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BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRadv 

3 9999 06317 519 2 



OFFICE OF NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION 
DIVISION OF REVIEW 



W^ 



VVC 



Jtt Ji u U -, 
lllSfARTMEBT OF COaUEaOS 



AN ANALYSIS OF THE PRA CENSUS 

By 
Max Sasuly 



WORK MATERIALS NO. 83 



STATISTICS SECTION 
MARCH, 1936 



OFFICE OF MTIOiIAL JJECOVSRY ADiAniIST3ATI0K 
DIVISION OF x^JlVIS.7 



m MALYSI3 OF TliE PHA CENSUS 
3.y 
Max Sasuly 



STATISTICS SECTIGI 
MARCH, 1936 



0854 



This "Analysis of the PRA Census" v/as prepared by Llr. Max Sasuly. 

In essence, the report is a tabulation of the results of the P3A. 
Census which yielded two spot records on employment and payrolls. The 
report has interest for several reasons: 

First, the analysis throws light upon the degree of success of the 
volijntary effort at recovery urged by the President, Such analysis is 
not derivable in as clear form from any other existing census procedure 
It is true, of course, that auxiliary analysis of price and man-hour 
trends is highly desirable. 

Second, tne analysis provides a unique example of an inexpensive, 
prompt densus comprehending all industry — non-manufacturing and manu- 
facturing. The analysis exliibits the most co;nprehensive pattern extant 
on employment and payroll income by regions and industries. 

Third, a fruitful approach is indicated to exiiibit the patterns 
of variation of employment and payroll income by size of establish- 
ment. 

At the back of this report will be found a brief statement of 
the studies undertaken by the Division of ileview. 



L. C. Llarshall 
Director, Division of Review 



March 23, 1936 



9854 -i- 



COilTELITS 



Page 
Introductory suirimary 1 

I . Suinmary of Tabulated a n d Cxiar ted Hes'iilts 
Section I - Development of PEA Census Project 

Industry group and sab-t^row^ classification 3 

Special tabulation by the Census Bureau 4 

Early use of tabulated results 4 

Extended analysis by IJilA. 5 

Section II - Summary of results 

Validity of employment increase under P.^ 7 

Variations and PRA increase'^ of emplo;y'raent and payrolls.. 10 

Emplo'/ment- payroll variations by size of establisiimcnt. . . 16 

Econouuc implications of PEA. employment increase 19 

I I . Detail_e^d_i\jialy si s_j)f_Data 

Section I - Reliability of PIIA Census 

CoiTiparable results for manufacturing industries, Chart 3. 21 
Comparable results for all industries, by states, 

PBA and BLS .'36 

Weekly income per worker, all industries. Chart 6, 26 

All-industry eraplojmient changes, by states, C^art 7 28 

Relation of PRA changes to seasonal f lucta.tions, 

Charts 4 and 5 30 

Section II - Distribution of E/nplo;/ment by Industries 
and Regions 

Distribution by industries. Charts 8 and 9 30 

Distribution in a sample state-group 36 

Industry distribution in PRA and Census of Occupation.... 38 

Extended basis for estimate of PRA employment 38 

Distribution by geographic regions, Cliarts 10 and 11 39 

Section III - Variations in Pay, Employmant, and Cliangcs, 
by industry Groups 
Variations in employment and PRA Cxianges, summary, 

Chart 2 44 

Variations by regions, all industry groups. Charts 12 

and 13 1. 46 

Variation of PRA employment increase by primary 

industry groups, Charts 14 50 

Section IV - Variations by Size of Sstablisiirafcnt 

PRA Census all-industry 3-state sample. Charts 15 and 16. 50 
Census of Manufactures data, 7state sample, Giiarts 17.... 60 
Section V - Economic Implications of PRA Employment In- 
crease 60 

Section VI - Possible Further Analysis of Data 76 



-11- 



9854 



CONTENTS (continued) 

III. Appendixes - Detailed Data Tables 

Appendix I 

Table XII. By- size variations in Census of Manufacturoo - Onio 

Table XIII. P.SA data suinrcary by primary industries 

Table XIV. PRA. data regional suiimaries by industry groups 

Appendix II 

Sxliibit A. Extract from NAA Insii^nia Section history 

Exliibit B. Copy of memo S.I.Posncr to Lt. Johnston 9/16/33 

Exiiibit C. Copy of memo S.I.Posner to :.iobt. K. Straus 9/25/33 

Exliibit D. Code of Industry Classification for PHA 



-m- 
9854 



LIST OF TABLES 



TABLE Page 



1. I PRA. Summary of Major Hesults - Co.nparison with 

Census, BLS 8 

2. II PRA. Summary by I.iajor Industry 'G-roups - U. 3. 

To tal s 11 

3. Ill PRA Suinrnary by States and Regions 12 



4. IV CTneck of PRA by Census of "d-'Jiufactures - 16 

Groups 22 

5. V-A Census of Manufactures - Estimate of Total 

Siaployment , June , 1953 23 

6. V-B Census of Manufactures - Co.nputation of 

Avera^je leelrly Pay 34 

7. VI BLS Sample Smployinent, Indexes, Changes - 

Ifi I/'fg. Industries 25 

8. VII Census Seasonal Trend of Employment, Man-hours, 

Hours 31 

9. VIII BLS Trend of Manufacturing Sraployraent, 1929-35 32 



10. IX PRA Distribution by Regions and Industry 

Groups - Establisiiments 33 

11. X' PRA. Distribution ay Regions and Industry 

Groupp - Emplo:/rnent 34 

12. XI PRA. Variation by Regions and Industry Groups - 

Weekly Inco/ae 47 



13. XII Census - Variation of Emplo;'/ment, Ohio, by 

Size of Industry (4 s^ieets) 94 

14. XII-A Census - Variations oi Eraplo.yraent 'oy size - 

Massachusetts 69 

15. XII-3 Census - Varie.tions of Employment by size - 

Pennsylvania 70 

16. XII-C Census - Variations of Eraployment by size - 

Ohio 71 

17. XII-D Census - Variations of Employment by size - 

North Carolina 72 

18. XII-E Census - Variations of Einplojanent by size - 

Missouri 73 

19. XII-F Census - Variations of Siaplcyment by size - 

Texas 74 

20. XII-G Census - Variations of Ernployment oy size - 

California 75 



-IV- 

9854 



LIST OF TAEL513 (coutiimed) 



TA3L5 



Page 



21. XIII P.IA. Tabulation by Inlustrie^ and Sroups - 

U. 3. Totals (5 Slxeets) 98 

22. XIV-A P3A Regional Summaries by Industry Groups 

New England 103 

23. XIV-B PHA Regional Sanmaries oy Industry aroups 

i.'Iid-Atl antic 104 

2^. XIV-C FRA Regional Sur^imaries by Industry Groups 

East N. Central 105 

25. XIV-D PRA Regional Soinraaries by Industry Groups 

West IT. Central 106 

26. XIV-E FRA Regional Summaries by Industry Groups 

Soutii Atlantic 107 

27. XIV-P PRA. Regional Summaries by Industry Groups 

East S. Central 103 

28. XIV-G PRA Regional Suraraaries by Industry Groups 

West S. Central 109 

29. XIV-J: FRA Regional Sui.imaries by Industry Groups 

Mountain 110 

30. XIV-I PRA Regional Smimiaries by Industry Groups 

Pacific Ill 



-V- 



9854 



LI.ST OF OLAl-lTS 



1 . GTA.^S 



1. 1 Principal Census G-eo2ra>iic Ze^^ions o 

2. 2 PHA Employinent Census, U. 3. Totals by- 

Industry Groups jnt^ 



3. 3 Co.iparison of PliA. He turns 'vvltli BL3 and Ccncus - 

Manu:r?acturing 14 

■-4, 4 Seasonal Trend of Manufacturin;-, Einployment - 

Census Year? 15 

5. 5 Trend of Employment - 3L3 iu-'^iiufacturinti In- 

dustries 20 

6. 6 '.Veekly Inccrne per ,7orker - AlA Industry - 

BLS, PHA. .^ 27 

7. 7 June-October Cliange - Einployment, Pc?yrolls - 

"by State s 29 



8. 8 PEA U. S. Totals - Distribution of Establish- 

ments, Eraplo2;"ment , Payrolls 35 

9. 9 PRA Her)ref^entatiVd 7- State Sainole Distributions.... 37 



10. 10-A P?A Distribution by flegions - Establishments - 

iron-Manuf ac turin^- 40 

11. lO-B PHA Distribution by Regions - Establishments - 

Manufacturing 41 

12. 11-A PSA Distribution by Regions - Employment - 

ITon-lianuf ,-c turing 42 

13. 11-3 PEA Distribution by Hegions - Employment - 

Lianufac turing ^3 



14. 12 P?A Employment Change - by Regions 48 

15. 13 PRA leekly Pay - by Regions 49 



16. 14— A PRA June- Oct. Change - Kon-manufac turing 51 

17. 14-B PRA June-Oct. Change - 1-Ion-durable Manufacturing... 52 
13. 14-C PRA June-Oct. Change - D-j.rable Manmacturing 53 



19. 15 V: riation by Size of Establisimient - PRA Siti- 

ployment, Payroll - 3 states 55 

20. 16-A PRA, 3-states, Variations by Size of Establish- 

ment -Pood Pro iucts 56 



-VI- 

98 54 



LIST 07 C'liUTS (continued) 



GJlRI! 



21. 16-B PEA, 5-i;tates, Variations by Si::e of nstablisii- 

./lents - Departivient Stores 57 

22. 16-C PHA, 3-states, Variations oy Size of Sstablis^^- 

monts - Cotton Goods 53 

23. 16-D PPA, 3-states, Variations b,/ Sis^e of Establisli- 

ments - Leatlier Products 59 

PA. 17-C Census of Llanufactures, Vi-riations by Size of 

Establisiiiiients - 7-State Compopite 61 

25. 17-1 Census pf l/ianufac fires, Variations by Size of 

EstablislLTient 3 - l/iassac-iusetts 63 

26. 17-11 Census of Manufactures - Variaticais oy Size of 

EstaJlis/iinents - Pennsylvania 63 

27. i7-III Census of lianuf actures - V-.riations by Sizo of 

E^t-'olis/'iiients - Oaio 64 

j8. 17-IV Census of l-ianuf ac ture s - Variation; by Sir.e of 

Estajlisjun.mts - i-Tcrtli Carolina 65 

29. 17-V Census of l.Ianu..f actures - Variation-f; by Size of 

Establis"'ments - Ilis.iouri 65 

30. 17-VI Census of l.ianufactare? - Variation = by Size of 

Establish iments - Texas 67 

31. 17-VTI Census of Manufactures - Variations by Size of 

Establisi'jEJnt'j - California 68 



32. 18. Census E.i;ilo,7;.ie:.t, I.L?n-liours, Hours per leek - 

19c3. 77 

33. 19. Trend of .Teeicly Hours 1934-35, 3LS Sample 78 



-Vll- 



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-1- 



a:: AIIiiLYSIS 01^ T'IS rM. CSITSUS O? ZffLOYISlTT 
Si<i-;niricance oi" Zes-a.lts fcr 1J2A Policy 

The "Post-;>ard" Geri'^us taken in connection wit-i tlie President's 
Heemplojment Agreement (PJA) of A"a,'pj..jt, 1933, was design. d to 
deteryaine tlie effectiveness of this racasure in pmmotin^, industrial 
recovery. (*) T-j-b simple quostlonnaire card, sli^'vn below, v^rs distri'outod 
shortly aiterward. hy the mail caxrier ever/ place wlieve persons were em- 
ployed on his r'-^ute. (**) l^j- sentit.ll/ the inni;.ir/ r^jl.-.ted to the nuuber 
emolo^-'ed rnd t' .- asno-uit of the p8/:oll durin2 t..e pa.' period ending 
nearest to Jime 17 and l:;toJor 14, 1033. The iresent report is an 
anadysis of the si/piif icmcj f.)r h^dA of the returns frci tliis ouestionnaire 
card. 

Tnile the PPA Census thus -pives only two svot records of em'olov- 
ment and pa/rolls, its results throw li;3:ht on a number jf fundamental 
elements ajid problems of H?A. First, tiiey supply fairly conclusive 
proof of the effectiveness as a recovery rnea-sure of PIA in its voluntary 
phases. Second, they suoply bench-mark data, which are 'oractically i.in- 
avodlable elsev/.xere concornin ;; employment and ourchasin.g po-.yer, the oasic 
ele:aents in the task xmdertaken by /..RA in 1933. Third, the res-odts 



(*) See r?A hulletins 2-6, Aajust- September lJ33, in oarticular, the 

following reports 'ore-'^red in the Til Or^&n:i.2a.tion Studies Section 
of the Division of ^.^eview: History of tlie President's Jleem'iloyment 
Agreement by ... Conrad Hoover, history ui tJie Insi^^nia Division by 
7. LI. D-avpJl. 

(**) Per the mechanics of t.ie distributi..n of t^ie auestionnoire througli 
the Post Office, and District Cfiice? of t,..e Depa .'tmant of Cr-unerce, 
see A'iToendix II. 



9854 



disclose the striking.; tec-inical possibilities of a miniature censiis, 
■onusually simple and inexrpensive, tliat can supply indispensable data 
basic to problems suc'a as were faced oy VIA, -and still press for 
solution. 

I Suima a ry of Tabulated and Cliartod Hesults 
Tlie analysis of tao PPiA data nere presented vras made in- tlie 
spring of 1934 and the fall of 1955. Its essence is embodied in tlie 
accompanying chart ■? and tJie supporting data. IT.esG are ^iven in the 
tables of Appendix I. T-ie principal tables are based on the returns 
from the a lestionnairs cai'ds a,o classified gnd. tabulated by the Census 
Bureau (*) for P:^. 

Section I - Development of P.'tA Census Project 
Industry group and sub-t-i^roup classification . Sie primary industries 

probably numbering several thousand items are usually ii;rouped into a 
smaller nu:-nber of fundiAmental groups, some 500 in the case of the mp.na- 
facturing industries covered by t^e Census. Host of tlie latter indus- 
tries are canvassed by tie Bureau of Labor Statistics and classified in 
some 90 primary r^roups. Census sujninarizes the returns for the primary 
groups in 16 major classes. Tiiese major classes are a.1 so used essentially 
by BLS. In the classification pattern used fur PM, all industries are 
grouped into a tota.1 of 167 primary classes (to fit a 3-digit code), 



(*) Hie entire work of receiving t.ie returned questionnaire cards, 

classifyint., punching, machine and hand tabulation of the returns 
was done wita notable dispatcji by the Special Tabulation Section 
of the Census Bureau. Tne entire job was completed in about 5 
weel-=!. The working force nuiabered some 350 at its peak. The 
cost of tl.e tabulation work proper was a,b out $37,000.00. 



9854 



-4— 

conforming to the established Census and 3LS groupings. Tlie non- 
manufacturin^i industries are grouped primarily in t^ie classification 
of tae last censuses (1950) of distribution and occup. tions. The manu- 
facturing industries are grouped in the IS census classes with sub- 
groups corresponding v/itli the 90-industry grouping of I3LS. 

Special tabula t ion by the Census 3ureau . The special classification 
used Wc-.s arranged by consultation with the Census Bureau, BLS, and 
other Government agencies. Tlie cla,sses, and t}ie comprised industries, 
are given m Appendix II. Mo-.'t oi tlie data on tlie questionnaire card 
could be tabals.ted diroctly. iloATever, a special adjustment had to be 
made for the different lengths oi the pay period indicated in tae re- 
turns. For the monthly r^&j .» riod t'.ie payroll uas divided ''oy 4.34, 
for a half month period it was divided by 2.17, to give the equivalent 
weekly pay. Some 900,000 cue'='tionnaire cards were returned. Of these 
a number could not be used because tn.ey vi/cre illegible, also those re- 
porting no employment for either J"uie or Octcber were rejected. Tlie 
643,000 returned cards taat '.vere usable were tabulated by. t?ie Census 
Bureau in the primary 167 industry group's, giving a record of tlie re- 
porting establisliments, enployment, and the adjusted weekly payroll 
for each state and for all cities over 3b0,000. In a su;)plementary tabu- 
lation a breakdown of the employment da,ta was made by size of establish- 
ment for Massachusetts, Ohio, and ITorth Carolina, three states consider- 
ed representative of the principal economic regions. 

Early use of - ta.bulated resul ts. T.io m'lin taoulation by states, 
completed in December, 1933, was tl^e oasis of tlie roUcJi estimate of 



9834 






TBA reemplojTTient released soon thereafter oy "JRA.. Tlie June-October 
increase in employment reported by tli.e PRA. returns for the entire 
country v;as assumed to represent a coverage of 30^. Tliis value, 
derived by a, crude extrapolation from an estimate of total eraplojmient 
suggested by 3LS, is too iiign. A closer estimate of V.ie coverage is 
suggested below based on a separate consideration of the principal 
employment groups in rela-tim tot.i-j corresocnding groups of the gain- 
fully employable, (see page 17 and [Table I.). 

Tloe supplementary tabulation giving a brialcdown by size of 
establisliment for the three selected states becajiie -available in 
February, 1931-. It served as a basis for the first statistical study 
by llilA. of. the variations .of employnent conditions by size of enter- 
prise - effected, pres^'omably by PPA or the codes. (*) 

E xtended analysis by Y2A .. In tha sabsequent work by I\'^, here 
presented, the data tabulated by Census for individual states were 
suiniTia.rized by primary industries and ^oy major groups for the entire 
country, and for the nine Census geograp.iic divisions. Comparisons 
v-'ere made of the reported PJIA. employment and payroll changes with 
the corresponding changes saown by the Bureau of Labor Statistics 
and the 1933 Census of Man\if actures. 



(*) A comprehensive analytic tabulation of the by-size varia- 
tions of employment and payroll changjs for these three 
states was made by Liax Sasuly witi the aid uf Zmily C. 
Pixley, Clement 7inston, and otners during Pebroary- 
March, 1934. A detailed discussion of the results is 
given in a report by Spurgeon Bell, June, 1934, avail- 
able in the files of HHA. 



9854 



-6- 



Tliis analysis suxplies measures of significant economic 
changes, for which other sources afforded only moa:;er infornation. 
BLS covered in 1333 only some 60,000 estahlisliments for all industries. 
Census report?; payrolls only as yearly totals. The PRA analysis alone 
supplies measures of payroll change over the interval studied; weekly 
income in "both periods; change in weekly income - all for a fairly 
complete all-industry representation. These dynamic spot indications 
of employment and purciiasing po\/er can also be derived for identical- 
firm industries grouped by size of e3tabli3iim.ent for other states than 
the three selected. 

An analysis of similar scope was also made 'for a ' seven-state 
composite, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Ohio, North Carolina, i/iissouri, 
Texas, and California. This composite is a fair representative sample 
for the entire country with respect to. the proportions of employment 
and payrolls and their variations, in the major industry groups. For 
some individual industries, however, this state-group does not afford 
adequate representation. 

Significant comparisons vere made of tiie e;fl:)loyment and es- 
tablisliment coverage by PRA. and BLS for the 90 manufacturing industry 
groups of BLS-CENSUS. Particularly significant are the coiiparisons 
between PEA, BLS, and Census as regards the indicated June-October change 
in employment and payrolls, the Ip.tter lacking in Census. Tae PRA anal- 
ysis made available for the first time a measure of the range of varia- 
bility of movements indicated by samples like BLS or PRA when inter- 
compared. ■ ■• '■ 



9854 



-7- 



S ection II - Summary of results 
Validity of bm'jlo.7iaent increase under P'.RA . Doubt ha? "been 

raised in s^ondry critical ••quarters rejardinc^ t':e validity of the 

remarkable Juiie-Octobc r increases in emplo^/iaent. The present analysis 

shov.'s quite conclusively that the PRA returns are adequately checked by 

BLS and by the Census of Manufactures rejirtinj for coiaparable industr.y 

groups and regions as sAovvn by Charts 3 and 7. 

The weekly income per worker shovm by P3A, BLS, and Census 
(for June) are: 

VRA, U9.05; 3t.J, ;317.99; Census, ;/3.65. 
Tliis is a reasonable as^reement considering-^ the difference in the ty^e 
of coverage and the data re ~rted. PilA. includes in payrolls wages and 
salaries; BLS includes only wages; for Census only yearly average 
values are obtainable of a composite wa^jes- salaries weekly pay. Tnese 
were estimated by a special computation for the principal groups ar^d 
for ill Manufacturing. 

WTiile the differences for weelcly pay shov/n by Cliarts 3 and 6 
between PHA, Census and BLS are m.oderate, somewhat wider ranges of vari- 
ation are fotmd for the June-October changes in payrolls and employment. 
The magnitude of tuese differences is seen on Cliart 3 for the principal 
manufacturing groups as between P3A and Census. The corresponding dis- 
crepancies between PIA. and BLS are shown en Chart 7 for the changes "'oy 
individual states. However, tie average cnange for All Manufacturing 
shown at tlie top of Ci:art 3 is slir;ht, considerin,_; t^xe differsnce in 
character of coverage between PJIA and BLS-Census. T-ie weig.ited average 
for All Industry sIicoti at t-e bottom of Cjiart 7 for ti^e entire United States 



9854 



8 

TABLE 1 
PRA JtJHE-0CTOB2B. 1933 CKHSUS - SUMJUHir OF EESULTS \J 
With ComparlwD Occupation - Hn^loyneQt Skta 





1930 R^1nfull7 EBployabXc 


- by Occi;q>fttiona 2/ 




PSiSat* 1/ 


1933 Cen«j« of 
Manufaoturee 


BL8 
BeceaAar 1935 




J\£ricaIluro 

riBhlac 

yorcBtry 


iTibllc 
S^'rvlce 
Profeaalonal 


Minerals 

Transport. 

Trade 

Service 

Clerical 


Uanufactr. 
Uttchanlcal 


Beportlng 

Eatabllah- 

isenta 


EraployiBent 


June 
•eelcl7 Pay 
per Worlcar 


aeportlng 

Eetabllab- 

Benta 


June 
face 

Xanara 




ECiUPaiC Division 


Jua 
Imih 


i/ 


Peroeutace 
Increase 

June-October 


Beportlne 
letabl lal>. 




K: 


itts. 


Hon- 

ute.. 


Kfe. 


Bon- 
lUs- 


life. 


Hon- 

life. 


BfS- 


Hon- 
KfS. 


nfe. 




1 
(COO) 


2 
(000) 


(000) 


(000) 


(000) 


6 
(000) 


7 
(000) 


(000) 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 
(000) 


lU 
(000) 


15 
(000) 


16 
(000) 


OTiL UlilOIl SCtSSS 


10.723 


11,110 


19.387 


11.110 


552 


«7 


5.500 


5.075 


12.7* 


18.6)( 


123.89 


J19.98 


lUl.S 


5.970 


»6.7 


23-3 


roius 


U.OI6 


2.631 


12.838 


10.065 


359 


63 


3.3^9 


3.761 


11.2 


18. 5 


21.. 75 


a.oi 


102. U 


1.398 


62.2 


16.7 


.OUHH 


S.fe'* 


950 


lj.819 


2.858 


110 


13 


8S2 


T72 


18.8 


lU.S 


18.82 


13.69 


21..1. 


1.227 


15.6 


1.3 


1ST 


1.0S3 


529 


2.230 


1.187 


66 


9 


528 


256 


16.2 


29.3 


2I..77 


a. 61. 


15.0 


3I5 


8.9 


2.3 


SOHIB 
Sbw England 


235 


329 


1.388 . 


l.'t79 


t7 


9 


392 


671 


10.3* 


17.1.* 


I2H.05 


SI8.95 


11.. 


789 


11.6 


3.1 


1 Uld-Atlontlc 


596 


1.035 


5.351* 


3.973 


130 


27 


1.1*0 


1.512 


9-5 


16.9 


27.66 


a. 77 


1.3.9 


1,705 


29.1 


5.0 


II Saot North Central 


l.>»77 


?37 


u.isit 


3.611 


117 


20 


1.089 


1.335 


12.3 


a.7 


22.72 


a. 35 


32.3 


1.586 


12.3 


6.6 


7 T««t Sorth Central 


1.708 


1)29 


1.912 


1.003 


65 


7 


1.29 


21.3 


15-1. 


13-5 


20.75 


20.05 


12.2 


319 


9.2 


2.0 


SODTU 
V South itlantlc 


2.021 


¥45 


2.126 


l.irfl* 


W 


6 


399 


U93 


17.0 


11..1 


18.82 


13.35 


12.6 


776 


8.1 


2.6 


* Zaet South Central 


I.S05 


193 


1.106 


633 


23 


3 


192 


167 


19.0 


U.5 


I6.IU 


12.81. 


4.9 


261 


3.8 


• 9 


I ffest South Central 


1.852 


?11 


1.587 


762 


t3 


U 


301 


112 


a. 2 


a. 6 


20.52 


16.10. 


6.9 


187 


3.1 


.8 


msT 

IMountain 


1*2 


130 


568 


255 


lU 


1 


91 


18 


18.8 


31.5 


20.31 


a. 60 


2.9 


56 


1.1 


■5 


Pacli-lc 


5B1 


399 


1.662 


932 


52 


8 


1133 


237 


15.7 


29.1 


25.61. 


a.61. 


12.1 


289 


1.8 


1.8 



Based on BSGIOUlL TABULillOU BI XNDUSTBI QBOUPS vanuaarlee and SUUUifiT TiBULiTIOH - U- S. TOTILS glvan below. The immbsre of reporting «stabllBhnents and June anployaes for 
tbe U. S. TOXaLS miamary oxceod the respective totala for all tlie re^ons. dace tha U. S. TOtiLS suasar7 Indudea alao th« clasB All Othere, coo^>rtfln£ later-regional or 
othorwise non-allocablo tndustrleB. Source of Census: Rotoprlnt releases J-l^, 27-1935; for SIS. Diploymeat and P»Tolla. Deceaiber. 1935, P- 27- 

Gainfully employable Include all persons over 10 years of age assigned to Boae gainful occupation la the Census of Occx^atlons- (See Fifteenth Census: 193^, Occupation 
Statistics, United States SuiQinary, p. 5)- The grouping by occupation given In Colusns 3 ^°^ '* corraspoods rou^Uy to the grouping by Induatrles comparable with the , 
Uanuf ac t'ATln^ and Non-oanufacturing groups of employed enumerated In the PRl, and other censuaea, as exemplified In columns 7 and 8- See fifteenth Cenaus: 193^, Population 
Bulletin, Second Series, United States Sumnary, p. 23 f°^ the tabulation of the gainfully aoployable by ladustrlee. The numbere for the Lanuf acturlng &nd llechaalcal 
Indixntrlea ar« very similar to the occi^ation i^roupin^ in column h. Thus the totals for the principal regioae (in thoussmde) are: Horth, 10,500; South, 2,71^*; fast, I.IO}: 
tota, 1'^.317. 

The totale for the regions In columnr 5> ^t 7 and S ore somerhat less than the correspond Inf; values for U. S. TOTALS because the latter coaprlscs also the data for the 
All uthers class. 

^0 June euployment Ig distributed tn'az.^ the cereral regions rou^ly In the same proportion? ac the October einploynent. Columns 7 asd S are cot^arable in scope with 
colucns 3 Q°d ^. ColunB S Is directly costparabli with column lU, indicating the a^loyme&t covera^ of PRA with respect t<^Uie regalar 1933 Oeaaus of Jlaou/ac tures. 



Division of Review 

MS:JinJ 
Uarch, 1936 



(0 

z 
o 

(f) 
> 

Q 

O 

X 
CL 

< 

o 
o 

UJ 

o 

(O 

D 
CO 

z 
u 
u 






a. 




9854 



1 


n^ h- "i n r "J u 

J g u S S^S - ^ O 
^ i 2 ^SiSs i 2 

II II u II II 11 A ^ " 



-10- 



shows a still smaller discrepaiicy; the agreement between PRA and 3LS 
here is complete within a few percent. 

The sharpness of tie employment increrse for the PHA period 
is greater than the ciiange for any like interval since 1929. As is 
shown in Ciiart 5, this is tie case for practically each 3LS industry 
group. Very little of this increase can he ascribed to seasonal ?;wing. 
For the All Manufacturing composite of Census the percenta^^e June-October 
changes for recent Census yetrr- are, as a.nwn on Jnart 4: 

1925, D.4'o', 1929 2.0'^^r 19.11 -2.Qi\ 1933 15.71. 
Variations and PilA increases of emplo./:ne nt a nd pvayrolls. Tiie vari- 
ation of est.ablisliraents (enterprises) from region to re^jion and by in- 
dustry grou'os is sharply revealed in the charts 2-3 and tables I-III. 
Tlie regional distribution of tie various major industry groups can serve 
as a basis for economical analysis of Census results, when it is desired 
to study only tiie dominant industries of particular regions. Tlie varia- 
tions of weekly pay by regions can serve a similar purpose. 

Characteristic variations of compliance wit'i the President's 
Reemoloyment Agreement may be noted for the larger industr"' group by 
Charts 2 and 12, for tne primary industry group by Caarts 14-A - 14-C. 
as checked oy the 1930 Census of Occupations data it appears that manu- 
facturing industries returned a considerably Irrgor coverage than non- 
manufacturing indastries, 75;j against peivia;)s 'oOl. Likewise manufactur- 
ing industries were more able, or willing, to increase employment and 
payrolls than tiie distribution tind service industries. Thu? tie June-October 



9854 



11 

TABLE ir 

pra cxbsds - sotouHX UBCLiSios BT ikditstb; oboops ly 

B«portlng Sstsbllshneats, XaployaeDt, Pt^Tollt 
June - Octol)«r, 1933 - 0. S. TOTAI^ 





BlU'lishsents 


>q)107n»t 


WeeUj Feyroll 


leelO; IncoM 
Per Worker 




Per >st 
of lotftl 


ironb.r 
fi.port- 

toe 


Jan. 1 


October 


Per Cent 
Qwn^e 


June 


October 


Per Cent 
Change 


An. 






Per CTOt 
of Total 


IMab.p 


ffODbor 


Per Cent 
of Tfltftl 


iBOTiat 


mnjnt 


October 


iXi taaoMtTlmm 


100.00 


6U3.066 


100.00 


10.867,0211 


12.564,843 


15.6 


100.00 


•238.457,075 


$282,615,898 


18.5 


$21.94 


$22.49 


loi-iiiiDrAcinHiia 


85*79 


551,752 


50.60 


5,>t99,«* 


6.197.175 


12.7 


55.10 


131.398,786 


151,500,088 


15.3 


23-89 


24.45 


A- ACrlcQltun (nlnor) 


.67 


't,308 


.50 


5^.395 


59.676 


9.7 


■^ 


1.283.877 


1,418,058 


10.5 


23.60 


23.76 


8. UlJilag 4 Qoarrjinc 
X. Coa 
II. OUitr IUs6r«l« 


.6() 


lt.l«5 


^.1|7 


376.11? 


456.216 


?1.^ 


2.99 


7.141.873 


9.661.227 




18.99 


?1.18 


.Z8 


1.773 
2,662 


2.12 
1.35 


229,522 

11^.590 


27S:a2 

181. 974 


19-5 
24.1 


1.51 
1.48 


3.599.284 
3.542,589 


5.302.377 
4.358.850 


47.3 
23.0 


15.68 
24.17 


19.33 
23.95 


0. COBstTlUtlQB 


2.76 


17.737 


1.93 


209.390 


238,804 


14.0 


1.84 


4,385.983 


5.387.288 


22.8 


20.95 


22.56 


S. Potollo Utliltlai 


?,« 


1S.R7U 


9.35 


1.0l6.Wt5 


1.10?. l43 


8.4 


11.11 


?6. 493.704 


2a.70'i.097 


8.3 


26.07 


?6.o4 


I. TTuiportatloD, •te. 

II. Oth«r PuDllc Otllltl.. 


1.82 
1.11 


11.719 
7,125 


tM 


317.1tl 
699.304 


368;t2S 
733.722 


lE'.l 
4.9 


3.13 

7.98 


7;4«;493 
19,027,211 


8.810,297 
19,894.800 


illo 

4.6 


23.54 
27.21 


23.91 
27.U 


B. DlfltrlbntloD 


53.S 


!t2,6ll 


21. "J") 


2.385.738 


2.766.150 


15.0 


22.29 


53.145.255 


63.777.n7 


20.0 


22.28 


23.06 


I. fholvMl* 
IZ. laUll 


7-83 


50.336 

292.275 


5.8? 
16.10 


635.757 
1.71*9.981 


724.169 
2.041.961 


13.9 
16.7 


7.n 

14.58 


18.374.900 

34.770.355 


21.100.356 
42.676.961 


22.7 


28.90 
19.87 


29.14 
ao.90 


ft. roods, I)ni£i, etc. 
\, Diy good*, etc. 
c. Otlwr r*Uil 


17.79 
8.58 
19.08 


11><.377 
55.180 
122.718 


3.91. 
6.35 

5.81 


6S9.560 
S31.7n 


499.419 
810,602 
731,940 


17.6 
15.9 


6.53 


8.080.872 
11,126,048 
15,563,435 


9.764.^60 
13.854.049 
19.058.252 


20.8 
24.5 
22.5 


15.85 
16.13 

*.63 


19.55 


V. ftXTlM 


iq,17 


12T.W8 


8.19 


890.078 


984.238 


10.6 


7.72 


18.423.805 


21.056.105 


14.3 


20.70 


a. 39 


I. SOMttlo 

II. ipnuesKiU 

III. pr«fei«looal 
IT. Biulaeit 


11.06 

.87 
1*.23 

3.01 


71.099 
5,610 


5:k 
.55 


'•99,301 
59.897 
15O,02>4 
180.856 


554.196 
76.759 


u.o 

28.2 
6.1 

7.3 


3.06 
.85 
1.70 
2.13 


7. 260. 991 
2.034,649 
4,047,459 
5,080,706 


8.521.997 
2.711.782 
4,310,689 

5.511,637 


17.4 
33.3 
6.5 
8.5 


17.07 
g.97 
26.98 
28.09 


15.38 
35.33 
27.09 

28.39 


11.^* . II 4 III 4 IT 


8.U 


52,209 


3.59 


390.777 


430,042 


10.0 


4.68 


11,162,814 


12.534.108 


12.5 


26.57 


29.15 




6.2q 






567.61)6 




3.9 


8.61 


?o.';?4.?«q 


?l. 494.996 


4.7 


16,16 


16,43 


I. Buldiig, «tc. 

II. Isvomce, Brotorac* 


l-M 


7.939 
32,5«> 


1.35 

3.87 


>k:936 

420,710 


153.062 
436,906 


3.8 


2.12 
6.49 


5.061,331 
15.462.958 


5,248,086 
10,246,910 


3-7 
5.1 


3't.lt5 
36.75 


34.29 
37.19 


H. uvuTicTTOaa 


13.5» 


87,298 


W.71 


5.075 .1W3 


6.017,102 


18.6 


42.53 


101.406.025 


124,169.064 


22.4 


19-98 


20.64 


I. roods 


z.ie 


17.253 


5.n 


020.642 


777.733 


25.3 


5.64 


13.457.459 


16.069,016 


19.4 


a. 68 


2D.66 












1.355.386 


9.8 


7.42 


17.690.744 


22.879.088 


f5-9 


14.33 


16.88 


ft. ipp&rcl 

b. Other tsxtllM 


'■2 


s;«55 

5.387 


5.70 

6.66 


510,380 

T*,oe5 


557.994 

797,392 


9.3 

10.1 


3.05 
4.37 


7.261.017 
10.429.727 


10.183,935 
12.695.153 


14.0 
21.7 


14.23 
14.40 


18.25 

15.92 


III. Fortit Products 


1.50 


7.698 


3.O8 


335.096 


405,069 


ao.9 


2.20 


5.256.748 


6.985.832 


32.9 


15.69 


17.25 


IT. Paper Products 


•29 


i.eT* 


l.'»3 


155.01U 


185,194 


19.5 


1.34 


3.184,962 


3.756.204 


17.9 


20.55 


20.28 


T. PrlBtliis-PiibllthlBg 


2.28 


lll,6l40 


2.93 


318.637 


355,610 


U.6 


3.81 


9.073.375 


10,140,560 


11.8 


28.48 


28.52 


n-ni. CbcBlCAla 


.80 


5,168 


2.70 


293.285 


354,543 


ao.9 


3.2S 


7,829,972 


8,947,180 


14.3 


26.70 


25.2lt 


TIII.Bubbsr Prodacts 


.06 


388 


.62 


67.093 


80,408 


19.8 


.65 


1,541,2* 


1,735.913 


12.6 


22.97 


a. 59 


IZ. Lsather Products 


.3^ 


2,205 


2.15 


233.585 


251.145 


7.5 


1.72 


4,108,158 


4,678,760 


13.9 


17.59 


18.63 


X. Stoos^doi', Olftss 


.62 


3.980 


1.48 


161,074 


185.118 


14.9 


i.;8 


3.278,867 


3.791, 1''5 


15.6 


20.36 


20.48 




.66 










29.7 


U.48 


10.691. s48 


14.640. 424 


36.9 


20.06 


a. J? 


a. StMl sails 

b. Other Iron A Steel 


.08 
.58 


3,72't 


2:54 
2.35 


277,633 
255.400 


375.940 
315.248 


35-4 
3.4 


2.33 

2.15 


5.556,13'' 
5.137.414 


8,167,032 
0,473,392 


^:S 


20.01 
20.12 


a. 72 
20.53 


XII. H0]k-f«nmu UetUs 


.57 


3.631 


1.69 


1S3.467 


226,245 


23.3 


1.65 


3.935.660 


4,828.766 


22.7 


a. 45 


a.34 


XUI.IUchlaer? 


I.IO 


7,086 


H.J9 


476.644 


604,004 


26.7 


4.67 


11.125.868 


14,058,730 


26.4 


23.34 


23.28 


ZXT. TraDftportatlOB Ecuip. 


.20 


1.2't9 


2.31 


251.435 


295.331 


17.5 


2.64 


6,298,206 


6,727,409 


6.8 


25.05 


22.78 


XT. Bfclirwd Rep«tr Shop 


- 


16 


.01 


1.353 


1.407 


4.0 


.01 


30,514 


32.072 


5.1 


22.55 


22.79 


Zn. MlocellaaeouB 


.91 


s.sig 


l.Jlt 


210,600 


248,7a 


IS.l 


1.64 


3.902.720 


4.897.965 


25.5 


18.53 


19.69 


Onciuslflvl 
lil Others £/ 


.OU 
•59 


2« 
3.770 


.07 
2.62 


7.069 
284, bos 


9.275 
341.291 


31.2 
19.9 


.07 
2.30 


172,940 

5.477.324 


216,328 
6,730,418 


25.1 

22.9 


24.46 
19.24 


23.32 

19.72 



^ Sourcei Special tabulation for XBl of PSJi questionnaire returns by Buxaiei of Csnsus. December 1933- EnoloTnent and perroll data are for the raeka of June I7 and 

October lit, 1933. 
gj "All Others" corers data for quostlonnalres which do not clearly Indicate that a breotaloira has been made 00 a proper seosTMhlcol basis; data for establlshaonta 

operating in two or nor* States, mach ae, rallroada, ateaoboats, pipe lines, telephone and telegrasb, a:id power coopanlee: *he reports of coapanles having plants 

In varioua States for which Individual reports were not submitted but for which a aiasler report was supplied; and data froD returns received for a State after the 

State had been sent to the Tabulation Section for punching and tabulating. 

H.B.A. 

Division of Review 

US:JUH 

Deoeaber. I933 

9854 







12 

TABLE m 




UTlilom aU •(•t* I nutlttli 




kDlUIMt [ 


WMklTDvaU 1 


! 

frMr r-iir* frr fifm 




m- oaot 
of total 


tabar 


** 


• 


OotcVar 




A> 




totjW 


0>i.i«« 


^%r"-fibff" 




XaF«rtlac 


T*t cat 

of *«tal 


•m-kn 


Aakar 


r«r (Mt 


•f Ktal 


IMkw 


kVar 






CXirSD STilS 


100.00 


61.3,060 


100.00 


10,t6<,00l| 


12.561.3* 


15.6 


100.00 


«23«,158,>I11 


*a8£.6l3,k70 


18. 5 


»a.j» 


»a.i» 


ta aoijii. 

Hum 

l«« K«3pshlre 

Teraoot 

8ta<J< itlaud 
OoJUfectlcut 


3.7U 

.86 
.57 
■35 

"••58 
.72 

1.57 


56,195 

m 

2,?58 

29. "31 
ll.oOO 
10,72U 


10.09 

.68 
.6lt 
.18 

5.1.1 
1.00 

2.17 


l,096,i6U 

71,399 

69.302 

20,011 

5«7,705 

103,909, 

235.805 


1,260,189 

81,301 
77.315 

67l!62s 
126,119 
277,809 


15.0 
13.3 

11. £ 
11. 7 
11.3 
15.8 
178 


9.56 

5. 10 

.90 

2.10 


a.7S7,037 

1.305. 6o» 
1,068,272 

12,88^,109 
2,150,266 
5,011,520 


26.9>I9,018 
1,522,928 

15,010,91» 
2,611,635 
6,027,971 


U.2 

16.6 
22.1 
17.2 

16.7 

a.5 

»-3 


iD.m 

17-2 

15.% 

18.81 

a.jt 
19.7* 
a.!5 


a.ji 

}l:2 

i9.a 

22- 3» 
ao.71 

a. TO 


liimui iniXTic 


21t.Hl 


151'.979 


27.28 


2,961,591 


3.360,721 


13.1 


30.63 


73.019,165 


85,586, 5» 


17.2 


21.61 


25.17 


itm Tort 

P'jnjiE/lvuila 


.2-93 
3.1.1 
8.07 


83.158 

21.951 

51.870 


13- '6 
3.62 
10.17 


1.166,061 

393.131 

1.105,102 


1,657,706 
1116,235 

1,256.780 


13.1 
13-7 


17.26 

l.ol 

9.33 


11.150.693 
».6fc.35; 
22,258.111 


17,135.77» 
11,161.712 
27.285.829 


11. 5 28.07 
15.8 21.50 

22.6 20.11 


88.1} 

25.02 

a. 71 


USI KOBTK COTEil 


21. u; 


137,728 


22 59 


2,151,818 


2.883,975 


17.5 


S8.M 


53.S5O.i3j 


«.375.0J» 


19.1 


a.» 


a.3» 


Cblo 

iBdlsSM 

IlllDola 

HichlfM! 

IUbcociIii 


O.JO 
2.83 

^■30 
3-3' 
2.t5 


10.508 
IS. 208 

1«.'*1 
21. ''37 
17.0311 


6.53 

Ui 

1..06 

1.98 


710,017 
258,081 
830,561 

111,273 

214,881 


831,211 
310,991 
9 A 187 

500.1.87 

213.396 


17^5 
20.5 
19.7 
13-5 
13.5 


6.26 

2.01 
1.81 


11,925.599 
1,871.915 

19.920.031. 
9.870.239 
1,399,318 


17.809,925 
6.013,177 
21,529.56* 
10,888,315 
5.131.023 


19.3 
23^3 
23.1 

10.3 
16.7 


2i.oe 

18.89 
23.98 
22-37 
20.17 


21.35 

a. 75 
a.05 


nSI ^CBTK CDITKtL 


11. ?3 


72.231 


6.12 


697.855 


800.115 


11.7 


5.9« 


11,267,178 


16,726.957 


17.2 


20.11 


20.91 


UliiSeroti 
Ion 

Uleaoui 
?.' Siusta 
S. Doimti 
Kebrasif 


2.13 

2.1 

3.01 
.1.1 

l.?3 
1-57 


15.599 

13.3»2 

19. jug 

2.011 

2. «3 

7.89^ 

10.092 


l.Ki. 
1.01 
2.1.7 
.11 
.15 
■53 
.62 


166,923 
109.335 

2t>8,277 

12.1.15 

^^7:^26^^ 

:7.303 


198,5.>9 

125,571" 

298.01 

15,180 
18,917 

;-b,2:a 
77,67.- 


IB. 9 
11-9 
11.1 
25.3 
13-7 
15.0 
15.1 


1.52 
.88 

2.31 

.10 

•f5 

.Is 

•53 


3,628, 2r5 
2,087,833 
5,519.218 
211, *7 
357,993 
1,156,110 
1,273,692 


1,351,797 
2,11c:, 588 
6,. 381, 969 

fcli381 
1.317. 987 
1.186.833 


20.0 
17.3 
15.6 
251 

12.1 
Ib.b 
16.7 


21.71 

19.10 

20.57 

20.11 
21.52 
20.19 
18.92 


a.93 

20. U 

a.?2 

20.35 
19.1I 


SOI77H XT-tStlQ 


?.95 


51. ^1 


i.ji 


^71.21 


,127, 2;S 


15-7 


■51 


15,531.392 


19.511.171 


25.1? 


15-91 


17.31 


Dela*[-r« 
MBJ7l»i><l 
Dl.t. Oolonblii 
TlreliiU 
V. 71reljil« 
H Carolling 
S. Carol iDa 
G«or£la 
norlda 


.19 

1.10 

1.? 

I.Od 
.■id 


1,231. 
7.u^ 

2, .49 

S.Wi 

5,577 
1-.300 
3.J'- 

7.32S 


■15 
1.31 

•"I 

1-37 
1'9 

.81; 

l.?5 


15,92 
11^.09; 

50,032 
137.;'.. 
113,371 
191.2^2 

93.920 
135. f 53 

-'1.372 


i;.302 

1-7.012 

56.201 
■59.150 
175. .-39 
'-25.79? 
.02,202 

i>:,l<,1 
70.^75 


11.9 
17^ 6 
11.0 

10.3 

22.2 

10.2 
8.3 
12.5 

li.O 


.11 

1.20 

■55 

■92 

1.06 

1.02 

■13 

.81 

.10 


333,178 

2,302.197 

1.,'09.917 

2,la5.!tl2 
2. "^16, 177 
2,122,165 

1,031.232 

1,919.801 
917.983 


390.183 
3.155.' 7 
1,113.772 
2, (06,916 
3. 391. "83 
3,208.065 

1.383.201 

2,115,897 
1,175.160 


17.2 
20.7 
7.9 
23.9 
3l.« 
32.1 
33-7 

25 8 
21.0 


20.93 
20.11 
25-87 
15-91 
17-55 
12.17 
11.01 
11.16 
15.15 


a.31 

20.69 
25.16 
16.98 
I?. 37 

13-53 
15..B 

19. :6 


U5T SOUTE CUTSil 


J. 99 


25.^70 


3.55 


38-. 030 


117. ?ai 


U.J 


2.37 


5,ol«.1.18 


7.202.930 


27.5 


IU.03 


16.08 


7«aiieiB«e 

llabaoa 

Uleal'ilrrl 


1.20 

1.19 

1.05 

• 55 


7.707 
7.;72 
1-..7U3 
3,5'.« 


.95 

. 1.19 

1.07 

i -31 


100,11.8 
129,361 

ii6,2t.3 
33.9S5 


;£7,9i6 
115.031 
I32.9ii 

42.03. 


10. i 
12.1 
11.3 
23.8 


.77 

.81 
.62 
.17 


1,829,271 
1,9'7.31« 

1.161. lis 
110, .28 


2.321,372 

2.312.798 
1.953.23^ 

582.5'- 


27.1 

21.6 
31.9 
I1 9 


17.18 

11.90 
12.71 
i?.09 


u;.i7 
16.15 


ireST SOOTt OEKT.JJ. 


7.39 


«7.513 


3-97 


431.700 


520,519 


20.6 


3-17 


3, 282,;^ 


10. 33b. 912 


21.8 


19.19 


19.86 


Aflujlaae 
LouJalaoa 
Oldahwa 
Taxaa 


.b7 

•79 
1.58 
...31. 


'..338 

5.073 

10.175 

27,927 


■ 32 
.72 

■ 70 

2.23 


31,99'. 
75,217 
75,906 

2U2,S51 


15,818 
91,21- 
93.612 
291. ■73 


25-2 
16.7 
23.6 

20.2 


.21 

.55 

2.0( 


501.902 

1. 305.018 
1.5^1.731 
11,917.009 


^75. 31= 

1. "13.172 
1.936,923 
6,103,?01 


31-} 
21.0 
B1.6 
■'1.1 


11.13 

lb. "9 

20.18 
20.27 


15*8 
17.71 

a.93 


UCVHIilSI 


i.Ui 


li,9*>2 


1^17 


127, 5'5 


15I.-70 ] 21.3 


1.12 


2,677. c56 


3.:-9i.827 


2r,.7 


21.00 


Uootana 

Iilkho 

TyoDiag 

Oolorndo 

lla> -d ilco 

ArlBOoa 


• 3E 
•3- 
.18 
■ 85 
.17 
.23 

:o1 


2.1.73 
2,3U 

1.183 
5.^-1 
1.109 
1.1^7 
1.599 
593 


.12 
.11 
■09 

• 39 

.08 
.12 
.21 
.03 


13.278 

15,157 

9,901 

12, .-i 5 
1 8.603 

12, ..97 

22.3!; 

■•.9^7 


15.375 
19.393 
12.078 
51. '98 
■0.112 
llt,o83 
21-, ,'7l 
3.557 


19.6 

27.9 

28.0 
21.2 
I8.3 

15.-. 
19^7 
IS. 7 


• 13 

.12 
.09 

■37 
.07 
.12 

• 19 

.03 


312. 301 

293.917 
223.31 

878.191 

101.907 

278,383 

156.831 

T2.S08 


395,115 
390,'.37 
305,853 
1,111,071 
201, 6c1 
319.11» 
578.716 
8, .157 


26.6 
32.9 
37- 

26.5 

26.1 
11.7 

20.7 

18. 3 


23-52 
19-39 
22..>5 

20.75 

18-39 
21.93 

20.12 
24.29 


21.91 

».11 

21.12 

a.« 
1J.S5 

a.76 


.:i:-i; 


9.3" 


00.082 


6.30 


1 . I ■ 

i -^s.'jOo ii^^,03i 


20.3 


f.95 


16,501,711 : 30,001,832 


20.8 


21.18 I 21.M 


faabiactso 

Oracoo 

:*. l.orala 


1.62 
1.01 
■.71 


10. WT 

6.527 
'.3.1'^ 


l.Oo 
.67 

"■57 


t ■ 

; Ul.yol 

73,179 
l9-,863 


133. 815 
93,020 
J92.203 


20.7 
27. 1 
19-2 


5.35 


2,311.181 2,8a}, 766 

i;»7i,5oi 1 1,906,902 

12,719.056 ; 15,217,161 


23.0 

29-3 

19^1 


20.36 1 20.75 

20.15 : a).50 

25.66 1 25- » 


IIJ. OTHOS 1/ 


3.05 


19. 01 


^.06 


1,050. j62 


1.181.918 


12.6 


10.76 


25.650. 391 


28,195.162 


11.1 


21.13 i 21-0? 



tot* for ^pualloB&alr*! «hlch do aot clcoxljr ladlcAt* tuat » br««kd9n has bea nads as » proper i^ogfphioml baalt; dMt* for «it«kll«liM«Bt> op«r»tlAC la t«D T m»n 
Stat*i, «ucb at, rkllroad*. tttiB boati, plp« llaei, t«l*pboiiw and tulafraph, ud po*or c<H;«al««; the roportt of coBpaol** teTla< plaat* la Tarlous Statat for ^iA 
iDdlTldual rcjortt ■»• not •ub.ltt*d but or which a wuttr roport wm* tup Had; and data frrm rmtanw rM«lv«d lor a Stata after tha Stata had bot« tmt to tho 

Tut-j^ntloo S«ctloB fot uDchla^ and tnbulatioc. 



9154 



NRA 

DIVISION OF REVIEW 
M.S., 0CT.,I»3S 



IS 

CHART Z 



PRA EMPLOYMENT CENSUS* 



U.S. TOTALS BY INDUSTRY GROUPS 

ESTABLISHMENTS, WEEKLY PAY, EMPLOYMENT- PAY ROLL CHANGES, 



JUNE- OCTOBER, 1933 



JUNE AVCMACe 

REPORTTNC ESTASUSHMENTS WCEKLY INCOME PER WOftlCR 

«« CEMT or TOTAL 

CMPLDYMEMT- 
2& 30 > 10 IS 20 2S 30 u 



NOUSTBY* * 



NON ' MA NUFACT U R I N G 



manT'c., non-durable 



man'f'g., durable 





1 1 1 J 




W '"^ J 




\^ ^r--\ 




\\"-*\ 










&* 


.1 




u 





e5TA9^ 




fERCCMTACC irtcRCASC, JUNC-OCTOMft 

CUFLOVMeNT PAV HOL^ B.L S INDEX OT 



"I — T 



I I I I 



u 



NOr*-MANUFACrURING 



IT' 






lUf 




J 


eo 








1 1 






90 89 


1 1 1 








69 T3 


■"1 1 1 1 " 















A- AGRiCULTune (MINOH1 ( 



C- CONSTRUCTION 



O-OTxea BuiLic uriLiTtt 



nb-w ooooi, ETC. 



nC-OTHEB KTl 



n-OTMU aCNVICt 



%roe 
IT, Too 



71,100 

»2;io<i 



~l — !" 



I I I I 



34^0 
29»,J00 
l4«,«O0 
209^00 

IIT.IOO 



I I I I I 



I 



«Si aoo 

4tg,300 

39D.MI0 
»sT.«eo 



VnVrTWlWM" 



^rz 



T-T— r 



:i 



D 



i n« i .. i f ii i i ft i i l«rii .f i 



I I I I 



D 






Ti •« •! 



MANUFACTURING, NON-DURABLE G00C6 

Htt CGNT 0* TOTAL 0OU>«» PE* C6IIT . *"" 5*"'''„ ,. ._ 

o 5 10 ii, to & ic IS 20 2a 30 ?. . 'o '^ ^0 , ," .'P ° .■.?... .'°, . ..^ I.. .,,.,, ^..y? 



H-HA«UrACTUItlNC 
1- FOODS 



b -FABRICS 



1 



ISn-PAHt TO»*CCo PSOO 

D-PAPCB PFKJDUCTS 

7- PRINTING-PUBLISMING "^ 

n-TCD-CMEMICAU 

Vm-RUBBER PRODUCTS 

B-LEATHER PRODUCTS 



& 10 1 


3 20 U 


30 




""1""!'"' '"T" 




T.SOC 








! 




s.roo 


1 










S,M« 




ftoo 


i 1 


1 1 








1 ! 




4.SB0 


II 






i I 




5.200 














1 1 




two 


1 




111' 



ej>oo 

(59.0 00 



"T"T"T"T" 



T 



LIL 



E 



J__L 



^ 



xn: 



T-r 



f 



• • •• 

TI >• 

• 4 ST 



MANUFACTURING, DURABLE GOODS 



m-FOREST PRODUCTS 

X-5T0NE. CLAT, GI,ASS |) 
E-lRON k STEEL 

a- tncL MILL* 
b- OTMEB <MOH 4 vn.t\. 
XD- WON -FERROUS 

ZC-MACHINERY 
mr-TRANS. EQLPtPMENT 



] 














1 














1 

1 














1 
















n 


■ CEH1 


1 


9 


2 






ZIL 



1111 



25S^oo 
l«3.»oo 



xin 



I I I 



".iIhiiImiiIiiiiIhiJihiI 1 1 1 , 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 1 i I ll l lllllll l l l lllllll l llll h llll 

I 3 10 19 20 25 JO 5 10 15 20 25 30 O 5 10 15 20 2S M 



HJ 



J— L_L^ 



imliiiiliii 



OOLLARS 
VSOURCE: NRA ANALYSIS I M, S.) OF TABULATION OF PRA aUESTIONNAlRE 

HETURWS, DECEMBER 1933, OV BUREAU OF CENSUSi INDUSTRY CLASSIFICATkONi CENSUS- 

• •includes ALSO 'uNCLAssinEO" part'miscellaneous^ 'H.R-REPAiR shops; 

WIDTH OF BARS PROPORTIONAL TO JUNE EMPLOYMENT. 



9854 



I OVER 800,000 I 



NRA 

avisioH or rcview 

M.1. OCCf IMS 

;noi». Mo ta\,^^^. 



14 

CHART 3 



COMPARISON OF PRA RETURNS WITH BLS AND CENSUS* 
ANALYSIS OF MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT, JUNE- OCTOBER, 1933 



ALL MANUFACTURING 



COVERAGE, EMPLOYMENT 
CEN SUS = 100 ?f 



WEEKLY INCOME 
PER WORKER 



t ^- • — " ]» » 



.ji'^-s^'i-iiM 



PERCENTAGE INCREA 5E, JUNE - OCTOBER 
EMPLOYMENT PAYROLL 



CEMSUS 


^V-K 






'fl.l ■:■ 


■:.l 


priir 


18-9 


"1 



CEnSOS, s(OT" OEPOHTEO 






RfPCRTlHG 
iSTABL'SHME'-l 

I 3 3,6 J 

62, 2£C 



a_ 



' ' I" ' I I ' ' I ' 



n- TEXTILES 

(a) APPAREL 



([^ F*B«ics,rrc. 



ZSatPARTl-TOBACCO PROD'S. 



IT- fWPER PRODUCTS 



V-PBINTING -PUBLISHING 



H.YB- CHEMICALS 



Yin-RUBBER PRODUCTS 



n-LEATHER PRODUCTS 



ET' 



^ 





NON-DURABLE GOODS 

PER CENT PEH CEMT 

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 0. . . , 5 ip . . .'5 ,. 2 0. . . Z5„ . 3 0. 35 

M""! " 




.2SC 





1.6 7C 

TiO 


19 


4no 




J4 ,640 




l,Z30 


' 


470 



3 ,2.6 i 

2,2 10 

490 



m- FORE ST PRODUCTS 



X-STONE,CLAY, GLASS 



Xl-IRON ISTEEL 
(a} 5TC£L MILLS 



(b)OTHEP IRON t STEEL 



Xn-NON-FER. METALS 



Xm- MACHINERY 



mr-TRANS. EaUIPMENT 



n-R.fl.HeRMR SHOPS 



DURABLE GOODS 

I I I M r-T 1 1 1 M j) r M I 1 1 1 1 I H M 1 1 n I 




PCB CENT 



9S54 



* SOURCE: e.L.S., CENSUS REPORTS; NRA ANALYSIS. tM.S.) OF TABULATION OF PRA QUESTIONNAIRE 
RETURNS, DECEMBER 1933, BY BUREAU OF CENSUS. 
Il;'.S';^S^«l «"°'^'^"^^' CENSUS -BLS. CLASSIFICATION, OMITTING X2L EXCEPT TOBACCO PRODUCTS 
WIDTH OF BARS PROPORTIONAL TO CENSUS JUNE EMPLOYMENT. 
**CEN5US WEEKLY INCOME IS YEARLY AVERaA COVERING WAGES AND SALARIES; B.L S COVERS WAGES ONLY 
»»«PRA COVERAGE FOR Xy IS 0.6>o i ••♦•GROUPS 17-7 COMBINED IN BLS. 



' ! I ' ' M II I I 1 t i I I I I i MH U I m l 1 I n j I n I 1 I n I I I I I . t I i u I 

5 10 15 20 25 30 35 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 

PER CewT PER CENT 



NRA 

DIVISION OF REVIEW 
US, DEC. I93S 

STATISTICS SecTiON.NO 482, &^9. 



15 

CHART 4 



SEASONAL TREND OF MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT 

SELECTED CENSUS YEARS 




JFMAMJJA S 

SOURCE: CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES, I93P , PAGE 45; ROTOPRINT RELEASE MARCH 27,1935. 



9854 



NRA 

DIVISION OF REVIEW 

M.S., DEC, 1935 

Statistics Section No 553 SSf^. 



-16- 



mcreases are: 

Emplojtnent Payroll 

All Industry . 15, &i 18. 5t 

ITon-Manuf ac taring 1 .? . 7 3 ^ 5 . Sl 

Manufacturing 18.6 j 22. ^i. 

In raanufac taring industries jTojer, a comparison of PBA and 
Census reveals a marked difference in cc.ripliance. T'ne June-Cctoter 
change in eraployment is smaller l)y Census for every industry jroup 
(except Tobacco), as seen in Cliart b. Por All Industries tlie c'nange is: 

Census, 14. 3i; PIU, 13.41; BLS, 1819/^ 
Census does not report monthly payrolls, hence .mly com^xirison of PllA. 
with BLS is possible. The June-October payroll change is: 

P3A, -^S.S,^; BLS, 25.8.^3 
The greater degree of compliance saown by the industries in the BLS 
sample appears highly significant. It emphasizes the need for indepen- 
dent checking of the current employrnent-rpayroll movements indicated by 
the BLS sample. 

Empl oyment-payroll variaticns by sir.e of esta b lisliment . A 
special supplementary t'lree fold tabulatim summarized the returns, by 
establislunent si^e groups, for 30 of the principal industries out of the 
primary 167. These sum.naries were made for each of tne three selected 
states; for Boston; and for a composite of the five Ohio cities of more 
than 250,000 population. Tlie establishment groups v/ere ordered in the 
folloY/ing interval classes, namely, establisliments for which the average 
number of employees was: 

0, 1-5, 6-20, 21-50, 31-100, 101-500, 501-1000, 1001-2500, over 2500, 



9854 



-1? & 18- 

The range of siss of esta'blisTi;aeTit-Tr.al-:e3 it som-iwhat difficult to follow 
the variation pattern by ordinary tjra'iuical pro-eiitation. Tlie size 
patterns may be presented in a significant forra by adjuctin^ the data ^ 
"equal-ratio" size interval s: 

0, 1-2, 2-4, 4-8, 3-16, 16-32, 32-64, 

Tiie analysis by number ox employees reveals clearly the 
marked preponderence of small enterprises mnon;'"^ the establishments re- 
porting in an all-industry census. Some GO j oi all establishments in 
the three selected states had five or less employees. On t^e otiier hand, 
only about Sp of the employment and priyroll is concerned with the size 
group 5 or less employees. Tlie analysis t.irew mo.:t interesting light on 
the moot question of wnether tie "little" or "bi^;" enter^'rise fared 
better under PRil and codes. Tlie t-iree-state sample shows clearly that, 
as regards the emploj,Tiionc-payroll increase under PEA, the "little fellow" 
complied to about the same degree as the "big fellow". A similar 
analysis by size groups of the 1935 Jensus data, v;hen they become avail- 
able, should show by changes in tue distribution jatterns of Cliarc 15 
what effects may be ascribed to the codes and tl.eir passing in 1935. 

Anong other interesting results of the analysis are the char- 
acteristic patterns of variation of weekly pay by size of establislLnent 
for different states. These cliaracteristic patterns app5£;,r also in Census 
data of different periods (1929,1931,1933) for each state, as s^iown in 
Charts 17-1 to 17-VII. Prcsujuably similar c:ia,racteristia patterns would be 
found for 1 -'.rger regions and for :aaj..r iniustry groups. This is emong several 



9854 



-19- 



other interesting problems suis^eated 07 tliis analyaiti for future research. 

Eco nomic imjlicationo ci FRA. em"^^;lo^'ment increase. Tlie theory of 
NIRA. re;=;Krding reomiloyinent implies adju3tments and caanjies in sundi-y 
exonomic fr.ctors in the fields of finance, prices and production. In 
some critiques of I-IZi theory a p riori proff was adv.'-vnced that these 
factors would prevent any employment increase. It is of interest accord- 
ingly to consider tlie chanties in man-hours and liours por week, tv;o of the 
variables directly influenced "by FHi emolojinent increases, for which some 
statistical data are available. At t:ie request of 'JRk, ELS and Census 
made an anaJysis of te .:ian-hour returns of 33 Census manufacturing 
industries in 1933. T-ie;=e cover some 1,600,000 workers (out of 6,000,000 
in All Man'irifacturing) . Tlie analysis of theee returns sh-ow tne interesting 
trend of man-hours by months durin-j 1933, shovni in 'Juart 18. Tlie general 
contour ...f this trend agrees with the steep rise in production noted in 
current indexes for i.'Iay and Jmie and t.ie decline after Auigust. If the 
man-hour trend is assumed to be adequately representative of All 
i;anuf acturing, it ma.y be related t'. the trend of wage earners by months. 
From this may be derived t^^e corresponding trend m hours per week. The 
trend of v/eekly hours can be estimrted for tue 3-5 industries oro;oer by 
dividing tne man-hours per w^.ge earner given for eacli month by an assumed 
number of working v/eeks in eacli month. (see Table VII). The latter trend 
is shown on Chart 18. A clear indication is given of the increase in 
employment, for an assumed trend in output, that may be effectuated by a 
decrease in average weekly hours. 



9854 



to 

CHAflTT % 



TREND OF EMPLOYMENT, 1929-1935 



aLS. MANUFACTURING INOUSTRCS* 

MONTHLY ^NOEXES» AVERAGE J929 - 100 



NON-OURAtU COODS 



DURAILC GOODS 



»U CENAUS AVCMHK ^ 
WHKUr rHCOME PCR wdhkoi 
oc u>w 
UTTTTTTT 



l-fOOOS 



Bb-APMML 



■ b-FAMICS 



ZDcpw-tt-TOSACCO 



IT-T -WkFeH-PRIHTING 



V-V-<HEMICALS'^ 



HB-mBacn ntooucTS 



]X<£ATT«R nnciuc'n 



imwn ocooa 

m-rONtST PRODUCTS 



x-fTOMe,cun;ctA ss 



m- NON-rcmious 



Xtr-THAMS. CQWIKT. 



>-iuuKmmsHon 




■•MWCX: WL» B«U.tTnt N» alO. T*eH» m IMPLtfrMCMT, OfE. ^. PCC Ik. 

• * «t«mt V DAKS mOPOffnofML TO CCNSUS 0» MANUMCTUKJ, JUMI B«*t.aVME>n; Whcc CMiMai 



orvisioN or rcviiw 



-21- 

II. Se tailo d .Analysis cf I)"t_a. 

In this -oart some e>rpanr,ion in detail will be given of the 
summaiT of the analysis results presented above. In Section I the 
reliability of the PEA Census v/ill be discussed. In Section IX the 
distribution of enrployment v:ill be taken up by industries and regions. 
In Section ILL the variations in pay and PRA changes v-dll be considered 
by incustry ^rotips. The variations of employment and :)ayroll changes 
by size of establishment in the sample studies '-'ill be considered in 
Section IV. In Section V some further consideration '-dll be given to 
the economic implications of tiie PRA. emnlcymont increases. Finally, some 
f ruitfv.l further work that;raight be done on the PHA data is noted in 
Section VI. 

Section I - ?Lcliability of F~A Census 

The validity of the P~A Census results is fairly well established 
by check contoa-rison with BLS and Census, in so far as the data arc com- 
parable in cliaracter and scope. 

Cpmrparable results for manufacturing indus tries, Chart 3. This 
chart shows the principal corq^arable elements in Census, PEA and BLS. Column 
1 shows the employment coverage of BLS and PEA, June 1933, using the com- 
parison base, Census = 100. The data arc given in Tables II, IV and VI. 
Column 2 gives the weekly income per worker, while col-umns 3 and 4 show 
the Jujic-October emplcyiaent changes by each Census. The supporting da-ta 
are given in Tables noted, also in V-A and V-B. 



9854 



Z. FmA* 

II. f«tUM 

XT, Fip*r PxvdcD t> 

TIII.ftibt«r rnftuti 
XX. L*««ter rrotecti 



23 

TABLE IZ 
CnOE OJ TBA OraOS BT CIII8D9 OF UHTXIOIDHU 1/ 
Co^srlMv of &ip*rtl2ic Iitablltteastt and ffBe*-8aLttZjr S^ilQ7B*Bt, Jua*. October 1933 







" 












btdlltli- 


>vi<vm>t 


. latftbllcb- 


^)l<]7unt 


BBatt 

(5)/(l) 


bVlorunt 




•■ita 


> 


JUU 


Ootobsr 




Jm. 


Ootobtr 


P*r Cecl 
Change 


Am. 
(6)/(12) 


OctoMr 
(7)/(3) 


Per C«at 
1ZC«H 2/ 

0/j btlo 

(111/riouioo 


Otol Ibnf utuli^ 


(1) 


(2) 
4.769.891 


(3) 

7,7'n.ooo 


A) 


(5) 
S7.298 


(6) 


(7) 
6.017.102 


(!) 
18.6)( 


(9) 
61.7* 


(10) 


(11) 

n.7)i 


(12) 
3.6* 



"to.* 


73^,113 


916.05I1 


19.266 


1.5S6.272 


1.707.lt79 


2.697 


ai,u3 


2lt«.61l7 


19.395 


393.617 


>>20,26l 


7.«« 


1102.169 


,H«0.776 


Hoe 


U«.l67 


1110,671 


3.265 


305.103 


321.H61 



21t.> 
7.0 

17-7 
6.6 

19.6 

19.0 
5.lt 



Boi>-Dur»bl« 2/ 



17.253 
12.0ltl 

l.»71< 
ll|,61(0 

5.l6< 
3" 

2,205 



i,23ii,ii6; 
155,011* 

318.637 

293.285 
67.093 
233.585 



777.733 


25.3 


1.355.3*6 


9.8 


ISS.lSk 


19.5 


355.610 


U.6 


35».51'3 


20.9 


80,iioe 


19.8 


251.11*5 


7.5 



1*2.8 
62.5 
69.5 
75.5 
69.2 
95.1 
67.5 



8^.5 

77.3 

73.11 
81.0 
72.9 

56.8 

76.6 



81..9 


0.5 


79.1' 


2.7 


7". 5 


1.5 


8H.6 


ll.U 


n.7 


1.1 


57.2 


0.7 


78.1 


2.0 



XII. V»i«i« Prednoti 

X* IteiM, Ql«r> 91»aa 

XI. Ino-ltMl 

XU. I«nl«mnu HbIrIs 

XXII.ltoabyuiT 

XXT. fr^iport. IqolpiMDt 

XT* E. B, ftq^ftlr Sbop* 











Pnrabla 1*/ 








12.295 


1*93.920 


572.362 


15.9 


7.698 


335.096 


1*05,069 


20.9 


11.528 


197.1*56 


as, 032 


10.1* 


3.980 


I6l,07>* 


185,118 


llt.9 


5.133 


6olt.l30 


729.329 


20.7 


1*,220 


533.033 


691.I88 


29.7 


i»,919 


208, J*9 


257.003 


23.11 


3.631 


183,1167 


226,21*5 


23-3 


9.713 


625,383 


770.713 


23.2 


7.086 


l»76,61lll 


bcU.ooi* 


26.7 


1.551 


3'*5.9e« 


363.280 


5.0 


1.8*9 


251.135 


295.331 


17.5 


1.901 


21*11.312 


267.765 


9.6 


16 


1.353 


1,1*07 


U.O 



62.6 
87.9 
82.2 

73.8 
73.0 
8O.5 
0.8 



67.8 
81.6 
88.2 

88.1 
76.2 
72.7 
0.6 



70.8 


1*.U 


Sl*.9 


1*.0 


9l*.8 


7.5 


88.0 


- 0.1 


78.1* 


2.9 


8I.3 


U.8 


0.5 


-16.7 



Zn. HlMallMou 8.682 

• 


289.099 


33l*.l67 


15.6 


5.81*9 


210,660 


21*8,721 


18.1 


67.I1 


72.9 


7l1.ll 


2.1 


»>uac a'fotin 801* 


90,786 


97.1*09 


7.3 


766 


62,81*3 


66.7W 


6.2 


95.3 


69.2 


68.5 


- 1.0 



^ loarevt' XU ipalj'ai* (U>3. ) of VU c«Dni« racolta; Census of Manofacturea va^ - aaluy en^lOTTMOt eBtloatsd as "by Tabla "JT'A 

£/ Tba axoccB of Octobsr ooT*rme* or*r S«pt«Bb«r coTarag* Is ixio to tb» dlffarcncs Is character botvseii tim •■tabllihmniti reporting undar P&l asd tha ragolar Oraaoj of 

IfeBoXaotaraa. ' Tt» lattar aLaw a aBalto-tacraua la aqplojmant batraea Juia aod October tbac PU or B.L-S- Sa« Table'SI or Chart 3 

1/ Tbm |o&4hinl>la Hrvofi Lo tba Survaa of l,abor statlstlca claaetficatloa lacfaidaa alao Tobacco Haoof octoraa* . 
.]/ To oorraapaiid «lth tha l.L.S- Dorabla Qroiip XTI, Uitcallaaaoua, ouat b« axdudad. 



SlTlaloa of toTlaa 

Mtnu 

BM«A*r. 1935 



9854 



23 

TABLE Y-A 

SSTUUXB) TOTAL OEHSOS 07 HiBDTAOTOBXS AOlODaatf 1/ 
Tor J^e, 02to>«r, 1933 







WaM Xnrnara 








— — 


Ufl3UST3i SBDUP 




rnn|r ^iyiTt>U^ f 






TaarlT 
ATera£* 


latlaa 


ta^ g/ 


(1) ♦ (8) 






Sapt. 


Oct. 


Per Cent 
Batto 
»/• 


JQBO 


sapt. 


SatlAatod 

Oct. 
= m X (5) 


Juna 6cto1)or 


October 

(6) t (9) 




(i; 


(2) 


(31 


\ (!,)■■■ 


C5) 


(6) 


(7) 


(8) 


(9) 


(10) 


(11) 


ItttiU Uonufccturlng 


6,703.127 


6.623,187 


98,807 


5.970.6I9 
500 


6.9?1.527 
-Ihirnblo 2/ 


6.907,921 


802,171 


798,612 


*lo,0-9 


6.769,291 


7.718,000 


1. Food* 


8a. 523 


766.171. 


93.26J 


636,^8 


872.066 


813,311 


98,111 


97,675 


102,713 


73I.II3 


9l6.0St 


II. TaitUoi 


l-.5t>7.9lS 


l.?52.8?5 S9.038 


1.511.591 


1.637.317 


1.621,563 


82,070 


81,678 


85.916 


1,596,272 


1.707.179 


IT* Pap«i- Prodiutfl 


217.ets 


217.51W 100,135 


187,060 


222,971 


223.272 


21,239 


*,123 


25,375 


211.183 


21«,617 


T. Prlntlag-hibliBhlng 


251.328 


256.051 101,^79 


256,998 


271,152 


276,553 


137.275 


136.619 


il3.70« 


393,617 


I20,2£l 


TI*-T11. Ohonlcals 


37e.05ll 


336.B5lt 102.328 


323,1* 


388.605 


397.651 


79,101 


79.085 


83.125 


102,169 


180,776 


nil. Hubbor ProductB 


126.152 


123.936 


9<,2'« 


103,361 


127.335 


125,100 


11.871 


11,803 


15.571 


U8,l67 


110,671 


IX. LOhthor Pioduc:« 


2se,ei7 


283,125 


98.029 


21^5,217 


306, big 


300.575 


19.951 


19.856 


20,886 


305,103 


321,161 










Ssu^itJJ 














III. Forost Product* 


5*.J»1 


50t.3l'i 


99.605 


157.677 


536.35) 


31,238 


36,117 


36.213 


3»,12l 


143.920 


572.362 


I. Stone, Clw, 31f^iB 


197.U13 


193.OS! 


97.710 


176.275 


202.193 


197.856 


19,273 


19.1(1 


20,176 


197,156 


a<,032 


XI. Iroo-SUol 


£5«.'i26 


652, S36 


99.091 


^•1.057 


669.065 


662.985 


63,376 


63.073 


■ J^516 
29,191 


601,130 


729,329 


XXI. Hotfomuc UendB 


2l(;,e;l 


220.530 


101.735 


1SC,S3J 


223.831 


227, «t9 


:7,e»'9 


27.716 


208,319 


257,003 


XIII. UacLlnery 


o03,Ut6 


biO,l<l.5 


102,617 


510,888 


633.692 


65c, C76 


U5.0II 


111.195 


120.135 


625.383 


770,713 


XIT. Transport. Etfilp-.^ect 


3^3. i5C 


513.397 


91.32a 


3')7.582 


353.5I1 


32.882 


38.590 


3«.1oC 


10.396 


315,988 


363,280 


iT. H. B. Brifir shopc 


2«.«e9 


251.09? 


100,1*78 


?31.3i6 


252.889 


251.097 


13,^ 


12.99" 


13.66s 


211,312 


267,765 


Xn. «ljr.«Uanooi^8 


272.1(75 


2;i!.lllt2 


102.188 


256.311. 


293.^95 


^S.713 


32,912 


32.755 


31,151 


280,099 


331.167 


Tooa-tco H'lct're U/ 


78.605 


73.77; 


101,191 


«7.33« 


92,1u1 


93.782 


3,165 


3,118 


3,627 


90.786 


97.109 


Staal Ullls ^/ 


352.871 


1 

352.125 ' 

1 


281.820 


352.871 


352.1l?5 


211,171 


*.35Y 


25.6a 


306,177 


3n.7l6 






! 
1 ., J=-,. ... 




J 
















ly. Smircej Ceneo^ !:a.vil<-cfuta, 1?33 Rotoprljit Lc.'eai^e, Jen. 23, Iterch 27,1935 

2/- Tiio SoQ-Durabl c Orc'jp l£ tiic juroBU of LcbJr StAtv-llc Ciuai float Ice lsclud»e also Totcicco AUr^ttctar*** 

i/- To corrvspocd «ltb thci S-L-Sa iXi^riJnlfl ^rcip, XTI, Uia-ceilasejus, nuct b« <nciud»d 

Ml- Includb.: thu Cociru? Is-Lustrlei. Cl£/ire, Cit~vr«...6G, Tobacco Produste. 

^- IncludcB thu Cobuuc muoetrlLS S>a4t .i^jmncofi, l^vsal SoiY-ea 

hf- Ttc eetijMt* of aelarlfd ea-clo; ata for Juno and Jctober Ib ffi>d« tj aamolBe l/3 *f the uiorcftse chova for «a^ «ar)ier« foi- tlw •••■ aooth*. B? th» Standajd (Iabc) 

SctffdtiiO, U5« u\:3ibar of ita-B camorn *»re: Jur^. 5,723,51*8: OcLobsr 6.625,1S7: sTwragc for th» y«ar, 5,gOb,8U6. Accordingly, tl* June sua October otttaatai 

f'jr aolaried e.Tiijl-/<»es were ob-,ai:ied by pultlpi,. tng the y«arly aTera^e »aJ.Ti« el^wi by tlie Ctobii» by too f«cu.rs: 



JUno fciclar — i • 



■ O 



•ftiSt^h 



0.935.2* 



Cctobor i-iClor = i ^ i ( 6.6^.^ -i;= l.oHi.eol 



735 



n.s.i. 

SiTlsion 0* Bavlea 
Qecambar. 1935 

9S54 



24 

TABLE y:-B 

OOUFUTlIIOU OF ATXRiCn ISQCHOi FEB KDHXXB 

mDusTK OBOUPs, 1933 o^fgtjs or iiimiri,CTUHJ8 ^ 







Teariy Average bnployment 


Teariy ATera«e Parroll 
Dnltt $1,000 


Incone Per forloer 




Salaried 
Imployeoe 


Ia«e 
lamera 


Total 
Snplo/eee 


Salarlei 


Ia«ee 


lotal 
Payroll 


learlj 
(6)/(3> 


Weekly 
C7)_t. 






(1) 


(2) 


(3) 


(4) 


(5) 


(t>) 


(?) 


If) 




HI <>roMi>i 2/ 






$6,733,869 






♦6,530,250 


« 969.8O 


t 18.65 


1. 


rood 


91.1114 


666.237 


764.381 


151,271 


620,558 


771,823 


1,009.70 


19.42 


IT. 


ToxtlleB 
(a) JUpparel i/ 


32.894 


1.474. ^» 


495,751 


^m 


uazem 

322.813 


371.897 


741.60 

750.20 


l4^ 




462,857 




(b) ratrloi, oto. 


49.176 


1,011,468 


1,060.644 


87.801 


694,4« 


782.289 


737.60 


14.18 


XTI. 


(part) Tobacoo Pro4. 


3.W5 


87.325 


90.790 


8.412 


50.933 


59.345 


653.70 


12.57 


IV. 


Paper Produota 


A.83S 


196.38O 


220,619 


• 46.195 


172,*K! 


219.037 


992.80 


19.09 


V. 


Prl&tlnfi, pvLbllahlng 


137.275 


254.106 


401,381 


226.805 


355.625 


582.430 


1451.10 


27.91 


TI. 


Ohemloale 


79,4o4 


347.933 


427,337 


147.839 


365.420 


513.259 


1,201.10 


23.10 


VII. 


(part) Patrolavun Baf Inlis 


9.815 


69,047 


78,862 


21,567 


89.793 


111.360 


1,412.10 


27.61 


nil 


Rubber Produote 


14,874 


106.283 


la.157 


26,323 


99,117 


125,440 


1,035-40 


19.91 


a. 


Leather Produeti 


19.951 


282.000 


301.951 


31.584 


222,487 


254,071 


841.40 


16.18 



III. Forest Produota 

X. Stose, Clay, Olaae 

XI. Iron and steel 

(a) Steel UUla 3/ 

(b) other IroQ A Steel 
Zll. Nonferroue Uetala 
ZIII. Uaohlaeiy 

XIV. Trasiportatloa 

XV, Sailroad Bepair Stiopa 



36.417 
19,273 

6vy6 
24,474 

38,902 

27,849 

115,044 

38,590 

13,056 



454,171 
173,000 

sataag 

288,945 
265,163 
I8S.271 
538,593 
307,373 
241,875 



490.588 
192,273 

6n.4g4 
313,419 

304,065 

216,120 

653,637 
345.953 
254.931 



52.885 

33.676 

lll-ll? 

47,506 

64,411 
46,001 
193,779 
69,43a 
27,729 



289,097 

142.142 
■iOO.W 

270.J67 
230,012 
166.722 
501.770 
3IS.316 
284.450 



341.982 

175,818 

6ia.go6 
317.873 

294.423 

212.723 

695.549 

388.746 
312,179 



697.10 


13.41 


914.40 


17.58 


<»l.6o 
1,014.20 


UaQ7 

19.50 


968.30 


18.62 


984.30 


18.93 


1,064.10 


20.46 


1,123.70 


a.6i 


1.224.60 


23-55 



ly Souroei Oaiinia 1933, aotoprint Beleaee Jesuary 23. I935, Lon« schedule. 
2/ Xxoludea part of Z7I, MLacellacsoua; and part of VII, Petroleuja, Ooal Produote. 

1/ ;4>parel Ijicludaa Ceaaua Iteaa dealing with learlne Ipparel aad Punlehiags, f20«-211, 213,215,223,224, 226.228,239,243, 245; Steal lUllB iBolndae 
Blast rgmacaa and BoUlae UUla, Itaaa #1110,1112. 



H.B.Jl, 

Slvlaloa of Beriev 

Deoember, 1935 



9854 



25 

TABLE SI 
CooparlBOD Data for FRJk Ce&ia* 

BLS siXPLE XKFLonunvfiiiiau, joa-oacaisk, 193} 1/ 







Baportlif 
lataklUhxanta 


faca lanari 


Payroll 


Weelcly Eamlnga 








Indezea 








Indazea 










lunjnBi (Boops 


j™. 




Soabar 


U 


1923-25 = 100 




IBonnt 2/ 


192>25 


r 100 










Par Cant 
of Total 


■nabar 


jnsa 


3otobar 


Jiuie 


( 

Octobar 


i^ar Oant 
Cbanea 


Jrmo 


October 


Jnne 


October 


Per Cant 
Changa 


Jma 


October 


iU gnqia 


100.0 


17.952 


2,802.711 


3,358,960 


66.9 


79.6 


18. 9» 


»50,U08,132 


$63,195,865 


"7.2 


59.'' 


25.8* 


♦17.95 


$18.81 




SOI-niBlBLI 






























I. 


roola 


i6.e 


3.013 


252.*9 


322,300 


89-7 


115-9 


19.9 


5.187.093 


6.528,685 


73.5 


91.1 


17.2 


ao.55 


20.26 


11. 


a. ipparel 
t. 7alirt<si 


17. "i 


l.lVi 


701.86'i 


771.1WS 


8<).7 


97.7 


8.9 


q.lje.'Al 


11.820.893 


59.3 


T7.K 


M."! 


13.01* 


l,i.?8 




6.9 
10.6 


l.aUl 
1.89'' 


129, W 
575, W9 


I'im 


89.0 
88.>l 


95.8 


li 


1.649,893 
7,506,6118 


2,1*96.819 

9,32U,oWi 


"9.5 
62.5 


72-7 
77-5 


23.8 


12.90 
13.07 


iI:J2 


xn. 


(part) Tobacco 


1-3 


237 


53.025 


55,898 


61,2 


it. 6 


5-7 


677.935 


780,962 


"3-7 


51.2 


17-3 


12.79 


13.97 


nr. 

T. 


Fivor Piodnoti 
Prlj)tln«-PQlillililA« 


3-9 

6.E 


705 

1.229 




129.736); 
119.085) 


J 

ee.3 


9". 5 


lit. 7 


1.8>io,55li 
3.193.732 


2.385, UCl)i 
3.IK18.280) 


66. K 


76.0 


lU.l 


18.1*1 
28.66 


18-39 

28.62 


n-ni.QuBloali t Pitrolna 


6.1 


1,101 


152.788 


isU.Uig 


87-9 


109.1 


25-1 


3,1128,132 


■',015.109 


71.3 


85.5 


20.6 


22.41* 


2i.n 


nil 


Babtwr Prodoctf 


0.9 


153 


80,813 


96.368 


69.3 


88.7 


26.6 


1,785,260 


1.93i',586 


53.3 


62.9 


15.1* 


22.09 


20.07 


n. 


Laattoar Prndocta 


2.T 


'«3 


I39.I6U 


153.033 


83.lt 


88.9 


6.6 


2.297.320 


2,61l6,6l6 


6I1.8 


72.3 


11.7 


16.51 


17.29 


HI. 


Mraat Pzod^uti 


8.6 


l.SUl 


126,789 


l67.3e' 


1»2.7 


55.2 


29.8 


l,63l'.603 


2,5ltl,181 


2U.8 


38.1 


53-7 


12.89 


I5.I8 


I. 


■taaa. Oliv. Olaai 


7.3 


1,311 


95.362 


105.1'77 


45.9 


51.6 


12.1* 


1.593. "51 


1,831.971 


28.6 


33.6 


18.0 


16.71 


17.37 


n. 


Iron aad Staal 

a. Staal allli 

t. Othar Iron t itaal 


7.6 


1.168 


laS.TVt 


1117. 7l|6 


■55.7 


60.8 


25.1 


S.K70.1W 


7.939.979 


T«,2 


1*7,6 


11.'* 


17,97 


19.01 




1.- 

6.5 


l,f2l 


199.580 

127.1?' 


1631383 


• 


70.2 


28.5 

19.9" 


3,657,Uio 

2,212,928 


5.012.991 

2,926.988 


3i'.e 

• 


118.0 

• 


37-9 
19.7* 


i?:S 


19.69 
17-91 


HI. 


Xoa-farrona liatali 


3.3 


599 


79,667 


108,188 


58.U 


75-6 


30.8 


l,Ul6,eo6 


2.022,181 


iw.o 


53.8 


33.5 


17-78 


18.69 


XIII 


Vacklaair 


9.9 


1.771 


266,298 


359.680 


9t.l 


73.0 


32.8 


5.135.608 


7,207.029 


35.6 


50.2 


39.3 


19- 29 


20. OU 


m. 


Iraaaportatln Iqal;. 


2.3 


U07 


227,U22 


270,106 


51.7 


59-1 


llt.o 


5,166,260 


5,697,293 


110.6 


"3.3 


5-6 


22.72 


a.09 


IT. 


Ballro^ Sapalr Slwpa 


5.0 


899 


86,965 


96.065 


Ug.U 


55-0 


13.3 


2.00l'.699 


2,lt35.699 


38.1 


1*8.9 


28.1 


23.05 


25.35 



}J 8oaTC«i BL8 tr«Dd of BqtloTBoat, Jtme. Ootobsr, 1933: Bolletln f6lO. 

g/ CoT*r^9 lAclxuifli a f«w raportinc •■tablliliBanti not Identical in both Jon* and Octobar. 

V Oronpi IT and T ar« oonblned is SL0. Totals for leparate grot^i w«r« darivad from data elTan for component BLS induatriasa 

• Oo^TUtad u wel^tod ararm^ baaad on ELS Taluea for group total and one eub-groiq>; walgjita proportional to raportad aoployBent. 

ii/ Hi* Ineontlitanoy batwoan the Indaz noabara for tba groap and for Ita coaponenta la dua to aaparftte adjuatmaat to Canaoa. 

SlTlaloB of Barl** 
MSiJUl 
Daeaabar, 1935. 



9854 



- ;36 - 

It may "be noted that the agreeraent between the throe censuses 
is quite close, considerinti' the cifforence in character and coverage of 
the data. Greater increasec are pliOvm in the 3LS sarnj.-)le for the PRA 
period than iv. the more ccnmrehensive PRA, Census samples. 

Com-oaiahlc results for all inuustri.js, by states, ??A and 3LS . The 
checl: coViToarisons for -"11 industries, manufacturing and non-manufacturing 
combined, a.rc shovm for weekly income and for J-ono-Octcber changes, b^^- 
states in Cha.rts 6 and 7. The s\ipporting data are given in Table III, 
and in the results by states in the ELS Trend of jinployment for Juno- 
October, 1D73. The totals by states in Table III are taken directly from 
the summary suoplied by the Census. There are slight discrepancies betv.-een 
these and the totals given i;i Table II vfhich were computed separately from 
the data sroplied by Census for thd primary industries. 

Weekly income -per worker, all industries. Chart 6 . For BLS the in- 
come figu.res apply primarily to factory vages. Fcr PRA. the figures represent 
the avera/;;:e va^'cs and salaries, manufacturing, distribution, service and 
the professionals being a.bout equally represented. 

In the graxih of Chart 6 BLS and PHA. values are shovm as super- 
posed bars coinciding in width. A black bar terminated by a white tip 
shows thr.t PJA exceeds BLS. A white bar is terminated by a black tip 
when BLS exceeds PPA. The tip bar represents the difference between the 
tvro valu.eE, 

The width of the bars is •orot)ortional to the population of the 
state represented. The average for the United States is computed by 



9854 



27 

CftAwr « 

CMtcK Of ai-S-AHO RRA. iBAjmc V EMUTMCNT AMD WTII0CL5 JONE-OCTOaW I93S 
WEEKLY INCOME Mtd WORKER 






JUNE 



B.L.S. s«iVlt^ «2ae4Firii* 4 445 000 wvtan 
P. R.A, SamHi: e43 OeO rtr«» 10 eeS OOO Wfrtvt 






i 10 15 
' '■ ■•' 


20 


25 

1 ■ ■ 


Ooiiva 

' 1 


Veftwrrt 


j } 


1 — 1 




RtwM lilM 






_=. 






C««f»ecticut 
Middit AtMit 






■^ '- 


Mm Yorh 






NMJVMy 

CMf Mrlh CMfnl 
HIiRSii 




L 


IHL 




\ I 




, 










■MHHI^H 


!Lr 




Micft>|W 




T 






_ . . . '. . 


Minnexiti 




r 


CD 










^ 


a 1 






^H 


I"* LTj' 






* 




NAMki ' 


; 




"" 




















SM.tl.AtM. 




--4 




Oeli-*r* 






■D 


MBT 




"- 








■HA. 9 


. 








vri B 




- 


** ' 


^^^^^^^ 






□ 


Georgia 






EMlSMftiC^tr.1 




Kintwiy 




















Wnt SmM CMtral 




















L 


Te.*i 






MBMm 


. \ 
















wimw| 




* 










^^^m 








^ 








f 








caHfwuii 










3 














■^CZ] 


1 


L-jJ 1 i 1 1 1 L 1_ 















OCTOBER 

K.L.S. Sli*k: tlMttPlru S4UO0O 
P.K.A 9a«ki M30«O TinM 11 M4000 



N<t«: Wi4fli of ban lll4lC«t«l *<f«rifiM ft ttitai 



25 Oolln 



CENSUS OF MANUFACTUBES 





9&ii4 



N.R.A. 

oiitiia rf n II m 

M.1. 'IW«I 



C.W.W. 



-28- 

weigiatin^: the values for the separate states, usin^: the PHA employment 
values for Octohcr 1933, as wei^.htc . (T'lo latter i^-ii.ui-ec were the only 
data on all-industry cmplo^/raont available in Fiarch 1934, vrhen this part 
of the analysis was done). The split in the hars for the total United 
States values indicates that it is not pospihlc to present the ftill 
width proportional to tae total prpulation. 

The excess of the average PLnA income value over the BLS value 
indicates the reliahility of PIiA and BLS as samples. That each t.ivcs 
a valid rcorcsentation of vrngc-salary conditions in general is snown 
by the similarity of the ratios of "BLS wages" to "PPA wages and 
salaries" and the corresponding ratios of "v?ages" to "wages and sal- 
aries" in the Censuses of Ivianufactures of 1927 and 1929, presented 
at the oottom of Cl:iart 6. 

All-industry e mployment changes, "by states. Chart 7 . The changes 
during the F~A period presented in Clria.rt 7 show wider variations between 
corresponding ELS and the P?A measures than those foxind for weekly income, 
Chart 6, This is due presum.ably to the meager coverage of BLS fjr many 
states. The agreement for the United States a^verage, shown by the bottom 
bars, is fairOy close. 

The BLS change in employm.ent and T3ayrolls is computed as a 
month-to-m.onth ratio for the returns of identical firms, coverage vary- 
ing slightly each month. The change over the 4-month span is comput- 
ed by chaining the monthly ratio links. For PEA the Jime-October change 
is given directly, for identical firms. 



9854 



29 

CHART 7 

ctcCR or B.LS. ANO PRA. MEASURE OF £mpi.ovii«nt ano pa*boh.3 JUNC-OCTOBCR 1933 
PtR CENT CHANGE Jun« to Ocfobo'' 

e.LS. SM^ FACTOav EMfUlVMCNT-wACCS ^^^^^ 

P R.A. SinvK FACTOBV iM omcE EM^lOVMENT -WAGES .n« salaRICS ' 



EMPLOYMENT CHANGE 



PAY ROLLS CHANGE 




Vi«i|ln«ri **tc*|i 



9854 



MillKtli PR* tW LnplovwiM ^ OcloMr 



N. R.A 

M.5 M*M» 1»3< 



c.w.w. 



I 



-30- 

Tlie differencGS in the ainom-'.t of change by P3A and BLS for 
individiT-l states indicates the i-narl^ed difference in tyre of coverafc. 
These difrcrcnccs may "be taken as random samplinc variations. The 
weighted ?~A average for employment exceeds BLS slightly, 16.2 vs. 
16.0 i-oi- cent. But for payroll, BLS exceeds P?A, "31.2 vs. 20.2 per 
cent. This smaller change shovm hy PRA. :n3.y oe due to its wage-salary 
composition, office payrolls, presumably snovdng a smaller increase than 
wa^os. 

Eolation of PRA. clTan&es to seasonal fluct^oa-tions, Charts 4 and 3 . 
The seasonal swin;--; of many industries is upward during tnc summer months. 
Tne ??A r^sv.dng is, however, ■luitc independent. This is clearly shown 
for all-iiH?.nufacturin,-, industries during sover-'^l census years in Chart 4, 
Tabic VII. T.o same conclusion is indicated by the trends of the several 
BLS maiuiscturing industry grou.ps shown in Chart 5. 

Section II - Distribution of j]mploymont by jndus^tjj-Qs. an d He^ions 

The distributions of emplojTnent by industries and regions t,ivcn 
belo\7 derive from the tabulation of the 64o,000 unable PRA. returns. The 
distributions ;t ivo a reorosoniative r.icture of t}ie emnloyment variations 
by industry and region. This is shown by the comparisons with corres- 
pondini., distributions given by BLS, and the Census of Manufactures and 
Occvraations as shown in Tables I, II and IV. 

D istribution by industries, Charts 8 and 9 . The distributions of 
establisiimonts, enployraent and payrolls are each shown by a vertical 
bar re'Dresenting 100,3. The proper portion of each bar is allocated to 



9854 



31 

TABLE VII 



M 



Average Hours per Month and per V/eek l/ 
35 Manufacturing Industries, 1933 



Monthly 

Hour* 165 159 165 

Working 

Days 26 23 27 

Weekly 

Hours 36.1 41.5 36.7 



M 



169 187 195 



25 27 26 



40.6 41,6 45.0 



182 171 155 



25 27 25 



43.7 38.0 37.2 34.8 34.2 33.6 



N D 



151 148 140 



26 26 25 



Yearly 

^_Averaj;e 



165.1 



l/ Monthly Labor Review, October 1935, Table 5. In computing the working 
days, a six day week was assumed. The assumption was made also that no 
work was done on the following days: January Ij February 22; July 4, 
Labor Day, and December 25. The number of weeks in the month was 
computed as the quotient of the number of working days divided by six. 



Seasonal Trend of tlanufacturing Employment 

Selected Census Years 2/ 
Unit; 1000 Employees 



Year 


8125 


8231 


8343 


1929 


8493 


8678 


8835 


1951 


6583 


6697 


6798 


1933 


5015 


5077 


4932 



8324 8260 8230 

8903 8898 8912 

6802 6730 6573 

5087 5351 5724 



8255 8405 8612 

8956 9094 9189 

6469 6513 6566 

6095 6519 6703 



8674 8622 8532 

9086 8681 8341 

6386 6151 6008 

6623 6354 6203 



8384 
8839 
6523 
5807 



2/ Biennial Census of Manufactures, 1931, page 1177; Rotoprint Release 
March 1927-1935. 



9S54 






s I 



4 



.-, I 



ff .", 



in :^ r» (Ts Q a. in f- 

to u a\ ^ 9. a. p- m 

O (O ai r*- lb o f— ff. 

cess's KKA 

pj (Ti r- O' t^ to 'J> ^ 

iotc<jNOtoo>f--'^ 

ftJ ix> ir> .-t *' -^^ -I "^ 

-j> (»• tn 1^ wi d> p- w 



o-< ^a ^ 



E * 



rH -^ Jt ^ 'C: '^ 



ft 3 



O 0^ (T\ 



^ \0 e>J 



^ c 



^ ^ 



■:i ^ 



#. ^ 



<Ts CT^ ON to 



r^ ei) «" ^ ^ (vj p^ r- 

0> Cr\ CT. ^ O o to CT> 

{338000*80 
oiOO O oi'a'O en 
S-'Oo O 3^o o*^ 



32 



SCN IT. 1^ ^ O «" 
ifN n- w> r^ O vD 

S .? C S K S 3 



r- m3 ff\ 



1?> >n Vfl '^ 1,0 
r-i <^ J^ ^ ^^J 



■O >^ (7^ 



ic <t> '^ 



.ri ir\ vo vo 



(-. tft u\ 






5 
R 



P- vO 



5~ S. R 

a 3 ji 

J- '^ 

^ tr. t-i 

3 IT. -J 

rt J3- «0 

tS >^ wj 

l^^ w ^ 

in .0 r— 

.ix f^ tfi 

in \D r— 

vfl -0 1^ 



^O 


'£ 


-£ 


j« 


s 


s 


* 


« 


? 


2 


c 


« 


s 


8^ 


R 


a 


» 


s 


E 


S 


in 

0^ 


01 


s 


R 


* 


R 


C^ 


m 


>^ 


R 


» 


« 


S 


•s 


8 


S 


1 


1 


g 





•§ 


S 


|J\ 


£; 


8; 


* 





g 



. ..1,1-..- ^tSs^f- q. 






IP .T t C 



gi SSS SlKf^ fl^C f.!t,\^ 



S| 

n 

Si 

it 

1 = 

I o 

I s?s 
[in 

^11 






!•> W 0\ t^ vO O 



» 3 



5 ^ 



m .H w 



B a 



IT\ CT\ C' 



3 i I ^ 

^. . S ? I 

« • (J rt (u 

s : ^ I I i 

s e s 3 I 3 

H M [^ R n EI 



V K\oj .n^ 



3 -. 

I e J - - 



c^ i.t)i,t< -4VO a> 



*i 



..■as 

« 

O O X 

ir 3 

MAS 



|3f 



;i Ja 



• -4 i/i « 



33 

TABLE JX 
?&Jl CSL'SUS. JUUB. OCKIEER, 1^33 

fiisraQinioK st hboiois . bzpobziuc esuslzseuehts 

BSaiOlUI) FZHQSfT or TOTiL 



Hew 

Sr eland 
Industry Oroups i. 


'-'id 

Atlr'jitiC 

II. 


Eaet.So. 
Central 
III. 


ffcat I'u. 
Central 

n. 




South 

Atlantic 

V. 


£&et So. 

Central 

n. 


:l08t 60. 

Central 

m. 




fountain 
Till. 


Pacific 
IX. 


"All 
Others" 
.X".2/ 


Total 
l^]abe^ 
Beport- 


per Sent 


Per Cent 


Por Cent 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


Per COiit 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


Por Cent 


iae 


ttL iSDDSTKJSS B.7U 


^M 


a.'42 


11.23 




7.95 


3.99 


7.39 




2.118 


9.311 


3.05 


61*3.066 


naa-myjPAcroamo sJtT 


23.52 


a.23 


11.69 




B.02 


1.08 


7.82 




2.61 


9.110 


3.16 


551.752 


A. AericultUM (minor) 11. Ul* 


26. lU 


19.75 


9.211 




5.1*8 


2.58 


KSk 




3.46 


13. 11 


11.16 


lt.30S 


3. liinlag aad (^ujuryln^ 
1. r>oal 
II. OUwr l(t,«ral« 3.«7 


28.77 
18.52 


21.58 
13.36 


7.90 

8.98 




15.51 

1..36 


10.32 
2.89 


22.514 




tl 


0.96 
11.16 


6.71 
S.56 


m 


U. C<-uatructioa \Z.Zk 


28.97 


21,3!* 


9.13 




7.80 


2.90 


1..31 




1.90 


9.02 


2.39 


17.737 


D. Public L'tUlUeB 

I. IranuportBtiua.etc. 6.73 
II. Ctlior puLllc 

Utilitiee 5.02 


18. 61 

iU.it3 


21.15 

19.52 


iU.29 

13.73 




5.6l» 
10.67 


3.98 
3.79 


12.11 
12.65 




2.21 
3.65 


9.40 
7.6I1 


5.83 
8.SI1 


11.7119 
7.125 


E. DlstnbutiOL. 

1. ri.'Mutale f,30 
II. BetBil 

(b) Youta, Urae8,itz. lO.lC 

(b) D.-y ^^odo. etc. 2.03 

(c) Other retA?.! «.53 


2S.0U 

23.69 
21. 8S 
?l.o6 


20.09 

22.S5 
ro.07 
22.12 


10.05 

10.96 
12.29 

12.93 




7.76 

8.14 

10.35 
7.S0 


3.6s 

U.07 
5.83 
;.97 


7.6). 
6.77 
8.li. 




2.18 
2.89 


9.59 

7.BG 
6.99 
8.95 


3.16 

3.13 
2.62 

3.01 


50.336 

llli.ST? 
55.180 
122.713 


F. S-^rvlce 

■ I. DouOsticSuUl^.atr- .i.l7 
II. Other Service 7-10 


21..5C 
23. S6 


19.85 

21.12 


11.09 
11.61 




7.39 
7.07 


3. so 
3.32 


8.02 

7.23 




2.53 
2.27 


11.U6 
13.26 


l.lU 
3.04 


71,099 
52,209 


C. rjiance 7.lj 


2?. 39 


20.X8 


12.96 




5.28 


t.52 


8.07 




2.119 


9.89 


2.63 


140,479 


E. ujuiufAcr'jHa& io.ju 


30.96 


23.15 


a.2s 




i.V 


;-i7 


11.56 




1.29 


9.01 


J.35 


87.298 


I. Toodi 6.2C- 


13. 5U 


2J.;i 


12.1.2 




5.30 


U.50 


7-<;i 




2.S0 


10.30 


3.52 


17.25; 


II. TextUen 

U) Jpparel 7.53 
(b) ether tex-.ileB X3.36 


6a. 9^ 
ij6.35 


10. 6j 
.90 


I'M 




•,.11. 
11.3lt 


-.68 
2.14 


1.16 
1.37 




0.22 


3-97 
'4.55 


o.ss 

1.41 


0,651* 
5,387 


Hi. ?OTtt:i produ--t« lO.Ui 


i;-25 


20.il 


5.« 




12.7* 


7.09 


0-57 




i.a 


l,-.63 


3-21 


7,693 


tV. Peter Pi-oaiictfl 11. ''M 


35-70 


2b. 63 


».1i 




2.40 


0.6". 


U.85 






0.15 


1.50 


1,874 


V. PrtntlPr-rubllsflliK 7.f'l. 


S?-**} 


23.59 


13.2: 




0.73 


:..18 


6.12 




2.4.J 


9-42 


1.99 


l4,6!lC 


TI -Vil. Cbeiflcal* 7 lb 


;2.d7 


22.29 


7.35 




7-39 


3.1s 


7.35 




0.14 


8.98 


3.58 


..168 


7III. B-ibbcT Trc^ucta ?1.13 


-.29 


3H.0: 


lt.83 




o.;2 


- 


- 




- 


11.60 


1.55 


388 


DL. Leather Prodjctb yi,C\ 


jo- 5: 


lt.;,« 


5. 2d 




2.13 


0.45 


0.95 




- 


4.25 


0.6)1 


2,205 


X. Stoae, Clay. GIe^s C.oZ 


3C.i*« 


25.58 


7.5S 




7.i'i 


3.19 


3.69 




1.05 


6.77 


3-62 


3.980 


3a. tMB and Stesl 

U) Steal -Ills i.2p 
f\) CUi.ifon£t stal 13.27 
XIT. Hon-ferrcas lintJa I5.CI 
XIII, acclilBPiy lO.Gi 
JtlV. Cl'Oe;-. Ea-^Dment ^,37 
XV. E.H. Ziepair Sl-op 
XVI. UlF.'-e.iaatoua 10.0S 


35. S7 

32.33 
-7.3= 

5J.9» 


«0.7J 
53.8S 

29.5'J 
;.'.95 
35.37 
w.oc 
23.65 


2.62 
11.97 
5.73 
7-17 
I4.S0 

7.10 




5.CI. 

1.'42 
1.35 
3.51 
3.68 

5-P; 


2.i> 
1.93 
1.10 
1.57 

o.ito 
"39 


i.;i 

1.87 

3.33 
1.52 

2.41 




O.U9 
0.88 
0.56 

0.87 


0.05 
9.53 
?.09 
9.I45 
10.49 

7.25 


1.41 
1.26 

-'.53 

3.12 

50.00 

1.1! 


496 
3.7.-^ 
3,631 
7,086 
1,2149 
16 
=.549 


K;o_Ai>symD 7.73 

ALL OTHUIS ?/ lO.S,' 


'•a.oC 


26.U2 
"..77 


M_ ^__ 


..JIJS.. 


i.b3 
o.i-i) 


2.1, ll 




12.02 


S.13 
5.97 


10.1c 
1.-2 


2I46 
'„77« . 



iy Sourc*! ?periftl tciiUiCtlfu 

Jmuo 17 zai Ocijber l^, 1?; 

2/ "Ali ethers" covers uatc i'»r q-aoatli. 
llsJiai'Dte cperatlDg )n 5.T0 
Oi CdmoAbier. ^.svlig p-rate 
data £r;>i.: rcturiiR recelreu 

V.U.L. 

£i/ial3D sf aevlev 

:j~:>?uibcr, 19.'5 

9854 



'PJl of PFA nudotijTuioii-e i*t-.-jTn oy Buxeni 01 Ccnsue, tl^caJoir Ij}}- EnFiloyiDon t a&i Payroll data ere for tho -eexs of 
"■!>• 
iiuPire-s t.jilch do not vlearlj- iadlcnte tbs'. a brBfi.,iis-n il-e li'jon ^icde 01 a pro;er gooi ra '.ilcai bRStr; data fjr eetab- 
or B»re stc.;«e, ruch ai, r*'Alr.>ftd«, 8t>4cun bcat^, jrlpo ILies, telephone wid telC£T'5:'ii and po-ier cca^JCJii-eti; tht r*port6 
In v;;rlOMK 3ta*ea Tar rtilch IndWldiii-.! r'r^«rts rare r.ot submitted hut fcr rtilcb e ia2.5t.er reputt t-ec oup .lied: ?iA 
ur a S'-tto after the Static t^ *iae-a ne-al :■) tJie T.,bai-j^tloc Seel. an i^T inmchl;i' ace. tabuletln;. 



34 

TABLE X 

FSA CKHSUS. i; JUKE, OCTOiiSH. I533 
DISTPJBUTlOa 31 EEGIOHS - JUIIE 21iPL0TS£EHT 



crD'jsTSY aEcups 


New 

i>.ClBnd 
I. 


Uld 

Atlantic 

II. 


Central 
III. 


I«t »a 

Caitral 

IT. 




South 

Atlantic 

T. 


Saet So. 

Central 

VI. 


feet So. 

Central 

VII. 




Uountaln 

nil. 


Paclfle 
H. 




■All 
Otliero" 

•I- 1/ 


Total 
itaber 

Hcportid 




Per Cent 


Per Cent 


Per Omt 


Per Cm 




Per Cent 


Per Cent 


Per cent 




Per Cent 


Per Cant 




Per Cent 




ALL IN'a'JSTRISS 


10.1 


27.3 


22. e 


6.I1 




9.0 


3.6 


I4.0 




1.2 


6.3 




9-7 


10.867,02U 


iJos-Uii:iujAcrjR0o 


7.1 


26.2 


19.3 


7.8 




7-3 


3-5 


5.5 




1.7 


7.9 




13-3 


5.1l99.«Olt 


A. lerlfultura (Dinor) 


8.U 


30.9 


a. 8 


8.2 




1..9 


1.8 


3.3 




2.1 


15.6 




2.9 


5^.395 


B. mnine & q<CLixryiag 

I. Coal 

II. Other ijLnerals 


2.5 


37-3 
9.0 


lU.? 
8.1 


1.5 
9-2 




21.8 
2.9 


12.8 
3.6 


•3 

23.0 




U.6 
6.0 


5:5 




6.9 
30.3 


lU-^ 


C. Conatruclloa 


8.6 


27.2 


22.2 


lO.U 




9.3 


2.9 


6.2 




1.2 


7.5 




li.l 


209.390 


D. Public DtUitlOB 






























I. TranBportatlon, etc. 

II. Other :)tibllc utllttlSB 


5.0 

3.1 


2U.7 
1U.9 


15.5 
11.0 


J:^ 




H.5 
3-1 


2.2 

1-3 


It.l) 
3.it 




.It 
• 7 


10.1 

3.5 




26.1 

55.0 


317.1111 
699.30'l 


S. Dlatrlbutlrti 






























I. WTiolBcale 

II. Hatall 


7.1 


28.8 


20.3 


9.8 




6.6 


3.5 


5.6 




l.lt 


8.6 




8.0 


635.757 


a. Poodj;, Drugs, etc. 

b. Dry jooda, etc. 
c Other retftll 


10.3 
9.3 
S.8 




23.1 
25-3 
28.S 


9.1 
9.3 

8.B 




8.2 
8.7 

7.8 


a 


6.0 

u 




2.0 

1-9 

2.0 


7.1t 
8.0 
8.0 




It. 9 
1.3 

It.l 


689.560 
631.777 


F. service 






























I. Domeotic, Hotels, etc. 

II. Other Service 


8.2 

8.0 


29.0 
30.8 


19-7 

22. K 


9.0 
7.7 




8.14 

5.5 


3.9 
3.0 


6.6 
I1.2 




2.2 
1.3 


11.0 
12.6 




2.1 

ll.lt 


1199.301 
390,777 


G. ?insncce 


8.0 


37.6 


15.6 


6.7 




6.6 


2.U 


U.o 




1.0 


8.3 




9.8 


567,6H6 


K. Ua-WFaCTUHIHG 


13.2 


29-8 


26.3 


u.s 




9-7 


3.3 


2.2 




O.U 


1».7 




5-7 


5.075.1t«3 


I. ?ood« 


5.7 


a.6 


29.lt 


I't.O 




6.5 


2.7 


U.6 




1-3 


10.3 




3.9 


620,61t2 


II. Tsztlles 






























a. Apprjjfll 

1). Other textUea 


S'5 
31.3 


119.U 

JK.O 


V, 


3-7 
0.9 




11.0 
28.6 


0.1 

5-5 


1.2 
0.8 




0.0 


2.1) 
0.7 




1.8 
3-7 


510,380 
72l»,085 


III. Forest Products 


6.2 


11.9 


20.0 


lt.6 




16.7 


8.2 


8.7 




1.3 


17.7 




H.S 


335.096 


IT. Piiper ProductB 


IB. 3 


51-9 


32.1 


3.8 




2.0 


0.6 


2.5 




- 


6.1t 




2.3 


155.01U 


V. Priiitlof-Publiahlng 


8.3 


i>t.l 


25.2 


7.8 




5-9 


2.6 


3.8 




1.2 


8.3 




2.2 


318.637 


71-VII. CheolcalB 


k.i 


26.8 


29.0 


3.0 




i».5 


2.2 


It. 8 




0.1 


it.3 




21.0 


293.ZS5 


vm.Bubber Products 


20.8 


17.t 


U8.6 


3.0 




0.0 




- 




- 


6.5 




3.7 


67.093 


IX. Leather Products 


3U.b 


30.0 


19-5 


11.8 




2.6 


0.1 


0.2 




- 


0.9 




0.3 


233,5»5 


X. Sloae, Clej-, Glass 


5-7 


U2.5 


26.U 


lt.l» 




9.H 


2.3 


1.7 




O.lt 


It. 8 




2.0 


.l6l,07U 


XI. Iron and Steel 






























a. Steel Ifills 

t. Other Iron & Steel 


0.7 

IB.l^ 


37.1 
30.3 


1.3.6 

111.9 


0.9 
2-5 




13.6 
0.8 


2.1 
2.9 


0.1 
0.3 




- 


1.7 
2.8 




0.1 
2.2 


277,633 
255,1100 


Xll. Kon-ferrou» Uetole 


2U,2 


29.7 


33.3 


2.1 




1.7 


2.3 


0.9 




0.1 


1.6 




U.2 


183,1176 


XI 1 1. Machine r? 


12.1 


33. ■* 


37-0 


3.0 




1.2 


0.8 


0.9 




0.1 


5-3 




9-3 


ll76,61tlt 


XIV. Trunspoptatlon Equip. 


2.1* 


13-5 


51.U 


0.6 




2.1 


0.1 


0.2 




0.0 


l.ii 




27.9 


251,'t35 


XV. Rail road Repair Shop 


- 


- 


35.7 


- 




- 


- 


- 




- 


. 




64.3 


1,353 


X7I. UiBceUane<nu 


10.1+ 


■rt.it 


19-1* 


5-0 




11.3 


5.0 


0.5 




0.2 


2-3 




1.6 


ao,66o 


UBclaselXled 
All Others 2/ 


5.e 
U.7 


50.3 
3.3 


29.6 
10.2 


3.6 
8.6 




29.1 


1.2 
9.8 


0.U 
6.3 




5.2 


5:^ 

1 




3.7 
11.0 


7,069 
2«t,66s 



2/ 



y Source; SpeclEd tabulation for NRA of PDA crueatioimaire retune by Biiresu of Census. December 1933. QnploTiae&t and pfUTOll data are for the veeka of June I7 sad 
October Ik. 1933. 

"All Others" covore data for ':]ueetiomiaires rhich do not clearly Indicate that a breakdown has been made on a proper geographical basis: data for establlaluieDtB 
operating in two or more States, such a£, railroads, eteao boats, pipe linen, telephone and telegraph and power Rompaniee; the reports of coiq}anieB having pleats 
In Tarioua States for which Individual roporto wore not submitted but for *,lch a mastor report was supplied; and data from returus received for a State after the 
St^te had been aeait Lo the Tabulation Section for punching and tabulating. 

U.a.A. 

Dlvielon of Review 

US:JUX 

C^cvmoer, 1935 

9S54 



3S 

CHART 8 



PRA EMPLOYMENT CENSUS 

us. TOTAL. ALL INDUSTRY 

PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTIONrJUNE. 1933 



ESTABLISHMENTS 

(«4 3,006) 



EMPLOYMENT 

CrO. 067,000) 



PER CeffT 

PAYROLLS 

(♦230.457.00 0) 




NON- MANUFACTURI NG 
h-A- AGRlCULTUREjMiNOR) 
B-- MINING i QUAHRtlNG 



-OTMCtt MINERALS 

— C - CONSTRUCTION 
D.- PUBLIC UTILITIES 

-f\ — TRAN^PORTION 



_a - OTHCft PUBLIC UTHJTlCS 



E.- DISTRIBUTION 



I. - WHOLCSALf 



H- RETAIL 

- (a)-FOOOS, DRUGS, ETC. 



tbJ-D«T G0O09, E7C- 



■* C C )- OTmE b RETAIL 



F.-SeRVICES 

1 - OOMECTlC, Horeu, ETC 



OTMEH SERVICE 



H ^VAfJUFACTURlNG 
—I,- FOODS 

n. -TEXTILES 

(3.) APPAREL 

,Cb)OTHER TE«TlLe3 

— m.-FOREST PRODUCTS 
nr.-PAPER PRODUCTS 

v.- PRINTING- PUBUSHING 

»_YFVn-CHEM(CALS 

-^300; RUBBER PRODUCTS 
Et-LEATHER PRODUCTS 
X ^ STONE, a AY, CLASS. 
B.-IRON & STEEL 

" f fa.)5TE£L MILLS 

^\fb.>OTVieR IROMASTCEL 

— XIL- NON-FER. METALS 
■^Xni -MACHINERY 

^xnr TRANS*. eoutp'T 

„— iy-R.R REFWIR SHOP 
jaa - MISCELLANEOUS 

— — UNCLASSIFIED 
- — -'ALL OTHERS' 



♦source: NRA ANALYSIS (MS) Of TABULATION OF PRA OUE STIONNAIRE 
RETURNS. DECEMBER 1933, BY BUREAU OF CENSUS 

NOTE:-"ALL others': DIVERSE ESTABLISHMENTS COVERED BY MASTER REPORT,' 
INDUSTRIES NOT ALLOCABLE TO A SPECIFIC REGION 

9654 



NRA 

DIVISION OF REVIEW 

M.S, DEC, 1935 

Statistics Sectiow, no. 473, &OfS: 



-36- 
th3 SGveral -orincipal industry groups. It is seen that the relative 
proportio^ic of the total for a ^iven industry group vary in the charac- 
teristic nia.nner for each industry. For oxaraplo, wholesale diatrihution 
has aoout S of the total estahlishments, 6,; of tne total oniployrnont and 
9, J of the payroll. The correspondini portions of retail distrihution 
ho'7ever, are irarkedly rMffer'^nt. The sun-jortin£ data are given in 
Tgblc II. 

Lin-s of var2,"in^ tii-ic'raess connect the portion rllocated in 
each coliu.m in each inrlu.stry. The heaviest line se'naratGS fenufacturing 
from llon-rnanufacturing. Linos of secondary thicl;ness separate corToosite 
groups lil:e Distrihxitio ■. and Service. Special suo-divisions of con- 
ventional census -.rou'op made i-, tnis stud;, are indicated by dashed 
lines. 'rhis is the case in G-ro\r.Ts B, 3]-lI, F, H-II and K-aI. 

I'lsbrihution in a san^-Tle sta t c->:.ro\vp . Tii'.' distrioiition sho-ii in 
Chart t, of a representative 7-ritate r,ajT'>le, are ver;^'' similar to the 
correspcndinc distribu.tions ^lor the Unitec* States totals shown in 
Chart 8. The principal differences are in the proportions of the total 
payrolls and tAe total cinplnynient allocable to iiianufacturing and Kon- 
manui'acturin\,'. The 7 selectoa states represent about a third each of 
the establislirnents, einpljyment and payrolls for the entire country. For 
these 7 states, lIon-m=nufacturin;,' lias some 47-S of the empljyinent and 
51,!) of tne payrolls. In the United Stati-is total however, Hon-mann-factu-rini: 
has 51,j of the emieloyraent ano 55,, of the payrolls. Similar conspicuous 
differences for the principal i.'_,ro"aris can be seen in the case of Iron 
and Sccel, Public Utilities and Coal Mining. 



9854 



37 

CHART 9 

REPRESENTATIVE SAMPLE 

PRA EMPLOYMENT CENSUS 

SEVEN SELECTED STTATES * ALL INDUSTRY 
PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION, JUNE, 1933 



ESTABLISHMENTS 

(2)9,076) 



EMPLOYMENT 

C3.S92.000) 



PERCENT PAYROLLS 

C$75 675,000) NQN- MANUFACTURING 

5^A -AGfllCULTURC (MiNOfl") 

B - MINING & QUARRrriMG 
■fl- COAL 

I n- OTNEft MINCBAI^ 

•- C - CONSTRUCTION 
0- PUBLIC UTILITIES 

m A N5 PORTAT (ON 

OTMCA PUBLIC uriLlTlES 

E- DISTRIBUTION 

^ I- WHOLESALE 

n- RETAIL 

(aj - fOOOS, DRUGS. ETC. 



( b)-0(W GOODS. ETC 



*-G-FINANCC 




,tC}-OTWEH RETAIL 



n- OFHEB SERVICE 



M- MANUFACTURING 
1 - FOODS 



n- TEXTILES 

{.3)-APPAReL 



(bJ-OTMEB TEKTILEi 



m- FOREST PRODUCTS 
nr-RAPER PRODUCTS 

7-PRINT;NG-PUeLeHlNG 



YI-m-CHEMlCALS 

RUBBER PRODUCTS 
IX-LEATWER PRODUCTS 

X-STONE-CL^y-GLASS 
H- IRON & STEEL 
CaJ-STEEL MILLS 

fbVOTHEB lR0r4ASreeL 

Xn-NQN-FER METALS 



jaSF-TRANS' EQUIP'T. 

MISCELLANEOUS 
UNCLASSIFIED + 



•MASSACHUSETTS, PENNSYLVANIA, OHIO. No-CAROLIMA, MISSOURI, TEXAS, AND CALIFORNIA- 
W-GROUP XS, RAILROAD REPAIR SHOPS, WAS NOT COVERED FOR THESE SEVEN STATES 
■♦■- UMCLASSIFIED CONTAINS 'ALL OTHERS' 

SOURCE NRA ANALYSIS (MS) OF TABULATION OF PRA QUESTIONNAIRE 
RETURNS, DECEMBER 1933. BY BUREAU OF CENSUS 

9654 



NRA 

DIVISION OF REVIEW 
M S., OeC.1935 



Statistics secTiON.No. 474, 



^^r? 



-38- 

In-'.iistr:/ cdGtrilj-ation i. i P'°A -"-no Census of Occnatiors . By Chrrt 3 
the nr^or i.ir.ustiv atouts siio - a F.i.nif icant .nffor-uco from the pattern 
indicated oy t.i- Censv-s of Occv.rjatious. In tno latter, soe Table I, 
th« •:)ersons avail?"blo for enrolny.ient, ail ovei- 10 years of a^^e who 
declare theaselves attached to so-io occr,,:.ation, y;ere distributed in 
1930, rou-fahly: I.anufacturin;,,, 14 Liillioi;; ITon-manufacturin^, 
24 million; A^'-ri culture, 10 million. In tne industries ro-nortin-^ to 
PRA., it IE seen that Kon-manufacturing is representr-id to a markedly 
smaller de-ree than lVfenufacturin-5. The proportions indicated in 
Ch2.rt 8 --nd Table II are 51 ;. and 47;j. P.ut th-j Censn.G of Occupations 
ratio is 24 to 14; i.e., 80 to 47, instead cf bl to 47. 

artended basis for estimate of. PRA roemplosnnent . A conr>a risen 

with the Census of Occupations suggests a deficiency of representation 

in th^^ PPA Census of 80-^^1 for tn ; Non-raanufacturin£, relative to t]:e 

80 
Manuia.c curing, indnistri^-s. As ihown belnw, the Marufactvirirt, indu.strie?5 

have a 73 cov. rai-;s in T'?A for e.n-oloyment. Hence a ;-ilau.f>ible measure 

of Hon-iaanufacturin>i enroloyment coveragv: is 5 of 3, or about 50,j. ?er- 

8 4 

haps it T'ould be more accurat : to co;npare l^janu-facturing with the trade 

and comm-,,rco occuoations of column 3, Table I, i.e., oraittinA thu Public 

Service and Professional ^-roups as having no relevance to PPA. The 

corres'^ondin^ ratio is 30 to 14 or 67 to 47, These considerations afford 

a basis for a more reliable e&ti.n^t..of tn: actual PFA ;im"'dayment incr^^ase 

than thi rou.£:h a^oi:5roximation made early in 1934, 



9854 



-59- 

Distribution Toy feeoferaphic rrg:ions, Charts 10 and 11 . The dis- 
trihutions of estahlishjnjnts and of Juni imnloym-nt* are shown by the 
principal ^eo^raphic r-^ions for th- major industry j^roups. For the 
distributions by region, Charts 10, 11, the horizontal bars renresent 
100,j. The width of the bars is proportional to th-. number of establish- 
ments. The graphical indication of reporting establishments is supt)le- 
mented by ths actual n-omber shown in the right-hand columns. Separate 
width scales are used in Charts 10-A and 10-E, because of the markedly 
greater n-umber of establishments in the !Ion-aianufacturing inc'ustries. 
The relative proportions are indicated by comparing the widths of 
Construction in the non-manufacturing, industries and of Foods in the 
manufacturing industri -s, both havin=^ approximately zhz- same number 
'->f establishjnents. In -^ach chart the distribution of the total is shown 
at the top, by the split horizontal bar. Th^, split indicates that the 
total width corresponding^ to the number of establishments cannot be 
shovm. At the top of eacn cxiart tnere is a special bar showing thu: dis- 
tribution of the total population among the several regions. The length 
of this special bar corresponds to the ag, regat- percentage allocable to 
the 9 geografiiic regions. This aggregate is 97, j in the case of the Fon- 
manufacturing, 98, j in the case of Manufacturing industries, the remainder 



* 



The distribution for June is closely similar to the distribution 
for October; lik--.-wise the distributions of paj^rolls are similar 
to the distributions of employment. The differences are given 
in the detailed summary tables, Table II, and th'. tables in 
Appendix I, 



9854 



40 

CHART lOA 

PRA CENSUS - REPORTING ESTABLISHMENTS* 

JUNE-OCTOBER, 1933 

PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION BY GEOGRAPHIC REGIONS 
NON-MANurACTURING INDUSTRIES 

10 20 30 40 50 60 7 80 90 100 PER CENT 

1 I M I I I I I I I M I I I I I I I I I I M I I I I I I I 11 I I M I rp I I I I I M rp I I I I I I I I p I I I I I I M I I I M I I I I I I M I I I I I I I I I I I I I M I I I 



U30 POPULATION V^/M 
UM1T— 1^00,000 Vj'/.///. 



TOTAL NON-MAN'F G. 



A - AGBICUUURE.WNOneZ^aZzaZ^ 



— MINII 

Ln-oi 



OrMER MINERALS 



C - CONSTRUCTION 



D- PUBLIC UTILtTIES 

f 1 - TRANSPORTATION 



n-OTHCn PUB- imL. V///,'//^ 



C - DISTniBUTlON 

l-WMOLCSALt 



a-FQOI»,D*>UCS^«C. 



b~DPVCOOD&, 1.C 



,C -OTHER RETAIL 



F - SERVICES 

' : - DOMESTIC, MOTELMC 



B-OTHCR SERVICE 



G - FINANCE 




I ■ ■ ■ ■ I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I , I , il I II I h I ] >l I I I il ■ I. I I . I I ,1 1 . I I h I ■ il I ! I ] I I I t I I I I I I I I II I 1 nil I I n I III 1 I I I I I ■ I 
10 20 30 40 SO 60 70 SO 90 100 PER CENT 



9654 



I — PERTAIMS TO INTER-REGION OR OTHER N0M-ALL0CA8LE INDUSTRIES. 
•source, nRA analysis (MS) of TABULATION OF PRA GUESTIONNAIRE 
RETURNS- DECEMBER 1933, BY BUREAU OF CENSOS. 
WIDTH OF BARS PROPORTIONAL TO NUMBER OF ESTABLISHMENTS. 



NRA 

DIVISION OF REVIEW 

M.S.DEC 1935 

Statistks Section, No475, ^»5?^ 



41 

CHART 10 B 

PRA CENSUS- REPORTING ESTABLISHMENTS* 

JUNE- OCTOBER, 1933 

PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION BY GEOGRAPHIC REGIONS 

MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 



I I I ' I I M I I I I M I I M I . p I I r , I ,| I I I I M I . ■ I i I ■ I . I I n M I U I T j I I I . I M , i I I I M I I M I I i I I I I I M I I M M I I I I 

WEST SOUTH t*ST WEST MOJNTW IWIinC 

NO-CEHTDAt. *rt.*»*T»C 3a CtMTRAl. iO-COtTMi, ^ V" 



100 PER CENT 



iREPOfmNG ESTAB&- 

MUMBEB * or TOTAL 



167,300 13.6 



17.300 2.7 



8,700 1.0 



S,400 o.a 



7,700 i.a 



t,900 0.3 



14,000 2.3 




Xy-R.R RE«yfl 5H0PI 



XSn-MISCeULANEOUS w/////////^ 



"X- PERTAINS TO tNTER-REGION OB OTHeR NON-ALLOCABLE INDUSTRIES. 
*%OURCe NRA ANALYSIS fM.5-> OF TABULATION OF PRA aUESTlONNAlRE 
RETURNS, OECEWeeR 1933, BY BUREAU OF CENSUS- 
9S54 WIDTH OF BARS PROPORTIONAU TO NUMBER OF ESTABLISHMENTS. 



NRA 

DIVISION OP REVIEW 
M.S., DEC. 1935 

STATimci SECTION, ^4o. 476, SjS^^. 



42 

CHART II A 



PRA CENSUS -JUNE 1933 EMPLOYMENT^ 



PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION BY GEOGRAPHIC REGIONS 

NON-MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 

PER CENT 

1 1 1 M . f n 1 1 1 M I ffl 1 1 M ' ' ' ^f I ' ' M ' ' ' T ' ' ' ' I ' ' I " ' ' ' ' 1 1 ' ' ' T ' ' ' ' I ' ' ' ' T ' ' ' ' I ' ' ' ' l' ^ ' ' ' I ' ' ' ''f'' ' ' ' I ' ' ' T 



TOTAL MANUFACTURING 



TOTAL NON-MAN'f'C 



A-AGRICULTUflE fniNOB^ 



n- OTMER MINERALS 



C- CONSTRUCTION V//////A 



D- PUBLIC UTILITIES ^ 

' l-'mANSPORTATION 



n-OTHER PUBLIC LrtlL. 



E- DISTRIBUTION 
I-WH0LE5ALE 



H-RETAIL 

-FOODS, DBUCSjETC 



b-ORr 6OO05,ETC 



c- OTHER nenkiL 



NUMREIl >< Of TOTAL 

5,075,500 46.7 



F- SERVICES 

rl-OOMESTICMOTELS.eTC. 



Lil-OTtCfl SERVICE 



C-F(NANC6 




J ■■■■' " "1" "' I " ill 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 Ml 1 1 1 1 i.i 1 1 II 1 1 n I ill I ■■ 1 11 ■ ill ■ M 1 11 M I , , , 1 1 . 1 1 ■ I i ■ , , I ■ . . , I , ■ . 1 1 , , 1 1 1 



609.300 0.4 



635,400 5,9 



426^600 34 



os9,aoo i.« 



9654 



pen CE»fT 

•I'- PERTAINS TO INTEB-BEGION OR OTHER NON-ALUOCABLE INDUSTRIES. 
»SOUBCE: NRA ANALYSIS (MS.) OF TABULATION OF PRA QUESTIONNAIRE 
RETURNS. DECEMBER 1933. BY BUREAU OF CENSUS. 
WIDTH OF BARS PROPORTIONAL TO NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES. 



90 



100 



NRA 

DIVISION OF REVIEW 

MS., DEC. 1935 

ST«nsT7C3 SECT»ON. No. 477, S^9, 



43 

CHART II B 



PRA CENSUS-JUNE 1933 EMPLOYMENT* 

PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION BY GEOGRAPHIC REGIONS 
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 

PER CENT 



H-TOTAL MANUFACTURING 



1 1 iM| 1 1 II 1 1 III |ii II M 1 1 1 1 III 11 iiiT-iii 1 111111 |i nil III I M n il I II I I Mi l 1 1 1 1 1 |i i 1 11 n 1 1 | i ii 1 1 1 1 I I |ii i 1 1 

i ENGLAND ATLANTIC NO CtNTWAL NOCCNTSi 

\z^^^ mi!^= ^w^^^^ww-Nw^ ^^m 



__ PAClftC 

wtST SOUTH "so saMoutmuN^-™ JIJNe EMPLOVMENT 

NoceNraAL wvAwnc gw cEXj.^ ^"^ Z numkh >t of twhil 

5,075.500 46.7 



n-TEXTlL£S 

(a)' A PPA R E L 



(W-ffTOS* TE)CTH.ES 



nr-PAPER PRODUCTS V//////////////A 



Y-PRlNTING-PUBLISHJNG 



yr-^n- CHEMICALS 



I-5T0NE,CLAY, GLASS 



Xt-IRON i STEEL 

(a)-3TKL MILL9 



Cb)-OTHCR IRON & STEEL 



m-NON-fERROUS METALS 



Xiy-TTIAHS. EQJJIPMEMT 



J3r-R.R. REPAIR SHOP 
Jm-MtSCELLANEOUS W/^'f^^/ZA 



n- FOREST PRODUCTS 




318 600 2.9 



BH- RUBBER PRODUCTS *J >^ ^ i > >>>'»J}fff>>/fyyyi 
IX-LEATHER PRODUCTS 



277,600 



1" 'I ^^-^-^^^^--i M i ili ii ij^i H i l ii i i lii iil i I I 1 1 II I . I n il I ,lLuxlLuJ 



9854 



»f^Ml^7 ^ ° 'N^ER-neoiON os other non-allocable industries 

•source. NRA analysis (M.S.) OF TABULATION OF PRA QUESTIONNAIRE 
RETURNS DECEMBER .9J3 9V BUREAU OF CENSUS. 
WIDTH OF BARS PROPORTIONAL TO hu\'?ER OF EWPLOVEES. 



100 

NRA 

DIVISION OF REVIEW 
US.. DEC. IMS 

STATlSTtCa SECTION, NO. 478, £3^3! 



-44- 
■being the Group "X", pertaining to inter-r-..gion or oth.= r non-allocalDle 
industries. As in the preceding charts, thin lines to guide the eye 
connect the proportions of th-.; total allocable to a given region. 
Charts 11-A and 11-B snow the same type of distribution for 
June employment. Th.; distribution of employment among the several 
regions shows a greater range of variation than the corresponding dis- 
tributions of establishments. The conspicuous differences are seen in 
the case of Public Utilities, Chemicals and Transportion :E;quipment, and 
in "X" or inter-regional classes. Similarly conspicuous are the unusual 
proportions allocated to certain regions for Textiles, Leather Products, 
Machinery, and Finance. It is interesting to compare the distributions 
of Manufacturing Fith 'Non-manufacturing totals on Chart 11-A. The 
g -ographic distribution of llon-maieafacturing industries is seen to be 
roughtly similar to the distribution of total population shown on 
Chart 10-A. 

Section III - Variations in Pay, EmiDloyn-.ent, and Changes, by Industry 
G- roups 

The variations in weukl;- pay and the PHA increased by regions 
and industries are of oarticular interest. They constitute the sole 
source for data that are of erime importance to NRA policy. 

^uriations in ^m^ol oyment and PPA changes, s-gmmary. Ch3.rt 2. The PEA 
Census gives a conTprehensive picture of the variations in pay and employ- 
ment-payrolls for Ion-manufacturing as well as Manufacturing industries. 
In Chart 2, the principal variation patterns in all industries are shown 
in foiir groups. In colioire 1 is shown the percentage distribution of 



9854 



-45- 
reniortinii estalilishir.; nts in all industries. In coliiim 2 is shown the 
average weakly incomrj Tjer worker in th: different industry groups as 
a spot picture for Jime 193?. In the 3rd and -itn columns are shown 

the percentage increases from June tc OctoDer of employment and -'layrolls 
respectively. These variation patterns arr' given for the Tirincipal 
industry groups ser.arated in three major classes: the duratle manufac- 
turing class in 7 groups; the non-durable manufacturing class in 9 
groups; and the non-manufacturing class in 13 groups. Summaries for 
each of these classes and for all industry are shovm at the top cf the 
chart. 

The length of the tars indicat-.-s the per cent change of dis- 
tribution, and, in th- case of the average incomj, dollars. The width 
of the bars is proportional to th ■ June vmplojTment by the PRA. Census. 
In the case of the swimary ^roues at the tcp, th torn lower edge of the 
bar indicates that it is not jossible to show on the graph the full width 
proportional to the J\ijie er. dcjonent. In ^ach case the graphical indi- 
cation of employir-=nt in ih i industry is supplemented by the rounded 
numerical value for June, shewn in the middle space. Svipplementary 
information is also given of the rounded n^'omber of r-porting esta.blish- 
ments in each industry group. 

At the right of tne Cliart, the BLS index of employmient is 
shown for three significant dates for each ind-ustry, where available. 
The- index numbers ar-j converted to the base, average 19S9 - lOQ . The 
index for June 1933 indicates the depression level at the beginning of 
NHA. For March, 1935, the index v.'ould indicate roughly the recovery up 



9854 



-45- 

to the time pr^.^ceding the Schechter decision. Th^ index for Decemter, 
1935, marks the last nhase considered in this stiidy. 

Variations 'hy re^'^^^jo ns, a ll industry groups, Cha^rts 12 and 13 . The 
variations in establisliments and employment patterns for industries and 
regions are given in detail in the regional summaries of the data, 
Tables VIII, IX and in the tables of Anpendix I. It must suffice at 
present to show only tvo groups &f the- variables given in the data, the 
PRA increase in emplcyrrion-t and the June weekly incom.e. 

The variations in employment increase, Chart 12, show the 
varying r^sp'jns j elicited in different r-jgions and for different 
industries by the PRA drive. Th-^ same device is used as in Chart 2 tj 
indicate the size of tne industry ^roup by making thj width of th-i scale 
bars proportional to the em.ployment at some base period, June, 1933 in 
this case. B',:-cause of th^; l-.rge range of variation of size in the 
several regions, it v"=is necessary to eninloy thrive size measures for 
three groups of r giens, as ir lic^e d by thv EJ seal? bars at the top 
of each region tjroup. Tn ; vxi^h indication of size is suDpl -m nted by 
the rounded valu- s of th- P'LA June em.-Dloymient for each industry group 
shcvm in each EJ column. In th:- summary' sections at the top of the 
chart both the --mplcym.nt and the reriorting establishments are given. 

The variations of weekly pay incom. ^ shown in Ch^rt 13 affcrd 
the most con^prehensive statistical pictur- available concerning the 
m.uch discussed subject of wag:- differentials. Thj representation form 
used is the sam ; as in Chart 12. 



9854 



47 

TABLE Si 

PRi OSNSUS - lEEKLY Pil PEH HOIUffiB 
BI GS0OS4PHIC Divisions UTO IKDUSTBT SfOBPS 1/ 
EmploTment, Sj, and Average ^Teekly Incone. JU>^5, I933 





I 
HEW Gn^illD 


II 
MID-AILiUTIC 


III 
EAST i'OP.TB 
CEKTHAI, 


IV 

W£51 NCHTH 
CEHTRAL 


V 
SOUTH 

ati.ai:tic 


IX 

pacific 


VI 
EAST SOITH 
OEKTaAL 


Til 
BEST SOUTB 
CEK^RAl 


VIII 
IJOraTAO 


CenmiB - PHA 
Industry Groins 


(ooo: 


p 


(000 


P 


(000) 


P 


(ocoj 


(000) 


(000 


p 


(000) 


(000) 


(000) 


P 


ALL IHDD3TH1ES 2/ 


1.096 


$20.80 


2,965 


$2ll.6it 


2.1155 


$21-99 


697 


$20,117 


971 


$15.91 


6S5 


$21-15 


386 


$111.63 


132 


$19.19 


138 


520.99 


SOH-IUHOTACTVRINO ^ 


392 


2lt.05 


I.MK) 


27-66 


1.089 


23.72 


129 


20.75 


399 


18.82 


153 


25-611 


192 


16- lU 


301 


20.53 


91 


20.81 


lUSOTiCTrmiHO 1^ 


671 


I8.95 


1.512 


a.n 


1.335 


a. 35 


2U3 


20.05 


193 


13-35 


237 


21. 6U 


167 


12- SI 


112 


16.11 


18 


21.60 


Hon-I>arabl« 


l»67 


18.07 


881 


21.113 


590 


a. 15 


182 


20.21 


311 


12-61 


136 


22.60 


101 


12.80 


71 


18.17 


13 


311.58 


Durable 


182 


a. alt 


537 


22.69 


70U 


21.65 


50 


20.011 


125 


15-32 


97 


20.05 


52 


13.90 


39 


13.77 


6 


15.17 


boh-uamufacturihg 






































B. MlnlBS A (^uari^'lag 


It 


$21.53 


99 


$18. b6 


15 


$15.66 


17 


$16.37 


51 


S13.26 


9 


$29.37 


35 


$11.79 


31 


$39.18 


19 


$18. 21 


C. ConBtructlon 


18 


25-51 


57 


25-57 


116 


19.61 


22 


17-51 


19 


18.66 


17 


20.83 


6 


11.50 


13 


13-59 


3 


19.81 


C.I. TranaportatloQ 


16 


26.1.7 


78 


23-B7 


19 


2U.19 


23 


22.611 


11 


20.16 


32 


2U.50 


7 


15.66 


ll 


l8-b! 


1 


22.15 


D.II. Other Public Otllltles 


21 


30.25 


lou 


30-05 


77 


28.36 


28 


2I.98 


22 


25-53 


25 


39.67 


9 


23. 2S 


21 


25-56 


5 


2:.1s 


E.I. Wholesale 


U7 


28.66 


185 


33.36 


129 


27.71 


62 


25.81 


12 


25-01 


55 


29-89 


22 


3l.l6 


36 


25-60 


9 


38.3a 


S-II.a.EetaU ?ood, Dnige 


m 


19. 3t 


109 


21.57 


99 


18-38 


39 


16.76 


35 


15-slt 


32 


a.oo 


16 


II.09 


26 


15.1s 


5 


30.90 


E.II.b.Diy Goods 


&i 


16.62 


181 


17.86 


175 


15-55 


6U 


11.81 


60 


13-76 


55 


19. 2I 


25 


13.50 


39 


13-87 


13 


15.96 


c. Other Retail 


55 


2'».73 


131* 


27-00 


182 


26.6I1 


56 


22.39 


19 


30.23 


51 


35.76 


25 


16.19 


13 


19.81 


!3 


21. 51 


r. Service 


72 


21. 7U 


265 


23-73 


186 


19.61 


75 


17.39 


63 


15-55 


1* 


25.69 


31 


13.117 


19 


1I4.96 


16 


lb.79 


a. Ilnsaca 


U5 


33. 2t 


au 


101.32 


88 


31.76 


38 


30.29 


37 


30.16 


17 


33-03 


ll 


27.16 


33 


30.2- 


6 


31-59 


UiSOTACTDEIBG 
Son-Durable 






































H.I. Foode 


35 


$22.01 


IS"* 


$25-59 


183 


$21.22 


87 


S2I.9I 


Ho 


$lb-lll 


6U 


$30-98 


17 


$10.91 


29 


$17. 3( 


S 


$21-18 


II. a. Apparel 


t3 


llt.U2 


252 


l6.1t2 


81 


12-99 


19 


11.18 


56 


10-23 


12 


16.10 


31 


9.11 


6 


8. 11 


- 




II. b. Fabric* 


227 


15.92 


IT" 


17-85 


32 


IU.69 


7 


15-85 


207 


10-68 


5 


19.28 


Uo 


10.53 


6 


?.1i 


• 


1O.5U 


17. Paper Product* 


28 


20.37 


1*9 


20.82 


50 


20.38 


6 


18.93 


3 


17.60 


10 


3l.l1 


1 


13-17 


1* 


15.35 


- 


- 


V. Printing-PubllBhlng 


26 


28.96 


111 


31.16 


80 


26.99 


25 


26.62 


19 


27.29 


26 


25.60 


8 


?4-33 


12 


2U.^-. 


- 


30.35 


TI-TII.Caiemlcale 


13 


25.t9 


79 


26.86 


85 


28.15 


9 


21.15 


13 


1B.5U 


13 


29-52 


7 


18.65 


ll 


ri.»" 


• 


S.23 


7III. Rubber Producta 


lU 


19.5" 


12 


23.66 


33 


2U.1U 


2 


19-35 


• 


36.0-J 


ll 


26.80 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


IX. Leather Producte 


81 


18.52 


70 


19.15 


lt6 


15.55 


27 


15.12 


6 


13-31 


3 


19.I3 


• 


13.10 


* 


1.;.?; 


- 


- 


Durable 






































III. ForeBt Products 


21 


18.21 


Uo 


27-29 


67 


15-65 


15 


17-37 


56 


9.811 


59 


17.82 


27 


10.13 


39 


lO.llll 


ll 


15-05 


X. Stone, Clar. Glass 


9 


29-77 


69 


21-09 


13 


19-33 


7 


17-90 


15 


16. Ill 


8 


22.79 


ll 


13 -12 


3 


18. so 


1 


111. 83 


XI. Iron A Steel 


m 


20.8U 


180 


19-28 


228 


20.18 


9 


20-50 


iw 


a. 22 


12 


2I1.OU 


13 


11.61 


1 


17.01 


- 


- 


Xn. Moa-ferroua Uetals 


w» 


20.33 


5^ 


23-25 


61 


20.35 


1 


?1.61 


3 


20.25 


3 


23-91 


It 


I9.SO 


3 


22.11 


• 


20.65 


I2II.Uachlnei7 


58 


22.0lt 


159 


25.73 


176 


22.51 


11 


21.59 


6 


20. a 


11 


25-78 


ll 


16.67 


It 


26.119 


1 


23-78 


XIT. Transport at Ion Iqulp. 


6 


22.11 


35 


22.96 


129 


26.91 


1 


26.01 


5 


18.66 


ll 


a.91 


• 


11.31 


a 


16.91 


. 


21. .3 



i/ Bourc; KKl «i.lr.U of Ubul.tlon of PRl questloimalr. r.turn. of C.oortl.r, 1933. *y Bur.aM of Ooubm.. Derlred from HEOIO:,A1 lABOLAIIOH BY nnusm OKJUPS simwirle,. 

The reported numbers of June efflployoan t are rounded to the neareot thousand. 
ZJ Includes also Agriculture (minor), XVI Miscellaneous, UnclasBUled, All Ctbero. 
1/ Includee also Agriculture (minor. 
H/ Includes also XVI Uiecellaneous. 

The maA (•) indicates leas than 5OO enrployeee reported; the marlc (— ) indlcrtea no useable returns received. 



N.B.A. 

SiTlsion of Beviei 

December, 1935 



9854 



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-dG- 

Variation of TRk iirr.plo.vmnt increase ty primary industr?/ ;-.,rouDS , 
Cliarts 14 , Thi variation? of r snons to VTA ar-, naturally, of 

wider range in tn ^ individual industry sub-grovips. Tho PEA clianges for 

thGs^ aro depicted in CUart 14-A for 57 Hnn-manufacturing, in Chart 14-B 

for 48 llon-duratle Manufacturing, and in Chart 14-C for 47 Durable 

Manufacturing industries. 

Section IV - Variations by Giz : of SstalplisliiTient 

The analysis res-alts of emnloym.-nt and payroll variations "by 
size of concern are shovn by Charts 15 and 16 for PEA, ana by Cnarts 17-C 
17-1 to 17-VII, for Census data. 

PEA Ce;iGUS all-ind ustry o-state samnle, Charts 15 and 16. The data 
for PEA are for identical f irn.s, based on a special tabulation for the 
3 representative stat---s. The distribution patterns shov the percentage 
of the total falling in "ach siz:> group for the 4 variables: 

1. Th' number of firms m ^ach siz-'- group 

2. The numb-;r of emfloyees and the amount of payroll in 
each siz-^ group 

3. Th- specific perc^ntagj change bet??e-n Jun-- and Octob 
of employm-'^nt and nayroll in zvch size group 

4. The we-kly incorn- -p^'r worker in J-on--, and in October, 
in each s is e 'group. 

In each figure the si?, int^-rvals are measured by the range cf 
the number of employees -oer establisimi^ nt. The rertangl^^s sho'/;' the per- 
centage amount allocated to groups of firms whose siz^;; is measured by 
employee numbers: 

0, 1-2, 2-4, 4-8, 8-16, 16-32, o2-64, 64-128, ... 8, 192-16, 384. 
That is, in -jack size int-rval th ~- largest firm has twice as many 



9854 



51 

CHART I4A 



PRA CENSUS, NON- MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES* 

PERCENTAGE CHAt4GE, JUNE- OCTOBER, 1933 



EMPUOYMENT 




•iOORCC: Mft* A»i*L!f5IS [M.SjOF TABULATION OF PRA QjUESTIONNAIftE 
SETURNS, OecHMSeR !»»», BV BURCAU Of CENSUS. 



WIOTM Of BASS 



TOUP5 E«;e*»T AS MARKED Ol. ' 

P«0(>0RTIOHAL TD JUNE EMPLOVMCtfT Of lO.OOO TO 80,000; I OVER BO.OOO I 



NRA 

nviaioN OF REvjew 

M3^ Dec, I CM 

STATKTICt SKTIOM, No 4Sl. 'JV 



CHART 14 B 



PRA CENSUS- MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES^ 

NON-DURABLE GOODS 
PERCENTAGE CHANGE. JUNE-OCTOBER, 1933 



aLS JUNE 
INDEX OF 

EMPLOVMENT 

IS2}-a9- 100 ' 




*SOURCE: NRA ANALYSIS <»rt.S.) OF TABULATION OF PRA aUESTIONNAlRE 
RETURNS, DECEMBER 1933, BY BUREAU OF CENSUS. 
INDUSTRY GROUPING: CENSUS CLASSES FOR MAJOR GROUPS; CENSUS-BLS. CLASSIFICATION FOR 

SUB-GROUPS EXCEPT AS MARKED is)' , . 

WIDTH OF BARS PROPORTtONAL TD JUNE EMPLOYMENT OF 10,000 -4D,C00t 1 OVER 40,000 | 

9854 ^ *^' 



NRA 

DIVISION OF REVIEW 
M. S., DEC.,1935 



Smnsrics SecrrON, uo. 479, 



s^§. 



53 

CHART lie 



PRA CENSUS-MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES* 

DURABLE GOODS 
PERCENTAGE CHANGE, JUNE-OCTOBER, 1933 



aL5. JUNE 

INDEX OF 

EMPLafMENT 

mt»-ti ■ too 

^33135 




* SOURCE: NRA ANALYSIS Ovi S.) OF TABULATION OF PRA Q.UESTIONNAIR€ 
RETURNS, DECEMBER 1933. BY BUREAU OF CENSUS 
INDUSTRY GROUPING: CENSUS CLASSES FOR MAJOR GROUPS; C£NSUS-aL-S CLASSIFICATION FOR 
SUB-GROUPS EXCEPT AS MARKED (s). 



9BS4 



WIDTH OF BARS PROPORTIONAL TO JUNE EMPLOYMENT OF 10,900-40,000; I OVER 40.000 1 



NRA 

DIVISION OF REVIEW 
M.S.. DEC . Idas 

smnanci Scctiom, mo.a&o,£T!P, 



-54- 
emriloyses as th sirall7:st includorl firm. These sqxial ratio size 
intervals arc obtain d by a grrdua-ticr adjustm'-nt of tin size grouor, 
given by th_- C-jnsus tabulation, nam-^ly: 

0, 1-5, 6-20, 21-50, ol-lCO, 101-500, 2,051--»v-r. 

The configuration in each pattern is determined bj' size and 
also by the charact-;ristic types of indiistry peculiar tn the several 
states. Thus the riattorns of weekly income per worker shovi/n gt the 
right of the chart are definit ly disc:rnibl- also in the 1929 Census 
of Manufacturiii:-. data. This is of int re^st, since only a rou^. h tabula- 
tion by size can be obt-ein^o, by assigning- -;ach industry to a single 
size class, because Census has no breakdovn of oa.yrolls by size- of 
establishm .nt. How.-v r, sun rimons.c' on this fundam.ntal natt^rn is the 
distinct in com'- chan^-.e pattern of Junr-Octob :r peculiar to each state, 
and presumably varying v/ith th- tin; and changing economic policy. 

The regularity of form of each pattern suggests th ; g-oproximate 

adequacy of repr -sentation of t'^e samples. The cnmjj'-^site sample (of the 

3-state totals) graDhed in Chr.rt 15 covers the following emiplryment 

r turns: 

460,000 out of 710,000 PFA tot^l for Ohio 

366,000 out nf 588,000 P':A total for t;=>ssachusetts 

159,000 out of 194,000 FTA total for North Carolina 

The patterns --f veriation by size for individual industries 
are shown by the gn^up rf Charts numbered 16-A, ..., 16-D. The support- 
ing tabulated data ar,- in th^- PRA by-siz^ of concern study, in the 
files of NEA. 



9854 








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-60- 

Census of Man-gfacturrs data, 7-stat-^ sample, Chp.rts 17. In the 
analysis of thLS-.; data a procsdure vi-as us-d diiforing in some respects 
from that followsd in thr study of th:- PPA samplo. This v.-as necessitated 
by the lack of "idr^ntical firm" data in th- availabl-; Census records for 
1931-1933. 

The analysis results ar; depicted in Charts 17-J, ..., 17-VII, 
17-C. The suoporting data illustrated in Table XII for Ohio, sum^narize 
published Census of Manufactures r -suits, 1929, 1931, 1933 (RotoiDrint 
Releases of 1935). 

Section V - Sconomic Implications of P5A Employment Increase 

This section is concem-d vith inf-'rences flov/ing from an 
examination of the trends of employment and weekly hours, the former 
shown in Chart 5 and th; lattir* in Ciia.rt 19. In a v>':ll consider 5d 
judgm-nt of the indications of th-se tr3nds on;-- would liave to take 
account also of th- related economic variables of -emeloym-nt, man-hours, 
weekly hours depicted in Ch^.rt 18. For the latter the supporting data 
derive fromi a C cnsus-BLS study of th:: man-hour returns for 35 industry 
groups, of the 1933 Census of Lanufactur-S The man-hour data are sum- 
marized in Tabl ; VII. 



The BLS indexes of we-„-kly hours for the major groups were 
computed from the v^^eekly hour data given for the primary 
industries in SLS "EmployTnent and Payrolls" each raonth. The 
computed indexes shown in ClTS.rt 19 v/ere checked against \m- 
published BLS values. 



9854 



^ 



61 

CHART 17-C 



WAGES AND WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 
BY AVERAGE SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT,* 1929, 1931, 1933 

7 STATE COMPOSITE ** 



DISTRIBUTION 



RATIOS TO 1929 



ESTABLISHMENTS 

PEF* CENT PER CENl 

OF TOTAL OF 1929 



«R CEMT 
OF 1929 



PER GENT 
or TOTAL 



^'- 





UHBER 


'4»- 


6S.S»S 

1 


'3I> 


&4,ee9 


*33' 


«.Z7I 



I 5 10 20 &0 K}0 200 400 SOOieOOOVEff 
SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT 



.^" 



" 1933-^ 



5 to 20 50 100 200 400 600 leOO-OVEFT 
SIZE OF ESTABUSHMENT 



WAGE EARNERS 



























1929 


^ 




1931 


p= 






1^ 


iJ 


^^ 


^ 


-1 




mmd 



NUMBER 




'29< 3,143,000 




'3I> e,3l7.000 




■33 8.160,000 





SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT 




WAGES 



> 



M 



= 


AM0Uf4T 


•29. 


$4,133,000,000 


•31- 


♦2.BH,0O0.O0O 


1^ 


$ l,S42p0O,00Ol 



1 5 10 20 50 100 200400 BOO 1600 



D-WEfP 



r 



1 5 10 20 50 100 200 4oO BOO ISOO-OVDr 







AVERAGE INCOME 






- 


DOLLARS __-, ^1929 ; 

■' — -i ^^'T - 




— ' 


1 ■ . t 

i93K :—. 


20 






1— 1— -^ 1 1 


IS 






t 


^' 






— 


-A 


1 


10 




















- 


s 






















- 




S 1 


> ^ 


! 


O 10 


X 


10 4 


SOW 


JO lb 


OO-ONfE 



WEEKLY INCOME 
PER WORKER 

PER CENT 
DOLLARS OF 1929 

25 II^^T.THTTI ^I '00 



RATIOS TO 1929 



PER CENT 
OF 1929 



AVERA4E 




'S9> * 2929 




'31. * »0.»0 




"93. * 16.40 





/-;' 



SIZE OF ESTABLISKMENT 



[ 5 10 20 50 100 200 400 BOO i 
diZE OF ESTABLISHMENT 



teoo-ovEff 



•distribution BY SIZE IS MADE BY ALLOCATING EACH CENSUS INDUSTRY ACCORDINO 
TO THE AVERAGE NUMBER OF W«E EARNERS PER ESTABLISHMENT IN 1929 
••mass.. PENN., OHIO, N-C, MO. TEX.jCAL 

SOURCe- CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES. 1929, 1931, 1933.. 

9S54 



NRA 



MS., OCT., 1935 



62 

CHART 17-1 

WAGES AND WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 
BY AVERAGE SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT: 1929 1931 1933 

MASSACHUSETTS 



DISTRiaUTiON 



Pi:R CENT 
or TOTAL 
29 r 



i_ 



A- 






ir. 



ESTABLISHMENTS 



RATIOS TO 1929 




«fN CENT 

OF TOTAL 

i6 , 



r 



-'"-•^ L 



WAGE EARNERS 

I CEliT PEB CENT 

TOTAL Of t9?.9 

100 



f^' 



J — I — ' 



2t' «9T,4«4 
'9I> 4Ca,B7* 
•33' S«4,:77 



{ 60 j- 



r— 




1933 




l»3l 




- 


— 














— 



PER CENT 
OF 1929 
100 



16 10 20 SO 100 200 400 600 1600 
SIZE OF ESTABUSHMENT 



PER CENT 
OK TOTAL 
26.- 



IS 



^V 



10 

: 



rf 



WAGES 



^ 



^i. 



♦ •M.aoe.iic QQ J"' 

60 t-i 



'3i< * 4«e,r4r,99z 

'33. 4 380,eZ7,Z44 



^1929, 

4 



5 10 20 50 100 200 400 600 ICvlO 



J933 



.-r" 



PIH CENT 
OF 1929 
100 



9 10 20 BO 100 200 400 600 1600 



PER CENT 
OF TOTAL 



AVERAGE INCOME 

1929V 



WEEKLY INCOME 
PER WORKER 

'ER CENT PER CENT 

)F TOTAL OF 1929 



X I " 



K 



:r^ 



AVEftAUE 




■29. *23 96 




1 'ai. *2f.02 




j 'SS' »IT.O» 





RATIOS TO 1929 



eo 


T"" 1 


- i-^-<:^..r-...^ 


1 













' — 








60 


















— 


40 














' 






— 


20 










.. 










— 



PER CENT 
OF I9E9 
100 



%,ii°oVk%m%mif°' 



*DISTRieUTION BY SIZE iS MADE BY ALLOCATING EACH CEMSUS INDUSTRY ACCOROINO 
TO THE AVERAGE NUMBER Or WAGE EARNERS PER E^TABUSHMENT IN 1929 

SOURCE' CENSUS OF MANUfACTURES, (929, 1951, 1933. 

UbS4 



NRA 

DIVISION OF REVIEW 
STATISTICS SECTION 
NO. 340 
M.S., OCT., 1935 



63 

CHART 17-tt 



WAGES AND WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 
BY AVERAGE SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT/ 1929. 1931, 1933. 



DISTRIBUTrOW 



KR CENT 
OFTOUIL 
» 



1929 -»_J 




5 10 20 80 100 200 



PENNSYLVANIA 



ESTABLISHMENTS 



RATIOS TO 1929 



'4do!Sooisoi 



NUMBER 




'28. 


1«.»47 




'SI' 


14^90 




•33. 


1 Il7»0 






I 9 K) 20 



100 200400 aoonoe 



pen ccnY 

OF TOTM. 



X 






WAGE EARNERS 





' 


NUHSEH 1 


20 


'28' 


1,014,048 


IS 


•si. 

■S3- 


78S.7»5 
6»0.tTS 



5 10 20 90 KX> 200 400 900 1600 



t=i 



X 



9 10 20 90 no 200 400 9001600 



WAGES 



^ 



»X 







MOUNT 


20 


f' 


* l,3Tt,444.ttS 


5 


•SI. 
•S3. 


* Ml. 937.594 1 

* 974.442,826 1 



9 10 20 50 100 200 400 800 1600 




5 10 20 50 100 200 400 800 COO 



AVERAGE INCOME 




WEEKLY INCOME 



PER WORKER 

DOLLARS 



RATIOS TO 1929 



PER CENT 

OF 1929 

100 





WERAOE 




•29 


♦2e.i8 




■31' 


^ 20.89 




"SS- 


^5» 






SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT 



SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT 



*^Dt8TRIIUTI0N BY SIZE IS MADE BY ALLOCATING EACH CENSUS INDUSTRY ACCORDING 
TO THE AVERA8E NUMBER OF WAQE EARNERS PER ESTABLISHMENT IN 1929 



SOURCE- CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES. 1929, 1931, 1933. 

9SS4 



NRA 

DIVISION OF REVIEW 

STATISTICS SECTION 

NO. 339 

M.S-, OCT^ 1935 



64 

CHART J7-ra 



WAGES AND WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 
BY AVERAGE SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT 1929. 1931. 1933 

OHIO 



DISTRIBUTION 




NUMBEH 




'29- 


II. ess 




i 'St. 

1 


•.7Z» 




*5Si 


T894 





ESTABLISHMENTS 

PER CENT PER CENT 

OF TOTAL, OF 1929 

26 , ,. — ., ..■ ,100 



WAGE EARNERS 

PER CENT PER CENT 

OF 1929 
00 



RATIOS TO 1929 



^; 



X 



100 
•0 

»0 
40 

20 



'8,21" 8? m>IHW«?«"~««« 



OF TOTAL 



NUMBER 
'2»- 741.143 
'Sl> 4SS,740 
'33> ' 462,719 



IM iM-Waf 



PEft ceirr 

OF I929 

100 



PER CENT 
OF TOTAL 



r^ 



^ 



5 10 eo 50 100 20O 800 I600-OV£R 



WAGES 

PER CENT . PER CENT 
OF TOTAL OF 1929 

25 , 100 



AMOUNT 




'Z* ♦l,l02.t«6.4M 




'SI' * M2,4»4,47« 




'33- ♦450. 144,397 





r 



I S 10 20 90 100 200 800 ! 



woo-oveS 



PER OENT 

OF l*ta 

100 



DOLLARS I !,_ 



AVERAGE INCOME 

54.44-x 

J — ■'- laafesi DOLLARS 



^ 



^ 



r 



WEEKLY INCOME 
PER WORKER 

PER CENT 
OF 1929 
100 



RATIOS TO 1929 



AVERAOE 

29- ^ ze.so 

'5(' * 22.55 
33> ^ IT 89 



1 ~5 10 20 t-3f lUO 200 800 l600--OVEfP 

SIZE OF ?E»TARL1SHMENT 






^933 



PER CENT 
OF 1929 
100 



SfZE OF ESTABLISHMENT 



-WEff 



^DISTRIBUTION BY SIZE IS MAOE BY ALLOCATING EACH CENSUS INDUSTRY ACCORDlNtJ 
TO THE AVERAGE NUMBER OF WAGE EARNERS PER ESTABUSMMENT IN 1929 

SOURCE' CENSUS OF UAHUmCliURES, 1929. 1931, 1933. 

9S54 



N R A 

DIVISION OF REVIEW 

STATISTiOB SECTION 

NO. 342 

M.S., OCT, 1935 



65 
iHART n-js 



WAGES AND WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 
BY AVERAGE SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT* 1929. 1931, 1933 






DISTRIBUTWN 



NORTH CAROLINA 



ESTABLISHMENTS 

PER CENT PER CENT 

OF TOTAL OF 1929 



RATIO TO 1929 



r^- 



Li 



I 5 10 20 50 100 200 400 800 1600 OVER 
SIZE OF E8TABU8KUENT 




I 6 10 20 SO 100 200400 800 «00 OVER 
SIZE OF ESTABLIBHUENT 



PER CEMf 
. OF ,TOTAL 

It 

20 

13 

10 

s 








V4 5!50 

-a 5.01 _ 



















IMS— 


1 .'IMK 




nf 







■-'—^ 


I n 1 


3 20 SO IC 
SIZE OF E 


STtE 


OO* 


M 800 1000 0\.f 

UENT 



. WAGE EARNERS 

PER CENT PER CENT 

OF TOTAL OF 1929 







NUMBER 1 


■2, 


20B.S26 


'3I< 


1 78,463 1 


1 '9S> 


IM,U4 




i 




1 8 10 20 80 100 200 400 8001600 OVE 

SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT 




l°°1 I 1 i 1 1 1 L^ U a 

I 8 10 20 80 100 200 400804 laOO OVER 



■42.67 

r4i.S0 



WAGES 

PER CENT PER CENT 

OF TOTAL OF 1929 



1 


AHOUNT 


1 ■«». 


*l«(^W7.Me 


1 -SI- 


^iie,o«6/«68 1 


. '3* 

1 


^ir2,96».2l6 I 

1 



^981 




1 8 10 20 80 100 2004ooaaoi«aaovE 



AVERAGE INCOME 



WEEKLY INCOME 
PER WORKER 



RATIOS TO I9Z9 




PER CENT 
OF 1929 



eo 


1 — ' 


-—1 


_... 


931 


._, 


■ 


V^,r-> 


eo 








—I 




to 














i ; h 


20 




1 i 
1 ! 






; 1 


n 


MM 







*bBTmBUTION Br SIZE IS MAOE BY ALLOCATINO EACH CENSUS INDUSTRY ACCOROINO 
TO THE AVERAGE NUMBER OF WAOE EARNERS PER ESTABUSHMENT Hi 1929. 

SOURCE: 0EM8US OF MANUFACTT URE8 . 1929, 1931, 1933. 

9SS4 



NRA 

DIVISION OF REVIEW 

STATISTICS SECTION 

HO. 337 

M.S.. OCT. 1935 



66 

CHART IT-TT 

WAGES AND WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 
BY AVERAGE SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT. 1929. 1931. 1933 

MISSOURI 

DISTRIBUTION 



RATIOS TO I9a9 



"^ 



( 6 10 20 60 100 200 400 BOO 
SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT 



ESTABLISHMENTS 

:R cent ■ PER CENT 

IF TOTAL OF 1929 

100 



NuysEft 
'?» s.res 

'31- 4,736 
'93> 5,rOB 



7\^-U-. 



5 10 20 60 100 200 400 
SIZE OF ESTABUSHMENT 



PER CENT 

Of TOTAL 

26 



WAGE EARNERS 



















PER CENT 
OF TOTAL 


PER C 
OF 19 


'"K 


...<-»» 


20 
15 


'2S' 
'SI- 
'S 5 


NUySER 
202,874 

IB3, 020 
137,894 














-1933 
















5 







=J 





6 10 20 60 100 200 400 600 
SIZE OF ESTABUSHMENT 



-..S 



I931~, 



I I 

I i 



I A 10 20 60 100 200400 BOO 
SIZE OF ESTABUSHMENT 



PER CENT 
OF 1929 
100 



WAGES 



5 10 20 50 100 200 400 800 







AMOUNT 




20 


'Z9- 


'240.3M,eO3 




16 


■si- 

■33 


^ 169,837.748 
* 117,021,142 





P-ER CENT 
OF 1929 
100 



-T IBM 



-A-'= 



ZS" 



A ^ gt> M iM ^ US 



PM CBtT 
OF 1929' 
100 



AVERAGE INCOME 



DOLLARS r" 



6 

to 














— i 






-t=d 




— 1 


itbI;^ 


^-1929 

















^933 

































1 




10 


















6 























r-n: 




5~5i 


) IC 


>0-2 


00 41 


5oT 






WEEKLY INCOME 
PER WORKER 

DOLLARS '%} iSlgT 

26 



20 



RATIOS TO 1929 



AVERAOe.. 




•29' ♦ 22 T9 




*S1- ♦ 20.09 




^»- ^ 16.38 





SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT 





r-J 


— 




— 1 


, 


,1931 


60 


I 193 


ii 








le ii 




"•' 






20 










fe— r 


6 S 

SIZE 


OF 


Ef 


TAB 


»4 

LISH 


00 SI 
MEN 


X 



'%iSIS' 

100 
BO 
BO 



D13T1BUT10N BY SIZE IS MADE BY ALLOCATINO EACH CENSUS INDUSTRY ACCOROINO 
TO THE AVERASe NUMBER OF WAOE EARNERS PER ESTABUSHMENT IN 1929- 



SOURCE' 

9SS4 



CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES. 



1929, 1991, 1963. 



DIVISION OP ReVIEW 
STATISTICS SECTION 

NO. 348 

US.. OCT., I93S 



67 

CHART 17-m 

WAGES AND WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 
BY AVERAGE SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT.* 1929, 1931. 1933 

TEXAS 



4a3j. 


^ 


DISTRIBUTION 

p 


Si 






.< 


1926 






1933 


^ 




. .. 


2 
IZE 


> ft 



ESTA9L18HMEKT 



RATIOS TO 1929 



ESTABLISHMENTS 



NUyBEf) 
'Z9> (1,198 

■31 4.29» 
'33' 3,613 




PER CENT 
OF 1929 
00 



1 5 10 20 50 100 2J0O 400 

SIZE OF eSTABUSHMENT 



'^T 



n 



WAGE EARNERS 



PER CENT 
" )S9 
100 



OF TOTAL 


OF l< 










""""" 1 


20 


'29 


134,496 


l» 


'31 


94,204 




'35' 


90.3G4 



ur^ 



PER CENT 
OF 1929 

100 



WAGES 



)TAL 








..< 


1929 




-1933 


f93l^ 














= 


r-A 




10 
9 

P 










r 




1 


9 1 


3 J 


» 


10 


2< 


>0 4( 


» 



PER CENT 
OF TOTAL 
25 



! 


AyOUNT 


■29. 


^161.627,267 


"Sr. 


^ 98,4I3,5BT 


"53 


• 72.S0 1,099 





l93l-> 



To 20 eo 100 200 400 



PER CENT 
OF 1929 
100 



AVERAGE INCOME 



DOLLARS 
26 



WEEKLY INCOME 
PER WORKER 

DOLLARS 



RATIOS TO 1929 




S 16 S6 i6 IM ido 4i)6 

SIZE Of ESTABUSHMENT 



DISTIBUTION BY SIZE IS MADE BY ALLOCATING EACH CENSUS^ INDUSTRY ACCOROINO 
TO THE. AVERAGE NUMBER OF WAGE EARNERS PER ESTABUSHMENT IN 1929. 



SOURCE' CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES, 1929, 1931, 1933. 

9S54 



DIVISION OF REVIEW 

STATISTICS SECTION 

HO 5*4 

M.S., OCT, 1935 



6S 

CHART l7-3m 

WAGES AND WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 
BY AVERAGE SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT* 1929. 1931. 1933 

CALIFORNIA 



SP'tSKJ 



DISTRIBUTION 

==^S44,e4 



""1—1- 



RATIO TO 1929 



ESTABLISHMErrrS 

PER CENT PER CENT 

Of TOTAL OF 1929 





NUMBER 






■29. 


1 1,961 


60 




■31 


9.821 






•33. 


8,190 


60 








40 








20 












i»ai>^ t 

__a — I 

3 1933^ 



SIZE OF ESTABUSHMEJ 







■~ 


4 


1 

1931 


1933 


^ 










^ 








-1929 


y 




r^ 














-1 



WAGE EARNERS 

PER CENT PER CENT 

OF TOTAL OF 1929 

too 
eo 





NUMBER 


'29i 


28Z.BB9 


'Sl> 


199.738 


'33 


les.tso ' 

1 



^" 



■-_,I933^ 



SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT 



I S 10 20 60 100 200 400 BOO 
SIZE OF eSTABLISHMEJ^T 



PER CENT 
Of TOTAL 
















- 




193! 


^ 


= 


Z 










l~" 










10 


















5 








F= 


^1929 



WAGES 

PER CENT PER CENT 

OF TOTAL OF 1929 



I S 10 20 50 100 2(X)4O0 800 



AMOUNT 
'29< > 403,016, 04< 
•31- ♦ 25»,893,8I7 
'33< ♦ IS4,42S,6»S , 


80 
60 
40 
20 










100 
BO 
60 


r 


, 


r — 


^1931 


: 




• 


^ 


i 








n 






40 
20 



















I S 10 20 50 100 200400 BOO 



s 

25 


~r-"— 

1 
1 


Jk\ 


rERAOE 

^1929 




INCOME 






1 ^ 1 

! ; ^933 






. 










— - 


. 




^ 


































1 




























i 




° 




1 


3 2 


5 


.0 


X 


>a 4 


00 a 


00 



WEEKLY INCOME 
PER WORKER 

PER CEKT 
OLLARS OF 1929 

:il00 



RATIOS TO 1929 



AveRA«E 

». ♦ 27.43 

I- ^ 24,93 
»■ * 19.16 



-—.y:" 



SIZE OF ESTABLISMmENT 



'distribution by size is made by allocating each census industry according 

TO THE AV£RA0E NUMBER OF WAOE EARNERS PER ESTABLISHMENT IN 1929 



SOURCE: CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES, 1929, 

9854 



NRA 

DIVISION OF REVIEW 

STATISTICS SECTION 

NO. 341 

MS, OCT., I93S 



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-76-- 

It is -viclent by Chart 5 th^t -mploym-nt rose only ; mcderatoly 
in the period 1934-1935. Tn ■ infrr nco is rarranted th?.t a greater 
increase, in ; mijloyment would have occursd if the trend of hours had 
at least remained stationary. luoreover th- rising trend of Y;e-„kly hours 
shown in Chart 19 may re-oresent mild-r conditions tmn those obtaining 
in thj industries outside th, small BLS sampl^. The latter, it v/as 
seen abjvu, renres-nted a group of industries showing a much mor liberal 
emplojTnent policy than industry as a v;hole, at least during the period 
of PRA.. 

Section VI -.Po'-si hie Fur.th r Analysis of D ata 
Considerable ado.itional information may be derived from the 
data at uresent availnbl- . Th- follovinB analyses v,-ould ;^ield results 
of substantial int-.r-st: 

a. Sum.aary tabulations by major industry t^roups for the 
individual stat=s. Those would entail com.putations 
cim.ilar to those summarized in Table 11. 

b. Summary tabulations for the major geographic regions, 
Horth, South a.nd VJ.-st. (S-.-t-^ Cuart l) . If tnis were 
don^ for the principal inausti-y groups, the computa- 
tions vvoulc. involve combining the regional summaries 
in Appendix I. 

c. Analysis of vari'ition of Pay P-riods by industry and 
Tc-gion. This v^ould supply extremely valuabl j infor- 
mation, hardly available elsewhere, of the frequency 
of occurence of we kly, by-we--kly, ieonthly, and half 
monthly pay periods in different industries and 
localities. The data may b- obtained from the 
Bummarj-es furnisncd hy th :- Census Bureau for each 
state a.nd for th ■ cities over 250,000. 

d. CompariFon for ITon-m.anufacturing industries of PRA, 
BLS and Census of American Business. This would 
sup^l^ment th , comnparisons made for Manufacturing 
shown in Chart 7^ and in Tables IV. 



9854 



77 

CHART I 8 



MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT, MAN-HOURS. HOURS PER WEEK 

CENSUS DATA, 1933 




CENSUS EMPLOYMENT . MANUFACTURING, COVERS ABOUT 6,000,000 WORKERS. 

MAN-HOURS ARE REPORTED FOR 35 INDUSTRIES COVERING l,SOO,000 WORKERS, CENSUS RETURMS. 

SOURCE; CENSUS 1933 SUMMARY; MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW, OCTOBER, 1935. 

9S54 



D 

NRA 

DIVISION OF REVIEW 

M.S., DEC, 1935 

SIATISTICS SECTION No 5S-» 



CHAFTT !• 



COMPOSITE3 

NON- DURABLE GOODS 



DURABLE GOODS 



TREND OF WEEKLY HOURS, 1934-1935 

B.L5. SAMPLES, MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES* 
MONTHLY INDEXES, MARCH. 1934=100 




1»33 rtNSUS AVZRACE 

WEEKLY INCOME PER WORKER 

DOLLAR* 





riu 




MM 


1 1 II 


III! 


<_»•'■"•"' J 








2,400,000 


■IXLL 


1JJ.L 


am 


J±LL 



NON-PURABLE GOOOS 
I-rOOD 

na -APPAREL 

nb-FABRIC5 

XmrpartJTOBACCO 
H-y-PA PER- PRINTING 

V-^-CHEMICALS 

Xm- RUBBER 

n-LEATHER 

OURA BU coooa 

m-FOREar PRODUCTS 
X- STONE, CLAY, CLASS 
H-IRON t STEEL 

Xn- NON-FERROUS 
Xm- MACHINERY 

m-TRANS. eauiFT. 



ZX-R.R. REPAIR SHOPS 



OOLLARS 

?i i ut i M i ' | S i M'P iii fi^ i n^^M ^° 




1936 



*aOUMCt. ALS OAT* (UNPUftLISHCO). 

•• WKrTH OF »ARS PROPO«TTO^ML TO CCNSUS Of MANunCTUHUt JUHt'CWUrrMQfn WMI tMW 



NRA 

DIVISION Of RCVKW 

M.S., DEC, l»5 

•TATisncs 9CCTKM, Na aM ^J'^ 



-79- 

III. App-^ndixos - Detailr.d Data Ta"blris 

In thj Appendix I are given the detailed "basic tables of the 
PEA data compilod from the C-nsvis cioii-iiiiari-s. Included also is Table 
XII giving the grouTings b;/-size of th-. Census of Manufact-aros, 1929- 
1933, data for Onio. 

In App^-ndix II are given several Exhibits b-jaring on the 
mechanics of execution of the PFA. C -nsus questionnaire distribution. 

AP PZIIDIX I 

Table XII. Tabulation of establishments, employment, and payrolls for 
th- primary Census of Manufactures of industries, grouped in size 
categories, 1929, 1931, 1933, Stat, of Ohio. 

Table XIII. Summary bj individual industries of U. S. Totals, PRA. Census. 

Tahle XIV. Summaries of tabulation by regions, for the principal industry 
groups, Kon-rcanufacturing, Manufacturing, unclassified. All Others. 



APPUTDIX II 

Exhibit A. Extract from History nf Insignia Section, NRA report, 
August 28, 1935, by ;i. ivi, Duvall. 

Exhibit E. Memorandum from S. I. Posner to Lieutenant Johnston of 
September 16, 1933 concerning mechanics of PHA questionnaire 
distribution. 

Exhibit G. Memorandum from S. I. Posner to Eobert K. Straus, 
Saptember 25, 1933 concerning mechanics for the distribution and 
return of the PRA qu^stionnair - . 

Exhibit D. Summary Cod- for Industrial Classification for PEA C-nsus. 



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89 

TABLE Ziy-A 

prti CE'iETis - ss"-io:!."i. T.^BULlTIon BY irausTRT c-acw* j_' 

I - lir* FSGLJiPD STATES Zj 
Srtabllahr.entf ?.T'>'';inf;,2iiiployinent. Payrolls - June - Ccto'ier, 1933 





Setcbl 

Per Cent 
of Total 


JohmentB 




rnroloynent 






Jun 


TTcekly r?ypol! 




Weeltlj Inc-jre 


IKDUSTBT C^UPa 


Huraber 
1"S . 


June 1 


October 


Per c«"t 
Ch-.n(.e 

l^.n 
10.3 


' 


October 


Per Cent 
Chnji .^e 


June 
$20. "0 
24.05 






=er Cent 
Jf TotM 

00.00 


fumber 

i.oq6.i6U 
391.652 


KiTOber 
l,26o.6no 
132.176 


Per Cent 
of Totp.l 

100. no 
41.31 


Anoisnt 
♦".797,083 
9.1'9.033 


inoimt 


Cctc.ier 


All Indugtrlea 


ino.oo 


56.207 


$?6. 940.060 
I3,6l5,9?5 


13.' 
12.-' 


*ri.7B 


NOH-'iANUyACTTOIKC 


83.18 


16.755 


35.73 


21.56 


A- Igrlcultyr'; [alnor) 
I. illnlne 1 Hoarrylne 






.In 


".31(5 
1.6^^ 


5.227 

■i.658 


1I1.9 
-1.0 


.46 


105,265 
79.566 


122,582 

31.552 


;^--; 


23.1'! 
21.53 


23.'-*; 

22.29 


I. Coal 

II. C^ar ll'ier.ilff 

:;. CoDstructloa 

L. Public UtUUlr? 


.1? 
3.86 
2.o«; 


103 
2,171 
1.1':5 


•3'' 

1.6; 

■ 3.K0 


3.695 
l8.Cplll 
■!-.^6 


13,825 
TO. 529 


-1.0 

9-9 
6.1 


.7- 

2.02 
4.68 


USO,331 
1.067.T30 


'1,55? 

524,313 
Ull-LlTl 


2-5 

11. 


21.;; 
^;-51 

28.64 


22.25 

?6.'-'7 

27. -.7 


I. Triir";?ortatloD, etc. 

II. Other Public 'Jtllltlec 


l.'-12 
■il+.OO 


797 
35s 

'O.ltOT 


1.^5 
'•95 

19.20 


15,906 
21,360 

210.1(62 


17.157 
22.07- 

238.251 


9.3 
7.1 

13.5 


l-?5 
2.33 

20.30 


4.-1.105 
ei6.221 

'1.623.904 


167,763 
661,406 

e .1*63.1160 


11.1 
2.3 

'8.0 


30. ?5 


26.20 
23-97 

p-'.T' 


I. Wholesale 
:i. Retell 


6.33 

1+7.11 


^^ 


i;.27 


li^,7bl 
167. w. 


52.01-' 
1 86.-1(1 


•Xi 


ll'ili' 


1. 339.911 
1.288.963 


1.507.398 
3.955.062 


2o!3 


20.09 


21.17 


a. Toode. Drugs, etc- 

b. Dry goods, etc. 

c. Other retail 

F. Service 


20.56 
7-93 

18.62 

l6.9»* 


11.557 
t.''57 
10,U61l 

9,519 


U.02 
5.87 
5.0K 

6.60 


1(U,102 
6K.313 

55.286 
72,385 


50.177 
p. 532 
62.832 

78.192 


14.5 
11.3 
13.6 

8.4 


^:I9 
6.00 

U.90 


852,828 
1,069.111 
1,367,021 

1.573.103 


1,003,435 

1,287,890 

1,658,737 

1,711,799 


18.2 
20.5 
21.3 

9.0 


19.31 
16.62 

21-73 
21.71 


19.96 

21.35 


I. Domes tic 

II. jUmiBeoieotP 

III. Profeasioaal 
IT- BusinesB 

11-^ « II 4 III ♦ IV 


6.6o 
5.18 


5,811 

2l<6 

1,999 

1.1*63 

3.708 

2.911 


.22 

1.72 
•92 

2.36 

1<.13 


1(0,91(0 
2,1*37 
18,886 
10.122 

31,11*5 
15.251 


1*4, 664 
3,013 
19,616 
11.169 

33.828 

1*6.594 


9-1 
24.9 

3^9 
10.3 

7^6 

3.0 


2.80 
.24 
2.57 
1.29 

1.10 

6.60 


638.218 

586 ',391 

293.128 

935.185 
1.504.334 


721,242 

68,035 

603,189 
322,333 

993.557 

1.578.510 


13.0 

23-3 

2.3 

10.0 

6.2 
4.9 


M 

21.08 

28-96 

29.71 
33.24 


16.15 
22.36 
30.75 
23.86 

29.37 
33.88 


I. Baailog, etc. 

II. Insurance, firokBrafe 


^7« 

it.its 


2.11S3 


.83 

3.30 


9,058 
36.196 


9.291 

37.303 


U 
3-1 


1.17 

5.13 


331,392 
1,169.41*2 


342,987 

1,235,553 


2.4 
5.7 


36-97 
32.31 


36.92 

33.12 


H. 
UHOFACTUBINQ 


16.06 


9.025 


61.19 


670.766 


787,652 


17.1 


55-77 


12,712,713 


15,529,803 


22.2 


18-95 


19-72 


I. Foods 


1.90 


]'Z 


zl'.^ 


35.232 
270.118 


ll.oSl 
305.236 


12. 3 
13.0 


3.10 
18.57 


, n5.6l0 

U.2'il..423 


896,560 

5.013.879 


15.6 
19.1 


22.01 
15 .68 


21.51 
16.52 


a. Apparel 

b. Other textiles 

III. Forest Products 
17. Paper Products 
T. Prlntlng-PubllBhlag 
VI-TII. Chemicals 

nil- HuLuer Producte 
12. Leather Products 
X. Stone, Clay. Glass 


.1 

1.1.3 
•58 

2.06 

.66 

•15 

1-33 

.61 


525 
1.01(3 

801 

325 
1,158 

370 

82 

750 

3'»3 


20.70 

1.89 
2.58 

2.111 
l.lU 
1.27 

7-38 
■83 

1.19 


13.163 
226,955 

20,76s 
28,309 
26,369 

12,517 
13,915 
80,811 
9,105 
13.7K6 


17.292 

257,911 

26,193 
33,265 
28,530 
14,122 
18,089 

86,537 

11.204 

56.383 


13-7 

26.1 

17^9 

8.2 

.12.8 

29.7 

7.0 

23.1 

28.9 


i?:S 
1.S6 
2.53 

3-35 
l.'*0 
1.20 
6.57 
1.19 
4.00 


622,349 
3,612,074 

378,223 

576,717 
763,662 
319,011 

272.167 
1,197,303 

271,087 
911.633 


799,129 
4,214,451 

185,179 
688,233 
828,415 
356,266 
357,999 
1,706,553 
376,421 


23.5 
17.5 

28.3 

19-3 
8.5 
11.7 
31.1 
14.0 
38.9 
30.P 


14.42 

15.92 

18.21 

20.37 

28.96 

25.19 

19.51 

18.52 
29-77 
20.84 


16.90 
16.45 

18.52 
20.69 

29.04 

25.23 
19.79 
19-72 
33.60 

21-01 


a. Steel laiilB 

b. Other Iron & Steel 
ZII- Uos- ferrous Metals 

XIII. Uachlnery 
XIV. Transportation Equip. 
IV. Hallroad Repair Shop 
XVI. UiecellaneouB 


.05 

.88 

1.02 

1.3» 

.21 

1.05 


31 

U9l( 

571* 

75^ 

117 

588 


.18 
3.31 
I1.O5 

5.25 

• 55 

2.00 


1,965 
1*1,76'. 

11,393 

57,500 

b,023 

21,897 


1:619 
53.761 

56,480 
75,688 

7,729 
26,515 


31.9 
28.7 
27.2 

31^6 

28.3 

a.i 


.22 
3.78 

3-96 

5.56 

• 58 

1.80 


49.707 
361,926 
902,692 

1,267,513 

133.183 
109,186 


62,766 

1.121,993 

1,182,022 

1,723,989 

171,838 

522,640 


26.3 

30.2 

30.9 
36.4 

29.1 

27.7 


25.04 
20.64 

20.33 

22.04 
22.11 

13.69 


23-97 

20.37 

20.93 

22.34 
22.24 

19-71 


UnclasBlfled 
All Others U 


.03 

•73 


19 
1(08 


3.0K 


1*12 

33,331 


591 

40,270 


43.4 

20.8 


.04 
2.88 


9.109 
656.198 


12.344 
792,988 


35-5 

20.8 


22.11 

19.69 


20.89 
19.69 



Source: Special tabulation for ERA of PHA questionnaire returns by Bureau of Censue, December 1953- Employnpnt and payroll date are for the weeks of June 1? and 

October Ih. 1933- 

Maine, Mew Haapstlre, Vermont. Measachusetls, Hhode Island, Connecticut. 

"All Others" covore data for questionnaires which do not clearly Indicate that a breaJcdown has been made on a proper geographical basis; data for estahllrfiflients 

operating in two or more States, such as. rp.Uroads. steamboats, pipe lines, telephone and telegr^h. and pow^r companies; the reports of companies having plants 

in TarloUB States for wr.lch individual reports were not submitted but for w;.loh a master report was sU5'Pll«'i; and data from retuma recelwed for a State after the 

State had been sent to the Tabulation Section for punc hin g and tabulatlos- 

U.B.A. 

Division of Review 

US:JUU 

December, 1935 

9854 



90 

TABLE XI2-B 
Pai, CBHSUS - fiSaiOUXL lADULATIOM BY IKDUSTDI aSOUPS ^ 
XX . HIS iSUNTIC STATES £/ 
BttabllthfflBQtt Rsportlog. EniplOTBent, Fayrolli - Jooa - October, 1933 




y 8ov.rctt SpeelftI tibulation for BBi of PBA ({UttloaBAlr* retuni* br ?ur«iia of 0«cra», D«o«A«r 1933> ftvloTaont and paTroll Aata at* for th* M«kt of Job* 17 and 

October lU. 1933. 
£/ Uar York, fie* Jersey, PeiiaaylT«alft 
^ "All Otheri" ooTorg data fcr questlonnftlrei eblob de sot ol«arl7 iituloote tb«t ■ br*«kdowe h*e teen skwle on e proper ceogrepUokl b»als; d«ta for eetebllelaeati 

OF«r«tiii£ in liio or nore Stittet, luoti ei, rallroade. etvsffl bo»te, pipe llsaa, telephone tod telecreph, uul power eo^)anlei; the reporti of ooopaole* harinc plent| 

In Tarioue States for eblob IndlTldual reporii vers not ev^joltted but for «hlob a matter report «aa luppiied; aod data frOB retume reoeired for a State after the 

State bad been eeot to the Tabulation Seotloa for punobla^ and tabalatlof. 

V.R.A. 

SlTlilOQ of B«Tle« 

USjJTTN 

Deoeaber, I935 

9854 



91 

TABLE XSS~C 
PBA CBiraOS . EEOIOUlL TABOLATIOB BT DIDnSTHT CSODFS 1/ 
III - EAST VOB.tr C2HTRAL STATES 2/ 
Xfltabllshmenti Beporting, EnrpIOTment, PaTrolls - June - October, 1933 





Eatabllshinanta 


Siq>l07meDt 


feelEly PaTToll 


Weekly 
Per Wo 


ncooe 

■ler 




Per Cent 
of Total 


Sambo r 
Heport- 
'"f 


jTin. 1 


October 


Per Cent 
Cbange 


Jane 1 


October 


Per Cent 
Change 


Juno 






Per Cat 

nf Tnt.l 


Haabar 


Boabor 


Per Cent 

of Tnt.pl 


ipiount 


^nount 


October 


AU IndustrUi 


100.00 


137.728 


100.00 


2,151.818 


2,883,975 


17.5 


100.00 


»55.990,272 


$61,375,180 


19.2 


$21.99 


$22-32 


HOl-llAVUTACTUBJHa 


85.07 


117, l9t 


11.35 


1,088,836 


1,222,258 


12.3 


15.82 


*,74l,359 


29.005.831 


17.2 


22.72 


23.73 


A. Acrloaltur« (nlnor) 

I. OOAl 

II. Other yincrftlg 

C> ConatructloB 

D. Pablie UtUltlAB 


.62 


851 

757 


■ .18 


11,867 
15.181 


12,181 
58.115 


2.6 
29.1 


■ 59 
1.11 


318,907 

707.460 


318.562 
1.056.111 


-0.1 
19. 1 


26.87 
15.66 


26.15 
18.08 


.28 

.27 
2-75 
2-81 


388 
369 

3,785 

T.876 


1.89 
■i.lU 


33.323 

11,861 

16,112 
136.111 


i!3:2?5 

15.150 
55.505 
118.000 


29.8 
27.7 

19-5 

9.1 


•93 
■58 

1.69 

6.21 


504,559 
203,101 

910.878 
1.171.457 


792.565 
263. 5I8 

1.198.289 
1.717.257 


57.1 
29.8 

3l^6 
10.1 


15.14 
17.12 

19.61 

26.71 


17^10 

21-59 
26.94 


I. Transportation, etc. 

II. Othar Poillc Dtllltlea 

1. Dlttrlbution 


1.80 
1.01 

Si*. 07 


2.1*85 
1.391 

7II.I162 


2.00 
3.1I 

21.81 


19,083 
77.028 

S8I.96I 


55. "ig? 

82,503 

661.712 


13-1 
7-1 

11.5 


2.20 

l.d 

21.01 


1.187.097 

2,18l,360 
12.q7l."i10 


1,101,153 
2,513.124 

15.572.812 


18. 3 
5.9 

20.0 


21.19 

28.56 

22.18 


25.30 
28.01 

21-46 


I. ffliol*flal.« 

II. B«tall 


ii:S 


10.112 
61. ^SO 


5-27 

18.56 


129.372 

15=1.592 


l1U,7l7 

518.985 


11.9 

11.9 


17.18 


3.588,995 
q.iss.Tis 


1,128,271 
11.141. 5I7 


15.0 
21.9 


27.74 
20.60 


28-52 
22.05 


a. Food.!, DrD«a, etc. 
t). Srj gooda, ate. 
e. Other retail 


19-71 


U.O73 
27,111 


1.03 

7.U 

7.12 


98.857 
1711.567 
182,168 


113,954 
200,707 
201,521 


15.3 
15.0 
12.2 

8.9 


5.57 
5.03 
8.98 

6.76 


1,817,223 

2,715.517 

1.852.995 

1.619.276 


2,177,295 
3.369,217 
5.898.037 

1. 119.114 


21.5 


18-38 

M:H 

19-61 


19-11 
16-79 
28.87 

20.S0 


I. Doneitlo 

II. APiaBeffleate 

III. Profeaelonal 
IT. Boslnaaa 

11.^' s II ♦ III ♦ IT 


10.25 

.80 

U.05 

3-15 

8.00 

6.02 


11. U5 
1.097 
5.585 
1.311 

11.026 

8^292. 


1.00 
• 35 
1.11 

2.11 

3^57 
1.60 


98,122 

8,736 
27.156 
5I.8O5 

87.697 

88.119 


108,8110 
10,150 
28,792 
54,339 

93,581 

92.001 


10.9 

6.0 
4.9 

6.7 
4.0 


2.60 

•35 
1^30 
2.51 

1.16 

5.20 


1.402,576 
187,968 

701,957 
1.556.995 

2.246,900 

2.808.851 


'•^26^:JS 

776,784 
1,146,879 

2,484,707 

2.991.148 


18. 7 
38.9 
10.7 
6.6 

10.6 

6.6 


11.29 
a. 52 

25.85 
26.19 

25.62 

11,76 


15.30 
24-98 

26163 

26.55 

1S.53 


I. BBD]cln£, etc. 

II. lamirance, Brokerage 


1.17 
11.85 


Lis 

6.686 


1.11 
2.I9 


27.331 
61,118 


28,619 
63.555 


4.8 
3.7 


]f^ 


829,359 
1,979.492 


891,130 
2.102.218 


7.4 
1.1 


30.34 
52.39 


31.11 
33-18 


B. lUVOTACTUEIHO 


IU.67 


20,206 


5^-38 


1.331,981 


l,62l,l87 


21-7 


52.80 


28,504,158 


34,483,017 


21.0 


21.35 


a. 25 


1. lOOdfl 


2.92 
.90 


1,022 
I.2IO 


7.11 
1.61 


182,723 

in.i61 


221,311 
119. II5 


21^1 
5.5 


7.18 
2.81 


5.876,813 
1.524.871 


4,162,310 
2,029,-73? 


15-1 


21.22 

11.17 


20.16 
>7.9l 


a. ipperel 

h. Other textUea 

III. Torast Producta 

IT. P«4jer Producta 

T. Printlii«-Pul>llahlii£ 

TI-TII. Ghemleala 

TlXX.Sahher produett 

a. leather Producta 

X. Stooe, Cla7i Olasa 

ZI. IroD and Steal 
a. Steel ollla 
"b. Other Iron & Steel 

ZII. BoD-ferrous Uet«la 

ZXII.Bax^hlnaij 

XIT. tTransportatlOQ Xqulp. 

XT. Ballroad Bapalr Shop 

Xn. lUacellaneoua 


•51 

•39 

l.lll 
.36 

2-51 
.811 
.10 
•25 

• 71 


707 

533 
1,571 

199 
3.t53 
1,152 

132 

339 

1,018 

1.161 


3.30 
1.31 

2.73 

2.03 
3.28 
3.16 
1^33 
1.86 
1^73 


80,91*2 
32,222 

. 67. 118 

19,817 
80.116 

81,990 

32,606 
1*5.560 

12.5^ 


86,589 

32.756 

83.261 

60,175 

97,161 
97,626 
58,251 
19,696 
17.031* 

111.290 


7.0 
1.7 

24.1 

20.8 

20.8 

14.9 

17.3 

9-1 
10.6 

16.5 


1.95 
.88 

1.95 

1.88 
1.02 
4.43 

1.16 

1.31 

1-52 
8.65 


1,051,435 
473.436 

1.050,509 
1.015,509 
2.171.536 

2,592.580 
787,121 
708,401 
822,381 

1.669.171 


1,497,294 
532,414 

1.374.209 

1.172.738 

2.56I.549 

2.654,020 

869,629 

785,944 

897.779 

6.791.556 


12.1 

12^5 
30. 8 

15-5 

18.1 
10.9 

10.5 

10.9 

9.2 

45.5 


12.99 
11.69 

15.65 
20.38 

26.99 
28.15 
24.14 
15-55 
19.33 
29-4? 


17.29 
16.25 

16.50 

19.49 

26.39 

27.19 

22.73 

15.82 

19.09 

21-82 


■ 15 

• 91 

• 78 

1.75 
■32 

1.00 


202 

1,261 

1,071 
2,1o6 

118 

8 

1,381 


1.93 
1.36 

2.I9 

7.19 

5.26 

.02 

1.66 


120.997 

106,971 

6l,022 

176,173 
129,263 

183 
1O,806 


180:566 
130,721 

72.719 

2*. 527 

153,608 

525 

1*7,916 


49.2 

22.2 
19-2 
27-2 
18.8 
8.7 
17.1 


4^55 
4.09 

2.30 

7.37 

6.45 

.02 

1.43 


2,159,171 

2,210.000 
1,242.025 

3,978,253 

3,482,220 

10,482 

772,456 


4.076,915 
2,711, 611 

1,156,108 

1.856,366 

5,611.759 

10,855 

961,659 


65.8 

22.8 
17.2 
21.6 

3.8 

3.5 

24.5 


20.32 
20-66 

20.35 
22.54 
26-94 
21.70 
18.93 


22-58 
20.77 

20.02 

a.51 

23.55 

20.67 

20.07 


Cnclaaalfled 
All Other a i/ 


■05 

.21 


65 
293 


.09 
1.18 


2,091 

28,901 


2. 1*75 
54,755 


18.2 
20.2 


.10 
1.28 


54,475 
690,280 


62,576 
824,726 


14.9 
19-5 


26.01 

23-88 


35-16 

23.73 



Sourc; SpeoliL tibal.tlon for USA of PHi doeetlonnalr. return, by irar.«a of Coneo., rec«.ber 1955- ia?)loyment luid pwroll Uta .re for the nek. of J«ne 17 and 
October l4, 1933. 

^J'oJSfrr;o"il'dlS; fi?JS^Uoi^i"t%Uch do not clearly Indicate that a brea):do^ ha. been c«de on a proper geographical ^.s.U: ^'-J^.l^'tWl^lT^t, 
oplratl«"n ^ oJ "rJ Stat2a. inch ae. railroad,, ateao boeta. pipe llnea. telephone and telegraph. «id power co»panleB: the reports of ~Wle« l»'l»e Pl«jt« 
2^^W S.aree Jor^cTlnJlvldnal r^rta «re not eubmitted but for which a «aeter report waa applied; and data from retu«a rewind for a State after the 
State had been aent to the Tahulatlon Section for punching and tabulating. 

H.E.A. " 

DlTlalon of Harlew 
USiJTJB 
Decenber, 1935 

9654 



92 

TABLE xnr-D 

PHA CEKSUS - HEGIOllAL TJflOLAlIOH 3Y IKDUSTHI &BDIJPS i/ 
17 - WEST NORTH CSKTEjU. STATES 2j 
EatabllBhrnente Reporting, Employment, Payrolls - June - October. I933 





EatabllshjuentB 


Employment 


•oekly Payroll 




Weekly Income 
Per fforkar 


nrouSTHY SHOOTS 


Per Cent 
of Total 


Hunter 
Heport- 


June 


October 


Per Cent 


June 


October 


Per Cent 
Change 


Jmie 




Per Cent 


number 


number 


Per Cent 
of Total 


imount 


Amount 


October 


All Indufl tries 


100.00 


72.231 


100.00 


696.355 


800.115 


11*. 8 


100.00 


$ll*.267,290 


$16,727,060 


17.2 


$20.1.7 


»20.Sl 


H0H-UAHU?ACTUH1N3 


89-30 


9*,50lt 


61.55 


1*28.885 


1*91*, 812 


15.1* 


62.39 


8,900.961 


10,536.775 


18.1. 


20.75 


a.29 


A. igrlcultare (yiaor) 


.55 


39s 


.9i 


l*.l*5l* 


1*.620 


3.7 


.61* 


90.785 


96.732 


6.6 


20.38 


20.91. 




.fi2 


179 


2.1t5 


n.<M^ 


23.863 


1*0.0 


1.J6 


279.102 


1*56.961* 


6IJ 


16.17 


19.17 


I. Coal 

II. Other Uineralfl 


.19 

-33 


II40 
239 


i:ii 


3.535 
13.510 


6.095 
17.768 


72.1. 

31.5 


.37 

1.59 


52.320 
226,782 


108,190 
31*8, 771. 


106.8 
53.8 


1I..8O 
16.79 


19.63 


C< CoQBtructloD 


2.A 


1.620 


3.12 


a,7l*H 


26,327 


21.1 


2.67 


380,656 


519,1.70 


36.5 


17.51 


19-73 


D. Public Utllltlea 


1.6q 


2.662 


7.10 


50.869 


58.1*02 


lU.S 


8.51 


i.a7.ioo 


1.188.017 


lU.O 


21.91 


21.77 


I. Tranaportatlon, etc. 

II. Other Public Utilities 


t'i 


1.679 
983 


3.29 

4.01 


22.959 
27.910 


26,301 
32,101 


IU.6 
15.0 


1.6* 
I*. 89 


519,898 

697,202 


631*, 8a 

753. a6 


22.1 
8.0 


22.61* 
2l*.98 


?l..ll» 
23.1.6 


S. Siatributioa 


v\.-n, 


110.252 


11.77 


221.1*21 


257.666 


16.1* 


11.12 


i*.i*68.i6a 


5.IG1.170 


20.0 


20.18 


20.81 


I. Wholesale 

II. Retail 


7.01 

iia.72 


5.061 
■i"i.l91 


8.96 
22.81 


158.972 


69,361* 
187.802 


11.9 

^8.l 


11.31 
20.01 


ileillsul 

2.85l*.522 


1,81*5.927 
1.515.21*1 


ll*.l* 
21.1 


17.96 


18.72 


a. 7ood.B, Drugs, etc. 

b. Dry gools, etc. 

c. Other retail 


17.36 
9.39 
21.97 


12.537 
6. 78'* 
15.870 


5.58 
9.2ll 
7.99 


38.896 

61*. 378 

55.698 


1*5,620 

75.178 
67,001* 


17.3 

16.8 
20.3 


It. 57 

D.7O 

8.71* 


651,838 

955,61*9 

i,2'*7.035 


SO3.707 
1,195,21*9 
1,516,287 


23.3 
25.1 

a.6 


"iji 

11*. 81* 
22.39 


17.62 
15.90 
22.63 


T. Service 


1<).31 


13.9l»5 


10.77 


75.01*9 


83.266 


10.9 


9.1I* 


1. 101*. 81*8 


1.1«0.1.72 


11.S 


17.19 


17.78 


I. Oomsetic 

II. Aonueiaenta 

III. Profeaalonal 
IT. BusineBB 


10.91 

1.08 
1..68 
2. St 


7,882 

777 
3.378 

1.908 


6.4i 

i.7t 


lll*.856 

t.355 
13.688 
12.150 


50,589 
iu!^70 

12,810 


12.8 
23.9 


ll.j2 
.67 
2.18 
2.17 


587. ?*5 
95.533 
311,391 
310,379 


697,1.32 

1,180,098 
327,828 

337.111* 


18.7 

23.6 


13.10 

a. 91* 


17.78 
a. 88 

22.66 
26.32 


11.^' . II 4 III + IT 


8.110 


6.063 


".33 


30,193 


32,6n 


8.2 


5.02 


717.303 


783,0iw 


9.2 


?3-76 


23.96 


a. Plnance 


7.26 


'i.2l4« 


5.50 


38.303 


1*0.668 


6.2 


8.11 


1.160.102 


1.211.910 


6.1. 


10.29 


10.11* 


I. BanVlng, etc. 

II. Insurance, Broksrase 


U.90 


1.705 

3.5^3 


1.70 

3. SO 


11.865 
26,1*J8 


12, au 

28.1*51* 


2.9 

7.6 


2.52 
5.61 


359.273 
800.829 


370,858 
863,072 


3-2 
7.8 


30.28 
29.19 


30.36 
30.33 


E. kUinjFACTJRIHa 


9.97 


7.203 


3U.92 


*3.353 


276.220 


13-5 


3l*.20 


i*.S79,92i* 


5,628,362 


15.3 


20.05 


20.38 


I. Poods 


2.97 


2.11t3 


12.1*9 


87.01*1* 


101.659 


16.8 


13.39 


1.909,915 


2,178,033 


11..0 


a.91. 


a.te 


II. Textiles 


.■iC 


lt05 


1.72 


25.961 


26.291* 


1.1 


2.10 


127.858 


1W1..116 


21.1 


12.61 


15.17 


a. ipparel 

b. Other textiles 


.31 

.25 


22l! 
181 


2.75 
.97 


19.138 
6,823 


19.13; 
7.156 


K.9 


■76 


a9.698 
108,160 


278.527 
125,589 


li.l 
16.1 


11.1.8 

15.85 


11.- 55 
17-55 


III- j^oreet Products 


•58 


1122 


2.19 


15.29^ 


17.109 


11.9 


1.86 


265.731 


285,095 


7.3 


17.37 


16.66 


IT. P^«r Products 


.12 


89 


.85 


5.922 


6,91*8 


17.3 


.79 


112.089 


129,630 


15.6 


18.93 


18.66 


7. Prlntlne-PQbliBhln« 


2.6! 


1.337 


3.57 


2U,872 


27,087 


8.9 


U.61* 


662,092 


725,220 


9-5 


26.62 


26.77 


7I-TII. ChemloalB 


.53 


380 


1-27 


8.858 


10,1*00 


17.1* 


1.50 


213.956 


21.5,520 


11..8 


21..15 


23.61 


TlILRubter Products 


.03 


19 


.28 


1.988 


2,125 


6.9 


.27 


38.1.67 


110,961 


6.5 


19-35 


19.28 


n. Leather Products 


.16 


116 


3.911 


27.1*40 


28,1*88 


3.7 


2.91 


1*15,271. 


1*60,275 


10.1 


15.12 


16.16 


X. Stone, C1b7. Olass 


.lt2 


302 


1.02 


7.087 


8,277 


16.8 


.89 


126,890 


150,766 


18.8 


17.90 


18.22 


ZI. Iron and Steel 


.28 


199 


1.29 


8.962 


11.011 


22.9 


1.29 


181.711 


226.51.7 


21.1 


20.50 


20. S7 


a. Steel sIIIb 

b. Other Iron A Steel 


.02 
.26 


lit 

185 


.3^ 
■ 93 


i:^? 




18.3 

21*. 7 


■87 


60.098 
123.635 


73,889 

152.658 


22.9 
23-5, 


21..09 

19.12 


":3i 

18.9". 


ZII. Hoo-femma yetale 


.29 


208 


•55 


3.85'' 


i*,551 


18.1 


.58 


83.1*05 


98.812 


18. 5 


a. 61. 


a.71 




.70 


50s 


2.03 


lU.uj 


17,202 


a. 9 


2.13 


30l*,61*2 


367.901. 


20.8 


a.59 


a.39 


ZIT. Transportation Squlp. 


.08 


60 


.21 


1.1*31* 


1,1*78 


3-1 


.26 


37.293 


39.933 


7.1 


26.01 


27.02 


XT. Bailrood Repair Shop 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


T7T. ULscellHteous 


.57 


1.15 


1.51 


10,501* 


13,589 


29.1* 


1.39 


198.579 


275.550 


3«.8 


18.91 


20.28 


Unclassified 
All Others i/ 


.01 
•72 


5 
519 


.OU 

3.1*9 


2'*.3^ 


28.1*58 


^6:5 


.01* 
3.37 


, 5.875 
1*80,530 


u.to 

550,502 


1I..6 


23.1.1 
19.72 


17.99 
19.35 



^ Source! Special tabulation for HBA of PEA queatiosnalre returns b; Bureau of Census, Seoamber I333. Smploraent and payroll data are for the weeks of Juns 17 and 

October lit, 1933. 
i/ lanneaota, Iowa, yissourl. Horth Latajta, Hebraaka, Sansaa, south Dakota, 
i/ 'All Othsrs" coTors data for questionnaires which do not clearly indicate that a breakdown hae been inade on a proper geogra(>hical basis; data for estatpllshaents 

operating in two or more States, such as, railroads, ateas boata, pipe lines, telephone and telegraph, and power compaales; ths reports of ooqtanlea hawing plsata 

In ▼arloue States for which tndlTldual reports were not BObnitted but for which a master report was supplied; and data froai returns recelwed for a State after ths 

State had been sent to the Tabulation Section for punching and tabulating. 

o.a.A. 

Division of Bewlew 
lfS:Jtn( 
Deoeaibor. I935 

9S54 



93 

TABLE HV-E 

nu cDtsus - maioniL iiBtn^ioi bt isddstei sboops y 

V - SOOTB ITLUrrlC ST13S8 £/ 
IitablithaentB Beportia^. loploTmeDt, P^rolls - Jane - Oototier, 1933 



Xttabllelisentt 



iDDSTEi aams 



P«r Cent 
of Kital 



Beport- 



Per Cent 
Ct iBtti. 



P«r Cent 
Change 



feeiclj Payroll 



Per Cent 
tif Tntlll 



Per Cant 
Change 



Vaaklj I neon* 
Per fforkar 



All Induatrlee 



atm-iumtiii'imuia 



86.57 



'H(,23l 



'w.Si 



971*, 2U6 
39«.7iA 



i,i?7.2*e 



15-T 



♦15.529.392 



♦19.5^.553 



25.9 



$15.91* 



n7.3't 



>t£6,H<3 



Its. 32 



7,50it,l*«l 



9.i»5.770 



22.U 



19.69 



A. Agriculture (minor) 

B. lllnlng A hurrying 

I. Coal 

II. Other Ulnerala 

C. Oonetrootloo 

I. Pnhllc Otllltlei 

I. Tranoportation, etc. 

II. other Pnhllc Iftllltlea 

1. Dlatrlbution 

I. ffholeaale 

II. EataU 

•■ Poo&a, DnigB, ato. 
h. Drr goode, ate. 
e. Other retail 

r. Berrloa 

I. Doneatlo 

II. Avuaaaante 

III. Profeeelonal 
IT. Snalnaai 



.55 
.23 



236 



282 
116 



1.383 



5-15 
.'♦3 



2.678 



^ 



50. 

'>,19< 



19.1llt7 



3.3« 

6-i.6lit 



25-7 



51.'*76 



611,850 



26.0 



2.78 

1.25 
I.I19 



■i5.78 
7.65 



65 
t8.t3 
18. a 

11.18 
18. 7U 

17. -iO 
10.28 



760 



^ 



3,908 
211] F11 



9.3( 

5.711 

9.576 



lt.29 
I't.gQ 



a.6it3 
_1S5, 



60.656 
U.958 



21.833 



'11.769 
1'^.22'i 



16,201 

23.070 



IZI.Qlt 



5.03 
6.1t« 



II. 



s II 4 III 4 n 



3.81 
2-57 



7.22 



5.251 
1(32 

1,312 

3.690 



rinaaea 

I. Banking, ate. 

II. Ineorance, Brokerage 



6.-56 
• 91 

5.65 



11.29 

-.11 

1.02 
2.19 
3-82 



3lt.993 

60,210 
U9,022 

6^.167 



53.751 

1,73,387 



U63 

2.889 



.87 
2.95 



1*1,81*7 

2,9n 

8.387 

9.956 

a, 320 
37.af*7 



1*2.357 
73.167 
57.803 

43-221- 



8,501* 
28,71*3 



3.527 
9.023 
10,558 

23.128 

ito.p^ 



9.1*52 
30,582 



a.o 

18.1 



12.3 
9.1* 



-x:sr 

.1*0 

2.31* 

■i.l*3 



'U 



22.1 



20.2 



a.o 
a. 5 
17-9 

9.7 



10.3 
19.1 
7-6 



-±•5- 



u.i 

6.U 



3.56 



ZtSi- 



73 



3.57 
5.33 
6.39 

6,3 3 



3.27 

•31* 

1.27 

llW 

3.06 



-i^ 



720.11'> 
657,790 
62,329 

362,793 

8iti*.Pi?i* 



3.377 

<,a6 



291. i*a 
552.583 

3.1*20.3U 
1,01*6,009 
2.37|*:392 



1,108 
75.161 

l*llt,813 

11,5.716 



20.6 



11..3 



3St353 
591,363 

5^1*31 



55».362 
828,1*51 

991.1*89 
iga.iKW 



1.263,01 



11.3 
7.0 



8 f* .5 



508,083 
52.2S 

i96.Ua6 
225.607 

i*7i*.3a6 

1.121.^69 



702, 

1,066 
1.225.993 

l.;26.g2S 



a.7 

26.2 



258. 

861*. 563 



602,871 

63.657 

ai,7li3 
21*7,955 

523.3* 

1-222.3'a. 



2578 
28.7 
23-7 

li*.6 



18.7 

a.7 

7.8 
9.9 

10.3 



281,923 
91*0,1*28 



8.9 

8.8 



19.22 

t?6 



13.12 

1U.85 

18.66 



19.27 



^ 



18.27 
15.16 



19.00 

83.38 



25-53 



20.02 
25.63 



i'-Ti 



I5.A 
13.76 
20.23 



23.50 



12!l<t 

17.57 
23.1*2 

22.66 
S2.S 



TBilg 

30.1*3 
30.08 



16.60 
1U.58 
a.a 



17.95 
23.1*7 

23.1t< 
22.S3 



29-83 
30.75 



E. KAItTACTimUa 



11.83 



50.58 



1*92.732 



562,132 



11*. 1 



1*2.35 



6,576,198 



8,539.1*02 



13-35 



15.19 



I. 
II. 

III. 

IT. 

T. 

TI-TII. 

Till. 

n. 
z. 
u. 

III. 
Ill I. 

IIT. 
IT. 
XTI. 



Textllea 

a- Apparel 

h- Other textUea 

Toreet Prodacta 

Piver Produeta 

PTlntlne-Pohllihlng 

Chaaloala 

ftlhbar Product I 

Leather Pr«dacta 

fltoB*. CliQr, olaaa 

Iron and Stael 

a- Itael •Ilia 

b- Other iron A Steel 

loD-ferroua Ifetale 
Uaohlner7 

Tranaportatlon Xqulp. 
Xallroed Repair Shop 
Hlaeallanaoua 



3.11* 



liSO 

■71 

I. IS 



1.601* 



1.92 

-09 

1.93 

•75 

.09 
•58 



ii5_ 

• 05 



.10 
•1*9 
.09 



362 
611 

981 

1*5 

986 

382 

2 

1*7 

295 

78 
25 
53 

1*9 
2i*9 
1*6 



305 



lUlaaaUlad 

All OUsera ij 



1.60 



U.15 



26. 98 
5-75 

a. 23 



110,1*20 
262.e2S 



5.71* 

■33 

1.92 
1.31. 

.61 
1-55 
l*-08 



3-87 
-a 

• 31 

-58 

■55 



8.1*9 



:62^ 

561039 
206,786 

55.929 
3,i6b 

18,733 
13,091* 
11 
5.981* 
15.071* 
W.766 



37.b98 
2,06s 

3.035 
5.597 
5.365 

23.731 



1*9.389 

227,506 
65.3S7 
3.999 

20,1*32 
18,633 
13 
''.653 
18,079 
-169 



3.262 

7.226 

7,626 
26.695 



oX" 

10.0 

16.9 
26.2 
9-1 
32.2 

IS. 2 

11.2 

19-9 

28-7 



I1.27 
17.91* 



29-7 

9-5 

7.5 
29.1 

1*2.1 



12-5 



3.71 

ll*.23 

3-51* 

-36 
3-29 

1.56 

-52 

1.59 

5-1*3 



663, U72 
8.786.U5 



5-15 

-28 

.1*0 
• 73 
-65 



576.702 
2.209.l)«3 

550.079 
55,771 

511, 2S0 
21*2,717 

2S6 
79,8U2 
21*7.293 



itSl3'io 

61, Ml 
113.125 
100.137 

320,830 



82,770 



98,653 



9.33 



1.111*8,713 



801,715 



761.033 
2.9311.203 

820,515 

7i*.9l3 

568,073 

321*. 702 

326 

ioi>,ia 
3111,597 



38t6 



1,0»,175 
53.837 

67.367 
iits.73'* 
157,569 

383.522 



l,8a,38i 



33.0 

32.8 
1*9.2 

31*. 3 
11.1 
33-8 

llt.O 

30-I* 
27.2 

27,8 



28-1 

a.ii 
9.6 
51-5 
57-3 

19-5 



25-7 



16.1*1 
10.60 



10.2) 
10.68 

17.60 

27-29 
18-51* 

26.00 

13-31* 

16.1*1 



16-23 



13-57 
12.90 

12.55 
H.73 
Z7.KI 

17.1*3 
25.01 
15.65 
17-1IO 



a-20 

a. 1*1* 



20.25 



U.66 



13-52 



20. 9t 
23- 7« 

20.65 

20.^ 
20.66 



in. 37 



is.ii£ 



1/ Source; Special tabulation for NBA of PRA quBatlonnalre returns by Bureau of Ceneua, December 1933. ^.loyment and payroll data are for the ««e^ of Jue 17 Bd 

2/ Bali.IJe, ialylend, Bl.trlct of Columbia. Virginia, »e.t VlrelnU, north Carolina. South Carolina, Oeorgla, Plorld.. ^. , , , . , , .„,.,_. 

1/ "All Others" ooTere data for imeetlomialree which do not clearly Indicate that a breakdown hae been made on a proper geogragihlcal baale; data for astahllahsaita 
operating In two or more states, such aa. rallroadt, eteam boat., pipe lines, telephone and tolegr^h. and power coiqianlea; the reports of coa^anlee hawing plnta 
In Tarloua States for which Individual reports were not nbmlttsd but for which a master report waa eupplled; and data from retume reoelTed for a State after tha 
State had been sent to the Tabulation Section for punching and tabulating. 

l.X.A. 

DlTlslon of Bewlaw 
IIS:JUH 
Becember. 1935. 

9654 



94 

TABLE air-F 
FBA aasaa - sioioiul liiuurioH si mmsisi osoupa y 

TI - liSI SOUTH CIWmiL 3I1IX9 £/ 
Ztt«]bllthm*Qti Baportinx, ^gjlo/isflat, Parrolli - Jua« - Ooto^sr, 1933 





letabllebsente 


Xi^lojrment 


teaklr Payroll 


Wiakl7 lK)e»a 

par loiter 


imusiu oBotiFs 


Per Cent 
of Total 


HOJBber 

Eoport- 

ln£ 


June 


October 


per Cent 


Jma 


October ■ 


Per Cant 

0han«e 


J«a 


t\ 




Par Cant 
a! Tntal 


Bomber 


Number 


Per Ont 

of IV.t.1 


iwrmt 


iammt 


.-October 


ill iDdufltrlflfl 


100.00 


25,670 


100.00 


386,030 


ltU7,900 


16.0 


100.00 


(5,S>MI,l|6o 


17,202,976 


27.5 


•1D.6J 


(16.0« 


BOH-IUIIOTICTDHISO 


»7.7lt 


22,523 


it9.62 


191. sw 


228,006 


19.0 


5l*.*l 


3,«9»,«n6 


3.900,871* 


26.2 


l6.1lt 


I7.U 


A* i^lcultup* (nlnor) 


.1*3 


HI 


•25 


953 


999 


U.8 


.21* 


13.305 


15.365 


15.5 


13.96 


15.3* 


B. lUslng 1, ^uarnrliie 




?6o 


8.OT 


Ilt.6lil 


I«.'il6 


11.<i 


Trti 






50.1 


11.70 


lU.21 


I. Ooal 

II. Otlitr Mlnarali 


.71 
•30 


183 
77 


''.in 
1.37 


29.330 
5.309 


38,856 
6,680 


32.5 

25.8 


S 


3i.9.p7 
5B.630 


565.803 
efi,598 


61.8 

nit.3 


11.92 

u.ok 


1D.« 
12.W 


0> COQttructloa 


2.00 


SlU 


1.56 


6,031 


6,1>»3 


1-9 


1.55 


87.1*50 


9i*.8i< 


8.1) 


ID.50 


15.DD 


D. Public Vtllltlea 


2.8« 


738 


1».22 


16.276 


iq.6i2 


20.6 


1.78 


126.621 


17S.02l( 


l'i.7 


20.07 


10.56 


I. TruiportAtioQ, eto. 

II. Oth«r Poblio ntllltlei 


1.83 

1.05 


ill 
270 


1.78 

2.>tU 


6,857 
9.W9 


9.397 
10.235 


37.0 
8.7 


1.90 

3.88 


107.31*? 
219.271* 


11*7.389 

230.635 


37.3 

5-2 


i5.6e 

23.28 


15.S 
22.53 


X. Dlitribution 


s6.a6 


lll..5<l7 


22.M 


as.iBi 


106.100 


20.0 


26.27 


1.1(81.710 


1.870.220 


26.0 


16.78 


17.61 


I. 1Riol«Bal« 

II. liet^I 


7.21. 

UQ.62 


1.859 

12.718 


5.78 
17.12 


22,317 
66.03it 


2S,ts7 
70.611 


18.7 


9.55 
16.72 


'^'Ws 


636,008 
I.JIU.?^ 


18.0 
10.7 


^.ll 


. 2D.01 
l«i.l» 


a. Toods, Sru£t. sto. 

b. Dx7 goodi, eto. 
0. Otiiar retail 


18.13 
12.5} 
18.96 


'!655 
3.a6 
5.867 


K.ll 


15, 8^8 
2't,901 
25.335 


19,218 
30,751» 
29. Wl 


a.3 
23-5 
17.0 


3-95 
5.51 
7.26 


223.257 
uioioSt 


288,5lU> 
1*23,068 
522,613 


29.2 
35.9 

27.1* 


ID. 09 
12.50 

16.19 


15.01 

13.7s 
17-63 


T. 8»rTlo« 


17.28 


U.UW 


a.iU 




1I(.607 


10.2 


6.91 


iqi.eni 


MU.VM 


18.7 


12.D7 


ll.DU 


I. Soaaotlc 

II. ABRnementt 

III. ProfeBBlooal 

IT. KUllMBI 


10.53 

.80 

3.67 

2.28 


2.702 
206 
9U2 
585 


5.0s 

.27 

1.11 
1.68 


19!S2 
l.oUs 

U,2S5 
6,1*79 


21,1«89 
1.315 
■*.96o 
6.SU3 


9.6 
25.8 

1:1 


Vic 

1.1*2 


203,650 
16,991 
90,91*9 
so.oitit 


22,081 

101*, 393 
89.050 


22.5 

30.0 
1U.8 
11.3 


i2:S 

a. 22 
12.35 


11.5 
16.79 
21.05 
13.01 


"■'• r II 4 HI + IT 


6.75 


1.733 


3.06 


11,809 


13,118 


11.1 


3.33 


H7.981* 


215.521* 


ID. 7 


15.92 


16.U3 


0, ;in«ao« 


7.21! 


1.868 


i..ie 




lU.oao 


>.>« 


6.72 


17<1.«17 


1*27.07'! 


12.1) 


27.D6 


M.Dq 


I, Banking, ato. 

II. lABuxance, Brolcarage 


l.lif 

6.1» 


291 
1.577 


1.09 
2.U9 


It. 239 
9.592 


lo',o66 


ilii 
1..9 


2.28 

U.l*lt 


• 129,029 
250,808 


llt8,2l*5 
278,831* 


ID. 9 
11.2 


26.15 


30.U 

27.70 


a. lumiTicTuuso 


10.79 


2.769 


1.3.15 


166,561 


185.707 


11.5 


37.88 


2.139.31*1 


2,736.961 


27.9 


12.ID 


lD.>t 


I* ?00dl» 


3-23 


828 


1..31 


l6,65it 


19.3* 


16.2 


1..98 


281,621 


31*3.130 


a.g 


1S.91 


17. 7U 


II. lutUei 


•?? 


227 


18.17 


TD.<122 


71. 18^ 


o.it 


12.62 


712.6*1 


<iii.6ii( 


27.0 


10.05 


12.81 


a. ipparal 

b. other teitUei 


.m 


112 
115 


8.11 

10.26 .. 


. 31.317 
^ 39.605 


30,976 

1)0,209 


—1.1 
1.5 


5.23 
7.39 


295.650 
1*17.031 


391.01*1 
520,573 


32.3 

2l(.8 


9.1*1* 
10.53 


12.62 
12.95 


III. roreet Produote 


2.13 


5W 


7-12 


S7.lt73 


32.769 


19-3 


i*.93 


27«.383 


399.901 


1*3-7 


10.13 


12.20 


IT. Paper Frodueti 


.05 


12 


.26 


■ 9«7 


1,115 


13.0 


.23 


12.999 


16,121 


2U.0 


13-17 


1D.D6 


T. PclntUg-Publlehlig 


1.81 


W5 


2.11 


8,153 


8.839 


l.k 


3.50 


197.516 


220,7<*8 


11.8 


*.23 


2^.97 


TI-TII. Cbealcali 


.&> 


165 


1.71 


6.590 


10,92lt 


65.8 


2.18 


122,911* 


1**,5«3 


50.2 


I8.65 


16.90 


Tlll.Subbar Prodaota 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


. 


. 


. 


. 


- 


. 


IX. Leather Prodiicte 


.on 


10 


.on 


155 


171* 


12.3 


.OK 


2,on 


2,6S8 


29.D 


;3.Do 


15-1*5 


X. Stme, Cloy, Olaae 


•*9 


127 


.9! 


3.781* 


U,i09 


8.6 


.90 


50,791* 


56.892 


12.0 


13.D2 


13.85 


XI. Iron and stael 


.11 


86 


I.mt 


11.2«<1 


l<i.888 


11.6 


1.1A 




2^1i.07<> 


11.D 


1D.61 


i6.0ii 


a. Stael allle 

b. Other Iron i Steal 


.05 
.28 


lU 
72 


1.5^ 
1.90 


5.950 

7.339 


lis 

9.261* 


11.3 

26.2 


m 


100.157 
93.939 


119.1*71 

135.606 


i2:5 


16.83 
12.10 


18. OD 
1U.6D 


nl> loo-farrou Uetala 


.16 


HO 


1.08 


11.171 


lt.673 


12.0 


iM 


82.593 


82,906 


O.D 


19.80 


17 •7D 


XIII.yachlneiT 


M 


118 


.97 


3.7IM) 


lt.i*99 


20.3 


1.10 


62,31*1* 


8O.81I* 


29.6 


16.6T 


21.61 


XIT. traneportatlon X(iulp. 


.02 


5 


.05 


178 


159 


-10.7 


.oU 


2,552 


2.362 


7.1* 


1D.3I1 


1D.«6 


XV. aallroad Bepalr Shop 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


XTI. Hlaoellaneouj 


•55 


110 


2.71 


10,1.65 


12,029 


1U.9 


2.14« 


138,771 


180,123 


29.8 


13.26 


lD.97 


DholaailtSad 
ill Othere ]/ 


.02 
1.1*5 


5 
37} 


.02 
7.21 


27.836 


3l».073 


31.0 

22.1* 


.02 
7-38 


1,219 

1*17.051* 


1,562 

563,579 


28.1 

35-1 


ID.OI 

lD.98 


16. 5D 



9oiiTO«i Spsolkl tabulfttlos for BBA of FSa qxufltioimalr* r^tumt 'by Burtai of Oanvoa* I)«orat«r 1933* l^loyBrat ud payroll d«t« ats for tb« w*«ln of Jod* 17 mA 

Ootober lU, I933. 

Xflntudc?, T«iui«fli*«, Alabatiuii Ultiloiippl. 

"All Oth«r«" covari data for quiBtionnalr** vbich do not cl^nxly ludlcatu tWt « bi-«akiloinj has b*bD maA» ob a proper (•osriphioal buLi; (l«t« for ••t«tiltihB«ati 

optrfttlnc in tvo or aor« stfttot, ouch ««, ralXroa&ai ttaam boat*, pip* liaea, t«l«phoa* and tala^i^ib, mtA power oo^paslatj tha raporti of coopaslti havlac pliAts 

in varloiu Statai for which isdivLdual raportt vara not aubDlttad but for whloh a nattar ropert vaa rappliad; mi- data froa ratuna raoolTad for a Stato after the 

Stata had baao t«&t to tha TahulatioD Seetioa for ponohlss and tabulacing. 

SaEaJl. 

DiTlaiOD of RvTlav 
HSlJDS 
Deoaobar, 193*) 

9S54 



95 

TABLE 3Iff-G 
PEA CBISD8 - aiOIOHil TlBULlTIOH BT QOUSTEI (ffiOUPS \J 
Til - WEST SOinH CEHTEAL STATES 2/ 
BstabllehmeBte Reporting, Employment, PayrollB - Jane - October, 1933 



Un)DS!EET QS0UP8 



iU ladTUtrtsB 



xaMuirnrACTUBiio 



A. icrleoltor* (slnor) 

X. Ooal 

II. Otber lUneralB 



S. Pobllo UtUittei 

I. Traniport&tloD, etc. 

II. Othvr PoMlc Utilities 

B. Slitrlbutlon 

I. Iholesale 
XI. Betail 

a. roods, Drugv, etc. 

b. Dr7 goode, etc. 
o. Otlier retail 

f. lernce 

X. Soseetle 

II. Aneeaeote 

III. Profeeslonal 
IT. Buelseat 



II. 



. XI f III t 17 



riaaaoe 

I. Banking, etc. 

II. Inwj-Mice, Brotorage 



B. lUIDTACniBXHO 



fntllee 

ft* Appai^X 

b. Other textlli 



III. Toreat Producte 

IT> Paper Prodoeti 

T. Prlntlog-Publlahlng 

Tl-TII. Chemicals 

TIlI.ftujDber Producta 

IZ. Leather produote 

X. Stone, Cle7t Qlase 

XI. Iron aod Steel 

a. Steel mllia 

b. Otiier Iron A Steel 

XXX* Boik-ferroua Uetala 

ZXII.Uaohisery 
XXT. Sraovportatlon Iqolp. 
XT. Ballroad. Repair Shop 
X7I. yiacelleneoiu 



Ooclaaalfled 
All there i/ 




%% Jon* 17 ttiA 



1/ »<mr.., sp.ol.1 t.iml.U0. for m of m .r«.t'o«»lr. r.tu„. ., B^.i« Of 0«™.. I..c....r 1933. !^lo:™on. «- p^oU 4... .r. for *. . 
OcWter l"*, 1933- 



3/ "All other." ooTere data for qaeetlonnalree *lc^ do 
operating In two or -oore States, Buch ae ra*' 

In TarlTOJ Statea ur wbloh Udlvldual repo ^ . v i *<-» 

State had been B<mt to the Tabulation Section for punching and tab^atlng. 



H.B.A. 

SlTleloQ of Bevie* 

MSiJUH 

Deoe*ber, 1935 



9854 



96 

TABLE ilT-H 
PS± CSKSTJS - BEGIOUiL TABULATION B7 DOnjSTRT OBOUFS 1/ 
nil - UOOHIia ST1IE5 2/ 
EstsbllBhiBfinte BeportlQg, finployment , Psyrolle - Jane ~ October, 1933 





Establisbmests 


S^lOTVent 


Weekly Peyroll 


ireekly laeoM 
Per lorbr 




Per Cent 
of Total 


number 
Report- 
ing 


June 


October 


Per Cent 


June 


October 


Per Cant 
Change 


Jane 






Per Cent 
of Total 


Bomber 


Humber 


per Cent 
of Total 


Amount 


Amount 


October 


All Industrlee 


lOO.OOit 


15.962 


100.00* 


127.5^9 


I5I1.670 


21.3 


IX.OO* 


»2,677.756 


»3.391.3«li 


26.7 


$20.99 


»a.93 


BOB-IUBOJACHmjIG 


90.10 


llt,382 


73.91* 


9^.307 


112,012 


18.8 


73.29 


1.962.1162 


2.1l60.1(2ll 


25^5 


20.81 


a.97 


A. Agriculture (minor) 


•93 


ll»9 


.91 


1.161 


l,62ll 


39-9 


.76 


20.U70 


25.016 


22^2 


17^63 


15.110 


B. HlQlng A (JUAriTliis 


1.51 


21*7 


l«i.O<) 


iq.2iio 


2ll.052 


25.0 


n.09 


150.1101 


5I11.I115 


5I1.5 


15.21 


2?. 51 


I. Coal 

II. Other klnerole 


.67 

.ss 


107 
11*0 


8.20 
6.89 


lO.UllJ 

8.791 


111, 110 
9.9112 


35.0 
13.1 


6!6i 

6.118 


173 iWA 


323.769 
217.666 


83.0 

25-5 


lS.9lt 
19-73 


22.95 

a.S9 


C> COQBtrUCtlOD 


2.10 


336 


1-97 


2.509 


3.OI19 


21.5 


1.86 


119.782 


69.286 


39-2 


19.8I1 


22.72 


S. Public Utllitlee 


^.26 


520 


It. 76 


6.071 


7.11lll 


21.0 


5.10 


116.1150 


156.6111 


IK. 8 


22.118 


a. 11 


I. TrenEportatioD. etc. 

II. Other Public Utllitlee 


1.53 

1.63 


260 


•91 

3.85 


i.iES 
11.905 


1.933 
5.1111 


65. B 
10.3 


•98 
U.12 


26,182 

110,268 


37. 86^ 
118.777 


7.7 


22.115 
22.118 


19.59 
a.95 


E. Dletrlbutlon 


■57.02 


<).102 


Tll.l2 


111.5211 


52.152 


19.8 


15.67 


955.178 


1.169.107 


22.ll 


21.95 


22.112 


I. RhoLesale 

II. Setall 


6.86 
50.16 


1.096 
e.006 


6.93 
27.19 


8.837 

*.6S7 


10,6110 
111.512 


20.U 
19.7 


^M 


2119.396 
705.782 


297.7611 

871.lll1 


I9.I1 
21.5 


28.22 
20.15 


27.99 
2D.<X1 


a. FoodB. Dru£8. etc. 

b. £i7 goods, etc. 

c. Other retail 


17 •'•3 
10.53 
22.20 


lieso 
3.5W 


6.88 
10.37 
9.91* 


8.773 

13.232 

12,682 


10,731 

15.712 
15.069 


22.3 
18.7 
Ig.S 


1:85 

7.89 
11.62 


I83.3I1O 
211,185 
311.257 


233.91't 
376:6^ 


27.6 
23.5 

a.o 


20.90 

n 


a.so 
16.60 
25.99 


T. Service 


18. in 


1.021 


12.611 


16.122 


17.798 


10. U 


10.11 


270.710 


109.689 


lU.K 


16.79 


17.110 


I. Doneetlc 

II. AausementB 

III. ProfeaBlonal 
XT. BUGloesB 


U.50 
1.21 

3.86 

2.36 


1.83? 

616 
376 


1.92 
1.19 


10.926 
1,220 
2.1151 
1.525 


I2.II1I1 
I.32I1 

2.792 

1.533 


11.1 
8.5 

13.9 
0.9 


5.75 

• 78 

2.15 

1.13 


153.935 
20.809 
57.691 
38.296 


178.795 

25.626 
65.712 
39.556 


U.i 
23.1 
13-9 
3.3 


23.55 
25.11 


IU.72 

25.72 


II.'- » II 4 III * IT 


7.U2 


1.185 


I1.07 


5.196 


5.65»i 


8.8 


1.36 


116.796 


130.895 


12^1 


22. !« 


23.15 


Q. yioasce 


6.-il 


1.007 


11.115 


5.680 


5.991 


5.5 


6.70 


179.1*9 


189.2118 


5.5 


11.59 


11.58 


I. Banking, etc. 

II. Insurance, Brokerage 


1.87 


299 

708 


I.9I1 
2.51 


2.1181 
3.199 


l^ 


3.I1 

7.2 


3.03 
3.67 


81,1511 
98.295 


83.557 
105.701 


2^9 

7^5 


32.71 
30.73 


32.57 

30.83 


H. luinjriCTUBmo 


7.06 


1.127 


lit. 39 


18,362 


2^.137 


31.5 


lU.Sl 


396.595 


523.517 


32.0 


a. 60 


a.69 


I. Food! 


3.03 


US} 


6.21 


7,927 


12.3116 


55-7 


6.27 


167.927 


236.1129 


110.8 


a.i8 


19.15 


II. TeztUes 


.08 


12 


.16 


198 


87' 


-56.1 


.12 


I.27I1 


1.587 


-51.5 


16.5I1 


18.2)1 


a. Apparel 

b. Other textiles 


.08 


12 


^16 


198 


87 


-56.1 


.12 


3^275 


1.587 


-51-5 


16.511 


18. aU 


III. Forest Products 


•58 


93 


3.30 


ll,20lt 


I1.966 


18.1 


2.36 


63.303 


89.286 


Klo 


15.06 


17- 9« 


IT. Paper Products 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


T. Printing-Publishing 


2.21 


352 


3.O8 


3.925 


U.161 


6.0 


U.115 


119.126 


1112.226 


19.11 


30.35 


35.18 


TI-TII. Ohsiilcals 


.OK 


7 


• 15 


188 


212 


12.8 


•19 


11.931 


5.8U1 


18.5 


26.23 


27-55 


VIII.Bubber Products 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 


U. Uather Products 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




X. Stone, Clay. Qlaes 


.26 


U2 


.116 


590 


633 


7.3 


•33 


8,751 


10.019 


15. 5 


lii.»3 


15.«3 


11. Iron and Steel 

a. Steel mllle 

b. Other Iron A steel 


~ 


~ 


~ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


III. Hoa-ferroua Ketala 


.11 


IS 


• 15 


195 


268 


37.11 


• 15 


11,027 


5.581 


36.1 


20.65 


ao.ii5 


XIII. Uachlnezy 


■39 


62 


.lA 


565 


816 


lA.ll 


•50 


13.1138 


19.288 


53.5 


23.78 


23.61. 


UT. Transportation Equip. 


.Oil 


7 


.05 


66 


79 


19-7 


•06 


1.619 


1.578 


-2^5 


25.53 


19. »7 


rr. Hallroad Repair Shop 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


. 


, 


_ 


_ 


_ 


. 


. 


ZTI. Ulsoellaneous 


•32 


51 


•39 


5* 


569 


12.9 


•38 


10.199 


11,752 


15.2 


20.2ll 


20.65 


UDolassUted 
All Others i/ 


2.811 


1<53 


11.67 


1I1.88O 


18.5a 


2^5 


11.90 


318.699 


507.573 


27.9 


a.Ua 


22.00 



i/ 8oupc«i Special tabalfttlon for 9£A of PfiA, (Tiieetloiinaire retoniB by Bureau of Cmbub, Decombsr 1933. fcjjloymeat and pvoH data are for th« wMki of Jtans 17 v^ 

October l"*, 1933* 
£/ UoDtaoa, Idahfl, lyomiug, Colorado, Sew Mexico, irlzoaa, Utah, HeTada. 
i/ •All Others" covers date for quest loanalre* which do not clearly Indicate that a breakdown has been m«le on a proper geogn^loal baslt; data for aatabllthBenti 

operating In two or more States, such as, rallroadB, steam boats, pipe linos, telephone and telegr(q)h, and power companies; the reports of coEf>anleB having plants 

In Twloua States foi which Individual reports were not safamltted but for which a master report was supplied; and data from r«tuTOs recelTed for a State after the 

State had been sent to the Tabulation Section for punching and tabulating. 

M.fi.A. 

DlTlslon of BsTlsw 
UStJUB 
Lweeaber. 1935. 

9S54 



97 

TABLE ZrZ-I 

pm ciaisos - ssoiouiL iibuuiio!! bt liBusiKr asoDPs 1/ 

II - PACIFIC SlilES 2/ 
EotabllalLiionte Reporting. Enrplojrnent. Payrolls - June - October, 1933 





Katahlishmente 




Efl^ployment 








ITeekly Payroll 




WeeSly 
Per 


Income 

lorker 


muosiKt (ffloops 


Per Cent 
of Total 


Itenher 

Eeport- 

Ing 


June 


October 


Per Cent 
Change 


June 


Oc*■-i^?^ 


Per Cent 

Cb^inee 

20.8 


June 
$2l*.15 






Per Cent 
of Total 


Number 


Dumber 


Per Cant 
of Total 


Amount 


Arnold t 


October 


All loiuBtriea 


100.00 


60,082 


100.00 


685,006 


821*. 03s 


20.3 


ICO. 00 


$16,5611,823 


$20,00l*,82l* 


$2l*.28 


HOU-lUSOTiCTUmiO 


86.32 


51,860 


63.27 


U33.KO7 


501,287 


15.7 


67.09 


11,112,1*1*1 


15,l61*,9l3 


18. 5 


25.61* 


26.26 


1. Aerlcultore (minor) 


.9U 


565 


I.2I4 


8,501 


9,399 


10.6 


■95 


156.860 


181,290 


15.6 


18.1*5 


19.29 


B. lilnlns & Quarrylnf 


■ W 


U* 


1.26 


8.611 


10.611 


21.2 


1.51 


252.901 


297.506 


17.6 


29.17 


28.01 


I. Coal 

II. Other riineralt 


.03 
.19 


17 

297 


.11 

1.15 


752 
7,859 


852 
9,761 


'iX 


.■Jk 


10.851 
21*2,052 


22,221 
275.285 


IOU.6 
13-7 


1I1.U3 
30. BO 


26.06 
28.20 


C. Conetnictlon 


2.66 


1,600 


2.U2 


16, 588 


20.221 


a. 9 


2.08 


31*5,1*51 


1*90. 86^» 


1*2.1 


20.83 


2l*.27 


S. Pobllc Utllltlea 


2.7U 


1.6i« 


8.* 


56.1*73 


61.617 


12.7 


q.l2 


1.510.256 


1.61*1*. 811* 


8.9 


26.71* 


25.36 


I. IraasportatiOQ, ato. 

II. Other PoJillo Dtilltlee 


1.8U 
•90 


1,1014 
51* 


3.58 


31.953 
21*. 520 


37,971* 
25,61*3 


18.8 

it.6 


>;.73 

U.39 


762,826 
727,1*30 


901*. 933 
739,901 


15.6 

i-7 


2"*. 50 
29.67 


1 23-83 
28.85 


2. Dlatrlhutioa 


1(7.70 


28.6'i7 


28.00 


iqi.807 


226.7Q1 


18.2 


28.11 


1*. 657.01*6 


5.61*1.079 


a.2 


21*. 26 


2l*.68 


I. fholeaale 

II. Retail 


8.03 
M.67 


lt,825 
23.812 


7-97 

20.01 


5l*,6ll 

117.1<)6 


161.825 


15-3 

19.5 


9.85 
18.26 


1,632,222 
1.02l*.82l* 


1,875,781 
1.7b7.295 


1U.9 

2U.5 


29.89 

22.05 


29-79 
21.00 


a. Poode, Bnife, etc. 

b. Dry goode, etc. 
e. Other retail 


ill. 97 

18.28 


8.99I' 

3,658 

10,980 


S.Ol 

7.38 


31,758 
51*, 891* 

50. 5!*'* 


37,853 

65. 881 

60,091 


19.2 

20.0 
18. 9 


lt.03 
6.37 
7.86 


666,931* 
1,056.101 
1,301,789 


800,676 
1,282.982 
1,683,61*0 


20.1 

a.5 
29.3 


a. 00 

19. 2l* 
25.76 


a. 15 
19.1*7 

28.02 


I. Mrrloe 


2^.0<) 


IS. 072 


1S.20 


101*. 116 


120.9iq 


16.2 


16.15 


2.67l*.585 


1.291.1*28 


21.1 


25.69 


21-22- 


I. Soaeatlo 

II. ivaeemeota 

III. Profeeelonal 
IT. Biuineae 


13.57 
1.17 
6.1H 
3.9^ 


8,150 
701 

21369 


E.OO 
2.11t 
2.62 
2.Ult 


5"*. 805 
l'*,657 


60,679 

22,330 
19,37s 

18.552 


10.7 
52.1* 

7-9 

11.2 


5-55 
5.22 


919. 79I* 
861*,1*21 
1*52,108 
■138,262 


1,067,261* 

i,a2,9i*6 

503,826 
507,392 


16.0 
1*0.3 
ll.!* 
15.8 


16.78 
56.98 
25.17 
26.26 


17.59 
5H.32 
25.00 
27.35 


ll."- . II ♦ III ♦ 17 


11.52 


6,922 


7.20 


1*9,311 


60,260 


22.2 


10.60 


l,75lt.791 


2,22lt.l61* 


26.7 


35.59 


36.91 


0. Pliiaiica 


6.67 


ll.OOl* 


6.<)1 


1*7.111 


W.707 


5.1 


9.15 


i.sis.iito 


1.615.912 


6.6 


12.01 


12.51 


I. Banking, etc. 

II. ineoranoe. Brokerage 


1.00 

5.67 


3.W17 


1.81 
5.10 


12,373 
31*. 338 


13,16« 

36,51*1 


6.1* 
U.6 


2.S 
6.55 


1*31.315 
1.08lt,025 


1*66,105 
1,11*9,807 


8.1 

6.1 


311.8^ 
31.03 


35-1*0 
31. 47 


s. lUiiiTAOiaBua 


13.09 


7.86>» 


3i'.63 


237,21*9 


306.388 


29.1 


31.00 


5.13l*,89l* 


6,1*83,632 


26.3 


a.6i* 


a.i6 


I I. rocla 


2.96 


1,777 


9.30 


63,6«0 


97,500 


5J.1 


8.07 


1.336,133 


1,»77.1*35 


1*0.5 


20.98 


19.26 


IX. TaxtUee 


1.07 


61t2 


2.1m 


17.026 


20.1*1*8 


20.1 


1.75 


289.215 


180.1*91 


11.6 


16.99 


iS-61 


a. Jjipaial 

h. Other teitUai 


:s4 

.w 


% 


' 1.80 
.69 


12,295 

i*,731 


s:7o6 

5,71*2 


19-6 
a.U 


1.20 
•55 


197.983 

91.232 


269,820 
110,671 


3^.3 
21.3 


16.10 

19.28 


18-35 
19.27 


III. Pozaet Producte 


1.75 


1.W9 


8.6lt 


59.181* 


70.837 


19.7 


6.36 


1.05l*,368 


1,367,590 


29.7 


17.82 


19.31 


IT. P^er Product! 


•19 


116 


1.1*6 


9,999 


12,281* 


22.9 


1.1*6 


21*1.358 


277,021* 


ll*.8 


21*. ll* 


22.55 


T. Print ls«-PnbllBhlh£ 


2.29 


1,379 


3-85 


26,371* 


28,596 


8.1* 


1*.08 


675.072 


735,191 


8-9 


25.60 


25.71 


TI-TII. Cheaioale 


-77 


Ii61» 


1.85 


12,680 


15,608 


25.1 


2.26 


371*, 299 


1*28,596 


11*. 5 


29.52 


27.1^ 


TIII.Bnhber Pradnate 


.07 


1*5 


.61* 


i*,358 


1*,86S 


11.7 


.70 


116,788 


100,007 


-lU.l* 


26. 80 


20. 5U 


IX. Leather Pi«dncta 


.18 


107 


■32 


2,179 


2,553 


17.2 


.26 


1*2,323 


1*9,922 


18.0 


19.1*2 


19-55 


X. Stana, Olar, Olaae 


.5! 


31.9 


1.13 


7,771* 


9,202 


le.u 


1.07 


177.11*3 


206,769 


16.7 


22.79 


22-1*7 




.a 


385 


1.71* 


11.912 


l6.1*t2 


18.2 


1.71 


286.886 


180.71*0 


32-7 


2l*.0l* 


21-09 


a. Steel mile 

t. Other Iron « Steal 


.05 
•59 


30 

355 


.S9 

1.05 


"iJiK 

7.188 


6,608 
9,881* 


39-3 
37-5 


i:g 


lli*,923 

171.963 


161, lid 
a9,''3o 


llO.l* 
27.6 


21*. 22 
23.92 


A.Ul 
22.20 


HI. Ie».ferratia Vetale 


■55 


330 


."3 


2.937 


3,631 


23.6 


.1*2 


70,305 


85.1*78 


21.6 


23.91* 


23.51* 


XIlI.llaahlaeiT 


l.U 


666 


l-5< 


10,851* 


ll*,130 


30.2 


1.69 


279,793 


353,560 


26.1* 


25-78 


25.02 


|IT. trsiaportation Iqo^* 


.72. 


131 


■51 


3.512 


i*,538 


29.2 


.1*6 


77,060 


1011,286 


35.3 


a.91* 


22.98 


XT. BaUroai Eapalr Ship 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




.71 


It2« 


.65 


i.,?6o 


5,701 


19.8 


.69 


lilt, 151 


136,51*3 


19.6 


23-98 


23.95 


til Othsra iJ 


% 


iiO 

338 


.06 

2.01* 


375 
13.975 


1*06 
15.957 


8.3 

IU.2 


.06 

i.«5 


10.727 

306.761 


11,189 

31*5.090 


1*.3 
12.5 


28.61 

a. 95 


27.56 

a. 63 



1/ Jouxoas Special tabulatlan for HA of PU qaaetlonnalre retume bj- Bura»i of Canaoa, December I933. Bployment aid payroll data are for the malca of June 17 and 

OoUbai lit, 1933. 
\l ■All'oSri' nJeri data for maatlonnalraa which do not clearly Indicate that a breakdoan hae been made on a proper geogrephlcal baele; data for eetabllehmsnto 

oaaratlnx la t« or aore SUtea eich aa. rallroada, eteam boate, pipe linea, telephone and telegraph, and power companlee: the reports of coa^ianlea having plants 

to Tarlola Btataa for which ladlTldoal reporta were not acbaltted but for which a maeter report waa wi^rHed; and data from retuina roceHed for a State after the 

Itata h^ baaa aaat to the Taholatloa flection for punching and tabulating. 

I.B.A. 

I>J.TlBloa of BaTlaw 

aSiJSI 

Seoeabar, 1935 

9S54 



-98- 

z:::iiBiT a 

Ccrjj of Ve/^ez 4 raid 5 of "Histor:,'' of Insigiia Section" Au^ist 
23, 19o5, U, il, Duvr-11. 

D. Althoiigh "olpna for the President's Reen-^loynent Survey had 
previously been u.-^de by S. lo Posner, Sconomic Advisor, under supervision 
of I^r. Georj-e 3. G-allovrpy for the Heser.rch and Planning Division, under 
date of October S, 1933, the Insignia Section -s-ras authorized by the 
Executive Officer to hrijidle the -orintiny and distribution of this Q,T'.es- 
tionnaire, after consultptio-i vith the Census Bureau, the CoT::.iiGsioner 
of Lrbor Statistics, the Division of Researchrnd Planning, and the 
Central Statistical Bureau. ITo fornal authorizntion ''''as trrasMitted to 
the Chief of the Sectio--. in this connection, rlthoUj:h the Insignia Sec- 
tion files contain copi -.s of re Dorts to the Szecutive Officer on the 
progress of the work. 

Approval vrs then given the Chief of the Section to print four 
million (4,000,000) Quest ionn-^i re forns, to be distributed on an allot- 
ment basis fron the C-overnnent Printing Office t.rough all Post Offices 
in the United St-ues. .^ids ^'ere secured and contrrct ^ts : nven the U.S. 
Envelope Conipeji;^, P.ocIrville, Connecticutj for four lillion (4,000,')00) 
envelopes to cnrr]/ the Questionnaire ferns, these envelopes being 
addressed, "The President, The TTnite House, !7rshington, D. C." Postal 
cprriccs delivered the Questionnaire forms in these unsealed envelo-oes 
to each l-mo^Ti jl-^ce of business throughout the United Strtes rs soon as 
the sui^olies rerched each Post Office, a letter form of instructions 
having been furnished each Postnaster. Included '.dth this form ^-rrs sn 
additionpl Taessr,;e restrting the previous distribution instructions 
rega;.^' .in;; the President's Reen ilo'/nent xlgreenent, because certain Post- 
mpstez's either hrd not received original instructions or had failed to 
act in accordance Trith then, postmasters i:7ere olso furnished ^dth a 
frr.nlced return tallr lostcrird to furnish con^lete reTort as to the nuior- 
ber of Questionnpire messages distributed. 

A careful cplculr.tion of the requirements for Questionnaires 
for Post Offices resulted in a totrl of .^,332,483 Questionnaires being 
seat on the original shiijment fron the Government Printing Office to Post 
\3ffices. In B.ddition, all of the Central Accouiiting Offices of the Post 
Office De-oprtment ^-ere furnished pji original shiT.ient of 445,000 Ques- 
tionnaires, together v.-ith instructions as to he? to make replenishments 
for local Post Offices ^dthin their territories, paid ho-7 to re-)ort -^'eelcly 
to the Insignia Section regrrdin ; the exact status of the distribution. 
A balfjice reserve stock on hand at the Government Printing Office amount- 
ing to 222,512 Questionnaires -'p.s soon e-Jiausted by shipments to the 
Commerce District Of 'ices at their request and to other rgencies. 

The tally caru re--iorts fron Postmasters reqiiired considerrble 
follow/ uo corres 'ondence, but upon prp.ctical completion of the returns, 
it \-'rs fo-and that the original allotments had been very satisfactorily 
made. 



9854 



-99- 

Upon investif-ation it •■as found most desiraole to place the 
entire jo"b of editiii^;, co^insj, ta'oulrtin-j, rnd verifyin;:^ all Question- 
naires, together with the finrl co;jT,iilation of statistics, in the hands 
of the Census Biu'eavi. Per this -our-oose iulA. -itire-orred and printed at the 
Government Printin^-^ Office a hooliet entitled "Industry pjid Business 
Classif icftions" . Although more than one nillion conilete ,':,nd incor>- 
plete ret'orns T.'ere received by the Census Bureau, they 'rere only ahle to 
trhulate 643,060 "because of ins^aff icient or illegible inf orination fur- 
nished. The detrlled re!3\ilt.: ox the taoulatioii, although favorahle,- --ere 
not relea.se d by II. H. A. 

During the distrioution of the Questionnaire, the Insignia Sec- _ 
tion snd the Econonic Advisor initi. too- certain -oress release information, 
similar to the annexed Releases, iJo's, 1126, 1299, 1387, nid 1501. In- 
terest x/as disTolayed by large chain organizations and other coroorrtions 
in the iDroper nethod o:' reporting their entire systems nnd corres-iondents 
vTos required to inforra then of the necessity of securing returns on a 
strictly geographicrl ba.sis. 



9854 



-ino- 
EOIIBI^r JB , C 




P 
Y 



Septeuter 16, 1933. 

> . ' 

TO: Lt. Johnston 

PROM: Stanley Irvin^r Posner 

SUBJ!ECT: Pro-nosed nechrnics for Blanket Q,ue3tionnaire« 

BeloT rire outlined in a inroad v/ay the necessary 
mechanics for distribution, return pnd to^fjiilation of the 
"blanket questionnpire nov? boin'T considored, 

1. Distribution vrill be a.ccon ^lishe:. along the same 
lines followed in distributing;- the orif;;inal President's 
Eeem'olcyment Agreement. An un-addressed envelo-oe i^ill be 
delivered by each mail mm to every eiivolo^rer end -•olace of 
business on his route. This vrill not include farmers or 
households e:Tployin : domestic service, but these are the 
only e"era;Dtions. Charitable organizations, non-"orofit in- 
stitutions and adl others vdll receive the envelope. The 
envelope vrill contai-n one copy of .7orn 1, t'-o copies of 
Porm 2 and one franked envelo-ie to be returned to the 
District Office of the Deprrtnerit of Coh-uaerce. 

2. ]?or;n 1 (On uhich will be printed pn adesquate 
statement cf its confidential, nature) v-m "be placed in 
the enclosed envelope rnd mailed to the District Office, 
One copy of Porn 2 \,dll be delivered to the local Cormli- 
ance Board, The second copy of Porn 2 may be posted by the 
eiiToloyer vhere his empiloyees and/or customers raay see it. 

3. The locrl Conpliance "Joard vdll chock receipt of 
Perm 2 against its local Roll of Honor. 

4. The District Office of the De-nartracnt of Cora.ierce 
will open the envelopos as received. They will then check ^ 
the list of signed President's ReenDloyment Agree:aents, and 
after a reasonable period of time, -perhaos one week after 
the first return is received, notify each com. ami-by of the 
specific em:)loyers who have si:-;ned the Prosident's Reenploy- 
ment Agreement but have not yet returned Porm 1 of the 
questionnaire. The local Con-oliance Boards will then begin 
a "Pollow IJ-o" carroaign. 



9854 



5, Lach day the District Coiamei-ce Officer. -Till send to 
the Census Bureau all forms received 'out assoi^ted 1)7 conmToni- 
ties. 

6« The retvtrns ^-ill be trbulatec. p.s ra'oidly ."s received 
"by the Census 3urer,u, and onno^uaceiaont of totnl mcde each day 
■fay Comnerce Districts, njid after the first Teelc "by specific 
coramunities. 

7, Notice nust "be sent to all local IT. R. A. Boards and/or 
Conipliance Boards and/or orp;ani3atio:<s of all kinds to discontinue 
local questionnrires since thin national qucstio;:naire is desi.^ped 
to produce the nocessra-'- infornation on e coniorra'ble "basisifor the 
entire United States, • 

8, A sheet of instructions ^-ill "be prei^ared "by this office 
for distri"bution 'oy "your offic^ to e;\ch Conrpliance 3oard in order 
that thejr may assist in fillin^; out these q-estionnairos. 

9, I shall -roceed r,t once to detemins the necessary" nechanics 
said estirar.tod exoense, and other relevant information concerning 
this process. 

10. If this procedure is initip.ted rt once, pnd the G-overninent 
Printin^i Office Inst ucted to send the first forms to the Pa.cific 
Cost, it Hhould 'oe oossible to have the forms in the hands of every 
em'jloyer at least one 'reek "before tlie .,.p,te on v/hich retittrns sho-:ald 
he made. 



STA.j"LSY IRVIIIG POSIEE 



9854 



-102- 

C 


IXIIBIT C . P 



Y 



l.'IEiylOHAiTDUM 

September "35, 1933 

TO: Robert K. Straus ' • ' 

FHOi.'i: Stanley Irvirij; Posner 

SUBJECT: Proposed liechanics for tie Dl^tribatlon and Heturn of the 
Blanicet Queetionnaire. 



1. Tlie distribution of tlie Blanket Qae&tionnaire as contem- 
plated at present will be simpler tiian tlie distribution of tie Presi- 
dent' s Reemployment Agreement. An envelope addressed to tlie President 
at tie \JBiite 'louse, with a suoer-scription which notes the importance 
of tie message contained in this envelope, will be delivered by mail 
carriers to every employer and place of biisiness in the United States. 

2. T3.ie envelope contains a single card with a massage from 
the President and seven simple questions. ."/iieh tie questions are 
answered, tie card will be inserted in the same envelope in v/hich it 
arrived, and deposited in mail boxes. 

3. Tlie envelope identified by the super-scription will be 
intercepted at Washington, D. C. and delivered to the Census Bureau. 

4. Tlie cards will be sorted and returns tabulated at first 
only for the forty-eigi.it States and fifteen or twenty large cities viith 
a classification by ind^lstries. 

5. A letter must be drafted by ileneral Johnson and a:")proved 
by Postmaster General Farley, which will be sent to the 48,000 Post- 
masters in the United States. 

6. A copy of the questionnaire vifill be forwarded to the 
Governinent Frinti.ng Office, and the three million pieces will be com- 
pleted within a weelc. Tlie envelope will be furnished through tie Post 
Office Depa.rtaent and vfill be ready, if the Department is authorized 
to proceed I.ionda,'', within three days of such authorization. 

7. The Post Office Department -.vill itself distribute tae 
questionnaire tlirougiiout the United States. Present plans are that five 



9854 



-1^'3- 



questionnaires shall be sent to evc'ry lourtli class Post Office in the 
United States, leaving only 13,000 Pont Offices to whom distribution 
will be mpd'3 in a more exact v?ay. Sai-;.')lu? sup'ilies will be kept at 
each District Office of the Department of Goirunerce to be forwarded to 
Post Offices where th.j original supplies are inadequate. 

8. Notice should be sent iniaediately to all local "J.R. A. 
Recovery Boards and other voluntary organizations to discontinue local 
questionnaires since this j'l-tional questionnaire is designed to secure 
the required infoniation en. a comparable basis for the entire United 
States. 



3ta.nley Irving Posner. 



9854 



- :i ■<. - 

EXHIBIT D 

CODE FOH lilDUSTHIAL CLASS IEIC-4.T ION 

DIVISION A. AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, Al^ A1\^IK'.AL HUSBANDRY 
Code 

001. Agriculture. 

Cotton tirowin;^; or in connection vdth preparing cotton for market, 
except ginning, compressing and baling - see 016. 
-Grain farming. Alfalfa, "b-irley, "buckwheat, corn, hay, oats, rice, 
rye, wheat, etc. 

Horticulture. Growing fruits, flowers, nuts, vegetables; landscape ' 
gardeners, nurserymen. 

Stock farming. Cattle, hogs, horses, sheep, etc. Bee oulture 
(apiaries) ; poultry; fur-beaiing animals, as foxes; ostrieh farm- 
ing; silkworm culture; feeding stock for market (not stockyards, 
see 017) ; dairy farming separating stations creameries (not butter) 

Other aij^ri cultural pursuits. Operating agricultural machinery as 
as baling (not cotton, see 016) ; sheep shearing, threshing, spray- 
ing; general farming; growing coffee, hemp, hops, medicinal plants, 
mushrooms, rubber, sugar, tobacco. 

Lessors or holders of farm lands. 

002. Related industries. 

Fishing. Claras, crabs, fish, nonfood shells, oysters, pearls, 

sponges; fish hatcheries; oyster cultui-e. 
Ice harvesting. Natxiral ice (manufacture of ice not included, 

see 074) . 
Other related industries, f.-aple-sugar camps; hunting or trapping 

for furs or feathers; seal hunting, (llot inclusing the gathering 

of naval stores, see 092.) 
Lessors or holders of timber lands. 
Bottling spring water. 

DIVISION B. I.:iNING iOTO QUAHaiirGu 

003. Metals (metalliferous mining) . 

Copper, and extracting processes. 

Iron and extracting processes. 

Lead and sine. All forms of lead — anglesite, bournonite, cerussite, 

crocoite, galena (lead sulphide), pyromorphite, etc. 

All fcrras of zinc — calamine, smithsonite, sphalerite, etc.; 

extracting processes. 
Precious metals. Gold, iridium, platinum, silver, etc.; extracting 

processes. 
Other metals. Quicksilver (mercury), manganese, vanadi-um, etc.; 

extracting processes. 

004. Anthracite coal and related activities. 

005. Bituminous coal and related activities; lignite, peat, semianthra- 

cite. 

006. Oil (crude petroleum producing). 

Producing petroleum or drilling, exploring, or prospecting for 
petroleum. Includes building oil derricks. ^ 



9854 



— 105 — <■•'-■ 

DIVISION 3. MIHING AED QUAIEING (.Continued) 
Code 

007. Other minerals (quvirrving and nonmetallic mining:). 

Astestos, toraz, emery, feldspar, grapliite, gypsaam, magnestite, 

mica, sulphur, etc. 
Clay, gravel, sand; kaolin (.porcelain clajO ; molding sand, pottery 

clay, silica (quartz), talc, etc. ; grading or washing for market. 
Granite, limestone, marlile, rock, sandstone, slate, etc.; stone 

crushing. 
Precious and semiprecious stones, amethyst, oeryl, diamond, emerald, 
• garnet', jade', ruhy, sapphire, topaz, tourmaline, etc. 
Salt mines, wells; producing or refining salt. 
Mining or quarrying not elsewhere classified. • 
Lessors or holders of njining or- quarrying property, 

DIVISION C. C0IIST3UCTI0H 

008. Building and construction ahove ground, (buildings.) 

Building ty contract — iron, steel, wood, masonry (cement, concrete, 
mosaic, stucco, or tile work), carpentering, decorating, glazing, 
.fireproofing, painting, papering, -plastering, plaster-hoard work; 

■ tinsmithing; roofing 'work (compound, metal, shingle, slag); sheets- 
metal work. 

Installing machinery and, equipme.nt . Carrier, cleaning, fire pro- 
tection, vacuiM or ventilating , systems; ;elevators; soda fountains; 
tanks; mill-v^'righting;' plumhing,, heating, lighting, and electrical 
contractors. ■■- . • 

009. Other construction undergro-und and on surface (not buildings). 

Blasting; cais'son work; clearing, , grading, or reclaiming lands; 
excavating for fcanals, cellars, ditches j trenches, irrigation 
systems, etc.; laying pipe for gas or sewer systems, waterworks, 
etc.; constructing levees, reservoirs; laying masonry foundations 
(other than for buildings) ; drilling wells for gas or water (not 
including oil, see 005) ; sinking shafts; test boring, tunneling 
or other mine construction work. 
Moving, razing, or v/recking buildings and sale of material (not 

including marine v.-recking, . see 012). 
Bridge building, ' ■ ■ ■ ' • 

Oth-er general contracting not alloca.ble.- to code 008, ■ 
Waterfront construction. Bullcheads, cofferdams, dams, dikes, 
drydocks, jetties, marine railways, piers,, rigging lofts, wharves; 
dredging, piling. 
Related industries. Cleaning or scaling boilers; cleaning or 
scraping ships; cleaning stone buildings by sand blasting or 
otherwise; treatment of cement floors to prevent dust. 

010. Paving and road building, including railroad beds. 



9854 



DIVISION D.'TRAUSPCaTATIOK .Ai© OT'i^R PUBLIC QTILITOS 

; - ^ SECTIDH'!! r TIl^ISPO^lTATIOH AKD ; HiCL ATED Il^USTRI'SS 
Code ' ' / - • ' 

Oil. .Stearn railroads, or or,era,tiiig leased railroads or railw^-s^not 
street or- interur'baii.r.allvrays.. (See i\fo. 018),. ;, i.',:'.: ' '. 

Other railroads, _ railwajys, and related industries. '^&^t lines, 
electric inclined, or log.^ing railways, .poultry or stock cars, 
J ■ - private, car. . J-iiies;,., dining, parlor, pullman, refrigerator, or 
tank cars. ' ,- 
Lessors of railroads or railways. 
012. Water transportation and related industries. Bay, lake, ocean, 

river, or sound lines; barges, ferries; tugs; canals; sluiceways; 
:. boomage, contracting, marine railways, salvaging or marine wrecking; 

pier leasing; piloting; stevedoring; towing; wiiarfing. 
' • Lessors of water transportation facilities. 
013.: Aerial transportation, aviation schools. 
014. Auto bus lines and street railways (where not operated by' electric- 

.light companies, see 018). 
015v Taxicabs, auto touring, sightseeing companies, renting cars (with 
'■''■ b'r without drivers). 

016. Cartage and storage. Safe deposit vaults (when not in connection 

with banking) ; warehouses; cotton baling, comprfessing, ginning, 
:■ , ■■'shipping, storing, or v/arehouse packing; drayage or delivery service; 
■ freight handling; general merch;indise shipping or storing; loading 
and transporting sand or gravel (not production, pe.e.^Op?) local or 
long-distance express; teaming, trucking. • -;.':!.'^--- "' ■:"'..''''^ 

Other local transportation and related industries, not elsewhere 
classified. Chutes, etc., freight subways, , etc. 

017. Food storage, packing (not meat packing, see.. 069) ,, and shipping. 

Cold storage; grain elevators; tobacco storage, stock yards; egg 
packing; milk shipping, stock feeding (when not in connection with 
farming) . ■ ,■ ■- 

..,y-r. SECTION. II. OTHBH' PUBLIC UTILITIES' '•'.'• 

018. Electric light and pOY/er companies, hydroelectric companies. 

Combinations of electric light, pov;er, and street railways. 
,,,•:., 'G-as companies, artificial or natural gas. 
-0-19. Tplephpne and telegraph- companies, including mutual .companies. 
020. Radio broadcasting companies. 

021.. Public titilities- not-; elsewhere classified. Burglar or fire alarm 
■ .stations,' pipe line s-^ terminal .stations, toll bridges , .toll roads; 
garbage o.r sewage disposal; irrigation with permanen'fc tnaintenance; 
sanitary drainage; steam-heat-, supply; street cleaning; street light- 
ing. 

Water conrpanies. 

Lessors of other public utilities. 



9854 



DIVISION E. THADilS 

SECTION I. WH0L33ALE THADS 

(All concerns trading, in lorgtg quantities as jofjers or dealers are 

{generally considered wholesale -unless otlierwise indicated on the return. 
.Concerns which are Loth wholesale and -retail are to oe included as 
wholesale concerns, ^iflaolesale manuf actui'ers are to he classified in 
the raanufa-ctioring group to which they helong.) 

022. Chemicals, drugs, and allied products, virholesale. Chemicals 

(industrial), dyestuffs, dyes, dry-cleaning supplies, and allied 
products, exj.losives, inse'cticides, naval stores, other chemicals, 
drugs and drug sundries,'' patent medicines, ruhber goods (druggists'), 
sanitary supplies, etc, whisky, other alcoholic heverages, paints, 
varnishes, lacquers, and enamels; toilet articles, toilet prepara- 
tions. ' 

023. Dry goods and apparel, wholesale. Clothing and' furnishings (men's 

and hoys', whomen' s and children's; second-hand), furs and fur 
clothing, hats and caps, hosiery, knit goods, millinery arjd milli- 
nery supplies, huttons, gloves, laces and emhroideries, notions 
(general line), tailors trimmings and supplies, cotton goods, s^ay 
goods, linens, piece goods (general line), rayons, silks and vel- 
vets, v;oolens and v/orsteds, shoes and other footv/ear, and other 
dry goods and apparel.- '■■..■ 

024. Food products, wholesale. Confectionery., soft drinks, "butter, cheese, 

ice cream, milk and cream, eggs, poultry, fish -and sea foods (fresh 
and cured) ,, fruits, produce,' vegetahles-, lard,- meats (fresh and 
cured), meat products, -and other food products. 

025. Autbmo'tiV'g--";, Wholesale. AtitomShiles (new and used), motorcycles, 

trucks and tractors, automohile accessorifes, . automo "Bile .equipment , 
automobile parts (new and used) , tires- gnd tuhes, and other automo- 
tive supplies. ■• ' ,-'-'■''' 
026,. Fetroleumk and petroleum products, wholesale. Crude and fuel oil, 
gasoline and naphthas, lubricating oils and greases, aid other 
petroleum and petroleum products. - ' 

027. All other concerns, wholesale* Amusement and sporting goods, elec- 

trical equipment, farm .supplies, forest .products , furniture and 
house f -urni shings , hardware,- ii^n arid steel scrap, jewelry and 
optical goods, machinery, equipment and supplies, metals and min- 
erals, paper and paper products, pluijibing and heating equipment 
and supplies, tobacco and tobacCo products,' and all other commodi- 
ties not specifically classified, (junk) 

028. Commission— wholesale and/or retail agents. Purchasing, selling, 

manufacturers: Ticket agents, auctioneers, brokers, commission 
merchants, factors. (Not including. stock brokers and other finance 
brokers, see 059.) ' ', : 

SECTION II. HETAIL , ■ • ' 

029. Groceries, retail. Combination 'Stores, groceries and meats, grocery 

stores without meats, meat markets, fish markets, sea foods, etc. 



9854 



SECTION II. H3TAIL (Continued) 

030. Other food groups, retail. 

Milk dealers, retail. Dairy products stores, egg and poultry, 

milk dealers, iDutter and cheese, etc. 
Others, retail. Delicatessen, hal-ceries (including the talcing of 

pastery, etc., v/here the products are sold on the premises), candy 

and confectionery, rn^ts, coffee, tea, spice dealers, hottled soda 

and "beverage dealers. . • 

031. Automotive group, retail. ... 

Motor vehicle dealers, "retail. New- and used-car dealers, automo- 
hile salesrooms, farra-machinery dealers, trucks, tractors, automo- 
. ' "bile "bodies, trailers, etc. 

Gnrages. Storage garages, parlcing stations and lots, repair shops, 
"body, fender, and paint shops. 
Filling stations. G-asoline and oil. - 

' Others. Auto;no"bile accessories, tires and "batteries. ■ Aircraft 
and accessories, "boats and accessories, motorcycle and "bicycle 
dealers. 

032. Department stores (with or without food departments). 

033. Variety, 5— and 10-cent stores, including all limited price stores. 

034. Other general merchandise stores. 

Dry-goods and piece-goods stores. 

General merchfuidise, army and navy stores, women' s .exchange, etc. 
, -Mail-order -houses, including mail-order retail stores, . 

035. Apparel. ' '" .. ".,..,■ , . 

^Vomen* s . ready-to-v;ear and accessories. Blouses, corsets and 
lingerie, furriers, hosiery, knit goods, ^millinery, .costume ac- 

■ cessories, umhrellas, etc, . :: - -, ■ ■ ,. •-••■ • 

Men's and' "boys' furnishings,, ■',Clo'ih;ing stores," hsts, furnishings, 
etc. . . 

Shoes. Men's, women's, and children',s. 
■Others. Family clothing stores, .children '.s specialty -shops, in- 
fants' wear, etc. ,,!.-;, 

036. Furniture and household. . .. .-. ,.^ . 

■ Furnlt-ure. Ftirnit-ure, floor coverings, drapery, curtains, etc. 
Others. Household appliances,, refrigerators, alumin-umv^/are, antique 

dealers, "brushes and "brooms, china, glassware, crockery, tinware, 
' enamelware, picture frames, sto-yes and, ranges, lariips, interior 

decorators, ladders, radio, music stores, furniture cuid undertakers, 

etc., see also 053. ' • _ • 

037. Cigar stores aiid drug stores. 

038. L-am"ber and''building materials, ■ retail.,, L'um'ber and "building material, 

lum"ber and hardware, and. roofing detilers, other retailers of "build- 
ing materials ("brick, stone, cement, etc.), electrical shops (with- 
out radio), heating appliance and oil-"burner dealers, pl-umbing shops 
(heating and ventilating), glass and mirror shops, and paint and 
glass, and hardware stores. 

039. Other retail trade. Book stores,, coal and wood, .florists, gifts and 

novelties, jewelry, luggage and leather goods, news dealers, office, 
school and store supplies, opticians and optometrists, sporting 
goods, scientific and medical instruments, miscellaneous. Feed and 
grain. 



9854 



_ 109 „■ 

DIVISIOi^T F. SEIlVIGJil 

• SZCTIOIT I. DC:.i:]aTIC SEIWICE 

Code 

040. Laundries. Steaming, di\^- cle.'^iin^:, dvein;,- (not textile dyeing, 

■ see 08l) ; coat or towel service (all t;^3es, hand laundry, povrer 
laundry, etc.). (llot including tailor shops where cleaning and 
dyeing is done, see 043.) 

041. Hotels, apartment houses, office buildings - see 030. 

042. Hestaurants, lunchrooms; caharets; ice-creniQ parlors; teahouses; 

etc.; catering, tap rooms, beer gardens, etc. 

043. Other domestic service, beauty jjarlors; turkish baths; house or 

vdndow cleaning; barbers; shoe shining; hat reblocking; shoe repair 
shops; end. tailor shops, including custom tailors. 

SECTIOlJ II. Ai USSivHMTS 

044. Theaters or theatrical organizations, legitimate; vaudeville theaters; 

choruses, etc.; burlesn-ae. 

045. Motion-picture producers and film laboratories (not including 

photographers, or photo finishing, see 053). 

046. Motion-picture theaters. 

047. Other amusements. Amusement parks; bathing beaches; billiard or 

pool rooms; boYfling alleys; circuses; coimty fairs; dancing pavi- 
lions; golf links; hunting lodges; race tracks (book malcing) ; 
recreational camps; roller coasters; shooting galleries; skating 
rinks; other pleasure resorts. 

S3CTICI-I III. PROFSSSIOML SiaVICS 

048. Curative. Asylums; clinics, clinical laboratories; curative baths., 

hospitals, sanitariums, X-rny laboratories; chiropodists; chiro- 
practors; Christian Science practitioners; d^entists, dental lab- 
oratories; electrolyzers, oxodomists, oculists, otologists, osteo- 
paths, orthopedists, pathologists, physicians, surgeons, veteri- 
narians, psychiatrists. 

049. Educational. Chautauquas, colleges, educational camps, cpj-np direc- 

tors; libraries, museuins, universities, schools; china painting; 
artists (including coihraercial artists), lecturers, musicians, 
sculptors, translators, tutors, educational foundations, and re- 
search foundations.' 

050. Engineering. Scientific or mechanical experimentation or research; 

prospecting, exploring (not including exploring or prospecting for 
petroleuin, see 006); engineers — .agricultural, architectural, civil, 
chemical, consulting, electrical, mechanical, marine, military, 
mining, or public-utility engineers; draftsmen, inventors, ^aetall- 
urgists, surveyors. 

051. Legal. Liquidating companies (do not confuse with companies in 

liquidation which are to be coded for their respective business) ; 
abstracting; adjusting insolvent estates; conveyancing; searching 
titles; administrators, attorneys-in-fact, claim agents, executors, 
guardians, lawj'-ers, patent attorneys, or solicitors; receivers, 



trustee 



'>S. 



9854 



- :iio - • 

SECTIOiJ IV. i3UoI:>fE33 SERVICE 
Code 

052. Business or coroorate riaii.'i.'ienient ; credit or protection "biireaus; 

o^etective 'btu'-eatis; e:Tiplo;':Tient agencies; letter or mailin^^ agencies; 
mercantile agencies; police patrol of "buildings (watchmen); trade 
shoviTs; advertising and selling advertising space; till posting; 
equipping and. maintaining electrical advertising signs;- erecting 
or painting signs or biinDoards; raimeOo^raphing, -multi graphing, 
■ puhlishing -directories, time tahles, etc.; supplying press clippings, 
accountants, actuaries, adjusters, appraisers, auditors, husiness 
promoters, collection agents,, efficiency engineers, fiscal ■ agents, 
forvrai'ding or shipping agents, nota ries, ' statisticians, stenographers, 
tj^jists, theatrical agents or hrokers, trade associations. 

SECTIOII V. O'lIIEPu SanVICE i:OT. ELSSVraEIffl CLASSIFIED 

053. Auto camps, "boards- of trade, chamhers of coram.erce, fraternal organi- 

zations, sight— seeing tours (not autos, see 015) , social clubs, .tr 
tract societies; cemeteries, crem<ato'ries, iinder'-t'-aliing, estaolishment 
(undertaking in combination with trade, 'code for' trade) ; hlueprijitersj 
concessionaries of amasenent's,' cloala-odrn and refreshments privileges; 
confidential a.gent'j; craftsmen, evan.. ;e lists ,'photogr'aphers,' technical 
experts, hlaclcsmiths. ' , •'' - 

054. Publications -services;; authors, cartoonists, -fashion-.writers, .illus- 

trators, freelance -writers, hev.'spaper djmdieates, press :ass-ociations, 
editors, proofreaders. '■ •' ■' ■ ■■■ 



■■ . DIVISIOli ,a. ?INAi>JC:3 
SECTIOH I . BA^KIIIG ALTO DELATED IlIDUSTEIES 

055. National b.'-nks. ., ' . ' 

056. Sta,te Banks; trust companies (.not natioha.l) . 

SECTIOl-I II. IHSIHAl^'CE COiiPANIES' ■ ^ 

057. Life ins'uraiice, mutual or stock companies," all co'iirpanies doing any 

life-insurance business, including agents. 
Other insurance. Accident, casualty. Credit, fidelity and bonding, 
• fire intorinsurance, liability, marine, mutual, reciprocal, or 
title insurance; mutual benefit associations. 

SECTION III. OTIEH ElilANCE- 

058. Loan companies. Building and loan a-ssociations ; industrial banks 

(Morris Plan banks); loans on cattle, crops, mortgages, real estate 
or wages, combinations of loan v/ith investments or savings; no.te or 
pawn -brokers; commercial-paper brokers; dealers in acceptances. 
Savings banks; general b-nking .lot elsevhere speo'ified, jointstock 
land banks, priv-\te , bf.mkD, etc. 

059. Stock ,=ffld bond brokers; c\rrb dealer-.v, "investment bankers, investment 

brokers, inve-atment trusts. 



9854 



I 



i 



- Ill - 

III. CTLZ ri:"AFC:: (C:..itini.ed) 

Code 

06C. Reai-er.tate end- re j: It / r-.olc.in-^ cOiVJEnies. Reslty ceveloijment, financ- 
ing /ro.jectg; holr.i: ■ or le; ria", inclr.olnj factory ;oroperty or 'builc.ini^.-s; 
realty tirusts; real-estate invertuenta; incoroorated estates; f idiiciaries; 
colonization of fanii lands; concessions for the development of n-atr.ral 
resources and for ntlaer ■)rivil3;-,e3 f^ranted liy ^-overnments; real-estate 
Gi'ents and orokers. 

061. finance not elsewnere classified. Financial cle^'rin"; hoi'.scs; stock 
exCiian^,es ana commodity excnanjes; stock syndicates; lorei ii cxcliE,n^e; 
co.iipanies holc'in,™ fonaulas, patents, sec.irities or stock, licensing 
•latents; custoiii-iuuse 'orokers; lea'Hc bro^cers; dealers in oil leases or 
roy.^lties; dealers in lutiires — coffee, cotton, sugar, etc.; financial 
,)roiaoters, financing; tke retail sale of ar.tomooiles, furniture, pianos, 
radios, etc. 

DIVI3I0i>' K. iJilM.rAC5^'Iiir& 

3ECTICF I. FOOD Al'D riMiSLS FEOD'XTS 

062. Jevcra^es. Hoot beer, .in'::er ale, carbonated ocveraT^es, coca cola, 
^rape jiiice, etc. (F^t : :-cluc.i; ;■ to..iato ju.ice, cr-nberry juice, or kraut 

■juice, (see 073), nor the bottling of sprin/j water ( r,ee 002), nor v/ines, 
cordials, or wM skey (pee 109).) 

063. Cereal beverages, beer an-d "near tei r. " 
06-'. ■ ISrero. and ot;ier bakery rocucts. 

Breac, biscuit, crackers, a-etzels, rie-^, ca""e3, etc. 
06^. 3o-tter. 

06b. Confectionery (not inclV'-din-; cccoiaite bul. cocoa pi'oducts, see 074). 
Candies of all kinds, stick licorice, corn balls, salted nuts, etc. 

067. Flo^^r and other grain iaill orocuctcj (not inclLiCdn^- feeds, prepared, 
for animals and fowls, see OVd). '..lieat, corn, rye, buckwheat, rice, 
and barley, flour aiid mesl , ,crrcl-:ed corn, shorts, middlin,7;s, feed 
for livestock, etc. 

068. Ice creaai. "jVater ices, skeroerts, chocolate covered ice cream, etc. 

069. Meat Packing. This classification covers establishments en-:aged in 
both slaughtering cattle, ho.;;:s, sheep, or other animals and preserv- 
ing all or a part of the ran stock by canning, salting, smoking, or 
othenvise curing it for the trade; establishmients which purchase 
raw stock- from slau hterhouses and ,jreserve it; inclades lard. 

070. Sugar, beet. 

071. Sugar refining-, cane. Tiiis clasciiication embraces establisbnents 
eng-ged wh.olly or mainly in reiininr'; raw cane sugar, practically 
all of which is imported. 

072. Cannin;; and preserving: Fish, crabs, shrimps, oysters, and clams. 
Cainned, pickled, smoked, and dried fish, and canneo crabs, lobsters, 
shrimps, oysters, and clam.^. (Does not cover establislments engaged 
solely in shx^cking oy^^ters, see 002.) 

073. Canning an( ireserving: Friits and vegetables; pickles, jellies, 
preserves, and. sauces. Canned and preserved imiits and vegetables; 
processed and dried friits and ve;-etaoles; preserves, Jellies, 
pickles, sauces, dres'-iin :3, catsup, prepared iuustard, etc. 



9Cd4 



- 112 ~ 

SSCTIOII I. FOOD AJffi lai^HSD PHODUCTS (Continued) 
Code 
074. All other food products. 

Cereal preparations. Cereal Drea2cfa-t foods, hominy, cracked wheat, 
rolled oats, hulled corn, self-risinA' flour, cereal, coffee substi- 
tutes, etc* 

Coffee and spice, roastin,"; and grindinj^. 

Corn sirup, corn su^ar, corn oil, and starch. Corn sirup; corn sugar; 
corn, whe.-jt, potato, and root starch; corn oil; corn oil cake and meal; 
etc. 

Cheese. 

Condensed and evaporated milk. Condensed milk, evaporated milk, 
pov/dered milk, suj.;ar of mill:; dried casein (not plastic) . 

Chewing ^^urn. 

Chocolate and cocoa products, not including confectionery. 
Chocolate, cocoa, cocoa "butter, "broma, and other products of the nut 
of the cocoa tree. 

Feeds, prepared, for :miinals and fowls. Feeds yjrepared from ground 
grain and other ingredients such as alfalfa, molasses, hone meal, 
etc.; ground oj''ster shells. 

Flavoring extracts and flavoring sirups. Flavoring extracts, pastes, 
and pov/ders; colors for ba!:ers and confectioners; flavoring sirups; 
crushed fruits for soda-fountain use. 

Food preparations, not elsevhere cl- ssified. All food preparations 
for human consumption which rire not classifiable in any of the other 
industries in the group. Blended nnd compounded sirups for tatle use; 
peanut "butter; prepjarations such as mincemeat, potato chips, and plum 
and fig puddings; raalted-milk products; ice-cream cones, etc. 

Ice manufactured. Ice manufactured for sale. 

Shortenings (other th;ui lard, see 059), vegetable cooking oils, and 
salad oils. Shortenings compounded of "both animal and vegeta'ble oils 
and fats and those made of vegeta"ble oils only; vegetable cooking oils 
and vegetable salad oils. 

Macaroni, spaghetti, vermicelli, and noodles. 

Malt. Malt, made chiefly from barley but to some extent from other 
grains. 

Oleomargarine .and other margarines, not made in meat-packing establish- 
ment s . 

Peanuts, walnuts, and other nuts, processed or shelled. Bleached and 
shelled vralnuts; polished pecans; graded and shelled peanuts; etc. 

Poultry killing, dressing, and packing, vfholesale. 

Rice cleaning and polishing. 

Sausage, meat puddings, headcheese, etc., and sausage casings, not made 
in meat-packing establishments. 

Sugar, cane, not including products of refineries. Tliis classification 
covers all establisiiments engaged T^rimarily in the manufacture of 
sugar (raw or refined), molasses, :md sirups, from cane. 

Vinegar and cider. 



3854 



- lis ~ 

SSC2IG:T II. TEXTILES AIJD THEIH PHODUCTS 

075, Carpets and ru^rs, vool, other thaii rag. Carpels and riigs made chiefly 

of wool, and "'isuallj with a jute, cotton, or linen hack. This in- 
dustry does not inclr.de '■■i:e, inanuf actiire of rr-.g, cotton, or ,,'ute car~ 
nets and rvig", or floor coverings of grass or reeds, 

076, Clothing (including vrork clothing except shirts, see 035), men's 

youths', and hoys' not. elsewhere classified. 

077, Clothing, wcr.en's, not elrewhere classified, Women's, misses', girls', 

and infants' suits, drer.sc-s, coats, cloaks, skirt?*, hlouses, shirt- 
v/aists, undergarments, X'f^'^'''^'icosts, scarfs (except hjaitted), neclc- 
vear , etc. 

078, Corsets and allied ,;i-arments. Corsets, hrassieres, bandeaux, comtina- 

tions, girriles, coropt stays, etc. 

079, CottoR goods ,. All kinds o"!' nlain and fr-ncy wovjn f aorics, in the 

piece or othor-A-ise; cottc-^ felts; and yarn, thread, cotton waste for 
sale, 

080, Cotton small wares, l^arro'-v woven fahrics, and hraids of every des- 

cription. Woven 'beltin:^ and hose, elastic and non-elastic v/el:"cing, 
tape, trimnings, ed^;in(S,v; , tindings, shoe laces, corset laces, "icks 
and wi eking, obc, 

081, lyeing and finishing ter.tiles. Bleaching, dyeing, printing, merceriz- 

ing, spooling, warping, vdnding (e;:cept silk and rayon warping and 
winding), etc, piece «;o">up, yarn, stock," etc., of cotton, wool, 
silk, or other ter.tile fib'^r. 

082, Fu-nishing goods, T.en's, not elsewhere classified, ITeckiffoar; celts; 

other than leatiier; crith r:>oes; lounging garn;ents; sleeping garments; 
underv;ear; etc. 

083, -Men's shirts and collars. Shirts of cotton, Ijnen, wool, silk, rayon, 

etc., shirt horonr-., and ^hirtwais-ts for men and hoys; work shiits. 

084, Hats, far-felt. Stiff and soft hats and hat bodies made chiefly from 

hatters' fur, for r.en, v.-o'nen, and children, 

085, ICnit goods. Hosiery, unoG^wear, outer-'/err , knii, cloth, ,and all other 

nachine-icnit goods. . 

086, Millinery. Trimnj'^d hat-;, including felt hats made from p^^rchased 

bodies; women's straw hf-'.st hat frames; millinery trimmings (for 
sale as such); infants' heriwear; etc, : 

087, Silk and rayon ma-ufact;ivc3. 

(a) Manufacture of fi^ii -'ivd products; Broad silks i. all-silk, all- 
ra^'on, silk-mixed, .'Uid --'yon-mixed goods), velvets, plushes, "up- 
holstery, tapestries, ribbons, veils, veilings, braids, binaings, 
trimmings, machine twi-t, etc., se\ving, embroidery, and other floss 
silks, 
(b) Throwing^ winding, .and warping of silk and rayon, and the -pinning 
of silk and rayon Y/a^te. 

088, r.oolen and worsted goods. 

All kinds of wov^n fabric-, (except woven felt?), in the piece or 
otherwise, braids, webbing, cords, etc., and yarns and waste for 
sale. 



9854 



- 114 - 

SECTIOIJ II. TSXTILjIS AND THEI?. PZCDDUCrs (Continued) 
Code 
089, All other textiles and their products. 

Artificial leather. All liinds of tirtificial or imitation leather, 

regardless of method of manufacture, materials, or use of finished 

product. 
Asphalted'-fe'lt-base floor covering. 
Awnings i, tents, sails, and canvas covers. 
Bags, other than paper, not r.iade in t Gxtile mills. Meal hags, s^lt 

har-s, guiiny or jute hags, and all other ha^s made from materials 

other than paper. 
Beltin;^' other than leather and ruhber, not made in textile mills. 
Carpets and ru.:;s, rag. 
Clothing, men's, buttonholes. 
Cloth, sponging end refinishing. Sponging ;;Lnd reflnishing cloth on 

contract. (_T^is classification must not be confused with "dyeing 

and finishing textiles.") 
Cordage and twine. Hope, cable, cordage, twine, binder twine, fish 

line, etc., braided or twisted, made from hemp, flax, cotton, 

m.onila, jute, paper, and other fiber. 
Embroideries. Schiffli embroideries and burnt-out laces; bonnaz 

and other hand-machine embroideries; hand embroideries. 
Felt goods, \700l, hair, or jute. Felt goods made of wool,' hair, 

or jute, woven or made by the needle-loom process or by heat, 

moisture, snd pressure. 
Flags and b.nnners. 

Flax and hemp, dressed. Removal of seeds, dross, etc., and prepara- 
• tion of raw flax and heme for factory use. 
Gloves and mittens, cloth or cloth and leather combined, made from 

purchased fabrics. 
Haircloth, 
Handker chi ef s . 
Hat and cap materials, men's. Hatters' fur, sv/eatbands, visors, 

linings, bindings, tri;,amings, tip printing, etc. 
Hats and caps, except fur-felt and straw, men's, (Straw hats, 

see 167; fur-felt hats, see 084.) 
Hats, wool-felt. Ken's, women's, and children's hats and hat 
■bodies, the chief materials of v/hich are wool, wool noils, wool 
■ shoddy, etc. 
Horse blankets, fly nets, and related products. Horse blankets 

made from purchased fabrics, saddle cloths, fly nets, sweat pads, 

etc. 
House- furnishing goods, not elsewhere classified. Comfortables, 

piano covers ixnd. scarfs, carpet linings, raosuuito canopies, port- 

ieve^i, draperies, slip covers of every kind, cushions (except 

spring cushions), hassocks, pillow shams, carpet sweepers, pillows, 

quilts, mops, pincushions, clotneslines (put up from purchased 

line) , and other house-furnishing goods not covered by separate 

classifications. 
Jute goods. Bag,:ing for baling rot ton; carpets and rugs, webbing, 

yarns, twine, etc. 



9854 



115 - 

S3CTI01J II. T3:[TILE3 yilD THSIfi t.RODUCTS (Continued) 
Code 

089. Lace goods. All lace-macliine products, such, rs Noxtingha'^i lace 

curtains and nets, levers, laces, "boboinets, lace bedspreads, 
panels, and other pieces, barmen laces, etc. 

Linen goods. Crash, towels, tov^eling, oivi other linen and cotton- 
and-linen mixed fabrics; ;;arns, thread, etc., in y;hich the material 
of chief value is flex. 

Linoleum. Plain, printed, end inlaid linoleum, and a form of linO" 
leum ImoTi'vn as "cork carpet". 

Mats end matting, grass and coir. Door mats, floor mattings, art 
squares, rugs, and carpets, nade from such materials as vdre grass, 
reeds, and cori (cocoa fiber). 

Nets (fish) and seined. Seines .-md other fish nets. 

Oilcloth, Table, wall, shelf, stpir, and enams-led oilcloth. 

Eegalia, robes, vestments, and badges. Regalia, collegiate and 
judicial robes, gowns, anr' capes; church vestments; badges; lodge 
paraphernalia, etc. 

Wool pulling. Detaching wool from sheepskins. 

Wool scouring. Scoioi'ing, sorting, and carbonizing wool. 

Wool shoddy. Hecovered wool I'iber, loao^ai as "shoddy" "muaigo," 
"flocks" (the result of shearing cloth), end "vrool extract," made 
from rags, waste, noils, tailors' clippings, etc. 

Suspenders, garters, and other elastic woven r':oods, made from pur- 
chased v/ebbing. 

Trimmings (not made in textile mills) find stamper? art goods for 
embroidering. I)i'c-SK and coat trimmings, millinery trimnings, 
tucMngs, pleatings, hem-stitching, bias bindings, crochet goods, 
staiqoed art goods for embroidering, etc. 

Upholstering m/terials, not elsewhere classified. Chiefly materials 
for filling or stuffing upholstery, such as curled hair, moss, and 
tov;. Tnis classif ic:;tion does not cover the manufact-ure of uphol- 
stery fabrics nor of upholstery hardware, springs, etc. 

Waste. Cleaning or . otherwise preparing waste of cotton or other 
fiber by use of picker or similar machine, .and production of wiping 
rags, oalcum, etc. ' • 

S3GTI0N III P023ST PRODUCTS 

090. Furniture (including store and office fixtures). All classes of wood 

and netal furniture, including h2mm.ocks, store and office fixtures, 
show ca':^es, display cases, wall cases, and cabinets. Sewing machine 
cases, cabinets, and tables are classified in tnis industry. 

091. Lumber a:id timber products, not elsewhere classified. Logging camps, 

producing logs, bolts, and rough timber products, such as hevm cross- 
ties, poles, pO'sts, mine tjmbers, wheel and handle stock, excelsior 
stock, etc.; sawmills, producing rough lumber, laths, shingles, 
staves, herding, hoops, veneer stocl:, veneers, and other products 
from logs and bolts. 
Pl£ining--iiiill -nroducto (including ."energl mill'-crk) , not m.ade in plan- 
ing mills connected with snw.nillr'. Dressed 1-ujrber, sash, doors, 
blinds, moldings, panels, v;ood m.antels, brackets, stair '>7ork, door 
and windcv/ fronts, and all classes of general mill\7ork. 



9854 



■ - 116 - 

C92. Tur":)entine nnd rosin. Spirit? of tiiroentine and rosin made "by dis- 

tillptim cf the resincus eradation of the pine tree. (Naval strres.) 
093. A1.1 other forrst products. 

Ijf-E^rets and rattan and --.illow -'are, not including furniture. Has- 
kets of all kinds, including fruit and berry iDPskets and "boxes; 
coffee drums, laiindry hampers; pnd, in general, small articles 
made of veneer, raed, Tattan, and - 1110^7. (Rattan and ■■illow 
furniture is classified under "rurniture", ) 

Billiard and j^ool trhles, bo^jlin;?; alleys, and accessories. Billiard, 
pool, rnd ba;;:atelle tables, billiard cuss and chalk, pool t)Ockets, 
cue tips, pool balls, bo'ling alleys, bo^-ling-alley accessories, 
..etc. 

Boxes, '. ooden. Wooden boxes end' cases; box shocks; trimlc slats; 
cr.'-tes for- btitter, fruits, berries, and ve-^etables; cases for eg,:-;s 
.-^nd canned goods; carrier trays; ' '-/ooden storage-battery boxes; 
fancy boxes cf---ood covered \.'ith cretonne, silk', cigar boxes, etc. 
O-iikets, coffins, burial Cr?ses, and rthermorticians' goods. Caskets 
pnc. coffins, -hether of ^'ood or of metal; burial cases, shipping 
cases; morticians' suiDplies and accessories, such as burial gar- 
ments, gloves and slimiers, casket linings and dro'^eries, ambu- 
Innce bas]cets, doer dra-peries, lo'-'ering devices, couches, embalm— 
ihg tables and erab'-lming fluids. 

Oco-oera;,,e. C&sks, kegs, tierces, bariels, hogsheads, v/ooden tubs, 
tanks, vats,, and similar containers made of staves. (staves, head- 
ing, and hoops — the cooperage stock— are products of the "Lumber 
and tim'ber -oroducts" industry, see 091). 

C.cr": products. Bottle cor^c;s, life preservers, cork board for insu- 
lation, cork ti-i^s, and other articles made of cork. 

L]xcelsicr. Excelsior and excelsior p;;ds, '-.'rappers, etc. 

L'sts and related "orcducts. Lasts for boots and shoes, shoe- 
troes,.shoe stretchers, aisnlay forms for boots and shoes, etc. 

Matches. 

Liirror and picture frames. Prarrios and finished picture moldings, 
chiefl;'- of ood, for mirrors, pictures, photographs, and medallions. 

Pul-2 goods and molded ■ccmpositi'n products. Vul canized fiber; pr'"- 
ducts pressed or 'nolded from vu]-canized fiber, from plastic com-oosition 
(phenolic resins and similar plastics), from asphalt compositions, 
and from pulp. 

Ilefrigeratcrs and refrigerator ca'binets, exclusive of mechanical re- 
fri;^'erating equipment. Sef rigerators, ice boxes, and refrigerator 
sho\7 cases, counters, and cabinets; ^-'ater coolers; cabinets for me- 
chanical refrigerators made for sale as such. This classification 
does, net cover mechanically-operated (electric) and heat-operated re- 
frigerating equip-inent or tmits for commercial or household use, nhich 
are clrssified in the "Refrigerators, mechanical" industry, see 155; 
nor ice-making raachinerj'' for use in ice factories, \Thich is classi- 
fied in the- "Po-undry and machine-shorj products" industry, see 149. 

ITin-do" and door screens and ''■eathor strip, ■..'indoi? screens, door 
screens, and ■ eataer strip, irrespective of the, material used. 

I7ood preserv,.i-:v,.- -treatment cf 'food to -orevent decay and for pro- 
tection a-ainst fire, vrorras, etc. 
- ■^Jocd turned and shaped and other -'ooden goods, not elsewhere classi- 
fied. Bobbins, boT'ls, bungs, brush blocks, dowels, handles, mar- 
quetry, cars, rollers, rolling pins, spools, picker sticks for 

9854 






. looms, and v.c'«he.r turned and shoped wooden nrticles and -rood cPr- 
inrs; &lsc miscellaneous articles such as \rcoden dishes, trays 
meat hoards, tocthnichs, T.73shhcards, clothespins, ironing hoards 
and t.'ihles, frrain measures, tailors' pressing hlocks, flagpoles, 
masts and spars, ladders, etc. 

sicoTicN IV. .Piipsa iuro ^lied fhobucts ■ 

094. Boxes, paper, not elsewhere classified. Plain and metal-edged 

ho::es, made of paper, ne"<,shoard, or csrdhoard, for confectionery, 
m.illinery, cigarettes, lunches, druggists' preparations, silver- 
\.are, etc. 

095. Pulp (ncod and other f iher. ) Wood pulp, mechanical and chemical; 

ether p-ulp. Establishments making wood flour are classified in 
this industry. 
Pa-oer. All kinds of Tapper and -oaper hoards, such as nerrsprint, 
hook, cover, writing, wrapping, tissue, ahsorbent, and huilding 
papers. Ccnverted-ftaper' products made in r)aper mills are to he 
included in this classification. An independent factory making 
crnverted-paper products: should he given its specific classifi- 
cation, most of T'hich fall under 096, 

096. Sill other, paj^er products. 

Dags, pener, exclusive of those made in i^apcr mills. (See 095.) 

Cardhoard, 'not made in paper mills. 

Cfrd cutting and designing. Je^-elers' cards; index cards for 
ofx'ice and library cahinets; Jacquard cards; fancy cards; stencil 
cards for addressing machines; photograph mats, mounts, and 
folders; cardhoard lanels and foundations; etc. 

Envelops. 

Paner goods, not else- -here classified. Crepe naper; surface- 
coated paper; glazed, vaxed, oiled, waterproof, and corrugated 
paper; tar, fly, and toilet ijaper; paper lace, cigarette paper; 
playing cards, confetti; milk-hottle caps, etc. (Not including 
paper patterns see.Q97.) 

V/all -oaper. Establishments engaged chiefly in designing patterns 
and printing paper to cover interior Falls and ceilings. (The 
paper itself, designated as "•\iiu.i'ing paper" , is made in paper 
mills.) ■ ■ 

■ SECTION V. PRINTING, PUBLISHING,- AND ALLIED INDUSTRIES 

©97. Printing and publishing, hook and job. Establishments engaged 

primarily in (a) job printing; (h) printing and publishing books 
and pamphlets; (c) publishing, but not printing, books and 
pamphlets; (d) linotype ' ork or typesetting; (e) printing paper 
patterns, frshion plates,- etc.; (f) labels and tags. 

098. Printing and publishing, ne^.-js-oaper and periodical. Establishments 
engaged lorimarily in preparing, printing, and publishing, o.r in 
preparing and publishing but not printing ne'^gpapers and periodi- 
cals. Some of these establisiments also do job printing; but 
establishments engaged primarily in job printing sho-uld be classi- 
fied -under Printing and publishing , book and job. 



9854 



3i:CfI0:" V. PRIFTirG, PUBLIS'^'Ira, i'D JiLLIllD i:'Er;:3xEIZ": (GOl'T-'D) ^ 

C99. All other printim; rr.C ..aiblishiiv.; ':rid rdliea ini",U!r fries. Bookbinding 
end ■blrnd-book in^lcin/^. "Joolctindin;^ end' blank- jo ok making; embossing; 
book '^ildin^'; .3';..'er i^^ling; ueuer c\-.ttin:-;", card, book, rnd i-jaoer 
ed','in'-!;; crrd bevelin,^ f-nd ,;ronzln ;; sr.Utole-.cr.rO. mov.ntin^5; etc. 

Bn^rtvers' materials. Co;.p£r, zinc, steel', pnd" othtr nretf 1 -plctes 
for engravers' -use; wood blocks for use in wood en^-raving and photo- 
en .Tf-'vir.:;;; lit'iOfjrruhic ^t^nes; etc. • ■• ^ 

Sn_,rpving (other than steel, cop ..er .Ic-te, or v/ood) , chasing, etchinf;, 
rnd diesin^cing (not including heiid stamps and stencils' snd''br;-^hc"s, 
see 16?). iingr.:ving, classing,, f.nd , etching on jewelry r?nd silvt- rwr^re, 
not: rial seals, fancy iuetrls, etc., for punoseR other than printing; 
cdesinking. '' 

Sngr<?ving, steel, co , .lerplate, raid "ood, and pl-rte printing, Engrsving 
and etching on steel r.nd. copper pl£.t.es and printing- from -such plates, 

Litnogrr.phing. . Zst.-rblisbTients engaged ■jriiaarily in T;hDt.o- lithographing, 
in lithographing on p;,per, tin, etc; , and in di'cwing or transferring 
der.i.p-is or preparing :itones or ;"ilates .v.seC in' litho:^raphin'T, 

Phot'ongraving,, not done in irinting est' blisluiients. , Pliotogr'^vures 
rnd sirnils.r trinsier work. ■ ', 

Printing'' materials (not including ini-c, see lOS). Composing rules fJid 
sticks, mcllets, pl.-nes, Shases,, quoins, .type crses, galleys, printers'- 
rollers, blocks, olate hooks, loc]:ipg devices, etc. 

Printing and lA^bli'shing, inasic.' Books of ynusic. and sheet music. 

Sterotyping anc elsctroty 'ing, not r.one in ;.u'intin''; e'-^t?blishments. 

Type founding. Type, bras rules, leads,, slugs, etc. 

SECTio^'" VI. c^'::.iGAL3 atj uj-iid :^noircTS :■■ 

100. Che':iicals, not elsewriere cir s^'ifi'^d. ' ■ _; 

All cheirdcfls except tjiose prodx^.ced in incustri^s such as those 
specified below f.re grouiedATider seven heads, na'nely: ,(l) Acids. 

(II) i'Titrogen cor.ioounds, incli-din;; aini-Iohium .end cyanogen compounds. 

(III) Sodiwn compound';. (IV) Pot--''5'^i-'Jj:n com irtunds, including potash 
from ori:;;inaI sources. (V) Coal-t?r ciUL.es, ihtenviediates,- and 
finished corl-tar products- (dyes, color, Irkes, .'hotograohic' chemicals, 
meddcinpls, flavors, jerfume materials, synthetic tcnnin-g-materials, 
phencdic resins, etc. ) . (Vl) G-enerrl inorgrnic coio.pounds, in-- 
eluding a 1 ■cams and the various -s: Its anc, compounds of met-rls (antimony, 
arsenic, copper, gold, iron, etc.), rare earths, etc. {'^I-lt) G-eneral 
organic Compounds stic.j las smyl, butyl, and. et?iyl acetates; acetone; butyl 
and other alcohols, not including etnyl <--lco.uol nor mL-thc'nol (wood alcohol) 
produced by the distillation of wood; crirbon chemicals (bisulphide, 
tetrechloride, etc. ); ether; ethylene glycol; othyl chloride; glycerin; 
cosein, pyroxj-din, . and other plr sties; ictraethjd lesd; . vrnillin, etc. 

101. Drug\dsts' preparations,- Seru.ms, vaccinas, and toxins; capsules (filled 

or emptjO . tablets, pdlls, tinctures, meuicinal plasters, covigh sirups, 
ointments, and other phannacerdic'als. 

102. Explosives (not incli'.ddiig EKununition end. detonating caps, etc. , which 

are included in all other c-emical products see 109). Blasting pov.'dcr, 
gunpowder (blac^c), nitroglycerin, d.^'nam.ite, guncotton or ijyroxylin, 
smokeless powder, ■ful.ain.nting mercury,, p.ermis.siole explosives, etc. 



9854 



-119- 
SEGTIOII TI. CH3i;iCALS AilD ALLIZD PRODUCTS (CO"TT'D) 

103. Fertilizers. Supenilios-oliates froui minerals, oones, etc; ammoniated 

fertilizers, comolete fertilizers, ficli scrnn, etc. 

104. Oil, cake, aiid meal cottonseed. Cottonseed oil, either cr-ade or 

refined, and sucli "byn-odwcts as meal and c:^ke, Iralls, linters, and 
^ratlDots. 
195.. Prints and varnisnes. Colors and -■ assents , -aaints in oils, ready- 
mirced -laints, y-iater -saints, kal'souiine, stains, fillers, iiutty, 
varnislies, JaDans., lacq.uers, etc. 

106. Rayon and allied -oroducts. Hayon and allied iDroducts in yarn, in 

sheet, or in other form. Rcjon textiles are classified under 
Silk and rayon manufactures. 

107. Soai-i. Hard, soft, cake, Dar, powdered, liquid, and other soaps, ajad 

shaving creams. 

108. PetroleuiTi refininj:. 

109. All other chemicals and allied products. 

Alcohol, ethyl, and distilled linuors. Ethyl or ^;rain alcohol, in- 
cluding denat-ured v;ines, cordia.ls, and v/hisi;:;/. 

Ainmutiition and related -products . Ami.:[unition for small arms and 
artillery; also fr.zes, hlastin-, and detonating caps, miners' 
squihs, naval and railroad ton:)edoe3, fog and danger signals, etc. 
(Dynamite and other ejnlosives for agricultural use and "cartridges" 
for use in oil wells are cl- ssified under Ex-ilosivea, see 102. 
Baking DcMers, yeast, and other leavening conipo;ands.. 
Blacking, stains, and dressings. Blacki-\,s, wi-xes, stains, dress- 
ings, and i3olishes for leather, hoots and shoes, harness, and belt- 
ing; stove polish; hurnishing inks; dressings for aiitomooile tops, 
etc . 

Bluing. Laundry hluing,, soluhle and liquid, aniline blue, etc., 
made principally from indigo aaid Prussian blue.. , ' 

Bone black, cai'bon black, and lacipblack. 

Candles. Candles made of spermaceti, paraffin, v.'ax, tallow, stearine, 
etc. 

Cleaning and -polishing -■ reparations. Pre-iarations for cleaning and 
polishing furniture, floors, wall vaper, gloves, and other werring 
apparel, metal ware, and cars; automobile body -polish; paint and var- 
nish removers; rust and stain removers; wrshing, ironing, sv.'eeping, 
and scouring .comjTOunds; Ipuiidry tablets; floor v/ax; eyeglass and wind- 
shield cleaners; co-^per cloth; steel v;ool, etc. 
Coke, not including gas-house coke. 

Comi^ressed and liquefied gases. Acetylene (when sold in containers), 
chlorine, hydrogen, nitrous oxide (laughing gas), ox^'-gen, sulphur di- 
oxide, and other gases, compressed and liquefied. 
Dr-ug grinding. Establishments eng-ged in grinding drugs of all 
kinds, sometimes laiown as "dr^ug millers." 

Fireworks. Display fireworks of all kinds, such as air and toy 
torpedoes, bombs, shells, V'/heels, torches, rocke'ts, colored fire 
sparkles, and firecrackers. 

Fuel: Briquettes. Briquettes and boulets made from anthracite culm, 
bituiainous slack, peat, etc., mixed with tar or pitch as a binder; 
charcoal briquettes; ;owdered fuel. 

&lu,e and gelatin. Glue (flexible and liq-aid), gelatin, and glue 
jelly or paste, derived fron hides, fleshings, and fish. 
Ink, printing. Printing and lithographing inks. 
Inlc, writing. V/riting ink aiid fluids, idelible ink, etc. 
Lubricating oils and greases, not made in petroleum refineries. 
Lubricating oils, not made in petroleum refineries; axle grease and 
9354 other hard and soft lubricating greases. 



SECTIOII VI. CHEIICALS AND ALLIED PHODUCTS (COirT'D) 

Liucilage, -nrste, raid other adiiosives . 

Oil, c^lze, and rae;;^!, linseed. Linseed oil, made iVnm flaxseed, 
and such b^oroducts as flaxseed cake and meal. 

Oils, essential. ■Vr)l,?tile oils from -ilantc, ^uch as pcrpToermint, 
spearmint, sa safr-,s, v.intprjre-'n, clove, lemon, aniseed, bergauiot, 
lavender, orajn ;e, iDatchnuli, 'vitch hazel, etc 

Oils', not elsevhere clar;sifird. C stor oil, coconut oil, i:)eanut 
oil, fish oils, etc. 

Patent or proprietary medicines -I'A coiri'TO'ands. 
-Perf'OJ.ies, cosmetics, and other toilet ire'oarations. Coloj.ie, 
toilet v/ater, face iiowders, w hes and lotions, hair tonics, shin 
e;nollients, tooth—Taste "lowder, '^oaj rui.^., etc. 

Tanning raat^-rials, natural dyestu^fs, mordants and assistants, 
and sizes. Oa^;, chestnut, he.Aloch, and other tanning extr'-^cts; 
chroine tannage and other tannin^; materials; natura>l dyest^iffn, of 
logT/ood, fustic, quercitron, etc.; mordcaits, such as tannic r.cid, 
iron li;|uor, etc., ar-sis^ants and sizes - 
'Jood distillaii.ni and chrrcoal ..i."nuf acturing. 

SZCTIOI; VII. PRODUCTS CI PETHOISUi; AID COAL (COIZ^HED -wlTH CHEMICALS) 

(prodiicts of petroleiun an."", coal, usually cla?rified in the Census of lianu- 
factures as group VII, are comoinad ^vith gfouo VI in this classification.) 

S^CTIOil VIII. PdTBBSE ?30Juc:rs 

110. Loots and shoes, ruo'cer. 2ur/oer hoots; overshoes of ruhoer or of 
textile and ruhher; canvas shoes vith ruLaer soles. 

111. Euhher goods other thaxi tires, inner tubes, and boots and shoes- 
(See also sus"Tenders,' garters, and other elastic-woven goods, see 

089.) Rabber belting and hose; balata belting; rubberized fabrics 
and cloth; druggists' and stati-^ners' simdries, such as rubber 
brushes, I'UDber bands, rubber tj-^e, etc.; rubber mats; hard-rubber 
goods; rubber heels and soles; etc. 

112. Rubber tires and inner tubes. Pneunatic tires and inner tubes for 
motor vehicles, motor cycles, bicycles, etc.; solid- and cushion- 
rubber tires for trucks and other vehicles. 

SLCTION IX. ISAK-IDH AIQ ITS ".AIJUFACTUPZHS 

113. Boots and shoes, ot'ier thaxi rubber. 

114. Leather, tannod, curried, nnd finished. 

115. All other leabher oroducts. 

Belting, leather. All kinds of leather belting, used for the trans- 
mission of power. 

Boots and shoe cut stock. Hot made in boot and shoe factories. 
Soles, tips, heels, to-o lifts, inner soles, uppers, etc. : 
Boot and shoe findings, not made in boot and shoe factories. 
Shoe pegs, bov's, clasps, stays, metal tips and heeli^lates, toe caps, 
buckles, boot and shoe laces, heel ca;i.-)s, rands, stajmles, counters, 
shanks, wooden heels, shoe triirjiaings, etc. 

G-loves and uiittens, leather, hen's, boys, \Yomea's, and children's 
leather t>loves and mittens, lined ajid unlined. 

Leather goods, not elsewhere classified. Miscellaneous leather 
products not classified in other industries; for examoles, belts 

S854 



" 121 - 

S3C2I01J IX. LZATHZZ AlTD IPS 1X110;' AC U^^::iS (CCl'T'D) 

(for i"ear on the nerpon.)", IirnfUe?, corners, -aid ctrai?s for lu^^^age; 
dog furnisnin-go; cif^rr rad citjaretto ,c.--ses-, vnnity cases, key cases, 
and leather check-'book covers; dos^-: sets; erribosoed leather and 
"burnt-Leather t>oods; leather v;asher<;,. razor stroiis, etc. 
Pocketbooks,, Piirses, .•^.id cardaases. ..Pocketbooks, bill folds, card- 
C'ses, coin ipurses, woinen's ourse-hand-bapjs, etc. 
Saddler/ aiid harness. Sr^ddlery and iiarts, harness and parts, 
halters, horse boots, turf t:;oods, frcd /ba^jS, etc. 
Trunks, suitcases, and.bn:,£. 

szc?ic:i ::. stche, clay, ai.d glass p?.oduc2s 

116. Cement. Portland cement, hydraulic, fireproof, ajid slag cement, etc. 

117. Glrss- All t.7,:^es of sheet glass for building and other pUrooses, 
pressed and blo\rn glass, and glass containers. Products made of 
purchased glaso are classified under Ihrrors and other, glass pro- 



ducts made of -Tar chased glass, see 12 



113. I.Iar-le, granite, slate, aaid other .stone products. Llon^'ajaents, tomb- 
stones, and other articles for cemetery uses; roofinfj slate, slate 
blackboards, nd other slate ', oi'k; builders' and p lumbers' :narble, 
granite, and other stone \for]'; soa-istone work; all other stone woi-k 
(exce-^t millstones, grind'-.tones, Dulp3t.ones, and hones and whet- 
st'^nes, see l.ll) . 

119. Pottery, including porcelain ware. Stonev-are, red earthenv/are, 
white vfare, china, bone china, delft, Zelleek ware, sanitary v^are, 
etc. 

120. Clay -oroducts (other th-n -:)0ttery) and nonclay refractories. 
Products (e::cc-Tt nottery) of balced or burnt clay, such as oriel-:, 
building and wall' tile, draintile, and similar commodities;- re- 
fractories of ma.terials other than clay; crucibles, both of clay aaid 
of other matferials. . . 

121. All other stone, clay, and glass products. 

Abrasive ifrheels, stones, ■;:ia--ier, and' cloth, and related products. 
Abrasive grinding vheels ; artificial abrasive sticks, stones, and 
bricks; oilstones, scythestones, -^nd o ther whetsones, homes, and 
rubbing stones, either artificial or from natural stone; abrasive 
paper and cloth; buffing and polishing wheels. 
Asbestos products, steam packing and pipe rJid boiler covering. 
Asbestos building materials, 'such as roofing, sheathing, siding, and 
flooring; other asbestos products, sue", as table mats and pads,_ 
holders for flatirons, -^^acking for ice boxes and refrigerating cars, 
antifriction facings aaid linings, aaid ins-'olating material. 
China firing and decorating, not do-.ie in -ootteries. China firing 
and decorating for the trade. 

Concrete •'Dr-oducts. Building blocks, building trimmings, cement 
roofing tile, etc., and o'ther articles, such .as laundry tubs, burial 
vaults, etc., hianirf act"ared from a coiabination of stone or gravel and 
srmd, with cement. 

G-rapnite, ground and refined. The extraction from the ore said the re- 
fining of gra">hite (plumbago or bind; lead).. 
Lime . 

iiinerals and earths, ground or other'-ire treated. Groiond or pulverized 
earths, roeks, and minerals, such as emery, flint, barytes, manganese, 
chalk, talc, feldspar, sandstone, kaoliii, mica, fp.ller's earth, pui.iice 
slate, etc. ' 

9354 



S3CTI01T X. STONE, CLAY, AiO GLASS PRODUCTS (CONT'D) 

Mirrors and other glass products made of purchased glass. 
Mirrors, framed and lanframed; cut, 'beveled, bent, and engraved 
glass; stained an ornamented glass; scientific glass apparatus 
for latoratories, hospitals, druggists, etc; watch crystals; 
laininated glass, etc. 

Sand-lime hrick. Brick made from a combination of. sand and lime. 

Statuar--- and art goods (e::cept concrete).' Statuary, vases, urns, 
brackets, flower boxes, fountains, plaojies, mantels, col-uunns, panels, 
moldings, pedestals, ornamental plaster work, architectural sculp- 
tures, small images, scagliola, and papier-mache articles. 

Wall plaster, wall board, insulating board, rmd floor composition. 
Gypsum plasters, such as unfibered neat plaster and sanded, fibered, 
gaugin:,:, finish, molding, casting, pottery, foundry, terra cotta, 
dental, and plate-glass. plaster ; other ready-mixed plasters, such 
• • as magnesite and portland-cement stucco; plastic paints and other 
orn,amental plasters for interior decoration; gypsum wall board and 
O'ther wall boards not made in paper mills; insulating board not 
made in paper mills; floor composition; etc. 

SECTION XI. IRC'J AlID 3T3ilL AI'D THjI?. PRODUCTS, NOT' IIICLLtDING 

i.;ACHiJEzr 

Code 

122. Bolts, nuts, washers, and rivfets, not made in plants operated in 

connection vdth rolling mills. 

123. Cast-iron piTJo and fittings. Cast-iron gas, water, soil, and other 

cast-iron pipe and fittings, including cast-iron screw fittings. 

124. Cutlery (not including silver and plated cutlery, see 140) and edge 

tools. Imrjlem.ents, which have a cutting edge, t^.'pical examples of 
which are Icnives, razors, scissors, shears, augers, gimlets, planes, 
m^eat choppers, axes, aaid hatchets. Does not include silver, nickel- 
silver, and plated table cutlery, which is clas.sified under "Silver- 
ware and plated ware." 

125. Porgings, iron and steel, not made in plants operated in connection 

vdth steel works or rolling mills. Light and heaYj drop and steanw 
hammer iforgings, such as chains, anchors, axles-, car wheels, frogs, 
etc. 

126. Hardware not elsewhere classified. 

127. Steel works, rolling mills, and blast fui-naces. Sstablishments 

engaged in the manufacture of steel or in the rolling of hot iron 
and steel. Products include steel ingots and direct steel castings; 
rolled iron and steel, such as rails, splice bars, rail joints, bars 1 
and rods, tin-plate bars, wire rods, structural shapes, hoops, bands, 
and cotton ties; Tjlates and sheets, including black plates and sheets 
for tinning; nail and tack 'ol^-.tes; car a;:les, rolled and hammered; 
car wheels; armor plate; gun forgin::s, etc. 

128. Plurabers supplies, not including pipe or vitreous-china sanitary ware. 

Bath and laundry tubs ( enamel ed-iron) , bathroom and lauadry equip- 
ment and fittings of all descriptions except vitreous china and semi- 
vitreous or porcleain (all-clay) plumbing fixtures, which are classi- 
fied -under "Pottery" (see 119); kitchen and pantry sinks, range boilers, 
flush valves, faucets, pipe hangers, and kindred products. 



9854 



- Iii3 - 

SSCTIOH XI. I-IOII MD 3T33L .UJI) TIEIR I10DUCT3, KOT li'TCLUDING 

!CICHI1I3:IY'(CQITT'D). 
Code ■ . . 

129. Steam and hot-water lieatini-';; apparntus .and steam fittings. 

ilot~v7ater and steain heating apparatus, rnd^ators, valves, gages, 
coils, thermostats, etc. 

130. Stoves cind ran^^'es (other than electric) and, v;arm-air ftirnaces. 

All heating and cooking applicnces tising coal, gas, oil, or other 
fuel. These include, among others, he.-sting and cooking stoves, 
ranges, and furnaces; gas fireplaces, logs, and grates; gas and oil 
water heaters; hot>-v;ater tanks; gas pressing irons, hot plates, 
soldering furnaces, etc.; Bunsen hurners. 

131. Structural and ornamental metal Y,'ork, not made in plants operated in 

connection with rolling mills. 

132. Tin cans and other tinware, not else.where classified. Packers'- cans, 

plai-n and decorated tin c^ns, pails, "boxes, and packages; milk cans 
ahd ice-cream cans; steam, -cookers, hoilerg, and household and cooking 
utensils; and other tinware not elsewhere classified. Stamped tin- 
ware is classified under " Stamped, ware, enameled ware, etc.", see 
142. ■' , , •' 

133. Tools, not including edge tools, machine tools, files, or saws.' 

■ Hand tools'of a more' general character th,an cutlery, sav/s, files, 
etc., which are assigned to special classifications. -Aa-nong the 
products of this industry. are hammers, .wrenches, pliers, screw 
drivers-, etc.; hoes, ral-:es, shovels, and f 6rks ; picks and mattocks; 
levels; soldering irons; and a variety of si:iecial tools used hy 
jev/elers, plimbers, stonecutters, iromYorl-;ers, etc. 

134. Wirework, not else-f/nere classified (see also Mattresses and bed 

, springs (see IS?);' v.-ire, drav;n fxom purchased, bars or rods). Pro- 
ducts made of imrchasexl ■■•ire, among v;hich , are woven fencing, screen, 
and wire cloth; barbed ■A'ire and vare^ rope and cable-; wire springs; 
and a variety of small vdre" articles stich as boskets, bird cage's, 
traps, clothes hooks and. hangers, and many other devices- and con- 
veniences. ('»ilire nails and spikes are clasBified under ''Wails, 
spikes, etc.", see 135.) 

135. All other iron and steel, prqducts, not including machinery. 

Doors, shutters, ano window sash ,and frames, molding, and trim, 

: metal. . 

Files. Tlie manufacture and recutting of files and rasps. 

Firearms. Rifles, shotguns, revolvers, pistols, stocks, parts, etc. 

Galvanizing and other coating, not done in plants operated in con- 
nection with rolling mills. G;ilvanizi»ig or coating sheet steel or 
■ iron or formed products with zinc; coating sheet steel or iron or 
formed- products with al-uminum and lead; retinning cans and utensils. 

Sailsi spikes', etc., not m,ade in wire mills or in plants operated in 

. connection with rolliiag mills. . 

Safes'and vaults. Sftfes and. vaults, safe-deposit boxes and chests, 
vault doors and linings, sfe and vaul-fc locks, etc. 

Sav/s. 

Screw-machine products and wood screws. Machine screws and a great 
variety of special parts (most of vfhich are threaded) made on 
"screv; machines", and wood screws. 



9854 



- 124 - 

SECTION XI. I30Jr Aim 3T3SL Al© THEIR PRODUCTS, HOT IHCLUDING 

MAdlli^lY (COLIT'D) 
Code 

135. Springs, steel, except, wire, not iap.de in plants oper',ited in connec- 

tion v;ith rolling mills. Leai' springs — railv/ay, motor-vehicle, 
_. CDXriage. wagon, etc.'; ho t—i.TOuiid springs, railway, and other; flat 
springs, coiled. (Does not include the manufacture of light coiled 
springs, which are prodiicts of the "Wirework, not elsewhere classi- 
fied", industry,, see 134.) 

Steel hprrels-, kegs, and drums. Portable iron >3nd steel barrels, 
kegs, and drums, for shipping and storage purpose. 

Wire, dra?/n itom purchased "bars or rods. 

Wrought pipe, Yi^elded and heavy 'riveted, not made in plants operated 
: in. connection with rolling mills. ■ Wrought welded pipe and hoiler 
tuhes; clinched, .orazed, and heavy riveted pipe. 

3SCTIC:i XII. NOIffERRCUS ivIETALS. Alffi THEIR PRODUCTS 

136. Aluminum manufactures. , 'Aluminum castings, bars, plates, and sheets; 

aluminum, ware, such as kitchen utensils taid household appliances 
(except electric); and othei* aluminum goods, such as specialties, 
airplane part:?:, engine and' machine parts, etc. (The extraction of 
alumintim from the ore is classified in the "Chemicals, not elsewhere 
classified" industry, see- 100.) 

137. Clocks, watches, and materials and parts, except watchcases; time- 

recording devices and tiine stamps. 

138. Jewelry. Rings, pins, bracelets, and chains; .gold triflmings for 

umbrellas, canes, etc.; diamond setting .and mounting, (Gem cutting 
is classified as ."Lapidary vfork" j see 157.) 

139. Lighting equipment. Lighting fixtures and other lighting equipment 

for hones, offices, public buildings, and outdoor use; lamps and 
headlights for motor vehicles, locomotives, etc.; searchlights, 
spotlights, and flood lights; Lamps and lanterns; reflectors and 
shades. (Electric bulbs are classified under "Electrical machinery, 
apparatus, and sujoplies", see- 1-17.) 

140. Silverware cind plated wc-xe. Enives, forks, spoons, and other flat 

ware, hollow ware, toilet wai'e, ornaments, ecclesiastical ware, 
novelties, etc., of solid silver, or metal plated \7ith silver, gold, 
or other metal, or of nickel silver, or of pevfter. Al-ticles plated 
with gold, silver, or other metals; articles made of nickel-silver 
or pewter. 

141. Smelting and refining, copper, lead, and zinc. 

142. Stamped ware, enamel v.'are, and metal stampings; enameling, japanning, 

and lacquering. Stamped and enaLieled sheet metal products of all 
kinds, except those classifiable in "Plumbers supplies" or "Tin 
cans and other tinwar-e" ; perforated m.etals and metal stampings, 
including stamped machine parts; japanning, lacquering, and paint- 
enaneling on bathroom fixtures, bedsteads, motor-vehicle, and bicycle 
parts, sewing machines, -and other machines, typewriters, signs, em- 
blems, ta.gs, gas, and electric fixtures; vitreous enameling house- 
hold and hospital ware, stove parts, etc. 



9854 



SECTIOIT XII. lONFMl^US I.IETiLLS xJID TIffiI3 FHODUCTS (CONT'D) 
Code 

143. Nonferrous metal alloys p.nd pi-oducts, not iiiclxiding aliimimjin pro- 

ducts. Lead, bar, pipe, and sheet; antifriction-TDearing metals; 
type metal; solders; bars .-md rods of brass, bronze, and other 
nonferrous alloys, such az Monel ir^etal and G-erman silver; plates, 
sheets, rods, tubing, castings, and machinery fittings made from 
copper or zinc or from brass, bronze, or other nonferrous alloys; 
various finished products, such as die ca",tin:gs, eztruded shapes, 
car and engine brasses, refinished brajs v.'ork, ' oiling devices, 
hose couplings, stair plates find rods, fenders, screen plates, spun 
metal, bells, etc. Copper ingots are normally products of the 
"Smelting and refining coprer" industry. Establishments engaged 
in the manufacture of wire from purchased bars or rods are classi- 
fied in the '"V/irc; drawn from purchased bars or rods" industry (see 
134) . Establishments enga^jed primarily in the man-ofacture of 
lighting equipment, hardvvare, and pi-umbers' supplies are not to 
be classified in this indixstry, these lines of manufacture being 
covered by separate classifications. 

144. All other nonferrous metal products. 

Collapsible tubes. 

Copper, tin, and sheet-iron work, including gal vani zed-iron vrark, 
not elsev/here classified. Tiie shop production, but not the in- 
stallation of cornices, ventilators, skylignts, gutters, and 
similar sheet-metal v;ork for buildings; the raanufactui^e of sheet- 
m.etal products svich as stovepipe, smokestacks, tanks and bins, 
furnace casings, axi6. other articles of the kind. 

Electroplating. Electroplating, of all descriptions, such as nickel 
plating, silver plating, etc., on a contract basis on articles 
owned by others. 

Fire extinguishers chemical. Portable fire extinguishers, hose 
reels,' and other apparatus (except motor propelled apparatus, 
.. ■ which is classified in the motor-vehicle industry) and appliances 
for fire extinguishing by means o.f chemicals; chemical preparations 
for use with such apparatus and appliances; haad grenades for fire 
extinguishing, ete. 

Gold leaf and foil. Gold leaf anf foil for decorators, sign 
painters, etc. (made by establishments generally known as gold- 
beaters) . . 

Gold, silver, and platinu^i, reducing and refining, not from the ore. 
The reduction and refining or precious metals, chiefly from the 
\7aste and sweepings of factories engaged in the manufacture of 
jewelry, silverv.'are , etc. 

Jewelers' findings and materials. Unassembled parts of jewelry 
(not including gems and stones, see 137), such as balls, beads, 
links, and pinstems; stock-shop prodxxcts (sheets, vdre, and tub- 
ing) . 

Needles, pins, hooks and eygs, and snap fasteners. Machine and 
hand needles, l-oiitting &nd sewing; toilet, hat, and safety pins, 
wire hairpins, etc.; glove fasteners, snap ■ fasteners, slide fasten- 
ers, hooks and eyes, etc. 

Smelting and refining, metals other than gold, silver, or platinum, 
not from the ore. The smelting and refining of scrap metals and 
dross of all kinds. 



9854 



- 126 - 

3ECTI01I XII. IJOIIITEPJIOUS IvlSTALo ,-JD TIISIH PRODUCTS (CONT'D) 
Code 

144. Tin anc. other foils, not incKidini^ gold foil. Tin foil, alumin-um- 

foil and leaf, IjucI foil, etc. 
Vv'atchcases. 

SSCTIOH XIII. IvIACEIlIElTf, HOT IIJCLUDIHG- T3Ai3P03TATI02T . 

S(ciUi pis.it 

145. Agricultvjral implements. Msciiines, usually operated "oy horse or 

other "oower, for plowing, harrovdnj, plantin^^, cultivating, harvest- 
ing, threshing, tjid other operations tnid processes pertaining to 
e^ri culture. 

146. Cash re;i;isters, adrling machines, and calculating machines. 

Adding machines, cash registers and similtur devices, fare registers 
■• and recording lars "boxes, ticket-counting machines, coin changers, 
rotary wage tables , slide rules, and other calculating and comput- 
ing machines and devices. 

147. Electrical machinery, apparatus, and supplies. All classes of 

machinery, apparatus, and supplies for eraplo;.Tnent directly in the 
generation, storage, transmission, or utilization of electric" 
energy. Product.; incluoe el?ctric locomotives, dynsrnos, motors, 
"batteries, transformers, s-.fitchh cards, ptmel boards, cut-out cabi- 
nets, carbons, ai-c and incandescent lairrps, projectors onr'- focusing 
lamps, sockets, transmitters, receivers, lightning firresters, 
rheostats' and resistances, electric welding apparatus, electric 
therapeutic apparatus, switches, • signals, telegraph aiid telephone 
apparatus, fire-alarm apparatus, miscell.aneous electric household 
appliances, etc. 

148. Engines, t^'ai'bines, tractors, water wheels, and '.vindmills. Steam 

engines. — reciprocrting and turbine; interna.l-combustion engines— 
ftiel-injection and carbra-etor t;q-jes; tractors; v.'ster y/heels and 
turbine r; ; vindmi 1 Is. 

149. Foundry and machine-shop products, not elsev.'here classified. 

All products of boiler shops, foundries, and m.achine shops not 
classified in any of the other industries, 

150. Machine-tool accessories .and machinii^ts' precision tools and in- 

str-jments. Attacknents, fixtures, and small tools (chucks, jigs, 
cutters, drills, reamers, taps, etc) for us 6 chiefly with machine 
tools; precision measuring tools (micrometers, verniers, and gages). 

151. Machine tools. Power-driven machines for cutting and shaping 

metals, such as lathes, planers, drilling machines, etc. Machine 
tools tire designed for more or loss general use, as distinct from 
machines desi,;:ned for maiiiifacturing special articles. Portable 
hajid tools (power-driven) for calking, riveting, and driving screws 
are also included under this classification. 

152. Hadio apparatus and phonographs. All kinds of radio apparatus, 

including tubes, for transmitting and receiving; all kinds of 
machines for mechanically recording or reproducing speech, music, 
or other soxuids; combination radios and phonographs; parts and 
supplies, such as mechanical parts, record blanks, and records. 

153. Textile machinery and parts. All classes of textile machinery and 

parts, including machinery for bleaching, d;/eing, printing, mer- 
cerizing, finishing, etc. 

154. T-'pewriters and parts. 

9854 



- 127 - 

SECTION XIII. MACHIiSIiY, NOT liiCLUDING- TS_U>ISPOSTATIOir 

3^;UI?MSNT (COIJT'D) 

Code ■ • ■ 

155. All other machinery (not including; tren-jportatiou eqxiipment) ,, 

G-as machines, gas :neters, , aUd \7ater sncl other liquid meters. 
Machines for raanvif actiji'-ing. '^as, acetylene generators, gsis meters, 
v.'ater meters, gas and v/ater regiil-j.tors, etc. 

Fimrps (hand and power) pnd p'oinping equipment. Ptumps for air, water, 
oil, aiid other fluids, "both haiid and power; residence water-supply 
systems; gasoline filling-station pumps; spraying outfits; pump 
jacks 02id other p"amping equipment. 

Refrigerators, . mechnnical/. All. types of refrigerators which do 
not use ice as the" refriger-Lting medium. Such refrigerators in- 
clude not only the motor-driven tw.e hut also those v.'hich use 
heat to actuate the- coding raeuiun. 

Scales and 'b-ilaiices. Scales, hr.lano-as, weighing machines and 
apparatus, aixtomatic, and computing weighing machines, etc. . 

Sevang machines and attacliments. 

Washing machines, \7ringe.r3,: driers, and ironing machines for house- 
hold use. VJashing machines, '-ringers, drying machines, and iron- 
ing machines, whether operated hy mechanical power or hy hand, 
for use in homes. 

SECTION XIV. T2AI^3P0?.TATI0N ,BQ,UIPLSNT, AIS, LAND, AIID' WATER 

155. Aircraft and parts. All types of aircraft (including balloons) 
and parts. 

157. Motor-vehicle hodies and motor-vehicle parts. Establishments en- 

gaged primarily in the manufacture of (a) motor-vehicle bodies; 
(b) parts and acce^ssories such as gears, wheels, radiators, biimpers, 
axles, reai'-axle housings, pj'ile shafts, shock absorbers, windshields, 
rims, frames, horns, -'indshi old wiper's, and various other assemblies 
and parts, not including complete chassis, v.'hich are classified- 
under "Motor vehicles." 

158. Motor vehicles, not inclixding motorcycles. All complete four- 

v/heeled motor vehicles — automobiles, trucks, motor busses, etc.— 
and complete chass"es and trailers. 

159. Cp.rs, electric and steam railroad, not build in railroad repair 

shops. 
130. Locomotives (other thati electric) not made in ra.ilroad repair shops. 

All kinds of steam and internal-rcombustion locomotives. (Electric 

locomotives are classified under "Electrical ma'chinci-y, apparatus, 

and supplies;" See 147.) 
161. Ship and boat building, steel and vooden, including repair work. 

The building of all classes of rtoel and v.-ooden vessels, including 

yachts, rowboats, canoes, etc.; repairs to such vessels; masts, 

spars, and other accessories for sxicn veL-sels; the rigging of such 

vessels, 
a.62. All other transportation equipment. Carriage, v/agon, sleigh, and 

sled materials, made for sale as such. 

Bodies, tops, cushions, hubs, fellovjes, spokes, v.'heels, whiffle- 
trees, carriage boots and aprons, axles, dashboards, neck yokes, 
whip sockets, and other materials and parts' except springs, which 
are separately classified. . 

9854 



- 1.38 - 
SECTION XIY. TRAlI3P03TA^I01>I,3Q,UIFrC>IT, AI3, LMD', AMD WATER (CONT'D) 

Code . ■ 

162. .C'ii-i"ia^,'es 0-nd slods, cMldren's. Baby carria;"ss, "Y/alkers" go- 

caxts, sleds, doll carriages, children's velocipedes and tri- 
cycles, cliildren' s express wac:^'ons, etc. 

Carria'Ses, wagons, sleighs and sleds. Coraplete carriages, vragons, 
sleighs, sleds,, pungs, handcarts, pushcarts, and v/heelharrows. 

Motorcycles, bicycles, and parts. Complete motorcycles side cars, 
and bicycles, and motorcycle and bicycle parts, such as saddles, 
seat posts, frames, gears, handlebars,, chains,, etc. Establish- 
ments v;hich manufacture complete motorcycles or bicycles by merely 
assembling purchased parts are included under this classification. 

SECTION XV. '3AIL30AD SEtaIH SHOPS 

163. Car and general construction and repairs, . electric-railroad repair 

sho-os. Shop\7ork done, by electric-railroad companies; principally 
repairs to rolling stock and bridges belonging to the company 
operating the shop. Some shops, hov/ever, build nev/ cars, and some 
perform repair \70rk for other railroad coiapaiiies. 
Car and general construction and i-epairs, steam-railroad repair 
, shoT)s. S-iopwork done-by stc'im-railroad com^janies; principally 
repairs to rolling stock and bridges belonging to the company 
operating the shop. Soma .shopjs, hovrever, build ne.v; cars and lo- 
comotives, and some perform repair vrork for other railroad compah'^ 
ies. ■ . 

SECTIOIT aVI. lilSCELIuUISOUS IlIDUSTRIES ■ • 

164. Tobacco: Chevdng and smoking and snuff. 

165. Cigars. 

166. Cigarettes, 

167. All other miscellaneoui. 

168. Artificial and preserved flov.'ers and plants. 
Artists' i.naterials. 

Brooms. , ■ 

3rushe;i, other th;in rubber, 

Buttons. 

Carbon paper and inked ribbons. 

Combs and 'hairpins, not made from metal or rubber. 

Dentists' supplies and equipment, e::cept instruments, 

Eancy ;ind miscellaneous articles, not elsewhere classified. 

5^eathers, plumes, and manufactures thereof. 

Foundry supplies. 

Far goods. 

Furs, dressed. 

Hair work. ■- _ ■ 

Hand stamps and stencils and br.ands,. 

Hats, stravf, . m.en' s. 

InstruiTients, professional and scientific, and gauges, except 

machinists' gau^iiea. 
Ivory, shell, and bone work, not including, buttons, comibs, or 

hairpins. 
Jewelry and instruiTient cases. 

9854 , 



- 1% - 

SSCTIOil XVI. ::iSCELLAI'i:30US' Il'ILUSTHIES (CONT'D) 

Lap i dar ;,'' v/o i-k . 

Kattres3es nni "bed sprin^^^s, not elsev:here classified. 
Models and patterns, not including' paper patt-jrns. 
Musical instrtment parts and materials: Pi;ano and organ. 
Musical instriu.'ients and parts and materials, not else^'/here 

classified. 
Musical inc-tr-urnents: Organs. 
Musical instruments: Fianos. 
Optical foods. 

Paving materials: Asphalt, tar, crushed sl;i(?', and mixt-ares. 
Pencils, lead (including; mechanical). 
Fens, fountain and stylographic; pen points, ^^old, steel, £ind 

"brass. 
Hiotogr-;,)luc sppcT.-^tus and materials arid projection app.aratus. 
Pipes (totacco), 
Hoofing, TDuilt-up and roll; asphalt shingles; roof coatings 

other than paint. 
Signs and advertising novelties. 
Soda-water apraratus. 

Sporting and athletic goods, not including firearms or ammunition. 
Stationery £oods, not elsev/here classified. 
Sui'gical and orthopedic appliances, and related products. 
Tlaeatrical ocenerj ai'id stage equipment. 
Toys (not including children's v/heel good.s or sleds), 
UmlDrellas, parasols, ajid canes. 
Whip s , 

Window shades .and lixt^ores, 
168, Unclassified, 

All reports which do not contain sufficient information to permit 

classification in any of the atove divisions. 



3C54 



OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION 

THE DIVISION OF REVIEW 

THE WORK OF THE DIVISION OF REVIEW 

Executive Order No. 7075, dated June 15, 1935, established the Division of Review of the 
National Recovery Administration. The pertinent part of the Executive Order reads thus: 

The Division of Review shall assemble, analyze, and report upon the statistical 
information and records of experience of the operations of the various trades and 
industries heretofore subject to codes of fair competition, shall study the ef- 
fects of such codes upon trade, industrial and labor conditions in general, and 
other related matters, shall make available for the protection and promotion of 
the public interest an adequate review of the effects of the Administration of 
Title I of the National Industrial Recovery Act, and the principles and policies 
put into effect thereunder, and shall otherwise aid the President in carrying out 
his functions under the said Title. I hereby appoint Leon C. Marshall, Director of 
the Division of Review. 

The study sections set up in the Division of Revie'A- covered these areas: industry 
studies, foreign trade studies, labor studies, trade practice studies, statistical studies, 
legal studies, administration studies, miscellaneous studies, and the writing of code his- 
tories. The materials which were produced by these sections are indicated below. 

Except for the Code Histories, all ite.-as mentioned below are scheduled to be in mimeo- 
graphed form by April 1, 1936. 

THE CODE HISTORIES 

The Code Histories are documented accounts of the formation and administration of the 
codes. They contain the definition of the industry and the principal products thereof; the 
classes of members in the industry; the history of code foruiation including an account of the 
sponsoring organizations, the conferences, negotiations and hearings v/hich were held, and 
the activities in connection with obtaining approval of the code; the history of the ad- 
ministration of the code, covering the organization and operation of the code authority, 
the difficulties encountered in administration, the extent of compliance or non-compliance, 
and the general success or lack of success of the code; and an analysis of the operation of 
code provisions dealing with wages, hours, trade practices, and other provisions. These 
and other matters are canvassed not only in terms of the materials to be found in the files, 
but also in terms of the experiences of the deputies and others concerned with code formation 
and administration. 

The Code Histories, (including histories of certain NRA units or agencies) are not 
mimeographed. They are to be turned over to the Department of Commerce in typewritten form. 
All told, approximately eight hundred and fifty (850) histories will be completed. This 
nuaber includes all of the approved codes and some of the unapproved codes. (In Work Mate- 
rials No^ 18, Contents of Code His to ries , v/ill be found the outline which governed the 
preparation of Code Histories.) 



(In the case of all approved codes and also in the case of some codes not carried to 
final approval, there are in NRA files further materials on industries. Particularly worthy 
of mention are the Volumes I, II and III which constitute the material officially submitted 
to the President in support of the recommendation for approval of each code. These volumes 
9768—1. 



set forth the origination of the codes, the sponsoring group, the evidence advanced to sup- 
port the proposal, the report of the Division of Research and Planninf on the industry, the 
recommendations of the various Advisory Boards, certain types of official correspondfcnce, 
the transcript of the formal hearing, and other pertinent matter. There is also much offi- 
cial information relating to amendments, interpretations, exemptions, and other rulings. The 
materials mentioned in this paragraph were of course not a part of the work of the Division 
of Review. ) 

THE WORK MATERIALS SERIES 

In the work of the Division of Review a considerable number of studies and compilations 
of L.ata (other than those noted below in the Evidence Studies Series and the Statistical 
Material Series) have been made. These are listed below, grouped according to the char- 
acter of the material. (In Work Materials No. 17, Te ntative O utlines and Summaries of 
Studies in Process , the materials are fully described) . 

I ndustry Studies 

Automobile Industry, An Economic Survey of 

Bituminous Coal Industry under Free Competition and Code Regulation, Ecnomic Survey of 

Electrical Manufacturing Industry, The 

Fertilizer Industry, The 

Fishery Industry and the Fishery Codes 

Fishermen and Fishing Craft, Earnings of 

Foreign Trade under the National Industrial Recovery Act 

Part A - Competitive Position of the United States in International Trade 1927-29 through 

1934. 
Part B - Section 3 (e) of NIRA and its administration. 
Part C - Imports and Importing under NRA Codes. 
Part D - Exports and Exporting under NRA Codes. 

Forest Products Industries, Foreign Trade Study of the 

Iron and Steel Industry, The 

Knitting Industries, The 

Leather and Shoe Industries, The 

Lumber and Timber Products Industry, Economic Problems of the 

Men's Clothing Industry, The 

Millinery Industry, The 

Motion Picture Industry, The 

Migration of Industry, The: The Shift of Twenty-Five Needle Trades From New York State, 
1926 to 1934 

National Labor Income by Months, 1929-35 

Paper Industry, The 

Production, Prices, Employment and Payrolls in Industry, Agriculture and Railway Trans- 
portation, January 1923, to date 

Retail Trades Study, The 

Rubber Industry Study, The 

Textile Industry in the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, and Japan 

Textile Yarns and Fabrics 

Tobacco Industry, The 

Wholesale Trades Study, The 

Women's Neckwear and Scarf Industry, Financial and Labor Data on 

9768—2 



- iil - 

Women's Apparel Industry, Some Aspects of the 

T rade P ractic e Studies 

Commodities, Information Concerning: A Study of NRA and Related Experiences in Control 

Distribution, Manufacturers' Control of: Trade Practice Provisions in Selected NRA Codes 

Distributive Relations in the Asbestos Industry 

Design Piracy: The Problem and Its Treatment Under NRA Codes 

Electrical Mfg. Industry: Price Filing Study 

Fertilizer Industry: Price Filing Study 

Geographical Price Relations Under Codes of Fair Competition, Control of 

Minimum Price Regulation Under Codes of Fair Competition 

Multiple Basing Point System in the Lime Industry; Operation of the 

Price Control in the Coffee Industry 

Price Filing Under NRA Codes 

Production Control in the Ice Industry 

Production Control, Case Studies in 

Resale Price Maintenance Legislation in the United States 

Retail Price Cutting, Restriction of, with special Emphasis on The Drug Industry. 

Trade Practice Rules of The Federal Trade Commission (1914-1936); A classification for 

oomparision with Trade Practice Provisions of NRA Codes. 

Labo r Studies 

Cap and Cloth Hat Industry, Commission Report on Wage Differentials in 

Earnings in Selected Manufacturing Industries, by States, 1933-35 

Employment, Payrolls, Hours, and Wages in 115 Selected Code Industries 1933-35 

Fur Manufacturing, Commission Report on Wages and Hours in 

Hours and Wages in American Industry 

Labor Program Under the National Industrial Recovery Act, The 

Part A. Introduction 

Part B. Control of Hours and Reemployment 

Part C. Control of Wages 

Part D. Control of Other Conditions of Employment 

Part E. Section 7(a) of the Recovery Act 
Materials in the Field of Industrial Relations 
PRA Census of Employment, June, October, 1933 
Puerto Rico Needlework, Homeworkers Survey 

Administrative Studies 

Administrative and Legal Aspects of Stays, Exemptions and Exceptions, Code Amendments, Con- 
ditional Orders of Approval 

Administrative Interpretations of NRA Codes 

Administrative Law and Procedure under the NIRA 

Agreements Under Sections 4(a) and 7(b) of the NIRA 

Approved Codes in Industry Groups, Classification of 

Basic Code, the — (Administrative Order X-61) 

Code Authorities and Their part in the Administration of the NIRA 
Part A. Introduction 
Part B. Nature, Composition and Organization of Code Authorities 

9768—3. 



- iv - 

Part C. Activities of the Code Authorities 

Part D. Code Authority Finances 

Part E. Summary and Evaluation 
Code Compliance Activities of the MRA 
Code Making Program of the HRA in the Territories, The 
Code Provisions and Related Subjects, Policy Statements Concerning 
Content of NIF.A Administrative Legislation 

Part A. Executive and Administrative Orders 

Part B. Labor Provisions in the Codes 

Part C. Trade Practice Provisions in the Codes 

Part D. Administrative Provisions in the Codes 

Part E. Agreements under Sections 4(a) and 7(b) 

Part F. A Type Case: The Cotton Textile Code 
Labels Under NRA, A Study of 

Model Code and Model Provisions for Codes, Development of 

National Recovery Administration, The: A Review of its Organization and Activities 
NRA Insignia 

President's Reemployment Agreement, The 

President's Reemployment Agreement, Substitutions in Connection with the 
Prison Labor Problem under NRA and the Prison Compact, The 
Problems of Administration in the Overlapping of Code Definitions of Industries and Trades, 

Multiple Code Coverage, Classifying Individual Members of Industries and Trades 
Relationship of NRA to Government Contracts and Contracts Involving the Use of Government 

Funds 
Relationship of NRA with States and Municipalities 
Sheltered Workshops Under NRA 
Uncodified Industries: A Study of Factors Limiting the Code Making Program 

Leg.al Studies 

Anti-Trust Laws and Unfair Competition 

Collective Bargaining Agreements, the Right of Individual Employees to Enforce 

Commerce Clause, Federal Regulation of the Employer-Employee Relationship Under the 

Delegation of Power, Certain Phases of the Principle of, with Reference to Federal Industrial 
Regulatory Legislation 

Enforcement, Extra-Judicial Methods of 

Federal Regulation through the Joint Employment of the Power of Taxation and the Spending 
Power 

Government Contract Provisions as a Means of Establishing Proper Economic Standards. Legal 
Memorandum on Possibility of 

Industrial Relations in Australia, Regulation of 

Intrastate Activities Which so Affect Interstate Commerce as to Bring them Under the Com- 
merce Clause, Cases on 

Legislative Possibilities of the State Constitutions 

Post Office and Post Road Power — Can it be Used as a Means of Federal Industrial Regula- 
tion? 

State Recovery Legislation in Aid of Federal Recovery Legislation History and Analysis 

Tariff Rates to Secure Proper Standards of Wages and Hours, the Possibility of Variation in 

Trade Practices and the Anti-Trust Laws 

Treaty Making Power of the United States 

War Power, Can it be Used as a Means of Federal Regulation of Child Labor? 

9768—4. 



- V - 

THE EVIDENCE STUDIES SERIES 

The Evidence Studies were originally undertaken to gather material for pending court 
cases. After the Schechter decision the project was continued in order to assemble data for 
use in connection with the studies of the Division of Review. The data are particularly 
concerned with the nature, size and operations of the industry; and with the relation of the 
industry to interstate commerce. The industries covered by the Evidence Studies account for 
more than one-half of the total number of workers under codes. The list of those studies 
follows: 



Automobile Manufacturing Industry 
Automotive Parts and Equipment Industry 
Baking Industry 

Boot and Shoe Manufacturing Industry 
Bottled Soft Drink Industry 
Builders' Supplies Industry 
Canning Industry 
Chemical Manufacturing Industry 
Cigar Manufacturing Industry 
Coat and Suit Industry 
Construction Industry 
Cotton Garment Industry 
Dress Manufacturing Industry 
Electrical Contracting Industry 
Electrical Manufacturing Industry 
Fabricated Metal Products Mfg. and Metal Fin- 
ishing and Metal Coating Industry 
Fishery Industry 
Furniture Manufacturing Industry 
General Contractors Industry 
Graphic Arts Industry 
Gray Iron Foundry Industry 
Hosiery Industry 

Infant's and Children's Wear Industry 
Iron and Steel Industry 



Leather Industry 

Lumber and Timber Products Industry 
Mason Contractors Industry 
Men's Clothing Industry 
Motion Picture Industry 
Motor Vehicle Retailing Trade 
Needlework Industry of Puerto Rico 
Painting and Paperhanging Industry 
Photo Engraving Industry 
Plumbing Contracting Industry 
Retail Lumber Industry 
Retail Trade Industry 
Retail Tire and Battery Trade Industry 
Rubber Manufacturing Industry 
Rubber Tire Manufacturing Industry 
Shipbuilding Industry 
Silk Textile Industry 
Structural Clay Products Industry 
Throwing Industry 
Trucking Industry 
Waste Materials Industry 
Wholesale and Retail Food Industry 
Wholesale Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Indus- 
try 
Wool Textile Industry 



THE STATISTICAL MATERIALS SERIES 



This series is supplementary to the Evidence Studies Series. The reports include data 
on establishments, firms, employment, payrolls, wages, hours, production capacities, ship- 
ments, sales, consumption, stocks, prices, material costs, failures, exports and imports. 
They also include notes on the principal qualifications that should be observed in using the 
data, the technical methods employed, and the applicability of the material to the study of 
the industries concerned. The following numbers appear in the series: 
9768—5. 



- vi - 

Asphalt Shingle and Roofing Industry Fertilizer Industry 

Business Furniture F neral oupply Industry 

Candy Manufacturing Industry Glass Container Industry 

Carpet and Rug Industry Ice Manufacturing Industry 

Cement Industry Knitted Outerwear Industry 

Cleaning and Dyeing Trade Paint, Varnish, ana Lacquer, Mfg. Industry 

Coffee Industry Plumbing Fixtures Industry 

Copper and Brass Mill Products Industry Rayon and Synthetic Yarn Producing Industry 

Cotton Textile Industry . Salt Producing Industry 

Electrical Manufacturing Industry 

THE COVERAGE 

The original, and approved, plan of the Division of Review contemplated resources suf- 
ficient (a) to prepare some 1200 histories of codes and NRA units or agencies, (b) to con- 
solidate and index the NRA files containing some 40,000,000 pieces, (c) to engage in ex- 
tensive field work, (d) to secure much aid from established statistical agencies of govern- 
ment, (e) to assemble a considerable number of experts in various fields, (f) to conduct 
approximately 25% more studies than are listed above, and (g) to prepare a comprehensive 
summary report. 

Because of reductions made in personnel and in use of outside experts, limitation of 
access to field work and research agencies, and lack of jurisdiction over files, the pro- 
jected plan was necessarily curtailed. The most serious curtailments were the omission of 
the comprehensive summary report; the dropping of certain studies and the reduction in the 
coverage of other studies; and the abandonment of the consolidation and indexing of the 
files. Fortunately, there is reason to hope that the files may yet be carec for under other 
auspices. 

Notwithstanding these limitations, if the files are ultimately consolidated and in- 
dexed the exploration of the NRA materials will have been sufficient to make them accessible 
and highly useful. They constitute the largest and richest single body of information 
concerning the problems and operations of industry ever assembled in any nation. 

L. C. Marshall, 
Director, Division of Review. 
9768—6 .