(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Work materials ..."

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06317 354 4 / 



OFFICE OF NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION 
DIVISION OF REVIEW 



WAGES AND HOURS IN AMERICAN INDUSTRY 
NRA SOURCE MATERIAL 



By 



Solomon Barkin 
Anne Page 



WORK MATERIALS NO. NINE 



IN THREE VOLUMES 
VOLUME I 



LABOR STUDIES SECTION 
MARCH, 1936 






OFFICE OF KATIOKAL RECOVERY ADMIN I STRATI ON 
DIVISION OF REVIEW 



WAGES AND HCUKS IK AMERICAK INDUSTRY 
NRA SOURCE iAAIEiJAL 



By 



Solomon Barkin 

Anne Page 



IK THREE VOLUIEES 
VOLUME I 



LA30F. STUDIES SECT I OK 
MARCH, 1936 



9bl8 



^OE^^ORD 

This Compilation on "".ages and Hours 01 American Industry - NRA 
Source rlattrial" was prepared by .r. Solomon "iarlcin and firs. Anne Page 
with the assistance of the staff of the Labor Studies Section. 

The materials herein presented are derived from NBA files exclusively 
and are intended to ^resent the more important data made available 
during the 1~RA period. Although not all-inclusive, they are representa- 
tive of the more important data in the files. The information is 
arranged by industry according to the Industry Divisions developed 
in NBA. Attention is directed particularly to tht, introduction as a 
guide in the use of the information. 

The assistance of the Bureau of Labor Statistics in preparing 
this document is gratefully acknowledged. .Mr. Arnold Tolles was especially 
helpful. 

At the back of this report "ill be found a brief statement of the 
studies undertaken by the Division of Review, 



L. G. Marshall 

Director, Division of Review. 



Ma rch 30, 1936 



9618 -i~ 



- 1 - 

Tf-ME CF CONTJ? T TS (By Industry Groups) 



ABLE SOMBSEfl 



5 




6- 


•10 


11 




126 


L-18 


19 


-22 


23 


-26 


27 




28 


-32 


33 


-35 


36 


-36 


37 


-39 


40 


-42 


43 


-44 


45 


-47 


48 


-50 



9TLH 



tNHr.ODTC TIOH 

1. I.:::T. IS - FF1R0TJ3 SIJP N0N-F3MPuUS 

Iron and Steel 1-42 

2. NGN METALLIC INDIiSTkrjS 

linoleum and Felt Pase 
Glass Container 
Asbestos Industry 
Asphalt Shingle and Roofing 
Asphalt and Fasti c Tile 
Grinding Wheel 
Coated Abrasives 
Ball Clay Producing 
7 L ock and Slag "fcol 
Earthenware Manufacturing 
Fibre Wallboard 
Insulation 3oara 
Preformed Plastic Products 
Flexible Insulation 
Abrasive Grain 



3. FiriL 

Manufactured Gas 51 

Natural Gas 52 -53 

4. F0P2ST F-CDUCTS 

",'OOQ Plug 

Nop Stick 

Excelsior 

2nd Grain Strip Wood Block 

Metal Eat Die and " r ood Eat -lock 

Venetian Blind 

Ornamental Mouldings, Carving and Turning 

Wood Heel 

Wooden Insulator Pin and .' racket 

Wood Turning and Wood Shaping 

"'rush Iiandle and Brush n lock 

plat and Shaped veneer 

Standard and S?pring Clothespin 

Variety 7/ood Turning and Small 
Turned ' ;7 ood Handles 

Miscellaneous 
Shoe Las* 
Wood Preserving 
architectural T,r ood Carving 
S-wdust, shavings, and Sawdust Specialties 
Wood Tank 



54 




55 




56 


-58 


59 


-6(3 


61 


-63 


64 


-66 


67 


-70 


71 


-74 


75 


-76 


77 


-91 


77- 


- 79 


80 


-32 


83 


-85 


86 


-88 


89 


-91 


92 


-93 . 


94 


-101 


102 


-103 


104 


-106 


107 


-109 



TABLE Tui.DE^S 



CHEMICALS, PAINTS AND DRUGS 



Faint, Varnish and Lacquer 110-113 

Hardw«od Distillation 114-115 

Waterproofing, Damp Proofing, etc 116-117 

Pyrotechnic Manufacturing IIP -122 

Oxy-Aoetyleno Industry 123—125 

Shoe and Leather Finish- Shoe Polish 126-123 

Ohoirical Manufacturing 129o.-13Ib 

Candle Manufacturing 132-153 

Tapioca Dry Products 134 

Printing Ink 135-156b 

Tanning Extract 137-137 

Bleaohfcd Shellac 135-139 

Dry Colors Industry 140-142 

Sulphenatod Oils 1 43-144' 

Animal Hue 145-147 

Adhesive and Ink 140-154 

Natural Organic Products 155-157 

Plastic Fabricators 158-159 

Stoair. Solvent Naval Stores 160-165 



6 . PAPEP 

Waited Paper 164-137 

Sot-Up Paper Box 168-175 

Paper Stationery and Tablet 176-179 

Folding Paper Pox 180a~182b 

Sanitary Naphin and Cleansing Tissue 185-.184 

Paper Pag 185-187o 

Corrugated Solid Fibre Shir-fins Container 188-18911 

Paper Disc Milk Bottle C P ,p ~ 190-1941 

Food Dish and Pulp and Vapor Plato 195-196 

Hazel and Fancy - apor 197-198 

Tag 199^200 

Cylindrical Liquid Tight Paper Container 201-21C 

Cloth Reel 211-212 

Photographic Mount 215-215b 

Grmnming 216-21 

Gummed Labols and Embossed Seal 219-221 

Fluted Cup, Ian Liner and Laea Paper 222-223 

Sample Card 224-225 

Fibre Can and Tube 226-227 

Bulk Drinking Straw 228-256 

Upon Paper, Prin'dLng Cup 237-238 

Sanitary Milk Pottle Closure 259-244 

Transparent Mat-erials Cor.-vortors 245-246 

Loose Leaf and Blank Book 2-47-248 

tscose Extrusion 249 

7. RUBBER 

- : a", mod B.ubl or 250-251 
980.8 



-;,UI?: VfT .-nd . AC HIT 



: AiTFAJTURIift} 



Llectrical anufacturing 
Autoaobile 
Para Lcmipment 
Compressed Air 

Machine Tool and Forging 

Sear 

Gas Appliance and Apparatus 

7arTn Air Furnace 

P^per 'Viking Machine Builder 

Commercial Refrigerator 

Csst Iron Fressure Pipe 

Rail^a - " Safet^ Appliance 

T: arine Auxiliary Machinery 

Steam Heating "quiptient 

Chilled Car TOieel 

l\ T ewspa"oer Printing Press 

Hide and Leather "forking Machine 

Motor C^cle ioanufacturing 

Cla 1 ' - Machinery 

Machinery and Allied Products 

Steel Tire 
RaUva"" - and Industrial Spring '■ 
Locomotive Manufacturing 
Small Locomotive 
"Tood forking Machinery 
Beater, Jordan and Allied Equipment 

ater i eter 
Diamond Core Drill 
-•echanical Lubricator 
Contractor ' s Puap 
Locomotive Appliance 
TJaterpo^er lilciuip ent 

Polling : : ill - lachinery and Pquiprnent 
Pulverising Machinery and Lq-. ipment 
Steam "Jngine anufacturing 
Rock and Ore Crusher 
Reduction Machinery 
Hoisting Bngine 
Hoist Builders 
Convenor and ■Material Preparation 

Lcruiom e nt 
Roller and Silent Chain 
Power Transmission Machinery 



252 

254 

255 

257 

259 

251 

252 

■264 

266 

26? 

269 

270 

272 

275- 

7^7- 

281- 

234- 

237- 

290- 

292- 

296- 

300- 

304- 
508- 
312- 
316- 
320- 
322- 
325- 
329- 

534- 

558- 
543- 
345- 
34b- 
353- 
557- 
361- 



-255 

■256 
■258 
■250(c) 

■253 
•265 

-268 

271 
374 
276 
280 
235 
286 
739 
291 
295 
299 

303 
307 
311 
315 
319 
321 
334 
328 
531 
3<i3 
337 
541 
344 



352 
556 
560 
■364 
5-3S8 



369-572 
573-376 



9313 



- 4 - 
^Equipment and Machinery Manufacturing - Continued) 

Mechanical press 

"'fit or Softener and Filter 

Bakery Equipment 

Air Filter 

Spr octet Chair. 

Oil Field Pumping Engine 

Refrigerating Mac! ir.ery 

3«*noreto Mixer 

Jack Manufacturing 

Rail'' - r ay .dbpi i anco 

Diesel Bngino 

Hydrauli o Machinery 

Pulp and Paper Machinery 

SaTrenill Machinery 

Cereal Machinery 

Electric Chrorhead Crane 

Fair Clipper 

Industrial Furnace ■ 

Cylindor Mould and Dandy Roll 

Railroad Special Track Equipmont 

Shoe • aohinory 

Serving Machine 

Bobbin- arid Spool 

Counter Type loo Croam Freezer 

I -cch aui oal I" acking 

Shower Door 

Biejrole 

Trailer 

Warm Air Rogister 

Cold Storage Door 

Eloctric ' T oist and onorail 

Cottor Ginning Machinery 

Zo~ r >, is r c i a 1 Vbh i cle D u dy 

Shuttle 

Stoker 

indirect 'Tatcr TT eatcr ■ anvtf aoturing ■ 



TABLE FU13ZMS 



377-378 

379-381 

382-335 

386-388 

389-392 

393-o93 

397-4*0 

401-403 

404-407 

408-411 

412 

413-414 

415-416 

417-420 

421-424 

425-426 

427-430 

431 

432-434 

435-458 

439-441 

442-444 

445 

446-449 

450 

451-452 
453-455 
456-460 

461-463 
464-465 
466-469 

470-472 

473-475 

476 

477- 

401-483 



9315 



CC 7 3STTS (Cont'd) 
9 . FOOD 



9313 



Commercial and Breeder Hatchery 

Linseed Oil 

Auction and ^oose _.eaf Tobacco Warehouse 

Macaroni 

Peanut Butter 

Dog Food 

Ice Cream Cone 

Bottled Soft Drink 

preserve Maraschino Cherry, etc. 

Candy 

Cigar 

Malt Products 

Yeast 

Flavoring products 

Pecan Shelling 

Seed Trade 

Cigarette Manufacturing 

Smoking Tobacco 

Snuff 

Chewing Tobacco 

Processed Cheese 

Livestock Marketing Agency 

Leaf Tobacco Dealers, Fedriers, Repackers, 

and Storers 
Vinegar 
Baking Powder 
Biscuit g; C"acker 
Butter 
Cane Sugar 

Cotton Compress "-, ",'areho using 
Cottonseed Cil Refining 
Edible Gelatine 
Bgg & Poultry 

10. T.BITI/L3 - FABMICS 

v 7ool Felt 

Hair Cloth 

Rayon and Silk Dyeing and Printing 

Carpet and Rug 

Drapery and Upholstery Tri ...i:i, 

Narrow '^ab^ics 

Cotton pickery 

Bias Tape 

Sash cord 



TV..-: i\TUJv5BB3 

484-489 
490-492 
493-496 
497-428 
499-5(0 
501-504 
5fE5-51J> 
511-516 
517-528 
529-550 
531-556 
537-541 
542-544 
545-549 
550-553 
554a-554(c) 
555-559 
560-563 
564-567 
568-571 
572-575 
576-578 

579-582 

583-593 

594-597 
598a-60Cb 

6Cl-604b 
605a-606b 

607-626 

627-629 

•630-633 

634-637 



638-640 

641 

642-644 

645-648 

649-656 

657-661 

662-663 

664-665 

666-668 



, 6 - 



11. T3XTILE - APPALL 



TABLE mL3EiS 



Coat end Suit 

Corset and. Brassiere 

'. en' s Clothing 

Leather and 'wool Knit Glove 

Ion's Garters, Suspenders and Belts 

o 1 1 o n G a rr ig nt 

il liner y 
Blouse and Skirt 
' en' s NsoIrvV ^ar 
Candlevick Bedspread 
Cap and Cloth Sat 
Hatters' Fur Cutting. 
V/tv ior. ' s ^aciasear 



669 - 677(f) 

670(a) - 679(h) 

680 - 682 

683$a) - 686 

687 

688 - 719 

720 

721 

722(a) - 724 

"25 - 726 

727 - " 7 5f 

"31 - 752 

733 - 737(c) 



12. LEATHER and FJp 



Leather 

Boat and Shoe 

Fur Dressing and Pur Dyeing 

Fur x ,; anuf ac tur ing 

Shoe Pattern 



738 


- 


743 


744 


- 


758(b) 


759 


— 


"60 


"61 


- 


769 


770 


m. 


773 



PICATIPG 



Photographic 

Optical , anuf aoturing 

Cap and Closure 

Stoel-Co.-sting 

iianganese Steel ^roducts 

Fabricated ) etcl Products 

Bri, :' it >.irc 1 anuf actur ing 7 8 5 

Machine Screw anuf aoturing 786 

Cap Screw Manufacturing 787 

Drapery and Carpet Hardware anufacturing780 
- >\ Scrovr --anuf actur ing 789 

Business Furniture, etc. 

Office Equipment 

Piano - anufaoturing 

All etal Insect Screen 

Malleable Iron 

■ :' actur ing 

Poll: ag Steel Doer 

Silverware - .anuf aoturing 
fetch c aso -anufacttu-ing 

Petal findow 
usioal .eroliandiso 

Porcelain Breakfast Furniture Assembling 



"74 


- 


^76 


777 






778 


- 


780 


701 


mm 


782 


^83 


- 


789 



790 


- 


792 


793 


- 


795 


796 


- 


798 


799 


- 


801 


802 


- 


804 


805 






806 


- 


808 


809 


- 


ill 


812 






013 


- 


815 


816 


- 


817 


818 


- 


821 



9«1B 



- 7 - 



13. FABRICATING (cont'd.) 



TABLE FUi.£3]£iS 



Band Instrument 

Gray Iron Foundry 

Beauty and Barter Shop Equipment 

Steel TCcol 

Metal Lrth manufacturing 

Collapsible Tube 

Snail Arms and Annunition 

Umbrella Frames and Umbrella Hdw. 

Commercial Fixture 

Drop Forging 

Specialty Accounting Suoply 

Assembled !7atch 

Floor "'aohinery 

Clock Manufacturing 

Shoe Form 

Fountain Fen & 'Cechanical Pencil 

Tank "later Heater 

^lieelbarrow 



322-823 

324 

325-827 

328-329 

330-832 

333-835 

836-338 

839-842 

843-846 

847-350 

351-352 

353 

854-855 

856-859 

C60-861 

062-863 

364-866 

867-869 



14. 



GRAPHIC ARTS 



15. 



Graphic Arts Periodical 
Daily Newspaper Publishing 
Book Publishing 
I'nisic Publishing 
Duplicating and Tailing 

CONSTRUCTION 



876-874 

375 

876-077 
8^3-379 
880-881 



Reinforcing Materials Fa.bricating 

Construction 832-833 

Elevator 884-386 

Kalamein 887-839 

Construction News 390 

Arts and Crafts 891-394 
Rig Building 

1 6 . TRANSPORTAT 1 01' and COi " UNI C - T ICN 



9810 



Transit 
Motor Bus 

Inland ^pter Carrier Trade 
Toll Bridge 

Electric Light and Power- 
Taxi cab 

Telegraph Communications 
Telephone 



8S8-905(i) 

906 

907 

908(a)-908(b) 

909-913 

914-924 

925-926 

927(a)-929(b) 



-fl- 



19. SERVICE TRADES 



table suiasiS 



Cleaning and Dyeing 930-931 

Laundry 932-938 

Frivate Home Study School 939 

20. DIS TRIBUTI NG TRADES - ^IIO-ESALE 

Rive poultry of Matro-olitan Mew York 94C 

Wholesale Frosh Fruit and Vegetable 941-946 

Machine Yfastc 947-950 

Paper Distributing 951-952 
wholesale or Distributing, Trado -■ 

Wholesale ■""allpapor 953A955 

Fourdry Supply 956-957 
Scrap Iron, Ronferrcus Scrap Metal and Waste 

Materials Trado 950-960 

Optical Iholosalo 961-962 

Wholesale Tobacco 963-965 

Photographic Wholesale Dealers 966 

Vyholosalo Drug 967-968 

Stool r ar chousing 969-971 

1/Vholesalc Ncats and r agazinc Distributing 972-f'74 

Hide and Skin Dealers 975-979 



IT 'CLASSIFIED 

T "irncsota Industries 980-991 



9318 



V9 - 



ALP'L 



JICaL TA^L-j uF 



NAfcLS uj 1 iiCDUSTxiY 



Abrasive Grain 
Adhesive 
Air Filter 

All jifetal Insect Screen 

Animal Glue 
Architectural ('cod o'arving 
Arts and Crafts 
AsDestoa 

Asphalt and ivastio file 
Asphalt Shingle and ^oofin^ 
Assembled -atch 

Auction and Losse Leaf fooacco warehouse 
Automobile 

Bakery Equipment 

Bakint Powder 

Ball Clay Producing 

Band Instrument 

Beater, Jordan and Allied ^uiipment 

Beauty and Barber Shop Equipment 

Bias Tape 

Bicycle Manufacturing 

Biscuit and Crocker 

Bleached Shellac 

Blouse and Skirt 

Bobbin and Spool 

Book Publishing 

Boot and Shoe 

Bottled Soft Drink 

Bright /ire Manufacturing 

Bulk Drinking Straw 

Business Furniture, etc. 

Butter 



CuiJ^NfS 




TAHLji u i 


X.LjF-iS 


48 - 


50 


143 ■ 


- 150 


386 - 


388 


799 - 


801 


145 ~ 


147 


102 - 


103 


831 - 


894 


11 




19 - 


22 


12a ■ 


- 18 


853 




49 3 - 


496 


254 




382 - 


385 


594 - 


597 


28 - 


32 


822 - 


823 


316 - 


319 


825 - 


3.27 


664 - 


665 


453 - 


455 


598a ■ 


- 600b 


138 - 


139 


721 




445 




876 - 


877 


744 - 


758 "b 


511 - 


516 


785 




228 - 


236 


790 - 


792 


bOla 


- 604b 



9 81 PI 



-10 



Cor:morciai Refri erator 



Construction ' T ei».-s 






727-730 



Can Manufacturing gp 5 

Candle I- anuf ■ cturing 132-133 

Candlewick .Bedspread 725-726 

Cand y . 529-530 

Cane Sugar Refining 505a-606b 

Cap and Closure 778-780 

Cap and Cloth Hat 727 _ 

Cap Screw Manufacturing 737 

Carpet and Rug 645-648 

Cast Iron pressure pipe 270-271 

Cereal Machinery 421-4^4 

Chemical I.'anufacturing I29a-131b 

Chewing Tobacco 563-571 

Chilled Car 7- eel 281-283 

Ci § ar 531-536 

Cigarette Manufacturing 555-559 

Clay Machinery 292-295 

Cleaning and Dueing 930-931 

Clock Manufacturing 855-859 

Cloth Reel 211-212 

Coat and Suit 669-677 (: 
Coated .- brasives 27 

Cold Storage Door 464-465 

Collapsible pubs 833-835 

Commercial and Breeder Hatchery 484-489 

Commercial Fixture 843-846 



269 



Commercial Vehicle Body 473-475 

Compressed ' ir pen C r^ 

Contractors pump 329-331 

Concrete Lixer 401-403 



090 



Conveyor and Material Preparation qui . ,;nt 365-368 

Corrugated Solid Fibre S ipping Container 183-189b 

Corset and Brassiere P78(a)-579(n) 

, Cotton Compress & 'aieliousir 607-626 

Cotton Garment 688-719 

Cotton Ginning Machinery 470-472 

Cotton Pickery 662-663 

Cotton Seed Oil Refining 627-629 

Counter Tyoe Ice Cream Freezer 446-4-49 

Cylindrical r.iruid Tight Paper Container 201-210 

Cylinder [ ould and Dandy Roll 432-434 

9818 



~ n " TABLE NUMBERS 

!:TA1j3 OF INiAjSTKT 

Daily Newspapor publishing 

Diamond Core Drill 

Diesel .Engine 

Dog Food 

Drapery and Carpet hardware uanuf aoturing 

Drapery and Upholstery Trimming 

Drop Forging 

Dry Colors 

Duplicating and mailing 

Earthenware Manufacturing 
Edible Gelatine 
Sgg and Poultry 
Electric Hoist and Jionorail 
Electric Light and Power 
Electric Overhead Crane 
Electrical J Manufacturing 
Elevator ilanuf aoturing 
End Grain Strip Wood Block 
Excelsior 



j?abricatod Metal Products 
Farm Equipment 
Fibre Can and Tube 
Fibre ".Tailboard 
Flavoring Products 

Flexible Insulation 45 - 47 

Floor i achinery G54 - 855 

Fluted Cup, Pan Liner and Lace Paper 222 - 223 

Folding Paper Pox 18C(a) - 182(b) 

Food Dish and i : ulp and Paper Plate-* 195 - 196 

Foundry Supply 956 - 957 

Fountain Pen and L'echanical Pencil 862 - 863 

Fur Dressing and Fur Dyeing 759 '- 760 

Fur Manufacturing 761 - 769 

Gas Appliance and Apparatus 264 - 265 

Gear Manufacturing 262 - 263 

Glass Container 6 - 10 

Glazed and Fancy Paper 197 - 198 

Gray Iron' Foundry 824 

Grinding Hdieel 23 - 26 

Gummed Labels and Embossed Seal 219 - 221 

Gumming 216 - 218 



9=7L?3 



. .. 






875 






322 


- 


324 


412 






501 


— 


504 


788 






649 


- 


656 


847 


- 


850 


140 


- 


142 


830. 


- 


881 


36 


_ 


36 


630 


- 


633 


634 


- 


6S7 


466 


- 


469 


909 


- 


913 


425 


r- 


426 


252 


- 


253 


804 


- 


886 


59 


- 


60 


56 


" 


58 


783 




789 


255 


- 


256 


226 


- 


227 


37 


- 


39 


545 


- 


549 



Fame of Tndnst.r-r 



TABLE FULBERS 



Hair Clipper 

Hair Cloth 

Hardwood Distillation 

Hatter's Fur Cutting 

Hide and L -ather forking 'Machine 

Hide and Skin Dealers 

Hoist Building 

Hoisting Lnginc 

Hyuraulic Machinery 



437 
S41 
114 
731 
237 
975- 
361- 
357- 
413- 



-430 

-115 
-733 
-289 
-979 
•364 
■360 
■414 



Ice Cream Cone 

Indirect 7ater Heater Mfg. 

Industrial Furnace 

Ink and Adhesive 

Inland ^ater Carrier Trade 

Insulation Board 

Iron and Steel 



505-510 
481-485 
431 

151-154 
907 
40 - 42 



Jack " anufa.cturing 



404-407 



Ka.lamein 



837-839 



Laundry 

Leaf Totacco Dealers, Redriers, 

Repackers and Storers 
Leather 

Leather and ^ool : r nit G-lcve 
Linoleum and Felt Base 
Linseed Oil 
Live Poultry of 

'"etrooolitan 
Livestock '"arketing Agency 
Locomotive Arvoliance 
Locomotive F-anufacturing 
Loose Leaf and Blank Book 



932-933 

573-582 
738-743 
663(a)-686 

5 
490-492 

940 

576-578 

352-333 

304-307 

247-248 



931-3 



-13 
MisSreFi INDUSTRY 



TABLE EUiZBEElS 



Macaroni 407 - 498 

Machi .e Screw Manufacturing 736 

j achine Tool and Forging 261 

Machine Waste 947 - 950 

Malleable Iron 502 - 804 

'alt Products 537 - 541 
Manufactured Gas 51 

Marine Auxiliary achinery 275 - 276 

Mechanical Lubricator 325 - 328 

Ifechanical backing 450 

Mechanical Press 377 - 378 

Men's Clothing 630 - 682 

Men's 'barters, Suspenders and Belts 687 

Men's Neckwear 722(a) - 724 

Metal &at Die and tfood Hat Block Gl - 63 

Metal Eath Manufacturing '830 - 832 

Metal vfindow . 813 - 815 

Millinery 720 

Minnesota Industries 980 - 991 

Motorcycle kanufacturing 290 - 291 

Motor Bus 906 
' pp Stick 55 

Music Publishing 873 - 879 

Musical Merchandise 816 - 817 



Harrow Fabrics 657 - 661 

Natural Gas 52 - 55 

Natural Organic Products 155 - 157 

Newspaper Printing Press 204 - 286 



Office Equipment 793 - 795 

Oil Field Pumping Engine 393 - 396 

Open r aper Drinking Cup 237 - 238 

Optical Manufacturing 777 

Optical iVholesale 9G1 - 9C2 

Ornamental Mouldings, Carving and Turning S7 - 70 

Oxy-Acetylene 123 - 125 



3313 



14- 



;■'.'". i of imbustcy 

Paint, Varnish and Lacguei 

Paper lag 

P per Disc Milk 3ottl'e Cap 

P r Distributing 

Paper I aking Machine Builder 

P yer Stationery and Tablet 

Peanut Butter 

Pecan Shelling 

periodical 

Photographic 

Photographic? Mount 

Photographic "Vholesale Delaers 

Piano Manufacturing 

Plastic Fabricators 

Porcelain Breakfast Furniture Assembling 

Power Transmission Machinery 

Preformed plastic P-o ducts 

Preserve, }. raschino Cherry, etc. 

Printing Ink 

Private Home S udy Schools 

Piocessed Cheese 

Pulp and Paper I achinery 

Pulverizing 2^. chinary and Equinrient 

Pump 

Pyrotechnic 'Mfg. 

Railroad Special Hack Equipment 
Railway and I': dun trial Spring 
Railway /Lppl'iance 
Railway, Safety „' ^liance 
Rayon and Sill Dyeing and Printing 
slieclaimed Rubber 
Reduction Machinery 
R ef r i ger at i n; . I. 'ach ins r y 
Reinforcing 'Materials Imbricating 
Rig Building 
Rock and 0.ve Crusher 
Rock and Slag "Tool 
Roller and Silent Chain 
Rolling Mill Machinery and ,'quipment 
"oil in,- Steel Door 



$£BLi? MtT.IR&S 



11C-115 
187c 
194b 



loo 
190 
951 
267 
176 
499 
550 
R7r 

774 
213 
956 
796 
158. 
818 
373' 
43 
517- 
135- 
939 
572- 
415- 
342- 
259- 
118 



435- 
300- 
408- 
272- 
- 
- 
353- 
397- 
332- 
8S5 
549- 
33- 
369- 
338- 
806- 



■268 

-179 
-500 
-555 
-874 
-776, 
-215b, 

•798 

-159. 

-321- . 

-376- 

■44 

•528 

■136b 

■575 
■416 
•344 

■260 (c) 
-122 

-438 
-305 
-411 
-274 
•644 

■356 
400 
•383 

■352 

■35 

•372 

341 

308' 



3813 



-is-* 



TABLE FJriBERS 



Name of Industry 



Sample Card 

Sanitary .""ilk Bottle Closure 

Sanitary Napkin and Cleansing Tissue 

Sash Cord 

Sawdust, Shavings and Sawdust Specialties 

Spwraill Machinery 

Scrap Iron, Non-Ferrous Scrap Metal and. 

Waste Materials Trade 
Seed Trade 
Set-Up Paper Box 



jnoe^nd a Lea ! £aar Finish. 



Shoe 'Polish 



Shoe Form 

Shoe Lpst 

Shoe Machinery 

Shoe Pattern 

Shotjer Door 

Shuttle 

Silverware Manuf acturing 

Small Arms and Annrunition 

Small Locomotive 

Smoking Tohacco 

Snuff 

Specialty Accounting Supply 

Sprocket Chain 

Steam Zngine Mfg. 

Steam Heating Equipment 

Steam Solvent Naval Stores 

Steel Casting - Manganese Steel products 

Steel Tire 

Steel Warehousing 

Steel Wool 

Steker 

Sulphonated Oils 



324-225 

239-244 

185-184 

666-668 

104-106- . 

417-420 

958-96C 

554(a)-554{c) 

168-175 

m~m 

860-861 

92-93 
439-441 

770-773 

451-452 

476 

809-811 

836-838 

308-311 

560-563 

554-567 

851-852 

389-392 

345-348 

277-280 

160-163 

781-782 

296-299 

969-971 

828-829 

477-480 

143-144 



Tag 

Tank and Water Heater 

Tanning Zxtract 

Tapioca Dry Products 

Taxicah 

Telegraph Communications 

Telephone 

Toll Bridge 

Trailer 

Transit 

Transparent Materials Converters 



199-200 

864-866 

137 

134 

914-924 

935-926 

937-929(h) 

908(a)-903(T>} 

456-460 

398-905(i) 

245-246 



9818 



TABLE E0M3ERS 



-16" 

NA 3 OF INDUSTRY 

Umbrella Frames and Umbrella hardware 839 - 842 



Venetian Blind 

Vinegar 

Viscose Extrusion 



Warm Air Furnace 
Warm Air Register 
Watch Case Fanufacturing 
Water Meter 
' 'fat e r p owe r E quipment 
Waterproofing, Damp Proofing, etc 
Water Softener and Filter 
./axed Paper 
Vheelbarrov; 
Wholesale Drug 

fnolesale Fresh Fruit and Vegetable 
Fholesale News and i agazine Distributing 
iholesale Tobacco 
wholesale '.Wallpaper 
Wooden Insulator tin and Bracket 
Wood Heel 
Mood Plug 
Wood Preserving 
Wood Tank 

Food Screw kanufacturing 
Mood Turning and Food Shaping 

Crush kancklc and Brush Block 

Flat and Shaped Veneer 

Variety Wood Turning and Small Turned 
Wood Handles 

Standard and Spring Clothespin 

I'dscellaneous 
Woo dworking - -achii.e ry 
Wool Felt 
Women ' s K e c lewear 



Yeast 542 ~ 544 



64 


- 


66 


683 


- 


593 


249 






266 






461 


- 


463 


G12 






320 


- 


321 


334 


- 


337 


116 


— 


117 


379 


- 


331 


164 


- 


167 


867 


- 


869 


967 


- 


963 


941 


- 


946 


972 


- 


974 


963 


- 


965 


953 


- 


955 


75 


- 


76 


71 


- 


74 


54 






94 


— 


101 


107 


- 


109 


789 






77 


- 


91 


77 


- 


79 


80 


- 


82 


OG 


_ 


38 


83 


- 


85 


89 


- 


91 


312 


_ 


315 


638 


- 


640 


733 


- 


737(c) 



-17*- ... 

INTRODUCTION 

Fur-pose of He. -port 

Much statistical information on labor conditions which had never 
before been .available was collected by FRA« In particular, distributions 
of hours and earnings '"ere collected for many industries for which, at 
best, no more than averages had bten published previously* (*) The. 
larger nart of this new information was collected to provide a basis 
for deciding on the labor standards which should be incorporated into 
new codes. Later there was collected .adre detailed information than 
had been published to test the practical operation of the code -orovi- 
sions which concerned labor directly. 

This information was never assembled into one report during the 
life of FRA and portions of it still remain scattered. The present 
volume has brought together the data that could be found so that the 
student of labor problems may nave as full .a record as possible to serve 
as new source material. No attempt is here made to interpret the tables, 
and only the most elementary tests of their statistical reliability , 
could be applied, during the time available to the Division of Review. 

Sources of L.aterial and i'le t hods of Go llecti on 

( a ) FRA 'questionnaires .' 

A function of the NLA Division of Research and Planning was to 
prepare, in connection with almost ^11 codes, a survey of the economic 
position of the industry, including a report of earnings and nours 
worked by factory and other classes of employees.. These reports were 
to provide the basis for administrative action on the codes. At the 
time statistics available on labor by industries were almost wholly . 
restricted to the reports and investigations by the U. S. bureau of 
Labor Statistics, the U. S. Census of manufactures and in a few cases the 
National Industrial Conference <uard. Information .available through 
these sources was .limited in coverage pr.d dealt primarily with .averages 
in employment, payrolls, earnings and hours worked. The classifications 
of industry, moreover,, were often not .exactly comparable with the defini- 
tions of industry in the appli cat ions for cooes. The ERA division of 
Research and -lanning, therefore, found it necessary to survey many , 
industries for the data essential in determining code provisions. The 
Questionnaires in some cases were ad-pted to provide information in 
connection with special -problems of specific industries. In general, 
however, five standard forms were developed, as follows: 

1. Porn AAA-1. (See Appendix). This form was developer to Drovide 
information on industries which came jointly under the AAA an^ the .FRA. 



(*) The reader is referred to the lists of studies appended to the back 
of this volume for other material presenting the available series 
of averages and detailed distributions in the case of particular 
• industries. 

9818 



-18- 



It asked for data concerning the peak of the operating season and 
man-hours. Specific data ''trt- requested for the nearest peak season 
and the nearest slack season, including the average nomber of processing 
and clerical workers by sex, the average hours worked per meek, and a 
distribution of weekly earrings of both categories of employees. 

•2. Forri 1-3, (See Appendix). Tnis form requested information 
from manufacturers for the payroll -eeks including June 15, 1933 »nd 
September 15, 1933, or the nearest typical weeks. Specific information 
'"ps asked on the total number of ofiice employees and factory '-'age 
earners; classified weekly earnings of ofiice employees; classified 
hourly earnings and classified weekly nours using a double frequency 
table of lactory employees for the ">eek oi Septembler 15, 1933; and 
the average number oi factory '"age earners for 19c 9, 1930, 1931 and 
the four ouarters of 1932 and 1933. 

3. Form 1-C, (See Appendix). This form reouested information 
from manufacturers for the pav roll weeks inducting June 15, 1929, 
June 15, 1935, and October 15, 1933, or the nearest typical weeks. 
It asked for numoer, man-hours worked, weekly earnings and minimum 
hourly rate of earnings for office employees and factory wage earners 
oy sex; classified hourly earnings and weekly hours of factory w S ge 
earners, using a rouble frequency table I or the week ol June 15, 1933; 
classified weekly earnings of office employees; and the average number 
of factory -'age earners and total wages for 1929, 1930, 1931 and the 
four Quarters of 1933. 

4. Form 1-I>, (See Appendix) . This form differs from From 1-C 
onlv in that it reaueets information on classified hourly earnings 
and weekly hours by sex instead oi by the total number oi f set-Dry wage 
earners. 

5. Form 176-2, (See Appendix). This form was developed for non- 
manufacturing industries. It reouested information of. number, nan- 
hours worked, weekly earnings and minimum weekly earrings, for ofiice 
employees, inside sales employees and other employees, for the pay roll 
weeks of June 15, 1929, June 15, 1933, and October 15, 1933, or the 
nearest typical weekfs classified weekly earnings for the week of 
June 15, 1933 for the three groups of- employees by sex; and the average 
number of employees and total earnings. for 1929, 1930, 1931, and the 

i" our ruarters oi 1S3? and 1933. 

Fo field work was done in connection with these questionnaires, 
the entire procedure being carried on oy nail. Tabulation of the 
returns ir some cases was done by the FJ-A Division ol hi search and 
Flannin .-, nost of the industries,- however, were reouested to mail 
their Questionnaires to the U. S. Bureau of the Census which tabulated 
the returns for the MA. The information thus made available was in 
large measure incorporated in the reports of the economic advisers 
on trie Codes involved. These reports appear in Vol. II of the code 
as submitted to the "resident or to tiie NBA Administrator for approval, 
and mav bt found in the NBA files. Detailed data as .tabulated was not 

9618 



*19" 



always induced in the economic reports, nor "ere renoits always made 

after tabulation. Source material, therefore, appearing in this present 

study has been taken fro i Doth the economic reports and from the original 
tabulations. 

(b) Industry Question naires. 

In the early code negotiations, the National Recovery Administration 
was confronted by the problem of making surveys of industry with sufficient 
r-piditv to keep pace with the applications for cades. >viany industries 
through their Code Committees or Trace Associations undertook to make 
surveys by means oi Questionnaires in many cases approved in form by 
the Kr.A division of I-esearch and Planning, returns on these Questionnaires 
were taoulated as a rule by a firm of certified public accountants and 
transmitted to tht N5A Division of research anc Planning for inclusion 
in the reports of the economic arvisers on the industrial coces. Source 
material appearing in this study has been taken ooth from the economic 
reports anc from the original taoulations as transmitted by the Code 
Committees or Trade Associations* to the WxA. 

( c ) Code Authority . Reports . 

most approved codes contained a nrovision to the iolloring effect: 
"The code authority shall have the following powers and duties ....to 
obtain from members of the trade/ industry such information and recorts 
as are required for the administration of tne cote. In addition to 
information recuired to be submitted to the code authority, members of 
the trade/industry subject to this code shall furnish such statistical 
information as the Administrator may deem neces-.ary for the purposes 
recited in Section 3 (?) of the Act t.o such Pederal and State agencies 
as he may designate; nrovided that nothing in this code shall relieve 
any member of the trade/industry of anv existing obligations to furnish 
reports to any governmental agency,, Fo individual report shall be 
disclosed to any other iiember of tht trad.e/incustry or any other party 
except to such other governmental agencies as may be directed by the 
Administrator. " 

It -.--as intended that the code authorities should -provide periodic 
reports on prevailing conditions in industry. Regular reporting services 
by the code authorities, ho-ever, were never completely organized. 
Several code authorities est-olished statistical Dureaus and made 
periodic surveys; 'others arranged with the U. S. Bureau oi the Census 
or tne U. S. T >ureau of Labor Statistics for the periodic assemoling 
and publication of reports. Uniformity of reporting and tabulation vets 
not acnieved during the life of the KKA. Labor data from these reports 
and from special statistical surveys are induced in tnis report. 

( d ) State Department s of Labor . 

.here special surveys of State Departments of Labor have covered 
the seme period or the same inoustries as tnose embodied in this com- 
pilation, their statistical tables h»ve been included. 

9818 



-20- 



Th e source of the tables, incorporated in this compilation is 
indicated on each tpble. 

Period Covered . 

The information collected within this compilation refers principally 
to the Deri or immediately Trior to and the first months of NLA. A 
considerable proportion of the material describes conditions within 
each of the industries for the weeks of June 15 and SeDteraber 15 or 
October 15, 1933. Most of the data collected' by the Division of 
research and Planning had these dates as their points of reference. 
In many industries information was collected for prior dates but 
rarely was material obtained for the period before 1929. 

The information for the FLA code period was obtained primarilv 
from questionnaires distributed by the Division of Research and 
Planning during the years 1935 and 1934 or by special investigations. 
The principal source for the NLA period is the code authority material. 
Special reference for the. student of labor statistics should tlso be 
made to the U. S. 3u: &au of Labor Statistics' studies of the NEA period. 

Arrangement of I'iaterial s 

... To make the information most useful for the study of NLA experience 
all of the data with respect to a single industry has been assembled 
together. The arrangement which has Deen adopted is that outlined in 

ork Materials 13 which outlines a "classification of approved codes in 
industry groups. " The materials for unapproved codes has been placed at 
the end of each group. The codes have been placed within each group 
in the order of their approval. "ithin each industry the tables have 
been arranged insofar as practical in the following manner; hours, 
hourly earnings, and. "'eeklv earnings for productive employees and week- 
ly earnings for office emplovees. . 

reliability and Uses of the Data. 

All of the tables presented were based upon information collected 
through questionnaires. A series oi carefully planned field studies, 
had such been practical, would have yielded more reliable results. On 
the other hand, the concerns which answered these various questionnaires 
were usually interested, in supplying accurate and comprehensive in- 
formation at the times "then these data were requested. The resulting 
knowledge was certainly more comprehensive and more accurate than that 
obtained by other questionnaires covering hours and earnings. Neverthe- 
less, much care should be used before accepting these materials as repre- 
sentative since it was impractical to check the accuracy and coverage of 
the various samples. 

Many of these tables are prefaced with the phrase "To be used with 
Caution." The purpose is to call particular attention to ;the need for. 
investigating the industrial field which was covered or the degree to 

9616 



-21- 



which the data are representative^ This vnvr.se is not intended as a 
q\iestion as to the accuracy of the reports received but as a earning 
against their misuse. 

To permit the student to obtain some guide for the understanding 
of the significance of the data in each group, the date of the approval 
of the code is noted in the preface to each industrial group. Similar- 
ly, the presence of a President's Reemployment Agreement substitution 
is noted wherever industries had had substitutions approved for them- 
selves. These substitutions might be termed temporary codes, as tney 
were substitutions to the President's Reemployment Agreement, applied 
for by industries and authorized until such time as a permanent code 
might be approved. 

The number of concerns and the number of employees represented 
by the reports are stated in most tables. This information, together 
with estimates of total employment has made possible a rough check of 
the proportion of the '"hole industry in the study. Tables covering 
samples which were known to be small or specialized in this sense were 
among those which were marked for "caution." However, it was not 
possible to check the size of the reporting plants, their geographical 
location or the population group to which they belong, whenever such 
information was available it is provided, in one or more of the published 
tables. 

The most general problem involved in using these materials hinges 
on the definitions of industries. The present tables are based on the 
NRA system of classification by cooe, except in the rather minor cases 
where the boundary of the industry was redefined between the time when 
the questionnaire was mailed and the time when the code in question 
was adopted. It does not follow that the tables are completely satis- • 
factory in the present form as a measure of conditions in the code 
industries. In many cases the tables reier to a sub-group of concerns 
or a group covered by one of the supplementary c'odes. Where labor 
standards did not differ, as between such divisions of the industry, 
more satisiactory information may often be obtained by combining the 
data contained in two or more tables along code lines. The arrange- 
ment of tables should facilitate suchcombinations. It must be 
remembered, however, that an individual establishment may have oper- 
ated under a number of different NRA codes. It had to duplicate 
reporting in some cases, due to an inability to allocate employees 
among the various products of the concern. ifor this reason the returns 
sometimes included more employees than those who were strictly subject 
to the provisions of a particular code. Inasmuch as such overlapping 
was mot likely to occur within the sr ie industrial group it probably 
does not seriously affect the broader conclusions to be drawn from 
the data. 

It may be desirable to use the definitions of industry adopted by 
the Census of Manufactures or the. Bureau of Labor Statistics in making 
future compilations of these data. The student is earned, in this 
connection, that the classification by NRA code was different from 
these older classifications of industry. Before attempting such a 

9618 



-23- 



reclassif ication by Census or Bureau oi Labor Statistics industries 
it is suggested that material in the N3A files be used vhich shoe's the 
extent 01 inter-weaving of there various definitions of . the inanuiac- 
turins; industries. (*) 



(*) BLS - NRA Code : !arual. Coordination of Bureau Of Labor Statistics 
Manufacturing Industries and National Recovery Administration Codes, 
compiled bv I. C. Reich, Chief of the Special Statistics Unit, of the 
Statistics Section, *NuA Division of Review, 'March 20, 1936,, and 
Distribution of ypnufr cturing ilraployees by BLS. Industries and 
NRA Codes as of December, 1934, compiled by the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics, Coded Industries Section, in cooperation with the NRA 
Division of Research and Planning. 

Further information may be obtained from "\ork Materials 12. 
Employment, Favrolls, Hours and Wages in 115 Selected Code In- 
dustries, 1933-1935. " published by the NRA Division of Review. 



9818 



-23- 



APFENDIX 



9810 



-24- 

CONFIDENTIAL GOVERNMENT REPORT 



File No. 



Form AAA1 

THE NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION 

Washington, D.C. 



SPECIAL REPORT ON WAGES, HOURS OF WORK, VALUE OF PRODUCTS, ETC. 
This report should be returned in the inclosed envelope to the Bureau of the Census 



In accordance with Sections 3a and 6a of the National Industrial Recovery Act, 
you are requested and required to fill out the following schedule for your plant or 
plants. 

The person responsible for the assembling of the material requested on these 
pages should sign this report in the space provided below and return it promptly to 
the Bureau of the Census for tabulation. An addressed envelope is inclosed for this 
purpose. The additional copy of this schedule is for retention in your files. 

This report will be available only to sworn employees of the Bureau of the 
Census and. of the National Recovery Administration. Any summary statistics which 
may be compiled from this and other similar reports and published will be grouped 
according to the usual Census rules, so that it will be impossible for any one to 
identify your figures or separate them out of the aggregates. 



A 



L^l /£l/L^~^. 



Administrator. 



DESCRIPTION OF PLANT: 



a. Name of plant_ 



b. Name of owner or operator_ 



c. Post-office address of general office_ 



d. State 



f. County_ 



Location of Plant 

e. City, town, or village, 

g. Street and number 



Trade association with which affiliated 



Principal products. 



THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the information contained in this report is correct and 
complete to the best of my knowledge and belief. 



<\ ' s 



Form AAA-1-5M-9/28/33. 



(Signature and official title of person furnishing 
the information. ) 



-25- 
Page 2. 

YOU WILL NEED INFORMATION OF THE GENERAL CHARACTER CALLED FOR BY THESE IN- 
QUIRIES IN ORDER TO BE SURE YOU ARE COMPLYING WITH CODE REQUIREMENTS. It is import- 
ant, therefore, that your records be kept in such a manner as to make it readily 
available. 

INSTRUCTIONS AND DEFINITIONS 

The answers to the several inquiries in this schedule should show actual hours 
worked and actual earnings per week, not nominal or "normal" rates. Convert piece- 
price earnings to a weekly basis for the period covered by this report. 

A. Processing employees are workers in your plant, including stock and time 
clerks, inspectors, working foremen, yard men, warehouse men, etc., but not inc lud- 
ing persons whose duties are entirely supervisory. Do not report field workers en- 
gaged in the cultivation, harvesting or transport of crops raised for processing in 
your plant. . Pieceworkers in your plant should be included under Processing 
Employees . 

B. Clerical employees are workers in offices located at plants-, but do not 
include employees in central offices which administer the affairs of more than one 
plant. Officers, directors, partners, departmental heads and salesmen should be 
excluded. 



INQUIRY I. Operating; season and m an - hours 

a~ In what month or months does the peak of your operating season usually occur? 

b. Over how many weeks does activity remain at or near its maximum? 



c. What percent of a year's total production is usually turned out in your busiest 
single month? 

d. In what month or months is your plant least active (or entirely idle)? 



e. Is the decline from the peak month rapid or gradual? 



f . Give the exact or the approximate total number of man-hours worked by all your 
processing employees during your most active single month. For example, if 10 em- 
ployees worked 8 hours a day for 25 days during the month, the total number of man- 
hours worked would be 2,000. 



g. Give the approximate total number of man-hours worked by your processing em- 
ployees in the course of a year's operations. 



h. Is any of the work in connection with your regular plant operations done on a 
contract basis by outside employers? 



. i. Please describe the type of work done for you by these contractors, and state 
the approximate percent which the cost of contract work forms of your total pro- 
cessing labor cost. 



REMARKS: 

Form AAA-1-5M-9/28/33. 



-26- 



INQJUIRY II. — Total employees , hours of work and weekly earnings . 
for typical week in most recent PEAK SEASON 

The week for which figures are given below ended on 



Page 3. 



193 



Processing employees (see "A", p. 2). 
Clerical employees (see "B", p. 2) 



Numb er of Employees 
Hale : Female 



Average Actual 
Hours of Work 
Per Employee 
During Week 

Covered* 



Number of employees whose earnings f all within the designated range 



Weekly earnings after deductions 
(compulsory only) for insurance, 
spoilage, tools, etc. 



Processing employees 
(See "A", p. 2) 



Less than 83.00 .. 
f3.00 to $5.99 ... 
$6.00 to $8.99 ... 
$9.00 to $11.99 . 
$12.00 to $14.99 
$15.00 to $19.99 
$20.00 to $24.99 
$25.00 to $29.99 
$30.00 to $39.99 
$40.00 to $59.99 
$60.00 or more .... 



Clerical employees 
(See "B", p. 2) 



What was your total processing payroll during the typical Peak season week? 



What was your total clerical payroll? 



*If accurate data are not available, the average hours of work may be estimated 
This figure should reflect the actual time worked per week, not the normal working 
week characteristic of your plant. 



Form AAA-1-5M-9/28/33. 



9 'SIR 



-27- 



Page 4^ 



INQUIRY III. — j'otal employees , hours of work , and weekly earnings 

for typical week in most recent SLACK SEASON 



The term " SLACK SEASON " as here used refers to some part of the year in which 
you are actually operating with a minimum number of employees, not to any part of 
the year in which your plant is entirely idle. 



The week for which figures are given below ended on 



193 



Processing employees (see "A", p. 2). 
Clerical employees (see "B", p. 2) 



Number of Employees 



Male 



Female 



Average Actual 
Hours of Work 
Per Employee 
During Week 

Covered* 



Number of employees whose earnings fall within the designated range 



Weekly earnings after deductions 
(compulsory only) for insurance, 
spoilage, tools, etc. 



Processing employees 
(See "A", p. 2) 



Less than $3.00 . 
43.00 to $5.99 ... 
$6.00 to $8.99 .... 
$9.00 to $11.99 . 
12.00 to $14.99 . 
$15.00 to $19.99 
20.00 to $24.99 . 
$25.00 to $29.99 
$30.00 to $39.99 
$40.00 to $59.99 
$60.00 or more .... 



Clerical employees 
(See "B", p. 2) 



What was your total processing payroll during this 
typical SLACK SEASON week? $_ 



What was your total clerical payroll? 



$_ 



•If accurate data are not available, the average hours of work may. be estimated . 
This figure should reflect the actual time worked per week, not the normal working 
week characteristic of your plant. 



Form AAA-1-5M-9/28/33 . 



9518 



-28- 
CONFIDENTIAL GOVERNMENT REPORT File No. 



FORM 1-B 

THE NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION 
Washington, D.C. 



SPECIAL REPORT ON EMPLOYMENT, HOURS OF WORK, AND EARNINGS 

In accordance with Sections 3a and 6a of the National Industrial Recovery Act, 
you are requested and required to fill out the following schedule. Reports must 
be made for all plants. Separate reports are required for plants in different 
counties and for those in different cities having 10,000 inhabitants or more. A 
combined report may be made for two or more plants engaged in the same line of 
manufacture and located in the same city, town, borough, or village, or for two 
or more such plants located in the same county but in different cities, towns, 
borroughs, or villages having fewer than 10,000 inhabitants. The name and loca- 
tion of each plant must be given. DATA FOR MINING AND QUARRYING, MERCHANDISING, 
AND OTHER NONMANUFACTURING ACTIVITIES SHOULD BE OMITTED. 

Answer all the inquiries in detail , supplying estimates if records are not available. 
The report should be returned promptly in the inclosed envelope, which requires no postage, 
to the Bureau of the Census. The additional copy of the schedule is for retention in your 
files. 

This report will be available only to sworn employees of the Bureau of the Census, 
the Bureau .of Labor Statistics, and the National Recovery Administration. Any summary 
statistics which may be compiled from this and other similar reports and published will be 
grouped according to the usual Census rules, so that it will be impossible for any one to 
identify your figures or separate them out of the aggregates. 



J! 



Administrator. 



DESCRIPTION OF PLANT 
a. Name of plant 



b. Name of owner or operator 



c. Post office address of general office 

Location of Plant 

d. State e. City, town or village 

f. County g. Street and number 



h. Is this plant a branch or subsidiary of some other concern? . If so, 

(Yes or No) 
give name and address of such concern 



i. Trade association or associations with which affiliated 



j. During the payroll week which included 15, Sept. 1933, or nearest typical week, were the 
plant and of>fice covered by this report operating under a Code 



(Yes or No) 



or. under the President's Reemployment Agreement (Blanket Code)? 



(Yes or No) 



Principal products: 



YOU WILL NEED INFORMATION OF THE GENERAL CHARACTER CALLED FOR BY THE FOLLOWING IN- 
QUIRIES IN ORDER TO BE SURE YOU ARE COMPLYING WITH CODE REQUIREMENTS. It is important, 
therefore, that your records be kept in such a manner as to make this information readily 
available. 
Form 1-B - 5 M - 9/28/33 f)[ . . c 



Special Instructions and Definitions 

A. Weekly Earnings . In the following inquiries this term' refers to actual earnings 
(not nominal or "normal" rates) after deductions for insurance, spoilage, tools, etc. If 
employees received benefits not payable in cash, such as use of company houses, meals, 
etc., report under "Remarks" the nature of the benefits, the number and class of employees 
who received them, and their cash value, for the weeks covered. 

B. Office Employees . Include all office workers except officers, directors partners, 
departmental heads, and salesmen. 

C. Factory Wage Earners . Report skilled and unskilled factory workers of all 
classes, including engineers, firemen, watchmen, packers, etc.; also foremen and overseers 
in minor positions who perform work similar to that done by the employees under their 
supervision, but NOT overseers, superintendents, etc., engaged solely in supervisory work. 
Include pieceworkers employed in the plant covered by this report, but do not include per- 
sons working in other plants or at their homes on materials furnished by your establish- 
ment . 

D. Part-Time Workers . Report for the periods covered total numbers of office em- 
ployees and wage earners on the active payroll, actual hours worked, and actual earnings, 
regardless of whether employment was full-time or part-time. 

E. "Typical Week" is nearest week to the date specified which was representative of 
your operations during the month in question. 



INQUIRY I — EMPLOYEES, HOURS OF WORK, AND EARNINGS 



PAYROLL WEEK WHICH INCLUDED SEPTEMBER 15, 1935 , OR THE NEAREST TYPICAL WEEK 



Office employees (see "B," above) 

Factory wage earners (see "C," above) 



Total number 
of Employees 



Male 



Female 



Total 

Man-hours 

Worked* 



Total 
Weekly 

Earnings 



PAYROLL WEEK WHICH INCLUDED JUNE 15, 1933, OR THE NEAREST TYPICAL WEEK 



Office employees (see "B," above) 

Factory wage earners (see "C," above) 



Total number 
of Employees 



Male 



Female 



Total 

Man-hours 
Worked* 



Total 

Weekly 

Earnings 



♦To calculate the total number of man-hours worked, add together the actual number of 
hours worked by each employee during the week covered. If accurate data are not avail- 
able, the average hours of work may be estimated. The figures should represent the actual 
time worked per week, not the normal working week characteristic of your plant. 

INQUIRY II — WEEKLY EARNINGS OF OFFICE EMPLOYEES 

Number of office employees whose earnings fell within the designated 
range for the payroll week which included September 15, 1933, 
or the nearest typical week. 



Less 1 85 . 00 j $10 . 00 1 S15 . 00 1 $20 . 00 1 $25 . 00 1 $30 . 00 ] $40 . 00 | $60 . 00 1 
than 1 to | to to to to to to or | 
$5.00|$9.99[$14.99|$19.99|$24.99]$29.99j$39.99|$59.99| more | 


Total office 
employees 



Form 1-B - 5 M - 9/28/33 



9 



-30- 
INQUIRY III — HOURLY EARNINGS AND HOURS OF WORK OF FACTORY WAGE EARNERS 

Report here all factory wage earners whether on a straight-time, an incentive, or a piece 
price basis. Calculate actual hourly earnings, excluding deductions for insurance, 
spoilage, tools, etc., by dividing the amount deducted for the week by the number of 
hours worked, and subtracting the result from the nominal rate. For example: If de- 
duction amounting to $2.00 were made from the compensation of a wage earner whose 
gross earnings during a 40-hour working week were $16.00, the $2.00 charge should be 
subtracted, leaving $14.00 actual earnings for the week. Divided by 40, the number 
of hours, this gives 350 as the actual earnings per hour requested below. 



Number of factory wage earners who worked specified number of hours 
in each wage group during the payroll week which included 
September 15, 1933 



Actual 




DO NOT 


INCLUDE 


DATA FOR OVERTIME WORK* 






earnings 20 
per hours 
hour or 

under 


20.1 

to 

30 

hours 


30.1 

to 
35 
! hours 


35.1 
| to* 

40 
| hours 


40.1 
j to 
45 
| hours 


45.1 
to 
50 
1 hours 


50.1 
to 
60 
| hours 


Over 

60 
hours 


Total 


Under 10 cents 


















10 to 19.9 cents 


















20 to 24.9 cents 


















25 to 29.9 cents 


















30 to 34.9 cents 


















35 to 39.9 cents 




















40 to 49.9 cents 














50 to 59.9 cents 


















60 to 79.9 cents 


















80 to 99.9 cents 


















$1 .00 or more 














1 




Total 

















* If overtime work was done, state under "Remarks" the total amount of such work per- 
formed during the week covered, together with the total number of factory employees by 
whom it was performed, and specify also the :zte as compared with the normal rate - for 
example, time and a half. 



REMARKS: 



Form 1-B - 5 M - 9/28/33 



<v 



-31- 
INQUIRY IV — FACTORY WAGE EARNERS: 1929-1933 

You are not asked to devote an undue amount of time to the answering of this inquiry, 
and therefore careful estimates will be accepted if book figures are not readily available 
The computation of these averages may be simplified by basing them on the payroll records 
for a few typical weeks in each quarter instead of on the total quarterly payrolls. 



January 

through 

March 



April 
through 
June 



July 

through 

September 



October 
through 
December 



Average number of factory 
employees on payroll: 



1933 
1932 




X X X X 



In order to supply a basis of comparison for the figures given above, you are re- 
quested to enter the data called for below. The average number of wage earners for each 
year may be computed from the figures for a few typical weeks; or you may simply give the 
figure for a single typical week if you can select one which represents approximately the 
average for the year. In any event, you are not expected to perform the laborious opera- 
tion of adding and averaging the payroll totals for each year. 



Yea r 



Average number of 

factory employees 

on payroll 



1931 
1930 
1929 



THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the information contained in this report is correct and com- 
plete to the best of my knowledge and belief. 



Form 1-B - 5 M - 9/28/33 



(Signature and official title of 
person furnishing the information.) 



-0- 



9'::.S 



-32- 
FORM 1-C CONFIDENTIAL GOVERNMENT REPORT File No. 



THE NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION 
Washington, D. C. 



SPECIAL REPORT ON EMPLOYMENT, HOURS OF WORK, AND EARNINGS 

In accordance with Sections 3a and 6a of the National Industrial Recovery Act, you 
are requested and required to fill out the following schedule. Reports must be made for 
all plants. Separate reports are required for plants in different counties and for those 
in different cities having 10,000 inhabitants or more. A combined report may be made for 
two or more plants engaged in the same line of manufacture and located in the same city, 
town, borough, or village, or for two or more such plants located in the same county but 
in different cities, towns, boroughs, or villages. having fewer than 10,000 inhabitants. 
The name and location of each plant must be given. DATA FOR MINING AND QUARRYING, MER- 
CHANDISING, AND OTHER NONMANUFACTURING ACTIVITIES SHOULD BE OMITTED. 

Answer all the inquiries in detail , supplying estimates if records are not available. 
The report should be returned promptly in the inclosed envelope (which requires no post- 
age) to the Bureau of the Census. The additional schedule is for retention in your files, 

This report will be available only to sworn employees of the Bureau of the Census, 
the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the National Recovery Administration. Any summary 
statistics which may be compiled from this and other similar reports and published will 
be grouped according to the usual Census rules, so that it will be impossible for any one 
to identify your figures or separate them out of the aggregates. 



•^Lyi pJLol**^ 



Administrator. 



Special Instructions and Definitions 

A. Earnings refer -to actual earnings of employees (not nominal or "normal" rates) 
after deductions for insurance, spoilage, tools, etc. 

B. Office Employees include all office workers except officers, directors, 
partners, departmental heads and other responsible administrative employees, and out- 
side salesmen. 

C. Factory Wage Earners include all factory workers, inspectors, working foremen, 
etc., but exclude employees whose duties are entirely supervisory. 

D. P art-Time Workers to be included . Report, for the periods covered, total numbers 
of office employees and wage earners on the active payroll, actual hours worked, and 
actual earnings, regardless of whether employment was full-time or part-time. 

E. A Man-Hour is one hour of work by one person. To calculate the total number of 
man-hours for a class of workers, add together all the hours actually worked during the 
period by all workers, both full-time and part-time, in that class. 

F. A Typical Week is the nearest week to the date specified which was representa- 
tive of operations during the month in question. 

— — ■ — ' — ^ 

YOU WILL NEED INFORMATION OF THE GENERAL CHARACTER CALLED FOR BY THE FOLLOWING IN- 
QUIRIES IN ORDER TO BE SURE YOU ARE COMPLYING WITH CODE REQUIREMENTS. It is important, 
therefore, that your records be kept in such a manner as to make this information readily 
available. 

9' * »? 



-33- 
DESCRIPTION OF PLANT 



Name of plant 



Name of owner or operator 



Post-office address of general office 
Location of plant 



(State) 



(County) 



(City, town, or village) (Street address) 
Is this plant a branch or subsidiary of some other concern? If so, give 



(Yes or no) 



name and address of such concern 



Trade association or associations with which affiliated 



During the payroll week which included OCTOBER 15, 1933, or the nearest typical week, 
were the plant and office covered by this report operating under the President's 
Reemployment Agreement (Blanket Code)? . Under a Code? 



(Yes or no) 



If so, what Code? 
Principal products 



(Yes or no) 



(List in order of importance) 



Principal material used 



(List in order of importance) 



Number of shifts and shift-hours for 

June, 1929: June, 1933: 



October, 1933: 



INQUIRY I EMPLOYMENT, HOURS OF WORK, AND EARNINGS 





Payroll week which | Payroll week which] Payroll week which 
included JUNE 15, | included JUNE 15, | included OCT. 15, 
1929, or the near-jl933, or the near-|l933, or the near- 
est typical week lest typical week lest typical week 


1 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


Office employees: 

Number 














Total man-hours worked 














Total weekly earnings 














Minimum hourly rate of 
earnings 














Factory wage earners: 

Numbers 














Total man-hours worked 














Total weekly earnings 














Mininum hourly rate of 

earnings 














The typical week ended on 


, 1929 




, 1933 


, 1933 



Form 1-C 2377 



9MH 



-34- 

INQUIRY II HOURLY EARNINGS AND HOURS OF WORK OF FACTORY WAGE EARNERS 

Report here all factory wage earners, whether on a straight-time, an incentive, or a 
piece-work basis. Calculate actual earnings, excluding deductions for insurance, spoil- 
age, tools, etc., by dividing the amount deducted for the week by the number of hours 
worked and subtracting the result from the nominal rate. For example: If deductions 
amounting to $2.00 were made from the compensation of a wage earner whose nominal rate of 
pay was 35 cents an hour and who worked 40 hours, divide $2.00 by 40 and deduct the quo- 
tient, 5 cents, from the nominal rate of compensation. This leaves 30 cents, not 35, cents, 
as the actual earnings per hour for the wage earner in question. 



Actual 
earnings 


Number of factory wage earners who worked specified number of hours 

in each wage group during the payroll week which included 

JUNE 15, 1933, or the nearest typical week. 

The typical week ended on , 1933. 

DO NOT INCLUDE DATA FOR OVERTIME WORK* 


per 
hour 


20 

hours 

or 

under 


20.1 
to 
25 

hours 


25.1 

to 

30 

hours 


30. 1 | 35.1 

to | to 

35 | 40 

hours \ hours 


40. 1| 45.1 

to | to 

45 | 50 

hours ' hours 


50.1 

to 

55 

hours 


55.1 

to 

•60 

hours 


Over 

60 

hours 


Total 










1 












150 to 19.90 






















200 to 24.90 






















250 to 29.90 





















300 to 34.90 








1 










35* to 39.90 
















400 to 44.90 







i 


| 










450 to 49.90 






1 












500 to 54.90 




















550 to 59.90 




1 1 










600 to 69.90 


1 1 
















1 

| | 












80^ or more 






1 1 

1 1 












Total 




1 1 

! ! 


1 











*If overtime work was done, state under "Remarks" the total amount of such work per- 
formed during the week covered, together with the total number of factory employees by 
whom it was performed, and specify also the rate as compared with the normal rate — for 
example, time and a half. 

REMARKS: 



Form 1 -C 2377 



<V-c 



-35- 



INQUIRY III — OFFICE EMPLOYEES GROUPED ACCORDING TO WEEKLY EARNINGS 



Total 
Employees 



Number of office employees whose earnings fell within the designated range 
for the payroll week which included JUNE 15, 1933, or the nearest 
typical week 



Less I $5. 00 1 $10. 00 
than j to | to 
85.001 $9.991814.99 



$15. 00 1820. 00 1 $25. 00 1830. 00 1 $35. 00 1 $40. 00 1 845. 00 
to | to j to | to | to | to and | 
$19^99 1 g24^99 1 gg9_. 99 j S34 . S9 j S59 . 99 ] S-44 . 99 1 over j 



INQUIRY IV— EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES 



Period 


1 

Average number 1 

of factory wage | 

earners on payroll j 


Total wages 
paid factory wage 
earners 




1933 3rd quarter 


1 






































2nd quarter 
















1931 








1930 








1929 










I • > 





THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the information contained in this report is correct and complete 
to the best of my knowledge and belief. 



Date 



(Signature and official title of 

person furnishing the information.) 



Form 1-C 2377 



9rlL8 



-36- 
FORM 1-D CONFIDENTIAL GOVERNMENT REPORT File No. 



THE NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION 
Washington, D. C. 



SPECIAL REPORT ON EMPLOYMENT, HOURS OF WORK, AND EARNINGS 

In accordance with Sections 3a and 6a of the National Industrial Recovery Act, you 
are requested and required to fill out the following schedule. Reports must be made for 
all plants. Separate reports are required for plants in different counties and for those 
in different cities having 10,000 inhabitants or more. A combined report may be made for 
two or more plants engaged in the same line of manufacture and located in the same city, 
town, borough, or village, or for two or more such plants located in the same county but 
in different cities, towns, boroughs, or villages having fewer than 10,000 inhabitants. 
The name and location of each plant must be given.' DATA FOR MINING AND QUARRYING, MER- 
CHANDISING, AND OTHER NONMANUFACTURING ACTIVITIES SHOULD BE OMITTED. 

Answer all the inquiries in detail , supplying estimates if records are not available, 
The report should be returned promptly in the inclosed envelope (which requires no post- 
age) to the Bureau of the Census. The additional schedule is for retention in your files. 

This report will be available only to sworn employees of the Bureau of the Census, 
the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the National Recovery Administration. Any summary 
statistics which may be compiled from this and other similar reports and published will 
be grouped according to the usual Census rules, so that it will be impossible for any one 
to identify your figures or separate them out of the aggregates. 



iL^jL ijLILl^~^ 



Administrator. 



Special Instructions and Definitions 

A. Earnings refer to actual earnings of employees (not nominal or "normal" rates) 
after deductions for insurance, spoilage, tools, etc. 

B. Office Employees include all office workers except officers, directors, 
partners, departmental heads and other responsible administrative employees, and out- 
side salesmen. 

C. Factory Wage Earners include all factory workers, inspectors, working foremen, 
etc., but exclude employees whose duties are entirely supervisory. 

D. P art-Time Workers to be included . Report, for the periods covered, total numbers 
of office employees and wage earners on the active payroll, actual hours worked, and 
actual earnings, regardless of whether employment was full-time or part-time. 

E. A Man-Hour is one hour of work by one person. To calculate the total number of 
man-hours for a class of workers, add together all the hours actually worked during the 
period by all workers, both full-time and part-time, in that class. 

F. A Typical Week is the nearest week to the date specified which was representa- 
tive of operations during the month in question. 

YOU WILL NEED INFORMATION OF THE GENERAL CHARACTER CALLED FOR BY THE FOLLOWING IN- 
QUIRIES IN ORDER TO BE SURE YOU ARE COMPLYING WITH CODE REQUIREMENTS. It is important, 
therefore, that your records be kept in such a manner as to make this information readily 
available. 

Form 1-D - 2472 , m 



-37- 



DESCRIPTION OF PLANT 



Name of plant 



Name of owner or operator 



Post-office address of general office 
Location of plant 



(State) 



(County) 



(City, town, or village) (Street address) 
Is this plant a branch or subsidiary of some other concern? . If so, give 



(Yes or no) 



name and address of such concern 



Trade association or associations with which affiliated 



During the payroll week which included OCTOBER 15, 1933, or the nearest typical week, 
were the plant and office covered by this report operating under the President's 
Reemployment Agreement (Blanket Code)? . Under a Code? 



(Yes or no) 



(Yes or no) 



If so, what Code? 
Principal products 



(List in order of importance) 



Principal material used 



Number of shifts and shift-hours for 

June, 1929: June, 1933: 



(List in order of importance) 

October, 1933:. 



INQUIRY I EMPLOYMENT, HOURS OF WORK, AND EARNINGS 





Payroll week which 
included JUNE 15, 
1929, or the near- 
est typical week 


Payroll week which 
included JUNE 15, 
1933, or the near- 
est typical week 


Payroll week which 
included OCT. 15, 
1933, or the near- 
est typical week 


1 


Male | Female 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


Office employees: 














Total man-hours worked 














Total weekly earnings 














Minimum hourly rate of 
earnings 














Factory wage earners: 

Numbers 














Total man-hours worked 














Total weekly earnings 














Mininum hourly rate of 

earnings 




1 










The typical week ended on 


, 1929 




1 
, 1933 | 


, 1933 



Form l-D-2472 



-38- 



INQUIRY II-A - HOURLY EARNINGS AND HOURS OF WORK OF MALE FACTORY WAGE EARNERS 

Report here all MALE factory wage earners, whether on a straight-time, an incen- 
tive, or a piece-work basis. Calculate actual earnings, excluding deductions for 
insurance, spoilage, tools, etc., by dividing the amount deducted for the week by the 
number of hours worked and subtracting the result from the nominal rate. For example: 
If deductions amounting to $2.00 were made from the compensation of a wage earner 
whose nominal rate of pay was 35 cents an hour and who worked 40 hours, divide $2.00 
by 40 and deduct the quotient, 5 cents, from the nominal rate of compensation. This 
leaves 30 cents, not 35 cents, as the actual earnings per hour for the wage earner in 
question. 



Actual 
earnings 


[Number of MALE factory wage earners who worked specified number of hours | 
in each wage group during the payroll week which included 
JUNE 15, 1933, or the nearest typical week. 
The typical week ended on , 1933. 
DO NOT INCLUDE DATA FOR OVERTIME WORK* 


per 
hour 


1 20 
| hours 

1 or 
under 


| 20.1 

| to 
| 25 
1 hours 


| 25.ll 30.1 
to J to 
| 30 | 35 
1 hours 1 hours 


| 35.1 | 40.1 

| to j to 
| 40 | 45 
hours I hours 


| 45.1 

to 
1 50 
hours 


| 50.1 
| to 
55 
hours 


1 55.1 

1 to 
1 60 
hours 


Over 

60 

hours 


Total 


Under 150 




1 1 
1 














150 to 19.90 






1 
1 














200 to 24.90 






1 
1 














250 to 29.90 






















300 to 34.90 






















350 to 39.90 


1 




















400 to 44.90 . 






















450 to 49.90 






















500 to 54.90. 






















550 to 59.90 






















600 to 69.90 






















700 to 79. 9c« 






















80c< or more 
















1 






Total 





















♦If overtime work was done, state under "Remarks" the total amount of such work 
performed during the week covered, together with the total number of male factory wage 
earners by who.m it was performed, and specify also the rate as compared with the 
normal rate — for example, time and a half. 



REMARKS : 



2472. 



9f]LR 



-39- 



INQUIRY II-B-HOURLY« EARNINGS AND HOURS OF WORK OF FACTORY WAGE EARNERS 

Report here all FEMALE factory wage earners, whether on a straight-time, an incen- 
tive, or a piece-work basis. Calculate actual earnings, excluding deductions for in- 
surance, spoilage, tools, etc., by dividing the amount deducted for the week by the 
number of hours worked and subtracting the result from the nominal rate. For example: 
If deductions amounting to $2.00 were made from the compensation of a wage earner 
whose nominal rate of pay was 35 cents an hour and who worked 40 hours, divide 12.00 
by 40 and deduct the quotient, 5 cents, from the nominal rate of compensation. This 
leaves 30 cents, not 35 cents, as the actual earnings per hour for the wage earner in 
question. 



Actual 
earnings 


| Number of FEMALE factory wage earners who worked specified number of 
hours in each wage group during the payroll week which included 
JUNE 15, 1933, or the nearest typical week. 
The typical week ended on , 1933. 
DO NOT INCLUDE DATA FOR OVERTIME WORK* 




per 
hour 


| 20 | 20.1 
| hours ] to 
| or | 25 
under Ihours 


| 25.] 
| to 
| 30 
| hours 


. 30.1 
to 
35 
hours 


35.1 
to 
40 
hours 


40.1 
to 
.45 

Ihours 


45.1 
to 
50 
hours 


50.1 
to 
55 

hours 


55.1 
to 
60 
hours 


•Over 
60 
hours 


Total 




Under 150 






f 


1' 
1 














150 to 19.90 






I 


1 1 




1 










200 to 24.90 












1 


1 1 
| 










250 to 29.90 














1 1 
1 1 








300 to 34.90 
















1 










350 to 39.90 


























400 to 44.90 


























450 to 49.90 



























500 to 54.90 
























550 to 59.90 



























600 to 69.90 
























700 to 79.90 


























800 or more 






















1 




Total 


















1 

1 1 


1 
, 1 





*If overtime work was done, state under "Remarks" the total amount of such work 
performed during the week covered, together with the total number of female factory 
wage earners by whom it was performed, and specify also the rate as compared with the 
normal rate — for example, time and a half. 



REMARKS : 



2472. 



H' 



-40- 



INQUIRY III— OFFICE EMPLOYEES GROUPED ACCORDING TO WEEKLY EARNINGS 



Total Less 
Employees than 
$5.00 



Number of office employees whose earnings fell within the designated range 
for the payroll week which included JUNE 15, 1933, or the nearest 
typical week 



55. 00 | $10. 00 

to J to 
$9. 99 J $14. 99 



$15 . 00 1 $20 . 00 1 $25 . 00 1 $30 . 00 1 $35 . 00 1 $40 . 00 1 $45 . 00 
to | to J to | to | to J to and 
$19.99 | $24.99 | $29.99 l $34.99 J S59.99 J $44.99 | over 



INQUIRY IV— EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES 



Period 


Average number 

of factory wage 

earners on payroll 


Total wages 
paid factory wage 
earners 




1933 3rd quarter 








2nd quarter 








1st quarter 








1932 4th quarter. 
















2nd quarter 








1st quarter 








1931 








1930 








1929 










. ,i 





THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the information contained in this report is correct and complete 
to the best of my knowledge and belief. 



Date 



(Signature and official title of 

person furnishing the information.) 



Form 1-D 2472 



fi ■:«? 



-41- 

Form 176-2 CONFIDENTIAL GOVERNMENT REPORT File No. 



THE- NATIONAL RECOVERY ADMINISTRATION 
Washington, D. C. 



SPECIAL REPORT ON EMPLOYMENT, HOURS OF WORK, AND EARNINGS 

In accordance with Sections 3a and 6a of the National Industrial Recovery Act, 
you are requested and required to fill out the following schedule. Reports must be 
made for all merchandising establishments. Separate reports are required for estab- 
lishments in different counties and for those in different cities, towns, boroughs, 
or villages having 2,500 inhabitants or more. A combined report may be made for two 
or more establishments engaged in the same line of merchandising and located in the 
same city, town, borough, or village, or for two or more establishments located in 
the same county but in different cities, towns, boroughs, or villages having fewer 
than 2,500 inhabitants. The name and location of each establishment must be given. 

Answer all the inquiries in detail , supplying estimates if records are not 
available. The report should be returned promptly in the inclosed envelope (which 
requires no postage) to the Bureau of the Census. The additional schedule is for 
retention in your files. 

This report will be available only to sworn employees of the Bureau of the 
Census, the Bureau of Labor Statistics , and the National Recovery Administration. 
Any summary statistics which may be compiled from this and other similar reports 
and published will be grouped according to the usual Census rules, so that it will 
be impossible for any one to identify your figures or separate them out of the ag- 
gregates. 



•'Vw^ fLtfL~~y. 



Administrator 



Special Instructions and Definitions 

A. Earnings refer to actual earnings of employees (not nominal or "normal" rates) 
after deductions for insurance, breakage, etc. 

B. Do not report , in ANY of the inquiries, individual owners, partners, offi- 
cers, directors, department heads and other responsible administrative employees, 
employees whose duties are wholly or chiefly supervisory, and outside salesmen. 

C. Part - time workers to be included. Report, for the periods covered, total 
number of employees on the active payroll, actual hours worked, and actual earnings' 
regardless of whether employment was full time or part-time. 

D. A Man- Hour is one hour of work by one person. To calculate the total num- 
ber of man hours for a class of workers add together all the hours actually worked 
during the period by all workers, both full-time and part-time, in that class. 

E. A Typical Week is the nearest week to the date specified which was repre- 
sentative of operations during the month in question. 



YOU WILL NEED INFORMATION OF THE GENERAL CHARACTER CALLED FOR BY THE FOLLOWING 
INQUIRIES IN ORDER TO BE SURE YOU ARE COMPLYING WITH CODE REQUIREMENTS. It is im- 
portant, therefore, that your records be kept in such a manner as to make this in- 
formation readily available. 
2734. 



Form 176-2 



Name of establishment 



Name of owner or operator 



-42- 
DESCRIPTION OF ESTABLISHMENT 



Post-office address of general office 
Location of establishment 



(State) 



(County) 



(City, town, or village) (Street address) 
Is this establishment a branch or subsidiary of some other concern? 



so, give name and address of such concern 



(Yes or no) 



Trade associaticn or associations with which affiliated 



If 



During the payroll week which included OCTOBER 15, 1933, or the nearest typical week, 
was the establishment covered by this report operating under the President's 
-Reemployment Agreement (Blanket Code)? . Under a Code? 



If so, what Code? 



(Yes or no) 



(Yes or no) 



Principal lines of merchandise 



(List in order of importance) 



INQUIRY I - EMPLOYMENT. 


-10URS OF WORK, AND 


EARNINGS 








Payroll week which 
included JUNE 15, 
1929, or the near- 
est typical week 


Payroll week which 
included JUNE 15, 
1933, or the near- 
est typical week 


[Payroll week which 
[included OCT. 15, 
j 1933, or the near- 
est typical week 




Male I Female 


Male 1 Female 


Male 


1 Female 


Office employees^: 

Number 














Total man-hours worked 














1 
Total weekly earnings** 














Minimum weekly earnings* 














Inside sales employees^: 














Total man-hours worked 














1 
Total weekly earnings** 














Minimum weekly earnings* 














Other employees^: 














Total man-hours worked 














Total weekly earnings** 














Minimum weekly earnings* 
















. 1929 


, 1933 i 


, 1933 



f See "B" page 1. "Include earnings for overtime work. 

* For full-time employees only. 

2734. 



n us 



Form 176-2 



-43- 
INQUIRY II — EMPLOYEES GROUPED ACCORDING TO 


WEEKLY EARNINGS 




Actual earnings per week 

1 
EXCLUDING EARNINGS FOR 

| 


Number ol 

ignate 

JU 

Tt 

Of] 
emplc 


' employees whose earnings fell within the des- 
d range for the payroll week which included 
HE 15, 1933, or the nearest typical week. 
le typical week ended on , 1933. 


OVERTIME WORK* 


'ice 
>yees# 


Inside sales 
employees^ 


Other 
employees?? 




Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


Under $5.00 














$5.00 to $9.99 







. 




$10.00 to $12.49 






$12.50 to $14.99 







$15.00 to $17.49 






$17.50 to $19.99 










$20.00 to $24.99 









$25.00 to $29.99 














$30.00 to $34.99 









$35.00 or more 











Total 






















§ See "B" page 1. 

* If overtime work was done, state under "Remarks" the total amount of such work 
performed during the week covered, together with the total number of employees by 
whom it was performed, and specify also the rate as compared with the normal rate — 
for example, time and a half. 

REMARKS: 



INQUIRY III — EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES 



Period 



1933 — 3rd quarter.. 

2nd quarter.. 

1st quarter.. 

1932 — 4th quarter.. 

3rd quarter.. 



Average 
number of 
employees^ 
on payroll 



Total 

earnings* 

of 
employees 



Period 



1932 — 2nd quarter.. 
1st quarter.. 

1931 

1930 

1929 , 



Average 
number of 
employees# 
on payroll 



Total 
earnings* 

of 
employees 



# See "B" page 1. * Include earnings for overtime work. 



THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the information contained in this report is correct anc 
complete to the best of my knowledge and beliex . 



pate_ 
2734. 



n -;:. 



(Signature and official title of person 
supplying the information) . 



-JLA- 



. , -nlo- ,- ees 

ode lui'ocr Aucroved Cedes f t-imsnnd s) Affective Date 



..TA1S - 1T:3H0US and NOSW^HHOUS 



ITOTJ 



(12 Codes) TOTAL 576.0 

11. Iron & Steel (l suople*ient) 430.0 8-19-33 

X81. Copper & Brass '"ill Products 28.0 11-13-33 

X173. Smelting & Refining Secondary 

I'etals 1.3 

X263. Secondare Aluminum Industrv .4 2-23-34 

X351. Quicksilver Industry 1,0 3-31-34 

401. Copper Industry 64.0 4-26-34 

435. Kanganese Industry .4 5—21-34 

X442. Lead Industry 28.0 6-4-54 

XX445. Nickel A Nickel Alloys 1.4 11-37-33 

X470. Alu unun Industry 17.0 7-11-34 

515. Alloys Inaustr^ 3.7 9-15-54 

X555. Zinc Industry 11.9 



X ^ PSA substitution approved for Industry 
XX n HBA code more inclusive than PHA substitution (difference 

is narked) 



9318 



-45- 
T&BL2 1 

Iron and Steel Industry 

Distribution of Employees by Weekly Hours 

September 1933 to Aoril 1534 













E "ermted 




Average 








r fee 


kly Hou 


rs 


from 




Hours 


"unber of 






40 


Over 


Over 


Code 




of 


Cov.v:>a"ies 


Week Sr.di: 


'-to 


or 
less 


40 
to 48 


48 


Limitation 


Total 


Employees 

Wording 
40 hours or less 


Reporting 


1933 


















September 


9 


332883 


19041 


3572 


36411 


391907 


31,6 


"ot stated 




16 


317665 


36254 


4835 


36574 


395323 


33.2 


it 




25 


319214 


33334 


3697 


36618 


392863 


33e3 


ii 




30 


314120 


33751 


4489 


36683 


394043 


32.9 


it 


October 


7 


306746 


36717 


3611 


37437 


384511 


33.3 


224 




14 


312296 


34950 


4102 


37430 


383778 


33.4 


224 




21 


325631 


26797 


3129 


37433 


392990 


32.0 


224 




28 


319684 


23327 


1767 


37302 


382080 


30.9 


224 


November 


4 


304134 


19220 


1502 


37071 


361927 


29.8 


224 




1 T 


309339 


17969 


863 


37196 


365367 


29.6 


219 




18 


309822 


18156 


752 


37302 


366032 


29.3 


219 




25 


306314 


20437 


948 


37243 


364930 


29.4 


219 


December 


2 


304836 


15491 


595 


37117 


358040 


27.7 


219 




9 


302387 


30100 


1277 


37532 


371096 


30.3 


222 




16 


295793 


38988 


1890 


37377 


374043 


31.1 


222 




23 


286516 


44498 


3204 


37475 


371693 


31 .7 


222 




30 


293018 


13365 


1571 


37123 


350078 


23.7 


222 


1934 


















January 


6 


289213 


21417 


1634 


37452 


549716 


28.3 


223 




13 


291547 


25641 


1723 


37565 


356477 


29.9 


223 




20 


295596 


26117 


1504 


37750 


360967 


29.9 


223 




27 


296025 


27199 


1349 


37777 


362350 


29.8 


223 


February 


rr 
O 


295916 


32850 


1065 


37911 


367742 


30.1 


223 




10 


297399 ■ 


36240 


1450 


38198 


373287 


31.0 


221 




17 


296462 


43156 


1402 


33388 


379408 


32.0 


221 




24 


297388 


47257 


1186 


38478 


334309 


32.4 


221 


March 


3 


299983 


50973 


1527 


38512 


390995 


33.1 


221 




10 


316733 


36655 


1062 


38687 


393137 


33.6 


225 




17 


324584 


34773 


757 


38747 


398861 


33.7 


225 




24 


327645 


35284 


545 


38875 


402350 


33.9 


225 




31 


328376 


35417 


467 


33918 


403173 


33.8 


225 


Anril 


7 


332659 


23934 


386 


39063 


401042 


33.8 


226 




14 


336335 


33260 


700 


39203 


409998 


34.5 


226 




21 


337645 


37755 


568 


3? 275 


415243 


uDi o 


226 




28 


336237 


43588 


707 


39437 


41C f :63 


l;D . O 


225 



Source: From i.Ionthly Re-oorts (Form l) of the American Iron and Steel Institutei 
9818 



-46- 
TABLE 2 



Iron and Steel Industry 
Distribution of Employees "by IJeekly Hours 
Kay to December, 19S4 







W 
40 


eeMLy Hours 


Over 


Ez emoted 
fro ! 


Total 


Average 
Hours 






Over 


lumber 






or 


40 


48 


Code 




of 


of 


Week Ending 


less 


to 48 




Limitation 




Enrol oyees 


Co r s 
















iTorhing 


P.e-oort- 
















40 hours 


ing 
















or more 




1934 


















May 


5 


336601 


47234 


1030 


40030 


424945 


35.4 


224 




12 


341776 


47628 


1043 


40193 


430646 


55.5 


224 




19 


340979 • 


50000 


888 


40173 


432046 


35.4 


224 




2S 


337452 


55341 


780 


40271 


434344 


35.5 


224 


June 


2 


344776 


50562 


671 


40380 


436389 


34,5 


224 ( 




9 


331438 


67163 


861 


40051 


439513 


35,4 


225 




16 


328235 


73955 


1737 


40111 


443674 


55 . 5 


225 




23 


334786 


65414 


708 


40117 


441025 


35.0 


225 




30 


329279 


64354 


1195 


40046 


435372 


35, 5 


225 


July 


7 


270804 


6575 


136 


37724 


315289 


26.0 


223 




14 


317516 


18991 


182 


33 929 


375618 


29,5 


223 




21 


325118 


15426 


114 


3913 ! 


379796 


29.2 


223 




2G 


314525 


16387 


214 


33703 


369839 


29,2 


223 


August 


4 


311169 


13755 


144 


38352 


363420 


28,9 


224 




11 


311061 


12547 


112 


33252 


361972 


2u» D 


224 




18 


392391 


9610 


102 


37533 


333689 


27.3 


224 




25 


388503 


8791 


164 ' 


37493 


334931 


27.3 


224 


September 


i 


286331 


8147 


69 


37532 


332229 


25. 3 


224 j 

217 




Q 

O 


282415 


1893 


27 


37128 


321463 


34.0 




15 


292350 


7793 


63 


37577 


337998 


26.7 


217 




22 


294788 


8707 


71 


37585 


341151 


27.3 


217 




29 


293906 


10902 


140 


37783 


342749 


27,6 


217 


October 


6 


292154 


9084 


116 


37734 


359088 


27.1 


222 




13 


239981 


8323 


79 


37855 


535240 


97.1 


222 




20 


290937 


9114 


66 


37784 


337921 


27.4 


222 




27 


291817 


10314 


153 


3781 


340638 


27.7 


222 


Novemb er 


1-T 


232533 


11883 


74 


37S : 'i 


338311 


27,4 


222 




10 


: v : 556 


12065 


38 


3CC12 


347722 


27,9 


216 




17 


297721 


13358 


47 


38070 


349206 


28.3 


216 




24 


296867 


15923 


65 


38138 


350995 


28.3 


216 


December 


1 


294274 


12593 


25 


38033 


344955 


27,3 


216 




n 
u 


292638 


21688 


138 


38174 


552658 


.2 


219 




15 


289956 


33142 


149 


38353 


361603 


,9 


219 




22 


280177 


43595 


449 


317 


362538 


. 


219 




29 


290453 


11331 


57 


33003 


339844 


25.5 


219 


Source : 


From 


monthly 


reports (Form 1) of 


the American 


Iron and 


Steel Inst it 


-'.te. 


9818 



















— a-7~ 



TAELE 3 









] 


iron and 


Steel I nous i 


;ry 












Distritn 


it: on of 
January 


E^/nloyeec bj 
to Se-otenbei 


- Weekly ] 
'. 1335 


lours 








Weekly Hours 


Over 


Ezie'ioted 
frora Code 


Total 


Ave.Hrs.of 
Enrol o ye es 


ITo . of 




40 


Over 40 


Cor.roanies 


Week En 


ding 


or 


to 48 


48 


Lin'iitat: on 




Working 40 


Sa-oortin,f 


1935 




less 










hrs. or less 




January 


5 


285258 


36152 


395 


38460 


3G0235 


29.6 


215 




12 


285230 


43258 


503 


38755 


372726 


31.9 


215 




19 


279549 


61588 


480 


33934 


380551 


32.8 


215 




26 


OT? one 


75919 


556 


39053 


387183 


33;4 


215 


Februar 


7 2 


273004 


82435 


653 


39221 


395293 


33.7 


"15 




9 


274901 


84223 


485 


39520 


399129 


34.2 


217 




' 16 


278264 


83033 


916 


39667 


401830 


33.9 


217 




23 


283229 


79580 


801 


39743 


403353 


33.8 


217 


March 1 


2 


289727 


74218 


1017 


39795 


404757 


33.9 


217 




9 


310293 


54393 


1090 


39999 


406375 


34.5 


219 




16 


309289 


56270 


992 


40074 


406625 


34.1 


219 




23 


312309 


56374 


772 


40232 


409687 


34.0 


219 




30 


308130 


59146 


758 


40267 


408281 


34.1 


219 


April 


6 


315635 


51121 


454 


40594 


407804 


33.3 


218 




13 


315384 


49505 


467 


40657 


406017 


33.9 


218 




20 


317892 


46948 


449 


40641 


405930 


33.9 


213 




27 


319008 


44844 


331 


40595 


404778 


33.8 


218 


May 


4 


314344 


45521 


404 


40594 


4008S3 


35.4 


208 




11 


320894 


33399 


367 


40673 


401238 


33.4 


203 




18 


323298 


33052 


426 


40746 


402522 


33.5 


208 




25 


322918 


36263 


313 


40845 


400300 


t-O t£~i 


208 


June 


1 


326892 


27168 


1201 


40817 


396078 


31.0 


208 




8 


316591 


35231 


1602 


40747 


395174 


32.3 


209 




15 


318638 


35869 


831 


-40819 


395157 


32.4 


209 




22 


316769 


34521 


740 


40727 


392757 


82.1 


209 




29 


3U4528 


47471 


865 


40793 


395553 


32.6 


209 


July 


6 


311721 


10552 


259 


40102 


562744 


26.8 


208 




13 


304951 


44322 


589 


40503 


390970 


32.3 


208 




20 


306590 


44962 


546 


40470 


392368 


33.0 


208 




27 


308369 


44540 


622 


40460 


395431 


33.1 


208 


August 


3 


304220 


51571 


865 


40812 


397468 


33.3 


201 




10 


305456 


51599 


737 


40745 


398537 


33.7 


201 




17 


301921 


56783 


665 


40773 


400142 


34.1 


201 




24 


302598 


56915 


898 


40851 


401262 


34.1 


201 




31 


300168 


61397 


1175 


40934 


403674 


?4;A 


201 


Sept. 


7 ■ 


331915 


24994 


489 


41353 


338751 


32.3 


200 




14 


304146 


59141 


1154 


41542 


405983 


34.4 


200 




21 


301952 


60625 


1335 


41642 


405564 


34.5 


200 




28 


293934 


70077 


1479 


41795 


407286 


34.7 


200- 



Source: Eror.i monthly reports (Eor i l) of the American Iron and Steel Institr.te. 



9818 



TA13LI 4 (a) 

IHO"T AIT STEEL INDUSTRY 

Avera£:e Weekly Hours and Hourly Earnings of Employees 
Receiving Hourly, Piece-Work or Tonnage Wages. 

June 1953 



Districts 



ITo. of 
Companies 



Eastern 

Johns toun 

Pittsburg 

Youngstovn Valley 

North, Ohio hiver 

Canton, Llass. - Mansfield 

Cleveland 

Buffalo 

Detroit - Toledo 

South Ohio River 

Indiana-Illinois-St . Louis 

Chicago 

Southern 

Birmingham 

Kansas City 

Duluth 

Colorado 

Utah 

Seattle 

San Francisco 

Los Angeles 

A&nin. Sell, and General 



1/ 



ITo. of 
Employees 



Avge. Hours 

Per Week 

Per Enrol oyee 



Average 
Earnings 
Per Hour 



38,127 


40.2 


45.46- 


6 , 905 


37.6 


44.1 


71 , 244 


35.1 


48.1 


36,026 


3P.0 


48.9 


21 , 545 


43.5 


48.2 


11 , 205 


42.5 


50.4 


IS, 604 


41.7 


47.7 


0,503 


39.1 


45.4 


6,048 


51. 5 


50.6 


11,482 


44.1 


48.9 


11,765 


40.6 


44.9 


43,002 


40.1 


48.4 


c> j O-t- to 


49.0 


30.3 


8,255 


35.2 


37.3 


1.058 


40.4 


49.1 


927 


40.4 


42.5 


2,043 


oo « O 


50.0 


227 


28.1 


40.7 


330 


20.2 


49.3 


2,032 


40.1 


55.3 


1,053 


43.8 


53.2 


805 


46.9 


44.7 



Total 



305,259 



39.4 



47.3*5 



SOURCE: Erom iionthly Reports Porn Ho. 3 of the American Iron and Steel 
Institute, 



9818 



TABLE- 4 (t>) (Cont'd) 

II10IT AIT STEEL II JuSTRY 

Average Weekly Hours and Hourly Earnings of Employees 
Receiving Hourly, Piece-¥ork or Tonnage Wages 

Se-ot ember 1933 



So. of 




Avge. Hours 


Average 


Companies 


ho. of 


Per Week 


Earnings 


Districts JJ 


Employees 


Per Employee 


Per Hour 


Eastern 


52,669 


33.0 


53. Of* 


Johnstoun 


8,491 


26.4 


51.5' 


Pittstrurg 


84,775 


30.0 


57.6 


Youngstoun Valley 


43,602 


31.5 


58.8 


North Ohio River 


26 , 033 


31.9 


59.5 


Canton, Mass, - Mansfield 


15,818 


34.7 


59.9 


Cleveland 


22,386 


33.8 


57.4 


Buffalo 


11,915 


33.8 


55.7 


Detroit « Toledo 


7,495 


37.5 


63.5 


South Ohio River 


16 . 040 


34.0 


60.9 


Indiana-Illionis-St. Louis 


13,406 


30.9 


54.6 


Chicago 


52,591 


32.7 


57.2 


Southern 


4, 516 


32.8 


36.6 


Birmingham 


9,229 


32.0 


43.8 


Kansas City 


1 , 200 


34.5 


55.3 


Duluth 


974 


31.7 


52.5 


Colorado 


2,851 


24.9 


58.8 


Utah 


230 


27.2 


47.4 


Seattle 


461 


27.6 


59.3 


San Francisco 


2, 919 


34.3 


62.7 


Los Angeles 


1.567 


36.6 


57.9 


Admin. Sell, and General 


973 


37.6 


49.6 



Total 



330,271 



52.0 



56.7rf 



l/ Date- not available prior to October 1933 

SOURCE: From Monthly Reports Form Ho, 5 of the American Iron and Steel 
Institute. 



-60- 

TABLE-4 (c) (Cont'd) 

rHOH USD STEEL I. "JUSTLY 

Average Weekly Hours anc Hourly Earnings of Employees 
Receiving Hourly, Piece-Work or Tonnage Wages 

October 1935 



Districts 



Avge. Hours Average 
Ho. of Ho. of Per Week Earnings 
Companies Employees Per Employee Per Hour 



Eastern 76 


52 r 833 


34.2 


54. In 


Johnstown 2 


8,172 


25.6 


55. o' 


Pittsburg 45 


83,876 


29.4 


59.4 


Youngs torm Valley 20 


44, 056 


30.7 


60.8 


North Ohio River 5 


25,985 


28.2 


59.3 


Canton, hass. -Mansfield 11 


15,460 


32.4 


61.3 


Cleveland 9 


22 t 005 


30.0 


53.8 


Buffalo 13 


11,844 


31.3 


54.9 


Detroit - Toledo 15 


7,727 


56.0 


63.6 


South Ohio River 13 


15,931 


32.7 


61.8 


Indiana-Illinois- St. Louis 24 


13,099 


30.5 


55. 6 


Chi cago 28 


52, 899 


32.6 


58.6 


Southern 15 


4. 423 


32.8 


35.9 


Birmingham 5 


9,396 


29.4 


43.9 


Kansas City 2 


1 , 250 


35.4 


55.7 


Duluth 2 


1,104 


50.3 


53. 5 


Colorado 2 


2,728 


25.9 


57.8 


Utah 1 


229 


28.0 


47.4 


Seattle 4 


450 


29.6 


59.0 


San Francisco 4 


2,949 


36.4 


61.8 


Los Angeles 3 


1,619 


37.4 


53.2 


Admin. Sell. & General 224 


S37 


38.3 


49.4 



Total 



224 



378,862 



31.2 



57.9^ 



SOURCE: From honthly Reports 
Institute. 



09* 
rorn £ 



3 of the American Iron and Steel 



9818 



• : TABLE- 4 ( d > CCont'd) 

iaor ahd steel iieustet 

Average Weekly Hours and Hourly Earnings of Employees 
Receiving Ho-arly, Pieoe-TJork or Tonnage Wages 

IJovemher 1933 









Ayge. Hours 


Average 




So. of 


7:0. Of 


Per Week 


Earnings 


Districts 


Companies 


Empl02 r ees 


Per Employee 


Per Hour 


Eastern 


69 


51 , 699 


30.7 


54.9;; 


Johns totm 


2 


7,878 


21.1 


54.6 


PittsDurg 


46 


82,039 


25.8 


59.5 


Youngstovn Valley 


20 


41,463 


26.6 


60.5 


ITorth Ohio River 


5 


24,354 


32.7 


60.0 


Canton, Llass.- Uansfield 


12 


15,044 


26.1 


59.0 


Cleveland 


3 


21,013 


27.5 


58.9 


Buffalo 


17 


11,199 


28.4 


52.5 


Detroit - Toledo 


15 


7,202 


26.0 


62.2 


South Ohio Paver 


13 


14,391 


25.4 


61.2 


Indiana~Illinois-St. Louis 21 


11,914 


27.4 


54.9 


Chi cago 


27 


49,429 


27.9 


58.7 


Southern 


15 


4, 314 


30.6 


35.9 


Birmingham 


5 


8,802 


27.2 


44.2 


Kansas City 


2 


1,240 


rj r- t-j 


59.5 


Duluth 


2 


1,159 


33.9 


53.8 


Colorado 


2 


2,759 


23.9 


57.4 


Utah 


1 


228 


28.6 


47.4 


Seattle 


4 


456 


28.6 


58.9 


San Francisco 


4 


2,951 


36.4 


63.4 


Los Angeles 


3 


1,704 


38.2 


57.6 


Admin. Sell. & General 


219 


963 


35.9 


48.9 


Total 


219 


362,206 


27.8 


57.7r.< 



SOURCE: Prom Monthly Reports Eo^m 
Institute. 



). ? of the American Iron and Steel 



9818 



T/OLE 4 (c) ( Cont'd) 

ISOE Ai:i) STESL INDUSTRY 

Average TTeeltly Hours and Hourly Earnings of Employees 
Receiving Hourly, Piece-work or Tonnage TTages 

Deccnoer 1933 



Mo. of 



I' 10. Of 



Avge. Hours Average 
Par TTeek Earnings 



Districts 



Companies Employees Per Eraployee Per Hotu 



Eastern 


72 


£1,549 


30.3 


5o. 30 


Johns tOTTxi 


2 


1,910 


26.8 


54.8 


Pittsburg 


45 


80,599 


26.8 


59.3 


Youngs to xnz Valley 


20 


40 , 901 


27.4 


60.4 


Ebrth Ohio Eiver 


5 


23 , 375 


29.7 


59.4 


Canton, I lass. - Mansfield 


11 


14,756 


29.1 


59.6 


Cleveland 


8 


20^758 


28.4 


59.1 


Buffalo 


17 


11,069 


29.4 


54.8 


Detroit - Toledo 


15 


6,963 


28.7 


62.7 


South Ohio Hiver 


13 


14 , 062 


27.5 


60.6 


Indiana-Illinois-St. Louis 


21 


12,250 


29.5 


58.1 


Chicago 


28 


47,796 


30.0 


58.8 


Southern 


15 


4,451 


33„3 


37.0 


Birmingham 


5 


9,628 


32.7 


45.1 


Kansas City 


2 


1,423 


35.8 


59.3 


Duluth 


2 


1,327 


34.5 


54.9 


Colorado 


2 


2,4 61 


28.3 


56.6 


Utah 


1 


£27 


29.1 


47.5 


Seattle 


4 


494 


30.3 


63.0 


San Francisco 


4 


2,811 


35.0 


63.4 


Los Angeles 


3 


1,621 


37.1 


57,2 


Admin. Sell. & General 


222 


933 


35.5 


50.0 



Total 



222 



357,424 



28.9 



57.8<i 



SOURCE: Prom Monthly He-oorts Porn Hb. 3 of the American Iron and Steel 
Institute. 



9818 



TABLE 



(f) 



IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY 

AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS AND HOURLY EARNINGS OF EMPLOYEES RECEIVING- 
HOURLY, PIECE-WORK 02 TONNAGE WAGES 

January 1934 







No . of 


ilo . of 


Avge-. hours 


Average 


Districts 


Companies 


Employees 


per week 


E 


arnings 










Per Employee 


P 


sr Hour 


Eastern 




72 


52,141 


32.2 




55.4«< 


Johnstown 




2 


7,000 


27.2 




56.0 


Pittsburg 




45 


79,724 


24.7 




59.2 


Youngstown Valley 




20 


40 , 753 


26.1 




60.4 


North Ohio River 




5 


33,062 


31.3 




60.9 


Canton, Mass.-Mansf 


ield 


10 


14,811 


33.0 




61.5 


Cleveland 




8 


21,031 


29.6 




59.1 


Buffalo 




16 


11,029 


30.7 




55.8 


Detroit-Toledo 




15 


7 , 106 


55.4 




66.3 


South Ohio River 




13 


13,934 


31.9 




62.5 


Indiana-Illinois-St 


. Loui 


s 21 


11,735 


29.1 




58.9 


Chicago 




28 


46 , 387 


29.5 




58.9 


Southern 




15 


4,405 


31.4 




36.9 


Birmingham 




5 


9,536 


35.1 




45.8 


Kansas City 




r? 


1,366 


35.6 




59.6 


Duluth 




2 


1 , 322 


33.7 




55.4 


Colorado 




2 


2,924 


25.3 




58.0 


Utah 




1 


227 


30.2 




47.5 


Seattle 




4 


538 


32.1 




58.3 


San Francisco 




4 


2,341 


36.0 




62.7 


Los Angales 




3 


1,586 


55.9 




57.6 


Admin. Sell and gen 


eral 


222 


993 


38.5 




49.4 


Tot a 


1 


222 


355,292 


29.2 




58.3rf 



Source: Prom Monthly Reports form No. 3 of the American Iron and Steel 
Institute. 



9818 



TABLE 4 



1 (g) 



i nor; and st: 



INDUSTRY 



AVERAG-E OTELY HOURS MD H0U3LY EARNINGS 0? EMPLOYEES RECEIVING 
HOURLY, PIECF-UORZ 03 TONNAGE WAGES 

February 1934 







IJo . of 


No. of 


Avge. Hours 


Average 


Districts 


Companies 


Employees 


per week 


Earnings 










Per Employee 


Fer Hour 


Eastern 




73 


52,876 


33.1 


55.6,^ 


Johnstown 




2 


7,725 


27.9 ■ 


55.1 


Fittshurg 




44 


81,531 


27.9 


59.5 


Youngstown Valley 




20 


43,094 


31.5 


60.6 


North Ohio River 




g 


22,972 


33.9 


61.7 


Canton , Mas s . -Mansf 


Leld 


9 


15,480 


36.0 


62.0 


Cleveland 




8 


21 , 764 


32.7 


59.5 


Buffalo 




16 


11,420 


34.3 


56 . 1 


Detroit-Toledo 




15 


7,870 


38.5 


67.5 


South Ohio River 




13 


14,651 


34.1 


63.4 


Indiana-Illinois-St 


.Loui 


s 20 


11,9X6 


20 . 5 


56.4 


Chic ago 




27 


48,219 


53.4 


59.0 


Southern 




15 


4,5 1 


23.9 


37.1 


Birmingham 




5 


9,6:6 


34.3 


47.9 


Kansas City 




3 


1 , 507 


34.8 


57.6 


Duluth 




2 


1,1 E 


34.2 


56.0 


Colorado 




2 


2,343 


23. G 


59.2 


Utah- 




1 


227 


29.5 


47.4 


Seattle 




4 


567 


31.4 


61.9 


Spn Francisco 




4 


2,828 


35 .6 


62.8 


Los Angeles 




3 


1,541 


33.3 


57.2 


Admin. Sell .and eeneral 


219 


1.069 


35.7 


50.6 


Total 




219 


365 . 305 


51.9 


58.7rf 



Source: From Monthly Reports form No. 3 of the American Iron and Steel 
Institute . 



9818 



table 4 (h) 

IRON AID STEEL INDUSTRY 

AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS AND HOURLY EARNINGS 07 EMPLOYEES RECEIVING 
HOURLY, PIECE-WORK OR TONNAGE WAGES 

March 1934 









No. of 


Ho . of 


Avge. Hours 


Average 


Districts 




C 


omponies 


Employees 


Per Wee]: 


E- 


irnings 












Per Employee 


Per Hour 


Er stern 






72 


54,539 


33.0 




55.3'* 


Jox'instown 






2 


8 , 364 


32.6 




56.4' 


Pittsburg 






45 


83,525 


29.9 




59.9 


Youngstovm Valley 






20 


44,465 


33.7 




60.9 


North. Ohio River 






5 


23,926 


35.1 




61.3 


Canton, Mas 3. -Man 


sf: 


Leld 


11 


17 , 264 


35.7 




62.9 


Cleveland 






g 


21,614 


34.4 




59.9 


Buffalo 






17 


12,903 


36.1 




56.6 


Detroit-Toledo 






14 


8,298 


37.7 




68.2 


South Ohio River 






13 


15,182 


32.3 




62.9 


Indiana-Illinois- 


St 


.Loui 


s 23 


12,711 


30.7 




55.5 


Chicago 






28 


51,520 


35.7 




59.2 


Southern 






15 


4,250 


30.9 




37.7 


Birmingham 






5 


9 , 823 


34.2 




48.1 


Kansas City 






3 


1,547 


34.7 




58.5 


Duluth 






p 


1 , 174 


32.9 




55.7 


Colorado 






2 


2,934 


29.0 




58.9 


Utah 






1 


228 


33.2 




47.5 


Seattle 






4 


512 


33.4 




60.3 


Son Frpncisco 






4 


2,925 


34.5 




62. 2 


Los Angeles 






3 


1 , 590 


35.5 




57.8 


Admin. Sell and f' 


ener,:l 


225 


1.076 


36.3 




52.0 


Tot 


-1 




225 


380.471 


33.3 




58 ,24 



Source: Prom Monthly Reports form No. 3 of the American Iron and Steel 
Institute . 



9818 



TA3L^ 4 (i) 

IRON AND STL^L INDUSTRY 

AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS AND HOURLY EARNINGS OF EMPLOYEES RECEIVING 
HOURLY, PIECE-WORK OH TONNAGE WAGES 

April 1934 



Districts 



No. ox 
Companies 



No. of 

Employees 



Avge. Hours 
per reek 
Fer Employee 



Average 
Earnings 
Per Hour 



Eastern 74 

Johnstown 2 

Pittsburg 44 

Youngsto^n Valley 20 

North Ohio River 5 
Canton, Mass.- Mansfield 11 

Cleveland 8 

Buffalo 1? 

Detroit - Toledo 15 

South Ohio River 13 
Indiana - Illinois - 

St. Louis 25 

Chicago 27 

Southern 14 

Birmingham 5 

Kansas City 3 

Duluth 2 

Colorado 2 

Utah 1 

Seattle 4 

San Francisco 4 

Los Angeles 3 
Admin, Sell, and general 226 



55,667 
9.435 
84,330 
45.622 
25 ,297 
17,, 666 
21,696 
13,961 
8,735 
15.943 

13,462 

52- 639 

4^591 

9 : 916 

l!580 

1,231 

2, 919 

227 

616 

3,079 

1.728 

1,127 



33.8 
33.0 
31.5 
33. 6 
34.6 
35.2 
34.4 
35.1 
35.7 
33.2 

32,4 

35.7 

31.2 
34.8 
36.5 
35.1 
31.3 
34.2 
33.2 
35.2 
36.1 
35.1 



61.1^ 

62.5 
65.1 
67.1 
66.9 
68.7 
67.0 
62.2 
73.5 
69.1 

60.9 
65.2 
41.4 
53.5 
62.7 
62.4 
64.9 
52.3 
63.2 
69.6 
64.5 
55.9 



Total 



226 



592.069 



35.7 



64.8^ 



Source: From Monthly Renorts form No. 3 of the American Iron and Steel 
Institute. 



9618 



• TABLE 4 (0 

IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY 

AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS AND HOURLY EARNINGS 0"« EMPLOYEES RECEIVING 
HOURLY, FIECE-WORK OR TONNAGE WAGES 

Ivlay 1934 





T 


T o. of 


No. of 


Avge. Hours 


Average 


Districts 


Companies 


Employees 


per week 


Earnings 










Per Employee 


Per Hour 


Eastern 




77 


58,925 


37.1 


60.8^ 


Johnstown 




2 


9' 110 


36„4 


61.8 


Fittst>urg 




44 


89,229 


35.2 


65.8 


Youngsto^'n Valley- 




20 


47,806 


36. 6 


66.8 


North Ohio River 




5 


25,014 


35.6 


66.1 


Canton, Mass.- Mansf 


ield 


11 


17,949 


36, 5 


68.9 


Cleveland 




9 


22' 791 


37.7 


66.8 


Buffalo 




17 


14. a 74 


37.1 


62.1 


Detroit - Toledo 




15 


8 S .547 


33„4 


72.6 


South Ohio River 




12 


16,667 


40.2 


70.9 


Indiana - Illinois - 


St. 












Louis 




14,229 


36.8 


62.2 


Chicago 




26 


5 288 


37.7 


64.9 


Southern 




15 


5l 267 


36.1 


42*3 


Birmingnani 




4 


10; 100 


37.5 


53.4 


Kansas City 




3 


1.596 


37.6 


62.5 


Duluth 




2 


1.229 


37.1 


63.4 


Colorado 




2 


3,020 


32.9 


64.2 


Utah 




1 


227 


37.3 


52.6 


Seattle 




3 


514 


36.9 


63.6 


San Ersncisco 




4 


3,098 


37.1 


69.6 


Los Angeles 




3 


1,757 


38.2 


64.1 


Admin. Sell, and general 


224 


1,161 


36.7 


54.3 


Total 




224 


409.698 


36.6 


64,6^ 



Source: From Monthly Reports form Mo. 3 of the American Iron and Steel 
Institute. 



9818 



TABLE 4 (\) 

IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY 

AVERAGE "..EEKLY HOURS AND HOURLY EARNINGS OJ? EMPLOYEES RECEIVING 
HOURLY, PIECE-WORK OR TONNAGE WAGES 

June 1934 





No. of 


No, of 


Avge. Hours 


Average 


Districts 


Companies 


Employees 


per week 


Earnings 










Per Employee 


Per Hour 


Eastern 




77 


58,404 


34.4 


59.9<£ 


Johnstown 




2 


8,674 


31.5 


61.2 


Pittsburg 




45 


91 s 229 


35,9 


65.4 


Youngstora Valley 




20 


49,065 


35.2 


66.1 


North Ohio River 




5 


27,094 


35.5 


64.3 


Canton, Iviass,- Mansfield 


12 


18,320 


35,6 


67.0 


Cleveland 




9 


23.465 


38.5 


66.1 


Buffalo 




17 


13,925 


34. 8 


62.1 


Detroit - Toledo 




14 


8,561 


33 o 6 


72,7 


South Ohio River 




12 


16,789 


36, 2 


67.0 


Indiana- 111 inois-St, 


.Louis 


: 23 


14,594 


34.0 


60,3 


Chicago 




24 


58 J 131 


37c 3 


64.6 


Southern 




17 


5,383 


35.1 


42.1 


Birmingham 




5 


10 t 2S5 


36.5 


53.3 


Kansas City 




5 


1,680 


36.3 


62.8 


Duluth 




2 


1 , 254 


38,0 


63,2 


Colorado 




2 


2.. 964 


32. 2 


63.1 


Utah 




1 


225 


37.9 


52.8 


Seattle 




4 


644 


34.8 


64.8 


San Francisco 




4 


3,042 


35.7 


69.9 


Los Angeles 




3 


1,709 


36.7 


65.1 


Admin. Sell, and general 


(1) 


(1) 


(1) 


(1) 


Total 




225 


415.547 


35,7 


63. 9c< 



Source: Prom Monthly Ret>ort: 
I) stitute. 



form No. 5 of the American Iron and Steel 



9819 



-59- 

TABLB 4 (1) 

IRON AlID STEEL INDUSTRY 

Average Weekly Hours and Hourly Earnings of Employees 
Receiving Hourly, Piece-work or Tonnage Wages 

for the 

Month of July, 

1934 



Districts 


No. of 
Companies 


No. of 
Employees 


Avg. Hours 

Per Week 

Per Employee 


Avg. 
Earnings 
Per Hour 


Eastern 


74 


55,340 


26.3 


58.54 


Johnston 


2 ' 


7,859 


18.6 


61.9 


Pittsburg 


45 


87,242 


24.0 


65.3 


Youngstown Valley 


21 


44 , 474 


21.6 


65.2 


North Ohio Paver 


5 


24,440 


27.7 


64.3 


Canton, Mass. -Mansfield 


12 


16,619 


22 . 9 


65.6 


Cleveland 


9 


21,905 


23.9 


65.4 


Buffalo 


17 


11,315 


21.0 


61.7 


Detroit-Toledo 


14 


8,120 


24.3 


69.8 


South Ohio River 


11 


12,786 


22.3 


67.9 


Indiana-Illinois-St. Louis 


23 


13, 873 


C,0» o 


58.5 


Chicago 


25 


54, 553 


26.0 


64.3 


Southern 


17 


3,703 


21.2 


42.5 


Birmingham 

Kansas City 


5 
3 


5,949 
1,617 


27.9 
31.4 


52.2 
62.8 


Duluth 


2 


1,190 


30.4 


61.9 


Colorado 


2 


2, 824 


20. 3 


62.9 


Utah 


1 


227 


56.3 


52.4 


Seattle 


4 


621 


30.3 


61.8 


San Francisco 


3 


. 2,904 


29.4 


69.3 


Los Angeles 


3 


1,612 


26.4 


62.2 


Admin. Sell, and General 


223 


(1) 


(1) 


(1) 


Total 


223 


38c> , c ( ^i 


24.4 


63. 2c 1 



(1) Data not available subsequent to May 1934. 

Source: Prom Monthly Reports Form No. 3 of the American Iron and Steel 
Institute.- 



9818 



-50- 
TABLE 4 (m)' ;•■: ! 

IRON Alffi SS5JE3D INDUS THY 

Average Weekly Hours and Hourly Earnings of Envoloyees 
P.eceiving Hourly, Piece-'vork or Tonnage Wages 

for the 

Month of August, 
1034 



Districts 




No. of 
Companies 


No. of 

Employees 


Avg. Hours 

Per Week 

Per Employee 


Avg. 
Earnings 
Per Hour 


Eastern 




73 


51,728 


28.9 


59.14 


Johnston 




2 


7,553 


22.7 


60.8 


Pittsburg 




45 


85,210 


23.8 


65.6 


Youngstown Valley 




21 


43,172 


21.5 


66.2 


North Ohio Elver 




5 


23,368 


26.0 


64.8 


Canton, Mass.-Mansf i 


.eld 


12 


14,547 


25.4 


66.3 


Cleveland 




9 


20,780 


18.7 


66.3 


Buffalo 




17 


11,248 


24.0 


61.9 


Detroit-Toledo 




14 


7,821 


22.9 


67.5 


South Ohio River 




12 


11,178 


22.1 


68.8 


Indiana-Ill inois~St. 


Louis 


24 


12,840 


25.4 


59.5 


Chicago 




25 


51 , 653 


28.3 


64.9 


Soutnern 




17 


4,731 


23. 2 


41.2 


Birn ingham 




5 


8,161 


27.9 


52.3 


Kansas City 




3 


1,558 


30.3 


62.9 


Duluth 




2 


1,066 


31.6 


60.2 


Colorado 




2 


2,797 


21.7 


62.4 


Utah 




1 


228 


38.1 


52.2 


Seattle 




4- 


583 


31.8 


63.7 


San Francisco 




4 


2,790 


33.7 t 


68.9 


Los Angeles 




3 


1 , 531 


33.0 


65.0 


Admin. Sell, and General 


224 


(1) 


(1) 


(1) 


Total 




224 


354,583 


25.0 


63.5<i 



(1) Data not available subsequent to May 1934. 

Source: From Monthly Reports Form No. 3 of the American Iron and Steel 
Institute. 



9318 



TABLE 4 (n) , ' ) 

IRON AND SEHSE INDUSTRY 

Average Weekly Hours end Hourly Earnings of Employees 
Receiving Hourly, Piece-work or Tonnage Wages 

for the 
Month of September, 

1934 











Avg. Hours 


Avg. 


Districts 




No. of 


No. cf 


Per "eek 


Earnings 






Companies 


Employees 


Per Employee 


Per Hour 


Eastern 


* 


• 71 


48,922 


24.7 


59.34 


Johnston 




2 


7,435 


23.9 


60.9 


Pittsburg 




44 


81 , 739 


22.4 


66.2 


Youngstown 'alley 




20 


39,251 


19.3 


67.2 


North Ohio River 




5 


20,842 


22.0 


65.1 


Canton, Mass. -Mar 


.sfield 


12 


lJ, 515 


22.6 


67.1 


Cleveland 




9 


19 , 490 


18,4 


66.1 


Buffalo 




15 


10 , 649 


20.9 


62.7 


Detroit-Toledo 




11 ' 


6,918 


20.9 


67.0 


South Ohio River 




11 


10,332 


22.0 


71.6 


Indiana-Illinois- 


St. Louis_ 23 


12,873 


22.7 


60.3 


Chicago 


1 


I 25 " 


47,548 


24.7 


64.7 


Southern 




• 15 


4,249 




43.9 


Birmingham 




5 

3 


6,204 
1,313 


25.8 
20.1 


53.3 


Kansas City 




62.1 


Duluth 




2 


1,060 


26.8 


62.6 


Colorado 




2 


2,421 


19.7 


61.7 


Utah 




1 


227 


37.4 


52.0 


Seattle 




3 


562 


31.0 


65.1 


San Erancisco 




4' 


2, 633 


32.0 


68.6 


Los Angeles 




2' 


1,460 


28.2 


84.7 


Admin. Sell, and 


General 


217 


(1) 


(1) 


(1) 


Total 




217' 


343,064 


2«3. b 


64.0^ 



(1) Data not available subsequent to May 1934. 

Source: Erom Monthly Reports Form Ho. 3 of the American Iron and Steel, 
Institute. 



9818 



TABLE 4 (o).' i/]T . W 

IE01T 'AND STEEL INDUSTRY 

Average Ueekly Hours anc Hourly Earnings of Employees 
Receiving Eourlv, piece work or "tonnage VJages 

for the 
Month of October^ 

1034 





Ho. of 


ITo. of 


Av^. Hours 


Avg'.' ' 


Districts 


Companies 


Employees 


Per Week 
Per Employee 

?9'.3 


earnings 

Per hour 


Eastern 


74 


43,553' 


59.55— 


Johnston 


2 


7,502 


22.7 


61,'' . 


Pittsburg ■ 


44 


31,477 




55.6 


Young st own • Vail ey 


20 


40,125 


21.6 


65.4 


ITorth Chio-~.iver 


6 


."1,823 


25.8 • 


65.4 


C an ton, ; las s . -] [an sf i e 1 d 


11 


14,351 


25.0 


67.6 


Cleveland • 


9 


19,530 


pi p 


65.4.. 


Buffalo 


16 


10,405 


PA 7 " 


■' ■. : ' ' ■ 


Detroit-Toledo 


13 


7,103 


23.6 


68.4 


South Ohio' River 


12 


11,928 


25.9 


.70.0 


I ndi ana- Illinoi s-St , Loui s 


23 


12,617 


27.0 


60.6 


Chicago 


PS 


46,266 


27.8 


64.8 


Southern • 


15 


4,045 


28.1 


41.7 


Birmingham 


5 


7,570 


28.8 


53.0 


Kansas City 


3 


1,301 




55.7 


Lulu th 


2 


98.. 


30.1 


52.2 


Colorado 


2 


2,381 


PR A 


. 


Utah 


1 


226 


58.4 


52.1 


Seattle 


3 


591 


36.0 


64.7 


San Franc rs'co 


4 




54.7 


71.1 


Los Angeles 


o 


1 A ?4 


29.9 


55.5 


Admin. Sell; and General 


22? 


(1) 


(1) 


(1) 


Total 


222 


342.772 


PR 4 


64.05 



(l) Data not available subsequent to i..:?.y 1934. 

Source: From Monthly Reports Form ITo. 3 of the American Iron and Steel 
Institute, 



9818 



-63- 

TABLE 4 (p) 

IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY 

Average Weekly Hours and Hourly Earnings of Employees 
Receiving Hourly, Piece~-work or Tonnage Wages 

for the 
Month of November, 1934 



Districts 



No„ of No.- of Avgo Hours Avg. 

Companies Employees Per Week Earnings 

Per Employee Per Hour 



Eastei-n 69 

Johns': on 2 

Pittsburg 43 

Youngstown Valley 21 

North Ohio River 5 
Canton, Mass. - Mansfield 10 

Cleveland 9 

Buffalo 15 

Detroit-Toledo 12 

South Ohio River 12 
Indiana-Illinois-St. Louis 23 

Chicago 25 

Southern 15 

Birmingham 5 

Kansas City 3 

Duluth 2 

Colorado • 2 

Utah • 1 

Seattle 3 

San Francisco 3 

Los Angeles 2 
Admin. Sell* and General 216 



47,124 

7,374 

81,408 

40,220 

21,791 

14,895 

19,566 

10,386 

7,404 

13,998 

12,130 

45,979 

4,037 

7,454 

1,268 

1,099 

2,301 

226 

580 

2,568 

1,411 

(1) 



76.9 


60.2(Zf 


21.3 


61.6 


24.5 


65.7 


23.7 


67.1 


28.5 


66.6 


28.4 


69.1 


23.9 


66.9 


24.9 


62.7 


31.5 


70.7 


28.5 


69.3 


24.2 


61.1 


29.3 


65.3 


29.1 


41.3 


29.7 


53.8 


29.8 


65.7 


31.0 


62.1 


25.5 


63.3 


38.1 


52.1 


31.5 


63.1 


31,9 


69.7 


34.3 


65.3 


(1) 


(1) 



Total 



216 



343,219 



26.3 



64.7(£ 



(1 ) Data not available subsequent to May 1934. 

Source: From Monthly Reports Form No. 3 of the American Iron and Steel 
Institute, 



9818 



-64- 
TABLE 4(c)', 

IE01I AH) STEEL" EHDUSIBY 

Average Weekly Tours and Hourly Earnings of Employees 
Receiving Hourly, Fiece-work or Tonnage "'ages 

for the 
Month of Lece.nber, 
1934 









Avg . 


" r ours 


Avg. 


Districts 


ho. of 


'To. of 


per ",7e 


ek 


Earnings 




Companies 


. Enrol oyees 


Fer Employee 


per Hour 


Eastern 


73 


43,327 


26.9 




S0.2£ 


Johnston 


2 


7,153 


21.2 




51.2 . 


Pittsburg 


4-4 


CO, 378 


24.5 




65.9 


Young r. town Val 1 ey 


20 


, 40,747 


26.0 




67.5 


Horth Ohio F.iver 


5 


, 22,950 


S0.1 




66.3 


Canton, h'ass. - Mansfield 


•12 


15,501 


30 . 5 




59.9 


Cleveland 


- 9 


19,755 


29.0 




57.3 


Buffalo 


15 


10,587 


27.0 




52.9 


Detroit-Toledo 


10 


7,525 


35.3 




73.3 


South Ohio Hiver 


13 


. 14,229 


30.5 




70.8 


Indiana-Illmois-St . Loui 


s 22 


, 12,338 


25.4 




61.1 


Chicago 


24 


, 46,298 


30.1 




65.1 


Southern 


15 


, 4,141 


28.2 




41.9 


Birmingham 


5 


8,353 


27.4 




53.7 


Kansas City 


3 


1,310 


39.2 




65.0 


Duluth 


• 2 


1,206 


^o q 




62.5 


Colorado 


2 


2,426 


21.5 




61.9 


Utah 


1 


225 


38.1 




52.0 


Seattle 


3 


543 


26.7 




64.6 


San Francisco 


4 


2,484 


29.3 




71.0 


Los Angeles 


2 


1,401- 


31.2 




65.5 


Admin. Sell, and General 


219 


(1) 


(1) 




(!) . 


Total ' 


•2 1 9 


. 347.872 


^7.4 




55.0^ 



(1) Data not available subsequent to hay 1934. 

Source: From Monthly Reports Form ITo. 3 of the American Iron and Steel 
Institute. 



9813 



TABLE 4 ( r) ' "I ' * 

IRON AiJD STEZL INDUSTRY 

Average Weekly Hours and Hourly Earnings of Employees 
Receiving Hourly, Piece-Work or Tonnage Wages 

January 1935 



Districts 


No. of 


No. of 


A.vge. Hours 


Average 




Companies 


Employees 


per Vfeek 
Per Enployee 


Earnings 
Per Hour 


Eastern 


70 


50, 054 


33.7 


60.8^ 


Johnston 


2 


7,237 


29.6 


62.2 


Pittsburg 


• • 44 


83,216 


30.8 


66.1 


Youngs town Valley 


20 


43,368 


33.3 


67,5 


North Ohio River 


5 


24, 366 


33.2 


66.4 


Cm ton, L'lass.-lvlansfi 


eld 12 


16,654 


37.6 


71.0 


Cleveland 


9 


20, 542 


35.0 


68.3 


Buffalo 


16 


11,978 


33.6 


64.0 


Detroit - Toledo 


11 


8,434 


39.4 


73.7 


South Ohio River 


12 


16,005 


35.6 


70.9 


Indiana-Illinois-St . 


L oui s 21 


12, 708 


31.4 


62.9 


Chicago 


23 


50,433 


36.5 


65.6 


Southern 


15 


4,439 


32.1 


41.7 


Birmingham 


5 


8,415 


31.4 


53.2 


Kansas 'City 


3 


1,324 


35.1 


64.9 


Duluth 


2 


1,262 


36 . 


62.4 


Colorado 


2 


2,960 


3-'.6 


64.5 


Utah 


1 


225 


38.8 


52.3 


Seattle 


3 


576 


34.5 


67.3 


San Prancisco 


4 


2,507 


35.2 


71.1 


Los Angeles 


2 


1,392 


35.8 


65.2 


Admin. Sell. And General 215 


(1) 


(1) 


(1) 



Total 



215 



368,095 



33.6 



65. 50 



(l) Data not available subsequent to L'ia~ r , 1934. 

Source: Prom Monthly Reports Porm No. 3 of the American Iron and 
Steel Institute. 



9818 



-66- 

TABLE -* (s) • ,' , 

IRON AMD STEEL Ij^DUSTRY 

Average Weekly Hours and Hourly Earnings of Employees 
Receiving Hourly, Piece-'Jork or Tonnage Vfeges 



February 1935 



Districts 



No. of 


No. of 


Avge. Hours 


Average 


Companies 


Employees 


Per VTeek 


Earnings 






Per Employee 


Per Hour 


71 


51, 176 


35.0 


61.00 


2 


7,470 


34.3 


63.3 


44 


85,210 


32.8 


66.7 


20 


44, 605 


35.0 


68.0 


5 


25,641 


35.8 


66.8 


12 


17,115 


37.9 


70.7 


9 


20, 803 


37.5 


68.4 


16 


12,373 


35.8 


63.7 


11 


8,747 


39.7 


74.0 


12 


16,986 


38.8 


71.1 


s 21 


12,758 


35.1 


63.3 


24 


53,552 


38.7 


65.6 


15 


4,469 


32.8 


41.6 


5 


9,586 


34.5 


53.5 


3 


1,376 


37.0 


64.9 


2 


1,281 


37.5 


62.9 


2 


2,921 


30.8 


65.3 


1 


235 


38.8 


52.9 


3 


608 


36.9 


68.7 


4 


2,722 


''Z3.-5 


71.1 


2 


. 1,376 


35.7 


64.9 


1 217 


(1) 


(1) 


(1) 



Eastern 

Johnston 

Pittsburgh 

Youngs tov/n Valley 

North Ohio Liver 

Canton, Mass. -Mansfield 

Cleveland 

Buffalo 

Detroit' - Toledo 

South Ohio River 

Indiana-Ill. - St. Loui 

Chicago 

Southern 

Birmingham 

Kansas City 

Duluth 

Colorado 

Utah 

Seattle 

San Francisco 

Los Angeles 

Admin. Sell, and General 



Total 217 



381,010 



35.6 



65.8^ 



(l) Data not available subseouent to Hay, 1934. 



Source: From Monthly Reports Form Ho. 3 of the American Iron and 
Steel Institute. 



9818 



-67- 



TABLE 4 (t) 



IRON A.D STEEL INDUSTRY 



Average Weekly Hours aid Hourly Earnings of Employees 
Receiving Hourly, Piece-Work or Tonnage Wages 



March 1935 



Districts Ho 


. of 


No . of 


Avge. Hours 


Average 


Companies 


Enrolovees 


Per Week 


Earnings 








Per Employee 


Per Hour 


Easter"- 


72 


52,1 '9 


33.1 


60.8^ 


Johnston 


2 


7,365 


28 . 3 


63.0 


Pittsburgh 


44 


85,758 


31.4 


66.7 


Youngs town Valley 


20 


44,821 


34.2 


67.7 


North Ohio ""aver 


5 


26,339 


35.0 


67.0 


Canton, Mass . -Mansfield 


12 


16,899 


34.7 


70.6 


Cleveland 


9 


20,795 


35.2 


68.4 


Buffalo 


16 


12,338 


31.5 


63.4 


Detroit - Toledo 


11 


8,916 


38.0 


74.7 


South Ohio River 


12 


17,270 


37.6 


-70.5 


Indiana- I 11. - St. Louis 


21 


13,400 


34.5 


64.5 


Chicago 


24 


54, 627 


3d-..4 


65.8 


Southern 


15 


4, 511 


32.2 


41.4 


Birmingham 


5 


9,597 


34.6 


54.0 


Kansas City 


3 


1,481 


34.9 


64.9 


Duluth 


2 


1,387 


37.0 


62.6 


Colorado 


2 


2,912 


29.4 


64.5 


Utah 


1 


236 


39.0 


52.1 


Seattle 


3 


650 


35.6 


65.8 


San Francisco 


5 


2,613 


34.7 


70.2 


Los Angeles 


2 


1,482 


34.8 


68.2 


Admin. Sell, and General 


219 


(1) 


(1) 


(1) 



Total 



219 



385,506 



33.9 



65. 7<* 



(l) Data not available subseouent to May, l v '34. 

Source* From Monthly Reaorts Form No. 3 of the American Iron and 
Steel Institute. 



9818 



-63- 
TABLE 4 (u) ' ,* 

I30SI AND STEEL I.DU3TRY 

Average , : eekly Hours and Hourly 'Earnings of Employees 
Receiving Hourly, Piece- Jork or Tonnage "Jages 

April 1935 



Districts 



Ho. of No. of Avge. Hours Average 

Companies E.molovees Per 7eek Earnings 

Per Enroloyee Per Hour 



Eastern 

Johnston 

Pittsburgh 

Youngs town Valley 

North Ohio River 

Cnnton, I iass. -Mansfield 

Cleveland 

Buffalo 

Detroit - Toledo 

South Ohio River 

Indiana- I 11, - St. Louis 

Chicago 

Soutiiern 

Birmingham 

Kansas City 

Duluth 

Colorado 

Utah 

Seattle 

San Francisco 

Los \ngeles 

Admin. Sell, and General 



72 


52,296 


33.2 


61.2^ 


2 


7, '>3'") 


24.7 


62.9 


43 


84,465 


32.1 


67.2 


21 


45, 420 


34.2 


67.6 


5 


25,68'") 


55.5 


67.2 


11 


15,678 


35.0 


70.5 


9 


2 \669 


34.0 


68.6 


15 


12,116 


32.9 


64.1 


11 


9,174 


35.0 


73.1 


12 


17,159 


'35.6 


70.9 


22 


14,495 


36.9 


64.0 


25 


54, 8 '2 


37.3 


66.3 


15 


4,437 


•30.5 


41.8 


' 5 


9,518 


•35.1 


53.8 


' 3 


1,498 


■37 . 8 


65.7 


• 2 


1,555 


59.6 


64.0 


2 


2,555 


31.7 


62.9 


1 


235 


59.2 


52.1 


3 


650 


36.7 


65.7 


5 


2,593 


36 . 9 


70.7 


2 


1,521 


33.0 


69.2 


18 


(1) 


(11 


(11 



Total 



218 



584, 546 



34.2 



65.9^ 



(lj Data not availrble subsequent to Mey, 1934. 

Source: Prom Monthly Reports Form Ho. 3 of the American Iron and 
Steel Institute. 



9818 



-69- 
TABLE 4 .(v) 

no;; ai"d steel ihdustp-Y 

Average Weekly "ours rmd Hourly Earnings cf Employees 
Receiving Hourly, Piece-Tork er Tonnage Jages 

May 1935 

Districts No. of No. of A'Vge. Hours Average 

Companies Employees Per reek Earnings 

Per Employee Per Hour 



Eastern 70 51,979 34.7 6 f >.8# 

Johnston 2 7.068. 28.8 62 7 

Pittsburgh 43 83,068 ,32.1 66.4 

Youngs town Valley 19 4-1,529 /33.4 67.4 

ITorth OMfl River 5 25.356 36.3 66.8 

C..r/.:n, !!■ ss. -Mansfield 11 16,664 32.6 71.1 

Cleveland 9 20,578 - 32.1 68.1 

Buffalo . 15 12,030 33.3 64.2 

Detroit - Toledo , 11 •9,184 32.7 73.4 

South 0hi<9 Eiver 10 16,637 33.2 69.6 

Indi-n--IIi. - St. Lpuis 2' -1 14/igO 34.9 62.9 

Chic-g-5 24 54,576 37.1 66.1 

Southern 15 4,216 31.9 41.5 

Birmingham 5 9,625 3;;. 3 53.8 

Kansas City 3 1,580 37.6 64.7 

Duluth 2 1,554 38.2 63.2 

Coloredo 2 2,888 28.2 64.0 

Utah : . 1 233 38.0 52.2 

Seattle 3 6' 15 38.0 65.5 

San Francisco 4 , 2,574 38.6 72.1 

Los -Angeles 2 1,5^9 38.7 69.9 

Admin. Sell, and General 2'">8 (1^ (l) (l"> 



Total 208 15Lil,203 33.9 65.5rf 

(1) Data not available subsequent to Way, 1934. 

Source: From Monthly Reoorts Eorra Ho. 3 of the American Iron and 
Steel Institute. 



9818 



TABLE 4 (r/) ', '■■;'•' 
IROil AJD STEEL I, GUST 'Y 



A" 3rage '..'eekly Hours and Hourly Earnings of Emoloyees 
Receiving Hourly, Piece-'Jork or Tonnage Tfeges 



Districts 



June 1955 

No. of Ho. of Arge. Hours Average 

Coimocnies Emoloyees Per "..'eek Earnings 

Par Employee . Per Hour 



Eastcrn 


67 


49, 8 XL 


32.7 


Johnsto/i 


2 


7, 167 


28.5 


Pittsburgh 


44 


84, 255 


29.6 


Youn^sto'/n Valley 


20 


45.720 


30.8 


'-Torth Ofaic Elver 


.5 


25.184 


32.1 


Cantor., ; 1 ss . -i'.ansf ield 


11 


16,435 


31.1 


CjL<£\£aT; jLu JU'JL 


8 


2^,291 


3\4 


Buffalo 


15 


11,706 


30.2 


Detroit -. Toledo 


11 


9,165 


33.2 


South Ohio River 


12 


16,346 


30.4 


Indiana-Ill. - St. Louis 


20 


13,493 


32.2 


Chicago • 


24 


54, 140 


34.2 


Southern 


16 


4, 471 


32.0 


Birmingham 


5 


9,390 


28.4 


Kansas City 


2 


1,564 


35.8 


Duluth 


2 


1,525 


37.1 


Colorado 


2 


2,850 


30.1 


Utah 


1 


rj "I n 


36.8 


Seattle 


S 


610 


32.9 


San Francis 30 


5 


2,743 


36.2 


Los Angeles 


2 


1, 475 


35.9 


Adnin. Sell, and General 


309 


(1) 


(1) 



6^.5^ 

62.8 

66.2 

67.2 

65.9 

70] 3 

67.9 

/- r-> ,-, 

oo. 2 
73.3 
69.5 
60.9 
66.0 
41.5 
52.8 
65.1 
63.3 
64.3 
53.5 
63.9 
72.5 
68.5 

(O 



Total 



209 



376,431 



31.4 



65. V 



(l.) Data not available subseouent to May, 1934. 

Source: From konthly Reoorts Form No. 3 of the American Iron and 
Steel Institute. 



9318 



-71- .. .. 

TADLE 4 (x) 

IROH AHD STIIEL IHDUSTRY 

Average Weekly Hours and Hourly Earnings of Employees 
Receiving Hourly, Piece-Vork or Tonnage Wages 







July 1935 


Avge. Hours 


Average 




Ho. of 


Ho. of 


Per Week 


Earnings 


Districts 


Companies 


Employees 


Per Employee 


Per Hour 


Eastern 


68 


50,119 


31.9 


60.6^ 


John stoma 


2 


7,025 


26.8 


61.5 


Pittsburg 


44 


83,431 


DO 2 


65.8 


Youngs bora Valley 


20 


43,708 


31.1 


66.6 


North Ohio P.iver 


5 


26,448 


33,9 


66,4 


Canton, Hassu - 










Mansfield 


11 '. 


16,223 


30.8 


68.4 


Cleveland 


9 


20,364 


29.0 


67 4 


Buffalo 


15 


11,402 


30.9 


63.0 


Detroit-Toledo , 


11 


9,018 


32.0 


71.2 


South Ohio River 


12 . . 


16,456 


30,1 


67,6 


Indiana-Illinqis- 










St, Louis .. • 


20 ,. 


13,560 


31.0 


62.3 


Chicago 


23 


54,441 


35.1 


65.5 


Southern 


15 


4,448 


32,0 


41.4 


Birmingham 


5 


7,922 


32,0 


52.8 


Kansas City , 


2 , 


1,534 


32,8 


63.6 . 


Doluth 


2 


1,542 


36, 5 


62.6 


Colorado 


2 


2,763 ' 


29.5 


64.1 


Utah 


1 


224 


37.4 


52.6 


Seattle 


3 


633 


28.8 


63.2 


San Francisco 


4- , 


2,632 


32.8 


69.6 


Los Angeles 


2 '■" 


1,455 


32.3 


69.6 


Adm. Sell. & General '208 ' 


(1) ' 


(1) 


(1) 


To tad 


208 


375,348 


31.5 


64.7^ 



(l) Data not available subsequent to May 1934. 

Source: Prom Monthly Reports Form Ho. 3 of the American Iron and Steel 
Institute. 



9818 



-72- 

TABLS 4 (y) 

IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY 

Average Weekly Hours and Hourly. Earnings of Employees 
Receiving Hourly, Piece-Work or Tonnage Wages 

August 1935 



Districts 



No. of 
Companies 



Ho. of 
Employees 



Avgc. Hours 

Per Week 
Per Employee 



Average 
Earnings 
Per Hour 



Eastern 65 

Johnstown ' 2 

Pittsburg 44 

Youngs to vm TTVlley 21 

North Ohio River 5 
Canton, Mass* - 

Mansfield 11 

Cleveland 8 

Buffalo 15 

Detroit-Toledo 10 

South Ohio River 11 
Indi ana- 111 ino i s- 

. St, Louis ■■ 20 

Chicago 21 

Southern 15 

Birmingham 5 

Kansas City- 2 

Duluth * 2 ■ 

Colorado 2- 

Utah 1 

Seattle • 3 

San Francisco -4 

Los Angeles • 2 i 
Adm. Sell. & General 201 



51,449 
7,029 
85,208 
44,348 
27,116 

17,152 
20,280 
11,808 
8,923 
16,442 

14,250 

55,337 

4,919 

8,088 

1,616 

1,492 

2,734 

223 

615 

7,562 

1,489 

(1) 



35,5 

OO, 2 

34.5 
35.6 



37.2 

32,1 
34.9 
37.9 
35.8 

34,7 
37,7 
36.1 
32.4 
56.0 
35.0 
31.8 
36.7 
31.9 
38.1 
37.9 
(1) 



62,7ef 

62,7 

65,8 

67.2 

65,5 

69,8 
68.6 
63,6 
73.1 
70,0 

62,5 
65,6 
40.7 
53.0 
62,0 
62.9 
63,2 
52,9 
67.6 
72.4 
69.9 
(1) 



Total 



201 



383,090 



35.0 



65,4^ 



(l) Data not available subsequent to May 1934, 

Source: From Monthly Reports Form Ho. 3 of the American Iron and Steel 
Institute. 



\ 



\ 



9818 



-<■ - 

TABLE 4 (z) 

IROH AND STEEL I1TDUSTRY 

Average weekly Hours and Hourly Earnings of Employees 
Receiving Hourly, Piece-Work or Tonnage Wages 

September 1935 









Avge. Hours 


Average 




Ho. of 


No. of 


Per Week 


Earnings 


Districts 


Companies 


Employees 


Per Employee 


Per Hour 


Eastern 


63 


50,763 


33.1 


61.4^ 


Johnstown 


2 


7,163 




62,8 


Pittsburg 


44 


85,740 


32o 6 


66.0 


Youngs town Valley 


20 


44,085 


33o7 


67.0 


Ho r th Ohio Eiver 


5 


26,192 


34.2 


65.7 


Canton, Mass. - 










Mansfield 


12 


17,613 


35.3 


69.6 


Cleveland 


8 


20,199 


52.5 


69.0 


Euffaio 


15 


12,215 


34.6 


64.0 


Detroit-Toledo 


11 


9,529. 


35.7 


72.7 


South Ohio Paver 


11 


16,451 


36.0 


. 70.8 


Indiana-Illinois- 










St Louis 


21 . 


14,552 


33.4 


62.9 


Chicago 


21 • 


55,679 


36.4 


65.6 


Southern 


14 . 


4,374 


35.5 


41.5 


Birmingham 


5 ■ 


8,275 


33.5 


53.8 


Kansas City 


2 


1 9 627 


35.7 


64.3 


Duluth 


2 • 


1,631 


34.7 


62.8 


Colorado 


2 • 


2,438 


31.4 


62.4 


Utah 


1 • ' 


219 


33.4 


52.8 


Seattle 


3 • 


581 


34.6 


67.2 


San Erancisco 


4 • 


2,625 


35.3 


72.5 


Los Angeles 


2 • 


1,498 


37.8 


71.2 


Admin. Sell. & Gener- 








al 


200 


(1) 


(1) 


(1) 


Total 


200 


383,949 


34.0 


65.4s* 



(l) Data not available subsequent to Hay 1934. 

Source: Prom Monthly Reports Eorm Ho. 3 of the American Iron and Steel 
Institute. 



9818 



-PRA substitution approved for Industry 7^ 

JStA code more inclusive than PRA substitution (aifference is narked) 
*:sES& BuLsi-iiratiaatooEo iiicluaiyetthan HRA code 



Code Number Approved Codes 

2. KOB-i 'JTALLIO JTnTRALS (52 Codes) 



. .mplovees 
.(Thousand s ] 



_L,f ective Date 



50. 
31 

X36. 
*63. 
X74. 
X30. 
X92. 
X99. 
109. 
113. 

X133. 

126. 
X128. 

133. 
X135. 

150. 
X168, 
X170. 

185, 

189. 

199. 
X20S. 

207. 
X215, 

218. 

284. 

321. 
X322. 
X326. 

350. 

b56. 

364. 

365. 

375. 

380. 

389. 

4091 

410. 

420 

421. 

438. 

449. 

434, 

519, 

520, 

530. 

531, 

DoOt 



TOTAL 
Linoleum & Felt Base 
Lime 

Glass Container 
Plumbago Crucible 
'lerra Gotta 
Asbestos Industry 
Tloor Sc Wall Clay Tile 
Asphalt Shingle & Roofing 
Crushed Stone, Sand, Gravel, etc. 
Limestone (1932) 

Structural Clay Product 

Chinp.ware & Porcelain (1933) 

Cement 

Concrete Masonry 

Vitrified Clay Se^er Pipe 

Asphalt & Mastic Tile 

Refractories 

Grinding The el 

Concrete, Pine "anufacturing 

Cor ted Abrasives 

Cork Industry 

Feldspar 

Ball Clay Production 

American Glassware 

Slate 

Pottery Sup-olies 

Rock & Slag ^ool 

Earthenware Manufacturing 

Fibre Wall Board 

T~lc & Soapstone 

Insulation Board 

Fuller's liarth Producing 

Preformed Plastic Products 

Cloy Drain Tile Kfg. 

Sand Lime Brick 

Roof ing, Granule i'-fg. 

Sandstone 

Clay & Shale Roofing Tile 

Flexible Insulation 

Soft Lime Rock 

G-"p sum 

K'arble Quarrying s Finishing 

Abrasive Grain 

Tiolesple Monumental Granite 

"Wholesale Monumental Maroe 

Natural Cleft Stone (1933 ] 

China Clay (1931 

Bituminous Road "?Bterial(l9! 

Stained Glass (1933 J 

'"and <* Glass 

Flat Glass 

i-ica Induct r"' 



0-3 



10- 2-33 

10-13-33 
10-13-33 
10-30-33 
11-13-33 
11-13-35 
11-13-33 
11*20-33 
11-20-33 
11-24-33 

12- 7-33 
12- 7-33 
12- 7-53 
12-11-35 
12-11-35 
13-18*33 
13-28-33 
1-8 ~34 
1-14-34 

1- 3-34 
1-22-54 
1-29-34 

1-29-34 
1-31-34 

2- 1-34 
2-2S-34 
3-19-34 
3-23-34 
3-19-34 
3-3L-34 
4- 3-34 
3— 30— 54 
4- 2-34 
4- 3-54 
4- 5-34 
4- 9-34 
4- 16-34 
4-16-34 
5-14-34 
5-17-34 
5-31-54 
5-23X54 
6-11-34 
6-11-54 
7-33-34 
9-21-54 

10- 3-34 
11-25-34 
l.l-13-v4 
12-3 -34 

3-5 -34 



75 

TABLE 5 

LINOLEUM AND FELT EASE MANUFACTURING -INDUSTRY 

AVERAGE EMPLOYMENT, PAYROLLS, ITOJRS AND EARNINGS 
1929 to January 1935 



Average Average Average Average Average 
Item 1929 1st 7 no. Aug. "3^ FeL. - Aug. '34 

1933 -Jan. '34 July '34 -Jan. '35 



Number of Wage 

Employees ' 5836 4002 6388 5826 5617 

Weekly Payroll - $60,901 $124,678 $125, 724 $123, 181 

Average hours 

Worked -per Employee 57.75 42.43 36.50 36.30 35.40 

Average rate 

■oer hour 53.5rf 44.7<£ 53. 3* 56.7c* 57.8c* 



Source: Industry Questionnaire returns, 11 manufacturers reporting. 
Submitted "by the Linoleum and Felt Base Manufacturers 
Association to the national Recovery Administration, received 
March 27, 1935. 



9818 



76 

TABLE 6 

'TEE GLASS C01WAIEGR IFDUSTEY 

Humber of Employees P;c sorted, By Occupation 
Four Periods, 1929 - 1954. 



Occupational April April 

Group , 1929 1933 



October 




March 


1933 




1934 


213 




337 


. 168 




146 


469 




519 ' 


424 




492 


915 


1 


,004 


119 




190 


35.9 




389 


11 




19 


532 




629 


1 , 942 


p 


,128 


1,856 


1 


,730 


56 




73 


243 




252 


12 




- 


2,482 


2 


, 692' 


2, 346 


3 


,019 


1,760 


1 


,916 


939 


1 


,166 


1,549 


1 


,623 


29 




17 


204 




231 


152 




152 


53 




54 


110 




114 


49 




56 


43? 




524 


351 




5G0 


178 




160 


18 




16 


226 




169 


58 




53 


172 




122 


217 
10 




154 
9 



Boiler Firemen 

Producer lien 

Batch Storage & nixing 

Tankmen 

Hold Halters 

Mold i.iaher Apprentices 

Mold Cleaner si Male 

ho la Cleaners, Female 

Machinists 

Machine 0-^er? tors' 

Carry-In Boys, Male 

Carry- In Boys, Female 

Lehrmen, Male 

Lchrmen, Female 

Selecting £ Packings Male 

Selecting & Packing, Female 

Warehouse <1 Shipping 

Maintenance 

General Labor, 'Male 

General Labor, Ferial c 5 

MISCELLAITEOUS 

Watchmen 137 136 

Electricians 133 124 

B 1 a cl ; smi t hs 5 8 44 

Truck Drivers 92 85 

Draft smen 29 30 

Carton Dept. Male 177 256 

Carton Dept. Female 180 165 

Box Dept. Male 254 120 

Bo:: Dent. Female 8 16 

Sundry, Laic 106 71 

Sundry, Female 39 15 

FOHELEII LECLIVILG LESS TEAF $35.00 WEEK 

Hot End 11 127 

Cold End 108 236 

Mold Shop 1 X 



151 




149 


167 




111 


410 




365 


485 




351 


759 




778 


187 




161 


273 




235 


33 




11 


427 




426 


1,569 


,1 


, 459 


1,562 


1 


, 126 


110 




32 


271 




196 


. 6 




■ 6 


2,428 


2 


,072 


IV 668 


1 


,504 


1,683 


1 


,421 


301 




786 


1,130 


1 


, 033 



9818 



77 
TA3LE - Cont.d 

TIE GLASS C01TTAINER INDUSTRY 

iTumber of Employees Reported, \f r Occupation 
Pour Periods. 1929 - 1934. 



Occupational April April October i larch 

C-rou-o 1929 1933 193S 1924 



P0ZEK3H1 I2ZSEIVI1TG HORE TIIAIT $35.00 
Hot End 
Cold End 
Hold Shop 

TOTAL PAC2CEY EMPLOYEES 
IIALS 
FELIA1E 

PbpFICE EiPLOYEES 
R1CEIVIITC- LESS THAI' $25.00 I7EEE 

I. ALE - - 466 519 

FELIALE - - 236 263 



Source: Industry Questionnaire, 37 coimanies east of the Rocky Mountains re- 
porting. Submitted by the Glass Container Association of America to the 
IIBA. , Division of Research and Planning, October 4, 1934. 





419 




262 




3^-8 




399 




222 




59 




245 




315 




76 




72 




99 




116 


1G 


, loo 


14 


,049 


20 


.048 


22, 


,047 


14 


,114 


1? 


,300 


16, 


,951 


18, 


,-.07 


■-;. 


, 049 


1 


,749 




,117 


3, 


,840 



> 



9818 



72 

TABLE 7 

THE CLASS COUTAIHES IlTDUSTEf 
Approximate (*) Averages of Actual Weekly Hours, 

Tour Periods, 1929 - 1934 



By Occupation 



Occupational 










Group 


April 1929 


April 1935 


October 1933 


March 1934 


Boiler Pirer.en 


59 


55 


39 


40 


Producer '..en 


5C 


53 


39 


39 


Batch Storage, Mixing 


54 


50 


36 


37 


Tank len 


58 


51 


33 


39 


Hold Makers 


52 


50 


39 


41 


i.iOld-i iaJ :er Apprant ice s 


51 


50 


59 


43 


Hold Cleaners - Hale 


55 


51 


39 


39 


Hold Cleaners 


a/48 


a/ 39 


a/38 


a/ 39 


'Machinists 


54 


55 


41 


41 


Machine Operators 


47 


44 


37 


35 


Carry-In - hale 


46 


38 


32 




Carry- In - Penal e 


48 


a/ 45 


35 


39 


Lehrmen - hale 


56 


49 


37 


37 


Lehmeii - Female 


a/ 65 


a/ 65 


a/ 39 


- 


Selecting-Packing- 1.1 


49 


43 


35 


36 


Selec ting-Packing- F 


4-6 


38 


35 


34 


Warehouse- Shipping 


52 


27 


36 


38 


Maintenance 


54- 


53 


49 


4-1 


General Labor- hale 


50 


46 


36 


36 


General Labor - Penal e 


a/ 4-0 


- 


a/ 37 


a/ 37 


MISCELLANEOUS 










Watchmen 


72 


66 


59 


41 


Electricians 


57 


55 


4-0 


42 


Blacksmiths 


54 


55 


40 


43 


Truck Drivers 


53 


50 


59 


40 


Draft snen 


a/ 48 


a/ 50 


42 


44 


Carton Dept. - Male 


46 


44 


36 


35 


Carton Dept. Pemale 


49 


38 


33 


33 


Bo:-;: Dept . - hale 


49 


47 


35 


36 


Bore Dept. - Penale 


a/ 46 


a/ 41 


a/53 


a/ 39 


Sundry - hale 


40 


44 


35 


54 


Sundry - Female 


a/42 


a/ 40 


33 


25 


F02EHEU - U1TDEH $35 WK. 










Hot End 


a/ 49 


50 


44 


35 


Cold End 


53 


52 


45 


38 


hold Shop 


a/44 


a/ 44 


a/ 44 


a/ 57 


FOiffihEH-OVEH $35 WE. 










Hot End 


55 


53 


49 


52 


Cold End 


55 


55 


49 


52 


Hold Shop 


51 


51 


49 


49 



9818 



79 



Table 7 Cont'd.. 



ALL FACTORY ELPLOYELS 50 - -46 37 37 

I ALL 51 47 37 38 

PLi^LL 46 33 35 35 
017 ICE - IOEH $35 UK. 

iJale 40 40 

Female - - 40 40 



SOURCE: Industry questionnaire, 37 companies east of the Roclcy fountains 
reporting. Submitted by the Glass Container Association of 
America to the national Recovery Administration, Division of 
Research and Planning, October 4, 1934. 

(*)l!ote; Since only approximate averages of working hours rrere reported, 
these figures should be cheeked vritb. the quotient of average 
weekly earnings divided by average hourly earnings. 

a/ To be used vith caution because of small nunber reported. See preced- 
ing table. 



9813 



>h 



H 



s 



CPi 



9818 



a --fi. 



t 



o -P 



o 



I 

cd 

rH 

o 



f s 



pi 5 



o co 

0) 
CD to 

<2 s 
a <d 

3 fa 



o o 

Eh ,a 



c3 

o 

CD Eh 



CO 

fa 



Q 
O 



p 4-> 

o 

CD Eh 

> 

■H 

4^ 



O 



O 
EH 



M 




w 


a) 




(l) 


fl 


<H 


rH 


fi 


n 


en 


3 




2sS 


^5 







to n. 


10 


S o 


xi 


•H W 


I 


*3 u 


■ 


W ft 


rH 



,-lJ- 00 -=f LT\ LC^ CTv CT\ 60 f— O J" ,<A f— r- CM CTM-- O 
OCXJrOtOvjDMDVOrHLPiOtiOWDrvjjd-Lr^cPiOJJ-O 

C\J w to J' r — O O 00 r^i&O r) J-VD r~- CO CTi C^i o 

<h i^J-vu r-- r^ co co er\e^cncncPicr>cno 



LO 60 I — i-H O r^ OVUJ 60 ^~0 O CO CM CO LfM — rOCTv 

rH r^-^D u H OJ OW W h-CTiH nJ LOVD VD ^O 

r-H r-O Hf LTiV£> U) l^-l^-l — W Kl W CO W M tO 



co 
co 



CO r^\ LPiVQ 
O CT\ I — <D 



■3" rH ..H- 



lp o 



cm o m co t> cr> o 
loco cr\ en en en o 



co vd co i — o r-c\) h- 

ir\U) kD nu H (\) CM 

rH IjC-\ O C\J ni^ffM^ 

rl rl HriHH 



i — co c\j en rp: 

LP O O VO VO , 

H J- lAH 



LT\C\J 



CM 
l~P 



O O rP Cnu3 HVD r^r^iTM — o i-^i^f" CM v_D CO O 
I LP CM I — O LP t — M N C N r^ (\110 H I — H r^O 

I 

I Wr-3- Mi^lH; H-o^O^inNM 'TiT»0 

cm rp lpvjd r— x) co cncncncncncr\cno 



l i^-oj en h- O^ 1 r-H- 4- aiU)J-toH-Hi^cnLr> 

I l^i^D W) h-_+ T> r- O Ti CTi LO>XI LP LP r — O HM3 
! rH :P I — M CTM — LP, to f-pvX) M O ri W i^ r^i r^ 

r-\ cm iaJ- lp lp^d ^dvo r — i — r — r — i — i — 



I r-irih- irv o vn 

I t-p CM O O VD rH 
I rH -T* CM O — I 



rH r~- o co.tj-co.h-vo r— CM^OUD 

W CM Cn 3^VT) o CT\ CTl rH |-P rH J" 

M h-KlH; CM CM H rH 



IP 



lp O ino lp q lp o '.no ino iao lp o moo 
h oj cm i^ r^ j h- m ipvui <D i — r~-co co en en o r— 

rH H 



II I I I I I 1 1 I 1 I I I I I I I 

IP O LlO LP O LT\ O LP O LP O IflO LP O LP, O 
rH CM CM, rP nJ- -J" LT> LPVD VO r~- t"- CO CO :T\ CTi O 



+3 
o 



>s 




U >j 




O rO 




> 




O T} 




O CD 




CD U 
« ffl 




ft 




^S 




S ft 




o 




• H 




4^> ^ 




CO u 




S hJ 




co 




g 




• rd 




r^ C 




r-<~\ rH 




CP> 




rH U 




O 




- c 




A -H 




o cd 




fH +^ 




CO £ 




2 o 




o 




« 




to to 




O v) 




•H tO 




4J rH 




co d 




•H 




4-3 a) 




cd A 




4J E-t 




CO 




f-i • 




O "JO 




-B « 




CO -H 




rH A 




ri 




CfH Cd 




O rH 




-i Ph 




?! 




cd tJ 




g § 




PQ ,C 




O 




co is 




CD cd 


• 


4J O 


rO 


cd v 


r^v 


■u o 


'"> 


co rt 


H 


tJ (h 


. 


CD O 


.— 1 


4J 


rH 


•H fl 




C O 


!h 


& H 


CD 


to 


Q 


>3 H 


p 


rQ > 


<D 


■H 


-u 


>1 (H 


ft 


TH 


a) 


pi - 




+> ^ 




to o 


» 


•H 


m 


rd +^ 


■rH 


CD cd 


rH 


rd rH 


O 


C/3 4J 


t/J 


•H CO 


to 


rH H 


O 


r9 


w 


P* H 




S <d 


^ 


P <=tj 




CD 




O 




H 




o 





SI 

TABLE 9 

TEE CLASS COlTTAIiiEE INDUSTRY 

Average Earnings per Hour, 3y Occupation 
Four Periods, 1929 - 1934. 



Occupational 
Grou~> 



A'i>ril 


Aoril 


Oci 


; ob er 


March 


1929 


19 


53 


U 




1934 


$0.51 


$0 


.43 


$0.53 


$0.53 


.47 




.39 




.49 


.43 


.4-6 




.38 




.47 


.47 


.48 




.41 




.50 


.50 


.75 




.63 




.77 


.32 


.44 




.43 




.47 


.43 


.43 




.37 




.45 


.45 


a/ ,35 


a/ 


.20 


sJ 


.30 


r/ .30 


.67 




.55 




.68 


.69 


.70 




.58 




.70 


.75 


.41 




.35 




.44 


.44 


.37 


a/ 


. 24 




. 32 


.30 


.46 




. 38 




.45 


.45 


a/ .22 


s/ 


.22 


a/ 


.30 


- 


.44 




.36 




.45 


.45 


.31 




.26 




.34 


.54 


.42 




.43 




.43 


.43 


.51 




.43 




.53 


.52 


.41 




.34 




.43 


.43 


a/ .20 




- 


sJ 


.31 


a/ -34 


. .55 




.39 




.37 


.39 


.59 




.51 




.62 


. 63 


.60 




.50 




.59 


.59 


.47 




.40 




.50 


.48 


a7 .79 


a/ 


.62 




.76 


.68 


.38 




.29 




.40 


.40 


.27 




.25 




.33 


. 33 


.44 




.37 




.45 


.43 


a/ .31 


w 


.32 


^ 


.34 


sJ - 34 


.54 




. 33 




.43 


.55 


a/ .29 


a7 


.25 




.31 


.31 


a/ .78 




.64 




.67 


.70 


.62 




.62 




.57 


.62 


a/ .79 


s/ 


.79 


sJ 


.72 


ej .61 


.82 




.77 




.92 


.94 


.77 




.59 




.85 


.81 


1.08 




.98 


] 


..05 


1.06 



Boiler Firemen 
Producer lien 
Batch Storage, Mixing 
Tankmen 
Mold Makers 

Mo 1 d- Maker Appr cut i ces 
Mold Cleaners - Male 
Mold Cleaners - Female 
Machinists 
■achine Operators 
Carry-In - Male 
Carry-In - Female 
Lchrmcii - Male 
Lchrmen - Female 
Sclccting-Packing - Male 
Selec ting-Packing - Female 
Warehouse, Shipping 
Maintenance 
General Labor - Male 
General Labor - Female 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Watchmen 

Electricians 

Blacksmiths 

jEruck Drivers 

Draftsmen 

Carton Dent. - Male 

Carton Dept, - Female 

Box Dept. - Male 

Box Dept. - Female 

Sundry - Male 

Sundry - Female 

F03EMEIT UTTDER $35 WEEK 
Hot End 
Cold End 
Mold Shop 

FOREI.EF/lT OYER $35 WEEK 
Hot End 
Cold End 
Mold Sho-o 



9818 



S2 
TABLE 3 Cont'd 
TEE GLASS COMTAIITER INDUSTRY 



Average Earnings per Hour, By Occuprtion 
Four Periods, 1929 - 1934 



Occupational 
Group 



ALL FACTORY EilLOYEES 
MA£E 

FEL1ALE ■ 

OFFICE UNDER $35 WEEK. 
I.ALE 
FEi ALE 



April 

1929 



..49 

-.o2 
.30 



Airil 
IS 33 



.54 
.26 



Ccto'ber 
1933 



,51 
FA 



.56 

.46 



:;c.rc: 
1334 



, 3D 



.56 
.49 



a/ To be used vith caution becrx.se of snif.ll number reported. See precee&in& 

Table. 

Source: Industry Questionnaire, 57 companies east of the Rocky Mountains 

reporting. Submitted oy the Glass Container Association of America 
to the iIRA, Division of Research and Planning, October 4, 1934. 



9818 



S3 

TABLE 10 
THE GLASS CONTAINER IMUSTRY 
Average Earnings par Week, By Occupation 
Pour Periods L 1929 - 1933. 



Occupational 

Group 



Aver are Earn ings Per Week 
April 1929 April 1953 Octoher 1933 March 1934 



Boilor Firemen 

Producer Men 

Batch Storage, Mixing 

Tankmen 

Mold Makers 

Mold-Maker Apprentices 

Mold Cleaners - Male 

Mold Cleaners - Pemale 

Machinists 

Machine Operators 

Carry_In-Male 

C arry-In-Femal e 

Lehrmen- Male 

Lehrmen-Female 

Selecting-Ppcking -M 

Selec ting-Packing -F 

Warehouse-Shipping 

Maintenance 

General Lahor - Male 

General Lahor - Female 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Watchmen 

Electricians 

Blacksmiths 

Truck Drivers 

Draftsmen 

Carton Dept. - 

Carton Dept. 

Box Dept. - Male 

Box Dept. - Pemale 

Sundry-Male 

Sundry-Female 

FOREMEN - UNLER $35. WK. 

Hot End 

Cold End 

Mold Shop 

FOREMEN - OVER $35 WK. 

Hot End 

Cold End 

Mold Shop 



Male 
Female 



$30.12 
27.63 
24.35 
27 . 73 
39.05 
22.55 
24.03 
12.40* 
36.54 
33.42 
18*94 
12*86 

. 25.51 
14.46*, 
21.79 
14.18 
21.83 
27.71 
20.90 
8.00* 

25 . 61 

34.44 

32.64 

24.67 

38.37* 

17.34 

15.85 

21.96 

14.60* 

21.91 

12.18* 

38.61* 

33.26 

34.60* 

45.17 
42.32 
55.67 



£23.19 

20.52 
19.21 
21.19 
33.90 
21.26 
13.95 
7.72* 



13.18 

10.79* 

13.61 

14.46* 

15.44 

10.13 

17.28 

22.19 

15.99 



19.66 

28.41 

27.72 

20.39 

30 . 89* 

12.80 

9.66 
17.45 
12.79* 
14.30 

9.91* 

31.67 
32.59 
34.60* 

40.42 
32.86 
50.17 



$21.12 
19.90 
16.75 
19.28 
30 . 16 
18.78 
17.75 
11.63* 
27.58 
26.04 
14.25 
11.31 
16.60 
11.65* 
15.74 
11.98 
15.41 
20.57 
15.48 
11.29* 

18.13 

25.98 

23.60 

19.47 

32.35 

14.41 

10.83 

16.08 

11.03* 

15 . 16 

10.44 

29.57 
25.57 
31.75* 

45.04 
41.52 
51.38 



$21.22 
13.74 
17.55 
19.75 
33.82 
20.50 
17.80 
11.70* 
23.78 
26.12 
14 . 87- 
11.81 
16.65 

16.27 
11.34 
16 . 33 
21.24 
15.58 
12.62* 

16.03 
26 . 81 
25.43' 
19.21 
29.34 
13.99 
10.86 
15.48 
13.60* 
18.79 
7.34 

24.50 
23.94 
22.47* 

48.53 
42.09 
52.36 



9818 



TABLE 10 (Continued) 

THE GLASS COETAlftEE INDUSTRY. 

Average Earnings per Week, by Occupation 
Four Periods, 1929 ~ 1933. 



Occupational 




Average 


Earnings Fer 


Week 


Group 


April 1929 


April 1933 


October 193J 


March 1934 


ALL FACTORY EMPLOYEES 


$24 . 90 


$19.63 


$19.00 


$19.52 


Male • 


26.48 


20.98 


20.24 


21.05 


Female 


14.00 


10 . 12 


12.30 


12.23 


OFFICE -UNDER $35. Wk. 










Male 


■ - 


- 


22.44 


22.45 


Female 


— 


- 


18.58 


19.52 



* To be used with caution because of small number reported. See pre- 
ceding Table. 

SOURCE: Industry questionnaire, 37 companies east of the Rocky Mountains 
reporting. Submitted by the Glass- Container Association o f 
America to the National Recovery Administration, Division of 
Research and Planning, October 4, 1934. 



9818 



S5 

TADLF 11 

AS3IST0S INDUSTRY 

Average Hours and Hourly Earnings of Factory Workers 
February 1935 to Aoril 1935 



Month, Year 


Employment 


Total 


Average 


Average 






Man Hours 


Weekly Hours 


Hourly 






(Thousands) 




Earnings 
(Cents) 


1933 


5,465 


191 


a/ 


a/ 


May 


5,762 


239 


41.4 


42.2 


August 


8,402 


316 


37.6 


48.7 


September 


8,581 . 


312 


35.9 


48.9 


October 


8,755 


315 


36.7 


48.9 


Hovember 


8,465. 


288 


34.0 


49.0 


December 


7,891 


275 


34.8 


49.7 


1934 










January 


7,552 , 


264 


35.0 


49.9 


February 


7,919 


280 


35.5 


49.5 


Larch , 


8,383 


311 


37.1 


49.7 


April 


8,662 


319 


36.8 


50.3 


May . 


8,735 , 


320 


36.6 


50.4 


June 


8,572 


313 


36.5 


51.2 


July . 


8,389 . 


302 


36.0 


51.4 


August 


8,321 


304 


36.5 


51.0 


September 


8,227 . 


288 


35.0 


50,7 


October 


8,163 


298 


36.4 


51.1 


November 


8 , 300 


301 


36.3 


50.9 


December 


8,433 


322 


38.2 


50.9 


1935 










January 


8,520 


060 


38.3 


51.7 


February 


8,877 . 


359 


38.2 


51.1 


March 


9,197 


351 


38,1 


51.1 


April 


9 ,,592 


363 


33*0 


51.0 



Source: Code Authority - Asbestos Industry, Factory Employnent, Wages and 
Hours in the Asbestos Industry. Based on return covering 96'.j of 
the Industry. Reported to the national Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and planning, May 22, 1935. 

.a/ Hot available. 



981S 



8b 



TABLE 12(a) 
Asphalt Shingle and Roofing Industry - Northern Area 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF WORE FOR FACTORY EMPLOYEES 
July 24, 1933 and July 23, 1934 











Factory Ernpl 


oyees 
















Cunulative 


Hours 


[forked 

ek 






ITunber 


Per 


Cent 


Per Cent 


per Tie 


July 24 


July 23 


July 24 


July 23 


July 24 


July 23 








1933 


1934 


1933 


1934 


1933 


1934 


20 and 


un der 




102 


168 


2.8 


4.1 


2.8 


4.1 


20.1 - 


24.0 




29 


60 


.08 


1.4 


3.6 


5 .5 


24.1 - 


28.0 




53 


27 


1.4 


0.7 


5.0 


6.2 


28.1 - 


32.0 




38 


129 


1.0 


3.1 


6.0 


9.3 


32.1 ~ 


36.0 




". 14 


39 


0.4 


0.9 


6.4 


10.2 


36.1 - 


39.9 




17 


90 


0.5 


2.2 


6.9 


12.4 


40.0 - 


.... 




403 


3,412 


11.1 


82.4 


18.0 


94.8 


40.1 - 


44.0 




127 


115 


3.5 


2.8 


21.5 


97.6 


44.1 - 


48.0 




1,241 


45 


54.2 


1.1 


55.7 


98.7 


48.1 






617 


13 


17.0 


0.3 


72.7 


99.0 


52.1 - 


56.0 




318 


42 


8.7 


. 1.0 


81.4 


100.0 


56.1 - 


60.0 




290 


1 


8.0 


* 


89.4 


- 


60.1 and over 




384 


2 


10.6 


* 


100.0 


- 




Total 


3,633 


4,143 


100.00 


100.0 


100.0 




* Less 


0.1 per 


cent 















Source: Questionnaire returns, reported by Code Authority to the N.R.A. , 
39 concerns reporting. National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning. "The Asphalt Shingle and 
Roofing Industry" , special report, prepared by R. von Huhn, 
Lay, 1935. 



9818 



„_TC BE USED WITH CAUTION 
°7 

TABLE 12(1)) 

Asphalt Shingle and Roofing Industry - Southern Area 
CLASSIFIED TOEKLY KOUHS CE U02K FOR FACTORY EMPLOYEES 
July 24, 1935 and July 23, 1934 



Factory Er.roloyees 



Cumulative 

Hours Worked ITunber Per Cent Per Cent 

July 24 July 23 July 24 July 23 July 24 July 23 
1935 1934 1933 1934 1933 1954 

Less than 4-0.0 

40.0- 66 205 31.4 92.8 31.4 92.8 

40.1 - 44.0 53 11 25.3 5.0 56.7 97.8 

44.1 - 48.0 27 3 12.9 1.4 69.6 99.2 

48.1 - 52.0 

52.1 - 56.0 

56.1 - 60.0 

60.1 and over 



54 


1 


25.7 


0.4 


95.3 


99.6 


3 


1 


1.4 


0.4 


96.7 


100.0 


7 


- 


3.3 


- 


100.0 




■al 210 


221 


100.0 


100.0 







Source: Questionnaire returns, reported by Code Authority to the 
17-. H. A. , 4 concerns reporting. National Recovery Adminis- 
tration, Division of Research and Planning. "The Asphalt 
Shingle and Roofing Industry", special report, prepared 
"by R. von Huhn, Liay, 1935. 



9818 



TO RE USJD 7ITE CAUTION 
TASLE 12(c) 

Asphalt Shingle and Roofing Industry 

CLASSIFIED YEEK1Y EOU2S 07 70EI: EOR EACTORY EMPLOYEES, III PACI7IC COAST 

AREA 

July 24, 193S and July 23, 1934. 



Hours 

OTorhed llunber 

July 24, July 23, 
1933 1934 



20.0 and under - - 
20..1 - 24.0 1 

24.1 - 28.0 - 1. 
28.1 - 32.0 

32.1 - 36.0 97 

36.1-39.9 1 2. 

40.0 - 93 185 

40.1 - 44.0 1 
44.1 - 48.0 1 
48.1 - 52.0 

52.1-56 - • 4. 

56.1 - 60.0 

60.1 and over 1 - 

Total 195 192 



Source: Questionnaire returns reported by Code Authority to the 1 T .R.A. , 
2 concerns reporting. National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning. "The Asphalt Shingle and Roof- 
ing Industry", special report, prepared "by R. von Huhn, 
Liay, 1935. 



9818 



S9 



TO BE USED 'TITH CAUT T ON 



TABLE 13 



ASPHALT, SHIEGLE AID ROOEIHJ 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY EARLT/GS OF EAGTORY 
July, 19.33. 



31.IPLOYEEE 



Weekly 




Eactorv Employ 


ees 


Earnings 






Cumulative 




ITumber 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


Less than $5.00 


25 


1.0 


1.0 


5.00 - 9.99 


100 


4.0 


5.0 


10.00 - 14.99 


253 


10 . 


15.0 


15.00 - 19.99 


609 


24.2 


39.2 


20.00 - 24.99 


643 


25.5 


64.7 


25.00 - 29.99 


483 


19.2 


83.9 


30.00 - 39.99 


321 


12.7 


96.6 


40.00 - 59.99 


85 


3.4 


100.0 


60.00 or more 


1 


(*) 




Total 


2,520 


100.0 




Mean (in dollars) 




$22.98 





SOURCE: Industry questionnaire returns, reported to FRA, 33 plants 
reporting. National Recovery Administration, Division of 
Research and Planning. "The Asuhalt, Shingle and Roofing 
Industry", prepared by A. B. Eridinger, September 29, 1934. 



( *) Less than .1 of one percent, 



9818 



90 



•~- m tc 



>Mf- 



O €> 



» O -H CJ> 

,0 H x nH 



3, 



9 S 



o a 

u o -h en 



O "" 

o 



§9f 



o a> 

. o . 

in* cr> 



8V 



o en 

• o • 

CTv 

O Oi 

• o- • 
m*» en 
to to 

O O-l 

• ©• • 
O «••** 
co to 

O O-v 

• o • 
lrn» en 
»— t— 

o en 

• o • 
O ■•».* 

p- t— 
o en 

. o • 

ir>4» en 

VO VO 
O Ol 

o en 

• o • 
m*» en 
in in 

o av 

• o • 

OS in 



'3> 



O en 

• o • 
inn 

.=»■ 

1». 

O en 

• o • 

in en 

• o • 
f— <• en 

° «•* 

• o • 
m*» r- 
f"» r"i 



m oi 
• o • 

K\ i*-i 



O ^» 
• o • 

O 4» CM 
K\ fV 



o-\ 



W) W O CVI 
« 3 G H 



cr>K\«v|f~-<ViJ3l~-iot0^ror^r<-»h r > I 
H H evlvoijvo t-- 1^\ in evi r-i 



till 



h cna\r-< evi av* o mtncvi evivo i-l cnfvcvi ki l l 

J* K-iVO nrfCTlNrt t-rtHVO incvi 



H H <\l 



ft 
>J3 



to 
en 



v2 



(VI CVI 



(VI H CVI H 



.* evi r^iK\ 



Klt^to tqvo CVI 



k\j* irv=l- cove evi 

CVI 



.-t CVI 00 K\J* evivo in 

CVI i-l CVI 



H rH into f">mqM-l.a- evi 

KV3- O CVI 



fll*Mf\d- rUt K\in 

■H VO CVI o 



l*V* OOP-lCVICVIVOCVieVlCMHfvCVI 
H i-l 60 (VI h-<nCVI 



^t to r-encncnH fu inn h 
^ h "^cvi 

r«KJn^^^ln ,0W 

CVI H CVI 



to J- H H i-l 



5 
& 



m 
vo 



$ 



K1 



VO 
CVI 



Si 



s 



to 
H 


cr> 
to 


Sn 


CTV 

in 

H 


VO 
VO 

in 


in 
8? 



« 



o a 

• ^t ov^* 01J* ov ov oi o\ en en en en en en en en ov ► 

in • • • • • • «•••«•*• • • • • o 

evi I— en (VI ^t I— ovf erv^ crv4 en^J- pSjl- en^r en 
evi evi roKMor'Sir J- ininvovo t~ F- to to a\ en -cf 

Sooooooooooooooooooo 



looinoinoinoooooocjooooo • 

ini— o evi ini~-o ino ino inp ino ino ino 
cm evi t"-»K~iK->K\JJ.:*- ufSinvovo P- 1— to to oS av H 



ID a 

^1 



z$\ 


-. c 


%H.5 H 


o o -d 




Ills 



to 



t<M^ 

ener 
ft I-l 

d a 

O 0> 

a> wi*» 

C9 O Tf l1 



§ 



» ■!• T» 



flj 

O 



to 
av 



s 

■a 
§ 



3: 

r 



r-f 



— 



s 



1. 

3 



1 



J. B P 

H ai 3 
x> a. x» 

3 O K\ 
P. CT> 



Irfrt I (MOW M^r-t I 



Cn-3" H M iribOK)\X>rHM)f\J(\J(\J(\J 

CVIH HH H H H W H H 



O Cn 

. o • 
o +>-3- 









o> 





+J 


J* 
eo 


■*v 






U 




4= 


cn 


U l 




en 



fc 


\£> v£) 


rJ 









^ 


"tt- 




cn 


■ 


• • 


a 


*» Jr 


■H 




c 


"•X. 


Bl 


0. 


M 


• • 




m+» o> 


3 


ix> in 


a 


•<*. 





en 


cr 


. • 




** J- 


0) 


ir> ir> 


3 




(h 


-*+. 


1) 


en 


t* 


. +■< . 


rf 


ir\ cn 




J* J- 



5 % 



3 « m 






H K>(\J IfNH 



<\J r-l v£> C\J f*- «-l 



C\J I 



CTv I 



C\, r4 ITNKNCVJ O -=T 



lT»r-t f^^j- ^ 



r— ir\ 



^f r- 



«J) t^ftj H C\J Jj CO 



t<\ r-i C\J IO ro t-t CVJ 



• ^* cr> j* en J* cncncncncncncncncncncTNcncn fe- 
rn c 

rvj r— en 00 j* r- en J- c»\^* enj* en j- cn.3- ov* en 
oj <\j k\ r*-\r»-\Kx=t j* tr\u^^o»^> r— r— eo k> en cn-rj 



jOOOOOOOOO 

r*o 



000000000 



Q ITNO lf**0 100 mo If 1 - O 

irs ir\\c v^) r*- »■— eo bo cn en <-« 



3 








-rJ 








JW 




M 




Ih 




u 


r*" 










)■•■ 


t* 


j- 


to 


n- 




r 




rH 


■ 


O 


M 




a 


.-H 


B 


r 


4' 




a> 




s 


Id 


* 







C 


O 


*j 


H 


3 


r-» 


o 


P 


r-^ 


§ 


a 


fl 


rr 


('1 


*> 




cr 




.-< 


«». 


r-* 


Vt 


>"- 


a 




O 






a 




-=r 


u 


*» 


h 


K* 


a> 


c 


«> 


c 


XI 


£> 


x> 


rH 


i 


C 


9 


c 


^ 


■0- 


y: 


•*-' 



C0 N*\ 

ffi cn 



3* 

■ri 

a 

- 60 
C C 

O -H 

~< a 
♦> t- 



a 


^ 


K 


D 




SJ 


y 


CO 

3 







^ a 



8£ 



h 







-^> 










tf> 


u 


at 


r*-> 





■rl 


Ch 


X! 


*-> 


^ 


«a 


c 




d 


♦> 




< 



t/J 


1 





E? 


B 





-»j 


d 


fc 


in 

n 

C 


i 


T3 







11 









s 


> 


« 






u 


*MPJ 


■ 







h 


,3 


>> 




IX 






a 


"3 


d 


I 


s 

a 




*> 




1 


■ 


4) 


p 


h 


^-« 


a> 




(m u 


■ 


c 


p 


h 


-^ 






X! 




d 


tfU" 


i 


^ 









r-t 


*-> 


1 


. 


w 


p 


u •■ 


■ 


(0 


r\j 


a 


«< 




c* 




>» 







rH 


H 


J3 


d 





Et'-S 



^ Btl 

■ n .11 

OH (« 

o a, o 



X6 



J- 

r-P 
en 



'd 

G 

en 



o 

Ph 
CD 

i 



o 

i— i 

o 
<! 

Ph 



tP CT 

fP r-l 
CTi 

1-1 a 

•H 

•H -P 
O 

n 






92 



i i i I aj im noJ-vo 



I I H I I .1 I 



0) ^ 
CD -P 
>. O 
O ,0 



pr> 
C cr 



o o cr 



LP> 

to 



Cn 

to 



EH 
CO 

B 



Ci> 

i-H 
PR 
O 
O 

Ci> 
!23 



CO 
EH 



co; 
H 

g, 

1-1 i 

g,OJ 



>3 



CD 

cS 

Ph 

>! 

^> 

tJ 
CD 

■H 
tH 
•H 
CO 



"to 

O O G~ 

. -p - 

to to 

-to. 

o o cr 



III! 



r-p I v£> to r-p rpvjD ro vd i — cr. . 

rH H tP.Hr rH 



I I I 



LP 

t — 



cr 



0, 

m 
■A 






>; 
U 
o 
-p 
o 

«H 
O 

Ph 
CD 

I 



9313 



■to. 

o o cr 

• -p ' 

o J* 

t — r-— 

-to. 

O o cr 

• -p 

lp cr 



o o cr 

• -p • 
o J- 

"to. 

o o cr 

• -p 
lp en 

LP LP 

"to. 

O O CT 

• -p 

o J- 

LP LP 

"to. 

o o m 

• -p 
lp cr 



cn 



rH CM iH LP 



CT 



"to 

o o 

o J- 



r-P 


en r— 

CM i-H 


rH 




CM 







to 



VJ3 



>! 






"to. 

o 
































CD 
t> 
O 


H 
Ph 




r-' 


LP 


-Hr 


CAJ- 


cn 


-Hr 

• 


Cn OA CTi cn cn en 

• fi • • • • 


cr> cti a • 

• * e 


en en cr 


en 


d 




cr 


CM 


r- CnCM ^} 


p- 


enj- 


cn^± 


o~\^f 


CTijH- 


mj- 


CAd- 


m 


o 

J3 


CO 

hi 


rH 


d 


CM 


CM I-p to tP rP J- ^f 


LC> LPUD 


UD 


i — r— to 


to 


en cr\ 


•xi 




PT 


CM 


3 


o 


P O 


O 


o 


o O 


o 


o 


O O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


si 
a) 


o 


•H 


^3 
-p 


-p 


-P -p 


-P 


-p 


-p -p 


-p 


-p 


■P += 


-P 


-p 


-p 


+3 


-p 


-p 


+i 


-t . 


cfl 

CD 


Ph 
n3 


P»s 




■to. 


-to. "to. 


■to. -to. -to- -to. 


-» 


-to. 


-tv -«* -to. -to. -to 


-to 


■to 


■to -to^rT 


CO 
CO 


o 


LP O 


LP O 


LP o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


• 


5 




d CD 


LP r- O 


CM 


iano 


u~\ o 


LP O 


LPO 


LP O 


lca n 


lc\ o 




^3 


M 


CM 


CM rp l"P hP k>J- J- 


LP LP.VX) VD 


r— i-— to 


to 


en cnrH 



o 



to 



en 



to 



CM 



u PI 



T"j -P CO Tj 

CD CO .H CD 

•rt 01 Jh 

•h a >j cd 

P -H rH p. 

S CVj CD 

O Tj C Jh 

O <3j <J P; 



93 























'•43-. -P fiU 














P to: P P 










. 


cn 


CD +3 CD -H 












-p 


CO O p O Ch 












rjj 


+3 0) O 












CD 


P ft O ft O 








«H 






O 


CD' CD 0) pej 








H O 


J$ 


W rH CM,. 


rd CO 


O p.lTi Pi 








CO 


t^ 


• • • 


'. ■ © r-l • ' O 


• i nri 








r-H, O rj W 
cd .rH CO cn 


CT 


lo c\i r-- 


rH CO' J" LTi 


lc\ i^, r-— . o P 








rH 




•H t> , • 


J" ■ K> • • CO 








-P 4-3 O CD 




j 


cB ' U H "hVO 


rH CM.; W 








O P -H O 






-P CD • O 


tH «H P CD 








r_, 1) +3 X 






CD -P fn 


O J4 O ft -H rH 








■d'C W 






«P P CO O 


O O +3 6jD 








<h' j-h ,cd 






•rl W 


0)l' CO U pi 








o "P P 






cd t; ,-j- 


CtflUd- W)^ O -rl 








en ;m -h 






<D cn ; . .h ^"^ 


P ' rH-\ P ■ i^v' P ,-P 








4J> cd ■ i en 




•{ 


h w P <T\ 

P^ CO, U r-\ 


•h o^i -n ' CT\ cd c/3 








P CD P EiO Jh 




i 


P rH P r-H ft 








0> ft, O P p 






+3 rH P 


ft ft P 








O OJq -ri O 




O mv_D 


O ' O P 


p ' P '.CO | P., cn n 








r-H .in' !P 


C~ 


• • • 


CD "H 


0) ! -H D.'.H'Ci CO 








ft Pi'-P ft 


r^ 


r^Hto 


.P .P >j 


Jh ,P 








CD S P O O 


cr 


GO V£>,,. 


+= O , rH W 


!>j cn > a cn 0) Ph 








PL, g CO t2 J" 


rH 




CO Jh 4^ 


rH -P rH -P O CO 












E ffiifj p P 


Jh p J^H P p =jj 














O O CD 


p CD p ' 0) O 














Jh Cn ,P O 


O O O O O CD 














4H O 


^ ^' .P 








. Pi • 








•P J" 


bO CM LO EH 








| -H J" 








fp w a • 


tH, • aj • ^ j- 








ft, ' K> 








CD P • > CM 


a) m id o 






— 


1 O ' ' hit CTi 








4-~> P -H Lf> 


P> LT\ > LT\ » • 






r^i 


P H (3 rH 








p -rl CD 


•H -rl !>> bj 






K"n 


CD P-i <H 








f O O O 


O O CD O -P P 

C 43 O +3 .H -H 






CT\ 


■P £ ■M.'d 






r-O rH VJD 


r P-, - CD P 




ft. 

J-H 


r-H 


n pq ft P 






>Xi UD tx) • 


C 1 Jh 


CD CD ftp 






; o CO 






O^v rA rH 


i.. Ot); r^, 


ft K\ ft hO C P 




o 


p 


H H Is 






« 


•h ' o r-<-\ 


K^ t<~S rP P 




P ft, 


■H 


P P r^ 






ro 


cd P : ^S o^ 


o cp\ o o^ p r-H 


s 

EH 
CO 


o u 




-p O : cn r^ 








Jh P rH 


P p 'P 
cn ,rl tn r H CD P 

a cd P cj 


ro o 

Ph -p 

o 


U3 

u 

p 

O 


O -H CD c> 
EH P CD rH 


-p 


P - 




CD CD 

p p i cn p 

-P : CD -rl 

CD 


e 


P Ph 
o 


W 


is 


cn 

Cj 


^f c^^f 


. '_.'\ P • C 4J 


cd W 0) tn o 

K 3 TO r-H-' ,*-^ r-H. 


j— i 


•H H 


o 


tH W 


o 


CD 


• « • 


t~{ "H i — ! 1-h 


O P O (P O 




4-3 P J- 


1) o : +> 




rH 


m U^rH 


, >^ 5 Sh m 


H (CD rH CD ?CD ft 


ci 


P P 




W) ' P 


rl 


CJ 


rj r-^, 


■d r-l i n O 


p., : Pi lO Lp P 




CD O 


<H 


CO CI r-( CD 


CD 


P 




P 'i CD 


■ S fj 4-3 CD 


i i — i 


•P EH 


o 


Ph 


n 




Cj -H CM 


cd o 0) CM cn 


Si 8 


HH 




CD P O 








4--> i-H • 


• • ' >- CD 


«H 


en 


> -H tH P 






ai cm aj , 


r<:, iH CO. to 


H fT\ H W p' P 


n 


<H O 


CO 


<aj P P -H 




^r ' : 


• • • 


K"' p O ^f 

ca n , -h 


Pp 


Ph 


O 


CD 


Jh P 




t^ 


cm co o ': 


o o [a tfl 


S3 

EH 




0) 


o 


t) CO SB 10 




o^ 


LOi LTi IT: r 


r-1 ' +> fi 


• H S -rl P O Q •• 


g 


W 6j0 


X 


o Ht) a) 




r-\ 




P o 


-p .O +3 O > LT\ 


tifl P 


rt • 


4-3 r- 1 CD 








J-i ,Q ; O Jh 


p ft p ft <H P r^\ 


<l! 


P P 


en 


P ft, : ft 








O r O <H 


CD Cn CD «H CD O' CT^ 




•rl P 


P P 


S rH rH O 




K> 


LT\ CPi CM 


tH - " -rl 


■P '-. rrj | O -H r-\ 
■H *P -rl tl CD t0 


9 


P G) 


•H O 


•rl Ph P rH 




1^1 ' 


• • • | 


p 'p 


ft O 


-rH 


4-= P P Pi 




<T\ 


r-l LO tO f 


cn o ch o 


O CD ft -H >i 


3 


P U 


W) ttf 


W O O G 




r-\ 


J- ir> t^i 


M rH ■• O W 


t)H Kl «n CQ > P 


Pi 
to 


Ph 
ft P 


P CD 

ft ft, 
O ,G> 


Ph W Eh Ph 




CO 




p; ri cn p 

. -rl O In- W CD 

f! <h S) W) Jh 

Jh ^ P O 

CO ,p . 5h -rl P 


o co o -P cn .h S 

CD CD P PI, 

cn ft cn ft jft 




■P 
P 




M o MUd p P 
r p p p p o ,p 

•H ,H -H *H 0) -H p 


EH 


3 


is 


i e 


CD 


CD O t> P -n 


| 


o 
IP w 

CD 


cd r^> 


id 


p 
■i- 


H J 

U CD 


o o tr\ . ; 

• • • 


; , .' c: w 
r-; p "Pi cd rp 


P j P ; *h +?; IP 

Jh tn ft ?" •! c, 

Cj >!p- ffi 'ti jh) ft.P 
CD p CD O ft +3 O 


Ph 


CD CD 


o <J\ 


CD 


P 


P -^ 


zt^t t^ I 


Poo 
p w ■ >j -H 


CO 


W ft. 


ft H 


TO, 




O CO 


j 


, -H J "H -H « > 


■a) 


P O 


O 


•rH 


;r 


rP r) 


, 


c t.O Jh r-l Jh 


> 3 ft ft I, g -H , • 

r-H CD rH CD .p P Cp 
f H p, ft, p, P -H 




Jh i-l 
CD p. 


r-H 
O-, -P 


CP 






.' 


P' P tl) rl CD 

CD P E O 
t j N SP ,P 




<j pi tS §■ 


Ph 


r 






p :; p , fc) « r 

O ,p C^rri tjfl 








0) 


s 

•H 




.1 


C CO K ,4-3 
Jh a . O 
03 tp- -tJ ,Q 


,p jp ^! +3 -P -a! 

o ob P 








. *> 


X 


g ' 


O O O :> 


. ' ti r& l3 rQ 'CD ft, CD 








o 


a 


H/J-P ; 


> .^ S>: CD 


cd ; p ft ft 

P 6J3 P W & CD P 








o 


i *^ 


tp 




P r-H -lH 4-3 !\£) 








r 






. Jh 4? CO P 


CO P p p . > Ph 








! 

j 






-P. p O S -H 


g -H E -H B O CD 










| 


CD O P -rl Jh 


•H Jh -h Jh O O ft 










"Wl . ', 


+3 ,p P, +3 p 
p CD w id 


P P P. P ft CD Pi 

cn -6 cn ^8 ch prj 








' ' 




R P dp CD 
•H. Oft 0) 


• CD 0) » 














-P CD . CD Ti rH ft, 








• 




-)J i. 

cn 


P CD Jh 
d rn p tjj[) O 
cd a p p S 

r-l -P ft 


PCDJhCDJhCDPJh 
0) t,0O MOrH p-P 

•O p ES cO B -H o cn 

Pi ft ' Ph -rH p 

jiO r dii)'dS+ > '0 

CDf>S>POPP 








• 




Hi b t^l ; 








P 






o 


0) ,0 G) "P 






, 


P 






p p , 


P lj !>j f> El 








•rH 






u o u 


[H +> P <^ CO 


Pn-aJcB-aJpOtsil-H 








Effl 






Ql .H CD . 


j 


i [•! 








CD 






,'■! «H ,P 


.. 








Pi 






4^-' «H P 1 


<D 












h op 


+' 1 


! ft 




9218 


i 




i 

i 








b cfl • a ' 
., Ph to 1 


o ->s: 

1 •'• p' 


"rKH iT^l C^ 
1 , "> 






L , 






9h 



^5 

b 

i 
1 



cjj 

EH 

CO 

I 



S3. <D 

0) ? 

O ri 

rH C. 

<d ,ri 

P-i o 



a) 

rH C 

2 r- 

ha 



H cr 

•i 



ri <u 

0) 

O ri 

Jf 

iO. f. 



c4 ^ 



S 



a -g 



e. 



OfO 
H 

o 

•H 
l«H 
■H 
O 
0i 
P4 



hi 

id ^ 

3* 






O 
rH. 

3' 



Pi 

o 

FJ-I 
O 

(•i 

o 

r-l 

ri 

fa 



OJ 
>"3 



CJ 

H -C 
ha 



-P 

in oj 

CD ti 

fH rf 

(L, O 



OJ 
r-j O- 



' 
rH 



OJ- 






^l- 



OJ 



LTM~- 

• « 

rH C" 

I -M 



OJ 



oy 



O r'" 1 


OJ 




! . • a 


• 


i 


1 .-t r-l 


o 


c. 


H VH 


rH 


OJ 


-J- 1 


■+■ 


I 



o 

LC> b0 to 

--J- O 

r— ' i 

,-H" O 

If 

r-l 



C 
LP. 






o 



J-l -p 

oj :-! 

,a r. 

" rH 



J- 



H 




• vo 


0.1 


tr 


r>- 


Ol 


OJ 


OJ 




o- 


^t 




to 


■69 



o y.o 


to 


r-H to 


r*"\ 


OJ to 


h- 


a 


r^ 




** 



CO 

■ 

to 



OJ 


l> 


vr> 


o^ 


OJ 


r-— 


r-r 


■■ 


I**) 




• 


*» 




;- 


-C/3- 



OJ 

o 



r~- 

CT\ 

I s — 

-L9- 



VO 
OJ 

-to- 



-=j- 



- . _-]- 



i , i 



,-h- 



G 

_--J- 



P-, •> 

I, t/1 

rH . U 

I., 'h 

•p oj c 

o :• 

i i ■ .; 



r— 



OJ 



o^ 
I — 



to 



r-- 



o 
in 






c 



OJ 



o 

LI . 






rH 



0) 

a) 



■ ' -i 



R 0) 



to 



I 

rH 



o 
to 



</> 



!■•> 



o 

OJ 



m 

b 

OJ 
■VH 



1 



CM 






ON 



a 

r- 
■'/JJ 



tt) 

a) >: co 



cc 



kl 



c 

O a. '(J 



x| ^1 



>. 




tl 




■ !D 


4^ 


> 


rH 


o 


Cj 


o 


rj. 


c 


Pi 


Pi 


V} 




■aj 


, rH 




2 


a>' ir\ 


- fi 


,S ro 


o 


-p en 


■H 


rH 


+3 


£j 


C'j 


or rS 


V,-; 


1 


1 


■»= K 


' 


fH 


• 


o - 


K. 

r -j 


Pi ts 


-P 


u) <D 


■H 


ni a 


fH 


fl 


O 


PS rl 


xi 


H « 


-4J 


tb 


rj 


s • 


. ,fe| 


•rH H 




fl 


; CD 


•H • 


'- ' C 


H !~: 


c 


CD 


o 


^h ^-> 




Pi .-^ 


4) 




r-Cl 








+= 


CD 




• r-l 


^: 


^ d 


O 


r! p., 


. m 


•H &' 


- «H 


ri m 




rt Pi 


! '*.. 


ni 


Q) 


rH = 


■ k. 


f-M i>5 


•in 


tH 


• Oj 


rd +-■> 


t) 


J^ W 


• CD 


- 3 


• !-: 


'J 




,-c; ri 


. U) 


O H 


r| 


rH " 


. Ph 


rJ o ■ 


, • J 


cu ri 


-i- 5 


m -H ■ 


' c 


QJ !h 


1 <r< 


ri 3 




-P 


< ■ 


<.H O 


u 


O"0i 


•rl 


<H 


Oj 


rl d 


f 1 


o ri 


■ r! 


•h n; 


o 


K ' • 


•rf 


•r-l 


-P 


r> -t j 


I VJ 


•h ,ri 


' °! 


IH -H 


• 


H-l 


v.. 


•> O 




ri o 


■ 1 > 


o PA 


1 o 


•H 


• rH 


-P rrj 


IS : 


o3 ri 




U oj 


!n 


•P 


: oj 


r/i o 


;h 


•H H 


,-r ! 


ri t • 


Pi 


•rl (1 


i r 


H -n 


o 


3 .^ 


O 


<! co 


© 




o 




f-l 








■ o 




Vi 





18 



95 
TO ; USED T] CAUTION 

TABLE 17 

ASPHALT, SHI17GL3 AFD lOOFIilG 

CLASSIFIED "WEEKLY EARTH 'G-S OP OPPICE Ei'.iPLOYEES 

July, 1933 



"eekly Earnings Office Employees 

Cumulative 
Number P er Cent Per Cent 

Less than $5.00 - 

5.00 - 9.99 3 ! .6 .6 

10.00 - 14.99 45 9.9 10.5 

15.00 - 19.99 ' 123 27.2 37.7 

20.00 - 24.99 93 20.0 57.7 

25.00 - 29.99 78 13.8 74.5 

30.00 - 39.99 76 13.4 90.9 

40.00 - 59.99 32 6.9 97.3 

60.00 or more 10 2.2 100.0 

Total 464 100.0 

Mean 

(in dollars) $25.86 



SOURCE: Industry, questionnaire returns, reported to URA,' 33 plants re- 
porting. National "Recovery Administration, Division of Research 
and Planning. "The Asphalt, Shingle and Roofing Industry", pre- 
pared by A. 3. Pridinger, September 29, 1933. 



9818 



to 



I 

EH 



Q 



o 

•H 

(1) 



a 5 



> • 
H 



3 

d 

5 

i~\ 
en 



xr 





•P 


03 




rt 


i , 




CD 


R 




O 


C\j 




S4 


XI 




CD 


o 




Ph 






ro 




rj 


ru j-j- 


P 


>J 


l*r> 


g 


H 


en 


o 


pi 


i-l 


OJ 


^ 






XT 


|«r 




<M 


r-- 




>r, CT 




H 


H 



•-D 



+3 a) 

3 Pi 

o (fi 

rl XI 

U) o 

p-l 



o 
o 



CM K~ 
>aC7> 



O 



9S13 



J? 

■H 

cO OJ i*^ 

P-i >s r^ 

rH CT 

3 H 



+3 <D 

o co 

:-. xi 

CD O 
Ph 



rH en 



Xf pr\ 
CM CO 
!>sCn 
H rH 

3 



1^ 



r^ 



en 

oi 



oj 



o 



i 



to 



UD 



to 



0) 

o 



^o 



96 



to 



Hi 



-c-o- 



xl- 



H 




>vD 


Cn 


OJ 


r~\ 


OJ 


M 







P-l 






til 




g 






u 




H 






p' 
o 


co 


CD 


w 




|x| 


■P 


O 


f-H 






Pj 


•rH 


d 




I" ; 


i — ! 




q 


I — 1 

i — ! 


7] 


Pi 

'.-1 


O 


a 


O 

r*i 


. 0) 


O 


O 


03 


1 i 

Ph 


CD 


pH 


f-H 






' 


cd 


CD 


rH 


H, 


(.' 


rO 


,o 


rj 


1 


M 


r- 1 


r3 


-p 


43 


CD 


1 


3 


o 


o 


*-\ 


12; 


EH 


EH 


< 



oj 
to 

r 



Hi 


O 


o 


r- o 


rn > 


• 


OJ 


a o 


CPv 


rH 


OJ it 


OJ 




-Cv> 


-03- 
H 


Ml 


Hi 


f— 


r— en 


1— O 


• 


OJ 


>:0 C~\ 


U) 


H 


rH J" 


OJ 




■w- 


HV3- 



OJ 



• 


"..0 


to 


to 


CO 


rH 


4- 


rH 


-I 


f 




"I 






LT\ 


to 


KO 


\C\ 


• 


• 


H 


H 


cn 


v_o 


r<n 


OJ 


rn 


OJ 




-ro- 




<&■ 



r— 

OJ 
OJ 
•€/> 



OJ 


• 


i*> 


r^ 


■ 


l — I 


• 


• 


o 


H 


r— 


r^i 


1 


•*k 


i 


-H- 






LOi 


to 




LT> 


■ 


k-i 


OS 


OJ 


C~-> 


• 


K.O 


XT 


K> 


X3- 


OJ 


— 4 - 




OJ 


r— 


■©3- 




-CO- 






>siO 


CO 


U5 


to 


• 


VD 


to 


C*\ 


OJ 


• 


OJ 


o 


Xt" 


rn 


r— 


xi- 




CM 




•ce- 




-co- 



Pi 



CD 
CD 



CD 



a 




o 




•H 




-P 




cS 




u 




-p 


V 


CO 


S 


•rl 


■H 


Pi 


fn 


■H 


fJ 


a 


-p 


rS 


o 


<4 


cti 




=H 


>> 2 


fH 

CD 


1 


!> 




o 




o 


M 


CD 


R 


r-l 


•rl 




ch 


H 


O 


CO 


O 


£ 


P^i 


Q 




•H 


H 


•P 


PI 


tj 


CO 



•H -H 
O CO 





-P 


•P 






Cj 


rH 






^ 


co 

XI 






CD 


Ph 






rd 


w 




• 


o 


< 




CO 


o 











CD 




O 





XI 






XI 


•P 




o 


-p 






rH 




c 




Q. 


n 


o 




g 


o 






CD 


rl 


-p 






«H 


!H 




CD 




o 




in 


TH 


ft 




CD 


CD 


OJ 




, ' 


> 


Pi 




-P 


•H 








u 


r j 




r ;-i 


o 


fH 




O 


o 


rj 






fn 


P! 


• 


r-"> 




•H 


ir^v 




CO 


' ' 


t^. 


Pa 


r\ 


•ri 


cr> 


rH 


u 


rH 


H 


P! 


pj 


CD 




o 


-p 


fn 






Q) 


Ph 


J3 


fH 


rl 




^h' 


o 








«H 


CD 


«. 


■k 




u 


££ 


r-i 


-d 


•H 


PI 


Q 


CD 


CO 


•H 


f ! 


-P 


Pi 


Pi 


pi 


Fh 


o 


£] 


•H 


O 


•H 


CO 


W 


ft 


-p 


rH 




CD 


CQ 


PM 


• 


h 


CD 




w 


CD 


g 




• 


fn 




a 




CD 


S 




>s 


r-. 


o 


r{ 


/O 




fi 


O 




in 


CfH 


Fi 


■d 


U 




CI 


CD 


pi 


'd 


o 


fn 


5 


CD 


to 


r. 


1 


r-l 


CD 


Pi 




•H 


rl 


c> 


=: I 






rl 


O 


' ' 


':-! 


Pi 




b 


O 




U 


o 




n 


''•• 




; 


r .- 1 


•5 


•■ 


O 


fH 







•H 


+5 


;■' 


p 


U3 


o 




r 


A 




6 


•H 


a 


Hi 


CO 


n 


H 



TABLE 19 97 

ASPHALT iin: Iirt.StlC TIL: INDUCTRY 

NUHEER OF FACTORY" J . R] KD II U V'ORK D 

PER '■: X FOR THE UEEK I iC UDING SEPTEA"3ER, 
15, 1933 



Factory r age-Earners 



Hours Work Cumulative 

per Leek Number Per Cent Per Cent 



20 hours or less 48 27.4 27.4 

20.1 to 30 hours • 16 9.1 36.5 

30.1 to 35 hours • 43 24.6 61.1 

35.1 to 40 hours 66 . 37.7 98.8 

40.1 to 45 hours • 

45.1 to 50 hours - 

50.1 to 60 hours - 2 1.2 100.0 

Over 60 hours 

Tutal 175 100.0 



SOURCE: Questionnaires sent out by National Recovery Administration, 7 
concerns reporting. National Recovery Administration Division 
of Research and Planning. The Lsphalt and Mastic rile Industry, 
prepared by Arthur B. Fridinger, November 16, 1933. 



9S 

TABLE 20 

ASPHALT AND MASTIC TILS INDUSTRY 

ACTUAL HOURLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY EMPLOYS E FOR 
THE 7EEX INCLUDING SEPTEMBER 15, 1933 



Hourly 
Earnings 



Numb er 



Factory Employees 



Per Cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Under 10' cents 
10 to 19.9 cents 
20 to 24.9 cents 
25 to 29.9 cents 
30 to 34.9 cents 
35 to 39.9 cents 
40 to 49.9 cents 
50 to 59.9 cents 
6o to 79.9 cents 
80 to 99.9 cents 
Cl»00 or moro 

Total 



9 

1 

24 

15 

23 

77 

20 

5 

1 

175 



5.1 


5.1 


.6 


5.7 


13.7 


19.4 


3.6 


28.0 


13.1 


41.1 


44.0 


85.1 


11.4 


96.5 


2.9 


9S.4 


.6 


100.0 


100.0 





SOURCE: Questionnaires sent out by the National Recovery "dministra- 
tion, 7 concerns reporting. National Recovery administration 
Division of Research and Planning. The ..sphalt and Mastio 
Tile Industry, prepared by Arthur B. Fridin^er, November 16,1933. 



981S 



99 



TABLE 21 



jU.< 



USED "TT': CAUTION 



ASPHALT AIT) LA.STIC TIL™ INDUSTRY 

WE 3KLY E RNINGS OF OFFICE EnPLOYE IS FOE TH : TEEK 
INCLUDING SEPTEMBER 15, 1933. 



Feekly Earnings 



Number 



Office Employees 
Per Cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Less than'>)5.00 
$5.00 to $9.59 
1©,00 to 14.00 
15.00 to 19,99 
20.00 to 24.99 
25.00 to 29.99 
30.00 to 39.99 
40.00 to 59.99 
60.00 or more 

Total 



9 
2 
9 

rr 
O 

3 
2 

1 

29 



SOURCE: Questionnaires sent tout by National Recovery Administration, 7 

concerns reporting* National Recovery Administration Division of 
Research and Planning, The Asphalt and Mastic Tile Industry, 
prepared by Arthur B. Fridinger, November 16, 1933. 



9S18 



100 



TO 33 USED "IT : CAUTION 



IA iLE 22 
ASPHALT AID IIAGTIC TILE IIIDUSTEY 
AVERAGE HOUR A.ID 'JEEiCLY EA&fllfGS OE EMPLOYEES, 1929, 1933, 1934 



1929 
Average Eumoer of Employees 332 
Average hours per Ueek (estimated) 

Average T7eekly Earnings 



1933 


1934 


July 9, 


February 


349 


311 


38 * 


35 * 


$ 15.74 


$ 21.17 



Source: Code Authority of the Asphalt and Mastic Tile Industry data 
7 out of 10 concerns reporting, submitted to the national 
Recovery Administration Division of Research and Planning 
October 19^ 1934. 



9818 



101 

TABLE. 23 

It 

GRINDING WHEEL INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED rr EEKLY HOFAS OF :1GE EARNERS FOR A TYPICAL Y'SEX - 

MARCH - OCTOBER, 1933 



Actual 
Hours Worked 



Under 29 hours 
28 tm 29.9 hours 
30 to 34.0 hours 
35 t» 39.* hours 
40 to 44,9 hours 
45 to 49.9 hours 
50 to 59.9 hours 
60 hours "or more 

Tetal 

Average 37.1 hours 



Numb <*r 



119 
484 

236 

• 499 

• 566 
241 

■ 123 

50 

2,238 





Cumulative 


Per Cent 


Per Ce»t 


5.3 


5.3 


1P.1 


23.4 


10.5 


33.9 


22 ,3 


56.2 


25.3 


51.5 


10.3 


92.3 


5.5 


■97.8 


2.2 


100.0 



100.® 



SOURCE: Data obtained from 26 establishments replying to question- 
naires sent out by the National Recovery Administration. 
Nation! Recovery Administration, Division o'f Research and 

Planning. The Grinding Wheel Industry, prepared by R. 

von Huhn and J. A. Hanley, December 1, 1933. 



9S13 



102 
TABLE 2U 
GRINDING 1HEEL IHDUI 



CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF .AGE E-'RNLRS FOR 

MARCH-OCTOBER, 1933 



n. TYI IC-iL . I ujJjIi. - 



Actual Earnings 
per Hour 



Number 



FACTORY EMPLOYEI 



Per Cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Under 10 conts 



10 to 


19,9 cents 


1 


20 tc 


■24.9 cents 


6 


25 to 


.29.9 cents : . 


22 


30 to 


34.9 cents 


67 


35 to 


39.9 cents 


170 


40 to 


49.9 cents 


600 


50 to 


59.9 cents 


621 


60 to 


79.9 cents 


628 


8C to 


99.9 cents 


109 


01. 00 


or more 


14 



.1 

.3 
1.0 
3.) 

7.6 
26.8 
27.7 
28.0 

4.9 
.6 



' ..1 

..4 

1.4 

4.4 

12.6 

38.8 

66.5 

94.5 

99.4 

130.9 



Total 



i,238 



100.0 



SOURCE: Data obtained from 26 establishments replying to questionnaires 
sent out by the National Recovery administration. National 
Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Planning. 
The Grinding "iTheel Industry, prepared by R. von Hulin and 
J. ... Hanley, December 1, 1933. 



9S1S 



Pi 

Eh 
CO 

to 



C5 



9 

c5 



9312 



CO 

:-} 
W 

o 

rH 

P4 



o 

M 
fa 
fa 

o 



-p 

a 
w 
o 

Pi 

CD 

fa 



CO 
,>H 

fa 

>< 

o 

i 

fa 

fc! 
Ph 
o 

Eh 
fa 



•H -P 

-p a 

ct5 a> 

rH o 

I * 

p CD 

O fa 



-P 
Pi 
CD 

o 

u 

CD 

PM 



o 
-p 

CD 

0) p 

yj o 

Pi -H 

•rH -P 

Pi O 

?j & 

H a p CD 



CD o 

o o 

EH 



3 



P) w 



rH Pi 

^ CD 

CD -P 

CD <H, 



cd 



Js <aj <n CO 



103 



LOvD ^D ^t O I — tOO 

• ••«•••• 

M H ITMTi K) OMO O 
rH CO LO<X> CO 0>0 



LO rH OlOVfl r- 



CM 



rH CO rH rH 



eg 



I U3 H N O H to I — LO 
J" CA SO LO tO K1 . 



r— co.rt- h-rH co cr.o 

• ••••••9 

rH I — nn LOO I*— O 
C\] LfM — CJ-\ CT\ O 



I — LO CO r^J- rH [-— rH 
• •••« * * • 

r-\ LOVO to rO LO r-— CO 
rH CM CO r-\ 



CJ>J- n l^i fr, CD CU U3 I 

co cm vo co co co r— J- 



O 
O CT\ 

• en 

LO 

-y>crv 



o> o~\ o^ CTi en O" i 

CTi CTi CTv CTi CTv Cn 
• ••»«• 

^ i rt" " . CT\ CO 

H H w w n m 
:.•> -c-a- -y> -r 0- -69- <'> 



% 



o o o c o 

.p -p -P -p -P 



o 



LO 



o 
c 

rH 



J" 



CO 



to 
lo 



LO 


cn 


^D 


O 


VD 


co 


J" 


^-i 


co 



o 


en 


rH 


• 


• 


• 


o 


^t 


LO 


o 


Cn 





CO 

CO 

CO 

co" 



CO 

CO 



CO 



LO 



i-H <ry 



o o o o o o o 

O O O O D O O 

o lo O lo o O o 

H H W W 1^,^- VO 
r ."> CO- r '?,• -r ;> -:,•> CO- -69- 



rH 

CO 



o 



CO 

a 

CD 

fa 



•H rrj 



CD 
O 
Pi 
p 
O 
CO 



lOU 
TABLE 26 

GRINDING WHEEL INDUSTRY \ 

AVERAGE EMPLOYMENT HOURS , HOURLY EARNINGS , MID WEEHLY EARNINGS 

OE FACTORY EMPLOYEES 
1934 



Item 



Week ending 
June 9, 1934 



Week ending 
Seiot. 15, 1934 



No. of Emoloyees 3719 

Average Hours 37.7 

Average Hourly Earnings 63^ 

Average Weekly Earnings $34.55 



3512 ■ 

38.6 

$21.34 



No. of Companies Reporting 41 



40 



Source: Statistical reports of the Code Authority, submitted to 
the national Recovery Administration, received 
Dec. 13, 1934. 



9318 



£5 

O 

EH 
-J) 

w 



Q 

in 

o 

EH 



CO 



13 





H 




ci> 




-a) 




aE 


K ' 




« 


.re 


EH 


o 


fO 


Ph 


£> 




@ 


CO 




W 


hH 


ci> 


**— 


<aj |v~j 


\J CO 


"=: r-O 


r-q 


CT\ 


3 > 


>-> rH 


q n 


h3 


q to 


3 I 




5 


~5 CXI 




P£ rH 


s 


ci 


3 


1 


O 


> 


O 


<J 



P-4 
i— i 
CO 

en 
<U 
hP 
o 



981S 



CD 
















> 
















•rl -P 
















•P fl 
















cd o 


co 


60 


U3 


CO 


O 


IC\ 


O 


H co 


• 


* 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


j3 


1 cm 


to 


U'\ 


60 


co 


UD 


O 


S ^ 




C\J 


LT\ 


1 — 


co 


CTA 


o 


p CD 














r-t 


O PL, 

















ro 


Pi 




CD 


K> 


O <H r-H 

e co 


o> 


Pi -p 




CD O 


r-i 


Ph C-h 



CD CO 
CD Ki CD 

3 <H CO 

SOW 



OJ 



<D 

> 

•H -P 

-P S 

CO 0) 

r-( O 
P 

g Pi 

P CD 

O Ph 



-P 
Pi 

CD 

OlH ft 
O -P 

Pi o 

CD EH 

P4 



O 

CO 

Pi Pi 

CD CD 

P 8 f! 

£ fU) Pi 

p cO co 

J3 *= W 



105 



CD 
CD 
CO 
CD 
k!) U 
CO 0> 
!3 Ph 



O 

o 



to 



U3 
w 
CD 

1-q 



co 


o 


co 


C\J 


OJ 


in 


iC\ 


• 


■• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


cm 


OJ 


CM 


KA 
CM 


CPi 


co 


r^i 



o> 



.=}• 



I — 
1^1 



CO 






i-O 



co 



O 
O 



c\J 



CO 



r-o 



CM 



LTi 



O 



o 


^t 


CT> 


O 


CTi 


o 


ro 


3- 


VD 


CT\ 


CT\ 





CO 






o> 



co 

ro 



OA 



•St 
OJ 



CM 



CM 

CTv 



60 



CM 



rC 


0J 


LO 


CTi 


m 


J- 


o 


CO 


<-i 


CM 


CM 





LTi 



O 
■O 



CM 

r— 

CT\ 



lpi 
co 



CM. 

co 



CT> 
CJN 



CTi 
-IB- 



CD 
O 



■«3- 






o 

+3 



o 
o 



o 






CTN 



o 



o 
o 



LO 



CM 



O 



o 

o 



o 

CM 



CP> 



CM 



O 
-P 



O 
O 



0J 



OA 






o 
-p 



o 
o 



o 



CT\ 

CTi U 

• CD 

CJA > 

LO O 



O 
■P 



o 



O 

o 



O rH 

O CO 

o o o 



CO 
CD 



rO 



re 



106 

TABLE 28 
BALL CLAY PSDiraCISG INDUSTRY ' : 

CLASSIFIED \TEWLY HOIKS 0? UORK JOE MI17IFG EMPLOYEES 
For Typical Tfeek : ay - August 1933 

Hours iiining Dnrployees 

Worked • CuraulatiTe 

Per TJeek Number Per Cent Per Cent 

20 hours or less - 

20 • 29.9 

30 ~ 34. S 

35 - 59.9 

40 - 44.9 

50 - 59.9 

60 or more 

■ Total 123 lOOiO 



34 


27.7 


27.7 


15 


12.3 


40.0 


19 


15.4 ! 


55.4 


2 


1.6 


57.0 


26 


21.2 


78.2 


6 


. 4..S 


83.0 


2 


1.6 


84.6 


19 


15.4 


100.0 



Source: 1". R. A. -questionnaire returns, 5 concerns reporting. Tabulation 
by the Bureau of the Census for the iTational Eecovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning, December 2, 1933. 



9760 



107 



TABLE 29 
BALL CLAY PRODUCING I1CDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY SA3HIEGS OP LIIITIIG EMPLOYEES 
FOR TYPICAL T73EK I.IAY - AUGUST 1933 



Hourly- 
Earnings 



'.lining T'.'mployees 



number per Cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Under 10 cents 
10 - 19.9 
20 - 24.9 
25 - 29.9 
30 - 34.9 
35 •• 39.9' 
40 ~ 49.9 



63 


51.2 


13 


10.6 


33 


26.8 


5 


4.1 


2 


1.6 


7 


5.7 



51.2 
61.8 
88.6 
92.7 
94.3 
100.0 



Total 



123 



100.0 



Source: 1JRA questionnaire returns, 5 concerns reporting. Tabulation of 
the Bureau of the Census for the National Recovery Adminis- 
tration, Division of Research and Planning. December, 2, 1933. 



9760 



10g 
TABLE 30 
BALL CLAY PRODUCING INDUSTRY 
TiTAGE EARNERS AND HOURLY RATES, MAY-AUGUST, 1933 



Actual Earnings 
Per Hour 



Number 



Factory Employees 
Per Cent Cumulative Per 
Cent 



Under 10 cents 
10 to 19.9 
20 to 24.9 
25 to 29.9 
30 to 34,9 
35 to 39.9 
40 to 49.9 
50 to 59.9 
60 to 79.9 
80 to 99.9 



48 
75 
45 
16 

5 
12 

1 



23.8 


23.8 


37.1 


6o.9 


22.3 


83,2 


7.9 


91.1 


2 .5 


93.6 


5.9 


99.5 


.5 


100.0 



Total 



202 



100.0 



SOURCE: Data obtained by means cf questionnaires sent out by the 

National Recovery Administration, five establishments report- 
ing. National Recovery Administration, Division of Research 
and Flanning. The Ball Clay Producing Industry, prepared by 
Thos. P. Kelly, December 21, 1933. 



921S 



109 



T-A3LE 31 
YALL CLAY ? ■: mC IITi I ~J" STAY 

classified "mnELY giasTisras o ; ' miitiyg employees 

POP TYPICAL T 7EZ£ ; AY - AYGUST 1033 



7 eekly 



Earnings 
(dollars) 



ining Enrol oyees 



ITumber Per Cent 



Cumulative 
per Cent 



Less than 5.00 
5.00 to 9,99 
10.00 to 14.99 
15 to 19.99 

20 to 24.99 



Total 



66 


53.7 


53.7 


7 


5.7 


59.4 


24 


19.5 


78.9 


19 


15.4 


94.3 


7 


5.7 


100.0 


123 


100.0 


100.0 



Source: "J. P. A. cru.e:;tionnp.ire returns, 5 concerns reporting. Tabulation 
"by the Bureau of the Census for the National Pecovery Ad- 
ministration, Eivision of Pesearch and Planning, December 
2, 1933. 



9760 



110 

tael:: 32 
ball gl&y- producing industry 
wage earners and '7eekly wages, luy-august, 1933 



Weekly Earnings After 
Deductions for Insurance 
Spoilag e, Tools, etc. 

Less than 05,00 
£,5,00 to :"9.99 
10.00 to 14.99 
15.00 to 19.99 
20.00 to 24.99 
25.O0 to 29. -.9 
30.00 to 39.99 
40,00 to 59.99 
60.00 or more 

Total 



Number 

50 
45 
73 
22 
12 



;ory Employees 




Per Cent 


Cumulative 
Per Cent- 


24.8 


24.8 


22.3 


47.1 


3G.1 


' 83.2 


10.9 


'94.1 


5.9 


ioo.c 



202 



100.0 



SOURCE: Data obtained by means of questionnaires sent out bythe 
National Recovery Administration, five establishments r e- 
porting. National Recovery Administration Division of 
Research -ind Planning. The Ball Clay Producing Industry, 
prepared by Thos. P. Kelly, December 21, 1935. 



9S1S 



Ill 

TABLZ3 33. 

roc; and sl,g ;;;ool industry 

classified v:33i1y hours for factory 'ag" !a.l irs for 

TriilEE "."HIGH INCLUDED JUN3 15, 1933 



■■ — - 


ITorked 






Factory "' 


.age Earners 


Hours 




Liale 


Cumula- 


Female Cumulative 


Per 


Ueek 


Number 


Per "Cent 


tive 


Number Per Cent Per 










Per Cent 


Cent 


20 hours or less 


69 


10.9 


10.9 


10 25.6 • -25.6 


20.1 


- 25 


31 


ii.9 


15.8 


15 38.U "6U.o 


25-1 


- 30 


22 


3.5 


19.3 


12 30.8 ; 9i-u8 


30.1 


- 35 


33 


5.2 


2U.5 


1 2.6 '97.U 


35-1 


-ho 


22 


3.5 


28.0 




I4.O.I 


-hb 


.. 2U 


3.8 


31.8 


1 2.6 100.0 


h.5.1 


- 50 


:..' 123 


I9.ii 


51.2 




50.1 


- 55 


75 


11.9 ' 


63.I 




55.1 


- 60 


63 


10.0 


73.1 




60.1 


- 65 


uu 


6.9 


80.0 




65.1 


- 70 


50 


7-9 


'87.9 




70.1 


- 75 


3U 


5.1; 


93-3 




75.1 


- 80 


22 


3.5 


96.8 




Over 


80 hours 


20 


3.2 


10C.0 




Toi 


;al 


632 


100.0 




39 100.0 


Source: NRA Questionnaire 


returns, 


16 concerns 


reporting. National 



Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Planning. 

The Rock and Slag Wool Industry, prepared by Arthur B. Fridinger, 

February 17, I93U 



9213 



112 

TABLE 3*1 

ROCK AND' 'SLAG TOOL INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS 0^ FACTORY WAGE EARNERS FOR WEEK WHICH 

INCLUDED JUKE 15, 1933. 



Hourly- 




Ear n 


mg 


s 


Unde 


r 10<# 


10 - 


14 


.9 


15 - 


19 


.9 


20 - 


24 


.9 


25 - 


29 


.9 


30 - 


34 


.9 


35 - 


39 


3 


40 - 


44 


9 


45 - 


49 


9 


50 - 


54, 


9 


55 - 


59. 


9 


60 - 


69. 


9 


70 - 


79. 


9 


80 - 


and 


. over 



Number 



Factory Wage Earne rs 



Per Cent 



Total 



16 

11 

2 

57 

293 

92 

92 

' 35 

17 

7 

7 

1 

2 

632 



2.5 

1.7 

.3 

9.0 

46.4 

14.6 

14.6 

5.5 

2.7 

1.1 

1.1 

.2 

.3 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



2.5 

4.2 

4.5 

13.5 

59.9 

74.5 

89.1 

94.6 

97.3 

98.4 

95.5. 

99.7 

100.0 



Source: NRa Questionnaire returns, 15 concerns reporting. National 

Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Planning. The 
Rock and Slag Wool Industry, preoared by Arthur B. Fridinger, 
Feb. 17, 1934. 



9Sig 



113 



TABLE 35 

rock akd slag aool industry 

classified i7bekly sarnisfgs of office .employees for 
week which included june 15, 1933 



Weekly- 
Earnings 



Office Emp 1 oyee s 



Number 



Per Cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Less than $5.0^ 
$5.00 - $9-99 
10.00 - 12. U9 
12.50 - Ik. 99 
15.00 - 17„U9 

17.50 -19.99 

20.00 - 2k. 99 
25.00 - 29.99 
30.00 -,3k. 99 

35*00 and over 
Total 



2 

5 

2 

6 

8 

11 

10 

6 

32 

82 



2.k 
6.1 
2.k 
7-3 
9.8 

13 .k 
12.2 " 

7.3 

39-1 

100.0 



2.2. 

8.5 

10.9 

18.2 
28.0 
kl.k 
53.6 
6O.9 
100.0 



Source: NRA Quest ionne. ire returns, 16 concerns reporting. National 
Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Planning. 
The Rock and Slag v "n& Ihdustry, prepared by Arthur B. Fridinger, 
February 17, 193k. 



921S 



111+ 

TAILE 36 
EARTHENWARE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 



AVERAGE HOURLY WAGE RATES BY OCCUPATIONS 
IN JULY 1929 AND JUNE 1933. 



July 15, 192^ 



June 16. 1933 



Occupation 



Number Average Number Average 
of Hourly of Hourly 
Employees Rates (cents) Employees Rates (cents) 



Engineers 

Machin: sts 

Modellers and Sculptors 

Die Makers 

Shape and Die Maker 

Mould Makers 

Clay Puggers 

Clay Preparation Workers 

Glase Makers 

Jiggermen 

Hand T urners 

Pinishers 

Male 

Female 
Stripors & Panders (Under- 
glaze) 
• Male 

Pemale 
Casters 

Male 

Pemale 
Machine Operators 

S tone Fare 

Flower pots 
Dippers & Glazers 

Male 

Female 
Dippers & Glazers Helpers 
& Fettlers 

Male 

Female 
Ware Handlers 
Kiln Setters 

Continuous 

Periodic 
Kiln Firing 

Continuous 

Periouic 
Kiln Drav/in: 

Continuous 

Periodic 
9818 



36 

22 

lb 

9 

6 

4-3 

83 

97 

20 

218 

]. 

87 

236 



16 
6 

54 

4 

' 34 
90 

156 

21 



35 
44 
G8 

31 
125 

22 

62 

27 
92 



49.4 
61.7 
89 . 7 
59,9 

60.0 
48.9 
45.7 
44.9 
48.4 
58.2 
80.0 

37.8 
27,0 



47.5 

25.0 

47.0 
25.0 

53.1 
47.5 

43.8 
26.6 



26.2 
43.2 

60.9 
50.3 

51.0 
46.7 

43.7 
43.5 



31 

21 

15 

7 

6 

43 

69 

79 

23 

196 

1 

62 
225 



25 
2 

53 

4 

27 
74 

126 

11 



32 

40 
56 

43 
94 

26 
47 

30 
73 



40.6 

48.9 

68.8 

51.3 

55.4 

38.1 

35.3 

34.3 

38.3 

45.0 

70.0 

28.1 
20.2 



3G.8 
30.0 

33.4 
24.1 

45.6 
36 . 6 

33.2 
17.7 



27.2 
20.6 

30.2 

41.7 
35,5 

37.6 
38.1 

33.6 
33.2 



H5 



TABLE 



(Continued) 



EARTHENWARE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 

AVERAGE EOOHLT WAGE RATES LY OCCUPATIONS 

III JULY 1929 AND JUKE! 1933, 





July 11 


; 1929 


June 16, 


1933 


■ 


Number 


Average 


Number 


Average 


Occupation 


of 


..Hourly 


of 


Hourly . 




Employees 


Rates (cents)' 


Employees 


Hates (cents) 


Warehousemen 










Foremen 


6 


61.4 


6 


53 . 1 


Male 


88 


39.6 


70 


31.4 


Female 


11 


26.5 


13 


19.8 


Packers 










Male 


116 


44.7 


118 


34.5 


Female 





— 


2 


17.0 


Packers - Helpers 










Male 


45 


39.0 


26 


28.5 


Female 


5 


29.0 


1 


20.0 


Bagger Makers 


15 


50.9 


10 


3S.6 


General Plant Foreman 


78 


69 . 6 


76 


59.8 


Truck Drivers 


53 


50.0 


57 


39.0 


Airbrush Operators 










(Underglaze) 










Female 


9 




11 


28.6 


Airbrush Operators 










(Underglaze) 





— • 


7 


31.1 


Decorators (Ceramic 










(Underglaze) 










Male 


1 


4 5.0 


2 


35.0 


Female 


33 


31.1 


24 


21.9 


(Ceramic Overglaze) 










Female 


13 


35.8 


7 


30.3 


Duco Decorators 










Male 


1 


22.2 


4 


32.3 


Female 





— 


2 


22.5 


Miscel. Unskilled Labor 










Male 


187 


38.8 


158 


31.9 


Female 


•2 


22.5 


3 


20.0 


Night Watchmen 


40 


36.7 


37 


27.1 


Mould Carriers 










Male 


147 


41.7 


139 


28.9 


Female 


3 


25.4 


1 


29.0 


Total 


2.615 




2,315 





Source 



XU DP .!. g, U1D tj, OA.U 

: Industry Questionnaire Returns - 57 concerns reporting, sub- 
mitted by the Code Authority to the National Recovery Administra 
tion, Division of Research and Pla.nn.ing, May 22, 1934. 



9818 



116 
TABLE 37 ( TC 32 USED T TTJI CAUTION) 



FIBRE TJALLBOARD INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF FACTORY EMPLOYEES FOR WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 

15, 1933 



Number of hours 
Worked 



Numb er 



FACTORY EMPLOYEES 



Per Cent 



Cumulative 
per cent 



20 hours or under 
20.1 to 30 hours 
30.1 to 3 5 hours 
35.1 to 40 hours 
40.1 to 45 hours 
45.1 to 50 hours 
50ol to 60 hours 
Over 60 hours 



Total 



17 


2.4 


2.4 


36 


5.1 


7.5 


63 


8.9 


16.4 


512 


72.3 


88.7 


27 


3.8 


92.5 


27 


3.8 


96.3 


21 


3.0 


99.3 


5 


.7 


100.0 



708 



100.0 



SOURCE: Questionnaires sent out by National Recovery Administra- 
tion, 9 concerns reporting. National Recovery Administra- 
tion Division of Research and Planning. The Fibre 
Wallboard Industry, prepared by 17. L. Yearsley, December 

. . 20, 1933. 



9818 



117 

TABLE 3S 



TO BE USED 'TTH CAUTION 



FIBRE WftLLBOARD I DUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY S 30JIIIGS Cv FACTORY ElIPLOYSES FOR THE 

WEEK OF SEPT. 15, 1933. 



Actual Earnings 
Per Hour 



Number 



Fa c tory Emp loyees 



Per Cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Under 10 cents 



10 to 19.9 cents 



20 to 24.9 cents 
25 to 29.9 cents 
30 to 34.9 cents 
35 to 3 9.9 cents 
40 to 49.9 cents 
50 to 59.9 cents 
60 to 79.9 cents 
80 to 99.9 cents 
vl.00 or more 



Total 



11 
11 
47 
13 
455 
80 
62 
19 
10 

708 



1.6 


1.6 


1.6 


3.2 


6.6 


9.8 


1.8 


11.6 


64.3 


75.9 


11.3 


87.2 


8.7 


95.9 


2.7 


98.6 


1.4 • 


100.0 



100.0 



SOURCE: Questionnaires sent out by National Recovery -idministration, 
9 concerns reporting. National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning- The Fibre Uallboard 
Industry, prepared by w r , L„ Yearsley, December 20, 1933. 



9Slg 



118 



(10 BE USED '"ITT CAUTION) 



TABLE 39 

FIBRE WALLBOARD INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY EARNINGS OF OFFICE EMPLOYEES FOR THE I7EEK OF 

SEPTEMBER 15, 1933. 



Weekly- 
Earnings 



Office employees 



Less than .,.5,00 
$5.00 to 09.99 
10.00 to 14.99 
15.00 to 19.99 
20.00 to 24.99 
25.oo to 29.99 
30.00 to 39.99 
40.00 to 59.99 
60.00 or more 



Number 



Total 



1 
11 
32 
22 

6 
12 

4 

1 
09 



Per Cent 



1.1 
12.4 
36.0 
24.7 

6.7 
13.5 

4,5 

1.1 
100 .0 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



1.1 
13.5 
49.5 
74.2 
80.9 
94.4 
98.9 
100.0 



SOURCE: uestionnaires sent out by National Recovery Administra- 
tion, 9 concerns reporting. National Recovery Admin- 
istration, Division of Research and Planning. The Fibre 
Wallboard Industry, prepared by W. L. Yearsley, December 
20, 1933. 



9S1S 



119 



TABLE kO 
INSULATION BOARD INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED iJEEXLY HOURS OF FACTORY EMPLOYEES 
TEEK INCLUDING SEPTEMBER 15, 1033 



Factory Employees 



Hours forked 


Numbe 


Per 


1 reek 






20 hours or less 


' 157 


20.1 


to 


30 


hours 


' 199 


30.1 


to 


35 


hours 


559 


35.1 


to 


40 


hours 


712 


40.1 


to 


45 


hours 


179 


45.1 


tc 


50 


hours 


377 


50.1 


to 


60 


hours 


68 


Over 


l:0 


hours 


20 



Per 


Ce 


nt 


6 


.9 




8 


.8 




24 


.6 




31 


.3 




7 


.9 




16 


,6 




3 


.0 
,9 





Cumulative 
Per Cent 



6.9 
15.7 
40.3 
71.6 
79.5 
96.1 
99.1 
100.0 



Total 



:271 



100. ? 



Source: 'Questionnaires sent out by N.R.A. 11 concerns report in- . 
Hational Recovery Administration Division of Research and 
Planning. The Insulation Board Industry, prepared by 
IT. L. Yearsley, November 16, 1933. 



9S1S 



120 

TABLE Ul 

INSULATION BOARD INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS O p FACTORY WORKERS FOR 
'7EFK INCLUDING Sept. 15, 1933 



Factory To rice rs 

Earnings Cumulative 

Per Hour N umber Per Cent Per Cent 

Under 10rf 

10* to 19.9rf 



20* to 24.9* 2 .1 .1 

25* to 29.9* 1 .1 .2 

30* to 34.9* 1124 49.9 50.1 

25* to 39.9* 578 25.4 75.5 

40«* to 49.9* 333 14.7 90.? 

50* to 59.9* 135 5.9 93.1 

60* to 79. 9* 72 3.2 99.3 

80* to 99.9^ 13 .6 99.9 

$1.00 or more 1 .1 100.0 

Total 2271 100.0 



Source: Questionnaires sent out by NRA. 11 concerns reporting. National 
Recovery Administration Division of Research and Planning. The 
Insulation "Board Industry, prepare! by f. L. Yearsley, Nov. 16, 1933, 



9S1S 



121 
TA^L 1 "! 42 

CLASSIFIED •7FEFLY EAR li JS "! 7 ~'7 7 TC^ ^PLTYEES, 
TPttT' IJICLUl T r SEPT^'BER 15, 193? 



Earn in » O ^IC^ ypLTYE^S 



Per 'Teel: dumber pfr Cent Cumulative 
A Per Cent 

Less than $5.00 - - 

*5.00 tc $9.99 - - - 

$10.00 tc $14.99 • 5 1.9 1.9 

$15.0-0 tc $19.99 61 24.2 2-5.1 

$20.00 to $24.99 84 23.3 59.4 

$25.00 tc $2^.9=1 42 16.7 76.1 

$30.00 tc $39.99 41 13.2 92.4 

*40.C0 tc $59.99 - 13 5.2 97.6 

$60.00 or mere 5 2.4 100.0 

Total 252 100.0 



Scurce: questionnaires sent cut by 1 T .F. .A. 11 concerns reporting. 

national Recovery administration Division of Research and Planning. 
The Insulation Board -Industry, prepared by ■». L. Yearsley, 
Nov. 16, 1933. 



9S1S 



TAPLE 42 
PFF^OR'TSD PLASTTC PRODUCT? DTDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED itcvj^y HOURS 0^ WA1E EARNERS FOR A TYPICaL WEEK, 

MAY TO AUGUST, 1933 



Eactory Empl oyees 



Actual Hours 
Worked 



Number 



Per Cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Under 20 hours 

20 to 29.9 

30 to 34.9 

35 to 39.9 

40 to 44.9 

45 to 49.9 

50 to 59.9 

60 hours or more 



7 
14 
10 
11 
14 
26 
47 
21 



4.7 

9.3 

6.7 

7.3 

9.3 

17.4 

31.3 

14.0 



4.7 
14.0 
20.7 
28.0 
37.3 
54.7 
86.0 
100.0 



Total 



150* 



100.0 



* 219 in code application for all employees, 
employees - 180 factory workers (--»» ' 



less 17.5 oer cent for office 



Source: Summarized N.R.A. questionnaires, nine establishments reporting for 

a typical , week, May to August, 1933. National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning. The Preformed Plastic Products 
Industry, prepared by A. P. Eridinger, March 1, 1934. 



9S1S 



123 

TARLE U3 

PREFORMED PLASTIC PRODUCTS INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARN IN 3S O 7 WAGS EARNERS FOR A TYPICAL WEEK 
MAY TO AUTUST, 1933 



Actual Earnings 
Per Hour 



Uuraber 



Factory Employees 



Per Cent 


Cumulative 




Per Cent 


5.7 


6.7 


2.7 


9.4 


5.3 


14.7 


32.7 


47.4 


18.0 


65.4 


21.3 


86.7 


10.6 


97.3 


2.7 


100.0 



Unde r 


10 cents 


10 to 


19.9 cents 


20 to 


24 .9 " 


25 to 


29.9 ■■ 


30 to 


34.9 " 


35 to 


39.9 " 


40 to 


49.9 » 


50 to 


59.9 " 


60 to 


79.9 « 


80 to 


99.9 " 



$1.00 or more 



10 

4 

8 

49 

27 

32 

16 

4 



Total 



150 



100.0 



Source: Summarized-Hational Recovery administration ^Questionnaires nine 
establishments reporting for a typical week May to August, 1933. 
rational Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Planning, 
The Preformed Plastic Products Industry, ttreuared by 
A. B. Fridinger, March 1, 1934. 



9813 



12U 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 



- TABLE kk 
PREFORMED PLASTIC PRODUCTS INDUSTRY- 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY AND OFFICE EMPLOYEES 
FOR A TYPICAL WEEK MY TO AUGUST, 1933 



Weekly Earnings 



20.00 to 24.99 
25.00 to 29.99 
30.00 to 39.99' 
40.00 to 59.99 
60.00 or more 



Factory Employees 



Office Employees 



After Deductions 






Cumu- 


Number 


Per 


Cumu- 


For Insurance, 


Number 


Per 


lative 




Per 


• lative 


Spoilage, Tools, 




cent 


Per 




Cent 


• Per 


et .cetera 






Cent 






■ Cent 


Less than $5 o G0 


5 






„ 






§5.00 to $9.99 


24 






1 






10.00 to 14.99 


23 






4 






15.00 to 19,99 


48 






6 







5 
4 
5 
4 
3 



•Tetal ■ 

Males 

Females 



150 




150 


100.0 



32 
20 

12 



62.5 
37.5 



Source: Summarized National Recovery Administration Questionnaires 
nine establishments reporting frr a typical week May to 
August, 1933. National Recovery Administration, Division 
of Research and Planning. The Pref >rmed Plastic Products 
Industry, prepared by A»B .Fridinger, March 1, 1934. 



9318 



125 



TALL! k 5 



FLEXIBLE I . L ., j': H IN] . T.., 
CLASSIFIEE l.-ELKLY hOUAS 01 i. LI a.GE EARNERS 



Eh 



La, FOR .-.ELi> 05 JUiIL 15, 1933 





3 '.orked 




Males 






Females 




Hour: 






Cumulative 






Cumulative 


Per i 


;ee] 


I 




dumber 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


[lumber 


Per Cent 


Per.Cent 


20 hrs. 


or 


under 


2 


1.5 


1.5 


2 


2.3 


2.3 


2 


to 


25 


hrs. 


9 


1.5 


3.0 


1 


1.1 


3.4 


25.1 


to 


30 


hrs . 


.5 


2.3 


5.3 


10 


11-4 


14.8 


30,1 


to 


35 


hrs. 


7 


5.3 


10.6 


3 


3-4 


18.2 


3';>l 


to 


40 


hrs. 


7 


5.3 


15-9 


12 


1^6 

A J . U 


31.8 


4.0 . 1 


to 


45 


hrs. 


31 


23.5 


39.4 


59 


67.1 


98.9 


45-1 


to 


50 


hrs. 


18 


13.6 


53.0 


1 


1.1 


100,0 


50.1 


to 


55 


hrs. 


9 


6.8 


59.8 








55.1 


to 


60 


hrs. 


12 


9.1 


68,9 








60.1 


to 


65 


hrs. 


4 


3.0 


71,9 








65.1 


to 


70 


hrs . 


10 


7.6 


79.5 








70.1 


to 


75 


hrs . ' 


4 


3.0 


82.5 








75.1 


to 


80 


hrs. 


10 


7-6 


90.1 









Over 80 hours 



100.0 



Total 



132 



100. 



Source- Questionnaires sent out, by National Recovery Administration, 6 concern!: 
reporting. National Recovery Administration, Division of Research and 
Planning. The Flexible Insulation Industry; prepared by Arthur B. 
Fridinger, April 20, 1934 



9818 



-LdO 



T«BLL U6 



FLEXIBLE INSULATIOLm INDUibTRi! 
CLASSIFIED HOURLi E.JINING3 OF FACTOKi AUE E. iu-JLES 



ii'i 



FOR tillS. 



JUNE 15, 1933 



Hales 



Females 



Earnings 






Cumulative 


Per hour 


Number 


Per Gent 


Per Cent 


Under 


20; 








20^ - 


2^.9 


2 


1.5 


1.5 


25^' - 


29.9 


33 


23, 8 


30.3 


30y. - 


34.9 


10 


7.6 


37.9 


35^ - 


39.9 


10 


7.6 


45-5 


4-0.,. - 


44.9 


46 


34.8 


30.3 


K% - 


49.9 


12 


9.1 


39.4 


50$ - 


54.9 


4 


3.0 


9?- 4 


55y - 


59.9 


2 


1.5 


93.9 


60y - 


69.9 


7 


5.3 


99.2 


70£ - 


79.9 


1 


8 


100. 



lumber 





Curnul a Live 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


2.3 


2.3 


77.2 


79-5 


15.9 


95.4 


9 *? 


97.7 


3 


100.0 



2 

63 
14 



Total 



132 



100. 



ba 



100.0 



Source; Questionnaires sent out by National Recovery Administration, C con- 
cerns reporting. National Recovery Administration, Division of 



Research and Planning. 
by Arthur 5. Fridinger. 



The Flexible Insult tion industry, prepared 
/oril 20, 193^. 



9818 



127 
TABLE kf 
FLEXIBLE INSULATION INDUSTRY 



CLASSIFIED WEEKLY K.RNINGS OF OFFICE EMPLOYEES FOR v . r EEK OF 

JUNE 15, 1933 (?). 



Weekly Earnings 



Number 



Fer Cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Less than ",12.50 

§12,50 to §14.99 

15o00 to 17.49 

17.50 to 19.99 

20.00 to 24.99 

25.00 to 29.99 

30,00 to 34.99 
35,00 and over 



Total 



3 
1 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 

20 



SOURCE: Questionnaires sent out by National Recovery Administration, 
4 concerns reporting. National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning. The Flexible Insula- 
tion Industry, prepared by Arthur B. Fridinger, April 
20, 1934. 



9S1S 



TABLE 4-6 

ABRASIVE GRAIN INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED NUMBER OF HOURS OP FACTORY WAGE _LvR!CRS 
FOR WEEK WHICH INCLUDED JUNE 15, 1933 



Hours Worked Per Week 

20 or under 
20.1 - 25 
25.1 - 30 
30.1 - 35 
35.1 - 40 
40.1 - 45 
45.1 - 50 
50.1 - 55 
55.1 - 60 
Over 60 

Total 



Average 41,2 



Factory Wage Earners 





Per Cent 


Cumulative 


Number 


of Total 


Per Cent 


5 


1.1 


1.1 


23 


4.9 


6.0 


40 


8.6 


14.6 


51 


11.0 . 


25.6 


77 


16.6 , 


42.2 


159 


34.4 


76.6 


75 


16.1 


92.7 


5 


1.1 


93.8 


10 


2.1 


95.9 


19 


4.1 


100.0 


464 


100.0 





STDURCE: Summary nf Reports submitted by 10 members of the Industry to 
NRA. National Recovery Administration Division of Research 
and Planning. The Abrasive Grain Industry, prepared by R. K. 
Lyle, April 3, 1934. 



9S1S 



129 
TABLE U9 

ABRASIVE GRAIN NDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS F FACTORY UA E EARNERS FOR VfEEK 

MUCH INCLUDED JUNE 15, 1933 OR NE .REST TYPICAL WEEK 





j Earnings 




Factory ' age S 


irners 




Hourl; 


Number 


Per Cent 


Cumulative 'I 


15 to 


19.9^ 


1 


.2 




.2 


25 to 


29.9 


5 


1.0 




1.2 


.• t,o 


34.9 


15 


3a 




4.3 


"7 r • 1 . 


7 ;9.9 


27 


5.6 




9.9 


3 ,'jj 


44.9 


68 


. 14.1 




24.0 


4i -co 


49.9 


52 


10,8 




34.8 


50 to 


54.9 


98 


20.4 




c;c 


55 to 


59,9 


64 


13.3 




68.5 


60 to 


69.9 


69 


14.5 




83.0 


70 to 


79.9 


60 


12.5 




95.5 


80 or 


more 


22 


4.5 




100.0 




Total 


481 


100. t 







Weighted Average 65.1 



SOURCE: 



Summary of Reports submitted by 10 members of the Industry to 
National JL ecovery Administration. National Recovery Administration 
Division of Research and Planning.' The Abrasive Grain Industry, pie- 
pared by R.K.Lyle, April 3, 1934. 



r -)SlS 



130 



TABLE 50 
ABRASIVE GHAUT INDUSTRY 
AVERAGE HOURS AID HOURLY EARiTIHGS JU1TE AND 
SEPTEMBER 1234 



Number of Companies Reporting 
Total Number of Factory Employees 
Total Factory Operating Man-Hours 

Average Work Week 
Total Factory Pay-roll 

Average Hourly Earnings 



Ueek Ending 
June 30. 1934- 

12 

834 

35,470 

40.1 

$21,923 

.613 



Week Ending 
Se-3t. 15. 1954 

13 

892 

32,384 

36.9 hours 
$19, 35l' 

.605 



Number of Shifts and Hours iDer Shift - One 8 hour shift 1 shift of 40 hours 



Total number of I.Ian-Hour Overtime 
Total number Office Employees 
Total number Offic T/orking Hours 

Average per rreek 
Total Office Pay-roll (a) 

Average Weekly Earnings 



(A f en -companies reported 
Wo 8 hour and three 3 
hour shifts) 
511 
98 
3,832 
39.6 
$4,353 
$44.50 



57 
112. 
4,434 
39.8 
$4,855 
$43.30 



(a) Ilanagerial salaries are included. 

Source: Code Authority, Abrasive Grain Industry, Quarterly Statistical 

Report to National Recovery Administration, Division of . Research 
and Planning, Sept. 10 and Nov. 23, 1S34. 



9818 



-131- 



CODE NUMBER 



APPROVED CODE 



EMPLOYEES 
( THOUSANDS ) 



EFFECTIVE 
DATE 



9. FUEL (3 Codes) 



Total 



1,429,5 



10. Petroleum 

Drilling, Production and Pipe line Operation 

(Estimate) 292.0 
Market Operation (Estimate) 133.0 

Filling and Service Stations (Estimate) 534.0 



* 24. Bituminous Coal 
104. Liquefied Gas 



9-3-33 



469.0 10-9-33 
1.5 11-8-33 



UNAPPROVED CODES 



x Manufactured Gas 
Natural Gas 



67.0 
65.0 



Note: x - PEA substitution approved for Industry 

* - PEA substitution more inclusive than NBA code 



qrt » 



-133- 

TABLE 51 

MANUFACTURED GAS INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS 0^ EMPLOYEES ^OR 1923, 1932 and OCTOBER 1933 



Hours Worked 
Per Week 



1929 

40 hours or less 

41 to 48 hours 
49 to 59 " 
Over 60 " 

Total 

1932 



Total 



1933 October 



Number 
of 

Employees 



5,661 
39,161 
16,783 

4,995 

66,600 



40 hours 


or less 


7,383 


41 to 48 


hours 


44,854 


49 to 59 


ii 


8,582 


Over 60 


ti 


2,271 



63,100 



40 hours 


or less 


53,595 


41 to 48 


hours 


14,310 


49 to 59 


it 


757 


Over 60 


ii 


138 



Per Cent 



8, 


.5 


58, 


.8 


25, 


.2 


7, 


.5 



100.0 



11 


.7 


71. 


.1 


13 


.6 


3, 


.6 



Total 



63,800 



100.0 



77.9 

20.8 
1.1 
0.2 

100.0 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



8.5 

67.3 

92.5 

100.0 



4.7 

82.8 

95.4 

100.0 



77.9 

98.7 

99.8 

100.0 



Source: "Based on material submitted by American Gas Association in 

"Statistical Data on the Manufactured Gas Industry," to the NRA. 
National Recovery Administration Division of Research and Planning. 
The Manufactured Gas Industry, oreoared by R. V. Rickcord, 
F. W. Clark and Grace W. Knott, Aug. 2, 1934. Approximately 500 
concerns reporting. 



9818 



-133- TABLE 52 

NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED VffiEKLY HOURS OF EMPLOYEES BY DEPARTMENT, 1929 and 1932, 



Department 














and Hours 




1929 






1932 




Worked per Week 


Number 




Cumula- 


Number 




Cumula- 




of Em- 


Per Cent 


tive 


of Em- 


Per Cent 


tive 




ployees 


of Total 


Per Cent 


ployees 


of Total 


Per Cent 


ALL EMPLOYEES 














Under 40 hours 


2,119 


5.4 


5.4 


3,715 


11.3 


11.3 


40-48 hours 


18,450 


47. fe 


52.4 


17,950 


54.4 


65.7 


49-59 hours 


12,169 


31,5. 


. 83.4 


7,555 t 


22.9 


88.6 


6C hours and over 


6,500 . 


16.6 


■100.0 


3,752. 


11.4 


100.0 


Total 


39,238 


100. d 




32,972. 


100.0 




PRODUCTION EMPLOYMENT 














Under 40 hours 


378 


5.6 


5.6 


469 


9.7 


9.7 


40-48 hours 


2,914 


43.6 


49.2 


1,876 


39.0 


48.7 


49-59 hours 


2,264 


33.8 


83.0 


1,801 


37.5 


86,2 


60 hours and over 


1,139 


17.© 


100.0 


662 


13.8 


100.© 


Total 


6,693 


160.0 


• 


4,808 


100.0 




TRA1IS1 IISSION EMPLOYMENT 














Under 40 hours 


379 


5.1 


5.1 


398. 


6.6 


6.6 


40-48 hours 


2,075 


28.2 


33.3 


1,521 


25.1 


31.7 


49-59 hours 


2,304 


31.3 


G4.6 


2,235 


36.9 


S8.6 


60 hours and over 


2,604 


35.4 


•100.G 


1,905 


31.4 


100.0 


Total 


7,362 


100. G 




6,659 


100.0 




DISTRIBUTION EMPLOYMENT 














Under 40 hours 


429 


3.5 


3.5 


1,237 


11.2 


11.2 


40-48 hours 


5,510 


45.2 


48.7 


6,049 


54.9 


66.1 


49-59 hours 


5,271 


43.2 


91.9 


2,874 


26.1 


92.2 


6fi hours and ever 


985 


8.1 


100.0 , 


859 


7.8 


100.0 


Total 


12,195 


lQO.n 




11,019 


100.0 




OFFICE EMPLOYMENT 














Under 40 hours 


228 


3.2 


3.2 


841 


9.5 


9.5 


40-48 hours 


6,531 


92.7 


95.9 


7,688 


66.5 


96.0 


49-59 hours 


217 


3.1 


99.0 


326 


3.7 


99.7 


60 hours and over 


73 


1.0 


100.0 ' 


27 


0.3 


lOO.G 


Total 


7,©99 


130. 




8,832 


190.0 




C 0N3 TRUC T I ON EI IPLOYME NT . 
Under 40 hours 


707 


12.0 


12.0 


770 


35.0 


35.0 


40-48 hours 


1,370 


23.3 


35.3 


816 . 


37. C 


72.0 


49-59 hours 


2,111 


35.8 


71.1 


318 


14.4 


86.4 


60 hours and over 


1,699 


28.9 


100.0 


299 


13.6 


100.0 


Total 


5,887 


1CC.0 




2,203 


100. 





Source: Questionnaires submitted through the A.ierican Gas Association to the 
National Recovery Administration. National Recovery Administration Division of 
Rasoarch and Plannin;;. The Natural Gas Industry, prepared by A.J. Hettinger, Jr., 
R. V. Rickcord and Grace W. Knott, Feb. 20, 1934. 



9818 



-134 

TABLE 53 



NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY 
OF EMPLOYEES 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY EARNINGS/AC CORDING TO HOURS WORKED PER LEEK, 1929 and 1952. 



Hours' 'forked Per 
Week and 

Weekly 

Earning s 



19 2 9 



19 3 2 



Number Per Cent 
of Em- of 
ployees Total 



Cumula- 
tive 
Per Cent 



Number Per Cent 
of Em- of 
ployees Total 



Cumula- 
tive 
Per Cent 



Under "$1$ per Week 


1,003 


2.6 • 


2.6' 


1,735 


5.3 


5.3 


U2 -"y$4.'99 . ' 


1,509 


3.9 


6.5 


1,649 


5.1 


10.3 


15 - 18.00 6, | • 


.: 4,487 


11.4 


17.9. . 


3,361 


10.2 


20.5 


Dver 18.00 


32,234 


82.1 


100. ' 


26,226 


79.5 


100.0 


Total 


39,238 


100.0 




32,971 


100.0 




Under 40-Hours •. 














Per Week 














Under &12.00 


836 


39.4- 


39.4.' 


1,368- 


36.8 


36.8 


.12 - 14.99 


.264 


12.4 


51.8' 


347 


9.3 


46.1 


15 - 18.00 


143 


7.0 


58.8 


205 


5.5 


51.6 


Over 18.00 


873 


41.2 


100.0 


1,797 


48.4 


100.0 


Total 


2,121 


100.0 




3,717 


100.0 


, 


40. - 48 


128 


.7 


.7 


252 


1.4 




Under- Q12.00 


1.4 


$12 - 14.99 


6.58 


3.6 


4.3 .. 


647 


3.6 


5.0 


15 - 18.00 


2,679 


14.5 


18.8 


2,215 


12.4 


17.4 


Over 18.00 


14,983 


81.2 


100.0 


14,838 


82.6 


100.0 


Total ' . ' \ 


18,448 


100.0 




17,952 


100.0 




49-59 


37 


.3 


.3 


99 


1.3 




Under 012. 00 


1.3 


$12 - 14.99 


500 


4.1 


4V4 


567 . 


7.5 


3.8 


15 - 018.00 


1,183 


9.7 


14.1 


640 


8.5 


17.3 


Over 18.00 


10,450 


85.9 


100.0 


6,243 


82.7 


100.0 


Total 


12,170 


100..0 




7,549 


100.0 




60 and Over .' , 


7 


.1 


■'.1 


16 


.1 




Under >Q12. 00 


.4 - 


}12 - 14.99 .• : 


■87 


1.3 


1.4 


.88 


2.3 


. 2.7 


15 - 18.00. 


477 


7.4 


8.8 


301 


8.0 


10.7 


Over 18.00 


5,929 


91.2 . 


100.0 


3,348 


89.3 


100.0 


Total 


6,500 


100.0 




3,753 


100.0 





oource: Returns from questionnaire submitted through the American Gas Association 
to the National' Recovery Administration. National Recovery Administration 
division of Research and planning. The Natural Gas Industry, prepared by 
A. J, I T ettin:;er, Jr., .1. V. Rickcord and Grace ¥• Knott, Feb. 20, 1934. 



9813 



-135- 

Code -biplryees Bffoctive 

ITunibor .ipprovod Codes ' (thousands) Pat o 

4. FOEJJSI PR ODUCTS (17 Codes) Total ' 606,3 

9. Lumbar and Timber Products 

x 107. Ladder Manufacturing (1932 Est,,) 

115. Bood Plug 

x llo. Bop Stick 

146. .Excelsior and Excelsior Products 

186. End Grain "trip .ood Block (1928) 

208. Picture "ouldirg and Picture Frame 

221. I etal Hat Die and "■ ood Block 

229. Venetian Blind 

260. Ornamental . oulding, etc. 

x 270. Wood iieel 

338. V.'ooden Insulator Pin and Bracket 

383. , B.ood Turning and 'ood Shaping {1 supplement ) 
x 405. ' Shoe Last 

440. Dowel Pin 

473. Eoven 7. r ood Pabric Shade 

x 481, ..'ood Pro serving 

Unapproved Codes 

Architectural ' ood Carving 

Sawdust, havings and Sawdust Specialties 

. ood Tank 



568.0 


8-2S-33 


• J? 


11-18-33 


.5 


11-24-35 


.2 


11-24-35 


1.2 • 


12-18-35 


.2 


1-8-34 


4.4 


1-29-34 


.4 


1-29-34 


.3 


2-5-34 


2.6 


2-19-34 


11.0 


2-12-34 


.3 


3-26-34 


5,1 


4-16-34 


1*2 


5-7-34 


• J- 


6-1-34 


.1 


7-9-34 


10,1 


7-30-34 



BOTE : 



PPP. substitution approved for Industry 



9318 



-136- 
TABLE 64 



WOOD PLUG INDUSTRY 



DISTRIBUTION OF WAGE EARNERS BY HOURLY EARNINGS 
FOR WEEK INCLUDING SEPT. 18, 1933 



Actual 






Hourly 


Number of 


Per Cent 


Earnings 


Wago Earners 


of Total 



20 - 24.9 / 90 21.7 

25 - 29.9 ' 20 4.8 

30 - 34.9 .. 210 50.6 

35- 39.9 50 12.1 

40 - 49.9- 30 7.2 

50 - 59.9 10 8.4 

60 - 79.9 5 1.2 



Total 415 100.0 



Sourcej National Recovery Administration. Division of Research 
and Planning. The Wood Plug Industry, prepared by 
John A. Hanley, October 31, 1933. 



9818 



-137- 

TABLE 55 
MOP STICK INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF MAGE EARNERS, WEEK OF SEPTEMBER. 15., 1933 



ACTUAL, EARNINGS NUMBER OF PER CENT 

PER HOUR WAGE EARNERS OF TOTAL 

(cents) 



36 - 39.9 100 62.5 

40 - 4-9.9 , _ 50 18.7 

50 - 59.9 20 12.5 

60 - 79.9 10 6.3 



Total 160 10 0.0 



Source: National Association of Mop Stick Manufacturing, reporting 
to the NRA. National Recovery Administration Division of 
Research and Planning. The Mop Stick Industry, prepared by 
J. A. Eanley, October 30, 1935. 



QQT P. 



-138 

TABLF 56 



ixcelsior Industry 



lluraber 


Employees, 


Four Weeks of January 1934 
Man-Hours, Payrolls and Average 


Hourly Darnings. 










Truck 
Clerical '.''atchmen Drivers 


Factory 

Male Female 


Total 



ITo. Dmpls. 



No rth 


41 


26 


34 


487 


51 


639 


South 


24 


13 


12 


255 


11 


315 


Total 


65 


39 


46 


742 


62 


954 


Man-Hours, 














Ho rth 


6514 


3724 


5319 


65,701 


6,338 


. 87,596 


South , 


2518 


1982 


1681 


28,116 


833 


35,130 


Total 


9032 


5706 


7000 


93,817 


7,171 


122,726 


Payrolls 















« 



Ho rth, $3,308.00 

South 1,177.00 

Total 4,485.00 

Average Hours 

Per iip jith 

Ho rth 159 

South 105 

Total 139 

Average 'j'ages 

Per Hour 

North .51 

South . 46 

-Total .495 



$1,304.00 

547.00 

1,485.00 



.$2,434.00 $23, 101.00 $t, €35. 00 $31,800.00 

527.00 7,822.00 185.00 10,258.00 

2,961.00 30,923.00 1,838.00 42,058.00 



143 


156 


135 


124 


137 


152 


140 


110 


76 


111 


146 


152 


127 


116 


128 



Source; 



35 


.65 


• .35 


- .26 


.36 


275 


.31 


.28 


. 225 


.29 


32 


.42 


.33 


.255 


.34 



« 



Data submitted by the Excelsior Products Code Authority, 52 
companies reporting, to the National Recovery Administration 
Division of Research and Planning, March 12, 1934. 



9818 



-159 



TABLF 57 
Excelsior Industry 



Four Weeks, of Feb. 1934 
ITc. Fniployees, Han-hours, Payrolls , Aver, Hourly darnings 



Clerical Watchmen 



% FUCK 

Drivers 



JV.etury- 



Ma. 1 g Female Total 



No . Emps . 



North 


39 


South 


3 


Total 


47 


Man Hours 




North 


5,964 


South 


1,320 


Total 


7,284 


Payrolls 




North $3 


,152.00 


South 


317.00 


Total 3, 


969.00 


Av. Hours 




Per Mo. 




North 


153 


So^^th 


165 


Total 


155 


Av. Wages 




Per Hour 





North 
South 
Total 



.53 
.61 
.55 



16 
41 



34 
20 
54 



3,424 5,050 
2,346 2,482 
5,770 7,532 



1,361.00 

620.00 

1,981.00 



137 
147 
141 



.40 



.34 



2,274.00 

697.00 

2,971.00 



148 
124 
139 



.45 
.38 
.39 



466 


51 


615 


337 


10 


391 


803 


61 


1,006 



50,413 6,477 81,333 

41,101 1,014 48,263 

101,519 7,491 129,596 



2?„824.00 1,856.00 32,467.00 
11,090.00 226.00 13,450.00 
34,914.00 2,082.00 48,917.00 



129 
123 
126 



,39 
,27 
,34 



127 132 

101 123 
122 129 



.29 

• 225. 
-PR 



.40 



.35 



Source: Data submitted by the Excelsior Products Code Authority, 
64 companies reporting, to the National Recovery Adminis- 
tration Division of Research and Planning, March '3*1,' 1934. 



9818 



-140- 



TABLE 58 

EXCELSIOR INDUSTRY 

No. Employees, Man-Hours, Payrolls, Average Hourly Earnings 

By Class of Work 







Eour 


Weeks of March, 1934 










Clerical 


Watchmen 


Truck 
Drivers 


Fac 


tory 


Total 






Male 


Female 




Number of Emp. 


39 

7 

46 

7425 
1381 
8806 

$3920.00 

993.00 

4913.00 

190 

197 

191.5 

.53 
.72 
.56 


24 
15 
39 

4195 
2735 
6930 

$1474.00 

707.00 

2181.00 

171 
182- 

178- 

.35 
.26 
.32 


34 
18 
52 

6843 
2874 
9717 

$3101.00 

773.00 

3874.00 

201 
159 
191 

.44 
.27 
.40 


421 
345 
766 

73084 

52791 

125875 

$28202.00 
14452.00 
42654.00 

173 
152 

164 

.375 
.27 
.34 


52 
10 
62 

7947 
903 

8850 

2091.00 
213.00 

2304.00 

152 

90 

143 

.26 

.225 

.26 


570 
395 
965 

99494 

60684 

160178 

38788.00 
17138.00 
55926.00 

175 
154 
166 

.39 
.28 
.35 












Man-Hour s 


% 










Payrolls 












Average Hours 
Per Month 












Average Wage 
Per Hour 


% 






Total 








Source: Data submi 


.tted by the 


Excelsior Products Code 


Authority 


, 64 companies 





reporting, to the National- Recovery Administration, Division of Research 
and Planning, May 17, 1934. 



9818 



-141- 
TABLE 59 



g END GRAIN STRIP WOOD BDCK INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF FACTORY LAGS ZRNSRS, WEEK OF 

SEPTEMBER 15, 1933. 



Hours Worked 
Per Week 



Wage Er.rners 



EO hours or under 

20.1 - 30 

30.1 - 35 

35.1 - 40 

40.1 - 45 

45.1 - 50 

50.1 - 60 

Over 60 



34 

11 
39 

54 

1 



Per Cent 



Total 



141 



1.4 



100.0 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



84.1 


24.1 


7.8 


31.9 


27.7 


59.6 


38.3 


97.9 


.7 


98.6 



100.0 



SOURCE: Data obtained by means of questionnaires sent out by the 

National Recovery Administration, 3 establishments report- 
ing. National Recovery Administration, Division of Research 
and Planning. The End Grain Strip Wood Block Industry, pre- 
pared by Arthur B. Fridin^er, October 16, 1933. 



9818 



-143- 

'TAELE 60 

END GRAIN STRIP WOOD BLOCK INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OP FACTORY EffiLOYEES, WEEK OF 

SEPTEMBER 15, 1933. 



Actual Earnings 
Per Hour 



Number of 
Wage Earners 



Per Cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Under 10 cents 
10 to 19.9 cents 
20 to 24.9 cents 
25 to 29,9 cents 
3C to 34.9 cents 
35 to 39.9 cents 
40 to 49.9 cents 
50 to 59.9 cents 
60 to 79.9 cents 
00 to 99.9 cents 
$1.00 or more 

Total 



16 

17 

4 

46 

34 

10 

6 

4 

4 

141 



11.4 


11.4 


12.1 


23.5 


2.8 


26.3 


32.6 


53.9 


24.1 


83.0 


7.1 


90.1 


4.3 


94.4 


2.8 


97.2 


2.8 


100.0 


100.0 





SOURCE: Data obtained by means of questionnaires sent out by the 

National Recovery Administration, 3 establishments report- 
ing. National Recovery Administration, Division of Research 
and Planning. The End Grain Strip Wood Block Industry, 
prepared by Arthur B. Fridinger, October 16, 1953. 



9818 



-143- 

TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 
TABLE 61 

METAL HAT DIE AND WOOD HAT BLOCK INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF FACTORY WAGE EARNERS 

FOR WEEK OF JUNE 15, 1933 



6666 



I 



Number of hours Number of factory wage earners 

worked T otal Per cent of total 

TotaT*.TT. Zy^Z .100,0" 

20 hours or 

under , 9 

20.1. to 25 hours 1 

25.1. to 30 hours 15 

30.1 to 35 hours , 13 

35.1 to 40 hours 3 

40.1. to 45 hours , 33 

45.1 to 50hhours 9 

50.1. to 55 hours 7 

55,1. to 60 hours — 

Over 60 hours 



10.0 


10.0 


1.1 


11.1 


16.7 


27.8 


14.4. 


42.2 


. 3.3, 


45.5 


36.7 


82.2 


10.0 


92.2 


7.8 


100.0 



Source: Data collected by the National Recovery Administration 

Division of Research and Planning in cooperation with the 
Bureau of the Census, reporting on Dec. 5, 1933. 



9813 



-144- 

TO BE USED VHTH CAUTION 

TABLE 62 

METAL AT DIE AND WOOD JIAT BLOCK INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY YJAGE EARNE2S 

FOR ".TEES OF JUNE 15, 1933 



Actual earnings 


Number of 


factory ware 


earners 


per hour 


Total 


Per cent 


of total 


Total ... 


90 


100.0 














1 


1.1 


1.1 




3 


3.3 


4.4 


25/ to 29.9/ 


3 


3.3 


7.7 




7 


7.8 


15.5 




5 


5.6 


21.1 




3 


3.3 


24.4 




4 


4.4 


28.8 




8 


8.9 


37.7 




7 


7.8 


45.5 


60/ to 69.9 / .... 


5 


5.6 


51.1 




13 


14.4 


65.5 




31 


34.5 


100.0 



Source: Data collected by the National Recovery Administration 
Division of Research and planning in cooperation with 
the Bureau of the Census, reporting on Dec. 5, 1933. 



9818 



-146- 

TABLE 64 

VENETIAN BLIND INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF WORK FOR FACTORY WAGE EARITERS 
Week of June 15, 1933 



Hours 




Worked 




20 hours or less 


20.1 


~ 


25 


25.1 


- 


30 


30.1 


- 


35 


35.1 


- 


40 


40.1 


- 


45 


45.1 


— 


50 


50.1 


- 


55 


55.1 


-» 




Over 


60 



Uumber 



3 
15 
3 
39 
4 
1 
1 



Total 69 



Source: N.R.A. questionnaire returns, 8 concerns reporting 
Tabulation by the Bureau of the Census for the 
national Recovery Administration, Division of Re- 
search and Planning, December 12, 1933 



9816 



-147- 



TASm 65 
s. 



VENETIAN BLIilD DTDUSTRY 

GMSSiriZE HOURLY RAR7IITG-S 01' PACTORY WAGE LAX\ERS 
Ice 1 .; of June 15, 1933 



Hourly Earnings 
Cents Per Hour number 



Under 30 cents 

20 - 24.9 7 

25 - 33.9 3 

30 « 34.9 12 

35 - 39.9 7 

40 - 44.9 12 

45 - 49.9 7 

50 - 54.9 1? 

55 - 55.9 3 

GO - 69.9 5 
70 - 79.9 

80 and over 1 

Total 69 



Source: itf.R.A. questionnaire returns, 8 concerns reporting. 
Tabulation "by the Yureaii of the Census for the 
national Recovery Administration, Division of Re- 
search and Planning, Decemher 13, 1333 



9818 



-148- 

TA3LE 66 
YEiCTIAN 3LIITD IUDUSTRY 

CIASSOTED WEEKLY EARITIITGS OF OFFICE EMPLOYEES 

Week of June 15, 1933 



Weekly Earnings 

(dollars) 



aiDuer 



Less than $10.00 

$10.00 to $14.99 2 

$15.00 to $19.99 4 

$20.00 to $24.99 3 

$25.00 to $29.99 '. 1 

$30.00 to $54.99 1 

$35.00 to #39.99 2 

$40.00 to $44.99 2 

$45.00 or over 1 

Total 16 



Source: 1T.R.A. questionnaire returns, S concerns reporting. 
Tabulation by the Bureau of the Census for the 

tional Recovery Administration, Division of Research 
and Planning, December 12, 1933. 



981G 



-149- 

TO BE US-ED WITH CAUTION 
TABLE 67 

ORNAMENTAL MOULDING, CARVING AND TURNING INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED ".ffiEKLY HOURS OP FACTOR": tfAC-E EARNERS DURING A REPRESENTATIVE 

WEEK IN JUNE, 1933. 



Hour ! 


3 '.forked 


Number of Factory 


Per Cent 


Cumulated 


Per 


v7e< 


3k 


Wage Earners 


of Total 


Percentage 


20 or under 


40 


15.3 


15.3 


20.1 


to 


25 


7 


2.6 


17.9 


25.1 


to 


30 


9 . 


3.4 


21.3 


30.1 


to 


35 


9 


3.4 


24.7 


35.1 


to 


40 


19 


7.3 


32.0 


40.1 


to 


45 


113 


45.1 


77.1 


45.1 


to 


50 


37 


14.1 


91.2 


50.1 


to 


55 


17 


6.5 


97.7 


55.1 


to 


60 


2 


.8 


98.5 


Cver 


60 




4 


1.5 


100.0 




Total 


262 


100.0 





Source: Bureau of the Census in Cooperation with the National 
Recovery Administration. Special Reports , 11 estab- 
lishments reporting. National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning. The Ornamental 
Moulding, Carving and Turning Industry, prepared by 
Martin Taitel, January 4, 1934. 



9818 



-150- 
TABLE 68 , *.. -- 

Ornamental Mouldings, Carving and Turning Industry- 
Number of Factory Wage Earners Employed in Establishments 
Working Snecified Shifts and Shift Hours 



Hours Worked 


June 1929 


June 193? 


October 


1933 


-oer shift 












1, shift 


1 shift 


1 shift 


2 shifts 


7 - 7.9 




25 


109 


79 


8 - 8.9 


70 


216 


304 


19 


9 ~ 9.9 


. 530 


6 


- 


- 


10-10.9 


51 


15 


— 


- 



Total 651 262 413 98 



Source: NBA questionnaire returns, 1? concerns reporting. Tabulations 
by the Bur eau of the Census for the National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning, December 29, 1923. 



9818 



TO BE USED VrtTH CAUTION 
TABLE 69 

ORNAMENTAL MOULDING, CARVING AID TURNING- INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY WAGE EARNERS DURING 
A REPRESENTATIVE ftEEK IN JUNE, 1933. 



Act-oal 
Earnings 
Per Hour 
(Cents per 
Eour) 


Number of 

Factory Wage Per Cent 
Earnerr of 

Total 


Cumulated 
Per Cent 


Under 15 


3 1-1 


1.1 


15 - 19.9 


10 3 • 8 


4.9 


20 - 24.9 


33 12.6 


17.5 


25 - 29.9 


17 6.5 


24.0 


30 - 34.9 


28 10.7 


34.7 


35 - 39.9 


56 21.4 


56.1 


40 - 44.9 


39 14.9 


71.0 


45 - 49.9 


19 7.3 


78.3 


50 - 54.9 


17 6.5 


84 . 8 


55 - 59.9 


7 2.6 


87.4 


60 - 69.9 


20 ?-7 


95.1 


70 - 79.9 


8 3.0 


98.1 


80 or more 


5 '..,/■ ' ■= . 1.? , 


100.0 


Total 


262 100.0 




Source: Bureau of 


the Census in cooperation with the 


National 



;covery Administration Division of Research and Planning. 
The Ornamental Moulding, Carving and Turning Industry, pre- 
pared by Martin Taitel, January 4, 1934. 
Special Reports , 11 establishments reporting. 



9818 



-152- 
TABLE 70 v. I ■ ,. ..,) 

Ornamental Mouldings, Carving and Turning Industry- 
Classified Weekly Earnings of Office Em-olo^ees 
Week of June 15, 1933 



Weekly Earnings 

(dollars) Number 

Under 5:00 1 

5:00 to 9:99 4 

10:00 to 14:99 4 

15:00 to 19:99 5 

20:00 to 24:99 — 7 

25:00 to 29:99 2 

30:00 to 34:99 2 

35:00 to 39:99 

40:00 to 44:99 1 

45:00 and over 

Total 26 



« 



« 



Source: MA questionnaire returns, 13 concerns reiaorting. Tabulation 
by the Bureau of the Census for the National Recovery Administration 
Division of Research and Planning, December 29, 1933. 



9818 



-153- 



TA3LE 71 



WOOD HEEL : I. USTRY 



classified weekly kolh-is ;j ; 1 factory '..age earners 
for the week jhice" iitcltjdm june 15, 1953 or 
nearest typical week. 



FACTORY WAGE EARNERS 



Hours Per Week 



Number 



Per 


Cent 


5. 


,7 


2. 


,9 


5. 


5 


6. 


3 


10, 


2 


15, 


,5 


45. 


8 


6. 


6 


1. 


2 


• 


3 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



20 hours or under 
20. 1 to 25 hours 
| 25.1 to 30 " 
30.1 to 35 " 
35.1 to 40 " 
40.1 to 45 " 
45.1 to 50 " 
50.1 to 55 " 
55.1 to 60 » 
Over 60 hours 
Total 



137 

70 
132 
151 
245 
372 
1102 
160 

30 

6 
2405 



5.7 
8.6 
14.1 
20.4 
30.6 
46.1 
91.9 
98.5 
99.7 
100.0 



Source: Questionnaires sent out by the National Recovery Administration, 
50 concerns reporting. National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning. The Wood Heel Industry, prepared 
by W. L. Yearsley, Dec. 28, 1933 



9818 



- L 54- 
TABLE 72 



TO BE US 1 !!) "'ITK CAUTION. 



WOOD HEEL i-AHUFACTU .IhC IIAUSTRY 

IflJLBEH 01: FACTOHY JAGE EARNERS hLPLOYED IK 
ESTABLISIILCTTS Y/OhhlhG SPECIFIED 
SHIFTS ATD SHIFT-HOURS 



Fumber of 


1929 




1 JUU 






1935 




Hours v.'orhed 


June 




June 






October 




Per shift 


1 /.hi ft 


1 


shift 2 


shifts 


1 


shift 2 


shifts 



3 to 3.9 hours 

9 to 9.9 " 

10 to 10.9 " 
Totrl 

hot rejorting 



84 
_£§ 
123 

931 



225 


31 




30 


613 


61 


1731 





555 53 

1538 



Source: ERA questionnaire returns, 50 concerns reporting. Tabulation by 
the Bureau of the Census for the National Recovery Administration, 
Division of research and planning, December 20, 1933. 



-155- 
TABLE ?3 

WOOD HEEL INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS FOR FACTORY WAGE EARNERS 
FOR TEE LEEi: WHICH IIICL DED JUNE 15, 1933 OR 
NEAREST TYPICAL ..EEK 



FACTORY WAGE EARNERS 



Cumulative 

Hourly Earnings Number Per Cent Per Cent 

Under 15/. 98 4.1 4.1 

15 to 19.9/ 247 10.3 14.4 

20 to 24.9/ 285 11.8 26.2 

25 to 29.9/ 342 14.2 40.4 

30 to 34.9/ 297 12.3 52.7 

35 to 39.9/ 418 17.4 70.1 

40 to 44.9/ 213 8.9 79.0 

45 to 49o9/ 199 8.3 87.3 ' 

50 to 54.9/ 110 4.6 91.9 

55 to 59.9/ 68 2.8 94.7 

60 to 69.9/ 64 2.7 97.4 

70 to 79.9/ 32 1.3 98.7 

80/ or more 32 1.3 100.0 

Total 2,405 



Source-. Questionnaires sent out by the National Recovery Administration, 50 
concerns reporting. National Recovery Administration, Division of 
Research and Planning. The l.ood Heel Industry, prepared by 
W. L. Yoarsley, Dec. 28, 1933. 



9818 



-156- 

TABLE 74 

WOOD KEEL INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED YfflEKLY EARNINGS OF OFFICE EMPLOYEES 
FOR WEEK WHICH INCLUDED JUNE 15, 1933 OR ilEAREST TYPICAL WEEK 



Weekly Earnings 



Office Employees 



Number 



Per Cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Less than $5.00 
$ 5.00 to 09.99 
$10.00 to 514.99 
$15.00 to §19.99 
$20.00 to $24.99 



$25.00 to $29.99 



$30.00 to $34.99 
$35.00 to $39.99 
$40,00 to $44.99 
$45.00 and over 
Total 



2 


1.9 


11 


10.7 


24 


23.3 


39 


37.9 


15 


14.6 


3 


2.9 


4 


3.9 


1 


1.0 


2 


1.9 


2 


1.9 


103 





1.9 
12.6 
35.9 
73. 8 
88.4 
91.3 
95.2 
96.2 
98.1 
100.0 



Source: Questionnaires sent out by National Recovery Administration, 

50 concerns reporting. National Recovery Administration, Division 
of Research and Planning. The Wood Heel Industry, prepared by 
¥. L. Yearsley, Dec. 28, 1933. 



9813 



-157- 

TABLE 75 



223? 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 

WOODEN INSULATOR PIN AND BRACKET L'ANU- 
FAC TURING INDUS TRY 



CLASSIFIED NUMBER OF HOURS OF FACTORY 
WAGE EARNERS FOR 'WEEK WHICH INCLUDED 
JUNE 15, 1333 OR NEAREST TYPICAL WEEK 



Factory Wa^o Earners 



Hours 
Worked 
Per Week 


Number 

s/ 


30.1 to 35 


8 


40.1 to 45 


6 


45.1 to 50 


1 


50.1 to 55 


4 


55.1 to 60 


1 



Per 
Cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Total 



20 



qj Source: Summarized questionnaire returns - 

4 concerns reporting. National Recovery 
Administration, Division of Research and 
Planning. The Wood Insulator Pin and 
Bracket Manufacturing Industry. Prepared 
by R. K. Lyle, February 13, 1954. 



.. ; -153- TO BE USED V/ITH CAUTION 
TABLE 76 

WOODEN INSULATOR PIN AND BRACKET MANUFAC TURING 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS 07 FACTORY 
WAG: EARNERS FOR TPIE WEEK INCLUDING 
JUNE 15, 1933 





Hoi 


arly 




Factory Wage 


Earners 




Number 


Per 


Cumulative 


Earnings 


*/ 


Cent 


Per Cent 


10 


to 


14.9;* 


8 


A 


^ • i 


25 


to 


29.9/2? 


1 


>> 




30 


to 


34.9^ 


8 


A 


f ) 


35 


to 


39.9^ 


1 


) 




40 


to 


44.9^ 


1 






45 


to 


49 . 9f£ 


1 


i 


'i 




Total 


20 


i' ' '■ 



a/ Source: Summarized questionnaire returns - 
4 concerns reporting. 

National Recovery Administration - Division of 
Research and Planning. The Wooden Insulator 
Pin and Bracket Manufacturing Industry. Pre- 
pared by R. K. Lyle, February 15, 1D34. 



9818 



-159- 

to b:: usid vith caution 

TABLH 77 
T700D TUErixIG- AID SHAPING- I.5TD[JSE?JZS - BRUSH HAITDIS AID BRUSH BLOCK. 
CLASSIFIED tfEHKLY HOURS CF T70RK FOR FACTORY "..'AGS 3ABF3RS 
77eek of June 15, 1933 



Hours 
forked 



.'al( 



1 emp.le 



Number 



Factor?/ ~h,p:e Earners 



Per Cent 



Cumul- tive 
Per Cent 



20 hours or less 
20.1 - 25 
25.1 
30.1 



2.4 



2.4 



- 30 

- 35 
35.1 - 40 



40.1 



45 . 1 
50.1 
55.1 
S0.1 
55.1 
70.1 
75.1 
Over 80 

Total 



- 45 

- 50 

- 55 



50 
65 
70 
75 

30 



6 


1 


7 


3.3 


5.7 


5 


- 


6 


2.9 


3.6 


7 


1 


n 
O 


3.8 


12.4 


15 


1 


16 


7.6 


20.0 


35 


a 


39 


13.7 


38.7 


54 


2 


56 


26.8 


65.5 


10 


- 


10 


4.8 


70.3 


28 


- 


28 


13.4 


83.7 


28 


- 


i Q 


13.8 


97.5 


2 


- 


2 


1.0 


98.5 


2 


- 


2 


1.0 


99.5 


1 


- 


1 


,5 


100.0 



201 



209 



100.0 



Source: IT. R. A. Questionnaire returns, 9 establishments reporting. Tabula- 
tion by the Bureau of the Census for the National Recovery Administra- 
tion, Division of Research and Planning, January 50, 1934. 



-160- 

TABLE 73 

WOOD TURNING AND SHAPIRO INDUSTRIES - 
BRUSH HANDLE AND BRUSH 3L0CK. 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY WAGE EARNERS 

WEEK OF JUNE 15, 1933 



(To bo Used vrith Caution) 



Hourly 














Earnings 








Factory 


Wage Earners 








Cumulative 


Cents Per 


Hour 


Male 


Female 


Number 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


Under 10 cents 


- 


- 


- 


.- 


- 


10 - 14.9 




3 


1 


4 


1.9 


1.9 


15 ~ 19.9 




18 


3 


21 


10.0 


11.9 


20 - 24.9 




90 


2 


92 


44.0 


55.9 


25 - 29.9 




26 


- 


25 


12.5 


68.4 


30 - 34.9 




'32 


1 


33 


15.8 


84.2 


oO *~* O^ • J 




'21 


1 


22 


10.5 


94.7 


40 - 44.9 




' 3 


- 


3 


1.4 


96.1 


45 - 49.9 




1 


- 


1 


.5 


96.6 


50 - 54.9 




2 


- 


2 


1.0 


97.6 


55 » 59.9 




1 


- 


1 


.5 


98.1 


60 - 69.9 


1 


3 


- 


3 


1.4 


99.5 


70 ~ 79.9 




1 


- 


1 


.5 


100.0 


80 and ovt 


sr 

Total 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




201 


P 


209 


100.0 





Source: i". R. A. questionnaire returns, 9 establishments reporting. 
Tabulation by the Bureau of the Census for the National 
Recovery Administration, Division of Research 'and Planning, 
Jan. 30, 1934. 



-161- 

tc 3E used "itii caution 

TABLE 79 
700D TUHfllFG- AED S3PII7G INDUSTRIES, - TIT SH EAiiDLE AIT BRUSH BLOCK. 
CLASSIFIED T7E3KLY EAEnr&S CE OEEICE EMPLOYEES 
T7eek of June 15, 1933 



TTeekly 

Earnings 

(Dollars) dumber 

Less than 5.00 - 

5.00-9.99 1 

10.00-12.49 2 

12.50 - 14.99 2 

15.00-17.49 2 

17. 5* - 19.99 

2C. 00 - 24.99 2 

25. OJ - 29.99 2 

30.00-34.99 

35.00 and over __ _^_ 

Total 11 



Source: I T . R. A. questionnaire returns, 9 establishments reporting. Tabula- 
tion by the 3ureau of the Census for the National Recover,]' Administra- 
tion, Division of Research and Planning, January 30, 1934. 



9818 



-162- 

TA3LE 80 

WOOD TURNING AND SHAPING INDUSTRIES - 
FLAT AND SHAPED VENEER DIVISION 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF WORK FOR FACTORY WAGS EARNERS 

WEEK OF JUNE 15, 1933 



(To be Used with Caution) 



Weekly 
Hours 

Worked 



Factory Wage Earners 



Mai e. 



Female 



Number 





Cumulative 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


9.1 


9.1 


1.0 


10.1 


2.3 


12.4 


1.3 


13.7 


6.5 


20.2 


15.4 


55.6 


25.2 


60.8 


20. C 


80.8 


12.1 


92.9 


5.1 


98.0 


1.3 


99.3 


.5 


99.8 



20 hours or less 15 21 

20.1 - 25 3 1 

25.1-30 ■ . 5 4 

30.1-35 -3 2 

35.1 - 40 - 15 11 

40.1 - 45 3 53 

45.1 - 50 • • 35 . So 

50.1 - 55 31 48 

55.1 - 60 48 

60.1 - 65 20 

65.1 - 70 5 

70.1 - 75 2 
75.1 - 80 

Over 80 1 - 



36 

4 

9 

5 

25 

61 

100 

79 

48 

20 

5 

2 



.2 



100.0 



[total 



186 



210 



396 



100.0 



Source: 



IT. R. A. questionnaire returns, 6 establishments reporting. 
Tabulation by the Bureau of the Census for the National 
Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Planning, 
Jan. 30, 1934. 



-163- 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 



TABLE 81 

"TOOD TURNING' AKD SHAPING INDUSTRIES 
FLAT AND SHAPED VENEER DIVISION 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OE EAGTORY WAGE EARNERS 

UESK OE JUNE 15, 1933 

(To he Used with Caution) 



Hourly 

earnings Male - Female 
Cents Per Hour 



Factory Uafie Earners 

Cumulative 
Number Per cent p er Cent 



Under 10 cents 



10 — 


14.9 


67 


81 


15 - 


19.9 


16 


68 


20 - 


24. S 


23 


45 


25 - 


29.9 


' 27 


:l 


30 ~ 


34.9 


' 19 


5 


35. - 


39.9 


9 


6 


40 - 


44.9 


10 


3 


45 - 


49.9 


6 


1 


50 - 


54.9 


2 


— 


55 - 


59.9 


3 


— 


60 - 


69.9 


3 


— 


70 - 


79.9 


— • 


— 


80 and 


over 


1 





148 


37.4 


37.4 


84 


21.3 . 


58.7 


67 


16.9 . 


.. 75.6 


28 


7.1 . 


.. 62.? 


24 


6.1. 


88.8 


15 


3.8 


92.6 


13 


3.3 


95.9 


7 


1.8 


97.7 


2 


.5 


98.2 


3 


.8 


99.0 



.8. 



99.8 



100.0 



Total 



186 



210 



396 



100.0 



Source: N.R.A. Questionnaire returns, 6 Establishments reporting. 
Tabulation by the Bureau of the Census for the National 
Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Planning, 
Jan, 30, 1934. 



9818 



-1 64- 
Tii3Jjjii 82 

WOOD TURNING AND SHAPING INDUSTRIES 
FLAT AJBLD SHAP T D VENEER DIVISION 

CLASSIFIED "EEELl EARNINGS OF OFFICE EMPLOYEES 

T7EEK OF JUNE 15, 1933. 

(To be Used with Caution) 

Weekly 
Earnings Number 
(Dollars) 

Less than 10.00 

10 - 12. '19 2 

12.50 - 14.99 1 

15.00 - 17.49 4 

17.50 - 19.99 2 

20.00 - 24.99 3 

25.00 - 29.99 

30.00 - 34.99 

35.00 and over 2 



Total 14 



Source: N.E.A. questionnaire returns, 6 establishments re- 
porting. Tabulation by the Bureau of the Census 
for the National Recovery Administration, Division 
of Aesearch and Planning, Jan. 30,' 1934. 



9818 



-165- To be used with caution. 

TA3LE 83 

WOOD IUHLTIEG A1ID SHAPIHG IITDUSTRIES, - .iTAIIQARD A1"D 3PRIEG CLOTHESPIE 

T3TV.t3T05- 

CEASoIFIED weekly eo t rs of work for factory wage earfers 

WEEK OF JUITE 15, 133b 





Hours 








Factory 


V/a/'e Er-rnerp 










C^oiaulrtivc 




Worked 




hale 


Female 


Uumbc r 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 




20 ho--: 


cs or lens 


2 


5 


7 


4.4 


--> 4 




20.1 - 


.J..J 


- 


- 


- 


— 


— 




25.1 ~ 


30 


3 


3 


6 


3.7 


8.1 


1 


30. 1 - 


35 


- 


9 


9 


5.6 


13.7 




35.1 ~ 


40 


9 


5 


14 


o. ? 


22. 4 




40. 1 ~ 


45 


1 


1 


2 


1.2 


23.6 




45.1 - 


50 


3 


5 


8 


5.C 


28.6 




50. 1 - 


55 


10 


4 


14 


8.7 


37.5 




55.1 ~ 


60 


31 


55 


86 


53.4 


90.7 




60.1 - 


65 


8 


1 


9 


5. 6 


96.3 




65.1 ~ 


70 


- 


- 


- 


— 


— 


1 


70. 1 - 


75 


6 


- 


6 


3.7 


100. 




75.1 - 


80 


- 


- 


- 


— 


— 




Over 80 


- 


- 


- 


— 


— 






Total 


73 


88 


161 


100,0 





SOURCE: 1TRA questionnaire returns, 4 establishments reporting. 'Tabulation 

by the Bureau of the Census for the national ReQOvery- Administration 
Division of Reseach and Planning, Jan. 30, 1934. 



9818 



-166- 

TO 3E USED WITH CAUTION. 

TABLE 34 

WOOD TUEHIl'G AUD SHAPI7TG INDUSTRIES, - STAICDAR? A/D SPRITTG CLOTTESPII! DIVISIOI 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EAMINGS OF FACTORY WAGE EARTERS 
WEEK OF JUKE 15, 1933 



Hourl y 






Factory 


Wage Earners 




Earnings 












Cumulative 


Cents Per Hour 


Male 


Female 


Itf-umber 


Per C 


3nt_ 


Per Cent 


Under 10 cents 


— 




— 




— 


10 - 14.9 


1 


26 


27 




16.8 




16.3 


15 -.'19.9 


3 


31 


34 




21.1 




37.9 


20 - 24,9 


14 


31 


45 




23.0 




65.9 


25 - 29. 9 


8 


— 


8 




5.0 




70.9 


3C - 34.9 


14 


— 


14 




G.7 




79.6 


35 - 39.9 


18 




18 




11.1 




90.7 


4C - 44.9 


4 


— 


4 








93.2 


45 - 49. : 


6 




6 




3.7 




96.9 


50 - 54.9 


3 


— 


3 




1.9 




98.3 


55 - 59.9 


1 


— 


1 




.6 




99.4 


60 - 69.9 


1 


— 


1 




.6 




100.0 


70 - 79.9 


— 


— 


— 




— 




— 


80 and over 


— 


— 


~_ 




— 




— 


Total 


73 


88 


161 




100.0 







SOURCE: iJ,E,A. questionnaire returns, 4 establishments reporting. Tabulation 
by the Bureau of the Census for the National Recovery Administrction 
Division of Research and Planning, Jan. 30, 1954. 



9818 



-167- 



TA3LE 85 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 



rprvoQ arBKHMB AKD SHAPING INDUSTRIES, - STANDARD AND SPRING 

CLOTHESPIN DIVISION 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY EARNINGS OP OPPICE EiPLOYEES 

WEEK OP JUKE 15, 1933 
(To b e IJ sed with Caut ion ) — , 



Weekly Earnings 
(Dollars') 



Less than 5.00 

5.00 - 9.99 
10.00 - 12.49 
12.50 - 14.99 
15.00 - 17.49 
17.50 - 19.99 
20.00 - 24.99 
25.00 - 29.99 
30.00 - 34.99 
35.00 or more 



Total 



Number 



2 

2 



Source: N.R.A. questionnaire returns, 4 establishments 
reporting. Tabulation by the Bureau of the 
Census for the National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and planning, June 30, 1934. 



9818 



-168- 



TO BE USED " r ITH CAUTION. 



TABLE 86 
WOOD 33UB1SING AUD SHAPING INDUSTRIES - VARIETY AITD SLIALL HANDLES 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOUR'S' OF WORK FOR FACTORY WAGE EAR! iERS 

WEEK OE June 15. 1333 



LOURS 

WORKED 



IEJLE 



FEIALE 



FACTORY UAGE EAR! 



A 



NjmDER 



m c: 



CIMULATIVE 
PER CEET 



20 hours or less 



2C.1 


- 


J 5 


25.1 


— 


30 


30.1 


- 


35 


35.1 


- 


40 


4C.1 


- 


45 


45.1 


« 


50 


50.1 


- 


._ . 


55.1 


— 


60 


60.1 


~, 


65 


65.1 


~ : 


. 70 


70.1- 


— 


75 


75.1 


- 


GO 


Over 


80 



29 
9 
12 
14 
73 
34 
46 
77 
7 



1 
7 



5 
31 

1-7 

o 
23 
10 



37 

9 

16 

If 

104 

37 

69 

87 

7 



1 
7 



9.4 
2.2 
4.0 

4.8 
26.4 

9.4 
17.5 

1.8 

.3 

.3 

1.8 



9.4 
11.6 
15. 6 
20.4 
46.8 
55; 2 
73.7 
95. 8 
97.6 

97.9 

98.2 
100. C 



Total 



310 



84 



394 



100.0 



SOURCE: E.Pl.A. questionnaire returns, 26 establishments reporting, Tab- 
ulation by the Bureau of the Census for the Eatirnal Recovery 
Administration, Division of Research and Planning, Jan. 30, 1934 



4 



3818 



r-169- 

TO BE USED WITH CAUTION . 
TABLE 87 
T700D TURNING ANT) SHAPING INDUSTRIES - VARIETY ALT) SMALL HANDLE 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY UAGS EARNERS 
Uee't of June 15, 1933 

Factory Wage Earners 



Hourly 










Cumulative 


Earnings 


Male 


Female 


Number 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


Under 10 cents 


_ 


„ 




^ 


^ 


10 - 14.9 


5 


19 


24 


6.2 


6.2 


15 - 19.9 


6 


17 


23 


5.9 


12.1 


20 - 24.9 


81 


22 


103 


26.4 


38.5 


25 - 29.9 


54 


25 


79 


2^*3 


58.8 


30 - 34.9 


62 


- 


62 


15,8 


' 74.8 


35 - 39.9 


29 


- 


29 


7.4 


82.0 


4J - 44.9 


25 


- 


25 


6-4 


' 88.4 


45 - 49.9 


13 


~ 


13 


3.3 


91.7 


50 - 54.9 


14 


- 


14 


3.6 


95.3 


55 - 59.9 


5 


- 


5 


1.3 


96.6 


60 - 69.9 


12 


- 


12 


3.1 


99.7 


7C - 79.9 


1 


«. 


1 


.3 


100. 


80 and over 


•"• 


"" 


"• 


•* 


" 



Total 317 83 390 lOD.n 



Source: N. R. A. questionnaire returns, 26 establishments reporting. Tabula- 
tion by the Bureau of the Census for the National Recovery Administra* 
tion, Division of Research and Planning, January 30, 1934 



-170- 
I TO BE USED '71 TH CATUION. 

TABLE 83 

WOOD TUEEIEO'AED SHAPPIITcAbDUSTPJES - VARIETY A3E0 SHALL HANDLES 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY EAR1IIKSS 0? OZTICE 1 1.IPL0YLES 
WEEK OE JU2E 15, 1933. ' 



Weekly 

Earnings - . .... 

( Dollars) Number 



Less than 5.00 

5.00 ~ 9.39 „ 1 

10.00 - 'lD. 49 . . 6 

r, 

12.50 ~ ,14.99 ..• 4 

15.00 ~;, .17.49 '.-: 3 

17.50 - .19.99 ■•."-. .-." .4 

20. 00 - 24. 99 ■•■. ; 1 

25. 00 - .29. 99 . 1 

30.00 - 34.99 1 

35. 00 - and over 2 



I 



Total 



Source: ll.E.A. questionnaire returns, 16 establishments repotting Tabulation 
by the Bureau of the Census for the National Recovery Administration 
Division of Research and Planning. Jan. 30, 1934. 



9818 



-171- 
TABLE 89 

70CD T.UEHIUG AID SHAPING IHMJSTH1BS - MISCELLANEOUS INDUSTRIES 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OP WORK FOR FACTORY WAGE EARNERS 

Week of June 15, 1933 



(a) 



Weekly 






Hours 






Worked 




Male 


20 hrs 


cr 


le.ss 35 


20.1 - 


25 


25 


25.1 - 


30 


30 


30.1 - 


35 


34 


35.1 - 


40 


71 


IfO.l - 


45 


80 


1:5.1 - 


50 


191 


50.1 - 


55 


172 


55.1 - 


60 


78 


80.1 - 


55 


147 


65.1 - 


70 


6 


70.1 - 


75 


• 10 


75.1 - 


80 


5 


Over 8( 


D 


4 



Female 



14 

1 

11 

4 

24 

19 

141 

175 

20 



Total 



49 

26 

41 

33 

95 

99 

332 

347 

98 

147 

6 

10 

5 
4 



Total 



888 



409 



1,297 



Factory Wage Earners 

Cumulative 
Per Cent Per Cent 



3.8 

2.0 

3.1 

2.9 

7.3 

7.6 

25.6 

26.8 

7.6 

11.3 

.5 

.8 

.4 

,_3 

IX. 3 



3.8 

5.8 

6.9 

11.8 

19.1 

26,7 
52.3 
79.1 
86.7 
98.0 
98.5 
99.3 
99.7 
100 . 



(a) 



> 



The following Industries are included in Miscellaneous: Hough Bobbin 
and S-oool Blank, Variety Wood Turning, Spool, Standard and Soring 
Clothespin, Candy Stic!:, Dor-el Pin, Flat and Shaped Veneer, Do" el, 
Toothpick, Skewer and 5rush Handle and Brush 31ock. 



Source: r. R. A. questionnaire returns, 36 establishments reporting.. Tabula- 
tion by the Bureau of the Census for the Rational Recovery Administra- 
tion, Division of Research and Planning, January 30, 1934. 



9818 



-172- 

TABLS 90 

¥00D TURNING- AND SHAPING INDUSTRIES - MISCELLANEOUS INDUSTRIES ^ 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EANTNGS OF FACTORY T7AGE SARilERS 

tfeek of June 15, 1933 



Hourly 








Factory 


TJa^e Earners 


Earnings 










Cumulative 


Cents Per Hour.. 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 



Under ID cents 
10 - 14.9 • 
15-19.9 . 
20 - 24.9 • 
25 - 29.9 
30 - 34.9 
35 - 39.9 • 
40 - 44.9 
45 - 49 ..9 
5C - 54,9 • 
55 - 59.9 
60 - 69.9 • 
70 - 79.9 
80 and over 

Total 



26 

SO 

71 

186 

189 

139 

98 

47 

34 

20 

16 

7 

3 

888 



18 
57 

?1 

125 

76 
28 
. 2 
11 
, 1 



20 

83 

141 

195 

262 

217 

141 

109 

48 

34 

20 

16 

7 

3 



409 



1,297 



1.5 

6.5 

10.9 

15.1 

20.2 

15.8 

10.9 

8.4 

3.7 

2.6 

1.5 

1.2 

.5 

,_2 

100.0 



1.5 
8.0 
18.9 
34.0 
54.2 
71.0 
81.9 
90.3 
94.0 
96.6 
98.1 
99.3 
99.8 
100.0 



(a) The following Industries are included in Miscellaneous; Rough Bobbin 

and Spool Blank, Variety V/ood Turnign, Spool, Standard and Spring 
Clothespin, Candy Stick, Dov.'el pin, Flat and Shaoed Veneer, Dor-el, 
Tootlvoick, Skener and Brusii Handle and Brush Block. 



Source: F. R. A. questionnaire returns, 36 establishments reporting. Tabu- 
lation by the Bureaxx of the Census for the National Recovery Adminis- 
tration,: Division of Research and Planning, Ja nary 30, 1934. ' 



9818 



-1(\}~ 



TABLE 91 

WOOD TURNING AID SHAPING INDUSTRIES - MISCELLANEOUS INDUSTRIES ^ 
CLASSIFIED T7EEILY EARNINGS OF OFFICE EMPLOYEES 



Week of June 15, 1933 



Weekly 

Earnings 

(Dollars) N-qmber 

Less than 5.00 2 

5.00-9.99 4 

10.00 - 12.49 10 

12.50 - 14.99 .' 5 

15.00 - 17.49, 10 

17.50-19.99 .' 3 

^.00 - 24.99 , 8 

P.OO - 29.99 7 

30.00 - 34.99 7 , 

35 . 00 and ove r 6 



Total 62 



(a) The following Industries are included in Miscellaneous; Rough Bobbin 
and Spool Blank, Variety Wood Turning, Spool, Standard and Spring 
Clothespin, Candy Stick, Dox T el Pin, Flat and Shaped Veneer, Dovrel 

Toothpick, Skevrer and Brush Handle and Brush Block. . 

-Source: N. R. A. questionnaire returns, 36 establishments reporting. 

Tabulation by the Bureau of the Census for the National Recovery 
Sl Administration, Division of Be search and Planning, January 30, 1934. 



9818 



-174- 

T^LL 92 

SHOE LAST INDUSTRY 

Classified Hours of Work Eor Factor; - ~r/;e Earners 
jor TJeek Representative of June 1332' 





)urs forked 
Per T 7eek 




Factor;/ Ua&e 


Earners 


He 


Humbe'r 


Per Cent 


Curiulative 

Per Cent 


20 Hours or 


■ under 


....;' 33 


.3-3 .. 


"• 3-S"- 


20.1 


to 


25 


hours 


23" 


' " 2.5 


e.k ■ 


25.1 


to 


30 


n 


. 20 


. 2 -3. 


s.7 


30.1 


to 


35 


it 


'. . .31 


3.6 


12.3 


35.1 


to 


Ho 


11 


76 


s -7 


21.0 


40,1 


to 


1*5 


it 


129 


lH.S 


35. s 


1*5,1 


to 


50 


11 


302 


3H.6 


70. h 


50.1 


to 


55 


it 


99 


11.3 


si. 7 


55-1 


to 


60 


11 


65 


7.U 


53.1 


60.1 


to 


65 


11 


^3 


H-9 


3^.o 


65.I 


to 


70 


11 


10 


1.1 


35.1 


70.1 


to 


75 


11 


35 


k.o 


93.1 


75-1 


to 


SO 


11 


1 


.1 


CO.? 


SO or more 


hours 


7 


.3 


100.0 


Total 






Sjh 


100.0 





SOURCE: ERA questionnaire returns, 27 concerns reporting. National 
Recovery Administration, Division of Research and planning. 
The Shoe Last Industry, prepared by J. A. Hanley and R. von 
Huhn, April o, I93I+. 



9760 



-175- 

IABLE 93 
SHOE LAST INDUSTRY 

Classified Hourly Earnings of Pact or;;; Uag'e Earners 
For "Jeer: Representative of June 1933 



Under 10 $ 

1(V to iU.g^ 

15f* to lg.g^ 

20,;* to 24.9^ 

25^ to 20. 9^ 

30^ to 34. 9i 

35*5 to 39. 3$ 

k0<p to kk.3<i 

45$* to U9.9^ 

50^ to 54. 9<* 

55f* to 59.9^ 

60^ to 69.9,* 

70 v j tc 79-9^ 

80rf or over 
Total 



Factory ! Jage earners 



Hourly Earnings Number Per Cent Cunulative 

per Cent 



5 


.6 


.6 


11 


1-3 


1.9 


21 


2.k 


4.3 


44 


5.0 


9.3 


56 


■6.4 


15.7 


44 . 


5.0 


20.7 


102 


11.7 


32.4 


123 


14.6 


47. c 


95 


10.9 


57.9 


167 


13-1 


77.0 


89 


10.2 


87. 2 


112 


12.8 


100.0 


oik 


100.0 





SOURCE: NBA questionnaire returns, 27 concerns reporting, national 
Recovery Administration Division of Research and Planning. 
The Shoe Last Industry, prepared "by J. A. Hanley and R. von 

Ruhn, April 6, 1934. 



9760 



-176- 

TABLE 94 
WOOD PRESERVING INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF FACTORY EMPLOYEES FOR WEEK MAY TO OCTOBER, 1933 



Factory Employees 
Hours Yforked 







Cumulative 


Number 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


703 


23.7 


23.7 


430 


14.5 


38.2 


265 


8.9 


47.1 


198 


6.7 


53.8 


' 408 


13.7 


67.5 


242 


8.2 


75.7 


337 


11.4 


67.1 


' 382 


12.9 


100.0 



Undor 20 

20 to 29.9 

30 to 34.9 

35 to 39.9 

40 to 44 9 

45 to 49.9 

50 to 59.9 

60 hours and ovor 

2,965 100. C 



Source; Questionnaires sent out by the National Recovery Administration, 

55 concerns reporting. National Recovery Administration, Division 
of Research and Planning." The Wood Preserving Industry, prepared by 
Arthur B. Fridinger, May 3, 1934. 



9818 



-177- 

TABLE 95 

WOOD PRESERVING INDUSTRY 

Classified Hourly Earnings of Factory Employees 
in the Northern Region for Week 
May to October, 1933 



Factory Employees 



Hourly Earnings ■ Cumulative 

Number Per Cent Per cent 



Under 10 cents 
10 to 19.9 cents 
20 to 24.9 cents 
25 to 29.9 cents 
30 to 34.9 cents 
35 to 39.9 cents 
40 to 49.9 cents 
00 to 59.9 cents 
60 to 79o9 cents 
80 to 99.9 cents 
$1.00 and over 

Total 00.0 



28 


2.3 


2.8 


13 


1.3 


4.1 


77 


7.7 


11.8 


67 


6.7 


18.5 


241 


24.2 


42.7 


243 


24.4 


67.1 


218 


21.3 


88,<9 


57 


5.7 


94.6 


37 


3.7 


98 .b 


17 


1.7 


100.0 



(Weighted average hourly earnings - 42.9 cents) 



Sources '.Questionnaire sent out by the National Recovery Administration - 
23 plants reporting. National Recovery Administration, Division 
of Research and Planning. The Wood Preserving Industry, prepared 
by Arthur B. Fridinger, May 3, 1934. 



9818 



-178- 
TABLE 96 

WOOD PRESERVING IEDUSTRY 

Classified Hourly Earnings of Factory Employees 
In the Southern Region for Week, 
Fra/i Kay tc October, 1933 



Hourly Earnings 



Under 10 cento 
10 to 19 .9 cents 
20 to 24.9 cents 
25 to 29.9 cents 
30 to 34.9 cents 
35 to 39.9 cents 
40 to 49.9 cents 
50 to 59.9 cents 
60 to 79.9 cents 
80 to 99.9 cents 
$1 and over 

Total 



Fac 


story Employees 




Ilumber 


Per Cent 


Cumulative 
Per cent 


6 


0.3 


0.3 


460 


23.5 


23.8 


270 


13.8 


37.6 


349 


17.8 


55.4 


328 


16.8 


72,2 


86 


4.4 


76.6 


347 


17.7 


94 c 3 


50 


2.6 


96.9 


58 


3.0 


99.9 


2 


0.1 


100.0 


— 


— 


— 



1, 956 



100.0 



Source j Questionnaires sent out by National Recovery Administration - 

27 plants reporting. National Recovery Administration, Division 
of Research and Planning. The Wood Preserving Industry, prepared 
by Arthur B. Fridinger, May 3, 1934. 



9818 



TABiS! 07 

WOOD PHIOSfiHVtlld INDUSTRY 

Classified Hourly Earnings of Factory Employees 
In the Pacific Coast Region for Week, 
From Mav to October, 1933 



Hourly Earnings 



Under 


10 cents 


10 to 


19.9 


cents 


20 to 


24.9 


cents 


25 to 


29.9 


cents 


30 to 


34.9 


cents 


■iO to 


*9.9 


cents 


40 to 


49.9 


cents 


50 to 


59.9 


cents 


60 to 


79.9 


cents 


80 to 


99.9 


cents 


$1.00 


and < 


yver 

Total 


Sources Questionnaire sent 



Numb e r 



Fact ory Employees 



151 



Per Cent 



100 .0 



Cumulative 
Per Cant 



1 


.7 


.7 


— 


— 


.7 


11 


7.3 


0.0 


16 


10.6 


18.6 


51 


33.7 


52.3 


49 


32.5 


84.8 


20 


13.2 


98.0 


1 


.7 


98.7 


2 


1.3 


100.0 



Questionnaire sent out by the National Recovery Administration- 
23 plants reporting. National Recovery Administration, Division 
of Research and Planning. The Wood Preserving Industry, prepared 
by Arthur B. Pridinger, May 3, 1934. 



9818 



-180- 



TABL3 98 



■•' WOOD P3ESERVIHG INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY. EI iPLOYEES 

Representative Week May to October, 1933 



Weekly Earn*ings 
(dollars) 

Cents Fer Hour 

Under 5.00 
5. 00, to 9.99 
10.00 - 14.99 
15.00 - 19.99 
20.00 - 24.99 
25.00 - 29.99 
30.00 - 59.99 
40.00 - 59.99 





Factory jamlovees 








Cunulat ive 


Humber 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


609 


20.5 


20.5 


' 788 


26.6 


47 . 1 


572 


19.3 


66.4 


424 


14.3 


80.7 


228 


7.7 


88.4 


176 


Ut S 


94.3 


122 


4.1 


98.4 


46 


1.6 


100.0 



Total 



oor 



oo 



.00.0 



: 



Source: IIRA questionnaire returns, 55 concerns reporting. 

Tabulation by the Bureau of the Censxis for the National 
Recovery Administration, Division of 'Research & Planning, 
January 11, 1934. 



9818 



I 



-131- 
TABLE 99 

tfOOD PRESERVING INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED Y/EEXLY EARNINGS OF OFFICE AND FACTORY 
ERLOYSES IN TEE NORTHERN REGION FOR WEEK 
FROM MAY TO OCTOBER, 1953 





3 ekly 

mines 




Off 


ice limp leys 


>9S 


Fac 


■tory Empli 


3V09S 


Ea] 


' Numb 


ier 


Per Cent 


Cumulative 
Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Cumulative 
Per Cent 


Less than Q5 


1 




1.6 


1.6 


57 


5.7 


5.7 


v 5 to 


I>9.99 


, 




— 


1.6 


136 


13.6 


19.3 


5 lo to 


14.99 


4 




6.6 


8.2 


180 


18.1 


37.4 


015 to 


19.99 


9 




14.9 


23.1 


236 


23.7 


61.1 


:;.2o to 


24.99 


7 




11.7 


34. G 


138 


13.8 


74.9 


025 to 


29.99 


16 




26»8 


61.6 


119 


11.9 


86.8 


ft 30 to 


39.99 


12 




20.1 


81.7 


89 


8.9 


95.7 


;J40 to 


59.99 


10 




16.7 


98.4 


43 


4.3 


100.0 


,,.60 auc 


t over 
Total 


1 




1.6 

100.0 


100.0 


— — 


__ 


MM. 




60 




998 


100.0 





Source: Questionnaires sent out by National Recovery Administration, 

23 plants reporting. National Recovery Administration Division of 
Research raid Planning. The Wood Preserving Industry, prepared by 
Arthur B. Fredinger, Kay 3, 1934. 



9818 



-182- 

TABLE 100 

WOOD PRESERVING INDUSTRY 

Classified Vifeekly Earnings of Office and Factory 
Employees in the Southern Region for Week 
From May '"to October, 1933 



Weekly 


g s 


Off: 


'. ce Empl 


oye e s 


' Fac 


tory Employees 


Earnin 


Number 


Per 


Cumulative 


Number 


Per 


Cumulative 








Cent 


Per Cent 




Cent 


Per Cent 


Less than $>5 


3 


3.3 


3,3 


539 


27.6 


27.6 


$5 to 


59.99 


2 


c .2 


5.5 


668 


34.2 


61 '.8 


10 to 


14.99 


9 


9.8 


15.3 


436 


22.3 


84'. 1 


15 to 


19.99 


17 


18.5 


33.8 


172 


8.3 


92.9 


20 to 


24.99 


18 


19.5 


53.3 


69 


3.5 


9 6' .4 


25 to 

t 


29,99 


14 


15.2 


68.5 


43 


2.2 


98'. 6 


30 to : 


39.99 


15 


16.3 


84.8 


28 


1.4 


100.0 


40 to 


59.99 


12 


13.0 


97.3 


1 


' V 


100.0 


60 and 


over 

Total 


2 
92 


2.2 

100.© " 


100.0 


— 


__ 







1,956 


100.0 





&/ Less than one-tenth of one- per cent . 

Sources Questionnaires sent out by National Recovery 
Administration - 27 plants reporting. 

National Recovery Administration, Division of Research and 
Planning. The Wood Preserving Industry, prepared by 
Arthur B. Fridinger, May 3, 1934. 



9818 



-191- 

TABLE 99 

WOOD PRESERVING INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY EARNINGS OF OFFICE AND FACTORY 
K PLOYESS IN THE NORTHERN LEGION FOR WEEK 

/no;: :ay to October, 1933 



> 





sekly 




Office Err 


tpleyees 


Fac 


to ry Emp 1 


oyees 


.-lie 










Cumulative 






Cumulative 


Earnings 


Numb 


er 


Per Zp 


nt 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


Less than $5 


1 




1.6 




1.6 


57 


5.7 


5.7 


5 to 


09.99 


— 




— 




1.6 


136 


13.6 


19.3 


01O to 


14.99 


4 




6.6 




8.2 


180 


18.1 


37.4 


515 to 


19.99 


9 




14.9 




23.1 


236 


23.7 


61.1 


1)20 to 


24.99 


7 




11.7 




34.8 


138 


13.8 


74.9 


;;,25 to 


29.99 


16 




26*8 




61.6 


119 


11.9 


86.8 


)30 to 


39.99 


12 




20.1 




81.7 


89 


8.9 


95.7 


;4o to 


59.99 


10 




16.7 




98.4 


43 


4.3 


100.0 


,>60 anc 


1 over 
Total 


1 




1.6 

100.0 




100.0 


__ 


__ 


__ 




60 




998 


100.0 





Source: 



Questionnaires sent out by National Recovery Administration, 
23 plants reporting. National Recovery Administration Division of 
Research and Planning. The Wood Preserving Industry, prepared by 
Arthur B. Fredinger, May 3, 1934. 



9818 



-182- 

TABLE 100 

WOOD PRESERVING INDUSTRY 

Classified Weekly Earnings of Office and Factory 
Employees in the Southern Region for Week 
From May to October, 1935 



Wee 


•nings 


Cffi 


. ce Emp 


loyees 


. Fac 


tory Employees 


Eai 


Number 


Per 


Cumulative 


Number 


Per 


Cumulative 










Cent 


Per Cent 


- 


Cent 


Per Cent 


Less than $5 


3 


3.3 


3.3 


,539 


27.6 


27.6 


" $5 


to 


$9.99 


2 


2 .2 


5.5 


.668 


34.2 


61.8 


' 10 


to 


14.99 


9 


9.8 


15.3 


436 


22.3 


84.1 


" 15 


to 


19.99 


17 


18.5 


33 .8 


172 


8.S 


92.9 


"20 


to 


24.99 


18 


19.5 


53.3 


• 69 


3.5 


96.4 


"25 


to 


23.99 


14 


15.2 


68 .5 


43 


Ci *c 


98.6 


30 


to ; 


59.99 


15 


16.3 


04.8 


28.. 


1.4 


100.0 


40 


to 


59.99 


12 


13.0 


97.8 


• 1 


V 


100.0 


60 


and 


over 
Total 


2 
92 


2.2 
100.© 


100.0 


— 





— 




1,956 


100.0 





a/ Less thai one-tenth of one per cent. 

Sources Questionnaires sent out by National Recovery 
Administration - 27 plants reporting* 

National Recovery Administration, Division of Research and 
Planning. The Wood Preserving Industry, prepared by 
Arthur B. Fridinger, May 3, 1934. 



9810 



-183- 



:0 BE US2D ,,ITH CAUTION 



TABLE 101 

WOOD PRESERVING INDUSTRY 

Classified Weekly Earnings of Office and Factory 
Enployees in the Pacific Coast Region for Week, 
From May to October, 1933 



Weekly 
Earnings 



office Emp 1 oyges 

Per Cumulative 
Number Cent P^r Cent 



Factory Employees 

Per Cumulative 
Number Cent Per Cent 



Less than $5 
| 5 to $ 9.99 
10 to 14.99 
15 to .19.99 
20 to, 24.99 
25 to 29.99 
30 to 39.99 
40 to 59.99 
60 and over 
Total 



1 


7.1 


7.1 


— 





7.1 


2 


14.3 


21.4 








21.4 


4 


2 


50.0 


5 


35.7 


>. 7 


£ 


14 .3 


100.© 












20 


13.2 


13.2 


21 


13.9 


27.1 


26 


17.2 


44.2 


31 


20.5 


64.8 


29 


19.3 


84.1 


19 


12.6 


; 96.7 


5 


3.3 


100.0 



14 



.00.0 



151 100.0 



Sources Questionnaires sent out by the National Recovery Administration - 
Division of Research and Planning. The Wood Preserving Industry 
prepared by Arthur B. Fridinger, May 3, 1934. 
6 plants reporting. 



9818 



-184- 



TC 



j . 



TA3L3 102 






''GOD CA L7IIJG 



CLA3SI?Ii]IIi 72."£!KLY HOURS Oj 1 T702K ?CQ ~A(?- 3AP2TSRS 
JO'- T E HEK O? SIPT. 15, 1933 



Hours 

Worked Per Week 



i.r.ioe:'' 



•Inge garners 



Per Gent 



Cumulative 

Per Cent 



20 hours or less 

20.1 - 30 - 
30 . 1 - 35 
35.1 - 40 '■ 
40.1 - 45 



7 

o 

5 
14 

23 



C 



Total 



Source: ¥.'A.A. cruestionnaire reutrns, 7 cone eras reporting. 

National Recover^ Aoministrt-tion, Division of Reseprcb end 
■Planning Tabulation. 



9750 



-185- 

TO BE USED vr IT ;j CAPTION 

TABLE 103 
AR CH I TECTU.tAL WOOD , C ARVING 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS 'OP WAGE EARNERS 
FOB WEEK OP SEPT. 15, 1933 



Wage Earner s 



Hourly Earnings Number Per Cent Cumulative 



Uner 10 cents 

25 - 29.9 1 

30 - 34.9 - 12 

35 - 39.9 

40 - 49.9 . ■ 12 

50 - 59.9 12 

60 - 79.9 10 

80 and over 4 

Total 51 






Source: N.R.A. Questionnaire returns, 7 concerns reporting. 

National Recovery Administration Division of Hesearch 
and Planning Tabulation. 



9760 



-136- 

•CiBUB 104 
SAWDUST, SHAVINGS AED SAWDUST SPECIALTIES IHDUSEff 



CLASSIFIED HOURS OE 7QLT. 'JOB. FACTORY WAGE EARinHS 
FOR WEEK WHICH INCLUDED JUNE 15, 1933 
TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 



Hours Worked 
Per Week 



20 hours 
and under 

20.1 - 25 ... 

25.1 - 30 

30.1 - 35 
35.1 - Uo 

UO.l - U5 

1*5.1 - 50 

50.1 - 55 

55.1 - 60 

Over 60 hours 
Total . 



Pact or?/ Wage Earners 



ITuiVber 



Per Cent 



Cuij.ulr.tive 
Per Cent 



s 


k.G 


U.6 


'J 


1.8 


e.u 


k 


2.3 


8-7 


2 


1.2 


9.9 


Ik 


S.2 


1S.1 


2S 


16.4 


34.5 


52 


30. u 


6H.9 


19 


11.1 


76.0 


3S 


22.2 


9^.2 


3 


1.8 


100.0 


171 


100.0 





SOURCE: KRA questionnaire returns, 2k concerns reporting. 

National Recovery Administration Division of Research and 
Planning. The Sawdust, Shavings and Sawdust Specialties 
Industry, prepared by J. 11. Hanley and R. von Iluhn, 
Feh. 26, I93U. 



976O 



-187- 



TAELE 105 
SaUDUST, SH.-VIITC-S AID SAWDUST SPECIALTIES INDUSTRY 

classified hourly rarrings o? Factory wage 

EARNERS FOR HEEII T71II CH INCLUDED JUNE 15, 1333. 

"■TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 



Hourly 
Earnings 

Unler 15 cents 

15 - 13.9 
20 - 2U.9 

25 - 23.9 
30 - 3U.9 

35 - 33-3 
1+0 - 44.9 
45 - U9.3 
50 - 54.3 

55 - 59.9 
60 - 69.3 
70 - 73.3 
80 and over 
Total 



factory ~7a, c :e Tamers 



[Turioer 



Per Cent 



Cu: illative 
: Per Cent 



1 


.6 


r 
• O 


3 


1.8 


2.4 


17 


9-3 


12.3 


13 


11.1 


23.4 


27 


15.8 


39.2 


31 


18.1 


57.3 


9 


5.3 


62. s 


33 


19.3 


Si. 9 


16 


9.3 


91.2 


7 


l+.l 


95.3 


5 


2.9 


98.2 


71 


1.8 
100.0 


100.0 



SOURCE: NHA questionnaire returns, 24 concerns reporting. 

National Recovery Adnini strati on Division of Research and 
Planning. The Sawdust, Shavings and Sawdust Specialties 
Industry, prepared "b T " J. R. Hanley and R. von Eahn, Eeb. 26, 
1334. 



3760 



-188- 

To 3e Used vrith Caution 
Table .106 
Sawdust, Shavings and 'Sawdust Specialty Industry 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY EAHKIUGS OF OFFICE EMPLOYERS 
For Payroll reel: including June 15, 1933. 



Weekly Earnings 

(Dollars) Number 

Less than 5 



5.00 - 9.99 4 

10.00- 14.99 1 

15.00- 19.99 13 

20.00- 24.99 7 

25.00- 29.99 3 

30.00- 34.99 4 

35.00- 39.99 2 

40.00- 44.99 3 

45.00 and over 4 

80 and over 



Total 41 100.00 



Source: IJ.R.A. questionnaire returns, 46 concerns reporting. . 

Tabulation by the Buroau of the Census for the National 
Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Planning, 
January 31, 1934. 



9818 



-189- 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 



TABLE 107 

WOOD TANK INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED- HOURS OF WORK FOR 
FACTORY WAGE EARNERS FJR WEEK 
REPRESENTATIVE OF JUNE, 1933 



Hours 
















Worked 




• Number of 


Pe 


r ( ent 


Cumulative 




Per Week 


Wage 


Earners 






Per Cent 




20 hours or under 




83 




10.2 


10.2 




20.1 


to 


25 hours 




13 




1.6 


11.8 




25.1 


to 


30 hours 




13 




1.6 


13.4 




30.1 


to 


35 hours 


% 


30 




3.7 


17.1 




35.1 


to 


40 hours 


• 


77 




9.5 


26.6 




40.1 


to 


45 hours 


', m 


230 




28.5 


55.1 




45.1 


to 


50 hours 


•. 


165 




20.3 


75.4 




50.1 


to 


55 hours 


, 


72 




8.9 


84.3 




55.1 


to 


60 hours 




20 




2.5 


86.8 




60.1 


to 


65 hours 




31 




3.8 


90.6 




65.1 


to 


70 hours 


9 


50 




6.2 


96.8 




70.1 


to 


75 h?urs 


' . m 


15 


- 


1.8 


98.6 




75.1 


to 


80 hours 




6 




0.7 


99.3 




Over 


80 


hours 
Total 


* 
• 


6 
811 




0.7 


100.0 




Source : 


Questionnaires 


sent 


'out by 


Nationa 


1 Recover- 


/ Administration 


_ 



36 concerns reporting. - National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning. The Wood Tank Industry, 
prepared by Arthur, B. Fridinger, August 13, 1934. 



9818 



-190- 



T0 BE USED WITH CAUTION 



TABLE 108 

WOOD TANK INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF 
FACTORY WAGE EARNERS FOR WEEK 
REPRESENTATIVE OF JUNE, 1933 



Hourly 

Earnings 



Numb er 
of Wage 
Earners 



Per Cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Under 


10 cents 


10 


to 


14.9 


cents 


15 


to 


19.9 


cents 


20 


to 


"24.9 


cents 


25 


to 


•29.9 


cents 


30 


to 


'34.9 


cents 


35 


to 


'39,9 


cents 


40 


to 


44.9 


cents 


^ 


to 


•4?. 9 


cents 


59 


to 


•5-' .9 


cents 


f>£ 


to 


'S9-.9 


cents 


60 


to 


'69.9 


cents 


70 


to 


79.9 


cents 


80 


cents or 


more 



1 


1 


1 


28 


3.4 


3.5 


25 


3.1 


'6.6 


68 


8.4 


15.0 


50 ■ 


6.2 


21.2 


114 


14.1 


35.3 


45 - 


5.5 


40=8 


88 


10.9 


51.7 


33 


4.1 


55.8 


164 


20.2 


76.0 


67 


8.3 


84.3 


128 


15.7 


100.0 



Totals 



811 



100.0 



Source: Questionnaires' sent out by National Recovery Administration 
36 concerns reporting. National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning. The Wood Tank Industry, 
prepared by Arthur B. Fridinger, August 13, 1934. 



• > 



9818 



-191- 

TABLS 1.U? 

WOOD TANK INDUSTRY 

CIAS3IFIED V/EEKLY EARNINGS OF 
OFFICE EMPLOYEES PAYROLL WEEK 
REPRESENTATIVE OF JUNE, 1933 





Number of 


Weekly 


"office 


Earnings 


Employees 


Less than 5.00 




05.00 to ;)9»99 dollars 


2 


10,00 to 12.49 


7 


12,50 to 14. §9 


10 


15.00 to 17.49 


15 


17,50 to 19.99 


10 


20.00 to 24.99 


12 


25.00 to 29.99 


5 


30.00 to 34.99 


3 


35.00 and over 


14 



Per Cent 



Cumu- 
lative 
Per Cent 



Totals 



83 



Weighted average weekly earning - ''22,355 



Source: Quetionnaires sent out by the National Recovery 
Administration - 28 concerns reporting. 
National Recovery Administration. Division of 
Res'estch and Planning. The Wood Tank Industry. 
Prepared by Arthur B. Fridinger, August 13, 1934. 



9818 



•y 



-193- 

Cods < Employoos Effcctivo 

Nunibor Approved Ccdoq (Tho usands) Pat o 

CHEMICAL S, FAII-TS A!*TD DRUGS (33 Codes) Total . 225,1 

LP?, Ant i -Hog Cholera Serum 

20. Salt Produoinr Industry 

x i'?, Fertilizer Industry 

71. Faint, Varnish and Laoquor 

x 83. Soap and G-lycorino (2 Supplements) 

x 97. Buff and Polish Composition 

110. Hardwood Distillation 

140. Waterproofing, Tamp Proofing, eto, 

146. Pyrotoehnic Manufacturing Industry 

x!55. Oxy-iioetyloro Industry 

xlB4. Shoe and Leather Finish, etc, 

195, American Match 

224. Furnitv.ro and Floor Wax arid Polish 

a£51. Wit eh Hazol 

x269," Carbon El aok 

275. Chemical Manufacturing Industry (3 Supple- 

x300. Lye Industry 

x302. Candle Hanufaeturing, ate. 

32 C. Tapiooa Pry Products 

x339. Printing Ink 

x3e'l. Perfume, Cosmetic, eto. 

x374. Tanning Extract 

391. Lnseotioido and Disinfectant 

x403. Blcachod Shollao 

x407. Pry Color 

x430, Paokago Medicine 

469i Sulphonatod Oil 

500. Proj>»sfe>d or Rofined Fish. Oil 

504. Animal C-luc [1933 

521. Adhesive and Ink (1933 

522. Automotive Chemical Specialties (l 
x529. Pharmaceutical and Biological 

545.. Natural Organic Products (Estimate) 

Unapproved Codes 

Piastio Fabricators 

Steam Solvent Laval Stores Manufacturing 





1,2 


3-9-34 




5.5 


9-19-33 




20.9 


11-10-33 




29.2 


11-15-33 




14,4 


11-13-33 






11-4-33 




2.8 


11-13-33 


Esti- 


• 




mate ) 


5.C 


12-4-33 




i;s 


12-11-33 




10.1 


12-18-33 




r.6 


1-8-34 




3.e 


1-8-34 




■ 3,0 


2-2-34 




.5 


2-11-34 




1,5 


2-19-34 


iupple- 






ieirbs) 


6b ,0 


2-20-34 




c 


3-6-34 




.8 


3-5-34 




;b" 


3-20-34 




2,4 


3-26-34 




13.1 


4-2-34 




.9 


4-S-34 




.4 


4-16-34 




,4 


-- 4-3C-34 




2.4 


5-5-34 




16.4 


5-28-34 




.5 


7-S-34 




'.G 


8-20-34 




1.5 ' 


9-3-54 




3;0 


10-1-34 


533) 


1.2 


1C-7-34 




10.7 


ll-F-34 




2.0 


2-11-35 



DfOt«i 



x - PPA Substitution approved for Industry 



-193- 

TABLE 110 

paint a:jd varnish industry 

classified weekly hours 01 factory employees i by areas, reported 
by 185 establishments, for typical "weeks in july, august - 

september, 1933. 



Hours 
W^rksd 
Per Week 



Combined 
Areas 



Northern 
1/ Are 



•ea 



Southern 
2/ Area 



FACTORY EMPLOYEES 



Under 20 hours 
ZO to 29o9 hours 
50 to 34 o9 hours 
35 to 39.9 hours 
40 to 44.9 hoars 
45 to 49 e 9 hours 
50 to 59-9 hours 
60 hours or more 



166 
202 
1,211 
2,504 
S22 
433 
129 



102 
163 
197 
1,185 
2,355 
9.00 
36S 
104 



2 

3 

5 

. 26 

149 

22 

64 

25 



1/ New York, 22 establishments; Wisconsin, 9; Washington, 2; 

Utah, 1; California, 8; Colorado, 2; Connecticut, 2j Delaware, 1; 
Illinois, 12; Indiana, 7; Iowa, 1; Maryland, 6; Massachusetts, 10; 
Minnesota, 3; Missouri, 9; Michigan, 9; New Jersoy, 13; Ohio, 26; 
lifeline, 1; Rhode Island, 2; Pennsylvania, 19. 

2/ Alabama, 1 establishment; Georgia, 4; Kentucky, 7; Louisiana, 1; 
Tennessee, 2; Texas, 3; Oklahoma, 1; Virginia j 1* 



SOURCE: National Recovery Administration in cooperation with the 
Bureau of the Census. National Rocove?y Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning* The Paint anc Varnish 
Industry, prepared by T. . A* Gill, October 23, 1933. 



9318 



-194. 



TABLE HI 



PAINT AND VARNISH INDUSTRY 



CLASSIFIED H URLY EARNINGS 0^ FACTORY E; l fl?LOYE^S, BY AREAS, REPORTED 

BY 185 ESTABLISHMENTS, FOR TYPICAL WEEKS IN JULY- AUGUST -SEPTEMBER, 1933 , 



Hourly- 




Combined 


Earnings 




Areas 


Under 


10 cc 


snts 





10 to 


19.9 


cents 


22 


20 to 


24.9 


cents 


78 


25 to 


29.9 


cents 


96 


30 to 


34.9 


cents 


*"i 388 


35 to 


39.9 


cents 


415 


40 to 


49.9 


cents 


2,222 


50 to 


59.9 


cents 


1,195 


60 to 


79.9 


cents 


'■••" 910 


80 to 


99.9 


cents 


235 


$1.00 


or more 


110 



Northern 
l/ Area 



Southern 
2/Area 



FACTORY EMPLOYEE a 



22 

76 

69 

326 

389 

■2, '112 

"1,166 

' 885 

227 

103 



2 
27 
62 
26 
110 
29 
25 



% 



l/ New York, 22 establishments; Wisconsin, 9j Washington, 2; 

Utah, 1; California, 8; Colorado, 2; Connecticut, 2; Delaware, 1; 
Illinois, 12; Indiana, 7; I ova , 1; t Maryland, 6; Massachusetts, 10; 
Minnesota, 3; Missouri, 9; Michigan, 9; New Jersey, 13; Ohio, 26; 
Maine, 1; Rhode Island, 2; Pennsylvania, 19. 

2/ Alabama, 1 establishment; Geor~ia, 4; Kentucky, 7; Louisiana, 1; 
Tennessee, 2; Texas, 3; Oklahoma, 1; Virginia, 1= 

Source: National Recovery Administration in cooperation with the 
Bureau of the Census. National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning, The Paint &• Varnish 
Industry, prepared by W. A» Gill, October 23, 1933. 



' 



981! 



-195- 

TA3LI 11C 

PAI1TT AND VARNISH INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED 1ESELY EARNINGS 0? FACTORY EMPLOYEES, BY 
AREAS, REPORTED BY 185 ESTABLISHMENTS,'- FCR TYPICAL 
7SEKS IN JULY - AUGUST - SEPTEMBER,- 1933. 



Weekly Earnings after 
deductions for insar- 
ance, spoilage, tools, 
etc. 



Less than $ 5.00. . 

$ 5.00 to $ 9.99.. 

$10.00 to $14.99.. 

$15.00 to $19.99.. 

$20.00 to $24.99.. 

$25.00 to $29.99.. 

$30.00 to $39.99.. 

$40.00' to $59.99.. 

$60.00 or more . . 



Combine 


id 


Northern 


Southern 


Areas 




Area. 1/ 


Area 


2/ 






Factor.; 


r Employees 






32 






31 


1 




175 






168 


7 




801 






736 


65 




1,975 




1, 


,854 


121 




1,327 




1, 


,275 


52 




665 






648 


17 




521 






497 


24 




156 






149 


7 




19 






17 


2 





1/ Hew York, 22 establishments; Wisconsin, 9; Washington, 2; 

Utah, 1; California, 8; Colorado, 2; Connecticut, 2; Delaware, 1; 
Illinois, 12; Indiana, 7; Iowa, 1; Maryland, 6; Massachusetts, 10; 
Minnesota, 3; i issouri, 9;- Michigan, 9; New Jersey, 13; Ohio, 26; 
Maine, 1; Rhode Island, 2; Pennsylvania.,. 19. 

2/ Alabama, 1 establishment; Georgia., 4; Kentucky, 7; Louisiana, 1; 
Tennessee, 2; Texas, 3; Oklahoma., 1; Virginia, 1. 

Source: national Recovery Administration, in cooperation with the 
Bureau of the Census. National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning. The paint and Varnish 
Industry, prepared oy "I. A. Gill, October 23, 1933. 



981? 



-196- 

TA3LE 113 

PAINT AND VARNISH INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED VffiEKLY EARNINGS OP OFPICS EMPLOYEES, 3Y AREAS, 
REPORTED BY 185 E 3 TA3LI STENTS, FOR TYPICAL 7EEKS IN JULY 
AUGUST - SEPTEMBER, 1933. 



ieekly Earnings after 
deductions for insur- 
ance, etc. 



Combined 
Areas 



Northern 
Area. 1/ 



Southern 
Area 2/ 



Office Employees 



Less than $5.00. . 
$5.00 to $9.99. . . 
$10.00 to $14.99. 
$15.00 to $19.99. 
$20.00 to $24.99. 
$25.00 to $29.99. 
$30.00 to $39.99. 
$40.00 to $59.99. 
$60.00 or more. .. 



24 
232 
638 
579 
267 
203 
116 

35 



23 
213 
614 
363 
252 
196. 
110 
. 31 



1 

14 

24 

16 

15 

7 

6 

4 



1/ New York, 22 establishments; Wisconsin, .9; Washington, 2; 

Utah, 1; California, 8; Colorado, 2; Connecticut, 2; Delaware, 1 
Illinois, 12; Indiana, 7; Iowa, 1; iwa.ryland, 6; Massachusetts, 10 
Minnesota, 3; r-;is=-ouri, 9; Michiga.n, 9; New Jerse; r , 13; Ohio, 26 
Maine, 1; Rhode Island, 2; Pennsylvania, 19. 

2/ Alabama, 1 establishment; Georgia, 4; Kentucky, 7; Louisiana, 1; 
Tennessee, 2; Texas, 3; Oklahoma, 1; Virginia, 1. 

Source: National Recover,;'' Administration, in cooperation with the 
Bureau of the Census. National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning. The Paint and Varnish 
Industry, prepared by J. A. Gill, October 23, 1933. 



3 I] 



hh 
Eh 



b 

Eh 
CO 
f 
P 



3 

rH 

n 

t— i 
O 

n 
o 

1 



rH 

m 

CM 



cr 
cvi 
cr 

H 



O 
'O 



o 

>■" 

H 



n 
i— i 

3 



• 
| 
o 

1-3 

u 

03 ' 
-P CO 

o a> 

CO 

fl o 

9- 
w _B 
h H 

ID 

u 
o 

■3 

a 
o 
S 

a 

o 
o 



W 



CTi 



CM 

cr> 

rH 

rH 
3 



CT\ 
CM 
CT. 



ha 



>s 



o 

O 

a 

P=H 



CM 
CT\ 



rH 

hi 



cr> 

C\J 

en 



03 




k^ 


k' 


(h 


0) 


O 


03 


^ 


' 


co 


r( 


fn 


03 


3 


Ph 


O 





I ^-D I 



-197- 



rH M 



~0 I 



I CM o U" 

h inf° 



i to I I I s — -=f o 

CM CU LO. 



I I 



I I Hi) M 
CM 






O 



O 

r— 

CM 



liii 



rH r— 



I I I I: 



1 J- r- 



1 I cn I MCT 

rH O^^t 



rH CM 



1 I Hr- 

o> O 



rH 



?o 



I I I 



CM 



i in lp 
o~v 

CM 



LT\ I 1 I ITi 
CM J" 



I f^ 

cr 



I — 

rH 



I I I CO LO CM 
LT\ O 
r<~\ CM 



CD 

cr> en cr> cr*. o^ cr » u 

• • • • • o 

cnJ- cti J- m ct\ F 
cm m r^-\^J- ^t- LO 

I I I 1 1 1 o 

oomoinoo 
cm m ro.iF j- mm 






CM 



LP 
LP 



P-l 

s 



M 
ffi 

EH 
fD 
O 
to 



1 I 1 CTi CM 1*^ 

r-ooj 

CM rH 



I I 1 



I 1 I 



r"\ O 

CM 



I N3 CM 



1111 



1 LO O 
CM 



I I 1 



OJ kX) LP 
rH CM 



I I 



I CM I rH 

cm <t^ cm 



cr, 



rH 



J- 



CM 



O 

r- 



r-- 

CM 



CM 
•=1" 

ITi 






I I I 



lx> r-- 

rH ^t 



0) 



Lf 



rr> CTi 0> CTi 0> Q> fn 

o 

cn^t a> j- en o^i E 
cm r<^ n^ J- LT\ 

i 1 1 i I 1 o 

OO^OI^OO 
CM r*^ hP^J- J" LPikX) 






HJ 



0) 

.'■1 



O 

cn 

r^ 

CD 
O 

03 



o • 

rt cpi 

03 H 

CM 
03 

+j 03 

r^ 

^ O 

,a +3 
O 
S O 
o 

•H 

+= W) 

M -H 



| 



EH rH 



n cti 

•H 

5h O 



03 03 

U B> 

03 

W Pi 

03 O 

o 



o 



PI 
o o 
a -h 
en 
i .Tv .h 

CM > 
•H 

-n 

03 

S3 
h 
3 
+3 -H 
03 +J 
U 01 

03 +J 
U CO 
•H -H 

nj d 

rJ -ri 

C B 

o id 

•H <! 

CO j> 
03 tH 
pJ 03 

a 1 > 
o 
ai o 

03 



g 



03 

o 

!H 

Pi 

o 

C/3 



to 
cr* 













cr 






r-l 






Tj 






c 






nJ 






rj 






f^ 






CP 






rH 






cr 






oj 






cr 






rH 




>-* 


p) 




rt 


•H 




EH 




• — V 


to 


CO 


TJ 




g 


+3 




[P3 


a 

o 


i— i 


3 


o 


; 


w 


v_^ 


b 






h-t 


F3 


ji 


EH 


o 


H 


<5 


,y 


r-r 


i-q 




H 


h- 1 


rM 


h- n 


rn 


O 


9 


to 




n 


to 


Eh 


Pi 
p 


( " 




o 


Hr< 




o 






r 


>H 




i 






rd 


H 






o 
h1 

U 
o 
si 
+^> 
o 

tJ 
c 
n) 

03 
f-l 
ID 

O 

■§ 

o 

I 

o 
o 



to e 

i; o 

m o 

Si c 
o 
n 

M 03 

M I-- 

l-H CD 



CO 

M 
u 
o 



03 



en 



OJ 
en 



en 

OJ 
CTv 



en 



1-3 



OJ 

r<n 
cr> 

rH 

H 
3 



en 






CTi 



OJ 
Cn 



H 
Ed 

•"D 



P I' 

o 



■198- 



KD 



OJ rH vD OJ 
r-H K^r-H 



r-H I I 






I r- o 

LPvLTv cr 



I ^O VO C\J 

vx> i — cr 



I I I I 



I rH ^D 
H H- 
rH 1^ 









1 I I 



to OJ 

OJ 



I 1 I I 



! CT-. OJ 



I I CTv r-H .-)- 

h oi J- r- 

rH LT.J- 



N) r— oj oj Oj 

rH OJ | OJ | OJ r-H 



,=t 



o 



to 



s 



to 



o 



I I 1 tO CTi LP 
LT\ LP 
LTi LT 



CO 

cn cn CT\ en cn 0> U 
o 

Cx=t ct\j± cn cn 6 
oj i"-n t-^3- ^t lo 

I I I I I I o 

o o ir<o lt>o o 

OJ f^ (OJ; ,=f LTMvJO 



OJ 

<\l 
H 

CM 



I I I 



I r<nvD 



I I I 



o 



OJ 



I I 



cr 



o 

U3 



I cr lo 
o t^ 






I I I I I U)H- 

r<-\H 



I r i . i i : r lt 



o 



LT 



I ! I I I OJ r-H 

tso r— 



i i i i i if t» 



LT- 
OJ 



J" 
OJ 



I I I • ! I to ,=t OJ 

J- H oj 
cr 



"Ft 



en en o^ en m o^ u 
o 

en j- cn-=r m o^ B 

OJ p^ tA4 j- LO 

u 

1 I I i I I o 

O O un o lo O O 

t\J r^ r*r>i J- J" LT.VJD 



to 



CJ^ 



TABLE 115 
HARDWOOD DISTILLATION INDUSTRY 
Classified Hourly Earnings of Wafje Earners i :. 1929, 1332 and 1333 



Combined Arcs 

All Factory Employees 

Hourly 

Earnings July 1929 Jul - 193.3 June 1933 
Jnder 10 - 



10 - 19.9 
20 - 24.9 
25 - 29.9 
30 - 34.9 
35 - 39.9 
40 - 49.9 
50 - 59.9 



479 
755 
424 
441 
23 



Job 
137 

134 
122 



540 
214 
267 
19 
121 



Corru on Laborers ana other 
Lo w Wage Suroloyee s 

July 19 :9 July 1932 June 1953 



136 

182 
33 
49 



138 

100 

64 

31 



295 
169 
175 



TOTAL 



Under 10 
10 - 19.9 
20 - 34.9 
25 - 29.9 
30 - 34.9 

40 - 49.9 
50 - 59.9 



424 

196 



2 , 122 


701 


1,161 


1,Q88 


533 


644 






Western Area 






'. J 



40 
84 



153 



128 
26 



60 



139 



Total 



Under 10 
10 - 19.9 
20 - 24,9 
25 - 39.9 
30 - 34.9 
35 - 39.9 
40 - 49.9 
50 - 59.9 



531 

7 
141 



124 



*fcb 

147 

50 



!_/0'_) 



Eastern Area 



119 
214 

14 
19 



435 



7 

136 

53 

54 



49 



60 



154 
7 
5 



139 



331 
70 

171 
33 



Total 



Unde 


r 10 


10 - 


19.9 


20 - 


24.9 


25 - 


39.9 


30 - 


34.9 


35 - 


39.9 


40 - 


49.9 


50 - 


59.9 



56!: 



479 
156 



212 



"I -1?t 



36&__ 

Southern Area 



421 



121 



2?i; 



16c 



565 



335 
39 



138 



25 



295 
15 



Total 



334 



54;; 



374 



163 



339 



Source: HRA questionnaire returns 25 concerns reporting. Tabulation by the 

Bureau of the Census for the National Recovery Administration Division 
of Research and Planning, Oct., 36, 1933. 



-200- 

TABLE 116 

WATERPROOF PAPER MANUFAC TURING INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF FACTORY EMPLOYEES 
DURING WEEK ENDING JULY 15, 1933 

Total 



Hours Worked Cumulative 

Per Week Number Per Cent of 

Total 



Under 20 14 4.9 

20 - 24.9 7 7.4 

25-29.9 8 10..2 

30 - 34.9 19 16.9 

35 - 39.9 13 21.4 

40 - 44.9 47 37.9 

45 - 49.9 51 55.8 

50 - 59.9 88 86.7 

60 or more 38 ■ 100.0 

Total 285 



Source: Data furnished by the waterproof Papor Manu- 
facturers Association, based on reports of 
18 companies. National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning. The Water- 
proof Paper Manufacturing Industry, prepared by 
Max Kossoris, December 18, 1933. 



9818 



-201- 



ro 
ro 

CO 



Pa 



Eh 
CO 



(H 



Cll F^P 

l-H EH 

EH l-l 

O 

•a) fO 

£h W 

P M 

H >-• 

«aj O 

3 H=l 



% 



ft 



P4 



s 

N Eh 

° y 

O <aj 

,T.; P-h 

EH 

«a) CO 



H 

>H 

o 
W 

ft 
i— i 

oo 

< 

yA 

O 



9818 



nj 


^l 


tH 






rH 


d) 


o 


H 




3 


Ph 




ri 








J-' 


+3 


LO 


CD 


1 

+3 


i 

o 


o 

EH 


• 

CM 



-P 


rH 


a 


flS 


0) 


+3 


O 


O 




EH 


%t 




0) 


*H 


Ph 


o 


?H 




a) 




s 





I 


0) 


Sh 




cd 


Ph 


o 


rH 


1 


G> 


-p 


cd 
-p 


1 


> 


£ 


o 


•H 


(D 


EH 


o 


+3 


O 




-p 


^} 






a> 


-p 






o 


o 

Eh 






?H 








a> 


r +-i 






Ph 


C 






M 








<U 








,o 









CO «H 
Ph O 



CJ 



50 

rv! 



rH 


c3 


a) 


+j 


o 


o 




EH 


h 




CO 


«H 


Ph 


o 


U 




a) 




fl 





cj 



ro 



at 



j^ 



cm 



ro 



r\j 


UD 


H 


cj 


r— 


C\J 


r— 


co 


o 


J- 


LO 


r— 


60 


60 


en 


co 


CO 


o 

rH 



o 


LO 


U3 


VJO 


co 


i*- 


£# 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


* 


AJ 


_=t 


rH 


CM 


o 


Jr 


^* 






rH 


rH 


rH 


rH 


H 



CM 



ro 


CO 


VD 


• 


• 


• 


LO 


.=*■ 


Zt 



CM 



ro 



ro 


>-D 


rH 


CM 


tHi 


CM 


LO 


ro 


m 


r-O 


-=T 


.fih 


ho 


rH 



H" 


ro 


o 


• 


• 


• 


J" 


rH 


o 


iO 


60 


c 

rH 












oo 

• 



O 



f-- CVI 



o 3 



iiO w 

C -p 

H fl 
£ CO 
O 



CO 



1 

o 



co 

rH 



LO 



CJ 

I 



o 

CXI 



60 

rH 



LO UD 



LO 



C\J 
C\J 



CO 



CO 

CO 



lo 

CM 



^t- 



^D 



CJ 



LO 

60 
CM 



CM 



60 



ro 



LO 



l — 



ro 



o 

60 



CM 



60 



CTi 



to 


ro 


U3 


CM 


1 


CTi 


lO 


• 


• 


ft 


ft 


ft 


• 


• 


H 


CM 


U3 


UD 


CM 


LO 


LO 


rH 


rH 


rH 


rH 


rH 







60 



CTi 



LO 



CM 



CT\ 
C7> 



O 

O 



J- 


60 


* 


ft 


CM 


o 



o 


rH 


CM 


rH 


OJ 


LO 


J- 


to 


("O 


J" 


Jf 


ro 


rH 


rH 



CO 



ro 



& 



CTi 

lO 



LO 

r-o 



o> 



o 



cn 






LC> 



co 



o 

LO 



cn 



CO 
LO 



LO 
LO 



CO 



CO 



o 



VD 



CO 



CO 



o 



CM 



CO 



CO 
60 



o 

60 



LO 
CM 



-p 
o 

EH 



EH 

!=> 

Q 



cb 



CO 


M 


rH 


g 




(H 




O 


H 


<J 


^ 


fe 



!23 

s 

o 

'EH 
O 

Ph 

>H 

Ph 



>H 




rH 




EH 




to 




t^ 




e 




(—4 




HH 




cb 




fe5 




hH 




g 




EH 


l-O 


O 


I*-* 


^ 


CT\ 


1 


rH 


1 







m 




o 


o 


EH 


1— 1 


o 


a 


o 


o 


o 


W 


EH 


EH 




O 


>H 


Ph 


3 


>H 




&H 





3 

o 
n 

Pi 

EH 



Pn 
O 

Ph 



981G 



CD O 

> co 

•H -P U 

-p p 3 

03 CD o 

H O K 

p I 

a m p 

P • CD £0 



o 






> 




co 


•H 


<H 


T-H 


+3 


O 


^ 


tti 




o 


| 


03 


1 




-p 


a 


P 


o 


CO 


o 


-p 


^ 



■p 




a, 


I 


CD 


g 


O 


3 


fH 




CD 


<H 


Ph 


o 


I 




CJ 


p 




•H 


H 


CO 


CO 

-p 


2 


o 


o 



CD 



EH W 



HH 

Cu 

•p H 
o o 

EH r Q 



+J 




p 


co 


•H 


CO 


O 


t'j 


P-irH 


! 


o 


-d 




•H 


eh 


^ : 


o 



H 

cd . 

p. 

CO CD 

P g 

O 

W 



-202- 



rHr^\OCMCMr-H,p-0 
• ••• •••• 

rH 1^1 Cn^t U'DM3 O 
rH f-\ _P" CO O 



OOCO ^ r-^UJ VO O 
CM r— .J- m r-t j- r^ CM 
.p- w J- j- LTMn to o> 

rH 1^1 LOi rH r— CM r-^ 

HH fOK^ 



i-h cu r-— c\l o CTi r^\ J- 
• • • • • • • • 

i— I C\J LPi LT\U3 LOO f-^ 
rH rH J" ■ 



ootor-toi^vOJ- 

CM LPvl — to r-nOM)0 
J-COHO^OuOlO 

oj hu)uj i-Tv in 

rH 



o 

CM 
CPv 

r — 



CM .p" r — r*V"M — to CM 
_p- r^iVO LPi .p- CM I — to 

rH rH CM 



CM 

60 



o iriLtMninirM^cy 

rH CM • » c • ITY-D 

CM r — cm c— 



1 ~ '-<<-* 

cncnc'i ^ '-.^ o .■ , 

O«».»»»oj>.p 

CM T\^f cr\ I c ■■. i -\ o o 

CM m : 1 , I i 

H H 

O I I 1 I I I o 

fl qOLO i. j ir\ o o 
, ' J r^nj- J- irv.n 



a 


* 




r- 




tH 


,-P 




i <" 


rj 




^5 


■r 




ft 

CD 


CO 




H 


•P 




Ph 


fl 






a 




n 


J 


>i r 


?H 


fH 


CO 


0. 


+J 


•H 


> 


. co 


rH 


o 


P 


r Q 


o 


r d 


CO 


CD 


fi 


-u 


rc 


H 


CO 






CD 


r-H 


EtO 




ct 


a 


LP 


£ 


•H 


CM 


o 

•H 


3 


>S P 


-p 


rQ 


co 


o 




;^ 


cd 


o 




^ 


•H 
4^ 


• 

rH 


9 


co 


CD 


.-^ 


Th 


rC 




+s 


o 


o 


CO 


■JJ 


•rl 


•H 


o 
a 


5 


• " H 




o 


1 


o' 


CD 

+3 


< 




o 


t>i 


CO 


S. ro 


rH 




Ph t<-\ 


(D 




cr> 


> 


Ti 


CD <-\ 


O 


o 


A 


O 


•H 


Ch - 


CD 


rH 


O 


M 


CD 


r-l 




Ph 


• 


rH 




-0 fH 




CD 


a <d 


r} 


rCj 


•H Q 


o 


-p 


P 3 


•H 

•p 


•>j0 


P CD 


■i 


Sh 


rH O 


:---h 


•H 


Ph ',^ 


(U 


3 


rrj . 


.c 


T=) 


P P 


•p 




CO o 




r« 


co 


a 


CD 


rP "P 


4J 


CD 


O fH 


•rj 


is 


5a ^ 





CO 


CD O 


+3 




CO -j 


4J 


H 


o 


■trj 


o 


p ^ s 


p 


CD 


HH ?Hi 

O r P 


to 


H 


4^ 




ro 


P CO 


CO 




B '-d 


CD 


CO 


H 


Th 


rj 


co 'p 




\ 


rl P 
> 3 


rl 


P . 


H 


i3 


CD" 


n cd 


o 


M 


> 


•H 




« o 


P 


O 


P ,H 


CO ^| 


O O 


Q> Eh 


H M 


P 




P o 


o 




CO CO 




• 


H 


a 


">.. 4 J >i 


O H 

■u . 


,H 2 M 


■d 


C; 


P CD 


CD 


2 • 


d W 


CO Tj 


a 


.0 


S ' 


d >, 


m n 


tj ,o 



CTv 
rH 
H 

P) 



E-i 
CO 

!=> 

r 



C5 



EH 

O 



| 




O 

C-l 



P 



O 
l-H 

CO 

l-H 
> 
I— I 

PI ro 

r-n 

PS en 

N rH 
CO 

t> 

[in 



E 



pi m 

3 ° 
<q eh 

>H O 

PI o 

Pi EH 

CO 



PI 



b 
< 



R 



B 



ft 
to 
•H 
R 



3 



CD 
> 

1 



P o> 
o p, 



-p 

M Pi 

CD CD 
p, O 



0) 

> 

• H -P 

-p PS 

aj a) 

^° 

g : -* 

P 0) 

O (X, 



(D PS 
fL, CD 

o 



CD 

> 
■H 
P 

a 

1 

o p 



-p 
U PS 
CD CD 
Pi O 



•H 


-p 


-P 


P! 


<rt 


CD 


3 


o 


p 


u 


r .i 


a> 


o 


P. 



•p 

pi a 

CD CD 
P O 



-::or_ 



• •••••« 

CTv o r-\ r— r<n r— o 

rH J" -X) Cn CX> O 



^t K\ m C\J LT\ O I~- 
• •••••• 1 

C^H OU) lC\^t CM I 

r-^rj evi 



IT\ LPiUj CM r— I^i O O 

rH _=f r^ muD i^- o O 

HHrlWinO 



ITi O i-l '-D LTV -wf I — O 



H I^TiHH (J fJ O 
i-H CM LO 



j- t-n.be en en^D o o 

• ••••••* 

H-CTiHt^OCTiWO 

nH rH r<n -3- en O 



4 a-.iTiHOr--.^ o 
• •••«•• 

j-^h-cj CM!— co w to 

rirlJ 



CT« 



o 

o 
o 






O 



O 
O 



H 

r— I 

U3 



O 



O 

o 



H Wmi^- H4 H O 

LO> en I — r-^rH^D O O 
rH CM J" i_n en O 



rH rH r-{ ^t ^T 1^1— Cn 
• «•••••• 

LTAjd - CO V-D I — LTN i^v Cn 



CM 
60 



O 



o 
o 







^S 


O 






tt) 


CO 




'd 


CD 




CQ 


r -} 


>• 


Pi 


Th 


.'■4 




CO 


fi 


M 


"^ 


<XJ 


c 


O 


CD 


PS 


W 


l£ 


P 


1 f 



en en en en en en Pi 
• ••••• o 

m =t 014 mm S 
cj r<n r-n.=+- ,--t n 



^ PS 



co 

4-3 
PS 

a) 

S CD 

m E-i 



El 



III! 

e. o un o 



I 

Lin 



CD 

42 



-P -H 
CO Pi 
CD PS 

a 

IPl r-i 

cm p, 



PS PS 



o 
u 
+j 

Pi 

CD 

JD 
O 



a 



G 
■H 
+" 

Oi 

-P 
CO 



-P 

ca ed 
c US 

0) 

O id 

pi a 



Cm 
O 



<tj Pi O 

O rH 

>i -H O 

r-i co ,y 

CD -rl O 

> > co 

O -rl 

O R >a 

CD Pi 

X ' PS 

PS CD 

rH O P! 
Qi .rH 

Pi "P >3 

o tip 

•H 
-P 



CD 

-p 

o 

-p 

■n 

51 

•P 
-P 

■rl 

a 
■3 

en 



-P Tj 

CO CD 

•rl 
PS 



^3 
pi 

CD 
Pi 

ft 



>s - 
Pi i>i 
CD Pi 



Q) TH 
PS Pi 



3 

Pi 
UJ O 
CD 

rl 

•H 

c3 
Pi 
PS 
o 



c\0 
Pi 
■H 

^ o 



11 



cn 



■P M CD rH 

CO -P S 

CD CO • 

pi pi o o 



Pi 



CD -P 



r 



CO 



CO 
CO 



ai 

o 

J p1 

a 

CO 



O CD 

CD CD rQ 

3 -P S 

O CD 

Pi 5s O 

rH P rH 



981E 



-204- 

TA3LE 130 
PYROTECHNIC MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 

ALL DIVISIONS 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF- 'JAGE-EAF-NERS 
III THE PYROTECHNIC ilANUFACTURING IiDUSTRY, 193S 



Hourly Earnings 
Cents -ner Hour 



Under 10- 
10 - 19.9 
20 - 24.9 
25 - 29.9 
30 - 34.9 
35 - 39.9 
40 - 49.9 
50 - 59.9 
60 - 79.9 
80 - 99.9 
100 and over 

Total 



Number 

of 
Workers 



9 

181 

223 

105 

104 

65 

63 

35 

28 

5 

3_ 

826 



Per Cent 



1.1 
21.9 
27.0 
12.7 
12'. '&. 

7.9 



4.2 

3.4 

.6 

:4 



Cumul? 


itive 


Per Cent 


1. 


,1 


23. 


,0 


50, 


,0 


62. 


,7 


75. 


,3 


83. 


,2 


91. 


A 


95. 


6 


99. 





99, 


6 


100. 






100.0 



Source: Based on questionnaires submitted to the N.R.A. by 25 

establishments in the industry. The returns are for a v/eek 
during the neriod May to October. National Recovery 
Administration, Division of Research and Planning. "The 
Pyrotochnic Manufacturing Industry", prepared by 
Henry Sokolove and Kathryn Robertson, November 10, 1933. 



9818 



-2«5- 



C\J 
H 

EH 



EH 

CO 

I 



ci> 



EH 

O 

P-H 



O 

EH 

O 

>H 

Ph 



P3 frj 



c!> 



>h 



9Sis 



3 



a 

CD 
O 
CD 

> h 
•H CD 
-P ft 



O 



CD 

> -P 

•rl fi 

-P CD 

Cj O 



s 



CD 

> -P 

■h a 

-P CD 

Cj O 



-P 

C! 

CD CD 

> O 

•H 

■P ?H 

aj cd 



Ph 



CD 

ft ^ 
0! 

01 h -P 

W) P Pi 

fi O CD 

•h trj o 

PI ^> 
u 

a 

p>q 



r— to to VX) O H C\J KM^ 

1 • ••£»•••• 

CM CO J- LO tO rO LO I — to 

rH OJ tO LO f-— CO CO CO 



o 
o 



CO 



r— rH O tO J--H H'rH^l- 



aiu)'.o or-oww h 

rH HHCUH H 



COCO lAftJ M J LOO 



I WHHinajvDtoo 
cm to lovo r-co mo 



tOON r— VJ V£> rH LO 



I to to co to r^- to cm rH 

CM rH rH rH rH 



LOrovxi cm t-\ r~-j3- coj- CO 
• ••»•••••• 

rH I — CO CO^O rH UD r~- CT\ CO 
CM LfM — to CO CO CO CO CO 



o 



o 
o 



U3 



O 



O 

o 



o 



U3 



LO to tOU3 COU3 I — LO LO LO 



LO CM t^v CM 
CM tO rH rH 



LO^t rH rH O 



o 



o 
o 



HOONnaij-t-Ht- 



r-{ tOO CM LOtOrH LO COCO 
CM LOUD I — to CO CTi CO CO 



O 
O 



C£> 
CM 

to 



rH co o r^-vo co cm to j- ko 



O 



h r--c\i c\j i — to 

CM CM rH rH 



H/fOO 



o 



CD 

p 



cococococococococo 
• ••*•»•«• 

o^j- CO J- CO CO CO CO CO 
-I CM CM tO to J" LO I — CO 

1 I I I I I I I I 

DOLOOLOOOOO 
■H CM CM to to J- LOcO to 



o 


o 
o 

rH 






a> 








!h 








o 




fl 


CD 


a 




•H 


rH 

ft 


u 




r( 


a 


o 


rH 


CD 


cd 




Cfl 


r^ 


co 


o 


-P 






o 


O 


p 




<-\ 


EH 







01 




•p 




fi 




CD CD 




E ,3 




A EH 




to 




•H 




rH • 




fl M • 




P fi fl 




-P -H O 




Dl fl M 




CD fi -P 




Cfi rl 




LO rH CD 




CM ft ,Q 




O 




i^-d P4 




,o fi 




a fi 




a >» 




o ,p u 




•H o ^ 




•P r( -P 




a3 aj nJ 




U CD M 




-p m 




en cd Td 




•h « d 




fi s 




•rH <H 




e o cd 




Tj > 




<■) fi o 




O rH 




S -H O 




h tn iJ 




•D -H O 




> > CO 




O -H 




o n >> 




CD r( 




rt-.fi 




fi CD 




^.2* 




p -p >» 




o ni ^0 




•H rf 




■P -P tj 




ctf o> a> 




, h -H >H r( 




fi p 




CD -H ft 




rP E 0> 




•P 'd r( 




<i ft 




o 




-P >J •> 




U >a 




-d O In 




CD > -P 




■POO) 




-pop 




•ri 0) t) 




EPlfl 




r-i PH 




F) ^j ttfl 




p a 




01 O -H 




CD -H r( 




Jn -p p 




■H C3 -P 




cj S O 




d c8 


• 


C3 <y 
o • p 


to 


to 


•H >j fl 


co 


-p u a 


rH 


oi +3 ;s 




CD 01 


•• 


p p a 


o 


tfTd -rl 


rH 


S P 




P -H ^ 


u 


o o 


CD 


a> cd 


A J 


Td A -P 


a 


O H- 5 O 


CD 


01 Jh 


t> 


nJ P >, 


o 


Ph -h ft 


s 


CD 




o 




U 




P 




o 




CO 





-206- 
TAELE £22 
Pyroteclrnic Manufacturing Industry 
Classified Weekly Earnings cf Factory and Office Employee: 
Typical Week Within the Period, May-Octc/ber, 1933 





Display 
Fireworks 
Division 
(a) 


Factory Employe as , office 
Commer- ■ • 
Fuses cial Fire- Total Industry ( d) 
Division works Total 
(b) Division 
(c) 


Enplovee 
Industry (ft) 




Numoer 


Number 


\ Number - 


I'lumbc 


sp Per Cum. 
' cent Per 
Cent 


Number 


Per Cum. 
Cent Per 
Cent 


less bhan $5.00 


2 





77 


79 


9,6 9.6 


— 




$5.00 to $9.99 


17 


20 


195 


232 


23.1 37.7 


1 


1.5 1.5 


$10 tc 14.99 


7 


63 


172 


242 


29,3 67.0 


16 


24.3 25,8 


$15 to 19.99 


15 


25 


no 


150 


18.2 85.2 


22 


33,3 59,1 


$20 to 24.99 


8 


22 ' 


28 ' 


58 


7.0 92.2 


11 


16.7 75.8 


$25 to 29.99 


8 


5 


14 


27 


3.3 95.5 


10 


15.2 91,0 


30 to 39.99 


9 


13 


9 


31 


3.7 99.2 


2 


3,0 94.0 


40 to 59.99 


_ 


j 1. 


4 • ■ 


6 


,6 99,8 
.2 100.0 


3 
l' 


4.5 98.5 


60 or more 


2 


2 


1.5 100.0 


Total 


66 


149 


611 

< 


826 


100. n - 


66 


100.0 - 



(a) 7 Concerns reporting 

(b) 6 Concerns reporting 
(c)l2 Concerns reporting 
(d)25 Concerns _ reporting 

Source: N.R.A. Questionnaire. Tabulation by the Bureau of the Census frr 
the National Recovery Administration,- Division of Research and 
Planning, November 1,1933. 



9818 



-207- 
TA3LE 123 
OXY-ACETYLZ-Iffi INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF. FACTORY- EMPLOYEES IN A TYPICAL PRE-CODE WEEK, 1933 

Hours Humber of Per Cumulative 

Worked per Employees Cent Per Cent 
Week * of Total 

Under 20 hours 195 a. 6 5.6 

20 - 29.9 365 . 10.5 16.1 

30 - 34.9 146 4.2 20.3 

35 - 39.9 265 7.7 28.0 

40 - 44.9 592 17.1 45.1 

45 - 49.9 1,316 33.0 83.1 

50 - 59.9 376 10.9 94.0 

60 or more 207 _ 6.0 ft 100.0 
Total 3.462 100.0 



Source: N.R.A. questionnaire returns from 41 concerns operating 
269 plants, rational Recover;/ Administration, Division 
of Research and Planning. The Oxy- Acetylene Industry, 
prepared t>y J. A. Gall, Edvem'ber 17, 1933. 



9818 



-20 3*. 

TABLE 124 

OXY-A'CETYLENE INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OE H 1 .CTORY EMPLOYEES IK A TYPICAL PRE-CODE ./EEK, 

1933 



Hourly Number of 

Earnings Employees 



Under 10^ 1 

10 to 19.9 2 

20 to 24.9 34 

25 to 29.9 110 

30 to 34.9 167 

35 to 39.9 255 

40 to 49.9 1,©07 

50 to 59.9 979 

60 to 79.9 804 

80 to 99.9 91 

$1.00 or more 12 

Total 3,462 



Source: i T .R.A. Questionnaire returns from 41 concerns operating 269 
plants. National Recovers Administration, Division of 
Research and Planning. The Oxy-Acetylene Industry, nrepared 
by . A. Gill, November 17, 1933. 



Per 


QiJ.raula.tive 


Cent 


Per Cent 




of Total 


0.02 


0.02 


0.06 


0.1 


1.0 


1.1 


3.2 


4.3 


4.8 


9.1 


7.4 


16.5 


29.1 


45.6 


28.3 


73.9 


23.2 


97.1 


2.6 


99.7 


• .3 


100.0 


100.0 





9818 



-209- 

TABLE 125 

OXY-ACETYLEITE INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY EASMIIIGS 0E -OFFICE EidPLOYEZS I T A TYPICAL PRE-CODE 

1933 



:ek, 



Weekly 
Earnings 



Numoer of 
Envoloyees 



Per 
Cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Less than 'o.OO 
5.00 to 9.99 
10.00 to 14.99 
15.00 to 19.99 
20.00 to 24.99 
25.00 to 29.99 ' 
L0.00 to 39.99 
40.00 to 59.99 ' 
60.00 or more ' 
Total 



15 

220 
565 
506 
425 
307 
230 
139 
2,407 



.6 

9.1 

23.5 

21.0 

17.7 

12.8 

9.5 

5;8 

100.0 



0.6 
9.7 
33.2 
54.2 
71.9 
84.7 
94.2 
100.0 



Source: M.R.A. questionnaire returns from 41 concerns operating 
269 plants. National Recover Administration, Division 
of Research and Flanning. The Oxy-Acetylene Industry, 
prepared by ':'. A. Sill, NoVeirib'.er 17, 1933. 



9818 



-210- 

TABLS 126 

Shoe polish Ilanufacturing Industry 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS 01' WORK FOR FACTORY WAGE 

EAENEHS 

Week of June 15, 1933 

Factory Wage Earners 



Hours Worked Cumulative 

Per Week | ITumber Per cent Per Cent 

20 hours or less 13 1-9 1.9 

20.1 - 25 ' 30 5.6 7.5 

25.1 - 30 : 34 4.8 12.3 

30.1 - 35 1 124 17.7 • 30.0 

35.1 - 40 29 4.1 34.1 

40.1 - 45 : 139 19.8 ' 53.9 

45.1 - 50 : 137 26.7 ' 80.6 

50.1- 55 36 5.1 85.7 

55.1 - 60 ! 60 8.6 94.3 

Over 60 40 5.7 100.0 

Total 701 100.0 



Source: IT. P. A. questionnaire returns, 30 concerns reporting. 

Tabulation by the Bureau of the Census for the National 
Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Planning, 
December 8, 1953. 



9818 



-211- 
TABLE 127 
Shoe Polish Manufacturing Industry 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARTilUG-S OF FACTORY 7JAGE EAR1IERS 
Week of June 15, 1933 



Factory Wage Earners 



Hourly Earnings 
Cents Per Hour 



lumber 



Per Cent 



Cunulative 
Per Cent 



Under 15 cents 
15 - 12.9 

20 - 24.9 

25 - 29.9 

30 - 34.9 
35 - 59.0 

40 - 44.9 

45 - 43.9 

50 - 54.3 

55 - 59.9 

60 - G3.9 

70 - 79.9 

80 and 1 over 



Total 



4 

234 

122 

95 

37 

36 

29 

14 

15 

27 

13 

27 

701 



.6 

40 . 5 

17.4 

13.5 

5. 3 

5.1 

4.1 

1.9 

1.9 

3.9 

1.9 

3.9 

100.0 



.6 
41.1 

Ju • O 

72.0 
77.3 
82.4 
86.5 
38.4 
90.3 
94.2 
96.1 
100.0 



Soxirce: IT.R.A. questionnaire returns, 30 establishments reporting. 
Tabulations by the Bureau of the Census for the national 
Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Planning, 
December 8, 1933. 



9818 



-213- 

TA3LE 128 
Shoe polish Manufacturing: Industry 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY EARtTIIJG-S OE OEEICE EMPLOYEES 
TTeel: of June 15) 1935. 



Weekly Earnings 
(Dollars) 



.unoer 



Less than $5.00 

5.00 - 9.99 1 

10.00 - 14.99 4 

15.00 - 19.99 32 

20.00 - 24.99 20 

25.00 - 29.99 11 

30.00 - 39.99 6 

40.00 - 59.99 1 



60 or i.io re 



Total 75 



Source: E.R.A. questionnaire returns, 30 establishments reporting. 
Tabulation Tjy the Bureau of the Census for the national 
Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Planning, 
December 8, 1933. 



9818 



-213- 



oj 



EH 





to 






M 






M 






>h 






c ) 






i-l 






&l 






w 




;■-! 






Pi 


>H 




LH 


w 




W 


O 


• 


i-> 


H 


r^A 


f-H 


O 


m 




«! cr\ 


n 


P-h 


H 




^ 
<! 


-d 

9 


s 


Ph 


„ 


H 


O 


t\J 


Cj 




ro 


'•: 


CO 


cr> 


1 


Hi a> 

OJ 




>-< 


en 


-i 


d 


rH 


o 


H 


r — 1 


M 


W 


H 


•=? 






N 






o 


H 

i— i 
to 

CO 

l-H 
o 





EH 

O 
Eh 

Pr 
O 

EH 

O 

Pi 

'^ 
Pn 

> 
n 

l-H 

o 



to 

Ph 
P3 

o 

rM 

O 

P3 



id 




(1) 




Ai 




rl 


rM 


O 


CD 


6s 


0) 


{/] 


' * 


£ 


r» 
a> 


O 


Ph 


W 





oj 



3 



oj 



3 



CT\ 



0> 
OJ 

'-D 



en 

ON 



1 






a 

pi 
..3 



I i I i cd| • • 



rH H O 60 O O 



1 I 



O CTM^OJ JH" O 



>-jd jh- im o cp> cr> r^J- ^ 

• ■ • • ., • •••• 

O W LOH H » I — CX> O 
i— I LOi r — to CTi CTv i— I 



I nj| nil 



,h J- r— vx) mo t^it-j 



owhohkm^-o 

OJ ITiCO CTiCT\ O 

• •• • . .H 



t I OJ I 



OJ ^O O O rH 



k-\co CO J- OJ 



OM^mo nincf] to >x> 
I m^wM now -o h- 

rH.it- O nCPlO <T\ J- rH 



r-^! CO if JH" rH 



r r*\ t rH 



CTitO LT\ to O OCO OJ 

4- omx^ow oin 
vo r^v mJ OJ OJ r-— 



inou) nH 



in 
(D 

•_o» • • • • • • • • ' t O 

rH d>,-t CTn.3- CTiJ- CTv.-h- O 
rH OJ OJ r^ i-r^^j- j- lo LTi 'd 

q I t I t I 1 .1 I 

■d 

s mo ino i^c mo ino 

PD rH OJ OJ r-^j r<>i.J- J- m IfA^-O 



OJ 



1 — 
cpi 

OJ 



OJ 



to 

OJ 



5 13 



-p 
o 
Eh 





a 






o 






•H 


• 




+J 


■=>! 




Cti 






Fh 


• 




-P 


£S 




W 






■H 


>s 




C 


r^ 




■H 






I 


-d 

CD 




< 






>> 


Ph 




u 


0) 




o 


U 




[> 


Ph 




o 






o 


n 




a) 


>i 




W 


!H 
-P 




3 


r< 




Pi 


'd 




o 


rj 




•H 


t— 1 




+J 






rt 


yi 




S 


r* 

•rl 




3 " 




S 


O 




o 


nj 




-P 


1 




o 


nj 




4^> 


•^ 




M 


rH 




n 


nj 




rl 


o 




-P 


•H 




r< 


S 




o 


<D 




■ PH.^H 




a> 


O 




?-* 




• 




O 


to 


0] 


rH 


w 


(D 


EH 


nj 


^H 




,H 


•rH 




O 


03 






H 


• 


w- 


rf 


UD . 


•H 


o 


d 


(H 


■H 


H 


+3 


J^> 


g 




W 


3 


fl 


M 


nj 


•H 





rH 




cr 


Ph 


+3 






:3 


- 


'd • 


CD 


• 


Pi r^v 
nj ■x-\ 


o 


o 




rj 


cr> 


u 


M 


r=! rH 


<D ■ 




o 


Pi 


•> 


rl - 




0) 


nj rH 


<D 


o 


CD rH 


rj 


C 


03 


O 


03 


CD rl 




•H 


Pi CD 


tH 


r-\ 


■9. 


o 


r-i 


«H S 




■=»! 


O CD 


A ■ 




O 


+^ 


13 


Pi CD 


r^ 


O Q 


S 


o 


•H 


+3 


•H 


W 


1 


r* 


•H rH 


0) 


(D 


> rH 


Pi 


r=! 


•rl -H 


o. . 


O 


O Ci3 


§ 






rH 


• • 




-P 


o 




w 


« 




w 


t-' 




o 


o 




Hi 


00 





9313 



en 

CM 






CO 

>-l 

pq 



en 



CM 

en 






TO CD C 







CO ,Q 
H S g 
CO CD O 



CD 
P*i 



CD 

i-H 
CO 



t3 

CD O 

cd rH 

cO Pr o 
3 O 



CD 



cO 

a 

CD 



CD 
H 

CO 





I") 


tJ 




C^ 


CD CD 




,-h rt 






cO -ri 




CD 


S r2 




rH 


CD 3 




CO 


Fq o 


C7> 
CM 


i2 


o 






CT> 






i-H 




CD 

rH 


• 




$ 


r"** 




CD 


1 




P-H 






CD 

H 
ffi 






t3 






(U 






,-4 






rl 






o AJ 






SB CD 






CD 






Cfl !■£ 






*J h 






O CD 






W Ph 



CD 
CD 
!>> 
O 
,-H 

& 

<H 
O 

U 

CD 



pq 



21 


4- 


















f"i 




en co 


ir\M o 


en co 


rj 


CM 








rH j- 


en LT\ O 


CM 


O 


LO 


r-t 








U3 


m mjj- 


CM 


CM 


r~- 


o 










m o i x> 


I^l r-{ 




CO 










rH 








CM 




fi 




LOvVD 
CM 


o r— cm 

CM CM 






r-^ 


co 

LT\ 








J" I.VJ 


LO, rH CO 


CT\ CO 


<-{ 


CO 








r-{ CM 


rH r*^ Lr\ CM 


O 


LT> 


CM 








VD 


rH' r-H' |-<-<i CM 


cm- 


r— • 


.J- 










#. m ■ m 


«- 


r. 




at 










inou) 


l-O r-{ 




r— 










rH 








C\J 






CT\rn T» O PO LPl CO 


co vo 


^_ 






m i*^ ro 


W K-iO 


CO 


co J- 


<T\ 






rH 


J- O 


nc>o 


cn^t- 


rH 


lT\ 








rn CO J- _3r 


rH 






l"0 


















CM 






J- J- in 


! — CO LTl 


,— i 




rH 








en m h- 


<-\ 






LT> 










CM 








LO 






mo\o 


l^MO O 


t-~ 


co 


in 


CM 






-=r 


CTiH 


cn o O 


r-co 


■H." 


<X> 








no 


CMNo 


cr\j-f 


r-H 


O 








•> 


n ' *• *• 


m 






' •» • 








m .CO J- -3" 


r-{ 






m 


















CM 






CM 


J- 


r—vo ^t 


LPi^D 


m 


P— 










^r LP\ J- ^D 


tneo 


m 










DJ U3 


O 


o 


rH 


CM 










-. *• 


*■ 


•* 


»• 


»» 










K-\CO 


CO 


,-t 


CM 








CM 


J- 


r--vo r-i 

j-wo 


0J 






rH 

o 










O I-0-4" >vD 


m 


U5 










i^iJ- 


J- 


.nco 


ro 










enmo 


o 


H 


in 










cm to 


co ._+ 


CM 


LO 












rH 






m 
















ri 


















O 




o 


en cr 


> 




• 


• 


• 


• 


o • • 


• 


« 


o 




Lf> (TlJ- 


en ^r 


cn^- ctnJ- 








rH 


rH 


CM 


cm rn 


i^i J- 


LTMTN id 






1 


1 


1 1 


1 I 1 


1 


1 


co' 




U 


o 


o 


O LPiO o o 


o 


o 


o 


•a 


d 


• 


• 


9 • 


• • 3 


• 


• 


• 


-i~> 


: 


LOO 


LOO 


tr\ O m O 


lt, o 


o 


; 


rH 


CM 


CM f-> m J" J- 


LTl LOl'vD 


EH 



s 




o 




•rH 




CO 




•H 




> 




■H 




n 




a 




o 




•H 




+-> 




CO 




rl 




4J 




CO 




•rl 




c 




H 




P 




H 




•^ 




>s 




rl 









> 




O 




o 




CD 




W 






• 


rH 


~^ 


CO 


r-'^i 


c 


0^ 


o 


rH 


•H 




+» 


M 


CO ^O 




— 1 


fl) 


u 


Si 


<a 


-p 


r^ 


o 


0) 


■p 


+» 




Pi 


-O 


CD 


rl 


CO 


O 




(\ 


<M 


m 


o 


rl 






q(l 


•» 


C 


• 


■rl 


o 


Pj 


t— i 


3 


■* 


r-i 


(D 


Ph 


C) 




5 


id 


•H 


QQ 


,-H 




rH 


^ 


< 


o 




rl 


73 


a 

CD 


o 


c/1 


•H 


o 


B 


n; 


o 




rG 


<H 


o 


o 






CD 




U 




& 









w 





9318 



to 



CM 



cr-i 
CM 
CT\ 





£ 






EH 


CO 




(1 






! _• 


;nh 




■0 


PQ 


o 


i— I 


pcj 


8}^ 


O 


nj 

H 


i— I 


3 


w 


£ 


pi 


rf 


C< 


i-^q 


r 3 


o 


o 


EH 


1 

1 


d 




o 






o 




3 


cq 




o 


, -1 




HI 


t3 




"■^ 


o 




w 


w 



O !-h 



Pi 

P! 
i— i 
Pr 
i— < 
'O 
CO 

•=»! 

Pi 
o 



en 

rH 



CM 



>5 
2 



<D 
rH 

d5 
p-h 



0) 



CM 



to 
Sh 

o 



7i 




Tl 


9 




a) 


<1> 


£ 




rH 


•H 


(I) 


«? 


rQ 


-1 


d 




ctf 


0) 


O 


-^ 


N 


o 



<D 

H 
Ph 





r— I 



Id 


Tj 


1 


S (D 


<B 




rH 


•H 




CO rf 


r Q 










13 0) 


O 




S Ph 


o 




o 






r-l 






«J 




1 


•—', 




1 


(D 






F-h 






(D 






rH 






.03 












" 






Td 


xi 


1 

1 
1 


£ 


CO 




«i co 


fi 




r— 1 


H 


1 


a) ri 


P 




H 5 




1 


CO (1) 


5 




3 !i( 


o 


1 



Si 

H 

CD 
J3 



pq; 



-215- 



*MTM^ M (MOW) O O 

rH cm, K^ii--r--r^r^vr--CM 

r^ CO CO [ — CO LT\ LP, 
rH rH r-l rH 



O 1 — *X> V£l 

i i h mai ir\H io i 

C\J rH 



1 rH 



50OK\HOOVD 

H Cd H CM inJ-^O CTi 

i-^S l vD r— r~— co r - rH 

-H rH rH rH LO :fA 



I i^T\M nOM CO H CJ fr-i 

k^ X) r— x> rH c^ cr. cm r<~\ qo 

CM CO rO O to CO CM 

rH rH rH 



I J- CM CM 



I — I — CM 

rH rH VD 



PO CT> l-CM 1 -- -=f rH rH a> CM CM 

I i-^v i^i r> r> (T\ to co cr> r^ oo 

CM 60 rH C7\ CO I s — CM 



I J" -3" I -O f"> C J O LT\ LPs CO 

Q J' H H H C^ 

rH u"\ CM "KTlO 

CM At rH rH 



I J- cm ro r--o t> to 

rH ,H C '\ I-— 

CM 



I I 



VD CM rH r^ CO CO 

I I I CM I J-r^Hr^HVO 

h r-H.t cr o 

CM .1- H H 



!4 

a) 

cncTi '^ c-i cri o \ cr\ cr> a~\ > 

o I o 

• C > -H- cr\J CT> -1 c>.t o^ 

ir-\rH CM CM rni^J; J ,C\lf.T) 

rH a 

i i i i i i i i I c3 

a> o o o o o o o o o o 

xJ . . , 

fi u~> o in o m o j> o irv o 

£ r-l CM CM r*--\ r^i ^ rt \r\ UAVD 



CTN 
CM 

co 
co 



VQ 

H- 



(A 
co 



rH 

CM 



v-O 



to 

O 



i-O 






CM 
'-O 
O 



rH 



o 



to 


a> 


+= 


u 


o 


Th 


L" ' 


pj 




o 




LQ 



TH 

a 

A 
o 



03 

m 

CD 

fsi 

Cm 

o 



> 

■H 
PI 

S 

o 

rH 

M 
-|J 

■H 



a; 




> 




o 




o 




a) 




p-; 




rH 




CTj 




; ., 




o 




■rH 




H^ 




EC 




•■ ' 




11) 








+a 




o 




-p 


• 




l<-\ 


+3 


■<\ 


'-\ 


o> 


o 


,H 



a 


M 


r^ 


CD 


1—1 


r" 




C3 


Q) 


Q) 


C) 


4J 


r* 


Ph 


«i 


CD 


•H 


CO 


rH , 


Vl 


<4 


o 


rH 


&.n 


cd 


a 


o 


•H 


•H 


C 


j 


fl 


(D 


c3 



CD P-i 



-216- 
TA3LE 129 .(d) 

CHEl.ICAL IIANHB'ACTUKING liJDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED .ffiEICLY HOURS OF ALL FACTORY EiZPLOYEES REPORTED 
BY SEX 
III THE SOUTH II" 1929, 1932, and 1933 





JULY , 
iiTor 'ked Per ,v'eek Hale 


1929 
Femal e 


JULY 


1932 


JUNE, 


. 1933 


Hours 


1 lal e 


Female 


ilal e 


Female 




15 


.0 




By N u 


m "b e r 


f E 


m p 1 c 


> y e e s 


Under 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


15.0 


- 


19.9 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20.0 


- 


2U.9 


- 


" - 


- 


- 


- 


- 


25.0 


- 


29.9 


- 


- 


- 


- 


14 


- 


30.0 


- 


3^.9 


- 


- 


537 


- 


585 


- 


35-0 


- 


39-9 


- 


2 


173 


2 


64 


2 


4o.o 


- 


44. 9 


- 


- 


1 , 046 


- 


345 


- 


45.0 


- 


49.9 


1,532 


- 


114 


- 


462 


- 


50.0 


- 


54.9 


1,854 


- 


45 


- 


73S 


- 


55.0 


- 


59.9 


474. 


- 


299 


- 


241 


- 


60.0 


and 


over 


120 


- 


53 


- 


1S1 


— 



TOTAL 3,986 2 2,272 2 2,630 



SOTTtCE: Chemical Alliance Inc. report to the National Recovery Adminis- 
tration Division of Research end Planning of September lo, 1933- 



0818 



-217- 

TABLE 129 (e) 

CHEMICAL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED .7EEKLY HOURS OF COMMON LABOR, BY SEX, 
IJ THE SuUTH, IN 1929, 1932, and 1933 . 



Hours Worked JUli , 1929 JULY LP 2 JUNE, 1933 

Per Week Male Female Male Fe male Male Female 

By tlumber of Employees 
Under 15.0 - - - 

15.0 - 19.9 - " 

20.0 - 2U.9 - 12 

25.0 - 29.9 
30.0 - 3W.9 

35.0 -39.9 

4o.o - 44.9 

45.0 - 149.9 

50.0 - 54.9 

55.0 - 59.9 

60.0 and over 

Total 974 554 718 



Source: Chemical Alliance Inc. report to the National Recovery Adminis- 
tration Division of Research and planning of September 16, 1933 • 



- 




13 




— 




- 




124 




53 




11 




200 




52 






None 




Hone 




None 


- 


Reported 


13 


Reported 


354 


Reported 


Hi 2 




4o 




33 




21b 




4 




- 




293 




135 




144 




42 




25 




60 





-218- 



cj 
b 

•H 

1 

o 

rC 
-p 



03 

co 
pi 


r° 

Si 



ro 



T) 



CM 



CPi 

CM 



pq 

CO 

o 

Hi 

p=; w 





EH 

CO >H 


'c? 


p m 


^— ' 


Q O 




125 EH 


o 


n O 


ro 


«i 


rH 


P Ph 


hh 

3 


EH 


EH 


O (k. 




p CO 




i§ 




*-? i— h 




J53 




^^ 




o N 




i— i 




o p 




o 




W 




a 




h- 1 




Ph 




IH 




eO 




53 




p, 
o 



-d 

Sh 

o 

p. 

CD 

Pi 



rol 



CM 

r-O 



3 



CM 



r-j 



h 1 



•d 


tJ 




q a) 

Cd rH 






cd 


•H 




<d g 


rQ 




rH CD 


g 




jd n 


o 




^ 


o 




CD 






rH 






«s 












a 






CD 






Ph 













1— 1 






cd 






TZl 


-d 




s 


CD 




id CD 


fl 




rH 


•H 




<D cd 


P 




i— i 2 






03 CD 


5 


00 


S Ph 


o 


CD 

CD 

o 

rH 
P- 


CD 




ft 


r a 




cm 


a 




O 


CD 






Fh 




H 
CD 

Q 

1 


CD 






rH 






'* 




;>. 


rf=i 




pq" 


-d 


Td 




3 CD 


CI 

a 




CD Cd 


■H 

P. 




Is § 


6 




3 Fh 


o 











H 






cd 






a 






CD 






Ph 






CD 






rH 






* 












CO 






M 






>» C 






rH H 












O «J 






: ! W 







W OM O W CPv J- OGMnr^i CM 
H I — LTiH tAW N H C\JH I — rH 

t^v-J- eo 'pi r- o o to o 



1-0.3- r — r— cm 



I I 



r— co loi o o 

POKACO O rH 
CM rH rH 



I rH l ro 



^ OHOIn CT\ J- O 60 LO o 
H I — W NN» h-H H H N 

cm r-- '.cm — o o co 



roP- r— r— CM 



en a~\ r-— r-ouo rH t — nwo o 

LOi nj- rH ,-H CM O CO p- MD 
rH CPi l«OVX> p O CT> 



GO 
CM 



P" 

CO 
LO 



CO 
CM 
P" 

r— 

CM 



LOi 



I I 



G> CTi 
LO 



I I 



I I 



I I 



rH CM rH MD CO UD 



M 

CD 



ft 



-■^c^a^c^cncXNCriO^criCX-i >• 

Ol ••••••••o 

• CT\ Hr O^p CTi p CTN h- o->, 
■ "\ rH CM CM r-o r-o p p- LO LO p 

I I I I I I I I I § 

M 

Q)0000000000 
P 

c i.o o LO o Lo o i-o o !r\ o 

-h C\l W r^K>J- J- LO LOUD 



P 

o 
cd 

CD 

CO 

03 



O 



O 
H 
CO 
H 
> 
■H 

p 



rH rH r-O LO LO LO 


i-O 


-P 

cd 




CM 


5 

CO 

S 

1 


1 — O O CTMTitnO CM fO 


o 




i^O rO.H,- I CM rH 


l-O 


>» 


i*'* 


IO 


M 

CD 

> 

o 

o 


I I^O*~0 CM CO CM CO CO 1 — 


CM 




rH r-r^mo l — ro, coi 


vo 


1 


r— co wu) H-ocn 


o 


rH l-O LO LO LO 


■ o 


o 




CM 


H 

cd 


LO P— UD rH J- O rH r-o 


,s_ 


a> 


I r n |0\l^|--HCD oai 


l-O 


,'3 •• 


rH t-O CM LO fO, CM i-o 


CM 


4J KA 


•.•«.•.•.•■ 


- 


KA 


rH CM rH M3 CO VX) 


UD 


O CTi 


r-^ 


(S™^| 


report t 
ber l6, 1 


1 r— r-~>vD CTN CM LO LOi | 


H 


• 


r— ct\j- j- cm 


o 


O CD 


CM CM 




liance In 

g of Sept 


CO O CM CM LOUD CO 


UD 


•H C 


1 LO 1 O^ CM CTi U^ CT\ CM 


[^~ 


«3j - 


O O d- CO rH i-o 


LT 

- 





id a 

O rH 

H !h 

Q) 'd 

O TO 



o 

!3 

o 
co 



.1 11 -J 



-219- 



o 

rH 



o 



> 43 

■H P 

43 CD 

P o 

P u 

3 P4 

o 



rP 

P 
O 

to 



>*cx\? 

H <AJ 
P O^ 

hs I " 



cd f-v 

P r^ 
p cr 
»-:> rH 



>acr 

rH cm 

P cr 



CD 



0) K> 
P m 

P cr 

ha rH 



>5CT 
CD rH <M 

> +3 p O^ 
•H p Hs 

43 CD 

cfi o 



3 u 



CD 



CD 1-^ 

P r<"> 

P cr 

ha rH 



r-jCT 
rH CM 

p cr 
ha 



a 

J3 



CD n~. 

P K^ 

P CT 
ha 



>, 



P 

o 



en 
tifl 






LT\ m CO VX; Co CO v£( O 
• ••••••• 

ri hw ino h oj o 
cm v_o I — r— i — O 



U) i^oco inn nai Qo o 

O r-r^v ^t .p" CO CO LT\ CO CT> CX\ O 

J- LTM — CTiCPiCTvC 



WWOCOWHGH 

m CTV-O tT .P" |v^ cT\ 

O J- CM *£> 

rH rH rH 



U)OWCMfcSr^C\l;+H VD 
rH r— rH c\i mm ! nti cm cm 

H OJPU) 



O to WU) CM >^Q CO LTM-— 

J-COOr^lt^OOrHj/ 
(M I^VX) rH rH O O 00 



mP i~- 



CM 



0) 



-■'-Crfrcrcrcrvcr.crcrNCr > 

H CTip CTVJp CT\.p- (T\Jt CT> 

r H cm cj if>npP imin r d 

O I I I 1 I I 1 I 1 § 
*p 

- p mo mo im <j m c mo 

p H Ol OJ i^rr»PP m m\JD 



CO 

oo 

cr 

M 



(M 
CM 



CM LT\ f~\ CO CO .P" CO O 
• ••••••• 

O Q rH r*M — r— co & 
cm m o 



oj f^inop ifiHM o 
• ••••«••• 

u H w inNi^iHta o 

rH l-^^Q CO O 



r— muD r^vn cr. rH cm cr, 

r-— cn.p- O O rH i — r<-> _=r 

W to mfnrl OJ CM 

rH \D CO LT\ CM 

rH m 



o 

eo 

m 

CM 



P 
+» 
o 

EH 



•H ,0 

43 

P tJ 



P 

4-5 



en P 

•H Ph 
P CD 
•H ^ 

I * 

>> f4 

'r-t 4^ 

O *P 

o p 

CD rH 

* (0. 

rH P 

P -h 

§ . 

■ H -o 
4^ O 

«J P 

1 

B 

3 rH 

P 

o u 

43 .H 
hO CD 

P rP 

■H O 

43 

fn CD 

O ,p 
Ph Ch 
CD 



w 

CD 

f-. 

•H 
P 
P 

a 

o 

•H 
43 

a 



P 

•H 
P 

P t^i 

.3 l-^l 

,H 0> 

F4 rH 



CD 



CD 

r9 



P 

o 

O CD P 

P tn O 

; 

h « o 



rH <M 
<3j O 



p 
o 

•H 
CO 
■H 

> 



P3 



CO 
rP 
O P) 



CD 
O 

u 

& 

o 

CO 



9813 



o 



M 

EH 






oj 



OJ 



>h 



x o 

eh m 

g ... 

S o 



- (in 

lh O 
o 

4 eg 

o >-< 

i3 p 

m p 



n 

1—4 

CO 
CO 

1 

o 






OJ 



■d 




-d 


d 







a 


a 


rj 




r-{ 


H 


o 


a 


.O 


A 




O 




IB 
rH 
CJ 

■r: 

.CD 

i 

■ CD 

rH 


o 



d d 

S (D 

!j c) r; 

nH H 

-t S H 

ni id o 

3 h o 



0) 
rH 
«3 



CD 
P=H 



CD 
rH 
CO 



S | 



I 

d 

0) SI 



CT*| 
OJ 
CA 



HI 





.H 


H 


o 


Sj 


r Q 


«! 


CD 


O 


g 


P=) 


O 



3 I 



rH 





03 


! - 


Pi 


i-H 


H 


3 


i-: 


r i 


m 


w 


10 



-220- 



tn 

CD 

H 
o 

i-H 
tD 






cti h intM co ru h ro a> w 




i-^m-— <jd ctih h h r-w r-o-H- 


O^ 


inn ur\ oj -j- oj ij^ r^ rH 


OJ 


*. M « «. 


co 



OJ OJ 



r — H w r^in I 
I ! vx> oj CO m 



1 rH 



CO 






CPl f— J" zt -"I" LT\ ( — H CM CT> ;' 

r^\ m ctm — oj^jd o i — co mni 
.h- o r^iOJ mnH J-: 

h oj w h 



(T\ OJ OJ C7\ OJ |v>, ,-/-, -J- vO L^VD 
r^v rH rH :r\ co r — <-< _=t lo oj 

rH LT\.H- J- Q>H; "J" rH rH 



LT\ -H i"P> |-^> "J- I.Pl 
I r-^ r— OJ V£> 

rH rH 



I I 



c^ oj r-— to i-^ o cr> o^^o m lo 
nr-j- cvj ruu) o + mai 

rOl-^H; CTlH; -f rH ^H 



O 3VD CO 0> W r^\r- 

i i '_r\ a - -. cr\ SrM^ni "^ jd- 
H-L^wwowJ-niA 



r^\ i 



r^i 



I I 



h- in H 53 CO 
rH r— OJ r~- rH 



I r<~NrH 



l^\ 
cr> 

co 



OJ 

I — 



MD 



CO 

o 

.H- 






UD 



OJ 
CO 



it 



'nr^f^^iO H CO OU) .H 

1 Hr r-~ tj r.ui oj ninJ- <-i 

j- oj r— o^ co ^t nn j- 

OJ H n O 



r) 

<D 
O CTi C> CT» CT> CT\ 0"> (Ti CT» CT» > 

H H W C\l iOnJ-.H- fN IPv 13 

i i i i i i i i i . 

FH • rH 

a> o o o o o o o o o o ra 

rrj •••••••••• (_i 

■ ; -.o^omo mo no <~> 
|. rH OJ OJ r<^ r-o^j- h- lo u^^D . i 



o 




H 




cd 




(D 




W 




0) 




X 




'M 




o 




c 




o 




H 




ca 




H 




> 




■rH 




o 




r; 








O 




•cH 




+3 




ni 




rl 




+= 




CO 




•H 




c 




■H 




r; 




-a 




<>! 




. 




>i 




u 




m 




> 




o 




o 




CD 




« 




rH 




ftj 




rj 




5 




•H 




+J 




<x. 




J3 , 




CD 












+3 


r^i 




r^i 


O 


o> 


+^ 


r-{ 


-P 


a. 


^H 


-.0 


o 


rH 


•A, 




CD 


fH 


f-i 


CD 




,'-"' 


• 


! 


o 


CD 


G 


4J 


HH 


rt 




CD 


CD 


CO 


O 




5 


«H 


ni 


o 


■H 




-) 


tie 


,— 1 


;"J 


•=•1 


•H 




ri 


rH 

CD 


3 


o 


rH 


• H 


P4 


g 








CD 


Tj 


rS 

O 


a 






CD 




U 




?H 




r^ 




o 




' ' 





9818 



'-221- 
TABLE 130 (&) 

CHEMICAL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF M&5FACT0RY EMPLOYEES, BY SEX, 

IN Till] SOUTH IN 192 9, 1932 and 1933 
( \LL REPORTED) 



Hourly 
Earnings 



July. 1929 



July, 1932 



Male 



Female 



Male 



Female 



June, 1933 



Male 



Female 



Under 15.0^ 
15.0 - 19,9 
20.0 - 24.9 

25.0 - 29.9 58 

50.3 - 34.9 
I 3-5.0 - 39.9 1,090 

40.0 - 44.9 1,468 

4,5.8 - 49.9 208 

50.0 - 54.9 41 

55.0 - 59.9 30 

30.0 - and over 1,091 



By Number of Employees 



9 
59 

11 
681 
545 
224 
607 

56 



16 

70 

18 

22 

1,148 

253 

452 

21 



26 



Lotal 



3,986 



2,272 



2,630 



Source: Chemical Alliance Inc. report to the National Recovery Administration 
Division of Research and Planning of September 16, 1933. 



-222- 



TABLE 130 (e) 



CHEMICAL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF COMMON L-BOR, BY SEX, 
IN 1929, 1932, and 1933. 



Hourly Earnings 



Under 15.0 
15.0 - 19.9 
20.0 - 24.9 

30.0 - 34,9 
35.0 - 39.9 
40.0 - 44,9 
45.0 - 49.9 
50.0 - 54.9 
55.0 - 59.9 
60.0 and over 



July, 1929 July, 1932 June, 1933 
Male Female Male Female Male Female 





BY 11 u n 


■n 
D 


E R 


0-F E M P 


L 





Y E 


E S 


- 






9 








30 




- 






32 








57 




45 
470 






77 
231 








75 
292 




222 


none 
reported 




187 


none- 
reported 






236 


none 
reported 


103 






18 








- 




134 






- 








6 




_ 






mm 








13 





Total 



974 



554 



718 



SOURCE: Chemical Alliance Inc. report to the National Recovery Administration 
Division of Research and Planning of beptem'oer 16, 1933. 



9818 



—C.C o— 







>H 






o 






rH 






ft 




H 


s 




to 






p-> 


w 




y 


o 






1— 1 




i— i 


pR t^l 


*"~** 




Pr i-o 


tfl 


e> 


o en 


* • 


s 


rH 




n 


Pr 


r-\ 


■\J 


O Td 


K> 


t> 


fl 


H 


H 


C/3 «3 




O 


Cl3 




< 


U3 CO 


W 


F^ 


i-i r^i 


i-h - 


£3 


", en 


sa 


H 


Ph rH 

■=5 


IH 


• • 






3 


>H CM 




o 






Is 

t3 H 




3 






o 


PI 

w 

t-H 

Pr 
1—1 
CO 

o 



O 

EH 

pr 
o 

C-i 

s 

o 

w 

Pm 



w 



Pr 
o 

S 



cnl 
cm 
en 



rH 



OJ 

en 



en 



CTj 
CM 

en 

r-{ 



CM 

en 
>= 



en 



0] 



w 

rH 

03 



I 1 — O LT^i BO VX3 r-^vjo ITM^O 



O CM K*\ 60 O CM 60 rH en O 

ri OJ (\l r^ j- r~cr\cno 



H O J- CT>M I — rH :rr en en O 

o J- o i — cn^rt- vo oo to en o 

CM CM CM KV._ri CO en Cn O 



CM CM i*-M-<"Mri CTi CTmJMD 



CM >X) LO LPt O zf r^\ CO jHt 

H Lno OJ^D Cn TY^O 60 CM I — 

>- CM C\) T\ H CM M n -O ' 

r-\ ^-\ Hl^\rl 



J; UMM Hl>- bOrHCMCMr^! 
<-\ Cn LC^ ITS O Cn LTM^-VQ O ^ 

WvDnWJ-hOIOH 

rH CM l^lH 



r-— CM CM CM lO^-D r^i CM jrl" inn 

vr> cricnm i^ i — * o cm r-o r~- cm 

|-r>VX> W H »i) O W - i 

rH CM r<~\ 



l-<n 

D 

■ o 
o 

rH 



--J- 

CM 

H 



rj- 



o 



o o en 
o o en 



en cr> en en en en c^ 

<X\ 'in CPi Cn en CT> 3^ 



ir\CT\H; 



rH 

-te- 
f-l 

CD 

P3 



CM 



en J- en en en en en 
cm romj ir>MD 



o 



o 



in 
CD 
> 
O 

TH 



un o 

rH OJ 



o o o o o o o o 
oooooooo 

lO O LP, o o o o o 

CM i^f\H; LT^D , f— 60 



L0 

c 

Eh 





M 






(H 




r"i 


•rH 






[3 




> 


•P 




o 


o 




o 


h3 




CD 

t J 1 


3 




rH 


| 




d 






o 


H 




•H 


Id 




+J 


o 




n3 


'rl 






rH 




• 


O 




<5 






P:J 


0) 




i H 


rH 






Eh 


• 


O 




r^> 


+3 




r^i 




V 


en 


yj 


tlO rH 


s 


r^ 




■H 


• rl 


•• 


-P 


rj 


^-\ 


Ih 


r< 


r-\ 


O 


CO 




fkr-i 


u 


o 


Ph 


<x> 


rH 




rS 




<tJ 


a 


- 


Pi 


CD 


M 


CC 


o 


O 




<D 


Vi 


rC| 


R 


•H 


O 




l 


S 


rH 


05 


^-1 


O 


W 


•H 


■H 


CD 


cb 


-P 


t" 




"W 






0) 


Vh 


-; 


pi 


O 




CP 




■ 




i-; 


'~- 


• 


b 




o 


H 


r"o 


rt 


to 


rQ 


I-H 


■H 






> 


■cl 


(11 


■H 


CD 


o 


n 


SH 


q 




CO 


ci 


p< 


ft 


•H 


o 


a> 


rH 


•H 


fH 


rH 


-P 


Ph 


■^ 


r3 






%\ 


•» 


, — ! 


-tJ 


>j 


a 


CO 


JH 


o 


•H 


+J 


■H 





in 


a 


H 


P 


CD 


< 


i-i 


^ 


■a 


C 


O 


•^ 


i— i 


0) 






o 






f-l 






3 






o 






GO 







\» 



9813 






>H 



r=> rH 



H 



en 



OJ 

en 



Ha 



Cn 
CO 

en 



Ti 




•vi 


Pj 








cfl 


^s 


•H 





m 


rQ 


^ 


o 

rH 


fa 

o 






rH 

cd 

s 


H 

CO 


o 


T< 







p! 


O 


a 


cn 


rH 


•H 




fll 


O 







2 


3 





u 

o 











r-H 
Cfl 





rH 




TJ 




Ti 


pj 







co 


(i) 


PI 




rH 


■H 





«f 


-P 


3 





fa 
O 






1 




rH 


o 



CO 

rH -iH 

3 c 

rl 
W 



-224- 



r~- oj oj oj m co ro v"\i j- in h 
O cn en LT\ r<n t — o OJ r^i r— oj 
I^UD CO HO O CO O 

rH OJ r<~\ 



U3 O OJ OJ Jt 

<J) OM!0 H J- 



CO 



WOOHOrAWJ-inH 
r-< J" CTi I — VD OJ KM — OJ 
rH VD OWU3 

OJ r<n 



J-JCOWHNWH(MC\ir^ 
r^ CTMTMnO CT\ LC> I — UD O rH 

r<no r~- ai i h c\i a h 



OJ i-^| , 



KVTN LOI — LT\ CO 
rH CO rH Cn rH 



Jt VX> VX) CO LPlP^VO O r-{ 
J- rH OJ O rH 



OJ r^i rH 



Lnnj'D itmtio zt pokij- 

r— O t\J VD CTi LTYJ3 CO OJ I — 
(AJ CM ITlH ai w nto 



'** 



<-t i^h 



r^v LT\J- jj- r^\ r-O OJ 

I — I — Cn CO OJ 
r-i r-< .Zf 



OJI"— OJrHOJl^OJr^bOj- 

oj r^y co r— .it ^O co oj i — 

rH OJ CO r-OCO 



encnencnmcnencno o 
o cncncncncncncncno 

• en_jj- iTnJ cn cn cn en m pj 
inn w c\j r^n^ lo^d i — to 

«• l 1 I l I I \ I 1 1 

MOOoOOOOOOO 
0^0000000 

cirioinoir\ooooo 

D H W rj r^y r^vAj" LTY^Q P— CO 



o 



OJ 

o 
en 

oj" 



cn 

OJ 



OJ 



a 



co 

K^ 

co 

oj" 



co 
oj 






cn 

oj" 



en 
o 
r— 



^ 



o 



Pi 
o 



> 

• H 
Pi 

P! 
o 

■H 

-p 

CO 

rl 
•P 

CO 



i 



rl 


> 

o 
o 



rH 

rH 
CO 
Pi 
O 
•H 
-P 
CO 



cn 



^o 



-p 


«• 


o 





Eh 


O 




& 




o 




co 





rl 


o 


CU 


-P 


n 




i 


+J 





rl 


-p 


O 


rH 


rH 








co 


rl 






HH 


•* 


CJ 


O 




Pi 


t«n 


H 


c 




■H 


» 


Pi 



o 


[1 


Pi 


H 


CO 


rH 


•H 




rH 


TJ 


H 


a 


^ 





o 

•rH 


a 


C 


'ii 


03 


V) 



o « 



9818 



U « 

II 



g 

a 



-225- 



h ff» r- if> h 



CTi ^£) IT* <-« 



OJ O J- IT\ 



(VI O K"» C-J 



f»-\ C"\ i-< Vfl OJ 



vo w »-* cu 



Kf KN 



i 

5 



3 



-226- 



kn cy ft) cu <y r- 

H S N m ^ Vfl 

nc m r— 



m kn kn in 



ir\ k\ w 



r— m m .* 



KN OJ K\ 



i 

o 

s 



I J* I ft) »-• M ft) ft; 

I I I I t I 1 I 

1 -=f I ftl .-4 r-t ftl ft) 






I r- J* KN ITN 

H. p4 H 

I ftl rvj to ft) 



ON 60 ITN 



P o en 

ftl ftl r4 



ON *0 ITN 



i tr\ # w i r 

I ft) O ftl K\ r-t 



«-» C I 



rV * 

a 1 
g a 



i r-i in r— ir\ r-i _.* <-t li-t i 
H 

I «-t Kl H H I 1 I t I t 

I I ft) \£> J- .H J* r-i I «H I 

I rH I— ON KN ftl KN tfN r«- J* r-t 

I O VU j» ft) | I I I I I 

1 r^r-lir»fHftJKSiri|^-J»rH 



ft 



l i ir w 4 r- r— • kn 

I i j* cr\ 

I I r-t KN 



in ft) I 



I i <h ^- jf r— \D fti 

M •-« 

I I O V*> ftl jn I I 

ftj r-* 

I I rH iH ft) ft) VC ft) 

( I KN 60 VO I KN I 

I 1 K> *0 IP- t CU I 

I I I. I H I <H I 



5 I 



8 u 



on on ON o f, » ON ON ON ON ON 



R 1 



UN O IT* 



5 R 



-227- 

TABLE 1S4 

TAPIOCA DRY PRODUCTS INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED lYEEKLY EARNINGS OP FACTORY EMPLOYEES 

JULY, 1933 







Number 


Per ce 


nt 


Cumulative 


Weekly 




cf 


of 




per cent of 


Earnings 




Employees 


Total 




Total 


Cio.oo - 


|14.99 


5 


3.08 




3.88 


15.00 - 


19.99 


46 


35.65 




39.53 


20.00 - 


24.99 


55 


42.64 




82.17 


25.00 - 


29.99 


14 


10.85 




93.02 


30.00 - 


39.99 


9 


6.98 




100.00 


Total 




129 


100.00 







Source: Questionnaire returns, 6 out of 18 establishments 
in the industry reporting. 

National Recovery Administration, Division of 
Research and Planning. The Tapioca Dry Products 
Industry, prepared by G. K. Hamill, February 2, 1934. 



-228- 

TABLE 135 

PRINTING INK INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED thtjely hours of factory wage earners 

DURING A TYPICAL TfJEEK, 1933. 



Hours worked 
Per Week 



Under 20 
20 - 29.9 
30 - 34.9 
35 - 39.9 
40 - 44.9 
45 - 49.9 
50 - 59.9 
60 and over 



TOTAL 1,446 



Number 


of 


Cumulative 


Cumulative 


Employe 


!CS 


Total 


Per Cent 








of Total 


15 




15 


1.0 


27 




42 


2.9 


11 




53 


3.7 


70 




123 


8.6 


532 




655 


45.6 


537 




1,192 


82.4 


223 




1,415 


97.9 


31 




1,446 


100.0 



Source: Questionnaire returns from 96 establishments reporting to the 
NRA. National Recovery Administration, Division of Research & 
Planning. The Printing Ink Industry, prepared by G.K.Hamill, 
January 19, 1934. 



HOT O 



STABLE 136 (a) 

PRINTING INK INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY WAGE EARNERS 
IN THE NORTH DURING A TYPICAL WEEK, 1933. 



Hourly 

Ear nings 



Under 10 cents 
in - 19.9 cents 
20 - 24.9 cents 
25 - 29.9 cents 
30 - 34.9 cents 
35 - 39,9 cents 
40 - 49.9 cents 
50 - 59.9 cents 
60 - 79.9 cents 
RO - 99.9 cents 
Cl.00 or more 

TOTAL 







Cumulative 


Number of 


Cumulative 


Per Cent 


Employees 


Total 


of Tetal 


1 


1 


0.1 


5 


6 


A.4 


16 


22 


1.6 


47 


69 


4.9 


55 


124 


8.7 


96 


220 


15.5 


269 


489 


34.5 


486 


975 


68. fi 


324 


1,299 


91.6 


73 


1,372 


96.5 


46 


1,410 


100. o 



1,418 



Source: Questionnaire returns from 88 establishments reporting t<» the 
NRA. National Recovery Administration, Division of Research & 
Planning. The Printing Ink Industry, prepared by G.K. Hamill, 
January 19, 1934. 



9818 



-RO- 
TABLE 136 (Id) 

PRINTING INK INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY VflVGE EARNERS 
IN THE SOUTH DURING A TYPICAL V/EEK, 1933. 



Hourly- 
Earnings 

Under 10 cents 

10 -' 19.9 cer.ts 

20 - 24.9 cents 

25 -' 29.9 cents 

30 - 34.9 cents 

35 - 39.9 cents 

40 - 49.9 cents 

50 - 59.9 cents 

60 - 79.9 cents 

80 - 99.9 cents 

$1.00 or more 

TOTAL 



Number of 
Employees 



Cumulative 
Total 



1 
1 
4 
5 
7 
3 
3 
4 



1 
2 
6 
11 
10 
21 
24 
28 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 
of Total 



28 



Source: Questionnaire returns from 8 establishments reporting to the 
NRA. National Recovery Administration, Division of Research ( 
Planning. The Printing Ink Industry, prepared by G.K.Hamill, 
January 19, 1934. 



-231- 



TJJBLE 137 

taffi: : o zf tfjic? ifdustry 
avf3age of 17eekxt hours, 30uhlt aid f3efly ea3fifgs, b! 

Fourteen iionths, December 1033 - December 1935 



201 OF 





:Fo. of 


:Aver. hrs. 


sAver.^age 


: Formal full-- 


: Total man- 


:Fo. of plants 


Periof: and 


(Employ— 


:per v;eeh : 


: (cts. per 


: tine- hrs. ' 


: hour 


[Reporting 


Segion 


: ees 




: hour) 


:per week ' 


: worked 




Dec- 1933 














!c th* 


756 


: 42.6 ■• 


: 39.2 ■ 


: 43.8 ' 


: 123548 


: 15 


rth'- 


140 


: -35.4 •' 


i tJt_; • x) 


: -47.9 ' 


: 19579 


: 14 


Dotal ' or 




J....'../: : 










■Ft ' d aver. 


906 


41.5 •■ 


t 41.2 : 


: 43.7 ' 


: 1431 27 


: 29 


J ily 1334 


e 












South ' 


844 


: 35.7 : 


: 38.3 ; 


40.8 •■ 


: 127609 


: 14 


forth.' 


357 


: -33.0 


: -51.7 ; 


: -47.9 


: 23155 


: 4 


Total: of 


t ' 




" Ft ' 6 aver. 


■ 1211 


35.1 


45.7 ' 


: 48.7 


: 150754 


: 18 


Se; t. :1934 


' ; 












30'u.tF '• 


735 


34.8 : 


38.9 


40.0 


: 105944 


: 14 


Forth : 


278 


•32.7 ' 


■49.9 


: -40.0 


: 13822 


: 4 


Total : of 




• 




:-■'." 






trght'd aver. 


1043 


54.5 


40.5 


40.0 


: 124766 


:.,..' 18 


Oct. 1934 














South 


850 


36.2 : 


40.3 ' 


: 40.0 


-142008 


14 


Forth : 


313 


■32.0 : 


■50.9 '• 


: '40.0 


23806 


6 


Total of 






light 'd aver. 


1163 




41.8 : 


: 40.0 " 


155814 


20 


Nov. 1934 














Forth ! 


300 


33.7 : 


■■. .6 


: 40.0 : 


22292 


■ 14 


South 


800 


•oOi o 


U 1 . -> 


: 40.0 


113851 


5 


Total of 






rcght 1 d aver. ! 


1190 


35 . 2 


39.8 


: 40.0 


136153 


19 


Dec. 1934 














SOUth ■ 


802 . 


35.4 •• : 


39.8 


: 40.0 ■ 


113432 : 


' 14 


■ orth : 


_332 


•3;F0 ' : 


55,7 •" 


: 40.0 


19219 : 


5 


Total of : 






v Ft ' & aver. : 


1134 : 
$ . 


35.7 : : 


42.1 ' 


40.0 : 


132651 : 


20 


Jan. 1935 : 










] 




South ' : 


880 : 


35.9 : ; 


58.3 : 


40.0 : 


140532 : 


' 14 


Forth : : 


286 : 


34.0 ■ : 


51.3 ' 


40.0 : 


23283 ! 


6 


Total of : 






wght'd' aver. : 


1156 : 


35.3 : 


40.7 ' 


40.0 ! 


153815 : 


20 



-232- 

TABLS:137 (Cont'd) 
TA NNING EXTRACT INDUSTRY 
AVERAGE OF WEEKLY HOURS, HOURLY AMD WEEKLY EARNINGS, 3Y REGION 
Fourteen Months, December 1933 - December 1935 





:.No. of :Av 


er.. hrs.. 


Aver. TJsge 


Normal full~:T 


ots.l man- 


No. of plants 


Period and , 


:ETrroloy-: 


per 


(ots.. per 


time hrs. :h 


our 


Reporting 


Region 


: ees t . 


7eek 


hour) 


per. week :v; 


orked 




Feb. 1935 














South 


: 8x1 : . 


36.1 


33. 9 


.40.0 : . 


114148 . 


14 


Forth 


: 359 : . 


34.5 


52.1 


40.0 : . 


21600 . 


7 


Total of 






v/ght ' d aver.. 


: 1170 . : . 


35.6 _ 


41.1 


40.0 , : . 


135748 . 


21 


March 1935 . 






■ 








South 


: 879 : 


35. 6 


38.9 


.40.0 : 


120630 


: 14 


North 


: 341 : 


36.0 


54.5 


40.0 : • 


22026 . 


: 7 


Total of 














i.'ght'd aver.. 


: 1220 : 


35.7 


41.4 


.40.0 p t . 


142556 


21 


April 1935 . 














South 


: 854 : . 


36.5 


3S.3 


40.0 : . 


123899 


14 


North 


: 3S4 : 


34.6 


51.3 


.40.0 : 


22029 


6 


Total of 






v/ght'd aver.. 


: 1218 : 


36.0 


40.2 _ 


40.0 : 


145928 . 


: 20 


May 1935 














South 


: 677 : 


35.8 


39.6 


40.0 : 


104927 


: 12 


North 


: 316 : 


33.0 


49.1 


.40.0 : . 


19263 . 


4 


Total of 






T7ght'd aver. 


: 993 : 


34.9 


41.1 


.40.0 : 


124190 


: 16 


Aug. 1935 '. 














South 


: 754 : 


36.3 


39.1 


.40.0 : 


120937 


13 


North 


: 497 : 


34.6 


51.2 


.40.0 : 


28246 


6 


Total of 






wght ' d aver. 


: 1251 : 


35.7 | 


41.4 


.40.0 : 


149183 


19 


Sept. 1935 














South 


: 715 : 


35.6 


39.5 


40.0 : 


102476 


13 


North 


: 385 : 


35.3 


: 51.2 


: 40.0 : 


25974 


6 


Total of 






rght'd aver. 


: 1100 : 


35.5 _ 


41.9 


.40.0 : • 


128450 


19-. 


Dec. 1935 














South 


: 808 : 


37.8 


33.6 


40.0 : 


121795 . 


12 


North 


: 551 : 


35.2 


50.8 


40.0 : 


30512 . 


6 


Total of 








v/^ht'd aver. 


: 1359 : 


37.3 


41.0 


40. ) : 


152407 


18 


Source: Rep 


Drt on ' 


s and hoi 


irs of Labor. Tabulated b 


r the Code 


; Authority 


for 


the Nation 


al Recov< 


sty Adminisl 


; rat ion Divisio 


n of Resej 


ireh and 



Planning. 



9818 



-233- 

TABLE 133 



TC BE UoiE "TTH CAUTION 



BLEaCHJD SHELLAC INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURS OF ,'ORX PER .."EEX OF FACTORY ELIPLOYSES 
Pre-Code 1933 



Hours worked 
per week 



Factory Employees 



Number of 
wa°:e earners 



Per cent 
of total 



Cumulative 
•per c ent 
of total 



Less than 40 



8.6 



8.6 



> 



43 - 44.9 



45 - 49.9 



16 



59 



15.2 



56.2 



23,8 



80.0 



50 - 59.9 



14 



13.3 



93.3 



60 or more 



6.7 



100.0 



Total 



105 



100.0 



SOURCE: Data from questionnaires of national .'ecovery Administration, 6 concerns 
reporting. National Recovery Admini strati on, Division of Research and 
planning. The Bleached Shellac Industry, prepared by G. X. Hamill, January 
26, 1934. 



qpt n 



-234- to 33 USED WITH CAUTION 

TABLE 133 

BLEACHED SHELLAC INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY EMPLOYEES, 

PRE-CODE 1933 



Earnings 
per hour 
(cents ) 



Number of 
employees 



Per cent 
of total 



Cumulative per 
cent of total 



Under 10 
10 - 19.9 
20 - 24.9 
25 - 29.9 
30 - 34.9 
35 - 39.9 
40 - 49.9 
50 - 59.9 
60 - 79.9 
80 - 99.9 
Ol.OO ©r more 



2 
2 
3 

11 
18 
29 
34 
4 
2 



1.90 

1.90 

2.87 

10.47 

17.15 

27.61 

32.39 

3.81 

1.90 



1.90 
3.80 
6.67 
17.14 
34.29 
61.90 
94.29 
98.10 
100.00 



Total 



105 



100.00 



SOURCE: Data from questionnaires of National Recovery Administration, 6 concerns 
reporting. National Recovery Administration Division of Research and 
Planning. The Bleached Shellac Industry, prepared by G. K. Hamill, 
January 2 6, 1934. 



9818 



•235- 



TALLL 140 

DRY COLOR 3 I.TloIVY 

Ufii Ji FACTORS I Lr-LOIEKSJ 

rp~~' ;T i T ' 1 H» O "i 



Hours '■ orked dumber of Cuy.iulu.tive Cumulative her 

Per I'ieek Employees Total Cent o? Total 



Under 20 8 S 

20 - 29. C 28 

30 - 34-o 9 ' 25 

35 - q 9.9 ' 190 251 15-7 



40 - 44-9 7<^4 1,045 65-6 

310 1,355 B5.U 

169 1,524 95.6 

) and over 70 l s 594 100.0 

Total 1,594 





S 




36 




61 




- 3x 


lj 


045 


!>■ 


355 


1, 


524 


1, 


594 



Source: C/uestionnaire returns from 37 concerns to the LIRA. 

Natic i ftecoverj Administr. bion Division of Research 
and rlonnin^ . Tl;o Dry Colore Industry,, prepared by 



9R1R 



-236- 

TA3LE 141 

DRY COLOP.S INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EA-i:I-'GS OF FACTORY ELPLOYEES, BY 
SIZE OF CITY, DURING A TYPICAL .ffiEK, 19^3. 



Cities over 250,000 Cities less than 250 t qoq 
Cumu- Cumu- 

Number Cumu- lative Number Cumu- lative 
of lative 70 of of lative of 

Hourly Earnings _ Employees Total Tot al Totrl T otal Total 



Less than 10 cents 

10 - 19.9 

20 - 2U.9 

25 - 29.9 

30 - 3^.9 1 

35 - 39.9 17S 

kO - 49. 9 280 

50 - 39.9 213 

60 - 79.9 131 

80 - 99.9 22 

$1.00 or more 1? 







16 


16 


2.3 


1 


0.1 


24 


40 


5.9 


179 


20.3 


35 


75 


11.0 


459 


5^.5 


272 


3^7 


50.9 


672 


79. ? 


158 


505 


74.1 


803 


95- U 


128 


633 


92.9 


325 


98.0 


33 


666 


97.7 


842 


100.0 


16 


682 


100.0 



Total 



842 



682 



Source: Questionnaire returns from 37 concerns to NRA. National 

Recovery Administration Division of Research and planning. 
The Dry Colors Industry, prepared by if, A. Gill, December 
19. 1933. 



9818 



TABLE 142 ■ 

DEY COLORS IliD" STEY 
CLASSIFIED rfEpLY EAR T:.SS OF OFFICE EIFPLGYEES 
' ' BY SIZE, OF CITY, DUEL G A TYPICAL ,ffiEK,1933 



Weekly Earni ngs _ 
Less than $5.00 
5.00 - 9-99 

10.00 - 14.99 
15.00 - 19.99 
20.00 - 24.99 
25.00 - 29.99 
30.00 - 39.99 

40.00.- 59.99 
60.00 £:ncl over 



Cit i e s over 250,000 



Ci ties less than 250,000 

CUiHU- 

CunTu- lative 



CU.U 

Number Cui.ru- lative: Uumbex 

of lative )o of : of 
Employees Total T otal ; Employees Total 



lative "jo of 
Total 









1 


1 


- 1.2 


2 


2 


1..7 


f 

6 


7 


• S.2 


15 


17 


14. 8 


32 


39 


45.9 


3^ 


51 


44.3 


19 


53 


• 63.2 


21 


72 


62.6 


13 


71 


S3. 5 


27 


99 


86.1 


11 


82 


.96.4 


9 


10s 


93-9 


3 


S5 


100.0 


7 


115 


100.0 









. Total 



115 



85 



Source: Questionnaire ret'orns from 37 concerns to the NEa. National 
Recovery Adi.iinistra.tion Division of Research and Planning. 
The Dry Colors Industry, prepared by »'. A. Gill, December 19, 
1933. 



9818 



-238- 

TA3LE 143 

SULFHOITATED OILS INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED " 3SKLT HOU 3 CP FACTORY '..AGE EARNERS 
WEEK REPRESENTATIVE OP JUNE, 1933 



Number of Hours 
worked Per Week 



Number of ""age Earners 

Factory Cumulative 

I'ale Female Total Per Cent Per Cent 



20 hours or under 1 

25.1 to 30 hours 5 

50.. 1 to 35 hours 3 

35.1 to 40 hours 56 

40,1 to 45 hours 30 

45.1 to 50 hours 55 

50.1 to 55 hours 61 

55.1 to 60 hours 66 

60.1 to 65 hours 26 

65.1 to 70 hour:; 11 

70.1 to 75 hours 2 

75.1 to 30 hours 3 

Over 80 hou^s 10 

350 



1 


.3 


.3 


5 


1.4 


1.7 


3 


.8 


2.5 


56 


15.8 


1.8.3 


32 


9.0 


27,3. 


56 


15.7 


43. Q 


85 


23. 9 


66.9 


66 


18.5 


35.4 


26 


7.3 


92.7 


11 


3.1 


95.8 


3 


.6 


96.4 


3 


.8 


97.2 


10 


2.8 


100.0 



356 



100. 



Source: NRA questionnaire returns, 28 establishments reporting, 

National Recovery Administration Division of Research and 
Planning. "The Sulphonated Oils Industry, prepared by 
G. K. Hamill., May 10, 1934. 



•J818 



TABLE 144 

sulphoi:atsd oils industry 

classified hourly earnings or factory "iage earners, 
neek representative of june, 1933. 







Number 


of -Facte 


>ry \iage 


Earners 




Actual 


L Earnings 
Hour 










Cumulative 


Per 


I tale 


Female 


Total 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


(Cents) 












20 to 


24.9 


4 


- 


4 


1.1 


1-1 


25 to 


29.9 


7 


3 


10 


2. 3 


3.9 


30 to 


34.9 


17 


2 


19 


5.3 


9.2 


35 to 


39.9 


. 19 


- 


19 


5.3 


14.5 


40 to 


44.9 


34 


1 


35 


9.8 


24.3 


45 to 


49.9 


40 


- 


40 


11.2 


35.5 


50 to 


54.9 


59 


- 


59 


16.6 


52.1 


55 to 


59,9 


33 


- 


58 


10.7 


62.3 


60 to 


69.9 


62 


- 


62 


17.5 


80.3 


70 to 


79.9 


42 


- 


42 


11.8 


92.1 


80 or 


more 
Totals 


28 . 

350 


__ 


28 

356 ' 


7.9 

1C0.0 


100.0 




'6 





Source: NRA questionnaire returns, 28 establishments reporting. 
National Recovery Administration Division of Research 
and Planning. "The 3ul;ohonated Oils Industry," prepared 
by G. K. Hamill, May 10, 1934. 



9818 



-240-., 
TABLE 145 

ANIMAL GLUE INDUSTRY 

NUMBER OF FACTORY VttGE EARNERS FORKING SPECIFIED 
HOURS DURING A WEEK RE RESENTATIVE OF 
JUNE, 1933 



Number of 
Hours Tforked 



Hour 


S OY 


■ Under 


.1 to 


25 


hours 


.1 " 


30 


i? 


.1 " 


35 


ii 


.1 " 


40 


it 


.1 " 


45 


ii 


.1 " 


50 


ii 


.1 " 


55 


ii 


.1 " 


60 


ti 


'.1 " 


65 


it 


.1 " 


70 


it 


.1 " 


75 


ii 


.1 " 


80 


ii 


rer 


80 


ii ' . 



Number of 
Wafee Earners 



Male 


Femal e 


24 




9 


_ 


5 


_ 


26 


2 


59 


2 


49 


11 


101 


8 


38 


_ 


40 


3 


22 


_ 


20 


_ 


7 


_ 


3 


_ 


4 


- 



Total 



407 



26 



3URCE: 



Data obtained from questionnaires sent out by the Natio al Recovery 
Administration, 15 concerns reporting. National Recovery Administration 
Division of Research and Planning. The Animal Glue Industry, prepared 
by G. K. Hamill, May 7, 1934. 



9813 



-241- 

TA3LE I4§ 
AlitLiAi GLUE INDUSTRY 
NIBffiER OF FACTORY WAGE EARNERS EMPLOYED 
IN REPORTING ESTABLISHMENTS WORKING SPECIFIED 
SHIFTS AIID SHIFT-HOURS 















June 


1929 












1 


SHIFT 






2 SHIFTS 


3 SHIFTS 


11-01111)6 


r Hours 


Hunt s r 


Wr.ge 


Number 


Wage 


Number 


Wage 


Worked 


Estab. 


Earners 


Es 


tab . 


Earners 


Estab. 


Earners 


Per S" 


lift 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. F. 


M. 


M. 


7 to 


7.9 


— 


— 


— 


~ 


— 


- 


- - 


- 


- 


8 ii 


8.9 


— 


3 


— 


11 


- 


- 


_ _ 


2 


158 


9 n 


9.9 


2 


1 


29 


6 


p 


1 


58 30 


- 


- 


10 ii 


10.9 


4 


- 


53 


- 


fm 


- 


- - 


- 


- 


11 n 


11.9 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


164 - 


- 


- 


12 ii 


12.9 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


52 - 


- 


- 



Total 



6 4 



82 



17 



274 30 



158 



1 SHIFT 



June 1933 

2 SHIFTS 



3 SHIFTS 



Numb 


er Hours 


Worked 


Per 


Shift 


7 to 


7.9 


8 " 


3.9 


9 » 


9.9 


10 " 


10.9 


11 » 


11.9 


12 '« 


12.9 



Number Wage Number Wager. 

Estab. Earners Estab. Earners 



M. F. 
- 12 
10 - 



M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


1 


3 


33 


12 


** 


1 


3 


1 


40 


2 


1 


- 


4 


— 


35 


— 


— 


— 



Total 



9 4 112 14 2 1 



62 - 
72 12 



Numb e r Wage 
Estab. Earners 



M. 



3 
1 



M. 



156 
67 



323 



November 1933 
1 SHIFT 2 SHIFTS 



Number Hours Number 
Worked Estab. 

Per Shift m. F 



Wage 
Earners 

M. F. 



Number 
Estab 

M. F. 



Wage 
Earners 

M. F. 



3 SHIFTS 

Number Wage 
Est "ib Earners 



M. 



M. 



7 to 7.9 

.8 '■ 8.9 

9 " 9.9 

10 " 10.9 



i „ 

3 4 

1 - 

1 - 



15 - 

45 15 

5 - 

4 - 



2 1 



83 22 



1 
6 



90 
410 



Source: N.R.A. questionnaire returns. Tabulated by the Bureau of the census 

for the National Recovery Administration, Division of Research and 
9818 . Planning of April 10, 1934. 



-24 ■ 
TAE?^ 147 

ANIMAL GLUJ INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY ^ tLTl G£ . i&* liiC.JtlS D'JRIJG 



Actual Earnings 

Per Hour -• Cents 



Number of 
Male 



age 



earners 
• le 



Urder 10/ 
10/ to 14.9/ 
15/ to 19.9/ 
20/ to 34.9/ 
25/ to 29„! / 
SOef to 34.9/ 
35/ to 39.9/' 
40/ to 44.9/' 
45/ to 49.9/ 
60/ to 54.9/ 
55/ to 59.9/ 
GO/ to 69„9/ 
70/ to 79.9/ 
80/ or more 



• 1 
5 

"78 
115 
111 

• 56 
l r .. 
20 

I 



R 

.16 



Total 



40', 



26 



SOURCE: ' Data obtained from questionhaij . 
leoover"y i'.dm r.d 



sent out by the If 



i onal 



tration, 15 concerns reporting. National aeoo"v 
Idministjration Division of Research and lanrri'ng* ■ ! " unal 

Glue Industry, ■prepared by G»_E U Haraill, I.-[ay 7, 1954, 






-243- 



K E USED YTTH CAUTION 



TABLE 1 148 

.ADHESIVE. IEBUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF WORK FOR 
FACTORY' WAGS EARIEES 



For a typical Pre-Code week of 1933 



A C T R Y W A G- S E A R Y E R S 



Hour a Worked 
Per Week' 



20 hours or less 
20. - 29.9 
30. - 34.9 
35. - 39.9 
40. - 44.9 
45. - 49.9 
50. - ^9.9 
60. or more 

Total 







Cumulative 


[lumber 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


1 


.7 


.7 


2 


1.4 


2.1 


4 


2.7 


4.8 


6 


4.0 


8.8 


42 


28.2 


37.0 


27 


18.0 


55.0 


65 


43.6 


98.6 


2 


1.4 


100.0 


149 


100.0 


100.0 



Source: SEA questionnaire returns, 13 establishments reporting. 
TABULATED 3Y TEE BUREAU OF THE CEKSUS 7 iARCH 8, 1934. 
for the Hational Recovery Administration Division of 
Res ear ch and Planning. 



9760 



-244- 

TO BE USED "rtTH CAUTION 

TABLE 149 

ADHESIVE INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY WAGE 
EARNERS FOR A TYPICAL PRE-CODE WEEK OF 

1933 



Factory Wage E arners 



Cumulat ive 
Hourly Earnings Number Percent Percent 



Under 10 cents - 

10 - 19.9 3 2.0 2.0 

20 - 24.9 • 3 2.0 4.0 

25 - 29.9 8 5.4 9.4 

30 - 34.9 10 S.7 16.1 

35 - 39.9 35 23.5 39.6 

40 - 49.9 3? 21.5 61.1 

50 - 59.9 ' 18 12.1 73.2 

60 - 79.9 27 18.1 91.3 

80 - 99.9 9 6.0 97.3 

1.00 - or. more 4 2.7 100.0 

Total 14 9 lOQ.O 1QQ.0 

Source: N.R, A. questionnaire Returns, 13 establishments reporting. 
Tabulated by the Bureau of the Census , Farch 8, 1934, for 
the National Recovery Administration Division of Research 
y and Planning. 



9760 



•245- 



TC BE USED 'TT, CAUTION 



TaBLS-- 150 (a) 

ADHESIVE INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY EAHFIITC-S OP 
FACTORY EMPLOYEES 

For a typical Pre-Code week of 1933 



Weekly Earnings 



FACT ORY E MPLOYEES 

Cumulative 
dumber Per Cent Per Cent 



Less than $5.00 
$5.00 - 09.99 
$10.00 - $14.99 
$15.00 - $19.99 
$20.00 - $24.99 
$25.00 - $29.99 
$30.00 - $39.99 
$40.00 - $59.99 
$60.00 or more 



Total 



16 

47 

31 

23 

26 

2 

1 

149 



2.0 


2.0 


10.7 


12.7 


31.5 


44.2 


20.8 


65.0 


15.4 


80.4 


17.5 


97.9 


1.4 


99. 3 


,7 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



Source: IIRA questionnaire returns, 13 establishments reporting. 

TABULATED BY THE BUREAU OF THE CENSUS MARCH 8, 1934. 
for the National Recovery Administration Division of 
Research and Planning. 



9760 



-246- 

-rrrr- r./T'TICN 



TABLE 150 (b) 

ADHESIVE INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED T.EEKLY EARNINGS OF OFFICE EMPLOYEES 
FOR A TYPICAL PRE- CODE WEEK OF 1935 



Office Employees 

Cumulative 
Weekly Earnings Numbe r Perce nt F arce nt 

Less than $5.00 

$5.00 - $9.S9 4 

$10.00 - $14.99 5 

$15.00 - $19.99 18 

$20.00 - $24.99 11 

$25.00 - i29.99 11 

$30.00 - $39,99 7 

$40.00 - $59.99 5 

$60.00 or more 3 ' 

Total 54 ; 



Source: N.R.A. questionnaire returns, 13 establishments reporting. 
Tabulated by the Bureau of the Census, March 8, 1934. For 
the National Recovery Administration, Division of Research 
and Planning. 



9760 



-' 47- 

TC -:, USED * ITT CAUTION 



TABLE 1.51 . 

INK AND ADHESIVE INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED .EEKLY HOURS OE V/OSK EOE FACTORY hAC-E EARNERS, 
TYPICAL PEE- CODE WEEK OE 1933 



Hours 
forked 


• 


20 


hours or less 


20 


- 29. 


9 


30. 


- 34. 


9 


35 


- 39. 


9 


40 


- 44. 


9 


45 


- 49. 


9 


50 


- 59. 


9 


60 


or inore 





a'&G 


tory 


V<age Earners 












Cumulative 


PUE 


iber 




Percent 


Percent 


2 






■ .6 


.6 


4 






1.1 


1.7 


12 






3.3 


5.0 


72 






20.0 


25.0 


71 






19.7 


44.7 


1E6 






51.7 


96.4 


10 






2.8 


99.2 


3 






.8 


100.0 



Total 



360 



100.0 



Source: NRA questionnaire returns, IS concerns reporting. Tabulation 
by the Bureau .f the Census for the National Recovery Admini- 
stration Division of Research and Planning, March 30, 1934, 



9818 



To Be Used 7ith Caution 
TABLE 152 

I UK AHD ADHESIVE I1DUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARJfirGS OF FACTORY '7AGS EARNERS 
TYPICAL PRE-CODE UEEK OF 1933 



Hourly Earnings Factory Wage Earners 

Cents Per Hour Cumulative 
Number Per Cent Per Cent - 

Under 10 cents -* 

10 - 19. D 24 6.7 6.7 

20 - 24.9 41 11.3 18.0 

25 - 29.9 33 9.2 27.2 

30 - 34.9 : ; 31 8.6 35.8 

35 - 39.9 42 11.7 47.5 

40 - 49.9 42 11.7 59.2 

50 - 59. 9 : ; 54 15.0 74.2 

60 - 79.9 ; 70 19.4 93.6 

80 - 99.9 18 5.0 98.6 

100 and over - _ 5 1.4 100,0 

Total 360 100.0 



SOURCE: IRA questionnaire returns. 19 concerns reporting. Tabulation 
by the Bureau of the Census for the National Recovery Adminis- 
tration Division of Research and Planning, March 30, 1934. 



9818 



-249- 
TABLE 153 



,it.i C. si -;j 



Iffi AND ADHESIVE ILIDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY EARHIKG-S OE EACTOEY 7JAGE EARNERS 
TYPICAL PRE-CODE WEEK OE 1933 



(To be Used with Caution) 



Weekly Earnings 
(dollars) 



Factory ..'age Earners 



Number 



Per Cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Under 5.00 



5,00 co 9.99 _ 
10.00 to 14.99 
15.00 to 19.99 
20. Q0 to 24.99 
25.00 to 29.99 
30.00 to 39.99 
40.00 to 59.99 
60. Ot) or more 
Total . 



28 


7.8 


7.8 


08 


30.0 


37.8 


76 


21.1 


58.9 


55 


15.3 


74.2 


45 


12.5 


88.7 


37 


10.2 


96.9 


11 


3.1 


100.0 



360 



100.0 



SOURCE: FRA questionnaire returns, 19 concerns reporting. Tabulation 
by the Bureau of the Census for the National Recovery Adminis- 
tration Division of E~search and Planning, March 30, 1934. 



9819 



-250- 

T0 3E USED WITH CAUTION 

TABLE 154 



INK AND ADHESIVE INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY EARNINGS OE OEEICE EMPLOYEES, 
TYEICAL FEE-CODE VEEK OE 1933 



Weekly Earnings 
(dollrrs) 



Number 



Under 5.00 
5.00 to 9.99 
10.00 to 14.99 
15. DO to 19.99 
20.00 to £4.99 
25.00 to 29.99 
30.00 to 39.99 
40.00 to 59.99 
60.00 or more 



4 
IS 
48 



b 

12 

9 



J 



Total 



125 



Source: NBA questionnaire returns, 21 concerns reporting. Tabulation 
by. the Bureau of the Census for the National Recovery Adminis- 
tration . Division of Research and Planning, riarch 30, 1934. 



q«1 R 



-251- 



TO BE USED ".VlTIi CAUTION 
TABLE 155 

natupal :_^ga:::c pp: ducts (a) 

CLASSIFIED 'J'ZBKLY HOURS OP J&HK PGP PACT'PY 
'.TAGE ZAGPS-.S, PAYPCLL GEEK REPRESENTATIVE r P 
1932 PEAK PERIOD 



our s 






Jo rite d 




Hal 


20 'rurs or les 


3 1 


20.1 - 


25 


4 


25.1 - 


30 


- 


30.1 - 


35 


13 


35.1 - 


GO 


22 


10.1 - 


45 


145 


45.1 - 


50 


65 


50.1 - 


f Q 




55.1 - 


60 


7 


60.1 - 


65 


! / 


65.1- - 


70 


1 


70.1 - 


75 


- 


75.1 - 


30 


- 


Cver 80 


1 



Female Total 



13 

.23 

19 162 

3 70 

- 4 

7 



Total 275 24 299 



(a) Industry includes Botanical Drugs, Essential Gils, Spirit and 
Gil Soluble "urn, fafcer Soluble Gum, Tonka and Vanilla Beans. 

Source: NBA questionnaire returns, 37 concerns reporting. Tabula- 
tion oy the Bureau of t.e Census for L.e National Recovery 
Administration Division of Hesearcli and Planning, koril 19, 

19Z4 . 

9313 



-252- 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 



TA3LE 156 

NATURAL ORGANIC PRODUCTS INDUSTRY (a) 

NUMBER ON NACTCRY WAGE EARNERS EMPLOYED IN ESTABLISHMENTS WORKING 3PECI- 
riED SHUTS AND SNIFT 1ICUHS, PAYROLL ,7EEK REPRESENTATIVE OF PEAK PERIOD 



Hours 


1929 


1 


932 






19S3 


'Jerked 


1 Shift 


1 


3- -if 


t 


J. 


3- 


Lift 


oer Shift 


1.5 ale Female 


I.Ial g 


J 


sraale 


Mai e 




Femal e 


7 - 7.9 


57 20 


60 




17 


99 


13 


3 - 8.9 


206 9 


183 




7 


180 




6 


9 - 9.9 


13 


17 






14 




- 


10 - 10.9 


12 


10 






- 




- 


Total 


238 29 


275 




: ' 


293 




24 



(a) Industry includes Botanical Drugs, Essontial' Oils, Spirit and Oil 

Soluble Gum, Water Soluble Gum, Tonics and Fanilla Beans. * 



v 



Scurce: NRA questionnaire returns, 37 concerns reverting. 

Tabulation by the Bureau of the Census for tie National 
Recovery Administration Division of Research and Planning, 
Aril 19, 1954. 



98 13 



TO BE USED TITH CAUTION 
FABLE 157 



NATURAL ORGANIC PRODUCTS INDUSTRY (a) 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARTHINGS jT FACTORY 

wage earners, payroll ./ebb: REPRESENTA- 
TIVE Or 1032 .PEAK PERIOD 



Zourly Eaunings 

Factory Wage Earners 



Cents Per '.'cur hale Female Total Percent Cunulrtive Percent 



.7 
1.0 
1.3 

3.0 

3.0 

4.7 

25.4 

23.4: 

r-n / 

43.7 

67.0 

82.9 

100.0 



Unde 


r 10 cents 


_ 


— 


- 


- 


10 - 


14.9 


2 


- 


"j 


.7 


15 - 


19.9 


1 


- 


1 




20 - 


24. 9 


1 


- 


1 


r-r 


25 - 


29.9 


3 


- 


j 


.7 


30 - 


54.9 


5 


- 


•- 


1.0 


35. - 


^9 9 


A 


1 


j 


1.7 


40 - 


44.9 


50 


12 


62 


20.7 


45 - 


49.9 


3 


6 


9 


3.0 


50 - 


54.9 


29 


1 


30 


10.0 


55 - 


59.9 


16 


- 


16 


5. 5 


60 - 


69.9 


63 


4 


72 


24.1 


70 - 


79.9 


45 


- 


A 5 


15.1 


30 and over 


51 


_ 


51 


17.1 



Total 375 24 299 100.0 



(a) Industry includes botanical Drugs, Essential Oils, Spirit and 
Soluble Gum, Water Soluble Gum, Tonka and Vanilla Beans. 

Source: NBA questionnaire returns: 37 concerns reporting. Tabu- 
lation by the Bureau of the Census for the National Re- 
covery Administration Division of' Research and Planning, 
April 19, 1934. 

9013 



-254- 






TH 

§ 



OJ 



CM 



« 
EH 

to 

S3 



- Ph 

CO 



o 



C5 

d 



>-< 

,-*; Ph 

rq o 

<! EH 

Ph o 

O Ph 
i—i 

EH Ph 

to O 



CO 



o 



Ph 

l-H 

Ph 

CO 

co 
< 

o 



-(J 

Pi 

O 

fn 



ft 

CD 
> 

•H 
-P 
«J 

a 
3 
o 



0) r*>i 

P r<~\ 

P OA 

>-3 rH 



o 

EH 

Ch 
O 

+3 

P. 

03 
O 



U 

o 
.p 
o 

a 

Ph w 

<H CD 
O J4 

In 

H O 

o S 



>jOJ 

H r<-, 
P o> 

1-3 rH 



>5 CPl 
rH C\J 

P OA 
^ rH 



P t^S 
3 CJ> 
•-3 rH 



>a CM 
rj KA 

P CT> 
»-D rH 



r-\ OJ 

P CT\ 

1-3 rH 



P, KA 

P <X\ 

-3 rH 



>iCM 
rH r^> 
P CTN 

»-3 rH 



rH CM 
P O^ 
►"3 rH 



Q31C 



Ti 




a 




H 


M 


n 


o 


i - 


o 


■■ 


* 


<n 


U 


% 


o 

ft 


o 




m 





o 



-H- 
o 



o 



J- 
o 



CO 



OJ 



C\J 



CM 



CM 



UD 



rO 



O 



m 



CTA 



C7A 



CTA 'vD 



O 



u 
S 



LC> 



o 



o 



o 



CM 



O 



o 

CM 



A+ 



rH 

O 



o 



o 



C7> 



O 

rH 



K, 



U3 



O 



OJ 



CM 






r«"\ 



CM 



O 

CJ 



1 I 



OJ 



LTl 






CTv 
1^1 



r — 



i — 



60 



LTN 
J" 



O 
3 



OJ 



tn 


CM 


J- 


.=* 


00 


CO 


O 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


o 


r^ 






LT\ 


<T\ 


rH 



CTv 






OJ 



OJ 



o 



u^ 



U3 

60 



r^ 



l/Tv 



O 



O 



60 


J" 


l-^\ 


o 


LCA 


60 


CT\ 





o 



o 


r— 


r^y 


OJ 


ir-i 


UD 


o 


OJ 


LC^ 


<JD 


f>: 


60 


60 


o 



OJ 


M 


cr\ 


60 


J- 


60 


o 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


o 


OJ 


63 


or. 


.=j- 


CTi 


C) 








60 


CPi 


CT\ 


o 



>^> 



J- 



rH 



tr\ 



60 UJ r~- 

>vO OJ rH 



OJ 



m 


o 


LT\ 


J" 


r^~\ 


\JT\ 


OA 

rH 


CO 

rH 


3- 

CM 


rH 



o 



LPl 



CD 
O 



VC 



o 



o 
o 



o 

LO 

CM 



CJ> 
60 



CO 



TH 

CJ 

ft 

0) 

>J rH 
H ft 

CD 

O >j 
O U 
CD -P 

p 

rH Xl 

Pi H 

o 

• H — 

-P CQ 

a5 h 

3 o 

-p 

CD Ci 
A 'J 

EH t\ 

U 

.■a 

.1-, o 

• -iH 

S -^ 

co 
o cS 

-P rH 

Ph 

•lH rf 

+= CH 

O 

P' «.- 

CD ''0 

u c 

•H 
CO C 

o a 

CD rH 

S Pi 

Ah 
CI li 



d Ah 

+3 o 

CO H 

CD «3 

o 

vx> CO 



CM 



0) J- 

id CTn 

uihH 

H O 



co o ro 

CD -H 

h 10 rl 



> 

v ) 



o 



CO 

c +» 

O CO 



id 
O 

CO 

cfl 

Ph 






CD 




O 
CO 



-255- 



S2i 

o 

I— I 

EH 

o 
W 

En 

l-H 



CO 

m 
o 

EH 



en 






>H 

Pi 

EH 

e 

e 



00 

PS 
O 

1 

PS 

PR 

o 
n 

EH 
l-H" 

Ph 



en 
CM 
en 



-p 

O 

U rH 

Q) cd 

Ph -p 
O 

CD Eh 
> 

■H MH 

+3 O 



CO 

1 

O 



CD r*"i 

S rn 
p en 

•"3 rH 



u 
o 
-p 
O w 

T-H CD 

r*4 

o o 

fH 

r3 



>s CM 

H m 

P en 

•"3 rH 



>sen 

rH cm 

P en 

»-3 rH 





CD l-^i 




P en 




'0 r~\ 


rH 




A 




-p 




o 


m 


FH 


>aCM 


<n 


rH 1^1 

P en 


u 


•-3 rH 


-P 




r| 




o 




o 




rl 


>scn 


o 

Ph 


rH cm 

P en 




•"3 rH 



co r-n 
P en 

h) rH 



>s CM 
rH 1^ 

P en 

""3 rH 



>a en 

rH cu 

P en 

•"3 rH 



>a CO CO 
rH E*0 -P 

B fS s 

P -iH CD 

o a o 

m b ^ 

CD 
CD 



9313 



cm rH LOirH^f or— ^rj- r^-cneno 

^o cn i-h ,3- vr> r-t cm into enen o 
oj J- h- Lncncncncncncno 



O J r^iH J- W 



r— r— to to o 



-=r r-^o enj- o^t- cm Locncno 
r-\ i-o mJ- u^v i_m en en en en o 



CO CM O fOCJM<M — to no o 
J-GO nLPiN O U3 CM cno O 

h^t J- in ir^vii en o o 



cm en j- vd r^v<o r— r— fn cm - 
• ••••••••• 

U) w c\j ai ojj- h oj nn 

CM rH H 1^ 



<0j 



O 



o Jcnw nw (M.|<iO H CM 

• ••••••••• « 

jt cnvD to LTMn^t to r-<n.-j- i o 



60 jt tO l-^i ^O J" J" rH LOi r~--~~- 

| • • • • • • •■«- • • q I 

^t" KiJ- CM CM CM VX) UD VjD O 



vX>enCMOtOCMr5^HrtOtO 
^t r<n envo to rH :zf VO r— CM 
rH LT\ CM CM tO' 



CM 



men o r— rH o o 

I — I — CM ^.O O rH to 
rH r^i rH rH rH 



I — V£> tO 

OJ LTlr- ! 



to U3 ^O VJO POi r~- fAJ NOH 
r^CAI^H r— Uj to I — Ki CM 

rH r-\ Cn rH r-H O 



moLc^OLnomoir-vo > 

O W ni^Jj J; LO LOVD V-D ( — o 
CM 



I t I 1 I I I I ! I 



5 



u 

flOLnoLnomomoirio 
pWCMi-n t^n- J- un muo ^o r— 



o 

• 

o 
o 

rH 



O 
O 



O 
O 



o 

r<n 

CM 



i — 
en 
to 



to 

CM 



CO 
-P 

o 

EH 





>s 




rl 




CD 




> 




o 




o 




~ 




PS !>s 




r< 




rH -U 




ni ci 




c 




C Ti 




•H fl 




-P l-H 




cd 




tS! - 




CO 




u 




o 




-p 




• cd 




<A o 




• -rH 




PS u 




• ^3 




t^H (0 




pq 




CD 




r ci o 




+= -rH 




4J 




O CO 




+J CO 




r-H 




yj pl, 




fl 




■rf 




■P ^ 




Th Eh 




o 




'" Ph 




CD • 




U tlO 




fi 




« -H 




CO r; 




+> c; 




fl ra 




CD rH • 




3 rH^f 






co x! cn 




■H fl rH 

rH CO 






r Q 




CO rd rH 




4^ O r^» 




CO f-4 

CD CO >s 


• 


CD Fh 


-p 


U3 CO CO 


fl 


CM CD p 


CD 


a w S 


o 




O «H f"3 


s-1 


u o 


CD 


«H 


rH 


PS rH 




CO O rH 


CD 


CD -rH -rl 


r; 


•rH CO q 


O 


• H -H CO 




55 > Hi 


MH 


d -H 


O 


a r • 




o M 


r3 


■ H 


■p 


-P JH . 


Pi 


00 O Ci3 


CD 


CD -H 


-P 


r< -P >j 


1 


O" CO 13 


CD 


r< 


r« 


fl+J'd 


vj 


O CO CD 


% 


tJ 'fl co 


CD tH ft 


rd 


co g cd 


-P 


co -3 u 


CO 


m -aj p. 


co 




CD 


• • 


r-1 


CD 




o 




^ 




o 


"rtl 


CO 



-256-. 

TA3L3 160 
Steam Solvent Naval Stores Manufacturing Industry 
Classified Weekly Hours of Work for Factory Wage 

Earners 

Week of June 15,' 1933.' 







Factory 


Wage Earners 




Hours 
Worked 


Number 


Per C e nt 


Cumulative 

Per Cpnt 


20 hours or less 


54 


5.4 

3.9 

.6 

2.0 

2.4 

2.1 

14.1 

8.2 

39.1 

22.2 


5.4 


20.1 - 


25 


40 


9.3 


25.1 - 


30 


6 


9.9 


30.1 - 


35 


20 


11.9 


35.1 - 


40 


24 


14.3 


40.1 - 


45 


21 


16.4 


45.1 - 
50.1 - 


50 
55 


. 142 . 
83 


30.5 
33.7 


55.1 - 
Over 6C 


60 
i 


393 
223 


77.8 
100.0 



Totnl 1006 100.0 



Source: jJ?A questionnaire returns, 8 concerns reporting. 
Tabulated by the Bureau of the Census for the 
National Hecovery Administration, Division of 
Research and Planning, January 1 ], 1934. 



9818 



-r^57~ 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTICI 



table i6i 



STEAM SOLVEITT NAVAL STOH1S MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 

Number of Factory Tiage Earners Employed in Establishments 
•.; -Working Specified Shifts and Shift-Hours. 



Number 

Of h0Ul S 

Worked 



June 19 2^ 



ITumb er of Factor:/ ~l? .re Earners 
J une 1931 



October 193? 



-per Shift 2 Shifts : 3 Shifts; 2 Sh ifts: 3 Shif ts ; 2 Shifts;? Shifts;^ Shifts; 



6 to 6.9 

7 to 7-9 

8 to 3.9 

9 to 9-9 
10 to 10.9 
n to 11.9 

TOTAL 



895 



23 
23 



1172 



117' 



71 
71 



935 



551 



935 



551 



895 



SOURCE: NRA questionna 
the Bureau of 
tion, Division 



ire returns, 8 concerns reporting. Tabulated by 
■the Census for the National He cove ry Administra- 
of Research and Planning, January 12, 193^« 



9818 



358- 



TA3LE 162 
STEAK SOLVANT NAVAL STORES MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY WAGE 3X3S&& 



WEEK OF JUNE 15, 1933. 



Factory "T^ge Earners 

Hourly Earnings Cumulative 
Cents per hou r Number ' P ercent Percent 

Under 15 cents 115 11.4 11.4 

15 - 19.9 278 27.6 39 t 

20-24.9 217 21.6 60 6 6 

25 - 29.9 155 15.4 76.0 

30-34.9 107 10.6 86.6 

35 - 39.9 60 5.0 92.6 

40 - 44.9 28 2.8 95.4 

45-49.9 31 3.1 98.5 

50-54.9 8 .8 99.3 

55 - 59.9 3 .3 99.6 

60 - 69.9 1 .1 99.7 

70 - 79.9 2 .2 99.9 

80 and over 1 .1 100.0 

Total 1006 100.0 

Source: N.R.A. questionnaire returns, 8 concerns reporting. Tabulation 
by the Bureau of the Census for the National Recovery Admin- 
istration, Division of Research and Planning, January 12, 1934. 



9818 



_5g g BE USED WITH CAUTION 

TABLE 163 

Steam Solvent Navr.1 Stofes Manufacturing Industry 

■Classified Weekly 'Earnings of Office 
Employees 

Week of June 15, 1933 



Weekly Earnings 

(dollars) Ihamb ; 

Less than $10.00 

$10.00 tb $14.99 4 

$15.00 tb $19.99 6 

$20.00 to $24.99 10 

$25.00 to $29.99 7 

$30.00 to $34.99 7 

$35.00 to $39.99 4 

$40.00 to $44.99 >2 

$45.00 and over 2 

Total 42 



Source: NBA questionnaire returns, 8 concerns reporting. 
Tabulated by the Bureau of the Census for the 
National Recovery Administration, Division of 
Research and Planning, January 12, 1934. 



9818 



260 



Code 



Fumbcr Approved Codes 
6. PATER ( 32 Codos' 



Total 





19. 


X 


100. 




11 Q 




ij.y. 


X 


120. 


X 


166. 


X 


167. 


X 


190. 


X 


193. 




200. 




220. 




23C. 


X 


245. 


X 


246. 


X 


247. 


X 


248. 


X 


24S. 


X 


^/v(v | 




289. 




290. 


X 


O C, -Z 

a a o a 


X 


294. 


X 


u Ju J 


X 


296. 


X 


301. 


X 


305. 




331. 




369. 




370. 




371. 




382. 


XX 


&12. 


X 


492. 



''■".'a 1 Ipaper anufacturing 

Paporboard 'lanufaeturing 

Newsprint ■, (1928) 

Papor and Pulp 

Wax Papor 

Set -Up-Paper Box 

Paper Stationery and Tablot 

Folding Taper Box 

Sanitary Napkin and Cleansing Tissue 

Envoi opo 

Paper Bag 

Corrugated Shir>p-ing Containers, oto. 

Paper Diso Nilk Bottle Cap 

Food Dish a^d Pulp and Papor Plato 

Glazod and Fancy Paper 

Tag Industry 

Cylindrical Liquid Tight Papor Container 

Cloth Reel 

Photographic TTount 

Gumming Industry 

Gummed Label and Embossed Soal • 

Waterproof Paper 

Fluted Cup, Pan Liner and Lace Paper 

Sanrolc Card 

Fibre Can and Tubo 

Bulk Drinking Straw, etc. 

Expanding and Sncoialt 1 ' Paper Products 

Open -aper Drinking Cup, otc. '1930) 

Sanitary ilk Bottle Closure 

Transparent aterials Converters 

Loose Loaf and Blank Book 

Stereotype Dry 1'fo.t 



Employees 
(Thousands) 

294.JL 

4.7 

28.0 

9.0 

128.0 

1.9 

40. 

■ • 7.0 

15.0 

.8 

11.6 

3.6 

13.2 

.4 

1.5 

1,8 

2.2 

.6 

1.1 

.0 
1.3 

.7 

.6 
2.0 
3.2 

9, 



i.C 

2.5 

.3 

o 

10.5 
.2 



Effective 
Date 



9-20-33 
11-20-33 
11-27-33 
11-27-33 
1-1-34 
1-1-34 
1-18-34 
1-8-34 
1-19-34 
2-5-34 
2 -5-34 
2-21-34 
2-12-34 
2-12-34 
2-12-34 
2-12-34 
2-12-34 
2-26-34 
2-26-34 
2-26-34 
2-26-34 
2-26-34 
2-26-34 
3-5-34 
3-5-34 
3-26-34 
4-9-34 
4-9-34 
4-9-34 
4-16-34 
5-14^.34 
G-o-34 



Unapproved Codos: 

Viscose Extrusion 

ote : 

x - PEA Substitution a proved for Industry 
xx - NRA Code more inclusive than PRA Substitution vdifferenoe 
is mar^od) 



9*1K 



2ol 



161+ 



TABLE 



Waxed Paper Manufacturing Industry 

CLASSIFIED hEEKLY HOURS 01? rt'ORK FOR FACTORY EMPLOYEES 
FOR WEEKS ENDING 

July 22, 1933, September 16, 1933 





we ek 
Worked 


En 


dking 


July- 22 


, 1933 

Cumulative 


Week End 


ing 


Sept. 16, 1933 


Hours 






Cumulative 


Per 


V7eek 






Number 


Per Cent 


Number 




Per Cent 


Under 


20 






115 


4.83 


118 




4.20 


20 — 


29.9 






77 


8.06 


142 




9.25 


30 — 


34.9 






37 


9.61 


217 




16.97 


35 — 


39 .'9 






98 


13.73 


253 




25.97 


40 — 


44.9 






387 


29.97 


1,624 




83.74 


45 — 


49.9 






642 


56.93 


268 




93.28 


50 


59.9 






607 


82.41 


134 




98.04 


60 Hours or More 




419 


100.00 ■■ 


: 55 




100 . 00 


Total 


! 






o 


382 


2, 


811 





Source: Industry questionaire returns, 48 companies reporting to the 
National Recovery Administration, Division of Research and 
Planning. The Waxed Paper Manufacturing Industry, prepared 
by Max Kossaris, October 31, 1933. 



9818 



262 
TABLE 165 
WAXED PAPER MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 
PLANTS CLASSIFIED BY SHIFTS A1HD AVERAGE SHIFT HOURS 



Hours 1933 1932 1931 1930 1929 1928 

. (5 aos.) 

A>verage number of 

operating hours per week 76.0 76.0 76.4 76.1 76.7 77.8 



Number of plants operating 

1 shift per 24 hr. 

2 " • " 24 " 

3 n 11 24 " 

Total plants reporting 50 49 46 42 39 37 



32 


31 


28 


26 


25 


23 


7 


7 


6 


5 


5 


5 


11 


11 


12 


11 


9 


9 



Source: Data reported by industry to the National Recovery Administra- 
tion, Division of Research and Planning. The Waxed Paper 
Manufacturing Industry, prepared by Max Kossoris, 
October 31, 1933. 



9818 



263 

TABLE 166 
Waxed Paper Manufacturing Industry 
Classified Hourly Earnings of 
Factory Employees for 
Weeks Ending July 23, 1933 and September 16, : 1933 



Hourly Earnings 
(Cents Per Hour) 



July 23, 1953 



Cumulative 
ITumber Per Cent 



Seiit ember 16, 1933 

Cumulative 
Number ■ Per Cent 



Under 10 ceni} 
10 ; ~ 19.9 
20 - 24. 9 
25 - 29.9 
30 -.34.9 
35 - 39.9 
40 - 44.9 
45 v 49.9 
50 - 54.9 



OJ 



59.9 



60 - 79.9 
80 - 99.9 
100 or more 

Total 



: 1 


.04 


72 


3.06 


141 


8.98 


246 


19.30 


267 


30.49 


341 


44.80 


333 


58.77 


309 


71.73 


.218 


80.87 


133 


86.66 


205 


95.26 


74 


98.36 


39 


100.00 



12 

20 

30 

371 

338 

506 

385 

274 

229 

442 

117 

69 



0.00 

.43 

1.15 

15.50 
27.60 
45.72 
59.51 
69.32 
77.52 
93.34 
97.53 
100.00 



2334 



Source: Industry questionnaire returns, 48 companies reporting to the 
Hational Recovery Administration, Division of Research and 
Planning. The Waxed Paper Manufacturing Industry, prepared 
by Max Kassoris, October 31, 1933. 



9818 



264 

TABLE 167 
WAXED PAPER I.I'EUSTRY 



Average Rates 
and 



per Hour and Pay per Weel:, Average and Total Hours, 
Total Payrolls -oer Week, by Sex 
1929, 1933 and 1934 







Total 


1 


Total : 


Ave. Rate: 


Ave . Hour s : 


Ave. Pa; 


Sex and Item 


To. Mills : 


Employ- 


Total: Pay- 


' per v : 


per : 


per 




Reporting 


ees. 


Hours: rolls . 


hour : 


week ; 


wee:: 


Hale Workers a/ 






■ « 








Typical wee]: May, 


! 




: 








1929 


40 : 


1433 


70703 :$38395 


$ J 543 


47.6 : 


$25.39 


Typical week May, 






■ 








1933 


: 53 


1866 


82838: 41053 


.495 


44.4 


32.00 


Avera e week Jan. 






: 








1934 


54 


2781 


103502;. 58674 


• .567 


37.2 


• 31.10 


Female Workers 
















Typical week May, 


- 














1929 


22 


322 


151:53 


- 4959 


• .328 


: 46.9 


15.40 


Typical week May, 
















1933 


28 


! 318 


11415 


: 3623 


• .317- 


: 35.8 


11.39 


Average week Jan. 
















1934 


30 


363 


•13380 


4741 


• .354 


: 36.8 


: 13.06 






a/ Male Workers in Mills, Excluding Superintendents, Foremen, Watchmen, Engineers, 
Firemen, Chauffeurs. 

Source: Summary of Wage Data, compiled by the Code Authority for the ERA, 
Division of Research and Planning, March, 1934. 



9818 



265 

TABLE 163 

SET-UP PAPER BOX INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED '/EEKLY HOURS 07 FACTORY EHFLOYSES, 
III THE NORTH AND SOUTH, OCTOBER 1933 



Hours Worked 


Number of 
Emoloyees 


Per Cent of 
Total 


CumulF 

Per ( 


itive 
lent 


per Week a/ 


North 


South 


North South 


North 


South 


Under 20 


757 


51 


5.6' 6.0 


5-6 


6.0 


20 to' 29.9 


1,137 


13S 


z.H 16.1 


lk.O 


22.1 


30 to 3k. 9 


987 


'••' S5 


: ' 7.3 9-9 


21.3 


32.0 


35 to 39-9 


1,909 


'■" iko 


ik.i : 16.)+ 


35.^ 


ks.k 


Uo to kk.s 


• 8,1^7 


434 


'••'■'■ 60.3' 50. g 


95-7 


99.2 


45 ttri+9.9 


362 


6 


' 2.7 0.7 


98. H 


99.9 


50 --59.9 


70 


l 


0.5 0.1 


98.9 


100.0 


60 or more 


1U6 


— 


1.1 


100.0 




Total 


13,515 


855 


100.0' 100.0 







a/ Does not include overtime. 

SOURCE: Tabulated from questionnaires secured by the National Paper 
Box Manufacturers' Association, kOO" concerns reporting. Data 
are week ending October 7 or the last nearest pay day. 
National Recovery Administration Division of Research and 
Planniiv. The Set-Up Paper Bo:; Industry, prepared by 
Mai: ICoscoris, Nov. 7» 1933* 



9760 



266 



TABLE I69 
Set-Up Paper Pox Industry 
Classified Hourly Earnings of Factory Wage Earners 
Week in June 1933 



Hourly Earnings 
Cents Per Hour 



Factory Wage Earners 



Male Female 



Total per Cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Under 10 cents 
10 - 19.9 
20 - 2419 
25 - 29.9 
30 - 34.9 
35 - 39.9 
40 - 49.9 
50 - 59.9 
60 ~ 79.9 
80 - 99.9 
1.00 - 1.15 

Total 



46 


890 


936 


90 


1584 


1674 


106 


2572 


2678 


160 


2302 


2462 


128 


IS 50 


1778 


450 


1112 


1562 


420 


96 


516 


362 


24 


386 


38 


- 


36 


6 


~ 


6 


180G 


10230 


1203S 



7.8 

13.9 

22.2 

20.5 

14.7 

13.0 

4.3 

3.2 

.3 

.1 

100.0 



7.8 
21.7 
43.9 
64.4 
79.1 
92.1 
96.4 
99.6 
99.9 
100.0 



Source; Industry questionnaire returns, 293 concerns reporting, submitted "by 
the Code Authority to the National Recovery Administration, Division 
of Research and planning, June 11, 1934. 



9818 



267 

TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 
TABLE 170(a) 

SET - UP PAPER BOX DTDUSTRY 

Classified Hourly Earnings of Male' Factory Wage Earners 
Week in J 'one, 1933 





Hew 
















Hourly Earnings 


England 


East- 


South- 


Cent-al 


West- 


Pacific 


AH 


(in cents) 




ern 


ern 




ern 


Co- 


=ist 


Div- 
isions 


Under 10 cents 
















— _ 


10 - 19.9 


20 


— 


10 


8 


8 




— 


46- 


20 - 24.9 


8 


2 


6 


56 


18 




— 


90. 


25 - 29.9 


12 


8 


2? 


44 


14 




6 


106- 


30 - 34.9 


24 


6 


24 


32 


72 




2 


160 • 


35 - 39.9 


24 


20 


16 


36 


28 




4 


128 


40 - 49.9 


120 


50 


16 


90 


140 




30 


450 


50 - 59.9 


90 


74 


36 


110 


102 




8 


420 


60 - 79.9 


78 


60 


6 


116 


82 




20 


362 


80 - 99.9 


2 


18 


— 


2 


10 




6 


38 ■ 


1.00 - 1.15 


— 


2 


— 


— 


— 




4 


6 • 



Total 378 240 136 494 478 80 1806 



Source: Industry questionnaire returns, submitted "by the Code Authority 
to the National Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Plan- 
ing June 11, 1934. 



9818 



26S 

TABLE 170(b) TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 

SET - UP PA^ER BOX INDUSTRY 

Classified Hourly Earnings of Eeraale Factory Wage Earners, By Districts 

Week in June 1933 



Hew East- South- Central 'est- Pacific All 
Hourly Earnings England ern ern ern Coast Div- 

(in cents) isions 



Under 10 cents 
















10 - 19.9 


50 


50 


1G6 


276 


348 


— 


890 


20 - 24.9 


288 


148 


178 


288 


676 


6 


1584 


25 - 29.9 


672 


410 


112 


474 


800 


104 


2572 


30 - 34.9 


kSS 


296 


110 


766 


588 


56 


2302 


35 - 39.9 


300 


384 


34 


396 


410 


126 


1650 


40 - 49.9 


228 


244 


38 


284 


234 


84 


1112 


50 - 59.9 


40 


30 


— 


2 


4 


20 


96 


60 - 79.9 


— 


— 


— 


8 


IS 


— 


24 


80 - 99.9 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— - 


1.00 •• 1.15 


— 


— 


— 


— 


-- 


— 


— 



Totpl 2064 1562 638 2494 3076 396 10230 



Source: Industry Questionnaire returns, submitted by the dode Authority 
to the National Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Plan- 
ing, June 11, 1934. Number of concerns reporting in all districts, 
293, distribution by district not available. 



9818 



269 

table 171 
set-up paper 30x industry 

Classified Hourly Earnings of Factory Employees, 
in the ITorth and South, October 1533 



Actual 

pe: 


Earnings 
? Hour 


Eunoer of 

E. :"-"•! oyees 


Per Cent of 
Total 
North South 


Cumulative 
Per Cent 




JOl't.l 


South 


North 


South 


Under 10<* 


h 




0.02 






10c* to 


19. 34 


US 




0.9 


0.9 




20 to 


2U.9 


72 


1 


0.5 0.1 


1.4 


0.1 


25 to 


29-9 


102 




0.7 O.5 


2.1 


0.6 


30 to 


34,9 


5,101 


460 


37.3 53- s 


39.4 


54.4 


35 to 


39-9 


2,177 


156 


15.9 13.2 


55.3 


72.6 


kO to 


U9.9 


~7 rf ] 1 


1U7 


24.0 17.2 


73.3 


89. S 


50 to 


59-9 


1,305 


46 


9.5 5-4 


S3.8 


95.2 


60 to 


79.9 


1,216 


37 


8.9 4.3 


97.7 


99.5 


80 to 


93.9 


230 


1 


1.7 • 0.1 


99.4 


99-6 


$1 or 


more 


GO 


3 


0.6 0.4 


100.0 


100.0 


Total 


13,690 


855 


100.0 100.0' 







SOURCE: Tabulated fron questionnaires secured "07 the National Paper 
Sox Manufr.ctu.rers association, 400 concerns reporting. Data 
are for v.-eel: ending Octooer 1 or the last nearest pay day. 
National Recovery Administration Division of Research and 
Planning. The Set-Up Paper Eox Industi-", prepared 'by Max 
Kossoris, Eovc.-'icr 7. i933« 



9760 



270 

TABLE 172 (a) 
Set-Up Paper Box Industry 
Classified Hourly Earnings of Factory Wage Earners 
Week in May 1934 



Hourly Earnings 
Cents Per Hour 



Under 25 cents 
25 - 29.9 
30 - 34.9 
35 - 39. b 
40 - 49.9 
50 - 59.9 
60 - 79.9 
80 - 99.9 
1.00 - 1.15 



Factory Wage Earners 



Male Female Total per Cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



6 


136 


142 


1.1 


1.1 


76 


3,250 


3,326 


25.4 


26.5 


160 


2,554 


2,714 


20.7 


47.2 


352 


4,038 


4,390 


33.5 


80.7 


328 


1,206 


1,534 


11.7 


92.4 


832 


36 


868 


6.6 


99.0 


104 


2 


106 


.8 


99.8 


24 


- 


24 


.2 


100.0 



Total 



1,882 11,222 13,104 



100.0 



Source; ln\ : istry questionnaire returns, 293 concerns reporting, submitted by 
the Code Authority to the National Recovery Administration, Division 
of Research and Planning, June 11, 1934. 



9818 



271 

TO BE USED '.71 TH CAUTION 

TABLE 172(1.) 

SET - IP PAPER BOX rTDUSTRY 

Classified Hourly Earnings of Fejflale Factory Wage Earners 

fteek in May 1934 



Hew East- South- Central 'Jest- Pacific All 
Hourly Earnings England ern ern em Corst Div- 

(in cents) isions 



Under 25 cents 














__ 


25 - 29^9 


— 


4 


12 


IS 


102 


-- 


136 


30 - 34.9 


500 


436 


314 


6 9 3 


1270 


32 


3250 


35 - 39.9 


418 


222 


112 


550 


1223 


24 


2554 


40 - 49.9 


863 


836 


202 


962 


884 


286 


4038 


50 - 59.9 


436 


355 


24 


290 


42 


58 


1206 


60 - 73.9 


10 


2 


— 


2 


22 


— 


36 


b3 - 9J.9 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


— 


2 


1.00 - 1.15 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— — 



Total 



2232 



185 : 



664 



2522 



3548 



400 11222 



Source: Industry nuestionnaire returns, submitted by the Code Authority 
to the National Recovery Adninstr^tion, Division of Heseacch and Plan- 
ning, June 11, 1934. 'urber of concer.is reporting in all districts, 
293, distribution ."by district not available. 



9818 



SET 



272 

TABLE 172(c) 
UP PAPER "BOX INDUSTRY 



TO BE USED WITH 
CAUTION 



Classified Hourly Earnings of Male Factory './age Earners 

Week in May, 1934 



Hew East- South- Central West- Pacific All 
Hourly Earnings England ern ern ern Coast Div- 

(in cents) isions 



Under 25 cents 



25 


- 29.9 


30 


- 34.9 


35 


- 39.9 


40 


- 49.9 


50 


- 59.9 


60 


- 79.9 


80 


- 99.9 


1.00 


- 1.15 



— 


— 


22 


26 


2 


14 


70 


14 


28 


44 


34 


32 


222 


120 


36 


8 


60 


— 


2 


14 


2 



— 


6 


12 


18 


84 


32 


104 


130 


124 


84 


206 


200 


14 


14 


— 


2 



— 


6 


24 


75 


2 


160 


6 


352 


10 


328 


48 


832 


8 


104 


4 


24 



Total 



372 



244 



134 



544 



486 



102 1882 



Source: Industry miestionnaire returns, submitted "by the Code Authority 
to the National Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Plan- 
ning, June 11, 1934. Number of concerns reporting in all districts, 
293, distribution by district not- available. 



9818 



>73 



TitBLE 173 

set- up paper bo:: inbustra 



Classified" 7'eekly Earnings of Factory Employees, 
in the North and South, October 1933 





ITauoer 


of 


Per Ce: 


it of 


Cunalative 


Weekly Earnings 


E: rol oy 


3es 


Tot 


3l 


Per 


Cent 




ITorth 


South 


North 


South 


ITorth 


South 


Less than $5 


307 


2S 


2.2 


3-2 


2.2 


3.2 


$5 to $3.99 


1,001 


149 


7.2 


17.4 


9.4 


20.6 


10 to 14.99 


5,992 


464 


42.9 


5^.3 


52.3 


7'4.9 


15 to 19.99 


3,-32 


13s 


27.5 


16.1 


79-2 


91.O 


20 to 2U.93 


1,390 


40 


10.0 


4.7 


89- S 


95-7 


25 to 29.99 


SS3 


16 


4.3 


1.3 


94.6 


37.6 


30 to 34.99 


43H 


10 


3-1 


1.2 


37.7 


9S.3 


35 to 39.99 


164 


3 


1.2 


0.4 


3S.9 


33-2 


kO to 59.99 


140 


r 
D 


1.0 


0.7 


99.9 


99-9 


60 or more 


13 


1 


0.1 


0.1 


100.0 


100.0 


Total 


■-3,3 ! I2 


S55 


100.0 


100.0 







SOURCE: Tabulated fror. questionnaire secured by the national Paper Bo: 
Manufacturers Association, 400 concerns reporting, lata are 
for week ending October 17 or the last nearest pay day. 
Pational Recovery Administration Division of Research and 
Planning. The 3et-Up Paper Box Industry, prepared by Has 
Kossoris, ITovember 7. 1933 • 



976O 



274 

TABLE 17U 
SET-UJ PAPEB BOX INDUSTIIY 
General Wage Hate Survey 



Single ^coring i 



Scoring Mac 
Double Scoring Machines 
Single Corner Cutting Machines 
Double Corner Cutting Machines 
Quad. Corner Cutting Ilacliines 
S. & S. Corner Gutting ilacliines 
Single Staying ilacliines 
Quad. Stayer Machines 
Single Ending Machines 
Double Ending Machines 
Governing Machines 
Turning In 

Pony Covering Machines 
S. <?.- S. Wrapping Machines 
S. "■ S. Gluing ilacliines 
Top & Bottom Paper Machines 
Extension Edging Machines 
Lacing Machines 
Lacing, Hand 
Plying Machines 
Plying, Hand 
Doming Machines 
Lining Machines 
Gumming Machines 
Bending Machines 
Bending, Hand 
Thumbholing Machines 
Paper Slitting ilacliines 
Paper Cutting Machines 
Closing 
Tying Up 
Men' s Hand Work 

Girls' Hand Work (Pine Hand Work) 
Girls' Hand Work (Co: von Work) 
Learners 
Porters 

Miscellaneous Unskilled Help 
Mechanics 
Chauffeurs 
Drivers 



Lowest 


Highest 


Predomi- 


Hate Paid 


Pate paid • 


nant or 


1932-1953 


1932-1933 


Prequency 
Pate 


26 


1.10 


53 


29 


1.10 


55 


15 


.92 


45 


24 


.70 


50 


30 


.65 


50 


20 


.85 


40 


16 


.61 


40 


28 


.75 


45 


20 


.?0 


45 


30 


• S3 


49 


17 


.55 


30 


15 


.38 


26 


20 


.40 


30 


24 


.60 


35 


10 


.58 


30 


15 


• S3 


33 


22 


.65 


40 


19 


.50 


35 


12 


.50 


32 


20 


.65 


35 


10 


.45 


30 


25 


.SO 


38 


28 


.85 


50 


IS 


• 55 


32 


15 


.50 


35 


12 


.48 


30 


15 


.So 


25 


30 


1.00 


55 


35 


1.25 


65 


10 


.50 


^0 


10 


.65 


35 


20 


.85 


40 


22 


.90 


45 


10 


.45 

"lot Considered 


30 


20 


.50 


33 


- 


•* 


- 


_ 


— 


- 


35 


1.25 


65 


30 


• 75 


55 



9760 



275 



TABLE 17U 

1 Continued ) 
SEE-UP PAPER BOX INDUSTRY 

General Wage Rate Survey 





La 


^est 


Highest 


Predomi- 




Rat 


e Paid 


Hate Paid 


nant or 




1932-1933 


1532-1533 


Frequency 










Rate 


Stenographers 




20 


1.00 


•50 


Foremen 




Uo 


1.50 


1.00 


Eoreladies 




35 


1.00 


.SO 


Office Clerks 




- 


- 


- 


Other Office Workers (Hot 










Executives) 




— 


— 


— ■ 



SOURCE: Survey ■ir'.e for national Paper Sox manufacturers Association, 
' 199 plants reporting. National Recovery Ad; Mini strati on 
Division of Research and Planning. The Set-Up Paper Box 
Industry, prepared hy Max Kossoris, November 7» 1933* 



9760 



276 

TABLE 175 

SET-UP PAPER BOX INDUSTRY 

Classified VieeldLy Earnings of Office Employees, 
in tiie ITorth and South, October 1333 







Number 


of 














Office 




Per Cen 


b of 


Curaul 


->.tive 


Ueeklj 


r Earnings 


Enrol or 


ees 


Total 


L 


Per 


Cent 




ITorth 


South 


North 


SOUth 


North 


South 


Less i 


shan $5 


3 




0.3 




0.3 




$5 to 


$9-99 


6 


2 


0.6 


U.3 


0.9 


H.3 


10 to 


14.99 


106 


5 


10. S 


10.3 


11.7 


15.2 


15 to 


19.99 


257 


15 


26.3 


32. S 


3S.0 


47. s 


20 to 


2U.99 


153 


4 


16.2 


S.7 


54.2 


56.5 


25 to 


29.99 


121 


4 


12.3 


8.7 


66.5 


65.2 


30 to 


3U.99 


71 


4 


7-2 


8.7 


73.7 


73.9 


35 to 


39-99 


S9 


5 


7-0 


10.9 


SO. 7 


84. S 


40 to 


59.99 


115 


6 


11.7 


15.0 


92. 4 


97.8 


60 or 


more 


75 


1 


7.6 


2.2 


- 




Total 


SC2 


46 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



SOURCE: Tabulated fron t uestionnaires secured b;- the National Paper 
Box Manufacturers association, 400 concerns reporting. Data 
are for "-eel: eliding October 7 or the last nearest pay day. 
National Recovery Administration Division of Research and 
Planning. The Set-Up Paper Box Industry, prepared by Max 
Kossoris, November 7» 1933 • 



0760 



?77 



TABLE'' 176 

STATIONERY, TABLET AMD SCHOOL PAPER 
IXAuim.CTURIMG IHDUSEBY - TOTAL, ■ ilORTH 
AMD SOUTH 

CLASSIFIED UEH1LY, HOURS OP FACTORY T7AGE EASIER S. 





u'eeli of September 


15, 1933 




Hoiirs per 


ITu: 


iber of 


Cumulative 


Cumulative 


week 


Unv 


sloyees 


Total 


3 of Total 


20 or under 




202 


202 


l+.Ofi 


20.1 - 30 




271 


1+73 


9.3 


30.1 - 35 




322 


735 


15.6 


35.1 - ^0 


3 


,52U 


1+.319 


SU.7 


U0.1 - U5 




1+C1+ 


i+,S03 


91+.2 


1+5.1 - 50 




263" 


5.0SS 


99.3 


50.1 ~ 60 




16 


5,032 


99-6 


Over 60 




_J£ 


5,101 


100.0 


Total 


5 


,101 







SOURCE: MRA questionnaire returns, 1+0 of the 60 plants engaged in the 
industry reporting, national Recover;' Administration Division 
of Research and Planning. The Stationers', Tablet and School 
Paper Manufacturing Industry, prepared "by Hare Kossoris, 
Oct. 25, 1933. 



9760 



273 



TABLE 177(a) 

STATIONERY, TABLET AND SCHOOL PAPER 
IJiinCACTURING INDUSTRY - HORTH 

Classified Hourly Earnings of Factory ""age Earners, 
7eek of September 15, 1933 



Actual Earnings 


Hurfoer of 


Cumulative 


Cumulative 


Per Hour 


Erroloyees 


Total 


c h of Total 


Under 10^ 








10 - 19.9 


32 


32 


0.75S 


20 - 3U.9 


59 


91 


2.0 


25 - 29.9 


75 ! 


166 


3.6 


30 - 3^.9 


1,5^5 


1,711 


36.7 


35 - 39-9 


S35 


2,5^6 


5U.7 


Uo - 1+9.9 


1,040 


3.5S6 


77.0 


50 - 59.9 


U90 


U.076 


S7-5 


60 - 79-9 


i+Us 


4,524 


97.1 


80 - 99.9 


115 


4,639 


99.6 


$1.00 or more 


19 


4.6^3" 


100.0 


Total 


4,65s 







SOURCE: NRA. quest ion^aire returns, 34 of the 60 plants engaged in the 

industry reporting. National Recovery Administration, Division 
of Research and Planning. The St itionery, Tablet and School 
Paper Manufacturing Industry, prepared oy Lias Kossoris, 
October 25, 1933. 



9760 



279 



TABLE 177(b) 

STATIOIIERY, TABLETS AlTD SCHOOL PAPER 
IIAIJUIPACTURING INDUSTRY - SOOTH 



CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OP FACTORY 
WAGE EARNERS 

tfeek of September 15, 1333 



Actual Earnings 

Per Hour 


LIunoer of 
Erroloyees 


Cumulative 

Total 


Cumulative 
^ of Total 


Under 10^ 






io - 19.9 






• 


20 - 2k.3 


k 


k 


0.9$ 


25 - 29.3 


1 


5 


1.1 


30 - 3^.9 


296 


301 


67.9 


35 - 39-9 


i:-i 


3^2 


77-2 


ho - 149.9 


52 


39^ 


88.9 


50 - 59.9 


19 


U13 . 


93.2 


60 - 79.9 


21 


I4.3U 


98.0 


so - 99.9 


k 


U3S 


93.9 


$1.00 or more 


5 


kk3 


100.0 


Total 


>!-U 3 







SOURCE: ERA questionnaire returns, of the 60 plants engaged in the 

industry reporting. National Recovery Administration Division 
of Research and planning. The Stationery, Tablet and School 
Paper Manufacturing Industry, prepared "by Has Kossoris, 
Oct. 25, 1933. 



9760 



280 






hi 



>h 

EH 

00 



O 



EH 
O 

<4 



EH 

H 

EH 
>H 



g 


3 ^ 


a 


o 


o 


00 « 


HH 


cis >h 


H 


a =>! 


*-> Ph 


EH 


a 


00 


•=3 w 


3 


F^J En 


si 




Ph 


e ^ 



9S13 



o 

EH 



DOM 
>^Q Jh 
O W 



[0 
O 






r-l 

• o 

LOl 4-3 



o 



nH W 

• o 

O -P Lf> 






• o 



o 

-t 



1— 1 




w 


• 


o 




o 


+J 


LO 


K> 




• 
to 


rH 




W 


• 


o 




o 


4^ 


O 


OJ 




r^ 


t 






w 






Sh 




fH 


W 


?h 


CD 




O 


Td 


O 




c 


C 1 




p 



rH F U0 O 

4-3 S3 Sh 

"; b ° 

<■! « Ph 



Sfi f^-V£> H" ,-H OJ rH 
60 CTMO J- J- rH 



I s — 
vO 
co 



rH rH 



CTiUD 50 CT\ [•— LO, LO 



OJ 






CXN 



I^H H-rl W (M 
00 rH OJ OJ 0J 



CM 



CO OJ 1^- OJ LTv^j- OJ o 

OHO W t\JM n <J>, 

0J 



mmino co o 

rH rH i-H 



r^vX) cr\ o -H- r^ 
U3 CT\^1- r^ OJ 



LTMv^ OJ fr,| — rO , 
MD LT^J- OJ 



U3 











+3 


• 


O 

E-i 


•■*- 3 —- : — S — — — — (11 




wo r; 

^ o 




o c^c^cr-\CTNcr\cricr\cr\CT> p 




• ••••••••' 




O CT..H- CTv^h- CP\ CT\ CT\ CTi O^ !h 




hhwoii^ r^jH- ltm-— cx\ o 




ShOOOOOOOOOO 








fioomoinooooH 




-)H W t\l n r-\i li^iUD 60 <r> 





o 

•rl 

4J 

cfl 

H 
4J 

w 

• iH 

d 

•H 



M 

> 

o 
o 




S3 
o 

•rl 
4J 



o 

4-> 

CQ 
4-> 
'<-\ 

o 

ft 

o 

« 

>a 

4J 
■H 

S-. 

O 

A 

4-> 

nd 
o 
o 



o 



o 

00 



281 



TABLE 172(1)) 

PAPER STATIONERY AND TABLET II". NUFAC TURING INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS i T D '.'.'EEIZLY HOURS OF FACTORY YiAGS EARNERS 
IN SOUTHERN ZONE FOR THE PAYROLL 3EK, INCLUDING FEBRUARY 10, I93I1 

H Hours Worked Per "eel; 



Actual 
Earnings 
Per Hour 



20 hrs. '20.1 30.1 35. 1 kO.l L5.I 50.1 Over 

or to to to to to to 60 

Under 30 35 1+0. U-5 50 60 Hours 



Total 



20 to 2U.9 cents 

25 to 29.9 

30 to 3U.9 

35 to 39-9 

ho to ii-9- 9 

50 to U9.9 

60 to 79.9 . 

8r to 99.9 . 

$1.00 or more 



2 
2 
2 
1 
1 



7 
h 

7 

1 



9 
5 
5 
2 



3 

l 

2U5 

ko 
Uo 

27 
30 
12 



h 
h 

3 

1 
1 
1 



h 

1 

1 
1 



2 
2 



3 

l 

273 
58 
57 
33 
35 
13 



Total 



21 



21 ii06 



m 



7 ii 



U8i 



NOTE: Southern Zone includes Virginia, "Jest Virginia, North Carolina, 

South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, 
Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas. 

Source: Code Authority Reports to National Recovery Administration 



9R1R 



2S2 



11-, 



ABLE 179 



PAPER STATIONERY AND TABLET MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 

OCCUPATIONS CLASSIFIED BY NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES, BY SEX AND BY 
HOURLY RATES, BY SEX AND MINIMUM AND MAXIMUM RATES, DURING 

YJESI, OF FEBRUARY 10, 193li 



Direct, Indirect 


Numb 
Empl 
iale 


er of 
oyees 

Female 


as of 


Hourly Rate 
February 10, 


193U 




and Maintenance 
Labor Operations I 


Male 

kin. 


Max . 


Fema 1 e 
Lin. Max. 




Cutting 


1.16 


- 


.35 


1.00 








Trimming 


13 


- 


• 38 


• 7k 








Ruling 


158 


18 


.30(8) 

•38(N) 


• 95 


• 30(S 

• 33 (H, 


) .1+5 
l 




Stripping 
Slicing 


26 
2k 


5 
16 


.30 (s) 

.38(H) 

•30(s) 

.38(H) 


• 70 

• 71 


.33 
.33 


.514 

.U+ 




Stapling 


h 


2k 


.38 


.70 


•30(s 
• 33(N 


) .1+5 ' 




Stitching & Severing 




37 






•30(s. 
.33(N. 


) .58 




Punching & Drilling 


ih 


3 


.30 


.63 


• 30(s 

• 33 (N. 


) .33 




Cornering & Scoring 


27 


5 


• 38 


.82 


• 30(S 

.33(N 


.33 




Banding 




09 






.30 (s 

.33 (n; 


) .li+i 




Folding 


8 


35 


.38 


• 57 


.30(s 
• 33(N 


) .1x6 




Labeling 


2 


25 


• 38 


.1+6 


•30(s, 
•33(N, 


.58 





Printing-(Compositors ) 

26 

Printing- (Pressmen 

and Feeders) 181 I4.6 



Plating 
081S 



13 85 



-38 



.87 



,30(S) 1.15 .30(s) 
.38(N) ' .33(N) 



.36 



.80 .30(S) 

.3li(N) 



.6i 
.I18 



283 



Direct, Indirect 
and Maintenance 
Labor Operations 

Die Cutting 

Die Stamping 



Number of 

Employees 

Kale Female 



10 
12 



Counting, Stacking 7 
Assorting & Assembling 



Envelope Machine 
Operators 

Envelope Liners 



Card Making 



13 



18 

93 

132 
6 



Hourly Hate 
as of February 10, 193^ 
Lale Fema le 
Lin. Lax, Lin. 



• 38 



■ 77 



.ko-h .87-?-; .33 



• 33 



l:ax. 



.1x2 1.00 .30(3) .52 

•33(H) 

.38 l.oo .30(3) .50 

.33(10 



.52 



.30(3) Mh 
.33 (n) 



■ 59 



Bordering, Gilding 














& Deckling 


13 


3h 


.ho 


1.05 


.33 


.61 


Tipping 




7 






.33 


.10 


Gluing 


6 


h 


.38 


.48 


.33 


• 33 


Filling 




121 






.33 


-hii 


Box Machine Operators 18 


ill 


• 30(3 

.33(K 


) .72-1- 


•30(3) 

.33 (N) 


.77 


Sample Making 






.38 


.38 


•30(s) 
•33(iO 


M5 


Hand T'orkers 




li+6 




/ 


.33 


.61 


Yfrapping 


h 


158 


.38 


.58 


•30(3) 
.33 (N) 


JtTi 


Inspecting 


1 


11 


.50 


.50 


.31(3) 

.33(10 


.ii9l 


Packing 


76 


35 


• 30(s 

• 38(N 


.90 


.33 


.50 


Stock Handling 


196 


6 


.30(s 

.33(K 


.92 


.33 


.43 


Shipping 


123 




• 30(3 

• 38(N 


.70 






V. r aste Balers 


8 




•30(s, 

.iiO(N 


.73* 






Trucking 
9218 


26 




• 30(s 

• 38(N, 


) .72& 







?m 



Direct, Indirect Number of 
and Maintenance Employees 
Labor Operations Male 



Machinists 15 

Adjusters 53 

Engineers, Firemen. 

and Vatchmen Jj.9 

Janitor, -Porters and hF> 
Elevator Operators 

General 20 

Foremen $0 



Fema 1 e 



13 

8 



Hourly Rate 
as of February 10, I93JU 



Male 
Min. Max. 


Femal < 
Min. 


a 

Max. 


.1x3 l.oi 






.38 1.18 






•30(s) .95 






.30 (s) .62* 

,38(N) 


• 33 


.40 


.38 .87 


.33 


M& 


.57 1.78 


•37* 


• 75 



NOTE: "N" represents Northern Zone and "3", Southern Zone. 

Source: Code Authority Reports to the National Recovery Administration. 



9S18 



236 



TABLE 180(b) 
F0LDIHG PAPER 1-30X IllDUSTHY - SOUTH 
Classified Hours of Work for Factor"' Znoloyees 
July and September, 1933 



TO B3 USED : ITH CAUTIOU 



Third T/eek, July 1933 



Hours UorJred 


Lumber 




of Workers 


Under 20 


1 


20 - 29.9 





30 - 34.9 


3 


35 - 39.9 


2 


40 - 44.9 


3 


45 - 49.9 


40 


50 - 59.9 


103 


60 hours or nore 7 



Second TTeek, Se-otenber, 1933 

ITumber 
of Workers 



12 
6 

42 
8 
106 
1 

1 



Total 



159 



176 



Source: II.?.. A. quest iorrir ire returns, 5 establishments re ^ortinr 
ITational Recovery administration, Division of Research 
rnd Pirn .in,:. The Folding Pa^er "5ox Industry, prepared 
by Ilax Kesso,rij, LTdvenber 13, 1933. 



9818 



2S7 

TABLE lSl(a) 
POLDIITG- PAPER BOX IITDUSTRY - H&KffiH 
Classified Hourly Earnings of Factory Employees, 
July and. September, 1933 



Third TTeek, July, 1933 



Second ITeeh, September, 1933 



Hourly Earnings 

Cents Per Hour Dumber Per Cent Cumulative Irumber Per Cent Cumulative 













Per Cent 






Per Cent 


Unde 


r 10 cents 
















10 - 


19.9 




203 


3.2 


3.2 








20 - 






585 


9.1 


12.3 








25 - 


29.9 




758 


11.3 


24.1 








30 - 


34.9 




735 


11.4 


35.5 


1,445 


19.7 


19.7 


35 - 


39.9 


1 


,023 


15.9 


51.4 


j 57 


7.7 


27.4 


40 - 


49.9 


1 


,261 


19.6 


71.0 


2 , 527 


<_>«3« o 


63.2 


50 - 


59.9 




714 


11.1 


32.1 


372 


11.9 


75.1 


60 - 


79.9 




695 


10.3 


92.9 


991 


13.5 


88.6 


80 - 


99.9 




320 


5.0 


97.9 


514 


7.0 


95.6 


100 


or more 




134 


2.1 


100. 09 


324 


4.4 


100.0 


Tota 


1 


6 


,430 


100.00 




7340 


100.00 





Source: H.R.A. questionnaire returns, 83 establishments reporting, 
National' Recovery Administration, Division of Research 
and Planning. Th L'oldi:.ig P" >or 3ox Industry,, prepared 
hv Max'Kdssoris, "Tovemoer 13} 1933. 



9318 



2SS 

TALLTJ 181(b) TO BI USLD WITH CAUTION 
POLDI1TG PAPER UOX IKDUSTRY - SOUTH 
Classified Hourly Earnings of Pactory Employees 
July to September, 1933 



Third Ueek, July, 1933 



Cents Per aoiir 


Humoer 




of TTorkers 


Under 10 cents 




10 - 19,9 


24 


20 - 24.9 


75 


25 - 20,9 


20 


30 - 34„9 


8 


35 - S3 9 


5 


40 - 49 a 


18 


50 - 59 9 


5 


60 -*' ,. 


3 


80 - 99,9 





100 or ,oo re 






Second TToek, Sentenoer, 1933 

Humber 

of Workers 



109 
22 
17 

13 

14 

1 



I 



iota:. 



159 



176 



Source! i," P.. A. questionnaire returns, 5 establishments reporting. 
national Recovery Adnin'istrrtion, Division of Research 
and Planning. The Folding Pa >< r Eox Industry, pre-oared 
by lias Kossriipis, November 13, 1933. 



9318 



TABLE 182(a) 
FOLDING PAPER BOX INDUSTRY - NORTH 
CLASSIFIED ./EEKLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY EMPLOYEES 
July and September, 1933. 



Weekly- 
Earnings 
(Dollars) 



Third Week, July, 1933 

Cumulative 
Number Per Cent Per Cent 



Second Week, September, 1955 

Cumulat ive 
Number Per Cent Per Cent 



Less than 5.00 
5 .00 - 9.99 
10.00 -14.99 
15.00 -19.99 
20.00 -24.99 
25.00 -29.99 
30.00 -39.99 
40.00 -59.99 
60.00 or more 
TOTAL 



102 


1.55 


1.55 


95 


1.27 


1.27 


428 


6.51 


8.06 


219 


2.92 


4.19 


1,526 


23.21 


31.27 


1,960 


26.15 


30.34 


1,535 


23.32 


54.59 


2,452 


32.44 


62.78 


1,210 


18.40 


72.99 


1,165 


15.52 


78.30 


659 


10.02 


83.01 


618 


8.24 


86.54 


665 


10.12 


93.15 


621 


8.28 


94.82 


408 


6.20 


99.55 


339 


4.53 


99.35 


44 


.67 


100.00 


49 


.65 


100.00 



6,575 100.00 



7,496 



SOURCE: N.R.A. questionnaire returns, 84 establishments reporting. 
National Recovery Administration, Division of Research and 
Planning. The Folding Paper Box Industry, prepared by 
Max Kassaris, November 13, 1933. 



9818 



290 



TO BS USED mm CAUTION- 



TABLE 182(13) 
FOLDING PAPER BOX INDUSTRY - SOUTH 
CLASSIFIED MEEKLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY EMPLOYEES 
July and September, 1933. 



— — I . . — 














Weekly- 


Third 


Week, July, 1933 


: Second 


Week, Se 


ptember,1933 


Earnings 
(Dollars) 


llumber 


Per Cent 


Cumulative 
Per Cent 


: Number 


Per Cent 


Cumulative 
Per Cent 


Less than 5.00 


. 42 


15.3 


16.3 


; 2 


0.7 


0.7 


5.00 - 9.99 


72 


28.0 


44.3 


: 55 


20.5 


21.2 


10.00 -14.99 


90 


35.0 


79.3 


•152 


56.7 


77.9 


15.00 -19.99 


19 


7.4 , 


86.7 


30 


11.2 


89.1 


20,00 --24.99 


21 


8.2 . 


94.9 


12 


4.5 


93.6 


25.00 -29.99 


8 


3.1 


98.0 : 


3 


3.0 


96.6 


30. CO -39.99 


5 


2.0 


100.0 : 


9 


3.4 


100.0 


40.00 -5 ',99 





- 


: 





- 


_ 


60.00 or more 



257 


- 


_ • 



268 






>!AL 


100. 00 




100.00 





Sj' ! re'rt 



N.R.A. questionnaire returns, 6 establishments reporting. 
National Recovery Administration, Division of Research 

u Planning. The Folding Paoer Box Industry, prepared 
by Max Kassaris, November 13, 1933. 



9818 



o 

EH 
O 
O 

a 



>H 




rt 


*> 


EM 


>s 


CO 


H 


£3 


CO 


o 






>H 


i-i 


pq 


F> 


. 


b 


CO 


CO 


« 


CO 

i— i 


ft 


Eh 


s 


CS 


F4 


, \ 






^ 
^ 


iH ' 3 


£< 


•=«! 


t 


W 




W hP 


>j 


HH u 


pi ro 


9? 


O K^ 


Eh CT\ 


** 


O r-\ 


< 




P-4 


i— . 


Ph 




o 


1 


CO 




1 


!>H 


o 


g 


W 


EH 


H 


l-H 


ti 


<3 


P=l 


CO 


1 




R 




H 




n 




pr H 




1— 1 




CO 



1 






CD !"<-> 
O T" 

o 
o 



cr 

rH 



^h 


Fh 


n 


O 




J-> 


i.' 


o 


CD 


+= 


(1) 


fj 


tr 


o 



cr 






>+H 


f< 


o 


CI) 




,o 


J* 


o 


C) 


H-> 


0) 


O 


t~~ 


o 



cr 



H W O 

o pi fn 

© o o 

tr- m r^ 



291 



cm j=t jt cn*x> to o o 



co^t- cu 



C\J to 



o o 
en o 



CM LTMO CA LO M O 

OW(J\HHK\0 

• •••••• 

OJ IfN r-\ ntAI~-0 

oj r— en en o 



rH J- KM^- Cnr~ O 

OJ OJ CH O LOv CTvO 

• ••««•» 

i^U3 r— r— en o 
H 



KMT\h-lfMnO 

oai ri h mo 



H CM to O 

oj j- r— cno 



OJOJOITM^-OJOJOO 

ix^vjd n. cx\ cm oj r— vd o 
• •••••••• 

rH r- LT\ r- O U) rH Cn O 
rH rH .=t O 

rH 



rH K> en ^t CUM no 

wouirim^oo 



>jd r— oj to 

OJ h^i 



[■— r— o 

r-l O 





Oj r^rOHU) K^i oj 







K> 


WfuMOin 
wmmtfl 


O 




O tO rH OJ Cn OJ ^.O 







O 


O 




• •*•••• 


• 




• 


• • • • • 


• 


1 


oj r^U) <-\ cnJ- oj 





! 


1 — t — VJD 


O 




H lOH 









H rH l^vOJ 


O 




-H 




r-i 








r-t 


'I 






cd 








1 






e 









-p 

o 
o 



OJ rH OJ 



r-i cn.*x> cn oj 

f"Vd- OJ OJ o 
rH K\ 



LT\iX> I — CTi rH MD rH LTv 

-=t" a « FOIOH OJ LT\ OJ 

rH CJ rH r— 



CTl OJ" CT\rH r^l 


VO 


r— en ro r— ct\n 


to 


rH tO LT\ Cn OJ rH 


en 


J3- r4 r-\ O t-- 


KO 


OJ 


;3- 


rH rH OJ rH 


UD 



• CTv CTi CT\ CT\ CT< CT\ 
Fh • • • # • • 

m cr\ j- en J- en cr> cd 

t) CM ro K^^)- J- LTv fn 
d o 

I I I ! I I B 

O rH O C8 

-P 

000 moinoo o 
oj oj r^n nj- J- ltnvjd eh 



en en en en en cr> 

Fh ***** • 

m enj- en j- en en 



o 



I I I I I 



I 



• -P 

OOOLOOLOO O 
t\J CM fO r^i^H" J" LTN Eh 



09A6 



292 



.SB 



Si 



ro 



w 



rH ^ 
R HH 

<q CO 

l-H 
o 

n 

3 



EH 
l-H 

m 



03LG 



ro 
ro 

CT\ 



•P, 

O 
EH 

<H <tH 

o 

-pUi 

£ O 

01 o 



d cr 



o 



Es ^ 



o a 

0> -P 

t^ o 



o. 

O 

o 

t3 



o r*~- 

rt r^ 

p cr 

h) rH 



cr 



O O 

.*"! O 
O -p 
O O 

ts o 






r-H CO O 
□ 2 (-* 

000 
t~ W r-- 



r—OrOrHOJ-tOO 

r-H r- ro a> en rH o 

J-M) O W (\l CTM^O 
CM LO LOV£> [~- C7\ o 



OHffiOMMO 

ct\-h- envo j-too 

• •••••• 

J-^D W OIVD to o 
rH ro r — (PiO^O 



i^- ro to ro cti J- .rt 0.1 o 

I — fO^O O O O CM W O 



CM CM 



MJ- r— r-- CM 



O 

o 



OH'MrlMO 
en LT\ LO>UD wj- 

• ••••■ 

J" H KO CX\ ro CM 
rH H fOCM 



CM 



8 

• 

o 
o 

rH 



Cn CP\ rO ro CM LT\ r— CTvI — 

J" rH ITlM J; | — |^- CM CM 

CM CM <-* r-t O 



i^-^t- nn mm 
lo ro cnuD 1 — cm 

rH rH ,=t" CM 



ro 



J3- 

rH 



CM IO rO,rJ- J" LO 



CT\ Cn Cn cn cn <X\ 
• ••••• 

Cn J" 0>^t Cn O O 

- r. 

o 

s 

o 



I I I- I 



'1 



OOOLOOLTNOO 

oj cm ro ro J- ^t lovX) 



-p 
o 



PI 

•H 

co 

cd 
o 



.5 







-)- 








•H 








a 








ni 








tva 

















.c 








EH 








M 








a 








•H 








rt 








§ 








rH 


• 






Ph 


ro 
ro 






-d 


m 






.- 


r-\ 






ni 








,C 


CTn 









rH 


• 




r( 




ro 


• 


n3 


^ 


ro r^ 


.0 


O 


m r^ 


to 


r^> 


r-^ 


cn 


CD 


s 




rH 


Ph 


(U 


U 









a) 


1) 


«h 








g 


O 


n 


-p 



•"3 


s 


CO 


O 


a 


• H 


C 




•H 


to 





c 




•H 


CO 


•H 


to 


> 


CO 




-P 


•H 





co 


q 


R 


w 


■p 


S 






a 


rH 


C 


M 




P 


O 

•rH 


J 


P. 


-P 


+5 






£1 


a 


s 


a 


b£ 


u 


r^ 


•H 


•H 


+3 




C 


O 


CO 
•H 


0) 


<H 


«H 


(3 


U 





O 


•H 


a 


>J 


^K, 


1 


p 



O 


O 


<| 


^ 


t> 


> 




p 


fH 

3 


& 


r? 




co 


CO 


> 


r? 





r) 


O 


•P 


rl 


rl 


O 


CO 


•H 


•H 


<o 


3 


8 


05 


« 


-B 


a 


c 




a 


5 


fl 


rH 


n 





O 


n! 




•H 


•H 


C 


0) 


-P 


+J 


O 


3 


0) 


to 


•H 


CO 


O 


O 


-1 ' 


CO 


id 


! 


H 




















u 








p 1 

















to 









293 



>H 

EH 

CO 



ft) 

ft! 

n 

EH 
O 

HH 
CO 



1- 3! 
ft| w 
rp 

CD 



a 



n 






SJ 
EH 
f-H 

en 



I 
o 

EH 

O 
O 

PI 



to 



w 

I 

>-< 
Pi 
o 

EH 

O 
PR 

o 

to 

o 



P-H 

o 

w 

n 
w 
i— i 
Pr 

t-H 

to 

en 
-I* 

H 
o 



ro 
ro 



o 



P ro 



«H 


S-H 




O 


(') 


r-^ 




^> 


K^ 


^ 


o 


o> 


O 


•p 


rH 


O 


o 




t-~ 


o 





<H 
O 

X g r 

O >-3 H 



'+< 

o 

a 



o r<- 

P r^ 

P cr 

h3 rH 



«H 


u 




O 


o 


r^ 




.£> 


f 


w 


o 


cr 


'■) 


+^> 


rH 


o 


o 





t- o 





CO 


u 






un 


p 


^->. 


rH 


p 


o 


w 


crj 


•H 


!'1 


+= 


?- 


P 




p 


+3 


f-> 


u 


"> 


o 


trt 


-) 


CD 


T 


N 


fH 





inai ooyjvflincy ho 
mo ro ltm — OJ rOLO r-- O 

HJ 60 rH'ODJ- to CTiCT,0 

r-\ .p- co co cricricr\0"M3 



ro CO .p" .p" >vO CX\ LT>.p- O 

OrHOr-ii — o o r~- o 

rH ro OJ UD ro CTv CT\ CT, O 

ro t — co co cr\ cr> o 



rH 

P 
o 



LtM^M O^D O CTih- CT\CTi o 
CnOWCMWinOHHCM O 

H ojj- t^m r— _p' rH o 



ro lpi^X) o oj rovD cn^jo d 

OH MHVD rO O^ 1 ^ OJ O 

• ••••«••« • 

H t\) M ai CfMTMT\ O 

oj,p- o 



OJ" PJH J h- OJ OJ OJ rO 


r~- 


oj oj loh- lo r-.p- rH 


Ol 


h f^n 


o 



Ol LTMUD O OJ OJ VO CO rO H- 

H (\J nmH^DH K_o 

rO.P" rH rH rH 



O 

cncTicncncno^criocricri o 
O •••••••••# Q 

rH enj- cr\,p- cri J- cr. cr> cr> en 

• rH OJ OJ- r^l^ Hr J" LT\ r— ' CT> U 

h I I ! I i I I I I I ° H 

O O tlj 

POOLTNOLOOLnOOO • O 
PHOl CJ K> rOJ" .p" LT\VD CO rH EH 



ft 



P 

•H 
CO 





Jp 




Eh • 




ro 




ro 




• CTi 




tvflrH 




P 




•H 




P en 




P rH 




P 




rH f-l 




Ph o 




rO 




-P s 




P O 




p o 




o 




Jp P) 




o 


• 


fn - 


ro 


• P CO 


ro ro o P 


CTi ro to o 


rH 


CTv CO CO 




H rt CO 


u 


O 


o 


0<hK 


rQ 


P o 


o 


3 M 


-p 


»~3 P P 


o 


o x; 


O 


P -H 




•H W >, 


p 


■H ,Q 


•H 


CO > 




+J -H Tj 


CO 


PRO 


+3 


P (h 


p 


rH P P 


td 


P, ° ^i 


rH 


-H O 


P- 


4J +3 ^H 




,3 03 Pi 


O 


0D fn 


P 


•H +^ « 


•H 


O » ^ 


P 


•H h 




<H S 4J 


<H 


O -H CO 


o 


S H 




^-dtl 


Is 

r-Ti 


CD <tj p 


O 


> rH 


> 


5h t-, 
p En O 


^ 


CO o p 


CO 


> CO 




O O CO 


o 


U O -rH 


u 


•H CD Eh 


•H 


cp « 


P 


P UD 


P 


P rH P 


P 


O P -H 


•H 


•H P CO 


+J 


4^ O P 


CO 


CO -H P 


(1) 


D +J O 


d4 


&:!3 


.. 




o 




o 




u 




3 




o 




to 





09Z.5 



cd 



R 



EH 
H-j 






Pi 

I 

o 

EH 
O 

o 



09Z6 



-p 

o 

EH 
SH 

o 

■P 

a 

o 
o 

u 
a 

Pi 

o 

> 

•H 
■P 

ffl 



p 
u 



7! 

o 

EH 

Cm 

o 

CD 
■P 

a 

o 
o 
U 
o 



CD 1^ 

P o- 

•-3 <~i 



«H 


h 


O 


O 




r° 


-^ 





') 


-p 





O 


f:- 









o 

cd r^ 

o 3(T 

CD 1-3 H 









CO 


WH 


F-i 




• 


O 


O 




tH 




J-> 


pr> 


«3 


y 





po 


s 


O 


•P 


O- 




O 


C) 


H 


1 


t- 










P o^ 

t-3 rH 



<H Jh 

O t) r 

o 

£= o 



w u 

Wi P 

H fi O t/J 

Cj -H W -p 

? a a 

p h h ) 

o «j o o 

«-h M Ah 



294 



o -r~vo o H to h o 
lt\ f"MTMO 1 — k£> o o 

[T\ LTWjD oj- w wo 
CM J- ip. WD Q'i CTi a> o 






cm a 



l - . •• jiroo 

fl • 

CTv C > O^ OACTiO 
H 



O CTiO LOH to mo 
ojvjDtoLTNtior— r-oo 

• ••••••• 

r-i o cn<vO i^aio 

rH U^vX> r-- CTv o~\ O 



O C^sXI r— rH O O 
t)0 Kin d- n CVI o 

r-i lo. r - r~ j- to o 
J" en 0\ CT> o 



O f— CTVd- rH I — 1^ (T\ 

ir\ to ir> to o~\ m n c?i 

• ••••••• 

LO CTi rH l<M^n 

C\] H H CM H 



O OH IC^^D r^- rH rH 

w J- H I — CM o~amd v£> 



o \ to 
r^rH 



o 

C\J 



o 
o 



o 
o 



o 
o 

• 

Q 
o 







-P 

a 





VO O r~NV? C\J CTv 


1 rH 







• •'■-»• 


• 


• 


cm r^ i-— to cm 









O CANHJ- CPiO 
to \T\ h- t^i tO to fO 






(M r^H 



O 
O 

• 

o 
o 

rH 



# 



I — O LOv CM CM CM 
I--VO KM— j? H 



rH f^ 



CM 



O .3" LOiH OMO I 


I H 


LTi 


CM CM r- tO rH 




CVJ 


H CM CM 




r— 



1 — J- r^iUD J- to 
lt> o^ cr* 1^1 o 

rH r-i 






cm J- ct\ko cs^^o rj 

H CM P-CTiH CM H 
CM CM 



O 

U 

CT\ CT\ CT\ &\ <3~\ CT\ (T\ 0^\ CT\ C~\ O 

o a 

rH CT,J- CT\-=t O"^ Oi CTi (Tv CTi 
• rH CM CM tO r^^f J" LPi ! — CTN U 

o 

U I I I J I I I I ! I rH 

cd on) 

tH O -p 

Booinoi^oinooo «o 

r_) rH ai CM rO r^l S5 J" LPlVO tO rH tH 



to 



o 

EH 



0) 

CT\c^CT\CPvO>a^cr\cri acn Q 
o ••••••••••E 

rH cnJ" o^j- o>J- cricnCTO^ 

. rH CM CM nrO J" J" LfM~~O^M 

O 1 

h I I I I I I I I t , : 

CD I O ' 

tH _,0 

P rH CM CM r^V r^Vj- J" Lnva^tOrH, . I 



295 

TABLE IS 5 
PAPS BAG INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOUilS OP FACTORY EMPLOYEES 





Pumber 


of Factory 


"Yorkers 


Cumulative Per 
Cent of Total 




Hours 
Worked 
Per Vfeek 


Vfeek 

Sept. 

1933 


Vfeek 

April 

1933 


Week 
April 
1929 


Week 

Sept. 

1933 


Week 

April 

1933 




Vfeek 

April 

1929 


20 or under 


160 


120 


100 . 


2.84 ' 


2.59 




2.60 


20.1 - 30 


157 


135 


107 


5.64 


5.50 




5.38 


30.1'.- 35 


433 


138 


103 


14.22 


8.47 




8.06 


35.1 - 40 


3,119 


437 


139 


69.67 


17.89 




11.67 


40.1 - 45 


240 


447 


436 


73.94 


27.53 




23.00 


45.1 - 50 


835 


2,272 


1,992 


89.64 


76.50 




74.79 


50.1 - 60 


530 


933 


774 


99.06 


96. G2 




94.90 


Over 60 


53 


157 


196 


100.0 


100.0 




100.0 


Total 


5,625 


4,g39 


3,847 











Male: 



Female : 



Sept. 1933 
Apr. 1933 
Apr. 1929 

3»pt. 1953 
Apr. 1933 
Apr. 1929 



survey of 61 plants 

" 63 plants 

" " 48 plants 



" 62 plants 
" 62 plants 
" 49 plants 



Source: N. R. A. Questionnaire returns. National Recovery Administration, 

Division of Research and Planning. The Paper Bag Industry, prepared 
by Max Kossoris, November 27, 1933. 



9818 



?Sb 



TABLE 186 
PAPER BAG INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY EMPLOYEES 



September 1933 
Hourly- 


April I933 


April 1929 


Earnings 
(cents) 


Number 


Numb er 


Numb er 


Under 10 


1 ' 


5 




io - 19.9 


233 ' 


1,001 


I69 


20 - 2U.9 


hh5 


623 


IM3 


25 - 29.9 


1,033 " 


888 


A16O 


30 - 3li.9 


1,357 


hh2 


750 


35 - 39.9 


730 


h75 


533 . 


ko - hh.9 


U77 ' 


307 


339 


k5 - U9.9 


329 


257 


296 


50 - 59.9 


U37 


311 


335 


60 - 79.9 


397 


227 


361 


80 - 99.9 


86 


63 


116 


100 or more 


100 


U2 


k5 


Total 


5,625 


[1,639 


3,8U7 


Average Y.'eekly 

Hours 
Total Hourly 


iio.6 


1x8.0 


50.0 


Payroll 088,860.00 
Change from 

April, 1929 f20.1±# 


073,788.96 

ft-6.0^ 


078,309.50 



Source : 



981S 



Computed from N.R.A. questionnaire returns. National Recovery 
Administration, Division of Research and Planning. The Paper 
Bag Industry, prepared by Max Nossoris, November 27, 1933. 



297 
TABLE 187(a) 

PAPER BAG INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY EMPLOYEES, BY SEX, IN NORTHERN ZONE 







Week 


Ending 


Week Ending 


Week 


Ending 


Hourly 




Sept. 


16, 1933 


Apr 


il 22, 1933 


April 


20 


, 1929 


Earnings 


No . 


Cum. % 


No. 


. Cum. % 


No. 




Cum. % 


( cents) 






of Total 




of Total 






of Total 










MALE 








Under 10 


















10 - 19.9 




10 


0.47 


11 


0.63 








20 - 24.9 




30 


1.90 


34 


2.59 


7 




0.46 


25 - 29.9 




' 86 


5.98 


111 


8.98 


31 




2.48 


30 - 34.9 




286 


19.56 


194 


20.15 


72 




7.17 


35 - 39.9 




272 


32.48 


338 


39.61 


150 




16.95 


40 - 44.9 




267 


45.16 


243 


53.60 


255 




33.57 


45 - 49.9 




281 


58.50 


225 


66.55 


257 




50.32 


50 - 59.9 




378 


76.45 


283 


82.84 


286 




68.97 


60 - 79.9 




331 


92.16 


208 


94.82 


333 




90.68 


80 - 99,9 




76 


95.77 


56 


98.04 


102 




97.33 


100 or more 


89 


100.00 


34 


100.00 


41 




100.00 


Total 




2,106 


1 


,737 




1,534 














FEMALE 








Under 10 








4 


0.26 








10 - 19.9 




S5 


4.54 


357 


23.26 


36 




2.30 


20 - 24.9 




216 


16.10 


329 


44.46 


153 




12.09 


25 - 29.9 




566 


46.36 


537 


79.06 


374 




36.02 


30 - 34,9 




726 


85.18 


186 


91.04 


539 




70.51 


35 - 39.9 




167 


94.12 


96 


97.23 


333 




91.81 


40 - 44.9 




65 


97.59 


23 


98.71 


65 




95.97 


45 - 49.9 




15 


98.40 ' 


8 


99.23 


27 




97.70 


50 - 59.9 




24 


99.68 


9 


99.81 


30 




99.62 


60 - 79.9 




6 


100.00 


2 


99.94 


5 




99.94 


80 - 99.9 










100.00 


1 




100.00 


100 or more 
















Total 




1,870 


1 


,552 




1,563 












Male 






Female 




Sept. 


1933 


Survey of 47 plants. 


Sept. 1933 


Survey 


of 


48 plants 


Apr. 


1933 


_ ti 


1 M 4 g ,| 


. 


Apr. 1933 


it 


ii 


48 " 


Apr. 


1929 


_ ii 


" 37 " 





Apr. 1929 


_ ii 


ii 


38 " 



Source: 



N.R.A. Questionnaire returns. National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning. The Paper Bag Industry, 
prepared by Max Kossoris, November 27, 1933. 



9818 



29? 
TA3LE lS7Cb) 
PAPER BAG INDUSTRY 



TO BE USED :;ITH CAUTION 



CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY EMPLOYEES 
BY SEX, III CENTRAL ZONE 





/eel; 


: Ending 


Y.eek 


Ending 


Tfeek 


Ending 


Hourly Earnings 


Sept. 


16, 1933 


April 


22, 1933 


April 


20,1929 


(cents ) 


ilo. 


Cum./£ 


No. 


Cum./b 


Ilo. 


Cum.'': 






of Total 




of Total 




of Tots 






Lale 










Under 10 














10 - 19.9 


1 


1.12 


2 


2.70 






20 - 2L..9 


9 


11.22; 


11 


17.57 


Ill 


I8.67 


25 - 29.9 


8 


20.22 


5 


2U.32 


1. 


2ii.00 


30 - 3^.9 


9 


30.3U 


6 


32.1i3 


8 


3U.67 


35 - 39.9 


17 


h$.hh 


11 


U7.30 


9 


2*6.6? 


ko - I4I1.9 


13 


6U.0J4 


9 


59. U6 


9 


58.67 


k5 - U9.9 


7 


71.91 


7 


68.92 


8 


69.33 


50 - 59.9 


8 


80. 90 


8 


79.73 


8 


80.00 


60 - 79.9 


13 


95.51 


11 


' 9*1.59 


10 


93.33 


80 - 99.'9 


3 


98.88 


h 


'100.00 


5 


100.00 


100 or more 


1 


100.00 











Total 



89 



tu 



75 



Und 


er 10 


10 


- 19.9 


20 


- 2U.9 


25 


- 29.9 


30 


- 3U.9 


35 


- 39-9 


ko 


- iiix.9 


k5 


- U9.9 


50 


- 59-9 


60 


- 79.9 


80 


- 99-9 


100 


or more 





Fema 1 e 










h 


k.h$ 


35 


2+1.18 






72 


85.39 


hh 


92.9*1 


50 


68.1x9 


3 


88.76 


2 


' 95.29 


20 


95.89 


5 


9ii.38 


It 


100.00 


3 


100.00 


3 


97.75 










2 


100.00 




- 







Total 



Source: 
Sept. 1933 
Apr. 1933. 
Apr. 1929 



89 



Kale 

Survey of 6 plants . 

" "6 " 

11 5 1, g 



85 



73 



Sept. 1933 

pr. 1933 

Apr. 192° 



Female 

Survey of 5 plants, 



Source: NR/. Questionnaire returns. National '/ecovery .' dminist ration, 
Division of Research and Planning. The Paper Bag Industry, 
prepared by liax Kossoris, November 27, 1933. 



9S1S 



poo 



TABLE 187(c) 

PAPER BAG INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF PACT R-v Ei^LOYESS, EY SEX, INDSOUTHERN ZJNE 



Hsurly 
Earnings 
(cents) 



Under 10 
10 - 19.9 



20 
25 
30 
35 
40 
45 
50 
60 
8© 



24.9 
29.9 
34.9 
39.9 
44.9 
49.9 
59.9 
79.9 
99.9 



B.00 or more 
Total 



Under 10 
10 - 19.9 



20 
25 
30 
35 
40 
45 
50 
60 
80 



24.9 
c y »y 
34.9 
39.9 
44,9 
49.9 
59.9 
79.9 
99.9 



Week Ending 
Sept. 16, 195 5- 

No. Cum. % 
of Total 



1 

10 

28 

67 

147 

270 

128 

25 

27 

47 

7 

10 

767 



l r 0- 'or more 
Total 



Sept. 1933 
Apr. 1933 
Apr. 1929 



704 



0.13 

1.43 

5.08 

13 .82 

32.99 

68.19 

84.88 

88.14 

91.65 

97.78 

98.69 

100.00 



123 


17.47 


90 


30.26 


303 


73.30 


184 


99.43 


1 


99.57 


2 


I99.SS 


1 


100.00 



".eel. 


Ending 


Week 


Ending 


kori 


1 22, 1933 

Cum. % 


April 


20, 1929 


No . 


Ho . 


Cum. % 




of r .otal 
IE 




of Total 


m 






1 


0.16 






103 


16.67 


1 


0.42 


185 


46 .31 


8 


3.80 - 


184 


75.80 


is 


11.39 


49 


83.65 


128 


62.03 


27 


87.98 


41 


79.32 


31 


92.95 


9 


83.12 


17 


95.67 


4 


88.55 


11 


97 .44 


11 


69.45 


6 


98 .40 


13 


94.94 


2 


98 .72 


8 


98.31 


8 


100.00 


4 


100.00 


624 




237 




FE 


ivALE 






493 


66,95 


132 


36.16 


2« 


90.48 


211 


93.97 


49 


99.12 


13 


97.53 


3 


99.65 


8 


99.72 


1 ' 


99.82 






1 


100.00 


1 


100.00 



567 



Hale 
Survey of 8 plants . 

II II Q II 

.ii ii g ii 



Sept. 1933 
Apr . 1933 
Apr. 1929 



365 • 

Fema le 

Survey of 9 plants 
I, ' n 1Q „ 

II It 17 II 



Source: N.R.A. Questionnaire returns, national Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning. The Fa per Bag Industry, 
prepared by Max Kossoris, November 27, 1933. 



3212 



30p 



TABLE 



CARRUGATED & SOLID FIBRE SHIFPING CONTAINER INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF WORK FOR FACTORY EMFL0YEE3 3Y SEX. 

WEEK OF JUNE 15, 1933 



NORTH AND SOUTH COMBINED 



(a) 















All Reported 


Hours 


Male 


.•• 




Female 




Factory 


Employees 


Wo rked 


No . 


$ 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Cumulative 


















Fer Cent 


20 hours' or 


















less 


178 


2.79 


136 


. 6.63 


314 


3.72 




3.72 


20.1-25 


79 


1.24 


55 


2.68 


134 


1.59 




5.31 


25 . 1-30 


118 


1.85 


93 


4.53 


■211 


2.50 




7.81 


30.1-35 


168 


2.63 


141 


6.88 


309 


3.67 




11.48 


35 . 1-40 


344 


5.39 


152 


7.41 


496 


5.88 




17.36 


40.1-45 


653 


10.24 


344 


16.77 


997 


11.83. 




29.19 


45.1-50 


1182 


18.53 


462 


,22i53 


1,644 


19.50 




48.69 


50.1-55 


1574 


24.67 


480 


23.40 


2,054 


24.36 




73.05 


55.1-60 


900 


14 . 10 


121 


5.90 


1,021 


12.11 




85.16 


Over 60 


1184 


18.56 


67 


• 3.27 


1,251 


14.84 




100.00 


Total 


6380 


100.0 i 


2.051 


100.0 


8.431 


100.0 







(a) See other Table for regional information 



Source: NRA questionnaire returns, 125 establishments reporting. Na- 
tional Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Plan- 
ning "The Carrugated & Solid Fibre shipping Container Industry," 
prepared by Max Kassaris, December 16, 1933. 



• 



9818 



301 

TABLE 139(a) 

OERRUGAT^D I SOLID FIBRE SHIPPING COETATJER inSUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARUIITGS OP FACTORY LLiFLOYE^S I1 T TIL KQRTH", BY El 

June 15, 1933 



Hourly 
Earnings 

cz::s pei 



Under 15 

15-19.9 

20-24.9 

25-29.9 
30-34.9 
35-39.9 
40-44. 9 
45-49. 9 
5C- 54. 9 
55-59.9 
60-69. 9 
7C-79. 9 
SC and ovc 

Total 



All Reported 
Male Female Factory Eg a layees 

Kb. ji Number Per Cent Number Per Cent CuiioiaM- 

Per cent 



o 
154 
305 
613 
1013 
1027 
852 
556 
431 
234 
246 
108 



.11 

2.72 

5.39 

10.93 

17.91 

18.16 

15.06 

10.01 

7. 62 

5.02 

4. 35 

1. 91 

.81 



96 

366 

517 

439 

211 

103 

46 

32 

7 



5.28 

20.14 

28.45 

24.16 

11. 61 

5.68 

2. 53 

1.76 



102 


1.36 


520 


6.96 


822 


ll.CC 


1057 


14.14 


1224 


16.38 


1130 


15. 12 


098 


12.02 


598 


8.CC 


438 


5.86 


284 


3.80 


246 


3.29 


108 


1.45 


46 


. 62 



1.36 
8.32 

19.32 
33. 46 
49.84 
64. 96 
76. ?£ 
84. ?S 
90.34 
94.54 
97. 33 
99. 3£ 
100. OC 



056 100.00 1817 100. OC 



7,473 100.00 



SOURCE: NBA questionnaire returns, 114 establishments reporting. National 

Hecovcry Administration, Division of Research and .Planning" The 

Carrugated and Solid Fibre shipping Container Industry", prepared 
bji Max Kassaris, Dec. 15, 1933 



9818 



302 



■ TABLE 189(b) 
CORRUGATED AND SOLID FIBRE SHIPPING CONTAINER INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY XJBBIXTG5 OF FACTORY EMPLOYEES IN THE SOUTH, BY SEX, 

June 15, 1933 



KA.'«7 '.=.« 



»«.>-..* ;m..w, i;--. 













All Re 


por 


ted 


Hourly 


Male 


Femal 


e 


Fac 


story 


Employees 


Earnings 








Cumulative 


_<V -i ' * Pi r Ho 


ur ' 'No. 
£9 


4.01 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number I 


er Cent 


Per Cent 


•under 15 


9 


S.85 


. 38 


3.97 




3*2.7. ■- 


15-1?. 3 


65 


8.98 


126 


53.85 


191 19.94 




23,91 


20-34, 9 


194 


2:V30 


00 


25.64 


254 26. 51 




50. 42 


25-2?= 9 


217 


;:: T)7 


32 


13.68 


249 25. 99 




76.41 • 


30-34= 9 


92 


12, vi 


6 


2,56 


98 • 10.23 




86. 64 


35-39,1 


35 


4.B3 


1 


.42 


36 


3.76 




90.40 • 


40-44, 9 


26 


3.59 


~ 


— 


26 


•2.71 




93.11 


45-49,9 


13 


1.'30 


— 


— 


13 


■1.36 




94. 47 


50-54.9 


24 


3. '31 


— 


— 


24 


2.51 




96.98 


55-59.9 


6 


.'83 


— 


— 


6 


.63 




97.61 • 


60-69.9 


10 


1.-38 


— 


— 


10 


1.04 




98.65 • 


70-79. 9 


5 


.69 


- 


— 


5 






99.17 • 


80 and over 


3 


1.10 


— 


— — 


8 ' 


.83 




100. 00 • 



Total 



724 100'. 00 234 



100.00' 



958 ■• 



100.00 



SOURCE: ERA. euestionnaire returns, 11 establishments reporting. National 

Recover:" Administration, Division of Research and Planning . "The Cor- 
rugated sad Solid Fibre Shipping Container Industry," prepared by 
Max Kdssoris , D e c. 16, 1933. 



'3818 



o 



o 

Eh 



m 
o 

EH 



o 



i-h" 

EH 



► 



>H 

Ph 

EH 

8 



O 

EH 
EH 

~> 

pq 
M 

Hi 



to 

I— I 

o 

Ph 



9S13 



C7"\ 



60 



'-- I cd 

I 3 

CD 



CD 

> 

•H 

•P 

cd 

H 

I 





r-t 


-P 


«i 


Pi 


4J 


cd 


a 


o 


EH 


in 




(1) 


^H 


Ph 


o 



>JJ 



H -P 

o o 

EH 



I CD 



o 



p 

s 1 



Q) 

P» 

■H -P 
+» PI 



'I -P 

o o 

Pl EH 

<D 
Ph 4H 

o 



h o 

cd 

Ph 



,g «h >s 



3- 



o o 



ti 



■a) hh cd 

O O -P 

M .O 

11 EH 

Ph 



CD 

l 



9 







J*i 






n> 


CO 


Ti 


cd 


P 1 


CD 
M 


s=- 


o 


Sh 


H 


m 


O 


(1) 




& 


Pl 



CO 


cm 


LP, 


1 — 


60 


ru 


o 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


J- 


o 


CO 


\X> 


rH 


o 


o 




rH 


rH 


m 


UD 


CT\ 


o 



60 

-3- 



VD 



-4" 

• 



60 
H 



60 



60 
CM 



C\J 
60 



LP 
CM 



:.f 



60 
CM 



60 
CX\ 



O 
O 



VJ0 



J- 


LPi 


r^> 


LP 


60 


CT\ 


r^v 


iP 



CM 

o 



LP 
60 



LP 
CM 



CM 
LP 



a> 



rp 

rP 



LP 
60 



rp 



60 
CJ^ 



O 
rH 



O^i 






60 

rp 



o 
o 



LP 



r — 


60 


r— 


CM 


0^ 


,=J- 


o 


O 


■ ' r — 


yo 


rp 


CTi 


o 


O 


« 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


LP 


a> 


U3 


r*- 


rp 


CO 


o 






r-H 


rp 


LP 


60 


o 

rH 



J- 

LP 






rp 



O 

CM 



rp 



o 

CM 



o 
o 



rp 



LP 



j3- 



J3- 



rp 
rp 



i — 
CM 



CX> 



C^ 



a> 



o 












o 




CM 


CPv 


CT\ 


j± 


o^ 


a^ 


S 






CM 


rp 


3 


J- 


LP 






u 












Ph 




CD 


! 


1 


i 


1 


i 


i 


r-H 


TJ 














« 


rt 


O 


o 


o 


LP 


o 


O 


-P 


t3 


CM 


rp 


.=!■ 


J- 


LP 


^D 


o 



EH 



o 


Tj 


^1 


pj 


HH 


CO 


CO 


rj 


; H 


O 


0) 


T-i 


P 


(D 


+J 


CO 


o 


CD 




M 


^ 


<H 


§ 


o 


S 


Pi CO 




O -H 


n. 


•H fn 


id 


CO -o 


o 


■rH W 




> CO 


CD 


•H O 


t— 1 


R X 


-u 




o 


p!" 3 


Ph 


o S 




•H 


hh 


■p >> 


O 


cd ^3 




u 


j^; 


-P Tj 


O 


CO CD 


+3 


pl aj 


ClJ 


■K Ph 


• H 

o 


S 0) 


o 


<4 Ph 


w 




m 


>» - 


<A 


:h >». 




ai u 


r-i 


> -P 


a 


1 CO 


r* 


f J ^ 


b 


a> -d 


H 


Ph Pl 


-p 


. I-H 


*-J 


rH 




cd P; 




Pl cd 


a> 


o o 


^ 


•rH 


+j 


+3 O 




Cd r-\ 


t^ 


n -p 


r a 


■P 




o 


xi 


: m 


CD 


<3 




. M 




r^H 


•H 


K r-i 


n. 


• -H 


-P 


fS! S 


^3 




O 


o o 




-P CO 


W 


■H 


ai 


XJ Ph 


T-h 


CD 


•rH 


-P U 


n! 


U CD 


rj 


O pl. 


H 


Pi Cd 


b 


<D Ph • 


•H 


h Jr 


-P 


i-^i 


W 


- "4 cn 


a) 


to Eh rH 


rj 


CD 


o n 


•rH 




PI • o> 
3 fc»D 


Pi 


o 


P. Pl >s 




S tH Pl 


Ti 


o d a 


a> 


O PI p5 


en 


cd pi 

CM r-H Cd 


Ph 


rH PL, Hj 


ai 




a 




!h 




O 




CO 





30U 

TABLE 191(a) 
PAPER DISC ;iILK BOTTLE CAP INDUSTRY 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 
NORTHERN DIVISION 



EMPLOYEES CLASSIFIED BY HOURS WORKED PER WE 11 FOR WEEKS ENDING 
NEAREST 15TH OF LIONTH, JANUARY 1934 to LARCH 1934. 







Manuf act 


uring Employees 






Hours Worked 




Watch- 


• Chauf- 


■ Engin- 


Other 


Office 


Per Week 


Total 


men 




feurs 


eers, 


Labor- Employ- 










etc. 


etc. 


ers 


ees 




548 


Week 


end 


ing nearest January 15,1934 




Total number employees 


9 




6 


17 


516 


113 


Under 20.0 hour:: per week 


31 


2 




- 


- 


29 


2 


20.1 to 30.0 hrs.per week 


45 


- 




- 


- 


45 


- 


30.1 to 35.0 hrs.per week 


58 


- 




- 


2 


56 


2 


35.1 to 37.5 hrs.per week 


23 


- 




- 


- 


23 


3 


37.6 to 40.0 hrs.per week 


303 


1 




2 


12 


288 


84 


40.1 to 45.0 hrs.per week 


43 


- 




3 


2 


. 38 


21 


45.1 to 48.0 hrs.per week 


27 


2 




1 


1 


23 


1 


48.1 to 56.0 hrs.per week 


14 


1 








13 


_ 


56.1 and over hrs.per week 


4 


3 




- 


- 


1 


- 




577 


Week 


end 


ing nearest February 15,1934 


Total number employees 


8 




8 


17 


544 


117 


Under 20.0 hours per week 


24. 


2 




1 


- 


21 


1 


20.1 to 30.0 hrs.per week 


31 


- 




- 


— 


31 


_ 


30.1 to 35,0 hrs.per week 


43 


- 




•* 


- 


43 


3 


35.1 to 37.5 hrs.per week 


32 


- 




- 


2 


30 


3 


37.6 to 40.0 hrs.per week 


374 


2 




3 


13 


356 


85 


40.1 to 45*0 hrs.per week 


41 


1 




2 


1 


37 


23 


45.1 to 48.0 hrs.per week 


14 


— 




2 


_ 


12 


2 


48.1 to 56.0 hrs.per week 


15 


- 




- 


1 


14 


M 


56.1 and over hrs.per week 


3 


3 




- 


- 


- 


~ 




603 


Week 


ending nearest I'ardh 


15, 1934 




Total number employees 


8 




8. 


16 


571 " 


125 


Under 20.0 hours per week 


19 


2 




_ 


1 


16 


_ 


20.1 to 30.0 hrs.per week 


18 


- 




- 


_ 


IF 


2 


30.1 to 35.0 hrs.per week ■ 


29 


- 




- 


3 


26 


1 


35.1 to 37.5 hrs.per week 


15 


- 




- 


_ 


15 


4 


37.6 to 40.0 hrs.per week 


413 


2 




2 


4 


411 


110 


40.1 to 45.0 hrs.per week 


62 


1 




3 


5 


53 


7 


45.1 to 48.0 hrs.per week 


17 


- 




3 


3 


11 


1 


48.1 to 56.0 hrs.per week 


18 


1 




- 


_ 


17 


N 


5G.1 and over hrs.per week 


6 


2 




- 


- 


4 


- 



Source: Code Authority for the Paper Disc Milk Settle Cap Industry. 
Number of reporting concerns not available 



q*]* 



305 

TABLE 191(1>) 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 



paper disc mil:; bottle cap industry - northern division 

c; ployees classified by hours forked per vclk for weeks ending 
nearest 15th of month, april, 1934 to june, 1934. 



Hours Forked 
Per Week 



Total 



Total number employees 616 

Under 20.0 hours per wenk 33 

20.1 to 30.0 hrs. per week 23 

50.1 to 35.0 hrs. per week 16 

35.1 to 37.5 hrs. per week 41 

37*6 to 40.0 hrs. per week 398 

40.1 to 45.0 hrs. per week 49 

45.1 to 48.0 hrs. per week 39 

48.1 to 56.0 hrs. per week 16 
56.1 and over hours per week 1 



Total number employees 623 

Under 20.0 hours per week 20 

20.1 to 30.0 hrs. per week 14 

30.1 to 35.0 hrs. per week 23 

35.1 to 37.5 hrs. per week 9 

37.6 to 40.0 hrs. per week 362 

40.1 to 45.0 hrs. per week 82 

45.1 to 48.0 hrs. per week 47 

48.1 to 56.0 hrj. per week 61 

56.1 and over hrs. per week 5 



Total number employees 655 

Under 20.0 hours per week 37 

20.1 to 30.0 hrs. per week 29 

30.1 to 35.0 hrs. per week 34 

35.1 to 37.5 hrs. per week 10 

37.6 to 40.0 hrs. per week 331 

40.1 to 45.0 hrs.-per week 135 

45.1 to 48.0 hrs. per week 61 

48.1 to 56.0 hrs. per week 14 

56.1 and over hrs. per week 4 



Manufacturin g Em ploye es 
Ifatch 1 "' Chauf- Engin- 
men feurs eers, 
etc. etc. 



Other Office 

Labor-- Employ- 

ers _ ees 

Yfeek ending nearest April 15, 1954 



18 



2 
1 

2 
1 



2 
5 

1 



7 
5 
6 



581 
31 
22 
16 
41 

387 
38 
32 
14 



We e k ending ne a rest Ma y 15, 19 34 



9 
2 



2 
2 

4 



6 

1 



598 

18 

14 

23 

9 

352 

79 

40 

58 

5 



Week ending nearest June 15, 1934 



8 
2 
1 



7 



1 
4 
1 
1 



•1 



634 

35 

28 

34 

10 

322 

130 

59 

12 

4 



Source: Code Authority for the Faper Disc Milk Bottle Cap Industry, 
NUMBER OF REPORTING CONCERNS NOTflAVAILABLE 



122 



2 

2 
111 

6 



126 

1 
1 
3 

116 
3 
1 
1 



131 
1 

1 

4 
70 
54 

1 



9S18 



306 

TABLE 191(c) T0 BE USED WITH CAUTI0N 

paper disc milk bottle cap industry ■• northern Division 

EMPLOYEES CLASSIFIED BY HOURS WORIZED PER WE V! FOR WEEKS ENDING 
NEAREST 15TII OF MONTH, JULY 1934 to SEPTEMBER 1934 





ITorked 




Manufacturing 


Employees 






Hours 




Watch- Chauf- 


Engin- 


Other 


Office 


Per 


Week 


Total 


men 


f eurs 


eers, 


Labor- 


Employ- 










otc 


' • 


etc. 


ers 


ees 




number employees 


649 


Meek 


ending 


nearest July 


15, 1934 




Total 


8 


7 




6 


628 


126 


Under 20.0 hours per week 


31 


3 


- 




- 


28 


1 


20.1 


to 30.0 hrs. per week 


19 


- 


- 




- 


19 


- 


30.1 


to 35 hrs. per week 


24 


- 


- 




- 


24 


3 


35.1 


to 37.5 hrs. per week 


19 


- 


1 




- 


18 


3 


37.6 


to 40.0 hrs. per week 


349 


2 


1 




5 


341 


112 


40.1 


to 45.0 hrs, per week 


103 


1 


1 




- 


101 


4 


45.1 


to ^8.0 hrs. per week 


83 


1 


3 




- 


79 


2 


48.1 


to 56.0 hrs. per week 


19 


1 


1 




1 


16 


1 


56.1 


and over hours per week 


2 


- 


- 




- 


2 


- 




numb e r emp 1 oy e e s 


592 


Week 


ending 


nearest August 15, 1934 


Total 


8 


7 




6 


571 


123 


Under 20.0 hours per week 


26 


3 


- 




- 


23 


1 


20.1 


to 30.0 hrs. per week 


80 


- 


- 




- 


80 


- 


30.1 


to 35.0 hrs. per week 


53 


- 


1 




- 


52 


- 


35.1 


to 37.5 hrs. per week 


17 


- 


- 




- 


17 


2 


37.6 


to 40.0 hrs. per week 


267 


1 


2 




5 


259 


115 


40.1 


to 45.0 hrs. per week 


104 


1 


2 




- 


101 


1 


45.1 


to 48.0 hrs. per week 


35 


2 


2 




- 


31 


2 


48.1 


to 56.0 hrs. per week 


10 


1 


- 




1 





2 


56.1 


and over hours per week 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 




number employees 


605 


Week 


ending 


nearest September 15, 


1934 


Total 


9 


7 




6 


583 


125 


Under 20.0 hours per week 


35 


3 


- 




- 


32 


- 


20.1 


to 30.0 hrs. per week 


28 


- 


- 




- 


28 


11 


30.1 


to 35.0 hrs. per week 


84 


- 


- 




- 


84 


4 


35.1 


to 37.5 hrs. per week 


84 


- 


1 




- 


83 


2 


37.6 


to 40.0 hrs. per week 


273 


2 


3 




5 


263 


102 


40.1 


to 45.0 hrs. per week 


58 


1 


1 




- 


56 


5 


45.1 


to 48.0 hrs. per week 


27 


2 


2 




■• 


23 


1 


48.1 


to 56.0 hrs. per week 


14 


1 


- 




1 


12 


- 


56.1 


and over hours per week 


2 


- 


- 




- 


2 


- 



Source: Code Authority for the Paper Disc Milk Bottle Cap Industry. 
Number of reporting concerns not available 



9818 



307 

TABLE 131(d) TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 

LILII BOTTLE CAP INDUSTRY - SOUTHERN DIVISION 

EMPLOYEES CLASSIFIED BY HOURS V.'OPJSD PEP TEES FOR WEEKS ENDING 
NEAREST 15TII OF MONTH, 0CT03ER 1934 TO DECEMBER 1934 





Worked 




Manuf 


'acturin 


g 


Employees 






Jiours 




Watch- Chauf- 


Engin- 


Other 


Office 


Per \ 


Teek 


Total 


men 


feur 


s 


eers, 


Labor- 


Employ- 










etc 


* 


etc. 


ers 


ees 




nuriber employees 


591 


"Week 


ending 


nearest Oct, 


1 15 » 1934 




Total 


8 


7 




6 


570 


115 


Under 20.0 hours per week 


35 


3 


- 




- 


32 


- 


20.1 


to 30.0 hrs.per week 


05 


- 


- 




- 


85 


- 


30.1 


to 35.0 hrs.per week 


23 


- 


- 




- 


23 


2 


35.1 


to 37.5 hrs.per week 


45 


- 


- 




- 


45 


3 


37.6 


to 40.0 hrs.per week 


288 


1 


2 




5 


280 


105 


40.1 


to 45.0 hrs.per week 


68 


1 


4 




- 


63 


4 


45.1 


to 48.0 hrs.per week 


27 


2 


1 




- 


24 


1 


48.1 


to 56.0 hrs.per week 


18 


1 


- 




1 


16 


- 


56.1 


and over hrs. per week 


2 


- 


- 




- 


2 


- 








We ek 


ending 


nearest Nov, 


,15, 1934 




Total 


number employees 


593 


8 


7 




7 


571 


113 


Under 20.0 hours per week 


24 


2 


- 




- 


22 


1 


20.1 


to 30.0 hrs.per week 


32 


- 


- 




- 


32 


- 


30.1 


to 35.0 hrs.per week 


30 


- 


- 




- 


30 


1 


35.1 


to 37.5 hrs.per week 


10 


- 


- 




- 


10 


3 


37.6 


to 40.0 hrs.per week 


329 


2 


2 




5 


320 


99 


40.1 


to 45.0 hrs.per week 


116 


2 


4 




1 


109 


7 


45.1 


to 48.0 hrs.per week 


27 


1 


1 




1 


24 


2 


48.1 


to 56.0 hrs.per week 


22 


1 


- 




- 


21 


- 


56.1 


and over hrs.per week 


3 


- 


- 




- 


3 


- 




number employees 


587 


Week 


ending 


nearest Dec, 


,15, 1934 




Total 


11 


7 




7 


562 


109 


Under 20.0 hours per week 


34 


3 


- 




- 


31 


- 


20.1 


to 30.0 hrs.per week 


43 


- 


- 




2 


41 


1 


30.1 


to 35.0 hrs.per week 


56 


- 


1 




1 


54 


2 


35.1 


to 37.5 hrs.per week 


19 


- 


- 




- 


19 


3 


37.6 


to 40.0 hrs.per week 


314 


4 


2 




2 


306 


65 


40.1 


to 45.0 hrs.per week 


81 


2 


2 




1 


76 


32 


48.1 


to 56.0 hrs.per week 


26 


1 


2 




- 


23 


6 


56.1 


and over lirs.per week 


14 


1 


- 




1 


12 


- 



Source: Code Authority for the Paper Disc Milk Bottle Cap Industry. 
Number of reporting concerns not available. 



9S1E 



o 



1— 1 




m 


EH 




m 


p 




a> 


>! 




rH 


o 




. 


rr: 




00 


EH 




rH 


HH 






• " 




o 


a 




pi 


M 




<3j 


CO 




)^5 


P 




P=H 


M 




O 


Ph 






o 




H 


EH 




S 




&M 






PEJ 


•» 




EH 

co 


M 




P 


CO 




g 


>H 




Ih 


Ph 






OJ 


W 


>H 


CTi 


i-q 


o 


rH 


EH 


i-q 




EH 


1 


pq 


O 


rH 


Ph 





q 


M 


fa 


EH 


rH 


Ph 




l-H 


o 




^ 


EH 
O 




o 


<* 




co 


Ph 




n 






R 


Ph 
O 




& 


CO 




S| 


e> 




Ph 


HH 

b 



@ 

l-H 

Ph 

HH 

CO 

co 

<: 

rH 
O 



ID 
H 

oj 
S 

CD 

Pn 




CD 

o 

SH 

CD 
Ph 



Pi 
CD 
X> 



r 

-P 
O 

LH 



CO 


0) 

>> 

o 

rH 



I +3 CO 

cd cd P -p 

H > CD o 

pi -h o EH 

3 += u 

P CD «H 

O (L, O 



S 

CD 
O 
H 

en 



oj 

H CD 

CD CD 

fl<H >; 

S O <-v 

P rH 

:=5 a 



30S 



+3 p 

i CD Pi -P 

P > CD O 

S -n O EH 

P -P H 

O CO CD =n 

rH Ph O 



4-3 

P rH 

a) col 

O «H +> 

MOO 

CD E-i 

rH 



en 

Q' 

c; 
><< 
o 
.-I 
& 



a) 



t*H 
O 



en ^-s 

UO tn 

P +3 

■h p 
P CD 

u o 

CO v^ 



: ; H 





r^ 


UD 


OJ 


-p- 


rH 


to 


rH 


r— 


o 








• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 




TH- 




in 


O 


o 


tn 


OJ 


in 


O^ 


cr> 


o 




CD 






OJ 


I*"") 


j- 


to 


CTi 


cr, 


c^ 


o 

rH 




, report 
sc Milk 




h- 


CT\ 


^D 


OJ 


r~— 


1 — 


m 


VD 


m 


o 


to vH 




• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


■ 


i 


• 


CD R 




m 


-P" 


CT> 


in 


UD 


r-H 


r*-» 


O 


o 


o 


■H 






rH 




rH 


PO 


<-{ 








o 

rH 


P fH 

CC CD 

ft ft 














































O Ph 
























O 




o^> 


O 


OJ 


rH 


m 


^D 


rH 


OJ 


rH 


LO 


CD 




rH 


in 


K1 


in 


OJ 

rH 


-P- 


rH 








. from 12 
nning. Th 




r— 


in 


m 




O 












W) P 




• 


• 


• 




• 












tn rH 




m 


rH 


to 




o 












S FM 




C\J 


en 


en 




o 
rH 












ft th 
P P 
O CO 

• 

CD rP -P- 

rH O rn 

3 H CA 
-P CO rH 


























1 — 


to 


to 




1 — 










o 


O CD 




• 


• 


• 




• 










• 


Ph en - 




K> 


r— 


UD 




rH 










o 


CD CTv 




OJ 


U3 
















o 

rH 


Asso. of 
ion of H 
January 




-P" 


o 


-P- 




rH 










CT> 


DO 




rH 


«=r 
















LO 


he Hat'l. 
ion, Divi 
Kossoris, 




CO 


.p- 


m 


O 


OJ 


CTi 


<T\ 


U3 


O 




+3 43 




• 


• 


« 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 






co M 

>S ^4 CO 




rH 


LO 


in 


-P" 


to 


J" 


CO 


CT\ 


o 










rH 


m 


1 — 


CJ^ 


CT\ 


o> 


o 

rH 




btained b 

Administ 

ared by M 




to 


VJD 


rH 


LOi 


OJ 


1 — 


O 


r— 


J" 


o 


O >, ft 




• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


I 


• 


• 


• 


H CD 




rH 


i*n 


o 


to 


3 


VD 


.P- 


q 


o 


o 


a ai u 








rH 


rH 


rH 








o 


CD > Ph 










- 












rH 


tionnair 
nal Heco 
dustry, 




UTl 


O 


CO 


rH 


OJ 


^D 


r-H 


OJ 


rH 


U3 


en o p 






rH 


OJ 


in 


OJ 

rH 


J" 


rH 




CD 
H 


t — 
OJ 


Bosed on que 
to NP.A, Ncti 
Bottle Cap I 




CT> CPv 


a~\ 


tx< 


CT\ 


o> 


o> 


(T\ 


a> 


O 






o 


• • 


• 


t 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


s 






rH 


crs j- 


CTl 


.P- 


CTi 


en 


CTi 


CTv 


o> 






•• 




rH C\J 


OJ 


r-n 


ro 


j- 


in 


1 — 


CT\ 


U 




CD 


(H 


















O 


rH 


O 


CD 

TH 


1 I 


1 


1 


I 


i 


i 


1 


1 


• 


CO 
4-3 


^ 


P 


o 


LT\ 


( 3 


in 


o 


o 


O 


o 


rH 


o 


O 


t> 


rH CM 


OJ 


m 


m 


J- 


in 


UD 


00 


<» 


EH 


co 



1 il 



JR DISC L"ILi; 



309 

TABLE 133(a) 
BOTTLE CAP INDUSTRY 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 
NORTHERN DIVISION 



FACTORY EMPLOYEES CLASSIFIED BY HOURLY i/AGE RATES FDR ViEEKS ENDING 
NEAREST 15th OF MONTH, JANUARY 1934 - MARCH 1935. 



Rate paid to employees 



Total numb 
Under 24. 
24.0/ to 
28.0/ bo 
30.0/ to 
32.0/ to 
35. C^ to 
40.0/ to 
45.0/ to 
50.0/ to 
60. 0/ and 



er of 
0/ -oer 
27.9/ 
23.9/ 
31.9/ 
34.9/ 
39.9/ 
44.9/ 
49.9/ 
59.9/ 
over 



employees 

hour 
per hour 
per hour 
per hour 
per hour 
per hour 
per hour 
per hour 
per hour 
per hour 



Total numb 
Under 24. 
24.0/ to 
28.0/ to 
30.0/ to 
32.0/ to 
35.0/ -to 
40.0/ to 
45.0/ to 
50.0/ to 
60.0/ and 



er of 

0/ per 

27.9/ 

29.9/ 

31.9/ 

34.9/ 

39.9/ 

44.9/ 

59.9/ 

over 



employees 
hour 
per hour 
per hour 
per hour 
per hour 
per hour 
per hour 
per hour 
per hour 
per hour 



Factory Employees 

Regular Handicapped 
Total Hale Female Female 



'Te el: ending nearest January 15/1954 

1 
1 



■548 


453 


97 


1 






1 


1 




58 


4. 


54 


8 




8 


?Z 


53 


29 


129 


126 


3 


43 


42 


1 


106 


105 


1 


120 


119 


1 



Vie el: end ing nearest February 15,1934 



577 



477 



99 



1 


1 




2 


1 




3 




3 


100 


10 


9C 


159 


157 


2 


61 


59 


2 


124 


123 


1 


127 


126 


1 



Total number 


.of 


employees 


Under 


24, 


,0/ 


per hour 


24, 


.0/ 


to 


27, 


,9/ 


per 


hour 


28, 


,0jz 


to 


29, 


.9/ 


per 


hour 


30, 


.0/ 


to 


31, 


,9/ 


per 


hour 


32, 


,0jL 


to 


34, 


,9/ 


per 


hour 


35, 


,0/ 


to 


39, 


,9/ 


per 


hour 


40, 


.0/ 


to 


44, 


.9/ 


per 


hour 


45, 


,0/ 


to 


49. 


,9/ 


per 


hour 


50, 


.0/ 


to 


59, 


.9/ 


per 


hour 


60, 


,0/ 


and over 


per 


hour 



Week ending nearest March 15, 1954 
603 495 108 



1 




1 


1 




1 


101 




101 


186 


185 


1 


56 


54 


2 


123 


122 


1 


135 


134 


1 



Number of reporting concerns not available, 
Sourco: Code Authority for the Paper Disc Milk Bottle Cap Industry, 



9S1S 



TABLE 193 (t) T0 BE USE2 WITH CAUTION 

PAPER DISC RIL7 BOTTLE CAP INDUSTRY - NORTHERN DIVISION 

FACTORY EMPLOYEES CLASSIFIED 3Y HOURLY WAGE RATES FOR WEEKS ENDING 
NEAREST 15th OF HONTH, JANUARY 1934 - MARCH 1935 



Factory Employees 



late paid to employees 



Regular Handicapped 
Total Kale Female emale 



Tot 


al : 


number 


of 


employees 


Under 


24 


.00 


pe: 


r hour 


24 


.00 


to 


27 


.9c? 


per 


hour 


28 


.00 


to 


29 


.90 


per 


hour 


30 


.00 


to 


31 


.94 


per 


hour 


32 


.0/ 


to 


34 


.90 


per 


hour 


35 


.y 


to 


39 


.90 


per 


hour 


40 


.0/ 


to 


44 


.90 


per 


hour 


45 


.04 


to 


49 


.94 


per 


hour 


50 


.04 to 


59, 


.9(2? 


per 


hour 


60 


,0/ 


and over 


per 


hour 


Total number 


of 


emp! 


Loyees 


Under 


24. 


,00 


per 


• hour 


24, 


04 


to 


27. 


,90 


per 


hour 


28. 


,00 


to 


29. 


90 


per 


hour 


30. 


0/ 


to 


31. 


90 


per 


hour 


32. 


.0(2? to 


34. 


90 


per 


hour 


35. 


04 to 


39. 


90 


per 


hoar 


40. 


00 


to 


44. 


9<i 


per 


hour 


45. 


V 


to 


49. 


94 


per 


hour 


50. 


00 


to 


59. 


90 


per 


hour 


60. 


00 


and 


over 


per 


hour 



Week ending neare st Apri 1_ 1 5 , 1934 
616 502 113 1 



107 
199 
53 
124 
132 



196 

51 

123 

132 



107 
3 
2 
1 



Week ending nearest May 15 , 1954 
G23 509 113 1 



1 




1 


104 




104 


196 


193 


3 


58 


56 


2 


124 


123 


1 


139 


137 


2 



Total number 
Under 24.0/ 
24.0;? to 27. 
28.0/ to 29. 
30.0/ to 31. 
32.0/ to 34. 
35.0/ to 39. 
40.0/ to 44. 
45. J/ t,» 49. 
50.0/ to 59. 
60.0/ and ov 



of employees 
per hour 
9/ per hour 
9/ per hour 
9/ per hour 
9/ per hour 
9/ per hour 
9/ per hour 
9/ per hour 
9/ per hour 
er per hour 



Week ending nearest Ju_ne_ _15, 1934 
655 522 133 



1 




1 




124 




124 




208 


204 


4 




52 


50 


2 




124 


123 


1 




146 


. 145 


1 





Source: Code Authority for the Paper Disc Kills Bottle Cap Industry. 

Number of reporting concerns nnt available 
9Slg 



3 11 , v 

TABLE 193(c) 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 



>. pep, disc :.:n : bottle cap indu; tpy - nort.3]RN division 

VOL LEPI iYEES CLASSIFIED 3Y IO T P.LY ,. r /.G3 PATES POP WEEKS - PDIPG 
NEAREST 15th OF MONTE, JANUARY 1934 - PARCH 1935. 



Pate paid to employees 



Totr 


'1 number 


of 


employees 


Unc 


ler 


24. 


,00 


per 


■ hour 


24, 


,00 


to 


27, 


,90 


per 


hour 


28, 


,00 


to 


29, 


,9c' 


per 


hour 


30, 


,0c' 


to 


31, 


,9<i 


per 


hour 


32, 


,00 


to 


34.9/ per hour 


35, 


,00 


to 


39, 


,90 


per 


hour 


40, 


,00 


to 


44, 


,90 


per 


hour 


45, 


,00 


to 


49. 


,90 


per 


hour 


50, 


,0d to 


59. 


,9d 


per 


hour 


60, 


,00 


and over 


per 


hour 



Factory Employees 

Regular Handicapped 

Total Pale Female Female 

Pee k ending nearest J uly 15, 1 954 
649 517 131 1 



1 




1 


123 




123 


198 


194 


4 


51 


50 


1 


127 


126 


1 


148 


147 


1 



otal number of 


employees 


Under 24.0/ per hour 


24.0/ to 27.9/ 


per 


hour 


28.0/ to 29.9/ 


per 


hour 


30.0/ to 31.9/ 


per 


hour 


32.0/ to 34.9/ 


per 


hour 


35.0/ to 39.9/ 


per 


hour 


40,0/ to 44.9/ 


per 


hour 


45.0/ to 49.9r?f 


per 


hour 


50.0^f to 59.9cf 


per 


hour 


60.0/ and over 


per 


hour 



Total number of employees 
Under 24.0c 7 'per hour 
24.0c? to 21 .90 per hour 
23.0/ to 29.9/ per hour 
30. Op' to 31.9/ per hour 
32.0/ to 34.9/ per hour 
35.0/ to 39.9/ per hour 
40.0/ to 44.9/ per hour 
45.0/ to 49.9/ per hour 
50.0/ to 59.9/ per hour 
60.0/ and over per hour 



Week ending nearest August 15, 1934 
592 494 97 1 



1 
90 
3 
2 
1 



Week ending nearest : eptember 15 ,195 4 
605 503 101 1 



1 




90 




189 


136 


60 


58 


122 


121 


129 


129 




„ „ _ . 



1 




1 


93 




93 


196 


193 


3 


62 


60 


2 


119 


118 


1 


133 


132- 


1 



Source: Code Authority for the Paper Disc l-!i Ik Bottle Cap Industry. 
Number of reporting concerns not available 



921S 



312 
TABLE 193(d) 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 



P.' PER DISC IJILK BOTTLE CAP INDUSTRY - IIOKTIilDRK DIVISION 

WAGE 
FACTORY EIIPLOYEES CLASSIFIED 3Y HOURLY/RATES FOR VE ,KS ENDING NEAREST 
15th OF HONTH, JANUARY 1934 - IIARCH 1935. 



Rate pc id to employees 



Total number of employees 


Under 24.0/ per hour 


24.0/ to 27.9/ per 


hour 


23.0/ to 29.9/ per 


hour 


30.0/ to 31.9/ per 


hour 


32.0/ to 34,9/ per 


hour 


35.0/ to 39.9/ per 


hour 


40. 0c? to 44.9/ per 


hour 


45.0/ to 49.9/ per 


hour 


50.0/ to 59.9/ per 


hour 


60.0/ and over per 


hour 



Factory Employees 



Total 



Regular 

"ale Female 



Handicapped 
Female 



Week ending nearest October 15, 1934 
591 491 99 1 



1 




92 


2 


182 


179 


66 


64 


106 


103 


143 


143 



1 

90 
3 
2 
3 



( 



Totn.l number of employees 


— —i 1 ,- -yi 


24.0/ per hour 


24. Ocf 


to 27.9/ per 


hour 


28.0/ 


to 29.9/ per 


hour 


30.0c' 


to 31.9/ per 


hour 


32.0c' 


to 34.9/ per 


hour 


35.0c' 


to 39.9c' ?er 


hour 


40.0/ 


to 44.9/ per 


hour 


45.0/ 


to 49.9/ per 


hour 


50.0c? 


to 59.9/ per 


hour 


60.0c' 


and over per 


hour 



eek ending nearest November 15, 1934 
593 495 97 1 



1 




86 




179 


173 


64 


62 


112 


111 


150 


149 



1 

86 
6 
2 
1 
1 



1 eek ending__neare_st December 15,_ 1934 



Total number of employees 


587 


497 


90 


Under 24.0/ per hour 


- 


- 


- 


24.0/ to 27.9/ per 


hour 


- 


- 


- 


28.0/ to 29.9/ per 


hour 


4 


- 


- 


30.0/ to 31.9/ per 


hour 


- 


- 


- 


32.0/ to 34.9/ per 


hour 


1 




1 


35.0/ to 39.9/ per 


hour 


85 




85 


40.0/ to 44.9/ per 


hour 


178 


176 


2 


45.0/ to 49.9/ per 


hour 


59 


58 


1 


50.0/ to 59.9/ per 


hour 


116 


116 




60.0/ and over per 


hour 


148 


147 


1 



Source: Code Authority for the Paper Disc Hi Ik Bottle Cap Industry. 
Number of reporting concerns not available 

981S 



313 

TABLE 133(e) 



TO HE USED WITH CAUTION 



PAPER DISC MILK BOTTLE CAP INDUSTRY 
(NORTHERN DIVISION) 
FACTORY EMPLOYEES CLASSIFIED BY HOURLY WAGE RATES FOP. WEEKS 
ENDING NEAREST 15th OF MONTH JANUARY 1934 - I1ARCH 1935. 



Rate paid to employees 



Tots 


il number 


of 


employees 


Under 


24, 


,0ft 


per hour 


24, 


,0/ 


to 


27, 


,9 ft 


pei 


hour 


28, 


.Oft 


to 


29, 


,9 ft 


per 


hour 


30, 


.Oft 


to 


31, 


,9<i 


per 


hour 


32, 


,0d to 


34, 


,9ft 


per 


hour 


35, 


,0<t to 


39, 


,9i 


per 


hour 


40, 


,0ft 


to 


44, 


,9 ft 


per 


hour 


45. 


,9ft 


to 


49, 


,9 ft 


per 


hour 


50, 


,9ft 


to 


59. 


,9 ft 


per 


hour 


60, 


,0 ft 


and over 


per 


hour 



Factory Employees 

Regular Handicapped 
Total Male Female Female 



wee k endin g near est January 15, 1 935 
584 497 86 1 



1 




1 


78 




78 


193 


190 


3 


55 


52 


3 


111 


111 




145 


144 


1 



Total numb 
Fnder 24. 
24.0/ to 
28.0;/ to 
30.0c' to 
32.0/ to 

35.0/ to 
40.0/ to 
45.0/ to 
50.0/ to 
60.0/ and 



er of employees 
0/ per hour 
27.9/ per hour 
29.9/ per hour 
31.9/ per hour 
34.9/ per hour 

39,9/ per hour 
44.9/ per hour 
49.9/ per hour 
59.9/ per hour 

over per hour 



Total number 


of 


employees 


Under 


24, 


,0ft 


pei 


• hour 


24, 


,0/ 


to 


27, 


.9/ 


per 


hour 


28, 


.0/ 


to 


29, 


.9/ 


per 


hour 


30, 


,0/ 


to 


31, 


.9/ 


per 


hour 


32, 


,0 ft 


to 


34, 


,9 ft 


per 


hour 


35, 


.0/ 


to 


39, 


,9/ 


per 


hour 


40, 


,0ft 


to 


44, 


.9c? 


per 


hour 


45, 


.0/ 


to 


49, 


,9c? 


per 


hour 


50, 


,0/ 


to 


59, 


,9 ft 


per 


hour 


60, 


,0 ft 


tod over 


per 


hour 



Week ending nearest February 15,1935 



596 



501 



94 



86 




181 


178 


59 


57 


121 


119 


147 


147 



3 
2 
2 



Week ending neares t March 15, 195 5 
591 502 38 1 



12 




' 12 


69 




■ 69 


186 


184 


2 


63 


59 


4 


118 


117 


1 


142 


142 





Source: Code Authority for the Paper Disc Milk Dottle Cap Industry. 
Number of reporting concerns not available 



9S1S 



33* 

TABLE 19^ (a) 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 



:: disc : 11. 



JOTTLE CAP I;"DUSTRY 



FORTE RN DIVISION 



OFFICE 



'.PI lYEES • L 

15th or 



ified 'Y '':; t ;iy vage rates : or. 

XNTH, JANUARY 1934 -• MARCH 1935 



as 



JING NEAREST 



Office Employees 



Rate paid to employees 



Total number of employees 
Under .11.19 per week 
Gil. 20 to '..12.79 per week 
12.80 to Cl3.r3 per week 
..14.00 to ",15. »9 per week 
.',16.00 to r 17.99 per week 

1-18.00 to .19.99 per week 
'■20.00 to .29.99 per week 
,30.00 and over per week 



Total number of employees 
Under .11.19 per week 
Oil. 20 to 12^.79 per week 
12.80 to ,13.99 per week 
$14.00 to 015.99 per week 
'..16.00 to ,17.99 per week 
.,'18.00 to ,19.99 per week 
£.20.00 to ,29.99 per week 
,30.00 and over per week 



Total number of employees 
Under ".11.19 per week 
,11.20 to 1.12.79 per week 
\12.80 to 13.99 per week 
,14.00 to 15.99 per week 
,16.00 to 17.99 per week 
.18.00 to 19.99 per week 
,'20.00 to '.,29.99 per week 
,30.00 &nd over per week 



- r eek 


Week 


"..eek 


Nearest 


Nearest 


Nearest 


Jan. 15, 1934 


Feb. 15, .1954 


liar. 15..1954 


113 


117 


125 


3 


3 


2 


4 


3 


4 


' 2 


1 


1 


19 


4 


3 


16 


34 


39 


16 


22 


20 


32 


29 


•32 


21 


21 


'24 


Leek 


Week 


,r eek 


Nearest 


Nearest 


Nearest 


Apr. 15, 1934 


Hay 15,1934 


June 15,1934 


122 


126 


131 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


3 


1 


1 


1 


5 


4 


2 


34 


36 


40 


19 


20 


22 


35 


35 


39 


23 


25 


22 


Week 


". eek 


Week 


Nearest 


Nearest 


Nearest 


July 15,1934_ 


Aug. 15, 1934 


Sept. 15, 1934 


126 


123 


125 


3 


2 


2 


3 


4 


4 


1 


1 


1 


8 


3 


3 


35 


39 


36 


20 


19 


23 


35 


34 


36 


21 


21 


20 









• 



Source: Code uthority for the Paper Disc Ililk Bottle Cap Industry. 
Number of reporting concerns not available 



9818 



-315- 

IA3LE 194(1)) 
PAPER DISC MILD BOTTLE CAP I1DUSTPY - IIORTHEHIT DIVISION 



0F7ICD EilPLOYEES CLASSIFIED 37 '..HEELY 7AGE DATES POD UEEES EIDIITG I1EA3EST 
15th 07 IIOITH, JAATUADY 1934 - IIARCK 1°3d 



Hate jcid to ei)Io;ees 



Total number of e vdoyees 
Under $11". 19 per - 
$11.20 to $12.79 
$12.30 to' $11 .99 
$14.00 to $15. 91 
$1.5.00 to' $17.99 
$18.00 to $19.99 
$20.00 to' $29. OS 
$30.00 anl over per veek 



jer 


week 


ier 


TTse]^ 


-ier 


' *ee]; 


->er 


week 


>er 


we ek 


-oer 


week 



Office dmloyees 
TTeek '.7eek 

Nearest ITerrest 

Oct. 15, 1934 .Tov. 15, 1934 



TTeek 
Nearest 

Dec. 15, 1954 



115 



o 
37 
19 
36 
20 



.1 



CO 

21 
35 

13 



109 
1 



3 
30 
24 
32 
19 



Total number of erroloyees 
Under $11.19 per week 
$11.20 to' 312. , per week 
$12.60 to $13.99 per "- 5k 
$14.00 to $15.99 :er '-eek 
$16.00 to $17.99 ner --eel: 
$13.00 to $19.95 per week 
$20.00 to $29.9:, jer w< ek 
$30.00 and ove ' :>er week 



Tie ok 
llearest 
Jan. 15, 1935 
113 
, 1 
1 



22 
54 

21 



TTeek 
Hearest 

Feb. 15, 1935 
116 



36 
19 
38 
23 



r :eek 
1,'earest 

ar. 15. 1935 
121 



2 
36 
21 
57 
25 



Source: Lode Authority for the Paper Disc "ilk dottle Cap Industry. 
Hurfoer of re-oorting concerns not available 



9818 



3 IS 



TABLE 195 
FOOD DISH AND PULP AND PAPER PLATE INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED ,v"EE-lY HOURS OF FACTORY EMPLOYEES IN THIRD 
'HESS. OF JULY, 1933 



Hours Worked 
per ,/eek 



Under 20 
20 - 29.9 
30 - 34.9 
35 - 39-9 
40 - 4^.9 
45 - 1+9,9 
50 - 59.9 
60 or more 
Total 



Number of 
Factory 
Employees 



62 
20 

54 

9 

211 

652 

392 

91 

1U91 



Per Cent 
of Total 



4.2 
1.3 
3.6 

0.6 

14.2 

43.7 

26.3 

6.1 

100.0 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



4.2 



5.5 



9.1 

9.7 

23.9 

67.6 

93.9 
100.0 



Source: Based on questionnaires sent in by 1] companies to the Pulp and 
Paper Plate Associates «f America reported to the LIRA. National 
Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Planning'. -. The 
Food Dish and Pulp and Paper Plate Industry, prepared by Max 
Kossoris, January 4, 1934. 



9318 



317 







W 






H 






CO 






!>H 




>H 


Ph 




t-j 






En 


- 




CO 


CO 




'— i 


Th 




a 






n 


o 

I-H* 




Ph 


Pj. 




En 




KO 


3 


M 


O^ 


(l, 


>H 


H 




Ph 




Ph 


O 


H 


w 


Ch K~i 


P 
5 


2) 




Ph 


r -H rH 


Eh 








n 


Ph - 




^ 


O >H 

CO P 




Ph 


tb hi 




£ 


n Ph 




Ph 


5 o 




e 


'■aj M 




rn h 




5; 


,8 




W 

CO 

HH 


Is 




ft 


O IH 




P 


EH 




o 
o 


@s 




Ph 


CLASS IF I 
I 



9S1S 



to 



CD 

> H° 
•H P 
-P CD 
O 



■g 



U 

CD HH 

Ph O 



U 

CD 




i> 

•H -P 

-p p 

03 CD 

rH O 

pi 

3 u 

P CD 

O PL, 





-P 


i-H 




P 


co 


co 


CD 


-p 


CD 

H 


O 


o 

EH 


cd 


?H 




3j 


CD 


«H 




Ph 


o 




rH 






a> 






rQ 





en 



P 

W w 
-p 

r-i CD 
O 

■x 



r-i so i-^ivn .j- r— o 

t • • • • * • 

caj ir\ i — o^ a^ ct> o 



i— i r~- tr> i-<^ co rni^\ 



J- CO <T\ W IT, iv>v O 
(\1 CVJ H H 



i_r> p^> r-— c\j r^\ i-^v i 

CT\ rH -tV- P— CVJ r-i 



O 



o 
o 



CTv 



,h co ht vx> mn r— cm >^o o 
• •••••••«• 

O l^cr\n'Oh-U3^ CO o 
rHiHOJLOir— 60CTiCTiC) 



rH I-— V.O CM rr\C\IU3 LO H/ j- 



TM^J; CM r-H 0> Cp\ CM rH 
rH h^ CVJ 



(^cncjNCTvcrvcriCTNO^cri o 

O • ••••••••[h 

rH a^ J- ctn j- o^ cn cn cri a> 
h Co w n mj' ltn r— cr. fn 

o 

.h I I ! I I I I I I 

<v o 

■J O O ' f> O LT\ O O O O O 
P r-i CM CVJ i^M^Hr I^VD CO rH 



O 



O 
O 



rH CVJ O '--D J" K-\ LTi^J- VO M) r— 

r— j- J- m n o o w h <r» 

rH i-^ CVJ —i r-i O 



CO 
-P 

o 

Eh 



<H 




O rjj 




CO 3 




a> 


« 


+3 rd 


CO 


cd O 


•H 


•H Jh 


Fh 


O CIS 


o 


O CD 


CO 


w to 


CO 


CO CD 


o 


«! Ph 


M 


CD Ch 


M 


+> O 


CO 


cd 


*T] 


rH P 




Ih O 


K'a 


•rH 


rO 


U CO 




CD H 


rd 


1, > 


CD 


CO H 


Th 


Ph Ph 


CO 




ft 


id - 


CD 


rt jH 


!h 


co b 


ft 


•H 




ft -^ 


- 


rH CO 


>s 


P Fh 


M 


Ih += 


+3 


CO 


CO 


CD H 


d 


<H, jH 


Ti 


+3 H 


;^ 


c3 


I-H 


o -6 




+3 «3j 


CD 




-P 


CO >J 


-3 


CD U 


rH 


H CD 


Ph 


CO O 


?H 


ft o 


CD 


S CD 


ft 


O pc; 


CO 


O 


Ph 


rH 




1 Cd 


id 


.h r, 


JH 


o 


CO 


>a -H 




P -P 


ft 


Cj 


rH 


c s 


3 


•H 


Ph 


+J 


'd 


CD Pi 


rH 

3 


CJ t-i 






^ 


CO CD 


CO 


CD <h 


•H 


^ -P 


o 


■H 




CO O 


•d 


Pj -P 


o 


g 


o 


b -d 


Ph • 


•H 0) 


.H- 


-p +J 


CD I^i 


CO !-, 


r 3 a> 


ID O 


EH rH 


P* ft 




O" 


■• 


^ 


• -=!- 


J^J 


UD 


o d 


P > a 


o 


■H J-i 


rd -H 


TO P 


CD U 


CO CD 


cu PJ 


rH CO 


Ph -a) 


Ph h> 






CD 




O 




^ 




o 




CO 





313 



TABLE 197 

0LA2ED AND FANCY PAPER INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF JAi-E EARi-EI-lS, BY SEX, 
.VEEX OF JULY Vj, 1933 



Hours 


■forked 

3ek 




Male 


• 


Ferric 


Lie 


• 

: AH 
ve: 


En 


lployees 


Per W 




Cumulat 


ive 




Cumulati 


Cumulati re 






Number Per Ce 


tit : 


Nuiribei 


• Per Ce 


nt:Numb 


sr 


Per Cent 


Under 


20 


k 


.67 




2 


2.20 


6 


.87 


20 - 


2U.9 


2 


1.00 




2 


4.40 


4 




1.45 


25 - 


29.9 


18 


4.01 




5 


9-89 


23 




4.79 


30 - 


34.9 


15 


6.52 




7 


17.53 


22 




7-98 


35 - 


39.9 


25 


10.70 




3 


20.88 


28 




12.05 


40 - 


4^.9 


S3 


24.5.3 




21 


43.96 


104 




27.14 


45 - 


49.9 


193 


56.86 




50 


93.90 


243 




62.41 


50 - 


59.9 


197 


89. 80 




1 


100.00 


198' 




91.15 


60 or 


more 


bl 


100.00 








61 




100.00 




Total 


J9S 






91 




689 


tic 




Source: Data fun 


lished 


by the G-laz 


ed a 


aid Fane 


-y Paper 


Associa 


m, based on 



reports from 20 establishments to the NEA. National Recovery 
Administration, Division of Research and planning. The Glazed and 
Fancy Paper industry, prepared "by Clarence J. North, June 1, 193^. 



9818 



319 



TABLE log 



GLAZED AND FA..CY PAPER INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY earnings of wage earners, 
■•BY SEX, rfEEK OF JULY 1/j, 1933- 













: Curnula- 


Cumula- 


Hourly 


i 


[ale 


Fc 


male 


: tive 

: Total All 


tive 


Earnings 




Cumulative 




Cumulative 


Per Cent 


(cents) 


Number 


Per ;->nt 


Numbc 


r Per Cent 


: Employees 


of Total 


Under 10 














ie - 14.9 


■ ■■• 






t 






15 - 19.9 


- • 


- 


4 


4.4J 


4 


.58 


20 - 24. 9 


1 ' 


.17' 


4 


8.79 


9 


1.31 


25 - 29.9 


14 ' 


2.51 


27 


38.46 


50 


7.26 


35 - 39-9 


52 


17.73 


11 1 


86.81 


185 


26.85 


4o - 44.9 


1C1 


34.62 


10 


97.80 


296 


42.96 


45 - 49.9 


io4 


52.01 


2 


100.00 


402 


58.34 


50 - 54.9 


121 


72.24 






£23 


75.91 


55 - 59.9 


74 


S4.b2 






597 


96.65 


60 - 69.9 


63 


95.15 






Sbc 


95.79 


70 - 79.9 


16 


97.-3 






676 


98.11 


89 - S9.9 


6 


98. S3 






682 


98.98 


90 - 99.9 


4 


J". 30 






686 


99.56 


10 j or more 


3 


IOC .00 






689 


100.00 



Total 



598 



91 



Source: Data furnished by the Glared and Fancy Paper Association, bared 
on repox ts from 20 establishments to the In A. National Recovery 
Administration, Division <f Research and Planning. The Glazed and 
Fancy paper Industry, prepared by Clarence J. North, June 1, 1934. 



9818 



^20 
TABLE 199 

TAG INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF FACTORY WAGE EARNERS 
DURING FIRST l.EEK IN NOVEMBER OF 1929 AND 1933 





Number of v/age 
earners 


rer 
t 


cent of 

ntal 


Cumulative per 
cent of total 


Hours 
Worked 

Per Vfeek 


Week 
H/l/33 


Week 
H/l/29 


Week' ■ 
H/l/33 


' Week ■ 
H/l/29 


We-ek. 
H/l/33 


.. Week 
ll/l/29 


20 or less 


18 


9 


1.68 


. .75 


1.68 


.75 


20.0 - 30 


46 


5 


4.30 


.42 


5.98 


1.17 


30.1 - 35 


45 


17 


4.21 


1.42 


10.19 


2.59 


35.1 - 40 


417 


'- 40 


38.97 


3.34 


49,16 


5.93 


40.1 - 45 


52 6 


130 


49.16 


10.84 


98.32 


16.77 


45.1 - 50 


12 


741 


1.12 


61.80 


99.44 


78.57 


50.1 - 60 


6 


257 


.56 


21.43 


100.00 


100.00 



Total 



1070 



1199 



100.00 100.00 



Source: Data furnished to the BRA by Tag Manufacturers Institute: 
represents 14 Northern and 1 Southern Companies, 
National Recovery Administration, ' Division of Research and 
Plahri-ing. The Tag Industry, prepared by Max Kossoris, 
January 12, 1934. 



9218 



321 

TABLE 200 



TAG INDUSTRY 



CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY WAGE EARNERS 
DURING FIRST WEEK IN NOVEMBER OF 1929 AND 1933 



Hourly 


Number of 
earners 


v/age 


Per cent of 
total 


Cumulat 
cent of 


ive per 
total 


earnings 
(cents) 


Week 

n/l/33 


-leek 
11/1/29 


Week ' 
H/l/3 3 


Week 

H/l/29 


Week 
H/l/33 


Week 
n/l/29 


20 - 24. 9 


- 


68 


- 


5.67 


- 


5.67 


25 - 29.9 


9 


94 


.84 


7.84 


e 84 


13.51 


30 - 34.9 


290 


217 


27.10 


18.10 


27.94 


31.61 


35 - 39.9 


150 


59 


14.02 


4.92 


41.96 


54.53 


40 - 44.9 


95 


63 . 


8.88 


5.25 


50.84 


41.78 


45 - 49.9 


79 


71 


7.38 


5.92 


58.22 


47.70 


50 - 59.9 


136 


176 


12.71 


14.68 


70.93 


62.38 


60 - 79.9 


230 


330 


21.50 


27.52 


92.43 


89.90 


80 - 99.9 


60 


99 


3.61 


8.26 


98 . 04 


98.16 


100 or more 


21 


22 


1.96 


1.84 


100.00 


100.00 



Total 



1070 



1199 



100.00 100.00 



Source: Data furnished to the NRA by Tag Manufacturers Institute: 
represents 14 Northern and 1 Southern Com-nanies, 
National Recovery Administration, Division of Research and 
Planning. The Tag Industry, preparod by llax Kossoris, 
January 12, 1954. 



9313 



l-O 



ae 





a 13 




r h w 




t— t 




«aj >-. 




H w 


rH 


o - 


o 


o cq w 


CM 


F=H EH 


W 


sBs 


PI 

EH 


^ a * 

EH Pi EH 






111 




o fh r?, 




n O n 




EH 




CO 




sg 




p o 




cyn: 




H 




HH >H 




CAL 
ESKL 




n ' - 




rt 




pi ft 




l— 1 rH 




Pi Ph 




>H 1—1 




O '/I 




3 




IH- 




o 







+» rH 




1 


rt o5 




ctj 


-p 




| 


tive 
er C 
f To 




o 


(X, O 


rH 

Cl5 




a r 3 


P 




CD -P 


O 




O O 


EH 




EH 
H 

CD Ch 



Ph O 





ch to 




O CD 




CD 




M >* 




CD o 




■s ^ 




1 §; 




1 


•P r-\ 


03 


fl as 


rH 


<1) -p 


a 


0) o o 


- 


> EH 


3 


■H !-, 


o 


•P CD Cm 




Ph o 




rH 




-p a) 




a +3 




o 




O EH 




h cm 




a> o 




Pi 




co 




cm CD 




O CD 




>» 




rl O 




CD r-H 




P 








r-1 




-P ,-H 


I 


a co 


nj 


o -P 


■g 


o o 

(D EH 


P 


> rl 


•m CD Ch 


o 


-p p., o 




s-d 




CD +3 




o o 




EH 




M 




CD Cm 




Ph O 



cm 


CO 


O 


CD 




fD 


M 


>s 


CD 


O 


,a 


H 




» 


r *< 


fl 


rl 




a 




en 


'! 


& 


CD 
CD 


• 


' t 


W 





322 



1^- W I- W rH CO o 

CTN l-^VXD [^- rH r-H O 

• •••••• 

r-H CM H I^O O 

K^jH- ixm — (T\ O 



r^-vo mo ^t i — c\i o 

JM^- CTi H n O CO O 

r — r^lOO^rHI — :r> o 

CM H CM rH O 



VO I-— I — 4- O O 0> 
lC-i*^D I — VD LT> CM VQ 



O 



o 
o 



o 
o 



K-\ 



LPi OMAJ IC\ r-<~\ CO O 

w w o>m O H o 
oj n iA n en r- o 

rH J- ijC^iMD CO CPv O 



lOi i-<-\ r^ r«A co n cm 

50 O O O O r-H UD 
«•••■•• 

CM H O O ITiCO CM 

H I^\H rl CM 



H (TNCM CM OU3 cn 
_=J- CTM-^ r^CO CM 



H H t^NO NO 

CTNViJ i-<-Y-Q CT\nO 

• •»•••• 

CU ro h- LT\ 60 O 



r+M CM mKM» CM 

cr\ r~- r— r^i cm j- ud 



|V-\ I" rl W W J- '!'\ o 

rH rH rH CM rH O 



^MinCMOJ-O J" 
rH ^O ,rt K^i r— CTiUD CO 



O^ CTv CTn Sh 

o • • • < J> m < i 
cm a"\ o> =f • • B 

CM r^J d> ^ 
<D I I I I I O 

s o o o 10 a o 

pi CvJ r^v J- -3" LTiUD 



O 
O 



«3 

O 

EH 



Pi 

o 

■H 



PI 



Pi 




o 


>a 


•M 


r^ 


+-> 




Rj 


Td 


rl 


CD 


-P 


H 


w 


cd 


■H 


Pi 


Pi 


CD 


■H 


M 


I 


P. 


<>! 


r» 




>a 


>a 


M 


rl 


-p 


CD 


10 


s> 


pi 


o 


■d 


o 


M 


CD 


l-H 


Pi 






!-l 


r-\ 


CD 


,.J 


C 


r; 


■H 


O 


a 


■H 


-p 


+3 


rj 


rt 


b 




o 




►-i 


• 


CD 


< 


Q. 


s 


Cfi 




Ph 


CD 


•p 


r=l 


r^ 


+= 


W) 




■H 


o 


EH 


+3 






-ci 


CO 


•H 


CD 


pi • 


■H 


o-^}- 


% 


■M CT\ 


PI CTn 


C-H 


rH 


g 


r-\ 


6 


CCJ - 


o 


o co 




H 


PI 


H t>a 


rl 


•O rH 


CD 


PI s 


^H 


H P> 


-P 


>. S 


rl 


O 


O t-3 


'"H 


<D - 


o 


P| rH 


r-H 


LH r-{ 




•rH 








— \ 


O 


• s 


D 


1.: ;■:: 


CH 


PI 




H • 


CO 


Pi fc=H 


PI 


r-1 C> 


-u 


CL, 


CD 


•d 


r) 


'=» s 




PI M 


CD 


cS 


M 


CO 


•H 


r=! "H 


aJ 


o u 


rj 


u o 


rj 


id co 


o 


CD CO 


• H 


CO o 


-P 


cd : : 


[0 


pel 




cm 3 


( »' 


o : : 


c 




u 




^ 




^ 




C/3 





981S 



y^5 

TABLE 202 
CILFDRICAL LIQUID TIGHT PAPER CONTAINER INDUSTRY 



EMPLOYEES CLASSIFIED BY OCCUPATION AND BY HOURS FORKED PER WEEK FOR WEEKS 
ENDING NEAREST 15th OF MONTHS OF SEPTEMBER, OCTOBER AND NOVEMBER, 1934 



Hours 'forked per 'Ilk, 



Under 20.0 hours 
20.1 to 30.0 hours 
30.1 to 35.0 hours 
35.1 to 37.5 hours 
37.6 to 40.0 hours 
40.1 to 45.0 hours 
45.1 to 48.0 hours 
' .1 to 56.0 ho\irs 
56.1 and over hours 
Total He. Employees 



Manufacturing Employees 
• : "Chauffeurs : -vnginesrs : OlHtU' Laborers 

:Watch-: Truck Dri-: Firemen, : or 

Total : men :vers, etc..: etc. sMaoh. Workers 

1 



: Office Em. 



Week Ending nearest September 15, 1934 —/ 



183 


1 


143 


- 


47 


- 


34 


- 


151 


-• 


18 


- 


12 


1 


15 


13 



3 

1 
1 



603 



15 



2 
2 

1 

5 



181 
143 
47 
34 
149 
13 
10 



577 



2 

■ 1 

72 

2 



77' 



Under 20.0 hours 
20.1 to 30.0 hours 
30.1 to 35.0 hours 
35.1 t» 37.5 hours 
3 7J6 to 40,0 hours 
40.1 to 45.0 hours 
45.1 to 48.0 hours 
48.1 to 56.0 hours 
56.1 and over hours 
Total Ho. Employees 



b/ 



Heek Ending nearest October 15, 1934 Zi 

87 

131 

1 1 ' 123 

13 
131 

5 1 69 

15 

3 2 
1 

6 5 572 



88 


1 


131 


- 


125 


- 


13 


- 


131 


- 


75 


- 


19 


4 


12 


7 


4 


3 


599 


15 



2 

6 

73 
1 



82 



Under 20.0 hours 
20.1 to 30.0 hours 
30.1 to 35.0 hours 
35.1 to 37,5 hours 
37.6 to 40.0 hours 
40. 1 to 48.0 hours 
45.1 to 68.0- hours 
58.1 &nd56y©r hours 
56.1 and over' hours 
Total No. Employees 



Week 


'Indi 


147 


2 


55 


- 


71 


- 


18 


- 


162 


- 


<*9 


- 


8 


- 


16 


10 


3 


3 


529 


15 



nding nearest November 15, 1934 _/ 



145 
55. 
69 
17 

160 

44 

8 



503 



source i 



1 
71 



79 



2/ 



Code Authority for the Cylindrical Liquid Tight Container Industry, 
"Confidential Employment Reports" 

13 companies reported data on factory employees:, 10 reported data 'on of- 
fice employees, 16 vrere v canvassed, 

14 companies reported data on factory employees, 12 reported data on of- 
fice employees, 16 uere canvassed. 



324 
TABLE 203 

CYLINDRICAL LIQUID TIGHT PAFER CONTAINER INDUSTRY 



EMPLOYEES CLASSIFIED BY OCCUPATION AST' BY HOURS WORKED PER WEEK FOR WEEKS 
ENDING NEAREST 15th OF MONTHS OF DECEMBER, 1S34, AND JANUARY AND 

FEBRUARY, 1S35 



r 



>urs " r orked per Week: 



Manufacturing Employees 
YCirguf f eurs : Engineers 

r atch-: Truck Dri-: Firemen. 



Total : men- :vers, etc.: etc. 



fOther"Eatrc 
or 
'ach. Workers 



Office 
Employees 



ider 20,0 hours 

).l to 30.0 hours 

i.l to 35.0 hours 

,1 to 37,5 hours 

.6 to 40.0 hours 

.1 to 45.0 hours 

.1 to 43.0 hours 

,1 to 56,0 hours 

i.l and over hours 

ital No. Employees 



ider 20,0 hours 
),1 to 30,0 hours 
).l to 35.0 hours 
i.l to 37,5 hours 
'.6 tc 40.0 hours 
).l to 45.0 hours 
i.l to 48.0 hours 
1.1 to 56,0 hours 
5,1 and over hours 
>tal No. Employees 



ider 20.0 
).l to 30 
),1 to 35 
.1 to 37 
.6 to 40 
,1 to 45 
,1 to 48 
,1 to 56 
. 1 and o 
lei No. 



hours 
,0 hours 
.0 hours 
,5 hours 
.0 hours 
,0 hours 
.0 hours 
.0 hours 
ver hours 

mployees 



Teek Ending nearest December 15, 1934 _< 



7 



111 


1 


63 


- 


96 


- 


12 


- 


201 


3 


36 


- 


8 


- 


13 


6 


4 


4 


544 


14 


Week 


Endi 


71 


1 


79 


1 


46 


_ 


14 


- 


239 


- 


32 


- 


14 


- 


21 


7 


8 


6 


52S 


15 



2 

3 



2 
3 

5 



110 
63 
96 
12 

196 
31 



520 



34 

41 



77 



Week Ending 



58 
58 
43 
19 
2 76 
97 
25 

9ft 



5 
607 



1 
12 
17 



15, 


1935 


ir~ 






_ 




70 


2 




1 




77 


- 




- 




46 


4 




- 




14 


- 




- 




239 


63 




1 




27 


4 




1 




13 


- 




- 




14 


V- 




1 




1 


- 




4 




501 


73 . 




15, 


1935 


-y— 






_ 




54 


2 




- 




58 


- . 




- 




43 


4 




- 




19 


- 




1 




275 


6.5 




1 
1 




93 
22 


6 

— 




1 
4 




13 

5 

582 


77 





urce: 
2/ 



Code Authority for the Cylindrical Liquid Tight Container Industry, 
"Confidential Employment Reports" 

15 companies reported data on factory employees, 13 reported data on office 
employees; 17 were canvassed. 

14 companies reported data on factory employees, 12 reported data on office 

employees; 17 were canvassed.' 

15 companien reported data on factory employees, 12 reported data on office 

employees; 17 were canvassed. 



325 



TABLE 20U ' 

l 

; CYLINDRICAL LIQUID TIGHT PAPER CONTAINER INDUSTRY 

EMPLOYEES CLASSIFIED T T OCCUPATION *AND ! 2Y HOURS WORKED PER WEEK FOR 7JEEK 
ENDING NEAREST 15th OF MONTH OF -MARCH, 1935 jV 



Hours 'Torked per : eek: 



_ Manufa cturing Employees ; 

: ~ : OhauT"~feur s : EngTrie - eVs~:Y)theV"T^b"o~re"rsT 
:"Tatch-: Truck Dri-: Firemen, : or : Office 
: Total : men ivors, etc.; etc. ;Mach. 'Yorkers :Employees 



Ufider 20,0 hours 
20.1 to 30.0 houses 
30.1 to 35.0 hours 
35.1 to 37.5 hours 
37.6 to 40.0 hours 
40.1 to 45.0 hours 
45.1 to 48,0 hours 
48.1 to 56.0 hours 
56,1 and over hours 

Total No. Employees 



61 


•1 ■ • 


• ■ - 


152 


2 


- 


114 


1 


- 


19 


- 


- 


200 


- 


- 


59 


- 


1 


24 


- 


- 


35 




2 


11 


5 


_ 



- 


60 


2 


148 


- 


113 


w* 


19 


- 


200 


2 


56 


- 


24 


1 


26 


— 


6 



1 

20 
59 



675 



15 



652 



82 



Source: Code Authority for the Cylindrical Liquid Tight Container Industry, 
"Confidential Employment Reports" 

a/ 15 companies reported data on factory employees, 12 reported data 
on office employees; 17 were canvassed. 



981S 



en 

rH 



< o m 



EH 



3 
+3 

o 

Eh 



O 
> 



O 43 



P a> 

P «H 
O 43 



■a 



CD += 

o o 

EH 

h 

CD <+h 
Ph o 



40 H 

a CO 

a) 43 

o o 

EH 

a) <m 

Ph O 
co 

<H CD 

O 0) 

M O 

<D rH 

£ 9i 



P3 



43 c3 

cu o 

O EH 

M t(H 

CD O 
Ph 



O EH 

U <H 
CD O 

ft 



cm 
a 



CD 
CD 
?H N 

a> o 
-9 H 

i s- 







£ "re 


L 




• CD 43 


cd 




O O 

. ^-1 


a 


CD 


M 




> 


CD Cm 


•H 


Ph O 





43 


Per Cent 
of Total 



cm co 

O CD 

CD 

M >5 

CD O 

r^> rH 



CO 



p£ 

o ij 



S^b 



^t Jd" CM M r— en en r^iVD O 

ru p^mo 1 — mc\j j- w o 

• ••»■••••« 

o o c\j lti lo, J- co en en o 

rH OJ 10,^0 CO Cn Cn <7\ en O 



^t O r— CnuD c\j o J- nj- o 

OJ H ITiO l^-M NH J" HO 



ooaiwoMnno 
h h nn w 



o o 
o 

H 



I (M H (Ti LTY^O OJ VD CO r^HI — 

11 — 1 — ojooj-udoj en 

OJ i-H v£> 



WWlTlrlO 

I rO\_d- hi*0 

I • • • • • 

rH LP> r— to o 
OJ t-^BO CO ct 



OJ rH OJ >- OS 

l^\H i^-Lnai 

\ • • • • • 

I HJ-HrlH 
OJ rH lin rH~ 



o 



o 
o 



I CO LT\ LPi LPvVJD 

I ^o J- UD r*^ en 

rH rH 



J-HWHO O r~-UD _=f o 

oco.^tr^\cn 1 -ibocnr~-o 

rH 1 — jt irM^iOvx)co cno 
oj ,-+• i^-cncncncno 



J" 1 — r — i^~\LT\Lcnr--co cou3C 



O r— <£> 


CO VD 


rH 


r— 


1 — OJ 


• • • 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• • 


rH VX> ^D 


O 


CO VQ U3 


OJ 








i-H 


OJ 


OJ 


rH 










H 



j-iDj-ooan-ow 

OJ U3 v-O rHU) OJ 



CO 



CD 

M 



■+). cn en en en en en en en en 

O • • ShH 

i-h en J- c-.j- en cn cn .en cn o ni 
rH cm oj i-j-m-^j- m>- cn 43 

w 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 : o eh 

"O • 

COOlOOLOOOOOrH 
! rH OJ OJ r-^ rv~\ J- LOWD CO C/5- 



cm 
O 

o 

•H 



CO £\fl jncJ 

cd c3 nd 

M i-H rt 

Ph 3 
a> 

M Hi CO 

a a m 

c o 

fi ,£ CO 

O O CO 
■HMO 

p a) M 

to CD 

CD co K 

p CD a 



CD 



o 
to 



3-^7 

TABLE: 206 

CTL1NIEICAI LIQUID TIGHT PAPER CONTAINER INDUSTRY - FACTORY 
3TPL0YH3S, REGULAR AND HANDICAPPED, CLASSIFIED BY SEX AND BY 
HO T ^:L" LA BINDS, FOR ' BITS KEDIFG *ELE ,ST 15th OF BOFTH, 
September, October and November, 1934 



Vfeek ending nearest September 15, 1954 a/ 
.egular Handicapped 

Hourly Barnings Total B'ale emale Bale 



Under 24„O0 per hour 
24.00 to 27.90 per hour 
28.03" to 29.90 per hour 
30.00 to 51.90 per hour 
32.00 to 34.99? per hour 
35.0$* to 39.99C per hour 
40. 00 to 44.90 per hour 
45.00 to 49.90 per hour 
50.0^ to 59.9$ per hour 
60.00 and over per hour 
Total number of employees 



1 




1 




1 




1 




7 


1 


3 


3 


252 




251 


1 


168 


159 


9 




55 


54 


1 




60 


58 


2 




60 
"604 


58 
330 




270 


___ 



;ek ending nearest October 15, 1954 b/ 



Under 24.00 per hour 

24.00 tC 27.90 per hour 

28.00 to 29.90 per hour 

30.00 to 31.-90 per hour 4 4 

32.00 to 34.90 per hour 6 1 2 3 

55.00 to 39.90 per hour 252 251 1 

40.00 to 44.90 per hour 161 154 7 

45.00 to 49.90 per hour 53 53 

50.00 to 59.90 per hour C7 65 2 

60.00 and over ^er hour 56 55 1 

Total Bumber of Bmpioyees 599 328 267 4 



' v.ek ending nearest November 15, 1954 b/ 
Under 24.00 per hour 
24.0^ to 27.90 per hour 
28.30 to 29.90 per hour 
30.00 to 31.90 per hour 
32.00 to 34.90 per hour 
35.00 to 39.90 per hour 
40.00 to 44.90 per hour 
45.00 to 49.90 per hour 
50.00 to 69.90 per hour 
60.00 pjad over per hour 
Total Number of "Employees 

Source: Code Authority for the Cylindrical Liquid Tight Paper Container 
Industry. 'Confidential Employment Reports" 

a/ 15 companies reported" data on factory employment; 16 
were canvassed. 

b/ 14 companies reported data on factory employment; 16 
were ccnvassed 



4 


1 




3 


213 




212 


1 


155 


14C 


15 




48 


48 






57 


56 


1 




53 


53 






530 


298 


228 


4 



3.28 . 

TABLS :?07 
CYLrrSTCAL LIQUID TI 'l'' ".?{■:. SC^T'lFTa ITTDUSTRY - FACTORY 
EMPLOYEES, REGULAR A 1 '-!) HA IDICAFP3D, CLASSIFIED BY SEX AND BY 
HOURLY EAR? IFGE, FOR "3EKS EKLTH 'REST Loth OF : ONTH 

December, 1934, January and February, 1955 



Hourly Earnings 



Total 



Under 24.00 per hour 
24.00 to 27,90 pel hour 
28.00 to 29.90 per hour 
30.00 to 31.00 per hour 
52.00 to 34.90 per hour 9 
35.00 to 39.90 per hour 216 
40.00 to 44.90 per hour 156 
45.00 to 49.90 per hour 39 
50.00 to 59.90 per hour 64 
60.00 and over per hour 61 
Total Lumber of Employees 545 



"eek ending nearest December 15, 1934 c/ 
Regular Handicapped 



pi 



.e 



141 

59 
63 
6 1 
308 



Female 



5 

215 

15 

1 

256 



Hale 



Under 
24.00 
28,00 
30.00 
32.00 
35.00 
40.00 
45.00 
51.00 
60.^0 
Total 



24.00 per hour 
to 27.90 per hour 
to 29.90 per hour 
to 31.90 per hour 
to 54,90 per hour 
to 59,90 per Lour 
to 44.90 per hour 
to 49.90 per hour 
to 59.90 per hour 
and over per hour 
Number of Employees 



"eek ending neaiest January 15, 1955 d/ 



4 


1 




5 


ppl 




220 


1 


157 


126 


11 




47 


47 






55 


55 






59 


57 


2 




r .r 


rs 


25§ ■ 


4 



"eek ending nearest February 15, 1955 c/ 



Under 24.00 per hour 
24.00 to 27.90 per hour 
28.00 to 29.90 per hour 
30.00 to 51.90 per hour 
32.00 to 34.90 per hour 9 

35.00 to 59.90 per hour 270 

40.00 to M.90 ner hour 153 

45.00 to 49.90 uer hour 50 

50.00 to 59.90 per hour 69 

60.00 ana o\ r per hour 57 

Total number of Employees 608 



142 
50 
68 
56 

317 



5 

269 

11 

1 

1 

287 



1 



9S1S 



urce: Code Authority for the Cylindrical Liquid Tight Paper 
ntainer industry. "Confidential Employment Reports" 
c/ 15 companies reported data on factory employment; 17 

were canvassed, 
el/ 14 companies reported data on factory employees; 17 
were canvassed. 



329 

LA L3 '-0J 



CYLINDRICAL LIQUID TIGHT PAPER CONTAINER INDUSTRY - FACTORY 
EMPLOVEES, REGULAR AND HANDICAPPED, CLASSIFIED ■ BY SEX A\D 3Y 
HOURLY EAR? T INGS FOP. WEEKS ENDING NEAREST 15th 'of MONTH, 

March 15, If 35 



Hourly Earnings 



Total 



Under 

24,00 

28,00 
30.00 
32.00 
35.0^ 
40.00 

45,00 

50.00 
60,00 
Total 



24.0$ per hour 
to 27, 90 per hour 
to 29.90 per hour 
to 31.90 per hour 
to 34, 9 per hour 
to 39.90 per hour 
to 44,90 per hour 
to 49.90 per hour 
to 59.90 per hour 
and over per hour 
Number of Employees 



'Veek ending nearest March 15, 1935 c/ 

Regular Handicapped 

Male Female Male 



8 


2 


3 


3 


285 




283 


2 


196 


188 


8 




63 


63 






70 


70 






54 


54 






676 


377 


294 . 


5 



Source: Code Authority for the Cylindrical Liquid Tight container 
Industry, ''Confidential Employment Reports", 
c/ 15 companies reported data on factory employment; 17 
were canvassed, 



)S13 



-330- 



o 

CM 



tO 

ro 



Pj >H 

3) o 



I 

cd 
H 



o 



r-l 

cd 
-p 
o 

EH 



E 

CD 
P< 



CD 
rH 

cd 



+3 


H 


p 


efi 


. CD 


-p 


O 





CD 


EH 


> P 




■h a> 


<H 


•P rH 





-P 


rH 


P 


ni. 


CD 


-p 


O 







EH 


fn 




CD 


Hh' 


Ph 





<H 


CO . 


O 


CD 




CD 


P 


>* 


CD 


O 


,0 


rH 


s 

3 


i 


s 


m 


•p 


r-\ 


p 


cd 


CD 


+2 








CD 


EH 


S> fH 




•H CD 


<H 


-p Ph 





+3 


rH 


r< 


Cfl 


CD 


-p 


O 







EH 


p 




CD 


tw 


P. 





<w 


m 





CD 




CD 


p 


>s 


CD 





£ 


r-\ 


e 


P 


3 


S 




w 


-p 


rH 


pj 


cd 


CD 


•P 


O 


O 


CD 


EH 


!> ?h 




•H <D 


<P 


■P Ph 


O 


-p 


rH 


C 


Cfl 


CD 


■P 


O 


O 




EH 


P 




CD 


Ph 


P. 


O 


«H 


co 


O 


CD 




CD 


P 


r^ 


CD 


O 


£ 


rH 


| 


| 


" 


M 




CO 




w 


^ 


a 


rH 


• H 


CD 


e 


CD 


c 


fce 


w 



CTM^-rH COM rOCM CTiCM 

ro ro J- r^> rH r~- r— cm f— 
.....< i . . 

fo r-- o,=t cm 10 r— cr>cri 
J- r-— ro cr\o~\CT\cP\Cr\ 



mw J r — o U3 cj\ud ro t>o 
ro cr\ O ro J- lo o~\ lp J- c\) 

ro tO l<\H/ 1 — ro h rH o O 

rO CM rH 



C^J- CM rH OJ LP.zt rH rO CM 
LP. I—- ^D O LP CM r-H r-i 
CM rH rH 



CPiUD VD O 

r — ro o o 



rH I — CJ> O 



cr>r- O-J" 
I — O CM <T\ 






J- N) J- ro 
J- cnr~- 



rH ohJ- wcn^ow o 

OA h-U3 rH VD rH to t~— J" O 



ro rouD CM LP CM LP TO CT\ o 



rH CT. CM CM J" rH LOUD K CM 
CTir- CTi LP LP LPUD TO I — LP 



ro en cm LP' rovx> ro cm o o 

rH CM CM rH 



P 
3 
.P 
■P 



O 

o 



I 



I I I I I I I 



Pi 



00000000 

WLPOOOOOOOOO 
co -f/> O • • * ••••• 
CD • O LP O LP O LP O O 

PI IP rH rH CM CM rP l*~ J" UD 



O 
O 



O 
O 



.ro 
O 
1 — 



O 

o 



CTi 

r-t 

ro 



O 
O 



o 
o 



LOUD Kl TO CM LP J" rH rO CM J" 

H r-M OMTinj H H ft? 

ro 



en en en en en en en cd 
en en en en en en en P 

Cn •••••••O 

cj^ J- cn.zf o^ J- rr> cri E3 

• rH rH CM CM rO rO LP 



•P 

o 

En 



HH 









s 









•H 




CO 




•H K 




> cd 




ri s 




n 




>» 




« ,a 




C3 




Td 




•H O 




-P r. 




nj c3 




U p. 




+3 CD 




w ^, 




•H P, 




a 




• H « 




■3 C 




<^ +j 




CO 




>, pi 




W id 




cd a 




> n 









^ 




CD O 




Pi c 




•H 




rH CIj 




nj +2 




ri S 









■H O 




HJ 




05 r( 




r^ 1> 




P. 




CD OJ 




A P. 




-P 




HJ 




O ,£! 




+J t«J} 




•H 




CO EH 




CD 




•H ti 




C! -H 




CS pi 




p cr 


• 


B -H^t 


O HH- 


to 


O 


CTi 


rH 


I-{ 


C Cd 




P O 


m 


CD .H 


TO 


,a p 




-P Tj 
U P 


tf 


O -H 
S rH 


i 


>* 


CJ 


O O 


cd 


rH 


>-3 


O 




E ,P 


» 


O EH 


rH 


p 


r-f 


C(H 


•r) 


• 


u 


n fu) 


cd 


13 


W 


^ c 


• 


-p p 


K 


CD cd 




Pi r-\ 


• 


Pi 


O 


CD 




U TT) 


■td 


•H O 


a 


cd cd 


cd 


P 




P .P 


CO 


O O 


• H 


•H P 


P 


-p cd 


O 


CO CD 


09 


CD CO 


CO 


&& 





,. 




O 




O 




l 




O 




CO 





9313 



-331- 

TABLE 210 

CYLINDRICAL LI QUID -TIGHT PAPER CONTAINER INDUSTRY 

OFFICE EMPLOYEES CLASSIFIED BY WEEKLY WAOE RATES '"FOR WEEKS. ENDING 
NEAREST 15TH OF MONTH, SEPTEMBER 1934 - MARCH 1935 







Office Employee 


s 




W v ?ek (a) 


Week 


(b) 


Week (b) 


Rate paid to 


nearest 


neares 


t 


nearest 


employees 


Sept. 15, 1934 


Oct. 15, 


1934 


Nov. 15, 1934 


Total number of employees 


77 


82 




79 


Under $11,19 per week 




1 




1 


$11.20 to $12.79 per week 


• 


1 






$12.80 to $13.99 per week 


2 


1 




"■ 


$14.00 to $15.99 per week 


1 


" • 




1 


$16.00 to $17.99 per week 


25 


28 




29 


$18.00 to $19.99 per week" 


14 


14 




12 


$20. 00. to $29.99 per week 


18 


20 




20 


$30.00 and over per week' 


17 


17 




16 


• 


Week (c) 


Week 


(d) 


Week (d) 




nearest 


neares 


it 


nearest 




Dec. 15, 1934 


Jan.15, 


1935 


Feb. 15, 1935 


Total number of employees 


77 


73 




77 


Under $11.19 per week 


1 


1 




1 


$11.20 to $12.79 per week 










$12.80 to $13.99 per week 










$14.00 to $15.99 per week 


3 


1 




1 . 


" $16.00 to $17.99 per week 


24 


25 




27 


. $18.00 to $19.99 per week 


13 


11 




10 


$20.00 to $29.99 per week 


18 


19 




21 


$30.00 and. over per week 


18 


16 




17 . 




"-'■ 


Week 
neares 

Mar ,15, 


(d) 

it. 
1935 




Total number of employees 


.3. 


82 






Under $11,19 per week 




1 






$11.20 to $12.79 per week 










$12.80 to $13.99 per week 










$14.00 to $15.99 per week 




3 






$16.00 to $17.99 per week 




23 






$18„00 to $19.99 per week 




12 






$20.00 to $29.99 per week 




23 






$30.00 and over per week 




20 







Source: Code Authority for the Cylindrical Liquid Tight Paper Contain- 
er, "Confidential Employment Report." 

(a) 10 companies reported data on office employees; 
16 were canvassed. 

(b) 12 companies reported data on office employees; 
16 were canvassed. 

(c) 13 comp. repted data on off.emp.; 17 were canvassed. 

(d) 12 comp. repted data on off.emp.; 17 were canvassed. 



9318 



332 
TABLE 211 

CLOTH REEL INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOU:S OF FACTORY VJAGE 
EARNERS,WEEK ENDING JUNE 17, 1933 



Hours Worked 
Per Week 


. Numb 
Wage 


er of 

Earners 


Per Cent 
of Total 


Cumu 
of 


lative Per Cent 
Total 




20 or Under 




31 


21.53 




21.53 




20.1 to 25 




26 


18,06 




39.59 




25.1 to 3C 




12 


8.33 




47.92 




30.1 to 35 




13 


9.03 




56.95 




35.1 to 40 




15 


10.42 




67.37 




40.1 to 45 




23 


15.97 




83.34 




4-5.1 to 50 




17 


11.80 




95.14 




50.1 t« 55' 




4 


2.78 




97.92 




55.1 to 60 




1 


.69 




98.61 




Over 60 




2 


1.39 




1-0,00 





Total 144 100.00 



oource: Questionnaire survey by National Recovery Administration, 7 concerns 

reporting. National Recovery Administration, Division of Research and 
In***!™' ThC C1Cth Reel Industr ^ Prepared by Max Kossoris, January 



9818 



V>3 . 
TAriLE 212 
CLOTH REEL INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY E RNIPG-S OP FACTORY 
WAGE ERNERS, WEEK ENDING JUNE 17, 
1953, 



Hourly 

Earnings 

(Cents) 



Number of 

Wage 
Earners 



Per Cent 

of 
Total 



Cumulative 

Per Cent 
nf Total 



Under 15 

15 - 19.9 

20 - 24.9 

25 - 29,9 

30 - 34.9 

35 - 39.9 

40 - 44. S 

45 - 49.9 

5© - 54.9 

55 - 59.9 

PO - 69.9 

) 71 - 79.9 

80 or more 



6 
22 

37 
35 
20 
1G 
3 
2 

« 

1 
1 

1 



4.17 

15.28 

25.69 

24.31 

13.89 

6.95 

6,25 

1.39 

,69 
.69 
.59 



4.17 

19.45 
45.14 
69.45 
83.34 
90.2? 
96.54 
97. S3 
97„93 
98.62 
99.31 
100.00 



Total 



144 



100. 0*^ 



SOUPCE: Questionnaire survey Toy NRA, 7 concerns reporting. National 
Recovery Administration, Division of research and Planning. 
The Cloth Reol Industry, propared by Max Kossoris, January 30, 1534, 



qsig 



CTl 



cis 





>H 






rt 


£2; 




EH 


h- 1 




CO 






t> 


tQ 




§- 


S 


m 


H 


*!^h 


rH 






CM 


EH 


t 


H 


j§ 


W 


1-3 


o 


^ 


9 


a 




EH 


o 
>-l 


■"■ 




w 


>H 




% 


1 H 

o 




Pd 


EH 




c3 


o 




O 


«! 




EH 


Pq 




O 






w 


ft 




ft 


o 
to 

1 

W 

'>H 







ft m 






(j m 






M LPl 




•a 


CD i-H 
CD ! 




-p 


5=5 l^i 




c 




<D 


R 




> 






■rH 


4h 




-P 


O 




fij 






£ 


-P 




fc- 


CD 


ft r^ 


[_J 


CD 


O m 


o 




1 




rH 


M u^ 




CD 


CD i-H 




ft 


CD 1 





ft 


r<~\ 




o 


r*> 


3 


rM 


I 


+= 


0) 


rH 


o 


CD 


1 


Eh 


"}■» 


m 


ft 






O 






+3 






Pi 


ft 


r-n 


a; 


O 


rn 


o 




1 




ry 


Lf> 


rH 





H 


(I) 


CD 


I 


ft 


""^ 


a> 






,'l 




CD 




CD 




! : 




u 


ft 


0) 


o 


ft 


CO 


rH 


£ 




1 ) 


Bl 


. . . 
t-*-i 


1-) 



J .1 



33^ 



VJD 
60 



r~- 


o 


00 


i**\ 


-J- 


■=T 


O 


C\J 


r-— 


r— 


VD 


^D 


60 


U 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


r- 


LO 


60 


KO 


LO 


60 


o 


LO 


U3 


h- 


60 


<T\ 


CTi 


rH 



J- 



C\J 

60 



I — 



CTi 









o 
o 



m 



^D 



60 



60 



60 



cr> o 
rH 



H 


V£> 


m 


GO 


i r— \ 


vi> 


<T) 


■=f 


o 


to 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


60 


CO 


60 


l*"\ 


r-— 


rH 


m 




H 





J- 



J- 



r— 



cm 



I — 



O 

« 






O 
CM 



m 



1^1 



VX) 



ro 



m 



^H" 



Lf^ 



o 



o 

Q 



o 

o 









CM 






CM 



r^ 






r^\ 



m 



CM 



O 



CD 
U3 



CM 



CM 



60 



o 








-li 


c 


LT> 


O 


d 


m 


r*-N 


J" 



LO, 



O 
CM 



O 



in 



o 


O 






I 


1 


o 

U3 


i-H 


rH 


r-H 


■ , 


fij 






G) 


+J 


IPi 


■ ' 


| . 


O 


.--f 


in 


O 


L 1 



e 

o 

?H 

<+H • 
HO 

+- .H 
rH fl 

ft S 
CD r-H 

Sh Ph 



CD 
CO 

cti 

rO 



rd 

o 

^3 

CD 

CO • 

CD rn 

Ph r^ 

V( rH 
o 

s a> 

3 

• H fn 
CO CD 

•H ,Q 

> s 

• H CD 
fi O 

<D - 

- O 
fl 

3 • 

• H CO 
+^> -H 

n3 u 

u o 

+3 CO 

co co. 

■H O 

1 a- 



O 'h P 

•rH ^D 

ft O CD 
Hi O fn 
fn .CD cj 

^i0 rr; ft 

p CD 

u 

ft 



o 

cfl 



-^ <-l 



o 

r^ 

ft 



+= u 

CD +=> 

^5 CO i 

.1 

• rH 



-p 



►J 

rQ 

O 
tj += Ah 



C> 



ft 
CO . 



(,J CD 






rH 

JO. 

ft o 

S rC 

O ft 
Gl O 

•P CD 

CO rH fl 

RH El 



O 

C 1 



to 



JOP 



cm 

W ■ 

1 






« 
eh 

CO 

p 

a 



o 



o 

n 

w 

s 

o 

EH 
O 

w 

Ph 

w 
w 
EH 



CX\ 



C3 



CO 
CO 

o 



o 

> 

■H 
■P 



o 





<h ro 




o r-o 


£ 


M. LO 


+J 


CD rH 


o 


CD 1 


EH 


is ro 


=H 




O 




-p 




a 




© 




o 


«h ro 




o r<~>, 
i 


£-1 
CD 


^ LO 


Ph 


CD i-l 




© 1 




r= CT> 



© 



3 81 .1! 



w w- 



*0 CT\ r-<~\ CTv CM r~- lO CO l^nO 
r^, r~— CTv CTi J" CM H^» CTiH O 

••-.•• • • • • • ■-•;• 

j- cm Co oS r— r— r-\ \r\c^a 

H CM H/ H/ LOUi> M ChCTiO 



CTiG r— CO O OK) lOLAO O 

r— p-i >x> ni<MJM — avx> a*, o 
• •••••••••• 

c\) i-oro ro crM-of— cm i — O 
rH J- LO.VO r— cpi cn O 






j-te toow 

CM 



r~- CPi J- =r r-o 



CP\ rH i — rH CM O CO I — OITlO 
I — rO LP\ r— CTiVD CO rH r — CM rH 

r-\ HC?iO>W N J- p* LTvCM 

CM rH rH rH 



lt> cr\ co cr, crv r^-_zt o o^h i«^ 

rH CM CM U3 CM CM r-O ITiJ- rH 



rn lt\vd r— ,ht to oj-vn oto 

nH^ l-O LT\ LT\ CM 



CD 



o^a^cno^a^aNO^crNCT^c^ o 
o • •••••••••S 

rH cj>J- <r\Pt cr\,d- a-\OMX\c^ 
h w wn r^pf J-mi — a> h 

© I 1 ! I I 1 1 1 1 1 

ti o 

rtooir\Oir\c looooo 

pH W PJ tO m^ -d" LP.UD CO rH 





B 

o 




?H •* 




«H *lD 




£ 




CO -H 




O CO 




ftrH 




CD Ph 




rM 




-d 




d d 
C TO 


, 


■ Td rf 




CD O 


. . ■ 


S TO 




p CD 


. 


CO ■ . 




- CD • 




fl Wro 




o ro 




•H <H CTl 




+3 O rH 




«j 




■H fl - 




o o cpi 




<S -H 




co co in 




: CO -H © 




< > ,-Q 




•H S 




IB R I) 




m o 




© - © 




U d O 
P o 




-P -H 




O -P CO 


ra 


33 Cti -H 


o 


<H !h H 

P -P O 


• 


o 


' ■ d co a 


o 


fij -H CO 


rH 


3 Pi O 




•H M 




-p S 




3 ^ TO 




O 3 




s >» 


O 


P. S 


o 


O © ^ 


• 


•H > 


o 


,3 O t) 


o 


ft O © 


rH 


cd © h 
Pi ft; ra 






W) ft 




O rH © 




-P si :h 




q a ft 




,3 O 




Ph -H •» 




■P >a 




H Oi - H 




TO tS5 -P 




rt co 




O P 




•H • TH. 


3 


+» <a] pj 

TO • H 


r<-\ 


3 ft; 




• -p 




© 53 d 




r=J 3 




-P © o 




^ S 




>i-p 




P o 




O -H 


rH 


Ti -p ,d 


co 


© ft 


ro 


,d C5 TO 




co © H 




•h -h ua 




d d o 




3 R 1 S 

HH H A 






, o Ph 




CO o 




-p © 




TO" rH A 




Pi rH EH 




• • 




© 


rH 


O 


ns 


u 


-p 


3 


o 


o 


EH 


co 



■r- 



TABLE 215(a) 
photographic Mount Manufacturing 
Hourly Earnings and Weekly Hours of Factory Wage Earners 
Payroll Week of March 15, 1933 



Actual 


20 hrs. or 


20.1 to 


30.1 to 


35.1 to 40.1 to 45.1 to 


50, 


1 to 


Over 


Total 


Earnings 


under 


30 hrs. 


35 hrs. 


'40 hrs. 45 hrs. -50 hrs. 


60 


hrs. 


60 




Per Hour 














hrs. 




Under lOrf 


















10 - 19.9 


10 


2 
10 


1 


1 „ .... 11 




1 




15 


20 - 24.9 


1 


8 11 


32 


25 - 29.9 


7 


12 


5 


7 2 3 




1 




37 


30 - 34.9 


5 


42 


5 


10 8 9 








79 


35 - 39.9 


5 


11 


5 


1 3 




2 


2 


29 


40 - 44.9 


9 


13 


1 


7 




2 




32 


45 - 49.9 


10 


16 


4 


3 




2 




35 


50 - 59.9 


16 


16 


3 


8 9 1 




1 


1 


55 


60 - 79.9 


7 


14 


6 


13 5 3 




1 


1 


50 


80 - 99.9 




5 


2 


1 2 




1 




11 


1.00 or more 


1 






2 2 








5 



Total 



70 



141 



33 



61 



29 



31 



11 



380 



Source: Industry questionnaire returns, probably 16 concerns reporting. Submitted 
by the Code Authority to the National Recovery Administration, Division 
of Research and planning, January 11, 1934. 



9818 



TABLE 215(1)) 
photographic Mount Manufacturing 
Hourly Earnings and Weekly Hours of Factory Wage Earners 
payroll We ok of September 15, 1333 

Actual 20 hrs. 20.1 to 30.1 to 35.1 to 40,1 to 45.1 to 50.1 to Total 

Earnings or 30 hrs. 35 hrs. 40 hrs. 45 hrs. 50 hrs. 60 hrs. 

Per Hour under '■ 



Under 10 cents 

10 - 19.9 111 3 

20-24.9 1 4 5 

25 - 29.9 114 6 

30 - 34.9 5 7 18 27 19 76 

35-39.9 8 3 44 56 5 116 

40-44.9 1 2 19 21 10 53 

45 - 49.9 3 13 11 4 1 32 

50-59.9 3 5 14 34 4 1 \ 61 

60-79.9 1 1 15 28 10 1 1 57 

80 - 99.9 1 18 1 20 

1.00 or more 18 1 10 

Total 20 22 127 203 63 2 . 2 439 

Source; Industry questionnaire returns, probably 16 concerns reporting. Submitted 

by the Code Authority to the national .Recovery Administration, Pi vision 
of Research and planning, January 11, 1934. 



9818 



, 



33 S 
TABLE 216 

GUMMING INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF FACTORY EMPLOYE 5 BY SEX, WEEK OF JULY 

9-15, 1933 



• Total 

Hrs, Worked Number Cumulative 
Per Week Per Cent 



Hales 



Females 



Number Cumulative) Number Cumulative 
Per Cent Per Gent. 



Under 29 


16 


2.4 


10 


1.7 


6 


6.1 


20 - 24.9 


9 


3.7 


7 


2.9 


2 


8.1 


25 - 29.9 


8 


4.9 


7 


4.1 


1 


y.i 


30 - 34.9 


13 


6.8 


10 


5.8 


3 


12.2 


35 - 39.9 


12 


8.6 


10 


7.5 


2 


14.2 


40 - 44.9 


66 


18.4 


37 


13.9 


29 


43.8 


45 - 49.9 


143 


39.6 


105 


32.1 


38 


82.6 


50 - 59.9 


220 


72.1 


212 


68.9 


8 


90.8 


60 «r more 


189 


100.0 


180 


1O0.0 


9 


100.0 


T*tal 


676 




578a/ 




98 b/ 





SOURCE: National Recovery administration, Division of Research and Planning. 
Data from survey made by the Gummed Industries association and 
reported to : the NRA. The Gumming Industry, prepared by Max 
Kossoris, December 4, 1933. 4 

a/ Based on reports of 16 companies. 
by Based on reports of 18 companies. 



9S18 



339 

TABLE 217 

GUMMING INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY EMPLOYEES, BY SEX, - WEEK OF 

JULY 9-15,3Q#3 a/ 









Males 






Females 




Actual Hourly 

Earnings 


Number 


Per cent 


Cumulative 
% 


Numb er 


Per Cent 


Cumulative 

of 

/" 


15^ - 19.9/ 


3 




o 5 


0,5 










20 - 24.9 


1 




2 


0.7 


29 




29.6 


29.6 


25 - 29.9 


. 14 




2 e 4 


3.1 


19 




19.4 


49.0 


30 - 34.9 


51 




8.8 . 


11.9 


13 




13.4 


62.3 


35 - 39.9 


113 




19.6 


31.5 


24 




34.5 


86.8 


40 - 44.9 


. I08 




18.0 


50.3 


5 




5.1 


91.9 


45 - 49.9 


80 




13.8 


64.1 


6 




6.1 


98.0 


50 - 54.9 


82 




14.2 


78.3 


2 




2,0 


100.0 


•55 - 59.9 


40 




6.9 


85,2 










■60 ~ 69.9 


61 




10.6 


95.8 










70 - 79.9 


16 




2.8 


98.6 






* 




8© - 89.9 


2 




0.4 


99.0 










90 - 99.9 


3 




0.5 


99.5 










£1.00 or more 


3 




0.5 


100.0 










Total 


578 


■/ 


100.0 




98 


y 


100.0 





SOURCE: Data from survey by the Gummed Industries Association, reported 
to NRA. National Recovery Administration, Division of Research 
and Planning. The Gumming Industry prepared by Max Kossoris, 
December 4, 1933. 
a/ Based on reports of 16 companies. 
b/ Based on reports of 18 companies. 



9218 



: 3^0 

TABLE 21 g 
GUMMING INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY .EARNINGS OF OFFICE EMPLOYE S DURI .G HIE '.TEA: OF JULY 

9-15, 1933 ' 



Cumulative 
Actual Weekly Earnings Number Per Cent Per Cent 



$10.00 to 14.99 
15.00 'to 19.99 
20.00 to 24.99 
25,00 to 29.99 
30.00 to 34.99 
35.00 to 39.99 
40.00 t'o 44.99 
45.00 to 49.99 
50.00 to 54.99 
55.00 to 59.99 
80.00 or over 
Total 



SOURCE: Data from survey made by t he Gummed Industries Association, based 
on reports of 18 companies, reported to t he NRA. National 
Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Planning, The 
Gumming Industry, prepared by Max Kossoris, December 4, 1933. 





12 


10.9 


10.9' 






3.5 

- ■» 


31.8 


42.7 ' 






23 


20.9 


63.6 


* 




10 


. 9.1 


72.7 • 


( 




5 


4.5 


77.2 ' 


1 


6 


5.5 


82.7 






4 


3.6 


86.3 




i 


3 


A 2 '7 


89.0 • 


- 




5 


4.5 


93.5 • 






1 


1.0 


94.5 






6 


_ 5.5 


100.0 


■ ' 




110 b/ 


100. 


• 












c 



981S 



3Ul 

TABLE 213 

GUMMED LABELS AMD EMBOSSED SEAL INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF FACTORY EMPLOYEES BY SEX IN YffiEK OF JULY 

15, 1933 



Total 



Male 



Female 



Hours 
worked 
per Wk. 



Under 20 
2Q - 24.9 
25 - 29.9 
30. - 34.9 
35 - 39.9 
40,- 44.9 
45 --49.9 
50 - 59.9 
60 ,or more 
Total 



Number Cumulative % 



16 
9 
4 

14 

29 
104 
236 
124 

33 
569 



2.0 

4.4 

5.1 

7.6 

12.7 

30.9 

72.4 

94.2 

100.0 



Number Cumulative % Number Cumulative 



5 

7 

3 

10 

15 

54 

146 

' 84 

23 

347 



1.4 

3.5 

4.3 

7.2 

11.5 

27.1 

69.2 

93.4 

100.0 



11 

2 

1 

4 

14 

50 

90 

40 

10 

222 



5.0 

5,9 

6.3 

8.1 

14.4 

36.9 

77.5 

95.5 

100.0 



SOURCE: Data furnished by the Gummed Lable and Embossed Seal Association, 
based on reports of 19 companies, to the National Recovery Ad- 
ministration. National Recovery Administration, Division of 
Research and Planning. The Gummed Labels and Embossed 'Seal 
Industry, prepared by Max Ko'ssoris, December 9, 1933. 



9S18 



3^2 
TABLE 220 

GUMMED IABELS AND ElIBOS^ED SEAL INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF EMPLOYEES, BY SEX, WEEK ENDING JULY 15, 1933, 

Factory Employees 

of 
/a 



Hourly Earnings 


Ma 


Le 


(cents ) 


Number 


Cumulate 


10 - 14.9 


11 


3.2 


15 - 19.9 


7 


5,2 


20 - 24.9 


14 


9.2 


25 - 29.9 


24 


16.1 


30 - 34.9 


34 


25.9 


35 - 39.9 


21. 


32.0 


40 - 44.9 


45 


45.0 ■ 


45 - 49.9 


23. 


51.6 


50 - 54.9 


42 


63.7 


55 - 59.9 


14 


67.7 


60 f 69.9 


34 


77.5 


70 - 79.9 


33 


87.0 


80 - 89.9 


20 


92.8 


90 - 99.9 


16 


97.4 


100 or more 


9 


loo.e 


Total 


347 





Female 




mber 


Cumulative % 


8 


3.6 


10 


8.1 


86 


46.9 


39 


64.4 


25 


75.7 


19 


84.2 


23 


94.6 


3 


96.0 


5 


98.2 


2 


99.1 


1 


99.6 




99.6 


'l 


100*0 



222 



SOURCE: Data furnished by the Gummed Label and Embossed Seal ..ssociation, 
based on reports of 19 companies, to the N.R. '. . N.E.A. Division 
of Research and Planning. The Gummed Labels and Embossed Seal 
Industry, prepared ly Max K»ssoris, December 9, 1933. 



|glg 



3^3 

TABLE 221 
GUMMED LA: ELS AND EMBOS : ID SEAL INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED VffiERLY EARNINGS OF OFFICE EMPLOYEES, VJEEK OF JULY 15, 1933 



Actual Weekly 
Earnings 



Number of Office 
Employees 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Less than $5 
$5 - $9.99 
10 - 14.99 
15 - 19.99 
20 - 24.99 
25 - 29.99 
30 - 34.99 
35 - 39.99 
40 - 44.99 
45 - 49.99 
55 - 59.99 
60 - or over 



Total 



8 

16 

22 

26 

10 

4 

6 

3 

3 

2 

3 

103 



7.8 
23.3 
44.7 
70.0 
79.7 
83.6 
89.4 
92.3 
95.2 
97.1 
100.0 



SOURCE: Data furnished by the Gummed Label and Embossed Seal Association 
based on reports of 19 companies, to the NRA. National Re- 
covery Administration, Division of Research and Planning, The 
Gummed Labels and Embossed Seal Industry, prepared by Max 
Kossoris, December 9, 1933. 



981g 



3UU 

TAI3LE 222 

FLUTED CUP, PAII LIPtR, and LACE PAPER isihisUFi'-CTU Rli-T G INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED i.EcJILY 4 URS 01 :iQM I ) . 
wDLK Of JU1I3 15, 1933. 



FACTORY AOL ErJJrllJ 3 



iiourt; 

'Worked Per Leek 



20 hours or lo.ss 
20.1 - 25 
25.1 - 30 
30.1 - 35 
35.1 - 40 
40.1 - 45 
45.1 - 50 
50.1 - 55 
55.1 - 60 
60.1 - 65 







CumuL Live 


:.ibcr 


Per Gent 


Per Cent 




1.1 


1.1 


6 


1.4 


2. 5 


9 


2.0 


4.5 - 


10 


2.3 


6.8 ■ 


13 


2.9 


9-7 - 


i 
i 


IJ o -. 


17.9 - 


78 


' 1 1 


C1.0 •■ 


'■c 


15- 4 


96. L •■ 





0,7 


97.1 


13 


i.9 


100.0 



Total 



100 . 



Source; Based on reports received frosn ben coxupcuiies in response to 

National Recovery Administration questionnaire, riRA Division of 
Research and Planning. The Fluted r _r Cup, Pun Liner, and Lace 
Paper Mfg. Industry, prepared by 'lax SCossoris, Deceubu 19> 19 



9S18 



3^5 





>H 








« 


•» 






EH 

to 


w 






1 *-i 


CO 






B 


>H 






h- 1 


m 






cb 


CO 






r-H 


vj 






ft 


ft 






b 








EH 

o 


i 






<=>] 


ft 






^ 


ft 






1 


•CD 






8 


95 






S< 


o 

EH 


• 




ft 


O 


i-O 






<■! 


CTv 




ft 


ft 


rH 


CM 


3 


ft 


„ 


CM 


Hi 


O 


i-l 


W 


Q 

si 


co 


ft 


ft 


. -H 


•^ 


EH 


1 
t— i 


l-H 

1 


? 
§ 




hi 


>H 


ft 






ft 


10 




3 


S 


1 




Th 


3 
ft 





ft 

I— I 
CO 

<n 

A 

ft 

o 



93lg 



cd 

> 

•H -P 

+> £ 
cd cd -p 

O o 



1 



u 
o ft o 



-p 


rH 


fj 


cd 


Q> 


-p 


O 


o 




+3 


u 




o 


=H 


m 


O 


u 




<u 




ft 




F3 




| 




ft 





> 

•rl -P rH 

-P Pi «J 

L,' O** 3 

Ay o o 

£j U- 

O ft o 





(i) 


-p 


en 


o 


o 


(1) 




+3 


H 


u 




cd 


a > 


<+H 


3 


ft 


o 







to 


• — , 






qf) 


to 


rH 


>> 


fl 


p 


B 


<-\ 


•H 


(-J 


% 


£{ 


a) 


-p 


M 


o 


o 


o 


crt 


-. ^ 


•=*: 


ft 


CD 





r-i cri ft- en cn cn cm vx> o 
• •••••■•• 

Cn I — VO CO .zj- NfTNCTiO 

ft- r-— co cn cn 'cn cn o 



rH H/OMTlO O l-nft" ft 



C7VCOCOCMV£>r-<nrHOO 



rH cn r — m ft ni^h h 

CM CO VD CM rH 



o eo ltnU) cm'vd vo o rH' ir\ i^ o 

rH J- rH Cn Cn r-\ l-n I LOl '.0 CM o 

rH rH cm,— r irvx> r— eo en o 



o to i — i-h U) ft- o J- h _)-. w i — 

rH r-^VD CO "n CM CM i-<~\ CO in-^ i'^\ r — 



cm do J- r-ou) into r— co co ud 

rH rH CM C\l CM CM rH CM r-\ 



en 



CD 



• cn en cn m cn cn cn cn cn cn. o 
cn g 

ft ft- cn ft- cn ft cn ft a > cn cn 

CM CM ni^J" J- LP, li^VD r-— u 

t i l o 

I I I ! I I I. I 

■ o o o o 
ixn o mo mo ir\ o » • • • 

rH CM CM rn f-\ ft J- LP, LP O O O 

lp.vq r— co 



o 
o 



CM 
■CM 



O 
O 



cn 
o 

CM 



cd 

p 
o 

EH 



•rl 


CD 


-P 


r c! 


LJ 


EH 


u 


«- 


-p 


to 


CO 


• rl 


H 


c\0 ^ 


fl 


a o 


•rl 


H 10 


^ 


C! to 


-d 


a o 


<5j 


n3 W 




rH 


>! ft X 


CD 


t) .; 


> 


rj 


O 


3 >s 


o 


_, p 


o 


^l 


w 


o Ti 


rH 


O rl 


a 


CD «J 


^ 


to ft 


o 


CD CD 


H 


! rl 


-P 


ft 


a 


CH 


^_; 


O 




>S 


• ) 


a !H 


H-> 


O -P 




rl CO 


CD 


to pi 


to 


H -d 


!Lj 


f» c 


O 


■H l-H 


ft 


ft 


to 


tiO 


CD 


n C 


rl 


£ rH 


j~^ 


s ^ 


rl 


-p p 




i3 o 


to 


fH rf 


CD 
•H 


-P ft 

co p 


9 


■H S 

n cd 


Pi 


■H ."3 






5 


-4 - 


O 


•<i CD 




ft 


O 


>3 0} 


rH 


rn ft 




CD 


f ^ 


> CD 


O 


o o 


rl 


O K) 


«H 


CD ft 


nH 


■r) 


CD 


^ § 


> 


H 


r; 


ai 


O M 


o 


•rl CD 


CD 


■p c 


rl 


tj H • 




ft nP r<~\ 


to 


r<^ 


+> 


Pi O'"'* 


;. , 


• Cd rH 


O 


<D ft 


ft 


SH 


CD 


■ri - cn 


rl 


'd ft rH 




CJ Pi 


pj 


;-; O Jh 


o 


O CD 




■rH Tj ft 


TH 


p (D r- 


CD 


co -p §3 


to 


5 r « 


t T J 


3 H CO 


Ph 


C' ft ft 


., 




a> 




o 




r 3 




6 




CO 





3^6 



TO BE USED WITH KAUTION 



TABLE 224 
SAMPLE CARD INFJSTRY 



CUMULATIVE PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF 
WEEKLY HOURS OF WAGE EAMERS, 
April and September, 1933 



Number of 

Hours 

Worked 

Fer Week 



Hale 



Female 



April Sept. 
17-22 11-15 



April Septo 
17-22 11-15 



Total 



April 
17-22 


Sept. 
11-15 


9.58 


2.34 


19.53 


11.68 


25.56 


24.38 


29.58 


35.18 


35.42 


97.08 


96.39 


100.00 


99.72 





Under 20 
20 - 29.9 
30 - 34.9 
35 - 39.9 
40 - 44.9 
45 - 49.9 
50 - 59.9 
Over 60 



4.41 
9.80 



1.39 
9.72 



16.18 24.07 

19.12 39.35. 

26.96 96.30 

88.73 100.no 
99.02 
100.00 



11.63 2.77 

23.45 12.58 

29.26 24.52 

33.72 33.26 

38.76 97.44 

99.42 100.00 
100.00 • ■ 



100.00 



Source; Survey returns, 20 concerns reporting, these concerns 

employing approximately 2,000 persons. National Recovery 
Administration Division of Research and planning. 
"The Sample Card Industry" , prepared by G-. K. Hamill 
and Max Kossoris, Jan. 3, 1934. 



9818 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 
TABLE 225 
SAMPLE CARD INDUSTRY 
CUMULATIVE PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF IIOUBLY EARNINGS OF V7AGE EARNERS, 

Aoril and September 1933 



Male Female Total 



Hourly Anril Sept. April Sept. April Sept. 

Earnings 17-23 11-15 17-23 11-15 17-33 11-15 

Under 10 cents 



10 - 19.9 


3.43 




14.15 




11.11 




30 - 34.9 


8.33 




42.44 


1.07 


32.92 


0.73 


35 - 39.9 


35.49 




60.46 


5.54 


50.56 


3.80 


30 - 34.9 


30.39 


7.87 


82.56 


42.43 


67.78 


31.53 


35 - 39.9 


39 . 3,2 


25.93 


95.15 


73.56 


79.31 


58.54 


40 - 44.9 


50.00 


34.26 


93.64 


85.93 


84.86 


69,63 


45 - 49.9 


52.94 


43.52 




97.01 


85.69 


80.15 


50 - 59.9 


70.59 


58.80 


99.23 


98.72 


91.11 


86.13 


60 - 79.9 


91.18 


80.09 


100.00 


9S.57 


97.50 


93.43 


80 - 99.9 


96.08 


92.13 




100.00 


98.89 


97,52 


$1.00 or more 


100.00 ' 


100.00 






100.00 


100.00 



Source: Survey returns, 20 concerns reporting, these concerns employing 
approximately 2,000 persons. National Recovery Administration 
Division of Research and Planning. The Sample Card Industry 
prepared by G. K. Hamill and Max Kossoris, Jan. 3, 1934. 






9818 



3^3 

TABLE 226 
Fi"bre Can & Tube Industry 
Classified Weekly Hours of Worl: for 

Factory Wage Earners 
in a Week of fey or June, 1929, 
and a Corresponding Week of 1933. 





;d 


May or 


June, 


1929 


Mav c r 


June, IS 


33 


Hours 
Wo rk« 


Numb e r 


Per 
Cent 


Cumulative 
Per Cent 


Number 


Per 
Cent 


Cumulative 
Per Cent 


20 hours or 


less 31 


1.45 


1.45 


33 


.1-77 


1.77 


20.1 


- 30 


67 


3.13 


. 4,58 


40 


2.15 


3.92 


30.1 


- 35 


60 


2.81 


7.39 


120 


"6,45 


10.37 


35.1 


- 40 


129 


6.03 


. 13.42 


212 


; 11.39 


21.76 


40.1 


- 45 


373 


17.45 


30.87 


334 


17.95 


39.71 


45.1 


- 50 


1,020 


47.71 


78.58 


649 


34.87 


74.58 


50.1 


- 60 


307 . 


14. 36 


92.94 


425 


22.84 


97.42 


Over 


60 


151 


7.06 


100.0 


48 


2.58 


100.00 



Total 2,138 100.00 1,861 100.00 



Source: Industry questionnaire data, based on reports of 43 companies, 
submitted to the national Recovery Administration, Division of 
Research and Planning. "The Fibre Can & Tube Industry", prepared 
by Max Kassoris, January 9, 1934. 



9818 



349 

TABLE 227 
Fit re Can and Tube Industry 
Classified Hourly Earnings of Factory Earners 
In a week of i.iay or June, 1939 and a 
Corresponding Week of 1933 





May 


or June, 
Per 


1929 

CumulaiLve 


May or June, 


1933 






Per 


Cumulative 


Cants Per Hour 


Humb 


er Cent 


Per Cent 


Turno er 


Cent 


Per Cent 


Under 10 cents 


19 


0.89 


0.89 


- 


- 


- 


10 - 19.9 


52 


2.43 


3.32 


165 


8.87 


8.87 


20 - 24.9 


267 


12.49 


15.81 


242 


13.00 


21.87 


2.3 - 29.9 


293 


13.70 


29.51 


258 


13.86 


35.73 


30 - 34.9 


241 


11.27 


40.79 


312 


16.77 


52.50 


35 - 39.9 


208 


9.73 


50.51 


156 


8.38 


60.88 


40 - 44.9 


582 


17.87 


68.39 


163 


8.76 


69.64 


45 - 49.9 


112 


5.24 


73.62 


118 


6.34 


75.98 


50 - 59.9 


274 


• 12.82 


86.43 


273 


14.67 


90.65 


60 - 79.9 


210 


9.82 


96.26 


125 


6.72 


97.37 


80 - 99.9 


58 


2.71 


98.97 


32 


1.72 


99.09 


$1.00 or more 


22 


1.03 


100.00 


17 


0.91 


100.00 


Total 


2138 


100.00 




1861 


100.00 





Source: Industry questionnaire data, based on reports of 43 

companies, submitted to the national Recovery Administra- 
tion, Division of Research and Planning. "The Fibre Can & 
Tube Industry 11 , prepared by Max Kassoris, January 9, 1934. 



9818 



350 



TA3LE 222 



DRINKING STPArf IvIAlJUFACTURIlTG I INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED rf'EEZLY HOURS OP FACTORY WAGE EARNERS, 
,»EEX OE JUNE 15, 1933 



Hours m/'crked 


llur.iber of 


Per Cent 


Cumulative 


per week 


n'age. Earners 


of Total 


per cent 


20 or -under 


2 


2.0 


2.0 


20.1 to 23 


2 


2.0 


4.0 


25.1 to 30 


2 


2.0 


6.0 


30.1 to 35 


- 


- 


6.0 


35.1 to 40 


13 


13.3 


19.3 


40.1' to 45 


24 . 


24.5 


43. S 


U5.I to 50 


52 


53.2 


97. c 


50.1' to 55 


1 


. 1.0 


9S.0 


55.1 to60 


2 


2.0 


100. b 


Over 60 


- 







Total 



92 



100.0 



Source! 



Based on reports received from 7 companies by the 
NRA. National Recovery Administration Division of 
Research and Planning. .The Drinking Straw Manu- 
facturing Industry, prepared by Max Kossoris, 
December 13, 1933. 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 



TABLE 229 • ■ 

PAPER DRINKING STRAW MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF WORK FOR FACTORY WAGE EARNERS 
Week of June 15, 1933 

Factory Wage Ear ners , 



Hours 


Worked 


Male 


Feme 


20 hours T less 


- 


2 


20.1 


- 25 


1 


1 


25.1 


- 30 


2 


- 


30.1 


- 35 


- 


- 


35.1 


- 40 


3 


10 


40.1 


- 45 


9 


15 


45.1 


- 50 


20 


32 


50.1 


- 55 


1 


- 


55.1 


- 60 


2 


- 


Over 


60 








Total 


38 


GO 



Total 



2 
2 
2 

13 

24 

52 

1 



98 



Source: NRA questionnaire returns, 7 concerns reporting. Tabulation 
by the Bureau of Census for the National Recovery Administra- 
tion, Division of Research and Planning, December 6, 1933. 



9818 



352 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 



<± <±. 



TABLE 230 

PAPER DRINKING STRAW I/IANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS 0? FACTORY WAGE EARNERS 
Week of June 15, 1933 



Hourly Earnings 
Cents Per Hour 



Male 



Factory Wage Earners 



Female 



Total 



Under 15 


1 


15 - 19.9 


1 


20 - 24.9 


4 


25 - 29.9 


4 


30 - 34.9 


3 


35 - 39.0 


3 


40 - 44.9 


7 


45 - 49.9 


- 


50 - 54.9 


7 


55 - 59.9 


1 


60 - 69.9 


4 


60 - 79.9 


- 


80 and over 


'3 


Total 


38 



11 

3 
9 
6 
19 
4 
6 
1 
1 



60 



12 

4 

13 

10 

21 

7 

13 

1 

8 

1 

4 

3 
98 



Source: NRA Questionnaire returns, 7 concerns reporting. . Tabulation 
"by the Bureau of the Census for the National Recovery 
Administration, Division of Research and Planning, 
December 6, 1933. 



9818 



353 



ta3le 231 t0 31j t]sed vjite caution 
paper dpj:z:iiig straw hamotac!TI]REIg industry 

Classified ",'eekly Earnings of Office Enployees 
Payroll '.,'eeli Including June 15, 1933 or ITearest 
Typical Week 



T 7eekly Earnings 

(Pollers) irari'oer 



Under 05.00 

5 to 9.9S 

10 to 1U.39 2 

15 to, 19.9S L !- 

20 to 24.99 U 

25 to 29.99 1 

30 to 3H.99 1 

35 to 39.99 2 
Ho to UU.99 

'45 and over 2 

Total 17 



SOURCE: I\PA questionnaire returns, 7 concerns reporting. Tabulation 
"by the Bureru of the Census for the National Recovery Admin- 
istration, Division of Research and Planning, December 6, 1933 • 



9S12 



35^ 



TABLE 232 

BULK DAT" T" "- STRAW ETJUSTRY 
35PL0YEES CLASSIFI D T" OCCUPATION _WD 3Y HOIKS 

T "ORi"D per weep: - for ~.rei ending barest isth 

March 15th and April 15th, 1934 









I "anuf fcturing Employees 








Total 


' atch- engineers ether 


Office 


flours Worked Per Week 




men etc Labc 


irers 


Employees 




week 


6 


'.'eel; Ending .'arch 15, 


1S54 - 


a/,e/ 


Under 20 hours per 


6 






20.1 to 30.0 hours 


per week 


1 


1 






30.1 to 35.0 hours 


per week 


2 


2 






35.1 to 57.5 hours 


per wee 1 .: 


c 


9 




24 1 


37.6 to 40.0 hours 


per week 


43 


• 48 


1 


40.1 to 45.0 hours 


per week 


12 


12 




2 


45.1 to 48,0 hours 


per week 


5 


2 • 3 






48.1 to 56. f hours 


per week 


9 


2 7 






56.1 and over hour; 


3 per week 










Total Number of Em] 


3loyegs 


92 


2 2 88 




30 














Week Ending Hpril 15, 


1954 - 


a/,e/ 








".'atch- Engineers Chauf- 


Other 


Offic 








men etc. . feurs 


Laborers Emplo 
ees 


Under 20 hours per 


week 


11 


1 


10 




20.1 to 30.0 hours 


per week 


1 


1 






30.1 to 35.0 hours 


per week 


12 




12 




35.1 to 37.5 hours 


per week 








4 i 

23 ^ 


37.6 to 40.0 hours 


per week 


82 


1 


81 


40.1 to 45.0 hourt 


Dcr week 


11 


1 


10 


2 


45". 1 to £8.0 hours 


ner week 


10 


2 2 


6 




48.1 to 56.0 hours 


"oer week 


2 


1 


1 





56.1 and over hours per week 
Total Number of Employees 



12S 



120 



32 



Source: Code Authority for the Bulk Drinking Straw, '.rapped Toothpick 
and 'Trapped Manicure stick Industry - 'Confidential Employ- 
ort" Twelve companies were canvassed. 
a/ i :." companies reported data on factory employees 
e/ Six companies reported data on office employees 



)818 



355 ' 

TABLE 233(a) 

BURN BE LURING STRAW LULUS TRY 
2WL0YEE3 CLASSIFIED E v QCCUPATICN AND BY HOURS 
"JPREED PER :7EEK - FOR WEEN ENDING NEAREST 15th 
May 15th, June 15th- and July 15, 1934 



Manufacturing jimployees 



Total 



Hours "Jorked per Week 



Watch- Chauf- Engineers Other . Offic 
men feurs e tc. Laborers Empli 

-eei 



Under 20 hours per week 
20.1 to 30.0 hours per week 
30.1 to 35.0 hours per week 
35,1 to 37.5 hours per week 
37.6 to 40.0 hours per week 
4 0.1 to 45.0 hours per week 
45.1 to 48.0 hours' per week 
48.1 to -56.0 hours per week 
56.1 and over hours per- week 
Total Number of Employees 



13 


i: 


20 


1. 


7 


1 


1 




53 




15 




8 


1 


6 





Week ending Nearest Ray 15, 19 54 

a/, e/ 



11 
19 

7 

1 
53' 
15. 

7 

4 



5 
25 



123 



2. 

2 



117 



33 



Under 20 hours per week 33 

20.1 to 30.0 hours per week 12 

30.1 to 35.0 hours per week 6 

35.1 to 37.5 hours per week 6 

37.6 to 40.0 hours per week 51 

40.1 to 45.0 hours per week 28 

45.1 to 48.0 hours per week 38. 

48.1 to 56.® hours per week 7 

56.1 and over hours per week 1 

Total Number of Employees 182 



T ,Veek Ending nearest June- 15, 1954 b/, f/ 

33 
12 
-6 

6 5 
51 3 
28 23 
.. .2 1 35 

7 
1 
2 1 179 31 



Uuder 20 hours per week 
20.1 to 30.0 hours per week 
30.1 to 55.0 hours pwE week 
35.1 to 37.5 hours per week 
37.6 to 40.0 hours per week 
4^.1 to 45.0 hours per week 
45.1 to 48.0 hours per week 
48.1 to 56. C hours per week 
56.1 and over hours per week 
Total Number of Employees 
Source 



11 

19 

9 

4 

69 

29 

34 

1 

1 

177 



Week Ending nearest July 15, 1954 c/,g/ 



11 

19 

8 

4 

69 

29 

31 

1 

1 

173 



5 
32 



38 



Code Authority for the Bulk Drinking Straw, 'rapped Toothpick and 
Wrapped Manicure Stick Industry - •"Confidential Employment Report" 
Twelve companies were canvassed ' 
a/ Eight Companies reported data'oh factory employees, e/ Six com- 
panies reported data on office employees, b/ Nine comnanies re- 
ported data on factory employees, f/ Seven companies reported data 
on office employees, c/ Ten companies reported data on factory 
employees, g/ Sight companies reported data on office employees. 



356 

TABLE 233(b) 
BULK DRIFTING STRA" UTfcSTRY - EMPLOYEES CLASSIFIED 3Y OCCU- 
PATION AND BY HOURS VJOBl'SD PER 7 VEEK FOR '"LETS SIDING NEAREST 
15th of MONTH - August, September end October, 1934. 



Hours forked Per " T 9ek 



Manufacturing Employees 



Total 



Latch- 
men 



Engineers 

etc. 



Other 

Laborers 



Office 
Employees 



Week ending nearest August 15, 1934, d/,h/ 



Under 20 hours per week 17 1 
20.1 to 30.") hours per week 1© 1 
36.1 to 35. Q hours per week 8 
35.1 to 37.5 hours per week 1 
37.6 to 40.0 hours per week 129 
40.1 to 45.0 hours per week 16 
45.1 to 48.0 hours per week 23 1 
48.1 to 56.0 hours per week 1 
56.1 and over hours per week 
Total Number of Employees 190 3 



1 
1 



16 

9 

8 

1 

120 

10 

22 



186 



1 

2 



37 



40 



Week ending nearest September 15, 1934, a/ 



Under 20.0 hours per week 15 
20.1 to 30.0 hours pwE week 39 
30.1 to 35.0 hours per week L3 
35.1 to 37.5 hours per week 1 
37.6 to 40.0 hours per week 77 
40.1 to 45.0 hours per weak 13 
45.1 to 48.0 hours per week 6 
48.1 to 56.0 hours per week 1 
56.1 and over hours per week 
Total Number of Employees 185 



15 

39 

33 

1 

77 

13 

3 

1 

182 



1 
4 
1 
1 
32 



39 



Leek ending nearest October 15, 1954, a/ 



Under 20.0 
20.1 to 30 
30.1 to 35 
35.1 to 37 
37.6 to 40 
40.1 to 45 
45.1 to 48 
48.1 to 56 
56.1 and o 
Total Numb 



hours per week 13 
. hours per week 16 
. hours per week 21 
.5 hours per week 5 
.0 hours per week 109 
.0 hours per week 5 
.0 hours per week 3 
.0 hours per week 1 
ver hours per week 
er of Employees 171 



1 
1 



13 
16 
21 

5 
109 

5 



167 



38 



38 



Source: 



d/ 
h/ 
a/ 



Code Authority for the Bulk Drinking Straw, V/rapped 

Toothpick, and Wrapped Manicure Stick Industry. 

•Confidential Employment Leoorts" Twelve companies 

were canvassed. 
Eleven companies reported data on factory employees 
Nine companies reported data on office employees 
Eleven companies reported data on factory employees and 
nine companies reported data on office employees. 



TABLE 233 ( c) 

BULK DRPYIFG STRAW INDUSTRY - 2KPL0YZ3S CLASSIFIED BY OCCU- 
PATIONS AND BY HOURS '"CRICD PRE 'EEL ROE TE3KS ENDING NEAREST 
15th of MONTH NOVSI'SER, DECEMBER, 1954 and JANUARY, 1935 



Manufacturing Employees 



Hours forked Per Week 



Total 



T . T at oil- 
men 



Engineers 
etc. 



Other 
Laborers 



Office 
Employees 



T "eek ending nearest November 15, 1954 a/ 



Under 20.0 hours per week 5 
20.1 to 30.0 hours per week 4 
30.1 to 35.0 hours per week 19 
35.1 to 37.5 hours per week 
37.6 to 40.0 hours per weekl06 
40.1 to 45.0 hours per week 1 
45.1 to 48.0 hours per week 5 
48.1 to 56. a hours per week 
56.1 and over hours per week 3 
Total dumber of Employees 143 



5 

4 

19 

106 
1 

1 

3 
139 



1 
1 

5 
27 



2 
57 



Week ending nearest December '15, 1954 a/ 



Unc 


lei 


• 20.0 


20, 


,1 


to 


50. 


30, 


,1 


to 


55. 


55, 


,1 


to 


57. 


57, 


,6 


to 


40. 


40. 


,1 


to 


45. 


45, 


,1 


to 


48. 


48, 


,1 


to 


56. 


56. 


,1 


and ov 


Total ITumbe: 



hours per week 18 
hour s per week 57 
hours per week 4 
5 hours per week 5 
hours per week 74 
hours per week 6 
hours per week 4 
hours per week 
er hours per week - 
r of Employees 148 



18 

57 

4 

5 

74 

6 



L44 



1 
1 

5 
51 



58 



".eek ending nearest January 15, 1955 a/ 



Under 20.0 hours per week 9 
20.1 to 50.0 hours per week 28 
50.1 to 55.0 hours per week 13 
55.1 to 57.5 hours per week 15 
57r6 to 40.0 hours per week 84 
40.1 to 45.0 hours per week 9 
45.1 to 48.0 hours per week 5 
48.1 tc 56.0 hours per week 1 
56.1 and over hours per week - 
Total Number of Employees l^g 





9 


1 


1 


27 

15 


1 




15 


19 




84 


14 




9 


5 




1 




1 






2 


158 


58 



Source; Code Authority for the Bulk Drinking Straw, "Tapped 
Manicure Stick Industry, -Confidential Employment 
Reports" Twelve companies were canvassed, 
a/ Eleven companies reported data on factory employees 
and nine companies reported data on office employees. 



SS18 



35S 



TAI 



23U 



PATIONS AND EY -TCUE 


S ""'I- 1 " 


"3D PEH tZEEE FOE 


"EEI 


"S ENDING 


N3. 


'REST 




15th 


of MONTH FSKtUARY, 


1935 










Manufacturing 


Employees 
rs Other 










T, /atch- Enginee 


Office 


Hours Worked Per Week Total 


men etc. 




Laborers 




Employees 






Ueek ending near 


est 


February 


15, 


, 1935 a/ 


Under 20.0 hours per week 


10 






10 




1 


20.1 to 30.0 hours per week 


9 






9 




1 


30.1 to 35.0 hours per week 


20 






20 






35.1 to 37.5 hours per week 


- 










8 


37.6 to 40,9 hours per week 


96 






96 




29 


40,1 to 45.0 hours per week 


12 






12 






45.1 to 48.0 hours per week 


5 


2 2 




1 






48.1 to 56.0 hours per week 


3 






3 






56.1 and over hours per week 


2 






2 






Total number of Employees 


157 


2 2 




153 




39 



Source: Code Authority for the Bulk Drinking Straw, Vitrapped 
Toothpick, and ".rapped Eanicure Stick Industry. 
'Confidential Employment Reports' Twelve companies 
were canvassed, 
a/ Eleven companies reported data of factory employees 
and nine companies reported data on office employees. 



9S1S 



359 

TABLE 235(a) 

BULK DRINKING STRAW INDUSTRY 

FACTORY EMPLOYEES CLASSIFIED BY SEX AND BY HOURLY EARNINGS FOR WEEKS 
ENDING NEAREST 15 OF LJOETHS OF MARCH, APRIL, JAY, JUNE, JULY 
AITD AUGUST, l£#4 



Houi 


5 

"ly Earnings : 


V7k. Ending 


nearest Mar. 15 : 


-flic, r 


nding neares 


t April 15 a 




Total 


: . ] 


'ale 


: Female 'Total 


: Male 


: 


Female 


Under 


28.0^ por hr. 


1 


• 


— 


1 


1 


1 






28.0/ 


to 31.9/ per hr. 


23 




- 


23 


12 


1 




11 


32.0:' 


to 34.9/ per hr. 


3 




2 


.. 1 


- 


- 




- 


35.0/ 


to 39.9/ per hr,' 


19 




8 


11 


50 


3 




47 


40.0/ 


to 44,9/ per hr. 


23 




10 . 


1 13 


39. 


■ ■ 22 




17 


45.0/ 


to 49.9/ per hr. 


6 




2 . 


4 


6. 


3 




3 


50.0/ 


to 59.9/ per hr. 


■6 




5 


1 


10. 


7 




°- 3 




and over per hr. 


11 




10 


1 


11. 


11 




- 


No. of Employees 


92 




37 


55 


129 


48 




■•■ '81 




: 


Re gul*ar 


: Handicapped 




: Regular 


:Ha2idi capped 






Cotal-.I 


[ale:] 


? emale 


: Male: Female 


Total 


: Male; Female 


:!"Iale : Female 




~n 


c. Ending nearest 


a 
1'Iay 15 


"/k. 


i k "h 

Ending nearest June 15 


Under 


28.0/ per hr. 


1 .. 


1 


- 




- 


- 


- 


<t ~ '•'• " 


28.0/ 


to 31.9/ per hr. 


12 . 


1 


r 11 




3 


' 


1 


c . A 2 


32.0/ 


to 34.9/ per hr. 


- 


- 


- 




5 


5 


1- 


* — 


35.0/ 


to 39.9/ per hr. 


56 . 


5 


• 51 




84 


1 


83 


- '; 


40.0/' 


to 44.9/ per hr. 


33 


. 23 


- 10 




64 


' 46 


18 


i« — j- . — 


45.0/ 


to 49.9/ per hr. 


3 


2 


1 




6 


5 


1 


- 


50.0/ 


to 59.9/ per hr. 


6 


3 


3 




6 


3 


3 


- 


and over per hr. 


12 


12 


- 




14 


14 


- 


- 


Total 


No. of Employees 


183 


r k i 


1(76 




182 


74 106 


2 




















* . 



Under 28.0/ per hr. 
28.0/ to 31.9/ per hr. 
32.0/ to 34.9/ per hr. 

35.0/ to 39,9/ per hr. 100 

40.0/ to 44.9/ per hr. 51 38 

45.0/ to 49.9/ per hr. 4 4 

50.0/ tp 59,9/ per hr. 7 5 

60,0/ and over per hr. 14 14 

Total Nc, of Employees 177 61 



Wk. Ending nearest July 15 

I - I 

1-1 



100 
13 



116 



VJk. Ending neafint August IP 

rf '. * i 

1 .. . •• 1 

1 . 1 

102 , 102 • 

56 40 15 

3 ' - 

2 " - 



6 

16 

190 



40 

5 

4 

16 

65 



123 



Source: Code Authority for the Bulk Drinking Straw, "Trapped Toothpick, and 
Wrapped Manicure Stick Industry, "Confidential Employment Report". 
Twelve Companies were canvassed, 
a Sight companies reported data on factory employees - no handicapped 
b Nine companies reported data on factory employees 

c Ten companies reported data on factory employees - no handicapped 
d H l pvrti oo^-^mes reooi-ted data on factory employees 



360 

TABLE 235(13) 

BULK DRINEI! G STRAW INDUSTRY 

FACTORY EMPLOYEES CLASSIFIED BY SEX AND BY HOURLY EARNINGS FOR WEEKS 
ENDING NEAREST 15 OF MONTHS OF HEPTSMBERJ, OCTOBER, NOVEMBER, 
• AND DECEMBER, 1934, AND JANUARY AND FEBRUARY, 1935 



Hourly Earnings 



Under 28.0/ per hour 
28.0/ to 31.9/ per hr. 
32,0/ to 34.9/ per hr. 
55.0/ to 39.9/ per hr. 
40. •/ tt 44.9/ per hr. 
45.0/ tt 49.9/ per hr. 
50.0/ tr 59.9/ per hr. 
"0,©/ and tver per hr. 
-jtt.1 lit. tf Employees 



. : Regular dlandi capped: : Regular ; H andicapped 
Total: Male : Female :T'[ale : Female : Total :Male : Female : M ale; Fem ale 

"a 



.4c. Ending nearest Sept. 15 
3. 

1 - - 1 

99 99 

48 40 £ 

12 8 4 - 

7 5 2- 

17 17 

185 70 113 1 



Vflt, Ending nparest Oct. 15 c 



94 
38 
13 
7 
18 
171 



12 

5 

17 

58 



93 

14 

1 

2 

1 
111 



Wk, Ending nearest Ntv. 15 a _| Vk. Ending nearest Dec. 15 



nd«r 28,0 / per hr. 
8.?/ ti 31.9/ per hr. 
2,0/ tt 34.9/ psr hr. 
5.*/ t<- 39.9/ per hr. 
0.6/ t« 44.9/ per hr. 
5,»/ tt 49.9/ per hr. 
0,0/ tt 59,9/ per hr. 
0,9/ and over per hr. 
ctvL Mt. of Employees 



71 


- 


70 


1 


43 


29 


14 


- 


3 


2 


1 


- 


7 


5 


2 


- 


18 


15 


3 


- 


143 


51 


90 


1 



73 


- 


72 


46 


31 


' 15 


3 


3 


- 


5 


2" 


3 


20 


19 


1 


48 


55 . 


91 



YJk. Ending nearest Jan. 15 Wk. Ending nearest Feb. 15 



Under 28.0/ per hr. 


- 


- 


- 


2S§0/ tt> 31.9/ per hr. 


1 


- 


- 


32.6/ tt 34.9/ per. hr. 


- 


- 


- 


35.*/ tt 39.9/ per hr. 


77 


- 


76 


40.0/ to 44.9/ per hr. 


CO 


46 


14 


4 5.0/ tt 49,9/ per hr. 


1 


1 


- 


SC .0/ tt 59.9/ per hr. 


4 


2 


2 


.0/ fcud over per hr. 


19 


13 


1 


lotal Nt, tf Employees 


162 


67 


93 


ouroej Code Authority 


for 


the Bulk 


Dr 



1 


- 


- 


.2 


- 


1 


60 


- 


68 


62 


41 


21 




M 


2 


- 


7 


5 



c 


15 


14 


1 


57 


62 


93 



Wrapped Manicure Stick Industry, "Confidential Employment Report". 
Twelve Companies were canvassed. 

a Eleven ctmpanies reported data on factory employees 



SS1S 



-361- 
TABLE 236 
3UIK DRINKING STRAW INDUSTRY 

OFFICE EMPLOYEES CLASSIFIED BY AGE AND BY WEEKLY EARNINGS 
FOR WEEKS ENDING NEAREST 15th OF MARCH, 1934 - FEBRUARY, 1935 



" 


OFFICE EMPLOYEES 




OFFICE EMPLOYEES 


WEEKLY EARNINGS : 




Adult Boys 






Adult Boys 


:Tc 


tal 


Worker & Gir 


ls / 


Tota 


1 Worker &Girls 


Weel 


: Ending Nearest 


3/15 


(&§J 


Week 


Ending Nearest 4/ 15./ 34 a/ 


Total number of employees 


30 


29 


1 




32 


31 1 


$14.00 to $15.99 per week 


5 


• 4 


1 




1 


1 1 


$16.00 to $17.99 per week 


3 


3 






6 


5 


$18.00 to $19.99 per week 


5 


' 5 






5 


5 


$20. cC to $29.99 per week 


9 


■9 






9 


9 


$30.00 and over per week 


8 


8 






8 


8 


Week Ending Nearest 


5/15 


/_34S/ 


Week 
31 


Ending Nearest 6/15/34.2/ 


Total number of employees 


33 


32 


1 




• 30 1 


$14.00 to $15.99 per week 














1 $16.00 to $17,99 per week 


8 


7 


1 




8 


7 1 


$18.00 to $19.99 per week 


5 


5 






5 


5 


$20.00 to $29.99 per week 


9 


9 






10 


10 


$30.00 and over per week 


8 


8 






8 


8 


Weel 


: Ending Nearest 


7/15 


[&£/ 


Week 


Eiding Nearest 8/' 15/ 34 d/ 


Total number of employees 


38 


38 






43 


40 


$14.00 to $15.99 per week 


1 


1 








i 


$16.00 to $17.99 per week 


10 


10 






11 


11 


$18.00 to $19.99 per week 


6 


6 






7 


7 


$20.00 to $29.99 per week 


12 


12 






12 


12 


$30.00 and over per week 


9 


9 






10 


10 


Weel 


c Ending Nearest 


9 A 5/541/ 


Week 


Ending Ne^.res 1 10 /l 5/^4.3-/ 


Total number of employees 


39 


39 






38 


38 


$16.00 to $17.99 per week 


9 


9 






7 


7 


$18.00 to $19.99 per week 


7 


7 






9 


9 


) $20.00 to $29.99 per week 


13 


13 






12 


12 


$30.00 and over per week 


10 


10 
ling Nearestll/lE 


"/ 54'!/ 


10 

Week 


10 


Week Enc 


Ending Nearestl2/ 15/34 d/ 


Total number of employees 


37 


37 




38 


38 


$16. "0 to $17.99 per week 


6 


6 






6 


6 


$18.00 to $19.99 per week 


9 


9 






9 


9 


$20.00 to $29.99 per week 


12 


12 






13 


13 


$30.00 and over per week 


10 
<c Enc 


10 






10 


10 


Wee] 


ling Nearest 


1/1E 


/35d/ 


Week 
39 


Ending Nearest 2/15/35 d/ 


Total number of employees 


38 


38 




39 


$16.00 to $17.99 per week 


6 


6 






5 


5 


$18.00 to $19.99 per week 


9 


9 






11 


11 


$20.00 to $29.99 per week 


13 


13 






13 


13 


$30.00 and over per week 


10 


10 






10 


10 



SOURCE: Code Authority for the Bulk Drinking Straw Wrapped Toothpick and Wrapped 
Manicure Stick Industry "Confidential Employment Report" 12 Companies canvassed 
a/ Six companies reported data on office employees 
b/ Seven companies reported data on office employees 
c/ Eight companies reported data on office employees 
9818 d/ Nine companies reported data on office employees 



3&2 



TA3LE 237 



PAPER DRIMINS CU? AMD PAPER ^OOD CONTAINER INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS IP FACTORY EMPLOYEES, IK A. 1IEEK DURING JULY AND 

SEPTEMBER, l933 





Numb 


er 


of 


Per 


Cent 


Cumulative 




enrol 


oyees 


of 


total 


per 


cent 


Hours "'orked 


"Peek of 




Week of 


Week of 


leek of 


Week of 


Week of 


Per Week 


9/15/3? 




7/17/33 


9/15/33 
It. 36 


7/17/33 
3.23 


9/15/33 


7/17/33 
3.23 


20 or under 


21 




55 


1.36 


20.1 - SO 


128 




47 


8.31 


2.76 


9.67 


6.00 


30.1 - 35 


434 




45 


28.16 


2.65 


37.83 


3.64 


35.1 - 40 


842 




103 


54.64 


6.06 


92.47 


14.70 


40.1 - 45 


87 




524 


5.55 


30.80 


98.17 


45.50 


45.1 - 50 


21 




505 


1.36 


29.75 


99.48 


75.25 


50.1 - 50 


7 




35? 


0.45 


21.28 


99.93 


96.53 


Over 50 


1 




59 


0.06 


3.47 


100.00 


100.00 



Total... 1,541 



1,701 



100.00 



100.00 



Source: Questionnaire returns from 9 establishments to the N.R.A. 

National Recovery administration, Division of Research and Planning, 
The Paper Drinking Cuo and Pa^er Food Container Industry, prepared 
by Fax TTossoris, December 27, 1933. 



* 



9Sis 



363 

TABLE ?3g 

PAPER DRINKING CUP & PAPER FOOD CONTAINER INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY EMPLOYEES BY SEX, 
JULY AND SEPTEMBER, 1933 







MALES 


















Cumuli 


itive 




Numb 


>er 


Per 


cent 


per 


cent 


Hourly- 


Week 


Week 


Week 


Week 


Week 


Week 


Earnings 


9/18/33 


7/17/33 


9/15/33 


7/17/33 


9/15/33 


7/17/33 


(cents) 














Under 10 














10-19.9 














20-24.9 




3 




.34 




.34 


25-29.9 




16 




1.80 




2.13 


30-34.9 


14 


83 


1.66 


8.99 


1.66 


11.12 


35-39.9 


34 


137 


4.04 


15.39 


5.70 


26.52 


40-44.9 


142 


187 


16.87 


21.01 


22.57 


47.53 


45-49.9 


135 


89 


16.03 


10.00 


38 .60 


57.53 


50-59.9 


183 


139 


21.74 


15 .£2 


60.33 


73.15 


SO-79.9 


250 


187 


29.69 


21.01 


90.02 


94.16 


80-99.9 


54 


33 


6.41 


3.71 


96.44 


97.86 


100 or mere 


30 


19 


3.56 


2.13 


100.00 


100.00 


Total 


842 


390 100. CO 
FEMALES 


100.00 


... - _ 












Under 10 














10-19.9 




40 




4.93 




4.93 


20-24.9 




124 




15.29 




20.22 


25-29.9 




397 




37. 8S 




58 .©8 


30-34.9 


202 


208 


28.90 


25.65 


28.90 


83.72 


35-39.9 


212 


82 


30.33 


10.11 


59.23 


93.83 


40-44.9 


249 


29 


35.62 


3.58 


94.85 


97.41 


45-49.9 


15 


9 


2.15 


1.11 


97.00 


98.52 


50-59.9 


12 


4 


1.72 


.49 


98.71 


99.01 


60-79.9 


S 


7 


1.14 


.86 


99.86 


99.88 


80-99.9 


1 


1 


.14 


.12 


100.00 


100.00 


lOOor m^re 















6 93 



811 



100.00 100.00 



[ Table continued on next page) 



364 

Table 239 

TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 

SANITARY ITLK BOTTLE CLOSURE INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF FACTORY WAGE EARNERS 



WEEK OF 'iAxCH 18, 1 9 3 3 



r,& 



WEEKLY 
HOURS 



FACTORY 



W A G- 



EAR N E R S 



Number 



Per Cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Under 


20 


20 - 


29.9 


50 - 


39.9 


40 - 


44.9 


45. - 


49.9 


50 - 


59.9 


60 or 


more 



12 
36 

12 
16 

5 



KALE 



TOTAL 



72 



Under 


' 20 


5 


20 - 


29.9 


r~ 


30 - 


' 39.9 


3 ' 


40 - 


' 44.9 


17 ' 


45 - 


49.9 


2 ' 


50 - 


59.9 


- 


50 or 


more 


- 




TOTAL 27 ' 


Under 


' 20 


6 


20 - 


29.9 


- 


30 - 


39.9 


15 


40 - 


44.9 


43 


45 - 


■ 49.9 


14 


50 - 


59.9 


16: 


60 or 


more 


5 • 



TOTAL 99 



100C0O 



6.06 

15.15 
43.^4 
14. 14 
16.18 

5.05 

100.00 



FEHALi 



TOTAL 



6.06 
6.96 
21.21 
64.65- 
78.79 
94.95 
100.00 



SOURCE: Data furnished by the National Association of Sanitary Milk 
Bottle Closure Manufacturers; based on questionnaires from 
four coiroanies. National Recovery Auministration Division 
of Research and Planning. The Sanitary :; ilk Bottle Closure 
Industry, prepared by Max Kossoris, January 15, 1934. 



9S18 



365 



o 
.=1- 

oj 



9 

EH 



O 



O 

K 
Eh 



Q 
I "i 
to 
P3 

o 

Eh 



en 



to 

r-t 

8 



o 



Ph 
1 






O 

EH 

O 

<aj 
pq 

P-H 
O 



g 



m 

l-H 



g 



P-H 
n 
CO 
CO 



o 



•iH 



> 

•H -P CC 

-p Ph B -p 

CO CD CD f H O 

HftO O EH 



Pi fi +3 

CD CD <H O 
Ph O O EH 



E Ph 



CD. 
I !>• 

pi -h -p to 

E -P ' ■ h B- ' -p 

p 1 a5 CD- CD t.H o 

O H Ph O O E-< 



rH 
-P CO 

B .+> 

CD <H O 
O O EH 






CD, • • 

d -h -p 
E -P P< B 

jj Oi 0) 0) <H O 
O rH Ph O O EH 



•P co 

^ jH ^ 

CD CD r H O 

Ph O O EH 



■3 



a p, 



ra 



fi 

CD 



5h 

o 



! I I 



rH .CO UD .to .60 K\tO O 

O H OJUD r-CTi CTi'O 

• •••■••• 

h co U3 i — r^ oj r— o 
rH cm ud r-- en en o 



! t i 



O rH 



l^-CO wo 
O ^t H 



H O O 



.rH r—.tO. rH O Lr\LT> CVI 
H J-riH 



I I I 



I I I 



Hh-WHOLHinnj 
r-t .zt r-H rH 



I I I 



III III 



rH ^O OJ K.O CM 
III rH ill 



I 1 I I 



I I I I 



I I I 



rH vo ir\ oo m i.ri c\j 

I rH OJ rH 



P 
P. 

CXN CPi en en en en en en en o 

O •■•*-,• • • • • • . • E 

r-\ C~\^ 0^,"-t CP\ CTS CTv en 'en 

rH CM OJ f*-> OJ J" LC^i 1^- (T\ Ph 

<3 I 'I II I I I I I 'l 

,B O O LT\ O LT> O O O O O 
P H W CM fM-<"\_-t- iOMD tO H 



O 

o 



cr 
er 



CM 



CM 



rd 

81 t! . 

cj cC ro 

,-Q en 

■B rH 

... o 

M ^ « 

Pi C LT> 

CD CD rH 

U CO 

p) <D • 

P Ph Pj 

CO 

<H O 
Pi 

B B co 

Ct! O .H 

1 -H Sh 

o 
co 
w 
o 



m 



CD 
in 

pi - 

en R y 
o 

rH - M 
O £ CD 

o u; 

•H 

-P >J 

re ,o 

Ph 

o -p x) 
pq co cd 

•H Pi 
M r- £Q 

-H ft 



. CD 



-P 
•P 



r-i 
•H 



-a 



CD 

U 



?H r^ • 

c u > 

-i J CD. U 

•h i> +s 

Pi O oo 

c3 O ;J 

CO CD '"'• 

|3h B 

<tH (H 
O r-H 

Cd CD 

B U 

Q 



B 
o 

■H 

-p P 1 



B 

CO 

o 

tt) cii H 

•H S O 



o 
o 

m • 



CD 
rH 
+3 

•ai CD +3 
•H O 

CO CO 
B P. ^ 
Q E H 

•H O mH 

■p o ';-; 
cj 
PiJ- N 



CD □ 

,B o 
p> Pi 



r. 



s 

rO C/3 

U 

tj -H CD 
CD CC: ^J 

x; a eh 

B 
o 

H 



en 

•H 

B 



r-H -p 
p' CO 
iH CD 



B 



CO 


C3" 


B 


4^ 




ni 


cd 


B 


H 


n 


o 


Ph 


#% 






P'-i 






n 






^ 






j_> 






o 






to 







o 

r— 
en 



J- 

00 



3 



EH 

to 

§ 



E3 



a 

— i 

to 



DO 



CO 

I 



co 


H 


o 


c5 


rH- 


■^ 


o 


[3 


a 


Ph 


EH 


O 


EH 


EH 


O 


O 


Ph 


*4 



o 
1 

O 






A 


-P rH 

CD -P 






rH 


O O 






pi CD 

II 


Eh 
ri 

Ph O 


W 

EH 

l-H 

t-a. 




to 

<D 
0) 


-P rH 






r 


£ c3 




P» 




o 
H 

p 


CD -p 

O O 

EH 




CO 
1=5 






^1 

0) <*H 
;PH O 




Ph 


m 


H 

p 






O 
Eh 


r*> 


o 


£ ^ 




CA 


EH 


3 <D 




rH 




£3 .a 





& 


+3 

cu 


H 

cti 
•p 


rH 


O 


o 


a a) 




CH 


E > 


Sh 




a -h 


CD 


tH 


O -p 


Ph 


O 


-P iH 






Pi cvJ 






(D 4J 






o o 






EH 






In 






CD <H 






Ph O 






1.2 







1 


C cC 


03 


CD -P 


H 


O O 


p CD 


Eh 


E > 


U 


P -H 


CD «H 


6 -p 


Pi O 



-P 


rH 


s 


d 


CD 


-p 


O 


o 




EH 


fn 




CD 


<H 


Ph 


O 



CO 

>> c 

rH -H 
CD *H 

cd r; 



366 



H; (MO CM mU3 mVO O 

OU3 I — rH^tVD CO CTiO 

• •••••••• 

H L^NM^O rl ITitO O 
HVD r— to CT> G"> CT> O 



J- Kl N CM I^H r- r^^t O 

OinOJ-hfllriHOO 

• *«••••••• 

rH ,=}- CM O CO LT> J- ,K>H O 
rH LT\rH O 



hj-oow in J- m .h *vD 

H LT\rH CTv 



H ^" O CM 
CM 



CM 



o 



O O to bO LHH; ^H Cn 
rH m MD 



O 
O 

• CTiCTiO <T» CTi CT* rTMX\ 
in CTi CT\ O CPv CT\ CPi CPi C> 
■€/>. •-• ••••• . 

(\) OJ (^KMf\ 



C <B- rH 

a 

•G l 

■p 
o 

en O 

a • 

cd mo 

1-1 -C> r-l 



J I I I I I I 



-p 
o 

EH 



O 
O 



8 8 8 8 8 8 

o lA o in o o 

CM CM fN m^, 1 - VD 



m 



< 



d $3, rH 



O rH 
O -H 



.O <H CO 

Tj 01 (1) 

CD CD 




n c-hph 



8 



o 

CO 






367 

TABLE 2^2 (a). 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 



SAklTARY EILR BOTTLE CLOSUEE INDUSTRY 

: iyees classified by o cu:-;.ti lis . ed by .durs v;p.ked per tceex .or 

i.EEIIS EEDIilG /"!.:. 1ST 15th OF IIONTH AUGUST, 1034 - TOBSR, 1934 



iours Ebrked 
. : er Week 



Total 



hauf- n^m- 

fei'.rs, ears, 

hatch- ruck- ire- 

nen ■ d r i vers, men t 

etc. etc. 



Of ,er 
Laborers 
. echanical 
Workers 



)ffice 



keek ending nearest August 15, 1934 



Total number employees 
Aider 20.0 hrs. per wk. 
20.1 to 50.0 ar s.per wk. 
30.1 to 35.0 ill's. per wk. 
35.1 to 37.5 hrs.per wk. 
37.6 to 40.0 hrs.per wk'. 
40.1 to 45.0 hrs.per wk. 
45.1 to 48.0 hrs.per wk. 
43.1 to 56.0' hrs.per wk. 
56.1 and over hrs.per wk. 



47 




15 




11 




34 




50 




23 




20 


1 


5 


4 



2 


311 




47 




15 




11 




04 




113 


1 . 


22 




19 


1 . 





'otal number employees 



316 



Under 2i. 


>.0 nrs. per wk. 


32 






20.1 


to 


50.0 h: s . ,er wk. 


11 






30.1 


to 


35. C hrs.'oer wk. 


19 






35.1 


to 


37.5 hrs.per wk. 


13 






37.6 


to 


40.0 hrs.per wk. 


193 




3 


40.1 


to 


45.0 In* s.Dei wk. 


2o 




1 


45.1 


to 


( 3.0 :i s o per wk. 


■^ 


1 




48 . 1 


to 


56.0 'us. er wk. 


2 


2 




56.1 


and over ^r s.per wk. 


4 


2 





otal number : 


mployees 


529 




6 




nder 20.0 hi 


s. per wk. 


30 








20.1 to 30.0 


hrs. oer wk. 


15 








30.1 to 35.0 


hrs.per wk. 


14 








35.1 to 37. 


hi s.per wk. 


13 








37.6 to 40.0 


n s.per wk. 


210 








40.1 to '-5,0 


hrs.per wk. 


12 








45.1 to 43.0 


hr s . ne r wk . 


J 




1 




43. 1 to 5o.O 


hrs.per wk. 


3 




3 




5 6 . 1 and o e r 


hrs.perwk. 


14 
: : or 


the 


2 

Canker : 




Source: Code uthority 


" 



Week ending nearest October 15, 195 4 

4 2 285 

29 

13 ■ 

13 

6 

4 ' 200 

11 
3. 

1 10 

r ' ilk bottle" Closure Industry. 



33 



33 



learest Septei 


iber 15, 1934 




2 


274 

.32 

, 11 


31 




. 18 


1 




. 3 


10 




.173 


18 


1- 


, 22 

4 


2 



32 

1 

2 

1 

12 

15 



9818 



-368- 

TABLE 242 (b ) 

SANITARY MILK BOTTLE CLOSURE INDUSTRY 

EMPLOYEES CLASSIFIED BY OCCUPATIONS AND BY HOURS WORKED PER WEEK FOR 
WEEKS ENDING NEAREST 15TH OF MONTH NOVEMBER, 1934 - JANUARY, 1935 







Chauf- 


Engin- 


Other 








feurs, 


eers, 


Laborers 




Hours Worked 


Total 


Watch- Truck- 


Fire- 


Mechanical Office 


Per Week 




men drivers, 


men, 


Workers 








etc. 


etc. 










Week ending 


nearest 


November 15, 1934 




Total number employees 


327 


5 4 


2 


284 


32 


Under 20.0 hrs. ner wk. 


15 






15 ■ 




20.1 to 30,0 hrs. per wk. 


10 






10 




30.1 to 35. n hrs. per wk. 


42 






42 




35.1 to 37,5 hrs. per wk. 


20 






5 


15 


37.6 to 40.0 hrs. pur wk. 


200 


4 




179 


17 


40.1 to 45.0 hrs. -per wk. 


23 


1 


1 


21 




45.1 to 48.0 hrs. per wk. 


11 






11 




48.1 to 56.0 hrs. per wk. 


2 


2 








56.1 and over hrs. per wk. 


4 


2 


1 


1 








Week ending 


nearest 


December 15, 1934 




Total number employees 


327 


5 4 


2 


285 


31 


Under 20.0 hrs, per wk. 


16 






16 




20,0 to 30.0 hrs. per wk. 


11 






11 




30..1 to 35,° hrs. per wk. 


19 






18 


1 


35.1 to 37,5 hrs, per wk. 


16 




. 


3 


13 


37.6 to 40.0 hrs, per wk. 


178 


3 


. 


158 


17 


40.1 to 45.0 hrs. per wk. 


22 


1 




21 




45.1 to 48.0 hrs. per wk. 


58 


1 


1 


56 




48.1 to 56,0 hrs. -per wk. 


6 


4 


1 


1 




56.1 and over hours per wk 


. 1 






1 








Week ending 


nearest 


January 15, 1935 




Total number employees 


345 


5 4 


2 


301 


33 


Under 20,0 hrs, per wk. 


17 






17 




20.1 to 30,0 hrs. per wk. 












30.1 to 35.0 hrs. per wk. 


19 






19 




35.1 to 37.5 hrs, "oer wk. 


18 






2 


16 


37.6 to 40.0 hrs, per wk. 


230 


4 




219 


7 


40.1 to 45,0 hrs, -per wk. 


34 




1 


24 


9 


45.1 to 43.0 hrs. per wk. 


17 






17 




48.1 to 56.0 hrs. per wk. 


6 


3 


1 


2 




56.1 and over hours per wk 


. 4 


2 




1 


1 



Source: Code Authority for the Sanitary Milk Bottle Closure Industry. 



9 01 8 



SANITARY MILK BOTTLE CLOSURE INDUSTRY TABLE 242(c) 
Employees Classified by Occupations and by Hours 7/orked per 7eek 
for "'leeks E nding Nearest 15th of Ilonth February 15^ 1935 - April, 1955 , 

TO BS USED T;iTH CAUTION Chauffeurs Other 

Truck- Engineers laborers 
drivers, Firemen, Mechanical Office 
Hours worked per week Total "Vatchmen etc. etc. helpers 



VJ eek ending nearest February 15, 1955 



Total number employees 
Under 20.0 hours per wk 
20.1 to 30.0 hours per wk 
35.0 hours per wk 
37.5 hours per 
40.0 hours per 
45.0 hours per 
48.0 hours per 
56,0 hours per 



30.1 
35.1 
37.6 
40,1 
45.1 
48.1 
56.1 



wk 

wk 

wk 

wk, 

wk. 



and over hours per wk 



Total number employees 
Under 20.0 hours per wk 



20.1 
30.1 
35.1 
57.6 
40.1 
45.1 
48.1 



30.0 
35.0 
37.5 
40.0 
45.0 
48.0 
56.0 



hours 
hours 



per 
per 



hours 
hours 
hours per 
hours per 



per 
per 



wk 

wk 

wk 
wk 
wk 
wk 



56.1 and over hours per wk 

Total number employees 
Under 20.0 hours per wk 
20.1 - 30.0 hours per wk 
30.1 - 55.0 hours per wk 
35.1 - 37.5 hours per wk 
37.6 - 40. C hours per wk 
40.1 - 45.0 hours per wk 
45.1 - 48.0 hours per wk 
48.1 - 56.0 hours per wk 
56.1 and over hours per wk 



360 

27 

8 

13 

2C 

229 

11 

43 

3 

6 

343 
17 
l" 1 
24 
26 

218 

22 

21 

6 

3 

358 

12 

17 

9 

16 

214 
31 
35 
14 
10 



1 
2 
2 



1 
2 
2 



1 
4 



4 2 310 39 

27 

8 

13 

4 16 

4 209 16 

1 10 

36 6 

1 
12 1 

V feek ending nearest March 15, _ 1935 

4 2 295 42" 

17 

10 1 

24 

10 16 

3 196 19 

1 1 14 6 

20 
1 3 
1 
T Je ek ending nearest April 15, 1955 



306 

11 

14 

9 

3 

193 

25 

34 



41 
1 
3 

13 
17 



SOURCE: Code Authority for the Sanitary Milk Bottle Closure Industry 



9S1S 



37*° ■ teake zhy : \ to be used tcith caution 

SANITARY MlfJi BOTTLE CLOSURE INDUSTRY 
FACTCEY 3.5PLOYE3S CLASSIFIED BY IICTJR1Y T 'AGE RATES 
FOE 'EELS ENDING NEAREST 15th of MONTH - AUGUST, 1934 
September, 15, 1S54, October 15, 1234, November 15, 1934 
December 15, 1934 and January 15, 1935 



Rates paid to employees 



Ueek ending nearest 
August 15, 1934 
Total Regular 

Male Female 



Total number of employees 
35.00 66 32.20 per hour 
40.00 to 44.90 per hour 
45.00 to 49.9c 1 per hour 
50. 00 to 59.9?; per hour 
60.00 and over per hour 



322 



224 



145 


115 


19 


14 


31 


27 


68 


68 



£8 

59 

30 

5 

4 





T .7eek 


ending nearest 




September 15, 1934 


Total 




Regular 


i 


Male 


Female . 


285 


215 


70 


39 




39 


232 


106 


26 


11 


9 


2 


38 


35 


3 


65 


65 





Total number of employees 
35. Off to 39.20 per hour 
40.00 to 44,90 per hour 
45.00 to 49.90' per hour 
50.00 to 59.90 per hour 
60.00 and over per hour 



, r eek ending nearest 
NCffibober 15, 1934 



29S 



127 
32 
36 
64 



108 
18 
33 
64 



38 

19 



225 


229 


31 




134 


110 


21 


15 


32 


34 


70 


70 



Week ending nearest 
Bovember 15, 1934 



66 

31 

24 

6 

5 



• 



"eel: ending nearest 
December 15, 1934 



eek ending nearest 
January 15, 1255 



Total number of employees 
35.00 to 32.90 per hour 
40.00 to 44.20 ner hour 
45.00 to 42.20 per hour 
50.00 to 59.20 per hour 
60.00 and over per hour 



226 


222 


67 


312 


233 


72 


31 




51 


42 




- 42 


135 


102 


24 


148 


115 


35 


26 


17 


2 


13 


17 


1 


36 


53 


3 


53 


35 


3 


70 


70 




66 


66 





f 



Source: Code Authority for the Sanitary Milk Bottle Closure Industry 



9818 



371 



TO 3E USED WITH CAUTION 



TABL3 2U3 (Cont'd) 
'eeks ending nearest February 15, March 15, and A. ril 15, 1S35 



" T eek ending nearest 
February IS, 1935 
■Rate paid to employees Regular 

Total Hale Female 



Total number of employees 321 241 

35.00 to 39.9^ per hour 37 

40.0?: to 44.90 per hour 149 117 

45. 00 to 49.9^ per hour 27 19 

50.00 to 59.90 per hour 42 39 

60.00 and over per hour 6G 66 



80- 

37 

32 

8 

3 





"/eel: endin 


g nearest 




I "arch 


15, 


1935 




i 


Regular 


•otal 


Hale 




Female 


306 


241- 




65 


28 






28 


145 


117- 




28 


22 


16 




6 


41 


38 




3 


70 


70 







"7eek ending nearest 
April 15, 1935 



1 Total number of employees 317 ■' 249 
35.00 to 39.90 per hour 
40.00 to 44.90 per hour 
45.00 to 49.90 per hour 
50.00 to 59.90 per hour 
60.00 and over per hour 



25 




146 


120 


33 


19 


44 


41 


6C 


69 



25 

26 

14 

3 






Source: Code Authority for the Sanitary.; ilk iottle closure Industry 



931S 



372 'ZAj-ibb ^44 
SANITARY ilILK BOTTLE CLOSURE IilDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED 3Y TEEKLY 7AGE HATES 
FOR TSEKS ENDING NEAREST 15th OF MONTH AUGUST, 1934- April, 1935 

number oe of?ice employees 

(to be used with caution) 



A^S PAID 


n eek 


eek 


"eek 


"< ek 


TTeek 


TO 


1T ea.rest 


Nearest 


Nearest 


Nearest 


Nearest 


fPLOYEES 


J-15-34 


9-15-34 


10-15-34 


11-15-34 


12-15-34 



otal nunber of en-olovees 
16.00 to $17.99 per -eek 

18.00 to 19.93 " " 

20.00 to £29.99 " '• 

30.00 fend over tier week 



33 


31 


32 


32 


31 


.-1 


2 


O 


3 


2 


3 


o 


C/ 


3 


4 


20 


16 


15 


15 


14 


9 


11 


11 


11 


11 



Total mzmoer of erroloyees 
$16.00 to $17.99 per week 
18.00 to $19,99 " " 
20.00 to $29.99 » " 
30.00 fend ov^r " » 



r 'eek 




Wee 


ik 




"eek 


Teek 


Neare 


St 


Nearest 


Nearest 


Nearest 


1-15- 


35 


2-15- 


•35 


3- 


•15-35 


4-15-35 


33 




39 






42 


41 


2 




2 






2 


2 


7 




7 






? 


6 


14 




14 






14 


14 


10 




16 






19 


19 



SOURCE: Code Authority for the Sanitary Milk Bottle Closure Industry 



9S1S 



373 



I 



» 



s 

O 
3 





>j 


■ — i 




Ph 


HI 




EH 






CO 


CO 




t> 


r-n 




n 


1 




«^H 






1-1 


sj 







f 'J 
en 




EH 


H fn 




r-n 


ci on 


.=1- 


I 


^^ 


CVJ 


S • 


M 




o 


>h LT\ 


W 


o 


PI i-l 


3 




O 


5 

EH 


to 

r>3 


EH W 

«jj B 




W 


F-l P=) 




Ej 


o o 




2i 






s 


CO M 

o ^3 




g 


M 




si 


rH 




Ph 


HH 


• 




n 

P3 




Ph 






Lh 


R 
n 

r-n 

n 

CO 

to 

HH 

o 









•P 


r-\ 






a 


O 




t-j 




CD 


-P 




rH 





O 


O 


to 


3 


> 




EH 


H 


<-* 


•rl 


f-i 




<D 


£ 


+3 


CD 


<H 


3 




Ph 


O 


rH 










cd 


-P 


rH 






Ph 


Pi 


cd 
-P 






V 


o 


O 






M 




EH 






c 


in 1 








t2 


(D 
Ph 


o 






rH 










Cd 




u 






+3 




<D 






o 




,£> 






EH 




s 







-P i-H 

cd cd -p 

H cb o o 

P >. EH 

r; -h fh 

O (h o 



.0) -P 

o o 

EH 



CD t.H 

Ph O 



<d 





1 




£ 


cd 




P5 




(U 


-p 




| 


a> 


a 


o 




>> 




EH 




I 


•H 


fn 






■P 


Ph 


o 




-p 


H 








£ 


rj 








o 


-p 








o 


o 






Q) 




EH 






H 


h 








ri 


CD 


"+H 








Oh 


O 
rH 

CD 

rO 

a 







h-CO rl mi — r-*nVD tO On O 

ni^\W en o~\ to ^d ^j- r~- o 

rH N H/miflH^KJOLhC 

rH r— en on o 



r— iH l^\J- WU3 (<-,0J H H 

n o to r- o w to w i^ w 



rlHHH 



r-M.cn en rH inj- 

V£> rH 



laho en r*n.-t r— en to uj 

rH rH C\J rH mVD en CM LO,.zf 
;V£> rH 



r^nLtnto. rH .j- ^t-cvjcno: i 
cm to j- m LmvjD, w t^o. ! 

• • •,•,•*«.••• • 
cm "r^iv.o en r-t en j- en o 

rrl H «J CTi O 



mwt^t^i^o to r- rH 



C\J rH CM 'CM CM 



oO LC^^j- 



rH to irv^t HO tM C\J lA I 

rA rH r-i rH jt CM 1— i I 



r>- r— J- to vp r- to rH h o 

H cm mvo o. i*n r-n oj o 

rH t^- to en o 



r- o r— .=]- to rH H' m o ,en 
vx3 i.cn h to vo o. r— m ai ud 

rH t^H; cm on on .r-- 



^t m r— an cm ,-j- unr— ic\^d 
cm cm r— lo ten^t 



O 
O 



O 
O 



cm 
en 
o 



o 
o 



o 
o 



en 



o 
o 



o 
o 



to 
en 

LTv 







(H 


rH 




'd ^^ 


(D 


CO 


w 


cp 


tiinoiTiOiriQino 


-P 


rt 


M Cu 


C win m^j- J- un un»x) 


O 


?l 


fn tr 


3 


EH 


o 





. i 1 1 1 : t 1 I vo 




w 


'.-'t rH 


rH 






' (D 


OririrlHriHHH rH 






Ph 


• •••••••Q) 





o o Lao mo l^o lo . 
cm cm cm i-n r<n,-H- j- lt\ un o 






CO 




rj 


•rl 




O 


rH 




•H 


O 




02 


to 




•H 


to 




r> 


O 




•rH 


M 




n 






„ 


| 




c 













•H 


f»j 




4^ 


,0 




CC 






U 


-d 




-P 


CD' 




CfJ 


in" I 




•H 


Ctf 




S 


ft 




•H 


<D 




s 


rH 




-B 


Pk . 




<« 






r;5 


>, 




Pi 


U 




s 


4J 




> 


to 1 







3 







-S' 




CD 


s 




Ph 


H 




•-{ 


u 




d 


CD 




r< 


4^ 




O 


rH 




•H 


CD 




H-> 


> 




ri 


fl 






O 
O 




# i 


to 






73 




■H 


•H 




-P 


rH 




rH 


(D 




O 


-P 




Ph 


ce 




CD 


( -, 




U 


-p 




in 


a 




S 


a> 




G 


rH 




•H 


cd 




HH 


P. 

to ■ 




^O 


£< 




rH 


rH 




M 


EH 




CO 






r< 


CD 




rH 


rH 




P> 


EH 




-P 






(D 






f-l 


M 




CD 


s • 




rH 


•rl 




•rl 


fl 




cd 


fi 




ti 


ro 




<-J 


rH 


• 


O 


Pi 


^t" 


•H 




m 


+= 


>d 


en 


03 


S3 


r-\ 


(D 


cd 




3 




«• 


a 1 


rC 


O 




O 


rH 


• 


!H 




i 


CD 


^ 




CD 


O 


pi 


to 


rH 




a) 


cd 




Ph 


s 


• • 






PI 






O 






g 






O 






to 







s 

on 





fe! 


l-H 




W 






EH 


CO 




CO 

1 


1 




1— 1 


n 




rt 






Fh 


H t^v 




EH 


cb r-o 




g 


oj CTv 


MD 




t= H 


J" 


p» 




<M 


£=3 


>H . 




O 


Ph LO 


| 


O 


O rH 
EH 


3 

EH 


CO 

3 


l3g 




l-H 


r "-a 




1 


O Fh 




EH 


o 




Si 


CO 




EH 


n \A 




s 


^ "3 




1 


9 




H 




Ph 






CO 


M 




3 

n 


ri 
& 




EH 


Q 



37^ 



n 

Ph 
n 

CO 

co 
o 







•P 


rH 




I, 





CO 




Co 


0) 


-P 




1 £ 


o 


o 


03 




EH 


U 


fc! • H 


u 




O 


£^ 


CD 


«H 


rjj 


Ph 


O 


rl 








rt 


•P rH 






H 


ri a 

CD -P 






01 


o o 






W 


EH 






TO 


U 






C^ 


CD «H 
Ph O 






H 








ra 


P 






+3 


CD 






O 


r^ 






EH 


J 
H 



















-P 


H 




1 




c 


d 




ni 




0) 


4-> 




^ 


0) 
> 


o 


o 

EH 






•H 


u 






c§ 


•P 


CD 

Ph 


eh 
o 




•p 


ri 








ri 


d 






ID 
H 


CD 
O 


•p 
o 






Cj 




EH 






r- 


r-i 








o 


CD 


<H 






P=) 


Ph 


o 

0) 







-P rH 

ri a 

CD -P 

CD O O 

> C-i 

•H H' 

+5 fl) 'H 

Ph O 



ri rf 

CD -P 

O O 

EH 

u 

CD' «H 
Ph O 



H 

CD 

I 






co 




<r. 


r;j 


C 


-p 


•H 


!-: 


c 


CO 


M 


( 1 


n ; 


s - 


W 





r-r-NlTiK>CiJ W [-— LT\ CTi Lf>VD O 

r^J- L(AW rl I-- r— H.- CM O CTv O O 

• ••««••••••«? 

H H- N O it 'O to LOv r^iUD rH IT\ O 
H W J Lf>V£> VD l~— to CO CTv CT O 

H 



t~- O O GO to CTvVO CTv to ^t KD H J- 

(^H rl W C\l ITiOU) I — to to rH CT 

• •••••••••*■• 

rH 'fr\ KN f*VK-\VO "CO <D r— CM LT\ t^\^t 
rH rH rH rH 



lo 1*-", k> m ir> cm to ninn J- J- J- 
h J- h-J-J- r— to r— to r^vn ro lt 

r-i r-i r-i r-i 



jmwvDuxnooooooo 

to ir\ Hr r— h n woj- 4 wwo 

• •••••••••••• 

C\J 'H LO tO "LTv f— 'to 'CTi CTv cTv CTv CT o 

i*mt>i — ctictv<Ti<tv<tvctctctvO 

rH 



H-mmtoo t^Hoo 
to r— to ojhtvt) o cm ht 
• «••■•••■• 
cm "to rx-Yr^vo cm rH 

CM CM CM r-i 



^t" C\J K) IT\H KMAH OJ 
rH Hf rH rH CO rH 
r-i rH rH 



1 ° 

1 J" 



I CM 



1 ° 

I CM 



-Hj- CM Hr _=T M CT\ r^ rH CTvVX) jrf O 
r^MfMTNCM rH CPvO CTiO J- rH O 

• H^ CTN Q ' O ' P^VD CTMI^ LOi rH O 

cm r^\^H- ltnvjd r— to a^i o 



r— h- to cm o r— to ^r to to t— to vx> 

HHriOr-WWOWH r^,V-D to 

• ' ht' ino o~< r^ c\i rnin O lo to 

H HrlH rH 



LCAO^H- CTir^CM r-^H CMHr 
CM r^iMD LO CO r— t0 nU) rO 



q 



C^^o^C^^a^cr^cT^cr^o^a^cr.o^ P 
rH O^^t CT\ J" CTi H- o> Hr CTiCTiCn E 

rH cm cm r^\ 1^,3- -d- ir\ lovxi r— 

a> t I I I I I I ! I I t ° 

'fiirioinoinginoirjooo 

£> rH CM CM KA r^^- H/ LT\ LP>vX) C— to 



O 
O 



O 
O 



CM 
CPv 
O 



o 
o 

* 

o 

o 

rH 



JH- 



O 

o 



o 
o 



to 

CTv 
LOi 



■a 
-p 

o 

EH 



en O 

O rH 

a ^ 

O O 

•H fn 



O w 



•» 


rl 


c 


O 





CO 


•H 


w 


-P 





CD 


M 


H 




■P 


% 


■ri 


*"' 


ill 




■H 


>a 


a 


^3 


T5 




<Jj -C 




CD 


>S 


fn 


Fh 


nJ 


CD 


Pi 


> 


CD 


O 


fn 


CJ 


Pi 


CD 




Ph 


n 




fn 


■H 


CD 


cd 


HJ 


C 


?H 





CD 


•H 


> 


•P 


P! 


c! 


O 


S 


O 




DJ 


• 


rH 


M 


CO 


S 


•rH 


•rH 


U 


-P 


a 


u 


-p 





cC 


ft 


^^ 


CD 




H 


-p 




ri 


Ul 


CD 


E 


h 


U 


efl 


•ri 


Pi 


<H 


U3 


U3 


f5 


rH 


rH 




Eh 


co 




rj 


CD 


H 


.ri 


H 


EH 


-P 




CD 




rl 


• 




M 


CD 


ri 


H 


■H 


•H 


ri 


c6 


ri 


C 


cd 


3 


rH 





Ph 


■ri 




+» 


tH 


CO 


ri 


CD 

cr 


nJ 


Si 







• 


fi 


<c! 


CO • 


• 


CD ^t 


p-i 


to r^, 


• 


CU 0"\ 


I** 


IH 1 1 


__ 




W 




O 




fi 









to 





o 

CTv 



375 



TO BE USED "TITJI CAUTION 



TABLE 247 

LOOSE LEAF AND BLANK BOOK LIMUFACT'URING INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED .ffiSKLY HOURS OF FACTORY EriPLOYEES FOR BEPRESENTATIV] 
iCEEK IN I AY AND OCTOBER 1933 . 







i-iALE 


WORKERS 








Hours 


Number 


Per 


Cent of 


Cumulative Per- 


t/onced 


/eek 


Week. 




total 


cent 


of total ■ 


Per ''eek 


•10/15/3 J 


5/15/33 


10/15/33-3/15/33 


10/15- 


5/15/33 • 


Under 20 


22 


II3. 


1.91 


12.80 


1.91 


12. 8* ' • - 


20 - 29.9 


*3 


104. 


3.72 


is. 5 7 


5.63 


31.37 • 


30 - 3^-9 


32 


146 


2.77 


16.53 


8.40 


47.90 


35 - 39.9 


77 


125. 


0.67 


14.16 


15.07 


62.06 


40 - 44.9 


950 


124. 


82.25 


14.04 


97.32 


76.10 ■ 


45 - I+9.9 


12 


1J2 


1.04 


21.75 


98.36 


97.85 


50 - 59-9 


14 


12 


1.21 


I.36 


99-57 


99.21 


60 or more 


5 


7 


M 


• 79 


100.00 


100.00 


Total 


115) • 


8S5 

FE. :aLE 


100.00 
.jORXSRS 


100.00 









• 








Under 20 


18 


88 . 


2.50 


18. 92 


2.50 


18. 92 ' 


20 - 29.9 


43 


88 


5.97 


18. 92 


8.47 


37-84 


30 - 34.9 


46 


101 . 


6.39 


21.72 


14.86 


59.56 


35 - 39-9 


42 


82 ■ 


5. S3 


17.64 


20.69 


77.20 • 


40 - 44.9 


570 


67 


79.17 


14.41 


99-86 


91.61 ' 


45 - 29.9 


1 


39 


.14 


8.39 


100.00 


100.00 • 


50 - 59.9 


- 


- 


- 


. - 






60 or more 


- 


- 


- 


- 






Total 


720 


465 


100.00 


100.00 






_ 






TOTAL 


ORKE. S 


• ■ 






Tnder 20 


40 


201 


2.13 


I4 : .9i 


2.13 


14.91 




20 - 29;. 9 


'86 


252 " 


4.59 


18. 69 


6.72 


33.60 




30 - 34.9 


78 


247 ' 


4.1b 


13.32 


10.88 


51.92 




35 - 2.3.9 


119 


207 


6.35 


15.36 


17.23 


67.28 


- 


ho - U4.9 


1520 


191 ' 


81. 06 


14.17 


98.29 


81. 45 




45 - ^.9.9 


13 


231 • 


.69 


17.14 


98.98 


98-59 




50 - 5.9.9 


14 


12 


• 75 


.89 


9'j. 73 


99-46 




60 or more 


5 


7 


.27 


.52 


10.:. 00 


100.00. 




Total 


1875 


131+8 


100.00 


100.00 









Source: Survey of 7 firms in the Industry, reporting to the BRA. National 
Recovery Adminis tratxon, Division of research and Planning. The 
Loose Leaf and Blank 3ook ; an.uf.a-cturing Industry, prepared by Bax 
Bossoris, January 4, 193^- ., 



9818 



^76 

. TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 
TAB1.E 248 

LOOSE LEAF A T D 3LA K BOOK . iANUFACTURIlTG IuDUST--Y 

CLASSIFIED HO'jHLY EATINGS OE FACTORY EMPLOYEES FOK . EPRESENTATIVE 

<zii: ii: :;ay ayd Octob er, .1935. __.._ 

Homely 

Earnings Number Per Cent of Cumulative per 

(cents) ,/eek ieek total cent of total 

iO/15/33 5/15/33 October Hay October May 

10-19.9 - - - 

20-24.9 - 5 .56 .56 

25-29.9 3 ■■:.'■ 24. .26 2.72 .26 3.22 

30-3U.9 3 39 .26 4.42 .52 7.70 

J5-39.9 93 57 7.96 6.46 .. 8. US 14. 16 

1+0-44.9 - 134 - 127 11.47 14.38 19.95 28.34 

45-49.9 ' 131 ■ 85 11.22 9.63 31.17 38.17 

50-59.9 236 215 20.20 24.35 51.37 62.52 

6o-,9.9 397 • 269 33-99 30.46 85.36 92.98 

80-99. 9 144 53 12.33 6.00 97.69 98.98 

100 or over 27 ■ .9 2.31 1.02 100,00 100.00 

Total ll6S S_03 10 .00 100.00 

FEMALE •ftOH KEF.S 

10-19.9 - - - 

20-24.9 14 - 3.01 - 3.01 

25-29.9 - 145 - 31. 18 - 34.19 

30-3^.9 170 137 22.82 29.46 22.82 63.65 

35-39.9 ' 369 88 4s. 53 IS. 92 72.35 82.57 

40-44.9 1C2 . 53 13.69 11.40 86.04 93.97 

45-4). 9 63 . 20 S.46 4.30 94..50 98.27 

50-59.9 • 37 • 7 M7 1.51 99-^7 99.78 

60-73.9 '31 .40 .22 9...S7 . 100.00 

80-99. 9 1 .13 - 10. ..00 

100 or over - - . - 

Total 745 ' 465 100.00 100.ro 

ALi> v/OHIIEP.S 

10-19.9 , - - 

20-24.9 - 19 - 1.41 - 1-.41 

25-29.9 3 ' 169 .16 12.54 .16 13.95 

30-34.9 173 ' 176 9.23 13.06 9.39 27.01 

35-39.9 422 145 22.51 10.76 31.90 37.77 

40-44.9 236 180 12.59 13.35 W.49 51.12 

■45-49.9 196 105 10.45 7.79 54.9^ 58.91 

■50t59.9 273 222 14.56 16.47 69.50 75.38 

60-79.9 ^00 270 21.33 20.03 90.83 95.41 

80-9J.9 145 -53 7.73 3.93 98.56 9j.}h 

100 or over 27 9 1.44 .do 100.00 100.00 
Total 1875 1348 100.00 100.00 



Source: Survey of 7 firms in the Industry, reporting to the NRA. National 
Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Planning. The 
Loose Leaf and Blank Book Manufacturing Industry, prepared by Max 
Kossoria, "anuary 4, 1934.' 



9818 



o -P 
^.eh" 



u 

0) 
r=> 



H 



R 



EH 
| 

^ I 

C7> I 



a 



00 

ft 
O 

CO 



s 



o 



n 

H 

HH 

ft 

n 

CO 
CO 

o 



3 0) 

E > rH 

g .h eo 

O +S +3 

CO O 

■VcP-rH EH 



<H cO 

o -p 

o 

5&.EH 



CD 



I 

d CD 

E !> rH 

3 -h co 

G -P -P 

cO o 

V-H EH 



<H CO 
O -P 

o 

\^EH 



CD 

r9 



377 



cm o 



HOMWO 



k\o r-eoj- o to w 

r-l HHOI rH 



aih-HOHOin 

CT\t0 OJ OJ O O K> i 



r— 
to 

CM 



♦ •«••» *• 

to ri r~WH ct\ cno 

r-H-rfXi tO 0-\CT» OlO 



lAriOr-OHO^D 
• •••••• • 

to ro >vO o i"<"> co o 

rH CM OJ OJ 






3 

s 



OJ LO O^ KA LT\ O 
O^rH OJ O H-d" 

ririH 



o ro 



I? 



O OJ rH 1— CTi LOiJ- O 
t • • • • • • 

NH WJ- MM O 
w-\ CMJ" UD r~-0 



O OJ CP\V.O OJ VO mvQ 
• •••••• 

i — p^i : — u) r*~\o~s i-i 

HH O] OJ 



O OJ CM I — VO O \.C\^T 

T— CT\ rH CO U3 n H 
H .=) KMO OJ LT> 



LTv 



OJ 



9S16 



CO 

-p 

Pi 

CD 
O 

O 
OJ 

u 

CD 

£ 



to 

OJ 

a 

a 
d 
-p 

m 

W 

CD 






OJ 
r<-\ d 
cd 



CO 
CO 

co 



•d -d 
3 d -d 

a! cd d 
cO 
LTMOi 



O 

m 

d 
aj 
rd 
-p 

CO 

to 

a 

rH 



CD 

> 

o 

•d 
d 

cO 



to OJ I— rH VO 
OJ f~\ r^A^t ^t 



cO 
o o 

LO EH 



OO oj (T\M mt^ro 

• ••••• 

i-H VO m LO CM tO 
rH t~{ r-i J" 



o O c^ to r-i r— r— M3 

J-VD f^H CO H 
<D OJ U3 J- a> 



oowm 



o mo 



LfM — CO 0"N O 
r-i 



OO WriLTi CT\V£> LT\ 

i — r— : — vd J- ^£> 

J- rH rH 



1^ 

cr 

rH 



^ 



.=f OJ rH r-l ka3- 

nn h 



OOO LT\ C^ CM O O 

o i^^no 

HHOJJ- O 
rH 



ooo lt\ j- t-rv, en cr> 

• • • • • 

O r^N LTA nU) 
r-\ H H in 



OOO ITNOJOJVOOJ 

J-HOinN 

rc\H mj- to 

rH 



LO 



to 

CM 



co si 

HJ +2 



LP\ r~- rH 



K 
CD 

o 
o 

CM 

^H 

CD 
-d 

a 



CO 
CO 
CD 
rH 

rd 

5 
n3 

o 

OJ 



a 
a 

Xi 
-p 

CO 
CO 
CD 



V£) O 



-d -d 
H Pi 



cd 



cd rd 

pi 



LT\ LT\ CD 



to OJ r— iH U3 o 

oj r^K-v^H- ^t lt> 



to 
en 



to 

U3 



to 

CM 



rH 

HJ 

o 

EH 



CD 

^1 

-p 

o 

•d 
P! 
CD 

CD 

+5 



CD 

rd. 

-p 

«)H 

o 

CD 

o 

rH 

CD 

Ph cti 

LP\ ft 

to d 



o 



o 

rH 

So 



-p 

C CD 
■H P! 



13 



CD 

co ,d 

O -P 



P! O 
O -P 



CO CO 



H CO 

> CD 

o u 

U JhjO 

ft o 

fn 

co fi. 



CD rH 

-d rH 

O -H 

o fc 

CD CO 

^h CD 

•P CD 

^ o 

CD r-i 

'd ft 

fl E 

3 « 

EuO CD 

P! co 

•H CD 

E rC 

O E-i 

o 
co 

CD HH. 

CD O 
>s.H 

O U 

r-i CD 

Pi P-i 

CD ^!J 

d 



CD 


•rl 


CO 


d 


o 


•H 


rd 


cO 


■p 


M 




4J 


H^> 




d 


CO 


CD 


r^ 


CO 


CD 


CD 


CD 


rH 


& 


ft 




CD VD 


U 





cO tJ 

CO o 

CD fn -H 

rH O f-l 

d '-H CD 
ft 



tcO 
■H CD 





CO 
CD 

rd 
EH 

151 



CO 

cO X 

■| CD 
CD 

I & 



rH 

-p 

CO 
rg 

d 



o 

•rl 

CO 



CD 
CO 

o 
o 

CO 

CD 

rd 

EH 



d 

•H 

d 
d 
cO 

rH 

ft 

-d 

d 

cO 

rd 

o 

rH 

d 

CD 
CO 
CD 
PJ 

<H 

o 

d r^i 
o r^ 
•h CT> 

CO rH 
•H 

> - 

•H O 
R rH 



S CD 

O ,a 

•H O 

+3 +> 

Cj O 

fH O 
-P 

CO A 

•H CO 
•H 

rH 
r§ 8 

I CO 

o 
>= M 

rH 

CD « 
> CO 

8 s 

CD >s 
Ph rQ 

H rd 

CO CD 

d rH 

O CO 

•rH ft 

-P CD 

CO rl 

S ft 



CD 
O 

rH 

CO 



-378- 



Code 
Unmber 



Approved. Codes 



Employees 
(Thousands) 



Effective 
Date 



7. RTrBTVFTR (4 Codes) 



Total 



**156. 

174. 

**342. 



Ratter Manufacturing Industry 
Rubber Tire 
Sanitary Specialties 



377. Reclaimed Rubber 



154.8 



74.0 


12-25-33 


75.0 


12-25-33 


3.5 


3-26-34 


2.3 


4-16-34 



Note: 



** - Tt;o PRA Substitutions for Indus try 



" 



9818 



-379- 



?! V . 



TABLE 250 
RECLAIMED RUBBER MANUF40 TURING INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF WAGE EARNERS. 
August 1933 



Hours per 
weak 



Under 20 hours 
20 and under 30 
30 and under 35 
35 and under 40 
40 and under 45 
45 and under 50 
Over 50 hours 

Total 



Number 



38 

57 
104 
396 
£57 

33 
' 1& 

1 , 205 



Per 


cent 


3. 


2 


4. 


7 


8. 


6 


33. 





46. 


2 


2. 


8 


1. 


5 



Cumulative 


per cent 


3. 


2 


7, 


9 


16. 


5 


49. 


5 


95. 


7 


98. 


5 


100. 






100.0 



Source: NBA questionnaire returns, reported by 6 (out of a possible 11) 

■ concerns <"hich in 1931 employed. 52;u of the total number of workers. 
.' National Recovery Administration Division of* Research and Planning. 
The Reclaimed Rubber Manuf acturing Industry, prepared by C. A. 
Pearce, February 26, 1934. 



9818 



-380- 



TABLE 251 

RECLAIMED RUBBER MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 

Classified Hourly Earnings of Image Earners, 
August, 1933 



Hourly earnings 



Number 



Total 



1,205 



Percentage 



Less than 35 cents 







_ 


35 cents and under 


40 


4 


.3 


40 cents and under 


45 


417 


34.6 


45 cents and under 


50 


190 


15.8 


50 cents and under 


55 


261 


23,3 


55 cents and under 


60 


110 


9.1 


60 cents and under 


20 


143 


11.9 


70 cents and under 


60 


45 


3.7 


80 cents and over 




15 


1.3 



100.0 



Cumulative 
Fer Cent 



.3 
34.9 
50.7 
74.0 
63,1 
95,0 
98.7 
100,0 



* 



Source: NRA questionnaire returns, . reported bv 6 (out of a possible 11) 
concerns vhich in 1931 employed 52$ of the total workers. 
National Recovery Administration Division of Research and 
Planning, The Reclaimed Ruboer Manufacturing Industry, 
prepared by C. A, Pearce, February 26, 1934, 



' 



9818 



-381. 



Code 
Number Approved Codes 



8 . EQUIPMENT AND MACHINERY MANUF A CTURING 

(92 Codes) Total 

2. Ship Building and Ship Repairing 

x 4. Electrical Manufacturing (3 supplements) 

17. Automobile (l supolement) 

18. Cast Iron Soil Pipe 
x 25. p'il Burner 
x 26. G-asoline Fump 

32. Knitting, Braiding and Wire Covering Machine 

34. Laundry and Dry Cleaning Machinery 

35. . Textile Machinery 
38. Boiler Manufacturing 

x 39. Farm Equipment 

x 40. Electrical Storage and Wet Frimary Battery 

50. Automatic Sprinkler 

55. "Compressed Air (Estimate) 

x 56. Heat Exchange (Estimate 1930-33) 

57. Pump Manufacturing (July, 1934) 
x 62. Steel Tubular and Firebox Boiler 

58. Road Machinery 
x 70. fi-as Coffik Industry 
x 72. Packaging Machinery Industry (2 supplements) 

xx 75. Canning and Packing Machinery 

65. Rock Crusher 

85. American Petroleum Equipment " 

98. Fire Extinguishing .appliance 

x 102. Shovel, Dragline and Crane 

103. Machine Tool and Forging Machinery 

x 105. Automotive Parts and Equipment (10 supplemen 

106. Printers' Rollers (1931) 

108. Motor Fire Apparatus 

x 114. Scientific Apparatus 

117-e- G-ear Manufacturing 

122. Special Tool, Die and Machine Shop 

131. Pipe Nipple (Estimate 1929-33) 

x 134. G-as Appliance and Apparatus 

137. Warm Air Furnace 

x 138. Anti-Friction Bearing 

144. Paper Making Machine Builders 

153. Valve and Fittings (1930) 

x 154. Metal Tank • 

158. Stone Finishing Machinery 

x 181. Commercial Refrigerator 

192. Cast Iron Pressure Pipe 

198. Railway Safety Appliance 

204. Plumbing Fixtures 

222. Card Clothing 

233. Railway Brass Car, etc. 

x 236. Cooking and Keating Appliance 

238. Fan and Blower 

242. Marine Auxiliary Machinery 

250. Wire, Rod and Tube Die 

9818 



Employees 


Effective 


(thousands ) 


Date 


1,683.7 




55.0 


8-5-33 


329.0 


8-15-33 


447.0 


9-5-33 


6.3 


9-11-33 


37.5 


9-23-33 


3.9 


9-18-33 


5.8 


10-13-33 


3.9 


10-14-33 


27.0 


10-16-33 


16.0 


10-16-33 


41.7 


10-23-33 


11.3 


10-16-33 


3.0 


10-19-33 


6.0 


10-22-33 


5.5 


10-22-33 


6.0 


10-22-53 


3.3 


11-6-33 


2.1 


11-20-33 


.4 


11-10-33 


3.8 


11-11-33 


2.2 


11-11-33 


1.0 


11-1-33 


22.0 


ll-j.3-33 


.8 


11-4-33 


14.4 


. 11^20-33 


47.4 


12-8-33 


its) 79'. 


11-18-33 


.5 


11-18-33 


2.0 


11-9-33 


16.0 


11-27-33 


8.0 


11t25~33 


15.9 


11-22-33 


;) 2.5 


12-11-33 


20.3 


12-7-33 


7.9 


12-11-33 


16.8 


12-7-33 


2.6 


12-18-33 


40.0 


12-20-33 


12.8 


12-25-33 


1.1 


12^26-33 


4.0 


1-1-34 


13.5 


1-1-34 


11.4 


1-12-34 


32.9 


1-16-34 


.4 


1-28-34 


2.5 


2-12-34 


14.2 


2-12-34 


3.9 


2-12-34 


.6 


.2-9-34 


.2 


2-11-34 



-3BS- 



Ccdo ■ Employees 

Du mber Approv ed Codes (thousands) 

(S",UIKEET APD AACiilA.BY I'JtUUPACTOEIiJG - continued) 



257 Printing Equipment 

251 Cast Iron Toiler, etc, 

263 Aachine Knife and Allied Products 

264 Foundry Equipment 

271 -Jon-F.errous and Steel Convector 

272 Unit heater and/or Unit Ventilator 
279 Steam Aeating Equipment 

285 Pai±v s r ay Car Building 

292 Chilled Car Lhoel 

x 315 Industrial Safety Equipment Trade 

319 Eeyfspaper Printing Press 

x 320 Side .and Leather forking Aachine 

x 324 Textile Print Roller Engraving 

340 . ctorcyclo Manufacturing . .. 

343 Clay \ achinery 

xx 347 Machinery and Allied Products (47 supplements) 

. 347-A Steel Tire Manufacturing ■ 

Pailway and Industrial Spring 
Locomotive '. 'anuf acturing 
Small Locomotive Manufacturing 

.ire ! achinery 
, oo&working " achinery 
Beater and Jordan, etc. 

ater ' eter . anuf acturing 
Diamond Core Drill 
. echanical Lubricator 
C ont r ac t or s ' ■ ump 
Locomotive Applianoo 
" .aterpovrer Equipment 
-idling . ill I achinery and Equipment 
Pulverizing lachinery end Equipment 
Steam Engine I anufacturing 
Hook and Ore Crusher 

'eduction i. achinery 
Hoisting Engine .anufacturing 
Hoist uilders 
Ililn C color, Dryer 

Conveyor and Arterial Preparation Equipment 
Chemical Engineering Equipment 
Poller and Silent Chain 
Pov. r er Transmission 
Caster and Floor Truck . anufacturing 

echanioal Press : anufacturing 

at'er Softener and Filter 
Balcery Equipment Manufacturing 
'. ultiple 7-Delt Drive 

Invelope Machine Manufacturing 
Air Alitor 

lb- »wered Industrial True]: . anufacturing 
Sprocket Chain 



affective 

Date 



13.5 


2-17-34 


15.7 


2-10-34' 


.6 


2-16-34 


1.4 


2-17-34 


1.5 


2-19-34 


1.0 


2-19-34 


tt.O 


2-26-34 


40.0 


2-21-34 


4.4 


2-26-34 


1.5 


2-19-34 


3.2 


3-15-34 


.4 


. 3-19-34 


1.0 


3-10-34 


2.2 


3-27-34 


.9 


4-2-34 


34.0 


3-28-34 



347-B 

.347-C 

347-D 

347-E 

347-F 

347-G 

347-E 

347-1 

347-J 

347-K 

347-L 

.347-M 

347-IT 

347-0 

347-P 

•347-q 

347-P 

347-S 

347-T 

347-U 

347-V 

347-V 

347-X 

347-Y 

347-Z 

,$47-Al 

347-E1 

347-C1 

347-D1 

347-E1 

547 -PI 

347-G1 

347-H1 

347-11 

347-J 1 
'.« IT 



Oil Field Pumping Engine 
Hefrigerating ' achinery 



-383- 

Cods 

■■. her Approved Co d eft 

(EQUIP! ;-;;SI j&HD AACK1PERY ICaUFAGTTffiEiTG - continued) 

347- Kl Concrete Pixer 

347-L1 Jack Ilaaufacturing 

547-P1 Railway ..Appliance Panufacturing 

547-F1 Diesel Engine Llanuf acturing 

347-C1. Hydraulic Machinery 

347-F1 Pulp and Paper Paehinery 

347-Q1 Saw Hill Paehinery 

347-R1 Corral Paehinery * 

347-S1 Coal Pine Loading Pachine •., p 

, 347-T1 Coal Cutting Pachine ?' 

347-Ui ine Car Panu.facturing 

Subdivision*" Electric Overhead Crane 
. • • * Pair Clipper 

Industrial Furnace ,; 

Cylinder Pould and Dandy Poll 
Print Poller and Print Block 
Air Valve :■'.'■'. 

Bottling Pachitoery and .Equipment 
Railroad Special Track Equipment 
Shoe Pachine ry 

Spray Painting and Finishing Equipment 
Sewing Pachine' 

Boat Building and Peat. Repairing 
B abb in and Sp^ol 
Counter Type" loo Cream Freezer 
Pechanical Packing Industry 
Shower Door . •■.; 

-icyclo 

Trailer I .anuf acturing 
Parm Pir Register 
Cold Storage Door 
Electric hoist and Poncrai'l 
Cotton Ginning ■ achinery 
Commercial Vehicle Body 
Industrial Oil Burning Equipment ', 
Llarine Equipment <» 

Ring Traveler . , (l&35) 

Shutt lo . I manufacturing 
3BP Chlorine Control Apparatus 

Pnapprvrvcd codes 
Stoker 
Indirect "Pater Heater Panufacturing 



Empl oye e e Effective 
(thousands ) Dato 



.357 
.358 
368 
376 
.379 
.385 

x ,687 
397 

x 4C2 
406 
414 

. 413 

x 428 
435 
437 

x 471 
472 
479 
483 
485 

x 486 
493 
50D 
517 
518 

7~5 



1.1 


4-3-34 


.1 


4-2-34 


.3 


4-9-34 


.4 


4-9-34 


2.1 


4-15-34 


3 e 4 


4-6-34 


5.4 


4-16-34 


1.1 


4-29-34 


25.0 


4-30-34 


23d 


5-4-34 


2.2 


5-13-34 


1.0 


5-14-34 


1.7 


6-*i3-34 


.2 


5~29-34- 


1.6 


5-31-34 


1,1 


7-11-34 


.6 


7-9-34 


.1 


7-23-34 


1.1 


7-24-34 


2.0 


7-23-34 


7.7 


7-30-34 


.5 


,Vp_34 


.0 


9-6-34 


.1 


9-17-34 


.4 


9-17-34 


.5 


12-28-34 



BOTE : 



x - PRA substitution approved for Industry 
xx - PRA cede mere inclusive than PEA suhsdvitrirbion (difference ie 
marked ) 



0818 



-384- 
TA3LE 252 

Electrical Manufacturing Industry 
Classified Weekly Hours, Common arid Female- Labor, By Population Grroup 

Week of June 10, 1933 







Common Lac 


ior 


Female 


Workers 


Common 


and Female 






Number of 
Workers 


Per Cent 
of 


Number 


Per C e nt 


T 
X 


^b or 


Ilrurs Worked 


Number 


Per C e nt 


Per Week 






Workers 






of 
Workers 


of 
Workers 


Cities over 200 


,000 inhabitants 












- .. 3 




5,095 


43.14 ■ 


7,516 


41.85 


12,611 


42.36 


Under 25 hours 


171 


1.45 


436 


2.43 


607 


2.04 


25 to 30 




686 


5.81 


1,338 


7.73 


2,074 


6.97 


30 to 35 




390 


3.30 


841 


4.63 


1,231 


4.14 


35 to 40 




1,467 


13.42 


3,062 


17.05 


4,529 


15.21 


40 to 50 




1,721 


14.57 


1,730 


9.63 


3,451 


11.59 


50 to 60 




376 


3.18 


59 


.33 


435 


1.46 


Over 60 




234 


2.41 


•* 


— 


284 


.95 


Cities 200,000 


to 


100,000 












inhabitani 


is 2,920 


24.73 


6,341 


35,31 


9,261 


31.11 


Under 25 hours 




•212 


1.80 


55 


.31 


267 


.90 


25 to 30 




171 


1.45 


39 


.22 


210 


.70 


30 to 35 




415 


3.52 


748 


4.16 


1,163 


3.91 


35 to 40 




305 


2.58 


2,834 


15-. 73 


3,139 


10.54 


40 to 50 




1,415 


11.93 


2,612 


14.54 


4,027 


13.53 


50 to 60 




402 ■ 


3.40 


53 


2.30 


455 


1.53 


Over 60 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 



Cities under 100,000 
i nhabitants 
hours 



Unc 


Ler 


25 : 


25 


to 


30 


30 


to 


35 


35 


tc 


40 


40 


to 


50 


50 


to 


60 


Over i 


50 



_3 t 7?4_ 
278 
239 
791 
658 

1 , 239 
181 
408 



32.13 
2.36 
2.03 
6.70 
5.57 

10.49 
1.53 
3.45 



4*!Q2_ 



668 
350 
363 
1,481 
1,101 
139 



22.84 

3.72 
1.95 
2.02 
3.25 
6.13 
.77 



7.396 



946 

589 

1,154 

2,139 

2,340 

320 

408 



26.53 



3.18 
1.98 
3.83 
7.19 
7.36 
1.07 
1.37 



Total all groups 11,809 



100.00 



17,959 100.00 29,768 



100.00 



Source: National Electrical Manufacturers Association questionnaire returns, 

319 plants reporting. Submitted to the National Recovery Administration, 
Division of He search and Planning, sup dement to report of July 10, 1933 



9818 



-385- 

TABLE 253 

ELECTRICAL MAmF^C TURING INDUSTRY 

AVERAGE T tJEEKLY EOURS, HOURLY 7/AGE RATES, AND AVERAGE WEEKLY 
WAGE FOR COMMON, SKILLED AND FEMALE LAfOR. 

Three Selected Weeks, 1929-1933 







Feb. 9, 


Feb. 11, 


June 10, 


Item 




1929 


1933 


1933 


Uumber of Wage Earners 








Common, 




22,525. 


10,600 


11,925 


Skilled 




102,953 . 


51,976 


63, 450 


Female, 




33,163 


14,284 


17,814 


Total 




158,641 


76,860 


93,189 


Average Hours, per 


Week 








Common 




48.7 


33.4 


41.4 


Skilled 




48.5 


30.3 


39.6 


Female. 




44.1 


31.4 


37.2 


Total 










Average Wag© Rate 


per Hour (Cents) 


' 






Common 




48.5$* 


42.0 


40.1 


Skilled 




67. fy* 


56.7 


54.3 


Female 




39. 7 $ _ 


32.0 


30.7 


Total 




' 






Average Weekly Wage (Dollars) 








Common 




23.60 


14.00 


16.60 


Skilled 




32.90 ■.« 


17.20 


21.60 


Female 




17.50 


10.00 


11.40 


Total 











Source: Industry questionnaire returns, 319 plants reporting, 

Submitted by National Electrical Manufacturers Association 
to .the National Recovery Administration Division of Research 
and Planning, received Dec. 27, 1334. 



-386- 

TABLE 254 

AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY - ALL CITIES 

CLASSIFIED HOUKLY BASHINGS OF MALE EMPLOYEES, 
Jane, 1933 



Cents per hour 



• Number 





Cumulative 


Percent 


Percent 


,33 


.33 


.03 


.36 


.04 


.40 


.14 


■.54 


,06 


.60 


49 


T.09 


.34 


1.43 


.55 


1.98 


. 22 


2.20 


.40 •. 


•2.60 


1.06 


,3.66 


.49 


■ 4.15 


.59 


4.74. 


.77 


5.51 


.62 


6.13 


1.66 


8.01 


.85 


8.86 


1.85 


10.71 


1.20 


11.91 


1.26 


13.17 


2.37 


15.54 


1.26 


16.80 


1.90 


18.70 


2.69 


21.39 


1.50 


22.89 


4.03 


26.92 


10.49 


37.41 


lb. 58 


52.99 


18.45 


71.44. 


IS. 48 


83.92 


7.16 


91.10 


3.94 


95.04 


1.94 


96.98 


.85 


97.83 


.72 


96.55 


.45 


99.00 


.49 


99.49 


.22 


99.71 


.14 


99.85 


.$3 


99.88 


,03 


99.91 



25' or less 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

32 ■ 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 

38 

39 

40 

41 

42 

43 

44 

45 

46 

47 

48 

49 

50 

51-54 

55-59 

60-64 

65-69 

70-74 

75-79 

80-84 

85-89 

90-94 

95-99 

$1.00-1.09 
1.10-1.19 
]. '20- 1,2 9 
1.30-1.39 
1.40-1.49 



• 365 

35 

.45 

161 

60, 

546 

378: 

610. 

244 

449 

1,175 

550 

65? 

859 

666 

2,086 

944 

2,053 

1,330 

1,402 

2,629 

1,396 

2,115 

2,986 

1,664 

4,453 

11,653 

17,301 

20,506. 

13,871 

7,964 

4,376 

2,152 

950 

803 

498 

545 

249 

159 

39 

37 



^818 



-387- 



Cents per hour 



1.50-. .59 
1.60-1.69 
1.70-1.79 
1.80-1.69 

1.90-1.99 
Over c.00 

Total 







Cumul at ir e 


Number 


Percent 


Pe 


rcent 


13 


.01 




39.92 


9 


.01 




99.93 


2 






100.00 


1. 









111,0?4 



100.00^ 



Source: Statistical artr supplied by the National Automobile Chamber of 
of Commerce to the National Recovery Administration Division 
of Research and Planning, 1933. 



9818 



-388- 

TABLE 255 
FABM EQUIPMENT INDUSTRY 
Average 7eekly Hours of Office Employees, 1929, 1933, 1934 





June 


February 


June : 


Augus t 


February 


June 




1929 


1933 


1933 


1933 


1934 


1934 


Number of 














Plants 


186 


186 


186 


186 


186 


284 


Number Office 














Employees 


19,137 


11,640 


11,736 


12,391 


13, 233 


12,776 


Average Week- 














ly Hours 


44.9 


: 4\1 


• 4\8 


39.7 


39.5 


39.5 



J 



Source: Summary of returns from Questionaire submitted to industry 
members by Farm Equipment Institute, received by National 
Recovery Administration Division of Research and Planning, 
August 20, 1934. 



( 



9818 



-389- 
TABLE 256 

fari; equipment industry 

Average Weekly Hours, Hourly Earnings, Weekly Earnings of Shop 
Employees, 1929, 1933, and 1934 



itk: 


JUNE 
1929 


FEBRUARY 

1933 


JUNE 

1933 


AUGUST 
1933 


FEBRUARY 
1934 


• 

: JUNE 
1934 




Number of 
Plants. 


'217 


217 


217 


217 


217 


284 


Number of 
Employees. 


' 70,571 


21,262 


22, 273 


25, 109 


37,798 


43,464 


Average Week- 
ly Hours. 


50.02 


36.70 


38.91 


36.11 


38.22 


37.84 


Average Hour- 
ly Earnings. 


$58.29 


$49.35 


$46.64 


$50.62 


,$53.81 


$56.28 


Average Weekly 
Earnings. 


29.16^ 


1 18.110 


18.15/ 


18.28<i 


20.57f* 


21.50(* 



Source: Summary of returns from Questionnaire submitted to industry mem- 
bers by Farm Equipment Institute, received by National Recovery 
Administration, Division of Research and Planning, August 20,1934. 



9818 



-390- 



TABLE 257 



COi PRESSED AIR INDUSTRY 

AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS, HOURLY EARNINGS AND WEEKLY EARN- 
INGS FOR COL'? ION AND SKILLED EMPLOYEES 

I- 

Si:: Selected Weeks, 1929, 1333, 1934 and 1335 





Feb. 9, 


Feb. 11, 


July 22, 


Aug. 26, 


Fe"b.lO, 


Jan. 12, 




1529 


1933 ' 


1933 


1333 


1934 


1935 


Number of Employees 














Common 


1,298 


465 


574 


596 


689 


797 


Skilled 


6,190 


2,225 


3,028 


3,185 


3,757 


4,233 


Total 


7,488 


2,690 


3,602 


3,781 


4,446 


5,030 


Average Hours per Wee] 














Common 


43.8 


26.1 


35.4 


34.6 


37.7 


33.5 


Skilled 


51.3 


24.4 


35.8 


34.5 


38.8 


39.5 


Total 


51.1 


24.6 


35.8 


34.5 


38.6 


'39.5 



Average Earnings per 












: 


Hour (Cents) 














Common 


44.6 


39.4 


39.1 


42.3 


42.9 


44.1 


Skilled 


64.2 


55.1 


53.9 


55.0 


56.1 


62.9 


Total 


60.8 


52.2 


51. 5 


53-. 


54.1 


59.9 


Average Weekly Earn- 














ings (Dollars) 














Common 


22.21 


10.28 


13.84 


14 . 64 


16.17 


17.42 


Skilled 


32.93 


13.44 


19.84 


16.98 


21.77 


24.85 


Total 


31.07 


12.84 


13.44 


18.29 


20.88 


23.66 


Source; Industry que 


istionnaire 


returns, 


19 to 21 


companies 


reporting 





Submitted by the Code Authority to the National Recovery Ad- 
ministration Division of Research and Planning, received 
April 17, 1335. 



\ 



9818 



-391- 



TA3LE 258 



COMPRESSED AIR I DUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF C0 : ■. «OK AND SKILLED EMPLOYEES 
Week Including January 12, 1935 





Hourly Earnings 


Common 


Skilled 


Total 




( 


in cents) 










Und 


er 40 


53 


9 


62 




40 


- 44 


497 


198 


695 




45 


- 49 


186 


617 


803 




. 50 


- 54 


5? 


794 


847 




55 


- 59 


8 


573 


581 




. .60 


- 64 


9 


643 


652 




65 


- 69 


3 


479 


482 




70 


- 74 




377 


377 




75 


- 79 


• ■ 


223 


223 




30 


to 84 




95 


95 




85 


to 89 




128 


128 




90 


and over 




159 


159 



Total 809 4,295 5,104 



1/ Apprentices, Exempted Classes, Watchmen, Firemen. 

Source: Industry questionnaire returns, 30 conraanies reporting. 
Submitted by the Code Authority to the National Recovery 
Administration, Division of 'Research and Planning, 
received April 17, 1935. 



9818 



-392- 

TABLE 259 
PUMP MAJraFACTqaiRB INDUSTRY 

AVERAGE WEEKLY HDURS, HOURLY EARNINGS AND WEEKLY EARNINGS 
. FOR COMMON, SKILLED AND FEMALE WORKERS 
THREE SELECTED WEEKS 1929 and 1933 



Week Ending Week Ending . Week Ending 
Feb. 9, 1929 Feb. 11, 1933':'' July 22, 1933 



Total Number of Wage 
Earners Employed 

Common Labor 
Skilled Labor 
Female Labor 

Total 



1641 


782 


844 


.7367 


3558 


4020 


50 


20 


.' 18 



8948 



4360 



4882 



" 



Average Number 
Hours Per Week 



Common Labor 
Skilled Labor 
Female Labor 



47.8 
50.4 
44.5 



28.1 
29.3 
33.0 



36.1 
37.8 

39.2 



Average Wage 
Rate Per Hour 



Common Labor 
Skilled Labor 
Female Labor 



48.10 


41..34 


40.4rf 


64.80 


56 . 7i 


55.3^ 


50.9c* 


33. 10 


38;90 



: 



Average Weekly Wage 

Common Labor 
Skilled Labor 
Female Labor 



"523.00 


$11.60 


$14.58 


32.66 


16.61 


20.90 


22. G 5 


10.92 


15.25 



Source: Industry questionnaire returns,. 69 nlants reporting. 

.Submitted by the Hydraulic Institute to the National Recovery 
Administration, Division of Research and Planning, 
August 23, 1933. 



9818 



-393- 

TO 3E USED "TT TT CAUTION 



TABLE 360 (a> 

puiip papupactupi* g - cities oveh 500.000 Ii" population 

CLASSIFIED E10UBLY iBl'-I-GS OP "./AGS JASPERS 
Au -plot, 1933 



Hourly 










- 


All Reported Ti 


'age 


Earners 




Earnings 






Pal 


,es 










Cumulative 




Cent; 


3 Per Hour 


Common 


Skilled 


Females 


Number 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 




Under 25 


cents 


1 






_ 


1 


.2 




.2 




25 -29 




T. 




1 


- 


1 


.2 




.4 




30 - 


34 




- 




1 


- 


1 


.2 




.6 




35 - 


39 




H 




2 


4 


6 


1.5 




2.1 




40 - 


44 




27 




7 


7 


41 


10.0 




12.1 




45 - 


49 




7 




24 


1 


32 


7.3 




19.9 




50 '-. 


54 




19 




50 


- 


69 


IS. 7 




36.6 




55 - 


59 




4 




44 


- 


48 


11.7 




43.3 




50 - 


54 




1 




51 


- 


52 


12.6 




60.9 




55 - 


69 




- 




42 


- 


42 


10.2 




71.1 




70 - 


74 




- 




42 


- 


42 


10.2 




81.3 




75 - 


79 




-: 




44 


- 


44 


10.7 




92.0 




30 - 


84 




- 




18 


- 


18 


4.4 




95.4 




85 - 


89 




- 




5 


- 


5 


1.2 




97.5 




90 - 


94 




- 




2 


- 


2 


.5 




98.1 




95 


99 




rt 




3 


• - 


3 


.7 




93.8 




1.00 


end. 


over 


- 




5 


■ — 


5 


1.2 




100.0 





Total 



59 



541 



412 



100.0 



SOURCE: Hydraulic .Institute report to the National Recovery Administration 
Division of Research and Planning, August 23, 1933, 62 plants re- 
porting for all population groups. 



9818 



-3.34- ^ jo HS USED T TT T; CAUTION 
TABLE 260 (o) 
Pumps Ilanufac -taring - Cities of 250,000 to 500,000 Population 
Classified Hourly Earnings of Male 7age Earners 

August 1933 



Hourly Earnings 
Cents Per I "our 


Common 


Skilled 


Liale Wage 

Total 


Earners 
Per Cent 


Cumulative 

Per Cent 


Undei 


c 25 cents 


- 


- 


- 


- 


-. 


25 - 


29 


1 


• - 


1 


.4 


.4 


30 - 


34 




13 


3 


21- 


7.7 


G.l 


35 - 


39 




2 


6 " 


8 


3.-0 


11.1 


40 - 


4-4 




12 


8 


20 


7 .-4 


i3.5 ':'. 


45 - 


49 - 




8 


13' 


21 


7.7 


26.2 .. 


50 - 


54 . 


7 


45' ■ 


52 


19.2 


45.4 ' 


55 - 


59 . 


4 


38" 


42 


15* 5 


60.9 ,"; 


60 - 


64 . 


1 


21/ 


22 


3.1 


69.0 


65 - 


69 . 


1 


19 


20 


7.4 


76.4 


70 - 


74 


- 


24- 


24 




85.5 


75 - 


79 


1 


13 


14 


5.2 


90 . 5 4 


30 - 


84 


- 


16 


16 


5.9 


96.4 


35 - 


39 


- 


6 


6 


2.2 


93.6 


90 - 


94 


- 


4 


4 


1.4 


100.6 


95 - 


99 


- 


- 


- 


- 




1.00 


and over 


- 


- 


- 


- 






Total 


> 


216 


271 


100.0 





Source: Hydraulic Institute report to tie National Recovery Administration, 

Division of Research and Planning, August 3, 1933, 62 plants reporting 
for all ho «ulation jrc .as. Number of plants represented in tliis 

■' iti n , roup net available. N femali reportei by tiiese plants. 



9813 



-oaa- jy B ^ us^D 'TTII C..FTI0N 

TABLE 360(c) 
Pump lianufac taring r- Citico of 2*500 to 250*000 
Classified Hourly Earnings of Uale .Tage S rners 

August 1933 



'loixrly Earnings 
C euts Per '. '.■rax 



Under 35 cents 

30 - 34 

35 - 39 

40 - 44 

'..-, - 49 

50 - 54 

55 - 59 

60 - 64 

65 - 69 

70 - 74 

75 - 79 

30 - 84 

35 - 89 

90 - 94 

95 - 99 • • 

1.00 and. ever 



i'.lale ,;ja:,o Earn ers 

■ Co.'Tiii ion Skill nd Total Per Cent 

7.1: 3 .2 

31 '• ■ 4 25 .7 



41 

73 

329 

109 

38 
10 



19 
39 
374 
557 
494 
3b O 

til -j .!. 

220 
201 
119 

66 
23 
56 

.-> 
P 

1.8 



do 

60 
117 
703 
666 
532 
590 
296 

202 

120 

67 

23 

o I 

r\ 
O 

13 



1.7 

rj r-7 
OmO 

19,3 

13. 7 

16.4 

11.2 

o • 3 

6.2 

5.7 

3.4 

1.9 

.3 

1.0 



Cumulative 

Per Cent 



.2 

.9 
2.6 
.5.9 
25.7 
44.4 
60.3 
72.0 
30.3 
36.5 
93.2 
95.6 
97 . 5 

OO r? 

3 O « O 

99.3 

99.5 

100.0 



Source: 



9318 



Total 



693 



3 356 100.0 



Hydraulic Institute report to tlie national Recovery Administration, 
Division of 3e search end Planning, August 23, 1933, 63 plants reporting 
for all population groups. Number of plants represented in this 
population group not available. Ho females reported by these plants. 



-396- 



TABLE 261 



MACHINE TOOL AND FORGING MACHINERY INDUSTRY 
AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS , HOURLY EARNINGS AND WEEKLY EARNINGS OF EMPLOYEES 

FIVE SELECTED WEEKS, 1934 and 1935 



Dec. 10 Jan. 7 Feb. 4 Mar. 4 Aoril 1 
Item 1934 1935 ' 1935 1935 1935 



Total Numbei Employed 16,455 16,841 17,536 13,134 18,558 
Number of Wage Earners 14,195* 14,513*' 15,205-* 15,779* 16,148* 
Average Hours tier Week 40.00 40.20 40.87 41.36 41.13 



Average Weekly Earnings 

Wage Earners Receiving 

40 (£ per hour or more $24.51 $24.87 io25.40 $25. 89 $25.72 
Less than 40^ r>er $14.15 $13.46 $13,81 $13.54 $13.33 
hour 

Salaried Employees I.-w.t, 
Receiving $15 to $35 

per Week '323.28 $23.43 $23.37 $33.77 $23.13 

Less than [615 ner week $12.96 $13.02 $12.52 $12.78 $12.44 



Average Hourly Rate 

Wage Earners Receiving 
40<* per hour or more 61.31^ 61.85rf 62. W 62.53^ 62.49rf 
Less than 40^ per hour 34.66^ 33.96rf 34.11^ 33.83^ 33.31^ 

Percentage of Wage Earners 
receiving less than 40^ 
per hour 3.09^ 2.99^ 2.83-1 3.07-1 2. 54*1 



Source: Industry questionnaire returns, 148 establishments reporting. 
Submitted by the National Machine Tool Builders' Association 
to the National Recovery Administration, Division of Research 
and Planning, May 2, 1935. 

* indicated. —No footnote o:i either co^y. 



9818 



i-397- .. 

TO BE USED- WITH CAUTION 



TABLE 262 
GEAR KANUFaCTORIIJG I1IDUSIHY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS EOR EMPLOYEES 

1934 y 



Hourly 
Earnings, 
(centc per hour) 



40 

40 to 50 
50 to 65 
Over 65 
Total 



Employ 


'rfes 




Cumulative • 


Number 


1 


•ercent 


Per Cent 


224 




7 


7 


5H i 




16 


23 


1273 




40 


53 


1180 




37 


100 


3192 


100 





1_/ 3elievecl to represent a "typical week". 



Source: Industry questionnaire returns, 69 companies reporting. Sub- 
mitted by the Code Authority to the National Recovery Adminis- 
tration, Division of Research and Flanning, March 29, 193". 



9C16 



-398- 

TO 3E USTD "'IT: CAUTION. 

TABLE 263 
G3^P. MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 

AVERAGE EARNINGS AMD WEEKLY HOURS OF EMPLOYEES 

1933 and 1934 !_/ 

1933 1934 

Total number of employees 
Average weekly hours 
Average hourly earnings 
Average weekly earnings 
Total weekly hours worked 

_!/ Believed to represent a "typical week" of each year 



Source: Industry raiestionnaire returns, 69 companies reporting. Sub- 
mitted by the Code Authority to the National Recovery Adminis- 
tration, division of Research and Planning, March 29, 1935. 



2514 


3192 


32 . 87 


35.44 


.623(2! 


.65# 


$20.41 


$22.98 


85,925 


113,124 



9818 



-399- 



TA3LE 264 

GAS APPLIANCES ALID APPARATUS Iia)USTHY 
CLASSIFIED .21 iY HOURS OP .*'AGE EARNERS JOA 
1926, 1925 and 1933 



19 2b 1'J29 1953 

Per Per Per 

Cent Cent Cent 

dumber of of Number of of Number of of 

..eercly .lours Employees Tot-..l Employees Total Employees Total 

Less than 30 I5O 1.4 199 1.4 1,678 15.0 

17b 1.2 9^5 8.4 

1,557 li. 1 i,3H ii.7 

15.3 2,57? is. 3 1,045 9.3 

25.3 2,522 17.3 1,343 12.0 

46.4 5,970 42.4 2,292 20.4 
11.6 1,0 jl 7.7 2,611 23.2 

Total 10,813 100. C 14,092 100.0 11.22 r ' 100.0 



30 to 35 




- 


36 to 39 




3 


4o to'4"S 




1,637 


44 to 45 




2,737 


46 tc 50 




5,011 


More than 


50 


1 , 255 



Scarce: Sample reports compiled by Gas Appliance Institute, repre- 
sent _ng about 68 per cent of the total wage earners to the 
NRA. national Recovery Administration, Division of Research 
and planning. The Gas Ap liance and Apparatus Industry, 
prepared by rf. E. ."alter, Hovember 4, 1933 • 



9818 



-400- 



GAS APPLIANCE AID APPASiATUS 

CLASSIFIED HCUHLY EA ill'JGS OP ;tAGE EAH'iEl-.S iOH 
1926, 1929 • nd 1933 



1920 1 929 1933 









Per 






Per 




Pei- 








Gent 






Cent 




Cent 


Hourly Earnings 


jjl 


amber 


of of 


Number 


of 


of 


Number 


of of 






forlcei 


■s Total 


.Jor-cei 


'S 


Total 


,/orkers 


Total 


' Less than ]>0\: 




394 


3.6 


607 




kA 


1,377 


12.2 


■ 3c to 35rv 




318 


k.3 


936 




6.7 


1,361 


12.1 


•35- t'o ^ 




'930 


0.0 


1 ■ 279 




T9-.1 


2,177 


19.3 


Over Uo<£ 


8 


,971 


S3.0 
100.0 


11,270 

1^,092 




79.8 

10-'. 


6,310 
11,223 


56. k 


Total 


10 


,813 


100.0 



Source: Heports furnished by the Gas Institute, representing about 68 

per cent of the tot 1 w, ^e earners, to the ISA. National Recovery 
Administration, Division of He search; -nd planning. The Gas 
Appliances and Apparatus Industry,' prepared by >. Z. .alter, 
November k, 1933 . 



0818 



-401- 
TABLE 266 

WARM AIR FURNACD MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 

Classified Hourly Earnings 
of .7a ge Earners During 
September, 1933 



Actual 


Factory ".Yage Darners 


Darnings 


(week including 


per Hour 


Sept. 15, 1933) 


(cent 


s) 




20 - 


24.9 


12 


25 - 


29.9 


31 


30 - 


34.9 


81 


35 - 


39.9 


154 


40 - 


49.9 


1,204 


50 - 


59.9 


556 


GO - 


79.9 


358 


80 - 


99.9 


122 


100 or 


more 


19 



Total 



2,537 



Source: NRA questionnaire returns, 

37 concerns reporting. National 
Recovery Administration, Division 
of Research and Planning. The Warm 
Air Furance Manufacturing Industry, 
prepared by John A. Hanley, 
November 1, 1933. 



9818 



-402- 



TAHLE 267 



FAPPiP :L'i 7 a":"r-?LV:rT: : BUILDERS 
I" DUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED ''JELKLY EDjURS OF WAGE EARNERS 

September 15, 1933 



Per Cent 
of Total 

8.6 

8.2 

40.9 

39.2 

1.7 

.3 

.6 

,5 

100.0 



Source: Figures submitted to the NRA by Paper Machine Buil-' 
dors' Association, National Recovery Administration, 
Division cf Research and Planning. The Paper Making 

achinc Builders' Industry, prepared by John ■■.. 
ilanley, November 6, 1933. 



FVrld 


.rig hours 


ITumber 


of 


per 


■ week 


wage earner's 


Under 


• 20 


134 


• 
* 


20.1 


- 30 


128 


■ 
■ * 


30.1 


- 35 


642 


♦ 


35.1 


- 40 


615 


'• 


40.1 


- 45 


27 




45.1 


- 50 


4 




50.1 


- GO 


10 




Over 


60 ■ ' 


8 




Tc 


>tal 


1,568 





-403- " 



TABLE 268 

PAPER MAKING MACHJ"i. r . T ; BUILDERS 
INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF VJAGE EARNERS 

September 15, 1933 



Actual Hourly 
Earnings 
(Cents) 



Number of 
7 'age Earners 



Per Cent 
of Total 







► 




10 - 


19.9 


3 


.2 


20 - 


24.9 


1 


.1 


25 - 


29.9 


7 


.4 


30 - 


34.9 


13 


.8 


35 - 


39.9 


9 


.6 


40 - 


49.9 


527 


33.6 


50 - 


59.9 


466 


29.7 


60 - 


79.9 


114 


26.4 


80 - 


99.9 


103 


6.6 


31.00 and over 


25 


1.6 



Total 



1,568 



100.0 



Source: Figures submitted to NRA by Paper Machine Builders' 
Association, National Recovery Administration, Eivi- 
sion of Research and Planning. The Paper Making 
Machine Builders ' Industry, prepared by John A. 
Hanley, November 6, 1933, 



9818 



-404- 

TABLE 269 
Commercial Refrigerator Industry 

Classified Hourly Earnings of 

'.Vage Earners 
for a Typical Week in Soring 

and Fall, 1933.' 



Hour! 


Ly Earnings 




& 


3 ring 


1933 








Fs 


ill 193 










Per 


Curaula 


t 


ive 






Per 


Cumulative 


Cents Per 


Hour 


Kumb 


er 


Cent 


Per 


C 


ent 


ITurab 


er 


Cent 


Per Cent 


Under 10 cents 


1 




0.1 


0,1 






- 




- 


~ 


10 - 


19.9 




22 




1.6 


1.7 






- 




*"" i 


- 


20 - 


24.9 




34 




2.6 


4.3 






- 




- 


- 


25 - 


23.9 




41 




3.1 


7.4 






- 




- 


-'_ 


30 - 


34. P 




81 




6.1 


13.5 






122 




10.0- 


10.0 


35 - 


39.9 




130 




9.8 


23.3 






97 




8.0 


18.0 


40 - 


43.9 


■ 


495 




37.2 


60.5 






439 




36.1- 


54.1 


50 - 


59.9 


■ 


238 




21.6 


82.1 






292 




24.0- 


78.1 


60 - 


79.9 


• 


172 




12.9 


95.0 






189 




15.5- 


93.6 


80 - 


99.9 


• 


46 




3.5 


93.5 






47 




3.9- 


97.5 


$1.00 and 


over 


20 




1.5 


100.0 






30 




2.5 


100.0 



Total 1,330 100.0 1,216 100.0 



Source: Association data, plants reporting represent approximately 
44. j of total employment of the industry, reported to the 
national Recovery Administration, Division of Research and 
Planning. The Commercial Refrigerator Industry, prepared 

hy John Hanley, ITqv. 16, 1333. 



9818 



nm i 



-40b- 
TABLE 270 

'• CAST- IRON PRESSURE PIPE 

DISTRIBUTION OF FACTQPY EMPL TPJES ACCORDING TO HOURLY EARNINGS 



Hourly Earnings 



10/ and 
15/ and 
20/ and 
25/ and 
30/ and 
35/ and 
40/ and 
45/ and 
50/ and 
55/ and 
60/ and 
65/ and' 
70/ and 
75/ and 
80/ and 



under 15/ pel-* 
under 20/ per 
under 25/ per 
under 30/ per 
under 35/ per 
under 40/ per 
under 45/ per 
under 50/ per 
under 55/ per 
under 60/ per 
under 65/ per 
under 70/ per 
under 75/ per 
under 80/ per 
over per hour 

Total 









Factory 


Employi 


ses 




• ■ 




North 


Dec . 




South 






Apr . 


Apr. 


Apr . 


Apr. 


Dec. 




30 


30 


31 


30 


30 


31 




_1935_. 


_1934__ 


1954 


1955 


1934 


1934 


Hour 


mm 


mm 




25 






hour 


1 


- 


- 


232 


- 


- 


hour 


23 


- 


- 


520 


2 


- 


hour 


.. 235 • 


2 


1 


672 


- 


3 


hour 


762 


5 


6 


444 


1355 


1384 


hour 


467 


540 


483 


152 


607 


722 


hour 


281 


901 


513 


119 


656 


602 


hour 


190 


. 439 " 


448 


108 


232 


282 


hour 


*• "125 


427 


423 


102 


172 


190 


hour 


72 


237 


225 


117 


126 


153 


hour 


34 


195 


156 


111 


124 


142 


hour 


18 


. .148 


138 


31 


86 


112 


hour 


' 15 


141 


169 


5 


68 


76 


hour 


5 


70 


70 


8 


182 


221 


, 


• • 19 


80 


75 


3 


64 


63 



2247- 3185 2707 



2649 3674 



3950 



Srurce: Code Authority reports compiled by.. Industry Reporting Unit, filed 
I.R.U., Division of Review 'National Recovery Administration, 
Based on reports from 10 plants in the North and 12 plants in the 
South. 



9818 



-406- 











h 




















CD 




















cu ,o ^j- r 


rH r^- 
















fc/ r i*~\ c 


•H 1*- LA tO VD to 


LO. 


o 












R '•'• CA Jh 


Ph 


~* • • • • 


• 


• 












K O H <:-- 


ft r-H 


LO 


LT\ 












4h O 


1 


.VISI 


-H- 


I 






+3 

pi rH j- r 


rH f- 






o 

•H 

co 










CD tH r--> O 
CD fn CA U 


• H K 
Ph O 


• • • . 


to 

• 


• 










Ph PVrH't.'H 

CD <t| 

Ph 


S"- 


1 60 rH CA to 


O^ 


CA 


•H 






Pi 

u 

3 




<j . 


.i-a CAJ- rA 


0J 


r- 


> 










-+---*- rH -S~ 


-s~. 


"H- 


•H 












*-t- 






n 




P-i 
















g 

CO 




CD 




O O O CA 


o 




jH" 








rO J" 




la oj r— • 


VD 


o 


•H 








F! K> 

CD CA 




CT\ 60 to LO 
- - - C\J 


J" 


CA 


rj 










U rH 




hA 0">VL- 




r-H 


m 






1 


- 


CD 

3 ■ n 




3 cm 


"9- 


rH 

-ea- 


rH 

Ph 






In 

CD 
43 








^t cy»r-r- 


vo 










c 


HJ- 




i^oh • 


[^ 


CM 








■rH |--<~\ 

U CA 




VQ LT, tO tO 

« - ~ nj 


,^J" 


LTi 


r rH 




fa 
CO 

1 


4^> 
Ph 
O 

!^ 

s 




£ HrH 




j r^\ r^-, h- 

UA Cs 
^t rH 


■c* 


CM 
H 


o 

!H 

n3 








to r— evi to 


VO 




CD 
CO 

id . 




•H 




rH v~\ 




^ LO, LT\ • 


r^ 


to 


lit, Hi 

South, 




05 

W 

_CJ 


.=+■ 


•H h<~\ 
Ph CA 
fi| rH 




"^iD VD _;H- q 
- - - CM 

CV UD o^ 
rAN 

OJ <■> 


• 
■C&- 


CA 

• 




(-1 


*-" 


r-A • 


• •• M »• •• 


• • •• 


• • •• •• •• »• •• • 


• •• » 


• »■ •• 


|f3 CD 


H 

OJ 


H 


T3 


H 


Li ' k> o 


rH rf- 

•H |-r» 


o !-: o o 
• • • • 


to 


r-A 


E|fl += 

rH 


Ph 
n 
Ph 


en 




S CD CA 'h 

rC CD 

o n 


r : rH 


LTM — LC> LOi 
.H H rH 
1 I I I 


CM' 


0J 

I 


■h rJ 

+= ;H 


1 


1 


3 
O 


r-' i 
i*A 












O CO 


-t^> 










:--i +' 


9 

EH 


CO 
CO 

y 


HI 

CO 


en 
H 

u 


CD rH .nt T 

O .rl fO O 

'- f-t CA Ph 


rH hr-> 
•H r-r- 
U CA 


• • • 

h h in 


• 
o 


o 

• 


CD S 

Ph eu 

rH 




CD 
CD 


o 

<rl 


CD ^ rH «h 
Ph -t| 


PttH 
<1 


."!- ,-H" r- 


CM 


OJ 


+3 CM 

2 H 




O 


O 
rH 


en 
cd 












^ ^ 




^h 










•d rrj 






p, 
g 

o 
43 
o 
cd 
F--i 


Are 
Ilorth 


CD 




o o ^;- . 


CM 
CM 


CA 


t-H CVj 




EH 

co 

3 


O CA 
O rH 

CD 

n 




r-jH-J- VD 
- - ~ OJ 

oj r~- lcn 

rH VO 
r^ rH 




to 

• 

rA 
r-\ 
O- 


C Ph 
O O 
•H ^T 








mo a. o 


CO 




+3 

tJ S 
Fh -h 








rH ^i~ 




to.r--,r-~ • 


3 


rH 


^j 






o 




•H r-A 
U CA 

P.I rH 




H O^v LC\ tO 
« - « CM 


LcS 

■ 


CM 
• 


CI CO 
•H +3 
rj rj 






f , 




' t 




to < ^ 




H 


•In r. 






CO 








K i rH 


:'.■• 


-'-> 


3 rH 














r O Oi 






H 








r-^.t CA O 


CA 




o 

> rH 

Ph 
CD C 

> O 
O 






si 

SH 

O 




rH fi 




,"t rl VO . 


o 


vo 








•H |-A 

Fh CA 
AH 




CM LC> r- tO 
•» •* •» CM 
CM O O 
r- H 


Jd' 


J- 

• 

H 

rH 






!• 








CM rH 


I 


•■•.' 


O TJ 
















CD CD 












1 






Ph CO 






1 








O CO Oi 

■^ H >ifi 

CD d r-{ H M 


rH 


rH 


cd 

H FQ 

cd 

S 4^ 
O Ph 
•H O 










S 




rt n OHi! 


Ph 


,Sd 


■P Ph 












1 CO |Tl O CD h 


p' 


CD 


cS O 










CD 




CD in CD CD 


O CO 


CD CO 


:-; pi 










+3 

r-H 




S RS & IBft 
















o ;., nl cd ta 


CD -H 


CD -H 


., 














fn rH till H 

J PHH (C H 


CT Ph 


■ I 


8 














a H i li h o « 


Ph fj 


Fh CC 


B 














3 | - 1 +» 49 CD W o 
•3 O O > 


0) M 


0) [- 












> 


> 


o 








i 






-i EH LH <3j 


•^ 


A 


CO 



o 

VD 

r— 



-407- 
n A3LE 272 



^m&tJ: SAFETY APPLIANCE INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED T7EEKLY HOUES OF FACTORY WAGE EAR1IERS 
^OR 'TEEK ITIIC'I INCLUDED JUNE 15,1933 . 





FORKED : 
WEEK' . : 


F A C 


HOURS 

PER 


NUMBER 


20 hours 


or 


under 


1,987 


30.1 






• 


56 Li 


25.1 








376 


30.1 






• 


297 


35.1 








270 


40.1 








153 


45.1 








44 


50.1 






- 


32 


55. 1 








9 


Over 


60 


hiurs 


3 








Total ■ 


3,759 



W AGE 



EAR IE.S S 



PER CENT 



53.1 

15.2 

10.1 

7.9 

7.2 

4.1 

1.2 

.9 

.2 

.1 

100.0 



CUMULATIVE 


?: 


FR CENT 




53, 


1 




68. 


3 




78. 


4 




■J>6 , 


3 




93. 


5 




97 


6 




98, 


,8 




99 


7 






9 



100.0 



SOURCE: NRA Questionnaire returns. 13 concerns reporting. National 
Recovery Administration Division of Research and PLanning.The 
Railway Safe'tv Appliance Industry prepared by Thomas P.Kelly, 
December 22, 1933. 



9818 



.-403- 
TABLE 273 

RAILWAY SAFETY APPLIANCE INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS FOB FACTORY WAGE EARNERS 
FOR THE WEEK WHICH INCLUDED JUNE 15,1933 



HOURLY 

EARNINGS 



F ACTOR Y 



WAGE 



EARNERS 



NW5HER 



PER CENT 



CUI^LATIVE 
PER CENT 



Under 15<t 
15# - 19.9rf 

20«* - 24.9c* 
25c* - 39.9rf 
30^ - 34.9 
35c£ - 39. 9c* 
40(2? - 44.9c* 
45c* - 49. 9(* 
50c* - 54.9c* 
55c* - 59.9c* 
60c* - 59.9c* 
70c* - 79.9c* 
80c* or more 



78 
51 
196 
166 
284 
325 
424 
488 
409 
525 
490 
155 
148 
Total3,739 



3.1 

1.4 

5.3 

4,4 

7.6 

8.7 

11.3 

13.1 

10.9 

14.0 

13.1 

4.1 

4.0 

100.0 



2.1 
3.5 
3.8 
13,2 
20.6 
29.5 
40.8 
53.9 
64.8 
78.8 
91.9 
96.0 
100.0 



SOURCE: NRA Questionnaire returns. 15 concerns reporting, National 
Recovery Administration Divirion of Research pnd Planning. The 
Rail^av Safety Apoliance Industry, prepared bv Thomrs P.Kelly, 
December 22, 1953. 



9818 



-409- 
TABLE 274 

RAILWAY SAFET 1 : A^PLIAKCE INDUSTRY 



CLASSIFIED WE KLY EARITIUG-S FOR OFFICE E?1PL0YEES 
FOR WEEK WHICH INCLUDED JUNE 15, 19S3 



WEEKLY 
EARNINGS 



OFFICE 



P L Y E E S 



-.TjiQER 



PER CiLE'S 



CUI1ULATIVE 
PER CENT 



Less than 85.00 



$ 5.00 - 


9.99 


10.00 - 


14.99 


15.00 - 


19,99 


20.00 - 


24.99 


25.00 - 


2y,99 


50.00 - 


34.99 


35.00 - 


39.99 


40.00 - 


4>$4.99 



45.00 and over 



Total 



155 

215 

284 

220 

108 

90 

53 

38 

105 

1,260 



.7 

10.7 
16.9 

23.5 
17.5 
o,6 
7.2 
4.6 
3.0 
3.3 

100.0 



.7 

11.4 
28.3 

. 50.8 
68.3 
76.9 
34.1 
38.7 
• 91.7 
100.0 



SOURCE: NRA Questionnaire returns. 13 concerns reporting. National Recovery 
Administration Division of Research and Planning. The Railway Safety 
Appliance Industry, prepared "by Thomas P. Kelly, December 22, 1933. 



OQ1 Q 



-410- 
TA3LE 275 
MAP. IIT AUXILLIARY MACHINERY INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS 0^ WAGE EARNERS, WEEK 0E OCTOBER 21, 1933. 









Cumulative 


forking Hours 


Number cf 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


Per Week 


^age Earners 


of Total 


of Total 



Jnder 20 
50.1 - 30 
50. 1 - 35 
55. 1 - 40 

10. 1 - 50 

'otal 



15 

1 

177 

144 

3 

341 



4.7 

.3 

51.9 

47.2 

.9 

100.0 



4.7 

5.0 

5 6. .9 

99.1 

100.0 



jource 



Marine Auxilliary Machinery Industry - Ouestionnaire Returns, reported 
to the N.R.A. National Recovery Administration Division of Research 
and Planning, The Marine Auxilliary Machinery Industry, prepared by 
J. A. Ranley and R. von Kuhn, Dec. 5, 1933. 



38 l 8 



-41 1- 



276 



MARINE AUXILLIARY ,u' ChLiLFY INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARiFIuGb JF ViAGI LARUERb WEEK 
01 OCTOBEF 21, 1933 



Actual 

Hourly 

Earnings 



Number of 


Per Cent 


Cumulative 


V/iige 


of 


Fer Cent 


Earners 


lotal 


of Total 



35- - 39.9^ 



40 - 4-9-9 . 

50 - 59 = 9 
60 - ?9-9 
80 - 99=9 
• 1.00 or more 



12 
30 
89 
166 
33 
11 



3-5 

8.8 
26.1 
48.7 

9.7 



'- 2 





' J 


12 


.3 


38.4 


87. 


,1 


9.6 


■ 8 . 


.00 


.0 



Total 



ill 



lOO > 



Source; Farine Auxiliary Machinery Industry - Questionnaire 
returns, reported to the NRA. national Recovery 
Administration Division of Research and Planning. The 
Farine Auxiliary Machinery Industry, prepared by 
J. a. Hanley, and R. von huhn, December 5, 1933. 



9818 



-412- .. 

TO BE USED TITH CAUTION 
T^3LE 277 

seal: asanas equipment iidust::iy 

Classified "ours of T7ork of Factory T>/;e Earners 
For "7eel: Uhich Included June 15, 1933 



Hours forked 
Per TJeek 



20 hours or under 
20.1 - 25 hours 
25-1 - 30 
30.1 - 35 

35.1 - HO 
1*0.1 - 145 
U5.I - 50 
50.1 - 55 
55-1 - 60 
Over 60 hours 
Total 



Factory T7age Earners 

Number Per Cent Cunalative 

Per Cent 



96 


IS. 6 


1G.6 


u 5 


8.7 


27.3 


3S 


7.4 


3^.7 


19 


3.7 


3S.U 


136 


2b. 1+ 


o^.S 


gg 


17.1 


Si. 9 


62 


12.0 


93.9 


Ik 


2.7 


36.S 


9 


1.8 


9S.U 


8 


1.6 


100.0 


515 


100.0 





SOURCE: MA questionnaire returns, 13 concerns reporting. National 
Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Planning. 
The Stean Heating Equipment Industry, prepared by J. A. Hanley 
an I R. von Huhn, February 3» 193^ • 



9760 



-413- 

TABL2 37 8 
Steam Heating Equipment Industry 
Number of Factory Wag<3 Earners Employed in Establishments 
Working Specified Shifts and Shift Hours 







1929 


1933 


1933 


Number of Hours 




June 


June 


October 


Worked per Shift 




1 Shift 


1 Shift 


1 Shift 


7 to 7.9 hours 




416 


304 


72 


8 to 8.9 




'7 


164 


515 


9 to 9.9 




94 


~— 


- 


10 to 10,9 




. 131 


- 


- 


Total 




688 


468 


587 


Shifts re-oorted 










but no hours 


1 Shift 

2 Shifts 


' 3 
219 


47 


90 


Total all 


1 Shift 

2 Shifts 


691 
219 


515 


677 • 



Source: 17.R.A. questionnaire returns, 13 concerns reporting. Tabulation by 
the Bureau of the Census for the National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning, December 29, 1933. 



9818 



-414- 



TO BE USED I'^TH CAUTION. 



table 279 
steai: heating equipiient industry 

Classified Hourly Earnings of Factory Urge Earners For 
The Ueeh Uhich Included June 15, 1933 



Hourly 
Earnings 



Factory Uqge Earners 







Cumulative 


Number 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


1 


.2 


.2 


■ 7 


l.U 


1.6 


17 


3.3 


M 


m 


S.5 


13.^ 


Gl 


11. S 


25.2 


35 


6.S 


32.0 


66 


12. 3 


uu.s 


71 


13. S 


5S.6 


60 


11.7 


70.3 


50 


9.7 


so.o 


52 


10.1 


30.1 


2h 


U.7 


9H.S 


27 


5.2 


100.0 


■515 


100.0 





Under 15 cents 
15 to 19.9 
20 to 2U.9 
25 to 29.9 
30 to 34.9 

35 to 39.9 
UO to kk.3 
U5 to U9.9 
50 to 5U.9 

55 tc 59-9 
60 to 69.9 
70 to 79.9 
80 and over 

Total 



SOURCE: NRA questionnaire returns, 13 concex'ns reporting. National 
Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Planning. 
The Steam Heating Equipment Industry, prepared by J. A. Hanley 
and R. von Huhn, February 3. 193^» 



9760 



-415- 
TABLE 280 
Steam Heating Equipment Industry 
Classified Weekly Earnings of Office Employees 
Week of June 15, 1933 



Weekly Earnings 
(Dollars) 



Office Employees 
IT-umber Per cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Under 5.00 
5.00 to 9.93 
10.00 to 14.99 
15.00 to 19.99 
20.00 to 24.99 
25.09 to 29.99 
30.00 to 34.99 
35.00 to 39.99 
40.00 to 44.99 
45.00 and over 



7 


3.4 


3.4 


16 


7.3 


11.2 


40 


19.4 


30.6 


43 


20.9 


51.5 


41 


19.9 


71.4 


27 


13.1 


84.5 


14 


6.7 


91.2 


3 


1.5 


92.7 


15 


7.3 


100.0 



Total 



206 



100.0 



Source: HJR.A. questionnaire. 15 concerns reporting. Tabulation "by the 
Bureau of the Census for the National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research rnd Planning, December 29, 1933. 



9818 



co 





>H 


o 




Ph" 


i-q 




EH 

CO 


Si 




P 


w 




e 
i— i 






o 


iH" 




; " j 


hH 




r-H 


ft 
















EH 


rt t-o 




O 


O r"-\ 


rH 


=>! P»M CT> 


60 


[^H 


rH 


CM 


l 


CO 


w 


£3 fi 


tA 




n ni 


Eh 


l 


3 CTN 




I 


r-H 
>H 

1-1 - 




si 


Ph >H 
P l-q 




o 


O . 3 
W '"3 




r-H- 


w 




1-1 


r-H 




1— 1 


Ph 




W 


r-H 




o 


CO 
CO 








<D 4-3 

> 

O 



1 



o 






C\J 

CTn 



(1) 



o 



•PI 
Si 

o 

<DI 
Ph 



(D 

1 

£3 



W 

a 

•rH 

a 

0} 

w 



13 



-416- 



P^ CTN ,-H CM CTNJ- f — O 
• ••••••• 

oj j- mvo r— 1*— .lp» o 

KMIM — a^ o 

rH 



4J 
Pi 

0> 






S-h 


Oh 


r^iU3 CM rH r — mr^n 


OJ OJ _=t 1-^rH CT\W J 
OJ C\J rH rH 



r*-, Lp\ -3" *vO LT\C\J LPv LP\ 
H H (M LTiCJ H O (\J 



LPl 
LP\ 



H 
+3 






-J 
— 1 


o| 


WJ3 O H H 1 — *_J 


,zi 


u\ 




I 


0)1 


faJ OMh-mO 


Phi 


rH OJ |V-\ LOf-- 



^-D O J" ,_, o v_q t<~\ 



r<~\ 



r\ to o> oj o 

.-I rH OJ OJ 



I — t\J O tOH K) H 
OJ CO J- K,J-U3 ;n 



o 
o 



o 

O 



J- 



o 

.^- cncricrNc^crvcrvo^cri 
• •»•■■••• 

S "J en J" ov.-f- ctijh- m 

OJ-J-Tl LPi^D U3 I — I-— 



O 

4-> 



o o 
■p HJ 



a 



rH 



o 

Eh 



h . -vv •*,* -f-v -<* -t -- ■*$. -^ 
O LP* O Lf \ O LPl O "lO 
J" J" LP\ LP\^J *^D I — I — -0 



u 






d) 


W 


1 


> 


PI 







•H 






0) 


3 




Ph 















•H 


I 




-t-3 






id 






S 


H 
CD 

tu 




• 


|j 




<i 






g 








a 




<d 


-j 




,3 






+j 


(D 




0) 


rH 




in 


rH 







•H 




HH 


rCj 




0) 


O 




,Q 




• 




0) J 


W) 


.-* 


r<^ 


zl 


Eh 


a> 


•rH 




^-{ 


Jh 






03 




■> 


a) 


• 


r^ 


W 


Pl 


rH 





H 


>» 


■H 


r^ 


U 


rH 


■a 


B 


pi 


r-\ 


§ 


Ph 


Ph 






t-3 


rH 


tH 




+5 


a 


>^ 


HH 




r-t 


nj 


^ 


rH 




•j 


J) 


0) 


.s 


M 


0) 


Q) 


• 


4J 


W 


Ph 


+3 


a) 




•H 


Ph 


tn 


| 


HH 


r4 


O 


O 


O 


O 




-'-; 




Pi 


Eh 


CD 


O 




ti 


•rH 


>> 





to 


^1 





•H 






> 


r o 


>> 


■-! 


O 


cP 


P 


a 


XJ 


Pi 


Ph 


a) 


c 


O 


jj 


H 


!h 


-to 


+2 


ft 


•rH 


03 




a 


?H 


» 


rQ 


+= 


kS 


£ 


W 


M 


w 


,H 


+J 




s 


U 


03" 


<H 


pi 


-p 


Q 


< 


03 


.! 


r-J 


« 


■; 


— H 



n 
o 

o 

CO 



9818 



-417- 



oj 

OJ 

R 

9 



C/3 



r^ P-H o^ 






:-. 



t> 

• H -P 

-P P 

Clj CD 

rH O 

p 

3 u 

p CD 

O Ph 



CO 



P 



03 
r9 



CD 

> 

•H += 

•P P 

CO" CD 

3 ° 



CD 



CO 
&JJ 
C 

•H 

u 



£ 



■D jt -H O CTs O 



.O CM CO f-— Jd- O 



u) w r- ?,chn 



LOi^Q LTV':0 P— LT\ 
rH HJ 



O rH rH o r— r\ 

r^O :-OC\J -n — 
OJ H W -H 



J* 

I — 

-P" 



o 



H -rt -O O ^d- O 

* • * • • 

r— -p- ' Q r - r~- o 

' r-f rn ~, lO O 

h 



O 



-i m c\j m irsvxi 



• WrlWH 



t^i r-- vd o-\ oj h/ 

O J- J- siO 50 'T\ lO. 
H rH J- m r> OJ 



o 

OJ 



to, 




ro OMLTN 


!h 


• • 


rr> o>cj\t> « 


P -^ -1 


• • • • f> 


«S |<^H/ 


: : .p- cr»j- o 


,P 


_p :x^ lo^-O 


-POO 


ii 


p -p 


o o o o P 


CO 


+3 +3 jJ +J Cfi 


CO " 




CD •• O 


lt> o .oo in 


^.-^d- 


-t lpi 10,^-D vx) 



+3 

o 

EH 



o 






H 


Jh 


t 


-P 


td Jr 


Cti 


o 


r<^ 


J-H 




O^ 




ti 


rH 




CD 






H 


•* 


• 


rH 


r^i 


•^ 


•H 


rH 


5 


cm 






O 




CD 


CD 


0} 


M 


rP 


p 


-P 


EH 


a 


CD 




'"0 


£h 






O 


• 


• 


<H 


*-^U 


>s 


O 


rl 


H 


^ 


H 


rH 




r 4 


CD 




§ 


w 


h 


rH 


• 


!n 


Ph 


IM 


n3 






CD 


id 


CO 


W 


rj 


s 




cti 




o 




o 


H 


rP 


rd 


rH 


o 


Eh 


r^ 


rH 






3 


>s 


Ph 


CD 
CO 


,o 


fn 





•vi 


m 


K 


CD 


■P 




H 


HH 
Ctf 


fc 


3 

CD 


0) 


pj 


>H 


CD 


o 


Ph 


-p 


H 




-P 


CO 


M 


•H 


H 


t^> 


^ 


> 


u 


_; 


■H 


-p 


o 


r 


to 


o 




P 




p 


Tj 


CD 


Q 


P 


d 


•H 


HH 


o 


-P 




o 


d 


TD 




u 


P 


>» 


■p 


H 


,Q 


to 

•H 


P 


•zi 


P 


1 3 


CD 


•r 


o 


-P 


e 


o3 


■P 

•H 


-a 


*P 


'.-_: 






r Q 


^ 


; a 


p 


fn 


" 


co 


CD 






> 


rH 


d 


O 


CD 


+3 


o 


CD 


fl3 


CD 





r p-; *s 



CD 
O 



Pi 

o 

CO 



to 



co 



-41-8- 



EH 



to 

!>H M 
^ O 



n o 

r; o 
to k^ 

E-i ,^ ro 

OOCTi 

'', fa r-H 

3 §3 



w i'l 



o o 






@ 



P 

i i 

1-1 i-h 
HH fa 

in • -i 

o <» 

■ n 

< 






«j O 



m 
CD 

,2 



en 

OJ 

en 

r-l 



g 



<ti o 



a 

•H 

5 



o 
W 



ro 



p— OJ CO O _=f- o 



■CO LO J" U3 M3 l-O O 

r-» C\J r<-\ LOi CO en O 



Jd- LO'vO OJ st ^O 

• ••••• 



i~- CO OJ CT\ I- 
OJ OJ 



tO 'V> a> OJ CO LT\ 0>N 

rH OJ — I OJ LPl I r-l r-l 



LC\ OJ 



St K> 



r-i^st 



O OJ st J>WU3 O 

OJ r^i i-O 4 Tit^o 



c n OJ r^i^r en. 
en oj ,— i 



I VD 



ocn i — st 

r-l r-l OJ 



OJ 



r-H OJ CO r^i 7"> si- r-l 

BO LPi ^-D rO P— O 



LO 



ir\ 



>oo 



Q) 

;- 
o 



or — OOJiPvi — O W lo 
Q) OJ ro i-o po ro t st sj- ^, 

OOOO-POOOW 
U +j jj 4-3 4-3 o += 4-3 -P 

o 



4-3 

o 

EH 



ir\ mi-- O oj lpv r~ o co 
OJ OJ OJ lOr-OCM-O^t -3" 



LO 

J- 





r-H 






(S 




■ 


rj 






b 




LTi 


•r-l 


• 


OJ 


+3 


SH J" 




«3 


i ! i-o 




! -H 


r-H 

CD - 
— 1 t-O 




i 


rH r-l 
■r-l 






rC >s 




CD 


c3 




r4 

1 — 1 


CD ^ 




4-3 


EH Cti 




CD 


'0 




r-t 






o 


• •» 




<H 


^0 >» 




CD 


P! rH 




r° 


•r4 rH 
P! CD 




u) 


3" 




H 


,— 1 • 




Ci 


a, P4 




CD 


Tj tn 




H 


-4 nJ 
«3 3 




o 


o 




r-l 


rC r4 




H 


O EH 




■9 


& >> 




M 


(D O 
en 


rH 


•h 


CD 'd 


OJ 


a) 


Ph CD 


st 


+3 


r4 




<H. 


Cm <& 




to 


O Pi 

CD 




<D 

a> 


§ h 



+3 

4-3 
•H 



o 
o 



H 

w •• 

r-l >a 

> r-. 

H -U 

PI W 

3 



o 
o 

■d 
CD 

4-3 



o 

•H 
4-= 



i U0 






3 

4-3 
1 O 

i eg 



! I 



m : : 

> h 

o a) 

o a> 



u 

1 

CO 



co 



00 
CPi 



-419- 

TABLE 234 

NEWSPAPER PRINTING PRESS INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED -JEEKLY FOURS OF FACTORY WAGE EARNERS FOR WEEK OF 

JUKE 15, 1933 






Number 


Factory Wage 
Per Cent 

13.9 


Earners 


Hours ''forked 
per Week 


Cumulative 
Per Cent 


20 hours or less 


132 


13,9 


20.1 - 25 


49 


5.1 


19.0 


25.1 - 30 


42 


4.4 


23.4 


30.1 - 35 


215 


22.6 


46.0 


35.1 - 40 


269 


28.2 


74.2 


40.1 - 45 


144 


15.1 


89.3 


45.1 - 50 


71 


7.5 


96.8 


50.1 - 55 


18 


1.9 


93.7 


55.1 - 60 


6 


0.6 


99.3 


60.1 - 65 


2 


0.2 


99.5 


65.1 - 70 


1 


0.1 


99.6 


70.1 - 75 


- 


- 


- 


75.1 - 8'0 


2 


0.2 


99.8 


Over 80 hours 


2 


0.2 


100.0 


Total 


953 


100.0 















bource : 



Questionnaires sent out by National Recovery 
Administration, 5 concerns reporting. National 
Recovery Administration, Division of Research 
and Planning, The Newspaper Printing "ress 
Industry, prepared by J. A. Hanley and R. von 
Huhn, February 21, 1934. 



9818 



-420- 
TABLE 285 

newspaper PRINTING PRESS INDUSTRY 



CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY WAGE EARNERS 
FOR WEEK OF JIMS 15, 19 3 3 



FA C TORY 



17 A G E 



E A R II E R S 



hourly : 




EARN 


INGS : 


HUM 


UNDE 


R 10 




10 - 


14,9 




15 - 


19.9 


o 


20 - 


24.9 


4 


25 - 


29.9 


4 


50 - 


34.9 


7 


55 - 


39.9 


23 


40 - 


44.9 


105 


45 - 


49.9 


54 


50 - 


54.9 


63 


55 - 


59.9 


56 


60 - 


69.9 


109 


70 - 


79.9 


399 


30 a 


nd over 


122 




Total 


953 



; ER CEHT 



CUMULATIVE 
PER CEHT 



0.2 

0.4 

0.4 

C.7 

2.9 

11.0 

5.7 

6.6 

5.9 

11.5 

41.9 

12.8 

100.0 



0.2 

0.6 

1.0 

1.7 

4.6 

15.6 

21.3 

27.9 

33.8 

45.3 

87.2 

100.0 



SOURCE: Questionnaires sent out b^ National Recovery Administration 

5 concerns reporting. National Recovers Administration Division 
of Research and Planning. The Newspaper Printing Press Industry 
prepared b-" - J. A. Kanlev and R. von Huhn, February 31, 1934. 



9318 



-■'' Tl • 



... TABLE 236 
NEVJSPAPEil PBIKTISG EKSS3S IKDUSTHY 
CLASSIFIED 7EEKLY EA31TDT3-S Si" jFFICS 
ELiPLCYEES iTEEK OF JTJ11E 15, 1933 



Weekly Earnings 

(dollars) Fur.ip^r 

,;io.oo to $12.49 . • 2 

$12.50 to 014.99 . 4 

£■5.00 to ,,17.49 4 

J17.50 to .;,19.99 •' ■ 17 

.j>20.00 to £34.99 -25 

•)25.00 to $29.99 12 

J30.00 to $34.99 9 

o35.00 and over 34 



Total 107 



Source: I7.E.A. questionnaire returns, 3 concerns reporting. 
Tabulation by tlie 3ureau of the Census for tlie 
National Recovery Administration, Division of 
Hesearcli and planning, February 9, 1934. 



9C13 



-422- 
TABLE 237 

HIDE AND LEATHER WORKING MACHINE INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF FACTORY '.YORKERS, WEEK OF JUNE 15, 1933 



Working Hours 


Number of 




Per cent 


Cumulative % 


per Week 


Wage 


Earners 


y 


of total 


of Total 


Under 20 




10 




4.9 


4.9 


20.1 - 25 




11 




5,3 


10.2 


25,1 - 30 




8 




3,9 


14.1 


30.1 - 31 




41 




19.9 


34.0 


35.1 - 40 




52 




25.2 


59.2 


40.1 - 4b 




29 




14.1 


73.3 


45.1 - 50 




32 




15.5 


88.8 


50.1 - 55 




20 




9.7 


98.5 


55,1 » 60 




1 




0.5 


99.0 


Over 60 




2 




1.0 


100.0 



Total 



206 



100.0 



SOURCE: 



Questionnaire returns representing about 80 per cent of the 
industry to the NRA. National Recovery Administration 
Division of Research and Planning, The Hide and Leather 
Working Machine Industry, prepared by J, A. Hanley and R. 
von Huhn, February 21, 1934, 



9818 



-433- 



TABLE 288 
HIDE AND LEATHER WORKLU Mi CHINE INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY WORKERS DURING WEEK OF JUNE 15, 1933 



Actual Hourly 
Earnings 



Number of 
Wage Earners 



Per Cent 
of Total 



Cumulative % 
of Total 



25/ to 29.9jzf 



30 - 


34. 


,9 


35 - 


39, 


,9 


40 - 


44, 


,9 


45 - 


49, 


,9 


50 - 


54, 


, 9T- 


55 - 


59, 


.9 


60 - 


69, 


,9 


70 - 


79, 


,9 


80^ 


and 


over 



2.9 



5 


2.4 


2 


1.0 


17 


8.2 


. 9 . 


4.4 


36 


17.5 


27- • 


. 13.1 


55 


26.7 


28 ■ ■ • 


:.. 13. '6 


21 


10.2 



2.9 

5.3 
6.3 
14.5 
18.9 
36.4 
49.5 
76.2 
89,8 
100.0 



TOTAL 



>06 



100. C 



a/ SOURCE: Questionnaire returns representing about 80 per cent of the 
industry te the NrA. National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning. The Hide and' Leather 
Workin Machine- Industry, prepared by J. A. Hanley and R. 
von Huhn, February 21, 1934. 



9818 



-424-" 

TABLE 289 
HIDE AliD LEATHER MACHINE INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED UEEKLY EARNIITGS OP OPPICE EIPLOYEES, 
POP JUNE, 1933 

( To be Us e d with "autron) 



Weekly Earnings Number 

-(dollars) 



Less Than 10. 00 ..." . - 

io.oo - 12.4? ; 3 

12.50-14.99 4 

15.00 - 17-49 '. 1 

17.50 - 19.99 ' 5 

20,00 - 24.99 V 7 

25.00-29.99 6 

SO. 00 - 34.99 6 

35.00- & over , 8 



Total 40 



Source: N.H.A.. questionnaire returns, 8 establishments. 
Tabulated by the Bureau of the Census, for the 
National Recovery Administration, Division of 
Research and Planning, Peb. 10, 1934. 



9818 



-425- 



TABLE 290 
M0T0RCYLE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED YffiEKLY HOURS OF WAGE EARNERS, JUNE 1933 









Percentage of 


Hours wc 


jrked per week 
3 and und<3r 


Number 


total number 


20 hour: 


112 


14.7 


20.1 to 


25 hours- 


49 


6.4 


25,1 to 


30 hours. 


126 


16.6 


30.1 to 


35 hours. 


95 


12.5 


35.1 to 


40 hours . 


174 


22.9 


40.1 to 


45 hours . 


102 


13.4 


45.1 to 


50 hours . 


79 


10.4 


50.1 to 


55 hours . 


10 


1.3 


55.1 to 


60 hours , 


5 


• 7 


over 60 


hours 

* 


8 


1.1 


Total 


760 


100. 



Source: National Recovery Administration questionnaire returns, 
representing most of the industry. National Recovery 
Administration Division of Research and Planning. 
The Motorcycle Manufacturing Industry, prepared by 
C. A. Pearce, Dec. 20, 1953' • 



9818 



-436- 

TABLE 291 

MOTORCYCLE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY VJAGE EARNERS, JUNE 1933 



Percentage 
Hourly Earnings Number of 



i io'- 



Total Number 



Under 


15' cents 


15 to 


19J9 


cents 


20 to 


24; 9 


ii 


25 to 


29;9 


it 


30 to 


34;9 


1! 


35 to 


39; 9 


t! 


40 to 


44; 3 


it 


45 to 


49;9 


n 


50 to 


5419 


ti 


55 to 


59; 9 


ti 


60 to 


69S9 


1! 


70 to 


79.9 


II 


80 cents and over 


Total 







1 .1 

35 ' 4.6 

57 7.5 

117 15.4 

154 20.3 

155 20.4 
150 19.7 

40 5.3 

31 4.1 

11 1.4 

9 1.2 



760 100.© 



Source: National Recovery Administration Questionnaire returns, 
representing most of the industry. National Recovery 
Administration Division of Research and Planning. The 
Motorcycle Manufacturing Industry, prepared by 
C. A. Pearce, Dec. 20, 1933. 



9818 



-427- 



'L.BLE 292 



CLAl LlACillWhitl INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURS 0, ■. CRN FOR FACTORY dAGL EaRNERS 
SOR fiEEK RL PRESET TaTIVJ: OF JUNE 1$33 



Number of Hours 
.;orked per < eek 



Nuraber 



Factory IVaoe Earners 



Per Uenl 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



20 hours or uncer 
20.1 - 25- hours 
25.1 - 30 . hours 
30.1 - 35 hours 
35.1 - 40 hours 
4.0.1 - / + 5 hours 
4-5.1 - 50 hours 
50.1 - 55 hours 
55 "1 - 60 hours 
60.1 - 65 hours 
65.1 - 70 hours 
70.1 - 75 hours 
75.1 - 80 hours 
Over 80 hours 



94 

9 

22 

31 



23 



IS 



1 

7 



41.1 



9.6 



V- 



xO.l 
7.9 



0.4 
1.3 



41.1 

45-0 
54-6 
64-2 
77.7 
87.8 
95-7 
97.0 

97.4 
93.7 



100.0 



Total 



^24 



100 . 



Source j Ouestionnaire --eturns sent out by NRA, 15 concerns reporting 
National Recovery Administration Division of Research r.nd 
Planning. Ihe Clay Machinery Industry, prepared by J. A. 
Hanley and ft. von Huhn, ilarch 12, 1934= 



9818 



-428- 

TO 3E USED WITH CAUTION 

TABLE 293 

Clay Machinery Incus try 

Clas ified Daily Hours of Male Factory Wage Earners for June 1929 

end November 1933. 



Number of 


June 


Hours 


1929 (a) 


Under 6 




6-6.9 





7-7.9 





-.8-8. 9 


96- 


9-9.9 


423 


10-10.9 


4.9 


11-11.9 





12 end over 






June November 
,1933 .( a) 1933 (b) 

16 16 

5 7 

93- 167 
107 

10 2 



Total 559 229 212 

(a) 15 'establishments reporting. 

(b) 11 establishments reporting 

Source: ERA questionnaire returns. Tabulation by the Bureau of the 
Census for the National Recovery Adraini strati on Division of 
the Research and Planning, Feb. 28, 1934. 



9818 



-429- 



TABEE 294 



OLkl MACHINERY IiiDU£TRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EitllWliJu^ 01 FACTORY iiGE LAR6ER5 
FOR ,,EEK REPilESLNTATIV.L OF 'JUNE, 1933 



Actual 
Earnings 

Per Hour 



i ,:qi3r> . ,:c earners 



j>j umber 



Per .Cent Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Less than 20a 
20± - 24.9, 



2% - 29.9, 



30^ -, 3.4.9;- 

3>, - 39.9, 

40o - AA.9v 

45? - 49.90 

50v': - 54. 9 v 

55^ - 59.9-, 

60v- - 69.9,' 

70,. - 79.9, 

80v- or mere 

Total 



u 


• 6.1 


6.1 


2 


0.9 


7.0 


5 


.;.. 2 


9.2 


16 


7.9 .. 


17.1 


24 


10.5 


27.6 


15 


6.5 


34.1 


52 


22 . 7 


56.8 


17. 


7.4 


64.2 


50 


21.3 


86.0 


- : 


9.6 


95-6 


] ) 


•+ .4 


100 . 


29 


10 . 





Source • 



9818 



iuestionnaire returns sent out by 



15 concerns report- 



ing. National Recovery Adniinistrrtion Division of Research 
and Planning. The Clay machinery Industry prepared by 
J.. A, Hanlej and R. von Hulin. inarch 12 s 1934 = 



-430- 

T0 BE USED- "WITH CAUTION 
TABLE 295 

CLAY MACHINERY INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY EARNINGS OF OFFICE EMPLOYEES, 
REPRESENTATIVE WEEK OF JUNE, 1933. 



Weekly Earnings 

(Dollars) Number 



Under 5.00 3 

5.00 to 9.99 4 

10.00 to 12.49 3 

12.50 to 14.99 2 

15.00 to 17.49 8 

17.50 to 19.99 - 

20.00 to 24.99 G 

25.00 to 29.99 6 

30.00 to 34.93. 5 

35.00 and over 4 

Total 43 



Source: ITRA questionnaire returns, 1?? concerns reporting. 

Tabulation by the Bureau of the Census for the National 
Recovery Administration Division of Research and Planning, 
Feb. 28, 1934. 



9818 



-431- 



TO IE USED WITH CAUTION 



T*3LE 296 

STEEL TIRE HABOTACTtmiNG I1IDUSTHY 

Classified Hours of Work Eor Factor;'" Wage Earners 
Wee!: Including June Vj, 1933 



Hours Worked 


lumber of 


Per Cent 


Cumulative 


Per Week 


Wr/"e Earners 




Per Cent 


20 hours or less 


19S 


CT)*J 


25.3 


20.1 


to 25 


69 


3»S 


3^.1 


25.1 


to 30 


37 


11.1 


U5.2 


30.1 


to 35 


79 


10.1 


55-3 


35-1 


to UO 


70 


9.0 


6U.3 


Uo.i 


to U5 


7U 


9-5 


73. s 


1*5.1 


to 50 


69. 


g.s 


S2.6 


50.1 


to 55 


69 • 


S .0 


91. h 


55-1 


to 60 


27 


3.5 


9U.9 


Over 


60 hours 


HO 


5.1 


100.0 




Total 


7S2 


100.0 





SOURCE: NRA questionnaire returns, k concerns reporting. National 
Recovery Administration Division of Research and Planning. 
The Steel Tire Manufacturing Industry, prepared by Thomas Pi 
Kelly, March 19, 193H. 



9760 



— 4 ^ o_ 
TO 3E USED \TTE CAUTION 

TABLE 297 

STEEL TIRE liAMJEACTURING INDUSTRY 

Number of Eactor;; T7age Earners Employed in Establishments 
Vforkinc Specified Shifts and Shift Hours 



Number of Hamper of Eactory "wa r :e Earners 

Hours Worked June 1929 June 1931 October 1953 

■per Shift 1 Shift: 2 Shifts:! Shift :2 Shifts ill Shift:, 2 Shifts 3 .Shift s 

7 to 7-9 5lU 

8 to g.9 1SS 216 

9 to 9.9 13S Uig 

10 to 10.9 5U1 250 1S0 

11 to 11.9 5U5 llU 

Total 13s 1026 250 532 3^3 216 5 lU 

SOIRCE: NRA questionnaire returns, U concerns reporting. Tabulated by 
the Bureau of the Census for the National Recovery Administra- 
tion, Division of Research and Planning, February 26, 193^» 






9812 



-433- 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 



TA3LE 298 

STEEL TIRE KALUGA CTURIUC- INDUSTRY 

Classified Hourly Earnings For Factory T7a;;e Earners 
Payroll Ueek Including June 15, 1933 



Actual Earnings 


Humber 


Per Cent 


Cumulative 


Per Hour 








Per Cent 


20 to 2U.9 


sents 


14 


l.S 


1.8 


25 to 29.9 


11 


40 


5.1 


6.9 


30 to 3U.9 


11 


61 


7.8 


14.7 


35 to 39-9 


11 


112 


14.3 


29.0 


HO to 44.9 


11 


96 


12.3 


4l.3 


45 to H9.9 


11 


107 


13.7 


55.0 


50 to 5U.9 


n 


9^ 


11. s 


66.8 


55 to 59-9 


n 


66 


8.1+ 


75.2 


60 to 69.9 


n 


so 


10.2 


85. 4 


70 to 79.9 


11 


W 


5.6 


91.0 


SO cents or 


more 


70 


9.0 


100.0 


To 


tal 


782 


100.0 





SOURCE: NBA Questionnaire returns, 4 concerns reporting. National 
Recovery Administration Division of Research and Planning* 
The Steel Tire Manufacturing Industry, prepared by Thomas 
P. Kelly, March 19, 1934. 



9760 



-434- 



TABLE 299 

STEEL TIRE I.IANUEACTURING- INDUSTRY" 

Classified 7/eckly Earnings of Office Employees 
Payroll Week Including June 15, 1933 

TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 



Weekly 
Earnings 



ITuuber 



Per Cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



$5.00 to 


$9.99 


2 


10.00 to 


1U.9'9 


6 


15. CO to 


19.99 


9 


20.00 to 


2U.99 


12 


25.00 to 


29.99 


15 


30.00 to 


3^.99 


16 


35.00 to 


39.99 


6 


hO.OO to 


UU.99 


S 


$45.00 and over 


s 


Total ' 


S2 






SOURCE: NBA. questionnaire returns, U concerns reporting. National 
Recovery Adr.ini strati on Division of Research and Planning. 
The Steel Tire Uanufacturing Industry, prepared by Thomas 
P. Kelly, liarch 19, I93U. 



V 



9760 



•435- 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 



TABLE 300 

RAILWAY A TT ~ INDUSTRIAL SPRING MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED VJESKLY HOURS 0? FACTORY WORKERS FOR PAYROLL 7JEEK INDLUDIND 

JUNE 15, 1953 



Hours "forked Per Ueek 



20 Hours or less 
20.1 hours to 25 hours 
25.1 hours to 30 hours 
30.1 hours to 35 hours 
35.1 hours to 40 hours 
40.1 hours to 45 hours 
45.1 hours to 50 hours. 
50.1 hours to 55 hours 
55.1 hours to 60 hours 
Over 60 hours 



j.umoer 



Per Cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



97 


25.2 


25.2 


13 


3.4 


28.6 


32 


8.3 


36.9 


34 


8.8 


45.7 


50 


13.0 


58.7 


54 


14.0 


72.7 


43 


11.2 


83.9 


31 


8.1 


92.0 


22 


5.7 


97.7 


9 


2.3 


100.0 



Total 



385 



100.0 



Source: NRA Questionnaire returns, 6 concerns reporting. National 
Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Planning, 
The Railway and Industrial Spring Manufacturing Industry, 
prepared by Thomas P. Kelly, March 21, 1934; 



9B1P, 



-436-- 

TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 

TABLE 301_ , 
Railway and Industrial Spring Manufacturing 
Number of Factory Wage Earners Enroloyed in Establishments 
Working Specified Shifts and Shift Hours 



Hours Worked Ju ne IS ?9 June 193? October 1933 

per Shift 1 Shift 2 Shifts 1 Shift 3 Shifts 1 Shift 2 Shifts. 3 Shifts 

7-7.9 - - - - - 153 

8 - 8»9 364 - 359 11 238 - 5- 

9-9.9 321 - - 

10 - 10.9 94 9 15 - 

Total 779 9 374 11 238 153 5 



Source: N.R.A. questionnaire returns, 6 concerns reporting. Tabulation bjr 
the Bureau of the Census for the National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning, February 24, 1934. 



9818 



-437- 



TAELE 302 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 



RAIL/JAY AMD INDUSTRIAL SPRHIG I IANUFAC TURING INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF' FACTORY WAGE EARNERS PAYROLL WEEK 
INCLUDING JUNE 15,. 1933 



__ — 


Earnings 


, 


Factory Wage Earners 


. _ . , 


Hourlv 


Number 


Per Cent 


Cumulative 
Per Cent 


20/ to 


24.9/ 


3 


.8 


.8 


25/ to 


29.9/ 


12 


3.1 


3 f 9 


30/ to 


34,9/ 


52 


13,5 


17,4 


35/ to 


39.9/ 


69 


17.9 


35,3 


40/ to 


44.9/ 


99 


25.7 


61,0 


45/ to 


49,9/ 


45 


11.7 


72.7 


50/ to 


54.9/ 


35 


9.1 


81 f 8 


55/ to 


59.9/ 


24 


6.3 


88,1 


60/ to 


69.9/ 


22 


5.7 


93.8 


70/ to 


.79.9/ 


9 


2.3 


96.1 


80/ or 


more 


15 


3.9 


100.0 



Total 



385 



100,0 



Source: NRA Questionnaire returns, 6 Concerns Reporting. National' 
Recovery Administration, Division of Research and Planning^ 
The Railway and Industrial Spring Manufacturing Industry, 
prepared by Thomas P. Kelly, March 21, 1934. 



9318 



433- 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 



TABLE 303 
RAILWAY AIID INDUSTRIAL SPRING MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 



CLASSIFIED WEEKLY EARNINGS OF OFFICE EMPLOYEES PAYROLL WEEK 

INCLUDING JUNE 15, 1933 



Weekly Earnings 



liq.OO to $14.99 
$15.00 to $19.99 



'ip 



2Q.00 to $24.99 



$25.00 to $29.99 
$3p.OO to $34.99 
$3,5.00 to $39.99 
$40.00 to $44.99 
$4,5.00 and over 



Number 



5 
2 
6 
3 
4 
11 
5 
1 



Office Employees 



Per Cent 



Cumulative 
Per Cent 



Total 



37 



Source: NRA Questionnaire returns, 4 concerns reporting. National' 
Recovery Administration, Division of Research and i lanning, 
The Railway and Industrial Spring Manufacturing Industry, 
prepared by Thomas P. Kelly, March 21, 1934. 



0813 



TO BE USED '.TITH CAUTION 
TABLE 304 
LOCOUOTIVE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF FACTORY WAGE EARNERS , PAYROLL WEEK INCLUDING JUNE 15,1935 

Factory Wage Earners 



Hours Worked 
Per Week 


Number 
417 


Per Cent 
36.8 


Cumulative 
Per Cent 

36.8 




20 Hours or Under 




20.1 


to 


25 Hours 


71 


6.3 


43.1 




25.1 


to 


30 " 


179 


15.8 


58.9 




30.1 


to 


35 " 


83 


7.3 


66.2 




35.1 


to 


40 " 


136 


12.0 


78.2 




40.1 


to 


45 " 


78 


6.9 


85.1 




45.1 


to 


50 " 


79 


7.0 


92.1 




50.1 


to 


55 " 


30 


2.6 


94.7 




55.1 


to 


60 " 


26 


2.3 


97.0 




Over 


60 


Hours 


34 


3.0 


ieo.9 





Total 



1,133 



100.0 



Source: National Recovery Administration Questionnaires, six 
establishments reporting. 

National Recovery Administration Division of Research 
and Planning. The Locomotive Manufacturing Industry, 
prepared by Thomas P. Kelly, April 5, 1934. 



9813 



-440- TO BE USED T "TTH CAUTION 
TABLE ,305 

LOCOMOTIVE HAKUEACTURINQ INDUSTRY 

NUMBER OE MALE FACTORY WAGE EARNERS EMPLOYED IN ESTABLISHMENTS 
WORKING SPECIE ISC' SEIETS AND SHIET-HCURS 



June 15, 1929 June 15, 1933 October 15, 1933 
Hours Worked One Shift Two Shifts One Shift One Shift 

Per Shift No. Wage No. Wage No. Wage No. Wage 

Estab. Earn- Est. Earn- Est. Earn- Estab. Earn- 
ers ars ers ers 



7 - 7.9 

8 - 8.9 

9 - 9.9 

10 - 10.9 

11 - 11.9 

12 and over 
Total 



Source: NRA questionnaire returns. Tabulated by the Bureau of Census 
.for the National Recovery Administration, Division of Research 
and Planning, March 24, 1934 



- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


1563 


184 


- 


- 


1 


98 


2 


.384 


4323 


- 


- 


3 


807 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




226 


- ,■ 


- 


- 


1 


4259 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


453 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4507 • 


2 


4712 


6 


1133 


6 


1947 



981E 



-441- 



Lu 306 



LOCOjIOTZVI rL-ilfUFACTUPtllTG IIJDUSTRY 



CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARlTIITCrS "'F ; ACTORY JAGE EA A... IS PAYROLL :T!EK 

A CLUDIRG JAL 15, 1933 



(To bo Used with Caution) 



Factory ' : a*:e Earners 







- 






Cumulative 


Eai 


nings 
er 15 


Per Tour 
cents 


ITumber 


A^r Cent 


Por Cent 


Unc 


2 


n 

■ C 


.2 


15 


cents 


- 19.3 cents 


.1 


.3 


20 


ii 


- 24.3 


10 


•5 


1.2 


25 


it 


90 P 1 


48 


A. * C 


5.4 


30 


n 


- 34.9 


78 


6.9 


12.3 


55 


n 


- 39.9 


78 


6.9 


19.2 


40 


i 


- 44.3 ' 


143 


12.6 


31=8 


45 


■• 


- 43.9 


216 


13.1 


50.9 


50 


- 


-54.9 


168 


14. G 


65.7 


55 


;i 




125 


10.3 


76.6 


oO 


.i 


-69.9 


142 


12.5 


83.1 


70 


ii 


- 79.3 ' 


74 


6.5 


95.6 


80 


cents 


or more 


50 


4.4 


100.0 




Total 


1, 133 


100.0 





Sources : 



9818 



National Recovery Administration Questionnaires - Six 
establishments reporting* 

rational Recovery Administration Division of Research 
and Planning. The Locomotive Aanufacturin^ Industry. 
prepared by Thomas ?. Felly, April 5, 1934. 



-442- 



TABLE 307 
LOCCIIOTIVE HAi iUFACTURIITG INDUSTRY 

SSIFIED I'JEEKLY EARNINGS OF OFFICE EMPLOYEES, PAYROLL UEEK INCLUDING JUNE 15, 13:33 

. (T.q be. JJs.ed juijdl .Caution) 

OFFICE EliTLOYEES 

Cumulative 

Earnings Per 1/Teelc Number Per Cent Per Cent 

Less than ■'. 5.00 2 .5 .5 

5.00 to [J 9.99 14 3.2 3.7 

OlO.OO to 512.49 67 15.4 19.1 

012. 50 to ' 14.99 123 28.2 47.3 

.15.00 to 017.49 70 16.0 63.3 

017.50 to 019.99 48 11.0 74.5 

020.00 to 024.99 44 10.1 84.4 

025. 00 to 029.99 21 4.8 89.2 

,30.00 to ;34.99 14 3.2 92.4 

;,;35.00 and Over 33 7.6 100.0 

Total 430 100.0 



Source: National Recovery Administration questionnaires. Si:c 
establishments reporting. 

National Recovery Administration Division of Research 
and Planning. The Locomotive Manufacturing Industry, 
prepared by Thomas P. Kelly, April 5, 1934. 



9818 



-443- 
TABLE 308 T0 *® USjilI) WITH CAUTION 



SOIL LOCOMOTIVE UMOFACTURIKCt INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED YE Y.LY HOURS OF FACTORS iAGti EARNERS, TCSEK OF JUKE, 1933 



Hours Worked 
Per Vfeek 



20 hours or under 
20.1 to 25 
25.1 to 30 
30.1 to 35 
35.1 to 40 
40.1 to 45 
45.1 to 50 
50.1 to 55 
55.1 to 60 
Over 60 hours 
Total 



umber 


Per Cent 


Cumulative 
Per Cent. 


64 


24.5 


24.5 


19 


7.3 


31.8 


34 


13.0 


44.8 


13 


5.0 


49.8 


25 


9.6 


59.4 


22 


8.4 


67.8 .' 


17 


6.5 


74.3 


10 


3.8 


78.1 


12 


4.6 


82.7 


45 


17.3 


100.0 . 


261 


100.0 


* 



Source: National Recovery Administration questionnaires, 9 estab- 
lishments reporting. National Recovery Administration 
Division of Research and Planning. The Small Locomotive 
Llanufacturing Industry, prepared by Thomas P. Kelly, April 
13, 1934, 



9818 



••4-4- 4— 

TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 

TABLE 309 

Small Locomotive Industry 

Number of Male Factory Wage Earners Employed in Establishments 
Working Specified Shifts and Shift-Hours for weeks of 1929 and 1933. 

Number of 

Hours Payroll weeks including 

per Shift 

One Shift Two Shifts 

No. of Es- Ho. of Wage No. of Es- Ho. of Wage 
tablishments Earners tablishments Earners 

7-7.9 
8 - 8.9 
9-9.9 4 

10 - 10.9 1 

11 - 11.9 1 76 

Total 5 497 2 143 



June 


15, 


1929 


'430 




1 


5? 




1 


497 




2 


June 


15, 


1933 


95 






10 






45 




1 


27 







7-7.9 1 

8-8.9 '1 

9-9.9 3 45 50 

10-10.9 '1 
11 - 11.9 

Total 5 177 1 50 

October 15, 1933 

7-7.9 3 180 

8-8.9 3 33 

9-9.9 1 33 

10 - 10.9 

11 - 11.9 

Total 7 246 



Source: NBA questionnaire returns, 7 establishments reporting. 
Tabulation by the Bureau of Census, for the Notional 
Recovery Administration Division of Research and 
Planning, March 24, 1934. 



9818 



-445- 
TABLE 310 



TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 



SMALL LOCOMOTIVE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED HOURLY EARNINGS OF FACTORY WAGE EARNERS WEEK OF JUNE 1933 



Hourly 
Earnings 



15^ to 19.9^ 
20f£ to 24.9(z5 
25^ to 29.9$* 
30^ to 34.9$* 
35$* to 39.9$* 
40(2? to 44.9$* 
45$* to 49.9$* 
50$* to 54.9$* 
55^ to 59.9$* 
60$* to 69.°$* 
70$* to 79.9$* 
80 cents or more 







Cumulative 


Number 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


1 


.4 


.4 


1 


.4 


.8 


12 


4.6 


5.4 


19 


7.3 


12.7 


20 


7.7 


20.4 


42 


16.1 


36.5 


51 


19.5 


56.0 


51 


19c5 


75.5 


35 


13.4 


88.9 


16 


6.1 


95.0 


11 


4.2 


99.2 


2 


c8 


> 100.0 



Total 



261 



100.0 



Source: National Recovery Administration questionnaires, 9 estab- 
lishments reporting. National Recovery Administration 
Division of Research and Planning. The Small Locomotive 
Manufacturing Industry, prepared by Thomas P. Kelly, 
April 13, 1934. 



9818 



-446- 

TABLE 311 TO BE USED 171 TH CAUTION 

SMALL LOCOMOTIVE MANUFAC TURING INDUSTRY 
CLASSIFIED WEEKLY EARNINGS OF OFFICE EMPLOYEES, IEEK OF JUNE, 1933 

Weekly Cumulative 

Earnings Number Per Cent Pur Cent 

$10.00 to $14.99 . 7 

15.00 to .19.99 , 14 

20.00 to 24.99 12 

25.00 to 29.99 9 

30.00 to 34.99 . 18 

35.00 to 39.99 14 

40.00 to 44.99 11 

45.00 and over 8 

Total 83 



Source: National Recovery Administration questionnaire, 9 establish- 
ments reporting. National Recovery Administration Division 
of Research and Planning. The Small Locomotive Manufacturing 
Industry, prepared by Thomns P. Kelly, April 13, 1934. 



! 



9818 



-447- 

TO BE USED WITH CAUTION 

TABLE 312 
WOOD WORKIEG LiACEINERY INDUSTRY 

CLASSIFIED WEEKLY HOURS OF WORK FOR FACTORY WAGE EARNERS 

WEEK OF June 15, 1933 
_L±° 1 ° e Hsed with Ca ut ion) 







Factory Wage 


Earners 


Hour s 






Cumulative 


Worked 


Number 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


20 hor.rs or less 


149 


13.6 


13.6 


20.1 ~ 25 


47 


4.3 


17.9 


25-1 - 50 


54 


0.9 


22.8 


30. 1-35 


54 


4.9 


27 . 7 


35.1 - 40 


112 


10.2 


37.9 


40.1 - 45 


123 


11.2 


49.1 


45. 1 - 30 


284 


25.9 


75.0 


50.1 -55 


173 


16.2 


91.2 


55.1 -60 


57 




96.4 


60 and over 


40 


3.6 


100.0 


Total 


1098 


100. 





SOUHCE: ERA questionnaire returns, 40 Concerns reporting. Tabulation 

oy the Bureau of the Census for the National Recovery Administration, 
Division of Research and Planning, December 21, 1953. 



981C 



-448- 



TABLE 313 
WOOD WORKING MACHINERY I1IDUSTEY 

NUMBER OF FACTORY WAGES EARNERS IH ESTABLISHMENTS WORKING SPECIFIED SHIFTS 

AND SHIFT-HOURS 

Number of 
hours worked 
■per shift 



1929 


1937. 


1933 


Juno 


June 


October 


1 Shift 2 Shifts 


1 Shift 2 Shifts 


1 Shift 2 Shifts 




17 


400 92 


264 106 


268 


315 


724 72 


228 




956 ■ 


7 


22 



7 to 7.9 

8 to 8.9 

9 to 9.9 

10 to 10.9 

11 to 11.9 94 

Total 1944 173 520 94 737 

Not reporting shifts 

and shift hours -663 484 606 



Source: NRA questionnaire returns, 40 concerns reporting. Tabulation "by the 
Bureau of the Census, National Recovery Administration, Division of 
Research and Planning, December 21, 1933. 



9818