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BOSTON PUBLIC LIBHAMt 



3 9999 06542 032 3 



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OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION 
DIVISION OF REVIEW 



AN EXPLANATORY REPORT ON THE 
STUDY OF NATURAL AREAS OF TRADE IN THE UNITED STATES 
AND A GUIDE TO THE 
METHODOLOGY USED IN ITS PREPARATION 



By 
Robert A. Dier 



WORK MATERIALS NO. 42 



Ml 



INDUSTRY STUDIES SECTION 
February, 1936 



OriTICL OF THE NaTIOFAL ESCOVERY ADI-:i>nSTrL4.TI01-' 
Division Q]? ZEVIEIT 



M EXPhMATOlTf HEFORT OIT 'TES 
STUDY 0? ITATUEAL IREAS OF TFJlDE IF 1!¥S IH^ITEF STATES 
AIFD A aUIEE TO THE 
I.IITHODOLOGY USED IF ITS PFEPAS^TIOK 



F.ODert A. Dier 



FelDnmry, 1936 



9712 



I0EET7£iED 



This stiic.;" vrr.s -ujidertp.ken under the supervision of Leon Henderson, 
Director of the ?.esearch and Planning Division of the National Recov- 
ery Adainistr--.tion to estahlish a factual "basis for the solution of 
certain prohleus encountered in the adinmistration of the Retail and 
Wholesale Codes. 

The c>,tr, presented here, toi^-ether rrith the Tr-de Area ■;aps, in- 
dicates ho-' the duplication end. overl3,pping of ■ O'Cinistrative facili- 
ties ma:/ he Minimized, horr territories mas'- ^e most efficiently tra- 
velled and, in general, provides for the maximuin economy in adjuinis- 
trative control. 

Other iises are of course a"o;'^arent . For expjaple, it has long 
teen desiralile to establish units of territory, which vTOuld provide 
a hasis for larizing the statistics 2.> thered hy various government de- 
partments coi-iparaDle . The a.reas designrted here could readily he 
used for this ■"ujrpose since they ap3:)ro>:imate the areas upon v/hich 
the Federal ~es3rve System no'"- reports statistics. 

Altho\T(-,-h the present study ".as intended primarily for use in 
connection vrith the distribution codes it can, "aith slight adaptations, 
he made ap;plicaole to many mcjiufactiuring and service industries. 



L. C. Har shall 
Director Division of Review 



9712 1 3 My 36 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



.» * « 



Fore'vord ^ 

Sources 3_5 

Description of Maps 6 

Location of Boundaries 6 

The 37 Economic Divisions of the United States 7 

One of the 37 Economic Divisions showing Primary and Secondary Areas. 8 

Terms or Phrases Used in a Technical or Special Sense 9 

Methodology 

Defining a Trading Area i^l4 

The Use of Federal Reserve Lines in Establishing Major 

Wholesale Areas il-i2 

Selecting the Trading Centers 12 

Special N.R.A. Trade Area Factors 13 

Primary and Secondary Trading Areas 13 

Multiple Trading Markets and Their District Centers 14 

The Specific Process of Delineating Trade Areas 14-17 

Summaries 

United States Sximmary of Primary and Secondary Trade Areas 

by Branch Districts 18 

Composition of Branch Districts by Primary and 

Secondary Trade Areas 19- 30 

Tables 

The Need for Trade StatisticSj by Trading AreaSj 

to Supplement Trading Area Naps 30-A 

Table I Summary of Retail Outlets and Sales — Other Pertinent 

Data — by Branch Districts 31 

Table II Retail Outlets and SaleSj by Retail Trading Areas and 

Kinds of Business . 32 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/workmaterials42unit 



4-5 



Retail Trading Areas 
(based on the department store experience, fol- 
lowing study lay the J. Walter Thoiisjson Company.) 

District Agency Areas for the Radio Wholesaling 
trade — study by the Radio Wholesaling Code Au- 
thority. 

Other Publications 

Leading Department Stores, published by Internat- 
ional Magazine Company, 1934. 

Leading Advertisers, published by Curtlss Publish^ 
Ing Company, 1933. 

A survey of Economic Data of the Eastern Roclsy 
Mountain Region, published by Roclsy Mountain Eco- 
nomic Council, 

The Law of Retail Gravitation — Mn. J. Rellly — pub- 
lished by G.P.Putnam's Sons, 1931. 

Methods for the Measurement of Retail Trade Terri- 
tories — Wm. J. Rellly — published by G.P.Putnam's 
Sons, 1931. 

The Federal Reserve System, by H. Parker Willis. 

Band He Nally Conmerclal Atlas — 1934. 



DESCRIPTION OF MAPS 

* .« .« 

The results of this study are graphically presented in map 
form. These maps appear under separate binding and indicate 57 
economic divisions of the United States. Each of these 37 econom- 
ic "states" is subdivided into Primary Trading Areas of which there 
is a total of 372 in the United States. Some of these Primary Trad- 
ing areas containj within their boundarieSj one or more Secondary 
Trading AreaSj of which there are 268. 

An enlarged map of the New York City Mult iple Trading Market 
is included to show this densely populated metropolitan area in more 
detail than was possible otherwise. 

LOCATION OF BOUNDARIES 

» * * 

Trade area boundaries are drawn along county lines except 
when the evidence shows that the trade of any particular county is 
divided between two trade areas. In such instances the dividing 
line is drawn across the county on Minor Civil Division lines. 
Should the trade of a particular township (Minor Civil Division) 
be dividedj the entire township is included in that adjacent trade 
area having the dominant trade influence. Township lines are fol- 
lowed in such cases because the Minor Civil Division (township) is 
the smallest political unit for which comprehensive statistics are 
gathered. 

The Files of the Division of Research and Planning con- 
tained a master set of Minor Civil Division Maps which gave the of- 
ficial location of any line deviating from county boundaries. 



The 37 Ec onomic Divisions of the United States 
as desi gnat ed by this study 



» .* «■ 



Reproduced from 

"A STUDY OF NATURAL AREAS OF TRADE IN TEE UNITED STATES" 

Research and Planning publication February 1935 





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TERMS OR PHRASES USED IN A TECHNICAL OR SPECIAL SENSE 



BRANCH DISTRICT: A composite of contiguous Retail Trading Areas which forms what may 
be termed a V.^iolesale Trading Area. The United States can be logically divided into 
37 such major areas using the "adjusted" lines of the 37 Federal Reserve Districts for 
this division of territory. 

PRIMARY TRADING AREA: An irregularly shaped unit of territory based on the flow of 
trade and containing 2,000 or more full-time employees, (retail) the boundaries of which 
are determined primarily by the radius of the commercial influence of its dominant 
trade center. (Primary Trading Areas may contain one or more Secondary Trading Areas.) 

♦SECONDARY TRADING AREA: Corresponds to a Primary Trading Area except that the retail 
establishments therein do not employ 2,000 or more full-time employees. 

PRIMARY TRADING CBiITER: The city or town of dominant commercial influence within a 
Primary Trading Area. 

SECONDARY TRADING CSOTER: A city of commercial influence secondary to that of the Pri- 
mary Trading Center — yet of some distributing Importance to its nearby towns and rural 
communities. 

**MULTIPLE TRADING MARKET: A special type of Trading Area of more than 500 square miles, 
containing more than a million people living in a series of closely connected cities 
and twms. There are ten such markets in the United States. Special Treatment is giv- 
en these markets in this study. 

DISTOICT CENTER OF A hULTIPLE TRADIIC MARKET: A city or town subordinate to the Pri- 
mary Trading Center of a Multiple Trading Market but of dominant comnercial influence 
within a contiguous portion of a Multiple Trading Market, 

SUBORDINATE URBAN CITIES: Cities of sufficiently dominant trade Influence to attract 
consumers from outlying towns and districts, but of less dominant influence than either 
Primary or Secondary Trading Centers or District Centers of Multiple Trading Markets. 
These fall into four groups as follows: Cities of 25,000 to 100,000 population, 
10,000 to 25,000 population, 5,000 to 10,000 population, and less than 5,000 population. 



This study is mainly concerned with Primary Trading Areas and Centers. Secondary Areas 
are outlined only to provide flexibility. 

Definition from Marketing Atlas of the United States published by the International Mag- 
azine Company. 



10 



DEFIIflMG A TRADING AREA 

* * * 

ManufacturerSj distributorSj advertising agencies and other 
private business concerns have divided the country into such trade 
areas as reflect the sales and distribution of their particular pro- 
ducts. Certain large publishers of per iodicals have designated other 
similar areas as representing units of territory which reflect the 
buying habit s and customs of retailers^ wholesalers and consumers to 
provide national advertisers with a basis for determining the most 
efficient method of directing sales forceSj est ablishing branch unit s 
and for ascertaining the most strategic points for warehousing and 
distributing merchandise. 

The study presented heredeals principally with two types of 
trading areas: 

1. RETAIL or LOCAL TRADIl*} AREAS which are, In reality, irregularly shaped 
units of territory based on the flow of retail trade, the boundaries of 
which are determined by. 

The radius of the conmerclal Influence of the dominant trade 
center (city) In that retail trading area. 

The transportation and distribution facilities senrlng It from 
within and without Its limits. 

The buying habits and customs of the people located therein. 

2. WHOLESALE or NATIONAL TRADING AREAS which are composed of a group of con- 
tiguous retail trading areas bounded by a line which represents the ap- 
proximate boundary of one of the 37 Federal Reserve branch territories, 
ADJUSTED to the FLOW OF TRADE as follows: 

Consideration of geographic barriers such as mountains and 
rivers. 

Consideration of the radius of the Influence of that city 
within Its limits which possesses to a greater degree than 
any other, facilities for wholesaling, distribution and 
banking. 

Consideration of the boundaries of the influence of each of 
the retail trading centers located on the outlying fringe 
of the major wholesale trade area. 

Consideration of the most Important lines of communication 
and transportation running through the major area and Its 
adjacent areas; the range of warehouse deliveries ana the 
extent of the Influence of newspaper circulation. 



11 



Interpreted strictlyj any town containing a retail store 
might be called a Trading Center and a boundary representing the 
radius of its influence drawn around it. We arej howeverj con- 
cerned only with the selection of the minimum number of markets 
of first importance which as sizeable cities transact the major- 
ity of our total retail and wholesale business. When the line 
representing the radius of the influence of these cities isdrawn 
around each we have our retail trading areas. When fitted to- 
gether in contiguous groupSj the retail areas make up still lar- 
ger natural economic unitSj or wholesale areas whichj when joined 
together J complete the map of the United States. 

The 37 main divisions^ the 372 primary retail trade areas 
and the 268 secondary retail trade areas offer a practical and 
flexible basis for systematic administration - the difference in 
volume being taken care of by additional persone+4 under the var- 
ious administrative units. 

The way trade actually goes makes it impossible to estab- 
lish areas of equal populat ionj _ equal sales volume or equal size. 

THE USE OF FEDERAL RESERVE LINES IN 

ESTABLISHING MAJOR WHOLESALE AREAS 

* « * 

While surprisingly accurate boundaries can be drawn around 
retail trading areaSj it is more difficult to define equally accur- 
ate boundaries forwholesale trade areas. Most retail trade is in 
convenience, goods such as foods and drugs, the distribut ion of which 
follows lines of great similarity. On the other hand wholesale 
trade embraces such widely dissimilar goods as hardware and mill 
supplieSj drugs and clothingj rawmaterials and household special— 
tieSj such as radios andvacumn cleaners. For examplej the bound- 
aries of the trade area of thedrug wholesalers in Chicago may dif- 
fer widely from that of the Chicago distributors of farm or indus- 
trial machinery. 



12 

A careful analysis of the location of the borders of the 
*37 Federal Reserve territories revealed that these dividing lines 
reflected natural major wholesale areas to a remarkable degree. 
This result is probably due to the fact that evidence concerning 
the movement of trade was examined when the main banks were estab- 
lished years ago and it is logical to suppose that the location of 
these banks has exerted some influence on the general flow of trade. 

There arej of coursej certain areas which seem to have been 
improperly allocated at the outset or inwhich considerable economic 
change has occurred. These are the areas where the Division of Re- 
search and Planning has made several major and numerous minor "flow 
of trade" adjustments. 

To further confirm the use of the adjusted Federal Reserve 
lines as a guide to wholesale areas we find that 33 of the 37 Fed- 
eral Reserve Cit ies are included in the first 49 wholesaling centers 
in the United States. (Census of Wholesale Distributionj 1930). 

SELECTING THE TRADING CENTERS 

« « « 

Private business concerns have gathered and analyzed basic 
data relating to the relative commercial importance of every city 
in the United State% for a period of 15 years or more. 

In this work each center was analyzed from the standpoint 
of retail and wholesale advantages. Stores and warehouses were 
rated and their variety in each community recorded. Comparative 
values were then made of cities in each section. The initial step 
in this study was a detailed analysis of this source material - 
plus a careful study of the results of similar marketing data com- 
piled by such government agencies as the Department of Commercej 
Census Bureau^ Federal Reserve System and so forth. Our Trading 
'AreaSj thereforej portray composities of the experience of all ex- 
isting marketing studies^ andthe Division of Research and Planning 
was exceptionally fortunate in having the heartiest cooperation 
from all sources. 

12 Main Federal Reserve Districts plus 25 branch territories. 



13 



SPECIAL N.R.A. TRADE AREA FACTORS 

» « « 

Because this study was developed with special reference to 

Retailj and to a slightly lesser degree Wholesale Trade^ certain 

special factorSj in addition to those listedj were applied to each 

Retail Trade 'Area. In brief these were: 

That each Retail Trade Area contains at least 2^000 full- 
time retail employees (Census of Retail Distribution 1933). 

That each Retail Trading Area contains at least one or more 
warehouse or wholesaler and by a recognized source of sup- 
ply for its surrounding territory. 

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY TRADING AREAS 

* « « 

Retail trading areas arej for the purpose of this studyj 
divided into two classifications — Primary and Secondary. 

A Primary Retail Trading Area is one that qualifies as such 
when all factors^ including the two special N.R.A. factors^ are ap- 
plied. Such Primary Areas may include one or more Secondary Retail 
Trading Areas. These boundaries are drawn as a solid line on the 
maps (See Legend on Maps). 

A Secondary Retail Trading Area (Qualifies by all except the 
two special N.R.A. factors and is outlined on the maps with a dot- 
ted line. 

This study designates 372 Primary Retail Trading Areas and 
368 Secondary Retail Trading Areas. 

For control purposes we are concerned only with Primary Re- 
tail Trading 'Areas. However j should the volume of commerce so in- 
crease as to raise the number of retail full-time employees in a 
Secondary Area to 2jOCG - or should such an area become of greater 
importance as a warehousing and distributing po-int - it could then 
be given "Primary" status. 



14 



MULTIPLE TRADING MARKETS AND 

THEIR DISTRICT CENTERS 

* » .« 

There are lO *Multiple Trading Centers in the United States. 
These multiple markets present a special problem because in every 
instance they include cities of tent imes larger than some of the Pri- 
mary Trading Centers in other sections of the country. For instancoj 
Newarkj New Jersey lies within the New York City trading area and 
yet is a larger commercial center and distributive point than is 
Portlandj Maine. Such centers as Newark are treated as District 
Centers of the Multiple Trading Market andj in realityj differ from 
Principal Trading Centers only insofar as their unusual location 
places them under the powerful influence of an exceptionally large 
metropolitan center. 

TBE SPECIFIC PROCESS OF 
DELINEATING TRADE AREAS 

X X « 

Trade area boundaries are necessarily approximations. The 
complexity of competitionj the general nature of some of the deter- 
minating factors used and the dictates of practical use make arbi- 
trary refinement beyond a certain point impractical. 

NeverthelesSj an unbiased approximation of trade area bound- 
aries will supply a far better control basis than the present major 
or minor political divisions. 

Our maps show Retail Trade Area boundaries at the farthest 
points from which the consumer is in the habit of coming to the 
Primary Trading Center for merchandise. Likewise they show Wholesale 
Trade Area boundaries at the farthest points from which merchants 
come to that city within the area which contains the greatest dis- 
tributive facilit ies and t he largest and most varied stocks of mer- 
chandise. 

As dejign«t»d in "The Trading Area System of Sales Control", - (Araarketing 
atlas of the United States) - published by International Magazine Company I93I. 



15 



In approaching the problems of actually drawing the border 
lines many "flow of trade" factors are examined comparatively for 
every section of the country. Their effect on commerce is then 
graphically plotted on maps. The actual delineation of the bound- 
ary line is then a matter of impartialj experienced judgment. 

The factors used can be grouped under four general head- 
ings : 

Physical and geographic features 

Mountain rangesj deserts^ lakes and waterways must be care- 
fully considered and their effect on the flow of trade thorough — 
ly understood before accurate boundaries can be drawn. For example^ 
in Eastern Pennsylvania there are complete units of territory hem.- 
med in by mountain ridges. Transportation lines can enter such 
Trading Areas only through certain narrow valleys. Consequently 
these mountain ridges determine the directions in which people and 
goods move. 

Other similar factors which must be given their proper value 
in the selection of trade centers and the determination of the ex- 
tent of their influence are placement of cities and townSj climate 
and natural resources and historical background. 

Population, Families and Home Ownership 

In selecting trade area Centers a city with a smaller pop- 
ulation than another was sometimes chosen. While population fig- 
ures are highly informative they do not tell the whole story^ for 
they do not take into account the density of populationj difference 
in standards of living or buying habits of the populace. Numerous 
factorSj examined in con junction with population figureSj determine 
the selection of the dominant Centers. 

The number of families and homeSj the extent of homeowner- 
ship and the educationalj resortj amusement and residential advan- 
tages ore indicative of the general character of a center and its 
consequent importance in relation to other competing communities. 



i 



16 



Transportation, Communication 
and Distributive Facilities 

Frequently a town located between two rival trade centers 

may belong in the trading area of the more distant trading center 

because of longer established or more convenient transportation 

facilities — the distance in time being less than the distance in 

miles. Consequently all lines and schedules of transportation 

must be carefully studied. 

The drift of trade from the smaller to the larger centeTj 
withasmaller backflow to the smaller townSj has been greatly ac- 
centuated by the hundreds of thousands of miles of new roadSj the 
thousands of new bus lines and the tremenduous increase in travel 
in privately owned automobiles. ThuSj transportation's new facil- 
ities exert an ever increasing influence on the map of commerce. 

After transportation^ communication is checked. Telephone 
exchanges and their connecting lines are also considered. The lo- 
cation of newspapers j andthe extent of t heir circulation in adjoin- 
ing territory; the jobbing operations in all trades and the range 
of retail store delivery by large and small merchandising concerns 
is carefully analyzed. 

Volume of Business , Wealth and 
Standard of Living 

Such factors include volume of retail and wholesale businesSj 

the number of full and part time employees retail and wholesalej bank 

depositSj savings accountSj car ownershipj distribution of income^ 

buying customs and trade tendencies. 

From a marketing viewpointj the Standard of Living is of 
fundemental importance. The poor cannot buy sterling silverwarej 
electric rangeSj oil burnerSj and golf club memberships nor can pri- 
vate yachts and aeroplanes be sold to people inmoderate circum — 
stances. Consequent lyj the fact or of wealth must always be considered 
in con junct ion with the dist r ibut ion of t hat wealthy and the stan- 
dard of living in the community. 



17 



Boundary lines arsj thereforej a compromisG or an average 
of all the factors which apply to peoplej buying power^ standards 
of livingj educational and amusement facilitieSj volume of business^ 
strategic location and buying habits. They represent the nearest 
possible delineation of areas and as such provide a workable basis 
for economy of control. 

Trade for the most part ignores political boundary lines. 
To cite just a few exampleSj the Northwestern Counties of Illinois 
are dominated by the Iowa cities of Dubuquej Clinton and Davenportj 
the 16 counties in the Southwestern part of Illinois properly belong 
in the Missouri trading area of St. Louis. ProvidencOj Rhode Islandj 
attracts trade from the cities in Massachusetts and Connecticut. 
Chattanoogoj Tennesseej pulls consumer trade from four counties in 
Georgia. 

Whenever a decisive boundary line could not be immediately 
drawnj we have had available for references the results of question- 
naires sent by large publishing houses to thousands of their sub- 
scribers located in these conflicting areas. This combined local 
opinion analyzed in the lig ht of other special regional studies 
provided a basis for alloting conflicting portions of territory to 
that adjacent trading area which dominates the doubtful section. 



R. A. Dier 
Research and Planning 



SUMMAR I ES 



* * ♦ 



18 



UNITED STATES SUMMARY OF 
PRIMARY AND SECONDARY TRADE AREAS 
BY BRANCH DISTRICTS 



.« «r « X 



SUMMARY OF PRIMARY AMD SECONDARY TRADING AREAS 
BY BRANCH DISTRICTS 







NUMBER OF 


NUMBER OF 


BRANCH DISTRICT 




PRIMARY 


SECONDARY 


NUMBER 


FEDERAL RESERVE CITY 


TRADING CENTERS 


TRAD 1 NG CENTERS 


61-0 


Boston 


29 


20 


Ofe-l 


. New York City 


22 


8 


02-2 


Buffalo 


4 


2 


03-0 


Philadelphia 


17 


11 


04-1 


Cleveland 


12 




04-2 


Pittsburgh 


12 




04-3 


Cincinnati 


5 




05-1 


Richmond 


17 


13 


5-2 


Bait Inore 


9 




05-3 


Charlotte 


8 




06-1 


Atlanta 


9 




06-2 


Nashville 


4 




06-3 


BlrBlnghan 


4 




6-4 


New Orleans 


10 




06-5 


Jacksonville 


10 




07-1 


Chicago 


50 


24 


7-2 


Detroit 






08-1 


St. Louis 






08-2 


Louisville 




12 


08-3 


Memphis 






08-4 


Little Rock 






09-1 


Minneapolis 


23 


18 


9-2 


Helena 








Kansas City 


15 


12 


10-2 


Omaha 


10 




10-3 


Denver 






10-4 


Oklahoma City 






11-1 


Dallas 


11 


11 


11-2 


Houston 






11-3 


San Antonio 






11-4 


El Paso 






12-1 


San Francisco 


10 




12-2 


Seattle 






12-3 


Spokane 






12-4 


Portland 






12-5 


Salt Lake City 






12-6 


Los Angeles 


7 








TOTALS 372 


268 



19 



COMPOSITION OF BRANCH DISTRICTS 



BY PRIMARY AND SECONDARY TRADE AREAS 



« .«.« « * 



20 



BRAUCE DISTRICT oi~o 



AREA NUMBER 
01-0-01 



01-0-02 
01-0-03 
01-0-0* 
1-0-05 
01-0-06 
01-0-07 
01-0-08 
01-0-09 
01-0-10 
01-0-11 
01-0- 12 



01-0-13 
01.0-m 

01-0- IS 

01-0-16 
01-0-17 
01-0.18 
1-0-19 
01-0-20 
01-0-21 



01-0- 21 



01-0-23 



01-0-2* 
01-0- 25 
01-0-26 
01- 0- 2 7 

01-0- 28 
01-0- 29 



PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 



Boston, Mass, 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 

Haverhill, Mass 
Lawrence , Mass . 
Lowell, Mass 



Fltchburg, Mass. 

Greenfield, Mass. 

Plttsrield, Mass. 

Holyoke, Mass. 

Worcester, Mass 

Sprlngiield, Mass. 

Brockton, Mass. 

Fall River, Mass. 

New Bedford, Mass. 

Newport , R.I. 

Provldence-Pawtucket , R.I. Including; 

E . Providence , R.I. 

N . Providence , R.I. 
Woonsocke t , R.I. 
Hartford, Conn. 



Brattleboro, Vt. 
M. Adams, Mass. 



Waterbury, Conn. 
New Haven, Conn. 
New London, Conn. 
Rutland, Vt. 
Keene , N. H . 
Manchester, N.H. 
Concord, N.H. 



Rochester, N.H. 
Barre-Burllngton, Vt, 



St. Johnsbury, Vt. 
Portland, Maine 
Lewis ton-Auburn, Maine 
Augusta, Maine 

Bangor, Maine 
Houlton, Maine 



New Britain, 
Wllllmantlc, 



Conn. 
Conn . 



Meriden, Conn. 
Norwich, Conn. 
Bennington, Vt. 

Nashua, N.H. 
Laconia, N.H. 
Lebanon, N.H. 

Dover , N.H. 
Plymouth, N.H. 

St. Albans, Vt. 
Montpeller , Vt . 

Berlin, N.H. 



Waterville, Maine 
Rockland, Maine 



AREA NUMBER 

2-1-01 
02-1-02 
02-1-03 
02-1-0* 
02-1-05 
2-1-06 
02-1-07 

02-1-08 
02-1-09 
02-1-10 
2-1-11 
2-1-12 
02-1-13 
02-1-1* 
2-1-15 



BRAUCE DISTRICT 02-1 

* « « » 

SECONDARY TRADING CcNTERS 



PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 

New Tork, N.Y. 
Ithaca, N.Y. 
Watertown, N.T. 
Malone, N.Y. 
Plattsburg, N.Y. 
Syracuse , N.Y. 
Utica, N.Y. 

Gloversvllle , N.Y. 
Schnectady, N.Y. 
Glens Falls, N.Y. 
Auburn, N.Y. 
Albany, N.Y. 
Troy, N.Y. 
Elmlra, N.Y. 
Blnghamton, N.Y. 



Dover, Del. 



Ogdensburg, N.Y. 

Oswego, N.Y. 

Rome, N.Y. 

Little Falls, N.Y, 



Corning, N.Y. 
One onta , N.Y. 



21 



02-1-16 
02-1-17 
02-1-18 
2-1-19 
02-1- 20 
02-1-21 
2-1-22 



Kingston, N.Y. 
Poughkeepsle , N.Y. 
Mlddletown, N.Y. 
Danbury, Conn. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 
Norwalk, Conn. 
Long Branch-Asbury 



Newburgh, N.Y. 



Park., N.J. 



BRANCH DISTRICT oa-a 



AREA NUMBER 

02-2-01 
02- 2-02 
02- 2-03 
02-2-04 



PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 



Buffalo, N. 
Roches ter , 
Janes town , 
Olean, N.Y. 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 



Hornell, N.Y. 
Bradford, Pa. 



BRANCH DISTRICT 03-0 



AREA NUMBER 

03-0-01 
03-0-03 
03-0-0* 
03-0-05 
03-0-06 
03-0-07 
O3-O-O8 
03-0-09 

03-0-10 



03-0-11 
03-0-12 
03-0-13 
03-0-11* 
03-0-15 
03-0-15 
03-0-17 
03-0- 18 



PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 



Phlladelptila, Pa. -Camden, N.J. 
Atlantic City, N.J. 
Wilmington, Del. 
Lancaster, Pa. 
Trenton, N.J. 
Easton-Phlll ipsburg , Pa. 
Allentown, Pa. 
Reading, Pa. 



Harrlsburg, Pa, 



York., Pa. 
Lewlstown, Pa. 
Al toona , Pa . 
Will lamspor t , Pa , 
Sunbury, Pa. 
Hazleton, Pa. 
WllKes-Barr e , Pa. 
Scranton, Pa. 



Bathlebem, Pa. 
Pottsvllle, Pa. 
Pottstown, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Carlisle, Pa. 
Chambersburg, Pa. 

Huntingdon, Pa. 

Lock Haven, Pa. 
Shamokln, Pa. 
Hationoy City, Pa. 

Carbondale, Pa. 



BRANCH DISTRICT 04-1 



AREA NUMBER 

OH- 1-01 
0'*-l-02 
0H-1-03 
OH-l-Oi* 
»H-l-05 
0H-1-06 
OH-l- 07 
OH-l-OS 
04-1-09 
04-1-10 
04-1-11 
04-1-12 



PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Ashtabula, Ohio 
Youngstown, Ohio 
Akron, Ohio 
Sandusky, Ohio 
Toledo, Ohio 
Lima, Ohio 
Mansfield, Ohio 
Canton , Ohl 
Steubenvllle , Ohio 
Zane svl 11 e , Ohl 
Columbus, Ohio 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 



Flndlay, Ohio 
Marlon, Ohio 
Alliance, Ohio 
E. Liverpool, Ohio 



Newark, Ohio 
Lancaster, Ohio 
Washington Court 



House, OhlO) 



22 



AREA NUMBER 

04-2-01 
Ot- 2-02 
Ot- 2-03 
C*- 2-0'* 

0<i- 2-05 
04-2-06 



04- 2-07 
04-2-08 
04-2-09 
04-2-10 
04-2-11 
04-2-12 



BRANCH DISTRICT 04-2 

Jit « 4r 
PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Erie, Pa. 
Warren, Pa. 
New Castle, Pa. 



Oil City, Pa. 
Du Bols , Pa. 



Butler, Pa. 
Johnstown, Pa. 
Wheeling, W.Va. 
Washington, Pa. 
Unlontown, Pa. 
Connellsville , Pa. 



Sharon, Pa. 
Meadsvl lie , Pa. 

Rldgway, Pa. 
St. Marys, Pa. 
Clearfield, Pa. 
Klttannlng, Pa. 
Indiana, Pa. 



AREA NUMBER 
04-3-01 

04-3-02 

04-3-03 
04- 3-04 

04-3-05 



BRANCH DISTRICT 04-3 



* * * 

PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 



Clnc innatl , .-Cov ington, Ky . Hamilton, Ohio 

1; ays VI lie , Ky . 



Bay ton , Ohl 

Springfield, Ohio 
Portsmouth, Ohio 

Marietta, Ohio 



Greens vllle, Ohio 
Plqua, Ohio 

Chllllcothe, Ohio 
Ashland, Ohio 

Athens, Ohio 



BRANCH DISTRICT 05-1 



AREA NUMBER 

O5-I-OI 
05- 1-02 
05-1-03 
05-1-04 
05-1-05 



O5-I-O6 
05-1-07 
05-1-08 
05-1-09 
05-1-10 
05-1-11 
05-1-12 



05-1-13 
05-1-14 

05-1-15 



05-1-16 
05-1-17 



PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 

Richmond, Va. 
Huntington, W.Va. 
Charleston, W.Va. 
Covington, Va. 
Staunton, Va. 



Bluefleld, W.Va. 
Bristol , Tenn. 
Roanoke, Va. 
Danville, Va. 
Lynchburg, Va. 
Petersburg, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. including; 

Portsmouth 

Newport News 

South Norfolk. 

Hampton 
Durham, N.C. 



Raleigh, N, 
Goldsbor 0, 



N.C. 



Washington, 
Wilmington, N.C. 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 

Fredericksburg, Va. 
Logan, W.Va. 
Beckley, W.Va. 

Charlottesville, Va. 
Harrisonburg, Va. 



Henderson, N.C. 
Fay e t tesvllle , N. c , 
Klnston, N.C. 
Greenvlll e , N.C. 
Wilson, N.C. 
Rocky Mount, N.C. 
Elizabeth City, N.C 
New Bern , N.C. 



23 

BRANCH DISTRICT 05-2 

« « « 

AREA NUMBER PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS SECONOARr TRADING CENTERS 

05-2-01 Baltimore, Md. 
05-2-02 Parkersburg, W.Va. 

05-2-03 Clartsburg, W.Va. Elklna, W.Va. 

Grafton, W.Va. 

05-2-o^ Fairmont, W.Va, Morgantown, W.Va. 

05-2-05 Cumberland, Md . 

05-2-06 Winchester, Va. Martlnsburg, W.Va. 

05-2-07 Hagerstown, Md. Frederick, Md . 

05-2-O8 Washington, D.C. 

05-2-09 Salisbury, Md. Cambridge, Md . 

BRANCH DISTRICT 05-3 

« « « 

AREA NUMBER PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 

05-3-01 Charlotte, N.C. Statesvllle, N.C. 

Salisbury, N.C. 
05-3-02 Ashevllle, N.C. 
05-3-03 Wins ton- Salem, N.C. 
05-3-04 Greensboro, N.C. 
05-3-05 Greenville, S.C. Anderson, S.C. 

Spartanburg, S.C. 

Greenwood, S.C. 

05-3-06 Columbia, S.C. Rock Hill, S.C. 

Sumter, S.C. 

Orangeburg, S.C. 
05_3_07 Florence, S.C. 

05-3-08 Charleston, S.C. Georgetown, S.C. 

BRANCH DISTRICT 06-1 

JT « 4r 
AREA NUMBER PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 

06-1-01 Atlanta, Ca. Rome, Ga. 

Griffin, Ga. 

06-1-02 Athens, Ga. Gainesville, Ga. 

06-1-03 Lagrange, Ga. Opellka, Ga. 

06-1-04 Macon, Ga. Dublin, Ga. 

06-I-05 Augusta, Ga. 

06-I-06 Columbus, Ga. 

06-I-07 Savannah, Ga. 

06-1-O8 Albany, Ga. Amerlcus, Ga. 

Cordele, Ga. 

Fitzgerald, Ga. 

06-I-09 Waycross, Ga. Brunswick, Ga. 

BRANCH DISTRICT 06-2 
* * * 

AREA NUMBER PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 

06-2-01 Nashville, Tenn Clarksvllle, Tenn. 

Murf reesbor , Tenn. 

Columbia, Tenn. 
06-2-02 Chattanooga, Tenn. 
06-2-03 Knoivllle, Tenn. 
06-2-04 Johnson City, Tenn. Morrlstown, Tenn. 



24 



BRANCH DISTRICT 06-3 



AREA IIUM8ER 
06-3-01 

06-3-02 

06-3-03 
06- 3-04 



* * * 
PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 

Birmingham, Ala. 



Decatur, Ala. 

Montgomery, Ala, 
Pensacola, Fla. 



SECOHOARY TRADING CENTERS 

Gadsden, Ala. 
Annlston, Ala. 
Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Florence , Ala. 
Huntsvllle, Ala. 

Selma, Ala. 
Troy, Ala. 



BRANCH DISTRICT 06-4 



* * * 

AREA NUMBER PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 

06-4-01 New Orleans, La. 

06-4-02 Baton Rouge, La. 

06-4-03 Lake Charles, La. 

06-4-04 Alexandria, La. 

06-4-05 Natchez, Miss 

06-4-06 Vlcskburg , Miss. 

06-4-07 Jackson, Miss- 

06-4-O8 Meridian, Miss. 

06-4-09 Hattlesburg, Miss. 

06-4-10 Mobile, Ala. 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 



McComb, Miss. 



Guir Port & Blloxi, Miss 



AREA NUMBER 

06-5-01 

06-5-02 
06- 5-03 



06- 5-04 
06-5-05 
06-5-06 
06-5-07 
O6-5-O8 
06- 5-09 
06-5-10 



BRANCH DISTRICT 06-5 



* * * 

PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

Dothan, Ala. 
Valdosta, Ga. 



Tallahassee, Fla. 

Daytona, Fla. 

Orlando, Fla. 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Tampa, Fla. 

West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Miami, Fla. 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 

Gainesville, Fla. 
Ooala, Fla. 

Thoraasvllle, Ga, 
Balnbrldge, Ga. 



Key West, Fla. 



AREA NUMBER 

07-1-01 
07-1-02 
07-1-03 
7-1-04 
07-1-05 
07-1-06 
07-1-07 
07-1-08 
07-1-09 
07-1-10 
07-1-11 



BRANCH DISTRICT oj-i 



* * * 

PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 

Chicago, 111. 
Sioux City, la. 
Fort Dodge, la. 
Mason City, la. 
Wa terl 00 , la. 
La Crosse , Wis . 
Apple ton. Wis . 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Des Moines, la. 
Marshalltown , la. 
Cedar Rapids, la. 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 



Stevens Point, Wis. 
Marinette-Menominee, Wis 
Cres ton , la . 

Iowa Ci ty , la . 



25 



7-1-12 


DuDuque, la. 


07-1-13 


Clinton, la. 


7-1-lH 


Rockrord, 111. 


7-1-15 


Madison. Wis. 


07-1-16 


Osbliosh, wis 


07-1-17 


Sheboygan, Wis. 


07-1-18 


Milwaukee, Wis. 


07-1-19 


Racine, Wis. 


07-1-20 


Kenosha, Wis. 


07-1-21 


Ottunwa, la. 


7-1-22 


Keokuk. la. 


7-1-23 


Burlington, la. 


7-1- 21* 


Quad Cities, in 



07-1-25 
07-1- 26 
07-1-27 
07-1-28 
07-1-29 
07-1-30 

07-1-31 
07-1-32 

07-1-33 
7- l-3'» 
07-1-35 
07-1-36 
07-1-37 

07-1-38 
07-1-39 
07-1-fO 
07-1-m 
07-1-42 

07-1-H3 
07-l-'t'» 



07-1-H5 



07-1-46 
07-1-47 
07-1-48 
07-1-49 
07-1-50 



Including; 

Davenport, la. 

Rock Island, 111. 

Mollne, 111, 

E. Mollne, 111. 
Calesburg, 111. 
Peoria, 111. 
La Salle-peru, 111. 
Elgin, 111. 
Aurora, 111. 
Jollet, 111. 
Bloomlngton, 111. 
Springfield, 111. 
Decatur, 111. 
Cnampaign-Urbana, 111. 
Danville, 111. 
Petoskey, Mich. 
Cadillac, Mich. 

Greater Muskegon, Mich. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Battle Creek, Mich. 
South Bend. Ind. 

Fort Mayne , Ind. 
Marlon, Ind. 



La Fayette, Ind, 



Munc le , Ind . 
Richmond, Ind. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Terre-Haute, Ind. 
Fond Du Lac, Wis. 



Janesvllle, wis, 
Freeport, 111. 



Manitowoc, Wis. 



Oskaloosa, la. 
Centervllle, la. 



Kenanee, 111. 
Streator, 111. 

Kankakee, 111, 



Traverse City, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 



Elkhart, Ind. 
Michigan City, Ind. 

Wabash, Ind. 
Peru, Ind. 
KokoBO, Ind. 

Logansport, Ind. 
Frankfort, Ind. 
Crawf ordsvllle , Ind. 
Anderson, Ind. 



Branch District 07-2 



AREA NUMBER 
7-2-01 



07-2-0 2 
07- 2-03 
7-2-04 
07-2-05 
07-2-06 
7-2-07 



PRIM ART TRADING 

Detroit, Mich. 



Bay City, Mich. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Flint, Mich. 
Lansing, Mich. 
Jackson, Mich. 
Pontlac, Mich. 



* * * 

CENTERS 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 

Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Adrian, Mich. 
Port Huron, Mich. 



26 



BRANCH DISTRICT 08-1 

* in * 
AREA NUMBER PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 

08-1-01 St. Louis, Mo. Cape Girardeau, Mo. 

08-1-02 Moberly, Mo. Klrksviiie, Mo. 



Hanibal, Mo, 



O8-I-03 Qulncy, 111. 

OB-i-ot Springfield, Mo. 



BRANCH DISTRICT 08-2 

* * * 

AREA NUMBER PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 

08-2-01 Louisville, Ky. - Bowling Green, Ky . 

Madison, Ind. 

08-2-02 Vlncennes, Ind. Bedford, Ind. 

O8-2-03 Mt. Vernon, 111. Marlon, 111. 

08-2-04 Evansvllle, Ind. Owensboro, Ky. 

Hopklnsville , Ky . 

O8-2-05 Lexington, Ky. Frankfort, Ky . 

Winchester, Ky . 

Danville, Ky . 

Hazard , Ky . 

Somerset, Ky . 

Mlddlesboro, Ky . 
O8-2-O6 Paducah, Ky . 
08-2-07 Cairo, 111. 

BRANCH DISTRICT 08-3 

* * * 

AREA NUMBER PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 

08-1-01 Mempbls, Tenn. Helena, Ark. 

08-3-02 Jackson, Tenn. Corinth, Miss. 

O8-3-03 Greenwood, Miss. Clarksdale, Miss. 

Greenville , Miss . 

08-3-0'* Columbus, Miss. Tupelo, Miss. 



BRANCH DISTRICT 08-4 



* * * 

AREA NUMBER PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 

08-4-01 Little Rock, Ark. Batesvllle, Ark. 

Hot Springs, Ark 
Searcy, Ark. 

08-4-02 Fort Smith, Ark. Faye ttevllle , Ark. 

Russellville , Ark . 

O8-4-03 Jonesboro, Ark. Paragould, Ark. 

08-4-04 Pine Bluff, Ark. 
08-4-05 El Dorado, Ark. 

BRANCH DISTRICT og-i 

AREA NUMBER PRIMARY TRADING ce»Te«S SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 

09-1-01 Minneapolis, Minn. 

09-1-02 Minot, N.D. Williston, N.D. 

09-I-03 Grand Forks, K.D. Devils Lake, N.D. 



27 



09-l-o^ Duluth, Minn. Hibblng, Minn. 

09-1-05 Mandan, N.D. Dickinson, N.D. 

09-1-06 Jamestown, N.D. Valley City, N.D. 

Bismarck, N.D. 

09-1-07 Fargo, N.D. Fergus Falls, Minn. 

09-1-08 St. Cloud, Minn. Bralnerd, Minn. 

09-1-09 Superior, wis. Ashland, wis. 

09-1-10 Calume t-Laurlum , Mich. Marquette, Mich. 

09-1-11 Ironwood, Mich. Iron Monntaln, Mich. 

09-1-12 Escanaba, Mich. Saulte Ste Matle, Mich. 

09-1-13 Rapid City, S.D. Deadwood, S.D. 

og-l-ii* Huron, S.D. Pierre, S.D. 

09-1-15 Mitchell, S.D. 

09-1-16 Sioux Falls, S.D. Yankton, S.D. 

09-1-17 Mankato, Minn. Albert Lea, Minn. 

09-1-18 3t. Paul, Minn. Rochester, Minn. 

09-1-19 Winona, Minn. 

09-1-20 Eau Claire, Wis. 

09-1-21 Wausau, Wis. 

09-1-22 Aberdeen, S.D. 

09-1-23 Watertown, S.D. Brookings, S.D. 

BRANCH DISTRICT og-s 

* * * 

AREA NUMBER PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 

09-2-01 Bozeman, Mont. Helena, Mont. 

09-2-02 Butte, Mont. Missoula, Mont. 

Dillon, Mont. 

09-2-03 Great Falls, Mont. Kallspell, Mont. 

Havre, Mont. 

09-2-OH Billings, Mont. Lewlstown, Mont. 

BRANCH DISTRICT 10-1 

* * * 

AREA NUMBER PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 

10-1-01 Kansas City, Kans.,Mo. Leavenworth, Kans. 
10-1-02 St, Joseph, Mo. Chllllcothe, Mo. 

Atchison , Mo . 
10-1-03 Manhattan, Kans. 
lO-i-OH Sallna, Kans. 
1O-I-05 Topeka, Kans. Lawrence, Kans. 

Ottawa, Kans. 
10-1-06 Sedalla, Mo. 

10-1-07 Jefferson City, Mo. Columbia, Mo. 
10-1-08 Emporia, Kans. 
16-I-09 Hutchinson, Kans. 
10-1-10 Dodge City, Kans. 

10-1-11 Wichita, Kans. Arkansas City, Kans. 

10-1-12 Fort Scott, Kans. lola, Kans. 

10-1-13 Pittsburg, Kans 
lo-i-m Coffeyvllle, Kans. Caanute, Kans. 

Pars ons , Kans . 

Independence, Kans. 

10-1-15 Joplln, Mo. Carthage, Mo. 

Miami , Okla. 

BRANCH DISTRICT 10-2 
* * * 

AREA NUMBER PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 

10-2-01 Omaha, Neb. Council Bluffs, la. Atlantic, la. 



2R 



10-2-02 
10-2-03 

10- 2-OH 
10-2-05 



10- 2-06 
10-2-07 
10- 2-08 
10-2-09 
10-2-10 



Casper, Wyo. 
Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Scoctsbluf f , Neb. 
Grand Island, Neb. 



Columbus, Neb. 
Lincoln, Neb. 
Norrolk, Neb. 
Hastings, Neb. 
Beatrice, Neb. 



Sheridan, Wyo. 
Laramie , Wy o . 
Rock Springs, Wyo. 

North Platte, Neb. 
Kearney , Neb . 

Fremont, Neb. 
Nebraska City, Neb, 



ARE A NUMBER 

10-3-01 

10-3-02 



10-3-03 
10-3-ot 
10-3-05 
10-3-06 
10-3-07 



BRANCH DISTRICT 10-3 



* * * 

PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 

Denver, Colo. 
Boulder, Colo. 

Grand Junction, Colo. 
Pueblo, Colo. 
Colorado Springs, Colo 
Albuquerque, N.Mex. 
Las Vegas , N.Mex . 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 



Greeley , Colo . 
Fort Collins, Colo. 

Durango, Colo. 
Trinidad, Colo. 

Gallup, N.Mex. 
Raton, N.Mex. 
Santa Fe , N.Mex. 



AREA NUMBER 

lO-H-Ol 
10-^-02 
10-H-03 
10-4-04 
10-4-05 
10-4-06 
10-4-07 
10-4-08 



BRANCH DISTRICT 10-4 



* * * 

PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Enid, Okla. 
Tulsa, Okla. 
El Reno, Okla. 
Okmulgee , Okla. 
Altus, Okla. 
Lawton, Okla 
Shawnee, Okla. 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 

Guthrie, Okla. 
Ponca City, Okla. 
Bar tlesvil le , Okla. 

Muskogee , Okla. 

Chlckasha, Okla, 

Ad a , Okla. 

He Alester, Okla. 



10-4-09 



Ardmore, Okla. 



BRANCH DISTRICT ii~i 



AREA NUMBER 
11-1-01 



11-1-0 2 



11-1-03 
11-1-04 

11-1-05 
11-1-06 
11-1-07 
11-1-08 
11-1-09 
11-1-10 
11-1-11 



PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 

Dallas, Tex. 



Paris, Tex. 

Texarfcana, Tex., Ark. 
Shreveport, La. 

Amar 11 lo , Te x . 
Lubbock, Tex. 
Wichita Falls, Tex, 
Albilene, Tex. 
San Angelo, Tex. 
Fort Worth, Tex. 
Waco, Tex. 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 

Greenv 1 lie , Tex . 
Tyler, Tex. 
Corsicana, Tex, 

Denison, Tex. 
Sherman, Tex. 

Hope, Ark . 
Marshall, Tex. 
Monroe , La. 



3r ownwood , Tex , 
Cleburne, Tex. 
Temple, Tex. 



29 



BRAHCE DISTRICT ii-a 



AREA NUMBER 
11-2-01 



11-2-02 
11-2-03 



* * ♦ 
PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 

Houston, Tex. 



Galveston, Tei, 
Beaumont, Tex. 



SECONOART TRADING CENTERS 

Palestine, Tex. 
Bryan, Tex. 
Brenbam, Tex. 



AREA NUMBER 

11-3-01 
11-3-02 

11-3-03 
ll-3-Of 



BRANCB DISTRICT 11-3 

* * * 

PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 



San Antonio, Tex. 
Austin, Tex. 
Corpus Chrlstl, Tex. 
Brownsville, Tex. 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 



Laredo, Tex. 



AREA NUMBER 
11-4-01 

ll-*-02 



BRAHCE DISTRICT 11-4 
* * * 

PRI MARY TRAD I NG CENTERS 

El Paso, Tex. 



Tucson, Ariz. 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 



Big Spring, Tex. 
Rosffell, N.Mex. 
Silver City, N.Mex. 

Douglas, Ariz. 
Nogales, Ariz. 



AREA NUMBER 

12-1-01 
12-1-02 
12- 1-03 
12-1-04 
12-1-05 
12-1-06 
12-1-07 
12-1-08 
12-1-09 
12-1-10 



BRASCE DISTRICT is-i 
* * * 

PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 



San Francisco, Cal 
Medford, Ore. 
Chlco, Cal. 
Santa Rosa, Cal. 
Sacrenento, Cal. 
Reno, Nev. 
Stockton, Cal. 
Fresno, Cal. 
Santa Cruz, Cal. 
Bakersfleld, Cal. 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 

Klaaath Falls, Ore. 
Marysvllle, Cal. 
Eurelia, Cal. 

Tonopah, Nev. 



AREA NUMBER 

12-2-01 
12-2-02 
12-2-03 



BRANCH DISTRICT 12-2 



* * * 

PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 

Seattle, Wash. 
Belllngham, Wash. 
Tacoma, Wash. 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 



Everett, Wash. 
Olympla, Wash. 
Aberde en-Hoqulac, Wash. 



AREA NUMBER 

12-3-01 
12-3-02 

12-3-03 
12-3-04 



BRANCH DISTRICT 12-3 
V * * 

PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 



Spokane, Wash. 
Wenatchee, Wash. 
Lenlston, Idaho 
Yakima, Wash. 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 

Wallace , Idaho 
Walla Walla, Wash. 



30 



AREA NUMBER 

12->»-01 
12-4-02 
12-4-03 

12-*-0'f 
12-4-05 



BRANCH DISTRICT 
* * * 

PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 

Portland, Ore, 
The Dalles, Ore. 
Pendleton, Ore. 

Salem Ore. 
Eugene, Ore. 



ls-4 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 



Astoria, Ore. 
Bend, Ore. 
Le Grande, Ore, 
Bak.er, Ore. 



AREA NUMBER 

12-5-01 
12-5-02 

12-5-03 



BRANCH DISTRICT 12-5 



* * * 

PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 

Salt Lake City, Utah 
Boise, Idaho 

Pocatello, Idaho 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 



Elko, Nev, 

Idaho Falls, Idaho 
Blackfoot, Idaho 
Twin Falls, Idaho 



12-5-04 

12-5-05 
12-5-06 



Ogden Utah 
Provo, Utah 
Las Vegas, Nev. 



Logan Utah 



BRANCH DISTRICT 12-6 



AREA NUMBER 

12-6-01 
12-6-02 
12-6-03 
12-6-04 

12-6-05 
1^-6-06 

12-6-07 



* * * 
PRIMARY TRADING CENTERS 

Los Angeles, Cal 
Santa Barbara, Cal. 
San Bernardino, Cal 
San Diego, Cal . 
Prescott, Ariz.. 
Phoenix, Ariz. 
Globe , Ariz. 



SECONDARY TRADING CENTERS 



El Centro, Cal, 



* * * * * 



30-A 



TEE HEED FOR TRADE STATISTICS. BY TRADIMG AREAS 

TO SUPPLEMENT TRADING AREA MAPS 

« « « 

Although the trading area system established a sound geographic 
basis for efficient and economical administration of the Distribution 
CodeSj a supplementary statistical framework is needed to facilitate 
the researchj planning and budget operations of Code AuthoritieSj Coda 
Administrators and Members of Industry^ as well as the planning work 
necessary to effect the consolidation of codes. 

This statistical tabulation should present the findings of the 
1933 Census of Retail and Wholesale Distribution by trading areas. It 
might also include certain pertinent marketing data from other sources 
such as the International Magazine Marketing Atlas. 

The present Census (which gives totals by townshipSj counties 
and states) would be recompiled to give totals by trading areas. The 
tables which follow offer a suggestion as to the form in which these 
statistics might be compiled. The groupings of the various Census 
trade classifications cs shown in the Tables are not intended as a 
recommendation for code consolidation but should be as tools 

by means of which final consolidation of related groups can be accom- 
plished. 



3i 



TABLE 1 

m * * 

Summary of Retail Outlets and Sales—Other. Pertinent 
Data — by Branch Districts 

This serine of Tables presents certain primary 
statistical totals taken from the Census of Pop- 
ulation^ Census of Retail and Wholesale Distrib- 
ution and International Magazine Marketing Atlas. 
The territorial composition of the Trading Areas 
shown in the last column would provide a basis 
for special statistical compilation by Code Au- 
thoritiesj individual or private concerns. 



















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32 



TABLE II 

« « « 

Retail Outlets and Sales, by Retail Trading Areas and 
Kinds of Business 

This series of tables groups the various tYpes 
of related retail businesses. Its purpose is 
to present the figures of the Census of Retail 
Distribution by trading areas instead of by 
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OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION 
THE DIVISION OF REVIEW 

THE WORK OF THE DIVISION OF REVIEW 

Executive Order No. 7075, dated June 15, 1935, established the Division of Review of the 
National Recovery Administration. The pertinent part of the Executive Order reads thus: 

The Division of Review shall assemble, analyze, and report upon the statistical 
information and records of experience of the operations of the various trades and 
industries heretofore subject to codes of fair competition, shall study the ef- 
fects of such codes upon trade, industrial and labor conditions in general, and 
ot.ier related matters, shall make available for the protection and promotion of 
the public interest an adequate review of the effects of the Administration of 
Title I of the National Industrial Recovery Act, and tne principles and policies 
put into effect thereunder, and shall otherwise aid the President in carrying out 
nis functions under the said Title. 

The study sections set up in the Division of Review covered these areas: industry 
studies, foreign trade studies, labor studies, trade practice studies, statistical studies, 
legal studies, administration studies, miscellaneous studies, and the writing of code his- 
tories. The materials which were produced by these sections are indicated below. 

Except for the Code Histories, all items mentioned below are scheduled to be in mimeo- 
graphed form by April 1, 1936. 

THE CODE HISTORIES 

The Code Histories are documented accounts of the formation and administration of the 
codes. They contain the definition of the industry and the principal products thereof; the 
classes of members in the industry; the history of code formation including an account of the 
sponsoring organizations, the conferences, negotiations and hearings which were neld, and 
the activities in connection with obtaining approval of the code; the history of the ad- 
ministration of the code, covering the organization and operation of the code authority, 
the difficulties encountered in administration, the extent of compliance or non-compliance, 
and the general success or lack of success of the code; and an analysis of the operation of 
code provisions dealing with wages, hours, trade practices, and other provisions. These 
and other matters are canvassed not only in terms of the materials to be found in the files, 
but also in terms of the experiences of the deputies and others concerned with code formation 
and administration. 

The Code Histories, (including histories of certain NRA units or agencies) are not 
mimeographed. They are to be turned over to the Department of Commerce in typewritten form. 
All told, approximately eight hundred and fifty (850) histories v/ill be completed. This 
number includes all of the approved codes and some of the unapproved codes. (In Work Mate- 
rials No_ 18, Contents of Code Histories, will be found the outline which governed the 
preparation of Code Histories.) 

(In the case of all approved codes and also in the case of some codes not carried to 
final approval, there are in NRA files further materials on industries. Particularly worthy 
of mention are the Volumes I, II and III which c nstitute the material officially submitted 
to the President in support of the recommendation for approval of each code. These volumes 
9675—1 . 



set forth the origination of the code, the sponsoring group, the evidence advanced to sup- 
port the proposal, the report of the Division of Research and Planning on the industry, the 
recommendations of the various Advisory Boards, certain types of official correspondence, 
the transcript of the formal hearing, and other pertinent matter. There is also much offi- 
cial information relating to amendments, interpretations, exemptions, and other rulings. The 
materials mentioned in this paragraph were of course not a part of the v/ork of the Division 
of Review. ) 

THE WORK MATERIALS SERIES 

In the work of the Division of Review a considerable number of studies and compilations 
of data {other than those noted below in the Evidence Studies Series and the Statistical 
Materials Series) have been made. These are listed below, grouped according to the char- 
acter of the material. (In Work Mat erials N2_ IZ. Tentative Outl ines and Summaries gf 
Studies in Process , these materials are fully described) . 

Indus try Studies 

Automobile Industry, An Economic Survey of 

Bituminous Coal Industry under Free Competition and Code Regulation, Economic Survey of 

Construction Industry and NRA Construction Codes, the 

Electrical Manufacturing Industry, The 

Fertilizer Industry, The 

Fishery Industry and the Fishery Codes 

Fishermen and Fishing Craft, Earnings of 

Foreign Trade under the National Industrial Recovery Act 

Fart A - Competitive Position of the United States in International Trade 1927-29 through 
1934. 

Part B - Section 3 (e) of NIRA and its administration. 

Part C - Imports and Importing under NRA Codes. 

Part D - Exports and Exporting under NRA Codes. 
Forest Products Industries, Foreign Trade Study of the 
Iron and Steel Industry, The 
Knitting Industries, The 
Leather and Shoe Industries, The 

Lumber and Timber Products Industry, Economic Problems of the 
Men's Clothing Industry, The 
Millinery Industry, The 
Motion Picture Industry, The 

Migration of Industry, The: The Shift of Twenty-Five Needle Trades From New York State, 
1926 to 1934 

National Income, A study of. 
Paper Industry, The 

Production, Prices, Employment and Payrolls in Industry, Agriculture and Railway Trans- 
portation, January 1923, to date 
Retail Trades Study, The 
Rubber Industry Study, The 
Statistical Background of NRA 

Textile Industry in the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, and Japan 
Textile Yarns and Fabrics 
Tobacco Industry, The 
Wholesale Trades Study, The 
9675. 



Women's Apparel Industry, Some Aspects of the 

Trad e P ractic e Stu dies 

Commodities, Information Concerning: A Study of NRA and Related Experiences in Control 
Distribution, Manufacturers' Control of: A Study of Trade Practice Provisions in Selected 

NRA Codes 
Design Piracy: The Problem and Its Treatment Under NRA Codes 
Electrical Mfg. Industry: Price Filing Study 
Fertilizer Industry: Price Filing Study 

Geographical Price Relations Under Codes of Fair Competition, Control of 
Minimum Price Regulation Under Codes of Fair Competition 
Multiple Basing Point System in the Lime Industry: Operation of the 
Price Control in the Coffee Industry 
Price Filing Under NRA Codes 

Production Control Under NRA Codes, Some Aspects of. 
Resale Price Maintenance Legislation in the United States 

Retail Price Cutting, Restriction of, with special Emphasis on The Drug Industry. 
Trade Practice Rules of The Federal Trade Commission (1914-1936): A classification for 

comparison with Trade Practice Provisions of NRA Codes. 

Labo r Studies 

Employment, Payrolls, Hours, and Wages in 115 Selected Code Industries 1933-1935 

Hours and Wages in American Industry 

Labor Program Under the National Industrial Recovery Act, The 

Part A. Introduction 

Part B. Control of Hours and Reemployment 

Part C. Control of Wages 

Part D. Control of Other Conditions of Employment 

Part E. Section 7(a) of the Recovery Act 
PRA Census of Employment, June, October, 1933 
Puerto Rico Needlework, Homeworkers Survey 

Administra tive S tudies 

Administrative and Legal Aspects of Stays, Exemptions and Exceptions, Code Amendments, Con- 
ditional Orders of Approval 

Administrative Interpretations of NRA Codes 

Administrative Law and Procedure under the NIRA 

Agreements Under Sections 4(a) and 7(b) of the NIRA ., _ 

Approved Codes in Industry Groups, Classification of 

Basic Code, the — (Administrative Order X-61) 

Code Authorities and Their Part in the Administration of the NIRA 
Part A. Introduction 

Part B. Nature, Composition and Organization of Code Authorities 
Part C. Activities of the Code Authorities 
Part D. Code Authority Finances 
Part C. Summary and Evaluation 

9675. 



Code Compliance Activities of the NRA 

Code Making Program of the NRA in the Territories, The 

Code Provisions and Related Subjects, Policy Statements Concerning 

Content of NIRA Administrative Legislation 

Part A. Executive and Administrative Orders 

Part B. Labor Provisions in the Codes 

Part C. Trade Practice Provisions in the Codes 

Part D. Administrative Provisions in the Codes 

Part E. Agreements under Sections 4(a) and 7(b) 

Part F. A Type Case: The Cotton Textile Code 
Labels Under NRA, A Study of 

Model Code and Model Provisions for Codes, Development of 
National Recovery Administration, The: A Review and Evaluation of its Organization and 

Activities 
NRA Insignia 

President's Reemployment Agreement, The 

President's Reemployment Agreement, Substitutions in Connection with the 
Prison Labor Problem under NRA and the Prison Compact, The 
Problems of Administration in the Overlapping of Code Definitions of Industries and Trades, 

Multiple Code Coverage, Classifying Individual Members of Industries and Trades 
Relationship f NRA to Government Contracts and Contracts Involving the Use of Government 

Funds 
Relationship of NRA with other Federal Agencies 
Relationship of NRA with States and Muncipalities 
Sheltered Workshops Under NRA 
Unpodjfied Industries: A Study of Factors Limiting the Code Making Program 

Legal Studies 

Anti-Trust Laws and Unfair Competition 

Collective Bargaining Agreements, the Right of Individual Employees to Enforce Provisions of 

ommerce Clause, Possible Federal Regulation of the Employer-Employee Relationship Under the 

Delegation of Power, Certain Phases of the Principle of, with Reference to Federal Industrial 
Regulatory Legislation 

Enforcement, Extra-Judicial Methods of 

Federal Regulation through the Joint Employment of the Power of Taxation and the Spending 
Power 

Government Contract Provisions as a Means of Establishing Proper Econ mic Standards, Legal 
Memorandum on Possibility of 

Intrastate Activities Which so Affect Interstate Commerce as to Bring them Under the Com- 
merce Clause, Cases on 

Legislative Possibilities of the State Constitutions 

Post Office and Post Road Power — Can it be Used as a Means of Federal Industrial Regula- 
tion? 

State Recovery Legislation in Aid of Federal Recovery Legislation History and Analysis 

Tariff Rates to Secure Proper Standards of Wages and Hours, the Possibility of Variation in 

Trade Practices and the Anti-Trust Laws 

Treaty Making Power of the United States 

War Power, Can it be Used as a Means of Federal Regulation of Child Labor? 

9675. 



- V - 

THE EViDENCS STUDIES SERIE S 

The Evidence Studies were originally undertaken to gather material for pending court 
cases. After the Schechter decision the project was continued in order to assemble data for 
use in connection with the studies of the Division of Review. The data are particularly 
concerned with the nature, size and operations of the industry; and with the relation of th9 
industry to interstate commerce. The industries covered by the Evidence Studies account for 
more than one-half of the total number of workers under codes. The list of these studies 
follows: 



Automobile Manufacturing Industry 

Automotive Parts and Equipment Industry 

Baking Industry 

Boot and Shoe Manufacturing Industry 

Bottled Soft Drink Industry 

Builders' Supplies Industry 

Canning Industry 

Chemical Manufacturing Industry 

Cigar Manufacturing Industry 

Coat and Suit Industry 

Construction Industry 

Cotton Garment Industry 

Dress Manufacturing Industry 

Electrical Contracting Industry 

Electrical Manufacturing Industry 

Fabricated Metal Products Mfg. Industry and 

Metal Finishing and Metal Coating Industry 

Fishery Industry 

Furniture Manufacturing Industry 

General Contractors Industry 

General Contractors Industry 

Graphic Arts Industry 

Graphic Arts Industry 

Gray Iron Foundry Industry 

Hosiery Industry 

Infant's and Children's Wear Industry 

Iron and Steel Industry 



Leather Industry 

Lumber and Timber Products Industry 
Mason Contractors Industry 
Men's Clothing Industry 
Motion Picture Industry 
Motor Vehicle Retailing Trade 
Needlework Industry of Puerto Rico 
Painting and Paperhanging Industry 
Photo Engraving Industry 
Plumbing Contracting Industry 
Retail Lumber Industry 
Retail Trade Industry 
Retail Tire and Battery Trade Industry 
Rubber Manufacturing Industry 
Rubber Tire Manufacturing Industry 
Shipbuilding Industry 
Silk Textile Industry 
Structural Clay Products Industry 
Throwing Industry 
Trucking Industry 
Waste Materials Industry 
Wholesale and Retail Food Industry 
Waste Materials Industry 
Wholesale and Retail Food Industry 
Wholesale Fresh Fruit and vegetable Indus- 
try 
Wool Textile Industry 



THE STATISTICAL MATERIALS SERIES 



This series is supplementary to the Evidence Studies Series. The reports include data 
on establishments, firms, employment, payrolls, wages, hours, production capacities, ship- 
ments, sales, consumption, stocks, prices, material costs, failures, exports and imports. 
They also include notes on the principal qualifications that should be observed in using the 
data, the technical methods employed, and the applicability of the material to the study of 
the industries concerned. The following numbers appear in the series: 
9675. 



- vi - 



Asphalt Shingle and Roofing Industry 

Business Furniture 

Candy Manufacturing Industry 

Carpet and Rug Industry 

Cement Industry 

Cleaning and Dyeing Trade 

Coffee Industry 

Copper and Brass Mill Products Industry 

Cotton Textile Industry 

Electrical Manufacturing Industry 

9675. 



Fertilizer Industry 

Funeral Supply Industry 

Glass Container Industry 

Ice Manufacturing Industry 

Knitted Outerwear Industry 

Paint, Varnish, and Lacquer, Mfg. Industry 

Plumbing Fixtures Industry 

Rayon and Synthetic Yarn Producing Industry 

Salt Producing Industry