock and Soil The 
underlying rock is 


height growth of this part of thr 
forest is fnily normal. Along 


14 Bharnigi 
15 Other species . 


8 

38-5 










basalt and laterite along 


the main stream are scattera 














the rivar, turning to 


large Bharnigi, while Jamba !> 














crystalline rock on the 


the prevailing species through 














slopes. 


out the area. 














The soil is deep in the 


(J) Natural Regeneration. Jam- 














ravines and mora leve 


ba seedlings are scattered pro- 














ground, becoming ra 


fusely all over the area, while 














ther poor on the slopes 


advanced growth of Nana anc 














and especially in the 


Kindal is found in the Jamba 














nortb-east. 


pole woods. Matti seedlings occur 
















in and round the old Kumr 
















areas, now forming more 01 
















less blank patches on the hil 
















side. In the true deciduous area 
















Kindal, Nana and Dhamni seed- 
















lings are found in small quanti- 
















ties. 
















(c) Undergrowth. Bamboo s 
















occur on the lower slopes, with 
















patches of Karvi. Under the 
















thick Jamba pole woods little 
















undergrowth appears, while in 
















the evergreen shrubs and canes 
















occur. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is very 
















limited being only carried on 
















along the banks of the river. 








39 


910-4 


North. A 25 feet 
blazed line am 
the Harueult 
Nalla. 
East. The Han 
gule and Kolge 
Nallas. 
South. A. 25 fee 
cut-line. 
West The Han 
dimadi River anc 
a small nalla in 
the north-west. 


(o) Configuration. As- 
pect south-eat in the 
eastern half and wesi 
and south-west in the 
western half of the 
compartment. Down 
the centre of the com- 
partment running in 
an " S " shape is a low 
range of hills, the 
heighest point of which 
is not more than 450 
feet above M. S. L. 


(a) Growing Stock. The whole 
area contains more or less ever- 
green growth, the central north 
portion being true evergreen 
which gradually changes to 
semi-evergreen intermixed with 
a good many of deciduous species 
towards the south. In the true 
evergreen are found a few scat- 
tered large Matti, Kindal, Nana, 
Goting, Jamba mixed with such 
evergreen species as Howga, 
Bobbi, Mango, Bherendi, eto. 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound ... 
(6) Unsound... 
2 Nana 
3 Kindal 
4 Jamba 
5 Teak 
6 Sissum 
7 Honni 
8 Heddi 
9 Dhamni ... 
10 Apta 
11 Jambul ... 


3-4 

1-4 
6-2 

4-9 
18-5 

'"3 



8 
2 

3 

.0 


Exploitation will 
not be easy from 
these dense 
forests. To do 
anything Jin the 
form of improve- 
ment felling will 
also be diffi- 
cult, as the ever- 
green growth i 
very heavy. 








Innumerable small 


The absence of young trees of 


12 Womb ... 


O 










nallas drain the area 


the deciduous species is here 


13 Kharsing 


... 
d 










eastwards into the 
Kolga Nalla and West- 


very marked. Coming out of 
the true evergreen forest we get 


14 Bharnigi. ... 
15 Other species ... 


O 

64-6 










wards into the Handi- 


nearly pure patches of Jamba, 














madi River. 


mixed with a few trees of the 














(6) RoeTc and Soil. 


same age, such as Nana and 














The underlying rock 


Kindal. Along the Harugule 














in the low lying areas 


Nalla and Handimadi River large 














is laterite, while the 


Nana, Kindal, Matti, Jamba 














hills are composed 


are found, the height growth of 














of a fine grained basalt. 


which is above normal. 














The soil is deep through- 


(1) Natural Regeneration. The 






i 








out 


regeneration in the south-west 
















of Matti, Kindal and Jamba is 
















good, while in the interior of the 
















compartment only Jamba and 
















evergreen seedlings are found. 









44 
APPENDIX III concluded. 



Coin- 
part- 
inent 
No. 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 










c) Undergrowth. Patches of 
















Karvi and a few Bamboos in the 
















south -west, andevergreeu shrubs 
















elsewhere. 
















d) Grazing. Grazing is very 
















limited, being carried on in the 
















west and along the river in the 
















south-east. 








40 


666-0 


North. A 25 feet 
blazed line. 
East Do. 


(a) Configuration The 
compartment covers 
much broken undula- 


'a) Growing Stock. The com- 
partment contains a variety of 
types of forest- In the south- 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound ' 
(&) Unsound . 


3-8 
1-5 




Exploitation pre-J 
sents no diffi-j 






South. A 25 feet 
cut-line and the 
Kendga Nalla. 
West. The Kolga 
and Harugule 
Nallas. 


ting ground, in which 
all aspects'are represen- 
ted, the highest point 
of which rarely exceeds 
250 feet fibove M. S. L. 
The area is drained by 


east, along the foot of the hills, 
and again in the extreme north 
of the compartment evergreen 
forests are found, in which occur 
very large Matti, Nana, Bharnigi, 
Mango and Kindal scattered 


2 Nana 
3 Kindal 
4 Jamba 
5 Teak 
6 Sissum 
7 Honni 


4-4 
6-8 
15-9 

'"2 


culties, judging] 
from the heavy] 
fellings in part.l 
The natural! 
regeneration inj 
the north and! 








the Kolga and Kendea 


here and there. To the north 


8 Heddi 





east is not satis-1 








Nallas. 
(b) Bock and Soil. The 


of Kendga village a good deal oi 
young Jamba forest has come 


9 Dhamni 
.0 Apta 


2-0 

4 


factory, probably! 
the only way to; 








underlying rock is 


into existence on the old F.umri 


11 Jambul 


3 


favour the better! 








chiefly laterite, crystal- 


areas. To the south-west, be- 


12 Womb 


3 


deciduous species] 








line rock only appear- 
ing here and there on 


tween the junction of the two 
rivers, the forest is open, con- 


13 Kharsing 
It Bharnigi 


2 
1-8 


would be to form 1 
small blanks in 








the hillocks. 
The soil is deep every- 


taining inferior species mixec 
with, a few Honni and Matti. 


15 Other species 


629 


the semi-ever-j 
green tracts and! 








where and very wel 


West of the Kendga River the 






dibble thesf! up I 








suited to tree growth. 


forest is of a more deciduous 






witb deciduoui 










character, ont of which many 






species. 










of the large Matti, Nana ant 
















Kindal have been exploited 
















In the neck of the compartmen 
















the forest is semi-evergreen, th 
















large trees of the better species 
















having been exploited in 1905 
















Round the Kolga cultivation in 
















the extreme north the forest i 
















noticeable for its nice patche 
















of young Matti and Nana inter 
















mixed with Jamba and Bharnig 
















forest. 
















(6) Natural Regeneration. Th 
















condition of the regeneration 
















varies greatly. It is good in 
















the south and west portions o 
















the area and very poor in th 
















south-east. 
















(c) Undergrowth. Karvi and i 
















few Bamboos in the west, anc 
















Jamba, evergreen shrubs am 
















canes elsewhere. 


\ 














(d) Grazing. Grazing 5s confine 
















to the vicinity of the cultivatio 
















and to each side of the Suruk 
















bail-Kendga foot-path. 









1 


45 


APPENDIX III continued. 


South of the River. 


BLOCK No. XXV. 


Com- 
















part- 
ment 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


No. 
















1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


41 


442-8 


North and West. 


(a) Configuration. As- 


(a) Growing Stock. With the 


1 Matti 




Exploitation is a 






The Gangavali 01 


pect north-west. The 


exception of a small area in the 


(a) Sound ... 


4-3 


thing of the past 






Bedti River. 


compartment is situ- 


north-east, which contains ever- 


(J) Unsound . 


1-1 


for many years 






East. A cut-line 


ated on the lower slopes 


green forest, the rest of the 


2 Nana 


6-2 


to come. Tha 






between the 


and spurs of the Togi 


growth is of deciduous charac 


3 Kindal 


15-8 


trees exploited in 






Ankola a n ( 


ridge with its north- 


ter. The height growth near 


4 Jamba 


11-6 


1907 were very 






Arbail Working 


west boundary lyinj 


the river and on the lower slopes 


5 Teak 


4 


fine. 






Plan. 


along the Gangaval 


is up -to 100 feet, while on the 


6 Sissum 


1-3 


A little might be 






South and East. 


River. The gradients 


slopes it falls off to 75 feet in 


7 Honni 


1 


done by improve- 






A 25 feet blazec 


are in places steep 


height. On the 404 feet hil 


8 Heddi 


1 


ment felling, but 






line. 


rising from 200 feet on 


in the north a small patch 01 


9 Dhamni ... 


5-3 


far more by re- 






West. The Haro 
ghad Nalla. 


the edge of the Shovkar 
cultivation to 805 feel 


young Teak occurs. The locality 
is a very good one for growth 


10 Apta 
11 Jambul 


9 
3 


stricting grazing 
of the Shovkar 








in the south-east anc 


of big trees, but all the Matti 


12 Womb 


1-6 


cattle. 








750 feet in the south- 


and Nana was exploited in 1 907 


13 Kharsing ... 


9 










west of the area, s 


leaving a very meagre stock oi 


14 Bhamigi 


9 










narrow strip of leve 


young trees of the better species. 


15 Other species... 


49-2 










ground being formed 


Kindal, Dhamni are fairly re- 














along the banks of the 


presented and Matti is scattered 






< 








main stream. 


sparsely all over the area except 














(6) Bock and Soil The 


in the south-east corner of the 














underlying rook on the 


compartment- The area before 














lower ground, near the 


felling contained a mature crop, 














river, is laterite, while 


so that there was little place for 














on the slopes schists 


secondary growth. Now that 














and sandstone occur. 


light has been let in a new crop 














The soil is deep on the 


should soon appear as the under- 















level and lower slopes 


growth is naturally not heavy 














and moderately deep on 


and the locality most favourable 














the hill sides. 


for regeneration. 
















(6) Natural Regeneration. '1 he 
















cut-lines and glades show pro- 
















fuse natural regeneration of 
















Kindal, Nana, Matti, Jamba 
















and inferior species. 
















(c) Undergrowth. Not heavy. 
















Karvi appears in small patches 
















on the upper slopes and clumps 
















of large Bamboos occur below. 
















(d) Grazing. The Grazing is 
















heavy on the level ground. 








42 


6100 


North-East. The 
Haroghad Nalla. 


(a ) Configuration. As- 
pect generally north- 


(a) Growing Stock. The growing 
stock is 01 deciduous character. 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound ... 


4-9 


Exploitation of 
Matti, Kindal and 






South-Eatt.K 25 


west. The compart- 


On the level ground the forest 


(b) Unsound . 


T5 


Nana took place 






feet blazed line. 


ment is situated at the 


attains a height of 90 feet, rather 


2 Nana 


3'5 


in 1908. As in 






South. Th Saga- 
dia Nalla. 


lower extremity of the 
Dorangiri spur, rising 


open in places but the growth 
of Matti, Kindal, Heddi, Nana, 


3 Kindal 
4 Jamba 


24-3 
23-6 


compartment 41, 
grazing is the 






West. The Ganga- 


from 176 feet on the 


Jamba and Sissum is good. On 


5 Teak 


5 


difficulty. 






vali River. 


river to 876 feet on 


and round the 520 fe-t hill 


6 Sissum ... 


1-1 










the south-west bound- 


occurs a patch of young Teak of 


7 Honni 


5 










ary. The ground in 


average quality. Between the 


8 Heddi 


7 










the north-west is un- 


520 and 876 feet hills good 


9 Dhamni ... 


2-5 










dulating to flat, while 


Matti is being exploited in 


10 Apta 


4 










it rises in the south- 


1908. On the rising up the 


11 Jambnl 


3 










east portion of the 


steep slops of the 876 feet hill, 


12 Womb 


3-5 


1 








compartment with stiff 


Matti disappears and a forest of 


13 Kharsing 


5 










gradients to the outer 


Kindal, Womb, Dhamni, Heddi 


14 Bharnigi 


2 










boundary. 


and much Jamba is found, some 


15 Other special . 


32-0 










(b) Rock and Soil. 


of the trees being of large size. 














Laterite is found on 


(V) Natural Regeneration. In 






* 








the lower ground while 


the plain the natural regenera- 














gniess and striated 


tion ig confined to Sissum, Matti, 














sand-stones occur on 


Kindal, Jamba, etc., it being 














the hill side. The goil 


much kept back by grazing. 














is fair to good below, 


On the slopes it is good where 














the hill sides being 


" Chiva " bamboo does not occur. 














poor and rocky. 


(c) Undergrowth. Not heavy on 
















the level ground, scattered 
















Bamboos being found here and 
















there. On the hill side patches 














- 


of dense"Chiva "bamboo growth 
















occurs. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is confined 
















to the flat portion of the com- 
















partment, where it is heavy. 









B 99032 



46 , 
APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
















part- 
ment. 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


No. 
















1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


43 


706-0 


North. The Sag- 


() Configuration. As- 


(a) Growing Stock. The crop is 1 Matti 




Kxploitation in the 






dia Nalla. 


pect generally north- 


deciduous with the exception of (a) Sound 


6-4 


past has been 






East. A. 25 feet 


west. The compart- 


an evergreen area in the north-, (b) Unsound ... 


2'9 


heavy, and eicept 






blazed line. 


ment is situated <>n the 


east and another small patch in 2 Nana 


4-6 


Kindal on the 






South. The He- 


lower slopes of the 


the extreme south of the com-; 3 Kindal 


15-1 


hill side, little re- 






gar Nalla. 


main range, and con- 


partment On and round the 4 Jamba ... 


17-2 


mains to be ex- 






West. The Gan- 


tains three or four 


4EO feet hill is a fairly large 5 Tek 


y-4. 


ploited. The 






gavali River. 


hills or semi-detached 


Teak area, with Some exploitable: 6 Sissutn 


1-6 


locality is a good 








spurs, the highest ot 


trees in it. On the more level 7 Honui 


... 


one, and provided 








which is 611 feet above 


ground to the west, is good 8 Heddi 


4 


grazing is kept 








M. S. L. Towards the 


forest of Matti, Kindal, Jamba' 9 Dhamni 


2-4 


in check there is 








river is a narrow strip 


with a fair percentage of Sisbum, 10 Apta 


1-0 


no feur that na- 








of flat ground. 


Womb, Dhamni and a few 11 Jambnl 


'5 


tural seedlings 








(b) Sock and Soil. The 


Honni, Apta and Nana. Of in-! 12 Womb 


7 


will not establish 








underlying rock on the 


ferior species Karinal and Char 13 Kh.irsing 


3 


themselves in 








river banks is laterite 


predominate. From this area 14 Bhirnigi 


.5 


profusion. 








and alluvial deposits. 


many of the large Matti and Nana 15 Other species .. 


4-3-0 










On the spurs and hill 


have been exploited, the middle 












eides a variety of rock 


aged classes being, however, 1 












occurs, such as schists, 


well represented. On the spurs 












striated sandstones, 


and slopes rough deciduous 












and in places approach- 


forest is found, composed of 












ing a shale or slate. 


Kindal, Jamba, Womb, a few 












The soil is deep on the 


Nana, Kosum and many inferior 












level ground, near the 


species, Matti only being found 












river, consisting of 


in the small ravines. 














alluvial deposits and 


(J) Natural Regeneration. 














laterite soil. Where 


Seedlings only occur on the hill 










p. 




the crystalline rocks 


side where the Chiva bamboo is 














occur it is shallower 


absent. On the level ground 














but favourable to tree 


the regeneration of Matti, Kin- 














growth. 


dal, Apta, is fair and mixed 
















with a few Sissum and Dhamni. 
















(c) Undergrowth. On the spurs 

















dense Chiva bamboos, on the flat 
















ground the undergrowth is 
















practically nil. 
















(a) Grazing. Grazing along the 
















Hegar foot-path and near the 
















cultivation is heavy. 






Exploitation of 


44 


562-8 


North. The Gan- 
gavali River and 
Hegar Nalla. 


(a) Configu ratio n. 
Aspect, north and 
north-west. The 


(a) Growing Stock. On the flat 
ground very fair Matti, Kindal, 
Nana, Jamba forest is to be 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound ... 
(J) Unsound... 


11-6 

3-2 

4O 


the hill sides 
and plateau will 
be difficult. 






East. The Hegar 
Nalla, the cul- 
tivation, a 25 
feet blazed line 
and a nalla. 


northern half of the 
compartment lies on 
flat ground, stretching 
from the Gangavali 
Eiver; | of a mile 


found, though not containing a 
great number of Urge sound 
trees, the large Matti being very 
faulty, and of large Nana there 
are very few. Stretching from 


2 Nana 
3 Kindal 
4 Jamba 
5 Teak 
6 Sissura 


2 
17-9 
25-0 
7-1 
1-5 

.Q 


This is one of the 
richest Teak areas 
in the locality. 
Seedlings of all 
sorts are numer- 






South. The com- 


south- eastward s. 


the 588 feet to the 1,0^1 feet 


7 Honni .. 


l 
-. 


ous on the hill 






partment runs to 
a point. 


From here at an eleva- 
tion of 150 feet the 


hill, on the ridge and slopes Teak 
occurs of all sizes, some of the 


8 Heddi 
9 Dhamni ... 


1 

2-7 


sides and should 
be freed of over- 






South- West. The 
Konal Nalla and 
one of its bye 


ground rises with steep 
gradients to 1,091 feet 
in the south of the 


trees being very well grown. 
On the lower slopes is very fail 
Matti, Kindal, Nana and Jamba 


10 Apta 
11 Jambul 
12 Womb 


"3 

4 
i 


growth where 
possible. 






nallas running 
to the top of the 
Kamrigudda hill. 


compartment, the whole 
area being drained b) 
Godi Nalla, running 


forest, on the middle and 
southern slopes Matti is scarce 
but appears again as a fairly 


13 Kassing 
14 Bbarnigi 
15 Other species 


1 
1 

25-6 










north-westwards into 


well grown tree on the plateau. 














the main stream. 


Jaaaba is found chiefly on the 














(6) Ruck and Soil. The 


northern slopes and in less 














underlying rock to 


quantities on the more western 














wards the river is 


aspects. 














laterite. The hills are 


(b} Natural Regeneration. The 














composed of striatec 


natural regeneration of Kindal 














sandstones and shales 


Jamba, some Teak and inferioi 














and which in place 


species is plentiful on the slopes 














resemble a poor quality 


while at the higher elevation ii 














of slate. 


the Teak area, the seedlings oJ 














The soil is deep on th 


this species are very numerous 














level ground and ver 


more so than in any other placi 














fairly good on th 


in the Ankola forests. Mixec 














hill sides. 


with them are Matti, Kinda 
















and many Jamba seedlings. 
















(c) Undergrowth. The under- 
















growth in the plain and on the 
















hill slopes is restricted to the 
















nalla edges. On the edge of 
















the plateau patches of Karvij 














occur where Teak is absent, ane 
















on the plateau itself Chiva 
















Bamboos ;.re found. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is restrict- 
















ed to the area between the 
















river and the Hegar foot-path 
















where the poorer patches o: 












j 


forest occur. 









47 
APPENDIX Ill-continued. 



Com- 
















1 pavt- 
ment 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
ge. 


.Remarks. 


No. 
















1 


-2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


45 


775-0 


North The Gan 


(a) Configuration. As- 


(a) Growing Stock. In the plain 


1 Matti 




Exploitation should 






gavali River. 


pect east and west 


towards the north-west occurs 


(a) Sound 


3-3 


present no diffi- 






East. The Komi 


The area lies in an angls. 


an old cultivated area, surround- 


CO Unsound... 


7 


culties, the logs 






Nalla. 


formed by a bend o) 


ed by young Matti forest. In 


2 Nana 


80 


being taken 






South. A nalla on 


the Gangavali River 


the north-east occurs a forest of 


3 Kindal 


14-6 


across the river 






each side of the 


To the west is leve 


dense large Bamboos intermixed 


4 Jamba 


19-4 


at Kotha. This 






hill joined by a 


ground reaching down 


with straight scattered immature 


5 Teak 


3 


is one of tbe 






25 feet blazed 


to the river. In the 


Aana, Jvindal, Womb, Dhamni. 


6 Sissum 


34 


richest Nana areas 






line. 


east occurs a ridge of 


inferior species and but few 


7 Honni 


3 


in Ankola. The 






Wet. The Gan- 


hills, running due north 


Matti. The south-west is si- 


8 Heddi 





difficulty is the re- 






gavali Kiver. 


and south and termina- 


milar forest to that in the north- 


9 Dhamni 


14-3 


generation under 








ting to the south, 


east, but the growth is much 


10 Apta 


6 


the heavy Bamboo 








beyond the limits of 


more advanced containing many 


11 Jambul 


... 


growth, the pre- 








the compartment, in 


very fine Nana, Jamba, Kindal 


12 Womb 


3-2 


sent crop having 








the Malapurgndda Hill. 


Dhamni and Womb of great 


13 Kharsing 


1-5 


no doubt come 








The gradients on the 


size and over 100 feet high, 


14 Bhaicigi 


... 


into existence be- 








western slope are mode- 


Matti being conspicuous by its 


15 Other species... 


30-4 


fore the Bamboos 








rate falling fairly ab- 


absence and inferior species re- 






became so heavy. 








ruptly from 778 feet 


latively few in number. The hil 






A seedling year of 








on (he eastern side 


contains good rough deciduous 






the Bamboo will 








down to the Konal 


forest of the above species, bul 






have to be care- 








cultivation. 


the height growth falls off to 






fully watched. 








(6) Rock and So,?. The 


75 feet. Towards the top of the 














underlying ronk is 


ridge a few scuttered Teak occurs 














laterite in the plain. 


(6) Natural Regeneration. The 














while the hill is com- 


natural regeneration under the 














posed of schists and 


dense Bamboo f rest is practically 














qnartzite. 


nil. On the slopes where the bio- 














The soil is deep on the 


bamboos do not occur, Kindal 














flat ground becoming 


Jamba, Nana, Dhamni, Womb 














rather poor towards 


and Kharsing sendlinjrs occur. 














ttie top of the hill. 


(e) Underijrowth. Nil on the 
















level ground, for the huge Bam- 
















boos cannot here be classed as 
















undergrowth and moderate Karv 
















growth on the hill sides. 






- 










(d) Grazing. Grazing is caniei 
















on all over the flat portion o: 
















the area. 








46 


553-2 


North. A tribu- 


a] Configuration. As- 


(a) Growing Stock. With the ex- 


1 Matti 




Exploitation will 






tary of the Konr 


pect generally south- 


ception of a small area of ever- 


(<i) Sound ... 


4-3 


not be easy, as 






Nalla, running 


west. The compart- 


green round the summit of the 


(J) Unsound... 


2-4 the gradients are 






in the north-ea*t 


ment lies on the west- 


Kumrigudda Hill the growing 


2 Nana 


4'4 very steep and 






of the compart- 
ment up to the top 
of the Kainri- 


ern slopes and spurs of 
the Kamrigudda Hill 
(1,200 feet). Thu hill 


stock is deciduous in character. 
All over the northern and east- 
ern slopes of the hill and 


3 Kindal 
4 Jamba 
5 Teak 


16'1 the ground very 
30-) broken. The 
5-8 natural regemra- 






gndda Hill. 


tide is much cut into 


stretching for a short distance 


6 Sis?um 


3-0 


tion is excellent 






East -A. 25 feet 


by deep ravines, the 


on to the plateau, good growth 


7 Honni 


2 


and only wants 






blazed hue and a 


slopes of which are ex- 


of Teak is found some of thr 


8 Heddi 


1 


fostering to con- 






small nalla ririn- 


tremely steep, while 


trees being of exploitable size. 


9 Dhamni 


2'4 vert it into pro- 






ing into Kalesh- 
war cultivation. 


the top of the hill, 
which lies on the north- 


Mixed with these are many 
Kindal, Jamba and to a lesser 


10 Apta 
11 Jambul 


3 mising advanced, 
o growth. 






South. The Kur- 


east of the area, forms 


extent Nara and SUgum, Dham- 


12 Womb 


6 






nap Nalla. 


an undulating plat- 


ni, being represented by small 


13 Kharsing 


2 






West. The Koual 


eau. In the extreme 


trees only. The percentage of 


14 Bharnigi 


1 






and Malapurgud- 
da Nallas. 


south of the compart- 
ment is the Kankan- 


inferior species is not high, the 
prevailing species being Kum- 


15 Other species. 


290 










halli cultivation. 


bia and Karmal. The southern 














(6) Rock and Soil. The 


spur contains practically no Teak, 














underlying rock varies 


the forest otherwise resembling 














greatly, schists, shales 


that described above, but of 












and semi -metamorpho- 


rather more inferior quality. 














sed sandstones forming 


On the plateiu the forest is 














the bulk of the rock. 


somewhat open, fine Kindal 












The soil is deep in the 


Jamba and Nana occur and a 














south-west and on the 


few Matti mixed with inferior 














plateau, being moder- species. 




| 








ate to poor on the steep 


(b) Natural Regeneration. The 












hill sides. 


natural regeneration of Teak. 














Kindal, Jamba on the slopes is 














excellent, while Matti seedlings 




] 










are found in the extreme north- 














west and south-west of the area. 
















(e) Undergrowth. Sea t t e r e d 














Bamboos and light Karvi growth 














is found on the lower lying 














areas, on the slopes the under- 
















growth is practically nil, while 
















on the plateau heavy Karvi, 
















occurs where Teak i absent. 
















In places clumps of Chiva 
















Bamboos occur. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is restrict- 
















ed to small areas in tho north 
















west corner of the compart- 

















mnt. 









48 
APPENDIX Illcontinued. 



Com- 
















part- 
ment 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
Crowing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


No. 
















1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


47 


740-0 


North- Two nal- 


(a) Config uratio n. 


(a) Growing Stock. The whole 


1 Matti 




Similar to those of 






las one on each 


Aspect west turning 


area contains true deciduonn 


(a) Sound ... 


7 


compartment 45. 






side of the hill 


round the Malapur- 


forest. On the top of the hill a 


(6) Unsound . 


3 


. 






and a 25 feet 


gudda Hill to due east. 


few scattered Teak occur. 


2 Nana 


7'3 








blazed line join- 


In the north of the 


The slopes contain rough 


3 Kindal 


12-1 








ing them over 


compartment is the 


deciduous forest of Kindal, 


4 Jamba 


23-3 








the crest of the 
ridge. 


Malapurgudda Hill, 
running north and 


Nna, Jamba, Dhamni, Womb, 
Karmal, etc. Towards the west 


5 Teak 
6 Sissum 


1 
3-7 








East. The Konal 


south down the centre 


is a similar forest to that 


7 Honni 


1 








and Malapur 


of the compartment 


described in compartment 45, 


8 Heddi 


1 








Nalla*. 


finally sha'iingaway to 


containing large Bamboos and 


9 Dhamni 


9-2 








South. The Kur- 


level ground in the 


fine Nana, Kindal, Jamba and 


10 Apta 


3 








nap Nalla. 


extreme south of the 


Womb of great size with but 


11 Jambul .. 


i 








West. The Kan- 


area. The gradients on 


few Matti or inferior species. 


12 Womb 


4-9 








kaiihalli cultiva- 


the lower slopes of the 


In the extreme south the forest 


13 Kharsing 


2-6 








tion, the Kotha 


hill are moderate, 


ia rather open and the height 


14 Bharnigi 










cart-track and the 


becoming steeper to- 


growth falls off considerably. 


15 Other species 


35-3 








Gangavali Biver. 


wards the crest of the 


(i) Natural Regeneration. 














ridge. 


Seedlings are practically nil 














(6) Bock and Soil The 


where dense Bamboo growth 














underlying rock on the 


occurs in the plain and where 














level ground is laterite. 
The hill is composed 


openings occur advanced growth 
of Nana, Jamba, Sissum and 














of a trap, intersected 


Kindal is found. On the hill- 














by a strata of metamor- 


sides the seedling growth of 














phosed striated grey- 


Jamba, Womb, Sissum and 














white sandstones de- 


Kindal is fair to good. 














composing rapidly. 


(c) Undergrowth. Nil on the 














The soil is good on the 


level ground, if the huge Bam- 














lower slopes and rather 


boos are not taken into account. 














shallow on the hill side. 


Moderate Karvi growth is found 
















on the slopes, being nowhere 














\ 


dense and mixed with small 
















Bamboos. 
















(d) Grazing.- Grazing is confined 
















to the sou^h and south-west on 
















flat ground. 








48 


6C62 


North and East. 
The Halvalli Ko- 
tha cart-track and 


(a) Configuration. 
With the excepti' n of 
a low flat hill rising 


Growing Stock. The growing 
stock is entirely deciduous ii 
character throughout the area 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound 
(b) Unsound... 


1-2 

1-3 


Exploitation should 
present no diffi- 
culties. An im- 






the cultivation. 


to 408 feet in the 


All through the centre of the 


2 Nana 


12-2 


provement felling 






South. The Hashi 
Nalla. 


north of compartment, 
the ground is undula- 


area and to the west, along the 
Hashi Nalla, fine Nana, Jambn, 


3 Kindal 
4 Jamba 


]5-0 
19-4 


more i a the shape 
of a thinning is 






We,t,~ The Hashi 


ting to flat. 


Kindal and Sissum forest is 


5 Teak 


... 


necessary in the 






Nalla. 


(6) Bock and Soil. The 


found containing many mature 


6 Sissum 


3-3 


young wood in 








underlying rock is 


trees of up to 100 feet in height. 


7 Honni 


... 


the south of the 








laterite, the soil being 
deep in the centre and 


Matti has been exploited from 
this area, only leaving a number 


8 Heddi 
9 Dhamni 


is-5 


compartment. 








rather poorer in the 


of large unsound trees. Dhamni, 


10 Apta 


... 










north and south oi 


Kharsing and Womb are fairly 


11 Jambul 


... 










the area. 


represented, the whole is mixed 


12 Womb 


2-6 












with inferior species, of which 


13 Kharsing 


1-7 












large Karmal are most noticeable 


14 Bharnigi 


2 












On the 408 feet hill, Jamba and 


15 Other species . 


29-6 












Karwi prevail, while in the 
















south the forest is of a younger 
















age. Here what now looks to be 
















a promising crop of Matti,Kindal 
















Sisscm, etc., has established itself 
















being some 40 feet in height, bu1 
















whether it will ever produce 
















large timber is questionable 
















looking to the shallow nature oi 
















the soil. 
















(b) Natural Keg en e ratio n. 
















Seedlings are found scattered in 
















open places all over the area 
















being most noticeable in the 
















south where fair Matti, Kinda 
















and Jamba reproduction is found 
















(c) Undergrowth. The under- 




, 












growth is very light, except foi 
















large clumps of Bamboos in th< 
















east and high Karvi on ant 
















round the hill in the north. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is con- 
















fined to the south-east of the 
















compartment where it is some 






. 










what heavy. 















49 



APPENDIX III continued. 


Com- 
















part- 
ment 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rook 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


No. 

















' 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


49 


798-0 


North. The Kur- 
nap Nalla. 


(a) Configuration. As- 
pect generally west 


(a) Growing Stock. With the 
exception of a small area of ever- 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound ... 


10-4 


Exploitation of the 
hill side will not 






East. A blazed 


The compartment lies 


green forest on the south top of 


(b) Unsound .. 


4-1 


be easy. 






line chiefly run- 


on the slopes of tht 


the hill, the forest i of deciduous 


2 Nana 


6-6 


The regeneration is 






ning along the 


1,403 feet hill and run- 


character. By the Kankanhalli 


3 Kindal 


177 


not altogether 






Kankan h y p h i- 


ning down to the Hal 


cultivation, in the north of the 


4 Jamba 


24-5 


satisfactory, and 






Muski foot-path. 


valli Nalla t the 250 


compartment, the forest is 


5 Teak 





the reason for 






South, A small 


feet contour line. The 


somewhat open, and signs of 


6 Sissum 


2-8 


this state of 






r.alla starting 


west of the compart- 


former cultivation appear, now 


7 Honni .. 


1 


things is hard to 






from the 1,775 


ment slopes gently 


covered with young Matti forest. 


8 Heddi 


17 


find. The ab- 






feet hill and 


down to the river, while 


All the more level central and 


9 Dhamni 


3-4 


sence of Teak on 






running into the 


the eastern portion con- 


south portion* of tho area contain 


10 Apta 


1 


the hill side is 






Halvalli Nalla. 


tains the steep slopes on 


food, though somewhat open 


11 Jambul 


1 


noticeable, it 






West. The Hal- 


the big hill. The area 


orest of Kindal, Nana, Matti 


12 Womb 


13 


being a locality 






valli Nalla. 


is well drained by in- 


Jamba and largo Heddi, mixed 


13 Kharsing 


7 


suited to the 








numerable small nallas 


with many Ka/mal and Knmbia 


14 Bharnigi 





species, except 








running into the main 


the height growth is, however, 


15 Other species. . 


26-5 


for the fact that 








stream. 


reduced by the moderately 






the underlying 








(b) Sock and Soil. The 


shallow soil in this locality 






rock is laterite. 








underlying rock is late- 


Many large Heddi and Matti 














rite to the top of the 


have bfen exploited from this 














hill. Such a formation 


area. On the hill side is founc 














is curious as elsewhere 


rough deciduous forest of Kindal. 














in Ankola a strata o 


Nana, Sissum, .Dhamni, Honni 














metaraorphic crystalline 


Kossura with much .Jamba in 














rock is generally founc 


planes, especially on the uppei 














lying between the low 


and southern slopes. Very fine 














lying laterite and the 


Nana exists on the spur above 














upper layer forming 


Kankanhalli, while on the top oi 














the top of the ghats. 


the hill a few large Honni and 














On a spur in t lie south 


Nana ocuur. 














schistose rock occurs 


(b) Natural Regeneration. Fair 














locally. 


regeneration of Kindal, Sissum 
















Jamba, Dhamni, Apta, etc., on 
















the hill sides, and Matti, Kindal 
















Jamba and a few Heddi on the 
















more level ground. 
















(r) Undergrowth. S c a 1 1 e r e c 
















clumps of Bamboo and littlaweec 
















growth on the flat ground ant 
















Karvi with Ohiva bamboos on 
















the slopes. 








50 


667-6 


North. A small 


(a) Configuration. All 


(a) Growing Stock. The growing 


1 Matti 




Exploitation will 






nalla coming 


aspects are found in 


stock is deciduous, except for a 


(a) Sound 


8-9 


not be cheap from 






down from the 


this area. The com- 


small patch of evergreen in the 


(b) Unsound... 


16 


this compartment 






1,775 feet hill. 


partment lies towards 


south-east on and round the 


2 Nana 


5-7 


as it lies far from 






Kast.A 25 feet 


the top end of the 


summit of the 809 feet hill 


3 Kindal 


16-3 


the main road 






blazed line. 


Halvalli-Kamani valley, 


North of the Halvalli cultiva- 


4 Jamba .. 


15-8 


and Gangavali 






South. The Ma- 


much intersected by 


tion is fair deciduous forest 


5 Teak 


1 


River. The ex- 






danmani Nalla 


strips of cultivation in 


containing some large Kindal 


6 Sissum 


1-4 


cessive grazing 






on the east of the 


the centre and stretch- 


and Nana and a few Matt . 


7 Honni 


1 


between the Hal- 






main stream and 


ing not higher than 800 


Between Halvalli and Unchalli 


8 Heddi 


1 


valli and Unchalli 






a small nalla on 


feet up the hills on 


the forest is of poor character, 


9 Dhamni ... 


1-6 


valleys together 






the west. 
West A 25 feet 


both sides of the valley. 
The area is drained hy 


especially on the slopes. Between 
the Unchalli and Kamani culti- 


10 Apta 
11 Jambul ... 


2 

2 


with petty pack- 
ing has partly 






blazed line and 


the Halvalli Nalla and 


vations, on the lower slopes of the 


12 Womb 


5 


destroyed the 






cultivation. 


by its many small byp 
streams, the gradients 


TJrby Igadda Hill, very fair Matti, 
Kindal and Jamba forest exists, 


13 Kharsing ... 
14 Bharnigi 


7 
3 


forest in this 
locality. 








being moderate to 


with a patch of similar forest 


15 Other species . . 


46-5 










steep in the east and 


directly after crossing the river 














west of the compart- 


westwards. The 704 feet hill on 














msnt and gentle else- 


the west of the river, contains 














where. 


rough deciduous forest of no great 














(b) Bock and Soil. 


value. 














The underlying rock is 


(6) Natural Regeneration. 














laterite with out crops 


Regeneration is fair to good in 














of crystalline rock on 


the south and on the slopes and 


I 












the upper slopes. 


decidedly poor in the centre oi 














The soil is deep round 


the compartment. 














the river and moder- 


(c) Undergrowth. Sc a 1 1 e r e d 














ately so on the slopes. 


clumps of Bnmboo occur on the 
















flat ground, Karvi on the slopes 
















and between Unchalli and 
















Kamani valleys. 
















(d) Grazing. ~&\\ over the flat 
















portion being heavy round the 
















cultivations. 









B 990-13 



50 
APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
part- 
ment 
No. 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 

and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


1 


| 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


51 


694-8 


N o r t h T h e 


(a) Configuration. As- 


(a) Orowing stock. The growing 


1 Matti 




Exploitation on 






Hasbi Nalla. 


pect east to north-east 


stock is of deciduous character, 


(a) Sound .. 


14-2 


the whol should 






East The Hal- 


and west. The area 


except for a small area of ever- 


(b) Unsound 


32 


present no serious 






vail i Nalla. 


lies at the foot and on 


green forest in the extreme 


2 Nana 


6-3 


difficulty. Syste- 






South. A smal 


the lower slopes of the 


north-west of the compartment. 


3 Kindal 


153 


matic cutting 






nalla north o: 


Kotegudda hill (1,841 


In the north of the area and 


4 Jamba 


24 9 


of Bamboos is 






the 704 feet hill. 


feet) and extends from 


again between the hill slopes 


5 Teak 


1 


necessary in the 






West. A 25 feet 


the west side of the 


and small ridge, good forest 


6 Sissum 


2-1 


north of the area. 






blazed line. 


Halv^lli cultivation, 


occurs, containing large Matti 


7 Honni 


3 


A good deal of 








on the south to the 


and Kindal, the latter species, 


8 Heddi 


2 


thinning of the 








Hashi Nalla in the 


however, is much subject to 


9 Dhamni 


3-2 


inferior species 








north. Between the 


" water-blister." A few Nana 


10 Apta 


1 


is necessary, with 








foot of the main range 


and many large inferior species 


11 Jarnbul 


... 


the object of 








and the river, and 


as found in these localities and 


12 Womb. 


1-9 


improving the 








running parallel to 


creepers are very numerous in 


13 Kharsing 


1-1 


natural regenera- 








both, is a low ridge 


the northern area. The ridge 


14 Bharnigi 


... 


tion. 








not exceeding 235 feet 


contains rather poor deciduous 


15 Other species . 


27-1 










in height. The gradi- 


forest, improving on the lower 














ents are gentle to 


and eastern slopes towards the 














moderate, the ground 


Halvalli river. The slopes of the 














being nearly flat in the 


main range of hills contain fair 














northern portion of the 


Matti forest lower down, mixed 














compartment 


with patches of good Kindal, 














(b) Sock and Soil. 


Nana and Womb, while on 














The underlying rock 


rising up the slopes Jamba be- 














on the level-ground and 


comes the prevailing species. 














in the valleys is late- 


In the ravines in the north-west a 














rite, while the hill sides 


large number of "Tali Palm" 














are composed of shale, 


seedlings have established them- 














gneiss and partially 


selves. 














metamorphosed sand- 


(b) Natural regeneration. The 














hyple stones. 


regeneration except of Jamb* is 














The soil is deep in the 


for some reason poor in this 














valley and in the north 


locality, in spite of the under- 














of compartment, fair 


growth not being heavy. It is 














on the slopes and rather 


true, Matti and Kindal seedlings 














poor on the ridge. 


have established themselves on 
















the lower lying areas, but not in 
















sufficient number to assure the 
















future of the forest. 
















(c) Undergrowth. Generally not 
heavy, being limited to clumps 
















of Bamboos especially on th 
















ridge and in the north, and to 
















patches of Karvi and scattered 
















Kuda elsewhere. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is limited 
















to an area along the river and to 
















the neighbourhood of the Hal- 
















Vftlll C lilt lYB fcl.011 








52 


6570 


North. The Ha- 
ul) ol Nalla and a 
part of a 25 fee' 


(a) Configuration. As- 
pect south-east through- 
out. 


(a) Growing stock. The grow- 
ing stock is entirely deciduous. 
The forests are good, east of the 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound .. 
(b) Unsound . 


16.4 
4-8 


Exploitation from 
the upper slopes 
will be costly 






cut-line. 
Hast The Ha- 

T_ i TIT 11 


The compartment lies on 
the south-east slope, at 


Malegaon-Bidralli foot-path, 
where large Matti, of which 


2 Nana 
3 Kindal 


2-0 
10-3 


but probably 
remunerative on 






shol Nalla. 
South. A blazec 


the northern and of the 
Bidralli- Dongri hill 


many are attacked by " water 
blister " Kindal and to a less 


4 Jamba 
5 Teak 


17-8 
1-4 


account of ths 
Teak to be ex- 






nalla coming 
down from th( 


and stretches down to 
the Hashi Nalla. The 


extent Nana and Jamba are 
found. West of the above foot- 


6 Sissum 
7 Honni 


2-2 
4 


ploited. 






1,144 feet hill 


gradients in the easl 


path, on the hill sides the height 


8 Heddi 


3 








and joining the 
Hashol Nalla. 
West. A 25 feet 


are gentle, rising from 
1 58 feet at the junction 
of the Hashi and Gan- 


growth falls off considerably and 
the forest becomes more open. 
It contains Teak up to trees of 


9 Dhamni 
10 Apta 
11 Jambnl 


1-1 
4 

o-o 








cut line on the 
. _j * . . 


gavali Eivers, in the 


exploitable girth, mixed with 


12 Womb 


T7 








ridge of the 
Bidralli Hill. 


north-east, to 1,144 feel 
in the south-west corner 


Jamba, Matti, Kindal, a few 
Honni, Womb and many inferior 


13 Kharsing 
14 Bharnigi 


4 










of the compartment 


species, the forest being some- 


15 Other species . 


40-8 










the gradients being 


what, open in places. 














very steep towards the 


(b) Natural regeneration. The 














crest of the ridge. 


seedling growth on the slopes 














(b) Bock and Soil . The 


is good and many Teak are 














underlying rock is 


present. East of the Malgaon 














latent* near the Hashi 


foot-path, where the forest is 














River, while the hill is 


denser, Jamba seedlings prevail. 














formed of basalt ant 


(e) Undergrowth.^-^, few scat- 














quartzite. The soil is 


tered clumps of Bamboo occur 














deep in the east becom- 


on the more level ground. 














ing very shallow on the 


Grass is found on the slopes and 














upper slopes, when 


higher up a light growth of 














sheet rock often appears 


tr * 

Karri. 














on the surface. 


(rf) Grazing. Grazing is con- 
















fined to the vicinity of the 
















Malgaon cultivation. 









51 



APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
prt- 
ment 
No. 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


53 


730-0 


North. A nalla 
coming down 
from the top of 
the 1,144 feet hill 


(a) Configuration, As- 
pect south-east and 
north-west. The area 
lies on the south-east 


(a) Growing stock. The growth 
is of deciduous character through- 
out. Generally speaking the 
forests in this compartment are 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound ... 
(6) Unsound . 
2 Natm 


7'8 
9 
4'2 


There .ire practi- 
cally no trees in 
this compartment 
of any present 






and running 


slopes of the Dongri 


extremely poor, due to the 


3 Kiudal 


15-6 


value. 






through the Mal- 


ridge and also com- 


shallow soil, which is also res- 


4 Jamba ... 


28'8 








gaon cultivation 


prises the western 


ponsible for the poor height 


5 Teak 


... 








and a portion of 


spur of 1,560 feet hill 


growth. At the summit 


6 Sissum ... 


3-9 








the ridge line. 


above Malgaon village. 


of the Dongri hill a few scatter- 


7 Honni 


... 








East. The Mal- 


The gradient* on both 


ed Teak occur, of poor growth. 


8 Heddi 


1 








gaon cultivation, 


sides of the valley are 


The hillside is poorly stocked 


9 Dhamni 


7-0 








the Malgaon- 


very steep, rising to 


with stunted Matti, Kindal, 


10 Apia 


3 








Dongri foot-path 


1,324 feet on the 


Dhatnni, Sissum, Jamba, a few 


11 Jam Ira 1 ... 


2 








and iii the south- 


Dongri ridge. There 


Nana and inferior species, which 


12 Womb 


4 








east a 25 feet 


is no ground that 


improve in growth towards the 


13 Kharsing 


3 








blazed line. 


could be termed flat 


valley, though the height growth 


14 Bharnigi 


... 








South and West. 


throughout the area. 


is nowhere* normal. To the 


15 Other species . 


30-5 








Two nail as, one 


(6) Rock and Soil. The 


south of the Dongri-Malgaon 












on the south com- 


underlying rock in the 


foot-path, on the spur below the 












ing down from 


ravine is laterite, the 


1,560 feet hill, matters improve 












the 9151 feet hili 


Dongri hill being of 


somewhat on the lower slopes, 












to the east end o) 


basalt and quartzite, 


as the height growth improves 












tha Dongri culti- 


while the south slopes 


and the stocking is fuller, but 












vation, and the 


are formed of granites, 


even here the growth is not 1st 












other one coming 


schists, and what 


class. 












down the south 


appears to be a rock of 


(4) Natural regeneration. The 












slopes of the 


olivine character. 


natural regeneration is fair, 












Dongri ridge. 


The soil on both slopes 


consisting chiefly of Jamba and 














is extremely shallow 


Dhamni. 














and covered with loose 


(c) Undergrowth. Small Bam- 














stones, while the rock 


boos are very numerous on the 














often appearing on the 


slopes, while grags occur in 














surface. 


places and in others Karvi, 
















especially on the southern spur. 
















(d) Grazing. Practically nil. 








64 


590'0 


North and West. 
The Gangaval 


(a) Configuration. As- 
pect north-west. The 


(a) Growing stock. Between 
the river and the Malgaon foot- 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound ... 


9-7 


It will be difficult 
to exploit the 






River. 


area lies between the 


path an area containing poor 


(6) Unsound... 


4-8 


slopes owing to 






South-east. T h e 


Gangavali Eiver am 


stunted growth occurs, and 


2 Nana ... 


5-3 


the stiff gradient 






ridge line. 


the crest of the Bidrall 


though full of Matti, its future 


3 Kindal 


14-7 


and loose stonei 






S out h-w e it. J 


ridge. Towards the 


is not hopeful. The whole of 


4 Jamba ... 


163 








nalla coming 


river the ground slopes 


the slopes are covered with Teak, 


5 Teak 


3-8 








do.vn from the 


gently to the north- 


though few aroof exploitable size, 


6 Sissum ... 


1-7 








1,144 feet hill and 


west, but rises with 


as from the stumps it appears 


7 Honni ... 


fj 








the Bidralli cul 


steep gradients from 


the large trees were exploited 


8 Heddi 


6 








tivation, also a 


the 200 feet contour 


many years ago. Mixed 


9 Dhamni ... 


6-7 








small bit of a 25 


line to l,03Tfeet on the 


with the above species are many 


10 Apta 


7 








feet en t -line. 


crest of the ridge. The 


large Kindal and to a less extent 


11 Jambul 













face of the hill side i 


Matti, Heddi, Nana, Jamba, 


12 Womb 


8 










intersected by innnmer 
able small nallas wlvicl 


Sissum, Womb, small Kharsing 
and a fair number of Dhamni, 


13 Kharing 
14 Bharnigi ... 













run into the main 


the forests being of better quality 


15 Other species . 


34-7 










stream. 


on the middle slopes than to- 














(6) Bock and Soil. The 


wards the crest of the hill. 














underlying rock on 


(J>) Natural regeneration. The 














the hill is basalt anc 


regeneration is fair to good al 














quartzite. The soil is 


over the area. Matti seedlings 














fair on the middle 


are found on lower elevations 














slopes, becoming some 


while many Teak and Nana 














what shallow toward! 


have established themselves on 














the top of the hill anc 


the middle and upper slopes 














covered with loose 


The percentage of trees in the 














stones. Towards the 


pole stage is very low for al 














river the soil is hart 


species, even of Jamba. 














and unfavourable to 


(c) Undergrowth. Not heavy 














tree growth. 


anywhere. Bamboo clump 
















occur on the lower ground am 


h 














patches of Karvi nnd Chiva 
















bamboo exist on the slopes. 
















(d) Q-razing. Grazing is confined 
















to the area between the rivei 
















and the Malgaon foot-path. 









52 
APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
part- 
ment 
No. 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 

and soil. 

* 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 

growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Eemarks. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


56 


642-8 


North-west. f h 


(a) Configu ratio n. 


(a) Growing stock. With the 


1 Matti 




Similar remarks 






Gangavali River 


Similar to compart 


exception of a small area covered 


(a) Sound ... 


16-3 


apply to this com- 






No rth-eas t. A 


ment 54. 


with evergreen forest on the 


(i) Unsound... 


3-1 


partment to those 






nalla running 


(b) Bock and Soil. 


middle slopes, near the north- 


2 Nana 


2-0 


made for com- 






down from th 


Similar to compart- 


east boundary, formed by a 


3 Kindal 


11-6 


partment 54. 






1,144 feet hill, the 


ment 54. 


spring which supplies the 


4 Jamba 


12-7 








Bidralli cultiva 




Bidralli village with water, the 


6 Teak 


1-2 








tion and a bit o 




forests are similar to those 


6 Sissum 


12 








a 25 feet cut-line 




described in compartment 54, 


"7 Honni 


10 








South-east. T h e 




the percentage of inferior species 


8 Heddi 


2 








ridge line. 




being high. 


9 Dhamni ... 


ID 








So u t h-w e s t. A 






10 .Apta 


3 








nalla. 






11 Jambul ... 


2 














12 Womb 


2 














13 Kharsing 


1 














14 Bhainigi ... 


... 














15 Other species 


48-0 












i 








56 


793-2 


North-east. f h 


(a) Configuration. As- 


(a) Growing stock. The grow- 


1 Matti 




Exploitation will 






nallas one on eacl 


pect north turning to 


ing stock is all of deciduous 


(a) Sound .. 


9'7 


present no great 






side of the ridge. 


south- east. 


character. The whole of the 


(V) Unsound .. 


4-8 


difficulties as the 






South-east. T h 


The area contains the 


upper slopes contain Teak, 


2 Nana 


22 


upper slope con- 






Eomdi Nalla. 


south end of the 


though few exploitable trees are 


3 Kindal 


11-6 


tains no large 






West. The Gan 


Bidralli-Dongri ridge 


to be found. On the middle 


4 Jamba 


24-2 


trees and only on 






gavali Biver. 


Towards the main river 


and western slopes fair Matti, 


5 Teak 


2-2 


the lower slupes 








and again along the 


Kindal and Jamba forest exists, 


6 Sissum 


3-1 


is there much to 








Eomdi Nalla, in the 


mixed with scattered, Sissnm, 


7 Honni 


7 


exploit. The poor 








south, the ground is 


Honni, Dhamni, Womb, Nana 


8 Heddi 


3 


state of the forest 








level, soon rising from 


and inferior species. On the 


9 Dhamni 


2'2 


along the river 








each side of the spur 


upper western slopes and again 


10 Apta 


2 


banks is hard to 








at an elevation of 75 


far down the eastern slopes the 


11 Jambul . 


... 


explain, the wood 








feet to 1,300 feet, on 


forest is open and the growth 


12 Womb 


6 


is young no 








the crest of the ridge 


poor. Along the main river 


13 Kharsing 


5 


doubt, and subject 








the gradients each side 


and in the extreme south of the 


14 Bharnigi 


M 


to grazing and 








of the spur being 


area, on the flatter ground, the 


15 Other species 


37-7 


bad treatment but 








extremely steep and or 


growth, though fairly dense, is 






even there the 






V 


the south side precipi- 


extremely poor. 






trees do not 








tous. 


(b) Natural regeneration. Fair 






appear to have a 








(6) Bock and Soil. The 


seedling growth is found on 






vigorous growth. 








underlying rock is 


the lower ground, though the 














laterite in the south 


soil is so hard here that its future 














the slopes being f ormec 


is doubtful. A fair number of 














of basalt and quartsite 


seedling of Teak, Hssum, Jamba, 














The soil in the south 


Kindal, etc., are to be seen on 














though of fair depth 


the western slopes between the 














is hard, while on the 


patches of Karvi. 














hill side it is shallow 


(e) Undergrowth. Small Bam- 














the rock coming to the 


boos are scattered over the lower 














surface in places. 


lying areas, while large patches 
















of Karvi and Chiva bamboos 
















occur on the slopes. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is confined 
















to the flat areas only. 








57 


792-4 


North. The 


(a) . Configuration. As- 


(a) Growing stock. The grow- 


1 Matti 




Exploitation will 






Eomdi Nalla. 


pect west. The west 


ing stock is deciduous, with the 


(n) Sound ... 


16-3 


present no diffi- 






East. A 25 feet 


ern half of the compart 


exception of small semi-ever- 


(b) Unsound 


3-4 


culties. 






blazed line. 


ment lies on flat to 


green patches in the upper 


2 Nana 


1-6 


With the exception 






South. TheKumti 


undulating ground neai 


ravines. The whole of the 


3 Kindal 


13-4 


of portions of the 






mali Nalla anc 


the Gangavali Biver 


central portion is extremely 


4 Jamba 


19-4 


slopes the forest 






a outline. 


while in the east the 


poor, forming at present nothing 


5 Teak 





is very backward 






West. The Qan- 


compartment is formed 


more than exaggerated scrub 


6 Sissum 


1-3 


and little timber 






gavali River. 


of the lower slopes 


jungle. Towards the river 


7 Honni 


8 


is fit for exploi- 








and spurs of the Koti- 


matters improve, but even here 


8 Heddi 


4 


tation. 








gudda Hill. The 


the forest is hardly of normal 


9 Dhamni ... 


9 










gradients in the hill 


quality. The slopes contain 


10 Apta 


3 










portion are moderate to 


very fair forest of Nana, Kindal 


11 Jambul 


... 










steep and rising from 


and Jamba with fair patches of 


12 Womb 


3 










about 100 feet in the 


Matti, especially on the lower 


13 Kharsing 


2 










plain to 900 feet on the 


slopes, mixed with the above 


14 Bharnigi 


... 










eastern boundary. 


species are a few Sissum, Womb, 


15 Other species . 


41'7 










(V) Bock and SoU.Tho 


Dhannd and a number of large 














underlying rocfc in the 


inferior species, such as Karmal, 














plain is laterite, while 


Goting, Kumbia, etc. The 














that of the slopes is 


deciduous forest here stretches 














granite and schists. 


in places far up the slopes, but 














The soil is shallow both 


after crossing the 900 feet 














on the flat ground and 


contour line it becomes of very 














on the elopes and 


inferior quality. 









53 
APPFNDIX Illcontinued. 



Com- 
part- 
ment 
No. 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Bemarks. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 








covered with " loose 


(b) Natural regeneration. In 














stones and boulders. 


the plain some Matti, Kindal 
















and Nana seedlings are to be 
















found and to a less extent on the 
















slopes, where however Jamba 
















regeneration is good. 




. 












(c) Undergrowth. Bamboos are 
















found scattered all over the 
















area, and on the slopes Karvi in 
















moderate quantities and rather 
















locally. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is carried 
















on all over the plain and 
















especially near Don^ri where 
















grazing and packing are 
















responsible in a great measure 
















for the present wretched condi- 
















tion of the forest. 








8 


624-4 


Nor t h.~ The 
Kumtimali Nalla 
and a cut line. 


(a) Configur at ion. 
There is no definite 


(a) Growing' stock. The whole 
of the north-east of the compart- 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound .. 


13-0 


E xploitation 






East . T h e 
Dongri-Kanchan- 
keri foot-path, 
which is blazed 
on both sides. 


aspect in this area, it 
being an undulating 
strip of land along the 
east bank of the Gan- 
gavali River. It 


ment contains very poor forest 
indeed, with an average height 
of not over 20 feet, broken np 
by large blanks. The specie* 
which constitute thin poor 


(5) Unsound 
2 Nana 
3 Kindal 
4 Jamba .. 
5 Teak 


22 
4-2 
156 
18-1 


should be easy. 
A strong im- 
provement felling 
is very needful 
in the south and 






South. T h e 
Hegarni Nalla. 
West. The Gan- 


drains south-west bv a 
small stream called the 
Kumtimali Nalla, 


growth are stunted Matti, Kindal, 
Jamba, Khair, Bor, Char, Hirda, 
etc. The south and western 


6 Sissnm 
7 Honni 
8 Heddi .. 


"9 
9 
4 


west where owing 
to want of light 
the natural re- 






gavali Kiver. 


which runs down the 
centre of the area. 


portions of the area contain 
forest varying between 1st and 


9 Dhamni 
10 Apta 


3-1 
3 


generation is 
poor. The Karvi 








(b) Rock and Soil The 


2nd quality. Here Matti, 
Kindal, Jamba of fair growth 


11 .1; ill l!i ill 

12 Womb 


1 
1-fl 


will have to be 
burnt after the 








underlying rook is 


exist, mixed sparingly with 


13 Kharsing 


4 


seed is formed 








laterite with outcrops 


Nana of no great size, Honni, 


14 Bharnigi 




and before it 








of basalt and gneiss. 

mi '1 


Dhamni, Womb and inferior 


15 Other species . 


89-3 


drops. 








The soil is very 


species. 














shallow, especially in 


(b) Natural Regeneration. As 














the north, where out- 


is usual in such areas the natural 














crops of rock are 
frequent, in the south 


regeneration in the poor open 
forests in the north-east is good, 














round the Donibai! 


though the prospect of such 














Nalla, the soil is some- 


seedlings is poor ; while in the 














what deeper. 


south and west, where better 
















forest exists and the stocking is 
















full, only Jamba and Shade 
















bearing seedlings are to be 
















found. 
















(a) Undergrowth. Practically nil 
















in the north-east, while fairly 
















heavy Karvi growth exists else- 




. 












where. Bamboos are scattered 
















all over the area and especially 
















round the Donibail Nalla. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is confined 
















to the more open north-east 








59 


7208 


No rth T h e 
Kumtimali Nalla, 
East. A blazed 
line in the north 
the source of the 
Donibail Nalla 
in the centre 
and the Hegarn 
cultivation in the 
south. 
8 o u t h . T h e 
Hegarni Nalla. 
West. T h e 


(a) Configuration, The 
aspect turns from 
north to south rounc 
the 740 feet hill in 
the north-east of the 
compartment, while 
the south is leve 
ground. The hill in 
the north-east of the 
compartment is. an 
outer spur of the main 
ridge, the gradients 
round the summi 


portions of the area. 
(a) Growing gtock. The forests 
are deciduous all over, and with 
the exception of the forests on the 
slopes of a very poor character. 
In the plain the growth rarely 
exceeds 30 feet in height and is 
composed of stunted Matti, 
Kindal, Jamba, Bor, Char, 
Khair, etc. On the hill slopes 
the growth is fairly good, in the 
ravines to the north of the hill 
especially so, for here some fair 
Matti and Kiudal are found in 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound ... 
(6) Unsound... 
2 Nana 
3 Kindal 
4 Jamba 
5 Teak 
6 Sissutn 
7 Honni 
8 Heddi 
9 Dhamni 
10 Apta 
11 Jambul . , 


14-4 

4 
132 
7-1 

"b-2 
9 
4 
2 
1 
5 


A poor compart- 
ment in which 
little can be done 
sylvieultu rally 
owing to the poor 
nature of the 
soil. 






Don g r i 
Kanchankeri foot 
path. 


being very steap. 
(6) Rock and Soil 
The underlying rock in 
the plain is qhieflj 
basalt, while the hill is 
formed of granites am 
schists. The soil on 


small quantities, 
(i) Aatural regeneration. The 
regeneration is very fair all ovei 
the area especially in the plain. 
(e) Undergrowth The under- 
growth in the plain is practically 
nil, On the hill sides dense 


12 Womb 
13 Kharsing 
14 Bharnigi 
15 Other spec leg 


3 
698 










the slopes is shallow an( 


patches of Karvi growth exisl 














stony except in the 


mixed with armed bamboos. 














bottom of the ravines 
on the level ground the 


(d) Grazing. Grazing is carriec 
on all over the plain especially 














soil is poor and hard. 


in the vicinity of Hegarn 










t<!<l__l . 






village. 









54 
APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
















part- 
ment 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forest. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


No. 
















1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


60 


732-8 


NortL-The Heg- 
arni Nalla. 


(a) C o nfi g u ration. 
Aspect generally west. 


(a) Growing Stock. The grow- 
ing stock is all over of deciduous 


1 Matti 
Ea) Sound 


17-0 


Read note against 
Compartment 59. 






East. Thu Heg- 


The ground in the west 


character. In the centre of 


b) Unsound . 


45 








arni cultivation 


is undulating to flat, 


the area and eastwards on the 


2 Nana 


1-4 








and a 25 feet 


while in the east it is 


slopes the growth is poor and 


3 Kindal 


11-0 








blazed line. 


formed by the lower 


of second quality, the growth on 


4 Jamba 


10-7 








South. The nor- 


spur of the 1,713 feet 


the slopes being slightly better 


5 Teak 


... 








thern tributary 


hill, on which the 


than in the plain. Here are found 


6 Sissun 


1-7 








of the Kanehan- 


gradients rising to 408 


many stunted Matti mixed with 


7 Honni 


21 








keri Nalla. 


feet are only moder- 


Kindnl, a few Womb, Sissum, 


8 Heddi 


1-3 








West. The Gan- 


ately steep. 


patches of Nana and inferior 


9 Dhamni ... 


4 








gavali river. 


(b) Sock and Soil The 


species. Some of the Matti in 


10 Apta 


... 










underlying rock on the 


the pole stage look not improv- 


11 Jambul 


2 










level ground islaterite, 


ing and may grow to second qua- 


12 Womb 


2 










with outcrop of quartz 


lity trees. West of the Hegarni 


13 Kharsing 


... 










and basalt, while the 


foot-patt the growth improves 


14 Bharnigi 


... 










elopes are of gneisg and 


towards the river, and fair Matti 


15 Other species . 


49-5 










granite. The soil is 


up to 80 feet in height are to be 














poor in the centre of 


found and of fair girth. Mixed 














the area and along the 


with this species are Kindal, 














slopes, improving con- 


also well grown, scattered Nana, 


' 












siderably in the west 


Jamba, Honni and inferior 














near the Gangavli 


species of no great size. Jamba 














river. 


is scarce compared with the 
















percentage found in the forests 
















on the slopes. 
















(6) Natural regeneration. The 








4 








seedling growth is good nearly 
















everywhere, the species more 
















commonly represented being 














' 


Matti, Jamba and Kindal, 
















while Nana and Honni are only 
















seen locally. 
















() Undergrowth. The Karvi 
















growth in the plain is local, but 
















fairly dense on the slopes in the 
















north-east. Small Bamboos are 














. 


found in the plain and a small 
















armed Bamboo on the slopes. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing is carried 
















on all over the plain, but is no- 
















where heavy. 








61 


6568 


North. A tribu- 
tary of the Kan- 


(a) C o nfi gur ation. 
Aspect west. 


(a) Growing Stoek. The grow- 
ing stock is deciduous. In the 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound 


14-3 


No difficulties will 
be found in ex- 






chankeri Nalla. 


The extreme west cor- 


west rather poor forest exists, 


(b) Unsound ... 


4-8 


ploting this area. 






Eagt.A. 25 feet 


ner of the compartment 


similar to that described in 


2 Nana 


2'6 


Much can be done 






blazed line. ' 


is on level ground. 


Compartments 59 and 60. On 


3 Kindal 


13-4 


in freeing the 






South and West. 


The rest of the com- 


the slopes matters improve and 


4 Jamba 


15-0 


advanced growth 






TheKanchankeri 


partment is formed by 


very fair Matti, Kindal and 


6 Teak 





on the slopes. 






Nalla. 


the lower slopes of the 


Heddi forest exists. Jamba 


6 Sissum 


.8 










1,713 feet hill. The 


prevails on the upper slopes, 


7 Honni .. 


6 










gradients on the slopes 
are gentle to moderately 


while patches of Nana are found 
on the lower slopes, in which 


8 Heddi 
9 Dhamni 


1.2 
7 










steep, while the side of 


here and there the pole and 


10 Apta 


1 










the hill is! out up by 


seedlings stages are well repre- 


11 Jambul 


4 










innumerable small 


sented. In and along the 


12 Womb 


9 










nallas draining west- 


ravines strips of semi-evergreen 


13 Kharsing .. 


1 










ward. 


forest occur but they are very 


14 Bharnigi .. 


.. 










(b) EoeJc and Soil. The 


limited in area. These forests 


15 Other species 


45-1 










underlying rock in the 


havs been formerly much ex- 














plain is laterite, while 


ploited. 














the hill sides are 


(b) Natural reffeneratian. The 














cf gneiss and semi- 


regeneration of Jamba, Kinda! 














metamorphosed sand- 


and inferior species is good while 














stones. 


advanced growth of Nana is 














The soil is poor in the 


promising. Matti seedlings are 














west and very fair on 


scarce, probably owing to the 














the slopes in the east 


full stocking of the wood. 














of the compartment. 


(c) Undergrowth. Bamboos are 
















plentiful all over the area. 
















Karvi is found in patches but 
















is nowhere really dense. 
















(d) Grazing. The grazing rounc 

















the Kanchankeri footpath ie 














i 


somewhat heavy. 












55 


APPENDIX III continued. 


Com- 














IS; 4~ 

!No. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


1 2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


162 


634-4 


North-oatt. T h e 
Kanohankeri 


(a) Configuration. All 
aspects are found here. 


(a) Growing Stock. The grow- 
ing stock is deciduous, good on 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound ... 


3-9 


An area which 
esse n t i a 1 1 y re- 






Nalla. 
South-east. A cut 


The compartment con- 
tains three low hills, 


the low ground and poor on the 
slopes. The height growth is 


(6) Unsound... 
2 Nana 


1-8 
87 


quires rest after 
heavy exploita- 






line and a nalla. 
South-west. The 
Chenghar Nalla. 


all of about the same 
height, the highest 
being 383 feet above 


not generally speaking normal, 
except perhaps in the low lying 
areas, and the stocking is 


3 Kindal 
4 Jamba 
5 Teak 


9-9 
26-2 


tion in the past. 






North-west. The 


M. S L. The surface 


nowhere full. All the good 


6 Sissum 


"1-9 








Gangavali Kiver. 


of the ground is there- 


Matti, Nana, Jamba and Hedd 


7 Honni 













fore broken, irregular 


have been exploited in passec 


8 Heddi 


3 










and undulating and 


years, leaving a good number o\ 


9 Dhamni ... 


5-8 










well drained. 


large faulty Matti. Kindal is 


10 Apta 


4 










Bock and Soil. The 


represented by many large trees 


11 Jambul ... 


2 










underlying rock is gen- 


Womb, Dhamni and Sissum 


12 Womb 


1-9 










erally laterite though 


are fairly well represented, while 


13 Kharsing ... 


8 










veins of quartz and 


Kannal and" Sagadi are very 


14 Bharnigi ... 


1 










basalt occur on the 


common. 


15 Other species . 


38-6 










hillocks. The soil 


(b) Natural regeneration A 














varies between 1st and 


good deal of Matti regeneration is 














2n quality. 


found in the openings. Kindal, 
















Womb and Sissum are scattered 
















here and there and numbers oJ 
















Jamba everywhere. Nana is 
















most noticeable in the pole 
















stages. 
















(c) Undergrowth. The whole 
















area is covered with scattered 
















clumps of Bamboos, while a 
















t moderately heavy growth oi 
















Karvi is found everywhere. 
















(d) Grazing. A little grazing 
















takes place in the north-eat ol 














. 


the compartment near Kanchan- 
















keri. 








63 


542-4 


North The Kan- 
chankcri Nalla, 


(a) Configuration. The 
area contains the Kun- 


(a) Growing Stock. Deciduous 
everywhere, except on the east 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound ... 


30 


This area want* 
rest, it having 






cultivation, a cut 
line and a smal 
Nalla. 


tagani Spur rising with 
moderate to steep 
gradients to 745 feet 


boundary where it approaches 
evergreen in places. 
On the north and west slopes of 


(b) Unsound .. 
2 Nana 
3 Kindal 


1-5 
8.9 
11-9 


been heavily ex- 
ploited in the 
past, and round 






East.k blazed 


situated rather in the 


the spur, very fair deciduous 


4 Jamba 


30-2 


Kuntagani the 






line and the 
Armainbail cul- 


north centre of the 
compartment. To the 


forest occur, containing a few 
Matti, all the large trees of 


5 Teak 
6 Sissum 


"i-o 


forests have been 
badly treated. The 






.tivation. 


south of the hill is the 


which have been exploited, and 


7 Honni . 


* 


old cultivation 






South. The Kuu- 
tagani road. 


Kuntagani cultivation 
on lower ground. 


a fair number of exploitable 
Kindal and Nana, with many 


8 Heddi 
9 Dhamni .. 


4 
5-3 


might be dibbled 
up with advan- 






West. TheChand- 


(b) Bock and Soil. The 


Jamba and inferior species. 


10 Apta 


2 


tage. 






gar Nalla. 


underlying rock con- 


The southern slopes contain 


11 Jambul 


2 










sists of schists and 


similar forest to that desoribed 


12 Womb 


6 










quartzites, the soil 
being fair ail over the 


above, but of inferior quality. 
In the plain, round to Local 


13 Kharsing 
14 Bharnigi 


1 










area. 


Fund road and Kuntagani Biver, 


15 Other species .. 


36'7 












scrub jungle prevails, much 
















split up by old cultivated areas, 
















the present growth being the 
















result of former clearings. 
















(b) Natural regeneration. 
















Regeneration of Matti, Kindal 
















and Jamba is good in the south, 
















while many shrubs also prevail. 
















On the northern slopes only 
















scattered seedlings are to be 
















found in the more open places. 


, 














() Undergrowth. A moderately 
















heavy growth of Karri on the 
















slopes and Bamboo clumps 


9 














scattered everywhere. In the 
















plain many thorny bushes and 
















creepers. 
















(d) Grazing. All over the flat 
















portion in the south and south- 
















west. 









56 
APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
















p*rt- 

ment 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


No. 
















I 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


64 


41-2 


North The Kun- 
ta<?ani lload. 
East. A blazed 


(a) Configuration. As- 
pect west. The east- 
ern portion of the area 


(a) Growing Stock. The growing 
stock is of three types. On the 
slopes good deciduous forest 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound 
(b) Unsound ... 


7-2 
7 


Exploitation will 
be easy. Every- 
thing should be 






line and a nalla. 


contains the lower 


is found, containing large 


2 Nana 


6-4 


done in the semi- 






South. The Asnir 


slopes of the Kalmani 


Kindal and Nana scattered all 


3 Kindal 


7-6 


evergreen portion 






Nalla. 


Hill, the gradients in 


over the area, together with a 


4 Jamba 


7'2 


to favour decidu- 






West. The Chand- 


places being very steep. 


few Matti, Jamba, Dhamni, 


5 Teak 





ous species, even 






gar Eoad. 


All west of the Nirkoli 


Kossum, Jambul, etc., and 


6 Sissam 


4 


if or inferior 








and Asnir villages is 


many Bamboos. On the upper 


7 Honni 


2 


kinds. 








flat, slightly undulat- 


slopes Jamba becomes very 


8 Heddi 


5 










ing ground, and is 


plentiful while in the bottom of 


9 Dhamni .. 


28 










drained by the Chand- 


the small ravines the growth 


10 Apta 


1-8 










gar Nalla and its two 


approaches evergreen forest. 


11 Jambul 


1-1 










large tributaries. 


Westward of the Nirkoli-Asnir 


12 Womb 


3 










(6) Rock and Soil. In 


footpath as far as the river, and 


13 Kharsing .. 













the plain the under- 


especially towards Asnir culti- 


14 Bharnigi 


7 










lying rock is laterite, 


vation the growth is little 


15 Other species . 


64-2 










while the eastern 


more than scrub jungle. 














slopes are composed of 


Between the river and 'the Ohand- 














schists, shales and 


gar roaa is a semi-evergreen 














basalt. The soil is 


forest, containing many Bharni- 














fertile and deep in the 


gi, Bobbi, Mango, Hawga, etc., 














plain and is fairly so 


and here and there scattered 















on the slopes. 


large Nana, Kindal and a few 


B 














Matti. 
















[b) Natural regeneration. On 


i 














the slopes fair regeneration is 

















found of all species. Seedlings of 
















Matti, Kindal, Nana and Jamba 
















with many inferior species are 
















plentiful in the central portion, 
















where the forest is open, while 
















in tbe semi-evergreen tract, 
















the stocking being full, there arc 
















only seedlings of such species as 
















Hawga, Bhirendi, etc. 
















(e) Undergrowth. Many Bam- 
















boos are scattered all over the 
















slopes with moderate to heavy 
















Karvi growth. In the centre 
















of the compartment there is 
















little undergrowth except thorny 
















shrubs and creepers, while in 
















the west, the undergrowth is o 
















laurels and other evergreen 
















shrubs. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing goes on 
















all over the centre of the com 
















partment. 








65 


7292 


Nort h. T h e 
Chandgr Nalla. 
East. A blazed 
line in the north 


(o) Configuration. For 
the purpose of descrip- 
tion the area may be 
divided into two por- 


(a) Growing Stock. The slopes 
in the north, with the exception 
of a patch of evergreen in the 
north-east corner of the com- 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound 
(6) Unsound 
2 Nana 


7-2 
5-1 
5-5 


A very backward 
com p a r tm e n t. 
To try to" do 
much in the plain 






and the Mabge 


tions. In the north 


partment, and the hill in the 


3 Kindal 


8-9 


with the eioessive 






Nalla in the 


with a western aspect 


south near Mabge village con- 


4 Jamba 


4-3 


grazing would be 






south. 
South. A. blazed 


the compartment covers 
the Chandgar spur, the 


tain fairly good deciduous forests 
in which Nana and Kindal are 


5 Teak 
6 Sissum 


"'2 


waste of time. 






line. 


gradients of which are 


plentiful and Matti and Jamba 


7 Honni 










W e f t. T h e 


gentle in the west am 


rather scarce, while the number 


8 Heddi 


"9 








Chandgar Nalla. 


moderately so in the 


of inferior species is very great 


9 Dhamni 


I'l 










east. The southern 


All over the plain are patches o 


10 Apta 


5 










portion consists of a 


evergreen and serai-evergreen 


11 Jambul .. 


5 










582 feet hill, dividing 


forest, with old cultivated areas 


12 Womb 


2 










the Mabge and Angdi 


cutting up the forest everywhere 


13 Kharsing .. 


* 










bail villages anc 


In these semi-evergreen forest 


14 Bharnigi 


5 










nallas. 


and standing over it are many 


15 Other species.. 


67-1 










(b) Roek and Soil 


very fair young Matti and othe 














The underlying roc! 


deciduous species, giving on 














in the pkin is laterite 


the idea that the evergreen i 














that of the slopes an 


enchroaching on the deciduous 














hill in the south is cry 


but that the transformation i 














stalline, granite anc 


incomplete. In the extrem 














schists. The soil i 


the south of the compartment is 














good on the leve 


small patch of pure evergreer 














ground and rathe 


forest of small extent. 














shallow on the slopes. 


(b) Aatur&l regeneration. Th 
















seedling growth on the slope 
















and hill in the south is fair 
















Except on the edge of the ol 
















cultivations in the plain seedling 












m 




growth is poor, owing to thi 


i 














dense evergreen growth o 
















shrubs. 









57 
APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
















part- 
ment 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rook 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


No. 
















1 


* 


8 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 










c) Undergrowth Karvi and 
















Bamboos are found on the slopes, 
















and evergreen shrubs in the 
















plain. 
















'd) Grazing. Grazing which is 
















fairly heavy, is carried on all 
















over the flat ground between 
















Chandgar and Mabge villages. 








66 


959-2 


North, A nalla 
starting in the 
north-east corner, 


(a) Configuration. As- 
pect generally south 
turning to east. The 


a) Growing stock. All types of 
forest are found in this com- 
partment, varying from pure 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound 
(b) Unsound ... 


8-0 
9 


The tendency of 
this forest is to 
become evergreen, 






2 furlongs north 


area contains tte east- 


deciduous to true evergreen, the 


2 Nana 


6-5 


so that every 






of the junction of 
the Kuntaganiand 


ern spur of the 1,259 
feet hill above Hillur- 


stocking being evereywhere full. 
On the flat ground near the 


3 Kindal 
4 Jamba ... 


8-7 
21-7 


effort should be 
made to favour 






Ohandgar roads ; 


bail, and the continua- 


Chandgar Dharmashala and round 


5 Teak 


... 


the deciduous 






and a cut line to 


tion of the spur which 


the Boroli river nearly true ever- 


6 Sissum 


9 


species of ever/ 






the west of the 


forms a 451 feet hill in 


green forest is found, with only 


7 Honni 


... 


kind by careful 






Boro 1 i-K a r i k a 1 


the east of the com- 


a few large Deciduous species 


8 Heddi 


2 


improvem ont 






footpath. 


partment. In the 


scattered here and there. The 


9 Dhamni 


7 


fellings. 






East. The Chand- 


west, above Boroli 


north-east of the compartment 


10 Apta 











gar road, and 


village and directly 


contains deciduous forest with 


11 Jambul 


1 








part of the 


below the crest of the 


good Nana, Kindal and some 


12 Womb 


3 








Chandgar nalla. 


hill, the gradients are 


Matti. Between the 451 feet 


18 Kharsing 


1 








West. A cut line 


very steep and in places 


and 507 feet hills is good deci- 


14 Bharnigi 


1-5 








to the top of the 


precipitous, while in 


duous forest overhead, while 


15 Other species... 


55-4 








1,259 feet hill, 


the centre of the area 


many evergreen shrubs cover 












from the spur of 


and westwards the 


the ground. Here large Nana, 












the 900 feet hill. 


ground is much broken 


Kindal, Bharnigi, Jamba and 














up by Nallag, with 


some Matti are found, though 














gentle gradients, the 


the younger classes are some- 














extreme south of the 


what poorly represented. The 














area being practically 


Kindal are here more unsound 














O i. 

flat. 


than is usually the case. In the 














(b) Rock and soil. The 


west and on the steep side slopes 














underlying rock is 


towards the top of hill, mnch 














laterite in the east, the 


Jamba growth is present inter- 














slopes and hill being of 


mixed with a few fair Nana and 














metamorphosed rook, 


Kindal. 














olivines and basalts. 


b) Natural regeneration. The 














The soil is fair to good 


seedling growth of deciduous 














in the centre and east- 


species is not good except 














ern portion of the area 


locally in the true deciduous 














and poor on the upper 


forests, where more light is let 














slopes, where flag rock 


in. Seedlings of evergreen 














appears in place on the 


species are well represented 














surface. 


in places, and the general 
















tendency is to produce evergreen 
















forests in the future. 




\ 












e) Undergrowth. Large Bam- 
















boos occur locally on the slopes, 
















and here and there patches of 
















Karvi are found. Elsewhere 
















evergreen shrubs appear usur- 
















ping mnch of the soil. 
















(d) Grazing. Practically nil 
















except in the extreme south of 
















the compartment. 








67 


1210'0 


N o r t h.T h e 
Chandgar a n t 
Holemaki Nallas 


() Configuration. The 
aspect generally north- 
east. This compart- 


[a) Growing/ rfoci. The eastern 
half of the compartment contains 
fair deciduous forest of Nana, 


1 Mali 
(a) Sound ... 
(b) Unsound... 


5-1 
2-3 


See note against 
Compartment 66. 






East. The Chand- 


ment contains the 


Kindal, Matti, Womb and some 


2 Nana 


4-3 








gar Nalla. 


three north-easterly 


Jamba, Sisum being scarce. A 


3 Kindal 


7-8 








South. A nalla 


spurs of the 1,259 feet 


good many of the large Matti 


4 Jamba 


17-7 








described as the 


hill, between which 


have been exploited from this 


5 Teak 


... 








north boundary 


the Harsnalli anc 


area in former times. All wes 


6 Sissum 


3 








of Oompartmen 


Ho'emaki Nallas fine 


of the Harsnalli cultivation, on 


7 Honni 


I 








66, and a cut 


their way down to 


the upper slopes, the forest 


8 Heddi 


4 








line. 


the Chandgar Nalla 


though well stocked, is of 2nc 


9 Dhamni 


7 








West. The Hole- 
maki Nalla an< 


The slopes of three 
spurs are extremely 


quality containing mnch Jamba 
Jambul, Kharsing, many inferio 


10 Apta 
11 Jambul 


2 

7 


' 






a out line to the 


steep and much cu 


speoies and only scattered Nan 


12 Womb 


1'4 








top of the 1,259 


into by bye-nallas 


and Kindal, and no Matti 


13 Kharsing 


1 








feet hill. 


East of the Chandga 


Here also patches of evergreen 


14 Bharnigi 


1-4 










road the ground i 


occur, an especially large area o 


15 Other species . 


57'5 










undulating. 


this type of forest occurrin 
















south of Holemaki cultivation 
















Just above Harsnalli a bare aree 
















occurs, probably an old Kumr 
cultivation. 









B 96015 



8 
APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
















part- 
ment 


Area. 


Boundaries. 


Configuration, rock 
and soil. 


General character of 
Forests. 


Distribution of 
growing stock. 


Percent- 
age. 


Remarks. 


No. 
















1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 
























(6) Rock and iSW. The 


(b) Natural regeneration. The 














underlying rock is late- 


natural regeneration is fair in 














rite in the east and 


the east and round the old culti- 














metamorphosed rock 


vations,' while on the upper slopes 














and basalt on the hill 


Jamba seedlings abound. 














side. 


(c) Undergrowth. Karvi and 














The soil is fair in the 


Bamboo are found in the east 














eastern half of the area 


and evergreen shrubs and a few 














and poor on the upper 


canes occur on the upper slopes. 














slopes. 


(e?) Grazing. Grazing is c<in- 
















fined to round the Harsnalli cul- 
















tivation, and below the road. 








68 


644-0 


NortJi. A cut 
line, Tagse culti 
vation and a ou 
line in the north 


(a) Configuration. As- 
pect west and north 
east. The compart- 
ment comprises the 


(a) Growing stoolc. T h e s e 
forests are generally of poor 
quality, the growth not being 
often over 40 feet in height. 


1 Matti 
(a) Sound 
(b) Unsound... 
2 Nana 


1-8 
"5 
5-5 


A poor area with 
little to exploit 
in it. 






east. 
East The Hole 
maki Nalla and 
cut line to the to 
of the 1,259 fee 
hill and over th 


north-west spnr of the 
1,269 feet hill rising 
with steep gradients 
from 100 feet in the 
plain to 1,259 feet at 
the summit of the hill ; 


The \hole of the western 
slopes contain poor deciduous 
forest where Jamba, Kossum, 
and inferior species compose most 
of the growing stocjc. Towards 
the Hillurbail Nails, ou the 


3 Kindal 
4 Jamba 
5 Teai 
6 Sissum 
7 Honni 
8 Heddi 


12-8 
28-2 
3 
3 
1 








crest to th 
boundary. 
South. A sum 
nalla. 


the slopes towards the 
ridge being nearly 
precipitous. The sides 
of the hill are cut uj 


lower slope, a few fair Nana and 
Kindal are to be found, while 
on the upper slopes a small patch 
of Teak occurs. Kumri culti- 


9 Dharnni 
10 Apta 
11 Jambul 
12 Womb 


"2-5 

5 
1-4 
2 








West. The Ba 


by innumerable smal 


vation must have been common 


13 Kharsing 










Kalla and a cu 


iiallas. 


on this side of the hill in former 


14 Bharnigri 


3 








line. 
North-west. Pa1 


(b) Sock and Soil, 
The underlying rocl 


times. 
On the north-eastern slopes the 


15 Other speciqe . 


45-6 








tanpur road. 


is basalt and meta- 


forest contains much Jamba 














morphosed schists. 


and a good deal of evergreen 














The soil is poor every- 


growth. In the extreme south 














where even at the 


of the compartment, on the 














bottom of the slopes. 


ridge, there occurs a patch oi 
















true evergreen forest. 
















(4) Natural regeneration. Scat- 
















tered regeneration of Nana, 
















Kindal, Kossum, etc., occurs 
















on the western slopes, while 
















Jamba seedlings are found 
















everjTfhere. 
















(c) Undergrowth. Karvi 5s 
















found on the lower slopes, Bam- 
















boos on the middle slopes, and 
















evergreen shrubs and canes on 
















the west of the ridge and on 
















the eastern aspect. 
















(d) Grazing. Grazing ig con- 
















fined to the vicinity of the 
















Hillurbail cultivation. 








*9 


764-4 


North. The Gan 


(a) Configuration. As- 


(a) Growing stock. The north- 


1 Matti 




There is little to 






gavali River. 
East. The Chand 


pect north. The com- 
partment comprises in 


ern portion of the area contains 
deciduous forest, while in the 


(a) Sound ... 
(6) Unsound... 


4-4 
1-2 


exploit at present 
fro"i this com- 






gad arid Hole- 
maki Nallas. 
South. A cut line 


the north the undula- 
ting ground running 
down to the Gangavab 


south, on the spur, evergreen 
growth is found. To the north 
of the road, average deciduous 


2 Nana 
3 Kindal 
4 Jamba 


6-2 
11:1 
11-1 


partment owing 
to the heavy t'el- 
ings in the past 






and the Tagse 


river, and in the south 


forest occurs in which not many 


5 Teak 


... 


and to the heavy 






cultivation. 


the lower portion of 


large t<-ees are found, most of 


6 b'issum .. 


5 


calls of permit 







West. The Pat- 


the northern spur of 


them having been exploited in 


7 Honni 


< 


holder on the 






tanpur Road. 


the Hillurbail hill up 


the past ; the crop here contains 


8 Heddi 


2-9 


forests. 








to the 460 feet contour 


a few Matti, A ana, Kindal, 


9 )>hamni 


2-0 










line. The gradients 


Sissum, Dhamni, Womb and a 


10 Apta 


1-2 










on this spur are moder- 


fair number of inferior species ; 


11 Jambul 


2 










ately steep. 


of the above species only Kindal 


12 Womb 


9 










(b) Bock mid Soil. To 


is represented by exploitable 


13 Kharsing ... 


1*1 










the north of the road 


trees. The lower slopes of the 


14 Bharnigi 


6 










the underlying rock is 


hill are covered with deciduous 


15 Other species . 


57-6 










laterite, while the spur 


forest containing fair Kindal, 














is formed of metamor- 


Matti and Nana, mixed with 














phosed rock and sch- 


small f-'isum, Jamba, Heddi, 














ists. The soil is deep 


Dhamni, Apta, Womb, Khar- 














in the north and fairly 


sing and a large number of 














so in the south on the 


inferior species. The upper 














slopes of the hill. 


slopes contain nearly all ever- 
















green forest with signs of 
















former cultivation everywhere. 









59 
APPENDIX III continued. 



Com- 
part- 
ment 
No. 



Area. 



Boundaries. 



Configuration, rock 
and soil. 



General character of 

Forests. 



Distribution of 
growing stock. 



Percent- 
age. 



Remarks. 



70 



659-2 



North. The Gail 

gavali River. 
East and south. 



(a) Configuration, The 
compartment contains 



undulating ground. 
The Pattanpnrl the highest point of 
Road. which is 227 feet in 

West. The Yoke- the wst centre of thej 
;ruli Road. area. The whole area| 

being along the banks 
of the Gangvali ial 
drained by smal 
nallas direct into thai 
river. 

(b) Boek and Soil. 
The underlying rock 
is laterite and granite. 
On the hillocks, the 
soil is everywhere 
good. 



(b) Natural regeneration. Na- 
tural regeneration is rather 
poor in this area, probably due 
to the heavy growth of Karvi 
and evergreen shrubs. 

(c) Undergrowth. Heavy Karvi 
and even evergreen shrubs 
occur nearly everywhere. Bam- 
boos are found north of the 
road and only sparingly so on 
the lower slopes, while on the 
spur practically none occur. 

(d) Grazing. Grazing is confin- 
ed to near the river, and even 
here is at no times heavy. 

(fl) Growing stock. The grow- 
ing stock, is a mixture of: 
deciduous and evergreen forest; 
on the small hillocks deciduous, 
forest is found, containing 
Kindal, Matti ;ind Nana locally,, 
with many inferior species , : 
nearly all the large trees have [ 
been exploited from this area.j 
On the low -lying ground, 
especially in the south centre 
of the compartment, evergreen 
forest occurs, where Kossumj 
Bharnigi, Mango and Bhirendi! 
make up much of the growing* 
stock. All along the road, in 
the south, the forest is of poor 
quality ; the stocking is however, 
complete. 

(b) ^Natural regeneration. The 
seedling growth is fair and in 
places good, especially of Jamba 
and Kindal, while Nana ad- 
vanced growth and Matti 
seedlings are found here and 
there only. 

(c) Undergrowth. Many Bamboos i 
of poor quality together with a: 
light crop of Karvi are found! 
in the deciduous portions, while! 
evergreen shrubs cover the' 
ground elsewhere. Creepers 
abound in many places. 

(d) Grazing. Grazing is carried 
on all over the more open 
portions of the compart- 
ment. 



1 Matti 
(a) Sound 
(b\ Unsound 

2 Nana 

3 Kindal 

4 Jamba 

5 Teak 

6 Sissum 

7 Honni 

8 Heddi 

9 Dhanini 

10 Apta 

11 Jambul 

12 Womle 

13 Kharsing 

14 Bharnigi 

15 Other species 



7-2 

2-7 

10-5 

13-9 

11-5 



2 
9 
3-7 
2 
3 
7 



47-0 



The main require- 
ments of these 
forests are rest 
from over-fell- 
ings. Creeper 
cutting is necess- 
ary everywhere- 



R . S. PEARSON, 

Divisional Forest Officer, 

Working Plans, S. C. 





43 


g B 















5 ** 


i 


S - 








Tr, 




_ <O 

I -a 


43 


-1 










fame of Village. 


&a 


a 

*S 


"3.8 












ii 


& Z 

odd 


-*3 

s.s 


7" 9" 


10" 12" 


13" 15" 


16"- 




o 


O 


H 










1 


2 


3 


4 


5 





7 


8 


da and Mavinmani 


1 


426-4 


48-15 


205 


136 


90 




do. ... 


2 


655-2 


59-7 


211 


111 


96 




idda ... ... 


3 


276-8 


49-2 


15 


14 


13 




and Mavinmani ... 


4, 


674-4 


62-1 


97 


62 


50 




Ida 


5 


382-8 


58-B 


28 


35 


41 




... ... 


6 


554-8 


66-0 


14 


8 


18 




and Mavinmani 


7 


674-8 


55-8 


43 


58 


66 




do. 


8 


620-0 


73-8 


140 


136 


135 




Mavinmani and Sunksal. 


9 


618-0 


58-2 


109 - 


88 


104 




do. do. ., 


10 


516-4 


53-1 


31 


28 


39 




in ... ... 


11 


480-8 


44-1 


291 


150 


58 




and Sunksal 


32 


618-0 


59-7 


84 


52 


33 




do. 


13 


893-6 


94-5 


121 


72 


73 




... ... ... 


14 


344-4 


3F.-3 


13 


15 


21 




... ... ... 


15 


424-8 


47-7 


56 


31 


36 




... ... ... 


16 


524-4 


51-0 


35 


46 


61 




and Kalinhakal 


17 


429-2 


43-8 


42 


49 


40 




al 


18 


719-6 


58-2 


42 


32 


86 




Ida 


19 


737-2 


38-6 





8 


25 




... , .. , 


20 


729-2 


76-2 


33 


13 


24 




... .. 


21 


759-0 


66-6 


46 


49 


45 




... . . ... 


22 


633-2 


75-6 


245 


210 


174 




... .. ... 


23 


736-4 


63-4 


35 


34 


44 




... . ... 


24 


730-4 


72-0 


148 


150 


145 


: 


md Katiuhakal ... 


25 


585-6 


60-9 


167 


114 


73 




ind Hebul ... 


26 


798-0 


71-1 


61 


50 


36 




nd Kavlalli... 


27 


467-2 


55-5 


118 


75 


63 




do. 


28 


5772 


63-3 


48 


32 


21 




... ... 


29 


566-4 


52-2 


12 


3 


13 




... ... ... 


30 


614-8 


64-2 


197 


79 


53 




... ... 


31 


392-0 


52-2 


74 


37 


40 




... ... 


32 


765-6 


73-8 


32 


12 


19 




... ... ... 


33 


750-8 


57-a 


36 


33 


51 




... ... ... 


34 


566-8 


63-6 


137 


100 


76 




la and Agsur 


35 


678-2 


49-8 


103 


53 


37 




and Kavlalli 


36 


612-4 


69-3 


151 


116 


93 




and Marugadda 


37 


500-0 


56-4 


52 


41 


18 




Kavlalli and Maragadda. 


38 


585-6 


49-5 


43 


43 


36 






39 


910-1 


76-5 


39 


43 


42 






40 


666-0 


63-0 


31 


41 


42 




Total ... 




24,096-8 














41 


442-8 


32-25 


30 


18 


16 




lad Heggar... 


42 


6100 


50-10 


38 


19 


27 




... ... 


43 


706-0 


67-20 


48 


64 


44 




nd Kalleshwar ... 


44 


562-8 


66-45 


111 


98 


105 




ar and Halvalli 


45 


775-0 


82-80 


67 


32 


11 




ar 


46 


553-2 


61-95 


63 


38 


50 




ar and Halvalli 


47 


740-0 


7290 


7 


10 


6 




... .. ... 


48 


605'2 


69-70 


10 


5 


2 




Kalleshwar and Muski... 


49 


798-0 


84-15 


168 


59 


61 




and Eammani 


50 


667-6 


59-10 


74 


48 


62 




... ... ... 


61 


694-3 


82-20 


388 


92 


53 




and Dongri... 


52 


657-6 


51-3 


46 


90 


107 




do. .. 


o: 


730-0 


42-3 


36 


36 


49 




do. .. 


54 


590-0 


603 


68 


67 


70 




... .. ... 


55 


6428 


64-2 


186 


ICO 


111 




... ... 


56 


793-2 


66-0 


4t3 


65 


73 




... .. 


57 


792-4 


77-1 


251 


213 


162 




... >. . 


58 


624-4 


68-1 


192 


150 


99 




... * ... 


59 


720-8 


68-7 


242 


181 


113 




and Kuntgani 


60 


732-8 


70-8 


193 


179 


161 




do. ... 


61 


656-8 


63-3 


119 


125 


123 




i and Hillur... 


62 


634-4 


72-0 


36 


30 


28 




[ ... ... 


63 


542-4 


63-0 


48 


23 


15 




... ... 


64 


641-2 


78-3 


226 


62 


41 




i and Manigadda ... 


65 


729-2 


73-2 


79 


77 


82 




i ... ... 


66 


959-2 


97-5 


65 


31 


50 




and Hillur ... 


67 


1,210-0 


107-1 


44 


47 


95 




do. ... 


68 


644-0 


58-5 


23 


33 


23 




f 


69 


794-4 


86-4 


111 


41 


26 




... t> .. 


70 


659-2 


69'9 


172 


90 


73 





XXIV. 


















Sound. 


















1,815 


1,204 


797 


602 


301 


248 


97 


62 


6,126 


2,316 


1,218 


1,054 


647 


351 


154 


143 


66 


6,949 


84 


79 


73 


45 


34 


22 


28 


22 


387 


1,053 


673 


543 


478 


347 


304 


217 


174 


3,789 


183 


229 


268 


242 


268 


124 


105 


118 


1,537 


118 


67 


151 


93 


134 


126 


126 


252 


I,0i57 


520 


701 


793 


605 


435 


314 


133 


169 


3,676 


1,176 


1,143 


1,134 


664 


428 


218 


126 


118 


5,007 


1,157 


934 


1,104 


616 


361 


223 


159 


10l> 


4,660 


302 


272 


379 


311 


185 


148 


117 


68 


1,780 


3,205 


1,635 


632 


305 


76 


55 


* 


33 


5,941 


869 


538 


342 


248 


269 


135 


101 


52 


2557 


1,144 


681 


690 


492 


416 


151 


95 


67 


3,726 


323 


142 


228 


152 


171 


142 


114 


190 


* 1,262 


499 


276 


321 


392 


303 


169 


169 


178 


2,307 


360 


473 


627 


596 


319 


154 


186 


257 


2,971 


412 


430 


392 


294 


304 


176 


167 


235 


2,460 


519 


396 


445 


358 


321 


396 


223 


346 


3,004 


* 


153 


478 


382 


650 


669 


314 


408 


3,054 


124 


124 


230 


182 


258 


239 


153 


249 


1,559 


524 


558 


513 


638 


658 


445 


160 


319 


3,715 


2,052 


1,759 


1,457 


737 


327 


209 


69 


59 


6,659 


377 


366 


473 


452 


377 


301 


226 


194 


2,766 


1,501 


1,522 


1,471 


1,177 


801 


436 


325 


193 


7,426 


1,606 


1,096 


702 


615 


404, 


336 


202 


221 


6,182 


6S6 


561 


404 


494 


258 


123 


67 


168 


2,760 


993 


631 


530 


387 


227 


152 


61 


03 


3,064 


438 


292 


191 


165 


109 


61 


73 


46 


1,368 


130 


32 


141 


87 


87 


65 


22 


98 


662 


1,886 


766 


608 


249 


153 


86 


29 


38 


3,705 


556 


278 


300 


135 


37 


60 


30 


38 


1,434 


832 


124 


197 


135 


52 




... 


21 


861 


467 


428 


661 


635 


467 


428 


272 


311 


3,669 


1.221 


891 


677 


232 


89 


71 


46 


71 


3,297 


1,196 


615 


430 


221 


186 


81 


23 


81 


2,833 


1,334 


1,290 


822 


362 


239 


53 


62 


141 


4,303 


161 


363 


159 


98 


53 


27 


18 


106 


1,285 


509 


608 


426 


296 


237 


130 


106 


166 


2,378 


464 


512 


500 


595 


393 


285 


71 


310 


3,130 


328 


433 


144 


629 


349 


264 


148 


264 


2,769 


XXV. 

412 


247 


220 


151 


179 


82 






1,261 


463 


231 


329 


1'55 


292 


134 


"ei 


"85 


1,850 


0U4 


672 


462 


536 


420 


294 


95 


221 


3,20i 


940 


830 


889 


838 


661 


381 


212 


144 


4,895 


627 


299 


103 


168 


94 


28 


76 


47 


1,441 


563 


339 


446 


277 


179 


98 


107 


89 


2,098 


71 


102 


61 


61 


10 


10 


20 


20 


345 


101 


51 


20 


30 


81 


61 


10 


41 


395 


1,593 


560 


607 


597 


697 


559 


427 


427 


5,367 


836 


542 


700 


621 


407 


282 


271 


339 


3,998 


8,237 


778 


44S 


50G 


380 


414 


245 


355 


6,423 


590 


1,153 


1,371 


1,269 


653 


603 


295 


308 


6,242 


621 


621 


846 


570 


293 


276 


86 


52 


3,365 


665 


655 


685 


430 


156 


391 


59 


88 


3,179 


1,862 


1,602 


1,412 


851 


320 


290 


l&O 


130 


6,647 


553 


781 


877 


625 


505 


337 


180 


312 


4,170 


2,579 


2,189 


1,664 


997 


709 


329 


134 


103 


8,704 


1,760 


1,375 


908 


652 


367 


284 


165 


110 


5,601 


2,539 


1,930 


1,185 


766 


315 


199 


73 


32 


7,039 


1,997 


1,853 


1,66 


1,025 


714 


311 


176 


155 


7,897 


1,235 


1,297 


1,276 


861 


519 


228 


83 


73 


6,572 


317 


264 


247 


238 


158 


185 


44 


35 


1,488 


413 


198 


129 


129 


103 


17 


9 


26 


1,024 


1,851 


508 


836 


147 


106 


65 


57 


33 


3,103 


787 


767 


817 


6.67 


388 


219 


159 


90 


3,894 


610 


305 


492 


354 


236 


168 


118 


127 


2,440 


497 


531 


1,073 


949 


847 


429 


181 


219 


4,756 


310 


366 


255 


78 


66 




11 


... 


1,086 


1,021 


877 


239 


156 


73 


55 


28 


64 


2,013 


1,622 


849 


688 


434 


141 


113 


123 


56 


4,026 


64,245 


46,705 


42,143 


31,251 


21,303 


14,623 


8,448 


9,909 


2,38,627 



B 99016 



61 



















BLOCK 


















Matti 


1 


3 


7 


8 


6 


3 


3 


5 


36 


3 


7 


8 


7 


11 


9 


6 


23 


74 


3 


5 


3 


3 


4 


4 


2 


6 


30 




2 


3 


5 


8 


8 


17 


16 


69 


" 2 


2 


4 


6 


12 


14 


9 


21 


70 





... 


2 


6 


5 


12 


8 


33 


66 


... 


' '4 


6 


<i 


5 


6 


9 


14 


51 


" 8 


17 


26 


32 


18 


20 


11 


20 


152 


* 


7 


20 


21 


15 


15 


8 


12 


98 





1 


* 


4 


7 


3 


8 


11 


34 


1 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


24 


2 


2 


5 


9 


6 


4 


3 


... 


30 


2 


15 


25 


20 


16 


13 


6 


9 


10G 


t. 


3 


12 


12 


10 


11 


11 


21 


80 


1 


1 


3 


7 


8 


22 


8 


22 


72 





10 


16 


23 


29 


20 


17 


22 


137 


3 




11 


13 


20 


24 


17 


30 


118 


1 


... 





1 


2 





. . 


8 


12 


Taken a 


sound fr 


om Arba 


Plan. 






It 


27 


41 


1 


13 


16 


37 


25 


39 


33 


36 


200 







2 


5 


7 


6 


6 


26 


52 


1 


" 1 


6 


9 


10 


10 


11 


9 


67 


... 


3 


17 


27 


19 


16 


9 


15 


106 


2 


1 





... 


... 


1 


... 


1 


5 


4 


IS 


20 


32 


34 


33 


21 


63 


213 


2 


3 


9 


7 


10 


31 


H 


20 


73 


6 


7 


10 


15 


26 


21 


8 


15 


108 


** 


3 


5 


10 


13 


8 


6 


24 


69 


1 


2 


3 


6 


9 


8 


5 


19 


63 





6 


8 


13 


16 


10 


4 


9 


66 


2 


3 


13 


DO 


15 


10 


10 


6 


69 


t 


1 


3 


2 


3 


2 


3 


14 


28 


2 


5 


12 


17 


12 


26 


20 


46 


140 


1 


8 


19 


21 


17 


17 


8 


15 


106 


1 


1 


7 


13 


15 


12 


18 


9 


76 


> 


2 


4 


9 


8 


13 


13 


24 


73 


2 


6 


6 


4 


4 


e 


6 


13 


46 


... 


6 


9 


18 


16 


21 


15 


30 


115 




3 


8 


12 


16 


22 


8 


38 


107 




3 


5 


10 


21 


33 


11 


24 


107 


















BLOCK 


1 


4 


2 


5 


5 


5 


3 


... 


25 


... 





2 


3 


9 


9 


7 


"l6 


46 


6 


8 


11 


11 


19 


15 


24 


47 


140 


6 


9 


15 


27 


26 


25 


25 


25 


153 


2 


2 


1 


3 


3 


9 


4 


9 


33 


5 


14 


17 


17 


22 


16 


13 


12 


116 


1 







1 





2 


2 


8 


14 


1 


1 


1 


1 


7 


6 


7 


17 


41 


6 


7 


17 


28 


46 


45 


45 


39 


233 


1 


2 


3 


12 


11 


14 


8 


13 


64 


4 


7 


6 


17 


27 


40 


30 


42 


173 


5 


7 


25 


30 


19 


21 


13 


21 


111 


... 


1 


5 


2 


5 


4 


1 


4 


22 


6 


23 


22 


31 


23 


21 


14 


23 


163 


19 


13 


22 


22 


19 


9 


9 


15 


123 


11 


13 


28 


18 


22 


17 


34 


27 


170 


5 


17 


28 


44 


26 


19 


13 


23 


175 


3 


6 


16 


11 


24 


13 


15 


14 


102 


11 


23 


28 


16 


19 


7 


5 


5 


114 


12 


35 


32 


37 


35 


20 


20 


13 


204 


12 


26 


29 


40 


35 


19 


10 


11 


182 


2 


2 


8 


10 


9 


13 


12 


20 


76 


8 


7 


6 


13 


2 


8 


8 


6 


58 


2 


2 


7 


8 


5 


8 


4 


1 


37 


29 


61 


43 


39 


41 


39 


17 


20 


279 


6 


3 


12 


8 


12 


9 


8 


16 


74 


8 


15 


29 


i9 


29 


27 


25 


29 


191 


2 


* 


2 


8 


3 


4 


3 


8 


30 


2 


4 


3 


4 


7 


5 


11 


24 


60 


4 


12 


17 


16 


28 


21 


23 


37 


168 


231 


487 


773 


975 


1,018 


985 


802 


1,295 


6,566 



62 



XXIV. 


















Unsound. 


















9 


26 


62 


71 


53 


27 


27 


44 


319 


33 


77 


88 


77 


120 


99 


66 


262 


812 


17 


28 


17 


17 


22 


22 


11 


34 


168 


^ ( 


22 


33 


54 


87 


87 


184 


174 


641 


13 


13 


26 


39 


79 


92 


S9 


137 


468 






17 


50 


42 


101 


67 


278 


555 




"48 


73 


85 


60 


73 


109 


170 


618 


'67 


143 


218 


269 


361 


168 


92 


168 


1,278 




74 


212 


223 


159 


359 


f-6 


128 


1,0-10 


f t 


10 


... 


39 


68 


29 


78 


107 


331 


11 


44 


33 


33 


33 


33 


33 


44 


264 


21 


21 


52 


93 


5^ 


41 


31 


i 


311 


19 


142 


236 


189 


151 


123 


67 


85 


l.OC'2 




28 


114 


111 


95 


104 


104 


199 * 


758 


" 9 


9 


27 


62 


7! 


196 


71 


l'J6 


641 


... 


103 


165 


236 


298 


2J6 


375 


320 


1,409 


29 


... 


108 


127 


1!I6 


235 


1C7 


294 


1,156 


12 


... 





12 


25 


* 


... 


99 


148 


Taken as 


sound f 


om Arba 


1 Plan. 






266 


99 


118 


10 


124 


153 


354 


239 


373 


818 


344 


1,913 





* 


23 


57 


80 


68 


68 


296 


692 


8 


8 


60 


75 


84 


84 


92 


75 


476 





32 


183 


291 


205 


172 


97 


161 


1,141 


20 


10 


... 


... 


... 


10 


, ,. 


10 


60 


38 


125 


192 


308 


827 


317 


231 


610 


2,048 


22 


34 


101 


79 


112 


123 


123 


2*5 


819 


51 


69 


84 


126 


219 


177 


67 


126 


909 


1 


27 


46 


91 


118 


73 


55 


219 


629 


11 


22 


32 


65 


98 


87 


64 


206 


575 


* 


67 


77 


125 


153 


96 


38 


86 


632 


15 


22 


98 


75 


113 


76 


76 


45 


518 


.. 


10 


31 


21 


31 


21 


31 


145 


290 


26 


65 


156 


239 


156 


337 


259 


597 


1,815 


9 


71 


169 


187 


J52 


152 


71 


334 


45 


12 


12 


81 


151 


174 


139 


209 


104 


882 


... 


18 


35 


79 


71 


115 


115 


212 


645 


18 


63 


53 


36 


35 


44 


63 


115 


407 


..* 


71 


106 


213 


189 


48 


177 


366 


1,359 


... 


86 


96 


143 


190 


262 


95 


452 


1,273 





32 


53 


106 


222 


349 


116 


254 


1,132 


XXV. 


















34 


65 


27 


68 


69 


69 


41 




343 


... 


>.. 


24 


36 


110 


110 


85 


195 


660 


62 


81 


116 


116 


193 


158 


252 


494 


1,471 


51 


76 


127 


228 


220 


212 


212 


212 


1,338 


19 


19 


9 


28 


28 


84 


37 


81 


308 


45 


125 


152 


152 


196 


143 


116 


107 


1,036 


10 





** 


10 


* 


21 


10 


81 


142 


10 


10 


10 


10 


71 


61 


71 


172 


415 


67 


66 


161 


265 


436 


427 


427 


370 


2,209 


11 


23 


34 


136 


124 


158 


90 


147 


723 


84 


69 


61 


143 


228 


338 


254 


355 


1,462 


64 


00 


320 


385 


243 


269 


167 


269 


1,807 


... 


17 


86 


35 


86 


69 


17 


69 


379 


69 


225 


216 


303 


225 


205 


137 


225 


1,694 


190 


130 


220 


220 


190 


90 


90 


150 


1,280 


132 


156 


337 


216 


265 


204 


409 


324 


2,043 


51 


175 


288 


452 


267 


195 


134 


236 


1,798 


27 


55 


147 


101 


220 


119 


138 


128 


935 


116 


241 


294 


168 


200 


73 


52 


52 


1,195 


124 


363 


331 


383 


362 


207 


207 


134 


2,111 


124 


270 


801 


415 


363 


197 


104 


114 


1,888 


18 


18 


70 


88 


79 


116 


106 


176 


670 


69 


60 


51 


172 


17 


69 


69 


52 


499 


16 


16 


57 


66 


41 


66 


33 


8 


303 


289 


508 


428 


389 


408 


389 


169 


199 


2,779 


59 


29 


118 


79 


118 


89 


79 


157 


728 


90 


169 


328 


328 


328 


305 


282 


828 


2,158 


122 





22 


89 


33 


44 


33 


89 


332 


18 


37 


27 


37 


64 


46 


101 


221 


651 


38 


113 


160 


151 


264 


198 


217 


34.) 


1,<90 


2,289 


4,866 


7,810 


9,800 


10,184 


?,847 


8,172 


13,318 


66,285 



63 














' 






BLOCK 


















Na 


12 


10 


12 


12 


6 


10 


3 


2 


67 


22 


2S 


13 


13 


10 


3 


6 


3 


98 


49 


29 


26 


35 


23 


25 


20 


38 


245 


27 


16 


10 


11 


7 


6 


9 


4 


90 


28 


12 


6 


9 


9 


9 


5 


3 


81 


81 


29 


11 


14 


18 


19 


13 


33 


218 


34 


24 


18 


14 


7 


10 


a 


3 


112 


23 


12 


14 


14 


9 


31 


4 


4 


91 


31 


15 


10 


4 


8 


2 


1 


4 


75 


11 


16 


13 


20 


14 


12 


32 


9 


106 


6 


9 


7 


6 


1 


1 


,.. 


4 


34 


26 


36 


23 


18 


16 


3 


8 





129 


89 


49 


48 


46 


19 


19 


6 


16 


292 


88 


35 


23 


21 


34 


21 


9 


9 


170 


44 


71 


39 


34 


22 


20 


17 


27 


274 


28 


18 


21 


9 


7 


6 


4 


6 


98 


28 


31 


16 


15 


11 


4 


6 


6 


116 


113 


70 


69 


35 


20 


12 


12 


17 


348 


32 


9 


15 


8 


11 


13 


12 


16 


115 


93 


62 


25 


24 


23 


17 


7 


16 


256 


68 


32 


19 


12 


7 


12 


8 


9 


167 


61 


43 


36 


29 


21 


15 


10 


13 


217 


64 


42 


28 


34 


26 


21 


9 


13 


237 


68 


32 


27 


27 


24 


16 


5 


9 


198 


19 


23 


23 


36 


14 


12 


13 


6 


146 


85 


85 


36 


30 


45 


26 


14 


25 


246 


38 


19 


17 


16 


13 


12 


6 


8 


129 


166 


96 


40 


30 


20 


14 


7 


26 


399 


249 


206 


?1 


32 


11 


11 


8 


34 


612 


326 


156 


114 


66 


31 


14 


9 


6 


722 


150 


58 


19 


10 


12 


7 


1 


6 


263 


66 


63 


62 


44 


38 


29 


31 


64 


377 


18 


20 


15 


19 


24 


34 


28 


35 


193 


13 


9 


12 


12 


14 


16 


14 


12 


102 


89 


67 


41 


24 


13 


5 


1 


6 


246 


164 


144 


75 


40 


25 


17 


18 


17 


500 


76 


65 


37 


38 


26 


12 


15 


35 


304 


111 


84 


44 


20 


8 


7 


5 


8 


287 


136 


65 


32 


30 


26 


27 


26 


71 


403 


71 


62 


48 


43 


41 


18 


7 


26 


309 


















BlOCK 


29 


30 


29 


26 


13 


6 


4 


2 


138 


10 


9 


9 


20 


14 


15 


9 


21 


107 


61 


60 


33 


28 


21 


12 


9 


5 


219 


e9 


41 


23 


23 


17 


11 


12 


12 


208 


144 


43 


27 


32 


28 


35 


28 


39 


376 


43 


38 


42 


30 


23 


17 


9 


11 


213 


72 


78 


44 


38 


36 


32 


23 


50 


873 


104 


55 


52 


32 


89 


29 


25 


68 


394 


95 


64 


70 


65 


31 


16 


13 


13 


356 


61 


64 


34 


33 


29 


10 


7 


8 


226 


172 


68 


33 


17 


13 


8 


14 


15 


340 


19 


4 


3 


2 


4 


10 


6 


11 


69 


37 


18 


14 


16 


11 


2 


4 


2 


104 


68 


33 


37 


17 


15 


8 


5 


8 


181 


34 


12 


5 


10 


9 


6 


2 


4 


81 


21 


7 


14 


9 


9 


6 


7 


6 


78 


13 


10 


15 


10 


8 


13 


7 


9 


85 


68 


63 


31 


36 


14 


6 


2 





199 


2 


1 


2 


2 


4 


2 


5 


1 


19 


16 


12 


H 


8 


6 


4 


3 


1 


63 


18 


15 


28 


16 


6 


5 


4 


7 


97 


127 


80 


64 


44 


27 


14 


13 


16 


375 


84 


61 


64 


43 


37 


21 


21 


19 


350 


107 


66 


33 


41 


26 


27 


11 


26 


337 


25 


51 


65 


1 49 


87 


29 


23 


20 


299 


99 


94 


82 


80 


39 


46 


32 


69 


541 


82 


74 


61 


52 


39 


21 


12 


18 


359 


113 


63 


52 


28 


21 


15 


6 


11 


309 


90 


70 


61 


45 


15 


15 


8 


12 


306 


227 


190 


114 


60 


19 


13 


4 


6 


623 


4,855 


3,314 


2,359 


1,845 


1,302 


998 


718 


1,096 


16,487 



XXIV. 
106 


SS 


106 


106 


53 


89 


27 


13 


593 


241 


307 


143 


143 


110 


33 


66 


33 


1,076 


276 


163 


146 


197 


129 


141 


113 


211 


1,379 


2P3 


174 


109 


119 


76 


65 


98 


43 


977 


183 


79 


39 


69 


59 


59 


S3 


20 


531 


681 


14 


92 


118 


151 


160 


109 


277 


3,832 


411 


290 


218 


169 


85 


121 


24 


36 


1,354 


193 


101 


118 


113 


76 


92 


84 


34 


76 


329 


159 


106 


42 


85 


21 


11 


42 


795 


107 


146 


126 


104 


ISO 


117 


H7 


88 


1,031 


65 


98 


76 


65 


11 


31 


... 


44 


370 


269 


362 


238 


186 


166 


31 


83 


... 


1,335 


842 


463 


454 


435 


180 


ISO 


67 


151 


2,762 


361 


332 


218 


199 


133 


199 


86 


85 


1,613 


392 


632 


347 


303 


196 


178 


151 


241 


2,440 


288 


185 


216 


93 


72 


62 


41 


51 


1,008 


274 


304 


157 


147 


108 


39 


49 


59 


1,137 


1,397 


8K6 


853 


433 


247 


348 


148 


210 


4,302 


611 


172 


287 


153 


210 


249 


226 


287 


2,195 


890 


498 


239 


230 


210 


163 


67 


153 


2,450 


775 


365 


216 


137 


80 


137 


91 


103 


1,904 


427 


360 


293 


243 


176 


126 


84 


309 


1,818 


689 


452 


301 


366 


280 


226 


97 


140 


2,551 


588 


325 


274 


274 


243 


162 


61 


91 


2,008 


383 


221 


221 


346 


135 


115 


125 


58 


1,104 


893 


393 


404 


330 


505 


291 


157 


281 


2,760 


320 


160 


143 


135 


109 


101 


51 


67 


1,086 


1,514 


875 


365 


273 


182 


128 


64 


237 


3,638 


2,702 


2,235 


879 


347 


119 


119 


87 


15-2 


6,640 


3,122 


1 494 


1,092 


632 


297 


134 


86 


5S 


6,915 


1,126 


438 


143 


75 


90 


53 


7 


45 


1,975 


581 


654 


643 


394 


436 


301 


322 


660 


3,891 


233 


259 


195 


246 


311 


441 


363 


454 


2,502 


116 


80 


Ic7 


107 


125 


142 


125 


107 


909 


1,033 


778 


476 


279 


151 


58 


12 


70 


2,857 


1,449 


1,272 


li(>3 


354 


221 


150 


159 


150 


4,118 


674 


576 


328 


337 


230 


106 


183 


310 


2,694 


1,313 


993 


5-JO 


237 


95 


83 


59 


95 


3,395 


1,618 


655 


381 


357 


309 


321 


309 


845 


4,795 


782 


650 


507 


455 


433 


190 


74 


275 


3,268 


XXV. 


















398 


412 


398 


357 


179 


69 


55 


27 


1,895 


122 


110 


110 


243 


170 


182 


110 


256 


1,303 


64) 


525 


847 


294 


221 


126 


94 


52 


2,300 


585 


347 


195 


195 


141 


93 


301 


101 


1,761 


' 1,348 


402 


253 


299 


262 


32S 


262 


865 


3,519 


384 


339 


375 


268 


206 


152 


80 


98 


1,902 


731 


792 


446 


386 


365 


325 


233 


508 


3,786 


1,054 


558 


5!i7 


324 


895 


294 


253 


588 


3,993 


901 


607 


664 


521 


294 


142 


123 


123 


3,375 


676 


610 


381 


373 


327 


113 


79 


90 


2,552 


1,454 


575 


279 


143 


no 


67 


118 


127 


2,873 


243 


51 


38 


26 


51 


128 


77 


141 


755 


639 


311 


241 


276 


190 


34 


,69 


34 


1,791 


667 


323 


362 


166 


147 


78 


49 


78 


1,770 


340 


120 


50 


100 


90 


50 


20 


40 


810 


253 


84 


168 


108 


108 


72 


84 


60 


937 


133 


303 


154 


103 


82 


134 


72 


92 


873 


5:i2 


4-<i 


284 


830 


128 


46 


18 


... 


.1,824 


21 


10 


21 


21 


42 


21 


52 


11 


199 


155 


124 


145 


83 


62 


42 


81 


10 


653 


187 


156 


290 


155 


52 


52 


41 


73 


1,008 


1,119 


705 


475 


388 


238 


123 


115 


141 


3,304 


723 


6'.'5 


651 


370 


319 


181 


181 


163 


3,013 


876 


540 


270 


336 


213 


221 


90 


213 


2,759 


219 


508 


647 


438 


369 


289 


229 


199 


2,978 


974 


925 


807 


787 


383 


452 


315 


679 


5,322 


926 


836 


689 


588 


441 


237 


136 


203 


4,056 


1,253 


698 


576 


310 


233 


166 


67 


122 


3,425 


827 


643 


4C9 


414 


138 


138 


74 


110 


2,813 


2,141 


1,792 


1,075 


471 


179 


122 


38 


56 


6,874 


48,199 


33,013 


83,729 


18,362 


13,15S 


10,019 


7,262 


11,053 


1,64,795 



99017 



















BLOCK 


















Kiu\ 


286 


183 


110 


75 


41 


25 


10 


11 


741 


221 


110 


94 


57 


41 


43 


24 


32 


622 


155 


114 


95 


62 


53 


23 


29 


42 


573 


133 


103 


77 


89 


68 


60 


81 


46 


597 


144 


141 


127 


S8 


69 


73 


43 


56 


751 


122 


98 


76 


55 


61 


62 


45 


101 


620 


128 


105 


71 


55 


64 


24 


11 


13 


401 


155 


111 


125 


79 


61 


82 


i9 


SI 


613 


J38 


113 


88 


58 


34 


18 


17 


14 


480 


38 


33 


89 


35 


31 


25 


29 


27 


257 


150 


81 


43 


17 


11 


10 


5 


6 


823 


130 


111 


100 


77 


46 


80 


23 


20 


637 


298 


173 


135 


98 


63 


40 


25 


34 


866 


102 , 


61 


60 


65 


34 


24 


16 


26 


378 


101 


103 


110 


64 


60 


41 


35 


58 


572 


228 


234 


215 


146 


81 


65 


41 


31 


1,041 


111 


117 


98 


7U 


51 


46 


37 


41 


571 


339 


296 


210 


148 


109 


68 


43 


63 


1,276 


51 


73 


110 


113 


77 


59 


52 


79 


C14 


135 


108 


92 


98 


103 


93 


56 


79 


764 


87 


96 


90 


90 


80 


62 


61 


110 


676 


190 


174 


166 


134 


98 


73 


45 


69 


9C9 


134 
133 


116 
100 


112 
90 


73 

87 


56 
67 


30 
52 


30 
35 


42 
30 


593 
694 


HJ'I 

117 
135 


111 
120 


89 
156 


64 

138 


48 
110 


44 

82 


34 
67 


38 
122 


510 
930 


145 

1V7 


124 
77 


122 

to 


62 
85 


41 
50 


33 
37 


19 
29 


in 

49 


564 
574 


fffi 
130 
309 
109 


93 
159 
85 


48 
88 
67 


89 

70 
46 


19 
47 
34 


15 
25 
31 


19 

16 
26 


23 

27 
24 


88S 
741 

422 


J.UJ7 

106 

*1 


87 
89 


85 
96 


62 
73 


44 
43 


24 
43 


28 

24 


48 
33 


484 
472 


1 JL 

106 
209 
460 

AO 


60 
12J 
803 
33 


64 
63 
155 
43 


64 
88 
79 
29 


48 
32 
41 
26 


39 
17 
29 
22 


32 

10 
16 
20 


61) 
8 
40 
72 


473 i 
497 
1,128 
294 


4y 
160 

U 1 


109 
39 


60 

47 


38 
68 


25 
40 


21 
34 


14 

28 


22 
85 


449 
382 


51 
96 


5 


69 


45 


40 


43 


26 


67 


471 


















BLOCK 


HO 


62 


64 


46 


46 


20 


13 


23 


350 


78 

120 
171 

OOQ 


139 
147 
204 


103 
110 
J48 


94 
101 
99 


75 
70 
69 


71 
53 
49 


64 
35 
36 


87 
86 
56 


753 

723 
8P9 


Zi& 

183 
166 
116 
109 
194 
137 
279 
73 
120 
90 
139 
108 
217 
269 
266 
161 
128 
103 
139 
138 
303 
160 
156 
335 
175 
414 


109 
149 
83 
50 
161 
121 
109 
55 
83 
t-4 
98 
63 
144 
172 
138 
110 
96 
69 
96 
64 
68 
137 
146 
194 
81 
196 


103 
123 
95 
51 
171 
112 
95 
51 
80 
83 
82 
92 
113 
116 
84 
104 
90 
51 
61 
71 
58 
ISO 
106 
86 
84 
93 


67 
105 
80 
52 
139 
86 
89 
46 
87 
76 
50 
44 
83 
79 
57 
44 
71 
44 
64 
42 
43 
93 
59 
39 
60 
51 


54 
63 
51 
51 
83 
48 
46 
27 
37 
41 
26 
83 
65 
31 
33 
27 
44 
33 
43 
27 
38 
47 
45 
26 
38 
86 


E5 
62 
53 
52 
67 
43 
68 
26 
11 
29 
27 
80 
26 
31 
37 
26 
24 
37 
29 
24 
18 
57 
39 
14 
41 
18 


30 
41 
52 
39 
54 
85 
45 
12 
13 
29 
25 
21 
28 
23 
20 
13 
22 
33 
29 
12 
26 
32 
38 
12 
9 
10 


81 

78 
90 
79 
94 
65 
91 
14 
8 
62 
28 
24 
25 
13 
11 
9 
28 
53 
41 
17 
22 
78 
63 
9 
45 
13 


682 
787 
620 
463 
963 
647 
822 
304 
889 
494 
475 
415 
701 
733 
616 
493 
503 
423 
472 
395 
376 
7SO 
662 
715 
653 
830 


12,152 


8,081 


6,690 


4,953 


3,474 


2,722 


2,051 


3,161 


43,284 







66 



XXIV. 


















dal. 


















2,532 


1,620 


974 


664 


365 


221 


88 


97 


e.sftt 


2,425 


1,207 


1,032 


626 


450 


472 


263 


851 


6,Si'6 


872 


641 


34 


349 


2<i8 


129 


163 


236 


3,222 


1,444 


1,119 


836 


96? 


738 


643 


337 


499 


6,483 


942 


923 


831 


641 


452 


478 


281 


866 


4,914 


1,026 


8:!4 


638 


462 


513 


521 


378 


849 


6,211 


1,548 


1,270 


859 


665 


653 


290 


133 


157 


5,575 


1,302 


933 


1 050 


664 


428 


268 


244 


260 


5,149 


1,165 


l.'OO 


'934 


616 


361 


191 


181 


149 


6,097 


870 


821 


379 


840 


801 


243 


282 


263 


2,499 


1,635 


883 


469 


185 


120 


109 


65 


65 


3,521 


1,346 


1,149 


1,035 


797 


476 


810 


238 


207 


5,558 


,818 


1,636 


1,277 


927 


596 


878 


236 


821 


8,1*9 


968 


679 


669 


522 


822 


228 


152 


247 


8,587 


899 


917 


980 


670 


534 


365 


312 


617 


5,094 


2,344 


2,406 


2,211 


1,501 


833 


668 


422 


319 


10,704 


1,088 


1,146 


960 


68t) 


600 


451 


363 


402 


5,596 


4,191 


3,660 


2,596 


1,830 


1.348 


841 


532 


779 


15,777 


974 


1,395 


2,101 


2,158 


1,471 


1,127 


998 


1,510 


11,734 


1,292 


1,034 


880 


938 


986 


890 


536 


756 


7,312 


llfll 


1,094 


1,026 


1,026 


912 


706 


695 


1,264 


7,704 


1,591 


1,457 


1,390 


1,122 


81' 1 


611 


377 


745 


8,114 


14t2 


1,249 


1,206 


780 


603 


323 


323 


452 


6,384 


1,349 


1,014 


913 


882 


680 


528 


355 


804 


6,025 


1,125 


1,067 


856 


615 


4U 


423 


327 


365 


6,l!i2 


1,815 


1,347 


1,751 


1,549 


1,234 


920 


752 


4,369 


10,437 


1,221 


1,044 


1,027 


522 


345 


269 


160 


160 


4,748 


1,432 


702 


821 


775 


456 


337 


264 


447 


5,234 


1.410 


1,009 


521 


423 


206 


' 163 


206 


260 


4,188 


2959 


1,523 


843 


670 


450 


239 


153 


278 


7,115 


819 


638 


503 


346 


255 


233 


195 


180 


8,169 


3,100 


903 


882 


643 


456 


i49 


290 


498 


5,0-21 


92 1 


1,154, 


1,245 


947 


567 


567 


311 


428 


6,120 


945 


535 


570 


570 


428 


348 


285 


535 


4,216 


2,427 


1,393 


731 


441 


372 


197 


116 


93 


1,770 


4,065 


2,722 


1,370 


698 


302 


i56 


141 


854 


9,968 


434 


293 


381 


257 


231 


195 


177 


638 


2,606 


1,893 


1,289 


710 


450 


296 


248 


160 


260 


6,312 


607 


464 


559 


690 


476 


405 


333 


1,012 


4,546 


1,015 


8iS 


730 


476 


423 


454 


275 


708 


4,979 


XXV. 


















1,044 


851 


879 


631 


632 


275 


178 


816 


4,806 


1,461 


1,692 


1,254 


1,145 


913 


865 


779 


1,059 


9,168 


),797 


1,544 


1,156 


1,061 


735 


557 


368 


378 


7,596 


3,931 


1,728 


1,253 


83 S 


684 


415 


305 


474 


7,528 


1,713 


l.O'-'O 


964 


627 


505 


515 


281 


T58 


6,383 


1,482 


1,330 


1,098 


938 


563 


664 


366 


697 


7,028 


1,178 


843 


964 


812 


518 


638 


528 


913 


6,294 


1,105 


507 


517 


527 


617 


527 


395 


KOI 


4,896 


1,840 


1,526 


1,622 


1,318 


787 


636 


512 


891 


9,132 


1,548 


1,367 


1,265 


971 


542 


486 


395 


734 


7,308 


2,358 


921 


803 


762 


389 


575 


380 


769 


6,947 


936 


705 


653 


690 


346 


333 


154 


179 


3,896 


2,071 


1,432 


1,380 


639 


639 


190 


224 


138 


6,713 


881 


821 


812 


744 


401 


284 


284 


606 


4,833 


1,392 


9^1 


821 


501 


260 


270 


250 


280 


4,755 


1,298 


757 


1,1 (J6 


529 


397 


361 


252 


28* 


4,988 


2,230 


1,480 


1,161 


853 


668 


267 


288 


257 


7,204 


?,4S6 


1,577 


1,055 


724 


284 


284 


211 


119 


6,720 


2,68(5 


1,448 


881 


598 


346 


378 


210 


115 


6,462 


1,666 


1,139 


1,076 


455 


279 


259 


134 


94 


5,102 


1,328 


996 


934 


737 


457 


249 


228 


290 


5,219 


907 


608 


449 


388 


291 


326 


291 


467 


3.727 


1,024 


827 


525 


465 


370 


250 


249 


353 


4,0t3 


1,130 


524 


581 


344 


221 


197 


98 


139 


3,234 


1,026 


677 


578 


428 


379 


179 


269 


219 


3,715 


1.476 


1,348 


1,338 


916 


462 


661 


315 


767 


7,182 


1,762 


1,649 


1,198 


667 


508 


441 


429 


712 


7,366 


3,714 


2,151 


954 


432 


288 


155 


132 


100 


7,926 


1,609 


745 


772 


651 


349 


377 


267 


414 


5,084 


3,904 


1,848 


877 


481 


330 


170 


94 


123 


7,827 


1,11,706 


81,7oO 


68,106 


50,657 


35,682 


27,658 


20,951 


32,130 


4,28,589 



67 



















BLOCK 


















Jam 


S05 


129 


60 


16 


'7 


3 


... 




520 


257 


159 


111 


60 


20 


22 


"4 


1 


624> 


119 


110 


124 


82 


54 


39 


20 


7 


555 


293 


233 


137 


82 


27 


IS 


8 


1 


796 


327 


226 


148 


111 


57 


32 


10 


10 


921 


371 


186 


143 


79 


71 


49 


32 


31 


963 


316 


184 


116 


49 


16 


11 


2 


1 


695 


474 


269 


127 


51 


15 


6 


3 


1 


936 


269 


171 


87 


38 


8 


6 


... 


2 


684 


146 


103 


87 


75 


88 


17 


6 


4 


476 


8 


6 


5 




1 


1 


* 


*.. 


21 


137 


73 


36 


"l6 


3 


4 


1 


.. , 


270 


642 


237 


174 


70 


66 


25 


11 


3 


1,118 


278 


130 


84 


54 


16 


15 


8 


2 


587 


335 


291 


156 


98 


37 


23 


9 


2 


yei 


495 


377 


205 


73 


30 


8 


9 


3 


1,200 


181 


126 


77 


45 


18 


8 


4 


2 


461 


948 


435 


209 


76 


20 


12 


... 


... 


1,700 


47 


42 


58 


78 


66 


35 


35 


'10 


341 


114 


134 


332 


117 


55 


41 


10 


12 


615 


147 


124 


135 


89 


67 


25 


7 


4 


598 


527 


400 


221 


123 


39 


36 


3 


3 


1,331 


241 


157 


130 


97 


42 


28 


7 


4 


706 


135 


119 


97 


71 


50 


22 


8 


3 


505 


285 


261 


373 


101 


33 


13 


6 


1 


873 


339 


370 


301 


165 


78 


29 


8 


5 


1,295 


220 


148 


102 


60 


33 


8 


1 


1 


673 


S04 


98 


68 


52 


36 


17 


13 


7 


595 


313 


171 


104 


45 


26 


16 


15 


6 


696 


199 


101 


72 


37 


31 


10 


4 


2 


456 


260 


118 


73 


49 


27 


16 


2 


3 


548 


514 


425 


248 


174 


88 


60 


23 


20 


1,542 


220 


200 


173 


113 


45 


25 


8 


5 


789 


170 


82 


69 


47 


27 


13 


8 


8 


424, 


328 


134 


71 


31 


15 


7 


3 


1 


590 


1,740 


882 


227 


57 


22 


12 


4 


3 


2,947 


399 


275 


161 


eg 


38 


37 


10 


14 


1,023 


1,434 


666 


141 


43 


14 


14 


7 


2 


2,321 


630 


801 


192 


152 


86 


42 


19 


19 


1,441 


364 


238 


199 


138 


89 


43 


19 


17 


1,107 


















BtOCK 


76 


49 


47 


29 


32 


11 


8 


5 


257 


251 


143 


10* 


99 


65 


35 


2U 


7 


733 


339 


174 


128 


90 


51 


25 


8 


8 


823 


542 


3VO 


174 


104 


63 


23 


10 


10 


1,246 


303 


164 


133 


110 


84 


63 


35 


18 


910 


551 


361 


2i-6 


158 


73 


45 


26 


5 


1,475 


459 


283 


172 


320 


75 


42 


24 


18 


1,193 


191 


HO 


96 


80 


66 


43 


23 


14 


623 


533 


294 


229 


118 


71 


41 


28 


16 


1.330 


200 


158 


120 


74 


33 


20 


12 


12 


629 


546 


231 


210 


186 


88 


61 


41 


21 


3,334 


162 


130 


97 


61 


40 


20 


10 


8 


523 


341 


186 


89 


60 


24 


11 


3 


3 


717 


. 195 


134 


91 


61 


30 


26 


6 


4 


547 


211 


132 


76 


39 


34 


19 


6 


1 


618 


379 


222 


139 


67 


31 


16 


8 


3 


865 


436 


291 


159 


81 


22 


16 


2 


2 


1,009 


449 


14 


108 


46 


23 


11 


1 


... 


852 


197 


61 


41 


21 


4 


3 


2 




3-<9 


189 


132 


88 


34 


20 


10 


2 


3 


478 


231 


133 


91 


68 


26 


18 


7 





564 


434. 


269 


183 


122 


60 


32 


19 


8 


1,127 


453 


826 


237 


326 


30 


11 


5 


5 


1,193 


148 


96 


74 


33 


16 


8 


2 


1 


378 


72 


66 


42 


27 


17 


11 


8 


2 


235 


942 


409 


226 


112 


56 


33 


15 


28 


1,821 


626 


308 


203 


153 


84 


61 


31 


11 


1,467 


982 


429 


112 


36 


14 


3 


... 


5 


1,581 


176 


107 


114 


68 


44 


23 


13 


4 


649 


385 


187 


69 


26 


4 


3 


1 




6S5 


25,730 


15,004 


9,141 


5,342 


2,771 


1,543 


712 


442 


60,690 



68 



XXIV. 


















la. 


















J.701 


1,142 


531 


142 


62 


27 






4,605 


2,821 


1,745 


3,218 


549 


219 


241 


44 


11 


6,848 


669 


619 


698 


461 


304. 


219 


113 


39 


3,122 


3,182 


2,530 


1,488 


891 


293 


362 


87 


11 


8,644 


?,140 : 


1,479 


968 


726 


373 


209 


65 


65 


6,025 


3,119 


1,572 


1,202 


664 


597 


412 


269 


261 


8,096 


3,821 


2,225 


1,403 


593 


194 


133 


24 


12 


8,405 


3,9*2 


2,176 


1,067 


428 


126 


50 


25 


8 


7,862 


2,856 


1,848 


924 


41)3 


85 


64 


... 


21 


6,201 


1,420 


1,002 


846 


729 


370 


165 


58 


39 


4,629 


87 


65 


55 


KM 


11 


11 







229 


1,418 


756 


373 


166 


31 


41 


10 





2,795 


5,] 25 


2,241 


1,645 


662 


630 


236 


104 


28 


10,571 


2,638 


1,233 


797 


512 


152 


142 


76 


19' 


5,569 


2,983 


2,591 


1,389 


873 


330 


205 


t-0 


ia 


8,470 


5,090 


3,876 


2.10S 


70 


308 


82 


93 


31 


12,38 ' 


1,774 


1,235 


755 


441 


176 


78 


39 


20 


4,518 


11,721 


5,378 


2,584 


940 


247 


148 


.. 





21,018 


898 


803 


1,108 


1,490 


1,070 


659 


290 


194 


6,512 


1,091 


1,282 


1,263 


1,120 


527 


393 


95 


115 


6,886 


1,675 


1,413 


1,639 


1,014 


764 


285 


80 


45 


6,815 


4,414 


3,350 


1,851 


1,030 


327 


126 


25 


25 


11,148 


2,595 


1,690 


1,400 


1,044 


452 


301 


75 


43 


7,600 


1,370 


1,207 


984 


720 


5C7 


223 


81 


31 


5,123 


2,740 


2,510 


1,663 


971 


317 


125 


58 


10 


8,394 


3,805 


4,152 


3,378 


1,852 


875 


325 


90 


56 


14,533 


1,852 


1,246 


859 


505 


278 


67 


8 


8 


4,823 


2,772 


894 


620 


474 


328 


155 


118 


64 


5,425 


3,306 


1,855 


1,129 


488 


282 


174 


163 


65 


7,552 


1,906 


967 


690 


354 


297 


96 


38 


19 


4,367 


1,952 


886 


548 


368 


203 


120 


15 


23 


4,115 


5,332 


4,<J09 


2,573 


1,805 


913 


519 


239 


207 


15,997 


2,853 


2,593 


2,213 


1,465 


584 


324 


104 


65 


10,231 


1,515 


731 


6'5 


419 


241 


116 


71 


71 


3,779 


3,808 


1,556 


824 


360 


174 


81 


35 


12 


6,850 


15,376 


7,784 


2,006 


504 


195 


106 


35 


27 


26,043 


3,537 


2,438 


1,427 


789 


336 


328 


89 


124 


9,068 


16,964 


7,879 


1,668 


508 


166 


166 


83 


23 


27,457 


7,497 


3,582 


2,286 


1,809 


1,023 


500 


223 


226 


37,148 


3,848 


2,516 


2,104 


1,459 


941 


454 


201 


180 


11,703 


XXIV. 


















1,044, 


673 


645 


398 


439 


151 


110 


G9 


3,529 


3,056 


1,741 


1,246 


1,205 


792 


426 


353 


85 


8,924 


3,562 


1.K28 


1,345 


945 


536 


262 


84 


84 


8,646 


4,590 


2,710 


1,474 


881 


534 


}M 


85 


84 


10,552 


2,836 


1,535 


1,245 


1,030 


786 


589 


828 


108 


8,537 


4,920 


3,224 


2,26 


1,411 


652 


402 


232 


45 


13,172 


4,659 


2,873 


1,746 


1,218 


761 


426 


24-1 


383 


12,110 


1,936 


1,115 


973 


811 


669 


436 


233 


142 


6,815 


5,054 


2,783 


2,172 


1,119 


673 


389 


265 


152 


12,612 


2,259 


5,785 


1,355 


J-36 


372 


226 


136 


136 


7,105 


4,615 


],952 


1,775 


1,149 


744 


615 


347 


177 


11,274 


2,076 


1,666 


1,243 


781 


513 


256 


128 


102 


6,765 


5,884 


3,210 


1,536 


1,035 


414 


190 


52 


52 


12.373 


1,907 


1,311 


820 


597 


293 


255 


59 


39 


5,351 


2,113 


1,32-2 


701 


390 


310 


190 


60 


10 


5,186 


4,555 


2,668 


1,671 


80S 


373 


192 


96 


36 


10,396 


4,481 
4.116 


2,991 
1,962 


1,634 
990 


833 
422 


226 
211 


164 
101 


20 
9 


20 


10,369 
7,811 


2,067 


640 


430 


2-JO 


42 


31 


21 





3,451 


1,956 


1,361) 


911 


352 


207 


103 


21 


81 


4947 


2,397 


1,380 


944 


602 


269 


187 


73 


... 


6,852 


3,823 


2,370 


1,612 


1,076 


529 


282 


167 


70 


9,928 


3,900 


2,806 


2,040 


],085 


258 


95 


43 


43 


10,270 


1,2)2 


786 


60(5 


270 


131 


66 


16 


8 


3,095 


717 


558 


418 


269 


169 


109 


80 


20 


2,340 


9,267 


4,024 


2,223 


1,102 


551 


325 


348 


275 


17,915 


7,073 


3,480 


2,293 


1,729 


949 


576 


350 


124 


16,574 


10,886 


4,755 


1.242 


399 


155 


33 


... 


65 


17,525 


1,618 


984 


1,048 


625 


405 


211 


119 


37 


5,047 


3,630 


1,858 


651 


245 


38 


28 


9 





6,459 


2,60952 


1,51,SU7 


92,233 54,317 


28,239 


15,678 


7,194 


4,464 


614,924 



B 98018 



09 



















BLOCK 


















Te 


4 


6 


H 


1 










14 


13 


12 


14 


13 


7 


11 


"*8 


4 


82 


24 


16 


7 


9 


2 


5 


6 


12 


81 


24 


29 


37 


21 


13 


18 


7 


15 


164 


6 


4 


2 


1 


1 





1 


... 


16 


6 


9 


7 


4 


6 


3 


2 


4 


41 


63 


42 


41 


28 


10 


12 


6 


6 


208 


21 


20 


15 


11 


8 


7 


7 


9 


98 


13 


23 


10 


13 


12 


4 


2 


5 


82 


46 


37 


22 


8 


8 


10 


4 


7 


142 


"*19 


"is 


"ii 


"l2 


"*e 


"*6 


..'. 


"3 


" - 74 


119 


S5 


62 


23 


12 


8 


3 


5 


317 


32 


1 19 


5 


3 


2 


1 


3 


1 


66 




'"l 


... 


"*2 


... 




.;'. 


'"l 


" 4 


... 


'.'.'. 


** 





** 




... 


|" 





22 


"V 


4 


1 


... 




... 


... 


34 


* 

1 


.'.'.' 




"'. 


!!! 





"*1 





2 


1 


'"l 

* 


*.* 


... 


"2 


... 


... 


... 


4 


"'16 


"ii 


'"7 


"io 


* 
** 

11 


'"9 


"io 


"l5 


'89 


24 


25 


13 


6 


5 


5 


1 


7 


8 


" 4 


" - 3 


"*2 


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1 


.!! 


*** 


'"12 


35 


25 


10 


6 


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1 


* 


> 


82 


5 


1 


2 


1 




1 


** 


1 


11 


23 


30 


13 


13 


"V 


8 


6 


6 


106 


42 


26 


33 


33 


15 


12 


5 


10 


176 


"*52 


"is 


'"e 


"'4 


2 


... 


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i * 


'"so 


... 


... 


* 


... 


... 


... 




* 


BLOCK 


o 


2 


3 




1 




... 


1 


9 


5 


1 


1 


"2 


1 


2 


... 


3 


15 


33 


28 


25 


27 


20 


9 


'ii 


9 


162 


113 


72 


60 


42 


20 


20 


14 


14 


355 


9 


2 


1 


... 






... 


1 


13 


73 


66 


46 


33 


26 


'l6 


15 


9 


284 


Z 


... 


... 


1 




... 







3 


... 


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... 


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... 


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t 


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... 


1 


... 


. 





'"l 


It* 


1 


3 


13 


6 


5 


2 


4 


6 


3 


3 


43 


"*47 


"23 


"is 


"ii 


"9 


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"*8 


'*9 


127 


16 


10 


9 


6 


t , 


5 


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49 


7 


9 


14 


11 


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79 


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... 


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... 


... 


it* 





.. 


> 


- 


* 


1 






*** 




** 





... 


1 


944 


690 


508 


363 


232 


191 


134 


168 


3,230 



70 



KXIV. 


















rAr. 


















36 


53 


27 


9 


... 








124 


142 


132 


154 


142 


77 


121 


88 


44 


900 


135 


90 


39 


51 


11 


28 


34 


68 


456 


201 


315 


402 


228 


141 


195 


76 


162 


1,780 


39 


26 


13 


7 


7 


... 


7 


... 


99 


50 


76 


59 


34 


50 


25 


17 


34 


345 


762 


cos 


4>6 


839 


121 


145 


73 


73 


2,517 


177 


168 


126 


92 


67 


59 


59 


75 


823 


138 


244 


10(i 


138 


328 


42 


21 


53 


870 


147 


360 


214 


78 


78 


97 


88 


68 


1,380 


"l97 


i's'e 


i'ii 


124 


"62 


'*52 


... 


31 


'766 


1,125 


80 1 


586 


21 S 


114 


70 


"28 


47 


2,998 


3U4 


180 


47 


29 


19 


9 


29 


9 


623 


... 


i'o 


... 


'I 1 


... 




... 


"io 


"41 


"420 


134 


"76 


"19 


... 


... 


... 


... 


"649 


'"ll 





* 




... 





"ii 


... 


'"l'2 


8 


"s 







'l7 


... 


... 


... 


33 


"iso 


123 


*79 


m 


1-23 


101 


112 


168 


898 


202 


211 


109 


51 


42 


42 


8 


59 


724 


"43 


32 


'*22 


"22 


* 


"ii 




... 


130 


335 


23y 


96 


57 


43 


10 


... 





785 


38 


8 


15 


8 


** 


7 


... 


7 


83 


290 


311 


135 


135 


73 


31 


62 


62 


1,099 


544 


337 


428 


428 


194 


150 


66 


130 


2,282 


604 

* 


174 


"70 


"46 


23 


... 


12 


... 


"929 


XXV. 





... 


** 


... 













27 


27 


41 




14 


... 




14 


123 


61 


12 


12 


"24 


12 


24 





37 


182 


347 


294 


268 


284 


210 


94 


116 


94 


1,702 


957 


610 


508 


356 


169 


169 


119 


118 


3,006 


84 


19 


9 


... 




>* 


... 


9 


121 


652 


589 


411 


295 


232 


143 


134 


80 


2,536 


20 









10 


** 





... 


... 


30 







... 


"ii 


11 


... 


"ii 


... 


"*45 




9 


... 






"s 





" 8 


25 


'l67 


77 


64 


'26 


51 


77 


38 


38 


538 


'480 


225 


127 


108 


"88 


"68 


"78 


"is 


1,2*2 


160 


100 


90 


60 




50 


10 


20 


490 


84 




108 


168 


132 

* 


192 


lOi 

M 


96 


60 


948 





"41 


'{J6 


"22 


... 


* 


- 


... 


155 


" 9 


... 


... 


... 


... 





... 


... 


" 9 


9,548 


6,855 


5,162 


3,716 


2,374 


1,948 


1,342 


1,666 


82,611 



71 



















BLOCK 


















Sissam 


101 


54 


18 


11 


7 


2 


1 





194 


25 


14 


16 


8 


7 


5 


2 


3 


80 


31 


26 


8 


7 


5 


3 


3 


4 


87 


51 


36 


20 


7 


2 


1 


2 


... 


119 


51 


37 


23 


9 


5 


* 


1 


... 


126 


40 


27 


7 


8 


4 


2 


<* 


... 


88 


26 


2<> 


15 


12 


2 


2 


1 





84 


35 


26 


16 


10 


3 


2 


2 


... 


94 


17 


9 


11 


11 


3 


4 


... 


... 


55 


26 


21 


25 


36 


19 


6 


8 


4 


148 


1 


2 


... 





1 





1 




6 


48 


40 


"32 


11) 


3 


3 


... 




145 


120 


60 


42 


2<> 


10 


7 


' 4 


'3 


272 


25 


U 


10 


5 


5 


4 


4 


3 


67 


16' 


7 


5 


4 










1 


33 


5 


6 


8 


5 


'"4 


2 


1 


1 


32 


16 


9 


9 


6 


1 






1 


42 


22 


24 


6 


5 


1 


5 


1 


1 


65 


18 


16 


7 


11 


3 


9 


4 


... 


67 


4 


7 


5 


4 


2 


2 


... 


1 


25 


1C 


3 


6 


4 


3 


t. 


... 


... 


32 


21 


14 


17 


4 


5 


5 


1 


... 


67 


9 


4 


g 


6 


5 


... 


... 


1 


33 


20 


18 


9 


3 


1 


1 






52 


11 


17 


16 


10 


8 


4 


"2 


3 


71 


9 


38 


18 


10 


3 


2 


1 


*. 


61 


61 


24 


29 


17 


13 


8 


4 


5 


151 


32 


16 


7 


3 


2 


2 




... 


62 


il 


18 


5 


4 


3 


3 


... 


** 


54 


72 


38 


M 


12 


7 




1 


* 


148 


34 


21 


6 


4 


3 


>.. 


*.* 


... 


68 


45 


SO 


10 


10 


4 


1 


1 


* 


301 


80 


28 


37 


24 


14 


36 


3 


7 


159 


7 


6 


5 


1 


1 





... 




20 


87 


68 


29 


14 


4 


3 




1 


206 


7 


JO 


7 


7 


3 


1 


' 1 


... 


36 


'"l6 


'"l 


" 4 


'"l 


... 


* ** 


... 


.'.'! 


" - 22 


8 


4 


5 


2 


1 





... 


"2 


22 


6 


3 


2 


2 


... 


" 


1 


... 


14 


















BLOCK 


9 


6 


6 


o 


4 


1 


1 


... 


29 


18 


11 


i 


4 


1 




... 


... 


35 


28 


19 


14 


5 


5 


1 


3 


i 


76 


23 


20 


14 


7 


5 


2 


3 


i 


76 


68 


33 


23 


21 


8 


3 


2 


... 


158 


63 


35 


20 


15 


7 


4 


2 


* * 


146 


75 


55 


27 


21 


7 


5 


1 


... 


191 


54 


21 


15 


9 


2 


2 


2 


1 


106 


58 


37 


29 


17 


4 


2 


1 


1 


149 


83 


6 


5 


4 


3 


1 





* 


52 


70 


26 


10 


5 


* 


2 


1 


i 


115 


31 


10 


12 


4 


2 


1 







66 


44 


17 


14 


13 


2 


3 1 ... 


"3 


96 


15 


10 


5 


10 


5 


4 2 


6 


57 


20 


13 


3 


2 


5 


3 


1 


1 


48 


33 


31 


19 


15 


5 


8 


1 


... 


112 


24 


20 


11 


7 


3 


1 





1 


67 


20 


1* 


8 


2 




1 


... 


... 


43 


4 


1 


i 


2 












11 


44 


18 


8 


2 


J 




* 


... 


73 


19 


3 


5 


3 


M 




4.. 


... 


30 


33 


14 


1* 


9 


6 


2 


1 


2 


81 


15 


7 


7 


5 


4 


2 


1 


... 


41 


10 


3 


fi 


1 


1 


*.. 


1 


... 


22 


5 


4 


2 


1 








... 


... 


12 


20 


18 


15 


12 


6 


... 


1 


1 


79 


3 


9 


4 


4 


2 





... 


... 


22 


8 


1 


2 


2 




i i 


1 


16 


3 


4 


7 


3 


"'5 


3 1 


... 


26 





3 


1 




... 





... 


... 


4 


2,039 


1,274 


830 


519 


200 


157 76 


61 


5,248 



XXIV. 


















(BlacTcwoo 


<*). 
















894 


478 


159 


97 


62 


18 


9 





1,717 


274 


154 


176 


88 


77 


55 


22 


33 


879 


174 


146 


45 


39 


28 


17 


17 


23 


489 


554 


391 


217 


76 


22 


11 


22 




1,293 


334 


2-12 


150 


<9 


33 





7 


... 


825 


33 fj 


227 


59 


67 


34 


17 


* 


... 


740 


314 


314 


181 


145 


24 


24 


12 


... 


1,014 


294 


218 


135 


81 


25 


17 


17 


... 


790 


181 


95 


117 


117 


32 


42 


... 


... 


584 


J."A 

253 


233 


243 


350 


185 


58 


78 


39 


1,439 




22 




... 


11 




11 




55 


497 
1,185 
237 


414 
567 
104 


331 

397 
95 


197 
246 
47 


31 
95 

47 


31 

66 
38 


*38 

38 


"28 
29 


1,501 

2,573 
635 


14.9 


62 


45 


36 




3* 





9 


, 294 


i * 
52 


62 


82 


51 


"41 


21 


10 


10 


329 


157 


88 


88 


59 


10 




... 


10 


412 


272 


297 


74 


62 


12 


"62 


12 


13 


804 


344 
38 


286 
67 


134 

43 


2'0 
38 


57 
19 


172 
19 


76 


"io 


1,279 
233 


182 


34 


68 


46 


34 


* 


... 




364 


176 

97 


117 
43 


142 
86 


34 
64 


42 
64 


42 


8 




11 


551 
355 


203 


183 


91 


31 


10 


10 


... 


... 


523 


306 


164 


154 


96 


77 


38 


19 


29 


83 




202 


202 


112 


34 


22 


11 


... 


684 


429 


202 


244 


143 


109 


67 


34 


42 


1,270 


292 


146 


64 


27 


18 


IS 


... 





565 


223 
6Sg 


195 
364 


54 
172 


43 
115 


33 

67 


33 


.. 
10 


... 


586 
1,417 


255 


158 


45 


30 


23 





... 


... 


511 


467 
339 


311 
363 


lOi 

480 


104 
311 


42 
181 


10 

207 


10 
39 


91 


1,048 
2,061 


62 


53 


45 


9 


9 







... 


178 


1,010 


789 


337 


162 


46 


"35 


... 


12 


2,391 


62 


88 


62 


62 


26 


9 


9 




318 


189 




12 


"47 


'l2 


..'. 


... 




... 


260 


95 


48 


59 


24 


12 


... 


... 


24 


262 


63 


32 


21 


21 


* 


... 


11 


... 


148 


XXV. 


















123 


82 


82 


28 


55 


14 


14 


... 


39S 


219 
294 
220 
636 
563 
71 
548 
550 
373 
591 


134 
199 
169 
309 
312 
558 
213 
351 
28 
220 


12 
147 

102 
215 
179 
274 
152 
275 
56 
85 


49 
53 
59 
597 
134 
213 
91 
161 
45 
42 


12 
52 
8 
75 
62 
71 
20 
38 
34 


"ii 

26 
28 
36 
61 
20 
19 
11 
17 


32 
17 
19 

18 
10 
20 
9 

'"& 


10 
42 

'io 

9 

's 


426 
798 
643 
1,479 
3,304 
1,938 
1,074 
1,412 
587 
971 


397 
159 
147 
200 
397 
246 


205 
293 
98 
130 
373 
.206 


154 
241 
49 
30 
2-J8 
113 


61 

224 
98 
20 
180 

72 


"26 
35 
49 
50 
60 
31 


13 

52 
39 
30 
96 
10 


* 

"l9 
10 
12 


"52 
8 
10 

"io 


845 
1,656 
567 
480 
1,346 
68 


184 


110 


73 


18 


>.. 


9 





... 


394 


42 


10 


. 42 


21 


... 


* 


... 


... 


115 


455 


186 


83 


21 


10 





... 




755 


197 
291 
129 
82 


31 
123 
60 

25 


52 
123 
60 

49 


31 

79 
43 

8 


"58 
35 

8 


"is 

17 


"9 
9 

8 


"is 




311 

714 
363 
180 


50 

256 


40 

177 


20 
U7 


10 

118 


"59 


** 


"io 


"io 


120 

777 


34 
89 

28 


102 
11 
37 

23 


45 
22 
64 
9 


45 
22 
27 


23 
"46 


"n 

28 


"ii 

9 


"ii 


249 
177 
239 
87 


20,449 


1-3,831 


8,436 


5,674 


2,573 


1,715 


764 


661 


53,103 



B 990 19 



73 



1 














3 


BLOC 
Si 

4 





* 








> 










11 


4 


1 


2 


' 1 


2 


'"l 


5 


"*27 


2 


1 


3 


2 


2 


2 




4 


16 


2 


2 


3 


1 


3 


3 


'"2 


6 


21 


2 


... 


... 




1 


2 


1 


3 


g 


32 


20 


18 


5 


1 


2 






58 


3 


4 


9 


* 


5 


2 


"l 


2 


26 


19 


16 


15 


6 


5 


2 


3 


3 


69 


6 


... 


... 


4 


1 


2 


1 


2 


16 


1 


2 


1 


... 


1 


... 


i * 


1 


6 


1 


1 


1 


3 


3 


2 


1 


1 


13 


6 


1 


... 


2 


1 


... 




1 


11 


... 


... 


... 




... 


... 


'"l 


2 


3 




... 


... 


1 


... 


... 


1 


... 


2 


" 1 


"l 


"l 


** 


... 


..'. 


... 


1 


" 4 


""HO 


enumera 


1 

ed separ 


tely. 


... 


'"l 


... 


3 


5 


2 


" 2 


"2 


'"l 


.'." 


2 


1 


1 


'"ll 


i 


4 


4 


3 


1 


... 


1 




14 


... 


... 


... 




. 





* 


1 


1 


i 


... 


1 


... 




... 


... 




2 


... 


... 


... 







... 


... 


'"4 


4 


" i 


"l 


**2 


'" 




!!! 


... 


"l 


" 5 


'." 


*** 





t 





... 


... 


... 





... 


... 





* 


.. 


i 





... 


* . 

1 


! 


* 

" t 




1 


* 








... 





... 


" 1 




* 
* 












2 


BLOOI 
2 


" i 


1 


"3 


2 


3 


3 


'l 


3 


17 


... 


... 


1 


... 


... 


... 


* 




1 


... 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 




"4 


11 


... 


... 


1 


1 


2 


1 


"2 


10 


17 


i 


2 


1 


... 




1 


1 


5 


11 


2 


2 


... 


... 


... 


... 


1 


2 


7 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 





3 


3 


... 


1 


... 


1 


1 


1 





3 


7 


I 


... 


1 


i 


* 


... 


1 


1 


4 


1 


1 


1 


* 


1 


3 


4 


6 


17 


6 


3 


... 


2 




... 


1 


1 


32 


" 5 


'"3 


... 


'"4 


'"l 


"2 


'"S 


3 


21 


13 


10 


6 


6 


1 


1 


1 


1 


39 


3 


4 


2 


2 


4 


2 


1 


5 


23 


13 
12 


13 
15 


5 
6 


2 

4 


1 


3 


1 
3 


3 
4 


41 

44 


14 


9 


7 


7 


3 


2 


2 




44 


17 


18 


18 


13 


11 


8 


5 


^ 


94 


4 


8 


2 


5 


2 




1 


2 


24 


1 


... 


... 








* 


^ 




1 


... 


... 


... 


f 







* 


"l 


1 


3 


... 


1 





3 


'"l 






8 


1 


1 


... 


* 




... 






2 




1 


... 




... 


... 


! 


' 1 


2 


... 


... 


1 


3 


3 


1 


1 




9 


... 


1 


... 


2 


... 


2 


1 


'"l 


7 


5 


3 


'"2 


* 
* 


... 


... 


... 


... 


10 


174 


356 


122 


86 


63 


55 


44 


108 


808 



XXIV. 


















Mi 


















9 


... 


... 


... 


... 


* 


... 


27 


36 


'"62 


23 


"* 


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8 


" 2 


8 


5 


2 


... 




1 


.. 


18 




1 


3 


' 


... 


' 1 


... 


.. 


5 


" 7 


4 


2 


3 


1 


.. 


1 




18 


5 


2 


2 


1 


... 


1 


... 


... 


11 


12 


5 


2 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


19 


... 


"l 





'"l 


... 


... 


... 


... 


" 2 


4 




i .1 


IM 


... 


... 


... 


... 


4 


4 


"3 


' 4 


i 


... 




... 


... 


12 


1 




2 


... 


2 


.. 


... 




5 








... 


... 


lm 


... 


1 


1 




"*1 






... 


ff 


... 


... 


1 


" 3 


1 


!!! 


'"i 


1 


.. 


... 


... 


6 


4 


2 


4 


... 


... 


.. 


... 


... 


10 




1 


1 


... 


... 


.. 


... 




2 


" 2 


1 


... 


... 


... 


.. 


... 


... 


3 


39 


22 


'4 


3 


1 




1 


1 


71 


425 


409 


234 


83 


38 


19 


11 


10 


223 



86 



XXIV. 


















ting 


















... 


9 


'" . 


... 


... 


... 


... 


9 


18 


'l63 


124 


"45 


"23 


11 


'"e 


... 


... 


"s7 


185 


87 


43 


33 


11 








359 


111 


79 


59 


M 


13 


'"7 


... 




282 


160 


81 


67 


17 


... 


8 


... 




330 


181 


73 


12 


30 


.,, 




12 






42 


25 


25 


8 


... 


... 






100 


42 


32 


11 


... 


... 


... 


"S2 




117 


19 


39 


39 


19 


... 


... 




... 


11G 


'"10 


"62 


"42 


. .. 


... 


* 





... 


114 


180 


66 


47 


28 


... 


... 


... 


... 


321 


66 


47 


19 


10 


... 


... 


* 




142 


125 


98 


63 


27 


9 




... 


... * 


312 


41 


10 


10 


... 


... 


... 


10 




71 


20 


69 


19 


... 


... 


.. 


... 




10S 


173 


62 


62 


... 


49 


12 




... 


358 


29 


38 


86 




... 









153 


67 


34 


11 


** 


... 


>.. 




"ii 


313 


50 


159 


34 


... 


... 


8 


... 





251 


65 


53 


11 


11 


32 


... 


... 


... 


172 


51 


61 


31 


10 


... 


... 


... 





143 


38 


29 


29 


... 





... 


... 


... 


M 


11 


23 


22 


22 


... 


.. 


.* 


... 




76 


101 


59 


17 


8 


... 





* .. 


jig! 


146 


173 


64 


27 


18 


IS 


9 


... 


455 


76 


76 


22 


32 


... 


... 


... 


22 


22"* 


134 


86 


67 


57 


... 


... 


... 


.. 


344 


... 


8 


15 


... 


... 


... 


... 




23 




31 


..' 


... 


10 


... 


... 


... 


41 


"*91 


65 


13 


13 


... 


... 


... 


. 




18 


.. 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


9 


27 


46 





23 


... 


... 


... 


.. 


12 


81 


18 





9 


... 


.'.'.' 


... 


... 


... 


27 







"l2 


"l2 


... 


* 


... 


... 


24 


"iie 


"32 


... 


11 


"21 


... 


... 


... 


180 


XXV. 


















182 


41 


27 


... 


... 


* 


... 


... 


2'X> 


122 


85 


12 


... 


... 


... 


... 


* 


219 


84 


52 


11 


... 


... 


... 


... 


*.* 


147 


42 


... 


8 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


50 


131 


06 


187 


75 


28 


19 


... 


19 


665 


36 


36 


9 


... 


9 


... 


... 


... 


SO 


345 


628 


284 


81 


61 


31 


*.. 


... 


1,330 


182 


142 


122 


71 


10 


20 


... 


... 


547 


. 161 


86 


57 


19 


10 


9 


... 


... 


341 


158 


79 


68 


... 


11 


... 


... 


... 


316 


253 


110 


68 


9 


... 


8 


8 


... 


456 


88 


77 




... 


... 


13 


13 


... 


141 




69 


"62 




17 


... 


... 


... 


138 


'"20 


78 


49 


19 


... 


... 


10 




17(5 




10 


30 


... 


... 


10 


... 


... 


50 


'"84 


48 


24 


36 


12 


... 


12 


... 


110 


51 


21 


21 


10 


... 


10 


... 


... 


113 


110 


46 


18 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


174 


... 


"io 


... 


"io 


... 


... 


.. 


... 


'"20 


41 





... 


... 


... 


... 


.. 


... 


41 


35 


26 


35 


9 


... 


... 


.. 


... 


105 


9 


... 


17 


... 


17 


.. 


.. 


... 


43 






... 


... 


... 


.. 


.. 


8 


8 




"io 




... 


... 


.. 


,, 


... 


10 


"29 


10 





10 


10 


.. 


.. 


... 


59 


45 


23 


45 


... 


... 


.. 


.. 


... 


113 


g 


11 


11 


; ... 


... 




.. 


... 


22 


"is 


9 


... 


... 


... 


.. 


t. 


... 


27 


368 


208 


38 


28 


9 




9 


9 


669 


6,094 


3,945 


2,254 


803 


376 


179 


116 


99 


12,865 



87 



60 



APPENDIX 
Valuation Survey Notet, Black XXIV, Compartments 1 to 40 



Name of Village. 


Compartment 
Number. 


Compartment 
area in 
acres. 


i 

^ Trees in the Test Plot. 


"3.1 
























1 


2 


3 










































JjZiOOK 
Ska 








5 


3 


1 


6 


1 


... 


..." 


* 


16 


Kodalgadda and Mavinmani 


1 


426-4 


8 


6 


8 


5 


3 


... 


4 





34 


Do. do. 


2 


655-2 





... 


* 






... 









Kodadlgadda ... .. 


3 


276-8 


... 


2 




... 


1 


... 


* 


... 


3 


Do. and Mavinmani .. 


4 


674-4 


... 


... 







... 


... 


... 


... 




Kodalgadda 


5 


882-8 


... 


1 


2 




... 


... 


... 


... 




Do. ... .. 


6 


554-8 





... 





... 


... 


... 


*. 


... 


... 


Do. and Mavinmani 


7 


674-8 


2 


4 


i 


2 


... 




... 


1 


10 


Do. do. 


8 


620-0 


... 


1 


... 


1 


... 


... 




... 


2 


Do. Mavinmani and Sunksal. 
Do. do. do. ... 
Mavinmani ... ... 


9 
10 
11 


618-0 
516-4 

480-8 


"42 
6 


35 

8 


"is 

6 


8 


'"s 

3 


'"s 

4 


3 


"5 
3 


"l40 
41 


Do. and Sunkaal 


32 


618-0 


... 


... 


1 


1 


1 


... 


... 




K 


Do. do. 


13 


893-6 


2 


2 


1 


... 


... 


... 







O 


Sunksal ... 


14 


344-4 


... 


i . 


... 


... 


... 


... 


* 


... 





Do. ... 


15 


424-8 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 





... 


* '" 


Do. ... 


16 


524-4 


... 


... 








... 


... 


... 


... 


Do. and Kaliuhakal 
Kalinhakal 
Kodalgadda ... 


17 
18 
19 


429"2 
719-6 
737-2 


1 
10 


2 
Not en 

4 


umeratec 
I 


separate 
8 


y-" 

3 


3 


..* 


. 


3 

29 


Sunksal ... . 


20 


729-2 


... 


... 




... 


... 





... 


... 


.. 


Do. ... 
Hebbul ... 


21 
22 


759-0 
633-2 


" 4 


" 6 


'"7 


4 


"*2 


* * 


'"l 


... 


"*24 


Do. ... 


23 


736-4 


4 


7 ' 


1 


2 


... 


" 


... 


... 


14 


Do. ... 


24 


730-4 




... 


... 




... 


* 


... 






Sunkaal and Katiuhakal 


25 


585-6 


" 2 


5 




1 


... 


' 


... 






Sunkaal and Hebul .. 
Hebbul and Kavlalli... 
Do. do. 


26 
27 
28 


798-0 
467-2 
5772 


" 6 

4 


*2 
4 


'"l 


"*3 

1 


'"l 


* 

1 


"*i 


"'l 


'"l3 
12 

17 


Kavlalli .. 


29 


566-4 


2 


1 


3 




| 




"*. 


... 


/ 

4 


Do. .. 
Do. .. 


30 
31 


614-8 
392-0 


1 
3 


3 


... 


1 
3 


1 


1 


... 


"'l 


12 


Do. .. 
Do. .. 


32 
33 


765-6 
750-8 


""l5 


'u 


'"9 


13 


'"s 


"is 

2 


'"G 
i 


'19 


"'97 
3 


Do. .. 

Jlakigadda and Agaur 
Do. and Kavlalli 
Do. and Marugadda 
Do, Kavlalli and Marugadda. 


34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 


566-8 
578-2 
612-4 
500-0 
585-6 
910-4 


'"23 
12 
8 
11 
17 


"22 

17 
9 
7 
26 


"is 

23 

6 
5 
13 


13 
21 

7 
10 
18 


9 
12 
5 

7 
7 


9 
13 

7 
5 
4 


5 
9 
3 

3 


"'5 
18 
1 
1 
6 


104 
125 
46 
46 
94 




40 


666-0 




















Total ... 




24,096-8 


















BLOCK 








6 


4 


7 


2 


1 




1 


... 


20 


Shevkar ... .., 
Shevkar and Heggar... 


41 
42 


442-8 
6100 


" 4 


1 
4 


2 
5 

n 


2 
2 


... 


'"l 

2 


3 


"3 


6 
23 
2 


Heggar ... 


43 


706-0 


1 


... 


1 








* 








Heggar and Kalleshwar .. 
Kalleshwar and Halvalli 


44 
45 


562-8 
775-0 


" 1 


... 


"'2 


'l 


'"l 


'"2 


.... 


'"l 


8 


Kalleshwar 


46 


553-2 


... 


... 




... 


1 









" 7 


Kalleshwar and Halvalli 


47 


740-0 


3 


1 







J. 


... 








Halvalli ... 
Halvalli, Kalleshwar and Muski.. 


48 
49 


605-2 
798-0 


"2 


::: 


'"3 


1 


"*2 


"l 


"l 


.." 


'"10 


Halvalli and Kammani 


50 


667-6 


... 





... 


* 


... 










Halvalli ... 


51 


694-8 


... 


... 




... 


... 










Do. and Dongri... . 


52 


657-6 


... 


... 




... 


... 


... 






" 1 


Do. do. ... 


68 


730-0 


1 




... 


'' 


... 


... 


'"l 




4 


Do. do. ... 


54 


590-0 


1 




... 




... 


... 








Dongii ... ... 


55 


642 '8 


... 


... 


"* 


... 


... 


1 


'"l 


B 


" 3 


Do. ... 


56 


793-2 


... 


... 




... 


... 








1 


Do. ... 


57 


792-4 


1 




*.* 




... 


... 


'"l 




2 


Do. ... 


58 


624-4 


... 







... 


... 








... 


Do. ... 


59 


720-8 


... 


... 


*** 


'* 


'"l 


... 






1 


Do. and Kuntgani 


60 


732-8 


... 










... 






5 


Do. do. ... 


61 


656-8 


1 




i 


1 











2 


Kuntgani and Hillur... 
Kuntgani ... 


62 
63 


634-4 
542-4 


"*15 


*3 


13 
3 


i. 

3 

4 


'"l 
4 


'"l 


'"l 
1 


... 


36 

26 


Do. ... 

Kuntgani and Manigadda 
Kuntgani 
Do. and Hillur ... 


64 
65 
66 
67 


641-2 
729-2 
959-2 
1,210-0 


9 
34 
34 
8 


29 
33 
5 


21 
17 
1 

4 


10 
12 

5 


15 
6 

1 

7 


12 

2 


4 
5 

3 


2 
5 

'"l 


127 
114 
15 
32 


Do. do. 
Hillur ... 


68 
69 


644-0 
794-4 


5 
39 


22 


4 


3 


1 


... 


1 


1 


71 


Do. ... ... 


70 


659-2 




















Total .. 




20,910-2 


352 


304 


214 


192 


115 


96 


67 


75 


1,415 


ran o a , 




45,007*0 





88 



91 



IV a. 



and Block XXV, Compartments 41 to 70, Angola High Forest, 



Trees in the compartment. 
















Eatio. 


7* 9" 1 


0" 12" 1 


S" 15" 16" 18" 1 


9" 21" 22" 24" 


25" 27" 


28"? 


Total. 












22 


23 


24 


XXIV. 


























rangi. 


























44 


27 


9 53 


9 










142 






88 


CO 


88 


55 


33 


... 


'44 


... 




374 


23,891 
23,223 




8-855 
10-975 




"22 






"ii 










*33 


3,555 




5-626 
























13,097 




10-86 




'"s 


17 














26 


5,e69 




6-543 
























7,835 




8406 


17 


34 


"*8 


**17 




*** 




'"s 




'*84 


12,431 




12-093 




11 




11 












22 


16,249 




8-401 










... 














16,809 




10-618 


"458 
62 


382 
83 


196 
62 
9 


185 
83 
10 


87 
31 
9 


"87 
41 


"76 
31 


'55 
31 
10 




{,526 
424 
38 


8,697 
44,938 
20,070 




9-725 
10-902 
10-351 


"*19 


"l9 


. 9 














47 


18,298 




9-456 
























6,148 




9-4S7 


















* 






7,534 




8-9(5 


... 










.. 












12,616 




10282 


*"]2 


25 
















'"37 


10.848 




9-8 








... 




... 


... 








18,459 




12-364 


96 


38 


10 


77 


29 


29 








279 


11,057 




19-09S 
























13,838 




9-67 






.'.. 



















15,315 




11-396 


'"43 


65 


75 


"43 


"21 




ii 






"258 


16,448 




8-375 


40 


71 


10 


20 








... 




141 


21,435 




10-766 






> 


















21,719 




10-144 


22 


"56 





'ii 












'"89 


17,931 




9-615 

























24,578 




11^223 


'55 


"is 




27 




9 


"'9 






"l'l8 


14,193 




8-418 


43 


43 


11 


11 


"ii 






'ii 




130 


16,276 




9-118 


19 


10 


29 




10 










68 


20,984 




JO-850 


7 


... 


... 


"s 


7. 




"s 






30 


13,636 




9-676 


31 


31 




31 


11 


"io 




10 




124 


12,067 




7'509 
























33,134 




10-374 


"l34 


125 


80 


lie 


71 


lie 

23 


53 
12 


169 




"864 
35 


16,558 
28,206 




12-967 
8-912 


- 203 


194 


159 


us 


'so 


80 


44 


"44 




919 


9,938 




11-610 


107 
95 
131 


IcO 
106 
83 


204 
71 
60 


188 
83 
119 


106 
59 


115 

83 
60 


80 
35 


160 
13 
12 




1,108 
544 

548 


23,091 
20,92 
26,215 




8'837 
8-865 
11-83 


180 


275 


137 


100 


74 


42 


32 


64 




994 


59.809 
46,364 




11-9 
10-671 


XXV. 






























69 


55 
12 


96 
25 


27 
24 


14 


12 


14 


... 




275 
73 


14,938 




13-73 


"Vj 
9 


42 


53 

8 


21 


... 


21 


32 


31 




242 
17 


12,102 
21,611 




12-175 
10-606 


























10,814 




8-469 


" 9 




"is 


"*9 


"*9 


18 




9 




'"72 


13,319 




9-36 


... 


... 






















12,672 




8'93 


'so 


10 


"20 




'io 










"70 


18,342 




10-151 















... 












9,630 




10-137 


'"23 


... 


"34 


"ii 


"23 


"ii 


11 


... 




"l!3 


13,646 

20,875 




9-483 
11-296 











... 


* 










... 






12,272 




8-462 


'.'.'. 


".' 


.'.'! 




... 


* 
















15,535 




12-818 


'"10 










... 














13,132 




17-257 


10 


"io 


... 


"io 


... 


... 


"io 







'"40 


11,427 
19,603 




9-784 
10-012 


" 9 


... 


"io 






"io 


"io 






'"so 

9 


16,166 
22,342 




12-019 
10-277 




"ii 






... 


* 


10 


*" 




21 


16,979 




9-168 


... 
























29,290 




10-491 










"io 











*10 


22,946 




10-350 


" 9 


'is 


17 














44 


17,577 




10-376 


... 




9 


'"s 




** 


< 


* * 




17 


14,680 




8-81 


128 


"25 


103 


25 


"s 





'"s 


* * 




295 


12,483 




8-609 


89 
334 
384 
89 


40 
285 
373 
55 


30 
807 

192 
11 


40 
98 
136 


40 
148 
68 
11 


"io 

118 
23 


10 
39 

56 


"20 
56 




259 
1,249 
1,288 
166 


27,728 
36,377 
45,638 
54,128 




8-189 
9961 
9-838 
11-298 


46 

3G8 


28 
208 


37 

38 


"46 

28 


64 
9 


"37 


27 
9 


'"9 
9 




294 
669 


28,355 
23,322 




11-085 
9-194 


























26,451 




9-480 


3,559 


3,114 


2,155 


1,934 


1,1 r>6 


955 


671 


720 


14,264 








13,71,531 



B 990-23 



89 



60 



APPENDIX 
Valuation Survey Notes, Blcck XXIV, Compartments 1 to 40 



Name of Village. 


mpartment 
"umber. 


g o 

i- . 


6 2 


a j Trees in the Test Plot. 


s - 1 














_^| 







O OS CO 
















1 


2 


3 
















BLOCK 
















Jungle 








1,617 




559 




270 




124 


48 




88 




18 


24 


2,698 












1229 




424 




210 




110 


54 




37 




15 


37 2,116 






Codalgadda and Mavinmani 


1 


426-4 


*9**wv 

195 




119 




109 




53 


51 




30 




18 


57 


632 






Do. do. 


2 


655-2 


458 




249 




185 




117 


80 




61 




26 


40 


1,206 






\odadlgadda ... ... 


3 


276-8 


287 




204 




120 




101 


69 




49 




23 


44 


897 






Do. and Maviumani ... 


4 


674-4 


3)9 




173 




147 




68 


65 




46 




28 


86 


932 






vodalgadda ... ... 


5 


382-8 


315 




256 




187 




110 


60 




55 




20 


25 


1,028 




Do. 


6 


554-8 


773 




443 




342 




166 


89 




52 




30 


39 


1,934 






Do. and Mavinmani ... 


7 


674-8 


629 




417 




230 




129 


87 




52 




20 


39 


1,583 




Do. do. 


8 


620-0 


245 




187 




138 




106 


90 




68 




25 


35 


884 




Do. Mavinmani and Sunksa . 
Do. do. do. . 


9 
10 


618-0 
516-4 


2,683 
866 




826 
468 




303 
276 




144 

150 


57 
62 




41 
57 




21 
30 


47 
24 


4,122 
1,939 




Havinmani ... 


11 


48U-8 


816 




423 




296 




168 


81 




52 




42 


67 


1,935 




Do. and Sunksal 


12 


618-0 


208 




130 




111 




69 


42 




42 




17 


29 


648 




Do. do. 


13 


893-6 


248 




188 




132 




92 


62 




46 




31 


57 


846 




tunksal ... 


14 


344-4 


490 




282 




184 




108 


60 




41 




23 


36 


1,227 




Do. ... 


15 


424-8 






240 




158 




135 


95 




61 




34 


65 


1,107 




Do. ... 


16 


524-4 


RKl 




343 




244 




118 


89 




58 




32 


58 


1,493 




Do. and Kalinhakal 


17 


429-2 


19" 




113 




89 




74 


61 




37 




90 


... 


579 




Calinhakal 


18 


719-6 


i$ 




311 




211 




130 


89 




86 




44 


55 


1,446 




Vodalgadda ... 


19 


737-2 


430 




29F 




200 




148 


89 




62 




36 


81 


1,344 




5unksal ... . ... ... 
Do. ... 


20 
21 


729-2 
759-0 


719 

762 




473 

445 




308 
301 




181 
175 


107 
129 




67 
83 




52 
41 


57 
55 


1,964 
1,991 




3ebbul ... 


22 


633-2 


838 




507 




298 




08 


126 




74 


47 


43 


2,141 




Do. ... 


23 


736-4 


1SS 




422 




264 




147 


92 




59 


49 


100 


1,865 




Do. ... 

iunksal and Kat'mhakal 
Hiiikaal and Hebnl 


24 
25 
26 


730-4 
585-6 
798-0 


fV4t 

888 
768 




487 
361 
404 




209 
202 

258 




202 
119 

168 


134 
86 
102 




65 
50 
74 


51 
28 
06 


94 

72 
109 


2,190 
1,686 
. 1,785 




lebbul and Kavlalli... 


27 


467-2 


Mft 




427 




239 




170 


95 




92 


53 


118 


1,934 




Do. do. 


28 


5772 


M7 




295 




191 




129 


91 




68 


44 


S9 


1,424 




SavlalH ... 


29 


566-4 


tji i 
531 




341 




268 




193 


JOO 




71 


37 


66 


1.607 




Do. ... 


30 


614-8 


1,489 




6GO 


380 




210 


145 




79 


70 


161 


3,194 




Do. ... 


31 


392-0 


392 




260 


206 




176 


85 




59 


29 


70 


1,277 




Do. ... 


32 


765-6 


1 477 




eos 


382 




253 


152 


99 


67 


127 


3,165 




Do. ... 


33 


750-8 


J)^f/ * 




169 




110 




72 


39 


36 


15 


26 


856 




Do. ... 

Uakigadda and Agsur 
Do. and Kavlalli 
Do. and Marugadda 
Do. Kavlalli and Marugadda. 


34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 


566-8 
578-2 
612-4 
500-0 
585-6 
910-4 


1,378 
1,074 
1,215 
2,746 
2,521 




581 
634 
519 
939 
854 


297 
813 
223 
491 
434 




154 
156 
110 

262 
206 


73 
91 
51 
164 
119 


58 
76 
42 
128 
90 


27 
36 
22 
70 
62 


45 
85 
34 
166 
100 


2,613 
2,368 
2,216 
5,026 
4,386 






40 


666-0 
































































Bi 


rpw 


Total ... 




24,096-8 




































442 




221 




161 




96 


71 


38 


15 


44 


1,088 






shevkar ... ... 
Shevkar and Heggar... 


41 
42 


442-8 
6100 


324 
776 

448 


213 
618 
281 


163 
317 

184 


101 
182 
116 


61 
110 
79 


45 
65 
65 


31 
35 
36 


66 
54 
68 


994 
2,057 
1,277 




ieggar ... 
leggar and Kalleshwar ... 
ifalleshwar and Halvalli ... 


43 
44 
45 


706-0 
562-8 
775-0 


633 
622 

714, 


274 
311 
393 


190 
206 
244 


132 
128 
149 


82 
82 
79 


64 
64 
76 


51 
49 
43 


97 
57 
110 


1,423 
1,419 
1,807 




falleshwar 
xalleshwar and Halvalli 


46 
47 


553-2 
740-0 


t if 

346 
373 


162 
312 


147 
249 


80 
156 


63 

125 


54 
83 


23 

48 


76 
93 


950 
1,439 




Halvalli ... 
ttalvalli, Kalleshwar and Muski.. 


48 
49 


605-2 
798-0 


666 

A7Q 


437 

280 


277 
166 


162 

108 


118 
62 


68 
45 


47 
36 


73 

77 


1,848 
1,452 




ETalvalll and Kammani 


50 


667-6 


\Ji O 

400 


327 


229 


111 


68 


41 


22 


17 


1,212 




Halvalli ... 
Do. and Dongri... . 


51 
52 


694-8 
657-6 


242 
388 


172 
291 


no 

199 


90 

1C2 


62 
73 


46 
46 


23 

24 


16 

45 


761 
1,168 




Do. do. ... 
Do. do. ... 


6:4 

54 


730-0 
590-0 


780 
463 


506 
881 


328 
205 


147 
159 


80 
90 


51 
59 


29 
44 


37 
44 


1.958 
1,345 




Dongri ... 


55 


642'8 


867 


610 


332 


195 


99 


71 


48 


52 


2,174 




Do. ... ... 


56 


793-2 


831 


443 


263 


145 


63 


40 


35 


32 


1,852 




Do. ... 


57 


792-4 


1,506 


727 


3U3 


151 


57 


25 


8 


16 


2,792 




Do. ... 


58 


624-4 


882 


568 


377 


195 


80 


57 


30 


28 


2,217 




Do. ... 

Do. and Kuntgani 


59 
60 


720-8 
732-8 


759 
642 


405 
357 


234 
245 


129 
161 


77 
109 


39 
62 


23 
40 


28 
39 


1,694 
1,655 




Do. do. ... 

Kuntgani and Hillur... 
Knutgani ... 


61 
62 
63 


656-8 
634-4 

542-4 


594 
3,678 

1,780 


317 
725 
823 


195 
433 
457 


132 
239 
2S5 


75 
133 
140 


72 

77 
74 


31 

47 
63 


34 

54 
63 


],450 
3,386 
3,652 




Do. ... 

Kuntgani and Manigadda . 
Kuntgaui ... 
Do. and Hillur ... 


64 
65 

66 
67 


641-2 
729-2 
959-2 
1,210-0 


2,445 
2,250 
1,419 
1.337 


874 
1,051 
551 
534 


497 
611 
238 
365 


285 
335 
139 
224 


142 
209 
67 
132 


120 
132 
53 
89 


94 
85 
28 
65 


182 
118 
63 
117 


4,639 
4,791 
2,558 
2,863 




Do. do. 


68 


644-0 


1,483 


574 


356 


174 


87 


66 


28 


37 


2;S05 




Hillur ... ; 


69 


794-4 
































Do. ... 


70 


659-2 


































Total .. 
f~\ n j 1^*1.1 




20,910-2 


59,681 


29,437 


17,847 


10,502 


6,216 


4,309 


2,660 


4,358 


1,35,010 




urand lotal .. 




45,007-0 





90 



91 



IV a. 



and Block XXV, Compartments 41 to 70, Angola High Forest. 



Trees in the compartment. 










Ratio. 


7* 9* 1 


0" 12" 1 


3" 15" 1 


6' 18" 1 


9" 21" 2 


y 24" 2 


5" 27" 


28"? 


Total. 






14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


XXIV. 






















wood. 






















14,319 


4,950 


2,391 


1,098 


425 


836 


159 


213 


23,891 




8-855 


13,488 


4,653 


2,305 


1,207 


593 


406 


165 


406 


23,223 




10-975 


1,097 


669 


613 


298 


287 


169 


101 


321 


3,555 




5-626 


4,874 


2,704 


2,009 


1,271 


869 


554 


282 


434 


33,097 




10-86 


1,878 


1,335 


785 


661 


451 


321 


150 


288 


5,69 




6-343 


2,682 


1,454 


1,236 


572 


546 


387 


235 


723 


7,835 




8406 


3,809 


3,096 


2,261 


1,330 


726 


665 


242 


302 


12,431 




12-093 


6,494 


8,722 


2,873 


1,395 


748 


437 


252 


328 


16,249 




8-401 


6,679 


4,428 


2,442 


1,370 


924 


552 


212 


202 


16,809 




10-618 


2,383 


1,819 


1,342 


1,031 


875 


564 


243 


340 


8,697 




9-725 


29,260 


9,005 


8,303 


1,570 


622 


447 


229 


612 


44,938 




10-902 


S.964 


4,844 


2,857 


1,615 


642 


590 


310 


248 


20,070 




10-351 


7,716 


4,000 


2,799 


1,589 


766 


492 


397 


539 


18,298 




9-456 


1,973 


1,233 


1,053 


655 


399 


399 


161 


275 


6,148 




9-487 


2,209 


1,674 


1,175 


819 


463 


410 


276 


508 


7,534 




8-9f 5 


5,038 


2,900 


1,892 


i.in 


617 


452 


236 


370 


12,616 




10282 


3,221 


2,352 


1,548 


1,323 


931 


598 


333 


539 


10.848 




9-8 


6,812 


4,241 


3,017 


1,459 


1,100 


717 


396 


717 . 


18,459 




12-364 


2,387 


2,158 


1,699 


1,413 


974 


707 


1,719 




11,057 




19-098 


4,986 


2,976 


2,019 


1,244 


852 


814 


421 


526 


13,838 




9-67 


4,900 


3,396 


2,279 


),687 


1,014 


706 


410 


923 


15,315 




11-396 


6,022 


3,961 


2,580 


1,516 


896 


561 


436 


476 


16,448 




8-375 


8,204 


4,791 


3,240 


1,884 


1,389 


894 


441 


592 


21,435 




10-766 


8,501 


5,143 


3,023 


2,110 


1,278 


751 


477 


436 


21,719 




10-144 


7,038 


4,058 


2,538 


1,413 


885 


567 


471 


961 


17,931 




9-615 


9,966 


5,466 


3,019 


2,267 


1,504 


729 


572 


1,055 


24,578 




11-.223 


6,465 


3,039 


1,700 


1,002 


724 


421 


236 


606 


14,193 




8-418 


5,507 


3,684 


2,352 


1,532 


930 


675 


602 


994 


16,276 




9-118 


8,029 


4,633 


2,593 


1,845 


1,031 


998 


675 


1,280 


20,984 




IO-850 


4,951 


2,825 


1,829 


1,235 


872 


651 


421 


852 


13,636 




9-676 


3,987 


2,561 


2,012 


1,449 


751 


533 


278 


496 


12,067 




7-509 


15,447 


6,847 


3,942 


2,178 


1,504 


820 


726 


1,670 


83,134 




10-374 


5,083 


3,371 


2,671 


2,282 


1,102 


766 


376 


908 


16,558 




12-967 


13,163 


5,418 


3,404 


2,255 


1,355 


882 


597 


1,132 


28,206 




8-912 


4,516 


1,962 


1,277 


836 


453 


418 


174 


302 


9,938 




11-610 


12,177 


5,134 


2,625 


1,361 


645 


512 


239 


398 


23,091 




8-837 


9,521 


4,734 


2,776 


1,383 


833 


674 


319 


753 


20,992 




8-865 


14,374 


6,140 


2,638 


1,301 


603 


497 


260 


402 


26,215 




11-83 


32,677 


11,888 


5,843 


3,118 


1,952 


1,523 


833 


1,975 


69,809 




11-9 


26,649 


9,028 


4,588 


2,173 


1,258 


951 


655 


1,057 


46,364 




10-671 


XXV. 






















6,069 


3,034 


2,210 


1,318 


975 


522 


206 


604 


14,938 




13-73 


3,945 


2,593 


1,863 


1,230 


743 


548 


377 


803 


12,102 




12-175 


8,153 


5,442 


3,330 


1,912 


1,156 


683 


368 


667 


21,611 




10-606 


3,794 


2,380 


1,558 


982 


669 


550 


305 


576 


10,814 




8-469 


4,989 


2,565 


1,778 


1,235 


768 


599 


477 


908 


13,319 




9-36 


4,661 


2,777 


1,840 


1,143 


732 


572 


438 


509 


12,672 




8-93 


7,248 


3,989 


2,477 


1,512 


802 


761 


436 


1,117 


18,342 




10-151 


:{,503 


1,642 


1,490 


811 


639 


647 


233 


760 


9,630 




10-137 


3,537 


2,959 


2,361 


1,480 


1,185 


787 


455 


882 


13,646 




9-483 


7,523 


4,936 


3,129 


1,830 


1,333 


76S 


531 


825 


20,876 




11-296 


5,730 


2,367 


1,403 


913 


524 


380 


304 


651 


12,272 




8-462 


5,1 -'7 


4,191 


2,936 


1,513 


743 


525 


282 


218 


15,535 




12-818 


4,176 


2,968 


1,898 


1,553 


1,070 


794 


307 


276 


13,132 




17-267 


3,796 


2,847 


1,947 


998 


714 


450 


236 


440 


11,427 




9-784 


7,809 


5,066 


3,234 


1,472 


801 


511 


290 


370 


19,603 




10'012 


5,565 


3,377 


2,464 


1,911 


1,082 


709 


529 


629 


16,166 




12-019 


8,910 


5,241 


3,412 


2,004 


1,018 


730 


493 


534 


22,342 




10-277 


7,619 


4,061 


2,411 


1,329 


578 


367 


321 


293 


16,979 




9-168 


15,789 


7,627 


3,179 


1,584 


598 


262 


84 


167 


29,290 




10-491 


9,129 


5,879 


3,902 


2,018 


828 


590 


310 


290 


22,946 




10-350 


7,875 


4,202 


2,428 


1,339 


799 


405 


239 


290 


17,577 




10-376 


5,656 


3,145 


2,159 


1,418 


960 


546 


352 


344 


14,680 




8-81 


5,114 


2,729 


1,679 


1,136 


645 


620 


267 


293 


12,483 




8-609 


13,741 


5,937 


3,546 


1,957 


1,089 


631 


385 


442 


27,728 




8-189 


17,731 


8,198 


4552 


2,540 


1,464 


737 


528 


627 


36,377 




9961 


24,054 


8,598 


4,889 


2,804 


1,397 


1,181 


926 


1,790 


45,638 




9-838 


25,421 


11,874 


6,903 


3,785 


2,361 


1,491 


960 


1,333 


54,128 




11-298 


16,730 


6,108 


2,638 


1,641 


743 


587 


310 


698 


28,355 




11-085 


12,292 


4,910 


3,356 


2,059 


1,213 


818 


598 


1,076 


23,322 




9-194 


13,985 


5,413 


3,367 


1,6*1 


820 


622 


264 


349 


26,451 




9-480 


6,06,215 


2,99,347 


1,80,926 


1,06,831 


63,238 


43,838 


27,516 


43,620 


13,71,531 







8 99024 



92 



APPENDIX IVb. 



Estimated number of trees that will be available in each compartment for felling including those that come 
over from the penultimale class, minu* deductions as per para. 48 of the Beport. 





Compartment area. 


1st quality. 


2nd quality. 




Compart- 
ment 








Remark*. 
























No. 


1st class 


2nd class 


Total 


Matti. 


Jamba. 


Nana. 


Kindal. 


Matti. 


Jamba. 


Nana. 


KindaU 






in acres. 


in acres. 


acres. 




















1 




426-4 


426-4 










172 


18 


30 


124 


Note. These figurei 


2 


376-4 


278-8 


655-2 


"94 ' 


"24 


'l4 


136 


130 


87 


29 


174 


do not exactly tally 


3 


276-8 




2768 


35 


105 


143 


156 


... 


... 


... 


... 


with those given in 


4 


674-4' 




674-4 


245 


69 


32 


336 








... 


... 


the falling state- 


5 


382-8 




382-8 


171 


94 


14 


219 


... 





... 




ment, para. 53 of 


6 


554-8 




6548 


366 


367 


185 


572 


... 


... 




... 


the report, as the 


7 


674-8 




674-8 


239 


30 


23 


109 


... 


... 


... 


... 


calculation here has 


8 


620-0 




620-0 


191 


6 


25 


186 


... 


... 


... 




been made for each 


9 


3+2-8 


275-2 


618-0 


92 


10 


16 


61 


145 


26 


16 


ibi 


compartment sepa 


10 


413-6 


102-8 


616-4 


97 


62 


53 


157 


48 


36 


27 


74 


rately, whereas the 


11 




480' 8 


480-8 




... 


... 





61 


8 


29 


81 


figures in the plan 


12 


362-0 


266-0 


618-0 


"88 


6 


5 


92 


65 


16 


25 


126 


are calculated ac- 


13 


729-6 


164-0 


893-6 


84 


93 


86 


193 


35 


45 


26 


64 


cording to the 


14 


344'4 




344-4 


281 


80 


66 


178 





... 


... 


.. 


average of the com- 


15 


424-8 




4?48 


295 


90 


176 


376 





.. 


... 


.. 


partment in the 


16 


5244 




5244 


398 


92 


40 


266 




... 


... 


.. 


sub-period to which 


17 


429-2 




429-2 


380 


49 


45 


316 


... 


... 


... 


.. 


they belong. 


18 


719-6 




759-6 


412 


23 


160 


590 





... 


... 


.. 




19 


737-2 




737-2 


660 


425 


226 


1,148 


i * 


... 


... 






20 


729'2 




729-2 


430 


206 


1x3 


583 





... 


... 


.. 




21 


769-0 


M 


759-0 


459 


133 


84 


944 


i.t 


... 


... 


.. 




2-2 


633-2 




633-2 


108 


67 


88 


557 


... 


... 









23 


7S6-4 




736-4 


316 


137 


110 


359 





... 


... 


.. 




24 


730-4 





7304 


276 


120 


71 


273 





... 


... 







25 


5856 




685-6 


487 


71 


64 


311 


, , 


... 


... 


.. 




26 


798-0 




7980 


279 


169 


219 


1,061 




... 


... 


.. 




27 


467-2 




467-2 


160 


27 


66 


142 


, , 


... 




.. 




28 


677-8 




677-2 


156 


J57 


171 


356 


t . 


... 





.. 




29 


5664 


. 


56G-4 


185 


192 


121 


214 


, , 


... 


... 







30 


614-8 


Bl 


614-8 


81 


63 


69 


222 


. . 


... 


... 






31 


392-0 




392-0 


73 


57 


32 


170 




... 


... 







32 


765-6 


ff 


765-6 


79 


435 


454 


405 




... 


... 







33 


750-8 




760-8 


661 


203 


399 


368 


... 


... 


... 


. 




34 


566-8 


... 


566-8 


147 


Ii7 


106 


433 





... 


... 


... 




85 


678'2 




578-2 


159 


56 


49 


96 


t.i 


... 




... 




36 


350-0 


262-4 


612-4 


147 


42 


84 


156 


133 


49 


"90 


I'll 




37 


5000 




500-0 


160 


245 


245 


472 








... 


... 


* 


38 


390-4 


195-2 


585-6 


246 


83 


54 


142 


149 


61 


34 


94 




39 


645-6 


364-8 


910-4 


309 


278 


393 


462 


226 


257 


306 


356 




40 


666-0 


. * 


666-0 


435 


40(i 


205 


656 


... 


... 


... 






41 


442-8 





442-8 




118 


18 


207 





... 


... 


... 




42 


610-0 




610-0 


157 


292 


168 


702 





. .. 


... 


... 




43 


706-0 


... 


706-0 


403 


116 


36 


256 





... 





... 




44 


562-8 





562-8 


231 


117 


69 


818 





... 





.. 




45 


7760 





7750 


82 


349 


248 


605 


., 


... 


... 







46 


553-2 




553-2 


135 


201 


68 


472 


M 


... 


... 


.. 




47 


740-0 





740-0 


52 


304 


344 


626 


., 





... 







48 


605-2 


Mv 


605-2 


107 


274 


399 


549 


., 


... 









49 


798-0 


... 


798-0 


607 


301 


88 


620 


., 


... 


..t 







50 


>.. 


. 667-6 


667-6 










654 


335 


115 


754 




51 


529-2 


166-6 


694-8 


390 


297 


"71 


407 


188 


168 


40 


183 




52 


309'6 


348-0 


657-6 


208 


83 


47 


62 


382 


174 


77 


118 




63 


247'2 


482-8 


730-0 


30 


30 


30 


39 


106 


132 


46 


163 




54 


424-0 


166-0 


590-0 


134 


68 


41 


309 


76 


68 


24 


166 




55 


470-8 


172-0 


642-8 


158 


52 


20 


157 


101 


48 


11 


96 




56 


317-2 


476-0 


793-2 


192 


45 


20 


89 


437 


132 


69 


218 




67 


406-0 


386-4 


792-4 


U4 


25 


37 


107 


176 


69 


55 


181 




58 


472-8 


151-6 


624-4 


150 


17 


2 


84 


84 


18 


2 


54 




59 


201-6 


519-2 


720-8 


19 


5 


4 


30 


97 


26 


31 


159 




60 


384-0 


?48-8 


732-8 


134 


27 


6 


44 


207 


52 


15 


75 




61 


416-U 


240-8 


656-8 


90 


61 


34 


146 


83 


66 


28 


129 




62 


634-4 


... 


634-4 


122 


208 


114 


360 




... 


... 


... 




63 


362-4 


'i'so-o 


542-4 


36 


51 


96 


187 


"24 


41 


77 


133 




64 


196-8 


444-4 


641-2 


16 


9 


49 


34 


67 


43 


139 


110 




65 





729-2 


729-2 











366 


141 


290 


324 




66 


806-0 


163-2 


959-2 


187 


293 


431 


479 


50 


80 


106 


115 




67 


884-0 


326-0 


1,210-0 


330 


325 


120 


412 


169 


192 


61 


206 




68 


... 


644-0 


644-0 







* 




56 


62 


126 


157 




69 


569-2 


225-2 


794-4 


l-'O 


112 


63 


240 


67 


70 


36 


128 




70 


272-0 


387-2 


659-2 


108 


5 


20 


43 


213 


14 


38 


83 




Total .. 


34,986-6 


10,020-4 


46,007-0 


13,732 


8,684 


7,109 


20,887 


4,766 


2,533 


1,986 


4,887 





Kdrwdr, 10th November 1908. 



R. S. PEARSON, 

Divisional Forest Officer, 

Working Plans, S. C, 



APPENDIX V 



APPENDIX 

Increment of Test Treet 
BLOCKS 





Age in 


Compartment No. 


5 


10 


15 


20 


25 


30 


35 


40 


45 


50 




Diameter 






















MA 


30 


14 


4-2 


5-6 


7-0 


8-0 


8-8 


|9'4 


10-1 


10-6 


11-4 


29 


9 


14 


2-1 


2-9 


3-5 


3-9 


4-6 


5-4 


6-0 


6-3 


29 


8 


1-4 


2-2 


2-9 


3-4 


3-8 


4-2 


4-7 


5-2 


5'9 


* 


1-4 


2-8 


3-6 


4-4 


6-1 


56 


6-4 


6-9 


7'2 


7-4 


32 


8 


2-7 


4-2 


6-8 


8-5 


10-8 


11-4 


12-4 






32 


1-1 


2-7 


3-8 


4-8 


6-1 


6-4 


7-2 


8-0 


8 : 9 


'9-4 


38 


1-6 


3'4 


5-0 


60 


7-1 


8-4 


10-0 


114 


32-7 


13-6 


32 


14 


2-2 


3-4 


4-4 


5-3 


6-3 


7-9 


9-1 


10-6 


12-4 


82 


1-8 


3-9 


4-6 


6-1 


6-9 


8'3 


9-7 


11-4 


12'3 


13-4 


34 


6 


1-3 ' 


14 


2-5 


3-2 


3-8 


4-4 


4-9 


55 


6-2 


34 


14 


2-1 


2-7 


3-3 


3-6 


42 


4-7 


5-4 


6-3 


6-8 


34 


5 


1-1 


14 


2-0 


2-6 


8-1 


3-6 


4-3 


5-1 


5-5 


34 


14 


2-0 


2-7 


3-4 


4-4 


6-2 


5J 


6-9 


7'8 


8-6 


34 


... 


3-3 


4-5 


5-6 


6-4 


7-1 


8-4 


9-4- 


10-6 


11-5 


10 


7 


14 


2-2 


3-1 


3-9 


4-9 


6-7 


6-3 


6-9 


7-3 


10 


8 


14 


23 


2-9 


3-5 


4-0 


4-5 


5-2 


5-8 


6-4 


10 


7 


1-7 


2-4 


3-4 


4-1 


4-9 


5-8 


6-1 


7-5 


8-1 


10 


1-0 


1-9 


2-8 


3-6 


6-0 


6-0 


7-0 


8'3 


9-9 


114 


10 


9 


1*6 


2-1 


2-9 


3-4 


4-0 


4-6 


5-4 


6-1 


6-6 


10 


9 


14 


2-9 


3-7 


4-0 


5-0 


5-7 


6-5 


7-1 


7-8 


26 


9 


1*7 


2-7 


3-5 


4'4 


5-4 


6-2 


6-9 


7-8 


8-9. 


9 


8 


14 


2-1 


2-9 


3-5 


4-1 


5-2 


6-1 


7-2 


8-2 


22 


7 


14 


26 


3-7 


4-4 


5-6 


6-6 


7-6 


8-2 


9-1 


22 


1-1 


2-6 


3-5 


4-5 


5-7 


6-9 


8-1 


9'8 


10-8 


11-3 


23 


1-6 


2-8 


39 


4-8 


6-0 


7-0 


8'0 


9-1 


10-0 


IW 


21 


14 


2-1 


3-0 


4-1 


5-0 


5-7 


6-6 


7-4 


8'4 


9-5 


a 


7 


14 


2-4 


38 


3-8 


4-5 


5-3 


5-8 


6-5 


7-2 


22 


9 


14 


2-1 


2-6 


3-1 


3-7 


4-3 


4-9 


5-4, 


5-9 


21 


VI 


2-2 


3-2 


4-2 


5-3 


6-1 


6-9 


7-7 


8-5 


92 


21 


14 


2-1 


3-8 


4-2 


5-3 


6-5 


7-6 


8-7 


9-8 


10-6 


8 


6 


14 


2-6 


3-1 


3-9 


5-1 


63 


7-1 


7-9 


8-9 


8 


9 


2-4 


3-2 


4-2 


55 


6-7 


7-9 


9-1 


10-2 


11-4 


41 


14 


2-5 


3-4 


4-6 


5-5 


6-7 


7-5 


8-3 


9-4 


10-2 


41 


1-0 


14 


2-9 


3-4 


4-1 


5-0 


5-8 


6-3 


7'5 


8-4 


41 


1-1 


2-1 


3-3 


4-0 


5-3 


63 


7-2 


7-6 


8-1 


8-8 


41 


14 


3-0 


46 


6-8 


7-8 


8-4 


9-6 


107 


114 


12-4 


41 


1-0 


3-0 


8-6 


3-4 


4-1 


4-8 


5-4 


6-1 


6-8 


7'5 


41 


1-4 


2-1 


2-6 


4-1 


4-8 


5-2 


5-7 


5-6 


6'G 


6-8 


41 


1-4 


2-3 


3-1 


3-7 


4-2 


5-2 


5-8 


6-1 


6-5 


7-0 


41 


14 


3-3 


4-4 


5-1 


7-3 


8-3 


9-4 


10-4 


11-2 


11-9 


41 


1-4 


2-4 


3-0 


3-7 


4-5 


5-3 


6-1 


6-8 


7-2 


7-9 


41 


9 


14 


14 


2-7 


3-4 


3-9 


4-5 


6-2 


6-4 


7-6 


41 


9 


2-5 


2-8 


5-4 


6-6 


8-0 


9-0 


9-8 


10-7 


114 


41 


1-0 


24 


39 


4-9 


5-6 


6-6 


7-3 


7-9 


8-7 


9-4 


41 


8 


14 


2-4 


3-1 


3-6 


4-4 


5-2 


5-9 


70 


7-9 


41 


1-7 


2-2 


3-0 


4-1 


5-2 


6-1 


7-2 


8-4 


9-5 


10-8 


41 


1-4 


2-1 


2-9 


34 


4-1 


4-6 


5-4 


6-1 


71 


7-8 


66 


5 


14 


2'7 


3-8 


4-8 


5-4 


6-3 


7-6 


8-6 


9-9 


57 


7 


1-7 


3-3 


44 


5-6 


6-7 


7-5 


8-3 


9-8 


11-7 


Total .. 


51'8 


106-7 


149-8 


196-3 


240-4 


282-5 


326-0 


365-6 


395-5 


434-4 


Averages 


1-07 

i 


2-18 

j 


3-05 

i 


4-00 


4-90 


5-76 


6-63 


7-46 


8-25 


9-05 


Period taken to pass from 




one 3" class to the next 


9 years. 17 years. 17 years. 



V. 

for periods of 5.#cari. 



XXIV t XXV. 



97 



year. 



00 


60 


66 


70 


76 


80 


85 


90 



in inches. 



190 



195 



200 



TTI. 
















12-3 


33-0 


339 


14-4 


14-8 


15-2 


15-7 


16-3 


7-0 


77 


8-5 


9-8 


1O5 


11-1 


11-9 


12-6 


7-1 


7-5 


8-1 


8-8 


9-3 


8-7 


10-3 


13-1 


7'8 


S-2 


8-7 


9-7 


10-8 


... 





... 


10-3 


11-G 


124 


13-2 


... 


** 





> 


ii-i 


16-0 


17 : 4 


18-3 


!!! 










14-4 


15-9 


16'9 




... 




tt 


> 


6-8 


7-4 


7-9 


8-5 


B-3 


9 : 8 


]-t 


10-9 


7-2 


79 


86 


9-3 


97 


30-3 


10-8 


11-2 


6-8 


6-6 


7-1 


7'8 


8'2 


8-7 


9-3 


9 -9 


9'5 


10-2 


10-7 


115 


12-3 


13-3 


14-0 


14-7 


J2-3 


131 


13 '6 


H-3 


15-0 


15-7 


.16-6 


17-4 


7-9 


H-6 


9-2 


9-8 


10-6 


11-1 


11-7 


32-6 


6-9 


7-4 


7'9 


S-4 


8-8 


9-6 


10-0 


10-6 


8-8 


9-4 


10-0 


10-4 


13-1 


11-4 


11-8 


Bark -4 


12-2 


33-7 


14-5 


Bark -5 


... 








. . 


7'2 


7-7 


8-2 


8-<3 


9-0 


U-3 


9-6 


99 


8-5 


9'3 


9-9 


10-6 


11-3 


11-7 


32-3 


13-0 


9-6 


10-6 


11 -B 


12-4 


131 


13-9 


14'7 


15-3 


9-1 


10-0 


ll-l 


11-6 


12-5 


12-9 


13-6 


14-5 


9-8 


11-2 


11-5 


123 


12-8 


Bark -7 


... 




12-4 


Bark -4 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


32'0 


12-6 


Bark -4. 


. 


* 


* 


... 




103 


10-8 


11-5 


12-2 


12-8 


13'1 


13-3 


13 : 5 


7-8 


8-4 


9-5 


10-1 


10-8 


115 


12-1 


125 


6-3 


7-1 


7-8 


8-2 


8'6 


9-4 


9-9 


10-2 


9-5 


9-9 


10-6 


11-4 


31 a 


12-4 


13-0 


Bark -4 


11-5 


12-7 


33-0 


13-8 


Bark '6 


.. 




... 


9-5 


10-5 


11-5 


12-5 


333 


14-1 


14-8 


15-7 


124 


13-2 


14-2 


15-1 


156 


16-4 


17-2 


17-8 


10-8 


11-9 


12-8 


13-0 


13-6 


14'4 


15-2 


15-7 


9-1 


9-6 


10-4 


31-0 


11-5 


13-9 


32-4 


12-8 


9'1 


9-6 


10-0 


10-7 


111 


11-6 


12-3 


32-9 


13-5 


146 


15-5 


16-5 


17-7 


190 


39-8 


21-0 


8-4 


9-3 


10-1 


11-0 


11-8 


12-5 


13-3 


14-2 


7-6 


8-5 


9-5 


30-2 


30-7 


111 


31-7 


3L'-3 


7-8 


8-4 


90 


!t-9 


10'9 


11-8 


12'6 


13-2 


12-2 


13-0 


33-6 


14-3 


15-0 


35-6 


16-2 


16-7 


8-5 


91 


9-7 


30-0 


307 


31-2 


13-7 


12-4 


8-4 


9-4 


10-3 


10-9 


11-4 


12-4 


13-0 


13'7 


12-2 


33-1 


13-9 


14-9 


15-5 


16-1 


16-4 


16-8 


10-6 


13-2 


11-7 


12-3 


12-9 


13-8 


14-7 


15-6 


8-8 


93 


10-0 


10-9 


114 


11-9 


123 


12-8 


122 


13-2 


13-9 


14-6 


15-7 


36-4 


37-2 


18-3 


8-8 


9-6 


10-0 


10-4 


11-1 


33-9 


12-9 


13-7 


ITS 


12-1 


32-8 


136 


14-5 


15-3 


16-0 


16-7 


13-8 


15-4 


17-0 


17-9 


18-6 


19-2 


39-8 


20-2 


459-4 


485-5 


505-7 


5047 


496'1 


486-6 


510-5 


508-6 


9-77 


10-55 


11-23 


1173 


12-15 


12-80 


13-43 


14-13 





25-1 
21-7 


26-0 
23-9 


27-1 
22-3 




.'.. 


... 





: 


26-8 


27-1 


; 


,'2 
J-l 

i'-o 

2-2 


** 

2V6 

22-9 

81-4 
22-9 


Bark 
23-3 

si's 

28-5 


32- 

23- 



2-3 
3-1 



3-8 

4-3 

2-2 
8-4 
2-4 
7*9 
3-2 



4-2 

!4-90 



23-8 
23-7 



24-2 



22-6 
88-7 
Bark -8 
28-4 
33-7 



384-1 
25-60 



23-3 
24-2 



24-6 

25-1 
23-1 
28-9 

28-7 
34-2 



865-7 
26-12 



23-5 
25-0 



Bark '7 

Bark '5 
234 
29-0 

28-9 
Bark -8 



235-4 



20 years. 



26 years. 



B 990 re 



APPENDIX 

Increment of Test Treet 



Compartment No. 



30 
29 
29 
32 
32 
32 
38 
32 
32 
34 
34 
34 
34 
34 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
26 
9 
22 
22 
23 
21 
-2 
22 
21 
21 
8 
8 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
66 
57 



Total 
Averages 

Period taken to pass f ron 
one 3" class to the next 



Ago 111 



95 


100 


105 


ilu 115 120 


125 


130 



Diameter 

















S1A 


16-7 


17-1 


17-5 


18-0 


185 


19-1 


19-7 


20-6 


13-1 


13-6 


14-3 


15-2 


159 


16-5 


17-3 


18-0 


11-6 


12-2 


12-9 


136 


144 


34-9 


15'6 


16-1 


li : 5 


13-6 


12-0 


12-6 


1*3-2 


13-7 


14-0 


34-3 


11-5 


12-2 


12-8 


15-1 


13-6 


33-9 


14-4 


15-0 


10-1 


11. 1 


11-8 


12-6 


13-1 


13-5 


13-9 


14-4 


15-4 


16-1 


367 


17-3 


17-9 


18-6 


19-0 


39-6 


18-1 


18-6. 


19-4 


20-1 


20-7 


21-3 


21-8 


22-4 


13-1 


14-0 


14-6 


15-1 


15-6 


15-9 


36-2 


Bark & 


11-1 


Bark '4 


M 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


10-2 


30-5 


li'o 


ii-4 


Bark -5 


... 


... 


t** 


13-5 


14-1 


14-7 


15-3 


Baik '5 




... 




16-1 


16-6 


17-2 


17-9 


18-7 


395 


20-3 


21-2 


15-6 


15-9 


17-1 


17-9 


J8-6 


19-4 


19-9 


20'2 


13-9 


... 


... 


... 





. 


... 


... 


Bark '6 






< 


... 


... 


... 




107 


li'-i 


"' 6 


120 


12-3 


128 


13 * 


13-8 


16-6 


17 : 6 


l's-5 


19-5 


20-3 


20-9 


Bark '8 


.:: 


18-3 


18-9 


19-5 


201 


20-6 


Bark -4 


... 


... 


13-3 


36-9 


17-5 


17-9 


18-4 


18-9 


19-4 


19'R 


13-4 


14-1 


148 


15-3 


15-6 


15-8 


16-4 


16-9 


13-6 


14-1 


14-9 


15-6 


16-4 


17-1 


17-6 


18-5 


21-6 


2-2-0 


22-7 


23-4 


24-0 


24-7 


25-3 


26'1 


14-9 


16-6 


16' a 


16-6 


17-3 


17-2 


17-4 


17-7 


12'8 


13-5 


14-1 


14-6 


15'3 


36-2 


17-1 


17-7 


13-8 


14-5 


14-9 


156 


15'3 


16-3 


17-4 


17-9 


17-4 


17-9 


18-4 


18-9 


19-4 


19-8 


20-0 


20-5 


13-1 


33-4 


15'0 


16-2 


17-2 


17-9 


18-6 


19-5 


14-5 


15-1 


15-6 


16-4 


16'9 


17-4 


18-1 


18-9 


17-3 


18-0 


18-4 


18-9 


19-3 


20-1 


Z(i'5 


21-1 


16-4 


17-1 


17'5 


17-9 


18-3 


187 


19-0 


li-7 


13-3 


13-7 


342 


14'6 


15-2 


15-9 


16-3 


16-9 


19-1 


20-f, 


2T1 


21-6 


21-9 


22-3 


22-7 


23-4 


14-6 


14-S 


35-3 


159 


1C -8 


17-4 


17-8 


18-3 


17-G 


18-3 


18-9 


399 


20-6 


M-l 


21-8 


2-2-4 


21-7 


22-1 


231 


24-2 


24-9 


257 


266 


27-4 


518-4 


512-8 


534-2 


555-2 


547-0 


5430 


537-4 


38'0 


14-81 


15 -Gl 


16-19 


16-82 


37-64 


18-10 


18-63 


19-21 



22 years. 



24 years. 



96 



97 



V. 

for periods of S. 
XXIV * XXV. 



year. 



135 


140 


145 


150 


155 


160 


1G5 


170 


175 


180 


J85 


190 


195 


200 



in inches. 



TTI. 




























21-1 


21-7 


22-4 


23-1 


23-5 




... 


... 


... 










... 


18-8 


192 


19-6 


20-2 


21-0 


21 : 6 


22-1 


22-7 


23-3 


23-9 


2-1-4 


25-1 


26-0 


27'1 


16-8 


37-0 


178 


18-1 


186 


18'9 


19-4 


19-9 


20-5 


21-0 


21*2 


21-7 


21-9 


22-3 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


* 


.'.'. 


... 


... 


... 





14-8 


i .. 


... 





.. 


... 


... 


... 








... 


... 


... 


,. 


15-4 


15'9 




... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 





... 


... 


... 


., 


14-9 


15-2 


15-6 


16-2 


16-8 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 




... 


* .. 


.. 


ao-i 


20-3 


21-2 


21-9 


22-5 


230 


23-3 


23-8 


24-1 


24-6 


24-9 


... 


... 


,. 


22-9 

* 

* 


23-4 


23-6 


24-1 


24-6 


249 


25-2 


OCt/ 
rO O 


25-9 


23-3 


26-6 


26'8 


27-1 


k* 


22- 1 


24*0 


2*5 


.".' 


... 


... 


... 


..* 


* 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


20-0 


20-9 


... 


::: 


::: 


::: 


... 





>.. 


::: 


... 


::': 


.".'. 


* . 


Bark -6 


I 





* ** 


... 


... 


... 


... 





I 


I 


... 


... 


I 


20-2 


20-9 


21-2 


21-8 


22'-0 


22-4 


23-1 


2s"-6 


* 

23*-8 


24-1 


21'2 


2V6 


Bark -5 


... 


17-4 


17-8 


18 "4 


18-9 


19-5 


19-9 


2 >-5 


21-0 


21-4 


21-8 


22-1 


22-9 


23-3 


... 


19-6 


20-3 


Sil-0 


22-4 


231 


23-8 


24-8 


25-4 


26-1 


.. 


... 


... 


... 


... 


26-8 


27-1 


27 -3 


27-9 


28-6 


29-1 


29-,3 


30-0 


30*1 


30-7 


31-0 


31-4 


31-8 


32-4 


18-2 


18-8 


19-1 


19-4 


19-8 


20-4 


20-7 


20-9 


21-3 


218 


22-2 


22-9 


28-5 


23-8 


18-2 


18-6 


18-8 


19-6 


202 


20-6 


20-9 


21-2 


21-6 


22-0 


22-3 


23-8 


23-3 


23-5 


18-5 


19-0 


39-6 


20-0 


80-6 


21-1 


21-3 


21-8 


22-2 


22-7 


23-1 


23-7 


24-2 


25-0 


20-9 


21-4 


2-2-1 


2-2-4 


22-7 


23'2 


Bark '6 








... 





.. 


... 




199 


20-2 


23-0 


28-7 


243 


24-7 


25-3 


2.V9 


26-3 


26-8 


- .. 


... 


... 


... 


19-7 


20-0 


20-4 


20-9 


214 


21-9 


223 


S28 


23-2 


23-6 


23-8 


24-2 


24-6 


Bark '? 


21-3 


21-6 


21-9 


222 


22 '4 


22-6 


22-9 


Bark -6 


... 




... 


... 


... 


. 


20-3 


20-7 


21-1 


21-6 


220 


22-3 


22-6 


23-0 


23-4 


23-9 


24-3 


24-6 


25-1 


Bark '5 


17-7 


18-6 


19-0 


194 


198 


203 


2 1-8 


21-3 


21-7 


219 


22-2 


2-'-6 


23-1 


234 


242 


24-9 


25-4 


25-9 


26'5 


26-9 


27-3 


27-i 


27-8 


26-1 


28-4 


28-7 


28-9 


29-0 


38-7 


19-2 


19-6 


20-0 


20-5 


209 


21-2 


21-6 


22-0 


22-1 


22-4 


Bark -8 


... 




22 '8 


23-4 


23-8 


24-3 


24-6 


25-1 


257 


26-4 


27-0 


27-5 


27-9 


28-4 


28-7 


28-9 


28-4 


29-0 


K9-6 


80-2 


80-7 


31-4 


31-9 


32-2 


32-6 


82-9 


33-2 


33-7 


34-2 


Bark -8 


540-6 


539-6 


516-4 


604-2 


615-7 


485-0 


470-9 


456-5 


461-6 


445-7 


424-2 


384-1 


865-7 


235-4 


20-02 


20-75 


21-51 


21-98 


2242 


2310 


23-54 


24-02 


24-45 


24-76 


24-90 


25-60 


26-12 


... 












L_ 








f " 








-\ 



25 yean. 



35 years. 



B 99026 



98 



APPENDIX 

Increment of Test Trees 



BLOCKS 



Compartment No. 


Age in 


6 


10 


15 


20 


25 


30 


35 


40 


45 


50 


Diameter in 






















NA 


31 


1-0 


1-9 


2-7 


3-6 


4-4 


5-0 


6-4 


5-7 


6-5 


7* 


31 


2-2 


C-9 


8-5 


100 


11-4 


123 


Jtf 


14-0 


14-9 


15-6 


30 


10 


1-9 


2-7 


3-6 


4-4 


5-4 


6-4 


7-2 


82 


M 


30 


1-0 


2-0 


3-1 


4-2 


5-4 


6-8 


7-8 


8-4 


9-1 


9-6 


29 


1-1 


17 


2-5 


3-0 


3-5 


4-1 


4-5 


6-0 


6-5 


5-9 


39 


1 2 


2-5 


3-1 


3-8 


4-4 


4-8 


6-3 


5-9 


6-7 


7*3 


39 


1-2 


1-9 


2-7 


3-6 


4-9 


6-9 


68 


8-0 


9-2 


10-5 


6 


9 


2-4 


3'4 


4-5 


5'6 


6'4 


7-2 


7'9 


8-7 


9-7 


6 


11 


3-6 


4.7 


5-7 


8-1 


10-1 


11-7 


13-1 


14-1 


14-9 


6 


8 


1-6 


2-6 


3-7 


4-6 


5-6 


6'6 


7-3 


8-2 


92 


6 


1-0 


2-0 


2-9 


36 


4-1 


5'2 


6'2 


7-0 


7-5 


8*1 


22 


5 


1-1 


2-2 


3-3 


4-1 


5-6 


6-6 


7-3 


8-2 


90 


6 


2-0 


S'O 


3-8 


4-8 


6-1 


7-1 


7'9 


8-6 


9-0 


94 


9 


7 


1-6 


2-3 


39 


3-6 


44 


5-5 


6-6 


7-5 


8-0 


6 


1-3 


2-2 


3-5 


4-6 


5-6 


6-8 


7-8 


8-3 


9-5 


10-9 


S 


5 


1-1 


1*8 


2-4 


2-9 


33 


4-1 


4-7 


55 


6-7 


6 


6 


1-1 


1-8 


2-3 


28 


3-5 


4-2 


5-1 


5-6 


6'2 


48 


1-1 


2-0 


4-7 


6-8 


8-6 


97 


10-5 


11-8 


12-0 


12-6 


* 


1-9 


4-2 


6-0 


6-8 


7-5 


8-3 


9-2 


10-0 


10-9 


11-6 


48 


4-8 


7'3 


9-1 


1C-5 


11*9 


12-6 


13-3 


14-0 


14-6 


153 


54 


1-0 


27 


3-5 


4-3 


4-9 


5'8 


6'7 


7'2 


7-9 


8-8 


...... 


9 


1*2 


2-8 


8-6 


4-2 


5-2 


6-1 


6-9 


7-6 


8-3 


66 


1-2 


2-4 


3-3 


4-9 


6-2 


7-1 


8-1 


9-1 


101 


11-1 


48 


1-4 


3-4 


44 


5-3 


6-2 


7-4 


8-0 


9-1 


10-2 


11-4 


48 


2O 


3-4 


4-5 


5-6 


6-4 


7-2 


8'0 


8-9 


9'9 


1M 


68 


1-8 


3-5 


46 


6-6 


6-6 


7-4 


9-0 


103 


10-9 


11-5 


48 


1-9 


6-2 


7-1 


7-7 


8-3 


91 


10-1 


11-4 


12-0 


13-5 


48 


1-4 


3'6 


4-8 


5-8 


6'6 


7-3 


8J 


8-8 


9-6 


10-1 


66 


6 


1-3 


2-7 


4-3 


5-3 


6-5 


76 


9-2 


10-1 


10-6 


58 


9 


2-0 


2-7 


3-4 


3-9 


4-6 


5-4 


6-9 


7-8 


8-5 


58 


9 


1-9 


2-4 


33 


4-0 


4-6 


53 


6-2 


7-8 


9'0 


66 


6 


1-6 


2-5 


4-4 


5-2 


7-0 


8'5 


9-7 


11-7 


13-4 


67 
Total ... 


1-9 


4-9 


7-3 


8-3 


9-1 


10-0 


11-2 


12-4 


13-5 


15-1 


42-8 


90-1 


126-7 


161-1 


190-7 


222-1 


251-7 


281-5 


310-5 


339-4 


Average ... 

Period taken to pass from 
one S' class to the next . 


1-30 

L 


2-70 


3-80 


4-90 


5-78 


6-73 


7-62 


8-53 
^_ 


9-41 


10-28 


7 years. 


14 years. 16 years. 18 years. 



101 



V. 

for periods of 5 years. 





year. 


53 GO 


65 


70 


75 


80 


86 


90 


95 16 


200 


205 


210 


i?\cht>9. 


NA. 



























7-8 


8-2 


8-4 


8-6 


9-1 


94 


10-0 


10-6 


11-5 


2-3 


22-6 


23-3 


2S-5 


16-3 


16-9 


17-4 


18-0 


19-0 


19-7 


20-3 


20-6 


21-3 





... 


... 


... 


10-0 


10-7 


11-5 


12-8 


13-5 


14.6 


15-2 


16-1 


17-0 





... 


... 


... 


10-1 


107 


11-3 


11-9 


12-5 


12-9 


13-2 


13-6 


14-1 





... 


... 


... 


6-4 


6-8 


7-4 


8-1 


8-8 


9-2 


9-7 


102 


10-8 


4-1 


24-6 


... 


** 


79 


8'4 


9-0 


9-6 


JO-3 


11-1 


11-6 


12-2 


12-8 


- 


... 


i 


. 


11-6 


12-9 


14-0 


14-9 


157 


16-6 


17-4 


18-5 


19-8 


,.. 


... 


... 


* 


10-4 


10-9 


11-6 


12-2 


12-8 


13-2 


13-9 


14-4 


14-9 


... 


... 


... 


... 


15-8 


16-5 


17-2 


17-8 


18-6 


19-4 


20-3 


21-2 


21-8 


!9-3 


298 


Bark -3 


... 


9-9 


10-6 


11-4 


11-8 


12-8 


13-0 


13-5 


14-0 


14-5 


13-3 


23-6 


24-0 


243 


8-6 


9-1 


9-5 


9-9 


10-1 


10-6 


10-9 


11-3 


11-9 


... 


... 


... 


... 


9-6 


10-9 


11-5 


12-1 


12-5 


1J-8 


13-9 


14-4 


14-8 


... 


... 


* 


... 


-7 


10-1 


10-6 


11-1 


11-8 


12-4 


13-1 


13-7 


14-1 


... 


... 


M 


... 


88 


9-6 


10-4 


11-1 


11-9 


12-6 


13-5 


Bark -2 




* 


... 


* 


* 


11-9 


12-7 


13-2 


13-9 


14-7 


15-5 


16-0 


16-4 


)6'8 


24-6 


25-1 


25-7 


25-9 


7-0 


7-5 


8-2 


9-0 


9-6 


30-5 


11-2 


11-9 


12'5 


24-7 


25-0 


25-5 


Bark -3 


6-9 


7-7 


8-3 


9-1 


9-7 


10-4 


11-2 


12-1 


13-0 


... 


... 


* 


... 


1J-0 


13-4 


13-9 


14-4 


14-8 


15-2 


156 


16-1 


16-6 


irk -4 


... 


... 


... 


12-3 


130 


13-7 


144 


14-9 


15-4 


16-0 


16-5 


170 


... 


... 


Mi 


I'M 


16-0 


16-5 


16-9 


173 


17-9 


18-4 


18-9 


19-4 


19-9 


... 


** 


... 


... 


9-5 


10-4 


11-3 


12-3 


13-4 


14-2 


15-1 


15-8 


16-5 


29-1 


29-7 


30-1 


31-6 


9-0 


9-6 


10-2 


10-8 


11-4 


121 


12-7 


13-3 


13-8 


24-9 


25-4 


25-8 


Bark 4 


11-8 


12-0 


13-8 


14-6 


155 


16-6 


17-6 


18-3 


18-9 


ark -3 


... 


... 


... 


12-6 


14-0 


15-1 


16-9 


166 


17-6 


18-3 


19-2 


19-9 


... 


... 


... 


... 


12-5 


13-5 


14-3 


15-3 


16-3 


16-9 


17'7 


18-3 


19-0 


... 


... 


... 


... 


12-2 


12-9 


13-6 


14-6 


15-6 


16-6 


17-9 


19-0 


19-9 


... 


... 


... 


... 


15-6 


16-8 


17-9 


18-6 


19-4 


19-8 


20-3 


21-1 


21-9 


... 


... 


... 


... 


10-9 


11-6 


123 


12-9 


13-5 


13-9 


14-5 


14-9 


161 


26-4 


269 


27-1 


Bark. 4 


11-4 


m 


13-0 


13-5 


14-4 


15-1 


16-6 


16-1 


16-7 


... 


... 


... 


M 


94 


10-3 


11-0 


12-0 


12-9 


13-8 


14-8 


16-0 


17-1 


** 


... 


... 





103 


11-3 


12-2 


12-8 


13-6 


14-1 


14-6 


15-1 


15-6 


25-9 


26-2 


26-5 


26-8 


14-4 


15-5 


16-9 


181 


19-5 


20-8 


22'2 


23-4 


24-5 


... 


... 


... 


... 


16-4 


17-8 


18-9 


200 


20-3 


22-2 


22-9 


23-6 


24- 


... 


* 


... 


... 


3650 


390-9 


415-8 


439-2 


r 
463-4 


487-5 


509-6 


517-3 


639-4 


254-6 


258-9 


208-0 


132-1 


11-06 


H-84 


12-63 


13-31 


14-04 


14-77 


15-41 


16-16 


16-85 


25-4 


25-9 


26-0 


26-4 


20 ye*"- 21 yean. 



B 99026* 



98 



APPENDIX 

Increment of Test Trees 







Age in 










* 


Compartment Xo. 


ICO 


105 


110 


115 


120 


125 


130 


135 140 




Diameter in 
















. 






NA 


31 






















12-4 


13-3 


13-5 


14-1 


14-9 


15'5 


16-1 


16-5 


17-0 


31 






















22-1 


22-6 


22-9 


23-5 


24-3 


24-8 


265 


i* 




30 






















17-8 


18-.-) 


19-1 


19-9 


20-3 


20-8 


21'2 


21-8 


2-'2 


30 






















14-6 


15-2 


16-0 


36-4 


16-3 


17-6 


1S-4 


19-0 


19-8 


29 






















31-3 


11-8 


12-2 


12-9 


13-6 


14-2 


14-8 


15-8 


16-8 


to 

... tt 






















13-5 


14-2 


15-0 


15-6 


16-4 


17-1 


17-9 


18-3 


18-6 


39 






















20-5 


211 


21-7 


23-0 


23-6 


24-2 


24-9 


25-6 


26-1 


6 




( 


















15-2 


15-5 


16-0 


16-8 


17-5 


18-3 


39-1 


19-9 


20-6 


6 ' 






















22-6 


22-9 


23-2 


23-5 


23-9 


24-2 


24-6 


25-0 


25-4 


6 






















14-7 


15-2 


ln-5 


16-1 


16-8 


37-4 


18-0 


1S-6 


190 


6 




















... . 






















12-1 


12-5 


12-7 


13-1 


13-4 


13-7 


14-0 


34-2 


14-6 


22 






















16-2 


15-7 


16-2 


16-8 


17-3 


38-0 


18-5 


190 


195 


6 






















14-6 


15-0 


15-3 


15-0 


16-1 


16-5 


16-9 


17-7 


1 8-2 


9 




















6 


... 




... 




..i 


... 


... 


... 


... 




17-5 


17-9 


18-3 


18-7 


19-1 


19-4 


197 


20-1 


20'4 


* ... 


13-1 


14-1 


15-0 


15-7 


16-5 


108 


17-4 


18-0 


187 


6 






















14-0 


15-1 


16-8 


16-8 


17-8 


18-4 


39-0 


1SI-6 


20-2 




17-2 


17-S 


18-3 


18-8 


19-2 


19-7 


20-0 


20-5 


20-8 





17-6 


18-1 


18-7 


19-4 


20-0 


20-8 


21-7 


22'6 


23-4 

























0-3 


20-8 


21-4 


21-8 


22-2 


22-7 


23-1 


23'6 


241 


54 






















17-4 


181 


38-6 


19-1 


19-7 


20-6 


21-3 


22-0 


22-6 


'* 


U-2 


H-7 


152 


15-9 


16-5 


17-1 


17-5 


18-0 


18-5 


66 






















19-6 


20-3 


21-3 


21-9 


22-5 


23-0 


23'6 


24-2 


25-0 


48 






















209 


21-8 


22-9 


23-9 


Bark -3 








... 


48 






















19-7 


20-4 


20-9 


217 


22-2 


22-9 


23-6 


24-1 


Bark -2 


68 




















20-1 


21-9 


22-7 i 23 3 


23-9 


24-4 


249 


25-5 


26-1 


48 






















22-7 


23-6 


242 


24-7 


25-5 


26 1 


26-8 


27-4 


27-8 


... 


3 


















66 


17-1 


17-7 


18'3 


191 


19-5 


20-0 


0-6 


21-1 


21-7 




17-3 


17-8 


18-5 


19-1 


197 


TO-2 


211 


21 8 


2-2-2 


68 






















37'9 


18-9 


19-6 


20-7 


21-G 


22-6 


23-5 


244 


25-1 


68 




















6 ... ... 


16-2 


36-7 


17-3 


17-8 


18-4 


18-9 


19-3 


20-1 


20-8 


67 


25-6 
1 


26-7 


28-0 


28-9 


Bark -4 


... 


... 


... 


... 


t25'0 


25-6 


26-0 


26-4 


27-0 


27-6 


i-8'1 


2S-9 


29-5 


42- 

560-0 


581-5 


600-3 


621-0 


586-3 


6035 


622-1 


613-3 


604-5 


l 


















Period taken to pass from 


17-50 


.18-17 


18-76 


19-09 


1832 


20-10 

-A 


23-60 


21-1 


21-5 


one 3* class to the next . 


7 




29 years. 35 years. 



100 



101 



V. 

for periods of 8 years. 
XXIV & xxv. 



years. 



145 


150 


155 


160 


165 


170 


175 


180 


185 


190 


195 


200 


205 


210 



inches. 



NA. 




























17-6 


18-3 


187 


19-0 


19-6 


20-0 


20-5 


21-0 


21-4 


21-8 


22-3 


22-6 


23-3 


2S-5 


229 


23-4 


24-0 


24-5 


247 


... 


... 


* 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


20-2 


20-8 


21-5 


22-1 


22-9 


24-0 





... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


17-8 


18-9 


19-5 


20-3 


208 


21-6 


22-1 


22-6 


23-2 


23-7 


24-1 


24-6 


... 


... 


19-2 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


26-8 


27-2 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


* 


* 


21-4 


21-9 


22-3 


22-9 


23-4 


23-8 


24-2 


24-9 


25-1 


Bark -5 


... 


... 


... 


... 


25-7 


260 


263 


26'8 


27-2 


27-7 


28-0 


28-4 


28-8 


29-1 


29-3 


29-8 


Bark -3 


... 


19-5 


19-9 


20-4 


20-8 


21-2 


21-5 


21-9 


22-2 


22-6 


22-9 


23-3 


23-6 


24-0 


24-3 


14-8 


151 


15-4 


15-7 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


19-9 


20-4 


20-7 


21-1 


21-3 


21-6 


21-9 


222 


Bark -2 


... 


... 


... 


* 


* 


18-7 


19-0 


19'3 


20-0 


20-4 


20-8 


21-2 


21-4 


21-6 


Bark '2 


... 


... 


- 


... 


20-8 


21-2 


21-6 


f 

21-9 


22-2 


22-5 


23-0 


23-5 


23-8 


24-2 


24-6 


25-1 


25-7 


25-9 


19-3 


20-1 


20-7 


21-4 


21-9 


223 


22-8 


23-3 


23-7 


24-2 


24-7 


25-0 


255 


Bark -3 


20-8 


21-3 


21-7 




... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 




... 


t 


... 


21-4 


22-6 


23-0 


23-2 


23-6 


24'0 


24-3 


24-6 


24-9 


25-4 


Bark -4 


... 


... 


... 


Eark -4 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


* 


* 


Bark -3 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


f 


234 


241 


247 


25'3 


25-8 


263 


26-9 


27-4 


27-9 


28-4 


29-1 


29-7 


30-1 


31-6 


19-1 


19-8 


20-3 


208 


21-2 


21-7 


22-2 


22-7 


23-3 


24-1 


24-9 


25-4 


25-8 


Bark 4 


25-7 


265 


27-3 


27-9 


28-6 


29-4 


30-3 


80-9 


31-6 


32-4 


Bark -3 


... 


... 


: 


26-6 


27-2 


27'5 


28-1 


28-7 


29-2 


29-7 


30-2 


Bark '4 


... 


* 





... 


** 


28-3 


23-5 


28-8 


Bark 2 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 





... 


... 


... 


22-1 


22-5 


22-9 


13-3 


23-7 


24-2 


24-7 


25-1 


25-6 


26-0 


26-4 


26-9 


27-1 


Bark. 4 


22-7 


Bark -3 


... 


... 




* 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


* 


25-8 


263 


26-7 


Bark -4 


... 


... 


... 


... 


* 


... 


... 


* 


... 




31-4 


22-0 


22-8 


23-3 


23-8 


24-2 


24-7 


24-9 


25-2 


25-5 


259 


26-2 


26-5 


26-8 


* 

30-1 


306 


30-8 


81-2 


31-5 


81-8 


Bark -4 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


572-1 


543-6 


526-9 


459-8 


482-5 


436-5 


388-4 


395-3 


348-7 


307-7 


254-6 


258-9 


208-0 


132-1 


22-0 


22-6 


22-9 


22-98 


24-1 


24-2 


21-3 


24-7 


24-9 


256 


25-4 


25-9 


26-0 


26-4 



45 years. 



102 



APPENDIX 

Increment of Tett treet 
BLOCKS 





Age in 


Compartment No. 


5 


10 


15 


20 


25 


30 


35 


40 


45 


50 




Diameter in 






















KIN 


80 


7 


1-7 


2-2 


3-0 


40 


5-0 


6-1 


7'2 


8-1 


9-6 


31 


1-0 


1-6 


30 


4-0 


5-0 


5-6 


6-8 


7-2 


8-1 


9-2 


30 


1-2 


24 


3-3 


4-5 


5-9 


6-0 


82 


9-4 


106 


11-9 


29 


1-8 


3-1 


4-6 


6-0 


7-0 


7-9 


95 


10-3 


11-4 


12-1 


29 


8 


J-6 


2-4 


3-2 


4-2 


5-2 


6-2 


6-9 


7-7 


85 


29 


8 


1-5 


2-5 


8-8 


4-9 


6-3 


7-6 


9-3 


DO-8 


11-8 


32 


M 


2-0 


2-9 


3-8 


4-9 


5-9 


7-2 


8-6 


96 


107 


31 


11 


20 


3'0 


3-9 


4-8 


5-4 


6-9 


6-8 


7'4 


8-4 


31 


I -4 


2-5 


R-4 


4-2 


4-9 


5-6 


6-4 


6'9 


7-8 


8-3 


31 


... 


... 


... 


... 





5-5 


8-6 


9-4 


10'5 


11-6 


31 


... 





... 


... 





i 





5-4 


5-9 


6-8 


34 


6 


1-3 


1-9 


2-7 


8-6 


5-1 


6-0 


6-3 


7'6 


8-4 


34 


6 


1-2 


2-0 


2-9 


4-0 


4-9 


6-0 


6-8 


7-9 


8-8 


84 


1-5 


2-7 


4-0 


5-1 


fi-0 


67 


7-5 


8-4 


9-0 


100 


34 


1-4 


2-5 


3-8 


4-8 


6-1 


7-4 


8-5 


97 


ll-l 


12-0 


84 


1-1 


2-2 


3-6 


47 


5-6 


6-6 


7'3 


8-3 


9-4 


11-0 


10 


9 


1-9 


2-5 


3-2 


3-9 


4-7 


5-6 


6-6 


7-6 


8-7 


10 


9 


1-5 


2-6 


3-8 


4-4 


6-1 


67 


6-2 


6-6 


72 


23 


9 


1-6 


2-6 


3-5 


4-6 


5-4 


5-9 


6-4 


7-2 


7'9 


23 


1-0 


2-3 


3-4 


4-1 


5-9 


6-3 


7-2 


7-9 


87 


9-1 


21 


11 


2'1 


2-9 


37 


4-4 


5-8 


6-1 


6-9 


7'6 


8-9 


7 


l-l 


1-6 


2-1 


27 


3-4 


4-1 


4-6 


6-2 


5-8 


6-2 


SI 


2-2 


8'5 


5-3 


6*1 


7-1 


7-8 


8-4 


9-8 


:o7 


11-3 


21 


1-3 


3-4 


4-7 


58 


6-3 


7'0 


7-7 


8-7 


9-5 


10-3 


48 


1-5 


2-8 


4-4 


5-4 


6-5 


7-6 


8-2 


9-0 


10-0 


10-8 


66 


1-2 


2-8 


3-6 


4-3 


4-6 


53 


64 


7-3 


8-2 


9-0 


66 


11 


2-2 


S'O 


3-9 


4-9 


5-9 


6-8 


8-0 


9-6 


11-0 


68 


8 


14 


2-1 


2-8 


3-3 


4-0 


4-9 


5-3 


6-0 


6-7 


58 


1-1 


2-2 


3-1 


3-9 


49 


6-8 


6-6 


7-5 


8-3 


9-1 


Total ... 


30-2 


57-6 


84-9 


109-8 


135-1 


163-4 


191-9 


222-2 


2487 


275-3 


Average ... 


1-1 


2-1 

-- 


8-1 

V 


4-1 


5-0 


5-8 


6-8 


7-6 


8-6 


9-5 


Period taken to pass from 




one 3" class to the next... 


9 years. ]6 years. 17 years. 






















JAM 


39 


8 


1-6 


2-4 


29 


35 


4-5 


6-2 


6-1 


6-6 


7-5 


39 


7 


1-5 


2-4 


3-2 


8-9 


4-5 


5-3 


6-0 


6-6 


7-3 


34 


7 


1-5 


22 


2-9 


3-8 


4-5 


5-2 


6-3 


7-3 


8-1 


39 


6 


1-6 


2-3 


3-1 


8-7 


4-4 


5-0 


5-5 


6-2 


7-3 


30 


1-3 


29 


4-0 


4-9 


6-8 


6-8 


7'9 


9-6 


100 


10-9 


10 


1-0 


1-9 


8-0 


4-1 


5-1 


5-8 


6-8 


7-8 


8-6 


9-5 


9 


-4, 


1-3 


2-0 


2-8 


3-7 


4-6 


5-2 


6-1 


6-9 


7-5 


10 


1-2 


2-4 


3-2 


4-4 


6-6 


6-9 


7-6 


8-4 


9-5 


10-4 


10 


1-1 


2-5 


3-3 


4-3 


4-9 


5-6 


6-2 


6-8 


7-7 


8-4 


9 


8 


1-6 


2-6 


3-6 


4-5 


5.2 


6-0 


6-8 


7t 


8-1 


23 


1-7 


1-8 


2-5 


3-8 


4-1 


4-9 


5'8 


6-8 


7-4 


8-0 


9 


1-1 


2-2 


3-1 


4-0 


4-7 


6-4 


6-1 


7-0 


8-1 


8-9 


9 


1-1 


2-4 


3-4 


4.4 


6-4 


6-3 


7-1 


8-3 


97 


10-9 


21 


1-4 


2-4 


3-3 


4-1 


5-1 


5-8 


6-6 


7-0 


7-8 


8-5 


21 


6 


1-3 


1-8 


2-6 


3-2 


4-1 


4-8 


5-6 


6-3 


7-3 


9 


6 


1-7 


2-3 


3-1 


3-8 


4-t 


5-1 


5'8 


6-6 


7-4 





1-2 


2-4 


3-5 


4-6 


5-2 


6-2 


7-3 


8-6 


9-6 


107 





1 1 


1-7 


2-3 


2-9 


3-4 


3-8 


4-4 


6-0 


5-8 


6-6 


48 


1-8 


2-5 


3-3 


4-2 


5-2 


6-1 


7-1 


8-2 


93 


10-4 


57 


1-1 


1-7 


2-3 


2-7 


3-2 


8-6 


4-1 


47 


5-3 


6-0 


48 


1-0 


1'6 


3'1 


5-0 


8-4 


69 


7-9 


8-9 


9-9 


111 


43 


1-4 


2-6 


3-8 


4-9 


5-6 


6-5 


7-3 


8-0 


90 


97 


48 


8 


1-8 


2'6 


8-6 


4-1 


4-8 


6-5 


6-1 


70 


7-8 


58 ... . 


7 


1-3 


2-1 


8-1 


3-9 


4-3 


4-6 


5-1 


5-4 


5-9 


58 


7 


1-1 


1-7 


2-3 


3-2 


4-0 


4-7 


5-2 


56 


5-9 


58 


1-0 


2-0 


2-6 


2-9 


8-7 


4-5 


6-2 


6-6 


7-3 


8-0 


Total ... 


257 


49-3 


710 


93-8 


114-7 


134-0 


153-9 


176-6 


196-9 


218-1 


Avenge ... 


99 

V 


1-90 
; 


2-73 


8-60 


4-41 


5-15 


5-92 


6-79 


7-57 


8-39 

I 


Period taken to pass from 




one 3" class to the next .. 


11 years, 18 years. 19 years. 



105 



V. 

for period of 5 years. 

XXIV AND XXV. 



yt-.ir. 



">5 


00 


65 


70 


75 


80 


85 



170 



175 



180 



DAL. 


j 








11-2 


11-6 


12-6 


134 14-4 14-8 


1.V9 


JO'O 


108 HI 


lla U'-O 12-8 


135 


12-d 


14-2 


157 


36-5 17-5 18-5 


190 


13-1 


14-0 


15-0 


lfi-1 17-2 18-0 


18-8 


9' I 


<J-7 10-2 


107 11-4 1-2-4 


1 3 "2 


12-5 


13'5 lo'l 


10-3 17-6 18-3 


19-1 


31-9 


32-8 ! 13-8 


14-9 15-5 






9-4 


102 


10-8 


11-4 12-3 


33-4 


14-1 


8-7 


9-3 


10-1 


10-6 11-3 12-3 


33-2 


12-4 


13-2 


13-8 


14-5 15'1 156 


lti-4 


7'8 


8-4 


9'3 


10-2 10-8 1J-5 


]"2"L 


i-l 


9-9 


10-8 


11-4 32-3 13'1 


13-8 


9-9 


iro 


11-9 


12-7 13-6 146 


357 


:o-8 


11-5 


121 


V2-9 )3-6 148 : Ju-5 


12-8 


13-9 


14-7 


15-5 17-0 17-8 1 18'li 


1-2-7 


14-1 


15'5 


15'6 : 17-8 18-4 


39-4 


V-5 


10-3 


309 


11-5 12-2 13-0 


13'ti 




8-4 i 9-0 


9-6 10-1 10-7 13-1 


8-4 


9-0 9'7 


10-5 H-4 J2-3 13'!) 


10-0 


10-7 U-3 


12-2 13-2 14-2 15-1 


9-7 


108 11-6 


12-7 13-6 14'8 15-3 


fi-6 


7-1 7-6 


8-1 s-5 9-0 9-6 


l'-'"2 


13-2 


13-1I 


14-6 ' 15-(i 16-6 17-0 


10-9 


11-5 


12-1 


12-8 13-5 14-9 1.V1 


11-6 


12-6 13'4 


143 15-4 167 ! 177 


9-8 


10-6 H-4 


12-1 12-9 13-7 14-5 


12-1 


13-5 ! 14-fl 


15-8 37-4 18-8 20-0 


7-4 


8-1 8-7 


9-3 10-1 11-0 


117 


9-8 ! 108 H'5 


12-1 13-0 13'8 


14-5 


;)(X'-2 324-7 


348-2 


370-1 396-3 


405-7 


430-5 


10-3 11-2 


12-0 




12-7 : 13-6 

' 


14-5 


15-1 


17 years. 18 years. 18 yiars. 


8-3 


8-9 


10-0 


10-6 


11-4 


1-2-0 


12-6 


7-9 


re 


9-4 


10-1 


11/7 


31-4 


32-0 


8-3 


9-4 


9-9 


10-5 


31-3 


11-8 


U'4 


7-9 


ST. 


9-0 


9'7 


10-5 


11-0 


117 


1-2-1 


13-8 


147 


15-6 


16-3 


17-0 


17-S 


10'4 


11-3 


12-2 


13-0 


11 -0 


14-8 


15-3 


8-4 


9-3 


9-6 


10-3 


111 


11-9 12-8 


11-3 


12-3 


13-1 


14-3 


15-2 


15-9 16-4 


9-6 


10-7 


12-8 


14-2 


35-5 


16'9 3s "i 


8-8 


9-3 


9-8 


lo-7 


11-0 


12-4 


13-2 


H'6 


9-5 


10-2 


31-0 


11-8 


127 


3 3"2 


'.!<) 


10-9 


11-6 


12-2 


12-9 


13-3 13-S 




13"2 


1C2 


15-2 


lrt-2 


17-2 18-4 


9-3 


10-1 


11-0 


319 


128 


13-8 l.VO 


8-4 


9-3 


10'2 


10-8 


11-3 


12'0 


12"t! 


S-0 


9-2 


97 


10-7 


116 


121 


32-7 


11-4 


12'3 


. 131 


14-0 


14-8 


1.V7 


1 6-8 


77 


8-5 


9-8 


10-3 


10-8 


n-3 


11-11 


]1'4 


1-2-3 


131 


13-9 


147 


15'5 


36-1 


6-8 


7-4 


8-2 


'.i-l 


9-9 


10-7 


11 -8 


12-0 


12-8 


13-8 


147 


35-9 


17-0 


17-8 


111-4 


11-2 


12-0 


12-8 


13-6 


14-1 


l.VO 


8-4 


9-2 


1U-2 


ll-l 


1'7 


32-3 


13-0 




0-8 


7-3 


8-1 


8-6 


9-1 


9-6 


6-tt 


7'3 


7-7 


8-1 


8-6 


9-0 


9-3 


9-2 


10-2 


11-4 


12-4 


33-1 


13-9 


14T) 
















240-2 


2G2'4 


284-0 


3053 


3259 


344-8 


363-4 












I 


941 


10-09 


10-92 

_J 


H-74 12-53 

V^ -v 


13-2C ' 13-JS 



IS yoavs. 



B 09027 



1!) vcars. 



268 



25-1 



266 
28-7 



21-9 
25-2 



154-3 
257 



27-0 



Bark -8 
289 



22-4 
Bark -3 



78-3 
26-1 



27-8 



29-4 



22-9 



801 
26-7 



22-2 
25-1 


22-4 
26-1 

* 


22-8 
26-9 


21-8 


22-6 


** 

... * 

23-3 


22-0 


22-3 


23-0 


'22-4 


22-9 


"23 : 4 


'26-8 
24-2 
20-1 
19-1 


273 
24-9 
20-5 
19-5 


25-4 
20-8 
19-9 


203-7 


208-5 


213-3 


22-63 


23-16 


23-7 



103 



102 



APPENDIX 

Increment of Teat treet 
BLOCKS 











Age in 










90 


95 


100 


106 


no 


116 


120 


125 






Compartment No. 


5 


1 
























Diameter in 








17-5 


18-6 


19'4 


19-8 


20-4 


21-4 


Kl 

22-0 


^ 






166 


30 


7 


14-6 


15-2 


16-1 


37'0 


17-8 


is-l 


19-0 


200 




31 .. 


1-0 


20-2 


21-1 


22-J 


22-8 


23-2 


247 


25-4 


2IJ-2 




30 


1-2 


19-6 


20-4 


21-2 


22-1 


22-9 


23-5 


24-2 






29 .. 


1-8 


14-0 


14-6 


1&-1 


15-9 


16-4 


17-1 


17-d 


18-6 




29 


8 


20-2 


21-2 


22-1 


22-7 


23-6 


24-1 


... 







29 


8 








... 


... 






... 




32 .. 


1-1 


14 : 9 


15-6 


16-5 


17-6 


18-2 


18-9 


20-0 


20-6 




31 


1-1 


139 


14-6 


15-4 


16' 1 


16-9 


17-7 


18-2 


18-9 




31 


1-4 


17-1 


17-7 


18-4 


19-1 


20-0 


0-7 


21-5 


yg'3 




31 




12-9 


13-4 


14'0 


14-6 


15-2 


16-8 


16-4 


16-9 




31 





14-6 


15'3 


16-0 


16-6 


17'3 


18-0 


18-9 


19-6 




84 .. 


6 


16-6 


18-0 


19-2 


20-6 


21-8 


23-1 


24-fi 


25-2 




34 


6 


16-1 


16-6 


17-1 


17-6 


18-1 


18-5 


18-9 


19-3 




84 


1-5 


! 19-7 


20-4 


21-0 


21-5 


22-2 


23-0 


211 


26-0 




34 


1-4 


20-2 


21-3 


22-3 


23'2 


23-9 


24-8 


25-4 


26-1 




Si 


I'l 


34-1 


14-6 


Bark -4 


... 





. i 


... 






10 


9 


14-2 


15-1 


15-5 


15-9 


16-4 





... 


... 




10 


9 


14-9 


15*7 


10'8 


16-9 


Bark '3 


... 


... 


... 




23 


9 


16-2 


17-0 


38-0 


Bark -4 


... 


... 




... 




23 


1-0 


: 16-3 


16-9 


17-7 


18-1 


18-6 


195 


20-2 


20-9 




21 


1-1 


10-1 


10-6 


iro 


11-4 


11-9 


12-3 


12-7 






7 


1-1 


18-4 


19-2 


20-1 


20-7 


21-5 


21-3 


22-5 


23-2 




ai 


2-2 


15-8 


16-5 


17'2 


Bark -4 










>.* 




21 


1-3 


18-8 


19-7 


20-6 


21-8 


23-0 


24-2 


25-0 


26'4 




48 


1-5 


1 15-3 


16-4 


37-4 


18-1 


18-9 


19-8 


20-6 


21-6 




66 


1-2 


21-1 


22-1 


23-1 


23-6 


Bark -5 


.*. 


... 






66 


I'l 


I 32-4 


33-0 


14-0 


14-7 


15-3 


16-1 


16-9 


17 : 6 




68 


8 

1.1 


14-8 


15-5 


16-3 


17-0 


17-5 


18-3 


19-0 


19-5 




S3 


-L 


A5_ fi 


. 


482'2 




AAfi'A, 


. . 


400.7 


4AQ.7 




Total ... 


30-2 


5 


VfO'l 







^fU *fc 





tbOA i 


t\jy i 






ll 


16-2 


17-0 


17-8 


18'6 


19-4 


20-0 
l 


20-6 


21-5 




Aver&ge . . . 
Period taken to pass from 


j 

\ 


ir- 
is years, 20 years. 22 years. 




one 3* class to the next... 


9 years 




















JAM 












13-5 


14-1 


14'5 


16-1 


16-5 


16-1 


164 


16-9 




3* * * 


8 


12-4 


13-1 


13'8 


14-6 


15-3 


16-4 


17-0 


17-8 




39 


7 


12-9 


13-6 


14-4 


15-1 


16-8 


16'1 


16'6 


16-9 




34 


7 


12-4 


13-0 


33-8 


14-4 


15-1 


16-0 


16-8 


17'4 




39 


6 


18-5 


f 


... 




... 


* 


... 


... 




30 


1-3 


15-8 


16'1 


ferk -3 


ft 


... 


* 


... 


... 




10 


1-0 


13-9 


14-6 


15-6 


16-3 


16-8 


17'4 


17-9 


18-3 




9 


4 


17-2 


17-6 


18-1 


18-5 


19-1 


19*4 


19-7 


19-9 




10 


1-2 


19-8 


21-2 


22-3 


23-2 


23'9 


2V4 


250 


25-5 




10 


I'l 


13-7 


Jark-8 


... 


... 


... 





... 







9 


8 


13-9 


14-5 


5ark -3 


... 


... 


* 


.. 


! 




23 


1-7 


Bark -3 


m 




... 


... 




... 







9 


1-1 


19-2 


20-1 


21 : 2 


22-2 


23-2 


24 : 1 


24-5 


Bark -4 




9 


1-1 


16-0 


16-9 


17'6 


18-7 


19-5 


20'3 


21-2 


220 




21 


1-4 


12-9 


13-4 


13-9 


14-2 


14-7 


15-5 


16-2 


16-9 




21 


6 


13-1 


13-5 


14-1 


14-4 


14-7 


15-3 


159 







9 


6 


18-1 


19-1 


202 


21-1 


22-1 


23-3 


24-4 


25'4 




** 


1-2 


12-9 


13-7 


14-6 


15-3 


16-9 


166 


17-2 


17-6 






11 


16-9 


17-5 


18-2 


18-9 


19-5 


20-1 


20-7 


21-2 




48 "".'.. 


1-6 


12-0 


12-8 


136 


14-4 


lo'l 


15-8 


16-4 


17-2 




57 


1-1 


19-0 


19-5 


20-6 


21-6 


22-4 


23-1 


23-8 


24-4 




48 


1-0 


15-8 


16-3 


17-1 


17'6 


18-3 


19-2 


19-9 


20-7 




43 


1-4 


13-6 


14-5 


16- 2 


15-7 


16-4 


17-1 


17-8 


18-3 




48 


8 


10-2 


10-7 


11-3 


11-7 


12-2 


12'6 


13-3 


14-0 




68 .. 


7 


9-6 


10-1 


10-5 


11-1 


13-6 


12-0 


32-5 


13-1 




68 


7 


16-1 


15-6 


16-4 


17-2 


17'9 


18-6 


19-1 


19-7 




58 


1-0 


























351-5 


337-0 


351-3 


364-9 


379-4 


392-3 


363-2 








Total .. 


25-7 


4 






















H73 


15-28 


16-06 


16-73 


17-38 


18-07 


18-68 


19-12 




Average .. 


99 

V 








Period taken to pass fron 


^^ r~~ 

22 years. 




one 3" class to the next . 


11 yea 





104. 



105 



V. 

for period of 5 years. 

XXIV AND XXV. 



year. 


130 


135 


140 


145 


150 


155 


160 


165 


170 


175 


180 



inches. 



22-6 


23-0 


23-2 


23-6 
















21-0 


21-8 


22-6 


23-8 


24-3 


25-0 


25'7 


26-0 


268 


2*7-0 


27'3 


26-9 


27-8 


28-4 


29-2 


30-4 


31-2 


... 


... 


... 


... 





'l9-6 


20-4 


21-1 


... 


... 


... 


.* 


::: 


... 





:::::: 


19-8 


20-6 


21-3 


22-1 


23-1 


23-6 


'24-4 


24-6 


25-1 


* 


* 



231 


24-1 


24-9 


25-6 


... 





IM 





* 






17-4 


18-1 


18-7 


19-4 


20-0 


20-7 


21-1 










.. i 


20-2 


20-8 


21-6 




... 


... 





' 




... 





26-1 


27-1 


27-6 


28-1 


28-5 


29-0 


29-2 


29-6 





... 





19-8 


20-2 


20-7 


21-1 


21-5 


22-0 


22-5 


22-7 





... 


*** 


25-7 


26-4 


27-1 


27-7 


... 


... 


... 


... 


* 


. 





26-8 


27-2 

* 


27-8 


28'2 





... 


* 


... 





* 


>.* 
* 


21-8 


* 

22-6 


23-2 


'23-7 


24-4 


25-0 


25-5 


26-1 


266 


Bark" -8 


****** 


'28-8 


24-8 


24-4 


26-2 


26-8 


27-4 


279 


28-2 


28-7 


289 


"^ 


27-2 


Bark" -7 


.'.'. 


." 





." 


.* 





'.".'. 


* 


*. 
*.... 


22-5 


23-3 


24-1 


217 


Bark -7 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


...... 


18-2 


18'8 


'l9-3 


19-8 


20-3 


20-9 


21-1 


21-4 


'21-9 


22-4 


22-9 


20-1 


20-8 


21-5 


22-2 


22-9 


23-6 


24-2 


247 


25-2 


Bark -3 





402-5 


3878 


397-5 


365-4 


242-2 


248-3 


221-6 


203-3 


154-3 


78-3 


801 


22-3 


22-8 


23-3 


24-3 


24-2 


24-8 


24-8 


25-4 


25-7 


26-1 


26-7 



37 years. 



BA. 






















17-5 


18-2 


18-6 


19-3 


19-7 


20-4 


21-1 


21-6 


22-2 


22-4 


22-8 


18-6 


19-4 


20-1 


21-1 


22-1 


23-1 


23-9 


24-5 


25-1 


26-1 


26-9 


17-2 




... 






V 


... 


... 


... 


... 





18-3 


194 


20-0 


20 -4 


21-0 


21-6 


22-1 


22-4 


... 


... 





... 





... 


... 








... 


... 


... 


... 





Bark" -3 


; 


;; 


... 


,. 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 





Bark -2 




:: 


!'.' 


, a 


H 


.. 


... 


... 


... 





22-6 


23 1 


Mt 

Bark" -5 


... 








- 


... 


... 


... 





17-5 


18-1 


18-5 


Bark" -4 


>B 


... 


.. 






... 







16-5 


173 


17-7 


18-5 


19-2 


20-2 


si -2 


21-8 


22-6 


23-3 


26-4 


27-3 


27'9 


Bark '3 





... 


... 




.-. 







18-3 


18-8 


19-2 


197 


20-3 


20-7 


21"! 


21-6 


22-0 


22-3 


23-0 


21 6 


22-0 


22-5 


22-9 


23-5 


Bark -5 


... 


... 


... 




...... 


17-9 


18-6 




196 


201 


20-6 


21-2 


21-8 


22-4 


22-9 


23-4 


25-1 


25*7 


Bark '4 


. 


* 












... 


... .. 


21-3 


219 


22-5 


23-2 


2:i-9 


24-6 


25-3 


26-0 


26-8 


273 


27-8 


19-0 


20-1 


20-5 


20-9 


21-6 


22'2 


23-1 


286 


24-2 


24-9 


25-4 


147 


15-7 


16'6 


17*1 


17-8 


18-5 


19-1 


19-6 


20-1 


20-5 


20-8 


13-6 


14-2 


14-9 


16-6 


162 


!? 


37-4 


18-2 


19-1 


19-5 


19-9 


20-3 


209 


21-5 


21-9 


22-4 


227 


Bark -3 


> 




..* 





309-9 


319-9 


279-2 


239 '4 


247-1 


230-3 


214-5 


220-5 


203-7 


208-5 


213-3 


19-37 


19-99 


19-90 


19-95 


20-6 


20-9 


21-4 


22-0 


22-63 


23-16 


23-7 



31 years. 



35 years. 



99028 



106 



APPENDIX 

Increment of Test trees 

BLOCKS 





Age in 


Compartment No. 


5 


10 


15 


20 


25 


30 


35 


40 


45 


50 




Diameter in 






















BLACK 


32 


9 


2-2 


2-7 


3-2 


41 


4-7 


5-5 


6-2 


71 


7-9 i 


32 


1-7 


2-6 


2-9 


3-7 


4'5 


5-2 


6-0 


6-9 


7-6 


8-0 1 


32 


7 


1-6 


23 


3-3 


4'1 


4-9 


6-7 


6-5 


7-2 


8-1 


35 


5 


1-6 


2-2 


3-4 


4-3 


5'4 


6-3 


7--V 


8-6 


10-1 


39 


1-0 


1-9 


2-8 


3-8 


4-6 


6-3 


6'2 


7'5 


8-5 


9-5 


9 


1-4 


2-2 


2-9 


4-1 


5-0 


5-7 


6-4 


7'2 


7-6 


8-1 


9 


1-2 


2-8 


3-9 


4-9 


5-6 


6-6 


7 P 1 


7-6 


8-4 


8-9 


4 


9 


1-8 


2-8 


3-6 


4-6 


5-3 


6'8 


7-8 


8-8 


10-1 


9 


1*1 


2-0 


2-5 


2-9 


3-6 


4-0 


4-6 


5-3 


6-1 


6'7 


62 


2-2 


4-1 


5-6 


6-9 


8-6 


9-9 


10-9 


11-8 


12-6 


13-5 


61 


1-3 


23 


3-0 


3-8 


46 


5'2 


60 


6-8 


7-6 


8'3 


63 


8 


1-9 


3-4 


4-5 


57 


7-0 


7-4 


8-3 


9-3 


30-1 


63 


8 


1-6 


2'9 


4-3 


6-0 


6-8 


7-6 


8-2 


9-0 


9-6 


.. 


3-0 


1-7 


2-3 


2-8 


3-6 


4-1 


4-8 


5-4 


6-0 


6-6 


66 


8 


1-3 


2-0 


2-7 


3-3 


4-0 


4-6 


5-1 


5-7 


6-3 


Total ... 


163 


315 


44'2 


57-9 


72-2 


840 


96-9 


108-0 


120-0 


131-8 


Average ... 


1-08 

t_ 


' 2-10 


2-94 

\_ 


3-86 


4-81 


5-60 


6-46 


7-20 


8-00 


8-78 


Period taken to pass from 




one 3" class to the next ... 


9 years. 17 years. 19 years. 






















HON 


9 


5 


1-2 


1-9 


2'6 


3-6 


4-7 


5-6 


6-6 


7-1 


8-2 1 


9 


1-1 


2-2 


3-1 


4-1 


5-3 


6-5 


8-1 


8-9 


9-5 


10-1 


10 


6 


1-3 


2-2 


3-0 


3-8 


4-6 


5-5 


6-4 


7-1 


8-0 


10 


6 


M 


1-5 


2-1 


2-7 


3-2 


3-7 


4-1 


4-6 


49 


10 


6 


1-3 


2-4 


3-4 


4-9 


6-4 


8-1 


9-9 


11-9 


135 


8 


9 


1-9 


3-0 


3-8 


5-3 


6-3 


7-0 


7-9 


9-2 


10-1 


21 


1-0 


2-2 


3-4 


4-6 


6-8 


7-0 


8-3 


9-4 


30-3 


11-6 


3 


7 


1-6 


2-4 


3-2 


4-0 


4-8 


5-3 


6-9 


7-9 


8-9 


3 


6 


1-5 


2-1 


2-9 


3-8 


4-6 


5-6 


6-5 


7-0 


7-8 


3 


7 


2-2 


3-3 


4-4 


5-3 


6-0 


7-0 


7-8 


8-7 


9-6 


Total ... 


7-3 


16-5 


25-3 


34-1 


445 


54-1 


64-7 


74-4 


83-3 


92-7 


Average ... 


0-73 


1-65 


2-53 


3-41 
\ 


4-45 


5-41 


6-47 


7-44 

j 


8-33 

L 


9-27 


Period taken to pass from 


TT -v r 


one 3* class to the next ... 


12 years. 16 years. 16 years. 16 years. 



109 



V. 

for period of 5 years. 
XXIV AKD XXV. 



55 


60 


65 


70 


75 


80 


85 



incliei. 



5 


370 


175 


180 



WOOD. 














8-8 


9-1 


10-9 


12-2 


13-3 


14-1 


... 


8-5 


9-0 


9-7 


10-2 


10-7 


11-3 


11-8 


S-7 


9-3 


10-1 


11- 1 


12-3 


12-6 


... 


30-9 


11-9 


1--8 


13-6 


14-o 


lf>-4 


16 : 1 


10-2 


11-1 


11-9 


12-1 


12-6 


13-5 


14-0 


8'9 


9-5 


9-9 


10-6 


11-1 


11-7 


12-5 


9-1 


10-2 


r-'-l 


13-1 


13-7 


14-4 


14-fl 


10-8 


11-0 


12-6 


13-3 


14-1 


15-0 




7'2 


8-0 


8-8 


9'4 


l:i-l 


10-7 


rt-a 


14-3 


15-3 


16-3 


17-2 


1S-2 


19-0 


192 


9-1 


9-6 


10--' 


10-8 


113 


12-0 


12'5 


11-8 


12-6 


13-9 


15-2 


16-4 


17-5 


18-<3 


10-1 


10-7 ! 11-4 


12-0 


]'2-6 


13-1 


tt-S 


7-2 


7-8 i 8-3 


8-7 


92 


9-6 


10-1 


6-7 


7-5 


8-1 


87 


9^3 


10-1 


10-7 














H2-1 


153-5 


1C7-0 


178-5 


189-4 


200-0 


165-8 


9-47 


10-23 

4 


11-13 

i 


11-90 


12-62 


13-38 


13-81 

.* 



197 



c -8 



19'4 
20-9 



60-0 
20-0 



20-1 
21-6 



41-7 
20-85 



23 years. 



NI. 














9-4 


10-9 


11-8 


12-7 


13-7 


142 


15'0 


10-6 


11-0 


11-8 


H-7 


12-2 


12-7 


13-0 


9-1 


9-9 


10-9 


11-8 


12-5 


134 


14-0 


6-G 


6-1 


6-8 


7-2 


7-7 


8-2 


8-S 


14-8 


16-1 


171 


Bark -5 









11-0 


11-9 


12-6 


13-4 


14-2 


151 


15-5 


13-0 


14-0 


14-8 


16-3 


17-7 


191 


21-2 


10-1 


ll-o 


11-7 


12-8 


13-7 


141 


34-7 


8'9 


9-7 


10-6 


11-2 


11-9 


12-6 


13-3 


10-6 


11-8 


12-9 


14-1 


15-1 


15-6 


17-5 


103-1 


112-4 


120-5 


111-2 


118-7 


125-0 


133-0 


10-31 


11-21 


12-06 


12-35 


13-18 


53-88 


14-77 



23-5 



23-5 
33-7 



80-7 
26-9 



23-7 



23-8 
34-1 



81-6 
27-2 



24-1 



24-2 
Bark '5 



48-3 



Bark 



24-7 



24-7 



y 

22 years. 



18 years. 



I. S. PEARSON, 

st Officer, Working Plans, S. C. 



107 



B 99028* 



106 



Compartment No. 




5 






32 


9 


32 


1-7 


32 


7 


35 


5 


39 


1-0 


9 


1'4 


9 


1-2 


4 


9 


9 


1-1 


62 


2-2 


61 


1-3 


63 


8 


63 


8 





3-0 


66 


8 


Total ... 


163 


Average ... 


1-08 

t_ 


Period taken to pass from 




one 3" class to the next ... 


9ya 


9 


5 


9 


1-1 


10 


6 


10 


6 


10 


6 


8 


9 


21 


1-0 


3 


7 


3 


6 


3 


7 


Total ... 


7-3 


Average ... 


0-73 
^ 


Period taken to pass from 




one 3* class to the next... 


1 



APPENDIX 

Increment of Test trees 
BLOCKS 



Age h> 



90 


95 


100 


105 


110 115 


120 


125 



Diameter in 

















BLACK 


12-4 


is'-o 





" 


..4 


... 





... 


17-4 
14-7 
13-0 
15-0 


18-3 
15-2 
135 
15-6 




19-1 
157 
14-0 
16-1 


19-8 
16-2 
34-5 
16-6 


20*4 
16-7 
15-0 
17-1 


21-3 
17-9 
156 
176 


2i 

18-3 
16-1 
18-1 


22-5 
18-6 
16-6 
185 


12-3 
20-5 
12-9 
19-3 
14-6 
10-5 
11-3' 


13-0 
21-2 
13-3 
Bark -5 
15-3 
11-0 
11-9 


13-7 
21-9 
188 

16-2 
11-5 

12-5 


14^ 
22^ 
14-6 

Bark -5 
12-3 
13-2 


15-4 
23-1 
152 



13-0 
14-1 


16-4 
23-8 
15-9 

13 : 6 

14-7 


17-2 
24-5 
16-4 

H-2 
15-3 


i?9 
25-1 
17-1 

14 : 8 
160 


173-8 


1613 


154-6 


144-2 


150-0 


1568 


162-0 


167-1 


14-48 
v_ 


14-65 


15-45 


16t)2 


16-66 


17-42 


18-0 

V 


18-56 


25 years. 25 yeart 
















HON 


16-7 
337 
147 
93 


16-4 
14-3 
15-5 
9-9 


16-9 
14-8 
16-6 
10-6 


17-7 
15^ 
16-9 
11-2 


18-3 
15-S 
17-4 
11-9 


19-3 

15-9 
18-1 
32-7 


19-5 
16-4 ' 
18-6 
130 


199 

16-9 
19-2 
33-6 


16-2 
22-2 
157 
14-0 
186 


Bark"-5 
23-1 
16-3 
14-6 
19-9 




24-2 
179 
15-3 
21-3 


24 : S 
18-8 
16-0 
22-2 


27-3 
20-1 
16-6 
23-4 


26-6 
212 
17-1 

24-a 


26-0 
Bark -6 
17-4 
25-9 




Bark 7 

181 

26-8 


140-1 


130-0 


137-6 


142-8 


148-6 


154-7 


136-8 


114-5 


15-56 16-25 

18 years. 


17-20 17-85 
i 


18-57 


19-33 


19-54 


19-08 


32 years. 



108 



109 



V. 

for period of 5 years. 
XXIV ASD XXV. 



year. 






















130 


135 


140 


145 


130 


155 


160 


165 


370 


175 


180 


inches. 






















WOOD. 


* 





















23-2 

18-9 
17-1 


23-8 
19-3 
17-6 


24-4 
20-0 
18-1 


26-1 
20-5 
18-5 


25'6 
21-1 
18-7 




19-2 


19-5 


'{97 


... 






25'9 
17-5 


26-7 
18'2 


27-3 

18-9 


28-1 
Bark -4 


28-8, 


'29-7 


30-3 




Bark* -6 









15-3 
16'8 


15-9 
17-2 


'i<3-4 
17- 


17-0 
18-4 


'17-4 

19-1 


18-0 
\9'G 


18-7 
20-3 


19-4 
20-9 


20-1 
21-6 






1347 


138-7 


142-9 


127-6 


130-7 


86-5 


88-8 


60-0 


41-7 






19-24 


19-81 


20-41 
i. 


21-26 


21-78 


21-62 


22-2 

> 


20-0 


20-85 







30 years. 



HI. 






















20-3 


20-6 


21-1 


21-6 


22-2 


22-7 


23-1 


23-5 


23-7 


24-1 


Bark -4 


17-5 


17-9 


18-3 


18-7 


Bark '3 


... 


... 


... 


.. 






19-9 


20-6 


21-2 


21-8 


22-1 


Bark -4 


... 




.. 







li-0 


Bark -8 





** 


> 





... 










; 


'is-9 


i's-4 


20-0 


20-7 


21-4 


22-2 


227 


'23-5 


23-8 


'24-2 


""24-7 


27-8 


28-y 


30-0 


307 


31-6 


32-6 


33-1 


33-7 


34-1 


Bark 5 





118-4 


107-4 


110-6 


113-5 


97-3 


77-5 


78-9 


80-7 


81-6 


48-3 


247 


19-73 


21-48 


22-12 


22-70 


24-32 


25-83 


26-30 


26-9 


27-2 


... 


.* 



26 years. 



R. S. PEARSON, 

Divisional Forest Officer, Working Plans, S. C. 



110 

APPENDIX VI. 
Statement of Area, Blocks XXJ.7 and IXF, Ankola High Forest. 



Compart- 
ment 
No. 


Area of Compartments. 


DetaiU. 


Forest, 
proper. 


Minor 
Forest. 


Total. 


Betta. 


Cultiva- 
tion. 


First 
quality 
area. 


Second 
quality 
area. 


Teak 
producing 
area. 


Ever- 
green. 




Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


1 


426-4 





426-4 


... 




... 


426-4 


16 


77 


2 


665-2 





655-2 


20-8 


14-8 


376-4 


278-8 


68 


16 


3 


276-8 


... 


276-8 


165-2 


50-0 


276-8 


, B 


70 


... 


4 


674-4 


t 


674-4 


... 


13-6 


674-4 





152 


25 


5 


330-8 


52-0 


382-8 


165-2 


64-4 


382-8 


.. 


50 




6 


510-4. 


44-4 


554-8 


2-0 


... 


554-8 




48 


18 


7 


669-6 


6-2 


674-8 


* 


1-6 


674-8 


.. 


164 


4 


8 


579-6 


40-4 


620-0 


... 


28-8 


620-0 


.. 


168 


... 


9 


618-0 


... 


618-0 


... 


,., 


342-8 


275-2 


120 





10 


616-4 


... 


516-4 




50-0 


413-6 


102-8 


228 


** 


11 


480-8 


,., 


4RO-8 


** 


... 


... 


480-8 


*.i 


285 


12 


666-0 


52-0 


618-0 


... 


8-8 


3620 


256-Q 


40 


42 


13 


893-6 


... 


893-6 


... 


96-4 


729-6 


164Q 


220 


40 


14 


308-4 


36-0 


344-4 


22-4 


63-2 


344-4 


* 


66 


28 


15 


424-8 





424-8 


48-4 


55-4 


424-8 


* 





20 


16 


496'4 


28-0 


524-4 


* 


56-0 


524-4 





... 


21 


17 


417-2 


32-0 


429-2 


... 


30-0 


42-2 





... 


60 


18 


712-4 


7-2 


719-6 


2-0 


97-2 


719-6 


. 


* 


104 


19 


737-2 


>.. 


737-2 


* 


... 


737-2 





28 


... 


20 


729-2 


... 


729-2 


... 


0-8 


729-2 


.. 


... 


... 


21 


759-0 


... 


759-0 


... 


8-0 


759-0 


.. 


2 


... 


22 


508-8 


)24-4 


638-2 


*.. 


41-8 


633-2 


.. 


18 


... 


23 


588-0 


148-4 


736-4 


3-2 


135-4 


736-4 


.. 


... 


40 


24 


730-4 


... 


730-4 


. 


19-6 


730-4 


.. 


... 


72 


26 


330-0 


255-6 


585-6 


26-0 


166-0 


585-6 


. 


... 


76 


26 


777-2 


20-8 


798-0 




39-2 


798-0 


. . 


216 


64 


27 


4452 


220 


467-2 




94-4 


467-2 


. . 


124 


6 


28 


677-2 




577-2 


... 




577-2 


. , 


... 


... 


29 


547-6 


18-8 


566-4 


... 


24-0 


566-4 




24 


20 


30 


614-8 




614-8 


... 


21-2 


614-8 


, . 


118 


... 


31 


392-0 


* 


392-0 




... 


392-0 


. . 


16 


8 


32 


740-4 


25-2 


765-6 


>i 


13-2 


765-6 


... 


76 


178 


33 


750-8 


... 


750-8 





... 


750-8 


... 


48 


96 


34 


554-4 


12-4 


566-8 


... 


12-8 


566-8 


... 


... 




35 


578-2 


... 


578-2 


... 


... 


578-2 




60 


... 


36 


522-4 


90-0 


612-4 


... 


29-4 


350-0 


262-4 





112 


87 


490-0 


ic-o 


500-0 





67-2 


500-0 




... 


ISO 


38 


549-6 


36-0 


585-6 




25-2 


390-4 


195-2 


... 


230 


39 


909-8 


0-6 


910-4 






545-6 


364*8 




490 


40 


638-0 


28-0 


6660 




36-0 


6ii6-0 


... 


... 


224 


41 


395-6 


47-2 


4428 


80-4 


118-0 


442-8 


... 


20 


32 


42 


610-0 


. 


610 


2-0 


* 


610-0 


... 


8 


28 


43 


706-0 


... 


706-0 


1-6 


54-4 


706-0 


... 


56 


n 


44 


431-6 


131-2 


562-8 


72-8 


56-4 


662-8 


... 


64 


... 


45 


770-8 


4-2 


775-0 


63-2 


35-8 


775-0 


. . 


39 


2 


46 


5J3-2 


40-0 


553-2 


57-1 


100-0 


553-2 


. . 


168 


20 


47 


622-8 


117-2 


740-0 


48-0 


14-0 


740-0 


. . 


32 





48 


605-2 


... 


6U5-2 





20-0 


605-2 


. . 


... 


* 


49 


798-0 




798-0 


8-1 


132-8 


798-0 




... 


24 


50 


277-2 


390-4 


667-6 


31-4 


209-2 


..* 


667-6 


... 


14 


51 


522-4 


372-4 


694-8 


178-8 


109-2 


529-2 


165-6 


... 


60 


52 


656-8 


0-8 


6572 


2-4 


40 


309-6 


3480 


132 


1 


53 


654-4 


75-6 


730-0 


... 


... 


247-2 


4828 


58 


12 


54 


590-0 




590-0 


... 




424-0 


166-0 


US 


1 


55 


552-8 


90-0 


64'J- 8 


... 


65-2 


470-8 


1720 


152 


36 


56 


793-2 





793-2 


... 


23'2 


317-2 


476-0 


140 




57 


711-6 


80-8 


792-4 


.. 


171-2 


406-0 


386-1 


... 


20 


58 


624-4 




6244 


... 


. .. 


472-8 


151-6 


... 


... 


59 


590-4 


130-4 


720-8 




13-4 


016 


6192 


... 


... 


60 


732-S 


... 


732-8 


... 


340 


384-0 


348-8 


... 


... 


61 


656-8 


* 


656-8 


... 


29-6 


416-0 


2408 


... 


... 


62 


634-4 





634-4 


... 


44-0 


e84-4 


... 


... 


64 


63 


542-4 




542-4 


... 


171-0 


3U2-4 


10-0 


... 


48 


64 


641-2 





611-2 


... 


158-0 


196-8 


444-4 


... 


223 


65 


729-2 





729-2 


... 


1060 


. 


729-2 


... 


232 


66 


959-2 




959-2 




13-6 


806-0 


153-2 


... 


300 


67. 


1,066-0 


144-0 


1,210-0 




66-0 


884-0 


326-0 


... 


176 


68 


605-6 


38-4 


6440 


28-8 


166-4 


... 


644-0 


8 


320 


69 


456-4 


338-0 


794-4 


76-8 


22S-8 


569-2 


2252 


... 


10 


70 


398-0 


2612 


6592 


... 


41-2 


272-0 


387-2 


... 


34 


Total ... 


41,875-8 


3,131-2 


45,007-0 


1,106-9 


3,529-8 


34,936-6 


10,020-4 


3,105 


4,205 



R. S. PEARSON, 
Divisional Forest Officer, Working Plans, S. C. 



Ill 

APPENDIX VII. 

GRAZING ALLOTMENTS. 
Ankola High Forest Working Plan. 



















Farther 


Area allotted. 




















area 




















Total 


equired 








Serial 
No. 


Name of Village. 


No. 
of 
cattle. 


opu- 
tion. 


Area of 
minor 
Forest. 


Area of 
Betta. 


irea of 
Joveru- 
ment 


1 ULttl 

area 
avail- 
ble for 


accord- 
ing to 

forest 


Block 


>om- 
art- 


Remark* 














waste. 




Settle- 






















grazing. 


ment 


No. 


oient 
TTn 




















fficer's 




1.1 U. 




















report. 
















Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


; 
Acres. 




















BLOCK 


XXIV. 










J 


ilarugadda 
(1) Todsalbail 


'55 


116 


46-25 


... 


30-19 
I 


76-44 


247-56 


Block 
XXIV. 


88 
37 


247 acres are required by this village. 
The cattle of Marugadda and (Kan- 




(2) Eancbibail ... 


53 








f 








38 


chibail) will be given grazing in 
























cOTtiDJvrtmGnt 38 while those or 




Total ... 


108 


















Todsalbail can graze in compart- 
























ment 37. This more than provides 


























for their requirements, the grazing 
























in reality will be confined to the 
























banks of the Handimadi river which 
























is the only place grass is found in 
























these forests. 


2 


Jakigadda ... 
(1) Makigadda ... 
(2) Beggar 
(3) Muth 


137 
99 
6 


138 


327-29 (of 
this 90-0 
within 
and 


... 


30-20 


357-49 


467-51 


Block 
XXIV. 


*36 
35 
36 


The greater portion of the Makigadda 
minor forest is outside the working 
circle, however, in the reserved forest 
outside the block the forest is 




(4) Arsabail 


33 




237-29 out- 












36 


nnsuited to grazing, so that 467 acres 
to be given for grazing will have to 




Total ... 


275 




side the 
circle). 














be given from within the area. 
























Makigadda and Arsabail villages lie 
























to the north of compartment 36, 












, 












while the hamlet of Muth is in the 
























south of the compartment, grazing 
























should, therefore, be allowed in 
























compartment 36 for these hamlets. 
























as regards Heggar hamlet, it lies on 
























the main road adjoining compartment 
























35 and the cattle of this hamlet 
























should be allowed to graze in it 
























everywhere east of the Heggar-Muth 
























foot-path. Such an allotment allows 
























for increase of the cattle of these 
























villages. 


8 


Agsur 


742 


652 


557-39 


... 


181-12 


738-51 


,487-49 






This village lies nearly entirely 










(outside 














outside the working circle and the 










the circle) 














grazing can conveniently be given 
























from reserved forest outside the 
























area. 


4 


Kavlalli 
(1) Yekeguli 
(2) Shirukbail 


"S4 
10 


106 


84-6 


... 


4-31 


88-91 


244-09 


Block 
XXIV. 


"29 
32 


This is a very scattered village and 
allotments will have to be made 
separately for each hamlet ; the total 




(3) Keri Kendge .. 
(4) Kendge 
(5) b'elargadde .. 


10 
39 




depopu 


lated. 










34 
40 


amount of grazing required being 
244 acres. Kendge cattle shonld be 
allowed to graze east of the Kendge 




(6) Shedigule 


"is 


















river in compartment 40, those of 
























Keri Kendge in compartment 34, 




Total ,. 


111 


















west of the Kendge river, and those 
























of Shirukbail in compartment 32. 
























Yekeguli cattle should graze west of 
























the Yekeguli-Yellfipur road foot-path, 
























in compartment 29. In Belargadda 
























there is no habitation and no 
























cattle, while Shedegule is outside the 
























circle. 


6 


Hebbnl 


... 


167 


346" -27 


3-2 


63-10 


412-57 


30V43 


... 




The 301 acres required for graring of 




(1) Ranjanguli 


... 




depopi 


latcd. 












the Hebbul cattle should be given 




(2) Bhairekop 


20 














Block 


1 


in compartment 22, a compartment 




3) Hebbul 


218 














XXIV 


} 22 


adjoining the village. There is a 






















' 


detached cultivation in the compart* 




Total . 


238 


















meat belonging to Hebbul, locally 
























known as Bhairekop, inhabited by 


























one family ; it is through this strip 
























of cultivation that the cattle from 
























Hebbul proper go to water at the river 
























in the hot weather, so that this is the 
























most convenient area in which to 
























give the extra area for grazing to the 
























villagers. 



B 99029 



112 
APPENDIX VII continued. 











' 








Further 


Area allotted. 




















area 




















Total 


required 








Serial 
No. 


Name of Village. 


No. 
of 
cattle. 


'opu- 
ation. 


Area of 
minor 
Forest. 


Area of 
Betta. 


Area of, 
Jovern- 
ment 
waste. 


area 
avail- 
able for 


accord- 
ing to 

Foret 
Settle- 


Block 


Com- 
part- 


Be ni arks. 
















grazing. 


ment 


No. 


ment 

vr_ 




















Officer's 




JNO. 




















report. 
















Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 




















BLOCK 


XXIV 


ontd. 








6 


Kattinhakal 


... 


279 


7-2 with- 


2-0 in- 


23-24 


42943 


560-67 


XXIV. 




Practically the whole of the minor 




(1) Biroli 


48 




in the 


side 










"is 


forests of this village are outside the 




(2) Chanchihakal... 
(3) Kattinhakal ... 


30 
252 




circle. 
235-17 out- 


the 
circle. 










is 

18 


working circle. Biroli being the only 
hamlet inside the area. It will, how- 










side 


162-0 out- 












ever, be necessary to allot a certain 










the 


side 












portion of the 560 acres, to be given, 










circle 


the 












from within the working circle, so as 












circle 












to meet the wants of the people of 




























Total ... 


330 




24219 


164-0 












-t>irun dud MI [) [Kiln lull ot iVOpp&lj 

Mathunmalli and Hatigadda. These 
























places all lie along the Kotepal- 






























Sunksal nulla which forms the west 
























boundary of compartment 18, within 
























which area grazing should be allowed. 
























Sunksalvadi can be supplied with 
























grazing from outside the area. 


7 


Sunksal ... 
(1) Ujrali 
(2) Hegadmanikop . 
(3) Marthikop 
(4) Heggar 


'*56 
65 
45 
67 


352 


383-6 in- 
side 
49-67 out- 
side 
the 


96-8 in- 
side 
20-37 out- 
side 
the 


184-20 


734-64 


465-36 


XXI\ r . 


14 
14 


This Tillage covers a very large area 
and is composed of many small 
hamlets for which arrangements will 
have to be made separately. 




(5) Mulemani 
(6) Saleguli 
(7) Sunk-sal Manjre. 
(8) Aladkon 


71 
8 
29 
66 




circle 


circle 










14 


The greater part of Ujrali is now 
deserted and the land fallen fallow, 
o that the grazing in the minor 
forest and fallow land is more than 




(9) TiDgalkeri 


12 


















sufficient to meet all requirements. 




Total .. 








117-17 












Heggar, Marthikop, Hegadmanikop 
and Mulemani cattle should be 


400 


433-27 
























allowed grazing in compartment 14, 
as these hamlets lie on either aide of it. 
























The falegnli, Tingalkeri and Aladkon 
























cattle have been given a strip of minor 
























forest by the Forest Settlement 
























Officer for grazing and it is suffi- 
























cient for their purpose. Sunksal 
























Manjre villagers have a large area of 
























minor forest allotted to them which is 
























more than sufficient for tiieir require- 
























ments. 


S 


Mavinmani .. 




98 


3,457-14 




3438 


3491-52 


... 


... 


... 


* Pasture reserves in Yellapur. 




(1) Geral 


"94 




(on t s i d 


















(2) Salemani .. 


58 




the circle. 














No area from reserved forest i 
























required by the people, large area of 
























minor forest and betta land belongs 
























to this village and is all outside the 
























working circle. 


9 


Kodalgadda 
(1) Mellmkeri 


126 


713 


152-13 


353-2 with 
in. 


12-25 


881-75 


255-25 


xxiv. 


3&o 


The greater portion of Kodalgadda 
proper is outside the working circle 




(2) Mullikeri 


89 






364-2 out 










345 


and can be given grazing from the 




(3) KiuminunU .. 


65 






side 










7 


reserved forest outside the area. 




(4) Kalginkeri 


99 






the 










8 


The people of Mellinkeri and 












circle 










. 


Mullikeri will have to be allowed to 
























graze in compartments 3 and 5. 








-Total .. 


379 






717-4 












The Ramangnli cattle will be allowed 
















































the Kamanguli footpath, while those 
























of Kalginkeri (Mavikop) will graze 
























south of the main road in compart- 
























ment 8. 


10 


Shevkar 
(1) Kaigadi 


227 


174 


47-2 in 
side 


80'4 in- 
side 


26-22 


274-62 


406-38 


XXV. 


41 


The greater portion of the village is out- 
side the working circle, Kaigadi being 










62-0 out- 


58-80 out 












altogether outside the area, so that 










side 


side 












of the 406 acres required not more 










the 


the 












than half is wanted by Shevkar 










circle 


circle 












itself. This area can be given from 
























the south half of compartment 41, 










109-2 


139-20 












and after half the cutting period, the 












_____ 












north half should be given and the 
























south closed. 



113 
APPENDIX VII continued. 



















Further 


Area allotted. 


- 


















area 




















Tfttnl 


required 








Serial 
No. 


Name of Village. 


No. 
of 

cattle. 


Popu- 
lation. 


Area of 
minor 
Forest. 


Area of 

Betta. 


Area of 

lovern- 
inent 
waste. 


jLuvm 
area 

avail- 
able for 


accord- 
ing to 
Forest 

Settle- 


Block 


Com- 
part- 


Keinarki. 
















grazing. 


ment 


No. 


ment 

Nn 




















Officer's 




JAU. 




















report. 
















Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 




















BLOCK 


XXIV 


ontd. 








11 


Heggar 


185 


138 


64-34 of 


70-28 (of 


15-16 


349-78 


205-22 


XXV. 


44 


Grazing should be allowed in compart- 










this (70-8 


this 68-8 












ment 44, which adjoins the village, 










inside, 


inside, 












but not in compartment 43, north of 










93" 54 out- 


101-48 












the village. 










side the 


out side 






















circle). 


the cir- 
























cle). 


























BLOCK 


XXV. 










12 


KalleshwarSS 


157 


148 


177-9 


117-33 


16-12 


341-35 


129'65 


XXV. 


46 


The Konal cattle should be ullowed to 




(1) K onil 74. 


















45 


graze in compartment 45, north of 
























the Konal- UumangulL footpath, those 
























of Kalleshwai in compartment 46 
























and also outside the working circle 
























to the east of the village. These 
























arrangements allow for a substantial 
























increase in the number of cattle. 


13 


HalyalH 




469 


70-4 in- 


54-2 in- 


111-3 


1,373-71 




XXV. 


49 


HalvalH and Unchalli cattle are 




(1) Kankanhalli ... 


"59 




side. 


side. 












provided for by the Forest Settlement 




(2) Unchalli 


22 




Sl'85 out- 


26-96 out- 












Officer The Kaukanhalli cattle 




(3) Donemaddi ... 


118 




side the 


side. 












should be given grazing in compart- 




(4) Malegaura 


53 




circle. 














ment 19, all east of the Kankanballi- 




(5) Dnginmani ... 


** 


















Halvalli foot-path. 




Ostside hamlets ... 


180 






































XXV. 


51 


Malegaum is nearly all outs : de the 






Total ... 


432 


















working circle, Donemaddi or 

























Cliilepal is altogether out of the ares, 

























there is good grazing outside the 
























working circle, south of Malegaum, 
























cultivation which can be given for 
























grazing to both the Malegaum and 
























Chilepal cattle. 
























As regards Duginmani grazing will 
























have to be given in compartment 51, 
























all south of the Halvalli-Malegaum 
























footpath. 


11 


Kainmam 


97 


43 


105-2 in- 


5-20 


12'1 


133-46 


157-54 






The village and hamlets of Kammani 










side 


(outside 












lie, except for a very small area, all 










10-96 out 


the circle] 












outside of the working circle and 










side 














csn be fully provided for from 
























reserved forest outside the area. 










116-16 
















15 


Muaki ... 


163 


161 


406-3 


199-29 


11-18 


616-77 









Same as note against 14. 


16 


Dongri ... 
(1) Bidralti 


64 


197 


301-2 in- 
side 


7'8 
outside th 


216-20 


;574-80 


526-20 


XXV. 


54 

&55 


In Dongri 527 acres are required. The 
cattle of Dongri proper can be given 




(2) Heggarni 
(3) Dongri 
(4) Hosalikop 
(5) Aladbail 


158 
66 
22 
57 




1 9-6 out- 
side 
the 
circle 


circle. 










59 
67 
59 
59 


ample grazing in compartment 57, 
all west of the Dongri-Kanchenker 
footpath. The cattle of Bidralli 
may be allowed to graze in compart- 
ment 55, for half the felling period 




Total ... 


367 




320-8 














and in 54 for the other half. 
























The Hegarni, Hosalikop and Aladbail 
























cattle can be allowed to graze in 59, 
























all south of the Donibail mil la and 
























also if necessary outside the workinar 
























circle. This provides fully for all 
























the cattle of Dongri and its hamlets. 


17 


Euntgni 
(1) Armainibail .. 


182 


274 


... 


* 


261-28 


261-28 


845-72 


XXV. 


64 
64 


The Kuntgani, Armainibail and Asnir 
cattle can find good grazing grounds 




(2) Kanchkcri. 


126 


















in the fallen fields and also in 




(3) Virkoli 


des 


rttd. 














& 


Viikoli deserted village; if more is 




(4) Amur .. 


17 
















&64 


wanted grazing can be allowed in the 




(5) Changor 
















XXV. 


C4 


south portion of 63 and in 64 in 




(6) Malege .. 


17 


















areas between the cultivated and 




(7) Hudgod 


27 


















fallow fields, where th forest is of 
























poor quality. For the Malege and 




Total .. 


369 


















Hudgcd cattle, ample grazing can be 
























given from the unorganised forest 
























which adjoins the village. 



m 

APPENDIX VII concluded. 













i 


























Further 


Area allotted. 




















area 




















Tnf al 


required 








Serial 

Mo, 


Kama of Village. 


No. 
of 
cattle. 


Popu- 
lation. 


Area of 
minor 
Forest. 


Arpa of 
Betta. 


Area of 

Govern- 
ment 
waste. 


J UI.,IL 

area 
avail- 
able for 


accord- 
ing to 
Forest 

Settle- 


Block 


Com- 
part- 


Betrarks. 
















grazing. 


ment 


No. 


ment 




















Officer's 




No. 




















report. 
















Acres, 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 




















BLOCK 


XXV 


oontd. 








18 


Hillur 




971 


781-6 in- 


105-10 in- 


550-1 


2,950-63 


682-37 




... 


The greater portion of this village i 




(1) Killurbail 


117 




side. 


side. 












outside the working circle. Hillur 




(2) Kolge 


46 




984-62 out- 


528-71 out- 








XXV. 


"70 


and Hillurbail are outside the area 




(3) Togsi 


69 




side 


side 










69 


and the people graze their cattle in the 




(4) Karikal 


55 




the 


the 










6y 


extensive minor forests allotted to 




(5) Holemaki 


124 




cir- 


cir- 










69 


them. Part of Kolge is inside the 




(6) Halsauhalli 


3 




cle. 


cle. 










67 


area and grazing will have to be 




Outside hamlets 33. 


795 


















allowed for this hamlet from the 
























south-east portion of compartment 70. 










Total ;J... 


1,209 




1,766-22 


381-81 












Togsi, Karikal, Holeinaki and Hal- 
















































they have been allotted eitenaive 
























minor forests and betta lands, which 
























will probably be sufficient for their 














1 










requirements, if necessary the area 
























north of the road in compartment 69 
























can be opened to the first 3 named 
























hamlets and north-east of the road 
























in compartment 67 to the Bhats of 
























Harsanhalli. The other 33 hamlets 

























are all outside the working circle and 
























the grazing can conveniently be 
























given from reserved forest outside 
























the area. 



IC'h November DC9. 



K. S. PEARSON, 
Divisional Fcrett Officer, Working Plans S. C. 



115 
APPENDIX VIII. 

Names of the more common species found in these forests. 



Vernacular name. 


Latin name. 


Remarks. 


Kanarese. 


Marathi. 


Heddi or Yetagnl. 


Heddi or Hedi ... 


Adina cordifolia ... 


Common, growing to a great 








size. 


Kulgi 


Khair 


Acacia catechu ... ... 


Not common, except in poor 








localities. 


Manjutti ... 


Val or Thorla- 


Adenanthera pavonina ... 


Fairly common. 


Mudhol 


Satwan or Sat- 


Alstonia Scholaris ... 


Often found aa a very tall 




win. 




tree in the semi-evergreen 








forests. 


Moshe ... 


Phndgus or 


Alseodaphene semicarpifolia . 


Ditto. 




Pherdgua. 






Hebbalsina or 


Patphannaa 


Artocarpus hirsuta .. 


Not very common. 


Phanai. 








Halaina ... 


Ph annas .. 


Artocarpus integrifolia 


Generally found in old cul- 








tivated areas. 


Wonte .. 


Wotomba .. 


Artocarpus, lakoocha .. 


Moderately common as a large 








tree in the deciduous forests. 


Godhunchi or 


Kali Siris 


Albizzia odoratisima .. 


Fairly common, on lower 


Bilkumbi. 






olevationa. 


Bnawanpad 


Kanchan or Apta 


Bauhinia Lawii or faviolata.. 


Fairly common. 


Ban no 


Apta ... 


Bauhinia racemosa .. 


Not common. 


Shadloo 


Imli or Apta .. 


Bauhinia malabarica 


Fairly common. 


Muttagal or Mu- 


Palas 


Butea frondoaa ... .. 


Common only in poor locali- 


thal. 






ties. 


Sauri or Bu:la .. 


Sayar 


Bombax rnalabaricum ., 


Common, as a large tree 


Nurkal 


Char 


Bnchanania latifolia 


Common. 


Hole Kawla ... 


Tivar 


Barringtonia acutangula .. 


Common, along the banks of 








the Gangavali river. 


. 


Nivar .. 


Barringtonia, racemosa .. 


Do. but not so 








common, 


Ippi ... 


Mhowra .. 


Bassia latifolia ... 


Common, especially in ever- 








green areaa and on river 








banks. 


Mulla bonne .. 


Kanta kanchi ... 


Bridelia retnsa ... .. 


Uncommon. 


...... 


Lai devdari .. 


Chickrassia tabularis .. 


Very uncommon. 


Kakkai 


Boya or Bahawa 


Cassia fistula ... 


Moderately common. 


Kaal ... 


Kumbia 


Careya arborea 


One of the commonest trees 








in these forests. 


Irai ... 


Bobbi 


C&lophyllum Wightianum .. 


Common in evergeen forests, 








near nallas. 


Audmurgal ... 


Punsehi 


Carallia integerriraa .. 


Ditto. 


Dalchini ... 


Dalchini 


Cinnamomum ze^ lanicnm . . . 


Fairly common in the ever- 








green areas. 


Biti 


Siasum ... 


Dalhergia latifolia ... ... 


Common on the hill sides, and 








in true deciduous forests. 


Kusrani 


Phansa 


Dalbergia panicnlata 


N''t common. 


Kanagoia ... 


Karmal .. 


Dillenia pentagyna ... 


One of the commonest trees 








in these forests. 


Kurikocmar ... 




Diospyros pauiculata .. 


Common in evergreen. 


Nerlu ... 


Jambul 


Eugenia Jambolana 


Common. 


Advi Bhendy 


Ran bhendy ... 


Erinocarpus Nimmoanus ... 


[/ommon. 


Aole lucky or 


Bhedaa ... 


Eugenia zeylamca ... ... 


Common on banks of nallas 


Nirkal. 






and by the side of cultiva- 








tion. 


Al 


Wad 


Ficua bengalensis ... 


Common on the low-lying 








reaa. 


Arle 


Ashvatha ... 


Fiona rcligiosa 


Near old cultivationa. 


Atti 


Umbar 


Ficus glomerata ... ... 


Fairly common. 


Pakari 


Pipli 


Ficus infectoria 


Not very common. 


Goli 


Bhnrvar 


Ficus mysorensia 


Common. % 



B 990 SO 



116 
APPENDIX VIII continued. 



Vernacular name. 


Latin name. 


Remarks. 


Kanarese. 


Marathi. 


Dadsal ... 


Dhamni 


Grewia tilieefolia 


Common, but not of great 








size. 


Murgal 


Bhirand or 


Garcinia indica ... ... 


Common, especially near 




Bherandi. 




nallas and in moist places. 


Shivani ... 


Shiran 


Gmelina arborea 


Very uncommon, 


Honga ... 


Kalhonni or 


Hopea Wightiana 


Common in evergreen areas. 




Kalazad. 






Nandi ... 


Nana 


Lagerstrcemia microcarpa ... 


Very common and growing to . 








a great size. 


Hole dasal ... 


Taman ... 


Do. Flos-Reginse . 


Found along the Gangavali 








river. 


Chunungi ... 


Lende or bondga 


Do. parviflora 


Common in poor localities. 


Marina .. 


Amba 


Mangifera indica ... 


Common as a large tree, espe- 








cially in semi-evergreen 








forests. 


Ohandkal ... 


Chandodi 


Macaranga t Roxburghii 


Common in open glades or on 








cut lines. 


Bnckhne 


Owli ... 


Mimusops Elengi ... ... 


Common in evergreen. 


Pandry 


Pandry ... 


Murraya exotica ... ... 


On banks of precipitious 








nallas in evergreen. 





Ranjaiphal 


Myristica malabarica 


Common in evergreen. 


Gugul 


Moee ... 


Odina Wodier ... 


Common. 


Ilouni or Honne... 


Bio (Asan) 


Pterocarpns marsupium ... 


Common in the true deci- 








duous forests only . 


Honsjye or Honge. 


Karanj ... 


Pongamia glabra 


Common along nallas. 


Nelli 


Aw la 


Phyllanthus Emblica 


Fairly common as a small tree. 


Kadawar 


Kul lam 


Stephegyne parvifolia 


Fairly common, but not of 








great size. 


Maragavargi ... 


Umb or womb ... 


Saccopetalnm tomcntosum ... 


Common in deciduous forests, 








often as a very tall* tree. 


Genasing 


Kursing ... 


Stereospermnm xylocarpum. . 


Fairly common as a small 








tree. 


Amahe ... 


Ambada... 


Spondias mangifera ... ... 


Not very common. 


Sagadi ... 


Kosum 


Schleichera trijnga ... ... 


Common, especially in semi- 








evergreen areas. 


Kasarkana 


Kajra 


Strychnos Nux-vomica 


Very common. 


Sag or Tegina 


Sag ... 


Tectona grandis ... ... 


Found locally only. 


mara. 








Matti ... 


Ain ... ... 


Terminalia tomentosa 


One of the commonest trees 








in these forests. 


Hongal ... 


Kindal 


Terminalia panicalata 


Ditto. 


Tare 


Goting or Bherda. 


Terminalia belrica ... 


Common as a very large tree. 


Hole matti 


Arjun ... 


Terminalia Arjuua 


Common on river banks. 


Anala 


Hirda ... 


Terminalia Chebnla .. 


Common on the poorer loca- 








lities south of the river. 


Bhendi ... 


Bhendi ... 


Thespesia populnea ... 


Not common. 


Jermul ... 


TJgado .. 


Tetrameles nudiflora 


Fairly common as a very 








large buttressed tree. 


Hunase 


Chinch ... 


Tatnarindus indica 


Common in deserted places. 


Bele kodsaloo or 


Naglkudo or 


Taberncemontana Heyneana 


Common in the evergreen 


Nagar kedo or 


Pandrakuda. 




areas. 


Muddarsa. 








Bulgi 


Bharnigi .. 


Vitex altissima ... .. 


Fairly common, but local in 








distribution. 


Jambe 


Jamba ... 


Xylia dolaleriformis 


The commonest tree in these 








forests. 


Illanji 


Bor .. 


Zizypus Jnjuba 


Found very locally. 


Gorchi 


Got-bor 


Xixyphus xylopyra ... 


Ditto. 


Armadol or June 


Thirpal 


Zanthoxylum Bhetsa 


Not very common. 


znikai. 









117 

APPENDIX VIII concluded. 



Vernacular name. 



Kanarese. 



Marathi. 



Latin name. 



Remarks. 



Medar or Shib 

when small. 
Dowgi 

She me > 

Bettha (cane) 
Talipalin ... 

Dadsel 

Gurti 

KoJsa ... 

Kowri ... 

Kuntnair ... 

Knda (Kodmurki) 

Gudde daeal (Ku- 

sumale). 
Purgi or Kare- 

Suji. 



Bamboos 



Thirpal 
Kalak 
Chiva 
Weth 



Karvi 

Kuda 

Kevani 

Ranlavang 

Ksla-kura 

Pendgul 

Kanerb:lli 



and Common Shrubs. 
Dendrocalamus strictus ... 
Bambnsa arundinacea ... 

Oxytenanthera monostigma... 
Calamus Thwaitesii 
Corypha umbracalifera 
Arenga Wightii ... 

Strobilanth.es callosns 
Holarrhena aatidysenterica ... 

9 

Helicteres Isora ... ... 

Eugenia Caryophylosa ... 
Wrightia tinctoria ... ... 

Ixora coccinea 

Zizyphus CEnoplia ... 



Very common. 
Very common 
Found only very locally. 

Found in the evorgreeii 

forests only. 
Only found on the hill south 

of Kankauhalli. 
Only found in evergreen 

forests and along river 

banks. 
Very common in all true 

deciduous forests. 
Fairly common. 

Fairly common. 

Not very common. 

Fairly common. 

Common. 

Common in open jangles. 



Kdru-dr, 10th November 1909. 



KALPH S. PEAESON, 

Divisional Forest Officer, 

Working Plans, S. C. 



118 



^ 

<to 
-e: 
** 

a 



I 



I 



4! 
v 




a. 



8 

I, 



I 



S 



Remarks. 


f-H 

II 


t 

V 

9 

o 

"* 6 o 

i" 



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S t~ 

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" * V 
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BOMBAY , PRINTED AT THE GOVERNMENT CENTKAL PBKS8. 



39475^ 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY