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BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06317 511 9 



OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION 
DIVISION OF REVIEW 



A STUDY OF OPEN PRICE FILING IN THE 
ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 

By 

Willard L. Thorp and A. H. Caesar 

with the assistance of 

F. W. Powell 

Volume I 

WORK MATERIALS NO. 78 



* 



March, 1936 



OFFICE OF NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION 
DIVISION OF REVIEW 



A STUDY OF OFEN PRICE FILING IN THE 
ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 

I:/ 
Willard L. Thorp end A. H. Caesar 

with the assistance of 

F. W. Fowell 



March, 19^6 



9822 



>a 5. Sbjtftc. 




£ jyyvt><*&A*4Jt^ t 



F R 3 W R D 

This "Study of Open Price Filing in the Flcctrical Manufacturing 
Industry" was made "by Messrs* Willard L. Thorp and A. H. Caesar with the 
assistance of F. W. Powell. 

This study is highly significant — not only because it breaks new 
ground in technique of analysis but also because it is the product of 
genuinely cooperative efforts of an industry and a governmental agency. 
Immediately following this Foreword will be found the statement of the 
cooperating industry committee. 

Since the study breaks new ground it has seemed appropriate to 

mimeograph not only the analyses and the findings contained in the 
study proper but also elaborate appendices which -arc both work data 
for the study and mines of information with respect to the price 
practices of the industry. 

While the authors modestly disclaim ability to guarantee the 
accuracy of the study, it is believed that the material was obtained 
from an accurate source and was accurately handled, iTo pretense has 
been made to finality; rather an effort has been made to secure such 
facts and present such material as will assist in the consideration of 
open price filing as an economic device. 

The student of price filing will find other material of interest 
in Work iJaturials "Jo. 67, Fertilizer Industry Price Filing Study, in 
Work M i Is ITo. 76, Price Filing UikI sr JRA Codes, and Work Materials 

ITo. 55, Price Control in the Coffee Industry. 

At the back of this report will be found a brief statement of the 
studies undertaken by the Division of Review. 



L. C. Marshall 
Director Division of Review 



March 25, 1036 



9822 -i- 



President 
FRANK C JONIS 

CUES. DINT. TNI OftONlTC COM 

Vice President* 



fMSlOENf, HAIIWAY * ' 



; -. l « 



.„, ,o.,c™"~"lo U „^e Natioxal Electrical Manitfactitveks Association 

l wra. co. 

F. W. MAOIN 

FMMMNT< sou«rc o company 

« o •»«»■ 155 East ti™ Stvekt.NkwYovk .TST.Y. 

VICE MtCSIOCNT, OCnEBal CLCCTftlC CO. 

CARL L. RBIRCC. JR. 

FMCSIDCNT, HUlM'D A COMPANY 

Treasurer 

R. M. GOODWILL.lt 

HAKARUI, YON«£«3 *0«*S. OTIS ELtVATO" CO. 



Managing Director 
w J DONALD 




March -16, 19 36. 



Dr. Leon C. Marshall, Director, 
Division of Review, 
National Recovery Administration, 
Department of Commerce, 
Washington, D.C. 

Dear Sir: 

In July 1935, you, as Director of the Division of Re- 
view of NRA, and Dr. Willard Thorp requested the Board of 
Governors of National Electrical Manufacturers Association to 
cooperate in a study of open price filing as reflected by the 
experience of the electrical manufacturing Industry, and re- 
quested that a committee be appointed to cooperate with NRA 
in such study and to review the final report before publication. 

The appointment of such a committee, with such authority, 
was promptly authorized by the Board of Governors, and the Com- 
mittee has met with Dr. Thorp and Mr. A. H. Caesar on several 
occasions to review the procedure being followed and to assist 
in solving some of the problems with which they were confronted. 

Today we have had the opportunity to review with Dr. 
Thorp and Mr. Caesar the text of the several chapters of the 
study, and particularly Chapter I, History, and Chapter XV, 
Conclusions. 

Our comments are as follows: 

1. We have welcomed this study of open orice filing 
and the assembly of the factual data regarding the 
experience of a number of branches of the Industry. 
Open price filing was not an unqualified success 
from any point of view. Whether the defects as 
they developed from month to month would have proved 
to be temporary, or whether they were of a permanent 
nature, cannot be determined on the basis of the 
experience of a year and a half. Some of the de- 
fects of open price filing were undoubtedly due to 
defects in the Code. Others were due to defects 
of administration both by the NRA and by the Code 
Authority, which might have been removed with ad- 
ditional experience" of ■ both. Others were due to 



-ii- 



VbZ'Z 



National Electrical Manufacturers 
Association 



2. 



lack of enforceability. Others were undoubtedly 
defects which accrued from human nature as it is 
found. This study has served to bring out the 
salient features of such defects and to serve not 
only as a guide for the establishment of public 
policy but also as a guide to the industry. 

We wish to commend the objective nature of the 
study. It represents in full degree what from the 
beginning we understood to be the point of view of 
the Division of Review, namely, that the study was 
not designed to prove any t':lng one way or the other, 
but rather to assemble facts in as brief a form as 
possible for such future use as nay arise. 

There are a good many problems on which no definite 
conclusions can nosslbly be reached, either by NRA 
or by the Industry, without much more time than has 
been available, and there are even problems on which 
conclusions can be reached only by making certain 
basic assunotions. 



The text of the study, as we have reviewed it, war- 
rants fully, we believe, the position which we have 




National Industrie! Recovery Act. 



It has be^n a pleasure to i!, ork with all of those in 
the Division of Review with whom vr G have come in 
contact in, the course of cooperating in this study, 
particularly Dr. V/Illard Thorp and Mr. A. H. Caesar, 
who have borne the burden of a very difficult analytical 
task, which they have carried out obj ectively, co- 
operatively and intelligently. 

Sincerely yours, 



'//. J. Donald, Managing! 



Director 



F.2. Jones 
Clarence L. Collens 
A. G. Newton 
S. L. Nicholson 
H. C. Petty 
D.G. Phelps 
3. I*. Tassle. 



for the 

cc:.::i :e : om o?^:; price filing study. 



3822 



\y. T ^/ T "' 



A STUDY OF OPEN ?RIC V FILDJC- III Tra ELECTRICAL I1ANUFACTTTRING- 

INDUSTRY 



T p"ble of Contents Page 

Chapter I. Introduction . 1 

A. History 1 

The Code . 1 

The Amendment 3 

Mechanism 3 

B. The Price Filing Study 5 

Inception 5 

Purpose 6 

C_. Cautionary Comments 7 

No Background • • 7 

Brevity of Period 7 

Technique 8 

Enforcement and Enforceability 8 

Consumer Pressure 8 

Complexity of Sources 8 

Limitations of Pats. 8 

Limitations of Time 9 

Chanter 2. Ruhber Cov^r^d Building ?ire 10 

A. The Industry 10 

1. Product 10 

Dfiscrrotion 10 

Materials 10 

Manufacturing Process 10 

Variations and C-rade 10 

Standardization 10 

9822 _iv~ 



Page 

2. Coraoaniet; ^° 

Number 10 

Size 10 

Oth=r Products 10 

Location 10 

3. Market 10 

Use 10 

Distribution 1° 

Freight n 

4. Price Filing 11 

B. Basic Price Structure H 

1. Original Structure H 

2. Major Structural Change-Effective May 1, 1934.... 12 

3. Major Structural Change-Effect iv- Ju^y 5, 1934. ..14 

4. Major Structural Change-Effective Ruth er- "bra id 
Wires March '27, 1935 and the -Rubber- lead Wires 
A^ril 1 15 

5. Summary of Ksjor Structural Changes .16 

C. Leader shir) and Uniformity 18 

P_. Incidental Pilings 21 

E. Summary • • • -22 

Exhibit A Price Call 28 

Exhibit B Tables of Pric°. .. .23-27 
Chaoter 3. Flexible Cord Group 30 



A. The Industry 30 

1. Product 30 



9822 -v- 



^ag* 

• ■ ■Description* . . < 30 

• -Materials.' .......:....... 30 

Process. ....■.■...•...•....•.■.■.•.•.■....■ 30 

Variations- Standardization. ..30 

2. Cora-oanies. .............................. 31 

-Humo°r. ................... 31 

Size . . . 31 

■ Classes ....... . . . 31 

- • -Location.-. .'.■.■•■ . . 31 

3. Market. 31 

Distribution 31 

4. Probl ems 32 

5. Orjsn Price Filing 32 

Price Call. 32 

Work Sheets .32 

S. Base Structure.. .34 

1. Original, and Pinal. Piling?... 34 

Prion. 34 

. Net Prices 34 

■ Customer Classifications and Discounts 35 

Quarterly Discounts 37 

Pxarcrole of Pilings of a. Single Coraoany 38 

. An Exanole of Shifting Leadership 39 

Freight 40 



9822 



-VI- 



Page 
T^rms of Payment 41 

Packing. ....... 7 . .'. . . 41 

2. Chronological Record of filings "by Comi-ipni^s.41 

Number of Fil ings 41 

Waiting Period. ...'.' 41 

Le?dershro. ..'... 41 

C. Sumnp.ry ; •' 41 

Exhibit A Pric° Call 43 

Chanter 4. Mpen°t Wire Group . ;.;.-..-..*.-.*.' 45 

A. Th° Industry ...•;....'. 45 

1. Product '. .45 

Description. 45 

Construction Materials 45 

Process 45 

Variations 45 

2. Coranani^s 45 

Numb er 45 

Size 45 

Lo cat ion 46 

3. Market 46 

Use 46 

Distribution 46 

Location 46 

' Freight.'. .'. .7.7.'. . . .'. . ... 7.7. .".'.'.' 46 

4. Proolems 46 

5. Or>en Price Piling 46 



982? 



-VI 1- 



• • • ■ ■ Page 

Pric° Call ...,....,...,.. 46 

TTork Sh°°ts 46 

B_. Basie Structure •••••, .• 47 

1. Original Structure. 47 

Pri ce ..... . . . . 47 

Extras .Over Base..- . . '.'. 48 

QuA.n.t i.ty .-.-. Extras and Reductions .48 

Terms, of Delivery. . ■.-. ..-..• 48 

Terms Of. Payment. ,48 

Wire Prices. — Extra Over- Base i *.;. . ......48 

2. Final Structure. 48 

Extras Ov°r Ba se 49 

Quantity — Extras and Seductions 49 

Terms of Delivery 49 

Terms of Payment, 49 

C,. Chronological Record rif Price Pilings 50 

Pric Q Fii inrs ..50 

G°nernl 50 

Numoer of Fil ings 50 

Form and Content......... ............... .50 

Waiting Period ., 50 

Leadership 50 

General , , .50 

P_. Astiestos Insulated Magnet Wire, ... , 51 



98?2 -viii- 



Page 

1. Original Filing 51 

Extra Ov°r Br. se 51 

Quant it r — Extras and Reductions '51 

T^rms of Delivery 51 

Terms of Payment 51 

"Tir^ Prices Extras Over Base 52 

Discounts 52 

2. _ Final Filing. 52 

3. . Suromat ion. 52 

E . Summa ry •' 53 



Exhibit A Price Oall .54 

Chanter 5. Fractional Horre Pp-'er Motor Oroun 56 

A. The Industry 56 

'<- 'emhers of Industry 56 

Standard anr 1 'Non-Standard. 56 

1. Price Call 56 

2. Work Sheets i 57 

3. Standard Structure, . '. 57 

B. Br sic Structure '. '. . '• 57 

1. Structure Original ' Filing. '. 57 

List ' Price Standard and Non-Standard 57 

Custom°r Clps ; ;es' and Discbunt. .57 

Operation of Standard. .'....' 58 

Structure 

Terms of Delivery and Payment 60 



9822 -ix- 



Page 

2. Comparison — Standard and Non-Standard Structure. 60 

3. Structure — Final Filing 61 

Operation of Final Structure 61 

List Price ....... .62 

Uniformity. 62 

Maximum Discount — Customer Clrss G ..62 

C_. Chronology of Change 62 

1. Major Change — Effective March 9, 1934 62 

2. Major Change — Effective November 5 to November 15, 
1934. ' 63 

3. Int°rmediate Filings 63 

Number of Filings. 63 

P_, Summary 64 

Exhibit A Pric° Call. 65 

Chapter 6. Si ecti-i.c Fans 71 

A, Dh Q Industry 

1 . Description o f Product '. . . .71 

Materials 71 

Process 71 

Variations '72 

Standardization.. . . .' .' .73 

2. Companies 73 

Location 73 

Market . .' 73 



98?? -x- 



Page 

Freight 73 

Problems 74 

3. Price Call 74 

4. Work Sheets 74 

B, Basic Structure 75 

1. Original Structure 75 

Price 75 

Customer Classification and Discount 75 

Freight Items ..76 

Terms of Payment 76 

2. Final Structure 76 

Price 76 

Customer Classification and Discounts 76 

Freight...... 77 

Terms of Payment 77 

3. Comparison of Original and Final Structure 77 

4. Chronological Record of Price Filing 78 

Nxunoer ol Filings 78 

Form and Content 78 

Waiting Period 78 

General • • 78 

C . S-umma ry 79 

Exhibit A Price Call 80 

Charjt°r 7. Electric Arc ^elding- 82 

A. The 'industry 82 

1. Development 82 

9822 ~zi- 



Pag* 

Number of Comoanies. 82 

Acceptance of Product , 82 

Trade - Ins 83 

Deferred Payments, Rentals 83 

Demonstrations and Guarantees 83 

2. Price Call,.. 83 

B, Original Price Structure 84 

Pi scount s 84 

Terms of Payment 84 

Delivery Terms 84 

Demonstration Plans 84 

Guarantee* .84 

C_. Final Price Structure .84 

Terms of Payment 85 

Del iv°ry Terms. 85 

Demonstration Plans. 85 

Guarantee .85 

D. Chronological Record of Price Pilings "by Companies 86 

Number of Pilings ...87 

Government Business 88 

P. Results of Open Price Piling .88 

Exhibit A Price Call 89 

Chapter 8. Dry Cells and Plash Lights 96 

A. The Industry 96 

1. The Product 96 



9822 



-XI 1- 



Pag= 

■ Materials 96 

Fro cesses 96 

Standardization 96 

Variety 96 

• Cases .96 

• ■ Members of the Industry 96 

• • Market 98 

■ Location. 98 

• -Market Statistics 98 

Distribution 98 

2. Problems 100 

Product- Standards. .....,.., 100 

3. Price .Call 101 

4.- -Work Sheets 101 

B, 'Basic Structure 102 

• 1. Original Pi] ing. 102 

• Price. . 102 

Quantity ."Differentials 102 

Tyr,e of Product 102 

Packaging, , 102 

Deals and Assortments 103 

Customer Classes and Discounts 103 

Quotations 103 

Special Allowances and Discounts > .103 

Delivery T=rms 104 

Terms of Payment 104 



9822 -xiii- 



Page 

2. Final Structure. t 1C4 

Pricing '...... •. 104 

Quarterly Differentials. . 1^5 

Tyioe of Product.' v.v 105 

Packaging 105 

Customer Classes and Discounts .105 

Delivery Terras * 106 

Terms of Payment 106 

3. Chronological Record of Price' Piling 106 

Number of Filings'.'. ...... ............ 106 

Form and Content. ....... ... . . .'. . . .v. . ... .106 

Waiting Period. '.' 107 

General. ....... '. '. '.'. '. ....'...-...-. : 107 

C_. Summary 107 

Chanter 9. P-adio Receiving Tube's . ........;.... Ill 

A. The Industry. . . .............. Ill 

1. Product Ill 

Description ' Ill 

Materials .... ' Ill 

Process Ill 

Variations of Product .111 

2. Companies. Ill 

Number '.'.' Ill 

Size Ill 

0th<=r Products ' 112 

Loca.tion 112 

3. Market 112 

Tyne of Sales 112 

9822 -xiv- 



Page 
' ' Distribution. H2 

Location "* 

Freight'. . . . ' '.'..'..' 112 

' 4.' Problems. . -^2 

' 5. Op°n Price Piling. . ....... 113 

Price' Call ' 113 

Work Sheets 113 

B. Basic Structure. .......' . 114 

1.' Original Price S'tructu-'e. .'. 114 

Discounts and' Customer Classifications 114 

Freight. I 14 

Terms' of Payment I 14 

2. Final' Price Structure.... 115 

3. Chronological' Record of Pilings by Companies 116 

' lT\imber of Pilings. 116 

' Content and' Form. H 6 

' Tp itihg' Period. •..■.*..'.•.'.'..' • H6 

C_. Summation. ....'. H™ 

• Exhibit A ■ Pric<- Call ...118 

Cha-nter 10. Sockets . . •. -. ISO 

A. The Industry •. 120 

• 1. Product •..-... . 120 

Manufacturing Processes 121 

Packaging ; • 121 

Location . ■• ^-2 

Number of- Enrol oy°.°s.» . . . .• 122 

Market 12 2 

9322 -xv~ 



Pag<= 
2. History 122 



3. Price .Call., 124 

4. 7 P rk Sheets 124 

B. Basic. Structure,, 124 

1 . Original Pilings 124 

Prices... ... . . 124 

•Customer Classif ic^tions and Discounts .124 

• Terns . of Payment 125 

T<=rms of Delivery 125 

2. Pinal Pilings 126 

■Prices 126 

• Customer, Classifications and Discounts 126 

• ■ Terms, of Payment 126 

v - Terms of Delivery 126 

3. Changes During Price Pilings 126 

4* Waiting Period. 127 

C., Summa -ry. ............ 128 

•Bxhihit A , . Price Call 129-132 

Chapter 11.- ■Domest ic .Electric Heat ing Appliances 133 

A. The Industry. ■. 133 

Development . •. . ....... 133 

1. Problems 133 

Design 133 

' Product Dumoing. ..... r 133 

Safety . . . 133 

Spies Outlets 134 



9822 -xvi- 



98^2 



Pag c 
Price Com?'"' ri son-, » .134 

Meraters of the Industry. 134 

B. Pric« Call 134 

1. Work Sheets. .-.- ■ 135 

C. Original Price Structure 135 

Pricing 135 

Customer Classifications and Discounts. . 135 

Variance in Discount '.'. 135 

Wholesalers 136 

Large Buyers. ....... 136 

Qua.ntity and- Maximum Discounts .136 

Manufacturers Agent s , 136 

Miscellaneous .Allowance , 135 

Terms of Payment 136 

Delivery Terras. ' 136 

Lack of Uniformity 137 

D. Final Filings — Comparison with Original 137 

Growth of Miscellaneous Allowances 137 

Terms of Payment and Delivery 137 

E. Lowest and Highest Prices - Electric Heating Irons 137 

1. Prices - Original Filing 137 

2. Prices - Final Filing 138 

3. Pric° Changes on Electric Toasters 138 

F. Chronological Record of Price Filings "by Companies 138 

Waiting Period 138 

Meeting. Competition 139 

Increa s ing Lin° s 139 

-xvii- 



Page 
G. Summary. -"-39 

Exhibit A Price Call 141 

Chapter 12. Food Ser vice . * 142 

Ecrurom^nt 142 

A. The Industry 142 

1. Product 142 

Description .142 

Materials 142 

Variations 142 

2. Conroanies 142 

Number 142 

Size 142 

Other Products 142 

Locat ion 143 

3. Market 143 

Distribution 143 

Freight 143 

4. Orien Price Piling .143 

Price Call 143 

Work Sheets 143 

B. Basic Structure 144 

1. Original and Pinal Structures '. 144 

Price 144 

Discounts and Customer Classifications 145 

Freight Terms 146 

Credit Terms 146 

Trade In Allowances 146 

9822 -xviii- 



■.-... . _ Pag° 

2. Chronological Record of Price Pilings by Corroanies.147 

Nuriber of Pil in^s I 47 

Waiting Period 147 

Porm and Cont ent I 47 

C_. Summation 147 

P. Conclusion 147 

Exhib it A Price Call .... 149 

Chapter 13. Laminated Phenolic Products 153 



A. The Industry. 153 

1. The Product. • • • . .153 

Sheets 153 

*?psh°.rs and Pises 153 

Tuhing .'.... 154 

Rods 154 

2. Members of the Industry 154 

Fabricators 154 

Pmoloym°nt . ." 154 

Location of Plant s , ,., , 154 

Act ivity ...'.•............ . 155 

Markets'.' ?.vv. 155 

3. Scope of Study ■ •••••• , • •. 155 

4. The Price Call ..,*., 155 

5. "embers of the Industry......... 155 

S. Price Structure-. .,,..., 156 

-^0 GLSa*«a*-*«»**« ••••••••••.••_• ••••••••♦••• .•«• • ( ' • • • • • • • -LOO 

Tubes 1 ....... .... _,,......... 156 

"Ushers 156 

9C22 -zix- 



Page 
Sr>°ciplti^s 156 

Illustration of List Price and Discount 156 

Specialties and Instructions 158 

Strins and Blocks. 158 

Angles and Channels 158 

Machinery Changes 158 

Government Bids. 158 

typical Price Change ..< 158 

B. Price Movements 159 

dashers 159 

Sheet Material 160 

Tubing ...........'. 161 

Rods 162 

Terms of Delivery 162 

C_. Summary 162 

Exhibit A 163 

Chapter 14. G eneral Comment on Group of 5 i n 

• the Electrical I' '^anufac tuning. Indus try .165 

A. Introduction. .' . . . . . . .......... ...165 

'"Ul'V Oil . * a s * . . . * . * * * « * s * w I *"•'•"•'• •'•'»'•'•'■• • • • • •• • • • • • • • • i C ■ 

Grouo Pattern. ,'...............•...■........... 165 

Pricing. .................. 166 

Customer Classes and Discounts;;..;..;. ..166 

Price Trend. . . '. ............... '. , 166 

Terms of Payment' and' Delivery. '.'. :.;;;;.. 166 

'-'nxxormiby...................'. '•'»'•. •'..•.'•>■. '.. ......... ...-Lc)' 

Number of Piling's.'. .'.'.'. . .... .'.'.. .°. .... ■• .167 

Waiting Period. 7. Y.'.'.Y.y.v.'.'.V.v.v. .... . . . •• 167 

98?2 ~xr.- 



Page 
I'eeting Conroetition 167 

B. Brief Summary of Each of the Group of Five 168 

1. Non-Renewable Plug Fuses. 168 

2. Portable Tools. 169 

3. Pnnplhoards 170 

4« Pole Line H^rd^are 171 

5. Industrial Lighting 173 

Chapter 15. Conclusion 175 

A. The Pro"bl°m of Conrolex Price Structures 175 

Products 176 

Freight 177 

Credit 177 

Oth^r Considerations 178 

Customer Classifications 178 

Quantity Discounts 179 

Conclusion 179 

B. The Behavior of Prices Under Price Fil ing 180 

The Trp-nd of Prices 181 

Shifting Price Structure 182 

Customer Differentials 182 

Uniformity 183 

Flexibility 184 

Waiting Period 185 

Leadership 185 

Entrances and Exits. 186 

Conclusion 185 



9822 



-xxi- 



• • • ■ • • • • - ' ' Page 

C_, The Requisites for Price Filing 186 

Scope of the Price Call 186 

Price Sensitivity. 187 

Standardization of Products 187 

Informptory Character of Filing ,189 

Pur-oo se 190 

Flexibility of Operation 190 

P. The Need for Further Study 191 



XXll 



Appendix A. 

Chronological Records of ?rice Filings by Companies. Also 

other Charts. 

part 1. Rubber Covered .Building Wire. 

Section a. Chronological Record of Price pilings by Companies. 
Section b. Sample Price Filings. 

Part 2. Flexible Cord Group. 

Section a. Chronological Record of Price Filings by Companies. 
Section b. price Trends. , 

Part 3, Magnet Wire C-roup. 

Section a. Chronological Record of price Filings by Companies. 

Part 4. Fractional Horsepower Motor Group. 

Section a. Chronological Record of price Filings by Companies. 

Part 5. Electric Fans. 

Section a. Chronological Record of Price Filings "oy Companies. 

Part 6. Elevtric Arc Welding Apparatus. 

Section a. Chronological Record of Price Filings by Companies. 

Part 7. Pry Cells and Flashlights. 

Section a. Chronologic -\1 Record of Price Filings by Companies, 

Part 8. Radio Receiving Tubes. 

Section a. Chronological Record of Price Filings by Companies. 

Part 9. Sockets. 

Section a. Chronological Record of Price Filings by Companies. 

Part in. Domestic Electrc Heating Appliances. 

Section a. Chronological Record of Price Filings by Companies. 
Section b. Price Changes on Electric Toasters. 

Part 11. Food Service Equipment. 

Section a. Chronological Record of Price Filings by Companies. 

Part 12, Laminated Phenol ics Group. 

Section a. Chronological Record of Price Filings by Companies. 
Section b. Fricing Instructions on Specialties and Government 
Quotations. 

Part 13. Chronological Records of Filings by Companies as follows; 
Section a. Non-Renewable Plug Fuses. 
Section b, portable Electric Tools. 
Section c. Panelboards. 
Section d. pole Line Hardware. 
Section e. Industrial Lighting Equipment. 



9322 

xziii 



Appendix B. 

Charts of Original and Final pilings and other Charts. 

Part 1. Ruboer Covered Building Wire,' 

Section a. Chronological Chart of price pilings. 

Part 2, Flexible Cord Group. 

Charts of Original and Pinal Filings, 

Section' a. Flexible Cords and portables. - 

b. Heater Cords. 

c. Radio Wires. 

d. Radio hook-up and Radio Lead-in Wires. 

e. Fixture Wire. 

f. Delivery Terras, packaging etc. 

Part 3. Magnet Wire Group, 

Section a. . price differentials for various' Magnet Wires. 
Section b. Original and Final Filings. 

■Part 4. Fractional Horsepower Motor Group, 

Section a. Original and Final Filings. . 

Part 5, Electric Fans. 

Section a. Original and Final Filings, 

Part 6, Electric Arc Welding Apparatus, 

Section a. Original and Final Filings. 

Section b. Calculated costs on deferred payment and rental purchase 
plans Original and Final. 

Part 7. Dry Cells and Flashlights. 

Section a. Customer differentials - Original and Final. 
Section b. Delivery Terns etc. Original and Final 
Section c. Sample Prices. 

Part 8. Radio Receiving Tubes. 

Section a. Original and Final Filings. 

Part 9. Sockets. 

Section a. Original and Final Filings,,- 
.. Section b. Major Price Changes. 

Part 10. Domestic Electric Heating Appliances. 
Section a. Original and Final Filings,, 
Section b. Lowest and Highest Prices on Electric Hand Irons. 

Part 11. Food Service Equipment„ 

Original and Final Filings. 

Section a. Meat Choppers. 

Section b. Potato and Vegetable peelers, Silver Burnishers. 

Section c. Coffee Mills and Slicing Machines. 

Part 12. Laminated Phenolic Products. 

Section a. Chronological Chart Showing Comparison of Discount 

Original and Final. 
Part 13. Non-Renewable Plug Fuse, 

Section a. Original and Final Filings, 



9822 



XXIV 



-1- 



CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION 



A. HIS TORY 

The Code: The code of fair competition for the Electrical Manufacturing 
industry, was the fourth code to be approved "by the President. Approved 
about six weeks after the signing of the National Industrial Recovery 
Act, it was the first code to provide for open-price filing. The exact 
code provision is as follows: 

ARTICLE X. 



"If the supervisory agency determines that in any branch or sub- 
division of the electrical manufacturing industry it has been 
the generally recognized practice to sell a specified product 
on the basis of printed net price lists, or price lists with 
discount sheets, and. fixed terms of payment which are distri- 
buted to the trade, each manufacturer of such product shall, 
within ton (10) days after notice of such determination, file 
with the -supervisory agency a net price list or a price list 
and discount sheet as the case may be, individually prepared 
by him showing his current prices, or prices and discounts, 
and terms of payment, and the supervisory agency, shall im~ ' 
mediately send copies thereof to all known manufacturers of 
such specified product. Revised price lists with or without 
discount sheets may be filed from time to time thereafter with 
the supervisory agency by any manufacturer of 'such product, 
to become effective upon the date specified therein, but such 
revised price lists and discount sheets shall be filed with 
the supervisory agency ten days in advance of the effective 
date unless the supervisory agency shall authorize a shorter 
period. Copies of revised price lists and discount sheets, 
with notice of the effective date specified, shall be im- 
mediately sent to all known manufacturers of such product, 
who thereupon may file, if they so desire, revisions of their 
price lists and/or discount sheets, .which shall become ef- 
fective upon the date when the revised price list or discount 
sheet first filed shall go into effect. 

If the supervisory agency shall determine that in any branch 
or subdivision of the electrical, manufacturing industry not 
now selling its product on the basis' of price lists with or 
without discount sheets with fixed terms of payment the dis- 
tribution or marketing conditions in said branch or subdivi- 
sion are similar to or the same as the distribution or market- 
ing conditions in a branch or subdivision of the industry 
where the use of price lists with or without discount sheets 
is well recognized, and that a system of selling on net price 
lists or price lists and discount sheets should be put into 



9822 



-2- 



effect in such branch or subdivision, each manufacturer of the 
product or products of such branch or subdivision shall with- 
in twenty (20) clays after notice of such determination file 
with the supervisory agency net price lists or price lists 
and discount sheets, as the supervisory agency may direct, 
containing fixed terms of payment, showing his prices and dis- 
counts and terms of payment, and such price lists and/or dis- 
count sheets and terms of payment may be -revised in the manner 
hereinabove provided. 

"No employer shall sell directly or indirectly by any means 
whatsoever any product of the industry covered by the provi- 
sions of this Article at a price lower or at discounts greater 
or on more favorable terms of payment than those provided in 
his current net price lists or price lists and discounts sheets." 

This provision differs from the "standard" price filing article 
which was later incorporated in the National Recovery Administration 
policy in the following particulars! 

(a) The code authority through the supervisory agency 

was to act as administrator of the provision, collecting ;■ 
and distributing the actual price filings. 

(b) A waiting period was included in the provision which 
was mandatory unless (a) the filing was coincidental to 
meet that of a competitor or (b) a shorter was authorized 
by the supervisory agency. 

(c) The permission for short filing to meet competition, 
did not establish the competitor's filing as a limit of 
change, but authorized the filing of "revisions" without 
any restrictions. In actual fact, efforts were quite 
successful in preventing the literal interpretation of 
the provision, and coincidental filings were usually kept 
to the scope of the initiatory revision. 

(d) The only mandatory distribution of the filings was 
to all known manuf rcturers of the specified product. 

(e) The provision forbids sales at less than filed 
prices, but does not prohibit sales at more than filed 
prices. 

(f) The fact that the last paragraph of Article X. stated 
that "No employer shall sell etc" covered various difficult- 
ies on enforcement due to varying interpretations of the 
word "sell". This was later overcome by the following amend- 
ment. Approved April 25, 1935. 



9822 



Amendment ; 

ARTICLE X 

CODE OF FaII COi. PETITION FOR THE 
ELECTRICaI MANUFACTURING- INDUSTRY 

Amend the third paragraph of Article X by inserting after the word 
"shall", in the first line, the words - 

"quote, hid, offer to sell, contract to sell or" so that the said 
paragraph shall read as follows: 

"lie employer snail quote, bid, offer to sell, contract to 
sell or sell directly or indirectly "by any means whatsoever 
any product of the industry covered by the provisions of this 
article at a price lower or at discounts greater or on more 
favorable terms of payment than those provider' in his current 
net price lists or price lists and discount sheets." 

Mechanism: Article X. provided that the varioxis supervisory agencies 
should h. ve final authority in determining that prices should be filed 
with respect to any product, within their jurisdiction. The supervisory 
agencies were members of the industry, one to five in number, appointed 
by the Board of G-ovenors of National Electrical iuanuf acturing Association, 
usually upon the recommendation of the members of the group. In practice, 
the cuestion of issuring any price-call was discussed at some meeting 
of the group or section involved, and recommendations were made to the 
supervisory agency with respect to the advisability of such a price-call, 
the scope of the price-call, and a preliminary mailing-list to be used 
for the initial call. 

Each member subject to a price-call, was required to file a certain 
number of copies of his price lists, specified in the call, and suffi- 
cient to -oermit distribution to all participating companies. It was 
assumed at first that the collection and distribution of the price-fil- 
lings would be largely routine clerical work. However, the unexpected 
volume of filings and the number of technical problems which continually 
arose, made a larger and more specialized staff necessary, so that at 
its peal:, it totaled eighteen persons. Of these, several were designated 
-s executive secretaries for the different supervisory agencies, particu- 
larly those having a large number of price-calls and many manufacturers 
under their jurisdiction. These secretaries were individuals with some 
degree of experience in the industry. It still remained true, however, 
that the more troublesome situations were referred to the supervisory 
agency for solution. When the problem was one of enforcement, the agency 
which promised to be most effective within the entire code authority 
structure was utilized. 

When a filing was received, it was noted in a card index in which 
each member of the group had a separate record. Unless a sufficient 
number of copies were provided, the filing was deemed incomplete, and the 
fil^r so notified. The filing was then checked to make certain that it 

9822 



-4~ 



conformed to the price-call. If accepted, the executive secretary so 
notified the price-filing department and distribution proceeded auto- 
matically. If the filing was found to be inadequate, the executive secre- 
tary with held distribution and communicated at once with the filer. 
The stipulated number of copies was such as to permit the building up 
of a master file in the price-filing department, located at the National 
Electrical Manufacturers Association offices in New York City. This 
master file is the source of the basic data used in this study. 



9822 



-o— 

.:• "EM PBICE 5TLIF& STUDY 

Incepti on. The problem of the usefulness end dangers of price filing 

had been a matter of great concern to the national Recovery Administration. 

Lacl: of experience with the device made it necessary to formulate polic- r 

and make specific decisions on the basis either of abstract reasoning or 

limited incidents in some feu reported cases. Unfortunately,, there was 

not sufficient observation of the various plans in action to build up 

a large bod" of experience during the life of the I T RA as an administra.ting 

agency. 

However, \fti€h the ERA metamorphosed into a research organization, 
it was felt that one of its most useful services might be to e;:amine -the 
record of price behavior in various industries which had had experience 
with the price-filing device. Because the electrical manufacturing indus- 
try was the first to adopt the device and also because of its importance 
among industries, its relatively long e:qierience with price-filing was felt 
to be of particular significance. The national Electrical Manufacturers 
Association, which had acted s.s code authority in the industry, vras ap- 
proached concerning such a project. Immediately a committee of the associ- 
ation was appointed to cooperate with iRA officials and the price— filing 
records "'ere made available for their study. 

Procedure . Inasmuch as the files were all in rev: York City, an office was 
opened in the same building as the national Electrical Manufacturing Associ- 
ation office, and a staff preceded with the actual organization of the 
data. After consultation with the industry committee and examination 
of the data, seventeen units of the industry operating under separate 
price-calls were selected for detailed study operating the various condi- 
tions and circumstances existing in the industry. 

Uhile it was not possible to follow on identical procedure in every 
case, the normal operation was to prepare a tabulated summary of the price 
structure as it appeared on the original filing, company by company, A 
similar tabulation was prepared for the price structure at the final 
filings. A third tabulation, on a chronological basis, showed the series 
of changes by which was brought about the transformation from the first 
to the la.st filing. 

In man;' cases, special tabulations were made in the hope that they 
might illumine certain specific points, such as changes in net prices 
for particular products, or differentials according to st} r le and grade 
for some product which appears in many different specifications. These 
various studies have been analyzed and some tentative conclusions con- 
cerning the experience of specific groups are presented in the detailed 
chapters which follow. A final chapter attempts to draw some broader 
conclusions from the mass of detailed material presented. 

Throughout the entire stud;-, members of and individuals familiar 
with the industry have been most cooperative in helping to interpret or 
explain events or technical situations, although all too frequently, 
the history is unfortunately confused and largely a matter of personal 
opinion and prejudice. 



3822 



-6- 



PURPOSF 0? THE STUDY 

• 

The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of Article X. 
(Open Price Filing) on the electrical manufacturing industry. It seemed 
important to determine the possibilities of the device as a method of 
eliminating certain forms of unfair competition, and as a means of 
assisting an industry to obtain the type of controls which are assumed 
to exist in a competitive market. Furthermore, it was hoped to define 
more clearly the technical procedures and administrative safe guards 
which appear necessary or desirable to assure the operation of the device 
in the public interest. From the point of view of the industry, it was 
hoped that the study might shed some light on its problems in the field 
of price. 



9322 



-7- 



0. CAUTIONAR Y COMMENTS 

Despite the cooperative efforts of ^TEA and the industry, it is only 
fair to say that these purposes have been accomplished only to a slight 
degree. Many qu-stions about price-filing remain unanswered. The fault 
lies in certain underlying conditions outlined belo^ which must be fully 
recognised before the detailed reports are examined. 

ITo Background . One serious difficulty was that no adequate information 
was available concerning the level of prices or the nature of the various 
price structures prior to price-filing, Tnere is no previous bench-mark 
which can be used for comparison. In many instances, companies actually 
had no formal orice structures in the -ire-code days, but established 
-prices for customers without any basic classification or uniformity of 
treatment. This was possible because of the lack of marketing information 
and the many special relationships between 'manufacturer and customer 
which had been developed. As a result, the original price-filing repres- 
ented the first formal price structure for many companies in some of the 
groups, and obviously there is no possible way of comparison with the past 
short of actual study of old invoices. \~-?-ny of the early filings obvious- 
ly were prepared by individuals who had little or no knowledge of ^hat a 
.price list should 1 look like or contain. 

In other groups where the use of-ipublished price lists was custom- 
ary, the pressure of the depressed state of the market had resulted in 
the development of special, variable and secret discounts so that the 
published price list was merely the starting point for the process of 
bargaining. Even in those instances where the original filings were print- 
ed lists dated several months prior to the price-call, there is no assur- 
ance that they represented in fact the prices which obtained. 

.This means t iat the original price-filing often started with price 
lists veil above the selling prices which actually existed just prior 
to the price— call, or with a price structure which was in fact different 
from : ;hc previous practice of individual bargaining oy the company which 
filed it. Of course, it frequently happened that industries "'ere unable 
to support these first prices. Consequently, a price decline may appear 
to have taken place, although that decline may merely have brought prices 
back to the level at which they were before the first filing was made. 

Brevity of period . Although some of the branches of the electrical manu- 
facturing industry operated under price-filing for as long as a year and 
a~half, this interval is still an extremely short one for evaluating such 
an experiment. In many of the groups, major changes in structiire took 
place, and there is no assurance that the process of evolution had run 
its course. Furthermore, some of the groups examined appear to have re- 
latively inflexible prices, with changes only at infrequent intervals, 
if at all. In such instances, perhaps a longer interval might have been 
more revealing. 

It was inevitable that in certain groups where the price situation 
was particularly chaotic, the early months of price filing would see many 
filings as the result of the ne" information about each other's policies 
suddenly made available to the ambers of the group. Until this process 

9822 



-8- 



of adjustment was completed, the behavior could hardly he taken as en 
evidence of the normal price behavior of the group under -or ice-filing. 
In some groups, there was evidence that a relatively stable structiire 
had emerged after an interval of considerable price-filing activity, 
while in others, there is no evidence that any appreciable degree of 
stability was ever accomplished. 

Technique . More will be said later concerning the technique of price- 
filing. It began as an experiment with little in the way of experience. 
In many of the grouos, the character of the filings both in form and 
def initeness, improved decidedly during the neriod. Likewise, improve- 
ments were made and might further have .been made in administration which 
^ould have, made the device more effective. 

Enforcement and Enforceability . The record of enforcement was not a 
happy one. The industry -'as most diligent in its efforts to enforce the 
provision, but the National Recovery Administration did not. give strong 
support, and the doubtful enforceability made them reluctant to take of- 
fenders into court. The result was a gradual disregard of the provisions 
in some branches of the industry. This is evidenced by the decline in the 
number of filings during the end of the period, and by the claims of the 
industry that many companies disregarded their filed prices with impunity. 

Consumer P ressure . Certain of the potential benefits of nr ice-filing, 
particularly those tending to reduce excessive differentials in functional 
or quantity discount, presumably come in large -oart from consximer oressure, 
based upon knowledge of how other consumers may be treated. The element 
of publicity is an important aspect of most price-filing theory, since 
there may be buying sellers as well as buying buyers. The code provision 
did not require distribution of information except to other manufacturers 
governed 'oy the price-call.- There is no evidence that consumers were re- 
fused data, but the fact remains that they did not seek or obtain it, and 
therefore this important aspect of NRA's standard price-filing procedure is 
absent in this instance. 

Complexity of Sources . The period was one of tremendous change - demand . 
and cost were both subject to wide variation. It is almost impossible to 
separate the influence of any one factor in the midst of so many variables. 

Limitations of Data. The study is based uoon the actual orice-filing records. 
One cannot even be certain that they represent the orices which were in ef- 
fect. The code provision was so i-'orded that it permitted convoanies to sell 
above their filed orices, if they could and there are many claims that other 
companies were selling below their filed -orices. Even assuming that the 
price records were correct, they did not provide answers for many of the 
problems which immediately appeared. They did not provide explanations for 
their own behavior, nor did they give any evidence of the effects uoon volume 
of sales, the use of different channels, or the fortunes of companies of 
different size or type of organization. Perhaps, with a longer period, many 
of these results ^ould have become evident, but they are certainly not exposed 
by the record of the orice-filing. It is at least of some significance that, 
except in very limited areas, fe'f members of the electrical manufacturing 
industry appeared to have regarded their experiment rrith price-filing under 
the 1IRA. as having oroved beneficial to the industry. 

9822 



-9- 



Limitations of Tine . The study of the nrice-filing records oroved to "be 
much -.r.ore of an undertaking than had been anticipated. It could not he 
neatly reduced to an automatic routin ', but the filings of each grbuo and. • 
sometimes each company raised new problems. The obscure nature of some 
of the fili also made analysis difficult, while the volume of separate 
filings to he examined riroved to run into the thousands. Furthermore, the 
gradual liquidation of '"3A oersonnel "as a disturbing factor mf major im- 
portance. Consequently, when the task of organizing the data into ork 

ts --as completed as originally -olanned, the time remaining for. its 
analysis '-as ell too snort. 

It uas indeed a pretentious undertaking to develon a technique and 
complete an analysis of such a bewildering mass of data in a oeriod of a 
fe-7 months. 1" evert he-l<--ss, those close to the project have found it a most 
stimulating e::ercise in practical statistics aid realistic economics. It 
is to be hoped that same of the excitement of e:coloration may be reflected 
in detailed and com-olic-ted Gase. histories of the ne::t thirteen chapters, 
and that some of the broader conclusions may serve to shed some light on 
certain aspects of the problem of nrice behavior. "•■:'. 



9832 



-10- 

CHAPTER 2i. RUB3ER COVERED BUIL DING WIRE 

A. THE INDUSTRY 

P roduct 

Description . A copper core consisting of one or more conductors, 
stranded or solid and covered with rubber, lead, braid, or a ciMnation. 
The product of the various producers is identical so far as vcntta* of 
material, size, or performance are concerned. There is no element of eye 
appeal or design. 

Materia l -.: ,. Three major raw materials used are: rubber, lead, and 
copper. 

■ Manuf ac tor in/.; proces s. A relatively simple mechanical process in- 
volving the use o:t special eouipment. The product is made up in standard 
lengths of 500 ft, coils or reels. There ar3 apparently six processing 
patents controlled by one company and most but not all members of the 
industry operate as licensees. 

Variations and Grade . A series of products standardized according 
to the following: (l) size of conductors (gage size), (2) number of con- 
ductors, (3) stranded or solid conductors, (4) thickness of rubber wall, 
(5) type of braid, (6^ thickness of lead sheath. 

Standardization . Processing patents identity of technical specifi- 
cations for particular application and reouirements of building ordinance 
have brought about exact standards which are closely followed. 

C ompanie s 

Number . Thirty-four. 

Size . Producers vary in size from the smallest, employing about 
200 people to the largest which employ in excess of 1000. About one-half 
of the companies are large. 

Other Products . All companies produce forms of wire and cable other 
than rubber covered building wire. Several of the companies are engaged 
in the copper industry while others operate generally in the Electrical 
industry. 

Location . The majority of the manufacturers are located in New Eng- 
land, New York and Pennsylvania. Also one company in Virginia, one in 
Michigan and two in Illinois. 

Market 

Use . The product is used by electrical contractors, industrials and 
utilities in the construction of wiring systems. The largest market dur- 
ing the code period was probably the Federal government. 

Distrib ution. The product was sold direct to the consumer and through 
distributors, the distributor in practically every case being given prefer- 

9822 



■11- 



ence. Salesmen are employed and distribution made in given cases from 
warehouses locrted in various parts of the country. The number of lineal 
feet purchased varies from order to order. 

Freight . The weight and bulk of the product cause freight to he an 
important item. 

price Filing 

The original price call was issued on August 26, 1933, "becoming ef- 
fective September 7, 1933. (See Exhibit A).. The call covered rubber 
covered building wire more particularly described as Rubber Covered Build- 
ing wire intermediate, 302 Rubber Covered Building Wire, Braided and Lead- 
ed. All manufacturers of such products were directed to file 40 copies 
of their price lists or price lists and discount sheets showing current 

rices, fixed terms of sale, payment, delivery, and any other conditions 
affecting the sales price on the products specified. 

B. BASIC P-JCi: ST EUCTUZE 

with the exception of a few companies specializing in small package 
lot, all companies in the group tend to conform to a basic price struc- 
ture.. Frice. filings of six companies have been omitted in the entire 
studs'- <hie to their being small, having short lines or imcomplete filings. 
However, provision was made to illustrate companies of the type omitted 
by including representative samples thereof in the list of conrDanies 
examined. 

The filings _ of one company are used as work sheets (Appendix A, Part 
1, Section B) to depict the major structural changes discussed below in- 
die tes that this single record adequately represents the basic changes 
undergone by the structure during the period. The original price struc- 
ture was completely revolutionized on Lay 1, 1934, and there were two 
broad readjustments thereafter. These three significant changes are de- 
scribed in the following sections: 

1. O riginal structure - Effecti ve September 1, 1935 . 

A. List Price. Per M. feet for each type and size 

of wire. 

3. Discounts . 

1. Customer Classification 

A. Distributers: list price less 1') per cent 
Shipments to jobbers' stock to be treated 
on carload basis regardless of quantity. 

B. Contractors: industrials; railroads; 
public utilities; United States counties, 
cities, other municipalities at lits. 

2. Quantity discount applying only to customers listed 
under B above. (Based on purchases of items on 
building wire price list only and not including 

9822 f 



-12- 

freight and reels.") 

A. $2,500 list value or more, list prices 
less 5 per cent and carload rate even 
though less than 30,000 pounds. 

B. Less than $2,500 list value and LCL 
freight. 

C. Freight. Added in all cases to list price less discounts, 
if any. The destination symbol bulletin, dated 
April 15, 1932, divided the country into about 
'■■ ' 5 1 '0 city and other areas with proper destination 

symbols from 1 to 34, symbols differing in size 
being assigned to each destination for leaded' 
and non-leaded wire, and for LCL and C L lots. 
Having determined the proper symbol for a given 
destination, it is applied to the Freight Adder 
Table which gives for size of wire and symbol, 
the amount to be added per l,0 , 'l feet. The 
lower symbols seem to cover the industrial areas 
where the greatest distribution takes place. 
Cities usually carry lower symbols than the sur- 
rounding country areas. Shipments from ware- 
house stocks add freight as if shipped from the 
factory. 

D. Terms . 2 per cent 10th prox. Net 60 days. 

2. iia.j or structural change. Effective May 1, 1934 . '. 

A. List Price . One master list price to determine which of 

four secondary list prices shall apply: 

A. Less than $50 as determined by the master list. 

B. $50 - $199.99 « » '< 

C. $20 1 - 4,999.99 » " " 

D. $5, OK) - and over ■'" • » " 

Master list about 115 per cent above previous list. ' The 
four secondary prices were all above the earlier list price.- The re- 
ductions for size of purchase, are indicated by taking prices 
or the list as 100, then prices are about 79, 72 and 68 for the 
other three groups. : 

B. Discounts . 

•Wholesalers discount' on manufacturers' 
shipment to wholesalers stock, discounts 
apply to secondary lists as follows: A, 
15$; B, 15f=; C, 10$; D, 5$. These dis- 
counts make the net of C and D equal, with 
B only slightly above. 

9822 



-lo— 

".'.holesrlers discount on manufacturers' ship- 
ment direct to customer of wholesaler, ex- 
cluding manufacturers 1 shipment of $20<> list 
or any direct to customer of wholesaler ap- 
plying on specific building job contracts, 5tfo. 

C. F reight . Shipments over 100 lbs. are F. 0. B. desti- 
nation; shipments under 1 '0 lbs. are F. 0. B. 
point of shipment. 

B. Terms . 2<$> IHh prox. Set E Li prox. 

To wholesalers, 2Jo 15th prox. Net E i 
prox. 

Net Effect of Change. The change brings about a complete revolution 
in the price structure. A much more detailed Quantity discount structure 
is established. It also shifted the price basis on purchases over 100 
lbs. from a list plus freight to a delivered price basis. 

In order to make more exact comparison, Exhibits B. Tables 1 and 2 
give the earlier price structure for two types and size of wire, and 
Tables 3 and 4 the prices after the revision. Due to the fact that vari- 
ous types or sizes of wire do not move with exact uniformity, these 
tables are only illustrative of price measurements in the entire' industry. 
However, they do serve to show the effect of the major structural changes 
which applied to all products of the industry. In these two examples, 
the resulting change may be compared for 'three classes of customers as 
follows: 

1. Under the new schedule, a smell purchaser not a wholesaler would 
have the following -prices: 

List A - less than $50 $26.95 
List B - $50 - $199.99 21.24 
List G - $200 -'$4,999.99 19.47 

Under the old schedule, he would have purchased at list ($16.80) plus 
freight. In no section of the country would freight have brought the 
price up to list A. The list B price is less than the previous price for 
all destinations with a symbol exceeding 20. The list C price is less 
than the previous price for all destinations with a symbol exceeding 12. 

2. ?or an industrial purchaser talcing over $2, 50\ the possible clas- 
sifications in the new schedule are: 

List C - $200 - $4,999.99 $19.47 
List B - Over $5, ')■ » * 18.44 

The old schedule, allowing 5 per cent discount, was $16.16 plus freight. 
The list C price is less than the previous price for all destinations with 
symbol exceeding 16, and for list D, destinations exceeding 11. 

3. For wholesalers purchasing for stock, the prices according to 
size of purchase in the new schedule are: 

9822 



-14- 

List A less than $50 $22.90 

List B $50 - $199.99 18.27 

List C $200 - $4, 999.99 17.50 

List D $5,000 and over 17.50 

The old schedule, allowing 10 per cent discount, was $15.32 plus freight. 
The new price is therfore higher on A purchases for all destinations, and 
less on B purchases for all beyond destination symbol 14, and for C and D, 
"beyond destination symbol 10. 

Another interesting aspect of the schedule is that the inverse char- 
acter of the wholesalers discount, i.e., larger for small purchases, tends 
to offset the differences of the lists, and reduce or eliminate the quan- 
tity discount aspect as it affects wholesalers. 

The net result is that prices for small purchases are increased to 
all points, the increases being greatest for points with the smallest 
destination symbols. For large purchases, prices are lower at points 
having large destination symbols and higher for those having small symbols. 
The amount higher or lower depends on the size and type of the wire pur- 
chased as well as the size of the destination symbol. 

3. Lla.jor structural change. Effective July 5, 1934 . 

A. List Price. The master list -orice was increased on 

all wire sizes, and the coverage of the 
secondary price lists was revised as 
follows: 

A. Broken package less than 50'". ■ 

B. Standard package $200 to $199.99 list. 

C. Standard package $200 to $4,999.99 list. 

D. Standard package $5, ''00. list and over. 

Prices in the new group A correspond rather closely with 
the old below $50 group, although there is some reduction in 
the list for large wire sizes where the price per foot is so 
high that a purchase of 499 feet might have been in the old 
• group C before. The other three groups include a number of 
small increases or decreases for particular types and sizes 
of wire. 

B. Discounts. Wholesalers discounts on manufacturers' 

.shipments to wholesalers stock increased 
to discount in. list A, 17-g$; B, 17-g$; 

U, Xog/O, JJ, '2/ ° 

Wholesalers discount on manufacturers' 
shipment direct to customer of wholesaler 
still 5 per cent except forlist D, re- 
duced to 2-g- per cent. The destination is 
eliminated between shipments applying on 

9822 



<-15~« 

specific 'building job contracts and 
other direct to customer shipments. 

C« Freight . ITo change 

L, Terns . ITo change. 

Net Effect of Changes : The actual effect of this revision is diffi- 
cult to determine Since it represents a change in classification (both 
through increase of the master list nd introduction of physical measure- 
ment), an increase in wholesalers' discounts, and revisions of specific 
jorices for certain grades and sizes of wire. 

The transactions included under groups C. ana D have apparently not 
been affected, except that the increase in the master list throws border 
line cases into the D group. However, List A now includes transactions 
involving less than 500 feet, rather than those under $50. This still 
pe lalizes the purchaser of small quantities, and extends the penalty to 
all purchases of broken packages of large size wires, which, if entered 
at more than $50, would previously have been priced according to Lists 
B or C. 

The results of the changes in' secondary List B and the increased 
wholesalers' discounts are indicated in Ta'.bles;5 and 6, which should be 
compared with Tables' 3 and 4. In the-ifeKaiaple of braided wire (Table 5) 
the larger discounts rerenbre than off set- by. the increa.se in the second- 
ary list prices, resulting in a net -increase in price to all purchasers 
the smallest increase being to wholesalers. For solid single conductor 
"ire, (Table 5), there is no change in secondary list prices for A and B 
purchases, so the increased discounts resulted in lower net trices for 
wholesalers. The secondary lists for C pnd D ^ere increased, an increase 
which is approximately offset for wholesalers by their increase discounts. 

The changes in the discount structure' resulted in shifting the dif- 
ferentials among types of transaction in four particulars: 

(a) The gap "ps widened between the price to wholesalers purchasing 
for stock and other customers. 

(o) "Thile discounts -'ere increase • to wholesalers purchasing for 
stock, no general change was made in the 'discounts for manufacturers' 
shipments direct to wholesalers' customers.' 

(c) The original exemption from discount of mmufacturers' shipments 
direct to wholesalers' customer-; of $200 or more, "as eliminated. 

(d) A penal. ty of a lower discount was placed upon manufacturers' 
shipments direct to wholesalers'- customers' nnde-r List D (purchases of 
stenirr-;. jacka ;es, $5,000 master list and over.) 

The net results are therefore increased penalties on less than stan- 
dard "cka ;es, increased differential between wholesalers and other cus- 
tomers, and so.- ; e increases in ?rice. 

4. Ha ."i or s t rue tural change . Effective Rubber-braid TTlres March 27, 
1355 a..i the Rubber-lead T res Anil 1. 

A. List Prices . Jive sets of secondary list prices are 

established, of which List A is now employed 
9322 as a. master list. 



-16- 

A. Broken coils or rolls under 500' to $150 list. 

B. Full coils, 500' to 2, 500« . 

C. Full coils, 2,500' and over to $150 list. 

D. Orders of $150 to $4,000 list. 

E. $4,000 list and ever. 

The master price list was greatly reduced as the result of using List A 
rather than a separate master list. The secondary prices are difficult 
to compare because the boundaries are not identical, and the changes for 
different sizes and types of wire are not uniform. 

B. Discounts. Wholesalers discounts on manufacturers' shipments 

to wholesalers' stock list A, 20°£; list B, 20f ; 
list C, 17^; list D, 12-^; list E, 7§#. 

Wholesalers discounts on manufacturers' shipments 
direct to wholesalers' customers, unchanged at 
5fo, the special treatment of old list D under 
this heading having been eliminated by price 
filing July 5, 1934. 

C. Freight. No change. 

D. Terms . No change. 

Net Effect of Change . The dropping of the separate master list de- 
vice means that the transactions are now rated on a smaller value basis. 
This is approximately offset by the equivalent reduction in the boundaries 
defining the size groups. 

List A is now limited as to value as well as quantity, thus removing 
much of the penalty for less than standard packages of large and more ex- 
pensive wire which will now be priced under List D. List E prices are 
now based solely on quantity, permitting orders of small size wire though 
low in value to be recognized on a uantity basis. 

Because of the change in master list and the new definition of boun- 
daries among the groups, net price changes vary according to the nature 
of the transaction. However, it is possible to state: 

(a) The differential between distributors and other customers has 
further widened. 

(b) The redefinition of the groups to which the secondary lists 
are applied was such as to increase the number of possible' transactions 
in the lower price group. For example, small quantity but high value 
purchases of large size wire now may fall under Lists D and E. Large 
quantity but small value purchases of small size wire may fall under B 
and C. 

5. Summary of Major Structural Changes. 
9322 



-17- 



The record of this industry is particularly interesting due to the 
major changes in its price structure during the period under observation. 
TJithout detailed records of individual transactions - in terms of grade, 
type and size of wire, location of ourchase, and size of order - it is 
inroossible to make any satisfactory calculation concerning the changes in 
the general level of prices. However, it is possible to draw certain cont» 
elusions concerning the effect of the internal changes of the structure 
upon different types of transactions. 

A. Shift to deliver ed p rices . The original price structure provi- 
ded for factory prices plus a computed freight charge, based upon a spec- 
ial system of determining freight charges according to the destination 
regardless of the point of shipment.- This resulted in higher freight 
adders for areas such as Texas and Colorado, and smaller additions for 
the industrial northeast. The revised structure simply includes F. 0. B. 
poin.t of shipment for less than 100 lbs., and a flat delivered price for 
all larger transactions. The net result of the new structure with uni- 
form -orices for all destinations is a higher price in the industrial east 
and north central areas, where the bulk of the sales are made. On the 
other hand, prices for other areas were reduced, frequently exceeding the 
maximum increase. Because of the nature of the product, these freight 
adders were very considerable, and the revision in the price structure 
meant a major change in net price at many points. 

B. ' Increased functio nal differentials . The original structure used 
the freight charge feature as a method of distinguishing certain types of 
transactions. All wholesalers purchasing for stock were charged' freight 
on the carload basis, regardless of quantity. However, the primary func- 
tional differential was a reduction of 10 per cent from' list to wholesalers. 
The final revision results in differentials from 7|- per cent to 20 per 
cent depending upon the size of the order, for wholesalers purchasing for 
stock as distinct from other customers. However, evidently in order to 
distinguish between a wholesaler -oerforming the function of holding stock 
etc., and merely taking orders, a new discount of only 5 per cent appears 
for cases of direct shipment by manufacturer to wholesaler customers. 
T.'it'-out some such special class, customers might place their orders through 
wholesalers, splitting the larger discounts. The new structure strenthens 
the position of the stock carrying distributor in the marketing structure. 

C. Quantity differentials . The original structure allowed a 5 per 
cent reduction on orders of more than $2, 510 and made a distinction in the 
freight adders between carload and less than carload lots. The first re- 
vision created four secondary price lists which decreased in price accord- 
ing to the dollar volume of the order. Farther revisions were primarily 
efforts to find a formula which would recognize properly the fact that the 
dollar volume of an order is the result both of quantity and price, and 
that the prices of wire of different sizes vary enormously. The final 
scheme introduces both physical quantity rnd value as criteria for deter- 
mining the classifications. The system of wholesaler discounts which 
likewise decrease with increases in quantity and value orders, tends to 
nullify quantity differentials as far as the wholesaler is concerned. 

It should further be noted that the purchaser of less than standard 
packages was severely penalized. 

9822 



-18- 



G. L3ADX.SHIP AiiD ujipch'-ITI 



There are about 15 filings "hich see; 1 , to have been of sone gen- 
eral significance. (Appendix 2 Pari 1 and Append i:-: A Part 1 Section 
o) The original filing vas lade before September 17, 1931. by tweiity- 
five of the twenty-eight connanies studied. The remaining three co:;- 
sanies nade their first filing in September, . 19C-' in connection with 
filing number 11 concerning snail oachage lots. 

A sir rial"" of these 15 filings is given in the Table on the op- 
posite >age, sho-ing the com 'nr' lendi ig and the extent and rapidity 
\7ith •.'hich other cormanied followed.. Complete detail is given in Ao- 
pend.i:: A., Part I. and in Appendi:- . ., Part I. 

It, has been indicated th; fc filings ho. 1,4,6., 14 and 15 effect a 
series of major structural changes. Only 1 co: roa-.iies made all of 
those filings. Pour companies hos. 11, IV, 1"., and 15 may be elimin- 
ated, fro - consideration for the moment on the round that they con- 
cerned the. :selves with snail pachage lots. The following records for 
seven of the cova~-nies indicate that eve.i tuoso -.hich did. not follow 
the mat tern of major structural change en .ctly, nevertheless cannot 
be r ard.ed as entirely/ non-conformist. 

Comr-any ho. 1 made Pilings ho. 1, 6, 7 and 14, but not ho. 4 
and 13. 

Company ho. 2 nade Pilings ho. 1, 4, 3 and 14. 

Co many ho. 5 na.de Pilings ho. 1 rnd 4 -hich brought it in to 
1934, The connany nade no further filing of moment except on August 
54, lh4, -hen a price "as filed on ho. 1' Srfecote and ITo. IS fixture 
a-ire to syndicate stores. 

Company ho. 7 na.de Pilings ho. 1 and .' , the latter being effective 
on Jul" 5. This date narhs the last appearance of Conpahy ho. 7 as a 
participant in filing ^rices. 

Cor.nr.ny ho, G nade Pilings ho. 1, 4, 5, 7 and 14. 

Co- nary ho. 15 nade pilin;;s ho. 1, 4, 7, 14 and 15. 

Co- na.uy ho. 25 of which Coma-vy 1" is a subsidiary na.de Piling " T o. 
1 only, 

Pil: igs "o. 14 and 15 "ere the final " ] ;s and provided a co l- 
plste statement of structure, prices and discounts. Piling ho. 14 was 
-w.de by 14 companies and 15 companies nade Piling ho. 15. The a.osence 
of sone companies from one or the other possibly explrined by the fact 
that Piling ho. 14 covers lubber mid hraid raid ho. 15 covers Rubber 
a.nd Le-.d, and all companies do not nahe both tyoes of uire. 

Leadership . In considering the matter of the efTect of le^d and lag 
on the various co mnanies discussed, reiglit vast be -iven to the fact 






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-20- 

that certain companies hove peculiarit ies which account in a large 
measure for their divergence in '"/hole or in ua.rt from the sta.nda.rd 
structure. For example: Cornea iv ITo. 1 does not malre a conrolete line 
and as has teen previously indicated, Co manias such as ITo. 17, 18 and 
19 concern themselves with small package lots 

Commanies ITo. IS and 20 originated Filing ITo, 4. Commxny ilo. 13 
originated Filing Ilo. 3, and was one of the four co:roanies initiating 
Filing "go. 15 ~s was Corronny go. 20. 

Filing go. 7 was initiated "oy Con-o-n" - Ilo. 3. 

Filing Ilo. 14 '"as initiated "oy Companies Ilo. 20, 22 and 25. 

Thus there is no apparent outstanding leader in structural revis- 
ions. Occasionally nore than one connany initiated a ^articular filing. 
Considering all the filings, it is interesting to note that 11 differ- 
ent co. roaiiies have made some originating contribution to the develon- 
ment of the new structure. 

'Jaiting Period . Filings ITo. 7, 3, 9, 10, 13, 14 and 15 were made 
effective with a waiting t>eriod shorter than 10 days. Of the remain- 
in]; filings I T o. 1 need not "be considered since it was the original fil- 
ing and go, 2 and 5 must of necessit} 1- he excluded for there are no 
effective dates specified. giling go. 4 was initiated with a wait- 
ing period in excess of 10 days as was Filin" ITo. 6, Filings ITo. 5 and 
11 '"ere initiated with exactly 10 days as a waiting oeriod. 

In case of Filing ITo. 4, although it was effective llry 1, 1934, 
comaiies meeting it as late as Hay 14 were given an effective date 
iiay rirst. With regard to Filin'; ITo. 5 which was effective Hay 28 with 
a 10 day waiting -oeriod, companies filin; in conformit3' - thereto as late 
as Jul - / 24 '-ere given an immediate effective date. The same general 
situation was true of Filings ITo. V, 3, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14 and 15. 

In Summary it a;omears: 

1. That the Supervisor;'' Agency often exercised its ontion to re- 
duce the waiting period, 

2, If a drastic change was made as in the case of filings Ilo, 4 
and S the Supervisory Agency o-oerated on the basis that the full 10 days 
was needed for the industry at lar.je to accuaint itself and to adopt 
such measures as ea,ch member saw fit, 

3, After the effective da.te of such filings it aomears that the 
Supervisory Agency remitted any subseouent meeting to go into effect 
without a waiting recuirement. 

4, In ever;" instance , there were members of the industry who met 
the filin;, after the effective da.te. 



9822 



-.31- 



i:-ci:d:i."tal ili: 



jilin; s included in this category "ore those nade to cover 
special Alices to syndic te stores, 1 ::i un settlement terns on special 
orders, special construct ion nnd-sone fen oroducts not included in the 
re ular ;orice schedules, but for hich there is an occr.sionnl demand. 
For the :iost part, these filings vrere reouired to fulfill the 10 da/ 
; ..i:i, period. 

These filings serve to illustrate that although the general ??at- 
tern oi bhe nrice structure in this ;roup '~as definitely fixed at each 
nonent of tine j- there were :iaay specirl deviations to meet specific or 
tenporar" situations. For example, such filings ".'ere reouired for syn- 
dic te stores '"hich purchase the snaller size ":ires and constitute a 
class of customers entirely different fron 'joy in the standard custoner 
classification. 

The content of the incidental filings is presented in Ap~oendi:: A. , 
Part I. Section d 



332: 



-22- 



E. SUMMARY 

No group among those studied showed a greater change in its method of 
doing business during the price-filing period than the one here discussed. 
The major changes v/ere: 

A. Uniform prices for all destinations instead of prices delivered at 
separate destinations. 

B. Increased number of prices reflecting differences in size and type 
of transaction. 

3. Increased preference to . stock- carrying wholesalers. 

D. Severe penalties on broken packages and increased premiums on 
quantity purchases by non-wholesalers-. 

These changes were accomplished with no apparent confusion. It would 
appear that those initiating the major changes, were concerned with the 
development of a general price pattern rather than furthering their indivi- 
dual interests by grasping or endeavoring to create temporary opportunities 
or a dvantages. Furthermore, there v/ere evidently a number of members of the 
industry critically observing the situation and taking the lead from time 
to time in initiating adjustments or revisions. 








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-28- 

EXBIBIT A 

NATIONAL ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION 

CODB AUTHORITY FOR THB ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 



155 East 44th Street, 



COD! 



New York, N. Y. 



Designated at the Agency for Adminiitrrin«, Supervising and Promoting the performance 
of the provisions of the Coda for the Electrical Manufacturing Industry, under the 
Nadoaal Industrial Retovery Act, enprored by Praaidant Rooeevelt on August 4, 1933. 



OFFICB OF SUPERVISORY AGENCY 



WIRE & CABLE SUBDIVISION 
August 26, 1933. 



We, TJylie Brown, H. D. Keresey, Everett Morss, Jr., 
Alfred Bellis and F. C. Jones, Supervisory Agency of the Ylire and 
Cable Subdivision of the electrical manufacturing industry ap- 
pointed, in accordance with the provisions of Article XII of the 
Code for the Electrical Manufacturing Industry approved by the 
President on August 4, 1933, by the Board of Governors of Nation- 
al Electrical Manufacturers Association, hereby notify you that 
we have, pursuant to the authority vested in us by Article X of 
said Code, determined that it has been the generally recognized 
practice to sell: 

RUBBER COVERED WIRE - more particularly des- 
cribed as Rubber Covered Building "/ire, In- 
termediate 30$ Rubber Covered Building Wire, 
Braided and Leaded - 

on the basis of net price lists, or price lists and discount 
sheets, and fixed terms of payment. 

TiQ. therefore direct that you as a manufacturer of, or 
one promoting the manufacture for sale of, all or any of the 
above products, file with this Supervisory Agency for distribu- 
tion, as required by said Code, to all other manufacturers of the 
products specified above, at the office of National Electrical 
Manufacturers Association, 155 East 44th Street, New York City, 
on or before September 7, 1933, FORTY copies of your price lists, 
or price lists and discount sheets, showing your current prices . 
and fixed terms of sale, payment, delivery and any other condi- 
tions which affect the sales price on the products specified 
above. 

Show all discounts, terms, etc., either on price lists 



uOwu 



< 



-29- 



or attached thereto and not in a Separate letter to the Super- 
visory Agency. 



Very truly you 




C ~- £jvJuS3S~VV\>8 






JL <3V 

ft „ L/0>vw f^^c^C^ 







// 






Supervisory Agency. 



P.S. All packages must be marked R¥-8-26 for identification. 
Your company name and a date must appear on all sheets or sets 
of sheets furnished this Agency. As typewritten sheets, either 
original or carbon copies, require first class mail, your price 
sheets or revisions thereof should be printed or in some form of 
processing or duplication. 



9b22 



I 



-30- 

CHAFTER 3 
FLEXIBLE CORE GROUP 



A. The Industry 

1. Product 

Description 

Flexible cords are stranded cooper wires insulated and covered with 
various materials which vary with different applications. 

Materials 

The materials used in fabricating flexible cords include: copper, 
rubaer, cotton, rayon, asbestos, paraffin, bees wax, p^per, and flame 
proofing compound. 

Frocess 

The fabrication of flexible cords is a machine process consisting 
of stranding and serving the wire, applying filler to round out and then 
applying insulation and outer covering. 

Variations - Standar dization 

Flexible cords fall into two major groups: 

1. Approved 

2, Non-Approved 

Approved cords are considered to be those carrying Underwriters' 
Laboratories Inc., labels and conforming to specification and require- 
ment of the Underwriters' Laboratories Inc. 

In the approved group, specified types of cords are given letters 
identifying the type and classification which are the same for all manu- 
facturers and, eliminating differences due to ability to manufacture, 
approved cords are the same for all manufacturers, 

Non- Approved include: 

a. Those which, due to differences in quality, thickness of in- 
culation, copper size, braid construction, and the like, are produced 
and sold without Underwriters' Laboratories Inc. labels. These cords 
vary as to the quality injected by individual manufacturers. 

b. Types of flexible cord for which Underwriters' Laboratories 
Inc., has no classification or tyoe letters. Cords of this tvoe do not 

S822 



-31- 



vary particularly from one manufacturer to another because construction 
and specification are determined by the application. 

Coflj^ruction 

Flexible cords are usually designed for voltages of 100 or 220, at 
not more than ten or fifteen amperes. The wires vary in gua^e size from 
aboat No. 22 to No. 14 AWG-. 

The si?e of wire, number of conductors, and the amount of type of 
insulation varies in accordance with proposed aoolication, 

2. Companies 

Number 

Price calls '"ere sent to fifty-seven companied of which thirty-five 
were found to be active producers of flexible cords as defined in the 
price call. 

Size 

Companies vary from smallest, employing as low as ten people to large 
ones, employing more than one thousand. Since other products are also 
manufactured by some companies and figured on employment by departments 
are not available, it is not oossible to give accurate estimates on the 
number of employees of e^cn company engaged in the production of felxible 
cords. For our purposes, it may be considered that there are two sizes of 
companies, small and large, with about an equal number of each. 

Classes 

Rrughly speaking, there are three classes of flexible cord manufact- 
urers: 

1. Ttu se who manufacture flexible cords only. 

2. Those who manufacture heavier wires as well is cords, but to 
whom cords are an important item. 

3. Tnose whose main business is in tne field of heavier wires with 
felxible cords produced namly to fill out a complete line of insulated 
wires. 

Locati~~ 

The majority of the manufacturers are located in the so-called 
Eastern industrial area, especially around New York City, with a few in 
Mchigan and Illinois. 

3. tiarke t 

Distribution 

Flexible cords are sold orimarily to three orincipal 
9822 



-o,d~ 



customer divisions: 

1. Chain stores and main order houses. 

2. Jobbers 

3. Electrical appliance manufacturers, including radio manufacturers. 

4. Froblems 

It is alleged by the Industry that their main nroblem arises from 
the differences in overhead between the large manufacturers, producing 
complete lines cf insulated wires, and the small manufacturers, producing 
flexible cord only and not necessarily a full line of that. The result 
is that the small manufacturer is reported to be able to sell at a nrice 
above his cost but below the cost of the large manufacturer. 

The flexible cord group had to absorb manufacturers of other uro- 
ducts who found that their market was rapidly disapoearing. Two illus- 
trations concern manufacturers originally engaged in producing buggy 
whips and corset strings. Their entry into the flexible cord industry 
was made easy by the fact that the machinery used in braiding the outer 
cover of buggy whips and that. used in braiding corset strings was prac- 
tically the same as that used in braiding flexible cords. 

Flexible ■ cords, low in price, inferior as to quality and Dermormance, 
have appeared on the market in such quantities as to cause concern to 
the Industry. To offset this increased growth of so-called "unsafe" 
cords, manufacturers have expended considerable s.uns in fostering 
ordinances aid in attemoting to educate the consumer in the value of 
using only approved flexible cords. 

5. Open Price Filin g 
Price call 

The purpose of the price call was three-fold: 

1. Filing of information which would, at all times, advise 
manufacturers as to the state of the market. 

2. Stabilisation of orices 

3. Elimination of unfair competitive practices. 

• The price call, Exhibit A, was issued on August 26, 1933, effective 
September 7, 1933, based on the first paragraph of' Article X of the code 
of fair competition for the Electrical Manufacturing Industry. The call 
was cancelled in F-bruary, 1935. 

Work Sheets 

Examination of the records of price filing in the felxible cord 

9822 



~<DC~~ 



group revealed that filings made, expecially the early ones, were 
voluminous, inaccurate, vague, and difficult to follow. Further con- 
sideration showed that display of customer classifications and discounts 
for seven of the companies would sufficiently illustrate that phase of 
the price structure. So far as chronological record of filings was con- 
cerned, the filings of nine companies were found to represent the charges. 
The initial and final terms of payment and delivery for each company 
was recorded. To illustrate packaging and packaging charges the nine 
companies used in the chronological records of price filings were found 
to be adequate. In addition to the display of list prices in connection 
with customer classification and discount, net prices on four types of 
cord were computed for one company. 

The work sheets are, therefore, as follows: 

1. Appendix B, Fart 2 Customer classifications and their discounts 
with separate sheets for: 

Section a. Flexible cords and portables 

Section b. Heater cords 

Section c. Radio wires 

Section d. Radio hook-up wires and radio lead-in wires 

Section e. Fixture wires 

Section f. Delivery terms, terms of payment, and packaging 
data 

The purpose in setting up separate sheets fcr a,b,c,d,e, and f was 
to illustrate the major product groupings and to show differences of 
discount and customer classification. 

2. Appendix A, Fart 2 Chronological Record of Filings by 
Companies. 

3. Appencix A, Fart 2a Price Trends. Since prices change with 
considerable similarity both in the" point of degree and time, this 
study is based on the filings of one company. 



9822 



-34- 

B. Basic Structure 

1. Original and Final Filings 

The original filing, effective September 7, 1933, was in- 
complete in the case if most companies. Some failed to file prices 
for their entire line, others failed to quote discounts, terms, pack- 
aging data, and the like. There was some confusion iue to the fact 
that the product grouping used in the price call was not familiar 
to some companies and as a result, prices were filed on -products 
not included as for example, custom cord sets and rubber insulated 
fixture wires. 

The form and content of the filings improved somewhat 
after the first filing, and in the latter months, filings were 
clear and complete in all essential particulars. ' For example, 
Company No. 8, a leader in the Industry, ma.de a very -poor original 
filing, failing to quote prices on all types of cord manufactured by 
it and omitting discounts for t m o types. These omissions were 
corrected and the subsequent filings of this company, were in good 
order. 

Price 

Throughout the entire period of price filing, 'a list price 
and discount basis was used. In the "Flexible Cords and Portables" 
product group, the list price was more than doubled on the type 
cord used as a representative specimen on the work sheet almost im- 
mediately after the original filing. Following the list price further, 
a reduction of twenty-five percent occurred, followed almost im- 
mediately by another reduction of f ity percent in March' of 1934. This 
list was maintained for about eight months and was then increased less 
than 5$. Thus, during the period of price filing, the net result 
was that the list price on the specimen cord was reduced from eleven 
dollars to nine dollars and forty cents per thousand feet. 

Net Prices 

Consider now list prices in conjunction Vith quoted dis- 
counts. The original list price of eleven dollars was discounted 
10$, 10$- 5$ , and 10$-10$. The second list, twenty-four dollars per 
thousand feet, an increase of one hundred and twenty percent over 
the original, was discounted 48$ to 65$. This same discount applied 
also to a subsequent list of eighteen dollars. However, the fourth 
list of nine dollars carried a discount more ccmparable with the 
original. These discounts were 5$, 5$~5$, 10$, 15$, and 15$-5$. 
The fifth list of nine dollars and forty cents carried discounts 
similar to those in effect on the nine dollar list. 

Examining the net price on four types of wire illustrated, 
in Appendix A, part 2a, the final price on Type CF #18 Rayon has 
been reduced under the original price 25$. Type PO #18-16/30 rayon 
has been reduced 28$. Notice, however, that type SJ #18-16/30 and 

9822 



-35- 

Type #18-1/64: Radio Wire, Solid Tinned, has been reduced respectively 
2fo and 9$ (See Appendix A, Part 2a, note on No. 18-1/64 Radio Wire 
Solid Tinned) . 

Members of the Industry attributed the wide variations in the 
amount by which these net prices were reduced .to differences in the 
respective nature of the various types of wires. For instance, Type 
PO, size No. 18, a wire with a braided cover, is the most widely used 
and easiest to manufacture. Consequently there are many and more 
"in and out" producers of this cord. The reverse is true of type SJ, 
a rubber covered wire, and of radio wire. Hence the greater stability 
of net prices for these types during the price filing period. 

Customer Classif icfitions and Discounts 

As has been previously stated, flexible cords are sold primarily 
to three principal customer divisions. These three divisions were 
maintained, except for one brief period, throughout the entire period 
of Tjvice filing, but each one was divided and subdivided in various 
ways from time to time. 

In the first, Chain Stores and Mail Order Houses, such terms 
appear as; Chains, Class A and Class B; Mail Order Houses; National 
Syndicates; Purchasing Service Companies, "Billed by Us" and "Billed 
by Them"; and Department Stores. 

In the second, Jobbers, such terms appear as: Distributors; 
Distributors (sales to manufacturers); Jobbers and Wholesalers; 
Sales Agencies; arid Dealers. 

The third, Electrical Appliances Manufacturers, was subdivided 
on the basis of quantity with the exception of Wiring Device Manu- 
facturers who were given a flat discount. This Wiring Device 
Manufacturer classification is reported. to have been made in an 
effort to correct a situation where a manufacturer designated an 
actual -iring device manufacturer as a selling agent for his own 
product, (not a legal "agent"). The agent would obtain "listing" 
with Class A chain-store concerns. This arrangement made it 
possible for the manufacturer to sell to the chains, through the 
agent, without the prices being made public. The effort at cor- 
rection failed to bring sUch agreements into the open and the clas- 
sification was soon dropped. 

In addition to the three principal types of customers, «ther 
customer classifications include Central Stations, Contractors, 
United States Government, Railroads and Industrials. 

The Industry states that prior to open price filing some pro- 
ducers of flexible cord specialized or sold only to chain stores 
or distributors, some had no jobber business, some dealt exclusively 
with jobbers, some sold direct to manufacturers, some sold all 
three. With the advent of price filing, this appears to have 
changed. New customer classifications were created; old customer 
classes rere expanded, contracted, and realigned, and often further 



9822 



-36- 



redefined internally by shifting discounts for quantity. 

Lost of the companies under consideration started their filings 
with from three to five customer classes without wide differentials, 
among which "Distributors any Quantity", "Distributors, to Manufacturers", 
"Manufacturers", "jobbers r nd wholesalers", "chain store "warehouses", 
figured most prominently. This resulted in a relatively sinrple 
structure. One conroany, however, starting somewhat later than the 
others, appeared to elect a policy of bidding more directly to 
specific large buyers and consumers, rather than relying upon in- 
termediaries. This comoany quoted a broad list oi customers, in- 
cluding Chain Stores (Classes A and B), United States Government, 
Railroads, Dealers, Jobbers and Wholesalers, Central Stations, 
Contractors, Purchasing Service Companies and '~iring Device Manu- 
facturers with chain store listing. This change was accompanied by 
a virtual doubling of list prices, previously cited, making it 
possible for discounts to be more finely diversified. Almost all 
of the others followed. 

Pour months later, under the leadership of two other comnanies, 
this trend of bidding directly for buyers was further emphasized by 
almost complete concentration on a new class termed "all buyers", 
which was sub-divided by means of a sliding scale of quantity dis- 
. counts and supplemented by a single jobbing or distributing group, 
receiving discount equal to maximum quantity discount. The ful- 
fillment of this particular phase was apparently reached in the 
next step with the general elimination of the remaining jobbers and 
distributors as special classes, and the consolidation of all buyers 
into a single class at a single discount. 

This new structure was not maintained. Signs of recession ap- 
peared only a few weeks later with the return of special treatment 
for a few jobbing and distributing groups. After another short 
interval the reaction was apparently completed, lists and discounts 
reduced below the original level, the "all buyers" class eliminated, 
mail order houses and national syndicates snecif ically recognized, 
and intermediary classifications such as jobber-wholesaler, dis- 
tributors, and jobbers became more plentiful. Some of the latter, 
however, again disappeared in succeeding minor moves. In the end, 
practically all of the filings had with respect to customer clas- 
sification regained their original character, although with 
changes such as. 

(1) Disappearance of unconditioned distributors and jobbers. 

(2) A greater differential for mail order houses and buying 
syndicates. 

(3) A discount for "all buyers" on large orders and 

(4) stiffer quantity requirements for manufacturers and "Dis- 
tributors to manufacturers". 

It is not to be inferred, of course, that the foregoing 
pattern was exact for all groups, nor that all member companies 
moved with military precision within each group. The pattern was 
roughly representative o'f the price movements of Flexible Cords and 

9822 



-57- 



Portables, Heater Cords and Fixture Wire. 

The initiative in instituting classification changes lay ™ith 
t-o companies principally, as was the c-^se with price, although one 
or another of the "followers" c-irae forward at times and proved able 
to at' least flex the course of events. One company ignored entirely 
the revisions of its competitors in the Heater Cord grout) while con- 
forming in other groups to which it also belonged. Conformance was 
occasionally ■ complete throughout a group as in. the case of the 
switch to the several quantity brackets of the new "All Buyers" 
class and thence to the consolidated class of "All Buyers". In 
other instances while closely obedient to the trend, comnliance was 
only approximate ?s to both classifications and size of discounts. 
There w a s in fact quite a pattern of minor deviations in spots, pre- 
sumable rirovoked by the emergence of a trend not suited to the 
needs of a number of members. It is a.cain emphasized however, that 
in general the industry marched and wheeled fairly closely behind 
those exercising initiative. In contrast with this type of in- 
fluence, is the fact that simultaneous filing of identical prices 
and customer classes, was very rare; two or three instances were 
all that could be found in the year and a quarter's accumulation 
of filings, and these might easily ha.ve been caused by parent- 
subsidiary relations. Independent and highly specialized classi- 
fications were sometimes put forward by one or another company, 
but usually did not long remain. 

It -as not uncommon for individual companies to extend a 
new classification to all of the c'Ord grouos to which they belonged, 
only to shortly drop the class from one or more of the group. In 
one instance, the establishment by a comnany of an "All Buyers" 
class for Flexible Cords was folloed the next day by a similar 
classification for buyers of Heater Cords and a month later for 
the Fixture Wire Trade. . There was very little evidence, on the 
other hand, of extensions of either classif icafion or discounts to 
buyers of one group of products forcing a similar extension on other 
products sold to the same customers. ' 

Quantity Discounts " 

The volume required to receive quantity discounts, and the 
amount of discount frequently changed. The minimum and maximum 
limits of quantity discount were 250 feet and 500,000 feet. Look- 
ing at Company No. 23 on the work sheet "Flexible Cords and 
Portables", Appendix B, Part 2, we -see that originally distri- 
butors were given extra discount when purchasing 50,000 feet or more. 
For the same company at the same time, manufacturers' discounts 
were restricted entirely to purchases of 50,000 feet or more. The 
same comnany in January of 1S34, quoted a maximum discount to distri- 
butors rega"dless of quantity, and + o all other "buyers discounts 
ranged from fifty to sixty percent based on quantities of less 
than 10,000 feet. to 200,000 feet or more. In February, all buyers 
received discount regardless of quantity. 



9822 



-38- 



In March 1934, distributors, jobbers, mail order houses and 
national syndicates all received the same discount (5$) regardless 
of quantity. Manufacturers received an equal discount on purcha.se s 
of 100,000 feet or more. In July 1934, distributors, jobbers, and 
wholesalers received'an equal discount re gar less of quantity. All 
other buyers received 5$ on purchases of 100,000 to 499,999 feet, 
and lOfo on purchases of 500,000 feet or more. Occasionally new 
filings Fere made for the sole purpose of increasing or> decreasing 
the quantities that had to be bought by particular customer classes 
to receive the current discount. 

The same sort of shifting quantity schedule is in effect for 
all other companies in greater or lesser degree. 

Example of Filings of a Single Company 

Continual shifts in price, classification and discount 
policies are necessarily confusing, and the marches and counter 
marches of this particular industry are interestingly reflected in 
the following chronological details of a single company' s filings 
(net prices have been computed to permit easy comparison and are 
entered parenthetically after the respective discount figures): 

September 27, 1933: Original filing, list price $11 per L', 
three classes - Mfgs. purchasing 50 M or over 10 percent 
($9.90) - Jobbers and Wholesalers 10 percent - ($9.90) - 
Chain Store Warehouses 10 per cent ($9.90). 

October 9, 1933: list price upped to $24; classes in- 
creased to seven, three of them subdivided - Mfgs. buying 
less than 50 k 58 percent (10.08), 50 M or more 60 per- 
cent ($9.60), Jobbers and Wholesalers 60 percent ($9.60) - 
Chains, class A 60 percent ($9.60), class B 58 percent . 
($10.08) - U. S. Government and Railroads 58 percent 
($10.08) - Purchasing Service Cos., "Billed by Us" 48 per- 
cent ($12.48), "Billed by Them " 50 percent ($12.00); 
Dealers, Central Stations, and Contractors 40 percent 
($14.40) - Wiring Device Mfgs., for listing; with class 
A Chains 65 percent ($8.40). 

December 21^1933: the same, except discount to Mfgs. pur- 
. chasing 50 M' t over increased to 65 percent ($8.40). 

January 3, 1934: List price dropped to $18 per M'a two 
classes, one of them subdivided into four quantity groups - 
Jobuers and Wholesalers 60 percent ($7.20) - All Buyers - 
less the 10 M 52 percent ($3.6-*) - 10M? to 50 M 1 55 per- 
cent ($8.10) - 50M' to 200 M 1 50 percent ($7.56) - 100 M to 
500 M or over 60 percent ($7.20). 

January 25, 193-±: One Class - All Buyers any Quantity 60 per- 
cent ($7.20). 

February 14, 1934, (effective February 13): Two Classes - 



9822 



-39- 

Distributors to MfgrSi buying 50 U or over 60 percent and 

5 percent ($6.81) - All Buyers any Quantity 60 nercent ($7.20). 

February 14, 1934, (elfective February 2<t)': 'Three Classes - 
Distributors any Quantity 60 percent and 5 percent ($6.84) 
All Buyers any Quantity 60 percent ($7.20) - firing Devices 
Mfgrs. for listing with Class A Chains 65 percent ($6. '30). 

February 28, 1934: Three Clashes, one of them subdivided 
into t'-'o quantity groups - Distributors any Quantity 60 percent 
and 5 percent ($6.84) - Distributors to Mfgrs. buying 501'!' or 
over 60 percent and 5 percent ($6.84), less than 50M' 58 per- 
cent ($7.56) - Lfgrs. buying 50k • or over 60 percent ($7.0u). 

March 15, 1934: List dropped to $9.00 per M' : Three classes - 
Distributors to Mfgrs. buying 100k' or over 5 percent and 
5 percent ($8.12^) - Mfgrs. buying 100M' or over 5 -percent 
($3.55) - Jobbers, kail Order Houses and National Syndicates 
5 m rcent ($8.55) 

April 7, 1934: Four Classes - Distributors to kfgrs. buying 
100 hJ to 500k' 5 nercent and 5 percent ($8.12i) - Mfgrs. 
buying 100l«. ' to 500k' 5 nercent ($8.55) - Jobbers and 
rational Syndicates 5 nercent ($8.55) - All Buyers 500M' or 
over 10 percent ($8.10). 

April 13, 1934: Same, excent kail Order Houses- added to 
Joboers and National Syndicate .class. 

October 8, 1934: List Trice Advanced to $9.40: Three Classes 
Distributors to Mfgrs. buying 100M' to 500k' 5 percent and 
5 nercent ($8.4835) - kfgrs. buying 100M» to 500M' 5 percent 
($8.93) - All Buyers 500k' or more 10 percent ($8.10). 

An Examnle of Shifting Leadership 

Prices and classifications in the radio '*rire : s group are more 
specialized than in the other grpuns. The evolution of .customer 
classification is equally interesting, and the shifting relations 
between "leaders" and "followers" even more so. A skeleton outline 
summarizing the above has been assembled from the Radio Tire work 
sheet, Appensix B, Part 2, and is herewith submitted. 

Company No. 3 made its original filing on October 6, at a 
$9.90 list price, setting up seven customer classes, most of 
the classes large direct buyers with discounts varying from 40 to 
50 percent. Companies Nos. 12 and 7 followed on October 26, and 
November 3, respectively. On November 15, however, Company No. 8 
jumped the list price to $12.00, confining its classification to 
Jobcers and Radio kanufacturers, and Radio Parts Manufacturers, and 
giving them about the same, discount as they received before. Com- 
panies Nos. 23, 25, 7, and 12 followed -ith some minor variations. 



9322 



-40- 

On January 31, Company Not. 25 returned to a $9. CO list price, 
selling to all buyers at 60 percent discount. On February 6, Company 
No. 12, rejecting this new arrangement, adhered to its previous 
filing which conformed with that of Company No. 8. On February 23, 
Company No. 8 compromised by establishing a single "All Buyers" class 
at 68 percent i discount but retaining its $12.10 list. On March 5, 
Company No. 25 stood pat except for the addition of a 65 percent dis- 
count to all buyers- taking a million feet or more. Company No. 8 
finally accepted this plan on Larch 15. On the same day Company No. 
23 acceoted the new classification but stuck to the $12.10 list it 
had held from the beginning. 

On March 20, Company No. 25 again stepped out, retaining its 
$9.60 list but changing its customer classes to manufacturers buying 
50M 1 or more and Jobbers, Mail Order- Houses and Chain Store concerns, 
both at 60 and 5 percent. Company No. 12 followed but non-conformist 
Company No. 23 still clung to $12.10 list and went back to "All 
Buyers" at discounts from 60 to 65 percent. 

Conroany No. 8 now altered the entire structure by quoting $8.18 
list, (which thereafter was the only list price filed by any company 
to the end of the period), and selling to all buyers on a quantity 
basis at premiums or discounts; . plus 15, plus 10, list, minus 5, 
minus 10, and to Jobbers, Mail Order Houses and Chains at minus 5. 
Companies Nos. 23, 7, 10, and 6 followed in close order, except 
that No. 23, always independent in one or more, particulars, omitted 
the Jobbers, Mail Order House and Chain.,classes. The other com- 
panies did not change. 

This situation stood until July: 5, when Company No. 10, a new 
comer among the leaders, accepted the no w generally prevailing 
classification but increased the discounts to: List, minus 5, minus 15, 
minus 20, minus 25 and 20 respectively. Nos. 8, 7, and 23 followed 
immediately (this was the first time that No. 23 had followed in toto ). 
On July 17, however, Company No. 25 reaffirmed the less favorable dis- 
counts set up by Company No. 8 on April 16, but which it had not 
theretofore followed. Companies Nos. 7, 8, 23, and 10 also then 
made the change. 

Freight 

Originally, all companies quoted f.o.b. factory, with freight 
allowed to destination, onp hundred pounds or more. In the final 
filing, all but three companies continue the same terms. These 
three allowed to National Syndicate Stores full freight on ship- 
ments w. o.g. (with other goods) weighing fifty pounds or more and 
of total value of thirty dollars and allowed full freight on ship- 
ments regardless of weight or value to metropolitan New York, Newark, 
Hoboken, Jersey City, Philadelphia, and Chicago, In the case of one 
company, the same allowance was made to metropolitan Philadelphia 
area, Chicago, Cicero, Roaeland, Kensington, and San Francisco. For 
work sheet see Appendix B, Part 2. 



9822 



-41- 

Terms of Payment 

The original filings quoted terras generally 2 per cent, 10th 
prox, net 30 to 60 days or some approximation thereof. Exceptions 
"•ere one half per cent, ten days, net 30, and another five percent 
10th prox, net 60. Finally! practically all com anies quoted 2 per- 
cent 10th prox, net EOM. For ">ork sheet see Appendix B, Part 2. 

Packing 

Packing of vrrious size wires was fairly uniform as indicated 
from the standard packaging schedule, Apoendix ?, Part 2. "here a. 
company permitted a customer to require packing different from 
standard, i.e., spools instead of coils, there was usually a charge of 
twenty cents per thousand feet in 500 foot spools and forty cents per 
thousand in 250 foot spools. 'iVhere the quantity warranted "buying in 
factory lengths, (usually about 3000 feet) put up on reels, reductions 
per thousand feet were made depending on standard package size for the 
wire involved. There were some differences in these charges originally, 
"but finally all conrnanies quoted similarly. 

?. Chronological Record of Filings "by Companies (Appendix A, Part 2) 



Number of Filings 

The number of filings per company varied from ten to forty-five. 
Except for Magnet Wire, more filings per company ^ere made in the 
Flexible Cord group than in others. 

Waiting; Period 

The majority of filings were made to meet competition and therefore 
had a short waiting period. Even initiatory revisions were frequently re- 
garded as meeting competition and were not held to the ten day period. 

Leadership 

Companies Nos. 8 and 25 were very definitely the leaders, although 
other conroanies would occasionally initiate changes. Changes were adopted 
by practically all companies, some immediately and some not for a month or 
two in a fev cases. As a result, on a given date most companies had in 
effect much the s^me prices, discounts, and, in general, the same cus- 
tomer classifications, 7ith regard to the customer classifications a num" 
ber were similar, although varying terminology was used. It is alleged 
that other members of the Industry were really selling at prices below 
those which they had on file. These t^o conroanies presumably revised their 
filings to meet these requirements, and consequently although they ap- 
peared to be making a price change they were, in fact, meeting competition. 

C. Summary 

The following may be said " T ith regard to the open price filing ,-T x- 
perience of the flexible cord group: 

1. Relative uniformity of price and amount of discount. 
9822 



-42- 

2. Frequency of price change resulting in many filings. 

3. Rapid fluctuations in list prices and discounts. 

4. Reduction generally in list prices and net nrices. 

5. Frequent and extensive changes in customer classifi- 
cations. (Data not available for comparison with nre-code 
price changes. ) 

6. More uniform terms of payment and packaging. 

7. Initiating revisions made in the majority of cases by two 
companies. 



9822 



-43- 

EXHIBIT A 
NATIONAL ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION 

CODB AUTHORITY FOR THE ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 
155 fcast 44th Street, 3JpV NeW Yolk ' N ^ Y ' 

eoDi 

Designated at the Agency for Administering, Supervising and Promoting the performance 
of the provisions of the Code for the Electrical Manufacturing Industry, under the 
National Industrial Recovery Act, approved by President Roosevelt on August 4, 1933. 

OFFICE OF SUPERVISORY AGENCY 



WIRE & CABLE SUBDIVISION 
August 26, 1933. 



We, Wylie Brown, Everett Morss, Jr., II. D. Kereaey, 
Alfred Bellis and F. C. Jones, Supervisory Agency of the Wire and 
Cable Subdivision of the electrical manufacturing industry, ap- 
pointed in accordance with the provisions of Article XII of the 
Code for the Electrical Manufacturing Industry approved by the 
President on August 4, 1933, by the Board of Governors of Nation- 
al Electrical Manufacturers Association, hereby notify you that 
we have, pursuant to the authority vested in us by Article X of 
said Code, determined that it has been the generally recognized 
practice to sell: 

FLEXIBLE CORDS, as specifically described 
under (1), (2) and (3) in the attached 
list - 

on the basis of net price lists, or price lists and discount 
sheets, and fixed terms of payment. 

We therefore direct that you as a manufacturer of, or 
one promoting the manufacture for sale of, all or any of the 
above products, file with this Supervisory Agency for distribu- 
tion, as required by said Code, to all other manufacturers of the 
products specified above, at the office of National Electrical 
Manufacturers Association, 155 East 44th Street, New York City, 
on or be fore September 7^ 1933, SIXTY copies of your price lists, 
or price lists and discount sheets, showing your current prices 
and fixed terms of sale, payment, delivery and any other condi- 
tions which affect the salts price on the products specified 
above. 

Show all discounts, terms, etc., either on price lists 



<.JhV 



or attached thereto and not in a separate letter to the Super- 
visory Agency; 



Very truly yours, 




Co-OvuEfcik Yw^-^xj^^Aa^, 



rf fc Utn/vw &l>c<&u 




6%Al0* yQa&ks. 




Supervisory Agency. 

P.S. All packages must be marked FC-8-26 for identification. 
Your company name and a date must appear on all sheets or sets of 
sheets furnished this Agency. As typewritten sheets, either orig- 
inal or carbon copies, require first class mail, your price sheets 
or revisions thereof should be printed or in some form of process- 
ing or duplication. 



cy* 



%% 



-45- 

C_K AFTER 4. UAGKET WIRE GROUP 
A. The Indus try. 

1. Frcduct. 

D esq r ip t i o_n 

Magnet wires consist of a copper core insulated with various 
materials depending en the pro-oosed use. 

Co_nstructi_(.'n. Materials. 

Materials include cop-oer, cotton, enamel silk, varnish,, lacquer, 
paper and cellophane. 

Proc ess. 

A machine process consisting of drawing the wire, insulating and 
spooling. 

Yar i_a t i ons. 

Magnet wire is made in three shapes, round, square and rectangular. 
Sizes of wire follow the American Wire tables and most companies make a 
fairly complete line". 

Some standard insulations are: 

Single ccttcn covered Single cotton covered enamel 

Double cotton covered , Single silk covered 
Plain enamel Double silk covered 

Double plain enamel Single silk covered enamel 

In addition to the standard magnet wire three of the companies manufac- 
ture asbestos insulated magnet wires. 

Most of the companies manufacture "Litzendraht" commonly known as "Litz" 
which is a type used for high freouency. Other special construction magnet 
wires include the following: 

Twin conductor wire , Magnet wire tinned 
Single cotton Quadruple cotton covered 

Double enamel Varnished or lacquered 

Double silk enamel Combination of cotton and silk 

Triple silk enamel "Barber pole" textile covered 

Due to technical requirements, all wire of a given type must be the 
same. 

2. Companies,. 

Number. Twenty-one. 

.Siz e.* 'The majority of the companies are large, not' more than 
9822 



-46- 

five or six "being in the class of small companies. 
Oth or .P i; o ducts . 

:m.-r r : — . . . - ■ .- 

Fractically all companies of the industry produce other forms cf wire 
and cable and some operate generally in the Electrical Industry. 

Location. 

Plants are lucated in the Eastern industrial area. 

3. Market. 

Use. Magnet wire is used in the fabrication of coils, magnets, 
and similar electrical devices, manufactured 'by other members of the 
electrical industry. 

■ Ji atji but ion . 

The product is distributed direct to the consumer, usually a manufac- 
turer. Most companies maintain warehouses at points other than the factory. 

Location . 

The largest market is in the industrial East. 

Freight . ■ 

Freight is a considerable item to manufacturers due to the physical 
characteristics of the product. 

4. Problems . 

The fact that relatively little is added by manufacture and that the 
operating margin is narrow results in a very fine degree of sensitivity to 
price change and no individual company can be permitted by its competitors 
to maintain a material- advantage. -Thus it is most important to this group 
that they be constantly possessed of accurate information as to the state of 
the market and the activities of their competitors. 

5. Open Price Filing. 



The original price call (Exhibit A) of the magnet wire group was 
issued September fi, 1933, effective September 17, 1933, and was based on the 
first paragraph of Article X. of the code of fair competition for the 
Electrical Manufacturing industry. 

Work Sheets.. 

Work sheets were made showing the original and final ^pricc filings for 
all twenty-one companies, (Appendix B., Part III.). Because of the slightly 
different structure a separate work sheet was made covering_asbestos insulated 
magnet wire for the three companies in the group manufacturing this product, 

9822 



-47- 

(Appendix B. , Part III.B) . This structure will be discussed separately. 

In recording the "Chronological Record af Price Filings by Companies, 
(Appendix A., Part III.) it was found that it would be sufficient to use the 
filings of three manufacturers whose records were deemed representative of 
the method of doing business and the experience under open price filing of 
the industry. A marked similarity existed between the filings of all 
companies, many being exact duplicates, except for minor details. Further- 
more, the large number of filings per company would have made a very 
voluminous record. 

Because of the numerous tyr>es of product and adaptation and the 
difficulty of computing prices, a special study (Appendix B., Part III. A) 
was made to illustrate a few representative price differentials for various 
types of wire. 

B. Basic Struc ture. 

1. O riginal Structure . 

Price. 

The pricing system in the magnet wire group was to use the base price 
of copper plus extras in cents per pound for various sizes, shapes and types 
of wire. To this were added spooling charges and freight. Published freight 
rates issued by the ^awkins Publishing Company was used by all members of 
the industry. 

The base price in all cases was the same, being the copper price, and 
the following instructions were given by each company: 

"1. Magnet wire base price to be used shall be that reported in the 
latest issue of the 'Daily Metal Trade' preceding the day quotation 
is made. The base price is found under the heading 'Copper Wire 
Products' ". 

"2. When the magnet wire base price decreases, all quotations will be 
decreased upon receipt of telegram from 'Daily Metal Trade' stating 
the new price or when the new base price is published in the 'Daily 
Metal Trade' ". 

13, Wnen the magnet wire base price increases, the quotations will be 
allowed to remain effective until five P.M. the day change in the 
published base price has been published in the 'Daily Metal Trade'." 

"No orders using the base price in effect prior to the increase will be 
accepted after five P.M." 

Extras and spooling charges arc somewhat voluminous and complex. Briefly, 
various extras are added to the base price according to the size and shape 
of wire, type of insulation, amount of insulation, set-up charge, etc. 
Deductions and adders from the resulting price may be made on the basis of 
quantity. After all these computations are made, still further deductions 
and adders are possible for certain types of wire, (See Appendix B. , part III.A, 

9822 



-48- 



The filings of Company "ITof 1 were found to follow the general pattern. 
These filings were therefore set 'up and filings of the r emalning companies 
compared thereto. (Appendix B., Part III.) 

Extras O ver Base Price 

Six items appear under the standard filing representing various 
construction extras which are added to the "base price (copper). 

Comparing the original filings of each of the twenty remaining companies, 
with Company No. 1., it appears that all are practically the same. However, 
under "base price v>er pound will he noticed that Companies No. 4 and 7 quote 
13.875 while the balance quote 13.75. This difference is offset in the 
factor of freight allowance. Host companies quote from the same group of 
basing points. Those using the ha.se price of 13.75, note that when certain 
mid-western basing points are used, the base price is increased to 13.875. 
Those using the base price of 13.875 note that when the eastern basing points 
are used, the base price shall be reduced to 13.75. Thus in fact, the base 
price is the same for all companies. 

Quantity - Extras and Seduction s 

Four items, three quoting extras covering adder for broken packages 
(less than 200 lbs.), set up charge for less than one reel rectangular 
wire and per lb. adders for oxygen free high conductivity magnrt wire, which 
is a specially treated and refined product, and one, a reduction of -k cent 
per pound -oh orders 30,000 lbs. or over, are contained under standard filing 
under this heading. Three of these four items are quoted by all but four 
companies. The oxygen adders are quoted by only eight coirroanies. 

Terms of Delivery 

Six items under delivery were generally standard and the delivery terms 
of each company, with slight exception, included these six. Briefly, ■ the 
shipping terms were f.o.b. factory orders of less than one hundred- pounds, 
Orders of one hundred pounds and over were f.o.b. basing point. 

Terms of Payment 

Terms of payment were generally net thirty days from date of invoice; 
one-half of one percent discount ten days from date of invoice; interest 
added at the rate of six percent per annum after thirty days. 

Wire Prices Extra Over Base " , , • . - 

Extras over base for four types and sizes of wires are indicated for 
. the purpose of comparison later in the study. These extras are the same for 
all companies filing them. (Appendix B. Part III.) 

2. Final Structure 

The filing of Company :.!o. 1 may still be considered as picturing the 
pattern so that by comparing the original and final filings of Company No. 1 
chaaiges may be determined. 

9822 



-49- 



E xtras. Oyer Base 

The base price has increased to 15.25 cents, an increase of one and 
one-half cents per pound. Comparison shows that there has been no change in 
the six items originally filed under this heading. 

Quantity - Extras and e d uc tions 

Number of items generally quoted under this heading has increased from 
four to nine. 

°riginally, the only quantity deduction was one-half cent per pound on 
orders of 30,000 pounds or over. Finally, orders of 30, COO pounds or more 
shipped c.l. received a deduction of one-half cent per pound from the base 
price, less 5^ discount from the total price per pound. Orders of 30,000 
pounds or more in l.c.l. received a deduction of one-quarter cent per pound 
from the base price less five percent discount from the total price per 
pound. Lots of 15,000 pounds or more which previously received no deduction 
for quantity are now subject to deduction of one-quarter cent per pound from 
the base price. Lots of less than 15,000 pounds still carry the base price. 

In the final filings recognition is given to the fact that wires of 
size 25 and finer are not normally ordered in lots of 15,000 pounds or more 
because of the large lineal footage involved, therefore, these wires aarry 
a five percent deduction from the total price on orders of 5,000 pounds or 
more. 

The set up charge on rectangular wire in the final structure is the 
same as in the original except that a reel of two hundred pounds as specified 
rather than 225 pounds. 

In the final- structure charges for special spooling were established 
increasing in amount as the weight - cr spool decreased. The other extras 
and reductions were unchanged. 

The' net result of these changes was first, to reduce the quantities on 
which premiums were given and to increase the premiums given on quantities 
originally specified; second, to permit lineal foot orders of small size 
wire of more than 5,000 pounds to receive a discount; third, new adders for 
spooled magnet wire were established, increasing as the size of the spool 
decreased. Practically all companies conform to the standard filing. 

Terms o f Del ivery 

In the final structure, terms of delivery have been simplified so that 
all prices include delivery to destination except orders of less than one 
hundred pounds which are 3T.0.B. point of shipment. This change was generally 
followed by all companies except company No. 10, which company used a modified 
basing point system. 

Ter ms of rayme nt 

In the final structure, the discount for cash is in amount the same as 
in the original structure but the time element has been changed so as to cause 
the discount period to relate to fixed settlement days, instead nf being fixed 

9822 



-50- 



at ten days. The net date thus provides for approximately twenty-five to 
forty days instead of thirty from date of invoice, ^hese changes terms 
of payment were general throughout the industry. 



C. Chronological rt ecord of Price Filings (Appendix A. Part III. 



In examining the records of price filing for the magnet wire group, 
it was noted the filings were very numerous but quite uniform. By com- 
piling a detailed chronological record of the filings made "by three 
companies, an adequate representation v/as secureu.. 

general. 

During the period of price filing, two changes in "base price- occurred 
amounting in all to an increase of one and one-half cents per pound. 
Considering the entire number of filings about eighty percent dealt with 
extras and deductions, ton percent with delivery, five percent with, terms 
of payment and the balance miscellaneous matters, such as pricing instruc- 
tion, construction information and changes in base price. 

Sffi^-PJE. of Filin gs^. 

Probably more filings per company were made in the magnet wire group 
than in any other, -the average being about fifty to fifty-five filings 
per company, with a maximum of "30. 

For m and Content . 

In the original filings some incomplete and vague filings occurred 
but these were corrected almost immediately and from then on filings were 
quite clear and complete in all material particulars. 

Wai_ti_n^ Period. 

About sixteen percent of the filings had short waiting periods of 
which one- third were to meet competition and the balance, general in 
nature, covering such matters' as construction detail, new items, and 
changes in the base price of copper* 

Le_ad er_sh _ip_ ' 

ITo one company was outstandin- in ititiating revisions, practically 
every company originated one or more changes. 

general 

Considering the entire number ,of filings about eighty percent dealt 
with extras and deductions, ton percent with delivery, five percent with 
terms of payment and the balance miscellaneous matters, such as pricing 
instruct! on, construction information and changes in base 'orice. 

In the point of time the pattern of doing business as shown by the 
final structure did net appear at once but came about through a series of 
general industry movements. For instance, by November of 1933, there was 

• 9822 



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a definite trend toward the form of the final t erms of delivery, "but terms 
of payment and extras and reductions for quantity do not appear in their 
final form until may of 1D35, 

In the chronological record it will he found that many charges for 
special individual constructions occurred affecting only one or two of 
the many types of magnet wire. Appendix B, Part 3Q, indicates the various 
differentials and adders to be used in connection with various wires. 
Since changes in these differentials and new types of constructions were 
constantly occurring, it is rather difficult to say whether the general 
price level was higher or lower at the -close of the price filing period. 
Considering the basic elements in the price structure, the base copper 
price advanced, the various constructisn extras despite their numerous 
revisions so offset each other that they did not bring about appreciable 
net change, and the quantity discounts which were increased were a factor 
tending towards reduction in net price. It is impossible even .to estimate 
the effect of the delivery terms 

D. Asbe sto s Magnet Wire - .Origin al Filing Ap pe ndix B. Part 3jb . 

As was staged previously, the three companies manufacturing asbestos 
magnet wire, operated in a somewhat different manner with respect to such 
wire. The skeleton price structure is the same as that used for other 
magnet wires, but with different "extras over base price" and "extras and 
reductions for quantity.". Terms of delivery differ from those originally 
in use for other types of wire but terms of payment are exactly the same. 

The method of doing business_ includes -one feature which does not 
appear in connection with other types of magnet wire, which is that 
discounts are given to certain types of customers. 

E xtras ov er Base Prices. 

The items under this head are much the same for all types of magnet 
wire. 

Quantity - Extras and ^eductions 

Originally two items appear under this heading. The first gives 
adders for less than full reels, round and square wire graduating according 
to size of wire and Weight of order, and the second gives adders for less 
than full reels of rectangular wire. 

Terms of Delivery 

■'■erms of delivery originally were f.e.b. factory on less than one 
hundred pounds. Delivered prices one hundred pounds and over appeared 
east of the Mississippi, including the city of St. Louis, Missouri; west 
of the Mississippi the terms were f.o.b. factory with freight allowed 
ninety cents per hundred pounds. 

Terms of Payment' 

Terms followed exactly those used for other types of magnet wire. 



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Wir e pr ices - Ex tras Over Base 

On the work sheet showing original and final price structure for 
asbestos insulated wire, three samples are given illustrating some extras 
over "base. 

Discounts 

Two of the three companies quoted a ten percent discount to manufac- 
turers, except coil manufacturers, who received five percent discount as 
did motor repair shops and electrical jobbers. Prices to all other 
customers were at list. 

In addition to the above, one company quoted for ap-oointed distributors 
a discount of ten and five percent on sales to purchasers including 
manufacturers using magnet -wire in their products for resale, motor repair 
shops, coil manufacturers and electrical jobbers, and a discount of ten 
pprcent on their sales to all other buyers. 

£inal_ JT i 1 ing s 

Considering the last filings -on asbestos insulated magnet wire, six 
changes have occurred. 

(1) The base price increased from ,;13.75 to $15.00. This final 
base price is not the same as that for other magnet wire for the reason 
that the last filing on asbestos insulated wires occurred prior to the 
increase in the base price of copper from $15.00 to $15.25. 

(2) U n d.er "extras and reductions for Quantity 11 in addition to the 
adders for less than full reels a deduction is now given of three-fourths 
nf a cent per pound from the base price for 30,000 pounds or more CLL. and 
a ''deduction of one-half cent per pound for 30,000 pounds or more LCL. 

(3) Terms cf delivery are now identical with those for other magnet 
wires and all prices are based on del ivery to destination, 

(4) Terms of payment continue to follow those in effect for other 
magnet wires and reflect the changes which occurred. 

(5) Wire prices - "extras over base" - as illustrated by the three 
specimen wires appear to have been reduced. 

(fi) The system of discounting has been materially changed and is 
now on a. ouantity basis for all purchasers. However, wholesalers with 
sales agreements are given a discount in excess of that offered other 
types of purchasers for similar ouantities. In extent the rates of 
discount have been increased. 

Summation 

The net result nf these changes was! 

(l) to continue the penalty on small orders* 

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-DO- 

(2) to offer increased premiums for quantity, resulting in a 
wider price ran c with lower prices available. 

E . Summary 

Changes occurring during open price filing, tut not necessarily 
resulting therefrom, may for the magnet wire group be briefly stated: 

(1) The avera e rice was probably lower in spite of an increase 
in the base price of copper, the lowering being due to increased premiums for 
quan t i t y pur cha s e r s . 

(2) Shifting of delivery terms from basing point to delivered 
■orice. 

(o) Increased uniformity of structure. 

The magnet wire group is an interesting cxanrole because in spite of 
numerous products and adaptations, the group moved smoothly and without the 
usual confusion which attended the price filing experience of other groups 
manufacturiiic involved lines. Possible the standardization of the product 
and the narroY/ mar in between cost of materials and final price and the 
absence of competing channels of distribution explain to some degree the 
sensitivity cf the group to price variation. 

^ecause of the fact that so many variables of construction cost, 
pnantity discounts, adders and extras affect the price, the group illustrates 
the difficulty of measuring change in price level. 

In the ca.se of asbestos insulated magnet wire their is indicated 
possibilities in connection with limiting the scope of a price call to a 
smaller area than that covered by the experiment. 

There also occurs in this group a tendency toward further uniformity. 



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• 



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EXHI3IT A 
NATIONAL ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION 

CODE AUTHORITY FOR THE ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 



155 East 44th Street, j£. New York, N. Y. 

CODE 

Designated as the Agency for Administering, Supervising and Promoting the performance 
of the provisions of the Code for the Electrical Manufacturing Industry, under the 
National Industrial Recovery Act, approved by President Roosevelt on August 4, 19J3. 



OFFICE OF SUPERVISORY AGENCY 



WIRE & CABLE SUBDIVISION 
September 6, 1933. 



We, Wylie Brown, Everett Morss, Jr., H. D. Keresey, 
Alfred Bellis and F. C. Jones, Supervisory Agency of the Wire and 
Cable Subdivision of the electrical manufacturing industry ap- 
pointed, in accordance with the provisions of Article XII of the 
Code for the Electrical Manufacturing Industry approved by the 
President on August 4, 1933, by the Board of Governors of Nation- 
al Electrical Manufacturers Association, hereby notify you that 
we have, pursuant to the authority vested in us by Article X of 
said Code, determined that it has been the generally recognized 
practice to sell: 

MAGNET WIRE - all sizes and shapes of insula- 
ted solid copper wire generally used in the 
winding of coils, including high frequency or 
"LITZ" wire - 

on the basis of net price lists, or price lists and discount 
sheets, and fixed terms of payment. 

We therefore direct that you as a manufacturer of, or 
one promoting the manufacture for sale of, all or any of the 
above products, file with this Supervisory Agency for distribu- 
tion, as required by said Code, to all other manufacturers of the 
products specified above, at the office of National Electrical 
Manufacturers Association, 155 East 44th Street, New York City, 
on or before September 17, 1933, TWENTY-FIVE copies of your price 
lists, or price lists and discount sheets, showing your current 
prices and fixed terms of sale, payment, delivery and any other 
conditions which affect the sales price on the products specified 
above. 

Show all discounts, terms, etc., either on price lists 



-55- 



or attached thereto and not in a separate letter to the Super* 
visory Agency. 

Very truly yours, 




Co<j\jOCfck "V\\-«-v^-A-y^, 



nf. Uokw h^.< 




6%£jl*6 yQue^ 



Superv 



isg gy Agen cy. 



P.S. All packages must be marked 117-9-6 for idertification. 
Your company nane and a date must appear on all sheets or sets 
of sheets furnished this Agency. As typewritten sheets, either 
original or carbon copies, require first class mail, your price 
sheets or revisions thereof should be printed or in some form of 
processing or duplication. 



OS? 



o o 



-56- 

CKAPTE3 5 

FiiA.CTICl"AL rlORSEFOYIE KOT03 GEOTJF 



A The Indus try 

The Fractional Horsepower Motor Industry as it exists today is the 
result of a situation which has cone about in the past 10 years. Start- 
ins about 1925 the use of Fractional Horsepower Motors increased tremend- 
sly by reason of the increased sales of the electrically operated house- 
hold refrigerator, washing machine, vacuum cleaner, anc" motorized kitchen 
appliance, not to mention the individual motorization of plant machinery, 
the use of electrically driven portable tools and the home work shop. 
These conditions made it possible for the industry to go into production 
on a volume basis and after equipping itself to handle volume business it 
had to have volume in order to protect its investment and to live. At 
the same time many of the purchasers were developing on such a volume 
basic that individual contracts assumed tremendous importance. 

At the beginning of the price filing era motor sales were at a marked 
low due to general business conditions. Thereafter the volume increased 
quite rapidly, due largely to the tremendous jump in sales of household 
refrigerators. 

Members of the Industry 

The original Price Call was directed to 47 companies. For the purpose 
of this study, 4 of the 47 companies have been disregarded because they 
made non-comparable motors, motors on special order only, or very limited 
lines. However, the peculiarities of such companies are covered in con- 
nection with companies included in the study. . 

Standard-lion Stan dard 

For purposes of generality the industry can be divided into two 
sections from the standpoint of --rice structure; standard and non- 
standard. There is, however, no distinct dividing line, divergence from 
the standard being in degree rather than in.toto. Since the non-standard 
companies must be commented upon individually in relation to the standard 
it is necessary to proceed first with consideration of the standard group. 

The usual pattern of price structure in the group is based upon 
list prices for motors with discounts for carefully defined customer classes, 
quantities and on specific motors. Within certain of the customer classes, 
a "multiplier" system is used to provide special treatment for individual 
comoanies. Terms of sale and delivery are also included. 

1. Price Call - Exhibit A 

The original Trice Call was issued under date of January 5, 1954, 
effective January 29 , 1934, and based on the first paragraph of Article X 
Code of Fair Competition for the Electrical Manufacturing Industry. There 
was specified in some detail the products to be covered and the information 

22 



-57- 

t'o be filed in connection therewith. There was also issued an amended Price 
Call exempting sales to purchasers buying annually motors valued at 3100,000 
or more. 

Work Sheets : 

Appendix A, Part 4: Chronologic 1 Record of Price Filings by Companies, 

Appendix B, Part 4: Gives original and final filing in detail for each 

company. 

Standard Structure - 

After the original filing two major changes were made by standard 
companies. The first increased customer quantity discounts to resale 
machinery manufacturer's and made a general list price revision slightly up- 
ward, but. with some decreases on specific motors. This occurred about March 
19, 1934. The second major change was generally effective November 5, 1934, 
and increased customer classification discounts so as to redn.ee the differen- 
tial between Class G- and other customers. 

.B. Basic Structure 

1 • Str uctu re - Original Filing 

List Price; S tandard and Hon- Standard 

In order to set up a bench marl: to serve as a means of comparing list 
prices and the effects thereon of the discount structure, the list prices 
of three popular types ,f motors were arranged under Columns 1, 2, and 3, 
Appendix B - Part 4. In scanning these list "prices it will be noted that 
motors V3lued at §,32.50, $32.00 and $37.0' are quoted by practically every 
company adhering materially to the standard price structure. To continue 
the original scheme of dividing the group into standard or non-standard 
companies, we shall, so far as list price is concerned, consider the above 
mentioned list prices as representing standard and all others as non-standard. 
In some cases, exactly comparable motors were not available in the price 
lists of certain companies, and therefore, the motors most closely resembling 
the specimens v. r ere taken. 

So as to become familiar with the method of doing business in this 
group it appears necessary to examine the structure under the original filing, 
The purchaser or customer classification situation is defined in detail under 
Note 2, Ap] endix A, Part 4. This classification was subscribed to by all 
of the standard, companies and "as used in part by non-standard companies. 

Cust omer C lass e~ and Discounts 

The purchaser classification entitled "Class A Users" were required 
to pay list prices. "Forty companies quoted to this classification, all but 
6 of which quoted list price. Of the companies not following, Company #1 
quoted only 3 types of motors and offered a 10$ discount to Class A Users 
on a price list comparable to the standard. Company ;''-ll quoted users "net 
to 2 r 'p." Company #22 set up a discount schedule (See Appendix A Par, T4 - 

9822 



• -53- 

llotc B. 3) which differed materially from the standard.. Company #24 "based 
discou.t on a value of order "basis. Company #26 quoted 20$ to all classes 
for unit shipment of less than 10 motors. Company #31 quoted Class A Users 
"list to 15$". 

For Class B Users it v.dll ho note'"- that practically the same general 
situation prevails e;:cept that Conroany #40 "which quoted Class A Users does 
not quote Class B. 

Class C purchasers (central stations, etc) under the standard structure 
received a classification discount of 16;' from 25 companies. Seven comoanies 
quoted other discounts. A s to the 3 classes, Company #1 has "been consistently 
different from the standard as have Companies #26 and #31. Companies #11 and 
#22 who have differed from standard do not quote Class C. In addition Com- 
panies 3 and 28 who have "been consistently standard now differ. This is typ- 
ical throughout the entire filing, not ony of the specific companies men- 
tioned but generally. I n fact a total of 21 companies out of the 43 at some 
time or other in greater or less degree do diverge from the standard. Other 
divergences will he noted in that a company does not quote to a customer 
classification which is considered a part of the standard structure. 

For Class D (resale motor dealers havin, agreements) a situation 
similcr to th t of Clashes A, B and C prevails. However, with respect to 
the discount grouping, indicated hy the symbol DQ,, which deals with quantity 
discount to Class D purchasers only, based upon aggregate net value of orders 
placed annually, -31 companies quote the DQ, classification and all quote on 
the standard "basis. 

In Classes E, F and G- there is marked similarity to the situation 
pointed out in Classes A, 3, C and D. For the discount grouping GQ which 
covers discount to Class G- purchasers "based on dollar volume of order and 
shipping requirements, 23 companies quoted, all hut 2 of which quoted the 
standard. Company #1 which has thus far "be- n consistently different quotes 
on the basis of an annual quantity discount to all purchasers. Comaany 
#11 quotes only on orders of $10,000 or more. 

About the same degree of conformity appears in the other and less 
important classiiicat 'cations such as Classes H, I and M, 

O perati c n o f Sta nd ard Structure 

The analysis of the original structure mill be divided into two parts. 
First the competitive positions of the various customer classifications under 
the standard structure and second the competitive positions of manufacturers 
and purchasers on the b?sis of deviations from the standard. 

Customer Class A may be disposed of by saying that.it is the last 
favored of the customer classifications under the standard structure. 

Clashes B, C and G- though having classification discounts of 10$, 16-5 
and 20$ respectively have within the confines of each, competitive levels 
because specifically named companies ire given what are lenown as multipliers. 
These always offer discounts larger than the standard classification discount. 
Taking the B Classific tion for instance more than 60 speciiic companies, 

9823 



-59- 

naraed in the filings are quoted multipliers providing discounts ranging 
from 11$ to 22$. Thus purchasers quoted the straight Class B Classi- 
fication discount of 10$ are definitely handicapped. 

Customer classification C having a general classification discount 
of 16$ has the same situation with multipliers resulting in discounts 
ranging from 17$ to 22$, "but applying to less than 20 companies. 

Thus although the standard customer classification discounts for 
Classes B and C give a larger discount to Class C the use of the multi- 
plier system creates an overlap between Classes B and C in that Class B 
multiplier ciscounts range from 11$ to 23$ and Class C ranee from 17$ to 
_>. There are other special discounts but these apply equally to "both 
Classes B and C and therefore competitive positions remain unchanged. 

Customer Classification G, manufacturers using motors in their product, 
which carries a standard classification discount, of 20$, also utilizes 
a multiplier system. This system, which is similar in form to that used 
in connection with Customer Classificrtions B and C, applies to about two 
hundred specifically named companies and offers discounts from 21$ to 25^. 
Thus, Class G overlaps slightly with Classes E and C. 

Class G customers also have available a discount based on dollar 
vnlue of orders and shipping requirements which ranges from 7$ on an order 
.of $1500.00 having a shipping requirement of 90 day delivery, unit shipment 
of 10 or more motors, to a discount of 18$ on an order of $10,000.00 or more, 
shipping requirement of unit shipment of $10,000 or more. 

Examining Class G Further, it is found that additional discounts 
are given on specific ratings of fractional horse power motors. However, 
this added discount is available to about only one-third of the listed 
Class G purchasers. These few customers in addition to the multiplier 
and other discounts, receive on the purchase of specific motors, an 
additional discount ranging from 3$ to 14 f /0 . 

Customer Class D, has a standard customer classification discount of 
174 and an additional discount based on aggregate net value of orders 
placed annually. This added discount ranges from 1-|$ on $2500.0 to 7$ 
on $200,000.00 or more. 

Comparing Classes B, C, D and G, Class B discunts range from 10$ 
to 22$; Classic range from 16$ to 22$; Class D range from 17$ to 21.41$; 
Class G range from 20$ to 47.11$. 

In connection with the higher ranges of discounts in the four customer 
classes set out above, certain facts must be noticed and kept constantly in 
mind in order intelligently to comprehend the availability of these dis- 
counts. A specific illustration of the need of such warning is given here 
in connection with Class G customers. ]?ir;.t, in order for a Class G cus- 

;r to receive the highest total discount 347.il ( o), he must first be 
assigned the largest Class G multiplier . (.75) , (a disco-Lint of 25$). In 
the average filing, only about twelve companies receive this multiplier. 
Second, the Class G purchaser must have available the largest possible 
additional disco-ant on -ourchases of specific ratings of fractional horse 

9822 



-60- 



power motors. Companies receiving the highest possible discount on this 
"basis are seven in number. Only four of the seven however, receive a 
multiplier of .75 and one of the four is an affiliate of a large manufacture! 
of fractional horse power motors and would, therefore, not "bull; large in 
outside purchases. Third, even they can obtain the discount only for 
shipments in quantities valued at $10,000.0 • or more. 

Customer Class H, covering authorized machinery dealers who are 
resale outlets for machinery manufacturers (Class G) , receive a dis- 
count equivalent to Class C. 

Customer Class I coveres discounts to educational institutions where 
motors are used for purposes of instruction. 

Class M, Jobbers and Wholesalers, is not a pupular channel of distri- 
bution and carries no standard discount. Only nine companies quote. 

Terns of Delivery and. Payment 

- — --■■ - u ' — * — ■ 

In the area of delivery, practically all companies quoted F.O.B. 
factory, freight allowed to destination, and the usual terms net 30 days. 

2 . Conroarison: S ta ndard and non-Standard Struc ture 

Company Ho. 1 which does not conform to standard is relatively small 
and in its original filing covered only three types of motors. To Customer 
Class A, a discount of 10$ is offered except on one type motor. To Customer 
Classes B , C, E and G, a discount of 20$ and 10$ is quoted except on one 
type motor where the discount is 20$. No multiplier list was used except 
to four purchasers, but all purchasers had available annual quantity 
discounts ranging from 2$ on $1,000.00 to 10$ on -125,000.00 or more.. 

Company No. 3 diverges from standar; to Class C purchasers and 
offers them a discount of 19$ rather tloan a standard 16$ and docs not 
quote a discount to Clss G purchasers based either on dollar value of 
order and shipping requirement, or purchases of specific motors. 

Company No. 4 quotes only Classes D, E, G_and M. Discounts to 
Classes D and E are higher than the standard discounts and to customers 
in Class G are available discounts ranging from 25$ on lots of one motor 
to 50$ if the customer is carrier' on a monthly schedule. 

To cor.tinue the summation of the individual differences appears un- 
necessary and a short statement would seem to apply the necessary infor- 
mation. This could be in two parts, first that differences from the 
standard usually offer greater discounts than the standard except that 
in the case of Customer Classes 3, C and G, extra discounts such as are 
offered by multipliers, purchasers of specific motors, annual purchases 
andunit orders purchases are usually lacking. Second, the effect of this 
is that the non-standard companies offer greater discounts to those Customer 
Classes least favored by the standarc companies. 



9822 



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There are, hovever, exceptions to this, for instance, Company "Jo. 
2 . which of~ ers Customer Class G purchasers buying less than fifty thous- 
and dollars of motors per year, discounts totaling 55.3$ and those over 
fifty thou- ollars discounts totaling 56. J . 

Among the signific nt matters are special forms of quantity discount 
for one cl r LOther s imetimes tricing the form of discounts for number 
of motor? in the order and at others based on total annual dollar purchases. 

3 . Structure - Final Filing 

In the final structure as compared with the original, the functional 
Customer Class discounts were increased. The definitions of the various 
Customer Classes were slightly revised, but no material change was made. 

Class A is quoted on a sliding scale from list on orders less than 
$500.00 to 16$ off on orders of $5,000.00 or more. Six companies who 
quoted list to Class A in the original filing continue to do so. 

Since Class 3, C and G are those to which most attention is paid 
in the filings and since they are in some respects related, consideration 
will be given them as a group. 'These classes continue to have available 
the multiplier system which has been revised as tc rate and application 
to specific companies, but not generally, "he general Class B standard 
-count has been raise: from 1 • to 16' . Classes C pad G remained the 
same as to general classification discounts. 

In Class G occurred the most material change. It will be recalled 
that Class C- had available th« a> t favorable multipliers. Class G 
purchasers, whose purchases from a single company average $2,000.00 or 
more annually through 1931-34, are now quoted a discount of 35$ by seven 
companies. Furthermore Class G purchasers on- the basis of dollar value 
of order aad shipping requirements have available discounts ranging from 
20$ on a $1,000,00 order, unit shipment $150,00 and completed order in 
98 days, to 4.^- on $16,000.00 order with the same shipping requirements. 
Discounts are also quoted Class G purchasers on specific motors. Notice 
that a Class G porclia.se r can not receive on one order both discount based 
on dollar value of order and shipping requirements, and the 25$ discount 
on a $2,C ■,. average over the 4 stated years. 

Operation of Final Structure 

The- result of these changes to 'Class G customers has been to make 
available a discount of 53.6$ in the basis of multiplier and dollar value 
of order and shipping requirements. In addition, there is the additional 
discount to some Class G buyers on specific motors. 

Under' the original filin- , the maximum discount available on the 
basis of dollar value of order and shipping requirements was 18$. Finally 
the maximum discount available based on dollar value of order and shipping 
requirement was 42$. To reduce this to actual illustration, let us take 

t 537. OC list. Under the original filing, the Class G 
purchaser ~ in units valued at §10, 'J00.00 or more, shipped as 

a unit to : seive the maximum discount on dollar value of order and 
shi ing requirements. This would require a purchase of about 275 motors 



-62- 
at 337.0 3 each. 

Under the final structure, purchasing motors valued at $16,0'")0.00 
in 'ne order, completing the on er in 90 days in unit shipments of not 
less than $150.00, would require about 435' motors at $37.00 each, the 
purchaser receiving a discount of 42^. Thus, by the use of an additional 
$6,000.00 for 90 days, the Class G purchaser, under the final structure, 
had available a discount much greater than the discount available under 
the original structure for a purchase valued at $10,000.00 or more, 
unit shipment. 

Thus, as between the original and the final structure, the final 
structure offers a much higher premium for volume especially to Class G 
Customers, than did the original structure. 

List Price 

In the matter of list prices, changes were spotty, some motors being 
increased and others decreased. Many popular motors were unchanged. For 
the specimen motors used on the work sheets the changes are predominately 
upward but seldom more than 10$. 

Uiiform ity Under Final 5 true tur e 

As to uniformity under the final structure, the situation is much 
the same as was seen under the original. Most of the same companies con- 
tinue to diverge, plus a few additional companies who have maintained 
parts of the original standard structure and added to this parts of the 
final structure. 

Maximum Discount - Cu stome r Clas s G 

Considering now the total possible discounts to Class G purchasers 
under the original and final standard structures, we see that the original 
structure offered the Class G customers a maximum discount of 33.5$, not 
including special discount quoted certain Class G customers on purchases 
of motors of specific ratings. In the final structure, excluding the same 
special discount, the total maximum discount possible was 56.5$. The 
special discount excluded in both cases is the same, and therefore, does 
not change the picture from the standpoint of comparison. 

Comparing the requirements to be fulfilled, in the original and 
final structures in order to receive these discounts. In both cases, the 
purchaser must be of the Class G group and must receive the largest 
multiplier. Under the original structure, in order to receive the highest 
discount based zn dollar value of order and shipping requirement, the Class 
G purchaser had to order in lots valued at $10,000.00 or more, unit ship- 
ment amounting to $10,000.00 or more. Under the final structure, he had 
to order in lots valued at $16,000.00 or more, unit shipment $150 and com- 
plete order in 90 days. Thus, it appears reasonable to say that the final 
structure greatly increased quantity premiums. 

C . Chron ology of Change 

1. Ma.jjr Ch ange Effective Ap o ut March 19, 1 934. 

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Considera"ble comnent has already been made ra the original filing 
and the structure therein set up. I n the first major development, 
generally effective March 19, 1934, the discount to Cliss G purchasers 
based Dn quantity and shipping requirements was materially revised up- 
■< . This filing was originated by Company No. 15 and was not within 
the ten day waiting period by fourteen companies. Subsequentl'-'- it was 
met either in whole or in part by twelve additional companies. In 
addition, all other companies in the group revised their structure in 
some way or other, as a result of its effect. 

2. Major Ch ange Effective N ov ember 5 to No vember 15, 1934. 

The maj >r development was also initiated by Company No. 15. The 
change made was with respect to definition of customer classifications 
and discounts thereto and is, as explained in detail in Notes 5 and 6, 
Appendix A, Fart 4. Nine companies met the filing within the ten day 
waiting period and sixteen companies met it in whole or in part thereafter. 
This filing also caused changes to follow and it will be noted that 
finally practically all companies have made commensurate revision, 

3 • Inter medi ate Filings, 

Intermediate filings were, for the most part, administrative. That 
is to say that the filings give directions how to calculate prices, supply 
information concerning types of motors, add new motors and accessories, 
change individual motor prices and serve to bring the filings to date. 
The vast majority of them had a tan day waiting period. It was quite 
exceptional to find an initiating revision which had been met within the 
ten day waiting period, and even when found, the content generally related 
to a fact or condition pertinent to a few comnanies only. For example, 
Company No. 10 changed one multiplier, effective August 30; this was met 
by Company No. S within the ten day waiting period, but apparently the 
change was not of importance to any one else.. This might mean a number 
of things; for instance that the company whose multiplier had been changed 
was the exclusive customer of Companies Nos. 8 and 10, or it might mean 
that other companies were already quoting a similar multiplier. 

Numb er of Filin gs 

Considering the number of filings made and the rate of change, filings 
averaged from five to fifteen per company and a noticeable gap occurs in 
many instances between January and April of 1934. By and large, the smaller 
companies made very few filings, sometimes only two and nearly a year 
apart. Usually in the case of the large companies, after the original 
flurry there were few filings until the Spring of 1934 when there was 
considerable activity. After another period of activity in the Fall of 
1934 there rcas a decided drop In the .number of filings. 

This can oe accounted for in some measure by the fact that nego- 
tiations were pending between the Supervisory Agency and the National 
Recovery Administration toward a decision as to whether or not annual 
purchasers of $.00,000.00 or more could be eliminated from the scope of 
the price call. The Industry was alleged to be seriously concerned about 
the matter, it being their feeling that the inclusion of this type of 



9322 



-64- 

pur chaser had a very detrimental effect on the price situation. The 
outcome of the negotiations was the withdrawal of an amended price call 
which the Supervisory Agency load issued exempting purchasers as described 
and the cancellation of the entire price call hy the Supervisory Agency. 

D. Summary 

The major changes in this group were: first, increased premiums 
for volume; this reflected reductions in price to all customer groups; 
second, little or no list price change in comparison with the extent of 
discount revisions. 

The waiting period was xised in the vast majority of filings. With 
the exception of the major changes of March and November, 1934, few 
coincidental revisions were made. Thus, although a complicated structure 
existed, it apparently made little or no difference whether an initiator 
was penalized by a waiting period except on major changes. 

The stated purpose of applying open price filing in this group was 
to "do something about quantity discounts". The result of the experiment 
as to this purpose was obviously not successful and in fact,' the cancel- 
lation of the price call prior to the Schechter Decision was brought 
about directly by the further increase of quantity discounts. 



932^ 



-65- 




KXHIBIT A 

National Electrical Manufacturers 
Association 

155 EAST 44th STREET 
NEW YORK 



Designated as the Agency for administering. Supervising and Promoting 

PERFORMANCE OF THE PROVISIONS OF THE CODE FOR THE ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURIN« 

Industry, under the National Industrial Recovery Act, approved »y President 
roosevelt on august 4, 1933. 

offics of Supervisory aoincy 

INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS SUBDIVISION 



I, Clarence L. Collens, Supervisory Agency of the In- 
dustrial Apparatus Subdivision of the electrical manufacturing 
industry appointed, in accordance with the provisions of Article 
the Code for the Electrical Manufacturing Industry ap- 
by the President on August 4, 1933, by the Board of Gov- 
of National Electrical Manufacturers Association, hereby 
you that I have, pursuant to the authority vested in me by 

that it has beer, the generally 



XII of 



proved 

ernors 

notify 

Article X of said Code, determ 

recognized practice to sell: 



Fractional horsepower electric motors and elec- 
trical and mechanical modification, all as here- 
under defined and described in Sections (1), (2), 
(3) and (4), 

on the basis of net price lists, or price lists and discount 
sheets, and fixed terms of payment; or where in respect to any 
product specified herein it has not been the generally recognized 
practice so to sell that the distribution and marketing condi- 
tions in respect to such products are similar to or the same as 
the distributiuil and marketing conditions where the use of price 
lists with or without discount sheets is well recognized. 



(1) 



Frame sizes on which are given the following standard open 
ratings, are defined as fractional horsepower motors and in- 
dicate the range of frame sizes embraced within the scope of 
this price call in connection with any of the types of frac- 
tional horsepower motors specified in the subsequent section. 
Only standard and special motors of current design, both new 
or unused, are to bo considered as within the scope of this 
Price Cull. 




CODE 



60 cycle - 3600 r.p.m. - 1 

1800 « f 

1200 " I •' 

JO " 1/3" 



3P 



•1/60 HP irjcl. 



*i 



.-. o 



9o<S* 



-66- 



50 cycle , 


- 3000 


r.p.m. 


- 1 HP 




1500 


M 


1 tt 




1000 


tt 


J w 




• 750 


tt 


1/3" 


40 cycle 


- 24C0 


tt 


a. « 
1/3" 




- 1200 


tt 




800 


tt 


30 cycle 


-' 1800 


tt 


3. «t 
1?3" 




900' 


it 


25 cycle 


- 1500 


tt 


a. « 
1?3" 




750 


n 


D..C. 


- 3600 


tt 


1 " 




1800 


tt 


a. it 

1 .. 

2 




1200 


»t • 




900 


f? 


1/3" 



■1/60 HP incl, 



tt 


n 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tt 


»t 


»t 


tt 


tt 


•t 


•t 


tt 


tt 



Ti.e scope of this Price -Call includes the following standard 
voltages to the extent that they are applicable in connec- 
tion with any of the types of fractional horsepower motors 
specified in the. subsequent section: 

Single Phase - 110 and 220 volt 
Polyphase 110, 220, 440 and 550 volt 
Direct Current 32, 115, 230 and 550 volt 

Ir. connection with sections (2) and (3) the scope of this 
Price Call covers. merely bare motors without any type of con- 
trol or standard pulleys but does include solid and resilient 
bases. 

(2) General Purpose Fractional Horsepower Motors - Solid and Re- 
silient Bases - Sleeve- Bearing. Open Type Continuous Duty 
Horizontal Operation. . 

Note - Long hour characteristics are sometimes designated as 
long annual service characteristics. 
Short hour characteristics are sometimes designated 
as short annual service characteristics. 

Single Phase - Capacitor Start Induction Run-Long Hour Char- 
acteristics 
Capacitor Start and Run (2 Value) Long Hour 

Characteristics . 
Capacitor Start and Run (1 Value, permanent 

split ) 
Long Hour Characteristics v 
Repulsion Start Induction (or Repulsion In- 
duction) 
Long Hour Characteristics 
Repulsion Start Induction (or Repulsion In- 
duction) 
Short Hour Characteristics 
Repulsion Start Capacitor Run 

9822 



-67- 



Split Phase - Long Hour Characteristics 
Split Phase - Short Hour Characteristics 

Polyphase Squirrel-Cage induction 

D.C. Direct Current - Shunt and Compound Wound 

The split phase motors specified above are definitely limit- 
ed to that type of split phase motor using or employing a 
starting resistance winding to split the phase, which wind- 
ing is cut out by a switch or relay after starting. 

The following types of motors are definitely excluded from 
this Price Call: 

Toy Motors 

Universal Motors 

Series Motors 

Shaded Pole Induction Motors 

(3) Special Application Fractional Horsepower Motors - Solid and 
Resilient Bases - Sleeve and Ball Bea ring. 

Board of Underwriters Class I Group D Motors for Gasoline 
vending pumps (Intermittent or Short Time Hated) 

Propeller Fan (Unit Heater) Motors - Enclosed - Rating based 
on air drawn over the motor - Continuous Duty - 55o Rise 

Centrifugal Fan Motors - Enclosed - Rating based on no air 
drawn over the motor - Continuous Duty - 55o Rise 

Centrifugal Fan Motors - Open Continuous Duty - 40o Rise 

(4) Price schedules filed on standard general-purpose motors 
(Section (2) above) and on the special application motors 
(Section (3) above) shall be supplemented by additional sep- 
arate price information giving the charge for, or the basis 
of figuring, the following modifications, parts or special 
features: 

Electrical Modifications 

Winding for special voltage or frequency 
Other special windings 

Dual Voltage Connections for polyphase motors 
Reversing Motors 
Special Insulation of Windings 
Mechanical Modifications 
Special Shaft 

Special Work on Standard Parts 
Special location of terminals 

Special location of nameplate or drilling for 

special size nameplate 
Holding shaft height to special limits 
Special Machining and/or Drilling and tapping 
on frame 
Totally Enclosing 

Allowance for Omission of Parts from Standard 
Motors that have been assembled and tostcd 
as complete motors 
Motor parts of standard construction supplied ; - 9 

without assembly and test consisting of ^' K ' 



-68- 



stator, rotor with shaft and brush mechan- 
ism or centrifugal switch if any- 
Round Frame Motors 

Motors for Ceiling or Sidewall Mounting 
Special Machining and/or drilling and tapping 

on one end bracket 
Special Pcrt3 

Special 2nd Bracket 
Special Base 
Thrust Bearings 
Ball Bearings 
Ball Bearings one end, Sleeve Bearing other 

end 
Vertical Motors - for End Bracket Mounting 

" Ring Base * 
n tripod * 
Marine Parts 

Price information for these additional features would onj.y 
be shown in connection with the special application motors 
to the extent that they are applicable. 

Prices filed covering additions to be made for special shafts, 
special mounting dimensions, location and length of terminals 
and special location of name plates shall not apply to such 
minor modifications of these mechanical details as are re- 
quired to meet the corresponding dimensions and details of 
any competitor's standard listed motors of equivalent types 
and ratings if the manufacturer so indicates in his filed 
price schedules. 

I therefore, direct that you as a manufacturer of, or 
one promoting the manufacture for sale of, all or any of the 
above products, file with me for distribution, as required by 
said Code., to all other manufacturers of the products specified 
above, at the office of National Electrical Manufacturers Asso- 
ciation, 155 East 44th Street, New York City, on or before 

copies of your price lists, or price 
lists and discount sheets, showing your current prices to vari- 
ous classes of customers, and fixed terms of sale and payment 
either regular or deferred, the F.O.B. basing point or points 
with price differentials, if any, and basis of delivery to other 
than rasing points, including basis of storedoor delivery if giv- 
en, and any other conditions which affect the sales price on the 
products specified above. 

The following exemptions are made: 

(a) Prices covering export sales. Export sales 
include all sales made for shipment to for- 
eign countries and to the territories and QH2^ 
possessions of the United States. ** 

(b) Fractional horsepower motors which are manu- 
factured by a company for its own use as an 



-69- 



integral part of some motor-driven device, 
appliance, or machine manufactured and sold 
by such company, are not subject to the Price 
Call. 

(c) Prices to employees for their own use and not 
for resale. 

(d) Prices covering sales to any other motor manu- 
facturer provided such other motor manufactur- 
er, manufactures not less than seventy-five 
percent in dollar volume of the motors he- 
sells. 

(e) Fractional horsepower motors, as specified in 
this Price Call, when sold to any purchaser 
who, for the twelve months ending June 30, 
1934, has purchased for resale with machinery 
or appliances $100,000 net of electric motors 
of all types having a rating of 15 horsepower 
and smaller, including any industrial control 
purchased with such motors and any renewal 
parts furnished. This figure of $100,000 is 
based on the aggregate net billings to any 
such purchaser from all electric motor manu- 
facturers who have been used as source of 
supply for that purchaser. 

Any electric motor manufacturer whose indi- 
vidual net billings to any customer for the 
period specified have equalled or exceeded 
the amount specified can immediately qualify 
such customer for this exemption, provided 
the name of the customer so exempted is filed 
with the Supervisory Agency. Where the indi- 
vidual billings of any electric motor manu- 
facturer do not reach this figure but the 
manufacturer has reason to believe that the 
aggregate billings of all sources of supply 
equal the amount specified and the name of 
the customer is filed with the Supervisory 
Agency, a check will be made to determine 
that facts and the manufacturer will be noti- 
fied accordingly. The Supervisory Agency 
will, at any time, advise any electric motor 
manufacturer whether any specified customer 
has been qualified under the exemption. 

Show all discounts, terms, etc., either on price lists 
or attached thereto, with the same number of copies as specified 
above, and not in a separate letter to the Supervisory Agency. 

All packages must be marked FH-1-5 for identification. 
Your company name, a date and an identifying section and page 
number or other identifying notation must appear on each individ- 



-70 



ual sheet or set of sheets furnished this agency. As typewritten 
sheets, either original or carbon copies, require first class 
mail, your price sheets or revisions thereof should he printed or 
in some form of processing or duplication. 

Very truly yours, 






Clarence L. Collens 
Supervisory Agency. 



Qfc2 



-71- 

CHAPTER 6 
ELECTRIC EAIIS 
A. T he Industr y 

1« Description 

Electric fans known in the industry as "IPdxi motors" are 
triefly described as electrical devices used for circulating air. 
A fan usually consists of an electric motor upon the shaft of which 
is located an arrangement of varies which when rotated by the motor 
induces the movement of air. There are few fixed limitations on 
f an design, the primary object "being to secure the greatest cir- 
culation of air with the least consumption of current. 

Material s 

Many materials are used in the construction of electric 
fans the principal items being steel sheet and wire, brass, iron 
castings, die castings, copper, insulating and metal finishing mat- 
erials and molded plastics. 

Process 

The process -varies widely with the type, size a.nd value of 
the fan. The small size fan designed to be sold at low cost is very 
often n?.de of meta.1 stampings with the possible exception of a cast 
iron base. Some small and inexpensive fans .have been placed on the 
market which have the base and motor case made of a molded plastic. 
Ilotors used in fans vary in quality from those used in the low cost 
"price merchandise" fans to the standard merchandise class in which 
the motor is designed and engineered to a high efficiency of operation. 

In the more expensive fans iron castings and die castings 
are used for motor frames and bases although in recent years steel 
stampings have replaced iron castings to a considerable extent. 

The more expensive fans of the oscillating type require a 
gear train for the oscillating motion and the gear case and gears 
are usually die cast, but some machine work is also' required. 

Practically all of the remaining parts of fans except fan 
blades and guards are automatic screw machine products. Fan blades 
are usually made of metal, in which case they a.re stamped to shape. 
But they are also made of wood and fabric materials, which require 
other methods of forming. 

Most fans have a safety guard of some kind around the fan 
blades usually of steel wire, resistance welded or soldered. 



?822 



-72- 



Manual operations are in the assembly and finishing operations. 
The finishing 'Operations var;/ - widely and ranee from spray lacquering to 
"baked enamel or metal plated finish. 

Variations 

The electric fans covered by the price call embrace a great 
many types and sizes. There are four basic types; desk, bracke., ceil- 
ing and ventilating. The usual design of desk fan may be used either 
mounted on a bracket on the wall or as a, desk fan since provision is made 
in the construction to allow the fan blades to be adjusted vertical to 
or parallel with the base. Ceiling fans are made in a great many designs, 
types and sizes and are extensively used in commercial application.. The 
usual type includes a hanger by which the fan is suspended from the ceil- 
ing. The fan motor is usually larger and of a different type than the 
desk fan and the fan blades have a diameter of from 2 to 5 feat, usually 
being made of wood. 

The ventilator fans are limited by the price call to such fans 
"which are adaptions of desk fans and which are for use in free air." 
Fans installed in kitchens for exhausting smoke and odors from cooking 
illustrate this latter type. 

Probably the greatest volume of fans are of the desk and 
bracket ' typBU .The fan sizes are usually expressed by the diameter of the 
blades and four common sizes are the 8" , 10", 12", and 16". The price 
of fans varies with the diameter of the blades which in turn relates to 
the size and rating of the fan motors. Other variables such as finish, 
shape of blades and oscillating feature enter into the price. 

During recent years many changes have been ma.de in fan design 
some of which have had considerable effect. It was found that by making 
radical change in the shape of the fan blades, "flutter" and vibration 
induced in the blades could be eliminated reducing the noise of the fan 
considerably. This silent fan has become quite popular. Another design 
uses loops of a fabric material for fan blades. These blades are held 
in place by centrifugal force and will not cause injury if interfered 
with while the fan is in operation. Therefore these fans da not require 
a guard around the blades. 

Since different voltages and frequencies in electric power supply 
require fans of differing design a complete line of fans requires listing 
a great many items. 

Some sompanies do not attempt to furnish fans for all applica- 
tions and power supplies but concentrate on the fans in popular demand. 
The large electrical companies usually have the most complete line. 



9822 



-73- 



S t andardi zat ion 

T7ith respect to superficial appearance there is considerable 
standardization t>ut differences occur in quality, construction and 
operation so' that while fans may have similar descriptions and motor 
ratings they are different as to method and efficiency of operation. 

2. Companie s 

About twenty-five companies filed prices hut only about 
one-half of them were active in the fan no tor industry. A number after 
mailing one or two filings discontinued upon learning that their product 
was not included in the price call. 

Companies range in size,: the small ones employing perhaps 
250 employees while the large include companies operating generally 
in the Electrical manufacturing Industry. 

All companies manufacture products in addition to fan motors, 
many "being manufacturers of electric motors. 



Location 



liarke t 



Plants are located in the ITorthcentral States. 



The use of fans is widespread with the greatest volume con- 
centrated in urban areas. 

Fans are a very seasonal product and sales are> affected by 
climatic conditions. There is a general observation in the industry 
that if the month of June is unusually warm sales will be good, but if 
June is cool sales will fall below normal. 

luring the winter distributions are contacted and sales 
programs worked out. Agreements are entered into between manufacturers 
and distributors and production schedules are planned based on the 
expected total sales. 

Since there is an appreciable degree of obsolescence plus 
various expenses in carrying inventory, manufacturers attempt to fol- 
low the market as closely as possible. Consequently, production is 
carried on largely during the winter and spring. 

The distributor is the most important channel of distribution 
and although quotations oxe made direct to large buyers the distributor 
often arranges the sa.le on a commission basis. 

Freigh t 

The freight cost is a low percentage of the value of the pro- 
duct and, except in the case of very small orders, is usually paid by 
the manufacturer. 

9322 



-74- 



problem s 

One of the serious problems facing the industry was the 
introduction of the lor; priced far. retailing at little more than $1.00. 
Prices on high grade merchandise apparently were not affected, however, 
■because the chnap fan developed its own market without considerably 
penalizing the high grade merchandise, though it undoubtedly cut into 
the sales of what had "been previously its lowest price class. This was 
probably due to the: fact that although there was a very wide difference 
in price, the comparative . value of the two types was readily apparent and 
the purchaser knew that in buying the cheap product he was getting less 
satisfactory performance. 

The growth of air conditioning has made some inroads on the 
fan business and may be am increasing threat. 

}• price Cal l 

The price cell was issued December 19, 1933, effective 
January 3, 1934, and covered desk, bracket, ceiling and those ventila- 
ting fans which were adaptations of desk fans end used in free air. 
(Exhibit A) 

4- Work Sheet s 

Appendix A, Part V, presents a chronologically ,arre::ged 
record of the price filings of the companies covered. 

Appendix B, Part V, presents 2 work sheets showing list 
prices and discounts to customer classes together with delivery and 
payment terms on representative types of fan motors. 

The filings of 12 companies were analyzed a.s these offered the 
only series of filings \7hich were sufficiently complete to be useful. 



9822 



-75- 
B.~ Basic Structure 

1 . O ri/mial Structure - Amendix B Part 5 

Price 

Most cru.otations are on the basis of list price but some few manufac- 
turers, especially those selling fans in the lower price brackets, quote 
on a net basis. In work sheets 3 types of fans wore used to illustrate 
list prices, an 8" and a 10" stationary fan and 1 oscillating fan. Of 
the 12 companies, 8 had list prices for the three fans, respectively, at 
C4.60, 12. 95, and 22.50. Hone of the others had a complete line, and 
three appear to have 3" fans of a much cheaper grade. 

Customer Classification and Discounts 

There are two types of customer: Users; and Resellers. The same 
general pattern of customer classification is widely employed in the 

industry. 

Users are qxiptcd under the following names: 

1. Consumers 

2. Government 

3. Commercial users & hotels 

4. Institutions 

Resellers are quoted as: 

1. Chains 

2. Dealers 

3. Department stores 

4. Distributors 

4a. Distributors Consignment. 

5. Jobbers 

6. Public Utilities 

7. Resale Machinery Manufacturers 

In the original filing, the highest discounts were to distributors 
and jobbers who received 50$. discount on outright purchases and 40-10-3^ 
on consignment. Practically all other accounts had available a maximum 
discount of 35 and 5 L ,o, but, it was required by some companies that the 
order 'be $50.00 or more in value, and by others that 50 fans or more be 
purchased to obtain this discount.' 

All accounts except chains, distributors, Government and institu- 
tions had available a quantity discount based either on value or number 
of items of outright purchase. Consumers, Commercial Users and Hotels 
are quoted on the basis of the number of items purchased up to 50, and 
dealers, department stores, public utilities are quoted discounts on the 
basis of more or less than $50.00 value of order. Disccunt for given 
quantities may vary for different customers classes, for example, con- 
sumers pay list on orders of 1 — 5 fans while industrials are given a 
discount of 25,:> on similar orders. Resale machinery manufacturers are 



9322 



-76- 

also quoted on the "basis of more or loss than $50.00, "but in addition 
arc givon a discount on 100 fans equal to that given for consignment, 
(40-10-6). All the quantity discount schedules are very simple, never 
having more than three size groups. 

Exceptions to the foregoing occur usually in connection with the 
companies selling lov/er price fans and in this price class fewer customer 
classifications are quoted. 

Freight Tcjrms 

Delivery terms arc .faily uniform. Six companies quote f.o.b. des- 
tination distributors warehouse city for 100 Its. or ever, and f.o.b. 
point cf shipment less than 100 Ids, Points other than distributors 
warehouse city are quoted f.o.b, shipping point, except that orders of 
not less than 50 fans and shipments to chains, commercials, or industrial 
organizations are quoted f.o.h. destination. 

Five companies quoted similarly hut emit quoting shipments to iDoints 
other than distributors warehouse city. Two companies quote f.o.h. 
factory, one f.o.h. destination and one f.o.h. jobbers warehouse point, 
lots 300 lbs. or more, lots less than 300 lbs. f.o.b. point of shipment. 

Terms of Payment 

Terms of payment are generally 2p, 10 days, net 30 days or some 
approximation thereof with one company offering thrity-nine da/s extra, 
west of the Rockies, and two companies quoting varying terms to differ- 
ent customer classification and consignment accounts. 

2. Final Structure 

Price .'."'■■".. 

In the final structure most fans are still quoted on the basis of 
list price, among the specimen fans used in the work sheet the 8" fan ■ 
has generally been reduced from $4.60 to $3.95, while the others remain 
at the previous list. 

List prices for low price fans. are hard to follow bocuaso fans of 
this type are constantly being dropped from the cataloquc to be replaced 
by others, but whereas 3 companies had previously quoted below $4.60, the 
final filings show 4 quoting below $3.95. 

Custo mer Classification and Discounts 

Ho new customer classifications appear in the final structure al- 
though manufacturers have shifted somewhat as to the channels tc which 
they quote. 



9822 



-77- 



In the User Group, Consumers, Commercial Users and Hotels arc no 
longer quoted quantity differentials according to the number of fans 
purchased, but arc now given a flat discount about 7^ to 8$ below the 
most favorable discount quoted originally. Discounts to Government^ 
accounts continue on a functional basis but x:o\co increased about 13p 
to 18$ while discounts to institutions were for the most part reduced 
7^;j to 8;j. In connection with Company ho. 7, the uiscount of oZf/o 
quoted to institutions, Government, distributors, dealers and consumers 
is on "close out" items only. 

In the reseller group, discounts to chains have been generally 
reduced about 7^o, except on the lower priced fans where discounts 
have been increased. Department stores and public utilities no longer 
have quantity differential according to the value of order but are 
now quoted a straight discount which varies from 35 and 5,'?, the most 
favorable previous discount, to 55 and 5',j on one low priced fan. 
Dealers have also been taken from a quantity differential on value 
of crder basis and given a straight discount equal to that given public 
utilities. 

Discounts to distributors, including jobbers and wholesalers, have 
been increased by the addition of an added 5)'o discount in connection 
with Government orders. 

The discount basis for resale machinery manufacturers has been 
changed from a combination value of order and number of fans basis to 
a basis of more or less than 100 fans. 

Freight Terms 

Terms of delivery remained about the same except that seven com- 
panies now quote Government inquiries f.o.b. destination regardless of 
weight. 

Terms of Payment 



Terms of payment continue generally 2 c /o ten days, net 30 days, but 
with some now exceptions, such as Companies ilo. 11 and 12, quoting 2$> 
ten days, net 60, on shipments to points other than distributors ware- 
house city. 

3. Ccnroariscn of Original and Final Structure 

(1) The general form of the structure remains the same. 

(2) Discounts based on quantity and value of order almost 
entirely eliminated, except to resale machinery manufacturers. 

(3) List prices on hi & her grade standard items have, for 
the most part, remained the.sa.mc but lower net prices are applicable 

to seme customers, due to having available a straight functional discount 
larger for small orders than originally. On the other hand, to these 
same customers prices have sometimes been increased on larger orders, 
likewise due to the elimination of quantity premiums. 



9822 



-73- 

(4) Some customer groups now have lower prices becau.se cf in- 
creased discounts. 

(5) Terms of payment and delivery show little change. 

(6) The relative competitive position of customer classifica- 
tions remains about the same with the exception of Government inquiries, 
which are now q_uoted discounts equal to distributors. 

(7) The impact of the cheap fan motor is evident in the fpct 
that list -orice has been reduced on about 8" fans. 

4. Chronological Record of Price Piling (Appendix A Fart 5) 

Number of Filings 

About an average number of filings were made in this group, averag- 
ing from about 15 for large to 1 or 2 for small companies* The maximum 
number of filings made by any one company was 25. 

Form and Content 

Many of the filings were exceedingly poor in form and the contents 
vague and difficult to folic-' due to incomplete statements regarding terms 
of sale, application of discounts and description of -product. There "as 
little or no improvement under experience. 

Waiting Period 

The waiting -oeriod was seldom used to meet competition. These fil- 
ings which had short waiting periods had to do usually with construction 
details and similar ma.tters. 

General 



One factor which makes it troublesome to follow mam.y of the filings, 
is that manufacturers are almost constantly changing lines by closing out - 
old types and introducing ne^. Another source of difficulty occurs in the 
matter of deviation from standard. A standard fan may be changed slightly 
or materially and while it still retains its original identification and 
type, it may or may not be the same competitively. 

This problem constituted one of the major difficulties under price 
filing, especially in meeting Government specifications. In such cases, 
the specifications might require the elimination of some item of standard 
equipment on a given fan, such as the attachment cord. With this as an 
excuse, the item was considered by some comoai ies to be "tailor made", 
not covered ay price filing, and therefore to be sold at any price, most 
of the reductions in ^rice made on this score were qaesti mable on the 
ground of the actual saving involved. For exammle, in the case of a 
specification eliminating attachment cords, it is not corroletely accurate 
to deduct merely the cost of the attachment cord because since the fan 
must be tested, the fan must be hooked u->, given a test run and then 
disconnected. 



9822 



-79- 

C. Summary 

The record of the open price filing experience in the Fan Motor 
Group is unusual in one material aspect, and that is that there occurred 
a very definite trend away from quantity discounts. It will he noticed 
that in most other groups studied, quantity discounts expanded either in 
scope or effect. 

In the Fan Motor Group, as in others, it will be noted that there 
arc competitive units within the group and that sensitivity to change is 
in many c-ases confined within such competitive iinits, being particularly 
evident among low prico fans. 

In connection with the form and content of filings, wo are again 
forced to the conclusion that too little attention, perhaps because of 
lack of authority, was given to requiring that the filings be complete 
and adequate not only as to prices and discounts but also product des- 
cription, cancellation of previously filed terms and adequate defining 
of customer classification. 



9822 



-80- 
EXEIBIT A 




National Electrical Manufacturers 

Association 



l»« BAST 44TH STREET 
new YORK 



In Reply Please Refer to 



Designated as the Agency for Administering. Supervising and Promoting the 
performance of the provisions of the code for the electrical manufacturing 
Industry, unqer the National Industrial Recovery Act. APPROvEq by President 
Roosevelt on August 4, 1933. 

Office of Supervisory Agency 

APPLIANCE PRODUCTS SUBDIVISION 
December 19, 1933. 



I, Vlalter L'. Stearns, Supervisory agency of the Appli- 
ance Products Subdivision of the electrical manufacturing indus- 
try appointed, in accordance with the provisions of article XII 
of the Code for the Electrical Manufacturing Industry approved 
by the President on August 4, 1933, by the Board of Governors of 
National Electrical Manufacturers Association, hereby notify you 
that I have, pursuant to the authority vested in me by Article X 
of said Code, determined that it has been the generally recog- 
nized practice to sell: 

ELECTRIC FANS - which embrace electric fans 
of the desk, bracket and ceiling types, and 
those ventilating fans which are adaptations 
of desk fans and which are for use in free 
air 

on the basis of net price lists, or price lists and discount 
sheets, and fixed terms of payment. 

I therefore direct that you as a manufacturer of, or 
one promoting the manufacture for sale of, all or any of the 
above products, file with me for distribution, as required by 
said Code, to all other manufacturers of the products specified 
above, at the office of National Electrical Manufacturers asso- 
ciation, 155 East 44th Street, New York City, on or before Janu- 
ary 3, 1934, FORTY-EIGHT copies of your price lists, or price 
lists and discount sheets, showing your current prices and fixed 
terms of sale and payment to your various classes of trade on 
the products specified above. 

The following exceptions are made: 

(a) Prices to your employees for their 
MRA own use 

(b) Prices covering export sales ( . rt 

(c) Prices to othe-r manufacturers of 96'^^ 
electric fans. 

CODE 

BMHrnHBOnH 




-81- 



Show all discounts, terms, etc., either on price 
lists or attached thereto and not in a separate letter to the 

Supervisory Agency. 



X%4i ?fS7oM*v<e- 



Supervisory Agency. 

P. So All packages must be marked F-12-19 for identification. 
Your company name and a date must appear on all sheets or sets 
of sheets furnished this Agency. Price sheets, or revisions 
thereof should not be typewritten, either original or oarbon 
copies. 



<db2* 




EIZCTR IC A:iC :."SLSI .'C- APPARATUS 

A. The I ndustr y 

1 . Develop ment 

The principles of electric arc welding are not particu- 
larly new but their application to commercial welding today 

is tii? rcsv.lt of progress made in the past ten years. Among 
the fields in which arc welding is used are: ship building, 
bridge and general construction involving the use of steel 
and, of late years, in industries where frames and forms can 
be shaped from sheet or standard shades and joined by welding. 
This latter use has made material inroads on the work of patt- 



] umber of About twenty companies manufacture arc welding appratus. 

Companies The product is engineered and to a large extent fabricated by 

members of this group, and is susceptible of many modifications 
in the form of special attachments and extra, equipment. In 
addition there arc special purpose uses which require a some- 
what "Tailor-made "unit. It is not a product which can readily 
be sold against future possible use, rather is it sold to meet 
an existing requirement or as often happens the manufacturer 
ferrets out a new use and attempts to introduce his product 
for trial. 

As between the products of the various manufacturers there 
exists a comparison in that a product of given type and price 
will be practically the same in general construction and per- 
formance, differing only in detail. For example, the specimen 
200 Amp Stationary ".'."elder used (Appendix B, Part S) , sold gexer*- 
ally for $5G0 and was quite similar for all producers. 

Problems 

Lower cost to the user and more rapid construction are 
among the main sales features. Among the problems encountered., 
the matter of overcoming the almost universal resistence to 
change in method of Production looms large. I?or example: In 
advocating the use of wholly welded structures such as bridges 
and steel frame buildings the matters of securing architectural 
Acceptance and municipal approval are common obstacles. There is also the 
objection of craftsmen who see their trade endangered by a new 
yrocess, as in the case of riveters who see possibility of 
wholly welded structures eliminating the riveter. One of the 
latest ships built for the i'avy has less than 100,000 rivets 
whereas previous ships of the same type had. many times that 
number. 

Those in charge of production in industry do not care to 
undertake the expense and trouble of training employees in a 
new art especially if employees skilled in the process to be 

9322 



-83- 

replaced are available. To meet this situation the Industry 
has issued books and instructions on the practical phases of elec* 
Trade in s trie arc welding and has cooperated to train employees. The 
rapid development of the product has created a high rate of 
obsolescence and with it the problem of the "trade in, " which re- 
sults in some rather ludicrous "sales." One fairly authentic 
case cites two manufacturers involved in spirited bidding that 
included trading in some old equipment which had been standing 
exposed to the weather for some little time. After bids and 
counter-bios with the purchaser goading the contestants on, 
the successful bidder wound up by practically "swapping" the 
Deferred new equipment for the old and obsolete. Electric arc welding equip- 

Favments ment sells at prices ranging from about $300.00 to $3500.00, and 
Rentals - • The relatively high unit cost coupled with the fact of it 
Demonstra-p " -.being a comparatively new product led manufacturers to encourage 
tions and new users by offering trials and demonstrations, deferred payment, 
Guarantees rental and rental purchase plans. Frior to price filing the 

variance among the terms and conditions of plans offered by the 
various companies ma.de it difficult to know the actual market 
price. Thus in order to sell his product effectively a manufac- 
turer in addition to pushing the quality and performance had to 
sell his plan of handling the particular account in competition 
with the plans of other manufacturers. 

2. The Frice Call (Exhibit A) 

In 1933 the Industry was at a low point both in sales and 
employment. Estimated sales dropped from a peak of eleven and 
one-half million dollars in 1929 to a low of four and one-half 
millions in 1932. Sales were somewhat improved in 1933 with an 
estimated total of seven and one-half millions of dollars. The 
purpose of issuing the price call was to attempt stabilization of 
prices and to bring in the open all the various factors of payment, 
rental, demonstration, etc., which went to make up price. 
The original price call was issued October 19, 1933, effective 
October 29, 1933. This call exempted prices to re-sellers and 
for export. 

The Industry did not include "trade ins" under open price 
filing because they felt that the regulatory measures available 
through KRA v?ere insufficient. 

In November 1934 it was found necessary to supplement the 
price call emphasizing the necessity of including all types of 
equipment with adequate descriptive and technical inf orma.tion. 

TTork Sheets 

1. Appendix A, Part 6 - 

Chronological Record of Frice Filings by Companies. 

2. Appendix B, Part 6 - 

Original and Final Frice Structure. 

3. Appendix B, Part 5a - 

Deferred Payment, Rental a.nd Rental Purchase 
Costs Original and Pinal. 



9822 



-84- 



3 . Original Fr ice St ructure 

The original price structure shows (Appendi:: B, Part 6) 
that as of the inception of open price filing there was little 
or no uniformity as to structural content. Eleven companies 
offered e deferred payment plan, only three offering the same 
plan. Fourteen companies used a rental or rental purchase plan. 
Eight companies using one plan, three another, and three still 
another. In pricing a standard set of welded accessories 
seventeen companies quoted $40.00, one compan5' quoted from 
$25.00 to $150.00, depending upon the rating of the machine, 
and two companies did not quote on a standard set. The uni- 
formity here is probably due to the fact that a more or less 
standard set was sponsored "by the rational Electrical I.ianu- 
facturers 1 Association, prior to FSA. 

Discounts 

Two companies quoted discount of 33 l/3$ to Educational 
Institutions. 

Terms o f Pay ment 

Terms of payment were quoted net 30 days "by fifteen com- 
panies, 2>D ten days, net 30 days hy four companies. One com- 
pany did not file cash discounts or terms of payment. 

Delivery Term s 

Deliver;'- terms of twelve companies; f.o.b. factory, 
freight allowed; six- companies quoted f.o.b. factory, and two -~ 
quoted f.o.b. freight allowed, except on tractor types which 
were quoted f.o.b. factory. 

Demonstration Flans 

Fine companies did not offer a demonstration plan; five 
offered 30 days one machine of a given rating; three offered 
30 days; two offered 30 days, customer pays freight; and one 
company stated that demonstration was allowable, subject to 
the division manager. 

Guarantee 

Eight companies filed no guarantee; four offered 12 months; 
six gave 12 month's, except- on gasoline engines or other pur- 
chased parts carrying makers 1 guarantee, four companies quoted 
12 months material and workmanship, and two guaranteed to meet 
I"E1A Standards. ' 

C. Final Price Structure 






9822 



In the final price structure more uniformity exists. 
Seventeen companies offered a deferred payment plan, four- 
teen using exactly the same plan. In rentals fifteen companies 
used the same plan. 

Accessories in standard sets continued to be quoted as in 
the original filing. 

Terms of Payment 

Terms of payment are nor; qtioted, net 30 days "oy seventeen 
companies; one company offers 2$ and another I'fo for payment in 
ten days, net 30 days, and one company still does not file terms 
of payment. 

Delivery Terms 

Delivery terms have remained substantially the same, er.cept 
that one additional company quotes "f.o.b. factory, freight 
allowed, " and one company instigated new terms of "f.o.b. factory, 
freight prepaid. " 

Demonstration Plan 

Eight companies still do not file a demonstration plan, 
but the remaining twelve all off erred the same plan, which was 
30 days, one machine of a given rating. 

G uarant ee 

Guarantees are now offered by thirteen companies, twelve 
of which quoted 12 months, material and -workmanship, two of the 
twelve limiting the guarantee on gas engines to 30 days, and 
two not guaranteeing gas engines and accessories which carry the 
guarantee of the maker. The remaining company gtiaranteed to meet 
I7SMA. Standards, no time specified. Thus a marked trend toward 
uniformity has occurred in foiir important elements in the final 
price structure: 

1. Deferred payment plans. 

Seventeen conroanies now offer a deferred payment plan, 
whereas originally eleven companies offered a plan. Originally 
nine plans were offered of which one was used by three companies 
and the balance subscribed to by individual companies. Finally, 
there were four plans, of nhich one was used by fourteen com- 
panies, and the remaining three used by individual companies. 

2. Rental and rental puchase plans. 

Originally fourteen companies offered a plan, finally four- 
teen conroanies. At first, eight companies used one plan, three 
used a second, and three a third. Finally, fifteen companies used 
a -olan originally used by three companies; two companies used a 



9822 



-86- 

plan previously ' used by three companies, and one company offers 
a plan not found in tiie original. 

3. Demonstration plans. 

At first eleven companies offered demonstration -olans, fin- 
ally twelve companies, originally four different plans were used, 
finally only one plan. 

4. Guarantee. 

The number of companies offering guarantee increased from 
twelve to thirteen, with twelve of the thirteen offering practi- 
cally the same guarantee. 

5. Price. 

Price changes were frequent and were brought about by 
raising and lowering list price. Most of the changes involved 
only a few items, it being a comparative rarity to find a price 
change affecting the entire line of a company. A bare majorit:' 
of the list price changes were in the nature of price reductions 
and! it is probable that more individual items were reduced than 
increased in price. 

Similarity of list price may at first glance appear odd in 
view of the apparent elements of individuality and qualit^r of 
the product. However standard welding apparatus does not have 
nearly so many deviations as do a number of other products and 
in fact product comparison ms?? often be made accurately on 
the basis of performance. Furthermore some flexibility exists 
under open price filing because of the fact that information 
regarding trade-in allowances was not required under the price 
call. 

Reference to the compilations on total purchase prices 
under deferred payment and rental purcha.se plans will indicate 
that finally it was easier to purcha.se and that the cost of 
financingwas not, on the average, as, high as under the original 
structure, interest charges being reduced' generally to 6$. 
Originally five companies required more than 20$ down. In the 
final filing all except two quoted 20$ down, the two exceptions 
requiring 30$ and 33 l/3$. It is interesting that in the pro- 
posed supplemental code submitted by this group but never app- 
roved by iUA, a proposed Uniform Sales Plan contained exactly 
the standard conditions of the final stiTi.ctxi.re. 

D. C hronological P.ecord of Price Filings by Conroanies - 

Appendix A, Part 6 

In analyzing how the trend toward uniformity occurred the 
following points emerge: 

First: Each company changing an element moved from its 

original position to its final without any intermediate 



9822 



-87- ■' 

change. In praoti calls'" every case only one change 
per company was made in each element. 

Second: The changes did not occur at the same time for all 

companies. In the case of the deferred payment plan 
changes occurred from February 1934 to February 1335. 

Third: i : ew plans are rare. Pious used by one or more indus- 
try members in the original filing "become the stand- 
ard. 

At the outset of open price filing the policies of certain 
companies gave them advantage, as for example Company #6 in 
its original filing quoted Government specification at nrices 
equal to those for standard equipment of equivalent rating. 
In addition the standard equipment of this company was quoted 
at prices leer than comwarable items of other Cotmpanies. 

This was a distinct a.dvantage during the early days of 
">rice filing "because Government schedule s, especially Naval, 
offered the best marhet. To offset the advantage held by 
COiinan" #6 and at the same time to preserve - : ->rice levels on 
standard items competitors split their filed prices into Wo 
groups: 1. Prices to Government and 2. Prices to others. This 
arrangement enabled competition 7/ith Conroany #6 in the active 
marhet (Government) and at the same time permitted prices to "be 
held firm in quiet marhet c. As a result of this move on the 
part of competitors Company #6 initiated price increases which 
in turn were followed by competitors. 

ilumber of Pilings 

A total of 218 filings were made, of which 67 had waiting 
periods less than ten days. Of the 67, twenty-eight filings 
made by fifteen companies had short waiting periods approved 
"by the Supervisory Agency. These included cases where in the 
judgment of the Supervisory Agency nothing "as to be gained by 
a waiting pena.lt:*, as in the case of construction detail, em- 
ergency requirements of Government schedules, and in a few 
cases increase or decrease in price. Of the remaining filings 
with short waiting periods, thirty-nine in number were filed by 
twelve companies to meet competition. This would indicate that 
the waiting period was not frequently utilised to meet initiating 
revisions. The average number of price filings per month was 
10.8. This is slightly more than one filing per company each 
two months. The number of filings for each company over the 
eighteen months of price filing varies from two to twenty-two. 
Incidentally the small companies mahe few changes in price. 
This may be e;.\->lained. by the fact that the value added by 
manufacture and. the margin of operation were sufficient to 
d.esensitize the industry to all but major price movements. Thi s 
is not the only possible rea.son. It may have been that a.t the 
time of a particular initiating revision no one was selling. 
However, when and if sales possibilities occurred these appa.rent 
laggards ventured to bring their filings up to date. 



9822 



Government Busines s 

As an indication of the importance of Government business 
during open price filing note that 75 filings were made to that 
market. This is about r 65fo of the total filings made. 

2. Besxilts of Open Price ffiling. 

Probable results of open price filing as indicated by the 
record are: 

1. Trend toward Uniformity of Structure by members of 
the group. 

2. Generally loner published list prices. 



9822 




-89- 
ETHIBIT A 

National Electrical Manufacturers 
Association 

155 EAST 44th STREET 
NEW YORK 



DESIGNATED THE AGENCY FOR ADMINISTERING. SUPERVISING AND PROMOTING THE PERFORM. 
ANCE OF THE PROVISIONS OF THE CODE FOR THE ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY. 

IMPORTANT LETTER IN RE: PRICE LISTS . office of supervisory agency for 

Industrial Apparatus 
Classification 
October 19, 1933. 



Gentlemen: 



I, Clarence L. Collens, Supervisory agency for Industrial 
Apparatus under the Code for the Electrical Manufacturing Industry, 
approved by the President on August 4, 1933, hereby determine that, 
in the Welding Apparatus branch of the industry, it has been the 
generally recognized practice to sell '.'elding Apparatus on the 
basis of printed net price lists or price lists with discount 
sheets, containing fixed terns of paynent. Therefore, in accord- 
ance with article X of said Code, within ten days from October 19, 
1933, every manufacturer of arc weldinr. apparat us coming under 
said code is required to file wi £n™7TSaf B, Tff? , ^Wf ice of IJEIIA, 
155 East 44th Street, Tew York, N.Y. , a net price list, or a price 
list and discount sheets, showing his current prices, fixed terms 
of payment, both regular and deferred, free delivery point or 
points with basis of charge to other delivery points, or for store 
door delivery, and other conditions of sale affecting price, on 
the following Arc 'Voiding Apparatus : 

1. Standard Single Operator "/elding Sets: 

Of 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, and 800 ampere ratings 

Including 220, 440, and 550 volt A.C. and 
115, 230 and 550 volt D.C. motor drives 

All one hour, 50° C. rise, 0*92 

40 volt arc. J ° ; ' 

Also prices on belt driven and gas engine 
driven single operator welding sets of the 
same ratings as indicated above for motor 
driven welding sets. 



oe * . ■ •• • • 



-90- 



2. Standard Constant Potential Multiple Operator Sets: 

Of 500, 750, 1000, 1500 and 2000 ampere rating* 

Including 220, 440, 550 and 2200 volt A.C. 
and 115, 230 and 550 volt D.C. motor drives, 

3. Standard Accessory Boxes for the Yielding Apparatus Sets 
specified. 

4. Single Operator Welding Sets meeting, and of the types, 
sizes and ratings specified in I'avy Tentative Specifica- 
tion 17'713, dated September IS, 1933. 

Prices to distributors and other resale customers are ex- 
empted and are to be excluded from the price data to be filed, 
but the price data filed shall include that to all other classes 
of customers. Prices governing export sales,- whether direct or 
indirect - that is, for ultimate shipment outside the United 
States, except to its territorial possessions are also exempted 
and excluded from the price data to be filed. 

I also direct that price data be filed covering the basis 
under which Yielding Sets of the Single Operator and Constant 
Potential Multiple Operator types of the ratings specified above 
are rented. 

In filing this price data with me, kindly send me twenty 
complete sets of each for distribution. 

Very truly yours, 

Clarence L. Collens, 
Supervisory Agency. 

CLC/ATF 

P.S. Show all discounts, terms, etc., either on price 
lists or attached thereto and not in a separate letter 
to Supervisory Agency. Kindly mark all packages T7A-10-19 
for identification. 



982' 




*91- 
EIHIBIT A 

National Electrical Manufacturers 
Association 

155 EAST 44th STREET 
NEW YORK 



DESIGNATED AS THE AGENCY FOR ADMINISTERING. SUPERVISING AND PROMOTING THE 
PERFORMANCE OF THE PROVISIONS OF THE CODE FOR THE ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING 
INDUSTRY. UNDER THE NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL RECOVERY ACT, APPROVED BY PRESIDENT 
ROOSEVELT ON AUGUST 4. 1B33. 

OFFICE OF SUPERVISORY AGENCY 

INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS SUBDIVISION 
November 6, 1934. 

Superseding E'A-1C-19 issued under Date of October 19th, 1933. 



I, Clarence L. Collens, Supervisory Agency of the Indus- 
trial Apparatus Subdivision of the Electrical Manufacturing Indus- 
try, appointed in accordance with the provisions of Article XII of 
the Code for the Electrical Manufacturing Industry approved by the 
Freside-nt on August 4, 1933, by the Board of Governors of National 
Electrical Manufacturers Association, hereby notify you that I 
have, pursuant to the authority vested in me by Article X of said 
Code, dot: mined that it has been the generally recognized practice 
to sell: 

ARC '.7ELDING APPARATUS and ACCESiORIES - more 
particularly described under paragraphs (1), 
(2), (3), (4), (5) and (6) 

on the basis cf net price lists, or price lists and discount 
sheets, and fixed terms, of payment. 

(1) Standard now and unused stationary and portable single and 
double operator welding units of. current design, of 100, 
20C, 3 r .. : , 400, 600 and 800 ampere ratings including 110, 
22C, 440 and 550 volt A.C. and 115, 230, 550 and' 400/650 
volt D.C. motor drives. 



9825 




Also prices or. bolt driven and gas engine driven single 
operator welding sets of the same ratings as indicated above 
for motor driven welding sets. 

All of the above 'prices shall be based on units conforming 
to the proposed NEMA standards (one hour, 50 deg. C rise, 
40 volts, against resistance lead) with variations in pric- 
es, if any, for any modifications of rating, in which case 
price lists shall clearly show the rating basis in terms of 
current voltage, temperature and time. 



-93- 



State which of the following items are regularly furnished 
under filed prices for standard units with sufficient de- 
scription to identify these items as to type and purpose to 
the Supervisory Agency and to all manufacturers of similar 
types of welding units. The Supervisory Agency considers 
the following as an essential informational part of the 
prices filed under this price call and where items listed 
are not mentioned on manufacturers filed price sheets they 
will not he considered as a regular part of that manufac- 
turers standard unit. 

I Motor Generator Arc 'Tcldcrs 

(A) Motors - AC State synchronous speed, volts 
phase and frequency. State whether recon- 
nec table at motor terminals 220-440 volt 
and vice versa. 

Motors - DC Volts and approximate full load 

speed . 

Motors - AC-DC Motor amperes at 220 volt AC 

or 230 volt DC with full rated generator 

load. 

(B) Motor Started stating: ".'hether overload or 
under volt ago features included, whether 
manual or magnetic with push button, whether 
for full or reduced voltage start. 

(C) Generator - Rating - in terms of current, 
volts, temperature and time. 

Range per N2MA proposed standards from 30?b 
normal amperes at 25 volts to 125$ normal 
amperes at 40 volts. 

(D) Generator Control Stating provision for: 

1. Adjustment open circuit volts 

2. Adjustment output amperes 

3. Instrumental readings of volts and 
amperes 

4. Reversing polarity 

5. Other features if any 

(E) Auxiliary Power - if stated it is supplied 
as standard at filed prices state amount 
and kind, AC or DC and voltage frequency and 
phase at which supplied. 

(F) leather or dirt protective provisions , 

a. Open construction VOC>(L 

b. Drip proof 

c. Other provisions 

(G) Lifting Lug bale or eye 

II Belt or coupling drive welder generator only with 
control means. 



-93- 



a. As described under Motor-Generator Arc 
Welders (paragraphs C, D, E, F and G) 

b. State whether price includes base, pul- 
ley or coupling. 

Ill Engine Driven Units 

a. Generator-Generator Control and auxil- 
iary power as described under Motor Gen- 
erator Arc Welders. 

b. Engine - Number cylinders, capacity at 
and Operating speed, magneto ignition, 
battery ignition, self starter. 

c. Mechanical features such as type of skids 
canopy and weather protection, lifting 
bale. 

(3) Standard Constant Potential Multiple Operator Sets: 

Of 500, 750, 1000, 1500 and 2000 ampere ratings 
Including 220, 400, 550 and 2200 volt A.C. and 115, 230 and 
55C volt E.C. motor drives. 

(4) Show on price lists extra charges for and a description of 
any of the following items that may be offered as added fea- 
tures to the units listed in Section 1. Where not offered as 
standard equipment also show extra prices for any of the fea- 
tures listed under Section 2. 

I Motor Generator Sets 

a. Auxiliary power - State amounts, kinds, AC or 
DC, voltage frequency and phase at which sup- 
plied and prices for each - suggested standard 
amounts 1 k.w., 2 kw., 3 k.w., 5 k.w. 

b. Automatic Remote Control for; 

1, Starting and stopping 

2. Increasing and decreasing welding arc heat 

c. Running Gear. 

1. Standard Portable feature 

2. Standard rubber tired portable features 

d. Canopy Qfc? 2 

1. Navy Type aofr * 

2. Other types if any 

II Belt Driven Units 

a. State as additions or deductions from listed 
unit prices for pulleys, sliding base, or coup- 
ling 

b. State additions as in I on Motor Generators 
immediately above additions for: 

1. Auxiliary Power 

2. Automatic Remote Control 



-94- 



III Engine Driven Units 

a. Auxiliary Power as in I with additional engine 
capacity when necessary. 

b. Automatic Remote Control as in I 

c. Running Gear, 2-3 and 4 wheel type. 

1. Small shop type suitable for moving over 
cement or other smooth floors 

2. Large Diameter Outdoor type wheels steel 
with wide rims 

3. Large Diameter outdoor type wheels solid 
rubber tired 

4. Large Diameter Pneumatic tired wheels 

5. Spring mounting for any of the above por- 
table gear 

6. Sand Rims 

7. Drawbar - handle or towing eye 

d. Automatic Idling Control 

IV Standard and special set of accessories sold on same 
order as the welder. 

A listing of what a standard set of accessories con- 
sists and prices at which items may be omitted and 
additional ones supplied. 

1. Protective Head Gear 

a. Helmet - Type or catalog number 

b. Handshield " " " 

2. Electrode Holder 

a. Metallic Arc - Type or Catalog number 

b. Carbon Arc 

c. Sizes of rods or carbons with which A & B 
may be used. 

d. Soldered or clamp connection 

3. Scratch Brush 

4. Cable 

a. Number of and lengths furnished standard 

b. Size to nearest B & S gauge for electrode 
holder and extension cable and ground cable 

c. Price additions and deductions for changed 
lengths or cable or changed sizes of cable. 

5. Whether or not a complimentary set of electrodes 
is included in standard and/or special sets of 
accessories . 

V Extra charge filed as required under Section (4) here- 
of covering^ any specified items shall not apply where, 
in quoting on welding apparatus under definite spec- 
ifications, the specifications call for any such item 
regularly supplied by any other manufacturer on stan- 
dard commercial welding units of current design, as 



S8S2 



'&- 



disclosed by his filing under the requirements of 
Sections (1) and (2), provided the manufacturer so 
quoting has so indicated in his filed price schedules. 
This same exemption waiving extra oharges under the 
conditions specified also applies to any item not 
listed under Section (4), tout which may toe disclosed 
to f any filing under the requirements of Sections (1) 
and (2) on standard commercial welding units of cur- 
rent design. 

(5) Single Operator Welding Sets meeting, and of the types, sizes 
and yatings specified in Navy Tentative Specification 17 W1B, 
dated September 18, 1933. 

(6) Price data shall also toe filed covering the toasis under which 
Welding Sets of the Single Operator and Constant Potential 
Multiple Operator types of the ratings specified atoove are 
rented. 

I, therefore, direet that you as a manufacturer of, or 
one promoting the manufacture for sale of, all or any of the 
above products, file with me for distribution, as required by 
said Code, to all other manufacturers of the products specified 
above, at the office of National Electrical Manufacturers Asso- 
ciation, 155 East 44th Street, New York City, on or before Novem- 
ber 26, 1934, TWENTY-SIX copies of your price lists, or price 
lists and discount sheets, showing your current prices to various 
classes of customers, and fixed terms of sale and payment either 
regular or deferred, free delivery point or points with basis of 
charge to other delivery points, including basis of store door 
delivery if given, and any other conditions which affect the sales 
price on the products specified above. 

The following exemptions are made: 

(a) Prices to distributors and other resale cus- 
tomers 

(b) Prices covering export sales, Export sales 
include all sales for ultimate shipment out- 
side the United States, except to its terri- 
torial possessions. 

Show all discounts, terms, etc., either on price lists 
or attached thereto, with the same number of copies as specified 
above, and not in a separate letter to the Supervisory Agency. 

All packages must be marked WA-10-19 for identification. 
Your company name, a date, and an identifying section and page 
number, or other notation, must appear on each sheet or set of 
sheets, furnished this Agency. As typewritten sheets, either orig- 
inal or carbon copies, require first class mail, your price sheets 
or revisions thereof should be printed or in some form of process- 
ing or duplication. 

Very truly yours, QS22 



Clarence L. Collens 
Supervisory Agency. 



( 



-96- 

CHAPTER 8 

LRY CELLS AMD FLASHLIGHTS 



A . Tne Industry 

1 • The Product 

Tiie dry cell consists of a zinc case enclosing a fabric sack in 
which is contained a solidified solution of ammonium chloride and water 
in the center of wnich is located a stick of carbon surrounded by a 
layer of manganese dioxide. The zinc cell or case is open at the top 
and after tne assembly of the various components is sealed by pouring 
in a melted resin. In recent years a method of sealing has been develop- 
ed in which a metal ton is spun in place in a manner similar to the pro- 
cess us<=d in making tin cans. 

Mat erials 

Raw materials required are zinc, ammonium chloride, manganese 
dioxide, some form of carbon, cotton fabric, water, sealing resin and a 
paper material for cover tubing. 

Processes 

Manufacturing processes involve the cutting and forming of the zinc 
into cups, forming the carbon into rods of the required size, mixing 
solution of ammonium chloride and water wnich is solidified with some 
filler sucn as starcn and tne preparation of the manganese dioxide. 
Tnese various components are then made up into sub-assemblies and assembl- 
ed with the zinc case and sealed. The cells are then inserted in a 
paper tube bearing tne name or brand of the manufacturer and the process 
is complete except for ageing. 

Standardization 

The application of dry cells requires that they be standardized as 
to size, while chemical reactions of similar compositions provide 
standardization of voltage. The only variation wnich can easily be made 
is in the current producing capacity wnich can be regulated by the purity 
and strengtn of the chemicals used and by the thickness of the zinc case. 



Regardless of the size of the cell tne voltage output is constant 
at about 1.6 volts, but by increasing the size a larger current may be 
drawn for a longer period of time. The cells are made in many sizes, 
the smallest probably being the so-called "pen light" about ^ in 
diameter, and about 1-^' long. Next in size is the "small meno cell" then 
the "large mono cell". The "large mono cell" is probably the most popular 
for use in flashlights. The largest unit cell made commercially is the 
#5 cell which is about 3^" in diameter and 6" high. This type of cell is 
used for telephone, doer bells, ignition, etc. Since the rate of dis- 
charge of the cell regulates the amount of depolarizer needed, the in- 

9983 



( 



< 



-97- 

ternal construction varies slightly in cells for specific us^s. This 
is particularly true in case *6 cells which are made in at least 4 
types, namely, Ignition, Radio, General Purpose, and Telephone. Each 
of these cells is designed to meet a specific condition of current 
demand. Number 6 cells are sometimes connected in multiple and sealed 
in cases for ignition and otner purposes. 

F.adio B batteries are made by connecting the necessary number of 
"mono cells" in series to secure the required voltage, This "block" is 
then mounted in a cardooard box and closed with sealing resin. The life 
or capacity of a oattery is regulated by the size of the cells used or 
by the hook-up of cells in trie block. B catteries are made in light 
and heavy duty sizes. 

The quality of the cell can be altered to some extnet by adulterat- 
ing or decreasing tne amounts of the chemical elements entering into 
construction, out it is doubted if any gr»at saving could be accomplish- 
ed sinc» the major production cost appears to be labor ratner tnan 
materia.ls. 

Due to the high percentage of labor cost ev-ry effort is made to 
utilize production machinery wherever practical, but there still remain 
a numoer of operations which are better performed manually. The work 
lemands manual dexterity rather than skill and experience. 

i ono cells are quoted in at least three grades by the larger 
companies. The standard grade bears the manufacturer's name, the other 
grades being referred to as special label, private label, customers 
label, etc. 

Flashlight Cases 

Flashlight cases are made in numerous suzes ranging from the 
mi nature vest pocket light to tne six and seven cell searchlight. The 
manufacture usually involves only usual metal stamping, forming, and 
finishing operations. The construction details vary widely in the 
various types and sizes of lights. The only standardization in flash- 
light cases concerns the space provided for tne dry cells. All other 
details, reflector, lens, switch mecnanism, etc., can vary in different 
types of flashlight cases, and from company to company. Thus it becomes 
almost impossible to compare accurately the flashlight cases of various 
manufacturers due to tne variations in construction "and resultant dif- 
ferences in value. Flashlight cases are made in retail from 10^ to 
4>5.00 and over. Tne materials required in construction are mainly 
glass, brass, copper, zinc, insulating material and metal finishing 
materials. 

Members of the Industry 

The industry is made up of about 25 companies, some of which 
manufacture only flashlight cases or dry batteries, while others 
manufacture both. The companies vary in size from small concerns of 
50 employees or less to the larger units employing 1000 processing 
employees. The plants are located through the Forth central and North- 
eastern part of the country. At least 6 are located in and near New 
York City; 3 each in Wisconsin and Ohio; 2 each in Illinois and 

9822 



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Connecticut while others are located in nearby states, and one company 
in Virginia. 

Llarke t 

Dry cells are widely used not only for lighting and radio purposes 
"but for power supply for recording and indicating instruments, telephones, 
ignition, etc. Probably the largest market at the present time is for 
use in flashlights and other lighting devices. Only a few years ago the 
largest volume was in radio A, 3 and C batteries. 

In recent years, a new market has been approved. American manufac- 
turers of mechanical toys, in striving to develop intricate and faithful 
reproductions of trains and automotiles and similar toys "began to use 
dry cells to light electric head lamps- and to operate electrical acces- 
sories. This could be done without any unreasonable increa.se in produc- 
tion costs and the popularity of this type of toy rapidly spread through- 
out the countrye This class of customer purchases, the large mono cell 
si^e and is quoted trices on lots of as raajiy as three million and over. 
While the sales in this field probable do not represent any major part of 
the volume of the industry, each cell used in a toy of this type repre- 
sents a. possible later sale of at least one or two batteries for replace- 
ment purposes. Only standard brand cells are quoted to this class of 
customers. The prices quoted to toy manufacturers approxmia ,te *1he prices 
quoted to syndicate stores on special label or private label cells. 

Location 

Batteries are eventually sold to consumers through many forms of re- 
tail outlets such as drug, grocery, hardware stores, etc. The per capita 
consumption is probably higher in the suburban areas than in the cities. 
The majority of radio batteries are sold in rural areas and for amplica- 
tion where electric power is not available. 

Market Statistics 



The statistics on the following "page, are derived from a questionnaire 
sent out in 1933 by the national Electrical Manufacturers Association in 
connection with a, proposed Supplemental Code. The show a tremendous decline 
in sales, from about $60,000,000 in 1926 to about $16,000,000 in 1 932. 

Distribution by Manufacturers 

Distribution of dry batteries must be carefully planned as they are a 
perishable item. Distribution falls into three channels which are: sales 
for resale, sales for consumption, and sales for use a.s an integral part 
of a "Droduct. 

Probably the major portion of the flashlight and radio batteries are 
distributed through wholesalers, distributors, jobbers, and retailers to 
the ultimate pruchasers. Telephone companies consume a large part of the 
#6 cell production while initial equipment manufacturers and toy manufactur- 
ers use large numbers of the mono cells. 



9822 



-99- 



6" Dry Cell Sales (12 companies) 



Number 
Domestic 



Dollar 
Domestic 



1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 



1925 
1927. 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 



19-25 
1927 

1928 
1929 

1930 
1931 
1932 



1925 

1927 
1928 
1939 
1930 
1931 
1932 



52,814,582 
45,350,534 

40, 179, 557 
3-t,525,343 
26,211,585 
20,079,410 
1S,824,7<±3 



>13,925,025 
12,144,769 
10,282,119 
8,u82,839 
6,308,856 
4,568,168 
3,579,549 



Flashlight Cills Sales (11 comn-nnies) 



95,698,056 
101,309,805 
111,021,090 
132,860,186 
134,952,903 
133,4^7,595 
133,152,070 



$7,088,946 
7,092,132 
7,039,312 
7,345,013 
6,711,186 
5,054,272 
5,630,146 



■5 Battery Sales (10 companies ) 



470,409 
4-29,537 
382,765 
292,709 
^19,706 
179,353 
lSc.,934 



,286 
,580 
,192 
,500 
,936 
,943 
,257 



S 33, o08,334 
31,078,090 
24,302,905 
16,981,620 
11,837,937 
7, D48.913 
5,204,515 



Flpshlignt Cases gal^s (9 companies ) 



5,724 
o, 97 
5,350 
8,505 
5,592 
5,378 
5,884 



,495 
,279 
,139 
,538 
,652 
,582 
,829 



.4,587,777 
3,986,943 
4,563,492 
5,440,645 
3,871,729 
3,076,548 
1,955,848 



Dollar Value Total for 6" Dry Cell, 
Flasnlignt Cells, 1 Battery, Flashlight Cfises 
(12 conropnies) 

Dollar 
Domestic 



1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 



: 22 



: 59, 110 

54,301 
45,187 
38,350 
28,7^9 
21,247 
15,370 



,082 
,934 
,828 
,117 
,718 
,901 
,158 



-IOC- 



Dry cells pre comparatively heavy and therefore freight becomes 
an item of importance in the price structure. 

2 . Problems 

At the outset of pric c filing the industry faced several major 
problems, 'witn the widespread use of vacuum tube radios, in the 1920' s 
the demand for dry cells built up very rapidly. New companies enter- 
ed the battery field, factories were expanded, and machinery install- 
ed to meet this n^w demand. However, tne introduction of the AC 
vacuum tube and the radio set operating entirely on household current 
caused an abrupt decrease in this market for dry cells. . 

Dry batteries were also supplanted in other fields such as signal- 
ling systems in which new. developments made the use of alternating 
current practical. Low voltage transformers replaced considerable 
numbers of batteries used. for door Dell and similar uses. 

Since practically the only other major use was in flashlights, 
efforts were made to stimulate sales in' that market. Some manufac- 
turers who were primarily makers of dry cells also began making flash- 
light cases. It is alleged that this type of manufacturer would 
practically give away flashlight cases in order to sell dry cells. 
On the other hand the same statement is made about manufacturers whose 
primary product was flashlight cases and who would give away the dry 
cells cells in order to sell the flasnlignt cases. 

Thus the decrease in demand caused by the depression coupled with 
the loss of markets brought tne industry volume to a very low ebb. 
The serious nature is indicated Dy statistics submitted by the industry, 
in application for the supplemental code, showing that the number of 
concerns in the industry fell from 125 in 1928 to 40 in 1930 and to 
27 in 1933. 

This condition brought about the widespread introduction of the 
low price snecial label cell. These were made by practically all mem- 
bers of the industry. 

Pr o duct Standards 

There is a problem in establishing, in terms of quality, some 
form of standards for all grades of cells, and some form of classifi- 
cation by performance is also needed. Large purchasers, such as the 
government, nave set up standard tests in an attempt to establish the 
value of a cell on the basis of its performance under regulated con- 
ditions of current (electrical) demand. 

The cheap grades of large mono cells are usually sold by the 
manufacturer for a fraction of a cent per c°ll less than the standard 
brand but the low orice cell usually retails for 5^ while the standard 
cell retails for 10^. The following is an illustration, but does not 
take into consideration special discounts, allowances, etc. 



9822 



: 22 



-99- 

6" Dry Cell Sales (12 companies) 

Number Dollar 

Domestic Domestic 

1926 52,614,682 ' il3,925,025 

1927 45,350,534 12,144,769 

1928 40,179,557 10,282,119 

1929 34,525,343 P,oP2,839 

1930 26,211,585 6,308,856 

1931 20,079,410 4,568,158 

1932 15,P24,7-*3 3,579,549 

Flashlight Cills Sales (11 companies ) 

1925 95,698,066 $7,0e?,946 

1927, 101,309,805 7,092,132 

192P 111,021,090 7,039,312 

1929 132,860,186 7,345,013 

193^ 134,95^,903 6,711,186 

1931 133,437,595 5,054,272 

1932 133,152,070 5,630,146 

B Battery Sales (10 companies ) 

1925 470,409,286 S33,o08,334 

1927 ■ 429,537,580 31,078,090 

1928 382,765,192 24,302,905 

1929 292,709,500 16,981,620 

1930 «19,706,936 11,837,937 

1931 179,353,943 7,548,913 

1932 13o.934.257 5,204,615 

riashligiit Cases Sales (9 companies ) 

1925 5,724,495 .-4,587,777 

1927 b, 97,279 3,986,943 

1928 5,350,139 4,563,492 

1929 6,505,588 5,440,645 

1930 5,593,652 3,871,729 

1931 5,378,582 3,076,548 

1932 5,884,829 1,955,848 

Dollar Value Total for 6" Dry Cell, 
Flashlight Cells, 2 Battery, Flashlight Cnses 
(12 companies) 

Dollar 

Domestic 

1926 359,110,082 

1927 54,301,934 

1928 45,187,828 

1929 38,350,117 

1930 28,7^9,718 

1931 - 21,247,901 

1932 16,370,158 



-IOC- 
Freight 

Dry cells pre comparatively heavy and therefore freight becomes 
an item of importance in the price structure. 

2 . Problems 

At the outset of pric« filing tne industry faced several major 
problems. Witn the widespread use of vacuum tube radios in the 1920' s 
tne demand for dry cells built up very rapidly. Few companies enter- 
ed the battery field, factories were expanded, and machinery install- 
ed to meet this n^w demand. However, tne introduction of the AC 
vacuum tube and the radio set operating entirely on household current 
caused an abrupt decrease in this market for dry cells. 

Dry batteries were also supplanted in other fields such >s signal- 
ling systems in which new developments made the use of alternating 
current practical. Low voltage transformers replaced considerable 
numbers of batteries used for door Dell and similar uses. 

Since practically the only other major use was in flasnlights, 
efforts were made to stimulate salys in that market. Some manufac- 
turers who were primarily makers of dry cells also began making flash- 
light cases. It is alleged that this type of manufacturer would 
practically give away flashlight cases in order Co sell dry cells. 
On tne other hand the same statement is made about manufacturers whose 
primary product was flashlight cases and who would 'give away the dry 
cells cells in order to sell the flasalignt cases. 

Thus the decrease in demand caused by the depression coupled with 
the loss of markets brought tne industry volume to a very low ebb. 
The serious nature is indicated oy statistics submitted by the industry, 
in application for the supplemental code, showing that the number of 
concerns in the industry fell from 125 in 1928 to 40 in 1930 and to 
27 in 1933. 

This condition brought about the widespread introduction of the 
low price special label cell. These were made by practically all mem- 
bers of the industry. 

Pr qduc t Standards 

Tnere is a problem in establishing, in terms of quality, some 
form of standards for all grades of cells, and some form of classifi- 
cation by performance is also needed. Large purchasers, such as the 
government, nave set up standard tests in an attempt to establish the 
value of a cell on the basis of its performance under regulated con- 
ditions of current (electrical) demand. 

The cheap grades of large mono cells are usually sold by the 
manufacturer for a fraction of a cent per c>=ll less than the standard 
brand but the low price cell usually retails for 5^ while tne standard 
cell retails for 10^. The following is an illustration, but does not 
take into consideration special discounts, allowances, etc. 



9822 



-101- 

Price to Usual Retail Spread Mark up 4> 

Syndicate Store Price _________ 

Standard brand cell .027 to .5 .10 .073 27C$ 

Special brand cell .02cj .Ob .025 10O& 

3. Price Call (Exnibit a) 

The price call covering dry batteries and flashlight cases of all 
types was sent out on November 10, and was due on November 23, 1933. 
It was cancelled about a year later. 

4. 'ork Sneets 



The voluminous nature of the filings made it necessary te s Q t up 
the work sneets in two parts. The first, Appendix 3, Part 7a, shows 
customer classifications and quotations on radio B batteries, #6 dry 
cells, large mono cells and flashlignt cases for both the original and 
final structure. The spcond, Appendix B, Part 7b, snows delivery terms, 
delivery charges and allowances including special discounts and allow- 
ances r<nd terms of payment. Both tabulations cover all representative 
companies. 

Since net prices derived from a standard list are quoted to the 
various customer classifications, Appendix 3, Part 7, Section (a), 
gives the list price of specimen items and the calculated discount for 
each customer classification. It should be remembered that these 
discounts are not qtoted by the companies but calculated from the list 
price to facilitate comparison of customer differentials. 

It was necessary to use symbols to a large extent on the various 
work sneets in order to condense material, and a legend will be found 
on each work sheet explaining the symbols used. 

Tne Chronological- Record of Price Filing (.-vpnendix A, Part 7) 
gives in detail tne content of the price filings of renresentative 
companies. All cf th^ large companies are included as well as s*»me 
small companies whose filings w>'re sufficiently complete to be usable. 

Some of tne small companies made only 1 or 2 filings and listed 
a very few products while others .wer° not particularly active. For 
instance, one company was primarily a manufacturer of portable 
acetylene lamps and made only 1 or 2 lamps which were battery operated. 
Another manufactured dry batteries for hearing devices. 

Work sne<=ts were also made listing each price quoted on #6 dry 
cells and large mono cells (Appendix 3, Part 7-3). This covers prices 
on standard, special label, and private label brand cells for th°se 
products. 



9e22 



-102 
B. Basic Structure 



Original Filiag 



Pricing 



List trices wpre quoted on most items together with net nrices to 
the various customer classes. This list t)rice appeared to b» of little 
use excent as a measure of the reduction or discount given to tue various 
classes of customers and possibly as a suggested retail nrice. 

Two liat prices for fS dry cells and two net prices were quoted to 
even customer classification, 1 applying in the east and the other for 
snipment to the Pacific coast. Tnis was the only product on which an 
East-west differential was stated. 

However, percentage discounts do aToear as illustrated in the 
following quotation: 

"On the general line of flashlight cases the distributor is en- 
titled to a 1-gja discount on prices quoted to them; de-oartment stores and 
chain stores receive a 15 • discount from dealers prices .industrial users 
and governments are charged o : -> above the distributors net prices quoted." 

Quantity Differentials ' 

Tne net prices arrnear to be graduated largely on the basis of 
quantity purcnased, ranging from dealers, who purchase in small quantities 
and are. quoted the hignest price to toy manufacturers wno are quoted in 
lots as large as "3 million and over" and receive the lowest price. 

Practically all companies offered a 3' •■ discount on carload quantities 
and aoout 5 companies set um 2 quantity groups of less than 5^00 and 
over 5400 cells annually but this applied only to industrials. The price 
for over 54 00 annually ranged from 10 to lbl b^low tne price for smaller 
quantities. 

Toy manufacturers were quoted on quantities purcnased annually in 
stens ranging from 250,000 to 3,000,000 cells and over. 

T ype of Produc t 

Prices vary materially on grade and brand for all types of batteries. 
These grades and brands are referred to as standard label, special label, 
private label, customer label, and the like. This label differential 
does not appear for flashlight cases as tnese are quoted by catalogue 
numbers although some of the companies quote a very cheap product usually 
referred to as "zinc cas»" flashlights'. '••. ; .. • 

/ 
Packa ging 

Dry cells are quoted per each in standard packages which vary in 
number of batteries contained. In the case of toy manufacturers quotation." 
are for large units on an annual consumption basis and packaging is of 
little importance. An extra charge is made to all customer classes for 

9822 



-1 :- 



l°ss than standard package quantities. 

Deals and Assortments 

One of the practices in the industry was to- offer packaged deals or 
assortments to dealers, distributors, joboers and wholesalers. These 
consisted of a number of flashlight cas°s and batteries. A typical deal 
would be made up of 6-3 cell flashlights and 48 batteries. Thus if the 
flashlight cases were sold complete with batteries, 30 cells would be 
left to be sold separately. .A net trice was quoted on this deal which 
amounted to from 5--> to !<•$ below the price of the goods if purchased ,i 
separately. Apparently the object of these deals was to "push" cells 
and get them on display in retail establisnments.. Deals and allowances 
were included only in Appendix A, Part 7 because of their variety, 
comr.lexity and short life. 

Customer Classes and Discounts 



Customers are of two basic types- Users and Resellers. Practically 
all producers quote both types. Typical of Users are industrials, 
governments and telephone companies who consume cells. 

Resellers are of three types - First those who sell direct to 
consumers such as dealers, chain stores, mail order houses and 
department stores; second, those who resell for resale "as such" in- 
cluding distriDutors, wnolesalers and jobbers; and third, those who 
resell as an integral part of their products such as toy manufacturers. 

Quotations 

The various customer classes are established in price ranges that 
are more or less uniform throughout the industry. The relative com- 
petitive positions of these classes appear to be based on potential 
volume to be purchased and fall in 'approximately the following order: 



Dealers 

Department Stores 
Wholesalers 

Jobbers 
Distributors 



Industrials and Governments 
Chain Stores 
Mail Order Houses 
Equipment Manufacturers 
Toy Manufacturers 



Special Al lo wances and Discounts 

a furtner cause of difficulty was the individual treatment of 
customers within a customer class. This, it is believed was a cause 
underlying the quotation by most companies of specisl allowances and 
discounts wnich in some cases were applicable only on the option of the 
manufacturers. In others a range of discount or allowance was establish- 
ed permitting the manufacturers to quote a specific customer a dis- 
count any where within the range. 

■^he creation Tf this type of discount was also brought about by 
the keenly competitive situation resulting from both price and volume 
decreasing. All producers were very sensitive to price change and tried 
to establish a flexibility available as required without revisions of 



3822 



-104- 

filings. Tnese special concessions instead of oeing occasional and 
temporary became a fixed part of the structure and once a customer 
received a special discount or allowance ho expected to secure it on 
all miren-tr.es. This brought about a lowering of price on all sales 
rather than only lowering prices in the special or emergency cases 
where the manufacturer felt the circumstances .justified. 

Tnese special allowances and discounts show little uniformity 
from company to comoany as to formal description although usually 
limited to 104. Therefore discounts quoted in the original filings 
ane in subsequent revisions do not appear in the final filings be- 
cause of having been replaced by new ones. Some examples of these 
discounts are described below. 

One discount was quoted in consideration of quantity, quality and 
cost of selling or transportation. 

Some companies quoted a discount ranging from 2^ to 9$ to key 
d: 5 stributors. 

One or two companies reserve right to grant up to 204 discount on 
government orders. 

Delivery Terms .(Appendix B, Part ■ 7-A). 

Toy manufacturers were sold F.O.B. factory in all cases; Mail 
Order Houses and Chain Stores were usually quoted F.O.B. destination 
in carload lots and F.O.B. warehouses in less than carloads. These 
warehouses or distribution points were located in cities which were 
about fifty per cent uniform for all companies. All other customer 
classes were quoted in 100 pound shipments .and over. Freight terms 
were not very uniform and while the foregoing sums up the general trend 
of the quotations many companies differed more or less in their delivery 
terms. 

Delivery terms varied on different products, for example, the #6 
cell is quoted at a higher delivered price west of the Rockies than in 
The East, but the radio B Dattery, which is heavier and costs more than 
the #6 cell, is quoted at the same price for all distribution. 

Terms of Payment (Appendix B, Part 7 -a) 

Terms were fairly uniform throughout the industry and were usually 
2*5-10 days or 10th prox, net 30 days or 60 days. 

2. Final Structure 



List prices with tne exception of tnose on flashlight batteries 
all have been revised downward. Typical list price revision on radio 
3 batteries would be from the original list price of $2.60 to the final 
lis't price of a'1,80, resulting in a corresponding decrease in net prices 
because the percentage difference between original list' prices and net 
prices and final list and net prices remained about the same. The #6 

9822 



-105- 

dry cells list price was decreased for Eastern joints from 37(# to 30<# 
each proportionate reductions were made for Western points. This 30^ 
list price was almost universal in the industry and net prices were 
also reduced. 

List price changes on flashlight cases varied from drastic reductions 
on some types to very little change in others, net price changes follow- 
ing the list. 

Quantity Differential s 

Quantity differentials remained practically unchanged. J-'here was no 
change in discount on carload quantities but the quantity discount to 
industrials was eliminated by price reductions which gave as low a price 
for "any quantity" as had been available by purchasing over 5400 cells 
under the terms of the original filing. 

fyoe of Product 

So far as could be determined the same grades and brands of products 
continued to be quoted while in some cases new brands were added. 

Packaging 

There was no important change under this heading. 

Deals and Assortments 

The number of "Deals" and "Assortments" was increased but tnere 
appeared to be no change in the 5 to 10 > difference between the deal 
price and the total net value of the component items, j-'he increase in 
number made a greater range of comoinations available. 

Customer Classes and Discounts 

The net prices quoted to different customer classes still appear to 
be in about the same ratio to each other as in the original filings. 
Hewever, during the period of filing tne relative n°t prices quoted to 
Users were increased slightly while those quoted to some Resellers 
"as sucn" were decreased slightly by some companies and increased by 
others. Prices to still other Resellers no Id their position. 

Changes in level of net prices quoted are in the nature of readjust- 
ments for all customer classes and do not materially penalize or favor 
either of the* two basic customer groups of users and resellers. Most 
•f the pricp movements tended to narrow the rangp- of prices quoted to 
eacn customer classification rather than to change the relative position 
of a given classification. 

Howpver, by the application of any of the special discounts or 
allowances drastic cnanges could fep made in any of the differentials 
between customer classifications. 

Thus there are two known levels of price, (l) the list price and 
', <0 net prices to customer classes. However, the use of special 
allowances and optional discounts to the customers net offers numerous 

9822 



-106- ' 

possibilities in the creation of additional unrecorded price levels. 

For instance consider the list price of a product as a straight 
norizontal line, the filed net prices to customer classes range down- 
ward in a stair like line from "Dealers" as the "top step" to "Toy 
Manufacturers" as the "bottom step" . Ey using' special allowances and 
optional discounts thestairs can De moved below the quoted position 
without distortion of snape or change in direction. 

However, if they are not applied merely the shape or direction of 
tiao pattern <^ a n be materially changed. 

Tnis results in a situation where it is practically impc^sible to 
determine the price on a specific transaction from the price. The most 
exact calculations would indicate only the range within filing records 
wnicn might occur. . ,-■ 

Probably the most important of these special discounts is that 
quoted "in consideration of quantity, quality and cost of selling and 
transportation" . Originally this discount was quoted as VJ'-, but it 
was taxen up oy company after company and increased until one company 
actually reacned the ridiculous extreme of quoting "up to 80#" for 
tnese considerations. 

Continual changes were made in these special discounts throughout 
the period of price filing. For instance, one filing might cancel a 
discount and the succeeding filing reinstate it and even broaden its 
scope. As a general observation it seemed that the number of special 
discounts increased for a period and then during the latter period of 
price filing a trend occurred toward decreasing tneir numoer and 
complexity, however,, the net effect was a decided increase in their use. 

Delivery Term s 

Delivery terms were changed continually throughout the filing 
period but no .more uniformity developed than in the origiml filings. 
Toy manufacturers were still sold '.'F.O.B. Factory".. The warehouse 
cites from which chain store and mail order shipments were made were 
increased in number especially on the Pacific const. 

Terms_ of Payment 

No changes of ' any importance were made. 

3. Chronological _Eecord of Price Filings - Appendix A, Part .7 
dumber of Filing_s . ....... 

The number of price filings varied from one or two for small 
companies to about 20 for large companies. 

For m and Content 

The form and content of the filings was very poor. Products could 
not be identified from filing to filing nor was it clear to wnom dis- 
counts applied. In filing revisions very few companies indicated what 

9822 



_ -107- 

material if any were cancelled. Terminology used in describing customer 
classes would be referred to under three different names in the same 
filing, for example, a discount sheet would carry the heading "Distribu- 
tors Discount Sheet" but in the body of the filing reference would be 
made in one place to dealers and in another to jobbers. 

Waiting Period 

The majority of the filings had short waiting periods but not ap- 
parently to meet the competition of any individual company. It would 
seem as thoxigh filings were made to meet the competition of a number of 
companies, for example, in making a revision a given company would not 
indicate that they were meeting the competition of a specified company 
or companies but would merely state "to meet competition" and thereupon 
file to meet one company on list price, another on discount, a third on 
terms, and a fourth on special allowances. 

In the matter of leadership no one company was outstanding. Initi- 
ating revisions were made by practically every company. In some ca.ses the 
filing would be met by all of the major companies prior to the effective 
d-~te, in others the meeting would be strung out over a period of weeks. 
It was, however, more usual that filings be met within the 10-day waiting 
period or shortly thereafter. 

General 

A most interesting incident is the upward revision of prices by 
Company #4 filed May 1st, effective May 15, 1934, which was followed by 
most of the major companies by cancelled before the effective date, 

A second movement of interest is the cancellation of all prices on 
August 9, 1934, by Company #8, which ?;as followed by similar cancellation 
by practically all of the larger companies. However, within two or three 
days after this cancellation the prices which had been cancelled were 
reinstated. After a further trial of about three months the price call 
was cancelled. 

Summary 

1, Eumber of grades and brands increased slightly. 

2, The number of special brands made product identification very 
difficult. 

3, The form and content of many of the filings was very poor. 

4, List and net prices generally lower. 

5, Customer classes showed no increase in number and the net price 
differentials remain in about the same ratio. 

6, Special allowances increased in number and extent. 



9322 



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7. "Deals" and "Assortments" increased in number. 

8. Little change made in delivery and credit .terms, 

9. J'-Iany filings had short waiting periods. 



< 



9822 



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National Electrical Manufacturers 
Association 



155 EAST 44th STREET 
NEW YORK 



DESIGNATED AS THE AGENCY FOR ADMINISTERING. SUPERVISING AND PROMOTING THE 
PERFORMANCE OF THE PROVISIONS OF THE CODE FOR THE ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING 
INDUSTRY. UNDER THE NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL RECOVERY ACT. APPROVED BY PRESIDENT 
ROOSEVELT ON AUGUST 4. 1933. 

OFFICE OF SUPERVISORY AGENCY FOR 



DRY BATTERIES & FLASHLIGHTS 
November 10, 1933. 



We, W.W. Cargill, C.P. Deibel , Ralph Gelardin, 
C.B. Plante, and H.S. Schott, Supervisory Agency of the 
Dry Batteries and Flashlights Subdivision of the Electrical 
Manufacturing Industry, appointed in accordance with the 
tirovisions of Article XII of the Code for the Electrical 
Manufacturing Industry approved by the President on August 
4th, 1933, by the Board of Governors of National Electrical 
Manufacturers Association, hereby notify you that we have, 
pursuant to the authority vested in us by Article X of said 
Code, determined that it has been the generally recognized 
practice to sell: 

(1) dry cells 

(2) dry batteries 

(3) flashlights with dry batteries 

(4) flashlights without dry batteries 

on the basis of net price lists, or prioe lists and discount 
sheets, and fixed terms of payment, to the following classes 
of trade: 

Retail dealers 
Wholesalers and Jobbers 
Chain stores 
Department stores 
Mail order houses 

Manufacturers of battery consuming devices 
Industrial users 

Government (Federal, State or subdivisions 
thereof) 




98 






-110- 



'7e therefore direct that you as a manufacturer of 
all or any of the above products, file with this Supervisory 
Agency for distribution, as required by said Code, to all 
other manufacturers of the products specified above, at the 
office of National Electrical Manufacturers Association, 155 
East 44th Street, New York City, on or before November 2*d,. 
1933, THIRTY-EIGHT copies of your price lists, or price lists 
and discount sheets, showing separately for each of the trade 
classes specified above your current prices and fixed terms 
of sale and payment on the products epecified above. The 
following exceptions are made: 

a. Prices covering export sales 

b. Sales to other manufacturers of the 
products specified above 

Show all discounts, terms, etc., either on price 
lists or attached thereto and not in a separate letter to the 
Supervisory Agency. Kindly mark all packages BF-11-10 for 
identification. It is important that your company name 
appears on all sheets furnished this Agency. 




^4/±£ 




Supervisory Agency. 



OS 9S 



-111- 



Chamtrr 9 

rajio a:-:c2ivr. : & tud::s 

A. The Industry 

1. Product 

? rscri - 'tion 

Radio reciving tubes are electrically motivated devices and re- 
semble incandescent lamps in appearance. The tube is made up of a 
ba-kelite base in which are cemented various f ilaments and grids en- 
closed in a glass bulb. 

: later iris 

The materials used include bakelite, glass, tungsten, nickel and 
steel. 

Process of iianufactur e 

Originally/ most of the operations, especially in assembly, uere 
manual. Machinery has been developed which has eliminated to a largo 
extent rll manual work. Those companies still using manual ofocesses 
do so in the omerati ns incident to assembling the intricate and deli- 
cate inner mechanism of the tube where manual de::terity is essential. 
Very fe T * manufacturers produce their own bases -nd bulbs, the- bases 
being purchased from Droducers of ohenolic products and the bulbs be- 
ing -ourchased, rough blown, from glass manufacturers. The degree of 
skill required, of erroloyees might be termed a s that of "specialized 
assembly." 

Variations of Products 

All radio receiving tubes of the same type should theoretically 
be indentical, since e"_cemt for some older types they are made under 
license, but ability to manufacture and differences of machine equip- 
ment cause some difference in grade. There are in e::cess of two 
hundred types of tubes, each having a separate ouroose and use in 
connection with radio reception, as between manufacturers, a g iven 
ty >e of tube will earn'- the same identifying symbol. 

2. Companies 



..umoer 

During the period of price filing, twenty-one corroaniea filed 
prices. 

Si-;e 

Manufacturers employed from one hundred and fifty employees in the 

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smallest plants to three thousand or more in one laxge -olant. About 
twenty-five nor cent of the companies could bo rated as large and the 
balance, ledium and snail. 

Other Products 

iianufacturers of radio receiving tubes are sometimes also pro- 
ducers of incandescent lanps. Several connanies <::ho bulk largo in the 
sale of radio receiving tubes do not manufacture, but handle tubes 
in conjunction with radio receiving sets -.rhich they do manufacture. 

Location 

Over fifty jer cent of the companies are located in and around 
IleT' York City, with the remainder divided about enually between l!e ,r 
FngLand and the Chicago area, -ith one company located in Kentucky-. 

3. Market 

Type of Sales 

1. Sales for use .in nev sets, (initial Houipment) 

2. Replacement sales. 

Distribution 

The relationship between the number of tubes sold as initial 
eouinnent and the number sold for replacement is rather difficult 
toil:;, due to the f a.ct that new t"?pes are constantly being introduced 
as part of ner; equipment and old tyes are becoming obsolete. About 
fifty per cent of the tubes sold each year are sole, for replacement 
through distributors, jobbers, dealers and chains. The bulk of the 
remaining vol e is distributed to set manufacturers for initial 
equipment an-, the rest distributed to sales outlets under private 
Label or brand. 

Loc"tion 



The market for re xLacenent radio receiving tubes v-ries rrith the 
numer of radio sets sold and in use in an area. Sales for initial 
equipment are largely confined to the industrial northea.st. 

Freight 

Freight is an item to be considered because due to the bulky and 
fragile nature of the product, it carries a relatively high freight 

rate. 

4. Problems 

The problems of the Radio keceiving Tube Manufacturing Industry 
jarellel, to a, large e::tent, those of the radio industry, of -'hich 

9822 



-113- 

tube manufacturing is a como'ient Dart. The radio industry is 210*7 rnd 
unseasoned. Personalities comosing it ha.ve been drawn from nany raid 
varied fields, with .the result that ir.-.ctices r:id custons of conjletely 
divergent lines of "business hr.ve been )rought into the Industry. 

The mortality among rrdio nanufacturers has been very high. The 
peak number of irnuf acturers in one year was over two hundred, of 
which not more than fifty are still in business. 

In hind ruth nost production industries, the question of volume 
loons large rnd it hp.s been an ever existent nroblen to resist de- 
mands of volune vurchrsers for preference deened unreasonable. 

"any and varied are the channels of distribution which have been 
in use at one tine or another rnd the record of ooen nrice filing 
shc-s evidence that even yet it has not been established which channels 
of distrib-ution are nost advantageous. 

The srtter of licensin : has involved much litigation due to the 
nuierous natents -'hich -rere issued by the hundreds in the early dpys 
of rrdio. 

Ther: still exists the necessity for development and research, 
the bill for '-.'hich is naid by the large manufacturers, and the re- 
sults of -'hich are utilized by all nenbers of the Industry. 

In the natter of nrice rlone, drastic unheavrls have occurred. 
Bruio receivin;- tubes which ori ginally sold at u'icos an )roxiuating 
those of present-day low-price snail receiving sets can now be purchased 
in ten-cent stores for twenty-five and thirty cents. 

5. Q-ien Price Tiling 

Price Call 

The original nrice call was issued on hovenber 3, 1933. On Peb- 
rurry 8, 1934, su' 1 nlenentary ca.lls "ere issued coverin ; dealers on 
consignnent and ->en pecount, purchasers of one million or more tubes 
annually, sales agents, and allowance having a bearing on nrice. All 
of these calls were in effect at the tine of the Schechter decision. 

b'ork Sheets 



The following work sheets ^ere set up! 

Appendix A, Part 8 - Chronological Pecord of Price Filings 

by Companies. 

Appendix A, Part 8 - Price Illustrations. 

Appendix 3, Part 8 - Original and Final Structure. 



9322 



-114- 

3. " 3 r s i c 5 t r ac tur e 

1. Qi-i nnol Price Structure - Annendi;: 3, Part G 

Price 

All channels ^ere quoted on a basis of list orice and discount, 
e:;c©^)t set nanufa.cturers v.'ho -'ere quoted a net lo'-er than the net 
oriee quoted any other channel. 

Discounts and Cnstoner Glosoific tions 

Set io:m:''o.cturers nere quoted net nrices o- >ed on nurchases of 
more or less than one dllion tubes lev year. Distributors and 
jobbers of various t' r ->es vr ere generally q .oted a discount of about 
fifty to i ft]/- five nor cent fron the standard list. Separate dis- 
counts ^ere ouoted on consign' lent. These, for the nost nart, annrors- 
imated the discounts offered o-oen accounts but the accounts —ere net 
given as favorable terns of nayuent. 

In the area of enceitions to sonerrhat renerall" - standard dis- 
counts alnost ever;/" possible snecial arrangement and condition nay be 
found. These are listed in detail in Aonendix 3, Port 8a and include 
spocial net nrices on narticular tubes, bonus -3.ans for s ieci:."ic tubes, 
quantity discounts based on nunb^r of tubes, va.lue of order, turnover, 
annual mrchase, ;eo ;ra ihical location, -oo;ranhicrl differentials 
based on the standard list for specific tubes, discounts on "no nuality 
specification unbranded tubes," " private brand," "special quality 
specific tion branded, " "particular quality specification branded," 
and "a.ssorted branus." 

In the category of discounts allowed as s lecial allowances there 
o .--in a.nnears on almost endless list such or, discounts for "sod is 
effort," "advertising nronotion," consi ;nncnt," "closiiig out consi ;:v- 
ient," "re-consi nuent," etc. 

The description of "articular t~ r nes of distributors are such as 
to i;iake it practica.ll~ r irnossible to determine ",ho could or could 
not be classed as r distributor. Illustrf tions of distri r.itor t~r )es 
Mentioned ore: snail jobber, large jobber, '.e~ler, dealer jobber, 
large dealer, ..eoler (large or exceptional retr.ilers), deale s- 
lrrge retailers sold on o jobber bo sis. 

3rei,?;ht 



Freight is usually P.O.3. destinotion or "'.n. '. flant. There ore 
in audition numerous e::ce jtions such as "frei ht allowed to destinotion 
on s hinments 'to set "manufacturers," nrenaid fifty tubes or more," 
"nrenaid any ouontity ITer Tor]: area," "nrenaid on one hundred tubes 
or nore," and others based on order or custoner class involved. 

Terns of P.^~ r pent 

Generally, terns of nayuent ^ere 2 •>, 10 days, net 30 days, or some 
9822 



•llO- 



approxiraation thereof. But this, again, is merely a starting -point 
and all sorts and kinds of special terns c 'g offered to customer class- 
es ■■ nd t-oes of sale, such as i;i from list for payment with complete 
remort 'before the twelfth of the month following date of invoice; net 
10 days; 2 l ,s, 10 drys, 3-,s, 30 days, etc. 

2. T' in-l "'rice Structure - Appendix 73. °prt 8 

There is actually no final structure during the >eriod of o oen 
nrice filing. The structure as of the date of the automatic cancella- 
tion of the price call (Schechter decision) was practicall'' the sme 
rs the original in so far as customer classif icrtion, amouit of dis- 
count Multiplicity of terms, allowance, conditions, etc. The main 
differences are three. 

Pirst , that list and net prices pre Much lower, in sone cases less 
than fifty per cent of the original list -price. 

For exavue of actual reduction in nrice, reference should be made 
to Appendix A, Part 3-a. It will be noted that jobbers net trices 
appear to he somewhat higher than set manufacturers net prices, hut 
it is often true that this difference is offset by special allowances 

to the jobber. 

As a result of the rapid and material price decrease, the c ompeti- 
tive position of the various companies has changed radically* To 
illustrate, on one type of tube, ITo. 25-Z-5, the company quoting the 
highest price in January, 1934 quotes a -price lo-er than anyone else in 
April 1S35. In .'act, considering the entire -orice structure, if 
companies were listed in January 1934 in accordance with the -rices 
they quotud and then relisted again as of A >ril 1935, company positions 
in the list would be jractically reversed. 

Second , a form of distributor, generally called "jobber" has 
apparently been selected as the most advantageous channel of distri- 
bution, and -prices are now quoted him emial to and even less than those 
available to set manufacturers* 

Competition to secure the job ier market began in the summer of 
1934 "hen jobber prices wore reduced about one-third. Continued 
competition to April of 1935 reduced jobber nrices further so that 
finally the level was more than fifty per cent belc- that of November 
of 1933. Practically every coiroany concentrated on the jobber market 
■ l did so am >arently because Company Ho. 13 decided that it was a good 
channel and took ste-os to get it. 

Third , consignment has iractically disap eared. 

The fret that consignment .oes not apnear as frequently in the 
latter months of omen price filing should not give rise to the con- 
ception that it had 'oeen eliminated permaiiently. It is -probable that 
the conditions and allowances that "ent along with consignment tended 
to destroy the usefulness of the device. For example, there is one 
case in which a manufacturer offered a very attractive consignment 
9322 



-116- 



orooosition. tTithin sixty days of his offer, ho mr.de a new -oro^osition 
to Ihe effect that consignments could he closed out at mrices in effect 
phout thirty days orior to the original consignment offer. These • 
>rices '-ere considerably higher than the mrices in effect at the tine 
of the consignment offer xnd at the time of the cancellation offer. 

3 . Chr onolo'-icrl p.eccrd of F i lings "by Companies - Ammendix .-. ., 
Part 8 lumber of Pilings 

Of the twenty-one comoanies who filed trices, chronological record 
v ts made of thirteen companies. These are illustrations of those not 
i:irlndorl. The number of filings made ->er company varies from five 
or six to more than forty. . In the case of the larger companies who 
usually made the most filings, there is no particular meak filing 
period hut rather a continuous filing and re-filing. 

Content and Pom. 



The content of the various filings was in many cases extremely 
vague and incomplete and apparently no effort "as made toward im- 
provement. State ents such as "2,S, 10 days," and "P.O. P." frequently 
occurred without any further clarification. In chrnging list mrices, 
some price sheets were issued under the name 'Distributors' Price Sheet" 
or "Jobbers' Price Sheet" reducing the^list >rice materially. Ileither 
then nor later did aiy specific mention occur of other customer classi- 
fications with regard to the reduction in list. Thus, in the latter 
stages of the price filing experience, it was extremely difficult to 
be certain if there existed one list orice for all custoner classes or 
whether the customer classes not referred to specifically in orice 
reductions had been left high and o.ry with list mrices fifty to 
sevexty-f ive per cent rbout the general levels. '-To-ever it anmears 
unreasonable that such a condition should exist and it is jroVble 
that the omission is due to the moor form of the xrice filings of many 
companies. 

Paitinrc Period 

Pue to the confusing nature of the filings, it is difficult if 
not immossible to determine when a filin ■ was ;iven a short waiting 
meriod to ;ieet competition. 'my ,of the filings ao have r short 
waiting me iod and a few am >arently meet the commetition of some other 
conmany but, by rnC large, the almost continuous struct. m- 1 movement 
made it i . ossible to determine "ho 'rs meeting whom and "hen, excent 
on the most obvious natters. 



9822 



-117- 

C . Supination of Chen Prir o Fil in.-; L:"ie rio_nco_ 

1. lie nr.tu.rnl increase in number of custoner classifications, 

2. Jobber market becrne most favored channel for reulaceuent 
distribution. 

3. Tyjes of special allowances increased in avail ability to 
certain customer classes, especially jobbers. 

4. The con >etitive irice positions of member comnanies nere 
almost the reverse of the original siturtion. 

5. List and net prices materially reduced. 

6. Consignment selling decreased. 

7. The lack of uniformity evident originally maintained 
throughout. 

3. Operation of the waiting )eriod is difficult to determine. 



9322 




-118- 

ECHIBIT A 

National Electrical Manufacturers 
Association 

155 EAST 44th STREET 
NEW YORK 



DESIGNATED AS THE AGENCY FOR ADMINISTERING. SUPERVISING AND PROMOTING THE 
PERFORMANCE OF THE PROVISIONS OF THE CODE FOR THE ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING 
INDUSTRY. UNDER THE NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL RECOVERY ACT. APPROVED BY PRESIDENT 
ROOSEVELT ON AUGUST 4. 1933. OFF|CE op 8UpERVI60RY AGENCy FOH 



radio receiving TUBES SUBDIVISION 
November 3, 1933. 



I, 3. W. I.lul downy, Supervisory Agency of the Radio Re- 
ceiving Tube branch or subdivision of the Electrical Manufacturing 
Industry, appointed by the Board of Governors of National Electri- 
cal Manufacturers Association, in accordance with the provisions 
of Article XII of the Code for the Electrical Manufacturing Indus- 
try approved by the President on August 4, 1933, hereby notify you 
that I have, pursuant to the authority vested in mc by Article X 
of said Code, • determined that it has been the generally recognized 
practice to sell Radio Receiving Tubes on the basis of net price 
lists or price lists and discount sheets, and fixed terms of pay- 
ment to the following classes of trade: 

Dealers sold on consignment 
Dealers sold on open account 
Jobbers sold on consignment 
Jobbers sold on open account 
Radio Set manufacturers purchasing less than 
1,000,000 receiving tubes per year. 

Therefore, I direct you, as a manufacturer of, or one 
promoting the manufacture for sale of, Radio Receiving Tubes to 
file with me for distribution to all other manufacturers of or 
companies promoting the manufacture for sale of, the products 
specified above, at the office of NTCMA. 155 East 44th Street, New 
York City, on or before November 15, 1933, THIRTY-FIVE copies 
of your prico lists, or price lists and discount sheets (except 
price lists and discount sheets applying to (A) Export business; 
(B) Sales to other manufacturers of Radio Receiving Tubes) , show- 
ing separately for each of th^ trade classes specified above your 
current prices and fixed t^rms of sale and payment on the products 
specified above. 

Show all discounts, terms, etc., either on price lists 
( o^ attached thereto and not in a separate letter to the Supervisory 
mcy. All packages must be marked rt -//-«? for identification. 
iur company name and a date must appear on all sheets or sets of 

f, id 



*11$* 



sheets furnished this Agoncy. As typewritten sheets, either orig- 
inal or carbon copies, require first class mail, your price sheets 
or revisions thereof should be printed or in some form of process- 
ing or duplication. 

Very truly yours, 



^W<^^i. 



S. 77. Mul downy 
Supervisory Agency. 



, 



&> 



%i 



-120- 



CHAPTER 10 
SOCKETS 



A. The Incus try 

I he aanufacture of sockets is usually carried on in addition to 
that of other products, e special!' 1 ,'" other firing devices* There are 
about fift'" - companies ranging from very small producers carrying 
only the popular and fast moving items, to large organizations handling 
a complete line of standard and specialty sockets. 

Froduct 



The t" r pes of sockets may be classed under four headings: 

1. Brass Shell Sockets. 

2. porcelain Sockets. 

3. Composition Sockets. 

4. Weather Proof Sockets. 

The variations from this point on, however, make the natter of product 
identification and comparison exceedingly complex. For instance, unda- 
brass shell sockets, are found sub-divisions such as "standard size" 
and "electrolier" size. Then under both these general groupings, sockets 
var3 r according to wattage, finish and cap. For example, pendant cap, 
flat cap, bracket cap, etc. Although sockets are furnished with standard 
thread, others can be supplied. Weather proof sockets can be either porce- 
lain or composition and all types of sockets may vary as to the switch- 
ing mechanism supplied, length of chain or cord, whether an insulator is 
placed in the chain and numerous other features which would adapt the 
item for special use. In addition to the two general groups mentioned, 
"-ere are also the mogul, intermediate, and candleabra. 

Some types of sockets ere fairly well standardized as, for exa.mple, 
brass shell sockets. The brass shell sockets of most manufacturers are of 
the same dimension and appearance and may be interchanged. This r 'oes not 
folio-' in the case of other types such as composition and porcelain, 
where ea.ch manufacturer is likely to have a different or individual de- 
sign. 

The basic design of sockets for the screw base bulb has not changed 
but many variations in design are found in switch mechanism, construction 
detail, dimension, finish, and amplication. Sockets, originally a separate 
unit to be attached to the fixture, are now often made an integral p rt of 
the fixture. This eliminates certain parts of the old type sockets in that 
the shell, f@r example, will he part of the fixture. 

As a result of the special applications which arise, the lines of 
manufacturers r -ho are equipped to handle rpecial order work have gradually 
increased to include numerous slow moving items. ThiL is not true in the 
case of the smaller companies ''here the tendency is to handle only the 

22 



-V 1- 



tendency is to handle only the standard "constant demand" product. 

Realizing the difficulty of comparing the products of various compa- 
nies, efforts have "been made . y producers to set up master catalogues which 
cross reference the catalogue numbers of the various companies* This has 
been attended with only limited success because only standard items can 
be included, ?rC. the raoid change in the newer types and the special appli- 
cation items lakes it almost useless for a company to !:eep track of any 
one except its immediate competitors. 

Manuf rcturin-;: Processes 

The manufacturing processes vary somewhat in the different types of 
sockets. In the case of brass shell sockets a body of porcelain or other 
insulating material is used upon which are mounted the switch mechanism 
and other parts of the socket. The brass shell is then assembled around 
the internal assembly. With the exception of the body and the insulating 
lining which is usually made of some fibre material, all parts are metal 
sta :pings. 

In making composition and molded sockets the body and shell are 
molded or pressed as a unit and as the shell is a non-conductor of elec- 
tricity the various metal :arts can be assembled directly to the shell thus 
making a simplet assembly and requiring fewer parts. 

Porcelain sockets have some of -the characteristics of the composition 
sockets in that the shell is a non-conductor and may be used to support 
the internal parts. However, metal inserts anc" screws may not be molded 
into the porcelain shell as in the case of the composition type. Thus 
an assembly often reouires a larger number of parts tnan in the case of 
a similar socket molded of some plastic material. It is doubtful if all 
companies manufacturing a line of porcelain sockets actually make their 
own porcelain parts as the mauifacture of the ceramic products is a spe- 
cialized business. The porcelain parts are probably supplied by some manu- 
facturer of electrical porcelain. 

The maker of a complete line of sockets requires a large array of mach- 
inery and some skilled labor. The manufacture of sockets is not a speci- 
alized art but a combination of usual manufacturing processes including me- 
tal stampings, forming and finishing, plastic moulding, assembly, etc. 

Packaftinr 

Packaging of the goods appears to be quite uniform. Cartons are made 
up of from 1 to 25 items. A certain number of txiese cartons then make 
up a stanc rd package, the total number of items comprising a standard 
package varying from 25 to as many as 1000. Factors governing the number 
apparently are bulk, weight, value and the demrndfdr that particular pro- 
duct, as an example: 250 standard brass shell sockets usually make a stand- 
ard package. In the case of electrolier, candelabra- and other small sized or 
unusual types of brass shell sockets the standard package is usually 50 
or 100. Porcelain sockets are usually quo tec 1 , in standard packages of 100 

9822 



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i terns. Composition sockets are usually packages the sane as porcelain 
types. 

This natter of packaging is important for the reason that discounts 
are emoted on a package basis, for example: standard packages quantities 
may carry a discount of 50$' ; carton quantities 35$o, less than carton quantitit 
20)o. If the number of items making up a standard package '"ere to oe re- 
duced by any one company it would amount to r reduction in the quantity 
discount requirements in that a purchase: would receive a maximum dis- 
count ~oy purchasing 200 sockets from one company, whereas it 7:ould be ne- 
cessary to purchase 250 from another company to secure the same discount. 

"owever, a comparison of the catalogues of t'-'O of the major com- 
panies indicates that comparable sockets ^ere usually packaged in txie 
same qxiantities by both companies, goth of these catalogues were dated prior 
to the price call. Balk packaging used in shipments to class J customers, 
etc., is assumed to mean packaging in uarrels or joxes with excelsior or 
some similar material to prevent breakage. Thus a savings is made in 
cost of cardboard boxes and manual labor of packaging. 

G-eQigra'ohic Loca-tion 

Plants are located in the Northeastern and North-central sections, 
with eleven in or around New York City, six in Connecticut, four in Il- 
linois, and the remainder distributed in surrounding states. 

Number of Employees 

Since most of the companies manufacturing sockets manufacture 
other wiring devices, it is difficult to estimate accurately the number 
of employees engaged in the manufacture of sockets. A rough estimate 
would indicate that the number or employees range from about twenty-five 
in small plants to over one thousand in the la; :;er units. 

Marked 

Sales may be divided into two general classes. First, sales to 
manufacturers for use as an integral "part of their products, and second, 
sales to resellers to resell "as such. " 

2. History 

The volume of socket manufacture and sale was seriously affected -• 
by the general manufacturing and construction decline leading up to the 
inception of NRA. Dating from the NEA but not necessarily because of it, 
the volume has increased materially but prices have decreased. Various 
projects of the Federal government, such as home modernization, farm el- 
ectrification, low cost building, and construction have stimulated some 
activity. In addition, the increasing use of built-in sockets in electric 
home appliances and the new tvpes of sockets lately in demand -'or mod- 
ernistic and indirect lighting have also given volume an impetus. 

Originally, the manufacture of sockets, true also of many other 

9822 



""J. (COM 

electrical items, was carried on by a relatively few pioneers in the 
Industry, These companies with their early start, established a certain 
amount of customer acceptance for various brands and names. As new com- 
panies appeared from time to tine, they found themselves f^ced with the 
necessity of overcoming this customer acceptance. This was usually at- 
tempted by selling at a lower price, frequently made possible by cheapen- 
ing the product. 

In order to counteract the new competitor, the old line manufacturer, 
in many ctrsea, brought out a secondary line with which to combat price 
comoetitors without materially lowering the price level on their standard 
lines. In addition to this, certain of the companies who apparently felt 
that engaging in an open price war would endanger their dignified position, 
equipped themselves with affiliates qr subsidiaries who could match tactic 
for tactic with cry interloper without muddying the fair name of the parent 
company. 

The Wiring Device Group, including Sockets, is rich in the lore of 
price cutting and unfair competitive practices. One of the more interest- 
ing legendary schemes to increase business, concerns a manufacturer who 
would approach a distributor offering very attractive prices and encourag- 
ing the distributor to go in debt to the manufacturer. Then, when the 
portents were propitious, the manufacturer would advise the distributor 
that prices were up. The distributor, of 'course, would complain, stating 
that he could purchase elsewhere for less. The reply of the manufacturer 
would be that he had better not, because reposing in the strong boxes df 
the manufacturer were sufficient notes for which, if payment were pressed, 
the distributor would be sold out, lock, stock and barrel. 

Competition for the questionable honor of putting the material in 
prominent buildings has been alleged to lead manufacturers to offer to 
give the material to the distributors or contractors who '-'ere the success- 
ful bidders on the job. 

The Socket Industry, like so many others, has changed a.s a result of 
the advent of the volume buyer. The five and ten cent : . stores can' now pur- 
chase so effectively as to be able to supply the contractor with wiring de- 
vices at lower prices than he could purchase them from the manufacturer.. 

The cost a.ccounting system used by a goodly number of the smaller manu- 
facturers is said to be very simple. It consists merely in knowing the 
prices quoted by one or two of the large manufacturers. Then by a series 
of rapid mental calculations and a few guesses he determines that, since 
the larger maoiuf acturer has a much higher overhead, the smaller company 
must have costs lo-rer by 5fo, 17fo, 20fo or whatever other percentage sounds 
proper. Thus by applying the determined percentage, the smaller company 
arrives at its selling prices. The fact that the larger company used as 
en inde:: in arriving at cost may be itself losing money or not making any 
sales at the prices quoted, is apparently of little or no interest. 



9322 



-124- - 
Price Cell 

i 

The original urice call for the socket group was issued qn Sep- 
tember 14, 1933, (iSxhibit A) and cancelled 'March 1, 1935. This first 
price call, however, included all wiring devices. On October 6, 1933, 
the Supervisory Agency cancelled the original price call on the ground 
that it had "resulted in confusion and misunderstanding much to the dis- 
advantage of the wiring device industry." Consequently* the products 
covered by the original price call were grouped on the ba.sis of affilia- 
tion and separate price calls were issued for each. The price call for 
sockets was re-issued on llovember 29, 1933, effective December 12, 1933, 
. (Exhibit "3). This second price call requested prices on all types of. 
sockets and variations thereof together with terms of sale and payment, a,s 
well as catalogue numbers and descrit-oions of each socket. The descrip- 
tions filed, however, proved to be most inadequate. It is probable that 
none could be made which - ould enable reliable comparison of -products* 

4. Work Sheets 

1. Appendix A Part 9. 

Chronological Record of Price Filings by Companies. 

2. Appendix B Part 9. 

Original and Pinal Price Structure. 
Appendix B Part 9a. 
Major Price Changes. 

B. Basic Price Structure (Atroendix B. Part 9 ) 
Original Filings 
Prices 

The basis of quotation in this group was exceedingly varied. Some 
companies quoted list, others net, and the majority a combination of both. 
Thus, one customer classification would be quoted on a list basis for a given 
item and another on a net basis and any one customer classification might 
be quoted on a list basis for some items and net for others. In at least 
one case, a customer class is quoted a discount fro:: the net price of another 
class. 

Discounts '-here quoted range from 30^ on less than carton quantities 
to 50 and 5$ on standard packages. 

.Customeri-Cl assificat ions and Discounts . 

Discounts were quoted to customer classifications such as the following: 

1. Distributors 

2. Class J Customers 

3. Competing Manufacturers 



9822 



-125- 

4. Syndicate Stores 

5. Wholesalers 

6. Portable Lamp arid Shade iianufacturers 

7. All Buyers 

Competing manufacturers appear "because the many variations in pro- 
duct make it advisable for some companies to fill out an incomplete line 
by purchases from other manufacturers* 

Class J was the only customer classification defined and its defini- 
tion was apparently interpreted differently by different companies* This 
definition was "the Class J customer is defined as one who buys standard 
catalogue devices for use in assembly, but does not include portable lamp 
and shade or wiring device manufacturers." 

The above list of customer classes is arranged in the approximate 
order of preference given 'in discounts or net prices. 

Most companies quoted for distributors, wholesalers, syndicate store 
and competing manufacturers. Of the remaining classes, Class J customers 
and quantity buyers were quoted by the fewest companies. 

Two compahied did not employ any customer classifications but quoted 
a single price list to all buyers. 

Terms of Payment . 

It was general practice to quote the sane term for all classes of 
customers although' some companies quoted slightly different terms to two 
or more classes of customers. Terms were not uniform from corroany to com- 
D.any, 'although 2$, 10th prox, net 30 or 60 days or approximation thereof 
was most frequent, with extremes such as 5$, 15th prox, net 60, and 12%, 
10 days; 10_, 30 days net 60 days. 

Terms of Delivery 

Delivery terras were based generally on the following: freight allowed 
100 lbs. or over to any point in the United States. Less than 100 lbs. 
P. 0.3. factory, express or parcel post shipments allowed at freight rates. 

Some co jpanies allowed freight on less than 100 lbs. to syndicate 
stores in large metropolitan areas. 

Company ITo, 10 quotes on a/ basis of three ?:ones which is a carry over 
from other branches of the Electrical Industry in which this company is 
engaged. It is interesting that in 1 the final filing this zone system has 
been eliminated. 



j 32, 



-126- ' 

2. Final Piling s 
Prices 

practically all wrices were revised downward during the period of 
pri<^e filing, the extreme reduction on a few items "being about 45$ and 
the average, 25$ to 35;'. The "basis of quotation "became more uniform in 
that the majority of companies quoted more often on a net "basis. Complete 
uniformity did not occur however, only about eight com-oanies uoting en- 
tirely on a net basis and the remainder continuing, in a. lesser or greater 
degree, the list and net basis of the' original filing. 

Customer Classifications and Discounts . 

The same costomer classes still exist but the majority of companies 
now quote net prices to all buyers on a large mirber of items, whereas 
only two companies had so quoted. ' 'TTnere discount s are quoted they are 
about equivalent to those pf the original filing. The number of companies 
quoting Class J has increased from five to ten; those quoting syndicates 
have been reduced, from eight to two. 

Terms of Payment ! 

The terms of more companies no" more nearly approach the typical 
cited in the original filing, the previous extreme being now reduced to 
5$, 10 days, invoices - first to fifteenth, due on the twenty-fifth; in- 
voices sixteenth to thirty-first, due on the tenth prox, 30 days net. 

Terms of Deliver:/- 

Several companies made charges in delivery terms, changing the pre- 
vious allowances of freight on 100 lbs. or over to an allowance on ship- 
ments valued at sixty dollars or over or weighing 100 lbs. or over. 
Delivery to syndicate stores was changed in. most cases to be freight al- 
lowed on shipments of 50 lbs; or over or thirty dollars new value or over. 

Changes Durin g p rice Filing 

Appendix B, Part 9a, is a concise picture of the major changes which 
occurred with respect to price. Appendix A, Part 9 shows the number of 
filings mace, their content, the use of the waiting period ant the evolu- 
tion of delivery and payment terms. 3ut, due to the many vague 'and in- 
complete filings made, plus the difficulty of comparing products, it is 
rather confusing from the standpoint of determining overall changes. 
Therefore, to sum up the major change during price filing, i.e. price re- 
duction, it is suggested that Appendix S, Part 9a be consulted. "Thile 
this study covers only fifteen companies, it embodies all of the material 
and essential changes which occurred. 

In examining this evidence, it -ill be noted that few filings occurred 
during the months of January and February of 1934, but that most of the 
filings recorded reduced prices by reducing the list price. In March, 
1934 more numerous filings rrere made and two companies, ITos. 3 and 8, re- 
vised practically their entire line downward. On April 2, 1934 came the 

9822 



-127- 

nost drastic occurefice of the sntir< price filing experience. Company 
No. 5 made a substantial reduction in price by changing to a net basis, 
the reduction amounting to about 2 r fo. Practically every company followed 1 
C lany No, 5 "ithin the ten day waiting period and as a revult, the gen- 
eral price level in comparison to Hie original • as reduced about 25;o. 

After this drastic reduction, filings becane a matter of sniping at 
a fen items rather than a general reduction of the entire line of any 
company. Only about six initiating revisions reducing an entire line 
occur after April second. This gradual whittling of prices resulted in 
an avera e reduction of an additional 10$ between the last of April and 
the close of price filin ;• 

Prom the standpoint of accuracy, ..the filings made, after April are 
of questionable value, because the group became discouraged, and the degree 
of co:ipliance "as reduced until in the latter months of the price filing 
experience it is quite probable that little or no attention v as paid to 
filed prices. 

The reason for the drastic price change of April 2 does not appear 
in the record, i '.embers of the industry allege that it was actually due 
to open price filing, because open price filing revealed the arices quoted 
by the large manufacturers. As a result the smaller manufacturers, espec- 
ially the medium sized, ones, cut under in an effort to secure volume out- 
lets, especially- chain store distribution. The April 2 filing was just 
such a bid for chain store trade. 

They allege further and the record bears the i out to some extent, 
that after April. 2, the large companies and some others determined, that 
the chain store business T 'aa unprofitable at such prices and they there- 
fore c Leir attention to other markets, leaving; those companies 
-ho 1 ad cut prices, and obtained, the chain store business, <~ith those 
ace or: 1 1 3 . 

■ 'The Industry .believes further, probably correctly, that the reduction 
in price to secure chain store business resulted, in the reduction of the 
entire price level. In this connection, note that dating from April 2, 
many companies quote net prices to all buyers, giving ur any attempt to 
attract any special customer class by preferential discount. 

After April 2, keen competition occurred between manufacturers in 
endeavoring to secure Class J business, replacing the less attractive 
chain store business. Since s. Class J customer "ould ordinarily provide 
a i'ood steady volume of business, it appears reasonable that efforts 
should be made to secure accounts in that class. In connection with the 
definition of Class J customers, it should, be noted, that although he is 
define" a c one -mrchasing standard catalogue devices, most of the filings 
list 3 vi es from a special catalogue. Under packaging Class J customers 
are usually quoted, per thousand, bulk packing, and in some cases, per ten 
thousand. It is also quite probable that many of the Class J sockets are 
made to customer specification and therefore carry special prices. 

gaiting Period 

In spite of the fact that it is extremely difficult accurately to 

9S22 



-120- 



convoare products, many coincidental revisions were made. In fact, the 
majority of filings were to meet the price competition of some other 
company. 

The spread of an initiating revision in this group is quite 
interesting. To illustrate: let us take five hypothetical companies, 
a, b, c, d, and e of which a and b are very close competitively, but 
b is also a competitor of e, and a is a competitor of d, with c compet- 
ing with e. Thus, Company c, which is directly competitive only with 
Company e, by reducing its prices, transmits an impulse through e to b, 
to a, and then to d. As a result, a and b have made revisions because 
of c, with whom they seldom, if ever compete. 

In making a coincidental revision it was apparently not necessary 
actually to duplicate the filing met b\xt rather to seek the balancing 
of competitive positions. 

Jts interest in open price filing lagged, due to lack of compliance, 
the number of initiating revisions met within the ten day waiting period 
gradually decreased. 



SUI.S/iAEY 
The net result of these changes was as follows: 

1. Prices were reduced during the period of price filing about Z5fo. 
There was a definite trend toward quoting all products on a net 
basis although some companies continued on a list and discount 
basis. 

2. To a noticeable extent, customer classifications disappeared, 
since thirteen companies now quote all buyers. 17ith the tendency 
to eliminate customer classification and to quote on a net basis, 
discounts also are fewer. Those discounts which remain are 
practically unchanged as compared with those originally filed. 

3. Terms of payment have become more uniform. 

4. Delivery terms have become more uniform and have been amplified 
by allowing freight on smaller packages and by qualifying freight 
allowances on the basis of value and freight. 



9322 



-129- 




National Electrical Manufacturers 

Association 

IS* UtT44THtTRtIT 
NSW YORK 

IMPORTANT ! OFFICIAL CALL FOR PRICE LISTS, ETC. 

Sept siab er 14th, iyb3 . 




HBOC : _- : 



I, R. Edwards, Supervisory Agency for the Wiring Devices 
Section, hereby determine that in the Wiring Devices branch or 
subdivision of the electrical manufacturing industry, it has 
been the generally recognized practice to sell Wiring Devices _ 
including all such devices as Lamp Sockets and Receptacles; 
Attachment Plugs, Receptacles and Connectors and Socket Plug 
Devices; Snap Switches; Toggle Switches; Flush Switches and 
Plates; Miscellaneous Adapters etc; Plug and Enclosed Fuse 
Cutouts, on the basis of printed net price lists, or price 
lists with discounts sheets, containing fixed terms of payment. 
Therefore, within ten days from September 16th, 1933, every 
manufacturer of all or any of the above products, is required 
to file' with me at the office of NEMA, 155 East 44th Street, 
New York, a net price list, or a price list and discount 
sheets, showing his current prices and fixed terms of sale 
and payment thereon. 

In filing with me these price lists and discount sheets 
kindly send me one hundred fifteen copies of each for 
distribution. 



9822 




R, Edwards 
Supervisory Agency. 




.-130- 

miBiT i 
National Electrical Manufacturers 
Association 

155 EAST 44th STREET 
NEW YORK 



DESIGNATED AS THE AGENCY FOR ADMINISTERING. SUPERVISING AND PROMOTING THE 
PERFORMANCE OF THE PROVISIONS OF THE CODE FOR THE ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING 
INDUSTRY. UNDER THE NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL RECOVERY ACT. APPROVED BY PRESIDENT 
ROOSEVELT ON AUGUST 4. 1993. 

OFFICE OF SUPERVISORY AGENCY FOR 



INSTALLATION DEVICES SUBDIVISION 
November 29, 1933. 



I, Robert Edwards, Supervisory Agency of the Installa- 
tion Devices Subdivision of the electrical manufacturing indus- 
try, appointed in accordance with the provisions of Article XII 
of the Code for the Electrical Manufacturing Industry approved 
by the President on August 4, 1933, by the Board of Governors of 
National Electrical M-nufacturers Association, have, pursuant to 
the authority vested in me by Article X of said Code, determined 
that it has been the generally recognized practice to sell Wir- 
ing Devices on the basis of net price lists, or price lists and 
discount sheets, and fixed terms of payment. 

However, the filing of price lists or price lists- and 
discount sheets, under my call expiring October 6th, has result- 
ed in confusion and misunderstanding much to the disadvantage of 
the Wiring Devices industry. The immediate necessity, therefore, 
of breaking down the list of manufacturers into various subdivi- 
sions and the calling for refiling of prices on such wiring de- 
vices as naturally fall into these subdivisions is apparent. 

I therefore direct that you as a manufacturer of, or 
one promoting the manufacture for sale of 

Sockets, all types, including: 

Brass Shell Sockets, 

Porcelain ♦» 

Composition »' 

Weatherproof " and all variations thereof 

file with me for distribution, as required by said Code to all 
other manufacturers, of the products specified above, at the of- 
fice of National Electrical Manufacturers Association, 155 East 
44th Street, New York City, on or before Dec. 12, 1933, FIFTY 



9822 



-*L31- 



copios of your price lists, or price lists and discount sheets, 
showing your current prices and fixed terms of sale and payment 
on thw products specified above. 

Please see that each set is firmly bound together and 
that 'ioth the catalog number and a comprehensive description of 
each product is shown thereon. Show all discounts, (which may 
include discounts to other manufacturers of the products speci- 
fied above) , and all of your terms for sale and payment either 
on your prico lisTs - or attached thereto and not in a separate 
letter to the Supervisory Agency. 

Very truly yours, 




Robert Edwards 
Supervisory Agency. 



P.S. All packages must bo marked S- //m ^f for identification. 
Your company name and a datu must appear on all sheets or sets of 
sheets furnished this Agency. As typewritten sheets, either orig- 
inal or carbon copies, require first class mail, your price sheets 
or revisions thereof should be printed or in somo form of process- 
ing or duplication. 



9822 



•/3Z- 




National Electrical Manufacturers 
Association 



155 EAST 44th STREET 
NEW YORK 



DESIGNATED AS THE AGENCY FOR ADMINISTERING. SUPERVISING AND PROMOTING THE 
PERFORMANCE OF THE PROVISIONS OF THE CODE FOR THE ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING 
INDUSTRY. UNDER THE NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL RECOVERY ACT. APPROVED BY PRESIDENT 
ROOSEVELT ON AUGUST 4. 1933. 

OFFICE OF SUPERVISORY AGENCY 

INSTALLATION DEVICES SUBDIVISION 
June 6, 1934. 



TO ALL MANUFACTURERS OF: 



SOCKETS ALL TYPES 



Gentlemen: 



Your attention is directed to the last paragraph of 
price call dated November 29, 1933, covering 

Sockets all Types. 

That portion within brackets reading (which may include dis- 
counts to other manufacturers of the products specified above) 
means that if the manufacturer files such '•courtesy discounts" 
he may quote or sell- at such discounts only to actual manu- 
facturers who have filed under the same call, i.e., manufac- 
turers of the same product as specified in the call. It is 
a distinct violation to extend these courtesy discounts to 
any manufacturer other than the above and such discounts must 
be filed before any such sales are made. 

To l;e more specific, a socket manufacturer is en- 
titled to extend courtesy discounts to other .manufacturers of 
sockets but may not extend a courtesy discount on sockets to 
any other manufacturer even though the latter makes other 
wiring devices. 

A manufacturer not having filed discounts to other 
manufacturers of the same product, must quote or sell only 
at discounts filed for other classes of trade. 

If courtesy discounts are extended to manufacturers 
not entitled to them, such sales will be treated as violations 
of Article X of the Code for the Electrical Manufacturing In- 
try. 




i 



9822 



*i M ova nun 



R. Edwards 
Supervisory Acencv. 



^w 



A. The Industry 



—133- 

C hFT S 11 
DOld STIC ELECTRIC HEATIITG APPLIAl CE 

Development 



The Domestic Electric Heating Aopliance industry, as well as the 
Domestic Electric Appliance industry, is relatively new. A number of 
factors are responsible f ? its growth. Basic, perhaps, is the higher 
standard of living. The Public 'Utilities have contributed in no small 
measure by introducing promotional current rates and expending increased 
efforts to build up domestic load through the sale of aubliances. In -late 
rs, the Federal government has assisted through the TVA, Rural Electri- 
fication, the Electric Earn 'and Home Authority, and the Federal Housing 
Administration, 

1 . Problems of D evelopment 

This group is primarily of the Electrical industry, but it has drann 
■ manufacturers from many other lines. This came about because most of the 
products are straight metal stamping jobs ' hich require' merely provisions 
for a heating element and a switch, .manufacturers of aluminum '-'are and 
others haying available metal stamping equipment have been quick to sense 
the opportunity to participate in a new field. This participation, fre- 
quently experimental ., .Vas after only to the extent of producing two or three 
thousand items subseouently sold at a loss, tut still the ease ^ith. which 
producers of other lines can cut across from a standpoint of fabircation 
is a real source of difficulty. 

The part played by ! the appliance manufacturer has changed considerably. 
In the beginning of the industry, his interest was centered almost wholly 
on production. But now, package appeal, product design, display and con- 
sumer advertising are considerations in noint. 

Design 

In the matter of design, there is the problem of design piracy and the 
difficult problem of maintaining a line of sufficient scope to keen up "ith 
fast moving industr?/ product developments „ 

Product Dunning 

A problem also existed due to numerous products ^ith varying seasons 
of sale, and the "in and out" aanufacturer who takes a flyer in manufacturing 
s ier product and then, discouraged, throws his output on the market, 'do 
effort is made, in this dunning of "unnrof itable merchandise, to protect the 
prices of competitors by spreading the -orofitless items over a considerable 
area. Rather it is found that they "-ill be unloaded in some urban center to 
the detriment of nrices of similar products-. 



There is also the matter of safety and the requirements of municipal 
9822 



-134- 

i 
ordinances. The industry has an ever growing problem in finding some way 

to cope rith "unsafe" appliances which are the source of fires and home 

accidents and at the sane tine to prevent the establishment of such rigid 

municipal ordinances as would handicap development and sale. 

Sal es Outlets 

The sales: outlets for modern ao.'oliances are very different from those 
of the early da~ r s of , the industry.. This is due, in a large measure, to 
■ several iactors. Firtt, that the original domestic electric heating ap- 
•olia-ice»was a very unlovel"- thing at best, hut throtigh changes and improve- 
ments in design., finish and general aopearance, it has "become ver-' attract- 
ive, aid therefore more easily suscentible for sale through channels in 
which sales to consumers 'are accomplished through counter display ad price. 
A good example of this is the "Ten cent store." 

Second, the development of channels devoted to the sale of low nriced 
merchandise offered a -potential volume outlet for lo^er -priced merchandise 
than the industry offered. The result, of course, res that cheaper devices 
were produced to meet this demand am 6 to take advantage of the new outlet. 
To illustrate, when the chain and other drug stores undertook to handle 
domestic electric heating appliance, it was necessary that they stock items 
Fhich were priced in. the price grouip with nhich the customer associated 
drug stores. By this is- meant that since the average item nruchased in a. 
drug' . tore is lees than a dollar, the customer r -ould merhans instinctively 
be reluctant to undertake the purchase of an apnliance costing five or six 
dollars. In ado.ition, the value of smace in such : tores is a.t a preiniun 
and it is more -profitable to handle low priced ite ;s since the- - move faster. 

Third, the increasing demand by the consumer, coupled v 'ith reductions 
in current rates, the establishment or promotional rates-, aid the sales 
programs of utilities, causecl 6e-oa.rtmeit stores to become interestec" in the 
possible business. True enough, department stores had handled appliances 
previously but had not e mhasized them. 

Price Comparison 

It is extre. :el" difficult to compare the product' of individual maiu- 
•facturers. First, because while some manufacture man 1 / types of 'product, 
others produce but one or two. However the sales of those one or t--'o items 
may be equal to or grea.ter than the sales of similar items by a compan"" -'ith 
extern: ive lines. 

Members of . the Industry 

About 175 companies ranging from very snail to ouite large and located 
in- the eastern and north central areas, 

B. Price Call — Exhibit a 

The mrice call was issued under date of December 19, 1P33 , to be effect- 
ive December 30, 1933, aid directed to in exce::s of 175 manufacturers, Com- 
iDarativel" little '"as kno^n- concerning the actuail number of manufacturers, 
"hat the" manufactured and hoi- they sold, manufacturers made original filings 

9822 



-135- 
as late as December of 19S4. The majority, however, complied by the letter 
rt of Jriuary, 193o. 

Work Sheets 

In studying this group, clue to the number of companies and the type of 
product, the price filings were exceedingly voluminous, and it became re- 
quisite that the study be made of representative companies, products and situ- 
ation. For this reason, the study embodies information taken from the fil- 

of fifty-eight of the one hundred seventh-three companies. They, it is 
believed, fairly illustrate the entire group.' 

The work sheets and materials are as follows: 

l a Appendix A Part 10. 

Chronological record' of price filings by companies. 
Appendix A Part 10a. 

Price changes on electric toasters. 

2. Appendix B Part 10. 

Original and final or ice structure. 
Appendix B Part 10a. 

Lowest and highest prices by companies for 
electric hand irons. 

In the first column of sheet covering original. and final price struct- 
ure in additional to inducating the" company and the effective date of its 
iriginal filing, a key has been given as to tlie line of products manufactured 
by each company. B ir reference to the chronological record of price filings 
by companies, page 2, a list of )roducts <-ith their key letters rill be found. 

C. Original price structure - Appendix B Part 10 

Prici ng List prices &xe cuoted on most items by some companies although 
the saie company may also juote net prices on certain items. Other companies 
quote net prices on the entire line and still otherr- quote net prices and 
have small functional discounts for some customer classes, while other class- 
es are cuoted net. 

Cust omer Classification and Discount . 

Consider no 1 "' the work sheet 'Trade classifications and discounts' 
Appendix B Part 10. 

Practically all companies manufacturing more than one or two types of 
product quote to the first customer class 'Dealers and Retailers' a Companies 
manufacturing one or t-'O products, in many cases, fail to quote. 

Although there are ten types under this customer class, no company quotes 
to more than three. Discounts quoted vary from zero (net price) to 55$ off, 
list with intermediate steps of 25$, 35)i, 35^ and 5$, 40,; and 10$, 40$-10$~ 

5;a, etc. 

Variance in Discount 

This same variance in amount b'f discount 'ill be found in all of the six 
9822 



-136- 

general customer classes. These classes are: 

1. Dealers or Retailors. 

2. "Iholesalers. 
3„ J^M-go Buyers, 

'j--. Quantity discount only, Maximum discount or minimum net. 
5, Central stations, power eonpani.es and utilities. 
S. manufacturers agents. 

T7hole r . alers 

Wholesalers in most cp.ses ,■ re ruoted slightly larger dii counts nd 
lorer net prices than dealers and retailers. 

Large Buyers 

"Large Buyers" are given discounts "hich are eouivalent to, and in 
some cases, slightly less than these offered wholesalers. Also companies 
who did quote dealers and/.or ^hole-i alers , do' not quote large buyers. 

Quantity and 1 aximui a Discounts 

a further classification covers those ' companies Quoting quantity 
only or maximum discounts or minimum net. In mo:- t cases , this is a net. 
Central Station, and the like, are emoted di' counts which vary from par 
with dealers and retailers to in excess of those oioted large buyers, 

manufacturers' Ageiitr 

": anufacturers ' Agent! " , are ouoted discounts by a few companies 
generally on a oar with the highest discount to any other customer cla.ss, 

miscellaneous: Allowance 

"Miscellaneous Allowances" nre a source of much difficulty pji& con- 
fusion. In comparing the trices or c iscounts of individual companies, it 
is of the utmost uroortance that the record be checked for morsible special 
discounts. T-noical or these special discounts or charges are: 

1. 10 : /o allowance for advertising anc sales-promotion r- ork. 

2. 25 to 50 heaters - 5, advertising allowance. 

3. Prices subject to extra IC70. 

Terms of Payment . 

Terms were usually 2$, 10 days, net 30, but many variations occurred 
with some companies quoting as high as 2, , 10 days, 90 days net and others 
offering no discount for cash. 

Delivery Terms . 

Deliver 1 / terms were usually f.o.b Factory but with deviations and 
exceptions as, f.o.b. destination 100 lbs., f.o.b. i ctronolitan "few York 

9822 



-1. 7- 

f.o.b, warehouse, Freight prepaid IOC lbs. and over. 

Lack of Uniformity , 

Probably the most outstanding characteristic of these first filings 
is the difference and dissimilarity between the f ilin ;■ of individual 
manufacturers. This is accountable -on the ground of difference in types of 
product manufactured, design and quality plus "a relatively large number 
of manufacturers. 

D. Pinal P i lings. — Corr oa rison with Original 

The 'Final Tilings' are ; o termed rather than 'Final Structure 1 
because the situation was not one of regul.-r form or design. 

Comparing the final filing: vith the original, the trade classi- 
fications have remained the same as have the discounts quoted. In some 
groups, as for instance, "Large Buyers", there has "been some shifting 
as to the type of the outlet cuotecl, Liany companies because of having 
made only one filing retain their position as of the original filing. 
It is quite interesting that the smaller companies, in many ca es , in 
the final filings ouote more often than originally to wholesalers and 
large buyers. 

Growth of i iscellaneor.s iillov : ances 

In the original filing", nine companies ouoted specific special 
allowances. In the latest filings some twenty-five quote such allow- 
ances. This development is probably one of the most significant and 
indicates that due to the confusion which existed, manufacturers felt 
that these odd discounts had to be set up to xrovide flexibility in each 
case • ithout the necessity making revision of existing filings. In 
actual practice, it probably r orked out that these specials became regu- 
lar discounts. 

Terms of Payment and Delivery 

In the area of terms of payment and delivery, the same general r :it- 
uation prevailed with an increase in the number of miscellaneous elements 
which were optional for standard or customary r>ra„ctice. 

5. Lo"e r t gxd Highest Prices — PI ectr i c Fie at in ~ Iro ns 

Considering the - ork sheet entitled "lowest and Highest Price':, 
Electric Heating Irons", (Appendix B Part 10a) and comparing the list 
prices end discounts under the original filings "ith those -of the latest 
filings, it -ill be seen that although the items selected for each com- 
pany --ere as nearly comparable as "oossible, reat differences in price 
and discount emerge, 

1, Prices - Original Filings 

In the original filings., irons are listed from about $1.50 to $3. 95 
"ith fairly regular gradation between. After considering the discounts 

9822 



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and net prices quoted on the specimen irons, the difficulty of comparing 
products becomes evident. It • ill be found that one iron list? at $1.50 
with a net of $1.60, another iists at $1.47 i ith a dif count of 10$. Also 
one iron listed at $3.25 with a discount of 50, j, another listed at $3.50 
with a discount of 50;s to most customers snd a net of $.75, to one pur- 
chaser. Another iron listed at $3.50 is quoted down to $1.80 less 5$, 
and to another customer class at $3,50 less 40 c /o-10$j-5fi, TVo different 
corapanieslist irons at $7.95, one cuoting a net of $3.93, 'and the other 
$3.60 less 5fj, including a one collar trade-in-allowance. 

2. Prices - Final l-'ilings 

In examining the latest filing;, it 'as found, that certain of the 
items originally selected as typical specimens had "been eliminated and 
others had been reviser as to construction, design, etc. So that in add- 
ition to changes in price, certain irons "'ere cheapened in construction 
or finish, while others were eliminated from the line and remlaeed by- 
less costly products. 

Irons nor list from $.60 to $8.95 with very fe™ being listed above 
$5.00 and the majority below $3.50. This situation is a further indica- 
tion of the fact that the lev outlets have created a very considerable de- 
mand, for price merchandise. There are, however, instances of increased net 
prices, and prices which have remained the same, found usually in the high- 
er priced .merchandise, produced by old. line houses and subjected to nation- 
al advertising. Other conroanies , in on attempt to preserve previous list 
prices and classification die counts, quote additonal allowances which affect 
the net price from 5fo to 15fo. 

This work sheet illustrates, in so e measure, the activity which occur- 
red', in the low orice field with the possible effect of seriously impairing 
the sales volume of the higher -oriced quality items. 

3. Price Chancer on Electric Toasters (A'open d ix A Fart 10a ) 

In line with comments on orice changes, refer to Appendix a Part 10a. 
This study serves to illustrate not only price variations with respect to 
specific items, but also the possibility of obscuring filed urices by the 
re-arrangement of catalogue nmebers and symbols.. Notice also the drastic 
reductions made in items v hich are to be eliminated or closed out. 

P. Chronological Record of Price Filings by Companies 

In order to examine specific filings and changes between the original, 
and. later filings , refer to Appendix A Part 10, Chronological Price Filings 
by Companies. In compiling this record, fourteen companies were used, they 
being illustrative of tine entire group. The number of filings made varies 
from t r, enty-rfive or thirty for large companies to four or five for very small. 

Waiting Period 

The ' aiting period was used quite often, the Supervisory Agency requir- 
ing ten clays excent under exceptional circumstances. Due to the fact that 
there is little or no comparison possible between products, initiating re- 
vi' ions were not met within the ten day waiting oeriod. except in one or twm 

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c . 

m eeting Competit ion 

At this point, it is orobably '-ell to discuss the difficulty in deter- 
mining in this groun -hen a filing net con-oetition. It is relatively simple 

letter where a fe 1 " store ardized products are to be considered , but in the 
Domestic Electric Heating Appliance Groun, '"here, as in one case, a manu- 
facturer ouotes -ormces on nineteen types of percolators , it is exceedingly 

.if fi cult to decide when or when not products are competitively comparable. 
Tor instaxe, a toaster is sold by i .anuf acturer A at $2.00. Manufacturer B 
sells a toaster for $1.50. A reduces his toaster $.10 B wishes 'also to re- 
duce his toa- ter $.10 on the groundthat the two products compete. In the 
broad sense, it is true that they co compete, but ti>o carry the thought fur- 
ther, a toaster competes for the consumer's dollar • ■ ith the percolator, the 
ironing joard, shoes and a.rroles. Obviously, if a line is to be drawn, it 
must be an arbitrary one. Further more should the manufacturer be permitted 
to reduce his toaster $.10 then he is not perhaps meeting the -orice of Lianu- 
facturer A in the strictei t sense. But if it is suggested that he reduce his 
■orice only 5;.o, he may object on the ground 1 that there ha.s always been a 
difference of $.50 in the -orice of his toaster and that of manufacturer A. 
This illustration can, of course, be enlarged to include the case of the 
manufacturer '.-ho reduces one percolator and his competitor who wishes to 
meet this reduction by reducing a percolator which is comparable and then 
or a dozen others in addition, on the ground that he has to maintain set 
-orice differentials in order to move his entire line. Theso are merely ad- 
ministrative questions which did arise during the price filing era. 

Increasing Line s . 

One very interesting feature of the Chronological Record of Price Filings 
is the constantly recurring situation where a manufacturer files nrices on a 
product in the Domestic Electric Heating Apoliance Group which he has not 
previously manufactured. There is little or no evidence of an increasing 
number of outside manufacturers entering the Industry during the code period 
but there is a strong indication that manufacturers already in the Industry 
did materially increase the scope of their operations from the standpoint of 
number of products. This may or may not be traceable in an 1 ' degree to the 
open price filing system. It n?y be that -ith business at a low ebb, manu- 
facturers were looking about for means to better their condition and there- 
fore would have hit uoon the extension of line regardless of open price 
filing. 

Summary ; 

1. Certain natural characteristics of the groum apparently resulted 
in confusion. Some of the characteristics which seemed to cause 
the most difficulty were: 

1. Lack of standardized products. 

2. Numerous products and adaptations. 

3. Liany product ouality levels not clearly defined, 

4. Product Design. 

5. Numerous manufacturers many of them relatively new in the 
Industry. 



Ft' 



5, There was a decided increase in the number of '-nrica 1 items. 



-140- 



3. I/ell known and. nationally advertized products of old line com- 
panies did not lower materially in price. 

4. Customer classes and functional discounts did not change sub- 
stantially but special allowances and discounts increased- in 
number end effect with the result thatmost 'Trices orobably were 
lower ft the close of price filing than at the beginning. 

5. Manufacturers in the general field of domestic electrical 
appliances a'J 'err to have extended their product lines to in- 
clude items not previously manufactured by them. 

6. The -orice filing experience ,v as a. means of compiling a record 
of the number 'of members in the Industry, their oroducts and 
methods of selling. 



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EXHIBIT A 

PRICE CALL- Domestic Appliances 

APPLIANCE PRODUCTS SUBDIVISION 
December 18, 1933 

I, Walter M. Sterns, Supervisory Agency of the Appliance Products 
Subdivision of the electrical manufacturing industry appointed, in 
accordance with the provisions of Article XII of the Code for the Elec- 
trical Manufacturing Industry approved by the President on August 4, 
1933, "by the Board of Governors of National Electrical Manufacturers 
Association, hereby notify yo'u that I have, pursuant to the authority 
vested in me by Article X of said Code, determined that it has been 
the generally recognized practice to sell; 

Domestic Electric Heating Appliances - except electric ranges 
ever 2-g- K.W. capacity and electric water hoatcrsof the non- 
portable type 

Domestic Portable Motor Driven Appliances - except clocks, dish- 
washers, fan motors, refrigerators, sewing machines, vacuum clean- 
ers and washing machines 

en the basis of -noi, price lists, of price lists and discount sheets, and 
fixed terms of payment. 

I therefore direct that you as a manufacturer ef, or one promoting 
the manufacture for sale of, all or any of the above, at the office of 
ITational Electrical Manufacturers Association, 155 East 44th Street, 
New York City, on or before December 30, 1933 ONE HUNDRED NINETY-FIVE 
(195 copies of your price lists, or price lists and discount sheets, 
showing your current prices and fixed terms of sale and payment to your 
various classes of trade on the products specified above. 

The following exceptions are made: 

(a) Prices to your employees for their own 
use 

(b) Prices covering export sales 

(c) Prices to other manufacturers of the 
products specified above^ 

Show all discounts, terms, etc., either on price lists or attached 
thereto and not in a separate letter to .the Supervisory Agency. 

(Signed) Walter i.i. Stearns 

Supervisory Agency. 

P.3. All packages must he raarkMl DK-12-18 for identification. Your 

company nafliu and a date must arrocar on all sheets or sets of sheets 
furnished this Agency. Priee sheets, or revisions thereof should 
not be typewritten, cither original or carton copies. 



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■ CHAPTER 12 
JOOD SERVICE EQUIPMEN T 
A. The Industry 

1. P r oduct 

De scriptio n 

The products of the Pood Service Equipment group include all elec- 
trically operated or heated counter appliances, hake ovens, dish wash- 
ers, neat choppers, coffee mills, potato peelers, drink misers, slicers, 
silver burnishers, and other similar appliances. 

The problems of this group '/ere not particularly -jell known at the 
tine of the price call, for a number of reasons, of which the follow- 
ing are illustrative: 

1. llumber of manufacturers unknown. 

2. The products manufactured oy each unknown. 

3. Method of selling undefined. 

Materials 

Materials used in fabrication of products of this group include 
iron and steel castings, die castings, molded plastics, knives, saws, 
formed steel and iron parts, electrical motors and control equipment. 

Va riations 

Included in this stud;^ are twenty-three separate and distinct 
products plus numerous special and almost custom-built items. The 
various pieces of equipment vary from small store size to large com- 
mercial units. Equipment produced o^ individual companies will vary 
as to size, appearance, construction, motor, amount of work done and 
type of work done. 

2. Compani es 

" umbe r 

Forty-two companies filed prices. 

Size 

Companies vary from very small with one or two employees to large 
manufacturers maintaining substantial payrolls. 

Other Produc ts 

host of the members of the Industry confine themselves to the 

9322 



-143- 

lanuf cture of food service equipment ; out about tne manufacture other 

allied products! Sone fern operate generally in the Electric?! 
I 1 ".ustry. 

Location 

The majority of the companies are located in the E - stern indus- 
trial r.rer and in the Chicago and Detroit metropolitan areas, one in 
Tor ' i one in Louisville. 



The products of this grouo \re used in hotels and commercial es- 
tablishments rnd other enterprises "here food is prepared in large 
volume. 

Distribution 



Distribution is made -direct to user arid by means of distributors, 
chains, dealers and equipment houses. The -oroducts ere distributed 
• ?.tionall3 r . 

Freight 



Dae to the weight and bulk of some of the eouipment, freight 
1? - be an iiroortant item, though the high unit value usually renders 
it not significant. 

4. Omen Price Piling. 

Price C all 

Realizing the lack of information concerning those properlv with- 
in the jroup, the Supervisory Agent had, on Feoruary 21, 1934, addressed 
a letter to all manufacturers who might be properly included, ashing 
the i to supply a list of their oroducts and other data which would be 
helpful in composing the price call. 

The -orice call based on the first paragraph of Article X of the 

Code of fir conroetition for the Electrical Manufacturing Industry and. 

issued ilarch 30, 1934, effective April 10, 1934, was addressed to more 

than forty-five manufacturers. (S::hibit A) 

Si:: exemptions for special transactions', such as rules for ex- 
port, were made in the price call. Attention is called to these ex- 
ecutions in the light of confusion in some of the other groups, and the 
suggestion concerning the elimination of particular -oroducts and types 
of transactions from the scome of orice calls. 

TJork Sheets 

Due to the diversity of products, lack of descriptive material, and 
the vague and incomplete filings made, work sheets were not set up for 



9822 



-144- 

all -products included. To illustrate the diversity of products, there 
is included (Exhibit 2) ? list of products -ith an identifying symbol. 
a list of the -Troducts manufactured by erch corco^n^, and a suivmary of 
the nun.ier of companies producing each of the uroducts. Of the tT7enty- 
one products, sixteen .are manufactured "by four companies or less, 
usuall"/ less. Sir:teen comp-iiies made different tyoes of neat cho-omers, 
fourteen co:r-anies different coffee mills, eleven como-ries made meat 
slicing machines, rhile nine companies made some proouct or products 
apparently not manufactured by any other company. 

'.'or. 1 - sheets v/ere made shoeing customer classifications, discounts, 
trade in allowances , deferred patient plans, delivery and terms of pay- 
ment. (Appendix 3, Part II) In additions, these sheets include prices 
for the lowest priced itens aid the highest priced items of a given pro- 
duct n-'uif-ctured "ay each company. 

liany of the companies made o; , .h/ one, tuo or three filings, so that 
in many instances the entire record of a particular company is set out 
on the '.rork sheets descrioed above. In an effort to simplify the com- 
plexity resulting from the number of products, separate - T orh sheets of 
the t-npe described r/ere made for meat choosers, -ootato and vegetable 
peelers, silver burnishers, coffee mills and meat slicing machines. 

It was not considered necessary to m°ke v.'ork sheets for all types 
of products, since the five named illustrate the tyoe of industry and 
its ^activities under the open price filing system. Each -oroducer tends 
to sell his various products according to much the same arice pa.ttern. 
A second study v.ts made in the form of a chronological -ecord of price 
filings by com-oanies. (Annendix A, Part 11) This includes only the 
records of those companies Tvho made more than tmo filings. 

B. Ba s i c S t rue tur e 

1. Oriainfl r-.qd Final Strop ture • 

In this Industry, a price structure exists in name only. The 
structural pattern for each company is similar but not identical. The 
tyoe of structure might be illustrated by the fact that all people 
a"e constructed of the same number- of parts but that these parts vary. 
Normally all meople aave hands, but of different shape, size and dex- 
terity, rll have eyes, but of different size, color, shape and use- 
fulness. 

Price 

I n the matter of price, some manufacturers quote list trices, 
others quote net -orices, some ruote on a. combination of both, and 
some even quote net trices on specific t-~oes of a particular item a'ith 
list orices on other tyoes, and others cuote net prices to certain 
customer; classes and list to other classes. 

Practically all companies have list arices but often bhe price to 
a given customer is not exoressed as by a discount from list but merely 



9322 



-145- 

a net 'rice, r -hich is loner than the list. 

As mi lit be expected under 'the conditions of mroduct differences, 
the of list orices varies considerably in amount. For neat 

raers, the lorrest -price is ninet" dollars and the highest price is 

hundred dollars. Similar differents in list are found in 
jci ' 1 ' ith other products. There are a fe-.r cases of two or more 
co it lies ruotir.v similar lists, hut the oroduct in each case varies 
beriall", ~s do the discounts. 

As jetveen the original and final filings, no definite "orice 
:;;e occurred, out modifications of product aid the dropping of old 
lines and adding n&r. caused different list prices to appear. It is 
not nossible to determine whether these lrter -orices v;ere hi her or 
lower than the original; 

Discounts aid Customer Classif i-cations_ 

The: e are tiro general types of customer class. 

1. -Users < 

2. Distributors: 

Users are described by various commies- as follows: 

1. Users 

Government agencies, other than federal 
5. United States government 

4. Institutions 

5. Paching houses 

Distributors are descrioed ?s : 

1. Distrioutors 

2. Chains 

3. Dealers 

4. Quantity buvers 

5. Johhers 

Z, Various types of supply and equipment houses 
7. Manufacturers' agents 

I .e sam.e list prices are usually employed as the oasis of quota- 
tions to all tyoes of customer class out there is apparently no channel 
"" lich is most favored in every ca.se. -Some companies cuote preferential 
prices to chains, others to johhers, dealers or distrioutors. However, 
the distributor groups is usually quoted more favorably than the user 
group. 

There was no uniformity r s to the number of customer classes quoted 
by individual commrnies. Some companies apparently specialized in sell- 
in- to eouroaent houses, others to distributors, still others to chains. 
The errjosure of the channels of distribution of their competitors appar- 
ently did not cause manufacturers to increase the number of channels 

9322 



no 



-146-- 

through which they quote:. 

Corroaring list prices and discounts, it is seen that there is 
constant rela.tionshi\-> between the t'-o. For example, one manufacturer 
with a list -orice- of one hundred and fifty dollars has a discount of 
60^, while another with a list price of one. hundred and fort3 r ~f ive 
dollars has a discount of 25,j. Any further comarison of list prices 
and discounts rill provide i.mu.ierablo illustrations of the lack of 
relationship jetween size of list and siz.e of discount. 

During price filing it appears for the record that prices changed 
very little. This conclusion cannot be stated with certalnt3 r for the 
reason that the nrice filings gave such an inadequate uicture. Having 
in mind the disorganized character of the filings, and in vie 1 ' of the 
fact that little or no change is ndted in connection with items on 
which comnlete filings were originally made, it is "orobable that the 
final filings represent nore adequately the "ay the group did business 
than do the original filings. 

Freight Terms * 

During the period of open arice filing, at !e?„st twenty-eight 
varying sets of delivery terns were used (see list in A - oaendix E, Part 
ll). These terns varied from a sirrole statement, such as FOI factor - ' - , 
to delivered "orices on e zone basis. ITo trend toward simplification 
or uniformity is evident. 

Credit Terms 

The average aa - anent tens v ;ere 2;c, 10 Days, net 30 days, or some 
approximation thereof. Ho"ever, man3 r divergent and varying terms oc- 
curred such as 5y, 30 dr.ys; 10;1 cash; 5y for cash on large machines 
and ?Jo for cash on snail machines. Here again there was no tendency 
toward uniformity. 

About 30^ of the Industry filed deferred payment plans, no t^o 
bein;; alike, nor was there any tendency toward uniformity during ' 
open price filing. 

Credit terms were ustially, for a given com'oan;", the sa.ie for all 
nroducts. The changes and time allovred on deferred payments related 
to the cost of the equipment and varied so as to afford the purchaser 
of the nore costly items an owmortunity to pay over a longer ;oeriod 
of time. 

Trade Allowances 



About one-third of the com - oanies filed infor irtion - oertaining to 
trade-in allowances, usually in connection '.7ith the trade-in value of 
specified eouipnent as credit against eurchase of a given item. It 
is auite probable that everyone in the industry made trade-in allov;- 
ances but that the Supervisory Agenc?/ did not insist that they file 
data in view of the difficulties of enforcement. 



9822 



-147- 

r . Chronol ogica l P^cord of Pr ice gj lings by C o -ronnies (Amendix A , 
Pert 11 ) 

"i*o e" oi" *?ili:igs 

pewer filings per company were rjp.de in this grout) than in any- 
other, the Average being two, with many co r^nies mailing only one 
filing. Pour filings was the maximum number made by any company. 

*. . itin g P eriod 

After the original filing, practically ever"/ filing was given a 
ten lay treating period. i"o filings were made to meet competition 
within a ten day waiting period. 

Porm rnd Conten t 

The forri of the filings in the raajorit}' of crses was exceedingly 
poor. The filings were made' on little scraps of paper, business cards, 
and booklets. They contained little or no descriptive material, no 
adequate customer definitions, and only the vaguest statements with re- 
ard to trade-in allowances, deferred payment plans, discounts, etc. 

Summat i on 

iree things apparently accrued to the Pood Service Equipment 
group during o-oen price filing, in that information was gained as 
to: 

1. Fumber of manufacturers 

2. Products manufactured by each 

G. Channels of distribution employed 

Conclusion 

It would appear from the experience oi this sroup that open 
price filing is one method of obtaining registration for an Indus- 
try. As to whether any trends in actual prices would have occurred 
under longer experience is merely an interesting conjecture. 

Too much emphasis cannot be laid upon the necessit; r for making 
accurate, complete filings. It is possible that in this group if the 
experience had been longer, members of the Industry would have be- 
come educated to do so. But the records as they stand in many cases 
are practically useless. 

The ratner c-?"eless handling of trade-in allowances in this 
group necessitates pointing out that regardless of the efficiency 
of administration or the decree of cooperation on the part of in- 
dividual members, so far as price is concerned, the failure to cover 
the matter of trade-in allowances nullifies any value, statistical 
or otherwise, that night be obtained from price filing. 

The group is clearly one in which: 



9322 



143- 



(a) products Qannot be defined because of quality and 
design variations, 

(b) Corroetition lies in the field of nroduct cuality and 
skillful selling pp/tlier than in orice variation. 

(c) A large ironor^ion of the sale3 are nade in terms of 
single units to purchasers not continual! - / in the market, 

(d) The, group does not consist of actve conoetitors as 
such, but firms vhich split up intp nan:'' small, overlapping, coime};- 
ing jrouos according to oroduct, each not concerned "ith the behavior 
of other snail grouos -oroducing other products of £ood service eouio- 
ment. 

In other "ords, the groiro vas by no me-ns a fertile field "q-r orice 
filing, "[.liile there t.-~s, "oarh-ns, benefit f ron the sough filing, it 
is difficult to discover any value in the continuing procedure beyond 
the i-ifornption orpvided in the initial filing, p^rtainly there uas 
no evi-'ent effect in the price structure frpm trice filing. 



9322 





-149- 

EXHIBIT A 

National Electrical Manufacturers 
Association 

155 EAST 44th STREET 
NEW YORK 



DESIGNATED AS THE AGENCY FOR ADMINISTERING. SUPERVISING AND PROMOTING THE 
PERFORMANCE OF THE PROVISIONS OF THE CODE FOR THE ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING 
INDUSTRY. UNDER THE NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL RECOVERY ACT. APPROVED BY PRESIDENT 
ROOSEVELT ON AUGUST 4. 1833. 



OFFICE OF SUPERVISORY AGENCY FOR 

APPLIANCE PRODUCTS SUBDIVISION 
I.r.roh 38, 1934. 



I, Walter M. Stearns, Supervisory Agency of the 
Appliance Products Subdivision of the electrical manufac- 
turing industry appointed, in accordance with the provisions 
of Article XII of the Code for the Electrical Manufacturing 
Industry approved by the President on August 4, 1933, by the 
Board of Governors of National Electrical Manufacturers As- 
sociation, hereby notify you that I have, pursuant to the 
authority vested in me by Article X of said Code, determined 
that it has been the generally recognized practice to soil: 

FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT coming within the 
definition given below by the Food Service 
Equipment Section of the above subdivision 
of the National Electrical Manufacturing 
Industry 

on the basis of net price lists, or price lists and discount 
shee-ts, and fixed terms, of payment. 

The term "Food Service Equipmont" as usod heroin 
is defined to mean all electrically operated counter appli- 
ances, electrically operated hoavy duty equipment, eloctric- 
bakc ovens, dishwashers, moat choppers, coffee mills, vege- 
table peelers, drink mixers, slicers, silver burnishers, and 
such other appliances as are natural affiliates, for sale to 
the commercial and institutional trade, excluding in all cas- 
es equipment designed for household use. 

As a basis of dividing the above products into two 
groups for price filing purposes it has been decided to is- 
sue a separate price call covering products in this class- 
ification for 

(A) Equipment oporated by electric mo- 
tors (not suppliod with olectrical 
heat for cooking or heating pur- 
poses) 

(B) All other appliances equipped for 
electric heating or cooking with 
or without motor attachment, and 



9fe22 



oo 



-15o- 



such non-electrical appliances com- 
ing within this classification 
as are natural affiliates. 

I, therefore, direct that you, as a manufacturer 
of, or one promoting the manufacture for sale of, all or 
any of the above products designated in subdivision (A) as 
equipment operated by electric motors, file with me for 
distribution, as required by said Code, to all other manu- 
facturers of the products specified above, at the office- 
of the National "Electrical Manufacturers Association, 155 
East 44th Street, New York City, on or before April 10, 1934, 
FIFTY copies of your price lists, or prico lists and dis- 
count sheets, showing your current prices and fixed terms 
of sale and payment to your various classes of trade on the 
products specified above under (A) . 

The following exceptions are made: 

(a) Prices to your employees for their 
own use. 

(b) Prices covering export sales. 

(c) Prices to other manufacturers of 
the products specified above. 

(d) Prices covering sales to the Fed- 
eral Government. 

(o) Commercial dishwashers as this 

product has already been covered 
by a price call. 

(f) Prices on appliances covered in 
paragraph (B) . 

It should be noted that this price call does not 
require you to submit prices on equipment covered in para- 
graph (B) as these prices will be called for in a separate 
letter which will be sent out tomorrow and should be filed 
individually. If you manufacture and/or sell devices cov- 
ered in paragraph (B), and do not receive a letter from us 
within the next three days calling on you to file prices 
for products in this classification, I will appreciate re- 
ceiving a letter from you giving us this information. 

Show all discounts, terms, etc., oither on price 
lists or attached thereto and not in a separate letter to 
the Supervisory Agency. 

/ <> . , ,^ . - ••- 

Supervisory Agency. 

P.S. All packages must be marked FM-3-28 for identification. 
Your company name and a date must appear on all sheets or 
sets of sheets furnished this Agency. As typewritten sheets, 
either original or carbon copies, require first class mail, 
your prico sheets or revisions thereof should be printed or 
in some form of processing or duplication. O'i.9 9 



-151- 




National Electrical Manufacturers 
Association 



155 EAST 44th STREET 
NEW YORK 



DESIGNATED AS THE AGENCY FOR ADMINISTERING. SUPERVISING AND PROMOTING THE 
PERFORMANCE OF THE PROVISIONS OF THE CODE FOR THE ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING 
INDUSTRY. UNDER THE NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL RECOVERY ACT. APPROVED BY PRESIDENT 
ROOSEVELT ON AUGUST 4. 1B33. 



OFFICE OF SUPERVISORY AGENCY FOR 



APPLIANCE PRODUCTS SUBDIVISION 
February 21st, 1954 



Gentlencn: 

The Food Service Equipment Section of the above subdivision has 
defined the basis of determining products coning within its scope as 
follows : 

The tern "Food Service Equipment Sub-division of the 
Electrical Manufacturing Industry" as used herein is de- 
fined to mean the manufacture for s:.le of all electrically 
operated counter appliances, electrically operated heavy 
duty co3king equipment, electric bake ovens, dishwashers, 
meat choppers, coffee mills, vegetable peelers, mixers, 
slicers, silver burnishers, and such other appliances as 
are natural affiliates, for sale to the commercial and 
institutional trade, oxcluding in all cases equipment de- 
signed for household use. 

Our records show that you are a manufacturer of one or more of the 
products in this classification, and to avoid unnecessary future cor- 
respondence it will be helpful if you vail see that this letter is 
promptly replied to, giving the following information: 

1 - Furnish us with a record of the entire list of 
products coning within the above classification that you 
manufacture or sell. 

2 - Advise if it is your practice to recognize in 
your price schedule varir.ua classes of trade such as 
distributors, jobbers, public utilities, dealers, and 
others, specifying which in each case. 



9 



9&S 



-152- 



5 - Do you havo an established price schedule apply- 
ing to chain stores, and if so, can you furnish us with 
your definition of what constitutes a chain store for 
this purpose. 

This letter is not a call for prices or discounts, and is written 
only to secure helpful information for the Supervisory Agency prior to 
a formal call for prices, which will be made in the very near future. 

I an also enclosing a record of the names of concerns on our list 
who are understood to be manufacturers of a product coning within this 
classification, and I will appreciate any information from you of addi- 
tional nanes that should be added to the list, and would request you to 
advise us of street addresses if they are located in large cities. 

Assuring you of appreciation for a prompt reply, and also advising 
you that it will be held confidential. 

Very truly yours, 






Supervisory Agency 



WMS-.ME 
Enc. 



-153- 



, Chant er 13 

LAMINATED PHENOLIC PRODUCTS 

A. The Industry 

The Laminated Phenolics Products Group is made ud of 13 manufacturers 
of the primal product together with about 40 "fabricators" of' the 'material. 

1. The Froduct -" ' 



Laninated phenolic compounds have be c n developed since about 1910, 
but the greatest progress has been in the past 10 years. They are an 
outgrowth of the vulcanized fiber industry. 

This material, often referred to as bakelite, is standardized as to 
nomenclature, size, and form and is more or less uniform in comnosition 
from company to company. 

Pehnol prodacts were widely used by the electrical industry as an 
insulating material and this use- has constantly increased. :• The l^rge 
electrical companies began its manufacture probably for use "in their 
products bat the great .increase in .'demand for the material .'in other in- 
dustries ooened -new markets wherein "the material was used because of its 
appearance and physical properties rather than electrical properties. 
Wider uses are constantly being found in machine construction as' well as 
decorative fields but it is probable- that the electrical industry utilizes- 
a large portion of the production. 

It falls naturally into .four product groups, each being a different 
manuf actar-d form or shap c , having its o-jim quantity discounts. The four 
types are briefly described as follows: 

Sheets - Laminated phenolic sheets are olips of paper, cloth or 
other fibre sheets impregnated with a phenolic varnish or compound and 
bonded together under heat and pressure. The thickness of the sheet 
is regulated by the number of plies ^.nd the oressure applied. The 
standard maximum size sheet available is about 38" square and ranging from 
1/64" to 3 or 4" in thickness. Since washers, blocks and all flat shapes 
are cut fron sheets they are probably made in greater volume than any of 
the other shapes, 

Washers and Discs 

Washers are partially fabricated oarts cut from sheets material and 
are sold at a net price per 100 or per each rather than on a pound basis, 
but the actual weight of the scrap .i'S figured in the price. Thus the 
customer purchasing a washer 3" in diameter actually pays for a 3" square 
of material plus a machining charge. In the case of large rings cut 
from canvas or linen base material used in the manufacture of ring gears, 
etc., the customer is allowed about 50$ of .the net value of the discs cut 
from the center. The weight of the scrap which amounts to about 1/4 
of the total weight is eliminated in transportation. 

i 

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Tubing 

Tubing is made by wrapping_impregnated plies around a core or 
mandrel and molding under heat and pressure as in the case of sheet 
material. The maximum length made is about 48", This is usually sold 
by the foot or cut up in specified lengths with machining charges added. 
Round tubing is standard but tubes of other shapes are made on special 
order at extra charge. 

Reds 

Rods are made from impregnated plies rolled and then molded as in 
the case of the other forms. The maximum length made is about 48 rt . 
Rods are als:> sold by the foot, 

2, Members of the Industry 

Fabricators 

The exact definition of a fabricator as used in the industry is not 
available although the term implies one who forms, makes or manufactures 
the material into finished or semi-finished parts. In quoting special 
discounts to fabricators, only Company #33, defined the term in detail 
to mean cne who maintains an adequate stock cf material, a.nd furnishes 
delivery, selling, and catalogue service together with the extension of 
credit to his buyers. It is apparently not necessary that he fabricate 
the material. 

i' That some fabricators are merely distributors is further indicated 
by the fact that it was the universal practice, during the period of the 
price call, for fabricators to file the price sheets of the company 
whose materials they sold. The only alteration made was the stamping of 
the fabricator's name on the filing. Fabricators' filings were usually 
made some time after the effective date of the similar manufacturer's 
filing, and in many cases they would file two or more previous filings 
of the manufacturer bringing their filings up to date. Since these 
fabricators filed prices identical to those of -the primal manufacturers, 
they will be covered in the general discussion, 

■Employment 

It is not possible to estimate accurately the number of processing 
employees engaged in the manufacture of this material as most of the 
plants are also engaged in the manufacture ef vulcanized fibre and other 
affiliated products. However, it is likely that most of the plants em- 
ploy normally from 250 to 500 processing employees. 

Location of Plants 

The manufacturing plants, for the most part, are located along the 
Northeaster!; Seaboard with slightly more than one half of the number be- 
ing located in Delaware and Pennsylvania and one each in Ohio and Illinois. 
The plants of the fabricators are located in the industrial centers and 

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in the major cities on the west coast. 

Activity 

Since the products of ishisgroup are principally used as raw material 
in the electrical and other manufacturing industries, the group's 
activity was probably affected by the inactivity of manufacturing as a 
whole. This decrease in the volume may have been partly compensated for 
by increased use of its product in the past few years in construction and 
decorative fields. Sales in these two markets were not covered under the 
price call but effects were no doubt felt. 

Markets 

Sale of the products of this group, as covered by the price call, 
is principally confined to man or' act tiring centers since it is used largely 
as a raw material in the manufacture of other products. The greatest 
market is in the North central and Northeastern sections of. the United 
States, 

Sales are more dependent on engineering specification and introduction 
in new. fields than on design and appearance, 

3, Scope of the Study 

D Due to the fact that filings were basically simple and few in number 
a chart was made showing all important filings of the 13 manufacturing 
companies on the 4 types of material. This is entitled "Comparison of 
Discounts," (Appendix B, Part 12, Section a). The Chronological Record 
of Price Pilings covers the filings cf 33 companies out of the total of 
57 companies who filed prices c (Appendix A, Part 12 Section a.) A 
number of fabricators were included in order that any effect of their 
filings -might be studied. Copies were also made of instructions for 
calculating prices on specialties and instructions for quoting on 
government bids (Appendix A, Fart 12, Section b). 

4. The Price Call - Exhibit A 



The. price c^ll was based on the first paragraph of Article X of the 
code and became effective, September 28, 1933", • and was terminated by the 
Schecter decision. 

Members of the Industry 

There are three types of members in the laminated phenolic- group, 
the large electrical company whose production of this product is partly 
for its own use, the vulcanized fibre and phenolic fibre manufacturer 
and thn fabricator or agent of either of the above. 

As an example of the problems of this group, the first two types 
are fabricator, due to lower overhead, is able to handly small orders 
more profitably than the larger companies. Pue to keen competition 
there was a greater tendency to take any business available regardless of 
the size of the order with a re-salt of price being cut by the fabricator 

£ E 22 
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to maintain his position. 

Price Structure. 

The basis of price of all unfabricated forms is a list -orice per 
pound on various size ranges of all of the forms of material. There are 
two list prices on each range, one on material within NEMA Standards 
Limits, the other on "close" limits of thickness or other dimensions. 
The, grades of material are quoted in two groups in the case of sheet 
material, the first "being grades D and UF and the second all other 
grades. Discounts are quoted per pound for sheets, per foot for rods 
and tubes, and per each or per hundred for washers, discs and gear 
blanks. Specialties, when quoted on request, are quoted per each or 
on a weight basis as requested or may be calculated in most cases by- 
following pricing instructions. 

The system of list orices for various shapes is briefly outlined 
as follows: 

Rods 

List prices quoted on 27 sizes. Intermediate sizes. Intermediate 
sizes at price of next larger diameter. The list applies to all grades. 

Tube s _ 

List prices quoted on 1500 sizes of tubing and applied to all grades, - 
It is interesting to note that considering all combinations pf quantity, 
quality and size there will be a total in excess of 25,OD0 prices on tubing. 

Washers 

Quotations on washers up to 3 inches in thickness requires 5200 
list urices and without considering snecial machining etc, these work 
out to over 125,000 net prices in possible combinations as above in 
tubing. 

Specialties 

Net nrices are calculated from the base orice of the material used 
according to instructions given in price filings. 

Illustration of List Price and Discount 

To illustrate the list price and discount structure quotations on 
sheets are listed below (also see Appendix A, Part 12, Sertion c) and 
although those on other forms of material are stated differently and 
list a greater number of items, the general set-up is the same. 

She e t s 
Size about 38" x 38--« and 38" x 43" 

List prices per pound 
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All grades 
Except Grade 
and UF 
N.E.M.A. 

Standard 
Limits 



01c se 

Limits 



Grade D 
and Grade UF 
N.E.M.A, 

Standard Close 
Limits Limits 



Under l/64» thick $3„50 $3-70 

1/64" thick 3,00 3.15 

1/32" thick 2.55 2.45 

3/64" thick 2.20 2.30 

1/16" thick 2.05 2.15 

3/52" and over 2.00 2,10 _ 

INTERMEDIATE THICKNESS at price of next THICKER 



not made 
$8. on 
4.00 
2.70 
2.05 
2.00 



not made 
$8.40 
4.20 
o« 85 
2.15 
2.10 



r iSCLUNTS (*) 

Less than 
50 lbs. 

X and XF Natural, x and XT Natural 

with black surfaces, X and XF black ..... 64$ 

XX and XXX Natural and Black 60$ 

C Natural and Black 48$ 

L Natural and Black 36$ 

D— Wood and ttarble 52$ 

D — Fancy and Solid Colors 47$ 

UF Paper Base 3?$ 

UF Linen Base . 17$ 



50 to 


300 lbs, 


299 lbs. 


& over 


68$ 


72$ 


65$ 


69$ 


53$ 


60$ 


43$ 


50$ 


55$ 


57$ 


50$ 


52$ 


42$ 


45$ 


23$ 


30$ 



It is interesting to note that the list nrices on ^ashers and other 
fabricated items. have remained unchanged for many years and in fact are 
identical, to. those which have been used for. many years in the Vulcanized 
Fiber Industry. There were no changes in these list prices nor in the 
list trices on any of the other forms during the period of jirice filing, 



(*) NOTE: Generally, fabricators received a discount of 16 2/3$ from 
prices calculated; on about list and discount schedule and 
income cases. Small discounts and concessions were offered 
to certain purchasers as, for example, gear cutters were a 
discount of about 5$ from the net and were excluded from 
minimum machining charges. 



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changes in discount, mostly minor, w=>re made by practically all companies. 

Spec ialties arid' "Instructions 

In addition to the above list prices and discounts, formulae and 
instructions for calculating prices on various shapes and si^es of 
material which were not covered in the price list are quoted- These 
methods of calculating prices on specialties become rather involved, 
but are briefly described as follows: 

Strips and Blocks 

Conversion tables are furnished which apply to strios and blocks of less 
less than inn square inches, and within certain limits of length. These 
tables convert the area of the item to an equivalent washer size. The 
list price for that washer and the discounts for the quantity and grade 
of material are applied. For pieces containing less than inn square 
inches and not coming within the range of the conversion table the weight 
of the number of pieces required is calculated and multiplied by the list 
price per pound of the material required, less the discount which would 
apply to that number of washers of the same material. Pieces containing 
over ino square inches are figured in' the same way, and a net price 
quoted per each. ' ■ 



Angles a nd Channels 



In calculating prices on angles and ■channels the inside periphery 
of two such angles or channel's is added together and divided by pi. 
The result is the diameter of an equivalent tube of round section. The 
list price for this tabe can be found from the tables and 30;& to cover 
special work, cutting etc., is added to this. Since each foot of tubing 
will make 2 feet of the angle or channel, one-half of the number of 
feet of channel required will be used to find which quantity group the 
order will fall in. The discount for this group is then applied giving 
a net price for the entire order. This can be divided by the .number of 
feet of angle or channel required to give the net price per foot. 

Machini ng Charges 

Prices on machine work of various kinds, such as drilling, tapping, 
bevelling, etc. were listed on instructions given for calculating the 
cost. Roughly, the added cost per machining operation was about 10$ of 

the net. 

Government Bids 

Government bids usually required quotation on a given number ef 
square feet and therefore instructions for converting the usual prices 
per square foot were given. 

Typical Trice Change 

Generally a price change would be brought abou^ as follows: 

One company would change a discount, another conroany within a few 

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days might meet or even "over-shoot" that urice, others would file to 
meet one or the other, and eventually after several revisions the 
entire industry would end up on a common level only slightly different 
from the original. Changes in price or in discounts were not extensive. 
In fact in the 'case of the discount on washers each company made as many 
as three or four filings to effect a change of not more than 2$ on large 
quantities. The intermediate filings gave a greater discount than the 
final filings, revisions being made bringing all quotations to the 
final level, 

B. Price Movem e nts 

Washers 

Of the four types of material considered more filings concerned 
washers than any other, 

1st Cha nge 

On November 18, 1933, company #10 made a filing quoting 'quantity 
discounts on washers. Lots of 10,ooo of X and XF grades had hertofore 
been given the maximum discount of 75$, By the terms of this filing the 
principle of quantity discount was extended to larger ourchases, so' that 
lots of 25,000 to 50,000 were quoted'??^; 50,000 to 100,000 '- 79$; 
100,000 to 250,000 - 80$, and over 250,000 - 82$. These quantity dis- 
counts applied only to X and XT grades of any thickness and canvas or 
linen grades 1/4" less in tiiickness. This filing was met by one company 
on November 22nd, one en November 23rd, one on November 29th, two '"■ • 
on December 4th r hue on December 5th, two on Di ce'iaber' 6th, one on 
December 7th and by the last company on December 13th. It is noted, 
however, that the above filings for Companies #8, 30 and 34 are 
identical in every respect with the exception of the discount on lots 
of 250,000. In this quantity the discount on paper ba.se material is 1$ 
lower and fabric base material 2$ lower. 

This change r°prf 3 sents added quantity discounts in the large 
brackets. 

2nd Change 

The next change came almost immediately, on December 18th, when two 
companies filed a revision of discounts on washers in which lots of 
more than 10, QO J ^ere quoted the maximum discount. However, lots of 
l p ,000 in this filing are 'quot-d a discount as high as the discount 
quoted for lots of 100,000 to 250,000 in the filing of November 18th. 
Quantities 'less than 10,000 remain unchanged. All but two companies 
excepted did not meet it until A"cril 14, 1934, the other company did not 
file. 

This change drops the one largest quantity discount and extends the 
discount of the largest --roup baclr to the original minimum group. 



3322 



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3rd Change 

The lest filing on washer prices became effective on June 5th, for 
nine companies. Discounts on lots of less than inn were increased, de- 
pending on grade, ranging from 6 to 12$, and on lots of inn to 2nn from 

3 to 7$. Discounts on lots of 1,000 to lO.nnn were increased from 1 to 
8/o and on lots of 10,ono and over discounts were decreased from 5 to 7$, 
This filing compared with the filing of December 18th shows that while 
the December filing extended better prices to purchasers of large 
quantities the January filing decreased the price to purchasers of small 
quantities and increased the orice on large quantities. 

In comparing this filing of June 5th with the original filing it is 
noted that the original quoted a discount on lots of in,nnn and over 
which is 2fo greater than the filing of June 5th, while the June 5th dis- 
count on lots of inn is 6fo greater than the original filing. Thus in a 
period of 9 months the industry showed a trend toward quoting lower prices 
on larger quantities with no change in small quantities, than reversing 
and lowering price decidedly on small quantities and returning to about 
the previous level on larger quantities. 

In very brief summary, the first tendency was to broaden the orice 
range, but the final result was to mrrow it, by reducing orice to small 
purchasers. 

Filings on washers made of Grade S material were first made on 
November 19, 1934, by 8 companies and followed during the next month by 

4 others. On April 8, 1934, 5 companies again filed on Grade S, and 
decreased the discount 3$ on all quantity groups. This filing was 
followed by 3 companies during April but the remaining 5 comoanies did 
not file. 

Sheet Material 

Sheets are the most widely used of the four tyoes of materials in 
the fabrication of parts, Discounts were quoted 'on lots of less than 
50 lbs; 5n to 30n lbs. and over 3nn lbs. Different grades, colors and . 
thicknesses may be aggregated in determining quantity discount. 

On June 5, 1934, Company #10 revised the discounts on sheet 
material. Until this time X and XP grades had been quoted the same 
discount and XX and XXX together, were quoted another discount, the X 
and XP grades being about 4$ higher than the other two. In this filing 
the four grades were combined and the discount quoted for the 4 grades 
was lower than had previously bee n quoted for either of the two groups. 
This amounted to a discount on XX and XXX grades of 2 or 3$, and on X 
and XP of from 5 to 7$, Discounts on canvas grades were lowered from 

5 to 6f> and on linen grades from 5 to 8$ in each quantity group. This 
filing became effective on June 5th for 7 companies, and was followed 
during June by 4 more companies. 

During November, Grade S material was brought into the picture at 
discounts ranging from 15 to 20$ greater than corresoonding quantity 
groups in the other paper base materials. This Grade S material hai been 

9822 



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introduced to me^t competition of vulcanized fibre manufacturers who coated 
fibre sheets with ohenol varnish to simulate laminated Dhenol sheets. 
The Grade S sheets were inferior in finish ^nd thickness was not guaranteed 
to be as exact as were the better grades of material. During November 
and December nearly all of the companies filod on this material at 
practically the same discounts. 

The next important move in the industry concerned extensive dis- 
counts to Fabricators, Company #33 made a filing, effective December 
10, 1935, which granted an additional 10$ to Fabricators on Grade S 
material! and 16-2/3$ on all other types of material* This discount 
represents a 10$ or 16-2/3$ decrease in net orice. Other companies 
before this time had quoted 16-2/3$ discount to specific agents or 
fabricators. As an example: Company #10 had quoted this discount to 
Company #11. a fabricator of its oroducts, on October 4 5 1933, and other 
companies from time to time had made similar moves. The filing of 
Company #33 extended this discount to those who fell within its defini- 
tion of a Fabricator. This definition is quoted in the description of 
a Fabricator in the first part of this analysis. Before this, on June 
5, 1934, Company #30 had quoted a discount of 15$ to jobbers on washers 
for resale. Apparently this jobber classification is about the same 
as a fabricator. 

These discounts were brought about by various companies dabbling in 
special discounts to specific customers until one of the largest companies 
took a definite stand, defined those to whom the discount would apply, 
and then quoted a standard discount to those customers. This filing 
resulted in four other major companies making a similar filing during 
February 1935. 

The next and last important filing lowered the discounts on all 
quantities of Grade S material about 5$, This was initiated on Apiil 
6th by Company #4 and followed by four other companies between that 
time and April 22, 

Tubing 

Discounts were quoted on four quantity groups of tubing, in lots of 
up to 50 ft,, 50 to 200 ft., 20D to 500 ft. and over 500. 

On January 12, 1934, company #33 quoted discounts on tubing of 
Grade S material which were from 3 to 8$ greater than for X and XX 
material. This filing was met by Company #5 on March 10, 1934, but no 
others quoted at any time. 

On June 5th, Company #5 revised discounts on tubing. All discounts 
had been quoted an additional 15$, such as 45 plus 15, etc. , and by this 
filing the additional 15$ was discontinued by the basic discount remained 
the same. Since the basic discounts range from 15$ to as high as 60$, 
depending on the grade of material, percent nge of change in price 
varies with the type of material, there being a greater reduction in 
price on the expensive grades and less redaction on the cheaper grades. 



9622 



-163- 

Company #51 on August 13th quoted a discount of 65 and 15$ on X and 
XX tubing up to 2" inside diameter in lots of 2500 ft. and over. This 
filing was. met prior to the effective date by 8 other companies, and by 
September 1, 1934, by two other companies. The original filing did not 
limit the inside diameter of the tubing nor did it specify the cross 
section shape, but subsequent minor revisions limited the coverage to 
round tubing up to 2" inside diameter. This filing together with two 
filings affecting washers ms.de on December 18, 1933, and June 5, 1934, 
are the only ones showing a grouo action in which more than 2/3 of the 
indvLstry mode fjlings, becoming effective on the same date. 

Rods 

There were no changes in discounts on rods during the ueriod of 
price filing. 

Terms and Del iver y 

Terms of payment and delivery throughout the industry were perfectly 
uniform. Terms being thirty days net, no cash discount and delivery as 
follows: 

Freight allowed on shipments east of the eastern 
boundary of Montana, Wyoming, Utah and Arizona. Shipments 
west of this line had 5^ added to net Trice and freight 
was prepaid. All express and parcel -oost shipments were 
f.o.b. factory. 

Summary 

No basic change occurred in the price structure of the group although 
net prices on large quantities were lowered slightly. 

It is doubtful that price filing really accomplished much in this 
group with the single possible exception of iirice changes being made with 
less confusion. With the advent of the price call the industry continued, 
with no noticeable change, in the former methods of selling. 

Since the products of the various manufacturers are practically 
identical in finish, composition and physical properties, there is a 
tendency for competition to center on price alone. Considering this it 
is remarkable that so few changes in price were made and that such 
changes as were made were relatively minor. 

Probably a strong stabilizing influence is the fact that two of the 
largest producers use a large part of their production in the manufacture 
of electrical apparatus. This would give them a distinct advantage in 
price competition in that it would tend to sustain production volume at 
a higher level than in the case of those manufacturers whose entire 
production is for sale. 



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EXHIBIT A 

National Electrical Manufacturers 
Association 

155 EAST 44th STREET 
NEW YORK 



DESIGNATED AS THE AGENCY FOR ADM i NI6TER I NG. SUPERVISING AND PROMOTING THE 
PERFORMANCE OF THE PROVISIONS OF THE CODE FOR THE ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING 
INDUSTRY. UNDER THE NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL RECOVERY ACT. APPROVED BY PRESIDENT 
ROOSEVELT ON AUGUST 4. 1933. 

OFFICE OF SUPERVISORY AGENCY 

CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL SUBDIVISION 




I, I. H. Ott, Supervisory Agency of the Construction 
Material Subdivision of the electrical manufacturing industry 
appointed, in accordance with the provisions of Article XII of 
the Code for the Electrical Manufacturing Industry approved by 
the President on August 4, 1933, by the Board of Governors of 
National Electrical Manufacturers Association, hereby notify 
you that I have, pursuant to the authority vested in me by Ar- 
ticle X of said Code, determined that it has been the generally 
recognized practice to sell: 

l ( Laminated Phenolic Products made of paper, 
fabric or asbestos base material, bonded 
with synthetic resin bond and made in 
form cf plate, tube, rod, angles, chan- 
nels, washers and blanks, 

i, Laminated Phenolic Specialties sawed, 
punched, cut or fabricated from primal 
forms as described above 

on the basis of net price lists, or price lists and discount 
sheets, and fixed terms of payment. 

I therefore direct that you as a manufacturer of, or 
one promoting the manufacture for sale of, all or any of the 
above products, file with me for distribution, as required by 
said Code, to all other manufacturers of the products specified 
above, at the office of National Electrical Manufacturers Asso- 
ciation, 155 East 44th Street, New York City, on or before 

copies of your price lists, or 
price lists and discount sheets, showing your current prices 
and fixed terms of sale, payment, delivery and any other condi- 
tions which affect the sales price on the products specified 

bove - yotftf 



*164- 



The following exemptions are made: 

a. Prices for refrigeration strip 
material which is included in 
a separate price call. 

b. Prices for materials intended 
primarily for decorative appli- 
cations. 

c. Courtesy discounts to manufac- 
turers or those promoting the 
manufacture for sale of the 
products mentioned above. 

Show all discounts, terms, etc., either on price lists 
or attached thereto and not in a separate letter to the Super- 
visory Agency. 

Very truly yours, 



I 



/ //i 

/v 7 a%t- 



E. H. Ott 
Supervisory Agency. 

P.S. All packages must be marked LP-9-15 for identification. 
Your company name and a date must appear on all sheets or sets 
of sheets furnished this Agency. As typewritten sheets, either 
original or carbon copies require first class mail, your price 
sheets or revisions thereof should be printed or in some form 
of processing or duplication. 



XJO^* 



-165- 

CHAPTER 14 

GENERAL COMMENT OK FIVE GROUPS 
IK THE 
ELECTRICAL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 

POLS LINE HARDWARE INDUSTRIAL LIGHTING EQUIPMENT 

PANEL BOARDS PORTABLE ELECTRICAL TOOLS 

NON-RENEWABLE PLUG FUSE 

A. Introduction 

Seventeen industry sections or groups in the Electrical Industry 
were studied in connection with "Open Price Filing." We have so far 
in this report reported on twelve of these in detail. Generally speaking, 
the remaining five serve to illustrate that situations and conditions 
touched uncn arc typical in the industry rather than exceptional. Work 
sheets were made on these five groups following the same form as used in 
connection with the other twelve. 

1. Work Sheets 



1. Appendix A Part 13. 
Chronological record of Price Filing. 
Section a. - Non-renewable Plug Fuse. 
Section b. - Portable Electric Tools. 
Section c. - Panelboards. 

Section d. - Pole Line Hardware. 

Section e. - Industrial Lighting Equipment 

2. Appendix B Part 13. 

Original and Final Price Structure. 

Section a.' Noii-rencwable Plug Fuse. 

C-rcuo Pattern • 

Considering these five, we notice first that *ach has its own pecul- 
iar structure or design for doing "business and also that members of each 
group engage in the manufacture cf other products. Each member conforms 
to the pattern of each group of which he is a member. This is a situation 
very typical of the Electrical Manufacturing Industry but with exceptions. 
For example, in the Portable Electrical Tool Group, several manufacturers 
sell the product not in conformity with tne group structure but on the 
basis cf the modus operendi of the Fractional Horse Power Motor Group, 
Exceptions, however, in almost every case become less divergent under 
"Open Price Filing" experience. 

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-166- 
Pricing 

In the matter of price, these five groups generally quoted a list 
price and discount "but also quoted net price to some customer classes 
and on certain products. These list prices remain fairly steady and on 
the same list usually applied to all customers. 

Customer Classes and Discounts 

Discounts arc almost invariably quoted with respect to the poten- 
tialities of a. customer as a quantity buyer and with few exceptions may 
be divided into two groups, (l) A service differential given to types 
of distributor. (2) Discounts quoted to institutions or organizations 
where the product is to be used for educational purposes or where the 
institution or organization is supported by public contribution. 

Discounts are flexible, that is to say, they can be and are changed 
often butdt is a rarity for the differentials between customer classes 
to be revised so as to realine the competitive position of types of cust- 
omer. A typical arrangement is to have a. standard discount for a given 
customer class plus a range of additional discounts so that not only do 
customer classes aline themselves in accordance with their purported 
customer value but within each class there is usually a secondary 
alinement which evaluates the customers individually. 

There appears to be a tendency toward individual manufacturers 
having a particular customer class which they endeavor to keep in a 
preferred position and also some tendency toward increasing the number 
of customer classes quoted. The definition of customer classes is almost 
invariably insufficient. The theory is not advanced that customer classes 
can always adequately defined but if open price filing is to be utilized 
the degree of success is materially dependent on adequate customer defini- 
tion. While on the subject of defining for purposes of identification, 
there exists in the records of the open price filing experience of these 
five groups as well as in others the necessity for more adequate des- 
cription and identification of product. 

Price Level 

In these five groups as in others examined in the Electrical Industry, 
it is questionable whether or not a price level can be determined and whether 
determination can be made that prices arc higher or lower than previous 
prices. Generally there arc two price levels (l) the level of list prices 
and, (2) the level established by fixed functional discounts. But in add- 
ition to functional discounts there is usually a pool of additional discount' 
which may be drawn upon and applied sometimes the option of the manufacturer, 
thus the known level of price may b<* lifted or depressed for any or all 
customer classe: 



touCg, 



-Terms of Payment and Del ivery 

With respect to terms of payment and delivery, it is quite typical 
that in either or both, uniformity will be approached during "open price 
filing." 

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Unifcrmity 

On the general subject of uniformity the go five groups conformed 
to a characteristic of the industry in that structurally members of a 
group follow each other closely and the general tendency is to increase 
the decree of uniformity. Increasing uniformity ordinarily occurs in 
either or two ways: (l) through copying an old line company and, (2) 
through evolution. This evolution may consist of changing an existing 
element of the structure and through a scries of such changes to move 
from a situation where individuals vary as to pattern to one wnerein 
individuals conform essentially to the developed scheme. Evolution 
may also occur through the establishment of a radical factor which must 
be taken up by all members of the group to prevent their being closed 
out of a market. 

lumber of Filings 

The number of filings made apparently varies in these five groups 
according to the sane formula as in the .industry groups examined previous- 
ly. The formula is that the narrower the margin between cost of materials 
and final price value by manufacturer and the narrower the margin of 
operation, the greater the sensitivity to change and as a result the great- 
er the number of filings. . ■■•;■ 

Waiting Period 

The experience -of these five industry groups in the use of the wait- 
ing period conforms to that of other groups studied. Generally the waiting 
period was not utilized as frequently as was supposed. This, perhaps, 
because of several reasons of which difficutly of product comparison, 
lack of sensitivity to price change, the problem of what sort of filing 
did moot competition, and the necessity in many cases for complete flex- 
ibility to meet a present and nressing situation are probably important. 

Meeting Competition 

It is probably well at this point to touch on the matter of com- 
petition and the difficulty of determining, when two products are on a 
competitive level and the even m re difficult -oroblem of deciding whether 
a structural change or a price change made to "meet competition" is just- 
ified and if so, docs the change equalize competitive positions. For example, 
in the Non-Renewable Plug Fuse Group, Approved and Non-Approved fuses are 
manufactured. There is no question but that the two types of product compete, 
but it is equally true that they are not always competitive because, for 
instance, Fon-Aoprcved Fuses may be eliminated from a specific case by 
building regulations or municipal ordinance. But assuming a transaction 
where both types of fuses may be used, how shall the degree of competition 
be determined and if it can be determined, should the price or conditions 
of sale in connection with either be subject to modification so as to 

tablish the two on a competitive level and if this is deemed advisable 
and proper, what shall be the rule determining the correct amount or degree 
of modification permissible? 



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This subject of competition lias been discussed in connection with, 
other of the Electrical Manufacturing groups, notably the Domestic Electric- 
Heating Appliances, and while the unanswered problem is not fatal to the 
device of "open price filing" , it is question which is often met. Thje 
Electrical Manufacturing industry appears to have met the problem by out- 
wardly ignoring it and the method would seem to have some merit if the 
absence of serious controversy is a measure. 

Brief Summary of Each of the Group of Eivc. 

In the following brief s no pretense is made of covering adequately 
the price filing experience of the five industry groups. The object is 
to identify the groups and attempt to point out some of the more interest- 
ing and. perhaps unusual features of each. 

Group 1. Non-renewable Plug Fuses . 

The product manufactured by this group is the ordinary "windc- 
face" plug fuse used around the home. There are about forty-five manufac- 
turers located mainly in the Eastern industrial area. 

Perhaps the most interesting feature of the sales plan is the 
classification of customers. Prices to all customers are quoted on a 
net basis with the exception of some special fuses on which list prices 
and discounts are quoted to distributors. This list is about twice the 
net of other fusos and discounts usually range from 30?o on broken package 
quantities to 50 and 5$ on standard package quantities. 

In the point of preference given, customer classes range in about 
the following crder: 

1. .Wholesalers 

2. Syndicates and Chains — twenty or more stores 
3 f United States Government ($300 or more) 

4. Extra large buyers (5,000 fuses or more) 

5. Large buyers (2,000 fuses or more) 

6. Distributors 

7. Trade prices 

3. Dealers 

With the exception of wholesalers, price quotations are based on 
standard size, sub-standard size and special size fuses, special sizes 
usually carrying a set up charge of about $2.50. 

Wholesalers are quoted on a quantity basis on standard and sub- 
standard sizes as follows: 



3822 



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Orders less than $15.00, orders $15.00 tc $-10.00, orders $40.00 
or more. On the special sizes wholesalers are quoted a flat net. 

Wholesalers in New York arc quoted on standard and sub-standard 
sizes on the basis of orders less than $15.00 or more than $15.00. 

In the original filing eight companies filed to a class of "all 
buyers." 

In the final filing customer classifications remained the same ex- 
cept that fourteen companies quoted prices to "all buyers." 

Ihere is little similarity in price between various companies 
and during the price filing experience it is difficult to say whether 
or not prices changed, in fact, there is difficulty in coming to any 
definite general conclusion, because only twenty-seven companies of the 
forty-five made more than one filing' and many of these were vague and. 
incomplete. 

Jt is interesting that prices to the United States Government 
on standard size fuses were below those quoted to any other cuaf-omer 
class. 

.Although terms of payment were generally 2/o 10 Prox. , net 25th Prox 
for all customers, separate quotation was made with reference to each cus- 
tomer class. 

In tho area of terms of delivery extra large buyers, wholesalers, 
syndicates and chains were allowed freight to destination, large buyers 
and the "trade" f.o.b. factory or warehouse. 

Exceptions to this were that some companies offered the same deliv- 
ery terms to all customers varying from f.o.b. factory or warehouse to 
freight allowed on the basis of weight or destination. 

Free delivery was offered the United States Government by most 
compani c s . 

Those companies mailing mere than one filing usually, quoted finally 
general terms of payment and delivery to all customers: 2fo 10 Prox., 
net 25th or 30th Prox. or 60 days and freight allowed or f.o.b. ware- 
house or factory. 

2. Portable Electric Tools 

Sixty-two companies filed prices ranging from companies quoting 
on one -type of product to those quoting on many types. The majority of 
the com?ar.ieo are located in the north central section with some i: the 
industrial cast. 

There was some uniformity of structure throughout. Generally the 
structure was about as follows: 



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List and discount basis with three main customer classes listed below 
in the order of preference given. 

1. Stocking distributors — discount about 30$ on tools and service 
parts and 40$ on accessories. 

2. TTon-s to eking distributors — discount on all items about 15$. 

3. Authorizing stocking service stations — discount of 30$ on 
service parts only. 

The above discounts illustrate the average. Some quantity discounts 
and special allowances were quoted, but the effect thereof was not 
material until purchases of more than one hundred tools were involved. 

Customer classifications with various names appeared for a few 
companies but the difference was usually one of terminology. There were 
however a few companies that carried over the structure of another 
group. One illustration of this has already been given and another 
concerns a company that also carried over the fractional horesepower 
motor plan. This company quoted on bench grinders only. It will be 
recalled that in the motor group customers were classed on the basis 
of motors purchased. It would not be reasonable for a purchaser to buy 
bench grinders in the quantities specified for many of the customer 
classifications of the motor sales plan, so it amy be presumed that for 
this company discounts offered to purchasers of bench grinders were based 
on the number of fractional horsepower motors purchased by that customer 
and the classification given him in the purchase of fractional horse- 
power motors. 

3. Panelboards 



In this group there were about seventy manufacturers of which 
more than 50 made only one or two filings and only about twelve made a 
sufficent number of filings to give continuity to the record. 

The product in this case is quite interesting. A panel board 
for a given installation is usually made up of a number of items for 
which prices are the same for all companies. "However, each company 
may recommend to the purchaser 6ome change in the proposed panel which 
will reduce the price, for example, the panel may be of the tumbler 
switch and fuse type but on~- company might recommend that instead 
of six tumbler switches only one be used and place a bid on that basis. 
The result is that the ability of a company to propose a Panel board 
which will do a given job and at the sane time be comprised of parts 
less costly than different parts proposed by competitors, determines 
who gets tho order in many cases 

There is a general tone of uniformity but with some exceptions. 
In very brief form the structure is as follows: 

Three classes of purchasers in order of perference given - 

1. Class three users; electrical wholesalers. 



9822 



-171- 

2. Class two users; electrical contractors, industrial- 
machinery manufacturers, federal, state and municipal 
governments, and educational institutions. 

3. Class one users; included. all purchasers not included under 

Class two and three above. 

Discoiints are quoted to these -purchasers, first on the "basis of specific 
item purchased; second, on the geographical location of the purchaser 
and third, the customer classification of the purchasers. Discounts 
on the functional "basis decrease from class three to class one. 

The class three purchaser is given an additional discount on stand- 
ard list panelboards of certain types when he ships from stock either 
on all cr part of such panclboard. 

The geographical difference is stated in thirteen different ways, 
each of which set-up essentially the same line of demarcation "between 
East and West. The most usual statement, however, is East of longitude 
110 degrees and West of longitude 110 degrees. ■ ' 

Variations of this are Standard and Pacific cuast points, Standard 
Schedule and Alternate Schedule. Another- cites discounts fur territory 
East of the eastern boundaries of hew Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming and 
Montana end for all territories West of certain boundaries of the sane 
states, excluding El Paso, Texas. The list prices to all easterners 
and areas are the same. The differential between customer classen 
averages about 10 l ,o between classes, one and two and the same between 
two and three. 

Perhaps the net. change during price filing was to increase the 
differential between East and West, giving the East still more preference 
and to increase prices on the circuit breaker type of equipnBnt and to 
reduce ^rices on other types. 

The purpose of open price filing in this group was to encourage 
standardized grouping of product parts resulting in products which 
cculd be identified by catalogue number, Prior to open price filing 
some members of the industry had subscribed to a. service of catalogue 
publishing in which this was attempted. 

4. Pole Line Hardware 

Pole Line Hardware consists of metal products applicable for usage 
in and with cross arms, wires and poles as used for the transmission 
and distribution of electrical energy and in communication lines. 

There are twelve companies who manufacture sc.:e or all of the pro- 
ducts of this industry. The price call was issued May 23, to be effect- 
ive June 7, 1934, but because many members of the industry stated that 
due to the voluminous, number of items involved extra time was needed, 
the effective date of the ..rice call was extended to June 10, 1934. 

9822 



-173- 

Tliis group divided the United States into three geographical 
areas, Eastern Division, Western Division, or Pacific Coast Division 
and the Arizons Division. The Eastern Division comprised all terri- 
tory. with the exception cf the Western and Arizona Divisions. The 
Eastern division included California, Oregon, and Washington, and 
also parts of the following states: 

1. Idaho — the counties of Benewah, Bonner, Coundary, Clear- 
water, Idaho, Kootenani, Latah, Lewis, Kez Perce, Shoshone; 
Montana, — counties of Flathead, Lake (northern half) and 
Lincoln; Nevada, — all counties exceot counties of Elko,Eurcka 
Eureka, Lincoln, and White Plains, The Ariaona Division comprised 
the state of Arizona. 

The following shoes the number of companies making filings in 
the various divisions: All three divisions - 3 companies 

Western and Arizona division - 1 company 

Eastern division - 7 companies 

Western division - 1 company 

Prices, terms and other conditions of sale varied in each of the 
three geographical areas. However in any one area, at any given 
time, the prices, terms and conditions of sale of all competing com- 
panies were the same. 

The following are one company's prices on the same items either 
at different times in the same locality or in different localities; 
all prices are porhundred items: 

Eastern Piling effective June 19,1934. 

$50.00 or lose $50.01 - $150.00 $150.01 or over 

74.00 64.80 61.70 

61.30 53.70 51.10 

67.00 58.60 . 55.80 

Eastern Piling effective August 13, 1934. 

$25.00 or less $25.01 or over 

71 '. 70 61 . 70 ' 
59 140 51.10 

64.90 55.80 

Western Division effective September 23, 1934 

Less than Standard Package Standard. Package or over 

$82^65 $71.90 

"0.80 61.60 

76.55 66.60 

Arizona Prices effective November 12, 1934 

Less than Standard Package Standard Package or over 

$85.95 $74.75 

76.90 66.90 

82.30 71.60 

9822 



-173- 

It can "be seen from the foregoing that the Western di vision prices 
were higher than those in tho Eastern division, whils the Arizona 
Division prices exceeded those of the Western division. 

Approximately the same differential in prices between the three 
geographical locations as shown above, prevailed on all items. The 
filings by members of this industry made but very few changes in the 
list price as originally filed for each geographical areaa. Most of 
the changes only affected terms of payment. 

An unusual degree of uniformity existed between companies of this 
^rcup sofar as -orices, discounts, terms, and delivery were concerned 
The main difference between companies being the areas to which they 
quoted. 

Only one basic change occurred during open price filing, this being 
in connection with terms of payment. 

These changes can best be seen by consulting Appendix A, Part 
13, Section D . 

5. Industrial Lighting Equipment 

The products of this group are fixtures designed to direct light 
for industrial uses. There were five customer classes listed below in 
the order of preference given by most companies. 

1. Distributors. 

2. Jobbers 

3. ElcctricalCrntractcrs and Dealers 

4. Large Users. 

5. Consumers. 

Disccunts were given each class on the basis of less than standard 
package, one standard package or more, five standard packages or more, and 
50 standard Packages or more. To illustrate customer differentials, one 
company quotes the five classes discounts on one standard package or more 
as follows: 

Distributors 48f£, Jobber 37;1, Electrical contractors and dealers 
33$, large users 25$, and consumers list. 

There is a fair degree of uniformity but with exceptions of two 
types, one, companies quoting net prices to distributers or discounts 
to distributors only, all others list, net prices to contractors and 
dealer; and wholesalers and "all buyers". 

As between the original and final filings no change of moment 
occurs in the structure, except that not prices probably were reduced 
by the reduction of list trices. 



9822 



-174- 



Terms of delivery remain about the same for all companies, "but 
terms of payment changed. About 50$ of the companies changed their 
basis of cash discount with the result that some uniformity occurred 
because the trend of the change was toward terms of 2fo 10 or 15days 
net thirty days. 



j 3 22 



-175- 
Cr'AFTZ a 15 

corcLiisioii 



After examining the evidence presented in the preceding separate 
group reports, it n-y seen hopeless to attempt to draw any general 
conclusions. Much the sane procedure of analysis was applied to records 
collected in accordance with a single code provision, nevertheless, 
the result is a series of pictures of industry groups which, if they 
cr.n "be understood at all, seem to hear almost no relationship to each 
other. It is not only that some are less vague and more clear-cut in 
outline than others. Sut "basically the various experiences neither start 
with nor follow any simple pattern. A tendency in one group to go in one 
direction appears in the next as a definite trend in the opposite direc- 
tion. The mere fact that they were all exposed to price-filing as defined 
in Article X. of the Electric ~.l manufp.cturing code, is apparently no 
significant common denominator. 

Much of this difference ir. to "be er-plained "by the fact that, while 
the seventeen groups are all defined, as "belonging to the electrical 
manufacturing industry, that arbitrary definition is about all they have 
in common. Prom the economic point of view, flash-light "batteries, weld- 
ing apparatus, radio tubes, fuse-plurs, building wire, and potato peel- 
ing machinery have little similarity in eiiy economic respect. The under- 
lying characteristics of their production, their distribution and their 
use fall in entirely different categories. And while some few companies 
may operate in many of the lines, the majority are specialists active in 
only one of the groups . 

A . T IE PP.OBIEk OP CCTT-'LSX PRICE STPJJCTTJPES . 

Certain markets and price structures have been taken as typical 
by nearly all who have discussed the problem of prices. The famous 
Law of supply and demand relates to the amoiint of money paid for a cer- 
tain quantity of a certpin quality of a certain commodity in a certain 
market where all purchasers are indentical except for the degree of their 
desire for the product and the money in their pockets, and all sellers 
are indentical except for their costs of aroduction. On the basis of such 
assumed conditions, it has been possible to evolve a body of theory des- 
cribing the determination of price. The theoreticrl justification usually 
advanced for price-f iling is that it contributes to the creation of such 
a "perfect" market. 

If there is any one thing demonstrated by the record of electrical 
prices, it is that no such simplicity exists in fact, .'perhaps raw mat- 
erial prices are less com; lex; certainly retail prices are more diffipl©; 
but mriinuf a.cturers engaged in the type of economic activity typified by 
the £ . oups here examined, are enmeshed in price structures which are 
compounded of many elements. 



9S22 . 



-176- 

They are not selling products, "but credit and transportation. The pur- 
chasers are not interchangeable "but divide into many groups and types, 
frequently noncompetitive with each other. Before considering the oper- 
ation and effects of price-filing, it is necessary to describe this 
complex multi-i arket situation in some detail. 

Products 

There is hardly a price-call in the electrical industry which 
related to a simple product without variation in size, grade, design 
or technical specifications . Of those examined, perhaps welding appar- 
atus comes nearest to such simplicity, "but even it is quickly complicated 
"by many variarions in supplementary equipment and accessories .In many 
instances, although the number of basic products is small, the presence 
of a small number of universal ■ variables plus a great many variations 
in size and grade, result in so many possible combinations and permut- 
ations as to involve thousands of different prices, applying to parti- 
cular specifications, as is the case in the rubber-covered building wire 
group. In still other cases, the actual products themselves are numerous, 
as in domestic heating appliances. 

To add further confusion to this picture the products do not nec- 
essarily maintain a quality continuity. There are the cases where the 
products are continually changed in design or structure, or where old 
products are dropped and new products appear as in the domestic heating 
appliance group. 

In the battery group, the problem of defining the product is fur- 
ther complicated by the provision for different prices according to the 
nature of the label, ~ the standard brand label carrying higher prices 
than special labels although the actual merchandise involved may be 
identical. 

In several grouos, the problem of packaging appears. The product 
is usually cot p^.rchased in bulk so prices must take into account the 
form in : irk it is purchased. In the wire groups, this raise problems 
of spools, laels and factory lengths; in products such as sockets, of 
standard packages, cartons and broken cartons. 

One might expect that price changes in a line such as building wire 
or sockets would move uniformly, and that consequently one or two 
typical items woxild provide a base from which all other prices would 
maintain regular differentials. Unfortunately, such is by no means the 
case. To be sure, there are occasional broadside price changes affecting 
the entire list, but in addition there are continual sharp-shooting 
revisions in the list price of one or another single item. 

In some instances, other elements in the price structure may vary 
according to the particular product under consideration. Some products 
may be quoted on a, list less discount basis, while others will carry 
a net price. 



9322 



-177- 



in the battery group, freight ch rges or allowance vary according to 
the particular product under consideration, In the magnet wire group, 
the asbestos insulated magnet wire price structure includes discounts 
to specified customer classes, while other magnet 'Tire does not. 

Freight 

Inasmuch as most manufacturers of electrical products sell their 
products over a wide geopraphical area, the problem of transportation 
enters into the price contract. The manufacturer frequently includes 
freight as jjart of the total sale. The extreme forms which the price 
structure may take is s: le f.o.b. factory or a delivered price regard- 
less of the customer's location. Other variations are the use of basing 
points, i.e., freight charged from some point other than the factory, 
and the use of zones,' the most usual being some variant on the theme of 
east and "/est. Perhaps . the m^st unusual is the pole line 'hardware 
group, having three zones, one of which 'is the single state, Arizona. 
In several groups, the treatment of freight varies among the classes 
of customers, while in many the character of the freight charge or 
allowance: varies with the size of the order, a form of quantity discount. 

It has usually been assumed that the freight element in the price 
structure changes but little ."from time to time. It is possible, of course, 
that such changes were largely the result of the new information sudden- 
ly made available about the practices of others in the indsutry, and 
that it was inevitable that there would be numerous changes in the first 
year of price-filing. This. would argue th t the record of change was 
merely temporary. Certainly, the filings for the groups studied show 
that freight terms are by no means inflexible. However, changes were 
not merely along the line of the development of uniformity. The out- 
standing is that of the rubber- cove red building wire group, whose 
price structure changed from an el; borate system of freight charges to 
a delivered price basis during the period. This is not an isolated case 
of structural change, for otlher groups also recorded revised freight 
structures. 

One form of price change under this head relates to the companies 
which charge freight from variouv warehousing points. Since they ab- 
andon or add warehouses from time to time the result is an unrecorded 
change in prices. 

Credi t 

In addition to selling products and transportation, these industries 
all sell credit. This element in the price structure takes the form of 
cash discount and credit terms. In the case of expensive products, it 
may appear in the guise of an installment purchase as is the case for 
welding apparatus. Here again, it is usually assumed that little variat- 
ion exists, if any. 

Although the credit, terms item ^as more uniform than most elements 
in the price contract, variations existea within most industries, as 
well as wide differences among the various industries. 



9822 



, _ 

-178- 



In come few instances, terms varied with the class of customer or the 
size of the order. It is one further complexity in the price contract, 
— one other item which apparently may "be varied in the search for 
customers. 

Other Considerations. 

In some cases, still additional elements enter into the trans- 
action to complicate it. The problem of container extras or returning 
reels, of rental and leasing plans, of special label or design charges 
or allowances, of trade-in allowances, of guaranteed performance or 
perfection, of speed of delivery, of standard or special equipment and 
accessories, — any of these may also appear as part of the price 
contract or offer, to increase the d ifficulty for the purchaser in 
comparing competitors' products, or to worry the analyst who tries 
to summarize neatly the character of or changes in the price structure. 

Customer Classification 

The serious problem of competing distribution channels is clearly 
in evidence in the price structures of the groups in electrical industry. 
If the elements in the price are complicated, the treatment of different 
groups of customers is frequently even more so. It is important to 
keep in mind that, prior to price-filing, many companies engaged in 
separate bargaining with e ach customer, with no formal price structure 
at all. Inasmuch as business is often a series of independent trans- 
actions, a difficult customer may be won by creating a new customer 
class or redefining an old one so as to increase his discount. 

Furthermore, many of the products go to quite different and often 
non-competing types of customers. They may be sold to competitors to 
fill out incomplete lines, to manufacturers of other more complicated 
electrical products who '"ill use the product purchased as part of their 
own fabrication, to industrial users, to supply houses, to wholesalers 
and jobbers for distribution to retailers, and direct to retailers. 

The result of this complicated marketing situation is the frequent 
use of a list price which serves no purpose except as a basis from 
which various differential discounts may be computed. Rather than vary 
the list price, price changes may be made by changing some or all of 
the discount rates. In other groups, there are separate net price lists 
for different customer clasres. 

In most of the groups studied, these customer discounts are the 
heart of the price structure. They create wide differences in price 
to different customers. The most significant changes in price occur by 
means of their revision, reflecting the efforts to attract those oper- 
ating in one or another channel. of distribution or use* 

In some groups, the industry never escaped from its earlier state 
of chaotic individual discounts. The members of the fractional horse- 
power motor industry incorporated the multiplier system for larger 
buyers as part of their filings, and the domestic heating appliance 

9322 



-179- 

group, after an early period of exact, discounts, introduced the 
system of special discounts of 10 per cent available at seller's choice. 
In the "batteries group, the development of such optional discounts was 
subject to -continual extension until one company reached the extent of 
quoting a "blanket discount "up to TO per cent in consideration of 
quantity, quality and cost of selling and transportation." 

Finally, undoubtedly the disregard of filea prices, alleged W) 
"be so frequent in the later days, usually took the form of concessions 
to certain favorite "buyers rather than a uniform reduction below 
filed prices. . " 

Quantity Discount 

In addition to, or imposed upon these functioanl discounts, are 
various forms of quantity discount. Of course, the functional discounts 
themselves reflect to a considerable extent the quantities involved in 
different types of transactions. Specific quantity discounts take 
many different forms. They may be based upon dollar volume or physical 
quantity. Frequently, they vary with the class of customer as in the 
original fan motor filings. In rubber-covered building wire, the 
quantity discounts which apply to most customers, are offset by a 
reverse discount schedule for distributors. In some instances they 
have no relation to the quantity or value involved in tBae particular 
order, but may relate rather to the year's purchase, not always limited 
even to purchases. from the concern giving the discount (fractional 
horsepower motors.). 

Conclusion . 

The above brief summary of the complexity of some of the various 
structures within the electrical manufacturing indsutry, emphasizas 
certain elements among the many problems of price behavior. The two 
problems in the price area most frequently considered are the level of 
prices and the relationship of price to cost. Not only does the factor 
of complexity inject difficulties into the determination of a statist- 
ical measure of changes in the price level, but it suggests that per- 
haps the rearrangement of prices within the stricture may be sven mor<^ 
important in some connections than changes in the level. In the build- 
ing wire industry, fcr example, it is impossible to determine whether 
prices moved up or down on the average, during the price filing period, 
but it is clear that there were major changes affecting particular 
customers far beyond any movement in the level. As to the problem of 
the relationship between price and cost, the problems raised appear 
almost insuperable. With prices dependent upon variations in product , 
quantity in the transaction, types of customers, and innumerable other 
factors, the determination of the actual cost applicable to any single 
transaction sterns hopeless. 3ut if complexity increases the difficul- 
ties in the analysis of price level or cost, it opens wide for analysis 
the area of the behavior of internal industry price structures, not 
only with respect to the basic pattern disclosed of the methods of 
doing business* but the process of continual revision and adjustment 
as it affects members of the industry and other customers. 

9822 



-180- 



3. The Behavior of prices Under price Filing 

By this time, it should be clear that it is impossible to 
isolate the influence of price-filing upon the price structure vhich 
existed prior to the code. However, one can discuss some of the 
characheri sties of price behavior during this period, and draw 
some tentative conclusions about the possible relationship of price- 
filing to the various incidents. Even if it had no causative influence, 
it performed the service of establishing for the first time in hist-. 
ory, a detailed record of the nature of change in such complicated 
structures. 



9822 



-181- 

The point must be stressed that changes in the level or structure of 
prices during the short period from late 1933 to early 1933, were the 
result of a bewildering and complex sot of. forces both in respect to demand 
and cost of production which varied from group to group. Furthermore, 
assuming for the moment that orice-filin is an attempt to approximate the 

adltions of an organized market, then the behavior of prices under its 
aegis should merely reflect more accurately than otherwise the underlying 
economic conditions, Price-filing should operate as a lubricating agent 
rather than an originating force. 

. __ Level of Prices.. 

All that has been said before, argues against the possibility of 
determining whether prices advanced or fell during the period, and certainly 
against any exact determination of the extent of the change. However, some 
conclusions can be drawn concerning direction. 

There is no case cf conspicuous price increase, The only instance 
where it seems possible that the average may have risen, is rubber-covered 
building wire. I. that instance, the structure changed so completely, 
that one oust judge on the basis of the fact that the change in method of 
charging freight caused a higher price to most customers although the average 
reduction to others exceeded the average increase, that there was a heavier 
penalty on very small orders and an increased quantity premium, and that 
wholesalers reeeived a much greater discount than previously. 

In some cases such as food service equipment and laminated phenolic 
products, there wad little change according to the record of filings. 

In a other cases, there were reductions in sections of the price 
structure, as in connection with, the Bmallest electric fans, or the quantity 
purchasers of magnet wire or fractional horsepower motors. 

Finally, there wore illustrations of. general price reductions varying 
from relatively slight deer ses such as welding apparatus to the greater 
reductions of batteries, fie. .idle cords, radio tubes and sockets. 

The significance of these estimates is weakened by uncertainties 
relating to both ends cf the price-filing period. Undoubtedly, original 
filings were in many cases above actual prices then prevailing, especially 
en special and secret disccunts are taken into account, and the declines 
map represent merely the return to previous levels. On the other hand, 
the filed prices at the end when compliance was so faulty were frequently 
above the actual market. The evidence of marked' price decline in the 
battery and flexible cord groups is supported by the fact that the price- 
call was. cancelled for both these groups, ana it became a dead letter in 
the : • : ■: group, although not formally cancelled. 

nich influence the -resence of price-filing had ir. affecting the 
3 urs oricos. can only be a matter of speculation. Considering the 
cases - Line, the situations appear tc be complicated by many 

factors. . " . - : flexible cord, the persistent secret under-cutting 
af prices by some members of the industry seeking a temporary advantage is 
alleged to have forced those ira compliance to make retaliatory filings. 
The battery industry was suffering severely from over-capacity. The sockets 

9822 



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industry t/ss co;iroetir:g for chrnnels of volume distribution. i!ad there 
been no price-filing, the history of nrices could not have been so clearly 
a matter of record, although the basic circumstances might still have 
interfered with "stability". 

Shifting Price Structure. One of the most interesting results is the 
number of major changes in the -oattern of the various price structures 
which occurred during this period. To be sure, these industries do not 
have old established practices, hoary with tradition. They were all 
severely hit by the depression. As a result, instance after instance 
is in the record of a revision in the way of doing business. It might 
be the disappearance of middlemen operating on a consignment basis in the 
radio tube industry, the trend towards substitution of a single customer 
class for the previous plural classification in the sockets graup, the 
shift from a form of basing point system to delivered prices in the magnet 
wire industry, or the wide— spread elimination of quantity discount in the 
electric fan industry. Whether or not these changes were healthy is 
another story, Kit some one thought they ought co be made. 

There are two groups in which the changes v/ere sweeping in character. 
In rubber-covered building wire, the price structure was completely 
revolutionized in terms of its application to any specific customer. 
Freight was changed from a freight-added basis to a delivered price. 
Separate list prices v/ere established for various types of transactions, 
and wholesalers were given a much greater discount. 

The flexible cord industry is another case of extreme structural 
variation in which a mere detailed customer classification structure 
was supplanted by one based on quantities, then by a single priae to all 
buyers, and finally returned to a structure resembling that in the original 
filings. 

Under a policy of price secrecy, the nature of any new price structure 
of any complexity' which some competitor might establish, would be a 
matter of detective work by salesmen until enough data had been accumulated 
to solve the puzzle. The interim would necessarily be a state of confusion, 
withclaims and counter-claims made to and by customers. Under price-filing, 
these changes took place quietly and openly. Perhaps it tends to make them 
more healthy than if they never are exposed to the light. At least it can 
be said that price-filing evidently greatly eases such periods of transition. 

foksAo raer Pi f f eren t i al s . The treatment of customer groups shows conflicting- 
trends. In radio tubes and building wire the wholesaler or jobber emerged 
in a stronger position than before, while in other groups his position is 
weaker. In sockets and fuse-plugs, there was a tendency for differentials 
to disappear, and a single category of " all buyers" to be substituted. 
The discount for quantity increased in the magnet wire and fractional horse 
power motor groups. On the other hand, it disappeared in all but one 
customer class in the fan motors group, and was abandoned as a main basis for 
classification after a brief period of trial in the flexible cord industry, 
in which industry the range of differential pricos went in and out like an 
accordion. The distant purchaser gained at the expense of the customer 
nearby in building wire and magnet wire, and penalties on purchases less 
than the standard unit were made heavier in several groups. In several 
groups, for example, fan motors, the government improved its rclativo position 

0822 



-183- 



among the customer classes. 

It has already been noted that in certain groups, the old system of 
individual discounts could not be entirely overthrown. In the domestic 
heating appliance and the batteries group, the filing of blanket discounts 
for use at the manufacturer's option in such general terms as "for 
promotional activity" completely destroyed the exactness of any customer 
classification. 

In general, it can be said that there were changes in differentials 
representing a major form of price change in .iost groups. The fact that 
customers did not directly receive the filed information raises an 
interesting question as to whether full publicity would have led to greater 
readjustments of these differentials. 

Uniformity . If there is any single characteristic which may be taken as 
an indicator of an organized market — organized either bv competition or 
agreement — it is uniformity* Presumably, under such circumstances, no 
individual can afford to maintain a price above his competitors , nor will 
the2 r permit him to be below. 

In most industries, nearly all members appear to follow the general 
pattern of price -structure which prevails. In portable electric tnols, 
several manufacturers who also r.ianuf ac tur e fractional horse power motors 
and were using the motor price structure, quickly abandoned their original 
methods after price-filing began for these generally prevalent in the 
industry. It appears that an enterprise operating in several groups, 
will follow the structure of each, a situation which would be most 
bewildering were not the prevailing practice to operate under a policy of 
decentralization. This persistence of pattern even appears within groups, 
as for exajnple, the special structure of asbestos insulated wire in the 
magnet wire group. 

Likewise, when significant changes in structure appeared, as the 
experiment in supplanting functional discounts with quantity discounts in 
the flexible cord industry, the new structure was almost immediately adop- 
ted by the entire industry, and as speedily and universally abandoned several 
weeks later. In general-, differences among manufacturers are not so much 
the use of different patterns of price structure, as the use of varying 
differentials or rates. 

The most noticeable trend towards uniformity during the period was in 
terms and conditions of sale. Perhaps the most interesting case is that of 
welding apparatus, where the wide variation in installment plans and in 
rental arrangements tended to give way to a single plan, although all members 
of the grou had not adopted it by the end of the period. In many groups, 
terms became somewhat more uniform. This same trend was evident in the 
me tho d o f handl i n ; f re ight . 

The tendency to uniformity wa.s also present in the area of customer 
classification, but it took a rather different form . The tendency frequently 
was for a concern upon discovery of a cla.ss used by another manufacturer 
to establish it also. Thus uniformity cane about by the simple method of 
each incorporating the vagaries of all other members of the industry. Whether 
this would prove a persistent tendency is difficult to determine. In the 



•484- 

sockets and fuses groups, as well :is the flexible cord, there is evidence 
of a trend towards simplification. 

It should be -noted that in many industries, changes are very gradual 
in being adopted by the various members. Often,' the filings which relate 
t:> some particular variation may take several months before they are 
completed, and a small number of companies may disregard the revision 
entirely. This means that, at any given moment of time, it may appear 
superficially to be an extremely disorganized situation. ' Furthermore, 
there are always various situations (i.e. navy contracts) in which only 
certain members of the industry are interested so that filings pertaining 
thereto are not made by the entire industry 

Considering all the elements in the structures, however, it may be 
said that the extreme cases of considerable uniformity at the' beginning 
had it at the end, and those with wide deviations in the original filings 
still recorded them in their final filings. 'This seems to be. much- more 
a matter of the extent to which the" market is in fact a somewhat' unified 
market with vigorous comoetitors or ccoperators, than merely' a group of 
firms not a competitive unit and relatively insensitive to the nrice 
behavior of each other. HoWVer, at many specific points in the price 
stmcturc, there was a noticeable increase in uniformity, which can be 
attributed only to the improvement in price information. 

Flexibilit y. Without" records concerning price behavior in the -oast, it is 
difficult to evaluate the degree of price flexibility in these industries 
during the recorded -oeriod. None of the groups behaves with those frequent 
price changes which are usually found in agricultural markets. 'On the other 
hand, the fact that changes may and do occur in any of the many items, 
involved in the price contract, or for certain customers and not for others, 
, means that' there is much more flexibility than had commonly been supposed. 
The cases of little -price change, for example, food service equipment, are 
cases where the product is sold on a basis of ouality or specific utility, 
and variations take place in the product rather than the cash aspect of the 
price. . 

While the matter is not finally demonstrated, there is no evidence that 
prices- were made less flexible by the price-filing device. Probably in 
matters such as terms and conditions of sale, there were more variations 
as. uniformity developed that would normally be the case. The wide experi- 
menting with the nrice structure appearing in the flexible cord and building 
wire industries, for example, would appear to be much more apt to happen 
under price-filing than otherwise. The effect of publicity was that, as 
soon as one' member of the industry made a change, all the others followed. 
Then some one else had another idea which he filed, and the others followed. 
Thus the structure changed under the impact of various individuals separatc- 
. ly assuming leadership. In several cases, the followers filed a modifica- 
tion of the suggestion of the leader, -and he was forced later to revise. 

The record shows almost no cases where filings were made and subse- 
quently withdrawn, where" it can even be suspected that undue pressure was 
brought to bear. There are, however, instances (i.e. batteries) where 
individuals filed higher prices in the hope that the industry would advance 
to the higher level, but Were disappointed in their .ho'oe and were forced 
to climb dovm again.- ' 
0832 .. . 



-185- 



Waiting pe riod . The code provision provided for .a ten day waiting period, 
unless a filing was "to meet competition," or the supervisory agency 
authorized a shorter period. The authorization was given frequently in 
some groups, particularly in cases relating to construction detail involved 
in special orders. 

The I lem of the waiting period had "been one on which the industry 
and XRA had violently disagreed. The studies relegate the tempest to the 
teapot. There are very few instances where the waiting period appears to 
ve been of real significance. The filings in many groups show not only 
a failure to file within the waiting pcriea, hut even delays of weeks 
before the new filing is met. The speed of reaction varies with the . 
importance of the price change. Where it is a major change", it will proceed 
through the industry with more rapidity than a minor revision. In general, 
there seems to be little necessity demonstrated for the waiting period, 
though something of a case can be made for some device permitting delay 
in these, cases of such major importance that the members of .the industry 
and customers will gain by the opportunity to consider and study the change 
carefully before following the initiating filing. 

In many groups, the problem of determining when a filing was "to meet 
competition" proved to be a particularly difficult one. In both the .sockets 
and flexible cord groups, it appears that short filings were permitted 
"tc meet competition" of individuals allegedly selling below their filed 
prices. . However, the more difficult problem is best illustrated in the 
domestic heating appliance group. Manufacturer A sells a toaster for $2.00. 
Manufacturer 3 sells a 'toaster for 51.50, A cuts his price 10 cents. 
Should B be allowed tc file a coincidental pr'ice'reduction to meet 
competition? Suppose 3 also produces a percolator which sells for the same 
price as his toaster - is it in competition with A's toaster? Or, to note 
another variant, A sells through jobbers and B sells direct. A increases 
his jobbers discount, - may 3 file "to meet competition" and how much may 
he reduce, — the amount or the percentage of A's reduction. Despite the 
number of cases such as these, it docs not appear that any principle emerged 
jverning their solution oy the several supervisory agencies. 

Leadership, ft is impossible from the record to make any adequate analysis 
as tc the extent to which price policies were determined by some form of 
group decision rather than in complete individual isolation. Certainly the 
erratic behavior cf most of the groups makes such a hypothesis quite untenable, 
Dn the other hand, it occasionally appears that certain sub-groups within the 
group considered have a degree of uniformity which may result either from 
competition or cooperation. In soma instances, this may be the result of 
patent and license agreements and in others, of some form of parent- subsid- 
iary relationchi . • . 

There is little evidence in the price 'filing record of dominance of 
the policies of any gr . T one or two companies, taking the timing of price 
filings as a "oasis. Even where such major changes occurred as in the 
building wire group the leadership was taken at different times by different 
members of the industry. In the flexible cord group, most of the initiating 
filings were made by t a nies, but as discussed in detail in the chapter 
on this group, the record does not demonstrate any well controlled precession 
behind the leaders. 

9822 



-1£ 



As to oifferences between large and small companies, the small 
companies were frequently very inactive, as though they had separate little 
markets or customer relationships not affected by the general market 
situation. As a result, the large companies usually made many more filings 
than did the small ones. . " 

£nt£ancea and Exits, The evidence does not indicate that any considerable 
number of companies were attracted into these groups by price-filing. Th-re 
is evidence that some manufacturers with incomplete lines extended them 
during the period. Furthermore, if the establishment of new customer 
classes is any indication, there was a considerable attempt to enter new 
markets, however, botn these developments may be accounted for by the 
necessities oi the enterprises rather than the initiation of price-filing. 

Conclusion. This record of seventeen experiments in ^rice-filing presents 
some evidence that the device possesses neither all the evil characteristics 
which some had alleged nor all the excellent ones claimed for it by others. 
Oertamly the records of price behavior of the groups during the period do 
not appear to disclose any single pattern which can be attributed" to the 
distribution of price information throughout each group. As a device it 
served primarily to lubricate the market machinery rather than to solve the 
basic economic problems of industry. 

It proved- to be no panacea. Prices were not neatly stabilized. 
Economic differentials were not necessarily created. On the other hand, 
many changes were brought about with little disorder or confusion, and there 
was some increase in uniformity. Undoubtedly, it served to illuminate many 
of the particular problems in each group and possibly introduced more 
rationalization into individual price policies. At the very least, it 
provided a set of basic facts about a series of complex markets which 
deserve study not only by those in the industries concerned, but by all 
interested in the operation of our economic system. 

. £• TM Hao,ui sites ice ppjce filing 

I 

The ^ concept of price-fling as a method of establishing an organized 
market, is by no means overwhelmingly demonstrated by the records of these 
seventeen experiments, ^ne may assume such a market to be one in which there 
is considerable uniformity in price at any given moment, flexibility of price 
reflecting economic conditions, and sensitivity on the part of each member 
cf the industry to the behavior of his competitors. The evidence demonstrates 
certain conditions where this development appears to be more apt to occur 
than others. The following sections indicate tentative conclusions based on 
the studios alone, concerning the necessary requisites for price-filing to 
operate in the direction of creating such a market. 

£co£e of the Price-Call. The electrical industry offered peculiar difficultly 
;.o the .Hational Recovery Administration, and to itself for that matter, in 
determining its boundaries. The problem becomes even more difficult when one 
endeavors tr define groups for ririce-f iling purposes. Some products, such as 
rubber- covered building wire or welding apparatus, are sufficiently unique 
and definite to define an exact group of competitors. Cn the other hand, 
a group such as food service equipment includes a largo number of non-competin 
products and many companies which produce specialized items which cnmpctef with 
only one or two other companies in the group, if any. The entire group is 

0822 



-187- 



sub-divided into a large number of small, c ver-lapping semi-competitive _ 
sub-divisions. The potato-peeler manufacturers are not much interested m 
the drink-mixer price structure, etc.. 

The cases where price-filing seems to have operated with some effective- 
ness are the groups where the concerns involved are clearly competitors, -- 

re it is an economic group and not one created chiefly because of the 
necessities of a complete plan of subdividing the industry for organizational 
purposes. fed all t>rice-calls been limited to specific competing items 
rather than to broad classes of products, the process would have been much 
less expensive, less bother, and much more effective. 

Although it is in the realm of the intangible, perhaps some distinction 
should be made between the groups which have boon organized for many years 
and those which have developed no "group-consciousness," the groups whicn 
have members who are definitely committed through considerable investment to 
continuing in the industry and those whose members are in and out, the groups 
whose members think in terms of the industry and those whose natural 
characteristics dispose them to seek temporary advantages. The tendency for 
the one is for price policies to be determined in terms of their implications 
for the entire industry, in the second, in terms of the immediate advantage 
for tbe particular enterprise. Without adequate enforcement, price-filing 
in groups of the second type, seems to have led to widespread dissatisfaction 
and even its abandonment by several such groups. 

Trice Sensitivity.. The various groups examined appear to vary widely in 
tenia of "STe place of price in their economic behavior. In some instances, 
such as building wire and batteries, it appears that any change by one member 
of the industry in his price level or structure is likely to be quickly 
reflected through the industry. In other groups, such as welding apparatus 
and domestic heating appliances, the various enterprises show little immediate 
concern over the behavior of others. 

It app-ars to be true that in the case of products where the producers 
have a narrow margin and there is no significant distinction between the 
pmduct of the various members of the industry, price competition is important 
and changes by one member of the industry are rapidly reflected by the others. 
There products are distinguished by design, etc., and the manufacturer has 
a wide margin of choice in determining price because a large proportion of the 
cost is within his control, the market is much mere sluggish. Probably the 
potentialities of price-filing could be obtained in the second case by 
occasional filings of terms, freight allowances, etc., without any attempt 
to maintain complete, up-to-date filings. 

Standardization of Produ cts. It appears to be important that the pmduct_be 
something which has a clear qualitative meaning to all involved m the price- 
filing. "An advertisement stating that a suit of clothes costs $30.00 means 
nothing unless and until there is some measure of quality. A price is a 
price for something. 

In grouos with product standardization such as radio tubes or building 
wire, there 'is no such difficulty. However, price-filing in the domestic 
heating appliance field could not possibly give any real picture of price 
levels. With a manufacturer prodiicing a series of irons, percolators or 
toasters at different price levels, and giving only the most inadequate 
descriptions of the product, neither competitor nor consumer can interpret 
accurately his -orice list. In some cases, of course, the name of the 
9322 manufacturer may help to identify the quality of the product. 



-1*88- 



This does not mean that exact specifications in every respect are 
required. No one knows the full values involved when he purchases a share 
of stock in the stock exchange. But lie does know what the share is. The 
product must be clearly identifiable. The more the situation is confused by 
variations in dor.ign, color, trick gadgets and the like the more impossible 
af realisation is the concept of an organized market. 






9822 



-189- 

Infornntory Character of Filing . Although the product may ho difficult 
to define, there is no excuse for indefiniteness on the prico side of the 
transaction. Price-filing is intended to be informs tor/. It should tell 
any intelligent reader the nature of the price offers which each com- 
petitor is mailing. 

Although there was marked imporvenent in this respect in certain of 
tho grouos during the months of experience, it still remains true that 
many of the filings were incomplete or inexact. In the case of the 
larger products, the incomplete record of trade-in allowances, greatly 
weakened the accuracy of the record which was filed. Prices wore filed, 
for East and West, without indicating the line whore the twain sha.ll 
meet. Terms were filed on the "basis of 2 per cent 10 days, without in- 
dicating that basic date was that from which the 10 days should be 
counted. And under the heading of customer classes, filings referred to 
"large retailers", "Class A Chains", or such classes as "wholesalers" 
and "jobbers" without any indication of the distinction. Perhaps, over 
a longer -ocriod of time, these elements of obscurity would have gradually 
been eliminated. 

A further difficulty was the fact that new filings frequently failed 
to tell how much of the old filings were displaced. Ylhen a new customer 
class was created, it was. sometimes impossible to tell how much of the 
old structure .remained. Likewise, in some of the more complicated filings, 
it was a necdle-in-thc haysta.ckta.sk to determine what changes had been 
made. It mi^ht have helped if each filing had been accompanied by a 
brief summary of the changes involved. 

Perhaps the greatest violation of this principle of exact informa- 
tion was in the groups whore special or optional discounts were filed 
without any indication of when or under what circumstances they might 
be granted. In the domestic heating appliance and batteries groups, for 
example, the period of price-filing saw a marked increase in .the number 
filing such special "promotional" discounts. 

Furthermore, there must bo assurance that salos arc actually made, 
at the filed price. Although there are no official records of such cases, 
members of the industry report that, under the authority of the looso 
phraseology of the codo urovision, sales were sometimes made abovo the 
prices filed. There is considerable evidenco that sales were made at 
less than filed prices, particularly in the latter days of the code. 

It is of course true that misinformation may- do more harm than no 
information at all. One of the innate difficulties with price-filing as 
a device is that the non-participating members of the industry derive an 
advantage over the men who give full information about thoir orice 
structure. This advantage is ,of course greatly enhanced when the com- 
pilers are bound by a, waiting period. 

Filing Agency . 77hile there is much to be sa.id for the procedure of 
using members of the industry as supervisory agencies, the fact remains 
that they were too busy with their own affairs to bo able to supervise 
carefully the details of the actual price-filings. Much of the obscurity 
of some of the filings could have been eliminated if full-time experts 
with authority had been able to insist upon revisions in form and 

9822 



-190- 

adoquacy of content. While it would perhaps he impractical to require 
the use of some special form, at least the essential information necessary 
could have "been more carefully specified, and a greater attempt made to 
eliminate the inexact elements in the filings. Both this reason, and the 
values to be' obtained from continual analysis of the data, suggest the 
importance of a competent full-time staff to operate the price-filing 
mechanism. 

Pu rpose .' Perhaps most important of all, is the attitude with which the 
particular group approached price-filing. Many felt that the distress of 
their particular industry was due to price "behavior, rather than app- 
reciating that -orices usually reflect some maladjustment in more basic 
economic conditions. Undoubtedly, many business men hoped that price- 
filing would raise prices. Others saw it merely as a cpnvenient moans of 
enforcing the no-soiling— bolrw-cost "orovision. The record does not de- 
monstrate the effectiveness of price-filing at least under the existing 
circumstances for either of those objectives. Its failure in these two 
respects was regarded by many as a failure of the device. 

For its "successful use, an industry must desire to expose its 
price structure to the operation of basic economic forces. If it wishes 
to reduce the element of discrimination among customer classes, or to 
eliminate the procedure of separate bargaining with each purchaser, it 
must be willing to place the information in the hands of customers, so 
that their insistence will enforce reduction in differential discounts. 
If it believes that economic controls should operate through the law 
of supply and demand, it must be willing to place its prices in a gold- 
fish bowl. Too few business men were aware of the real implications of 
tho prico— filing device. 

To be sure, there were many other special purposes which price- 
filing accomplished. It gave impetus to the development of product stand- 
ardization. In some lines, it created for the first time a record of 
those enterprises engaged in the production of the particular products 
in a group, and the variety of products which each produced. Most im- 
portant of all, it created a record of the nature of the price structure 
in each industry, a set of economic facts of great ' importance to those 
concerned with the development of public and private policy in the fiold 
of industrial operation, and facts which might be of great benefit to 
the industry itself when carefully studied and analyzed. 

Flexibility ,_qf Operation. Prico filing in all seventeen groups in the 
oloctrical manufacturing industry was governed by a single code provision. 
However, it appears that the economic problems and operations of the , 
several groups are by no moans identical. Had there been more careful 
analysis^ of the specific situations, perhaps modifications of the basic 
plan might have been devised which would have been more effective and much 
less costly. 

The wording of the code specified that filing should involve in 
providing of all price information about a "product" by all producing 
that product. In fact, various exemptions developed, such as sales to 
employees or for export. In many cases, it might have been possible to 
eliminate whole areas of transactions without weakening the usefulness 

9822 



-191- 

of the device, — disregarding sales into certain channels of distribution, 
such as the government, for example. In other cases, only certain areas 
of the price structure might have "been covered by the price-filing, as 
for example, installment terms in the welding apparatus industry, or 
discounts to customer clasc.es in the domestic heating appliance industry. 

Finally, there are some instances where there was real value in the 
original call, hut little gained by continued filing. In the food 
service equipment group, ted emphasis been laid upon original registration, 
and no attempt been made to obtain later revisions, the essential values, 
such as they* are, of its price-filing experience would have been conserved. 

These comments merely serve to emphasize the fact that price-filing 
is a device. It shoLild not be applied according to any single formula 
to evci-y situation. Probably it should not be applied at all under 
certain situations. In any event, it should be preceded by the most 
careful consideration of the specific problems of the specific industry 
group concerned. And, like all devices, its operation should be subject 
to observation in order to insure its maximum effectiveness. 

D. TIE 1T33D FCQ FUETH3R STUDY 

The study of the price-filing records for the electrical manufactur- 
ing industry has raised many more problems than it has solved. Intended 
as an evaluation of the price-filing device, it lias proved to have much 
more significance as an exploration into the behavior of prices for a 
short period of time in a small number of industry groups, — groups whose 
exceedingly complicated price structures are in the continual process of 
internal readjust'^&at. Multiple products, functional discounts, quantity 
discounts, credit terms, freight charges and innumerable other elements 
all enter into the fabric woven by competition. 

The light thrown upon economic processes by these experimental 
studies, seems chiefly to exoosc an area of ignorance. Ho such records 
have ever been available before and therefore no such studies have been 
made. But even these few studies raise some fundamental problems. Are 
these seventeen industries isolated phenomena or do they typify other 
industries? If such price behavior appears elsewhere, how does it 
differ in kind and in degree? Would observation over allonger period of 
time disclose evolutionary trends not evident in so short and so dis- 
turbed a period? What are the implications of their many variations 
upon consumers, on competing industries? What basic economic character- 
istics appear to define the form of the price structure? What elements 
in the price structure seem to be harmful to the industry or to the en- 
tire economic system? What forces of economic control, public or private, 
arc necossa.ry to insure price behavior which will encourage economic 
health? These and many other problems emerge as one considers the 
record. 

What further study is needed? The answer is simple - similar and 
better examinations should be ma.de of every other industry with a complex 
price structure. Any existing compilations of industry prices should be 
subjected to careful study. The records of every industry engaged in 
price filing should be analyzed. Just as industries have been encouraged 

9322 



-192- 



to study their costs, they should ho encouraged to submit their price 
structure to scientific examination, in their own interest. Economic 
problems cannot he solved apart from the facts of economic processes. 
Certs-inly, laiov/lcdge of the behavior of prices is essentail to those 
determining individual business policies and even more so to those 

r]nto™i:jin£; i-m"blic pol icy. 



9322 



-192 A- 



A?PEID I X A 



9822 



-193- 



APPENDIX A; PART 1, SECTION a 

STANDARD AND INTERMEDIATE FILINGS 



APPENDIX A; PART 1, SECTION 1) 
SAiPLE PRICE FILINGS ILLUSTRATING MAJOR CHANGES 



RU33ER COVERED BUILDING TIKE 



9822 



-194- 

SECTIOU a 

STANDARD FRICE FILINGS 

See Appendix B Section A 

^1) rrtce riliri^-s pinci Delivery Symbols for Rubber Insulated Braided 
* Wires and Cables and Rubber Insulated Leaded Wire and Cable, to- 
gether with Discounts and Sales Policies for Distributors, Contract- 
ors, Industrials, Railroads, public Utilities including Telephone 
and Telegraph Companies, TJ.S. Government, States, Counties, Cities, 
and other Municipalities. 

(2) Change of Sales Policy - Delivery Terms, Contracts on Specific 
Building jobs. 

(a) Delivery is required within six months from date of contract, 
except that one estension of not to exceed six months will be 
granted if shown to satisfaction of seller that extension is 
due to causes beyond control of buyer, and request made in 
writing. In consideration of seller granting this 2nd period 
of protection, buyer agrees, upon expiration of second period, 
to accept billing for entire unfilled portion of contract. 

(b) Contracts from Industrials, Railroads, Utilities, etc. Delivery 
a.s required within 90 days from date of contract. 3uyer 
agrees to accept billing for unfilled portion of contract at 
expiration of 90 day period. 

iTi) Change of Sales Policy - 600 Volt R.C. Building Wire. To U. S. 
Government, States, etc. change corresponding paragraph to read 
"quotation made under closed bidding, procedure must be priced on 
the basis of prices in effect after 5 P. H. of the fourth day be- 
fore the day bids are open. There will be no change in these prices 
under any conditions. (Balance of original paragraph eliminated.) 

Above quotations must bear the following clause; 

"Prices quoted and accepted for ivire or cable on an order or con- 
tract shall only apply to orders or contracts releasee 1 for im- 
mediate manufacture and shipment, such releases to be given within 
90 days from date of customer's order or contract." 

(4) New price sheets - changes in symbols and methods of computing 
prices for Rubber Covered and Rubber and Lead. Change in Dis- 
counts to Wholesaler's Warehouse Stock, Direct to Customer of 
Wholesaler, Direct to Customer of Wholesaler and applying to Speci- 
fic Building job Contract. 



(*) These numbers identify the same filings listed in Appendix B 
Section A. 



9822 



-1.95- 

(f) Letter 5/17/34. Letter re: Vinson 3ill — Amend Terms and Condi- 
tions of 3;ile: — 

"On U. S. Navy Propositions, specifying quote on basis of rebating 
Government any amount in excess of 1'. over the total cost, agree 
to quote accordingly, and make following proposition on each quota- 
tion: — 

We are quotin ; on basis that in determining whether or not we make 
a profit of 10 .> over cost, that cost will be figured in the same 
manner as we ivve figured cost in past, such cost to be complete, 
including total commercial expense." 

(6) New Frice Sheets. Change in prices some increases and some decreases, 
No change in method of computation. Discounts increased 2-Y>. 

(7) Change in Discount; Discontinued on certain items to, Direct to 
Customer of Wholesaler and Applying to Specific Building job con- 
tr ct. 

(S) Change in Sales Policy - 3s Vinson 3ill (5th Piling). 

Omitting proposition regarding method of determining whether or not 
• profit of lOfj is made. 

(9) On bids to U. -S. Government involving Land Grant Preight Hates — 
"Deduct from total bid as an item of freight a sum equal to the 
maximum saving on land-grant freight rates obtained from any bidder." 

(10) Change in Sales Policy — Closed Bid Transactions with Federal, State, 
County, City or Municipal Governments. 

Frices quoted on closed "bids are to be those in effect at date of 
opening. Frices quoted must be on basis of column covering list 
value of exact quantity called for in inquiry. On closed bid trans- 
actions, quotations may be continued in effect not in excess of 30 
days from date of opening of bid. 

Frices cannot be quoted for future delivery, extended delivery, on 
a contract basis or on indefinite quantities. Orders placed against 
closed bids nay not vary to exceed 10^ from the individual quantities 
as specified in inquiry, and must be immediately released with auth- 
ority to ship as fast as material is available. 

(11) Terms and Discounts: 

Terms: 2$ 10 days - E.O.I.:, net 50 days. 

Delivery: ■ Pull freight allowed on shipments W.0.G-. 

(a) 100 lbs.- or more or total net value $50. or more 

(b) 50 lbs. " " " " " " $30. to Syndicate 
Stores only. - 

(c) P-egardless of weight or value to Syndicate Stores 
within Metropolitan N. Y. Area: Newark, Hoboken, 
Jersey City, N. J.; Metropolitan Philadelphia Area: 
Chicago, (these points general-other points includ- 
ed vary. 

9822 



-196- 

Ivo other freight allowance will he granted. 

Future Delivery 

All orders for future delivery will he subject to prices 
prevailing on specified shipping date. 

(12) POLICY IN CONNECTION WITH PRICING CERTAIN SPECIFICATION OF 
RUB3ER POWERED CABLE GROUP & RUBBER COVERED 3LDG. WIHE 

group. 

Specification defining Class A and A.O. Rubber as NEMA Building Wire 
standard for 30''; Rubber includes Class A, '"ires and Cables with Class 
A Rubber are priced from Building Wire Sheet for 30S Rubber. 

Where wires and cables differ from NEMA Building Wire Standards only 
in requiring A. 0. rubber, prices will lso be quoted from Building 
Wire Sheets for 30fj Rubber. 
Class priced for 30^j Rubber. 

(13) Terms to Telegraph Companies for 1 conductor IS solid l/32" R. C. 
1 W. P. braid fixture wire in lots of 1,000,000 or more on 1,000 
spools. F.O.B. Destination. Terms 2£> 10th prox. 

(14) New Price Sheets on Rubber Covered 31dg. & Fixture Wire. Change 
in Prices, Discounts and. Methods of Computing: 

(15) Few Frice Sheets on Rubber Lead Covered Building & Fixture Wire-Change 
in Prices, Discounts and Methods of Computing. 

INTERMEDIATE FILINGS 

Iniating Effective 

Company Date 

#8 11/22/33: 

(a) Syndicate Store Prices fl4 S.B.R.C. 500', 250', 
100' , 50' , 25' coils. 

12/14/33: 

(b) Item (a) withdrawn. 
tf2 12/11/33) 

fl4 12/18/33) — 

Filing prices on #18-3/64" Ins. 600 Bolt 31dg.,Wire 

7f20 12/14/33: . 

Maximum Settlement Terms-Export to U. S. Possessions and 
Points not U. S. Possessions. 

r -28 1/4/34 Effective l/l4/3i 

Prices on (l) 10 conductor cable composed of 7fl6 and : ,fl2) 
(2) 7 fl9 tinned. ) Spec- 

ks) 3/0 - 259 strands tinned )ial 

fl=3 1/5/34 Effective l/l5/34 

9822 



-197- 

1. Prices on wires of Special Construction. 

2. Correcting Zone adder for Bremerton, Washington- 
(Hot previously b "iv3n) . 

#10 1/11/34 Effective l/2l/34 

Syndic^ Store prices "14 S.B.R.C. (same as Co. #8, Item 1) 

#14 1/4/34. Effective 1/14/34 

Revised prices on wooden reels. 

,fl6 1/10/34 Effective 1/20/34 

Frices on plain Rubber Covered Wire for use in Nonmetallic 
Sherthed Cabled. 

#24 1/11/34 Effective l/.' ; ,l/34 

Syndic- te Store Frices (same as Co. 7 f8 & 10, Items 1 & 6) . 

#25 1/9/34 Effective 1/19/34 

Frices on plain Rubber Covered wire for Sheathed Cable 
(same as Company 7fl6 - Item 8) . . 

#27 l/n/34 Effective l/2l/34 

Frices on plain Rubber Covered Wire for Sheathed Cable 
(same as Company 7fl6 and 7f25,. Items 8 and 10) . 

#3 1/17/34 Effective 1/27/34 

Frices on #18-3/64" (same as Co. 7 f2, Item 2). 

#16 1/19/34 .Effective 1/25/34 

Syndicate Store Frices (same as Companies 7f8, 10, & 24, 
Items 1, 6, and 9) . 

#15 1/25/34 Effective 1/25/34 

Syndicate Store Frices .( same as Companies #8, 10, 24, 
and 16, Items 1, 6, 9, and 13). 

#20 2/20/34 Effective 3/2/34 

Frices on #18-3/64" Insulated (same as Co. #2, 14, and 3, 
Items 2 and 12) . 

#3 2/23/34 Effective 3/5/34 

Special price #16-7 strand (cancelled 5/l/34) . 

#22 3/9/34 Effective 3/19/34 

Special price #16-7 .strand .( same .as Co. #3, item 16). 

7fl4 3/23/34 Effective 3/23/34 

Letter 3/21/34 To District Specialists re: Sales Policies. 
(l T ot filed by other Companies) . 

"Orders for shipment to our Distributor's Warehouse must 
be shipped or cancelled prior to the effective dr.te of 
any subsequent price sheet issued by G-. E. Co. under its 
license agreement on "Safecote" wire. This does not 
apply to specific contracts which are recorded with the 
Licensor's Agent and on which deferred shipments are 



S822 



-198- . 

permitted. 

Orders from any customer, which are not for immediate 
shipment, must be treated as a contract, copy of which 
will also be filed with the "licensor's Agent." 

^3 3/23/34 ..Effective 4/7/34 

Spocial prices .on 7fl8~19 strand 3/64, #16i-19 strand 
3736, #18-7 strand 3/64, rf3 Stranded, #16~Solid and 
Strand v.catherproof , #16 Solid Conductor Cable, #18-19 
Strand l/64, #16 Flat Duplex. 

#3 4/27/34 Effective 5/l/34 

Cancelling price #16-7 strand (item #16) . 

#11 6/15/34 Effective 6/15/34 

Syndicate Store Prices (same as Companies #8, 10, 24, 
16, 15, Items 1, 6, 13, 14). 

#18 6/15/34 Effective 6/15/34 

Syndicate Store Prices (same as Companies G, 10, 24, 
16, lis 11, Items 1, 6, 9, 13, 14, 21 ) . 

#19 5/23/34 Effective 6/15/34 

Syndicate Store Prices (same as Companies 8, 10, 24, 16, 
15, 11, 18, Items 1, 6, 13, 14, 21, 22) and Terms of 
Delivery and Discount to Syndicate Stores. 

#2 6/27/34 Effective 7/5/34 

Frices on #13-3/64 600 Volt 3uilding Wire cancelling 

Item 2. 

12/11/33 increases from 40 to 50 f£. 

#16 6/27/34 Effective 6/27/34 

Prices to Syndicate Stores on #14 Flame Retarding #18, 
Fixture Wire. 

#13 6/28/34 Effective 7/5/34 

Letter to District. Offices 6/26/34. Policy re: 31dg. 
Wire - supersedes and cancels Building Wire Bulletin #1- 
8/29/34 (no record of such, filing) all supplements 
cancelled except #1, revised 2/15/54 (no record)-on 
U. S. Federal Specification.. . 

#18 6/25/34 Effective 6/25/34 

Price #14 weatherproof. 

#22 7/5/34 Effective 7/5/34 

letter 7/2/34 Correcting price #10 Solid Twin- typographi- 
cal error on price sheet. ■. 

#16 7/13/34 Effective 7/13/34 

Cancelling price on #14 to Syndicate Stores (Item 25). 



9822 



«199r 



#17 8/1/34 Effective 8/10/34 

Discount Sheet on Flexible Cord, Heat Resist Fixture 
Wire, Heater Cords, Rubber Sheathes, Portable Cords, 
5/2/34 also list on #=14, 13, 10, 8 weatherproof ed 8/3/34. 

#3 8/2/34 Effective 8/ll/34 

Syndicate Store Frices if 14 Safecote, #18 Fixture Wire. 

7f22 8/10/34 Effective 8/20/34 

Syndicate Store Frices if 14 Safecote, #18 Fixture Wire 

#15 8/13/34 Effective 8/20/34 

Syndicate Store Frices if 14 Safecote, if 18 Fixture Wire 

#26 8/17/34 Effective 8/27/34 

Syndicate Store Prices #14 Safecote, if 18 Fixture Wire. 

#2 8/21/34 Effective 8/27/34 

Syndicate Store Frices # 14 Safecote, if 18 Fixture Wire 

#5 8/24/34 Effective 8/24/34 

Syndicate Store Prices if 14 Safecote, ifl8 Fixture Wire. 

#13 8/29/34 Effective 8/29/34 

Syndicate Store Prices mi 14 Safecote, & #18'Fixture Wire 

if 16 9/20/34 Effective 9/29/34 

Syndicate Store Prices #14 Safecote & #18 Fixture Wire 

#1 9/25/34 Effective 10/5/34 

Prices and Discount #16 Fixture Wire to Telegraph Co.s. 

#17 12/14/34 Effective 12/24/34 

Price list on #14, 12, 10, 8 Weatherproof 

#20 1/15/35 Effective 1/25/35 

Frices on Reels and Lags for R.C. wire. 

#17 1/30/35 Effective 2/9/35 

Prices and Discount #14, 12, 10, 8 — Weatherproof 

#11 2/4/35 Effective 2/14/35 

Syndicate Store Prices #14 Safecote & J 18 Fixture Wire 

#18 2/4/35 Effective 2/14/35 

Syndicate Store Prices #14 Safecote & #18 Fixture Wire 

#19 2/4/35 Effective 2/14/35 

Syndicate Store Prices #14 Safecote & #18 Fixture Wire 

#16 2/20/35 .Effective 2/20/35 

Syndicate Store Prices #14 Safecots & #18 Fixture Wire 
(additions to previous filing Item 38). 



9822 



-200- 

#2 3/1/35 Effective 3/l/35 

Syndicate Store Prices /fl4 Safecote & #18 Fixture Wire 
(additions to previous filing Item 35). 

#22 S/l/35 Effective 3/9/35 

Syndicate Store Prices #14 Safecote & #18 Fixture Wire 
(additions to previous filing 1 Item 32). 

#19 3/18/35 Effective 3/28/35 

Withdrawing price on #14 Old Code to Syndicate Store. 

#8 3/6/35 Effective 3/16/35 

Memo advising- their interpretation of Building Wife. 

#20 3/21/35 ...-.., Effective 3/30/35 

Price on #16-1 conductor E & S gauge solid Soft Drawn. 
Untinned Copper l/32" Code rubber, plain. 

#25 4/6/35 Effective 4/16/35 

Filing Price on #4 Rubber Covered 600 V Duplex (Twin) 
Stranded Code Wire. 

#4 4/10/35 Effective 4/16/35 

Filing Price on #4 Rubber Covered 600 V Duplex (Twin) 
Stranded Code Wire 

#27 4/8/35.'....' Effective 4/16/35 

Filing Price on #4 Rubber Covered 600 V Duplex (Twin) 
Stranded Code Wire 

#21 4/11/35 Effective 4/16/35 

Filing Price on #4 Rubber Covered 500 V Duplex (Twin) 
Stranded Code- Wire. ■ . 

#20 4/13/35 Effective 4/16/35 

Filing Frice on #4 Rubber Covered 500 V Duplex (Twin) 
Stranded Code Wire 

#3 4/17/35 , Effective 4/17/35 

Filing Price on #4 Rubber Covered 500 V -Duplex (Twin) 
Stranded Code Wire 

#22 4/15/35. . ' . .Effective 4/16/35 

Filing Price on #4 Rubber Covered 500 V Duplex (Twin) 
Stranded Code Wire. . ..'• 

#26 4/24/35 Effective 4/20/35 

Filing Price on #4 Rubber Covered 500 V Duplex (Twin) 
Stranded Code Wire. 

#21 4/23/35 Effective 5/3/35 

Filing Prices on R. C, 600 V not included in regular 
price sheets, for which there is an occasional demand. 



9822 



-201- 

?f27 4/26/35 Effective 5/3/35 

Same as Company 21, Item 60. 

,--19 4/26/35 Effective 5/6/35 

Syndicate Stores and Mail Order Houses — Frices on 
7fl4 Safecote and 7fl8 Eixture Wire 

if22 4/29/35 Effective 5/3/35 

Some as Companies 21 and 27, Items 60 and 61. 

#25 5/1/35 Effective 5/3/35 

S;.me as Companies 21, 27, 22, Items 60, 61, 63. 

,,-•12 5/3/35 Effective 5/3/35 

Sime as Companies, 21, 37, 22, 25, Items 60, 61, 63, 64. 

if 14 5/2/35 Effective 5/3/35 

3'ime as Companies 21, 27, 22, 25, 12 Items 60,61,63,64,65. 

,fl5 5/2/35 Effective 5/3/35 

Same as Companies, 21,27,22,25,12,14, Items 60, 61, 63, 

64, 65, 66. 

-,f26 5/3/35 Effective 5/3/35 

Some as Companies 21,27,22,25,14,15, Items 60, 61,63, 

64, 65, 66,67. 

7f20 5/7/35 Effective 5/7/35 

Same as Co nypnies , 21, 27, 22, 25, 14, 15, 26, Items 

60, 61, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68. 



9322 



-202- 



APP. A, PAST I, 
SSCTIOIJ B I 



SAMPLE PRICE FILINGS 

Illustrating 
ORIGINAL PRICE STRUCTURE 

EFFECTIVE SEPTEMBER 1, 1933 



9822 



'303- 



AMBRICAI STRKL & WIRE COMPANY 



Sheet #1 



Woroeeter, Mass* 
Sept. 1* 1935* 



SALB8 POLICY 
Applying to 
RUBBER COVERED BUILDING HIRES 



EFFECTIVE SEPT. 1, 1933 . 



This bulletin consisting of eight pages give In oomplete 
ffrm our prlolng polloles for each of the principal classes of 
eustomers, and supersedes our bulletin dated February 1, 1933* 

These polloles apply only to 600 Volt Building Wires, 
Braided and Leaded, In Code, Intermediate and S0?£ grades, as 
covered by our price sheets AM and AML. 



Prices to Distributors 

■ M Contractors 
* " Industrials 

■ " Railroads 
M Utilities 

■ Governments 



Sheet #2 
n 3-4 

" 6 
" 6 

7 

8 



9822 



JOHN MAY 
A.6.M.S. 



Building Wires - Sept.1,1933 

-204- 
Sheet #2 



DISTRIBUTOFS' COST 



1. In tUl eases to be published list less 10$ plus proper destination 
symbols. 

2. Destination symbols ere to be used in all oases and are to be added 
after disoounts (if any) hare been deducted. 

5. Shipments frem warehouse stooks to outside points are to be prioed 
wf.th proper destination symbol as though shipped from the factory, 

4. /J.1 shipments to jobbers 1 steoks, either consigned or regular aooount, 
•to be on basis of carload destination symbol, whether shipped from 
faotory or warehouse stock, and regcjrdless of <pmtity. (it should be 
understood that the carload destination symbol does not apply to 
L.C.L. shipments which may be made fron factory or warehouse fcr 
Jobber direot tc his oustomer, except on a specific oontraot calling 
for #2,600. rr more - see pages 3 to 8 inclusive, pp. 2). 

6* Specification material for building jobs *o be prioed at net less 
than for the corresponding grade of building wire. 

6. There will be. no cutting oharge or paralleling oharge on Rubber- 
Braided or Rubber-Lead building wire. 

7. All orders and contracts to be taken on a firm prioe basis and net 
subjeot to cancellation. 

8. Prioes become effective on date shown on price sheets as issued. 



9822 



-205- 

Bullding Wires - Sept. 1,1955 

Sheet #5 



CONTRACTORS' COST 

1* Less than #2,500. list -value to be published list prices plus proper 
LCL destination symbol. 

2. #2, 500. list value or more to be published list prices less 5% plus 
oarload destination symbol even though totaling less than 50,000 lbs. 
(Froight and Reels may not be added to arrive at list value). The 
$2,500. list vaaue to be made up of only such items as can be prioed 
on the basis of the 600 volt Rubber-Braid and Rubber-Lead building 
wire sheets. 

3. DESTINATION SYMBOLS are to be used in all oases and are to be added 
after discounts (if any) are deducted. 

4. Shipments from warehouse stocks to outside points are to be prioed 
with proper destination symbol as though shipped from the faotory. 

5* All orders and contracts to be taken on a firm prioe basis without 
protection against deoline, not subject to cancellation, and to state 
sices and quantities. 

6* SPECIFICATION MATERIAL for building jobs to be priced at not less 
than for the corresponding grade of building wire. 

7. There will be no. cutting or paralleling charges on Rubber-Braided or 
Rubber-Lead building wire. 

8. Contractors may be qmoted for future delivery only on speoifio building 
Jobs, - the speoifio job to be mentioned and the list of approximate 
quantities and sites to be made a pattt of the quotation. 

9. Quotations either direct or through distributors, for speoifio 
building jobs, may be continued in effect until the effeotive date 
of any price ohange, on which date such of these options as may not 
have been taken up in the form of definite eontraots will expire. 
New quotations may be submitted at the time of any prloe decline. 

10. Contracts covering speoifio building jobs will be taken in aocordanoe 
with our published oontract terms in effect at the time of final 
quotation. 

11. We do not permit eembining two cr more jobs in order to secure minimum 
prioes. 

12. All united States Government, State, County and Municipal work let to 
contractors to be 1 figured in accordance with the above instructions. 



5822 



-206- 



Building Wires - Sept. 1,1933 
Sheet #4 



CONTRACTORS* COST (Continued) 

13* If anjfinquiry for a speoiflo building job Is priced on the basis of 
a $2,500. list value or on a oarload destination symbol basis, 
quotations in every caso should carry one of the following clausesi 

"These prices apply only in the event that the total 
list value of the 600 volt code, intermediate or 30$ 
building wire is not less than $2,500". 

— OR — 

"These prioes apply only in the event that the total 
shipping weight of the 600 volt oode, intermediate- 
or 30JS building wire is not less than 30,000 lbs." 



-207- 



Building Wires - Sept. 1.1933 
Sheet #5 



INDUSTRIALS 

1* Lass than $2,500, list value to be published list price plus proper 
LCL destination symbol* 

2* $2,500* list value or more to be published list price less b% plus 

oarload destination symbol, even though totaling less than 30,000 lbs< 
(Freight and Reels may not be added to arrive at list value)* The 
$2,500. list value to be made up of only suoh items as oan be priced 
on the basis of the 600 volt Rubber-Braid and Rubber-Lead building 
wire sheets* 

S* If no tpeoifie amount designated, price as though less than $2,500* 
list value, (see pp. 1 above). 

4* DESTINATION SYMBOLS are to be used in all cases and are to be added 
after disoounts (if any) have been deducted. 

6* Shipments from warehouse stocks to outside points are to be priced 
with proper destination symbol as though shipped from the factory. 

6* Industrials regularly contracting for not more than three montha' 
requirements may be quoted for that period in accordance with the 
published oontraot terms in effect at time of final quotation. 

T« QUOTATIONS either direot or through distributors may be continued in 
effect until the effeotive date of any prioe change. On suoh date 
sueh of these options as may not have been taken up in the form of 
definite oontraots will expire. New quotations may be submitted at 
the time of any prioe deoline. 

8* All orders and contracts to be taken on a firm prioe basis without 
protection afcainst deoline, not subjeot to cancellation. 

9* There will be no outting or paralleling charges on Rubber-Braid or 
Rubba-r-Lead building wire. 

10, All orders or contracts must be oompleted within the specified time 
designated on qctation and/or order. 

11. All these Instructions apply whether for use in plant wiring or for 
use in fabricating materials of their own manufacture for resale. 



$822 



-208- Building Wires - Sept. 1,1953 

Sheet #6 



RAILROADS 

1. Less than $2,500. list value to be published list prie*« plus proper 
LCL destination symbol. 

2. $2,500. list value or more to be published list price less 5% plus 
oarload destination symbol, even though totaling less than 30,000 lbs. 
(Freight and Reels may net be added to arrive at list value). The 
$2,500. list value to be made up of only suoh items as oan be prioed 
on the basis of the 600 velt Rubber-Braid and Rubber-Lead building 
wire sheet 8. 

3. If no specif io amount designated, prioe as though less than $2,500. 
list value, (see pp. 1 above). 

4. DESTINATION SYMBOLS are to be used in all cases and are to be added 
after discounts (if any) have been deducted. 

5. Shipments from warehouse stocks to outside points are to be prioed 
with proper destination symbol as though shipped from the factory. 

6. Railroads refcularly contracting for not more than three months 1 
requirements may be quoted for that period. 

7. QUOTATIONS either direct or through distributors may be oontinued in 
effect until the effective date of any prioe change. On suoh date 
Buoh of these options as may not have been taken up in the form of 
definite contracts will expire. New quotations may be submitted at 
the time of any price decline. 

8* All orders and contracts to be taken on firm price basis without 
protection against deoline, not subject to oanoellation. 

9. There will be no cutting or paralleling charges on Rubber-Braid or 
Rubber- Lead building wire. 

10. All orders or contraots must be completed within the specified time 
designated on quotation and/or order. 



9822 



-209- 

Building Wirea - Sept. 1,1933 

Sheet £T 



POTLIO UTILITIES INCLUDING TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANIES 

1* Less then $2,500. Hat value to be published list prioes plus proper 
LCL destination symbol. 

2. #2,600* list value or more, to be published list prioes less 5% plus 
oar load destination symbol, even though totaling less than 30,000 lbs. 
(Freight and Reels may not be added to arrive at list value). The 
♦2,500. list value to be made up of only suoh items as oan be prioed 
on the basis of the 600 volt Rubber-Braid and Rubber-Lead building 
wire sheets. 

8* If no speoifio amount designated, prioe as though less than $2,500. 
list value, (see pp. 1 above). 

4. DESTINATION SYMBOLS are to be used in all oases and are to be added 
after diseounts (if any) have been deducted. 

6* Shipments from warehouse stooks to outside points are to be prioed 
with proper destination symbol as though shipped from the faetory. 

6. Publio Utilities regularly oontraoting for not more than three months' 
requirements may be quoted for that period. 

7« Telephone and Telegraph Companies regularly oontraoting for not more 
than three months' requirements may be quoted for that period. 

8. QUOTATIONS either direot or through distributors may be oontinued in 
effeot until the effeotive date of any prioe ohange. On suoh date 
suoh of these options as may not have been taken up in the form of 
definite oontraots will expire. New quotations may be submitted at 
the time of any price decline. 

9* All orders are to be taken on firm price basis without proteotion 
against deoline, not subjeot to oanoellation and to state sites and 
fjiantities. 

10. There will be no outting or paralleling charges on Rubber- Bra id or 
Rubber-Lead building wire. 

11. All orders or oontraots must be oompleted within the specified time 
designated on quotation and/or order. 



9822 



_2lo~ Building Wires - Sept, 1,1935 

Sheet #6 

U.S. GOVERNMENT, STATES, COUNTIES, CITIES AND OTHER MUNICIPALITIES 

!• Less than $2,500* list value to be published list prioes plus proper 
LCL destination symbol. 

2* #2,500 list value or more to be published list prioes less 6% plus 
carload destination symbol, even though totaling less than 30,000 
lbs* (Freight and Reels may not be added to arrive at list value)* 
The |2,500 list value to be made up of only suoh items as oan be 
prioed on the basis of the 600 volt Rubber-Braid and Rubber-Lead 
building wire sheets* 

3* If no speeifio amount designated, prioe as though less than $2,500 
list value, (see pp. 1 above). 

«• DESTINATION SYMBOLS are to be used in all oases and are to be added 
after discounts (if any) have been deducted. 

6* Shipments from warehouse stooks to outside points are to be prioed 
with proper destination symbol as though shipped from the faotory* 

6* U.S. Government, etc., regularly oontraoting for not more than three 
months* retirements may be quoted for that period. 

7* QUOTATIONS, except as oovered by paragraph 8, either direot or through 
distributors may be oontinued in effeot until the effective date of 
any prioe ohange. On suoh date suoh of these options as may not have 
been taken up in the form of definite oontraots will expire. New 
quotations may be submitted at the time of any prioe deoline* 

8* QUOTATIONS made under olosed bidding procedure must be prioed on the 
basis of prices in effeot four (4) days prior to the opening date. 
Suoh prioes will remain firm for a period of seven (7) days from 
date of opening. This firm prioe period of seven days from date of 
opening must be speoif io'ally referred to on all suoh quotations. 

9* All orders to be taken on firm price basis without proteotion against 
deoline, not subjeot to cancellation and to state sites and qantities. 

10* There will be no outting or paralleling oharges on Rubber-Braid or 
Rubber-Lead building wire. 

11. All reels will be invoiced at the time of shipment in aooordanoe with 
the usual prooeduro. No exoeption will be made in the case of any 
Government Department exoept where, at the requost of the Government, 
the reels are to be inoluded in the prioe of the material. 

12* All orders or oontraots must be oompleted within the specified time 
designated on quotation and/or order. 

13* Only material purchased by and billed direot or through jobbers ts 
above class of customers to be oonsidered under this schedule. 

9832 



-211- 



ANACONDA WIRE AND CABLE COMPANY 

£5 Broadway 

New York. 

BUILDING WIRE No. 1 



August 29th, 1933, 
Subjeot: RUBBER COVERED 
BUILDING WIRE 
PRICING POLICY 



This bulletin consisting of eight pages gives in complete 
form our sales policies for each of the prlnoipal olasses 
of trade. 

These apply only to 600 volt Building Wires in Code, Inter- 
mediate and 30$ grades both Braided and Leaded and supersede 
all previous instructions with respect to these types of 
products and olasses of customers. 

F. W. Brower 



9822 
48-J 



-212- 



BUILDING WIRE 

SHEET #2 

AUGUST 29 th, 1933, 



DISTRIBUTORS' COST 



1. In all cases to be published list less 10% plus proper 
destination symbols. 

2. Destination symbols are to be used in all cases and are 
to be added after disoounts (if any) have been deducted. 

3. Shipments from warehouse stocks to outside points are to 
be priced with proper destination symbol as though ship- 
ped from the factory. 

4. All shipments to jobbers' stocks, either consigned or re- 
gular account, to be on basis of carload destination 
symbol, whether shipped from factory or warehouse stock, 
and regardless of quantity. (It should be understood* that 
the carload destination symbol does not apply to L.C.L. 
shipments which may be made from factory or warehouse for 
jobber direct to his customer, except on a specific con- 
tract calling for $2,500. or more - see pages 3 to 8 in- 
clusive, pp.2). 

5. Specification material for building jobs to be priced at 
not less than for the corresponding grade of building 
wire. 

6. There will be no cutting charge or paralleling charge on 
Rubber-Braided or Rubber-Lead building wire. 

7. All orders and contracts to be taken on a firm price 
basis and not subject to cancellation. 

8. Prices become effective on date shown on price sheets as 
issued. 



9822 



49-J 



"* 2l3 ~ BUILDING WIRE 
SHEET ffZ 
AUGUST 29TH, 1933. 



CONTRACTORS' COST 

1. Less than $2,500. list value to be published list prices 
plus proper LCL destination symbol. 

2. $2,500. list value or more to be published list prices 
lejs 5$ plus carload destination symbol even though total- 
ing less than 30,000 lbs. (Freight and Reels may not be 
added to arrive at list value). The #2,500. list value to 
be made up of only such items as can be priced on the 
basis of the 600 volt Rubber-Braid and Rubber-Lead build- 
ing wire sheets. 

3. DESTINATION SYMBOLS are to be used in all cases and are 
to be added after discounts (if any) are deducted. 

4. Shipments from warehouse stocks to outside points are to 
be priced with proper destination symbol as though shipped 
from the factory. 

5. All orders and contracts to be taken on a firm price 
basis without protection against decline, not subject to 
cancellation, and to state sizes and quantities. 

6. SPECIFICATION MATERIAL for building Jobs to be priced at 
not less than for the corresponding grade of building wire. 

7. There will be no cutting or paralleling charges on Rubber- 
Braided or Rubber-Lead building wire. 

8. Contractors may be quoted for future delivery only on 
specific building jobs, - the specific job to be mention- 
ed and the list of approximate quantities and sizes to be 
made a part of the quotation. 

9. Quotations either direct or through distributors, for 
specific building jobs, may be continued in effect until 
the effective date of any price change, on which date such 
of these options as may not have been taken up in the form 
of definite contracts will expire. New quotations may be 
submitted at the time of any price decline. 

10. Contracts covering specific building jobs will be taken in 
accordance with our published contract terms in effect at 
the time of final quotation. 

11. We do not permit combining two or more jobs in order to 
seoure minimum prices. 

12. All United States Government, State, County and Municipal 
work let to contractors to be figured in accordance with 
the above instructions. 

50- J 9822 



-214- 



BUILDING WIRE 

SHEET #4 

AUGUST 29 TH, 1933, 



CONTRACTORS' COST (oontlnued) 



13. If an inquiry for a spec if io building job is priced on 
the basis of a $2,500r list value or on a oar load desti- 
nation symbol basis, quotations in every case should oarry 
one of the following olauses:- 

"These prioes apply only in the event that the 
total list value of the 600 volt code, inter- 
mediate or 30$ building wire is not less than 
12,500", 

- OR - 

"These prioes apply only in the event that the 
total shipping weight of the 600 volt code, 
intermediate or 30% building wire is not less 
than 30,000 lbs." 



9822 



51-J 



BUILDING WIRE 
-215 ~ SHEET #5 

AUGUST 29 TH, 1933. 

INDUSTRIALS 

1. Less than $2,500. list value to be published list price 
plus proper LCL destination symbol. 

2. $2,500. list value or more to be published list price less 
5$ plus carload destination symbol, even though totaling 
less than 30,000 lbs. (Freight and Reels may not be added 
to arrive at list value). The $2,500. list value to be 
made up of only such items as can be priced on the basis 
of the 600 volt Rubber -Braid and Rubber-Lead building 
wire sheets. 

3. If no specific amount designated, price as though less 
than $2,500. list value, (see pp. 1 above). 

4. DESTINATION SYMBOLS are to be used in all oases and are to 
be added after discounts (if any) have been deducted. 

5. Shipments from warehouse stocks to outside points are to 
be priced with proper destination symbol as though shipped 
from the factory. 

6. Industrials regularly contracting for not more than three 
months' requirements may be quoted for that period in 
accordance with the published contract terms in effect at 
time of final quotation. 

7. QUOTATIONS either direct or through distributors may be 
continued in effect until the effective date of any price 
change. On such date such of these options as may not 
have been taken up in the form of definite contracts will 
expire. New quotations may be submitted at the time of 
any price decline. 

8. All orders and contracts to be taken on a firm price basis 
without protection against decline, not subject to cancella- 
tion. 

9. There will be no cutting or paralleling charges on Rubber- 
Braid or Rubber-Lead building wire. 

10. All orders or contracts must be completed within the 
specified tine designated on quotation and/or order. 

11. All these instructions apply whether for use in plant 
wiring, or for use in fabricating materials of their own 
manufacture for resale. 



9822 
52-J 



-SI 6 " BUILDING WIRE 

SHEET #6 
AUGUST 29TH, 1933. 



RAILROADS 



1. Less than #2,500. list value to be published list prices 
plus proper LCL destination symbol. 

2. $2,500. n s t value or more to be published list price less 
5$ plus carload destination symbol, even though totaling 
less than 30,000 lbs. (Freight and Reels may not be added 
to arrive at list value). The #2,500. list value to be 
made up of only such items as oan be priced on the basis 
of the 600 volt Rubber-Braid and Rubber-Lead building wire 
sheets. 

3. If no specific amount designated, price as though less than 
#2,500. list value, (see pp. 1 above). 

4. DESTINATION SYMBOLS are to be used in all cases and are to 
be added after discounts (if any) have been deducted. 

5. Shipments from warehouse stocks to outside points are to 
be priced with proper destination symbol as though shipped 
from the factory. 

6. Railroads regularly contracting for not more than three 
months' requirements may be quoted for that period. 

7. QUOTATIONS either direct or through distributors may be 
continued in effect until the effective date of any price 
change. On such date such of those options as may not 
have been taken up in the form of definite contracts will 
expire. New quotations may be submitted at the time of any 
price decline. 

8. All orders and contracts to be taken on firm price basis 
without protection against decline, not subject to cancel- 
lation. 

9. There will be no cutting or paralleling charges on Rubber- 
Braid or Rubber-Lead building wire. 

10. All orders or contracts must be completed within the spec- 
ified time designated on quotation and/or order. 



9822 



-217- 



PUBLIC UTILITIES INCLUDING TELEPHONE 
AND TELEGRAPH COlffANLES 



BUILDING WIRE 

SHEET #7 

AUGUST 29TH, 1933. 



1. Less thun $2,500. list value to be published list prices 
plus proper LCL destination symbol. 

2. *2,500. list value or more, to be published list prices 
less 5$ plus carload destination symbol, even though total- 
ing less than 30,000 lbs. (Freight and Reels may not be 
added to arrive at list value). The $2,500. list value 

to be made up of only such items as can be priced on the 
basis of the 600 volt Rubber-Braid and Rubber-Lead build- 
ing wire sheets. 

3. If no specific amount designated, price as though less 
than $2,500. list value, (see pp. 1 above). 

4. DESTINATION SYMBOLS are to be used in all cases and are to 
be added after discounts (if any) have been deducted. 

5. Shipments from warehouse stocks to outside points are to 
be priced with proper destination symbol as though ship- 
ped from the factory. 

6. Public Utilities regularly contracting for not more than 
three months' requirements may be quoted for that period. 

7. Telephone and Telegraph Companies regularly contracting 
for not more than three months' requirements may be quoted 
for that period. 

8. QUOTATIONS either direct or through distributors may be 
continued in effect until the effective date of any price 
change. On such date such of these options as may not 
have been taken up in the form of definite contracts will 
expire. New quotations may be submitted at the time of 
any price decline. 

9. All orders are to be taken on firm price basis without 
protection against decline, not subject to cancellation 
and to state sizes and quantities. 

10. There will be no cutting or paralleling charges on Rubber- 
Braid or Rubber -Lead building wire. 

11. All orders or contracts must be completed within the 
specified tine designated on quotation and/or order. 



9822 
54-J 



- 218 " BUILDING WIRE 

SHEET #8 



AUGUST 29TH, 1933. 



U.S. GOVERNMENT, STATES, COUNTIES, CITIES 
AND OTHER MUNICIPALITIES 



1. Less than $2,500. list value to be published list prices plus 
proper LCL destination symbol. 

2. $2,500. list value or more to be published list prices less 5% 
plus carload destination symbol, even though totaling less than 
30,000 lbs. (Freight and Reels may not be added to arrive at list 
value). The $2,500. list value to be made up of only such Items 
as can be priced on the basis of the 600 volt Rubber-Braid and 
Rubber-Lead building wire sheets. 

3. If no specific amount designated, pricu as though less than 
$2,500. list value, (see pp. 1 above). 

4. DESTINATION SYMBOLS are to be used in all oases and are to be 
added after discounts (if any) have been deducted. 

5. Shipments from warehouse stocks to outside points are to be 

?rioed with proper destination symbol as though shipped from the 
actory. 

6. U.S. Government, etc, regularly contracting for not more than 
three months* requirements may be quoted for that period. 

7. QUOTATIONS, except as covered by paragraph 8, either direot op 
through distributors may be continued in effect until the effec- 
tive date of any prioe change. On such date such of these options 
as may not have been taken up in the form of definite contracts 
will expire. New quotations may be submitted at the time of any 
price decline. 

8. QUOTATIONS made under closed bidding procedure must be priced on 
the basis of prices in effect four (4) days prior to the opening 
date. Such prices will remain firm for a period of seven (7) 
days from date of opening. This firm price period of seven days 
from date of opening must be specifically referred to on all such 
quotations. 

9. All orders to be taken on firm price basis without protection 
against decline, not subject to cancellation and to state sizes 
and quantities. 

10. There will be no cutting or paralleling charges on Rubber-Braid 
or Rubber-Lead building wire. 

11. All reels will be invoiced at the time of shipment in accordance 
with the usual procedure. No exception will be made in the case 
of any Government Department except where, at the request of the 
Government, the reels are to be included In the price of the 
material. 

12. All orders or contracts must be completed within the specified 
time designated on quotation and/or order. 

13. Only material purchased by and billed direct or through jobbers 
to above class of customers to be considered under this schedule. 

9822 
55-J 



-219- 



FREIGHT ADDERS 

To arrive at delivered prices add to the met price per 1000 feet the amount showa opposite 
the wire size and under the correct symbol. For Symbols above 10 combine adders under symbol 
10 with adders uader other symbols to give correct total symbol — i.e. for symbol 16 use symbol 
10 plus symbol 5. 



> 



Site 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


8 


7 


8 


9 


18 


Strundinx 










SINGLE CONDUCTOR 










14 


.13 


.06 


.09 


.12 


.13 


.17 


.20 


.23 


.26 


.29 


Solid 


13 


.04 


.08 


.11 


.15 


.19 


.23 


.27 


.30 


.34 


.38 


Solid 


It 


.05 


.18 


.16 


.21 


.26 


.31 


.36 


.42 


.47 


.52 


Solid 


8 


.08 


.16 


.24 


.32 


.40 


.48 


.56 


.64 


.72 


.80 


Solid 


6 


.10 


.25 


.35 


.45 


.60 


.70 


.80 


.95 


1.05 


1.15 


7 


4 


.20 


.40 


.60 


.80 


.95 


1.15 


1.35 


1.55 


1.75 


1.95 


7 


S 


.25 


.45 


.70 


.90 


1.15 


1.40 


1.60 


1.85 


2.05 


2.30 


7 


i 


.25 


.50 


.75 


1.05 


1.30 


1.55 


1.80 


2.05 


2.30 


2.60 


7 


1 


r>o 


1.00 


1.50 


2.00 


2.50 


3.00 


3.50 


1.00 


1.50 


5.00 


19 


III 


.tin 


1.20 


1.90 


2.50 


3.10 


3.70 


1.40 


5.00 


5.60 


6.20 


19 


2/8 


.70 


1.10 


2.20 


2.90 


3.60 


4.30 


5.00 


5.80 


6.50 


7.20 


19 


3/0 


.00 


1.70 


2.00 


3.40 


4.30 


5.10 


6.00 


6.80 


7.70 


8.50 


19 


1/0 


1.10 


2.10 


3.20 


1.30 


5.30 


6.40 


7.50 


8.50 


9.60 


10.70 


19 


250.000 


1.10 


2.80 


1.30 


5.70 


7.10 


8.50 


9.90 


11.40 


12.80 


14.20 


37 


.100,000 


1.00 


3.30 


4.90 


6.50 


8.10 


9.80 


11.40 


13.00 


14.60 


16.30 


37 


350.000 


1.80 


3.00 


5.10 


7.20 


9.00 


10.80 


12.60 


14.10 


16.20 


18.00 


37 


100.000 


2.00 


1.10 


0.10 


8.20 


10.20 


12.20 


14.30 


10.30 


18.10 


20.40 


37 


r.no.noo 


2.10 


1.90 


7.30 


9.80 


12.20 


11.70 


17.10 


19.50 


22.00 


24.10 


37 


KOO.OOfl 


3.00 


0.00 


9.00 


12.00 


15.00 


18.00 


21.00 


21.00 


27.00 


30.00 


61 


700.000 


3.50 


7.00 


10.10 


13.90 


17.40 


20.90 


24.40 


27.80 


31.30 


34.80 


61 


7. r .0.000 


3.00 


7.20 


10.70 


11.30 


17.90 


21.50 


25.00 


28.00 


32.20 


35.80 


61 


800.000 


3.90 


7.80 


1 1 .00 


15.50 


19.40 


23.30 


27.10 


31.00 


34.90 


38.80 


61 


•100.000 


4.:io 


8.70 


13.00 


17.10 


21.70 


26.00 


30.40 


34.70 


39.00 


13.40 


61 


1.000.000 


4.80 


9.00 


11.40 


19.20 


24.00 


28.80 


33.60 


38.40 


13.20 


18.00 


61 


1.250.000 


5.98 


11.90 


17.80 


23.80 


29.70 


35.00 


41.00 


10.70 


53.50 


59.10 


91 


1.500,000 


7.00 


13.90 


20.90 


27.80 


34. SO 


11.80 


48.70 


55.70 


62.60 


09.60 


91 


1.750.000 


8.00 


17.30 


25.90 


31.60 


13.20 


51.80 


60.50 


69.10 


77.80 


80.10 


127 


2.000,000 


9.00 


19.20 


28.80 


38.10 


48.00 


57.60 


67.20 


76.80 


86.40 


96.00 


127 










TWO CONDUCTOR 










14 


.07 


.13 


.20 


M 


.33 


.40 


.46 


.53 


.59 


.66 


Solid 


12 


.09 


.17 


.26 


.34 


.43 


.51 


.60 


.68 


.77 


.85 


Solid 


It 


.12 


.25 


.37 


.49 


.62 


.74 


.86 


.98 


1.11 


1.23 


Solid 


8 


.10 


,31 


.47 


.62 


.78 


.93 


1.09 


1.24 


1.40 


1.55 


Solid 


6 


.:!0 


.60 


.85 


1.15 


1.40 


1.70 


2.00 


2.30 


2.55 


2.85 


Solid 












FIXTURE 












18 


.01 


.02 


.03 


.14 


.06 


.07 


.08 


.09 


.10 


.11 


I ■ft Solid 
I A Solid 


16 


.02 


.03 


.05 


.87 


.09 


.10 


.12 


.14 


.15 


.17 


1 -ra Solid 
1 A Solid 



9822 



-220- 



To arrive at delivered prices add to the net price per 1.000 feet the amount shown opposite the wire 
size and under the correct symbol. 























■■■k« 


liklir 


— GS 


ApiralMtl 


SIZE 


1 


2 


8 


4 


5 


6 


7 8 


9 


10 


•f 


Will 


Sbwtt 
64tki Ik* 

1*114 


• 






















StriMl 


«4t»l lark 


Ixktt 










SINGLE CONDUCTOR 














18 


J5 


30 


35 


30 


.75 


.90 


1.05 130 


1.35 


1.50 


1 


2 


2 


.195 


16 


.18 


35 


35 


.70 


.90 


1.05 


130 1.40 


1.60 


1.75 


1 


2 


2 


305 


14 


JO 


.45 


35 


.90 


1.10 


1.30 


1.50 1.80 


2.00 


230 


7 


3 


2 


360 


12 


.25 


30 


.70 


.95 


130 


1.45 


1.70 1.90 


2.15 


2.40 


7 


3 


2 


380 


10 


.35 


.75 


1.10 


130 


1.85 


230 


2.60 3.00 


3.30 


3.70 


7 


3 


3 


335 


8 


.50 


1.00 


1.45 


1.95 


2.45 


2.95 


3.45 3.90 


4.40 


4.90 


7 


3 


8 


365 


6 


.80 


1.60 


2.40 


330 


4.00 


4.90 


5.70 6.50 


7.30 


8.10 


7 


4 


4 


365 


4 


.90 


1.90 


2.80 


3.70 


4.70 


5.60 


6.50 7.40 


8.40 


9.30 


7 


4 


4 


310 


3 


1.10 


230 


3.40 


430 


5.70 


6.80 


7.90 9.00 


1030 


11.30 


7 


4 


4 


370 


1 


1.30 


230 


3.80 


5.00 


6.30 


7.60 


8.80 10.10 


11.40 


12.60 


19 


5 


4 


345 


1/0 


1.40 


230 


430 


5.70 


7.10 


8.50 


9.90 1130 


12.70 


14.10 


19 


5 


4 


.685 


2/0 


130 


8.60 


5.30 


7.10 


8.90 


10.70 


12.40 14.20 


16.00 


17.80 


19 


5 


4 


.730 


3/0 


2.00 


4.00 


6.00 


8.00 


10.00 


12.00 


14.00 16.00 


18.00 


20.00 


19 


5 


4 


.780 


4/0 


2.30 


430 


630 


9.00 


1130 


13.50 


15.80 18.00 


20.20 


2230 


19 


5 


4 


340 


250,000 


8.10 


6.10 


930 


1230 


1530 


18.40 


21.40 24.40 


27.60 


30.60 


37 


6 


5 


.950 


800.000 


838 


6.60 


10.00 


1830 


16.60 


20.00 


23.30 26.60 


30.00 


83.30 


37 


6 


5 


1.005 


850.000 


8.70 


730 


11.00 


14.60 


1830 


22.00 


25.60 2930 


83.00 


36.60 


37 


6 


5 


1.055 


400.000 


830 


730 


11.60 


1530 


19.40 


23.40 


2730 81.10 


35.00 


38.90 


37 


6 


5 


1.100 


500,000 


430 


8.90 


18.40 


1730 


2230 


26.80 


31.20 35.60 


40.10 


44.60 


37 


6 


S 


1.190 


800.000 


530 


11.00 


16.60 


22.10 


27.60 


8330 


38.60 44.20 


49.70 


55.20 


61 


7 


6 


1.330 


700,000 


6.10 


12.10 


18.10 


2430 


3030 


36.30 


42.40 48.40 


54.50 


60.50 


61 


7 


6 


1.400 


750.000 


6.70 


13.30 


20.00 


26.60 


33.40 


40.00 


46.60 53.40 


60.00 


66.60 


61 


7 


6 


1.435 


800,000 


7.00 


14.00 


21.00 


28.00 


85.00 


42.00 


49.00 56.00 


63.00 


69.90 


61 


7 


6 


1.470 


1.000,000 


8.20 


1630 


24-50 


82.70 


40.90 


49.00 


57.20 65.40 


7330 


81.70 


61 


7 


6 


1390 


1.250,000 


9.60 


19.10 


28.70 


38.20 


4730 


57.40 


67.00 76.50 


86.00 


95.60 


91 


8 


7 


1.790 


1.500,000 


10.80 


21.60 


82.40 


4330 


54.00 


64.70 


75.50 86.40 


97.10 


107.90 


91 


8 


7 


1.910 


2.000,000 


14.20 


2830 


4230 


56.70 


71.00 


85.00 


99.20 11330 


127.40 


14130 


127 


8 


7 


2.130 








TWO CONDUCTOR— PARALLEL 














18 


JO 


35 


.70 


.90 


1.10 


1.35 


1.60 130 


2.00 


2.25 


1 


2 


2 


30 k 33 


16 


35 


30 


.75 


1.00 


130 


1.45 


1.70 1.95 


230 


2.45 


1 


2 


2 


31s 35 


14 


35 


.70 


1.00 


1.35 


1.70 


2.05 


2.40 2.70 


3.10 


3.40 


7 


3 


2 


.26 z .40 


12 


30 


1.05 


135 


2.10 


2.60 


3.10 


8.65 4.15 


4.70 


530 


7 


8 


8 


31s 33 


10 


30 


130 


1.90 


2.50 


3.10 


3.70 


4.30 5.00 


5.60 


6.20 


7 


3 


3 


.34 x 38 


8 


30 


1.60 


2.50 


3.30 


4.10 


4.90 


5.70 6.60 


7.40 


830 


7 


3 


3 


37 s .64 


6 


130 


2.50 


330 


5.00 


6.30 


7.50 


8.80 10.00 


11.30 


12.50 


7 


4 


4 


.47 s .80 


4 


1.60 


3.10 


4.70 


6.30 


7.90 


9.40 


11.00 12.60 


14.10 


15.70 


7 


4 


4 


.51s .90 


2 


1.90 


3.80 


5.80 


7.70 


9.60 


11.50 


13.40 15.40 


17.30 


19.20 


7 


4 


4 


37 s 1.02 


1 


230 


4.40 


6.60 


8.80 


11.00 


13.20 


15.40 17.60 


19.80 


22.00 


19 


5 


5 


.68x1.19 


1/0 


3.10 


6.20 


9.30 


12.40 


15.50 


18.60 


21.70 24.80 


27.90 


31.00 


19 


5 


5 


.71 x 1.28 


2/0 


3.50 


7.10 


10.60 


14.20 


17.60 


2130 


24.80 28.40 


31.90 


35.40 


19 


5 


5 


.76x1.37 


8/0 


4.00 


8.00 


12.00 


16.00 


20.00 


24.00 


27.90 31.90 


35.90 


89.910 


19 


5 


5 


.81 x 1.47 


4/0 


4.40 


8.80 


13.10 


1730 


21.90 


26.30 


30.60 35.00 


39.40 


43.80 


19 


5 


5 


.87 s 1.59 








THREE CONBUCTOR- 


-ROUND 














18 


.45 


.90 


1.35 


130 


2.25 


2.70 


3.15 8.60 


4.05 


4.50 


1 


2 


3 


.410 


16 


30 


1.00 


1.50 


2.00 


2.50 


3.00 


8.50 4.00 


4.50 


5.00 


1 


2 


3 


.435 


14 


.70 


1.40 


2.10 


2.80 


3.50 


4.20 


4.90 5.60 


6.30 


7.00 


7 


3 


3 


350 


12 


30 


1.50 


2.30 


3.10 


3.90 


4.60 


5.40 630 


6.90 


7.70 


7 


3 


3 


390 


10 


1.10 


2.20 


3.30 


4.40 


5.50 


6.50 


7.60 8.70 


9.80 


10.90 


7 


3 


4 


.670 


8 


1.30 


2.60 


4.00 


5.30 


6.60 


7.90 


9.30 10.60 


11.90 


13.20 


7 


3 


4 


.735 


6 


2.00 


4.10 


6.10 


8.20 


10.20 


12.20 


14.30 16.30 


18.30 


20.40 


7 


4 


4 


385 


4 


2.40 


4.90 


7.30 


9.80 


12.20 


14.60 


17.10 19.50 


22.00 


24.40 


7 


4 


5 


1.015 


2 


3.40 


6.80 


10.20 


13.50 


16.90 


20.30 


23.70 27.10 


30.50 


33.90 


7 


4 


5 


1.150 


1 


4.00 


8.00 


12.00 


16.00 


20.00 


24.00 


28.00 32.00 


36.00 


40.00 


19 


5 


6 


1.335 


1/0 


4.80 


9.60 


14.40 


19.20 


24.00 


28.80 


33.70 38.50 


43.30 


48.10 


19 


5 


6 


1.425 


2/0 


5.40 


10.90 


16.30 


21.70 


27.20 


32.60 


38.00 43.40 


48.90 


54.30 


19 


5 


6 


1.520 


3/0 


6.10 


1230 


18.30 


24.40 


30.50 


36.60 


42.70 48.80 


54.90 


61.00 


19 


5 


6 


1.630 


4/0 


7.40 


14.90 


22.30 


29.80 


37.20 


44.60 


52.00 59.50 


67.00 


74.40 


19 


5 


7 


1.790 


250.000 


10.00 


20.00 


30.00 


40.00 


50.00 


60.00 


70.00 80.00 


90.00 


100.00 


37 


6 


7 


1.960 


300.000 


11.30 


22.60 


33.90 


45.00 


56.30 


67.50 


78.80 90.00 


101.30 


112.50 


37 


6 


7 


2.075 


350 OOfl 


12.50 


25.00 


37.50 


50.00 


62.50 


75.00 


87.50 100.00 


112.50 


125.00 


37 


6 


7 


2.185 


400.0011 


13.80 


27.50 


41.30 


55.00 


68.80 


82.50 


96.30 110.00 


123.80 


137.50 


37 


6 


8 


2.319 


500.000 


16.30 


32.50 


48.80 


65.00 


81.30 


97.50 


113.80 130.00 


146.30 


162.50 


37 


1 R 


8 


2.505 



9822 



-221- 



MM BKR 


T 4-A-25 



AnacondA 



IH I I 



from mint to con 



Sept. I. I !».<.? 



Anaconda Wire & Cable Company 

Genera! Offices; 25 Broadway, New York. 
Chicago Office; 20 No. Wackcr Drive. 

PUBLISHED LIST 



600 V Rubber and Lead Cables 



N. E. C. Standard 



Cod* 

Intermediate 
30y o -P«'forrnance Typ« 



SOLID 



SIZE 
A.W.G. 




CODE 




INTERMEDIATE 




30% 




Simla 


I Cond. 


Three 


Slnfl* 


J Cond. 


Tllrf* 


Slmle 


1 Cond. 


Thro* 


Cond. 


Pir.ll.l 


Cnd. 


Cond. . 


Parallel 


Cnd. 


Cond. 


Parallel 


Cnd. 


•18 


$12.70 


$21.00 


$46.20 


$13.10 


$21.80 


$47 50 


$13.70 


$22 40 


$48 50 


•16 


13.70 


23.00 


53.40 


14.30 


24.00 


54 70 


14.90 


24.60 


56.00 


11 


16.80 


25.80 


64.80 


17.70 


30 00 


67 10 


18.50 


31.60 


69 80 


12 


19.90 


41.60 


72 90 


21.20 


43 70 


75 70 


22.20 


45.90 


79.10 


10 


30.20 


49.30 


97.00 


3080 


51.50 


99.70 


32 10 


53.40 


102 80 


8 


36 10 


60.90 


110.80 


37.80 


63.20 


117.70 


39.50 


67.10 


124.80 


6 


59.00 


100.10 


164.841 


61.10 


103.80 


170.00 


63.30 


108.30 


176.60 


4 


73.40 


130.70 


232.50 















• 300 Volts. 



STRANDED 



SIZE 




CODE 




INTERMEDIATE 




30% 




Slnfl. 


1 Cond. 


Three 


Simla 


1 Cond. 


Three 


Simla 


> Cond. 


Three 


A.W.G. 


Cond. 


Parallel 


Cnd. 


Cond. 


Parallel 


Cnd. 


Cond. 


Parallel 


Cnd. 


11 


$19.70 


$32.50 


$69.00 


$20.50 


$34.80 


$71.70 


$21.80 


$36.30 


$74.50 


12 


2260 


48.20 


91.50 


24 00 


50.70 


95.00 


24.90 


52.40 


9X.70 


10 


34.20 


56.00 


107.10 


35.00 


58.60 


110.10 


36.30 


61.40 


114.50 


8 


40.40 


69 50 


127.50 


42.30 


73.20 


131.20 


44.00 


76.50 


136.10 


6 


64.80 


110.40 


221.00 


67.10 


114.90 


227.50 


69.20 


119.10 


234.80 


4 


77.00 


137.80 


241.80 


79.20 


142.70 


248.60 


81.20 


147.10 


252.90 


2 


94.70 


168.20 


303.80 


97.50 


173.10 


310.90 


99.70 


179 50 


320.00 


1 


120.00 


257.00 


436.00 


125 00 


265.00 


451.00 


130.00 


273.00 


464.00 


1/0 


149.00 


298.00 


490 00 


154.00 


310.00 


503.00 


159 00 


319.00 


517.00 


2/0 


165.00 


339.00 


555.00 


173.00 


351.00 


566.00 


176 on 


356 00 


580 00 


SO 


192. 04) 


381.00 


626.00 


199.00 


392.00 


637.00 


203.00 


400.00 


650.00 


4/0 


226.00 


450.00 


769.00 


230.00 


458.00 


786.00 


237.00 


470.00 


802.00 


250.000 


293.00 




939.00 


298.00 




955.00 


303.00 




973.00 


300.000 


328.00 




1070.00 


332 00 




1074.00 


336 00 




1091.00 


350.000 


363.00 




1188.00 


373.00 




1206 00 


379.00 




1226.00 


400.000 


395.00 




1356.00 


403.00 




1378.00 


411.00 




1400.00 


500.000 


462.00 




1566.00 


471.00 




1593.00 


478.00 




1622.00 


600.000 


603.00 






613.00 






622.00 






700.000 


667.00 






684.00 






691.00 






730.000 


693.00 






715.00 






724.00 






800.000 


727.00 






745.00 






759.00 






1,000.000 


863.00 






886.00 






902.00 






1.250.000 


1130.00 






1159.00 






1198 00 






1.500,000 


1287 00 






1320.00 






1352 00 






2.000.000 


1629 00 






1666.00 






1706.00 







This Sheet Shows Price per "M" ft., Add Stand. Universal Freight Adders for Delivered 
Price as Shown on Reverse Side. Destination Symbols per Bulletin P 101-6 

TF.RMS: 2% 10th Prox. Net 60 Days 
Prices effective when issued, subject to change without notice. 



Canceling T 4-A-24 July 15, 1933 



9822 



-222- 



NUMBER 



T l-A-26 




DA I K 



Se|)t. 1. l\)H;i 



Anaconda Wire & Cable Company 

General Offices; 25 Broadway, New York. 
Chicago Office; 20 No. Wacker Drive. 

PUBLISHED LIST 

Pricea Cover Either Flame Check or Weatherproof Finish 



600 V Rubber Covered Wires 






N. E. C. Stan dard 
SOLID 



Cod* 

Intermedia ft 
3 07,,- Perform* nee Typo 







CODE 




INTERMEDIATE 




30% 




SIZE 
A.W.G. 


Single 


tDouble 


2 Cond. 


Single {Double 2 Cond. 


Single 


I Double 


2 Cond 


Braid 


Braid 


Parallel 


Braid Braid Parallel 


Braid 


BraiJ 


Parallel 


14 


S 5.30 


$ 7.40 


$1450 


S 6.00 $ 8.10 $15.90 


$ 6.60 


$ 8.40 


$17.00 


12 


7.20 


9.00 


18.50 


8.30 10.10 20 10 


9.30 


11.30 


21.80 


10 


9.90 


11.80 


23.70 


11.00 1280 26 00 


12.00 


14.30 


28.20 


8 


14.10 


16.30 


33.20 


15.30 18 10 37.10 


17.00 


19.60 


41.50 


6 


•20.30 


25.00 


50.60 


•22.70 27.20 55 20 


•25.00 


30.20 


59.30 



STRANDED 



SIZE 

A.W.G. 

14 

12 

10 

8 

• 



Single 
Braid 

S 0.90 

9.00 

11 90 

17.00 

25.70 



CODE 

{Double 

Braid 

$ 8 70 

10.90 

13.70 

19.20 

28.80 



2 Cond 
Parallel 

$16.20 
20.90 
2670 
38.40 
55.20 



Single 
Braid 

$ 7.70 
10.00 
13.10 
18.00 
28.00 



INTERMEDIATE 



tDouble 
Braid 
S 9.30 
11.80 
14.90 
20.30 
30.20 



2 Cond 
Paralle 
$ 17 40 
23.00 
29.10 
40 40 
60.50 



SI*e STRANDED tDouble Braid 



AWG 

4 
S 
2 

1 

1/0 
2/0 
S/0 
4/0 
250.000 
300,000 
350.000 
400.000 
1500.000 
600.000 
700.000 
750.000 
800.000 
900.000 
1.000,000 
1.250.000 
1.500,000 
1.750.000 
2.000.000 



CODE 

$36.40 

43.60 

50.10 

71.00 

83.00 

97.00 

114.00 

139.00 

171.00 

194.00 

224.00 

242.00 

298.00 

368.00 

424.00 

453.00 

474.00 

532.00 

589.00 

744.00 

881.00 

999.00 

1130.00 



INT. 

$38.40 

53.00 
76.00 
86.00 
103.00 
119.00 
145.00 
175.00 
201.00 
229.00 
252.00 
310.00 
378.00 
436.00 
462.00 
485.00 
549.00 
604.00 
760 00 
897.00 
1024.00 
1161.00 



30% 
$40.60 

55.10 
80.00 
95.00 
107.00 
123.00 
153.00 
178.00 
203.00 
238.00 
259.00 
320.00 
391.00 
448.00 
474.00 
503.00 
562.00 
620.00 
782.00 
923.00 
1053.00 
1194.00 



Single 
Braid 

$ N.30 
11.00 
14.30 
19.20 
30.20 



30% 

tDouble 

Braid 

$10.10 

12.80 

16.30 

21.40 

33.30 



2 Cond. 
Parallel 

$19.20 
25.20 
30.80 
42.30 
65.10 



FIXTURE WIRE— WEATHER PROOF 
300 VOLT 



SIZE 


CODE 


INT. 


30% 


A.W.G. 


Solid 


Strand. 


Solid 


Solid 


18 RF-64 


S3.60 


$4.10 


13.90 


$4.20 


18 RF-32 


4 10 


4 40 


4.40 


4 80 


16 RF-64 


•3.80 


•4.50 






16 RF-32 


4.50 


5.10 


4.80 


5.30 



tSlzea No. 8 AWG and larger muy be double braid or tan 
and braid at Manufacturers option. 

•Not approved by Underwriters' Lahoratorlee. 



Thi" sheet shnwa price per "M"' ft.. Add Stand. Universal 
Fieicht Adders for Delivered Price as shown on reverse aide. 
Destination Symbols i-er Bulletin P 101-6. 

TERMS: 29o 10th 1'rox. Net 60 Days 

Prices effective when issued, subject to ch:inge without notice. 



Reels billed estra — Credit ol'nwe-l when returned freight 
rtlBrffea collect, in good condition within one year to jioint 
of original shipment. 



Canceling T l-A-25 July 15, 1933 



9822 













J-223- 




















I 


Anacc 


>nda Wire & Cable Company 

General Offices: 25 Broadway, New York 


BULLETIN P 101-5 


c 


April 15, 1932 










Snpenuding P 101-4 




Chicago Office: 20 No. Wacker Drive 












Rimpm no 




f DESTINATION SYMBOLS / 


IHJBrJfclt HH^iiim^ 

RUBBER AND LEAD 


These symbols axe to be used in conjunction with basic price lists on 600 volt types and symbol adders 






applying to such bade lists. 








NmImM 


* iriliif 


DESTTNATIGN 


NwsLaadad 


InW 


DESTINATION 


HwlnJid 


uw 


DESTINATION 


























LCL 


CL 


LCL 


CL 




LCL 


CL 


LCL 


CL 




LCL 


CL 


LCL 


CL 


ALABAMA 










CONNECTICUT 










ILLINOIS 










Birmingham 

Mobile 
Montgomery 


19 
id 


13 

in 


16 

19 


10 

8 

10 


Entire State 


6 


4 


6 


3 


(0MMtao«() 


10 
10 


8 
7 


10 
10 


s- 


A** 

19 


12 


lit 

16 


DELAWARE 










Keck island 
Rockford 


5 
5 


Other Points 


19 


13 


16 


10 


Dover 
Wilmington 
Other Points 


7 

7 


5 


7 
7 
8 


4 
3 
4 


Sjjringheld 
Waukegan 
Other Points 


10 

9 

11 


7 

7 
9 


10 

9 

11 


5 


ARIZONA 










i 

8 


6 


5 
6 


— "^hoenuc 
Tucson 


29 


15 


29 


16 






















31 


16 


30 


17 


DISTRICT OF 










INDIANA 










Other Points 


32 


20 


32 


19 


COLUMBIA 


7 


5 


7 


4 


Anderson 
Blccmingtob 


9 

9 

8 

10 


7 
7 
6 
7 


9 

9 

8 

10 


5 


ARKANSAS 

Fort Smith 












# 


5 


25 


16 


20 


12 


FLORIDA 










oiuxtton 
Columbus 


4 
5 


Hot Springs 


23 


16 


20 


11 


Jacksonville 
Key West 


12 


8 


10 


6 


Danville 


9 


7 


9 


5 


Little Rock 


22 


15 


19 


11 


16 


12 


16 


10 


Decatur 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Pine Bluff 


23 


15 


20 


11 


Miami 


17 


10 


17 


9 


East Chicago 


9 


7 


9 


5 


Other Points 


24 


17 


21 


12 


Orlando 
Pensacola 
St. Petersburg 


22 
15 
15 


14 

10 


18 
1? 


12 
8 
9 


Elkhart 
Evansville 
Fort Wayne 


9 

10 

8 


6 
7 
6 


9 

10 

8 


5 

4 


CALIFORNIA 










10 


12 


Alemeda 


9 


9 


9 


9 


Tampa 


14 


11 


14 


10 


Gary 


9 


7 


9 




Bakersfield 


17 


15 


16 


15 


West Palm Beach 


17 


10 


17 


8 


Hammond 


9 


7 


9 


5 I 


Berkeley 
Fresno 
Long Beach 


9 

16 

9 


9 

12 

9 


9 

15 

9 


9 

14 


Other Points 


23 


15 


19 


12 


Indianapolis 
Indiana Harbor 
Kankakee 


9 
9 
9 


7 
7 
7 


9 
9 
9 


5 
5 

5 


it 

9 


GEORGIA 










Los Angeles 


9 


9 


9 


9 


Atlanta 


18 


12 


15 


10 


Kokomo 


9 


6 


9 


5 


Modesto 


14 


12 


14 


12 


Augusta 


17 


11 


14 


9 


La Porte 


9 


7 


9 


5 


Napa 


14 


12 


14 


12 


Brunswick 


14 


9 


14 


8 


Lafayette 


9 


7 


9 


5 


Oakland 


9 


9 


9 


9 


Darien 


12 


8 


10 


6 


Logansport 


9 


6 


9 


5 


Pasadena 


12 


11 


11 


11 


Macon 


18 


12 


15 


10 


Marion 


9 


7 


9 


5 


Red Wood City 


14 


12 


14 


12 


Rome 


18 


12 


15 


10 


Michigan City 


9 


7 


9 


5 


Richmond 


9 


9 


9 


9 


Savannah 


12 


8 


10 


6 


Muncie 


9 


6 


9 


4 


riverside 


14 


13 


13 


12 


Waycross 


18 


12 


15 


9 


Newcastle 


9 


6 


9 


4 


S Sacramento 


9 


9 


9 


9 


Other Points 


19 


13 


16 


10 


Porter 


9 


7 


9 


5 


n Bernardino 
San Diego 


14 
9 


11 


13 
9 


12 












Richmond 
Shelbyville 


9 
9 


6 

7 


9 
9 


4 
5 


9 


lb 

9 


IDAHO 










San Francisco 


9 


9 


9 


9 


Boise 


32 


18 


31 


17 


South Bend 


9 


6 


9 


5 


San Jose 
San Pedro 


11 


11 


11 


10 


Orifino 


30 


17 


29 


16 


Terre Haute 


10 


7 


10 


5 


9 


9 


9 


9 


Sand Point 


31 


17 


30 


16 


Union City 


9 


6 


9 


4 


San Rafael 


14 


12 


14 


12 


Other Points 


32 


21 


32 


20 


Vincennes 


10 


7 


10 


5 


Santa Ana 

Santa Barbara 


14 
16 


12 


14 


12 
13 












Whiting 
Other Points 


9 
10 


7 
7 


9 
10 


5 
5 


lit 

14 


15 


ILLINOIS 










Santa Rosa 


14 


12 


14 


12 


Aurora 


9 


7 


9 


5 












Santa Crux 
Stockton 


14 
12 


1? 


14 
11 


12 
11 


Belleville 
Cairo 


i] 


a 


ii 


6 
6 












lit 
11 


n 
11 


o 

8 


11 
11 


IOWA 










Vallejo 


14 


12 


14 


12 


ago 


9 


7 


9 


5 


Burlington 

Cedar Rapids 


11 


8 


11 


6 


Ventura 
Other Points 


14 


12 


14 


12 


cago Heights 


9 


7 


9 


5 


14 


9 


12 


7 


20 


16 


20 


16 


Cicero 


9 


7 


9 


5 


Clinton 


10 


8 


10 


5 












Danville 
Decatur 


10 
10 


7 
7 


10 
10 


5 
5 


Council Bluffs 
Davenport 


18 
10 


12 


15 
10 


8 
5 


COLORADO 










8 


Boi. 


26 


17 


22 


12 


East St. Louis 


11 


8 


11 


6 


Des Moines 


16 


11 


13 


7 


Colorado Springs 


26 


17 


22 


12 


Elgin 


9 


7 


9 


5 


Dubuque 


11 


8 


11 


5 


non City 


31 


20 


26 


14 


Evanston 


9 


7 


9 


5 


Ft. Dodge 


17 


11 


14 


7 


Denver 


26 


17 


22 


12 


Galena 


11 


8 


11 


5 


Ft. Madison 


11 


8 


11 


6 


Grand Junction 


32 


22 


32 


21 


loliet 
Kankakee 


9 


7 


9 


5 


Keokuk 


11 


8 


11 


6 


la | 


26 


17 


22 


12 


9 


7 


9 


5 


Mason City 


16 


10 


13 


7 


Pueblo 


26 


17 


22 


12 


Moline 


10 


8 


10 


5 


Muscatine 


11 


8 


11 


6 


Springfield 


25 


16 


20 


11 


Mt. Carmet 


10 


7 


10 


5 


Otturawa 


15 


10 


12 


7 


Sterling 


26 


17 


22 


12 


Murphysboro 


11 


9 


11 


6 


Sioux City 


18 


i: 


15 


8 


Trinidad 


26 


17 


22 


12 


Peoria 


10 


7 


10 


5 


Waterloo 


15 


10 


13 


7 


Other Points 


43 


28 


36 


23 


Quincy 


11 


8 


11 


6 


Other Points 


18 


12 


15 


8 


NOTE: J 


supersedes all previous Rubber Covered and Rubber 


and Lest 


Delivery Symbol Schedules 





































-224- 



-B—Unmtlmn Srmhmtt 



F»saUad«l 


sisasWl 


DESTINATION 


<— i l— a«d 


U.d«d 


DESTINATION 


H—LiiSiS 


| nm tt4 


DESTINATION 






















y 






LCL 


CL 


LCL 


CL 




LCL 


CL 


LCL 


CL 




LCL 


CL 


LCL 


CL 


KANSAS 










MICHIGAN 










NEW HAMPSHIRE 










Abilene 


20 


13 


17 


9 


V •MtCifMtaMf) 










Manchester 


6 


5 


6 


3 


Atchison 


17 


11 


14 


8 


Marquette 


IS 


9 


12 


7 


Nashua 


6 


4 


6 


3 


Ft. Scott 


19 


12 


15 


8 


Menominee 


9 


7 


9 


5 


Portsmouth 


6 


5 


6 


3 


Hutchinson 


21 


14 


17 


9 


Monroe 


7 


5 


7 


4 


Other Points 


7 


5 


7 


4 


Independence 


20 


13 


17 


9 


Muskegon 


9 


6 


9 


a 












5 












Kansas City 


17 


11 


14 


8 


Pontiac 


8 


5 


8 


NEW JERSEY 










Lawrence 


20 


13 


16 


9 


River Rouge 


7 


5 


7 


4 


Asbury Park 


6 


5 


6 


3 


Leavenworth 


17 


11 


14 


8 


Saginaw 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Atlantic City 


7 


5 


7 


4 


Pittsburgh 
Salina 


20 


13 


16 


9 


Sault Ste Marie 


12 


9 


10 


6 


Camden 


6 


5 


6 


3 


20 


13 


17 


9 


Three Riven 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Elizabeth 


6 




6 


3 


Tope lea 


19 


12 


16 


8 


Wayne 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Hoboken 


6 




6 


3 


Wichita 


21 


14 


17 


9 


Wyandotte 

Other Point*— Upper 


7 


5 


7 


4 


Jersey City 
Mornstown 


6 




6 


3 


Other Points 


24 


16 


20 


10 










6 




6 


3 












Peninsula 
Other Pointe— Lower 


16 


10 


13 


7 


Newark 

New Brunswick 


6 




6 


3 


KENTUCKY 










6 




6 


3 


Ashland 


9 


6 


9 


4 


Peninsula 


9 


7 


9 


5 


Passaic 


6 




6 


3 


Bowling Green 

Covington 

FrankJort 


IS 

9 


10 
6 


12 
9 


8 
4 












Paterson 
Perth Amboy 


6 
6 




6 
6 


3 

3 


MINNESOTA 












14 


9 


11 


7 


Carlton 


18 


12 


15 


8 


Phillipsburg 
Plainfield 


6 




6 


3 


Glasgow 


15 


10 


12 


8 


Duluth 


16 


11 


14 


7 


6 




6 


3 


Greenville 


15 


10 


13 


8 


Fairbault 


16 


11 


14 


7 


Trenton 


6 


5 


6 


i 


Harlan 
Htnderson 


16 
10 


11 
8 


14 
10 


9 
5 


Hibbing 
Mankota 


18 
17 


12 
11 


15 
14 


8 
a 


Other Points 


7 


5 


7 














Hoplcinsville 


15 


10 


13 


8 


Minneapolis 


16 


11 


14 


7 


NEW MEXICO 










Lexington 


10 


7 


10 


5 


Rochester 


16 


10 


13 


7 


Albuquerque 


32 


22 


32 


22 


Louisville 


10 


7 


10 


5 


St. Cloud 


18 


12 


15 


8 


Aztec 


27 


16 


27 


15 


Middlesboro 


16 


10 


13 


9 


St. Paul 


16 


lo 


14 


7 


Las Cruces 


32 


22 


32 


22 


Newport 


9 


6 


9 


4 


Winona 


15 


13 


7 


Other PoinU 


33 


22 


33 


22 


Owensboro 
Paducah 


14 
11 


9 
8 


11 
11 


7 
6 


Other PoinU 


19 


13 


16 


9 
































Other Points 


16 


11 


14 


9 


MISSISSIPPI 










NEW YORK 




















Biloxi 
Greenville 


17 
20 


12 
13 


15 
16 


10 
11 


Albany 
Amsterdam 


4 


3 


4 


2 


LOUISIANA 










4 


3 


4 


2 


Alexandria 


18 


13 


15 


11 


Hattiesburg 


16 


12 


14 


10 


Auburn 


4 


3 


4 


2 


Baton Rouge 


17 


13 


15 


10 


lackion 
Meridian 


16 


12 


14 


10 


Binghamton 


4 


3 


4 


2 


Covington 
Lake Charles 


17 


13 


15 


10 


16 


12 


14 


10 


Brooklyn 


6 


4 


6 


3 


15 


10 


13 


8 


Natchez 


17 


13 


15 


10 


Buffalo 


S 


4 


5 


3 


Monroe 


20 


15 


18 


12 


Vicksburg 
Other Points 


17 


13 


15 


10 


Cohoet 


4 


3 


4 


2 


New Orleans 


14 


10 


12 


8 


21 


14 


17 


11 


Cortland 


4 


3 


4 


? 


Rayville 
Shreveport 
Other Points 


18 
18 


13 
13 


15 

15 


11 
11 












Dunkirk 


6 


4 


6 




MISSOURI 










Elmira - 


5 


3 


5 


2 


20 


15 


18 


12 


Bonne Terre 


15 


11 


14 


8 


Fulton 


3 


3 


3 


2 












Cape Girardeau 
Columbia 


15 
16 


11 
10 


15 
13 


8 

7 


Geneva 
Glens Falls 


4 


3 


4 


2 


MAINE 










5 


4 


5 


3 


Augusta 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Fulton 


16 


10 


13 


7 


Hancock 


4 


3 


4 


2 


Bangor 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Hannibal 


11 


8 


11 


6 


Herkimer 


3 


2 


3 


1 


Lewiston 


7 


5 


7 


4 


Jefferson City 


16 


10 


13 


7 


Hudson 


5 


3 


5 


2 


Portland 


7 


5 


7 


4 


Joplin 


20 


14 


19 


10 


I lion 


3 


2 


3 


2 


Waterville 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Kansas City 


17 


11 


14 


8 


Jamaica 


6 


4 


6 


I 


Other PoinU 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Moberly 


15 


10 


12 


7 


Johnstown 


3 


3 


3 












St. Joseph 
St. Louis 


17 
11 


11 
8 


14 
11 


8 
6 


Kingston 
Little Falls 


5 
3 


4 
2 


5 
3 


j 


MARYLAND 








, 2 


Baltimore 


7 


5 


7 


4 


Sedalia 


16 


11 


14 


7 


Long Island City 


6 


4 


6 


,3 


Cumberland 


7 


5 


7 


4 


Springfield 
Union 


19 


13 


17 


9 


Mount Vernon 


6 


4 


6 


3 


Hagerstown 


7 


5 


7 


4 


16 


11 


14 


8 


Newburgh 


5 


4 


5 


3 


Salisbury 


8 


5 


8 


4 


Other Points 


20 


14 


19 


11 


New Rochelle 


6 


4 


6 


3 


Other Points 


8 


6 


8 


4 












New York City 

Nutrara P'alla 


6 

5 


4 

4 


6 
5 


3 
3 


MASSACHUSETTS 










MONTANA 










iiui^tutt i alii 

Olean 


6 


4 


6 


3 


Entire State 


6 


5 


6 


3 


Entire State 


32 


22 


32 


22 


Oneida 

(Wall n i n (T 


2 
6 


2 
4 


2 
6 


1 
3 


MICHIGAN 










NEBRASKA 










Oswego 
PeekskiU 


4 


3 


4 


2 


Adrian 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Grand Island 


20 


13 


17 


9 


6 


4 


6 


3 


Ann Arbor 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Hastings 


20 


13 


17 


9 


Poughkeepsie 


5 


4 


5 


3 


Bay City 
Benton Harbor 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Lincoln 


19 


12 


15 


8 


Rensselaer 




3 




2 


9 


6 


9 


5 


North Platte 


23 


15 


19 


10 


Rochester 




3 




2 


Calumet 


16 


10 


13 


7 


Omaha 


18 


12 


15 


8 


Rome 




2 




1 


Dearborn 


7 


5 


7 


4 


Other PoinU 


24 


16 


20 


11 


Saratoga Springs 




3 




2 


Detroit 


7 


5 


7 


4 












Schenectady 




3 




2 


Escanaba 
Flint 


14 
8 


9 
5 


11 
8 


6 
4 
















2 




2 


NEVADA 










Troy 




3 




2 


Grand Rapids 
Highland Parle 


9 


7 


9 


5 


Carson City 


28 


16 


28 


16 


Utica 




2 




1 


7 


5 


7 


4 


Elko 


31 


18 


31 


17 


Watertown 




3 




2 


Ishpeming 


15 


9 


12 


7 


Los V'egos 


28 


16 


27 


16 


Watervliet 




3 




2 


Jackson 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Reno 


26 


14 


26 


14 


White Plains 


6 


4 


6 


3 


Kalamazoo 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Winnemucca 


29 


17 


29 


16 


Yonkers 


6 


4 


6 


3 


Lansing 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Other Points 


32 


19 


32 


18 


Other Points 


6 


4 


6 


3 



9822 NOTE: Supersedes all previous Rubber Covered and Robber and Lead Delivery Symbol Schedules 













-225- 




































WburlMi Srmhol* — J 




Noa Leaded 


Ltadad 


DESTINATION 


Nob Leaded 


L«d«d 


DESTINATION 


Noo Lradrd 


Laadaa 1 


DESTINATION 




























LCX 


CL 


LCL 


CL 




LCL 


CL 


LCL 


CL 




LCL 


CL 


LCL 


CL 


NO. CAROLINA 










PENNSYLVANIA 










VIRGINIA 










Ashv.lle 


16 


11 


13 


9 


(dentin u#d) 










Alexandria 


8 


5 


8 


4 


Charlotte 


13 


9 


11 


7 


Williamsport 


6 


4 


6 


3 


Charlottesville 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Durham 


12 


8 


10 


7 


York 


6 


5 


6 


3 


Danville 


10 


6 


9 


5 


Gasioma 


16 


10 


13 


8 


Other Points 


7 


5 


7 


4 


Lynchburg 
Newport News 
Norfolk 


9 


6 


9 


5 


Greensboro 
Goldsl>oro 


12 


g 


10 
13 


7 












9 
9 


6 

6 


9 
9 




13 


9 


8 


RHODE ISLAND 










4 


High I'oint 


12 


8 


10 


7 


Entire State 


6 


5 


6 


3 


Petersburg 


9 


6 


9 


4 


Raleigh 


12 


8 


10 


7 












Portsmouth 


9 


6 


9 


4 


Salisbury 
Wilmington 


13 
13 


Q 


11 

11 


7 












Richmond 
Roanoke 


8 
9 


5 
6 


8 

9 


4 
5 


9 


7 


SO. CAROLINA 










Winston -Salem 


12 


8 


10 


7 


Charleston 


12 


8 


10 


6 


Staunton 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Other Points 


16 


11 


13 


9 


Columbia 


16 


11 


13 


9 


Other Points 


10 


7 


10 


6 










Florence 

Georgetown 

Greenville 


16 
14 
16 


10 

9 

11 


13 
14 
13 


8 
8 
9 












NORTH DAKOTA 

Fargo 




















20 


13 


17 


9 


WASHINGTON 










Grand Forks 


21 


13 


17 


9 


Spartanburg 


16 


11 


13 


9 


Aberdeen 


15 


13 


14 


13 


Other Points 


25 


16 


21 


11 


Sumter 


16 


10 


13 


8 


Olympia 


12 


11 


12 


11 












Other Points 


17 


11 


14 


10 


Seattle 


9 


9 


9 


9 














OHIO 




















Spokane 


21 


18 


19 


16 


Akron 
Bryan 


7 


5 
6 


7 
8 


4 
4 












Tacoma 
Other Points 


9 
22 


9 
18 


9 
20 


q 


8 


SOUTH DAKOTA 










17 


Canton 


7 


5 


7 


4 


Aberdeen 


20 


13 


17 


10 












Cincinnati 
Cleveland 


9 

7 


6 
5 


9 

7 


4 

4 


Sioux Falls 
Other Points 


18 
22 


12 
14 


15 

18 


Q 












11 


WEST VIRGINIA 










Columbus 

Dayton 

Elyria 


8 
8 

7 


6 
6 
5 


8 
8 

7 


4 
4 
4 












Bluefield 

Charleston 

Clarksburg 


10 
9 

8 


7 
7 
6 


10 
9 
8 


5 
5 
4 


TENNESSEE 










Lancaster 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Chattanooga 


18 


12 


15 


10 


Fairmont 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Lima 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Jackson 


17 


11 


14 


9 


Huntington 


9 


6 


9 


4 


Mansfield 


7 


5 


7 


4 


Johnson City 
Knoxville 


15 


10 


13 


8 


Martinsburg 


7 


5 


7 


4 


Marion 


7 


5 


7 


4 


17 


11 


14 


9 


Morgantown 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Marietta 


8 


6 


8 


6 


Memphis 


18 


12 


15 


10 


Moundsville 


8 


5 


8 


4 


Newark 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Nashville 


17 


11 


14 


9 


Parkertburg 


8 


6 


8 


4 


Norwalk 


7 


5 


7 


. 4 


Other Points 


18 


12 


15 


10 


Welch 


10 


7 


10 


5 


Portsmouth 


9 


6 


9 


4 












Wheeling 


8 


5 


8 


4 


Sandusky 
Steubenville 


7 
7 


5 
5 


7 
7 


4 
4 












Williamson 
Other Pointi 


10 

10 


7 
8 


10 
10 


5 
6 


TEXAS 










Toledo 


7 


5 


7 


4 


Abilene 


24 


13 


20 


13 












\i- 


7 


5 
5 


7 

7 


4 

4 


Amarillo 
Austin 


26 
23 


14 
13 


21 

19 


14 
12 












Youngstown 


7 


WISCONSIN 










Zanesville 


7 


5 


7 


4 


Beaumont 


15 


8 


13 


8 


Ashland 


16 


11 


13 


7 


Other Points 


9 


6 


9 


4 


Corpus Christie 
Dallas 


24 
24 


13 
13 


20 
20 


12 
12 


Appletoa 
Reloit 


10 
10 


7 
7 


10 
10 


5 
5 












OKLAHOMA 










El Paso 


31 


14 


25 


14 


Green Bay 


10 


7 


10 


5 


Entire State 


23 


1.7 


20 


13 


Fort Worth 


24 


•13 


20 


12 


Janesville 
Kenosha 


10 


7 


10 


5 












Galveston 


15 


8 


13 


8 


9 


7 


9 


5 












OREGON 










Harlingen 


26 


14 


22 


13 


Kohler 


10 


7 


10 


5 


Astoria 


9 


9 


9 


9 


Houston 


15 


8 


15 


8 


La Crosse 


15 


10 


12 


7 


Eugene 


16 


14 


15 


13 


Laredo 


26 


14 


22 


13 


Madison 


10 


7 


10 


5 


Portland 


9 


9 


9 


9 


Marshall 


18 


13 


15 


11 


Manitowoc 


9 


7 


9 


5 


Salem 


13 


11 


13 


11 


Palestine 


22 


13 


19 


12 


Marinette 


9 


7 


9 


5 


Other Points 


22 


18 


20 


16 


Port Arthur 
San Antonio 


15 
23 


8 
13 


13 
20 


8 
12 


Milwaukee 
Oshkoah 


9 

10 


7 
7 


9 

10 


5 
5 












PENNSYLVANIA 










Temple 


23 


13 


20 


12 


Racine 


9 


7 


9 


5 


Allentown 


6 


4 


6 


3 


Tex-Arkana 


21 


14 


17 


12 


Sheboygan 


9 


7 


9 


5 


Altoona 


6 


5 


6 


3 


Tyler 


23 


13 


20 


12 


Stevens Point 


14 


9 


12 


6 


Bethlehem 


6 


4 


6 


3 


Waco 


23 


13 


19 


12 


Superior 


16 


11 


14 


7 


Bloomsburg 


6 


4 


6 


3 


Wichita Falls 


24 


13 


20 


13 


Wausau 


14 


9 


12 


6 


East on 


R 


4 


A 


3 


Other Points West of 










Waukesha 


10 


7 


10 


5 


Erie 


6 


4 


6 


3 


extension of New 










West Allis 


9 


7 


9 


5 


Gettysburg 


7 


5 


7 


3 


Mexico — eastern 










Other Points 


16 


11 


14 


7 


Harrisburg 


6 


5 


6 


3 


boundary 


31 


14 


25 


15 












Hazelton 
Huntingdon 
Johnstown 
Lancaster 


6 
6 
7 
6 


4 

5. 
5 
5 


6 
6 

7 
6 


3 
3 
3 
3 


Other Pointi 


26 


14 


22 


14 












WYOMING 


27 
26 


18 
17 


23 
22 


12 
12 


L'TAH 










Casper 
Cheyenne 


Mahanoy City 


6 


4 


6 


3 


Ogden 


32 


21 


32 


19 


Other Pointi 


32 


22 


32 


21 


Meadville 


6 


5 


6 


3 


Provo 


32 


21 


32 


19 












Northumberland 
Oil City 


6 
6 


4 
5 


6 
6 


3 
3 


Salt Lake City 
Other Points 


32 
34 


21 
22 


32 
34 


19 
21 












PANAMA CANAL 










Philadelphia 


6 


5 


6 


3 












ZONE 










Pittsburgh 
Pittston 


7 


5 


7 


4 












Cristobal 


12 


g 


12 


g 


5 
6 


4 

4 


5 
6 


3 

3 


VF.RMONT 

Rennington 


5 


3 


5 


2 










Reading 








Scranton 


5 


4 


5 


3 


Ritrlington 


6 


5 


6 


3 








Warren 


6 


4 


6 


3 


Rutland 


5 


4 


5 


3 








W.Ikes Uarre 


5 


4 


5 


3 


Other Points 


7 


5 


7 


4 









9322 



NOTE: Supersedes all previous Rubber Covered and Rubber aod Lead Delivery Symbol Schedules 



-226- 



APP. A, PART I, 
SECTI01J B II 



SAMPLE FRICE FIII1T&S 
Illustrating 
FIRST MAJOE CHAIIGE IB PRICE STRUCTURE 
EFFECTIVE MAY 1, 1934 



9322 



-227- 



* 






RWL-P-ll 

Anaconda Wire & Cable Company 



General Office*; 25 Broadway, New York. 
Chicago Office; 20 No. Waeker Drive. 



DISCOUNT SHEET 



WHOLESALERS 

SERVICE DISCOUNTS 

Electrical i^AEftfCOTE) Conductors 

RUBBER - LEAD BUILDING WIRES 
RUBBER - LEAD FIXTURE WIRES 

Code, Intermediate, 30% 
Applying to Sheet RWL-T-26 dated May 1, 1934 

SHIPMENTS MADE BY MANUFACTURER 

1. TO WHOLESALER'S WAREHOUSE STOCK 

(priced in column applicable to quantity 

specified in each individual order) COLUMN "A" DISCOUNT 15% 

COLUMN "B" DISCOUNT 15% 

COLUMN "C" DISCOUNT 10% 

COLUMN "D" DISCOUNT 5% 

2. DIRECT TO CUSTOMER OF WHOLESALER 

(wired in column applicable to quantity V^oftinpi." 

specified in each individual order) ^^t.X.^.lWiwQCNTX 5% 

DIRECT TO CUSTOMER OF WHOLESALER AND APPBMj&fc TO V> 

SPECIFIC BUILDING JOB CONTRACT (FORM No. i)^ .., T- 

($200 LIST AND OVER, priced in column applicable l| Eg * 7.934 rn 

to quantity specified in Contract; V -£. 

LESS THAN $200 LIST, priced in column applicable \ '*"> „<^' 

to quantity specified in each individual order) \... $fy _...DISCQ6#*i '/$% 

TERMS: Net cash last day of month following date of invoice. 2% casnNa^fon nt hjj fifo by the 
15th of month following date of invoice. 






This is a new sheet — No previous issue. 



All discounts changed. 



9322 



-228- 



May 1, 1934 



AnacondA 



front nunc f© corift 



RWL -T- 26 



Anaconda Wire & Cable Company 

General Offices; 25 Broadway, New York. 
Chicago Office; 20 No. Wacker Drive. 



PUBLISHED LIST 



RUBBER — LEAD 



Electrical 




Conductors 



BUILDING WIRES 

CODE, INTERMEDIATE, 30% 

600 Volts 

Solid or Stranded, Sinsle or Multiple Conduct 



FIXTURE WIRE 

CODE, INTERMEDIATE, 30% 

300 Volts 

Solid or Stranded 




Canceling T I- A-2*. Sept. 1, 1933 Bulletin P 101-5, Apr. 15, 1933 & all previous Bldg. Wire Policies. 

9822 



-229- 



Electrieal 




Conductor* 



RUBBER AND LEAD CODE WJRES AND CABLES 

BUILDING WIRE— 600 VOLT 



Size 
A. W. G. 



List 
Trice 






• 

»50t» 

1199 99 
LI* 



C 

(200 U 

t4.»9.99 

LIU 



■ 

15.000 

LM 



Mto 


Imt 


Aiprai. 


»m«L 


Wall 


U—ti 


1. D. 


U Wft 


«4tkt 


64t»t 


iHtn 


hrl' 



SOLID SINGLE CONDUCTOR 



Price Her 1000 Feet 



18' 
16* 
14 


$27.50 
30.00 
36.90 


$20.10 
21.95 
26.95 


$15.85 
17.28 
21.24 


$14.53 
15.84 
19.47 


$13.77 
15.01 
18.44 


2 
2 
3 


2 
2 
2 


.19 
.20 
.25 


92 
100 
135 


12 
10 

8 


43.30 
65.70 
89.80 


31.65 
48.05 
65.60 


24.92 

37.35 
51.67 


22.84 
34.70 
47.36 


21.64 
32.87 
44.86 


3 
3 

4 


2 
3 
3 


.27 
;32 
.38 


153 
260 
320 


6 
4 


130.50 
160.50 


95.40 
117.30 


75.15 
92.44 


68.89 
84.73 


65.26 
80.27 


4 

4 


' 4 
4 


.47 
.52 


620 
620 



STRANDED SINGLE CONDUCTOR 



SOLID TWIN 



• For 300 Volt Service. 



14 


42.40 


31.00 


24.40 


22.37 


21.19 


3 


2 


.25 


136 


12 


48.40 


35.35 


27.87 


25.54 


21.20 


3 


2 


.27 


163 


10 


73.30 


53.60 


42.22 


38.70 


36.66 


3 


8 


.32 


260 


8 


98.90 


72.30 


56.95 


52.20 


49.45 


4 


3 


.38 


320 


6 


141.50 


103.40 


81.48 


74.69 


70.76 


4 


4 


.47 


520 


4 


167.40 


122.30 


96.36 


88.33 


83.68 


4 




.62 


620 


2 


205.50 


150.20 


118.34 


108.48 


102.77 


4 




.58 


770 


1 


256.60 


187.55 


147.76 


135.44 


128.32 


6 




.64 


930 


1/0 


315.00 


230.15 


181.33 


166.22 


157.47 


5 




.68 


1060 


2/0 


353.90 


258.60 


203.76 


186.78 


176.95 


5 




.73 


1210 


3/0 


410.10 


299.70 


236.12 


216.44 


205.05 


5 




.78 


1370 


4/0 


480.40 


351.10 


276.61 


253.56 


240.21 


5 




.84 


1570 


250,000 


626.10 


457.55 


360.48 


330.44 


313.05 


6 


5 


.95 


2030 


300,000 


698.50 


510.45 


402.18 


368.67 


349.26 


6 


5 


1.00 


2270 


350,000 


772.60 


564.60 


444.85 


407.78 


386.32 


6 


5 


1.06 


2490 


400,000 


838.50 


612.75 


482.79 


442.56 


419.26 


6 


5 


1.10 


2720 


500,000 


978.70 


715.25 


563.52 


516.56 


489.37 


6 


5 


1.19 


3160 


600,000 


1270.30 


928.30 


731.39 


670.44 


635.16 


7 


6 


1.33 


3980 


700,000 


1404.00 


1026.00 


808.36 


741.00 


702.00 


7 


6 


1.40 


4420 


750,000 


1467.40 


1072.30 


844.85 


774.44 


733.68 


7 


6 


1.43 


4620 


800,000 


1539.40 


1124.90 


886.30 


812.44 


769.68 


7 


6 


1.47 


4850 


900,000 


1675.40 


1224.30 


964.60 


884.22 


837.68 


7 


6 


1.63 


5265 


1,000.000 


1824.40 


1333.25 


1050.42 


962.89 


912.21 


7 


6 


1.59 


5690 


1,250,000 


2362.50 


1726.45 


1360.24 


1246.89 


1181.26 


8 


7 


1.79 


6890 


1,500,000 


2688.40 


1964.60 


1547.88 


1418.89 


1344.21 


8 


7 


1.91 


7875 


1,750,000 


3023.80 


2209.70 


1740.97 


1595.89 


1511.89 


8 


7 


2.02 


8890 


2,000,000 


3414.30 


2495.10 


1965.82 


1802.00 


1707.16 


8 


7 


2.13 


9850 



18* 
16* 
14 


45.00 
49.30 
56.80 


32.85 
36.00 
41.50 1 


25.88 
28.36 
32.69 


23.72 
26.00 
29.97 


22.47 
24.63 
28.39 


2 
2 
3 


2 
2 
2 


.19x.33 
.20x.35 
.25x.44 


145 
165 
225 


12 

10 

8 


90.80 
107.70 
151.10 


66.35 

78.70 

110.40 


52.29 
62.03 
87.01 


47.93 
56.86 
79.76 


45.41 
53.86 
75.57 


3 
3 
4 


3 
3 
3 


.30x.51 
.32x.55 
.38x.66 


360 
410 
540 


6 

4 


218.70 
284.00 


159.85 | 
207.60 | 


125.93 
163.55 


115.43 
149.92 


109.36 
142.03 


4 
4 


4 
4 


.47x.81 
.52x.91 


852 
1045 



:*322 



-230- 



Electrical 




Conductors 



RUBBER AND LEAD CODE WIRE S AND CABLES 

BUILDING WIRE— «00 VOLT 



Size 
A.W.G. 



List 
Price 



A 

Lm rtllB 

J50 

lilt 



B 

$50 to 

$199.99 

Lilt 



C 

$200 tt 

$4,999.99 

Lilt 



D 
$3,000 

Lilt 
••Mtw 



• •kfcr 

Will 
64tta 


Ini 
tbutt 

64 Ml 


A»«m. 
t. D. 



i«tW|t. 



STRANDED TWIN 



Price Per 1000 Feet 



14 


$69.50 


$50.75 


$40.00 


$36.67 


$34.74 


3 


2 


.25x .44 


225 


12 


103.30 


75.50 


59.49 


54.53 


51.66 


3 


3 


.30x .51 


360 


10 


120.40 


88.00 


69.33 


63.56 


60.21 


3 


3 


.32x .55 


410 


8 


169.50 


123.90 


97.57 


89.44 


84.73 


4 


3 


.38x .66 


540 


6 


238.20 


174.10 


137.16 


125.73 


119.12 


4 


4 


.47x .81 


852 


4 


297 .50 


217.40 


171.30 


157.02 


148.76 


4 


4 


.52x .91 


1045 


2 


363.10 


265.35 


209.07 


191.64 


181.56 


4 


4 


.68x1.03 


1310 


1 


537.90 


393.10 


309.70 


283.89 


268.95 


5 


5 


.67x1.19 


1860 


1/0 


636.40 


465.10 


366.43 


335.89 


318.21 


5 


5 


.72x1.27 


2120 


2/0 


724.20 


529.25 


416.97 


382.22 


362.11 


5 


5 


.76x1.36 


2395 


3/0 


814.30 


595.10 


468.85 


429.78 


407.16 


5 


5 


.81x1.47 


2730 


4/0 


954.10 


697.25 


549.33 


503.56 


477.05 


5 


5 


.87x1.58 


3120 



SOLID 3 CONDUCTOR 
















18* 
16* 
14 


98.00 
112.80 
156.30 


71.60 

82.40 

114.18 


56.40 
64.92 
89.96 


51.70 
59.51 
82.47 ! 


48.98 
56.38 
78.13 


2 
2 
3 


3 
3 

4 


.41 
.44 
.56 


315 
345 
600 


12 179.4* j 131.M 

10 i 209.00 1 152.75 

8 27«.M , 197.7* 


103.27 
120.36 
133.73 


9«.<7 
110.33 | 
142.77 


89.68 
104.53 
135.26 


3 
3 

4 


4 
4 
4 


.60 
.64 
.77 


680 
770 
960 


6 | 359.40 
4 497.00 


262.63 
363.15 


206.93 

286.12 


189.69 
262.28 | 


179.71 
248.47 


4 
4 


5 

5 


.92 
1.03 


1470 
1780 



STRANDED 3 CONDUCTOR 



14 


166.10 


121.38 


95.64 


87.66 


83.05 


3 


4 


.56 


500 


12 


194.50 


142.15 


112.00 


102.66 


97.26 


3 


4 


.60 


680 


10 


228.20 


166.75 


131.38 


120.43 


114.09 


3 


4 


.64 


770 


8 


306.10 


223.70 


176.25 


161.56 


153.06 


4 


4 


.77 


960 


6 


465.90 


340.45 


268.24 


215.89 


232.95 


4 


5 


.92 


1470 


4 


314.50 


376.00 


296.27 


271.58 


257.28 


4 


5 


1.03 


1780 


2 


65 J. 10 


478.00 


376.63 


345.21 


327.07 


4 


5 


1.16 


2240 


1 


918.70 


671.40 


528.97 


484.89 


459.37 


5 


6 


1.33 


2980 


1/0 


1039.80 


759.85 


598.67 


548.78 


519.87 


5 


6 


1.42 


3340 


2/0 


1177.30 


860.30 


677.82 


621.33 


588.63 


5 


6 


1.52 


3830 


3/0 


1327.40 


970.00 


761.24 


700.56 


663.68 


5 


6 


1.63 


4370 


4/0 


1629.30 


1190.60 


938.06 


859.89 


814.63 


5 


7 


1.79 


5430 


2. r >0.000 


2010.70 


1169.40 


1157.70 


1061.22 


1005.37 


6 


7 


1.96 


6320 


300.000 


22H8.00 


1672.00 


1317.33 


1207.56 


1144.00 


6 


7 


2.08 


7100 


.r>o.nnn 


2540.40 


1856.45 


1462.67 


1310.78 


1270.21 


6 


7 


2.19 


7830 


•loo.non 


2887.80 


2110.30 


1662.47 


1524.11 


1443.89 


6 


8 


2.32 


9130 


r.no.ooo 


3343.60 


2143.10 


1925.09 


1764.67 


1671.79 


6 


8 


2.50 


10550 



• For 300 Volt Service. 



9822 



-231- 



Electrical (t^J^ ^OTE) Co n d nc t p« 

RUBBER AND LEAD INTERMEDIATE WIRES AND CABLES 

BUILDING WIRE— €00 VOLT 


Hm 
A. W. G. 


Lilt 
Price 


A 

Lwttu 

WO 

IM 


■ 

$30 1* 

1199.99 
List 


c 

I2O0I* 
J4.999.99 

Lilt 


I 

15.000 

List 
niOnr 


littor 

Will 

6-ltta 


Us* 

Skutt 

64 Uu 


At mi. 

0. 

iMktt 


Asm*. 

IttWlt. 
NrB" 


SOLID SINGLE CO] 


VDUCTOr 


i Price Per 1000 Feet 










18* 
16» 


$28.30 
3120 


$20.70 
22.75 


$16.29 
17.94 


$14.93 
16.44 


$14.15 
15.58 


2 

2 


2 
2 


.19 
.20 


92 
100 


14 
12 
10 


38.60 
45.70 
66.88 


28.20 
33.45 
48.90 


22.22 
26.34 
38.51 


20.37 
24.14 
35.30 


19.29 
22.87 
33.44 


3 
3 
3 


2 
2 
3 


.25 
.27 
.32 


135 
153 
260 


8 
6 


93.30 
134.50 


68 20 

98.39 


53.76 
77.44 


49.27 
70.99 


46.67 

67.25 


4 
4 


3 

4 


.38 
.47 


320 
G20 


STRANDED SINGL1 


E CONDU 


CTOR 




14 

12 

10 

8 

6 


43.90 

51.00 

74.80 

103.00 

145.90 


32.10 
37.30 
54.70 
75.30 
106.60 


25.27 
29.39 
43.09 
59.27 
83.99 


23.17 
26.94 
39.50 
54.34 
76.99 


21.95 
25.53 
37.42 
51.48 
72.94 


3 
3 
3 
4 
4 


2 

2 
3 
3 
4 


.26 
.27 
.32 

.38 
.47 


135 
153 
260 
320 
520 


4 
2 

1 
1/0 
2/0 


171.50 
210.80 
266.10 
824.40 
369.00 


125.35 
154.10 
194.45 
237.10 
269.70 


98.76 
121.39 
153.21 
186.79 
212.49 


98.53 
111.28 
140.44 
171.22 
194.78 


85.77 
105.42 
133.05 
16221 
184.53 


4 

4 
5 
5 
5 




.52 
.58 
.64 
.68 
.73 


620 

770 

930 

1060 

1210 


3/0 

4/0 
250,000 
300.000 
350,000 


423.40 
488.00 
635.60 
706.10 
791.60 


309.40 
356.60 
464.45 
516.00 
578.45 


243.76 
280.97 
365.94 
406.55 
455.76 


223.44 
257.56 
335.44 
372.67 
417.78 


211.68 
244.00 
317.79 
353.05 
395.79 


5 
5 
6 
6 
6 


5 
5 
5 


.78 

.84 

.95 

1.00 

1.06 


1370 
1570 
2030 
2270 
2490 


400,000 
500.000 
600,000 
700,000 
750,000 


853.70 

995.80 

1289.30 

1436.20 
1509.00 


623.85 

727.70 

942.15 

1049.55 

1102.75 


491.52 
573.33 
742.30 
826.91 
868.85 


450.56 
525.56 
680.44 
758.00 
796.44 


426.84 
497.89 
644.63 
718.11 
754.53 


6 
6 
7 

7 
7 


5 
5 
6 
6 
6 


1.10 
1.19 
1.83 
1.40 
1.43 


2720 
3160 
3980 
4420 
4620 


800,000 

900,000 

1,000,000 

1,250,000 


1573.50 
1707.60 
1868.00 
2417.50 


1149.85 
1247.85 
1365.10 
1766.60 


905.94 

983.15 

1075.52 

1391.88 


830.44 

901.22 

985.89 

1275.89 


786.74 

853.79 

934.00 

1208.74 


7 
7 
7 
8 


6 
6 
6 
7 


1.47 
1.53 
1.59 
1.79 


4850 
5265 
5690 
6890 


1,500,000 
1,750,000 
2.000.000 


2751.00 
3084.40 
3484.40 


2010.30 
2254.00 
2546.30 


1583.88 
1775.88 
2006.18 


1451.89 
1627.89 
1839.00 


1375.47 
1542.21 
174221 


8 
8 
8 


7 
7 

7 


1.91 
2.02 
2.13 


7875 
8890 
9860 


SOLID TWIN 


16* 
18* 


51.20 

46.30 


37.40 

33.8U 


29.45 
26.75 


27.00 
24.52 


25.58 
23.13 


2 
2 


2 
2 


.19x.33 
.20x.35 


145 
165 


14 
12 
10 


64.70 

94.80 

111.90 


47.30 
69.30 
81.75 


37.27 
54.58 
64.43 


34.17 
50.03 
59.06 


32.37 
47.40 
55.95 


3 
3 

3 


2 
3 
3 


.25x.44 
.30x.51 
.32x.55 


225 
360 
410 


8 
6 


156.00 
225.70 


114.00 
164.95 


89.83 
129.96 


82.35 
119.13 


78.02 
112.86 


4 

4 


3 
4 


.38x.66 
.47x.81 


540 

852 


•For 3<H 


Volt Sei 


Tie*. 













9822 



-233- 

















Electrical (J 


fAraCOTEj Conductor* 








RUBBER AND LEAD INTERMEDIATE WIRES AND CABLES 




BUILDING WIRE— €00 VOLT 




% 






Size 


List 


A 
UutBaa. 


I 
$50 to 


c 

$200 U 


D 
$5,000 


Robber 


Leatf 


Appro*. 


Aprax. 




A.W.G. 


Price 


150 

Lilt 


$199.99 
Lilt 


$4,999.99 
lilt 


Lilt 
intf Om 


Wall 
64thi 


Shtatlt 
64tbi 


o. o. 

Inchti 


Nil Wit. 
Pir M' 




STRANDED TWIN Price Per 1000 Feet 




14 


$73.80 


$53.95 


$42.51 


$38.97 


$36.92 


3 


2 


.25x .44 


225 




12 


108.00 


78.95 


62.22 


57.03 


54.03 


3 


3 


,30x .51 


360 




10 


125.30 


91.60 


72.17 


66.16 


62.67 


3 


3 


.32x .55 


410 




8 


177.30 


129.60 102.10 


93.60 


88.67 


4 


3 


.38x .66 


540 




6 


246.80 1 180.30 


142.07 


130.23 


123.38 


4 


4 


.47x .81 


852 




4 


30G.80 J 224.20 


176.64 


161.92 


153.40 


4 


4 


.52x .91 


1045 




2 


372.40 272.15 


214.41 


196.54 


186.20 


4 


4 


.58x1.03 


1310 




1 


553.00 | 404.15 318.42 


291.89 


276.53 


5 


5 


.67x1.19 


1860 




1/0 


659.20 


481.70 


379.52 


347.89 


329.58 


5 


5 


.72x1.27 


2120 




2/0 


744.00 


545.85 


430.06 


394.22 


373.47 


5 


5 


.76x1.36 


2395 




3/0 


835.20 


610.30 


480.85 


440.78 


417.58 


5 


5 


.81x1.47 


2730 




4/0 


969.30 


708.30 


558.06 


511.56 


484.63 


5 


5 


.87x1.58 


3120 




SOLID 3 CONDUCTOR 




18* 


100.40 1 73.40 


57.82 


53.00 


50.21 


2 


3 


.41 


315 




16* 


115.20 ! 84.20 


66.34 


60.81 


57.61 


2 


3 


.44 


345 




14 


160.60 


117.37 


92.47 


84.77 


80.30 


3 


4 


.56 


500 




12 


184.60 


131.81 


106.22 


97.37 


92.24 


3 


4 


.60 


680 




10 


214.20 


156.50 


123.31 


113.03 


107.08 


3 


4 


.64 


770 




8 


285.20 


208.50 


164.22 


150.54 


142.62 


4 


4 


.77 


960 




6 


369.30 


269.85 


212.61 


194.89 


184.63 


4 


5 


.92 


1470 




STRANDED 3 CONDUCTOR 




14 


171.20 


125.12 


98.58 


90.36 


85.61 


3 


4 


.56 


500 




12 


221.00 


161.54 


127.27 


116.66 


110.53 


3 


4 


.CO 


680 




10 


233.90 


170.90 


134.65 


123.43 


116.94 


• 3 


4 


.64 


770 




8 


314.00 


229.40 


180.79 


165.72 


157.00 


4 


4 


.77 


960 




6 


478.20 


349.45 


275.33 


252.39 


239.11 


4 


5 


.92 


1470 




4 527.50 


385.45 


303.69 


278.38 


263.73 


4 


5 


1.03 


1780 




2 667.60 


487.85 


384.37 


352.34 


333.80 


4 


5 


1.16 


2240 




1 947.20 


692.15 


545.33 


499.89 


473.58 


5 


6 


1.33 


2980 




1/0 ; 1064.40 


777.85 


612.85 


561.78 


532.21 


5 


6 


1.42 


3340 




2/0 1198.10 875.55 ' 689.82 


632.33 


599.05 


5 


6 


1.52 


3830 




3/0 1.118.20 


985.25 776.24 


711.56 


674.11 


5 


6 


1.63 


4370 




4/0 1661.50 


1214.15 956.61 


876.89 


830.74 


5 


7 


1.79 


5430 




250,000 2011.00 


1491.55 I 1175.15 


1077.22 


1020.53 


6 


7 


1.96 


6320 




300,000 2295.60 1677.55 


1321.70 


1211.56 


1147.79 


6 


7 


2.08 


7100 




350,000 | 2571.50 


1881.40 


1482.30 


1358.78 


1287.26 


6 


7 


2.19 


7830 




400,000 1 2929.50 


2140.75 


1686.67 


1546.11 


1464.74 


6 


8 


2.32 


9130 




500,000 1 3394.70 


2480.75 


1954.55 


1791.67 


1697.37 


6 


8 


2.50 


10550 




• For 300 Volt Service. 





9822 



-233- 



Electrical 




Conductors 



RUBBER AND LEAD 30 PERCENT WIRES AND CABLES 

BIILU1NG WIRE— 600 VOLT 



Size 
A. W. G. 



List 
Price 



A 

L— (»!■ 

ISO 

LIB 



• 

$50 1. 

1199 99 



C 

1200 tt 

J4.999.99 

Lbt 



D 
13.000 

IM 



llMw 


In* 


*Hm. 


Aim. 


Wall 


Ik.mtk 


t. 0. 


IM Wft 


**m 


64t*» 


!«>• 


Pw »■ 



SOLID SINGLE CONDUCTOR 



Price Per 1000 Feet 



18* 
16* 


$29.50 
32.30 


$21.50 
23.60 


$16.94 
18.59 


$15.53 
17.04 


$14.72 
16.15 


2 
2 


2 
2 


.19 
.20 


92 
100 


14 
IS 

10 


40.10 

47.68 
69J0 


29.30 
34.80 
50.70 


23.09 
27.43 
39.93 


21.17 
25.14 

36.60 


20.05 
23.82 
34.67 


3 
3 
3 


2 
2 
3 


.26 
.27 
.32 


135 
153 
260 


8 
6 


97.00 
138.70 


70.90 
101.35 


55.84 
79.84 


51.19 
73.19 


48.51 
69.34 


4 
4 


3 
4 


.38 
.47 


320 
620 



STRANDED SINGLE CONDUCTOR 



14 


46.40 


33.90 


26.69 


24.47 


23.18 


3 


2 


.25 


135 


U 


52.80 


38.55 


30.37 


27.84 


26.38 


3 


2 


47 


153 


It 


774* 


56.50 


44.51 


40.80 


38.65 


3 


3 


.32 


260 


8 


106.50 


77.90 


61.36 


5645 


53.29 


4 


3 


.38 


320 


6 


149.90 


109.50 


8648 


79.09 


74.93 


4 




.47 


620 


4 


175.30 


128.10 


100.94 


92.53 


87.66 


4 




.52 


620 


2 


215.00 


157.10 


123.79 


113.48 


107.51 


4 




.68 


770 


1 


275.60 


201.40 


158.67 


145.44 


137.79 


6 




.64 


930 


1/0 


333.90 


244.00 


19244 


176.22 


166.95 


5 




.68 


1060 


J/0 


374.70 


273.85 


215.76 


197.78 


187.37 


5 




.73 


1210 


3/4 


431.00 


314.90 


248.12 


227.44 


215.47 


5 




.78 


1370 


4/0 


501.30 


366.30 


288.61 


264.56 


250.63 


5 




.84 


1570 


250,000 


645.00 


471.40 


371.39 


340.44 


322.53 


6 


6 


.95 


2030 


300,000 


713.70 


521.55 


410.91 


376.67 


356.84 


6 


5 


1.00 


2270 


350.000 


803.00 


586.75 


462.30 


423.78 


401.47 


6 


5 


1.06 


2490 


400,000 


868.80 


634.90 


500.24 


458.56 


434.42 


6 


5 


1.10 


2720 


500,000 


1009.00 


737.40 


580.97 


532.56 


504.53 


6 


5 


1.19 


3160 


600,000 


1306.30 


954.60 


752.12 


689.44 


653.16 


7 


6 


1.33 


3980 


700,000 


1449.50 


1059.25 


834.55 


765.00 


724.74 


7 


6 


1.40 


4420 


750,000 


1526.10 


111545 


878.67 


805.44 


763.05 


7 


6 


1.43 


4620 


800,000 


1600.00 


1169.25 


921.21 


844.44 


800.00 


7 


6 


1.47 


4850 


900.000 


1743.60 


1274.15 


1003.88 


920.22 


871.79 


7 


6 


1.53 


5265 


1.000,000 


1898.30 


138745 


1092.97 


1001.89 


949.16 


7 


6 


1.59 


5690 


1.250,000 


2491.40 


1820.60 


1434.42 


1314.89 


1245.68 


8 


7 


1.79 


6890 


1,500,000 


2811.60 


2054.60 


1618.79 


1483.89 


1405.79 


8 


7 


1.91 


7875 


1,750,000 


3148.80 


2301.10 


1812.97 


1661.89 


1574.42 


8 


7 


2.02 


8890 


2.000,000 


3560.20 


2601.70 


2049.82 


1879.00 


1780.11 


8 


7 


2.13 


9850 



SOLID TWIN 



18» 
16* 


47.60 
52.30 


34.80 
3820 


27.40 
30.11 


25.12 
27.60 


23.80 
26.15 


2 
2 


2 
2 


.19x.33 
.20x.35 


145 
165 


14 
12 
10 


67.80 

99.M 

115.50 


49.50 
72.30 

84.10 


39.02 
56.98 
66.50 


35.77 
52.23 
60.96 


33.88 
49.48 
57.75 


3 
3 
3 


2 
3 
3 


.25x.44 
.30x.51 
.32x.55 


225 
360 
410 


8 
6 


164.40 
234.30 


120.10 
171.20 


94.62 
134.87 


86.74 
123.63 


82.17 
117.13 


4 
4 


3 
4 


.38x.66 
.47x.81 


640 
852 



• For 300 Volt Service. 



9822 



-234- 



Electrical 




Conductors 



RUBBER AND LEAD 30 PERCENT WIRES AND CABLES 

BUILDING WIRE— 600 VOLT 



Size 
A. W. G. 



List 
Price 



190 

LM 



■ 

wot. 

S199.99 
Lilt 



C 
$200 1» 

•4,999.99 
LM 



D 
15,000 

LM 



ftikbr 


III! 


hum- 


Apnx. 


Will 


Shut* 


0. D. 


Nit W|t 


64tta 


64lhi 


Inehd 


f«r 



STRANDED TWIN 




Price Per 1000 Feet 










14 


$76.70 


$56.00 


$44.15 


$40.47 


$38.34 


3 


2 


.25x .44 


225 


12 


111.30 


81.30 


64.07 


58.73 


55.64 


3 


3 


.30x .51 


360 


10 


130.70 


95.50 


75.23 


68.96 


65.33 


3 


3 


.32x .55 


410 


8 


184.40 


134.70 


106.15 


97.31 


92.19 


4 


3 


.38x .66 


540 


• 


254.70 


186.15 


146.65 


134.43 


127.36 


4 


4 


.47x .81 


852 


4 


315.20 


230.30 


181.44 


166.32 


157.57 


4 


4 


.52x .91 


1045 


2 


384.50 


281.00 


221.39 


202.94 


192.26 


4 


4 


.58x1.03 


1310 


1 


568.20 


415.25 


327.15 


299.89 


284.11 


5 


5 


.67x1.19 


1860 


1/0 


676.20 


494.15 


389.33 


356.89 


338.11 


6 


5 


.72x1.27 


2120 


2/0 


756.40 


552.75 


435.51 


399.22 


378.21 


5 


6 


.76x1.36 


2395 


3/0 


85040 


621.40 


489.58 


448.78 


425.16 


5 


5 


.81x1.47 


2730 


4/0 


992.00 


724.90 


571.15 


523.56 


496.00 


5 


6 


.87x1.58 


3120 



SOLID S CONDUCTOR 



18» 
16* 


102.30 
117.60 


74.75 
86.00 


58.91 
67.76 


54.00 
62.11 


51.16 
58.84 


2 
2 


3 
3 


.41 
.44 


315 
345 


14 
12 
10 


165.70 
190.90 
220.00 


121.11 
139.52 
160.80 


95.42 
109.93 
126.69 


87.47 
100.77 
116.13 


82.86 

95.46 

110.02 


3 
3 
3 


4 
4 
4 


.56 
.60 
.64 


500 
680 
770 


8 
6 


300.40 
381.80 


219.50 
279.00 


172.93 
219.81 


158.52 
201.49 


150.17 
190.88 


4 
4 


4 
5 


.77 
.92 


960 
1470 



STRANDED 3 CONDUCTOR 



14 


17640 


129.00 


101.64 


93.17 


88.27 


3 


4 


.56 


500 


12 


228.60 


167.08 


131.64 


120.66 


114.31 


3 


4 


.60 


680 


10 


242.20 


177.00 


138.45 


127.83 


121.11 


3 


4 


.64 


770 


8 


32440 


237.10 


186.81 


171.24 


162.23 


4 


4 


.77 


960 


6 


492.00 


359.55 


283.30 

• 


259.69 


246.02 


4 


5 


.92 


1470 


4 


535.60 


391.40 


308.38 


282.68 


267.80 


4 


5 


1.05 


1780 


2 


684.80 


500.45 


394.30 


361.44 


342.42 


4 


5 


1.16 


2240 


1 


971.80 


710.15 


559.52 


512.89 


485.89 


5 


6 


1.33 


2980 


1/0 


1091.00 


797.25 


628.12 


575.78 


545.47 


5 


6 


1.42 


3340 


2/0 


1224.60 


894.90 


705.09 


646.33 


612.32 


5 


6 


1.52 


3830 


3/0 


1372.80 


1003.25 


790.43 


724.56 


686.42 


5 


6 


1.63 


4370 


4/0 


1691.80 


1236.30 


974.06 


892.89 


845.89 


5 


7 


1.79 


5430 


250.000 


2075.20 


1516.45 


1194.78 


1095.22 


1037.58 


6 


7 


1.96 


6320 


300.000 


2327.80 


1701.10 


1340.24 


1228.56 


1163.89 


6 


7 


2.08 


7100 


350.000 


2612.40 


1909.10 


1504.12 


1378.78 


1306.21 


6 


7 


2.19 


7830 


400.000 


2971.20 


2171.25 


1710.67 


1568.11 


1485.58 


6 


8 


2.32 


9130 


500,000 


3449.70 


2520.90 


1986.18 


1820.67 


1724.84 


6 


8 


2.50 


10550 



• For 300 Volt Service. 



9822 



-2 35- 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 

USE QUANTTTY OR LIST PRICES TO DETERMINE VALUE OF ORDER 
OR INQUIRY. 

Rubber-Braid and Rubber-Lead wires may be combined to arrive at list value to 
determine prices. 

PRICES ARE F.O.B, DESTINATION any point in the United States, ports of 
entry Panama Canal, Hawaiian Islands and Alaska, on shipments of 100 lbs. or 
over, from manufacturer's factory or warehouse. Shipments of less than 100 lbs., 
F.O.B. point of shipment. No freight allowance. 

EXPRESS OR PARCEL POST SHIPMENTS F.O.B. POINT OF SHIPMENT. 

No freight allowance. 

INVOICE DATE shall be same as date of shipment. 

TERMS: Net cash last day of month following date of invoice. 2% cash dis- 
count if paid by the 10th of month following date of invoice. 

No cash discount will be allowed on payments made by trade acceptances, notes, 
securities, postdated checks, etc. 

Prices subject to change without notice. 

For sizes not listed, use the price of next larger sise. 

SHIPMENTS are priced on the basis of the Column covering the Quantity 
or List Value oteach single shipment, except that shipments against filed Specific 
Job Contracts (Form NOTT) are to be priced in accordance with the contract. 

SPECIFIC BUILDING JOB CONTRACTS. When the requirements of wire 
and cable on a specific building job amount to not less than $1,000 LIST, THE ELEC- 
TRICAL CONTRACTOR WHO HAS RECEIVED A DEFINITE SIGNED CON- 
TRACT FOR THE JOB, may be covered for the specified requirements for a period 
of six (6) months, in accordance with contract (Form No. 1) which will be provided. 

Each shipment shall be treated as a separate contract. If the Buyer fails to 
fulfill the terms of payment herein provided, or if the Buyer's financial responsi- 
bility becomes unsatisfactory to the Seller, the Seller may, without prejudice to 
any other lawful remedy, defer further shipments, or, at its option, terminate its 
own further obligations with respect to any outstanding commitments. 

REELS shall be paid for (net, no cash discount) at the same time as the 
material, and may be returned freight collect to destination specified by Seller. 
When reels are returned in good condition not later than twelve (12) months from 
date of shipment, full credit will be allowed. 



9832 



-236- 



Section 10 Page 5 
May 1, 1934 




RW-P-1~| 



AnacohdA 

Anaconda Wire & Cable Company 

General Offices; 25 Broadway, New York. 
Chicago Office; 20 No. Waeker Drive, 

DISCOUNT SHEET 

WHOLESALERS 
SERVICE DISCOUNTS 



Electrical 




Conductors 



RUBBER - BRAID FIXTURE WIRES 
RUBBER - BRAID BUILDING WIRES 

Code, Intermediate, 30% 

Applying to Sheet RW-T-27 dated May 1, 1934 

SHIPMENTS MADE BY MANUFACTURER 

1. TO WHOLESALER'S WAREHOUSE STOCK 

(priced in column applicable to quantity 

specified in each individual order) COLUMN "A" DISCOUNT 15% 

„..„ DISCOUNT 15% 

...... .:....'.' DISCOUNT 10% 

DISCOUNT 5% 



COLUMN "B" 
COLUMN "C" 
COLUMN "D" 



2. DIRECT TO CUSTOMER OF WHOLESALER 

(priced in column applicable to quantity 
specified in each individual order) 



..DISCOUNT 5% 



DIRECT TO CUSTOMER OF WHOLESALER AND APPLYING TO 
SPECIFIC BUILDING JOB CONTRACT (FORM No. 1) 

($200 LIST AND OVER, priced in column applicable 
to quantity specified in Contract; 

LESS THAN $200 LIST, priced in column applicable 
to quantity specified in each individual order) ... 



DISCOUNT 5% 



TERMS: Net cash last day of month following date of invoice. 2% cash discount if paid by the 
loth of month following date of invoice. 



This ia a new sheet — No previous issue. 

9822 



All discounts changed. 



-237- 



Anaconda Wire & Cable Company 

-£\^ General Offices; 25 Broadway, New York. 

15 tp- Chicago Office; 20 No. Wacker Drive. 



May 1, 1934 



PUBLISHED LIST 



RW -T- 27 



RUBBER COVERED CODE WIRES & CABLES 

BUILDING WIRE— €00 VOLT 




Site 
A.W.G. 



SOLID SINGLE BRAID 



wo 



I 



c 

Boot. 

M.W9.W 
I tot 



■ 
15.000 

lilt 
•a* *nt 




Will 
Mtta 



14 
II 

10 
8 
6 



4 

3 

2 

1 

1/0 



2/0 
8/0 
4/0 

250,000 
300.000 



17 JO 

21.50 
27 JO 
38.20 
57.20 



73.50 

88.00 

100.90 

146.00 

171.60 



200.40 
235.80 

288.20 
356.80 
405.30 



12.65 

15.76 
19.85 
27.95 
41.80 



53.70 

64.30 

73.75 

106.80 

125.40 



146.45 
172.30 
210.60 
260.80 
296.15 



9.88 
12.40 
15.64 
24.76 
32.93 



42.31 
50.65 
58.11 
84.12 
98.79 



115.39 
135.76 
165.94 
205.45 
233.33 



9.06 
11.37 
14.33 
22.69 
30.19 



38.79 
46.43 
53.26 
77.11 
90.56 



105.78 
124.44 
152.11 
188.33 
213.89 



14 


$10.50 


$7.70 


$6.06 


$5.56 


$5.26 


8 


.19 


26 


12 


14.50 


10.60 


8.36 


7.67 


7.26 


8 


Jl 


86 


10 


20.00 


14.60 


11.49 


10.53 


9.98 


8 


J8 


49 


8 


28.60 


20.90 


18.50 


16.96 


14.28 


4 


J8 


80 


•e 


41.60 


30.30 


26.36 


24.17 


20.74 








SOLID DO 


UBLE BR/ 


LID 















14 


14.70 


10.75 


8.46 


7.76 


7.35 


3 


.22 


89 


18 


18.00 


13.10 


10.33 


9.47 


8.97 


8 


.24 


88 


10 


23.60 


17.20 


13.56 


12.43 


11.78 


8 


.26 


64 


8 


33.70 


83.90 


21.20 


19.43 


16.37 


4 


.82 


86 


• 


60.00 


S&66 


28.79 


26.39 


25.00 


4 


.36 


120 


STRANDE 


D SINGLE 


BRAID 















14 


13.80 


10.05 


7.92 


7.26 


6.87 


8 


.19 


26 


18 


18.00 


13.10 


10.33 


9.47 


8.97 


8 


.21 


86 


10 


83J0 


17.35 


13.67 


12.53 


11.87 


8 


.23 


49 


8 


84.00 


24.90 


22.06 


20.22 


17.03 


4 


.80 


80 


DUPLEX 


SOLID 

















14 


89.00 


21.20 


16.70 


15.31 


14.51 


8 


.41 x .22 


62 


18 


87.00 


27.05 


81.38 


19.54 


18.52 


8 


.46 x .24 


82 


10 


47.80 


34.90 


27.49 


25.20 


23.87 


8 


.49 x JO 


114 


8 


66.50 


48.60 


43.01 


39.48 


33.25 


4 


.60 x .32 


174 


6 


102.50 


74.90 


59.02 


54.10 


51.25 


4 


.68 x .36 


286 


DUPLEX 


STRANDEI 


> 















14 


S2J0 


23.55 


18.56 


17.01 


16.12 


3 


.43 x .28 


64 


18 


41.60 


80.38 


23.94 


21.94 


20.79 


8 


.47 x J6 


84 


10 


53.50 


39.05 


30.76 


28.20 


26.72 


8 


.62 x J7 


124 


8 


76.40 


65.80 


49.44 


45.33 


38.18 


4 


.64 x .88 


186 


e 


111J0 


81.30 


64.04 


58.70 


55.61 


4 


.72 x .88 


296 


STRANDE 


D DOUBU 


i BRAID 
















350,000 
400,000 
500,000 
600,000 
700,000 



466.10 
505.70 
621.00 
768.70 
884.00 



340.60 
369.85 
453.85 
560.30 
646.00 



268.36 
291.15 
357.58 
441.46 
508.97 



246.00 
266.89 
327.78 
404.67 
466.56 



750,000 

800,000 

900,000 

1,000,000 



941.30 

988.00 

1108.40 

1227.20 



687.85 
722.00 
810.00 

89G.80 



541.94 j 
568.85 
638.18 
706.55 



1,250,000 
1,500,000 
1.750,000 
2.000.000 



1547.20 
1830.50 
2092.80 
2364.40 



1130.60 
1337.70 
1529.10 
1727.10 



890.79 
105 3.9 4 
1201.97 
1360.73 



496.78 
521.44 
585.00 
047.67 
816.56 
966.11 
1104.56 
1217.33 



4400 
6240 
6060 
6S90 



See Page 4 for General Instructions; Fixture Wire^ :tml Colors. 'Do not bear Underwriter's I.abela. 
Canceling T l-A-26 Sept 1, 1933 Bulletin 1> 101-5, Apr. 15, l4n & all previous Bldg. Wire Pollclei 



9822 



-238- 



Electrical 




OTE; Conductors 



RUBBER COVERED INTERMEDIATE WiRES AND CABLES 



BUILDING WIRE— 600 VOLT 



Size 
A. W. G. 



List 
I'rice 



* 

IMI t>» 

ISO 
Lfct 



ISO t» 

H99.99 

Lilt 



C 

1200 t» 

14,999 59 

List 



D 
15.000 

Lilt 
ind Ovtr 



RikWr 


Altroi 


Aliru 


Wall 


0. 


■ft Wft 


6-lthi 


Inchu 


r 1 1 u 



SOLID 8INGLE BRAID 



14 
12 
10 

8 



$12.00 
16.60 
22.00 
30.80 



$8.80 
12.15 
16.10 
22.55 



$11.93 
9.56 I 
12.60 | 
17.76 



$6.36 

8.77 

11.63 

16.28 



$6.02 

8.31 

11.02 

15.42 



3 


.19 j 


3 


.21 


3 


.23 


4 


28 



26 
35 
49 
80 



SOLID DOUBLE BRAID 










14 


16.00 


11.70 


S.23 


8.46 


8.01 


3 


12 


20.00 


14.65 


11.53 


10.57 


10.01 


3 


10 


25.50 


18.60 


14.65 


13.43 


12.73 


3 


8 


36.10 


26.40 


20.81 


19.08 


18.07 


4 


6 


54.20 


39.60 


31.19 


28.59 


27.08 


1 




STRANDED SINGLE BRAID 














14 


15.30 


11.15 


8.79 


8.06 


7.63 


3 


.19 


20 


12 


19.80 


14.50 


11.42 


10.47 


9.92 


3 


.21 


35 


10 


26.00 


19.00 


14.98 


13.73 


13.01 


3 


.23 


49 


8 


36.00 


26.30 


20.70 


18.98 


17.98 


4 


.00 


80 



DUPLEX SOLID 












14 


31.70 


23.15 


18.23 


16.71 


15.83 




13 


40.00 


29.30 


23.07 


21.14 


20.03 




10 


52.10 


38.10 


30.00 


27.50 


26.05 




8 


7S.90 


54.00 


42.55 


39.00 


36.95 




6 


111.20 


81.30 


64.04 


58.70 


55.61 





3 


.41x.22 


62 


3 


.45 x .24 


82 


3 


.49 x .26 


114 


4 


.00 x .32 


174 


4 


.08 >: .36 


285 



DUPLEX STRANDED 














14 


34.50 


25.20 


19.87 


18.21 


17.25 


3 


.43 x .23 


61 


12 


45.50 


33.30 


26.23 


24.04 


22.78 


3 


.47 x .25 


84 


10 


58.00 


42.35 


33.38 


30.00 


28.99 


3 


.52 x .27 


124 


8 


80.10 


58.55 


46.15 


42.30 


40.07 


4 


.04 \ .33 


180 


6 


121.30 


88.60 


69.82 


64.00 


60.63 


4 


.72 x .38 


295 



STRANDED DOUBLE BRAID 














14 


18.30 


13.35 


10.53 


9.66 


9.15 


3 


.23 


30 


12 


23.20 


17.00 


13.38 


12.27 


11.62 


3 


.25 


40 





29.50 


21.50 


16.94 


15.53 


14.72 


3 


.27 


66 


8 


40.30 


29.45 


23.21 


21.28 


20.16 


4 


.33 


90 


S 


59.90 


43.75 


34.46 


31.59 


29.93 


4 


.38 


126 


4 


77.30 


56.50 


44.50 


40.79 


38.64 


4 


.45 


190 


2 


106.40 


77.75 


61.27 


56.17 


53.21 


4 


.51 


278 


1 


155.60 


113.70 


89.57 


82.11 


77.79 





.59 


304 


1/0 


177.30 


129.55 


102.06 


93.56 


88.63 


5 


.03 


443 


2/0 


211.80 


154.75 


121.94 


111.78 


105.89 


5 


.07 


540 


3/0 


245.30 


179.25 


141.21 


129.44 


122.63 


5 


.73 


003 


4/0 


299.60 


218.90 


172.48 


158.11 


149.79 


5 


.78 


814 


250,000 


364.40 


266.30 


209.82 


192.33 


182.21 


6 


.86 


902 


300.000 


418.50 


305.85 


240.97 


220.89 


209.26 





.92 


1139 


350.000 


475.60 


347.55 


273.82 


251.00 


237.79 


6 


.97 


1300 


400,000 


524.60 


383.40 


302.06 


276.89 


262.32 





1.02 


1473 


500,000 


643.80 


470.45 


370.67 


339.78 


321.89 





1.10 


1815 


600,000 


785.70 


574.15 


452.36 


414.67 


392.84 


7 


1.21 


2177 


700,000 


906.70 


662.60 


522.06 


478.56 


453.37 


7 


1.28 


2512 


750,000 


958.30 


700.30 


551.76 


505.78 


479.16 


7 


1.32 


2073 


800,000 


1008.80 


737.25 


580.85 


532.44 


501.42 


7 


1.35 


2848 


900.000 


1140.60 


833.55 


656.73 


602.00 


570.32 


7 


1.41 


3194 


1,000.000 


1255.60 


917.55 


722.91 


662.67 


627.79 


7 


1.47 


3530 


1,250,000 


1577.50 


1152.75 


908.24 


832.56 


788.74 


8 


1.64 


4400 


1,500,000 


1860.80 


1359.85 


1071.39 


982.11 


930.42 


8 


1.70 


5240 


1,750,000 


2140.20 


1564.00 


1232.24 


1129.56 


1070.11 


8 


1.88 


0000 


2.000000 


2422.00 


1770.00 


1394.54 


1278.33 


1211.05 


8 


1.09 


osno 



■932T 



-239- 



Electi-ical 




Conductors 



RUBBER COVERED 30 PERCENT WIRES AND CABLES 

BUILDING WIRE— 600 VOLT 



Size 
A. W. G. 



Lilt 
Price 



Imthu 
$50 



I I C 

ISO a 1200 t» 

»1»9.99 H.999.99 

lut IM 




15.000 

Lilt 
•>< tm 



ttM«r 

Wall 

64t»l 



• k. 

ImMc 



Hrt 



SOLID SINGLE BRAID 



14 


$13.20 


$9.65 


$7. :.9 


$6.96 


$6.59 


3 


.19 


26 


IS 


18.50 


13.30 


10.66 


9.77 


9.25 


3 


.21 


35 


11 


24.00 


17.50 


13.78 


12.63 


11.97 


3 


J23 


49 


8 


34.00 


24.90 


19.61 


17.98 


17.03 


4 


.28 


80 



SOLID DOUBLE BRAID 



14 


16.60 


12.10 


9.55 


8.76 


8.29 


3 


.22 


29 


12 


22.30 


16.30 


12.84 


11.77 


11.15 


3 


.24 


88 


U 


28.30 


20.70 


16.29 


14.93 


14.15 


3 


.26 


64 


8 


39.00 


28.50 


22.45 


20.58 


19.49 


4 


.32 


85 


6 


59.90 


43.75 


34.46 


31.59 


29.93 


4 


.30 


120 



STRANDED SINGLE BRAID 



14 


16.40 


12.00 


9.44 


8.06 


8.20 


3 


.19 


26 


u 


21.70 


15.90 


12.51 


11.47 


10.86 


3 


.21 


86 


10 


28.30 


20.70 


16.29 


14.93 


14.15 


3 


.23 


49 


8 


33.20 


27.95 


22.01 


20.18 


19.12 


4 


.30 


80 



DUPLEX SOLID 
















14 


33.70 


24.65 


19.13 


17.81 


16.87 


3 


.41 x .22 


62 


12 


43.30 


31.65 


24.92 


22.84 


21.64 


3 


.45 x .24 


82 


10 56.30 


41.10 


32.40 


29.70 


28.14 


3 


.49 x .26 


114 


8 82.20 


60.10 


47.35 


43.40 


11.12 


4 


.60 x .32 


174 « 


6 I 119.00 


86.95 


68.51 


62.80 


59.49 


4 


.68 x .36 


285 



DUPLEX 


STRANDED 














14 


38.00 


27.70 


21.83 


20.01 


18.96 


3 


.43 x .23 


64 


12 


49.70 


36.35 


28.63 


26.24 


24.85 


3 


.47 x .26 


84 


10 


61.20 


44.70 


35.24 


32.30 


30.60 


3 


.52 x .27 


124 


8 


83.70 


61.20 


48.22 


44.20 


41.87 


4 


.64 x .33 


186 


6 


130.00 


95.00 


74.84 


68.60 


64.99 


4 


.72 x .38 


296 



STRANDED DO' T BLE BRAID 



14 


19.80 


14.50 


11.41 


10.46 


9.91 


3 


.23 


30 


12 


25.10 


18.35 


14.47 


13.27 


12.57 


3 


.26 


40 


10 


32.00 


23.45 


18.47 


16.93 


16.04 


3 


.27 


66 


8 


42.40 


31.00 


24.41 


22.38 


21.20 


4 


.33 


90 


6 


65.70 


48.05 


37.84 


34.69 


32.86 


4 


.38 


126 


4 


81.50 


59.00 


46.90 


42.99 


40.73 


4 


.45 


190 


2 


110.40 


80.70 


"63.56 


58.27 


55.20 


4 


.51 


278 


1 


163.20 


119.25 


93.94 


86.11 


31.58 


5 


.59 


864 


1/0 


194.30 


142.00 


111.88 


102.56 


97.16 


5 


.63 


443 


2/0 


219.40 


160.30 


126.30 


115.78 


109.68 


5 


.67 


640 


3/0 


252.80 


181.75 


145.57 


133.44 


126.42 


5 


.73 


sea 


4/0 


314.70 


230.00 


181.21 


166.11 


157.37 


5 


.78 


814 


250.000 


370.00 


270.45 


213.09 


195.33 


185.05 


6 


.86 


962 


300,000 


422.30 


308.60 


243.15 


222.89 


211.16 


6 


.92 


1139 


350.000 


492.60 


360.00 


283.64 


260.00 


246.32 


6 


.97 


1300 


400,000 


537.90 


393.10 


309.70 


283.89 


268.95 


6 


1.02 


1478 


500,000 


662.70 


484.30 


381.58 


349.78 


331.37 


6 


1.10 


1816 


600.000 


810.30 


592.15 


466.55 


427.67 


405.16 


7 


1.21 


2177 


700.000 


929.50 


679.25 


535.15 


490.56 


464.74 


7 


1.28 


2512 


750,000 


981.00 


716.90 


564.85 


517.78 


490.53 


7 


1.32 


2673 


800.000 


1043.00 


762.15 


600.48 


550.44 


521.47 


7 


1.85 


2848 


900.000 


1165.30 


851.55 


670.91 


615.00 


582.63 


7 


1.41 


8194 


1,000,000 


1286.00 


939.70 


740.36 


678.67 


642.95 


7 


1.47 


8680 


1,250.000 


1619.20 


1183.25 


932.24 


854.56 


809.58 


8 


1.64 


4400 


1.500.000 


1910.00 


1395.85 


1099.76 


1008.11 


955.05 


8 


1.76 


6240 


1,750,000 


2195.20 


1604.15 


1263.88 


1158.56 


1097.58 


8 


1.88 


60to 


2.000 000 


2481.60 


1S15.70 


1430.54 


1311.33 


1242.32 


8 


1.98 


6890 



See Paee 4 for General Instructions; Fixture Wires and Colors. 



9822 



-240- 



RUBBER COVERED FIXTURE WIRES 300 volt 



(In 

A.W.8. 



III. 

IM. 



Lilt 
rrlM 



A 

Inittti 

150 

Lilt 



I 

$50 tt 

U99.99 

Lilt 



C 

1200 tl 

J4.999 99 

Lilt 



D 
J5.000 
Hit and 

Qvir 



Appm. 
0. 0. 
Inchci 



AllTM. 

Nt. W|t 



SOLID 






CODE GRADE 










20* 


1/64" 


$5.70 


$4.15 


$3.26 


$2.99 


$2.83 


.09 


6 


20« 


1/32 


7.20 


5.25 


4.13 


3.79 


3.59 


.12 


10 


18 


1/64 


7.10 


5.15 


4.07 


3.73 


3.54 


.11 


9 


18 


1/32 


8.00 


6.85 


4.62 


4.23 


4.01 


.13 


12 


16* 


1/64 


7.60 


5.55 


4.37 


4.01 


3.80 


.12 


12 


16 


1/32 


8.90 


6.50 


5.14 


4.71 


4.46 


.14 


16 



STRANDED 




CODE GRADE 










20* 


1/64 


7.20 


5.25 


4.13 


3.79 


3.59 


.09 


6 


20* 


1/32 


8.00 


5.80 


4.57 


4.19 


3.97 


.12 


10 


18 


1/64 


8.00 


5.85 


4.62 


4.23 


4.01 


.11 


9 


18 


1/32 


8.60 


6.30 


4.94 


4.53 


4.29 


.13 


12 


16* 


1/64 


8.90 


6.50 


5.14 


4.71 


4.46 


.12 


12 


16 


1/32 


10.00 


7.35 


5.79 


5.31 


5.03 


.14 


16 



SOLID 



INTERMEDIATE GRADE 



18 
18 
16 



1/64 
1/32 
1/82 



7.60 
8.60 
9.50 



5.60 
6.30 
6.95 



4.40 
4.94 
5.47 



4.03 
4.53 
5.01 



3.82 
4.29 
4.75 



.11 
.13 
.14 



9 
12 
1G 



SOLID 



30% GRADE 



18 
18 
16 



1/64 
1/82 
1/82 



8.20 

9.30 

10.50 



6.00 
6.85 
7.65 



4.73 
5.38 
6.01 



4.33 
4.93 
5.51 



4.11 
4.67 
5.22 



.11 
.13 
.14 



9 

12 
16 



•Do not bear Underwriters' Labels 

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 
USE LIST PRICES TO DETERMINE VALUE OF ORDER OR INQUIRY. 

PRICES ARE F.O.B. DESTINATION any point in the United States, Panama Canal, Puerto 
Rico, Hawaiian Islands, on shipments of 100 lbs. or over, from manufacturer's factory or ware- 
house. Shipments of less than 100 lbs., F.O.B. point shipment. No freight allowance. 

EXPRESS OR PARCEL POST SHIPMENTS F.O.B. POINT OF SHIPMENT, 
allowance. 



No freight 



INVOICE DATE shall be same as date of shipment. 



TERMS: Net last day of month following date of invoice. 2% cash discount if paid by the 
10th of month following date of invoice. 

No cash discount will be allowed on payments made by trade acceptance, notes, securities, 
postdated checks, etc. 

Prices subject to change without notice. 

For sizes not listed, use the price of next larger size. 

SHIPMENTS are priced on the basis of the Column covering the List Value of each single 
shipment, except that shipments against filed Specific Job Contracts (Form No. 1) are to be 
priced in accordance with the contract. 

COLORS: Sizes No. 20 A.W.G. to No. 6 A.W.G. inclusive, regularly furnished in the following 
colors: BLACK, WHITE, RED, BLUE, GREEN, YELLOW; colors other than those mentioned, 
quantity price plus 10%. Sizes larger than No. 6 A.W.G. regularly furnished in Black; colors 
Red or White available at quantity price plus 5%; all other colors, quantity price plus 10"^. 

FOR CONVENIENCE IN RETAILING: Wire in sizes No. 18 A.W.G. to No. 6 A.W.G. will 
be furnished in lengths and at additional charges per thousand feet as noted: 2r>(v lengths - 10c; 
100' lengths -2f> v ; 60' lengths- 40* ; 25' lengths -00*. 

SPECIFIC BUILDING JOB CONTRACTS. When the requirements of wire :iml cable on a 
specific building job amount to not less than $2,000 LIST, the electrical contractor who has received 
a definite signed contract for the job, may be covered for the specified requirements for a period 
of six (6) months, in accordance with contract (Form No. 1) which will be provided. 

Each shipment shall be treated as a separate contract. If the Buyer fails to fulfill the terms 
of payment herein provided, or if the Buyer's financial responsibility becomes unsatisfactory to 
the Seller, the Seller may, without prejudice to any other lawful remedy, defer further ship- 
ments, or, at its option, terminate its own further obligations with respect to any outstanding 
commitments. 

REELS shall be paid for at the -ame time as the material, and may he returned froipht 
collect to destination specified by Seller. When reels are returned in good condition not later 
than twelve (12) months from date of shipment, full credit will be allowed. 



9822 



-241- 



APP. A, PAST I, 
SECTIOI? B III 



SAMPLE PRICE FILINGS 
Illustrating 
SECOND MAJOR CHANGE III PRICE STRUCTURE 
EFFECTIVE JULY 5, 1934 



9822 



-242- 



>tctnn\ II t'»m '' 
July 5. I«*.U 



* 



w* 




Ana£ondA 

WW 



RWL-D-3 



Anaconda Wire & Cable Company 

General Office*; 25 Broadway, New York. 
Chicago Office; 20 INo. W acker Drive. 

DISCOUNT SHEET 

WHOLESALERS 
SERVICE DISCOUNTS 



Electrical 




Conductor* 



RUBBER - LEAD BUILDING WIRES 
RUBBER - LEAD FIXTURE WIRES 

Code Intermediate 30', 
Appbin* to Sheet RWL-T-27 dated July 5. 19S4 

SHIPMENTS MADE BY MANUFACTURER 

1. TO WHOLESALER'S WAREHOUSE STUCK 

(priced in column applicable to quantity 

specified in each individual order) Column "\" Discount 17>j% 

Column "B" Discount 17t'i% 

Column "C" Discount 12V t % 

Column "IV Discount 1Y t % 



•2. DIRECT TO CUSTOMER OF WHOLESALER 

(priced in column applicable to quantity 
specified in each individual order) 



Discount 5% 



•3. DIRKCT TO CUSTOMER OK WHOLESALER AND APPLYING TO 
SPECIFIC HI 1I.IMNC. JOB CONTRACT (FORM No. 1) 
($200 LIST AND OVER, priced 
in column applicable to quantity 
specified in Contract; Discount 

LESS THAN $200 LIST, priced 
in column applicable to quantity 
specified in each individual order) 



TERMS: Net cash last day of month following date of in\oicc. 2<*r cash 
15th of month following daie of invoice. 

INVOICE DATE shall be same as date of shipment. 



Canceling RWL D) Section 11 Page 9 July 5. HJ4 



9822 




-243- 




AnaAidA 1~* wi - - T - 27 1 

L ^ r July 5, 1934 

Anaconda Wire & Cable Company 

General Office*; 25 Broadway, New York. 
Chicago Office t 20 No, Wacker Drive. 

PRICE SHEET 



RUBBER — LEAD 



Conductor* 




BUILDING WIRES 

CODE, INTERMEDIATE, 30% 

600 Volt* 
S*Ud or Stranded, Single or Multiple Conductor* 



FIXTURE WIRES 

CODE, INTERMEDIATE, 30% 

300 Volt* 

Solid or Stranded 



I iim-rlinK KWI.-T-2B, St-rlimi II i'.iv, - I In ^ M;i> I. I Ml. 

t 



9822 



-244- 



Ekctrfeal fSAEOCOTE) CosdMton 

RUBBER AND LEAD CODE WIRES AND CABLES 
BUILDING WIRE— 600 VOLT 




SIZE 
A. W.6. 


LIST 
PRICE 


•ooKia 

PACK**! 
• UU 

n THtn >M* 


Mm4w4 PMtttt «M«tlth«-500' (MM tr tntC 

to taOOM I 15,000 
QUtt.9* pJ4.»9 9* 1) utTto 
D HIT ■ lilt I* 0»M 


HUMtft 
WALL 

MTtt* 


LIAO 
■M1ATM 


tmoi. 

a*. 

menu 


AMROJL 

HIT W«T. 

KB M' 




SOLID SIN< 




18» 
16* 
14 
11 


888.28 

30.84 
87.88 
44.46 


$80.12 
81.04 
86.05 

31.63 


$15.85 
17.88 
31.34 
34.93 


$14.95 
16.30 
80.03 
83.50 


$14.14 
15.48 
18.04 
23.33 


8 

8 
3 
3 




.10 
M 
M 

J7 


98 
100 
136 
168 




10 
8 
S 
4 


67.58 

92.16 

184.06 

158.16 


48.05 
65.57 
05.38 

112.54 


37.85 
51.66 
75.15 
88.67 


35.60 

48.71 
70.86 
83.60 


33.76 
46.08 
67.03 
70.08 


3 
4 
4 
4 




.38 
.88 
.47 
.58 


840 

no 

$10 

CM 




Strand] ib 


CKi 




14 
11 

10 

8 
6 


48.18 

40.70 

76.80 

101.58 

145.34 


80.07 

35.37 
53J18 
78.38 

103.42 


83.61 
37.87 
43.23 

56.95 
81.48 


22.26 
36J7 
30.81 
53.60 

76.82 


21.06 
34.85 

87.65 
50.79 
73.67 


3 
3 
3 
4 
4 




.25 
J7 
.38 

.88 

.47 


185 
1S8 
860 
800 
$80 




4 

8 

1 
1/0 
2/0 


171.00 
811.10 
263.56 
888.46 
363.46 


123.31 
130.47 
174.14 
313.71 
240.14 


96.36 
118.34 
147.76 
181.33 
203.76 


90.86 
111.58 
130.31 
170.97 
192.11 


85.05 
105.55 
131.78 
161.73 
181.73 


4 

4 
5 
5 
5 




.68 
.68 
.64 
.68 
.73 


680 

770 

10W 
1810 




3/0 

4/0 
250,000 
300.000 
350.000 


421.18 
493.40 
643.02 
717.40 
793.52 


278.29 
326.00 
396.53 
442.40 

489.33 


236.12 
276.61 
360.48 
402.18 
444.85 


222.63 
260.80 
339.89 
379.20 
419.43 


210.59 
246.70 
321.51 
358.70 
396.76 


5 
5 
6 
6 
6 


6 

5 


.78 

.84 

.95 

1.00 

1.06 


1370 
1570 
8030 
2870 
2490 




400,000 
500.000 
600,000 
700.000 
750,000 


861.18 
1005.18 
1304.64 
1441.94 
1507.02 


531.07 
619.87 
804.53 
889.20 
929.33 


482.79 
563.52 
731.39 
808.36 
844.85 


455.20 
531.31 
689.60 
762.17 
796.57 


430.59 
502.59 
652.32 
720.97 
753.51 


6 
6 

7 
7 
7 


5 
5 
6 
6 
6 


1.10 
1.19 
1.33 
1.40 
1.43 


2720 
3160 
3980 
4420 
4620 




800.000 

900.000 

1.000.000 

1.250,000 


1580.98 
1720.64 
1873.72 
2426.38 


914.00 j 886.30 

994.75 964.61 

1083.25 1050.42 

1402.75 1360.24 


835.66 

909.49 

990.40 

1282.51 


790.49 

860.32 

936.86 

1213.19 


. 7 
7 

7 
8 


6 
6 
6 

7 


1.47 
1.53 
1.69 
1.79 


4860 
5265 
5690 
6890 




1,500.000 
1,750.000 
2.000,000 


2761.08 
3105.52 
3506.60 


1596.25 1547.88 
1795.38 1740.97 
2027.25 1 1965.82 


1459.43 
1641.49 
1833.49 


1380.54 
1552.76 
1753.30 


8 
8 
8 


7 
7 
7 


1.91 
2.02 
2.13 


7876 
8890 
9860 




SOLID TV 


flN 
















18* 46.16 32.8.". j 2.VS8 
16* 50.60 i 36.00 ; 28.36 
14 62.44 | 44.43 1 3.-..01 
12 93.28 1 66.37 | .".2.29 


24.10 
26.74 
33.01 
49.30 


23.08 
25.30 
31.22 
46.64 


2 
2 
3 

s 


2 
2 
2 
3 


.19x.S3 
.20x.35 
.25x.44 
.80x.51 


145 
165 
225 
360 




10 110.64 | 7S.72 62.02 
8 ! 1.-.5.22 110.13 87.02 
6 ; 221.62 159.83 125.93 
4 | 278.12 | 197.89 : 153.92 


.".8.18 

S2.03 

118.73 

117.01 


55.32 

77.61 
112.31 
139.06 


3 
4 
4 
4 


3 
3 
4 
4 


.32x.55 
.3Sx.66 
.47x.81 
.52x91 


410 

640 

852 

1045 




* For 300 Volt Service. 


















9822 



-246- 



Electrical 




Conductors 



:l ' : »J.UiKj_J : «»« , 



RUBBER AND LEAD CODE WIRES A^ CABLES 

BUILDING WIRE— 600 VOLT 



SIZE 


LIST 


HOKIN 


I St«n tlri PMtlfl flmtlt In-SOO 1 ( C*fl> » ImIi) 


RUBBER 


LEAD 


APPROX. 


APPROX. 


PACKASt 


TO $200 to 1 $5,000 


WALL 


SHEATH 


0.0. 


NET WST. 


A. W. G. 


PRICE 


1 LIU 

l\ THAN Sod' 


D $199.99 P $4,999.99 II list and 

B LUT |U LUT 1 H OVIN 


C4THS 


C4TM« 


INCHES 


PER M' 















STRANDED TWIN 




Price Per 1000 Feet 










14 


$70.66 


$50.28 


$39.61 


$37.35 


$35.33 


3 


2 


2hx .44 


226 


12 


103.78 


73.85 


58.18 


54.86 


51.89 


3 


3 


.30x .51 


360 


10 


126.20 


89.80 


70.75 


66.71 


63.10 


3 


3 


.32x .55 


410 


8 


174.04 


123.83 


97.56 


91.99 


87.02 


4 


8 


.38x .66 


640 


6 


247.22 


175.91 


138.59 


130.67 


123.61 


4 


4 


.47x .81 


862 


4 


305.56 


217.42 


171.30 


161.51 


152.78 


4 


4 


.52x .91 


1046 


2 


390.26 


257.86 


218.79 


206.29 


195.13 


4 


4 


.58x1.03 


1310 


1 


552.44 


365.00 


309.70 


292.00 


276.22 


5 


5 


.67x1.19 


1860 


1/0 


653.62 


431.86 


366.42 


345.49 


326.81 


5 


6 


.72x1.27 


2120 


2/0 


743.78 


491.43 


416.97 


393.14 


371.89 


5 


5 


.76x1.36 


2396 


3/0 


836.32 


552.57 


468.85 


442.06 


418.16 


5 


5 


.81x1.47 


2730 


4/0 


979.90 


647.43 


549.33 


517.94 


489.95 


5 


5 


.87x1.68 


3120 



SOLID 3 


CONDUCTOR 
















18* 


100.60 


71.58 


56.40 


53.18 


50.30 


2 


8 


.41 


316 


16* 


115.80 


82.40 


64.92 


61.21 


57.90 


2 


3 


.44 


345 


14 


160.48 


114.18 


89.96 


84.82 


80.24 


3 


4 


.56 


600 


12 


184.22 131.08 


103.27 


97.37 


92.11 


3 


4 


.60 


€80 


10 


214.70 


152.77 


120.36 


113.49 


107.35 


3 


4 


.64 


770 


8 


277.84 


197.69 


155.76 


146.86 


138.92 


4 


4 


.77 


960 


6 


369.12 


262.65 


206.93 


195.11 


184.56 


-4 


5 


.92 


1470 


4 


485.28 | 345.29 


272.05 


256.50 


242.64 


4 


5 


1.03 


1780 



STRANDED 3 CONDUCTOR 



14 


173.42 


123.40 


97.22 


91.67 


86.71 


3 


4 


.66 


600 


12 


200.76 


142.85 


112.55 


106.11 


100.38 


3 


4 


.60 


680 


10 


239.24 


170.23 


134.12 


126.46 


119.62 


3 


4 


.64 


770 


8 


307.48 


218.78 


172.38 


162.53 


153.74 


4 


4 


.77 


960 


6 


404.74 


287.98 


226.90 


213.93 


202.37 


4 


6 


.92 


1470 


4 


528.48 


376.03 


296.27 


279.34 


264.24 


4 


5 


1.03 


1780 


2 


671.82 


443.89 


376.63 


355.11 


335.91 


4 


6 


1.16 


2240 


1 


943.56 


623.43 


528.97 


498.74 


471.78 


5 


6 


1.33 


2980 


1/0 


1067.84 


705.54 


598.64 


564.43 


533.92 


5 


6 


1.42 


3340 


2/0 


1209.08 


798.86 


677.82 


639.09 


604.54 


5 


6 


1.52 


383# 


3/0 


1363.24 


900.71 


764.24 


720.57 


681.62 


5 


6 


1.63 


4370 


4/0 


, 1673.30 


1105.57 


938.06 


884.46 


836.65 


5 


7 


1.79 


6430 


2.->0.000 


2065.08 


1273.47 


1157.70 


1091.54 


1032.54 


6 


7 


1.96 


6320 


300,000 


i 2349.84 


1449.07 


1317.33 


1242.06 


1174.92 


6 


7 


2.08 


.7100 


350,000 


1 2609.08 


1608.93 


1462.67 


1379.09 


1304.54 


6 


7 


2.19 


7830 


400,000 


! 2965.84 


1828.93 


1662.67 


1567.66 


1482.92 


6 


8 


2.32 


9130 


500,000 


1 3433.94 


2117.60 


1925.09 


1815.09 


1716.97 


6 


8 


2.50 


10550 



• For 300 Volt Service. 



9822 



J4b- 



Electrical 




I Condurtori 



RUBBER AND LEAD INTERMEDIATE WIRES AND CABLES 



BUILDING \V IKK— 600 VOLT 



SIZE 

A. W. G. 



LIST 
PRICE 



BROKEN 
PACKAGE 

A LESS 
THAN 500 



Standi d Paekafl- Quant ill. I 300 (Coil, or Refill 
TO S20C to 5 i0 

BJ1 ) ')J p S4.999 99 1] LIST AND 

LIST U LIST II 0*E« 



RUBBER 
WALL 

Mihi 



LEAD 

SHEATH 

64IH9 



APPROX. 
O. O 

INCHES 



APPROX. 
NET WOT. 
PER M 



SOLID SINGLE CONDUCTOR 



I'rice Per 1800 Feet 



18* 


$29.36 


$20.89 


$16.46 


$15.52 


$14.68 


2 


2 


.19 


92 


16* 


32.00 


22.77 


17.94 


16.91 


16.00 


2 


2 


.20 


100 


14 


39.64 


28.26 


22.22 


20.95 


19.82 


3 


2 


.26 


135 


12 


46.98 


33.43 


26.34 


24.83 


23.49 


3 


2 


.27 


153 


10 


70.,<4 


50.15 


39.52 


37.26 


35.24 


3 


8 


.32 


260 


8 


96.26 


68.49 


53.96 


50.88 


48.13 


4 


3 


.38 


820 


6 


138.66 


98.66 


77.73 


73.29 


69.33 


4 


4 


.47 


620 



STRANDED SINGLE CONDUCTOR 



14 


43.98 


31.29 


24.65 


23.25 


21.99 


3 


2 


.26 


186 


12 


52.44 


37.31 


29.39 


27.71 


26.22 


3 


2 


.27 


168 


10 


78.40 


55.78 


43.95 


41.44 


39.20 


3 


3 


.32 


260 


8 


105.76 


75.25 


59.28 


55.90 


52.88 


4 


8 


.38 


320 


6 


149.82 


106.60 


83.99 


79.19 


74.91 


4 


4 


.47 


620 


4 


176.86 


125.85 


99.15 


93.49 


88.43 


4 




.62 


620 


2 


216.54 


143.07 


121.39 


114.46 


108.27 


4 




.58 


770 


1 


270.56 


178.76 


151.67 


143.01 


135.28 


6 




.64 


930 


1/0 


331.40 


218.96 


185.78 


175.17 


165.70 


5 




.68 


1060 


2/0 


372.56 


246.16 


208.86 


196.93 


186.28 


5 




.78 


1210 


3/0 


431.28 


284.96 


241.78 


227.97 


215.64 


5 




.78 


1370 


4/0 


505.14 


333.76 


283.19 


267.01 


252.57 


5 




.84 


1670 


250,000 


657.64 


405.55 


368.68 


317.61 


328.82 


6 


5 


.95 


2030 


300.000 


732.90 


451.96 


410.87 


387.39 


366.45 


6 


5 


1.00 


2270 


350.000 


810.62 


499.88 


451.11 


128.47 


405.31 


6 


5 


1.06 


2490 


400.000 


878.94 


542.01 


492.74 


464.58 


439.17 


6 


5 


1.10 


2720 


500,000 


1024.54 


631.80 


571.36 


541.54 


512.27 


6 


6 


1.19 


3160 


600.000 


1327.04 


818.35 


743.95 


701.14 


6ti 3.52 


7 


6 


1.33 


3980 


700,000 


1167.64 


905.01 


822.76 


775.75 


733.82 


7 


6 


1.40 


4420 


750.000 


1537.92 


918.39 


862.17 


812.90 


768.96 


7 


6 


1.43 


4620 


800.000 


1615.26 


933.83 


905.53 


853.78 


807.63 


7 


6 


1.47 


4850 


900.000 


1759.26 


1017.08 


986.25 


929.90 


879.63 


7 


6 


1.58 


5266 


1,000,000 


1915.12 


1107.35 


1073.79 


1012.43 


957.71 


7 


6 


1.59 


6690 


1.2.-,0,000 


2189.12 


1139.20 


1395.59 


1315.84 


1211.71 


. 8 


7 


1.79 


6890 


1,500.000 


! 2830.70 


1636.50 


1586.91 


1496.23 


1415.35 


8 


7 


1.91 


7875 


1.750,000 


3181.30 


1839.19 


1783.45 


1681.51 


1590.65 


8 


7 


2.02 


8890 


2.000.000 


3588.98 


2071.88 


2012.00 


1897.03 


1794.49 


8 


7 


2.13 


9850 



SOLID TWIN 



18* 


1 48.28 


34.35 : 


27.07 


25.52 ; 


21.14 


2 


2 


.19x.33 


145 


16* 


."..•..18 


37.8.-. 


29.82 


28.11 


26.59 


2 


2 


.20x.35 


165 


14 


I 66.10 


47.03 


37.05 


34.94 


33.05 


3 


2 


.25x.44 


226 


12 


98.20 


69.88 


55.03 


51.91 


19.10 


3 


3 


.30x.51 


360 


10 


116.58 


82.95 


C.5.36 


61.62 


58.29 


3 


3 


.32x.55 


410 


8 


163.14 


116.29 


91 .62 


86.39 


81.72 


4 


3 


.38x.66 


540 


6 


233.8.S 


166.12 


131.12 


12.5.62 


116.94 


4 


4 


•47.X.S1 


852 



• For 300 Volt Service. 






-247- 



Electrical 




Conductors 



.mu.'jja, 



RUBBER AND LEAD INTERMEDIATE WIRES AND CABLES 



BUILDING WIRE— 600 VOLT 



SIZE 
A.W. G. 



LIST 

PRICE 



■KOKIN 
■MCKMI 

TNtNSOo' 



SUn<i-4 rKki|t Qiutltln-SOCV (CtUi « Hull) 
TO $200 ti | $5,000 

B $199.99 |» $4,999.99 tl lii 
urr |W liit I" < 



JIT AND 

oven 



RUBBER 
WALL 

S4TN1 



LEAD 
SHEATH 

64THS 



APPROX. 

O. D. 
INCHES 



STRANDED 3 CONDUCTOR 



APPROX. 

NET WGT. 
PER M' 



STRANDED TWIN 




Price Per 1000 Feet 










14 
12 
10 

8 


$74.40 
108.72 
132.42 
182.70 


$52.94 
77.35 
94.22 

130.00 


$41.71 
60.95 
74.23 

102.42 


$39.33 
57.46 
69.99 
96.57 


$37.20 
54.36 
66.21 
91.35 


3 
3 
3 
4 


2 
8 
3 
8 


.25x .44 
.30x .61 
.32x .65 
.38x .66 


225 
860 
410 
640 


6 
4 
2 
1 


256.66 
315.10 
401.00 
566.40 


182.63 
224.20 
264.94 
374.23 


143.89 
176.64 
224.80 
317.53 


135.67 
166.55 
211.95 
299.38 


128.33 
157.55 
200.50 
283.20 


4 

4 

4 
6 


4 
4 

4 
5 


,47x .81 
.52x .91 
.68x1.03 
.67x1.19 


862 
1046 
1310 
1860 


1/0 
2/0 
3/0 
4/0 


669.52 

761.98 

856.54 

1003.40 


442.36 
503.46 
565.93 
662.96 


375.33 
427.18 
480.18 
562.51 


353.89 
402.77 
452.74 
530.37 


334.76 
380.99 
428.27 
501.70 


5 
5 
5 
5 


5 
6 
6 
5 


.72x1.27 
.76x1.36 

.81x1.47 
.87x1.68 


2120 
2395 
2730 
3120 



SOLID 3 CONDUCTOR 
















18' 
16' 
14 
12 


103.98 
119.88 
166.22 
191.98 


73.98 

85.29 

118.28 

136.60 


58.29 

67.20 

93.19 

107.62 


54.96 

63.36 

87.86 

101.47 


51.99 
59.94 
83.11 
95.99 


2 
2 
8 
3 


3 
8 
4 
4 


.41 

.44 
.56 
.60 


316 

345 
500 
680 


10 
8 
6 


224.10 
290.76 
383.70 


159.46 
206.89 
273.02 


125.64 
163.01 
215.10 


118.46 
153.69 
202.81 


112.05 
145.38 
191.85 


3 
4 

4 


4 
4 
6 


.64 
.77 
.92 


770 

960 

1470 



14 


179.32 


127.60 


100.53 


94.79 


89.66 


3 


4 


.56 


600 


12 


208.52 


148.37 


116.90 


110.22 


104.26 


3 


4 


.60 


680 


10 


249.02 


177.18 


139.60 


131.62 


124.51 


3 


4 


.64 


770 


8 


321.12 


228.49 


180.02 


169.74 


160.56 


4 


4 


.77 


960 


6 


419.64 


298.58 


235.25 


221.81 


209.82 


4 


6 


.92 


1470 


4 


544.20 


387.21 


305.08 


287.65 


272.10 


4 


5 


1.06 


1780 


2 


688.72 


455.04 


386.10 


364.03 


344.36 


4 


5 


1.16 


2240 


1 


965.56 


637.96 


541.30 


510.37 


482.78 


5 


6 


1.33 


2980 


1/0 


1093.18 


722.28 


612.85 


577.83 


546.59 


5 


6 


1.42 


3340 


2/0 


1237.72 


817.78 


693.88 


654.23 


618.86 


6 


6 


1.52 


3830 


3/0 


1395.06 


921.74 


782.08 


737.39 


697.53 


5 


6 


1.63 


4370 


4/0 


1710.26 


1130.00 


938.79 


904.00 


855.13 


6 


7 


1.79 


5430 


230,000 


2111.10 


1301.84 


1183.19 


1115.86 


1055.55 


6 


7 


1.96 


6320 


300,000 


2398.72 


1479.21 


1344.74 


1267.90 


1199.36 


6 


7 


2.08 


7100 


350,000 


2662.90 


1642.12 


1492.84 


1407.53 


1331.45 


6 


7 


2.19 


7830 


400.000 


3021.80 


1863.1 1 


1691.04 


1597.23 


1510.90 


6 


8 


2.32 


9130 


500,000 


3194.96 


21 .",.23 


1959.30 


1847.34 


1747.48 


6 


8 


2.50 


10550 



• For 300 Volt Service. 



9822 



-248- 



Electrical fa AEOCOTEJ Conductor* 

RUBBER AND LEAD 30 PERCENT WIRES AND CABLES 

BUILDING WIRE— 600 VOLT 


SIZE 
A. Wf.G. 


LIST 
PRICE 


■ UM 

Htmamm*' 


ttuitH Ps.ii*. luitltlat-500' (Mil m Mi) 

TO BOO «• W,000 
B 1199.99 pt4.999.99 It u*T AND 
D UIT H UST U ov«t 


RueaiEt 

WALL 
•4TM 


LEAD 
•MATH 

MTNt 


APPRO?. 

O. D. 
INCHU 


APPRO*. 
MIT ««T. 

pir w 


SOLID SINGLE CONDUCTOR Price Per 1000 Feet " 


18» 
IS* 

14 


$30.22 
33.16 
41.18 


$21.51 
23.60 
29.31 


$16.95 
18.59 
23.09 


$15.98 
17.53 
21.77 


$15.11 
16.58 

20.59 


2 
2 
8 


2 


M 
M 
M 


92 

100 
186 


12 

10 

8 

6 


48.02 

72.92 

99.64 

142.42 


34.82 

51.89 

70.89 

101.34 


27.43 
40.88 
55.85 
79.84 


25.86 
38.55 
52.66 
75.28 


24.46 
86.46 
49.82 
71.21 


S 
8 

4 
4 




set 

M 
M 

Al 


168 
260 
830 
620 


STRANDED SINGLE CONDUCTOR 


14 

12 

10 

8 

6 


45.50 

S4.18 

80.92 

109.48 

153.90 


32.37 

38.55 

57.58 

77.89 

109.51 


25.50 
30.38 
45.37 
61.37 
86.28 


24.05 

28.64 
42.78 
57.86 
81.35 


22.75 
27.09 
40.46 
54.74 
76.95 


8 

S 
8 

4 
4 




.26 
.27 
.32 
M 

XI 


186 
168 
260 
320 
620 


4 

2 

1 
1/0 
2/0 


180.98 
220.82 
276.28 
337.90 
380.00 


128.77 
145.90 
182.54 
223.26 
251.07 


101.45 
123.79 
154.88 
189.43 
213.03 


95.66 
116.72 
146.03 
178.61 
200.86 


90.49 
110.41 
138.14 
168.95 
190.00 


4 
4 
6 
5 
5 




.62 
M 
.64 
.68 
.78 


620 

770 

080 

1060 

1210 


3/0 

4/0 
250,000 
300,000 
350,000 


439.56 
514.82 
669.62 
745.62 
824.64 


290.43 
340.14 
412.93 
459.80 
508.53 


246.42 
288.61 
375.39 
418.00 
462.30 


232.34 
272.11 
353.94 
394.12 
435.89 


219.78 
257.41 
334.81 
372.81 
412.32 


5 
5 
6 
6 
6 


6 


.78 

M 

.95 

1.00 

1.06 


1870 
1570 
2030 
2270 
2490 


400,000 
500,000 
600,000 
700,000 
750,000 


893.52 
1040.38 
1345.40 
1488.64 
1563.14 


551.00 
641.57 
829.67 
918.00 
963.93 


500.91 
583.25 
754.24 
834.55 
876.30 


472.29 
549.92 
711.14 

786.86 
826.23 


446.76 
520.19 
672.70 
744.32 
781.57 


6 

6 
7 
.7 
7 


5 
6 
6 

6 
6 


1.10 

1.19 
1.8S 
1.40 
1.48 


2720 
8160 
8980 
4420 
4620 


800.000 

900,000 

1,000,000 

1,250.000 


1643.24 
1790.70 
1949.62 
2540.86 


950.00 
1035.25 
1127.13 
1468.94 


921.21 
1003.88 
1092.97 
1424.42 


868.57 

946.52 

1030.52 

1343.03 


821.62 

895.35 

974.81 

1270.43 


7 
7 
7 
8 


6 
6 
6 

7 


1.47 
1.68 
1.69 
1.79 


4850 
6265 
6690 
6890 


1,500,000 
1,750,000 
2,000,000 


2887.56 
3243.34 
3656.44 


1669.38 
1875.06 
2113.88 


1618.79 
1818.24 
2049.82 


1526.29 
1714.34 
1932.69 


1443.78 
1621.67 
1828.22 


8 
8 
8 


7 
7 
7 


1.91 
2.02 
2.13 


7875 
8890 
9850 


80LID TWIN 


18* 
16» 
14 


49.86 
55.26 
69.06 


35.48 
39.32 
49.14 


27.95 
30.98 
38.72 


26.35 
29.21 
36.50 


24.93 
27.63 
34.53 


2 
2 
3 


2 « 

2 

2 


.19x.33 

, .201.85 
.25X.44 


145 
165 
225 


12 

10 

8 

6 


102.22 
121.42 
170.22 
241.38 


72.74 

86.40 

121.12 

171.75 


57.31 

68.07 

95.43 

135.32 


54.03 

64.18 

89.98 

127.59 


51.11 

60.71 

85.11 

120.69 


3 
3 

4 
4 


3 
3 
3 
4 


.SOx.51 
.32X.56 
.38z.66 
.47x.81 


360 
410 
540 

852 


• For 300 Volt Service. 



9322 



-249- 



Electrical 




Conductors 



RUBBER AND LEAD 30 PERCENT ^RES AND CABLES 

BUILDING WIR&— 600 VOLT 



SIZE 
A.W. 6. 



LIST 
PRICE 



tiotn 
ruiui 

Itmaiom' 



Jt».«ir< PmLi* luilllln 500 (Colli u Knit) 
TO $200 t. ! 15.000 

B 1199 99 lp»4.999 99 ft list .no 
Ll.T II* HIT U CI. 



RUBBER 
WALL 
MTH1 



LEAD 

SHEATH 

64im 



APPROX. 

O. D. 
1HCHES 



WMOX. 

HETWCT. 

PER M- 



STRANDED TWIN 



Prie* Per 1000 Feet 



14 


$77.44 


$55.11 


$43.42 


$40.94 


$38.72 


3 


2 


.25* .44 


226 


12 


112.76 


80 J 3 


63 2. 1 


59.60 


56.38 


3 


3 


.30x .61 


360 


It 


137. '.J 


97.80 


77.05 


72.65 


68.72 


3 


3 


.32i .66 


410 


8 


189.83 


135.06 


106.41 


100.33 


94.91 


4 


3 


.38x .66 


640 


6 


264.36 


188.11 


148.21 


139.74 


132.18 


4 


4 


.47x .81 


852 


4 


323.66 


230.29 


181.44 


171.07 


161.83 


4 


4 


.52x .91 


1045 


2 


409.76 


270.73 


229.71 


216.58 


204.88 


4 


4 


.68x1.03 


1310 


1 


577.82 


381.77 


323.93 


305.42 


288.91 


5 


6 


.67x1.19 


1860 


1/0 


682.50 


450.94 


382.62 


360.76 


341.25 


5 


6 


.72x1.27 


2120 


2/0 


776.86 


515.29 


435.52 -1 


410.63 


388.43 


6 


6 


.76x1.36 


2396 


3/0 


873.30 


577.00 


489.58 


461.60 


436.65 


6 


5 


.81x1.47 


2730 


4/0 


1022.70 


675.71 


573.33 


540.57 


511.35 


6 


6 


.87x1.58 


3120 



STRANDED 3 CONDUCTOR 



SOLID • CONDUCTOR 
















18* 
16* 
14 
12 


106.42 
123.18 
176.90 
198.30 


75.72 

87.65 

121.60 

141.09 


59.66 

69.05 

95.81 

111.16 


56.25 

65.11 

90.33 

104.81 


53.21 
61.59 
85.45 
99.15 


2 
2 
3 
3 


3 

3 

4 
4 


.41 
.44 

.66 
.60 


816 

346 
600 
680 


16 

8 
6 


231.72 
301.44 

395.52 


164.88 
214.49 
281.43 


129.90 
168.99 
221.73 


122.48 
159.34 
209.06 


115.86 
150.72 
197.76 


3 
4 
4 


4 

4 
6 


.64 
.77 
.92 


770 
960 

1470 



14 


184.10 


131.00 


103.21 


97.31 


92.05 


3 


4 


.66 


500 


12 


214.86 


152.88 


120.45 


113.57 


107.43 


S 


4 


.60 


680 


10 


256.98 


182.85 


144.06 


135.83 


128.49 


3 


4 


.64 


770 


8 


332.32 


236.46 


186.30 


175.66 


166.16 


4 


4 


.77 


960 


6 


431.70 


307.17 


242.01 


228.18 


215.85 


4 


6 


.92 


1470 


4 


657.06 
703.36 


396.37 


312.29 


294.45 


278.53 


4 


6 


1.03 


1780 


2 


464.71 


394.30 


371.77 


351.68 


4 


6 


1.16 


2240 


1 


98334 


649.84 


551.38 


519.88 


491.77 


6 


6 


l.SS 


2980 


1/6 


1113.30 


735.57 


624.13 


688.46 


556.65 


5 


6 


1.42 


3340 


2/0 


1257.72 


831.00 


705.09 


664.80 


628.86 


5 


6 


1.62 


3830 


3/0 


1421.16 


938.98 


796.71 


751.19 


710.58 


5 


6 


1.63 


4370 


4/0 


1740.66 


1150.08 


975.83 


920.07 


870.33 


6 


7 


1.79 


6430 


250.000 


2148.88 


1325.15 


1204.68 


1135.84 


1074.44 


6 


7 


1.96 


6820 


300.000 


2438.78 


1503.92 


1367 .20 


1289.08 


1219.39 


6 


7 


2.08 


7100 


350,000 


2707.04 


1669.35 


1517.59 


1430.87 


1353.52 


6 


7 


2.19 


7830 


400.000 


3067.72 


1891.76 


1719.78 


1621.51 


1533.86 


G 


8 


2.32 


9130 


500.000 


3542.92 


2184.80 


1986.18 


1872.69 


1771.46 


6 


8 


2.50 


10550 



• For 300 Volt Service. 



9822 



-250- 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 

USB LIST PRICES TO DETERMINE VALUE OP ORDER OR INQUIRY. 

Rubber-Braid and Rubber-Lead wires may be combined to arrive at list Tame to 
determine prices. 

PRICES ARE F.OB. DESTINATION any point in the United States, ports of 
entry Panama Canal, Puerto Rico, Hawaiian Islands and Alaska, on shipments of 
100 lbs. or over, from manufacturer's factory or warehouse. Shipments of lees than 
100 lbs., F.Q.B. point of shipment No freight allowance. 

EXPRESS OR PARCEL POST SHIPMENTS F.OB. POINT OF SHIPMENT. 

No freight allowance. 

INVOICE DATE shall be same as date of shipment 

TERMS: Net eash last day of month following date of invoke. 2% cash dis- 
count if paid by the 10th of month following date of invoke. 

No cash discount will be allowed on payments made by trade acceptances, notes, 
securities, postdated checks, etc 

Prices subject to change without notice. 

For sizes not listed, use the price of next larger sise. 

SHIPMENTS are priced on the basis of the Column covering the List Value 
of each single shipment except that shipments against filed Specific Job Contracts 
(Form No. 1) are to be priced in accordance with the contract 

SPECIFIC BUILDING JOB CONTRACTS. When -the requirements of wire 
and cable on a specific building job amount to not less than $2,000 LIST, the elec- 
trical contractor who has received a definite signed contract for the job, may be 
covered for the specified requirements for a period of six (6) months, in accord- 
ance with contract (Form No. 1) which will be provided. 

Each shipment shall be treated as a separate contract If the Buyer fails to 
fulfill the terms of payment herein provided, or if the Buyer's financial responsi- 
bility becomes unsatisfactory to the Seller, the Seller may, without prejudice to 
any other lawful remedy, defer further shipments, or, at its option, terminate its 
own further obligations with respect to any outstanding commitments. 

REELS shall be paid for (net no eash discount) at the same time as the 
material, and may be returned freight collect to destination specified by Seller. 
When reels are returned in good condition not later than twelve (12) months' from 
date of shipment full credit will be allowed. 



9822 



-251- 



Sacttao 10 P«t« S 
July 3. 1934 




tamliMM* 



DA I «w-»-«| 

Anaconda Wire & Cable Company 

General Office*; 25 Broadway, New York. 
Chicago Office | 20 No. Waeker Drive. 

DISCOUNT SHEET 

WHOLESALERS 
SERVICE DISCOUNTS 

Electrical (SAKOCOTb) Conductor* 




tut 



RUBBER - BRAID BUILDING WIRES 
RUBBER - BRAID FIXTURE WIRES 

Code, Intermediate, 30% 

Applying to Sheet RW-T-28 dated July 5, 1934 

SHIPMENTS MADE BY MANUFACTURER 

1. TO WHOLESALER'S WAREHOUSE STOCK 
(priced in column applicable to quantity 

specified in each individual order) Column "A" _ Discount lTyi% 

Column "B" Discount 1TH% 

Column "C" Discount 11 Yt% 

Column "D" Discount 7*4% 

2. DIRECT TO CUSTOMER OF WHOLESALER 

(priced in column applicable to quantity 

specified in each individual order) Columns "A" "B" ft "C" Discount 5% 

Column "D" Discount iVt% 

3. DIRECT TO CUSTOMER OF WHOLESALER AND APPLYING TO 
SPECIFIC BUILDING JOB CONTRACT (FORM No. 1) 

($200 LIST AND OVER, priced 
in column applicable to quantity 

specified in Contract; Column "C" Discount 5% 

Column "D" Discount 2V,% 

LESS THAN $200 LIST, priced 
in column applicable to quantity 
specified in each individual order) Discount 5% 

TERMS: Net cash last day of month following date of invoice. 2% cash discount if paid by the 
15th of month following date of invoice. 

Canceling RW-D-l Section 10 Page 5, May 1, 1934 All discounts changed. 

9822 



-252- 



S< .lion 1 1 Pjigf V 

Julv S, l«».*4 




RWL -D-2 




AnacohdA 

Anaconda Wire & Cable Company 

Grneral Oilier* ; 25 Broadway, New York. 
Chicago Oflice: 20 No. Waeker Drive. 

DISCOUNT SHEET 



WHOLESALERS 
SERVICE DISCOUNTS 

Electrical [SAFflCOTEl 

:tu:B3i 

RUBBER - LEAD BUILDING WIRES 
RUBBER -LEAD FIXTURE WIRES 

Code, Intermediate, 30^ 
Applying to Sheet K\\ UT-J7 d.l.-d July 5. 1934 

SHIPMENTS MADE BY MANUFACTURER 

1. TO WHOLESALER'S WAREHOUSE STOCK 
(priced in column applicable to quantity 

specified in each individual order) Column "A" Discount 17Vi% 

Column "B" Discount 1TYi% 

Column "C" Discount 12Vi% 

Column "1>" ..'. Discount 7Vj% 

2. DIRECT TO CUSTOMER OF WHOLESALER 

(priced in column applicable to quantity 

specified in each individual order) Columns "A" "B" & **C" Discount 5% 

Column "D" Discount 2}-i% 

3. DIRECT TO CUSTOMER OF WHOLESALER AND APPLYING TO 
SPECIFIC BUILDING JOB CONTRACT (FORM No. 1) 

($200 LIST AND OVER, priced 
in column applicable to quantity 

specified in Contract; Column "C" Discount 5% 

Column "IV Discount 2Vi% 

LESS THAN $200 LIST, priced 
in column applicable to quantity 
specified in each individual order) Discount 5% 

TFRMS: Net ca-h last day of month following dale of invoice. 2°r cash discount if paid by U»e 
1.1th of month following date of invoice. 

Canceling RWL-D-1 Section 11 Pai;r *), May I. W34 All discounts changed. 

9822 



•253- 



.V-<-tllin It) i><t ' 

Jul\ 5, I 



» 




An At oh d A 



RW-D-3 



Anaconda Wire & Cable Company 

General Offices 25 Broadway, New York. 
Chicago Office j 20 No. Wacker Drire. 



DISCOUNT SHEET 



r lUi-r. 



f- /' 



WHOLESALERS '^ 

0r ; g 

SERVICE DISCOUNTS f<°-^ *••••• 

Kl - •• ;. 



Electrical 




' Conductors 



DA1E '^ 



* r.L-L 



Ho'd 




RUBBER - BRAID BUILDING S^lfeES 
RUBBER- BRAID FIXTURE wftffi& " 

Code Intermediate 30',, yh£o+^eJ //-» 

Applying to Sheet RW-T-28 dated July 3, 1931 

SHIPMENTS MADE BY MANUFACTURER 

1. TO WHOLESALER'S WAREHOUSE STOCK 

(priced in column applicable to quantity 

specified in each individual order) Column "A" Discount 17} 2% 

Column "B" Discount 17}',% 

Column "C" Discount 12'/,% 

Column "D" Discount 7'/2% 

•2. DIRECT TO CUSTOMER OF WHOLESALER 

(priced in column applicable to quantity 

specified in each individual order) 



•3. DIRECT TO CUSTOMER OF WHOLESALER AND APPLYING TO 
SPECIFIC BUILDING JOB CONTRACT (FORM No. 1) , % 



($200 LIST AND OVER, priced 
in column applicable to quantity 
specified in Contract; 

LESS THAN $200 LIST, priced 
in column applicable to quantity 
specified in each individual order) 




I 
— *£- jV Discount -v 



TERMS: Net cash last day of month following date of invoice. 2% cash discount if paid by the 
15th of month following date of invoice. 

INVOICE DATE shall be same as date of shipment. 



Canceling RW-D-2 Section 10 Page 5 July 5, 1934 

--32 



'Change in Discount 



-254- 



Anaconda Wire & Cable Company 



AnacondA 



General Office*; 25 Broadway, New York. 
Chicago Office; 20 No. Wacker Drive. 



R W-T-28 



PRICE SHEET 



July 5, 1934 




CODE 

RUBBER COVERED WIRES & CABLES 
BUILDING WIRE 600 VOLT 




SIZE 
A. W. G. 



LIST 
PRICE 



iA 



BROKEN 
PACKAGE 

LESS 
THAN SOO* 



Stinilara Ptckui Qonlltln — 500' (Colli or RttIO 



B 



TO 
$199.99 
LIST 



$200 to 

C$4.999 99 
LIST 



$5,000 

DLIST AND 
OVEH 



RUBBER 
WALL 

«4TH1 



APPROX. 

O. D. 
INCHES 



APPROX. 
NET WGT. 
PER H' 



SOLID SINGLE BRAID 



14 


$11.90 


$8.46 


$6.67 


$6.29 


$5.95 


3 


.19 


26 


12 


16.50 


11.74 


9.25 


8.72 


8.25 


3 


21 


35 


10 


22.56 


16.05 


12.64 


11.92 


11.28 


3 


23 


49 


8 


36.32 


25.85 


20.36 


19.20 


18.16 


4 


2% 


80 


•6 


49.70 


35.37 


27.87 


26.27 


24.85 


4 


.32 


115 



SOLID DOUBLE BRAID 



14 


15.70 


11.17 


8.80 


8.30 


7.85 


3 


.22 


29 


12 


20.58 


14.65 


11.54 


10.88 


10.29 


3 


.24 


88 


10 


26.62 


18.94 


14.92 


14.07 


13.31 


3 


.26 


64 


8 


41.90 


29.82 


23.49 


22.15 


20.95 


4 


.32 


85 


6 


56.50 


40.20 


31.67 


29.86 


28.25 


4 


.36 


120 



STRANDED SINGLE BRAID 



14 


15.52 


11.05 


8.70 


8.21 


7.76 


3 


.19 


26 


12 


20.26 


14.42 


11.36 


10.71 


10.13 


3 


21 


35 


10 


26.84 


19.09 


15.04 


14.18 


13.42 


3 


23 


49 


8 


41.24 


29.34 


23.12 


21.79 


20.62 


4 


.30 


80 



DUPLEX SOLID 



14 


32.78 


23.32 


18.38 


17.33 


16.39 


3 


.41 x .22 


62 


12 


41.84 


29.77 


23.45 


22.11 


20.92 


3 


.45 x .24 


82 


10 


53.94 


38.38 


30.24 


28.51 


26.97 


3 


.49 x .26 


114 


8 


84.56 


60.17 


47.41 


44.70 


42.28 


4 


.60 x .32 


174 


6 


115.80 


82.40 


64.92 


61.21 


57.90 


4 


.68 x .36 


285 



DUPLEX 


STRANDED 














14 


40.12 


28.55 


22.50 


21.21 


20.06 


3 


.43 x .23 


64 


12 


49.52 


35.23 


27.76 


26.17 


24.76 


3 


.47 x .25 


84 


10 


62.98 


44.82 


35.31 


33.29 


31.49 


3 


.52 x 21 


121 


8 


95.40 


67.88 


53.48 


50.42 


47.70 


4 


.64 x .33 


186 


6 


129.36 


92.05 


72.52 


68.38 


64.68 


4 


.72 x .38 


295 



STRANDED DOUBLE BRAID 



14 

12 

10 

8 

6 



19.40 
24.32 
31.06 
47.46 
62.94 



13.80 
17.31 
22.11 
33.77 
44.78 



10.87 
13.64 
17.42 
26.61 
35.28 



10.25 
12.86 
16.42 
25.09 
33.27 



9.70 
12.16 
15.53 
23.73 
31.47 



.23 
.25 
.27 
.33 
.38 



30 
40 
66 
90 
126 



4 

3 
2 

1 
1/0 



83.02 

99.10 

114.02 

165.06 

193.84 



59.08 

70.72 

75.33 

109.06 

128.07 



46.55 
55.72 
63.92 
92.53 
108.67 



43.89 
52.54 
60.26 
87.25 
102.16 



41.51 
49.70 
57.01 
82.53 
96.92 



.45 
.48 
.51 
.59 
.63 



190 
230 
278 
364 
443 



2/0 

3/0 

4/0 
250,000 
300.000 



226.42 
266.38 
325.60 
403.14 
157.84 



149.60 
176.00 
215.13 
248.60 
282.33 



126.93 
149.33 
182.53 
226.00 
256.67 



119.68 
140.80 
172.10 
213.09 
242.00 



113.21 
133.19 
1K2.80 
201.57 
228.92 



.67 
.73 
.78 
.86 
.92 



640 
663 
814 
962 
1139 



350,000 
400,000 
500,000 
600,000 
700.000 



512.90 
571.28 
701.62 
866.20 

99N.6K 



316.29 
352.29 
432.67 
531.16 
615.85 



287.54 
320.27 
393.33 
485.60 
559.87 



271.11 
301.97 
370.86 
437.85 
527.88 



256. 15 
285.64 
350.81 
433.10 
499.31 



750.000 

800.000 

900.000 

1.000.0110 



10U3.3S 
1116.18 I 
1252.22 
I386.3K 



655.75 

6 15.29 
723.9 1 
S01. 19 



596.13 
625.73 
702.00 
777.20 



562.07 
589.98 
661.89 
732.79 



531.69 
558.09 
626.11 
693.18 



.97 
1.02 
1.10 
1.21 
1.28 



7 


1.32 


7 


1.35 


7 


1.41 


7 


1.47 


S 


1.64 


8 


1.76 


8 


1.88 


8 


1.98 



1800 
1473 
1815 
2177 
2512 



2673 
2848 
3194 
3530 



1. 250.000 
1,500.000 
1. 750,000 
2.000.000 



1717.88 
20C8.00 
2361.31 
2669.93 



1010.19 
1195.56 
1366.89 
1513.58 



979.87 
1159.33 
1325.17 
1 196.N0 



923.88 
1093.09 
1249.73 
1111.27 



873.9 ! 
1031.00 
1182.17 
1331.98 



4400 
5240 
6060 
6890 



Sot- ;';il'»' 4 fur Cem-ial Instructions; Fixture Wire^ ;irvl Colors. 
Canceling KW-T-27, Section 10 Pages 1 to 4 May 1, 1931. 



'Dn not bear Underwriters' Labels. 



-255- 



Electrical 




Conductor* 



RUBBER COVERED INTERMEDIATE WIRES AND CABLES 



BUILDING WIRE— 600 VOLT 



SIZE 
A.W.G. 



LIST 
PRICE 



BROKEN 
PACKACI 

ILIU 
TMAKIOO' 



Stmlirl P.ck.f' BiinlltlM — 500' 



TO 

(J199.99 
LIST 



J200t« 

C 14.999.99 
LltT 



(Mil m »M||) 

»vooo 

DLIST AND 
OV1K 



rumh 

WALL 

•4TN1 



APFROX. 

O. D. 

INCHH 



APPRO X. 
HIT WST. 
FIR M' 



SOLID SINGLE BRAID 














14 


$13.60 


$9.68 


$7.62 


$7.19 


$6.80 


8 


.19 


26 


12 


18.64 


13.26 


10.45 


9.85 


9.32 


8 


.21 


86 


10 


24.90 


17.72 


13.96 


13.17 


12.45 


8 


.28 


49 


8 


40.46 


28.78 


22.68 


21.38 


20.23 


4 


M 


80 



SOLID DOUBLE BRAID 














14 


17.40 


12.38 


9.76 


9.20 


8.70 


8 


.22 


29 


IS 


2262 


16.09 


12.68 


11.96 


11.31 


8 


.24 


88 


10 


29.04 


20.66 


16.28 


15.35 


14.52 


8 


M 


84 


8 


45.92 


32.68 


25.75 


24.28 


22.96 


4 


.82 


86 


• 


61.44 


43.72 


34.45 


32.48 


30.72 


4 


.88 


120 



STRANDED SINGLE BRAID 














14 


17.26 


12.28 


9.67 


9.12 


8.63 


8 


.10 


26 


12 


22.40 


15.94 


12.56 


11.84 


11.20 


8 


.21 


86 


10 


29.40 


20.92 


16.48 


15.54 


14.70 


8 


.23 


49 


8 


45.42 


32.32 


25.47 


24.01 


22.71 


4 


.80 


80 



DUPLEX 


30L1D 
















14 


36.16 


25.72 


20.27 


19.11 


18.08 


3 


.41X.22 


62 


12 


46.14 


32.83 


25.87 


21.39 


23.07 


8 


.46 x .24 


82 


10 


58.88 


41.89 


33.01 


31.12 


29.44 


8 


.49 x .26 


114 


8 


92.64 


65.92 


51.94 


48.97 


46.32 


4 


.60 x .82 


174 


6 


125.64 


89.40 


70.44 


66.41 


62.82 


4 


.68 x .36 


286 



DUPLEX 


STRANDED 














14 


43.50 


30.95 


24.39 


22.99 


21.75 


3 


.43X.23 


64 


12 


53.82 


38.29 


30.17 


28.45 


26.91 


3 


.47 x .26 


84 


10 


67.92 


48.32 


38.07 


35.90 


33.96 


3 


.62X.27 


124 


8 


103.48 


73.63 


58.01 


54.70 


51.74 


4 


.64 1.83 


186 


6 


139.20 


99.05 


78.04 


73.58 


69.60 


4 


.72 x .88 


296 



STRANDED DOUBLE BRAID 














14 


21.12 


15.03 


11.84 


11.17 


10.56 


3 


.23 


80 


12 


26.56 


18.89 


14.88 


14.03 


13.28 


3 


.26 


40 


10 


33.68 


23.97 


18.88 


17.81 


16.84 


3 


.27 


66 


8 


51.30 


36.51 


28.76 


27.12 


25.65 


4 


.33 


90 


6 


68.02 


48.40 


38.13 


35.96 


34.01 


4 


.38 


126 


4 


88.70 


63.11 


49.72 


46.88 


44.35 


4 


.45 


190 


2 


120.24 


79.44 


67.41 


63.55 


60.12 


4 


.51 


278 


1 


173.64 


114.73 


97.35 


91.78 


86.82 


6 


.69 


364 


1/0 


203.56 


134.50 


114.12 


107.60 


101.78 


5 


.63 


443 


2/0 


237.28 


156.77 


133.02 


125.42 


118.64 


5 


.67 


640 


3/0 


278.78 


184.20 


156.29 


147.36 


139.39 


6 


.73 


663 


4/0 


338.44 


223.61 


189.73 


178.89 


169.22 


6 


.78 


814 


250.000 


420.06 


259.04 


235.49 


222.03 


210.03 


6 


.86 


962 


300,000 


475.92 


293.48 


266.80 


251.56 


237.96 


6 


.92 


1189 


350.000 


532.10 


328.13 


298.30 


281.26 


266.05 


6 


.97 


1300 


400,000 


592.70 


365.49 


332.27 


313.28 


296.35 


6 


1.02 


1473 


500,000 


723.76 


446.32 


405.75 


382.56 


361.88 


6 


1.10 


1816 


600,000 


891.06 


519.19 


499.54 


470.99 


445.53 


7 


1.21 


2177 


700,000 


1024.36 


631.69 


574.27 


541.45 


512.18 


7 


1.28 


2512 


750,000 


1093.20 


674.13 


612.85 


577.83 


546.60 


7 


1.32 


2673 


800,000 


1150.08 


664.89 


611.71 


607.90 


575.04 


7 


1.36 


2848 


900,000 


1288.60 


711.98 


722.10 


681.12 


644.30 


7 


1.41 


3194 


1,000.000 


1423.86 


823.18 


798.23 


752.62 


711.93 


7 


1.47 


3530 


1,250,000 


1791.20 


1037.28 


1005.X 1 


918.37 


897.10 


8 


1.64 


4400 


1,500,000 


2119.98 


1225.61 


1188.17 


1120.56 


1059.99 


8 


1.76 


6240 


1,750.000 


2129. ss 


1101.78 


1362.21 


1281.37 


1214.91 


8 


1.88 


6060 


2.000.000 


2716.78 


1587.99 


1539.87 


1151.88 


1373.39 


8 


1.99 


6890 



-822 



-256- 



Electrical 




Conductors 



RUBBER COVERED 30 PERCENT WIRES AND CABLES 

BUILDIN'G WIRE— «00 VOLT 



SIZE 
A.W. G. 



LIST 
PRICE 



A 



BROKEN 

PACKAGE 

LESS 

THAN SOO' 



Standard Packaat (oanlitics — 500' (Coll! ar RmIi) 
$200 ta 15.000 

C$4,999.99 n LIST AND 
LIST I U OVER 



TO 
I $199.99 

' LIST 



RUBBER 
WALL 
64TNI 



APPROX. 

O. D. 
INCHES 



APPROX. 
NET WCT. 

PER W 



SOLID SINGLE BRAID 



14 


$14.90 


$10.60 


$8.35 


$7.87 


$7.45 


3 


.19 


26 


12 


20.34 


14.48 


11.41 


10.75 


10.17 


3 


.21 


86 


10 


27.04 


19.25 


15.16 


14.30 


13.52 


3 


.23 


49 


8 


44.06 


31.35 


24.70 


23.29 


22.03 


4 


.28 


80 



SOLID 


DOUBLE BRAID 














14 




18.74 


13.34 


10.51 


9.91 


9.37 


8 


.22 


29 


12 




24.28 


17.28 


13.61 


12.83 


12.14 


3 


.24 


88 


10 




31.30 


22.28 


17.55 


16.55 


15.65 


3 


.26 


54 


8 




49.38 


35.14 


27.68 


26.10 


24.69 


4 


.32 


85 


6 




65.54 


46.63 


36.74 


34.64 


32.77 


4 


.86 


120 



STRANDED SINGLE BRAID 



14 


18.52 


13.18 


10.39 


9.79 


9.26 


3 


.19 


26 


12 


24.06 


17.12 


13.49 


12.72 


12.03 


3 


.21 


85 


10 


31.64 


22.51 


17.73 


16.72 


15.82 


8 


.23 


49 


8 


49.04 


34.89 


27.49 


25.92 


24.52 


4 


.80 


80 



DUPLEX 


SOLID 
















14 


38.74 


27.57 


21.72 


20.48 


19.37 


3 


.41 x .22 


62 


12 


49.52 


35.23 


27.76 


26.17 


24.76 


3 


.45 x .24 


82 


10 


63.16 


44.94 


35.41 


33.38 


31.58 


3 


.49 x .26 


114 


8 


99.66 


70.91 


55.87 


52.67 


49.83 


4 


.60 x .32 


174 


6 


134.42 


95.65 


75.36 


. 71.05 


67.21 


4 


.68 x .36 


285 



DUPLEX 


STRANDED 














14 


46.10 


32.80 


25.84 


21.37 


23.05 


8 


.43 x .23 


64 


12 


57.22 


40.71 


32.07 


30.24 


28.61 


3 


.47 x .25 


84 


10 


72.20 


51.37 


40.47 


38.16 


36.10 


3 


.52 x .27 


124 


8 


110.50 


78.63 


61.95 


58.41 


55.25 


4 


.64 x .33 


186 


6 


147.98 


105.29 


82.96 


78.22 


73.99 


4 


.72 x .38 


295 



STRANDED DOUBLE BRAID 



14 


22.38 


15.92 


12.55 


11.83 


11.19 


3 


.23 


30 


12 


28.26 


20.11 


15.84 


11.91 


14.13 


3 


.25 


40 


10 


35.94 


25.57 


20.15 


18.99 


17.97 • 


3 


.27 


56 


8 


51.80 


38.98 


30.72 


28.96 


27.40 


4 


.83 


90 


6 


72.62 


51.68 


40.72 


38.39 


36.31 


4 


.38 


126 


4 


93.78 


66.72 


52.57 


49.57 


46.89 


4 


.45 


190 


2 


125.86 


83.16 


70.56 


66.53 


62.93 


4 


.51 


278 


1 


181.32 


119.80 


101.65 


95.8 1 


90.66 


5 


.59 


364 


1/0 


212.24 


140.23 


118.98 


112.18 


106.12 


5 


.63 


443 


2/0 


247.82 


163.74 


138.93 


130.99 


123.91 


6 


.67 


540 


3/0 


289.88 


191.53 


162.51 


153.22 


144.94 


5 


.73 


663 


4/0 


350.22 


231.40 


196.33 


185.12 


175.11 


5 


.78 


814 


250,000 


434.76 


268.11 


243.73 


229.81 


217.38 


6 


.86 


962 


300,000 


491.74 


303.24 


275.67 


259.92 


245.87 


6 


.92 


1139 


350,000 


519.06 


338.59 


307.81 


290.22 


274.53 


G 


.97 


1300 


400.000 


611.00 


376.79 


312.53 


322.96 


305.50 


6 


1.02 


1473 


500,000 


743.44 


458.45 


416.77 


392.96 


371.72 


6 


1.10 


1815 • 


600,000 


915.44 


564.52 


513.20 


483.87 


457.72 


7 


1.21 


2177 


700.000 


1050.06 


617.53 


588.67 


555.03 


525.03 


7 


1.28 


2512 


750,000 


1119.86 


690.59 


627.81 


591.93 


559.93 


7 


1.32 


2673 


800,000 


1178.24 


681.18 


660.53 


622.79 


589.12 


7 


1.35 


2848 


900.000 


1316.44 


761.06 


738.00 


695.83 


658.22 


7 


1.41 


3194 


1.000.000 


1152.72 


839.85 


811.10 


767.86 


726.36 


7 


1.47 


3530 


1 .250.000 


1829.22 


i 1057.51 


1025.17 


966.87 


914.61 


8 


1.64 


4400 


1,500.000 


2157.90 


1217.51 


1209.73 


1110.61 


1078.95 


8 


1.76 


5240 


1.750,000 


; 2179.91 


1 133.71 


1390.27 


1310.82 


1239.97 


R 


1.88 


6060 


2,000,000 


2806.9'i 


1622.78 


1 573X0 


1183.68 


1403.48 


8 


1.98 


6890 



Rep Pace I for General Instructions; Fixture Wires and Colors. 



9822 



-257- 



RUBBER COVERED FIXTURE WIRES 300 volt 



SIZE 
A. W. 6. 



RUB. 
INS. 



LIST 
PRICE 



•MCKIN 

FACKA6C 

11111 
tnanim' 



SU»«ir« Nell*' tlMlllln — 500 (CHIi m Ittili) 
TO I J200H I 1-000 

B 1199 99 p 14,999 99 | II i.st »«0 

lisi I O kill I U o»K 



APPROX 

O 0. 

INCHES 



APPRO! 

Nit w&r 
PtR <•■ 



SOLID 






CODE GKADK 










20* 


1/64" 


$6.40 


$4.55 


S3..19 


$3.38 


$3.20 


.09 


6 


20* 


1/32 


7.36 


5.23 


4.12 


3.89 


3.68 


.12 


10 


18 


1/64 


8.00 


5.69 


4.48 


4.23 


4.00 


.11 


9 


18 


1/32 


9.06 


6.45 


5.08 


4.79 


4.53 


.13 


12 


16* 


1/64 


8.58 


6.11 


4.81 


4.5 1 


4.29 


.12 


12 


16 


1/32 


10.08 


7.17 


5.65 


5.33 


5.01 


.14 


16 



STRANDED 




CODE GRADE 










20* 


1/64 


7.46 


5.31 


4.18 


3.94 


3.73 


.09 


6 


20* 


1/32 


8.48 


6.03 


4.75 


4.48 


4.24 


.12 


10 


18 


1/64 


9.36 


6.66 


5.25 


4.95 


4.68 


.11 


9 


18 


1/32 


10.40 


7.40 


5.83 


5.50 


5.20 


.13 


12 


16* 


1/64 


10.18 


7.25 


5.71 


5.38 


5.09 


.12 


12 


16 


1/32 


11.64 


8.28 


6.52 


6.15 


5.82 


.14 


16 



SOLID 



INTERMEDIATE GRADE 



18 
18 
16 



1/64 
1/32 
1/32 



8.72 

9.88 

11.04 



6.20 
7.03 

7.86 



4.88 
5.54 
6.19 



4.61 
5.22 
5.84 



4.36 
4.94 
5.52 



.11 
.13 
.14 



9 
12 
16 



SOLID 



30% CRAPE 



18 

18 
16 



1/64 
1/82 
1/32 



9.28 


6.60 


5.20 


4.90 


4.64 


10.56 


7.51 


5.92 


5.58 


5.28 


11.80 


8.40 


6.62 


6.24 


5.90 



.11 

.13 
.14 



9 
12 
16 



•Do not bear Underwriters' Labels 

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 

USE LIST PRICES TO DETERMINE VALUE OF ORDER OR INQUIRY. 

Rubber-Braid and Rubber-Lead wires may be combined to arrive at list value to determine 
prices. 

PRICES ARE F.O.B. DESTINATION any point in the United States, ports of entry Panama 
Canal, Puerto Rico, Hawaiian Islands, and Alaska, on shipments of 100 lbs. or over, from manu- 
facturer's factory or warehouse. Shipments of less than 100 lbs., F.O.B. point shipment. No 
freight allowance. 

EXPRESS OR PARCEL POST SHIPMENTS F.O.B. POINT OF SHIPMENT. No freight 

allowance. 

INVOICE DATE shall be same as date of shipment. 

TERMS: Net last day of month following date of invoice. 2% cash discount if paid by the 
10th of month following date of Invoice. 

No cash discount will be allowed on payments made by trade acceptances, notes, securities, 
postdated checks, etc 

Prices subject to change without notice. 

For sizes not listed, use the price of next larger size. 

SHIPMENTS are priced on the basis of the Column covering the List Value of each single 
shipment, except that shipments against filed Specific Job Contracts (Form No. 1) are to be 
priced in accordance with the contract. 

COLORS: Sizes No. 20 A.W.G. to No. 6 A.W.G. inclusive, regularly furnished in the following 
colors: BLACK, WHITE, RED, BLUE, GREEN, YELLOW; colors other than those mentioned, 
quantity price plus 10%. Sizes larger than No. 6 A.W.G. regularly furnished in Black; colors 
Red or White available at quantity price plus 5%; all other colors, quantity price plus 10%. 

FOR CONVENIENCE IN RETAILING: Wire in sizes No. 18 A.W.G. to No. 6 A.W.G. will 
be furnished in lengths and at additional charges per thousand fset as noted: 250' lengths -10*; 
100' lengths -25*; 50' lengths -40*; 25' lengths -60*. 

SPECIFIC BUILDING JOB CONTRACTS. When the requirements of wire and cable on a 
specific building job amount to not less than $2,000 LIST, the electrical contractor who has received 
a definite signed contract for the job, may be covered for the specified requirements for a period 
of six (6) months, in accordance with contract (Form No. 1) which will be provided. 

Each shipment shall be treated aa a separate contract. If the Buyer fails to fulfill the terms 
of payment herein provided, or if the Buyer's financial responsibility becomes unsatisfactory to 
the Seller, the Seller may, without prejudice to any other lawful remedy, defer further ship- 
ments, or, at its option, terminate its own further obligations with respect to any outstanding 
commitments. 

REELS shall be paid for (net, no cash discount) at the same time as the material, and may be 
returned freight collect to destination specified by Seller. When reels are returned in good condi- 
tion not later than twelve (12) months from date of shipment, full credit will be allowed. 



'258- 



A??. A, PART I, 

sscTioi: 3 iv 



SAMPLE! PHIOH FILIITGS 
I litis 1; rat in 
03IGIIIAL PHIC3 SilSUCTUPE 
WESCTm FOE. EUB33R-BHA.ID LiAHCH 27, 1935 
EEF3CTIYS POR HU333H-LZAD AP3IL 1, 1935 



982.° 



-259- 



Sectlon I* Page 5 

March 11, 1935 



* 




RW-D-S 



Anaconda Wire & Cable Company 

General Offices; 25 Broadway, New York. 
Chicago Office; 20 No. W acker Drtra, 



DISCOUNT SHEET 



WHOLESALERS 

SERVICE DISCOUNTS 



Electrical 




Condneto 




! 



RUBBER -BRAID BUILDING WIRES 
RUBBER -BRAID FIXTURE WIRES 

Code, Intermediate, 30% 
Applying to Sheet RW-TM dated March 11, 1935. 

SHIPMENTS MADE BY MANUFACTURER 

1. TO WHOLESALER'S WAREHOUSE STOCK 

#14 Solid Single Braid Code Wire Full Colls) $5.50 M* Foot Net 

(Ali offer ttam$ prieW COLUMN "A" DISCOUNT tt% 



•mek IniiwUuml ordtr) 



COLUMN -B" DISCOUNT M% 

COLUMN "C" DISCOUNT MVi% 

COLUMN "D- DISCOUNT 11H% 

COLUMN "E" DISCOUNT 1V»% 



I. DIRECT TO CUSTOMER OF WHOLESALER 

(priced In column applicable to quan- 
tity specified in each individual order) DISCOUNT 

I. DIRECT TO CUSTOMER OF WHOLESALER AND APPLYING TO 
8PECIF1C BUILDING JOB CONTRACT (FORM No. 1) 

(priced in column applicable to quan- 



5% 



tity specified in Contract) 



DISCOUNT 5% 



TERMS: Net cash last day of month following date of invoice. 2% cash discount if paid by th« 
15th of month following date of invoice. 



Canceling RW-D-4, Section 10. Page 5, Mirch 11, 1935. 

9822 



-260- 



Anaconda Wire & Cable Company 



AnacondA 



General Offices; 25 Broadway, New York- 
Chicago Office ; 20 No. Wacker Drive. 



[W-T-29 



PRICE SHEET 



March 11, 1935 




CODE 

RUBBER COVERED WIRES & CABLES 
BUILDING WIRE— 600 VOLT 




LIST PRICE FULL COILS OR REUS 

BROKEN COILS 
0* REELS 

A(uadar 500' 
t«tl 50 Lilt) 



•Awrtad u to alio* aid Mian 
2.500' 



500' to 
2.500' 



CI a»w to 
$150 Lift 



ORDERS OF TOTAL LIST VALUE 



D |I50 la 
14.000 Lilt 



$4,000 Lilt 
»*d «ar 



RUBBER 
WALL 

*4TH» 



STRANDED SINGLE BRAID 



14 

12 

10 

8 



11.00 
14.00 
19.00 
29.00 



8.98 
11.71 
15.51 

23.84 



8.70 
11.36 
15.04 
23.12 



8.21 
10.71 
14.18 
21.79 



7.76 
10.13 
13.42 
20.62 



14 

12 

10 

8 

6 



28.00 
35.00 
45.00 
68.00 
92.00 



23.20 
28.63 
36.41 
55.15 

74.79 



22.50 
27.76 
35.31 
53.48 
72.52 



STRANDED DOUBLE BRAID 



14 
12 

10 

8 
6 



1/0 
2/0 
3/0 
4/0 



250,000 
300,000 
350,000 



14.00 
17.00 
22.00 
34.00 
45.00 



59.00 

71.00 

81.00 

117.00 



138.00 
161.00 
189.00 
232.00 



11.21 
14.06 
17.96 
27.44 
36.39 



48.00 
57.46 
65.91 
95.43 



112.06 
130.90 
154.00 

188.24 



10.87 
13.64 
17.42 
26.61 

35.28 



46.55 
55.72 
63.92 
92.53 



108.67 
126.93 
149.33 
182.53 



287.00 
326.00 
365.00 



400,000 


406.00 


500,000 


499.00 


600.000 


616.00 


700,000 


710.00 


750,000 


757.00 


800.000 


791.00 


900.000 


891.00 


1,000.000 


986.00 


1.250,000 


1213.00 


1,500,000 


1471.00 


1,750,000 


1682.00 


2,000,000 


1900.00 



FULL REELS 

CIRCULAR MIL 

SIZES 

PRICED IN 

COLUMN D 



10.25 
12.86 
16.42 
25.09 
33.27 



43.89 
52.54 
60.26 

87.25 



102.46 
119.68 
140.80 
172.10 



213.09 
242.00 
271.11 
301.97 



370.86 
457.85 
527.88 
562.07 



589.98 
661.89 
732.79 

923.88 



1093.09 
1249.73 
1411.27 



9.70 
12.16 
15.53 
23.73 
31.47 



41.51 
49.70 
57.01 
82.53 



96.92 
113.21 
133.19 
162.80 



201.57 
228.92 
256.45 
285.64 



350.81 
433.10 
499.34 
531.69 
" 558.09 
626.11 
693.18 
873.94 



1034.00 
1182.17 
1334.98 



APPROX. 

O. D. 
INCHES 



APPROX. 
NETWT. 
PER W 



SOLID SINGLi: BRAID — 


Price* per 1.000 Fee*. 












14 


$7.50 


$6.67 


$6.50 


$6.29 


$5.95 


3 


.19 


26 


12 


11.50 


9.54 


9.25 


8.72 


8.25 


3 


.21 


35 


10 


16.00 


13.04 


12.64 


11.92 


11.28 


3 


23 


49 


8 


26.00 


21.00 


20.36 


19.20 


18.16 


4 


.28 


80 


•6 


35.00 


28.74 


27.87 


26.27 


24.85 


4 


.32 


115 



SOLID DOUBLE BRAID 
















14 


11.00 


9.08 


8.80 


8.30 


7.85 


3 


31 


29 


12 


15.00 


11.90 


11.54 


10.88 


10.29 


3 


M 


38 


10 


19.00 


15.39 


14.92 


14.07 


13.31 


3 


26 


54 


8 


30.00 


24.23 


23.49 


22.15 


20.95 


4 


22 


85 


6 


40.00 


32.66 


31.67 


29.86 


28.25 


4 


.36 


120 



.19 
.21 
.23 
20 



21.21 


20.06 


3 


.43 x .23 


26.17 


24.76 


3 


.47 x .25 


33.29 


31.49 


3 


.52 x .27 


50.42 


47.70 


4 


.64 x .33 


68.38 


64.68 


4 


.72 x .38 



.23 
35 
37 
23 
.38 



.45 
.48 
.51 
.59 
.63 
.67 
.73 
.78 



.86 

.92 

.97 

JL02_ 

1.10 

1.21 

1.28 

1.35 
1.41 
1.47 
1.64 



1.76 
1.88 
1.98 



26 
35 
49 
80 



DUPLEX SOLID 
















14 


23.00 


18.95 


18.38 


17.33 


16.39 


3 


.41 x .22 


62 


12 


30.00 


24.19 


23.45 


22.11 


20.92 


3 


.45 x .24 


82 


10 


38.00 


31.19 


30.24 


28.51 


26.97 


3 


.49 x .26 


114 


8 


60.00 


48.89 


47.41 


44.70 


42.28 


4 


.60 x .32 


174 


6 


82.00 


66.95 


64.92 


61.21 


57.90 


4 


.68 x 26 


285 


DUPLEX STRANDED 





64 

84 

124 

186 

295 



30 
40 
56 
90 
126 



190 
230 
278 
364 



443 
540 
663 
814 



962 
1139 
1300 
1473 



1815 
2177 
2512 
2673 



2848 
3194 
3530 
4400 



5240 
6060 
6890 



9822 



Page 4 for General Instructions; Fixture Wires & Colors. 

Canceling RW-T-28, Section 10 Pages 1 to 4 July 5, 1934 



•Do not bear Underwriters' Labels. 



-261- 



ElMtrical 




Condocton 



RUBBER COVERED INTERMEDIATE WIRES AND CABLES 



BUILDING WIRE— «•• VOLT 



•in 



un PUCE 

RROKIM 

COIU OR 

KIEL* 

I (a*rMr 



Fll UM 



n ieqs 



Burn 
l.tM' 



Ctmrk 
|INLM 



mm or mu iiji »ik 

DIlHk r KMiM 
*4.MtLM C utmt 



RURilR 

WALL 
MTM 



APTROX. 
•. 

IRCNW 



AFPMX. 

HCTWT. 
f IR ■' 



SOUD SINGLE BRAID 



14 


SUM 


8746 


87.08 


87.10 


UM 


8 


.18 


86 


IS 


13.00 


10.78 


10.45 


8.85 


843 


8 


Jl 


88 


M 


18.04 


14.40 


13.06 


18.17 


13.46 


8 


M 


40 


8 


29.00 


8830 


8X68 


3148 


36 JS 


4 


J8 


80 



SOLID DOUBLE BRAID 



14 

18 

10 

8 

6 



12.00 


10.06 


16.00 


18.08 


21.00 


16.70 


33.00 


2645 


44.00 


85.58 



0.76 
1168 

1128 
85.75 
84.48 



940 
1146 
15.35 
2448 
3248 



8.70 

1141 
1448 
22.96 
80.78 



8 
8 
8 
4 
4 



Jl 
J4 
J6 
43 
M 



88 

84 

86 

120 



STRANDED SINGLE BRAID 



Sm 

UM 
14.70 
88.71 



14 

18 

10 

8 



12.00 
16.00 
21.00 
S2.00 



0.08 

1105 
17.00 
2136 



167 
1156 

1148 
25.47 



113 
1144 
1544 
24.01 



8 
3 

a 

4 



48 
Jl 
J3 



36 
88 
40 
80 



DUPLEX SOLID 
















14 


36.00 


30.00 


30 J7 


19.11 


18.08 


8 


.41 x .33 


62 


13 


33.00 


3168 


25.87 


24.39 


28.07 


3 


.45i .24 


83 


10 


42.00 


34.04 


33.01 


31.12 


29.44 


3 


.49 x .26 


114 


8 


06.00 


5846 


51.94 


48.97 


46J3 


4 


.60x42 


174 


6 


89.00 


72.64 


70.44 


66.41 


62.82 


4 


.68x46 


285 



DUPLEX 


STRANDED 














14 


31.00 


25.16 


2449 


22.99 


21.75 


3 


.43x23 


64 


13 


38.00 


31.11 


30.17 


28.45 


26.91 


3 


.47x45 


84 


10 


48.00 


3946 


38.07 


35.90 


33.96 


3 


42x47 


124 


8 


74.00 


59.83 


58.01 


54.70 


51.74 


4 


.64x43 


186 


6 


99.00 


80.48 


78.04 


7348 


69.60 


4 


.72x48 


295 



STRANDED DOUBLE BRAID 



14 


15.00 


1241 


11.84 


11.17 


1046 


3 


43 


SO 


13 


19.00 


1545 


14.88 


14.03 


13.28 


3 


45 


40 


10 


24.00 


19.48 


18.88 


17.81 


16.84 


3 


47 


56 


8 


37.60 


29.66 


28.76 


27.12 


25.65 


4 


43 


90 


6 


48.00 


39.33 


38.13 


35.96 


34.01 


4 


48 


136 


4 


63.00 


5148 


49.72 


46.88 


44.35 


4 


.45 


190 


2 


86.00 


6951 


67.41 


6345 


60.12 


4 


41 


278 


1 


124.00 


100.39 


97.35 


91.78 


86.82 


5 


49 


364 


1/0 


146.00 


117.69 


114.12 


107.60 


101.78 


5 


.63 


443 


2/0 


169.00 


137.18 


133.02 


125.42 


118.64 


5 


.67 


540 


3/0 


198.00 


161.18 


156.29 


14748 


139.39 


5 


.73 


668 


4/0 


241.00 


195.66 


189.73 


178.89 


16942 


5 


.78 


814 


250.000 


299.00 




222.03 


210.03 


6 


46 


•63 


300,000 


338.00 




231.56 


237.96 


6 


.92 


1139 


350,000 


378.00 




281.26 


266.05 


6 


.97 


ISO* 


400,000 


422.00 


FULL REELS 


313.28 


296.35 


6 


1.02 


1478 


500,000 


515.00 


382.56 


361.88 


6 


1.10 


1815 


600,000 


634.00 


CIRCULAR MIL 


470.99 


44543 




141 


2177 


700.000 


729.00 




541.45 


512.18 




148 


2513 


750.000 


777.00 


SIZES 


577.83 


546.60 




142 


2678 


800.000 


818.00 


607.90 


575.04 




145 


2848 


900.000 


917.00 


PRICED IN 


681.12 


644.30 




1.41 


3194 


1,000.000 


1013.00 




752.62 


711.93 




1.47 


S5S6 


1,250.000 


1277.00 


COLUMN n 


948.37 


897.10 


8 


1.64 


4406 


1400.000 


1508.00 


112046 


1059.99 


8 


1.76 


5346 


1,750,000 


1729.00 




1284.37 


1214.94 


8 


148 


6466 


2,000.000 


19.->4.00 






145148. 


1373.39 


8 


1.99 


68M 



9822 



-262- 



Ektttrfcd 




Condneten 



RUBBER COVERED 3Q PERCENT WIRES AND CABLES 
BUILDING WIRE— 460 VOLT 



•in 



ust met 

«»enm 

oei ta •■ 

sill* 

a (m*vw 



FILMS «lttS 



B iw I 6 »••• i 



mot 

1IMIM 



■»S IF mti LOT I AIK 



Bum* r tu* 
mwun|t —* 



9M0I Urt 



WNN 

WAU 



APPMX. 
IROHtt 



APfOOX. 

■itwt. 
pur 



SOUD SINGLE BRAID 



14 


111.00 


$861 


$845 


$7.87 


47.45 


8 


at 


28 


M 


15.00 


11.76 


11.41 


10,75 


10.17 


t 


ji 


88 


1* 


19.00 


15.64 


15.1ft 


1440 


1152 


2 


48 


4* 


8 


31.00 


25.48 


24.70 


2849 


22.05 


4 


48 


88 



SOUD DOUBLE BRAID 



14 


12.00 


10.84 


10.51 


8.81 


947 


8 


42 


28 


12 


17.00 


14.04 


18.61 


124$ 


12.14 


8 


44 


88 


10 


22.00 


18.18 


1745 


164* 


1545 


8 


48 


84 


8 


85.00 


28-55 


27.63 


28.16 


2446 


4 


42 


85 


6 


47.00 


87.88 


36.74 


8444 


82.77 


4 


48 


128 



STRANDED SINGLE BRAID 




14 


13.68 


10.71 


16.39 


6.78 


846 


8 


J9 


86 


12 


17.00 


1341 


13.49 


12.72 


1248 


8 


41 


88 


16 


23.00 


1848 


17.73 


18.72 


1642 


8 


48 


48 


8 


35.00 


2845 


27.49 


2542 


2442 


4 


48 


88 


DUPLEX SOLID 




14 


28.00 I 22.40 


21.72 


20.48 


1647 


8 


.41x42 


62 


12 


35.00 


28.62 


27.76 


26.17 


24.76 


8 


.45x44 


82 


16 


45.00 


8641 


85.41 


88.38 


3148 


8 


49x46 


114 


8 


71.00 


5741 


55.87 


52.67 


4943 


4 


.66x42 


174 


6 


96.00 


77.71 


7546 


71.05 


6741 


4 


.68x46 


288 



14 


33.00 


26.65 


2544 


2447 


23.05 


8 


.48x48 


84 


12 


41.00 


23.08 


32.07 


3044 


28.61 


8 


.47x45 


84 


16 


51.00 


41.74 


40.47 


38.16 


36.16 


8 


42x47 


124 


8 


7848 


63.89 


61.95 


58.41 


5545 


4 


.64x48 


184 


6 


105.00 


8545 


82.96 


7842 


73.99 


4 


.72x48 


288 



STRANDED DOUBLE BRAID 










14 


16.06 


12.94 


1245 


11.83 


11.19 


3 


48 


88 


12 


26.66 


1844 


1544 


14.94 


14.13 


8 


48 


46 


10 


26.00 


20.78 


20.15 


1849 


17.97 


3 


47 


88 


8 


3940. 


31.68 


30.72 


28.96 


27.40 


4 


43 


88 


6 


6248 


4148 


40.72 


38.39 


8641 


4 


48 


188 


4 


6746 


5441 


5247 


4947 


4649 


4 


45 


IN 


2 


90.00 


72.76 


70.56 


6648 


62.98 


4 


41 


278 


1 


129.00 


104.83 


101.65 


9544 


90.66 


5 


49 


884 


1/0 


151.00 


122.70 


118.98 


112.18 


106.12 


5 


.63 


443 


2/0 


176.00 


14347 


138.93 


130.99 


123.91 


5 


.67 


540 


3/0 


206.00 


16749 


16241 


15342 


144.94 


5 


.73 


663 


4/0 


249.00 


202.48 


196.33 


185.12 


175.11 


5 


.78 


814 


250,080 


309.00 




229.81 


217.38 


6 


46 


962 


300.000 


350.00 




259.92 


24547 


6 


.92 


1139 


850,000 


391.00 




290.22 


27443 


6 


.97 


1800 


400,000 


435.00 


FULL REELS 


322.96 


30540 


6 


1.02 


1473 


500,000 


529.00 


392.96 


371.72 


6 


1.10 


1815 


600,000 


651.00 


CIRCULAR MIL 


483.87 


457.72 


7 


141 


2177 


700,000 


747.00 




555.03 


525.03 


7 


148 


2512 


750,000 


797.00 


SIZES 


591.93 


559.93 


7 


142 


2673 


800,000 


838.00 


622.79 


589.12 


7 


1.35 


2848 


900,000 


937.00 


PRICED IN 


695.83 


65842 


7 


1.41 


3194 


1,000,000 


1034.00 




767.86 


726.36 


7 


1.47 


3530 


1,250,000 


1302.00 


COLUMN D 


966.87 


914.61 


8 


1.64 


4400 


1,500.000 


1535.00 


1140.61 


1078.95 


8 


1.76 


5240 


1,7„0,000 


1765.00 




1310.82 


1239.97 


8 


1.88 


6060 


2,000.000 


1997.00 






1483.68 


1403.48 


8 


1.98 


6890 



9822 



-263- 



RUBBER COVERED FIXTURE WIRES — 300 VOLTS 



sue. 
Ill 



LIST rUE 

■ HORN 

COILS •■ 
SttLS 

Aim** m* 
kflMLkt) 



m eta.: at ims 

mhM m to «i**a satst ttttn 



BMrii a i«rk n linn r H,« 
LMr 1 k iihlm U »uwmt| L — 



vnriLim»iK 



e.s. 
ihomh 



MITWT. 



80UD 






CODE GRADE 










M* 


1/84" 


$4.68 


83.78 


$349 


83 48 


$346 


48 


8 


M* 


l/n 


5.28 


445 


4.12 


849 


348 


.12 


18 


18 


1/84 


5.78 


4.83 


4.48 


443 


4.08 


.11 


• 


18 


1/33 


646 


6.24 


548 


4.79 


443 


J8 


12 


16* 


1/84 


6.18 


4.98 


4J1 


444 


448 


J2 


12 


18 


1/SS 


746 


Ml 


6.85 


543 


6.84 


44 


18 



STRANDED 




CODE GRADE 










28* 


1/84 


648 


441 


448 


344 


3.78 


48 


• 


28* 


1/32 


848 


448 


4.75 


448 


444 


42 


18 


18 


1/84 


8.78 


641 


545 


446 


448 


41 


t 


18 


1/82 


748 


841 


548 


548 


548 


48 


12 


16* 


1/84 


748 


649 


5.71 


648 


648 


J2 


IS 


16 


1/22 


848 


8.78 


842 


841 


642 


44 


16 



SOLID 






INTERMEDIATE GRADE 








18 
18 
16 


1/84 

1/83 

i/n 


848 

748 

748 


544 
6.71 
848 


448 

644 

6.19 


441 
642 
544 


448 

644 
642 


41 
42 
44 


f 
U 
18 


80UD. 






38% GRADE 






18 
18 
16 


U84 

1/32 
1/22 


646 

744) 
848 


648 

846 
842 


648 
642 
6.62 


448 
648 
844 


444 
548 
648 


41 
42 
44 


6 
12 
16 



•Do not boar Unde r wr ite r s ' Labels. 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 



prle 



USE QUANTITY OR LIST PRICES TO DETERMINE VALUE OP ORDER OR INQUIRY. 

Rubber-Braid and Robber-Lead wires may be combined to arrive at list value to determine 



PRICES ARK F.O.B. DESTINATION any point in the United States, ports of entry Panama 
PjmI, Hawaiian Tf 1 "^*, and Alaska, on shipments of 100 lbs. or over, from manufacturer's 
factory or warehouse. Shipments of less than 100 lbs., F.O.B. point shipment. No freight 
allowance. 

No freight 



EXPRESS OR PARCEL POST SHIPMENTS F.O-B. POINT OF 8HIPMENT. 

allowance. 

INVOICE DATE shall be same as date of shipment 

TERMS: Net last day of month following date of invoice. 2% cash discount if paid by the 
10th of month following date of invoice. 

No cash discount will be allowed on payments made by trade acceptances, notes, securities, 
postdated checks, etc 

Prices subject to change without notice. 

For sties not listed, use the price of next larger sise. 

SHIPMENTS are priced on the basis of the Column covering the Quantity or List Value of 
each single shipment, except that shipments against filed Specific Job Contracts (Form No. 1) 
are to be priced in accordance with the contract. 

COLORS: Sises No. 20 A.W.G. to No. 6 A.W.G. inclusive, regularly furnished iu the following 
colors'. BLACK, WHITE, RED, BLUE, GREEN, YELLOW; colors other than those mentioned, 
quantity price plus 5%. Sizes larger than No. 6 A.W.G. regularly furnished in Black, Red 
and White. All other colors, quantity price plus 5%. 

FOR CONVENIENCE IN RETAILING: Wire in sixes No. 18 A.W.G. to No. 6 A.W.G. will 

be furnished in lengths and at additional charges per thousand feet as noted: 250' lengths - 104; 
10O* lengths -26*; 50' lengths -404; 25' lengths - 60<. 

SPECIFIC BUILDING JOB CONTRACTS. When the requirements of wire and cable on a 
specific building job amount to not less thsn $1,000 LIST, THE ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 
WHO HAS RECEIVED A DEFINITE SIGNED CONTRACT FOR THE JOB, may be covered 
for the specified requirements for a period of six (6) months, in accordance with contract (Form 
No. 1) which will be provided. 

Each shipment shall be treated as a separate contract. If the Buyer fails to fulfill the terms 
of payment herein provided, or if the Buyer's financial responsibility becomes tuiaatiafaetorTto 
the Seller, the Seller may, without prejudice to any other lawful remedy, defer fu rther ship- 
ments, or, st its option, terminate its own further obligations with respect to any outstanding 
commitments. 

REELS shall be paid for (net, no cash discount) at the same time as the material, and may be 
returned freight collect to destination specified by Seller. When reels are returned In good condi- 
tion not later than twelve (12) months from date of shipment, full credit will be allowed. 



3322 



-to*- 



17018 



Section 11 Page* 1 to 8 



* 




RWL-T-28 



Anaconda Wire & Cable Company 

General Offices; 25 Broadway, New York. 
Chicago Office; 20 No. Wacker Drive. 



PRICE SHEET 



Effective 
April 1, 19S5 



RUBBER— DAD 

Electrical (SARTCOTE) Condn^M^ v f/\ 

APR 1 1935 mj 

BUILDING WIREdpk 

CODE, INTERMEDIATE, 80 %N^' 1 JjM» B |rt« 
600Volu ^^ l 

Solid or Stranded, Single or Multiple Conductor* 

FIXTURE WIRES /f^'^'V 
CODE, INTERMEDIATE, 30% ' ' CU 

300 Volti •"• * "i|li.**!!. 

Solid or Stranded **"'YjJL ""afett ..... 

***. S..rf.Z.-M> 

BATE MAR 27 1935 fcCD 

S, A. «!.••» J/-/- 

H#kJ /'//" 

Ramacta Y- 

iT " raMiiMo rwc* urr 01 




Canceling RWL-T-27, Section 11 Page* 1 to 8 July 5, 1935. 



9822 



-265- 



RUBBER AND LEAD CODE WTBES AND CABLES 

BUILDING WIKE— «66 VOLT 


Mil 


UJT rtJCE 

MOKIH 

ooiuei 

■ IIU 

AfcflMLtoO 


Fli MS ■ IFELS 

■mm at to tint —* wfcn 

1 utr 

■ m>* a • «*» 
D LMT ||f IIMLIM 


ttaStfTsTUUSTVlLK 

n |im«» r immlm 
Up.MtUtfll aim* 


■uitia 

WALL 
MTH« 


LEAD 

MCATH 

MTHS 


APPIIOX. 

0. D. 
IUCMM 


APPROX. 
METWT. 
PIUN' 


SOLID SINGLE CONDUCTOR 








18* 
10* 

14 
13 


$38.88 

22.50 
37.88 
32.40 


$16.77 

18.29 
22,46 
26.36 


$16.26 

17.72 
21.78 
25.56 


$16JS 

16.72 
20J3 
24.10 


$14J0 
15J2 
19.43 
22J0 


2 
2 
$ 
8 


2 
2 
2 

2 


.19 

.20 

.25 
J7 


93 

108 
135 
153 


10 
8 

e 

4 


49J0 

67 J« 

97 JO 

115.40 


40.04 

54.65 
79.49 

93.78 


S8J2 
52.98 
77.08 
90.94 


36.61 
49.96 
72.68 
85.74 


34.68 
47.28 
68.75 
81.11 


$ 

4 
4 
4 


8 
$ 

4 
4 


J2 

J8 
.47 
J2 


260 
320 

520 
620 


STRANDED i NGI 


■E CONDUC 












14 

13 

11 

8 

6 


88.78 

3«J0 

55J8 

74.08 

108.00 


14*7 
29.48 

44.66 
60.24 
86.18 


24 21 
28J8 
43.30 
58.41 
88.57 


22J3 
26.94 
40J3 
65.07 

78.79 


21.80 
25.49 
$8.62 

52.09 
74JS 


8 
2 
$ 

4 
4 


2 
2 

3 
8 

4 


.25 

.27 
J2 
J8 
.47 


135 
153 
260 
320 
520 


4 
2 

1 

1/8 
3/8 


125.50 
154 JO 
192.00 
288.00 
265.00 


101.93 
125.17 
156.29 
191.79 
215J2 


98.83 
121J7 
151.55 
185.98 
208.98 


93.19 
114.44 
142J8 
175.35 
197.04 


88.15 
108.26 
135.16 
165 J8 
186 J9 


4 
4 
5 
8 
8 


4 
4 
4 

4 
4 


J2 

J8 
.64 
.68 
.73 


620 

770 

930 

1060 

1218 


8/8 

4/8 
350.000 
308.080 
850.008 


307.00 
888.88 

469.00 
524.88 

579.00 


PRICE IN 

COLUMN 

APPLICABLE 

TO 

LIST VALUE 

OP ORDER 


228.34 
267.49 
348.61 
388.92 
430.18 


215J9 
253.08 
329.75 
867.90 
406.98 


8 
8 

6 
6 
6 


4 

4 
5 
5 
5 


.78 

J4 

.95 

1.00 

1.06 


1376 
1570 
2080 
227$ 
2490 


400.000 
500.000 
600.000 
700.000 
750.000 


628.00 

734.00 

952.00 

1052.00 

1100.00 


466.87 
544.93 
707.28 
781.71 
816.99 


441.63 
515.48 
669.05 
739.46 

772.88 


6 
6 
7 
7 
7 


5 
8 
6 

6 
6 


1.10 
1.19 
1.33 
1.40 
1.43 


2720 
3160 
3980 
4420 
4620 


800.000 

900.000 

1,000.008 

1,250.000 


1154.00 
1256.00 
1367.00 

1771 00 


857.09 

932.81 

1015.79 

1815.39 


810.76 

882.38 

960.88 

1244.30 


7 
7 
7 
8 


6 
6 

6 

7 


1.47 
1.53 
1.59 
1.79 


4850 
5265 
5690 
6890 


1 .500.000 
1.750.000 
2,000.000 


2015.00 
2266.00 
2559.00 


1496.85 
1683.58 
1901.02 


1415.94 
1592J7 
1798.26 


8 

8 
8 


7 
7 
7 


1.91 
2.02 
2.13 


7875 
8890 
9850 


SOLID TWIN 


18* 
16» 
14 
12 


33.70 
37.00 
45.60 

68.00 


27 J7 
30.00 
37.03 
55J1 


26.54 
29.09 
35.91 
53.63 


25.03 
27.43 
33.86 
50.56 


23.67 
25.95 
32.02 

47.84 


2 
2 

3 

3 


2 
2 
2 
8 


.19x.S3 
.20i.35 
J5X.44 
JOxJl 


145 
165 
225 
360 

410 
540 

852 
1045 


10 

8 
6 

4 


80.70 
113 JO 
164.00 
203.00 


65.60 

92.04 

133.19 

164.91 


63.61 

89.25 

129.16 

159.92 


59.98 

84.15 

121.77 

150.78 


56.74 

79.60 

115.19 

142.63 


8 

4 

4 
4 


3 
8 
4 
4 


J2xJ5 
J8x.66 

.471.81 
.52x.91 


• For 30 


» Volt S«TTice. 













9822 



-266- 



Ekctrical 




CondwAon 



RUBBER AND LEAD CODE WRES AND CABLES 
BUILDING WIRE— 600 VOLT 



•in 



LIST WCl 

BMRIN 

001 UOt 

MILS 



HIIQUrt) 



mi tms a itns 

MM til M » llM w* whn 



MO* 






ClM 
•IN 



UDS OF TOTU UST fUK 

0*IMt» P HWtM 



■U01?« 
WALL 
•4TM* 



LEAD 

•MATH 

*4TH« 



APPROX. 

o. o. 

IKOMt* 



APPROX. 
NCTWT. 
PIRM' 



STRANDED TWIN 



14 


$31.50 


$41.90 


$40.63 


$38.31 


$3644 


S 


S 


45x .44 


228 


12 


75.70 


61.54 


59.67 


56.27 


634$ 


S 


S 


401 41 


360 


11 


92.00 


7443 


72.56 


68.42 


64.72 


s 


s 


42x 45 


410 


S 


127.00 


103.19 


100.06 


94.35 


894S 


4 


s 


48z .66 


540 


• 


180.00 


14649 


142.14 


134.02 


126.78 


4 


4 


.47z 41 


852 


4 


223.00 


181.18 


175.69 


165.65 


156.70 


4 


4 


42s .91 


1045 


2 


285.00 


231.42 


224.40 


21148 


200.13 


4 


4 


48il.03 


1310 


1 


403.00 


32747 


317.64 


299.49 


28340 


5 


6 


.67x1.19 


1860 


1/0 


477.00 


387.57 


$75.82 


354.35 


335.19 


5 


8 


.72x147 


2120 


2/0 


543.00 


441.03 


427.66 


403.22 


381.43 


8 


8 


.76x146 


2393 


3/0 


•10.00 


49S.90 


480.87 


453.39 


42848 


8 


6 


41x1.47 


2730 


4/0 


715.00 


581.03 


563.42 


531.22 


50241 


8 


5 


47x148 


3120 



SOLID 3 CONDUCTOR 
















18* 


73.40 


59.65 


67.85 


54.54 


51.59 


2 


8 


.41 


315 


16» 


8440 


68.67 


66.58 


62.78 


5948 


2 


3 


.44 


343 


14 


117.00 


95.16 


92.27 


86.99 


82.30 


3 


4 


46 


500 


12 


134.40 


10943 


105.92 


99.87 


94.47 


3 


4 


.60 


680 


10 


157.00 


12741 


123.45 


116.40 


110.10 


3 


4 


.64 


770 


8 


203.00 


164.75 


159.75 


150.63 


142.48 


4 


4 


.77 


960 


6 


269.00 


218.87 


212.24 


200.11 


18949 


4 


8 


.92 


1470 


4 


354.00 


287.74 


279.03 


263.08 


248.86 


4 


6 


1.03 


1780 



STRANDED 3 CONDUCTOR 
















14 

12 

16 

8 

6 


126.60 
14640 
175.00 
224.00 
296.00 


102.83 
119.04 
141.86 
182.32 
239.99 


99.71 
115.44 
137.56 
176.80 
232.72 


94.02 
108.83 
129.70 
166.70 
219.42 


88.9$ 
102.98 
122.69 
157.68 
20746 


8 

3 
3 
4 
4 


4 
4 
4 
4 

5 


46 
.60 
.64 
.77 
.92 


500 
680 
770 
960 
1170 


4 

$ 

1 

1/0 


$86.00 
490.00 
689.00 
779.00 


PRICE IN 

COLUMN 

APPLICABLE 

TO 


286.50 
364.22 
511.53 
578.90 


271.02 
344.52 

483.88 
547.61 


4 
4 

5 

5 


5 

5 
6 
6 


1.03 
1.16 
1.33 
1.42 


1780 
2240 
2980 
3340 


2/0 
3/0 

4/0 
250,000 


882.00 

995.00 

1221.00 

1507.00 


655.48 

739.05 

907.14 

1119.53 


620.04 

699.10 

858.10 

1059.02 


5 
5 

5 

6 


6 
6 
7 

7 


1.52 

1.63 
1.79 
1.96 


3830 
4370 
5430 
6320 


300.000 
350.000 
400.000 
500.000 


1715.00 
1904.00 
2164.00 
2506.00 


LIST ^ 
OF O 


fALUE 
RDER 


1273.91 
1414.45 

1607.86 
1861.63 


1205.05 
1337.99 
1520.94 
1760.99 


6 
6 
6 
6 


7 

7 
8 
8 


2.08 
2.19 
2.32 
2.50 


7100 

7f»0 

9130 

10550 



• For 300 Volt Service. 



9822 



-267- 



Eleetrical 




Conduct on 



RUBBER AND LEAD INTERMEDIATE WIRES AND CABLES 



BUILDING WIRE— 600 VOLT 



•in 



list nice 

•ROKIN 

COIL* OR 

RIILI 



kt 



SIM LMI 



F1L COILS 01 REELS 



BWk M tow 
I.W I ll (IMl 



Lift 



MDEiS OF TOTAL LIST VALK 

DUMo r HMM 
$4,000 LM I C llim 



*U«il» 


LIAD 


APPR0X. 


WALL 


•HEATH 


O. D. 


MTHS 


MTHS 


imohis 



APPROX. 
MITWT. 
PIR ■' 



SOLID SINGLE CONDUCTOR 



18* 


$21.40 


$17.42 


$16.88 


$15.92 


$15.06 


a 


2 


.19 


92 


16* 


23.40 


18.97 


18.40 


17.34 


16.41 


a 


1 


.20 


100 


14 


28.90 


23.50 


22.79 


21.49 


20.33 


3 


2 


.25 


135 


12 


34.30 


27.86 


27.02 


25.47 


24.09 


8 


2 


.27 


153 


10 


51.40 


41.79 


40.53 


38.22 


36.14 


3 


3 


.32 


260 


8 


70.30 


57.08 


55.34 


52.18 


49.36 


4 


3 


-38 


320 


6 


101.20 


82.22 


79.72 


75.17 


71.11 


4 


4 


.47 


520 



STRANDED SINGLE CONDUCTOR 



14 


32.10 


26.08 


25.28 


23.85 


22.55 


3 


3 


.25 


135 


12 


38.30 


31.09 


30.14 


28.42 


26.89 


3 


a 


.27 


153 


10 


57.20 


46.49 


45.08 


42.50 


40.21 


3 


3 


.32 


260 


U 


77.20 


62.71 


60.80 


57.33 


54.24 


4 


3 


.38 


320 


6 


109.30 


88.83 


86.14 


81.22 

95.89 


76.83 


4 


4 


.47 


520 


4 


129.00 


104.87 


101.69 


90.70 


4 


4 


.52 


620 


2 


158.00 


128.40 


124.50 


1 7.39 


111.05 


4 


4 


.58 


770 


1 


197.00 


160.42 


155.56 


146.68 


138.75 


5 


4 


.64 


930 


1/0 


242.00 


196.50 


190.54 


179.66 


169.95 


5 


4 


.68 


1060 


2/0 


272.00 


220.91 


214.22 


201.98 


191.06 


5 


4 


.73 


1210 


3/0 


315.00 




233.82 


221.17 


5 


4 


.78 


1370 


4/0 


369.00 




273.86 


259.05 


5 


4 


.84 


1570 


250,000 


480.00 




356.52 


337.25 


6 


5 


.95 


2030 


300.000 


535.00 


PRICE IN 
COLUMN 


397.32 


375.85 


6 


5 


1.00 


2270 


350.000 


592.00 


439.46 


415.70 


6 


5 


1.06 


2490 


400.000 


641.00 


476.49 


450.74 


6 


5 


1.10 


2720 


500.000 


748.00 




555.43 


525.41 


6 


5 


1.19 


3160 


600.000 


968.00 


APPLICABLE 


719.43 


680.53 


7 


< 


1.33 


3980 


700.000 


1071.00 




795.64 


752.64 


7 


6 


1.40 


4420 


750.000 


1122.00 


TO 


833.74 


788.68 


7 


6 


T.43 


4620 


800.000 


1179.00 


875.67 


828.34 


7 


6 


1.47 


4850 


900.000 


1284.00 


LIST VALUE 


953.74 


902.18 


7 


6 


1.53 


5265 


1.000.000 


1398.00 




1038.39 


982.27 


7 


6 


1.59 


5690 


1.250,000 


1817.00 
2066.00 


OF ORDER 


1349..'»8 
1534.59 


1276.63 


8 


7 


1.79 


6890 


1,500,000 


1451.64 


8 


7 


1.91 


7875 


1,750.000 


2322.00 




1724.66 


1631.44 


8 


7 


2.02 


8890 


2.000.000 


2619.00 




1945.07 


lsto.r.o 


8 


7 


2.13 


9850 



SOLID TWIN 


















18* 


35.20 | 


28.63 1 


27.76 | 


26.17 


21.76 


2 


2 


.19x.33 


115 


16* 


38.80 1 


31.54 I 


30.58 | 


28.83 | 


27.27 , 


2 


2 


.20x.35 


165 


14 


48.20 1 


39.19 j 


38.00 1 


35.84 


33.90 


3 


2 


.25x4 4 


225 


12 


71.70 | 


5S.21 


56.46 1 


53.21 j 


50.36 


3 


3 


.30x.51 


360 


10 


85.00 


69.13 | 


67.04 | 


63.20 I 


59.78 


3 


3 


.32x.55 


410 


8 


11 9 JO 


96.91 


93.97 


88.61 


83.82 


4 


3 


.38x.66 


540 


6 171.00 


138.68 


134.48 


126.79 


119.94 


4 


* 


.47x.81 


852 



• For 300 Volt Service. 



9822 



-268- 



Eiectrical 




Condaeton 



RUBBER AND LEAD INTERMEDIATE WIRES AND CABLES 

BUILDING WIRE— «00 VOLT 



Mil 



LIST PIICE 

BROXIN 

OOILAO* 

REELS 

• |a*>w 
HHflMLUt) 



FRl MILS N lEllS 

unrfi u <m tint u4 whn 

I l.MT 

BWII U 1 nrt 
1HT | \i »IM Lilt 



OUEK OF TOTAL LIST TALK 

D SIM to r »«.*MIM 
M.ooo L M I t —tmw 



Nllll IUI 

WALL I ONEATM 
14THS I («THt 



AFFlOX. 
0. 0. 

INCHE* 



APPMX. 

■rrvr. 

Ff « ■' 



STRANDED TWIN 



14 


$54.30 


$44.11 


$42.78 


$40.34 


$38.15 


3 


2 


•25x .44 


225 


12 


79.30 


64.46 


62 J 1 


58.93 


55.75 


3 


3 


JOz .51 


360 


10 


96.70 


78.51 


76.13 


71.78 


67.91 


3 


3 


.32x .55 


410 


8 


113.30 


108.34 


105.05 


99.05 


93.69 


4 


3 


.38x .66 


540 


6 


187.00 


152.19 


147.58 


139.15 


131.62 


4 


4 


.47x .81 


852 


4 


230.00 


186.83 


181.17 


170.82 


161.59 


4 


4 


.52x .91 


1045 


2 


293.00 


237.77 


230.56 


217.38 


205.64 


4 


4 


.58x1.03 


1310 


1 


413.00 


335.85 


325.67 


307.06 


290.46 


5 


6 


.07x1.19 


1860 


1/0 


489.00 


396.98 


384.95 


362.96 


343.34 


5 


5 


.72x1.27 


2120 


2/0 


556.00 


451.83 


438.13 


413.10 


390.76 


5 


5 


.76x1.36 


2395 


3/0 


625.00 


507.89 


492.49 


464.35 


439.25 


5 


5 


.81x1.47 


2730 


4/0 


732.00 


594.96 


576.93 


543.97 


514.56 


5 


5 


.87x1.58 


3120 



SOLID 3 


CONDUCTOR 
















18* 
16* 
14 
12 


76.00 

87.50 

121.30 

140.00 


61.65 

71.08 

98.56 

113.84 


59.78 

68.92 

95.58 

110.38 


5647 

64.98 

90.11 

104.07 


53.32 

61.48 

. 85.24 

98.45 


2 
2 
3 

3 


3 

3 
4 

4 


.41 
.44 

M 
.60 


315 
345 
500 
680 


10 
8 
6 


164.00 
212.00 
280.00 


132.88 
172.41 
227.52 


128.86 
167.19 
220.62 


121.50 
157.63 
208.01 


114.92 
149.11 
196.77 


3 
4 

4 


4 
4 
5 


.64 
.77 
.92 


770 

960 

1470 



STRANDED 3 CONDUCTOR 



14 


131.00 


106.34 


103.11 


97 .22 


91.96 


3 


4 


.56 


500 


12 


152.00 


123.64 


119.90 


113.05 


106.93 


3 


4 


.60 


680 


10 


182.00 


147.65 


143.18 


134.99 


127.70 


3 


4 


.64 


770 


8 


234.00 


190.41 


184.64 


174.09 


164.68 


4 


4 


.77 


960 


6 


306.00 


248.82 


241.28 


227.50 


215.20 


4 


5 


.92 


1470 


4 


397.00 




295.03 


279.08 


4 


5 


1.05 


1780 


2 


503.00 




373.36 


353.19 


4 


5 


1.16 


2240 


1 


705.00 


PRICE IN 


523.46 


495.16 


5 


6 


1.33 


2980 


1/0 


798.00 


COLUMN 


692.65 


560.61 


5 


6 


1.42 


3340 


2/0 


903.00 


671.01 


634.73 


5 


6 


1.52 


3830 


3/0 


1018.00 


APPLICABLE 


756.30 


715.42 


5 


6 


1.63 


4370 


4/0 


1248.00 


TO 
LIST VALUE 


927.18 


877.06 


5 


7 


1.79 


5430 


250.000 


1541.00 


1144.47 


1082.62 


6 


7 


1.96 


6320 


300,000 


1751.00 


1300.41 


1230.11 


6 


7 


2.08 


7100 


350.000 


1943.00 


OF ORDER 


1443.62 


1365.59 


6 


7 


2.19 


7830 


400.000 


2205.00 




1638.18 


1549.64 


6 


8 


2.32 


9130 


500.000 


2551.00 




1894.71 


1792.29 


6 


8 


2.50 


10550 



• For 300 Volt Sei-rice. 



9822 



-269- 



Electrieal 




Conductors 



RUBBER AND LEAD 30 PERCENT WIRES AND CABLES 
BUILDING WIRE— 600 VOLT 



LIST NICE 

BROKEN 

coat an 

DHLS 

IMkW 
\+ |IM Lift) 



FULL COILS 01 BELLS 

M4*rt*4 I* to ttM* *** ottor* 

*or to a « «w to 

1.500' b •■** Lit* 



ORDERS OF TOTAL LIST VALUE 



Dm' 



|i»k 

MO LID 



fl.MO Llrt 



I i 

RUBBER LEAO AF-PHOX »PPROJl. 

W*LL 8NEATH 0. MCTWT. 

MTMt i t4TH* INCHES PtRH' 



SOLID SINGLE CONDUCTOR 



18* 


$22.00 


$17.93 


$17.38 


$16.39 


$15.50 


2 


2 


.19 


92 


16» 


24.20 


19.67 


19.07 


17.98 


17.01 


2 


2 


.20 


100 


14 


S0.00 


24.42 


23.68 


22.33 


21.12 


3 


2 


.25 


135 


12 


35.70 


29.02 


28.13 


26.52 


25.09 


s 


2 


.27 


153 


10 


53.20 


43.21 


41.93 


39.54 


37.39 


3 


3 


.32 


260 


8 


72.70 


59.08 


57.28 


54.01 


51.10 


4 


S 


M 


320 


6 


103.90 


84.45 


81.89 


77.21 


73.04 


4 


4 


.47 


520 



STRANDED SINGLE CONDUCTOR 



14 


33.20 


26.97 


26.15 


24.67 


23.33 


3 


2 


.25 


135 


IS 


39.50 


32.13 


31.16 


29.37 


27.78 


3 


2 


.27 


153 


10 


59.00 


47.99 


46.53 


43.88 


41.50 


3 


3 


.32 


260 


8 


79.90 


64.91 


62.94 


59.34 


66.14 


4 


3 


.38 


320 


6 


112.30 


91 .26 


88.49 


83.44 


78.92 


4 


4 


.47 


520 


4 


132.00 


107.31 104.05 


98.11 


92.81 


4 


4 


.52 


620 


I 


161.00 


130.93 


126.96 


119.7 J 


113.24 


4 


4 


.58 


770 


1 


202.00 


163.83 


158.85 


149.77 


141.58 


5 


4 


.64 


930 


1/0 


247.00 


200.36 


194.29 


183.19 


173.28 


5 


4 


.68 


1060 


2/0 


277.00 


225.32 


218.49 


206.01 


194.87 


5 


4 


.73 


1210 


3/0 


321.00 




238.30 


225.42 


5 


4 


.78 


1370 


4/0 


376.00 




279.09 


264.01 


5 


4 


.84 


1570 


250,000 


489.00 




363.02 


$43.39 


6 


5 


.95 


2030 


300,000 


544.00 


PRICE IN 

COLUMN 


404.23 


382,37 


6 


5 


1.00 


2270 


350,000 


602.00 


447.07 


422.89 


6 


5 


1.06 


2490 


400.000 


652.00 


484.40 


458.22 


6 


5 


1.10 


2720 


500,000 


759.00 




564.02 


533.53 


6 


5 


1.19 


3160 


600,000 


982.00 


APPLICABLE 


729.37 


689.95 




6 


143 


3980 


700,000 


1086.00 




807.04 


763.41 




6 


1.40 


442* 


750,000 


1141.00 


TO 


847.42 


801.61 




6 


1.43 


4620 


800.000 


1199.00 


890.84 


842.69 




6 


1.47 


4850 


900,000 


1307.00 


LIST VALUE 


970.79 


918.31 




6 


143 


5265 


1,000,000 


1423.00 




1056.94 


999.81 




6 


1.59 


5690 


1,250,000 


1854.00 


OF ORDER 


1377.47 


1303.01 


8 


7 


1.79 


6890 


1,500,000 


2107.00 


1565.43 


1480.80 


8 


7 


1.91 


7875 


1,750,000 


2367.00 




1758.30 


1663.25 


8 


7 


2.02 


8890 


2,000.000 


2668.00 




1982.25 


1875.10 


8 


7 


2.13 


•880 



SOLID TWIN 



18* 


36.40 


29.57 


28.67 


27.03 


25.57 


2 


2 


.191.33 


145 


16* 


40.30 


32.77 


31.77 


29.96 


28.34 


2 


2 


40x.S5 


1*5 


14 


50.40 


40.95 


39.71 


37.44 


35.42 


3 


2 


.251.44 


325 


12 


74.60 


60.62 


58.78 


55.42 


52.42 


3 


3 


.30x41 


360 


10 


88.60 


72.00 


69.82 


65.83 


62.27 


3 


3 


42x45 


410 


8 


124.00 


100.93 


97.88 


92.29 


87.29 


4 


3 


48x.66 


540 


6 


176.00 


143.13 


138.79 


130.86 


123.78 


4 


4 


.47x41 


852 



• For 300 Volt Seryle*. 



9822 



-270- 



Electrical 




Conductors 



RUBBER AND LEAD 30 PERCENT WIRES AND CABLES 
BUILDING WIRE— 600 VOLT 



•in 



Lin PIKE 

■ROKIN 

OOIU OR 

MIL* 

■ (M*mr 

Ato tIM LM) 



FEl CMS U REELS 

mmtiti m *> tint art mkn 



Wk 
t.MT 



t.MT 

luck 
|IM LIU 



tUaS Of TOTAL LIST VJU.K 

Df 194 k> r f..tM LM 
t4,Wlltllt uitmt 



■URBCR 
WALL 

MINI 



LIAO 

8HIATM 

MTHS 



APrROX. 
0. O. 

INCHES 



approx. 

NETWT. 

PER M' 



STRANDED TWIN 



14 


85640 


$45.93 


$4443 


$41.99 


$39.71 


3 


2 


.25x .44 


225 


11 


biJO 


66.86 


64.83 


61.13 


57.83 


8 




.30i 41 


360 


10 


100.30 


8140 


79.03 


7441 


70.48 


3 




-32x .55 


410 


8 


138.50 


112.55 


109.14 


102.90 


97.34 


4 




.38x .66 


540 


6 


193.00 


156.76 


152.01 


143.32 


13547 


4 




.47i .81 


852 


4 


236.00 


191.91 


186.09 


175.46 


165.98 


4 




.52i .91 


1045 


2 


299.00 


242.96 


235.60 


222.13 


210.13 


4 




48x1.03 


1310 


1 


422.00 


342.62 


332.24 


313.25 


296.32 


5 


5 


.67x1.19 


1860 


1/0 


498.00 


404.70 


392.43 


370.01 


350.00 


5 


5 


.72x1.27 


2120 


2/0 


567.00 


460.65 


446.69 


421.16 


398.39 


• 5 


5 


.76x1.36 


2395 


8/0 


637.00 


517.83 


502.18 


473.44 


447.85 


5 


5 


.81x1.47 


2730 


4/0 


746.00 


606.41 


588.03 


554.43 


524.46 


5 


5 


.87x1.58 


3120 



SOLID 3 CONDUCTOR 



18* 


77.70 


63.11 


61.19 


57.69 


5447 


2 


3 


.41 


315 


16* 


90.00 


73.04 


70.82 


66.78 


63.17 


2 


3 


.44 


345 


14 


124.70 


101.33 


98.27 


92.65 


87.64 


3 


4 


.56 


500 


12 


144.70 


117.58 


114.01 


107.50 


101.69 


3 


4 


.60 


680 


10 


169.00 


137.39 


133.23 


125.62 


118.88 


3 


4 


.64 


770 


8 


220.00 


178.75 


173.32 


163.43 


154.58 


4 


4 


.77 


960 


6 


289.00 


23442 


227.42 


214.42 


202.83 


4 


5 


.92 


1470 



STRANDED 3 CONDUCTOR 



14 

12 
10 

8 
6 


134.40 

157.00 
188.00 
243.00 
315.00 


109.17 
127.39 
152.37 
197.06 
255.98 


105.86 
123.54 
147.75 
191.08 

248.22 


9941 
116.48 
139.31 
180.16 
234.03 


94.41 

110.18 
131.78 
170.42 
221.38 


3 
3 
3 
4 

4 


4 

4 
4 

4 
5 


46 
.60 
.64 
.77 
.92 


500 
680 
770 
960 
1470 


4 

2 

1 

1/0 


407.00 
513.00 
718.00 
812.00 


PRICE IN 

COLUMN 

APPLICABLE 

TO 


302.00 
381.30 
533.21 
603.55 


285.67 
360.70 
504.38 
570.92 


4 1 5 

4 1 5 

5 1 6 
5 6 


1.03 
1.16 
1.33 
1.42 


1780 
2240 
2980 
3340 


2/0 

3/0 

4/0 

250.000 


918.00 
1037.00 
1270.00 
1568.00 


681.85 

770.45 

943.66 

1164.96 


644.98 

728.80 

892.65 

1101.99 


5 
5 
5 
6 


6 
6 

7 

7 


1.52 
1.03 

1.79 
1.96 


3830 
4370 
5430 
6320 


300,000 1780.00 
350,000 1976.00 
400,000 2239.00 
500,000 ' 2586.00 


LIST T 

OF O 


PALUE 
RDER 


1322.13 i 1250.66 
1467.56 ! 1388.23 
1663.09 1 1573.19 
1920.71 1816.88 


6 7 
6 7 
6 8 
6 8 


2.08 
2.19 
2.32 
2.50 


7100 

7830 

9130 

10550 



• For 300 Volt Service. 



9822 



-271- 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 

USE LIST PRICES TO DETERMINE VALUE OF ORDER OR INQUIRY. 

PRICES ARE F.O.B. DESTINATION any point in the United States, Panama 
Canal, Puerto Rico, Hawaiian Islands, on shipments of 100 lbs. or over, from manu- 
facturer's factory or warehouse. Shipments of less than 100 lbs., F.O.B. point 
of shipment. No freight allowance. 

EXPRESS OR PARCEL POST SHIPMENTS F.O.B. POINT OF SHIPMENT. 

No freight allowance. 

INVOICE DATE shall be same as date of shipment 

TERMS: Net cash last day of month following date of invoice. 2% cash dis- 
count if paid by the 10th of month following date of invoice. 

No cash discount will be allowed on payments made by trade acceptance, notes, 
securities, postdated checks, etc. 

Prices subject to change without notice. 

For sizes not listed, use the price of next larger size. 

SHIPMENTS are priced on the basis of the Column covering the List Value 
of each single shipment, except that shipments against filed Specific Job Contracts 
(Form No. 1) are to be priced in accordance with the contract. 

SPECIFIC BUHJHNG JOB CONTRACTS. When the requirements of wire 
and cable on a specific building job amount to not less than $2,000 LIST, the elec- 
trical contractor who has received a definite signed contract for the job, may be 
covered for the specified requirements for a period of six (6) months, in accord- 
ance with contract (Form No. 1) which will be provided. 

Each shipment shall be treated as a separate contract. If the Buyer fails to 
fulfill the terms of payment herein provided, or if the Buyer's financial responsi- 
bility becomes unsatisfactory to the Seller, the Seller may, without prejudice to 
any other lawful remedy, defer further shipments, or, at its option, terminate its 
own further obligations with respect to any outstanding commitments. 

REELS shall be paid for (net, no cash discount) at the same time as the 
material, and may be returned freight collect to destination specified by Seller. 
When reels are returned in good condition not later than twelve (12) months from 
date of shipment, full credit will be allowed. 



9822 



-27a* 



Section 11 Page • 

April 1, 19.45 



» 



Ana&Wa 

fc— mim to cow i mu M 




RWL -D-4 



Anaconda Wire & Cable Company 

General Offices: 25 Broadway, New York. 
Chicago Office; 20 No. Wacker Drive. 

DISCOUNT SHEET 



WHOLESALERS s^WEs 

SERVICE DISCOUNTS /& S^ 

Electrical/ jcOTfe) Conducto ^ ^ APR 1 1935 m 

^^^^^ \. <^> ^ 

RUBBER -LEAD BUILDING WIR 
RUBBER -LEAD FIXTURE WIRES 

Code, Intermediate, 30% 

Applying to Sheet RWL-T-28 dated April 1, 19S5. 

SHIPMENTS MADE BY MANUFACTURER 

1. TO WHOLESALER'S WAREHOUSE STOCK 

(priced in column applicable to quan- 
tity specified in each individual order) COLUMN "A" ...-. DISCOUNT 20% 

COLUMN "B" DISCOUNT 20% 

COLUMN T DISCOUNT 17^i% 

COLUMN "D" DISCOUNT 12ft% 

COLUMN "E" DISCOUNT 7ft% 

2. DIRECT TO CUSTOMER OF WHOLESALER 

(priced in column applicable to quan- 
tity specified in each individual order) DISCOUNT 5% 

8. DIRECT TO CUSTOMER OF WHOLESALER AND APPLYING TO 
SPECIFIC BUILDING JOB CONTRACT (FORM No. 1) 

(priced in column applicable to quan- 
tity specified in Contract) - DISCOUNT 5% 

TERMS: Net cash last day of month following date of invoice. 2% cash discount if paid by to* 
15th of month following date of invoice. 



Canceling RWL-D-3, Section II, Page 9, July 5, 1934. 



9822 



-273- 



APPEEDI X A, PART 2 



ELEXIBLE CORDS 



Chronological Record of Price 
Filings "by Companies 



9322 



-275- 



to mrchasers ••■-re, on- the pve-';\;e, iracticr-ll"- - the s. r ie; customer 

sii'ic- tions were expanded at the sane ti ie so that sone jaid 
less ra a not 'rice than before, while otJ >a.id nore. 

C ronological records '^ere coupiled for nine of the most active 
nnd re "iresentative comanie of t e section, both large and small. 
These records show all the filings made by the companies selected., 
and. whether they originated the prices or rhether the/ -'ere following 
the. lead of another, and if so, wnom. 
a stud"- of theie records will reve,-.l the iV-' 1 o- in : :: 

1. The big irjority of the fill ■ ■■■ •?] ich initiated n change 
in not prices or custoner classifications were nade by one 
of two co; Danies. 

2. Such a chan 'e was r .0 vted ~r r all other comr.nius affected 
some iianei iiately, some not for a mo *.th or so. Company #7 
t;ade 12 filings affecting; voices in major lines, 9 of '-'hich 
were to meet the >ric9s originated by 2 commies; and 3 to 
meet mrices ori ;inated by 3 others. ( One of these 2 is an 
oil, large, amd conservative fir:, and the other has a 
renut-tion for mrice cutti w an other more or less shady 
practices.) (25) 

3. The general net :>rice trend was down"; rd. (This is attributed 
in part to price filing itself by so ie responsible members of 
the industry.) 

4. On a given date, lost companies woul ' h-ve in effect the sane 
■ rices and discount", and in general the sane custc :er 
classifies tions. (In snite of this fact, and tahiug the period 
as a whole, there wa.s no sta dlization of irices, for the 

f llowing rensons: (Ooinion in the industry and ITE1.1A.) 

a. The unreliable ele lent in the industry die not file Clear, 
comprehensive prices an.. discounts, or 

b. If the- did, filings coul ■■. not jo raade effective because 
insufficient co :i s had been submitted for distribution, 
and 

c. Uhile the agency was endeavoring to -;et the filings in 

older the re; >rti : co 1 >a i r would sell at any mrice it 
sa.w fit. 

d. hnf or cement was im possible: because such elements as 
"cost" and "overhead. 11 (uoon -'hich the nrice filing 
syste 1, in mart, rested) ^ere so difficult of oroof.. 

e. The following fi ures show the >rice changes rnd gen- 
eral trend during the peri' in which nrice filing 
was in effect, four 5: tjl ty>es were taJren, together 
with the dates on which one co r >; :r; filed these trices 

9822 



-276- 



r:id discounts. The other companies in the grou-o suonitted the sane 
fi ;,JBs cither 'before or rfter the date shorm. for the company taken. 



TYPE CF #10 - IIAfOlT 



Drte 

Filed 



List 
Pries 



Discount 
~ 7 i hi Lo',7 



iTet 
hrice 



9/7/33 
10/2/33 

2/5/34 
3/15/34 
10/9/34 
2/13/35 

ITote: I 



$'•6.50 

14.50 

14.30 
4.30 
5.20 
5.20 



1058 

'55 

50 

5 

5 
15 



10$ 

40 

60 

5 

5 
15 



'ir_al ITet °rice 25 under original ITet Price. 



$ 5.85 
8.70 
5.08 
5.80 
4.54 
4.94 
4.42 



Dr.te 


List 


Filed 


Price 


9/7/33 


$14.00 


9/22 ''33 


31.00 


2/15/54 


31.50 


3/24/5^ 


13.60 


6/21/34 


15.60 


10/15/34 




10/15/34 


14.40 


2/18/34 


14.40 



TYPF SJ #13 - 15/50 

Discount 



li :h 



jOVT 



Net 
h-ice 



10, 


10)0 


65 


40 


60 


oO 


5 


5 


10 


5 


10 


5 


15 


15 



$12.50 
10.35 
18.50 
12.40 
12.92 
12.92 
12.24 
15.58 
12.90 
12.24 



Note: Final ITet Price is 2h uni.er ori :in."l ITet Price. 



Dnte 
Filed 



^18-1/ A ILiDIO h r Iih] S^LID TUT 'D 



List 
Price 



D i s c'ount 
hi, _ :h Lov; 



i'et 
D rice 



10/6/35 

11/15/33 

2/23/34 
3/15/34 
3/15/34 
4/15/34 

7/10/34 
7/23/34 



$2.10 

2. 65 

2.65 
2.10 

.85 

.85 

.85 



o5 ; j 

58 

68 
65 



40,"o 

60 

58 
60 



10 List 

i 15 
20 Quantity 

5 
25 
10 Quantity Disc. 
List * 15,1 
Jobbers, chains, rar.il 
order houses, 5$ any num. 0.808 



SO. 755 
1.25 
0.868 
1.06 
0.338 
0.735 
0.84 
0.765 
0.973 
0.58 
Quantity Prices 
0.800 to 0.638 
0.755 
0.973 



ITote: The ji/^est nprket for this tyne -■■ire is the radio nanufacturers 
and the . ■ • .*• ' • '•■'••: 

9822 



the level of the prices on this date. "Also,' raost manufacturers "buy in 
large quantities and are able to take advantage of the lowest price. 
Therefore, manufacturers buying large quantities paid 9$ less at the end 
n at the start of price filing. 

TYPE PO if 16-1/64 - 3AY0N 



Date 
Filed 


List 
Frice 


Disc 
KUh 


u n t 

Low 


Net 
Price 


9/7/33 


|11.50 


10$ 


10$ 


$10.35 


9/22/33 


26 .00 


65 ' 


40 


9.10 
15.60. 


1/15/34 


26.00 


60 


' 52 


10.40 
12.48 


2/16/34 


26.00 


60 


60 


10.40 


3/24/34 


8.50 


5 


5 


8.08 


6/21/34 


8.50 


10 


5 


7.25 
8.08 


10/15/34 


8.90 


10 


5 


8.11 
3.55 



2/10/35 8.90 15 15 7.57 

Note: Final Net Price 28yj under original Net Price. 



The wide variations in the amount by which net prices dropped are 
occasioned "by the differences in the competitive status of the various 
types of wires comprising the industry. For instance, Type PO size rfl8 
is the most widely used of the flexible cord group, 'and the easiest of 
manufacture; that is, less expensive machinery is required in order to 
get into the business than in other types. Consequently, there are more 
of the "in-and-out" factories in this line, and it is more susceptible 
to price-cutting. The converse is true of Type S J , and of radio wires; 
hence, the narrower range of net prices for these types during the price- 
filing period. 

A member of NEMA who wrs for several years on the engineering staff 
of the .Underwriters' laboratories, and who is, therefore, well qualified 
to express an opinion, has written a brief statement on price-filing as 
it worked out in the flexible cord group. This statement is quoted in 
full, as being the best available testimony on this subject: 



9322 



-273« 



"The open price policy -under the ITHA code v;as a failure so 

far as the flexible cord industry was concerned. 3y "failure" I 

mean that it failed to accomplish its two fundamental objects, 
.as follows: 

(a) Frice Stabilization. This is quite different from 
price-fixing. There was no attempt at price-fixing, 
that I could see. 

("b) Furnishing all employers at all times, with correct 
information as to the state of the market* 

Many pages could he written as to the reasons for the failure; 
I will therefore confine myself to a hew highspots, not necessarily 
in the order of their importance. 

1. Diversity of Interests . Flexible cord is sold primarily to 
three principal custodier divisions: 

(a) Chain stores and mail order houses 

(b) Jobbers 

(c) Electrical appliance manufacturers, 
(including radio.) 

The 45 flexible cord producers comprising the industry were divided 
into numerous sub-classes so far as these customer divisions were 
concerned. Some sold chain stores only; some had no jobber business 
at all; some dealt exclusively thru the jobber; some sold all three; 
some sold radio manufacturers only, - and so on. What happened with 
the advent of the first filed price sheet? The cord producer let 
us say, whose sole business was to chain stores, received his com- 
petitor's sheet, which gave a more favorable price to the jobber 
than to the chain store. He immediately decides that that isn't 
right ~ so he files his prices, meeting the other fellow's price, 
but making it favorable to the chain store. It is easy to see that 
an endless stream of filings follows, with each type of manufacturer 
attempting to maintain a favorable position for his particular "pet" 
type of customer. Obviously, stabilization is impossible under 
such circumstances. 

2. Diversity of Production . Roughly speaking, there are three 
types of cord manufacturers. 

(a) Those who make flexible cord only. 

(b) Those who make heavier wires, as well as cords, 
but to whom cords are an import. ant item. 

(c) Those whose main business is in the field of 
heavier wires, with flexible cord produced mainly 
to fill out a complete line of insulated wires. 
Quite naturally there were pronounced differences of 
opinion ~ reflected in price filings - as to "cost", 
"selling below cost", etc. It doesn't require any 
argument to show Jfliat striking differences there arust 
have been, between these three classes, in such items 



9822 



-279- 

as overhead, distribution expense, etc. If a producer 
in class (c) filed prices to meet those filed by one in 
class (a), he was violating the code 'by "being "below cost, 
whereas the fellow in class (a) was probably all right. 
If he didn't file to meet the aforesaid filing, he found 
himself out of the market. Hence there was a continued 
series of filing, up and down, 'which again made stabilization 
impossible 



Lei . 



3. Retaliatory Fil ings. The flexible cord industry, as is 
every other industry, is m.o.de up of personalities as well as 
manufacturing units. There were many price filings made purely 
and simply in retaliation of one previously filed by a bitter 
competitor, resulting in a downward step for the entire industry. 

All the above discussion is on the general subject of the 
failure to effect stabilization. In regard to the failure of 
the open-price policy to give accurate information, little need 
be said. The flexible cord industry is no different from any 
other industry; it has in it a small group of manufacturers who, 
from the very outset, never had the slightest intention of com- 
plying with the filed price regulations - or anything else - 
in the 1TRA Code. At first, their efforts at evasion were confined 
to the filing of evasive, incomplete or obscure price sneets; but 
when these tactics failed, due to the alertness of the code authority, 
deliberate disregard of filed prices became the next step. When it 
became apparent that these tactics were to receive no punishment, the 
practice spread somewhat further into the industry. Thus a condition 
developed throughout a considerable portion of the industry where a 
filed price was merely a piece of paper, with no real significance. 

The above might seem to be a fairly severe indictment of the 
open-policy. It is not intended to be. I am merely pointing out why 
it failed. I personally feel, - how many will agree with me I do 
not know - that the industry was better off with it, than without it, 
even though the whole curve, throughout the filed price era was con- 
stantly downward. It is certain that the structure went all to 
pieces when the open-price policy was abandoned; it is also evident 
that the entire industry is " gaessing" at the market now. I feel 
that there are enough thinking and ethical producers in the industry 
who would abide by their published policies to make it possible to 
effect a fair degree of stabilization, in spite of the difficulties 
involved. " (Unquote) 

With the filing of September 22, 1933, there appeared a new cus- 
tomer classification, known as "Wiring device manufacturers who have a 
listing with Class A chain stores, and who operate under a sales agency 
contract " 

This classification was made in an effort to correct a situation which 
had existed for a long time, whereby a manufacturer would designate an 
agent (not a legal "agent") ana a contract would be signed between them. 
The agent would obtain a "listing 11 with Class A chains which would give 
him a preferential position in the chains' purchases of material. This 
arrangement, all "under cover", made it possible for the manufacturer to 

9822 



-280- 



sell indirectly to the chains without the prices "being made public. 

The effort on the part of the more responsible manufacturers to 
brijg all such agreements out into the open failed, however, and the 
classification was soon dropped. 

(This is another reason why the price call on flexible cords was 
cancelled.) 



9822 



-281- 
COMPAHJ. #3 ... 

1st Filing 

September 7, 193:5 Effective September 7, 1933. 

Bulletin #1 and nrice list on- 

1. flexible cotton and rayon cords. 

2. Tyoe HPD and HC Heater Cords. 

3. Non-approved flexible cords. 

Discounts:- lCY i 

1. -Wholesaler or jobber, any quantity List less ug. 

2. Manufacturers 50 s 000 or more ' 1U ;°" 

Less than 50,000 List 

3. Chain store warehouses, 50,000 ft. 

or more List less 10> 

Less than 50,000 ft ...List. 

Terms :* - 

2-o 10th prox. net 25th prox, 

Del ive "~ ~ * — 

fToTb. factory, freight rllowed to destination on 100 lbs. or more. 



2nd Filing 

October 5, -1933 Effective October 2, 1933. 

To meet Company #8' s .Tiling -*2 .Iff. Oct. 2, 1934. 

Bulletins S-l, S-4 and S-5. 

List prices more than doubled on- • 

1. Flexible cotton and rayon cords. 

2. Non-anproved flexible cords. 
Discount?;- 

1. Dealers 

2. Manufacturers lesc- than 50,000 ft. and 
Class E chain stores • 

3. Manufacturers 50,000 or more, .Class A . 
chains and jobbers'. ••:•••• 

4. firing device manufacturers with Class A 
chains listing operating on s^les agency 
coiitracts 

Rote: Class A Chains are: 



ist 


less 40fo 


ii 


1" 58$ 


ii 


■i 60*o 



654 



Sears Roebuck & Company F. W. 'Jool-orth Co. 

Montgonery Waid & Company NeisneW Bros.-, Inc.. 

S E T "res= Co. s - s - Kresge Co. 

fc'cLellan Stores Co. Butler Bros. 

G. C. kurphy Co. "• T - Grant Co « 

Class B Chains - All others. 

3rd Filing 

(1st filing on this product) 

Gctober 20, 1933 
BulletinsO-6 (Radio wires. 
3322 0-7 ( Radio lead in -ire), 
O-p f:orio hook-up wire^). 



-282- 

All terms and discounts some as 2nd filing. 

4th Filing 

October 30, 1933 

Bulletins S-4 '(Flexible cotton and rayon)* 

S-5 (Non-anoroved flexible cor-ds). 

S-l (Terms and discount sheet). 
No change from 2nd filling. 

5 th Filing 
('Compare with 3rd Filing). 

December 1, 1S33 ' ' •■■■... 

Bulletins N-6 (Radio wires). 

N-7 (Radio lead in vires). ■ • ■ ■ ■ 

K-8 (Radio hook-up 'wires). 

S-2 (Discount sheet). 
25 L /> increase in list prices. 
Discounts:- 

1 ■ -■-■ ■■ , 

1. Apolying to radio wires- 

a. Jobbers and radio manufacturers, less than 
500,000 List less 6C# 

b. Radio, manufacturers, 500,000 or more." " 68fo 

c. pLadio parts manufacturers " " . 68'b 

2. Applying to flexible' cotton and rayon cords and 
non-approved flexible cords. ( Compare' with 2nd Filing) 

a. Dealers, contractors, utilities and department 
stores ' List less 4C£o 

b. Purchasing service comuanies 

when billed by us I 1 " 48^ 

when billed by them.. .-•• ,K » 50$ 

c. Lanufacturers for use, less than 50,000 ft., Class B 
Chains,' U. S'. Government and rail- • 

roads ■ " " 58^ 

d. manufacturers' for use, 50,000 ft. or 

more, jobbers, Class A Chains " " 60fo 

e. firing device manufacturers ,:, ith 

Class A Chain listing "'hen operating under sales 
agency contracts " " 65^ 

To Class A Chains of 2nd Filing add: 

Sco^t _Stores, McCrory Stores Corp: J. J. Newberry Co., Rose Stores, 

U. K, 'Fisfeaattn. -Co. , Inc. 



9822 



NOTE: The above discount sheet dated October 27 was printed to in- 
clude discounts on radio wires and other items, but radio 
wire discounts were also typed in at the bottom of the sheet; 
there discounts being different from those printed. Dis- 
counts as listed above were considered the more logical as 
intended by the company. 



( 



-283- 

6th Fi ling 
(Compare with 2nd Filing) 

January 15, 1934 Effective January 25, 1934. 

To meet Company =£25' s Filing 9, Effec. Date Jan. 13, 1934. 
Bulletins J-4 (Flexible cotton and rnyon 'cord's) , and 

J-5 (l : on-anproved flexible cords.) • 
Reduction in list prices on certain items of 15 to 30^. 
Discount s:- 

1. Les- than 10,000 ft List less 52?o 

2. 10, 000 to 50, 000 .\. {-.'.' " » 55fo 

3. 50,000 to 200,000 " " 58 L 'o 

-x. 200,000 and over '" " 60y 

5. Jobbers, ?niy quantity " " 60 c i 

NOTE: It is not. clear from the filing whether the above discounts were 
intended .to entirely replace discounts as under 5th filing, 

7th Filing 
(Compare "dth 5th Filing) 

February 15, 1934 Effective February 15, 1934. 

To meet Company #25' s Filing lit, Eff. Date Feb. 10, 1934. 
Bulletin F-6 (Badio wires) superseding Bulletin N-6, and 
Bulletin F-8 (Radio hook-up wires) superseding N-8. 
General reduction of 25'o in list prices, 
Discounts:- 

Jobbers and manufacturers , List less 6Q-/0 

NOTE: Again it is not clear whether these discounts are intended to 
completely supersede all previously filed discounts. 

8th Filing 
(Compare with 7'th Filing) 

Augast 50, 1934 .'.'.Effective Septemoer 9, 1934. 

Bulletin A - 6 (Radio wires) superseding Bulletin F-6; also 
Bulletin A— 8 (Radio hook-up '"ires) superseding Bulletin F-8. 
Reduction of 55:o in list prices. • 
Discounts:- 

1. Jobbers, chains and mail order houses, any quantity 

List less 5'-<j. 

2. Other buyers- 

a. 1,000 to <±,999 ft " plus 15$. 

b. 5 : 000 to 9,993 ft " " 10$. 

c. 10,000 to 99,999 ft List 

d. 100, 000 to 499,999 ft » less 5$ 

e. 500, 000 and over. " " lCfS. 



9322 



-284- 
9th Filing 

October 23, 1934 Effective October 23, 1934. 

To meet Company #6's Filing 19, E-ff. Date Qct. 10, .1934 

(later changed October 15, 1934 by filing 20.) 
Bulletin 0-4 (Flexible cotton and rayon- cords) superseding 
Bulletin K-4 (not filed), and 

Bulletin 0-5 (Non-qpnrcved flexible cords) superseding 
Bulletin M-5 (not filed). .. -. 



This filing effects a 55% reduction in list prices as compared. with, 
the last w-iich were filed with, the Supervisory .Agency on January 15» 
1934, and listed as the 6th filing. 



Discounts:- 



1. iTobbers, mail- order houses, national syndicates. List less , '5$. 

2. .Manufacturers, 100,000 ft. to 499,999 ft " " 5$. 

3. Any buyer, 500,000 ft. or more » " 



COMPACT #4 



This company .did ho,t file in time, for .the effective date of Septem- 
ber 7, 1933. It only makes a partial line in the flexible cord group; 
the only type being the. rubber sheathed portable cord; '•; 

1st Filing 

October 26, 1933 

List #W 2106 and ,: •• . 

Discount sheet. • 

Pis coun t s ; - 

1. Dealers, contractors, utilities... List less 40$ 

2. Purchasing service companies 

When billed by us 

When billed by them ' 

3. Mfrs. for use, less than 50,000 ft., 
Chains, U. S. Gov' t. and railroads - . 

4. Mfrs. for use, 50,000 ft. or more 
and jobbers 

Terms: - . . 

2$ 15th prox. net EOM prox. 



11 


It 
II 


48$ 
50$ 


II 


II 


58$ 


II 


II 


60$ 



Del ivory :- . .... 

F.0.3. factory, freight to. destination on 100 lbs. or more 



2nd Filing . .. . . - . 

January 5, 1934 Effective January 15, 1934 

Discount sheet supplementing previous filing. 
Pis coun t s : - 

1. To Mfrs. for use 50,000 ft. or more List less 65$ 

2. Less than 50,000 ft " " 58 

3. Company #4 distributors selling man- 
ufacturers as above, 50,000 ft. or more... " " 65 and 5 

4. Less than 50,000 ft " " 58 and 5 

9822 



II 


II 


58 


II 


II 


60 


II 


II 


60 



-285- 
3rd Filing 

January 13, 1934 Effective January 13, 1934 

Discount sheet cancelling all previous discounts. 

Meetin ; Company #25' s filing 9. . , Effective January 13, 1934 

Discounts ;- 

1. To all buyers, less than 10,000 ft List less 52$ 

2. 10,000 to 50,000 ft " " 55 

3. 50,000 to 200,000 ft. 

4. 200,000 ft. and over •....: 

5. Jobbers any quantity ■ 

Ilote: Sizes may be combined to obtain quantity discounts. 

1-th Fil ing 

January 25, 1934 ■ v. . .Effective January 25, 1934 

Memo changing packing data. 

5th Filing; 

February 21, 1934 Effective March 2, 1934 

Discount sheet cancelling all previous discounts. 
Meeting Company #25' s filing, effective Feb. 4, 1934 
Discounts:- 

1. Company #4 distributors, any quantity List less 60 and 5$ 

2. Other buyers, any ouantity " " ' 60 

6th Filing 

tfarch 5, 1954 Effective aarch 15, 1934 

Memo dated March 2 changing delivery terms from f.o.b. factory to 
f.o.b. shipping point. 

7th Filin g 

March 26, 1934 Effective '..arch 27, 1934 

ting Co - ? any #8's filing 23, effective "..arch 24, 1934 
List #¥ 2107' cancelling W 2106, and 
Discount Sheet. 

List prices reduced approximately 30^. 
Discounts ;- 

1. Jobbers ■ ■ ' . . List less 5% 

2. iafrs. 100,000 ft. or more ; " "5 

3. Company $4 distributors, 5o -commission, 
orders from manufacturers, 100,000 ft. or more. 

Terms ;- 

2 c o 10th prox. net EC nrox. 



9322 



-286- 

8th Filing; 

July 11, 1934 Effective July 9, 1934 

Letter dated July 9- malting additional freight allowance on 
Government bids (Land Grant freight rates). 

9th Filing 

October 18, 1934 , Effective October 18, 1934 

Meeting Co. up any #6' s .filing .19 Effective October 10, 1934, (later 

made ^effective. October .15, 1934 by filing #20) 
List #'.7 2108-, cancelling .W 2107, and 
Discount sheet. 

List prices increased approximately 5$ 
Discount s ; - 

1. Jobbers List less 5$ 

2. Mfrs. 100,000 to 499,999 ft " » 5 

3. HI buyers, 500,000 ft. or more. » » 10 

4. Corp any #4 distributors, 5% 
commission, orders from manu- 
facturers, 100,000 ft. or more. 

,:■ ... . ; COMPANY #6 

1st Filin g; 

September 7, 1933. 

Sheets 535 F (Flexible co.ttpn and rayon cords) 

535 EC (Heater Cords) 

530 EF (Fixture wire) 

529 HA (Non-approved flexible cords) 

R,adio LI (Radio lead in wires) , . 

Also Bulletin A-l (Terms and conditions of sale and discbunts) 

Terms; - 

2)o 10th prox. net 60 days. 

Delivery ;— 

F.O.S. factory, freight allowed to destination on 100 lbs. or more. 

Discounts :- 

1. Wholesalers or jobbers, any quantity List less 

2. Manufacturers, 50,000 ft. or more " " 10 

3. Manufacturers., le.ss than 5.0,000 ft List 

4. Chain store warehouses, 50,000 ft. or more.... » " 10 



lb 



982: 



-237- 
2nd Filing 

October 9, 1933 (Meeting Company #3 filing 2 - effective October 2, 1933.) 

Sheets 536 F (Flexible cotton and rayon cords), cancelling 535 F 

536 HC (Heater cords) cancelling 535 HO. 

531 KF (Fixture wire) cancelling 530 FT. 

530 ITA (Non-approved flexible cords) cancelling 529 NA. 

Radio LI-2 (Radio lead in wire) 

Bulletin A-2 (Discounts and terms) 

prices more than doubled. 

Discounts :- 

1 . Dealers List less 40$ 

2. Mfrs. less than 50,000, Class B 

chains " " 58 

3. Mfrs. 50,000 ft. or more, Class A 

chains and jobbers " " 60 

4. Wiring device mfrs. with Class A 
chains listing operating on sales 

agency contracts " " 65. 

Class A Chains are: Scott Stores; S. S. Kresge Co., W. T. Grant Co.; 
S. H. Kress Co.; McCrory Stores Corp.; McLellan Stores Co.; H. L. Green; 
J. J. Newberry Co.; F. W, Wool worth Co.; G. C. Murphy Co.; Neisner Bros. , 
Inc.; Rose Stores, Sears Roebuck & Co.; Montgomery Ward & Co.; Butler 
Bros.; M. E. Fishman Co., Inc. 

Terms :- 2$ 10th prox. net EOi.'I prox. 

3rd Filing 

November 16, 1933. 

Sheet SF-1 

Special prices to wiring device manufacturers with chain store 

listings on sales agency agreements. 

Reduction of 50 to 60$ in list prices for certain sizes and 

tyoes of flexible and heater cords. 

Discounts: - 5$ 

Note: No correspondence accompanied this filing so comparisons 
with all companies are impossible. 

4th Filing 
(Compare with 2nd filing) 

December 20, 1933 - (meeting Company #25 ' s filing 7, filed 12/13/34.) 
Sheet LI-3 (Radio lead in wires) cancelling Sheet LI-2 
Approximately 50$ reduction in prices. 

Discounts :- 

1. Wholesaler or jobber, any quantity List less 10$ 

2. Mfrs., 50,000 ft. cr more " " 10 

9822 



-23.8-- •■„ 

5th Filing; ' 
(Compare with 2nd Filing) 

January 3, 1934 Effective January 18, 1934 

Sheets 537 F (Flexible cords) cancelling 535 F. 
537 E.C. (Heater cords) cancelling 536 LC 

531 I\T.A. (I'Jon-approved flexibles) cancel ling 530 EA. 

532 EF (Fixture wire) cancelling 531 RF 
Bulletin A-3 (Terms and conditions of sale) 
Discount sheet A-4 

15 to 25$ reduction in list prices on flexible cords and non- 
approved flexible s. : 
No change in lists on other types. 

Discounts: - . . . . . 

1. Less than 10,000 ft . List less- 52> 

2. 10,000 to 50,000 .. ■ » « 55 

3. 50,000 or more " " 58 

4. 200,000 or more " » 60 

5. Jobbers, any quantity " " 66 

■ 6th Filing 
(Compare "with' 5th Filing) 

January 23, 1934 ;. Effective February 2, 1934 

Special price on one type non-approved flexible cord-10'o reduction. 
Hote:- Company states "this price filed to meet competition but it 
is not effective for 10 days after filing date". 

7th Filing 
(Compare with 5th Filing) 

February 2, 1934 Effective February 4, 1934 

(Meeting Company #25' s filing 12, effective February 4, 1934) 
5f reduction in list price of one size non-approved flexible cord. 

Discounts: - (Cancelling discount sheet #A-4) 

To all buyers, any quantity — List less 60$. 

8th Filing 

March 7, 1934 Effective Larch 17, 1934 

Price change #10 
Applicable to all product: 



■ • = 



Discounts :- 

1. Jobbers, chains, /mail order houses .List less 60 and 5$ 

2. 50,000 ft. or over " » 60 " 5 

3. Less than 50,000 ft " " 60 



9822 



-239- 

9th Filing 
(Compare with 5th Filing) 

March 19, 1934 Effective March 24, 1934 

(Meeting Company #8»s filing 23, effective arch 24, 1934. 
Sheets 538 F (Flexible cords) cancelling 537 F. 
538 EC (Heater cords) •cancelling 537 KG. 

533 EF (Fixture wire) cancelling 532 rtt, 

532 FA (iiTon-approved flcxibles) cancelling 531 NA. 

Discount sheet # A-5 

General -reduction of 50^ in list prices. 

Discouiits: - 

1. Jobbers, mail order houses and national syndicates. List less 5fo 

2. Manufacturers, 100,000 ft. or more " " 5 

10th Filing 
(Compare with 9th Filing) 

April 14, 1954 Effective April 24, 1934 

Discount sheet # A-6 cancelling A-5 

Disceunts:- 

1. Jobbers, mail order houses and 

national syndicates. List less 5$ 

2. Mfrs., 100,000 to 499,9 ; ?9 ft... " " 5 

3. Any "buyer, 500,000 ft. or more " " 10 

4. To jobbers' on -100,000 ft. or more from 

mfr. for use " " 5 and 5 

11 th Filing 
(Compare wi'th 9th Filing) 

hay 3, 1934 Effective May 3, 1934 

Sheet 533-1T (Uon-app roved flexibles) cancelling 532 NA. 

The only change from previous filing is in the addition of a 
few types and deletion of others. • List prices the same. 
Discounts not mentioned. Same ar: before. 

12th Filing 
(Compare with 3rd Filing) 

(feay 7, 1934 Effective May 7, 1334 

Sheet #2-SP (Wires and specials) cancelling sheet #1-SP. 
This filing has no apparent relation with previous filing 
which listed standard type wires with special, discount to 
wiring device manufacturers. This, filing is for special 
type wires for special purposes and is an original filing 
in these types. 



9822 



-290- 



13th Filing 
(Compare with 10th Filing) 

May 7, 1934 Effective May 17, 1934 

Discount sheet A-7 cancelling A-6 
Discounts;' - 

1. Jobbers, mail order houses, national syndicates. List less 5$ 

2. Manufacturers, 100,000 'to 499,999 ft " " 5 

3. All buyers, 500,000 ft. or more. » " 10 

Note: Special 5fo commission to distributors on orders 
from manufacturers for 100,000 to 499,999 ft. 

14th Filing 
(1st Filing on these products) 







May 5, 1934 Effective May 15, 1934 

Sheet #3-RW (Radio wires) and 
#2-HW (Radio hook-up wires) 
Discount sheet RW-2 

Dic co unts;- 

1. Jobbers, chains and mail order houses, 

and quantity List less 5$ 

2, Other- buyers,. 1,000 to 4,999 ft...... » plus 15 

3. 5,000 to 9,999. ;:;;....; ;;.... <> » 10 

4. 10,000 to 99,999..:.'....;. List 

5. 100,000 to 499,999.... .' ] « loss 5 

6. 500,000 and over .' . « » 10 

Note; Prices are in line with those already on file 
at this date from other companies. Discounts 
originated by this filing. 

15' tli. Filing 



(1st filing on this product) 

June 26, 1934 ' '.Effective July 6, 1934 

Sheet SP-MG-2 (Special construction cords) 

Note: Company states "to meet competition" but Supervisory 

Agency apparently determined that this filing originated 
these prices as he made the effective date 10 days. from . 
filing date. 

Discounts :- 

1. Jobbers List less 5$ 

2. Manufacturers, 100,000 ft. or more. .' " " 5 

16th Filing 

July 2, 1934 - never became effective. 

Letter quoting an exception to price sheet 533 F (9th Filing) 
withdrawn before effective date because of ruling by Supervisory 
Agency that it was an improper filing. 

9822 



-291- 

17th Filing 
(Compare with 12th Filing) 

July 30, 1934 .-. .-Effective July .30, 1934 

Letter cancelling ratter covered wires improperly listed en Sheet #2-SP. 

18th Filing 
(Compare with 15th Filing) 

Sep tranter 8, 1934 Effective September 8, 1934 

Letter cancelling Sheet SP-MG-2 

19th Filing 
(Compare with 9th Filing) 

Septemter '28, 1934 '.' Effective Octoter 10, 1934 

Sheets 539 F (Flexible Cords) cancelling 538 F 

539 HC (Heater cords) cancelling 538 HC. 

534 RF (Fixture wire) cancelling 533 EF. 

534 NA (i-Ton-approved flexitles) cancelling 532 NA. 

#3-SP (Special wires) cancelling #2-SP (12th Filing) 

Discount sheet A-8 

General increase of 5$ in list prices. 

Discounts :- 

1. Jotters, mail order houses, national syndicates.. List less 5$ 

2. Mfrs. 100,000 ft. to 500,000 ft. .• , " " 5 

3. All tuyers, 500,000 ft. or more " " 10 

20th Filing 
( Compare with -19th Filing) 

Octoter 13, 1934 Effective Octoter 15, 1934 

Letter changing effective date on previous filing to Oct. 15, 1934. 



2lst Filin g 
(Compare with 19th Filing) 

Decern ter 6, 1934. .' Effective December 16, 1934 

Sheet 539 F Supplement, adding a specially constructed type. 
TO-SJ. 

22nd Filing 
(Compare with 19th Filing) 

January 4, 1935 Effective January 9, 1935 

(Meeting Company #23 A' s filing, effective January 9, 1935). 
Discount sheet cancelling A-8. 
Discounts :- 

To all tuyers List less 15$. 



9822 



-292- 

COJyiFAlPf #7 

1st Filing 

September 7, 1933 Effective September 7, 1933. 

Sheet ALC 4-33 (Flexible cords \ 

Ail 3-33 (Heater cords'). 

CPR 4-33 ( Rubber sheathed portables^. 

AFC 1-33 (Fixture wire). 

Sales terms and discount bulletin. 

Discounts: 

1. Wholesalers, jobbers, any Quantity. List less 30$. 

2. Mfrs., 50,000 ft. or more " " 10. 

3. Mfrs., less than 50,000 ft ., List. 

4. Chain store warehouses, 50,000 ft. or more Listless 10, 

5. Chain store warehouses, less than 50,000 ft List. 

6 . All other buyers, any quantity List. 

Terms: 

2$ 10th prox. net 60 days. 
Delivery: 

FOB Factory, freight allowed on 1 '0 lbs. or more. 



2nd Filing 

October 16, 1933 ITo effective date mentioned. 

Meeting Company #8's filing #2, effective 10/2/33. 

ALC 5-33 (Flexible cords) cancelling ALC 4-33. 

AH 1-33 (Heater cords') cancelling AH 3-33. 

AFC 2-33 (Fixture wire) cancelling AFC 1-33. 

CPR 5-33 (Rubber sheathed portables^ cancelling CPR 4-33. 

ULC 4-33 (Non-approved cords) (1st filing). 

Price list-wire for Christmas sets. (1st filing). 

FC 1-33 (Terms and conditions). 

Discount sheet. 

All list prices previously quoted are increased approximately 60$. 

Discounts: 

1. Dealers List less 40$. 

2. Mfrs., less than 50,000 ft. and Class B chains...... » " 58. 

3. Mfrs., 50,000 ft. or mere and Class A chains " " 60. 

4. Jobbers,' any quantity " " 60. 

5. Wiring device mfrs. with Class A chain listing, 

operating under sales agency contracts... " " 65. 

Class A Chains 

Butler Bros. G-. C. Murphy Company 

W. T. Grant Co. i.icLellan Stores Corp. 

S. H. Kress Neisner Bros. , Inc. 

S. S. Kresge Company Sears Roebuck 

Montgomery Ward • F. W. Woolworth Company 

Also memo dated October 13 making correction in price of 1 item on NLC 4-33. 



9822 



-293- 



C0MPANY-#7 

3rd Filing 

November 1, 1933 No effective date mentioned. 

Memo placing mercerized cotton braid in same price class as hard 
cotton grade. 

4th Filin g (1st filing on this product 1 ) 

November 3, 1933 ....No effective date mentioned. 

Meeting Company tt8's filing of October 15. 

Ri7 1-33 (Radio wires). 

Price list on radio lead in wires. 

BH 1-33 (Radio hook-up' wires) . 

Corrected list of Class A Chains. 

Discounts and other terms same as under 2nd filing. 



Scott Stores-Butler' Bros. 
H. L. Green Company' 
McCrory Stores Corp. 
J. J. Newberry Co. 
Rose Stores, Inc. 



Class A Chains 

M . H . ■ Fishman Co . , 
S. H. Kress Co. 
Montgomery Ward 
McLellan Stores Co. 
Sears Roebuck 



Inc. W. T. Grant Co. 
S. S. Kresge Co. 
Or. C. Murphy Co. 
Neisner Bros., Inc. 
F. W. Uoolworth Co. 



5th Filing 

November 14, 1933 No effective date mentioned. 

Price list — wire for Christmas sets. 

Memo quoting special net prices on sales to Class A chains .on or before 

December 15, 1933, for 5 types flexible cords . 



6th Filing 

(Compare with 4th Filing) 

November 29, 1933 No effective date mentioned. 

Meeting Company #8' s filing of 11/15. 

Sheet RW 2-33 (Radio wires) cancelling RW 1-33. 

RH 2-33 (Radio hook-up wires) cancelling RH 1-33. 

RL 2-33 (Radio lead in wires) cancelling list of October 2. 

Discount sheet. 

List prices increased approximately 25f5. 

Discounts: 

1. Jobbers List 

2. Radio mfrs., less than 500,000 ft., assorted. " 

3. Radio mfrs., 500,000 ft. or more, assorted... " 

4. Radio parts manufacturers " 



less 


60fS 


it 


60. 


ii 


68. 


ii 


68. 



9822 



-294- 

C0MPAKY-#7 

7th Filing; 
(Compare with 2nd Filing) 

January 3, 1934 Effective January 13, 1934. 

This company and Company #25 filed the same price lists and dis- 
counts on the same date, effective the same date. 
Sheet ALC 1-34 (Flexible cords) cancelling ALC 5-33. 
List prices on certain items decreased about 25$. 
AH 1-34 (Heater cords) cancelling AH 4-33. 

List prices on a few items decreased about '15$ and one or- two sizes 
added to the list. 

NLC 1-34 (Non-approved flexibles) cancelling HLC 4-33. 
List prices on most items decreased 15 to 20$. 
discounts: (Applying also to fixture wires and rubber sheathed portables) 

1. Broken packages List less 50$. 

2. Standard packages 

a. Less than 1 ■, 000 ft List less 52. 

b. 10, 000 to 49,999 ft »' " 55. 

c. 50,0)0 to 199,999 ft " " 58. 

d. 200,000 ft. or more » »■ 60, 

3. Jobbers, any quantity " " 60. 

Different sizes and kinds, may be combined to obtain quantity 
discounts. 

8 th ■Filing: 

January 12, 1934 Effective January 22, 1934. 

Trice list — wire for Christmas sets, cancelling list of November 16. 
One size wire dropped from list and cne decreased by about 15$. 

9th Filing 

January 19, 1934 Effective January 29, 1934. 

Specially constructed all-rubber portable cord. 

Terms and conditions of sale (See FC 1-33) (2nd Filing). 

LHh Filing 

January 26, 1934 Effective February 5, 1934. 

Letter dated January 24 elimineting interest charge on qiiotations 
to U. S. Government. 

11th Filing 

January 26, 1934 Effective January 28, 1934. 

Meeting Company #22' s filing effective 1/28/34. 

iviemo dated l/24 eliminating adders' for special rayon stripers on 

heater cords. 



9822 



-^295- 

COli P.-ift Y #7 

12th Filing 

(Compare with 7th Filing) 

February 8, 1934.. Effective February 12, 1934. 

Meeting CompanyTr25 ' s filing #12, effective 2/4/34, except for the one 

item of broken packages. 

Flexible cord discount sheet cancelling issue of January 13 (not filed). 

Last filing dr. ted Januarv 8th. 

Discounts: 

1. Broken packages List less 30$. 

2. All classes, any quantity " " 60$ ,<. 

13th Filing 

(Compare with 12th Filing) 

February 27, 1934 Effective March "2, 1934. 

Meeting Company #25' s filing #19, effective 2/24/34, except on the 

item broken packages. 

Flexible.; cord discount sheet cancelling issue of February 6. 

Discounts : 

• 1. Broken .packages List less 30$. 

2, All classes, any quantity " " 60$. 

3. Jobbers, any quantity " " 60 and 5. 

14th Filing 

(Compare with 8th Filing) 

March 12, 1934 Effective March 22, 1934. 

Price list-wire for Christmas sets. 
List prices decreases 15 to 25$. 

15th Filing 

March 22, 1934 Effective March 24, 1934. 

Meeting Company #8's filing #23, effective 3/24/34. 

Sheet aLC 3-34 (Flexible cords) cancelling ALC 1-34 (?th Filing). 

AFC 1-34 .(Fixture wire) cancelling AFC 2-33 (2nd Filing). 

AH 2-31- (Heater cords) cancelling AH 1-34 (7th Filing). 

CPR 1-34 (Rubber sheathed portables) cancelling CPE. 6-33 (2nd Filing). 

NLC 2-34 (iTon approved flexibles) cancelling HLC 1-34 (7th Filing). 

Flexible -cord discount sheet cancelling issue of 2/23 (l3th Filing). 

All list prices decrease approximately 60$. 

Discounts: 

1. Jobbers, mail order houses, nat'l. syndicates. ..List less 5$. 

2. Llfrs., 100,000 ft. or more » " 5. 

3. Co. #7 distributors, 5$ commission, orders from mfrs., 

lQ0,C00.ft. or more. 



3822 



-296*- 

C OIIPaIIY # 7 (Continued ') 
16th Filing 
(Compare with 14th Filing). .. , 

April 3, 1954 Effective April 3, 1934. 

Price list-wire for Christmas sets, cancelling issue of March 20. 

■List prices — 2 items down, 1 item up fractionally and I unchanged. 

(Note; The letter of transmittal states that since this is an increase 
in price, they will not have tora.it 10 days. 'The Supervisory 
Agent evidently took their word and did not check back on pre- 
vious filing), 

17th Filing 

(Compare with 15th Filing) 

April 19, -1934 Effective April 19, 1934. 

Meeting Company #33' s filing effective 4/13/34. 

Flexible cord discount sheet cancelling issue of March 24. 

Discounts: ■ 

1. Jobbers, mail order houses, nat'l. syndicates. .List less >5^. 

2. Mfrs., 100 ,'000 to 499,999 ft.. ... . " " 5. 

3. All buyers , 500, 000 ft. or more... » " 10. 

4. Company #7 distributors, 5^> commission, orders 
from mfrs., 100,000 to 499,999 ft. 

18th Filing 

(Compare with 6th Filing) 

April 25, 1934 Effective April 26, 1954. 

Meeting Company #8's filing #27, effective 4/26/34. 

RW 1-34 (Radio wire and radio hook-up wires) cancelling BW 2-33. 

RL 2-33 end. RK 2-33. (Apparently discounting radio lead in wires). 

R L-34 (Discount sheet) cancelling issue of 11/25/33. 

List prices decreased approximately 60^>. 

Discounts : 

1. 'Jobbers, chains and mail order houses, anv quantitv. .List less 5/i. 

2. Other buyers, assorted items- 

a. 1,000 to 4,999 ft List plus 15. 

b. 5,000 to 9,999 ft 

c. 10,000 to 99,999 ft 

d. 100, 000 to 499,999 ft 

e. 500,000 ft. or more 



10. 



;ss 5. 



it 



10. 



19th Filing; 

(Compare with 16th Filing) 

Filed June 7, 1934 Effective June 17, 1934. 

Issue FCX -2 (Hire for Christmas sets) cancelling issue of March 30. 
Only change from previous issue is the deletion of "interest charged at 
the rate of ofo per annum after due date." 

9822 



-297- 

C01EPANY y7 (Continued) 

30 th Filing 

(Compare with 18th Filing) 

July 10, 1934 Effective Jul- 10, 1934. 

Meeting Company #37' s filing effective 7/9/34, 
Issue R 2-34 (Piscount sheet) cancelling R 1-34. 
Discounts: 

1. Jobbers, chains, mail order houses, any quantity. .List less 20$, 

2, Other buyers, assorted items- 

a. 1,000 to 4,999 ft' List. 

b. 5,000 to 9,999 ft " less 5. 

c. 10,000 to 99,999 ft " " 15. 

d.100, 000 to 499,999- ft " " 20, 

e. 500, 000 ft. or more " " 25, 

■• 21st Filing 

July' 11, 1934 Effective July 9, 19.34. 

Made effective by wire of the 6th. Letter dated July 10 makes addition- 
nal freight allowance on Government bids. (Land Grant Freight Rates), 

22nd Filing 

July 24, 1934 Effective July 24, 1934. 

Letter dated 7/23 stating policy on U. S. Uavy propositions as a result 
of "the Vinson Bill. . ■ • ■ 

23rd Filing 

(Compare with 20th Filing) 

July 21, 1934 Effective July 27, 1934. 

Meeting Company #25's filing #33, effective 7/27. 

Issue R-3-34 (Radio wire discount sheet) cancelling issue R-2. 

Discounts: 

1. Jobbers, chains^ mail order houses, any quantity. .List less 5$, 

2, Other buyers, assorted items- 

a. 1,CC0 to 4,999 ft List plus 15. 

b. 5, CCO to 9,999 ft " " 10. 

c. 10,000 to 99,999 ft " 

d. 100,000 to 499,999 ft " less 5. 

e. 500,000 ft. or more " " 10. 

24th Filing 

August 21, 1934 Effective August 26, 1934. 

Issue Sup R'tf (Radio lead in wire). 

This is a new filing for this -oroduct and meets current prices established 

by majority of the industry. Effective date was apparently arbitrarily 

assigned. 

Discounts: As per 23rd Filing. 

3322 



-298- 

COilPANY #7 (Continued ) 

25th Filing 

(Compare with 15th Piling) 

October 17, 1934 Effective October 17, 1934. 

Meeting Company #6's filing #19, effective 10/10/34, changed to 10/15/34. 

Sheet ALC~3~4(Portable cords) cancelling ALC-2-34. 

AH 3-34 (Heater cords) cancelling Ah 2-34. 

AFC 2-34 (Fixture wire) cancelling AFC 1-34. 

CPR 2-34 (Rubber, sheathed portables) cancelling CPR 1-34/ 

NLC 3-34 (Non-approved portables) cancelling NLC 2-34. 

Issue NLC 3-34 .supplement (Bon-approved rubber sheathed portables). 

Li.st prices increased aporo-ximatel3 r 5^o. 

Discounts: '.Hot mentioned. -Apparently same as 17th Filing, 

26th Filing - 

November 6, 1934 Effective November 6, 1934. 

Letter dated November 5, 1934 changing packing data on radio wires. 

27th Filing 

(Conraare with 25th Filing) 

November 22, 1934 Effective November 22, 1934. 

CPR 3-34 (Rubber sheathed portables) ■cancelling CPR 2-34. 

No change in list prices. 

This filing merely adds one type wire to the list. 

28th Filing 

January 19, 1935 Effective January 29, 1935. 

Letter dated January 18 advising that price shee.ts effective October 17 
(25th Filing) superseded special price list to mail order and national 
syndicate stores dated August 3 (not filed). This in effect cancels said 
special prices. 

29th Filing 

(Compare with- 19th Filing) 

February 7, 1935. -.Effective February 17, 1935. 

Issue PCX 1~35 (Uire for Christmas sets)- cancelling- issue of June 15, 1934, 
List prices are down on one type and up on 3 tyoes by fractional amounts. 



9822 



-299 

lrt Tiling 

1. September 7, 193" (incomplete) 
Sheet T 20-16 (Fixture wire) 

Bulletin. P 106-1 (Terms and conditions of sale) and 
Discount sheet. 

Discovmts :- 

1. "holesaler or jobber, any quantity. ...... .List less 10$ 

2. Manufacturers " " 10 

3. All other "outers List 

Terms :- 2$ 10th prox. net 60 days. 

Delivery :-, F.0..B. factory _, freight allowed to destination on 
100 lbs. or more. 



11. All-rubber paralled-tyoe PO-SJ 

2 types listed 

Discounts :- 

1. Small users List 

2.' Large, users, and. industrial companies with electrical 
denartments- 

a. Less than 250 ft Li-t less 15>i 

b. 250 to 999 ft " " 35 

c. 1,000 to 4,999 " " 40 

d. 5,000 ft. or more " " 44 

3. Recognized jobbers, above discounts, less 5-/o 

4. Di: tributors handling other #8 Company 

products, any quantity List less 50 

Terms :- l/2 of 1$, 10 days, net 30 davs. 

Delivery :- Freight allowed on 100 lbs. or more, east of Mississippi; 
$1.00 per 100 lbs. freight allowance vest of Mississippi. 

Ill, Radio hook-up wires;, sheets, 60 and 61 J. 
Discounts :- Hone quoted 

Terms:- 2?o 10th prox. net EOM prox. 

Deliver-'- :- F.O.B. frctor--, freight allowed on 100 lbs. or more. 

IV. "on— ap roved flexibles; sheet 70 J 
Dir:c A n .nts.:- Hone cuoted 



Terms and deliver- ;- Same as #1 above. 



9822 



-300- 

C0MPMY-#i 8 (Continued) 

2nd Fi l ing 

September 22, 1933 Effective October 2, 1933 

Sheet {r T 21-6 (rubber sheathed portabled) (1st Filing) 

T 24-1 (ilon-ao oroved flexibles) cancelling 70-J 

For the bryve listed on orevious sheet list -orices are more than doubled. 

T 20-7 (Fixture wire) cancelling T 20 A-6; prices nore than doubled. 

T 5-18 (Flexible. .Qo.tton and rayon) (1st filing) 

I 22-3 (Heater cords)" (lst filing) 

Bulletin F'-KXV—Q . (T<=wris avid 'crfrfrfHji-on". . gf q ale and 

Discount Sheet 

Di scoiuit.s;— 



1. Dealers List less 40^ 

2. Ilfrs., less than 50,000 ft., 

Class B Chains ...... " " 58 

3. ::frs., 50,000 ft. or nore Class A 

Chains and Jobbers . . . " " 60 

4. "Tiring device mfrs. with Class A 
Chain, listing operating under 

sales agency contracts....... .' " " 65 

5. 

Note: Class A Chains not specified. 

Terns :- 2$ 10th prox. net 60-da^s. .... 

Deliv ery;- F.O.B.' factory, freight allowed to destination on 100 lbs. 
or more. . ' 

Note: T'-o radio wire 'price sheets included with the above destroyed at 
company ' s re oue s t . 

.• . 3rd Filing 

(lst effective filing on these items) 

October S, 1S33 •, . .Effective October 15, 1933 

Sheet T 63-2 (Radio wire) 

T 64^2 (Radio lead in -ire) 

T 62-2 (Radio hook-tip '-ire) 

Bulletin P 106-2 (Terms and conditions of sale and 

Bulletin P 107-3 (Discounts applying to this and 2nd filing) 

Terns and delivery - sane as 2nd filing 

Disc ou nts:- . . 

1. Dealers, contractors, utilities, department 

stores List less 40$ 

2. Purchasing service coimanies— 

a. When Ml] ed by us " " 48 

b. " » by then " " 50 

3. Mfrs. for use, less than 50,000 ft., Class 

B Chains, U. S. Government, railroads " " 58 

9822 



-301- 

COi iPAKY-# 8 (Continued) 

3rd Dili ng_ (Co ntinued) 

PL/counts :- (Continued) 

■-. I rs, for u. e 50,000 ft. or nore 

jobbers ard Class A Chains List less 60^ 

5. T'iring device mfrs. with Class A Chains 

listing, operating under sales agency 

contract:- . » " 65$ 

Class A Chains are.- 

Sears Rosbuck & Company J.- J. dewberry Comany 

: ontgonery r ard & Co. F. ~. o -l'-orth Company 

Scott Stores-Butler 3ror.. G. C. mur-ohy Company 

S. S. IZrerge Co. Keisner Bros,, Inc. 

S. 3. Kress Co. Rose Stores 

LcCror ■ Stores Corp. i . H. Fishman & Co. Inc. 

hcLallan Store:- Co. I. T. Grant Co. 
H. L. Green Company 

4th Filing 

November 2, 193. . ■ 

Special prices to Class a Chains on five tynes of wire for shipment on or 
before December 15, 1933. 

5th I iling 

November 15, 1933. ('Coup are • ith 3rd Filing) 

T 62-3 (Radio hook-up T ire) cancel' ing T S2-s2 

T 63*3 (Radio wires) cancelling T 63-2 

T 64-3 (Hadio lead in -ires) cancelling T 64-2 

T 66-3 (Stranded radio lead in wire) - ne 1- ' listing. 

Discount sheet P 111-1 

25 (J i icrer.se in list nrices on all the above typesi 

Disccunts :- 

1. Jobbers and Radio i frs. less than 

500,000 ft* assorted,*.., ... ., List less 60$ 

2, Radio mfrs* j • 500,000 f t. • aad . over , . 

assorted-and radio B-?j?ts -mirs , " " 68 

6th Filing . 

Nove .ber 2d, 1933 - ■ . 

Special pa,c!:ing informatioi to acconoany price lists of 5th filing. 



9822 



-302- 



C0I.;Fa HY-#'B (Continued) 

7th Filing 
(Compare rith 5th Filing) 

December. 1.,. 1933 

List of 28 radio' parts and aerial kit manufacturers entitled to the 68>o 

discount, 

8th Filing 

December 5, 1933. 

8 letters bearing dates from 10/31/33 to 11/20/33 filing list -orices on 
special types of flexible cords. Apparently ne~ products as no mention is 
made of previous filings but rre subject to regular discounts. 

9th Filing 

December 5, 1933 ■ 

3 letters dated 11/ 23/ 33 of the same nature as 8th filing. 

10th Filing 

December 14, 1933. 

Change in packing data on stranded radio lead in wire. 

11th Filing 
(Conroare v.'ith 2nd Filing) 

Januarys, 1934 Effective January 15, 1934 

Sheets T 5-19 (Flexible cotton and rayon) cancelling T 5-18 

effecting a 25^ reduction in list orice on certain items. 

T 22-8; additional size in 2 types ana 10$ reduction in list price on 

certain items, Heater cords. 

T 24-2 (Hon approvad flexibles) cancelling T 24-1; effecting 

a 5 to. IQfjo reduction in list price on certain ite 's. 

Bulletin P 107-4 (Discount sheet) cancelling P 107-3. 

Bulletin P 106-3 (Terms and conditions) cancelling P 106-2. 

Letter filing list prices of specially constructed flexible cords. 

Discounts :- 

1. Less than 10,000 ft List less 52$ 

.2. 10,000 to 50,000 ft " " 55 

3. 50,000 to 200,000 ft. , " « 58 

4. 200,000 ft. or more, assorted- » " 60 

5. Jobbers, any Quantity " " 60 

Terms ;- 2)i 10th prox, net EOJJ prox. 
Deli very:— Ho change 



9822 



C0HP£FY-#8 ( Continued) 

12 th Filing 

J - mar- ■■■ 10, 1934 Effective January 20, 1934 

Three letters dated January 3, 4 and 9 respectively quoting net prices 
on specially constructed flexible cordr. 

1 3th Fili ng 

January 16, 1934 Effective January 26, 1934 

Three letters dated January 18, 1934 quoting list prices on specially 
constructed flexible cords. 

14th Filing 

January IS, 1934 Effective January 28 , 1934 

Letter dated January 16 quoting list. prices on specially constructed 
heater cord. 

15th Filing 

February 5, 1934 Effective February 15, 1934 

Letter dated 2/1/34 quoting list price on specially constructed flexible 
cord. 

16th Filing 
(Compare with 11th Filing) 

February 6, 1934 . .Effective' February 16, 1934 

Letter dated FebniFry 5 eliminating charge for brain combinations quoted 
on Sheet T 22-9. 

17th Filing 
(Compare r'ith 11th Filing) 

February 6 , l c 34 Effective February 16 , 1934 

Bulletin P 107-5 (Discount sheet) cancelling P 107-4. 
Discounts:- 



Any quantity List less 60fo 

iTote: This discount -as originated by Company #25, effective 
February 4, All companies follo^ec suit eventually, but since 
Company #8 did not file until after Conroany #25' s effective date, 
they nere forced to take the 10 day 1 "aiting period. 

18th Filing 

February 9, 1954 Effective February 19, 1934 

Letter dated February 8, 1934 quoting list oricec on specially constructed 
flexible cords. 



9822 



-304- 

C0i.iPAJ.TY fr-3 (Continued) 
19th Filing 
(Compare with 17th Filing) 

February 14, 1934 Effective February 15,1934 

(Meeting Company #16 ' s filing, effective February 15, 1934) 
Letter dated February 9, 1934 revising discounts as follows: 

Company #8 distributors, 50, nnn ft. or more. ...List less 60 and 5%. 

20th Filing 

(Compare with 19th Filing) 

February 16, 1934 Effective February 24, 1934. 

(Meeting Company ^#25' s filing #19 effective February 24, 1934) 
Letter dated February 16 revising - discounts as follows: 

Company #8 distributors, any quantity ; (Flex. Cords) - 'List less 60 and 

5%. 

21st Filing 
(Compare with 5th Filing) 

February 23, 1934 •. .Effective' February 23, 1934 

(Meeting Compa.ny #22' s filing, effective February 10, 1934) 
Letter dated February 20 revising discounts on radio wires as follows: 
All buyers, any quantity List less 08,0 

22nd Filing 

February 23, 1S34 Effective March 5, 1934 

Letter dated February 23, 1934 quoting list prices on specially con- 
structed flexible cords. 

Note: Withdrawn by letter of March 9. 
Letter of February 27 agrees to discontinue filing on snecial construc- 
tions since no other manufacturer does. 



23rd Filing 
(Compare with 2nd and 11th) 

March 15, 1934 Effective March 24, 1934 

Sheets FCA-T20(Flexible cotton and rayons) cancelling T 5-19 

FCN-T-3 (Non-aporoved flexibles) cancelling T-24-2 

RS-T-7 (Rubber sheathed portables) cancelling T 21-6 

HC-T-10 (Heater cords) cancelling T 22-9 

CF-T-9 (Fixturecwires)' cancelling T 20-8 

FC-D-6 (Discount sheet) cancelling P-107-5 

These sheets effect a general reduction of 50 to 60% in list nrices. 

Discounts :- 

1. Jobbers, mail order houses, national syndicates. .. .List less 5% 

2. Manufacturers, lon,oonft. or more " » 5 



9822 



-305- 

COUPAaY #8 (Continued) 

24th Filing 
(Compare with 5th & 21st Filing) 

March 15, 1934 Effective March 19, 1934 

(Meeting Company ^25's filing #24, effective March 15, 1934) 

RA-V-T-4 (Radio wires) cancelling 63-3, T 64-3 and T 63-3 

RHU-T-4 (Radio hock-up wire) cancelling T 62-3 

RAtf-D-2 (Discount sheet) cancelling P 111-1 

Redaction of 25$ -in list prices 

Discounts :- 

1. Less than 1,000,000 ft. assorted List less 60% 

2. 1,000,000 ft. or more, assorted » " 65 

25th Filing 
(Compare with 24th Filing) 

March 16, 1934 Effective March 22, 1934 

(Meeting Company #22' s filing, effective March 22, 1934) 
RA'tf-D-3 (Discount sheet) cancelling RAW-D-2 
Discounts : - 

1. Jobbers, chains and mail order houses. . .List less 60 and 5% 

2. Other buyers, less than 50,000 ft " « 60 

3. 50,000 to 999,999 ft » " 60 and 5 

4. 1,000,000 ft. or more " " 65 

26th Filing ■ 

March 27, 1934 Effective April 7, 1934 

Memo with a heading: "prices withdrawn from filings with the 
Supervisory Agency in letter of March 5." 

This covers all the various and sundry specially constructed cords 
for which prices were previously filed. 

27th Filing . - 

(Compare with -24th & 25th Filings) 

Aoril 16, 1954 Effective April 26, 1934 

RAW-T-5 (Radio wires) cencelling RAV/-T-4 
RHU-T-5 (Radion hook-up wires) cancelling RHU-T-4 
RAW-D-4 (Discount sheet) cancelling RAW-D-3 
60^ Reduction in list prices. 
Discounts: - 

1. Jobbers, chains and mail order houses, 

any quantity List less bt 

2. Other buyers, assorted items 

1,000 to 4,999 ft List plus 15$ 

3. 5,000 to 9,999 ft » » 10 

4. 10,000 to 99,999 ft List 

5. 100,0000 to 499,999 ft List less 5 

6. 500,000 ft. or more " » 10 



9822 



-306- 
CCl.iPAIIY ,?--■ (Continued) 

28th Filing 
(Compare with 23rd Filing) 

June 11, 1934 Effective June 21, 1934 

Sheet FC-D-7 (Discount sheet, all flexible cords except r?dio wires). 
Discount s : 

1. Jobbers, mail order houses, national syndicates. .. .List less 5^ 

2. Mfrs., 100,000 ft. or more " " 5 

3. All buyers, 500, noo ft. or more " " 10 

Note: Special 5% commission to distributors on orders from 
manufacturers for 100,000 to 499,999 ft. 

These discounts were originated by Company #33, Aoril 13, 1934. 

29th filing 

June 25, 1934 Effective Jon*= 25, 1934 

(Meeting Company #28A' s filing, effective June 25, 1924) 

Memo quoting special net prices to chain stores on 7 specified types, 

flexible cords. Also "5% additional discounts to warehouse". 

30th Filing 
(Compare with 27th Filing) 

July 10, 1934 Effective July 10, 1934 

Sheet RAW-D-5 (Discount sheet, radio wires) cancelling RAW-D-4 
(Meeting Company #37' s filing, effective July 9, 1934) 
Discount s :- 

1. Jobbers, chains and mail order houses, 

and quantity List less 20$ 

2. Other buyers, assorted items 

1,000 to 4,999 ft List 

3. 5,000 to 9,999 ft List less bt 

4. 10,000 to 99,999 ft " " 15 

5. 100,000 to 499,999 ft " " 20 

6. 500,000 ft. or more "' " 25 

31st Filing 

July 12, 1934 Effective July 9yl934 

Letter confirming wire of July 6, making additional freight allowance 
on Government bids (Land Grant freight rates) 

32nd Filing 
(1st filing on thisproduct 

July 23, 1934 ....Effective July 27, 1934 

Sheet CFA-T-1; type AF (Fixture wire). and. 
CFA-D-1 (Discount sheet apnlyin:? thereto). 



9822 



-307- 

CO'.iFMY #8 (Continu ed 
52nd Filing (.Continued) 

Discount s:- 

1. Less than in, ono ft List less 52$ 

2. 10,000 to 49,999 ft " " 55 

3. 50, ooo to 99,999 ft " " 58 

4. 100,000 or more " " 60 

5. Jobbers, any quantity " " 60 

Also RAW-D-6 (Discount sheet, radio wires) cancelling RAW-D-5. 

(30tn Filing) 

Discounts :- 

1. Jobbers, chains and mail order 

houses List less 5i 

2. Other buyers, assorted items, 

1,000 to 4,999 ft List plus 15$ 

3. 5,000 to 9,999 ft " " 10 

4. 10, 000 to 99,999 ft List 

5. 100,000 to 499,999 ft List less 5 

6. 500,000 and over " " 10 

33rd Filing 

July 23, 1^34 Effective July 23, 1934 

(Meeting Company #28 A's filing, effective June 25, 1934) 

Memo giving specal net prices on 7 specified flexible cord 

types to chain stores. Also ."5$ additional discount to the trade". 

34th Filing 

October 5, 1934 Effective October 8, 1934 

(Meeting Company #29 ' s filing, effective October 1, 1934) 

Memo dated lO/s/34. "Deliverv terms on orders for chain stores". 

Delivery :- Full freight allowed- ... 

(a) Shipments W.O.G. 50 lbs., $30 or more. 

(b) Any weight or value withi.nmetropolitan areas of 
New York, Newark, Hoboken, Jersey City, Philadel- 
phia, Chicago. 

35th Filing 
(Compare with 23rd Filing) 

October 9, 1934. Effective October 15, 1934 

(Meeting Company #5's filing' #19", effective 10/10/34, later made 

effective 10/15/35, by filing #20). 

RS-T-8 (Rubber sheathed portables) cancelling RS-T-7 

CF-T-10 (Fixture Wire) cancelling CF-T-9 

FCN-T-4 (Non-aporoved flexibles) cancelling FCN-T-3 

FCA-T-21 (Flexible cotton and rayon) cancelling FCA-T-20 

HC-T-11 (Heater cords) cancelling HC-T-10 

Prices on practically all items .increased about 5% 

No changes mentioned on terms, delivery or discounts. 



9822 



-308- 
COiilMY #8 (Continued) 

36th Filing : 

(Compare with 35th Filing) 

October 11, 1934.... •. -....Effective October 15, 1934 

RS-T-9 (Rubber sheathed portables) cancelling RS-T-8 

15$ increase in lisc prices on certain items. 

Note: Five items were increased, net prices apparently set 

by Company #25 in filing effective October in, 1934. 

37tn Filing 

November 8, 1934 Effective November 8, 1954 

Changes in packing data on radio wires. 

38th Filing 

December 4, 1S34 Effective December 5, 1934 

(Meeting Company #37 ' s filing, effective December 3, 1934. 

RLI-T-1 (Special lead in wires). 

List prices applicable only on 1,000,000 ft. or more. 

Discounts:- 

to jobbers - List less 5-'r, ■ ■ ■ 

39tn Filing 

December 11, 1934 Effective December 20, 1934 

Section 12, page 3b (Special type PO-SJ, all-rubber) cancelling 

same page of 4/23/34. (Not in file). 

Discounts, terms and conditions same as in 35th filing. 

40th Filing 

December 21, 1934 Effective December 31, 1934 

RAW- T- 5a (Special radio lead in wire) 

Discounts, terms and conditions same as in 30th filing. 

41st Filing 
(Compare with 33rd and 34th Filing) 

January 16, 1935 Effective January 25, 1935 

FC-B-1 "additional terras and • conditions of sale, national syndicates", 
cancelling the two above-mentioned filings. 
Delivery: Full freight on 

a. 50 lbs. wt. $30 value or more, W.O.G-. 

b. A?.y weight or value to metropolitan areas of New York, 
Newark, Hobcken, Jersey City, Philadelphia, Chicago. 

42nd Filing 

January 18, 1935 Effective January 18, 1935 

Memo dated 1/18/35 withdrawing Sheet RLI-T-1 (38th Filing) 



9822 



-309- 

COMPMY #8 (Ontinued) 
45rd Filing 

February 18, 1935 Effective February 18, 1935 

(Meeting Company #37 ' s filing, effective February 18, 1935) 

Section 12, page 3c (Special PO-SJ cord) 

Discounts: - 

To manufacturers - IList less 20$. 

Sheet FC-D-8 (Discount sheet flexible cords) cancelling FC-D-7 

28th Filing) 

Discounts :- ' 

Jobbers ,' mail order houses, national syndicates (all classes 

of trade) - List less 15$. 



3822 



-310- 

C0M?A1TY-#10 

Original filing Effective September 7, 1933. 

Bulletin #4823 (Radio hook-up wire). 
Bulletin 4843 (Flexible cords). 

4844 (Rubber sheathed cords). 

4845 (Heater cords). 

4842 (Terms and conditions of sale). 

F-l (Discount sheet). 

Discounts: 

1. Wholesalers or jobbers, any quantity List less 10$. 

2. Mfrs., 50,000 ft. or more " " 10. 

3. Chain store warehouses, 50,000 ft. or more " » 10. 

4. Mfrs. and chain store warehouses, less than 

50,000 ft List. 

5. All other buyers " 

Terms: 

2$ 10th prox. net 301,1 prox. 
Delivery: 

FOB Factory, freight allowed to destination, 100 lbs. or more. 

2nd Filing 

October 2, 1933 Effective October 2, 1933. 

Meeting Company #8's 2nd Filing, effective 10/2/33. 

Bulletin #4863 (Radio hook-up wires). (Apparently supplements #4823 of 

the 1st Filing). 

4857 (Rubber sheathed portables) superseding 4844. 

4858 (Heater cords) superseding 4845. 

4859 (Flexible cords) superseding 4843. 
All list prices more than doubled. 
Discounts: 

1. Dealers List less 4.4<?o. 

2. Mfrs., less than 50,000 ft. and Class B Chains " " 58. 

3. Mfrs., 50,000 ft. or more, Class A Chains & Jobbers. .List less 60. 

4. Wiring device mfrs. with Class A Chains listing 

with sales agency contracts List less 65. 

3rd Filing 

October 27, 1933 llo effective date mentioned. 

Bulletin 4874 (Special construction heater cord). 
Terms, conditions and discounts same as 2nd Filing. 

4th Filing 

November 9, 1933 No effective date mentioned. 

Bulletin 4879 (Special construction rubber sheathed cord). 
Terms, conditions and discounts same as 2nd filing. 



9822 



-311- 



5th Filing 
(Compare with 2nd Filing) 

January 12, 1934. Effective January 13, 1934. 

Meeting Company #25' s 9th filing, effective January' 13'," 1934. 

Bulletin R 4925 (pubber sheathed portables) superseding 4857. 

R 4926 (Heater cords) superseding 4858. 

R4927 (Flexible cords) superseding 4359. 

4661 (Terms and conditions). 

4929 (Discount sheet). 

List prices on a few items decreased by amounts ranging from practically 

nothing to as much as 35 ( "i. 

Discounts: 

Applying to this filing and Bulletin 4863 (2nd Filing). 

1. To all biiyers, less than 10,000 ft... List less 52^o. 

2. 10,000 to 50,000 ft » n 55. 

3. 50,000 to 200,000 ft " " 58. 

4. 200,000 ft. or more, assorted " " 60. 

5. Jobbers, any quantity " 60. 

6th Filing 

January 22, 1934 .'....Effective February 1, 1934. 

Bulletin R 4834 (Radio hook-up wire, special construction). 
Discounts: As per ^the 5th Filing. 



7th Filing. 



February 15, 1934 Effective February 16, 1934. 

Meeting Company #8's 17th filing, effective February 16, 1934. 

Bulletin 4967 (Discount sheet) superseding 4929. 

Discounts: 

All buyers, any quantity List less 60^. 



8th Filing 
(Compare with 7th Filing) 

March 8, 1934 ' Effective March 5, 1934. 

Meeting Company #18' s filing, effective March 5, 1934.. 
Note: Made effective by telegrs.m of March 5. 
Bulletin 4974 (Discount sheet) superseding 4967. 
Discounts: 

1. Jobbers, chains, mail ord(?r houses List less 60 and 5f£. 

2. Mfrs., 50,000 ft. or more " » 6C and 5. 

3. All others " " 60. 



9822 



-312- 

9th Filing 
(Compare with 5th piling) 

March 17, 1934..- Effective March 24, 1954. 

Meeting Company #8<s 23rd filing, effective March 24, 1934. 

Bulletin R 4977 (Rubber sheathed portables) superseding R 4925. 

R 4978 (Flexible cords) superseding R 4927. 

R 4979 (Heater cords) superseding R 4926. 

SAIT 8 (Discount sheet). 

List prices reduced approximately 60^. 

Discounts: 

1. Jobbers, mail order houses, nat'l. syndicates. List less 5$. 

2. All buyers, .100,-000 ft. -or moirey a f ?;gregato,v..; " " 5. 

3. Distributors, 5 c / commission, orders from 
manufacturers, 100, 00 J 'ft. or more.' 

10th Piling . j 

(Compare with' 9th' piling) 

April 17, 1934 Effective April 13, 1934. 

Meeting Company #33' s filing effective April 13, 1934. 
Kate: Made effective by telegram of April 12. 
Bulletin SAN 17 (Discount sheet) superseding SAIT 8. 
Discounts: 

1. Jobbers, mail order houses, nat'l syndicates List less 5f . 

2. Mfrs., 100,000 t^ 499,999 ft , " " 5. 

3. All buyers, 500,000 ft. or more " "10. 

4. To distributors, 5f commission on orders from 
manufacturers, 100,000 ft. to 499,999 ft. 

11th piling 
(Compare with 2nd piling) 

April 28, 1934 Effective April 26, 1934. { 

Meeting Company #8's filing #27, effective April 26, 1934. 

Note; Made effective by telegram of April 25. .... 

Bulletin 4999 (Radio hook-up wires) superseding 4863. 

5000 (Radio wiro) superseding 4854 (not filed). 

5001 (Discount sh«et, radio wires) 
List prices reduced approximately 60^ 
Discounts: 

1. Jobbers, chains and mail order houses List less 5$, 

2. Other buyers, assorted items- 

a. 1,000 to 4,999 ft.,...' ' '.' List plus 15. 

b. 5,000 to 9,999 ft " » 10. 

c. 10,000 to 99,999 ft " 

d. 100,000 to 499,999 ft " ess 5. 

e. 500,000 ft. or more n 



% 



982; 



-313- 



12th piling 

June 25, 1934 Effective July 3, 1934. 

Bulletin R 503C (Special construction,' heated cord') - . 

Discounts: "?er Bulletin #5008" (Not filed). 

13th Filing 

June 26, 1934. Effective July 5, 1934. 

Bulletin R 5C29 (Special construction rubber sheathed cord). 
Discounts: "Per Bulletin #5008" (Not filed). 

14th Piling 

July 3, 1934 ..Effective July 3, 1934. 

Meeting Company #28A' s filing, effective 6/25/34. 

SAN 30. 

Special prices on 6 specified items to chain stores, mail order 

houses, and national syndicates. 

Terms: 

2fo 10 days, net 30. 
5<f additional discount on warehouse shipments. 

15th piling 
(Compare with 11th piling) 

July 5,- 1934 ..................... .Effective .July 9, 1934. 

Meeting -Company #37 's filing, effective July 9, 1934. 

SAN 32 (-Terms and conditions of .sale .and discounts on radio wires), 

No change in terms. 

Discounts: • ... 

1. Jobbers, chains, mail order houses List less 20$. 

2. Other buyers, assorted items- 

a. 1,000 to 4,999 ft List. 

b. 5,000 to 9,999 ft " less 5. 

c. 10,000 to 99,999 ft....,..,,.,.. " " 15. 

d. 100,000 to 499,999 ft " "20. 

e. 500,000 ft. or more " "25. 

16th Filing 

July 9, 1934 Effective July 9, 1934. 

Telegram dated July 9 making additional freight allowance on Gov- 
ernment Mds. (Land Grant freight rates) 



9822 



-314- 



17th Filing 
(Compare with 11th and 15th pilings) 

August 8, 1934. ...Effective. August. 1,8, 1934. 

Meeting Company #25' s 33rd filing, effective 7/27/34. 
Bulletin 5050 (Radio lead in wires) (1st filing). 
SAIT 35 (Discount sheet-radio wires) superseding SAIT 32. 
Discounts: 

1. Jobbers, chain stores, mail order houses. . .List less 51,. 

2. Other buyers, assorted items- . . 

a. 1,000 to 4,999 ft List plus 15. 

b. 5,000 to 9,999 ft,.. " " 10. 

c. 10,000 to 99,999 ft.. c " 

d. 100,000 to 499,999 ft " less 5. 

e. 500,000 ft. or more " » 10. 

18th Filing 

October 22, 1934 Effective October 22, 1934. 

Bulletin R 5085 (Special construction heater cord) superseding 

R 5030 (12th filing). 

Bulletin 5084 (Discount sheet) superseding 5008 (Hot filed). 

Note: Last discount sheet filed covering flexible cords was SA 1l T 17, 

filed April 17. 
Discounts: 

1. Jobbers, mail order houses, national 

.syndicates List less 5$. 

2. All buyers, 100,000 ft, or more, 'aggregate •» * ■ ■» 5. ■ 

3. 500,000 ft. or more » "10. 

4. To distributors, 5 )i commission, orders 
from manufacturers, 100,000 ft. or more. 

19th Filing 
(Compare with 18th Filing) 

October 24, . 1934 ............Effective October 24, 1934. 

Bulletin R 5087 (Special construction heater cord) superseding 
R 5085. 

2 0th Filing 

October 24,. 1934 Effective October 24, 1934. 

Meeting Company #23' s filing #26, effective October 23. ■ ■ 
Bulletin SAIT 41 (Special construction lamp cord). 
Discounts: 

Same as 18th Filing. 



( 



9822 



-315- 



21st Filing 
(Compare with 9th Filing) 

October 26, 1934 Effective October 26-, 1934. 

Meeting Company #6 ! s filing #19, effective 10/10/34. 

Bulletin R 5070 (Rubjer sheathed portables) superseding R 4977. 

R 5071 (Flexible cords) superseding R 4978. 

R 5072 (Heater cords) superseding R 4979. 

R 5069 (Terms and. conditions) superseding 4861. 

List prices increased approximately 5$, 

22nd 'Filing 
(Compare with 21st Filing) 

October 29, 1934 Effective October 29, 1934. 

Meeting Company #8»s filing effective '10/15/34. 

Bulletin R 5092 (Rubber sheathed cords) superseding R 5070. . 

List prices on all sizes of one type increased 15 to 20 c /o, 

23rd Filing 

November 9, 1934 ' Effective ilovember 9, 1934. 

Meeting Company $22' s filing effective ilovember 1, 1934. 

Bulletin 5099. 

Changes in packing data on radio 'Tires. 

24th Filing 

November 16, 1934 Effective November 19, 1934. 

Letter dated November 14 cancelling Bulletin SAN 30 (14th Filing). 

25th Filing 

December 3, 1934 Effective December 13, 1934. 

Bulletin R 6003 (Special construction, all rubber cords). 
Discounts: Same as in 18th Filing. 

26th Filing 

December 7, 1934.. .' Effective December 17, 1934. 

Bulletin SAN 46 (Special construction tinsel cord). 
Discounts: Not quoted. 

27th' Filing 

December 10, 1934. .. : . . Effective December 20, 1934. 

Bulletin R 6009 (Special construction rubber sheathed cord) super- 
seding R 6047. 
Note: 5047 not filed; last filing on this item was the 13th. 



9322 



4 



-316- 

COMPAIT? #12 

September 7, 1933. . . ... . ■•■• 

Price sheet = L 300 (Fixture wire). . ■ 
#400 (Heater Cords).- 
#200 (Flexible cords). 
Discount sheet #1, 
Pi s counts ; - 

1. Applying to price' sheets 200 and 400- 

a. Wholesalers or jobbers, any quantity .. List Less 10$ 
"b. Mfrs., 50,000 ft. or more " " 10 

c. Mfrs., less than 50,000 ft List 

d. Chain store warehouses, 50,0'"0 ft...... List less 10 

or more , - 

<e. Some, less than 50 \ 300 ft List 

f. All other buyers, any quantity List 

2. Applying to }Drice sheet 300- 

a. Wholesalers or jobbers, any quantity-..-. List less 10$ 

b. Mfrs. of lighting fixtures and 

electrical appliances List less 10 

c. All other buyers, any quantity List' 

Terms :- 2$ cash, '10th prox. net SO days. 

Del iver y:- f.o.b. factory, freight allowed to destination, lOOlbs 
or more. 

2nd Piling 

Gctober 26, 1933. 

Sheet #201 (Flexible cords) superseding '8200. 

800 (IT o"n-ap'o roved flexibles) (1st filing). 

301 (Fixture wire) superseding 300. ..-••■ 

600 (Radio hook-up wire) (1st filing). 

700 (Radio wires) -(1st filing). 

Bulletin #2 (Terms and discounts). 

List prices on flexible cords and fixture wires. more than doubled. 

Discounts:- Applying to all of the above sheets- 

1. Dealers, contractors, utilities, department . stores* • -List Less 40; 

2. Purchasing service conrpanies- 

When billed by us ..List less 48$ 

When billed by them " " 50 

3. Mfrs. for use, less than 50,000 ft., class B 

Gha:'..ns , U.S. Gov ' t , and Railroads " " 58 

4. >Mfrs. for use, 50,000 f t . , or more.,, 

job ere Class A Chains ......... " " 60 

5. Wiring device mfrs. with Clas^ A Chains 

listing with sales agency contracts " " 65 

Terms:- 2$ 10th prox. not E01T prox. 



9822 



-317- 

COMPANY #12 (continued) 



3r d Tiling 
(Compare with 2nd Filing) 

January 15 , ^934 Effective January 25, 1934 

et #601 (R c'io hock-up wire) cancelling 600. 
701 (Radio wires) c-.ncelling 70"). 

(Radio lead in wires) (1st filing on this item). 
List prices incre sed . . proximately 25$. 
Discounts: Radio wires- 

1. Jobbers List less 60^ 

2. Radio mfrs., less than 500,000 ft. 

ssorted " " 60 

3. Radio mfrs., 500,0^0 ft. or more 

assorted " " 68 

4. Radio parts mfrs " " 68 

Flexible Cords-Non-approvcd flexibles and fixture wires- 

1. All "buyers, less then 10,000 ft... List less 52^ 

2. Less than 50,000 ft " " 55 

3. 50,000 ft. or more " " 58 

4. 230, 000 ft. or more _. " " 60 

5. Jobbers, any quantity " " 60 



4 th F iling 
(Compare with 2nd Filing) 

January 25 , 1954 Effective February 4, 1934, 

Sheet #202 (Flexible cords) superseding 201. 
15':> reduction in list price jn a few items. 
Discounts:- As per 3rd Filing. 



5th _Fi ling 
(Compare with 3rd Filing) ' ' 

February 6, 1934 Effective February 16, 1934. 

Bulletin #5 (Discount sheet-radio wires). 
Discounts i* 

1. Jobbers, any quantity List less 60^ 

2. Mfrs., less than 500,000 ft. assorted " " 60 

3. Mfrs., 500,000 ft... or more, asserted. » " 68 

4. R i .rts mfrs, ' " " 68 

(S s 3rd Filing) 



9822 



-318- 
COJ 1PA1TY #12 (continued) 

6th filing 

March 24, 1934 meeting Co. #8 ' s filing, #23 ef~ cctive March .24, 1934. 

Sheet #2 n 3 (Flexible ccrds) cancelling 202 (4th Piling). ' 

302 (Fixture wires) cancelling 301 (2nd Filing). 

801 (Non-approve& flexibles) cancelling GOO (2nd Filing). 

Bulletin #7 (Discount sheet). 

List prices reduced ppr DXiraatcly 60^. 

Discounts:- 

1. Jobbers , mail order houses, nat'l syndicates.. List less 5$. 

2. Mfrs . , 100,000 ft. or more '. .'.' '.'" '. .' " " 5 

3. All others ' Net. 



7t h Filing 
(Compare with 3rd Filing) 

April 2, 1934 Effective April 5, 1934. 

Meeting Co. #22 ' s filing, effective date March 2.'% 1934. 
Sheet #602 (Hadio hook-up wires) cancelling 601. 
Bulletin #8 (Discount sheet applying to 'this filing) and 
Sheet #702 (Radio wires) - Not filed.' 
List prices reduced approximately 25;1, 
Discounts:- 

1. Jobbers, chains and irr.il order houses, ,ny quantity-List less 60 &-,oyu 

2. Other buyers , less than 50,000 ft " " 60 

3. 50,000 to 999,999 ft.. " " 60&5 

4. 1,000,000 ft. or more " " 65 

Above discounts may be obtained on assorted items. 



8th Fi ling_ 
(Compare with 3rd and 7th Filings) 

April 26, 1934 .-Effective April 26, 1934 

Meeting Co. #8's filing #27, effective date April 26, 1934. 
Sheet #603 (Hadio hook-up wires) cancelling 602. 
703 (Radio. wires) cancelling 701. 
List prices reduced approximately 60^j. 
Discounts :~ 

1. Jobbers, chains, and mail order houses, any quantity, List .less 5$ 

2. Qthe" buyers , assorted items- 

a. 1,000 to 4,999 ft " plus 15. 

b. 5,000 to 9,999 ft " " 10 

c: . 10 ,000 to 99 , 999 ft " 

d. 100,000 to 499,999 ft " less 5. 

-.. 500,00? ft. or more " " 10. 



,9 th Filing 
(1st Filing on this item) 

May 17, 1934 Efi ective May 27, 1934. 

Sheet #1000 (Rubber sheathed portable corr~s) 
Discounts:- Hot quoted, 

9822 



-319- 

COL'-PANY #12 (Continued) 

10th filing 

June g, 193 k 
Letter dated May 31 - 

".Amendment to terns and conditions of sale to Navy Department on ac- 
count of till passed by Congress known as the Vinson Bill." 

11th Filing 
(Compare with 1st, 6th and 9th. Filing) 

October 29, ' 193 1 !-, 

(Meeting Company # 25»s filing # 37 Effective October 29.-193H, 

effective October 10, IO3U) . 

Sheet #204 (Flexible cords) superseding 203. 

List prices increased about 5$« 

303 (Fixtures wire) superseding 302. 

List prices increased about 5$« 

UOl (Heater cords) s~a;oerseding UOO. 

General revision of prices, some up, some dovm, but as much as 6fo. 

either way. A few types a.dded. . 

o02 (Non-approved fle:dLbles) superseding SOI. 

List prices on nearly all items increased approximately 5$» 

1001 (Rubber sheathed portables) superseding 1000. 

List prices increased about 20^. 

Discounts :- 

1. Jobbers, mail order houses, nat'l. syndicates... list less 5$ 

2. Mfrs., 100,000 to H99.999 ft • " " 5 

3. AH buyers, 500,000ft.- or more " " 10 

■ • • • 12th Filing 

November 22, I93U. 

Letter dated November 13th effecting changes in packing data. Effective 

November 22, I93U. 

13th Filing 
(Compare with 3rd Filing) 



December 6, 193^« 

901 (Radio lead in wires) cancelling 900. Effective December 6, 193^- 

List prices reduced approximately 75$ 

Discounts: - Same as other radio wires (See Sth Filing). 



9222 



-320- 



OuFAil x - „-.. ■-' 



1st ?ilin JI 
September 7, 1933 Effective September 7, 1933. 

I. Sheets CW 431 (Cords and Portables) ,CW 422 Cu 42? special, and 
t' o memos - discounts. 
Discounts :- 

1. Sug ested resale, all quantities, trade price. 

2. #23 Con/paoy distributors, list less 10 o. 

3. Manufacturers for use - 50,030 ft. or more, list less 10 j, 

4. #23 Company distributors selling manufacturers - 

a. Less than 50,000 ft. list less 10> 

b. 50,000 ft. 0" more, list less 10 -nd Z. 

5. #14 Company - list less 10 -nd 10 

3ote : Sells under o T m tr-de a? ie. 10 .'• is in lieu of 

ndvertising and is commission and handling profit. 

II. Sheet YIi 5S-D (Heater Cords tymes BPD ~nd IIC); -.lso discount 
sheets CYZ- 11-A. and CiT 11. 
D iscoimts:- 

1. #14 Company- (See ITote above) - List Less 10 and 10. 

2. #23 Conmrny distributors " » " " 5. 

2. Tnolesalers or jobbers " " "• 

4. Manufacturers, 50,000 ft. or more... » " ". 

I7.I. Sheet IT SO-D (jhrture r:ire) and discount sheets C7IE 11 and 
CYE 11-A. 
Discounts :- 

1. #14 Corronny - (See ITote above) -....List less 10 and 10. 

2. #23 Corxoany distributors " " 10 » 5. 

3. '/holes- ■ lers or jobbers " " 10. 

4. Lighting fixtures Manufacturers " " 10, 

5 : . Appliances Manufacturers " " ■ ' 10. 

IV« Sheet T.l 61 (Lead in T. r ire) and discount sheet OIK 11. 
Discounts :- 

1. #33 Company distributors List less 10 and 5. 

2. wholesalers or jobbers " " 10. 

3. Lighting fixture Manufactures....... " " 10. 

i. An-olianco Mfrs " " 10. 

7« S 1 eet YK 52- (Heater cord st3al.es A, C.and D) and discount sheet 
C3E 11. 
Discou.it s:- 

1. #23 Corroany distributors List Less 10 -nd 5. 

2. Wholesalers or jobbers " " 10. 

3. ; amfacturerr. , 50,000 or more " " 10. 

VI. Sales Terms:- 

1. Trade :orices are per one thousand feet. 

r . Deliver/ - D.O.L. factor - ,". 7rei;ht allowed to destination 

on 100 lbs. or over. 
3. Terns - 2;'j 10th -oro::. net CO days. 



982 3 



r 21- 



2n d 17ili - 1 

October 17, 1933. 

To meet Company #G's filing 2 Eff. Oct. 2, 1333. 

C'..' 433 (Cords and Portables) superseding Cb 431. 

Cb 434 and 434 special (discount sheets) superseding CT7 422 and 

Cb" 422 special respectively. 
List nrices approximately doubled. 
Disco unts :- 

1. Suggested resale to dealers List Less 40b" 

2. #23 Conoaay distributors, any quantity " " 30- 

3. I'frs. for use, less than -0,003 ft " » 5 n 

... ■ greater than 50,000 ■" " 50 

4. #23 Company distrioutors selling nfrs. as above 

a. Less than 50,000 ft List Less 58 and 5 

b. 50,000 or -no re " " 60 and 5 



Terns: - 



2$> 10th prox. net- 60 days. 

(iTcte: 2nd & 3rd filing equal 2nd filing of Company #3.) 



3rd Tilin g 
(Compare with 1st filing)' 



Octooer 20, 1933. 

I. Sheets YE 59-E (Heater Cords type HPD and HO) superseding IE 59-D. 
YE 60-L (Fixture -ire) Superseding YE SO-D. 
YE 61-A (Lead wire) superseding YE 61. . 
. CYE 13 '(Discount sheet) 
.List -ofices approximately doubled. 
Dj sccm ts:- 

1. #23 Corroany distrioutors, cnir- nuantity. . .List less 63;o 

2. Wholesalers , jobbers rnd Class A chains, 
any quantity, C-. Manufacturers for use 

50,000 or more " " 50 

3. Railroads, U. S. Government ". Class B chains, 
any quantity, & Manufacturers for use, less 

than "50,000 ft : List Less 53 

4. Dealers, central stations, electrical contractors 

and all other buyers, any quantity List Less 40 

5. Wiring device mfr*. or others operating under 
sales a?e-~:c~ r contracts having listing with Class A 

c lains List Less 55 

5. #"5 Company distributors - sales to Class 5 

buyers List Less 55 3 5. 



II. Sheet YZ 62' (Heater Cords, styles A, C and D) and discount sheet 
CYK 13. 
l T o change from "orevious filing. 



(1st filing on this product) 



4th filing 



lieve::foer,21, 193 



Sheets C." 433' r id C'J 439 (Radio wires) 

C T J 440, 441 (Radio lead in '.'ires) and 
CT7 442 (Discount sheet) 

Discounts :- 



1. Suggested resale 

' a. "Radio afrs, , less than 500,000 ft Lint Less 60y 



ii it 



c ■"> 



:■ 500,000 or ovei » 

b. Radio -parts nfr'&., 500,000 ft, or over" " S3 
2. #23 Conpan]' - distributors, any quantity " " E-0 

CV UU3 special' superseding C" U3H special (second filing) - dis- 
count sheet — - cords and portables. 
Discounts :- 

1. Mfrs. for use, less than 50,000 List Less 5^ 

50,000 or more » " 60 

2. ^23 Company distributors selling mfrs. as above - 

differential of 5fj 

3. '.firing device :nfrs. with listing with Class A 

chains List Less 65$ 

1'otc: Cl^ss A Chain s 

Serrs Roebuck ft Co. IT. 1, Grant Co. 

Scott Stores-Sutler Bros. Montgomery Ward ft Co. 
S. :i. Kress Co. 5. S. Ilresge Co. 

HcLellan Stores Co. ILcCrory Stores Corp. 

J. J. ITewberry Co. Ii. L. Green Co. 

G. C. l.Iurphy Co. T. ". "oolworth Co. 

Rose Stores' ITeisner Bros. Inc. 

'. . II. Pishmen Co., Inc. 
(llote: Apparently meeting Company ; „-'8's filing 
3 and 5 in part.) 



5th Filing 



December ik, 1933. 

Sales policy on radio '..'ires. 

Standard terras and delivery. 



6th Filing 



(Conpare with Uth filing) 

December 27, 1333* 

Sheet CT7 hl+g special (Discounts on Cords and Portables') superseding 

CT7 UU3 special. 

Discounts:- ' 

1. Mfrs. for use- Less than 50,000 ft List Less 58$ 

50 , 000 f t , or more ..." " 65 

2. #23 Company Mctributors selling mfrs. as a ;ove - 

Differential of 5^ 

9822 






3. ,T iring device -frs. with Class A chains listing, 

any quantity List Less 65^ 

("otes Dlass A Chains sane as in 4th filing.) 

7th filing 
(Compare with 4th filing) 

January h, I33U Effective January Ik, 193U. 

Sheet CW 1+50 (radio lead in -"ire) superseding CT." '-I-I1. 
No changes in list prices; only change in packing data* 

gth Piling 
(Conpare with 2nd filing) 

January 10, I33U Effective January 13, 1934. 

To meet Company ^25 J s filing, 9. . . Effective January 13, 1934. 

Sheet CTT 1+52 (Cords and Portables) superseding CT7 1+33 and 
Discount sheet CtT 1+51 superseding CW 1+33 and CT7 1+1+9 . 
10 to 15;' reduction in list prices on certain items. 
Discounts:- 

1. To all buyers— 

a. Less than 10,000 ft List less 52$ 

b. 10,000 to 1+9,999 " " 55 

c. 50,000 to 199,999 " " 5S : 

d. 200,000 or more " " 60 

2. To if-23 company C.istrioutors, all 

quantities " " 60 

■ 3. To ^23 company distributors, 200,000 ft. or 

•more, order placed on factory for full amounts. n " 60 and 5- 
Terms:- 2;1 10th pro::, net POM prox. 

9th Piling ' : 

(.Co: pare with 3 r d filing) 

January 11, 193I+ Effective January 27, 193U. 

Note: This filing received January 11, 1934, ' l7rs short 15 copies and 
was held up until they were received on January 1~[ . It then 
becarae effective 10 da Tr s from receipt of sufficient copies for 
distribution, or January 27. 

YK- 59-? (Del tabes to:. Heater Cord) superseding YIC 59~3. 

10 to 15$ reduction in certain items. 

YK oO-E *- reprint, no change. 

Disccunts:- 

1. To all buyers— 

a. Less than 10,000 ft List less 52^ 

t. 10,000 to 1+9,999 " » 55. 

c. 50,000 to 19.9,999 » " 58. 

d. 200 , 000 or more '. " " 60. 

2. To -^23 company distributors, all 

quantities " " 60. 

3. To #23 company distributors, 200,000 

ft. or more, order. placed on factor" - for full 

amount , . . " " 60 and 5« 

9S22 



-324- 



Terms:- 2$ 10th pro:;, net SO. 
Also OT U52-A - "All-iTLOoer" cord. 

10-' reduction on size --,--13; no other change fron Sth filing. 

10th Filing 

February 1, 193H Effective February 7, 193^. 

CT7 U55 - radio hook-up -.vires of special construction. • • ■ 

2 types listed; no comparison possible as these are special jobs. 

Discounts :- 

1. To all buyers. 

a. Less than 10,000 ft List Less 52I 

b. 10,000 to 1+9, '999 " " 55 

c. 50,000 to 199,993 » " 58 

d. 200,000 or more " " 60 

2. To #23 Co: pany distributors, all 

quant it ie s " " 60 . 

Terras:- 2 c i 10th pro::, net SO. 

. 11th filing 
(Go: 'pare with Sth Filing) 

February 9, 193^ .Effective February 12, 193^- 

To meet Company vj=13 x s Filing Effective February 12, 193^* 

Discount sheet CTT ty)& (Cords and Portables)' superseding CI7 U5I. 
Discounts:- Suggested resale 

1. To all buyers, any ouantity List Less 60^ 

2. To #23 conpany distributors, any quantity " " 60 

and 5« 

Terras:- 2$ 10th pro::, net SOM prox. 

12th Filing " ' I 

February lU, I93U Effective February 23, 193*+» 

(Due to financial operation of Government.) 
Letter cancelling interest charge on orders fror. U. S. Government. 

13th Filing 
( Co-pare rath Uth filing) 

February lk, I93U Effective February 2k, 193^« 

Discount sheet CYIC 17 superseding CYK I5. 
Discounts :- 

1. Applying to he:. tor cord s- 

a. On orders less than 25,000 ft List Less 56'^ 

b. 25,000 ft. or more " " 60# 

c. To all jobbers, any quantity " " Sofi 



9822 



II 
II 
II 
II 


„ 55-1 
" 58-1 

'i 6o^s 


II 


» 60 




and 5» 



-325- 



2. Apply in -; to fi::ture wjres- 

a. Or'.ers less than 10,000 ft List Less 52^ 

b. lo/ioo to 1+9,999 

c [30,0 j to 19?, 9' ° 

d. 200,00 or more 

e . _JP. jobbers, any quantity. 

f. To jobbers for order in Class D 
placed on factory for full amount 

Terras: ?A 10th pro::, net EOM prox, 

l4th Piling 
(Compere with 4th filing) 

Ilarch 6, 193U Effective March lb, 1934. 

CT7 U59 (radio -ire;-,) superseding Ow 439; also radio rrire sales policy. 
General reduction of 00 , in list prices. 
Discount s :- 

No change mentioned from previous filing on these items.. 
Terns: 

2.^3 10th pro::, net 66' days'. 

l^th Piling 
(Compare vrilth 4th filing) 

March 15, 1934 Effective March 19, 1934. 

To meet Company ,'OOts Piling 24 Effective i.iarch 15, 1934. 

Discount sheet 017 462 (radio wires) superseding 2" -1-42. 
Discounts :- All customers - 

1. Less than 1,000,000 ft List less 60$ 

2. 1,000,000 ft. or core ' " " 65$ 

Tens: 

2$ 10th pro::, net 50. 

l6th Piling 

I . tiarch 22nd 1934 Effective March 24, 1934. 

To meet Company >S*s Piling 23 Effective March 24, 1934. 

YK 36-B (fixture -.Tire); and CYK 18 (discount sheet) 
No mention is ma .e of previous sheets 

(Note: Discount sheet met Company '^€1 discounts but added one 
other -.;hich did not amount to much.) 
Discounts a- 

1. To jo' ,c rs - 

a. Less than 100,000 ft List Less 5$. 

b. 100,000 ft. or nore, order by manufacturer 

for use . " " 5 an ^ 

5. 

2. UrnuO rers for use, 100,000 ft. or nore... . " " 5. 
3- All other Or-ers, any quantity List 

Terris:- 

21 10th oro::. net EOi. prox. 



3222 



-326- 



II. March 24, 1S3 1 ' Effective March 2k, 1934. 

To meet Company v"S's Piling .23 Effective March 2k, 1934. 

CW U63 (Cords and Portables) superseding CI7 452 and CW 452-A 

(9th Piling) 

also CT7 464 (Discount sheet) superseding CT. r 458 (llth Filing) 
Approximate!" SO-j reduction in list prices. 



1. Joboers, mail order houses,- national 

syndicates.. List Less 5p 

2. Manufacturers 100,000 ft. or more " » 5. 

3« ir?-3 Company, distributors, any quantity...... " " 5» 

17th Piling 
(Compare with 13th filing) 

April 7, 193^ Effective April 17, 1934. 

CYK 19 (Discount sheet, Pixture "ares) applying to price sheet 
YK 60-E superseding CYK 17 . 
Discount s :- 

1. Any order less than 10,000 ft List Less 52$ 

2. 10,000 to L !-9,999 

3. 50,000 to 99,999 

k. 100,000 or more 

Terms:- 

2)o 10th pro::, net SOM prox. 

ISth Filing 
(Compare with 9th filing) 



1! 


II 


55. 


II 


II 


5S. 


II 


II 


60. 



April l4, 193^ i ; . i i » Effective April l6, 1934. 

To meet Company v35' s Piling Effective April 15, 193*+* 

YK 59-G (Delta'beston heater cord) superseding YK 59-E, list prices 
reduced approximately 60$. 

YK 60-E (fixture wire) - Only change from previous filing is the 
addition of one t"-pe ■'.lire. 

- 19th- Piling 
(Compare with 15th filing) 

April Ik, 133k Effective April 23, 1924. 

CW 463 (discount sheet, radio wire) superseding CT7 462. 
Discounts :- 

1. Less than 50,000 ft List Less 60$ 

2. 50,000 to 993,000.- ...■•• n H 60 

and 5« 

3. 1,000,000 or more. List Less 65. 

Terms:- 2-p 10th pro::, net 60. 

20th Filing 

April 23, 1934 Effective April 26, 1934. 

To meet Company #8's filing 27 Effective April 26, 1934. 

9822 



-327- 

CW U69 (radio hook-up) superseding CW U3S (tyth filing) 

6(>1 reduction in list prices. 
CW U70 (radio -.'ires) superseding CW U59 (14th filing) 

bO\j reduction in list prices. 
CW kfl (discount sheet) ■ superseding. CU ! !-6S (19th filing) 
CW 472 (terms and conditions, of sale), superseuin ■ sheet of 3/l5/3^» 

Discounts:- All- customers - 

1. 1,000 to -', ft List plus 15^ 

2. 5,000 to 9,'. , » " 10. 

3. 10,000 to 99,995 " 

4. 100,000 to 4; , • " less 5i. 

5. 500,000 and over-.-. " " 10. 

Terns:- 2$ 10th pro::, net SOM prox. 

21 st Filing 
(Compare with l6th filing) 

July 3, 193H Effective July 13, 1934. 

CW H79 (discount sheet—cords and portables) superseding CW 464. 

Discounts :- Suggested- resale - To all buyers — 

1. Jobbers. List Less 55^ • 

2. Manufacturers 100,000 to 499,999 " " 5 • 

500 or more " " 10 . 

3. : „-23 Company distributors, any quantity 

Terms:- 2p 10th pro::, net EOM prox., 

22nd Fili ng 

July 9, 133U Effective July 9, 1934. 

Telegram making en additional freight allowance on Government bids, 
(Land Grant Freight rates) . ... 

23rd Filing 
(Compare with 20th filing) 

July 11, I93U Effective July 21, 193U. 

CW 4S0 (discount sheet, radio wire) superseding CW kfl. 

Discounts:- To all customers - 

1. 1,000 to . ) f t List. 

2. 5,000 to 3,959. List less 5$. 

3. 10,000 to 99,999 " " 15. 

4. 100,000 to -:-':, V r -i " " 20. 

5. 500,000 and over " n 25. 

24th Filing 

August S, 193^ Effective August IS, 193H. 

AE 222 (radio wires) supplementing CW 470 (20th filing). 

9822 



-328- 

CW H82 (radio wire discount sheet) superseding C~ hGO (23rd filing). 
10^ reduction in list prices on certain items. 

Discounts :- To all customers - 

1. 1,000 - 4,999 ft List plus 15$. 

2. 5,000- 9,999 " " 10. 

3. 10,000- 99,995 " 

4. 100,000 ~ 499,999 " less 5. 

5. 500,000 and over ■' " 10. 

25th Filing 

October 10, 193^ Effective same date. 

To meet Company -,-'6 ! s filing 19 Effective October 10, 193^. 
YK 59-H (Deltabeston Heater Cord) superseding IK 59-G (lSth filing) 
G-YK 25 (Discount sheet) sixperseding CYK 23. (Never received) 
Also additional sheet YIC 59 _ H, correcting 2 prices as listed on the 
original 59-H. 
5:i increase in lint prices effective by this filing. 

Discounts:- Suggested resale - 

1. Jobbers and nail oro.er houses List Less 5/°« 

2. Manufacturers, 100,000 ft. or more " ,! 5 . 

3> 7r23 Compaiy distributors, any quantity ti ■ 11 5 ( 

5$ commission r,llo'.:ed to hr23 Company distributors on quantity 
orders fron manufacturers. 

Terms:- 2$ 10th pro::, net EOM prox. 

(Note: ,'-23 Company does not meet the discount of 10fj for 
500,000 or more to all buyers.) 

26th Filing 

October 13, I93U Effective October 23, 193.4. 

CW US5 (Special parallel all- rubber lamp cord; 2 new types not previous- 
ly listed) . 

Also CW 4S6 (Cords and Portables) superseding CT7 463 (l6th filing). 
General increase of 5^ i n list prices. 

Discounts :- For both — same as previous filings on cords and portables. 

Terms:- 2^ 10th pro::, net EOM prox. 

27th 'Filing 
(Compare with 20th filing) 

November 7i 1934 ........ . .' . Effective same date. 

To meet Company : „ : 22 , s Filing. Effective 'November 1, 1934. 

CW 48S supplementing CW 472 

On radio 'jires-deductions for other than standard packages. 



9222 



-329- 



28th Filing 
(Compare with 26th filing) 

November 26, 193H Effective same date. 

CT7 kSS (Special le •? core".) superseding C.i HS'3. 

5$ increase in list prices of the 2 special types listed. 

No change in discounts or terms. 

29th Filing 
(Co-pare with 20th filing) 

December k, 19 3*+ • • Effective same date. 

To meet Company 031 1 % Slling Effective December 3, 

193^- 
C!7 U91 (radio lead in wires)' supplementing CI k~[0, 

Reduction of 25 to 40p' in list" 'prices of *7 types on -orders of 1,000,000 
ft. or over. 

Discounts :- To distributors -List "less ;5/* 

' ' 30th Piling 

December 22, I93U Effective same date. 

YK 59-1 (Deltabeston Heater Cord) superseding YK 5S-H (25th Filing). 
YK 60-F (Deltabeston Picture "lire) superseding YK 60-E (loth Filing). 
No change from previous filings. 

(Note: Deductions made from net prices instead of from list prices). 

31st Filing , 
(Compare with 29th filing) 

January 26 , 1935 t Effective same date . 

Letter withdrawing CT7 U$l covering special prices, radio lead in wires-* 
1,000,000 ft. or more. 

32nd Filing 
(Compare with 21st filing) 

February l6, 1935 Effective February lg, 1935. 

To meet Company =,,=37' s filing Effective February 18, 1935* 

C~ U52 (Discount sheet, Cords and Portables) superseding CW U79. 
Covers 6 specified. types. of wires. 

Discounts :- 

1. =,r23 Co rpa.iy lis bributors'. .....'■ List less 15$ 

2. 7 f L 23 Company distributors on all other types. " " 5« 

Terms:- 2$ 10th -proc. m.e.t. EQi; pr'o'x.' 



9822 



-330- 

COMPANY #25 

Original Filing 

September 7, 1933 . 

Sheet S and SJ 101 (Rubber sheathed portables). 

Tyro 101 (Fixture wire). 

XT 101 (Non-approved flexibles). 

LC 101 (Flexible cotton and rayon). 

Telep 101 (Canvasite wire). 

Xmas wires (Special wires for Christmas sets). 

Radio 130 (Radio lead in wire). 

HC 101 (Heater cord). 

Bulletin SF-1 (Terms and conditions of sale and discounts). 

Discounts ; ' ' • • 

1. Wholesaler or jobber, any ' quantity ... List less 10^ 
'2. Manufacturers, 50,000 ft. or more .... " " 10$ 

3. Manufacturers, less than 50,000 ft....: List 

4. Chain stores warehouses, 50,000 ft. 

or more List less 10$ 

5. Chain store warehouses, less than 50,000 
and all other buyers, any quantity. .. .List 



Terms: 



2% cash, 10th prox. net 25th prox. 



Delivery : 

F.O.B. factory, freight allowed to destination, 100 lbs. 
or more. 



2nd Filing 

October 9, 1933. 

XT 102 (Non-approved flexibles) cancelling XT 101. 

Pyro 102 (Fixture wire) cancelling -Pyro -101. ■ • 

S 102 (Rubber sheathed portables) cancelling S and SJ 101. 

HC 102 (Heater cords) cancelling HC 101. 

LC 102 (Flexible cotton and rayon) cancelling LC 101 

Bulletin SP 2 (terms and conditions) and 

Discount sheet DIS-1. 

Prices more than doubled over previous filing. 

Discounts : ■ • .... 

1. Dealers, central stations and' electric contractors. .List less 40$ 



2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



7. 

8. 

9. 

10. 



Mfrs. for use, less than 50,000 ft 

Class B chains, any quantity..- , 

Railroads, any quantity 

U. S. Government, any quantity 

Purchasing -service companies- • 

When billed by us , 

When billed by them 

Mfrs. for use, 50,000 ft. or more 

Class A chains, any quantity „ , 

Jobbers, any quantity. 

Wiring device Mfrs. with Class A chains 
listing operating under sales agency con- 
tracts, any quantity , 



58 
58 
58 
58 

48 
56 
60 
60 
60 



.List less 65$ 



9022 






-331- 

A T t?25 



Class A Chains ar : 



Scott 3tores-5;utle"r "Pros'. ' H. L. Green.' Coixwzy 

5. S. I[res ;o Co. J. J. ITe'vberry Co. 

"'. I. Grant Co. r. T7. TToolnorth Co. 

5. H. dress Co. G. C. Purbhy Co. 

iicCrory Stores C- rp. "eisner Pros., Inc. 

dcClel -n Stores Co'o Ease Stores 

Seers Ro :1 & Co:ipany 5"ont ;onery TTr.rd & Co. 

!". H. Pish. :pji d- Co., Inc. 

: ' 1 ' filed n-. ,o trices and sr >o discount's on 

, ;ti .' October 2, although the filings ^ere 
not 1 by t 10 Supervisory Ap icy until October 17'.. It is 
= ■ nt that this :o i; (==25) obtained Co- nr> \y t?6' s filing 

I is meeting sa.'e." Co.'Vsp-iv #25 lives discount to greater 
ra; 1 ;c . f □ l ; to lers. 

I . r -. s : 2 10th pro.", not 20P >rod. 

3rd rili-y; 
(1st filing on this product) 

Tiled "To\ mi r 1 , 1 o3. 

I-IC 3-100 (List prices on special tyoo her tor cord). 

ct to sa o ter :s, cc L ls • Lisci 1 its of 2nd filin -. 

4tn :.'i li-v 

Pil d Nov. rab r 7, 1953. 

cial prices to syndicates on 6 specified t" r '3cs of r/ire for sn.ionont 
on or before December 15, 15 S3. 

ITote: Cor.up.ny states, "Pries pre to meet te: iporary conditions". 
Apparently refers to filin; of Co- too :j r - ; > of LTovenbor 2, 1033. 

5th Pili -.. : 
(Coma: e nith 1st Idling) 
Filed November 6, 1973. 
"- '""-• f*lt , cancelling Lnas "ires of September 7, 1933. 

tion in net nrice 01 5 t" r :>es and about 1,5 increase on 2 t'^ies. 
Lsc . , :v :s; I-onc other than 2 .■ for cash, 10th prox. 

3 th Piling 

ITovember 23, 1 5' (An 3s,rontl; Meeting prices filed 

• Company --3 on ".'ov. 15, 1955 - 5th filing) 
H 62 (Radio hook-u wires.) 
R 53 and I A and 13 (Eri io 'Tires) 
R S4 (Solid radio lead in) 
R 63 ( itrr.nded ra.< io lord in) 

ate: I. : only 'rice list filed before xr^s r. partial one on radio 
1 • i i nires, (1st Fili . ■) . ..... 

Li t prices this filing s t do t led.brevious filing. 

II ,tin R 200 (Pis 30 nt >heet) . . 






-332- 

COMPAMY #25 

Pi count s i- 

1. Jobbers < List Less 60$ 

2. Radio infrs*, less than 500,000 ft., assorted " » 60 

3. Radio mfrs., 500,000 ft., or more assorted.. " " 68 

4. Radio parts mfrs " " 68 

Note : Company states, under radio parts mfrs., "as listed on 
Bulletin R-201". Bulletin R-201 does not mention radio parts 
manufacturers. 

7th Filing 
(Compare with 6th Filing) 

December 13, 1935. 

R 64 Special (Radio lead in wire) superseding R 64 

Prices reduced approximately 50$ 

Discounts ; Applying to these items only- 

1. Wholesalers or jobbers, any quantity List less 10$ 

2. Mfrs. 50,000 ft. or more » » 10 

3. Mfrs. less than 50,000 ft., other buyers, 

any quantity List 

Mote ; Apparently Company #25 originated these prices and dis- 
counts which were not followed by any of the larger concerns. 
Company #6 filed same prices and discounts on December 20. 

8th Filing 
( Compare with 5th Filing) 

December 21, 1933. 

Xmas wires 101 (Special wires for Christmas sets), cancelling Xmas 

wires 100, 

List prices more than doubled. 

Sales to manufacturers only. 

Discounts :- "No disco ant for above trade other than 60$." 

Letter dated December 6, supplementing discount sheet DIS-1 
allowing discount of 65$ to all manufacturers on orders 
50,000 ft. or more, 

9th Filing 
(Compare with 2nd Filing) 

January 3, 1934 Effective January 13, 1934. 

LC 103 (Flexible cotton and rayon) cancelling LC 102, 

Decrease of about 25$ in list prices, 

HC 103 (Heater cords) cancelling HC 102, 

Most items unchanged; some list prices decreased by about 15$, 

XY 103 (Non-approved flexible s) cancelling XY 102. 

List prices on most items decreased 15 to 2C$; a few unchanged. 

Discount sheet DIS 3 cancelling DIS 1. 

Discounts:- 

1. Less than 10,000 ft List less 52$ 

2. Less than 50,0 'DC ft " " 55. 

3. 50,000 ft. or more " " 58. 

9822 4. 200,000 ft. or more " » 60. 



-333- 

5. Jobbers, any quantity List Less 6CK0. 

10th Filing 
(Conroare with nth Filing) 

" luar " 11 , 1954 , Effective January 21 , 1934. 

Xaas -ires 102 (Special wires for Christ ias sets) crncellin- Xnas 
"ires 101. 

Reverted to list prices and other tens of Xraas wires 100 (see 
5th Filing). 

11th Filing 
(Cornare with 9th' Filing) 

January IS, 1934 Effective January 26, 1934. 

;ing 3 list orices filed 0:1 XI' l r 5 (yon-aonroved flex- 
ible cords) . 

One tyoe reduced over 6OJ0 for 250,000 ft. or more. 
Two tyoes reduced about 5 |3 . 

".Tote : It is' not clear whether the discounts quoted with the 9th 
filing are to sppl:f to these orices. 

12th Filing 
(Conroare ^iuh 9th Filing) 

January 25 , 1934 Effective February 4, 1934. 

Letter drted January 24 changing discount sheet DIS'3 as follows: - 
Ail tyoes lrrro cords and fixture wire (Except radio v:ires)- 

List Less 60%. 

lo th Filing 
(Conroare with 9th Filing) 

January 29 , 1974 .Effective sane date. 

Letter dated January 2V adding 3 items to XY 103 (Eon-anproved 

flexioles) . 

Subject to sane term's and discounts. 

14-th Filing 
(Conroare with 6th Filing) 

January 51 , 1954 Effective February 10 , 1934. 

R 70 (f.r.dio hook-un runes). 

E 71, 71A, 713 (Rubber covered radio rrires). 

Bulletin SF 2 (Terns and conditions of sale), 

3ulletin E 201 (Discount sheet). 

List prices reduced approximately 25%, but company does not state 

that these -orices supersede the forner filing of Eovenber 23, 1953, 

Discounts: - 

"All above sheets are subject to a 5C ': discount". 

Eote : This appears to be a. very vague and indecisive hind 
of filing. 



3822 



-334- 

15th Piling ' ' 

Jamar" 31 , 1934 .Effective February 10, 1934. 

I. Letter d^ted Januar" 29 - changes in packing data -■ffecting cords 

as listed on Sheet S 102 (2nd filing).. 

II. Letter dated January 29 - referring to -orice sheet XY 103 (9th filing). 

a. Slight change in packing data. 

b. About 7/o reduction in list orices on 3 itens. 

16th Piling 
(Compare v:ith 9th Piling) 

February 6 , 1934 Effective February 15 , 1934. 

Bulletin S 101, making a 15' reduction .in list .-or. ice .of .one item 
on Sheet XY 103. 

17th Piling 

February 9 , 1934 Effective February 19, 1934. 

Letter dated February 7, 1934 ruoted -orice on a special tyoe vrire. 
note : go terns or discounts are mentioned so it is not apparent 
whether this is a list or a net price. 

13th Filing 
( Supplements' 9th- Piling) —■•••■• 

February 14, 1934 Effective February 13, 1934. 

To meet Company #14' s Filing. .. .Efi. February 12, 1934. 

Bulletin S 105, changing discounts on all flexible cords as follows: - 
To distributors or jobbers on orders from manufacturers of 
50,000 ft. or more..,! List Less 50 and 5? . 



19th Filing 



(Hevisi-ng 18th Filing) 

February 14, 1934 .-Effective February 24, 1954. 

Bulletin S 105 Flexible cords. 

Discounts : - 

Distributors or jobbers, any cuantity List less 50 and 5> 

Also includes "firing device manufacturers reselling to chains" 
as jobbers. 

•30th Filing ' 



February 14, 1934 Effective February 24, 1934. 

Bulletin S 108. 

Letter reserving the right to quote at vrill from Xmas sheet 101. 

(9th Filing), or Xmas sheet 102 (10th Filing). 

21st Piling 

February 25, 1934 Effective March 7, 1934. 

Published list dated February 19, 1934 quoting net u-ices on quantity 
orders of one t~ r oe rare. 



-335- 

32nd Filing 
(Revising 19th Filing) 

February 28, 1934 Effective Iiarch 2, 1954. 

3ulleti:i S 11? Flexible Cords 
Disc-cunts : - 

1. Less than 10,000 ft List Less 5Sfo 

2. lifrs.", 10,000 to 50,000 ft " " GO." 

3. : frs., 50.U00 ft or 'more." " " SO and 5. 

4. Jobbers & general distributors. " " 60 and 5. 

ITote: This. .company "states "This revised schedule is only 
being used by 'us where 'necessary. M 
"(Effective date 'of : arch 2," "1934 probably -mistake. 
Appears to be meeting Conpany ^-13 ' s Tiling of 
February 23, 1954. . .Effective iiarch 5, 1934. 

33rd Filing 

Li rch 2, 1934 Effective Iiarch 5, 1934. 

To neet competitors 
ietin S 113 cancelling Bulletin S 108 (20th Filing). 
This also cancels Snas wires 103' ( 10th Filing) and riakes effective 
Xias Hires 101 (3th Filing) i 

24th Til ins; 
(Compare with 14th Tiling) 

March 5, 1954 Effective Larch 15, 1934. 

E Special 500 (Eadio hooh-u" wires) suwr>l eventing R 70. 

Adds one tyoe to former list. 

Bulletin R 202 (Eadio wire disccunt sheet) supplementing E-201. t 

Ei g count p. : • ... 

a. Regular disco-ant : .List Less 50'.-. 

b. 1,000,000 ft. or more, assorted » " 55. 

• • - • ' • 25th Filing 

March 12, 1954 Effective sane date. 

To neet Company #17 Filing Eff. iiarch 10, 1934. 

Bulletin S 117, withdrawing soecia.1 nrices on one tyoe wire as 
per 11th, 15th and 16th filings. 

Restores -.rice on XT 103 (9th filing) effecting s, 15;' increase 
in list --rice. 

2:th Eilin--- 
(Compare with 2nd and 3th Tilings) 

tlareh 15, 1934 Effective March-24j -1934. 

LC 104 (Flexible cotton and rayon) cancelling LC 103. 

Pyro 103 (Fixtures wire) cancelling Tyro 103, 

HC 104 (Heater cords) cancelling HC 103. 

XY 104 (iTon-approved flexibles) cancelling XY. 103. 

S 103 (Rubber sheathed jortables) cancelling S 104. 

General reduction of about I0l in list prices. 

9323 



-336- 

Disc punts : - 

1. Jobbers, mail order houses, national syndicates. . .List Less 5fo 

2. !.frs. , 100,000 ft. or more » " 5' 

3. Distributors - 5fo commission on orders from 
manufacturers, 100,000 ft. or more,., 

g7th Filing 

(Coi.roare with 14th and 24th Filings) 

liarch 20, 1934 Effective March 22, 1934. 

To meet Con-can-/ #6's Filing 8... Eff. '.larch 17, 1334. 

Discount Bulletin p. 203 (Radio wires) supplanting Bulletin R 201 and 202. 
Discou nts: - 

1. Jobbers, chain stores, nail order houses List Less 50 and 5$ 

2. Manufacturers, 50,000 ft. or more 1r " SO and 5 

3. All others , " " 60. 

28th Filing 
(Coroare with 26th Filing) 

April 7th 1334 Effective April 13, 1334. 

(See next filing) 
Discount sheet DIS 23 (Flexible cords) cancelling DIS 22. 
Discpunts : 

1. Jobbers, national syndicates... List Less 5^. 

2. Manufacturers, 100,000 to 499,333 ft » « 5 

3. All buyers, 500,000 ft. or more... » " 10 

4. Distributors, 5fo commission, ' orders from 
: ianr.f acturers , 100,000 ft. or more. 

29th Filina- 
(Compare with 28th Filing) 

April 13', 1334 ... .Effective same date. 

To meet Company #33' s Filing Eff. April 13, 1934. 

Discount sheet DIS 23 (Flexible cords). 
Discounts :- 

1. Jobbers, mail order houses, national syndicates.. . .List Less 5o 

2. : "atmf acturers , 100 ,000 to 493 , 3 , : f t " " 5 

3. All buyers, 500,000 ft. or more. « » 10 

4. Distributors, 5j commission, orders from manu- 
facturers, 100,000 to 433,333 ft. 

"Jote ; This apparently/, is intended to supersede the previous 

filing although no mention is made of it and the changes 
are very slight. 

50th Filin a 
(Compare with 26th Filing) 

Aoril r Oth 1334 Effective same date. 

XI 105 (Eon-approved flexibles) cancelling XT 104. 

The onl-- change from previous filing is addition of a few items and 

deletion of others. 

Terms and discounts as 5er 23th filing. 

9322 



-337- 
31st Filing 

June 27, 1934 effective sane date. 

To :ieet Conpany «28-A> ! s Filing Eff. June 25, 1954. 

SL 1 (Flexible cords) to chain stores, .ip.il order houses, national 

ite stores. S">eci?l orices co ?„bove custoners on certain 
snecifiee i.tens - 10 to 15 • -under regular list 'prices,. 

Terns: 

2-5' 10 days, net 30 dv's, 



3gnd piling 

June 2 7 , 1934 Effective July 7^ 1934. 

XYZ 1 (Special construction cords.) 

Co;ioan3" sta.tes: "Tiled to meet prices of co:roetitor", "but 10 dr.ys 

wait in-; sriod vras imposed "before effective late. 

Discounts : - 

1. Jobbers List Less 5;'o. 

2. ;.rnnfacturers, 100,000 ft. o^~ more » " 5. 

Letter received July 9 explaining listing of radio lead in '.vires 
on above sheet. 

33rd Tiling 



(Compare Vrith 6th nnd 14-th Tilings) 

Jul-' 17, 1934 Effective July 27, 1934. 

R 51 (Radio rire) cancelling 3 71 and 71 A. 

R 30 (7 idio hook-up wires) cancelling 3 70. 

3 34 (Zadio lead in wire- solid) cancelling 3 64. 

R 36 (Stranded lead in vrire) cancelling ? 56. 

51 203 (Terns and conditions). 

ED 207 (Discount sheet) cancelling 3 203. 

General reduction of £0 to 75 • in list nrices. 

Discounts : ' * . 

1. Jobbers, chain stores, nail order housesj 

?jiy. t?uantit; i ". List Less 5fo 

2. Other buyers, assorted itens- 

a. 1,000 to 4,.. ; I5 ft " Plus 15. 

b. 5,000 to 9,999 ft » " 10. 

c. 10,000 to 93,9 ;l ft List 

d. 100, OHO to 4- , ft " Less 5. 

e. 500 ,0 ft, and over " " 10. 

34th Filing 



Jul:.- 51 , 1954 , Effective same date. 

Er^alanatory letter dated 7/23 re quotation on Sheets R 81, 34 and 
25 in the orevious filin . 



9322 



-338- 

35th Tiling; 

August IS, 1934 . . . . .Effective August 28 , 1934. 

Bulletin S 125 withdrawing Sheet XYZ '1 (32nd piling). 

36th Piling 



September 20, 1934 Effective September 30th 1934. 

SL 2 - This is identical with SL 1 (31st piling) quoting special 
prices on certain products to chain stores, nail order houses, and 
national syndicates. 

37th Piling 
(Conpare with 26th Filing) 



d 



October C, 1934 Effective October 10, 1934. 

To meet Company #6's Filing 19,...Eff. October 10, 1934, later nade 
LC 110 A (Flexible cotton and rayon) cancelling LC 104. (Eff. 10. 15-filing 
HC 112 (Heater cords) cancelling HC 104. 
Pyro 111 '(Fixture vire) cancelling Pyro 103. 
XY 114 (lion-approved flexible's) cancelling XY 194. 
S 113 A (Rubber sheathed portables) cancelling S 103. 
PIS 25 (Discount sheet). 
General increase of 5' 3 in list prices. 
Discounts : - 

1. Jobbers, nail order houses, national syndicates. . .List Less 5,o. 

2. : "mufacturers, 100,000 to 499 ,999 ft " " 5. 

3. All buyers, 500,000 ft. or nore » " 10. 

4. Distributors, 5j commission on orders from 
r.i mufacturers, 100,000 to 499,999 ft. 

( l:ote ; Also established trices on five items under Pubber Sheathed 
portables not' nanufrctured by Company #6-.) 



33th Fili ng 
(Compare with 37th Filing) 

ITovenber 2? , 1934 .Effective December 7 , 1934. 

9F-1 (Type PO-SJ) 

Although no mention is made of previous filing, apparently this 

reduces b _r about ZO'o the list prices on 2 sizes of the above type 

from those emoted on S 115' A. 

Discounts : Same as previous filing. 

' 59th Piling 

Hovenber 30, 1954 Effective December 3, 1934, 

To meet Company #37' s Filing. .. .Eff. Dec. 3, 1934. 
R 84 Special (Special construction radio lead in wires - orders 
1,000,000 ft. or nore. 

40th Filing 

February 16, 1935 Effective same date. 

Letter dated February 15, 1935 withdrawing R 84 (39th Filing), 



9322 



4| 



-339- 
41st Filin 



(Coirpare with 37th Filing) 

February 16 , 1935 Effective February 13 , 1335. 

To neet Company #37's Piling Eff. Feb. 13, 1935. 

LC 310 (Flexible cotton and rayon) cancelling LC 101 -A. 

HC 312 (Heater cords) cancelling HC 112. 

'7." 125 ( Ton-approved flexibles) cancelling "SI 114. 

S 215 (rubber sheathed -oortables) cancelling S 115-A. 

DIS (Discoxuit sheet.) 

The onl ■ changes in r>rice lists, are the addition of ono or txro items 

on each sheet. 

Discov_itr : - Sane as 57th Filing, 

Also HF 125 (Special construction-discount to mfrs.-20-,o 
PC 100 (Special construction-discount to mfrs. -15 b 



932? 



_340- A PP* A Part 2 

Section h 



St udy #3 -• Price Trends 

The following study shows price changes and general trend 
during the period of proce filing. Four sample types of cord were 
taken with the dates on which one company filed the prices and dis- 
counts indicated. 

The other companies in the group had in effect the same 
prices, although the effective dates varied slightly. 



9322 



TYPI 



-341- 
OF #18 ~ IiAYON 



Date 
Filed 



List 
Price 



D I SCOUH! 
High Low 



Net' 
Price 



9/7/33 


$ 6.50 




10fi 




10$ 






% 


5.85 


1C/2/33 


14.50 




65 




40 








8.70 
5.08 


2/6/34 


14.50 




60 




60 








5.80 


3/15/34 


4.80 




5 




5 








4.54 


10/9/54 


5.20 




5 




5 








4. 94 


2/18/35 


5.20 




15 




15 








4.42 


Note: Final 


let Price 
List 


25-;S under original Eh 


=w Price 












TYPE SJ #18 


- 16/30 


U N T 










Date 




D I S 


C 


Net 


Filed 


Price 




High 




Low 








Price 


9/7/33 


14.00 




10 




10 








12.60 


9/22/33 


31.00 




65 




40 








10.85 
18.60 


2/16/34 


31.60 




60 




60 




• 




12.40 


3/24/34 


13.60 




5 




5 








12.92 


6/21/34 


13.60 




10 




10 








12.92 


10/15/34 


















12.24 


10/15/34 


14.40 




10 




5 








13.68 
12.90 


2/18/34 


14.40 




15 




15 








12.24 


Note: Final 


Net Price 
List 


is 2/3 under original 


Net 


Price. 












#13-1/64 RADIO 


WISE : 


SOLID TIMED 
C U N T 










Date 




D I S 


Net 


Filed 


Price 




High 




Low 








Price 


10/6/33 


2.10 




bop 




40$ 








0.735 
1.26 


11/15/33 


2.65 




68 




60 








0.868 
1.06 


2/23/34 


2.65 




68 




68 








0.868 


3/15/34 


2; 10 




65 




60 








0.735 


3/15/34 


















0.84 


4/16/34 


.85 




10 




List 
/ 15 








0.765 
0.978 


7/10/34 


.85 




20 




Quant i 

5 
25 


ty 




Quant 
0.808 


0.68 
ity Prices 
to 0.638 


7/23/34 


.35 




10 




Quant i 
List / 


ty 

1! 


Dis< 
% 


J « 


0.765 
0.978 






Jotters, cha: 


ins , 


nail order 


houses 








5-,o any 


quant 


ity 










0.808 



Note: The biggest mg.rket for this type wire is to radio manufacturers and the 
quantity discounts shorm on July 23, 1934, show fairly accurately. the 



9322 



-342- 

Note: (continued) 

level of the prices on this date. Also, most manufacturers "buy in large 
quantities and are able to take advantage of the lowest price. Therefore, 
manufacturers buying large quantities paid 9^ less at the end that at the 
start of price filing. 

TYPE PO #18-1/64 - 3AY0N 

Date . List DISCOUNT Net 

Filed P rice High Low Price 

9/7/33 $ 11.50 10$ 10$ $ 10.35 

9/22/33 26.00 65 40 9.10 

15.60 
1/15/34 26.00 60 52 10.40 

12.48 
2/16/34 26.00 60 60 10.40 



3/24/34 8.50 5 5 8.08 

6/21/34 8.50 10 5 7.25 

8.08 
10/15/34 8.90 10 5 8.11 

8.56 
2/10/35 __.3^?0 15 15 7 .57 

Note: :Final Net Price 28-^ under original Net Price. 



10$ 


10$ 


65 


40 


60 


52 


60 


60 


5 


5 


10 


5 


10 


5 


15 


15 



9822 



-343- 



APEENDIX A, TART 3 



MAGNET. WIRE FLAIN AND ASBESTOS INSULATED 



Chronolo; ical Record of Price 
Filings by Conroanies 



3822 



-344- 



CHRCNvLOGIOAL RECORD OF FRICE FILINGS 
FOR COMPANIES MANUFACTURING 
MAGNET WIRE 



33. 



C OMPANY #1 
FIRST FILING 

Effective 5/18/33 in response to original call sent out on 9/^/ 

Z^ice 2A?A ..#41-17 Base Price 13.75 cents per lb. with extras over 
Base Frice on 

1. Round, Square and -'-ectangular Magnet Wire 

2. Spools, Reels, Cases (prices added but credited on return), 

3. M. W. Special Construction 

4. Litz High Frequency M.W. 
For colors add 5$ to total price. 

For colored tracer add lfo to total wire nrice. 

For M.W. in coils instead of on reels add l/2^ per lb. 

£aa_ntity Extrar? ever Base Price and Reductions 

1. Over 30,000 lbs. deduct l/2<# per lb. 

2. Add 35.00 (set up charge) en items less than on« reel 
(ap-or^x. 225 lbs) of Rectangular shape wire. 

3. Less than 200 lbs. in broken packages add 
1^ per lb. 
2<f per lb, 
3^ per lb. 
5^ per lb. 
7 if: per lb. 

l(ty per lb. le 

4. Oxygen Free High Conductivity M.W. add 

1-|^ per lb 30,000 lbs. and over 

1\4 per lb 10,000 ti 30,000 lb 

24 per lb less than 10,000 lbs. 



00 lbs. to 


109 lbs. 


in 


elusive 


75 lbs. to 


90 lbs. 




ii 


50 lbs. to 


74 lbs. 




ii 


25 lbs, to 


49 lbs. 




ii 


13 lbs. to 


24 lbs. 




ii 


esc than 10 


lbs. 







o . 



Deli very 



i. Orders less than 100 lobs, are F.O.B. Factory 

2. Orders for 100 lbs. and over add 30$ of Published Freight 
Rate tn cover tare freight on return of Riels and Spools 

3. Fr>r M.W, shipped in Coils packed in cases add 10$ of 
Freight Rate to cover tare. 

4. For 100 lbs. and over Base Prir*e is F.O.B. - 
Ansonid, Conn. New Haven, Conn. 
Bridgeport, Bonn, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Hastings-on-Huds^n, N.Y. Phillipsdale, R.I. 

Rome, N.Y. 
5renton,N.J. 
■Worcester, Mass, 



0822 



-345- 



5. Add l/8<* per lb. to Base Price. F.O.B. 



Anderson, Ind. 
Chicago, 111. 
Detroit, Mich. 



Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Muslcegon, Mich. 
Sycamo.-c, 111. 



Terms ; .' t 30 days or l/.2 of 1$ 10 days 'from date of invoice. 
Spools, reels & cases not stibject to discount. 
Interest at n$ per annum added after due date. 



SECOND FILING 



October 4, 1933 



1. Copy of Contract 

2. Instructions for tricing "Barberpole" textile covered M.W. 

3. Supolementary sheet on Litz Wire 

4. Instructions for pricing round M.W. Sizes between gauges. 



THIRD FILING 



October 23, 1933 



1. Instructions for pricing "Barberpole" textile 'covered M.W. 
cancelling previous instructions under socond filing. 

2. Instructions for pricing M.W. Special Construction. 



FOURTH FILING 



November 1, 1933 



1. Terms under first filing changed as fellows: 

Invoices dated from 1st to 10th less l/2% for cash on the 
'15th net 5th Prox. 
Invoices dated from 11th to 20th,' less l/2'i; for cash on the 
25th, net 15th Prox. 

Invoices dated from 21st to last day of month less l/2^ 
for cash 5th Prox. net 25th Prox. 
Interest at the rate of 8$ per annum added after due date. 



Discount allowed on wire only. 
cases not subject to discount. 



Spools, reels and 



FIFTH FILING 



November 7, 1933 



1. Instructions for pricing "Barberpole" Textile Covered M.W. 
Cancelling -nrevious instructions under Third Filing. 

2. Prices on Round, Square and Rectangular M.W. Tinned. 

3. Prices on Litz Wire, cancelling sheet dated 9/l^/33 under 
First Filing. 

SIXTH FILING 



November 1- , 1933 
9822 



-347- 
TE1TTH PILING 



December 5, 1933 



1. Instructions for pricing M.W. of Special Construction, 
12/1/33 

2. Prices on Cellophane Insulated M.W. 

3. Prices on "Barperpole" Textile Covered M.W. (Cancelling 
all previous instructions, Geo Fifth Filing) 

4. Prices on Square Double Cotton, Covered Twin 

5. Prices on #3ft F.E, 3 strand single silk enamel Litz wire. 
ft. Instructions for pricing M.W. of Special Construction 

12/4/33 

ELEVENTH FI LING ■ 

December 7, 1033 

Supplementing. Price, .List, dated B/l/33 (First Filing) and 
adding thereto advances for sizes #l/0 to #7 inclusive, 
on round M.W. (not previously given). 

TWELFTH FILING 

December 12, 1933 .... 

Term s under Sixth Filing changed as follows: 

Invoices dated from 1st to 1:3th, l/2 of l c /o for cash on 20th 
not 10th Prox. 

Invoices dated from l^th to 31st, l/2 of ifo for cash on 5th 
net 25th Prox. . .■■■■..• 

(balance of terms same as under Sixth Filing) 

THIRTEENTH FILING 
December 18, 1933 

Instructions for filing M.W. of Special Construction 

FOURTEENTH FILING 
December 28 i 1933 

1. Two companies added to list of Insulators of 'Single plain 
Enamel 11.71. receiving special prices (See Seventh Filing) 

2* Supplementing Price List dated November 2, 1933 (See Fifth 
Filing) giving extras for #38. P. E. - 20 strand Double 
Silk Enamel "Litz" Wire. 

FIFTEENTH FIL ING 

January -, 1934 . ; Effective January 14, 1934 

1, Extras on one Paper & Single Cotton Braid Covered M.W, 
(not previously given) 

9822 



-348- 

2. Supplementing Price List dated 11/2/33 (See Fifth Filing) 
giving extras for #38-81 & 1^2 Strand & Single Silk Enamel 
fl Litz" wire. 

3. Instructions for pricing M.W. Special Construction (2 sheets 
dated 1/3/34) 

SIXTEENTH FIL ING 
January 1 3, 1934 Effective January 25, 1934 

Terms. 

Instructions omitting P>fo interest rate on all quotations to 
U.S. Government. 

SEVENTEENTH FI LING 

January 18, 1934 Effective January 28, 1934 

Instructions for Pricing M.W. of Special Construction. 

EIGHTEENT H FILING 

January 22, 1934 Effective January 25, 1934 

•Magnet Wire on pound and fractional pound spools (non-returnanls) 

Quantity l/8 lb. spools are l/2 net price of l/4 lb. spool plus 5$ per 
spo o 1 . 

Delivery F.O.B. Factory except 100 lbs. and over which are shipped 
freight prepaid. 

Terms (Applying to this price sheet only) 2S 10th Prox. net 31st 
Frox. Interest at 6$ after due date. 

Dio count 58$ and 5$ extra for 200 lbs. and over, 

NINETE ENTH FILING 

January 22, 1934 Effective February 1, 1934 

1. Prices on 1 paper and double cotton braid covered Magnet 
Wirn, cancelling prices on 1 paper and single cotton braid 
covered Magnet Wire, dated January 3, 1934 (See 15th Filing) 

2. Additions for "Litz" wire, cancelling price list dated November 
2-, 1933 (See 5th Filing). Reductions from 30^ 

to $1.70 per lb. 

TWENTIETH FILING 

February 1,. 1934 '. ." Effective February 1, 1934 

To meet Company #17, filing of January 22, 1934. 

9822 



-349- 



Price List #41-19 Base same as 41-13 (6th Filing) 
II o changes in extras over "base, except sizes 16 to 
40 A.Vi.G. 

Single and double sill: covered, and sizes 15 to 
40 A.W.G. 

Single silk enamel. There is a reduction of approximately 
6fo in prices. 

Extras given for quantity lots from 2,000 lbs. to 4,999 
Ids. and for j,O00 lbs. and over (dedutions from 20 tc 
80 per pound) . 

liinor changes in reel, spool and case sizes and prices. 
Quantity, delivery and terms same as 6th Filing with 
additional changes in Delivery and Terms under 8th 
and 12th Filings. 

TWSJITY-FI3ST FILHTG- 

February 1, 1934 Effective February 11, 1934 

Schedule of Heel and SjooI prices to U. S. Government.. 

TY/FIITY-SECOIID FILI1IG 

February 5, 1934 Effective February 5, 1934 

To moot Company #21, filing of January 36, 1934 
Prices for Barbcrpolc wire, cancelling all previous 
instructions (See 10th Filing) 

FJSIITY-THIPJJ FILI1IG 

February 12, 1934 Fffective February 22, 1934 

1. Instructions for pricing Magnet './ire of Special 
Construction. • 

2. Prices on Bare Copper Wire on pound and fractional 
pound spools (non-retv.rnable) supplementing magnet 
'..'ire on nound and fractional .pound spools dated 
.1/11/34 ".(13th Filing) 

Quantity, Delivery, Terms and Discount same as 18th 
Filing. 

tvjdhtt-foupt:-: filiiig 

March 1, 1934 Dffective March 2, 1934 

Delivery - Change clause on price sheet #41-19 (20th Filing) read- 
ing "Orders for less than 100 lbs. are F.O.B. point of 
shipment l! to read: 

"^t seller's option orders for less than 100 lbs. are 
F.O.B. point of shipment." 

9822 



-350- 



TWSIITY-FIETH FILIlTG 



March 7, 19^4 Effective Larch 9, IS 34 

Price on #27-4 Strand, Double Silk Covered Litz 
Wire supplementing price list dated l/lS/34 (19th 
Piling) 

TWEIITY-SIXTH riLllTG 

March 7, 1934 Effective March 17, 1934 

1. Prices for square enamel and single covered 
Magnet Wire, sizes from 10 to 14(not previously 
filed) 

2. Prices for square plain paper covered Magnet Wire 
2, 3, & 4 papers, sizes l/O to 14 inclusive (not 
previously 'filed')' ' 

3. Typographical error, price list #41-19 (20th Fil- 
ling) #25 A.W.C-. Single silk covered corrected 

to read 33. 50^ ":>er pound instead of 32.50 as shown. 

4. Instructions for pricing Magnet Wire Special Con- 
struction. 

3. Price on #19, 2 paper single cotton covered Magnet 
'.."ire (Hot previously filed) 



TWSTTY-S3V5UTH FILIilG 

March 17, 1934 Effective March 27, 1934 

Instructions for pricing Magnet Wire Special Construc- 
tion. 



tWEMTY-EIGHTH FILlITG 
torch 21, 1934 .' . . Effective March 31, 1934 

1. Prices "Litz" wire, sizes 40 and 41, enamelled 
over all, lots of more or less than 100 lbs. 

2. Supplementing price list dated 12/3/33 (llth 
Filing) and adding round sizes, #15 to #20, 
inclusive. 

3. Instructions for pricing Magnet Wire .of Special 
Construction. 



TWS1TTY-I! IiTTH FILIITG 

March 21, 1334 .'...., Effective April 3, 1934 

1. Additional conditions of spies. Listing 28 cities 
9822 



-351- 



from which stock will be shipped without ware- 
housing charge. Points not listed, add 5j to 
total invoice ;irice of wire (oxclxisive of reels 
and spools). 

2. Terms and conditions of sale applying to Magnet 
Wire for resale by authorized sales agents. 
Comnission of 5't subject to conditions. 

3. Cancelling price list dated 3/17/34 (.':6th Filing) 
for #19 2 paper Single cotton covered IJagnet 
Wire. 



THIRTIETH FILIFG 

March 28, 1934 Effective April 7, 1934 

Prices for square plain paper covered Magnet Wire, 
1 to 4 papers, sizes l/o to 14 inciusivc, cancelling 
price list dated 3/l?/34 (See 36th Filing) 



THIRTY-FIRST FILIilG 

March 31, 1934 effective April 9, 1934 

Instructions for priding rectangular or square 
Magnet Wire of S ccial Construction #25, dated 
3/17/34 (#4, 26th Filing) cancels price list, 
Square Fnamel & Single Cotton' Cbvei-ed Magnet 
'."ire, dated 3/17/34 (Sec #1, 26th Filing). 



THI51'Y-S5C0;:D FILIhG 

April 18, 1934 Effective April 11, 1934 

Fase prices for Magnet '"ire, dated 4/ll/34, increased 
l/2^ per lb. over base on price sheet #41-19 (20th 
Filing). Base prices for bare & weatherproof and 
alloy wire and cable. 



THIRTY-THIRD FILIilG 

April 20, 1934 effective April 20, 1934 

Price on #38, 5x32 Double silk enamel Litz wire 

THIRTY-FOURTH FILIHG 
Kay 7, 1324 Ff fective May 10, 1934 

9322 



-352- " 



Price list rectangular 2 paper, 1 cotton tape covered 
Magnet Wire with additions for 3 to 8 papers (not 
previously filed) 



THIRTY-FIFTH FILFJG 

May 7, 1934 effective May 17, 1934 

Instructions for pricing Magnet Wire of Special 
Construction 



THIRTY-SIXTH FILING 

May 25, 1954 Effective Juno 4, 1934 

Instructions for pricing Magnet Wire of Special 
Construction 



THIRTY-SSVEITTH FILIliC- 

May 39, 1934 Effective June 8, 1934 

Instructions re Magnet Wire Base Price in connection 
with current M.W.Price list. 



THIRTY-EIGHTH FILIiTG- 

June 11, 1334 Effective June 21, 1934 

Additions to Magnet Wire Price List -,,41-19 (20th 
Filing) v6 & 7 A. 1 ."/. G. Double Cotton Enamel. 

THIRTY-illl'TH FILIUG 

June 13, 1934 Effective June 23, 1934 

Instructions for pricing Magnet Wire of Special 
Construction #25, (#4, 26th Filing) cancels extras 
for square single cotton .Magnet Wire incorporated 
in price list dated 3/l/34 (no previous filing) 

FORTIETH FILIIIG 

June 19, 1934 Effective June 15, 1934 

Base price for Magnet '.Tire .(dated 6/16/34) increased 
l/4f£ over "base price list 4/ll/o4 (52nd Filing) 
ITo change in "base prices for "bare and weatherproof 
and alloy wire and cable. 
9822 



-351 - 

f oety-e ie st file v- 

June 21 , 1934 2-ff ,ctivc Juno 25, 1934 

Price li 'Cello /a- lo Insulated Unknot Eire, 
sizes 15 to 22, cancelling price list dated 12/1/33 
(10th filing) o reduction- of fron 1.'- to 35 accordin : 
to sizo. 

eoety-secoee eilieq 

Juno 20, 1934 Effective June 30, 1934 

Additional conditions of sale adding 5 cities to pre- 
vious list of 23 fron vhich stock "il 1 be shipped 
(See 29th I'i] :• ig) 



:^.?T-T"-'i. e ::r,T\- 

July 5, 1934 .' . . Effective July 14, 1934 

Sxtrrs to be added --hen cost of spools is to be 
included to U. S. Govern ent, cancels "orice list 
dated 2/10/34 (21st Eiling) 

J-P ;- jh EILIEG 



July 12 , 1934 ■ '.'.' Effective July 9 , 1934 

Land Grant Erei • t ■■' '.ions on Government -orooositions 
equal to rat . obtr inod fron any bidder. 

RTI-FIETH Ef" IEG 



July 21, 1934 Effective July 31, 1934 

Instructions for pricing h'agnet Eire of S-oocial Con- 
struction. 



August 23, 1954 Effective Sent. 4, 1934 

not Hire on jouiid -nl fractional ;oound spools 
(nonr etumable) cancel 1 .:..; irice list dated 
1/11/54 (13th Eilin, ) - i increase fron 1 . to as 
r.nich as 111$ ace to sizo riv''. quantity. 
~ -livery (sa e ? s 13th Eilin ;) 
lor: .3 1st to 15th, 1 - of 1 '• for each on the 
20th, net 10th ?ro:c. 13th to 31st, g of l)v 
for - eh on tha 5th, net 25th Pro::. 
Eiscount Iq-us of less than 200 lbs. SO,-, lots of 
200 lbs. rnd ov--.r 50' hhd 5;a. 



-354- 



FOETH-SaVEiJTH FILING 



August 25, 1934 Effective Aug. 25, 1934 

Additional conditions of s ale adding, 6 cities to 
previous list of 33 from which stock will be 
shipped (See 42nd Piling) 

F0BTY-3IGHTH FILING 

September 11, 1914 .affective .S@pt. 14, 1934 

. Special prices on Single Plain Enamel Magnet Wire 
to 22 ins\;lators. Two companies and two sizes 
of wire added to original, dated ll/l7/33, prices 
same. (See 7th Filing) 

FORTY -NINTH FILIITG 



September 20, 1934 , affective September 20, 1934 

Additional conditions of sale adding one city to 
previous list of 39 from which stock will be shipped 
(See 47th Filing) 

FIFTIETH FILING 



September 20, 1934 affective September 29, 1934 

Special prices on single plain enamel Magnet Wire 
to 23 insulators, cancelling price list dated 
9/14-/34. One company added, prices same (See 
48th Filing). 



FIFTY -FIRST FILING • 

September 26, 1934 affective October 6, 1934 

Set up charge of $5.00 per item of rectangular Magnet 
Wire of less than 200 lbs. 

FIFTY-SaCOIP FILIIIG 

October 5, 1934 ...affective October S, 1934 

1. 3xact weight spooling extras 

2. Additional conditions of sale adding 2 cities to 
previous list of 40 from which stock will be shipped 
(See 49th Filing) 

FIFTY-THIRD FILIIIG 

October 31, 1934 .* affective October 31, 1934 

9822 



-355- 



Additional conditions of sale: 

Unlivery (a) All shipments for 100 lbs & over 

F.0.3. customer's city to any point in U. S. when 

shipped from stock located in list of 42 cities 

previously given (Filing 52) 

("b) Less than 100 lbs are' F.0.3. shipping point. 

(c) Shipments from stock at other points, add 5,j 
which will he F.0.3. shipping point regardless 
of quantity. 

(d) Ho allowance will be made for truck pick up 
at factory. 

FIFTY-FOURTH FILIITG 

Hovember 24, 1034 Effective Hovcmber 26, 1934 

Cancelling terms and conditions of sale applying to 
Magnet Wire for resale oy authorized sales agents, 
dated 3/29/34 (29th Filing) 

FIFTY-FIFTH FIL IITG 

December 20, 1934 Effective Decembcr20, 1934. 

Instructions for pricing Magnet Wire when shipped on 
nonreturnable spools. Use extras specified on price 
list dated 7/ 15/ 34 and covering schedule of reel 
and spool prices when same are to be included in the 
per lb. price of Liagnct Wire on inquiries from U. S. 
Government only (See 43rd Filing) 

FIFTY-SIXTH FILIITG 

February 13, 1935 Effective February 25, 1935 

Price list MW-W 3ase 15.25 same as price list 
dated 6/-16/34 (40th Filing). A total increase of 
3/4cJ per lb. over price list MW-19 dated 2/l/o4 
(20th Filing.) "Jo change in extras over base except 
#25 A. W.G. Single Silk Covered on which a typographical 
error was corrected. (56th Filing) 

Quantity , Delivery , Terms same except change in clause 
referring to delivery (See 24th Filing) 

FIFTY-SSVEETH FILING 



I - brua ry 21 , 1935 Effective March 2, 1935 

Change clause terms of Delivery price list 
MW—H-20 reading "all prices include delivery 
to destination except orders for less than 100 

9822 



-356- 



lbs. v:hich are F.O.B. point of shipment. 11 

Add, after "shipment" "at seller's option." 

Cancels previous instructions dated 3/9/34 (24th Filing) 

FIFTY-EIGHTH FILIIIG 

March 7, 1935 To he held for release 

Effective April 25, 1935 

Supplemental Price List MW-B-1 giving extras for 

1. Oxygen 'Free High Conductivity Copper .Magnet 
Wire 

2. Exact Weight Spooling 

3. Litz wire 

4. Rectangular double paper covered M. W. 

5. Rectangular double paper single cotton wrap, 

6. (a) Round, single paper, double paper, single 
paper enamel, double paper enamel, 2 papers and 
can cotton. 

(l/) v Square, paper covered, double cotton covered twin. 
(o) '..< Mcphane •coversd_*e.namel» '.. 

7. :. c ■■" ' i.'ire of specia.1 construction. 

Gau.J la all previous prices on these items after 
eff ec Live date. 

FIFTY-ItllTTH FILIHG 

March 29, 1935,. Effective April 8, 1935 

Price list on Hound Paper Covered Magnet Wire 

cancelling prices given in Supplemental Magnet 

Wire "price list MW 3-1, dated 3/18/35 (See 58th 

Filing) 

Prices are same but sizes from 10 to 14 inclusive and 

from 25 to 23 inclusive are added. 

SIXTIETH PILIIJG 

April 24, 1935 .April 27, 1955 

Instructions regarding closed bids covering Magnet 
Wire to Federal, State & Municipal Governments. 

SIXTY-FIRST FILIIIG 

May 6, 1935 Effective May 4, 1935 

Price list MW-H-21 Base same as price list MW-N-20 
dated 2/18/35 (56th Filing) 

Ho change in extras over base rectangular double 
cotton covered. 

Deductions in extras of l/2^ to 65(£ per lb. for 
round single cotton enamel, double silk covered, 
and single silk enamel from siz^e 23 to 40 A.W.G. 
and double cotton enamel, single cotton covered, 
double cotton covered and single silk covered. All 
9822 other prices on round and square wire are same. 



-357- 



Quantity 

1. 30,000 lbs. or more in C.L. deduct l/2jf per 
lb. from baso price and 5,; discount from total 
price per lb. (A decrease of l/4^ per lb. and 
5 ; j discount). 

2. 30,000 lbs. or more in L.C.L. deduct l/4$* per 
lb. fron base price and 5,j discount from total 
price per lb. (A decrease of l/4(£ per lb. and 
5,j discount). 

3. 13,000 lbs. or more deduct l/4{zf per lb. (not 
previously mentioned). 

4. Less than 15,000 lbs. is Base Price (Hot previous- 
ly mentioned) . 

5. Orders or contracts for 5,000 lbs or more, size #25 
. . and finer, deduct 5[j from total price per lb. 

(not previously mentioned) . 

6. Add 35.00 (set up charge), on items less than one reel 

(200 lbs) of rectangular vire.(l reel previously 
specified as 225 lbs) 

7. Less than 200 lbs. broken packages (same as item 3, 

1st Filing) 
Delivery 

Same as under 6th and 3th Filings. 
Terms 
Same as 12th Filing 



9822 



-358- 
COMPANY #7 

FIRST PILING 

Effective September 18, 1933 in response to original call sent out 
September 6, 1933. 

Bulletin #4836, 9/7/33, Base Price 13.875 cents per lb. with extras 
over Base Price on: 

1'. Round, Square & Rectangular Magnet Wire 

2. Spools and reels (Prices added but credited on return) 

3. Magnet Wire Special Construction 

(a) Round, triple cotton covered 

Square, single or triple cotton covered Tinned 
enamel 

(b) 75;o purified cotton covered 

(c) Combination of cotton and silk 

4. Litz High Frequency Magnet ¥ire 

5. Bare Copper Wire Base is l/2^ lb. less than M.W. base. 

For colors odd 5$ to total price 
For colored tracer, add ljj to total wire price. 
Where quantity warrants, textile covered M.W. will be furn- 
ished with the covering treated with lacquer or varnish at 
an addition of 5^ to the extra for size and insulation to 
be so treated. 



Quantity 



Z<p 


u 


it 


5? 


ii 


ii 


70 


ii 


ii 


10c 


ii 


ii 



Delivery 



1. Over 30,000 lbs. deduct l/2(£ per lb. from Base Price 

2. Add $5,00 (set up charge) on items less than one reel 
(approx. 225 lbs) of rectangular shape wire. 

3. Less than 200 lbs in broken packages, add 1/ per lb. 
100 lbs to 199 lbs. inclusive 

20 per lb. 75 lbs. to 99 lbs. inclusive 
50 » » 74 » p " 
25 " ii 49 'i " 
10 " " 24 " " 
less than 10 lbs. 

4. Oxygen Free High Conductivity Magnet Wire add 
10 per lb. 30,000 lbs and over 

lt$# " " 10,000 to 30,000 lbs. 
20 " I" less than 10,000 lbs. 

uagnet Wire on fractional lb. spools (non-returnable). 
Terms 2ja 10th Prox. net 31st Prox. All other terms and 
conditions of sale per current i/iagnet Wire price bulletin. 



Orders less than 100 lbs. are F.O.B. Chicago. 

Orders for 100 lbs. and over add 30$ of Published Freight 

Rate to cover fare freight and return of reels and spools. 



9822 



-359- 
COMPANY #? Cont'd ) 
Delivery (Cont'd ) 

3. For less than 30,000 lbs. Base Price is F. O.B.- 
Anderson, Ind. Detroit, Jaiofa, Muskegon, Mich. 
Chicago, 111., Ft, Wayne, Inc. Sycamore, 111. 

4. Deduct 1/8^ per lb. from Base .Price F.0.3. 
Ansonia, Conn. New Haven, Conn. Rome, N. Y. 
Bridgeport, Philadelphia, Pa. Trenton, N. J 
Conn. 

Hastings-on- Phillipsdale, R. I. Worcester, Mass., 
Hudson, N. Y. 

5. Orders of 30,000 lbs. and more shipped L.C.L. figured base 
on total quantity but delivered, prices figured L.C.L. 
freight rates. 

Terms 

Net 30 days or 1/2 of 1 j ten days from date of invoice. 
Spools, reels & cases not subject to discount. 
Interest at o,o per annum added after due date. 

■SECOND FILING 

October 30, 1933 

Terms under First Filing changed &s follows: 

Invoices dated 1st to 10th less 1/2 a for cash on the loth 

net 5th Prox. 

Invoices dated 11th to 20th less 1/2,'ofor cash on the 25th 

net 15th Prox. 

Invoices dated 21st to lest day of month, l/2,o for cash on 

the 5th Prox. net 25th Prox. 

Interest at tne rate of 6'i per annum added after due date. 

Discount allowed on rrire only, spools, reels and cases not 

subject to discount. 

THIRD FILING 

November 7, 1933 

Bulletin #4678, 11/4/33, superseding #4850, 9/7/33 (1st Filing) 
Extras for Litz wire, adding 3 strand #40 and #41 in Single 
Silk Covered (not previously given), no change in other prices. 



9822 



~3b0- 

ooMPAep -#7 

FOURTH PILIHCt 

November ,]£,' 1933' " " 

Bulletin #4887, ll/lf/33 : f ' 

Ins tract ions for Pricing Magnet Wire of Special Construction 

1. Twin Conductor Magnet Wire 

2. Single Cotton Double Enamel 

3. Double Silk Enamel 
;., Triple Silk Enamel 

Magnet Wire Tinned 

6. Quadruple Cotton Covered 

7. Supplement to Litz Wire (3rd Piling') combination of #35 &#41 

wires. 

8. Varnished or Lacouered Magnet Wire ( Same as 1st Filing) 

superseding Bulletin #4851, 9/7/33 
S. Combination of Cotton & Silk Magnet Wire (Same as 1st Piling) 

superseding Bulletin 24848,' 9/7/33 
in, "Barberpole" Textile Covered. 
11. Advances for square double cotton covered twin, sizes 7 to 14 

(not previously given)' 

PJ^TIi^ILD^C 
November 27, 1933 2 ■ ; r" : 

1. Price List ll/.Jl/33, Special prices on Single Plain Enamel to 

list of 20 Insulators, ■ sizes 7 to 40, a deduction of l/2rf 
per lb. 

2. Bulletin #489- , 11/.21/33, prices for Cellophane Insulated 

Magnet Wire (not previously given). 

SIXTH FILING 

November 27, 1933 

Bulletin #4888, 11/13/33. Base K-.50 (increase of 3/4<* per lb.) 

Base on Bare Copxier Wire 1«? per lb. less than Magnet Wire Base 

(deduction is ijci more than 1st Pili g) 

I"o change in extras for round, souare or rectangular wire. 

Extras for Bare Copper "'ire increased 2 > 

~eel and spool prices the same. 

Quantify 

1. Less than 30,000 lbs, 3ase Price 

30,000 lbs or mere in C.L. deuuet 3/-M per lb. from Base Price 

2. 30,000 lbs ir more in L.C.L. deduct l/3(# ver lb. from Base Price 
2. Set up charges for rectangular wire same as 1st Filing 



Or, j 2 



-361- 



SIXTK FILI1TG 



5, Less than 200 lbs, came as 1st Filing* 

; . C.F.H.C., same as 1st Filing. 

Deliver ' 

1. Less- than 100 lbs. F.0.3. Chicago. 

2. 100 Fbs. and over, Base Price includes freight to any point 

in U.S. 

3. I 7 o allowance for truce pick up at factory. 

-- '. m . s . 

c as 2nd Fili i t 

SEVEI{Th FILI.: G 

December IS, 1933 

Terns, dated 12/9/33, replacing Bulletin ;,^iC83, 11/13/33 («th Filin , 
change as follows: 

Invoices dated 1st to 15th inclusive, less l/2 of l;.'. for cash on 

. . th net, 10th Prox. 
Invoices dated 10th to 31st, inclusive, less l/2 of ifo for cash on 

ith Pro::, net 25th Prox. 

Interest at the rate of 6$ per annua added -after due date. 
Discount allowed on wire only, snools, reels and Cases not 
subject to discount. 

eighth filif . 

January 13, 1934 Effective January 25, 1 

Bulletin #4917, l/ll/3 List prices for iiagnet Wire on pound and 

fractional pound spools (not-returnable) A.O-.W. sizes 14 to 40. 

l/G lb. spools are 1/2 net price of l/4 lb. spool plus 54 per 

spool. 

Prices F.O.B. factor"- except shipments of 100 lbs. and over 

~hich are shipued freight prepaid. 

Terns 

10th Prox. net 31st Prox. Interest added at fifo per annum, 
' _ ter due date. 
Discount 50.. and 5 , extra for 200 lbs and over. 

FIHTH FILIHg 

February 1, 193- To meet Company - 17 Filing of January 22nd 

Effective February 1, 1934 

1. Bulletin M-4949, February 1, 193- (Superseding #<iC:88, ll/l-l/F , 
fith Filing) Base same. 
9822 



-362- 

COMPANY #7 

NIFTK FILING 

No change in prices except for Single Silk, Double Silk, and 
Silk Enamel, a reduction of approximately 6$ 
Quantity and terms of delivery same as 6th Filing. 
Terms as revised under 7th Filing. 

2. Bulletin, M-4947, 2/l/34, Prices on contracts or orders of 

5000 Ids. or more of textile covered Magnet Wire, sizes 25 to 
'-..0 inclusive, or contracts 30,000 lbs. or more Magnet Tire 
all sizes and insulations. 

5. Bulletin M-4948, 2/l/34, Contracts or orders of 2,000 lbs. 
(to 5,000 lbs.) 

4. Bulletin M-4955, 2/l/34, Instructions for pricing Magnet Wire 

of Special Construction superseding Bulletin #4887, 11/14-/33 
(4th Filing) 

a. Single cotton double enamel 

b. Double cotton heavy enamel 

c. Single silk heavy enamel 

d. Double' silk heavy enamel 

e. Double silk enamel 

f. All -triple insulation 

g. Quadruple insulation 

h. Single cotton covered scuare and rectangular 

i. Combination of cotton and silk 

j. Barberpole Textilo Covered Magnet Wire 

k. Varnished or lacquered Magnet Wire 

1. Bonded cotton or silk Insulation 

m. Twin conductor Magnet " r ire 

n. Round magnet Wire wound parallel on reels. 

o. D.C.C. 2 round bare copper \*/ires laid parallel 

Specials n_o_t lj_s ted - Off gauge conductors, non-standard insu- 
lations' or constructions, take next higher published list price. 
All Termt and Conditions, including extras for small quantities 
. in accordance with current Magnet Wire bulletin. 

5. Bulletin #4956, 2/l/34, superseding .#--870, 11/4/33 (3rd Filing) 

Extras for Litz wire (reductions from 30^ to 31.70 per lb.) 

6. Bulletin #4957, 2/l/34,' superseding #■ C2 >, 8/l/33 (1st Filing) 

Extras for 75^o purified cotton covered Magnet Wire. No changes. 

7. Bulletin #4958, 2/l/34, Extras for square D:uble Cotton Covered 

Twin (not previously given) 

8. Bulletin #4959, 2/l/34 Exceptions to Barberpole Textile Covered 

Magnet Wire in Bulletin #4955. 

9. Bulletin #4960, 2/l/34, Prices on Magnet Wire Tinned, round and 

square sizes, 3/0 to 34 (not previously given) 
10. Bulletin #4961, 2/l/34, Omit from Standard Terms "interest at 

6;j per annum after due date" on transactions with U.S. CTOvernynent, 
(Same as Co. #1, 16th Filing) 



9822 



-363- 



TENTH FILING 
March 1 , .1934 Ef fact.iye. March 10 , 1934 

1. Bulletin M-4972 3/1Q/54, Additional Conditions of Spies 

(Same as 0=1 , 39th Filing Co. #1, except 27 cities iiste-d of 
2'- listed). 

2. Bulletin ii-4975, 3/10/54 Terms and Conditions of s-^le 

(Same as #2 29th Filing Co-ipany #l) 

ELEVENTH FILI" T ^ 

March 12, 1934 Effective March 22, 1954 

Price quoted on Special Hiyh Frequency Cable for Navy 
Yard Specification, 3/3/34 

T ELFTK FILING 

March 30 , 1934 Effective March 31 , 1934 

To meet Company #11 filing of Ma ch 31, 193 , SAN 11, 3/31/34 
Prices on Enamel Litz wire, same as Item 1. 38th Filing Co. #1. 

THIETEENTE FILING 

March 30 , ■ 1934 Eff e ctive April 9 , 1934 

1. To meet Co. #1, filing of 3/9/34 SAN flO' 3/28/34 
Terms of Delivery specify Bulletin! M-4949 2/1/34 to be 

changed sp.m.j as 24thFilin--, Co. #1. 

2. To meet Co. #l', filin: of 2/10/3- , SAN #12 3/23/34 Schedule 
of reel fnd sncol prices to U. 3. Government, same as Co. #1 
21st Filing. 

3. SAN 7 7l3, 3/28/34 superseding #4959 , 2/1/3- 1 (item 8 9th Filin?) 
Exceptions to Barberpole Textile Covered Ma 'net .. : ire in 
Bulletin #4955 (Item 4- j . 9th Filing, 

FO URTEENTH FILING 

April 2, 1934 '. Effective April 12, 1934 

Price ouoted on Special Litz '.Tire 3/23/34 same as Co, #1 
33rd Filing, 

F IF I"! NTH FILING 

June 4, 1934 Effective June 3 1934 

SaN #23, 5/31/34 Instructions re i.a^net r ire Base, same as 
Cc. #1, 37th Filing. 

9322 



-364- 



SIXTEENTH FILING 



June 5 , 1934 .- Effective' June 5, 1934 

SAN # 2A. , 5/31/3' Superseding SAN #12, 3/28/34 (13th Filing)-' 
Extras for reels and spools 'to U.S. Grvernnent same as Co. r*l 
43rt Filing. 

SEVENTIETH FILIN G 

June 15, 1934 Effective June 25, 1934 

SIN -7,-27, 6/30/34 superseding #4984, 11/21/33 (Item 25th Filing) 
Price:: on Cellophane Insulated Magnet Wire; sizes' 15 to 22, a 
reductionof from l c p to 13 (See Co. 1, 41st Filing) 



EIG TT TEENTN FILING ' 

June 2 ., 1934 Effective June 16, 1934 

Bulletin #5024 superseding #4989, 4/11/34 (not filed) 
Change in Base from 14.50, Bulletin 1.-4949, 2/1/34 (9th Filing) 
to '15.255? per lb. rn increase of 3/4^ per lb. 
No change in Quantity or Terras of Delivery. 

NINETEENTH FILING 

June 27 , 1934 Effective June 27 , 1934 

Bulletin M-5028, 6/18/34 superseding M-4972, 3/10/34 (10th Filing) 
Additional conditions' of 'sales - same as Co. #1, 42nd Filing 
listing 33 companies. 

TWENTIETH FILING 

August 18, 1934 effective August 18 , 193,' 

Bulletin San- 36, 8/14/34 superseding Sp.n. 24, 5/31/34 (16th Filing) 
Extras for Magnet Wire, sizes 4 to 30, in addition to reel and 
spool prices to U. S. Government. 

TWENTY- FIBST FILIN G 

September 4, 193-.- Effective 'September 14, 1934 

Bulletin S a n-38, 8/31/34 superseding price sheet 11/21/33 

(Item 1, 5th Filing) 

Special prices on Single Plain Enamel to 21 insulators. 

One company and 2 sizes of wire added- prices same' (sane as Co. #1, 

48th Filing) 

9822 



- 



iv:lyty-slcoi t d filing 



October 13, 1034 Effective ©ctober 23, 193' 

1. Bulletin M-5076, 10/10/34 supplementing M-4949 (9th Filing 

ct weight spc.l extras (same as Item 1, Co. 1, 52nd Filing) 

2. Bulleti . fci-5075, lO/lO/o- superseding -10 28, 6/18/34 
(19th Filing) Additional Ccnditi; s of spies - same as 
Item L, 52nd Filing, Co. #1, listing 4.3 companies. 

jlllty-tiiibl fili ng 

October 13, 1334 Effective .October 25, 193 

Bulletin hi-5077, 10/ 11/34 superseding #5075, 10/10/34 (22nd Filing) 
Conditions of spies - seme except adding "F. O.B. warehousing 
city" clause referring to Lxtra Jarehousin charge. 

TflZITTY- FOURTH FILING 

■ aaber 16, 193 • Lffective November 16, 1934 

San. 45, 11/14/34, cancelling Bulletin it-4973, 5/10/34 
( 1C th Filing ) 

Tenr.s and Conditions of Sale by authorized agents - same as 
Co. 1, 54th Filing. 

T'J££TY- FIF TH FIL ING 

December 19, 193 Lffective December 29, 1934 

1. San. 48, 12/17-/3-. Prices on single gaper, do .ble paper, 
sin 1 paper enamel, double paper enamel, sizes #15 to *2 
(net previously given) 

2. San. 49, 12/17/3 ■ Prices to cust mer on Mr .net Lire to be 
'ihippec on non-returnaole reels, same as San. 35, 8/l< JZ : 
to U. S. Government ( Oth Filing) 

Ti ^ENTY- SIXTH FILING 

April g , 1955 lffective April 27, 193 : 



5, ^/3is/34 Instructions regarding closed bic.s covering 
Lagnet '.gre t: Federal, State ar an oipal Governments 
(same p.; Co. #1, 60th Film ;) 

tvoity-sivi>tt; t fili ng 

A.rii , . : Lffective Lay 4, 1935 

Bulletin M-6052, 5/1/35, superseding L-5093 (not file. ) Base 
15. 25, same as 18th Filing. 

9822 



-oC 5- 



ITo changes in extras for rect-angular. or. square 'Meg net '. : ire. 
Changes in extras for ror.no. Lagnet 'Jire in ingle white cotton, 
double white cotton, single white silk, double white silk, 
cotton enamel, double cotton enamel, silk enamel, sizes W-:- to 
•.'.-. (reductions from 5p to 13; ) 
Ho changes in other sizes. 

Adding extras on cellGpnane enamel liagnet Wire, sizes 10 to 
29, no change in extras, sizes 15 to 22 (other sizes not 
previously given, some of which are not carried in stock) 
hxtras for colors, tracer, and lacquer or varnish finish, same 

a: 1st Filing. • • • ■ • • 

Spools and reels, sane an Item 2, 1st Filing. 

quantity 

1. 30,000 lbs or more in C.I. deduct l/3j£ per lb. from 3ase 

Price and 5 c r from total price per lb. 

2. 10,000 lbs. or more, deduct l/-.y from Base Price. 

3. Orders or Contracts for 5,< 00 loo. or more, :-,i-ze $34 and finer, 

deduct 5p fmm total jrice per lb. 
.. ilagnet Wire :jn spool;; of exact weight for size, type and 
queai titj , add: 

50 lbs. anc" 1 )ver l/2p per lb, 
25 to 49. 99 lbs. 1 ■'■ per lb. 
20 to 24. 99 lbs. 2$ per lb. 
10 to 19.99 lbs. Z4 per lb. 
?. to 9.99 lbs. 5'' per lb. 
1 to 1.99 lbs. \'-4 per lb. 

5. Sot up charge same as Item 2, 1st Filing, under (Quantity. 

6. Less than 200 lbs, same as Item 3, 1st Filing, under 

Quantity. 
?. Oxygen Free High Conductivity Magnet "wire, same as Item 4, 
1st Filing under quantity. 

De livery - Same as 6th Filing. 

Terms - Same as 7th Filing. 



9822 



COIZP AIT #1 1 
FIRST FILIi;G 

Effective Septeralier 18, 1933 in response to original call sent out on 
Siptember 5, 1933. 

Price List #17~D, 9/14/33 3r.se Price (not stated, later filings indicate 
base nas 15.75c* at this time) with extras over Base on: 

1. Round, square and rectangular Magnet T/ire 

2. Spools, reels and cases (same as Item 2, 1st Filing, Co. #l) 

3. Magnet T/ire Special Construction: 

(a) Rectangular 2 paper, 1 cotton wrap 8/l/33) 

(b) » 2 '" 1 braid (8/I/33) 

(c) " 2 covered Magnet Wire (8'/l/33) 

(d) Roiuid and square 2 paper 1 cotton braid with extras for 
3 to 8 papers, sizes 2-12 (8/l/33) 

(e) Round & square 2 paper and 1 cotton rrap, sizes l/0~14 
(8/1/33) 

(f) Round triple cotton, square single cotton, square triple 
cotton, tinned enamel, sizes 3/0-36 (8/l/33) 

(g) Single paper, double paper, single paper enamel, double 
paper enamel, sizes 15-25(8/l/33) 

4. Colors, tracer, Magnet WiJfe in coils, same as Co. #1, 1st Piling.. 

5. Price List #5-11-9/1/33 Covering Asbestos Insulated Magnet TJire j 
rith e;;tra.s over M.TJ.3ase on 

1. Round, square arc. rectangular ''.'ire. 

•2. Round and square wire, add 15$ to toal price for enameled 
copper vritu asbestos, insulation over all. 

3. Reels and spools (same as Magnet T/ire, Item 2 above) 

4. Special Spooling Extra 

5. Billing prices standard spools. 

6. Cop"'- of conditions applying to quotations, orders and 
contracts, 3/l/£ 



<_><_> 



Quantity: 

1. Over 30,000 lbs (same as Item 1, 1st Filing, Co. #l) 

2. Set up Charge (same as Item 2, 1st Piling, Co. #1) 

3. Less than 200 lbs (same as Item 3, 1st Piling, Co. #l) 

4. Oxygen Pree High Conductivity Magnet TTire add: 

If per lb 30,000 lbs and over 

1±$ " " 10,000 to 29,099 lbs 

26 " " less than 9,999 lbs 

5. Asbestos Insulated TTire less than full reels , round and square 
wire: 

(a) Size 3/0 to 6 add 2i per lb. 150 to 199 lbs 

4*, 4 ~ " " 5^ to 149 " 

i.': » 'I 20 to 49 « 

20(5 'I " 5 to 19 » 

40 d " 11 less than 5 lbs. 



?822 



-368- ' 
COMPANY' #11 



Quantity , Continued 



Size 7-lU add k$ per Id 50 to 1U9 Its 

65* " " so to Ug its 

l60 " " 5 to 19 Its 

500 11 " less than 5 Its. 

Size 15-19 ac ~ LC ~- 10$ to full reel price. 
(0) Less than full reels rectangular wire 

Kill's 100 to 50 to 25 to 2k Its 

Thick 200 Its 99 Its Uq Its' and less 

60-300 30 60 120 250 

20-59 - 30 60 250 



Delivery ; 



Sane as Co. #1, 

First Filing 



Terns: 



1. Less than 100' Its 

2. 100 Its and over - 

3. Magnet *7ire in coils, packed in cases 
U. 3a.se for 100 Its and over 

: "5« Addition to Base F.0. 3. certain points 
6 , Astestos Insulated ",'ire 

(a) Less than 100 Its, .sane as plain Magnet TTire 
(t) ' Sheet prices include freight delivery on 100 Its and 
over to all -destinations East of Mississippi River 
and City of St. Louis, Mo. 

(c) "."est of Mississippi River, F.0.3, factory with a 
freight allowance of 900 per 100 Its. 

(d) Reels returned within one year in good condition nay 
"be' sent freight collect. 



Bane a.s Co. #1, -First Filing, for toth plain and astestos 
insulated Magnet' TTire. 

Disc o unts; Asoestor Insxxlated 7ire Only. 

Manufacturers using Magnet '« T ire in their, product for resale 1C$ 
Motor Repair Shops, coil Manufacturers, electrical jotters 5$ 
Net list to all other custoners. 

. SEOOHD FILING 

October IS, I933 

Letter 9/20/33 - Change last sentence Price List #17-D,5/lU/33 
to read "Special s.izes of round wire between gauges take price 
of ne;:t smaller size" - instead of "nearest gauge." 



9S22 



-369- 

COIIFAK? #11 
EEI2D rillHG 



October 23, 1333 



Price List 10/s/j3 on Litz T7ire, sizes 3^ to ^2, 5 to 10 strands 
(sane as Co. #1, First Filing) 

FOURTH FILING 
October 30, 1333 

1, Price List 10/27/33 Square, double cotton covered, sizes 
7 to lU 

2. Instructions for pricing llagnet '.Tire of Special Construc- 
tion 10/30/33 

(a) Twin Conductor Llagnet T7ire 

(b) Single Cotton Double Snaiiel 

(c) Double Sill: Enanel 

(d) Triple Sill: Enanel 

(e) Llagnet 'Jire Tinned 

(f) Quadruple Cotton Covered 

(g) Supplement to Litz '.Tire (3rd Filing) Conbination of 

#36 & hi 

(h) Varnished or Lacquered Llagnet 'Jire 
(i) Combination of Cotton d Silk 
(j) "Barberpole" Textile Covered 

FIFTH FILI NG 
November 2, 1333 

Letter to all customers dated 10/31/33 Saving terns of paynent 
on various products as follows: 

Group 1 . l/2 of 1$, ten days, net 30 days fron date of invoice. 
Interest added at rate of 6$ per annun fron net due date. 

1. Bare and w'eatherproo'f 

2. Paper (belted and type H) 

3. Tarnished Canbric 

U. Conbination V.C. and Rubber 

5. All Special Covered '.Tires and Cables 

6. Specification Rubber Cables 

7. Parkway & Trenchlay 

0. Asbestos Cable 

3. Asbestos & V. C. Cable 

10. Accessories , 

11. Bare shape 

G-rou: 2 . 2$ 10th Fro::, net cash last day of month following 
date of invoice. Interest added (sane as Group l) 

1. Flexible Cords and Cord Sets 

2. Building wire, braided and leaded 

SS22 



_;- .370 - 
COMPANY #11 

FIFTH FILING. Continued 

... 

5. All rubber sneatned cords and cables 

4. Braided Mining Machine Cables 

5. Automotive wire cables 
S. Radio wire 

7, Antenna wire 

Group 3 - 3 : -< 10th Prox. , net cash last day of month following 
date of invoice. Interest added (Same as Group l) 

1. Armored Bushed Cable 

5. Eomex 

3. Armored Service Entrance Cable 

Group 4 - All Magnet Wire and Coils (Change-, see 1st Filing) 

Invoice dated 1st to 10th - l/2 of Vfo payable on the 15th 
11th to 20th - 1/2 of 1$ " " " 25th 
21st to l«st day of month, l/2 of 1$ payable on 
the 5th Prox. 

Net cash last day of month following date of invoice. 

Interest added (Same as Group l) 

SIXTH FILING 

November 6, 1933 

Letter to all customers ll/l/33 Change in terms of Magnet Wire 
and Coils (See 5th Filing, Group 4) 

Invoices dated 1st to 10th l/2 of 1^ payable on t he 15th net cash 
iS.th Prpx.. 

Invoices dated 11th tn 20th, l/2 of Yjo payable on the -25th net 

cash 15th Prox. 

Invoices dated 21st to last day of month, l/2 of 1-b payable on the 

5th Prox. net cash 25th Prox. 

Interest added 'Sameas Group 1, 5th Filing) 

SEVENTH FILING 
November 3, 1933 

List Prices en Litz Wire 11/8/33 Prices same as 3rd -Filing 
adding 3 strand #40 & #41 single silk. 



EIGHTH FILING 



No v emb e r 9 , 1933 



1. Price List #6-D ll/l/33 superseding #5-D 9/l/33 -covering 
extras for asbestos insulated Magnet Wire - Base 14.50 
(increase of 3/4^ over list Filing) 

No change in extras over base or special finish, reels, 
spools, etc. (same as 1st Filing) 

No change in quantity or Delivery (sane as 1st Filing) 
Terms changed as per 6th Filing* 
9822 Discounts (same as 1st Filing) 



571- 



C01.PAKY Irll 

2. Price list #lS-D-ll/l/33 superseding #i7~D~9/lH/33 
Base lH. 50 (increase of 3/^ over 1st Filing) 
I\ T o change in extras over base (same as l.st Filing 
except that additional sizes are added in certain 
types of insulation) 

No change in Quantity or Delivery (sane as 1st Filing) 
Terns changed as per 6th Filing. 

KII'TH FILING 
November 10, 1933 

Price List $L9-D~ll/±3/33 superseding #lg-D~ll/l/3H Base 

(Sane as cth Filing) 

Extras over "base (sane as 1st Filing) 



Quantity 



Delivery 



1. 30,000 lt>s or nore in C.L. deduct 3/^ ? er lb fron Base Price 

2. 30,000 " " " "L.C.L. » 1/2^ « " " " ,! 

3. Set Up Charge (Sane as 1st Filing) 

U. Less than 200 lbs (Sane as 1st Filing) 
5. Oxygen Free High Conductivity Magnet TJire (sane as 1st 
Filing) 



1. All prices include delivery to destination. 

2. No allo'-rance for truck pick up at factory. 



Terns Changed as per 6th Filing. 
November 17, 1J33 

1. Letter dated ll/lU/33 r e new price list to be issued for 
Asbestos 'Tire 

(a) Prices to include delivery to any destination in U.S. 

(b) Distributors and electrical jobbers under Sales Agree- 
ments to receive discounts of 10^ fron list. 

2. Price List #7~D-ll/20/33 superseding -76-D-II/1/33 covering 
-:::tras for Asbestos Insulated Magnet 7ire Base 1U.5O (sane 
as 8th Filing) 

1. Prices on round vrire reduced fron 1.25$# to 2.60^ per lb. 

2. Prices on square wire reduced fron 1.35^ to S.15^ per lb, 

3. Prices on rectan.gij.lar Hire reduced fron 1.50^ to 5.£0f£ 
per lb. 

U. Extra for enanelcd copper round and square nire (sane as 
1st Piling) 

5. Spools & Peels (sane as 1st Filing) 

6. Special spooling extra (sane as 1st filing) 

7. Billing prices standard spools, sane as 1st Filing. 
S. Magnet 'Tire in coils, sane as Co. #1, 1st Filing 

9S22 



-372- 

coipaicy #11 

Quantity 

1. Extras for" less than full reels round, square and rectangular 
'•■ire. - sane as 1st Filing, 

2. 30 , 000 Ids or nore in C,L, or L.C.L. sane as for plain Magnet 
",/ire (see c jt'a Filing) 

Deliver;/ - Sane as 9th Filing 

Terns - Sane as 6th Filing. 

Discount - All buyers of 5,000 lbs and over, to be shipped within 90 days 
fron date of order - List less r /[- 

ELEVENTH TIL II7G 

Novenber 23, 1933 

Instructions for pricing Hacnet "Jire of Special Construction, 

11/22/33 

(a) Rectangular triple cotton insulation 

(b) Rectangular quadruple cotton insulation, 

T'JELFTH FILING 

l\ T ovcnbcr 2H, 1933 

Price List dated 11/22/33 Special prices on Single Enanel Magnet 
'.Tire to 20 corrocmies nanufacturing insulation (sane as Co. #1, 
7th Filing) 

T HIRTEENT H FILII'G 

Decenber U, 1933 

Instruction for pricing Magnet "Jire. of Special Construction 
12/1/22 

(c.) Rectangular triple cotton insulation ^s.onc is "nth 

(b) Rectangular quadruple cotton insulation) Filing 

(c) Single silk double criancl 

FOURTEENTH FILIl'C- 
Decenber 7».i°33 

1. Price List 12/6/33 superseding 11/6/33 (7,^h Filing) extras for 
Litz "/ire. Prices sane as 7th Filing except that price for 
3 strand #36 single silk is added. 

2'. Price List 12/6/33 superseding S/l/33 0- s t Filing) extras for 
round and square 2 paper and 1 cotton wrap, adding sizes of 
l/O to 7 for round pricing Magnet 'Tirc.-Uo change in other 
prices. 

3. Instructions for pricing Magnet Wire of Special Construction 
12/6/33 superseding 12/1/33. 

9S22 



-373- 
COIIFAHY #11 

(?) Rectangular triple cotton insulation ) 

(o) Rectangular quadruple cotton insulation) sane as 13th 

(c) Single sill: double cnancl ) Filing 

(d) Round iiagnet "..'ire "ound parallel 0:1 reels) 

fiftf fffk filifc- 

Dcccnbcr 13, 1933 

Letter dated 12/13/33 Change in Terms effective 12/1S/33, sane 
as Co. #1. 12th Filing. 

SIXTEENTH FILIHG- 

Dccenber IS, 1933 

Letter 12/18/33 To ncct competitive conditions effective 
immediately, revise 3~d page Price Sheet 7~2-ll/20/33 
(Covering Asbestos Insulated 7irc) 
Base 13.75 (a redaction of 3/Hfi per lb. fron 10th Filing) 

Deliver;/ - Sane as under Asbestos Insulated "ire, 1st .Filing. 

Tcrr'.s - Changed sane as 1st Filing 

Discount - Srxic as 10 th Filing. 

SF 7FFTFZ1TTH FILIFC- 

Dcccnbcr IS, 1933 

Price List #20-2-12/19/33 superseding #19-D n/13/33 Base sane 

as Sth Filing. 

Fo change in extras over base, quantity or delivery (sa-.ie as 9th 

Filing) 

Tcr-:s changed as per 15th Filing. 

zi :-:-:tzsltth filihg- 

December 26, 1933 

Price List #9-2-12/ 20/33 superseding #£-2-12/19/33 (not filed) 

covering c::tras' for Asbestos Insulated Magnet Fire (See loth 

Filing) 

Fzctras over base all sar.c as 10th Filing except that no mention 

is nadc of e::tra for ilagnet Fire in coils. 

Quant it" 

E:;tras for less bhan full reels, st-.c as 10th Filing. No 
mention :f C.L. or L.C.L. lots. 

Delivery, Tei s ; id discount revised as per l6th Filing. 

12 



~374t- 

co:papy #11 
pi epfflpth j ilted 

Doconber 29, 1933 

Price List 12/28/33 supplement to 12/6/33 (l^th Filing) extra 
for Litz "Tiro, 20 strand if\3S enamel, double sill: enamel. 

gPEFTIPTH FIL ING 

January 2, I93U 

Letter 12/29/33 adding t _, o companies to list of Insulators 
receiving special prices (Sec 12th Filing) 

TTENTT^FIPS? FILING 



January 2, I93U Effective January 12, I93H 

Letter 1/2/3': duplication of 20th Filing. 

p-.PPJTY-SFCOIG PILI1JC- 
January 10, I93H Pffcctivo January lU, I93U 

1. Instructions for pricin ' Ilagnct '.'ire of Special Construction 
I/1U/3U supersedeas list 12/6/33 OMh Filing) 

(e) a b c ft d under Iter: 3 ~ lUth Tiling - no change 

(f) Bonded cotton, silk or paper insulation 

(g) Single covered cotton rectangular ?:nC- square Llagnct '.."ire 
(h) 1 paper ft single cotton "braid covered Magnet '.."ire 

2. Price List l/lU/3^ Supplement to 12/6/33 supersedes 
supplement 12/28/33 (19th Filing) extras for Litz '.."ire 
20, 31, 162 strands #38. 

TlfEITTT-TKI ?D PILIN G- 

January IS, I93H Effective January 2?, I93H 

Letter to District Offices I/IS/3H or.it ting interest at 6f per 
annum after due date on quotations to U. S. Government. 

^.•FNTY-FOUHgH FILING 

January 22, :-;jk Effective January 25, 193^ 

Price List I/25/3U magnet 7,'irc on pound and fractional pound 
spo 1 s (no n- r c tur nab 1 c ) 

1. Quantity - sar.c as Co. #1 - lcth Piling, except 5^0 addition 
is onittcd. 

2. Delivery - Sane as Co. #1, 18th Piling 

3. Ter rs - (Applying to this price sheet only) l/2$ 10 days, 
net 30 days. 

Interest at Gfc per annum added after due date. 
k. Discoun t oOfj 

9822 



— o75~ 

coupany #11 

gjENTY-FIFT H filing 

January 24, 1934 Effective January 29, 1934 

Instructions for pricing Magnet "Jirc of Special Construction 
1/29/3- supersoc.es list l/l4/34 (22nd Filing) 

(i) I tons e,f,g sane as 22:1c 1 . Filing 

(j) 1 Paper and double cotton braid 

t-.tefty-s ixth p iling 

January 31, I93U Effective February 1, 193U 

Price List #21-33 2/1/3U supersedes #20-D 12/19/33 (17th Filing) 

Base sane as Sth Filing 

1'To changes in extras over Dace except sizes l6 to 40 

A. "7. G. single and double sill: covered and sizes 15 to 40 

single silk enamel. There is a reduction of approximately 

6$ (Sane as Co. #1, 20th Tiling) 

Extras given for quantity lots fron 2,000 to 4,999 lbs and 

for 5,000 Ids or over (not previously given) 

No change in other conditions of quantity, delivery or terns. 

(See 17th Filing) 

TIElTTY-SEySNTH FILIITG 

February 2, I93U To r;cet Co. #21, Filing of January 23rd, Effective 

February 2, 1934 
Price List 2/2/34 superseding 12/6/33 (l4th Filing) Extras 
for Litz 'Tire. 

Reductions fron 30^ to$1.70 per pound (Sane as Co. #1, Itcn 2- 
19th Filing) 

T'. TTEFTY-SIGHT H FILIITG 

February 2, I93U '.' V. .' Effoctive .February .5, I93U 

To meet Company t/- l 21, Filing of January 26th. 

Price List 2/5/3^. Extras for "Barberpole" v;ire - No contract 

and or. contract for quantities fron 2,000 to 5»000 and over. 

TTXTTY-FINTH FILING 
February g, I93U Effective February 11, I93U 

To ncct Company #1, Filing of February 11, I93U 

1. Schedule of Peel & Spool prices' to U.S. Government, 2/ll/34 

2. Letter to District Offices, 2/11/34. Instructions re Item 1. 

THI RTIETH FILIITG 

Uarcji ;, 1934. ..'. Effective March 5, 1934 

9S22 



~37~~ 
CO; HAITI #11 

1. Price List 3/5/3^ Extras for round, square end rectangular 
Magnet '/'ire with tinned conductor, sizes 3/0 to 3^ (- n -ot 
previously given) 

2. Price List 3/5/3^+ ' extras "for square plain paper covered 
Magnet "Jirc, 2, 3 ft ^ papers, siz:s l/O to lU (not previously 
given) 

3. Instructions for Pricing Magnet TTirc of Special Construction 

(-) Double Cotton Heavy Enancl 
(d) Double Silk Heavy Enar.cl 
(c) Paraffined Magnet 'Jirc 
(■&) Stranded Magnet '.Tire 

(c) Double Cotton Covered, 2 round bare copper wires 
laid parallel; 

THIRTY-FIRST TIL: 

March 9, I33U Effective March 10. .I93U 

Magnet "Jirc =1-1, 3A0/3'-, Conditions of Sale -, warehousing 
chaegc and co:i::ission to sales agents (sa::c as Co. 1, Itens 1 & 

2, 23'th Piling, except one city less) 

THIRTY-SE CCITD PTLIPG- 
March lS, 193U Effective March 17, I93U 

Instructions for pricing Magnet '.Tire of Special Contraction 

3/17/3^ 

(a) Square cnancl and single cotton covered 

(b) Rectangular or square Magnet "Tire (special) 

(c) 2 paper single cotton covered, size 19. 

THIRTY-THIRD PILIHG 
March lS, I93U Effective March 2'S, I93U 

1. To p.cct Co-roany #5, piling j/tt/Jk,' letter 3.16.3H, 
adding city of Buffalo, II. Y. to list of 27 cities 
(31st Piling) fro:: which stock is shipped without 
warehousing charge. 

2. Letter 3/lS/3^ "dding Bayonnc, H.J. to list referred to 
under Iter: 1. 

THIRTY-FOU RT H FILIPG- 

March 23 , I93U Effective March 27, I93U _ 

1. Price sheet 3/^7/3^ extras for round asbestor single 
cotton, sizes 3/0 to 10, .and enawcl cellophane 15 to 25. 

2. Instructions for pricing Magnet 'Tire of Special Construction, 
3/27/3H 

(a) 3 bare conductors laid parallel double cotton covered, 

$822 



-377- 

co::?a:;y vii 

T HIRTY -FIFTH FILIN G 
March 23, I93U Effective. March. Jl, 193U 

1. Price List 3/31/3U Extras for Litz '.Tire, eharicled over Ml 
sizes $10 & kl ~ 10, 7 <?: 5 strands, less than 100,/= r.nd 100# 
or ."lore. 

2. Price: List 3/31/3 1 ! superseding 12/5/33 (iten 2, lHth Filing) 
2 paper and 1 cotton -Trap. Adding sizes 15 to 20 round 

;nct '.."ire. There is a reduction in price of #19 round 
of I.50 cents fron price quoted under Iton (c) 32nd Filing. 

THIPeTY-SlXTK PILING 

ilarch PS, I93U. ".^'..................Effective Aeril 7, I93U 

1. I r.s timet ions for pricing Magnet "..'ire of Special Construction 
3/3I/3U superseding 3/17/3U (32nd Piling) No change fron 
previous list c::cept itcn (c) has Qijcn onnittcd as it is noi7 
shonr. on Price List covering 2 oaoors and 1 cotton v/rap, 
3/31/3*+ (33th Filing) 

2. Price List U/7/3 1 ' superseding 3'/'27"/'3' 1 +V '('I't'o'n' 1, PHth Filing) 
estras for Asbestos Single Cotton & Enancl Cellophane. 
Adding c::tras for square asbestos single cotton, sizes 3/0 to 
10. No change in other prices. 

THIP Pj Y- SEVENTH PILING ' • ■ 

April 2, 193U Effective April 2, 1S3H. 

Price List -4-/2/3^ Suppiancnt ' to ^21-D 2/l/3U (2of,h Piling) 
adding #7 single cotton en.a3.1cl. 

THIRTY-EIGHTH FIL ING 

A ril 2, I93U . Effective April 3, 193U. 

Su'o-oloncnt =, : "1 to Llagnct Fire #1, 3/3°/3 ! +> replaces Supplement 
£l" f "3/22/3U (33rd Filing)' 

1. Itcn 1, City of Buffalo, 1T.Y. ' rithdra-jn fron list exenpt 

frcn PP v,'p.rch using charge. 
P. Item 2, City of 3r -on , P. Y. no change. 

3. "./ins- 1 -:- -".' , Conn., : *£e£. to list of those enenpt. 

PHIPTY-NINTH PILIPG 

At ril 3 , 153h Effective April k, 193 l +- 

Fric Instructions U/H/3H Shot Firing 'Jire - Solid Copper 
Conductor insulated -nth Plain Enanel, double cotton, r/eathor*- 
proof treated - Synod E D C E T - Single, and 2 conductors, 

SS22 



-378- 
C0IIPA1TY #11 
rOHTIETH FILING 



April 9, '193U Effective April 9, I93U 

Instructions for pricing Magnet "Tire of Special Construction 
h/Q/jk supersedes 3/31/3 1 ! (36th Filing) ". 

1. Onitting Squn.ro Enancl & Single Cotton covered ■ 

2. Rectangular or square Magnet "Tire (Spocial) sane as 32 & 
36th Filings. 

FORTY-FIRS? FILING 

April 12. I93U Effective April 12, 193*4- 

Price list U/12/3H Supplcnenting 2/2/34 (27th Filing) 
extra for Litz '.Tire #3-8-5x32. 

FORTY-SECOND FILING 



April 13, I93U Effective April 13, 193*4 

Price List I+/13/3U supersedes 3/5/34 (I tons 2, 30th Piling) 
S::trr.s for Square Plain Paper Covered, giving prices for 
1 paper (not previously given) no change in prices for 
2, 3> & 4 papers. 

FO RTY-THIRD FILING 
'April 3C, 193^ Effective April 30i 193*+ 

Price List U/30/3U supersedes U/12/3U (Ulst Filing) 
Extra; for Litz 7/ire #38, 5:-:32 Double Silk enar.el, a 

reduction of .1^5^ per 11. 



FORTY-FOURTH PILING. 



Llay 2, 193*4- '. . . .Effective Nay 2, 193*4- 

Letter 5/2/3^ Regulations for Changing Ilagnot '.."ire Base. 
"li.'.T. Br.se is subject .to. change .after ^BU of the day r a 
change in the published .liagnot "Jirc Base, LCL, appears 
in the Drily iletal Trade,; " 

FORTY-FIFTK FILING 

May 10 , I93U Effective Nay 10, 1°3*+ 



Price List 5/10/3*+ Extras for Rectangular 2 paper, 1 cotton 
tape covered with additions for 3 to £ papers. 



9S22 



COMPANY #11 
FORTY-SIXTH PILING 
Hay 16, 193^ '.' Effective May 17, I93U 

Instructions for pricing Magnet "7Tire of Special Construction, 

5/17/3** 

(a) Hectangular Do\iblc Cotton Enanel 

FOP.TY-SEVEiITH FILIN G 

Wry ?3, I93U Effective Hay 2S, I93H 

Letter 5/28/35 Referring to provisions of Vinson Bill 
relating to ibfo profit on natcrial furnished to U.S. Navy 
Agree to ouotc on basis of rebating Govcrnncnt any. mount 
in c::ccss of 10fo over total cost. 

F02TY-EIGHTH FILING 



:: -V 31, 193^ Effective June k, 193^ 

Instractions for pricing Ir ;nct Nine of Special Construction 

S/U/3U suporsccLcs"3/5/3 1 + (iter. 3, 30th -Filing) 

No change in it ens a, 0, c, c. 

I ten d. Stranded rrire changed to read: 

"Add to the Magnet "Jirc.Basc Price 33~l/3/$ of the extra for 

the individual "size -.virc for 'the ' sane 'type 'of insulation as 

the conpleted conductor." 

Previous fil i ng v/r.s "Add 20$ to the differential for the 

individual' solid v:irc of the sane size and construction." 

popty- pipth pil ing 

June --, I93U Effective June 8 , 193U 

Instructions 're Magnet ".Tire 'Base "in connection 7/ith 
Current Magnet Ulre Price List, 6/8/3H 

FIFTIETH FILING 

June 18, I93U ' Effective June 20, 193^ 

Price List 10-C, 6/20/3U . r'scdes 9-3-12/20/33 (18th Piling) 
together -rith letter S/20/3H to all district offices advising 
a revision o'f "3- rt sc 'Pi'i'dd,' 'Tcrris a-rid "Conditions of sale 
applying to Asbestos Magnet "ire to conforr: with those 
1 lying to various Types of i.Iag:n t "ire.' Pages 1 & 2 (referring 
to ontras over "base on round, square and rectangular -.'ire) 
r rjxin sane (see 18th Filing) Page 3, revised, as shown 
"belo'T. Additional discounts to "holesrlers under Sales 
Agency ; ;r . its (not sho-m or. price sheet.) Paso last 
published list, class 310-1 =,r L 21-2-2/l/3U, lU.50 (26th Piling) 

22 



COIIPANT #11 

Quantity - Sane as It oris 1 and 2 under Quantity - gth Filing. 
Delivery - Sciio as I tens 1 and 2 under Delivery - 9th Filing. 
'Terns Sane as 15th Filing. 
Discounts 

To all Purchasers To wholesalers under Sales Agency Agrccnents 
Less than 1000 Ids List Less than 1,000 lis 10$ 

1,000 to U,999 lis % 1,000 to U,999.ihs. % plus 10$ 

5,000 to 9,999 lbs 10$ 5,000 to 9,999 lis 10$ " 10$ 

10,000 and over 15$ 10,000 and over 15$ " 5$ 



FIFTY-FIRST FILING 
June IS, I93U Effective June 21, 193^ 

Price 'list 'S't2l/jk suporsodes k/z/jk .(37th Filing) Supplementing 

class 310, #21-D (26th Filing) adding prices on #6 ?z 7 Double 
Cotton Enancl. 

• FIFTY- SECOND FILING 
June 27, I95U Effective June 27, I93U 

1. Letter 6/26/3H So- Vinson Bill, duplicati-an of U7th Filing. 

2. Price List 6/25/3U supersedes U/7/3U (iten 2, 36th Filing) 
Enancl Cellophane, sizes 15 to 22, onitting sizes 23 to 25 
incl. reductions in prices fro;: 1$ to 15 $ according to size. 



FIFTY-THIRD FILING 



June 27, 193H • Effective June 30, 193^4 

Magnet ".Tire #1 - 1 dated 6/30/3^ replaces #1, 3/IQ/3U (31st 
Filing) re Conditions of Sale, adding 5 cities to previous list 
of 2S, exempt fron warehousing charge (See 3Sth Filing) sane ■ 
as Co. vl, 42nd Filing. 



FIFTY-FOURTH FILING 

July 11, 193^ Effective July 9, 193^ 

To nect Co. #1 filing of 7/9/3^ 

Re Land Grant Freight on Government Propositions 
(Sane as Company # 1, HUth Filing) 



9S22 



-381- 

C0IZPA1SY #11 

FILDTG 

July 1?, lf3U Effective July 14, I93U 

Price list 7/14/34 supers e/ll/3^ (itcn 1, 29th riling) 
?j 3 ■ • Spool 

Frices to U. S. Gov ■ exit (Change in method of figuring - 
apparently a re duct: 0:-) 

FIPTY-SIXTH IILIl'G- 

July ;: , L< 4 Effective July 31, I93H 

Instructions for pricing liagne't '..'ire of Special Construction 
7/31/34 superset" s 3/27/3H (iter: #2, 3 Hth Piling) 
Mo change in previous filing except an acLc.it ion. of 2 Plain 
anelcd '.Tiros laic", parallel v;ith single cotton overall. 

PIITTY-.SSVSI^TK FILING 

July 31, 1934 Effective July 31, 1934 

Letter to District Offices S/l/3^- Policies on quotations 
to U. S. Govcrnnent. 

1. Period, of" acceptance United to 7 days 

2. oj per annum interest cLiarge eliminated 

3. Allo"7 Government right to increase or decrease an order 10fo 
"out not 25$ as i -'.core orated in sor.c Government bids. 

PI FTY-EP -HTH "ILIEG 

Au ust 21, 1' 3H. Effective August 25, 1934 

r ^places 
Magnet "ire 1 - 2.2/25/3ty#l~- 1, e/3'/3v (53rd Filing) 

'.ing 4 cities to previous lis':- 33> oxcr.pt fron warehousing 
charge (See Co. 1, 47th Piling) 

riFTY-::i:'T:: piliitg- 

August 30, 1 - ; : - Effective August 31 , I93U 

Price List S/k/jk supersedes I/25/3H (24th Filing) Magnet "Jirc 

en pound and fraction- 1 pound spools (non-»roturnablo) 

Increases of 5$ to 125$ according to size and quantity, 

no- r.cntion of l/c Yc spools. 

- livery, Terns -.ad Discount, sane as Co. 1, 46th Filing. 

SIXeelE TE FILIITG 

- :nbcr 12, I93U Effective Septenbor 14, I93U 

9S22 



-332- 

co:r;j:Y =,=11 



Sheet #2, 9/1H/3H. superset- os #1. H/22/33 and Supplement 
I/2/3U (12th & 20th filings) List of 21 Insulators receiving 
special prices, sizes Hi & H2 added, no change in other sizes. 

SIXTY- FIRST FILING 

September 12, 193H Effective September 20,193H 

Llpgnet T7ire #1 - 3, 9/20/3H replaces #1 - 2, S/25/3H (58th Filing) 
acY.ing 3 cities to previous list of 37i e::cnpt fron warehousing 
charge (Sane as Co. #1, H9th Filing.) 

SIXTY-SECOND FILING 

September 2H, 193H Effective Seno tenter 2H,193H 

Price Sheet 9/22/3H extras for fjfo purified Cotton Magnet ".Tire. 

SIXTY-THIRD FILING 

Septenber 2S, I93H .Effective •September 2S.193H 

Sheet #3, 9/29/3H supersedes #2, 9/1H/3H (60th Filing) adding! 
one company to list of 2S Insulators receiving special prices. 

SIX TY-FOURTH FILING . 

October S, I93H Effective October S, I93H 

Magnet ".'ire 1-H, replaces #1 - 3, 9/20/3H (Gist Filing) 

Adding 2 cities to previous list of Ho, e::enpt fron warehousing 

charge (sane as Co. #1, 52nd Filing) 

SIXTY-FIFTH FIL ING 

October 15, I93H i .Effective October IS, I93H 

Price Sheet #22-1), IO/IS/3H supersedes 21-D - 2/1/3H (26th Filing) 
Base 15»25 (increase of 3/V over previous filing) 
No changes in extras over base (See 1st Filing) 
Additional condition's" "of sale - 

Rectangular -'ire - all -Tires between sizes taken advance of 

next smaller size. 



Quantity 



1. Itens of 30,000 lbs or lore in C.L. & L.C.L. (sane as items 
1 c p : 2, 9th Filing) 

2. Acid $5 (set up charge) on itens less than one reel 
(approximately 200 lbs) of rectangular shape wire - 1 reel 

previously specified as 225 lbs. 

3. Extras for round and square wire in less than 200 lbs 
sane as 1st Filing, but the extra is based on total weight 
of all itens of round and square wire and is to be 
added to each item. 



9S22 



-333 

co; if;jiy #11 

4. 0::''{:en free High Conductivity iiagnct "Tire (sane as 1st 
Filing) 

5. Extras for lots of 2,000 - 5,000 lbs and over (sane r.s 
26th Piling) 



Delivery 



Sane as Sth Filing, except that [' at "seller's option, orders 
for less than 100 Its, except those applying against contracts 
of 1,000 lbs and over, arc E.0.3. point of shipment. 

Terns Sane as 15th filing. 

si; :ty- sixth eilieg ; , 

November 24. 1934 : .Effective November 26, I33U 

IIagnet Hire #1 - 5, H/2G/3U replaces 1 - 4, 10/S/3U (64th 

filing) 

List of cities exempt fro:: warehousing charge sane 5p commission 

to sales agents -cancelled (sane as Co. 1, 54th filing) 

BIX5Y-SEVEHTH FILING 

December 19, 1934.' Effective December 19, 1934 

iiagnct fire #17, December 15, 1534 supersedes l/lk/lk (55th Filing 
Reel & Spool prices to U. S. Government -apply to ANY CUSTOhEfi 
No change in prices. 

SIEEY-EIGHiCH FILING- 
February 2, _ 1935 Effective February 12 , 1935 

1. Letter to District Offices, 2/2/35 

(a) Eliminating 6$ per annum. Interest to U. S. Government 
" "oh" all- "bids, and in r.ll tranches (See 57th filing) 
^Elso to State and municipal Governments, 

("0) Granting right to increase or decrease an order "by 
10$ hut not oyer 100 'r.s nay he requested in some in- 
stances. 

2. Letter 2/2/35 "ithdrr.-:in:: Item 1 - S/l/34 (#1 - 57th Filing) 
Uniting period of acceptance* Dli Government quotations. 

to 7 days - due to fact that competitors generally o.re not 
so filed. 

sixty-eiet h eilieg 

February 13, 1933 Effective February 23, 1935 

1. Letter 2/13/35 Incorporate in Magnet '.Tire instructions - . 
"Prices are to he quoted under all closed bidding procedure 
for acceptance within 30 days fron date of opening of bids." 

22 



-334- 
COLiPAHY #11 
2. Letter 2/19/35 cancels letters 2/2/35 " n(? - 3/l/3U re Policies 
on quotations to U. S. Govornnont, No change in I tens 1, 
a & b of Goth filing - 30 days clause specified in letter 
(iten 1 above) added. 

S EVENTIETH FILIN G 

April 17, 1935 Effective April 27, ±935 

Letter H/17/35 Governing closed bids to Federal, State & Irani- 
cipal Governments - filed prices applicable to total poundage 
in one or riore schedules or other forn of request, for opening 
on any one date. 

SEVEIITY-FIPST FILIN G 

Hay 2, 1935 To ncct Co. 4l t Piling of sane effective date, Effective l.Iay 

4, 1935. 

1. Letter of Hay 2, 1935 (Hectograph copy) notice of filing 
neu prices and extras on Magnet ".Tire, Class 3 10-1 

Ease 15.2.5{# per lb. in L. C.L. (sano as 65th Filing) 

Quant i ty . . 

(a) 30,000 lbs and over -in C.L. deduct l/2{£.por lb.fron Base 
and 5^ frori total price. 

(b) 15,000 lbs and over, deduct l/h<fi per lb. fron Ease 

(c) Orders or contracts for 5»000 lbs or norc, size #25 and 
finer, deduct 5/= fron< total price. 

2. Price Sheet #23-2 (hectograph copy) 5/U/3U supersedes #22-3) 
IO/IC/3U all classes of round Llagnot Y'irc. No changes in 
extras for rectangular or -square iiagnet "ire. 

Changes in extras for all types of round '-ire except 
Plain enaricl, double plain, cnanol and square Llagnot TJire 
(sane as Co. #1, Gist Piling) Increases fron 1{£ to $$0 per lb, 
■ according to size and type. 

seve::t i-secoits filing 

liay S, 1935 • Effective Hay \ 1935 

Price Sheet #23~E-5/U/35 supersedes 22-D, IO/IS/3U . 

Base 15.25^ per lb. in L.C.L. (sane as 71st Filing) 

ho changes in extras for rectangular or square v:irc. 

Changes in extras for round Hire (sec 71 s ^ Filing) 

Additional conditions of sales rectangular -jirc (sane as 65th 

Filing) 

Extras for colors, tracer,. llagnot tfiro in 'Coils, spools and 

reels, no change," sane as 1st Filing, 



Ouantit? 



1. 30,000 lbs & 15,000 lbs and over (sane as I tons 1 & 2) 
(71st Filing.) 



9822 



-385- 
COIIPAi-JY #11 

2. 5,000 lbs or norc =,)- L 35 (sano as itc:i 3, 71st filing) 

3. Set up charge on rectangular vdrc (srno as I ten 2, 65th Filing) 
U. Less than 200 lbs (sane as I ton 3, 65th Piling) 

5. Oxygon Free High Conductivity (Sauo as Iton k, 65th Filing) 

6. Extras for lots of 2,000 L 5,000 lbs ant. over (sane as I ton 
5, 65th Filing) 

Delivery - Sane as 65th Filing 

Terns - Sane as 65th Filing 



9322 



386- 



APP'ENDIX A, PART 4 



FRACTIONAL HORSEPOWER MOTORS 

Chronological Record of Price 
Filings by Companies 



9822 



-337- 

F3ACTI0 1kiL '-iQHS EPQUFdl WO^ O'A PRICE FILING STUDY 

'The Fractional Horsepower Motor Industry is comprised of 47 com- 
panies. This studv is of 43 companies; four, "because of making non- 
comparable motors, motors on special order or very limited lines are 
not included. The price call issued under date of January 5th and 
prices uere to "be filed "by January 29th, 

'Fne scope of the industry is shown in the price call which is 
attached hereto. 

Thirt~-five of the members of the industry which are the subject 
of this, study i have cooperated with each other over a period of years, 
through "being members of the National electrical Manufacturers Associa- 
tion and otherwise. For purposes of generality, the industry can "be 
divided into two sections: sta,ndard companies and non-standard companies. 
The non-standard can only he commented on individually. At the time of 
the original filings, the stanr'ard companies' filings -comprised the fol- 
lowing: 

1. Classification of Purchasers and discounts to such classifications. 

2. Terms of sale. 

3. Deliver" Policy. 

4. Definition of Classifications of Purchasers. 

5. haltipliers (the use of multipliers is a departure from the normal 
method of doing business, as specific companies are assigned speci- 
fic 5-iscounts, rather than a. specific discount being given to a 
special class). 

6. Quantity discounts to all classes for unit shipment of 10 or more 
motors. 

7. Discount plan for Class G purchasers (resale machinery manufactur- 
ers) "oa.sed on quantitv and shipping requirements. 

3. Motor Pricesr 

General Purpose and Special Application Motor Prices are both sub- 
ject to discounts, etc. 

9. Zlectrical Modifications. 

10. Meclia.nical Modifications. 

11. Motor dimensions. 

This filing, as has been noted above, was effective as of January/ - 29, 
1934. Taereafter there wa.s two major filings by standard companies. 

The first established a considerable increase in the quantitv dis- 
counts to resaJ.e machinery manufacturers together with a general price 
revision, slightly uoward. This filing was generally effective March 19, 
1934. 

The second major filing was generally effective November 5, 1934. 
This filing increased the customer classification discounts, closing the 
gap between the Class G a.nd other customers. The other filings were 
quite desultory and unimportant. 



9322 



It will "be noted that due to increase in discounts, the customers 
were paying a less price for fractional horsepower motors at the end of 
the price filing period than the?/ were at its commencement As the orice 
filing period was quite short, it is impossible to reach any conclusion 
as to whether this decrease in net price was due to price filing or not. 

Looking over the whole period of price filing "by members of this 
industr3", the conclusion is inescapable that the end left the industry 
practically as it found it in the "beginning 

COMPANY jl 

The original f ilmg of this company received on February 1, 1934 
and effective the same date was on three types of motors on a list basis. 
Prices were quoted f.o.b. factor?/, net cash 30 days or 2jo 10 days from 
date of invoice. .Retail buyers received a 10)o discount on all motors 
other than replusion capacitor single phase motors on which there was no 
discount. 

Dealers, central stations, manufacturers for resale or industrial 
concerns paying in substantial quantities, received a discount of 20-10fi 
except for the repulsion capacitor single phase motor where the ciscount 
was 20fj. 

Four companies were given special discounts not subject to further 
discounts ranging from 30 to 35-l/3;1>. In addition, by agreement, pur- 
chasers could obtain an annual quantity discount ranging from 2$ for in- 
voicing totalling $1,000.00 to 10$ for invoicing totalling $25,000,000. 

COMPANY J2 
January 29, 1934 Effective January 29, 1934. 

Discounts to Classification of Purchasers - Note 1, 

Terms of sale - Net 30 days. 

Delivery - f.o.b. freight allowed to destination. 

Definition of Classification of Purchasers - Note 2. 

Multipliers (discounts to specific companies) 

Quantity/ discounts based on unit shipments of 10 or more motors. 

Standard discounts to Class G purchasers - Note 3. 

Iiotor Prices - small line. 

Electrical Modification. 

Mechani cal Modif i cat ion . 

Class D - Annual Quantity Discounts - Note 7. 

Class G - Annual Quantity Discounts - Note 3. 

April 5, 1934 Effective April 16, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 

Two changes in types of Class A and Class B users. 
25)o discount allowed educational institutions. 

Provisions for territorial distributors' terms of sale and delivers^ 
basis to be matter of contract. 
9822 



-389- 
CO..PANY # 2 (Continued) 

Increase in quantity discounts to Class G Purchasers - Note 4. 
10'b discounts to all classes based on unit shipment of .150. : > or 
more book: price. 
Approximate!' 1 - increase in two types of motors (21 motors). 

April ft, 1934 Effective At)riL 1ft, 193' . 

Initiating revision 

Addition of two companies to multiplier list. 

November 5, 133- Effective November 5, 1934. 

Coincident Revision 

To meet #15 company filin, • 

Change in discount to classes -of- customers - }Tote 5. 

Definition of Classification of Customers - Note ft. 

November 30, 193, . '. Effective December .10, 1934. 

Initiating revision 

Complete' multiplier list.' 



CO! PANT j#_3 

January 23, 1934 Effective January 29, 193- 

Orifinal Filing 

Prices - Two tyoes of motors (22 motors). 

Electrical modifications. 

Mechanical modifications. ■• . . ... 

10 o discount for unit shipment of ten or more motors. 

Terms - 30 aays net. 

Delivery - f.o.b. factory - freight allowed to destination. 

Classification of customer discounts as follows: . 

Same as Note 1, except Class C, 19 . " 

Glass D, discount - Note 7. 

Description of Class B Purchasers ( standard., see Note 2.) 

November 12, 1-3-.- Effective November 22, 193- 

Initiating Revision 

Erom approximately 12 to 'i0o reduction on all motor prices. 
Discount schedule for Customer Classification. - Note 5., 
except Class C, 13 o. 



9£^2 



-390- 



C015PMY H 

•January 29, 1934 Effective January 29, 1934. 

Original Filing. 

Motor Prices - complete line. 
Mechanical Modifications. 
Electrical Modifications. 

Discount schedule for machinery manufacturers ranged from 25$ for 
one motor to 25-25$ for 200 and over. Also if a machinery manu- 
facturer was on a monthly schedule, the discount was 5C4. 
Dealers - 25$. 
Contract dealers - 324. 
Jobbers and distributors - 4CH5. 
Terms - 1$, 10 days, 30 days net. 
Shipping - Freight allowed to destination. 

February 19, 1934 Effective March 1, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 

Addition to list nf mechanical and electrical modifications. 

Discounts: 

To distributor under contract, 46$. 

To machinery manufacturer, Federal, State, Municipal 
Government and Public Utilities ran. e from 2o$ for lots 
of one motor to 25-25$ for lots of 500 and over. 
In addition these customers, if on a schedule of 200 
motors or wre per no nth for a period of five months or 
^more receive a discount of 50$. 



September 2F, 1934 Effective October 8, 193-.. 

Original Filings of four types of motors. 

Approximately S c o reduction in price of 27 specific motors. 

November 12, 1934 Effective November 22, 193- 

Initiating Fevision 

Approximately 5 : 'o increase in most motor prices. 

Addition to electrical and mechanical modification list. 

Discounts to rpsale machinery manufacturers range from 25$ on 

shipment of one motor to 50 j on shipment of one thousand or over 

within five months. 

Discount schedule to other classes: 



Class B 




- 




20i 


Class C 




- 




25$ 


Class F 




- 




25*. 


Class D 




■* 




32 i 


Class E 




- 




25* 


Jobber 




- 




40$ 


Distributor 








under 


contra 


ct 


-4*1 



9822 



-391- 



COMPANY H 



January 7, 193d Effective January 17, 1935. 

Instating Revision 

Slight change in orices of unit Heater Motors. 



9622 



-392- 



C0MPA1TY if5 



January 29, 1934 Effective January 29,1934. 

Original filing. 

Definition of Classification of Customer. .- Note 2. 

Discounts to Classification of Customers. - Note 1. 

Quantity discounts of 10$ on unit shipments of 10 or more units 

to all classes. 

Quantity discount to Class G Purchasers. - Note 3. 

Terms - 30 days net. 

Mechanical and electrical modifications. 

Motor prices. 

February 26, 1934 Effective March 8, 1934 

First Revision 
Deli very™ where necessary to meet competition, freight allowed 
to destination. 
Complete multiplier list. 
Additional discount to 5 specific customers on specific motors. 

March 2, 1934 Effective March 12, 1934. 

Inclusion of two new types of motors. 
March 16, 1934 Effective March 26, 1934. 

Guide for figuring prices of mechanical and electrical modifications. 

April 2, 1934 Effective April 12, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Prices filed on 9 new motors. 

April 20, 1934 Effective April 30, 1934. 

Change in discounts to Class G Purchasers. Note 4. 

Change in multiplier list (few) 

10$ increase on approximately 8 types of motors. 

April 30, 1934 Effective May 10th, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Change in quantity d iscount of 10$ for unit shipment of 10 or 
more motors to conform to quantity discounts set forth in filing, 
effective April 30th. (10$ discount for unit shipment amounting 
to $150.00 or more). 



9822 



-393- 

COMPAHY §Q 
June 15, 1934 '•• • effective June 25, 1 34. 

Re-statemont (without changu) of discount to Class G 
manufacturers as contained in filing effective April 20th. 

January 5, 1934 Effective Janrary 13, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 

Slight reduction in price of three of the motors originally 

filed Aroril 2, 19-34. 

COKPAITC #6 

Januar: 39, 1934 Effective January 29, 1934. 

Original Filing 
l.iotor trices (fairly complete line). 
Additions for motor pulleys and "oases. 
Blectrical modifications 
i.iechanical modifications. 
Discounts: 

Class C ~ 30-10; i 
Class 3 - 30-10-7 J 
Class F - 20-10, j 
Class G-without J0-10..J 

agreement 
Class G-vith J0-10,'J-7,i 

agreement 
Class C-with sale 20-10-7, i 
service agreement 

All classifications when purchase orders total 310,000 or more 
for immediate release 20-10-7-2-^ ->. 

Terms - 30 d-ys net 60 days trade acceptance. 2jo 10 days FOB., fact, 
Additional 2-H discount allowed for freight differential on ship- 
ments to joints west of Roclcy Mountains 

April 5, 1934 effective April IS, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
llet prices on six motors to all classifications when purchase 
order totals $16,000, list (approximately 42>j off list). 

April 12, 1334 Ypril 22, 1934. 

Clar.s C- customers who have motor sales service agreement, 
given discounts equal to 42,j and multipliers on 8 motors. 

May 3, 1934 Effective ¥&y 13, 1934. 

Increase in price of approximately 15,j for tv.'o types of motors. 

December 28, 1S34 Defective January 7, 1935. 

Statement that the rame list price as is used for Sloeve Bearing 
Motors "be used for Ball and Timlien Bearing Motors when necessary 
to meet competitive prices. 

9822 



-394- 



De comber 31, 1934 Effective January 10, 1935 

Statement that same list applies for Polyphase Motor of 550 
volts as 220-440 volts. 

February 21, 1935 effective March 4, 1935 

; Initiating He-vision 

Addition of three types of motors 

COMPANY #7 

January 29, 1934 Effective January 29, 1934. 

Original Filing 
Schedule of annual discounts to class G purchaser - Ilote 3. 
Motor prices (complete line). 
Electrical Modifications 
Mechanical Modifications. 
10$ discount for unit shipment of 10 or more motors. 

February 12, 1934 Effective February 22, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Discounts to classifications of purchasers - iTote 1. 
Discount to educational institutions -25^ 

Delivery policy - f.o.b. factory, freight allowed to destina- 
tion. 

Definition of Classification of Purchasers - Uote 2. 
Multiplier list 

Additional discounts on specific motors to some class G 
purchasers. 

Class D annual quantity discount - Ilote 7. 
Terms of sale - net 30 days. 

February 26, 1934. Effective March 8, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Srice list of additional motors (two types). 

March 19, 1934 Effective March 19, 1934. 

Coincident Revision to meet -fl5 Co. filing. 
Withdrawal of schedule of additional discounts to Class G 
purchasers on specific motors. 
Addition to multiplier list. 
Discounts to class G purchaser. - Note 4. 
Approximately 10 j increase in all motor prices. 
Electrical and Mechanical Modifications. 

August 21, 1934 Effective August 31, 1934. 

Class G discount - 25;i. 
Class G-multiplier list. 



9822 



-395- 



Hovember 5, 19~4 Effective November 15', 1934. 

Change in discounts to all classes of purchasers. - Note 5, 
Reduction of discount to educational institutions from 
25 to 10, j. 

Definition of Classification of Purchasers. - ITote 6. 
Classes 3 and C Multiplier list. 

November 26, 1934 Effective ilovember 26, 1934. 

Coincident Revision to meet ;','43 Co. 
More complete multiplier list superseding all others, 

ilovember 26, 1054 Effective December 6, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Addition of one company to multiplier list. 



GOMPAITY #8 
January 25, 1934 Effective January 29, 1934. 

Definition of Classification of Purchasers - ilote 2. 

Discounts to Classification of Purchasers - Hote 1. 

Annual quantity discount to Class D purchasers - ilote 7. 

Quantity discount based on unit shipments of 10 or more 

motors. 

25 j discount to educational institutions." 

Delivery - f.o.b. factory, freight allowed to destination. 

Terms - 30 days net. 

Classes 3, C, and & multiplier list. 

Class G discounts - ITote 3. 

Additional discount to some Class G purchasers on specific 

motors. 

Motor prices - complete line. 

Electrical and Mechanical Modifications. 

Motor Dimensions, 

March 19, 1934 Effective March 19, 1934 

Coincident Revision to meet #15 Co. filing. 
Classes 3, C, and G multiplier list. 
Discount to Class G purchasers - Ilote 4. 
Approximately 10 ^ increase in motor prices. 
Electrical and Mechanical Modifications. 

May 3, 1S24 Effective May 13, 1934. 

5 j increa.se in eight motor prices and 4 ; j incres.se in two 
motor prices. 

May 10, 1934 Effective May 20, 1934. 

Tro changes in class 3 customer classification definition. 



9822 



-595- 






August 27, -1934 .'.'.'Effective August 30, 1334. 

Coincident Revision to meet #10 Co. filing. 

• Change in multiplier for one company. 

September 4, 1934 Effective September 11, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Definition of Class B customer classification. 
Classes B and G customer classifications. 
Class G multiplier list. 

September 4, 1934 Effective September 14, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Approximately 2p reduction in 'motor prices '(18 motors). 

IJovember 3, 1934. . . .' Effective ITovember 5, 1954. 

Coincident Revision to meet ,','-15 Co. filing 
Definition of Classification of customers - ilote 6. 
Increase in discount to all classes of customers - Ilote 5. 

December 3, 1954 '. .Effective December 13, 1934. 

Initiating Devi s ion 
Conditions under which orders may be accepted at previous 
price after filing of increased prices. 



COHPADY #9 

January 29, 1934 Effective January 39, 1934. 

Original Filing. 

Discount to classification of purchasers. - llote 1. 

Terms of sale - Ilet 30 days. 

Annual quantity discount to Class D. Dote 7. 

Delivery policy - f.o.b. factory, freight allowed to destination. 

Definition of classification of Purchasers.- Dote 2. 

Multiplier list. 

Discount: - 10,> based on unit shipment of 10 or more motors. 

Discount to Class G Purchasers. - Dote 3" ' ' 

Motor Prices -'Small line. 

Electrical and Mechanical modifications. 

February 15, 1934 Effective February 32, 1934. 

25$ discount to educational .' institutions. 

March 29, 1954 Effective April 9, 1934. 

Increase in quantity discounts to Class G purchasers. - Dote 4. 
Discount of 10,; for unit shipment of motors amounting to at 
least $150.00 book value. " ' 
Approximately 10 j increase in motor prices. 



9822 



-397- 



.-.;■ ell 13, 1934 Effective April 23, 1934. 

Multiplier Lis.t. 

September 25, 1934 Effective October 5, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Condition under which orders may be accepted' at previous 
prices after filing of increased prices. 

November 3, 1934 Effective ilovember 5, 1954. 

Coincident Revision to meet #15 Co. filing. 
Increase in customer classification discount. - Hote 3. 
Definition of Classification of Purchasers. - Note 6. 

Ilovember 6, 1934 Effective "Joveraber 16, 1934. 

Initiating. Revision 

Classes 3 and C multiplier list. 

November 17, 1934 effective Ilovember 27, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Supplementary List. 
Classes B and C multipliers. 

December 17, 1334 Effective December 27, 1934. 

Classes 5 and C multiplier list. 



?322 



-398- 

COMPANY #10 



January 29 , 1934 Effective January 29 , 1934. 

Original Filing 
Delivery Policy: - Machinery manuracturcrs f.o.b. factory, freignt al- 
lowed to destination. All other customers, freignt collect. 
Terms of sale: - Net 30 days. 

Discount Schedule and Customer Classificat i on : 
Class I - Machinery manufacturer dcmlor, 16-. 'iscount 

Class II- Machinery manufacturer branch distributor ice croaa company, 
2&'ii discount. . , . . ■=-•■ 

Class III - Macninery manufacturer, assigned raulti oli*r, and earned quan- 
tity discount. 

lCX.i discount on unit shipment of I"" or more motors to Class III custo- 
mer . 

Annual quantity discount of Class III ranges, from .3$ on purchases of 
2500 motors, to 14<j on purchase of 100,000 motors or over. 
Class III Purchases discount. - Note 3. 
Motar Prices - fairly complete line. 
Electrical and Mechanical Modifications. 

February 9 , 1934 Effective February 19 , 1934. 

Class III Multipliers 

Class HI - Additional discount on specific motors (range 3 to 14$) 

Prices on two types of motors. No cnange. 

February 21 , 1934 Effective March 3, 1934. 

Class III - Multiplier List. 3 changes in list, effective Feb. 19, 1934 

March 16, 1934 Effective March 19 , 1934, to meet 

#15 Co. 

Delivery Policy: - all classes f.o.b. factory, freight allowed to des- 
tination. 

Class III discount - Note 4. 
Class III multipliers. 

Price changes in practically all motors - generally slightly upward but 
some slight decreases. 
Supplementary Electrical and Mecnanical Modifications. 

Aaril 2, 1934 Effective April 12, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Decrease in one motor price. 
Electrical and Mechanical Modifications - One motor. 

April 9, 1934 Effective April 19, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Price decreases - four types of motors. 
Electrical and Mechanical Modifications. 

April 19, 1934 Effective April 30, 1934. 

Educational Insitiutions discount - 25$ 

Approximately 4*-> reduction in two motors, - addition of one type of 

motor. 

9 822 



COMPANY #10 



April 23, 1934 Effective May 3, 1934. 

Addition of two types of motors. 

April 26, 1934 Effective May 7, 1934. 

Addition of ene type of motor. 

May 14, 1934 Effective May 14, 1934. 

Meeting #43 Co. filing. 
Electrical and Lccr.anical Modifications. 

May 16, 1934 '. . Effective May 26, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Discount revision 

Classes A, B, and C added to Classes 1, 2 and 3. 
Standard discount for each class. Note 1. 
Electrical and Mechanical Modifications. 

June 25, 1934 Effective July 5, 1934. 

Change in one multiplier. . . . 

July 1"), 1934 Effective July 13, 1934. 

Coincident Revision to meet #15 Co. filing. 
Cnnnge in one multiplier. 

July 25, 1934 Effective August 4, 1934. 

Approximately 15"$ reduction in price of one motor. 

August 20, 1934 Effective August 30, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Cnange in one multiplier. 

November 5, 1934 Effective November 5, 1934. 

Coincident Revision to meet #15 Co. filing. 
Change in discount to Classes of Purchasers . 
Classes A, B, and C same as Note 5. 
Educational institutions - 16$. 
Class I - 17, 
Class II - 25-1 
Class III - 2C^ 

In addition to assigned multiplier, Classes A, B, C, D, 1 and 3 are 
given 1C ? 7 discount for unit shipments amounting to $150 list price. 

September 13, 1934 Effective September 28, 1934. 

Four additional multipliers. 
Approximately 2Cfio reduction on six motors. 

October 30, 1934 Effective November 9, 1934. 

Addition of six motors, 

November 7, 1934 Effective November 17, 1934. 

Addition of one multiplier. 

December 28, 1934 Effective January 7, 1935. 

Addition of 13 motors. 

9822 



-400- 

CQliSAW frll 



January 29 , 1934 Effective January 29 , 1934. 

Original Filing 
Discounts: - 

Users . . . Net to 20$ 

Dealers, for resale 10 to 15-10$ 

Jobbers and mf rs . , for resale 15-10 

Quantity Discount - 

10 of one specification 10$ 

50 of one specification 15$ 

Delivery: - 

F.o.b. factory - Government delivery, destination. '. 
Terms: - 

30 days net, 2$, 10 days from dating or bi-monthly. 
Motor prices - semi -complete line. 
Motor dimensions. ■ • . 

March 1 , 1934 . ' March 12 , 1934 . 

Customer Classification Discount: - • 

Class A 10$ 

" B 15 

" C ..... 20 ■ 

" D .- 15-10 

11 E 20 

11 F ..... 15 ■• . 

" 15-10 

Educational institutions: - 15-10$. 

Quantity discounts based on shirrDing requirements: 

1. Shipped and billed within 3 months, from d'*te of initial shipmeht- 

Lots of Discounts • 

10 to 24 10$ 

25 to 49 . 12i 

50 to 99 15 

100 or more l?a 

2. Shipped and billed within 6 months of date of initial shipment- 

25 to 49 10 

59 to 99 12-g 

100 tc 249 15 

250 or more- . 17-g- 

3. On orders of assorted specifications snipped and billed within 
6 months from date of initial shipment - 

List Value -of , Discounts 

$1500 7^ 

3000 10 

7CC0 ... 12| 

10000 15 ■ 

Delivery:- f.o.b. factory, freight allowed to destination. 

Mechanical Modifications. 

Motor Prices - Approximately 25$ increase in one type of motor. 

9822 



-■ 1- 

COMPANY fll 



May 28, 1934 Effective June 7, 1934, 

Customer Classification discount changes:- 

Class D - without agreemant 15-10 > 

with agreement 20-10 

Class & - without .agreement 15-10 

with agreement 20-10 

Educational Institutions 20-lCro 

Quantity discounts: - 

1. Unit shipment of motors of identical specif ications- 

5 to 9 b'.o 

10 or more 10 

2. Motors of identical specifications to be shipped witnin 3 
months : - 

15 to 24 10 

25 to 49 15 

50 to 99 20 

103 to 249 25 

250 to 500 : 30 

3. To be snipped wituin 5 mcntiis:- 

25 to t9 10 

50 to 99 15 

100 tc 249 20 

°53 to 499 25 

500 to 999 30 

1,000 or more 35 

4. f.otors of identical or assorted specifications: - 
a. To be snipped witnin 3 months- 
List value 1200 and over 10 



500 » 
1,000 " 
2,500 " 
5,000 " 

12,000 " 
To be shipped witnin 6 montns- 
List value -> 1,000 and over . 
2,500 



n n 

" " 5,000 
" " 12,000 
" 25,' 

50,000 
Electrical modifications. 
Mechanical modifications . 
Approximately 2% reduction in 2 
of motors. 



.15 
.20 
.25 

.30 
.35 

.10 
.15 
.20 
.25 
.30 
.35 



types motors; 10'" 3 increase in 2 types 






9822 



COMPANY =12 



January 29 , 193<± Effective January 29 , 1934. 

Original Filing 
Discounts to Classification of ' Purchasers.- Note 1. 
Discount to Class D purchasers ,- T Tote 7. 
Terms - Net 30 days. 

Delivery:- f.o.b. factory, freight allowed to destination. 
Definition of Classification of Purchasers.- Note 2. 
Multiplier List . 
Motor Prices (small line). 
Electrical and Mechanical Modifications. 

May 14 , 1934 Effective May 24, 1934. 

Two changes in Class 3 customers. 

Provision making any user purchases whose purchases of motors average 
a thousand dollars annually over a neriod of three consecutive years en- 
titled to Class B discounts. 

February 7, 1934 ■.-.■ ......Effective February 18, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Discounts to Classification of Purchasers.- Write 5. 
Definition of Classification of Purchasers.- "Note 6. 
Complete Multiplier List. 

Change in Motor Prices:- One type approximately 25$ reduction. 

One type approximately 10$ increase. 



COMPANY #13' 



January 29, 1934 Effective January 29, 1934. 

Discounts to Classification nf . Customers .- Note 1, exceot no discount to 
Classes C, "' and H, and 36$' discount to Class S. , 10$ discount for unit 
shipments of 10 or more motors. 

Discount plan for Class purchasers based on quantity and shipping re- 
quirements.- Note 3. 

Class G multipliers. Specific discounts on specific motors to some 
Class G. purchasers. ■ 
Motor Prices (fairly complete line) . 
Mechanical and Electrical Modifications. 
Terms - 30 days net. 
Shipping f.o.b. - freight allowed to destination. 

February 12, 1934. ...... .' Effective February 13, 1934. 

Authorized by Supervisory Agency 
Motor Prices. 

Marcn 17, 1934 Effective March 19, 1934. 

Coincident Revision to meet #15 Co filing. 
Educational institutions - discount 25$. 

Increase in quantity discounts to Class G Purchasers.- Note 4. 
10,.- discount to all classes based on unit shipment of .pi 50 or book price. 
Multiplier List. 

9822 



-403- 

cq::pat tiz 



March 21, 1934 Effective March 22, 1934. 

Coincident Revision to m6et #15 Co. filing. 
Filing adopting #15 Co. filing which became effective on March 19, 1934. 
Piling is tempo ry and co be in pffect only until filing received March 
21st becomes effective. 

' arch 28 , 1934 J . ; . Effective March 28 , 1934 . 

Coincident Filing to meet #15 Co. filing effective March 19th. 
Motor Prices. 

April 5, .1934 Effective April 13, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Approximately 10*5 increase in prices in nost r.otors. 

Aoril 30, 1934 : Effective May 10, 1934. 

Increase in prices effective -April 13, 1934 (four types of motors). 

May ■18," 193* /.•....................-. Effective May 28, 1934. 

Giving wholesale distributors with (.cm^ 'office approval a discount of 
20-42^. 

September 4, 1934 . . .Effective September 14, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Class G Multiplier List. 
Addition of two types of motors. 

September 22, 1934 Effective .October 2, 1934. 

Initiating Revision ■ 
Reduction in six motors (approximately 10$) from filing effective May lOtn. 

January 25, 193b . .. ............. .Effective February 4, 1935. 

Initiating Revision 
Withdrawal of 20-46% discount allowed wholesale distributors. 

January 28, 1935..". Effective February 7, 1935. 

Initiating Revision 
Supplemental motor prices. 

February 33 , 1935. Effective March 11 , 1935. 

Electrical and Mechanical Modifications (2 items). 



COITA-Y ^14 
Original Fil 'in .._■' 

January 29 , 1934. Effective January 29 , 1934. 

Complete List of multipliers. 

Specific discounts to specific customers on purchase of specific motors. 
Filing increasing list price on all price pages dated after August 1, 
1930 and prior to January 22, 1934, 31$ except: 



9822 



-404- 
COMPANY #14 



Fractional Horsepower Motors.' 

3/4 Horsepower, 1800 r.p.m. and smaller down to l/3 H.P. 1800 r.p.m. 

which were increased 195 

Also l/3 Horsepower 1800 r.p.m. ... 

l/4 Horsepower 1200 r.p.m. 

l/6 Horsepower 900 r.p.m. and smaller which were increased 15% and 

iogt. 

Terms: - Net 3C days. 

Delivery Policy: - f .n.b. . factory , freight allowed to destination. 

Definition of Classification of Purchasers.- Note 2. •■ . 

Discount to Class D Purchasers based on annual quantity discount.- Note 7. 

Discount to Classification of Customers.- Note 1. 

Electrical and Mechanical Modifications. 

motor Prices . ' ' 

May 19, 1934 Effective June 1, 1934. 

Note: 'Filing dated "effective June 1, 1934." 
Discount to educational institutions 25o. 

August 24, 1934 Effective September 4, 1934. 

Redefinition of Class B 'users," • . 

January 31 , 1935 Effective February 11 , 1935. 

Supplementary multiplier list. . 



COMPANY #15 



January 29 , 1934 • • • • '.Effective January 29 , 1934. 

Original Filing. 
Terms: 30 days net . 
Classification of customers discount. Notel. 

Discount to educational institution 2&\j 

Annual quantity discount to Class D purchasers. Note 7. 

Definition of Classification of customers. 'Note 2. 

Delivery Policy - f.o.b. factory, freignt allowed to destination. 

Classes B, C, and G multipliers. ". ' ' ' 

Additional discounts on specific motors to specified Class G purchasers, 

10% discount for unit shipment of 10 or more' motors. 

Class G discount 'based on quantity and shipping requirements. Note 3. 

Motor specifications. 

Motor prices (complete line). 
Electrical and Mechanical modifications. 

February 5, 1934 Effective February 15, 1934. 

Motor prices - one new type of motor. 

February 7, 1934 .... .Effective February 6, 1934. 

Coincident Revision (To meet #17 Company) 
Additional discount on specific motors given to Class G purchasers. 



9822 



- ' ■ 5- 



February 12, 1934 Effective February 21 , 1934. 

If Federal, State or i'unicioal Governments in their rcquosts for bids; 
specii"y terms for payment other tnan net 30 days, bids will be in com- • 
diance witn such request. . . 

Cnanges in definition of Class A and Class 3 customers (addition of 
two new types of customers) . 

February 25 , 1934 Effective March 8 , 1934. 

Change in multipliers and additional discount for motors to two Class 
G Purchasers. 

Marcn 9, 1934 .Effective March 19, 1934. 

Clacses 3, C, and G multiplier list. 

Discount to Class G customers based on quantity and shipping require- 
ments. v ote 4. 

10% discount on unit shipments of -;150.00 or more. 
Approximately 1C4 increase in some types of motor prices. 

re Federal, State, and Municinnl Governments in tneir requests for 
bids snecify terms of payment other than net 30 days, terms will be ex- 
tended in accordance with such specifications. 

Larcn 13, 1934 ." Effective March 23, 1934. 

!.;otor -oriels on motirs not covered by price change effective March 19th/ 
Approximately 1C<? increase of trices effective January 29th» 

Kay 5, 1934 Effective May 17, 1934. 

(Dated Effective : iay 17th) 
Addition to Class G and Class 3 of one industry each. 
Definition of customer classification. 
Addition of two Class G multinliers.' 

June 22, 1934 . ..'.'.'.'.' Effective July 2, 1934. 

Initiating Revision. 
Conditions und°r Yifnich orders may bp accer^t-.d .after the effecti\e date 
of an increase in ^orice at the previous price. 
Addition of on°. new type of motor. 

July 3, 1934 .'....... .Effective July 13, 1934. 

. Initiating Revision. 
Addition of on- 3 Class G multipliers. 

August ID, 1934 ...... .Effective August 20, 1934. 

R=statem-nt of Class B definition of customer classification. 

September 21, 193<t Effective October 3, 1934. 

(Dated to be Effective Octoter 3rd). 
Addition of one type of motor. 

October 26, 1934 Effective Nov°mb^r 5, 1934. 

Initiating Revision. 
Discount to classification of customers. Note 5. 
Definition of classification of customers. ftote 6. 

982?. 



-406- 
COMPANY ff!6 

Original Tiling 

January 29, 1934 ■• Effective January 29,1934. 

Terras: - Net 30 days. 

Delivery Policy: - f.o."b. factory, subject to the following: 
To meet competition -freight may he allowed on shipments 
to any authorized railway freight station within the con- 
fines of the U.S.A. 

Discounts to Classification of Customers.- Note 1, except that 

Class D is omitted. 

Definition of Customer Classification.- Note 2. 

10$ discount for unit shipments of 10 or more motors. 

Quantity discounts to Class G Purchasers.- Note 3. 

Electrical and Mechanical Modifications. 

Motor Prices. 

Motor Specifications. 

February 5, 1934 Effective February 15,1934. 

Prices for additional motors. 

March 22,1934 Effective April 2, 1934. 

10$ discount for unit shipments amounting to at least $150 list value. 

Complete multiplier list. 

Discounts to Class G Purchasers.- Note 4. 

New Mechanical Modifications. 

Motor Prices - downward revision approximate range 5 to 12$. 

March 31, 1934 Effective April 19,1934. 

Change in motor prices. General reduction, approximately 5$. 

April 18, 1934 Effective April 28,1934. 

Prices on five new motors. . ... 

May 22, 1934 Effective June 1, 1934. 

Prices on nine new motors 



o . 



June 25, 1934 Effective July 5, 1934. 

Initiating Revision . . 

Motor Prices on two new types' of ' motors. 

July 12, 1934.,., Effective July 23,1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Addition of two new. motors. 

July 21, 1934 Effective July 31,1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Discount to Technical Schools, 25$. 

Conditions governing the exceptance of previous prices after the 
effective date'of price increases. 
Additional Motor Prices. 



9822 



-407- 

COMPANY iflo 



November 26, 1934 Effective December 6, 1934, 

Frices en additional motors. 

November 50, 1934 Effective December 10,1934, 

Classification of Customers discount.- Note 5. 
Definition of Classification of Customers.- Note 6. 
Complete Multiplier List. 



9822 



-408- 
COMPANY if 17 

January 29 , 1934 Effective January 29 , 1934. 

Original Filing 
Discounts to Classification of Customer. Note 1 except 
Class B - 15|$ 
" II ~ 20 $ 

" G - 25 $ ... 
Quantity discount to Class G- purchasers only . Note III. 
Discount to certain .industries on purchase of specific motors. 
Note: This corresponds to the discounts given specific 
companies on the purchase of specific motors. 
Terms: 2$ 10 days net 30. 

Delivery Policy - f.o.b. factory with freight allowed to destination. 
Net prices governing two motors when purchased in quantity of ten 
thousand or more (approximately 55$ off list) 
10/o discount for unit shipment of ten or more motors. 
Electrical and Mechanical modifications. 
Motor Prices (semi-complete line) 

February 21 , 1934 .Effective March 3 , 1934. 

Definition of Classification of customers. Note 1. 

Change in discounts on purchaser classification. 

Class A - on purchase of three thousand or more for shipment not to 

exceed 90 days - 10/o. 

Electrical dealers having contracts with manufacturers other than 

this company - 17$. 

Class C - 20$. 

Educational institutions 25$. 

March 19 , 1934 .Effective March 29 , 1934. 

10$ discount on unit shipment of motors amounting to $150,00 or 
more list price. 

Discounts to Class 5 (in lieu of customer classification discount) ~ 

less than 10 motors or less than $150.00 list - 25$ 

Orders of 10 or more motors or value of $150,00 or more list price 

price for unit shipment - 25 - lO^o, 
Orders amounting to $1000, shipment not to exceed 90 days - 

25 - 10 - 10$. 
Orders amounting to $2500, shipment not to exceed 90 days-25~10~20$. 
Orders amounting to $7500, shioment not to exceed 90 days~25~10~25/o. 
Orders amounting to $15,000, shipment not to exceed 90 days - 

25 - 10 « 33$. 
Approximately 5$ reduction in motor prices. 

November 13, 1934 Effective November 23,1934, 

Discount to classification customer. Note 5 except 
Class C - 20$ 

" D - 17-10$ 

" G - 25$ 

" II - 20$ 
Definition of Purchaser classification. Note VI. (Omitting Classes GB-HB) 



9822 



-409- 



C0I.1PAHY y 18 

February 2, 1934 Effective February 1 , 1934. 

Original Filing 
Motor Prices (extremely United line) 

Classification of (Justomers discounts. Note 1 except Class H omitted. 
Delivery Policy ~ f.o.b. factory with transportation allowed to 

destination. 
Terms: Net 30 days. 

Classification of customers. Note II 
Class D ~ Annual quantity discount. Note 7. 

List of special multipliers to specific industry (comparable to standard 
multiplier list.) 

February 16, ' 1934 .Effective February 26 , 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Addition of four new motors with motor prices 

February 23, 1934 '.'. . . .Effective ' March' 5', ' i934. 

Initiating Revision 
Educational institutions given discount of 25$. 

April 3, 1934. . . .Effective 13, 1934. 

Change in and addition to list of special multipliers to specific 
industry ( general increase in discount.) 

Statement that "we meet Company ^=15' s competition on their published 
list of special multipliers where not covered by the above industries' 
classification." 

July 13, 1934 .'..'. '.Effective July 23, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Addenda to classification of purchasers (three changes). 

July 20, 1934 Effective July 30, 1934. 

Ball Bearing motor prices made the same as price list for Sleeve 
Bearing Motor. 

October 22, 1934. Effective November 1, 1934. 

Class G- customers given a discount of 25;.j. 

November 12, 1934 Effective November 22, 1934. 

Statement that customer classification discount is revised to meet 
Company #13' s filing Effective November 5, 1934. 

December 28, 1934 > Effective January 1, 1935. 

Discount to classification of customers . Note 5. 
Definition of classification of customers. 
Multiplier listo 

Note : This filing physically carries out statement contained in j 

filing , effective November 22, 1934. / 

9822 



-410- 



COhPAUY r 19 

February 19, 1934 Eff ective February 19, 1334. 

Original Filing 
Motor Prices ( very limited line ) 
Multiplier list. 

Definition of classification of customers Note 2. 

Delivery Folicy - f.o.b. factory - freight allowed to destination. 
Discount to Classification of customers. Note 1. ; 
Terms - 30 days net 

Class D - Annual quantity discount Note 7. 
Educational Institutions Discount - 25;o. 

August 8, 1934 . .'." Effective August 18,- 1934. 

Motor prices on additional motors and increase in price approximately 
from 2 to 12$ on five motors. 

September 17, 1934 '.'... Effective September 27,1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Class G- discount - 25$ 

November 5, 1934 .' .......'.. , .Effective November 15, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Definition to classification of customers. Note 5. (Class G discount 
reduced from 25$ to 20$.) 

Discounts of 10$ for unit shipment of at least $150 list price. 
Class G- quantity discount. Note 4. 
Multiplier list. 

January 31 , 1935 .".'.'.'.....'. . .Effective February 11 , 1935. 

Electrical and Mechanical Modifications. 

Price of bases of motors contained in August 8th filing, effective 

August 18., changed from six dollars each to $1.50 each. 



COMPANY 7 f 20 

January 29, 1934 '.. .'..'.'.•.'.'.•.Effective January 29, 1934. 

Original Filing 
Discount to customer classification. 

Class A - list • • • 

" B - 10$ 

" C ~ 20$ 

" E - 20$ 

11 F ~ 10$ 

" G ~ 20$ 

Terms! Net 30 days. 

Delivery Policy f.o.b. factory. 

Definition of classification of customers (similar but not as extensive 

as Note 2.) 

10$ discount on unit shipment of 10 or more motors. 

Quantity discount to Class G customers. Note 3. 

Eledtrical and Mechanical Modifications. 

Motor Prices. 

Motor Dimensions 

9822 



-411- 

February 26, 1934 Effective March '8, 1934. 

Discount to educational institutions 25$. 

Delivery Folicy - f.o.b. factory - freight allowed to destination. 

March 127, 1934 Effective April 6, 1934. 

Motor Prices. 

May 14, 1934 Effective May 24, 1934. 

Revisions and additions to rmiltilplier list. 

June 7, 1934 Effective June .18,. 1934. 

37$ reduction on the priceuof one motor to one company when purchasing 
in lot's from $3,000 to $8,000 to meet Company #13. 

July 9, 1934 '. . . . .Effective July 19, 1934. 

Revision of customer classification discount sheet. - 
Class A'- 10$ :■ ■ 

11 B - 20$ 

11 C - 20-10$ 

11 E ■ - 2©~1C$ 

" J - 20$ ■--... 

" G - 20-10$ 
Educational institutions 25$ 

Quantity discount based on shipment riot to exceed -90 days. 
10 to 24 motors 3$ 
25 - 99 motors 5$ 
100' motors or more 7$ 

August 15 , 1934 ... '.'..; ... •. .. .Effective August 25 , 1934 . 

Initiating Revision '•• ■■ . i 
Electrical and Mechanical Modifications. 

October 6, 1934 Effective October 16, 1934. 

Reduction of approximately 10$ - one motor. 

Change in prices of eight motors (from one to fifteen per cent reduction) 

February 9, 1935 Effective February 19,1935. 

Discount to customer classification. 

Class A - 10$ ' ' ■ ... 

11 B - 20$ 

■ C - 20$ 

11 E - 20$ 

"F,G,& Gb-20$ 
Educational Institutions 20$ 
Quantity discount to all classes. 

ITumber of Motors Discount 

1-4 . Authorized Discount 

5-9 5$ 

10 - 24 10$ . 

25 - 49 10$ and 3$ 

50 - 74 10$ and 7$ 

75 - 143 10$ and 10$ 

150 end over 20$ 

9822 



-412- 



Frorn approximately 10% increase to approximately 10% decrease in prices 
of two types af motors- predominantly increased. 

COMPANY #3 _ ' 

Original Filing 

January 29, 1934 Effective January 29, 1934. 

Terms - Net 30 days. 

Discount to customer classification - Mote I 

Definition of customer classification- " II 
Multiplier - two companies. 

Delivery Poliny - F.O.B. factory -freight allowed to destination. 
Motor Prices ( incomplete ) 

March. 16 , 1934 Effective March 19 , 1934. 

Adoption of motor prices similar to those of Company #15, • meeting, 
Company #15 '. Effective March 19, 1934. 

April 7, 1934 Effective April 17, 1934. 

Discount to educational institutions 25$. 

April 9, 1934 Effective Aptil 19, 1934. 

Approximately 10$ increase in two types of motors. 

July 2, 3.934 . . . . Effective July 12, 1934. 

Discounts to Class G. Note 4. 

Adoption of motor prices similar to those of Company #15 on seven 

types of motors. 

October 1, 1934 .'.......'.'...Effective October 11,1934. 

Statement that where FedeEal, Municipal Governments in their requests 
for "bids specify terms of payment other than those set forth by the 
comp-ny, it will be permissible to extend terms of paymentiin accordance 
with such specifications. 



COMPANY f 22 

Original Filing 

August 7, 1934 Effective August 17,1934. 

Motor Prices - (incomplete line) 
Discount schedule 
Discount classification 
Manufacturers or users forruse in their own plants or business - 

discount 25$. 
Dealers - any quantity - 40$. 
$2,000 worth or more within six months - 45$. 

Jobbers who normally buy less than $50,000 worth per year -52$. 
Jobbers who normally buy more than $50,000 worth; per:-year-22$ &42$, 
Manufacturers who buy motors for use as part of their equipment 

or for iea&le, who normally use less than $50,000 worth per 

year 22$ & 42$. 
Manufacturers who normally use more than $50,000 worth per year- 

25$ and 42$. 

9822 . . 



-413- 



An additional discount of 7.5$ on l/3'H'.r; motors will be allowed 
to those users who normally purchase $75,000 ■ orth of motors 
(any rating) during a period of one ye-r. 

Electrical and Mechanical Modificatv . 

Terms - 30 days net. 

Delivery Policy - F.O.B. Factory - freight 'allowed to destination. 

September 7, 1934 . . . . Effective September 17, 1934. 

Additional motor prices, 

Additional electrical and mechanical modifications. 

September 24, 1934....'.'.'... '.' Effective Ocotober 4, 1934* • 

Initiating Revision,, 
Discount Classification 

Manufacturers or users for use- 25>o. 

Dealers for resale - 40S, 

Dealers - $2,000 to be taken within six months - 45$. 

Jobbers, machinery dealer's' or distributors' who* purchase from 

any source less than $50,000 worth .annually - 52$. 

JobbSrsp, machinery dealers or distributors who purchase more 

than $50,000 worth annually - 22$ and 42$. 

Machinery manufacturers who purchase less th->n $50,000 worth 

annually - 22$ and 42$. 

Machinery manufacturers who purchase more than $50,000 annually- 

25$ .and 42$. 

Any purchaser whose aggregate purchase of motors from all sources 

is more than $75,000 worth annually, an additional 7j$. 

Bona Fide mail order Rouses who qualify as to volume of purchases 

are entitled to machinery manufacturers' disouniit . 

December 26, 1934 .Effective January 5,1935. 

Changes in discount from these effective October 4, 1934. 
Dealers j ~ in any quantity for resale - 50$. 
$2,000 worth to be t°ken within six months - 52$. 

February 15, 1935 Effective February 25, 1935. 

Initiating Revision. 
From approximately 30$ to 40$ reduction in four motor prices. 



COMPANY 7f23 



January 23 , 1934 Effective January 29, 1934. 

Original Filing 
Discount to Classification of Purchasers.- Note 1. 
Annual discount to Class D.~ ITote 7. 
Definition of Classification of Purchasers.- Note 2. 
Multiplier List. 

Quantity discount based on unit shipment of 10 or more motors 
Cl-ss G Discount to all purchasers.- Note 3. 
Delivery:- f,o c b. factory, freight allowed to destination. 
Terms :- 30 days net. 
Motor Prices. 
Mechanical modification. . 
Electrical modification. 
9522 



o e 



-414- 

March 9, 1934 Effective March 19, 1934. 

Addition to Motor Prices. 

March 16, 1934 Effective March 26, 1934. 

Addition to Motor Prices. 

January 11, 1935 Effective January 21, 1935. 

Discounts to Classification of Purchasers.- Note 5. 

Definifion of Classification of Purchasers.- Note 6. 

Multiplier List. 

Conditions under which orders may be accepted at previous prices. after 

filing of increased prices. 

Increase in quantity discounts to all classes.- Note 4. 

Prices on pulleys and slide rails. Generally 5$ price increase. 

Mechanical modifications. 

January 16, 1935 Effective January 26, 1935. 

Re-statement of classification of customer discount, and Definiation 
of classes of customers (slight change). 

COMPANY #24 

January 29, 1934. Effective January 29,1934. 

Original Piling 
Electrical and Mechanical Modifications. 
Discounts:- 

10$ discount for unit shipment of 10 or more mo-tors. 
Discount to Class G. Note 3. 

Additional discount "based on number of units purchased 
. • annually of specific motors. 

Units Discounts 

2„,500 3$ 

5!, 000 6$ 

7; 500 8$ 

15,000 9$ 

25,000 10$ 

.35,000 11$ 

50,000 12$ 

75,000 13$ 

100,000 14$ 

Educational Institutions - discount 10^. 
Class G multiplier list. 

Additional discount to specific Class G purchasers on specific motors. 
Terms: 30 days ne;fc. 

Delivery Policy f.o.b. factory - freight allowed to destination. 
Classification for customers discount. Note 1 - with the following 
exceptions: 

Users of $50,000 or more annually. Schedule A. 
Class G - Schedule B 
Schedule A is as follows: 

Users with annual aggregate purchases of $50,000 11$ 

75,000 12$ 
150,000 13$ 
250,000 14$ 
gg22 500,000 or more 15$. 



-415- 



Schedute B 

Machinery manufacturers with Aggregate annual- purchases- of less 

than - .' $ 50,000 -20$ 

more than 50,000 -21$ 

" " 75,000-22^ • • ■ ■ 

" " 150,000-23$ 

" " 250,000 -24$ 

500,000 or more -25$ 

Discount of Class D purchaser. Note 7. .... 
Motor Prices. (complete Line)" 

March 19, 1934 '. .'. .' Effective March 19,1934. 

Coincident Revision to meet #15 Company's filing. 
Mechanical and Electrical modifications. 

Discounts to Classification of customers. Note 1- except Class B 

net or assigned multipliers. 

Class C 17$, 

Discounts to all classes "based 'on quantity and shipping require- 
ments. Note 4. 

Approximately 10$ increase in motor prices. 

Multiplier List. 

March 26, 1934 .' Effective April 4, 1934. 

Motor Prices. "Prices of some motors up 10/5, other motors down approx- 
ornately 10$." 

April 23,1934 Effective May 3, 1934. 

Increase in price of eight types of motors. 

May 3, 1934 Effective May 13, 1934. 

Prices on new type of motors. 

May 21, 1934 Effective May 31, 1934. 

Discontinuance of several motors in various motor types. 

June 9, 1934 Effective June 14, 1934. 

Coincident Revision 
Establishment of wholesale distributor discount 20-42$ maximum to 

meet #13 Company Filing Effective May 28th 1934, 

andir # 34 Company Piling Effective June 14, 1934. 

June 15, 1934 - Effective June 25,1934. 

Change in customer classification. 
Class B 10$ or assigned multiplier. 

July 12, 1934 Effective July 23, 1934. 

Increase in price of four motors from approximately 12$ to 30$. 

July 18, 1334 Effective July 18, 1934. 

Revision of filing .-....■ Effective June 14th. 

Striking out word "maximum" to make discount to wholesale distributor 
definite and inflexible. 

9822 



-416- 



July 26, 1934 Effective August 6, 1934, 

Educational institutions given 25$. 

September 14, 1934 Effective September 14, 1934 

Coincident Revision to meet #8 Company' e Filing. 
Change in price of eight motors from price filing effective May 31st, 
(approximately 10$ reduction.) 

October 19, 1934 Effective October 29, 1934, 

Approximately 10$ reduction on eight motors. 

November 19, 1934 Effective November 29, 1934. 

Initiating. Revision. 
Definition of classification of customers. Note 6.' 
Discount to classification of. customers. Note 5, 
Multiplier List, 

January 26, 1935 Effective February 5, 1935, 

Electrical Modifications, 
Multiplier list, 

January 31, 1935 Effective February 11, 1935, 

Wholesale distributor discount withdrawn. 



9822 



_4i 



company ^ 35 

February 12, 1934 Effective February 13, 1934. ■ 

6riginal Filing 

Definition of customer classification. Note II 
Discount t~> customer classification. Note I 
Discount to Class D based on annual purchases.' Note 7 

Terms: Net 50 days. 

Discounts to Educational institutions - 25;. . - -' 

Classes B, C, and & multipliers. 

Electrical and Mechanical Modifications. . . ■ ■ ' ' 

Motor Prices (Snail line.) 

10$j discount to all classes based on unit shipment of 10 or 

more motors. 

Class G discount. : T ote 3 . .. ..-'■'' 

Delivery Policy - f . o. b. factory freight allowed to destination. 

August 15, 1934 Effective August 23, 1934. 

Clrss & given 25$ discount - special multipliers to Class »&' withdrawn. 
Class given 25$o discount - special multipliers to Class G withdrawn. 

November 5, 1934 Effective November 5, 1934. ' 

Coincident Revision to meet #15 Company's filing. 
Discounts to customer- classification. Note 5, 
Definition of purchaser classification. Note 6. 

November 5, 1934. .- Effective November 15, 1934. 

Multiplier list, classes 3 & C. 

.COMPANY #26 

January 29, 1954 Effective January 29, 1934 

Original Filing 
Discount to customer classification. 

20p to all cla.sses 

10$ discount for unit shipment of 10 or more motors. 

Quantity discounts to all classes of purchasers. Note 3. ' 
Terms: 3C days net. 

Delivery Policy - f. o.b. factory freight allowed to destination. 
Mechanical and Electrical Modifications. 
Motor Prices (medium. line) 
Motor Specifications 

March 19, 1954 Effective March 19, 1934 

Coincident revision to meet #15 Company's Filing. 
Discounts to Class G purchasers. Note 4. 

March 19, 1934 Effective March 29, 1934 

Multiplier list. 

Specific discounts to specific companies on purchase of specified 

motors. 

Approximately 5$ reduction in four motors. 

April 2, 1934 Effective April 12, 1934 

9322 



-41 8- 



Multiplier list. 

May , 1934 Effective May 14, 19.34 

Discount schedule to dealers and contributors. 

Dealers 45$ 

Jobbers and distributors on the following motors: 

Short hour, split phase, induction, single phase - AC motors 51. 35$. 

All other fractional HP motors 47. 75p. 
Delivery Policy f. o.b. factory or warehousing points. 

May 31, 1954 Effective June 11, 1934. 

Discount to dealers and distributors r 

All dealers - 45$ 

All jobbers - 53.6$- superseding filing effective May 14, 1934. 

June 6, 1934 Effective June 16, 1934 

Change in motor prices - 

Downward revision approximately 10$. 

June 22, 1934 Effective July 2, 1934 

Addition to multiplier list - one company 

July 23, 1934 Effective August 7, 1934. 

Approximately 10$ reduction in prices of one type of motor. 

September 4, 1934 Effective September 11, 1934. 

Initiating Revision ... 

Change in motor prices - one type of motor. 

General downward revision of approximately 10$ with some slight 
upward revision on specific motors. 

September 13, 1934 Effective September 24,1934.. 

Addition in price of two motors to filing effective June 16, 1934. 

Filed November 23, '1934 Effective December 8, 1934. 

Revision of price of two types of motors' from filing effective 

June 16, 1934. 
(l) Increase approximately 5$ (2) decrease approximately 12$. 

December 6, 1934........ Effective December 17,. 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Electrical and Mechanical Modifications. 

January 18, 1934 Effective January 28, 1935. 

Increase in prices of two motors approximately 12^, over prices 
effective. December 8, 1934. 

COMPANY #27 

January 29, 1954 Effective January 29. 1935. 

i Original Piling > 

Delivery Policy - f.o.b. factory, freight allowed to destination. 
Discount schedule to customer classification. Note 1, with the 
following exceptions: 

Class I - Distributors (duly appointed to act as distributors 
with commitment to maintain stock 25-10$, 
i. Class II - Distributors (appointed to act as distributor 
without committal to carry stock 2Q-1C° . 

9822 



-419- 



Arumal quantity discount to Class D customer. Note 7. 

Termor 50 days net. 

Multiplier list. 

.. tor Prices (extremely limited line). 

Mechanical modifications. 

April 2, 1934 Effective April 12, 1934. 

Initiating Revision. 
Discount to educational institutions - 25)o. 

August 20 , 1934 Effective August 30 , 1934. 

Initiating Revision. 
Addition of the following classification: 

ehinery agents, dealers in motor and/or generators and/or 
motor driven machinery discount - 20f/o. 
Terms of sale - 2f> 10 days net 30 days. If Federal, State or 
Municipal Governments in their requests for bids specify extended 
terms of payment, bid will comply with the terms specified in such 
requests. 

November 30, 1934 Effective December 10, 1934. 

Discount to educational institutions - 16$. 

COmPAIIY 7^23 

January 29, 1934 Effective January 29, 1934. 

Original Filing. 
Classification of customer discount. Note 1, except Cla.sses 
C & II receive 17 -.-. 
Educational institutions - 25,i. 
Terms: Het 30 days. 

Delivery Policy - -f.o.b. factory, freight allowed to destination. 
Definition of classification of customers. Note 2. 
Cla.ss C- quantity discount. Note 3. 

Class C- multiplier list - specific discounts on specified motors 
to specific Cla.ss G companies. 
Classes B £ C multiplier list. 
Motor prices (complete line). 
Electrical and mechanical modifications. 

March 5, 1934 Effective March 15, 1934. 

Class G multiplier and specific discount:.; on specified motors to 

specific Class G purchasers. 

Classes B d C multipliers. 

Approximately 10$ upward revision of four motor prfces. 

March 19, 1934 Effective March 19, 1934 

Coincidental Revision 
(To meet -,-15- Company) 
Discount to Class G manufacturers (comparable to Note 4). 
Discount is as follows: 

Less than $900. 00 as: igned multiplier 

(.900. 00 or more assigned multiplier plus 11$. 

•,>2700.00 or more assigned multiplier plus 22$. 

$27 . - or more assigned multiplier plus 28$. 

$14,400 or more assignee- multiplier plus 36$. 

9822 



-420- 



Multipliers for Class G manufacturers. 

From 5 to 20^ increase in p few motor prices. 

March 23, 1934 Effective April 2, 1934. 

Prom approximately lCp to 20p increase in four types of motors, 
anc. from 5 to lOp decrease in price of four types of motors. 

March 29 , 1934 ■ Effective April 9, 1934. 

10)j reduction in three types of motors. 10fj increase in two 
types of motors. 



c . 



March 30, 1934. ; Effective April 9, 1934. 

Approximately 5fj to lCp reduction, in three types of motor 
Approximately 15^ increase in one type of motor. 

April 50 , 1934 Effective May 10, 1934. 

©ne change each in definition of, Classes A £ B customer cl as sifi cation, 
One addition to Class multipliers. 

June 7, 1934 Effective June 13, 1954 

Motor dimension sheets. 



COMPANY #28 

August 24, 1934 Effective September 6,' 1934. 

(Filing date effective September 6th). 
Approximately 12p reduction on three motor prices. 

September 17, 1934 Effective September 27, 1934. 

Multiplier list. 

Wholesale distributor discount 20 and 42p. ' ' ' 

September 24, 1934 Effective October 4, 1934. 

Addition of one name to multiplier list. 

November 1, 1934 Effective November 12, 1934. 

(Date effective November 12th). 
Classification of customer discount. Note 5. 
Difinition of classification of customers. Note 6. 

November 12, 1934 Effective November 22, 1934. 

Classes B & C multiplier list. 

January 16, 1935 Effective January 26, 1935. 

Cancelation of wholesale distributors discount. 

February 20, 1935 Effective March 2, 1933. 

Class 3 multiplier list. 



COaiPANY -'^29 
January 29, 1934 ~ .1 1 ec tfvcH) i huary 29 , 1934.. 

Original Filing. 
9822 



-421- 

Motor Prices (extremely limited line). 
Discounts : 

Users Lint. 

Dealers 17,,. 

Manufacturers. . . . 20' . 
Terms: Net 30 days. 

March 12, 1934 Effective March 12, 1934. 

Mechanical modifications 

June IS, 1954 Effective June 28, 1934. 

Terms: Net 30 days. 

Discount to customer classification. Note 1, except Class C - 17$ 

approved large resale manufacturers - 24 ( ; j. Special distributors 

24- 1C . • 

Educational institutions - 25$. 

February 9, 1935 Effective February 19, 1935. 

Terms: Vp 1( cays net 30 days. 

Discount to customer classificrtion. Note 5, except Class C- 25S, 

Class H 20fj 

Class C 200 

Class D 17S and 100. 
Quantity ciscount to Glass G on specific motors to be shipped wi th- 
in 90 days. 

$l t 000 -50 

(.2,500 -7^-0 

05,000 -100. 



9822 



_422— 



COMPANY #30 



January 29, 1934 Effective January 29, 1934. 

Original Filing 
Classification of customers discount. Note 1. 
In addition users of $50,000 or mor = annually 1T> * 15%. 
Educational institutions 10%. 

Quantity discount to Class G- purchasers. Note ?_,. 
Terms! Net 30 days. 

10% discount for unit shipments of 10 or mor° motors. 
Motor prices ( complete line). 
Electrical and mechanical modifications. 

February 28, 1934 Effective January 29, 1934. 

B, C, and G multiplier list. 

Specific discounts on specified motors to specific Class G customers. 

March 7, 1934 Effective March 17, 1934. 

Additional motor prices. 

April 2, 1934 .• Effective Anril 12, 1934. 

Delivery Policy - f.o.b. factory, freight allowed to destination. 

Class G discount. Note 4. 

Multiplier list. 

Motor prices - approximately 10^ increase in price of considerable 

number of motors. Majority of motors remain at original price. 

Very fev motors d°creas°d in price approximately 5 ■•>. 

April 7, 1934 Effective April 17, 1934. 

Electrical and Mechanical modifications. 



CO MPANY # 31 

January 31, 1934 Effective January 31, 1934. 

Original Filing 
Motor prices (small line). 
Discount to customer classification. 

Classes A & B list to 15% 

d 



Class C 20% 

Class D 25% 



Distributors 30% 

Class E 20% 

Class F 20% 

Class G 

Unit Shipments ) Annual 

or ) or 
Release ) Volume 

Less than - 10 Less than $5,000 - 25% 

10 - 49 $5,000 - $20,000-28% 

50 - 199 $^0,000 - $75,000-32% 

0v«r - 199 Ov-r - $75,000-36% 



9622 



-423- 

COIPANY #31 (Continued) 

Terms: 2$ 10 days net 30 days. 

Delivery Policy - fr°ight allowed to destination-. 

Discount schedule on four s-oecific motors, lots 

10-99 - 1C$ 
100-499 - 14''- . . 
5X1-999 - 16 l 1 
1,000- - 18$ 
Electrical and mechanical modifications. 

June 12, 193-1 Effpctive June 14, 1934. 

Coincident Revision 
(To m^et Company #13 & Company #34) 
Statement that "in order to m°et competition **** a maximum 
discount of 20-42$ on fractional HP. motors for resale." 

January 22, 1935 . .- Ef f^ctive February 1, 1935. 

Initiating Revision. 
Customer classification discount. 

Classification A and B 15$ 

Industrial Buyer 20$ 

Class C 25$ 

Class F 25$ 

Class D .28$ 

Machinery mfgrs 34$ (Class G-) 

Distributors 34$ and 15$ ... 

Educ. Institutions ........ 25$ 

Additional discounts to Class S: 

Lots 10-24 3$..... 

25-49 within 90 days 5$ 

. 50-99 within 90 days 8$ 

100-399 within 90 days 10$ 

Over 400 within 90 days 15$ . 

Extra discount on one class of motor for all classes of customers except- 
ing distributors wh<=n purchas°d in lots of 10 or more, 5$. 
Extra discount on one Class of motor for all classes of purchasers 
"hen purchased in lots of 10 or mor^, 10$. 

Terms - Net 30 Days. 

COMPANY #32 

January 29, 1934 Effective January 29, 1934. 

Original Filing. 
Definition of Customer Classification. Note 2. 
Discounts to customer classifications. Note 1. 
Educational institutions, 10$. 

10/o discount allowed on unit purchases of 10 or mor° motors. 
Terms: 30 days net. 

Delivery policy - f.o.b. factory, frei^it allowed to destination. 
Class G- discount. Note 3. 



9822 



-424- 



0OMPJJ3Y #33 (continued) 

Cl3.ss G miltinlier list. Specific discount on sr> a cifi D d motors 

for specific ccnomi^s. 

Electrical and Mechanical modif ications. 

Motor nrices (extremely small line) 



March 31, 193 ' Effective A^ril 10, 1934. 

Ojonatity discounts to all classes. 



Shim ing 

Re qui reaent s 



Quantity or list 
Value of moto rs 
1-6 
7-15 
16-25 
26-50 
51-150 
] 51-300 
301-500 
501-750 
751-1000 
1001-3000 . 
3001-5000 
5001-Upwprds 
Terms 2$ 10 days net 30 days, 
E] ectrical and Mechanical modifications. 
Motor -prices. 









Unit 


Slirorn^nt 








11 


it 




90 


Days 


„ 


11 


n 


Of 10 - 


1! 


11 


— 


11 


it 


" to - 


1! 


11 


— 


11 


11 _ 


" 25 - 


It 


11 


_ 


11 


11 _ 


n 2B - 


II 


H 


_ 


11 


11 _ 


" 50 - 


II 


11 


— 


11 


11 _ 


" 100' - 


11 


11 


— 


11 


11 _ 


"100 - 


H 


11 


- 


11 


11 


"160'- 


II 


11 


— 


11 


11 _ 


"100 - 


II 


11 


— 


11 


n _ 


"100 - 



Maximum 
Diso<-aint 
2C$ 
35?o 
38^ 
39^ 
40$ 
44$ 
471 
50 C S 
52$ 



54' 
56$ 



57 



■d 



May 24, 1934 Effective June 4, 1934 

Corr°6tion of -orice sheet filed March 31st. 



July 3, 1954 !...... Effective July 13, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Discount: Jobbers, distributors and driers 53-6/10$.' 

January 30, 1935 , . Effective February 9, 1935. 

Motor specifications,... 

Electrical and Mechanical modifications. 



COI JPAFY #53 

February 12, 1934 Effective February 12, 1934. 

Original Piling 
Classification of customers discount. Note 1. 
Terms! l T °t 30 days. 

Class D annual quantity discount. Note 7. 

Delivery Policy - f.o.b. factory, freight allowed to destination. 
Definition of Customer Classifications. Note 2. 
Educational institution discount - 25$. 
Classes j^'jC, and C- multiplier list. 
Motor prices (limited line). 

July 20 , . 1954 ' Effective July 30, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Classes 3, C, and G multiplier list. 



9822 



-425- 

COMPANY #33 (continued) 

November 5, 1934 Effective November 5, 1934* 

Coincident Revision. 
(To meet Comoany #15 Filing). 
Customer classification discount. Note 5. 
Definition of customer classification. Note 6. 

COMPANY #34 

January 29, 1934 . Effective January. 29, 1934. 

Original Filing 
Motor prices (complete line). 
Motor dimensions. 

Electrical and Mechanical modifications. 
Discount to classification of customer. Note, except 

(1) Class C discount not given 

(2) Class H discount - 17$. 

10$ discount for $3,000 or more list value for shipment in 90 

days from date of order. 

Class D annual quantity discount. Note 7. 

Delivery policy - f.o.b. factory, freight allowed to destination. 

Terms** 30 days net. , . . , , . . . ... 

Class G- quantity discount. Note 3. 

Specific discounts on specified motors to soecific Class G- purchasers. 

February G, 1934 Effective Date Not Given. 

Multiplier list. 

March 17, 1934 Effective March 19, 1934. 

Coincident Revision 
(To meet #15- Company) 
Classification of customers discounts. Note 1, except Class C 
ommitted. 

Educational institution discount - 25$. 

Withdrawal of specific discount on specified. motors to specific 
Class G customers. 
Change in multiplier list. 
Class G quantity discount. Note 4, 
General price increase from 5 to 15$ in most motors. 

March 28, 1934 Effective March 28, 1934. 

Coincident Revision 
(To meet #15- COMPANY) 
Multiplier list (dated March 19th). 

April 16, 1934 . Effective Aoril 26, 1934. 

Definition of customer classification. Note 2. 

5 to 10$ increase in -orices of one type of motors from 

filing effective March 19th. 

Electrical and Mechanical modifications. 



9822 



-42S- 



v 



COMPANY #34 (continued) 

May 5, 1934 >..';. i ....... . Effective May 15, 1934. 

One change > 
definitions. 



One change each in Class; 3 and Class G' customer classification 



May 81, 1934 Effective May 31, 1934. 

Three additions to multiplier list. 
Prices on t'-'O new types of motors. 

June 4, 1934 Effective June 14, 1934 

Wholesale distributor given discount 20 and 42$ •(•filing to me<=t 
#l3-C0ivi£AMY' . 

June 13, 1934 Effective June 23, 1934. 

Prices on one new type of motor. 

July 2, 1934 . ..,.". Effective July 12, 1934 

Initiating Revision. 
Prices on one ne-^ type of motor. 

September 17, 1934 Effective September 27, 1934. 

Addition to multiplier list. 

October 18, 1934 Effective October 28, 1934. 

Slight change in motor trices. Some motors aooroximately 10$ 
downward, some motors arroroximately 10$ upward (scattering). 

November 5, 1934 ...................... Effective November 5, 1934. 

Coincident Revision 
(To meet JpLS-COMFAkY* . 

Classification of customer discount... . . Nate. 5. 

Definition' of classification of customers. Note 6. 

December 26, 1934 ....... Effective January 5, 1935. 

Classes B, C, and G multiplier list. 

February 19, 1934 Effective March 1, 1935. 

Supplementary list classes 3 & C multipliers. 



. , . COMPANY #35 

\ 

January 29, 1934 .... Effective January 29, 1934. 

Original Filing." 
Delivery Policy - f.o.b. factory, freight allowed: Ho destination. 
Terms! 30 days net. 

Customer classification discount.. . . Note -l. 

Educational institutions discount - 25-t. - 

10$ discount on unit shipments of 10 or more motors. ,/ 

Class G quantity discount. Note 4, (applies to all 1 purchasers) . 

Motor prices. 

Electrical and Mechanical modifications. 

9822 



-127- 

C01IPMY #55 (continued ) 
B, C, and G- mu" 1 t rollers. 

July 5, 1934 Effective July 15, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Terms J \$ 10 days net 30 days. 

December 5, 1934 Effective December 15, 1934. 

Initiating Revision. 
Discount to customer classification. Hote 5. 
Classes B and C multiplier list. 

December 28, .1934 . . Effective January 7, 1935. 

SuTTDlementary multiplier list Classes B and C. 

February 6, 1935 Effective February 16, 1935. 

Initiating Revision. 
Slight increase (ao-oroximately 8$) in some motor prices. 
Motor specifications. . 

Electrical and Mechanical modifications. 
Classes 3 and C multiplier list. 



3822 






ccrpA'Y #36 

January 29, 1934 i . Sf f ectiye January 29, 1934. 

Original Filing, 
iiotor orices (very limited line). 
Discount to customer classification. Note 1. 
10fo discount Tor unit siiiunent of 10- or more motors. 
Terms: Net 30 days. 

Delivery Policy - f.o.b. factory, freight allowed to destination 
Definition of customer classification, Note 2. 

Discount to dealers based dri "annual auantitv purchasers. Note 3. 
B, C, and G multiplier list. 
Electrical and 'iechanicel modifications.' 
Discount to Class D - Tote 7. 

Aoril' 5, 1934 Eff ectiv • Aoril 15, 1934. 

Discount to educational institution.,. 25$. 

Class G- auantity discount. ' Tote 4. .'."'.' 

fulti-olier list. 

Slight increase in some raotor trices a-moroninately 10 f '-. 

Aoril 25, 1934..'. Effective Nay. 5, 1934. 

fulti-olier list. 

Aoril 30, 1934 Effective fay 10, 1934. 

Electrical and Mechanical modifications. 

July 13, 1S3 1 Effective July 28, 1934. 

iiotor specifications. 

August 13, 1934 Effective August 23, 1934. 

Tvo changes in multinlier list. 

August 30, 1224 Effective September 10, 1934. 

iiecimnical modifications. 

November 2, 1934 Effective November 5, 1934. 

Coincident Revision 
(To meet COMPANY #15) 
Discount to custom -r classification. Note 5. 
Definition of customer classification. Note 6. 

January 24, 1S35 Effective February 2, 1935. 

Very slight increas-. in some motor orices. 
Electrical and Mechanical L'of if ications. 



COMPANY #37 

January 29 , 1934 Effective January 23 , 1934. 

Original Filing. 
Iiotor unices. 

Electrical and Mechanical modifications. 
Discount to Customer Classification. Note 1. 
Definition of custon^r classification. ' r ote 2. 
Class G- quantity discount. Note 3. 

9822 



-429- 

COMPANY #37 (con t i nued) 
Delivery Policy - f.o.b. factory, frei p:t a l. l.o , ' r '.;d to destination. 

Terms: 30 days net. 

Classes B, C, and D multiplier list. 

Discount 10$ for unit shi-onent of 10 or mor; motors. 

March 8, 1934 Effective March 19, 1934. 

Electrical and Mechanical modi ficat ions. 

April 18, 1934 Effective April' 28, 1934. 

Classes B, C, and G multrolier list. 

Class G quantity discount. Note 4. 

One type of motor approximately 10$ increase - one tyoe of motor 

"between approximately 5 end 10$ decrease. 

One tyoe of motor between 10 and 33 l/3$ increase. - 

November 22, 1934 Effective November 26, 1934. 

Coincident Revision. 
(To meet Company #43) 
Discount to customer classification. Note' 5'. ' ' 
Definition of customer classification. Note .6. 
Classes B and C multrolier list. 



cq;.:pa:.'y #38 

January 29 , 1934 Effective January 29 , 1934. 

Original Piling. 
Terms: Net 30 days. 

Deliverer Policy - machinery manufacturers f.o.b. freight allowed 
to destination, all others f.o.b. factory. 
Classification to customer discount. 
Machinery manufacturers dealers 16$. 

Machinery manufacturers branch,, distributors, ice cream conroany 25$. 
Machinery manufacturer assigned multrolier and earned quantity 
discounts. 

Discounts to Machinery Manufacturers 0nl' r . 
10$ for unit shipment' of 10 or more motors. 

Annual quantity discount on l/6, l/5, l/4 HP. standard motors 
or single suecific size standard or special motors. 
Yearly 
Quantity Purchased Discounts 

2,500 3$ 

5,000 ■ '3$ • ■ 

7 , 500 8$ 

15,000 9$ 

25,000 ' K)$ • ■ ■ 

35,000 • ''11$ 

50,000 r 12$ 

75,000 1*3$ • 

100,000 
Quantity discount to machinery manufacturers, rote 3. 

Motor prices. 

Electrical and Mechanical modifications. 

February 9, 1934 Effective February 19, 1934. 

Machinery Manufacturers multrolier list. 

9822 



-430- 



COiJAliY #58 (continued) 
Specific discount on specified motors to specific machinery 

manufacturers. 

February 21, 1934 Effective March 3, 1934. 

Three changes or additions to multiplier list and additional 
discounts filed effective February 19, 1934. 

March 16, 1934 Effective March 19, 1934. 

Coincident Revision 
(To meet Company #15) 
Delivery Policy - f ,cb. factory, freight allowed to destination, 
all classes. 

Class G quantity .discount. Note 4. 
Machinery manufacturers multiplier list. 

Slight increase in some types of motors ~ slight decrease in 
other types of motors. (Variations both ways from 5 to 10$). 

April 13, 1934 '. Effective April 23, 1934. 

Prices of new motors. 

Electrical and Mechanical modifications. 

May 16, 1934 Effective May 26, 1934. 

Classification of customers discount schedule. 

Classes A and B list. 

Classes E and F 10$. 

Resale machinery manufacturers dealers, ice cream and beverage 

manufacturers and distributors, Public Utilities and Central 

Stations - 16$ 

Manufacturers, branches and distributors - 25$. 

Class G- assigned multiplier plus dollar volume discounts. 

Educational institution - 25$. 

10% discount on unit shipments amounting to $150.00. 

Electrical and Mechanical modifications. 

June 25, 1934 Effective July '5, 1934. 

Change in one multiplier. 

July 10, 1954 Effective July 13, 1934. 

Change in one multiplier to meet Company #15' s competition. 

August 20, 1934 Effective August 30, 1934. 

Change in one multiplier. 

September 15, 1934 Effective September 25, 1934. 

Electrical and Mechanical modifications. 

September 18, 1934 Effective September 28, 1934. 

Four additional multipliers to meet Comnany #13. 

November 7, 1934 Effective November 17, 1934. 

Addition to one multiplier. 



9822 



L31- 



COMPAHY #38 (continued) 

November 21, 1934 Effective December 1, 1934. 

Discount to customer classifications. 
Cl?ss A same as Note 5. 



Class B 16? 







Class E 17$ 

Class F 16$ 

Class C 17$ 

Class G 30$ or assigned multiplier "olus dollar 

volume order discounts. 

Resale machinery manufacturers, dealers, ice cream and beverage 

manufacturers and dealers 17$. 

Educational institutions 16$ 

Resale machinery manufacturers branches and distributors.. .. .25$. 
Additional motor prices - one type of motor. 
Addition of -orices of two motors. 

COMPANY #39 

February 2, 1934 Effective February 2, 1934. 

Original Filing. 

Definition of Customer Classification. Note, 2, 

Terms: 30 days net. 

Discount to classification of customers. Note 1. 

Class D annual quantity discount. Note 7. 

Discount to educational institutions 25$. 

10*3 discount for unit shipment' of 10 or more motors. 

Discount to Class G customers, based on shipping, requirements 

and quantity. Note 3. 

Classes B, C and G multipliers. 

Delivery Policy - f .o.b. factory, freight allowed to destination. 

Motor prices (limited line). 

Electrical and Mechanical modifications. 

March 21, 1934 ..... .Effective Marcn 19, 1934. 

(To. meet Coxoany #15). ^ 

10$ discount for unit shi-oments amounting to $150.00 or r. ore. 
Class G quantity discount based on shipping require' ents. Note 4. 
Approximately 10$ increase in motor -orices. 

April 13, 1934 Effective April 23, 1934. 

One charge each in Class A and Class 3 definition of customer 
classification. 

hay 10, 1934 Effective May 21 , 1934. 

■Where Federal, State and Municipal' Governments in request for bids 
specify terms of payment other than net 30 days, terms of payment 
will be in accordance with such customer specifications. 

May 16, 1934 Effective May 26, 1934. 

Classes B, C, and G multipliers. 



9822 



-432- 



COLPAl-T #39 ( continued) 

May 26, 1934 ' Effective Juns 5, 1934'. 

Changes and additions in multi-olier list,' effective May 26th. 

June 25, 1934 Effective July 5, 1934. 

Addition of one com-oany to multiplier lint. 

October 1, 1934 Effective October 11/ 1934.' " ' 

Changes and additions to Multiplier list. ■ " ■ 

ITovember 5, 1S34 Effective Hovenber 15, 1934. 

Definition of customer classification. Note S. 
Discount to customer classification, Note 5. 
Multiplier list. 

llovember 19, 1934 Effective November 29, 1934. 

Complete multi-oiler list. 

December 20, 1934 Effective December 31, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Multiplier list, 

January IS, 1935 Effective January 26, 1935. 

Classes 3 and C multixilier list. 



• C0LPArY'#40 - 

February 13, 1934 Effective February '13, 1934. 

Original Filing. 

Discounts: 

Deal er 25$ 

Under contract 30$ 

Resale manufacturer, lots one 

to nine 30$ 

lots 10 to 100 35$'' 

Distributor ,' 35$ 

Delivery Policy - f.o.b. factory. 

Mechanical -no'dif i cations. 

Motor prices. 

L'otor specifications. 



June 27, 1934 Effective July 7, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Wholesale distributor discount 35 and 20$. 
Resale manufacturers quantity discount 25 motors' or more" 
shi-oment in one month 35$ ant? 10$. 



9822 



-432- 

COi.IPANY #41 

January 29 , 1934 3f f 3C t ive Janua ry 29 , 1934 . 

Original Filing. 
Discount to Cus toner Classifications..' Nots 1. 
Discount to Class D customer. Note 7. 
Terms: 30 days not. .... 

Definition of classification of customers, llote 2. 
Delivery Policy - f.o.b. factory, freight allowed to destination. 

Discount to educational institutions 25%. 

Classes B, C, and G multiplier list. 

10'1 discount for unit shipment of 10 or more motors. 

Class G quantity discount based on shipping requirements. Note 3. 

Special discount on specified motor to s-oecific Class G customers. 

Motor prices, (complete line). ■ 

Electrical and Mechanical modifications. 

February 6, 1954 Effective February 6, 1934. 

(Authorized ~t>y Supervisory Agency). 
Two changes in special discounts on specified motors to specific 

Class G customers. 

S-oecial net -orice on one motor to one Class G customer. 

March 19, 1934... affective March 19, 1934 

(To meet Company #15). 
Classes B, C, and G multiplier list. 

10$ discount on unit shipments amounting to not less than $150.00. 
Quantity discount to Class G customers, based on shipping 
requirements. Note 4. 

General increase in motor prices approximately 10%. 
Mechanical and Electrical modifications. 

April 9, 1934 Effective' April 19, 1934. 

Motor prices on t^o nen t;yo.es of motors. 

June 11, 1934 Effective June 20, 1934. 

Initiating Revision 
Filed effective June 20th. 

Three corrections of motor urices filed effective March 19th. 
Class G mult vol ier list. 
Electrical and Mechanical modifications. 

June 13, 1934 ..Effective June 25, 1934. 

Filed effective June 25th. 

Reduction in prices of t r_ o motors approximately 5%. 

August 29, 1934 Effective August 30, 1934. 

Coincident Revision. . 

(To meet Company #10 ) 
Class G multiplier list. 

November 2, 1954 Effective llovember 5, 1934. 

Coincident- Revision . 
(To meet Company #15) 

9822 



-434- 

COMPANY #41 (continued) 
Classification of customer discount. Note 5. 
Definition of customer classification. Note 6. 
Classes B and C multiplier list'.' ' ■ . 

February 8, 1935 Effective February 18, 1935. 

Class 3 multiplier list. 



.... COMPANY #42 

April 6, 1954 Effective April 6, 1934. 

Original Piling. 
Discount to Customer Classification. Note 1. 

Discount to sducational institution 25$. 

Terms: 2$ 10 days from date of shipment net 30 days. 

Deliver Policy - f.o.b. factory, freight allowed to destination. 

Ho tor prices. 

November 10, 1934 .Effective November 20, 1934. 

Discount to Customer Classification. Note 5. 

February 25, 1935 Effective March 7, 1935. 

Approximately 10$ reduction on prices of si:-: motors. 

Prices on four new types of motors. . . 

Electrical end Mechanical modifications. 



COMPANY #4-5 

January 29, 1934 Effective January 29, 1S3* . 

Original Piling. 

Discount to educational institution 25$. 

Discount to customer classification.' ' Hote* 1. 

Terms: Net 30 days. .-^y 

Delivery Policy - f.o.b. factory, freight allowed to destination. 

Definition of classification of purchasers. - Note 2. 

Annual quantity discount to Class D. Note 7 

lO^o discount for unit shipment of 10 or more motors. 

Discount to Class G- purchases based on shipping requirements 

and quantity. Note 3. 

Classes B, C, and G multiplier list. 

Additional discounts on specified motors to specific Class G purchasers. 

Electrical and Mechanical modifications. 

Motor 'prices (complete line.) ' 

February 6, 1954 Effective February 6, 1934. 

(Authorized by Supervisory Agency) 
Additional discounts on specified motors to two specific Class G 
customers. 

March 17, 1934 Effective 'March 19, 1934. 

Coincident Revision. 
(To meet Company #15)' 

. /'. , • 

9822 



-435- 

COhP-a-.h -'■- ' : • (continued) 
1055 discount for unit shroments :>f &150.00 or ",nv. 
Discount to C1<?fs G customers based on shipoin ■; reauirenenfcfe and 
quantity. Note 4. 

Classes 3, C, and S nrulti-oli r list. 
Electrical and Llechanical modifications. 
hotor urices - e; aerally up .approximately 10$. 

• 1, 1934 Effective Hay 10, 1934. 

Where ?edera! : , State, pry" 5 i.ur.icroal Governments in their requests for 

"bids specify terns of oayment other t'ir;i net 30 days terns '-ill 

be intended in accordaii.ee "dth ruch specifications. 

Three changes in definition of classification of customers. 

hey 4, 1934 Effective ha.y 14, 1934. 

Addition of 0; s multiplier. 
i le c. Lani cal modif i cat i 6ns • 

hay 31, 1934 Effective Junes 11, 1934. 

Addition of one Class G- multiplier. 

July 2 , 1934 Effective July 2 , 1934. 

(Dated Effective July 2 to 13 t Company #15). 
Prices cf one ne v type of notor. 

July 20, 1934 Effective July 30, 1934. 

Addition of t'-o Class G- nulti-oliars. 

September 12, 1934 Effective September 14, 1934. 

hotor -orices - to meet orices file! by Co-raany #8. 

September 7, 1934 '..Effective September 17,1934. 

Addition of one Class G- multiplii r. 

November 16, 1934 Effective hovenber 26, 1934. 

Discount to customer classification. Ihote 5. 
Definition of classification of customers . Fote 5. 
Classes B, C, end G- raultroli'er list. 

hovember 21, 1934..- Effective Decenber 3, 1934. 

Additional motor prices - one t-.T>e of motor. 



9822 



-436- 



1T0TE I 



Class A-Users Published Price 

Class B-Users 10$ 

Class C-Central Stations and Central Station 
Holding Companies 

Without Agreenent 10$ 

With Agreement 16$ 

Class E-xiesale Eealers with Agreement 

200 hp. and smaller, including 

fractional horsepower sizes. 17$ 

Class E-?Lesale Purchasers (Not otherwise classified) 10$ 

Class F-Federal, State and Municipal Governments 10$ 

Class G— Machinery Manufacturers 

When purchasing for resale as a part ■ of , ■ ■ ' 
or with, the product which they manufac- 
ture. 

Without Agreement 10$ 

With Agreement (*) ■ • ■ 20$ " 

Class H-Machinery Dealers (Machinery Manufacturers' 

Agents) 

When purchasing for resale as a part of, 
or with the product for which they are 
selling representatives. ....•■■ 
Without Agreement 10$ 

With Agreement 16$ 



: ) When purchasing to he used Dy themselves in' the manufacture 
of the motor-driven product referred to in their agreement 
(or its parts, for example, castings) .... • 10$ 



9822 



-437- 



NOTE 2 



PURC HASZ R C LAS S I IU C A^ I 0:. I 

Class A Users are those whose power requirements are limited, or whose 
"business is merely local in scope, or who purchase power as an incidental 
adjunct of their husiness, such as: (This is of necessit" only a partial 
list and is intended as illustrative only.) 



Amusement Parks 
Apartment Houses 
Automobile Repair. Shops 

Bakeries 
Beverage Mfgrs. 
Brick & Tile Mfgrs. 
Butcher Supply Mfgrs. 

Cleaning <3= Dyeing Shops 

Clothing & '/earing Apparel Mfgrs. 

Clubs 

Coal & "cod Yards 

Creameries 

Dental & Barber Supply Mfgrs • 

Drug, Perfume & Cosmetic Mfgrs. 

Extract Mfgrs. 

Flour Mills 
Furnace Mfgrs. 
Furniture Mfgrs. 

Garage s 
Glove Mfgrs. 
Grain Elevators 



Hat Mfgrs. 

Hospitals 

Hotels 

Ice Cream or Candy Makers 
Illuminating Gas Companies 

Jewelry Mfgrs. 

Laundries 

Machine & Similar Job Shops 

Match Mfgrs . 

Miscellaneous Jobbing Shops 

newspaper & Job Printers 

Office Buildings 

Optical Instrument Mfgrs. 

Paint & Varnish Mfgrs. 

Refrigerator Box Mfgrs. 
Restaurants 

Shoe Repair Sho'os 

Theatres 



Woodworking U Pattern Shops 

Class B Users are those doing an interstate business in one of the exten- 
sively motorized industries specifically listed below, and, in addition, 
purchasing motors 200 hp« (synchronous motors based on 1.0 p-f.) and smaller, 
and controllers from the comoany at an average rate over a three-year period 
of $2000 or more annually. Furthermore, to qualify in this class, the 
industry must be the predominating part of the business of the purchaser 
under consideration. For example, the predominating business of a comoany 
might be paints but the same company might also manufacture chemicals from 
which the paints are made. Such a company would not qualify under Class B 
merely because of its incidental manufacture of chemicals since the predom- 
inating business is manufacturing paints. Users engaged in industries not 
specifically listed, automatically come within the "Class A User" designa- 
tion. Users engaged in industries listed below but who are classed as A 
Users because of previously 'our chasing in insufficient volume, will be class- 
ed as 3 when their purchases at one time aggregate $6000 or more book value. 



9822 



-438- 



( Note 2 Cont' d) 

Their Class 3 status will continue for si:: months to complete the original 
order, after which they will revert to their former A classification. 



Aircraft Hfgrs. 

(Building their Own Engines) 
Battery (Dry or Storage) 
Bearing (Ball or Roller) 
Breakfast Pood Cereals 
Camera 

Car (Electric or Steam R.R.) 
Cast-iron Pipe Ivifgrs. 

(Centrifugal or New. Process) 
Cement 
Chemical (Manufactured), excluding 

Cosmetics, Drugs, Extracts, 

Perfumes, end Salt 
Cigarette 
Coal Mining 
Coke 

Composition Roofing Material 
Cork Flooring 
Corn Syrup & Glucose 
Cotton Oil 
Engine 
Explosive 
Fertilizer 
Foundries ( Steel) 

Glass (Bottles, Lens, Plate or Sheet) 
Gyp sum 
Lime. 
Linoleum 

Locomotive ( Steam) 
Lumber Mills Producing from Logs or 

Cants 
Meat Packing 
Metal Mining 



Metal Rolling Mills, includ- 
ing '.Tire & Cable Hfgrs. 
Producing from Ingots 

Metal Smelting & Refining 
from the ore 

Motor Vehicle, including 
Axle, Bod-, Electric Starter, 
Engine, Frame, Rim, Tractor,' 
Transmission, or Wheel 

Paper, ".bod Pulp or Fiber 

Petroleum Producing, Refining, 
Gas Pipe Lines, and Oil Pipe 
Lines 

Radiators (Hot YTater &. Steam 
for Heating Systems) 

Railroad Refrigerator Trans- 
portation 

Railroads (Steam or Electric) 

Rock, Ore or Sla" 1 Crushing 
Plants, excluding Asbestos, 

' Gravel, Kaolin, or Mica, 
Plants 

Rubber ""ire £ Tube 

Saw (Power Driven) 

Ship Builders, excluding 
Pleasure Craft 

Shoe (Leather)' 

Soap 

Sugar Mills £ Refineries 
(Cane & Beet) 

Sulphur Mining ■ 

Textile (Cloth Teaving, 
Spinning, including Knitting 
Mills Doing lieir r /n Spin- 
ning); Finishing Plants in- 
cluding Bleaching, Dyeing 
& Printing; excluding Tex- 
tiles made from Asbestos 

Tin Can 

'Taterwheel 

A subsidiary company which is more than 50 per cent owned bv the parent 
company, may at the request of the parent company, purchase in its own 
name and receive the parent company's multiplier (and purchases of both 
will be combined as a basis for 3 qualification) provided the subsidiary 
meets one of the two following requirements.: 



1. Either a predominating part of the subsidiary company's 
business must be recognized by the trade as being in the 
identical specifically listed Class B industry in which 
the pa-rent comoany i: 



enga' pd: 



QOin 



-439- 

2. Or 50 per cent or more of the subsidiary's output must be 
utilized by the parent company and other subsidiaries regu- 
larly qualifying under (l). 

In these two cases it is not required that the subsidiary either 
purchase constantly and in substantial volume or do an interstate business. 

Subsidiaries of a Class A user are considered independently on their 
own merits, and those which qualify are classified as B. This does not 
affect the status of the parent company, which continues as Class A. 

Class C Purchasers a.re central stations and central station holding 
companies buying motors and/or controllers for resale to nonaffiliated 
companies. 

To qualify under Class C, a. central station, or a central station 
holding company, must sell over 50$ of the electric power it generates 
to companies (other than central stations) neither owned and controlled 
by it nor owning and controlling it. 

To qualify for a Central Station Motor Purchase Agreement, purchases 
mace by a central station of motors, and/or controllers, for resale to 

Les neither owned and controlled by it, nor owning and controlling 
it, mast represent a majority of all such purchases made. 

All subsidiary companies which are more than 50 per cent owned by 
the agraemeni: holder, and which are regularly engaged in the business of 

j. station -"electric lighting or distributing electric power for other 
purposes, may, at the request of the parent company, purchase in their own 
names and receive the parent company's multiplier. Industrial subsidia- 
ries are treated independently on their own merits as Cla.ss A or Class B, 
unless the subsidiary is over 50 per cent owned by the agreement holder 
and over 50 per cent of the' subsidiary' s output is utilized by the parent 
company and subsidiary central stations in which case the industrial sub- 
sidiary may purchase in its own name and receive the parent company's 
multiplier. 

Class D Purchasers are resale motor dealers holding agreements with the 
company . 

A company or individual in order to qualify as a motor dealer must have 
an established place of business with facilities suitable for the aggres- 
e exploitation of motors and/or controllers as a separate item of 

Companies that qualify under some other classification normall - -, 
:..- ■ be granted a dealer contract provided they have a separate electrical 
department for the independent sale of motors' and/or controllers to non- 
affiliated companies through which department it is readily possible to 
.segregate all purchases. 

Agreements are offered only to concerns willing to give efficient 
and preferential service in the sale of motors and controllers for the 
company. 

The number of dealers in a given territory should not be chosen 
according to the number of eligible companies, but with respect to the 

9322 



-440- 

( Note 2 cont'd ) 

available Class A "business „ This requires that the number of dealers 
be limited so 'that a division: of the available Class A business gives 
each dealer a profitable :',:lold cf exploitation. 

Class E are resale purchasers not otherwise c3.assified. 

This class includes general building contractors, heating and venti- 
lating contractors, plumbing contractors, contracting engineers, electri- 
cal dealers not under agreement and all other resale purchasers who merelj^ 
resell electrical apparatus and/or controllers as an adjunct to, or inci- 
dental to .j the sale of other products. 

Class F Users are Federal, State, and Municipal Governments. 

Class G- Purchasers are bona fide resale machinery manufacturers as 
defined below: 

A re rale machinery manufacturer is a producer from his owned or con- 
trolled patents or.- in accordance with his own developed and organized 
plan of a complete oower-driven product, to be equip;oec" by him with motors 
and/ or controllers, which machine^ or ao-nliance has a recognized identity 
and is acloiowledged by the trr.de as a distinct product which the purchaser 
under consideration sells under his own trade name as a complete electri- 
cally driven unit, of which the Class G purchaser is the primary source 
of supply. 

The m-incioles underlying the above definition contemplate that: 

1. The Company Who. develops the basic idea and sells the 
product to the trade is the real manufacturer. 

2. We use normal and not artificial trade channels. 

3. Established customers of our machinery manufacturers 
already determined are not to be removed from the field 
of profitable exploitation. 

4o Provided the other conditions are met, a company is not 
excluded from Class G by having parts of its machine of 
appliance manufactured tiy other companies. 

5. The purchaser under consideration is not required actually 
to manufacture the motor-driven part provided he would not 
normally sell, nor the user normally buy, his product 
without the motor-driven part being incorporated, and in 
adcLition, otherwise meets the requirements of the above 
do.':initiono 

The following examples are typical of cases where some part of the 
functioning mechanism is purchased from other manufacturers as a unit, 
which may be the only motor-driven part of the whole, such as a fan, 
pump, or compressor, but .nevertheless the final product is readily iden- 
tifiable as a separate and distinct machine: 

9822 



-441- 
(l iote 2 cont'd ) 

Vacuum cleaners, oil burners, paint-? spray machines, and gasoline- 
dispensing machines. 

Contractors, dealers, or agents who merely assemble and sell to the 
user, even though under their on tr- 1 ■'.< names, are Class H if authorized 
agents of machinery manufacturers; otherwise they are Class E. 

6. Resale agencies that are both owned and controlled by a 
resale machinery manufacturer having a Motor Purchase 
Agreement, may, at the request of the latter company, 
purchase in their o,wn name for resale with machinery 
manufactured by the, parent company and receive the 
parent company's multiplier, 

'".here the electricall 1 /' driven machinery is manufactured by a sub- 
sidiary having a separate corporate identity and the parent company other- 
wise qualifies under some other class, only purchases for resale with 
such machinery made in the name of, and billed to, the subsidiary would 
qualify under Class G. 

In any case of doubt, refer all facts to the General Office for 
ruling. Class G discounts must not be extended to so-called manufacturers, 
such as rebuilders of second-hand machinery, grain-elevator builders, 
tunnel builders, mill and factory builders, fabricating machine-shops 
and the like, although many such customers may have more or less frequent 
requirements for mechanical equipment requiring motor drive which is in- 
tended for resale, as the effect of this would be to remove prospective 
customers of resale machinery manufacturers from the field, of profitable 
exploitation by the latter and otherwise dislocate natural trade channels 
of distribution. The proper rating for all such customers is Class E 
when purchasing for resale, and they must not be confused with Class G. 

Class H Purchasers are authorized machinery dealers who are resale 
outlets for machinery manufacturers ,(as defined under Class C-) and who 
purchase motors and/or controllers for resale in connection with the 
machines or machinery for which the;'- are selling representatives. Such 
machinery dealers are frequently termed Manufacturers' Agents although 
no lega.l relationship of agency may exist. 

Machinery Manufacturers' Agents must not be confused with concerns 
who merely install or resell machinery in connection with construction 
and fabricating work or incidental to fulfilling a contract or completing 
an assembled product. Such concerns are Class E. 

NOTE 3 

OUTLINE OP DISCOUNT PLAN TO CLASS G PURCHASERS 

Quantity of Motors Shipping Discounts 

or $ Value of Order Requirements 

1 to 9 motors Less than 10 lot Assigned Discounts 

10 or more motors Unit shipment of 10 Assigned Discounts 

or more motors pl 1 -^ 10$ 

9822 



^AAP_ 



Qjuantity of Motors 
of $ Value of Order 

$1500 or more 
("booh value) 



$10,000 or more 
("book value) 



$10,000 or more 
(book value) 



( Note 5 cont'd ) 

Shipping 
Requirements 

90-day delivery and unit 
shipments of 10 or more 
motors 

90-day deliver - * and unit 
shipments of 50 or nore 
motors 

Unit shipments 
amounting to $10,000 
or nore hook value 



Discount: 



Assigned Dis- 
counts 'TJIUS 10% 

and 7% 

Assigned Dis- 
counts plus 10$ 
and 15$ 

Assigned Dis- 
counts plus 10$ 
and 13% 



HOTE #4 
BRIEE QTTTLI1-5! OR DISCOUHT PLAN FOR CLASS G- PURCHASERS 
Value of Order Shipping Requirements Discounts 

Less than $150 (book value) Unit shipments of less than Assigned 



$150 (book value) or over 



$1000 (hook value) or over 



$3000 (hook value) or over 



$8000 (hook value) or over 



$16,000 ("book value) or 
over 



$150 (book, value) to one 
destination. 

Unit shipments of a least 
\L50 (book value) to.- one 
destination. 

Unit shipments $150 (book 
value) and complete order 
in 90 days. 

Unit shipments $150 (book 
value) and complete order 

in 90 days. 

Unit shipments $150 (book 
value) and complete order 
in 90 days. 

Unit shipments $150 (book 
value) and complete order 
in 90 days. 



Multiplier 



Assigned 
Multiplier plus 
10$ 

Assigned 
Multiplier -plus 
20$ 

Assigned 
Multiplier plus 

30$ 

Assigned 
Multiplier plus 
35$ 

Assigned 
Multiplier plus 
42$ 



hote ■ 5 



Class A - Users - Orders less than 3500 

Individual Order - $50C to $999 (book 
price), G0-7 equipment 



Basic 
i ulti'olier 
1.00 



Equivalent 
Discount 
Wet 



10$ 



-443- 
( Koto ■• -••: Co nt'ci) 



Basis Multiplier Equivalent 

Disco-ant 



Individual Order - ^100 to 34999 

(book price) , GQ-7 equipment 12-5$ 

Individual Order - §5000 or more 

(book ririce) , GO- 7 equipment Class 3 

Glass 3 r Users .84 16$ 

Classes A& B - 100 identical textile motors (excluding ra on 
motors) or 100 identical individual table-roll drive motors 
for shipment under the Company's shipping schedule, the Company 
being permitted to complete shipment within 90 days following 
the initial shipment, additional discount of 5$. 

Class C - Central Stations and Central Station Holding 
Companies - 

Without General Office Approval Class A 
With General Office Approval .34 16 $ 

Class D - Resale Dealers with Agreement 17$ 

Class 2 - Resale Purchasers (Hot otherwise 

classified) .33 17$ 

Class ? - Federal, State, Count", and iiunici- 
pal Governments, Municipal Central 
Stations and all Educational Insti- 
tutions . . .84 16$ 



Class G - Machinery Manufacturers 

Without General Office Approval Class 3 
With General Office Aonroval 



in 



a 



Class GB- Machinery Manufacturers .75 

Note.- Class GB does not apply to fraction- 
al horsepower motors. Previous 
discounts shown in section 8005. 
pages 31-34 and section 8260 pages 
5, 6, and 9 still apply 

Class H - Machinery Dealers (Machinery Manu- 
facturers' Agents) Class E 

Class H3- Machinery Dealers .30 20^ 



9822 



-444- 
NOTE #6 

ii-idust:/-Ial equipment discount sheet 

PUilCHASEE C LAS S IPI C ATI Oil 



Class A Users are those users who do not have multipliers assigned to 
them. The disccnrnt to this class of user is determined by the size of 
each individual order for motor policy motors, generators, and shipment 
under the Company's shipping schedule, the Company being permitted to 
make complete shipment within 90 days following the initial shipment. 
If such order amounts to .§5,000 or more (computed at boo]: price), the 
Class A user receives a Class 3 multiplier on that order and also becomes 
a regular Class B user. The discount on industrial control is the same 
as on the motors for which the control is sold. 

Class 3 Users are those users who have definite multipliers assigned to 
them. The users qualifying are those whose purchases, from a single 
company.; of motor policy material (see pages 3 and 4), and. industrial 
control have averaged $2,000 net or more annually during 1931, 1932, and 
1933, or 1932, 1933, and 1934. All owned cr controlled siibsidiaries of 
Class B purchasers may purchase in their own name at the multiplier of 
the parent company. Any subsidiary which purchases for resale should 
purchase at the multiplier to which its reselling activity entitles it, 
but only that reselling subsidiary is entitled to the resale multiplier. 

Class C Purchasers are central stations or central station holding com- 
panies who sell over 50^ of the electric power they generate to companies 
neither owned (or controlled) by- them, nor owning (or controlling) them. 
In case a central station is part of (or is owned by) a purchaser who 
qualifies in some other class, only ourchases made for central station 
purposes receive Class C discount. 

All central station or user subsidiary companies associated with 
Class C purchasers may, at the request of the parent Class C purchaser, 
buy in their own name at the parent company's multiplier either for . 
their own use, or (in the case of central station subsidiaries) for . , 
resale to their customers. 

TThen acting as consulting engineers, Class C purchasers receive 
the discount to which their client is entitled. 

Class D Purchasers are resale electrical dealers who hold I.iotor Dealer 
Agreements with the Conroahy. A conroany or an individual, in order to 
qualify for a Motor Dealer Agreement must have an established ;olace of 
business where facilities are, maintained and used for the aggressive ex- 
ploitation of motors and/or controllers as a separate item of sale. 
Companies that qualify under some other classification normally may be 
granted a Dealer Contract provided they have a separate electrical 
department for the independent sale of motors and/or controllers to 
nonaffiliated companies mid it is readily possible to segregate all 
purchases made through this department. 



9822 



-445- 

( Mote - L 6 Cont'd ) 

Since some confusion has exLstec between the classification of 
motor dealers and electrical contractors, lie latter class, is specifi- 
cally defined as folio ■ . : 

Electrical contractors normally offer for sale a service in 
the form of erecting, installing, altering, re tairing., 
servicing or maintaining electric wiring devices, appliances, 
or equipment, including the purchasing from suppliers and the 
selling of manufactured parts ana products, incorporated in 
such installation in accordance with specifications which the 
contractor bids. These companies do not qualify for Motor 
Dealer Agreements. 

Motor dealers do installation, repair ,. .and maintenance work as a 
necessary adjunct to the sale of electrical equipment and are not inelig- 
ible because of this similarity to electrical contractors. 

Electrical contractors sell equipment as a necessary adjunct to the 
sale of their services and are not eligible for Motor Dealer Agreements 
because of this similarity to motor dealers. 

In the first case, the normal and principal item of sale in any 
transaction is apparatus ; in the second case, the normal and principal 
item of sale is a servic e. 

Class 3 are resale purchasers not otherwise classified. 

This class includes electrical contractors, general building con- 
tractors, heating and ventilating contractors, plumbing contractors, 
contracting engineers, electrical dealers not under agreement and all 
other resale purchasers who merely resell electrical apparatus and/or 
controllers as an adjunct to, or incidental to, the sale of other pro- 
ducts or services. 

Class F Users are federal, state, county, and municipal governments, 
municipal central stations, and all educational institutions. 

A Class G- Purchaser is a purchaser known to the trade as the original 
source of supply for a complete power- ope rated pxxluct, which he equips 
with motors, generators, motor-generators, or controllers, and sells or 
leases under either his own name or his trade name as a. complete unit 
inclusive of the electrical equipment. Such purchasers are not required 
to actually manufacture the motor-driven part, provided they would not 
normally sell (nor would the user normally buy) their product without 
the motor-driven part being incorporated. 

Contractors, dealers, or agents who merely assemble and sell to the user 
without producing a new product are Class H if authorized agents of a 
Class G purchaser; otherwise they are Class .3. 

Class G-3 Purchasers are those Class G purchasers whose purchases, from 
a single company, of motor policy material (see pages 3 and 4), and in- 
dustrial control have averaged $2,000 net or more annually during 1931, 
1932, and 1933, or 1932, 1933 and. 1934. 

QpOO 



-44G- 
( Note #6 Cont'd ) 

Machinery manufacturing subsidiaries that are either owned or 
controlled by Glass G-3 companies nay, at ■ the written request of the 
parent company, purchase in their own. name at the parent company's 
multiplier for resale in connection with their own product. 

Resale agencies that are either owned or controlled by a Class G- 
(or G-B) purchaser may, at the written request of the latter, purchase 
in their own name for resale with the power- ope rated product of the 
parent company, and receive the parent company's multiplier, 

T ,7here the power-operated product is produced by a subsiciary 
having a separate corporate identity and the parent company otherwise 
qualifies under some other class, only purchases for resale with such 
machinery made in the mime of, and billed to, the subsidiary would 
qualify under Class G (of G-B) ■ 

In any case of doubt, refer all facts to the General Office for 
ruling, Class G- or G-B discounts must not be extended to 'so-called 
manufacturers, such as rebuilders of second-hand machinery, grain-eleva- 
tor builders, tunnel builders, mill and factory builders, fabricating 
machine shops ana the like. The proper rating for all such purchasers 
is Class E when purchasing for resale. 

Class H Purchasers are authorized machinery dealers who are resale out- 
lets for Class G (or G-B) purchasers and who purchase for resale in con- 
nection with the power-operated product for which they are selling 
representatives. Such machinery dealers are frequently termed Manufac- 
turers' Agents although no legal relationship of agency may exist. 

• Machinery Manufacturers' Agents must not be confused with concerns 
who merely install or resell machinery, in connection with construction 
and fabricating work or incidental to fulfilling a contract or completing 
an assembled product. Such concerns are Class E. 

Class HB Purchaser s are those Class H purchasers' whose purchases, from 
a single company, of motor policy material (see pages 3 and -i) and in- 
dustrial control have averaged $1,000 net or more annually during 1931, 
1932, and 1933 or 1932, 1933 and 1934. 



M05S #7 



TABLE OF Ai!I!UAL QUAi'TIT"" DISCOUNTS 



APPLIES OIILY; TO CLaSS D POBCHASBaS 



$2,500-1^ plus 2 : ^on excess 
5,000-2 c /i plus 3 $on excess 



10,000-2-^ plus 3 ; if$ on excess 
20,000-3 fo plus £'4 on excess 
30,000t3 ; ^ plus 5 -;; on excess 



40,000-4 $ plus 6^ 3 on excess 
50,000-4=^0 plus 6 $ on excess 
75,000-5 'f: plus 9 f j on excess 

100,000-6 fj plus 7 '5 on excess 
150,000-6-j^j plus 8;if£ on excess 
200,000- and" over--7^ 



9322 



-447- 



APF3NDIX A, PaKT 5 



FM MOTORS 

Chronological Record of Price 
Pilings "by Companies 



9822 



-448- 
C0MPMY-#1 

1st Tiling 

January 2, 1934 Effective January 5, 1934. 

General Price List, dated December 1, 3.933, includes (29) different 
L'odels (Stationary, Oscillating, Ventilating and Ceiling tyoes) . 

Discounts :- 

Users - 6-24 Fans 15$ 
25-49 n 25$ 
50 or more 35-5; o 
Commercial or industrial Users - 
Less than 50 Fans 25$ 
More than 50 Fans 35-5$ 
Government Institutions - 35-5^ 
Chain, Industrial) 'zc c«2 

Comnercial) 
Dealers - less than $50 - 35$, over $50 - 35-5$ 
llesale Machinery i'anuf rcturers, less than $50 - 35 r <5 
" " » over $50 - 35-5$ 

" » " 100 Fans or more, 40-10-3$ 

Terms :- 2-10 Net 30 Days 

Delivery :- F.O.B. Destination, T7arehouse City, 100 lbs. or over 
F.O.B. Point of Shipment, less than 100 lbs. 
F.0.13, Shipping Point, shipments to joints other than 
Distributors Warehouse City - with 
Exceptions A-Orders specifying minimum Shipment 
of (50) fans 
3-0rders specifying shipments to Chain, 
Commercial or Industrial organizations, 

2nd Filing 

February 19, 1934 Effective ^'arch 1, 1934. 

Special freight allovance on all Government orders F.O.B. Destination. 

3rd Filing 

February 23, 1934 ] ;arch 5, 1934. 

General Price List dated January 3, 1934 - Does not differ fro, 1 , fil- 
ing of January 2, 1934 except in reference to Shade Holders and Hanger 
Hods. 

4th Filing 

Liarch 19, 1934 Effective March 29, 3 934. 

General Price List dated Liarch 15, 1934. 

Discounts and terns same as Price List dated December 1, 1933, 

Only chang e aoiDlies to Snecial Construction of some fans. 



9822 



-449- 

COHPANY -#1 

5th Filing 

June 2, 1934 Effective June 4, 1934. 

Appling to Federal Government and Distributors. Discounts allowed 
to Federal Government 50$ from list and to Distributors who sell to 
Government shall be 50-10$ from list. 

5th Filing 

June 23, 1934 Effective July 3, 1934. 

Applies to Special Construction data for Special Fans. 

7th Filing 

October 2, 1934 Effective October 2 , 1934. 

Effects Terms to Federal Government and Distributors - 2-10 Prox Net 

30 days. 

8th Filing 

November 19, 1934 Effective November 29, 1934. 

Discontinued manufacture of (2) tj'pes of fans. Reduced the list price 
on (7) fans from 3 to 15$. Reduced price on Chromium Plating about 
15$. Dealers quantity discounts cancelled; given discount 35-5$ any 
quantity. All users except dealers, '30$; superceding discounts 1/5/34. 

9th Filing 

November 30, 1934 Effective December 10, 1954. 

Special $4.95 -or ice to trade (l) type fan (5000 to be sold) 

10th Filing 

December 1, 1934 ' Effective December 11, 1934. 

Error on filing effective December 10, 1934 - price reduced to '3.95. 

11th Filing 

January 25, 1935 Effective February 4, 1935. 

Addition of (1) ner r tyoe of fan. 

12th Filing 

April 3, 1935 Effective April 4, 1935. 

Change of discount to deslers including Utilities and Department 
Stores to 40$ - supercedes Filing of 11/29/34 of 35-5$ - difference 
of about 1-J $. 

13th Filing 

ray 3, 1955 Effective ! T ay 6, 1935. 

Changes delivery to Government to read F.O.B. destination regardless 
of r eight. 

9822 



-450- 
C0MFANY-#1 

Changes discounts to Distributors who supply Government agencies from 
50-10^ to 50-51. Difference of about 2- 1 --i. 

14th jllinx- ■ 

May 3, 1935 Effective Hay 13, 1935. 

Special S3. 00 price to all dealers and users one type of fan (4000) 
to be sold. See 9th Filing . 

■ : coi ;pany -#3 

1st Piling: ■ • • 

January 2, 1934 Effective January 3,1934. 

Genera,! price List dated 12/15/33, including (26) models ( Stationary , 
Oscillating, Ventillating an<? '.Ceiling .types) . 

Discounts :- 

Consumer - list price 

Dealer - less than $50. 35$, over $50. 35-5$ 
Special Users - 35-5$ 
Hotel, Large Building - 6 to 24' 15$ 
ii ''f " ■ .25 to 49 25$ 



Large Concerns 1 to 49, 25$ 



ii 'I '' 50 or more 35-5$ 

4 



I' 'I 50 or more, 35-5$ 

Distributors - Contract 50$ 

Consignment 40-10-3?$ 

Terms: Dealer and Special-. Users 'EST' 1§" -Prox. _ 
Distributor Contract 2$- 10 days 
Consignments 2$ 15 Prox. 

Delivery - Shipments of less than 100 lbs. 7.0.3. Point of Shipment. 
Shipments of more than 100 lbs. .7.0.3. Destination, 
Warehouse City. 

" 2nd filing 

March 27, 1934 '.'.'.' • ■ .Effective April 6, 1934. 

Supplement to Price List dated 12/15/33 to read: 

"Shipments made in April or ay, invoices dated due NET July 15th - 

allowed 2$ discount if paid on or before June 15th. " 

3rd filing 

March 30, 1934 '. Effective Ifarch 27, 1934. 

p.eserve the right to furnish fans with finishes to match standard 
finish fans of competitors without additional charge. 



9822 



-451- 

C01JPAHY-#3 

4th Til in ," 

April 18, 1934 .'...'.'...'.. Effective May 1,* 1934. 

General Price List 

Chances from 1st Fili ng 

Terns to Users 2-10 NET 15th Prox. 

5th Piling 

June 9, 1934 .' June 19, 1934. 

Chance in discounts to Federal Government and subdivisions, 50fb dis- 
count. Terras 2^ -10 Days, Date of Invoice, F.O.B. point of delivery. 

6th Piling 

August 30, 1934 Effective September 10, 1934 

ITet prices to Chain and Department Stores on a special lor price fan. 

7th Piling 

October 3, 1954 Effective October 3, 1934. 

Changing cash discounts to Federal Government and divisions to rer.c 
2 ': 10 Prox. 

To meet similar discount filed by other manufacturers. 

8th Filing 

January 16, 1935 Effective February 1, 1935. 

Decreased List Price ->n (l) " odel 14fo 

Increased " " !l (3) Models 3 to 5$, 

Discounts changed to 

Dealers 35-5^ 

Special Users 3C 

Eesale machinery yanuf acturers - less than 100 fans -35-5^ 

" " " 100 fans or o^er - 40-10-2$ 

Terms chanced to 

Dealers and Special Users - 2-10 
Distributors - 2-10 ITET 30 
Government - PET 30 

9th Filing 

February 20, 1935 1 "arch 2, 1935. 

Supplement to Price List of (4) Special Fans, quoting NET Prices 
Terras and Delivery 

10th Piling 

March 20 , 1935 March 30 , 1935. 

Supplement to Filing of February 20, 1935, Special Fans, addition 
of (2) net; models. 



9822 



-433- •■•• 

COMPLY- #3 
11th Tiling 

March gS, 1955 April .8, 19S5. 

r.evisecl shejt to supercede sheet on Special Fans 2/20/35 changing 
t?iscoonts to dealers iron 35-5't to 40p* Difference about 2 l A 

12 Filing 

Nay 3, 1955 Va? 13, 1935. 

Su-rolenent to Regular Price List adding (l) ne-- nodel, 



... 



COMPANY #4 

i 



1st Filing 

Janizary 2, 1934 January 3, 1934. 

General Price List, dated 12/5/33 including (48) different Models 
(Stationary, Oscillating, Ceiling and Ventilating types). 

Discounts :- ■ • ■ < 

Dealers - less than $50.00, 35$; over $50.00, 35-5$. 
Users - 6-24, 15$ 



" - 25-49, 25^ 



., 



■0 

" - 50 and over, 35-5$ 
Government Institutions - 35-5; 3 
Chain, Commercial and Industrial - 35-5$ 
Industrial Organizations - less than 50 fans, 25$ 
11 " 50 fans or over, 35-5$ 

Terms - 2-10 NET 30 
Deliver y - F.C.B. Factory 



2nd Filing 

January 3, 1934 January 13, 1934. 

Giving TCiolesalers 50$ on outright purchases. 

3rd Filing • • ■ ■■ ■ 

February 5, 1934 .February 15, 1934. 

Supplement to Price List effective 1/3/54 adding (1) new model; also 
Schedule of Discounts applying to Resale Machinery Manufacturers. 
Shipments less than $50.00 - 35$ 
" $50.00 or more - 35-5$ 

" • of 100 fans - 40-10-3$ 

4th Filing 

February 26, 1934 March 8, 1934. 

Changing delivery conditions to Federal Government to read. F. 0.13, 
Destination. 

5th Filing 

March 12, 1934 March 12, 1934. 

■Changing prices of Special- Finishes on different fans. 

. 6th Filing 

Maroh 22, 1934 March 22, 1934. 

Changing condition of Sale of Special fans to include Dealers, 
Chain,. Syndicates and large buyers. ■ ■ .... 



9822 



-454- 

OOMPANI H 

7th Tili ng 

Marcli 22, 1934 March 26, 1934. 

Changing delivery conditions to Dealer and Wholesaler ■ 

8th Filing 

Marcli 23, 1934 April 7, 1934. 

Special price ($2.40 ) on one type of fan, (800) to be sold 

9t h Filing 

April 4, 1934 ' April 6, 1934. 

Net price ($1.90) on one model, to Distributors, Chain, Syndicates, 
large Bayers and Dealers 

10th Filing 

April 14, 1934.. April 17, 1334. 

Amendment to filing l/o/34 adding "and subseouent orders" to the 
Trade Schedule. 

11th Fi ling 

May 24, 1934 June 4, 1934. 

Changing discounts to Federal Government to 50,o. Changing Dis- 
counts to Distributors for -quotations to Federal Government to 
50-10$. • 

12th Filin g 

July 23, 1934 August 2, 1934. 

Special discount 50-10$ on (1) discountinued model. 

13th Filing 

August 15, 1934 August 25, 1934. 

Reduction of net prices on (2) special make fans - one reduced 2Tfo - 
the other, l6/o. 

14 th Filing 

August 20, 1334 August 30, 1934. 

Superceding Price List of 3,/l2/34 in reference to special finishes 
and fan accessories, no change in discounts. 

■ • • ■ 15th Filing 

August 20, 1934 August 30, 1934. 

Amendment to filing of 4/17/34 changing "To the trade" to include 
Dealer, Contractors, etc. 

9822 



-155- 

COMPANY #4 

16th Piling 

September 4, 1934 September 14, 1934. 

Duplication of filing of April 6, 1934. _ 

17th Fil ing 

September 4, 1934 September 14, 1934. 

Duplication of filing of August 2, 1934. 



18th Filing . 

September 13, 1934 ' September 13, 1934. 

Duplication of filing of June 4, 1934. 

19th Filing 

September 13, 1934.. September 24, 1934. 

Amendment to change the expression. "Minimum Net Prise" to ."Net Price" 
and "Maximum discount" to "Discount." 

20th Filing 

September 21, 1934 October 1, 1934. 

Duplicating filing of 9/24/34 and eliminating "large buyer" 
wherever' it appears. 

21st Filing 

October 11, 1954 _. . October 22, 1934. 

C"nai:ging terms to Federal Government to. 2-10 Prox. 

22n d Filin g 

November 19, 1934 •. ... November 29,. 1934. 

Pries list for (4) special type fans, with discounts, terms and 
delivery - formerly appeared on previous filing as Net Price. . 

23rd Fi ling 

November 19, 1934 November 29, 1934. 

General Price List denoting the following changes: 

(4) models, List Price increased 4^o 

(3) models, List Price decreased 9-jzfo 
Discounts :- — 

Dealers _ 35-5^, 

Users *. 30$ 

Government Institutions _ 50^ 

Industrial Organizations „ 30^ 

Wholesalers - outright _ sr,;J Consignment 40-10-3$ 

Distributors to Government _ 50fo 

Delivery F.O.B. destination 

9822 



-456- 



COMPANY #4 

24th Fi ling 

February 4, 1935 . . . . February 14, 1935. 

Special $1.85 net price to Wholesalers one type of fan model 
discontinued (6125) to be sold. 

25th Filing 

Kay 9, 1935 May 20, 1935. 

Superceding filing of November 29, 1934, striking out paragraph 
referring to parts to Federal Government. 

; 26th Filing 

May 23, 1935 June 6, 1935. 

Applies to Resale Machinery Manufacturers. 

Discounts - less than 100 fans 35-5$, 100 or over 40-10-3 

Delivery ' - F.0.3. Point of Shipment. 

COMPANY #5 

1st F il ing 

January 2, 1934. , Effective January 3, 1934. 

General Price List dated December 15, 1933, including (93) dif- 
ferent styles of fans (Utility, Stationary, Oscillating, Ceiling 
and Venti Hating types). 
Discounts :- 

Dealers - less than $50.00, 35$ over $50.00, 35-5$ 
Government and Institutions - 35-5$ • 
Chain, Commercial and Industrial - 35~5$> 
Large Users - 6-24 - 15$ 25-30-25$ -50 over -35-5$ 
Delivery ; 

F.0.3. Destination, Warehouse City 100 lbs. 'or more 
• F.0.3, Point of Shipment, less than 100 lbs. 

F.O.B. Shipping Point, shipments to points other. than Distributors 
■ Warehouse City - with following EXCE P TIONS 

A - Orders specifying rnin. shipment of (50 ) fans 
3 - Orders specifying shipments to Chain Stores same as 
District Warehouse City. 
Terms:- 2-10 Net 30- 



2nd Film; 



i-T- Q 



March 15, 1934 March 25, 1934. 

To meet price filed by other manufacturers, delivery to chain 
organizations, institutions and Government any quantity changed 
to 2-10 days, F.O.B. destination. 



98J 



-457- 



3r d Filing 

April 7, 1934,. April 17, 1934. 

Revised selling instructions to Dealers - 
' "Orders of net value $50 or more and all subsequent orders. 

Discount 35-5$ 

4th Filing • • 

May 25, 1934 June 4, 1934. 

Change in discounts to Federal Government from 35-5$ to 50$. 
Difference of about ■ 11$. Terms- changed to 2$' 10th- Prox. 

5th Filing 

May 23, 1934 May 23, 1934. 

Net prices on (3) discontinued models to close out. No more of these 
models to "be made. 

6th Filing 

June 9, 1934 June 9, 1934. 

Changing terms to Federal Government from 2$ 10 days Prox. to 
2/o - 10 days. 



7th Filin, 



2 



August 11, 1934 ...... August 21, 1934. 

Revised selling instructions, the word "maximum" as applied to 
discount, deleted. 

8th Filing 

September 27, 1934 September 27, 1934. 

Changing terms to Federal ■ Government from 2-10 days to 2-10 Prox. 
To meet similar discount filed by o'oher manufacturers. 

9th Filing 

November 8, 1934. ;..:............:.. : . ..;.:... .'November 19, 1934. 

Revised price list superseding all others, changes in 
Discounts to 

Chain, Commercial and Industrial - 30$ 
Distributors, outright - 50$ - 3- 10 Prox. 

consignment - 48~£$~ 2-10 Prox. ' '' 
Deliv er-,- c-.. Government F, 0.B, destination. 

10th Filing 

November 2? 1934. , December 3, 1934. 

Revision •>.? terms of sale to distributors changed from 2-10 Prox. 
to 2-1C days. 



9822 



-458- 

11th Filing 

May 8, 1935 • .':... May 18, 1935. 

Changing discounts to Government to 50$, to Distributors who supply 
Government 50-5% 
Terms - 30 days NET 
Delivery- F«0.B. destination. 

- 12th Filing 

May 13, 1935 .May 23, 1935. 

Net price to trade of (1) model. This model to be discontinued. 

COMPANY #6 

1st Filing 

January 2, 1934 Effective January 3, 1934. 

General price list, including (6) models of stationary type 
giving Net Prices . 

Terms - 2-^0 NET 30 ........ 

Delivery r F.O.B. Factory 

2nd Filing 

January 22, 1934 February 1, 1934. 

General price list, adding. (1) new model- and listing (3) obsolete 

models. 

Discounts to trade 50-5$ 

Terms - 2-10 E. O.M. Net 30 E. O.M. West of Hockies extra 30 days. 

3rd Filing 

February 19, 1934 February 19, 1934. 

Addition of (l) new model List Frice $1.79. 

4th Filing 

March 26, 1934 , . ., ; ., April 5, 1934. 

Revision of terms as filed February 19, 1934. 

5th Filing 

May 7, 1934 May 17, 1934. 

Changing price on model put on market (February 19, 1934) from 
list price of $1.79 to net price of 85<£ with 

500 or over 5$ discount 
1000 or over 10$ discbunt 

6th Filing 

September 17, 1934. September 27, 1934. 

General Price list. 

Terms changed to 2$-l0 Frox. 

9822 



-41 .■- 
7 th Filing 



November 2, 1934 November 12, 1934. 

Changing price list of (1) model (see filings 2/19/34 and 5/17/34) 

back to $1.79. 

Discounts: - none given except an additional 5%, 1000 or more. 

Terms - 2-10 Prox. 

Delivery - F.O.B. destination. 

8 th Filing 

January 21, 1935 January 31, 1935. 

Price list of (4) models. 
Disccunts - Department Stores 

Jobbers 

Chain Stores 

Users 

Distributors - 50-5% 2-10 Prox. 

Organizations 

Institutions - 45% 2-10-30 Net 

9th Filing ' 

February 9, 1935 February 19, 1935. 

Appendix to Price List of January 31, 1935 changed to read: 

Di scount s - 

Department Stores 

Jobbers 

Chain Stores 

Users 

Distributors - 50-5-5% 

10th Filing 

March 15, 1935 March 25, 1935. 

Special price of 75^ each on (l) model. 

To close out (700) see Filings 2/19/34 - 5/17/34 - 11/12/34. 

11th Filling 

Ma-- -- , 1935 March 30, 1935. 

Special price of 70^ each on (1) model. 

To close out 700 fans - see Filings 2/19/34- 5/17/34 - ll/l2/34r 

3/25/35. 

12th Filing 

March 21, 1935. ..;..:..:..:.:..... .;.: April 1, 1935. 

Price list of (4) models. 

Duplicate of list filed January 31, 1935. 



9822 



-460- 

v • COMPANY #7 

1st Filing 

January 2, 1934. , Effective January 3, 1934. 

General price list, dated 12/29/33, includes (24) different models 
(Stationary, Oscillating, Ventilating and Ceiling types). 
Dcscounts 

Dealers - less that $50.00 35$; over $50.00, 35-5$ 

Government - 35-5$ • - • . . . 



-rl 



Users - 6 to 24 - 15$ 
» 25 to 49 - 25$ 

" 50 or more - 35-5$ 

Distributors - 50 ( ,j 
Terms - 2-10 Net 30 
Delivery - F.O.B. Destination, 100 Ids. or more. 

2nd Piling 

March 17, 1934 March 27, 1934. 

General price list, same as filing January 3, 1934, with the 

• following additions: ■ . 

Industrial Organizations - 1 to 49 fans, 25$ 

" " 50 fans or more, 35-5$ 

Discounts "besides the usual 2$ 10 days. 
Purchased April and paid before May 10 - 5$ 
" " " 'I " June 10 - 2$ 

" May " » " June 10 - 3$ 

« " » " " July 10.-2$ 

3rd Piling 



May4, 1934 May 14, 1934. 

Letter closing out (16) models of discontinued types. 

(3980) fans in all - no price or discount given, except "Maximum 

discount all classifications 55$." 

4th Filin g 

April 9, 1935 April 19, 1935. 

Letter closing out (15) models of discontinued types (1768) 
in all - no price or discount given (see filing of 5/14/34). 

5th Piling 

April 25, 1935 May 6, 1935 

Discount s changed to 
Dealers - 40$ 
Government - 50$ 
Users - 30$ 
Distributors) 
Jobbers) -50$ 
Wholesalers) 



9822 



■ ,1 

' ,0 



-461- 

COLIPANY #8 

1st Filing 

December 29, 1933 Effective January 3, 1934. 

General Price List, dated 12/15/33, includes (5b) different models 
(Stationary, Oscillating, Ventilating and Ceiling types). 
Discounts:- 

Dealers - less than $50.00, 35$; $50.00 or more, 35-5$ 
Chain- Industrial) ^rk-'' 
Commercial) /0 

Institutions - 35—5 $ 

Organizations and) ^ 4g . fang . Qr legs . ^ 5Q . fang or raore> 35 „^ 
Large Users ) 

Hotels and Small Users - 6-25 - 15$ 

25-49 - 25, i 
50 or over - 35-5$ 
Distributors-outright - 50$ 

" -consignment -'40-10-3$ 

Terms - 2-10 Net 30 

Delivery - F.OoB. ' destination, Warehouse City, 100 lbs. or over 
F. 0.3. Point of Shipment, less than 100 lbs. 

2nd Piling 

January 25 , 1934 February 3, 1934. 

Supplement to General Price list, January 3, 1934. 
Discounts to 

Resale Machinery Manufacturers: 

Less than $50.00 - 35$ 
Over 50.00 - 35-5$ 

100 fans or over- 40-10-3$ 

3rd Filing 

February 14, 1934 February 14, 1934. 

Supplement to regular Price List (1/3/34) of (2) additional models- 
Dis count to distributors - outright purchase 50$. 

Terms - 3-10 Net 30, except fans invoiced March, April or May, 1934. 
2$ extra if paid on or before June 10, 1934. 

4th Filing 

March 1, 1934 • March 11, 1934. 

Applies to (2) new models, filing of February 14, 1934, giving 
classifications, discounts, terms and delivery which are same 
as regular line filing of January 3, 1934. 

_ 5th Filing 

March 19, 1934 March 19, 1934. 

Addition of (l) new model and discontinuing of (l) model (35) 
on hand. 



9822 



-462- 

COMPABY #8 

6th Filing 

March 36, '1934 April 5, 1934. 

Amendment to previous filing of (2) special models "Maximum 
Discounts to, 'Distributors, 'Wholesaler's, Dealers, Syndicate 
Bayers, Utilities or Users - 50$. " 

7th Filing 

March 30, 1934 April 9, 1934. 

Revision of Delivery Conditions on (2) special models, Federal, 
State, County and Municipal Governments F.O.B; destination on 
; ther shipments of ICO lbs. or more F.O.B. destination. 

8th Filing 

May 29, 1934... . ... ..June 4', 1934. 

Change in 'discount to Government from 35-5$ to" 50$ 2-10 days, 
F.O.B. point of shipment. 

9t h Filing 

June 8, 1934 . : June 18, 1934. 

Special discount given to distributors for quotations to Federal 
Government of 50-10$ 

10th Filing 

June 11, 1934 , ,. June 21, 1934. 

Changing terms to Government from 3-10 to 2-10 Prox. 

' ' '■' 11th Filing 

July 31, 1934 " August 10, 1934. 

List Price on (2) models to meet Navy specifications. 

. 1 2th Filing 

August 17, 1934 August 37, 1934. 

Revising sales conditions on special fans, superseding filing of 
March 11, 1934, and April 9, 1934, and Amendment of April 5, 1934 - 
changing same to read as Regular Price List filing February 14, 1934. 

15th Filing 

November 21, 1934 December 1, 1934. 

'General Price List, changing: 
Discounts to 

Dealers - 35-5$ 

Chain Stores - 30$ 

Institutions - 30 r j 



9823 



-463- 

COMPANY #8 

15th Filing 

Government Federal - 50'jo 

Distributors, outright - 50$, Consignment 40-10-3$ 

Resale Mch. Manufacturers - 35-5$ less than 100, over 100 -40-10-3. 

Distributor to Government - 50-5$ 
Terms - 3-10 Net 30 
Delivery - F.O.B. destination 

14th Filing 



March 25, 1935 April 4, 1935. 

Supplementing prices and discounts schedule of December 1, 1934, 

to Dealers/\to 40$ 

Delivery - F.O.B. Destination, Warehduse City, 100 lbs. or over. 

F.O.B. Shipping Point, less than 100 lbs.'' Oh (2) special 
fans - 5$ extra allowed on orders of 100 fans or more. 

15th Filing 



1'ay 1, 1935 May 11, 1935. 

Reducing List Price of (l) regular listed fan from $4. 'SO 'to $3.95 

M$ 



reduction of 14$ to meet similar reduction of other manufacturers. 



16th Filing 

May 13, 1935 May 13, 1935. 

Changing terms to Federal Government to read 30 days net - no cash 
discount. 

COMPMY #9 

1st Filing 

January 2, 1934 '...'....v. Effective January 3, 1934. 

General Price Lists ((l) Eastern (l) Western) includes (24) different 
models- Stationary, Oscillating -and Ventilating (types). Western 
list is 3 to 8/o higher. 
Discounts ;- 

Dealers - less than $50.00, 35$; over $50.00,35-5$ 

Chain- Industrial - 35-5$ 

11 -Commercial - 35-5$ 

Institutions - 35-5$ 

Organizations - less than 50 fans 25$; over 50 fan a, 35-5$ 

Users - 6 to 24,15$ - 25 to 49,25$ - 50 or more- 

Government - 35-5$ '35-5$ 

Distributors— outright - 50$ 

" -consignment - 40-10-3$ 

Terms - 3-10 Net 30 days ■ • . 

Delivery - F.O.B. Destinations, Warehouse City, 100 lbs. or more. 
F.O.B. Point of Shipment, less than 100 lbs. 



9822 



-464- 



lst F ilin g; ( continued)' - ' 

F.O.B. Shipping Point, shipments to points other than 
Distributors Warehouse City - with 
Exceptions - A- Orders specifying minimum shipment 
of (50) fans. 
B-Orders specifying shipments to Chain, 
Commercial or Industrial organizations. 

2nd Filing 

March 26, 1934 April 5, 1934. 

General Price Lists (l) Eastern, (l) Western. 
Duplicate of Lists filed January 3, 1934. 



3rd Filing 

April 7, 1934.. April- 17, 1934. 

Special Net Price List to close out (5) discontinued-models - sizes 
8"' and 10" - prices $3,125 to $4,975 each. Approximately (1500 J fans. 
Terms and Delivery - same as filing January 3, 1934. 

4th Filing 



October 25, 1934 November 5, 1934. 

Reserving the right for Office or Branch Warehouse to sell to 
Individuals at list price or at a discount of 40^. Known to the 
trade as "Courtesy Discounts. " 

5th Filing • ■ 

December 23, 1934 January 5, 1934. 

General ^rice List showing a reduction on (18) models ranging from 

15 to 33^ depending upon type of fan. 

Discounts ;- 

Dealers - 40$ 

Chain Stores - 50- 5 c i 



Dept. Stores - 40*$ 

Distributors ~ 50-5^ 

Jobbers - 50-5$ 

Terms - 2-10 Prox. 
Delivery - F.0.3. Destination, Warehouse City, 100 lbs. or ofcer. 

6th Filing 

January 2, 1935.. January 12, 1935. 

Minimum Net Price on (l) discontinued' model, size 7" net price $1.00. 
List price January 3, 1934 $4. 60 to close out approximately (3650). 

7th Filin g 

January 5, 1935 January 15, 1935. 

Minimum Net Prices on (6) special models to close out (1075) fans. 
Regular terms. 

9822 



-465- 



8th Filing 

January 11, 1935 . . . January .21, 1935. 

Minimum Net Prices on (5) regular models to close out (518) fans' -'. 
regular terms. 

9th Filing 

January 25, 1935 February 4, 1935. 

List prices on (5) special "brand fans, subject to regular terms 
and discounts. 

COMPMY #10 . 

1st Filing 

January. 2, 19.34...... Effective January 3, .1934. 

General Price List, including (15) different models (Stationary and 

Oscillating types). 

Discounts:— 

Jobbers - 50/o 

Dept. ■ St6re:s - .40$ ... 

Utilities . - 40$ ■...-; 

Small stores - 35$ 
Terms ~ 2$ - 6/l/34 10 Prox. 
Delivery - not given. 

2nd Filing 

February 5 , 1934. February 15, 1934. 

General Price List, including (16) regular, (7) special models; 

also (10) discontinued, models. . 

Prices on Regular Models same as January 3, 1934. Changes on 

Discounts to small dealers from 35$ to 33. ~l/3$ to, 40$ depending 

on quantity. 

Delivery - F.O.B. destination, 100 lbs. or over. 

. ■ 3rd Filing 

April 20, 1934, April 30, 1934. 

Extra 10$ given on (l) model to distributors F.O.B. factory. 

4th Filing 

May 5, 1934 , May 15, 1934. 

Special Price $1.00 each, on (l) special fan to close out approximately 
(1800). F.0.3. Factory 2-10 Prox. 

5th Filing 

May 18, 1934 May 28, 1934. 

Change in price on (3) special models (chrome finish). 
Mote: - Cannot chech back for former price. 



9822 



-456- 



6th Filin g 

May 21, 1934 May 31, 1934. 

Frice list of (4) new models of kitchen ventilators. List price on 

(2) $10.00 and other (2) $12.00. 

D iscoun ts;- 

Distributors - 50-10$ 

Jobbers - 50$ 

•Mail Order - 50$ 

Premium Houses - 50$ 

Retail Stores - 40$ 

Terms - 2™ 10 Prox. 

Deliver y - F. 0.3, factory. 

7th Filing 

May 23, 1934 June 2, 1934. 

Giving 50$ discounts to fraternal organization's for premium purposes. 

8th Filing 

September 13, 1934. September 24, 1934. 

Supplement to general Price List of February 15, 1934. 
Contract orders - 50$ discount 
Retail Stores - 35$ discount 

9th Filing 

October 27, 1934 November 6, 1934. 

Offering (l) 8-». stationary, fan to the trade © 85^ each - 25,000 to 

50,000 fans 10$ extra discount. 

Terms 3-10 Prox - January, February, March, April, May, dated 

~ June 1, 1934. . 
Delivery - F.0.3. factory. 

10th Filing 

January 7, 1935. January 17, 1935. 

Price List of certain type (12) models, change in 
' Discounts; - . , 

Distributors- 50-10$ 

Jobbers - 50-10$ 

Contract Orders - 50-10$ ■ 

Department stores, using (500 ) cr over - 50$ 

Utilities, using (.50.0). or over - 50$ 

Retail Stores - 33-1/3$ 
Terms - 2$ - 6/l/34 10 Prox. 
Delivery - F.O.b. factory 



9322 



-467- 

11th Filing 

January 14, 1935 January. 24, 1935. 

Duplicate of filing of November 6, 1934, excetit model number has "been 
changed and quantity discount has been drop-oed. 

l?th Filing 

April 4, 1935 , April 15, 1935. 

Supplement to previous schedules, reserving the right to meet com- 
petition to shin fans oa consignment "basis. 
Discoun t - 50-5$ 
Terms - 2-10 Prox.. 
Delivery — F.O.B. factory 

13th Filmg 

A-oril 4, 1935 .April _ 15, 1935, 

Schedule of Special fans of snecial construction for national 
distributors - (9; models. 
Terms - 2$ E.O.M. 
Delivery — F.O.B. factory 

14th Filing 

Net nrice on (2) models (l) © $1.75; (l) © $3.00 to distributors, 
jobbers, nremium houses, mail order houses and department stores. 
Terms - 2-10 Prox. Anril and May - June 1 dating 
Delivery - F.O.B. -factory 

C0MPAMY #11 

.'.;•;..' •.'•■ . * *•" l'gt' Filing ' 

January 2, 1934. , .Effective January 3, 1934, 

General Price list dated November 15, 1933, including (l?) different 
models (Stationary, Oscillating, _ Ventilating and Ceiling types), 
piscounts'- 



Users - 6 to 24 fans If 
25 to 49 fans 21 
50 or more 35-5$ 






Industrial Organizations - less than 50 fans 25*. 

11 more than 50 fans 35-5$ 
Dealers - less than $50.00 - 35$; $50.00 or more, 35-5$, 
Government - 35-5/5 . . . 

Chain - 35-5$ 
Institution - 35-5$ 

He sale Machinery Manufacturers - l°ss than $50.00 -35$ 

550.00 or mere - 35-5$ 
" 100 fans or more - 40-10-3 

Terras 2-10 Net 30 



9 E c ■- 



-463- 

lst filing (Continued) 

Delivery P. 0.3. destination, Warehouse City, 100 lbs. or over 
• F.0.3. 'Point- of -shipment,- -less -tha.n-100 "lbs; • • ; 

P.O. B. ''Shrnping Point; shipments to joints other than 

distributors Warehouse City - ^ith 
Exceptions - A, Orders specifying minimum shroment of (50; fans 
3, Orders st>ecif"-ing shi-oraents to chain, com- 
mercial or industrial organizations. 

2nd Filing 

January 13, 1934„ „ .January 28, 1934. 

Price list of (l4; model, direct current fans. Ho discounts, terms 
or delivery given. 

3rd Filing 

February 28 ; 1934. . . . . . / . .- ." ; . . . . . . . . . ; . ; .' . . : : : ; ; : : ; . .March *io , 1934. 

Discount schedule to supercede filing of January 28, 1934. Ho changes 
from original filing. 

4th Filing ' " ' 

June 2, 1934, . . . '. '. ...... June 4, 1934. 

Changing discounts to Federal Government and distributor Tho ouotes 
to Federal Government. 

Government - 5C,-> 

Distributor - 50-10$ 

5th Filing 

September 28, 1934 September 28, 1934. 

Changing terms to Federal Gpv^rn::ient from 2-10 Uet 30 to 2-1© Prox. 

■ ■ ' - eth -Filing - • ' ' - ; 

November 19, ] 934c o ..... , November 29, 1934. 

General Price List, superceding previous filings, arroarently no change 
in list -orice - changes in th» following: 
Discounts to 

Users - 30% 

Industrial organizations - 30% 

Institutions - 30^ 

Dealers 35-5% ' 

Government - 50% (30 day net - F.0»?-« destination) 

De-oartment stores - 35-5% 

Utilities - 35-5$ 

Distributors - outright - 50^ 

" consignment - 40-10-3 

Terms - 2-10 



Q82^ 



-469- 



th Piling; 



January 11, 1934 ■ . ^....... .............................. ..January 21, 1935o 

Addition of (?) models, Discount schedule same as filing of 
November 29, 1934. 

8th Filing 

January 11 , 1935 e . January 21, 1935. 

Seducing list -Drice of (l) regular listed fan from $4.60 to $3.95. 
Reduction of 14^. 

9th Filing 

April 8, 1935. o .April 8, 1935. 

Refers only to electric fan( parts,) 

ICth Filing 

May 4, 1935. „ . i ', ','. . '. '. '»'.'. . .'. \ .......... .May 6, 1935. 

Refers only to electric fan( parts*) 

CO! PATTY #12 

1st' Filing ' ' 

January 2 , 1934. , Effective January 3, . 1934 . 

General Price List, dated December 31, 1933, including (lio) different 
models (Stationary, Oscillating, . Ventilating, Ceiling, . Coach and 
Marine types). 
Discounts'— 
Chain Stores 35—5% 
Users - 6 to 24 -15$ 
" 24 to 49 - 25$ 

" . 50 more- 35-5$, 

Dealers,- less than $50,00 f- 35$; "'over $50 '.00 - 35-5^' ' 
Department stores - l°ss than $50.00 - 35$; over $50*00 - 35-5$ 
Distributors - less than $50*. 30 - 35$; over $50.00 - 35-5$ 
Government - 35-5$ 
Institutions - 35-5$ 
germs - 2-10 Net 30 

Delivery - F.O.B. Jobbers "a rehou.se, Ppint, in lots of 300 lbs. or more, 
F.0.3, Point of Shipment, less than 300 lbs. 

2nd Filing 

February 13, 1934. '.'.'.February 23, 1934. 

Suc^lement to Filing of January 3, 1934. 
Jobbers, outright (no consignment) Disc. Max. 50/k 
Terms - 2-1C from 7/1/34 Net August 1, 1934. 
Delivery - same as January 3, 1934 - filing 



9822 



-470- 

3rd Filing 

February 23, 1934 March 5, 1934. 

General Price List. ■"■ ■ . . 

Increased List Price on (l6) models, 3 to 11$. 
Decreased List Price on (l4) models, 2 to 20% 
Terms and Delivery same as filing of January 3, 1934. 

4th Filing 



March 6, 1934. .' March 10, 1934. 

Discount schedule, changes to organizations from distributors. 
1 to 49 fans Max. discount 25$ 
50 or "ior° fans Max. discount 35»r5$ 
Delivery t" Government F.O.Be destination 



5th Filing • 

AiDril 12, T934 April 23, 1934. 

Foualizing delivery schedule 



6th Filing 

May 31, 1934 June 4, 1934. 

Discount schedule, only change Government 50$ maximum discount. 

7th Filing 



May 31, 1934 May 31, 1934. 

Adding (2) new models'. 

Discounts , Terms and Delivery same as filing March 10, 1934. 

8th Filing 

August 16, 1934 ...August 27, 1934. 

Discount schedule superceding all previous filings with the following 

change s ' 

(5) models reduced on list rjrice from 7 to 20$ 

Discounts to distributors-outright changed to 50$ 

" " " commission " " 46-2$ 
Terms - 2-10 Net 50. 
Delivery to Government changed to F.Q.B. • destination. 

9th Filing 

October 19, 1934. October 29, 1934. 

Special Prii.ce of ($1.95 each) to Trade (l) type of fan. (388l) to be 
sold,' • • • 



9822 



-471- 

10th Filing , . . . 

December 22, 3 934 January 2, 1935. 

Discount schedule, changing 

Discounts to , • . 

Chain Stores 30$ 
Users - 30;* 

Department Stores - 35-5$ 

Distributors - outright, 50$, consignment 46-2$, . .2-10, Net 60 
Government -50$ - Net' 30' days - F.O.B. destination 
Institutions - 30^> 

11th Filing 

December 31, 1934 , . . . . .January 10, 1935. 

Net Price on ("0 models ($1.75 and $5.5C\) to trade. 

Terms - 2-10 Net 30 

Delivery - P. 0.3. Destination, 100 lbs. or more. 

12th Filing 

March 6, 1935....'.......... March, 16, 1935. 

Adding (2) special models 

Terms 2-10 Net 30 

Delivery - F.O.B, Point of Shipment 

' 15th Filing 

March 11, 1935 March 21, 1935. 

Adding (l) ne~ nod<=l (special order only) # , 
Discounts ,. Termr and D°livery same as January 2, 1935. 

14th Filing 

March 19, 1935.... .7.'. ..... 7. .'.-. ..." ..■>....'.'. ..March 29, 1935. 

Discount schedule for Resale Machinery Manufacturers' 
Less then (l00) fans - 35-5$, 
(lOO) fans or more - 40-10-3$ 
Terms - 2-10 Net 30 

Delivery - P.O. 3. destination, Warehouse City - 100 Its. or over 
F.0.3. Foint of Shinnient - less than 100 lbs. 

15th Filing 

March 21, 1935. A^ril 1, 1935. 

Cancel filing of January 1C, 1935 
on (2) ne— models 

16th Piling 

Anril 12, 1935 A rar il 22, 1935. 

Adding (3) ne-- -icdels of special type. 

Discounts , Term", and Delivery same as January 2, 1935. 



9822 



-472- 
17th Filing 



Anril 12, 1955 Anril 22, 1935. 

Net Prices given on (7) obsolete models - to close out auoroximately 

(8 730) fans. 

Term s - 2-10 Net 30 

Delivery - F.O.B. Point of Shipment. 

18th Filing ' 

Ar,ril 22, 1935 Hay 2, 1935. 

Superceding filing of 4/22/35 in r°ferenoe to Net Prices on (7) 

obsolete models - 

Reduction of 10$ on. 7 models of. 4/22/35, (4330 ) to "be sold. 

19th Filing 

April 25, 1935 '. May 6, 1935. 

Changing discounts to Dealers, Utilities and Department Stores to 
Discount 

any miantity, - . 40^ 

Terms 2-10 Net 30 

Delivery - F.O.B. destination Warehouse City, 100 lbs. or more 
F.O.B. Point of Shipment, less than 100 lbs, 

20th Filing 

May 2 , . 1935. , . ...... f ........... . . . . .... . . . ] lay 6 , 1935. 

Discounts changed to Covernment - 50f? 
Distributors selling to Government 50-5/> 
Term s - Net 30 days 
Delivery - F.O.B. Destination 

21st Filing 



May 9, 1935 . . .May 20, 1935, 

Pric° List of (4) models introduced filing . 
April 22, 1935 - (duplication) 



9822 



-473- 



APPEI'DIX A, PART '6 



ELECTRIC ARC WELD ISC APPARATUS 

Chronological Record of Price 
Tilings D"/ Companies 



9822 



-474- 

RENTAL PURCHASES AND DEFERRED PAYMENT PLANS 

The various plans used are designated in the text "by numbers and 
the following legend gives their details. On page 5 - Appendix B - Part 
6, saimle applications of the plans are set up end a duplicate of this 
legend will he found attached thereto. 

RENTAL PURCHA.SE PLANS 

(1) List price plus 10$; 15^> of the result per month. 

(2) 10$ of list price per month; 6$ interest. 

(3) 10$ of list price per month; no interest. 

(4) Special rates per month for each welding set. 

DEFERRED PAYMENT TLANS 

(1) 20/o down payment; balance in 12 months; finance rate 6$. 
(la) 20/o down payment; "balance in 12 months; finance rate 8$, 
(I'd) 20$j down payment; "balance in 12 months; no finance charge. 

(2) List price plus 10$; 15$ of the result per month. 

(3) 10$ of list price per month; no finance charge. 

(4) 30$ down payment; "balance in 12 months; finance rate 10$ on 
purchase price, 

(5) 33-1/3$ down payment; "balance in 12 months; no finance charge. 

(6) 25$ down payment; "balance in 18 months; 11$ finance charge; 6 mo. 5$. 

(7) 10$ of list price oer month; finance charge 6$ after first month. 

(8) 25$ down; 10 months 6$. 

(9) 25$ down; 12 months 6$. 

COMPANY CLASSIFICATIONS 

For the purpose of indicating the completeness of the various companies' 
lines, we have designated them as follows: 

CLASS A ~ Companies making a full line of single operator, multiple 
operator and gas engine driven welders. 

CLASS B - Companies making a large percentage of the ahove types. 

CLASS C - Companies making only a few types. 



9822 



-475- 
COMPANY til - CLASS B 

March 30, 1934 Effective April 9, 1934. 

Original filing covering 

(a) Prices 

(b) Transportation 

f.o.b. factory, freight allowed. 

(c) Terms 

net 30 days. 

(d) Technical data 

(e) Deferred payment ulan #1 

(f) Rental purchase plan #2 

(g) Discount to educf : i°nal institutions - 33 l/3)o 

(h) Demonstration plan - 30 days, One machine of a given rating. 

October 15, 1954 Effective October 25, 1934. 

12 prices revised downward. 

November 26, 1934 Effective November 26, 1934. 

Authorized by Supervisory Agency. 

(a) Design and construction data. 

(b) Price for special accessories. 

February 2, 1935 Effective February 4, 1935. 

To meet Company #4. 

Prices revised downward on 2 gas engine driven welders. 
February 4, 1S35. Effective February 14, 1935. 

Additional construction data. 
Ajril 22, 1935 Effective May 2, 1935, 

Special vuslding accessories revised downward. 

COMPANY #2 - CLASS A 

October 30, 1935 Effective October 30, 1933. 

Original filing covering 

(a) Transportation - f.o.b. factory, freight allowed. 

(b) Terms - 3C days net. 

(c) Deferred ■oayment plan tt6. 

(d) Demonstration plan - 30 days free trial. 

(e) Rental purchase plan #1. 

(f) Design and construction data. 

(g) Prices. 

November 13, 1933 Effective November 13, 1933. 

Authorized by Supervisory Agency. 

Prices on Navy specification welders. These trices also 

ecpvlj on Federal, State and Municipal bids. 
December 5, 1933 , No effective date assigned. 

Navy specification prices segregated from Federal, State 

and Municipal bids. No price change. 
January 22, 1934 Effective February 1, 1934. 

All multiple, operator constant potential arc welder 

prices revised upward. ' ' ' ' 
January 23, 1934 Effective January 25, 1934. 

To meet Comoany #6 on Navy specification. Effective date 

of remainder authorized by Supervisory Agency. 

complete upward revision on both Navy specification and 

Federal, State and Municipal prices. 

9322 



-476- 
' COMPANY if 2 - CLASS A (Continued) 

February 23, 1954 Effective March' 5', 1934. 

(a) Delivery policy changed. Purchaser must pay additional 
transportation charges where special routing is requested. 

(b) Deferred payment plan changed from plan #6 to plan #1. 

(c) Rental purchase plan changed from #1 to #2, 

(d) Discovnt to educational institutions 33 1/3$. 

(e) Prices for optional features filed. 

(f) Price revision - 9 units increased; 6 units decreased. 
May 4, 1954 •. . . Effective May 14, 1.934. 

Price revision - 13 items revised clov.'nward; 1 revised upward. 
September 24, 1934..; September 24, 1934. 

variable voltage type' are welder prices revised downward to 
'meet Company #10, effective September 24, 1934. 
September 26, 1934 '..'... .Effective September 27, 1934. 

To meet Company #6. 

Price revision - 15 items revised downward. 
November 22, 1934 Effective November 26, 1934. 

(a) Design and construction data filed. Statement that Navy 
specification welders shall be the same price as corresponding 
ratings of standard types. 

(b) Provides for .special items or features regularly furnished by 
any competitor to be furnished by Co. #2 at no extra charge. 

(c) Price revision - 11 welders increased. 

November 26, 1954 .Effective November 26, 1934. 

Price revision - 11 welders revised downward. 
December 26, 1954 Effective December 26, 1934. 

Approved by Supervisory Agency. 

Navy specification welders same .price as corresponding ratings 

of Standard Type. 
January 14, 1935, '. . .' . J January 24, 1935. 

Prices on 2 gas engine driven welders revised downward to 

fficret Company #6 price list dated December 27, 1934. 
February 23, 1935 . .March -5, 1935. 

Prices on special set of accessories reduced downward to 

meet price sheet of Company #6 effective February 21, 1935. 
'March '18, 1955.1 \ .. .March. 28, 1335. 

Design, and construction data. filed, also charges for special 

modifications of or additions to standard equipment. 
March 25, 1935 March 25, 1935. 

Statement that formal bids hold for 6P days after date of 

opening, irrespective' 'of 'any price .revisions rca.de in the 

meantime. 
April '22, 1935. May 2, 1935. 

Price revisions — "8' units- revised downward., 

6 units revised upward/ 
May 23, 1935. '. May 23, 1935. 

Authorized by Superv'i's'ory Agency.. 

Uhen welders are shipped on Government bill of lading, 

deductions may be made equal to cost of freight to private 

customers at current freight rates. 

Filed to meet Company #6 prices, effective May 3, 1935. 



9822 



-477- 
COl.iPAITY #3 - CIaSS A 

October 30, 1933. Effective date October 30, 1933. 

Cri^inpl filing covering 

(a) Terms - 2)o 10 days, 30 days net from date of shipment. 

(b) Prices 

(c) Technical data. 

November 27, 1933 Effective December 5, 1933. 

Price filing covering Navy specifications. 
December 21, 1933 ....Ho effective date. 

Price filing on 1 gas engine driven welder to meet 

Conroany #6 -nrice. 

January 16, 1934. January 26, 1934. 

(a) Prices filed on standard accessories. 
(b') Prices filed on superseded models. 
March 29, 1934....:. .Effective I larch 29, 1934'. 

Authorized by Supervisory Agency., 

Prices revised - 6 units increased, 
April 23, 1934 Effective May 3, 1934< 

Filed a new price sheet showing their prices in the form 

generally recognized by the industry as standard. 
May 21, 1934 Effective May 31 j 1934. 

Price revision -Navy specifications - 2 models increased, 

2 models decreased. Prices now same as standard machines. 
May 31, 1934 -.'Effective June 11, 1934. 

Filed prices for rental machines showing a set figure per 

machine per month - Bla,n #4. 
June 7, 1934 . . Effective June 18, 1934. 

Price revision - 1 model increased and 1 model decreased. 
•July 27, 1934 Effective August 6, 1934. 

(a) Original filing on multiple operator constant potential arc 
welding sets. 

(b) Increased -orice on 1 model, single operator set, decreased 
price on 1 model. 

November 9, 1934. Effective November 19, 1934. 

(a) Increased prices - 21 models multiple operator sets. 

(b) Added 14 new multiple operator sets not -previously filed. 
November 23, 1934 Effective December 8, 1934. 

(a) Filed original prices for combination arc and cutting panels. 

(b) Filed design and construction data. 

(c) Seduced prices on 4 sets standard accessories. 

(d) Reduced all single operator welding sets to meet Company #6 
prices effective September 27. 

(e) Reduced all multiple operator prices to meet Company #19 
prices effective September- 27, • • • ■ ... 

February 16, 1935 Effective February 26, 1935. 

(a) Price revision reducing prices on 3 models. 

(b) Deferred payment plan #2.- 

March 13, 1935 Effective March 21, 1935. 

Statement that either synchronous or. induction drive motors 
will be furnished at customer's .option and that special prices 
previously listed for synchronous drive sets are no longer 
effective; this filed to meet Company #6. filing. Effective 
March 21, 1935. 



9822 



-47S- 

COMPANY #5 - CLASS A (Continued) 

March 27, 1935 Effective April 6, 1935. 

filed new price 'and data sheets superseding all others 

previously filed, 
(a) Reduced prices on 6 Toortahle welders, 
("b) • hew; design and construction data. 

(c) Changed, rental purchase olan from #4" 'to* #2," ' 

(d) Changed quotation data. All quotations automatically expire 
'15 days from date of quotation except Federal, State and 

Municipal, which shall he effective for 66 days from date 
of hid opening.. 

(e) Changed delivery policy from f.o.'h. factory to f.o.h. point 
of shipment with freight allowed. 

(f ) Ohanged terms from '2)0 10 days to net cash 30 days. 
June 4, 1935 Effective June 4, 1935. 

Authorized hy Supervisory Agency. 
Special freight deduction on Government Durchases. 
Material shipped on Government hill 'of lading. Deduction 
from price may he made equal to cost of freight to private 
'customer at current freight rates, 

COMPANY #4 - CL ASS A 

October 20', 1933 Effective Octoher' 30, 1933. 

Original filing covering 

(a) Prices : - 

(h) Tentative Navy specifications. • > 

(c) (Transportation - f.o.h„ factory, freight allowed. 

(d) Demonstration police - 50 day limit.' 

(e) Rental purchase plan #1 

(f ) Deferred payment plan #2 

Octoher 31, 1933 „ 7T o effective date assigned. 

Discount to educational institutions - 53 I/3/o 

Novemher -13, 1933 November 13,' 1933,' Effective- Date. 

Filed prices for Ne.vy specification welders. 

January -30, 1934 , .Effective January 31, 1934. 

' To meet Company #6. 

(a) Special prices for Naw specification welders withdrawn. 

In the future Navy specification equipment quoted to Federal, 
State or Municipal Governments will he prices shown on 
current price lists effective en the date of hid. Results 
in increased price, 
(h) Filed terms - net cash 30 days, 

Fehruary 1, 1934.. Effective Fehruary 1, 1934, To meet 

Company- #19. 
(a) Increased prices on 32 multiple operator welding sets, 
(h) Added 7 new items. ' ■ , t - 

March 14, 1934 Effective March '26, 1934 - 12 days 

requested. Increased prices on 2 gasoline engine welders. 

March 29, 1934 Effective March 29, 1934. Meeting 

Company #17. Reduced prices on 3 direct current welders. 

April 4, 1934 '.Effective April 16, 1934 - 12 days 

requested, 

9822 



—47 9- 

COMPANY if4 ~ CL^S S A (Continued) 

(a) Seduced -orices on 8 welding sets. 

(b) Changed rental purchase plan fron jfl to #2. 

(c) Changed deferred payment plan from f2 to #1. 
-11, 1S54 ".Effective May 21, 1934. 

(a) 3xpanded delivery -oolicv, Corraany will prepay transportation 
charges to' anv railroad destination vithih" the confines of 

' the United States if allo-zed to select '(l) the point of origin 
of shipment, (2) method of transportation, (3) routing of 
shipment, 

(b) Deliveries "by truck '"'ill be made at conoany's option and if 
store door delivery is includ.ed by carrier at no extra cost, 
no charge will be made. 

Lav 16, 1934 Effective May 26, 1934. 

Increased 1' price; decreased 7 prices. 
September 22, 1934 Effective September 24, 1934. 

Will meet prices by Company' #10 effective September 24. 
September 27, 1934 September 27, 1934. 

Uill meet prices filed by Company #6 effective September 27. 

To meet Company 7fl0 and' Cbr.foany #6 of September 27. 
Cctober 2, 1934, Effective October 2, 1934. 

(a) Revised price sheet - single operator welding sets. 

(b) Prices for additional optional features. 

November 24, 1934 Effective November 26, 1934. 

Design and construction data filed for single op ere tor 

welding sets. 
January 5, 1955 Effective' January 17, 1935. 

12 days per request. 

(a) Statement that on specifications calling for items regularly 
supplied by other naiuxi'ac'tur'ers' as" 'standard equipment, will 
furnish such items without extra charge. 

(b) Additional construction data and accessory prices filed. 
January 30, 1S35 '. Effective February 4, 1935. 

To meet Company fflC , effective February 4. 

2 gas engine driven welders reduced. 
March 2, 1955 ".Effective March 14, 1935. 12 days 

request. Special price filed for auxiliary generator. 
March 25, 1935 Effective March 25, 1935. 

Authorized by Supervisory Agency.' 

Prices filed for remote control special features for Navy. 
April 27, 1935 ". . .Effective April 29, 1935. 

Special prices for spring' mounting for gas engine welders 

filed to meet Company #6 prices. 

cqmp.--:.t --5 - class a 

October 50, 1933 Effective October 30, 1933. 

Original filing covering 

(a) Price lists. 

(b) Transportation - f.o.b. factory, freight allowed, except 
tractor welders and welding generators equipped for mounting 
on tractors, prices, f.o.b. factory. 

(c) Prices for extras and accessories. 

9322 



-480- 

COIviFAMY #5 - CLA SS a (Continued ) 

(d) Rental plan #1. 

(e) Deferred payment plan #8. 

(f) Tentative Navy specifications. 

(g) Terns - 30 days net. 

November 13, 1933 Effective November 13, 1933. 

Filed prices on Navy Specif icat'ion welders. 
November 22, 1933 Not released till 1/12/34. 

Authorized by Supervisory Agency. 

Statement making prices on Navy specification welders also 

apply to Federal, State and Municipal "bids. 
December 11, 1933 , ..No effective date. 

Prices for Navy specification welders do not now apply to 

Federal, State and Municipal bids. 

Also filed new price sheet for Federal, State and Municipal 

bids. Prices not changed. 
February 9, 1934 Effective February 19, 1934. 

New price sheet filed decreasing 5 items, increasing 8 

items, ' • • • • 

February 14, 1954 Effective February 24, 1934. 

New price sheet filed increasing 1 item. 
March 23, 1934, Effective March 23, 1934. 

(a) Deferred payment plan changed from #8 to #1. 

(b) Rental purchase plan changed from #1 to #2, 

(c) Discount to educational institution 33-1/3$.' ' ' 

(d) Demonstration plan - limit 30 days, one machine of given 
rating at one time. 

(e) Navy specifications, Federal, State and Municipal prices 
same as standard models of equal rating. 

March 28, 1954 Effective April 7, 1934. 

8 "prices decreased, 2 prices increased. 
July 30, .1934. Effective August 9, 1934. 

5 prices increased, 6 prices decreased. 
September 21, 1954 Effective September 24, 1934. 

Statement that they will meet prices filed by Company #10 

effective September 24, 1934, 
September 24, 1934... Effective September 27, 1934. 

Reduced 8 prices to meet Company #6 prices effective 

September 27, 1934. 
October 8, 1934 '. Effective October 18, 1934. 

Increased prices on 2 welders. 
November 2, 1954 Effective November 2, 1934. 

Authorized by Supervisory Agency. 

Filed statement covering shipments on U.S. Government bill of 

lading allowing deduction of freight equal to that allowed to 

any private buyer; this filed to meet Company #16 filing effect* 

ive November 2. 
November 24, 1934 Effective November 26, 1934. Autho- 

riz i by Supervisory Agency. 

(a) Hew price sheet reducing prices on 13 items, increasing 
prices on 3 items. 

(b) Filed special prices for welding accessories and welding 
cables, 

9822 



-481- 

COKPaI'T ifU ~ CIA S3 A (Continued) 

(c) Piled statement providing for supplying any. items regularly 
supplied "by competitors at no extra cost. 

Decemh?r 28, 1934 Effective January 7, 1955. 

(a) Seduced prices on § -^elders. 

(o) Reduced prices on 2 welding accessories. 

January 19, 1955 Effective January 29, 1935. 

Price on 1 welding accessory reduced. 

:.;rch 18, 1935 Effective March 28, 1935. 

Statement thatprices as filed for accessories cover only 
those sold in connection with a piece of welding equipment. 

tiarch 23, 1935 Effective March 25, 1935. Author- 
ized "by Supervisory Agents. 

Special price applying to automatic remote control for Navy 
specifications, 

April 25, 1935 ..Effective !.!a: r 6, 1935. 

Prices on various types of mountings for gas engine welders, 

May 24, 1935 Effective Lay 24, 1935. Authorized 

"by Supervisory Agency, 

Statement providing that on all shipments on Government hill of 
lading, deduction for freight may he made in the same amount as 
for any individual huyer. 



9822 



-482- 

coepaijy - JI 6 - cl ass a- 

October 30, 1933 Effective October 30,1933. 

Original filing covering 

(a) Prices 

(b) Terras - 2fi> 10 days net 30 days.' 

(c) Deferred payment -plan #1. 
(&) Rental purchase -olan #2. 

(e) ITavy, Federal, State and Municipal bids - price sane as regular 
s t andard e quipment . 

(f) prices for accessories and additional eauipment. 

January 16, 1934 Effective January 25, 1934. 

(a) Increased orices 2 items special eouipment for Navy specifica- 
tions. 

(b) Terms changed fron 2fj 10 days to net 30 days, no discount. 

(c) Transportation - Customer nay deduct freight by submitting paid 
freight bill rrith remittance. 

(d) Increased prices on 10 ^elders. 

September 17, 1934 '. . .Effective September 27, 1934. 

Statement reducing all prices $5.00 per unit lovrer than -orices fil- 
ed by Company #10 effective September 24, 1934. All prices previous- 
ly filed rhich r . r erc lorer than new Conoany #10 prices remain un- 
changed. 

September 26, 1934 Effective September 27, 19' 14. 

Authorized by Supervisory Agency. 

(a) Statement that federal, State and funicipal bids will be sr^-e 

as prices -luoted commercial users. 

(b) Piled ne - " orice sheet incorporating orevious changes and in- 
creasing one -orice. 

December 10, 1934 . . . .Effective December 20,1934. 

filed neT7 "orice sheet -hich included nev items out did not change 

previous trices. 
December 12, 1934 Effective December 22,1934. 

Statement that special items supplied by other manufacturers as 

standard eouipment r-ould be furnished at no e-rtra charye. 
December 26, 1934 Effective January 5, 1935 

Per: Price sheet adding several ne ,_T items and reducing prices on 

three uelders and t- '0 accessories. 
December 26, 1934 Effective December 26, 1934. 

Prices in first December 26th filing also aptily to Government busi- 
ness. 
December 29, 193': Effective Januar- 8, 1955. 

Tvo r.'elders reduced on Government sales. 
February 2, 1935 Effective February 4, 1S35 

Tv r o trices reduced. These had formerly applied only to Government 

sales; novr aonly to all commercial users; meeting similar prices 

filed by Company #4 effective February 4, 1955. 
February 11, 1935 Effective February 21, 1 955. 

P.evised -orices on relding accessories; 2 ite is increa.seE, 3 items 

decrer sed. 
March 11, 1935 Effective March 21, 1935. 

Sta.tement providing for eigher synchronous or induction drive motors 

a- optional e.,uioment at no extra charye. 

9822 



-483- 

March 25, 1935 Effective Ilarch 25, 1935. 

Authorized by Supervisory Agency. 

Prices on Navy specification welders shall be same as prices on 

corresponding ratings for comnercial users. 
Larch 25, 1935 Effective April 4, 1935. 

Includes special trices for sets driven by synchronous motors and 

cancels filing of i'arch 11. 
April 18, 1935 Effective A^ril 29, 1955. 

Specification data and extra, prices for special eouipraent. 
April 25, 1935 Effective May 3, 1935. 

Statement that all shipments on Government bill of lading are 

arrived at by deducting cost of freight to private customer. 

COLPATY r7 - CLASS A 

November 21, 1934- Effective December 1, 1934. 

Original filing 

(a) Statement that they would sell in conformity with Company #4 
price sheet dated September 27, 1934. 

(b) Deferred payment plan #1-6 

February 27, 1935 Effective Larch 9, 1935 

Complete filing covering 

(a) Prices. 

(b) Terms - net 50 days. 

(c) Delivery - f.o.b. factory, freight allowed. 

(d) Deferred payment plan #l-b. 

(e) Rental purchase plan #2. 

(f) Educational institution discount 33-1/3^. 

(g) Demonstration plan - limit 30 days, one machine of a given 
rating. 

(L) Statement that prices to U. S.lTavy are the same as trices for 

regular commercial users, 
(i) Statement that any features regularly furnished bjr any compet- 
itor as standard equipment will be furnished by Company #7 at 
no extra charge. 

Larch 18, 1935 Effective March 28, 19-5. 

Prices for individual welding accessories filed to meet Corn- 
pan;' - #2 prices effective March 5. 

Larch 25, 1935 Effective Larch 25, 1935. 

Authorized by Supervisory. Agency. 
Eiled prices in automatic control features for Nay;'-. 

Lay 23, 1935 Effective Hay 23, 1935. 

Authorized by Supervisory Agency. 

(a) Piled statement that freight deduction on shipments on Govern- 
ment bill of lading would be the same as those allowed any 

■ rivate customer. 

(b) Piled technical data on "elding apparatus. 

COLPATY r '-8 -CLASS B 

October 30,1933 Effective October 30,1933 

Original filing covering 

(a) Prices 

(b) Accessories and optional equipment. 

9822 



-484- 

CQMPANY #8 -CLASS B (Continued) 

(c) Navy Specification sheet. 

(.&) Transportation f. o.b. factory, freight allowed. 

(e) Terms - net 30 days, no cash discount. 

(f) Rental policy #1 

December 12, 1933 ! T o Effective Date 

Prices on Navy specification welders. 
March 15, 1334 . . Effective March 25, 1934. 

Prices on Navy specification sets filed December 12 withdrawn. Pegu- 

.lar commercial prices will be quoted. 
March 29, 1934. . . = Effective March 29, 1934. 

Authorized by Supervisory Agency. 

Reduced prices on 4 welders. 
April 12, 1334 , Effective April 22, 1934 

Prices filed for solid rubber tire equipment on portable welders. 
October 15, 1934 Effective October 25, 1934. 

(a) Piled prices on multiple operator welding sets. 

(b) New Price sheet on single operator welders reducing 13 prices, in- 

creasing 8 prices. 

(c) Rental plan changed from §1 to #2. 

(<?.) Increased amount of deductions for 4 accessories, making prices more 
favorable. 
January 14, 1935 Effective January 24, 1935. 

(a) Decreased prices - 1 welder. 

(b) Piled specification sheet on single operator welders. 

coi:pai:y ^9 - class c 

December 15, 1934 Effective December 26,1934. 

Original filing covering 

(a) Prices. 

(b) Terms - net 30 davs. 

(c) Trans-iortation - f.o.b. factory, freight, allowed. 

(d) Prices for extra. ecui;oment. 

March 29, 1935 . . . .Effective April 8, 1935. 

Piled statement that prices for Navy specification welders would 
be same as prices for regular commercial users. 

CQlf AIT £j.'j CLASS A 

October 30,1935.. ..Effective October 30,1955. 

Original filing cohering 

(a) Transportation - f.o.b. factory, freight allowed. 

(b) Terms - net 30 days, no cash discount. 

(c) Deferred payment plan -49 
(c) Demonstration - 30 davs. 

(e) Rental nurcha.se plan -=1 . 

(f) Prices on optional features and accessories. 

November 13, 1935 Effective November 15, 1933. 

Statement that Navy specification welc'ers are Priced' same as standard 
welders of similar rating ant? special features are priced at rep-ilar 
additions. 

November 14, 1933 ~ T o Effective Date. 

9822 



; 



-48 



c: 



COMFaMY jjQ.0 - CLASS A (Continued) 

Special prices for. Navy specification welders reduced from stand- 
ard price. • ■■•'.,. 

February 12, 1934 i Effective February 12, 1934. 

To meet Company #19 
Educational institutions discount 33-1/3 $. 
February 15, 1934 Effective February 24, 1934. 

(a) Rental purchase plan changed from i L l to #2. 

(b) Deferred payment plan changed from #9 .to #1. 

(c) 5 welder prices reduced; 4 "elder prices increased. 
February 26, 1934 Effective larch 8, 1934. 

(a) Delivery policy amplified. Company will prepay transportation 
"ithin the U.S. provided they select (1) point of shipment, 
(2) method of transportation, (3-) routing of shipment. Store 
door delivery, when included by carrier, will be passed on to 
purchaser without charge. 

(b) Statement that prices on welding or special ecuipment as 

• Favy, Federal, State and Municipal bids are same as regular 
industrial prices. 

(c) Special price sheet filed for optional features and accesso- 
ries. 

(&) Filed nev price sheet, reducing 15' welders', increasing 3 
■ 'elders. 

I larch 13, 1934 Effective March 22, 1934. 

Filing bringing printed sheet up-to-date. Mo change in prices. 

September 13, 1934 Effective September 24,1934 

New Price sheet revising 15 prices downward, 12 prices upward. 

October 23,1934 Effective October 23,1954. 

To "set Company #8. 
fenera.l price revision, rt-> icing 29 items. 

November 25, 1934 Effective Fovember 26, 1954. 

Authorized by Supervisory Agency. 

(a) Filed technical data on fielding apparatus. 

(b) Filed information on Navy, Federal, State and Municipal bids. 

(c) Filed prices on electrodes, protective material and cables. 
(&) Filed prices on combination engine and electric driven wel- 
ders. 

January 25, 1935 Effective February 4,1935. 

Revised prices downward on 2 gasoline engine driven rrelders 
to meet Company. #6. (Evidently error in meeting Company #6 who 
filed only for Government orders.) 

larch 25, 1935 Effective April 4, 1935. 

(a) Filed prices on two special welders^ 

March 25, 1935 :............ .Effective March 25, 1935. 

Authorized by Supervisory Agency 
Statement that present filed prices are effective on Navy 
specifications. 

March 28, 1935 '.' Mo Effective Date. 

Authorized by. Supervisory Agency 
Sheet covering technical information. 

April 29, 1935 Effective ray 9, 1935. 

prices revised dormwarc' on t v- o special velders filed under 
date of March 25. 

9822 ' ' 



-486- 

COMPANY #10 - CLASS A (Continued) 

Hay 8, 193.5. Effective Hay 13, 1935. 

To neet Company # 15. 
Prices on additional extra equipment. 

COFPAPY #11 - CLASS 3 

October 1, 1934 ■ , . . . . , .Effective October 11, 1934. 

Original filing covering 

(a) Prices 

(b) Tens - net 30 days. 

(c) Transportation - f.o.b. factory. ■• 

Eovenber 26, 1934 Effective November 26, 1934. 

To meet Company ^6. 

(a) Revised prices, 22 revised downward, 2 revised upward. 

(b) Piled technical information and "orices for accessories. 

(c) Terms revised from 30 days net to 1ft cash, 10 days, net 30. 

(d) Transportation revised from f.o.b. factory to f.o.b. factory, 
full freight allowed. 

(e) Discounts- 

(1) educational institutions 33-l/3f1. 

(2) users single quantity order for 10 or more welders - 
10$ off. 

(f) Rental plan #3. 

COUPAKY #12 - CLASS C 

April 30, 1934 Effective Hay 10, 1934. 

Original filing - Filed! .price on only one welder, which is all 
they manufactured. : 

(a) Terms - 50 days .net. 

(b) Transportation - f.o.b. factory. 

(c) Deferred payment plan #4« 

March 4, 1935 . . . Effective March 14, 1935. 

* Piled prices on 2 new welders. 

COHPAIIY #13 - CLASS 3 

October 31, 1933.... ' Effective .October 31, 1953. 

Original filing covering 

(a) Prices. 

(b) Specifications. 

(c) Transportation - f.o.b. factory, .freight .allowed. 
December 12, 1933. No Effective Date. 

(a) Terns - 30 days net, no cash discount. 

(b) Deferred payment plan #1. 

(c) Dental 'ourcha.se nlan #2. 

(d) Demonstration - 30 day limit, one machine of ^iven rating at 
■ a time. • .... 

(e) Transportation - freight allowed. 

(f) Discounts - educational institutions 33-1/3^-. 

January 15, 1934 Effective. January 25, 1934. 

Reduced nrices 3 gasoline engine driven welders. 
January 24, 1934 Effective February 3, 1954. 

Added 2 additional size "elders. . 
9822 



-487- 

COLEPAI-rr #13 - CLASS B (Continued) 

April 15, 1934 Effective April 23, 1934. 

Prices revised gasoline engine driven welders, 3 reduce"., 5 un- 
changed, 6 increase".. 

: "ay 23, 1934 Effective June 2, 193^ . 

Price sheet changed and simplified; trices unchanged. 

September 26, 1954 Effective September 27, 1934 

■.„ ■ . To Meet Company $6 and $19, 

(a) Statement that on single operator welding sets prices would be 

reduced to those filed by Company #5, effective September 27, 
1934. 

(b) Statement that on t'-p-operator welding sets prices would be re- 
duced to those filed by Company #19, effective September 27,1954. 

October 4, 1954 Effective October 4, 1954. 

Authorized by Supervisory Agency. 

•Revised prices on single operator and two-operator sets. 

P.evised 7 prices upward, 

November 30,1934 Effective December 10, 1934. 

Statement regarding design and construction data, 
February 7, 1935 Effective February 17,1955. 

deduced prices on 2 single operator welders. 
Hay 2, 1955 Effective ""ay 13, 1955. 

Tiled technical data and prices for extrr equipment. 

COilPxd'T r'r 14 - CLASS B 

January 29, 1934 Effective January 29,1934. 

Original filing covering 

(a) prices. 

(b) Terms - 2fa cash, 30 days net. 

(c) Deferred payment plan =' ; 5. 

(d) Transportation - f.o.b, factory. 

(e) Rental plan #4. 

Liay 53, 1934 Effective June 7, 1934. 

Prices added for accessories, 
December 1, n 934 Effective December 11,1934. 

Prices added for coupling- drive welders. 
April 1, 1935 ". Effective Aaril 11,1935. 

Prices filed remote control equipment for TTavy. 



-488- 



COMPANY #15 - CLASS A 

October 30, 1933 Effective October 30, 1933 

Original Piling Covering. , 

(a) Prices. 

(b) Terms ~ 30 days net. 

(c) Accessories and extra equipment. 

(d) Rental purchase plan #1. 

January 24, 1934 Effective February 3, 1934. 

Piled prices on 11 ne™ welders. 

February 28, 1934 Effective March 10, 1934. 

(a.) Filed ne^ sheet reducing 4 prices, increasing one -orice. 

(b) Transportation - f.o.b. -ooint of shipment, freight 
allowed. 

(c) deferred payment plan #1. 

(d) Rental purchase plan changed from #1 to #2. 

(e) Disccunts - educationa.1 institutions 33-l/3,'&. 
(Filed prices on additional optional equipment. 

October 2, 1934 Effective October 13, 1934. 

Hew price sheet reducing 15 prices, adding several 

ne" items. 

November 26, 1934 Effective November 26, 1934.