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BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06317 377 5 



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^^\- 



OFFICE OF NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION 
DIVISION OF REVIEW 



CHILD LABOR CONTROL UNDER NRA 

By 

Solomon Barkin 



(A Section of Part D: Control of Other Conditions of Employment) 



WORK MATERIALS NO. 45 ' 
THE LABOR PROGRAM UNDER THE NIRA 



H 



<\c. ,\ 



Work Materials No. 45 falls into the following parts: 



Part A 
Part B 
Part C 
Part D 
Part E 



Introduction 

Control of Hours and Reemployment 

Control of Wages 

Control of Other Conditions of Employment 

Section 7 (a) of the Recovery Act 



LABOR STUDIES SECTION 
MARCH, 1936 



9791 



OFFICE OF NATIONAL RECOVERY ADLIIII STRATI ON 
DIVISION OF rJLVIEW 



CHILD LABOR CONTROL mDER NRA 
BY 
Solomon Barkin 



LABOR STUDIES SECTION 
i.:ARCK, 19 06 



^ 



FOiCWOHIl 

r.-ie stue^;,' of I'Cliild Labor Control Under NRA." vas prepared by 
lur. Solonon Saxkin of the Lr.bor Studies Section, It is one of a series 
of stxiJ.ies conducted by this Section on the atterapts to control, throu{rh 
the codes of fair conpetition, not only yages and hours of rork but 
also other conditions of enplojinent. 

Probably the n.ost outstanding'- and universally approved section of 
this part of the NKA. labor procran vas the re^^ulation of child labor. 
Effective regulation of labor conditions permitted the realization of 
the humanitarian coal of the climinrition of child labor. The study is 
an investigation of the adr.iinistration as '-ell as the effects of the 
provision. 

In the iDreparation of this material assistance was given by the 
Industrial Division of the Children's Bureau of the United States De- 
partment of Labor. 

In the Appendices are many valuable compilations of lists of 
hazardous occup?,tions \7hich vrill be of .jreat assistance in the develop- 
ment of such legislation either by States or the Federal Governj-ient. 
Tlie e.-rperience under the IIHA should be of value to all adLiinistrative 
agencies handling this problen. 

At the back of this report will be found a statement of the 
studies undertalcen by the Division of Review. 



L. C. Lar shall 
Director, Division of Review 



March 14, 19o6 



9731 ~^~ 



<d 



^ 



Lists of ■.;az,?.rdous Cccupaoions Approved vnd. AclmoAvl edged 
OJiQ. Reouired uy Code 



■:::iLD laboh cokthcl u::d32 k2a 

TABLE or Ca:T3TTS 



SU:.a.iARY iv 

I. Development of ITRA Policy 2 

A. ??A 2 

3. CI:Lild Labor aiid '.'azardous Occupations 5 

C. Exe-T'^tions to Persons Under IG Years of A^e 9 

1. Daily l>Iev;s"5aper Indiistry 9 

2. Retail Code Group 21 
II. Code Provisions on Cliild Labor 22 

III. Development :.f Definitions of "."azardous Occupations 27 

IV. Occupations Prol^ibited to lanors as .'azairdous 34 

v. Compliance v/it- Cliild Labor Provisions 35 

VI. Tlie Effect of Cl-iild Labor Provisions ' 38 

VII. Post NRA Child Labor Conditions 44 

VIII. Conclusion 44 



TABLES 

I. Dr:?jts of C.ild Labor Provisions - ITev/spaper Business 

Code 15-18 

II. Cliild Labor Provisions in yPA. Codes 24-25 

III. Lists of llazr.rdous Occupations Furnished by Labor 

Advisory Board to Code Authorities 30 

IV. Lists of Hazardous Occupations Acloiowledged or Approved 

by the Administration 52 



33 



-11- 
9791 



71. Cl.ild Lcibor Co;r'lr.lnts "by Industrial Grou.^s 37 

711. O.ild L.-.oor Cor...)l:..ints 'by 5t=?,tes 39 

A?P51Z)IX 

A. I.Iemo rpndi'un from Cl.i], ^ren'3 Bureau, U. 3. Departraent of 
Lator, re: Desirability of a ^.iniiTum A^:e of 13 in 
Hazardous Suplcyinents 47 

3. S"aimnary of Public rsarings (Kevsoaper Riblisliin,; Business 

Code) on September 22, 1953 51 

C. Llemo rcjiduTi froi/; G-eorije Buckley, Division AcLninic-trator 
to General llu^'^ii S. Jo±inson, Ac'siinistrator, re: Cl;.ild 
La.bor Provisi-ns for tlie Daily ".'evs"ia :er Publis-.ing 

Cede and t"..e 3-rayo-ic Arts Cede 52 

D. Jag^ested A'-ienc'-.ient to Article 7, Section 1, C'.Ae f-r 
the Daily llevirspa'Ter Publisl.inj Business, B.y tl:.e Code 
Autlicrity of t-ie Industry, IToveraber 12, 19o4 54 

S. (a) Letter fr~.M Code Autlicrity for tlie Daily ]!js\7S"7aper 

Publishing Business to All Assenting L.enbers 55 

(b) Letter frc.i the Secretary of Labor to the General 
Cc'CJisel of the l^ewspaper Code Authority 56 

(c) Heport of Special Co-i ittee Designated by the Code 
Authority to Ccnsider Sugge?tians for the Anend- 

nent of Article 7, 3ecti::n 1 of t"'.e Code 56 

r. Letter from S. i.I. 'Jillians, Secretary, Code Authority 
for the Dailj'' Nev/spaper Publishing Business to Jack B. 
Tate, Division Administrator 60 

G. Ana-lysis of the prescribed Occupations with dotations 
.as to the Industries v/hich included l!h.em in l!I".eir Lists 
and copies of the hazardous CccLVjation s for tl:e Indus- 
tries W:-ere such Lists were A'/oroved 61 



• 111- 



9791 



SUMIARY 

The regulation of child labor was first undertaken by HEA. 
in the cotton textile code largely at the request of groups interested 
in the elitiineition of child labor. It was reaffirmed in the President's 
Reem-Dlojonent Agreement. The -nrovisions of the latter Agreement may, 
in fact, be declared to have contained the essential outline of NRA 
policy on child labor. It established a sixteen year minimum and -oer- 
mitted an exemption for minors bet-reen the years of 14 and 16 in non- 
manuf r cturir^c; industries. Additions to nolicy included the adoTotion 
of the certificate sysi-em for identifying the ages of employees and the pre- 
scription of a higher a::,'e, usually 18 years for hazardotis employments. 
The effort to eliminate the exemption granted in non-mercantile indus- 
tries to persons under 16 years of age failed. 

The codes provided for the regiilation of child labor. The 
general minimum was 16 years, but 49 codes set higher minimum ages. Six- 
teen codes granted exemptions from the minimum age of 16 years. In 444 
codes and supplenents to codes a higher minimum pge was established for 
hazardous occupations vrithin the industry. These lists ^-'ere not sub- 
mitted usually within the required rieriod. They were develoToed by the 
code authorities with the advice ano assistance of the Labor Advisory 
Board and the Children's Bureau of the Department of Labor, In all, the 
Labor Advisory Board furnished 355 individual lists of occunations to 
code authorities. One liundred seventy four lists were either aioproved 
or atf.oiowled^ed by the Administration as adequate definitions of the ha- 
zardous occuTDations of the particular industries. The other industries 
failed to furnish the proper lists for aiDDroval to the Administration. 
It wa,s the activity of the Labor Advisory Board staff which assured the 
achievement of such progress in this res'oect as was witnessed. 

Compliance with the child labor provisions was rather general. 
It was facilitated oj the fact that the Federal Emergency Relief Admini- 
stration undertook to taice special care of those cases where the removal 
of the child worker from industry would be esoe dally harmful to the 
family. 

The child labor provisions were verj'' effective. They resulted 
in the oractical elimination of child workers from industry. The number 
of certificates for emoloyment issued to child workers declined from the 
per ten thousojid children of the ages 14 to 16 in 1929 to 67 in 1934. 
All available evidence indicates that emplo;'/Tnent of children in industry- 
was negligible as a result of the code -orovisions. The removal of these 
persons under 16 years of age from industry apparently opened up a larger 
number of opportunities to the older children from 16 to 18 years. Two 
result r, of the interest in the child labor problem caused in part by the 
child labor legislation under NHA were the approval by 18 additional 
States of the Federal Child Labor Amendment and the raising by 4 States 
of their age standards to the levels approximately similar to those estab- 
lished in UEA codes. 

Availabl-j information indicates tha,t with the invalidation of 
the ITHA codes, child labor has returned in many industries where the NBA 
had eliminated it. 



9791 



-IV- 



CFILD LABOR COl^TAOL rilDEH 'J.?A 

The regulation oi child labor becc-juiic a pa.rt of NKA le^'jislation 
lar£,elj^ as a result of tne efforts oi la^or and other {;;roups interested 
in the elimination of child labor r.ncl the reducti-V;: of adult unenploy- 
r.ent. There is little evidnncr to s-a-v~ort the conclusion that it liad 
"been ori^-^iinallj'' conteir'"ilated tliat codes ^-'ould -orescribe niniraui:; ages 
for emplov'ment . In the Congressional debates and hearings on the UIEA 
little mention xies ;iiade of the subject. The most significant of the 
rare "instances in v/hich child labor v7-;;.s referred to in the discussions 
were the follo-'ing remark:? by ;Reprcsentative I-^elly of Pennsylvania on 
I'ay 25, 1?53, on the floor of the I-iouse. Ht; declared tlmt - 

"We are atterroting to stabilize industry. . . V/ith fair v/age 
standards and the elininatiri-.-i of pv/e.?t shop v/ages, child labor 
and other intolerable conditions, the fair and hxmane employer 
will be -orotected against cut-throat conpetition'! ('')• 

That proolems con.'.ectec. with child labor were ueing considered, however, 
is indicated by tnc fact that the subject nad appeared in the drafts for 
ether uieasTires of industrial reform or control. 

The r.iajor interest of NPlA a.dminist native leaders was in recovery 
broright about largely through the reduction of unemplcymenc aiid the in- 
crease of mass purchasing power. Tiie enrol-^asis ¥/as cor.sequently placed 
upon "maxim.um hours . . . minir.ni;Ti vrage scales . . . and conditions of 
cnloyment" , but the latter did not include a precise and direct 
prescription aga.inst child labor (**). ".Tone the less, the deinand for 
the elimination of child labor soon became articulate and found ej^)res- 
sion in iTSA pclic^^ and codes. The provision was "onivers.'^lly api^roved 
and inspired co..siderablo. comrncndation. 

It was at the hearings on the cotton textile code that the child 
labor issue was brought to tho fore. General Jornison declared that 
Congress had intended tzie minimum v/age in the codes to be a minimum 
wage in fact, '.'/hatever advantages industry rained out of the emplo;;/ment 
of children in the past through paying children less than adults vrauld 
be removed by the minimum v;age provision ixi the codes. (***). The 
cotton textile industrj', throw-h "Ir. C-, A. Sloa.n, President of the 
Cotton Textile Institute, replied that the industry liad "no interest in 
maintaining child labor" in the industry. 'The Administrator, vho had 
been previousl" informed at the meeting of the Labor Advisory 2oard on 
J-one 2Z , 1953 tliat it believed the absence of a:a adequate provision 
prohibiting the emplovTient of child \7orhers to be one of the major 
defects of the code, requested I!r. Sloan to insert a specific prohibi- 
tion against child labor. Such a provision would remove all doubt as 
to the effectiveness of the wa;'je provision as "might be (raised) hy 
3. representative of the Labor Advisory Board". Mr. Sloan, noting tiiat 
the problem. ha.d not been previously discussed in the preliminary con- 
ferences v.'ith t?^ C-overnment, declared tmt he would willingly discuss 
(*) Congression3-l Record (iic'.jr ,^5, 1., TTO - p. 4310. 

(*") "-T.?tional Recovery Administration Bulletin "Jo. ,-J , Basic Codes of 
Jair Corrpetition, (Jxme 19, 1935). Goveriiment Printin,;; Office. 

( ***)iIa,tional Recovery Acxnini strati on "-learini^s on the Code of P-air 
Conroetition for the Cotton Textile Industry, p. 13. iPA. files, 

9791 



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the matter with members of the industry. As a result of such a ineetin; 
the industry comittee reported, on Jime ■■:'.Q , 1933, that - 



b. 



"'7c "believe that the ninimum wage provisions of the code will 
end cMld lahor which lias already reached a vanishing point 
in tnis industry, hiit we wish to go oeyond this. . . 

"Oior cotton textile industry conjnittee "believes that it vrould 
he helpful to the broad movement, if the Administrator is 
agreeable, to put an express provision in the cotton textile 
code tliat the employment of minors under 16 years of age bt 
not permitted durin.?; the emergency" (*). 



3e 



The approved code -orovided tliat - 

"On and after the effective date emrployers in the cotton 
textile industry sliall not employ any minor under the age 
of 16 years." 

The significance of this stevi --jas widely recognized. Tlie Administrator 
declared this addition to be - 

"The most dramatic and sit;;,nif icant development . . . The 
reason why fnis ancient atrocic;' could so easily be killed 
notwit"xistandin;2.' i^s tenacity of life a{;;ain£t tv/enty-five 
years of attaclrs was also intrinsic in the President's idea 
that employers v/ould 'be glad to do much by general agreement 
that no single em^'jloyer would dare to do sepa,rately." (**) 

I. DEVELOFWEiTT OF HRA POLICY 

A. The FPA 

The esta'blisliment of a minimum age for employment in the cotton 
textile industry, the first codified industry, firmly fixed the elimina- 
tion of cnild labor as a major objective of the IT?A. The Administra- 
tion has since reiterated this objective in -any of its policy decla.ra- 
tions. In fact, in the President's Reenrolo^/ment Agreement, v/hich repre- 
sented the Administration's first definitive formulation of labor stand- 
ards, specific age limits v/ere set. The Agreement provided tliat no 
employer ws.s "to employ (after August 31, 1933) any person under 16 
years of ai^ e except that persons between 1'-- and 16 years may be' employed 
(but not in manufa.cturing or mechanical industries) for not to exceed 
3 hours per day and those hours between 7:00 A.ii. , and 7:00 P.'I. , in 



(*) Hearings op, cit., (June .33, 1933), ileleg.se, IIa»- . 18 , p. 2. 

(**) Fational P.ecovery Administration Codes of Fair Competition 
Vol. I, p. 12 



9791 



~3~ 

such v'OT : a,s viil not inceriere ''it'.i ho-oj'r of c'n;- school" (*) 

In its na jor aE;->ects, :I2A policy re:n-ined sixusts-ntially the s^me, 
although the effort to lirdt c.^ilc". l^bor r/as considerably .■rar.piified in 
the coii.rse of ITPJl's Msbory. "either the ori.^inal basic policies nor 
the specific c'.evelopments encountered p.ny seriovi? or inDrjrmountable 
op'r^osition. The nr.jor deveio"r.ients concerned themselves vdth the 
actvial pairasin^i of the specific provisions included in the code, the 
develo^pment of a specific teclinique for administration, the inclusion 
of a provision bsjinina, empiojunent of j"oun£: persons at hazardous employ- 
ment and the effort to eliminate the tolerance vdth regard to children 
of 14 to 16 years of a^,e in non-ra;UT,ufact;iriu£ jobs. 

The clause most co.Tk.ionly reconmondec' in the first months of IIPA 
declared th^at ."no -oerson under 15 ; ears of a;:;e slir.ll be emploj'^ed in the 
trade or ind\istry" (**) This clause v/as supplemented by a statement 
tliat "members of the trade or industry slia.ll comply v/ith any lav/s of 
such ste,te irr^of^inti; m?re strin^.,ent requirements reii,ulr.tin^ the age of 
employees. . .tiian \mder this code". This double provision remained the 
usual regulation in the e-"-rly codes. 

During the coce heo.rin;';s of the first basic codes, a question 
arose as to the responsibility of em^iloyers in connection vith the 
proof of the age of employees. The individiial trade associations pro- 
posed to insert in their code drafts the '-ords "Icnov'ingly' emplbying"* 
children. In the hearings on the steel code, Secretary of Labot 
Perkins-protested this langus,ge. She referred to it as "^probably in 
oversight in- the wording of Section 4 of Article IV" (***). Asi written 
it provided that no m.ember of the code shall "knovdngly" employ any 
person in the industry under the age of 16 years. It Imd been the e?:- 
perience of all state departm.ents cliarged with the enforcement of child 
labor laT7s that the inclusion of t>.e word "I'mowingly" m.akes it almost 
impossible to enforce any child labor la-v. The Children's Ivjrer.u of 
the Depa-rtment of Labor, particularly, protested this wording. It 
declared that "this limitation mahes the clause practically impossible of 
enforcement due to the great diffictilty of ;>iroving that the em^^loyer has 
not been deceived as to the child's age." In its arg^jment it pointed -out 
that - 

"Ditring the e?rly period of child labor legislation, one of 
th'. means of nullifying a law prohibiting the employment of 
children \mder a certain age or limiting their ho\irs of v/ork 

(-) The joint meeting of the H3A Advisory Boards anO- the Administrator, 
on July 10, 1933 developed an agreement on a flat minimtm of 16 
years for ail industries, The .exemption for persons of 14 to 16 
years v/as .added in the revision o" the Administrator's sta.ff. 

(**) The Develo-oment of The llodel Code and Model Provisions Codes 

" Tentative Draft of Hodel Code " (About August 15, 1933) a study by 
?:arr-- ilulhey "ilA. Achcdnistrative Studies Division of Review. 

(***)lTational Recovery Adininistrp,tion Hearings on the Steel Code, iIRA 
files (July 51, 19c3). Address by Secretary of Labor Frances 
Perkins, ITRA Release ITo. 146, p. 12. 

9791 



_4- 

was the imposition of a pens.lty effective onlj^ in the case of 
the enTployer 'lrnov/inc;ly' having; violated it, a provision which 
put a premiim on ignorance an^l 'balked the intent of such labor 
legislation" (*) • 

Although the code language vra^s revised so as to exclude the word 
"Imowingly" , represente^tives of industrj" continued to demand of HRA 
some clarification of the langaaage to remove the uncertainties concern- 
ing the oblit,,ations of enrployers. One suggestion v/as to provide that . 
"reliance in good faith 'by an employer upon any evidence as to age ad- 
missible in the court of the state in '.-'hich sucji emplo;)'Tnent ta.l;es place 
shall be deemed a compliance with this provision" (**). However, many 
protests vfere entered against this ambiguoxis langua.ge. The Children's 
lureau vigorously criticized this language. The representative of the 
Labor Advisory Loard, at the conference, recova^ended the use of the 
employjnent certif ica,tos c.s a positive proof of age. This suggestion 
was accepted. 

The provision ; enerally adopte"d in li2A ha,s read, as follov/s: 

"In a.ny state an employer sha.ll "be deemed to have complied 
vdth this provision if he shall have on file a certificate 
duly issued 'by the authority em'jowered to issue employment or 
age certificates or --'Crnits showing tha.t the em^^loyee is of 
the required, age" (***) 

The only later change made in this language was to prescribe that the 
certificate shall be a "valid" one "duly signet"! by the authority in 
such sta.te" (**^"*). 

The a'bove provision furnished a,n easy method wliere"by an employer 
could protect him.self , and still offer definite ;oroof of good faith. 
The system of issuin;;^, certificates in the varioiis states had accustomed 
employers to requiring such certificates. Parents' affidavits of age, 
on the other hand, have been found unreliable. TAridence to this effect 
Y/as obtanned ''oy the United States Children's ""_ureau when it was admini- 
stering the Federal Child Labor Ltiw of 1917-13. It fouiid it necessary 
to issue employiTient certificates in certain states because state 
certificates wer- not satisfa.ctory. The first C^,S58 a-pplications made 
for federal certificates, in one state, were ched:ed with the affidavits 
on the basis of v/hich the Commissioner h<?.d previously issued state 
certificates. This chccl: revea,led the ff.ct that the d.ocumentary 
evidence presented by the parents shoYfed tliat 601, or 16.6 percent of 
{''"■) Memorand-um of September 18, 1923, from Children's Bureau , re: IJse 

of the word "■aiov'in,:;ly" in the chile' labor prohibitions of the 

]I3A Codes. (ITRA files, Child Labor). 

(**) " Suggested Outline for Code "Draft "- (about September 15, 1933), The 

Development of The Llodel Code - suora. 

(***)" Suggested Outline for Codes "- (Draft of October 1, 1993), The 
Development of Tiie ^odel Code - supra. 

(*'''^''*) Labor Advisory Doard liodel Cod e - (Draft of Jan-ua.ry 7, 1935, The 
Development of Tnc i'odel Code - suora. 



9791 



-5- 

the nunilDer clieclced, v/ce yovm/;cor t iiavi the age -^ireviously sv/orn to "by the 
parents, and tliat SI children -.7erc over tha,t a^c^e. Those manufacturers 
v/ho shipped in interst'te or foreifm coiniierce, anc vho felt that the 
parents' affidavit vrag tae "best evidence, \v re free under the Federal 
Child Labor Act to accept it, hut ihey vrare liable to prosecution if 
in fact it proved xmreliahle and they employed, children contrary to 
the provisions of the Act. -Very few of them, aov/ever, hivl sufficient 
confidence in the "oaronts ' affidavits to he v-illinr; to take this risk. 
(*) 

3. Child Laljor and Hazardous Occuoations 

At the insistence of such organizations a.s the Hational Cluld Lahor 
Com:-;-.ittee , the Children's Biu-eau of the Department of Labor, and the 
re-oresentatives of the Labor Advisory Board, attention was increasingly 
directed toward the further protection of child v;orl-ers in industry by 
prohibiting them from eniplo;5'n;ent at hazardous occupations. On July 19, 
1953, the national Child Labor Conj.iittee recomiiended, as basic principles 
governing child labor, (l) a 16 year age rpinimurr: in every industry for 
8.11 types of employment in the indiistry, and (2), an 18 year age 
minimum for industries or specific processes in* industries "where 
unemployment is especially acute or where the rishs of employment 
mal-ce advis?.ble adult worhers" (**) 

The national Child Labor Corr^-aittee recom-nended, in the case of 
the Bituminous Coal Industry, an 18 year a.ge limit for all coal mine 
operatives, an 18 year minimum for the Steel Industry, and an 18 year 
ninimuni for certain processes such as eniploj^iient in savv' mills and 
logging operations in the Lumber Industry. The Children's Bureau 
supported these efforts by siibmitting leiigthy memoranda containing the 
available pertinent inlorraation justifying the above regulations. The 
Bituminous Industry established in the code a 17 year minimiun for inside 
mines and haza.rdcus worl; outside of any mine; the Lumber Industry set 
an 18 year limit for all its employees except tiia.t it permitted boys 
16 years or over in the yrooden pacl3,ge divij^ion of the industry and 
at non-hazardous occuroations during school vacation periods "if there 
are no wage-earners of 13 years or over in the families". The Iron 
and Steel Industry did not set a higher minimum for the more hazardous 
occupations. 

Tlie movement for the 'specific protection of minors from hazardous 
employments made considerable progress. Hot only did mo,ny large indus- 
tries adopt the principle, but other ad..vanced industries soon followed. 
Only three of the first tv/enty codes recognized the principle of a 
higher m.inim'uiri for hazardous work; but the later codes furnished an 
increasing number. Tne Children's Bureau of the United States Depart- 
ment of Labor, in order to further this movement, undertook a special 



( * ) " Adjiinigtration of the First federal Child Labor Law , " Chi Idr en ' s 
Bureau. Publication V.o. 78, page ^L . 

(**) Letter of ilr. Coui'tney Dinwiddle, Executive Secretary of the 

Ifetiona-l Child Labor Committee to General Hugh S, Johnson, July 19, 
1933. ( lIHAFileSy Child Labor ). 



?791 



-6- 

effort to faj:iiliarize the I'TBA acminisorative sta.ff v/ith the problems of 
hazardous emplojTnents . On AUf-^-Tist 15, 1953, it addressed a comnruni cation 
to all Deputy Administrators indicating, that "vmile the codes of fair 
competition are ^enerall recognizing 16 years as the minimum age for 
employment, it is equally desirahle tliat the code for some industries 
should prohibit the emplojTiaent of persons uo to 18 years of a^^e at 
least in occu;:'ations involving extreme danger." It furnished these 
officials with a complete list of the operations in which "accident 
evidence warra^nts the prohibition of employment for minors imder 18 
years" , and. a, list of the states in each case "which fix 18 years as 
minimum age 'for employment in this t^p^ie of v;ork" , und information on 
accidents to minors in industries (Appendix A). 

^The Labor Advisory Board took a. stron,:; stand in the development 
of policy on this subject rdthin the Administration. A draft of a 
tentative outline for cod.es by the Administration v/as criticised by the 
Board for not including a provision protecting minors under 18 from 
hazardous employments. It indicated that - 

"In some states dangerou.s occupations are prohibited to 
minors" under 18. In other bacte/ard stater this is not 
done. Result is unfair competition. Therefore, where some 
states mahe the age limit 18 years for certain trades, the 
code should prohibit employment of any minor under 18 in such 
trades throu^:hout the coimtry" (*). 

As a result of this criticism tne model code Has aiTiended to include a 
provision recoyiizing superior state laws to be api;'licable v/here they 
established higher labor standards. 'The memorand.um in reply to the 
Labor Advisory Board declared that it liad not become iJRA polic - to re- 
quire that "where a state sets a higher minimum, tha.t minimur! should 
apply to the v/hole industry". In fact, the respondent declai'ed it to 
be primarily the problem of the Ls,bor Advisory Board to obtain such 
a prdvision in the code. The campaign for such a provision in 
individual codes amd for a general policy was carried on by the Labor 
Advisor;- Board. 

The staff of the Labor Advisory Zoard formulated the prevailing 
policies of the B.oard on September 18, 193S. This statement made it 
encumbent uoo'n each staff member and labor advisor to insist upon the 
inclusion of a clause of the following content: 

"No employer shall employ any person Uiider 16 years of age 
nor any person under 18 years of age at ojoerati jns and/or 
occupations detrimental to health. The Code Authority shall 
submit to the Administrator for approval before Janriary 1, 
1934, a list of sLich occupations." 

The first o;oportunity to ootain general approval of this principle 
appeared in connection v/ith the drafting of the "model" code issued on 
October 1, 1933. The Lfxbor Advisory Board representatives recommended 

an d obtained tne inclusion in this draft of. the provision that - . 

(*) Letter of Augiist 9, 1933, William Leiserson to William p. Farnsworth. 

( IPA. files, Child Labor ) . 

9791 



-7- 

"iTo 2-erson unr-er years of age piiall "be emjiloyed in the 

trad§/indvGtry nor anyone ■under years of a{":e at opera- 
tions or occixoatious liazardou? in nature or detrimental to 
iiealtli. The Code Authority .shall submit to the Adiiiinistrator 
hefore (date) a list of such occupations" 

While no specific ages v;cre iaclufed, it vra.s ;_enerally understood that 
reierence v/as ueinc made to 16 years as a general minimum and 18 years 
as a minimum for hazardous occupations. It was in the Octohcr 25th 
and llovcmber 6th, 19?3, drafts of the so-called "model" codes that these 
a;;;;es were definitely inserted, ("''*) 

The inclusio. . of this -provision in the model codes had. the iriimediate 
effect of both standardizin;;-: the provision and brin£,-inr: to the fore the 
problem of protecting young persoj:.s against hazardous erni^loyments. 
The resiilting discussion of this provision within i'lRA administrative 
circles led to its general introduction in codes. Six of the 16 codes 
a''proved on October 3, 1933 had provisions establishing a higher minimum 
in the case of iXazarcous occuoations . The number of codes containing 
these clauses increased, considerably as tine went on. The codes did 
not mention, however, the specific occupations from vmich minors ■under 
Ic v/ere to be excluded but req-uired the code autliority to submit such 
a list GO the Adiiinistration at fv I'lter date. 

It is interesting to note, in passing, an incident in the develoi-)- 
mont of these clsAises relating to hazardous occupations which illustrates 
in p'.rt so'ie of the chj-ract eristics of the ad::ii-nistrative organization 
withiii the HHA. The "model" code generall: used i7ithin H?Jl was at 
first- the almost excliisive product of the Legal Division. -Beginning 
with the Octooer 1, 1937- , draft, the Advisor-^ Boards participated to a 
grea,ter exte-nt. I-Iowever, the A"oril 3, 1934 araft was produced complete- 
ly by the Legal Divisio-.i on the basis of current drafts. In this case, 
they sought to provide for an eighteen year age limit and for the 
specific occupations at vmich jpsi'sons bety/een 16 and IS years of age 
might be permitted to work. They had apoarently observed the length 
of some of the lists of hazardous occup^ations for s'oecific industries 
and had concl^uded, without consultatio-n with experts, that it vnuld b'e 
easier to list the occu:iations at which perso'ns ■under IS yesijrs of age 
might be permitted to v/or]":. The clause v/hich they recommended in this 
issue read'--as follows: • • ■ ' ■ 

"llo -erso-n ■under eighteen (13) ye^ars of age shall be employed 



(*) " Suj^gag.cecL Outline for Codec "-. (October 1; 1933 Draft.) Tlie ^Devel- 
opment of Model Codes, strpta. 

(**). " Sw^gested- Outline for Codes Including Some -Sw-.-gested General 
Frovic-iQ-/:'s" - (October 25, 1933 Draft- - Mimeograph Requisition 
2420). " Suggested Outline for Codes " - Signed by H. S. J-ohnson, 
Admin IS tra.tDr for industrial Hecovery - (i'ovember 6, 1533 Draft, 
- aih'eograph Requisition' 2592) , The Develo-ome-nt of the 'lodel Code- 
supra. • 



9791 



-8- 

in the industry- except as (list here sjiecific occupations such 
as ofiice boyG, office girls, messengers, etc,), ilo person 
under sixteen (16) years of age shall "be employed in the in- 
dustry in any capacitjr. " (*). 

The atove reconnendation drevr fire fron the Labor Advisor^r Board 
and the Children's Bureau in particular. It vra,s -oointed out that this 
provision is contrary to the convictions of all persons interested in the 
child lahor problem. It had been agreed that the 16 year age limit vras 
a sufficient minimum for general employment and that the 18 year limit 
for hazai-dous occupations nas sufficient protection for minors, (*) In- 
dustrie's ref-Lisal, in many instances, to consider the clause ;'-)roposed in 
the above outline for code malting, the discouragevient of it by the staff 
of the Labor Advisoi'^'- Bopa'd, and the genoralacceptance of the former 
provision b;^ the administrative ;nersonnel undid the effect of the proposal 
except in the snail number of codes -'here it r/as considered applicable 
by all jOcarties. 

Tlie fact that most of the codes ap; roved on and after lloveraber, 1933, 
contained a -irovision considered adeq-aa,te for the ;orotection of younger 
]ae rsons against enployrnent at hazardous acGupatioirs led the staff of the 
Labor Advisory Board, during the latter part of 1934 and early 1935, to 
attempt to amend the earlier codes to bring their standards up to the 
level of established policj^, Tliree different tirnes of aiaendments ^jere 
proposed to individual industries: the first provided for the inclxision 
of the complete model code ^Trovisions for industries which merely prohi- 
bited employment to persons under 16 years; the second requested the in- 
clusion of a provision requiring the submission of lists of hazardous 
occupa.tions to those industries, but did not mai^e any specific provision 
for their definition in their codes; the third requested the inclusion 
of a provision defining hazardous occti.pations and the requiring cer- 
tification of age b;!- certificates. Letters rrere sent to the adminis- 
trative officials in charge of each -code asking them to address the in- 
dividiiol code authorities on the subject so as to bring about these 
changes. The result of this effort was that 16 codes ^fere amended to 
improve their original child labor provision to bi-ing them in line 
with the standard -provision. (*) ivlany other similar amendments vrere 
TH " Suggested Outline for U^e in Code Drafting ," (Draft of April 3, 
1934), The Development of the iiodel Code - supra, 

(**) Letter of Clara i.i. Beyer, Director, Industrial Division, Children's 
Bureau, U, S. Department of Labor to L, CKarshall, Assistant Ad- 
ministrator for Policy, (June G, 1934), rRA files. 

(***) Artificial ITlcer and Teather, Amendment 1; B'J.ilders Supply Trade, 
Amendjient 2; Chinavrare and Porcelain, Amendment 5; Dress iianufac- 
turing, Ar.iendment 7; Hair and Jute iPelt, A'lendinent 1; Lace Uanu- 
facturing, Aiendnent 3; Legitimate Full Length Drajaatic and i.Iusi- 
cal TheE,trical, Amendment 1; Umbrella, Amencjiient 2; TJallpaper, 
Anend:ient 1; Beverage Dispensing Eqiiipment Indi,istr2A, Amendment 2; 
Lime, Ajuendment 2; Cork, Amendment 3; Industrial Supplies and 
iiachinery Distributors Trade, A'ien6:ment 3; i'.iachine Tool and Equip- 
ment Distributing Trade, Anendjient 2; Construction I'achinery Dis- 
tributing Trade, ATiendnent 2; Fullers Earth Producing, Ai-iendraent 1, 



9791 



pendin/j at the tiinc of tie inv.-^.lidation of tl'.e liHA. 
C. Lxeuptions to Persons Undor 16 y e ars of W.Q 

The President's Scenploynient A.-jreenent set :l standprd for 
exemptions froiii the 16 year a:;e minimuiii v/hidi was later copied in some 
codes. Af. noted above it e::eaipted children betv.'een the ages of K!.- aJid 
16 years '.vho were permitted to be eraoloyed in other than raanufacturinc 
or r.icchanical industries for not more tiian three hours per day iDetv/een 
7:00 A.M., and 7:00 P.H. , at such ■■-.•ork as ?;ould not interfere with the 
hours of day school. Ad.'litional e::emptions in the form of P. 1-^. A. sub- 
stitutions were granted' to the Advertising newspaper, ITev.'spaper and 
Llafiasine Bis.tributing, the Da,ily ITewspaper and the Non-Metropolitan 
Publishing-Printin^; and Printing; Industries. They were permitted to 
employ'- any person under 16 years irrespective of age at the delivery 
and s-le of newspapers, during the "nov/, established hours of such work 
where such work docs not interfere v/ith hours of day school and if this 
work cUd not impair the health of tiiese children". , 

1. Daily Hev^spaper Industry '' ., . 

The above F~A substitutions bcca-ic the subject of much con- 
troversy and h-ad groa.t influence. It may be well, therefore, to out- 
line the evolution of this issue. Tlie newspaper publishers, in their 
draft of a nroposed code, included provisions on child labor similar 
to those contained in the P.?:.A. substitution for their industry. "-;aJiy 
protests were heard against this proposal at the public hca,ring on 
September 22-23, 1933 (Appendix B) ." The provision finally included in 
the code was essentially simil-r to the P. 3. A. substitution. It per- 
mitted publishers to cmi-iloy children of any age to deliver newspapers 
if their he?lth was not impaired by such work, during such hours as 
would not interfere with hours of day school; and to sell newspapers 
during the hours of 7:00 A...., to 7:00 P. !•'.,, from October 1 to Majrch 31, 
cr between 8:00 A.M., and 7:00 P.M., .from April -1 to September 30. 
Hiey were also granted an e:;:emption for children between the ages of 14 
to 15 years for non-mechanical work "for not more than three hours a 
da;'' between 7:00 A.i>i., pjid 7:00! PeLi.-" In transmittin._; this code for ap- 
proval over tiie protests of the Labor Advisory Board and various groups 
interested in child labor, the Adrniiiistjrator declared that "it was found 
difficult to forrai:).latc a provision which would eliminate admitted evils 
in the lar.^e cities and .not impose uriduc .hardships in the smaller cen- 
ters of publication". The :ii:drn.inistra,tor also .noted that "much street 
selling will not be covered, by this code. Iviany minors who sell n.cvic~ 
pa.pers are employed by nevrs-agents or distributors v.rho will not be bound 
bjr the code's previsions" (*) 

(*) Codes of Fa.ir Oorf.jctition as approved, Oovornraent Printing Office 
.Vol, VII, p. 76. Letter of transmittal, 3aily Newspaper Code, 



9791 



The President of the United Statf s, in ar)^Trovin,o; the code, de- 
clared that - 

"I am not satisfied with the Child LalDor Provis-ions. " In order 
to review this sitiaation he called for "a snecial report and recom- 
mendations in regard to the carrying out of the ■orovisions" to oe made 
at the end of sixty daj'-s. He also instructed the "government members 
of the Code Authority (to) give ■oarticiilar attention to the provisions 
authorizing minors to delivi^r and sell ne^^sDa-oer? and . . . rer)ort 
to the President not later than 60 days hence "(*) 

The .studies conteraolated by the Executive Orner 'f the President 
were conducted by the Children's Bureau of the IJ. S. tie-oartment of 
Labor anc* by the Division of Research and Planning of the national "Re- 
covery^ Administration. The -Children's Bureau survey was undertaken in 
March, 1934. It surveyed 4,210 children under 16 years of age engaged 
in the sale and distribution of newsnaners or magazines in 17 re-ore- 
sentative cities in different t)arts of the country( *'") . The Division 
of Research and Planning survey obtained its information from the riub- 
lishers, advertising newp-oa.-oers ^nd various riublic agencies and -orivate 
organizations interested in the -Droblem. Tiie Questionnaires to nei"s- 
■oaiDers covered some 1,30R news^aners em'oloying 544, ?45 carriers and 
street seller's, to advertising newsT)ar)ers and -oeriodicals included 
9,182 newsToarjers and Tneriodicals emrjloying 214, 50^ carriers and sellers 
(***). 3oth of these studies furnished, extensive pertinent information 
on the T)roblera under considera,tion. 

It was on the basis of the above investigations tha,t a rer)ort was 
formulated under the direction of Hr. G-eor-ee Buckley, Division Admini- 
strator, and forwarded to .the President on ^-lay 12, 1934 together with 
the followinx recomiTiendations from the :^RA on amendments to be made to 
the code: , . _ 

(l) Prohibition of delivery or sale of newsr)aT5ers by girls; (2) 
■brohibition of delivery or s;-le of newsTpaners by boys under fourteen 
years of age, t>rovided that in cities under 100, "'T iJopulation, boys 
twelve years of age and over -oresently emr)loyed in sellirig or de- 
livering newsnar)ers may continue in sugh emrployme'nt; (3) limitation of 
hours which may be worked to four hours per day; (4) retention of the 
■orovisions of Article V, Section 1 (b) of tne code to regulate the hours 
between which the boys may sell newspapers ; (5) prohibition of delivery 
by boys bet"'een the hours of 7:00 P.M., ^nd 6:0^ A.I.i. , from October 1 
to March 31 and between, 8:00 P.M., and 6:00 A.Ii. , from Anril 1 to Sent- 
ember 30; (6) provision of supervision of boys under sixteen years of 
age delivering and selling newsp'^pers by providing for filing with the 
Department of Labor or other state or local agency, a certificate show- 
ing that the boy is at least fourteen years old and tliat his parents 



(*) ibid., p. 69. Executive Order of Approval, (February 17, 1934). 
(**) Unite'" States Department of Labor, Children's Bureau, " Children 

Engaged in Newspaper and Magazine Selling and Deliv ering," Pub 1 i - 
cation /To. 227 ( '"ashington, 19l"r)) , G-overnment Pririting Office. 
(***)Kational "Recovery Administration, Division of Research and "Planning, 
"News paper and Periodical Ca rriers and Street Sellers" by S-nencer 
^, Reed, (May 7', . 1934) . "".R.A. files. 
S791 



-11^ 

conr^ent to the enTOloyaent, ^-nd (?) retenfi.'on of the -nrovisions in the 
code that the sale and delivery of ne'^s'i'"'-^e:^s >;ia..y not he en;.:fi,°:ed in for 
children -onless it may "bf=' done without ia■'^airaent of health or without 
interference of the hour? of day school ( ^) . 

The Sec-^etary of Labor, "'is? France?- ''^orkins, in revie'"ing these 
reconimendations, declare'^ th;t she was "he'^rtily in fpvo':' of" then. 
She declared th-t "if r-OTroved , I believe they ^'-ill i-'ine out most of 
the evils of child labor in news■Da'^e^ distribution anc pserve as the only 
effective control of this work our co^mtry pver has lcno"Tn." She indi- 
cated that - 

"The investigators . . . ■'"'ho intervie\"'ed inrny circulation 
mana,::ers in connection with this study report a general feel- 
ing that a child labor restriction under the code for the news- 
•oa-oer business is as n^'.tura.! a.s regulation in other industries. 
Some of the managers have anticl-oated such control a,nd_have 
fixed a 16 year age mini mu:;i for- all ne:' carriers and sellers 
taken on. I believe a 14 year minimuin, -o-rticularly when 
counled with a rirovision that boys of 12 now. en^a-red as car- 
riers may continue their ■"'ork, will be considered a reason- 
able restriction." 

The modifier tions stagger ted by the Sec-etary of Labor were: (l) 
elimination of the 18 year minimum for girls and general iDrohibition 
of such emmlojrment for all girls: (2) "r)rohibition of delivery or sale 
of newsTJa^oers by boys under fear teen years of .age provided that boys of 
12 and over engaged in the delivery of newspapers as of May 1st may 
continue such work"; (o) reduction of four hours to three hours; (4) 
the restriction of hours of sale of newsnopners should be arj-olicable to 
all r)ersons irrespective of age; (5) the restriction of hours of de- 
livery of ne-"st)a-r)ers should be arj-olicaule to all -oersons irresioective 
of age; (5) with res'oect to the age certification provision, it was 
suggested that the United Stat'^s De-nartmont of Labor be given the 
•nower to designate the state and local officials who are to enforce this 
■orovision. Furthermore, she raconmended a -oublic hearing during the 
first week of Jtine.(**) 

An anno-ohcement w»s made on Jime 8, ig''4 of a -oublic hearing to 
take place on June 22, 19o4.' She lorcTOsal considered at the -oublic 
hearing with res'oect to the sale and. delivery 'of news-na-oers was the 
following: 

"!'o establishment shall eminloy girls under 18 or boys under 
14 years of age to sell or deliver newspaners or sr 11 to or 
furnish such persons ne^s^a.pers for the ^urriose of resale or 
delivery; provided tha.t boys between 12 and 14 yea-^s of age 
engaged in delivery of newspapers on . may con- 
tinue to be so engaged; nrovid<^d further thnt, establishments 



(*) G-eortie Buckley's mcmbr'^nduin' to t^ie Ad/dnist- ' tion on ''ay IS, 
19^''. (Apiiennix C). 

(**) Letter of i'iss Frances Perkins, Sec:^et^',ry of Labor, to the Presi- 
dent of the United States, "'ay IB, IGo'^. (IIHA Files, Daily IJew- 
9791 paper Code - Child La". or.) 



-12- 

may -nerrait the sale/or delivery of news'OPpers by boys ■under 
16 year? of age "ho may be eranloyed under the "orovisions of 
tlie paragraph or to ""horn this n.' r- granh -oermits the sale or 
furnisaing of ne"'sioaT)e""s for the ■oiirt)Ose of rf^sale or rie- 
livery, ps hereinafter provided but not otherwise: 

"1. To sell or deliver ne^'spaperr not nor'^ than three 
hoiirs a day on school days and not more than four hours 
a day on otVier days, whe^e such wor't may be done I'dth- 
out impairment of health and '"'ithout interference with 
the hours of day school. 

"?. To sell ne^^'spapers bet^feen the hours of 7:'*^^ A.M., 
and 7:00 P.Li,, from October 1 to ^iarch .'^l, and between 
7:00 A.M., f-nd 8:00 P.L:. , from April 1 to September 30. 

"3. jl^ca boy shnll obtain from a, state or local official 
designated by the Secretary of Labor a -nermit or badge 
showing th=5t the boy is oualified to sell or deliver 
newspapers under the provision of this paragraph. " 

The attitude of the newspa.ner publishers is best exemplified by the 
resolution adopted on June 11, 193'J:, at the meeting of the code com- 
mittee. It sumnarizes ve^y adequately the arguments and position of the 
group. It read as follows: 

"WHEREAS, On June ^th, the ^."R^A. proposed certain 
modifications of Article V, Section 1 of the Code for 
the Daily >Ie"'spaper Publishing Btisiness and designated 
such proposals for jrablic hearing on June 22, 1934; 
and 

"'TIIE'REAS , No provision of the Daily Newsr)aper 'Code wag 
given more careful consideration than the provisions 
respecting the sale and delivery of newspapers by 
■ minors; and 

"^HE^JEAS , Certain of the changes proposed, if accepted, 
would not only seriously disturb the normal delivery 
of daily newspap' rs to their subscribers but, more ira- 
riortant, would injuriously affect many thousands of 
newspa.r)er boys who are now using their earnings for 
the necessities of life or for assistance to other 
members' of their families, or for sa,vings for future 
educational requirements; and 

"'"HP'EAS, Boys who distribute newspapers outside of 
school hours without detriment to health or studies 
are not in any sense of the word engaged in Child 
Labor; and 

iir'trpp-q^^g ^ The proposal to register news-oaper boys and 
compel them to wear licensed badges is not a plan , 

9791 



-13- 



I'itlj. newE!-r^a>iL-r ooy vork; 'ni' 

II ^IZPJjii-S , The Ijcensf'ri "o^'dire 3?/s ter.i, "-herepvf^"^ trie'"" , 
h^s dfvelo-oed into -> le>:Pl nr^chini^ i3 ovoid of h-uman 
kindnes?, cavising hi'Lidrec's of vj'noceGr-'~-'"y arrests, 
pnd ept'^ jlishing rnif-Tir juvfnile court rpcordR; -■nd 

""WHZL^AS, iie licenped b.-^.-^-e sypteir. '••'ould tenri to Til^ce 
hundred? of thousands of boys imder the direct sianpr- 
vision and control of thp ^^ederal \'epartrnent of' Labor, 
£t great cost to the t.ax--iayc-r -'ithout corres-nondinfl; 
benefit; therefore be it ' 

"RTSOLV?'^, -That, the Code Coi.inittee reT.resenting the 
American ""e-soaner "ubliphe-'s As?ociation "nd the Re- 
gional Aj^sociation of daily ne'"ST)ar)'=r publishers 
reaffir.Ti its a-oT.rovnl of Section V of the Code for 
the Dail:/ TTe^wsTjaper Publishing: 'business and inform 
the Na-tional Hecovery Administration of its 'Hsaio^roval 
of the -ororjosals for modification thereof." (*) 

At the I'ublic hearing the riuolishers elaoorated this T)Osition in 
considerable detail. Much of the testimony centered about the educa.- 
tional advantares of the newsoaiper selling <' nd deliver?/ to the younger 
r)erson. ^\e high mark of the pre'^entp tion wps reached 'o}/ a demonstra- 
tion of the 'ctual i^o-^k of the ne'"sp."per deliver;/ boy. 

The pro-oonents of the am.endment consisted of Department of Labor 
officials a? well as rer>resentr. tivcs of the ITational Child Labor Com- 
mittee, various organiza.tions of public n ture concerned with nroblems 
of education and iFbor organizf^ tions. A general endorsement was heard 
of the "oroposed a.mendment as reasonable and feasible. The discussion 
of the proponents was intended to demonstr'ite the desirability of nro- 
hibiting young girls from selling and delivering newsToaners , of re- 
gulating the age of. boys who sell or deliver newspp.pe-^s and instituting 
a system of certification of the eli,eribility of news-op-rier carrier? r-nd 
sellersC '''. . 

(*) Letter from America.n "ews-na-oer Publishe-'-s Association "To _A11 

Assenting Membe-^s of the Co'^e for the T-^ily "'ewspnpe-f- ■Publishing 
Pusiners," signed, "'"or the Code Coa,.ii ttee" by Howard Davis, Chairman, 
and L. 3. Palmer, Acting Secretary, ,'-.ine 11, 1334, Few York. 
{'}1A Files, Daily "vews-oa-oer Code - Chil^-' Lajor). 

(**) rational Industrial -.ecover"' A'L-.inist:^r tion ^"earings on the '^ranhic 
Artp-''^ewsr)ar)pr Publishing i^'isiness, " S- le and Delivery of Hews ^'''^ per s 
by Kinor?" - (J-one ?3, 197^ - ? -"^olsO "■''^■A i^iles. 

9791 



-14- 

FolloiFin-"' the -^"ablic herrin;?. r.ejoti" tion? ^'eve conducteri with tJie 
re"oresent- ti'^rps of the mitliFhers .'no the -^.A Aovi?o:'y lo'ir'"? Pn' the 
'DenPrt.^ent of L-^oor. Sone fornul^ w-'.s sought which- the ■otihlisherr- woulr' 
pn^TOvr, but which woial('' also re-orepent p sig'nificrnt gain in the ■oro- 
tectiori of c'.iilcl workers in the cTelivery " nd s^le of ne"'sr)a-'-)e'»'?. '''he 
discussion hegan with p -ovihlj shers '' dr?ft of July, est^hlishinf? in the 
selling of ne^-'s-nr-oers, no P'^e limit for cities unc^e-^ P-5,0<^'0 -nonulPtion 
and a nininraa,-of 1"^ yer^rs for hoys ptxC 13 years for girls in citie^ of 
^5, '^00 ■oo-nul.'^tion or If r^er. The iDrotection for Ijoys delive^^ing -napers 
was less .cora->lete (Tsble l). 

''Various ■pro-nosnls w^re devploned out of a, nun'^je"" of conferences 
which culrainate'l in the -"cvenher l^th draft suhnitte-! hy 'Ir. S. "'. 
Williams, Secret' ry of the Code Authority (Atinendix D) . This nronosal 
set a 12 year mini.-num for delivery hoys "dth an exce'ition for hoys be- 
tween 10-1? years now distributing news^aners ir. cities of 50,000 or 
less, '^hile it est._»''::lished a 3 hotirs majiimun for school days, no linit 
was set for other days. The sale of news"oa-ners wPS li.nited to 14 year 
old boys in cities of over 50,' >'"'" -^^ )->:ula.tion and to 12-14 ye^v old boys 
in cities under th'-t size. Provision war ^::6e for a certificate system. 
However, the most controve:rsial issue was the coverace clause which read 

"Publishers shall uce their oest endeavors to see thiat the 
"orovisions of this section are otase'^ve'' b^^ those who 'dis- 
tribute their newsr)arierp. " 

The l^TRA was e- .ver to obtain speedy jiction and therefore acce-'ited 
the fbove ■oro-'^osals. The only definitive cna-a.e considered essential 
to having the amendment a-nrsroved by the Administrator was the following 
clause defining the r)ersons ■ covered 'jy trie regulation: 

"For the "ourt)Oses of tuis section, but for no other -nurriose, 
TDersons under 16 years of age who obtain newsnaoers directly 
from the publisher for the ■'■'uroose of sale and /or deli'"'ery there- 
of shall je deeme'^ to be emnlojefl b?/' the publisher. " 

This "provision w^c ripene" necesprry in or''er to be sure that boys, 
who we'f'e sellinf^ on their own account or ^"'ho we-^e dellverin-'^ unde"^ the 
little merchant system where title nasses to tne ooy, would be covered 
by the code. ;A limita.tion was also "orbTOsed on the hours of work for 
the sale and deljve-^y of ne^'sna'ne'^s on S-^turdays, Sundays and holidays 



(*) Letter of '"ir. Jac: 1. Tate, Acting division Administrator, to ''r. 
S. '/L "'illiams. Secretary of the Code Authority for the Daily 
7ewsT>ar)er Publishing "3upinesa, ('Toveraber 21, 19^54-). ( """lA Files, 
D'-'ily Kewso'iTer Code, - Child Labor, Ser)terabpv-December , 19?'-.';. 



9791 



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m 




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Pi^+34J p^p! O c\S4JrH fn 



9791 



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O H 

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-19- 

These -nrorjosal':; ^"cr^ seat out to the r,?'-pntinfr ouolrshprs on Nov- 
ember 24, 19'^4 (*). The rer)lieR ^Mch "'e-'V' receivor'' c'uring the Irttf^r 
nart of recein'oer '"ere preponrlernntly ne^'itivr. 

"?he bf'Sis of objection !• -p s.-^.icl to je the belief tiiat, under various 
stpte la^'s, the a^'o-otion of this provision vo\xlcl entail adriitional 
obligf-ticns under the '^or'ciien' s co;:i-^ens' tion lf>rs" (**). 

Several conferences vfere helc! '-'ith the varioar officials ^nd a subj- 
stitute -Dro^^osal T^as develobed, But this su^;geetion -ras unacce-ntable to 
the industry. At the H/irch 7, 1935 ;neetir:g' of the Core Authority, at 
the sugeeption of the Division Adrainistrator, a coinir.ittee was a-n-^ointed 
by the code authority to discuss this' -^roblen 'vith the ."PA and the De- 
•oartaent of Lf.bor with a vieiv to arrivi'n^: at a substitute nrovision, A 
tentative substitute ^^ra.? agreed UDon by 'ii'ss Lenroot of the Children's 
Jureau of the Unitec- States iJe^artrnent of Labor anc'' L'r. I^lisha Hanson, 
Counsel of the Corie AathoT-ity. It -'eao ; 

Publishers sha.ll not furnish c'-irt^ctly nor s-ell ne^i^s-oa-oers to 
r)ersons below the ages above sr^ecified for tlie 'rar'oose of re- 
sale and/or delivery thei'-eof under conditions contrary to the 
above conditions" (***). 

^Qirrever, at a lat'^'r conference x'rith 'iss Jjenroot on "'arch 26, 1935, 
changes ""ere agreed u^non concerning the .'bove "orovision and unon the 
■neriod in vhich certific tes rnight be T)ermittec' to be obtained, '"^ith 
these changes,- the Taro-oos-'-'l -"-as c'istributed on "'ay 1, 1935 to the as- 
senting members of the ne^^s^a-oer code r'ith a re^TOrt of the coraini ttee of 
the code authority '-hich "stron-"ly (urge'") u-aon -nublishers its accer)t- 
a.nce" (A-or)endix T.) . The resvdt'- of this b-'^llot i-ar^ as follo-fs: 647 for 
the amendment; 139 agai;ar,t tue r mendsnent; 6 defective ballots pnd 395 
not voting m'^mbers (***). 



(*) Only daily ne^^'s-ia^ers subscribing or assenting to the cor'e '-ere 

bound by the Daily •iTe"'S"oa,rie- Publishing J^iisiness Code. The 
others might aprent to the ^ra-ohic Arts Code. 

(**) Letter o^ L. C. ■'"-rshall, P.xecutive Secrat?ry, national Indus- 

trial Recovery 3o; rd to Prances Per'^ir.s, Secret-' ry of L'^bor, 
(March 11, 1935). ( j-RA Files, Bailv l!e"'sr)a.ner Code, Child 
Labor, 1955). 

(***) Re-Qort of ;.(eeting ^-ith Ne"^s-;a-oer Code Aathority Comnittee, 

Marcn 25, 1935 and 'iss TCatnerine Lenroot. ('"lA Files, Daily 
l'Te"sr)ar)er Code, Child Labor, 1935). 

(****) Letter fro.i S. !:. "illiams, Secretf^ry of the Code Authority 

for the Daily Me"''sioa':ier Publishing Buri.iess, to N''tional Re- 
covery Administration - June 1, 19'"5. (Ar)r)endix F) . 



9791 



V 

\ 



-20- 



The ■oro'DOsal which T'^s finally acce"otPo -rear! a? follows: 

"SECTIOIT 1. Puhlishe-^s shall not ermloy -oersoiip unc^er 16 
years of rge to sell .-nd/or deliver news-oa-oers nor furniph 
or sell newsTja-oer's to riersons under 16 years of :-ge for the 
purpose of resale or delivery, except those who ar-e ahle 
without irrmairrnent of health or interference i"ith hours of 
day school; 

"(a) to deliver newspapers on routes; ■orovided that no 
pe-^sons under 12 ye-: rs of age shall .e so engaged under 
this section, except that -nersons between 10 and 12 years 
of age so engaged on the effective date hei'eof in cities 
of 5O,")00 rjopulation or less may continue to deliver on 
routes in such cities. On school days no nerson engaged 
in such 'Work "onder this section sfell \>e so engaged for 
more than 3 hours. The hoiirs for deliv* ry shall he be- 
tween 7 a.m. and 7 p.n. from October 1st to "feirch T^lst, 
and between 7 a.m. and 8 P.m. from April 1st to Sept- 
ember 30th. 

"(b) to sell newspaper?; provided that no -nersons under 
14 years of age shall be so eng' ged under this section, 
' except that -nersons bet'"'een 12 and 14 years of age nay 
be so engaged in cities of 50, ''00 population or less. 
■On school days no person engaged jn selling under this 
section shall be so engage^^ for more than 4 hours. The 
hours for street sales shall be between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. 
from October 1st to March 31st, and bet'-'een 7 a.m. and 
8 r.m. from April 1st to September 30th. 

"(c) A publisher shall reouire from ef^ch person employed 
by him to sell and/oi' deliver newspapers and from each 
person to whom he sells newspaners for resale or delivery, 
where such person is under 16 years of f ge, a certificate 
signed oy the r)arent or guardian fnd b?/. the school attended 
by such person as evidence th' t he is of nualified age to 
sell and/or deliver newspapers under the nrovisions of 
this section. In the case of a person entering ur)on such 
work during the school year, a pe''"iod of 15 days shall be 
allowed for him to obtain and furnish the signature of the 
school on such a certificate. In the case of a person 
entering ur)on such work during school vacation, a similar 
period of 15 da,ys after the ooening of school shall be 
alleged him to obtain the school signature. 

"(d) Publishers shall not employ femt-ile minors to sell 
and/or deli^'er newspaper-^, nor shall riublishers furnish 
newspa.pers to female minors for resale or' delivery. 

"(e) Publishers shall not furnish or sell neT'sna^ers to 
any nerson for the purpose of resale or delivery under 
conditions contrary to the foregoing provisions contained 



9791 



.on, 



-21- 

in ?u'b--r)F,ragr?i^iis (-) to (c*) inclusive of thispectii 
Publislip^-? shall include ps a rjprt of every contract or 
agreement "'ith any ■'lerson, •nartnei'shi-n, coroor'^.tion or 
association for the distrihutioa of their newspa-oers a 
•orovision renuiring such per-=on, -oartnershio, . cor-nor^- 
ticn or association to observe the -orovisionn , of sub- 
t)ara;grar)hs (-i) to (ci) inclusive of this section in res- 
■oect of the sale and/or delivery of ne^'S-of'-ners by 
■oersons under 16 ye-Ts of age. 

"(f) Publishers :nay eiroloy -oersons under 16 years of age 
for other nrrt time services, but not in manufr cturin^^ 
and mechanical de-oartments , for not more than ? hours 
■oer day bet"-een 7 a.m. rnd 7 n, i. excerit during hours 
of day school, "orovided that no ^^e^son under 14 years 
of age shnll be so emnloyed." 

^hile it i^'?is nro-oosed, on June o, 195r:, to the National Recovery 
Board that it was -nossible to rmend the code in the manner outlined in 
the amendment {*) , no -action ^^as taken. 

The long discussion had- led to an agreement, but it "'as never P~y- 
nli-ed because of the invalidation of the ."^.A. • ;., 

Directly associated ^^fith. the above history "'as that for the G-raT)hic 
Arts Code. The child labor nrovisions v'ere to be identical. The -oro- 
visions ado-oted in- the he'^rsTDarier industry T;ere also to aT)"ily to the 
grat)hic arts industry. 

2. Retail Code Tr-oun 

rJith rpsr)ect to the exem-ntions granted in the. PlB tail Code, the 
development in the Retail Code should be rrcounted. The original code, 
as, presented by the National Retail Dry Gppds Association, contained no 
provision on child labor. Moreover, the ^'Tage differential for persons 
under 18 years of age in the code esta jlishing a lo'"er minimum wage for 
them might hrve been en incentive for their . employment (**). The Nation- 
al Child Labor Committee Protested this provision in a letter to the Ad- 
ministrator on June 30, 19.'^3 and called for a prohibition of t/.e employ- 
ment of persons under 16 years of age. (***) Hovrevcr, the drrf t_ of 
July«29, 1933, presented by the Retail Trade Associr^ tions , adopter^ the 
P.R.A. clause. '•". 



'(*) Letter 'of Jack R. Tate, Divisian Administrator, to Donald Richberg 
on June 3, 1935, on amendment to the code for the Dfily Fe^spaper 
Publishing Business. " (ITRA Riles, Daily '/eL^spa-ner .Code, Ciiild Labor 
1935). 

(**) ¥ev York Time s - June 17, 1933. 

(***) Letter of ITatiorial Child Labor Coriittee to r^eneral Hugh S. John- 
son, June 30, 1933. (ITRA Files, Child Labor). 

9791 



-22- 



It provided that - 

"No TDerson under the a^-e of sixteen years shall 
be erncloyed in a retail establishnjent, exce-ot 
that persons "between the ages of fourteen and 
sixteen years raay "be employed for n»t to exceed 
three hours per day and these hours "between 
7 a.m., and 7 p.m., in such work as will not 
interfere with hours of day school" (*) , 

All available evidence sus;f'ests that it was drafted with the coopera^ 
tion of the NEA officials in charge of the particular industry (**), 

In the August 24th draft, followine- the public h^arin^'s, the following 
addition was made: : , 

"It is provided, however, that where a state law 
prescribes a higher minimum age no employer shall 
employ within such state any person below the age 
specified by such state law" (***). 

It is interesting, in this connection, to note the attitude of the 
administrative official in charge of the codes for the mercantile in- 
dustries. In answer to triso- Children' s Buraaii recommendation for the 
elimination of the 14 and 16 year exemption, he declared -' 

"Only kindness and helpfulness can result from the 
fact that children between fourteen and sixteen 
years of age will be allowed to work outside of 
school hours" (****). ' • 

Repeated efforts were made by the staff member^-- of the Labor Ad- 
visory Board to have these exemptions ^emoved but to no avail. Freauent 
appearances were made before the code authorities to ehlist their aid, and 
in a few cases the administrative officials heartilv supported this effort, 
but no .sfi'.-.itc moves were taken by the appropriate code authorities, 

11. COD'S PROVISIONS ON CHILD LABOR 

The review of NRA policy furnishes a background for the study of the 
results. The adoTtion by NRA and industry of the policy of eliminating child 



(*) Proposed Code of Fair Competition for the Retail Trade , proposed by 

six National Retail Arsociations - Hist-^ry o.f the Code of Fair 

Competition for the Retail , Trade , p. 386. 
(**) ibid. p. 31. 
(***) proposed Code of Fair Competition for the Retail Trade , proposed by nine 

National Retail Associations.- ibid. "D. 395. 
(****)Let_ter_ from A. D, Whiteside, Division Administrator, to Miss Grace 

Abbott, Chief, Children's Bureau, .December 22, 1933. (NRA Files - 

Child Labor.) .' ' -. I , 



9791 



-23- 



labor from industrial ermDloyments led to the inclusion in all NRA codes of 
some limitation on the eraiDloyinent -of children. The early cod^s had lesss 
extensive -Drovisions than did the later ones, but a minimum age for em- 
oloyraent was es-ta^lished in .■■'I'l. 'The general minimum a^e "fas 16 years. In 
fact, 527 of ths 576 podes, 91 percent, adoiDted ' this minimum (Table II), 
However'j 49'cod?s set minima above these a^es. 0+' thesO', three codes, Clean- 
ing and -Dyeing, Laundry Trade, Hu^ Chemical Procer.sina-, specified a 17 
year a^,e limit. The mirs .numerous ^v^xm, 45 industries, ijrescribed an 18 
yeaf as;e limit for all emr)loyees. The latter codes may be divided into 
two .categories. The first class of 14 industries set a flat minimum of 18 
years for all -oersons irresoectiv ■•of occuoation (*). The second class, 
•'consisting of 32 industries, set a_flat minimum of 18 years for all em- 
■Dloyees but exemrited 'Yom this minimum, office boys and frirls, clerical 
workers, lab'^ratory workers and service ^^rouos which frenerally included the 
so-called "white-collar workers" in offices, brine-ing these jobs \inder the 
16 year a^e minimum (**). ' '^he latter industries include some of the most 
f rduous em-oloyments.. ... 

.. Si.Tteen codes -oro'vided exemptions from the 16 year age requirements 
for s-oecific lasses, of .workers. Probably' tlie..most common orovision is that 
contained in the Retail Trades Industries. It nermits r)ers':'ns between the 
years of 14 andl6 to be e-mDloyed outside o-f school hours betw-'^-^n 7:00 A.M., 
and 7:00 P.M., for three hours a -day or six day's a week or eight hours on 
One day a week. This provision may also iie.i'ound in the codes for the 
following- industries: Retail Trade, Retail 'Tobacco , Retail Piod and Crocery, 
Retail Jewelry, Retail Earm Eauiisment, Fap'er Distributing, Retail .Trade in 
Hawaii, and Savings, Building and Loan Associations. The second type may be 
fo'und in the recreatio'n"an6 service trades-, where talented child'ien are em- 
•nloyed for s-oecial rol.es.. In this grouc are' the Legitimate Theater, Motion 
Picture,' Radio Broadcasting, Photogra-ohic and Photo Finishing and Music 
Publishing Industries. 'The codes for these industri-»s exem-ot the a:ctor, 
children of talent, .the .model o^ the young Derformer, de-oending on, the 
nature of .the services recuired in the industry where they fill a role 



(*) 'Quicksilver; Concrete Masonry; Concre'te Pine; Slate Industry; 
Natural Clpft Stone;.. Pyrotechnic Mahilfa'cturing; Railway Brass 
' Car;' Distilled Spirits; Distilled Snirits Rectifying; Wrecking 
and Salvaf'e; Burlesoue Theatrical; Alcoholic Beverage Imnortin^; 
Wioing Cloth; Coal Dock. 

(**) CoD'^'er and Brass Mill Products; Lead; Nickel and Nickel Alloys; 
Co-DDer; Aluminum; Alloys; Zinc; Lime; Talc and Soa-pstone; Manu- 
facturing- in Hawaii; Liquified Gas; Lvunbcr; Tifoven Wood Fabric 
Shade; pharmaceutical and Biological ; Shovil, Dragline and 
Crane; Mechanical Packing; 'Electric Hoist and Monorail; Refri- 
gerated Warehousing; Urn -realla FrPme and Hardware; S'o'^cialty 
Accounting Su-oioly; Electric and Neon Sign; Book Publishing; 
Corrugated Rolled-Metal Culbert PiTje; Inland Water Carrier; 
Household Goods Stora^^e and MovinP'; Toll Bridge; Surgical 
Distributors; Alcohol Bever^-ee TTholesale; Optical Wholesale; 
Secondary Steel Products WareHousin.g; Builders SuTDDly; China Clay. 



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>r. 







u 


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ID 


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-P 


H 


tH 


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ro 






CO 


CO 


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^ 


•H 


Ti 


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^ 








K^ 


P 




;-'i 


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CQ 


CO 


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rH 


rH 


tj 


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•H 


ri 




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rO 




r-; 





M 


rt 















-P 


fin 




P! 


Pi 


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pi 


p; 








P 


p 


bl) 


IH • 




to 


CO 


Ti (D 


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cd 


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tmi 


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•H p; 




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to Ch 


c 


d 0) 





&: Ti 



-26- 



esTDecially Drenared for the child, xjarts which r^aiJ-ire the. g.eryices.pf a 
child. In these cases, aToi^roval of the annrOTDriate state officials is 
required "by fhe code -orovision, "but it may be noted few states' have oro- 
vision for such su-oervision. The third class .includes th^. Daily. News-oaiDer, 
Graphic Arts and Graphic Arts of Hawaii Industries. In these codes there 
is no age minimum for children engaged in'the delivery of newspapers outside 
of school hours between 7:00 A.M., and 7:00. P.M.. ,- .from Octoh.er 1st to 
March Slst and between 7:00 A.M., and 8:00 P.M., from April 1st to September 
30th; and permits children between the ages of 14 and 16 years to wor'c at 
non~raanufacturing part-time employments between. 7:00 A.M., and. 7:00 P.M<, 
foi three hours per day outside school hours (*). 

Kot only were employees und^r 16 years prohibited from being employed, 
but in 444 codes, there was also an additional prohibition against the 
employment "of persons of less than specified higher' ages at all ' hazardous 
occupations or. specifically defined hazardous, occupations in the industry. 
Two of these set the minimum for such occupations at 17 years; 4r'6 at 18 yean 
1, at 20 years; and 5, at' 21 years. The 17 years ap:e minimum '^as established 
for hazardous occupations in the Bituminous Coal and Shoe Rebuilding In- 
dustries, The 20 year minimum was set in the Fur Bre'^'sing and Fur Dyeing 
Industry, while the' 21 year minimum was established in the Proce'ssed or 
Refined Fish Oil, Bedding, Salt, Motor Bus and Bituminous Road Materials Dis- 
tributing Industries. In addition, a minimum of 21 years was established by 
the Household Goods Storage and Moving Industry for' drivers of motor vehicles 
(Appendix G) . . .... 

In the above industries the codes frequently required a list of 
hazardous occupations- to be submitted to the Administration to define the oc- 
cupations prohibited to persons under this higher miniraxim age. In all, 331 
of the 394"codes setting a higher minimum for hazardous occupations, but not 
specifically defining such occupations in the code-, required that such a list 
be submitted, generally by ^he Code Authority to the Administration. In 8 
cases these lists were to be submitted to the Code Authority and no provisioji 
was made for further reference to the Administration. In 52 industries these 
lists were to be approved by the Administrator or the National Industrial ' ^ 
Recovery Board. In the other cases, these lists had to be submitted by the ' 
Code Authority to the Administration wnic'h would acknowledge only those which 
it approved. 

The Labor Advisory Board sought to attain general uniformity in the 
child labor provisions of the codes, but this goal was not reached at the time 
of the invalidation of the KRA. The "model" codes in use in NRA did help to 
attain a considerable degree of uniformity of provisions. 'Except for the 
comparatively few cases where no protection was given against the employment 
of persons under 18 at hazardous occupations, the provisions in the codes were 
on the whole, similar and complete, NRA policy was renerally reflected in the 
code provisions on child labor. 



(*) See discussion on pp. 15-16, 18, 20, 26 



9791 



-P7" 



III. DETuLOFMEKT OF DEFIFITIOIIS OF IL4ZA:D0TTS OCCUPATIOl^lS 

Th3 sixteen year miniTnum required no more implementation. Each em~ 
Dloyer was aware of nis exact o"bli- ations. This was not true-'^ith regard 
to the hazardous occupation.-. So'ne 331 codes reauired lists of hazardous 
occuDations to he suh^iitted, Thet''^ lists were intended to d'='fine, in terms 
of the operations of th = indvistry, the occutiations S'o'^cif ical"! y T^rohibited 
to persons under the s-oecifie'd ase« These had to be silbmitted by the 
various :ode authorities within d=>f Inite time -oeriods; 87, within a 30 day 
■oeriod; 1!^1 within a 60 clay period; 73 within a 90 day period find 8 within 
a six months' period. Tiie'iv? codes ei+her specified "reasonable" time as 
a limit or n'^ specific date (Tabic- II). Few code authorities strictly 
complied with th^se ti'tne' r'eouirements. The' .greater number delayed these " • 
reports for several months. ■ In sora^ cases, trie final list was not approved 
for more than a year after the original date. 



9791 



-28" 

Some part of the d§lay '''cs inherent in reouiring the submission of a 
list '"'itnin so short e. period vhen the res^^onsihle code authority'' had not 
completed its organization. Many code authorities nere unfamiliar v;ith 
the manner in ': hich to ;^roceed, nor v/ere the exact requirements or stand- 
ards clear to them. Some advice and guidance nas necessary. The IJEA had, 
moreover, not definitively developed its ovai standards. 

The Lahor Advisor]'- Board staff took the firrt steps tov;ard develop- 
ing a method of assisting code authorities in this r7ork. An arraa-ement 
developed in i'overaber, 1933, hy the Lahor Advisory Board, provided that 
the latter V'as to request the Industrial Division of the Cliildren's Bureau 
to develop, through its Advisory Committee on Sm-olo^'-raent of i.'inors in 
Hazardous Occupations, appropriate lists for each industry. The latter 
used, as a "basis for its recommendations, the report issued in 1932 repre- 
senting the unanimous concliisions of this Committee aa to the hazardous 
occupations in industrj^, supplemented "by the availa'ble material nhich could 
"be obtained for specific industries. These recommendations of the Advisory 
Committee were considered to "be a highly satisfactory "base from r/hich to 
start. They represented the findings of some 19 persons professionally 
concerned T;ith the problems of accidents and disease in industry as they 
affect all worlcers in general, and child uorkers in particular. (*) 

The recommended lists of hazardous occupations sent oy the Children's 
Bureau vrere transmitted to the industiy thro'Ogh the La"bor Advisor;^ Board 
and the Deputy Administrator. (**) 



( *) IIRA Studies Special Exhi'bits TJork i^aterials iP. 45 

(**) O ffice kemorandura i:p 2 40 (June 28, 1934) 

"OCCUPaTIOFS U:"SUITED to PERSOilS U1D3H jUIG-HT^iill' (1G) YEAHS OP AGS" 

"Attention is called to Codes r-hich contain -orovisions reouiring the Code 
Authority to file vith i3JA lists of all occupations '.vhich are unsuited to 
minors under eighteen (18) years of age. 

"Each Industry Division i/ill prepare a reisort listing all Codes containing 
such -orovisions, and indicating '.Thether or not Code Authorities have filed 
the required lists. These reports \7ill be transmitted to the office of the 
Assistant Administrator for Field Admini stration. A weekly Divisional 
report indicating action ta!:en toward the submission of required lists, and 
the status of newly approTod Codes in regard to the above provisions will 
b.e submitted to the office of the Assistant Administrator for Field Admin- 
istTation. 

"It is the duty of Deriuty Administrators to call to the attention of Code 
Authorities the obligations v^hich they have assumed under the codes in re- 
spect to submitting lists of occupations UJisuited to minors under eighteen 
(18) years of age. 

"Code Authorities v/ill be urged to submit such lists at the earliest prac- 
ticable date. T7hon received these lists v;ill be transmitted to the Labor 
Advisor^'- Board for review. 

(Footnote Continued on next page) 
9791 



There was also sent to each code atithority, a coioy of a prepared 
statement ■■hich eicolained the natiire of the protilCim and the obligations 
assiomed by the code ruthori t,y. (*) This statement was intended to fami- 
liarize the memhers v;ith the character of the list, its purpose, methods 
"hy -Jhich it T7as to be furtliet developed and the procedure in IJT!A for con- 
sidering these lists. It v/rs pointed out that it was highly desirable for 
each industry to list these occu-'^ations as emplo^'ers assumed, under the 
code, 'the direct obligation not to employ persons under the specified age 
at hazardous occupations. It was felt desirable to have a specific list 
approved or aclmorle&ged by the Administration to direct and define the 
employer's obligations, and to guide the court in tpking official cogni- 
zance 'of the list as administrative determinations of ".'hat was reauired 
under the code. 

During the existence of the IJriA. 298 lists v;ere furnished to indus- 
tries which had codes reaxiiring the submission of such a list, and 57 
such lists V'ere submitted vcoqxi request to industries v/nich were not re- 
qtiired to send in lists of hazardous occupations for their respective 
industries (Table III). .One hundred a.nd t''.ent:f-eight lists \:ere trans- 
mitted to code authorities in tne eouipment and fabrica.ting group, includ- 
ing cases T/here codes were not reauired to present such lists. 

Very little opposition p^opeared to these s"cV:'gested lists of hazard- 
ous occupations. They were generallj'- adopted in toto 'oy the Code Author- 
ity. In some cases, additions were made to them bv the code authority, 
based on the more intirarte acouaintance \7ith the industry by the members 
of the code authority. Severa,l industries reauested that they be furnish- 
ed with specific data sup"oorting the recoi.imendations. In all such inrtan- 
ces^ original' data developed '^J the Advisory Committee of tlie Department 
of Labor were transmitted to the various industries, together with such 
recent materials as had a,ppeared. Only in the ctise of two occupations, 
did any really serious problems appear. They T;;ere the delivery boys on 
trucks and the off bearers of woodworking machinery. Despite the abundance 
of infcrm.aiion supporting the conclusions of the Committee, members of one 
code autho'ity were reluctant to incorporate these occupations in the 
approved lists as their inaivic^:-aal experience did not support the statisti- 
cal findings presented b- the Committee. Eowever, these same occupations 



(*) IIBA Studies S^oecial Exhibits '/ork ivlaterials rJo. 45. 

(**) (Continued from T>revious 'ga'g,e) 

"After consideration of the recommendations of the Labor Advisory Board 
and after such conferences with the Code Authorities as may be necessary, 
the Deputy Administrator will transmit such lists to the Code Record Section 
through the Division Acxiini strator, copj'^ to the o-^fice of the Assistant 
Administrator for Field Administration. 

"The Code Record Section v.'ill transr-it copies of the lists as received to 
the Public Relations Division for release. 



^*3y direction of the Ateinistra.tor 



G-.A. LYl'TCH 
Administrative Officer". 



9791 



-30- 



. TABLE III 

LISTS OF, KAZABDCUS CCCUPATIOIJS FU?xKISHED BY LABGH 
ADVISORY EGAED TO CODE AUTHORITIES 

II u ra t e r Of Lists 



Codes Requir- Codes Contain- 
TGTAL ing SalDrnis- ing Fo Such 

, sion of List Requirement 
' "by Code 
Authority 



TOTAL 


355 




298 


57 . 


:.etals 


2 




2 


— 


Hon-Metallic 


35 




26 


9 


Forest products 


14 




13 


1 


Chemicals 


21 




19 


2 


paper 


29 




29 




Ruhher 


3 




1 


2 


Equipment 


66 


(a) 


50 (a) 


16 


Food ■ 


33 


(b) 


32 (b) 


1 


Textiles - Fabrics 


21 




15 


5 


Textiles - Apparels 


24 




22 


2 ■ ■ 


Leather and Fur 


9 




6 


3 


Fabricating 


62 




53 


9 


Construction 


2 




— 


2 


Transportation 


5 




.5 ' . . 


. — 


Recreation 


1 




1 


— 


Service Trades 


4 




4 


— 


Distributing - Wholesale 


16 




13 


3 


Distributing - Retail 


7 




6 


1 


Territorial 


1 




1 





(a) Code 72, 3 lists, two for supplements 

(b) 2 lists for supplements 



Source: NRA Files - See also ERA Studies 
Materials No. 45 



Special Exliibits, Work 



9791 



"'61- 

had "been accepted as hazardous b- other code a^ithorities. In more thrn 
half of the cases in \.';iich these qnestions appeared, free discussion con- 
vinced the code authorities of the juctification of the Committee's recom- 
mendations. To conparatle -orobieras appeared -v/ith respect to other occupa- 
tions. 

The disposal of these suh.nitted lists varied consideraDl3'- as among 
the dii"ferent industries. Tb.e most definitive statenent can he made r.'ith 
resnect to tne lists" actually approved b;- an Adi^iinistrative Order or by a 
letter from the Administration (Table IV) . In all, 174 lists "ere in this 
class (A-p-iendix G-.?) . Of this atmber, 146 were aop roved and 20 acknowledged. 
Of the total a-o::iroved or ac'-no-.7ledt"ed, 164 rrere for codes reauiring the sub- 
mission of such lists and' 10 V;ere approved or acknowledged for codes vhere 
such lists v.'ere not recuired. Some 67 lists were approved for the equip- 
ment and fabricating classes. It ma^"- be noted that only 49.5 percent of 
the code authorities which had been required to submit lists had actually 
had lists approved or ac::nowled,:ved ty the Administration (Table V). The 
groups in which the percentage of approval v/as highest were: forest group 
(92.3), distribution-wholesale (84.5); transportation (56.7); fabricating 
(53.9); eouioment (58.0); and paper (50.0). 

As for the remaining lists, 47 were furnished industries whi'Ch were 
not" required to submit lists of hazaraous occuoations. In the case o'f the 
135' lists submitted to the industries where, the codes required such lists 
to be submit oed to the Administration, progress v/as not uniform, A few 
codes had been approved, by the Labor Advisory Board but hcd not as" yet been 
formally approved oy the Administration when the ITA codes were invalidated. 
Host of the code authorities hs-d not taken 'action on the^-.e lists. Constant 
reauests were made by the Administration for reports from the code authori- 
ties, but action was slow. It may be said that the -orogress in development 
and a-oproval of these 'lists was largely the resu].t of the constant' pressure 
applied "oy the staff of the Labor Advisory Board upon the Administration and 
the latter' s constpxit inquiries to the various code authorities. Hot all of 
the industries responded to these reminders. (*) 

Some industries felled to cooperate because they were preoccupied with 
the problems of afflnini strati on; others, however, were not functioning at all 
satisfactorily and took no action on any matters of moment. It followed 
that little wss to be expected of them. Some industries did not taJce action 
because the:^ maintained that no persons ur.der 18 ;:-ears of age were in their 
employ'' or tnat they sew no reason for developing lists since all the jobs 
in their industr;-- would be governed b;-- the 18 year minimum. In many of the 
latter cases steps were taken to am.end the codes to ra.i se the basic mini- 
m-uin age in the code. Onl3' a ho-ndful of lists ^.'ere unapproved because of the 
disagreement betv.een the code authorities and the Labor Advisory Board. In 
these cases, the latter insisted uoon the inclusion of one or another occu- 
pations to which the code authority would not assent. This case is e?:em- 
plified b-- tlie Spray Fainting and Finishing Equipment Manirf acturing Indus- 
try' which would not include spray painting as a hazardous occupation for 
younger persons, but agreed not to employ persons under 18 years of !?.ge in 
any capacity. Some industries fe.ared the effect of the approval of a list 
of hazardous occuprtions for persons tmder 18 j^ears of age upon their ind- 
ustrial compensation insurance rating. In these cases, the staff members 



(*) IxtA. Studies Special Exhibits T'ork i.'atei-ials I'o. 45. 
9791 



-35- 



TABLE IV 



LISTS OF HAZAiTOGUS GCCUPATIGHS ACKlIOmiEDGED 
GH APPRGVED BY THE ADlvilillSTRATIGil 









Industries Requiring 


Codes 


Wii 


bh No 




Grand 




Lists to 
Approved 


be Sabmitted 
Acknowl- 


Re qui: 


rement 




Approved 


Acknowl- 




Total 
174 


Total 
164 




edged 
25 






edged 


TGTAL 


159 


7 




3 


iietals 


3 


2 


2 


— 


1 




— 


i\Ion-Letallic 


11 


11 


8 


3 


— 




— • 


Forest products 


13 


12 


8 


4 ' 


*"— 




1 


Chemi cal s 


10 


10 


10 


— 


— 




— 


Paper 


. 16 


16 


16 


— 


— 




— 


Rabter 


1 


1 


1 


— 


— 




— 


Equipment . ' 


33 


29 


27 


2 


3 




1 


Food 


16 


16 


■ 14 


•2 


— 




— 


Textile-Fabri cs 


9 


7 ' 


6 


' 1' 


1 




1 


Textile- Apparel 


7 


7 


5 


2 


— 




— 


Fabricating 


34 


33 


25 


8 


1 




— 


Transportation 


4 


4 


4 


— 


— 




— 


Service 


2 


2 


2 


— 


— 




— 


Dist. - thole sale 


11 


11 


8 


r-f 

o 


— 




— 


Dist. - Retail 


3 


3 


3 


— 


— 




— 


Construction 


1 


— — 


mm-* 


"*"*" 


1 




" "■ ■ 


Source: NBA Studi 


es Special Exhibits Work Klaterials 


Ho. 45 







9791 



-33- 



TABLE V 



LISTS 0? HAZ.UI)CUS,GCCUPATIGHS APFHGTED 
MD ACiaiOTffjEriGED liJD ''SEQUJEED BY CODE 



TOTAL 

I.:etcls 

ron-iaetallic 

Forest products 

Chemicals 

Paper 

Ra'b'ber 

Equipment 

Pood 

Textile-Fabrics 

Textile-j^parel 

Leather and Pur .■ 

Pa"bri eating 

Transportation 

Re ere at i on 

Service 

Distributing- Wholesale 

Distributing-Retail 

Territorial 



Lists Required to be 
Submitted by Code 



o31 

3 
39 
13 
21 
32 

1 
50 
39 
17 
25 

6 
56 

6 

a 



9 
3 



, Lists 


Approved or 


AQknp' 


.fledged. 


"umber 


percentage 


164, 


'49.5 


2 


66.7 


11 


28.2 " 


12 


92.3 


10 


47.6 


16 


50,0 


1 


lOn.o 


29 


58.0 


16 


41.0 


'7 


41.2 


7 


28.0 


35 


58.9 


4 


66.7 


2 


33.3 


11 


84.:5 


3 


33.3 



Source: hha Studies Special Exliibits 7ork Materials No.. 45 



9791 



.- '-S4-' 

of the Labor Advisory Board explained rathei* fttll?/ to code authority repre- 
sentatives the methods by which iligurf>,nce ratings are determined, and ex- 
plained v'hy these lists, v/ould not adversely affect compensation insurnce 
costs hut would probably reduce the same. "Hhere it was possible to discuss 
this su-bjedt fully, objections v/ere usually removed. 

tio less responsible for tlie slow development by the code authority of 
an appreciation for its responsibilit,y in this reivDect v;as the attitude of 
i'lM officials vjho considered it a matter of routine handling and assigned 
it to periods of periodic review of code provisions. To overcome this atti- 
tude meetings xieve arranged by the staff member of the Labor Advisory Board 
charged with this resioonsibility with individaal Administrative Divisions to 
exrplain and outline the problems, the materials, rnd the significance of the 
work. The special educational effort bore fruit. It wis the persistent 
checking up of progress by the Labor Advisory Board and the services furnish- 
ed by the latter in the form of lists and explanations that assured com- 
pliance 'oy the code authorities v/ith code provisions reauiring the listing 
of hazardous occuoations within the industry. 

r/. • occTjpATiors phohibitsd to ..li'ORS AS iiAZAimous (*) ; ;, 

The codes usually reciuired that lists of "operations and occupations 
hazardous in nature or detrimental to health" be submitted 'by code author- 
it-y. To prepare such a list as has been e::plained, the ple.n developed in 
cooperation with the Children's Bureau of the United States Department of 
Labor was to furnish the code ruthorities of the separate industries with 
lists of three t-rpes of occupations which were considered unsuited to 
persons under the ase specified in the code for the specific industry. They 
f/ere:' occupations involving general hazards; specific mechanical hazards 
peculiar to the particular industrj)- cuid health hazards. Tliis classification 
was similar to the one developed by the Advisor3'- Committee on Emplovment 
of Liinors in Hazardous Cccxipations. The class of general mechanical haz~ 
ards included, such operations es constru.ction work, shipbuilding; manufac- 
ture, purification, storage or distribation of coal gas, water gas, natural 
gas, or the operation of gas pumping stations; viorh in or about mines, 
quarries, sand, gravel or clay banlcs or pits; work in or about ore reduc- 
tion works, smelters, bot rolling mill furna.ces, foundries, forging shops ' 
or any other places in which the heating, melting or heat treatment of metals 
is carried on; the cutting or welding of metals; hot galvanizing or tinning 
processes; junk or metal scrap yards; chauffeurs or assistants to chauf- 
feurs or as helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles; oiling, cleaning 
or wiping machinery in motion; and applying belts to a pullev in motion or 
assisting therein, or in proximitj'- to any unguorded belt or gearing. Among 
the specific mechanical hazards adopted in the vrrious lists of hazardous 
occupations are the operation of gas, oil or steam engines or other prime 
movers; the care, custody, operation or repair of elevators, cranes, derricks 
or other hoisting apparatus; the operation or assisting in operation of or 
taking materials from such machines as dough brakes, power driven la\mdry 
machinery; grinding abrasive polishing or buffing wheels; metal cutting 



(*) The lists of hazardous occupations e/oproved by LIEA Industries were 

distributed, by the Children's Bureau of the United States Department 
of Labor, as they were approved, to all state and local officials 
issuing emplo^Tient certificates. 



9791 



•. -35- 

machines iirving a guillotine actipn, .v.'ire caitting machines, "boring mills 
and the like. Tlie health hazards include the occimations in which heaw 
chemicals are manufactured; in v.'hich unstcrilized hides or anima>l hair\is 
used; in vdiich free silica d'.iFt, asbestos caict nay, be found; or other oc- 
cupations where some of the siiTistances with injurious properties may be 
found. (*) 

In addition to the generalized occupations certain indtistries added 
detailed reference to the exact jobs at which the hazard may be found. It 
was felt, however, that such r procedure was impractical for the most if 
not all industries since conditions varied within these industries and the 
occupational teminologj'' had not be'en standardised sufficiently to warrant 
its use. Onlj' in a selected number of indti.stries v/here specific job titles 
could be urimistal.ably identified \iexe the specific names adopted. 

On the v/hole these occuprtions were accepted as being unmistakably 
haza,rdous to .■'■-ounger persons. (**) 

V. COiiPLIAlJCZ 'JITH CHILD LA30R PROVISIOxTS 

The child labor provisions in codes presented but a slight problem 
to the iIRA compliance 3.ctivities. During the oeriod of transition from 
the free use of child workers, e::cept insofar as the state child labor lav/s 
regulated their eraplo^Tnent, the Fec'eral Emergency Relief Administration 
helped to relieve the de'iDendence in individual fanilies which couilted u-oon 
the earnings of the child wor]::er. On September '23, 1933, Harry L. Hopkins, 
Administrator, issiied an order to all his State Relief Administrations vruich 
read: 

"The recoyery pro-^ram is seeking to establish a 15 year minimuTi 
■ age for regular em'^loiTuent. This means that some children of 14 
a,nd 15 who now hold jobs v.'ill have to give them up and go back to 
school. In some cjires loss of 'child' s earning power, however 
meagre, will entsil great hardslii'os for individual families. 
In other cases ... this loss, of income may materialljr' lov/er 
the standard of living. To permit exemotions from tne minimum 
age on grounds of fgmily necessit3^ xrill be contrary to one of 
the main purposes of the T.R.A., v/hich is to soread emplo:"Tnent 
among adults and releare children to continue their education. . . 
May I urge the State and loca.1 Emergency Relief Administrations 
to secure at once cooperative arrangements v/ith the school sj'"stems, 
whereby . . . crses mpy be brought to the attention of the Relief 
Administrations. Upon investigation if it is found that the 
earnings of the m.inor are essential to maintaining a decent stan- 
dard of living in the family it is suggested, that assistance be 

(*) For a basic list see United States De-oartment of Labor, i^Ionthly Labor 
Revi ew (December, 1952) 7. 35, pp. 1315-1322 

(**) For an anal3^sis of the proscribed occupations with notations as to 
the industries V7hich' included them in their lists and copies of the 
hazardous qccupation-s for the industries where such lists were approv- 
ed, ( see Appendix G and G-2) 



9791 



-36- 

granted to the family " ('•') 

On the basis of this instruction, Dr. Leo irolrnan, Chairman of the 
Labor Aavisorj^ Board, earned the i"T?J. Corai^liance Boards on October 24, 1933 
against granting exemptions from provisions of the Presidential Heem'oloy- 
ment Agreements prohibiting child labor. He declared that: 

"It sho-uLl.d be fully understood by the local IHIA. agencies who 
v/i sh to cooperate v/ith the Adimini stration that no special e:;- 
emptions whatsoever are to be gro.nted from the child labor 
provisions of the codes. If the code specifies a 16 year mini- 
mum no child 'under this age should be employed". (**) 

The attention of the Relief Administrators to this problem throughout 
the entire period of the RRii. made it possible for the families of the unem- 
vloyed. to be less insistent uoon finding jobs for their children. 

Compliance records a'opepr to corrobora.te the fact that the Adminis- 
tration encountered little difficulty on enforcing tlie child labor clauses. 
It is the general consensus of opinion ranong industrial, labor and Govern- 
ment officials that there was a marked degree of compliance. The code 
histories for individual industries confirm this conclusion. 

Statistical evidence corroborating this im.pression maj^ be found in 
the relatively small number of complaints of violation of child labor pro- 
visions. There wore 317 complaints submitted to rlRA. These appeared in a 
small number of industries; in fact 35 of them were in industries in which 
exemptions were permitted for persons to work under 16 years of age for 
limited hours during the day. Of the total, 179, or 56.4 per cent were in 
the service, distribution and recreation trades. The next largest group 
consisted of 47 in the food industries of which 30 complaints .appeared in 
the baking industr^^ (Table Vl). These cases were easily disposed of by the 
'fRA compliance authorities, Of the total, 43 were immediately dropped as 
unfounded', and onl-,^ 19 '.vere still pending at the time of the invalidation 
of 'MA. The others ^'ere nroperlj,'' adjusted. 

The Southern State;- reported an undue proportion of complaints in re- 
lation to their total employment. In fact 103 complaints, or 31 per cent, 
came from the States ordinarily/ included within the South. Few of these 
'cases were dro'oped bv the Compliance Division since they proved well found- 
ed. Tlie other Stater, in which comparatively large numbers of complaints 
were filed were: California, 49, I.iassachusetts, 38, and Ohio, 17 (Table 
VIl). The California complaints came chiefly from the American Petroleum 
Equipment Indaistr-/ ^r-here minors under 18 had been employed at hazardous 
occupations. In Tassachusetts, 8 of the complaints came from the Ladies 
Handbag Industrj^ in the city of L3'-nn, arising largelj'- from the use of child- 
ren in homewoi-k. The Ohio complaints were scattered, with 5 coming from the 
Hetail Food and Grocer-'- Industr^/. It may be noted tha,t these complaints are 



(*) Letter from Harry L. Hopkins, Adxiinistrator to all State Emergency 

Relief Administrations - September 28, 1933. (l^P..A. Files, Child Labor) 

(**) Press Release l"o. 1040 . National Recovery Adnini stration, (October 
4, 13S3). (l"RA Files, Child Labor).. 



9791 



-37- ■ 

TifflLB VI 

CHILD LALOR COILPL^IIJTS 

BY Il^TDUSTHIAL ElOUPS 

Lfumber of Corny. laint?: - 517 



IIQUSTRI^IL GROUPS - (12 ) : Iwrnlier of Complaints 

Hetals • 1 . 

!Ton-I,ietallic minerals 1 

Porest Products 13 

Chemicals, Paint:: and Pra^s 2 

Paper 1 

RulilDer i 

Equipment and Manufacturing 22 

Pood 47 . 

Textiles - Pabrics 2 

Textiles - Apparel 15 

Leather aiid Pur 5 , ' • 

Pabri eating 6 _ 

Graphic Arts 5 

Constrij.ction 14 

Transportation and Coiarmnications 5 
Recreation -IS 

Seirrice Trades 27 

Distributing Trades -'JTholesale 12 

Distributing Trades - Retail 124 



9791 



for the most p£ rt derived frorn" alleged violations of the 16 3'-ear minimu'n 
rather than the rnininrarn for hazardous occupations. Enforcement of the 
letter provisions had not teen ,7;enerally undertaken in the com-oliance 
offices. 

VI. THE SFPSCT 0? CHILD LABOR PROVISIChS 

The number of child \7orl:ers in American Industry has declined during 
the last several decrdas. "Jhile the number of persons under 16 years of 
age gainfully employed in 1910 v/a.s 2 million, it '.7as reduced to one mil- 
lion in 1920 and 667 thousand in 1930. This trend was reinforced by the 
depression when the total number of jobs was reduced. IJevertheless, the 
abuses of child labor becsjne }jartic\:JLarly serious during the years 1932 
and 1933. The attention of the American pixblic, largely due to the dis- 
cussion of the Tederal Child Labor Amendment, had been necessarily concen- 
trated on these conditions. Tlie svrertshop investigation in the spring of 
1933 in Pennsylvania did much to confirm the impressions of exploitation 
which were generall,]'" susoected. The "baby" strikers who quit ^■ork in pro- 
test against the condition of their emplo.]/ment publicized the condition. 
The Governor of the Stp.te ap'oointed a Committee of Inquiry and subsequent- 
ly a Committee to look into ell sv/eatshop conditions. Other similar inves- 
tigations v-ere made by the National Cliild Labor Committee \7ith similar effect 
on public interest. (*) 

Similar findin^^^'s were made in other States "b:/ public bodies. In Con- 
necticut the CornmisKioner of Labor began a campaign against the sweatshop 
in the spring of 1932 softer a survey which disclosed its widespread char- 
acter. The -Dress was greatly aroused by this attiick. (**) 



C 



that 



Tae i'ar;'land Commissioner of Labor, in his annual report, commented 



"Another effect of the depression has been the lowering of 
ehild labor standards b]'' some emplo'^ers. i.Iany types of un- 
desirable jobs have opened u?, such as 'commission jobs' for 
boys. Eiese commission jobs are closely related to fraud, the 
boy being coached in hard luck stories l^y his employer in order 
to sell his wares or maga,zines". (***) 



(*) Courtney Dinwiddie, "The Rise and Fall of Child Labor in 1933". 
Annual Reiport of the Fational Child Labor Committee for the 
Year Erdin.T Se'otember 30, 1953 (Kimeographed) . 

(**) Eew Hp.ven Connecticut Times (l.iay 21, 1932), 

( * * * ) Forty-First Annual Report of the Commission of Labor and 
Statistics of i.iar'land (1932) pp. 27-23. 



c 



9791 



-S9- 



' T'A3I.E VII 
CHIxT LABOR COIiPIAi:"TS 
(B - Strtes -- Totpl 31V) 



Alatana ° 

Arkansas 4 ; ■ 

California-. ...... 49 

Colorado 4 

Connecticut ' ' -^ 

District of Coliimbia. . 1 

Florida 1 

Georgia 11 

Idaho 1 

Illinois 13 

Indiana 3 

lo'-'a 5 

Kansas 1 

Kentuclcy 1 

Louisiana 4 

Llaine 2 

Harj/'land 3 

Liassachusetts 30 

I ississiroi 11 

liinnesota 4 

liichigan 5 

liissouri 6 

'jest Virgin i 
wyoTning. . . 
9791 



J oritana 5 

Kebraska 5 

i'evadn 8 

^Ter; Hampshire .... 1 

L'e'TT Jersey 3 

Fe"7 llexico. ..... 3 



"e^T York H 



"orth Dp^cota 2 

r'orth Crrolina. ... 20 

Ohio 17 

Oklahoma 9 

OrecTon 3 

Pen^isylvania 4 

Rhode Island 1 

South Crrolina. ... 3 

South Dakota 1 

Texas 13 

Tennessee 1 

Utali 3 

Virginia 12 

/ashin^'ton 4 

'.'isconsi 1 6 

. . P. 



.. -40>^ 



In I"eu Yoi-y- State, tiie Secretary of Laljor observed that an increaEing 
proportion of Cinlciren are emplo^'ed in violrtion of lair. (*) 

The nituftion ','ith res'oect to c^iildren "before tJie IIRA marf bo s'ommar- 
ized as follo\.s: (l) Emplo-niient opoortiuiities for all. persons as vjell as 
children liad decreased, but the least desirable types of work for children 
have declined less than the other einpl07ments; (2) children v.'ere driven 
into enroloj^ments sivsh as street trades, industrial ho:me''.7ork', domestic 
and personal service, and industrialized a,5riculture, that are least 
regv.ia.ted 'and -mof-t subject to abuse; and (3) the standaTds of eraployinent 
for children had declined to unusiia.llj'- lov; levels, -particularly in the 
clothing and retail Inc-ustries, and also in other industries. 



(*) 



IJ. S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau, "Suinmary of the 
Conclusions of the Conference on Present Day Child Labor Problems" 
(Dec-ember -lO, 1932) . 



^1 



9791 



-41- 

The NIRA bscame law at a time i-'hen increasing protests of 
socially luinded individuals were a.ccorappnied by siuiilar Tjroteststions 
from iiidustry wuicli i^as feeling the efiect of the via.%e cutting in 
establishments '.vhere cliild '70rkers were oinrloyed. The NBA stopped 
these special abuses by setting a :.iininu:.i wa^'e \'i'hereby the employ- 
ment of child workers became less attrpctive. Furthermore, actual 
age minima were established in the codes. In still other cases 
prohibitions of homework eliMinated man:/ opportunities for the 
employiaent of child workers. The imoroved results \Yhich were 
evident during the NEA neriod were the -product of these develo-oments: 
minim'am wages, the prohibition or regulation of homework and child 
labor Tjrovisicns (*). 

The most complete available index of the effect of the IIEA upon 
the em-oloyment uf child workers is the nuhiber of employment certifi- 
cates issued during the period tindor consideration. Many of the 
States and citiec require that children shall have emnloyment certifi- 
cates when they go to work for the first time. Most frequently it is 
necessary for them to obtain these certificates only for manufacturing, 
mechanical and mercantile em-oloyments, ofi'ice and messenger work, and 
in some states, for domestic service, vfiiile these occupations do not 
cover all the employments, they are orirticularly pertinent since they 
embrace the very types of jobs found in the coded industries. Use of 
these figures iiriEt be qu.alified, however, by the fact that they are 
affected by the degree of eniorcement of the certificate law. The 
Children's Bureau of the Department of Labor has ta.bulated these 
figures for more than a decade. The Bureau's tabulation is used for 
a summary pjialysis of the employment certificate evidence (**) 

There was a marked, decline in the number of employment certifi- 
cates is-sued by the ,citi3s surveyed during the years 1933 and 1934 
despite the increased employment in KRA industries.) During these 
years the number Of children per 10,000 children between the ages of 
14 and 15 years receiving certificates declined from the rate of 930 
in 1929 to 210 in 1930. and to 67 in 1934. &ach a marked decline must 
be attributed, to a large extent, to the presence of the MRA codes, 
Uhile the number- of cities issuing no employment certificates to their 
minors was 5 in 1933, the number increased to 19 in 1934, The certi- 
ficates issued for work in the manufacturing and mechanical and mer- 
cantile establishments v;ere relatively smaJl; "for the most part 
children who obtained certificates" during the ITEA period left school 
"to go into domestic service; to help at home or to engage in other 
work not covered by the codes," To bring about this sharp decline 



(*) Se-e Or W. Rosenzweig's " I'RA ;^nd Industrial Homework ", a study by 
the Division of Review, 

(**) For 1933 material, consult the United States Department of Labor, 
Monthl-'.r Labor Review . V, 39 (December, 1934) pp. 1320-1331, 
"Child Labor in the United St.-tes as Reflected by Employment 
Certificates Issued". 

For 1934 material, consult sa:.ie magazine, V. 41 (December, 1335) , 
pp, 1477-1491, "Child Labor Under the IC-iA as Shown by Employment 
■ Certificates Issued in 1934", 



9791 



in child Ipbur and reduce em-nlo'nnent of children in NPiA industries to a 
negligible number the cooperf'tion oi the issuing officers and state labor 
officials ras most valuable. In many cpses tney revoked Certificates* 
In other esses the periaits were returned to them as em-plovers dropped 
children from the payrolls, i^irtheriiiure many officials refused to issue 
certificates to children unrer 16 yenrs' of age and offered additional 
facilities for the issuanpe of age certificates to thuse of legal age 
as a protection to the employer (*). 

That the IShk materially reduced the number of children in industry 
is evidenced from other sources. The Inaustrial .velfare Commission of 
Arkansas reports that "the enactment of the rational Industrial iiecovery 
Act has to a laige extent eliminated cnild labor problems in industry"'**). 
Similar testimony is presented in New York State '"here the Division of 
Junior Placement reports that the youne^er applicants had dropped in 
number. In ffct "this decrease has been particularly evident among 
fourteen and fifteen-year olas because under the provisions of the NRA, 
employment for these younger boys and girls has been practically elimin- 
ated" (***). The Forth .Carolina Department of Labor reports that - 

"The provision of the National xtecovery Act have wrought wonders 
for the abolition of child labor in Forth Carolina. In many 
quarters there is a feeling that child labor is a thing of the 
past . . . the Codes have eliminated hundreds of North Carolina 
children from industrial exploitation" (****), 

During the same period, it appears that minors of 16 and 17 years 
of age receiving certificates increased. ivhile the rate for 1929 ^''as 
1,179 certificates per 10,000 Minors of age, it had declined to 872 in 
1932 but had increased to 952 in 1933 and to 1,159 in 1934. These in- 
creases are to some extent due to the removal of the younger persons 
from jobs and to the increase in employment generally available during 
the latter year. 

The effect of the NHA raist also be judged in terms of its influence 
upon general legislation and opinion during the period. All persons 
interested in the promotion of the chile labor control "'ere aware from 
the beginning that the NEA might oe brief in duration and that existing 
laFS "'ould have to be brought in line with the NtJi. regulations in order 
to insure tneir permanence. T^^'O developments are noteworthy in this 
connection: The fii'st is the child labor amendment. Interest in 
the amendment I'-'as revived during the montns imiaediately preceding 
the NnA. ..'hile the measure had been submitted 



(*) United States Department of Labor, Children's Bureau, "Effect 
of NRA Codes on Child Labor" (June i, 1935) (uiraeographed) 

(**) State of Arkansas, "ureau of Labor Statistics, j^"', eventh 
Biennial Report . 1932-1934. 

( * * * ) Stat e of Nei" York Ann ual rteport_oi th e Industrial Commission 
f or the Tw elve onths Ended Decembe r 51, l_y35 (Albany: 1934- 
Legislative Document No, 21), 

(****) The ■u.lletir of the North Carolina Department of Labor, V.I, 
No. 5 (Decemuer, 1934). 

9791 



-43- 

to the States for ratification in 1924, only 6 states had ratified it 
■before 193b, Under the impetus of the pre-IEA and WdA discussion, 14 
additional Stater, ratified the amendment in 193o, and 4 in 1935 (*). 

The second development is indica'v^ed oy the fact that several states 
have undertaken to incorporate NRA standards into their State Laws, 
Prior to the KRA, only 4 States had established a 16 year miniimm age 
for general employment and three of these were non-industrial States, 
T'TO of these States raised the age rainim:iim just prior to the NHA (**). 
To this number rau.st nov be added the States of Pennsylvania, Ne^v York 
and Connectic^it ^^hich, in 1935, raised their miniiiium requirements to 
approximately NBA levels. 

Both of these movements for obtaining permanent legislation on 
child labor similar to that adopted in the codes r/ere undoubtedly 
expedited by the NM and impelled but not sufficiently to assure the 
early acceptance of them throughout the country, 

(*) The States vrtiich ha,ve ratified the Child Labor Amendiaent are the 
follo\7ing: 

(Prior to 1933): Arkansas (1924); Arizona (1925); California (1925); 
Colorado (1931); Montana (1927); Wisconsin (1925); 

(During 1933) : Illinois; Maine; Iowa; Michigan; liinnesota; Ne\; 
Hampshire; New Jersey; North Dakota; Ohio; Oklahoma; Oregon; 
Pennsylvania; Washington; West Virginia, 

(Daring 1935): Idaho; Indiana; Utah; Wyoming, 

(**) Tiiese States are: Utah; Montana; Ohio; Wisconsin, 



9791 



-44" 

VII. POST W£k CIIILVi LABOR COimiTlOllS 

The effectiveness of ITRA regulation is revealed in a negative 
nianr;Ler "by the events follo\7int'5 the Schechter decision. Tlic Children' s 
Bureau- of the Department of La^oor in a preliminarj" report on certificates 
issued durin,:; 1935 declared that while only 7,000 children were certi- 
ficated during the entire year of 1935, in the areas studied 11,000 v:erc 
certificated in the seven months of 1935 following the Scliechter deci- 
sion. The 3urc;u conrnents that "after the protective provisions of the ■ 
codes yrere removed, tlie nirnher of 14 and 15 year old children going to 
\7ork in these localities was 58 per cent larger than the numher going to 
work rJuring the 'alaole twelve months of 1934". Wliat is also significant 
is that the pro]:)ortion receiving certificates for manufacturing and 
mechanical occupations increased from 6 per cent in 1934 to 13 per cent 
in 1935, and for mercantile occupations from S per cent to 17 per cent (*). 
Re-ports from individual State Departments of Lahor confirm these statis- 
tical conclusions. 1!h.e ITorth Carolina State Department of Lahor urged 
employers "to maintain voluntarily the gains made possihle lij the code 
standards" Imt demands for certificates for the employment in textile 
mills increased (**). 'Uie rational Child Lahor Committee investigated 
the silk mills of Patterson, Few Jersey dtiring tiie suiTimer of 1935 and 
found children of 12 years of age employed in the mills (***), All 
available evidence suggests tlaa,t the removal of iTHA regulations pro- 
hibiting child lahor served to open' industry' s gates^ again to child 
workers. One of the sii':<nificsait iT3A contrihutions was therehy "being 
undone. 

VIII, XiOlTCLUSIOiT 

Ciiild lahor regulation hecruae one of the most generally approved 
provisions of TTHi codes; Though it had not heeh discussed during the 
formulation of the ITIHA as a su.oject for code regulation, it was gener- 
ally accepted hy industry. 'Dlle provisions re;gulatlng child labor con- 
stituted one of the m.a.jor pieces of social legislation undcrtalzen "by 
ITM. As such it hecarae an in tegi-al part of the 'JFiA labor program. 
The elimination of child labor through sj.iecific code- provisions was an 
affirmation of tiie effects likely to follow from the establishment of 
provision s respecting minimum v/ages, learners, homexvork and maximum 
hours. Eiese provisions, it wns contemplated, v/ould m?ke child labor 
unprofitable; the elimination of child labor could be best assured by 
the outrijit prohibition. 



(*) U. S. Department of Labor Children's Biireau, "Trend inChild 
Labor since ■ ITRA v;as Declared Unconstitutional" (Board on 
Prelimina?--y Reports) (January, 1936, T;/pewritten ;,;emorandum) . 

(**) ITorth Carolina Department of Labor, The "bulletin V. II, 
(July-December, 1935) 

(***)Hational Child Labor Committee, Annu a l Rep or t for the Year Ending 
September 50 , 1935. by Courtcney Dinwiddie, General Secretary. 



9791 



-45- 

In ra?^iy res-oects this rer,iilation excumlifiec'. the t^TJc of legisla- 
tion wM d^" could to undcrt.^lcen ^y the F3A. It could act on a national 
scalG whei'cr.s individual states could not. Althou-'jli dicapproval of 
child la-tor is quite j^cnrfral state legislation confirnin'; this conclusion 
ivxs not "been readily enacted. Employers in one state have been unvdll- 
in .": to encuinher themselves by stringent restrictions while other states 
could refuse to join the nioveraent. The result wr.s hadcv/ardness of .re^-^- 
lations in soac states and absence of our uniformity in the laws for 
the comitry as a v/hole, Biis condition was eli-ninated by the codes. 
Competitors could meet and establish similar terms of competition with- 
out fear of discrimination. This situation worked vdth particular ef- 
fectiveness with respect to child labor. The example set by the cotton 
textile code was accepted by all industries as a challenge and action 
was taken to comply with the sixteen year minimum. In other industries 
where hasardou s occupations v;ere present, a higher minimiim, usually 18 
years, was established for employment at these jobs. Considerable pro* ; 
gross was ma.de toward defining; the hn,zardous jobs. 

Tlie cooperative efforts of industry in this field sto;nd out as a 
strikin^^ exrjnple of the importance of having some national instrumental- 
ity which would permit socially desirable .:^oals generally approved with- 
in an in dastry to be ,-';iveu e:>q3resGion and the force of law. It like- 
wise illustrates how far-reachin^'; the effects of the voluntai"y action 
by one group ma:y be. &iGh a.dvances in one industry may set the pace for 
other industries raid thereby assure quidc achievement. 

Hot only, were standards v/ith respect to child labor advanced but 
the r e-;^ulations were also generally enforced vath little difficulty 
and complaint. The hardships of tiie family of the workers were re- 
lieved "oj the extensive system of organised assistance established in 
the United States during the period of the 13A. The movement was wel- 
comed by employers, workers and socially minded in'iividuals and v/as 
supported by all. 

The need of soaic new instruinentality v;hidi Y/ould effect the sajne 
achievements is erapliasir.ed 'by the collapse of standards since the in- 
validation of the codes. In some industries in ?/hich trade associations 
have promised to comply with code standards and where employers have 
generally approved these standards sjid in v/hich officials of State. De- 
partments of Labor "na,ve sought to emphasize the need of complying with 
the child labor ijrovisions of tlie code, the breakdown has appeared. 

Ivlany permaaient contributions v/ere made by this ei:pcrimcnt under 
the ITRA in the control of child labor: First, several states have 
adopted its provisions in their state la^Ts; secondly, many states have 
been added to those approving tlie Federal Child Labor Mendmcnt; thirdly, 
regulation of child labor at the standards prescribed by NRA has been 
proven to b practical both as social legislation and as a workable 
basis for factory operation; fourthly, voluntary compliance cannot reach 
the individual nonconfonnist in industry; fifthly, industry will readily 
comply with the provisions as established in IIRA codes; sixthly, much 
valuable experience in tlie development of specific regulation and the 
child labor problem.s of individual in dustries had been garnered. 



9791 



-46- 



Action in some form is necessary to assure tlie maintenance of the 
IIRA Gtandards developed to re;yj.late' child lalior. Among the steps most 
urgently advocated at present is tlie Child Lahor Ajnendmcnt to the Con- 
stitution of the United State: 



- •-) • 



9791 



"if 



APPENDIX A 



From: Children's l^ureau. U..S. Departme n t of Lal jor 



Aug:ust 15, 1933. 



Memorandum re DESIRABILITY OF A MINH.m AGE OF 18 IiT HAZARDOUS EMPLOYMENTS. 

While the Codes of Fair Competition are generally recognizing 16 as 
the minimum age for emTDlqyment it is equally desiralfle that the Code for 
some industries should -orohltit the emuloy^nent of persons -up to 18 years 
of age, at least in occupations involving extreme danger. Boys a,nd girls 
of 16 and 17 years of age are in many respects immature and imx)rudent vith 
undeveloTDed muscular coordination. These universal 'characteristics of 
adolescents mal-e it unsafe to eraiDloy them in or around complicated machin- 
ery. The proportion of accidents from machinery to boys and girls 16 to 18 
years of age are higher than for older ^-'orkers. Furthermore young persons 
are more suscBTitible than adults to industrial Doisons and should not be 
employed in places where they may he exoosed to harmful substances from 
which they may contract occupational disease. 

State legislation has long prohibited certain employments to children 
under 16 on the around of health and accident hazards, and the prohibitions 
are being gradually extended up to age 18. Some of the obvious prohibitions 
which are or ought to be in force for persons under 18 years of age will^ 
readilv occur to mind; for .example, operating circular saws in planing mills, 
metal punch presses, and stamping machines in machine shops; running 
elevators, and derrick's, street cars, or engines. 

- • Many thousands of young people sustain injuries each year because of 
the failure of employers to observe the principle of hiring none under 18 
for hazardous work. "Employers who are eager to maintain high standards ,; 
should be willing to cooperate in this matter, and the Codes provide a 
means for bringing more baci-rwai'd employers into line, and for reinforcing 
and extending State legislation. For each boy or girl displaced by the 
Code, and adult who is physically l»etter qualified^ for the work, and who 
has greater need for the ji)b, will be hired. Thus the policy will help 
■ to promote .re-absorption o.f the -unemployed. 



The following brief suggestions in tabular form may help to guide 
Deputy Administrators in formulating Code provisions to this point. The 
suggestions are based on a report of a Technical committee of Safety 
Engineers. Industrial Hygienists and Compensation authorities which 
studied this problem and issued its recommendations in December, 1932. 



Occupations in which . 
accident experience 
warrants the prohibition 
of employment for minors 
under 18 years. 



Construction work 
including repair or 
demolition work 

9791 



Industries whose codes 
should contain these 
.prohibitions. 



Construction 



States which fix 18 
years as minimum age 
for employment in 
this type of work. 



:Ala. ,Ark. .Calif. ,Conn., 
:Del. ,Ga. ;Md. .I-'ass. ,M.J. , 
:Ohio, Pa. ,Wis. , 



-48- 



Shipbuilding or in dry 
docks 

I7ork connected vdtli 
the generation of 
electricity 
Outside erection, 
maintenance or repair 
of electric wires 



Occupations in nhich 
accident experience 
v/arrants the prohitii- 
tion of emplojnnent for 
rainors under 18 years . 



Work connected Fith 
gas works or gas pump- 
ing stations 

Work in connection 
with oil wells, oil 
drilling operations 
or oil refineries 

Tfork in or in connec- 
tion with nines 

Qiiarries 

Stockyards , slaughter- 
ing or butchering 

Ore reduction works, 
Smelters, Blast ftir- 
nac e s , Fo undry , I'o rg- 
ing shops, or other 
places in v;hich the 
heating, melting .or\ 
heat treatment of. met- 
als is carried, pn 

In coniiection with 
metal working machin- 
ery e.g. punch ipressos 
boring mills, stamping 
raachines, grinding ci , 
abrasive machines., 
power-driven raetal 
planers, etc. 

Lumbering & Logging 
operations ' 



Shipbuilding & ship re- 
pair 

Electric Light Power 
Utilities 



Industries 'whose codes 
should contain these 
prohibitions. 



Gas operating utilities 



Oil 



Coal & I.Ietal H-ining 



Qp^arries 
Heat Packing' _ 



Iron & Steel' Industry, 
other Metal Industries 
Brass, Copper, etc. 



Foundries, machine 
shbjjs,' etc'.,' and' all 
industries working 
heavy 'metals '■ ' 



Lumbering &' Timber 



Md . , Mi ch . , Ohi o , '.Ti s . 



Ariz. ,Del. ,Hd. ,l,iich. ,Ohio, 
Wis.- 

Pa. , in the outside erec- 
tion and'repair of elect- 
ric wire Si including tele- 
graph and- telephone wires 

States which fix 18 yesrs 
as' minimum age for employ- 
ment in this type of work 



Ari'Z, jMich. ,i!.J. ,11 .Me::. ,lis. 
(Pa. ruling) 

I). C. ,Mich. ,N.Mex. ,Wis . 



JiTiz. ,Md. ,Mass. ,Mich. ,Mont . , 
Ilev. , Ohio, Pa, ,T7is.( covering 
one or more of the specified 
employments) 



ind. , Del.', Mass. ,Md. ,Mich. , 
IT.Y. , Ohio, Pa. , Wis. (covering 
one or more specified ma- 
chines 'Or similar machines) 



^reg. ( certain- 'oc'cupaitlQrls) ; 
•(17 irt-'■^Ti>s;■)••^■::. --iLit^ l-:-\l 



0'7 



9791 



-49- 



In connection \7ith an;'-: Lumber & timber Drod- 
ivood-vrorking machinery:ucts; furniture indus- 
e.g. sa'>7s, jointers, : try 
wood- turning or bor J 
ing machines, wood- : 
shar;ers : 



Bakery & Cracker mlz- 
ing aachinery 



Laundry machinery 



:?ood lu-oducts 



: Laundry & Dry Cleaning 
: establishments 



Work on electric rail-: 31ec trie railv7ays 
ways . ■ : ' 

Prime movers:.. : 

Dynamos :Hiscellaneous Indus- 

: tries 

Steam boilers : 
Other steam generating? ■ 
aoparatus : 

Occupations in which : Industries whose codes 

accident experience : shoiild contain these 

warrants the prohibi- :prohibitions. 

tion of employment for: 

minors under 18 years.; 



Jiich. , Pa. 



Mich. , Pa, , -mixing machines; 
(16, dough brakes, or 
cracker; machinery -25 States) 

Va. , girl, in aiF steam laun- 
dry. (16, 25 States) 

11 States 



Del. ,Md.,,Ohio 



(16, in 15 States) 
(16, in 14 States) 



Sta,tes which fix 18 years 
as minimum age for employ- 
ment in this tjrpe of v7ork. 



Hoisting apparatus, 
elevators 

Other hoisting appara- 

Oiling, v;iping or 
cleaning machinery in 
motion 

Delivery from motor 
vehicles 



iIiscellant:ous indus- 
tries 



II 



Retail & TJholesale 
trade (Groceries, meat 
stores, balceries, laun- 
dries, n3Y;spapers) 



13 States 

10 States 

14 States 



(Calif., 16. 'jTiile Calif, 
is the only State that has 
recognized this hazard, it 
is one which is growing 
rapidly.) 



HOIS : As to work on the following machines, most State laws recognize the 
hazard, but the legislative standards (most of them put into effect some 
years s-go) are not as high as accident emerience would demand. The usual 
minimum age is 16; however, general prohibitions applying to minors under 
18 may in some States be construed to prohibit their employment on ob- 
viously hazardous work. 



9791 



-so- 



Paper & paper products 
manufacturing machin- 
er,y, e.g. calendar 
rolls, paper cutting & 
lacing machines, 
stamping machines 

Eutber manufacturing 
e-.g, . calendar rolls 

Preparation of and 
tanning of hides , ' 

Leather working ma- 
chinery 



Meat grinding machines 
Dry cleaning machinery. 



Paper & Pulp, & paper 
products, including 
paper "box making; Hews 
print paper mfg. 



Hubljer 



Tanneries 



Leather working indus- 
tries(Boot & Shoe, 
Pockethooks, "bags, 
luggage, accessories, 
etc.) 



Food 



products 



Laundry & Dry Cleaning 
establishments 



(16 calendar rolls - 7 
States; paper cutting ma- 
chines - 13 States} paper 
lacing or lace machines - 
16 States; staiaping ma- 
chines - 12 States.) 

(16 , ^calendar rolls - 30 
States) 

(16, curing skins - N.J.) 



(16 , •t)-urnishing machines 
14 States; 16, stamping 
machines - 12 States) 



(16, Pa.) 
(16, R.I.) 



9791 



"51- 
APPEMDIX B 
SmCvIARY OF PU B LIC HEARING ON SSPTEIIBER 23. 1953 

The industry x)resented the recommendation thot there te no age limit 
on the employment of children in the sale or delivery of newspapers if 
they were atle and without impairment of health or without interfering 
with their school work to perform tnis work. They furthermore set a 14 
year age limit for non-mechanical departments where children hetween the 
ages of 14-16 might wor': for three years daily "between the hours of V a.m. 
and 7 p.m., but not during school hours. The discussion centered about 
the newsboys selling and/or delivering newspapers. It was contended by 
a representative of the publishers, (Mr. Stodghill) that newsboy work is 
not child labor. The character of the duties performed by this work are 
such as to warrant their being "added to the curricula of the school". 
"The children performed many duties! The boy is a merchant salesman, 
deliveryman, credit man and collector... Surely the boy who learns busi- 
ness fundamentals, who meets human nature, who learns the value of 
business policies on dependability, honesty, courtesy and promptness is 
better equipped to make his wa,y in the world than is the youngster who 
secures his education wholly within the four walls of the school room." 
Furthermore, the newspaper organizations take special pains to assure that 
every opportunity is given to the personal advancement and development 
of the young children within the organization. It was the policy of every 
newspaper "in every reasonable way to cooperate "ith the educational 
authorities and with the boys' parents with the object in view of maintain- 
ing and improving the boys' scholastic standing, their health and general 
well-being." Every effort is made by newspaper organizations to maintain 
such standards so "that parents can be assured that their son's connection 
with the circulation department will not be detrimental either by associa- 
tion or precept, but on the contrary will be helpful." Besides these 
advantages, the boys are enabled to continue school." This speaker for 
the publishers indicated in conclusion that "newspaper boys are working 
under ideal conditions highly beneficial to their development; their 
employment in no way interferes with the em.ploynent of adults ;, there is a 
part-time job requiring less than an hour and a half each day with an 
average weekly income so small that no adult could profitably undertake 
the work; the boys are encouraged and assisted to remain in school; the 
newspaper has done and is doing more toward developing boys for the future 
than any other social agency. " 

Much opposition was expressed to these views by organizations such as 
the national Child Labor Committee, national Congress of Parents 'and 
Teachers and National Educational Association, and by individuals. It 
was contended that the street trades are harmful to children of tender 
age whether they be boys or girls. In addition to subjecting children to 
the "unwholesome influences on the street, traffic dangers and health 
hazard, " the employment of child labor was considered undesirable because 
of the possibilities of employing older bo3''s and handicapped adults at 
such work. Huch evidence was submitted on the widespread recognition of 
the unsuitability of tnese trades as indicated by legislation prevailing 
throughout this and in foreign countries. In place of the publishers' 
proposal, it was suggested that no person under sixteen years of age be 
employed directly "or through any distributing agency, except bovs 
between fourteen and sixteen years to deliver or to sell ne^^spapers be- 
tween seven a.m.., and seven p.m., where such work does not interfere with 
hours of day school . " 

9791 



IwEIuOEAiiDU: 
To: 
From: 
Subject: 



-52- .- 
JU-PSISIX C 



Mar i:', 1-34 



General Hugla S. Jolmson, Adrniaistrator 

I.lr. Georfc^a 3iic]:ley, DiYi.sion 7. 

Cliild L--bor ProvisiC'iis' for the DAILY :3,7S?^i?33 ?lDLI'SEI"G 
CODE :vad the G?l4PHI.G ATJS CODE. 



Ulion tlie "basis of the re^o.rt of tAe Division of Hese-.rch and ,, 
Planninta, and ^ilta dree rej-jard to the r'e-i.ort of tne Child;: ens' Bureau of 
the De-_:;artm3nt of Labor, I recommend: 

1. Prohibition of tne. delive;y of sale of neiTS-^a'-'ers by .^'irls. 

This reflects, in :^,eneral, the reconiaend? tions of the ne\7S-^3;-'er 
"ublishers and th^^ v.-olfare or /--^n-izations consulted in ;-'re-iaririt- the re- 
port of the Division of Hesearch and Plannin-,-. Nearly 93^3 of the child- 
ren deliverint^; and selling; nev'S-ia,3^ers of those '-.ublishers res-_:o.ndint; to the 
questionnaire of the Eesearch and Plannintj Division (about VQ,':. of the total 
number) are boys. 

2. Prohibition of delivery or sale of nevjs'_"a"~ers by boys voider 
fourteen (l4) years of at.e, "provided t>iat, in cities under 100,000 _ o:-?ulation 
boys twelve, (l2) years of .at-:e and over presently employed in selliiitj or 
delivering;' neYirs-_pa;;)ers. rjay contint\e in such er.nloyment. 

.O.f the 32.8,395 children re-sorted as seliint^- and deliverinj^ 
nevi'spaners., 73. ."B^j are fourteen , (14) years of a.ge or over. 

3. Li-iutation of hours \7hich may be v,-orksd to 4 hours lei- day. 

Sit^hty-seven ^er cent 'S^j) of the nevs-ia leis re-^ortinj, give 
the avera.t^e hours '7orked duri z the vcek, excludin--; Satu.rdays, "at less'. . - 
tl:ian 2*. The uujnoer of hours v;or];;ed on Saturdays and Sundays is some- 
what greater, 

4. Retention of- the provisions of Article V, Section 1 (b) , 
of the Daily News;>a-_->er Publishi:it Code and Article II, Section 19 (b), 
Para-'.-raph 2 of the Graphic Arts Code, to- regulate the hotirs beti/voen rhich 
boys may sell nev.siapers. .■ 

The pirovinions referred to prohibit sale of newspapers between 
7 p.m. and 7 a.m. from October 1 to I.t^rch 31 and betv.'oen 8 p.m. and 7 a.m. 
from April 1 to September 31. 



f 



9791 



-55- 



5. Pro.iibitior'. of deliver;^ "07 lioys betvean tiie iiours of 
7 --.ra. and 6a. m . from October 1 to I.lo.rch 31, -^-nd bat-eea 8 :>m. and 
6 a.m. from A^u-il 1 to Ge-'tenber 31. 

6. ?rovis-on for tl.e su"3rvisi-6n of be t vaider 16 doliver- 
iiifa- and sellin;-: aGv,-s:-'a;er5, by -rovidin^ fc:.' filin; with the State Depart- 
ment of Labor, or other a ro-rir'.te strte or local ai-;ency, a Certificate 
sho'.vio^- that the boy is at I'^'.st 14- ye':>.rK of e.^?- and tliat his p.rents con- 
sent to the enrjloyme'.'it. 

Tv^enty (.30) st?tes and the District of Coltijnbia have ordi- 
nances i-ei^ulatin^- the vrorlc of children in street t/ades. All except 7 of 
these states i-eq\i.ire cnildren sellin,;.-, and deliverinji' nev/spapers to procure 
badges shov/in^; that they are entitled to do so. 

7. Reteation cf tl'.e "rovisi rns of the Daily reT,7saper Code 
and Graphic Arts Code that sale and deliver;,^ of newspapers may not be en- 
ja^ed in '"oy children ■ uhiess it may be done vdthotit irr^.airraent of health 
or without interference with the hova's of day school. 

8. That a conference be' held between the reyiresentatives of 
the Periodical Pxfolishers, the national Recovery Adrninistration , the De"^?rt- 
ment of Labor, anc" the ITational Child Labor Committee to consider the ques- 
tion of the ?,p"jlicability of the provisions recommended above, or sirailrr 
provisions, to the deliver^'' and sale of Periodicals. 

I ha.ve consulted v.-it;i officials of the De'^art'/ient of Le.bor 
v/ho apn-ove m,y recommendations with the followin^^ reservations: 

(1) That the " rohibition of delivery or sale of news-^a'iers 
by *s-;irls be limited to (_,irls under 18 years of at,'e. 

(2) That the limitation of hours y;hich ma.y be i-'-orhed per 
day be three (3) hours on school days and foxir (4) hoxirs 
on Saturdays, Sundays .?nd holidays. 

(3) That -provision be made that badi_;es inay be issued to 
children n)er;viitted to deliver and sell news-:'aners. 



E3W/ad 



Geor^'e .'.'uckley 
Division Seven 



9791 



— ^- .'' — 



APFIIin.rx D 



SUGG-ESTED Al'ET-TDlEYr TO ArJCCLE V, SECTION 1 
CODE FOR "'HS ^AILY TIEWSF IPE^. ^i;'3LISHIKG EU^^II'TflSS, - BY THE CODE 
AlITHO"RITY OF TIIE IKDUSTRY, - - Ko venter 13, 1934. 



SECTIOH 1. 



Publishers shall not employ persons under 18 years of age, ex- 
cept those who are able, vit'LOut icpairmeiit of heplth or interfer- 
ence with hours of da^'■ school ;- 

(a) To deliver newapao'^rs on routes; provided thpt no 
persons under 12 y-faars of af^e siicll be so employed, except 
that persons between 10 and 12 years of age eraploved on the 
effective date of this a.rnendment to deliver newspapers in 
c.Lties of 50,000 population or less may continue to deliv- 
er on routes in such cities. On school days no person 
ennloyed under this parai'Taph shall be employed for more 
than 3 hours. The hoiu-s fiv delivery shall be between 5 
A.ii. and 7 P.M, from Oc'orber 1st to March 31st and between 
5 A.l'i. and 8 y.I!. frum Arril l?t to September 33th. 

(b) To sell newspapers; provided thnt no persons under 14 
vears o^ a£-j bhall b3 s'' employed, excspt thao persons be- 
tween 12 an! 14 yeari of age may be so employed in cities 
of 50,. "OO populption or leaS. On sc-io>jl da-vs uo person 
employed under this oararraph shall It employeti for more 
tJian 4 hours. The hours for street srles shall be between 
7 A.M. pnd 7 P.l".. from Ocu-be-:- 1st to March 51st and be- 
tween 7 A.M. and B P.Ivi. Ir^'m .(^uril 1st to September 30th. 

(c) To oerform other part time services but not in man- 
rf act .'.ring and mech-\nical departments', for not more than 3 
hour; s day betweea 7 A.i.. anl 7 ?.M. , provided that no 
person under 14 years of a;:;e shall be so employed. 

(d) A publisher shall require from each such person em- 
ployed by him. to sell and/or deliver nev/spapers a certif- 
icate from the school attenr'ei by such person as evidence 
(l) that he is of qualified sga to sell and/or deliver news- 
papers under the orovisions of tl.ds Ge-tion, and (2) that 
such work may be performed ty such person without interfer- 
ence with school work or the hours of day school. 

(e) ■Publishers shall not employ female minors to sell or 
deliver newspaners. 

(f) Publishers shall use their best endeavors to see that 
the orovisions of this Section are observed by those who 
distribute their nevfspapers. 

November 12, 1934. 

9791. 



-55- 
aPFEITDIX E - (a** 



CODE AUTHORITY 
For The 
DAILY iJE'WSPAPER Pli)LISHIi\[G BUSINESS 
230 West Fcrty-Pirst St. 
New York 

May 1, 1935. 

To All Assenting iviem'bers: 

In aiDuroving the Code for the Daily Newspaper Publishing Business, the 
President expressed dissatisfaction with Article V, Section 1, and or- 
dered the government nem'bers of the Code Authority to "give particular 
attention to the -orovisions authorizing minors to deliver and sell news- 
papers . " 

Discussion of this subject has continued since earliest inception of 
the Code. Protracted negotiations have been carried on between repre- 
sentatives of the publishers and the United States Department of La- 
bor. Public hearings were held in Washington on September 22, 1933,____ 
and June 22, 1934. Various proposals were advanced, none meeting with 
mutual acceptance. 

At a meeting of the Code Authority, March 7, 1935, the government re- 
presentative asked that a further effort be made to meet the Administra- 
tor' s wishes. It was pointed out to hira then that on two occasions 
publishers had accepted proposals submitted to them by NRA, only to be 
followed by further government demands, and that in view of the rejec- 
tion by publishers of the amendment submitted in November, 1934, it 
appeared futile to present another proposition unless it could be ac- 
companied by assurance that its approval would end the controversy over 
this question. 

A special committee, consisting of Messrs. J. D. Barnum, now president 
of the American Newsviaper Publishers Association, Linwood I. Noyes, 
president of the Inland Daily Press Association, and Howard W. Stodg- 
hill, former president of the International Circulation Managers Asso- 
ciation, was appointed to draft new provisions and to confer with Ad- 
ministration officials. 

The committee re-oorted that attached draft of an amendment and strongly 
urges UTDOn publishers its acceptance. 

The Secretary of Labor by letter gives governmental approval and ex- 
presses hope that the amendment may be adopted. 

Accordingly, the Code Authority submits to assenting members the attached 
amendment to Article V, Section 1, of the Code, regulating the employ- 
ment of minors to sell and/or deliver newspapers, and recommends its._ . , 
adoption. 

Please mark the enclosed ballot and mail promptly one copy to: 



9761 



-oo- 



"Code Authority for the Dail:/ .TewsDa.per Publishing Business 
230 West 41st Street, New York, II. Y. '' 

(Sl-ned) S. H. T/illiains, 

Gecretary Code Authority. 



iPPEATDIX E (b^ 

Department of Labor 
Office of the Sscretary 
iTashington 

April 29, 1335. 

Mr. Slisha Hansen 
General Counsel, 
Newspaper Code Authority, 
Washington, D. C. 

Bear Mr. Hanson: 

I am informed by the Chief of the C>^ildren' s Bureau .that an amendment 
to the Code for the Daily ITewspai.er P v.blishing Industry has been pro- 
posed by tne. Code Authority and v;ill be submitted to the publishers. 

The standards incorporated in this amendment were develoried through 
conferences with representatives of this Beoartment and the Code Au- 
thority. 

Although these standards, are lower in some respects than those advo- 
cated by this Department, they represent, nevertheless, a real advance 
over practices now prevailing in many parts of the country. 

I an glad, Hherefore, to indicate my jordial approval of the agreement 
reached and ray hope that the amendineni, may be adopted, and that a way 
may be found by which the standards iucorrjorated therein may be conti- 
nued during a period long enough to demoistrate their value. 

Very truly yours, 

Frances Perkins 

Secretary of Labor. 

APPENDIX 3 (c) 

ESPORT 01 SPECIAL COMvIITTEE DESIGlilTED BY THE 
CODE AUIEO.^ITY TO C0HSIDE2 S;JGGSSTI0NS POR THE 
Ai.IEiJDivJl'JT OF AETiCLE V, SECTION 1 OP THE CODE. 

At the meeting of the Code Authority in New York on M?rch 7th 1935 
a committee consisting of Messrs. J. D. Barnum of Syracuse, N Y. , H 
W. Stodghill of Louisville, Ky. , and Linwood I. Noyes of Ironwood,' Mich., 



-57- 

was named to give consideration to the request of the Adininistra.tion 
that Article V, Section 1, of the Cod-a for the Daily Newspaper Pub- 
lishing Business te amended. This is the section dealing with the 
employment of persons under 16 years of age in the sale and delivery 
of newspapers and in other part-tiids woric in non-mechanical and non-iaanu- 
facturing departments. 

This Committee has given earnest consideration to the -Droblera. 
It made a trip to Washington where its meiahers, on March 26th conferred 
with Miss Katherine Lenroot, Chief of the Children's Sureau of the De- 
partment of Labor. It has conferred with niiraerous publishers and con- 
sulted many men o,ctive in the work of the International Circulation 
Managers' Association. It is now prepared to submit tc the Code Authority 
with it 3 recommendation a proposal for araendment Of the Cede which 
provides for striving out of all of Section 1 of Article V and substi- 
tuting therefor the provisions of the attached araendment. 



A brief explanation of this proposal is necessary. 

The delivery and pale nev:spapers by boys does not of itself mean 
that those boys are empiOyees. On the cciitrary by far the greater pro- 
portion of them are little merchants who buy their papers and then re- 
sell, them to patrons on their routes or to customers on the street. 
There has. been little difficulty over the employee problem. The real 
snarl has been over the insistence cf the Dwpartment of Labor that pub- 
lishers accept full responsibility for the activities of persons v/ho 
are not their employees and in no sense of the word under their control. 
The Publishers' Code Cor:;mittee, the Code .Authority, and this present 
Committee designated by the Cede A.uthority have always been ready to 
make anj'' proper provision for ennDlcyees. They have consistently re- 
fused, however, to foist ccmolete reEocnr."".bility upon publishers for 
h\indreds of thousands of boys who are n^'^ employees. 

The newspaper boy problem in these negotiations has consisted of 
several integral sub-problems. 

First, as to the boys employed by publishers. 

Second, as to the little merch?.nts to whom the publishers directly 
sell their newspaper for res-n.l3, — either to individuals or on routes. 

Our proposal maintains a clear, definite distinction between boys 
who are employees of newsT^a-pers and those who are not. It fixes no le- 
gal responsibility on pv.blishers d-aling \Tith independent contractors 
which by inference or iir;plica:;ion can bo construed as creating a con- 
dition or form of employment. It provides a minimum age Of 12 years 
for carrier emp^loyees and of 14 years for sales employees, except in 
cities of 50,000 population or les,-3 where boys between 12 and 14 may 
.be employed to sell. Boys between 10 and 12 now employed in delivery 
in cities of 50,000 poiovi.lation or less may continue to be so employed 
but no new boys under 12 can be taken on. There is no provision for 
a licensed badge system. There is, however, a provision that a boy 
must submit to his employer a certificate from a parent or guardian and 



9761 



-58- • 

the school attended by hira to the effect that he is of qualified age. 
The present code provision contains no minimum age and no restriction 
as to hours put in in delivery. The hours for street sales are retained 
and hours for delivery beginning at 5 A.M., and ending not later than 
7 P.M. in winter and 8 P.M. in summer are provided. 

Our proposal next provides that publishers shall not sell to little 
merchants who in turn engage in the delivery, or sale of newspa-oers un- 
til those little merchants furnish certificates that they meet the age 
requirements set out for those boys who may be employed in similar work. 

And finally, we propose that publishers shall not furnish or sell 
newspapers to any person for resale -or delivery under conditions con- 
trary to the foregoing provisions as to ages and hours and that where 
contracts or agreements are entered into for the distribution of news- 
papers they shall contain a provision requiring the distributor to ob- 
serve the same provisions which publishers have obligated themselves to 
observe. 

There is another proposal and that is that publishers shall not 
employ female minors to sell or deliver newspapers nor furnish newspa- 
pers to female minors for resale or delivery. 

We realize that this propos 1 possibly is subject to proper criti- 
cism. It represents a compromise in the nature of concessions by this 
committee to the views of the Department of Labor and concessions by 
the Department in turn to our views. There is today but a small per- 
centage of boys under 12 years of age engaged in delivery. Most of these 
are in cities of less than 50,000 population. Likewise, but a small 
percentage of boys under 14 are engaged in the sale of newspapers in ci- 
ties of over 50,000 population. The provisions enabling boys between 
10 and 12 now engaged in delivery in cities of less than 50,000 pop\ila- 
tion and those between 12 and 14 engaged in street sales in the same 
cities to continue will take care of most of these boys. 

The prohibition against girls engaging in this work with publishers' 
approval may work some individual hardships, but the total number of 
girls now so engaged is practically negligible. 

The provision for a certificate signed by the parent or guardian 
and the school is similar to present requirements insisted upon by many 
publishers. It was finally accepted by the Department of Labor when the 
Department became convinced that its insistence upon a licensed badge 
system under federal supervision and control would never be consented to 
by a vast majority of publishers. 

If approved b?/ publishers, we feel that the acceptance of this pro- 
posal by the Department of Labor will end a controversy of .many months' 
duration; set a standard for honorable part-time remunerative work for 
hundreds of thousands of American boys of today and the boys of tomorrow; 
and prove of inestimable public benefit thereby. 

In conclusion, let us say that throughout the long period of nego- 
tiations, first the Publishers' Code Committee, then the Code Authority, 
and finally this Committee have constantly kept in mind the welfare of 



9761 



-59- 

the boys of this coxintry who engage in the delivery and sale of news- 
papers. While voidoubtedly there have bee-n some abuses, there have 
been \intold benefits. The American newspaper boy is an intelligent, 
progressive, independent and alert future citizen. We have sought to 
retain for him his opportunity to employ his spare time so as to be- 
come a more valuable citizen. With those who would deny him such an 
opportunity and as an alternative throw hira on charity or public relief, 
we would not discuss the question. With those who might seek to abuse 
hira in his effort to progress and raalce a man of himself, we have no 
sympathy and to such we will lend no support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. D. BAH1TU14 
H. W. STODGHILL 
LIIWOOD I. BOYES 

Ar>ril 24, 1935. 



5761 



-60- 
APPElil-IX ? 

C0D3 Aur}:or.iTY 

for the 

d;.tly :',::-s?;f3R pujiishiyu ::usii^S3 

Jiuie 1 , 1 : 55 

national Recovery AclniniGtra.tion, 

Mr. Jack 3. ^ate, ..pivision Act.iinistrator , 

Hoom 1016, Larr "^i-;! 1 rfl ng , 

■i7aGiiin;^:ton, D. G. 

Dear I.ir. Tate: 

The Code Authority for the Dailv lleT/spaper RilDlishing Business initiated 
and suhmitted to all its assenting memhers on lu-y 1, 1955, an axnendraent to 
Article V, Section 1, of the Code relating to tne sale and deliver^'- of 
newspapers hy persons under 15 years of a:'::e. (Copy attached.) The Code, 
in Article VII, provides thr.t publishers do not consent to oxiy modifica- 
tion thereof, except as each inn,Y thereto suosequently a^ree. 

Response of newspaper members of this Code to the Ap.endment suhmitted has 
heen as follows: 

Por the Ai-iendment 647 

At~ainst the Ar-^encijnent 159 

Defective Ballots 6 

Hot Votin-:; 595 

The Code, Article VI , Section 5 (f), gives to the Code Authority power to 
initiate .^jnencjaents "which, upon a^^provpl of the AdiP-inisiirator, shall hecome 
a part of the Code," The Code Authority is ready to suhmit toid request ap- 
proval "by the Administrator of the jtoenchaent as fip-ilicaole to the 647 news- 
papers which have agreed to its adoption. But the Code Authority is advised 
hy its counsel, Ut„ Elisha Itrnson, that you, .aa Division Administrator, have 
informed him to the follov.dng effect: 

"That in view of the fact thrt the "HA is no longer functioning 
for the erii^'orcHment of Code provi';ions there is no occasion for 
this Code Authority to melce sny re .ort to the LIRA on this or any 
other £iiiien;umen"&; 

That IIRA coald not even receive the i-eport \uider present condi- 
tions rn.d undoubtedly vrould he coLtipelled to return it. 

If the iTf!,tional Recover:/ Ad^, inistrrtion is in -position to receive 
8iid a.-p-oTOYe re^-iort on the Amendraei.t , the Code Authority is pre- 
pared to 'irhmit the n?mes of the 647 newspapers that have filed 
their as'.;;ents to its rrovisioas." 

Verj.- trul^/ yours, 

/s/ S, ;i, Williams. 

S. li, Williams 
Secretary/, Code Authority for the 
Daily newspaper Publishing Business 

9791 



-61" 

A PPEMDIX G ( 1) 
/ 

Note: - Refer also to Atir^endix G (2) 

PRO HIBITION OF T70BK OF CHILDHEN UMDER IS IH OCCUPATIONS 
HAZARD'OUS OR INJURIOUS TO HEAI.TH 



The lists of hazardous or injurious occupations designated by the 
Code Authnrities as prohibited for minors under 18 are available for 
166 industries. 

Roughly, the prohibited occupations or processes may be classified 
in the following groups according to the type of hazard: 

1. Specific Machine Hazards 

2. General Mechanical Hazards 

3. Health Hazards 

4. General Hazards not classifiable under any one 

of the above. 

The following lists give t-he c^joiioatlorLS most frcqueiitly listed as 
hazardous or injurious to health, vith the industrioii in which each 
occupation or grouo of occupations was prohibited. 

HAZARDOUS OCCUPATIONS PROHIBITED TO MINORS UNEER 18 

SPECIEIC MCHINE HAZARDS 

Punch presses or stamninie machines if the clearance between the 
ram and the die or the. stripper exceeds one-fo urth inch . 

Air Valve Industry 
Alloy Casting Industry 
American Match Industry 
Band Instrument Manufacturing Industry 

Beauty and Barber Shon r'echanical Equipment Manufacturing Industry 
Bedding Manufacturing Industry 
Beverage Dispensing Equipment Industry 
Bicycle !Ianufacturing Industry 
■ Bobbin and Spool Industry 
Broom l'?.nufacturing Industry 
Bulk Drih!-ing Straw, Trapped Drinking Straw, Trapped Toothpick 

and Trapped ianicure Stick Industry 
Can Labeling and Can Casing ''achinery Industry and Trade 
Canvas Stitched Belt L'anuf acturing Industry 
Cast Iron Boiler and Cast Iron Radiator Industry 
Clay !:achinery Industry 

Coin-Operated I'achine i:anufacturing Industry 
Commercial Refrigerator Manufacturing Industry 
Counter I^rpe Ice-Crean Ereezer Industry 
Cylinder i^ould and Dandy Roll Industry 
Dental Goods and Equipment Indastry 

9791 



"62- 

SPECIFIC MCHINE H AZARD'S. (Con t Id ) 

Die Casting I-'anuf actiu ing Indlistry 
En-'-al op e 1 vAv.z I tj 
ppTi ana BlcTvor Irldu^=■Lry 
Pla-;^ M^/iufactnring xrx'vsivj 
FD.ocr r.lj-dvhinej: ;s: Indv, ■_ :. ry 

Fluted Cvip, tan Liiif^r ond Lace Paper Indtistry 
Fo!' 'ling ;?. Der 3o:: Ij^'3i.Ls'bry 

Ga:.'ter, Saspe'ader 3:'id "Belt I-'a-niTfarburing Industry 
• Gasoline Pa-ip hiLmufactvx.i'irij? Ind-istry 
Glazird 'ind FsiK-y Paper Irauv:ry 
Guained Label and EiiiDcssed Seal Industry 
Gu:?.:ninf~ Tnd^isiry 
' Gr.ay Iron '^'cij:-.^' "^y Industry 
Kousehold Ice r.'?frir';ratcr Industry 

Industrial Oil Cuming Enuip'nenb I'anufacturing Industry 
Indv-itrial Saft-'y Eqaipmenu Industry and Trade 
Ladder Ll^nufa^-^turing Industry 
Man u.rac 'curing a.id Uicles^le S-'JTgical Industry 
Mar:ine Auxiliary llaclnnery industry 
Marking i'ovricGs Indr.itTy 

Medium a.-.d Lotv ?i.-ic?d Jewelry I'^anufacturing Industry 
Metal Hat Lie a^jA Wood' Hat Block Indus-cry 
Metal Hospital rurnitare Manufacturing Industry 
Metal Tan"; J. Manufacturing Industry 
Metal Tfinlor Industry 

Musinal I'crchandise Tanufacturing Industry 
Nonferrous and Sr^eel Gonvector Manufacturing Industry 
Open Pa^Ter Drinking Cud and Round Nesting Paper Container 

Indti.stj^y 
OrnsTient-sl Molding, Car-s'ln"- and Turning Industry 
Packaging Machinery Industr^y a.nd Trade 
Paper Box ?'ach.inery Industry and Trade 
Paot^r Disc Milk Bottle Ca-o Industry 
Pappr Stacionery and Ta"blet Manufacturing Industry 
Petroleum Eauipnent Industry and Trade 
Piano ?'a.iTiracturing Industry 
Pipe Fipple Manutacturing Industry 
Pipe Or;'?ar. Industry 
Flumping Fixtures Industry 
p-^'^cious jewelry Producing Industry 
Print Poller and Prii't Block Manufacturing Industry 
Printing Ilquipnrout irdustry and Trade 
Rolling Steel Door Mrnafacturing Ind.ustry 

Safety Razor and Safety Razor Blade Manufacturing Industry 
Sanitary Milk Bottle Closure Industry 
Steam Heating Equipaent Mruiufacturing Industry 
S'jrgical Dressings Industry 
Tag Industry 

Toy and Playthings Industry 
Trailer Manufacturing Industry 

Unit Heater and/or Unit Ventilator Manufacturing Industry 
Upholstery Spring and Accessories Manufacturing Industry 



9791 



-63- 
SPSCIFI C MAC HIira HAZARDS (Cont'd ) 

Vacuum Cleaner Manufacturing Industry 

Valves and Fittings I'anufacturing Industry 

I7arn Air Register I'anufacturing Industry 

Waterproof Pauer Industry 

Waxed Paner Industry 

TJood Cased Lead Pencil Manufacturing Industry 

Metal-cutting machines having a guillotine action . 

Air Valve Industry 

All-Metal Insect Screen Industry 

Alloy Casting Industry 

Band' Instrument Manufacturing Industry 

Beauty and Barber Shop Mechanical Equipment Manufacturing 

Industry 
Bedding Manufacturing Industry 
Beverage Dispensing Equipment Industry 
Bicycle Manufacturing Industry 

Can Labeling and Can Casing ^'achinery Industrv and Trade 
Cast Iron Boiler and Cast Iron Radiator Industry 
Clay ITachinery Industry 

Coin-Operated Machine Manufacturing Industry 
Commercial Refrigerator Manufacturing Industry 
Counter Tyoe Ice-Cream Freezer Industry 
Cylinder I'ould and Dandy Roll Industry 
Dental Goods and Equipment Industry ■ 
Fan and Blower Industry 
Floor Machinery Industry 
Gasoline Pump Manufacturing Industry 
Gray Iron Foundry Industry 
Household Ice Refrigerator Industry 

Industrial Oil Burning Equipment Manufacturing Industry 
Knitting, Braiding and '^ire Covering I^'achine Industry 
Ladder Manufacturing Industry 
Marine Auxiliary Machinery Industry 
Marking DSvices Industrj'' 

Metal Hat Die and ^ood Hat Block Industry 
Metal Hospital Furniture Manufacturing Industry 
Metal Tank Manufacturing Industry 
Metal rindow Industry 

Musical Merchandise Ilanufacturing Industry 
Nonferrous and Steel Convector Manufacturing Industry 
Packaging Machinery Industry and Trade 
Paper Box Machinery Industry and Trade 
Petroleum Equipment Industry and Trade 
Piano Manufacturing Industry 
Pipe Nipple Manufacturing Industry 
Pipe Organ Industry 
Plumbing Fixtures Industry 
Precious Jewelry Producing Industry 
Print Roller and Print Block Manufacturing Industry 
Printing Equipment Industry and Trade 
Rolling Steel Door Manufacturing Industry 

9791 



-64" 

SPECIFIC IVIACHINE HA ZARDS . (Cont'd) 

Metal- c at tin-? Tnachines h a ving a ^-^illotine action . (Cont'd) 

S-^^i^t/ Ra/or and Safety Paznr Blade Manufacturing Industry 

Stesm Fea.tin.p; 'aquipiiient I'l-'.i-.ufacturing Industry 

Toy and Playthings Indust; y 

Traile.v J'.inufp.ctariijf,- I'nduscry 

Unit Heater and/or Unit Ver; :,lator !Ianufacturing Industry 

Uriholsterj Spring and Acccosories I^^anufacturing Industry 

Vacuum Cleaner I'anufacburiuf ln;la!?-''ry 

Warm Air Pegister I'anufacturing Inductry 

paper-cut cing machines having a i^uillotine action 

American l"'atch Industry 

BotiJin and S^oool Industry 

Envelope Indue, tr-y 

Excelsior and '^^icelsior Products Industry 

Flag Manufacturing Industry 

FliJt?d Clip, Pan Liner and Lace Paper Industry ilCj^ 

Folding paper Box Iiidustry 

Glazed and Fancy Paper Industry 

Gum^nei Lahel and Emhossed Seal Industry 

G-uiTiming Industry 

Open paner Drinking Cun and Pound Nesting PaT3er Container 

Industry 
Paper Stationery and Tahlet Ifanufacturing Industry 
Tag Industry 

Toy and Playthings Industry ^ 

Waterproof Paner Industry 
Ttered" Paper Industry 

Power driven metal planing machi nes 

Air Valve Industry 

All-Metal Insect Screen Industry 

Alloj'' Cf.ating Industry 

Band Inctrtiment Ilanufacturing Industry • r\^ 

Bedding L^anufacturing Industry >._ 

Beverage Dispensing Equipment Industry 

Can Labeling and Can Casing Macninery Industry and Trade 

Clay Machinery Ind\;.Gtry 

Coin-Operated Machine Manufacturing Industry 

Cylinder Mould and Dandy Roll Industry 

Fan and Elovver Industry 

Floor Machinery Industry 

Gasoline Pump Manufacturing^Industry 

Gray Iron Foundry Industry 

Household Ice Refrigerator Industrj^ 

Industrial Oil Burning Equir)ment Manufacturing Industry 

Ladder Manufacturing Industry 

Marine Auxiliary Machinery Industry 

Marh.ing Devices Industry 

Metal Hat Die and Wood Hat Block Industry 

Metal Tank Manufacturing Industry 

Metal Windor? Industry 

Musical Merchandise Manufacturing Industry 

9791 



-65- 

SPECIFIC IvLACH I NE HAZARDS (Cont'd ) 

Po\^er driven met al ■planin!^: machines (Cont'd ) 

NonferrouG and Steel Convector Manufacturin,^ Industry 

Packaging Machinery Industry and Trade 

Paper Box Machinery Industry and Trade 

Petroleum Equipment Industry and Trade 

Piano Manufacturing Industry 

Pipe Nip-Die ITanufacturing Industry 

Pi-oe Organ Industry 

Plumbing fixtures Industry 

Precious Jewelry Producing Industry 

Printing ^quinment Industry and Trade 

Rolling Steel Door Manufacturing Industry 

Steam Heating Equipment Manufacturing Industry 

Textile Machinery Manufacturing Industry 

Toj'- and Pln.y things Industry 

Trailer Mianufacturing Industry 

Unit Heater and/or Unit Ventilator T'anufacturing Industry 

Vacuum Cleaner Manufacturing Industry 

Valves and Fittings Manufacturing Industry 

Wire Stitching machinery 

All-I!etal Insect Screen Industry 

Band Instrument Manufacturing Industry 

Beauty and Barber Shop Mechanical Equipment Manufacturing 

Industry 
Bedding Manufacturing Industry 
Beverage Dispensing Equipment Industry 

Can Labeling and Can Casing Machinery Industry and Trade 
Coin-Ooerated Machine Manufacturing Industry 
Pan and Blower Industry 
Floor Machinery Industry 
Gasoline Tumn Manufacturing Industry 
Household Ice Refrigerator Industry 
Industrial Safety Equi-oment Industry and Trade 
Marking Devices Industry 

Medium and Low Priced Jewelry Manufacturing Industry 
Musical Merchandise Manufacturing Industry 
IJonferrous and Steel Convector Manufacturing Industry 
Packaging Machinery Industry and Trade 
PaTDer Box ?'achinery Industry and Trad<5 
Petroleum Equipment Industry and Trade 
Pipe Organ Industry 
Precious Jewelry Producing Industry 
Print Roller and Print Block Manufacturing Industry 
Printing Equipment Industry and Trad* 
Rolling Steel Door Manufacturing Industry 
Toj'- ?nd Playthings Industry 

Unit Heater and/or Unit Ventilator Manufacturing Industry 
Vacuum Cleaner Manufacturing Industry 



9791 



-66- 

SPECIFIC I'lACHIME HA ZARDS (Cont'd ) 

OPERATION OF POTOR- DRIVEN WOODWOBKING IvIACHINERY. OR TORK AS OFFBEARER . 

American }''atch Industry 
Band Instrument Manufacturing Indus trj-- 
Bedding Fanufacturing Industry- 
Beverage DisTjensing Equipment Industry 
Clay Machinery Industry 

Coin-Operated Machine Manufacturing Industry 
Commercial Refrigerator Manufacturing Industry 
Cordage and Twine Industry* 
Counter Type Ice-Cream Freezer Industry 
Dowel Pin Industry 

End Grain Strin "'ood Block Industry 
Excelsior and Excelsior Products Industry 
Flag Manufacturing Industry 
Floor Machinery Industry* 

Household Ice Refrigerator Industry ^ 

Industrial Oil Burning "Equipment I^anufacturing Industry \^ 

Ladder Manufacturing Industry 

Manufacturing and "[Vliolesale Surgical Industry* 
Marine Auxiliary Machinery Industry 
Metal Hat Die and Wood Hat Block Industry 
Mopstick Industry 

Musical Merchandise Manufacturing Industry 
Petroleum Equinment Industry and Trade 
Piano Manufacturing Industry 
Picture Moulding and Picture Frame Industry 
Pipe Organ Industry 
Plumbing Fixtures Industry 

Porcelain Breakfast Furniture Assembling Industry 
Print Roller and Print Block Manufacturing Industry 
Printing Equipment Industry and Trade 
Smoking Pipe Manufacturing Industry 
Toy and Playthings Indiistry 
Trailer Manufacturing Industry 
Trout Fanning Industry in the i^stern Section 
Upholstery Spring and Accessories Manufacturing Industry 
Venetian Blind Industry 

Wood Cased Lead Pencil Manufacturing Industry 
Wood Plug Industry 

Wood Turning and Shaping Industries 
Wooden Insulator Pin and Bracket Manufacturing Industry 

POWER DRIVEN PRINT IIIG PRESSES 

Bulk Drinking Straw, Wrapped Drinking Straw, Wrapped Toothpick 

and Wrapped Manicure Stick Industry 
Fluted Cup, Pari Liner and Lace Paper Industry 
Folding Paper Box Industry 
Glazed and Fancy Paper Industry 
Gummed Label and Embossed Seal Industry 
Gumming Industry 

Open Paper Drinking Cup and Round Nesting Paper Container 
. . Industry. ^ -- . .-.. - .. . . 



c 



9791 * Worded slightly differently. 



-67- 

SFECIFIC MACHIN E HA2ARI)_S_lCont!A) 

POWER DRIVEN PRINTING PRESSES (Cont'd ) 

Pappr Disc Filk Bottle Cap Industry 

Paner Stationery and Tablet I'anufacturing Industry 

Sanitary ;'ilk Bottle Closure Industry 

Tag Industry 

Toy and Playthings Industry 

Used Textile Bag Industry 

TJatcrproof Paper Industry 

TTaxed Paper Industry 

NETAL PLATE Pmm rJG l.IACHJNv.S FUNDIING MATE RIAL OF MORE TH AN 
0.2145 INCH IN TKICOESS 

Air Valve Industry 

All-Metal Insect Screen Industry 

Alloy Casting Industry 

Band Instrument Manufacturing Industry 

Bedding Manufacturing Industry 

Beverage Dispensing Equipment Industry 

Can Labeling and Can Casing Machinery Industry and Trade 

Clay Machinery Industry 

Coin-0-oerated Machine Manufacturing Industry 

Com'^.ercial Refrigerator Manufacturing Industry 

Counter Type Ice-Creara Freezer Industry 

Cylinder Mould and Dandy Roll Industry 

Die Casting Manufacturing Industry 

Fan and Blower Industry 

Floor Machinery Industry 

Gasoline Purap I-Tanufacturing Industry 

Gray Iron Foundry Industry 

Household Ice Refrigerator Industry 

Industrial Oil Burning Equipment Manufacturing Industry 

Knitting, Braiding and Wire Covering i^achine Industry 

Ladder Manufacturing Industry 

Marine Auxiliary r'achinery Industry 

Marking Devices Industry 

Metal Hat Die and ?7ood Hat Block Industry 

Metal Hospital Furniture !:anufacturing Industry 

Metal Tank Manufacturing Industry 

Metal ITindow Industry 

Musical Merchandise Manufacturing Industry 

Nonferrous and Steel Convector Manufacturing Industry 

Packaging Machinery Industry and Trade 

Paper Box Machinery Industry 

Petroleum Equipment Industry and Trade 

Piano Manufacturing Industry 

Pipe Nipple Manufacturing Industry 

Pipe Organ Industry 

Plumbing Fixtures Industry 

Precious Jerrelry Producing Industry 

Printing Tquipment Industry and Trade 

Rolling Steel Door Manufacturing Industry 

Steam Heating Equipment Manufacturing Industry 

9791 



-68- 

SPECIFIC LIACHIKE HAZAITDS (Cont'd ) 

METAL PLATS BSNJItIG ILA.CHINES HANDLING mTEFJAL OF MORE THAN 
0.5145 INCH IN THICKNESS (Cont'd ) 

Toy and Playthings Industry 

Trailer Manufacturing Industry 

Unit Heater and/or UniteVentilator Manufacturing Industry 

Vacuu'3 Cleaner Manufacturing Industry 

Valves and Fittings Manufacturing Industry 

ta aCHINEIg HAVING A HEAVY ROLLING OR CRUSHING ACTIO N 

Abrasive Grain Industry 
All-Metal Incect Screen Industry 
Band Inctruraent I'an'ifacturing Industry 
Beverage JJis-oensing Eqv.iprent Industry 
Bol)l)ir: .-••'id JiToooi Inc'uij'. •.•■■;: 

Can La>.el?ng and Can Cv.'ri-'.g i'°chinery Industry and Trade 
CJfy I)ri?.in Tile Mam::.fac o ;.ilng Industry* 
Clay Itcnine^y Indust'";' 
Clay and Shale Iloof:.ng Tile Industry 
Coin-Operated ''iachine I'anufacturing Industry'' 
Dental Goods and Equi-oraent Industry 
EarthenTfa,re I'anuj'acturing Industry 
Pan and Blower Industry 
Feldsnar Industry 
Floor Machinery Industry 

Floor and Fall Clay Tile Manufacturing Industry 
Foundry Suioply Industry 
Hair Clcth Manufacturing Industry 
Household Ice Refrigerator Industry 

Industrial Oil Burning Equipment Manufr?cturing Industry • 
Ladder Manufacturing Industry 
Marine Aujciliary Machinery Industry 
Marking Devices Industry ' ' 

Medium and Lov" Priced Jewelry Manufacturing Industry ^' 

Metal Tank Jianufacturing Industry 
Metal ?Jindow Industry 

Musical Mercha.ndise Manufacturing Industry 
Nonferrous and Steel. Convector Manufacturing Industry 
Ornamental Molding, Carving and Turning Industry 
Pacl<fging i'fechinery Industry and Trade 
Paper Box Machinery Indus try and Trade 
Petroleum Equipment Industry a,nd Trade 
Piano Manufacturing Industry 
Pipe Organ Industry 
Plumbing Fixtures Industry 
Precious Jewelry Producing Industry 
Print Roller and Print BlocV Manufacturing Industry 
Printing Equipment Industry and Trade 
Retail Jionuraent Industry 

Rock and Slag ^i'ool I'anufacturing Industry 
Rolling Steel Door 'Manufacturing Indur.try 

Safety Razor and Safety Razor Blade Manufacturing Industry 
TaDioca Dry Products Industry (124 rolling machine) 
Unit Heater and/or Unit Ventilator Manufacturing Industry 
. ■ Vacuum Cleaner Manufacturin g In dustry 



9791 * iTorded sliglitly differently. 



-59- 

SPECIZIC iviACKINE HAZAi-JS. (Cont'd) 

i/iACHINEEY USED IN THjl COLE HuLLIMG UJ; HJlAVY IviLTAL STOCK 

Air Vplve Industry 

All-Metal Insect Screen Industry 

Alloy Casting Industry 

Band Instrument kianufrcturing Industry 

Beddin^i: Manufacturing Industry 

Beverage Dispensing Equiximent Industry 

Bicycle I.tenuiacturing Industry 

Can Labeling and Can Casing i/.achinery Industry and Trade 

Clay Maciiinery Industry 

C-jin-Operated lipchine .manufacturing Industry 

Cylinder .lould. and Danoy holl Industry 

Die Casting manufacturing Industry 

Fan and Blower Industry 

Floor iiachinery Industry 

C-asoline Pu'np Manufacturing Industry 

Gray Iron i'oundry Industry 

Household Ice Refrigerator Industry 

Industrial Oil Burning Equipment Manufacturing Industry 

Knitting, Braiding and '.are Covering Machine Industry 

Ladder ivianuf acturing Industry 

Marine A'U>.iliary I'lachinery Industry 

Marking Devices Industry 

Metal Hat Die and ,;ood Hat Block Incustry 

Metal Tank ".manufacturing Industry 

Metal ..ind.^w Industry 

f.iusical i.ierchandise ilanuf ^cturing Industry 

Nonferruus and Steel Convectur ilanuf acturirg Industry 

Packaging achinery Industry and Trade 

Paper Box Maciiinery Industry and Trade 

Petroleum Eouipinent Industry and Trade 

Pian^ anufpcturing Industry 

Pipe Nipple- Manufacturing Industry 

Pipe Organ Incustry 

Plurahing Fixtures Industry 

Precious Jcx'^elry Producing Industry 

Printing Equipment Industry and Trade 

Ri-lling Steel Dour 'lanuiacturing Industry 

Steam Heating Equipment ;.anuf acturing Industry 

Trailer i.ianuf acturing Industry 

Unit Heater and/.>r Unit Ventilator llanuf acturirg Industry 

Vaccuura Cleaner '.ipnufacturing Industry 

Vplves and Sittings i.ianul acturing Industry 

G-P JIIDII'G. ABRASIVE. POLISHU ' r., Ot. BUFjIFG xHEEL S. PRO VIDED THAT 
APPREl'TICES JjFK-UTIFG \MDKh CGFDITIOFS OF BOUA PIPE A PPhEFTICE - 
SKIP :.iAY GRIFD TrlSlR 0\.'S TOuLS 

Air Valve Industry 

All-I'Ietal Insect Screen Industry 

Alloy Casting Industry 



9791 



-70- 

sPECiFi c i.iaci:i::e rjiz^iaDS, (coat'-;) 

&ri]::i)ii:g-. abrasive. Poi.i3i:ii'fT, C2 i^u rrii:^ /:eel s. frovided ti:at 

" APPRSIv TICEd GPERATm} Ul^'DER C':'::Di:;I0:;5 CP 3 GKA fide APPKSITTI3S- 
SIIIP HAY GRIK'D TllSIp 'ovr^ n^OQL S, (Ocnt':l ) 

Band InGtin:arient i.ipjraf actui-in^ Industry 
Bes.uty and Sarber Sliop i'ecb.anical ET.v.i7ment 
Bedding Lian-u-facturing Indur-try 
Beverage Dispensing Eqmpracnt Industry 
Bicycle Llanufactui'ing Industry 
Bobbin and Spool Industry 

Can Labeling and Can Casin;^ liacliinery Industry and Trade 
Cast Iron Boiler and Cast Iron Radiator Industry 
Clay Uacliinery Industry 

Coin-Cperated Liacl-.ine i.ipiiufacturing In.Uistry 
Commercial Refrigerator i.sxiTifac taring Industry 

Counter type Ice-Crseaa Prsezer Industry ^ 

Cylinder iiould ajid Dandy Roll Industry ^ 

Dental Goods and' Squip.nent Industry 
Pan and Blower Industry 
Floor Liacliinery Industry 
Gasoline Pump Llanufacturing Industry 
Gray Iron Poundry Industry 
Tloseliold Ice Refrigerator Industry 

Industrial Oil B"arning Equipment I;Ianu:!;'ac taring Industry 
Ladder i.ianof acturing Industry 
Hanuiacturing and Wholesale Surgical Industry 
Marine Auxiliary Lacliinery Industry 
Marking Devices Ind\istry 

lietal Hat Die and '';ioo(L Hat Eloclc Indr^stry 
Metal Hospital Purniture Manufacturing Industry 
Metal Tanic Mmu-f acturing Industry 
Metal Window Industry 

Musical Merchandise i.ianuf acturing industry f, 

IJonferrous and Steel Convector Manui" acturing Industry 
Pachagiiig Mr.chinery Indiistry and Trade 
Paper Box Machinery Industry and Trade 
Petroleum Equipment Industry ais"! Trade 
Piano Manufacturing Indastry 
Pipe Hippie Manufacturing Industry 
Pipe Organ Industry 
'Pltunbing Fixtures Industry 
Precious Je'.velry Producing Industry 
Print Roller and Print Block Manufactiiring Industry 
Printing Equipment Industry and Trade 
Rolling Steel Door Manui acturing Industry 

Safety Razor and Safety Razor Blade Man^af acturing Industry 
Stea..! I-Ieating Equipment Manufac tiring Industry 
Textile Print Roller Engraving Industry 
Toy and Playthings Industry 
Trailer Manul'acturing Industry 

Unit heater and/ or Unit Ventilator Manufacturing Industry 
Upholstery Spring and Accessories Manufacturing Industry 

9791 



-71- 

SP3CIFIC ..JlC'-HiTS IIAZiJDS, (Cont' d) 

GHTiDTTr A3^ 4■SIVE. ?:i.is:. ..n:G. '.3 suffik g j-lsls^ phovidbd t:jit. 

"Ipppf^T-^?^ np-^ATI-^5 ILCDE-l COr PITICio 01' BOI^A i lDE APr:iE:^TIC3- 
ST.-.IF LiAY C-EIIID TIJIIH 0.. "^ TOOLS, (Oont'cl') 

Vdccuum ClerJier Uanufo-Cturing Industry 
Valves and Fittingsi Uanaf acturini^ Indaistry 
Wan.i Air Purnace I.icji-afacturini^ Industry 
Warm Air Re.^ister i,i?aiufr.cturiu.j Indxidtry 

CIRCULAR SAV.'S USSD Ii: T'l: CUTTIlICr OF I.iSTALS 

Air Valve Industry 

All-lietal Insect Screen IndVustry 

Alloy Casting Industry 

Band Instrument Uanufacturing Industry 

Beauty and Barber SIiop i.Iechfjiical Eouipment Manufacturing 

Industry 
Bedding i,;?nufacturinG Industry 
Beverage Dispensing Eouipnient Industry 
Bicycle I.ianui'acturin'j Industry 

Can Lat)eling and Cexi Casing' Uachinery Industry and Trade 
Clay Hacliinery Industry 

Coin-Operated Liacliine IlsiiufPoCturing Industry 
Corxiercial Refrigerator Uanuiact-aring Industry 
Counter Type Ice-Creaa Freezer Industry 
Cylinder llould and Dand.y Rod Industry 
Faji and Blower Industry 
Floor Liachinery Industry (*) 
Gasoline Pui-ap lianufacturin^ Industry 
Glazed ajad Fpucy Paper Industry (*) 
Gray Iron Foundry Industry 
Houscihold Ice Refrigerator Industry 

Industrial Oil Burning Eqtiipi.ient Lieoiufacturing Industry 
Knitting, Braiding and Wire Covering l.Iachine Indiistry 
Ladder I.ianufacturing Industry 
Liarine Auxiliary Macliinery Industry 
Lledium and Low Priced Jewelry l.Iaziufacturing Ind-ustry 
Uetal IJat Die and Wood llat Block Industry 
Iietal Hospital Furniture Llaniif acturin^ Industry 
Metal Tanlc llanuf acturing Industry 
lietp-l Vfindow Industry 

i.Iusical lierchsjidise I.ianufacturing Industry 
iTonferrous and Steel Conve'ctor llanufacturing Industry 
Packaging Llachinery Industry and Trade 
Paper Box Llachinery Industry and Trade 
Petroleum Equipment Industry ajid Trade 
Piano Manufa-cturing Industry 
Pipe Hippie Manufacturing Industry 
Pipe Organ Industry 
Pluraliing Fixt'ores Industry 



(*) Worded sliglitly differently, 
9791 



-72- 

SPECIFIG iy.CI-IIlN"E l-IAZAaPS. (Cant' d) 

CiaCULAH SAV/S USED III TIZS CUTTIlCGr 'CJ? ia2TAI.S, (Cont'dV 

PreciovLS Jewelry Producini; Industry 

Printint:; Equipment Industry p.nd Trade 

P.ollin^; Steel Door Liariui"ac taring Industry 

Safety Eazor and Sai'ety Pa.zor Slade Up'jnufacturing Industry 

Steam IVeatinj^ Equipment L'iaxiuf acturing Industry 

Trailer Manufacturing Ij^dustry 

Unit Heater and/or Unit Yentilator iimiufac taring Industry 

■Vaccuurn Gleaner Lianufacturing Industry 

Valves and Pittings I,ia.nufacturing Industry 

BOILING- LULL 3 

Air Valve Industry 

All-i.ietal Insect Screen Industry 

Alloy Ca^sting Indu-.^try 

Bajid Instrument I.Laiiufacturing Industry 

Beauty and Barter Sliop ileclianical Equipment lianufacturing 

Industry 
Bedding Manufacturing Industry 
Beverage Dispensing Equipment Industry 
Bo'b'bin and Spool Industry 

Gan L-alieling and Can Casing Machinery Industry and Trade 
Clay llac'iinery Industry 

Coin-Operated liacliine lianufacturing Industry 
Cylinder iiould and Deaidy Poll Industry 
Pa.n and Blower Industry 
Floor Hacliinery Industry 
G-asoline Pump lianufacturing Industry 
G•r^.y Iron Poundry Industry 
Household Ice Refrigerator Industry 

Industrial Oil Burning Equipment lianufacturing Industry 
Knitting, Braiding said Wire Covering tiachine Industry 
Ladder lianufacturing Industry 
liarine Auxiliarj- iiachinery Industry 
liarking Devices Industry 

Liedium and Low Priced Jewelry lanufacturin^. Industry 
iietal Hat Die and ?ood Hat Black Industry (*) 
lietal Tank lianufacturing Industry 
Metal "Jindow Industry 

i,iusicall,ierc!iandise iirnuf acturing Industry 
Konferrous and Steel Convector lirnuf acturing Industry 
P?,ckaging Iiachinery IndrLstry and Trade 
Pa,per Box Machinery Industry and Tro,de 
Petroleum Equipment Industry and Trade 
Piano I/ianufacturing Industry 
Pipe Nipple Mrjiufacturing Industry 
Pipe Organ Industry 
Plwnbing Fixture ■--• Industry 



(*) V/orded sliglitly differently. 
9791 



-73- 

sPECi?.ic :j\.c:;dti] ::aza:j)s, (cont'civ 

3GHI1'G I.:iLLS. (Cont'd) 

Precious Je\7elry Producing, Indastry 

Printing Eqiiipraent Industry and Trade 

Rolling Steel Door i.ianufr.cturing Industry 

Stea-n l.:eating Eouijpment lianuf acturin;^' Industry 

Unit JTeater ajid/or Unit Ventilator Llajiuf acturing Industry 

Vaccuurn Cleajier i.ianuf acturing Industry 

Valves and Pittings Manufacturing Industry 

PGVffl:: SIIEilHS GF .iI,L KIl.'DS 

67 Codes 

CREASE.iS. SLITTE RS. GE CHILiPIKG. OH GHAIIIING RGLLS HOT GUAHSED 
AT TI:E POIr'T C-F GPERATIOI)! ~~ 

19 Codes 
PI OILII-G. CLEAIJIIIG OH yiP IKG liACHIlSRY G2 S-:ArTIKG 11: i.IQTIQK 

Abrasive Grain Industry 

Air Valve Industry 

Alloy Casting Industry 

American L:atcli Industry 

Bajid Instrument Majiuf-cturing Industry 

Satting ajid Padding Industry 

Bedding Liaaiuf ac turing Industry 

Beverage Dispensing Equipment Industry 

Bicycle aanufacturing Industry 

Bobbin and Spool Industry 

Brocrn l.ianuf actuj:'ing Industry 

Bulk Drinking Straw, V/rapped Drinking Straw, Wrapped Tootli- 

pick and trapped Liajiicure Stick Industry 
Can Labeling aaid Can Casing Liacliinery Industry and Trade 
Canning Industry (Fruit and Vegetable, but not fisli Canning)(*) 
Canvas Stitcked Belt kanufacturing Industry 
Card Clo tiling Industry 

Cast Iron Boiler and Cast Iron P^diator Industry 
Cigar I.ianufacturing Industry 
Cla.y Drain Tile lianufacturin^ Industry 
■Claj'- LiacL.inery Industry- 
Clay and Sliale Roofing Tile Indusliry 
Coffee Industry 

Coin-Operated Machine iianufacturing Industry 
Cora-iercia]. Refrigerator I.ianufacturing Industry 
Cordage and Twine Industry 
Corn Cob Pipe Industry 
Cotton Cloth Glove iianufacturing Industry 



(*) 'Jcrded sliglitly differently 
9791 



-74- 

sPEGiFic i.L<iC;iii:3 :az;uIDS, (c--nt' ':; ) 

la OILING. glej!j:i:'G g:: .7i Pi] \a ljaclii"::^! ca 3::jgTi::a i:- i,::ticw 

Coioriter T;/pe Tce-Crcsan -Preczer Industry 

Cr-asli3d Stone, Sand and CTrr-vel',: and Slag Industry 

Cur] ed IIa,ir lir'nuf acturinf- Industry 

Cylinder liould and Deaidy Holl Industry 

Dental Goods and ETaiprnent Industry 

Die Casting llenuf acturing Inc'ustry 

DoWel Pin Industry 

Ea.rtIiGnware Liajiuf acturin-^ Industry 

End Grrln Strip V/ood Block Industry 

Envplopo Indiistry 

Excelsior and E;:cclsior Product's Industry 

Ten and Blo¥/cr Industry 

Peed MsjLuf ac turing Industry 

Feldspar Industry 

Plag Lianufacturing Inriustry 

Ploor ilachincry Industry 

Plo:r and 'Jail Clay Tile Uanafacturing Industry 

Fluted Cup, Pan Liner and Lace Paper Industry 

Folding Paper !3ox Industry 

Foundry Supply Industry. 

Fuller's Earth Producing cjid uarkcting Industry 

CrP-rter, Suspender and Bolt: ila.nfi'acturing Industry 

Glazud and Fancy Paper Indastry 

Gray Iron Foundry Industry 

Garmed Label and Embossed Seal Industry 

Uetal llr^jik Manufacturing Indvistry 

Lietal "..'indov.' Industry 

Mopstic': Industry 

l.iusical iierch.andise lianufacturing Industry 

Konferrous and Steel Convector iisjiufacturing Ind^istry 

Open Paper Drinlcing Cap and Ho"and Kn sting Paper Container 

IndListry 
Ornamental j.iolding, Carving -and Turning Indu^jtry 
P'Ckage 'Liedicine Industry 
Packaging ilaclainery Industry and Trade 
Paper Box Uackinery Industry and Trade 
Paper Disc Llilk 'Bottle Cap Industry 
Paper LIrkers Felt Indu'^trj'- 

Paper Stationery and Tablet I.ianui'actv.ring Industry 
Perfume, Cosmetic and Other Toilet Preparations Industry 
Petrol erja Equipment Industry cind Trade 
Piano Lianufacturing Industry 
Picture lloulding and Picture Fr.-une Industry 
Pipe Kipple Manufacturing Industry' 
Pipe Orga,n Industry 

PlUiibing Fixtii.res Industry ' ' 

Pov/der T-'Jii Industry 
Precious Jewelry Producing' Industry 
Preserve, Liaraschino Cherry and Glace Fruit Industry 



9791 



-75- 

SPECiriC UAC::!!;!! TAZAilDS. (Cont'-l) 

i:: cili::g. cleai:ii:g ore ./ifii^g ijic::iime5Y on s'/j^tixIC- ii? jictiga'. (Cont'd) 

Print Holler oxiA. Print Block I.ianuf ac turing Industry 

Printing 3quipraent Industry ttJid Trade 

Printing' Ink Manxifac turing Industry 

Haw Peaxiut l,ullin£ Industry 

Heady-Liade Furniture Slip Covers Llanufac turing Industry 

Hetail Lionwaont Industry 

Boiling Steel Door l.Ianuf acturin;,-,- Industry 

Sri"ety Razor and Safety Razor Slade i/Ianufactu.ring Industry 

Sand-Line Brick Industry 

Sanitary Liilk Bottle Closure Industry 

Sanitary and '.Taterprocf SpecialtlGs Liantifac turing Industry 

Scrap Iron r^nd Steel Trade Industry 

Seconda,ry Aluninura Industry 

Smelting pjid Refining of Secondary l.Ietals into Brass and 

Bronze Alloys in Ingot Form, Industry Engaged in the 
3r-ioking Pipe iianufac turing Industry 
Soft Fibre lianufn.c turing Industry 
Spice Grinding Industry 

Steaja 'leating Equipment lianui'act\iring Indiistry 
Surgical Dressings Industry 
Tag Industry 

Tapioca Dry Products Industry 
Textile Machinery Lipjiufac turing Industry 
Textile Print Roller Engraving Industry 
Toy and Playthings Industry 
Trailer ilanufaxturing Industry 
Trout Farming Industry in the Eastern Section 
Unit heater and/ or Unit Ventilator Manufacturing Industry 
Upholstery Spring and Accessories IhJiufac turing Industry 
Used Textile Bag Industry 
Vaccuum Clea,ner hajiufac turing Industry 
Valves rzid Fittings i.ianuf ac turing Industry 
Venetiaji Blind Industry 
Jarm Air Furnace i.ipjiufac turing Industry 
'i7a.r;-a Air Regiriter lirnufac turing Industry 
Waterproof Paps r Industry 
T/axed Paper Industry 
v/et iicp i/Ianufac turing Industry 
whea.t Flour iJilling Industry 
vTliolesale Lionumental Grsjiite Industry 
'Tiiolesade i.Ionurnenta.l i/iarble Industrj/ 
7itch hazel Industry 

Wood Cased Le.3.d Pencil i.ianuf actLiring Industry 
'Jood Plug Industry 

Wood Turning and Sliaping Industries 
Yfooden Insulator Pin ruid Braclcet Hanxifac turing Industry 



9791 



-76- 

SPECIFIC LLA.CIIII.TE IIAZiLRDp. ( Cont ' d) ■ .'.'.' 

APPLYING BBLT 5 TC PULLEYS Ii; ^iOTICv: GH ASSISTIl'G fllEBEIi: 

A"brasive Grain Industry 

Air Valve Industry 

Alloy Casting Industry 

Araericmi I'ictcli Industry 

Bsjid Instrument Lianufac taring Indactrv 

Bedding Maaiuipcturing Industry 

Beverage Disijensing Equipment Industry 

Bicycle Manufactra-ing Industry 

Bobbin and Sped Indus tr:'' 

Broom Ilranuf acturin.j^ Industry 

'BulL Drinlci'n'ii' -Straw, '.Trapped Drinl-:inj Straw, .7 rapiied T ootii- 
pick and '//rapped Liaiiicure Stick Industry 

Can Labelin,2 and CanOasin^ I.:;ackinery Industry and Trade 

CaJininii Ind-astrj;' (Pi'^J.it and Ve.^etable , out not Fisl: Canning)( *) 

Canvas St itc/ie d 3 elt i;u: nufrcturini^ I ndustry 

Card C lo thing Industry 

Cast Iron Boiler and Cast Iron Hadiator Industry 

Cigar i.Ieiiui'ac turing Industry 

Cla^ Draan Tile Lrjiuiacturing Industry 

Cl?y and Sliale Hoofing Tile Industiy 
-■ . Clay Hachinbry Industry 

Coffee Industry 

Co in-Operated liachine '. LI"nuf -ic tur ing Indus try 

Co'Timercicl Tief rigerator i.ianuf acturing Industry 

Cordage and Twine Industry 

Com Cob Pipe Industry 

Cotton Cloth Glove I.ianuf acturing Industry 

Counter Type Ice-Crean Freezer Industry 

Crushed Stone, Sand rjid C-ravel , raid Slag Industry 

Curled hair Llanufadturing industry 

Cylinder I,io"ald and Daaidy Roll Industry ^ 

Dental Goods and Equ-ipment Indiistry \ 

Die Casting Ifenri-f acturing Industry 

Dov/el Pin Industry 

Earthenware LlanufaCturijit,, Industry 

End Grain Strip Wood Blcch Industry 

Envelope Industry 

Excelsior and Excelsior Products Industry 

F?-n and Blower Indv-stry 

Peed l.i£?Jiufacto.i-ing Industry 
- ..hPeldspar Industry 

Flag licaiTif acturing Industry 

Floor liachincry Indvtstry 

Floor and Wall Clay Tile Lifnuiacttiring Indiistry 

Fluted Cup, Pan Liner and Lace Prpsr Industry 

Folding Paper Box Industry 

Foundry Supply Industry 

(*) V/orded slightly differently. 
9791 



-77- 

SPECIFIC IIAC'III^ EAZAapS. (Cont'c') 

AP?L-:iy:^ ESI.T3 TO FJLLaYS Ii: UCTig'I :R ASSISTIUG TliaR^IIT. (Cont'd. y 

Puller's Sartli Producing r,ni I.iarkatin,^ Industry 
Gr.rter, Saspender r,nd Belt i.iriiufr.cturinv; Industry 
Gl"zed and ?ancy pr.per Industry 
Grny Ircn Foundry Industry 
' Guinraed Lcbel caid Bmbossed 3er,l Industry 
Guinming Industry 

Hair Cloth i,;rjiui'r,c turing Industry 
Housdar.M Ice Refrigerator Industry 
Ice Cream Cone Industry 
Imported Date Paclcing Industry 

Insecticide rnd Eisinfectant Ilanufacturing ' Industry 
Industripd Oil Burning Enuipraent I,u.nuiacturing Industry 
Knitting, Braiding and 7/ire Covering I.iacliine Industry 
Ladder Uanufacturing Indii^try 
Liacaroni Indus trj'' 

Llachined Waste Mrjiufacturing Industry 
liarine Auxiliary I.iachinery Industry 
liarking Devices Industry 

Medium rjid Low Priced Jev/elry uianufacturing Industry 
UetrJ. Kat Die ?Jid 'Jood "at Ulock Industry 
lietal Hospital Furniture Uanufacturing Industry 
Metal Tank Manufacturing Industry 
Iletal Y^ndow Industry 
uopstick Industry 

Musical MercLandise MrJiufacturing Industry 
iJonferrous rJid Steel Convectcr Mpjiuf acturing Industry 
C'oeT Paper Drinlcing Cup -rjid Hound nesting Paper Container 

Industrj'' 
Ornrjnental Molding, Canning r-nd T-urning Industry 
Packr^e Medicine Industry 
Packaging iiacliinery Industry and Trade 
Paper Box i'lacliinery Industry and Ti-ade 
Paper Disc Milk Bottle Cap Industry 
Paper iirkers Felt Industry 

Paper Stationery pjid Ta'olet i.lrjiuf actui-ing Industry 
Perfume, Cos:.:etic rjid Ctker Toilet Preparations Industry 
Petroleum Equipment Industry and Trade 
Pipjio Maniifacturing Industry 
Picture Moulding and Pictx.re Frrjne Industry 
Pipe Hippie Ilrjiufac taring Industry 
Pipe Organ Industry 
FluTibing Fixtures Industry 
Powder Puff Industry 
Precious Jewelry Producing Industry 
Preserve, i.iarascliinc Cnerry and Glace Fruit Industry 
Print Holler and Print Block Manufr.cturing Industry 
Printing IlnuiprQcnt Industry and Trade 
Printing Ink riC-nuic-.cturi:.„ Industry 
?r.w Perjiut Milling Industry 

Ready-Made ?-urniture Slip Covers Mrnufacturing Industry 
iletp,il Monument Industry'' 

S791 



-78- 

: :5 ::A2A?DS. (ContUl) 



n 



APrLYIlTG 3BL^5 TO PULLL Y3 I:' l.l'T I'"!: ^.5 ASSIS TTI'G- T^IliSII' , 

P.ollmj Steel Doer ur.nra ctui-in.,-; Inc^-istry 

Sr.fsty Hazor r/nd S'.it.t;/ Tu-.-or Blc'.cle xi-\nurf-.c taring; Industry 

Srnd-Lime }3ricli Ind-.-.&try 

Sanitrxy iiilic Settle CI:'' -re Industry 

Sr,nitr.ry ,"jid "..\"-tcrprocf S .c^clrltie;:' LI nuTrcturin^, Indi\?try 

Scr-";;. Iron pnd Steel Trr.do Indu try 

Second '\ry Al^'Vainum In^lustry 

Smelti/.;:; r.nd Befining of Hoccndr.ry Let-Is into Dr-^.ss ",nd 

Brr.use Alloys in In:,;ct ?ori~i, Indtistry Eng-^.^ed in t:ie 
Sraokin.i Pips i:riii^i'--.cturin:. Indu:try 
Soft I'l'bre ;.i-.nuf ■■ .cturin^; Indu'^try 
Spice Grinding; Industry 

Ste.",;,: :e;\tin.'; HoLdpi.ient '.}. .nuT-ctv-rin;;, Industry 
3ursic:\l Brerisi;i£;s Industry 
Tr;g Industry 

Trpioca Dry ?rodi\ctr Inda?try 
Textile iirxliinary ilr,nua'r.cturiii:: Industry 
Textile Print Poller i;n.-jr; .vin,^ Indu'rtry 
Toy r-nd Plr./thlngs Industry (*) 
Trail e?; r.I;;-.nu_';:;.cturinj:; In '.i.!: try 

Unit :i,.;ater ..nd/or Unit Ve.itil-'.tor Llr/nufr.ctiirini, Industry 
Upliclstery Sprinj; rjid Accc-.soricc IJr.nvi'r'.cturin^^ Industry 
Used Textile Bag Industry 
Vr,ccu-arri C].e r.er l...-nuf .-^ctv.rin:.-; Industry 
Vrdve^-; p^\0. Pittin.;-. lirjio-facturin,,-' Industry 
Venetirn Slind I^/lustry 
Wanu Air iurnr.ce l.irjiufrcturin.i; Indi\stry 
V/r.rm Air Rcj;ister LIrnuf actarin^j Industry 
Y/r.terjrcjf P'^pcr Industry 
iiT?.xed Paper Ind^istry 
v7et Mop Limuf actviring Industry 
'wneat Hour Ilillin^ Industry 
\,-iolesale I.ionu-iental G-rraiite Indu-try 
vfoolesale Lionujacntal liarule Industry 
'.Vitch "azel Industry 

■.7ood Cased Lead Pencil ;,;--n~afac taring Industry 
wood Plu/j Industry 

■Jood Turning and 31ia;:dng In.ustries 
'tVooden Insulator Pin anl Braclcet Lraiuf acto.ring Industry 

Cruslied Stone, Spaid rnd G-r-\vel, r^xid. SLa^^ Industry 
Ploor paid .Tall Clay Tile Il-iiuf acturing Industry 
Faller's Ep-rth Producing and liarketing Industry 
Garter, So.spender r-nC. Belt iirjiuf . cturing Industry 



(*) Jcrded slitd^tly difierei.tly. 
9791 



SPECIFIC lAOl'im 'rlLZJlc'DS, (Ccnt'd; '. ' . 

11^ ?5':;:i::iITY TC AI^T Ulv'GU.U DZD 3J JLT OR. Crl AllIluO , (Cont'd) 

■J-iclesr.lc i.icnutviontr'/i Gr:iiite Industry 
■J-iolesale Liontuiientd i.ir.r'blj Industry 

MEJULTi: ILA.ZAZDS LEAD POISGICIITG :.L4ZAZDS 

In •-.!]. "ji'oceGaes v.Qere sujstf.ncos cont:\inin^ ler.d or my ol its 
coap'imds p.ve used in a liquid or "powdered form or -,t r, tera- 
perr.ture s-'ufficient to vaporize le;^,d. 

All-I.Iet;~.l Insect Screen Indus trj"" 

Bedding lirnufr^cturin;; Industry 

Beverr^'e Dispensing Sqa.ip.;cnt Indixstr:/ 

Clr,y Dr'^.in Tile Irjraiacturin.;;; Industry 

Clr.y tjid Sliale Roofing Hile Industry 

Coin-Opcrr.ted Liacliine llanufacturing Industry 

Eartliemvare ilcnufacturin^ Industry 

PaJi and Elov/er Industry 

ricor i.iacliinery Industry 

Foundry Supply Industry 

Iioxiseliold Ice ?Lefri;~eratGr Industry 

Insecticide and Disinfectant Manufacturing Industry (*) 

Ladder Liaxiufacturing Industry 

i,iarl:ing Devices Industry 

Liedram and Lov/ Priced Jewelry 1/ianiifacturing Industrj' 

llonferrous caul Steel Convect^r ":k->jiuiacturin,^ Industry 

Picjio Licjiufacturing Industry 

Pipe Crgrji Industry 

Plxii-a'bing Fixtures Industry 

Precicus Jewelry Prod.ucing Industry 

Printing Snuipraent Industry and Tr?xle 

Printing Inlc i.iraiufacturin_; Industry (*) 

Textile :.iacliinery i.irxiufacturing Indv.stry 

Unit Heater a^id/or Unit Ventilc-.tcr LI.?ii-ji\^.Gturing Industry 

Icod. Cased. Lead Pencil I.am-'i'acturing Industry 

Lead soldering wor]; 

All-Iletal Insect Screen Indxistry 

B,-'Jid. Instrai.ient i.ian'of acturing Industry 

Beauty pjid. Barber Slicp I.:ecI:.ojii cal Equipment y.an-oiac taring 
Ind.ustry 

Bedduing lie-nufacturint. Industry 

Grxi Labeling rjid Ca:i Casing Iladiinery Industry rjid Trade 

Cast Iron Boiler and Cast Iron 3rd.iator Industry 

Coffee Ind.ustry (*) 

Ccin-Cperated. ?.c!_ine Lirn-o^acturing Ind.u-itry 

Fpji er.i Elo\7er Industry 

Floor i.ln.cj.iinerj'' Industry 

■■"GU3e".'..old Ice ZLof:'.'i.":erat r:r Indus try 

9791 (*) Worded slightly diffcre^.tly. 



-80- 

IBAITH IIAZ:>KDS. (Cont 'd) 

LEAD rCISCl'Il^? Il'.Z-ODS (Cont'd) 
Lor,d so ldorir.g v.-ork ( Cont'd ) 

Licrkins Devices Industrj' 

r.usical i..orc.i'Tv.lise ;.,"nur7,cturin;. Industry 

i:onierrcus and Steal Ccnvector .■.raiuir.cturin:;; Iiidu^try 

Pr,(lcr,ging L'lp.cV'incry Industry and Trade 

Paper 3cx L.ri.cl.-inory Industry and Trrde 

Petrol Gurn Eq-iiipment Industry and Trade 

Piano Ltarji'actui-in^ Industry 

Pipo Organ Induijtry 

Printing Eajaipment Industry and Trade 

Helling Steel Doer ilrmiJi'acturing Industry 

Toy and Playtl.ings Indv.stry 

Unit ;ioater and/or Unit Ventilator LiriW-f r.ctVLring Industry 

Vaccuui.! Cleaner iian-ofac taring Industry 

Certain Occuyiations in Printing Sioo^^ (in melting operations in 
printing sliops, Dry SYrceping cxid. cleaning in printing sncps. 
Cleaning linotype plungers in printing sl.cps, Blowing out type 
cases) 

Flxited Crj^'o, Liner and, L'ace Paper Industry 

Pol din J Paper Box Induc-try 

Guiii;.ain,3 Industry 

Paper Stationery cuid Tablet I.-Iaiiufacturing IndV'.'^tr-/ 

Tag Industry 

Toy md. Playtl.ings Industry 

"Jaterprooi Paper Industry 

■Jaxod Paper Industry 



rliscellrjieous Ler.d j.-:az ar :! s 



Konferraus Scrap Iletal Trade (Lroaking sorting batter:/ plates) 
Nonferrous Scrap l.ietal Trade (Bxirning battery boxes) 
LiCtal Trnlc i.ianuf acturing Industry (Lead burning) 
All-:.aetal Insect Screen Industry (".York involving handling 

metallic Le:'.d) 
Printing IrAz LL-\nuf acturing Industry (kandlin^^ lead except in 

laboratories) 



ALL v;ohk: iit spil^ pai ittivtg- 

Air Valve Indu'-try 

All-i'u."':al Insoct Screen Industry 

T^and. JnstrUEiont Mtmuf acturing Inductry 

Beauty .'^jid Baroer Shcp iiec:.ianical Squipraent Lianujfr.cturing 

Industry 
Bedding l.kJiufr-.cturing Indus tr3'- 
Beverage Dispensing Zquipraent Industry 



9791 



-31- 

DiVLTE HAZARDS . ( Con t ' d ) 

ALL XHK IN SPR/lY PAII'TIITG. (Ccnt'd) 

Bicycle Lianufacturing IncLustry 

Cpji La'beling nnd Cen Cr-sin^j i.iPCliinery Industry r;nd Trr.de 

Cast Iron Boiler paid Carjt Iron Htidiator Industry 

Clry Machinery Indastry 

Coin-Operated Liacliine Liaoi-ofa.cturin^ Industry 

Coniraercial Ref ri;.^erator iianufacturing Industry 

Coxmter I;rpe Ics-Creaia Preezer Industry 

DentaJ. Goods raid Equipment Industry 

I' VII raid Blower Industry 

rioor iiacliinery Industr.y 

Ilousehold Ice Hefri^erc.tor Industry 

InduEtri?d Gil Burning Equipment Llrjiuiacturin.;;; Indi^stry 

Industrial Sa,fety Equipy.ient Industry and Trade 

Ladder liaaiuf acturing Industry 

Llarine Auidliary Lia.chiner^/ Indastry 

Uarking Devices Industry 

lietaJ Hospitad Pumiture Uaaiuf a.cturini" Industry 

Irusical I.Isrchandise I.iajvaf acturing Industry 

'"onferrous and -Steel Ccnvector LkJiuf a.c turing Industry 

Crnajnental Molding, Carving and Turning Industry 

Packaging LLacliinery Industry aaid Trade 

Paper Box iiacliinery Industr?/ and Tra.de 

Petrol eujn Equipment Industry and Tra,de 

Pi;;jio liaiiufac taring Industry 

Picture Moulding and Picture Prajne Industry 

Pi::)e Oi-gaii Industry 

Plurnoing Pixtures Industry 

Porcela-in Brealtfast Furniture Assembling Industry 

Pr3Ci^us Je-\7elry Producing Industry 

Printing Eqaipment Industry and Tra,de 

Sterol Tea.ting Snuipment L;ajiuia,cturing Industry 

Textile l.ir.cliinery lianufa^cturing Industry 

Toy and Playthings Industry 

Trailer Lianuf acturing Industry 

Unit ::eater and/or Unit Ventilator I,ianuiacturing Industry 

Upholsteiy Spring and Accessories Lanuf acturing Industry 

Vaccuum Cleaner uanufacturing Indu.stry 

ITarm Air Register lloxrof -Lcturing Industry 

Jorh involving e:-:posure to oenzol or any benzol compound v/hich 
i s vola.tile or whic-i c an penetrate the skin 

Air Yalve Industry 

Band Instrument ii^nufacturing Industry 

Beautj'' and Barber 3i1;'Xj Mechanical Equiment ".Manufacturing 

Industry 
Bedding Ilrnuf -.cturin^ Industry 
B3ve"i*age Dispensing Equipment Industr.y 
Cm Labeling and Can Casing liachinery Industry pzid. Trade 



9791 



-82- 

]AL?H ":AZAr33S , ( Cg:i t ' -\ ) 

"."."ork involving ex jc sure to "ben:;ol or my 'benzol corn'oouad v/hicli 
is vclo-tile or vilAch c-n penetrr.te tii-3 s]:in 

Coin-Operr.ted i.iacliine l.ic-iiufc-,cturinii Industry 

Coiffi-aercial Eefrigerr.tor Lian-uf r.cturin^- Ind\istry 

Yvxi. rjid Blower Industry 

Floor lip.cliinery Industry 

Household Ice HefriGerr.tor Industry 

Lo.dder i,;c?Jir.f p,c turinj^- Industry 

Harking Devices Industry (*) 

Llediuin cJid. Low Priced Jev/elry Urntiic.cturing Industry 

Musical Liercliaaidisa l/Ianuf'acturing Industry 

Sonferrous and Steel Convector itaiuiacturin^ Industry 

Grnai'iiental Molding, CE^nring and Turning Industry 

Padcaging i.lackinery Industry and Trr.de 

Paper Box Mackinery Industry and Trade 

Petroleum Equipment Industry and Trade 

Pipjio Manixfr'icturing Industry 

Picture Moulding and Pictiu'e Prrine Industry 

Pipe OrgrxL Industry 

Plumting Fixtures Industry 

Precious Jewelry Producing Industry 

Printing Equipment Industry and Trade 

Sterm lieating Equipment Manuf actxiring Industry 

Textile Mackinery MpjQuf acturing Industry 

Toy aaid Playthings Industry 

Unit ke.-.ter rjid/or Unit Ventilator l.ianuf actixring Industry 

Vo-ccuum Gle.'-aier L^anu-Tacturing Industry 

Food Cased Lead Pencil Manulacturing Industry 

"iil'ork involving excessive exposure to corrosive substances 

Air Valve Jndustry 

Leverage Dispensing Equipment Indtistry 

Bicycle Mcjiuf actor in g Industry 

Can Labeling and CriXi Casing Machinery Industry pjid Trade 

Clay Machinery Industry 

Coin-Operated i.iackine Manufacturing Industry 

Coiomercial PLefrigera,tor Manuf actoring Industry 

Counter Type Ice-Crecjn Preezer Industry 

Dental Goods and Equipment Industry 

'Ploor Machinery Industry 

IZovLsehold Ice Hefrigera.tor Indtistry 

Industrial Gil Burning Equipment Mantifac taring Industry 

liarino Auxiliary Liachinery Industry 

Marking Devices Industry 

Medium and Low Priced Jewelry Licxiuf acturing Industry 

iMonferrous rad Steel Convector Lianaf acturin^ Industry 

Open Paper Drinking Cup raid ilound H.-sting Paper Container 

Industry 
Packaging Maclainery Industry and Trade 



C 



9791 (*) Worded sliglitly differently. 



-8?- 



JkLTII rAZrJ(DS, (Cont'd) 

17ork invclvinjg e:cGesFiivq expos\u-n to corrosive substr.ncos , 
(Gent':'.) 

Paper Lox i.i.'ac^iinery Industry anJ. Trade 

FLnno i,ianufp.ct-arin,-5 Industry 

Pije Orgrji Industry 

Plimbin^ Fixtures Induistry 

Precio^is Jewelry Producing Industry 

Priiitine Equipment Indu.stry and Trrxle 

StenTi I'eatint; Equipment lirnufacturins Industry 

'Trailer Ik^nufaoturini^ Indvistry 

Unit ::eater rjid/or Unit Ventilator iv;anuf,v,cturing Industry 

All work involvin,?; exposure to p.cid in connection v/itli r)ickling 
of sheet plate 

All-lietal Insect Screen Industry 
BrJid Instrument Lanufactui'int; Industry 
Beverage Dispensing Equipuent Industry 

Can Ls-beling and CrJi Casing liacliinery Industry and Trade 
Cast Iron Boiler and Cast Iron Radiator Indn.stry 
Coin-Operated liacliine Manufacturing Industry 
Co.'-Traercial Refrigerator Manufacturing Industry 
Pra riid. Slower Industry 
Ploor Machinery Industry 
■ Ilouseliold Ice ilsfrigerator Industry 
Manufacturing ?jid Viliolesale Surgical Industry 
Marking Devices Industry 

Musical Merchrndise Mrn.'^af acturing Industry 
ITonferrous a.nd Steel Convector Mrnuf acturing Industry 
Pac]::aging Machinery Industry and Trade 
Paper Box Machinery Industry and Trade 
PctrolouTi Equipment Industry and Trade 
Picjio Manufacturin;^ Industry 
Pipe Orgcji Industry 

Printing Equipment Industry and Trt-de 
Rolling Steel Door Manufactpj-ring Ind\istry 
Unit Heater rjid/or Unit Ventilator Mo-nufactv-ring Indiastry 
Vo-ccuiun Cleaner Manufacturing Industrj;" 
Uarrn Air Fu.rnace llanmacturing Industry 

Processes where gugg-tz or rxiy other form of silicon dioxide 
or rji asbestos silicote is present in pov7dered form . 

23 Codes 



9791 



-84- 

GSFEaAL ''AZXSDS 

^ill T/oi-J-.: in im-iiidries involving ex'oos'ire to mo?-ten le;:..d or 
rjiy itiolten lead alloy or to dust oi" le-.cl or of niy le-ji 
alloy . 

Air Valve Indu-stry 
Alloy C.-isting Indiistry 
4 Bedding IviP,niifr,c taring Indu^.try 

Beverr,je Dispensing Equ-ipmont Industry 

Cr,n Lalieling and Can Caning i.iac]iinery Industry and Trade 

Clay liacliinery Industry 

Coin-Operated Liacliine lianufacturing Industry 

Counter Tyjpe Ice-Crerrn Proezer Industry 

Cylinder liould f?a"id Dandy Soil Industry 

Dental Goods and Squipinent Industrjr ^ 

Die Casting lianufacturing Industry 

Tan and Blower Indus trj'' 

Ploor liacliinery Industry ('*■) 

ilouseliold Ice Ref rigerator Industry' 

Industrial Oil Burning Sradprnent uajnuf acturing Indxistry 

liarine Auxiliary Liacliinery Industry 

Lietal Hat Die and i7ood Eat Block Industry (*) 

lietal iIospita,l li^irniture iianuf acturing Industry 

iionferrous and Steel Convector Iianuf a.cturing Industry 

Ornrjnental Liolding, Carving cud Taming Industry (*) 

Packaging Liacliinery Industry r;iid Trade 

Pa.per 3cx Liacliinery Industry and Trade 

Petroleum Equipuent Industry and Trr.de 

Picture i.ioulding and Picture Prnrae Industry 

Pipe Llip.jle i.imuf^.c taring Industry(*) 

Pipe Orgim Industry 

Plumbing Fixtures Indxistry • /i 

Printiiig SquixJin'''-nt Industry and Tr',de ^ 

Stecm Heating Equipment Lianuf acturing Industry 

Textile iio,c:iinery Lianuf acturing Industry 

Toy and Playthings Industry 

Unit Heater and/ or Unit Ventilator i.i''jTaf>ac taring Industry 

Vr.ccuurn Cleaner ii;vnuf acturing Indxistry 

Valves and Fittings Manufacturing Industry 

In foundries (ferrous! and nonf errous) , all work in tlie foundry 

22roj2cr 

Air Valve Industry 
Alloy Casting Industry 
Bedding Lianuf acti^.ring Industry 
Beverage Dispensing Equipment Industry 

Can Labeling and Can Casing Lia.cliinery Industry and Trade 
Clay Ifecliinery Indastry 
Coin-Operated i.iacliine Manufactu ring Industry 

(*) 'Jorded slif;htly differently. 
9791 ~ ^ 



-85- 



I'OlIigjHT .ii'EK. (Cont'd') 

In fo-oiidries (fori'ous and nonf arroug) , all worlc in the foundry 
-oro'ocr (Cont'd') 

Co-uiiter Type Ice-Creran Proezer Industry 

Cyli?Tder Liould and D&jridy Roll Industry 

Dental Goods ajid Equipment Indu'5try 

Die Castin;-; Llroaufa-ctxiring Industry 

Fcji rjid Blower Industry 

?loor Machinery Indu^-try 

Tousei-old Ice Hef ri'^^erator Industry 

Industrial Gil Burning- Equipment i.iajiuf acturiUt^- Industry 

i.iarine Auxiliary Liacainery Industry 

i.ietal ;iat Die and 'i7ood "at Block Industry 

Iletad riospital Furniture I.Irnuf vctarin^ Industry 

ITonferrous aaid Steel Ccnvector i.Iajiuf acturing Industry 

Paclra^lng Ilachinery Industry and Trade 

Paper Box liachinory Industry and Trade 

Petrol eu.-n Equipment Industry axid Trade 

Pipe .Organ Industry 

Pluj-nbin^^- Fixtixres Industry 

Printir.^. pjouipraont Industry and Trade 

Sccondrxy Aluminiuia Industry 

Stesin Meatin,: Equipment i.ianufacturin - Industry 

Textile Uacainory Llanufacturing Industry 

Toy aaid pj.a/tliings Industry 

^^^-^ P-o-ter and/ or Unit Yontilator L'anuf ac t^arin.'-.- Industry 

Vaccuuia Cler-ior Lvanuf acturing Induf^try 

Valves and Fittings Hajaui'acturing Industry 

V/arm Air .ie:jistL)r Llanufacturini;; Industry 



In niallja ^lc fcuiidrics. ojor.tio, s involvin.v handlin-; of heated 
castinrs. etc. m connection with p jir.calin,--: work 

Air Valve Industry 

Bedding I.Ianu.f acturing Industry 

Bevera.ge Dispensing Epuip^raent Indixstry 

Can Lal)eling ajid Can Casing hachincry Indu-try and Trade 

Cast Iron Boiler and Cast Iron Padiatcr Industry 

Clay Machinery Industry 

Coin-Gperatod Llachine Lianufacturing In^lustry 

Counter Tya:; Ice-Grerr/i Preozcr Industry 

Cylinder 1-iould and Dajidy Roll Industry" 

Dental G-oods and Equipment Industry 

Fajti and Blov/er Industry 

Ploor Lla-chinery Industry 

■Pousehold Ice Pefrigoratcr Industry 

Inc'justrial Gil Burning Eouip/aunt I Manufacturing Indu-try 

uarino Auxiliary iiachinery Indr.stry 



97G1 



-86- 

GEimiL^J : 'Ji.ZAPI)S , ( Crnt' d) 

FGUIMDHY .TCTiC (Cont'd) 

In aaller-als f o'-inc-ries, opcrr^.tions involving lir-jidling of heatsd 
castinjgs, etc. in connection v/itJa "npo-'.ling -fforl: 

Uetc.1 ";os;_")ital Fu.rnitur:i iian'of picturing Industry 
Xonferrous r.nd Stool Convector lianuf r.cturing Industry 
Pr-.ckaging "i!ac>.inGry Industry r..nd. Trrxle 
Paper Box l.Iacliinery Industry and Trade 
Petroleum Squipmont Industry and Trade 
Piano lianui'acturing Industry 
Plui'iibing Fixtures Industry 
Printing Equipment Industry and Trade 
Stefiii Heating Equipment llanuia-cturing Industry 
Textile liacliinery Ivt^nufactojring Industry 
Toy and Playtliings Industry 

Unit '."eater p^nd/or Unit V'-ntilp,tcr Llanufp.cturing Industry 
YpxcuUii Clec,ner Li;..nufacturing Industry- 
Valves pjid Fittings ucnvijf.acturing Industry 
./r.rm Air Furnace Manufacturing Industry 

All clepning or grinding o;oerr.tions in foundrijs 

Air Valve Indus trjr 

All-ltCtrl Insect Screen Industry 

Alloy Casting Industry 

Bedding i,'iP,nufc;.Gturing Industry 

Beverage Dispensing Equipment Industry 

Can Lalfeling and GoJi Gn.sing llacliinery Inr'ustry and Trr.de 

Cast Iron Boiler and Cr.st Iron Piadiator Industry 

Coin-Operated l/ip.cliine Lsnufacturing Industry 

Cylinder Ilculd sjad Dandy Ecll Industry 

Die Ca.sting ilpaiufacturing Industry 

Feldspr.r Industry (*) 

Floor LaCiiinery Industry 

household Ice Refrigerator Industrj^ 

iiarino Auxiliary l.iaciiinery Industry' 

lietal Hat Die and V/ood HP.t Block Industry 

ITonforrous and Steel Convector I.ipjuifac taring Industry 

Packc^^ing iiac'iinery Industry and Trade 

Paper Box iiacliinery Industry and Trade 

Petrol eutn Er|uipi;icnt Industry- and Trade 

Piano I;ip.nuf acturing Industry 

Pine Hippie iianxifacturing Industry 

Pipe Orgrji Industry 

Pltmibing Fixtures IndxLStry 

Printing Equipment Industry rnd Trade 

Secondary Alu-iinum Industry 

Stopxi LePiting Equipment Lirjuifacturin," Industry 

Textile I.Ip.c'iinory LiP,nufacturing Industry 



(*) V/orded slightly differently, 
9791 



-87- 
GEySR.\L :LlZA-n)S, (Cmt'd) 

FCUCTRY ,/Ox-u{ (C-^nt'd') 

A-ll clc.xiini-'; or .:riuclin;; oporr.ticrxS in foimdries, (Cont'd ) 

Toy riic. Plr^7t.2iin;\;s Industry 

Unit "'c.-.ter rjid/or Unit Vcntil-tor i.kuiuf r.cturin^ Industry 

Vaccu'iM Clcraicr l..raaufacturiii_.; Industry 

Vrdve-^: r.nd ]?ittinr;s I,ir,no.i'r.cturin:^' Industry 

T;>.iTa Air j'urnacG ll.";nuf,^.cti\riri^: Industry 



^iouldin/r work, core molcin;''-; or oticr processes vihero suclx varlz 
ex':-'csoB tl-om t"' t'lo :'ir.zards of molted raot.-l , or lead or zinc 
ii-UTios, eiticr directly or indirect ly 

JLLl-l.Iotal Insect Scrocn Indt).stry 

Cast Iron Boiler and Ca,5t Iron 2adic.tcr Industry 

Piajio IlanvLfacturinj Industry 

Pi^TG "ipUo Liojiui'acturin/-; Industry 

V."arr.i Air Furnace ilanvoTr.cturinj;,- Indtistry 



All clii-./iin^-; and ^"rindin^ opora.ticns in foundries 
7 Industries 

ir -2:^ OAiG. aj3T0DY.C?E-liTIGi: 0? ^lEFAII. C a 3L3VAT0:i3 , 3IU:CS , 

jiLisazis, :j2. o;i:3_. :^5fiijc^\zp'4RATjs, zxj:;:r T ii' i:h opejlitioh 

OF (a) :^in.;Al'2ZxS Ao D.iJrii;ZD by '2:. 2 -u ..32 tI0Ai' 5T.U'D.3 D3 
CPBA lTI":' 

Aorrsive G-r-ain Industry 

Air 7alvu Ind.ustry 

Alloy C-.stin.^- Industry 

A.iorican i.latcA Industry 

Aiiiraal Soft ya,ir Ind.ii.stry 

Bpjid InstruTiiont iianufacturing Industry 

Battings ^'-^d Padding; Industry 

Bed-ding LiCJiuf ac tu^^in^ Indaistry 

Bevcra,£-o Dispensin/: iDquipment Indaistry 

Bicycle Aajiuf acturin^; Ind.astry 

Bote in ajid Spool Industry 

Brocm ;.,ajiufact"arinj Ind-ustr;,' 

Brasli I.i'Uimact'arin^; Industry 

B-all: DrirAcin^;- otrr.w, 'Jrrpp'-d Drimcin^ 'Jtrar, 7rapped 

TootApick and '.7i-apped A.anicure Stick Industry 
Crri LaDoling rjid CrJi Casin /'AinGry Industry and Trade 



97C1 



-88- 
GENEBAL HA.Z.4EI)S (Cont'd ) 

All chip-ning; and grinding operations in foundries ( Cont ' d) 

Caijning Industry (Emit and Vegetatle, tiut not Fish Canning) 
Canvas Sritched Bell: Manufacturing Industry 
Cai-i Clc'-hing Tndi\Et-.y 

Cast Ir^m Eoilnr jm.i Cact Iron Radiator Industry 
Cigar i.^-i:nafacturing Irdustry 
C3X-7 Lram TiLe Mar-j..Lf 3 curing Industry 
Clay I'achjnery I.iri.r.sT/ty 
dry pnd ?hfi]e r.o:;fing Tile Indus Iry 
Coffee Inrlustr*' 

Coin-0pe::ate<3 raohrne Manufacturing Industry 
Comiiercial Refrigerator f'anuf acturing Industry 
Cordage snd T^ine Ir?.:'ustry 
Corn Cob ripe Industry 

Cotton Oloch G.'ove I'anufacturing Industry 
Cotton R?g Trade 

Counter 'Tiroe Ice-Crsa^i rree?er Industry 
Cuvled Hair Fanufacturing Industry 
Cylinder i^'ould and I'andy Rull Industry 
Domestic freight PorT-farding Industry 
DoT^el Pin Indu"try 
Earthenware Kanufacturing Industry 
End G-iaixi Strip Wood Block Industry 
Envelope Indu<3iry 

Excelsior and ^xcel^ior Products Industry 
Fan and Blower Industry 
Feed Jianu.facturing Industry 
Flag Manufacturing Industry 
Floor Machinery Industry 

Fluted Cup, Pan Liner and Lace Paper Industry 
Folding Pai-ier Box Industry 
Foundry Supply Industry 
Gia-ned and Fancy Paoer Industry _ 

Gray Iror Foundry Industry V_ 

GiKTied Lc-liel and "^"bossed Seal Industry 
Gumjiing Industry 

Hair Cloth Manufacturing Industry 
Household Ice Hefrigerator Industry 
Ice Creai^ Gone Industry 
Imported Date PacT.lng Industry 
iPTDorling Trade 

Insecticide and Disinfectant Manufacturing Industry 
Industrial Oil Burning Equiptient Manufacturing Industry 
Industrial Safety Eqiiiprnent Industrv and Trade 
Ladder iianufacturing Industry 
Linseed Oil I'iarufacturing Industry* 
Macaroni Industry 

Machined I7aste Manufacturing Industry 
Manu.facturine and ^.olssale Surgical Industry * 
Marine Auxiliary !«ac}iinery Industry 
Marking Pevices Irdurtry 
M edium and Low Priced Jewelry lianufacturing Industry 

(*) Y'orded sligntly differently. 
9791 ^ 



-39- 
GE:ERAL hazards (Cont Id) 

All chinriinis: and grindin,?: operations in foundries (Cont'd ') 

Merchant pnd Custom Tailorin^^ Industry 
Metal Hat Die and Tood Hat Block Industry 
I'etal Hospital "urniture Manufacturing Industr,y 
I'etal TanV T'anufacturin.^ Industry 
Metal Windor Industry 
I'opstick Industry 

Musical "'erchandise Manufacturing Industry 
Uonferrous Scrap Metal Trade 

Konferrous a>:.d Steel Convector Manufacturing Industry 
Open Paper Drinking Cup and Hound Hesting Paper Container Industry 
OrnamentaJ Molding, Carving and Turning Industry 
Packaging Machinery Industry and Trade 
Paper Disc ;'il'-: "Bottle Cap Industry 
Paper Makers Felt Industry 

Paper Stationery and Tablet ^Manufacturing Industry 
/ Petroleum Eouipraent Indus trj^ and Trade 
Piano I'anufacturing Industry 
Picture Moulding and Picture Prague Industry 
Pipe Hippie i'anufacturing Industry 
Pipe Organ Industrj'- 
Plumbing rixtures Industry 

Porcelain BreaVfast Furniture Assembling Industry 
Po^rder Pujfi Industry 
Precious Je'-'alr:/ Producing Industry 
Preserve, ;!araschino Caerry and '^lace ?ruit Industry 
Print Roller and Print Jjlock Manufacturing Industry 
Printing "Equipment Industry and Trade 
Printing In'- I:anufacturing Industry 
Rax! Peanut Milling Industry 

Heady-Hade Jurniture Slip Covers f Manufacturing Industry 
Real Hstate Brokerage Industry 
Rock and Slag u'ool I'anufacturing Industry 
Rolling Steel Door ''anufacturing Industry 

Safety Razor and Saf et .^ Rarror Elpde Manufacturing Industry 
Sand-Lime Industry 

Sanitary Milk Bottle Closure Industry 

Sanitarv and "aterproof Specialities Manufacturing Industry 
Scrap Iron and Steel Trade Industry 
Scra.p Rubber Trade 
Secondary/ Alurninun Industry 
Smelting and Refining of Secondary ''etals into Brass and Bronze 

Alloys in Ingot For:Ti, Indus tr;'- Engaged in the 
Sno'ring Pi-ne "anufacturing Ind.ustry 
Soft Fibre I'anufacturing Industry 
Spice Grinding Industry 

Steam Heating Hquipment Manufacturing Industry 
Siirgical Dressings Industry 
Tag Industry 

Tapioca Dry Products Industry 
Textile Machinery Manufacturing Industry 
Textile Print Roller Engraving Industry 

97S1 



-90- 

GENE5AL HAZAKDS (Co nt'd ) 

All chix'-oing end grinding o rier atio ns in foundries (Cont'd ') 

Toy and Pln,ythin:^s Incinstry 

Ti-uc''inc Industr,'- 

Unit Healer aiic/jr Ur.ic Vantilator Tanufacturin^ Industry 

Upholstery ?^::'J ifi; a^ir Arce.:so'"ier. i'^nnufacturing Industry 

Used Texi lie JSag Inli-.stry 

Used Tsj.tile Machino:.y and Accessories Distributing Trade 

Vpcunm TLeaner* Manufacturljif Indurtry 

Valves and Fittings I''anufact'J-rinfi; Industry 

Venetian Blinl Industry 

Warm Air ITurnaee I^'anufacturin;: Industry 

War'n Air Register I^anufacturing Industry 

TJaste Faner Industry 

liTa.terprooi pa-er Industry 

Waxed Prvoer I'-du^try 

Wet I [on I'-anufp^cturiiig Industry 

Wholesale llonuinental G-rrnite Industry * 

Wholesale ■■cn\u:;eutal ''arble Industry * 

Wholesale Tobacco Industry 

Witch Ht'izel Induf^try 

Wood Ga::ed Lead Pencil I'anufacturing Industry 

Wood Heej Industiy 

Wood PlUr? IndL^::-*ry 

Wood Turi'ing anl Sha.ping Industries 

Wooden Insulator Pin and Bracket {Manufacturing Industry 



In. or ass isting : n_, t he operation of gas, oil, or stean engine s 

or other Tpriiar m '"grs. 

Abrasive Grain Industry 

Air Valve Indus trj?- 

Alloy Casting Industry 

American ; 'ftch Industry 

Animal Soft Hair Industry 

Band Instrument !'am^i"acturing Industry 

Batting and Padding Incustry 

Beauty and Barber SLot f'echanical '^'quipment Fanuf acturing 

Industry 
Bedding Manufacturing Industry 
Beverage ^Dispensing Equiprent Industry 
Bicycle ''•lanufacturing Industry 
Bobbin and StdooI Incustry 
Broom ?'anufactu^ing Iv.custry 
Brush "'anufacturing I^idustry 
Bull: Drin]:in,^ S'^raii, 'Trapped Drinking Straw, Wrap-oed Toothpick 

and TTrapped Manic\ire Stick Industry 
Can Labeling and Can Casing I'achinery Industry and Trade 
Canvas Stitched Belt i'anufacturing Industry 

9791 ^*^ 'forded slightly differently. 



C. 



-91- 

GE^nRAL HA ZAPDS (Cont'd) 

In. or assisting in. the o-peratio n of gf^s. oil, or stea^n eni°:ines 
or other ririme movers (C o nt' d) 

Card Clothing Industry 

Cast Iron joiTer and Cast Iron Rodiator Industry- 
Cigar ranufacturing Industry * 
Clay Drain Tile I'anufacturing Industry 
Clay I'achinerA'' Industry 
Clay and Shale ?oofing Tile Industry 
Coffee Industry 

Coin-Operated !'achine i'anufacturing Industry 
Con^aercial Hefrigerator I'anufacturing Industry 
Cordfige and Ti^ine Industry 
Corn Cob Pipe Industry 

Cotton Cloth Glove "Tanuiacturing Industry 
Counter T^/pe Ice-Crean freezer Industry 
Curled Hair "'anufacturing Industry/ 
Cylinder ''ould and Dandv Roll Industry 
Dental Goods and "Zquipinent Industry 
Die Ca-sting "'anufacturing Industry 
Dovel Pin Industry 
EarthemTare I'anufa.ctiaring Industry 
End Grain Stri^o "ood Bloc-c Industry 
Envelo-oe Industry 
7an and Bloi-er Industry 
7eed I'anufacturing Industry 
Flag iianufacturing Iridustry 
Floor j'achinery Industry 

Fluted Cux), Pan Liner and Lace Pnrjer Industry 
Folding Paner Tiox Industry 
Foundry Su'oply Industry 
Glazed and Fancy Pacer Industry 
Gum^ned Label and Zrabossed Seal Industry 
Gunning Industry 

Hair Cloth ranufacturing Inda^try 
Household Ice Refrigerator Industry 
Ice Creain Cone Industry 
Imported Date Packing Industry 

Insecticide and Disinfectant Lenufacturing Industry 
Industrial Oil Burning Equipment Manufacturing Industry 
Industrial Safety Equipment Industry and Trade 
Ladder Manufacturing Industry 
Macaroni Industry 

I'achined Waste I'anufacturing Ind.ustry 
Liarine Auxiliary Machinery Industry 
Mar'cing Devices Industry 

Medium and Lo^7 Priced Jerrelry Ilanufact^iring Industry 
i^etal Ha.t Die and TTood Het Block Industry 
Iletal riospital Furniture Manufacturing Industry 
I.fetal TJindor Industry 
Mops tie'" Indus trv 

Musical "erch-andise Manufacturing Industry 
ITonferrous and Steel Convector Manufacturing Industry 

9791 



-92- 

GEUERAL I-IAZAR D S (Co nt'd) 

Tn , or asBJsting in. the otjeration of gas, oil, or stearg engines 
or other -prime movers (Cont'd j 

Open Pa-jer Drin^ring Cup and Hound Nesting Paper Container Industry 

Ornauer.i.'.pl Molciirifc, Oarving and Turning Industry 

Package relic?.^e Tndr.£,Rry 

Packaging r'acriinery Industry and Trade 

Paijer Box J^achinery Industry and Trade 

Paper Dlsc r.i'LK Bottle Cfz^ Industry 

Paper Stationery and Tablet Ilanufacturing Industry 

Perfume, Cosmetic nnd Other Toilet Preparations Industry 

Petroleum Equipment Industry and Trade 

Piano Manufacturing Industry 

Picture " ouldin/? and Picture Trame Industry 

Pipe iN'i^TDle Kanufacturing Industry 

Pipe Organ Industry 

Plumbing I'ixtu-^es Inriustry 

Povder Puff Inoustry 

Precious Jewelry Producing Industry 

Preserve, ''sraschim Cherry and Glace ^ruit Industry 

Print Roller and Print Block I'anufacturing Industry 

Printing "Equipment Indastry and Trade 

Printing In'- T'^nufacturing Industry 

Rar Peanut Tilling Industry 

Read-Hviaoe "urniture Slip Covers I'anufacturing Industry 

Rea.l Estate BrokTage Industry 

Rock and Slag TJool ^'anufa.cturing Industry 

Rolling Steel Door ! Manufacturing Industry 

Safety Razor and Safety Razor Blade Tanufacturing Industry 

Sanitary "ilk Bottle Closure Industry 

Sanitary and Waterproof Specialties Kanufncturing Industry 

Scrap Iron and Steel Trade Industry 

Secondary Aluminum Industry 

Smelting and Refining of Secondary Metals ingot Brass and 

Bronze Alloys in Ingot Form, Industry Engaged in the 
Smearing Pipe Manufacturing Industry 
Soft Fibre Manufacturing Industry 
Spice Grinding Industrj'' 

Steam Heating Equipment Manufacturing Industry 
Surgical Dressings Industry 
Tag Industry 

Tapioca Dry Products Industry 
Textile Machinery Manufacturing Industry 
Textile Print Roller Engrr>ving Industry 
Toy and Playthings Industry 

Trout Farming Industry in the "'astern Section 
Unit Heater anc'/or Unit Ventilator Manufacturing Industry 
Upholstery Spring and Accessories Manufacturing Industry 
Used Textile Bag Industry 
Vacuijm Cleaner I'anufacturing Industry 
Valves and Fittings I'anufacturing Industry 
Venetian Blind Industry 
Warm Air Register Manufacturing Industry 

9791 



-93- 
GE!TEEAL HAZARDS (Cont'd) 

In. or n.ssi sting in, th e opera tio n of p:p^s, oil, or stea'n enfi:l nes 
o r other p rime movers. (Cont'd) 

Wate'rproof Paper Industry- 
Waxed ■^a-oer Industry 
Wet I'Qv Fanufactariiif^ Indar.try 
llieat Flour I'illing Industry 
Tiiolesale Monumental Granite Industry 
■^lolesale :'onuraental IJarble Industry 
T?itch Hazel Industrjr 

^ood Cased Lead Pencil I\anufacturini°; Industry 
Wood Heel Industry 
Wood Plu£' Industry 

To'-.'d Turning and Shaping Industries 
'.Tooden Insulator '^in and Bracket Fanufacturing Industry 

Firin."; of stea m or rater l^oil err. (exce -ot lioile rs not more than 15 
pounds pressure used solely f or heating purposes. 

Ahrasive grain industry 

Air val^'e industry 

Alloy casting industry 

American matcxi industry 

Animal soft hair industry 

Band instrument manufacturing industry 

Batting and padding industry 

Beauty and "barber shop mechanical equipment manufacturing 

industry • ■ 

Bedding manufrcturing industry 
Beverage dispensing equipment industry 
Bicycle Kanufacturing industry 

Bohhin and spool industry . . ■ 

Broom manufa.cturing industry 
Brash manufacturing .industry 
Bul'^ drirf'ing straw, Tirrapped drinking straw, wrapped toothpick 

and wrapped manicure stick industry 
Can labeling and can casing machinery industry and trade 
Canvas stitched belt manufacturing industry 
Card clothing industry 

Cast iron boiler and ca^st iron radiator industry 
Cigar manufacturing industry 
Cla'/- drain tile manufacturing ind.ustry 
Clay machinery industry 
Clay and shale roofini: tile industry 
Coffee industry/ 

Coin-operated machine na.nufacturing industry 
Commercial refrigerator manufacturing industry 
Cordage a-nd twine industry 
Corn cob oipe industry 

Cotton cloth glove manufacturing induptrj'- 
Counter t:,n)e ice crean freer;er indiistry 
Curled hair manufacturing industry 

9791 



-94- 
GEITERAX IIAZ.iRDS (Co nt'd) 

Firing of steam or x?ater boiler s (except boilers not more than 15 
nounds pressu re used solely for heating our-QOses . (Cont'd ) 

Cylinder mould and dendy roll industry 

Dowel pin industry 

EarthenTrare manufacturing industry 

End grain strip rood bloc^- industry 

■^■ivelope industry 

Excelsior and excelsior products industry 

Fan and blower industry 

Feed manufacturing industry 

Flag manufacturing industry 

Floor machinery industry 

Fluted CUT), iDan liner and lace pa.-oer industry 

Folding uaper box industry 

Foundry supply industry 

Glazed and fancy Daper indu.stry 

Gray iron foundry industry 

G\iramed label and embossed seal industry 

Gumming industry 

Hair cloth m«nuf a.cturing industry 

Household ice refrigerator industry 

Ice cream cone indu'stry 

Irar)orted date pac^ring industrj?- 

Insecticide and disinfectant manufacturing industrjT- 

Industrial Oil burning equiioraent manufacturing industry 

Industrial sa.fety equipment industry and trade 

Ladifer manufa.cturing industry 

Machined r/aste manufacturing industry 

Marine auxiliary machinery industry 

Marking devices industry 

Mediuia and lovv' nriced jewelry manufacturing industry 

Merchant and custom tailoring industry 

Metal hat die and rood hat block industry 

Metal hospital furniture manufacturing industry 

Metal tank manufacturing industry 

lietal window industry 

Mopstick industry 

Musical merchandise manufacturing industry 

Nonferrous and steel convector manufacturing industry 

Open paioer dritf:ing cup and round nesting parier conta,iner 

industry 
Ornamental molding, carving and turning industry 
Package medicine industry 
Packaging machinery industry and. t rad-e 
Paxier box machinery industry and trade 
Paper disc milk bottle cop industry 
Paper stationery and tablet m.anufacturing industry 
Perfume, cosmetic and other toilet preparations industry 
PetroleujTi equipment industry and trade 
Piano manufacturing industry 
Picture moulding and. picture frame industry 
Pipe organ industry 

9791 



-95- 

CtSIKBAL IIAZAKES (Cont'd) 

Firing of stea "i or water boilers (exce-ot boilers not mo re than 15 
TDOunds •pr ess ure_ us ed, so] el;"' for heatin.- ^ 'ouro o ses (Cont'd ) 

Plu-nbin<?; fixtures industry 

Porcelain brenkfnst furniture assemblin;?: industry- 
Ponder -nviff industry'' 
Precious jerelrv producin^•:^ industrj 

Preserve, raaraschino cherry and flace frait industry 
Print roller and print block manufacturinf: industry' 
Printing equipment industrj- and trade 
Print iii,5 in': manufacturing industry 
Raw peanut milling industry 

Ready-raade furniture slir) covers manufacturing industry 
Real estate bro'cerage industry 
Roc> and slag wool manufacturing industry 
Rolling steel door manufacturing ind.ustry 

Safety razor and safety razor blade manufacturing industry 
Sanitary milr bottle closure industry 

Sanitary and Faternroof specialties manufacturing industry 
Scrap iron and steel tra.de industry 
Smo^'ing niiDe manufacturing industry 
Soft fibre manufacturing industry 
Spice grinding industry 

Steam heating equipmejit manufacturing industry 
Surgical dressings industry 
Tag industry 

Tapioca dry products industry 
Textile machinery nanufncturing industry'- 
Textile nrint roller engraving industry 

Unit heater and/ or unit ventilator manufa.cturing industry 
Upholster;- spiring and accessories manufactioring industry 
Used textile bag industr;','- 
Vacuum cleaner manufacturing industry 
Valves and fitting'.- manufacturing industry 
Venetian blind industry 
Warm air furnace manufacturing industry 
Warm air register manufacturing industry 
Tater-oroof parser industry 
■^axed -caTser industry 
^et mop msnu'^acturing industr?/ 
THieat flour milling industry 
Wholesale monumental granite industry 
Wholesale monumental marble industry 
Titch hazel industry 

Wood- cased lead -oencil manufacturing industry 
Wood heel industry 
Wood plug industry 

Wood turning and shaping industries 

Wooden insulator pin and braclcet nanufact-aring industry 
Wool felt manui'acturing indxistry. 



S791 



-96- 

GENEEAL HAZARDS (Cont'd) 

As dri vers or a.ssistants to drivers of motor vehic les. or as 

helners or delivery "boys on motor vehicles . 

A total of 14,'3 of the 166 Industries adorited this clause though 
some of thera omitted the Torohltltlon of bo^s ps helriers or delivery 
boys. 

S^Tltching a.nd ^'orV - On and About Hailr oad E gui-pm.en t 

Claj'- Drain Tile I'lanufacturing iTidustry 

Crushed Stone, Sand and Gravel, and Slag Industry 

Earthen-Fare i'anufacturing Industry 

Fuller's ''arth Producing and Marketing Indur^try 

Importing Trade 

Ready-Kixed Concrete Industry 

Wholesale Monumental Granite Industry 

Tholesale I.onumental jiarble Industry 

TTliolesale Tobacco Industry 

In the Cutting or TTelding of Metals By Gas ^o r ll ectricit y 

Air Valve Industry 

All-P'etal Insect Screen Industry 

Band Instrument Hanufacturlng Industry 

Beauty and Barber Shop Hechanical Equipment Fanufacturing 

Industry 
Bedding ;'1anufa,cturing Industry 
Beverage Disnensing EquiiDment Industry 
Bicycle Manufacturing Industry 
Brush I-anufacturing Industry 

Can Labeling and Can Casing f'achinery Industry and Trade 
Cast Iron Boiler and Cast Iron Radiator Industry 
Clay !'!achinery Industry 

Coin-O'oera.ted I^achine 1 Manufacturing Industry 
Commercial Refrigerator Manufacturing Industry 
Counter T;/pe Ice-Crcam Free^ier Industry 
Cylinder Mould and Dandy Roll Industry 
ITloor Machinery Industry 
Household Ice Refrigerator Industry 

Industrial Oil Burning Equinraent Manufacturing Industry 
Industrial Safety Equipment Industry and Trade 
Ladder Manufacturing Industry 
I'lanufacturing and wholesale Surgical Industry 
I'arine Auxilla,ry Machinery Industry 

Medium and Lov Priced Jewelry Manufacturing Industry 
Metal Hat Die and Wood Hat Bloc^: Industry 
Metal Hos-oital Furniture !!anafa.cturlng Industry 
Metal '^Tlndow Industry 
Metal Tanh Manufacturing Industry 
Musical *.'!erchrandise Manufacturing Industry 
Honferrov.s and Steel ConvRctor ^Manufacturing Industry 
Packge Medicine Industry 
Paper Box flachinery Industry and Trade 

9791 



-97" 

GEIIEBAI.. HAZAP JDS (Cont'd) 

In the Cutting Oj:_JIeldlnfl: of I'eta ls By Gas or "Electricity ( Cent ' d) 

Ferf-jne, Cosnetic rnd Other Toilet PreDPrations Industry 

Fetroleani ■Zquinment Industry and Trade 

Piano ?'anufncturing Industry 

PiTje riiDiDle Tanufacturing; Industry 

Pine Organ Industry 

Pluntia? Fixtures Industry 

Precious Jevelr.y Producing Industry 

Print Roller and Print ^^loch manufacturing Inc^ustry 

Printing Zquiionent Indaptr-^ and Tra.de 

Rolling Steel Door I'anufacturiug Industry 

Steam Heating ::auir)raent f'anufacturing Industry 

Top and Playthings Industry 

Unit Heater and/or Unit Ventilator llanufacturing Industry 

U-oholstery Soring and Accessories ^'Manufacturing Industry * 

Vacuum Cleaner Tanufacturing Industry 

Valves and 7it tings manufacturing Industry 

:7arm Air Furnace ''.an'ofacturing Industry 

Tfarm ^:.ir Register Manufacturing Industry 

jheat Flour i'illing Industry 



In or In Connection Tith Hot C-alvanizina: or Tinninf: Processes 

Air Valve Industrj'- 

All-i'etal Insect Screen In-fustry 

Sedding i'anuf acturing liidustry 

Cpji L8."beling and Caa Casing ''achinery Industr^'- and Trade 

Beverage Dispensing ■gquipraent Industry 

Cast Iron Boiler and Cast Iron Radiator Industry 

Coin-0T3eratcd ^'achine :'anuf acturing Industry 

Conmercial Refrigerator ''anuf picturing Industry 

Counter Tjnje Ice-Cream Rreozer Industry 

Fan and Blorer Industry 

Floor Tachinery Industry 

Household Ice Refrigerator Industry 

Industrial Safety Equipment Industry and Trade 

Ladder i'anuf acturing Ind.ustry 

'Jarine Auxiliary !'achinery Industry 

Medium and Low Priced Jerelry I'anufacturing Industry 

Metal Hat Die and TTood Hat Block Industry 

Metal Tank i'anufacturing Industry 

Metal Tindow Industry 

iTonferrous and Steel Convector Manufacturing Industry 

Packaging Machinery Industry and Trade 

Paper Box r'achinery Industry and Trade 

Petroleum Equipment Industry and Trade 

Piano Manufacturing Industry 

Pipe Fip-ple Manufacturing Industry 



9791 (*) '/Torded slig'^tly difisrently. 



-98- 

aEMSRAL HAZ ARDS (Cont'd') 

In or In Connection ^ith Hot G-alvanizinig: or Tinning Processes ( Cont ' d) 

Pipe Or gin Industry 

Plumbing Fixtures Industry 

Precious Jewelry Producing Industry 

Printing "quipraent Industry and Trade 

Rolling Steel Door J'anufacturing Industry 

Stean Hea.ting ^^quinment Manufacturing Industry 

To'*'' a.nd Plpytliings Industry 

Unit Heater and/or Unit Yentilator J^anufacturing Industry 

Vacuun Cleaner JIanufacturing Industry 

Warn Air Furnace Manufacturing Industry 



^i^ 



9791 



-99- 

APPEIIDIX a (2) ,.« 

List of Hazardou:-', Occuijations Unsuitable for Ivlinors: 

iiOTE: The il.R.A. Codes of Pair Competition for the 
indviKtries li >ted. belo'.v established s. mininvam 
ai-;e of 16 for any employment in the industry, 
and of 18 years, nnd 21 years, at operations 
or occutietions hazardous in natiire or detri- 
laei.tal to health. 'The code required the 
authority tn submit a list of such occupations, 
and pursuant to this provision the occupations 
listed below v;ere approved by the divisions 
administrator as hazardous in nature or detri- 
mental to health for minors 18 or 21, as the 
case might be, at which said minors shall be 
employed. 

INDE X 

List of occupations unsuitable for minors under 21 - apuroved by 
the division administrator: 

Codes of Eair Competition EAibit Ho» 

3eddin;j Manufacturing Industry 1 



List of occupations '.nruitable for minors under 18 - approved by 
the di\"i3ion administrator: . t „ 

Codecs CI lair Competition Exliibit IIo. 



Abl^sive Graiii Irri-ur-'try 2 

Air Transport Industry 3 

Air Valve Industry 4 

All-Metal In'ject Screen Industry 5 

Alloy Casting; Industry ('■> 

American Llatch Industry 7 

Animal Soft Hair Industry 8 

Art needlework Industry 9 

Automotive Chemical S]3ecialties Manufacturing Ind. 10 

Anti-Hcg Cholera Sex-aia aiid Ilog-Cholera Virus Ind, 73 

Band Instruiuunt Manufacturiiig Industry 11 

Batting and Padcdng Industry 12 
Beauty ana Barber -Sl'.op MechanicaJ EquioLient 

Maxiufacturing Industry 13 

Beverage P-ispensing Equipment Industry 14 

Bicycle Majiiifacturin.^ Ind.ustry 15 

Bobbin and. Spool Industry 16 

Broom Manufacturi:v^ Industry 17 

Brush liaiiufacturi.ig Industry 18 



9791 



•100- 



Codes of ?air ConTjetition 



Exliibit To. 



Bulk Drinld.n^ Straw, Wra^yj }ec: Urlnlrin/:; Straw, 
WrapDed Toothpick aad Wrapi)ed Kanicure 
Stick Indu.stry 

Caji Lebelin^ end Csn ca.f.ing Machinery Industry 

Canned Salmon Industry 

Canning Indii.stry (Fxxi.it and Ve^^jetable, but not 

Fish cpnning) 
Canvas Stitched Belt Mamafocturing Industry 
Carbon Black Manufacturing Industry 
Card Clothing Industry 

Cast Iron Boiler and Cast Iron .Radiator Industry 
Cigar iuanufacturin^- Indii.stry 
Clay and Shale Roofing Tile Industry 
Clay Drain Tile Manufacturing^ In'faistry 
Clay Machinery Industry 

Coin-Operated Machine Manufacturing Indn.stry 
Coffee Industry 
Collective Manufactyj-ing for Door-to-Door 

Distribiition Industry 
CoiTBTiercial Eefrigerator Manufacturing Industry 
Cordage and Tvdne Industjy 
Corn Cob Pipe Industry 

Counter T3^.e Ice-Cream Freezer Industry 
Cotton Cloth Crlove MarAifacturing Industry 
Cotton Sag Trade 

Crushed Stone, Sand an Gravel, and Slag Industry 
Curled Hair Manufacturing Industry 
'Cylint.er Mould and Dandy Roll Industry 

Dental Gooc-s-and Equipment Industry 
Die Casting Manufacturing Industry 
Domestic Freight Forwarding Industry 
Dov/el Pin Industry 

Earthenware Manufacturing Industry 

End Grain Strip Wood Block Industry 

Envelope Indu.stry 

E;:cel;jior and Excelsior Protucts Industry 



19 

20 
21 

22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 

33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 

43 
44 
45 
46 

47 
48 
49 
50 



Fan and Blov/er Industry 

Feed i*ia,nufacturing Industry 

Felc.spar Indcstry 

Fibre Can and Tube Industry 

Flag Manufacturing Industi'y 

Floor and Wall Clay Tile Manufacturing Industry 

Floor Machinery Industry 

Fluted Cup, Pan Liner end Eace Paper Industry 

Folding Paper Box Industry 

Foundry Supply Industry 

Fresh Oyster Industry 

Fuller's Earth Proc.ucing and Marketing Incuctry 



51 

52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 



9791 



-101- 

Codes of Fair Competition E:-±iibit Fo . 

Gfu-ber, Sus;^jeiK.er ?nd Belt Lanv.facturing Induntry 63 

Gasoline ?-ui:ip Mrnufacturiiiig Industry 64 

Glazed and Pancy Paper Indxistry 65 

Grey Iron Povuidry Industry 66 

Gummed Lalsel and Lmbossed Seal Industry 67 

GuimniU;^-; Industry 68 

Hair Cloth Manufacturing Industry 69 

Hog-Cholera Virus and Anti-Eog Cholera Serum Ind. 70 

EouseliOld Ice Eeiri{jerator Industry 71 

Ice Cream Cone Industry 72 

Imported Date Packing Indiistry 73 

Importing Trade 74 

Industrial Oil Burning Equipment ivianufacturing Ind. 75 

Industrial Safety Equipment Industry and Trade 76 

Insecticide and Disinfectant lisnufacturing Industry 77 

Knitting, Braic ing and V/ire Covering Machine Industry 78 

Ladder i-ianufacturing Industry 79 

Linseed Oil Iianufacturing Industry 80 
Live Foi-'.ltry Industry of the Metropolitan Area 

in £jid ehout the City of New York 81 

Macaroni Industry 33 

Machined Wa.ste Manufacturing Industry 83 

Manuiact\.ring and Wholesale Surgical Industry 84 

iiiarine Af-ciliary Machinery Industry 85 

Marking Devices Industry 86 

Meditijn ?nd Low Priced Jerelry Maniif acturing Industry 87 

Merchant and Cn.stom Tailoring Industx-y 88 

Metal liat Die and Wood Hat Block Industry 89 

Metal Hospital Furniture Manufacturing Industry 90 

Metal Tajol: Maiiuiacturing Industry 91 

Metal 'window Industry 92 

Mopstick Industry 93 

Musical Merchandise Manufacturing Iiidustry 94 

Nonferrous and Steel Convector Mantifacturing Ind. 95 

NonferrovLS Scrap Metal Trade 96 

Open Paper Drinking C-^o sxi(.- Hound l-Jesting Paper 

Container Industry 97 

Ornamental Molding, Carving and Turning Industry 98 

Package MeJ.icine Industi^y 99 

Packaging Machinery Indixstry and Trade 100 

Paper Box Machinery Indt).stry and Trade 101 

Paper Disc Milk Bottle Cap Industry }02 

Paper Me^.ers Felt Industry 103 

Paper Stationery ano. Taolet Manufactu.ring Ind. 104 

9791 



r.102- 

Codes of Fair Competition Exhiliit IIo . 

PeriUi.ie, Cosmetic and Other Toilet Preparations 

Industry 105 

Petrole-ojn Ilquipment Industry and Tra.de 106 

PhotO;i'r£.pliic and PhotjQ Finishing Industry 107 

Pianr© i.iantifactL\ring Industry ' 108 

pictu.re Moulding and Picture Frame Industry 109 

Pipe i^ipple Maiiufacturing Industry 110 

Pipe Organ Industry 111 

Plurahin, Fixtii.res Industry 112 

Porcelain Breal-cfast Furniture Asr.embling Industry 113 

Powder Puff Industry 114 

Precioxis Jev/elry Producin;^ Industry 115 

Presei-ve, Maraschino Cherry ?nd (l-lace Fruit Inc. 116 

Print Roller and Print Block Manufacturing Ind. 117 

Printing Equipment Industry and Trade 118 

Printing Inl: Manufacturing Indxxstry 119 

Haw Peanut Milling Industry 120 , 

Eeady-Made Furnitiire Slip Covers Manufacturing 

Industry 121 

Ready-Mixed Concrete Industry 122 

Real Estate Brokerage Industry 123 

Retail Monujnent Industry 12^_ 

Rock aiid Slag Wool Manu.facturing Indiistry 125 

Rolling Steel Door Manufacturing Industry 126 

Safety Razor and Safety Ra^or Blade Manufacturing Ind. 127 

Sand-Lime Bricj- Industry 128 

Sanitary and Waterproof Specialties Manufacturing Ind. 129 

Sanitary Milk Bottle Closure Industry 130 

Sanitary Hapkin and Cleansing Tissu.e Industry 131 

Scrap Iron and Steel Trade Indiistry 132 

Scrap Ruhher Trade 133 

Secondary AlujTiinura Industry _ 134 

Smelting and Refining of Secondary Metals int« (\ 

Brass and Bronze Alloys and Ingot F'orrii Industry 135 

Smoking Pipe lianufacturing Industry 136 

Soft Fihre Manufacturing Industry 137 

Spice Grinding Industry 138 

Stea.i Ileacing Equipment i..anufactu.ring Industry 139 

Surgical Dresn..ngs Industry 140 

Tag Industry 141 

Tank Car Service Industry 142 

Tapioca Dry Proc'ucts Industry 143 

Textile Machinery Manufacturiixg Industry 144 

Textile Print Roller Engraving Incbistry 145 

Toy ajid Playthings Industry l'^^6 

Trailer L:a,ni\fs,cturing IjKUistry 147 

Trucking Industry 148 

Trout Farming Industry in the Eastern Section 149 



9791 



-103- 

Codes of Eair^.Competition • Exhibit IJo. 

Unit Heater and/or Unit Ventilator I.Ianufacturing Inc.. 150 

Upholstery Spring and Accessories Maimfr.cturing Ind. 151 

Used Textile Bag Industry 152 
Used Textile Ilachinery and Accessories Distributing 

Trade 153 

Vaccuum Cleaner Manufacturing Industry 154 

Valves and Sittings Mpnuf acttiring Industry 155 

Venetiaii Blind Industry ' 156 

Warm Air F-arnace lianufacturin^ Industry ' 157 

Warm Air Register Manuf actui-i ng Industry 158 

Waste Paper Industry ' • 159 

Waterproof Paper Indus-try 150 

Waxed Paper Industry 161 

Wet Mop Manii-facturing Industry 162 

Wheat Flour Milling Industry 163 

Witch Hazel Industry 164 

Wliolesale Monumental G-ranite Industry 165 

Wholesale Llonumental Marble Industry 166 

Wholesale Tobaccj Industry " 16V 

Wood Cased Lead Pencil Manufacturing Industry 168 

Wood Heel Industry _ 169 

Wood Plug Industry ' 170 

Wood Turning and Shaping Industries 171 

Wooden Insulator Pin and Bracket Manufacturing Ind. 172 

Wool Felt Maimfacturing Industry 173 



9791 



-104^ 
EXHIBIT .1 
BEDDIJIG I'LAiraTACTUPJlIO INDUSTRY 
I. ., Occupations involving general hazards 

1. As drivers or assistnnts to drivers of motor vehicles or as 

helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

2. In, or assisting in, the operr.tion of gas, oil, or stp.-ijn 

engines or other prine movers. 

3. In the care, custody, operation or repair of elevatcrs, 

cranes, derric'^s, or other hoisting ap^oaratus, eric^pt 
in the operation of (1) dom^waiters as defined hy the 
iUnerican Standards Association, or ( S) of elev-tors 
equip;ped only for a.utoTm.tic operation. 

4. Firing of stean or water "boilers (e:ccept "boilers of not 

more th-m 15 pounds pressure used solely for henting 
purposes.) 

5. In foundries, all vrorh in the foundry proper. 

6. All cleaning or grinding operation; in foundries. 

7. In malleo.'ble foundries, operations involving handling: of 

heated castings, etc. , in connection r/ith axinealing v/ork. 

8. All '7ork in foundries involving ercposure to molten lead or 

BJiy molten lead alloy, or to dust of lead or of -^ny lead 
alloy, 

9. In the cutting or -Telding of metals "by gas or electricity, 

10. In or in co:inection '7ith hot galvanizing or tinning process- 

es, 

11. Furnace oper-^tors for prelie'^ting net"^ls, 

II • • Occupations involving specific mecaanical hazards -mo.chine 

work (prohi"bition to a;pply to oper-ting, assisting in op- 
erating or taking material from the foll'^'iing machines) 

12. Work on picker machines, 

1'6, All garnett departnent operators, including opening nach— 

ines, 
14, Grinding, a'brasive, polishing or bixffin- -'heels r)rcvidnd 

that apprentices opei'ating under conditions of "bona fide 

apprenticeship may grind their QTm tools, 

15. Hetal-cutting machines having a guillotine action, 

16. Metal pla,te "bending machines h;uidling material of nore t'nrJi 

0,2145 inch in thickness, 

17. Poi^er-driven netal olaning machines, 

13. Circular sa'.TS ased in the cutting of metals, 

19, All aut on ■'t i c cut-off savs, 

20, Wire stitching mi,chinery. 

21, Wire straightening raachi:ies, on T'ire heavier th^n ilo.ll 

gauge, 

22, Power shears of all kinc's, 

23, All tj'pes of launch oresses. 



5791 



-105- 

24, Z}ie-settin{:^ on wire crimping machines* 

25. Oper-'^tion of wood planers or otner pone r-c. riven T^'^od--orl:- 

ing machinery, or '-trk as off-bearer, 
26o Ripsaw Operators, 
27, Sajid s-^Fin^,' and cut-off machines. 
23. l.;achinery used in the cold rolling of heavy meta.l stock, 

29. Boring mills. 

30, Dip machine operators, 

31, Routing machines, 

32. Beating machines and hand berating. 

33. In oiling, cleaning or "iping machinery or shafting iii 

notion. 

34, In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting the:'pi:i, 

III, Occupations involving healt.:. hazards 

55. In the handling of unsterilized animal hair. 

36. All sprpy "booth operations. 

57, In all processes nhere subst-'-nc'^s containing lead or -ni^ of 
its compounds are used in a liquid or povrdered foi— or at 
a temperature smficient to v.-^porize lead, 

38. I7ork involving exposare to benriol or a)iy benzol conpcuiid Thich 

is volatile or nhich c^i.n penetrate the skin, 

39. Removal of finishes by acids, alkali or thinners, 

40. In heavy lifting (vreight liiaited to 40 pounds for a single 

person) , 

IXilBIT 2. ' . 



iBRASIVi, GILxIJ IIiDUSTRY 
I, Occiipations involving general hazards 

1, liring of ste^ra or 'Tater boilers (except boilers of not 

more thp;a 15 lbs, pressure used solely for eating pia-- 
poses) . 

2, As drivers or assist^jits to drivers of motor vehicles, or as 

helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles, 

3, In, or assisting in, the operation of g s, oil, or ste-n 

engines or other orxne m "^'err:. 

4, In the care, custody, operation or re i air of elevators, 

crenes, derricks, or other hoisting a;p'"iar'^tus, except in 
the opor?tion of (a) dumb-waiters as de-^ined by the Aaeri- 
can Standards Association, or (b) of elevators eqtiipped 
only for automatic operation, 

II, Oc;uoations involving specific r.iechrnical hazarcs — machine nork, 

(Prohibition to apply to oper-ting, assisting in operat- 
in^g, or taking nat^^rial from the follcing machines), 

5, Lachinery having a heavy rolling or crashing ■action. 

6, Roller mixers, pug mills, putty chasers or forming machinery 

of the pressure t'fpe, 

7, In oiling, clepning or wiping n-'chinery or sh.-jfting in mo- 

tion, 

8, ADpl;/in:; belts to pulleys in motion or assisting theipin, 

III, Occupations involving health hazards 
S7S1 



-106- 

In processes nhei-e quartz or pnY other forms of silicon 
dioiicide or ?n asbestos silic':'te is present in ■ooi7d-r°d 



1 orm,, 

■EXHIBIT 3 
AI?- TIlAiJSPOHT L.TUSTRY ' 

1. Occupations of pilot, co-pilot," and stewardess, 

2, Ciper'tion of groinid servicing, 

EXHIBIT ^ 



AIH lldNE. liTOUSTRY 
I, Occup'itions involving general haz-irds 

1, As drivers or -i.tsistants to drivers of motor vehicle::: or as 

helpers or delivery "boys on notor vehicles, 

2, In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam 

_ engines or other prime movers. 
S, In the care, custody, operation or rep-iir of elevators, 

cranes, derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, e::cp-ot in 
the operation of (l) diimbwaiters as defined by the 
American St.',,ndards Association, or (3) of elevators 
equipped only for automatic operation. 

4, Firing of steam or ^later boilers (except boilers of not 

more th,an 15 pouiids pressure used solely for heating 
purposes) . 

5, In foiondries (ferrous a;ad nonferrous), all i^rk in ■''he 

foundry proper. 

6, All cleaning or grinding operations in foundries, 

7, All -fork in foundries involving e:q)osure to molten lead 

or aiijr molten lead alloy or to dust of lead or of aiv 
lea,d plloy, 

8, In malleable foundrius, opera.tions involvirog handling of 

heated castings, etc., in connection \7ith annealing 
\york, 

9, In the cutting or vrelding of •met'^ls by gas or electricity, 

10, In or in con/.ection with hot galvanizing or tinning process- 
es. 

H, Occupations involving specific mechanical ha.zards -machine 
Fork (Prohibition to ao'oly to operating, assisting in 
oper-vtine-, or trjcing materifO. frora the follo^nng ■■•^achi'oes, ) 

11, Grinding, abrasive, polishing, or buffing wheels, pre vided 
that apprentices oper-^ting under conditions of bona fide 
apprenticeship may grind their o-tl tools, 

12, Metal-cutting machines having a guillotine action, 

13, Machinery used in the cold rolling of neavy metal stock, 

14, Ketal plate bending machines handling m.n.terial of more thrn 

0.2145 incn in thickness. 



2791 



"107- 

15, Po'^er-driven metal planing machines, 

16, Circular sav^s used in the cutting of metals, 

17, Borin^; mills. 

IS, Po7;-er she,---rs of all kinds, 

19, Punch presses or stamping machines if the clear-mc? 'oet- 

ween the ram and the die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth 
inch, 

Er.ception ; Apprentices: Employment on any of the above- 
named Piachines may he permitted in the case of minors 
between 16 and 18 years of age who are bQiia, fide appren- 
tices,* 

20, In oiling, cleaning or v.dping m.achiiier,y or shaftin,?; in 

motion, 

21, In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting tjae:.ein, 

III Occupptionc involving health hazards 

22, All ifork in spray painting, 

23, 'Jork involving exposure to benzol or any benzol compouiid 

which is volatile or i-'hidx can penetrate the skin, 

24, 'Jork involving e:rposure to chromic a.cids, chroraates, or 

bichromates, 

25, Work involving excessive e:r[D0sure to corrosive subst^nc^s* 



* Apprentices shall be defined as "those who are regularly 
indentur^'d ■ander contra,ct to tne industry :'or a suf- 
ficient period of ti-ne to be systematically advar.ced 
through the virious operations, shops, depart •-'_ents, 
etc., of a tr^de, occupi-'^tion or industry, and who 
receive educational training in an organizf-d ed-ucrtion- 
al institation dur-ng a Dortion of thpir "orkin time," 

EXHIBIT 5 



ALL-IliiTAL Ix.'SiiCT SCHEE^T IKDUSTRY 
I. Occupations involving general hazards 

1, In the crttting of welding of metals b-?- gas or electricity, 

2, In or in connection with hot g'-rlv^nizing or tiiining pro- 

cesses, 

3, i.0-'J.ding work, cor^ mgking or othex- processes where such 

work exposes them to tae hazard.s of melted metal, or 
lead or zinc fujaes, either directly or indirectly, 

4, All cleaning or grincing operations, 

5, All work which involves the handling of metallic lead, ^ 

6, In the outside i:-istallation of screens ^-hen work must be 

carried on 10 feet above grade (the level of an ad.- 
joining fla,t roof may be taken as grade). 



57S1 



-108- 

II. Occiipations involving specific mechanical hazards -np.chine rork 
(prohibition to apply to oper -t.ing, assisting 'in oper-.tip..^;, 
or teiking material from tne folloTing machines) 

7, Grinding, o,l)rr?sive, polishing or "b-affing 'Theels; provided 

that apprentices operating under conditions of boni xide 
apprenticesLiip inay grind their own tools, 

8, i;etal cutting ;:a,chines having a guillotine action, 

9, Ketal plate bending machines ho,ndling material of nore than 

0.2145 inch in thickness, 
in, 'power-driven metal planing nachines, 

11. Circular sa,ws used in the cutting of raetals, 

12. V'ire stitching raaxhmery. 

13. machinery having a heavy rolling ar crushing action, 

14. L'achinery used in the cold rolling of heavy metal stock, 

15. ■ Soring mills. 

■£::;Geption ; Apprentices: Eraplo^/ment on any of the dhove-nained 

machines may he loerraitted in the case of minors "bet^-een 
IS and 18 years of age who are hona fide apprentices, 

III Occupations involving health hazards 

IS, Lead soldering work. 

17, All work involving exposure to acid in connection with 

pickling of sh^^et plate, 

18, All '.'ork in spray painting, 

19, In all processes ^'-here suostance conti.inirg lead or its 

compounds are used, 

20, In processes v/here materials producing a silicosis ha.zard 

are present. 

t 

Apprentices shall he defined as "those who a,re regularly in- 
dentured -under contract to the industry for a. sufficient period of 
time to he systematically advanced thjrough-the various operations, 
shops, dep.rtnents, etc., of a trade, occupation, or industry, and 
who receive educational training in an organizied educational insti- 
tution during a portion of their working tine. 



9791 



•109- 



ZKHIEI2_-6 



ALLOY GASTIHC^ ITTDUS'i'EY 

I. Occumtions involving s-jecific mechanicj^l hazards — 
machine \7ork» 

(Prohibitions to sryjly to operatint^, assistin^^ in 
operating", or taking material from the following 
machines). 

1. Grinding, abrasive, -polishiu^-:, or buffing wheels; 
provided that a-r^rentices operating under conditions 
of bona fide a-i 'renticeship may grind their oim 
tools, 

2. Metal-cut tins, machines ho.ving a giiillotine action. 

3. I/iachinery used in the cold rollin,^ of heavy metal 
stock. 

4. Metal plate bending macliines liandli:\-' material of 
more tha/a 0.2145 inch in tliiclcness. 

5. Pov;er-driven metal ;~la.ning machines. 

6. Circular sav/s used in the cutting of metals . 

7. Boring mills. 

8. Pov;er shears of all kinds. 

9. Punch presses or stamping machines if the clearance be- 
tween the ram and th5 die or the stripper exceeds one- 
fourth inch. 

B zce-otion — Apprentices — EmolojTnent on any of the above- 
named machines may be permitted in the case of minors 
between 16 and 18 years of age who are bona fide 
apprentices. 

10. In oilin;^-, cleaning or v/iping macliinery or sh9.fting in 
motion. 

11. In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting 
therein. 

II. Occupations involving general hazards 

12. Innon^orrous foundries, all work in the foundry proper. 

13. All cleaning or grinding o^Terations in foundries. 

14. All vrark in foujidries involving ex-iosure to molten lead 

or any molten lead alloy, or to dust of lead or of any lead 
alloy. 

15. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or 
as hclT5ers or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

16. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil or steam 
engines or other prime movers. 

17. In the care, custody, operation or reiair of elevators, 
cranes, derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except 
in the operation of (l) d'oinbwaiters as defined by the 
American Standards Association, or (2) elevators equipped 

9791 



-lie- 



only for autorac.tic o^Teration, 

18. Firint^ of steam or water "boilers (exce;Tt iDcilers of not 
more than 15 ITss. "-.ressure used solely for heatin£; pur- 
poses) . 

III. Occir:atio:is involving, health liazarcls 

19. work involvint^ ex-)osure to chromic acids, chroraates or 
tichromates, 

20. Work involvinj;,- exjosure to daMgerous f-umes. 



ilivHiBII 7 



AMEHICAll laTCH IIIDUST3Y 
I. Occupations involving" ^.eneral hazards 

1. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or 
3-s herders or delivery hoys on motor vehicles. 

2. In or assistiHij in the operation of tjas, oil, or steam 
entwines or other '^rirae movers. 

3. In the care, custody, opei'ation or repair of elevators, 
cranes, derricks, or other hoistinfj apparatus, except 
in the operation of (a) dumbwaiters as defined by the 
American S^^andai-ds Association, or (o) elevators equipped 

. , onli for automatic operation. 

4. Firin^- of steam or water toilers (except toilers of not 
more than 15 Ihs. -pressure used solely for heatin;-,' pur- 
poses). 

II. Occupatious involvin'j specific mechanical mzards — machine v/ork. 
(Prohihition to apply to operatin;:^, a.ssisting in operating, 
or takint^ material froia the follovi-it, maxhinesX 

5. Operation of pov:er-driven v;ood'..'or;:in^' machinery, or vork as 

of flearers. 



Where match hoxes are manufactured : 

6. Machinery of stampint^ or ptuich-press type used in the inanu-^- 
facture of paper or ^aper t;oods if the clearance betv^een the 
ram and the die of the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch. 

7. Paper-ciitting' niachines liavin^, a ^uillotine action. 

8. Creasors, slit '.ere, or crii.rdiit, printintj or /.rainint^ rolls 
which are not i-^u.ardea at tac joint of operation. 

9. Corner-stayin:;, corner-ctittin_, or ev.diiii;.: machines used in 
the paper-box industr:,' if th? openin^; to meet the plung-er 
exceeds one-fotirth inch. 



9791 



-111- 



Sx ception : Stirh comer-stayin{^ machines equip;ied with 
an a-atoro^tic device tliat v.lll instantly ston the dov.Ti- 
•vTard notion of the -_^^ ranger should the finger of the 
operator como hetv/een the ;-ilvin,_;or and the anvil. . 

5 xce-:;ti on; Ar";rentices: Enr^lo^.inent on any of the 
above-naned machines may he ;;ennitted in the case 
of minors "bet^-een 16 and 18 years of a4;e who are 
"bona fide a-^;Trentices. 

10. In oil in::, cleaning; or ^vii^in- macninery or sliaftin^ 
in motion. 

11. In applying; holts to -3ulleys in motion or assistinc 
therein, 

III. Occupations involvintj health hazards, 

12, All occ-a-iations which involve e:ciocure to white or 
yellow phosphorus. 

13, In the use of dan.^^erous dyes. 

Apprentices shall oe defined as "those who are re£-u- 
larly indentured tmdor contract to the Industry, for 
a sufficient period of time to he systematically ad- 
vanced throw;h the various operations, sho^Ts, depart- 
ments, etc, of a trade, occupation or -indiistry, and 
T'ho receive educational trainint i^- s,n organized educa- 
tional institution d\\ring a portion of .their working 
time. " 



3XKIBIT 8 



AinivAL soil HAIR lilDUSTP.Y 

The Code of Pair Competition for the Animal Soft Ilair Industry 
estahlished a minimum age of 16 for any emrployment in the industry, 
and of 18 at operations or occupations liazardous in nature or detri- 
mental to health. Pursuant to this provision the occupations listed 
"below hoave been designated as hazardous in nature or- detrimental to 
health for minors under 13 at which no minor under 18 shall he em- 
ployed: 

I. Zvery occupation involving the ha.ndlin,^ of hair in 
productive processes, 

1. Separating all hair fro:.i the furs or shins. 

2. Disinfecting the lia.ir, 

3. Sorting, classifying and matchin,;; of hair. 

4. Cutting of all I'sir to certain sizes, 

5. Combing of all hair whether by machinery or by Imnd, 

9791 



-112- 



6. '(Tasliing and 'bleachin;: of hair. 

7. Tyin^ hair vco in h-andles a.nd ;paclcins hxair. 

II. G-eneral hazards 

8. As drivers of traclis or other motor vehicles or as 
hel-jiers or delivery hoys on such, vehicles. 

9. In the operation or re;iair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks or other hoistiniT, apmratus, ezce^Dt in 
the o:;nration of (l) dvdnbv/aiters as defined hy 
the American Standrrds Association, or (2) ele- 
vators eq^u-i'^ped only for 3.utomatic operation. 

10. In, or assisting in, the o^Teration of &as, oil, 
or steam enjines used as ;• rime movers. 

11. Firin^ of steam or vater "boilers (except boilers of 
not more tlia.n 15 Ihs. pressure used solely for hes.t- 
in^a purposes). 



EXHIBIT .9 



AHT IISEDLZWOBK IITDUSTHY 

ITo. 335 

(B«f. - Code History) 

" D. Other Lg-hor Provisions ; 

1. Child l£iT3or: Section 1 of Article V of the 
Art TTeedleiTorlc Code prohibits persons under 16 years of 
age being emr:)loyed in the Industry, and further states 
tliat no person under 13 years of age shall be employed 
at operations or occupations liazardous in nature or 
detrimental to the health. The Code' Authority lias follow- 
ed the provisions of this section and ha.s complied vdth 
the latter "tiart of this section in submitting a list of 
hazardous occu:-iations '.7hich nas ap-oroved by the IT. ?., A. 
on July 20, 1934. (*) 

The only occupations v:hich it appears desirable, so 
far as ve Iniov.' the Industrj", to prohibit for minors under 
13, are those common to most manufacturing industries: 



(*) Ap'^roved by letter oi' Division Acijninistrator. ilo 
order issued. Only reference available: Division 
Administrator's files. Ho order issued. (P. 

27a). 



9791 



-llo- 

1. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor 
vehicles, or'rs helpers or dolivei^' boys on motor 
vehicle&,- ' • 

2. In, or assisting in, the opBraticn of tjas, oil 
or stearj en^'ires or otner ^frime movers. 

3. In the care, cu.stcdy, operation or re^^air of 
elevat^ns; cK.nos, dcrric'_^;s, or other hoisting 
apparatxiSv e::c-.ept in "tiife" operation of (l) durn'o- 
\.T.iter3 as dc±l-icd iDy the American Standards 

■ Associ.a'"ion, or (s) elevators equipped only for 
av-tomacic operation.; \ 

4. Firin^; of steam or rater boiiers (except boilers 
of not more than 13 lbs. pr'essure used solely for 
heatin^^ purposes).' : ■ :, 

If t he Induct r:,.^ ir.cl udes the '^•^'roceS'sinr. of yarns, the 
fcllowinff sho'u l f,. ce- -p-.vhi'ci Kt-d . ■■■■•■■ 

5. Foi"': on openers, nickers, (lappers)' or cards used 
in the textile industry. • '. 

Also; ■ ■ ■ 

6. Cloth SlitterG, if used in any branch of the Industry, 

■. ■ . ■ ■ ■ ZX:iIBI^ .10 



■ AUI0IXTI?2: CH>:;::iC:.AL SPECIAITIUS LlAlTUITACTimilC- IITDUSTRY 
I, !.Ieclia.nical and Health Hi slcs 

1. In oilin^, cleaning or ri;'in;; raa.chinery or shafting in 
raoticn. 

2. In applying belts to -^ulleys in motion or assisting 
therein. 

3. In occ"jpations involving exposure to fros silica dust, 
asbestos dust, o.r -othep dusts in' injurious quantities, 

4. .In occupations involving exposure to the follov7ing 

substances if present in inc'iicti-:^: 

(a) ITitro and araio.o derivatives of benzol 
or taluel 

(b) 'Arsenic or its com-^ounds 

(c) Benzol 

(d) Gr.rbon Bisulphide 

(e) •. Chlorine 

(f) Cr°cnote 

(g) Hi'dro fluoric acid or its compounds 
(h) Hydrocyanic acid or its compounds 
(i) Hs'^drogen sulphide 



9791 







U) 






(k) 






(1) 






(m) 






(n) 






(o) 






(p) 


' 


and 


. (q) 


5. 


In a 


,ccu-o 



-114- 

Lead or its conr-)o"uiids- 
Mercury or its cor.no\inds 

Mesothori"uin or its radioactive derivatives 
Hitrous gases 
White or yellov ^-^hosphoras 
Eadi^um or its radioactive derivatives 
TetTachl ore thane 

Other sutstances ha.vin{^' similar injurious 
properties. 

;),tions involving excessive exposure to the 
follov;ing substances if present in industry: 
(a) Antimony or its compounds 
. , , , (h) Carbon dioxide 

(c) Carbon monoxide 

(d) Carbon tetrachloride 

(e) Chromic acids,' chroraates, or bichromates 

(f) Corrosive substances 

■(g) Methanol (' jf 

(h) Petroleum or- its low-boiling distillates. • 

_ , such as gasoline, naphtha, or benzine 

(i) Tar ■ 

(j) Trichioretivione 

(k) Turpentine 

. -and (l) Other substances Imving similar injurious- ; 
properties 

II. (general Outside and Ifeintonance Hazards 

6. As drivers of truclcs or other motor vehicles or as 
helpers or delivery boys on such vehicles 

7, In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or 
steam engines used as prime movers 

8, In the operation, custody, or repair of eleva,tors, 
cranes, derricks or other hoisting apparatus, except in 
the operation of (l) dumbv/aiters as defiaied by the Amer- 

_^ ican Standards Association, or -{o) of elevators equipped 

only for automatic operation 

9. Firing of steam or i-^ater boilers (except boilers of not 
more than (l5) pounds pressure used solely for heating 
purposes). 

10. Lifting of heav^y'' \7eights (50 lbs. maxira-um) ; 



9V91 



-115- ■ 
EXHIIIT 1 1 . 

1. Occuoptions involving f^eneral hpzards , -. , . 

1. As drivers, --or assistci-.ics to drivers of motor vehicles or 

as helpers or delive-'v boys on inocor' vehicles. 

2. In, or assisting in, the operatiipn of gas, oil, or steam 

engines or other ' prime mover's, 
o. In the care, cu.s"ody, operation or repair cf elevators, 
crr.nes, derricks, cr other hoistiu.g npparat-as, except 
in the operati'-;n of (l) dainhv/aiters as defined hy the 
American Standards AsBociat ion,, or (2) of elevators 
epuipped only for autcmatic operation. 

4. Firing" of steam 'or water boilers (e--:ceiDt boilt:rs of not 

more than 15 ooands pressure used solely for heating 
purooses). 

5. In the cutting or welding of metals by gas or electricity. 

II. Occupations involving specific rafechanical ha7Prds - machine work. 

6. Grinding, abrasive, polishing, or brffing wheels. 

7. lv';etal-cutting machines having a ■-•'uiilotine action. 

8. Machinery -used in the cold rolling of hea-r,' metal stock 

9. Metal plate bending machines handling material of more, than 

0.2145 inch in thickness. 

10. Power-driven metal planing machines. 

11. Circular snxs used in the cutting of metals. 

12. Boring Mills. 

13. ''ower shears of all kind's. 

14. Punch presses or stamping machines if the clearance between 

the ram and the die or the stripper exceeds one-fo^JU-th 
inch. 

15. Wire stitching machinc-ry. 

16. {.Machinery having a heavy rolling or crushing action. 

17. _ Molding, splitting," rolling, perforating, stamping, dieing- 
- • out, embossing, bv.rnisxTing, clicking,, skiving, stripping 
or buffing machines u.red in the leather ix^du-jtry. 

18. All occupations .c£.rried on in connection witn power-driven 

wood working machinery. 

19. In oiling, cleaning or wiping machinery or shat ■•■ in^r in 

motion. 

20. In applying belts to pulley in motion or assisting therein. 

III. Occupations involving health haz.ards ^ . 

21.- Lead soldering, work. . 

22. All work involving exposure to acid in connection with 
pickling of sheet plate. 

23.- Work involving. ^xoQ.sur'?' to T>erizol, or. a:hy benzol comoo-'and 
which- i.s- volatile, or .which can. penetrate the skin. 

24. In the use of d^^ngerous dyestuffs. 

25. All work in spray -jainting. 



9791 



-116- 



EXHIBIT 12 . 

BATTING AND PADDING INDUSTRY 

I. Occupations involving mechanical hazards — machine work. 

(Prohibition ts aoply to operating and. assisting in oper- ' 
ating or taking materials from the following machines:) 

■v 1-' Power shears of all kinds. 
2. Garnett machines. ■ ' 

.3. -Stuffing machines. 
4. ; Opener, pickers, or cards (Same as used in the Textile' 

Industry) . 
5.- Cutting operations. 

II. • General hazards 

6. In oiling, cleaning or wiping machinery or shafting in 

motion. , . 

7. In applying belts to oulleys in motion or assisting there- 

in. 

8. As drivers of trucks or other raotof" vehicles or as helpers 

or delivery boys on same. 

9. In custody, operation or repair of elevators, cranes', 

derricks or other hoisting apparatus, except in thfe 
operation of (l) (Jumbwaiters as defined by the American 
Standards AssociaMon, or (2) elevators equipped only 
for automatic operation, 

10. Firing of steam or ifater boilers (except boilers of hot 

more than 15 lbs. pressure used solely for heatinig 
p o'ooses) . 

11. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or steam 

engines used as orime movers. 



., ..• ■ - EXHIBIT 15 . 

BEAUTY AND BARBER SHOP I^iECHANICAL EQUIPflENT MANUFACTTJRING INDUSTRY 
I. Occupations involving general hazards 

•1. In the cutting or welding of .metals by gas or electricity. 

2. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or 
.:■: as helpers. or delivery -boys on motor vehicles.. 

3. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam 

engines or other jrime movers. 

4. Firing of steam or water boilers (except boilers of not 

more than 15 lbs. pressure us.eij.. solely for heating, 
: :(■-;;- ■■■ purposes, ^..j,. j? :^... ,. « ,. . 

II. Occupations involving specific mechanical hazards—machine work. 
■ .(Prohibition to apply to. operating,, assisting in operat- 
,.; ing_, or . taking material from the following machines). 



9791, 



-117- 

5. Grinding, abrasive, polishins; or buffing; wheels; ' provided 

that aopreenticei oper?ting under conditions of bona fide 
apprenticeship may grind their own tools. 

6. Ketal-cutting machines havj.np: a guillotine action. 

7. Circular sav^s used in the cutting of metals. 

8. Boring Mills. 

9. Punch cresses or stBirioing m^'chires if the clenrance between 

the ram and the die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth 
inch. 
10. Wire stitching machinery. 

III. Occupations involving health hazards 

11. All work in spray painting. 

12. Work involving exoCs'Ji'e to benzol or any benzol co'm- 

pound'which is volatile or which can penetrate 
the skin. 

13. Work involving exoosure to chromic pcids, chrompte's, 

or bichromates. 

14. Lead soldering work. 



E:?aiB I? 14 

BEVERAG-E DISPENSim EQ,UIPi-ENT Ii^a)USTPY 

Occupations involving specific mechanical hazards — machine work. 
(Prohibition to aooLy to operating, 'assisting in oper- 
ating, or taking material from the following 
machines) . 

.1. Grinding, abrasive , polishing, or buffing wheels. 

2. Metal cutting machines having a guillotine action. 

3. Machinery used in co'ld rolling of heavy metal stock. 

4. Metal plate bending machines handl.ing ma.terial of m.ore 

than 0.2145 inch in thickness. 

5. Power-driven metal planing machines., 

•6. Circular aaws used in the cutting of metals. 

7. Boring mil ic. 

8. Power shears of all kinds. 

9. Punch presses or f.tar.Ding machines if the clearance 

between the ram and the die or the stripper exceeds 
one-fourth inch 

10. Wire stitching machinery. 

11. Klachinery having a heavy rolling or crushing action. 

12. Operation of all power-driven woodworking machinery, 

or work as off -bearer. 

13. Poller mixers, pug mills, dry pans, outty chasers, 

forming processes or other molding machinery of the 
pressijire type. 

14. In 5iling, cleaning or wiping machinery or shafting in 

motion. 

15. In applying belts to oulleys in motion or assisting 

therein. 



9791. 



-118- 



II. .OccuTD.ations involving health hazards 

16. Lead soldering work, 

17. Al"! WorV involving exiDOSiire to acid in connection with 

■Dibkling of sh.?pt nlate. 

18. In mirror manufacturing. 

19. In all Tjrocesses where , qufef'tz, or any other form of silicon 

dioxide or an asbestos silicate is rjpesent in -nowd^red form, 

20. All work in s-oray nainting. 

31, In all -orocess^s where substances containinff lead or any 
of its comtiounds are used in a liquid or iDowdered form, 
or at a temoerature sufficient to va"oorize lead, 

22. Work involving ex-oosure to benzol or any benzol comTDOund 

which is volatile or which can -oenetrate the skin. 

23. In cutting or grinding glass, 

24. Work involving ex-oosure to chromic acids, chromates, or 

bichromates. 

25. Work involving excessive . exnosure to corrosive substances, 

III, OccuTDations involving general hazards 

26. In the cutting or welding of metals by gas or electricity. 

27. In or in connection with hot galvanizing or tinning 

TDrocesses. 

28. Where the industry includes foundries: 

In ferrous or non-ferrous foundries, all work 

in the foundry -oroner. 
All cleaning or grinding ODerations in 

foundries. 
All work in foundries involving eTt)'^sure to 

molten lead, or any molten lead alloy or 

to dust or lead or of any lead alloy. 
In malleable foundries, onerations involving 

handling of heated castings', etc. , in 

connection with annealing work, 

29. As drivers or assis1?ants to drivers of motor vehicles 

or as helioers or delivery boys on motor vehicles, 

30. In the care, custody, o-oe- ation or repair of elevators, 

cranes, derricks, or othe- hoistin^: a-o-oaratus, exce-ot 
.in the or>eration of (a) dumbwaiters as defined by 
the American Standards Association, or (b) o^*^ 
elevators equi-ooed only for automatic ODeration. 

31. Firing of steam or water boilers (excent boilers of 

not more, then 15 lbs. -oressure used solely for 
. , . heating Tour-Dos-^s), 

32. In or assisting in the oiDeration of s:as, oil, or steam 

. '0, ,. .■ 
>. engines or otner Torirae movers. 



9791 



-11,9- 



T JIXHTEIT 15 

B"CYCLB:. ^lA!^UFAC^JRING IKDUSTRY 

I« OcciiiDations involving soecific mechanica'' hazards — machine 
vrork. 

1. ■ Grinding, abrasiv^, -oolishing or hu-^fing wheels; provided 

that aiD'-rcntic = s 0"oerating under conditions of bona 
fide at)rir>snticeshi-D may grind their own tools, 

2. Metal-cutting machines having a guillotine action. 

3. Machinerv used in the cold rnl^.ing of heavy metal- stock, 

4. Circular sa^s used in the cutting of metals. 

5. Power shears of all kinds. 

6. Punch iDressiS or stam-oin^ ma.chin='S if the clearance 

"between tne rani and the die or the striuner exceeds 
one-fourth inch. 

7. All occunations in forcing sho^s, 

Exceotion: ATD^rentices: Hm-C'loyment on anv of the 
above-named mochiJnes may be -oerrj:! tted in the case 
of minors between 16 and 18 years of age who ai'e 
bona fide an'oi entices, 

8'. In oiling, cleaning or wi-olng Tna.chinerv or shafting 

in motion. 
9. In a-o ilying belts to -nullevs in motion or assisting 

therein. 

II» OccuTDations involving health hazards 

10. All work in s-orav -oaintine- • 

11. Wori^ involving en^osure to chromic acids, chromates 

and bichr ornate SA„ 

12. . WorVr invo^^ving e:ccessive ex-oosure to corrosive 

substanc^eSo 

III. • OccuDaticns involving general hazards 

13. In the cutting or welding o-f metals by gas or elec- 

tricity. 

14. As drivers or assistants to driver k of m'^tor vehicles, 

or "s hel-oers or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

15. In, or asristing in, the o-oeration of gas, oil, or 

steam .'ngines or other Tsrime movers. 

16. In the care, custody, oneration or ret)air of elevators, 

cranes, derricks, or o':her hoisting a-or^aratus, ezce-ot 
in the o-oeration of (a) d^'ambwaiters as defined by the 
American Standards Association, or (b) elevators 
?auiti'D3d only for automatic o-oeration. 

17. Firing of stea^n or water boilers (exce-ot boilers of not 

mo -re than 15 lbs. -oressure used solel-^ for heating 
■Dur-ooses'). 



9791 



-130- 



"^XHIBIT 16 

BOBBir Al^ SPOOL INDUSTRY 

I. Occu-Dations involving specif ic mschanical hazards-niachine 
work (prohibition to amolv to oneratins;, assisting in 
oneratin^ or taking ma-t-erial from the following Tiachinss). ' 

1. GrindiniPC, Abrasive, polishing or buffing wheels; 

provided that au'crentices operating under conditions 
of "bona fide aiD^Trent ice shin may grind their own 
tools. 

2. Punch Dresses or stamioing machines if the clearanas 

between the ram and the die or the stri-oner exceeds 
one-fourth inch, 

3. Boring mills. 

"Er.cp-otion: ATDnrentices: Emnloyment on any of the 

above-named machines may be -oermitted in the case 

of minors between 16 and 18 years of age who are 
bona fide amorentices. 

4. In oiling, cleaning or wi-oing machinery or shafting 

in motion, 

5. In ao-nlying belts to -oulleys in motion or assisting 

therein. 

II. Occu-Dations involving general hazards 

6. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles 

or as helners or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

7. In, or assifrting in, the oioeration of gas, oil, or 

steam engines or other -orime movers, 

8. In the ca,r-, custody, o-oeration or re-oajr of elevators, 

cranes, derricks, or other hoisting aniDaratus, 
e7:ce-Dt in the o-oeration of (a) dumbwaiters as 
defined by the American Standards Association, or 
(b) elevators equi-D-Ded onljr for automatic o-oeration. 

9. Firing of steam or water boilers (exce-ot boilers of 

not more than 15 lbs, ore'sure used solely for 
heating runDOses). 

10. • Solifcter iic-vrs, 

11. Pa-oer ciltting machines having a guillotine action, 

12. Crear-ers, :s,litters, or corrugating, crimrjing, ■ 

embossing, -olating, -orintingj or training rolls 
used in the manufacture of -oa-Der and -oa-oer 
Droducts which are not guarded at the -ooint of 
o-oeration. 
1?. Machinery havins a heavy rolling or crushing action. 



9791 



-121- 



BHOOM MAmiFACTURING IKDUSTRY 

I. Operations involving mechanical risks 

1. ^.Derating sewing or stitching machines. 

2. Onerating h room-winding machines. 

3. Ooeratins lathes, hand, circular or swing caws 

involving the use of moving knives, drills, 
"bits and/or cutters. . . " 

4. Power driven -Dunch -oress^s, drill ^ress, nailing, 

riveting, sta^^ling or handing machin-^s.- 

5. Operating TDOwer driven cylinder hroom or hroom 

corn scra-oers or seeders. 

6. Power driven hroom clio-^ers or trimmers. 

II, General outside and. maintenance risks '•' ' ' ■ 

7. In oiling, cleaning or wirjing machinery or shafting 

* in motion. 

8. A-DTolying helta to -oulleys in motion or assisting 

therein. 

9. In, or assisting in, the oneration of gas, oil, or 

steam engines used as -orime movers.. 

10. As drivers or assistants to drivers or as helners 

or delivery hoys on motor vehicles, 

11. Firing steam or water 'boilers (exce-ot hollers of not 

more than 15 Ihs-. pressure used solely for heating 
TDurooses) . 

12. In the o-De-ation, custody or re-oair of elevators, 

cranes, derricks or other hoisting a-ooaratus, excer)t 
in the o-oeration of (l) duintwaiters as defined hy 
the American Standerds Association, or of (2) 
elevators eaui-ot)ed only for automatic oneration. _ 

13. Lifting heavy weights (lO'O lh.s. maxim^am). 



?XHI3IT 19 • 
BRUSK Ml^WACTUaillG INDUSTRY 
I. OccuTDations inv^^lving general hazards 

1. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles 

or as hel-oers or delivery hoys on motor vehicles. 

2. In or assisting in the. operation of "as, oil, or 

steam engines or other tjrime movers. 

3. In the care, custody, operation or rer)air of elevators, 

cranes, derricks, or other hoisting anuaratus, er.cex>t 
in the oreration of (l) dumhwaiters as defined hy the 
American Standards Association, or (2) elevators 
equi-oned only for automatic operation. 



9791 



-122- 



4. Pirine; of steam or water "boilers (erce-ot "boilers of 

not mor.e tnan 16 Its. -nressiire used solely for 
heat ing iDurrio se s ) . 

5, In the cutting or welding .of metals "by gas. or elec- 

tricity. 

II. OccuTjati'^ns' involving s-oecific meohanical hazards-machine- 
work _ . . ' . ■ /, 

1. Operation' of single suindl^ or dou"ble sxiindle sha-oers. 

2. O'oeration of "band or circular , saws, 

3". Ooerat.ion of buzz Tolaner or double surfacer. 

4. Operation of cavity. cutters. 

5. Q-oeration of "bristle com"bing,and mixing machines, 

6. Oneration of mechanical and/or iDOwer -oresses. 

7. OiDeratloh of any cutting knife or cutting dies if 

unguarded, excluding "brush trimmers* ... . z' 

■' ■ ' " ' '■ '" "" '" ^ EXHIBIT 19 . ..' : 

BULK'dRIKICIKG'sTBAW, ^;7RaPPED DEI^^KIKG STRAW, 

WEAPPED TOOTHPICK. AND fHAPPED IviAlIICUKE STICK IiaDUSTRY 
, . ( ■ ' - ■' ' ■ 

I. Occu-pations involving general hazards.. ■ ■ - . 

^ 1.. Firing of 'steam or water "boilers. (exceiDt "boilers. of 
not more, than 15 l"bs, r^ressure used solely for 
heating tjurooses), 

2. As drivers or .assistants to dr'ivers of. motor 'rehi.cles 
' or as helTDer^s ,or delivery "boys onmotor vehicles, 

3. "In, or assisting in, the o-oer-tinn of gas, oil, or 

■ steam .en£:ines or other. orime movers. 

4. In the cgx'e, custody, o-oeration or r'eoair of elevators, ( 

cranes, derricks, or -other hoistin,?: aio^jaralju-s, .except 

in the oneration of (l) dum"bwaitsrs, as defined "by 

the American Standards Association, or (2) elevators equin- 

TDed only for automatic operation. 

II. OccuToations involving s-oecific mechanical hazards — machine work 
(Prohi"bition to atioly to o-oerating, assisting in onerating, 
or taking material from thfi following machines) . 

1, Machinery o-f. stamioing, or^ uunch-riress tyne used in, the 

ma.nufapture of xiauer or naDer goods, if the clearance 
"be.tween the ram and the die. or the striDDer exceeds 
bne-fburth inch. 

2, Creasers, slitters, or corrugating, crim-oing, embossing, 

plating, -orinting, or graining rolls used in the manufacture 
af oaper and -oat) er. -Droducts which are not guarded at the 
point: of ' ope'ration , . 

3, Power shears .of all kinds. , ■ 



9791 



-123- 



4, In oiling, cl^^anine; or wiriin.^ machinery or sha:ftinf in 

TDotion. 

5, In at) flying belts to -oulleys in motion or assisting 

therein. 

6, Power-driven t)rinting oresses. 

4 

ATDTjrentices shall be defined as " tiiose who are regularly 
indentured under contract to the Industry, for a 
sxifficient iDeriod of time to be systematically advanced 
through the various OTjerations, shorjs, departments, 
etc., of a Trade, Occu-oation, or Industry, 'and who 
receive educational trainin,^ in an organized educational 
Institution during a -oortion of their working time." 

SuTD-olementary items to above list> 

■Pc'er-driven saws ' 

Work in connection with tiaraffining iDrocesses. 



TTXHIBIT 20 ■ 

■ ■' CM LABELING Alffl CAH CASIITO 
■ MACEIiraaY INDUSTRY AKD thaDE 

I. OccuToations involving general hazards 

1. In foundries (ferrous or non-ferrous), all work in the 

foundry nroioer. 

2. All cleaning or grinding o-oerations in foundries, 

3. All work in foundries involving e^roosure to molten lead 

or any molten lead alloy or to dust of lead or of 
any lead alloy. 

4. In malleable foundries, o-oerations involving handling 

of heated casti<nffs, etc., in connection with' annealing 
work. 

5. In the cutting or welding of metals by gas or electricity. 
5. In jDr in connection with hot galvanizing or titining 

nrocesses. 

7. As drivers or a;ssistants todrivers of motor vehicles or 

as helners or delivery boys on motor vehicle-s. 

8. In, or assisting in, ^:he operation of gas, oil, or steam 

engines or other -orime movers, 

9. In the care, custody, ooeration or repair of elevators, 

cranes, d-^rricks, or other hoisting a.-oiDaratus , axce-ot 
. in the o-oeration of (l) dumbwaiters as defined by the 
American Standards Association, or (2) elevators equiiDned 
only for automatic o-oera-tion, 
■ 10. Firin~ of stear, or water boilers (excent boilers of not 
more than 15 lbs. -iressure used solely for heating 
■ourooses) , 



9791 



-124- 



II, ■ OccuToations inVolving st)ecific mechanical hazards-niachine work 
(Prohibition to au ^ly■ to o-peral^ng, assisting in --oiDerating, 
:,■■.;':.-■. or 'tal^rin'g' material from the following machines) . 

11» Grinding, abrasive; '-boiishing of buffing wheels; rjfovided 
that a-D-orentices oijerating londer conditions of bona 
■■■■'" '' ' fide iaTD-orenticeshit) tna:^ grind their own tools. 
12, ■ Metal -cut ting ''lachiiie 6 ' having a guillotine .action. 
'■13, Machinery' used in the cold rolling of .heavy. metal stock. 
\4:i ' Metal' -oiate bending 'machines' haiidling material of more 
'•:-•" •'■ than" 0.21 45 inch in thcknesS. , ,'' 

.■.;•r^-.v;l5•,^; -power-driven metal -olahing machines. ^ , , . ,, 

'16^ 'Cir'ciilar saws used in the cutting of metals. 

17, Boring mills. ,■- 

18, Power shears of all kinds. 

19. Punch TDresses or stam-oing machines if the clearance 

between the ram and the die or tjie strit)-Der exceeds 
one-f oufth inch. 

20, Wire stitchin-^ machinery. 

21. Machinery hrving a heavy rolling or crushins: action. 

Exce-ption; AiTOrentic.,e&: "nmnloyment .on any of the above 
named machines may be -qermitted in the case of minors 
between 16 and 18 years of aee who are bonn fide 
aiDTor entices. ,.,■•...■,.■.. -■ 

22. In oiling, cleaning or wi-oing mr'chinery nr shafting 

in" motion. t '■■'■■■ "■■■ ' • ■■ '.,•.. 
22. In a-0T)lT-ing belts to pulleys, in. mbtion or assisting 
• ther'eitf. '"•'" '■ •.■.■, 

Illn OccuiDat ions involving heal til hazards"*" ' 

24,.' 'Ail work in s-oray -oainting. ' ', 

25. Work involving eroosure' to beA^ol or any benzol comnound 
wnich is volatile or which. Qa.n ■oenetrate.-th^' skin. 
. 26, Work involving ex-oosure to chromic , acids, chromates,^ 
or bichromates. 

27, Work involving excessive ex-oosure to corrosive substances, 

28, Lead soldering work, ' ., ' ' . \ 

29, All work involving extiosure to acid in connection- with 

TDickling of sheet 'olate, ' , ' " . 

■ " 'Atj-orentices- shall be defined as "those 'who ar.n regularly 
indentured under contract,. to fhe Industry, for a 
sufficient ,->.Deriod o+" time t,o be systematicallv advanced 
through the' vari'ous o-oeratibns., sho-os, de-oar tments, etc., 
of a Trade, OcauTDatibn or Industry, and who receive ; 
educational training during a oortion of their working 
time in an organized educational institution," 



9791 



1 

. 2 

3 

4 

■ 5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

IS 

14 

15 



-125- 

EXHIBIT 21 

CjUfilED SALi.IOK lilDUSTRY 

Operations of iron chinlc. 
Operations of gang knives or fisli cutters. 
Peeciin- the filling machines. 
Hand' tutchGrini'^. 

Tne lifting of heavy weights (85 pounds maximum). 
All direct operations or vrork as an offbearer 
on machinery for can-malcing or reforminr; cans, 

E3G-II3IT 23 

CA!:WI1:Ct IlIDUSTEY 
(Fruit and Ve^-^cto.ole, "but not Fish Canning) 

Occupations in cook room. 

Occupations in "boiler room. - 

Operating corn hixskers. 

OjDerating 'corn cutters, .. , , 

Operating clo'sing machines. 

Oiling and greasing. ' ^ ■ • 

Operating cutting aiid slicing machines. 

Putting on "belts. 

Heavy vrork, such as^piling hepvj.r filled cases. 

Brine room whore tanlcs are low. 

Pushing crates on overhead trolley conveyors. 

Operating steam or gasoline engines. 

O^BPaMng ■; industrial motor trucl<;s or tractors. 

Helpers or delivery boys on motor trudis. 

In the operation, custody, or repair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks, or other hoistin ; apparatus, except in the 
operation of (a) dum"b\7aitcrs as defined "by the American 
Standards Association, or (b) elevators equipped only 
for automatic operation, 

ES-IIBIT 25 

CAKVAS STITCHED BELT ;.;AirJFACTLrEIiJ& IK DUSTRY 



I. 



Occupations involving specific mechanical l:tazards-t-machinc work, 
(prohibition to apv,ly to opei-ating, assisting in operating, 
or taking material from the following machines) . 



1. 



2, 

2a. 

3, 

4. 



I'uiicjCi presses or stampingor dieingr-out machines if the 
clearance "between the rarn and the die or the stripper 
exceeds one-fourth inch. 

Power shears of all kinds, . ' 

Slitting machines. 

In oiling, cleaning, or wiping machiiiery in motion. 

In applying "belts to a pulley in motion or assisting therein. 



"136" 
II. Occui^ations involving general hazards 

5. Firin^" of steam or wa.ter 'boilers (except steam Tsoilers of not 

more than 15 lbs. pressure used, solely for heating purposes). 

6. As drivers or assistrjits to drivers of motor vehicles or as 

helpers or delivery hoys on motor vehicles. 

7. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or steam ■ 

engines or other prinle movers. 

8. In the care, cartody, operation or repair of elevators, cranes, 

derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in the opera- 
tion (l) of dumhvraiters as defined hy the American Standards 
Association, or (2) elevators equipped only for automatic 
operation. 

EXHIBIT 24 

CAEBOK BLACK i.;iUU]rACTUjniJ& IITOUSTP.Y 

1. In oiling, cleaning, or raping machinery or shafting in motion, 

2. In ap-lying belts to rmlleys in motion or assisting therein. 

3. As drivers or assistants to. drivers of motor vehicles or as 

helpers or delivery hoys on motor vehicles. 

4. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil or steam engines 

or other prime movers, 

5. In the care, custody, operation or repair of elovators, cranes, 

dcrridcs, or other hoisting apparatus, except in the opera- 
tion of (l) dumhviaiters as defined by the American Standards 
Association, or (2) of elevators equipped-only for automatic 
operation. 

6. Firing of stea^nor water boilers (except boilers of not more 

than 15 lbs. pre insure used solely for heating purposes.') 

EXiilBIT 25 
CAED CLOHIIHG IIUDUSTRY 

1. Firing of steam or v/ater boilers (except boilers of not more 

than 15 pounds pressure used solely for heating purposes). 

2. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or as 

helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles, 

3. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil or steam en- 

gin es or other prime movers, 

4. In the care, custody, operation or repair of elevators, cranes, 

derricl:s, or other- hoisting apparatus, except in the opera- 
tion of (l) dumbvaitcrs as defined by tlie American Standards 
Association rind:(2) of elevators eqioipped only for automatic 
operation. 

5. ITire drawing machine.s. 

Except , work on fine sizes of wire commonly drawn through 
cUainond dies. 

6. In oiling, cleaiiing or wiping machinery in motion. 

7. In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 



9791 



-127- 

Ap'j^rentices shall Tac defined as "those who are regularly in- 
dentured under contract to the 'industry, for a sufficient 
perioc. of tine to l>e systematically advanced through the 
various operations, shops, departments, etc., of a trade, 
occupation or industry, and who receive educational train- 
ing in an organized educational institution during a por- 
tion of their working time." 

TP'. pTU " "^ ^(T 



CAST IRON BOILSR AlIB CAST IRON RAJDIATOR lUDUSTHr 



1. ".[oulding work, _ core making, or other processes in foundries 

which expose the worker either directly or indirectly to 
melted metal. 

2. All cleaning: or grinding operations, in foundries. 

3. In malleable foundries, 'operations involving hancUing of 

heated castings, etc., in connection with annealing work. 

4. Firing of high pressure steam or water hoilers, except steam or 

water "boilej-s, used, solely for heating purposes. 

5. As drivers or assistulits to drivers of motor vehicles or as 

helpers or delivery Taoys on motor vehicles. 

6. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or steam engines 

or other prime movers. 

7. In the care, custo'dy, operation, or repair of elevators, cranes, 

derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in the opera- 
tion of (a) dumhwaiters' as defined hy the Anerican Stand^a'ds 
Association, or (b) elevators equipped only for automatic 
operation. 

3. In the cutting of v/elding of metals "b'y gas or electricity. 

9. In or in connection with hot galvani.zing or tinning processes. 

10. Grinding, atrasive, polishing or huffing wheels; provided that 

learners may grind their &m tools. 

11. In oiling, cleaning, or wiping machi-nery in motion. 

12. In ap"5lyirig hel'ts "to a pulley in motion or assisting therein. 

13. Lead soldering work. 

14. All work involving ejqposure to acid in connection v/ith pickling 

01 sheet plate. ■ 



S'upplementary List 

1. All work in spray painting. 

2. iietal-cutting machines halving a guillotiiie action. 

3. puiich -presses or staoRiing machines if the clea?'ance between 

the ram ajid the die or the striiiper exceeds one-fourth inch, 

EXHIBIT 27 ' ■' 
CIGifi iviAiraFACrJRIlTG IlTDUSTHy 
I. . General hazards 

1. Oiling, cleaning or v/iping nacl^inery .or shafting in motion. 

2. Applying helts to pulleys in motion. 

3. Drivers or hel-oers on motor vehicles. 



9791 



-128- 

■'.'.t •';■■; ■ ':.';V''i ""ii ' '■■ :'■' " '■■- ' ' ■ '■'■■'■'■ - ' - 

.';■;•■ .:'4f ■■}Oiper.ating^oi\;asslsting in the operati.onof j>rime movers. 
o;;,:5^- ,jC^3e;i^at|.o,n..or ^-naiintenance of elevators, craiies or otlier 
...(-,, ; .. koistin^; a^parafcy.s, excent automatic elevators, and. so- 

-■:on j.;6v. ;?ii'"i;i^S. of ;.pJ-i.,. "but ilo.w -pressure ."hoilcrs (15 ll)s. or less). 

7. Lifting of heavy v/cishts,,(;100 V^s. maximum)., , 

8. In aJ.1 loading and unloading operations from trains, trucks, 

ships, etc., where li:5 'ting is done "by hand, 

ili-Gp -if powcT-driyen machinery is used in conveying and hand- 
ling machinery the following should he added: 

; 9.' .In handling,,;: loading or unloading goods where power-driven 
machinery is used for conveying or, handling. 

II. ^^pccific.mechc^ical .liazards ,. '. . 

.., ,10, Tohacco stem crashing machine,; : ■ 

. :. ■ . .; . , . . EXIII-BIT 23 ■ . 

. ., „ ..." Cl4AY.,^'ID SHALE HOOFINa TILE INDUSTRY ■ • .. 

I. . Opcupa^ions involving general ha,zards 

1.. Wpfl?:. In or about clay hanlcs., or pits, including .surface work 

connected therewith. . , /, ■, , ,, .'■,'■-, :, , 

2. Handling of explosives, if used. . - 

.,,.i.3.t -.As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor, vehicles^ or as 
., ,., ...'. , helpers or delivery hoys on motor vehicles, 

■.,.4. In, .or assisting, in, the. operation or repa^ir of elevators, 

cranes, derricks, or, other hoisting apparatus, except in the 
operation of (l) dumhwaiters as defined .by the American Stand- 
ards Association, ox (2) of elevators equipped only .for auto- 
matic operation. . _ . 

6. Firin g of steam or, water "boilers (except hollers of not more 

than 15 pounds pressure used solely for heating purposes). 

II. Occupations in volving specific mechanical hazards — ^machine work 

(prohibition to apply to operating, assisting in operating, 
or talcing material from the following machines) . •' 

7. i:achinory having a heavy crushing or rolling action. . 

8. Roller mixers, pug mills, dry pans, putty chasers or molding 

machinery of the pressure tyi^e. 

Exception ; Apprentices: Employment on any of the above-named 
machines may bo permitted in the case of minors bctwcan 16 
and 18 years of age who arc bona fide apprentices. 

9. In oiling, cleaning or wiping machinery or shafting in motion. 
, 10. In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 



9791 



-129- 
II. OccapatiouG in volviug Ileal th liaaards 

11. In ':lazin.'^ or other procnsses v/liere lead or any of its com- 

poiuids are used in a liquid or powdered form, or at a tem- 
perature sufficient to vaporize lead. 

12. In processes where quartz or miy other form of. silicon dioxide 

or an asbestos silic3.te is present in powdered form. 
15. Occupations involving lifting of heavy weights. 

Apprentices shall be defin ed as "those who are regularly in- 
dentured Uii dor contract to the industry for a sufficient 
period of tim.e to be systematically advajiced through the 
va.rious operations, ships, departments, etc., of a trade, 
occupation, or industry, and v/ho. receive educational train- 
ing in an organized educational institution during a por- 
tion of their \7orking time." 

• ■ . SSIISIT 29 ■ 

CLAY, DRA.rj TILE :;A:-UrAClUErxJG-ISDUS THY 

I. Occupations involving general liazards • 

1,. T/ork.in or about clay banius or pits, including surface, work 
cormected therewith. 

2. Ilajidling of ercplosives, if used. 

3. In the operation, custody or repair of elevators, cranes, 

derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in the opera- 
tion of (l) dui-nbwaiters as defined by the jiinerican Standards 
Association, or (2) elevators equipped only for automatic 
operation. 

4. Firing of steaJTi or water boilers, (except boilers of not more 

thaji 15 lbs. pressure used solely for heating purposes). 

5. As drivers of truci:s, motor vehicles, or as helpers or de- 

livei-y boys on such vehicles. 

6. In, or assisting in, the oi:ieration of gas, oil or steam en- 

gines • used as prime movers. 

7. Switching and work on and about railroad equiiiment. 

8. All work in connection i;rith.the use of power operated 

mech.anical equipment for loading, unloading, handling, or 
conveying.. 

II. Occupations involving specific mcclianical hazards— machine work 

(prohibition to apply to operating, assisting in operating, 
or taking material from the following machines) . 

9. Extrusion machinery or other machinery having @, heavy , 

crushing or rolling action. 
' 10. Roller mixers, pug mills, dry pans, putty chasers, or molding 
ma.chinery of the pressure type. 

Excc-Qtion ; Apprentices: Employment on ajiy of the above named 
machines may be penviitted in the case-s of minors between 16 
ajid 18 years of age v;ho are bona fide apprentices. 

9791 



-130- 

11. In oiling, cleaning, or wiping- machinery or shafting in motion. 

12. In airrlying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

III. OccxLpations involving health liazards 

13. All work involving lifting or handling "by hand of weights in 

excess of 80 pounds. 

TTliere glazing is done: 

14. In processes where lead or any of its compounds are used in 

a liquid or powdered form, or at a temperature sufficient to 
vaporize load. 

15. In processes where qUartz or any other foi-m of silicon dioxide 

or an' achestos silicate is present in pov?dered form. 

EXHIBIT 50 
CLAY MACHIiJERY IK DUSTEf 

I. Occapations involving specific mechanical hazards — machine work. 

(Prohibition to apply to operating, assisting in operating, 
or tailing material from tlie following machines). 

" ■ ■- ^ T 

1. Grinding, abrasive, polishing or. buffing wheels; provided that 

apprentices operating under conditions of bona fide apprentice- 
ship, may grind their ovm tools.' 

2. i.Ietal- cat ting machines having a guillotine action. 

3.^ lictal plate bending machines handling material of more than 
0.2145 inches- in thickness. " ■ , 

4. Power-driven metal planing machines. 

5. Circular saws used in the cutting of metals. 

6. Machinery having a heavy rolling or crushing action, such as 

corrugating rolls. 

7. Ivlachinery used in the cold rolling of heavy metal stock. 

8. Boring mills. ' ' 

9. Power shears of all kinds. 

10. Punch presses^ or stamping machines if the clearance between the 

ram and thc' die or the -stripper exceeds one-fourth inch. 

11. All occupations' in connection with power-driven woodworking 

raachinery. . 

Exception ; Apprentices: Employment on any of tlic above-named 
machines may be .permitted in the case of minors between 16 
and 18' years of age under conditions of bona fide apprentice- 
ship to a trade. 

12. In oiling, cleaning, or wiping machinery or shafting in motion. 
. 13. In applying belts to pulleys in' motion or assisting tlicrcin. 

II. Occupation s involving health liazards ■ • 

_ 14. Work involving exposure to chromic acids, chromatos, or bi- 
chromates. : 
15. Work involving exposure to corrosive substances. 

9791 



16. All r.'ork in spray painting. 

III. OccuT)ations involving £;euer.':l i\'y..::rxC.s 

17. In the operation, custooy or renair of elevators, cranes, 

derridic, or other hoistin;:; appa^ratus, ercopt in the opera- 
tion of (1) d-unhwaiters as- defined "by the Ainci-ican Standards 
Association, or (2) elevrtors equipped only for automatic 
operation. 

18. As' drivers cf trudvs or other motor vehicles or as helpers 

or delivery "boys on such vehicles, 

19. In, or assisting in, t'le operation of r:;as, oil, or steam en- 

rin OS uscd_ as prime movers. 

20. Firing; of steam or -/ater boilers (evcept "boilers of not more 

tlian 15 Ihs. "oressurc used solely for heating purposes). 

21. _ In the ctittipg or wcldin'j of :.iotpls "by gas or electricity. 

In estatlislirnents in the industry where foundry work is done 

22. All Yfork in the foundry proper. 

23. In ferrous and non-ferrous foundries, all claipping or grind- 

ing operations. 

24. All TTork in foundries involving c:<posure to molten lead or 

any ■ molten lead alloy or to i^ist of lead or of any lead 
alloy. • 

25. In malleable foundries, oyjer.ations involving handling of heated 

castings, etc., in connection with cannealing work. 



9791 



-132- 

E]aiI3IT 51 

CCIIT-OPEEATEII MCHIITE IliU'rjmCTTZlIlIG IITDuSTRY 

I. Occxipations Inv.Cilving General Hazards 

"l'.-' Firing of stean or irater boilers (Except boilers of not nore 
'■'■than 15 lbs. pressure -ased solely for heating p-arposes). 
2,- In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil or stean 

engines or other prime novers. 
3,' ' In the car-e,, .c"astod,3/-, operation or repe.ir of elevators, 

cranes, derric'cs, or other hoisting apparatus, except in 
' ■" the -operation of (l) du'abwai t or s as defined by the American 

Standards Association, or (2) of elevators equipped only 

for automatic operj.tion. 
4-.. All T7oric in the foundry proper. 
5,. All cleaning or grinding 0":)erations in founories. 

6. All nork in foiuidries involving exDOsure to molten lead or 
' any molten lead alloy or to dust of lead or of any lead • 

alio?/. 

7. In nalleable foundries, operations involving handling of 
heated castings, etc., in connection .with annealing nork. 

8. In the cutting ot rrelding of metals by gas or electricity, 

9i : In or in, coxinection v.'ith hot galvanizing or tinning processes. 

Occupations Involving Specific Llechanical Hazards - Machine Tlorlc 

(Prohibition to apply to operating, assisting in operating, 
or tailing material from the following machines) 

10. Grinding, abrasive, polishing or buffing wheels; provided 
that ap-orentices operating under conditions of bona fide 
apprenticeship ma;'' grind their ov/n tools. 

11. Lietal cutting machines having a guillotine action, 

12. Metal plate bending machines handling material of more than 
0.2145 inch in thickness. 

13. Power-driven metal planing machines 

14. Circtilar saws used in the cutting of metals 

15. ITire stitching machinery 

16. Machinery having a heav^,'' rolling or crushing action 

17. Machinery used in the cold rolling of heavy stock 

18. Boring mills 

19. Po\7er shears of all kinds 

20. Punch presses or stamping machines if the clearance between 
the ram and die or the striiDper exceeds one-fourth inch 

21. Operating of pov/er-driven wood working machinery or as 
off bearer 

E::ce-3t ion; Ap-orentices: . E-mployraont on any of the above 
named machines may be permitted in the case of minors between 
16 and 18 years of age who are bona fide aoprentices.* 



9791 



-133- 

22. In oiling;, cleaning or iTiping machiner;^ in motion 

23. In applying belts to otilleyc in notion or asfdsting therein 

Occupations li^volving Health Hazards 

24. All '..'ork involviuf; o:coo«ure to acid in connection ;7ith 
pickling or sheet plate 

25. All work in spra^""" painting 

26. In all processes rmere su^ostances contR,ining lead or anj;- of 
its compoiands are used in a liquid or po^Tdered forn or at a 
temperature sufficiant to valorize lead 

27. In processes where qi-'ai-tz or cny other forn of silicon dio::ide 
or an asbestos silicate is present in powdered forn 

28. T7ork involving erroosuro to benzol or any "benzol conpound which 
is volatile or wnich can penetrate the skin 

2C. In the use of dangerous d^'^estiLffs 

30, Lead soldering work 

31. Uork involving e:q)Osii.re to chronic acids, chronates, or 
Dichro nates 

52. 'iTork involving excessive erroosure to corrosive substances 

*Apprentices shall be defined as those "who are regiJ.a--ly 
indentured under contract to the Indu.stry, for a sufficient 
period of tine to be systenatically advanced through the 
various operations, shops, depart; I'ents, etc. , of the Trade, 
Occupation or Industry;-, and who receive educational training 
in an orgaiiized educational institution during a portion of 
their working tine." 

aSilEIT 32 

cor?:E ir^ousTHY 

1. As drivers or assistants to drivers of notor vehicles or a,s 
helpers or deliver--- bo'^'s on notor vehicles. 

2. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or stean 
engines or other prime novers. 

3. In the care, custody, operation or re-oair of elevators, cranes, 
derridis, or other hoisting apparatus, except in the operation of 
(l) dunbwaiters as defined by the Anerican Standards Association, 
or (2) elevators equip-ned only for autonatic operation. 

4. firing of stea^i or water boilers (exce'ot boilers of not nore 
thaii 15 lbs. pressure used solely for heating purposes). 

5. In oiling, cleaning, or wiping nachinery or shafting in notion, 

6. In applying belts to pulleys in notion or assisting therein. 

7. TTxiere packing is done in netal cans; lead soldering work. 



9791 



-134- 



EXHIBIT 33 



DISTRIB"TTir'Cr THADZS DIVISIOi 



iiechsr-ical and Health Risks 



1. 



2. 



In occupations i::volviug ejcoosirre to e::tre:ne hee.t, cold, hLi.iic'it;", 
or daironess, or to sudden, frequent, or extreme variations tliereof, 

In odcixpat ions involving ezcoosure to free silica diist, asber-tos 
dv.st, or other dusts in injuriou.s qua:itities 



3. 



In occupations involvin*^ eitposure to the follovrin.™ suhsttaices 
lorer.ent in the indVLstry: 



if 



and 
4. 



(a; 

(h 

(c 

(d 

(e 

(f 

(g 

(h 

(i 
(J 
0'^ 
(1 
(r.i 
(n 
(o 
(p 
(o. 
In 



and 



(a 

(c 

(d 
(e 
(f 
(g 
(h 

(i 
(J 
(k 
(1 



Nitro or aaido derivatives of 'bei'izol or toluol 
Arsenic or its conpoi^nds 
Benzol 

Carljon 'oisn.lphide 
Chlorine 

Creosote \ 

Hydro C3''anic acid or its conpoujids 
Hydrofluoric acid or its coni"ooij:"ids 
I-^drogan sulphide 
Lead or its compounc.s 
I.iercury or itci compounds 

MesothorixTjL or its reaioactive derivatives 
ITitrous gases 

White or yellow phosphoi^is •, 
Radium or its< radioactive derivatives 
Tetrachlorethahe 

Other suhstsaices h3ving similar injurious properties 
occupations involvinr; excessive exposure to the follo^Ting 



substances if i:)resent in the industry: 



Antimony or its compounds 

Carhon dioxide 

Carbon monoxide 

Carbon tetrachloride 

Chromic acids, chromates,- .or bichromates 

Corrosive su.bstances 

ilethanol ■ 

Petroleum, or its lor.'-boiling distillates such as gasoline, 

naphtha, or benzine 

Tar 

Tr i chlor ethyl ene 

T'arpentine' 

Other substances having similar injurious properties 



In or assisting in the operation of: 

5. Power-driven mixing machines 

6. Power-driven machinery for punching or forming metal 

7. Power-driven machinery having a heaw rolling or pressing action 



9791 



-1S5- 

G. PoTfer-driven nacliinjry for grinding spices and other naterials 
9, Povrer-driven machinery for the pressing, chipping and plodding 
of soap 

10. Poner-driven machinery for the chopping of vtmilla teans ojid 
other substances 

11. Pouer'-driven printing nachinery, presses and cutters 

12. Pouer-driven nacliiner'f for the cutting, planing and fabricating 
of articles, from wood or timber 

13. ?ov,'er-driven laundry machinery 

1 1 . General Outside and. Maintenance Risks 

14. In oilin'-^, cleaning or v.aping machinery' or sha.fting in motion 

15. In applying belts to jp^iHeys in notion or assisting, therein 
IS. As drivers of trucks or other motor vehicles or as helpers or 

delivery boys on such vehicles 

17. In, or assisting in, tlie operation of gas, oil, or steexi engines 
used as prime lAOvers 

18. In the operation, custody/', or repair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks or other hoisting apparatus, excevjt in the operatio:--. of 
(l) dunbijraiters as defined by the American Standards Association, 
or (2) or elevators .equipped only for automatic operation^ 

19. firing of stea'-; or rrater boilers (except boilers of not more 
than (15) pounds pressure used solely/ for heating purposes.) 

20. Lifting of hea-'/y r/eir.hts (lOO lbs. laaximu-n) 

21. In blacksmithing 

23 311? IT 54 
COllMERCIAL HEFSiaSHA-TOR UJtirLlFACTliairG Il^DUSTRY 

I. Occupations involving general hazards 

1. In the catting or nelding of metals by gas or electricity. 

2. In or in connection --.Tith hot galvanizing or tinning processes. 

3. riring of stean or vfater boilers (c:ccpet boilers of not more 

than 15 lbs. pressure'tised solely, for heating purposes). 

4. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or as 

helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles, 

5. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam 

engines or other prime movers. 

6. In the care, custody, operation or repair of elevators, crcner-, 

derriclTS, or other hoisting apparatus, except in the operation 
of (l) dumbTTaiters as defined by the American Standards Associa- 
tion, or (2) elevators equipped only for automatic operation., 

II. Occupations involving specific mechanical hazards — machine xiorlz, 

(Prohibition to apply to operating, assisting in operating, 
or taking material from the following machines), 

7. Grinding, abrasive, polishing, or buffing rheels; provided 

that apprentices operating under conditions of bona fide 
ap--irenticeship nsy grind their ovn tools. 

8. Lie tal- cut ting machines havin,3 a guillotine action. 



9791 



-1S7- . 

12. Gear changers 

13. Electricians 

14. In oiling, cleaning or wiping machinery or shafting in motion. 

15. In applying "belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

EXHIBIT 36 
COmi COB PIPS INDUSTRY 
I. General and Outside liaintenance Hazards 

1. As drivers of trucks or other motor vehicles or as helpers or 

delivery boys on such vehicles. 

2. In the operation, custody or repair of elevators, cranes, 

derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in the operation 
of (l) duntv/aiters as defined by the Araerican Standards 
Association or (2) elevators equipped only for automatic 
operation. 

3. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or steam engines 

used as prime movers. 

4. Firing of steam or water boilers (except boilers of not more 

than 15 lbs. iDressure used solely for heating piirposes). 

5. In oiling, cleaning, or wioing machinery or shafting in motion, 

6. In applying belts to pulleys in motion or, assisting therein. 

II, Specific Mechanical Hazards 

1, Operation of cutting or shaping machines. 

If .there are any harmful ingredients used in the shellacking or 
finishing of pipes, these should be prohibited for minors under 
18 years because of the special susceptibility of young persons 



to poisons. 



EXFIIBIT 37 



COIIl^iTER TYPE ICE-CBEAI.I F±ffiEZEH INDUSTRY 

I. Occupations involving specific mechanical hazards — machine work, 

(Prohibition to aiDply to operating or assisting tin operating the 
following machines.) 

1, Grinding abrasive, polishing or buffing wheels, provided that 

apprentices operating under conditions of bona fide apprentice- 
ship may grind their ovm tools. 

2, Metal-cutting machines having a guillotine action. 

3, Metal plate bending machine handling material of more than 

0.2145 inch in thiclcness. 

4, Power shears of all kinds. . 

5, Circular saws in the cutting of metals. 

6, Punch presses or stamping machines if the clearance between the 
. ram and the die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch. 

7, Operation of power driven woodworking machinery. 



9791 



-138- ■ 

Exceptions - Apprentices . — Employment on any of the above-namGd 
machines may tie lermitted in the case of minors "between 16 and 
18 yeajrs of age who are bona fide apprentices. 

8. In oiling, cleaning,, or wiping machinery or shafting in motion. 

9. In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

II. OccTipations involving health hazards. 

10. All work in spray painting. 

11. 'York involving e::cpos"are to chromic acids, chromates, or bichromatos , 

12. "York involving excessive exposure to corrosive substances. 

III. Occupations involving general hazards (Including plant and outside 
maintenance.) 

13. In foundries (ferrous or nonferrous) all v/ork in the fotmdry 

proper. 

14. All shipping or grinding operations in foijndries. 

15. All work in foundries involving ej^josure to molten lead or any 

molten lead alloy or to dust of lead or of any lead alloy, 

16. In malleable foundries, operations involving handling of heated 

castings, etc., in connection with anhealing work, 

17. As drivers of trucks or other motor vehicles or as helpers or 

delivery boys in such vehicles, 

18. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam- engines 

used as prime movers. 

19. In the operation, custody, or repair of elevators, cranes, 

derricks or other hoisting apparatus, except in the operation 
of (l) dwnbwaiters as defined by the American Standards 
Association of (2) elevators equipped only for automatic 
operation. 

20. Firing of steam or water boilers (except boilers of not more than 1 

lbs, pressure used solely for heating purposes.) 

21. In the cutting or welding of metals by, gas or electricity, 

22. In or in connection with, hot galvanizing or tinning processes. 

EXHIBIT 38 
COTTON CLOTH GLOVE I.IAITUFAC TUEI iJG IKDU3THY 
'I, Occupations involving general hazards, 

1. Firing of steam or \7atcr boilers (except boilers of not more 

than 15 lbs, pressure used solely for heating purposes. 

2, As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or as 

helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles, • 

3, In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam 

engines or other prime movers, 

4. In the care, custody, operation or repair of elevators, 

cranes, derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in 
■ttie operation of (l) duiabwaiters as defined by the American 
Standards Association, or (2) elevators equipped only for 
automatic operation. 

9791 



-1S9- 



II. OccLipctiDns involvirii™ specific 'lechanicol hazards — Tiachine work, 
(Prohioiticn to -<y)ly to noer^.tinf;, ' pssistinf^ in oiierating, or 
t.'ilcing rwiterial from tine follo\7in;<:: ■.nacliines, ) 

5, Diiilcing or dieing out 'nachines, 

0. In oiling, cleaning or r.'iping n^chiuerj'- in motion, 

7, In ap"olying 'belts to a lulley in raotionnor assisting therein, 
3, Operating Seeley prestos, 

EXIII3I? 29 

■COTT(/i\ RAG TIL4I)E 

1. Drivers of trucks or other riotor vehicles or helpers on such 

vehicles. 

If hoisting acoaratus is vj^od. in the i ndust ry:' 

2. Operation or repair of '-^levrtcrs, cranes, oerricks, or_ other 

hoisting appr.>ratus e-cept the operations of du-^b-jp.iters a,s 
defined 'b;'- the Anaericrn Standards Association, or elevators 
eqxiipped onlj'- for sutoriatic onera.tion, 

EIlhlL IT 40 

CRUSRED STLO, SiilD AID GRAVJSL, .411D SLAG linD^JSTRY 

1, 7or!: in or ahou.t quarries or sand oi" gravel "oanks or oits, 

includ.ing 3,11 surface "jork 

2, In the transportation or Lise of (■■>:o].osives or er-ilosive 

su'b stances, 

3, All dredging Hork 

4, AJ-l T;ork on •-.■■creens or crashers 

5, All stevedoring ^7ork , 

• 6, In oiling, cleaning, or 'vroing ..mchinery in motion 

7, In ap':)lying "belts to a pulley in ?ioti',in or assisting therein 

• ... 

3, In ;or.o:^i}nity to p/ny laii^O-ardecl belt or r;er^.vinQ 

9. ' WorP: of enplcyees eng-t-u'v.-d as f ireien 

10, S'."^itching and. -lork .on and ahrtat railroad equionent 

11, Clepji-up on "barges or cars under cl-a'a-shall buckets 

12, Dri^'ing tinicks of over 2 tons crp^icit;'' 



-140- 
E:{HI]3IT 41. 
CURLED rlAIP. i.L(urjPAC'rURIIIG lilDUSTHY 
I. Kechanicpl and Health Hisks • - 

1. Handling of unsterilized or- ^a^■ hair. 

2. In occupations involviji^- ex^osvxe to dvists in 
injurious q-oantities. ' 

3. Operating or assisting in the operation of conting, 
sorting, ajid processing machines, 

II. General Outside and liaintenaiice Hisks 

4. In oiling, cletming, or -jiTjing nachiner;.- or shafting 
in motion, • 

5. In aaiplying -belts to zj^xlleys in notion or assistin."- 
therein, ; "-^ 

6. As drivers of ti^icks or other no tor vehicles or as 
helpers or deliverj^ hoys on same, 

7. In the custody, operation, or repair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting aro-'iaratus , ercce^ot in the 
operation of (l) du-ihuaiters as defined by the American 
Standards Association,, or (2) elevators equipped only for 
automatic operation, ■ 

8. Piring of steam or v/ater toilers (ericeut toilers of not 

. more tnan 15 lbs. pressure used solely for heating pxinooses.) 

y. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or steam^ 
engines used as prime .-lovors, 
10. Lifting of heavy -eights (80 lbs, ma:draum). 

ElQlimT 42. 

CYLIITDEH hOULD A;;;D DilimY ItOLL lUDlisTRY 

I. Occupations involvii^- specific mechanical hazards machine r;ork 

(prohibitions to apply to operating, assisting in operating, or 
talking material from the follouing machines) 

1. Grinding, abrasive, polishing of buffing wheels; provided 
tkat apprentices operating ^jjider conditions of bona vide 
apprenticeship may grind their ov/n tools, 

2. Letal-cutting machines having a giiillotine action. 

o. uachineny tised in the, cold rolling of heavjr raetal stock. 
■ ^^etal plate bending machines handling material of more 
than 0.2145 inch in thid^^ess. 
5, Po^.7ei-driven metal planing nachines. 
5, Circular sans used in tlie cutting of metals, 

7, Boring mills 

8, Pover shears of all Irinds, 

9, Pvjich presses or stamping mr.chines if the clearance between' 
the ram and tlie die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch. 



9791 



-141- 



ETceTtion : Apprentices: Employment on any of the fibove-n.-uned 
mnchines mny be permitted in the case of minors between 
15 and 18 years of ^^-e' wno are bona fide apprentices. 

10. In oiling, cleaning or wiping machinery or shafting in motion. 

11. In applying belts'- toipulleys' in motion or assisting therein-. 

II. Occtipations involving general hazards 

12. In ferrous and nonferrous foundries — all work in the foundry 
proper. 

13. All cleaning or- grinding' operations in foundries. 

14. In malleable foundries, operations involving handling of 

• heatSd- castings, etc.-, ih "connection with annealing work. 

15. All work in foundries involving exposuire to molten lead or 

■ any moitehlead alloy, or to dust of lead or of any lead alloy. 

16. In the cutting or welding of metrls by gas or electricity. 

17. As drivers or assist,",nts to drivers of motor vehicles or as 
nelpers or delivery. boys on motor- vehicles . 

18. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam 
engines, or other rprim.e. ■.movers. 

19. In the care, custody., operation or repair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting apparatus* except in the operation 
of (l) diimbv alters,- as- defined by the. American Standards Asso- 
ciation, or (2) of elevators equipped only. for automatic 
operation. . - ..' 

20. Firing of steair. or wa^t.er .boilers (except boilers of not more 
than 15 pounds pressure used solelyfor heating -purposes) . 

Apprentices shall be defined., as "Those who are regularly indentured 
under contract to the industry, for a sufficient period of time to be 
systematically advanced'-'thrcragh th0' various operations, shops, depart- 
ments, etc., of a trade, occupation or industry, and who receive educa- 
tional training in any organized educational institution during a portion 
of their working time." 

EXHIBIT 43 

DEI-TAL GOODS AND EQ,IJIFK'E:;T II-rDTJSTRY ■. . ■■ ..-..:; ■- 

-r- M re- ' . 
I. Occupations involving specific mechanical hazards — ^machine work . 
(Prohibition to apply to operating or assisting in operating the. 
follov/ing machines.) 

1. Grinding, abrasive, polishing of buffing wheels, provided that 
apprentices operating under conditions of bona fide apprentice- 
ship may grind their oym tools. 

2. Wetal-cutting machines having a guillotine action. 

3. Fo'.'-er shears of all kinds. 

4. Fur.ch presses or stamping machines if the clearance between the 
ram and the die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch. 

5. Ivlachinery having a heavy rolling or crushing action.. 



9791 



•• "142- 

E xcept ion! Apprenticsst Eteplojotient on; .anv of the above named machines 
may be permitted in the' case- of' minors between 16 and 18 years 
of age v'ho are bona fide apprentices. 

6. In oiling, cleaning, or v/iping macninery or :Shafting in motion. 

7. In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

II. Occupations involving health hazards 

8. All vork in spray painting. ■ -. 

9. Work involving exposure to chromic acids, chromates , ' or 
bichromates. 

10. Work involving excessive exposure to corrosiver substances . 

III. Occupations involving general hazards (including plant and outside 
maintenance) . • . 

11. In foundries (ferrous or nonf errous) , all v^ork in the foundry 
proper. 

12. All chipping or grinding operations in foundries. 

13. All work in foundries involving exposure to molten lead or any 
m.olten lead alloy or to dust of lead or of any lead alloy. 

■14. In malleable foundries, operations involving handling of heated 
Castings, etc., in connection with annealing work. 

15. As drivers of trucks or other motor vehicles or as helpers or 
delivery boys in such vehicles. 

16. In,, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam engines 
■ . ■ . used as prime movers. 

EXHIBIT 44 . 

DIE CASTILIG f,'Aj:roFACTURING IJIDUSTRY 

I . General Hazards ■..-._ 

1. As drivers or assistants to drivers, of .motor vehicles or as 
helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

2. In or assisting in tne operation of gas, oil, or steam engines 
or O'ther prime .movers. 

3. In oiling, cleaning, or wiping machinery or snafting in motion. 

4. . In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

5. All work in foundries' involving exposure to molten lead or any 
molten lead alloy, or to dust of lead, or of any lead alloy. 

6. All cleaning or grinding operations in foundries. 

■ 7. In non-ferrous foundries, all v/ork in the foundry proper. 

II. Occupations involving specific meciianical hazards—machine work. 

8. iJlachinery used in the cold rolling of heavy metal stock. 

9. Metal plate bending 'machines handling material of more than 
0.2145 inch in. thicki;ess. 

■10. ■ Flinch presses- or stamping machines if the clearance between the 
ram and the die or the stripper ' exceeds one-fourth inch. 

9791 



-14G- 

EXHIL IT 45. 
DOI/iESTIC FREIGHT FORW.^iRDING INDUSTRY 



1. Freight house or platform laborers or in any vork requiring 
heavy' lifting. 

2. Drivers or assistants td drivers of motor vehicles or as helpers 
or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

3. In the cure, custody, operation or repair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in tht- operation 
of diimbwaiters as defined by the American Standards Association 
or of elevators equipped only for automatic operation. 

EXHIBIT 46. 



DOWEL FIN INDUSTRY. 

I. In occupations involving specific mechanical hazards — machine work 
(Prohibition to apply to operating, assisting in operating, or 
taking material from the" following machines.) 

1. All occupations in connection with power driven woodworking 
machinery. 

Exception: Employment on any of the above-named machines may be 
permitted in the cases of minors between 16 and 18 years of 
age under conditions of bona fide apprenticeship by a trade. 

2. In oiling, cleaning or v/iping machinery in motion. 

3. In applying belts to a pulley in motion or assisting therein. 

II. Occupations involving general hazards 

4. Firing of steam or water boilers (except boilers of not more 
than 15 lbs. pressure used solely for neating purposes). 

5. As drivers or assistants to drivers of miOtor vehicles or as 
helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

6. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or steam engines 
or other prime movers. 

7. In the custody, operation, or repair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in the operation 
of (a) d-umbwaiters as defined by the American Standards Asso- 
ciation, or (b) elevators equipped only for automatic operation. 

Apprentices shall be defined as "those v^ho are regularly indentured 
ujider contract to the Industry for a sufficient period of time to be sys- 
tematically advanced through the various operations, shops, departments, 
etc., of a Trade, Occupation, or Industry, and v/ho receive educational 
training in an organized educational institution during a portion of their 
working tine." 



9791 



-144- 
EXi:i3IT 47 
EAETICENWAZn; ilA.irjFACTUSIi:G- IIIDUSTEY 

I. In occLi^r tions involviiijj'- s";jecifrc."mechahic?l liasards — liachine V/oiic. 
(Prohijition to aiiply to operatiiiL,', ansistin.;^- in operatin;^, or 

trhin; iiiaterial frojj. the followin; mrcliines.) 

1. i\Ip chine ry hsvinj a heavy rollinj or crushing- action. 
■2. Holler, mixers, pug, i.iill, A-rypans, putty chasers, forming; 
■.rocessen or other -moldintj machinery of the pressure type. 
-' 5.- In oilin;^', cleanin;^, or v/ipin;^' mechinery or fhaftinj ,in motion, 
; 4, In aoplyinrj helts to pLilleys in motion or assistin;^' therein. 

If meijihers of the :indu.Sbry--have their o\'.'n quarries, the followin,!; should 
oe prohibited: 

5, Mot'-: in or about clay Danks or jDits, incliidinj surface vrork 

con.iected therewith. ; \ 
5. Switchin,-^ and work on or about railroad equipment (if \ised) . 
:?. Ilgndljn ^--of ■ e:>:i3lGsives- ( if used ). • .. , 

II. Plant and outside maintenance operations. . . ■ ' • 

■ 8.- -As drivers of trucks or other motor vehicles or as helpers or 
celivery boys on such vehicles, 
9. In, or a.ssistin^' in, the operation of tiSiS, oil, or steam enj:ines 
used -as prime mov.ers. .,,-.•■, 

10. In the operation,- custody,, or repair of elevators, cranes, 

derricks, or other hois tin;^-' apparatus , except in the operation 
of (l) dtirnbwaiters as defined, by the lmerica,n Standards Associa- 
tion^ or (2) elevators equipped only. for automatic operation. 
■: 11, .Piring of steam or water boilers (exceiit boilers, of not more 
than 15 lbs. pressure used solely for heatinj^ purposes). 

III. Occu.pations involvin^,' health hazards 

.12, In all glazin;;; or other processes where substances containing 
lead or.an.y of its compounds are used in a, liquid or powdered 
form, or vt a temperature siifficient to vaporise lead, 
■ 13, In. processes where quartz or any Other form of silicon dioxide 
or an asbestos silicate is present in .powdered form. 

■ • , : EXHIBIT C8 ■ 



BUD GEAIN STRIP WOOD BLOCK IIIDUSTRY 

1, Piring of -steam or water boilers, 

2. Attendin.; :or assisting around hot oil treatment vats, 
.3, .. As drivers or assisting" in -drivin; motor vehicles, 

■.4,. Operating or assisting in tht .operrtion ,qf gas, oil, or steajn 

•-.. ■ eijgines or other prime-movers. ■'•. . .■ :■ 
5, Operation or repairing of elevptors, cranes, derricks, or 
other hoi;; ting a 'oaratus. 



9791 



-145- 

S, Operating, feedin,;, or of I'-'besrin ; frorr. jjot/ct driven v;ood 
Y.'orlrinj machinery. 

7, Oilinti, cleaninj, or vipin/; laachiner/ in niotion. 

8. Axoplying belts to a pvdley in motion nr pssistinjj therein, 

EXHIBIT 49 



Eir\r£LOP"j I : ^dustey 

I. Occupf,tions Involvin,^; General Haf.ards 

1, Firing of stcaiii or v;3.ter boilers ( ei-rcept boilery of not nore 
thaii 15 lbs, pressure used solely for heatiri,; pv'.rToaes. ) 

2, As drivers of truc::s or other uiotor vchinler-, or as helpeis 
or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

3, In, or a", sis tin .J in, the operftion of c^". oil, or stea-i e:v_,'- 
ines used as prime uovers-, 

4, In, or assisting in, the operetio;i of (jas, oil, or stesffi- 
heated rrun coolcinji; aopfratus. 

5, In the cpre, operation or repair of elevptors, cranes, derricks, 
or other hoistinvj apparatus, except in the operation of (l) 
dumbA'/aiters as defined by the Ainerican Standards Associc-.tion, 

or (2) elevators eauipped only for a'J-tom;:.tic ojieration, 

II. ^'Ccupations involving Mechanical Hazo.rds - Uachine Work 

(Prohibition to appl^ to operating,, assisting in operating, or 
talcing meterial from the fell owing r.iachines. ) 

5, Machinery of stompin^^ or punch-press ty~pe used in the manui"ao- 
ture of paper or paper goods (including- paperlacing machines) 
if the clesrance between the rain and the die or the stripper 
exceeds one- fourth inch. 

7. Paper-- cutting machines having a ^illotine g.ction, 

3. Paper punches or line perforators, inclo.ding window pujiching- 
machines. 

9, Greasers, slitters, or corrugating, crimpin,;, enbosfjing, pl.-,,t- 
ing, printing, or graining rolls used in the manufacture of 
paper and paper products --hich n.re not .g-aarded c t the :;oint of 
operation. 

10, In adjiisting, oiling, cleaning, or wiping ms.chinery in motion, 

11, In applyin^: belts to a pulley in motion or assisting therein, 

IX>:i3IT 50 
ZXCZLSI03 AI7D ZXCSLSICE rEODUCTS IITDUSTEY 
I. Occupations involving general hazards 

1. Firing of stegm or water boilers (p:';crpt boilers of not more 
than 15 pounC.s pressure used solel,/ for heating purooses), 

2. As drivers or ar.sistants to drivers of motor vehicles or as 
helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles, 

3. In or assisting in the operation of ,jas, oil, or steam engines 
or other jjrime movers. 



9791 



-145- 



4. In the cpre, custody, operation or repgir of elevators, cranes 
derricks, or other hoisting. apparatus, except in the operation 
of (1) durabwriters as defined by the American Standards Asso- 
ciation, or (?) of elevators equipped only for putomatic 
operation, 

II. Occupations involving specific mechanical hazards — machine work* 
(prohibition to aiDplv to operating, assisting in operating or 
taking material from the following machines) 

5. All i"ork in or in connection "dth pover-driven '"'oodworking 
machinery. 

6. Paper cutting machines having a guillotine action. • 

7. Slitters used in the rasnufacture of paper and paper products. 
6. In oiling, cleaning or viping machinery or shafting in motion, 
9. In api^lying belts to a pulley in motion or assisting therein. 



9791 



-147- 
EXKI3IT 51 

FAN m) BhO\BI. I1,TDU3TRY 

I. Occupations involving general hazards 

1. Firing of stean or '■/nte-'- boilnrs (e"ceot lioilers of not nore 
than 15 pounds pressure used solely for he?ting loartjoses). 

2. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor venicles or as 
hel-oers or deliver;'- ho'/s on motor vehicles. 

3. In, or assisting in, the o-iieration of /ras, oil, or r:te,.n en.;ines 
or other lorine movers. 

4. In the crre, custody, otier-tion or renrar of elevators, crrnes, 
derricks, or other hoisting appar tus, erceiotin the OTjer-tion 
of (l) durahwaiters as defined oy the Aiaeric-n Standards Asso- 
ciation, or (?) of elevators eoui"'"ioed only for automatic onera- 
tion. 

5. All nork in the fomidry oroioer. 

6. All cleaning or grinding o-oer^.tions in foundries. 

7. All work in foundries involving oroosure to molten lead or any 
molten lead alio*'- or to dust of lead or of any lead alloy. 

3. In malleable foiindries, ooer-^tions involving handling' of heated 

castings, etc., in connection with annealing '-/ork., 
9. In,, or in connection rvith, hot galv.-^nizing o-^ tinning •orocesses. 
10. . "fork in cleaning out tank cp"3 in t-nk c.-r shon. 

II. Occupations involving snecific raechanicp.l hazarcls — machine work 
(prohibition to aD^olv to oiserating, assisting in ovevkting, or tal:;ing 
material from the following machines) 

llj G-rinding, abrasive, 'Qolishing or buffing wheels; " t)rovided thpt 
arjT^rentices o-oerating londer conditions of bona fide apprentice- 
shin may grind their own tools. 

12. Hetal-cutting naciiines having a guillotine action. 

13* Metal nlate Dending n-'achines handling material of more than 
0.2145 inch in thickness. 

14i Po'^er-driven metal nlaning machines. 

15i Circular saws used in the cutting of metals. 

16. ',/ire-st itching machinery. 

17. ilachinery having a he^y;'- rolling or cmshing ncfion, such as 
corrugating rolls. 

13i Machinery used in tne cold rolling of heavy net-^l stock. 

19. Boring mills. 

20. Po'-'er shears of all kinds. 

21. Punch presses or stamping machines if the clea,rance between 
the ram and the die or the striroer e::ceeds one-fourth inch. 

22* Roller mi'ie'^s, 'oug mills, or outty chaser;.;. 

5:::ce'otion; A^onrentices: Enrolovnent on any of the above-named 
machines may be "oermitted in the case of minors between 16 a,nd 
18 years of age -^ho are bona fide a"Dr)rentices. 

23a. In oiling, cleaning O" wining machinery in motion. 

23b. In applying oelts to a pulley in motion or assisting therein. 

III. Occupations involving health hazards 
9791 



-148- • 

24. All vrark involving exposure to acid in connection vith pickling 
of iheet i3la,te. 

25. All work in spray iDainting. 

26. In all processes where substances containing lead, or, any ox its 
com-oounds a.re used in a liquid or -oowdered form or at a temner- 
atu'e sufficient to vaporize lead. 

27. .In processes where .quartz or any other form of silicon dioxide, 

or an as'oestos ex"oosure is present in powdered form. 

28. Vjork involvin,:': exposure to oenzol or ■ ny oenzol compound which 
is volatile or .'^hich can penetrate the skin; 

29. In the use 'of dangerous dye tuffs. 

,30. Lead soldering work. ' • 



S:fflI3IT 52 
FEED liAlWPAnTUSIlTG IITOUSTRY 



I. Occupations involving general hazards . ' '. ' 

^.. 1. . As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or as' 
helpers or delivery Doys on motor vehicles. , ' . 

2. In or assisting in the opern.tion of gas, oil, or stea;rf5 engjmes 
. or other prime movers. ' " 

3. .Firing of steam or water boilers (except steam or water boilers 

of not more than 15 lbs. pressure used solely for heating Pur-- 
poses). , ' ■• 

■ 4'. In the care, custody, opor-tion or repair of elevators, cranes, 

derricks', or other hoisting apparatus,, except in the operation 
(a) of dumbwaiters as defined ay the American S'tanda.rds As'^o- 
cip.tion or (b) of elevators equipped only for automatic opcra- 
•tion. , ' . . , 

II. Occupations involving specific mechanical hazfirds , 

5. In oiling, cleaning,- 'or wiping machinery in motion. 

■ 6. In applying belts to a pulley in motion or assisting therf^ih. 



EXHIBIT 53 
FELDSPAP-- IITDUSTRY 

I. . Occupations Involving General Hazards 

1. All work in or about mines, auarr.ies, or olts, including surface 
operations. 

2. \/ork involving the handling or upie of e.-plosives or explosive suo- 

.j: , ;.,'■■:,. I ■! stan.ce,s. ' ,■■■•".' 

. 9791 ■ • 



-149- 

II. Occu^n.tious Involvin;5 Soecific ilechanicp.l H- zp.rcis — Machine './oT-k. 

(Prohibition to aiD'ol-'.'- to o-oer-^.ting, assisting in ouerating, or 
t.'-Jciag material frora the follovdn;-; nrchinei!. ) ' 

3. llachinery having a heav:'" rolling or crushing action. 

4< All grinding machines. 

5, In oilinc;, cleanijig, or vriping machinery or shafting in notion. 

6, In a'TDlyi'ig belts tc "^ul.Teys in i?.otion, 

III. Occuortions Involving Health Hazaro.s 

7, In processes ^-'here quartz or anv other form of silicon dioxide 
or an asb 'stos silicate Js loresent in nc-'derec'. forin. 



S'-aillSlT 54 
T'^Z ¥13l-Z CAJ /JiD TlUT, liTOUS^'?.! 

I. G-eneral Hazards 

1. As drivers or assistants to dri^-ers o-f no cor vehicles or -s 
heliDers or delivery boys on notor vehicles. 

2. In or assisting in, the operr-tion o^ .y-.s , oil, or stean engines 
or other "•Drine niovers. 

5. In the care, custody. coer,\tion or re.-oair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks or other hoisting a"ooarF:tus, excent in the o-oeration 
of d-unb"7aiters as defined by the Ariericnn Standards Asso- 
ciation or of elevators equi-or)ed only for autoraatic O'oeration. 

4. firing of stea.'n or '.^ater boilers (e-xe-ot boilers of not more 
thrji 15 pounds 'oressure u.sed solely for heating purooses.) 

5. In the cutting or ^reMing of metals by gas or electricitj'-. 

6. In or in connection viith hut gplvrnizing or timiing -iDrocesses. 

II. iiachine './or'': 

7. Grinding, abrasive, polishing or buffing wheels; provided that 
ajorirentices onerPoting under conditions of bonafide a"oorentice- 
shi"o may grind their o^ii tools. 

8. Metal cutting machines arving a f-j-aillotine action. 

9. lietal plate bending machines ha:idling rarterial of more tna,n 
0.2145 inches in thickness. 

10. Eoner driven metal "olaning machines. 

11. Circular sarrs used in the cutting o" netals.. 

12. './ire Stitching machinery. 

15. iiachiner-" having a heav''' rolling or crushing ^ction. 

14. Po-^er sherrs of all kinds. 

15. Fonch -cresses or stamping machines of the clearance bet'jeen the 
ran and the die or the stri-otjer e-:ceeds one-fourth inch. 



9791 



-150- 

16. PatDer cutting nachines h-ving a gxiillotine -ction. 

17. Paner punches or -line -oerforators. 

13. Crep.sers , or corrugr tiug, crimiDing, euiboasini';:, ^olp.tin^, -print- 

ing or' graining rolls used in the :iirnuf?.ctu-'e of oaper and -oaoer 
products 'jhich are not guariec" at the "ooint of operation. 

19. Sliuters for tu'ces i7hich ara not ;^iarded at the point of opera- 
te o'l, . ■ 

20. Corner sta;;^ing, corner-cutting, or ending raachine-: used in the 
paper "box industry, if the opening to meet the plunger exceeds 
one-fourth inch. 

E'lCSPTIONG: Such corner-staying ra^chines enuipped 'lith rn automatic de- 
vice that i7Jll iastant.lv stoc t.ie do\'7nwarc) motion of the 
plur.ge'^ should tJie finger O" bhe oporator come between the 
Tl"ungei ajid '.he ar,,-il. 

21. If printing is lone; 

Peer-driven printing presses 
IIonotj^'De or linot;''pe machines 
Embossing m.::chinery used in the printijig industry 

WAClP'SlO'il - APP"^Sj'TICI1S: Smployment on an/ of the aoove-named machines 

ma^' he permitted in the case of minors "bet'Teen 
16 pjid 18 year^. o:"" age T7ho are oonafide ap- 
prentices. 

22. In oiling, cleaning, or '7iping mrcninery or shafting in motion. 

23. In applying belts to- pulleys m motion or assisting therein. 

HEALTH HAZa- DS 

24. Lead soldering work. 

25. All T/ork involving exposure to acid in connection nith pick- 
ling of sheet plate. 

26. If printing is done: 

Blowing out t^nje cases 

Cleaning linotype plungers 

In melting operations in printing sho)s. 

Apprentices shall oe defined as: 

"those who are reg\ilarly indentured under contrrct to the Industry, for 
a. sufficient period of time to oe systematically^ advanced through the 
various operation, sh6ps, department, etc. of a Trade, Occup-.tion or 
Industry, and who receive eductional training in an organized educational 
institution during a portion of their ^-'orking time." 



9791 



-151- 

EXHIBIT 55 
?L-i.G i .'A1'^?.-.CTIIRI"'5 lADUSTPJ 

1. O"oerar,ing or assistiTg to oferrte or ta!cint<r larterial fTon - 

(a) Po'-er shears of all kindr,. 

(Id) Mpxhinerv of stp.m"oing or ^-ujich-'orGss ty^^e xised in the 
maji-ufacture of v^pi-oot or -oaiDer goods (.including TDaper 
lacing raachines) if the clearance "oeti"'een the ran and the 
die or the strimoer exceeds one-fourth inch* 

(c.) Pa"^3er launches or line perforr.tors. 

(d) Pa;oer-cutting 'aachines halving a gaillotine action, 

(e) All •'tJO'-'er-driven '.TOOd^7or':ing machiiiery, 

2. Oiling, cleaning, or vdrung ra-'Chinery or shafting in motion. 

3. A'OTDlying oelts to nulleys in laotion or assisting thereat. 

4i Driving, or assisting' in driving motor vehicles or as helpers 
or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

5. Operating or iissisting to o-oer--',te gas, oil or stean engines 
or other orime movers. 

6. The care, custody, operation or repair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting app.ara.tiis j except in the OPera.tion 
of d^om'b'.Taiters as defined oy the American Standards Associa- 
tion, or elevators equipped oiil' for automatic operation. 

7. Firing of steam or r/ater Doilers (er-'ce Jt "boilers of not more 
than 15 Ids. pressure used solelv for heating purposes). 

8. The use of dangerous dyes. 



SIEOIT 5e ■ 

FLOOR AJD './AL:: CLAY TILj] " A'TTJ^-^.CTirRir^G- IIDUSTRY 

I. Occupations Involving General Hazards 

1. 'Tori: in or ahout clay oanlrs or pits, incradi;ig surface work 
connected therewith. 

II. Occupations involving S'oecific i;echa.nicR,l Hazards - Machine Vor]:. 
(Prohibition a„pplies to operating^ assisting in 0Pera.ting or tak- 
ing ma.teria.l fro'l the machines specified;) 

2. Macniner;'' having a heav- crushing or rolling action. 

3i Roller mixers, pug'nills, dry p.ans, outty chasers, or molding 
machinery of the pressure type. 

4. In oiling, cleaning, or '^iping machinery in motion. 

5. I?-L applying oelts to a pulley in motion or assisting therein. 

6. In proximity to any unguarde-'i oelt or ge^ing. 



3731 



-152- 



- . , . EXHIBIT 57 ■,- 

FLOOR ;;AcniKRy industry 

1. In occupations involvin,?: mechanic;'.! ha'<;'~rd.s - Ilpchine '.'or^:. 

1. G-rindin/i, abrasive,, ooliphi.^e-, or bLi'"fin" '7h.eels., -provided that 
apprenticeG operating under coiiditions of oona-fide a,'o>rent ice shin may 
grind their own tools. ■ ' 

2. Metal-cutting machines havir^ a ..'^'iiillotine action'. ■•■■. 

3. Kachinerj'- use'd in the cold rollinjc; of h;oa"v/ stock. 

4. Metal plate bsndlng machines handling material of.raore than 0.2145 
inch in' thickness. ■■,...;■ 

5. Pov;er-driven metal' olanin;^\• machines. 

6. Circular, band, miller, and i'lultipla , sa' :s used in the cjittin™ of. metals. 

7. Botinj^ mills. - ■ , ' . 

8. Poller' shears of all kinds.. ■ ..... ' . 

9. Punch presses or stixrnpinf; machines if ,the clearance betreen the ram 
and die or the stri'oper exceeds one-f otirth, inch. .■• 

10. 77ire stitchj.n.? machinery. 

11. Machinery havin^™ a heaver rollin,j or cru..shing_ action. . ■ , 

12. T'oOdworlzin^ machinery ('..fliere T/ood is used.). .' ■: 

1.3. Metal ■ slitters. , ' . , ■ ■ :, • ' 

14. Roller mixers, pub mills, c'rrjT pans, putty, chasers, forming processes 
or other moldin.^; nachiner",^ of the ;ores?.ure -tyoe. .. ,- , 

15. 7ire cirr.ring machine'.;. ..•, , . 

Exception : T7ork on fine sizes of v'ire cotir.-iojrily dra'-n throu^^h .diamond 
di e s . 

Exce'otion t Aoprentices: .^ilo-'-ment or- -.nr.^ of the a.bove named machines 
may be -oerraitted in the^ ca.'^e of minors bet^Teen 16 and 18 
years of age rho are bona fide aipprentices. 
15. In oilin.'v, cleaning or .ripin,;' machinery'-- or shafting in; motion. 

17. In applyin-; belts O'^ oulleys in notic;: or assisting therein. 

II. Plant i'aintenance , , . ■ . ■ • 

18. As drivers of truC'.;K or pthejv motor, vehicles or as helpers or oer'. 
livery boys on same. ' . ■ 

19. In or assisting in the oiDerrtion of gas, oil or steajn engines or 
other orime movers. •. , . ■ , ■ . ' 

20. In the operation or repair of elevatorcj^ cranes, derricks, or other 
hoisting a.roaratus, except in the 'operation .of (l) duriibrfaiters as ' 
defined by the j\merican Standards Associa.tion, or (2) elevators 
eoui opec"! orl];- for automatic operation. . . 

21. Firing of steam or water boilers (erscept boilex's of not more than .15 
lbs. pressure 'used solely for he.ating -ourooses.) ' 

III. Foundries ' . . : , 

22. In ferrous and non-ferrous foundries, all 'woi'lc in the foundrj'^ proper. 

23. All cleaning or grinding o-oei-ationj.; in foiandrie«. 

24. In malleable foioaidries, operations involving handling of heated 
castings, etc., in connection '•■'ith annoa.ling ''ork. 



-153- 



25. All work in non-f '^rrous f owirrieo; iiivolving '3::-Dosure to molten lead 
alio-"-. 

IV. OcciTOt'tions Involving Health Ka/.-rrds 

26. All "ork involving e-roosurs to acid in conjioctioi: ivith licklin-f^ of 
.:..;.>t plc^te. 

27. 'Tork involving erqjosnrre to chromic acic?>, chromatss, or bichromotes. 

28. TTork involvin.^ excessive e:.coosure to corrop.ive substances. 
P9 . All '■'or': in s-pra.y \-iaintin~. 

50. In all arocesssG rhere substancer, containing lead or an-- or its 

compoTinds are \isef" in a. liouid. or Do\-clered foiin, or at a. temperature 
sufficient to vapori?.e lead. 

31. In proce?.pe!? v/here quartz or an-"- other forrra of silicon cis::ide or 
an pshestos silicate is present in •oo^'Cared forin. 

32. '■^ov\' involvin,^ ex)os"ara to benzol' or an;- benzol com-oo\md '"'hich is 
volntilc; or 'hich cm penetrrte the skiu. 

V. Ov'-.er 

53. All occuvj^tions in foi-^'in.:^ shopc. 

34. In the CTitting or rolding of ;-^etals 07 >;as or olectricit'/-. 

35. In or in connect ion "ith hot .^alvan i ',i i . ;; o"' tin.vuv;; processes. 
35. Lead solcerin.;. 

37. All-- occuoation in connection ••it;.i the heat treatment of metals. 

EXHIBIT S8 
lliUT^D CU?, ?AF Ln~]R AED LA CI! ?M>~'r.. I:DTJST^' 

I. Occupatif.ns Involvin.7 i1--;neral Hazards 

1. Pirin.p; of steejn or r.-a-ter Dollers (except hollers of not nore than 
15 lbs. 'oressure used r.olel" for hoatinf^ ourooses). 

2. As drivers or aGsistcUits to driver-: of notor vehicles or as 
heloers or delivci";'- bo3-E on notor voiiiclep. 

3. In, or as-^isting in, the operation of iSas, oil, or steam en^^jines 
or other prime movers. 

4. Ir- the cere, custody, operation or reoair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting appa.ratus, except in the operation 
of (1) drjiibvcltcrs, as defined b- the American Standards Asso- 
ciation, or of (?) elevttors ecniip'^oi:'' onl-- for automatic ooeration. 

II. Occu-pations Irvolvi:;-^ Specific liechenical Hs-zards — hachine "Tork 
(Prohibition to ep'ol"'- to operatinj;, a.s^istin,'; in operrtinc, or 
tal-cing material from the follo'.dn.;-r machines.) 

5. Kachinery of rtanpin-,' or piinch-presa type used in the m.anufacture 
or "oa-per goods, if the clearrnce bet'^een the ran r'nc. the die or 
the stri-oier erceed.s o'e-fourth inc't. 

6. ?a;oer cuttir.-r machines having a g-aillotinc action. 

7. Papor ounches or line "oerf orators. 

8. Crecsers, rlitte-rs, or corru^^eting, criiiroing, embossing, plating, 
printing, or graining rolls used in the man-ifacture of paper ajad 
■oa.-oer orocucts ^'iiich are not roarded at the •ooint of o'oeration. 



-154- 



corner-cuttin,s, or enclin,]; macliinep used in the 
paper -orocliicts iiK'-astrs/ if tae ooenin^ to meet the plvji.'^er ex- 
ceeds one-fourth inch. 

3xce"otion: Siicii corner-Btayin,-! machines as a,re eoui'ooed ■ ith an 



autonatic device that vrill instantl7 stop the doT,'ni7a-M motion of 
the -olunger should the fini;^:e".- of the opera.tor come "betr/een the 
plun;;er end the anvil. 

10. Pc'er shears of all Icinds. 

Er-'ceTition ; Ap-orontice?: Sraolo'^inent on anv of the above machines 
na^,"- he ^jerr:;itted in the crse of minors betneen 15 and 13 years 
of acre under conditions of bona fide apioronticer.hip. 

11. In oilin-^-, cleaning or '^ioin.^ mpchiner:','' or shaftin;^' in motion. 

12. In a"0'olvi:a~ oeltr; to oulleys in motion or a^^istin.o: therein. 

r/here Printin.--;' i;- Done 

13. Power-driven printing nresses. 

14. Konctype or linotyoe machines. 

15. u^mDossir,;^ ma.cliiner:^ ur-ed in the ^jrinting inc;ustrT. 

16. JloTin.'^': out t^rpe cases in -orintin'-: shops. 

17. Clseninf: linotype plmiijers in irintin.; sho^os. 

18. Dr;' sv/eepin-,; and clcanin.^ ir: -orintin^ shops. 

19. In meltinr o'-'errtions in irintin.^ shops. 

Ap-orentices shall be o.efined as "those who are re.'-OLlarly indentu-i-ed 
uncor contract to the Ind.iXRtr-, for a sufficient "ooriod of time to be 
systematically^ advanced throwh the va-ioixs operations, shops, de- 
partments, Etc., of a Trade, Occuoation or Incustr-', and rrho receive 
educational trainin^^': in an o-.-gani^ed educational institution during 
a portion of their vorldng time." 

• ^LXHIBIT 59 

POLHIlTr tS^I>'£R BOX II"DUST"^.Y 

Machine TTork 

(Prohibition to ap'oly to o-oerating, assisting in operating, or taking 
material from the follonini; machines.) 

1. Kachinery of stam 'inrr or piinch--ore'^ r, type used in the manufacture 
of -oaper or paper .-roods, if the clearaiice betvreen the ram and the 
die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch. 

2. Paper-cutting m.achines having a fruillotine action. 

3. Paper p\Tnches or line ^erf orrtors. 

4. Greaser;-, slitters, or corrugating, crimping, embosing, plating, 
orintin-', or gr.-inin- rolls use'.'' in the mpnTifacture of paper and 
paper prooucts '/hicu iwe not fiUa.rded s.t tlie point of operation. 

5. Cori:.er-sta"'ing, corner-cutting, o'r ending mo.chines used in the 
paper product;- intii'^.tr:'- if the o'oening to meet the plunger exceeds 
one-fourth inch. 

9791 



-155- 



ExceTption ; Such co-rner-sta^''in,?-- moohines as are eauioped --ith an 
automatic device tlip t v,'ili. instantlj'- stop the do\7n\7arc! motion of 
tie -ol-iirif-er rhoul;'^ the Tin^'er o" the o;oerrtor come between the 
plunger and the anvil. 

6. Pover shears of all kindi?. 

7. In oilin.^, cleanin.r, or Aripin:" machine^'- or shef tin,"!; in motion. 

8. In applyinf,' belts to pulle^'-s in motion or assisting- therein. 

9. J'irins; of steam or -'ater boile-s (except boilers of not more than 
15 lbs. pressure used solel-- for heatin-r puriooses) . 

10. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or as helpers 
or deliver;.- bo^.'-s on motor vehicles. 

11. In, or assistiiir in, the orjeration of ,'::as, oil, or steam engines 
or other prime movers. 

12. In the care, custocly, operation or renair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting apparatxis, e::cept in the operation of 
(l) dumonaiters ao defined 'oj the American Standards Association, 
or of (2) elevators eouxpped onl-' for automatic o-oeration. 

Vrnere prir.tinr is done . 

15. Power-driven printin'~ presses. 

14. ;!onot;"pe or lintotype machines. 

15. limbossin,- machiner;'- usee" in tha printing; inclustrv. 

16. jlovring out t-.'pe cases in printi.",^ saops. 

17. ^leanin;-; linot^rpe plun^^^ers in print ir.,5; shops. 

18. Dr;"- sweepin;- and cleaning in ;orintin r shops. 
IS. In melting opera,tions in ■?rintin'^ shops. 

EXHI3IT 60 

FOUl'I'.RY SUPPLY liCUSTRY 

I. O'^.cupa.tions involving: .s:eneral has;-. rds 

1. As drivers or assistant?, to drivers of motor veixicles or as helpers 
or delivei^' bo-/s on motor vehicles. 

2. In, or assistin;" in, the operation of .^S-s, oil, or steam engines 
or other priie movers. 

3. In the care, custod', operation or repair of elevrtors, cranes, 
der'iuchs, or other hoistin-f .?"D"?aratus, exce-)t in the operation 
of (1) durab-.^aiters a.s defined 37 the American Standards Associa- 
tion, or (2) of elevatc;..-G eouipped orJ."'- for automatic operation. 

4. PirinT of steajn or uatc-r boilers (except boilers of not more 
than l-^ povmds pressure used solel'' for heatin.-; -oiirposes). 

II. Occupations involvin-; specific mechanical hazards — mr chine work 

(yjronibition to av')!" to operating, as?^istin,~ in operations, or 
talcing material from the folloving r:achines.) 

5. i'achinerj'- having a hea"'' rolling o-" ciiishing action. 

6. Roller r.i:ters, pug or putt" chancers. 

7. In oiling, cleanin.g or wipin.;- nachiner^'- or shaftivig in motion. 

8. In applj'-ing belts to .ToJLleys in motion or assisting therein. 



-156* 



III. Occupationr. involving health hazr^rcls. 

9. In all orocasrss 'There sxibstancic containing lee.d or any of its 
com'3oands are UEed in a liq-iid or rjo^'^dered forn, or at a tem- 
perature ru-fficient to vaporize lead. 

10. In proces"es 'vhere ouartz or anv other form of silicon dioxide 
o.r an s.sbestos silicate is present in pov;dered form. 

11. In the use of daAserous c^yestuffs. 



r 



9791 



-157- 

■ SI.CIII""!''.'' 'l 

IQZSll OYSTER Il©UST3.y 

Handlin,';;- of .v-chine-hoistec. oystei' dredges of the larger type on 
povrer vessels. 

e:s:ilit 62 

MLLUL'S EATiTJT mOSUCIlIG Aim IIAIQILTIKG IlDUSTin 

rjor': in or a'ooiit nines or pits, includin^:: all surface norl:. 

In the transportation or use of er:plosives or enrplosive 

svijsta.nces. 

All dre drying ^-'orl: or hj'-drav.ilic ninin^^. 

All '.70 rl: on screens or ci^ashers. 

In oilin.":, cleanin.;:, or -T-ipin.'; -achiner" in notion. 

In applyinr; oelts to a pulley in ■;iotion or assictin^ therein. 

In proxi.iity to any unf.uarded oolt or /■:eo-rinf". 

TJork of enployees eni':;a,'-;ed a,s 'f irefien. 

S-^itchinf; and -'orl: on and about railroav equipne-nt.. 

Clean-u"o on oar'^es or cars under cle.ashell TDUc]:ets. 

— ■ , - , ^ 

As drivers of tn\cl;s or other motor vehicles, or as helpers or 
deliverj'' boys on notor vehicles. 

GAZTZZ, su3fe:z}::s a:cd bzlt ::aiuiactj:2i_:g iin)usT-iY 

1. ■"orl: per-^oi-ned on splittiny, perforatin'^, star-vpin^;, dieinj'^-out e:.i- 
bossing, clichiny, s':ivin;;, strippiny, burnishiny, or b\iffing ma- 
chines. 

2. "orl: "oerforriec" on r.tapliiv or rivetiny ;iachines. 

3. TTorl: perfoned on punch presses' or stpnpiny Machines if the clear- 
ance bet'-.^een the raM and the die or the stripper e::cv?eds one-fourth 
inch; Tith the exception that enplojrient on any of the aboye naned 
nacliines may be per:itted i:n the case of riinors bet'Teen iS and IS 
3^ears of aye -tIio a.re "..;ona fide apprentices '7ithin the reapiirenents 
'of the Code. 

h. ITork perforLied in oilin;;, cleaniny or -ipiniy na.chinery in notion. 
5. 7orl: perforned in aoplyiny belts to a pulley in notion or assisting 

therein. 
c. 7ork perforned in pro::inity to any unguarded belt or gearing. 

3::hi-iy Sh 

GASOLIIZ ?Ln.?-i:AlYC-.:i JIIIITG- I:ZaJ3YIIY 

1. G-rindiny, s-brasivCj polishiny or b-uffing ','heels. 

2. lletal- cut tiny iiachines heaving a oiillotine action. 

3. Ilachineiy/- used in the cold rolling oi hes-vy netal stock. 
U. iletal plate benfing nachines. 
5. Fover-driven netal planing nachines. 

Circular S3.'7S used i:n the ciitting of 'letals. 
7. Boring nills. 



C 



r^-7r^-| 



-158- 



9. 



10. 
11. 
12. 



Po'Ter sliears of all liino.n. 

Fundi presses or staiipiiiif; iir.cliines. 

7ire stitchin;^' nacliiiiei-'. 

lietal slitters. 

'.Tire clra'"'in£: ■lacliines s,ncT anj" otlier p.aciiines iisec. in 'processing 

netals. 



GLAZED Aiil) 7AV.C': PAPHi: I^DUSTHY 



Occii-or.tions Im-olvin/; G-eneral Ha.zards; 



2. 
3. 



c 

10 
11 
12 
13 

15 



Pirin:'; of stea:.i or r'ater "boilers (Hxccpt "boilers of not more 
than 15 1"5ts. pressiire usee solel^,^ for lieatinp purposes). 
As c'ji-.'-ers or assistants to drivers of notor vehicles or as 
helpers or d-elivor" "coys on notor vehicles. 
In or assistinf^ in the operation of gas, oil, or steaii en- 
gines or other prine movers. 

In the care, custod;^, operation or rep3lr of elevators, cranes, 
derric':s, o'r other hoisting apptratus, e::cept in the opera.tion 
of (1) d-oinbna.iters, as defined "07 the A.ierican Stande.rds Asso- 
ciation, or (2) elevators equipped only for autouFtic opera- 
tions. 
Engineer. 

Be.nd S^w Operator. 
Circular sai,7 operator. 
Extractor operator. 

Electrical operation, either re'^ula.r or Maintenance. 
Planer operator. ' , ' 
Shaper operator. ' 

■Jelder operator. 
Stean fitter o'r pipe fitter. 
Truch drivers. 
Oilers. 



II. Occupa.tions Involving Specific llechrjiical Ha,zards — liachine "Tor!:: 
(FrohilDition to apply to operating, assisting i:i opera.ting, or 
taking raaterial fron the follo'Ting ..lachines.) 



IS. 



17. 
IG. 

19. 



20. 



I.Iachinerv of stanping or pu.nch-press tjroe used in the nanu- 
fa,cture of pa-per or pa.per goods, if the cle.ara.nce "'oetneen the 
ran a-nd the die or the stripper exceecs one"fov.rt";i inch. 
Paper cutting nachines ha.ving a. guillotine action. 
Paper punches or line "oei'forators. 

Greasers, slitters, or cori-.igating, crr.TJing, en"boEsing, plant- 
ing, printing, or graining- rolls used in the manufacture of 
paper and paper products '-rhich r.re not gua.rded a,t the point of 
operation. ■ 

Po^er s"hea,rs of all hinds. 



Exception — Apprentices: Enplo^/rnfent on any of the a"bove machine's 
nay "be periitted in the case of linors loet^-'een iS and lo years 
of B.-ze under conditions of bona fide a.pprent ice ship. 



9751 



-159- 

21, In oiling, cleaning, or viping machinery or shafting in 

motion, 
22» In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assiting therein, 

23, Coating machine operators, 

24, Stack operators, 

25, Bronzer operator, 

v^liere Printing is Done, 

26, Fover-driver printing presses. 

27, Monotype or linotype machines, ' , 

28, Erabpssing machinery used in the printing industry and calendars, 

29, Blo'Ving out type cases in- printing shops, 

30, Cleaning linotype plungers in printing shops, 

31, "Dry syeeping and cleaning in printing shops, 

32, In melting operations in printing- shops, 

33, Intaglio press oper.^tors. 

Apprentices shall be defined as "those who are regularly indentured 
under contract to the Industry for a sufficient period of time to be 
systematically advanced through the various operations, shopr,, depart- 
ments, etc. , of a trade, occunation or industry, and '"ho receive ed- 
ucational training in an organized educational institution during a 
portion of their i."-orking tii.re, " 

EXHIBIT 66 ■ ' 

■ GRAY IkON i.OUNrEY INDUSTEY 

A. The f ollo'.»'in-;i: operations, "'hether in connection '^ith a cupola, air 
furnace, electric furnace, open hearth, rotary furnace, or crucible 
pot: ■ 

Tappers Shakeout men 

Sl?g men' ' Fot puller & 

Bull ladle men Air furnace melters 

Buggy ladle men Electric furnace raelters 

Hand ladle men r.otary furnace melters 

Skimmers 

All work in foundries involving exposure to molten lead or any 
molten lead alloy, or to dust of lead or of pny lead alloy, 

B, The follovjing occupations in machine shops, pattern shops, car- 
penter shops, etc., '"hich are included in the industry: 

1, Grinding, abrasive, polishing, or buffing '--heels: provided 
that apprentices operating under conditions of bona fide ap- 
prenticeship ioay grind their ovn tools, 

2, Metal-cutting machines having a guillotine action, 

3, Ikiachinery used in the cold rolling of neavy metal stock, 

4, . tfetal plate Dending machines handling material of more than 
; 0,2145 inch in thickness, 

Pomer-driven metal planing machines. 



c; 



6, -Hi-speed circular sa'T's used in the cutting of metals. 



-160- 

7. Boring mills ' _ ; 

8. Fov/er shears of all icinds. 

•9. Punch presses or ' Stamping machines if the clearance between the 
ram and the die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch. . - 

Exception - Apprentices : Employiiient on any of the above named 

machines may be permitted in the case of minors between sixteen 
(l6) and eighteen (18) years of age v/ho are bone fide apprentices. 

10. In oiling, cleaning, or wiping machinery or shafting in motion. 

11. In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting thereon. 

1?. In the care, ciistody, operation, or repair of elevators, .cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in the oper/ition 
of ( l) dumbwaiters as defined by the American Standards Asso- 
ciations or' (2) elevators equipped only for automatic operation. 

13. Firing of steam' or water boilers (except boilers of not more than 
fifteen (l5) lbs. pressure used solely for heating purposes) 

EXHIBIT 67 

GUMMED LABEL AND asbSSED SEAL INDUSTRY. , 

I . Occupations Involving General Hazards . . ■ „ 

1.2 Firing of steam or water boilers (except boilers of not 

more than 15 lbs. pressure used solely for heating purposes). 

2. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or as 
helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

3. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or steam engines 
or other prime movers. 

4. In the care, custody,' operation, o'r repair of elevators; cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in the operation 
of (l) dumbwaiters, as defined by the American Standards Asso- 
ciation, and (2) elevators equipped only for automatic 
operation. 

II. Occupations Involving Specific Mechanical Hazards — Machine Work 
(Prohibition to apply to operating, assisting in operating, or 
taking material from the following machines.) 

5. Machinery of stamping or punch-press tj'pe used in the manu- 
facture of paper or paper goods, if the clearance between 
the ram and the die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch. 

6. Paper-cutting machines having a guillotine action. 

7. Paper punches or line perforators. 

8.. Greasers, slitters, or corrugating, crimping, embossing, , 

plating, printing, or graining rolls used in the manufacture 
of paper and paper products which are not guarded at the 
point of operation. . ■. 

9. Power shears of all kinds. 

Exception — Apprentices: Employment on any of the above machines 

may be permitted in the case of minors between 16 and 18 years 
of age under condition of bona fide apprenticeship. 



9791 



-161- 

10. In oiling, cleaning, or wiping machinery or shafting 
in motion. 

11. In fn-plj in.-," "belts to pulleys in motion or assisting 
therein. 

Where printing' is done 

12. Fower-'driven printing presses-. 

13. Monotype or linotj^e machines. 

EXHI BIT 68 ' ' /;■ 

Gm'.MING INDUSTRY 
I. Occupations involving f;eneral hazards' 

1. Firing of steam or water 'boilers (except toilers of not more 
than 15 Its. pressure used solely for heating purposes.) 

2. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or as 
helper-fe or delivery boys on njptor vehicles. 

3. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or steam 
engines or other prime movurs. 

4. In the care, custody, operation or repair of elevators, c 
cranes, derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in 
the operation of (l) dumbwaiters, as defined by the American 
Standards Association, or (2) elevators equipped only for 
automatic operation, 

II. Occupations involving specific mechanical hazards— machine v/ork 
(Prohibition to apply to operating, assisting in operating, or 
taking material from the follov/ing machines.) 

5. Machinery of stamping or punch^press tj^pe used in the manu- 
facture of paper or paper goods, if the clearance between 
the ram and the die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch. 

6. Paper-cutting machines having- a p^ilLotlne, action, 

7. Paper punches or line perforators. 

8. Greasers, slitters, or corrugating, crimping, embossing, 
plating, printing, or graining rolls used in the manufacture 
of paper and paper products which are not guarded at the 
point of operation. 

9. Power shears of all kinds. 

Exception: Apprentices: EmplojTiient on any of the above machines ■ 
may be permitted in the case of minors between 16 and 18 years 
of age under conditions of . bona fide apprenticeship, 

10. In oiling, cleaning, or wiping machinery or shafting in motion, 

11. In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

Where printing is done - ' • • 

12. Power-driven printing presses 

13. Monotype or linotype machines. 

14. Embossing machinery used in the printing industry. 



-162- 



15. Blowing out type cases,. in printing shops. 

16. Cleaning linotype plungers, in printing shops. 

17. Dry sweeping and cleaning, in printing shops. 

18. In melting operations in printing shops. 

Apprentices shall be defined as "those who are regularly indentured 
under contract to the industry, for a sufficient period of time to te 
systematically advanced through the various operations, shops, depart- 
ments, etc., of a trade occupation or industry, and who receive educa- 
tional training in an organized educational institution during a portion 
of their working time. 

EXHIBIT .69 ^ , 

HAIR CLOTH KANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 

I. Occupations involving general hazards , . , . . - _ 

1. Firing of steam or water boilers (except boilers of not more 
than 15 pounds pressure used solely for heating purposes). 

2. . In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil or steam 

engines or other prime movers. 

3. In the care, custody ,. operation or repair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in the operation 
of (l) dumbwaiters as defined by the American. Standards Asso- 
ciation, or of (2) elevators equipped only for automatic 
operation. •■ ■ 

II. Occupations involving specific mechanical hazards — machine work 
(prohibition to apply to operating, assisting in operating, or 
taking material from the following machines). 

.4. Machinery having a heavy rolling or crushing action, such as 
calerider rolls. ,- .. . . 

Exception : Apprentices! Employment on any of the above-named 

machines may be permitted in the case of minors between 16 
and 18 years of age who are bona fide apprentices. 

5. In oiling, cleaning or wiping machinery in motion. 

6. In applying belts to a pulley in action or assisting therein. 

III. Occupations invovling health hazards 

7. In the handling of unsterilized hair. 

8. In the use of dangerous dyes. . . 

Apprentices shall be defined as "those who are regularly indentured 
under contract to the industry for a sufficient period of time to be 
systematically advanced through the various operations, shops, depart- 
ments, etc., of a trade, occupation or industry, and who receive educa- 
tional training in an organized educational institution during a portion 
of their working time," ,■ . _; 



-163- - 
S-applementRfy Item of July 23, 1954 

As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles, or fis helpers 
of delivery "boys on motor vehicles. 

EXHIBIT 70 

ANTI-HOG CHOLERA SERUM AND 
HOG- CHOLERA VIRUS INDUSTRY _ • 

1. The said report and recommendation of the Deputy Administrator is 
hereby adopted and incorporated herein by reference, 

2. Tne Board hereby finds that said report so submitted is reasonable 
and in full conformity with the applicable provisions of said Code 
and well designed to effectuate the policies of Title I of the 
National Recovery Act. « 

3. The Board hereby orders that said report be and it is hereby approved. 



November 27, 1934. 

« - 

Mr. Edgar Markham, Executive Secretary 
Grain Exchanges Code Authority 
603 Hibbs Building , - 

Washington,. D. C. .... 

Dear Mr. Markham: 

The National Industrial Recovery Board instructs me to acknowledge 
your letter of May 14, 1934, informing it that there are no occupations 
which the Code Authority for the Grain Exchanges Industry considers 
hazardous. After consultation with the various advisory boards, this 
statement is hereby approved. 

By direction of the National Industrial Recovery Board. 

Arrain W. Riley 
Division Administrator. 



9791 



-164- 
EXHIBIT 71 _ ,.,-, 

HOUSEHOLD ICE HEi'HIGEBATOR^ IKDUSTHY 

I. Occupatipns ihvolving general hazar-ds". . ' '..■'■■ 

1. Firing of steaia or x^ater "boilers (except boilers of not 
more than 15 pounds pressure used solely for heating 
purposes). ,.,. ■ ,''''■ 

2. As drivers or "assistants to' drivbrs of motor vehicles or e.s 
helpers or delivery bo5''s on motor vehicles, 

3. In, or assisting in, the operation. 'of- gas, oil, or steam 
: „,-, J ,-ejigines or other prime movers,- ' "■ 

4. In the. care', custody, operstion or repair of elevators, 
cranes, derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in 

-, the operation of (l) ,'d\uiih waiters as defined by the 
_. .- ;. • Americ8:n Standards Association, or (2) of elevators 
., ■ equipped only for automatic operation, 

Tflien foundries are found; ■ ■ ' ' 

5. All v-ork in the foundry proper, 

5, All cleaning or grinding opera.tions in foundries, 

7, All i.70rk in foundries involving exposure to molten lead or 
any molten lead 'alloy or to dust of lead or of any lead 
alloy, 

8« In malleable foundries, operations involving handling of 
heated castings, etc, in connection 'lith annealing work, 

9, In the cutting or welding of metals by gas or electricity, 
10, In or in connection with hot galvanizing or tinning pro- 
cesses, 

II. Occupations involving sToecific raechanica.l hazards - machine 
work (prohibition to' ap^oly to operating,' assisting in opera- 
ting, or taking material from the following machines) 

12, Grinding, abrasive, polishing or 'buff ing' wheels; provided 
that apprentices operating under conditions of bona fide 
apprenticeship may grind their own tools, 

13, List al-cut ting machines having a guillotine action, 

14, Metal plate bending machines handling material of more 
than 0,2145 inch 'in thickness, 

15, Power-driven metal planing machines, 

16, Circular saws used in the cutting of metals. 

17, Wire stitching machinery, 

18, Machinery having a heavy rolling or crushing action, 

19, Machinery used in the cold rolling of heavy metal stock, 

20, Boring mills, 

21, Power shears of all kinds. 

22, Punch presses or stamping ..lachines if the clearance between 
the ram and the die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch, 

23, Operation of power-driven woodworking machinery or as 
off -bearer. 



9791 



-165-^.. 

Exception ; Apprentices: Employment on aay of the above- 
named yaachines may be permitted in the case of lainors 
"betv/een IS and 18 years of ai^e viho are bona fide apprenti- 
ces. 

24, In oiling, cleaning or wiping machinery in motion. 

25, In applying; belts to pulleys in motion or assistinf^ therein, 

III, Occupations involvint; health hazards 

26, All r,'ork involving exposure to acid in connection with 
pickling of sheet plate, 

27, All vjork in spray painting, 

28, In nil processes Y?here substances containing lead or any of 
its compo-ands are used in a liquid or pondered form or at a 
temperature stifficient to vaporize lead, 

29, In processes \7here quartz or any other form of silicon 
dioxide or an asbestos silicate is present in powdered form, 

30, V/ork involving exposiire to benzol or any benzol compound 
which is volatile or which can penetrate the skin, 

31, In the use of dangerous dyestuffs, 

32, Lead soldering work, 

33, Work involving e;-:p)0sure to' chromic acids, chromates, or 
bi-chromates, 

34, Work involving e.^cessive exposure to corrosive substances. 

Apprentices shall be defined as "those who ai'e regularly 
indentured under contract to the industry, for a sufficient 
period of time to be systematically advanced through the 
various operations, shops, departments, etc., of a trade, 
occupation or industry, and who receive educational train- 
ing in an organized educational institution during a por- 
tion of their working time," 

EXHIBIT 72 

ICE CHEAIi COlffi INDUSTRY 

I. Occupations involving specific mechanical hazards - machine work 

1, In the operation of mixing macnines, 

2, In the operation of any and all power-driven machinery and 
cone manufacturing machinery, 

3, In oiling, cleaning or wiping machinery or shafting in 
motion, 

4, In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein, 

II. Occupations involving general hazards 

5, As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or as 
helpers to delivery bovs on motor vehicles, 

6, In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil or steam 
engines or other prime movers, 

7, In the care, custody, operation or repair of elevators, 



qvqi 



-166- 

cranes, derricks, or other. hoisting apparatus, except in 
the OTDeration of (l) dumbwaiters as defined by the 
American Standards Association, or (2) of elevators 
equipped only for automatic operation, 
8, Firing of steam or water boilers (except boilers of not 
more than 15 pounds pressure used solely for heating 
purposes). 

EXHIBIT 73 

IMPORTED DATE PACKING- INDUSTRY 

I, Occupations involving specific mechanical hazards - machine work 

1, Oiling, cleaning, or wiping machinery or shafting in motion, 

2, In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein, 

II, Occupations involving general hazards 

3, As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or as 
helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles, 

4, In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil or steam 
engines or other prime movers, 

5, In the care, custody, operation or repair of eleva.tors, 
cranes, derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in 
the operation of (l) dumbwaiters as defined 'oy the 
AiQerican Standards Association, or (2) of elevators 
equipped only for automatic operation, 

6, Firing of steam or. water boilers (except boilers of not 
more than 15 pounds pressure used solely for heating 
purposes). 

EXHIBIT 74 

liffORTING TRADE 

I, Occupations involving general hazards 

1, As drivers or assistant drivers of motor vehicles or as 
helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles, 

2, In the OToeration, custody, or repair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in the 
orieration of (l) dumbwaiters as defined by the American 
Stjxndards Association or (2) of elevators equipped only 
for automatic operation, 

3, In all loading said unloading operations (from trucks, 
trains, ships, etc.) where lifting is done by hand. 

If power-driven ma.chinery is used in conveying or handling 
material, the following shou l d be added ; 

4, In handling, loading or unloading goods wncre power-driven 
machinery is used for conveying or handling, 

5, In switching or in operating railroad equipment, 

6, In dock or marine work, 

9791 



., -167- 
EXHIBIT 75 ,,, . , ; 

INDUSTRIAL OIL BURNING EQUIPi/IENT IviAl>IUx^ACTURING INDUSTRY 

I, Occunations 'involving specific mechanical hsizards - machine "ork 
(ProhiDition to api^ly to opefatinf;, assisting 'in operating, or 
taking material from the. following machines.) 

1. Grindin-, abrasive, polishing, of 'baffipg ^wheels; provided 
that apprentices operating under conditions of bona fide 
apprenticeship may 'grind 'their ovm tools., , 

2. iietal-cutting machines having a ^-^illotine action. 

3. Ifetal plate bending machines handling material of more 
than 0,2145 inch in thickness. 

4» Power-driven metal planing- machines. 

5« Circular sai''s'used' in the cutting of metals. 

6, Machinery having a heavy rolling or .c,rus,hing action, such 

as corrugating rolls. 
7.' Machinery used in the cold rolling of, h.eavy. -.mental stock. 
8,' 'Boring mills. ' ... _;•■ 

?• Power shears oi* all kinds.' 

10. Punch presses or stamping, machines if the clearance between 

■ the rp,m and the die or the. stripper exceeds, one-fourth inch, 

11. All occupations in connection -ith power-driven wood- 
working .aachinery. ' . . 

Exception - Apprentices . Employment on any of the above 
naiaed machines may be permitted in the case of minors 
between 16 and 18 years of s^e under conditions of bona 
fide apprenticeship' to a trade. 

12. In oilin J, cleaning', or "iping machinery .or shafting in 
motion. , 

13. In applying belts to pullevs in motion or assisting therein. 

II. Occupations involving health hazards. .- 

14. "iVoi-k involving ekposure to chromic acids, chromtes, or 
bichromates. 

15. w'ork involving exposure to' corrosive sub st. voices. 

16. All work in spray painting. 

III, Occupations involving general hazards 

17. In the operation, custod:/, or repair of, elevators, cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting' apparatus, except in the 
operation of (l) dumbwaiters as. defined by tue'Ainerican 
Standards Association, or (2) elevators equipped only for 
automatic operation, 

18. As drivers of trucks or other .motor vehicles or as helpers 
or delivery' boys on such vehicles. . . '■ , 

19. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil or steam 
engines used as prime movers. 

20. Firing of steam or water boilers (except boilers of not 
more than 15 pounds pressure used -solely for heating 
pui-poses). 

21. In the cutting or welding of metals by gas or electricity. 

9791 



., -168- 
In esta-blishraents in tfie industry where foundry \70rk is done', 

22, All v/ork in the foundry pror)er« ;■ 

23, In ferrous and non-ferrous foundries, all chi-pping or 
grinding operations, 

24, All i^ork in f.eundries involving exposure to molten lead 
or any molten lead alloy or to dust of lead or of any 
lead alloy, 

25, In malleable foundries, operations, involving. handling 
of heated castings, etc, in connection v;ith annealing 
v7ork 

EXHIBIT 76' 

INDUSTRIAL- SAPETY EQIJIFlvIENT IWDUSTHY AND TRADE , 

1, As drivers or assistnjits to drivers of motor vehicles or 
as helpers or delivery -"boys on motor vehicles. 

2, In, or assisting in, tiie operfition of gas, oi,l or steam 
engines or other pri::ie movers, . 

3, In the care, custody, operation or repair of , elevators, 
cranes, derricks, or other hoisting ap-oaratus, except in 
the operation of (l) dumbwaiters as defined by the American 
Standards Association, or (2) of elevators equipped only 
for automatic operation, . 

4, firing of steam or water ooilers (e:ccept boilers of not more 
than 15 pounds pressure used solely for heating purposes), 

5, In the cutting or ii/elding of uietals by gas or electricity,' 

6, In, or in connection with, hot galvanizing or tinning 
processes, 

7, In, or in connection with, all jorocesses in the manufacture 
of rubber goods, , 

8, Filling ampules and canisters, 

9, Electric ciitting 

10, Sewing machines. 

11, Riveting machines, 

12, Punch press - foot and povrer, 

13, Soldering, 

14, Grinding machinery, 

15, Lathes - Shears - Saws - Planes, 

16, Dies - Clickers* 

17, Sanders, 

18, Wire stitchers, 

19, Acid handling, 

20, Rubber processing, i 

21, Shipping sna. receiving, 

22, Oxygen filling appara.tus, 

23, Glass hfindling, 

24, Spray painting, 

25, Ii\imes - Filling ampules and c;i.nisters, ■ 

26, Silicon -dioxide - from grinding, 

EXHIBIT 77 
INSECTICIDE AImD DISINFECTANT i^lANUFAC TURING INDUSTRY 
I. Health Risks 



9791 



9791 



-169- 

No person under eit:^hteen (IS) shall do any '-ork in \7hich 
exposure to the following substances may occur: 

1. Arsenic and/or its compounds. 

2. Lead " " " " 

3. Cyanides. 

4, ■.Phenols and their hoinolof^ues. 

5. Other coiiipounds of hi^h toxicity, 

II. Mechanical Hazards 

6. Po^7er operated mixing machinery. 

7. In oiling, cleanin;?:, or wiping machinery or shafting in , 
motion. 

8. In applying "belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

III. General Hazai^ds 

9. As drivers of trucks or other motor vehicles or as helpers 
or delivery hoys on motor vehicles. 

10. In the operation, custod^rj or repair of eleva.tors, cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in the 
operation of (1)- dumh^aiters as defined "by the American 
Standards Association, or of (2) elevators equipped only 
for automa-tic operation. 

11. In, or assisting an, the operation of gas, oil, or steam 
engines used as prime movers. 

12. Tiring of steam or vater Loilers (except toilers of not 

more than 15 lbs. pressure used solely for heating purposes). 

EXHIBIT 78 
KWITTIl'G, BjHAIDIHG AITO WIRE COVERIKG i/iACHINE IHDUSTHY 

1, Metal-cutting 'oachines having a guillotine action. 

2, Machinery used in the cold rolling of heavy metal stock. 

3, Metal -olate bending machines handling material of more than 
0.2145" in thickness. 

4, Power-driven metal i^laning machines, 

5, Circular sa^^s used in the cutting of metals. 

6, Power shears of all kinds. 

7, Boring mills, 

8, In oiling, cleaning or 'wiping machinery or s"aafting in 
motion. 

9, In ap-plying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

Exceptions ; Apprentices: Employment on any of the above- 
named machines may be permitted in the case of minors 
bet^?een 16 ajid 18 years of age nho are bona fide apprentices. 

EXinSIT 79 

LADDER liAl^TACTUZING INDUSTRY 

I, Occupa,tions involving general hazards 

1. Eiring of steam or water boilers (except boilers of not more 



.. .-170-i 

than 15 powids used solely for heating purposes). 

2. As drivers or assistants to drivers of notor vehicles or 
helpers or delivery hoys oh motor vehicles. 

3. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or steam 
engines or other prine novers. 

4. In the care, custodj^, operation or repair of' elevators, 
cranes, derricks, or. other hoisting apparatus, except in the 
operation of (l) dunhtraiters as defined hy the American 
Standards Association, or (2) of elevators equipped only 
for automatic operation. 

II. Occupations involving specific mechgjiical hazards — machine work pro- 
jhihition to apply to operating, assisting in operating, or talcing material 
frora the folios-ring machines) 

5. All occupations in connection v-ith T)0v.'er-driven woodworking 
machinerj''. 

Exception : Apprentices: Employifient on the ahove-named types r 
of machinery nay he rjeriiiitted in the case of'ninors hetvreen ^ 
16 and 18 years of age \7ho are bona fide apprentices. 

6. In oiling, cleaning or "iping machinery in notion. 

7. In ap- (lying helts to a pulley in motion or assisting therein. 

8. All work in spra;'" paihting. 

9. In all processes whSre suhstances containing lead or any of 
» its compounds are used in a lio^uid or powdered form or at a 

temperature sufficient to vaporize lead. 

10. In processes where quartz or an;'' other form of silicon diox- 
ide or an ashestos silicate is present in powdered form. 

III. Occupations involving health Jlazards 

11. TTork involving ex^-iosure to henzol or finy benzol compound 
which is violate or which can penetrate the skin. 

Hote : If netal ladders are made, add, under item II. ^ 

Grinding, abrasive, polishing or buffing wheels, provided 
that apprentices operating under conditions of bona fide 
'appi"enticeship nay grind their own tools. 
Lietal-cutting machines having a guillotine action. 
Ilachinery used in the cold rolling of heavj' netal stock. 
i,Ietal plate bending nachines handling material of nore tha,n 
0.2145 inch in thickness. 
Power-driveri netal plaiiing machines. 
Circular sa^s used in the cutting of metals. 
Boring mills. 

Iviachinerjr having a heav;^ rolling or crushing action. 
Power shears of all kinds. 

Punch presses or stamping nachines if the clearance between 
the ram ajid die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch. 
In the cutting or '^elding of metals bj^ gas or electricity. 
In, or in connection nith, hot galvanizing or tinning pro- 
cesses. 

97S1 



•■ -171- 

EXHIBIT 80 
LIITSEED OIL I.iAlWrAnTUPJiia IIIDUSTRY 

Che-lists: General la.borator;y work, chenical control of processes 

?nd refinery supervision, 
iiill ¥rights: Llaintenance and repairing of all machinerjr. 
Oil Kou?e poreman and HeljTers: Tilling and shipping all orders. 
Heat Tenders: In charge of hydraulic pressing (oil nanufacturing) 

crew, and operation of these units. 
Pressmen: Operating h^.'-draulic nachinery in the nanufacture of 

linseed oil. 

Cooperers: Conditioning v/ood and steel barrels for oil containers. 
Grain Elevator Men: Receiving and shipping of flare and in charge 

of all nachinery pertaining thereto. 
General Worlmen: Sacking of feed, tracking, coal handling, and 

■ojiloading of flax. PLemoving chenicals from 
containers. 
Tailor: Repairing hair cloth mats used in hydraulic r.ia.chines. 
(Uses se'-'ing machine.) 



9791 



EliHI PIl] 8 1 

LIVE POm.TRY Iffi:^}ST2Y OF TIE iffiTROPOLITM AlffiA 
il AliD ABOLT THii: CITY OF NEvJ 'fOLRK 

1. Operation of >and trucks easoline vehicles or vehicles of 
EJ-..7 kinl, vrv.^oiis, aiicL passenger or frei-ht elevators. 

2. i'jrk as chaaff f:m''.s , drivers, teansters. 

3. "^Tork at disinfecting. 

4. Work in abbatoirs, poultry markets, and slaiTghter houses. 

5. T/ork as cooper, loader, or ^^nloader. 



gXHIPIT 82 
IvI^.CASOj\FI lilDUSTHY 

1. Dough mixing. 

2. Dough braking. 

3. Kneadin;^. 

4. Oiling -.-leaning, or wiping 'nachinery in motion. 

5. Supplying belts to a pulley in mr^tion or assisting therein. 

6. Taking care of, operating, or repairing elevators, cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except operating 

(l) dumb-waiters ar. definsd by the American Standards Associa- 
tion or (2) 'elevators equipped orly for automatic operation. 

7. Assisting in the cpei-ation of gas, oil, or steam engines used 
as nrine movers. 

• B^aiBIT 83 

i:acki.^;d '.oiste uaijufact-jhing ii^ustry 

1. Drivers or as^isbanli to drivers of mo cor vehicles or 
helpers or delivery ^joys on motor vehicles. 

2. Operating; or a -. •. o s u ■ -.-.g in i'^e oprtrrtion of gas, oil, or steam 
engine^- or othor pr-.-.e mo'-ers. 

3. firing of steaii 01 Wc^ter Icilers (excrv :: boil -^rs of not more 
thar 1^ l:is. prcssine usc-i solely for heating purposes). 

4. n-ie care custody, -jperatici or repair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting ap-oaratus, exce-o^ in the operation _ 
of (1') dim. bws Herd as defined by the American Stanf.ards Associa- 
titn, or 12') elevateds equip-Ded only f'..r automatic operation. 

5. Operating, a^icisting in operating, or taking material from 
r;i«-ker machi-".e-.s or l^^.undrj' machines. 

6. Oiling, clea'uing or v/iping machii'.ei'y in motion. 

7. Ap-Dlying "jel'.-s to a pulley in motion or assisting therein. 

8. handling of -^u-.sterilized T-ags. 



9791 



-173- 



EXIIISIT 84 



MANUFACTURIi^■G Aiffi WHOLESALE SURGICAL IimUSTHY 

1. Pinichin.^ -press operation. 
■' 2. Drco fc •^•in.g o-.>erati jps. 

3. . Operc^ti :■!? 'cra-iectei vdth cyanide furnaces. 

4. Operat,:" ju of c. Levators. 

5. Tr-Lck driving. 

6. Acid ani caustic dip^oing and pickling, (in plating and cleaning 
V • operations and processes^ 

7. 'liTork on high-speed woodworking machinery. 

8. I.Ietal spinning. 

rv.'l-. 9, Mill-wrighting and oiling of moving machinery and shafting. 

10. As drivers of trucks or other motor vehicles, or a-s helpers 
_-,.,: fr, • -.^-Atp drivers, or to deliver goods from trucks or other motor 

.br.'.l V.;-. 1.^ vehicles. 

11. In the cutting or welding of metals hy gas or electricity. 

12. Grinding, abrasive, polishing, or huffing wheels, except wet 
grinding wheels; provided that apprentices, operating under con- 
ditions of hona-fide apprenticeship may grind their own tools. 



EXHIBIT 85 
MARIl® AL^ILIARY LiACHIilEHY liTOUSTRY 

I. Occupations involving specific mechanical hazards — I'achine Jork 

1. Grinding, abrasive, polishing, or buff ing wheels ; provided 
that apprentices operating under conditions of bona fide 
apprenticeship may grind their own tools. 

2. Metal-cutting machines having a gaillotine action. 

3. Machinery used in the cold rolling of heavy metal stock. 

4. Metal plate bending machines handling material of more than 
0.2145 inch in thickness. 

5. Power-driven metal planing machines. 

6. Circular saws used in the cutting of metals. 

7. Boring mills. 

8. Power shears of all kinds. 

9. Punch presses or stam-oing machines if the clearance between the 
ram and the die or the strinper exceeds one-fourth inch. 

10. Machinery having a heavy rolling or crushing action. 

11. Woodworking machinery (vThere wood is used). 

Exce-ption — A pTjrentices : Employment on any of the above-named 
machines may be permitted in the case of minors between 16 and 
18 years of age who are bona fide ap-orentices. 

■ • 12. In oiling, cleaning, or wiping machinery or shafting in motion. 
13. In applying "halts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

II. Plant and outside maintenance. 

14. As drivers of trucks or other motor vehicles or as helpers or 
delivery boys on such vehicles. 

9791 



rorp 

15. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or steam enginS'^ 

usei as prime movers. 

16. In the operation, ci:-tody. or repair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks or o*her hoisting -apparatus, except in the operation 
of (l) dvTcfcw-j,"' ters as d.ef'.rjed by the American Standards 
i.sioci:'. 'jion'or_(,3) elevators equipped only for automatic 
opora'G v^ n. 

17. PirrT.s; .if stnam or water l)oilers (exce-ot boilers of not more 
than 15 lbs. pressure used solely for heating purposes). 

III. Foundries 

18. In ferrovxs and non-ferrous foundries, all work in the foundry 
pr '"per. 

19. Ail cleaning or grinding operations in foundries. 

20. In malleable foundries, operations involving handling of heated 
castin.f^'s etc. , in connection with annealing vjcrk. 

21. All iT-jrk in non-ferror-.s foi-ndiies invol-ving exposure to molten 
lead or any molten Itad alloy or to dust of lead or of any lead 
alloy. 

I?. Occupations involving health hazards. 

(These are involved in xainting and plating processes necessary 
in finishing sone of the products of the industry), 

22. Work ir.vclving exposure to chromic acids, chromates, or bi- 
chromates. 

23. Work irvnlving excecsive exposure to corrosive substances 

24. All work in spray ijainting. 

V. Other 

25. All occupations in .forging shops. 

26. In the cuttipg or relding oi metals by gas or electricity. 

27. 1^ hot galvarizing^ or ti.Tnmg processes. 

28. All oec-ipaticns in connection with heat treatment of metals. 



EXFIIBI T 36 
I\IAEK;IMG D37IC3S lanUSTHY ' .. • 

I. Occupations involving general hazards 

1. Firing of steaia orv.'ater boilers (except boilers of not ipore 
than 15 ]bs. p^'ess.ure used solely for heating purposes) .' 

2. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or steam engines 
or ether prime movers. 

3. In tl'.e cars, custody;, operation, or repair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting aiOTDaratus, except in the operation 

(l) of dumbwaiters as defined by the American Standards Associa- 
tion, or (2) -of elevators- equipped only for automatic operation. 

4. Work T/ith forging hammers, whether on hot or cold work.' 



9791 



r .•> o p 



-175- 

II, Occupations involving specific incchanieel hazo.rdp— r^^i-chinp work 

(prohiliitiTn to apply to operating, assisting in operating, or 
talcin{5; material ' from the I'olloy/ing machines.) 

5. Grinding;, ahrp.siye, poMshing, or buffins wheels; provide d 
that anprentices operating;; uiider conditions of bono, fide 
apprenticeship may ^,rind their o\«m tools. 

6. !:etal-cuttin^";; machines r^^ving a g-uillotine action. 

7. I'etal plate bending machines handling material of more than. 
0.2145 inch in thicfeiess. 

8. Fever-driven metal planing machines. 

9. ■ Circular .sav/s and band sav.'s . 

10. Wire stitching miichinery. 

11. liachinery having n ae-v.f rolling or crushln,., action, such as 
corrugciting rolls. 

12. Machinery used in the cold rolling of heavy metal stock, 

13. Boring n;ills. 

14. power shears cf all kinds. 

15. Punch presses or staraping machir.es if the clearance between 
the rar.i and the. die or b le stripper exceeds one-fo\irth inch. 

16. Zngraving machines. 

Excpp^tiOjis — Ap-orentices: Ei-roio^Tnent on r,ny of the above-named 
machines :ria.y be "06!rmitted inth^ case of , minors between 16 and 
18 5^ears of age who are bona fide ap;-rtntices. 

17. In oiling, cles/ning, or vdping miichinery in motion. . : 

18.- In a-oplying belts to a^'ptilley in motion or assisting therein. 

III. Occupations involving health hazards 

12. Lead soldering work. 

20. All v7ork involving exposure to acid in connection with 
pickling of sheet plate. 

21. All work involving er^Tature t^ chromic acids, chro-nates, or 
bichromates. 

22. All wor2r involving exposure to corrosive substances. • 

23. All work in sprav p 'inting. 

24. In all processes where substances containing lead or its 
c impounds aro used. 

25. Vri processes where rna.terials "'■roc'ucing a silicosis hazard 
are present. 

26. V/ork involving exposure to nitro or amido derivatives of 
benzol or toluol or other derivatives of benzol. 



EXIilEIT 8 7 
lEDIUi AL'TD LOW FFJCJ/iD JEWLLRl MASLTACTURIUG IITDUSTHY 

I 

I; '- Occupations i/.volving general hazards 

1. In or assisting in the overation of gas, oil, or steam 
engines or other prime movers. 



9791 



-176- 

2. . In the care, custody, operation or repair of elevators, 

cranes, derricks, or other hoisting ap" aratus , except in 
the operation of (l) di:mb\7aiters as defined "by the American 
Standards Association, or (2) elevators equip"ied only for 
automatic operation. 

3. Firing of steam or T;a,ter boilers (except "boilers of not more 
than 15 l"bs, pressure used solely for heating purposes). 

4. In the cutting or v/elding of metals 'by gas or electricity. 

5. In or in connection v/ith hot galvanizing or tinning processes. 

6. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or as . 
helperci or delivery "boys on motor vehicles. 

II. Occupations involving specific mechanical Ixizarcs — ma.chine work 

(ProhilDition to apply to operating, assisting in operating, 
or taJcing material from the follov/ing mTchiiTss.) 

7. Circular saws used in the chitting of ..letals. 
8 . Boring mills . 

9, Pov/er shears of all kinds. 

10. V/ire stitching machinery. 

11. iiachinery having a heavy rolling or crushing action. 

12. In oiling, cleaning, or v/iping machinery or shafting in motion, 

13. In applying "belts to ;-iulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

14. Punch presses or stampin^^; machines if the clearance "oetween 
the ram and the die or stripooer exceeds one-qijiarter inch, 

III. Occuoations involving health iiazards 

15. In all process4s where su"bstvnces containing lead or any 
01 its compoimds are used in a liquid or pov^dered form, or 
at a temperature sufficient to vaporize lead. 

16. In processes Y/here q^uartz or a.ny other form of silicon 
dioxide or an o,s"bestos silicar.e is present in powdered form, 

17.. I'/ork involving exposure to "benzol or any benzol compound 
which is volatile or v;hich ca.n penetrate the skin, 

18, In- the use of dangerous dye-stuffs. 

19, Work involving excessive expos\ire to corrosive su"bstances. 



E&'IEIT 88 
LiERCHAI^IT AtlD CUSTOM TAILORIiTG IITTjUSTRY 

1, As drivers of trucks or other motor vehicles or as heljDers 
or delivery "boys on same. 

2, Lifting of heavy weights (80 ,l"bs maximum), 

3, In the operation, custody, or repair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks or other hoisting: apparatus, except in the operation 
of (1) dui-n"b-waiters as defined by the Americaia Standards Asso- 
ciation, or of (2) elevators equ.ipped only for automatic opera- 
tion, 

4, Firing of steam. or water boilers (except boilers of not more 
than 15 pounds pressure used solely for heating purposes). 



3791 



C 



EXIi lEIT 39 
miJdj KAT DIE AIID V/OOD HAT BLOCK IHDUSTRY 



I, Occupations I.ivolviii':; Geiieral Hazards 

1. All voii- IT: tho foandr:" proper 

2. All clee-ning or tj'ri-.iding operations. in^foTOftdfies. 

3. All v/o:"!: in fo-undries \.'hich involves the hanclini;; of 
metallic; lead,, 

E^i^lp nation: Fractically all work in the foundry proper 
involves either exposure to the hazards of nelted r.ietal and, 
in nonierrous fouiidries , to lead or zinc and involves a 
silicosis xia.zard. 

4. In the cuttin;?; or welding of metals hy gas or electricity. 

5. In or in connection with hot galvanizing or tinning processes* 

6. Firing of steam or v/ater "boilers (except "boilers of not more 
tlian 15 l"bs. pressure used solely for heating purposes) 

7. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or as 
helpers or delivery "b.oys on motor vehicles. 

8. In or assisting in the operation gas, oil, or steam engines 
or other prime "iovers. 

9. In the care, custody, operation or repair of elevators, cranes, 
or derricks, or other hoisting arpparatus , except in the opera- 
tion of (l) d-um"b\7aiters as defined oy the American Standards 
Association, or of (2) elevators equipped only for automatic 
operation. 

II. Occupations Involving Specific l.iechanical Hazards - iiachine Work 
(pro'nihitions to av'ply to operating, assisting in operating or 
taking material from the follovving machines.) 

10, Grinding, alrrasive, polishing, or "bnoffing v/heels; provided, 
that ap;iorenticcs operating utader conditions of "bona fide 
apprenticeship may grind their oxin tools 

11, Lie tal-cut ting machines leaving. a guillotine action 

12, liachinery used in the cold rolling of heavy metal stock 

13, Metal plate "beniing ma.chines handling material of more than 
0,3145 inch in thiclcness 

14, ?ov/er-dri ven metal planing machines 

15, Circular sav/s used in the cutting o^ metals 

16, Boring mills and "boring oper':.tions performed on other machines 

17, pov/er shears of all kinds 

18, Punch presses or stamping machines if the clearance between 
zhe ram and the die or t"ne stripper exceeds one-foirrth inch 

19, All occupations in connection vdfn power-driven wo^d-J/orkihg 
machinery 

Exception: Employment on any of the a'bove-named machines may 
be permitted in the case of minors "between 16 and 18 years of 
age under conditions of "bona fide apprenticeship, 

20, In oiling, cleaning or idning machinery in motion 

21, In applying "belts to a ; lulley in motion or assis+iing therein, 

9791 



-178- 

Apprentices sha,ll "be defiiied as "those vmo are regularly indent-ured 
under co:-.tr.act to the Industry, for a sufficient period of time to ue 
systematically advanced throu^^h the various operations, shops, depart- 
ments, etc., of a Trade, Occuo'ition or Industry, and who receive educa- 
tional training in an organized educational institution during a portion 
of their worhing time," 



rXIIJBIT 90 
METAL EOSriTAL rir'i::iTUEJ: rAi-UF. CTirRKG Il^USTHY 

I. Occupations involving specific mechanic il lia.zards — machine v/orlr 

(Prohibition to apply to operating or afsisting in operating 
the following machines.) 

1, Grinding, abrasive, ;oolishing, or ■'birffing wheels, provided 

that apprentices o"')erating ■'JLnder condit-ions of "bona fide 
apprenticeship may grind their own tools. 

2. ].fetal-'c"atting machines having a guillotine action, 

3, Metal plate "bending machi'nes iiandling material of more than 
0.2145 inch in thiclmesSc 

4, Circ-oJ.ar saws in the cutting of metals.- 

5. Pover shears of all kinds. 

6. Func'h presses Jr stamping machines if the ' clearance "between 
. the rc^n and the 'die or tiie stripper exceed one-fourth inch. 

Excepti on; A;oprentices : Employment on any of the a"bove-named 
machines may 'be permitted in the case of minors "bctv/een 16 and 
IS years of age who are "bona fide ap;orentices, 

7,_ In oiling, cleaning, or wiping machinery or sha,fting in motion, 

8, In applying "belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein, 

II. Occupations involving health hazard, 

9. All vi/orl: in spray painting.' 

III. Occupations involving general hazards 

10, In foundries (ferroue' or nonferrous), all work in the foundry 
proper J 

11, All shipping or grinding op^erations in foundries. 

12, All wor"!': in foujidries involving exposure to molten lead or any 
molcen lead alloy or to dust of lead or of any lead alloy, • 

13, In mallea"Dle fouiidries, operations involving hiandling of heated 
castings, etc., in connection v/ith o.nnealing work, 

14, As drivers of trucks or other motor vehicles or as helpers • 
or delivery "boys in such vehicles. 

15, In, or a„ssisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam 
engines used as prime movers. 

16, In the operation, custody, or repair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks or other hoisting apparatus, except in the operation 
of (l) dum"b-waiters fe.3 defined "by the American Standards 
Association, or (2) elevators eqioipped only for automatic operatioB, 

17, Firing of steam or water boilers (except boilers of not more 
than 15 poimds pressure used solely for heating piirposes) ■ 

9791 18, In the cutting or vrelding of metals by gas or electricity. 



-179- 



1XEI?IT 91 



LiET^ I'.ain: riAl'^FACrURIFG IFDUSTRY 



I. Occupations involving- general hazpxds 

1. Welding. 

2. So^id blastin;';. 

5. Testing- of • tanks. 

4, Lead TDurnlng 

5. Tiring of sterrii' or water boilers (except ste-^m or vater 'boilers 
of not ir.ore than 15 lbs. pressure used solely for heating 
purooses) . 

6.' In tlie Care, ciistod'', operation or re;:)air of elevators, cranes, 
der-iuho, or other hoisting apparatus, e xcept in the operation 
of (a) du-Tih -waiters as defined by the American Standards Asso- 
ciation, or (h) elevators equip-oed only for automatic operation. 

7. In or in connoction with hot galvanizing or tinning processes. 

c. Cutting or welding of netals by gas or electricity. ' 

9, In oiling, cle'-ining, or viiping machinery in motion. 
10, In applying, bel.ts to a pulley in motion or assisting therein. . 

II, Occupations inv jiving snecific meclipnical hazards — machine vrork, . 

(prohibition to ap"".ly to operating, assisting in operating or 
tpking material from the following machines by employees 
under 18 years, except in the case of minors between 16 and 
18 years of age under conditions of bona fide apprenticeship, 
Er.-.plcyees imdcr 18 years nay be used as off-bearers from such 
machines only in case all moving parts and joints of operation 
of such rachines are so g-aarded, protected, aXid/or arranged 
tha.t em-Tloyees acting as off-bearers cannot come in contact 
with th^m; a,lso, provision shall be made such that the articles 
being offborne caiinot be throvm by such, machines in a manner to 
Cause injury to the off -bearer. Further, each employer shall 
maintain or cause to be m.aintained supervision adequate to in- 
sure the above conditions to be fulfilled. Persons removing 
•s-t"ock: from a "Toint remote from the machine are not included in 
^ this prohibition.) : 

1. G-rinding, abrasive, i-iolishing, or buffing ^.he61■e* 

2. Metal -cut ting machines having a sgaillotine action 

3. I.iachinery used in the cold rolling of heavy metal stock, 

4. Metal plate bending machines handling materiaJL of more thaji 
0,214-5. inches in thiclaiess. 

' 5, Pouer-driven metal planing machines, 

5. Circular sav/s used in the cutting of metal, 
7. Boring hills, 

S, l.iachinery having a heavy rolling or crushing action such as 

corrugating rolls. 
9, Power shears of all kinds. 
10, Punch presses or stamping m.achines if the cle.-^.rance between the 
ram and the die or the strip-!:)er exceeds one-fourth inch. 
9791 



-180- 
EXHIBIT 92 

IvIETAL WIIIDOW lilDUSTEY 



I. Occupations Involving;; G-eneral Hazards 

1. Firing of steajn or Wfi.ter boilers (except boilers of not 
more than 15 lbs, pressure used solely for heating purposes), 

2. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or as 
helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles, 

3» In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or steara engines 
or other prime movers, 

4, In the care, custod;^^, operation or repair of elevators, crajies, 
derricks, or other hoisting appa,ratus, except in the operation 
of (l) dumbwaiters aS defined by the American Standards Asso- 
ciation, or of (2) elevators equip-oed only for automatic opera- 
tion. 

5, In the cutting or welding of metals by gas or electricity, 

6, In or in connection with hot galvanizing or tinning processes, 

II. Occupations Involving Specific r.Iechanical Hazards — Machine work 

• (Prohibition to apply to operating, assisting in operating, 
. or talcing material from the follovdng machines.) 

7, Grinding, abra,sive, polishing or buffing wheels; provided 
. . that. apprentices operating under conditions of bona fide 

apprenticeship may grind their own tools, 
8» Metal-cutting machines having a guillotine action. 
9. Metal plate bending machines handling material of more than 

0.2145 inch in thicloiess. 

10, Power-driven metal planning machines, 

11, Circi-aar Saws used in the cutting of mettJs. 

12, Machinery used in the cold rolling of heavy metal stock. 

13, Machinery having a heavy rolling or crashing action, such as 
corrugating rolls. 

14, Boring mills/ 

15, Power shea.rs of all kinds, 

15. Punch presses or stamping machines if the clearance b-etween 
the ram and the die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch. 

Exception: Employment or any of the above-named machines may 
be permitted in the case of minors between 16 ajad 18 ye^rs of 
age -under conditions of bona fide apprenticeship, 
17. In oiling, cleaning, or wiping machinery in motion. 
■-■18, In applying belts to a pulley in motion or assisting therein. 

Apprentices shall be defined as "Those who are r-^gularly indentured 
under contract to the Industry, i'or a sufficient period of time to be syst 
systematically advanced 'through the vai"ious operations, shops, depart- 
ments, etc, of a Trade, Occupation or Industry, and v/ho receives 
educational training in an organized educational institution during a 
portion of their working time," 

9791 



-181- 

EXHIBIJ 95 
iuCPS'.'ICK IITDUSTRY 



I. Occv.-^F.tions Invol\-in;;i; G-enerpl Kazr.rd?: 

"1. Pirins of sterm or water toilers (exce-)t boilers of not 

rore thpn 15 lbs, pressure uced solely for lie-tin/^- purposes), 

2. As c^rivers or a' si stents to drivers of Liotor vehicles or as 
Lel-pers or deliver;,' boj's on motor vehicles. 

3. lii or assistin:^; in the oper.\tion of gas, oil, or steam engines 
or other prime movers. 

'.'.-. In the care, cus^^odj-, cperaoion or repa.ir of elevators, cranes, 
r'.er.vic'cs, or other hoisting appa^S'-tus , except in the operation 
of (l) dnmbwaiters as defined by the AinericoJi Standards Asso- 
ciation, or (2) of elevators equip-oed for autonr^tic operation. 

II. Occu-:)ations Iiwolving Specific i.Ieciianical Hazards — Machine Yifor]:. 

'(Prohibition to apnly to operating, assisting in opera,ting, or 
tfid-ng material from the follo?/ing machines): 

5, ^Ul occupations in con:-'°ction with power driven wood-world.ng 
machinery. 

Exc e-Q t j n ^ L m-'-il oyment on an^'' of the ?bove named machines may 
be per.vltted in the case of minors between 16 and 18 yeo.rs of 
age uiider conditions of bona fide apprenticeship. 

6, In oiling, cleaning; or wiping machineiy in motion. 

7, In applying belts to a pulley in motion or. assisting therein. 

Apprentices shall be defined as "those who fire regi\larly inden- 
tured under contract to the Industry', for a sufficient period 
of time to be syr:teria,ticr'lly ad-.Tiiced through the various 
operations, shops, ; e^r.rtuents, ezc,, of a OJrade , Occupation or 
Industry- , and who receive educational training in an organized 
educa,tional institution during a portion of thrsir working time." 



irSICAL L3RC:-ji;"I)ISI] EAiTL'EACTiJRIlIC- IKDUSTHY 
I. Occupations involving general hazards: 

1. As drivers, or assistrnts to drivers of motor vehicles or as 
hel-)ers or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

2. In, or assisting in, the operation, of gas, oil or steam engines 
or other prime movers. 

3. In the care, custod.;;'-, operation or repair of elevators, cranes, 
V "* derricks, or ..Other hoisting apparatus, except in the operation 

of (l) duabw.aiters, ^ defined by the Ajrorican Standards Asso- 
ciation, or {2) of elevators equipped only for automatic 
operation, 
9791 



-182- 



4. Firing of steaxn or vater "boilers (exceot lioilers of not more 

thai! 15 pounds pressure used solely for he.?t.i:if w.r:)0ses). 

5. In the cutting or reldinf; of m'^tals ''oj ;ras or electricity. 

II. Occupations i ivolvin;2- s'^ecific mechanical hazards - nachine vorh 

5. Grinding, abrasive, polishing, or buffing; vheels. . ■ 

7. L'etal- cut ting machines having a guillotine action. 

• 3. Liachinery used in the cold rolling of heavy .netal stock. 

9. Metal plaiie bending .:iachines hand.ling material of more tha^i 
0.2145 inch in thiclaiess. 

10. Power-driven metal pLaning machines. 

11. Circular sa'"s used in the chitting of metals. 
13. Boring, mills. 

13. Povjer shears of all kinds. 
• 14. Punch "oresses or stnn'oing machiiies if the clearaiice betv/een the 
rajTi and the die or the stri^D^oer exceeds one-fou.rth inch. 
lu. "'ire stitching machinery. 

16. Machinery 'having a heavy rolling or crushing action. 

17. .iiolding, s-^5littin , rolling, "oerf orating, stamoing, dieing-out, 

embossing, burnishing, clicking, skiving, stri'T:'ing or buffing 
machines used in the leather industrj^. 
13. All occu'Dations ca.rried on in connection vdth oover-driven wood- 
working machinery. 

19. In oiling, cleaniiig or i7i-:)ing machi.iery or 'shafting in motion. 

20. In a:rolying belts to -pulley in motion or assisting therein. 

III. Occupations involving health hazards 

21. Lead soldering ^-'ork. 

22. All '-ork involving exposure to acid in connection i^-ith -pickling 

of sheet 'olate. 

23. "fork, involving e:':':)0sure to benzol or any benzol con'oound ^-hich 

is vola^tive o-r vhich can penetrate the skin. 

24. In the use of dangerous dyestxiffs. 

25. All nork in s'oray tainting. 



ZXHIBIT S5 
lIOiO'ZIQGUS Airo ST22;L COnV^CTOZ LiAirJPAC.5^U:Ri;!G liJDUSTHY 
I. OccxrDatio..s involving general hazards 

1. Firing of steai.i or v;rter boilers (e-'.ce.5t boilers of not more 

than li;: nouauls pressure used solely for heating luroos^s. ) 

2. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or as 

helpers or delivery boys 'on motor vehicles. 
5. In, or assisting, i'l the operation of gas, oil, or steaia engines 
or other prime movers. ■ ' . 

9701 



-183- 



4i:. In tae cpre, custoc'-f, operrtion or repair of elevptors, cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting apparetus, excert in the operption 
of (1) dumowaiters as defined oy the Aiaericpr St?ndTds Asso- 
ciptior, or (?) of elevators equipped only for rutomatic 
,. operation, . ■ f 

In the care of foundrv '^'ork in the inc'astry: 

5, All I'^ork in the foundry proioer.- 

■f), - All cle^nin^- or ^rindinB operations- in foundries. 
V. Al"" '/Toik in foardries involving exposure to molten lead or any 
molten l.ead al.lo - or to dust of lead or of any lead alloy. 

6, In malle-'^ble foundries, operations- involving handling of heate 

crstinj-^s, et.c. , in connection with annealing vork. 
9. In the cuttinr or welding of metais .by gas or electricity, 

10. In, or in corinection with hot galvanizing or tinning processes. 

II. Occupations involving specific mechanical hazards - machine work 
(Frohioition to anrjly to c^errting, assisting in operating, or 
taking material from the following machines) 

11. G-rinding, adrasive, polishing or Duffing -heels; provided that 

apprentices operating under conditions of oona fide apprentice- 
ship may grind their 0"'n tools. 

12. ketal-cutting machines having a guillotine action. 

13. Ivietal pl'^te oerding machines handling Material of more than- 

0.214-: inch in thickness, . ' 

14. Fo'-er-driven metal planing machines. • 

15. Circular sa^'s used in tne cutting of metals. > 

16. ' ire stiching rarcninery. 

17. Kachinerv having a heavy rolling or crushing action, 

16» r.iachinerv used in the -cold rolling of heavy metal stock, 

19. Boring raillst 

20. Fover shears of all kindso 

21. Funch presses or stamping macnines if the clearance bet'^'een 

the ram and the die or tne stripper exceeds ore-fourth inch. 

Exception; Apprentices: j^mployment on an'^" of the above-named 
machines may be permitted in the case cf minors between 
16 and 16 years of age •-"no are. bona fide apprentices. 

22. In 'oiling, cleaning or '-iping machinery in motion. 

23. In applying belts to a pulley in :aotion or assisting therein. 

III. Occupations involving health hazards 

24. All "-ork involving exposure to acid in connection ^^ith pickling 

oi •iw- et plate. 

25. All "^ork in -spray pai.oting. 

26. In all processes T^nere .substances cont-sining le^^d or anv of its 

compounds are used in a liquid or pondered forna or at a 
terapeiature sufficient to vaporize lead. 

9791 



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27. In processes- where quartz or any other form of silicon dioxide 

or ?ri asbestos silicate is present in powdered form. 

28. 7/ork invoivine; exposure to benzol or any benzol compound ^^'hich 

is volatile or ^/vhich can penetrate the skin, 

29. Lead soldering work. 

Apprentices shall be defined as "those 'f'ho are regularly 

indentured under contract to the industry, for a sufficient 
period of time to be systematically advanced through the 
various operations, sho-os, departments, etc., of a trade, 
occupation or industry, and who receive educational train- 
ing in an organized- educatfonal institution during a- portion 

• of their "-orking titne. 

31. Tiork involving: exposure to chromic acids, chromates, o-r 

bichromates. 

32. Vork involving excessive exposure to corrosive substances. • 



NOMEEROUS SCPJLP ; ETAL TIIADE 

1. Breaking and sorting of batter' plates. 

2. The burning of battery boxes. 

3. The operation of shears. - 

4. Drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or 
helpers -on motor vehicles. 

•If hoisting apparatus is used in the industry 

5. Operation or repair of elevators, cranes, derricks, or 
other hoisting apparatus, except the operation oi r'umb- 
waiters as defined by the American Standards Association, 
or elevators equipped only for automatic operation. 



EXHIBIT 97 
OPEN PAPER DF.IlTiING CUP /JJD KOUND NESTING- FAFEr. CONTAIFEH INDUSTRY 
•I, Occupations involving mechanical hazards 

1, Machinery of stamping or punch-press type used in the manu-r ;. 

facture of paper or paper goods, if the clearance between 
■ the ram and the die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch. 

2, Pap.'r- cut ting machines having a guillotine action. 

3. Greasers, slitters, or corrugating, crimping, embossing, 

plating, printing, or graining rolls used in the manufacture 
of paper and paper products which are not guarded at the point 
of operation, 

4. Power shears of all kinds. 

9791 



-185- 



5, Po-'-er-driven ririntins;;: px'esses, 

Excerition — APT^rentices: Eiuployraent on pny of the pbove 
m^cnines may "be permitted in the case of minors betveen 16 
and 18 yenrs of pf^e under conditions of bona fide apprentice- 
ship, 

6, In oiling, clerning, or ^i^iping rarchinery or shafting in 'motion, 

7, In enplvini; belts to pulleys in' motion or assisting therein, 

II, Occupations involving general hazards. (Plant and outside mainte- 
nance, ; 

8, As drivers or rssis'hants to drivers of motor vehicles or as 
• helpers or delivery 'Doys on rao'tor vehicles. 

9, In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or steam engines 
used PS prime' movei-Sf ' ' , " 

10. riring of steam or '-'rter boilers (except boilers of not more 
then 15 lbs, pressure used solely for neating purposes). 

11. In the care, custody, operation or repair of elevators, cranes, 
■derricks, or otner hoisting apparatus, except in the operation 

' '■ ^of (l) cum'D-'/"a iters, as defined by the American Standards 

Association, ur of (r) elevators eouioped only for automatic 
operation.j 

III. Vi'here plating is done. 

12. v.ork involving e-vPOsure to chromic acids,, chromates or bi- . ' 
chromatfcSr 

13. Vork in\olviilg excessive exposure to corrosive substances, 



::XH-I"MT 98- 
0WJA:.L^'TAL i'OLriiG, CAr.Vi:-jG- ;JTT) TUfliaNCr irDUSMY 
I. Occupations involving general hazards 

1, Firing of steam or -ater boilers (except boilerg of not moi-e than 
IE lbs. -oressure used solely for heating purposes, ) 

2, As drivers of motor vehicles or as delivery boys pr motor vehicles, 

3, In, or asristing in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam engines 
or other prime movers, • 

4, In the care, custody, operation, or repair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in the operation of 
(1) cuml-'^iters as dei ined oy the American Standards Association, 
or (2) elevators ecuipoed only for automatic operation, 

5, In the hanoling' of lumber weigning more than 75 pounds per board- 
er in the liftir*;, lowering, ana/or carrying df objects weighing 
more than 75 pounas, 

9791 



-186-. 



II, OcGUT3ations involving snecific mechanical hazards - machine "'ork 
(Prohibition to applv to operating or assisting in operating^ 
except as of f bearer, the following, machines) 

• 6, OTJeration of lathes or of 'Tood-yoi-king machinery involving the 
use of moving knives, saws, drills, bits anc/or cutters. 
7. riachinery having a hervy rolling or ci'ushing action. 
&, Roller mixers, pug mills, putty chasers, or molding machinery of 
• • the pressure type. 
9. Punch presses, embossing presses, or stamrmg machines if the 

clearance bet'"een the ram and the die or the stripper or the "'ork 
exceeds one-iourth inch. 

10, In the operation ol metal-vorking milling machines, lathes, drill 
presses, shapers, planers, .'^rinding, or similar machines, 

11. In oiling, cleaning, or 'fiping machinery in motion. 

12, In applying belts to a pulley in motion or assisting tnerein, 

in. Occupations involving health hazards • ' ^ 

13, All "Tork in spray painting, ' • ■ 

14. In all processes vhere substances containing lead or any of its 
compounds are used in a liouio or povdereo form or at- a temperature 
sufficient to vaporize lead, 

15. In processes Fhere quartz or any other form of silicon dioxide 
or an asbestos silicate is present in po'^dered iorm except pro- 
cesses involving the use of sand-paper, sand-cloth or sand-belts. 

.16. Vi'ork- involving exposure to benzol or any benzol compound which 

is volatile or -• hich can pen; trrte the skin. 



SXHIBIT 99 

PACKAGE tIEDICINE INDUSTRY- 

I* Occupations involving machine hazards 

1, In oiling, cleaning, or wiping machinery Or shafting , 
in motion. 

2, In_ applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting 
therein, 

II, Occupations involving general hazard-s , . 

3, As drivers of trucks' or other motor vehicles or as helpers 
or delivery boys on such vehicles, 

4, In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam 
engines used as prime movers. 

, 5r .. Firing of steam or.-jater boilers (except boilers of nqt more 
than 15 lbs. pressure used solely 'for heating purposes). 
6, In the cutting or ^^felding of metals by gas or electricity. 

9791 



-187- 



III. Materials involving special hazards in handling 

7, The handlin;;: of phos-ohorus. 

8, The handlin;^ of radium. 

9.* 'The hcndlins:,- of caustic acids. 

10. 'The-ihandling of h/clro cyanic acid. 

11. The handlin.:; of oil of hitt'-^r almonds, USP. 



SiEIBIT 100 
PACKArxIl^G 1.IA.CHIKE11Y IKDUSTxiY AND TRADE 

I. Occupations involving; general Hazards 

1. In fo^juidries (ferrous or nonferrous) all v;ork in the 
foundry proper. i . 

2. All Cleaning or grinding operations in foundries. 

3. All '.7ork in foundries involving er^po'sure to molten lead 

or o.ny :nolten lead alloy or to dust of lead or of a.ny lead' 
alloy. 

4. In malleable :foundries, operations involving handling of 

' heated castings, etc., in connection -Tith annealing work. 

5. In the cut-ting or 'leldin- of raetels hy gas or electricity. 

6. In or in comection with hot galvanizing or tinning pro- 
cesseSi 

7. ii-s drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or 
as helpers or delivery hoys on motor vehicles. 

8. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam 
engines or other prime movers. 

9. In the care, custody, operation or repsir of elevators, 
cranes, derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, e::cept in 
the operation of (1) drauh^ 'alters as defined "by the American 
Standards Association, or (2) of elevators equipped only 
for automatic operation. 

10. -firing of steam or water ooilers (except boilers of not 
more than 15 po'onds pressure used solely for heating 
purposes). 

II. Occu-pations involving specific mechanical hazards — machine work 
(prohibition to apply to operating, assisting in operation, or 
talcing material from the follo^'ing mo,cnines). 

11. Grinding, abrasive, polishing or buffing vheels; provided 
that apprentices operating under conditions of bona fide ap- 
prenticeship msy grind their o'vn tools. 

12., Lie tal- cut ting machines having a guillotine action, 

13. iiachinery used iu the cold rolling of heavy metal stock. 

14. Lletal plate bending nachims handling material of more than 
0-2145 inch in thiccness. 

15. Po^r/er- driven metal planing machines, 

16,. Circular sa'.s used in the cutting of metals 

17, Boring mills. 

18, Power shears of all kinds. 

19, Punch presses or stamping machines if the clearance between 
the rajn and the die or the stripper e::ceeds one-fourth inch, 

20.. Wire stitching machinery. 

21, Liachinery having a heavy rolling or crushing action. 
97Q1 



-188- 



Exception: Apprentices: • Employment on pny of the pbove-npmed 
mpchines may be permitted in the cpse of minors between 16 
and 18 years of age who are bona fide aporentices. 

22. In oiling, plepning or "'iping machinery or shafting in motion. 

23. In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

Ill, Occupations involving health hazards 

24. All work in sprpy painting. 

25. '(.ork involving exposure to benzol or any benzol compound which 
is volatile or 'rhich can penetrate the skin. 

25. 'ijork involving expOE^^re to chromic acids, chromates, or bi- 
chromstes. 

27. \'«ork involving excessive exposure to corrosive substances, 

28. Lead soldering work. 

29. All '"ork involving exposure to acid in connection wi'th pickling 
of sheet plates. 

Apprentices shall be defined as "those w.:0 are regularly 
indentured under contr^^^ct tothe industry, for a sufticient 
period of time to be systemtic^llv advanced tnrough the 
various operations, shops, departments, etc., of a trade, 
occupation or industry, and \''ho receive educational training 
during a portion of their 'working time in an organized 
educational institution." 



9791 



-189- . 
EX HIBIT 101 
TAI>2R BOX i,JlC;-ii:j"i;:F/x IlIDUSTHY MD TIUDE 

I. Occupationr Irvolving G-eaci'al Hazards 

1. In fOTinr^Ties (■'^crrovis or nou-f ^^rrons) , all v;orl' in the 

f otm dr./ prop s r , 

2. All cleaning os grind? r.,5 operations in foimdries. 

3. All T7ork in fo'.ir.Lirios involvin;'"" errposiire to molten lead or 

ary r^oiten lerd alloj'- or to dust of lea.d or of any lead 
alloj'. 

4. In rasllealile foundries, operations involving handling of 

heatod crstin^s, etc., in connection xrith annealing work. 

5. In the cutting or welding of metals by gas or electricity. 

6. In or in connection with hot galvanizing or tinning pro- 

cesses. 

7. As drivers or assista^its to drivers of motor vehicles or 

as hei~)ers or delivor^' . ho^- s on motor vehicles. 
8i In, or assisting in, the operation cf gs.s, oil, or steam 

engines or other prime meters* 
9. In the cars, custody, operation, or repair of elevators, 
cranes,., "derri oh s, or oth^r. hoisting apparatus, except " 
in the operation of (l) d--u,rci7aiters s.s defined h;,'- the 
Ar^rican Standards Aiisociation, or (?) elevators eqtiipped 
only foL- automatic operation. 

10. Firing of steam or r;ater hcilers (except "boilers of not' 

more than 15 lbs. n^ressure used solely-- for heating 
punooses) . 

II. Occupptions Involving Specific liochanical Hezards — Machine 'iTork 

(Prohibition to aoply to operating, assisting in operrting, 
■ ■ or ta!:ing material fi'om thu foTlor-ing machines.) 

11, Grinding, rbrasive, ooli'-hirg, or buffing v;heols; provided that 

appren:ic3s operating under conoitions of bona fide apprentice- 
ship moy grind their ov/n tools. 
■ 12. Metal-cutting machines naving a, guillotine action. 

13. Machiner}' used in tho cold rolling of heavy metal stock. 

14. Metal place bending mtchines hrndling material of more than 

0.2145 inch m thi(;h..-iess, 

15. Pover-driven metal planing machines. 

15. Circular savs used in t:i.e cutting of metals. 

17, Boring mills. 

18, Po\."er shears of all kinds, 

19, Punch presses or stamping mach-ines if the clearance betveen 

tne ro.m and ths die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch, 

20, TJire stitcning machinery, 

21, Machinery naving a he^v-;- rolling or crushing action. 

Exception; A-'prsntices: Emplo'yment on an^y of the above named 
machines may be porr'dtted in the case of minors between 15 
ajid 18 years of age i^'ho are bona fide apprentices, 

22, In oiling, cleaJiing or wiping machiner;' or shafting in motion. 

23, In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein, 
9791 



... -190- 
III. Occupations involving health hazards 

24. All work in spray painting. ,,.. 

25. Uork involving expo.sure to "benzol or an^/ benzol compound which 

is volatile or which can penetra.te the skin. 
25. Work involving exposure to chromic acids, chromates, or 
■ bichromates* 

27. VTork involving excessive exposure to corrosive substances. 

28. liead soldering v/ork. 

29. All work involving exposure to acid in donnection v/ith 

pickling, of sheet plate. 

EXHIBIT 102 
' ■ ■ PAPER DI SC MILK BOTTLE CAP I1®USTRY 

I, Occupations Involving General Hazards 

1. Firing of steam of water boilers (except boilers of not 
■ ■ ■ more than 15 lbs. "pressure used solely for heating - 

purposes). 

2. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or as 

helpers or delivery boys '^n motor vehicles. 

3. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam 

engines or other prime movers. 

4. In the care, ciistod;^', operation or repair of elevators, cranes, 

derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in the 
operation of (l) dumbwaiters, .as defined by the American 
Standards Association, or (2) elevators equipped only for 
automatic operation, 

II. Occunations Involving Specific Mechanical Hazards — Machine TJork; 

(Prohibition to apply to operating, assisting in operating, or 
taking material from the following machines.) 

1. Machinery of stamping or punch-press trpe used in the 

manufacture of paper or paper goods, if the clearance 
between the ram and the die or the striirper- ercceeds- one- 
fourth inch. 

2. Greasers, slitters, or corrugating, crimiDing, embossi-ng', 

plating, printing, or graining rolls used in the manui'acture 
of paper and paper products vrhich are not guarded at the 
point, of operation. 

3. Power shears of all kinds. 

Exception ; Apprentices: Employment on sny of the above machines 
may be permitted in the ca.se ox minors betv/een 16 and 18 
years of ago under conditions of bona fide apprenticeship, 

4. In oiling, cleaning, or wiping machinery or shafting in motion. 

5. In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

6. Power driven printing presses. 

Apprentices shall be defined as "those. who are regularly 

indentured under contract to the Industrjr, for a sufficient 
period of t-ine to be systematically advanced through the 

9791 



-191- ■■ 

verious o;icratior.3, shcps, departuicutr;, etc, of a Trnde, Occupation or 
Inuustry, ^^nC. who receive ediicn tionrl training in an or^^anized education*". 
al instit tiozi durin.T; a portion of fieir working time. " 

• SKIILIT 105 

PATI-I: UAT-^RS 5!l;LT IICUSTRY 

I. Occupations involving; r:-^3eciiic mcclianical hazards — mnchj ne work 

1. Carding. 

2. P irking.: 

3. VJerviiig. 

4. WaLhiiig. 

5. Extrnctiii£';. 

6. Fu-lling. 
7., Kap-ping. 

II. Occupations involving general liazards 

8. As drivers of uotor vehicles or as helpers or delivery 
boj'S on raotor vehicles. 

S. In the operation, custotv, or repair of elevatorr-, craiies, 
derric'-.s, or other hoisting axwaratus, except in the 
operation of (l) ■uinV waiters, as defined by the American 
Standa.rdo Association or (3) elevators eqiiipped only for 
auto::ia,ti c opeTation, 
10,. In oilin,. , cleer.i.iv;, or riping machinery or shafting 
in motion. 

11.. In ? )plying belts to julleys in motion or assisting therein, 
12, Hpndlin- of heavy weights.. 

aniPIT 104 

PIPZH STA1lOr£RY AI". TAJT.h'f uA:\.7'-CW/RT<-G IM)USTHY 

I. Occupations in\olvini^' 'general ha,zar\s 

1. Firin;-; oi s-ce^-i.i or water boilers (except boilers of not more 
than 15 lbs. jresVure used solel.y for lieating purposes), 

2. As drivers or rssist-nts to t.rivers of motor vehicles or 
a.s helioers or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

5, In or as:;istin_\,- in the operation of gas, oil, or steam 
engines or other pri,.;e j.iovers. 

4. In the cars, custody, operation, or repair of eleva.tors, 
cranes, derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in 
the opeiTtion oi (l) cambwaAters, as defined by the Ameri- 
cai": Standards Association, and (2) elevators equip :ied 
only lor a^'itoraatic oyjeration. 

II. Occf-pa.tions involving -specific mechanic^^l hazards — u-' chine Work 

(?ro:.iibition to ap jly to operating, assisting in operating, or 
tricing r.aterirl fron the following machines:) 
1, haxhinery of stamping or pr-jach-pres*-; type used in the 
manufacture of paper or paper .:,-6ods, if the clearance 



9791 



-19 2-- ■ 

■bcti/ccn the ram snd th.c die or the stripper exceods one-fourth 
incli. ■■ . , . ■ 

2, Prner cutting nip.chines having a guillotine ruction. 

3, p-^per punches or line perfofhtors. 

4, Crcr.sers, slitters, or plrting rolles used in the manufacture 

of paper rno. paper products v/hich are not guardad.'.at the 
point of operation. 

5, In oiling, cleaning, or 'i/iping m-'^chincry or shafting in 

motion. 
G» Applying "belts to riulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

V^herc Printing is Done 

1. Pov/or-driven printing presses. 

2. Monotype or linotyiie machines. 

3. Emoossing machinery used in the printing industry, 

4. Glov/ing out type cases in printing shops. 

5. Cleaning linotype plungers in printing shops. 

6. Dry sv/eeping rnd clecning in printing shops. 

7. In melting operations, in I'rir.ting shops. 



ESIIBIT 105 
PEEFmiE, COSMETIC MD OTHi^R TOILER PREPAEATIOSiS INDUSTRY 

I. Occupations involving machine "'.a.zards 

1, In oiling, cleaning or wiping machinery or shafting in 

motion. 

2, In apolying "belts to pullv.;ys in motion or assisting therein. 

II. Occupr.tions involving general ha^^ards 

3, As driv\.rs of trucks or other motor vehicles or as helpers 

or delivery "boys on such vehicles. 

4, In, or assisting in, the operation of ga,s, oil, or steam 
• ■ engines used as prime movers, 

5, Firing of sterjn or water boilers (except boilers of not more 

thpXi 15 lbs. pressure used solely for heating purposes). 

6, In, the cu-tting or v/elding of metrls by gas 'or electricity. 

7, Hrndling of caustic rnd inflammable ra-^tcrials in'"b\ill<:. 

EXHIBIT 106 
PETROLEmi EqlJIPKENT IlTBUSTSy AflD TRADE 

I, Occupations involving general hazai'ds 

1. Firing of steam or V'O.t'. r boilers (except boilers of not 

more than 15 lbs. pressure used solely for heating pur- 
poses). 

2. As drivers, or assist'.nts to driv.^rs of motor vehicles or as 

helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicl>.,s. 



9791 



-193- 

3. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam 

engines or other prime. n)0'"'ers. 

4. In the care, oustody, operation or repair of elevators, cranes, 

derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in the operation 
of (l) d-oinhwaiters as defined "by the Anerican Standards 
Association, or (2) tlevaocrs equipped only for automatic 
operaticn, 

5. In the cutting or welding of metals "by gas or electricity. 

6. In or iii conni-t-tion vith ho t ' gal \rani z ing or tinning processes. 

7. All occupations in steel tiihe and cast iron, pipe manufacturing. 

8. In the m.xt treatment of metals. 

9. All Occivoa-tions in forging shops. ■ 

19. Manufact-i.Ting. transportation, or handling of explosives of 
highly iriflammable substances. 

In cases of foixndry work in the industry 

11. All Tvor^- in the fouridiy loroper. 

12. All cler.ning or -rvinding operations in foundries. 

13. All vor'- in foundrr.es Involving exposure to molten lead or 

any moicpn le-^d alloy or to dust of lee-d or cf any lead alloy. 

14. In n:alleahle foLuadries, operations involving handling of 

heated castinf^s, etc., in connection ^ith annealing work. 

II. Occupations involving specific mechanical hazards — Machine work. 
(Prohibition to ac-oly to ot>erati-ng assisting in operating, or 
taking material from the following machines. ) 

15. Grinding, abrasive, jDOlishlng or buffing wheels; provided 
that apr)ientices operating tjnder conditions of bona fide 
apprenticeship may grind their own tools. 

16. . Metal-cutting machines having a gu.illotine action, 

17. Metal plate bending '-machines handling material of more than 
0.2145 inch .in thickness. 

18. Power-d?'iven netal olaning machines. . ■,, 

19. CirculS'.t- saws u?^jd in the cr.tting of metals. 

20. Wire soicching machinery. 

21. Machine-.';./ havi.ng a heavy rolling or crushing action. 

22. Machinery used in the cold rolling of heavy metal stock. 

23. Boring mills. 

24. Por7er shears of all kinds. 

25. pianch presses or stamping machines if the clearance between 

the ram and the die or the striroer exceeds one-fourth inch. 

26. Operation of' wood-wor].;ing machinery or as off bearer. , 

27. Roller mixers, pug mills, or putty chasers. 

28. Wire dranin.g machines. 

. Exception: r/ork on fine sizes of wire commonly drawn 
through diancnd lies. 

Exception - Apnrentices - ■^mT)lcyment of any of the above-named 
ma,chines may be permitted in the case of minors .between 16 and 
' 18 years of age who are bonaf ide aTDr)rentices. 

'29. In oiling, cleaning, or '-i-oing machinery or shafting in 
motion. 

9791 



-194- 

■■1 •; V '1 ■ , ! , .- . . ^ , 

30. In applying belts to uullcys in motioa \bf, as ^i skiing therci 
,:■':. :if^::. ,':-ri'jir:rc.f'\':,r: -si :'^:/-. ^ ■■■ - ■ • . •- ,- ■ ''•-,•' 

Illi ■0cc&paMo-ni3Ti»yo:l,v4,>ng'- heel tij-. hazards ■ , . , .;' , • '. ■ 

31i .i.fc:act4?sQi-(a.c-ring-..'j^<3,rk* . •; , , •..,... ■ .. . ' ,' 

32. All v/ork involving exposure to acid... in connection vith '' 

. ,p-i;olvl-,i,t)rg-, of 'SlitjSft plate. . ;-■■■., 

32-t ,: Jllli-T.'ork-in ,SpPAy .Rai-nti-ng, ■ ' ■' 

24i['',-r;Xn ■allvprpceigses'.iyiiere. substances contrining lead or any.bf-"' 

its compounds are used, in -a liquid or pov/dorcd. form, . or -at- a 

temperature sufficient to vrporizc .lend. 
35w "*,:In. prts.OQSS'CS where quartz or , any other fom of silicon dioxid.e 

or an asbestos silicate is presj^nt in powdered forrn. '' ' ■'' 
36. 'Jerk involving exposxire to benzol or eny bmzol compound v.'hich 

in vola.tile^'OT v7hich;can pen-.etrnt,j: the skin. 

Apprentices shall be define,d as "those v/ho nrc regulprly indentured 
under contract, to' .the Industry, for a sufficient perioc. of time to be : 
systematically advrnced through tht various operations, shops, depart-" , 
ments, etc-,, -of a Tirade, Occupation or Industry, and v/ho receive' c'diica- 
tional tra.ining.'in an organized educatipn.al institution during a portion 
of their working •timCi n ■ ■ • 

• ■■' ■ • • . -gailBlT l(l7 ■ ' 

PHOTOGRAPHIC AlID KIOTO rilvTI SHI IJG INDUSTRY ' 

1. iny occuprtion v/hich requires the use of or exposure to the 
Chemical "Me-tol".. ' '' : . 



••■ ■ • EXHIBIT 108 

■■ ■ PlAHO LiAinjPAC TURING Il^USTEY 

I, Occupations involving general hazards , . ' , 

li Load soldering v/ork. 

3. All v/ork involving exposure to acid in connecting v;i th pick-_ 

ling of sh^^ct plate."-.' ■ 
3. Firing of stepjn or v/ater boilers (except boil.ers of not more 

than 15 pounds pressure ua^-d sol^-ly for heating purposes.) 
_4« As drivers or assistants to driv<. rs of motor vehicles or as 

helpers or delivery boys on motor .vehicles. 

5. In dr-'assisting in thc.opcr.ation of gas, oil, or steam 

engines or other prime movers. • ■• 

6. In the care, custocy, operation or repair of eliSvators ," -cranes, 

d;criidks, or other ''hbi sting dpp.'iratiis,- except in. the operation 
of (l) d-umbwaiters as defined by. the Amoripan Standr-rds Asso- 
ciati-en, or (2) of clevrtors equipped gnly for a,utoran,tic 
operation-,' .-• - .^ .. ,' ' ,,'..'.,, ;^\ -:''■ '^^ ■?-?■- ■ 

7. In the cutting .or;V;clding .of metals by ".gaB.',or 'el.o'cltf icit^_. '^ 

8. In or in connection v/ith hot g.--Jvanizing or tinning' processes. 



9791 



-1S5- 

Wotc; Som^- foundry wor : will bo found in thu industry; in 
such cp.scs the follov/iii/^- prohibitions r.pply: 

In mpJlc.^lc foundries;, opcrr.tions involvin/^ hr^,ndling of 
h-.r.tcd cr.stmjs, t-tc. ,. in connection v/ith frnhcrling work. 

Moulding v.'ork, core , asking or other processes vhcrc such 
T/ork cxposf "^ the v;o?'kc-r cither directly or indir^^ctly to 
the hr.zn.rds ox molted irii^tal or to lor.d or zinc f-umos or which 
involves th^. silicosir^ iir.zr^rd. 

All clurning or j-Tinding ooorpoions. 

All v.'ork which invo?.ves th^ hr,noling of met'^llic lead. 

II. Occupations involvi?ig specific mechanical hazards- -machine work 
(prohibition to apply to operating, a.ssisting in operating, or 
talcing uatorial frou tlii^ following machines) 

9. Grinding, rbrrsivc, polishing or buffing wheels; providc.d 
that -px^renticos operating ujider conditions and bona fide 
r.pprcnticoship mry grind their orm tools. 

10. 'lictal- cut ting -T/^'^hincS' having a g-uillotine rction. 

11. lictal platc: b. nding machines handling matcrirl of more than 

0. 214o" ■ in thi ckncsi: . 
12.. Po'./cr- driven niwtrl planing machines. 

13. Circulai Scav;g used in the cutting of metals. 

14. V'ire drawing machines, except work on fine sizes of wire 

comi'.ionly cravm through Diamond dies. 

15. Machinery ha,ving a, her'yy rolling or cru.shing action, such as 

corruga.ting rolls. 

16. Power shca,rs of rll kinds. 

17. All v/ork on saws. 

18. Punch presses or strmoing machines if the clearance between 

the rnm ajid div^ or the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch. 

19. All occupations in connection v/ith pov/er- driven woodv/orking 

machinery. 
ISr^ Machineiy useu in tlu, cold rolling of heavy metal stock. 
19b, Boriiig mills. 

Sxccption; Apprentices: 3nploy;-nent on my of the abbvc-npjned 
machines nay be pemuttcd in tho case of minors between 16 
Tjid 18 years of pf^.. under conditions of bona fide rpprcntice- 
ship to p. tr;idc. 

20. In oiling, cleaning or wiping mpchinery in motion. 

21. In applying bolts to a pulle.y in motion or assisting therein, 

III, Occupations involving health haz-\rd3 

22. In occxupations involving exposur.. to bone or composition dust. 

23. '.Tork involving exp'Osure, to Ciiromic r.cids, chromates or bichr^aates. 

24. All uork in sioray -oaintihg. 

25. '.7ork involving e:-:posurc to ccrrosivo substances. 

26. _ ".^ork involving exposure to nitro or rrnido derivatives of benzol 

or oth^r derivatives of b^.n^ol, 

27. In ail processes where substances containing lead 'or its com- 

pounds are used. 

9791 



: . -196- 

28. In .-roccSTcs vflierc qu-^rtz or oth>;.r mr.tcrirls producing a 
silicosis hr-zprc. r.,rc. ■pi'csent. ■ 

Apprentices shp.ll be dofinGd as "those '-/lio r.re rc:,\ilprly 
in'dcntured r.nder contract to the industry, for n 
Gii.fficicnt period of time to be systcinr.ticrlly ad.vr,nccd 
throUs;;-:h the vrrious operations, shops, departments, etc. ,■ 
of a trade, occupation or industry, -?nd v/ho receive cd.uc<a- 
tionpl training m rn orgpnizcd educational institution 
during p. portion of their v;orl:ing time. " 



EXHIBIT 109 
PICTUBE luOULLIilG AlvHD PICTURE PRAi.IE INDUSTRY 

;. Occupations ir.volvinfj 7;enc ral hazards 

1. Firing of sterm or v/ater boilers (except boilers of not more 

thcM 15 lbs. pressxire used, solely for heating purposes). 

2. As drivers or assistrnts to drivers of motor vehicles or as 

helpers or eeliver;/ Doys on motor vehicles. 

3. In, or assisting in, the operation of grs, oil, or sterm- 

cngiiiGG or other prime movers. 

4. In the care, custody,- operrtion or repaid of elevators, crp.nes, 

derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in the operation 
of (l) dumbv/aiters, as defined by the American Standards 
As!!ociation, or of (2) elevators equipped only for automatic 
operation. 

II. Occupations involving spcciiic mechpnical hazards — machine work- 

(Pi-ohibition to apply to opera.ting, assisting in operating, or 
taking- material from the following machines. ) 

5.' All occti.pp.tions in connection with power-driven ToodTcrfclng 
machinery. 

6. In oiling, cle?ning or wiping machinery in motion. 

7. In a.jplying belts to a pulley in notior or c^ssisting therein, 

III. Occu.oations involving henlth hazards 

8. All I'ork in spr?^y printing. ' ■ ■' 

9. In all -nrocess^s v-hcre suostpnces containing lead or its 

compotuads pre used.. 

10. In processes where qu.artz or other raateri.'-.ls producing a 
. silicosis hazard, pre present. 

11. "..'oi-1: involvin_ -czcpostire to b'..nzol. ■ "' 

■ • EXHIjilT 110 , '■ • ■ 



,' PIPE NIPPLE iuAl'lUFACTURING IlIDUSTHY 

Occupations involving general hazards 

1. Drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or as 
helpers or dtelivery boys on motor vehicles. 

9791 



-197- 

2- In or ass;istii\'; i;^ the operation of jip.r,, oil, or steam en- 
;;ines or othei- 'oi-imc rjovcrs. 

3. In the crrc, custoQ'', oyei-ation or rcpfir of elevators, crrncs, 
derrichs, or other hoistiiv; ap )aratv.s, except in the opera- 
tion of (l) ("jmbvaiter?? as v!lefincd hy the American Standards 
Association, or (.3) elevators equipped only for antornatic 
operation. 

6. In oilin:,, cleaning, or v/iping Machinery in motion, 

7. In :a;;j)lyin-j. belts .to pulleys in raotion or assir^ uin/^; therein. 

II. Occu-pations involvin.j specific raechanicpl haZc?.rds — machine work 
(prohihitxcn to.rpnly to operating, assisting in operating, or 
ta]cin;; raateriel from the folloi;ini; machines) : 

1. i'.ioi''idin~ \7ork, core raalcing, or other processes in foundries 

v/here su.ch v/erk exposes the Korker either directly or in- 
directly to the hazards of nelted metpj, or to le-^d or 
Kinc f"LU,.<js, or which involves a silicosis hazard. 

2. All cle-'iing or ■.jrindin;; operations. 

3. All work I'/hich, involves the handling of metallic lead, in 

f ov^iicries. 

4. A.11 mallcaule^ foundries, operations involvin,;; hrndling of 

heated castings, etc. , in connection v.-ith annealing vjork. 

5. Grinding, atrasive, jjolishing, or buffing v/heels; provided , 

apprentices operpting "LQider conditions of bona fide appren- 
ticeship may grind their cm tools. 

6. lietai- cutting m.^ chines laving a guillo'^ine . action. 

7. Machinery used in the colo. rolling of heavy metal stock. 

8. Uetal plate bending machines handling material of more than 

0,214.3 inch in thickness. 

9. Pov.-er-driven metal ilaning machines. 

10. Circular saws used in the cutting of metals. 

11. 3or:'.ng lidlls. 

12. Power shears of ,?.ll Mnds. 

13. Punch premises or stamping machines if the clearance between 

the ran nud the die or the stripper exceeds one— fourth inch, 

14. In t2ie cutting or welding of metals by ga,s or electricity. 

15. In 01 in connection with hot galvanizing or tinning pro- 

cesses. 



5791 



-198- 

ZXHIBri 111 
PIPE OHGM IHDUSTRY 

I. Occupations involving general hazards 

1. In nonferrous foundries , all v.'ork in the foiuidry proper. 

2. All cleaning or grinding operations in foundries. 

5. All Y>;orh in foxindries involving exroosure to molten lead or -^jiy 

molten lead alloy, or to dust of lead or of oxiy lead alloy. 
4. As drivers, or assistaiits to drivers of motor vehicles or r.s 
heli^ers or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

3. In, or assisting in, the OTjer;tion of gas, oil, or steajii 

engines or other -irime movers. 

6. In the care, custocly, opei'ation or repair of elevators, crpjnes, 

derricks, or ooher hoisting aTT.ratus , except in the o"oeration 
of (l) dumhv/aiters as defined Isy the Arnericsji Stfiidards 
Association, or (2) of elevators equi;o-)ed only for a,utomatic 
operation. 

7. Firing of steam or water boilers (exce^^t boilers of not more 

thon IC' -pounds -oressure used solely for heating purooses) . 

8. In the cutting or weldiiig of metals by gas or electricity. 

9. In, or in connection v.'ith, hot galvanizing or tinning -.processes. 

10. In, or in connection \7ith, all "irocesses in the manufacture of 

iTibber goods. 

II, Occupations involving specific mechanical hazards — machine v/oi-lc 

11 . Grindin,;_-, abrasive, --olishing, or buffing vheels; -provided that 

r.-—irentices O'lera.ting under conditions of bona fide apprentice- 
ship may grind their own tools. 

12. i.'etal -cut ting ma'chines having a gTiillotine action. 

13. hachinerj'- used in the cold rolling of heavy metal stock. 

14. Ketal plate "bending machines handling me;,terial of more thaji . 

0.2145 inch in thiclaiess. 

15. Pov/er-driven metal -ilaning machines. 

IS. Circular sav/s used in the cutting of metals. 

17. Boring mills. 

13. Pov/er shears of all kinds. 

IS. Punch presses or stai:ning machines if the clearajice betv/een the 

raj.i and the die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch. 

20. "i/ire stitching machinery. 

31. r.achinery having a heavjr rolling or crushing action. 

22. ;;olding, splitting, rolling, loerf orating, stamping, dieing-out 

embossing, burnis'ning, clicking, skiving, stri'iping or buffing 
machines used in the leather industrj/. 

23. All occupationii carried on in connection with T;^or;er-driven v/ooc- 

w rki ng machi n e ry . 

Exception ; Ap'orentices: Employment on anj;- of the above-named 
machines may be "oermitted in the case of minors between 16 -nd 
18 years of age who are bona fide apprentices, 

24. In oiling, cleaning or wiping machinery or shafting in motion. 

25. In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein, 

9791 



o 



-1S9-- 
III. Occupations involving- 'liealtli liar^nrcls 

25. Lead soldering v/ork. 

27. All v;ork invol "in" eroosure to r.cic' in connection v/ith --dcliing 

01 slieat pla-e. 

28. V.'orlr involvirg ex-oosare to liemol or any iDeuzol cora-iound which. 

is vcl.-.t-iln or which c:\n Tenctrr.te the shin. 

29. In the use oi" dan.gei-o-us dyestuffs. 
30.' All work in spray painting, 

1. In all processes vmere snTDstcnccs containing lead or any. of its 
corapcimds rre usee in a l-icfuid or -^ov/dered form,, or at a 
tem-.Terati.ire a^-.ifi cient to V£';oorize le.ad. 
32. In -oroces'.>es vnjre our.rt:: or any other form of silicon dioxide 
or ,nji ar^oe-tos silicate is -oresent in r>ov/dered form. . 
3. TiYork involving ejroor^ure to ohromic acids, chromates or • 
hichrorn;i,tes, 
34. Uorh irv'olving excessive ex':i0sure to corrosive substances. 

Apprentices shall he defined as ''those v;ho are regularly in- 
dentured tuider contrrct to the industry, for a sufficient 
period of time to he systematically advanced through the 
V£iricu3 o'ierations, sho-s, departments, etc., of a trade, 
occupation or industry, and who receive eciuco.tional training 
in an organized educational institution during a -oortion of 
their working ti^;e." 



SXHIhIT li: 



o 



PLlTtBIhC- FlhTITLES IITDUSTRY 
I. Occupations involvin;~ general hazards 

1. In f oiuidries (ferrous .■^nd nonferrous), all v/ork in the foundry 

proper e 

2. All cleaning or griiicTing operations in foundries. 

3. All work inf-oundries involving e:roosure to molten lead, or any 

molten lead alloy or to dust of lead or of any lead alloy, 

4. In malleable foundries, o-oerations involving; handling of heated 

castings,- etc. , in connection v/ith annealing work. 

5. In the cutting or welding of metals oy gas or electricity. 

5. In, or in connection v;ith, hot galvrnizing or tinning -orocesses, 

7. As drivers or assistants to driV'-^-rs of motor vehicles, or as 

helpers or deliver;/ hoys on motor vehicles. 

8. In, or assisting in, the O'leration of gas, oil or steam engines 

or other prime movers. 

9. In the Care, custody, operation or re;:tair of eleva.tors, croiies, 

derricks, or other hoisoing apparatus, except in the operation 
of (l) dumbwaiters as defined hy the Ainerican Stojid-rds Asso- 
ciation, or, (2) of eleva.tors eouipped only for automatic 
opera.tion. 
10. Firing of stecjn or v;ater boilers (except boilers of not more 
than 15 pounds pressure used solely for heating purposes). 



9791 



" -200- 

II. Occupations involving s-^ecific rneclinnic?,! hazards — machine work 

(prohibition to apply to operating, n.ssisting in o;oerr.tin-3, or 
talcing material from the follov/in^; machines) 

11. Grinding, abrasive, polishing or buffing wheels; orovidec. that 

ap^'irentices operating under conditions of bona fide a"Torentice- 
ship may grind their own tools. 

13. uetal-cutting machines having a gu.illotine action. 

13. hachinery used in the cold rolling of heavy metal stock. 

14. Metal -ilate bending ma,chines haiidling material of more than 

0.2145 inch in thiclaiess. 

15. Pov;er-driven metal iilaning machii.es, 

15. Circular saws used in the cutting of metals. 

17, ■ Boring mills, 

IS. Power shears of all kinds, 

19. Punch nresses or staxrping machines if the clearance between the 

ram and. the die or the stripiier e::ceeds one-fourth inch. 

20, Ilachinery having a hea.vy rolling or crushing action, 

.21, Poller mixers, pi\g mills, dry pans, putty chasers, forming proc- 
esses or other molding machinery of the pressure type. l^ 

22, "iTliere wood is used, all occupations carried on in connection 

with '-oov/er driven woodv/orking machinery. 

Exce'otion ; Ar-iprentices; Hmoloyment on anj- of the above-n?med. 
maCxiines m?y be loermitted in the case of minors betv/een 16 rjid 
18 years of age who are bona fide ap^irentices. 

23, In oiling, cleaning or v;i-->ing machinery/ or shf fting in motion. 

24. In ariplying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein, 

III. Occupations involving health hazards 

25. All v^ork in spray painting, 

26, In all "orocesses where substances containing lead or any of its 

compounds are used in a liquid or pov'dered form, or at a ter.T^er- 
atiire sufficient to vaporize lead, 

27. In processes where quartz or any other form of silicon dioxide or U' 

ail asbestos silicate is loresent in pov.dered form. 

28. T/ork involving e:r~os\ire to benzol or gnj- benzol compound which is 

'volf'tile or v.'hich caJi penetr'^-te the skin. 

29, '.Tork involving excessive e:cnosure to corrosive substances. 

Apprentices shall be defined as "those who are regularly in- 
dentured under contract to the inc'ustry, for a sufficient 
period of 'time to be systematically advanced through the 
various oi^erations, shops, departments, etc., of a trade, 
occuoation or industry, and who received' educational training 
in an orgejii'zed educational institution during, a portion of 
their working time," 



9791 



-201- 

rx-:i3i T 113 

POP.CELAI'i E?J]AIC?AS"? FUmTUPi: ASSEiBLIlTG IITDUSTEY 

I. Occu-^r.ticns Involvin^j General Hasp.rcls 

1. As drivers or assistants ';o ('.rivers of -motor vehicles or as 

heljero or c'-'?jivery "Loy^ oil notor vehiclbs, 

2. In, o..- a^'sistia-; in, '•-}^e op'^rotion of gas, oil, or steam engines 

or othe-'- ■oriTi'^ movers, 

3. In the care, ca.5tod5", orierauion or repair of elevators, craiies, 

derritlco; or other hoisting a^^^jaratus, except in the operation 
01 (1) d-Qiibrail ers as defined "by tae Aiiierican Standards Asso- 
ciation; or {'?■) of elevators equipned onlj- for automatic 
operation. 

4. Firing of stcpxu or v-ater "boilers (exce"7.t boilers of not more 

turn 15 Ihs- .'resen.ra ut^el solely for heating pur;-)0ses). 

II. OccupFtions Involving S-iecific f.iechanical Hazards — Machine iTork. 
(prohioition to apply to operating, assisting in operating, or talcing 
material from the follov;ing macnines.) 

5. All occir^ations carried on in connection with povver-driven v/ood- 

v/orhing mo-ciiinerj;- >, 

III. Occupations Involving Health Hazards. 

S. All work in spray painting. 

7. Work involving ejvDocure to henzol or my henzol compound v/hich 
is volatile or whicn can of-netrate the skin. 

EXHiri^ 114 



PCJDZR -TfiTF i:tust:ry 

I. Occupations involving general hazards 

1. Firing -of stepra or vrater ooilers (except "boilers of not more 

thpjn 15 pour.ds pressure lued solely for heating 'purposes) . 

2. ■ As drivers or assistants to driver": of motor vehicles or as 

helpers or dslivei-y "i-oys on motor vehicles. 

3. In, or assisting in, the operation of g-'S, oil, or steam engines 

or other prime movers. 

4. In the care, custociy, OTjeration -or re-nair of elevators, cranes, 

derricks, or other hoisting a^'^paratus, exce-ot in the operation 
of (l) riumhwcaters as defined h" the American Standards Asso- 
ciation, or (.2) of elevators equiprieci only for automatic 
operation. 

II. Occup'tions involving specific raechanical hazards — machine work (pro- 

hibition to apply to operating, assi'^ting in operating, or talcing 
material from the follovang machines) 

5. Linking or dieing-out m3.chines, 

6. In oiling, clesjiing, or v/iping ma.chiner;- in notion. 

7. In ap"olying "belts to a, -pulley in motion or assisting therein. 
9791 ^' . . 



-202-- 

EXHIBI'::' 115 
precious jE'vx?:: t'^iCduciitc iraiisTHY 

I. Occup;'.tions involvin,j ;;^ener,^l hazp.rds 

1. As dvivf rs or pocistpnts uO drivers of motor vehicles or as 
help3is or d'elivsiy 'boyc on motor vehicles. 

<2. In, or psr.istin;i in', the opsrr.tion of gas, oil or steaja engines 
or o'^her priire mo-^ers. 

3. In the earn, cv(.3tod;;-j operation or reT)air of elevators, cranes, 
dprri^irs, or other hoisting appa.ratus , except in the operaoion 
of (l; dinifo'u'aiter^ a^ defined "by the American Standards Asso- 
ciation, or (3) 01 elevators equip^Tec' only for a.iitonatic. 
operation. 
Firing of steaju or v/rter boilers (e;.ce'Mt hollers of not aore 'th.an 
13 porjids pressure used solely for heating pui-poses). 

5. In the currin;j or v/eldtn'j or metals by gas or electricity. 

In, or in conneccion with, hot galvanizing or tinning processes. ■ 



A 



o 



II. Occuprtions i;ivolving s-iecific mechanical hazards — machine work (pro- 

hioition to noply to o-oera,ting, assisting in operating, or tailing 
nrtcrial froni the following machi-es) 

7. Grinding, abrasive, polishing, or buffing wheels; provided that 

learners or apprentices o^ erating under conditions of bona, 
fide r:p,prenticeship may grind their own tools. 

8. hetal-ci'tting niachi-'.es having a guillotine acti;^n. ■ • 

9. Macninery xised i-.i cole rolli:ig of heavy raetal stock. ■ • 

10. lietal -oiate bending i-nachlnes handling material of more than 

0,214b inch in thiclciesSi 

11. Pov/er-diiven me tal-T- leaving ma.chires. 

12. Circular aa.wj used in tl:e cutting of metals. 

13. Bering mills, 

14. Po-.Ter sh'^c.rs of all hinds, 

15. Punch -iresses or stamping machiiies if the clearance between the 

ram anc" the die or the stri]TTer exceeds one-fourth inch. 

16. '.Viro stitching .nach'j;.ci"5'. 

17. LlrCidner]/- having a lieavy rolling or crushing action. 

18. li'i oiling, cltjpning or v^ipin, machirer;','' or Siia.fting in motion. 

19. In .applying belts to i^Jleys in mocion or assisting therein. ' 

III. Occuprtions involving health hazards 

20. All vrork in spray painting. 

21. In all ■pi'ocesses where stibstaiices containing lead or any of its 

compounds are used in a liquid or pov/dered form or at a temper- 
ature sufficient to vaporize lead. 

22. In processes vmere raiartz or any other form of 'silicon dio::ide 

or fui asbestos silic-'te is in-esent in powdered form. 

23. Work involving e;.poci\re to benzol or any benzol compoiuid v;hich ■ *' 

is volatile or which caii penetrate the skin. 

24. In the use of d-^jigerous dye-stuffs. 

25. w'orh invol^/ing e^cposure to chromic acics, chromates, or bi- 

chromates, 

26,- Tifork involving excessive exposure to corrosive substances. 
27. '■.'ork involving e:-rposure to nitric, L:[uriatic or sulphuric acids. 
9791 



"203- ■• 

LXHI3 I? 116 
PPZSEP.VE, M.3J:J.SCHI:T0 CEEJi'.Y AIID GLACE PRUI? IITDUSTRY 

I. Occupi^tio^•s iiivolvin,-._; geneirl hazai-ds 

1. As drivers of taicks or otl;:er motor vehicles or as helpers or 

doliver;'^ "ooj-s en such vehicles: 
2.. In the cperatic.i, custody, or repair of elevrtors, crpjies, 

. d;}rrlc''.zb , or :)ther hoistinr; a'oparatus, except in the operation 

of (l) dii-mortlters as defined by the American Standards Asso- 
••ciatii'n. or (i) elevators equipped onlj'- for a,utomrtic 
oi-)eration. 

3. In, or aSfist.Li:-; in, the operation of ^as , oil, or steam engines 

.used f,s Torii-ie movers, 

4. Firing of ste^uri or vo.ter hollers (e:.cept hoilers of not more than 

15 povjids -oretsure used solel;- for heating pui-poses), 

II. Occiipations involving machine hazards 

5. All v/crk on coohers, 

5. In oili-.t;, cl-.^iiing, or wiping raachi/.eiy or shafting in motion, 
7. In applying helts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein, 

I]]G:I?IT 117 
PPJ1JT-R0LL3?. AlaD PF.IrT BLOCK HAITUPACTURINC- IlIDUSTPY 

I. Occupations involving genero.l hazards. 

1. In the cutting or weilding cf rietals hy gas or electricity, 

2. As drivers or assisttxnts to drivers of motor vehicles or as 

helpers or delivery hoys on motor vehicles. 

3. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam engines 

or other prim.e movers. 

4. In the care, custo-Jy. operrticn or repair of elevators, cranes, 

derricks, or othsr hoisting a'opo.ratus, except in the operation 
of (l) dvxiibvr alters as defined "by the American Standards Asso- 
ciation, or (2) elevators equipped only for o,utom.-.tic operation, 

5. Firing of oteam or ^;rter hollers fe"-cept hoilers of not more than 

15 po-Luads pressure used solely ior neating purposes). 

II. Occupations involving siTecific mechanical' hazards—machine v/orh. 

(Prohihition to aoply to 0"-:-rating, assisting' in operating, or 
taking material from the follovang machines.) 

5. Grii-ding, ahrasive, polishing or huffing wheels; provided that 

apprentices operatin.r; under conditions of hona fide ap'Trentice- 
ship ne;y grind their OT/n tools. 

7. ivietal -cut ting mac"hi:.es having a guillotine action. 

8. TTire stitching ma^chinerj't.- / ' 

9. I.iachiner;'- having a neavj- rolling or crushing action. 
10. power shears of all kinds. 



9791 



~204f 

11. Punch ;oresses or stpin-iing mr.clii/.es if the clearance oetween the 

rsm and the die or the st'i-ip-)er exceeds one-foxirth inch. 

12. Opero.tinr; of pov/er-drive-i v;ood-v.'orki„g uachinery or as off- 

hearer. 

Exce-r?t '.on; Apv)rentices: E.-nlo^Tiient on any of the ahove-named 
mfchi.-.es mrj he -;^ emit ted in the cases of minors hetween 15. . 
pnd 13 ye-^rs of age v/ho are hona fide p:o irentices. 

13. In oiling, cleanin^^:, or win in:; raachi.iery or shaft in;;; in motion. 
1-1-. In a^plyin^- belts to ;-iV:.lleys in motion or assisting therein. 

Apprentices shall -^e defined as "those v.'ho are regularly in- 
dent-L.red under contract to the industry,-, for a sr^fficient 
"lerioc' of time to oe syst erratically advanced througlri the 
various oper\tions, shops ^ de'-'artments , etc., of a trade, 
occunation or Indus ti-y, and who receive educational trainiiig 
in an orga-niz^d ediicational institution during a portion of 
their v/orking tiiue.'' 



ac-iiriT lie 

PEi;'"::'iha zqijipiiirs i:dusthy juid trade 

I. Occupations Involving G-eneral Haza.rds. 

1. Eiring of steam or w- ter 'boilers (e:;ce--t hoilers of not more than 
13 poiUids oressure used solely for heating purposes) . 

3. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles, or as 
helpers or delivery hc/s on motor vehicles. 

3. In, or t.ssi sting, in t'le operation of gas, oil, or steajn engines 

or other prim? m.overs. 

4. In the ca,re, custod^-, operation or re-oair.of elevators, cr:>ji©s, 

derrirhs, or other noi sting apparatus, except in the operat>ion 
of (l) drjnb'.:aiters a.s defined hy the Aiiierica:.^ Standards Asso- 
ciation, or {?,) of elevators equipped only for atitomatic 
operation. 

5. In. ferrous and nonfu-rous foiuidries, a.ll work in the foundry 

proper, 
5. All cleaning or ^rinding operations in foundries. 

7. All vvork in foundries involving e:rposure to molten lead or any 

molten lead alloy or to dust of lea,d or of any lead alloy, 

8. In malleable foundries, operations involving handling of heated 

Castings, etc., in connection with ainiealing work. 
3. In the cutting or v.'pldin^ of metails by gas or electricity. 
19. In or in connection with hot galvanizing or tinning orocesses. 

II. Occupations Involving S".ecific liechanical Hazards — luachine V/ork. 

(Prohibition to a?pply to opera.ting, assisting in operating, or 
taking material from the following machines). 

11. Grinding, abrasive, polishing, or bijffing wheels. 

12. Hetal -cutting machines having o, guillotine action. 

13. i'achincry used in the cold-rolling of heavy metal stock. 



9791 



-205- 

!<:. Ketnl -~^late -oendin;; machines handling material of more thaii • 
. 21<:5 i ncl: i n tl :i claie g s . 

15. po'"er-driven metal planiuf- mfCliines. 

16. Circular Pav/s imed in the cutting of metals, 

17. Boring nulls- 

18. Pov.e.o s'-i.-^ars ox" all id.ndCc 

19. T^JU'uli T^rerce- or stanniiij m,achineT if the clearpnce betv;een the 

iL->vi .-id th'.; lie or the rtrippf-r e::ceeds one-fourth inch, 

20. Machinery havin^.; a haavy roxlin;"_ or crus/iinf; action. 

21. All oC(.a-'_io.tions carried on in coniection v/ith power— r'.riven 

\vood'"'orl:in-'; ■a-achmer;'',- 
21a,. VJiro-sti uChini}; nachinery- 

22. In oilirg, clea^iin:^ or wiping; .na^chinerj- or shafting in motion. 

23. In applying "jelos to pulleys in motion or assisting therein, 

III. Occu-:!aiions Involving Health Hazards. 

24-. All work in spray paintivig. 

25. In all processes where substfinces containing lead or any of its 

compoujiids are .used in a Ixouid or powdered form, or o,t a temper- 
ature sviffirient to valorize lead. 

26. Lead soldering worh,- 

27. V'orlc involvin; exno svre to beiizol or any benzol compound v/hich 

is volabilc or wliich caja penetrate the skin. 

28. All work involving exjosure to acid in connection v/ith sickling 

of sheet -ilate. 

29. ;,'ork involving eroosure to chromic acids, chromates. or bi- 

chrorao.tes, 

30. Uork involving excessive ejr:iosure to corrosive substances. 



s:h:i?it ii? 



.pei:?iii:g ii:i: :.^\:x5^Acru:.i-'c; ii'dustey 

I. Occr.pa.tions involving s-oecific .lechanical hazards ma.chine work. 

(Prohibition to apply to operrting or assisting in operating the 
follov.'ing machines.) 

1. Grind' ing or mixing machinery having r heavy rolling or crushing 

action, except laboro,tor;.- equipment, 

2. In orliiig, cleaning, or \7iping machiner:/- or shafting in motion, 
5. In a;')plying belts to -iu.lleys in motion or assisting therein, 

II. Occupptions involving health haza,rds 

1. ffor): involving,, exposure to the follov/ing ingrdients except in 
the labora.tor;,'-, 

leo,d mercury 

chroLiium arsenic 

Phenol -DaaTJiitrajiilin 



9791 



-206- 

III. Occupations involving' ^'enoral lirizards 

1. Handling- of hi^ lil;- irflpntar.ole substances in 'bullc. 

2. As drivers of trucks or ot.Ler uiotor veidcle or as helpers. on 

such veniclfis, except eri-and aaid like delivery boys. 

3. IHj cr ;";sistin;; in, the ope;.-c'.tion of {irs, oil, or stepjn engines 

Uoi.d r.i ' ri: .(■ :. :ov^rs. 

<!:. Piriu£- of ste^a,: or vrr ter boilers (er.ce-Tt boilers of not more than 
15 poxmds pressure used sclel?/ for heating pur^'oses). 

5. In the rperation, custody, cr r?"pair of elev:,tors, cranes, 

derri-'^ks, or o^her hoisting a.T.irratus, except in the o-^eration 
of (l^ dumbrrai ters as defined by the /vrnerican Standards Asso- 
ciation, or (3) elevators equipped only for automatic operation, 



SXMII.IT 1^0 



ZJ^;i PEAllJT i.:iLLIhG IITDUSTHY 

I. Occupations involving general hazards 

1. 7iring of stea/i. or v^ater boilers (except boilers of not more 

than 15 -'^ounds ^jressure used solely for heating 'purposes), 

2. As drivers or assistartts ud drivers of motor vehicles or a.s 

helpers or delivery bo^/s en motor vehicles, 

3. In or assisting in ui:e operation of gas, oil, or steam engines 

or other -'rime movers,, 

4. In the care, custody, o-)er,.tion, or re-Dair of elevators, craaies, 

derricks, or other noisting apparatus, except in the operation 
of (a) dvumb'..'ai ters a/s defined by the /imerican Standards. Asso- 
ciation, or (b) elevators ecuipped only for autona.tic 
operaci jn. 

II. Occupations involving s^iecific mecba^iical uazards — machine work. 

(Prohibition to aroply to operating, assisting in opera.ting, or 
talcing material from, the follo./ing machlMes.) 

5. i.'achines for -orescing oil. 
S, Grin'^ing machiues. 

7. In oiling, cleaning or v:i-iing ma.chlnery or sha.fting in motion. 

8, In applying belts to a -lulley in motion or assisting therein. 



9791 



-207- 

Era FI T 121 

RS^Y-l.iADE ?UEi^-ITUEE SLIP COVERS I'-'AiTOFACTURIivIO INDUSTRY 



A 



In tlie operation, cu-^tody, or repair of elevators, cranes, 

dorricl-.s^ Ox' ■5'-,lier ho J s tin:; app?.ri,tus, except in the opera- 

tioi-' of '1) cia-nwaite-s as rlefinel by the American Standards 

AGpcc:..r t-i.cn, or (2) cle/ators equipped only for automatic 

opctatno-'ic 

ririn.-; ox stean or rater 'bcilers (except biolcrs of not 

more thai 15 Ihs. pressure usca solely for heating purposes.) 

As ci rivers of uiotor trucks or other vehicles. 

In, or sTsistinf^ in. the operation of gas, oil, or stcani 
engines u^ed as prime movers. 



In oiling, cleaJiing, or repairing machinery or shafting in _ 
mo X ion, 
6. In applying "belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 



Ex: :iriT is2 

3EiJ)Y-hi::i^D OOhCSETE Il^USTRY 

1. Work of drivers and assistant drivers of motor drawn 
vehicles- 

2, Work on all mixing, screening, conveying, and material- 
handling equipment in operation, 

5. Occupation on any work at nil elevation of more than ten 
(10) feet ahove grac'c. 

4, Work in conuection «ilh the maintenaiicc of power equipment. 

5, All stevedoring v/ork, and clean up on barges, cars, et 
cetera; under clajn- shells or other similar loading equipment. 

S, Svdtching and worh" on or about rrilroad equipment. 

7. Occupations connected with the generation of electrical 
energy and the outside erection, maintenance, or repair 
cf electric ¥/ires. 

8. THork in connection wi tn inside installation, maintenance 
or removal of electric wires, and equipment at live volt- 
age, or more tiia.n fifty (50) volts; work on dead lines to 
be permitted only vhen means are provided (as by locking 
switches open) to insure that lines remain electrically 
dead. 

9. Work in connection with the operation of electrical utiliza- 
tion equipment or appliances at any voltage higher than 250 
volts. 



9791 



-208- 

BXFIIPI T 135 
EEji ESTATE BHOKSSAaS liffiUSTRY 



1. As drivers or assirvtants to drivers of motor vehicles 
or as j-ielpers or d-;]i/ciy Tno^'s on motor vehicles. 

2, In or fi.ss.ist.'r;^ in -he oper-,\,ion of gas, oil, or steafli 
en.-pnep or o cher prime mo\'ers, 

3. In the care^ curjtody, opeiation, or repair of elevators, 
ci-gnes, d3rrii''''c,^p or other hoistin;"; apparatus, except 

i n th 3 op 8 r a r. l o n o ± 

(1) dtijal v:ait;-;-s as defined by the Ajnericnjri Stajidards 
ArM-._iatioa or 

(2) elev^>, tors enuipped only for automatic operation, 

4, rirlngof st^-.p. or water "boilers (except hollers of not 
more than 15 ILs. pressure used solely for heating pur- 
poses). 



DXEILIT 124 



HLTAIL .iOhlT-SlIT Il-iDUSTHY 

1. Shapin-^ of caroorundum wheels. 

2. Operation of cai-ho:/imdiam wheels, 

3. In the operation of lathes. 

4. In all other stone cutting or polishing 

5. In oiling, cleaning, or wiping machinery in motion, 

S. In applying holts to a pulley in motion or assisting therein, 

V. All work in connection \7ith tne use of power operated me- 
chanical equipment for loari.lngj unloading, hajidling and 
conveying,, 

8, All wo.c-k involvin;: the lifting or hai^'Hing of weights in 
excess of 80 ihs, "by Iaa.nd.i 

9, If '•'aste material is utilized, in operating or assisting 
to opera.te curshing mo.chines. 

10. Sand blasting operations. 



9791 



-209- 

i^Ci: AlID SLA-J '1)01 IviAlIUPACrURIHG limUSTRY 
I, Occuor.tions Involvin.';; G-eneral TIar.prri-s: 

1. Firing:, oner^.tin;; or -xtteudinr cupolas for 'olovdng 
ro clc or si a.^^ v;o ol . 

Drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vcldcles. 



■Ci 



A 



Care, custody, operr'tion or reo.i.ir of elevators, cranes, 
derrid-rs, or lioistinc e.pparatu.s, except in the operation 
of (1) du.il-iv/aitors as defii.ed iDy the j^jnerican Stanc'i^irds 
Associatioji, or of (2) elevators equipped only for au- 
tomatic operation. 

In or assisting-- in the operation of gas, oil, or stcan 
engines or other prime movers. 

Firing; of sterra or nater boilers (excejjt of not ipore 
thaii 15 iQs, pressure used solely for heating purposes). 



II. Occupations Involvin-i; G-eneral Fazcards in wiachine T/ork 

(Prohiliition to apply to operating, _ assisting in 
operation or taiving material from these machines.) 

5, Machinery having a heavj^ crushing or rolling action, 

(L'acliine -iTork operating or attending wool granulators.) 



EXHIBIT 1^6 



SOLLING STE3L DOOH !';Al.TfFACTUr;II.IG IlIBUSTEY 



Occuprtions Involving General Hazards 

1, Firing of ste.'CT or water toilers (except "boilers of 
not more than 15 lbs, pressure, u.sed solely for heat- 
ing purposes. ) 

2, As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles, 
or as helpers or delivery to^/s on motor vehicles. 

3. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or steai'n 
engines or other prime movers, 

4. In the care, custody, operation, or repair of elevators, 
cranes, dcrricl:s, or other hoisting apparatus, e?;cept 
in the OTjera,tion of (l) dumbv/r.iters as defined by the 
Americg,'"'. Stanfords Association, or (2) elevators equip- 
ped only for automatic operation, 

4a, Installation': 

Tills covers all occrapations incident to the d.elivery and 
installation of rollin'^ steel rioors. 



9791 



-210- 



II. Occui^rtions Involviri"^ Specific iieclianical Ka.r^ards — Lachine 'Tori: 
(Proliioi bion to apply to oise rati !!:■■•;, a.ssistiii;'^: in operatin/j, 
or tpjzin-- material froai the follow/in.';; machines.) • •. 

5. In the cuttin" or -jeldini^ of metals "by gas or electricity, 

6. In or in connection with hot ;*;alvanizin;^; or tinning processes. 

7. Grincln;:, ahrr.sive, polishing, or huffin;-; wheels; providec 
thn.t apprentices operating iinder conditions of "bona fide 
apprenticeship may ^^^rinc their ov;n tools. 

8. hetal-cutting ma.chines havin^^ a ;:j.illotinc action; 

9,. hetal plate hendin.--; machines handling material of more 
than 0.,?145 inch in thic>:ness. 

10, Pov/er-driven raetal planin,-.j machines. 

11, Circular sa?/s used in the cutting of metals. 

12, ^iro stitching machinery. 

13, iiachinery having a heavy rollin-^ or crashing action, such 
as CO riu gating rolls. 

14-., Machinery used in the colf rollin ; of heavy metal stocl:. 

15, Boring mills. 

16, Power shears of all kinds, 

17, Punch presses or staiT:ipin ;." machines if the clearance between 
the rai.i and die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch. 

Exception : Apprentices: Emplojmient on any of the ahove- 
nained machines may he Tjermitted in the case of minors he- 
tween IS and 18 years of age under conditions of "bona fide 
a,pprenti ce ship , 

IS. In oiling, cleaning, or wiping machinery in motion, 
19. In applying belts to s. pulley in motion or assisting 
therein. 

Apprentices shall he defined as "those, who are i-eigula.rlj'- 
indentured unc'er contract to the Industry, for a suffi- 
cient period of time to be systematically advanced through 
the various opere>,tions, shops, departaicnts, etc., of a 
Trade, Occupation or Industry, and v/ho receive educational 
training in an organized educational institution during a 
portion of their working time." 

III. Occupations involving health hazards 

20. Lead soldering wori". 

21. All work involving exposure to a.cid in connection with 
pickling of sheet plate. 



9791 



n, 



SAFETY 3aZ0-^ AiC? S.^J^STY TcAZO?. LLiOE hMlIFACTUPJiTa liffiUSTRY 

I. OccuT^ationc involvin,:; specific rneclvuiical aazaro.s - machine work 
(Proliibition to applj*- to operating, assistin/; in oneratmc-, 
or taking material from tx^e xollor.'in:; machines) . 

1. Grindin.", aT^rasive, polishin;;, or buffings wheels; provided 
that apprentices operatin;- under conditions of hona fide 
apprenticeship may ^icrind their own tools. 

2. Metal-c-attinc machines having; a 5,aiillotine action. 
Z. Circalar saws used in the cutting of metals. 

4. uachinerr h-avin:?; a heavy rollin.s or crushinc action. 

5. Power shears of all kinds, 

6. Punch TDresses or strmping machines if the clearance between 
the rani exid. the die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch. 

7. Blade wrapping machines and cartoning machines. 

Exce-Dtio n>-AT3prentices! Employment on pjiy of the above-named 
machineG may^e permitted in the case of minors between 16 
and 18 years of age v/ho are bona fide apprentices. 

8. In oiling, cleaning, or wiping mnchinery or shafting in raotio 

9. In applying bolts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein, 

II. Occupations involving general hazards . . 

10. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or 
helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

11. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steajTi 
engines - used as prime movers. 

12. In^'the care, custody, operation, or repair of elevators, 
cranes, derridcs, or other hoisting apparatus, except in ta'.e^ 
operation of (l) d^Jiabwaiters as defined by the American Stand- 
ards Association, or {2) elevators equipped only fo.- automatic 
operation. 

13. Firing of stecjii or water boilers (except boilers of not more 
than 15 lbs. pressure used solely for heating purposes). 

EX;-:i5IT 138 

SAilD-LIhE BHICnC IimUSTHY 

1, Crpjie operator. 

2. Loiler engineer or fireman, 

3. Lime handler or hydrator. 

4, Press:-'iaxi. 

5, Cylinder man. 

6, Platform man. 

7. Loaders or uxxloaders of brick. 

8. Puepainaen or mechanics. 



9791 



-212- 



9. Drivers of trnidrs or other notor vehicles or helpers 
or oelivery boys on such vehicles. 

10. Operation, castoctv, or re;oair of elev,'^.tors, crrnes, 
derricks, or ot]j.er hoistin;; appra-atus except operation 
of (1) c.-uunh'Taiters a? 'lefined by the jtnericnn Standards 
Association, or (2) elevators ■ equijjped only for automatic 
operation, 

11, Oiling, clGsiiin;^, or wiping machinery or shafting in 
motion. , . . ■ 

13. Aoplyin;;; helts to pulleys in motion or assistin;^ therein. 

EXHIBIT 129 

Sil-IITARY Mm V/AT311PB0OF SPECI/iLTIES LiAiRIFACTUHIlIG 

ILT3TJSTHY ' 

I. Occupations Involvin,;; Gpccific Mechanical Hazards — i.Iachine v/ork. 
(Prohihition to apply to operating, assistin,:.; in operating-, 
or tricing material from txiese machines-.) 

In esta.hlisiments in the industry mich manuf actiare the ma- 
terials, the follo'.7in~ should be prohibited: 

'1. Pov/er shears of all kinds. 
2, ' Dioinp-out machines, 

3. Rolling machines. 

4. In oiling, cleaning, or i7ipin,g machinery or shafting in 
motioi:, 

5. In applying belts tc piolleys in motion or assisting therein. 

II. Occupations Involving Health Hazards 

7. All occupations involved in rabberising goods, 
III. Occupations Involving General Hazards 

8. As di-ivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or 
as helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

9. In,' or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam 
engines or other prime movers, 

10. In the care, '"Ustody, operation or repair of elevators, craAiec 
derricks, ot other hoisting apparatus, except in the opera- 
tion of (l) domb- waiters as defined by the Anerican Standards 
Association, or (2) elevators equipped only for automatic 
operation. 

11. Firing of steaw or water boilers (except boilers of not more 
than 15 lbs, pressure used solely for heating purposes,) 



9791 



-213- ■ 



5X::IEIT 150 " 
SA1'IT..RY i.ILK 30TTLE CLOSUHE li-TJUSTRY 
I. Occupations involviu;; ^veneral hazards 

1. Firing of steaiii or water "boilers (except "ooilers of not ^ ■ 

more than 15 Ihs. pressure used solely for heatiii/; 
pui3)0ses).' 

2. As drivers or assistants to drivers of iHotor vehicles or 

as helpers or delivery boys on.inotcr vehicles. 

3. Inor assistinc^ in the operation of gas, oil, or stean , 
engines or other prime movers. 

4. In tl-ie care, custo^.y, operation, or repair of elevators, 
cranes, derricks, or other hoi stin,<^ apparatus, except in 

the operation of (1) dumowaiters, as defined hy the. jtoerican 
Standards Association, or (2) elevators equipped only for 
automa,tic operation, 

II. Occupations involving": specific meclianical hazards — machine Trork _ 
(Prohihition to apply to opcratin;?:, assisting in operating, 
or taking material from the follo-./ing machines) . 

1. Machinery of stamping or punch-press t^n^e used in the manu- 
facture of paper or paper goods, if the clearance "between 
the raa and the die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch. 

2. Greasers, slitters, or corrugating, crimping, emhossing, 
platin--:, printing, or graining rolls used in the manufacture 
of paper and paper products v/hich are not guarded at the point 
of operation. 

3. Power shears of all kinds. 

Exception ; Apprentices: EmplbjTaent on ,any of the ahove- 
machines may. "be permitted in the case of minors between 
16 and 18 years of age Uiider conditions of bona fide ap- 
prenticeship. 

4. In oiling, cleaning, or wiping machinery or shafting in 
motion. 

5. In applying belts to nullcys in motion or assisting therein. 

6. Power-drive printing presses. 

Apprentices sh.all be defined as "those who are reg-ularly 
indentured under contract to the Industrjs for a sufficient 
period of time to be systematically advanced through the 
varp-ous operations, shops, departmdnt ,. etc. of a Trade, Oc- 
cupation or Industry, and who receive educational training ■ 
in an organized educational institution during a_ portion of 
their working time". 



9791 



-214^ 
E XHI3IT 151 

SMITARY NAPK IH AFP CLEAIISING TISSUE IKDUSTHY 

1. Bleach house Enmloyees 

2. Paper Cutters 

Mexhine Work . ■ 

3. Power shears of all kinds 

4. In oiling, cleanins^ or wipinsi machinery or shafting in 

motion . 

5. In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein 

General Plant Hazards 

6. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or as 

helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles 

7. In, or assisting in, the operation of t^as, oil, or steam 

engines or other prime movers 

8. Firing of stea;-a or water boilers (except boilers of not more 

than 15 pounds pressure used solely for heating purposes). 

9. In the car.e, custody, operation or repair of elevators, 

cranes, derricks, or other hoisting ap'iaratus, except in 
the operation of (l) dumbwaiters, as defined by the 
American Standards Association or of (P.) elevators equipped 
; only for automatic operation. 



„ . . E XHIBIT. 133 

SCHAP IROll AI"D STEEL TRADE II-^DUSTHY 

I . LIeclaanica.1 Hi sks : . 

In or assisting in o-neration of; 

1. Shears 

2. Drops 

3. Torches 

4. Crushers 

5. Hydraulic bundling 

6. Winding machines, . , 

7. Breaking rails 

8. Loading scrap 

II, General outside and maintenance risks. 

9. Operating or work on steam or electric railways of a::y kinds. 

10. In the custody, operation, or repair of elevators, cranes, 

derricks or other hoisting apparatus, except in the operation 
of (l) dumbwaiters as defined by the. American Standards 
Association, or (2) elevators equipped only for a,utomatic 
operation.. 

11. In oiling, clccining, or wiping ma,chinery or sliafting in motion. 

12. In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

13. As drivers of trucks or other motor vehicles or as helpers or 

delivery boys on same,. 

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14. Firing of ste^ur. or water ooil^rs (except boilers of not 

more than 15 pounds pressure used solely for heating 
purposes). 

15. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or steam 

engines used as prirae movers. 

16. Lifting of heavy weights — (80 pound maximum) • 



EXHIBI? 13S 
SCHAP RL1B3ER TRADE 

1. Drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or 

helpers on motor vehicles. 

If hoisting a.iTnaratus is used in the industry . 

2. Operation or repair of elevators, cranes, derricks, or 

other hoisting apparatus except the operation of 
dumbwaiters as defined "by the American Standards 
Association, or elevators equipped only for automatic 
operation. 

3. Operations such as (a) heading and (h) s-^litting wh..ch carry 

with them the ordinpry hazard connected with high spned 
machinery 'vhich --^erfcrms p cutting opoeration. 



E XHIBIT 154 
^ S EJOITDARY ALUUIl'mi IlIDUSTEY 

1. All v/oric in foundry -proper. 

2. All cleaninti.or grindinii o:oerations. 

3. ' All wor'-. involving exposure to molten aluminum. 

4. All em-oloyment on metal scrap. 

5. Eianloyment ?s drivers or assistants to drivers on motor 

vehicler, or. as help.ers or delivery boys on motor 
vthicl~3. 

6. In, or -.ssisti-.i^, in, the o/jeration of gas, oil, or 

steam engines or other nrime movers. 

7. In the care, custod;^ oneration, or repair of elevators, 

crazies, derricks, or other hoisting apparatus. 

8. In oiling, clerning, or vd^in.. imchinery or shaftin^, 

in motion. 

9. In a-))lying belts to pulleys in motion or assistin,, therein. 



EXHIBIT 155 
METALS Il'IO B.^.ASS AlTD 310H2E .\LLOYS III I ITGOT^J^ORM— 

1. All erai^loyment in or about metal scrap yards. 

2. In or about smelters or other -ilaces in which the heating 

and melting of metals is carried on. 



9791 



3. As drivers or assistants to drivei-s of motor vehicles or as 

helpers on motor vehicles. 

4. In, or assistin£i: in, the operation of (,b.s, oil, or steam 

engines or other prinie movers. 

5. In the care, custody, operation, or repair of elevators, 

cranes, derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except 
in the operation of (l) dumbwaiters as defined by the 
American Standards Association, or (3) elevators equipped 
only for automatic o'-^eration. 

6. In oilin^', cleanint,', or ^A-iping machinery or shafting in 

motion. 

7. In appljang belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 



EXHIBIT 156 
SMOKIIIG PIPS I'/AITUPAC^URirG IHDUSTEY 
I. Occupations Iiivolving General Hazards 

1. Firing of steam or water boilers (except boilers of 

not more than 15 lbs. pressure used solely for 
heating purposes). 

2. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles 

or as helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

3. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or steam 

engines or other prime movers. 

4. In the care, custody, operation or repair of elevators, 

cranes, derricks or other hoisting ap;oaratus, except 
in the operation of (l) dujabwaiters as defined iy the 
American Standards Association, or of (2) elevators 
equipped only for automatic oyoeration. 

II. Occupations Involving Specific Mechanical Hazards — iiachine Work. 
(Prohibition to apply to operating, assisting in operating, 
or talring ms.terial from the followins machines.) 

5. All occupations in connection with power-driven woodworking 

machinery, 

6. Pug mills. 

Exception ! Erriployment on any of the above machines may be 
permitted in the case of minors between 16 and 18 years of 
age under conditions of bona fide apirenticcship. 

7. In oiling, cleaninr;, or wiping machinery in motion. 

8. In applying belts to a pulley in motion or assisting therein. 

Apprentices shall be defined as "those who are regularly in- 
dentured under contract to the Industry, for a sufficient 
period of time to be systematically adva2:LCed tlirough the 
various operations, shops, departments, etc., of a Trade, 
Occupation or Industry, and v;ho receive educational training 
in an organized educational institution during a portion of 
their worl:ing time." 

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-217- 
E XHIBI? 157 

SOFT FI3HE iviAlT(JFACL:TX.UN(; lUDUSTRY 

1. As drivors of trvicha or other motor vehicles or as_ 

helpers or dcliveiv boys on such vehicles. 

2. In the operp.tion, custody, or repair of elevators, 

cranes, derricks, or othnr hoisting; apparatus, 
except in .the operation of (l) dumb'waiters as 
defined by the American Stanaards Association, or 
(2) elevators equipped onlj'' for automa.tic operatio:^. 

3. In, , or assisting in, the operation of '"as, oil, or 

steam engines used rs prir.e movers. 

4. Firing, of steam or v.'cter boilers (ejccept boilers of 

not more than 15 lbs. pressure used solely for 
heatin„- pur^^oscs.) 

5. In oiliUiZ, cleaning, or vupint^:' hazardous machinery or 

shafting in motion.. 

6. In ap--:lying.-.belts ■ to pulleys in .notion or- assisting . 

therein. . ' 

7. Dyeing. ond drying processes. 

8. Patching and opening and softening. 



EXHIBIT 138 



SPICE GKIiroiNG IKDUSTRY 

I. Occupations' involving general hazards 

1. In the operation, custody, or repair of elevators, cranes, 

derricks or other hoistin^ apparatus, except in" the 
operation of (l). diunbwaiters as defined by the American 
Standards Associa.tion, or (3) elevators equipped only for 
automatic operation. 

2. Firing of stean or water bailers (except boilers of not more 

th^n 15 lbs* pressui'e used solely for heating .purposes. ) 

3. As di'ivei's of mo'tor trucks or other vehicles or as helpers or 

delivery boys on such vehicles. 

4. In, or assisti:.^ in, the o-ieration of gas, oil, or steam 

engines used £<.s prime movers. 

II. General machine liazards 

5. In oiling, cleaning, or repairing machinery or sliafting in 

motion. . 

6. In a.'oplying bolts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 



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-218- 
E'C EIBIT 139 

STEAii Hi:ATIIia EQUIPLIENT i,iAIX'J'ACTURIl'G IIIDUSTHY 

I. Occupations involving e'e^eral hazards 

1. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or as 

helpers or delivery Doys on motor vehicles. 

2. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil or steam 

engines or other nrime movers. 

3. In the care, custody, oioeration or repair of elevators, 

cranes, derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in 
the operation of (l) duiribwaiters as defined by the American 
Standards Association, or (2) of elevators equipped only 
for automatic operation. 

4. Firing of steam or water ooilers (except boilers of not more 

than 15 j^ounds pressure used solely for heating purposes.) 

5. In foundries (ferrous and nonferrous), all work in the foundry 

proper. 

6. All cleaning or grinding operations in foundries. 

7. All work in foundries involving ; exposure to .molten' lead or any 

molten lead alloy or to dust of lead or of any lead alloy. 

8. In malleable foundries, operations involving handling of heated 

castings, etc., in connection with annealing work. 

9. In the cutting or welding of metals by gas or electricity. 

10. In, or in connection with, hot galvanizing or tinning processes. 

II. Occupations involving specific mechanical hazards — machine work 

(prohibition to apply to operating, assisting in operating, or 
taking material from the followin^: machines) 

11. Grinding, abrasive, polishing, or buffing wheels, provided 

tliat apprentices operating under conditions of bona fide 
apprenticeship may grind their own tools. 

12. Metal cutting machines having a guillotine action. 

13. Machinery used in the cold rolling of heavy metal stock. 

14. Metal plate bending machines liandling material of more than 

0.2145 inch in thickness. 

15. Power-driven metal planing machines. 

16. Circular saws used in the cutting of metals. 

17. Boring mills. 

18. Power shears of all kinds. . 

19. Punch presses or stamping machines if the clearance between 

the ram and. the die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch. 

Exception; Apprentices: Employment on aiiy of the above-nai"ncd 
machines may be permitted in the case of minors between 16 
and 18 years of ai^e who are bona fide cvoir entices. 

20. In oiling, cleaning or wi-':)ing machinery in motion. 

21. In applying belts to xrulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

III. Occupations involving health hazards 

22. All wor''- in spray painting. 
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-319- 

23. Work involving emosiire to bensol or any benzol compound 

which ic volatile or V'/hich Qfjin penetrate the skin. 

24. Work involving-, exiosure to chromic acids, chj'oraates, or 
- "bichrotnutes. 

25. Work involving excessive cxnosure to corroaive substances. 

Apprentices shall be defined as "those v/ho are regalarly in- 
dentured under contract to the industry for a sufficient 
period of tinif? to be systematically advs.nced through the 
various operations, shops, departments, etc., of a trac.Q, 
occupation or industry, and v;ho receive educational training 
in an ori^anized educationr.l institution during a portion of 
their v/orhin.^, tirae." 



EXHIBIT 140 
SUaC:IC/JL DRESS irGS Il-IDUSTRY 
List of Hazardous Occupetions. 

A. Adhesive Plaster Department 

1. Calendar Machines. 

2. Adhesive Mass Mixer. 

3. Rubber Grinders. 

4. Rubber Cutters. 

B. Sundries Department, 
1. Punch Presses. 

C. Maintenance De-oartments - jobs involving work on the 

following machines: 

1, Edging Planer. 

2, Band Saw, 

3, Circular Sav/. 

D. General, 

1. Box-forming equipment, stamping pressers and 

creasers. 

2. Beater and single cylinder machine in 

paper dc;partracnt. 

3. Any work on guillotine- t^rpe cutters. 

Occupations Detrimental to Health 

1. Mustard Plaster Spreading - Gasoline fumes. 

2. Isinglass Court Plaster Spreading - Gasoline fumes, 

3. Rolling Plaster of Paris Bandages - fumes and dust. 

4. Mixing of Ingredients and filling - Dust from 

Chemical ingredients. 



9791 



List of Occupations Involving General Hazards. 

1. In oiling, cleaning, or wiping raficMnery or shafting in 

motion. 

2. In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting ■■ 

therein. 

3. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles 
. or as helpers or delivery "boys on motor vehicles. 

4. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or 

steam engines or other prime movers. 

5. In the care, op.eration, or repair of elevators, cranes, 

derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in the 
operation of (l) dumbwaiters as defined by the 
American Standards Association, or (2) elevators 
equipped only for automatic operation. 

6. Firin^, of steam or water boilers (except boilers of 

not more than 15 lbs. pressure used solely for 
heating purposes.) 



M 



9791 



-221- 

::rriiBiT mi 

TAG INDUSTRY 
I Occu'Dations Invol"in£^ G-eneral Hazards. 

(a) Firin ; o-f stesm or water boilers (excent boilers of not 
more than 15 lbs. T5ressure used so] el;' for heating pur- 
noses) . 

(b) As drivers or ap.sistants to drivers of Tiotor vehicles 
or as helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

(c) In or assisting in the operation of grs, oil, or steam 
engines or other prime movers. 

(d) In the care, custody, operation, or repair of elevators, 
cranes, derricks, or other hoisting- apparatus, except in 
the operation of dumb^Taiters, as defined by the 
American Standards dissociation, or o "^ elevators enuipped 
only for automatic operation. 

II. Occupations Involvincj Specific liechanical Hazards - Ilachine 
Work. (Prohibition to appl}'' to operatin.-^, assisting in 
operating, or taking naterinl from the following machines. 

(e) Kachinery of stajnping or punch-prsss tyoe used in the 
manufacture of paper or paper goods, if the clearance 
between the ram and the die or the stripper exceeds one- 
fourth inch. 

(f) Paper-cutting macnines having a giaillotine action. 

(g) Paper punches or line perforators. 

(h) Greasers, slitters, or corinigating, crim-nin;-^. embossing. 
Plating, printing, or graining rools used in the manu- 
facture of paper anjd paper products which are not guarded 
at the Point of operation. 

(i) Power shears of all kinds. 

Exception: Apprentices- Employment on any of the above machines may be 
permitted in the case of minors between 16 and 18 years of age under 
conditions of bona fide apprenticeship. 

(j) In oiling, cleaning, or ^viping machinery or shafting in 

motion, 
(k) In applying belts to pulleys in mo+:ion or assisting therein, 

Where Printing is done. 



(l) Power-dri-^en printing presses. 

(m) i£onotype or linot:/pe machines. 

(n) Embossing machinery used in the pointing industry. 

(o) Blowing out t^roe cases, in printing shops. 

(p) Cleaning linotype pl-'Jingerr, in printing shops. 

(o) Dry sweeping and cleaning, in printing shops. 

(r) In melting operations in printing shops. 

Apprentices shall be defined as "those who are rarularly indentured 
under contract to the Industry, for a sufficient period of tine to be 
systematically advanced througn the various operations, shops, 

9791 



-222- 

departments, etc., of a trade, occuTDation or industry, and who receive 
educational training in an or^'-anized educational institution during a 
portion of their working time." 

Ei'OIIBIT 142 

TAin: CMl SEPVICE IIOUSTRY 



1. Sandhlast ing tank cars. 

2. Cleaning- tp.nk cars. 

3. Doin,?; oi;her "epair work on the 
interior of trmk carsc 



EXHIBIT 143 
TAPIOCA I^RY PRODUCTS INIiUSTRY 

I. Occupations Involving S'oecific Mechanical Hazards — Machine work, 

(Prohibition to ap-oly to o-oerating, assisting in operation, 
or ta!:ing material from the following machines.) 

1. HachJ.nea having a rolling or crushing action. 

2" I'J' USED: Machines of the general type of dough brakes 

or m:.::ing machir-^s. 
S. In oilingt cleaning, or wiping machinery or shafting 

in njtion,, 

4. In aoTjlying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting 
therein, 

II. Occupations Involvin'-i' General Hazards 

5. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles 
or as helijers or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

6. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam 
enginss or other iDrime i.iovers, 

7. In the care, custody, operation or retjair of elevators. 
Cranes, derricks, or other hoisting apnaratus except 

in the o-oeration of (1) dumbwaiters as defined by 
the American Standards Association, or (2) elevators 
eauipned only for automatic operation. 

8. Eiring of. steam or "'ater boilers (except boilers of not 
more than 15 lbs. oressure used solely for heating 
pvi-^'ooses). 



EXHIBIT 144 

TEXTILE IIACHIlfERY MAIIUFACTTJIjIIMG INDUSTRY 

Hazardous occuoations in the Industry from v/hich minors under 18 
are to be excluded and which are not specifically covered in the 
Code, are: 

1. Firing of steam or water boilers (excerit boilers of not 
9791 



-223- 

raore than 15 lbs. 'pressure used solely for heating 
TDunooses. ) . 

2. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles 
or as helners or delivery boys on notor vehicles. 

3. In, or assisting in, the OT>eration of gas, oil, or steam 
enc:;ines or other X5rime movers. 

4. In the care, custody, operation, or repair of elevators, 
cranes, derricks, or other hoistinf; apparatus, except in 
the operation. of (l) dumbwaiters as defined by the 
Araerican Standards Association, or (2) elevators equipped 
only for autonatic operation.. 

5. In foundries (ferrous or non-ferrous), all '?ork in the 
foixidry proper. 

6. All cleaning or grinding operations in foundries. 

7. All '-ork in foundries involving exposure to molten lead 
or any nolten lead alloy or to dust of lead or of any lead 
alloy. 

8. In malleable foiondries, operations involving handling of 
heated castings, etc., in connection '.7ith annealing work. 

9. In oilin.;, cleaning, or wiping machinery or -shafting in 
motion. 

10. In applr/ing belts to pulley.s in motion or assisting therein. 

"..Tiere paintin/j; is carried on , ■ 

11. All i-^ork in spray painting. 

12. In all processes where substances containing lead or any 
of its compounds a,re used in a liauid or powered form, or 
at a temperature s-ufficient to vaporize lea^d. 

13. 'iork involving exposure to benzol or any benzol compoiond 
which is volatile or 'vhich. can penetrate the skin, 

E:ffli:^IT 145 

TEXTILE P^IIJT HOLLER ENG-RAVirO INDUSTRY , ■ 

On the follo-7ing machines, if used by-, a member of the industry: 

1. Grinding, abrasive, polishing, or buffing wheels; 
provided that apprentices operating under conditions of 
a Dona fide apprenticeship may g"ind their own tools* 

2. Porer-driven metal planing machines. 

Exception ; Apprentices; Employment on any of the above-named machines 
may be permitted in the case of minors between 16 and 18 years of 
age who are bona fide apprentices. 

3. In oiling, cleaning or "dping maciiinery or shafting in 
motion. 

4. In appl^ring belts to pulleys in notion .or assisting 
therein. 

In occupations involving exposure to- 

5. I.!uriatic acid. 
9791 



-224- 

6. Nitric acid. 

7. Sulohuric acid ' • 

Other substances having similar iirjurious proiDerties. 

In the folloTTing general plant and outside maintenance occupations: 

8. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or 
as helpers or delivery "boys on motor vehicles. 

9. • In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam 

engines or othsr prime movers, 

10. In the O'O'-^ration o'^ repair of elevators except in the 
operation of (l) diamb'7aiters as defined by the American 
Standards Association, or (2) of elevators eajaipT3ed only 
for automatic operation. 

11. Firin.^ of steam or ^-'ater boilers (except boilers of not 
more than 15 pounds laressu-e used solely for heating 
puriDOses) . 

Ap"Drentices shall be defined as "those '^ho are reOT-larly indentured 
under contra.ct to the industry, for a; sufficient period of time to be 
systematically advanced throu^^h the various operations, shops, depart- 
ments, etc., of a trade, occuTOP.tion or industry, and '-vho receive 
educational training in an organized educational institution during a 
portion of their vrorking time." 



3KHI3IT 146 
TOY AMD PLAYTHI^I&S IICDUSTRY 

1. \JovV: TDcrforned in oiling, cleaning, or wiping machinery 
in motion. 

2. Work performed in proximity to -any unguarded belt or 
gearing. 

3. In the care, cu='>tody, oTjeration, or repair of eleva.tors, 
cranes, derricks or other hoisting apparatus, except in 
the OTDeration of ( l) durab^rraiters, as defined by the 
American Standards Association or (2) elevators equipped 
only for automatic operation. 

4. In the cutting or '-elding of metals by gas or electricity. 

5. Grinding, abrasive, polishing, or buffing wheels; •provided 
that apprentices operating under conditions of bona fide 
apTorenticeship ma.'''' grind their own tools* 

6. Metal-cutting machines having a guillotine action. ■ 

7. Pover shears of all kinds. 

8. Ruich riresses or staraping machines if the clearance 
beti^een the "am and the die or the stripper exceeds one- 
fourth inch. 

9. All work in spray painting. 

10. Band raid circular saws, 

11. Chromium plating. 

12. Pulverizers a.nd crushers. 

13. Printing presses. 

14. Lead soldering v/ork, 

15. Power presses. 

9791 



16. Work performed in or assistinf^ in the operation of gas, 
oil, or steam emanes or other prime movers. 

17. In the operation of po"7er-driven woodworking machinery. 

18. Pnper-cntting Machines havin;; guillotine action. 

19. Paper p-juiches or line perforators. 

20. Qreasers: slitters, or corru^-ating, crimping, embossing, 
plating, printing, or grainin,3 rolls -ased in the manu- 
facture of paper and paper products \7hich are not guarded 
at the point of operation. 

21. Corner- stay in;.;, corner-cutting, or ending machines used 
in the ppper box ind\\stry if the opening to meet the 
plunger exceeds one-fourth inch. 

Exception; Such corner-stavino; machines eq^uipoed vrith an' automatic 
device that ivill instantly stop the do^iryard motion of the plunger 
should the finger of the operator co^e bet':veen the Plxinger and the 
anvil. 

22. Embossing machinery used in the printing industry, 
25, Blcuing out type cases in printing shops. 

24, Cleaning linotype plungers in printing shops. 

25, Dry sweeping and cleaning in printing shops, 

26, In melting operations in printing shops, 

27, All processes in the manufacture of ruboer or rubber goods, 
e xcept in finishing, sorting, inspecting or packing, 

28, All VTork in the foundry proper. 

29, All clcr-Tiing or grinding operations in foundries. 

30, All -vork in foundries involving exposure to molten lead 
or any molten lead alloy, o^" to dust of lead or of any 
lead alley, 

31, In malleable foundries, operations involvirig handling of 
heated castings, etc., in connection with annealing T;ork. 

.32. Po".'er-driven metal planing machines. 

35. Metal plate bending machines handling material of more 
than 0.2145 inch in thickness. 

34. In or in connection vith galvanizing or tinnihg processes. 

35. Wire stitching machinery. 

.36. Molding, splitting, rolling, perforating, stamping, dieing- 
outv embossing, burnishing, clicking, s]iiving, stripping 
or buffing machines used in the leather industry. 

57. In occ\ix.r tions involving exposure to pyroxylin Tslastic or 

conposi-. :'.on dusts. 
'S8. In operations involving' the heating of celluloid. 

59. In processes whe-^e quartz or any other form of silicon 

dioxide or an asbestos silicate is loresent in povrered form. 

40, irork involving ercposure to benzol or any benzol compound which ij 
volatile or T"hich can penetrate the skin. 



EXHIBIT 147 

THAILTH lIAiro^ACTimiHG IimUSTRY 

I, Occupations involving specific mechanical hazards-machine 
work (prohibition to ap^oly to operating, assisting in operating, or 

9791 



taking material from t,he follo^Ting machines) 

1. Grinding-, abrasive, iDOlisliinw; or buffing wheels, provided 
that ar)ijrentices pperating .under conditions of bo-.^a fide 
apprenticeship may grind their own tools. 

2. Metal-cutting machines having a guillotine action. 

3. Machinery used in the cold rolling of heavy metal stock. 

4. l.ietal "olate oending machines handling material of mo^^e 
than 0,2145 inch in thickness* 

5. Povrer-driven metal planing machines.' 

6. Circular saws used in the cutting of metals. 

7. Power shears of all kinds. 

8. Punch presses or starping machines if the clearance 
between the ram and the die or the stripper exceeds one- 
fourth inch, 

9. Operation of power-driven woodworking machinery or as off- 
bearer. 

Exception : Apprentices: Enployment on any of the above-named machirfes 
may be permitted in .the case of minoT-s bet'^een 16 and IS years of age 
who are bona fide apprentices, 

, 11. In oiling, cleaning or wiping machinery or shafting in 
motion, 

12. In appl'^ing belts to pulleys in 'lotion or assisting therein. 

II. Occupations involving health hazards 

13. All work in spray painting, 

14. "ifork involving e.-oDOSure to chromic ;icids, chromates, or 
bichrorantes. 

15. "I'ork involving;, excessive exposure to corrosive substances. 

III. Occupations involving general hazards 

16. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or ^ 
as helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles. V 

17. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam 
engines or otiier prime movers. 

18. In the care, ctistody, operpition or repair of elev-.tors, 
cranes, derricks, or otaer hoisting a.ppara.tus, except 
in the operation of (l) dumbwaiters as defined by the 
American Standards Association, or (2) of elevators 
equipped only for automatic operation, 

- 19. Firing of steam or watar ooilers (except boilers of not 
more thar^ 15 pounds pressure used solely for heating 
purposes). 
20, In the cutting or welding of metals by g-^s or electricity. 



E:ffiI3IT 148 
TRUCKING IiroUSTRY 
1. As drivers on vehicles, 
9791 



2. In aaiy cmncity, driver, helrier or other'7ise, oi 
vehicles tiTn^po/tinf; clvnainite, nitrOi-jlycerin or other 
highly denser o\i-s e^olosives usually refused tra'^sportation 
under e.-^istin-'': iTiotor fre.i'-:cht tariffs. Transnortation of 
g.?.solino and its products, sniall-arins airniun it ion, , small- 
arms priasr-'s, fi "ewoi-lcr. , fuses, cartridge shells empty 
but primed, grenades e'anty "bat ori^aed, are not inpluded 

in tne above. 

3. In an-r cfoacit^', driver, holoer or oth'^rwir.e, on vehicles 
tranr-TDO-^ting inhoi'ently danperons acids such as nitric, 
sulphuric, hydrofluoric or others similarly dangerous in 
nature, 

4. Lopdins; of trucks directly from clay, gravel, sand or 
rock hanl-'s. , ,, 

5. In occu-oation.s . re.Guij^ing the lifting of weights in excess 
of 150 TDOunds. 

6. 1/liere elevators or hois ting machinery a,re used, the 
following are -orohibited: The care, custody, otdo ration or 
reriair of elevators, cranes, derricks, or other hoisting 
aTDT.aratuG , excerit in the o"oe ration of (l) dumuwaiters as 
defined uy the American Slrjidards Association, or (2) 
elevators eauiTO'oed only for autorartic operation.. 



EXHi:;IT 149 

THOUT F.Aiy'IlIG ICTUSTHY 111 THE EASTEPJT SECT-IOM" 

1. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles 
whether on or off the -Dublic highwayv including. tractors 
used^on the trout farm. 
.2. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil or steam 
engines or, other prirae movers, including compressors in 
refrigerating "olant and food grinding machines., 

3. In, or assisting in, the ^Deration of oiling, cleaning, or 
wiring raacainsry in motion^ 

4. In. or a?,sistir;r; in, tae operation of power griading 
machines for the 'oreTjaration of trout food, or any other 
puiTose, 

5. The operation of any no'ver-driven woodworking machinery. 

6. The operation of any nower-driven concrete mixer. 

7. ',;o-king in or a,roiurid derricks, hoists or other well-driving 
opcratio:is. 

8. Vorking in or r.ro"and steam shovels. 

9« Talcing a:i3'' -oart in any" oner'-tion involving the use of 

dynajnite or oti'ier exolosives used in the clearing of land 
or otherwise. 



S:Qr3IT 150 
m^IT HEATSE AITD/OR UITIT '/ElrTILATOR LAI^TUFACTIIRIITG IITOUSTRY 
I. Occu'oations involving general hazards 

1. firing of steam or water boilers (exce-ot boilers of not 



9791 



nore than 15 -poimdri pressure used solely for hef.ting 

■QUTjOSes). ' ' 

2. As drive's or =^.ssistants to drivers of motor vehicles or 
n,s helriers or delivery \)0j5 on iiotor vehicles, 

3, In, or assistin;'; in, the ooer.'^tion of ^'■■''.s, oil, or steam 
engines or otner r)"'ime movers. 

4. In the ca-e, ctistody,' 6'oerption o- rer)rir of elevators, 
cranes, derricks, or other hoistin.'" apparr.tus, exceiDt 
in the o'oerating of (l) dumD'7aiters as defined 'oy the 
American Standard.s As'sociation, or (2) of elevators 
eaui-D'oed onl;/ for autoTiptic oiDerrtion. 

In c.'^se of foundry :7ork in the industry — 

5, All ^ork in the foundry oro-oer, 

6, All cleaninj^ or .-jrinding O'D'Brations in foundries. 

7. 7-^11 • ork in foundries involving exoosure to molten lead 

or rny mo"!.ten lead a,lloy or to dust of lead or of any lead 
alloy. ■ 

8, In malle.'iule "oundries, 01:36 r.-^t ions involving handling of 
heated castings, etc» , in connection vith annealing '^'ork, 

9. • In the cuttin,, or -'elding of metals by gas or electricity. 

10. In, or in con.iection 'vith, hot ga-lvanizin ■ or tinning 
orocesses. 

II. OccuiDPtions involvini;: si^ecific mechanical hazards — machine 
'7ork (orohiuifrion to ao'oly to operating, assisting in operating, or 
taking material from the follo^ving machines) 

11. Grinding, abrasive, oolishing or "buffing ^^heels, provided 
that apprentices operating under conditions of bona fide 
apprenticeship may grind their o^-oi tools. 

12. iietal-cutting machines having a guillotine action. 

13. lietal pl'^te Dending Kiachines handling material of nore 
than 0.2145 inch in thickness. 

' • 14. Po'7er-dri'=en metal planing machines. 

15. Circular sa'''s used in the cutting of metals. 

16. '.'ire stitching raachinerv, 

17. liachinery having a heavy rolling or crushing action. 

1^-.. I'lachinery used in the cold rolling of heavy metal stock, 

19. 3oring mills. 

20. Po--er shears of all kinds. 

21. Punch Presses or stamping raacnines if the clearance 
'bet\7een the rr-n rnd tne die or the stripper exceeds one- 
fourth inch thic):ness. 

Exception — Apprentices: E^roloyment on any of the above-named machines 
may be permitted in the case of minors betv/een 16 -md 18 -^ears of age 
^ho are bona fide app-^entices. 

22. In oiling, cleaning or vipin;.; naciiinerjr in motion. 

23. In p.pplying belts to a pulley in notion or assisting there- 
in. 



9791 



-229- 
III. Occuijationa involving; health hpznrds 

24. All ^-.'ork in^'ol'-irit:^ ei-roosure to ncid in connection nith 
"oicklin-; of sheet pla-teo 

25. All ■•or^: in srir.?:/ -Dainting.- 

26. In all orocesses nhere siilDstances containing lead or any 
cf its com-DOunds p.re used in a liquid or -Dowered form or 
at a terTOeratu:^e sufficient to vapo,rize lead. 

27. In processes Trhere ouairtz or. any other form of silicon 
dioxide or an asbestos silicate is oresent in povered 
f crm. 

28. Work involving exposure to benzol or, any oenzol compound 
■7hich is volatile or r;hich can penetrate the skin. 

29. In the use of dangerotis dye stuffs. 

30. Le.d soldering work. 

Apprentices shall be defined as "those rrho are regularly indentured 
ujider contrn.ct to the industry, for a sufficient period of time to be 
systematically advances through the. various operations, shop^, depart- 
ments, etc. , of p. trade, occination or industry, and v-ho receive 
educational training in an organized educational institution during a 
portion of their '-working tiraeu" 

31. \j'ork involving e:cposure to chromic acids, chromates, or 
bichromates. 

32. Work involving excessive exposure to corrosive substances. 



9791 



-230- 
EXHIBIT 151 
UPHOLSTERY SPRIilG MD ACGESSOniES l/iAi'IUI'ACTURl?'a I'^IDUSTRY 



I. Occupations involving specific meclianical hazards — machine work 
, (Prohibition to apply to onerating or assisting in oper- 
ating the following ma.chines). 

1. Grinding, abrasive, polishing or biiffing wheels, provided 

that ap-nrentices operating under conditions of bona fide 
apprenticeship may grind their own tools. 

2. Metal-cutting machines having a guillotine action. 

3. Power shears of all kinds. 

4. Punch presses or stamping machines if the clearance 

between the ram and the die or the stripper exceeds 
one-fourth inch. 

5. Power-driven vjoodworking machinery (where used). 

Exception ; Apprentices: EmToloyraent on any of the 
above-named machines may be permitted in the case of 
minors between 16 and 18 years of age who are bona 
fide apr)rentices. 

6. In oiling, cleaning, or 'wiping machinery in motion or 

shafting in motion. 

7. In a-nr)lying belts to -ouller/s in motion or assisting therein. 

II. OccumationR involving health liazards 

8. All work in s-orny painting. 

III. Occupations involving general ha.7;ards (including plant and 
outside maintenance). 

9. As drivers of trucks or other motor vehicles or as 

helpers or delivery boys on such vehicles. 

10. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam 

engines used as prime movers. 

11. In the operation, custody, or repair of elevators, cranes, 

derricks, or other hoisting ap-naratus, except in the 
operation of (l) ^dumbwaiters as defined by the American 
Standards Association, or (3) elevators equi-o?-)ed for 
automatic o-oeration. 

12. Firing of steam or water boilers (exce-ot boilers of not 

more than 15 lbs. pressure used solely for heating 
purposes) . 

13. In the welding of metals by gas or electricity. 



9791 



EXHIBIT 15? 
USED TEXTILE 3AG IICDUSTRY 



1. OTDoratin."^ vacamn cleaning mr.chines. 

2. 0-pcratin'^ -Drnn-ylng •Dresses. 

3. C>perati,"j electric c" hand Ijaling -oresses. 

4. O-oeratirg mechanical cutting: Icnivss. 

5. Operating of tag tumolcrs. 

6. Operations involving excessive ex-nosure to dust. 

(Work on the aoove s-oecified ma.chines may not include all 
the occuDations ^vhich should be -orohiliited becavise of the 
excessive exnosure to dust). 

7. In oiling:, clciming or -s-'i-oing machinery or shafting in notion.. 

8. In a-oplyirig belus to rulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

9. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles, or as 

helT)ers or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

10. In, or assisting in, the or)eration of gas, oil or steam engines 

or other r)ririe movers. 

11. In the care, custody, orjeration cr rerair of elevators, cranes, 

derricks, or ether l:Gist,.ng a.^njaratxis, except in the otjeration 
(l) cf dumbii^ai ters as defined b^^ t:ie American Standards 
Association, cr (2) of elevators equi':'r)ed only for automatic 
otieration. ■ , 

12. Firing of steam or water boilers (except boilers of not more 

than 15 -oounds -oressure used solely for heating t)urposes). 



EXH3IT 153 
USED TEXTILE l.UiCl'lFE.V.X AO ACCESSORIES DIST^.IBUTINO TRADE 



Occupations Involving General Hazards 

1. As drivers of trucks or other motor vehicles or as helpers 

or delivery boys on such vehicles. 

2. In the deration, custody, or re-oair of elevators, cranes, 

derric;:s, or other hoisting a-OTjaratus, except in the onera- 
tion of ( l) dumbwaiters as defined by the American Standards 
Association or (2) elevators equipped only for automatic 
CT)eration. 

3. In all loading and unloading orierations (from trucks, trains, 

etc.) ivhere lifting is done by hand. 

If po'7ei' driven machinery is used in conveying or handling 
material the folloTving should be added: 

4. In handling, loading or unloading goods where -oower-driven 

machinery is used for conveying or handling. 



9791 



^232- 
EXHIBIT 154 
VACUTJi!.! CLEAIIEH Ml'JUPACTTJRIl^JG IITOUSTRY 

I. Occurjations involving general hazards 

1. In foxmdries (ferrous and non-ferrous) all ipork in the 

foundry proper. 

2. All cleaning or grinding- or)erations in foxondries. 

3. All work in foundries involving exr)0sure to molten lead or any- 

molten lead alloy or to dust of lead or any lead alloy. 

4. In malleable foundries, o-oerations involving handling of heated 

castings, etc., in connection with annealing work. 

5. In the cutting or welding of metals by gas or electricity. 

6. In, or in connection with, hot galvanizing or tinning -Drocesses. 

7. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or as 

hel-oers or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

8. In, or assisting in, the o-nerating of gas, oil, or steam 

engines or other orime movers. 

9. Firing of steam or water boilers (excent boilers of not more 

than 15 -nounds -oressure used solely for heating -numoses) . 

10. In the care, custody, o-neration or reiDair of elevatcrs, craned, 

derricks, or other hoisting an-oaratus, excent in the o-oeration 
of (l) dumbwaiters as defined by the American Standards Asso- 
ciation or (S) of elevators equiT)r)ed only for automatic 
o-oeration. 

II. Occu-nations involving s-oecific mechanical hazards — machine work 
(■orohibition to a,-i-)-oly to o-oerating, assisting in o-oerating or 
taking material from the following machines) 

11. Grinding, abrasive, polishing or buffing wheels; provided that 

apprentices operating under conditions 'of bona fide apprentice- 
ship ms,y grind their own tools. 

12. Metal-cutting machines having a guillotine action. 

13. Machinery used in the cold rolling of heavy metal stock. 

14. Metal plate bending machines handling material or more tlian 

0.3145 inch in thickness. 

15. Power-driven metal planing machines. 

16. Circular saws used in the cutting of metals. 

17. Boring mills. 

18. Power shears of all kinds. 

19. P-unch presses or stamping ma.chines if the clearance between 

the ram a.nd the die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch. 

20. Machinery having a heavy rolling or crushing action. 
20a. Wire stitching machinery. 

Exception ; Apprentices: ■ Employment on any of the above-named 

machines may be permitted in tlie case of minors between 16 and 
18 years of age who are bona fide apprentices. 



9791 



21. In oiling, cleanin,'-' or willing mr.chinery or r.hafting in motion. 

22. In a-ot)l.ying helt? to -n-ulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

III. Occu-oationf? involving health hazards 

23.- All work in s-oray -oainting. - 

24. Work involving exiDOrure to "benzol or any henzol comnoxind which 

' is volatile or' which c^n -oenetrate the skin. 

25. Lead soldering 'vorlc. 

26. All work involving exposure to acid in connection with •nickling 

of sheet -olate. 

Apprentices shall he ''defined as "those who are regularly 

indentured tjider contract to the industry, for a sufficient 
•oeriod of tiT.r! to' he systematically advanced thro\igh the 
various operations, shops, de^nartments , etc., of a trade 
occutjation or industry, and who receive educational training 
in an organized educational institution during a -oortion of 
their working time." 



EXHIBIT 155 
VALVES SQUD FITTINGS I.lAiTLTACTmiUrr IIIlUST^Y 



I. Occunation Involving Specific Mechanical Tlazards-'^Machine Work. 
(Prohihition to a-nnly to or>erating, assisting in onerating, or 
talcing material from, the following, machines) .,• ■'• 

1. Grinding, abrasive, t)olishing., or huffing wheels; nrovided- 
that an^irentices o-oeratjon under conditions: of bona fide 
at)-orenticeship may grind, their .own tools.- ■ '■ • 

3. Machinery used 'in the cold rolling of -heavy metal stock. • 

4. Metal -olate bending machines' handling material of more than • • 

0.2145 inch in thiclcness.. 

5. Power driven metai -olaning machines. 

6. Circular saws used in the cutting, of metals. , • 

7. Boring mills. 

8. Power shears of all kinds. 

9. Punch -Dresses or stam-oing machines if the clearance; between the 

ram and the "die or the stripper exceeds one-fourth inch. 

Exce-ption— ^A-QTPrcntices ; — EmplbjTnent on any of the above named 
machines may be permitted in the case ,of minors between 16 
and 18 years of age who are bona fide ap-orentices. 

10. In oiling, cleaning, or wiping machinery or, shafting in motion. 

11. In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

II. Occupations Involving General Ha.zards. 



9791 



-•254?- 

l?,. : , In ferrous and tion-f errotaS foundries — all work in the 
•:, ■ foundry -Dro-Der. 

13. All cleaning or grinding operations in foundries. 

14. In malleable foundries, ODerrvtidns involving handling of 

heated castings, etc., in connection with annealing work. 

15. All work in foundries involving exr)osure to molten lead or 

any molten lead alloy, ,' or to dust of lead or of any lead 
alloy. 

16. In the cutting or ^relding of metals by gas or electricity. 

17. As drivers of trucks or other motor vehicles or as helpers 

or delivery boys on such vehicles. 

18. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam 

engines or other -orime movers. 

19. In the care, custody, o-oeration or renair of elevators, cranes, 

derricks, or other hoisting ariparatus, except in the oneration 
of (l) dumbwaiters as defined by the American Standards 
Association, or (2) elevators equi-Dned only for automatic 
OTDeration. 

20. Firing of steam or water boilers (except boilers of not more 

than 15 lbs. nressure used solely for heating purposes). 



EXHIBIT 156 

VEIIETIAK T3i,ijiD iinjDUSTRY 



I. OcQupations involving general hazards 

1. Firing of steam or water boilers (excer)t boilers of not more 

than 15 lbs. -oressure used solely for heating purx)0ses). 

2. As drivers or assistants to drivers of njotor vehicles or as . 

helpers or delivery boys on motor vehiqles. 

3. In or assisting .in the OTseration of gas, oil, or steam 

engines or other -orime movers. 

4. In the care, custody, oioeration or reDair of elevators, 

cranes, derricks or other hoisting apnaratus, except .in 
the operation of (l) diarnbwaiters as defined by the American 
Standar'^s Association, or of (2) elevators equipned only 
for automatic operation. , ' , 

II. Occupations involving specific mechanical hazards — machine work 
(Prohibition to ap-oly to operating, assisting in operating, 
or t-'^king material from the following machines). 

5. All occupations in connection with power-driven woodworking 

machinery. 

Exc eption ; Eraplojmient on these machines may be permitted in. 
the case of minors between 16 and 18 years of age under 
conditions of bona fide apprenticeship. 

6. In oiling, cleaning, or wiping machinery in motion. 

7. In applying belts to a pulley in motion or assisting therein, 

9791 



-235- 



Ap-orentices rhall be defined as "those who are refcularly in- 
dentured -under contract to the Industry, for a sufficient 
•period of time to "be- systematically advanced through the 

* various operations, shops, departments, etc., of a -Trade, 
Occupation ot Industry, and who receive educational training 
in an organized educational institution during a portion 
of their irorking time." 



EXHIBIT 157 
WARM AI- FIJRMCE ivIMUPAC TURING ItlDUSTRY 



1. Moulding work, core making or other r)rocesses in foundTies which 

exT50se the worker either directly or indirectly to melted 
metal. 

2. All cleaning or grinding operations in foundries. 

3. In rao.lleable foundries, operations involving handling Of 

heated castings, etc., in connection w ith annealing work. 

4. Firing of steam or water boilers (except boilers of not 

more than 15 lbs. pressure used solely for heating -ourposes) . 

5. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or as 

helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

6. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or steam 

engines or other -nrime movers. 

7. In the care, custody, o-oeration or repair of elevators, cranes, 

derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, exceiDt in the o-oera- 
tion of (l) dumbwaiters as defined by the American Standards 
Association, or (2) of elevators equipped only for automatic 
o-i^eration. 

8. In the cutting or welding of metals by gas or electricity. 

9. In or in connection with hot galvanizing or tinning processes. 

10. Grinding, abrasive, polishing or buff ing wheels; provided 

that learners may grind -fcheir own tools. 

11. In oiling, cleaning or -^idping machinery in motion. 

12. In a-nplying belts to a p-alley in motion or assisting therein. 

13. Lead soldering work. 

14. All work involving exposure to acid in connection with 

pickling of sheet plate. 



EXHIBIT 158 
WARM AIR REGISTER IvANLEACTURING IHDUSTRY 



I. Occupations involving snecific mechanical hazards — machine work 
(Prohibition to anply to operating or assisting in operating 
the following machines). 

1. Grinding, abrasive, polishing or buffing wheels, provided that 
aiDPrentices operating under conditions of bona fide 
spprenticeship may grind their own tools. 



9791 



-236- ■ 

3. Metel-cutting machines having a guillotine action. 

3. Power shears of all kinds. 

4. Punch presses or starmDing machines if the clearance between 

the ram and the die or the strirjper exceeds orip-f ourth inch. 



Exce-Qtinn : Apiorentices: Employment on any of the above-named 
machines may he permitted in the case of minors between 
16 and 18 years of age who are bona fide apprentices. 

5. In oiling, cleaning, or wiping a^achinery or shafting in motion. 

6. In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

II. Occupations involving health hazards 

7. All work in spray painting. ,'. , 

III. Occupations involving general hazards ( including^.plant and outside 
maintenance)* . , ' , 

8. All work in the foundry proper.. • • • 

9. All chipping or grinding operations. 

10.- In the cutting or welding of metals by gas or electricity. 

11. As drivers of trucks or other motor vehicles or as helpers 

or delivery boys on such vehicles. 

12. In, or assisting in', the operation of gas, oil, or steam 

engines used as prime movers. 

13. In the operation, custody, or repair of elevators, cranes, 

derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, excent in the 
operation' of (l) dumbwaiters as defined by the American 
Standards Association, or (2) elevators eauipped only for 
automatic operation. 

14. Firing of steam or water boilers (except boilers of not 

mor'etl:ian 15 lbs. pressure used solely for heating purposes). 

EXHIBIT 159 . . , 
WASTE PAPE?, II^IDUST^-Y* 

1. Drivers of trucks or other motor vehicles, 

or helpers on such vehicles. 

If hoisting apparatus is used in the industry . 

2. 0-oera,tion or repair of elevators, cranes, 

derricks or other hoisting apparatus ex- 
cept the opera.tion of dumbwaiters as 
defined by the American Standards Associa- 
tion, or elevators eaiiiTrned only for 
automatic operation. 



(*) (Subdivision of the Scrap Iron, Ilon-Ferrous Scrap' Metals, and 
Waste Materials Trade) 



9791 



-257- 
EXHIBIT 160 

WATERPROOF PAPER INDUSTRY 

I. Occu-Dations Involving (T-eneral Hazards 

'. 1. Firing of steam or water boilers (except boilers of not 
more than 15 lbs. -oressure used solely for heating 
•Dumoses) . 

2. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles 

or as helpers or delivery boys en motor vehicles. 

3. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or steam 

engines or other prime movers. 

4. In the care, custody, operation, or repair of elevators, 

cranes, derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except 
in the operation of ( l) diombwaiters, as defined by the 
American Standards Association, or (2) elevators eauipped 
only for automatic operation, 

II. Occupations Involving Specific ilechanical Hazards - Machine Work. 
(Prohibition to apply to operating, assisting in operating, or 
taking material from the following machines). 

54 Machinery of stamping or punch-press type used in 
the manufacture of paper or paper goods, if the 
clearance between the ram and the die or the stripper 
exceeds one-fourth inch. 

6« Paper cutting machines liaving a guillotine action. 

7 4 Paper punches or line perforators. 

8. Greasers, slitters, or corrugating, crimping, embossing 

plating, printing, or graining r^'lls used in the manu- 
facture of paper and paper products which are not guarded 
at the point of operation. 

9. Power shears of all kinds. 

Exception - Apprentices 

Employment on any of the above machines may 
be permitted in the case of minors between 
16 and 18 years of age ujider conditions of 
bona fide apprenticeship. 

10. In oiling, cleaning, r,r wiping machinery or siiafting 

in motion. 

11. In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

Where Printing is Done 

12. Power-driven printing presses. 

13. Monotype or linotjToe machines. 

14. Embossing ma.chinery used in the printing industry. 

15. Blowing out ty^^e cases in printing shops. 

16. Cleaning linot:>'pe plungers in -orinting shops. 

17. Dry sweeping and cleaning in printing shops. 

18. In melting operations in printing shops. 



9791 



-238-- 

Apprentices shall be defined as "those who are regularly in- 
dentured under contract to the Industry, for a sufficient 
period of time 'tO "be systematically advanced through the 
various orjerations, shons, departments, etc., of a trade, 
occupation, or industryj .and who receive educational training 
in an organized educational institution during a portion of 
their working time." 



9791 



-^239- 

EXHIBIT 161 
WAXED PAPE?. IITDUSTRY 
J. Occupations Involving General Hazards. 

1. firing of stean or \mter 'boilers (except "boilerG of not 
i.iore than 15 IIds. presnixre xiMed solely for heating pur- 
poses). 

2. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or^ 
as helpers or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

3. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or stean 
engines or other prine novers . 

4. In the care, custody, operation, or repair of elevators, 
cranes, derric^zs, or other hoisting apparatus, except in 
the operation of (l) dumhrraiters, as defined by the 
American Standards Association, or (2) elevators equip35ed 
only for a.utonatic operation. 

II. Occupations Involving Specific Lechanical Hazards - hachine 
Uork: (Prohibition to apply to operating, assisting in opera- 
ting, or taking naterial fron the folloring machines). 

5. llachinery of stamping or punch-press type used in the 
manufacture of paper or paper goods, if the clearance 
betTjeen the ram and the die or the stripper exceeds one- 
fourth inch. 

6. Paper-cutting machines having a giiillotine action. 

7. Paper punches or line perforators. 

8. Greasers, slitters, or corrugating, crimping, embossing, 
plating, printing, or graining rolls used in the manu- 
facture of paper and paper products rrhich are not guarded 
at the point of ojjeration. 

9. Po\7er shears of all hinds. 

Exception- Apin-entices — Em.plojTient on any of the above 
machines may be permitted in the case of minors between 
15 and 18 years of s^ge under conditions of bona fide 
app rent i c e sliip . 

10. In oiling, cleaning, or 'riping machinery' or shafting in 
mo t i on . 

11.. Applying belts to pullej^s in motion or assisting therein. 

Uhere printing is done . 

12. Po'jer-driven printing presses. 

13. ilonotype or linotype machines. 

14. Embossing machinerj^ used in the printing industry. 

15. Blorring out tj'pe cases in ;orinting shops. 

15. Cleaning linotjn^e plungers in printing shops. 
17. Drj^ sTTeeping and cleaning in printing shops. 
13. In melting operations in j_)rinting shops. 

App i-er.t ices shall be defined as "those r/lio are regularly in- 
dentured \mder contract to the Industry- for a sufficient period 
of time to be systematically advanced through the various oper- 
ations, shops, departments, etc., of a trade, occupation or indus- 
tr5^, and Trho receive educational training in an organized edu- 
9791 cational institution dLiring a portion of their vorking time." 



-240- 

■ EXHIBIT 162 
WET i,;OP rAlKjTACTUPJlIG- IllDUSTRY . 

1. Drivers or assiistants to drivers of motor vehicles or 
helv)ers or delivery boys on motor vehicles. 

2. Opei^atin-r; or assisting in the o'Teratipn of .■i;as, oil, or 
stean engines or other prime movers. 

3. Pirin']; of Eteam or rrater boilers (except boilers or not 
more than 15 pounds presstire used solely for heating 
purposes) . 

4. The care, custody, operation, or rejjair of elevators, 
cranes, derricks or other hoisting apparatus, except the 
operation of (l) dumbwaiters as defined by the Imerican 
Stanc'^rds Association, or (2) elevators equipped only 
for automatic operation. 

5. Oiling, cleaning, or '■,'iping uachiner;?- in m.otion. 

6. Applying belts to a pulley in r.iotion or assisting therein. 

7. Operation of lathes. 

EXHIBIT 163 
FHEAT FLOUR I.iILLING INDUSTRY 

I. G-eneral machine Hazards 

1. In oiling, cleaning or wiping machinerj/- or shafting in 
notion. 

2. In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting there- 
in. 

3. As drivers of tiu.Gks or other motor vehicles, or as help- 
ers or delivery boys on such vehicles, (messengers, office 
find light delivery boys using such. vehicles excluded). 

4. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam 
engines used as prime movers. 

5. Firing of stesxi or v/ater boilers (except boilers of not 
more than 15 lbs. pressure used solely for heating 
purposes) . 

6. In the cutting or voiding of netals by gas or electricity. 

II. Specific Liechanical Hazards • _ 

7. Superintendent 
3. Head liiller 

9. Second Hiller 
10. Engineer 



9791 



-241- 

EDCiIBIT 154 
OCCUPATICITS PilOIiIDITZD TOR Ull'ORS FiTDEH 18 
Occupations Involving General Ha.zo.rds 

1. In oiling, cleaning or wiping machinery or shafting in 
notion. 

2. In applying belts to pulleys in motion or assisting therein. 

3. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or 
as helpers or delivery boys on yiotor vehicles. 

4. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam 
engines, or other prine covers. 

5. In the care, custodj% operation, or repair of elevators, 
cranes, derrichs, or other hoisting apparatus, except in 
the operation of (l) durnhvaiters as defined by the Ameri- 
can Standards Association, or (2) elevators equipped only 
for autonatic operation. 

6. iiring of steaii or rti-ter boilers (except boilers of not 
more than 15 lbs. pressure used solely for heating 
purposes). 

ESIIBIT 135 

VHOLSSALS i:01IUi;i:iTTAL GRAillTE IlIDUSTRY 

1. yorl: in or about quarries, including all surface \7ork. 

2. In the tmisiTortation or in the use of explosives or 
explosive substances. 

3. Pdgging of derricks. 

4. Shaping of carbo ran d^'Jin rrheels. 

5. In the operation of carborundiim wheels. 

6. In the operation of la.thes. 

7. In all other stone cutting or polishing. 

8. In the care or operation or repair of derricks, cranes, 
elev§.tors, or other hoisting apparatus except in the 
operation (1 ) of dumbwaiters as defined by the American 
Standards Asr-ociation, or (2) of elevators equipped only 
for automatic opera.tion. 

9. In switching and working on or about railroad equipment. 

10. In oiling, cleaning, or v.dping machinerj^ in motion. 

11. In applying belts to pulley in notion or assisting therein. 

12. In proximity to any img'aarded belt or gearing. 

13. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or stear:i 
ens^ines or other prime movers. 

14. Firing of steam or water boilers (except steai-i or vrater 
boilers of not more than 15 lbs. pressure used solely for 
heating purposes). 

15. If waste material is utilized, -in- operating or assisting 
to o-oerate crashing ;iachines. 



?791 



-242- 
SXHE'IT 166 

TJHOLESALS liOirai.lE'JTAl LX^LE IItdUSTHY 

1. As drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles 
or as helpers or delivery ooys on motor vehicles. 
■ 2. Shai^ine of carljorundun. vjheels 

3. Eigsing of' derricks. 

4. In the care, custody, operation or repair of derricks, 
craiies, elevators, or other hoisting apparatus, except 
in the operation (l) of duabvaiters as defined "by 
Anerican Standards Association, or (2) of elevators 
equipped onlj' for automatic operation. 

5. In the oiling, cleaning, or T7ipin;^i• nachinerj^ in niotion. 

6. In applj'-ing "belts to a pulley in notion, or assisting 
therein. 

7. In the proximity to 'cjaj \mgu^rded halt or gearing. 

8. Svritching and vrorking on and ahout railroad equipment. 

S. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or steam ( 
engines or other prime movers. 
10. Firing of steam or ^7ater boilers (esce^Tt steam or vrater 
boilers of not more than 15 lbs. pressure used solely 
for heating purposes). 

EXHIBIT 167 - - 

iTHOLESALE TOBACCO IITDUSTSY 

1. As drivers of trucks or other motor vehicles or as 
helpers to drivers or to deliver goods from trucks 
or other motor vehicles. 

2. In the operation, custody, or repair of elevators, 
cranes, derricks, or other hoisting apparatus except 
in the operation of (l) durabijaiters as defined by -the 
Araerican Standa/rds Association, or (2) elevators 

equipped only for automatic operation. V 

3. In handling, loading, or "onloading goods vrhere po'jer- 
driven machinery'- is used for convej'-ing or handling. 

'4. In snitching or in operating i-ailroad equipment. 
5, In dock or marine 'jork. 

E.XHI3IT 168 

UOOD CASED LEAD PEITCIL lIAm^ACTUHIITG IllDUSTRY 

In occuiDations involving specific mechaiiical hazards- machine 
'Tork (Prohibition to ap-nly to operating or assisting in oper- 
ating the follovdng machines). 

1. All povrer-driven ':'Ood.-:'orking machineiy. 

2. Punch jDresses or ntai.iping machines if the clearance 
betv/een the ram and die or the stripper exceeds one- 
fourth inch. 



97S1 



-243- 

E ::ce-ption — Ap:irentices: EnplojTnent on anv of the a"bove- 
naned nachineo naY 1)6 pemitted in the case of ninors 
"betrreen 16 and 10 yevas of a^e '"'ho are bona fide 
apprentices. 

5. In oiling, cleajiing, or ^-'iping nachiner;'- or shafting in 
notion. 

4. In applying "belts to niilleys in notion or assisting 
therein. 

II. Occupations involving health hazards ; 

5. In all procesr.es ^.-'here subst^xnces containing lead or any 
of its conpoinids 3,re used in a liquid or -oorrdered form, 
or at a temperature sufficient to vaporize lead. 

6. TTorl: involving exposure to "benzol or any "benzol compound 
\7hich is violate or vfhich can penetra,te the skin. 

7. In the Vise of dangerous dye-stuffs. 

III. Plpjit cJid outside Maintenance 

8. As drivers of trucks or other notor vehicles or. as helpers 
or delivery "boys on such vehicles. 

9. In, or assisting in, the operation of gas, oil, or steam 
engines used as prime movers. 

10. In the operation, custody, or repair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in the 
operation of (a), dunh'.raiters as defined "by the American 
Standards Association, or ("b) elevators eo^uipped only 
for automatic operation. 
11. Piring of steai or vrater "boilers (except boilers of not 
more than 15 lbs. pressure used solely for heating 
purposes). 

EXHIBIT 1S9 

XOD EEIL Iin)lIST?uY 

1. Turning, blocking, grooving, grading, concaving, shanlc 
scouring, leather and imbber trimi.iing. 

2. Firing of steam or rater boilers (except boilers of not 
more than 15 po-unds pressure used solely for heating 
purposes) . 

3. Driving of motor vehicles. 

4. Oper3,ting or assisting in the operation of gas, oil or 
steam engines or other prime movers. 

5. Care, custody of (sic) repairing of elevators or other 
hoisting apparatus, except in the operation of dumbwaiters 
as defined b;- the American Staiid.ards Association or of 
elevators equipped onl;; 



3791 



-244- 
EHIBIT 170 
WOOD PLUG IiraUSTRY 

I. Occupations involving specific Tieclianical hazards — machine 
TFork (Prohihition to apply to operating, assisting in opera- 

ing, or triring r.aterial fron the following machines). 

1. All occupations in connection '-'ith povfer-driven Tioodrrork- 
ing nachinerj''. 

Exception ; 

EnplojTient on any of the a'bove-na.ned machines nay be 
penaitted in the case of ninors 'bet'Teen sircteen (16) 
md eighteen (18) years of age -under conditions of 
"bona fide ap-jrenticeship to a trade. 

2. In oiling, cleaning, or v/iping Liachinery in notion. 

3. In applying telts to a nulley in motion or assisting there- 
in. 

II. Occupations involving general hazards 

4. Firing of steaii or 'jater "boilers, (except hollers or not 
nore than 15 Ihs. pressure used solely for heating pur- 
poses). 

5. As .drivers or assistr.nts to drivers of notor vehicles or 
as helpers or delivery hoys on notor vehicles. 

6. In or assisting in the operation of gas, oil, or stean 
engines or other prime movers. 

7. In the custody, operation, or repair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting apparatus, except in the 
operation of (l) dumhwaiters as defined by the Araerican 
Standards Association, or (2) elevators equipped only 

for automatic operation. 

EXHIBIT -171 

uooD Tu: ::iiic- ai:d shapiiig- ii:dust?jes 

I. Occupations involving specific mechanical hazards — machine 
nork (prohibition to apply to operating, assisting in 

operating, or taking material fron the folloning nachines) 

1. All occupations in connection nith pcjcr- driven voodvorking 
Biachinor;-. . -•.•./■.•.. •:•. ■_•,/- ^.o .c:---'.ri".-'-.::. 
Exception ; Emplo^Tnent on any of the above-named nachines 
nay be pemitted in the case of ninors bet^r-een 16 and 18 
years of age under conditions of bona fide apprenticeship 
to a trade. 

2. In oiling, cleaning or rriping .'machinery in motion. 

3. In applying belts to a -oulle;' in notion or assisting therein. 

II. Occupe^tions involving genera,! hazards 

1. Firing of stean. or rrater boilers (e'xeiit boilers of not 

.nore thaJi 15 -oounds presr^ure used solely ,-for-heatiiig pttS^^Oees. 

9791 



-245- 

2. As drivers or assistants to drivers of notor vehicles 
or as helpers or deliverj'- Tdoj^s on notor vehicles. 

3. In, or assistin{^ in, the operation of gas, oil, or 
steam engines or other prime movers. 

4. In tlie custody, operation or repair of elevators, cranes, 
derricks, or other hoisting epparatus, except in the 
operation of (l) dun'bv'aiters as defined hy the American 
Standards Association, or (2) of elevators equipped only 
for automatic or)eration. 

III. Occupations involvin^c inf lamraible material 

1. Lining and/or handling after mixing of any liquids con- 
taining lacquer, naptha, or any other easily inflsmnahle 
liquid su"bst?nce used in or aro-un,d so-called "enameling 
departments. " 

EXHII.it 172 

TOODSIT lilSUIJ^TOn PHI AilD BHilCiJZT 1 J.irjrACTU?JNG IITDUSTHY 

i; Occupation involving specific mechanical hazards, including 
Machine Work: 

1. All occuoations in connection '/ith power-driven v/oodnork- 
ing machinery. 

Exceotion - Enploj^aent on any of the ahove named machines 
ma^'- he permitted in the case of minors hetTTeen sixteen 
and eighteen years of age under conditions of hona fide 
apprenticeship to a trade. 

2. Any occuiiation involving the oiling, cleaning or rriping 
of an;'" machinery in notion. 

3. Any occupation involving the application of helts to 
nulleys in motion or the assisteaice therein. 



-'</ 



II. Occupations involving general haza.rds (General Plant and Out- 
side maintenance) . 

4. Drivers or assistants to drivers of motor vehicles or 
helpers or delivery hoys on riotor vehicles. 

5. Occupations involving the firing of steam or nater 
toilers (except boilers of not more than 15 Ihs. pres- 
sure used solely for heating purposes). 

6. Occupations in or assisting in the operation of any gas, 
oil, or steam engines or other prime movers. 

7. Occupations involving the custody, operation or repair 
of elevators, cranes, derricks or other hoisting appa- 
ratus, except in the operation of (l) d-ojnbuaiters, as 
defined by the American Standards Association, or 

(2) elevators equii^ped onl^^ for autons,tic operation. 



5791 



-246- 
EiailBIT 173 
WOOL TELT :jllIU:..'i.CTUHIl;G IIJDUSTRY 

1. Carding 

2. Lapping 

3. Falling 

4. Uashing 

5. Extracting 

6. Cixttinc 



9791# 



OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION 
THE DIVISION OF REVIEW 

THE WORK OF THE DIVISION OF REVIEW 

Executive Order No. 7075, dated June 15, 1935, established the Division of Review of *.he 
National Recovery Administration. The pertinent part of the Executive Order reads thus: 

The Division of Review shall assemble, analyze, and report upon the statistical 
information and records of experience of the operations of the various trades and 
industries heretofore subject to codes of fair competition, shall study the ef- 
fects of such codes upon trade, industrial and labor conditions in general, and 
other related matters, shall make available for the protection and promotion of 
the public interest an adequate review of the effects of the Administration of 
Title I of the National Industrial Recovery Act, and the principles and policies 
put into effect thereunder, and shall otherwise aid the President in carrying out 
his functions under the said Title. I hereby appoint Leon C. Marshall, Director of 
the Division of Review. 

The study sections set up in the Division of Review covered these areas: industry 
studies, foreign trade studies, labor studies, trade practice studies, statistical studies, 
legal studies, administration studies, miscellaneous studies, and the writing of code his- 
tories. The materials which #ere produced by these sections are indicated below. 

Except for the Code Histories, all items mentioned below are scheduled to be in mimeo- 
graphed form by April 1, 1936. 

THE CODE HISTORIES 

The Code Histories are documented accounts of the formation and administration of the 
codes. They contain the definition of the industry and the principal products thereof; the 
classes of members in the industry; the history of code formation including an account of the 
sponsoring organizations, the conferences, negotiations and hearings which were held, and 
the activities in connection with obtaining approval of the code; the history of the ad- 
ministration of the code, covering the organization and operation of the code authority, 
the difficulties encountered in administration, the extent of compliance or non-compliance, 
and the general success or lack of success of the code, and an analysis of the operation of 
code provisions dealing with wages, hours, trade practices, and other provisions. These 
and other matters are canvassed not only in terms of the materials to be found in the files, 
out also in terms of the experiences of the deputies and others concerned with code formation 
and administration. 

The Code Histories, (including histories of certain NRA units or agencies) are not 
mimeographed. They are to be turned over to the Department of Commerce in typewritten form. 
All told, approximately eight hundred and fifty (850) histories will be completed. This 
number includes all of the approved codes and some of the unapproved codes. (In W ork 
Materials No ig. Content s of Code Histries . will be found the outline which governed 
the preparation of Code Histories.) 

(In the case of all approved codes and also in the case of some codes not carried to 
final approval, there are in NRA files further materials on industries. Particularly worthy 
of mention are the Volumes I, II and III which constitute the material officially submitted 
to the President in support of the recommendation for approval of each code. These volumes 
9768—1. 



-ii- 

set forth the origination of the code, the sponsoring group, the evidence advanced to sup- 
port the proposal, the report of the Division of Research and Planning on the industry, the 
recommendations of the various Advisory Boards, certain types of official correspondence, 
tl.e transcript of the formal hearing, and other pertinent matter. There is also much offi- 
cial information relating to amendments, interpretations, exemptions, and other rulings. The 
materials mentioned in this paragraph were of course not a part of the work of the Division 
of Review. ) 

THE WORK MATERIALS SERIES 

In the A'ork of the Division of Review a considerable number of studies and compilations 
of data {other than those noted below in the Evidence Studies Series and the Statistical 
Material Series) have been made. These are listed below, grouped according to the char- 
acter of the material. (In Work M aterials No. r7. T ent ative O utlines and Sum marie s of 
Studies in Process , these materials are fully described). 

I ndustry Studies 

Automobile Industry, An Economic Survey of 

Bituminous Coal Industry under Free Competition and Code Regulation, Economic Survey of 

Electrical Manufacturing Industry, The 

Fertilizer Industry, The 

Fishery Industry and the Fishery Codes 

Fishermen and Fishing Craft, Earnings of 

Foreign Trade under the National Industrial Recovery Act 

Part A - Competitive Position of the United States in International Trade 1927-29 through 

1934. 
Part B - Section 3 (e) of NIRA and its administration. 
Part C - Imports and Importing under NRA Codes. 
Part D - Exports and Exporting under NRA Codes. 

Forest Products Industries, Foreign Trade Study of the 

Iron and Steel Industry, The 

Knitting Industries, The 

Leather and Shoe Industries, The 

uumber and Timber Products Industry, Economic Problems of the 

Men's Clothing Industry, The 

Millinery Industry, The 

Motion Picture Industry, The 

Migration of Industry, The: The Shift of Twenty-Five Needle Trades From New York State, 
1926 to 1934 

National Labor Income by Months, 1929-35 

Paper Industry, The 

Production, Prices, Employment and Payrolls in Industry, Agriculture and Railway Trans- 
portation, January 1923, to date 

Retail Trades Study, The 

Rubber Industry Study, The 

Textile Industry in the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, and Japan 

Textile Yarns and Fabrics 

Tobacco Industry, The 

Wholesale Trades Study, The 

Women's Neckwear and Sc?rf Industry, Financial and Labor Data on 

9768—2 



if 



- lii - 

Women's Apparel Industry, Some Aspects of the 

Trade Prac tice Studies 

Commodities, Information Concerning: A Study of NRA and Related Experiences in Control 
Distribution, Manufacturers' Control of: Trade Practice Provisions in Selected MRA Codes 
Distributive Relations in the Asbestos Industry 
Design Piracy: The Problem and Its Treatment Under MRA Codes 
Electrical Mfg. Industry: Price Filing Study 
Fertilizer Industry; Price Filing Study 

Geographical Price Relations Under Codes of Fair Competition, Control of 
Minimum Price Regulation Under Codes of Fair Competition 
Multiple Basing Point System in the Lime Industry: Operation of the 
Price Control in the Coffee Industry 
Price Filing Under NRA Codes 
Production Control in the Ice Industry 
Production Control, Case Studies in 

Resale Price Maintenance Legislation in the United States 

Retail Price Cutting, Restriction of, with special Emphasis on The Drug Industry. 
Traia Practice Rules of The Federal Trade Commission (1914-1936): A classification for 
comrarison with Trade Practice Provisions of NRA Codes. 

Labor Studies 

Cap and Cloth Hat Industry, Commission Report on Wage Differentials in 

Earnings in Selected Manufacturing Industries, by States, 1933-35 

Employment, Payrolls, Hours, and Wages in 115 Selected Code Industries 1933-1935 

Fur Manufacturing, Commission Report on VTa^cs and Hours in 

Hours and Wages in American Industry 

Labor Program Under the National Industrial Recovery Act, The 

Part A. Introduction 

Part B. Control of Hours and Reemployment 

Part C. Control of Wages 

Part D. Control of Other Conditions of Employment 

Part E. Section 7(a) of the Recovery Act 
Materials in the Field of Industrial Relations 
PRA Census of Employment, June, October, 1933 
Puerto Rico Needlework, Homeworkers Survey 

Adm i nist rative Studies 

Administrative and Legal Aspects of Stays, Exemptions and Exceptions, Code Amendments, Con- 
ditional Orders of Approval 

Administrative Interpretations of NRA Codec 

Administrative Law and Procedure under the NIRA 

Agreements Under Sections 4(a) and 7(b) of the NIRA 

Approve Codes in Industry Groups, Classification of 

Basic Code, the — (Administrative Order X-61) 

Code Authorities anc Their Part in the Administration of the NIRA 
Part A. Introduction 
Fart E. Nature, Composition and Organization of Code Authorities 

9768 — 2 . 



- iv - 

Part C. Activities of the Code Authorities 

Part D. Code Authority Finances 

Part E. Summary and Evaluation 

Code Compliance Activities of the NRA 

Code Making Program of the NRA in the Territories, The 

Code Provisions and Related Subjects, Policy Statements Concerning 

Content of NIRA Administrative Legislation 

Part A. Executive and Administrative Orders 

Part B. Labor Provisions in the Codes 

Part C. Trade Practice Provisions in the Codes 

Part D. Administrative Provisions in the Codes 

Part E. Agreements under Sections 4(a) and 7(b) 

Part F. A Type Case: The Cotton Textile Code 
Labels Under NRA, A Study of 

Model Code and Model Provisions for Codes, Development of 

National Recovery Administration, The: A Review of its Organization and Activities 
NRA Insignia 

President's Reemployment Agreement, The 

President's Reemployment Agreement, Substitutions in Connection with the 
Prison Labor Problem under NRA and the Prison Coapact, The 
Frc'.rlems of Administration in the Overlapping of Code Definitions of Industries and Trades, 

Multiple Code Covera?:e, Classifying Individual Members of Industries and Trades 
Relationship of NRA to Government Contracts and Contracts Involving the Use of Government 

Funds 
Relationship of NRA with States and Municipalities 
Sheltered Workshops Under NRA 
Uncodified Industries; A Study of Factors Limiting the Code Making Program 

Legal Studies 

Anti-Trust Laws and Unfair Competition 

Collective Bargaining Agreements, the Right of Individual Employees to Enforce 

Commerce Clause, Federal Regulation of the Employer-Employee Relationship Under the 

Delegation of Power, Certain Phases of the Principle of, with Reference to Federal Industrial 
Regulatory Legislation 

Enforcement, Extra-Judicial Methods of 

Federal Regulation through the Joint Employment of the Power of Taxation and the Spending 
Power 

Government Contract Provisions as a Means of Establishing Proper Economic Standards, Legal 
Memorandum on Possibility of 

Industrial Relations in Australia, Regulation of 

Intrastate Activities Which so Affect Interstate Commerce as to Bring them Under the Com- 
merce Clause, Cases on 

Legislative Possibilities of the State Constitutions 

Post Office and Post Road Power — Can it be Used as a Means of Federal Industrial Regula- 
tion? 

State Recovery Legislation in Aid of Federal Recovery Legislation History and Analysis 

Tariff Rates to Secure Proper Standards of Wages and Hours, the Possibility of Variation in 

Trade Practices and the Anti-Trust Laws 

Treaty Making Power of the United States 

War Power, Can it be Used as a Means of Federal Regulation of Child Labor? 

9768—4. 



THE EVIDENCE STUDIES SERI ES 

The Evidence Studies were originally undertaken to gather material for pending ocurt 
cases. After the Schechter decision the project was continued in order to assemble data for 
use in connection with the studies of the Division of Review. The data are particularly 
concerned with the nature, size and operations of the industry; and with the relation of the 
industry to interstate commerce. The industries covered by the Evidence Studies account for 
more than one-half of the total number of workers under codes. The list of those studies 
follows: 



Automobile Manufacturing Industry 
Automotive Parts and Equipment Industry 
Baking Industry 

Boot and Shoe Manufacturing Industry 
Bottled Soft Drink Industry 
Builders' Supplies Industry 
Canning Industry 
Chemical Manufacturing Industry 
Cigar Manufacturing Industry 
Coat cind Suit Industry 
Construction Industry 
Cotton Garment Industry 
Dress Manufacturing Industry 
Electrical Contracting Industry 
Electrical Manufacturing Industry 
Fabricated Metal Products Mfg. and Metal Fin- 
ishing and Metal Coating Industry 
Fishery Industry 

Furniture Manufacturing Industry 
General Contractors Industry 
Graphic Arts Industry 
Gray Iron Foundry Industry 
Hosiery Industry 

Infant's and Children's Wear Industry 
Iron and Steel Industry 



Leather Industry 

Lumber and Timber Products Industry 
Mason Contractors Industry 
Men's Clothing Industry 
Motion Picture Industry 
Motor Vehicle Retailing Trade 
Needlework Industry of Puerto Rico 
Painting and Paperhanging Industry 
Photo Engraving Industry 
Plumbing Contracting Industry 
Retail Lumber Industry 
Retail Trade Industry 

Retail Tire and Battery Trade Industry 
Rubber Manufacturing Industry 
Rubber Tire Manufacturing Industry 
Shipbuilding Industry 
Silk Textile Industry 
Structural Clay Products Industry 
Throwing Industry 
Trucking Industry 
Waste Materials Industry 
Wholesale and Retail Food Industry 
Wholesale Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Indus- 
try 
Wool Textile Industry 



THE STATISTICAL MATERIALS SERIES 



This series is supplementary to the Evidence Studies Series. The reports include data 
on establishments, firms, employment. Payrolls, wages, hours, production capacities, ship- 
ments, sales, consumption, stocks, prices, material costs, failures, exports and imports. 
They also include notes on the principal qualifications that should be observed in using the 
data, the technical methods employed, and the applicability of the material to the study of 
the industries concerned. The following numbers appear in the series: 
9768—5. 



- VI - 

Asphalt Shingle and Roofing Industry Fertilizer Industry 

Business Furniture Funeral Supply Industry 

Candy Manufacturing Industry Glass Container Industry 

Carpet and Rug Industry Ice Manufacturing Industry 

Cement Industry Knitted Outerwear Industry 

Cleaning and Dyeing Trade Paint, Varnish, and Lacquer, Mfg. Industry 

Coffee Industry Plumbing Fixtures Industry 

Copper and Brass Mill Products Industry Rayon and Synthetic Yarn Producing Industry 

Cotton Textile Industry Salt Producing Industry 

Electrical Manufacturing Industry 

THE COVERAGE 

The original, and approved, plan of the Division of Review contemplated resources suf- 
ficient (a) to prepare some 1200 histories of codes and NRA units or agencies, (b) to con- 
solidate and index the NRA files containing some 40,000,000 pieces, (c) to engage in ex- 
tensive field work, (d) to secure much aid from established statistical agencies of govern- 
ment, (e) to assemble a considerable number of experts in various fields, (f) to conduct 
approximately 25% more studies than are listed above, and (g) to prepare a comprehensive 
summarj report. 

Because of reductions made in personnel and in use of outside experts, limitation of 
access to field work and research agencies, and lack of jurisdiction over files, the pro- 
jected plan was necessarily curtailed. The most serious curtailments were the omission of 
the comprehensive summary report; the dropping of certain studies and the reduction in the 
coverage of other studies; and the abandonment of the consolidation and indexing of the 
files. Fortunately, there is reason to hope that the files may yet be cared for under other 
auspices. 

Notwithstanding these limitations, if the files are ultimately consolidated and in- 
dexed the exploration of the NRA materials will have been sufficient to make them accessible 
and highly useful. They constitute the largest and richest single body of information 
concerning the problems and operations of industry ever assembled in any nation. 

L. C. Marshall, 
Director, Division of Review. 
9768—6. 



v^„«^