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BOSTON PUBLICLIBRABY |||i|ilu|| f 



3 9999 06317 353 6 

OFFICE OF NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION 
DIVISION OF REVIEW 



NATIONAL LABOR INCOME BY MONTHS 
1929-1935 

By 
Dorothy E. Smith 



WORK MATERIALS NO. EIGHT 



STATISTICS STUDIES SECTION 
MARCH, 1936 



OFFICE OF NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION 
DIVISION OF REVIEW 



NATIONAL LABOR INCOME BY MONTHS 
1929-1935 



By 
Dorothy E. Smith 



STATISTICS STUDIES SECTION 
MARCH, 1936 



9858 



Foreword 



This study of labor income was prepared by 
Miss Dorothy E. Smith of the Statistics Section, 
Dr. Theodore Kreps and Mr. William Maguire in charge, j/ 
Grateful acknowledgement is made to Dr. Robert Nathan of 
the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce for valuable 
suggestions and criticisms. Dr. Nathan's annual estimates 
of labor income paid out were used as the bases for the 
monthly labor income estimated in this study. 

Labor income comprises total wages, salaries, 
commissions, pensions, workmen's compensations, and com- 
pensation or corporation officers paid out in continental 
United States. The inclusion of compensation of corp- 
oration officers in labor income is somewhat misleading 
because the principal corporate officers perform entre- 
preneurial functions and are entrepreneurs in all But the 
title. However, the segregation of this group is impossible 
with the data which are at present available. 

The study of labor income represents an attempt to 
break down total- labor income paid out into two groups, 
first, those industries which came under Title I of the 
National Industrial Recovery Act, and, second, those fields 
of activity which were excluded from the jurisdiction of 
NRA, namely, agriculture, steam railroads, government, 
professional and domestic service. 

The following items are entirely excluded: consider- 
ation of services of housewives and other members of the 
family in the home, earnings from odd jobs, direct relief 
and charity payments, and earnings from illegal pursuits, 
.ork relief wages are excluded from the total labor income 
figure, except in Table V. 



1/ Acknowledgement is made to the entire staff of the 
Current Statistics Unit, especially to Dr. Gertrude 
'..orking for valuable assistance throughout the study. 



-i- 



9858 



The data available for labor Income estimates are 
more abundant and reliable than for any other type of 
payment group. But even then, the data are far from ad- 
equate in many of the fields, especially in the con- 
struction, water transportation, motor transportation, 
finance, service, government, and miscellaneous groups. 
A more complete explanation of the shortcomings of the 
data is given in the description of the Sources. 

Labor income represents approximately two-thirds 
of the total income paid out. The following figures 
taken from the annual estimates of National Income by 
Mr. Nathan, of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
show the relative importance of labor income each year: 



Percentage Distribution of Income Paid Out, 
by Types of Payment, 1929-1934 





Per Cent 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


Tear 


Total Income 


Labor Income 


Non-Labor Income 


1929 


100.0 


65.0 


35.0 


1930 


100.0 


64.2 


35.8 


1931 


100.0 


64.2 


35.8 


1932 


100.0 


63 9 


36.1 


1933 


100.0 


65.5 


34.5 


1934 


100.0 


67.0 


33.0 



Quarterly estimates of non-labor income, comprising 
property income and entrepreneurial withdrawals, are in 
process, and it is hoped that soon they will be completed and 
made public under other auspices. 

At the back of this report will be found a brief 
statement of the studies undertaken by the Division of 
Review. 



L. C. Marshall 
March 23, 1936 Director, Division of Review 



-ii- 9858 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Foreword i 

Charts iii 

Total Labor Income (NRA and Non-NRA), 

by Months, 1929-1935 iii 

Selected Labor Income (NRA and Non-NRA), 

by Months, 1929-1935 iT 

Sources and Methods of Monthly Estimates of 

labor Income, 1929 to Date 1 

Bibliography 17 

Tables 19 



TABLE I Total, NRA and Non-NRA Labor Income Paid Out, 
and Per Cent NRA and Non-NRA Labor Income 
are of Total Labor Income, by Months, 
1929-1935 19 

TABLE II Actual and Real Total NRA and Non-NRA 

Labor Income Paid Out, by Months, 1929-1935 22 

TABLE III Index of Actual and Real Total NRA and 

Non-NRA Labor Income Paid Out, by Months, 
1929-1935 25 

TABLE IV NRA Labor Inoome Paid Out for Chief Indus- 
trial Divisions, by Months, 1929-1935 ... 28 

TABLE V Non-NRA Labor Income Paid Out for Chief 

Industrial Divisions, by Months, 1929-1935 . 31 

TABLE VI Total Labor Inoome Paid Out and Non-NRA 
Labor Income Paid Out, Including and Ex- 
cluding Work Relief Payments, and Work 
Relief Payments, by Months, 1933-1935 ... 34 

TABLE VII Wages and Salaries in All Manufacturing 

Industries and Per Cent Wages and Salaries 

are of Total Manufacturing Labor Inoome 

•Paid Out, by Months, 1929-1935 3« 

TABLE VIII Wholesale and Retail Trade Labor Income 

Paid Out, by Months, 1929-1935 ij S9 



P&ge 



TABLE IX Labor Income Paid Out in the Chief 
Branches of Finance, by Months, 
1929-1935 



42 



TABLE X Labor Income Paid Out in the Chief 
Branches of the Utility Industries, 
by Months, 1929-1935 45 

TABLE XI Wages and Salaries in the Contract 
Construction Industry, and Per Cent 
Wages and Salaries are of Total Con- 
struction Labor Income Paid Out, 
by Months, 1929-1935 48 

TABLE XII Total Wages Paid on Residential and 
Non-Residential Building Contract 
Construction Projects over $5,000, 
and All Construction Projects under 
$5,000, by Months, 1929-1935 51 

TABLE XIII Construction Contract Work and Force 

Work Labor Income Paid Out, by Months, 
1934-1935 54 

TABLE XIV Labor Income Paid Out in the Various 
Lranches of Government, by Months, 
1929-1935 55 



TABLE XV Labor Income Paid Out in the Chief 

Branches of the Transportation Industry 
for NEA and Non-NRA Groups, by Months, 
1929-1935 



58 



TABLE XVI Labor Income Paid Out in the Chief Service 
Industries for NRA and Non-NRA Groups, 
by Months, la29-1935 , 



61 



-iv- 



9858 



PERCENT 
100 



TOTAL LABOR INCOME 

(nra and non-nra) 

by months, i929~i935 

ON PERCENTAGE BASIS 



ILL 



PERCENT 
100 




MJSDMJSDMJSDMJSDMJSDMJSDMJSD 

1929 • 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 



BILLIONS 

OF DOLLARS 

4 



ON DOLLAR VALUE BASIS 






t ill . 1 i i h 



I,, I 






I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I II 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I M I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



\T 



BILLIONS 
OF DOLLARS 




t.-JSDMJ SDMJ SDMJ SDMJSOMJ SDMJSD 

1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 

(a; INCLUDES INDUSTRIES SUBJECT TO PROVISIONS OF THE NATIONAL RECOVERY ACT 

OF JUNE 16, 1933, BOTH CODIFIED AND NON- CODIFIED^ i#>m NRA 

DIVISION OF REVIEW 

STATISTICS SECTION 

NO. 545 



(b) INCLUDES GOVERNMENT, PROFESSIONAL, a DOMESTIC SERVICES 
RAILROADS, 8 A6RICULTURE 
SOURCE COMPILED BY STATISTICS SECTION, NRA 



LABOR INCOME 



MILLIONS OF 
DOLLARS 

■i 6 00 



1200 



FOR SELECTED INDUSTRIES AND TRADES 
BY MONTHS, I929-I935 (b) 

MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 



800 



400 



MILLIONS OF 

DOLLARS 

800 



600 



400 



200 



MILLIONS OF 

DOLLARS 

800 



600 



400 



200 






1929 



1929 



1929 



MILLIONS OF 
DOLLARS 



1929 



MILLIONS OF 
DOLLARS 

-i 1600 



1200 



1930 



1931 



1932 



1933 



1934 



1935 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADES 






1930 



1931 



1932 



1933 



1934 



1935 



CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIES (a >- 






1930 



1931 1932 1933 

RAILROADS 



400 
















200 




















. .,..!..,.. 


1 . . i . , 






..... 1.... . 


1 1 1 1 . 1 I 1 1 1 1 





.. i..l. .... 


. , i . . ! , . i . , 



1930 



19-31 



1932 



1933 



SOURCE COMPILED BY STATISTICS SECTION, NRA 



9853 



W> EXCLUDES FORCE ApCOUNT CONSTRUCTION 

t,b) 1933 AND 1934 FIGURES ARE BASED ON PRELIMINARY ANNUAL ESTIMATES. 

1935 FIGURES ARE PRELIMINARY AND SUBJECT TO REVISION WHEN DATA 

FOR THE COMPLETE YEAR BECOME AVAILABLE. 

-VI- 



800 



400 



MILLIONS OF 

OOLLARS 

800 



600 



400 



200 



MILLIONS OF 

DOLLARS 

800 



600 



— 400 



200 



MILLIONS OF 

DOLLARS 

600 



400 



200 



1934 1935 

N..R 

DIVISION O r REVIEW 

statistic; 

NO. 5- 



1934 



1935 



1. 



SOURCES AND METHODS OF MONTHLY ESTIMATES 
OF LABOR INCOME, 1929 TO DATE 

I. General Method 



The annual estimates of labor income paid out for 1929 
through 1934, made by Mr. Robert Nathan, Chief of the Income 
Section, Division of Kconomic Research, Bureau of Foreign and 
Domestic Commerce, have been broken down into monthly figures 
by correlating the various items with the appropriate annual 
totals of certain monthly series used as bases and assuming 
that the correlation established for the annual totals would 
likewise hold true for each month, current months have been 
estimated from the relationship established by this correlation, 
computed for the annual totals of the years 1929 through 1934. 

The three following requirements determined the selection 
of the monthly series used as bases. First, there must be a 
logical relationship between the monthly base series and Nathan's 
annual income estimates. In the majority of cases a sample pay- 
roll series of the same industry was used; where these data were 
not available, either an index of business activity for that 
particular industry or the labor income paid out for other re- 
lated industries was used as the basic series. Second, the 
monthly series must have a seasonal variation which would reflect 
as accurately as possible the seasonal variation in the annual 
group labor income. Third, the monthly series, having satisfied 
the above requirements, must show as high a coefficient of 
correlation as possible ". r ith Nathan' s annual estimates. In some 
cases it was necessary to consider interacting factors rather 
than rely on a given series. 

The monthly figures were computed from the correlation 
equation and the yearly sum of these computed figures compared 
with Nathan's estimates, bias was apportioned over the respect- 
ive months as indicated by plotting the residuals and estimating 
their curve. 



9858 



2. 



In most cases where there was any appreciable diff- 
erence between the computed annual total and Nathan's annual 
estimate, the computed figure was slightly greater than Nathan's 
figure for 1929, 1933 and 1934, and slightly less than Nathan's 
for 1930, 1931 and 1932; but in a few cases where the correlation 
was otherwise almost perfect, the 1934 computed figure was 
slightly less than Nathan's figure. The bias was presumably due, 
in part, to the fact that the bases were chiefly samples which 
involved the following limitations: first, they were samples of 
payrolls of the more efficiently organized concerns which reacted 
to general business conditions more rapidly and were therefore 
relatively higher than the average concern in recovery years, and 
relatively lower in depression years; second, they were samples 
of payrolls of a relatively constant number of concerns without 
proper provision for new concerns entering the field and old ones 
dropping out; and, third, for recent years they were preliminary 
samples of payrolls and therefore subject to revision. 



II. Component Parts of Labor Income 

A. MANUFACTURING 

The basic series were the weekly wage payroll figures, 
adjusted to a monthly basis, of all manufacturing industries 
minus railroad-repair shops, as reported in the Trend of ^mploy- 
ment, published by the Bureau of i,abor Statistics. Kailroad- 
repair shops were subtracted hsr9 because they are later covered 
in the steam-railroad group, Nathan's estimates were broken down 
into (a) wages and other compensation, which were correlated 
directly with the bureau of jyabor Statistics wage payroll figures, 
and, (,b) salaries, which, for lack of better information, V we 
assumed varied as wages and therefore were correlated with the 
Bureau of ijabor Statistics wage payroll figures after applying 
a 12-months' trailing average. Tnis last step was considered 
advisable to allow for the lag in salaries compared with wage 
payrolls, and also for the fact that salaries are not so subject 
to seasonal variation as wages. 



l/ The Bureau of Labor Statistics has received information on 
salaries from the same concerns which report wages since 
July, 1934, but no tabulation of the salary data has been 
made, nor any decision been reached concerning the handling 
of these data. 



9858 



3. 



B. MINING 

The basic series was composed of the sum of the indexes 
for anthracite mining, bituminous -coal mining, metalliferous 
mining, quarrying and non-metallic mining, and crude -petroleum 
producing, after having "Weighted each by its total payroll in 
1929, as reported in the Census of Mines and Quarries . The 
indexes used were those reported in the Trend of Employment , 
published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. These series were 
started in 1929 and the figures for the first year are not as 
reliable as those covering other years when the data were more 
representative . 

C. CONSTRUCTION 

1 . Contract Building Construction Val ue d at More Than £5,000 

Labor income paid out for contract building construction 
valued at more than $5,000 was computed by obtaining the per cent 
labor cost is of total cost from the ratio of the index of estim- 
ated total cost of construction per square foot to the index of 
average monthly wage rates and weighting the result by the per 
cent labor cost was of total cost in 1929. This per cent labor 
cost is of total cost was applied to the total F .'.','. Dodge's 
building construction value corrected to include the eleven 
.Testern states, and after an allowance was made for the duration 
of work. A more detailed description of this method is given 
belo.T. 

Index of Estimated Total Cost of Construction per Square 
Foot . - From the F. '.7. Dodge Corporation's monthly reports for 
contracts awarded in 37 eastern states, the total cost per square 
foot was computed for eaoh month by dividing the total value by 
the total floor space. This procedure was followed for each of 
the 4 groups, (1) 1 and 2 family houses which included "Dwellings, 
Owners," "Dwellings, Sale or Rent," and "2 Family Dwellings" ; 
(2) Apartment Houses which included "Apartments," "Dormitories," 
and "Hotels"; (3) Commercial Buildings which included "Commercial 
Buildings," and "Factories"; and (4) Public Buildings which in- 
cluded "Educational Buildings," "Hospitals and Institutions," 
"Public Buildings," "Religious and Memorial Buildings," and "Social 
and Recreational Buildings," 

The data on cost per square foot were then nade into a 
series of index numbers, 1929 to date, by months, with the average 
for 1929=100. 



t;Q 



9Sbb> 



4. 



Index of Average Monthly Wage Rates, by Months. - The 
weighted average wage rate for skilled and unskilled labor as 
reported by the Engineering Hews Record was made into an index, 
1929 to date, by months, with the average for 1929=100. 1/ 

Per Cent Labor Cost is of Total Cost, by Months. - The 
index of estimated cost per square foot was" divided by the 
index of average monthly wage rates in order to obtain the real 
changes in wage rates by eliminating the effect of the change 
in total construction costs since 1929. This corrected index 
was then weighted by the percentage which wages were of total 
costs as reported in 1929 by establishments doing an annual 
business of $25,000 or more. Total construction costs for this 
group were obtained by subtracting "subcontract work let" from 
the total value of construction business to give a net figure 
for the construction work done. The data on total costs and 
wages in 1929 were compiled from the Census report on the 
Construction Indu stry. -/ 

Total Buildii ; Contract Construction Costs for Projects 
Valued at more than 5,000 in the United States, by Months. - 

Total cost each montl was computed by increasing the Dodge total 
value to include ^he 11 .estern States not covered by the Dodge 
reports, as follows: the per cent which building permits for 
residential and non- residential buildings in the 11 7, estern 
States were of total permits reported in the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics publication, Building Construction , was computed and 
plotted on a graph for ach month from 1929 to date. The general , 
trends of the percentages were estimated by a gradation formula. _/ 



1/ The Engineering Hews Record wage reports cover 20 cities and 
the skilled figure represents bricklayers , carpenters , and 
iron workers. 

2/ The Construction Census, 'coverage is not sufficiently adequate 
to use for any totals, but the ratio of costs used here appears 
to be satisfactory. 

3/ The HRA is preparing a detailed study of the value of con- 
struction in the 11 Western States, which will probably be 
used when it becomes available. 



9853 



5. 



Allcr'rance for Du ration of Con stru ction " ork. - The 
duration of construction work for 1 and 2 Family Houses, 
Apartments, Commercial Buildings, and rub lie Buildings, was 
computed from the frequency tables shewing the "Number of 
Days Between Commencement of excavations and Completion of 
Building," as published by the Bureau of Labor statistics in 
the Monthly Labor Review of January, 1933. The time interval 
in which fell the median of the number of buildings, weighted 
by the average cost in each cost group, was selected as the 
duration of construction for each group of buildings. In 
each group the mode fell in approximately the same time inter- 
val as the median except for Public buildings, where the large 
cost of a few buildings tended to exaggerate slightly the 
amount of buildings taking over a year to build. 

Allowance for the duration of construction work was 
made by taking a trailing average covering the average number 
of months required to complete the buildings in the respective 

groups. 

Computation of Actual Labor Cost. - The actual amount 
of the labor cost was computed by applying the above derived 
labor-cost percentage (see p. 4) each month to the total 
building contract construction cost for projects valued at 
more than $5,000, adjusted to cover the entire United States 
and including an allowance for the lapse of time between the 
awarding of the contract and the completion of the project. 

2. 'Non-Building, Publicly financed Construction 

Beginning early in 1934, the Bureau of babor Statistics 
reported the payrolls on construction projects financed by the, 
P.'.V.A., the R.F.C., and the regular Federal appropriations. 2/ 



1/ Payrolls on construction projects financed from regular 
Federal government appropriations are incomplete because 
they do not include payrolls on projects awarded prior to 
July, 1934, when collection of this information began. 



98bB 



6. 



It was assumed that one-half of the non-building publicly 
financed construction projects were done by force work.V 
The remaining one-half of the total reported payrolls for 
Highways, zl "/Tatar and Sewerage, Bridges, Railroad 



l/ A rough estimate of the amount of force work done in 
1934 was made by taking the sum of the total wages on 
all types of construction projects for which such data 
were available, namely, the publicly financed con- 
struction payrolls (excluding building construction 
and naval vessels) reported by the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics, plus the computed contract building wagos 
on projects over $5,000 and the computed wages on all 
projects under $5,000, and subtracting Nathan's estim- 
ate of wages on contract construction. The remainder 
should approximately represent the amount of wages 
paid for force work in 1934, and practically equals 
one-half of the total wages on publicly financed con- 
struction payrolls (excluding building construction 
and naval vessels) reported by the Bureau of uabor 
Statistics, plus the computed wages on all projects 
under $5,000. 

In order to break the annual total down into monthly 
figures and also to project the series into 1935, 
one-half of the sum of the publicly financed con- 
struction payrolls (excluding building construction 
and naval vessels) reported by the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics, plus the computed wages on all projects 
under $5,000, was taken each month in order to obtain 
monthly estimates of payrolls on all force work — 
both public and private. The estimate for force work 
was not included in the total labor income estimates 
because a large portion of this force work was in- 
cluded in other industries, chiefly transportation, 
communications, manufacturing, mining, and government. 

2/ The Bureau of Public Roads reports employment begin- 
ning in 1931, but a comparison shows that payrolls do 
not closely follow the trend of employment. 



9858 



7. 



Construction, and River, harbor, and Flood Control ~i was added 
to the total contract building wages each month of 1934 and 
1935 to give the total contract construction wages. 

3. Construction Volume Under $5,000 

Monthly interpolations were made of the Dodge annual 
estimates of construction volume under $5,000 on the basis of 
monthly fluctuations in the Dodge "Total Building Construction 
over $5,000 in 37 Eastern States" and the "Total Amount of 
Additions, Alterations, and Repairs in 792 Cities," £/ as 
reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in Building Con- 
struction . 

Construction under $5,000 comprises for the most part 
small one-family houses, farm construction, and repairs and 
alterations, for which the per cent of labor cost to total 
construction cost is greater than for large buildings. This is 
due to the fact that more of the work has to be performed by 
manual labor than is the case on big jobs where machinery is 
more extensively used; and to the fact that the material used 
on small jobs is proportionately less expensive — for example, 
the rare marbles and steel framework in a large office or public 
building are proportionately much more expensive than the paint 
and lumber used to remodel a rococo house or build a garage. 



l/ Building construction as reported financed by P.17.A., R.F.C., 
and regular Government appropriations was not included due 
to the duplication which it would involve, because publicly 
financed building construction was included in the estimates 
based on the F. W. Dodge Corporation reports ^see p. 3). 
Forestry, naval vessels, reclamation, and miscellaneous were 
also omitted because in general they were reported in man- 
ufacturing or involve more force work than contract work. 
The reported payrolls on publicly financed non-building con- 
struction projects contain some payrolls which were duplicated 
in the ijovernment payrolls reported by the Civil Service 
Commission and other Government agencies. 

2/ The total amount of additions, alterations, and repairs in 
"~ April, 1935, covered 792 cities; other months were computed 
from the link relative. 



9858 



8. 



For lack of better information, it was arbitrarily assumed 
that the labor cost on projects under $5,000 is 50 per cent 
of the total cost. This 50 per cent was arrived at by adding 
10 per cent to the more or less standard 40 per cent labor 
cost. V This per cent of labor cost was applied to the 
total construction cost for projects under $5,000 after an 
adjustment was made for the lapse of time between the starting 
and completion of work based on the average length of time to 
complete a house or store valued at less than $5,000, as indi- 
cated in the frequency tables showing "number of Days Between 
Commencement of Excavations and Completion of Building," pub- 
lished by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in the Monthly Labor 
Review of January, 1933. 

4. Nathan's Annual Construction Wages Broken Down by 
Months According to Variations in the Computed Wages for 
Construction 

The total computed wages paid on building contract con- 
struction projects valued at more than $5,000 plua construction 
projects valued at less than $5,000 were used as the basic series 
to break down wathan's annual wage figures after adjusting the 
computed wages for 1934 and 1935 to include non-building publicly 
financed construction projects. £/ It should be noted that the 
two series are not strictly comparable because: (1) Nathan's data 
cover all contract construction, while that part of the computed 
series which related to construction valued at more than $5,000 
includes only building construction for the years 1929 through 
1933; and \2) n at nan's data include nothing but contract con- 
struction, while the computed series, since it covers all con- 
struction under $5,000, includes some force work. As indicated, 
the computed series excludes public works prior to 1934, while 
Nathan's includes contract public works for every year. 



l/ 40 per cent labor cost is used by the Associated General 

Contractors of America in their construction cost index, and 
by Mr. von Szeliski in his income estimate for construction. 

2/ The sum of the total contract building wages plus the non- 
building publicly financed construction wages for each month 
was weighted by the ratio of the total annual contract 
building wages to the total annual contract building wages 
plus one-half of the annual non-building publicly financed 
construction contract wages in order to maintain a correl- 
ation base similar to previous years. 



9858 



9. 



5. Construction Salaries 

For lack of better information, it has to be assumed 
that salaries tend to vary as total volume of building con- 
tracts over $5,000. However, salaries do not follow the wide 
seasonal variation shown in volume of business, and this 
situation was provided for by taking a IB-months* moving average 
of the Dodge figures on total awards of building contracts of 
more than $5,000. Current months were estimated in the moving 
average by computing the seasonal factor and correcting accord- 
ing to the proportional amount of the missing months determined 
by the seasonal factor. The volume of building contracts over 
$5,000 was chosen as the basic series because that is practically 
the only construction group which would be done by companies 
requiring any appreciable number of salaried employees. 



D. TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRIES WITHIN NRA SCOPE 

1. Yfeter Transportation 

The basic series was the sum of the water transportation 
traffic tonnage as reported by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 
Commerce, the War Department, and the New xork State Superintend- 
ent of Public Works, in the Survey of Current Business . 2/ This 
included the traffic on the Cape Cod Canal, New xork State Canal, 
U. S. vessels in the Panama Canal, and U. S. vessels in the Sault 
Ste. Marie Canal. £/ The traffic on the Suez Canal was omitted 
because the U. S. tonnage there has been included in the Ocean 
Traffic group listed below. The St. Laurence Canal traffic and 
the ,,elland Canal traffic have been omitted because of their 
Canadian situation and the fact that their traffic is partially 
included either in the Sault Ste. Marie or the aew xork State 
Canal group, and, moreover, its inclusion would give too much 
weight to the Great Lakes traffic. The Mississippi River gov- 
ernment barges, the traffic on the Allegheny, Monongehela, and 
Ohio Kivers, and the ship clearances of U. S. vessels in Ocean 
traffic were also included. 



1/ A weighting of the traffic tonnage figures based on the average 
annual labor income on the Great Lakes, inland waterways, and 
foreign and coastwise water transportation night have given 
slightly more accurate results, but the method of estimating 
labor income from tonnage figures is not sufficiently accurate 
to warrant too complicated calculations. 

£/ In order to confire the data to II. S. vessels, the percentage 
that these are of the total in the Sault Ste. Marie Uanal was 
estimated from data in the Report of the Chief of Kngineers, 
U. S. Army, 1953, . . aterborne Com.erce o f the United States*7 
Part II, Commercial Statistics . q r> c o 



10. 



2 . Electric Rail ro ad and Motor Bus Transportation 

The basic series was the payroll series for electric- 
railroad and motor bus operation and maintenance as reported 
in the Trend of Employment by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
This series excludes motor trucking and motor buses not affil- 
iated with street railways, which are included in Nathan's 
estimate for this group; also, it was started in 1929 end the 
figures for the first year are not as reliable as those cover- 
ing other years .Then the data were more representative. 

3. Pipeline Transportation 

The basic series was the crude petroleum consumption 
(run to stills) as reported by the Bureau of Mines in the 
Survey of Current Business . ±/ 

4. Airplane Transportation 

The basic series was the airplane travel — i.e., the 
number of passenger miles flown — as reported in the Survey 
of Current Business and covering the scheduled airlines oper- 
ating in the United States. 2/ This series was first reported 
in July, 1931. Monthly figures prior to this date were estim- 
ated by extrapolation, using the monthly average of Nathan'* 
annual figures as a guide to show the changes in trend. 

The monthly labor income for water, pipeline, and air 
transportation, which was based on data published in the Survey 
of Current Business , was corrected for the varying length of 
the month. This correction was not necessary for Electric 
Railroad and Motor Bus Transportation labor income because all 
of the Bureau of Labor Statistics series are based on the pay- 
roll for a given week in each month, and the only adjustment 
necessary was a weighting for the average number of weeks in 
a month. 

E. COMMUNICATION 

The basic series was the telephone and telegraph payroll 
index as reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in the Trend 
of Employment . This series was started in 1929 and the figures 
for the first year are not as reliable as those covering other 
years when the data were more representative. 



l/ The figures for labor income paid out in Pipeline and Air- 
plane Transportation were so small in amount that only 
general trends were capable of being distinguished. 



%%& 



11. 



F. RETAIL TRADE 

The basic series was the total retail trade payroll index 
as reported by, the Bureau of Labor Statistics in the Trend of 
Employment . ±f 

G. WHOLESALE TRADE 

The basic series was the total wholesale trade payroll 
J.s reported by th 
Trend of Employment . ±i 

R. BANKING 



index as reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in the 



The total salaries and wages paid semi-annually to Federal 
Reserve Member Bank employees, as published in the Federal Reserve 
Board Bulletin, was used as a sample series to break down Nathan's 
annual labor inc ome . 

The basic series correlated with these semi-annual figures 
for 1929, 1930 and 1931 _' was a weighted average index composed 
of loans and investments for 101 cities, as reported in the 
Federal Reser ve Board Bulletin, changed to an index with 1929=100, 
and weighted by the per cent that commercial banks are of total 
banks each year; and time deposits, as reported in the Federal 
Reserve Bulletin , changed to an index with 1929-1C0, and weighted 
by the per cent that savings banks are of total banks each year. 
The per cent that commercial and savings banks are of total banks 
was estimated from data in the Annual Reports of the Comptroller 
of the Currency . 

The basic series correlated with the semi-annual figures 
for 1932, 1933 and 1934 was the unpublished confidential bank 
payroll series of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. V 

l/ The indexes for wholesale and retail trade were revised in the 
latter part of 1934 to conform with the trends shown by the 
1929 and 1933 Census averages. 

2/ This basic series is the only one in the Labor income study 
whose coefficient of correlation has a probability greater 
than .01, and the probability here is .05, indicating that 
there would be 5 chances in 100 of getting a correlation as 
good as this due to chance alone. Twenty-five series and com- 
binations of series were tested and the series used here 
appeared to be the most satisfactory. 

3/ This series has a rather poor coverage, but it is reported that 
in the near future the federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
will take over this series and increase its coverage immensely. 



9858 



12. 



I. REAL ESTATE 

The basic series were the National Industrial 
Conference Board's rent index and the real estate aotivity 
index published in the Real Estate Analyst. The National 
Industrial Conference Board's rent index covers approx- 
imately 173 cities of more than 25,000 population, widely 
distributed geographically. The rents are based on the 
following specifications, "approximate average monthly rent 
for a house or apartment of 4 or 5 rooms with bath, heat 
not furnished by landlord, such as is usually ocoupied by 
a wage earner." V 

The real estate activity index is based on the rela- 
tionship of the number of families to the voluntary sales 
of real estate in 24 principal cities and their suburban 
communities, comprising in all 175 cities of more than 
5,000 population. This series, as published, is a prelim- 
inary series subject to the following objections: (l) that 
there are not enough Southern cities, and (2) that it is 
impossible in some instances to separate voluntary sales 
from voluntary ones, and (3) other complicating factors 
such as the fact that in one community cemetery lots are 
recorded by warranty deeds and can not be separated from 
ordinary real estate transactions. The real estate activity 
series, as reported in the Real Estate Analyst, is seasonally 
adjusted according to the number of voluntary transfers and 
the number of new deeds recorded, and the same seasonal 
factors were used to unadjust the series. 

J. INSURANCE 

The 1930 and 1931 yearly indexes were interpolated in 
the Bureau of Labor Statistics unpublished confidential series 
on insurance payrolls by correlation with Nathan's annual es- 
timates of insurance labor income. The seasonal factor was 
computed from the Bureau of Labor Statistics unpublished con- 
fidential insurance monthly payroll series for 1932, 1933, 1934 
and the first four months of 1935, and applied to the computed 
annual index for 1930 and 1931 and the base index for the year 
1929. The computed series combined with the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics series was used as a base. 



l/ National Industrial Conference Board, The Cost of Living in 
the United States, 1914-1930, pp. 57-59. 



9858 



13. 



K. ELECTRIC LIGHT AND POWER AMD GAS 

The basic series was the electric light and power 
and manufactured gas payroll index as reported by the Bureau 
of Labor Statistics in the Trend of Employment . This series 
was started in 1929 and the figures for the first year are 
not as reliable as those covering other years when the data 
were more representative. 

L. PERSONAL SERVICES 1/ 

The basic series were the Bureau of Labor Statistics 
payroll indexes for hotels, £/ laundries, and dyeing and 
cleaning 3/ as reported in the Trend of Employment, and 
weighted by the payroll for hotels as reported in the Census 
of Hotels and the payroll for laundries and cleaning and 
dyeing establishments as reported in the 1929 Census of 
Manufactures . The 1929 and 1930 payroll series for laundries 
and dyeing and cleaning were estimated by determining the 
seasonal factor from the given years 1931-1935 and applying 
this factor to the base index for 1929 and to the 1930 index 
computed by correlation with Nathan's annual estimates of 
Personal Servioe. 

M. BUSINESS SERVICE £' 

The basic series was the trade plus finance labor 
income as computed above. 

N. MISCELLANEOUS SERVICE £/ 

The basic series was the trade labor income as computed 
above. 



1/ Includes hotels, power laundries, cleaning and dyeing estab- 
lishments, and beauty and barber shops. 

2/ Basic series covers only hotels operating on a 12-month 
basis. 

3/ Basic series excludes hand laundries and small cleaners. 

4/ Includes independent private practice accounting, trade 
associations, and chambers of commerce. 

5/ Includes photography, undertaking and cemetery operation, 
social service and welfare agencies, and athletic and 
country clubs. ^85B 



14. 



0. AMUSEMENTS 1/ AND MISCELLANEOUS ll 

The basic series was composed of the sum of all the 
monthly labor income series computed above plus steam rail- 
way, government and agriculture labor income., and also plus 
agricultural entrepreneurial withdrawals. jV The basic series 
used for agricultural entrepreneurial inoome was cash income 
from farm marketings, as published by the Bureau of Agricul- 
tural Economics. The monthly agriculture figures were 
corrected for the varying length of the months. 

P. AGRICULTURE 

The basic series was an index of hired farm wages 
computed by weighting the hired employees per crop reporting 
farm, adjusted to represent all farms, by the farm wage rate 
without board per month. All of the above mentioned data 
were supplied by the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. The 
total hired farm labor income was adjusted for the varying 
length of the months. 

Q. STEAM RAILWAYS (INCLUDING PULLMAN AND EXPRESS) 

The basic series for steam railways and pullman companies 
was the total compensation of all employees as published in . 
Wage Statistics, Class I Steam Railways in the United States , V 
by the Interstate Commerce Commission. 



1/ Includes theatres, motion picture production, radio broad- 
casting, bowling alleys, etc 

2/ Includes fishing and harbor craft, hand trades, water com- 
panies, other public utility and finance not listed under 
main groups, and "nature of business not given" industries. 

3/ '.Then total property income and entrepreneurial withdrawals 
have been computed, they probably should be used also in 
the basic series. (See foreword.) 

4/ These reports include switching and terminal companies. The 
same number of companies are not covered each month, but 
the figures are comparable because the changes are due to 
leasings and consolidations. 



9858 



15. 



The basic series for 1929 through 1932 for express 
companies was the compensation of professional, clerical, 
and general employees V reported in ".'/age Statistics, C lass I 
Steam railways in the United States , published by the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission. The basic series for 1954 end 1935 
were the unpublished Interstate Commerce Commission series on 
total compensation of Pullman and Express Company employees. 

The monthly figures '..ere corrected for the varying length 
of the months . 

R. PROFESSIONAL AND DHjISTIC SERVICE 

The be sic series was composed of the sun of al] the 
monthly labor income series computed above plus steam railway, 
government and agriculture labor income, and also plus agricul- 
tural entrepreneurial withdrawals. (Sec p. 14.) 

S. FEDERAL SERvICE 

1. Salaries 

The monthly averages of Nathan's annual figures were 
graphed and monthly figures interpolated for 1929, 1930, 1931 
1932 and 1933, based on a graphical analysis. For 1934 and 1935 
the Bureau of Labor Statistics payroll series for the United 
States Government, as published in the Trend of Employment, was 
used, after adjusting for the slight difference between Nathan's 
total federal salaries and the Bureau of Labor Statistics total 
reported federal payroll. 

2. Pensions 



The monthly averages of Ilathan's yearly figures - were 
graphed and monthly figures interpolated for 1929, 1930, 1931 
and tne first 6 months of 1932, based on a graphical analysis. 
The expenses of the Veterans' Administration, ~/ as reported in 
the Annua l I.eports of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State 
of the Finances and the Daily Treas ury S tatement , published by 
the Treasury Department, were used as the basic series for 1932, 
1933 and 1934, and correlated with Ilathan's pensions. 

T. STATE AND LOCAL 

1. State, City, and County 

The monthly averages of Nathan's annual figures for State, 
City, and County labor incomes were graphed and the monthly 

l/ Approximately 80 per cent of this group are clerks. 

2/ The Treasury reports pensions only on a yearly basis* _ 

8 J li 



16. 



figures interpolated for 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933 and 
1934, based on the cycle trend. 1935 figures were computed 
by using Federal Salaries and Pensions as a base and correl- 
ating with Nathan's annual figures representing the sum of 
State, City and County labor income. 

2. Public Education 1/ 

The percentage of the various size cities falling in 
each frequency group of the number of months over which 
teaohers' salary payments extend, as reported by the National 
Eduoation Association in their Research Bulletin , Vol. 10, 
No. 2, was weighted by the total salary payments for teachers 
and principals in the respective city groups, as reported in 
Statistics of City School Systems , published by the Interior 
Department. The period distribution of rural school teachers' 
salaries was estimated from the ratio. of the average length of 
urban school terms to the average length. of rural school terms, 
obtained from data in the Statistics of State School Systems , 
published by the Interior Department, and applied to the total 
annual rural school teachers* salaries as reported in the same 
publication. The trend towards shorter pay periods in smaller 
communities as reported by the National Education Association 
Bulletin, mentioned above, was also used in determining the 
estimate of the length of rural schools pay periods. The 
salaries of the faculty of publicly financed Colleges and 
Universities, as reported by the Interior Department in 
Statistics of Higher Education, were assumed to be equally 
distributed between the 10 months pay-period and the 12 months 
pay-period. The per cent of the total of the urban and rural 
school salaries and the University and College faculty salaries 
paid each month was computed and applied as a seasonal factor 
to Nathan's total public education labor income. Necessary bias 
adjustments were made to maintain the same salaries throughout 
each academic year. 

The 1935 salaries were estimated from the data on the 
status of salary schedule operation in E03 cities, as reported 
in News Bulletin No. 3, issued October 15, 1935, by the National 
Education Association. 



l/ private education salaries are included under Professional 
Service. 



9858 



17. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



I. Government Publications 

1. Department of Agriculture 

Bureau of Agricultural Economics 

Employment on Farms of Crop Reporters 
Estimates of Cash Income from Farm Marke tings 
Farm Wage Rates and Related Data 

2. Department of Commerce 

Bureau of the Census 

Construction Industry 
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce 

Survey of Current Business 

3. Federal Reserve Board 

Federal Reserve Bulletin 

4. Department of Interior 

Office of Education 

Biennial Survey of Education 

5. Interstate Commerce Commission 

Yiage Statistics - Class I Steam Railways 
in the United States 

6. Department of Labor 

Bureau of Labor Statistics 
Building Construction 
Monthly Labor Review 
Trend of Employment 

7. Treasury Department 

Annual R eports of the Comptroller of 

the Currency 
Annual Report of the Secretary of the 

Treasury on the State of the Finances 

8. Department of VJar 

Report of the Chief of Engineers, U. S. Army, 
1933, 'water-Borne Commerce of the United 
States, Part II, Commercial Statistics 



985 



t,p 



18. 



II. Non-Government Publications 



1. F. W. Dodge Corporation 

Dodge Statistical Research Service, 
Construction Contracts Awarded in 
37 Eastern States 

Engineering News Record 

2. National Education Association 

Research Bulletin of the N.E.A., Vol. 10, 
No. 2, March, 1932 

3. National Industrial Conference Board 

Monthly Press Releases on Changes in the 

Cost of Living of Wage Earners 
The Cost of Living in the United States, 1913-1920 

4. Real Estate Analyst Company 

The Real Estate Analyst 

III. Unpublished Government Data 

1. Department of Agriculture 

Bureau of Agricultural Economics 

Confidential conversion factor for adjusting 
hired farm labor covering crop reporting 
farms, to hired farm labor covering all farms 

2. Department of Commeroe 

Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commeroe 

Annual Labor Income estimates by the Division 
of Economic Research 1/ 

3. Interstate Commerce Commission 

Unpublished series on total compensation of 
Pullman and Express company employees 

4. Department of Labor 

Bureau of Labor Statistics 

Confidential Banking and Insurance payroll indexes 



1/ This material will be published at an early date. 



9853 



19, 



TABLE I 



Total, NBA and Non-HIA Labor Income Paid Out, and Per Cent 

NBA and Non-NBA Labor Income are of Total Labor Inoome, 

by Months, 1929-1936 

(Millions of dollars) 





Total 


NRA Labor Income 


Non-NBA Labor Income 


Tear and 
Month 


Labor 
Income 


Amount 


Per Cent 
of Total 


Amount 


Per Cent 
of Total 


1929 Total, Tear 


51,875 


38,595 


74.4 


13,280 


25.6 


January 


4,040 


2,971 


73.5 


1,069 


26.5 


February 


4,207 


3,131 


74.4 


1,076 


25.6 


March 


4,281 


3,197 


74.7 


1,084 


25.3 


April 


4,324 


3,210 


74.2 


1,114 


25.8 


May 


4,398 


3,264 


74.2 


1,134 


25.8 


June 


. 4,371 


3,256 


74.6 


1,115 


25.5 


July 


4,243 


3,213 


75.7 


1,030 


24.3 


August 


4,295 


3,268 


76.1 


1,027 


23.9 


September 


4,463 


3,320 


74.4 


1,143 


25.6 


October 


4,583 


3,358 


73.3 


1,225 


26.7 


November 


4,371 


3,216 


73.6 


1,155 


26.4 


December 


4,299 


3,191 


74.2 


1,108 


25.8 


1930 Total, Tear 


47,558 


34,936 


73.5 


12,622 


26.5 


January 


4,123 


3,040 


73.7 


1,083 


26.3 


February 


4,113 


3,039 


73.9 


1,074 


26.1 


March 


4,117 


3,038 


73.8 


1,079 


26.2 


April 


4,140 


3,049 


73.6 


1,091 


26.4 


May 


4,172 


3,066 


73.5 


1,106 


26.5 


June 


4,084 


3,006 


73.6 


1,078 


26.4 


July 


3,854 


2,898 


75.2 


956 


24.8 


August 


3,758 


2,826 


75.2 


932 


24.8 


September 


3,881 


2,827 


72.8 


1,054 


27.2 


Ootober 


3,904 


2,806 


71.9 


1,098 


28.1 


November 


3,742 


2,689 


71.9 


1,053 


28.1 


Deoember 


3,670 


2,652 


72.3 


1,018 


27.7 


1931 Total, Tear 


40,083 


28,696 


71.3 


11,487 


28.7 


January 


3,532 


2,535 


71.8 


997 


28.2 


February 


3,533 


2,538 


71.8 


995 


28.2 


March 


3,547 


2,546 


71.8 


1,001 


28.2 


April 


3,544 


2,533 


71.5 


1,011 


28.5 


May 


3,524 


2,512 


71.3 


1,012 


28.7 


June 


3,426 


2,453 


71.6 


973 


28.4 


July 


3,226 


2,373 


73.6 


853 


26.4 


August 


3,142 


2,310 


73.5 


832 


26.5 


September 


3,212 


2,263 


70.5 


949 


29.5 


October 


3,218 


2,234 


69.4 


984 


30.6 


November 


3,122 


2,167 


69.4 


955 


30.6 


Deoember 


3,057 


2,132 


69.7 


925 


30.3 






(Continued) 




9858 



20. 



TABLE I (Continued) 

Total, NEA and Non-NBA Labor Inoome Paid Out, and Per Cent 
NEA and Non-NBA Labor Inoone are of Total Labor Inoome, 
by Months, 1929-1935 
(Millions of dollars) 



Year and 


Total 


NEA Lab 


or Inoome 


Non-NBA Labor Inoome 


Month 


Labor 
Inoome 


Amount 


Per Cent 
of Total 


Amount 


Per Cent 
of Total 


1932 Total, Year 


31,169 


21,243 


68.2 


9,926 


31.8 


January 


2,919 


2,018 


69.1 


901 


30.9 


February 


2,867 


1,982 


69.1 


885 


30.9 


March 


2,829 


1,946 


68.8 


883 


31.2 


April 


2,768 


1,876 


68.0 


882 


32.0 


May 


2,717 


1,839 


67.7 


878 


32.3 


June 


2,574 


1,747 


67.9 


827 


32.1 


July 


2,361 


1,661 


70.4 


700 


29.6 


August 


2,312 


1,628 


70,4 


684 


29.6 


September 


2,449 


1,645 


67.2 


804 


52.8 


October 


2,530 


1,679 


66.4 


851 


33.6 


November 


2,456 


1,629 


66.3 


827 


33.7 


December 


2,397 


1,593 


66.5 


804 


33.5 


1933 Total, Year */ 


28,965 


19,898 


68.7 


9,067 


31.3 


January 


2,338 


1,550 


66.3 


788 


33.7 


February 


2,313 


1,631 


66.2 


782 


33.8 


March 


2,252 


1,487 


66.0 


766 


34.0 


April 


2,275 


1,509 


66.3 


766 


33.7 


May 


2,351 


1,671 


66.8 


780 


33.2 


June 


2,385 


1,627 


68.2 


768 


31.8 


July 


2,306 


1,664 


72.2 


642 


27.8 


August 


2,379 


1,743 


73.3 


636 


26.7 


September 


2,564 


- 1,798 


70.1 


766 


29.9 


October 


2,660 


1,846 


69.4 


814 


30.6 


November 


2,583 


1,786 


69.1 


797 


30.9 


December. 


2,559 


1,786 


69.8 


773 


30.2 


1934 Total, Year */ 


32,319 


22,791 


70.5 


9,528 


29.5 


January 


2,532 


1,763 


69.6 


769 


30.4 


February 


2,605 


1,818 


69.8 


787 


30.2 


March 


2,682 


1,885 


70.3 


797 


29.7 


April 


2,742 


1,932 


70.5 


810 


29.5 


May 


2,783 


1,961 


70.5 


822 


29.5 


June 


2,748 


1,949 


70.9 


799 


29.1 


July 


2,584 


1,892 


73.2 


692 


26.8 


August 


2,604 


1,902 


73.0 


702 


27.0 


September 


2,685 


1,875 


69.8 


810 


30,2 


October 


2,815 


1,940 


68.9 


875 


31.1 


November 


2,757 


1,916 


69.5 


841 


30.5 


December 


2,782 


1,958 
(Continued) 


70.4 


824 


"•to 



21. 



TABLE I (Conoluded) 



Total, MRA and Hon-NRA Labor Income Paid Out, and Par Cent 

NBA and Non-IRA Labor Income are of Total Labor Inoorae, 

by Months, 1929-1936 

(Millions of dollars) 



Tear and 
Month 



Total 
Labor 
Income 



1955 



NBA Labor Income 



Amount 



Per Cent 
of Total 



Non-NBA Labor Income 



Amount 



Total, 6 moo. «/ 17,324 12,168 



70.2 



5,156 



Per Cent 
of Total 



29.8 



January 

Febmary 

Maroh 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



2,780 


1,948 


70.1 


2,849 


2,008 


70.5 


2,890 


2,043 


70.7 


2,951 


2,056 


70.1 


2,954 


2,057 


69.6 


2,920 


2,056 


70.4 


2,781 


2,027 


72,9 


2,832 


2,064 


72.9 



832 


29.9 


841 


29.5 


847 


29.3 


875 


29.9 


897 


50.4 


864 


29.6 


764 


27.1 


768 


27.1 



Souroes : 



Estimated from data taken from publications of the Bureau of 
Agricultural Economics; Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce; 
Federal Reserve Board; Interstate Commerce Commission; Bureau of 
Labor Statistics; Treasury Department; War Department; F.W. Dodge 
Corporation; National Eduoation Association; Beal Estate Analyst 
Company* A few of the base series are from unpublished material. 
For further information, see above, "Sources and Methods," p. 1-16, 

1933 and 1934 figures are based on preliminary annual estimates. 
1935 figures are preliminary and subject to revision when data 
for the oomplete year beoome available. 



9S58 



22, 



TABLE II 

Actual and Real Total NBA and Non-NRA Labor Income Paid Out, 

by Months, 1929-1935 
(Millions of dollars) 





Total Labor Income 


NRA Labor Income 


Non-BRA : 


Labor Income 


Year and 














Month 


Actual 


Real a/ 


Actual 


Real a/ 


Actual 


Real •/ 


1929 Total, Year 


51,875 


51,875 


38,595 


38,595 


13,280 


13,280 


January- 


4,040 


4,048 


2,971 


2,977 


1,069 


1,071 


February 


4,207 


4,215 


3,131 


3,137 


1,076 


1,078 


March 


4,281 


4,324 


3,197 


3,229 


1,084 


1,095 


April 


4,324 


4,377 


3,210 


3,249 


1,114 


1,128 


May 


4,398 


4,451 


3,264 


3,304 


1,134 


1,147 


June 


4,371 


4,406 


3,256 


3,282 


1,115 


1,124 


July 


4,243 


4,235 


3,213 


3,207 


1,030 


1,028 


August 


4,295 


4,257 


3,268 


3,239 


1,027 


1,018 


September 


4,463 


4,419 


3,320 


3,287 


1,143 


1,132 


October 


4,583 


4,529 


3,358 


3,319 


1,225 


1,210 


November 


4,371 


4,328 


3,216 


3,184 


1,155 


1,144 


December 


4,299 


4,286 


3,191 


3,181 


1,108 


1,105 


L930 Total, Year 


47,558 


49,609 


34,936 


36,510 


12,622 


13,199 


January 


4,123 


4,148 


3,040 


3,058 


1,083 


1,090 


February 


4,113 


4,079 


3,039 


3,088 


1,074 


1,091 


March 


4,117 


4,223 


3,038 


3,116 


1,079 


1,107 


April 


4,140 


4,242 


3,049 


3,124 


1,091 


1,118 


May 


4,172 


4,310 


3,066 


3,167 


1,106 


1,143 


June 


4,084 


4,254 


3,006 


3,131 


1,078 


1,123 


July 


3,854 


4,079 


2,898 


3,067 


956 


1,012 


August 


3,758 


3,997 


2,826 


3,006 


932 


991 


September 


3,881 


4,094 


2,827 


2,982 


1,054 


1,112 


October 


3,904 


4,149 


2,806 


2,982 


1,098 


1,167 


November 


3,742 


4,023 


2,689 


2,891 


1,053 


1,132 


December 


3,670 


4,011 


2,652 


2,898 


1,018 


1,113 


1931 Total, Year 


40,083 


47,137 


28,596 


33,621 


11,487 


13,516 


January 


3,532 


3,933 


C§ f *_**.' 


2,823 


997 


1,110 


February 


3,533 


4,015 


2,538 


2,884 


995 


1,131 


March 


3,547 


4,054 


2,546 


2,910 


1,001 


1,144 


April 


3,544 


4,097 


2,533 


2,928 


1,011 


1,169 


May 


3,524 


4,141 


2,512 


2,952 


1,012 


1,189 


June 


3,426 


4,078 


2,453 


2,920 


973 


1,158 


July 


3,226 


3,840 


2,373 


2,825 


853 


1,015 


August 


3,142 


3,741 


2,310 


2,750 


832 


991 


September 


3,212 


3,825 


2,263 


2,694 


949 


1,131 


October 


3,216 


3,831 


2,234 


2,660 


984 


1,171 


November 


9.34| 


3,807 


2,167 


2,643 


955 


1,164 


December 


3,05*K 


3,775 


2,132 


2,632 


925 


1,143 








(Continued) 




9RKC 



23. 



TABLE II (Continued) 

Aottial and Real Total NRA and Non-NRA Labor Income Paid Out, 

by Months, 1929-1935 
(Millions of dollars) 



Year and 
Month 



Total Labor Income NRA Labor iDOome Non-NRA Labor Income 



Aotual 



Real 



S/ Actual Real 2/ Actual Real */ 



1932 Total, Year 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1933 Total, Year 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

Ootober 

November 

December 

1934 Total, Year 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



31,169 41,569 21,243 28,324 



9,926 



13,245 



V 



W 



2,919 


3,695 


2,018 


2,554 


2,867 


3,699 


1,982 


2,557 


2,829 


3,673 


1,946 


2,527 


2,758 


3,624 


1,876 


2,465 


2,717 


3,623 


1,839 


2,452 


2,574 


3,469 


1,747 


2,354 


2,361 


3,186 


1,661 


2,242 


2,312 


3,128 


1,628 


2,203 


2,449 


3,327 


1,645 


2,235 


2,530 


3,451 


1,679 


2,291 


2,456 


3,374 


1,629 


2,238 


2,397 


3,320 


1,593 


2,206 


:8,965 


40,149 


19,898 


27,552 


2,338 


3,307 


1,550 


2,192 


2,313 


3,352 


1,531 


2,219 


2,252 


3,278 


1,487 


2,164 


2,275 


3,326 


1,509 


2,206 


2,351 


3,403 


1,571 


2,274 


2,385 


3,407 


1,627 


2,324 


2,306 


3,172 


1,664 


2,289 


2,379 


3,194 


1,743 


2,340 


2,564 


3,387 


1,798 


2,375 


2,660 


3,504 


1,846 


2,432 


2,583 


3,412 


1,786 


2,359 


2,559 


3,407 


1,786 


2,378 


2,319 


41,801 


22,791 


29,477 


2,532 


3,367 


1,763 


2,344 


2,605 


3,419 


1,818 


2,386 


2,682 


3,509 


1,885 


2,467 


2,742 


3,598 


1,932 


2,535 


2,783 


3,638 


1,961 


2,563 


2,748 


3,583 


1,949 


2,541 


2,584 


3,356 


1,892 


2,457 


2,604 


3,356 


1,902 


2,451 


2,685 


3,390 


1,875 


2,367 


2,815 


3,564 


1,940 


2,456 


2,757 


3,490 


1,916 


2,425 


2,782 


3,531 


1,958 


2,485 




(Continued) 





901 


1,141 


885 


1,142 


883 


1,146 


882 


1,159 


878 


1,171 


827 


1,115 


700 


944 


684 


925 


804 


1,092 


851 


1,160 


827 


1,136 


804 


1,114 


067 


12,597 


788 


1,115 


782 


1,133 


765 


1,114 


766 


1,120 


780 


1,129 


758 


1,083 


642 


883 


636 


854 


766 


1,012 


814 


1,072 


797 


1,053 


773 


1,029 


528 


12,324 


769 


1,023 


787 


1,033 


797 


1,042 


810 


1,063 


822 


1,075 


799 


1,042 


692 


899 


702 


905 


810 


1,023 


875 


1,108 


841 


1,065 


324 


1,046 



9858 



24. 



TABLE II (Concluded) 

Aotual and Real Total NBA and Non-NRA Labor Income Paid Out, 

by Months, 1929-1935 
(Millions of dollars) 



Tear and 
Month 



Total Labor Income HEA Labor Income Non-NRA Labor Inoome 
Actual Real */ Aotual Real •/ Aotual Real «/ 



1935 Total, 6 mos. */ 17,324 21,411 12,168 15,033 



5,156 6,378 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



2,780 


3,479 


1,948 


2,438 


832 


1,041 


2,849 


3,526 


2,008 


2,485 


841 


1,041 


2,890 


3,577 


2,043 


2,528 


847 


1,048 


2,931 


3,588 


2,056 


2,517 


875 


1,071 


2,954 


3,625 


2,057 


2,524 


897 


1,101 


2,920 


3,600 


2,056 


2,535 


864 


1,065 


2,781 


3,438 


2,027 


2,606 


754 


932 


2,832 


3,483 


2,064 


2,539 


768 


1,889 



Souroes 



y 
y 



Estimated from data taken from publications of the Bureau of Agricultural 
Economics; Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce; Federal Reserve Board; 
Interstate Commerce Commission; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Treasury 
Department; War Department; F. W. Dodge Corporation; National Education 
Association; Real Estate Analyst Company. A few of the base series are 
from unpublished materiel. For further information, see above, "Sources 
and Methods," p. 1-16. 

Computed from the NRA oost-of- living index. 

1933 and 1934 figures are based on preliminary animal estimates. 1935 
figures are preliminary aod subject to revision when data for the 
complete year beoome available* 



9858 



25. 



TABLE III 

Index of Actual and Real Total HRA and Non-NRA 
Labor Income Paid Out, by Months, 1929-1935 

(Yearly average 1929*100) 



Tear and 


1 ' ., i 
Total Labor Income 


NRA Labor Income 


Non-NRA Labor Income 


Month 


Aotual 


Real •/ 


Actual 


Real •/ 


Aotual 


Real «/ 


1929 Yearly Average 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


January 


93.5 


93.6 


92.4 


92.6 


96.6 


96.8 


February 


97,3 


97.5 


97.4 


97.5 


97.2 


97.4 


March 


99.0 


100.0 


99.4 


100.4 


97.9 


98.9 


April 


100.0 


101.2 


99.8 


101.0 


100.6 


101.9 


May 


101.7 


103.1 


101.5 


102.7 


102.5 


103.6 


June 


101.1 


101.9 


101.2 


102.1 


100.7 


101.6 


July 


98.1 


98.0 


99.9 


99.7 


93.1 


92.9 


August 


99.4 


98.5 


101.6 


100.7 


92.8 


92.0 


September 


103.8 


102.2 


103.2 


102.2 


103.3 


102.4 


October 


106.0 


104.8 


104.4 


103.2 


110.8 


109.3 


November 


101.1 


100.1 


100.0 


99.0 


104.4 


103.3 


December 


99.5 


99.1 


99.2 


98.9 


100.1 


99.9 


1930 Yearly Average 


91.7 


95.6 


90.5 


94.6 


95.0 


99.4 


January 


95.4 


95.9 


95.0 


95.1 


97.8 


98.5 


February 


95.1 


94.3 


94.9 


96.0 


97.0 


98.6 


March 


95.2 


S7.7 


94.8 


96.9 


97.5 


100.0 


April 


95.8 


98.1 


95.1 


97.1 


98.6 


101,0 


May 


96.5 


99.7 


95.0 


98.5 


99.9 


103.2 


June 


94.6 


98.4 


93.0 


97.3 


97.4 


101.4 


July 


89.1 


94.3 


89.6 


95.4 


86.4 


91.4 


August 


86.9 


92.5 


87.4 


93.6 


84.2 


89.5 


September 


89.8 


94.7 


87.5 


92.7 


95.2 


100.4 


Ootober 


90.3 


96.0 


86.9 


92.7 


99.2 


105.4 


November 


86.6 


93.1 


83.5 


89.9 


95.1 


102.3 


December 


84.9 


92.8 


82.8 


90.1 


92.0 


100.5 


1931 Yearly Average 


77.3 


90.9 


74.1 


87.1 


86.5 


101.7 


January 


81.7 


91.0 


78.8 


87.8 


90.1 


100.3 


February 


81.7 


92.9 


78.9 


89.7 


89.9 


102.2 


March 


82.0 


93.8 


79.2 


90.5 


90.4 


103.3 


April 


82.0 


94.8 


78.8 


91.0 


91.5 


106.6 


May 


81.5 


95.8 


78.1 


91.8 


91.4 


107.4 


June 


79.2 


94.3 


76.3 


90.8 


87.9 


104.6 


July 


74.6 


88.8 


73.8 


87.8 


77.1 


91.7 


August 


72.7 


86.5 


71.8 


85.5 


75.2 


89.6 


September 


74.3 


88.5 


70.4 


83.8 


85.7 


102.2 


Ootober 


74.4 


88.6 


69.5 


82.7 


88.9 


105.8 


November 


72.2 


88.1 


67.4 


82.2 


86.5 


105.1 


December 


70.7 


87.3 


66.3 


81.8 


83.6 


103.2 






(Continued) 









26. 



TABLE III (Continued) 

Index of Actual and Real Total NRA and Non-NRA 
Labor Income Paid Out, by Months, 1929-1935 

(Yearly average 1929-100) 



Year and 
Month 



Total Labor Income NRA Labor Income Non-NRA Labor Income 



1932 Yearly Average 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1933 Yearly Average 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



i/ 



*/ 



1934 Yearly Average 2 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



Actual Real £/ Actual Real */ Actual Real £/ 



60.1 



80.1 



55.0 



73.4 



74.7 



99.7 



67.5 


85.5 


62.7 


79.4 


81.4 


103.1 


66.3 


85.6 


61.6 


79.5 


80.0 


103.2 


65.4 


85.0 


60.5 


78.6 


79.8 


103.6 


63.8 


83,8 


58.3 


76.6 


79.7 


104.7 


62.8 


83.8 


57.2 


76.2 


79.3 


105.8 


59.5 


80.2 


54.3 


73.2 


74.7 


100.7 


54.6 


73.7 


51.6 


69.7 


63.2 


85.3 


53.5 


72.4 


50.6 


68.5 


61.8 


83.6 


56.6 


77.0 


51.1 


69.5 


72.6 


98.9 


58.5 


79.8 


52.2 


71.2 


76.9 


104.8 


56.8 


78.0 


50.6 


69.6 


74.7 


102.6 


55.4 


76.8 


49.5 


68.6 


72.6 


100.6 


55.8 


77.4 


51.6 


71.4 


68.3 


94.9 


54.1 


76.5 


48.2 


68.1 


71.2 


100.7 


53.5 


77.5 


47.6 


69.0 


70.6 


102.3 


52.1 


75.8 


46.3 


67.3 


69.1 


100.6 


52.6 


76.9 


46.9 


68.6 


69.2 


101.2 


54.4 


78.7 


49.8 


70.7 


70.5 


102.0 


55.2 


78.8 


50.6 


72.3 


68.5 


97.8 


53.3 


73.4 


51.7 


71.2 


58.0 


79.8 


55.0 


73.9 


54.2 


72.8 


57.4 


77.1 


59.3 


78.3 


55.9 


73.8 


69.2 


91.4 


61.5 


81.0 


57.4 


75.6 


75.5 


96.8 


59.7 


78.9 


55.5 


73.3 


72.0 


95.1 


59.2 


78.8 


55.5 


73.9 


69.8 


92.9 


62.3 


80.6 


59.0 


76.4 


71.7 


92.8 


58.6 


77.9 


54.8 


72.9 


69.5 


92.4 


60.3 


79.1 


56.5 


74.2 


71.1 


93.3 


62.0 


81.2 


58.6 


76.7 


72.0 


94.1 


63.4 


83.2 


60.1 


78.8 


73.2 


96.0 


64.4 


84.1 


60.7 


79.7 


74.3 


97.1 


63.6 


82.9 


60.6 


79.0 


72.2 


94.1 


59.8 


77.6 


58.8 


76.4 


62.6 


81.2 


60.2 


77.6 


59.1 


76.2 


63.4 


81.7 


62.1 


78.4 


58.3 


73.6 


73.2 


92.4 


65.1 


82.4 


60.3 


76.4 


79.0 


100.1 


63.8 


80.7 


59.6 


75.4 


76.0 


96.2 


64.3 


81.7 


60.9 


77.3 


74.4 


94.5 










9858 




(Continued) 









27. 



TABLE III (Concluded) 

Index of Aotual and Real Total NRA and Non-NRA 
Labor Inoome Paid Out, by Months, 1929-1935 

Clearly average 1929-100) 



Year and 
Month 



Total Labor Inoome NRA Labor Inoome Non-NRA Labor Income 
Actual Real •/ Actual Real •/ Actual Real »/ 



1935 



Average, 6 mos. £/ 66.8 



82.5 



63.0 



77.9 



77.7 



96.1 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



64.3 


80.5 


60.6 


75.8 


65.9 


81.6 


62.4 


77.3 


66.9 


82.8 


63.5 


75.5 


67.8 


83.0 


63.9 


78.3 


68.3 


83.9 


64.0 


78.5 


67.6 


83.4 


63.9 


78.8 


64.3 


79.4 


63.0 


77.9 


65.5 


80.6 


64.2 


79.0 



75.2 


94.2 


76.0 


94.0 


76.6 


94.8 


79.1 


96.8 


81.1 


99.5 


78.1 


96.3 


68.1 


84.2 


69.4 


85.4 



Souroe8: Estimated from data taken from publications of the Bureau of Agricultural 
Economics; Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce; Federal Reserve Board; 
Interstate Commerce Commission; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Treasury 
Department; War Department; F. W. Dodge Corporation; National Education 
Association; Real Estate Analyst Company. A few of the base series are 
from unpublished material. For further information, see above, "Sources 
and Methods," p. 1-16. 

a/ Computed from the NRA cost-of-living index. 

b/ 1933 and 1934 figures are based on preliminary annual estimates. 1935 

figures are preliminary and subject to revision when data for the complete 
year beoome available. 



9858 



TABLE IT 

HRA Labor Inoane Paid Oat, for Chief Industrial 

DiTisiona, by Months, 1929- 1936 

(Millions of dollars) 



28. 





Total 








Dirisian 








Tear and 


Manu- 








Publie 


Con- 




Miscel- 


Month 




fact- 
uring 


Trade 


HRA 
Sexviee 


Fi- 
nance 


ITfcil- . 
itiesf/ 


strue-. 
tionV 


Mining 


laneous 


1929 Total, Tear 


38,696 


14,850 8,210 


2,832 


2,628 


2,400 


2,757 


1,636 


5,302 


January 


2,971 


1,081 


659 


228 


222 


192 


212 


134 


243 


February 


8,131 


1,240 


654 


250 


213 


190 


207 


147 


250 


March 


3.19T 


1,260 


669 


233 


232 


196 


217 


157 


265 


April 


3,210 


1,271 


667 


237 


237 


197 


210 


127 


264 


May 


3,264 


1,276 


674 


257 


229 


199 


250 


151 


288 


June 


8,266 


1,264 


680 


237 


227 


201 


230 


128 


289 


July 


3,213 


1,233 


680 


235 


224 


208 


231 


120 


286 


August 


3,268 


1,274 


681 


254 


209 


205 


244 


151 


290 


Septeisber 


3,320 


1,285 


699 


243 


205 


204 


248 


141 


295 


Ootober 


3,868 


1,279 


705 


246 


214 


206 


254 


150 


505 


Voreaber 


3,216 


1,209 


703 


238 


207 


201 


257 


141 


280 


Deoenber 


3,191 


1,178 


739 


235 


209 


204 


217 


149 


260 


19S0 Total, Tear 


34,936 


12,761 


7,830 


2,679 


2,458 


2,548 


2,405 


1,408 


8,069 


January 


3,040 


1,141 


683 


229 


207 


199 


196 


154 


261 


February 


8,089 


U163 


670 


229 


198 


195 


195 


187 


262 


Maroh 


3,038 


1,161 


670 


229 


216 


198 


197 


119 


249 


Vil 


3,049 


1,148 


670 


230 


219 


197 


215 


116 


254 


May 


8,066 


1,127 


675 


229 


218 


198 


224 


119 


276 


June 


3,006 


1,097 


671 


229 


211 


200 


207 


117 


2T4 


July 


2,898 


1,028 


641 


222 


206 


201 


229 


108 


265 


August 


2,826 


1,014 


621 


219 


194 


195 


218 


108 


259 


Septenber 


2,827 


1,017 


629 


219 


192 


194 


205 


112 


281 


Ootober 


2,806 


996 


635 


221 


194 


191 


191 


119 


261 


loreaber 


2,889 


944 


627 


214 


192 


188 


170 


111 


245 


Deoenber 


2,682 


925 


640 


209 


192 


192 


160 


108 


226 


1981 Total, Tear 28,696 


9,971 


6,806 


2,318 


2,167 


2,125 


1,610 


997 


2,117 


January 


2,636 


879 


600 


204 


192 


182 


161 


99 


218 


February 


2,638 


908 


594 


203 


184 


185 


150 


99 


217 


Maroh 


2,646 


918 


697 


202 


197 


186 


142 


92 


218 


April 


2,633 


898 


590 


202 


199 


181 


154 


87 


222 


May 


2,812 


886 


886 


201 


198 


179 


152 


84 


281 


June 


2,463 


850 


684 


188 


186 


180 


145 


79 


281 


July 


2,573 


818 


869 


194 


182 


177 


145 


75 


226 


August 


2,810 


812 


840 


188 


170 


176 


183 


75 


219 


8epteaber 


2,263 


788 


540 


188 


166' 


172 


118 


76 


21T 


Ootober 


2,284 


764 


640 


188 


184 


170 


112 


82 


219 


HoreabeX 
Deoenber 


2,187 


781 


888 


1T9 


182 


171 


105 


TT 


206 


1,132 


724 


840 


ITS 


182 


170 


98 


76 


194 










(Cent toned) 




s 


1858 





29, 



TABLE IV (Continued) 

HSA Labor Income Paid Oat, for Chief Industrial 

D iris ions, by Months, 1929-1936 

(Millions of dollars) 





Total 










Division 








Tear and 


Manu- 




HSA 

Serriee 


Fi- 
nanoe 


Publio 


Con- 




Miscel- 


Month 


lUvax 


fact- 
uring 


Trade 


Dtil- 
ities?/ 


struo- . 
tion*/ 


Mining 


laneous 

2/ 


1932 Total, Tear 21,245 


7,076 


5,268 


1,783 


1,856 


1,791 


761 


674 


2,054 


January 


2,018 


681 


495 


170 


175 


165 


84 


66 


184 


February 


1,982 


685 


479 


164 


167 


165 


77 


65 


182 


Maroh 


1,946 


666 


474 


160 


170 


161 


71 


64 


180 


April 


1,876 


650 


462 


158 


170 


155 


65 


60 


178 


May 


1,839 


600 


455 


157 


173 


155 


66 


56 


177 


June 


1,747 


568 


434 


150 


161 


152 


63 


48 


171 


July 


1,661 


554 


415 


142 


156 


147 


62 


44 


161 


August 


1,628 


556 


400 


136 


146 


145 


57 


47 


163 


September 


1,645 


561 


407 


137 


158 


159 


57 


51 


165 


October 


1,679 


561 


415 


140 


137 


139 


55 


60 


172 


Voreaber 


1,629 


540 


408 


135 


184 


187 


52 


56 


167 


December 


1,595 


624 


414 


134 


151 


137 


42 


57 


154 


1983 Total, Tear 


19,898 


7,118 


4,655 


1,593 


1,681 


1,623 


625 


676 


1,965 


January 


1,550 


612 


387 


150 


153 


137 


42 


52 


152 


February 


1,581 


518 


566 


128 


186 


137 


41 


56 


149 


Mareh 


1,487 


492 


550 


125 


142 


137 


45 


51 


146 


April 


1,509 


608 


361 


127 


139 


134 


49 


45 


146 


«*y 


1,571 


541 


562 


129 


143 


135 


54 


45 


162 


June 


1,627 


582 


366 


132 


145 


183 


55 


48 


166 


July 


1,664 


614 


366 


130 


145 


133 


67 


52 


168 


August 


1,748 


664 


387 


133 


137 


134 


66 


60 


173 


September 


1,788 


686 


406 


139 


188 


132 


68 


65 


179 


Oeteber 


1,846 


688 


428 


142 


185 


138 


67 


67 


181 


lereaber 


1,716 


657 


422 


158 


140 


136 


55 


67 


171 


Deeember 


1,786 


651 


436 


140 


148 


187 


45 


67 


163 


1984 Total, Tear 


22,791 


8,620 


6,104 


1,867 


1,767 


1,737 


709 


869 


2,118 


January 


1.765 


646 


411 


142 


148 


139 


45 


73 


159 


February 


1,618 


701 


412 


147 


141 


139 


46 


73 


159 


Mareh 


1,886 


734 


419 


151 


142 


143 


48 


80 


168 


April 


1,952 


755 


428 


158 


152 


143 


55 


70 


171 


May 


1,961 


766 


428 


161 


154 


145 


58 


74 


185 


June 


1,949 


759 


427 


161 


149 


146 


65 


73 


190 


July 


1,892 


708 


425 


159 


150 


147 


62 


68 


180 


August 


1,902 


725 


413 


166 


145 


149 


66 


68 


182 


September 


1,875 


689 


425 


158 


140 


146 


66 


69 


182 


Oeteber 


1,940 


717 


455 


160 


148 


149 


70 


74 


189 


lereaber 


1,916 


710 


482 


157 


147 


146 


70 


74 


180 


December 


1,958 


747 


455 


167 


161 


146 


68 


73 


173 



(Continued) 



9858 



30. 



TABLE IV (Concluded) 

MBA Labor Income Paid Out, for Chief Industrial 
Divisions, by Months, 1929-1935 
(Millions of dollars) 







Total 








Division 








Year and 




















Month 






Manu- 
fact- 


Trade 


NRA 


Fi- 


Publio 
Util- ; 


Con- 
strue- , 


Mining 


Miscel- 








uring 




Service 


nanoe 


ities±/ tion£/ 




laneous 


1935 Total, 6 


mos ._/ 


12,168 


4,782 


2,578 


947 


988 


891 


415 


442 


1,125 


January- 




1,948 


760 


422 


155 


156 


148 


58 


74 


175 


February 




2,008 


803 


422 


155 


163 


148 


58 


79 


180 


March 




2,043 


818 


428 


15b 


170 


149 


64 


75 


183 


April 




2,056 


819 


437 


160 


166 


148 


74 


65 


187 


May 




2,058 


800 


434 


160 


166 


149 


81 


68 


200 


June 




2,057 


782 


435 


161 


167 


149 


82 


81 


200 


July 




2,027 


777 


426 


lbl 


177 


150 


84 


58 


194 


August 




2,064 


816 


423 


157 


162 


150 


93 


63 


200 


September 






897 


442 




166* 


150 


92 


74 




October 






867 


445 






151 


94 


83 




November 






864 


446 






149 


89 


74 




December 























Sources: Estimated from data taken from publications of the iiureau of Agricultural 
Economics; Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce; federal Reserve aoard; 
Interstate Commerce Commission; bureau of ljabor Statistics; xreasury Depart- 
ment; war Department; F. I 1 .'. Dodge Corporation; National education Association; 
Real estate Analyst Company. A few of the base series are from unpublished 
material. For further information, see above, "Sources and Methods," p. 1-14. 

a/ Includes sight-seeing busses, common-carrier busses, and motor trucks. 

b/ Excludes I'orce Construction. 

c/ Includes fishing, harbor craft, hand trades, water companies, other public 

utility and finance not listed under main groups, and "nature of business not 
given" industries. 

d/ 1933 and 1934 figures are based on preliminary annual estimates. 1935 figures 
are preliminary and subject to revision when data for the complete year become 
available . 



9858 



TABLE V 



31 



Non-NBA Labor Income Paid Out, for Chief Industrial 

Divisions, by Months, 1929-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 









Division 




Year and 


Total 


















Month 




Government f/ 


Professional 


Railroads £/ Ag 








and Domestic 


;rioulture£/ 








Service 






1929 Total, Year 


13,280 


5,385 


3,294 


3,286 


1,315 


January 


1,069 


471 


260 


259 


79 


February 


1,076 


471 


268 


270 


67 


March 


1,084 


472 


269 


263 


80 


April 


1,114 


472 


271 


272 


99 


May 


1,134 


473 


274 


274 


113 


June 


1,115 


439 


274 


279 


123 


July 


1,030 


340 


267 


279 


144 


August 


1,027 


340 


275 


285 


127 


September 


1,143 


452 


284 


282 


125 


Ootober 


1,225 


483 


298 


290 


154 


November 


1,155 


486 


279 


274 


116 


December 


1,108 


486 


275 


259 


88 


1950 Total, Year 


12,622 


5,593 


3,006 


2,909 


1,114 


January 


1,063 


488 


263 


265 


77 


February 


1,074 


488 


263 


259 


64 


March 


1,079 


491 


258 


260 


80 


April 


1,091 


491 


261 


257 


82 


May 


1,106 


491 


262 


252 


101 


June 


1,078 


457 


257 


248 


116 


July 


956 


350 


241 


240 


125 


August 


932 


350 


237 


239 


106 


September 


1,054 


469 


245 


238 


102 


Ootober 


1,098 


506 


249 


236 


107 


November 


1,053 


506 


238 


222 


87 


December 


1,018 


506 


232 


213 


67 


1931 Total, Year 


11,487 


5,748 


2,539 


2,390 


810 


January 


997 


507 


224 


210 


56 


February 


995 


507 


224 


214 


50 


March 


1,001 


508 


223 


208 


62 


April 


1,011 


509 


224 


213 


65 


May 


1,012 


512 


222 


206 


72 


June 


973 


471 


217 


208 


77 


July 


853 


359 


205 


203 


86 


August 


832 


359 


198 


196 


79 


September 


949 


480 


200 


194 


75 


Ootober 


984 


511 


206 


190 


78 


November 


955 


513 


201 


177 


64 


Dfroember 


925 


612 


196 


171 


46 



(Continued) 



9858 



TABLE V (Continued) 

Non-NRA Labor Income Paid Out, for Chief Industrial 

Divisions, by Months, 1929-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 



32, 









Division 




Ygilj* and 


Total 










J. Q Cfc.1. i*l|ll 










Month 




Government*/ 


Professional 


. / 


t 






and Domestic 


Railroads*/ 


Agriculture®/ 








Service 






1932 Total, Tear 


9,926 


5,636 


2,027 


1,738 


525 


January 


901 


510 


189 


165 


37 


February 


885 


509 


186 


156 


34 


Maroh 


883 


508 


183 


155 


37 


April 


882 


508 


179 


163 


42 


May 


878 


507 


177 


146 


48 


June 


827 


464 


170 


145 


48 


July 


700 


353 


156 


136 


65 


August 


684 


351 


152 


134 


47 


September 


804 


463 


156 


137 


48 


October 


851 


493 


165 


139 


54 


November 


827 


487 


160 


138 


42 


December 


804 


483 


154 


134 


53 


1933 Total, Tear d/ 


9,067 


5,131 


1,840 


1,610 


486 


January 


788 


477 


150 


130 


31 


February 


782 


471 


147 


132 


32 


Maroh 


765 


469 


142 


124 


30 


April 


766 


463 


144 


124 


55 


May 


780 


461 


150 


128 


41 


June 


758 


423 


165 


134 


46 


July 


642 


309 


149 


135 


49 


August 


636 


300 


151 


142 


43 


September 


766 


416 


160 


144 


47 


October 


814 


447 


169 


142 


56 


November 


797 


448 


164 


141 


44 


December 


773 


448 


159 


134 


32 


1934 Total, Tear V 


9,528 


5,261 


2,003 


1,744 


520 


January 


769 


446 


157 


137 


29 


February 


787 


450 


161 


145 


31 


Maroh 


797 


455 


165 


145 


32 


April 


810 


456 


168 


145 


41 


May 


822 


463 


170 


146 


45 


June 


799 


429 


170 


150 


50 


July 


692 


327 


160 


147 


68 


August 


702 


334 


163 


150 


65 


September 


810 


446 


167 


148 


49 


October 


875 


493 


178 


149 


55 


November 


841 


482 


172 


144 


43 


December 


824 


480 


172 


138 


34 



(Continued) 



9858 






33, 



TABLE V (Concluded) 

Non-NRA Labor Income Paid Out, for Chief Industrial 

Divisions, by Months, 1929-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 



Year and 
Month 



Division 



Total 



Professional . . 

Government^/ and Domestic Railroads"/ Agriculture^/ 
Service 



1935 Total, 6 mos.i' 5,156 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

Deoember 



2,926 



1,077 



912 



832 


481 


173 


146 


841 


480 


177 


152 


848 


486 


179 


147 


876 


501 


183 


152 


897 


507 


184 


159 


865 


471 


181 


159 


755 


367 


172 


157 


769 


376 


178 


158 




497 




158 




543 








537 







241 

32 
32 
36 
40 

47 
54 
59 
57 
57 
59 



Sources: Estimated from data taken from publications of the Bureau of Agricultural 
Economics; Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce; Federal Reserve Board; 
Interstate Commerce Commission; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Treasury 
Department; War Department; F. '.','. Dodge Corporation; National Education 
Association; Real estate Analyst Company. A few of the base series are 
from unpublished material. For further information, see above, "Sources 
and Methods, " p. 14-16. 

a/ Includes Public education labor income, and excludes work relief payrolls. 

b/ Includes Pullman and Express labor income. 

0/ uired farm labor income only. Includes oash income plus allowance for board. 

dy 1933 and 1934 figures are based on preliminary annual estimates. 1935 

figures are preliminary and subject to revision when data for the complete 
year become availaole* 



9858 



34. 



TABLE VI 

Total Labor Income Paid Out and Non-KRA Labor Income Paid Out, 

Inoluding and Exo lading Work Relief Payments , 

and Work Belief Payments, •/ by Months, 1933-1955 

(Millions of dollars) 



Tear and 
Month 



Total Labor 

Income 
(Including 
Work Relief) 



Total Labor 

Ineome 
(Excluding 
Work Relief) 



Hon-HRA 

Labor 

Income 

(Inoluding 



Non-HRA 

T Labor Work > 

(Excluding 



Work Relief) Work Relief) 



1953 Total, Year */ 29*602 28,965 

January 2,347 2,559 

February 2,322 2,314 

March 2,261 2,255 

April 2,275 2,266 

May 2,404 2,352 

June 2,454 2,386 

July 2,379 2,307 

August 2,456 2,380 

September 2,637 2,565 

Ootober 2,740 2,660 

November 2,680 2,584 

Deoember 2,647 . 2,559 

1934 Total, Tear */ 53,713 32,319 

January 2,822 2,532 

February 2,796 2,605 

March 2,837 2,682 

April 2,867 2,742 

May 2,855 2,785 

Jane 2,815 2,748 

July 2,659 2,584 

August 2,688 2,604 

September 2,763 2,685 

Ootober 2,895 2,816 

Horember 2,847 2,757 

Deoember 2,869 2,782 



9,704 

796 
790 
775 
775 
832 
826 
714 
712 
838 
894 
893 
861 

10,922 

1,059 
978 
952 
935 
894 
866 
767 
786 
888 
955 
931 
911 



9,067 



637 



788 


8 


782 


8 


765 


8 


766 


9 


780 


62 


768 


68 


642 


72 


636 


76 


766 


72 


814 


80 


797 


96 


773 


88 


,528 


1,594 


769 


290 


787 


191 


797 


155 


810 


125 


822 


72 


799 


67 


692 


75 


702 


84 


810 


78 


875 


80 


841 


90 


824 


87 



(Continued) 



9858 



35. 



TABLE VI (Concluded) 

Total labor Inoone Paid Out and Non-KRA Labor Income Paid Out, 

Including and Excluding Work Relief Payments, 

and Work Relief Payments, */ by Months, 1933-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 



Tear and 
Month 



Total Labor 

Income 
(Including 
Work Relief) 



Total Labor 

Income 
(Excluding 
Work Relief) 



Hon-NRA 


Hon-NRA 


Labor 


Labor 


Income 


Income 


(Including 


(Excluding 



Work 
Relief V 



Work Relief) Work Relief) 



1956 Total, 6 mos. */ 17,873 

January 2,880 

February 2,939 

Mar oh 2,978 

April 5,021 

May 5,050 

June 5,005 

July 2,867 

August 2,904 
September 
October 
November 
December 



17,524 



5,706 



5,166 



549 



2,780 


932 


852 


100 


2,849 


951 


841 


90 


2,890 


956 


847 


88 


2,931 


965 


875 


90 


2,964 


995 


897 


96 


2,920 


949 


864 


85 


2,781 


840 


754 


86 


2,832 


840 


768 


72 



Sources: Estimated from data taken from publications of the Bureau of Agricultural 
Eoonomios; Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce; Federal Reserve Board; 
Interstate Commerce Commission; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Treasury 
Department; War Department; F. W. Dodge Corporation; National Eduoation 
Association; Real Estate Analyst Company. A few of the base series are 
from unpublished material. For further information, see above, "Sources 
and Methods," p. 1-16. 

a/ Estimated from the Bureau of Labor Statistics data on C.W.A., C.C.C., and 

F.E.R.A. Emergenoy-Work payrolls plus F.E.R«A. data on administrative pay- 
rolls of state, county, and other local public relief administrative agencies. 
Duplications of these payrolls with those reported under government were 
e liminated . 

b/ 1955 and 1954 figures are based on preliminary annual estimates. 1935 

figures are preliminary and subject to revision when data for the complete 
year become available* 



98*8 



TABLE VII 

Wages and Salaries In all Manufacturing Industries */ 

and Per Cent Wages and Salaries are of Total Manufacturing 

Labor Income Paid Out, by Months* 1929-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 



36. 



Tear and 




Wages by 


Salaries 


Total 










Month 




Amount 


Per Gent 
of Total 


Amount 


Per Cent 
of Total 


1929 Total, Tear 


14,850 


10,870 


75.2 


5,980 


28.8 


January 


1,081 


852 


78.8 


229 


21.2 


February 


1,240 


909 


75.5 


551 


26.7 


March 


1,260 


927 


75.6 


555 


26.4 


April 


1,271 


955 


75.6 


556 


26.4 


May 


1.2T6 


958 


75.5 


558 


26.6 


Jane 


1,264 


924 


75.1 


540 


26.9 


July 


1,233 


891 


72.5 


542 


27.7 


August 


1,274 


930 


75.0 


544 


27.0 


September 


1,285 


959 


75.1 


846 


26.9 


October 


1,279 


952 


72.9 


547 


27.1 


lerember 


1,209 


861 


71.2 


548 


28 .8 


December 


1,178 


832 


70.6 


546 


29.4 


1980 Total, Tear 


12,761 


8,857 


69.5 


5,924 


50,7 


January 


1,141 


796 


69.7 


546 


50.5 


February 


1,163 


819 


70.4 


344 


29.6 


March 


1,161 


820 


70.6 


341 


29.4 


-April 


1,148 


810 


70.6 


558 


29.4 


May 


1,127 


791 


70.2 


556 


29.8 


Jane 


1,097 


766 


69.8 


551 


50.2 


July 


1,028 


701 


68.2 


527 


51.8 


August 


1,014 


692 


68.2 


522 


51.8 


September 


1,017 


700 


69.8 


517 


51.2 


October 


996 


684 


68.7 


512 


51.5 


November 


944 


657 


67.6 


507 


52.5 


December 


928 


622 


67.2 


305 


52.8 


1931 Total, Tear 


9,971 


6,699 


67.2 


8,272 


52.8 


January 


879 


679 


66.9 


500 


54.1 


February 


908 


615 


67.5 


295 


52.6 


March 


913 


624 


68.5 


289 


Sl.T 


April 


898 


614 


68.4 


284 


51.6 


May 


886 


607 


68.6 


279 


51.5 


June 


860 


676 


67.8 


274 


52.2 


July 


818 


548 


67.0 


270 


55.0 


August 


812 


646 


67.2 


266 


52.8 


September 


788 


526 


66.8 


262 


55.2 


October 


764 


508 


66.5 


256 


55.6 


lorcmber 


731 


480 


66.7 


251 


54.5 


December 


724 


478 


66.0 


246 


54.0 






(Continued) 







985$ 



TABLE VII (Continued) 

Wages and Salaries in all Manufacturing Industries £./ 

and Per Cent Wages and Salaries are of Total Manufacturing 

Labor Inoame Paid Out, by Months, 1929-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 



37. 



Tear and 
Month 




Wages b/ 


Salaries 


Total 


Amount 


Per Cent 
of Total 


Amount 


Per Cent 
of Total 


1932 Total, Tear 


7,076 


4,659 


66.6 


2,437 


54.4 


January 


681 


446 


65.5 


235 


34.5 


February 


685 


457 


66.7 


228 


33.3 


March 


666 


444 


66.7 


222 


33.3 


April 


6S0 


415 


65.6 


217 


34.4 


May 


600 


390 


66.0 


210 


36.0 


June 


568 


564 


64.1 


204 


55.9 


July 


554 


356 


62.9 


198 


37.1 


August 


5S6 


543 


64.0 


193 


36.0 


September 


551 


363 


65.9 


188 


34.1 


October 


561 


377 


67.2 


184 


32,8 


Mereober 


540 


359 


66.5 


181 


33.5 


December 


524 


347 


66.2 


177 


35.8 


19SS Total, Tear 


•/ 7,113 


4,972 


69.9 


2,141 


50.1 


January 


512 


336 


65.6 


176 


54.4 


February 


518 


342 


66.0 


176 


34.0 


March 


492 


317 


64.4 


176 


35.6 


April 


508 


333 


65.6 


176 


34.4 


May 


541 


366 


67.7 


175 


32.3 


June 


582 


405 


69.6 


177 


50.4 


July 


614 


436 


71.0 


178 


29.0 


August 


664 


486 


73.0 


179 


27.0 


September 


686 


506 


73.6 


181 


26.4 


Oeteber 


688 


506 


73.5 


182 


26.6 


lerember 


667 


474 


72.1 


183 


27.9 


December 


651 


467 


71.7 


184 


28.3 


1934 Total, Tear 


S/ 6,620 


6,533 


73.6 


2,287 


26.5 


January 


646 


463 


71.7 


183 


28.5 


February 


701 


619 


74.0 


182 


26.0 


March 


754 


652 


75.2 


182 


24.8 


April 


766 


571 


76.6 


184 


24.4 


May 


756 


670 


76.4 


186 


24.6 




759 


660 


74.4 


189 


25.6 


July 


70S 


613 


75.0 


190 


27.0 


August 


725 


550 


73.3 


193 


26.7 


September 


689 


496 


71.8 


194 


28.2 


October 


717 


620 


72.6 


197 


27.5 


lorember 


710 


609 


71.7 


201 


28.3 


December 


747 


541 


72.4 


206 


27.6 






(Continued) 




&B58 



38. 



TABLE VII (Conoluded) 

Wages and Salaries in all Manufacturing Industries */ 

and Per Cent Wages and Salaries are of Total Manufacturing 

Labor Inoone Paid Out, by Months, 1929-1936 

(Millions of dollars) 



Tear and 
Month 



Total 



Wages */ 



Salaries 





Amount 


Per Cent 
of Total 


Amount 


Per Cent 
of Total 


782 


3,482 


72.8 


1,300 


27.2 


760 


549 


72.2 


211 


27.8 


SOS 


589 


73.3 


214 


26.7 


818 


602 


73.6 


216 


26.4 


819 


601 


73.4 


218 


26.6 


800 


580 


72.5 


220 


27.5 


782 


561 


71.7 


221 


28.3 


777 


564 


71.3 


223 


28.7 


816 


590 


72.5 


226 


27.7 


897 


666 


74.2 


231 


25.8 


867 


633 


73.0 


234 


27.0 


864 


627 


72.6 


237 


27.4 



1935 Total, 6 mos.f/ 4,782 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

Ootober 

November 

Dedember 



Sources : Annual figures supplied by the Division of Economic Research, 
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Monthly figures 
computed from total manufacturing payrolls reported in the 
Trend of Employment by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. For 
further information, see "Sources and Methods," p. 2. 

a/ Excludes railroad repair shops. 

b/ Iholudes pensions and compensation for injuries* 

c/ 1935 and 1934 figures are based on preliminary annual 

estimates. 1935 figures are preliminary and subjeot to 
revision when data for the complete year become available. 



9858 



TABLE VIII 39. 

Wholesale and Retail Trade Labor Income 

Paid Oat, by Months, 1929-1936 

(Millions of dollars) 



Tear and Total Retail Wholesale 

Month Trade Trade 

1929 Total, Tear 8,210 5,199 5,011 

January 659 416 245 

February 654 412 242 

Maroh 669 422 247 

April 667 422 245 

May 674 426 248 

Jane 680 433 247 

July 680 428 252 

August 681 430 251 

September 699 440 259 

October 705 447 258 

Horenber 703 447 256 

Deoenber 739 476 263 

1950 Total, Year 7,850 4,962 2,868 

January 683 452 251 

February 670 424 246 

Maroh 670 421 249 

April 670 425 245 

May 675 452 243 

June 671 425 246 

July 641 402 239 

August 621 388 233 

September 629 396 233 

Ootober 633 402 251 

■©▼ember 627 401 226 

Deoember 640 414 226 

1931 Total, Tear 6,806 4,336 2,470 

January 600 383 217 

February 594 576 219 

March 597 377 220 

April 690 380 210 

May 586 577 209 

June 584 377 207 

July 569 354 205 

August 540 338 202 

September 540 340 200 

Ootober 540 344 196 

Horenber 536 341 195 

Deoember 540 350 190 



9858 



TABLE Tin (Continued) 40, 

Wholesale and Retail Trade Labor Inoome 
Paid Out, by Months, 1929- 1956 
(Millions of dollars) 



Tear and . Retail Wholesale 

Month J0X * 1 Trade Trade 



193a Total, Year 5,258 5,»6 1,952 

January 496 515 180 

February 479 505 176 

March 474 301 ITS 

April 462 296 166 

May 455 287 168 

June 434 275 159 

Julf 415 260 155 

August 400 249 151 

September 407 256» 151 

October 415 262 153 

Horember 408 257 151 

December 414 265 149 

1933 Total, Tear •/ 4,655 2,923 1,712 

January 587 241 146 

February 566 228 138 

March 550 216 134 

April 361 229 132 

May 362 227 136 

June 366 231 135 

July 565 226 159 

August 387 248 144 

September 406 259 147 

Oetober 428 271 167 

November 422 270 152 

December 455 282 163 

1934 Total, Tear «/ 5,104 5,208 1,896 

January 411 260 151 

February 412 259 165 

March 419 263 156 

April 428 270 168 

May 428 271 157 

June 427 269 158 



July 



160 



August 413 256 167 

September 426 265 160 

October 455 271 162 

lorember «2 271 161 

December 453 290 165 



9858 



41. 

TABLE VIII (Concluded) 

Wholesale and fie tail Trade Labor Income 
Paid Oat. by Months. 1929-1936 
(Millions of dollars) 



Tear and <r«t«i Betail Wholesale 

Month IO ™ x Trade Trade 



1936 Total, 6 bob. •/' 2,578 1,605 



973 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

Jane 

July 

August 

September 

October 

lorember 

Daoember 



422 


262 


160 


422 


260 


162 


428 


264 


164 


4ST 


274 


165 


454 


272 


162 


4S6 


275 


162 


426 


264 


162 


425 


260 


165 


442 


273 


169 


445 


278 


167 


446 


278 


168 



Souroes: Animal figures supplied by the Dirision of Economic 
Besearoh, Bureau of Foreign and Domestio Oosmeroe. 
Monthly figures computed from data in the Trend of 
Employment , published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
For further information, see "Souroes and Methods," p. 11. 

a/ 1935 and 1954 figures are based on preliminary annual 

estimates. 1955 figures are preliminary and subject to 
revision when data for the complete year become available. 



9858 



tabu: k 



42. 



Labor Inoome Paid Out. in the Chief Branches of Finance, 
by Months, 1929-1935 
(Millions of dollars) 



Tear and 


Total 




Branch 




Month 












Insurance 


Banking 


Real Estate 


1929 Total, Tear 


2,628 


1,422 


662 


544 


January 


222 


123 


53 


46 


February 


213 


119 


54 


40 


March 


232 


126 


55 


51 


April 


237 


129 


54 


54 


May 


229 


125 


52 


52 


June 


227 


122 


54 


51 


July 


224 


122 


55 


47 


August 


209 


111 


54 


44 


September 


205 


108 


56 


41 


Ootober 


214 


108 


62 


44 


November 


207 


111 


57 


39 


December 


209 


118 


56 


36 


1930 Total, Tear 


2,438 


1,370 


646 


422 


January 


207 


121 


51 


35 


February 


198 


117 


50 


31 


March 


215 


124 


53 


38 


April 


219 


124 


54 


41 


May 


218 


124 


54 


40 


June 


211 


117 


54 


40 


July, 


206 


116 


55 


35 


August 


194 


106 


55 


33 


September 


192 


103 


56 


S3 


Ootober 


194 


103 


56 


35 


November 


192 


106 


55 


31 


December 


192 


109 


53 


30 


1931 Total, Tear 


2,157 


1,236 


592 


329 


January 


192 


111 


52 


29 


February 


184 


107 


52 


26 


Maroh 


197 


113 


53 


31 


April 


199 


113 


63 


S3 


May 


193 


112 


51 


30 


June 


136 


105 


51 


SO 


July 


182 


105 


50 


27 


August 


170 


95 


49 


26 


September 


166 


92 


49 


26 


Ootober 


164 


91 


46 


27 


November 


162 


94 


44 


24 


December 


162 


98 
(Continued) 


42 


22 



9858 



TABLE DC (Continued) 



43, 



Labor income Paid Out in the Chief Branches of Finance, 
by Months, 1929-1935 
(Millions of dollars) 









Branch 




Tear and 


Total 








Month 


Insurance 


Banking 


Real Estate 


1932 Total, Year 


1,856 


1,086 


516 


254 


January 


173 


106 


45 


25 


February 


167 


103 


45 


19 


March 


170 


101 


44 


25 


April 


170 


103 


43 


24 


May 


173 


104 


45 


24 


June 


161 


95 


43 


23 


July 


166 


93 


43 


20 


August 


146 


84 


43 


19 


September 


138 


78 


41 


19 


Ootober 


137 


73 


42 


22 


November 


134 


74 


41 


19 


* December 


131 


73 


41 


17 


1933 Total, Tear */ 


1,681 


994 


462 


225 


January 


138 


80 


40 


18 


February 


136 


81 


40 


15 


March 


142 


84 


39 


19 


April 


139 


81 


38 


20 


May 


143 


84 


38 


21 


June 


145 


86 


38 


21 


July 


146 


87 


38 


20 


August 


137 


81 


38 


18 


September 


133 


77 


38 


18 


Ootober 


135 


77 


38 


20 


Norember 


140 


84 


38 


18 


Deoember 


148 


92 


39 


17 


1934 Total, Tear «/ 


1,767 


1,041 


472 


254 


January 


148 


93 


59 


16 


February 


141 


86 


39 


16 


Maroh 


142 


82 


39 


21 


April 


152 


90 


39 


23 


May 


164 


93 


39 


22 


June 


149 


88 


39 


22 


July 


150 


90 


39 


21 


August 


145 


85 


39 


21 


September 


140 


80 


40 


20 


Ootober 


148 


82 


40 


26 


Norember 


147 


83 


40 


24 


Deoember 


151 


89 


40 


22 



(Continued) 



9858 



44. 



TABLE DC (Concluded) 

Labor Income Paid Oat in the Chief Branches of Finance, 
by Months, 1929-1935 
(Millions of dollars) 



Branch 



Tear and 






Total 










Month 








insurance 


Banking 


Real Estate 


1935 Total, 6 


mos. 


•/ 


988 


594 


240 




154 


January 

February 

March 






156 
163 
170 


91 
101 
103 


40 
40 
40 




25 
22 

27 


April 

May 

June 






166 
166 
167 


99 

99 

101 


40 
40 
40 




27 
27 
26 


July 
August 
September 
October 






177 
162 

166 


111 

96 
99 
96 


41 
41 
41 
40 




25 
25 
26 


November 
















December 
















Sources j Estimated from data taken from pubL 


Loations of 


the 


Bureau of 



Foreign and Domestic Commerce; Federal Reserve Board; Bureau 
of Labor Statistics; Treasury Department; national Industrial 
Conference Board; and the Real Estate Analyst Co. A few of the 
base series are confidential payroll figures of the Bureau of 
Labor Statistics. For further information, see "Souroes and 
Methods," p. 11-12. 

1933 and 1934 figures are based on preliminary annual 
estimates. 1935 figures are preliminary and subject to 
revision when data for the complete year become available* 



9858 






TABLE X 



45. 



Labor Income Paid Oat in the Chief Branches of the 

Utility Industries, by Months, 1929-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 



Tear and 
Month 






Branch 




Total 


Motor e/and 












Street 


•Communication 


5/ 


Eleotric Light 
and Power jy 






Railway b/ 






1929 Total, Tear 


2,400 


1,151 


716 




533 


January 


192 


95 


56 




41 


February 


190 


94 


55 




41 


Maroh 


196 


95 


59 




42 


April 


197 


95 


59 




43 


May 


199 


96 


59 




44 


June 


201 


97 


60 




44 


July 


20S 


98 


62 




45 


August 


205 


98 


61 




46 


September 


204 


97 


60 




47 


Ootober 


206 


96 


63 




47 


November 


201 


95 


60 




46 


December 


204 


95 


62 




47 


1930 Total, Tear 


2,348 


1,091 


726 




531 


January 


199 


94 


62 




43 


February 


195 


93 


60 




42 


Maroh 


198 


93 


62 




43 


April 


197 


93 


61 




43 


May 


198 


93 


61 




44 


June 


200 


93 


61 




46 


July 


201 


92 


65 




46 


August 


196 


90 


60 




45 


September 


194 


89 


60 




45 


October 


191 


87 


59 




45 


November 


188 


87 


57 




44 


Deceiber 


192 


87 


60 




45 


19S1 Total, Tear 


2,125 


996 


662 




477 


January 


182 


86 


66 




41 


February 


183 


86 


55 




42 


Maroh 


186 


86 


57 




42 


April 


181 


85 


66 




40 


May 


179 


84 


55 




40 


June 


180 


84 


56 




40 


July 


177 


83 


54 




40 


August 


176 


82 


54 




39 


September 


172 


81 


53 




38 


Ootober 


170 


80 


62 




38 


lereaber 


171 


81 


61 




39 


December 


170 


79 


63 




38 no _ f 



(Continued) 



TABLE X (Continued) 



46. 



Labor Inoome Paid Out in the Chief Branches of the 

Utility Industries, by Months, 1929-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 



Year and 
Month 



Total 



Branch 



Motor */and 

Street . Communication «/ Bleotric Light 
Railway b/ and Power */ 



1932 Total, Year 1,791 



666 



545 



580 



193S 



January 


165 


78 


51 


February 


163 


77 


51 


March 


161 


76 


50 


April 


153 


74 


46 


May 


155 


75 


46 


June 


152 


74 


46 


July 


147 


71 


45 


August 


143 


69 


44 


September 


139 


68 


42 


October 


139 


68 


42 


November 


137 


68 


41 


December 


137 


68 


41 


5 Total, Year 


•/ 1,623 


812 


471 


January 


137 


68 


41 


February 


137 


68 


41 


Maroh ' 


137 


67 


42 


April 


134 


67 


59 


May 


135 


67 


40 


June 


133 


67 


58 


July 


133 


67 


38 


August 


134 


68 


38 


September 


132 


67 


37 


October 


138 


69 


39 


November 


136 


68 


39 


December 


137 


69 


39 


\ total, Year 


•/ 1,737 


872 


495 


January 


139 


70 


40 


February 


139 


71 


39 


March 


143 


72 


41 


April 


143 


73 


40 


May 


145 


75 


41 


June 


145 


73 


41 


July 


147 


73 


42 


August 


149 


74 


43 


September 


146 


73 


42 


Ootober 


149 


74 


43 


November 


146 


73 


41 


December 


146 


73 


42 



36 
35 
35 
53 
34 
52 
51 
50 
29 
29 
28 
28 

540 

28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
28 
50 
29 
29 

570 

29 
29 
30 
50 
51 
51 
52 
52 
31 
52 
52 
51 



(Continued) 



9858 



TABLE X (Concluded) 



47. 



Labor Inoome Paid Out in the Chief Branches of the 
Utility Industries, by Months, 1929-1935 
. (Millions of dollars) 



Branch 



Tear and 
Month 



Total 



Motor f/and 

Street Communication 2/ 
Railway b/ 



Electric Light 
and Power £/ 



1935 Total, 6 mos. •/ 



891 



444 



January 
February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



148 


74 


148 


74 


149 


74 


148 


74 


149 


74 


149 


74 


150 


73 


150 


73 


150 


73 


151 


73 


149 


72 



253 

42 
42 
43 
42 
42 
42 
43 
43 
42 
43 
43 



194 

32 

32 
32 

32 
33 
S3 
34 
34 
35 
35 
34 



Sources j Annual figures supplied by the Division of Economic Research, Bureau of 
Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Monthly figures computed from data in 
the Trend of Employment, published by the Bureau of Labor statistics. 
For further information, see "Souroes and Methods," p. 10 and 13. 

ay Includes sight seeing buses, ooimion oarrier buses, and motor -rucks. 

by Includes maintenance as well as operation. 

e/ Includes telephone and telegraph. 

d/ Include ■ manufactured gas. 

•/ 1933 and 1934 figures are based on preliminary annual estimates. 1935 
figures are preliminary and subject to revision when data for the 
oomplete year become available. 



9858 



TABLE XI 



48. 



Wages and Salaries in the Contract Construction Industry, 

and Per Cent Wages and Salaries are of Total Construction 

Labor Income Paid Out, by Months, 1929-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 



Month and 
Year 



Total 



Wages */ 


Salaries 


Amount 


Per Cent 
of Total 


Amount 


Per Cent 
of Total 


2,265 


82.8 


472 


17.2 


175 


82.5 


37 


17.5 


169 


81.6 


38 


18.4 


179 


82.5 


38 


17.5 


172 


81.9 


38 


18.1 


192 


83.5 


38 


16.5 


191 


83.0 


39 


17.0 


192 


83.1 


39 


16.9 


205 


84.0 


39 


16.0 


208 


83.9 


40 


16.1 


212 


83.5 


42 


16.5 


195 


82.3 


42 


17.7 


175 


80.6 


42 


19.4 


1,941 


80.8 


462 


19.2 


154 


78.6 


42 


21.4 


154 


79.0 


41 


21.0 


156 


79.2 


41 


20.8 


174 


80.9 


41 


19.1 


186 


82.6 


39 


17.4 


168 


81.2 


39 


18.8 


190 


83.0 


39 


17.0 


178 


82.4 


38 


17.6 


166 


81.8 


37 


18.2 


155 


81.2 


36 


18.8 


135 


79.4 


35 


20.6 


126 


78.8 


34 


21.2 


1,281 


79.6 


329 


20.4 


128 


79.5 


33 


20.5 


118 


78.7 


32 


21.3 


111 


78.2 


31 


21.8 


124 


80.5 


30 


19.5 


123 


8Q.9 


29 


19.1 


117 


80.7 


28 


19.3 


117 


80.7 


28 


19.3 


106 


79.7 


27 


20.3 


92 


78.0 


26 


22.0 


88 


78.6 


24 


21.4 


83 


79.0 


22 


21.0 


74 


79.6 


19 


20.4 ^ 

9858 



1929 Total, Year 



W 



2,737 



January 


212 


February 


207 


March 


217 


April 


210 


May 


230 


June 


230 


July 


231 


August 


244 


September 


248 


Ootober 


254 


November 


237 


December 


217 


1930 Total, Year V 


2,403 


January 


196 


February 


195 


Mareh 


197 


April 


215 


May 


224 


June 


207 


July 


229 


August 


216 


September 


203 


Ootober 


191 


November 


170 


December 


160 


1931 Total, Year */ 


1,610 


January 


161 


February 


150 


March 


142 


April 


154 


May 


152 


June 


145 


July 


145 


August 


133 


September 


118 


Ootober 


112 


November 


105 


Deoember 


93 



(Continued) 



TABLE XI (Continued) 



49. 



Wages and Salaries In the Contraot Construction Industry, 

and Par Cant Wages and Salaries are of Total Construction 

Labor Income Paid Out, by Months, 1929-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 



Year and 
Month 



Total 



Wages •/ 



Amount Per Cea * 
of Total 



Salaries 


Amount 


Per Cent 




of Total 


176 


23.4 


18 


21.4 


17 


22.1 


16 


22.5 


16 


24.6 


15 


22.7 


14 


22.2 


14 


22.6 


14 


24.6 


13 


22.8 


13 


23.6 


13 


25.0 


13 


31.0 


140 


22.5 


12 


27.9 


12 


28.6 


12 


26.1 


12 


30.0 


11 


20.0 


11 


19.6 


11 


19.0 


11 


19.6 


• 12 


20.3 


12 


17.9 


12 


21.4 


12 


26.7 


148 


20.9 


12 


26.7 


12 


26.1 


12 


25.0 


12 


21.8 


12 


20.7 


12 


18.5 


12 


19.4 


12 


18.2 c 


12 


18.2 * 


13 


18.6 


13 


18.6 


14 


24.1 



1932 Total, Tear 

January 

February 

Maroh 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

Horember 

Deoember 

1933 Total, Tear 

January 

February 

Maroh 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

Horember 

Deoember 

1934 Total, Tear 

January 

February 

Maroh 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

Ootober 

November 

December 



y 



b/c/ 



£/ 



751 

84 
77 
71 
65 
66 
63 
62 
57 
57 
55 
52 
42 

623 

43 
42 
46 
40 
55 
56 
58 
56 
59 
67 
• 56 
45 

709 

46 

46 
48 
55 
58 
65 
62 
66 
66 
70 
70 
58 



575 



76.6 



66 


76.6 


60 


77.9 


55 


77.5 


49 


75.4 


51 


77.3 


49 


77.8 


48 


77.4 


43 


75.4 


44 


77.2 


42 


76.4 


39 


75.0 


29 


69.0 


:83 


77.5 


31 


72.1 


30 


71.4 


34 


73.9 


28 


70.0 


44 


80.0 


45 


80.4 


47 


81.0 


45 


80.4 


47 


79.7 


55 


82.1 


44 


78.6 


33 


73.3 


61 


79.1 


33 


73.3 


34 


73.9 


36 


75.0 


43 


78.2 


46 


79.3 


53 


81.5 


50 


80.6 


54 


81.8 


54 


81.8 


57 


81.4 


57 


81.4 


44 


75.9 



9858 



(Continued) 



50. 



TABLE XI (Concluded) 

Wages and Salaries in the Contract Construction Industry, 

and Per Cent Wages and Salaries are of Total Construction 

Labor Income Paid Out, by Months, 1929-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 



Year and 
Month 



Total 



Wages 



a/ 



Amount Per Ceat 
of Total 



Salaries 



Amount 



Per Cent 
of Total 



1935 Total, 6 mos. £> 



415 



331 



79.8 



84 



20.2 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



58 


44 


75.9 


14 


24.1 


58 


44 


75.9 


14 


24.1 


64 


50 


78.1 


14 


21.9 


74 


60 


81.1 


14 


18.9 


80 


66 


82.5 


14 


17.5 


81 


67 


82.7 


14 


17.3 


84 


69 


82.1 


15 


17.9 


93 


78 


83.9 


15 


16.1 


92 


77 


83.7 


15 


lb. 3 


94 


78 


83.0 


lb- 


17.0 


89 


73 


82.0 


lb- 


18.0 



Sources: Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, estimates of annual 
labor income ; the Census report on the Construction Industry ; 
The F. W. Dodge Corporation Reports; the Engineering Sews 
Record ; and the following publications of the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics : Building Construction , Trend of Employment , and 
Monthly Labor Review . For further information, see "Sources 
and Methods,™ p. 3-9. 

9l/ Includes compensation for injuries. 

b/ The seasonal variation for non-building publicly finanoed 

contract construction is assumed to be the same as for other 
types of contract construction. 

o/ 193S and 1934 figures are based on preliminary annual estimates, 

1935 figures are preliminary and subject to revision when data 
for the complete year become available. 



9858 



TABLE XII 

Total Wages Paid on Residential and Non-Residential 
Building Contract Construction Projects over $5,000, 
and All Construction Projects under $5,000, 
by Months, 1929-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 



51. 







Building Contract Projects 




Year and 


Total 




over $5, 


000 


All Projects . 
under $5,000 V 


Month 


















Non- 








Total 


Residential 


Residential 




1929 Total, Year 


2,266 


1,564 


655 


909 


702 


January 


178 


131 


64 


67 


47 


February 


175 


125 


56 


69 


50 


March 


185 


132 


56 


76 


53 


April 


176 


123 


56 


67 


53 


May 


194 


139 


60 


79 


55 


June 


192 


132 


59 


73 


60 


July 


193 


134 


59 


75 


59 


August 


203 


143 


58 


85 


60 


September 


206 


142 


59 


83 


64 


October 


208 


134 


51 


83 


74 


November 


189 


.115 


43 


72 


74 


December 


167 


114 


34 


80 


53 


1930 Total, Year 


1,581 


1,096 


384 


712 


485 


January 


130 


93 


35 


58 


37 


February 


128 


94 


30 


64 


34 


Mar oh 


129 


89 


29 


60 


40 


April 


144 


96 


33 


63 


48 


May 


153 


100 


34 


66 


53 


June 


135 


86 


35 


51 


49 


July 


157 


109 


36 


73 


48 


August 


145 


100 


31 


69 


45 


September 


133 


94 


29 


65 


39 


October 


124 


86 


31 


55 


38 


November 


106 


79 


33 


46 


27 


December 


97 


70 


28 


42 


27 


1931 Total, Year 


1,098 


715 


297 


416 


383 


January 


109 


72 


28 


44 


37 


February 


100 


64 


25 


39 


36 


March 


95 


61 


26 


35 


34 


April 


107 


67 


29 


38 


40 


May 


107 


69 


31 


38 


38 


June 


101 


66 


30 


36 


35 


July 


103 


65 


30 


35 


38 


August 


91 


56 


23 


33 


35 


September 


78 


51 


21 


30 


27 


Ootober 


75 


52 


21 


31 


23 9| 


November 


70 


48 


18 


30 


22 


Deoember 


62 


44 


15 


29 


18 



TABLE XII (Continued) 

Total Wages Paid on Residential and Non-Residential 
Building Contract Construction Projects over $5,000, 
and All Construction Projects under $5,000, 
by Months, 1929-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 



52, 







Building Contraot Projects 




Year and 
Month 


Total 




over 


$5,000 


All Projects 
under $5,000 */ 






Tfon- 






Total 


Residential Res ' i(i9ntial 




1932 Total, Year 


469 


298 


101 


197 


171 


January- 


56 


40 


14 


26 


16 


February 


51 


35 


11 


24 


16 


March 


46 


30 


10 


20 


16 


April 


40 


22 


8 


14 


18 


May 


42 


24 


8 


16 


18 


June 


40 


23 


8 


15 


17 


July 


39 


24 


8 


16 


15 


August 


34 


21 


7 


14 


13 


September 


35 


22 


7 


15 


13 


October 


34 


21 


7 


14 


13 


November 


31 


21 


7 


14 


10 


December 


21 


15 


6 


9 


6 


1933 Total, Year */ 


399 


227 


85 


142 


172 


January 


22 


15 


5 


10 


7 


February. 


21 


14 


4 


10 


7 


March 


26 


17 


5 


12 


9 


April 


30 


17 


6 


11 


13 


May 


36 


19 


7 


12 


17 


June 


37 


16 


7 


9 


21 


July 


39 


20 


9 


11 


19 


August 


37 


19 


6 


13 


18 


September 


40 


23 


10 


13 . 


17 


October 


48 


30 


10 


20 


18 


November 


36 


21 


9 


12 


15 


December 


27 


16 


7 


9 


11 


1934 Total, Year W 


501 


259 


84 


175 


242 


January 


26 


13 


6 


7 


13 


February 


28 


15 


5 


10 


13 


Maroh 


32 


18 


8 


10 


14 


April 


40 


23 


7 


16 


17 


May 


43 


21 


7 


14 


22 


June 


48 


24 


9 


15 


24 


July 


44 


21 


7 


14 


25 


August 


48 


25 


7 


18 


23 


September 


48 


26 


7 


19 


22 


Ostober 


52 


25 


7 


18 


27 

269858 


November 


52 


26 


7 


19 


December 


40 


22 


7 


15 


18 



53. 



TABLE XII (Concluded) 

Total Wages Paid on Residential and Non-Residential 
Building Contract Construction Projects over $5,000, 
and All Construction Projects under $5,000, 
by Months, 1929-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 



Year and 
Month 



Total 



Building Contract Projeots 
over $5,000 



Total Residential 



Non- 
Residential 



All Projects . 
under $5,000*/ 



1935 



> Total, 6 mos. 3/ 


291 


135 


54 


81 


January 


36 


20 


7 


13 


February 


38 


19 


6 


13 


March 


44 


19 


7 


12 


April 


54 


23 


9 


14 


May 


60 


27 


12 


15 


June 


59 


27 


13 


14 


July 


60 


27 


14 


13 


August 


71 


32 


16 


16 


September 


71 


34 


16 


18 


October 


72 


37 


18 


19 


November 


68 


37 


17 


20 


Deoember 











156 

16 
19 
25 
31 
33 
32 
33 
39 
37 
35 
31 



Sources; Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, estimates of annual labor income; 
the Census report on the Construction Industry ; The F. W. Dodge Cor- 
poration Reports; the Engineering News Record ; and Building Construction , 
and Monthly Labor Review , published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics . 
For further information, see "Sources and Methods," p. 3-8. 

a/ Includes force work as well as contract work, and engineering as well as 
building contraots. 

b/ 1933 and 1934 figures are based on preliminary annual estimates. 1935 
figures are preliminary and subject to revision when data for the 
complete year become available. 



9S58 



TABLE XIII 

Construction Contract Work and Force Work l/ 
Labor Income Paid Out, by Months, 1934-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 



54. 



Year and 
Month 



1934 Total, Tear ii> 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

Dedember 



b/ 



1935 Total, 6 mos 

January . 

February 

March 

•April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



.*/ 



Total 



1,040 



Contract Work 



709 



63 


45 


65 


46 


68 


48 


78 


55 


88 


58 


99 


65 


96 


62 


100 


66 


98 


66 


103 


70 


102 


70 


80 


58 


568 


415 


77 


58 


78 


58 


87 


64 


102 


74 


111 


80 


113 


81 


116 


84 


129 


93 


126 


92 



Force Work 



331 

18 
19 
20 
23 
30 
34 
34 
34 
32 
33 
32 
22 

153 

19 
20 
23 
28 
31 
32 
32 
36 
34 
32 



Sources j Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, estimates of 
annual labor income ; the Census report on the Con- 
struction Industry ; The F. W. Dodge Corporation Reports; 
the Engineering News Record ; and the following pub- 
lications of the Bureau of Labor Statistics; Building 
Construction , Trend of Employment, and Monthly Labor 
Review . For further information, see "Sources and 
Methods," p. 3-9. 

a/ A rough estimato based on the difference between total ,\q^q 
payrolls on non-building publicly finanoed construction, «J O O 
plus wages on all construction projects under $5,000, 
and Nathan's contract construction wages minus building 
contract construction projects over $5,000. 

b/ 1934 figures are based on preliminary annua J estimates. 

1935 figures are preliminary and subject to revision when 
data for the complete year become available. 



TABLE XIV 

Labor Income Paid Out in the Various Branches of 
Government, by Months, 1929-1935 

(Millions Of dollars) 



55. 











Branch 






Year and 


Total 
























Month 












Public 






Federal 


State 


County 


City 


Education 


1929 Total, Year 


5,385 


1,912 


362 


442 


1,112 


1,557 


January 


471 


158 


30 


36 


92 


155 


February 


471 


158 


30 


36 


92 


155 


March 


472 


158 


30 


37 


92 


155 


April 


472 


158 


30 


37 


92 


155 


May 


473 


159 


30 


37 


92 


155 


June 


439 


159 


30 


37 


92 


121 


July 


340 


160 


30 


37 


93 


20 


August 


340 


160 


30 


37 


93 


20 


September 


452 


160 


30 


37 


93 


132 


Ootober 


483 


160 


30 


37 


93 


163 


November 


486 


161 


31 


37 


94 


163 


December 


486 


161 


31 


37 


94 


163 


1930 Total, Year 


5,593 


1,968 


376 


454 


1,149 


1,646 


January 


488 


162 


31 


37 


95 


163 


February 


488 


162 


31 


37 


95 


163 


March 


491 


163 


31 


38 


96 


163 


April 


491 


163 


31 


38 


96 


163 


May 


491 


163 


31 


38 


96 


163 


June 


457 


163 


31 


38 


96 


129 


July 


350 


164 


31 


38 


96 


21 


August 


350 


164 


31 


38 


96 


21 


September 


469 


165 


32 


38 


96 


138 


October 


506 


166 


32 


38 


96 


174 


November 


506 


166 


32 


38 


96 


174 


December 


506 


167 


32 


38 


95 


174 


1931 Total, Year 


5,748 


2,070 


407 


449 


1,120 


1,702 


January 


507 


168 


33 


38 


94 


174 


February 


507 


168 


33 


38 


94 


174 


March 


508 


170 


33 


38 


93 


174 


April 


509 


171 


33 


38 


93 


174 


May 


512 


175 


34 


38 


93 


174 < 


June 


471 


174 


34 


37 


93 


133 


July 


359 


174 


34 


37 


93 


21 


August 


359 


174 


34 


37 


93 


21 


September 


480 


175 


34 


37 


93 


141 


October 


511 


174 


35 


37 


93 


172 


November 


513 


175 


35 


37 


94 


172 


December 


512 


174 


35 


37 


94 


172 



9858 



(Continued) 



TABLE XIV (Continued) 



56. 



Labor Income Paid Out in the Various Branches of 
Government, by Months, 1929-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 











Branch 






Ya&r and 


Total 












X 9 v*l <i *-JI J V* 












Month 












Public 






Federal 


State 


County 


City 


Education 


1932 Total, Year 


5,636 


"2,008 


418 


443 


1,101 


1,666 


January 


510 


172 


35 


37 


94 


172 


February- 


509 


171 


35 


37 


94 


172 


March 


508 


170 


35 


37 


94 


172 


April 


508 


170 


35 


37 


94 


172 


May. 


507 


169 


35 


37 


94 


172 


June 


464 


167 


35 


37 


94 


131 


July 


353 


168 


35 


37 


93 


20 


August 


351 


167 


35 


37 


92 


20 


September 


463 


166 


35 


37 


91 


134 


October 


493 


165 


35 


37 


89 


167 


November 


487 


162 


34 


37 


87 


167 


December 


483 


161 


34 


36 


85 


167 


1933 Total, Year ■/ 


5,131 


1,738 


408 


389 


962 


1,634 


January 


477 


158 


34 


35 


83 


167 


February 


471 


154 


34 


34 


82 


167 


March 


469 


154 


34 


33 


81 


167 


April 


463 


150 


34 


32 


80 


167 


May 


461 


148 


34 


32 


80 


167 


June 


423 


147 


34 


32 


79 


131 


July 


309 


144 


34 


32 


79 


20 


August 


300 


135 


34 


32 


79 


20 


September 


415 


135 


34 


31 


79 


136 


October 


447 


137 


34 


32 


80 


164 


November 


448 


138 


34 


32 


80 


164 


December 


448 


138 


34 


32 


80 


164 


1934 Total, Year •/ 


5,261 


1,859 


395 


397 


997 


1,613 


January 


446 


136 


33 


32 


81 


164 


February 


450 


140 


33 


32 


81 


164 


March 


455 


143 


33 


33 


82 


164 


April 


456 


144 


33 


33 


82 


164 


May 


463 


150 


33 


53 


83 


164 


June 


429 


156 


S3 


33 


83 


124 


July 


327 


158 


33 


33 


83 


20 


August 


334 


164 


33 


33 


84 


20 

O r*i m> 


September 


446 


162 


33 


35 


84 


iw&5 


October 


493 


177 


33 


34 


84 


165 


November 


482 


165 


33 


34 


85 


165 


December 


480 


164 


32 


34 


85 


165 



(Concluded) 



TABLE XIV (Conoludod) 

Labor Income Paid Out in the Various Branches of 
Government, by Months, 1929-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 



57. 



Tear and 
Month 



Total 



Branch 



Federal State County City- 



Public 
Education 



1835 Total, 6 mos. ■/ 2,926 



1,006 



210 



222 



534 



954 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



481 


162 


33 


35 


86 


165 


480 


161 


33 


35 


86 


165 


486 


164 


34 


36 


87 


165 


501 


171 


36 


38 


91 


165 


507 


174 


37 


39 


92 


165 


471 


174 


37 


39 


92 


129 


367 


176 


37 


40 


93 


21 


376 


180 


38 


41 


96 


21 


497 


182 


38 


41 


98 


138 


543 


190 


40 


44 


102 


167 


537 


187 


40 


43 


100 


167 
167 



Sources: Annual figures supplied by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
Division of Economic Research, Monthly figures computed from data in 
Bureau of Labor Statistics, Trend of Employment ; Treasury Department, 
Daily Treasury Statement ; Office of Education, Biennial Survey of 
Education ; and National Education Association, Research Bulletin , 
Vol. 10,~No. 2 . For further information, see above, "Sources and 
Methods," p. 15-16 . 

a/ 19S3 and 1934 figures are based on preliminary annual estimates. 

1935 figures are preliminary and subject to revision when data for 
the complete year become available. 



9858 



58. 



TABLE XV 



Labor Income Paid Out in the Chief Branches of the Transportation Industry 
for NRA and Non^NRA Groups, by Months, 1929-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 









NRA Trans portat 


ion 




Non-NRA Transportation 


Year and 


Total 














Steam 




Month 




Motorfi/ 
















and 




Pipe 






Railway 






Total 


Street 
Rail-, 
waysly 


Water 


Lines 


Air 


Total 


Rail- , 
road&S/ 


Express 


1929 Total, Year 


5,051 


1,765 


1,151 


553 


49 


12 


3,286 


3,171 


115 


January 


386 


127 


95 


27 


4 




259 


250 


9 


February 


396 


126 


94 


27 


4 




270 


261 


9 


March 


392 


129 


95 


29 


4 




263 


254 


9 


April 


411 


139 


95 


39 


4 




272 


ZQZ 


9 


May 


434 


160 


96 


59 


4 




274 


265 


9 


June 


441 


162 


97 


60 


4 




279 


269 


10 


July 


443 


164 


98 


61 


4 




279 


269 


10 


August 


448 


163 


98 


60 


4 




285 


275 


10 


September 


442 


160 


97 


58 


4 




282 


272 


10 


October 


448 


158 


96 


56 


5 




290 


280 


10 


November 


421 


147 


95 


47 


4 




274 


264 


10 


December 


389 


130 


95 


30 


4 




259 


249 


10 


1930 Total, Year 


4,578 


1,669 


1,091 


523 


43 


12 


2,909 


2,805 


104 


January 


383 


128 


94 


29 


4 




255 


246 


9 


February 


387 


128 


93 


30 


4 




259 


250 


9 


March 


379 


129 


93 


31 


4 




250 


241 


9 


April 


389 


132 


93 


34 


4 




257 


248 


9 


May 


405 


153 


93 


55 


4 




252 


243 


9 


June 


403 


155 


93 


57 


4 




248 


239 


9 


July 


395 


155 


92 


58 


4 




240 


231 


9 


August 


390 


151 


90 


56 


4 




239 


230 


9 


September 


384 


146 


89 


53 


3 




238 


230 


8 


October 


377 


141 


87 


50 


3 




256 


228 


8 


November 


354 


132 


87 


42 


2 




222 


214 


8 


December 


332 


119 


87 


28 


3 




213 


205 


8 


1931 Total, Year 


3,880 


1,490 


996 


439 


39 


16 


2,390 


2,299 


91 


January 


325 


115 


85 


27 


2 




210 


.202 


8 


February 


330 


116 


86 


27 


2 




214 


206 


8 


March 


326 


118 


86 


28 


3 




208 


200 


8 


April 


334 


121 


.85 


32 


3 




213 


205 


8 


May 


335 


129 


84 


40 


4 




206 


198 


8 


June 


341 


133 


84 


43 


4 


2 


208 


200 


8 


July 


339 


136 


83 


47 


4 


2 


203 


195 


8 


August 


330 


134 


82 


46 


4 


2 


196 


189 


7 


September 


325 


131 


81 


44 


4 


2 


194 


187 


7 


October 


317 


127 


80 


43 


3 


1 


190 


183 


7 


November 


297 


120 


81 


35 


3 


1 


177 


170 


7 


December 


281 


110 


79 


27 


3 


1 


171 


164 


985 ? 8 








(Continued) 









59. 



TABLE XV (Continued) 



Labor Income Paid Out in the Chief Branches of the Transportation Industry 

for NRA and Non-NRA Groups, by Months, 1929-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 









NRA Transportat 


ion 




Non-NRA Transportation 


Year and 

Month 


Total 


Total 


Motors/ 
and 

Street 
Rail- , 
way si/ 


Water 


Pipe 
Linew 


Air 


Total 


Steam 
Rail- . 
roads°/ 


Railway 
Express 


1932 Total, Year 


2,987 


1,249 


866 


339 


30 


14 


1,738 


1,670 


68 


January 


271 


106 


78 


25 


2 


1 


165 


158 


7 


February 


261 


105 


77 


25 


2 


1 


156 


150 


6 


March 


261 


106 


76 


26 


3 


1 


155 


149 


6 


April 


258 


105 


74 


27 


3 


1 


153 


147 


6 


May 


254 


108 


75 


29 


3 


1 


146 


140 


6 


June 


252 


107 


74 


29 


3 


1 


145 


139 


6 


July 


241 


105 


71 


30 


3 


1 


136 


130 


6 


August 


239 


105 


69 


31 


3 


2 


134 


129 


5 


September 


241 


104 


68 


32 


2 


2 


137 


132 


5 


October 


242 


103 


68 


32 


2 


1 


139 


134 


5 


November 


240 


102 


68 


31 


2 


1 


138 


133 


5 


December 


227 


93 


68 


22 


2 


1 


134 


129 


5 


1933 Total, YearV 


2,792 


1,182 


812 


325 


30 


15 


1,610 


1,551 


59 


January 


222 


92 


68 


21 


2 


1 


130 


125 


5 


February 


223 


91 


68 


20 


2 


1 


132 


127 


5 


March 


213 


89 


67 


19 


2 


1 


124 


119 


5 


April 


213 


89 


67 


19 


2 


1 


124 


119 


5 


May 


227 


99 


67 


28 


3 


1 


128 


123 


5 


June 


234 


100 


67 


29 


3 


1 


134 


129 


5 


July 


241 


106 


67 


34 


3 


2 


135 


131 


4 


August 


252 


110 


68 


37 


3 


2 


142 


137 


5 


September 


252 


108 


67 


36 


3 


2 


144 


139 


5 


Ootober 


248 


106 


69 


33 


3 


1 


142 


137 


5 


November 


239 


98 


68 


27 


2 


1 


141 


136 


5 


December 


228 


94 


69 


22 


2 


1 


134 


129 


5 


1934 Total, Year^/ 


3,026 


1,282 


872 


358 


35 


17 


1,744 


1,680 


64 


January 


230 


93 


70 


20 


2 


1 


137 


132 


5 


February 


236 


91 


71 


17 


2 


1 


145 


140 


5 


March 


243 


98 


72 


23 


2 


1 


145 


140 


5 


April 


246 


101 


73 


24 


3 


1 


145 


140 


5 


May 


260 


114 


73 


37 


3 


1 


146 


141 


5 


Jons 


269 


119 


73 


41 


3 


2 


150 


145 


5 


July 


263 


116 


73 


37 


4 


2 


147 


142 


5 


August 


267 


117 


74 


37 


4 


2 


150 


144 


6 


September 


261 


113 


73 


35 


3 


2 


148 


142 


6 


Ootober 


262 


113 


74 


34 


3 


2 


149 


143 


6 


November 


251 


107 


73 


30 


3 


1 


144 


138 


6 


December 


238 


100 


73 


23 


3 


1 


138 


133 


u'ico 



(Continued) 



60. 



TABLE XV (Concluded) 

Labor Income Paid Out in the Chief Branches of the Transportation Industry 
for NRA and Non-WRA Groups, by Months, 1929-1935 

(.Millions of dollars) 



Year and rotal 




UKA Transportat: 


Lon 




Won- NRA Transportation 


Month 




MotorS/ 
















Total 


and 
Street 
Hail-. 
ways~/ 


Water 


Pipe 
Lines 


Air 


Total 


Steam 
Rail- . 
roads£/ 


Railway 
Express 


















1935 Total, 6 mos.2/ 1,562 


650 


444 


176 


20 


10 


912 


882 


30 


January 247 


101 


74 


23 


3 


1 


146 


141 


5 


February 255 


103 


74 


25 


3 


1 


152 


147 


5 


March 251 


104 


74 


25 


3 


2 


147 


141 


6 


April 257 


105 


74 


26 


3 


2 


152 


146 


6 


May 276 


117 


74 


37 


4 


2 


159 


154 


5 


June 279 


120 


74 


40 


4 


2 


159 


153 


6 


July 278 


120 


73 


41 


4 


2 


157 


151 


6 


August 279 


121 


73 


42 


4 


2 


158 


152 


6 


September 278 


120 


73 


41 


4 


2 


158 


152 


6 


October 


120 


73 


41 


4 


2 








November 




72 


37 


4 










December 


















Sources: Bureau of Foreign and 


Domest: 


Lc Commerce, est: 


Lmates 


of annual lab 


or income 


, end 


the Survey of Current 


Business; Bureau of Labor Statistics, Trend of Empl 


oyment; 


Interstate Commerce C< 


Dnraiissn 
partmeni 


3n, Wage 


Statist: 


Lcs - Class I 


Steam 


Ka i lways 


in the 


United States; and De; 


b of 7/ar, 


Report 


of the 


uhief 


of cng 


ineers, U 


. S. 


Army, "ater-borne Commerce of the United States, Part II, 


Commercial Statistics. 


For rurther information, see 


above, 


"Souroei 


s and Methods, 


," p. 9 


-10, and 


14-15. 


a/ Includes sight -seeing 


busses 


, c ommon 


carrier 


busses 


, and motor trucks. 




b/ includes maintenance i 


is well 


as operation. 












o/ Includes Pullman companies. 
















d/ 1933 and 1934 figures 


are based on preliminary annual estimates. 


1935 figures 



are preliminary and subject to revision when data for the complete year become 
available. 



9858 



TABLE XVI 



61. 



Labor Income Paid Out in the Chief Service Industries 
for NEA and Non-NBA Groups, by Months, 1929-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 











NEA Service 




Non-NEA 


Year and 


Total 












Rpnriiw 


Month 


Total 


Persona 


Amusement 
£/ and Business 
Recreation*/ — ' 


Miscel- 
laneousfy 


Professional 

and 

Domestic 


1929 Total, Tear 


6,126 


2,832 


2,060 


381 


279 


112 


3,294 


January 


488 


228 


167 


30 


22 


9 


260 


February 


498 


230 


168 


31 


22 


9 


268 


Maroh 


502 


233 


170 


31 


23 


9 


269 


April 


508 


237 


174 


31 


23 


9 


271 


May 


511 


237 


174 


31 


23 


9 


274 


June 


511 


237 


174 


31 


23 


9 


274 


July 


502 


235 


172 


31 


23 


9 


267 


August 


509 


234 


170 


32 


23 


9 


275 


September 


527 


243 


176 


33 


24 


10 


284 


October 


543 


245 


176 


35 


24 


10 


298 


November 


517 


2S8 


171 


33 


24 


10 


279 


December 


510 


235 


168 


32 


25 


10 


275 


1930 Total, Year 


5,685 


2,679 


1,935 


367 


270 


107 


3,006 


January 


492 


229 


166 


31 


23 


9 


263 


February 


492 


229 


166 


31 


23 


9 


263 


Maroh 


487 


229 


166 


31 


23 


9 


258 


April 


491 


230 


167 


31 


23 


9 


261 


May 


491 


229 


166 


31 


23 


9 


262 


June 


486 


229 


165 


32 


23 


9 


257 


July 


468 


222 


161 


30 


22 


9 


241 


August 


456 


219 


158 


30 


22 


9 


237 


September 


464 


219 


159 


30 


22 


8 


245 


October 


470 


221 


159 


31 


22 


9 


249 


November 


452 


214 


153 


30 


22 


9 


238 


Deo ember 


441 


209 


149 


29 


22 


9 


232 


1931 Total, Year 


4,852 


2,313 


1,658 


322 


240 


93 


2,539 


Jasfcary 


428 


204 


147 


28 


21 


8 


224 


February 


427 


203 


146 


28 


21 


8 


224 


Maroh 


425 


202 


145 


28 


21 


8 


223 


April 


42b 


202 


145 


28 


21 


8 


224 


May 


423 


201 


144 


28 


21 


8 


222 


June 


415 


198 


142 


28 


20 


8 


217 


July 


399 


194 


140 


26 


20 


8 


205 


August 


386 


188 


135 


26 


19 


8 


198 


September 


386 


186 


133 


26 


19 


8 


200 


Ootober 


388 


183 


131 


26 


19 


7 


205 


November 


380 


179 


127 


26 


19 


7 


201 


December 


369 


173 


123 


24 


19 


7 


196 



(Continued) 



9S58 



TABLE XVI (Continued) 



62, 



Labor Income Paid Out in the Chief Service Industries 
for NRA and Non-NRA Groups, by Months, 1929-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 

















Non-NBA 


Year and m 








NRA Service 


» 




Service 


Month 


Amusement 
Total Personal^./ and Business 
RecreationS/ 


1<5 / Miscel-. 
laneousfy 


Professional 

and 

Domestic 


1932 Total, year 3 


,810 


1,783 


1,277 


247 


188 


71 


2,027 


January 


359 


170 


121 


24 


18 


7 


189 


February 


350 


164 


117 


23 


17 


7 


186 


March 


343 


160 


115 


22 


17 


6 


183 


April 


337 


158 


114 


21 


17 


6 


179 


May 


334 


157 


113 


21 


17 


6 


177 


June 


320 


150 


108 


20 


16 


6 


170 


July 


298 


142 


102 


19 


15 


6 


156 


August 


288 


136 


98 


19 


14 


5 


152 


September 


293 


137 


99 


19 


14 


5 


156 


October 


305 


140 


99 


20 


15 


6 


165 


November 


295 


135 


96 


20 


14 


5 


160 


December 


288 


134 


95 


19 


14 


6 


154 


.1933 Total, YearfL/3 


,433 


1,593 


1,115 


242 


174 


62 


1,840 


January 


280 


130 


92 


19 


14 


5 


150 


February 


275 


128 


90 


19 


14 


5 


147 


March 


267 


125 


87 


19 


14 


5 


142 


April 


271 


127 


89 


19 


14 


5 


144 


May 


279 


129 


90 


20 


14 


5 


150 


June 


287 


132 


93 


20 


14 


5 


155 


July 


279 


130 


91 


20 


14 


5 


149 


August 


284 


133 


93 


20 


15 


5 


151 


September 


299 


139 


98 


21 


15 


5 


160 


October 


311 


142 


99 


22 


15 


6 


169 


November 


302 


138 


96 


22 


15 


5 


164 


Deoember 


299 


140 


97 


21 


16 


6 


159 


1934 Total, xear£/3 


,870 


1,867 


1,345 


265 


189 


68 


2,003 


January 


299 


142 


101 


21 


15 


5 


157 


February 


308 


147 


105 


22 


15 


5 


161 


March 


316 


151 


109 


22 


15 


5 


165 


April 


326 


158 


114 


22 


16 


6 


168 


May 


331 


161 


117 


22 


16 


6 


170 


June 


331 


161 


117 


22 


16 


6 


170 


July 


319 


159 


116 


21 


16 


6 


160 


August 


319 


156 


114 


22 


15 


5 


163 


September 


325 


158 


114 


22 


16 


6 


167 


October 


338 


160 


115 


23 


16 


6 


178 


November 


329 


157 


112 


23 


16 


6 


172 


December 


329 


157 


111 


23 

( P.nTi-f.iniififi ^ 


17 


6 


172 

9858 



TABLE XVI (Concluded) 



63. 



Labor Income Paid Out in the Chief Service Industries 
for NRA and won-NRA Groups, by Months, 1929-1935 

(Millions of dollars) 



Year and 




Total 






NRA 


Service 








Non-NRA 
Service 


Month 


Total 


Persons 


Amusement , 
il2/ and Business^/. 
Recreation^/ 


Mis eel- , 
Laneous—/ 


Professional 

and 

Domestic 


1935 Total, 6 


mos^/ 


2,024 


947 


674 


140 




97 




36 




1,077 


January 




328 


155 


110 


23 




16 




6 




173 


February 




332 


155 


110 


23 




16 




6 




177 


March 




335 


156 


111 


23 




16 




6 




179 


April 




343 


160 


114 


24 




16 




6 




183 


May 




344 


160 


114 


24 




16 




6 




184 


June 




342 


161 


115 


23 




17 




6 




181 


July 




333 


161 


115 


23 




17 




6 




172 


August 




335 


157 


112 


23 




16 




6 




178 


September 
October 








112 
112 






16 




6 
6 






November 








111 










6 






December 


















6 







S...rces: Estimated from data taken from publications of the Bureau of Agricultural 
Economics; Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce; Federal Reserve Board; 
Interstate Commerce Commission; Bureau of Labor Statistics; Treasury Depart- 
ment; War Department; F. W. Dodge Corporation; National Education Association; 
National Industrial Conference Board; and the Real Estate Analyst Company. 
A few of the base series are from unpublished material. For further information, 
see above, "Sources and Methods," p. 13-15, 

a/ Includes hotels, power laundries, cleaning and dyeing establishments, and 
beauty and barber shops. 

b/ Includes theatres, motion picture production, radio broadcasting, bowling alleys, 
etc. 

c/ Includes independent private accounting businesses, Trade Associations, and 
uj-.ambers of Commerce. 

d/ Includes photography, undertaking and cemetery operation, social service and 
welfare agencies, and athletic and country clubs. 

e/ 1933 and 1934 figures are based on preliminary animal estimates. 1935 figures 
are preliminary and subject to revision when data for the complete ye&r become 
available. 



9853 



OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION 

THE DIVISION OF REVIEW 

THE WORK OF THE DIVISION OF REVIEW 

Executive Order No. 7075, dated June 15, 1935, established the Division of Review of the 
National Recovery Administration. The pertinent part of the Executive Order reads thus: 

The Division of Review shall assemble, analyze, and report upon the statistical 
information and records of experience of the operations of the various trades and 
industries heretofore subject to codes of fair competition, shall study the ef- 
fects of such codes upon trade, industrial and labor conditions in general, and 
other related matters, shall make available for the protection and promotion of 
the public interest an adequate review of the effects of the Administration of 
Title I of the National Industrial Recovery Act, and the principles and policies 
put into effect thereunder, and shall otherwise aid the President in carrying out 
his functions under the said Title. I hereby appoint Leon C. Marshall, Director of 
the Division of Review. 

The study sections set up in the Division of Review covered these areas: industry 
studies, foreign trade studies, labor studies, trade practice studies, statistical studies, 
legal studies, administration studies, miscellaneous studies, and the writing of code his- 
tories. The materials which were produced by these sections are indicated below. 

Except for the Code Histories, all items mentioned below are scheduled to be in mimeo- 
graphed form by April 1, 1936. 

THE CODE HISTORIES 

The Code Histories are documented accounts of the formation and administration of the 
codes. They contain the definition of the industry and the principal products thereof; the 
classes of members in the industry; the history of code formation including an account of the 
sponsoring organizations, the conferences, negotiations and hearings which were held, and 
the activities in connection with obtaining approval of the code; the history of the ad- 
ministration of the code, covering the organization and operation of the code authority, 
the difficulties encountered in administration, the extent of compliance or non-compliance, 
and the general success or lack of success of the code; and an analysis of the operation of 
code provisions dealing with wages, hours, trade practices, and other provisions. These 
and other matters are canvassed not only in terms of the materials to be found in the files, 
but also in terms of the experiences of the deputies and others concerned with code formation 
and administration. 

The Code Histories, (including histories of certain NRA units or agencies) are not 
mimeographed. They are to be turned over to the Department of Commerce in typewritten form. 
All told, approximately eight hundred and fifty (850) histories will be completed. This 
number includes all of the approved codes and some of the unapproved codes. (In Work Mate- 
rials No_^ 18, Contents of Code His to ries . will be found the outline which governed the 
preparation of Code Histories.) 



(In the case of all approved codes and also in the case of some codes not carried to 
final approval, there are in NRA files further materials on industries. Particularly worthy 
of mention are the Volumes I, II and III which constitute the material officially submitted 
to the President in support of the recommendation for approval of each code. These volumes 
9768—1 . 



-ii - 

set forth the origination of the codes, the sponsoring group, the evidence advanced to sup- 
port the proposal, the report of the Division of Research and Planning on the industry, the 
recommendations of the various Advisory Boards, certain types of official correspondence, 
the transcript of the formal hearing, and other pertinent matter. There is also much offi- 
cial information relating to amendments, interpretations, exemptions, and other rulings. The 
materials mentioned in this paragraph were of course not a part of the work of the Division 
of Review. ) 

THE WORK MATERIALS SERIES 

In the work of the Division of Review a considerable number of studies and compilations 
of data (other than those noted below in the Evidence Studies Series and the Statistical 
Material Series) have been made. These are listed below, grouped according to the char- 
acter of the material. (In Work Materials No . 17 . Tentative Outlines and Sum m aries of 
Studies in Pro cess , the materials are fully described) . 

I ndustry Studies 

Automobile Industry, An Economic Survey of 

Bituminous Coal Industry under Free Competition and Code Regulation, Ecnomic Survey cf 

Electrical Manufacturing Industry, The 

Fertilizer Industry, The 

Fishery Industry and the Fishery Codes 

Fishermen and Fishing Craft, Earnings of 

Foreign Trade under the National Industrial Recovery Act 

Part A - Competitive Position of the United States in International Trade 1927-29 through 

1934. 
Part B - Section 3 (e) of NIRA and its administration. 
Part C - Imports and Importing under NRA Codes. 
Part D - Exports and Exporting under NRA Codes. 

Forest Products Industries, Foreign Trade Study of the 

Iron and Steel Industry, The 

Knitting Industries, The 

Leather and Shoe Industries, The 

Lumber and Timber Products Industry, Economic Problems of the 

Men's Clothing Industry, The 

Millinery Industry, The 

Motion Picture Industry, The 

Migration of Industry, The: The Shift of Twenty-Five Needle Trades From New York State, 
1926 to 1934 

National Labor Income by Months, 1929-35 

Paper Industry, The 

Production, Prices, Employment and Payrolls in Industry, Agriculture and Railway Trans- 
portation, January 1923, to date 

Retail Trades Study, The 

Rubber Industry Study, The 

Textile Industry in the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, and Japan 

Textile Yarns and Fabrics 

Tobacco Industry, The 

Wholesale Trades Study, The 

Women's Neckwear and Scarf Industry, Financial and Labor Data on 

9768—2 






- 



• 



fess 



- iii - 

Women's Apparel Industry, Some Aspects of the 

T rade P ractic e Studies 

Commodities, Information Concerning: A Study of NRA and Related Experiences in Control 

Distribution, Manufacturers' Control of: Trade Practice Provisions in Selected NRA Codes 

Distributive Relations in the Asbestos Industry 

Design Piracy: The Problem and Its Treatment Under NRA Codes 

Electrical Mfg. Industry: Price Filing Study 

Fertilizer Industry: Price Filing Study 

Geographical Price Relations Under Codes of Fair Competition, Control of 

Minimum Price Regulation Under Codes of Fair Competition 

Multiple Basing Point System in the Lime Industry: Operation of the 

Price Control in the Coffee Industry 

Price Filing Under NRA Codes 

Production Control in the Ice Industry 

Production Control, Case Studies in 

Resale Price Maintenance Legislation in the United States 

Retail Price Cutting, Restriction of, with special Emphasis on The Drug Industry. 

Trade Practice Rules of The Federal Trade Commission (1914-193S): A classification for 

comparision with Trade Practice Provisions of NRA Codes. 

Labo r Studies 

Cap and Cloth Hat Industry, Commission Report on Wage Differentials in 

Earnings in Selected Manufacturing Industries, by States, 1933-35 

Employment, Payrolls, Hours, and Wages in 115 Selected Code Industries 1933-35 

Fur Manufacturing, Commission Report on Wages and Hours in 

Hours and Wages in American Industry 

Labor Program Under the National Industrial Recovery Act, The 

Part A. Introduction 

Part B. Control of Hours and Reemployment 

Part C. Control of Wages 

Part D. Control of Other Conditions of Employment 

Part E. Section 7(a) of the Recovery Act 
Materials in the Field of Industrial Relations 
PRA Census of Employment, June, October, 1933 
Puerto Rico Needlework, Homeworkers Survey 

Administrative Studies 

Administrative and Legal Aspects of Stays, Exemptions and Exceptions, Code Amendments, Con- 
ditional Orders of Approval 

Administrative Interpretations of NRA Codes 

Administrative Law and Procedure under the NIRA 

Agreements Under Sections 4(a) and 7(b) of the NIRA 

Approved Codes in Industry Groups, Classification of 

Basic Code, the — (Administrative Order X-61) 

Code Authorities and Their part in the Administration of the NIRA 
Part A. Introduction 
Part B. Nature, Composition and Organization of Code Authorities 

9768—3. 



- IV - 

Part C. Activities of the Code Authorities 

Part D. Code Authority Finances 

Part E. Summary and Evaluation 
Code Compliance Activities of the NRA 

Code Making Program of the NRA in the Territories, The 
Code Provisions and Related Subjects, Policy Statements Concerning 
Content of NIRA Administrative Legislation 

Part A. Executive and Administrative Orders 

Part B. Labor Provisions in the Codes 

Part C. Trade Practice Provisions in the Codes 

Part D. Administrative Provisions in the Codes 

Part E. Agreements under Sections 4(a) and 7(b) 

Part F. A Type Case: The Cotton Textile Code 
Labels Under NRA, A Study of 

Model Code and Model Provisions for Codes, Development of 

National Recovery Administration, The: A Review of its Organization and Activities 
NRA Insignia 

President's Reemployment Agreement, The 

President's Reemployment Agreement, Substitutions in Connection with the 
Prison Labor Problem under NRA and the Prison Compact, The 
Problems of Administration in the Overlapping of Code Definitions of Industries and Trades, 

Multiple Code Coverage, Classifying Individual Members of Industries and Trades 
Relationship of NRA to Government Contracts and Contracts Involving the Use of Government 

Funds 
Relationship of NRA with States and Municipalities 
Sheltsred Workshops Under NRA 
Uncodified Industries: A Study of Factors Limiting the Code Making Program 

Legal Studies 

Anti-Trust Laws and Unfair Competition 

Collective Bargaining Agreements, the Right of Individual Employees to Enforce 

Commerce Clause, Federal Regulation of the Employer-Employee Relationship Under the 

Delegation of Power, Certain Phases of the Principle of, with Reference to Federal Industrial 
Regulatory Legislation 

Enforcement, Extra-Judicial Methods of 

federal Regulation through the Joint Employment of the Power of Taxation and the Spending 
Power 

Government Contract Provisions as a Means of Establishing Proper Economic Standards, Legal 
Memorandum on Possibility of 

Industrial Relations in Australia, Regulation of 

Intrastate Activities Which so Affect Interstate Commerce as to Bring them Under the Com- 
merce Clause, Cases on 

Legislative Possibilities of the State Constitutions 

Post Office and Post Road Power — Can it be Used as a Means of Federal Industrial Regula- 
tion? 

State Recovery Legislation in Aid of Federal Recovery Legislation History and Analysis 

Tariff Rates to Secure Proper Standards of Wages and Hours, the Possibility of Variation in 

Trade Practices and the Anti-Trust Laws 

Treaty Making Power of the United States 

War Power, Can it be Used as a Means of Federal Regulation of Child Labor? 

9768—4. 



THE EVIDENCE STUDIES SERIES 

The Evidence Studies were originally undertaken to gather material for pending court 
cases. After the Schechter decision the project was continued in order to assemble data for 
use in connection with the studies of the Division of Review. The data are particularly 
concerned with the nature, size and operations of the industry; and with the relation of the 
industry to interstate commerce. The industries covered by the Evidence Studies account for 
more than one-half of the total number of workers under codes. The list of those studies 
follows: 



Automobile Manufacturing Industry 
Automotive Parts and Equipment Industry 
Baking Industry 

Boot and Shoe Manufacturing Industry 
Bottled Soft Drink Industry 
Builders' Supplies Industry 
Canning Industry 
Chemical Manufacturing Industry 
Cigar Manufacturing Industry 
Coat and Suit Industry 
Construction Industry 
Cotton Garment Industry 
Dress Manufacturing Industry 
Electrical Contracting Industry 
Electrical Manufacturing Industry 
Fabricated Metal Products Mfg. and Metal Fin- 
ishing and Metal Coating Industry 
Fishery Industry 
Furniture Manufacturing Industry 
General Contractors Industry 
Graphic Arts Industry 
Gray Iron Foundry Industry 
Hosiery Industry 

Infant's and Children's Wear Industry 
Iron and Steel Industry 



Leather Industry 

Lumber and Timber Products Industry 
Mason Contractors Industry 
Men's Clothing Industry 
Motion Picture Industry 
Motor Vehicle Retailing Trade 
Needlework Industry of Puerto Rico 
Painting and Paperhanging Industry 
Photo Engraving Industry 
Plumbing Contracting Industry 
Retail Lumber Industry 
Retail Trade Industry 
Retail Tire and Battery Trade Industry 
Rubber Manufacturing Industry 
Rubber Tire Manufacturing Industry 
Shipbuilding Industry 
Silk Textile Industry 
Structural Clay Products Industry 
Throwing Industry 
Trucking Industry 
Waste Materials Industry 
Wholesale and Retail Food Industry 
Wholesale Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Indus- 
try 
Wool Textile Industry 



THE STATISTICAL MATERIALS SERIES 



This series is supplementary to the Evidence Studies Series. The reports include data 
on establishments, firms, employment, payrolls, wages, hours, production capacities, ship- 
ments, sales, consumption, stocks, prices, material costs, failures, exports and imports. 
They also include notes on the principal qualifications that should be observed in using the 
data, the technical methods employed, and the applicability of the material to the study of 
the industries concerned. The following numbers appear in the series: 
9768—5. 



- VI - 

Asphalt Shingle and Roofing Industry Fertilizer Industry 
Business Furniture Funeral Supply Industry- 
Candy Manufacturing Industry Glass Container Industry 
Carpet and Rug Industry Ice Manufacturing Industry 
Cement Industry Knitted Outerwear Industry 
Cleaning and Dyeing Trade Paint, Varnish, ana Lacquer, Mfg. Industry 
Coffee Industry Plumbing Fixtures Industry 
Copper and Brass Mill Products Industry Rayon and Synthetic Yarn Producing Industry 
Cotton Textile Industry Salt Producing Industry 
Electrical Manufacturing Industry 

THE COVERAGE 

The original, and approved, plan of the Division of Review contemplated resources suf- 
ficient (a) to prepare some 1200 histories of codes and NRA units or agencies, (b) to con- 
solidate and index the NRA files containing some 40,000,000 pieces, (c) to engage in ex- 
tensive field work, (d) to secure much aid from established statistical agencies of govern- 
ment, (e) to assemble a considerable number of experts in various fields, (f) to conduct 
approximately 25% more studies than are listed above, and (g) to prepare a comprehensive 
summary report. 

Because of reductions made in personnel and in use of outside experts, limitation of 
access to field work and research agencies, and lack of jurisdiction over files, the pro- 
jected plan was necessarily curtailed. The most serious curtailments were the omission of 
the comprehensive summary report; the dropping of certain studies and the reduction in the 
coverage of other studies; and the abandonment of the consolidation and indexing of the 
files. Fortunately, there is reason to hope that the files may yet be carec" for under other 
auspices. 

Notwithstanding these limitations, if the files are ultimately consolidated and in- 
dexed the exploration of the NRA materials will have been sufficient to make them accessible 
and highly useful. They constitute the largest and richest single body of information 
concerning the problems and operations of industry ever assembled in any nation. 

L. C. Marshall, 
Director, Division of Review. 
9768—6.