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Full text of "The World almanac and encyclopedia"

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WE have paid $225.00 for this chance to talk to you and re- 
alize the importance of saying something "worth while" 
and which will prove of value to us both. As you will consult 
the World Almanac for a year, here is a message for each season. 

Sprinsr: In the seed business this means from January to June but get 
your order in early. Write for our Catalog (illustrated above: and 
ready in January). When you get it study the Illustrated Contents in 
the front. It is full of good advice. You will be glad to see that we 
have done a lot of your thinking for you. 

Summer: This is vacation time for city people, but it is " busy season" 
for gardens. We issue " a little monthly talk about gardens" to those 
who ask for it. Your free subscription can begin wheneveryou wish. 
Write for a few back copies and see if you think them likely to prove 
interesting. 

Fall : Bulbs, bulbs, and then more bulbs should be your thought in the 
fall. Our Bulb Catalog is easily the most useful published, because — but 
ask for it and see. It is usually ready in August : but we will put your 
name down for a copy now. Shall we? 

Winter: There are a lot of things to do for a garden in getting ready for 
winter. We are planning a book about this. You can have a copy any 
time after September 1st. It will prove a genuine surprise. Shall we 
enter your name for one.'' 

If you will send us ten cents we will forward you a package of 
our African Daisy Hybrids, in many beautiful colors. This is 
the most attractive novelty in recent years.* It will be well 
worth the money ; and our catalog w ill come with it. Write today. 

* We would like to say a lot more about this beautiful flower. But better send for 
the seed, and you will say it for yourself when it blooms. 



J. M. THORBURN CS, CO. 

{110 years in business in New York) 

33 Barclay Street, through to 38 Park Place, New York 



Chalmers 

MOTOR CARS 
1913 Models 



"SIX" 


*'THIRTY-SIX'» 


$2,400 


$1 ,950 


2,600. 


2,150 


2,400 


1,950 


2,400 


1,950 


3,700 


3,250 


2,700 


2,250 



Touring Car, 5-passenger i 

Touring Car, 7-passenger 

Torpedo, 4-passenger ..••.... 

Roadster, 2-passenger 

Limousine, 7-passenger 

Coupe, 4-passenger 

Prices include full equipment 

15 Notable Chalmers Features 

• 

Electric Lights Eleven-inch Upholstery 

Turkish Cushions New Flush-sided Bodies 

Nickel Trimmings Increased Wheel Base 

Improved Springs Carbureter Dash Adjustment 

Chalmers Self-starter Big Wheels and Tires 

Long Stroke Motor Dual Ignition System 

Demountable Rims Speedometer 

4-Forwafd Speed Transmission 






E announce for 1913, big improvements in Chalmers <iars in 
comfort, convenience and appearance. For it is along 
these lines that we believe the greatest advances in auto- 
mobile building are to be made. 

Few changes have been made in our chasses. The mechanical 
features of our cars have been right from the beginning. Satisfactory 
service in the hands of 27,000 owners proves this. 

Here, then, are the principal additions and improvements on 
Chalmers 1913 cars: 

More Conveniences for Operator 

Electric lighting is regular equipment for 1913 on the *'Thirty- 
Six" and the *'Six." Just touch a switch on the dash and you can 
light at will head, tail and side lights. 

And no more cranking. A season's use has proved the Chalmers 
air pressure starter the simplest and most efficient starting device yet 
designed. 

Conveniently located on the new style Chalmers dash are all 
controls and indicators. Everything you need for running the car 
is within easy reach. 

II 



jziasier i^iaing uuaiities 

Luxurious comfort is built into every detail of Chalmers cars. 
The Turkish cushions, 1 1 inches thick, are soft as a down pillow. The 
upholstery is of the overstuffed type. All seats are wide, filled with 
high-grade hair and covered with heavy, soft, pebble-grained leather. 

The long wheel base, big wheels and tires, and long elastic springs, 
make all roads smooth. 

Added Beauty 

Chalmers cars have always been known for their "looks.'* For 
1913, they are even more beautiful than in the past. Flush-sided 
metal bodies have the graceful bell-shaped back. Dash is of one 
piece with body. 

Handsome nickel trimmings will be regular equipment. Leather 
lining throughout the body and on the dash leaves nothing to scratch 
or mar. The Chalmers finish cannot be surpassed. 

Three Great Cars 

Chalmers cars for 1913 are made in three chasses sizes and four- 
teen body types. 

The "Six" is now offered at the unprecedented price of $2400, 
a price made possible by our quantity production and increased 
manufacturing facilities. The "Six" motor, rated at 54 h. p., actual- 
ly develops 60 to 70 h. p. In every point the "Six" is a maximum car. 

The ** Thirty -Six" with striking improvements and added fea- 
tures, at $1950, is more than ever an ideal, all-around car. Wheel 
base is now 118 inches. Full electric lighting, Chalmers self-starter, 
reliable speedometer — are all furnished on the "Thirty- Six." 

New "30," self-starting, $1600 with improved motor, 34x4-inch 
tires, demountable rims, large brakes, beautiful new flush-sided body. 
Two body types, 5-passenger touring car $1600; 4-passenger torpedo 
$1600. 

All cars are fully equipped with top and windshield. 

Order now for early delivery so that you can get the use of your 
car during the best motoring season. 

So look these cars over carefully at our dealers' salesrooms. 
Compare them with other cars of the highest price. We are sure 
your verdict will be favorable to the Chalmers. 

Qialmers Motor Companp, Detroit 

III 




Reduce or Increase Your Weight 
— Improve Your Health — Perfect 
Your Figure 



ECOME my pupil and I will make you 
my friend. Devote but fifteen min- 
utes daily to my system and you can 
weigh what Nature intended. You can 
reduce any part of your figure bur- 
dened with superfluous flesh or build 
up any part that is undeveloped. 
The effect of my system can be concentrated on your 
hips, waist, limbs or any other part of your body. 
My system tends to make a figure perfectly pro- 
portioned throughout — a full, rounded neck; 
shapely shoulders, arms and legs; a fine, fresh 
complexion; good carriage with erect poise and 
grace of movement. 

YOU CAN IMPROVE YOUR HEALTH. 

My system stimulates, reorganizes and re- 
generates your entire body. It helps trans 
form your food into good, rich blood. It 
strengthens your heart, lungs ^nd other or- 
gans, conquering all weaknesses and dis- 
orders and generating vital force. 

My latest book, "The Body Beautiful," 
should be read by every woman, and 
I will send it to you free. It explodes 
the fallacy that lack of beauty or 
health cannot be avoided. In it 
I explain how every woman 
can be VIGOROUS, 



Trial 
Plan 
To-Day. 




HEALTHY AND 
ATTRACTIVE. 

Send 2c. 

Stamp for 

"The 

Body 

BeautifuF 

and 



I have 
practised 
what I 
teach. I n 
childhood I 
was puny 
and de- 
formed. I 
have overcome 
a 1 1 weaknesses 
by my own nat- 
ural, drugless meth- 
ods. Millions of peo- 
ple have seen in me a 
living demonstration of 



my unique system of 

bealth-culture and body-build- 
ing. If you are weak, nervous, fat, 
thin, unshapely, tired, lacking vitality, 
or in any other respect not at your very 
best, I can surely be of service to you. 

MY GUARANTEE. With my free book, "The 
Body Beautiful," which is fuHy illustrated 
with photographs of myself explaining miy system, 
I give full particulars of my Guarantee Trial Plan, 
Whereby you -can test the value of my instruction with- 
out risking a single penny. 

Annette Kellermann 12 wlsr^fsr street New York 



IV 



c/^ST^ 



. -3 



Send for 

FREE BOX 

U. S. Metal 
Polish 



Oowpaoj^ 



VZ 






'S^J<^ 



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Lo INrALLIBLE 



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{Paste) 



Largest Sale 
in the World 





FOR P0USHIN6 60LB.SILVER. PLATED /// S 
-l.V^WARE.NICKEL.TlH.BRASS,COPPER.Elc JH ,V 
oV^v DIRECtlONS: //I^ 

^^^Makea littteof ttiePblish onas4ifrdoHi,y^^«9 
x«w^C^»J?'b ^^ Nefal hard and then wipe, 



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jfoff wirhadryclo^h. 



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Best for all metals 

Cleans, polishes and preserves 

Guaranteed not to scratch and never to shrink 

or deteriorate 

Send for FREE SAMPLE 



ONCE TRIED, ALWAYS USED 



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\mSSM 



FRIEND 



FOK 
jSeotiflnB, Cleanslno and PoUshlitfl I 

!BAR FIXTURES 
DRAIN BOARDS! 

AND ALL 

fjTin, Zinc, Brass.4^opper, | 
iNicl<el andean Kitchenr 

and Plated Utensils 
^Glass, Wood, Marble, 
Porcelain, Etc. 

GEORGE WM. HOFFMAN 

9**« M«B«taetmr«r ■■« Praprtctor 
^ftM tASW WAaHBt gf W STm£XT. VIDIAHAPMJS ^ 



Bar-Keeper's 
Friend (Powder) 



Standard for Thirty Years 



PE BAR-KEEPERS' FRIEND! 



Tr*dt-M<rk Rciliicrcd Id U. S. Piicdi Otflcc 



All of our polishes received 

HIGHEST AWARDS AT 
THE WORLD'S FAIRS 

Chicago, 1893 
St. Louis, 1904 




The BEST 

Liquid Polish 
Blade. 



George William Hoffman Co. 

ESTABLISHED 1883 557 E. Washington St., Indianapolis 

Branches: 1 Park Row, N. Y. ; 70 W. Madison Street, Chicago, 

and 112 Market Street, San Francisco 



NO HILL TOO STEEP. 










NO SAND TOO DEEP 



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HI 



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Unsurpassed at any price— in comfort, 
riding ease and silence. 

The "Olympic" $1500 — 35 HP, long stroke 
(4^x4^) motor; 34x4 inch tires; 115 inch 
iwheelbase; full elliptic springs; 10 inch uphol- 
stering; black and nickel trim; self-starter. 
Completely equipped. 

The "Majestic" ^i850 — 45 HP, long stroke. 
(4^x5iA) motor; 36x4 inch tires; 124 inch 
wheelbase; full elliptic springs; self-starter; 
electric lights. Completely equipped. 

The "Sultanic" $2500— Six cylinder, 55 HP, long 
stroke motor (4^x4^): 36x4^/^ tires; 138 
inch wheelbase; full elliptic springs; -electric 
starter; electric lights. Completely equipped. 
Seven passenger, i$2650. 

Jackson Automobile Co. 

702 East Main Street 
Jackson, Mich. 





Make Your Family Happy 

Promote the happiness and unity of your family by 
owning a Winton Six. It is a car for all the family — ^big 
enough that nobody need be left behind. Self-cranking, 
and easily handled. It has the beauty of appearance and 
performance that makes the family glad to be seen in it, 
and the power and sturdiness to guarantee their safety. Its 
new-idea upholstery gives more restful riding than was 
ever before known. ' 

It is a car of distinction; the leader of Sixes, lowest in 
repair expense, and least costly of all high-grade Ccirs to buy. 

A proper expenditure for the pleasure and entertainment 
of the family is a legitimate part of your yearly expense. 
An expenditure for a genuinely good motor car is advan- 
tageous in health, happiness, unity, and usefulness. The 
Winton Six solves the family problem. 

Permit us to send you our 64-page, library size catalog. 
It is full of useful information. 

THE WINTON MOTOR CAR CO. 

The World^s First Maker of Sixes Exclusively. 
124 Berea Road, Cleveland, Ohio. 

WINTON BRANCH HOUSES 

New York, Broadway at 70th St.; Chicago, Michigan Avenue at 13tih St.; Bost'on, 
674 Commonwealth Ave. ; Philadelphia, 246-248 N. Broad St. : Baltimore, Mt, Royal at 
North Ave.; Pittsburgh, Baiun at Beat'ty St.; Cleveland, 1228 Huron Road; Detroit, 
998 Woodward Ave.; Milwaukee, 82-86 Farwell Ave.; Minneapolis, lG-22 Eighth St.. 
N.; Kansas City, 3324-3326 Main St.; San Francisco, 300 Van Ness Ave.; Seattle, 
1000-1006 Pike St. 

Vli 







The Clipless Paper 
Fasteners 
DO IT ALL! 

Briefly, these new Paper Fasteners' 
offer the business man four definite 
advantages : 

(1) A quicker way to fasten papers. 

(2) A quicker way to make a more se- 
cure fastening. 

(3) The elimination of clips and pins, 

which will pay 
for either the 



"Hand" or 
"St^nd" Clip- 



"Stand'» Ma- 
chine, Weight 

2% lbs.: 

Height 5 in. ; 

Price 



less Paper Fas- 
tener in a very 
few months. 

(4) By elim- 
i n a t i n g the 
bulki n e s s 
of clips and 
pins they 
double the 
capacity of 
files. 

ALL DEALERS CARRY THEM 

Beware of Imitators and Infringers! 

Clipless Paper Fastener Co. 

NEWTON, IOWA 




\hMhm 




•MM»jvMamioifMMaaiumiurm, 



^0^1^ ' Business 
"^^ '"■^"^ Furniture 

Combines Efficiency, Economy and Variety 

$13 



/ 




This Solid Oak File for 

20000 Letters Freight Paid (|j«.)^ 

Drawers roll easily on Roller Bearings— are dust 
proof and equipped with follow blocks. 
Very strortg. Joints are interlocked, glued and 
screwed together. Will withstand hard use and 

abuse. As serviceable 

as any file at any price 

Smaller cabinets and 

Cap and Invoice sizes. 

5^^ Stationery 
Storage Cabinets 

keep enough stationery for 

current use— handy, acces- 

sible— yet protected from 
dust and flies- Spaces for Note, Letter and Cap Paper, Enve- 
lopes and drawer for Carbon Paper, Etc. 

3 Ply Veneer lid raises and recedes. All beautifully finished 
Quartered Oak, Golden or Natiiral. 

$3.00 with lid, $2.50 without lid Express Paid (See Note) 

5^^S^ Filing Desks combine your choice of 

Filing drawers in a handsome Flat Top Desk 

There are three kinds of drawers for filing letters, 3x5, 4x6 and 5x8 cards, 

blanks and all business papers. Choose 

those you need and have them arranged as 

you want them. 

Solid Oak, top 52x28. All drawers on Roller 

Bearings. Center Drawer and Slide Shelves. 

The files you need at your finger tips. 

A desk plus filing drawers means multiplied 

efficiency. Get posted NOW. 

^f^£^ Sectional Bookcases 

are made in a variety of styles in in- 
expensive as well as high grade woods 

and finishes. 





Whether you need 

^ I note) ^ one section or an 

office or home library outfit— get Bookcase Catalog "H" and com- 
pare prices and constructional advantages before you buy. 

Get Free Booklet "Filing Suggestions" 

which helps solve filing problems. Sent with Catalog "F" show- 
ing filing equipment and many time saving office specialties. 
Catalog "H" shows two lines of Sectional Bookcases. 

Note: TRANSPORTATION CHARGES PAID AS INDICATED ABOVE 

to points EAST of Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Oklahoma and 
Texas. Consistently low prices beyond. 



The ^0£^ Manufacturing Co. 

150 Union Street Monroe, Michigan 

New York Office ^ 108 Fulton Street 



■.■^.■^■kv■l■v-^ ^,ln..^^.>..■ 



---v^J^-^-^^^'--^ 




{Burpee's Annualior 1913 1 

I ^^The Leading American Seed Catalog^' | 

g Is now ready for mailing. The first edition of more i 

g than four hundred thousand copies will soon be | 

g distributed. As usual, it is sent unsolicited ONLY i 

^ to "Customers of Record." We shall be pleased, § 

^ however, to mail a copy immediately upon applica- ^ 

« tion (a postal-card will do) to every one who ap- P 

I predates QUALITY IN SEEDS. I 

I Jhis SILENT SALESMAN (and we employ | 

g no "talking" salesmen to solicit orders) tells the ^ 

^ plain truth about The Best Seeds that Can Be S 

g Grown. It is a bright book of 180 pages and shows,be- i 

g sides colored plates of Burpee Specialties, hundreds i 

i« of the choicest vegetables and most beautiful ^ 

^ flowers, illustrated from photographs. It is almost 1 

1 indispensable to all who garden either for pleasure S 

^ or profit. % 

I The "HOUSE OF BURPEE" is known the i 

I world over not only as EXPERTS IN SWEET ^ 



^ 



I PEAS, but also as SEED SPECIALISTS. No | 

^ other American firm has ever introduced so many § 

novelties of sterling value — and no other growers ^ 

supply seeds annually direct to so many planters. ^ 

i It would be to your interest to read THE BURPEE | 

^ ANNUAL. It will cost you only one cent for a ^ 

^ post-card to send us your address, and 3^ou are p 

^ under no obligation to buy. We never ^nnoy ap- ^ 

1 plicants with "follow-up" letters! | 

U Shall we mail you a copy? ^ 

I If so, kindly WRITE TO-DAY. | 

I W. Atlee Burpee & Co. I 

^ Burpee Buildings - . - - Philadelphia | 

i The World's Largest Mail-Order Seed House ^ 

^ X S 




TOR GCXS — 3 in One gun oil lubricates perfectly ilac'k, trigger, ejector and break 
joints. It cleans and polishes like now the barrels, inside and out — also the wooden 
stock. Absolutely prevents rust. All leading gun manufacturers use and recommend 
3 in One. 

POR SEWING IVIACHINBS — 3 in One lubricates exactly right every action part, 
making the machine run 100 times easier. Saves the user's strength — saves wear on 
the bearings and prevents repair bills. Never collects any dirt, never gums or clogs. 
It cleans and polishes the wooden case, and prevents rust on all metal surfaces. 

FOR RAZORS — 3 in One means shaving: luxury. Do this: Draw "safety" or "or- 
dinary" blade between thumb and first finger moistened with a little 3 in One. 
Strop, and secure keenest edge ever. After shaving, oil blade again — no rust can 
form. Your request on a. postal brings our "scientific "razor saver" circular, free.) 

FOR FURNITURE — 3 in One has .simply revolutionized polishing furniture. This 
is the way: Wring out a soft cloth in cold water moistened with a little 3 in One. 
Go over your piano or other fine furniture. All the marks of lime and soil will van- 
ish. Then dry and polish with a piece of cheesecloth, rubbing with the grain of the 
v/ood. The beautiful lustre and high polish will come back right before your very eyes. 

FOR TALKING MACHINES— 3 in One nmakes every kind of a talking machine 
work beautifully — ^prevents irritating squeaks and "whir" of the motor and records. 
Always wipe your disc records with cheesecloth moistened with 3 in One. It prevents 
dust gathering on them and spoiling their exchange value. 



Send us your name and address on a postal and 
we will mail you a generous sample of 3 in One 
and the 3 in One Dictionary — both free. Get the 
bottte and the book, now! 



3 In One is sold in all good stores in 3 -size bottles: 10c. 

for % Dollar Household Size. 



2 5c.. and New %-Pint 



3 IN ONE OIL CO. 

71 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY 






Model 69T, Completely Equipped 

The Best Buy in the Market 



SEI^F-STABTEB 
30 SOBSXSFOWEB 
S-FASSEITGEB TOURING CAB 
llO-nrCH WHEEI. BASE 
TIMKEIT BBABIITGS 
CBITTBB CONTBOI^ 



BBMY MAGNETO 
WABNBB SFBBDOMETBB 
MOHAIB TOF AND BOOT 
CI^BAB VISION WIND SHIELD 
FBBSTOI.ITE TANK 



40,000 cars a year make these two values possible. 
Operating on the largest scale, we can produce at the 
lowest prices. In a word, we are able to give more car 
for less money than any other manufacturer in the 
world. Note the complete and costly equipment of 
each model. 

LET \JS MAILr A 1913 CATAI^OGX7£ 

THE WILLYS-OVERLAND COMPANY, TOLEDO, OHIO 




XII 




If475 

Model 7 IT, Completely Equipped 

Some of the Big Features 



00MFZ.ET1: ium^ctric i^ig-kthto 

O U T F I T — GEITEKATOB AJSTD 
STOBAGX: BATTERY 
SEIir STABTSB 
45 HORSEPOWER 
TIMXEN BEARINaS 
CEITTER OONTROIi 
WSEEI^ BASE 114 XITCHES 



WARNER SPEEDOMETER 

BCOHAIR TOP AND BOOTS 

CI^EAR VISION WIND SKIELD 

PRESTOI.ITE TANK 

BREW^STER GREEN BOD7— XVORY 
STRIPED, NTCKEi; PIiATED, AND 
DEAD Bl^ACE TRIBffMTNG 



For those who prefer an electric to a gas starter, 
we will build into either model, at the factory, the high- 
est type and most expensive of electric starters. These 
starters consist of no more than three parts and are 
the most efficient known. Model 69T so equipped is 
priced at $1210 and Model 71T at $1650. 

I^ET IJS MAIL A 1913 CATAI^OG17£ 

THE WILLYS-OVERLAND COMPANY, TOLEDO, OHIO 




XIII 



Svi 



Chemically Prepared Cloth 

used dry, will produce high polish on Gold, Silver, 
Copper, Brassware, etc. ; does the work without the 
use of polish. Price 25 cents. 

Dust Absorbmg Cloth 

Antiseptic-hygienic, to be used wherever dust lies; 
for furniture, woodwork and everything about the 
house. A dust cloth chemically treated io absorb 
dust — will not scatter it. The particles of dust are 
retained in the cloth until washed out in warm water 
and soap; absolutely sanitary, reliable, durable. 
Price 25 cents. 

Liquid Putz 

for cleaning Brass, Copper and all metals. Gives a 
ksting polish. Non-inflammable. One-lialf 
pint can 10 cents. 

Silver Cleaner 

Superior to all others. For cleaning Silver and 
Nickel. Gives a brilliant and lasting polish. 10 
and 25 cents. 

Aluminum Polish 

in liquid form. Keeps aluminum always looking 
like new. One-lialfpint can 15 cents. 



Rust Remover 

;| For removing rust from all materials. 
cents. 



Price 25 



To introduce the above articles 
they will be delivered, postage 
prepaid, to any part of the United 
States, on receipt of money or 
stamps for amount of purchase. 

Special Discount to Dealers and Agents. 

M. LOCWCnstCin, Solc Distributor 

71 Washington Square South - - New York City 



X/IV 





Why Not Make $200.00 a Month- 

That's 
$50.00 
a Week» 
Almost 
$10.00 
a Day 

* 

selling Victor safes and fireproof boxes to merchants, doctors, lawyers, dentists and 
well-to-do farmers, all of whom realize the need of a safe, but do net know how easy 
it is to own one. Salesmen declare our proposition one of the best clean-cut money- 
making opportunities ever received. Without previous experience YOU can dupli- 
cate the success of others. Our handsomely illustrated 200-page catalogue will 
enable you to present the subject to customers in as interesting a manner as though 
you were piloting them through our factory. Men appointed as salesmen receive 
advice and instructions for selling safes, giving convincing talking points which it 
is impossible for a prospective customer to deny. Why don't YOU be the first to 
apply from your vicinity before some one else gets the territory? We can favor 
only one salesman out of each locality. 

Wide-awake men 

are prompt to take 
advantage of our 
special inducement, and 
notwithstanding that 
the completion of our 
new factory has enabled 
us to double our out- 
put, indications point 
to an ever-increasing 
demand which will con- 
tinue to tax our facili- 
ties. We are spending 
many thousands of dol- 
lars enlarging our sales 
organization, but to 
learn all particulars it 
will cost you only the 
price of a postal-card. 
Just ask for **New 
Offer 6." 

Highest Award Grand Prize and Gold Medal, World's 

Fair, St. Louis, 1904 

The Victor Safe & Lock Co. 

Cincinnati, Oliio 




OUR NEW HOME. 



XV 



'■^-i 



Roll 



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fri 



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•/. 



ISJOTHING in the 
world gives so 
much pleasure for so 
little money as tobacco. 
And where in the wide 
world can you invest 5 
cents and draw as big a 
dividend of pleasure as 
fiom a sack of good old 



OCNUINE 

Bull Durham 

SMOKING TOBACCO ' ^ ^ 

Forty * 'rollings'* in each 5 -cent muslin sack — 

whether rolled in cigarettes or tucked away comfortably in your pipe? 
. Just look at it in plain figures: — 

10 ordinary ready-made cigarettes - - 5 cents 

10 better ready-made cigarettes - - 10 cents 

10 more expensive ready-made cigarettes 25 cents 

j|\ of the very best possible cigarettes p 

41 1 rolled from one 5-cent sack of ^ 

^^ ••Bull" Durham . . . *^ 

A book of "papers" 
free witli each 
5-cent muslin sack 



cents 



— Roll your own and enjoy the 
solid pleasure of a pure, mellow, 
fragrant, satisfying tobacco that for 
over fifty-two years has delighted 
more millions of men than 
all other high-grade tobac- 
cos combined. 

That plain muslin sack holds 
"Bull" Durham— "Bull" Durham 
will hold your loyalty for a lifetime. 



XVI 



•=^''?-V- ^•:".v.v':-> A "•■!-■■■ 




'TPAOe MARK REG. U.S.PAT, OFF. 



Inventions Sought hy Capital. Write for Free Book 

PATENTS that PAY BEST 

R. S. & A. B. Lacey, Dept. 900, Washington, D. C. 



^$>^>^x$><^^^>^><$><$><$><^><e^^^$>^^>^><^^ 



5% INTEREST 

Allowed on accounts from ^10 to ^3,000. 
Deposits made on or before the 5th of any month draw 
interest from the 1st. 
;^100,000 on deposit with the State of Ni Y. 
We are entering our 73d year. 
Banking by mail to meet your convenience. 
Call or write for booklet. 

CLARKE BROTHERS, Bankers 

158 Nassau St., New York City. Est. 1840 



XVII 



ALL SCRIVEN UNDERWEAR 




S.CR1VEN STAMP A<L^.^ 

ON EVERY GARMENT 



uuui.9itcn 



And this stamp is your GUARANTEE, 
so be sure that you get SCRIVEN 
GARMENTS. 







Here are a few reasons why you should 
wear them: 

The MATERIAL and WORKMANSHIP 
are of the BEST. 

No RIPPING or TEARING, as the 
INSERTION gives at just the right time 
and place, thus taking the strain from 
the body of the garment. 

You can assume ANY POSITION without wear or tear on the garments. 
SO COMFORTABLE AND GOOD FITTING, you are not aware of their 
presence. 

TRY THEM 

You Take No Chances. We Guarantee Them. 



You cannot afford to be without these health-giving and comfortable 
garments that will relieve you of your underwear trouble and an- 
noyance. 

On Request We Will Mail 
You One of Our Illustrated 
Catalogues of Prices and 
Styles. 

More Than One Hundred 
Carefully Selected Lines 
from which to Order. 
Your Dealer Will 
Be Glad to Supply 
Your Wants, 

Don't Miss This 
Opportunity. 

Jr A. SCRIVEN COMPANY, le & is East IStb St.,New York,'N.Y. 

XVIII 





OOR F/ll^ C/IT/ILOQ 



SP£CI/lliSTS IN 



Ne59 



REVOUfERS 



Wt C4RRy 

CO0PET& 

UM£SIN 

FISHINQ 
T/IQKIB 

/ITHtTlC 
OOTFITS 

OIOEMS 

Bicycifs 

HOKHNQ 
CIPTHINQ 



COfflPIITE (m OP TO THE ffllNOTE 

THt CATALOG • C0MPR15t5 'EVERy •Ra»ABl?-AFTlCl!-mOE-IN 

GUNS' RIFl§5 -REVOLVERS •AMriUr«m0N-rtUnHr(0CI2T11lf1Q*'»3H0ES 
CAMP'0(iTFn3-pOCKET^t1UM"nriG-C(JTL^Ry • FO0rBAli--BASKDrBAUr 
5WEATtRSAYHirnCO(rmTaF£riCiriG^»B0Xiri<3 • CAMEMS: 

•SEND -FOR- IT- NOW 

OOK f ISMINQ J/ICKIf «'^5PRING-5a(!)(!)ER5P0RTS CflTfllPQ 

— COiqiUFQ ON R£Qae5T — 

Sdioverlmg Da^ ^ Qalej 




c«»MfllifcST 



30a--30i^ BROAD w/iy 

XIX 



NECa VORKCITV 



THE TRAVELLERS COMPANION 

A FIVE-POUND PRIVATE SECRETARY 




BUILT OF ALUMINUM AND STEEL 

A Portable Typewriter, made to stand hard usage. It will 
double the ability Of the Travelling Salesman, Reporter, 
Engineer, or any one having reports to make or manu- 
scripts to write. 

Carbon copies can be kept for future reference without extra labor. 

THn NEW NO. 6 

ALUMINUM BLICKENSDERFER 

Weighs only 5 pounds, is so strong and durable it can be 
easily carried anywhere. U has Roller Bearings, Auto- 
matic Pointer, Paper Release, Adjustable Margin, Tabulator 
and Interchangeable Type, and is in every way a HIGH 
'CLASS MACHINE. Either Blickensderfer Scientific or 
Universal Keyboard. 

WR^ITE FOR CATALOG A-64 

THE BLICKENSDERFER MFG. CO. 

Executive Offices and Factory 

STAMFORD, CONN. 



Branch Offices and Agrencies in Principal Cities 
Ifo. 240 BBOAnWA-S* ITo. 121 No. DEABSOBaT STBEET 

XX 



New York, N. Y. 



diicaffo, ni. 



— < ■— » ■ W- » 



itimmimmBi'^t^m 



ttn\itm»mmkt^ 



EVER Y B USINESS 

REQUIRES IT 



STRONG 
ENOUGH FOR ANY WORK 



liICHT 
ENOUGH TO CARRY 







. 



NEW MODEL NO. 8 

The time has passed when a business can be properly con- 
ducted without the use of a typewriter. 

The BLICKENSDERFER is BEST adapted for all classes of 
work. You see what you write and can make perfect carbon copies 
for future reference. The Types are Interchangeable (allowing the 
use of different styles and languages on the same machine) . Ink- 
ing and Printing are direct. 

MODEL NO. 8 is thoroughly up-to-date, including BACK 
SPACER and DECIMAL TABULATOR for which no extra charge 
is made. 

Either Blickensderfer Scientific or Universal Keyboard. 

SEND FOR CATALOG A.65 

THE BLICKENSDERFER MFG. CO. 

Executive Offices land Pactory 

STjiMFORD, CONN. 

Branch Offices and Agencies in Principal Cities 
No. 240 BROADWAY No. 121 No. DEARBORN STREET 

New Tor*, N. Y. Chioagro, 111. 

XXI 



IS IT FAIR 

for you to pay $1.25 to $1.75 for roofing 
COSTING LESS THAN 45c TO MAKE? 



Many people ARE doing it every day. YOU are apt to if you 
don't know the facts, because ready roofing is being sold to jobbers 
for 45c per square. It certainly costs less than 45c to make, and 
you pay $1.25 to $1.75 for it. 

You can always tell cheap roofing. It is literally bleeding to 
death. It is oily, greasy, dirty and sort of a sickish yellow color. 
You can actually see the oil coming out, proving that the cheapest 
adulterants were used in making it. 

REX FLINTKOTE ROOFING 

is the safest roofing to buy. It is clean, firm and always stays so. We 
iiave been making it for nearly fifteen years. The first made is still giving 
good service without paint. 

RexFlintkote Roofing is used in large quantities by some of the 
'iDiggest corporations. Some of them got away from us for a while, and 
used dheaper roofing. They have come back, however, and are using more 
Rex Flintkote than ever. Cheap roofing is expensive at any price. 

Good roofing is economical at any price. 

Rex Flintkote is guaranteed as follows: 

1 ply 5 years 2 ply 7 years 3 ply 10 years 

The guarantee is simpliciy itself, and absolutely binding, which is not 
the case with cheap roofing guarantees. 

The first cost of Rex Flintkote may be a trifle more than many other 
roofings, but it is the cheapest per year roofing you can possibly buy. 
Isn't that what you want? 

RexFlintkote will cost you: 

$1.75 per roll of Vz ply, 108 sq. ft., weighing 25 lbs. 
$2.25 per roll of 1 ply, 108 sq. ft., weighing 35 lbs. 
$3.25 per roll of 2 ply, 108 sq. ft., weighing 45 lbs. 
$4.00 per roll <of 3 ply, 108 sq. ft., weighing 55 lbs. 

Also made in rolls of 216 square feet. 

These prices apply only east of the Mississippi River. 

Send for sample and booklet W. A. 13. 

Flintkote Manufacturing Company 

88 Pearl St., BOSTON, MASS. 
Branches and Representatives in Principal Cities 

XXII 



yjoUSE AND 




BEFORE YOU BUILD 

be sure you are getting the best style; the most con- 
venient and economical arrangement for the money 
you wish to spend. For the convenience of those 
who intend to build we have published in book form 
designs of houses, showing the houseis as they will 
appear when built, together with the floor plans of 
the same. Estimated costs of construction are given 
to guide you in your selection. We -are also afble 
to furnish the complete plans and specifications of 
any one of the 1,283 designs shown in our books at 
a low cost. 

Price 
Cement Houses and How to Build Them — 8 7 Deslgns$1.66 
Radford's Artistic Bungalows — 208 Desig-ns . . . .$1.00 
House and Barn Plajis— 100 Houses — 125 E:arns. .81.00 

Artistic Homes — 2 50 Designs $1.00 

Garages and How to Build Them — 5 5 Designs. .$1.00 

Ideal iHomes — 100 Designs $1.00 

Modern Homes — 200 Designs $1.00 

Stores and Flat Buildings— 5 7 Designs $1.00 

American Homes — 100 Designs $1.00 

Any three Books for $2.50 Postpaid. 

RADFORD ARCHITECTURAL CO. 

178 FULTON ST. NEW YORK 



PATENTS 



THAT PEOTECT and PAY. 

Send for FREE 96-page book. 

Advice free. Terms reason- 
able. Highest references. Best results. Send sketch or model for /ree search. 
Recommended Patent Lawyer in the Bankers' Register and special list of 
selected lawyers. Also in Martindale's Law Directory, Sharp & Alle- 
man's Directory of Lawyers, The Gast-Paul Directory of 
Lawyers, and Kime's International Law Directory. 
ALL BUSINESS GIVEN PROMPT AN D PROPER ATTENTION. 

A largfe list of stron g recoimnencL ationB furnlslied free. 

WATSON E. COLEMAN, Patent Lawyer, 624 F St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 




CIVIL SERVICE COURSES 




By EWART, FIELD and 
MORRISON of the Boston 
Public Schools. :: :: 

Why don't you work for Uncle Sam? Thousands appointed to good posi- 
tions every year. We prepare for the examinations. 

New books. Best of personal coaching. 

250 PAGE CATALOG FREE. WRITE T0-D.4Y. 

The Home Correspondence School, Dept. 99D, Springfield, Mass. 

REDDING 8c CO. 
MASONIC BOOKS AND GOODS 

Regalia, Jewels, Badges, Pins, Charms and Lodge Supplies. 
Send for Catalogue W. 200 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 

xxin 



PIANO 

To uphold a reputation for tone 
qtiality unequalled; to build a piano 
that has fixed the basic principles for 
all makes; to create a world standard 
and keep it at a level unapproached by 
others — that is the Steinway achieve- 
ment through four generations. 



Quality should be the only determin- 
ing factor in the selection of a piano. 



Uprights from $550 up. 
Grands from $750 up. 



STEINWAY & SONS 

STEINWAY HALL 
107-109 East 14th Street, New York 

Subway Express Station at the Door 



Represented by the Foremost Dealers Everywhere 



XXIV 



INVESTING FOR PROFIT 




This Broad Gauge and Vitally Helpful 
Magazine of Successful Finance YOURS 



FOR SIX 
MONTHS 




If you will send me your name and address 
I will mail you this wonderful magazine 
Absolutely Free for six months — Special 
Trial Introductory Offer. Each copy is 
worth $10.00 to $100.00 to you. 

"Wait till you see it is a good thing, but 
don't wait till everyone sees it — you will 
then be too late." One good investment is 
worth a lifetime of labor. 



Small Investors Have Made 
Stupendous Fortunes 

You know and I know that small invest- 
ors have made stupendous fortunes — men 
who, guided by judgment and courage, 
have placed their funds direct into creative 
enterprises at their inception, and thus 
reaped full benefit of the earning power 
of money. Today Opportunity on bended 
knee is entreating the small investor to ac- 
cept her favors — and those who heed the 
insistent call are achieving fortunes. 

My magazine explains the rules by which 
small investors have made wise and profit- 
able investments — how $100 grows into 
$2,200 — the actual possibility of intelligent 
investment. 

Learn the REAL EARNING POWER 
of Your Money 

The real earning power of your money is 
not the paltry 3% to 5% paid by banks or 
corporations who have their future behind 
instead of In front of them. 

INVESTING FOR PROFIT reveals the 
enormous profits bankers make, and shows 
how one can make the same profit — it 
demonstrates the real earning power of 
your money — the knowledge that finan- 
ciers and bankers hide from the masses — 
it explains HOW small investors are mak- 
ing big fortunes and WHY they are made. 

This and other valuable financial infor- 
mation is yours — it is free for six months 
for the asking. 

How to Determine the Value of 
Different Investments 

There are thousands of salaried people 
today who have a small sum laid aside or 
who can invest a small amount each month, 
but who realize that they do not know how 
to determine the value of the different 



classes of investments that are offered to 
them daily. This condition has created a 
demand for a publication or institution 
whose express object is to help direct and 
guide the small investor. INVESTING 
FOR PROFIT is the result of a pressing 
need and will be worth hundreds — even 
thousands — of dollars to you 

If You Can Save $5 a Month 
or More 
INVESTING FOR PROFIT is for the 
man who intends to invest any money, 
however small, or who can save $5.00 or 
more per month — but who has not as yet 
learned the art of investing for profit. 

Read what Russell Sage, one of the most 
successful financiers of his day, said in re- 
gard to Investments: 

"There is a common fallacy that, Avhile for le- 
gal ad\dce we go to lawj'ers. and for medical advice 
we go to physicians, and for the construction of 
a great work to engineers, financing is everjbody's 
business. As a matter of fact, it is the most pro- 
found and complicated of them all." 

Don't invest a dollar in anything any- 
where until you have at least read one 
copy of my really wonderful magazine. 
Send Your Name Today for Free Finan- 
cial Advice and Magazine 
There are absolutely no strings to my 
Six Months' Free Trial introductory offer. 
I will do exactly what I say. If you will 
send me your name and address I will send 
you absolutely without charge, for six 
months, my magazine — I NVESTING 
FOR PROFIT; then you are to decide 
whether or not you care to continue to 
subscribe and want free advice on financial 
matters. 

Surely this is a fair, square, liberal offer 
— so send your name before you turn this 
page. 



H. L BARBER, "4^ 24 Jackson Blvd., Chicago, HI. 



XXV 




mdjfdifrf^y/' 



Good roads are the red blood arteries of trade and travel. Such roads are 
best made and easiest maintained with 

L 1 LI JCj Leveller 

------------- -—--^ D i tcher 



A Real Road Machine — A Demonstrated Success. 



Made in Two Sizes 



The Glide is made in two sizes: 
No. 1 — A two horse, one man machine — has proven itself to be the most 
successful lightweight road machine built, and to-day 
we rightly claim to have more of our No. 1 machines 
in operation in all parts of this 
country and foreign lands than any 
other road machine manufacturers. 
No. 3 — ^Built for heavier work where 
4 horses are required. Can be oper- 
ated by one man if necessary. 

Write to-day for Catalogrue and Special ^ ^r^ V^/ No. 1 Weighs 6oO Pounds 

Good Boads flatter. All Free. v^*^^ No.* 3 Weighs 1100 Founds 

Glide Road Machine Cornpany 




541 Huron St.. 



Minneapolis, 3Iinn. 



Established 1853. 



Telephones- 
Cable Address— 



"280 JOHN." 
"281 JOHN." 

'BATHSON, N. Y." 



ROBERT C. RATHBONE, Pres. 

R. BLEECKER RATHBONE, V.-Prea. 

FRANK J. LEfENDECKER, Sec. 

CHAS. C. HUNT. Asst. Sec. 

NORMAN P. HICKS, Treas. 

R. C. RATHBONE, 2d, Counsel. 



R. C. RATHBONE ^ SON 

(INCORPORATED) 

INSURANCE IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 

45 WILLIAM STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

Fire, Marine, and Railroad Insurance effected on property located in any 
part of the United States. Life, Accident, Casualty, Liability, Fidelity, Bond, 
Rent, Elevator, Boiler, Sprinkler, Burglary and THieft, Tornado, and Plate 
Glass Insurance. 

We have AGENTS and OORRESPONDBNTS in all principal cities and 
abroad, and have special facilities for negotiating Insurance for Manufactur- 
ers, Merchants, Railroads, and property owners generally, at lowest possible 
rates, coupled with safest indemnity. 

Our INSPBCTTON DEPARTMENT will analyze present Insurance Rates 
on our clients' properties for the purpose of discoverinig- errors and over- 
charges; and will also sufggest such changes and improvements as will tend 
to reduce the cost of their insurance. 

We ADJUST ALL LOSSES for our customers without charge for our 
services, and have collected millions of dollars during the ipast fifty years. We 
have our own specialists in all branches of insurance wbose technical knowledge 
and experience enable us to give best results to our clients. 

We 'maintain a LAW DEPARTMENT in charge of our own Counsel, who 
passes upon all policies issued through our office and assists in the collection 
of our clients' losses. This Department is at the service of our clients in all 
matters connected with insurance law. , 

XXVI 



THE ACME 

FASTENERS 

Would not the prevention of loss of one single legal document 
compensate the cost of a fastener outfit ? Then again there is 
the convenience of keeping together important papers and com- 
munications for ready use. 

Hundreds of users can testify to the value of these Wire 
Staple Binding Machines. 

THE ACME NO. 2 
BINDER 

Especially adapted 
for Office Work. Gives 
a true staple every time 
and the user don't have 
to pick or knock out 
the last one when he 
comes to it. Always 
in position as shown 
in cut. Handsomely 
nickelled and holds 50 
staples. 




THE AOME No. 2 
OUIR BEST PBOOUCTION 




THE MIDGET 

is designed for fastening papers and 
light fabrics. Used by Manufacturers 
and in Offices. Wonderfully convenient 
in the preparation of samples, etc. 
Holds 100 tinned steel wire staples. 
We do or can make any kind of stapling 
machine to serve your purpose perfectly. 

WRITE FOR PRICES AND DISCOUNTS 
ILLUSTRATED FOLDER SENT ON REQUEST 

ACME STAPLE CO., LTD. 

n2 N. NINTH ST., CAMDEN, N. J. 



THE MIDGET BINDER 
LEVER ACTION. 




STAPLES 



XXVII 



ARE YOUR LUNGS 

WEAK OR PAINFUL? 

DO YOUR LUNGS EVER BLEED? 

DO YOU HAVE NIGHT SWEATS? 

HAVE YOU PAINS IN CHEST AND SIDES? 

DO YOU SPIT YELLOW AND BLACK MATTER? 

ARE YOU CONTINUALLY COUGHING AND HAWKING? 

DO YOU HAVE PAINS UNDER YOUR SHOULDER BLADES? 

These are Symptoms of Catarrh, Bronchitis and 

LUNG TROUBLE 

You should take immediate steps to check the progress of these symptoms. The 
longer you allow them to advance and develop, the more deep seated and serious your 
condition becomes. 

WE STAND READY TO PROVE TO YOU 

absolutely, that Lung-Germine (German Treatment) has cured completely and permanently 
Case after case of Chronic Bronchitis, Catarrh of the Lungs, Catarrh of the Bronchial Tubes, 
and other Lung Diseases. 

Many sufferers who had lost all hope and who had been given up by physicians, have 
been permanently cured by Lung-Germine. 

It is not only a remedy for Lung and Bronchial Diseases, but a preventive. 
If your lungs are merely weak and disease has not yet manifested itself, you can prevent its 
development, you can build up your lungs and system to their normal strength and capacity. 

Lung-Germine has cured advanced Consumption, according to statements made by 
the patients themselves, in many cases over four years ago, and the patients remain strong and 
in splendid health today. 

We Will Send You Proof Positive— Proof That 
Will Convince any Judge or Jury on Earth 

We will gladly send you proof of many remarkable cures; also a FREE TRIAL 
of Lung-Germine, together with our new book on Consumption, Its Cause, Its Treatment. 

JUST SEND YOUR NAME 

LUNG-GERMINE COMPANY 

21 Rae Block, Jackson, Mich. 

XXVIII 



LATEST IMPROVED 



Caroasselles 

Riding-GaDeries 

Twentieth Century 

Merry-Go- Rounds 

Razzle- Dazzles 




Striking Machines 

Doll Racks 
Gasoline Engines 
for Automobiles 
and Trucks 



Amusement Outfitters 

HcrSChell'-SpilllllEn Co., North Tonawandl^,V. Y., U. S. A. 



Cable Address 
"Spillman Tonawanda" 



Codes Used 
Lieber's, Western Union, A. B. C, 4th Edition 



Automatic Musical Instruments 

for Merry-Go-Rounds, 
Parks, Carousels, Moving 
'Picture Theatres, Cafes, 
Roller Skating Rinks and 
in fact for any place of 
amusement or where people 
congregate. 

We ship to all parts of the 
world. 

Write for catalogue, sent 
FREE, terms, etc. 

North Tonawanda Musical Instrument 

WORKS 
Nortti Tonawanda, NEW YORK, U. S. A. 

XXIX 





DR. A. C. DANIELS' 



Illustrated 



Book on Horses 

FREE 



How to Tell the Age— How to Feed — How to Locate 
Lameness — ^How to Diagnose the Different Ills — How 
to Care for When Sick or Well — 2c. Stamp for postage 



Book on Cows 

Book on Dogs 

Book on Cats 

Book on Sheep and Swine 



Ml FREE 

2c stamp for postage 

and mention the 

one desired 



DANIELS' COLIC DROPS, Sure Cure for Horse Colic, $1.00 
DANIELS' SPAVIN REMEDY, $L00 per Box 

Best Remedy on Earth for all kinds of Bunches and Swellings 

DANIELS' WORM EXPELLEE, for Dog or Cat, 50c 

Sure, Safe and Harmless 

DANIELS' DISTEMPER REMEDY, for Horse or Dog 

DR. DANIELS' 30 OTHER SPECIFIC REMEDIES FOR 
COMMON AILMENTS OF DUMB ANIMALS 



When your animals are sick write for Advice- 
you mention the Almanac. 



-It's Free if 



DR. A. C. DANIELS, 



172 MILK STREET, 

BOSTON. MASS. 



XXX 




In Illinois and Iowa where oats are 
sown in the stalks; in some of the 
Eastern States where fartpers us^ a 
grain drill to sow beans, peas, etc, as 
well as small grains; in every coun- 
try in the world wherever g^ain is 
grown, there you will find Superior 
Grain Drills at work planting the 
seed at an even depth — "Planting the 
Grain to Grow Again." No matter 
what your seeding conditions are, you 
can get a Superior Drill that will do 
the work right. "The Name Tells a 
True Story/* Send for the Superior 
Catalogue. Read it and insist on your 
dealer showing you the Superior. 



fc>- ^i»iMNOFJ z>t.D, Ohio U. <0'. .^T 

^^■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■BHIHI 

OUR WARRANTY 

We unreservedly warrant every Grain Drill, Corn Planter, 
Corn Drill, Potato Planter, Broadcast Lime and Fertilizer 
Sower, Harrow, Cultivator, and every other machine of our 
manufacture, to be and to do ALL we claim for them. If, 
AT ANY TIME, a machine of our make shows defects in cast- 
ings or workmanship, clearly our fault, we stand ready to 
make same good by repair or replacement. 

THE AMERICAN SEEDING MACHINE CO., Inc., Springfield, Ohio, U. S. A. 




Are made by men who know the Cuhivator business from A to Z. 
They have had more than 50 years' successful experience. That's why 
we can sell Buckeye Cultivators under such a strong warranty. If theiy 
were not alt we say they are,' we would never dare guarantee them the 
way we do. 

The new Buckeye Cultivator Catalogue should be in every farmer's 
possession. You will find in it just the style - cultivator you want, 
guaranteed to do everything claimed for it. Get this catalogue. Read 
it and then go to your loQal implement dealer and insist on seeing 
Buckeye Cultivators. 

"The Buckeye— a Wise Buy." 



nrr^rri 



XXXI 



Outfitters for Explorers, Campers, Prospectors and Hunters 

LIGHT WEIGHT WATER AND ROT PROOF TENTS ASK ABOUT OURGREENTENTS 

OUTING ^mmamBBSSBBBasammma^^ canoe 

^^^™^ |^BERCROMBIK's\ fishing 

OUTFITS ^ TRADE CAMP 

FOOTWEIAR 




TACKLE 

GUNS AND 
AMMUNITIOW 



DAVID T. ABERCROMBIE COMPANY, 311 BROADWAY, N. Y. 

VON LEXGEKKE & ANTOIXE, Chicago Affents „ 

AME2RICAN AGUENTS. NEWLAXD, TAKLTaN & CO., AFRICAN OUTFITTERS 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue W Please Note Name and Address 



TELEPHONE 889 ORCHARD 



J. COHEN Si BROTHER 

DEALERS IN 

LUMBER, TIMBER, PLAIN AND 
EMBOSSED MOULDINGS 

GET OUR PRICES BEFORE BUYING . 
223-225 CHERRY STREET 

NEAR MANHATTAN BRIDGE NEW YORK 



laNlTfEDiSTATES 
FRAME ANDemiOtURE CO. 

ES^TABUS WED 1878 

PIGTUR^a 0fe feVERY DESCRIPTION 

SIrlOWi GARD MOUNTING 

FRAMES FOR AtbyER PURPOSES 

Pictures, for Hotels and Hnstttutions a Specialty. 

24 BAFlQlli^Y ST. New York City. 



XXXII 



The Only 
School in 
New York 
Which 
Teaches 
Practical 
Illustrating 
Work 



8^H 



TEACH 

THE 

ARTS 

THAT 

PAY 




toWfi:^ 



Complete trainiiig in News- 
p a per Sketching, Fasliion 
Drawing. Magazine Illustrat- 
ing. Comics. Cartoons. 

Positions positively assured 
to all students. Day and 
evening sessions. New stu- 
dents enroll any day. 

Short-term courses. Low 
tuition rates. 

WRITE FOR CIRCULARS 

TWBXTY-THIRD YEAR 

THOMASSCHOOlofART 

161 W. 23rd St., New York City 



SHOOTING GALLERIES 




PROUDFIT 

PRINCIPLES IN 

Loose Leaf 

MEAN 

EVOLUTION 




^SEE THE REASON-^ 



(Proudfits have a SPRING BACK just 
,Iike your Bound Blank Book.) 

A Flat Opening 

Loose Leaf Device, using only 1^/4 inches 
for binding margin. 

A book with an 

Unlimited Expansion 

Ask us for the complete story. 



Indestructible Gravity Targets 

Complete Line of Military Speciaities, 

NoTelties and Sliooters' Supplies 

and Accessories. 



Write for Catalogue 

Service Specialty Company 



Dept S., Schenectady, N. Y. 




Proudfits for every loose leaf purpose. 




EfMFJS, 



West Lyon St., Cor. Campau 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN, U.S.A. 



XXXIII 



Anglo AmericanTelegraph Co.,Ltd. 

ESTABLISHED 1866 
THE PIONEER ATLANTIC CABLE COMPANY. 



PAUFtC 

OCIAN 




Direct Communication Between America an«l 
Europe by Four Cables. 

AUTOMATIC DUPIiEX SYSTEM. 



NEW CABLES TO FRANCE, HOLLAND, AND BELGIUM 

GCK)D COMMUNICATION WITH GERMANY. 

Telegrams can be forwarded 'VIA ANGLO CABLES," to Europe, Egypt, East and West Coasts of 
Africa, Turkey, India, China, Ooctiin China, Corea, Manila, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, South 
America, Zanzibar, Mozambique, Arabia, Cape of Good Hope, Cape Verde, Madeira, and the Canary 
XsltLuds dtc ofcc 

FROM THE FOLLOWING AnERICAN STATIONS: 

r Head Office, 8 Broad Street (Stock Exchange BIdg.), 

Tel. No. 3635 Rector. 

68 Broad Street (Morris BIdg.), Td. No. 3635 Rector. 

Produce Exchange Building, Tel. No. 870 Broad. 

445 Broome Street (Silk Exchange Bldg.), Tel. No. 69 J 

Spring. 

MONTREAL OFHCE:' 44 St. Francois Xavier Street, Tel. No. Bell J027. 

OFFICES IN EUROPE: 



NEW YORK OFFICES: 



LONDON : 63 Old Broad Street, E. 
'* Stock Exchange. 

109 Fenchurch Street, E. C. 
46 Mark Lane, E. O. 
" Baltic Exchange Chambers, 

St. Mary Axe. E. O. 
" 2 Northumberland Avenue, 

Charing Cross, W. 0. 
48 Tooley Street, S, E. 
LIVERPOOL: Al The Exchange. 
BRADFORD : 10 Forster Square. 
BRISTOL; Back Hall Chambers, Baldwin Street. 
DUNDEE: 1 Panmure Street. 



EDINBURGH : 50 Frederick Street. 
GLASGOW : 113 Hope Street, 
LEITH: Exchange Buildings. 
MANCHESTER; 31 Brown Street. 
NEWCASTLE-ON-TYNE : 1 Side. 
PARIS AGENCY : 37 Rue CaumarHn. 
CARDIFF " Atlantic Buildings. 
ANTWERP " 20 Courte rue de ia Boutique. 
ROME " 49 Via venti Settembre. 

AMSTERDAM AGENCY : Weesperzyde 4. 
BARCELONA " 96 Paseo de Gracia. 

COPENHAGEN " Dr. Olgasvej 47.1, 

HAVRE : 118 Boulevard Strasbourg. 



TBE SHORTEST AND QUICKEST RODTES ACROSS THE ATUNTia 



Used by all the principal stockbrokers of New York, London, Liverpool, etc., to whom 
the QUICKEST OBTAINABLE SERVICE is essential. 

THIS COMPANY, whose CARRYING CAPAQTY IS FAR IN EXCESS 
OF ANY OTHER ATLANTIC CABLE COMPANY, H naturally favorable 
to the MAINTENANCE OF A LOW RATE WITH AN INCREASING 
VOLUME OF TRAFFIC 

XXXIV 




> S ' " ! llsHi 'i^w^<g"ww .w> i w,njiw J , i<p M i' \^ " 



i*tjnii"i!|jw" '"'^wii w[ ijTumnMK, I , - ntw u y m m w 



^fieSpringfieid}i(etal(k(gs£e( 



...^^ .:. ^^.,.-..,..l,,M«.-.f^^ . 




— TRADE MARK. 

T)iis plate is on the end of every Springfield Metallic Casket 

SPRINGFIELD Metallic Cas- 
kets are Indestructible. They 
are made of bronze, of cast 
metal or of steel. 

They protect the bodies of your 
dead from the hideous violations of 
the earth. They keep the remains 
sacred forever. They place within 
the reach of everyone the protec- 
tion which, formerly, only entire 
nations could yield to their saints 
and kings. 

Their simple beauty is impressive 
and lends dignity to the last rites. 

**The Final Tribute'' tells of the 
efforts of all peoples, even savages 
to preserve the bodies of their 
dead. Write for it. 

The Springfield Metallic Casket Co. 

Springfield, Ohio* 



»v, ^„« ,:M-:.. 


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, V ^. ■■■.■«^5J. 


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Copyright— C. Deuhle, Canton,, O. 

The McKinley Monument at 
Canton, Ohio. In this tomb 
lie the remains of the late 
President McKinley and his 
wife in Springfield Metallic 
Caskets of bronze. 




The Springfield Bronze Casket. 
The most perfect burial receptacle known. U. S. Letters Patent Sept. IS, 1898 



XXXV 



BOOK ON PATENTS-FREE 



JOSH BILLINGS ONCE SAID: 

"/ luv a rooster for two things — the crow that is in 
him , and the spurs that are on him to back up the crow." 

WE HAVE WON OUR SPURS AS 

PATENT LAWYERS 

BY 30 YEARS OF ACTIVE PRACTICE 
Which Has Brought Satisfaction 
" and Wealth to Our Clients. 

Carefuly Honest Work Guaranteed in Every Case. Write for Our Book 

W, T. FITZGERALD & CO. 

814 F STREET = = - = WASHINQTON, D. C. 



TELL ME YOUR FOOT TROUBLES 

It will ease your Mind; Z will ease your Feet. 

Enlarged Joints Reduced and Toes Straightened by 
ACHFELDT'S (Patented) "Perfection" TOE SPRING 

Worn at night without inconvenience, with auxiliary appliances 
for day use. Sent on approval. Money ^e^funded if not as 
represented. 

Achfeldt's Hammertoe Spring- will straigrhten your 
SMAIiIi toes and prevent corns. 

Use M;y Improved Instep Arch. Supporter for "Flat Foot" 
and broken-down instep. Send outline of foot. 

Full particulars and advice free in plain sealed envelope. 

M. ACHFELDT, Fo ot Specialist. «'"'°"'i'|y^ro»K''^'"'*' 

"Be Qivilizedtr* 

Be civilized! Recognize the Truth and the truth shall malce you Fr^ 
from the ills and "horrors" due to Co nstipation Poison in your sy«. 

~ BlacRburiYs 





y«tem. 



Quit purging the bowels. 

Nourish the bowel-nerves and thus 
exercise the bowel muscles — they'll 
do the rest. This won't strain, irri- 
tate, nor drain the system of its al- 
buminous fluids. Purging weakens 
bv taking these fluids from other 
parts of the body to liquefy the 
bowel's contents. 

Physic mildly, by nourishing the 
bowel-nerves with Blackburn's Cas- 
ca-Royal-Pills. All druggists sell 
10c and 2 5c packages. 



iSca^atPilli 



TRADE MAQH 



XXXVI 



TILE CIVILIZED PHYSIC, 



Have You a Cold? 

Better Check It at Once— Neglect Often 
Leads To Serious Illness. 








Oil of Pine is a splendid natu- 
ral remedy for the treatment of 
throat and bronchial troubles. Be- 
cause of its purity and freedom 
from opiates and narcotic drugs 
it is especially valuable for chil- 
dren. Two or three drops of the 
Pine, on a little sugar, affords 
speedy relief to the most obstinate 
cough, soothes the irritation and 
heals iae inflamed mucous mem- 
brane. 



Oil of Pine is often prescribed 
in the following formula, which, 
it is claimed, will break up a cold 
in twenty-four hours and cure any 
cough that is curable : Mix a half- 
ounce of Oil of Pine with two 
ounces of Glycerine and eight 
ounces (a half pint) of pure 
Whiskey. These ingredients can 
be purchased in nearly every first- 
class drug store and are easily 
mixed in a large bottle. A tea- 
spoonful once in four hours is the 
usual dose. 



Leach's Virgin 

OIL of PINE 



Quickly allays all irritation 
and heals inflammation of the 
mucous membrane. Unexcelled 



for Coughs, Colds, Hoarseness 
and all throat and bronchial af- 
fections. 



Sold by Druggists only in original J^-oz, vials as put up for dispensing by 

LEACH CHEMICAL CO., Cincinnati, Ohio 



XXXVII 



Tio OUs 
Grease 
Odor 
Dietinsr 
Gymnastics 
Medicines 
Big: Fees 



A DELIGHTFUL EXPERIENCE TO GO THROUGH— The 
FATOFF Treatment — that unfailing corpulency reducer — 
i nvolve s 
nothing BUT 
cleanly, cool- 
ing, refresh- 
ing external 
applications, 
a delightful 
treatment 
from A to Z. 

^ ^ Worlis Marvelous Transformations 

—reduces superfluous flesh wherever applied, restores normal 
figure in 3 treatments, gives size desired in 60 treatments, 
leaving flesh firm, smooth and unwrinkled. 

FATOFF May Be Used in Your Hot Bath 

Appointments for expert treatment at your home made by 
phone or letter. 

Literature (mailed in plain sealed wrapper) will win instant conviction. 




PRICES: FOR DOirBL,E OHIN 

(A Chin Reducing "Wonder) 

Special Size Jar, $1.50. 



Full Size Jar, $2.50, FATOFF is obtain- 
aJble at leading druggists every- 
where or address 



M. S. BORDEN CO., New York City. 



\ 





«EADAC«€S 

lot 25* 50* &$lop Bottles 



xxxvni 



MERCHANT'S 

OLD 

METHOD 

(Open Hearth Base) 

We are the First to Publish 
Such a Standard for 

ROOFING PLATES 

Every Sheet Stamped with 
Brand and Thickness. 
Fluxed with Pure Lagos 
Palm Oil. Unparalleled as 
to Combination of Weight 
and regularity of Coating. 
Unparalleled as to Resquar- 
ing. Forty Pounds of 
Coating to box 20x28 Size. 

The Best Qnality and Most 
Dependable Boofingr Tin Manu- 
factured in the United States. 



The FIRE- RETARDING 
"Star" VENTILATOR 

(Model "A") 
Storm Proof-^Effective 







verti- 
cally 
by a 

lever arrans;ement, controlled by a chain 
with FUSIBLE LINK, and the top closes 
by grayity. 

The Top Is also a damper In itself, 
partially or wholly closable at any 
time. 



Brass and Copper 

Tubes, Sheets, Rods 

SEAMLESS DRAWN TUBES, 

SHEET BRASS FOR SPINNING, 

STAMPING AND DRAWING 

Cornice, Roofing and Braziers' 
Copper 

Drawn Copper Bars for 
Electrical Purposes 

Iron Size Brass Pipe for Plumb- 
ing, Etc. 



WE MAKE 



Babbitt Metals 

FOR ALL PURPOSES 



Linotype, Monotype, 

Stereotype, Electrotype, 

Composotype and Atitoplate 

And AH Special Alloys of 
Similar Nature 



HIGHEST QUALITY 



Merchant & Evans Co. 



Successor to MERCHANT & CO., Inc. 



Philadelphia 
New York 



Brooklyn 
Chicag^o 



Baltimore 
Kansas City 




Denver pat. Off.' 



XXXIX 



V L ! ■_ I 




Tf you suffer from FITS. "HARD" SPELLS, FALLING SICKNESS. EPILEPSY or I 
SPASMS, or have children, relatives or friends who do, my new treatment will relieve , 
them, and to prove this, all you are asked to do is to send for a free $2 bottle of • j 

Dr. May's Formula No. 1 for Adults 
Dr. May's Formula No. 2 for Children 

It has relieved permanently the very worst cases, wlien everything else has failed. 
Guaranteed by Dr. May Medical <JL,aboratory . Guaranty No. 189 71. 

Both' the FREE $2 four oz. trial bottle and book containing letters o-f permanent 
cures will be sent by mail. 

Please, when writing for them, give age and ooonplete address. 

DR. W. H. MAY 



548 Pearl Street 



NEW YORK 



NOTT'S RHEUMATIC BALM 

RBLmVBS IN 12 HOURS 

A positive and unfailing remedy for rheumatism, no matter how lC>ng standing. 

It increases the appetite and strengthens the constitution by acting as a 
powerful alterative, completely renovating and bracing a worn-out system. 

The most effectual medicine ever prepared for chronic and inflammatory rheamatism. TRY 
IT, at all druggists or by mail, 90c. PER BOTTLE. Prepared and sold at 

S. A. BROWN PHARMACY, EST. 106 YEARS 
Thos. H. Tucker, Proprietor, 28-30 Fulton St., N. Y. City 




CRIPPLES 

We correct and orercome 
all crippled conditions of the 
limbs and spine by the ap- 
plication of our mechanically 
perfected apparatus and cor- 
sets. 

Write and state your case 
aTid we will tell you what 
we can do for you. 

The William M. Eisen Co. 

Practical Orthopaedists 

413 Eighth Avenue 

New York, N. Y. 

iFor 25 years manufacturers 
to the prominent hospitals of 
the country. 

XL. 




'— - 



SANDHOLM'S ECZEMA LOTION 

AND DANDRUFF REMEDY 

Hundreds of sufferers from skin and scalp diseases have been per- 
manently cured. All who have used it have been greatly benefited, and 
when the treatment was faithfully continued a complete and permanent 
cure was the reward. 

If you are troubled with Eczema, Dandruff, 
Sunburn, Scalp Eczema, Scald Head, Barber's Itch, 
Cuban Itch, Doby Itch, Tetter, Hives, Enlarged 
Pores, Insect Bites, Falling Hair, Pimples, Black- 
heads, Acne, Salt Rheum, Psoriasis, Oily Skin, Red- 
ness of the Skin, Old Sores, &c., YOU NEED SAND- 
HOLM'B ECZEMA LOTION AND DANDRUFF REM- 
OEDY. ■ It is used externally and shows beneficial re- 
sults right from the start. 



uriiiiiii 




ECZErtA LOnON 

AND 

DANDRUFF REMEDY 

(AiC OXOl ^0 PER CENT) 

GUMv/TtBiuNoaineKCD/woonuss 
ACT. uuAie x>-/xe senv. mvfs 



roR, 

PIMPIIS. ACNE, oiACKHEios. ECZtrtA 
MfflJETTERSPlANT P0150NIK6, HIVES. 

MOsaunDBniS. ikh,b«r600itch, 

WtCWOftM.RWASmC DISEASES. 
.dCALY OR SOBEY ERUPTIONS 
OFTHESKINANOSOUJ*. 

<*V /PEAL HAIR TONIC 

KiRUFF mmm 



/O? eXTERNAL USS ONW 

SHAKE THEBCrrTLg 
PKICE ♦ 1»? 



5ANDH0LMDRU6C? 

D13 MOINES. IOWA 



It Cures by Absorption 

Use it on your scalp — it is the best Tonic for the 
hair known. It kills the Dandruff Germ. Use it on 
your face — as a massage it has no equal. 

Guaranteed under the Pure Food and Drugs Law of 
June 30, 1906. Serial No. 1646. 

Send for $1.00 bottle, which will prove to you 
the merits of our preparation. Where we have no 
agents or dealers handling our goods we prepay ex- 
press charges. 

SANDHOLM'S TONIC VITAIIZER 

For internal use is a scientific vegetable compound that upbuilds the en- 
tire system from whatever cause. Young women and mothers can use 
it with perfect safety for chronic constipation, and for the stomach, liver 
and kidneys. As a blood purifier it cannot be excelled. Sent anywhere 
in the United States, all charges prepaid, $1.00 a bottle. Literature of both 
of the wonderful preparations sent on request FREE of all cost. 

SANDHOLM DRUG COMPANY 

Med. Dept. 



Des MoineSj Iowa 



XLI 



American lee Company 
Knickerbocker Ice Company 

We are the largest manufacturers of Ice in the world, 
which enables us to produce the most perfect quality 
known to the art. 

We are the largest handlers of natural ice in the 
world, and it insures the purchaser the most sanitary 
conditions surrounding its harvest and delivery. 

We manufacture ice wagons, motor trucks, ice tools 
and appliances. It will pay you to get our prices when 
buying. 

We are expecting shortly to place on the market a 
refrigerating apparatus for small users that we believe 
to be far in advance, in economy of space, cheapness 
and efficiency, of anything heretofore offered to the 
public. It. is designed for suburban homes, stores, 
restaurants, soda fountains, &c. Write us for infor- 
mation. 

Try our ice and delivery. It will pay you if you 
live in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Washington, Atlantic City, Camden, New Rochelle or 
Mount Vernon. 

We guarantee reliable service, courteous treatment 
of patrons, full weight and perfect sanitation. 



XLII 




PMNTING M MFD0? 



BlAClCwOOLOfiS 



saiisf^yoib 
tell others, - 
Ifrvot^ 




Orders 



FilMty 



i 



735-mtasllMnmlr^t,NewroHi 

Telephone M65 Or»c/va,t*ct 




XL-ni 



PUBLISHERS VISITING NEW YORK 

Are invited to call at the pressroom of THE NEW YORK WORLD 
and witness in operation daily the wonderful new 

"Augmented Octuple" 

(72-PAGE) 

Duplex Rotary Press 

which has upset all press traditions 




■Naa 



This press can be seen producing 37 PER OENT. of The World's total 
output in two deliveries out of eight, averaging 75 PER CENT. MORE 
PRODUCT than corresponding presses of other makes in the same plant. 
(Figures from World pressroom records.) 

THE NEW YORK TRIBUNE is now printed exclusively up-on DUPLEX ROTARY 
PRESSES, the whole equipment in pressroom and stereotyping departments having been 
recently installed, the old-style skyscraper machines being entirely discarded in favor 
of this modern low-down construction. Any publisher interested is invited to inspect 
these machines in operation. The management will be glad to issue permits to pressroom. 

The great simplicity of this press and its remarkable convenience are obvious at 
a .£;!ance. Its superiority over the "skyscraper" construction of other press builders 
is so great that they are already compelled to offer to build, and some of them 
aie already building, machines of a similar type, in plain violation of our patent 
rights. We have brought suit in defense of these rights in the United States Courts 
and we hereby caution publishers against the purchase of infringing machines. 

DUPLEX PRINTING PRESS COMPANY, Main 

Linotype & Machinery, Ltd., 188 Fleet St., E. C. EASTERN OFFICE, WORLD 

XLIV 



The Duplex Tubular 
Plate Rotary Press 

A New Feature Which Doubles the Productive 

Capacity of the Press 

In the Duplex Single-Plate Rotary there is no collecting, no as- 
sociating, no tapes, no half-speed cylinders. All sheets are cut 
AFTER passing over the former — not before, as in other makes. 
ALL products deUvered BOOK-FOLD and AT THE SAME RATE 
OF SPEED, and with NO DUPLICATE PLATES and NO WASTE 
SHEETS. 




THE DUPLEX TUBULAR SINGLE-PLATE 16-PAGE PRESS. CAPACITY: 

ANY EVEN NUMBER OP PAGES UP TO AND INCLUDING 16. 

SPEED: 30.000 PER HOUR FOR ALL PRODUCTS. 

The DUPLEX TUBULAR PLATE ROTARY PRESS, carrying 
an equal number of plates, will give TWICE THE PRODUCT of 
any other press IN THE SAME RUNNING TIME— or, putting 
it the other way, WILL DELIVER A REQUIRED PRODUCT 
IN ONE-HALF THE TIME. 

These are important claims, but more important still, they HAVE 
BEEN PROVED. The demonstration in a large number of im- 
portant oflBces throughout the world is conclusive. 



Offices and Works, BAHLE CREEK,^ MICH. 

BLDG., NEW YORK CITY. Unotype & Machinery, Ltd., 10 Rue de Valois 

xLv 



Jagels and Bellis 

high-grade: 



COAL 



Direct Receivers from the Mines 



Coal Delivered by the Truck Load 
to All Parts of Manhattan and 
Hudson County : : : : : : : : 



Coal Pockets and Docks at 

Hoboken, Jersey City, Weehawken, 
Homesteadf New Jersey 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

23d St. and Broadway, Flatiron Bldg. 

Telephone Call, Gramercy 1919 
JERSEY OFFICE 

33 14th St. (near Ferry), Hoboken,N* J. 

Telephone Call, Hoboken 905 

Mail Orders Given Prompt Attention 

XL.VI 



Your 

System 

Needs Such 

A Food as This 



Rebuilds 

Overworked 
Physiques 



\C 



especially at this time of the year 
when winter has left you so susceptible 
to the ravages of sickness and disease. At 
this time, more than any other, your body re- 
quires a pure, wholesome, predigested liquid that 
is easily and quickly assimilated — one that will build 
up wasted tissues and weakened muscles — one that will 
strengthen and actually impart energy and vigor and life. 
That is why physicians everywhere recommend the use of 

CabstExtmct 

a perfect food welcomed by the weakest stomach — containing all 

the nutritive and digestive properties of pure, rich barley malt 

and the quieting and restorative qualities of choicest hops 

in predigested liquid form. It is the ideal spring food 

— giving men and women just the right energy and 

strength to take their part in the battle of life. 

Pabst Extract, The "Best" Tonic, is used all over the world 
to strengthen the weak and build up the over-worked; to re- 
lieve insomnia and conquer dyspepsia: to help the 
anaemic and turn nerve exhaustion into active, 
healthy vim ; to encourage listless convalescence 
to rapid recovery; to assist nursing mothers 
and reinvigorate old age. 

Order a Dozen from Your Drugg>s!--lnsist Upon ii Being Pabst 

The U.S. Government spe- 

cifically classifies Pabst 

Extract as an article of gejnvig- 

meJicine— not anal" 

coliollc beverage. 

PABST EX- 




««-« 



n:^ 



Free booklet, "Health 
Darts" tells ALL uses 
c,i.«M>a<*«. and benefits of Pabst 
Encourage* Extract.Write tor it, 



Listless Con 
valescenc» 



a postal will do. 

Library Slip, 
good for mag- 
azines 4hd 
books with 
each hot' 
tie 





orates Old 
Age 




TRACT CO. 
Depf. 25 
Milwau- 
kee, 
WIS. 



/^ 












XLVII 



A Guide to Correct Automobile Lubrication 

Explanation: In the schedule the letter opposite the car indicates the grade of 
Gargoyle Mo'biloil that should be used. For example, "A" means "Gargoytte 
Mobiloll A." ''Arc" means "Gargoyle Mobiloil Arctic." For all electric vehi- 
cles use Gargoyle Mobiloil A. The recommendations cover both pleasure and 
commercial vehicles unless otherwise noted. 



MODEL OF 


1908 


1909 


1910 


191 1 


191a 


CARS 


S 

E 
E 
3 


E 

i. 


i 

E 

s 


1 
i 


e 

E 

9 
M 

A 
Arc 

A 
Arc. 

E 

E 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 
Arc. 


1 
i 

Arc 
Are 
Are 
Arc 

E 

B 
Arc. 
Are. 
Arc. 

B 

A 
Arc. 

E 

A 
Are 


s 

6 

(A 

A 
Are. 

A 
Are. 

E 
Arc. 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 


1 

Arc 
Are 
Are 
Are. 

E 
Arc 
Arc 
Are 
Arc 
Arc. 

A 
Arc. 

E 

A 
Are, 


i 

3 
09 

A 

Arc. 

A 
Arc. 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 
Arc. 

A 

A 

A 


1 


Abbott Detroit. 


Arc. 


Alco 






Arc. 
A 
A 
E 
E 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 


Arc 
Arc 
Arc 

B 

E 
Arc. 
Arc 
Arc 

E 

A 


Arc 


American 


A 
E 
A 


E 
E 
A 


Arc. 
^rf 


Atlas 


A 


" Com'l . . 


A 


Austin 

Autocar (a cyl) 

(2 cyl) Com'l 

„ " (4cyl) 

Benx 


A 
B 


A 
A 


Arc 
Arc 
Arc 


A 


E 


Are. 
A 


BergdoU. 






Arc 


Brush 


A 
A 

A 
A 
A 
A 
B 


A 
A 
Arc. 
E 
E 
E 
A 


A 
A 
A 
B 
Arc. 
A 
A 


E 

A' 
Arc. 

A 
Arc. 

A 

A 


p 


Buick (2 cyl) 

" (4 cyl) 

Cadillac (I cyl) 


A 

Arc 


^ " (4 cyl) 

Cartercar 


Arc. 
A 
A 


Arc 
E 
B 


Arc. 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
B 
A 
A 


Arc. 

E 
Arc, 

A 
Arc. 
Arc. 

B 
Arc. 

A 


Arc. 

A 

A 

A 

A 
Arc. 

B 
Arc. 

A 

A 

A 
Are. 

A 

A 
Are. 

B 

A 

B 
Are. 
Are. 

A 
Arc 

B 

A 

A 

A 


Are. 
E 


ComT 

Case 


Arc 
Arc 


Chadwick 


A 


A 


A 

Arc. 
B 


A 

Arc. 

B 


B 
Arc. 

B 
Arc 

B 


A 

Arc 

B 
Arc. 

B 


Arc 




Are 


Chase 


B 


fi 


B 


Cole 


Arc 


Columbia 


A 


E 


A 


E 


A 




A 


Couple Gear 

Croxton-Keeton . . . 


A 


A 


A 


A 


A 
A 
A 


A 

Are. 

E 


A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

B 

A 

B 
Are. 
Arc. 

B 

B 

B 

A 

B 

A 


A 
Arc 

E 

A 

B 

A 

A 

A 
Are, 
Arc. 

A 

E 

B 
Arc. 

A 
Are. 


Arc 
Arc 


Daimler 


A 


E 


A 


E 


. A 


Daimler Knight 


A 


Darracq.. 


A 
B 
A 
B 
A 

a' 


E 
A 
A 
A 
A 

e' 


A 
B 
A 
B 
A 
Arc. 
B 


E 
A 
A 
A 
A 
Arc. 
A 


A 

B 

A 

B 
Arc. 
Arc. 

A 

E 

A- 

B 

B 


B 
E 
A 
A 

Arc 

A 

B 
Are. 
Arc 

A 


Arc 
A 


De Dion 


Delahaye 


A 
A 

Arc 
Are. 

A 
Arc 

B 
Arc 
Arc 
ArCi 


Delaunay-Bellevill^. , 
Elmore 


E. M. P... 

Fiat 


Flanders 


Ford 


A 
B 
B 


E 
E 
E 


E 
B 
B 


B 
E 
A 


Franklin 


Com!..... 
Gramm 


Gramm-Logan 






A 
A 
A 


Arc. 
A 
E 


A 

A 
A 

Arc. 
Arc. 

B 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 


Arc 
A 

E 
Arc. 
Art. 

A 

B 

A 

A 

A 
Are. 


Hewitt (2 cyl) 






A 
A 

A 
Arc 
B 
A 
A 
A 


Are 




* ' "■* 


Hewitt (4 cyl) 


A 


A 


Are. 
Are. 
Are. 

B 
Arc 

A 

A 


E 
A 
Are. 
B 
A 
A 
A 


Arc' 
Are. 

A 
Are, 


Hupmobile 

Intemtional 

Interstate 


b" 


"a" 


Arc. 
B 
A 
A 
A 
A 
A 


Arc. 
A 
E 
A 
A 
A 
B 


botta.... . 

Itala. 


A 


E 




A 
A 


A 

E 


Keiiy... <*'?'!* ;;::; 


A 

Are. 

A 
Arc 


Are. 
Arc 
Are. 
ftuc 


A 

Are. 

A 
Arc 


Aro 


iassel-Kar 

» Com-U.. 


A- 


B 


A 


E 


A 

f 

J fat 


E 



\ MODEL OP 


1908 


1909 


19 10 


1911 


t9ia 


CARS 


1 
e 
S 


1 
B 

'e 

A 
A 

B 
A 
A 
A 
B 

1 


w 

E 
E 

b" 
a' 
b" 

Arc 
A 
A 

A 
Aie. 

\- 
B 
A 


1 

A 
A 

"a 

Arc 
A 
E 
B 

Are 

"^ 
B 
E 


t 

E 

Are 
B 
A 
A 

b' 

Are 
Arc 

A 

A 

A 

B 
A 


1 

Are 
A 
A 

Are 

A 

Arc 

Arc 

E 

B 

B 

Arc 

B 


s 

a 
S 

Arc 

b 

A 
A 
A 

b 

Arc. 
Arc. 

A 

A 

A 

A 

B 
Arc 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 
Arc 

A 

A 

A 
Arc 
Are. 

A 

A 
Arc 

A 

A 

Arc 
Are. 

i 
A 

A 
A 
A 

Are. 

A 
Arc 

A 

D 

A 


1 

Ate 

A 

A 

Are 

E 
Arc 
Arc 
Arc 

E 

B 
Arc 

A 

E 
Arc 

B 

A 
Are 

A 
Arc 
Arc 

A 
Arc. 
Are, 
Arc. 
Arc 

B 

A 
Are 

A 
Arc. 
Are. 
Arc. 
Arc 
Are. 
Are. 
Are 
Ate. 
Arc 
Arc. 

E 
Arc. 
Are. 

D 
Arc 


1 

Are. 

B 

A 

A 

A 

B 
Arc 
Are. 

B 

A 
Arc 

A 

B 
Arc 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 
Are. 

A 

A 

A 
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.Arc.' 

A 

A 
Arc 

A 
Arc 
Are. 

A 
Are. 
Are. 

A 

A 

A 
Are. 
Arc. 
Arc. 

A 

D 

A 

A 
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A 

A 

A 

Arc 


1 


IdUckar. ' 

Knox . , 


b" 
a' 

A 
B 
A 
A 
A 
A 
B 


Arc 


Krit ,... . 

Lambert 

, ". Comi,. 

Lancia 

Locomobile . . 

Lorier 

Mack 


A 

Are. 

B 
Arc 
Are. 


Marion 

Marmon 

Matheson 

MaiweU(acyl) 

" (4 cyl) 


Arc 

Arc 

\- 
Arc 


Mercedes 

Mercedes iCnight. . . 


A 


E 


B 
A 


Mercer. , 










A 


Arc 


Minerva Knight.. . 










A 


MitchelL. .." 

Moon 

National 

Oakland 


A 
A 
A 


i 


A 
A 
A 
A 
A 

^. 
A 


A 

B 
Arc. 

B 

B 

E 
Arc. 

B 


Arc 
A 
A 
A 

A 
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A 


Ate 

B 
A 

B 
B 
B 


Arc 
Are. 

A 
Axe 
Arc 




A 

A 
B 
A 


E 
B 
B 

B 


Overland ; 

Packard.... ....... 

Panhard 

Panhard Knight.. . . . 


Arc 

Arc 

Arc 
A 


Peerless .". .. 


Arc 
A 
A 


Are^ 
E 
B 


Arc 
fi 


Are. 

B 

Are 


Alts. 

A 

Are, 


Arc 

B 

Arc 


An. 
A^ 

Arf 


Pennsylvania 

Pierce Arrow. 


PopeHartfflrt 

*remier, ; , , ; 


A 
A 
A 
A 


B 
B 
B 
A 


A 
A 

A 

^ 
A 
A 
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A 

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A 
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A 


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1 

B 

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Arc. 

A 


Arc 
A 
A 

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A 

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Arc 

A 

A 

B 
Are 

E 
Are. 

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Arek 

Are. 

An» 
Arc 
Arc- 
Arc 
Are. 

Are. 
A 


tamhler.> .. ....... 


Rapid 

Regal ,...'• . 


Renault.;"... . .v. .-. . . 

leo 

loyal Tourist... 

Selden . . . .- , . . . 

Simplex 


A 
A 
A 
A 
A 


B 
A 

E 

B 
B 


Speedwell 


Arc A"-1 


Stanley 


D 
A 


D 

B 


D 
Arc 


£c 


Steams : 


Steams Knight 


Stevens IKiryea 

Stoddard Dayton 

Stoddard Dayton- 
__ Knight 
Thomas 


A 


B 


Are. 
E 


Are. 
B 


Arc 
Arc 


Arc, 


Are. 
A 


Are. 
A 


Arc 
A 
A 


A 
A 

A 


B 

B 
B 


B 
A 

A 


E 
E 
B 


B 
A 
A 


B 
B 
E 


B 
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B 
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B 
Arc 


Walter 


Welch. 


Welch Detroit.. 


A 

Arc 


B 

Arc. 
D 


Aii: 


Arc 




White (Gas).. 










Ar*;. 

D 

Ate. 


Are 
D 

1^ 


Afo 


^^ (Steam) 

Wutfw 


D 
A 


D 
B 


D 
B. 


D 
6 



Different types of motor demand different grades of oil. By a th-oroug-h 
analysis of various ciairs, we 'have prepared a complete lubricating S'Ohedule 
(printed in part above). It ig^ives the grade of oil that will yield the greatest 
power from your imotor. It will be sent you on request. 



In power-engineering cir- 
cles these recommendations 
from us would be accepted 
as authoritative. You may 
feel assured that in quali- 
ty, the oils specified on 
the chart set a world 
standard. 

They are put U'P lin 1 
aaid 5-gailil'on seafled white 
cans, in half-barrels and 
barrea«. 



Of^^Zf- 




Mobiloil 

Abrade for each type of motor. 



The oils (refined and fil- 
tered to remove free car- 
bon) are named: 

Gargoyle Mobiloil "A." 
Gargroyle Mobiloil *'B." 
Gargroyle MobUoil "D." 
Gargoyle Mobiloil <'E," 
Gargoyle MobiloU "Arctic." 
All are branded with the 
Gargoyle, which Is our 
znark of manufacture. 



VACUUM OIL CO., Rochester, U. S. A. 
General Sales Offices, 29 Broadway, New York City 

Distributing warehouses in the principal cities oj the world, 

XI>VIII 




ATLANTIC 
ELECTRIC TRUCKS 

tflT Simplicity, Reliability, Efficiency, Low Cost of 
j| Operation — these are the points of superiority. 




One of the ''Atlantic" 5-Ton Recently Purchased by the 
Ballantine Brewery, Newark, N. J. 

Our Engineering Department Will Help Solve Your Transportation 
Problems. /.* Correspondence Invited. 

ATLANTIC VEHICLE CO. 



1600 Broadway 
NEW YORK 



10 Post Office Square 
BOSTON, MASS. 



Factory: Newark, N. J. 



XLIX 



REBUILT 



Save $25 to $50 



on any make of Typewriter. Our "Factory 1 
Rebuilt" Typewriters are perfect in quality, 
condition and looks. Durable and reliable 
in construction and serviceable in every way. Buy from the largest 
factory in the world with branch stores in all larg-e cities. "We Gruarantee 
for one year against defect in workmanship and material. Write for 
catalogue and addfess of nearest branch office. 




American Writing Machine Co. 

345 Broadway, New York. 




New York Preparatory School 

Chartered and Approved by the Board of Regents 

REGENTS and COLLEGE 

*^'*-«^J*-'^^ * •^ EXAMINATIONS 

15 West 43d Street 545 Franklin Ave. 

NEW YORK BROOKLYN 

Students May Enter at Any Time 24th Year 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE AND. "SUCCESS IN REGENTS' EXAMS." 

Toby's Correspondence Schools 

NEW YORK CITY. I WACO, TEXAS. 

158 Fifth Ave. | Drawer 500. 

EDWARD TOBY, F. A. A.. C. C. A., President. 

WE SUCCESSFULLY TEACH BY I^IAIL. 

ARISTOS (THE BEST). OR JANES' SHADELESS SHORTHAND 

Easy to Learn, Easy to Read, Easy to Write. — ^Harmsworth's 
Encyclopedia, the highest authority, gives it the First place in 
the world. 

Modem Practical Bookkeeping:, Advanced Accounting:, Aris- 

. tos or Janes' Shadeless Shorthand (three trial lessons and 

comiplete set of books, $5.00). Touch Typewriting, Penman- 

FOR YOU ship (Business or Artistic), Business Arithmetic, Simplified 

rv-fi\. ^^^j^^ English, Commercial Law and Business Letter Writing. 

Name Study Interested In. Write NOW for Catalogue. 





KOLESCH SURVEYORS' INSTRUMENTS 

ABE OF 

Highest Quality and Infallibly Accurate 

The name Kolesch on Engineers' and Draughtsmen's instru- 
ments guarantees careful construction, accuracy, reliaibility and 
biggest value for your money. 

Kolesch Quality Blue Print Paper 

A BETTER PRODUCT FOR THE SA:>rB 
MONEY THAT YOU ARE NOW PAYING 

Engineers, Architects and Draughtsmen, s^-nd for our Catalogue 
and Price List of Surveying Instruments and Drawine Materials. 
IT 1\'ILL SAVE YOU 3IONEY. 

KOL-ESCM 8c COIVIF>AIMY 

^38 FULTON STREET NEW YORK CITY 

L. 



e 



^: 





Let us make to your 
order a fine tailored 
suit or overcoat which 
would cost at your 
local dealer's $18 to 
$30. Ourdirect'from- 
the-factory prices . . . 



% 1 




(f 




In the first place, and regardless of price, 
we can give you a better flitting- and therefore 
onore elegant and satisfa'otory garment than 
any clothing dealer simply because we ,make 
your suit for you — to your exact measure — ■ 
adapted to your own figure. Ready-to-wear 
clothing is meant to fiit a thousand different 
men fairly well, but we fit you perfectly — 
there's a big difference. 

By doing business directly with you we of 
course entirely do away with the enormous 
expenses of the retailer's rent, clerli liire, light, 
ladvertising. etc. That saving goes to you in 
return for the slight task of .sending for our 
•catalogue and measuring yourself according to 
our perfectly plain and easy system of meas- 
urements. You take no risk whatsoever, for 
we absolutely guarantee to satisfy you. both 
as to fit and quality. We have pleased tihou- 
sands of particular men, and can please you. 

GLEN ROCK WOOLENS AND WORSTEDS 

MADE TO YOUR MEASURE 

Our suits and overcoats are cut in accordance with the very latest 
New York City styles and are splendidly tailored by high-grade work- 
men. The linings- are of best quality. 

Don't overlook this iKhance to get abetter clotbing than you ever 
bought ready-made, at a isaving of at least $8.00. 

Send for our handsomiely illustrated style book showing Wg 
all the latest correct models and for a big assortment of pure 
Glen Rock Woolens and Worsteds. Do it now — the book Prepay 
will absolutely convince you. It contains measurement p 
blanks, tape and all necessary instructions. tXpFESS 

GLMN ROCK WOOLEN CO. 



216 MAIN STREET, 



SOMERVILLE, N. J. 



LI 



Hatch and Raise Chickens 
Every Month of the Year 




^^Now is the time'' to 

wake up and get wise to 
the profits of Poultry Rais- 
ing by electricity, with the 
''LO'GLO'' Incubators and 
Hovers. No matter what 
your convictions or ex- 
periences are with the old- 
fashioned hatchers you owe 
it to yourself to investigate 
these new, perfected ma- 
chines that are making good 
with amateurs and experts 
alike. ^ 

You know what you have to pay for fresh eggs and chickens 
and ducks. You can easily and cheaply raise what you need in a 
small space if you have electric connection. 

LO-GLO Incubators and Hovers are positively automatic. 

No smell, no muss, no danger, no work or worry, attractive, 
compact, can be operated in any room. 

Incubators cost from $16.50 to $28.50. Hovers from $5.50 to 
$9.50. The only Incubator and Brooder sold on instalments. 

Send for Catalogue 
and Easy-Payment Plan. 

Standard Electric 
Incubator Co.^ 

132 NASSAU STREET, 
NEW YORK CITY. 




LII 



"Counting Your Chickens 

Before They're Hatched" Is Justifiable 
If Your Incubators Are Equipped With 



n 



ycos 



THERMOMETERS 

When You Buy New Incubators Specify Those Furnished 
With Tycos" Thermometers — They're Good Machines, 

One's working efficiency is greatest when the sur- 
rounding temperature is at 68° F. You would feel 
better and work better if the temperature of your 
Living Rooms, Schools, Offices, Churches, Factories 
(wherever people congregate) were regulated for 68** F. 
by "Tycos" Thermometers. 

Send for The Temperature Book — ^Free. Full 
of interesting, valuable information on temperature 
subjects of everyday importance. 

Write for Any or All of These Booklets — Free: 
The Thermometer Book. The Barometer Book. 

Danger Signals of Disease. FaTorite Candy Becipes. 

Incubator Thermometer Tips. Tips for Butter Makers. 

Humidity and the Hygrodiek. Watch and Pocket Barometers. 

Please mention World Almanac when writing, 

I 

Taylor Instrument Companies 

TForZd's Largest Makers of Thermometers for All 
Purposes. S. d- M. "Tycos" Barometers are stan- 
dard "Weather Instruments," specified by the 
United States, the British, the Japanese and other 
Governments. 

Rochester, N. Y. 

LrTTT 





/ 



Safe 
Deposit Vaults 

OF 

The National Nassau Bank 

Cor. Nassau and Beekman Sts. 

NEW YORK 



Safes to rent from $5 to $250 

per annum 

Packages, Trunks, Silverware, 

Etc., Stored 



Open from 9 A. M. to 5 P. M. 
Saturday, from 9 A. M. to 1.30 P. M. 







uv 




Eyes Need Exercise 



If your eyes are affected in any way, 'fhey can 
be made strong and perfect again by restoring the 
normal circulation of blood. 

If you wear glasses you know that they must 
be chang-ed for stronger ones ifrom time to time, showing that the eyes 
grow weaker. 

For twenty years The Ideal Sight Restorer has been restoring perfect 
sight to thousands, and nnaking them absolutely independent of Eye- 
Glasses — ^^some of their visions were seriously affected, too. 

By a simple and gentle exericise, given over the closed lids for 5 
minutes twice a day. the normal and healthy circulation of blood is in- 
dipoed. Nature is aided in correcting ^e trouble, and fhe eyes rapidly 
regain their original strength and perfection. 

To prove its efficiency to you personally we will be glad to have you 
try The Ideal Sight Restorer for 10 days (before you decide to purchase. 

Write to-day for interesting 'booklet No. 137 on the Oare of the Eyes, 
and particulars of 10 days' test to 

THE IDEAL CO., 134 West 65lh St.,N. Y. 

Canadian Office, 275 College St., Toronto, Ont. 



EVERY THIN WOMAN 

CAN HAVE A SUPERB FIGURE WITHOUT PAYING A PENNY 

Every woman wants a full, round bust, a sym- 
metrical figure and shapely lim'bs. So no 
woman who reads this generous offer should, 
in fairness to herself, fail to^ respond to it. 
AiU you have to do is to write, saying- 
♦'Send me your free treatment and illus- 
trated booklet." 

By return mail we will send you 
without a penny oif cost, a sufficient 
quantity of Dr. Whitney's Nerve and 
Flesih Builder to give you the addi- 
tional flesh that will add immeasurably 
to your style and attractiveness. 

No matter whether your sllmness is 
the result of sickness or iniheritance, 
Dr. Whitney's Nerve and Fl^esh Builder 
will promptly build up and beautify 
your figure. 

It acts directly on the fat-producing 

cells and fills out the hollow places. It 

will enlarge your bus't measurement 

from 2 to 6 inches. And iDeing a purely 

vegetable compound it cannot possibly 

do you any harm. Instead it actually 

beniefits the .'health. 

A special treatment can be obtained 
for developing the bust without enlarg- 
ing other parts of the body. 

_ Do not delay. Write to 

THE CrXi. JONES CO., 50 Friend Bldgf., Elmira, N. Y. 




LV 



FR ECKL ES 

Don't Hide Them With a Veil; Remove 
Them With the New Drug 

An eminent skin specialist recently discovered a new drug, 
othine— double strength — which is so uniformly successful 
in removing freckles and giving a clear, beautiful complexion, 
that it is sold by all leading druggists under an absolute guaran- 
tee to refund the money if k fails. 

Don't hide your freckles under a veil; get an ounce of 
othine and remove them. Even the first night's use will show 
a wonderful improvement, some of the lighter freckles vanish- 
ing entirely. It is absolutely harmless, and cannot injure 
the most tender skin. 

Be sure to ask your druggist for the double-strength othine; 
it is this that is sold on the money-back guarantee. 

Othine can be bought by the ounce from any druggist. 



Inventors* 

and 

Mannfactnrers* 

LcOal RiflhtS '^^® commissioner of Paten'ts is reported to have said in an 



PATENTS 



PitAlonfoH interview September, 1912, that — "a large percentage of the 

rrOICCIvQ patents issued from this office are not good patents." 

This is not surprising under present conditions. Inventors should awake to the 
fact that their patent applications should be prepared by one who is both a trained 
Engineer and a skilled Patent Lawyer. 

The real value of a patent dependis upon the expert preparation of the patent 
claims and the skilful prosecution in the Patent Office. 

If your invention is worth anything at all. do not risk it in the hands of a 
mere tyro or shyster merely because he may advertise no fee until patent is ob- 
tained or money refunded, etc., as a bait to the uninitiated. 

Industries are established upon patents prosecuted by me. Under date of Aug. 
23, 1912, one client wrote me as follows: — 

"Received your favor of the 17th, also copies of each of our patents, for which 
we beg to thank you. * 

"We beg to advise you that we have just a few days ago reorganized the 
company, and increased our Capital Stock froon $50,000.00 to $500,000.00, and 
that in a very short time we will probably be in a position to give you more 
business." 

Eugene C Brown, Patent Lawyer 

(Member of the Bar United States Supreme Court. Formerly Examiner U. S. 

Patent Office Over Nine Years. ) 

Patents, Trade Marks, Copyrights, Reports as to Patentability, 
Validity and Infringement. Patent Suits Conducted in All ^tates. 

Address Suite 44, Victor Building, Wasliington, D. C. 

LVI 



Don't Envy a 




Superb Figure 
Have O 



ne! 



Many thousands of thin ladies, during 
the past l5 years of our remarkable suc- 
cess, have thoug^ht because they had 
always been thin that we could not help 
them. In every such case we have given 
these ladies a generous trial treatment of 
Dr. Whitney's Nerve & Flesh Builder 
without a penny of cost to them — The 
result is that they now have superb 
figures, with large, firm, beautiful busts, 
plump, prettily rounded shoulders and 
perfectly developed limbs — their voluntary letters to us 
" prove this, and you can write them personally if you so 
wish to prove it. We now offer you, absolutely free, the 
same generous trial treatment that did so much for them — it is entirely different 
from any other treatment, purely vegetable, safe, always builds up the general 
health and quickly beautifies and dears the complexion. No. 1 is the general flesh 
builder. No. 8 is for developing the bust alone, without enlarging other parts 
of the body. Say which one you prefer. Just send us coupon below and get 
your free trial in plain wrapper by return mail. 

FREE TRIAL, COUPON— Cut this out now. This coupon entitles the sender to 
one full tria.1 treatment of Dr. "Whitney's Nerve & Flesh Builder, provld'cd it is the 
first trial sender has received. C. L.. Jones Co., 5 i^Yiend Bldg., Elmira, N, Y. 



Baby Chicks 

BEST QUALITY 

S. C. White Leghorns 

and 
Barred Plymouth Rocks 

WHY EXPERIMENT IN 
HATCHING when you can buy 
strong, healthy chicks, delivered in 
prime condition, at less expense and 
?A v?«^' i->:j^i>\^^""' with no trouble.? 
'^^^^.f^^ THE 'BEST EVIDENCE of the 

superior quality of Kerr's Chicks is the immense demand for them. 
This has come about solely because of the splendid satisfaction given 
customers. MY BOOKLET TO YOU will prove the advantage in 
buying chicks. Write for it now. It is Free. 

RICHARD A. KERR FRENCHTOWN, N. J. 




LVII 



A^ "-"J 


pjl^v, 


^m 


Bcfili:^ 


=^^^^^kM= 


mrm 


DOES pis 


'^- ■ i'^ ^-^ 


NOT , A \^ 


^■M 'e' ""^'■A 


NJURE Vf 


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SEED Vk- 


/ \ > 



POTATO 
GROWING 

COSTS cur 

IN TWO 



Double your potato profits. Minimize labor. 
Use a Eureka Potato Planter. Opens the 
furroAV, drops eeed accurately any distance or 
depth desired; puts on fertilizer if wanted, 
covers perfectly and marks for next row. Al- 
ways plants uniform depth. Requires only one 
man. Driver sees seed drop. Made in tlii-ee 
sizes, for one or two rows. 

The Eureka Mulcher and Seeder 

Is a mulcher, smootliing [harrow, cultivator, 
weeder and eeeder. Forms dust mulch and 
conserves moisture. Three sizes, S, 10 and 
12 ft. Lever with pressure spring regulates 
depth of cut. Pulverizes the soil. Levels the 
ground. Teeth are flat and can be removed to 
cultivate between rows. The driver rides. 

Seeding boxes quickly attached to sow 'grass 
seed, alfalfa, oats. etc. Adjusts for seeding 
varioufi quantities. Teeth cover seed thor- 
oughly either shallow or 
deep. Economical in 
price — serviceable, strong. 
Prompt shipments from 
branch near you. Send 
for free catalog to-day. 

Eureka Centre 
Draft Mower 



45 Years on the 
Market. 





Improved for 1913. 



The cut crop is left in almost 
standing position, and cures rapidly, 
retaining natural color. No Hay 
Tedder required. No trampling of 
cut crop. One-third saving in time 
and labor. 

NO SIBE DRAPT. QVTows Tjack 
and forth on one side of field any 
•direction desired, and avoids pull- 
ing up hill. FASTEST CUTTIITG, 
GREATEST STRENGTH, I.ONGEST 
IiIVED. Cuts heavy growths of 
timothy and alfalfa that side draft 
mowers >cannot. 

Wonks in orchards and between 
TOWS. Cuts weeds and brush in 
pastures. Made in 5 sizes for one 
or two horses. 

EUREKA MOWER CO., 
Box710,Utica,N.Y. 



Sell Your Stones 

TTHE Editor of Lippincott's Maga- 

* zine. Dr. J. B. Berg Esenwein, 

in his Short-Story Course of 

forty lessons, will help you to give 

your stories the correct form and 

detail which only training makes 

possible. 

Story writers must be made as well 
as born; they must master the de- 
tails of construc- 
tion if they would 
turn their talents 
to a'ccount. 

May we send you 
(the names of stu- 
dents and gradu- 
uates who have 
succeeded? And 
the success their 
_ _, . letters prove is 

Dr. Esenwein practical. It means 
recognition, accepted manuscripts 
and checks from editors. Let us 
send you our 250-page Catalog. 

(Mrs.) Sallie P. Harrisson of Taze- 
well, ya., says: "M.y first effort at 
short-story construction, done as a part 
of a lesson in tlie Home Correspondence 
Course, was accepted by a leadingr fic- 
tion magazine and I have been asked 
to do more along tlie same line. I am 
greatly indebted to The H. C. S." 

We also offer a course in joumalism taught 
by Ernest Xewton Bagg, formerly literary 
editor of the Boston Globe; and in all over 
One Hundred Home Study Courses, many of 
them under professors in Harvard, Brown. 
Cornell, and leading colleges. Please address 







Depl. 99E, Springfield, Mass. 



Partoform Lozenges 

For Sore Throat, Hoarseness 

and all Tliroat Diseases. Instantly 
do away with that nasty, tickling, 
irritating and smarting feeling in 
the throat. At all druggists, lo'c a 
box. Write for free book on Pai-tola 
Family Preparations. Address. 

Partola Company 

160 Second Avenue, New Yori City 



LVIII 




Are You 
Interested 
in Farming? 




ONE Hundred forty-six pages of information valuable to every man using farm implements is what 
this new John Deere book contains. It is the most complete implement book ever published. It 
illustrates and describes the best line of farm tools made. Tells when and how to use them. It 
answers every question about farm machinery. No man interested in fanning can afford to be 
without it. Get it quick — it's free. 




Soil Culture 

and Modern 
Farm Methods 

Contains over 140 
pages of practical in- 
formation and data 
on the latest and 
best known meth- 
ods of farming. 
All crops are dis- 
cussed. Itiafully 
illustrated. This 
book is an ex- 
pensive publication 
and in order to keep it 
out of the hands of those not necessarily in- 
terested in farming, it will be supplied free 
upon receipt of five cents in stamps, the exact 
amount to cover postage. 

John Deere Implements 

Standard for Three Generations 

The John Deere trade mark on the goods 
and the John Deere sign at your dealer's place 
mean more to you than all the claims and 
guarantees that can be put upon farm imple- 
ments. 

Wherever farm machinery has been used, 
for more than three generations, implements 
bearing the name "John Deere" have been the 
standard. You have the assurance of these 
years of successful experience in manufactur- 
ing back of every implement you buy when 
it bears the John Deere trade mark. 

To Get the Books You Want 

Ask us for package No. X-57, stating 
where! you saw this advertisement. We will 
then send you "Better Farm Implements and 
How to Use Them" free. Name the other 
books you want. In case you want the 
Soil Culture book, do not neglect to en- 
close the postage. 

John ''Deere Plow Company 



Agricultural Books Free 

TF any of the following special farm- 
•*■ ing books, by prominent authori- 
ties, will be of interest, ask us for 
the one you want and you will get 
it Free. 

Bigger Crops from Better Seed Beds — ^What propes 
seed bed preparation means. Single and double 
action disc harrows. 

Better Hay and How to Make It — How to cure hay 
vmiformly; how to avoid bleached or sunburned 
ihay, etc. Hay rakes and loaders for. all kinds of 
hay. 

More and Better Com — Careful selection of seed 
corn; how to produce a uniform and perfect stand. 
The proper planters and how to use them. 
Value of Manure — How crop yields are increased 
by the use of manure and what spreaders distrib- 
ute it most economically. 

Com Culture — Preparation of soil for the best com, 
both in quality and quantity, with the styles and 
kinds of cultivators to use. 

Truth About Plow Shares — How and of what ma- 
terial they are made and which are best. 
Alfalfa — Its seeding, culture and curing, the bac- 
teria necessary, the seed bed, the machines required. 

John Deere Engine Plows — Cost of engine and 
horse plowing, how to operate engine plows and 
why some engine plows are better than others. 
Science and Art of Plowing — When and how to 
plow under all conditions, with all kinds of walking 
plows. 

When the Goin? Is Hard — Roller Bearing Steel 
Wagons, their construction and use. 

How to Build Com Cribs and Granaries — Blue 
print plans and cost of material. Storing and 
handling of corn, etc. What elevators are best for 
each kind of grain. 

How to Buy a Wagon of Quality — ^John Deere 
Wagons; how they are made and why they are best. 



Moline, Illinois 



LTX 




;3X/\bl-isme:d 1857 



IS^ "\A/A LK EAS Y" 

ARTIFICIAL LEG 

vi^ Combines all the Latest Improvements. Acknowledjfcd by all wearers the 
Walk- most durable* comlbrtablef and easiest to v»'aik on of any leg made. Our 
easy large illustrated catalogue, "THE MAKING OF A MAN," sent free on request. 



ELASTIC HOSIERY 

Made to Pleasure from Fresh 
SStock) Insuring Best Results. 

Duplicates can be secured at any time 
from our records. 

Self-Measurement Blanks 
sent on request. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. ' 




ABDOMINAL SUPPORTERS, 

SHOULDER BRACES, 

DEFORMITY APPLIANCES, 

JACKETS FOR 

SPINAL CURVATURE, 

CRUTCHES, ETC. 




Metal Arche* for 
Flat Feet 



Send for Free Book About PAINFUL FEET 
TRUSSES of Every Description 

Send for Catalogue. Trusses That Fit 




GiEios^GE: R. RuL-i-ER 00., 



Branch Factories 



9» CLINTOIV AVE., NORTH 
ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

BUFFALO, BOSTON. PHILADELPHIA, 

•23 W. &wan Street. 17 Bromfield Street. 1233 Arch Street, 



Home Study Courses 

Over one hundred Home 
Study Courses under pro- 
fessors in Harvard. 
Brown. Cornell and lead- 
ing colleges. 

Academic and Preoara- 
tory, AfirrictiKural, Com- 
mercial. Normal and Civil 
Service Departments. 

Preparation for Col- 
lege, Teachers' and Civil 
Service Examinations. 
250> page catalog free. 
Write to-day. 
The Home Correspondence School 
Dept. 99B, Springfield, Ma«8. 




Pbof. Gbnuxg 
English. 



Partonic 

Braces Up the Whole System 

In cases of exhaustion, depression 
or debility its splendid results can be 
relied upon. At all druggists, $1.00 
per bottle. Write for free book on 
Partola Family Preparations. Ad- 
dress, 

PARTOLA COMPANY 

160 Second Avenue, New York City 



For Sleeping In-Doors or Out-of-Doors= 



THE PNEUMATIC MATTRESS 

combines all the good qualities of all other mattresses, with none of their 

disadvantagres. 

Send for illustrated catalogue, describing PNEUMATIC 3JIATTRESSE3, 

CTTSHZONS and TTLImOYTS for HOME, CAMP, YACHT and AUTOMOBIIiE. 

Also, the PNEUMATIC SItEEPINa BAG for the outdoor treatment of 

pulmonary diseases. 



PNEUMATIC MFG. CO., 281 Ninth Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

LX 



miUmPlllC£-U5TWr5Tm3aEWANf£D:^^ QUOTE 

l^' ' -ff TELEPHONE 1119 WORTH >|;>:^^;| 







The Master Cure foi* 

Used by Specialists and known since 1861 aa 
the one good medicine for deex>-seated and ap* 
patently hopeless cases. A safe, speedy and satis* 
factory treatment. Don't waste time with com* 
pounds, cure-alls and liniments. Insist on hay> 
ing Muller's Famous Prescription and success. 
Ctares ZIHetamatism AAd Gout 
any age or condition. 

At DrogglBts. 7 5c. Bottle. Booklet mailed £ree« 
WM. H. MULLER. 352 Atlantic Ave.. Brooklyn. N. f. 



I LOVE TO WALK— BUT 
Oh! My Corns! 

KBENE'S 

GLAD-PHEET 

Corns, Bunion and Callous 
POSITIVE BEaiEDY 

Our Guarantee. 

If there is any trance of corns, 
bunions or callouses on your feet 
after a trial of Keene's Glad-Pheet 
Remedy just retitm the money back 
coupon (attached to package) and 
your money will be return«d imme- 
diately. 

Entirely 'New Treatment. 
Glad-Pheet Plaster contains genuine 
Arabian Cannabis Indica. which 
soothes the pain instantly. Buy it 
to-day. 15c and 25c at all druggists. 



^iL^"^ INDIGESTION 

KEENE'S 

CHARCO-PEPSIC 

DIGESTIVE TABLETS 

Give immediate relief for all stomach distress — 
dyspepsia, flatulency, biliousness, heartburn, acid- 
ity, headaches, constipation, etc., etc. 

Every tablet contains Itefined Willow Charcoal. 
Ex. Strength Pepsin. Virgin Bi-NUXEM, Bis- 
muth. Soda Mint. Magnesia, Ginger, etc. Taste 
like candy. Money-back .Coupon in every box. 
15c. per box (extra larsre box 25c.) ai 
all drus^rists. 




KEENE CO., 85 Franklin, Street, New York 



LXI 



Every Wide-Awake Young Man 
Should Own and Operate This 

WIRELESS SET 




Complete Sending and 
Receiving Outht 

SPECIAL 
PRICE, 



$8.95 



Costs You Twice 
Much Elsewhere. 



as 



Sends 8 to 15 Miles 
Over Land, 25 Miles 
Over Water. Receives 
600 to 800 Miles. 

Ideal outfits for the home or for camping. Simple as A B C 
to operate. Every motor boat, sail boat and yacht should be 
equipped. Insures safety. A fascinating pastime. We equip schools 
and colleges. Install outfits on tugboats, fishing smacks, steam- 
ers, etc. 

Send at once for our Circular W, Including Continental, Inter- 
national, Morse and Navy codes. 

Our Famous Coils for Maiine Gas Engine Ignition, $..00 

per Cylinder. 

There is no coil on the market that will equal it. 

The Hou»e of 92-94 Murray St. 
""vSufel"' New York, U.S. A. 



HUNT & M'CREE 




$3-50 



ELECTRIC 
HEATING PAD, 

Discard your hot water bot- 
tle. Operates on lighting cir- 
cuit. Costs Ic. a night to 
operate. Lasts a lifetime. Doc- 
tors recommend them. For 
Rheumatism, Neuralgia, In- 
somnia, Poor Circulation, 
nothing will equal it. Send 
at once for Circular W. A., 
which describes its use in cases 
of illness. 

HUNT & M'CREE 

92 Murray St., New York 



LXII 



Learn 
Electricity 




IN ALL ITS 

APPLIED 

BRANCHES 



A COURSE IN ELECTRICITY 



to be useful must be PRACTICALr, Tou cannot become the "practical man" by 
reading- books or attending- lectures. You must have at hand the tools, material 
and machinery to prove your theory or you are losing time and money. 

We are ■ teaching a thoroughly practical course in ELECTRICITY. In this 
school you learn how to do it by doing- it, not by cramming your brain with useless 
formulas and diagrams which are usually forgotten as quickly as they are learned. 
In this school you work with your hands, you work individually and your ability 
is the only limit to your progress. 

Send for free illustrated catalog that tells you all about this practical, small cost "LEARN-BY-DOING' ' school 



The New York Electrical School 



40 West 17th JStreet 
^T3W YOKK 



Chas. F. Hubbs & Co. 

29-33 Lafayette Street 

NEW YORK CITY 

Telephone 4100 Worth 



PAPER 



RELIABLE ROD, $1 



2^ 

100 

We want all anglers to know 

about the manufactures of this 

old reliable house, hence this 

offer. 

Send us ^1.25 and l5 cents for 

postage and we will send to you 

'by return mail -a Four-Piece 

Steel Fishing Rod. 
Either a Bait Rod 6, GVz, 7, 7^/^ 
or 8 feet or a Fly Rod 9 or 10 
feet. Made by the Horton Mfg. 
Co., makers of the celebrated 
Bristol Steel Rod. Cork Handle, 
Nickel-Plated Mountings,- Lock- 
'ing Reel Band — all in Flannel Bag. 
Money back if you are not 
more than satisfied. 

200-'page catalogue sent on re- 
ceipt of 10 cents to cover post- 
age, or (free with above rod. 

Edw.VomHofe&Co. 

105-107 Fulton Street, New York. 



LXIII 



CONSOLIDATED 
TELEGRAPH & 
ELECTRICAL 
SUBWAY CO. 

54-60 Lafayette Street 
NEW YORK 



(^ 



BUILDS AND OPERATES HIGH 
TENSION ELECTRIC LIGHT AND 
POWER SUBWAYS IN THE 
BOROUGHS OF MANHATTAN 
AND THE BRONX © @ @ © 



LXIV 



INVAUDS' 



CHAIRS 



The Very Best That Can 
Be Produced 

THE 

WORTHINGTON CO. 

1600 Cedar St. Elyria, 0. 

Write for Catalogue. 

Also makers for over 
25 years of the 
most varied and 
individual line of 



MACHINES 




CRIPPLES 




LXV 



-"' — ■" ' ' ~ 



Gains 30 Pounds in 30 Days 

50c Package of Remarkable Flesh Builder, Protone, 
Sent Free to Prove What It Will Do. 



It is astonishing to see the effects produced by the new flesh- 
increaser, Protone. To 'put on real, solid, healthy fles'h at the irate of 

a pound a day is not at all re- 
markable with this new wonder. 

Protone induces nutrition, in- 
creases cell-growth, makes per- 
fect the assimilation of food, 
strengthens nerves, increases 
blood corpuscles, builds up, 
safely and quickly, muscles and 
solid, healthy flesh, and rounds 
out the figure. 

For women who never appear 
stylish in anything because of 
thinness, Protone may prove a 
revelation. 

It costs you nothing to provG 
the remarkable effects of Pro- 
tone. It is non-injurious to the 
most delicate system. The Pro- 
tone Company, 5136 Protone 
Bldg., Detroit, Mich., will send 
yoiu, on receipt of your mamo and 
address, a free 50c package of 
Protone, with full instructions, 
to prove that it does the work; 
also their book on "Why You 
Are Thin," free of charge, giving 
facts which will probably aston- 
ish you. Send coupon below 
to-day with your name and 
address. 




START 



CMO OP 

6ECON0 MONTH 



Protone Will Make You Nice 
and Plump 



FREE PROTONE COUPON 

This coxipon is g-ood for a free 50c package (all charges prepaid) 
of Pirotone, the remarkable scientifi'o discovery for building up thin 
people, together with our free book telling why you are thin, if sent 
with ten cents in silver or stamps to help cover postage and pa-ckinff, 
and as evidence of good faith, to 

The Protone Co., 5136 Protone Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 

Name 

Street * 

City .State 

LXTl 




Deaf People 

Hear Whispers 

With Common- Sense Ear Drums— 
"Wireless Phones for the Ears." 

For twenty years the Pom- 
mon-Sense Ear Drums ' have 
been giving erood hearing to 
hundreds of thousands of 
deaf people, and they will do 
the same f^o-r all who try 
them. 

Every condition of deafness 
or defective hearing is being 
<helped and cured, such as 
Catarrhal Deafness. Relaxed 
or Sunken Drums. Thickened 
Drums. Roaring and Hissing .Sounds. 
Perforated or Partially Destroyed 
Druims, Drums "Wholly Destroyed. Dis- 
, charge from Ears — no imatter what 
the cause or how long standing the 
case may be. there is hope of gcod 
hearing for all the afflicted deaf. 

The Common-Sense Ear Drum is made of 
a soft, sensitized material, comfortable and 
safe to Tvear. They are out of isight when -worn, 
and easily adjusted by tbe wearer. 

Good hearing brings cheerfulness, comfont .and 
sunshine into the life of rthe lonely deaf. 

Our Eree Book, whidh tells all, will be sent 
on applioation, Wiite for it to-day to 

WILSON EAR IXBTJM CO., Inconiorated, 
734 Todd Building Xouisville, Ky. 



liWfiiDlidPPOTi 



silver, diamonds, watoties, tgold jewelry, 
new or broken, any quantity. Sihip t»y 
mail or express. We send full value the 
day g-oods are received and if our offer 
is not satisfactory, we return the goods 
at our expense. "We also sell diamonds, 
watches, jewelry at ihalf the usual 
price, ^kt. genuine diamond $14.50. 
Write for catalogue (Showing 2,000 bar- 
gains. Banik reference. Elstablished 
1896. 

Liberty Refilling Company 

433 Liberty Street. Pittsburgrh, Pa. 

CURE THAT BUNION 

DON'T TRY TO HIDE IT 

At last, instant re- 
lief* and a quick cure 
for bunions and en- 
larsred toe joints. Dr. 

Scholl's Bunion Riaht 
relieves and cures be- 
cause it removes the 
cause and straightens 
the crooked toe. Light 
— comfortable — sani- 
tary. Shields and shoe 
stretchers never cure. 
Guaranteed or money 
back at drug or shoe 
stores, or send 5 cents for one or 
per pair to-day and stop that bunion 
tare. Write now for quick relief. 

THE SCHOL.I. MEG. CO. 
213 !B L. SchUler St. CMcagro, 111. 





tor- 



Greatest Robber of the 
Pay Envelope-Drink 

A Rensselaer Woman Says 

Renova Means Full 

Pay Envelopes 



This is her experience — ^her own 
story in iher own words. "I ihqpe 
you will excuse me for keeping your 
letter as long as .1 have, but as it 
was near time for my husband to 
be paid again, I thought it best to 
wait and see how he acted, as he 
only drinks on the day he is paid. 
\ am thankful to say he came home 
sober two different pay days." 

Has this any significance for the 
family that is deprived of necessities 
and comforts because some one 
spends half his pay on drink ? The 
remedy the Rensselaer woman writes 
about is Renova and you can get it 
at the drug store and put it in his tea 
or coffee and he won't know a thing 
about it, for it is tasteless and abso- 
lutely harmless. If there's a drinker 
in your family get it — get it right 
away — give it to him secretly, any 
way at all — ^but give him Renova 
'.and see if very soon you're not the 
happiest family in the world. 

If you'd like to try it — free — be- 
fore you buy a whole package, write 
in confidence to the Renova Co., 200 
Broadway, Branch 110, New York, 
for a sample and proofs of what 
Renova does for victims of intem- 
perance. 



LXVIl 



J 



"If I Were a Young Man" 

-^ays LUTHER BURBANK, the Greatest Living Horticulturist 

**Pd devote my life to the Pecan Nut, knowing 

as I do the possibilities of the Pecan Industry.'* 

It is rare that an opportunity of saving and investing 
money in small amounts where it will yield such large 
returns with absolute safety of principal is given the 
business man of to-day. We assume all risk. 

GROVE ASSURES YOU 
AN INCOME FOR LIFE 

and is ten times more valuable to you than Life Insur- 
ance, Look into it. Write to-day for 

^^£Vx««X«««*>»A ««• D>.^^«*^^^ and Expert Opinions on the 
tOTtUneS in teCanS promts in TMs industry 

St. Andrews Bay Nursery and Orchard Company 

111 BROADWAY NEW YORK 



A PECAN 





rtfidloni 



BEER mA ALE 

in Kegs and Bottles 



For 60 Years the Name Bar- 
tholomay Has Stood as the 
Standard of Excellence in 
Brewing* 

Barthotomay Means Quality 

LXVIIl 



The Vanderbilt Hotel 



"i4 Hotel of Distinction with Moderate Charges 



99 




Thirty-fourth Street East at Park Avenue 

New York City 

SITUATION unique on 

the high, ground of 

Murray Hill on 

New York's broad- 
est avenue, at the 

threshold of^ the 

shopping district, 

convenient to the 
theatres, three minutes from New 
York Central, New York, New Haven 
and Hartford and Pennsylvania Rail- 
way terminals. Subway station at 

the door. 

"In the world "but not of it." 

The only residential building in the 
world in which no combustihle material 
Jias been used. 

In T>lan 600 rooms are exposed to di- 
rect sunlig-ht and so disposed that 
withal ihere is a onost charming" wimter 
home. 

Each bedroom has a private bath. 

The central lo»cation of the hoitel on 
a ibroad avenue makes it a favorite 
stopping place for visitors by automo- 
bile. Dressing rooms for automobilists 
— both ladies and gentlemen — will be 
found on the Mezzanine Floor. Ar- 
rangement with a nearby -garage pro- 
vides for the 'oare of the visitor's car. 
Touring cars may be rented by the hour, 
day or week at reasonable rates. 

An Invitation is extended to inspect 
the various departments of the hotel, 
particularly the kitchens and wine cel- 
lars. Upon request guides will toe sent 
from the office. 

Tariff 

Single Room with Bath, $3, $4, $5, $6 Per Day 

Donble Room with Bath, $5, $6, $7, $8 Per Day 

Double Bedroom, Boudoir Dressing Room and Bath, $7, $10, $12 Per Day 
Suites— Parlor, Bedroom and Bath— $12, $15, $18 Per Day 

Private Suite for Entertainments— Tariff Upon Request 

Hilliard Hotel Company 

Thomas M. Hilliard, President and Managing Director 
Walton H. Marshall, Manager 

LXIX 





Rememler! 



THE BOTTLE OF THE 



ORIGINAL 

AND ONLY GENUINE 



DUBONNET 



Superior to the 

Best Cocktail 



WARNING 

By decision of the SUPREME COURT OF FRANCE, rendered on April 6th, 1909, the firm Of ^ 
DUBONNET, 7 rue Mornay, Paris, has the exclusive right to Its name "DUBONNET," and their 
wine Is the ONLY one that must be served when ordering "DUBONNET."* 

ANY INFRINGEMENT WILL BE PROSECUTED TO THE FULL EXTENT OF THE UW 



LfXX 



FUNSTEN!^CASH!!iFURS! 



We Want Ten Million Dollars' Worth of Furs 

Biggest Prices! Better Grading! Most Money by Return Mail! 

Those are tlie advantages you have in sending your furs to Fun- 
eteu. We are the largest in the world in our line. The biggest 
American. Canadian and European buyers aie represented at our 
regular sales. Compet'ition for Funsten 1<\its is greatest. As we 
sell furs in larger quantities and get more siKit c-ash. we can pay 
you more cash for yours than you can get anywhere. We coimt on 
large volume of business and small margin of profit. No traveling 
buyers — do all our business direct with yoxi. We want ten mil'lion 
dollars' worth of furs. We want your shipments, anything: — from 
one skin up. 

Big Money in Trapping g^ S^°fpo?r°aid^^p^Ss 'T,: 

Mink, coon, skunk, muskrat. fox. wolf. lynx, white weasel and all 
kinds of fiuis are valuable. 



TRAPPER S' 






FREE 






LARGEST 
IN THE 
WORLD 



Tl»anc To axx;ommodate trappers and shippers we furnish traps 
11 ays including the famous VICTOR, at factory cost. Largest 
stock in U. S. 

Fnncfpn Animal Roit Guaranteed to increase your catch or 

t UU3IC11 /llllllldl Dan money back. Beware of imitations. 

Funsten Animal Baits won Grand Prize at World's Fair in 1904. 

U. S. Government uses Funsten Baits. One can of FYmsten Ani- 
mal Bait brought one man in St. Michaels. Alaska. $1,199 clear 
profit. Costs only $1 a can. Different kinds for different animals. 
Wnether you are an experienced trapper or just a beginner, we can help 
you cat'ch more furs — ^make more money. Write today for free Trapper's 
Guide. Game Laws and Trapper's Supplv Catalog — three books in one — Fnr 
Market Reports. Fimsten 'Safety Fur Shipping Tags. etc. ALX, FREE. 

Funsten Bros. & Co., 209 Funsten Building, St. Louis, Mo. 



AA to S20.00 fD&r month 

•""saved on our plan 

assures you and your heirs 

An Income for Life 

Tou can plaroe it wihere it will not only yield 5 iper cent, inlterest, l3ut 
where the .principal will be absolutely safe and constantly increasing- 
in vialue, and 'where, after a period of 10 years, IT SEGUIiD TTUEIImI} 
YOU 100 PER CENT. AN-NVAIiIiY, and continue during- your life- 
time and that of your children. Ask for the proofs. 




SALESMEN 



WOULD $200 PER MONTH 
ON THE SIDE BE AN 
OBJECT TO YOU? 



One good business man in each community can secure this by repre- 
isentlng us. iwithout interfering with present occupation. To be sure 
of securing territory write to-day for full panticulars. 

ST. ANDREWS BAY NURSERY & ORCHARD CO. 

Trinity Bnlldlxiff - - - - - - NirV7 YGIRK CITY 



LXXl 



High Power Rifles and Automatic Pistols 

MHUufactured by the largest Arms Companies of the world; Deutsche Waff en & 
Munitionsfabriken, Berlin, and Waffeufabrik Mauser, Oberndorf a N. Germany. 

GENUINE MAUSER RIFLES 




Calibres— 6.5 7 8 9 10.5 mm, 

" .256 .275 .315 .354 .413 



IlIAUSER AUTOMATIC PISTOLS 




LUGER 

AUTOMATIC 

PISTOLS 



7.65 cal. & 9 mm. cal. 
.30 cal. & .38 cal. 

Adopted by 10 Governments, including 
German Army and Navy. 

MAUSER AUTOMATIC POCKET PISTOLS 

.25 and .32 cal. 




MANNLICHER SCHOENAUER RIFLES 

6.5, 8 and 9 mm. cal. 



Sole Agent for United States, Canada and Mexico 

H. W. TAUSCHER 

320 Broadway, New York City 

LXXIl 



Hotel Breslin 

Broadway at 29th St. 

NEW YORK CITY 




the individuality of the 



••THE CENTER 

OF 
THINGS ACTIVE" 

A well con- 
ducted hotel 
catering to a 
substantial 
class of peo- 
ple at reason- 
able rates. 

FIVE HUNDRED 
ROOMS 

An institution 
not so large that 
:uest is lost. 



DAVID B. MULLIGAN, Manager 



LXXIII 



"** 



NEW YORK LAND 

•has produced more permanent, substantial fortunes than any 
other form of investment. There is no safer or more profit- 
able security known. Statistics prove the steady enhancement 
of New York Realty regardless of general business or political 
conditions. 

We are engaged in the acquisition of New York Real Estate 
for the income derived from PERMANENT OWNERSHIP. 
During 16 years we have amassed a large estate for our security 
holders, have returned to them over ^1,200,000; 'have paid con- 
tinuous and increasing dividends, and accumulated ^1,000,000 
•surplus. 

By associating the funds of hundreds of investors, large 
and small, through corporate ownership, we accomplish results 
impossible 'by individual effort. 

WE OFFER TWO FORMS OF INVESTMENT: 



6^° GOLD BOND 

based upon permanently owned New 
York real estate. $5.00 in assets 
against evecy dollar issued. Term. 10 
years; denominations $100, and multiples 
thereof. Interest paid semi-annually by 
check (unbroken interest record for 16 
years) . This Taond has become la stanidard 
security the country over. Issued upon 
receipt of tprice. or can be bought on in- 
stalment payments over a (period of 
years. 



CONV. BOND 

Issued on three different p'lans, ©aoh 
affording you the opportunity to par- 
ticipate in the full profits and surplus of 
the Company at maturity (10 years), 
while securing substantial interest return 
on your investment in the meantime. 
Purchasable outright or on yearly or half 
yearly payments. 



Circular Y fully describes our business 
and will be sent free upon request. 

New York Realty Owners 

Assets, $3,500,000 - - Capital $1,500,000 

Surplus $1,000,000 



489 FIFTH AVENUE^ 



NEW YORK CITY 



OV7NERS~NOT OPERATORS 

LXXIV 



Here is a New Twist to the 
Advertising Pencil Idea 




SEND eaioh of your customers (ttiree 
assorted pencils in a box as illus- 
trated. His own name on eacti pen- 
cil will please him immensely and 
make him keenly appreciative of your 
favor. YO)UR name on the cover of the hox 
will be one of the moat effective forms o-f 
publicity that you can imagine. It allows 
ample room for a good big ad. and will be 
read as you see under conditions very favor- 
able to the consideration of your ipropositlon. 

This combination has an irresistible appeal to 

every man with a keen sense of publicity 

values. The cost is very little. Your name on 

the cover of the box — your cusitomer's nanme on 

each pencil in grold. 

Unconsciously to him you secure in this way 

your customer's good will and get his- orders. 

Every time he sees his own name on his pencil 

he thinks of your clever advertising idea and is 

reminded to order of you. 

4 in 1 Magazine JP^l!^^?^ ^ i^^'i^. ^.^" 1^"'^.^^ 

® of holder, about 4 m. On its 

" ATI " PT'lVrTT, surface may be displayed a 

^ xxixii^ii. six-line ad., trademarks, etc. 

ROUND PENCILS Prepared for advertising pur- 

■m poses, showing trade marks, 

^•nfl etc. Our full line 'comprises 

PENHOLDERS ^ V^^ ''^J'%^^ °^ pencils in 

grades suited for any special 
office use or general distribution. 

FARRAR PENCILS 

are the finest grade ever produced — and may be ob- 
tained in any quantity idesired. 

For Large Firms 

who value pencil quality and buy in large quantities. 
F'ARRAR pencils afford the most in satisfactory ser- 
vice and money-saving possibilities. 

In order to realize FARRAR Superiority you 'must see 
FARRAR PENCILS. To make this easy we will 
promptly send assorted samples to business firms re- 
questing on their letterheads. FARRAR QUALITY AIND 
FARRAR PRICES will surprise you. Write on your letter- 
head to-day. 

For the Polks at Home fuTlfrTr Sl^ofS 

at Tiome, send 25c for a set of fhree pencils in a beautiful 
floral design box, with name stamped in gold on each 
pencil. 

L. G. FARRAR, (Inc.) 

10 Spruce Street New York City 



LXXV 




We Can Increase 
Your Income 

No matter where you live, if you 
are honest, ambitious and determ- 
ined to succeed in business — a busi- 
ness absolutely your own — send 
your name and address and we 
will mail you our Big Free 64- 
Our "^^'^''Bjjlk, ^*8f® Book, showing how you 
President ^^^^Jk may earn 

$3,000to$10,000aYear 

in the Real Estate, Brokerage and Insurance 
Business. 

Our system is a positive success. We will 
teach you by mail, appoint you a 

Special Representative 

in your town of the oldest and largest co-oper- 
ative realty and brokerage company in the 
world, start you in a profitable business of 
your own and help you to make money from 
the beginning. 

Exceptional Opportunity for 
Men Without Capited 

Write Today 

International Realty Corporation, 

1386 Manhattan Building, Chicago, III. 



LXXVl 



jPlanchcuxl 

ADVERTISE 

YOUR 

BUSTNESS 




This is one of 150 varieties— Pencils, Pen- 
holders and Round Handle Utilities. Ask, 
and you will receive catalog complete with 
colored illustrations and net prices. Repre- 
: • sented in all leading cities : : 



Blanchard Bros.,^ 

8th Avenue and 18th Street 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK CITY, U. S. A. 

"LARGEST PRODUCERS IN THE WORLD" 

Cable A<3<kesg: BLANiPBNCIL— BROOKLYN. Western Union— AiB€— 5th and Liebers CJodes 

LXXVIl 



^ 



Play Billiards at Home! 

The Famous Brunswick Billiard Tables — 
Home Sizes^ Attractive Prices, Easy Terms 




"THE CRISIS'* 

From the Painting by C. Everett Johnson. 



Multiply the attractions and de- 
lights of home by providing a 
beautiful Brunswick Home Billiard 
Table on which all can play real 
billiards! Practically the same in 
playing qualities as our larger sizes 
used in exclusive "Millionaires' 
Clubs." 

BRUNSWICK 

**Baby Grand'' 

BILLIARD OR 
POCKET-BILLIARD TABLES 

World's finest home billiard tables. 
Genuine mahogany, inlaid design, 
highly finished. Celebrated Baby 
Monarch Cushions. Vermont Slate 
Bed. Concealed drawer holds Com- 
plete Playing Outfit. Also various 
styles instantly convertible from 
Billiard Table to Davenport, Dining 
or Library Table. Complete Playing 
Outfit free with each table. 



Clergymen, Physicians, Educators Say — 'Tlay Billiards'' 

The high opinion won by billiards as an ideal game for young people is 
shown by the many Y, M. C. A. Branches, Institutional Churches and 
Church Clubs which maintain Billiard Rooms. 

Clergymen, Physicians and famous Educators are strong advocates of 
billiards. 



"Billiards— The Home Magnet"— Free 



Beautiful color- illustrated book showin.g' 
aLl styles Brunswick Home Billiard Tables, 
with special prices and full details af Easy 
Purchase Plan, is ready for you. Write 
while you have our address. 

THE 

Brunswick- Baike - CoUender Co., 

Dept. S, 324-328 S. Wabash Ave., 

CHICAGO. 

LXXVIIl 




The Brxmswick "Bab.r Grand" 
Home BiUiard Table. 



The Schwarzlose Automatic Pistol 

Manufactured by Warner Arms Corporation, Brooklyn, N, Y, 



FREE TRIAL 




Effective 
Shooting 
Kange 200 
Yards. 



Eight trigger pulls, eigTit consec- 
utive shots. Loaded automatically 
from the magazine. Only one shot 
to each trigger pull. The Schwarz- 
lose is modelled so that the barrel 
registers with the natural pointing 
line of the forefinger. 

Burglars and Hold- Up Men 
Fear the Schwarzlose 

Adyantages Oyer Other Automatic Pistols: A 4-inch barrel, with pistol 
only 5% inches long over all; weight, 8 ounces. Greater Eange^ Greater 
Accuracy and Greater Penetration than others, because of its solid breech. 
Eemember, "The Schwarzlose'' is not a blow-back breech; barrel slides 

forward to function. Important: The Schwarzlose 
has the only positive safety which can be instantly 
operated by right or left hand. In Construction it is 
Simplicity Itself. Less parts than any other auto- 
matic. Men experienced in firearms recognize its 
superiority over other pocket firearms, and frankly 
admit it has others beat. 

Reliable to the Extreme. Unequalled in Accuracy. 

Made under A. W. Schwarzlose patents, whose Auto- 
matic Arms have been adopted by European Armies. 
Don't Buy a Pocket Arm until you have seen a 
Schwarzlose. If your dealer has not one, don't take 
his "just as good" or "better sort," but write to us for 
illustrated description, booklet and expert opinions 
showing the superior features of this new, moderate- 
priced, "Faultless Automatic Pistol," free trial offer, 
etc. It shoots 32-calibre automatic cartridges, same 
as all other American automatic pistols. All parts 
are made to gauge and are interchangeable. Get the 
latest and best; it costs no more. Your dealer should 
keep it; if not, write to the manufacturers and get 
posted on the latest and best pocket arm made. New 
principles and novel features are employed, namely: 
Our Factory BuiMing ^11 action being enclosed tight to exclude dirt, etc. 

WARNER ARMS CORPORATION 

Dept. W. L., 33 Prospect Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

T.XXIX 




11^— j ii iw um 



m,i.iwii iiiinirT-iii 1 —, ^— ^1— ^— ^M^^». 




CAN ALSO BE FURNISHED WITH BATTERY 



Is the latest and most effective achievement of Med- 
ical Science in the treatment of diseases of the nose, 
throat, bronchial tubes and lungs. 

It has accomplished the much desired and long sought 
for method of applying the essential remedies directly to the parts 
affected without the necessity of taking any medicine into the stomach. 

The six different formulas are the result of five years of experiment 
and research in the study of respiratory diseases and their causes. 
These formulas may be said to be the last word in respiratory medicine. 

They have been compounded of the costliest ingredients by the 
foremost medico-chemists and are used in their full strength without 
any dilution with a cheaper element. 

The great value of these formulas is conceded by the medical profes- 
sion, but without a proper method of application the greater part of their 
efficiency would be lost. In the Respirone there has been developed a 
method that will successfully apply these formulas directly to the seat 
of the disease. In this manner an ideal remedy has been effected. It 
will not irritate inflamed membranes but acts quickly, alleviating con- 
gestion and soreness. 

FORMULA 

A*l. Catarrh and Colds A-3. Hay-Fever A-5. Pneumonia 

A-2. Asthma A-4. Tonsilitis and Bronchitis A-6. Consumption 

The Electric Respirone stands entirely on its own merits and if not 
entirely satisfactory may be returned to us and money will be immedi- 
ately refunded. Write for complete information. 

531 Penn Bldg., :: THE ELEaRlC RESPIRONE CO. :: Cleveland, Ohio 



LXXX 



Reliable Fireless Cookers 




^ One of the best and 
most useful articles for 
the household. Posi- 
tively guaranteed; an 
article that is giving 
universal satisfaction ; 
an article we know will 
please the customers; 
the prices are reason- 
able, the goods are of 
the best; nothing but 
aluminum vessels. 

Reliable Incubators and Brooders 

^ We also manufac- 
ture the famous Reli- 
able Incubators and 
Brooders, having had 
thirty -one years of 
actual experience. 

^ For general catalog 
of the above articles, 
address 

Reliable Incubator and Brooder Company, 

Box 800 

Quincy, Illinois 

LXXXI 




— II""- 



SE INJD for DYKE'S RREE BOOK on IVIOXORIINIGi 



'NC.W«OF TEACH INC 



DVKE5 -^;;-;;: 
' Working MOPEL 4 



SVSXtM 



Explains how we can start TOU in the Auto Business as Re- 
pairman, Chauffeur. Salesman or Auto Expert with Dyke's 
New Idea Working: Model System of teaching by mail and 
our new idea Employment Plan. Let us tell you the names 
of some of our students and the salaries they are drawing 
to-dav — more than you are making. Don't miss it — Sena 
for Booklet NOW! 



DYKE'S SCHOOL OF MOTORING, Box 123, Roe Bldg., ST. LOUIS, MO. 



Partoherb for the Kidneys, Uric Acid 

and diseases of the bladder. Has proved itself an inestimable blessing". If 
you suffer from urinary troubles of any kind don't delay another day, but 
try Partoherb. You'll get quick relief. At all druggrists, $1,00 per box. 
Write for free book on Partola Family Preparations, Address 

FART Oil A COMPANY, 160 Second Avenue. New York Oity 



SECRET SERVICE STORIES 



^^ Between the Lines*' 



told by Bvt. Major H. B. Smith. CMef under Major Gen'l Lew Wallace. 

Tellum de Luxe. 



(Cavil War) 343 pages. 



Secret Service Stories of the Civil War that have never been told before. 

Although many times importuned by friends, the author has refrained from telling 
the stories publicly, until time should have worn off the sharp cutting edge of disap- 
pointment. 

This, the Semi-Centennial Seascm, is surcharged wi'th reminiscences, indulged In 
by both the Blue and the Gray, with no show of bitterness, and is pre-eminently the 
time for even a Sphinx to try to contribute to the general fund of stories. They are 
told in a spirit that will gratify without wounding. $1.25 inaiied. 

BOOZ BROS., Room 101, 314 W. 53d Street, New York 

or at any Bookseller's, 




Ask for our new Catalogue No. 6 6, containing a complete 
line of Cleaning Material, Janitors' Supplies and Housefurnishings, 
specially adapted for their needs. You will rind a complete list of 



Brooms. 
Brushes, 
Ash Cans, 
Feather Dusters, 
Toilet Paper, 



Hubber Goods, 
Mats and Mattini:. 
Cuspidors, 
Mops and Handles* 
Metal Polish. 
Soaps and Powders. Etc.t Etc. ..-- 

SAMUEL- LEWIS 

Exclusively Wholesale 

Housefurnishings and General Supplies 

FIVE FRONT STREET NEAY YORK, N. Y. 



Wrifirley's Patent 
Sewer Cleaners, 
Fnlon Mills Scrub Cloth 
"Lockit" Towel Rollers. 
"Wundermops" (made 

by the blind, ) 
Alpine Wax Oil Polish. 



Not a Cheap 
Make 



STORAGE BATTERIES 

But a RELIABLE PRODUCT Cheap 
lor LIGHTING and IGNITION 




6 Tolts, 60-90 
amp. hours . . . 

For ignition 
only 



$9.68 
7.45 



6 volts, 80-120 d»1 i 70 
amp. hours ... «plA.#\/ 

^onir!"'!'! .... 9-00 
^ ho"r? ^^^■^*'* ^^^' $16.83 
''**onir"'''° 12.95 

OTHER SIZES* QUOTED* UPON REQUEST. 

COSMOS ELECTRIC CO. 

130% Xiberty St., NEW YORK 

LXXXll 



r 



ELECTRIC 

HOUSEHOLD DEVICES 

REGINA VACUUM CLEANER 

MAKES WORK EASY 

The only sanitary way io do your housecleaning is witih a vacuum 
cleaner. Here *is an Electric Cleaner at a moderate price that will do the 
same work as the more expensive types. Equipped with a "GENERAL 
ELECTRIC" motor and guaranteed to give entire satisfaction. 
In ordering s'tate the voltage of your current. 





ELECTRIC CLEANER . . . $40.50 

Hand-operated Cleaner, same construc- 
tion and appearance as the electric, but 
without motor. A REAL VACUUM 
CLEANER that is used like ^^ ^^ 
a carpet sweeper ^«J»Otf 

SEND FOR DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULAR 

ELECTRIC IRONS 

These are the irons with the hot fpoint, cool 
handle and FIVE-YEAR G-UARA)NTEE on the 
heating- elemenit. Highly polished nickel finish 
and furnished complete with eigrht feet as- 
bestos covered cord and attachment plug. 

In ordering state the voltage of your current. 



■'; V.-; ■.TOffw?^K;- Vv^-V'VfiVg 



3-Pound Iron 
5-Pound Iron 
6-Pound Iron 



$3.00 
$3.50 
$3.50 



ELECTRIC GRILL 

With thiis device you can broil, fry, boil and 
toast. It is furnished with griddle, deep and 
•medium dishes, tray for protecting table, cord 
and plug. It is the handiest electric heating 
device ever put on the market. 

In ordering state the voltage of your current. 

Electric Grill . . $6.50 

« 

ANY OF THE ABOVE SENT EXPRESS PREPAID TO ANY PART OF THE UNITED STATES 

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

E. B. LATHAM Z,^ CO. 

Broadway and Murray St., New York, N. Y., U. S. A. 

Lxxxm 




A few of the more than 
2,000 Distinguished 
Editors and Contributors: 

FREDERICK CONVERSE BEACH. 

of the Scientific American, 

Editor-in-Chief 



Cardinal Gibbons 
Marquis Ito 
President Hadley 
Simon Newcomb 
Admiral Dewey 
David 3taiT Jordan 
Dr. Wmiam Osier 
Andrew Carnegie 
Joseph H. Choate 
Hugo Muensterberg 
Edmund Gosse 
Goldwin Smith 
Ernest Von Halle 
Edw. Everett Hale 
Hilaire Belloc 
Henry van Dyke 
Dr. Parkhurst 



Rabbi Hirsch 
Austin DolMon 
John H. Hammond 
Andrew S. Draper 
William T. Harris 
Benj. Ide Wheeler 
Carroll D. Wright 
Levi P. Morton 
James B. DiU 
Elihu Thompson 
Joseph Silverman 
Garrett P. Serviss 
John Muir 
General Cort)in 
Coimt Candiani 
Vice-Admiral Salto 
Captain Mahan 




^' 



/ 











This 84-Page Book Free to You 

You will be interested in the handsome booklet 
we have prepared, showing actual pages of the 
Encyclopedia Americana, with beautiful color- 
plates and fascinating illustrations. 

Simply fill in the coupon below, mail it to us, and the booklet will reach 
you postpaid and free of cost. It describes the latest (1912) edition of the 




a universal reference library, covering the entire range of the world's 
knowledge. Concise, readable and understandable — very different from 
the usual prosy "encyclopedic" style. 

Contains more subjects of living" interest to the American people than any 
other. Pirepared for Americans by Ameri'oans (assisted toy over 2,000 of the 
greatest scholars and aiojthorities of both hemispheres). 

The new India-paper edition is extremely convenient — volumes are aibout 
one inch thick — ^very handy to carry and to hold while reading. 

CASH for Your OLD Encyclopedia 

If. in sending the attached coupon, you ■will state the name and date of publication of your old 
encyclopedia, we will make a liberal allo-^vance in exchange for a set of the Encycloi>edia Americana. 



225 Fifth Avenue, New York ^ 

Cut or Tear Off Along This Line and Mail To-Day 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■I 

SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN COMPILING DEPARTMENT 

225 Fifth Avenue, New York 

Send me full particulars about your distribution of the ENCYCLOPEDIA AMERICANA 

•with explanatory pamphlet and actual pages from the woTk. 

Also state basis of exchange proiwsition : I own the encyclopedia 

published by Date (WA-1913) 

>Iy Name and Address are Wiltten in the space below: 



LXXXIV 



. ■ JU K ^i ^^i^^w 



'/^/^y/y///y/yy/////yy//^////yyy/y///y//yy^/^^^^ 









"Here Is Your Answer'* in 

WEBSTER'S New International 
Dictionary 



I 

I 
I 



—THE MERRIAM WEBSTER 



Even as you read this Almanac you likely 
question the meaning of some new 
word. A friend asks: "What makes 
mortar harden?" You seek the lo 
cation of Loch Katrine or the 
pronunciation of jujiitsu. What 
Is the Monroe Doctrine ? What 
is white coaH etc., etc. YOU 
often long for a quick, ac- 
curate, encyclopedic answer. 
This NEW CREATION is an 
encyclopedia — equivalent i n 
type matter to a 15-volume set 
It answers all kinds of questio 



^ in Language, History, Biography 



^ Fiction, Foreign Words, Trades, Arts 



§ and Sciences, with final anthority. It is 




a & C. MERRIAM CO., Springfield, Mass. 



I 



used as the standard of the State Supreme Courts, which can be said 
of no other dictionary. 

UNITED STATES COURT OF CLAIMS, Washin^on, D. C^ says: 

"Especially valuable is the New International Dictionary to all | 
persons engaged in literary, scientific and professional work. This ^ 
court finds the legal definitions accurate, and, in fact, of so full and 
extensive a character as practically to supersede the necessity for 
the publication of separate law dictionaries. Without hesitation we 
beg to say that the work is really a necessary adjunct to our daily 
labors." 

400,000 Words Defined. 6,000 Illustrations. 
2,700 Pages. Cost $400,000. 

The only dictionary with the new divided page— characterized as 

"A Stroke of Genius." 

WRITE ifor specimen pages, full particulars, etc. Name the 
World Almanac and receive FREE a set of pocket maps. 



I 

I 

i 



^ /yy/*^>vyyyyyyy/y^^^^^ 



LXXXV 






The 
Big 
Money 
iVIaker 



HERE'S A CORKING GOOD MONEY-MAKER 

AUTOMATIC STA3IPING MAOHINE.-SUmps name and 
address on Key Kines, Watch Fobs, Lucky Pocket Pieces, Grip Checks, 
etc., fonning identification mark. Work done in a jiffy. Big profit. 
Can be handled in many ways. Cr.ickerjack mail-order proposition, 
all OT spare time. Great at Resorts, Amusement Places, Carnivals, 
Fairs, etc. Operation of the machine draws the people, gets the Tione.^ , 
Everybody wants one. Merchants can take orders — do work in store 
odd times. Solicitors in office buildings ^et hun'dreds of orders. 
At Conventions, etc., you can clean up big profits. 

Alake 850 Where You Now 3Iake 810 

Machine is light, limple and easy to carry around. Do work on spot or take to home or shop. 
We furnish all blank supplies at right prices. Yon simply stamp, deliver — collect mont-y. 
No manufacturing, no fnaa for yotl. Just qu ck, easy work — big profits. Machine is 

_. Send to-daj for full particulars. Include dime and we will sead you our new one-piecf brass 

check complete with strap and buckle, atamped with your name and address, showing work of machine, 
postage paid. Exclusive territory granted. Get busy on this quick and cinch your territory. It's 
the best proposition out and brand new . W rite to-day. 

UNITED VENDINO MACHINE CO., 819 Huron Road, Cleveland, O. 



OBBC 



inexpensive. 






A WINNER 




Single or Treble Hooks 
Colors: White, Yellow and Mouse 



DECKER BAITS 



catch the fisTi. They are scientifically made, invented by a Lake Hopatcong 
Guide, a man who knows, and, wherever you go, a bass is a bass. 

These famous baits captured the first and fourth prizes in the Field and 
Stream 1911 contest. The large Lake Hopatcong bass weighed 8V^ pounds. 

If not at your dealer's, we will mail to you on receipt of price, 50c. 

OUR CATALOG IS FREE 

Send for a copy, mentioning your tackle dealer, and read Ans. B. Decker's 
hints on trolling and casting. Do it now. 
Our bass and trout flies are the best made. 

DECKER BAIT CO. 

36 WillougrhTiy Street — Dept. No. 1 Brooklyn, New York City 



The ^'GOLDEN GEM" ADDING MACHINE $ 1 Q 

For General Office or Personal Desk Use ONXY 

We have been making adding machines for ten years 
—and have sold over 30,000. "THE PROOF" on re- 
quest. During the past few years we have expended 
thousands of dollars in special tools and machinery to 
produce a machine that would be within the reacli of 
all. We have succeeded — the "Golden Gem" is the re- 
sult. You can keep It right on your desk or take it 
with you on the road. It saves brain work — avoids mis- 
takes — it suits the average man's needs as weM as high 
priced machines. It is supplied in pebbled morocco 
leather case for only $10. Send Your Remittance To- 
day. Your MONEY BACK within TEN days if Machine 
does not make good. SALES AGENTS: The "Golden 
Gem" Se^J^eH. ^ W. A. GANCHER 

Antomatic Adding Machine Co.. 319 Broadway. New York 

LXXXVI 




The FRED D. DIVINE CO. 




Manufacturers of the Celebrated 

DIVINE RODS 

If you see the name "Divine Rod" on 
the reel seat you may be assured 
you have the best. Others 
may cost more, 
but the quality 
Is no better. 





Rods Made to Order of 
Split Bamboo, Bethabarra, 
Greenhearty Dagama and 
Lancewood by competent 
workmen of many years' 
experience in our factory. 

Send for Free Illustrated Catalogue 
Mentioning THE WORLD ALMANAC 

The FRED D. DIVINE CO. 

416 State Street. Utica, N. Y. 



••ANTICIPATION!" 

The pleasure of anticipating the coming hunting or fishing trip is 
half the fun. The faithful dog, the dependent gun, the rounds of ammu- 
nition and the ever ready tackle are in readiness — to say nothing of the 
"grub!" 

But while the fun is on and the hunting and fishing good — suppose it 
rains! No need to worry and stop the fun — if you've protected yourself from, 
the wind and rain with a suit of • 



Duybak 



CraHJe netted 
Hunting and 
Fishing Clothes 



the only clothes that are treated by the world-famous Priestley Crayenette 
rain-proof process. They shed rain like a duck's back. The garments 
are warm, comfortable, well-yentilated and as pleasant to wear as your 
winter suit 

All styles for men that the sportsman needs. Also Ladies' Norfolk 
Jackets. Plain Skirts. Divided Skirts. Leggins, Hats, etc. 

KAMP-IT OUTIIVG GABMEKTS (not cravenetted) for men and 
women — for all outdoor uses in good weather and dry places. 

"Write for illustrated catalogue and dealers* names. 
BIBD. JONES & KENYON - - , 35 Hick ory Street, TTtlca, IT. Y. 

LXXXVIl 




Orders 

Invoices 

Bills 

Dept. Charts 

Reports 

Statements 

Drawings 

Engin. Specifications 

Architect's 

Specifications 
Price Lists 
Stock Lists 
Cost Sheets 
Accounting Forms 
Sales Instructions 
Card Records 
Tags and Labels 



General Electric Co. 
Western Electric Co. 
Union Pacific System 
Standard Oil Co. 
Armour & Co. 
Simmons Hardware Co. 
International Harvester Co. 



U. S. Steel Corporation 
Pennsylvania Railway 
Sprague Warner & Co. 
Wells Fargo Express Co. 
Marshall Field & Co. 
Roberts, Johnson & 

Rand Shoe Co. 



One Large Wholesaler has dispensed with 8 check- 
ers and 35 stenographers and thus saved between 
$10,000 and $15,000 per year by installing the 
COMMERCIAL DUPLICATOR 



THE COMMERCIAL DUPLICATOR fills the gap between 
the carbon copy and the thousand-run stencilling machine. It makes 
from 5 to 75 or more copies from the original. Simple — Speedy—^ 
Durable — prints on any size or weight of paper without compli- 
cated adjustments. 

Write for our catalog and tell us your duplicat- 
ing problems. It's our business to solve them. 

DUPLICATOR MFG. COMPANY 

1177 Monon Building CHICAGO 

New York Office, 50 Church Street 
ST. LOUIS BALTIMORE BOSTON MILWAUKEE PITTSBURGH KANSAS CITY 

LXXXVIII 



I 
I 




W^^/^^/^/^///^/ W//WM/7,_ 



'•You Have Learned How to Think 

—Take Charge" 



I 



"Your Sheldon training has increased your value to me and to yoyrself 

at the sa/m.e time. It has trained you hic'w to develop a'nd use the very powers 
that mos't men allow to lie dormant. It has made you lan executive before you 
realized it because it has taught you how to go ahead without super\'ision. This 
is a big jump for you, but It's only a start if you keeip Oa. the way you have begun." 

To Employers 

The Sheldon Course in Business 

Building is the applied science of busi- 
ness in concentrated, practical form. 

2,500 concerns that recognize the 

value of increasing the efficiency of 
their own organizations from the inside 

are now taking up the course officially with 
their emploj'ees. The results are remarkable. 
We shall be glad to supply you vvith the 
■names of several in your own viciiiity and 
allow jxm to communicate Avith them direct. 

Send Now for the Sheldon Book 

The coupon below or a postal or letter will 
bring you the valuable book. "The Sei-vice 
Idea," and clear, complete, detailed informa- 
tion. No obligation whatever. It will only 
take a couple of minutes to get this informa- 
tion — it may be worth thousands of dollars to 
you. Send now. 



Sheldon Develops and T rains 
Your Own Unused Strength 

Few men ever use more than one- 
tenth of their full mental powers. Al- 
most unlimited possibilities await the 
man who will develop his own dormant 
resources. 

The new Sheldon Business Building 

Course teaches you how to think clear- 
ly and constructively in a straight line. 

It shows you how to use and apply the 
fundamental laws that absolutely gov- 
ern success in every branch of business. 

Every single word is thoroughly 

practical. Every lesson marks an im- 
mediate atep forward toward success. 

The Sheldon 



School 




670 Republic Bld^., Chicago 
300 Fifth Arenne. New York 

Birkbeck, Bank Chamberst 
Liondon, Ensrland. 



THE SHELDON SCHOOL. 

670 Kepublic Building, Chicago, HI. 

Please send me FKEE copy of "The 
Service Idea^" giving full information re- 
garding Sheldon methods. 

Name 

3<treet 

City State. 






^/y/yyyy//yyy/yyyyy^^^^^ 



L 




Model B Marine Motor 



Brennan Standard 
Motors 

Built in Sizes from 20 to 60 S. F. 
FOR 

Automobile, Marine and 
Portabie Use 

BRENNAN MOTOR MFG. CO. 

Syracuse* N. Y. 



<< PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING 

ARRANGEMENT" 

Tills great book by Frank Alvah Parsons, President of the New 
York School of Fine and Applied Art, is the one new book which every 
advertising man and every buyer of "space" needs. 

Sent postpaid for examination, subject to return in 10 days if un- 
satisfactory, on receipt of price, ^2.00. 

Have You Got Your Copy? 

PRANG COMPANY - - 358 Hftii Avenue - - New Yorlc 



A- 



PROVIDENCE 

BANK 

Providence Square 

SCRANTOn.PA 



"TliURSDAY 



YOUR** 




CALENDAR 

MAKES NEW BUSINESS 



WEDNESDW 

34 



« UUlAr m 



hm DECEMBER w 



a.M.STYRaNBrCD. 

YYASMINGTaNy U . CiAUj SIZES 



PArtnYlA "Flilfir— — ^^^ most reliable and harmless remedy for ajll 
M. <u S.VAI.V; MjMM^KMM. nerve troubles. As a positive remedy for St. 

Vitvus's 'dance, Hysteria and all kindred troubles it istands pre-eminent — it 
ihas no equal. At all drug-gists, $1.00 per bottle. Write for free book on 
Par^tola Family Preparations. It is of great interest to every member of 
the family. Address, 

PARTOIiA COMPAinr, 160 Second Avenue. New York City 



FOR ADVERTISING RATES IN WORLD ALMANAC 
WRITE TO ALMANAC DEPT., ROOM 304, 



WORLD BUILDING, N. Y. CITY, 
xc 





Established 1879. 

CAH Whocping Cough, Spasmodic Croup, 
* V/li Asthma, Sore Throat, Coughs, Bron- 
chitis, Colds, Diphtheria, Catarrh. 

A simiple, isafe and effective treatment avoiding dTu&s. 

Vaporized Cresolene s'tops the paroxysims of Wihooping- Cough and relieves 
Spasmodic Croup at once. 

It is a boon to sufferers from Asthma. 

The air carrying the antiseptic vapor, inspired with every breath, makes 
breathing easy, soothes the sore throat and stops the cough, ass'uring restful 
nights. It is invaluable to mothers with young children. 

Cresolene relieves the bronchial complications of Scarlet Fever and Measles 
and is a valuable aid in the treatment of Diphtheria. 

Cresolene's best Tecommendation is its 30 years of successful use. Send us 
a postal for Descriiptive Booklet. 

FOB SAI.E BY ALIi DBUaGISTS. 

Try Cresolene An'tiseptlc Throat Ta/blets for the irritated throat, eo-mposed 
of slippery elm bark, licorice, sugar and Cresolene. They ean''t iharm you. Of 
your druggist or from us, lOc. in stamps. 

THE VAPO-CRESOLENE CO., 62 Cortlandt St., New York 

or Iieeming'-Miles Building*, Montreal, Canada. 




BAY-ROMA 

Restores gray hair to natural color by 
natural means, removes dandruff, stops 
falling hair and assists growth. 

IN PINT BOTTLES, $1.00 

Sold at Druggists aiid Barbers 

Bay-Roma Co., 409 Broadway 



Partocough As a Cough Remedy 

has over and over again proved successful where all other preparations have 
failed. In Bronchitis and affections of the lungs it is relieving, soothing, 
pure and reliable. All druggists, 50c. and $1.00 per bottle. Wtrite for free 
book on Partola Family Preparations. Address 

FARTOIiA COMPANY, 160 Second Avenue, New York City 



Railroad Companies throughout the world need trained men in the 
signal department. Every branch of this rapidly growing profession 



^ is thorc 



is thoroughly presented in our Course in Signal Engineering. All courses 
are offered by correspondence. Send for Catalogue B. 

THE SCHOOL OF RAILWAY SIGNALING 

Utica. N. Y., U. S. A. 

XCI 




THE HOUSEWIFE 

THE HOUSEWIFE MAKES THE HOME, 

AND THE HOME MAKES THE NATION 

Of all the women's publications, THE HOUSEWIFE is 
the only one that a woman positively needs. As soon 
as the first copy reaches the home it becomes a valued 
member of the family, and continues so. Hundreds of 
happy subscribers S'ay that they could not keep house 
without THE HOUSEWIFE. It is so bright, helpful, 
practical, entertaining and 'so thoroughly clean and 
wholesome that its presence is a constant encourage- 
ment and inspiration to the housekeeper. Its aim is to 
brightten the 'home, save money and labor for the home maker, advise and instruct 
her on all household problems, and furnish her with absorbing, fascinating read- 
ing for her leisure hours. Every line teems with interest. 

THE HOUSEWIFE contains short and serial stories by the 'best and most 
popular writters of the day, and these are illustrated by artists of national repute. 
The cover each month is a beautiful example of .color work, and is well worth 
framing as a household decoration. 

During its twenty-nine years of life THE HOUSEWIFE has enjoyed the reputa- 
tion of the most "homey" magazine at any price. 

The offers below will save you money by giving you splendid 
magazines at a club rate — a very positive saving to every one 

Housewife Bargain Combination Offers 



Regular Our 
Price Price 



The Housewife 50 

Thrice-a-Week World 



LOo|l»15 



The Housewife 

Am. Poultry Advocate 



^}75C 



The Housewife 50| m f g^ 

1.00/ 1«1U 



Farm Journal (5 yrs.) 

The Housewife 

Farm and Fireside. . . 



S}75C 



The Housewife 50' 

Farm and Fireside. . . .50 
McCall's Magazine . . .50* 



All for 

1.00 



Regular Our 
Price Price 



The Housewife 50 

McCairs Magazine. ,^0 



} 75c 



The Housewife , 
Ladies' World. 



S}75C 



The Housewife 50 

Word and Works.... 1.00 



} 1.10 



The Housewife 

Youth's Companion. 2 



.oo| 2*25 



The Housewife 50' 

Am. Poultry Advocate .50 
Farm and Fireside. . .50' 



All for 

1.00 



AH Prices Are for Full Yearly Subscriptions in Every Case 
Remit by P. 0. Order or Registered Letter. Send All Orders to 

THE HOUSEWIFE, 30 Irving Place, New York 



xcn 



■^ 



PATENTS 



Trade Marks and Copy- 
rights Secured or Fee 
Returned 

Special Offer— Free Search of Patent Ofbce Records 

Send us a model or ©ketcih and description of your invention, and w© will 
.make a Free Search of the Patent Office Records to ascertain If it is patentat>le. 
If we report the invention patentable we •will guaranltee to obtain a patent or 
return our fee, and furnish a certificate of ipatentabilitv backed by a bonded con- 
tra»>?t to thait effect. 

This Certificate of Patentability 
will protect the inventor and 
serve as proof of the Invention 
until the case can be filed In the 
U. S. Patent Office. 

OBTAINING ASSISTANCE FOB 
INVENTORS 

Our certificate is of great assistance 
to inventors who require financial aid 
to obtai'n patents. 

OUB FOUB BOOKS IffAXZiED FBES 

to any address. Send for these books — ■ 
the finest publications ever issued for 
free diistribution. 

HOW TO OBTAIN A PATENT 

Our illustrated eighty-page Guide 
Book is a book of reference for invent- 
ors, and contains 100 mechanical move- 
ments illustrated and described. 
TOBTUNBS IN PATENTS 

Tells how to invent for profit, and 
gives history of successful inventions, 

WHAT TO INVENT 

Contains a valuable LIST OP INVEN- 
TIONS WANTED and suggestions con- 
cerning profitable fields of invention; 
also information regarding prizes of- 
fered for inventions, among which is 
PBIZE OF ONE KHiXJON DGLlbABS. 
offered for one invention, and $10,000 
for others. 

PATENTS THAT PAY 

Contains lettens from our clients who 
have built up profitable enterprises 
founded upon patents procured by us; 
also endorsements from prominent in- 
ventors, manufacturers. Senators, Con- 
gress.men, G-overnors. etc. 




VICTOB BUIIiDINa 

Our new $150,000 buiMing ooposite U, S. Patent 

Office SPECIALLY ERECTED by ua for 

OUR awn use. 

Forelg'n Patents 

WE HAVE DIRECT AGENCIES IN ALL 
THE PRINCIPAL FOREIGN COUNTRIES and 
secure FOREIGN .PATENTS in the sborteatpoe- 
sible TIME and at the LOWEST COST. Write 
for OUT Illustrated Guide Book on Foreign Patemta. 
sent firee to vany address. 



Wanted Ideas 



LIST OF PATENT BUYERS contains requests from MANU- 
FACTURERS and PROMOTERS for patents secured by us, and sug- 
gestions as to New Ideas tliey wisli to purchase. 

WH ADVERTISE OUR CI^IENTS' REFERENCES 

INVENTIONS FREE Second 'National Bank. Washington. D. O. 

in a list of Sunday newspapers with two millio. B^Zd^'^'So^^irJ^'^S^Shn^S. 

circulation, in manufacturers' journala and in the Pitner Gasoline Lighting Co.. Chicago, 111. 

World's Progress. Sample Copy Free. We save g- 9- "^^ & Co.. Washington. D. C, 

, . . i. X »,^ National Savings and Trust Co.. Washington. D.C. 

you time and money an securing patents. After /Smethport Glass Co.. Smethport. Pa. 

the patent is granted we assist you TO SELL The Melvin Gauge and Signal Co.. Scranton, Pa, 

YOUR PATENT. M. Winter Lumber Co.. Sheboygan, Wia. 

VICTOR J. EVANS & CO. 

Registered Attorneys United States and Foreign Patents. 
VICTOB BUTLDING. Op. Patent Office, 734-726 Ninth St. N. W., WasIimirton«D.C. 

XCIII 



».'•. 




10 DAYS' fro: trial 



We will ship you a 
"RANGER" BICYCLE 

on api>roTal. freiifht 
prepaid, to any place in the United States without a cent deposii in 
advance, and allow ten days' free trial from the day you receive it. 
If it does not suit you in everj- way and is -not all or more than we claim 

for it and a better bicycle than you can get anywhere else regardlesa 

of price, or if for any reason whatever you do not wish to keep it. 

ship it back to us at oui- expense for freight and you will not be 

out one cent. 

low FACTORY PRICES iL't^^^ ^iS^tf \?£^'S 

..^_— .__^__^— ___^^_— - lower prices than any other 
house. We save you $10 to $25 middlemen's profit on every bicycle. 
Highest grade models with Ptmctm-e- Proof tires. Imported Roller 
chains, pedals, etc., at prices no higher than cheap mail order bi- 
cycles: also reliable medium grade models at unheard of low 
prices. 

RIDER AGENTS WANTED i^de^^lUThfbf f'f^X 

1013 "Ranger" Bicycle 
Eumislied by ua. You will be astonished at the wonderfullv 
low Prices and the liberal propositions and special offer we will 
give on the first 1913 sample going to your town. Write at once 
for mir special offer. 

DO NOT BUY a bicycle or a pair of tires from anv one at 
anv price until you leceive our catalogue and learn our low prices 
and liberal terms. BICY^CLE DEALERS, you can sell our bi- 
cj'cles under your own name plate at double our prices. Orders filled 
the day received. 
niwnT>n r>AAClir'n nnM1/T< ^^^^ ""Wheels, inner tubes, lamps, cyclome- 
TIRES, COASTLR-DRAKL ters. parts, repairs and everything in the 
' bicycle line at half usual prices. DO 

NOT WAIT, but write to-day for our Laree Catalogue beautifully illustrated and 
containing a great fimd of interesting matter and useful information. It only coeta a postal to 
get everything. Write it .Now, 

MEAD CYCLE CO., Dept. D 255, Chicago, III. 



THE AUTOMOBILE ^^^^MSmS" 
PRICE WRECKERS A?25t'S?SJ SI 

New Two and Four Door Bodies, all sizes $50 up 

New Tops, all sizes ' 15 up 

New Engines, 10 to 60 horse power 50 up 

New Tires, all makes, at half and less than regular prices. 

Transmissions, Frames, Steering Gears, Wlheels, Axles, Rims, 
Radiators, Fenders, Wind Shields, Magnetos, Tanks (round or 
oval and square), Rumble Seats, Lamps, Generators, Carburetters, 
Coils, Horns (bulb and electric). Tool Boxes, etc., etc. 

Don't buy without seeing: our No. 12 Bulletin. We 
gnuarantee to save you 50% on eTcrythinj? you re<iuire. 

Large and Complete Stock of New EVERY CAR 

and Second -Hand Automobiles «ir»/^i¥KT 

ranging in price from $75 to $900 ' A BARGAIN 

Write us what make or kind of a car you want. If we 
do not happen to have it in stock we will get it for you. 

TIMES SQUARE AUTOMOBILE CO. 

NEW YORK CITY CHICAGO 

1708, 1718 BROADWAY 1210-1212 MICHIGAN AVE. 

XCIV 




Send for beautifully 
illustrated catalog. 

Distributing points in all 
parts of the civilized world. 



Don't Row It-"Evinruae" It 

The "Evinrude" Detachable Row Boat Motor can be clamped to 

the stera of any row boat, round or flat bottom, in ene minute. 
Is adjustable for depth and angle of stern, 
la weedless and rudderless. Steers by propeller alone. 
Develops full 2 H. P. and is guaranteed to drive an ordinary 

row boat 7 to 8 miles an hour. 
Weighs but 50 pounds and is conveniently carried in canvas case. 
Can be run slow enough for trolling. 
No oil nor grease cups. Oil is mixed with gasoline, lubricating 

the entire engine. 
Is reversible. Starts half turn of fly-wheel. 
It is powerful enough to tow several boats. Its simplicity enables 

women and children to operate it with ease. 

GUARANTEE: The "Evinrude" Motor, built like the finest automo- 
' bile engine, has interchangeable parts, and each 

Detachable, Portable 
ROW BOAT MOTOR 



EVINRUDE 



is subjected to a severe factory test for five hours. Any part or parts proving defective, due to 
any cause other than the ordinary wear and tf-ar. abuse or neglect, will be replaced free of charge, 
providing such parts are returned to us, transportation prepaid, within a year of purchase date. 

EVINRUDE MOTOR COMPANY, 399 Walker St., MILWAUKEE. WIS. 

Members of National Association of Engine and Boat Manufacturers. 



1 



P®PLTR¥ PL1.TS 

Build an OTT POULTRY FLAT and 

you will be glad. Completely satisfied. 
Not half the work and that done under 
cover. No exposure to weather. It is a 
combination and the only one that pro- 
duces the results. Raise all the birds 
you wish. One flat will brood 600 
chicks.^ Send us 50 cents and get the 
book "Poultry Flats" and a year's 
subscription to our large paper. This 
njo^noo+i^ T,,^ a^^+ ifi iQT? system is only one year old. Thousands 
Gtentlemen:-Wanttotellyoutha7lSve1uBtwo^^^^^^ be built in the next 24 months. 

entries at State Fair with birds raised in my Ott Poultry Flat. * ours ought to be one of them. Address 
rhis is the onl7 oystem. Makes poultry raising a pleasure. Do INT ANH PnillTPV TAIIDMAT 
not have to move two feet to feed and water all my stock. Hen H^U^i^U lUULllXl JULIIUl/lL, 
commend itto everybody. Yours truly, W.O.NEWTON. 24 Wash. St. - Indianapolis, Ind. 




There's Money in Poultry ! 

Our Home Study Course 
in Praotical Poultry Cul- 
ture under Prof. Ohas. K. 
Graham, late of the Con- 
necticut Agricultural Col- 
lege, teaches how to 
make poultry pay. 

Personal Instruction. 

Prof. Graham. Expert Advice. 

350 Page Catalogue free. Write to-day. 

THE HOME CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL 

Dept. 99G, Springrfield, Mass. 





— New York^ 

Has a circulation In New York City, 
morning-s and Sundays, greater than 
York Herald. Times. Sun. 
and Press ADDED TO- 
Read for Variety! Use for 



the New 
Tribune 
GETHER. 
Results! 



World Advertisements! 



xcv 



Why Internal Bathing 
Preserves Perfect Health 



Tou cannot be healthy unless you keep your 
eystem absolutely free from waste matter. 
For when the bodily waste is not promptly re- 
moved the blood passing through the intestines 
absorbs the deadly poisons and carries them back 
into the vital organs. Your powers of resistance 
against infection are thereby weakened. Headache, 
palpitation. saHowness, dizziness and a multitude 
of ills are the result. Moreover, you are ex- 
posed to the attacks of countless other serious and 
often incurable diseases. 

The only natwra? way to keep the system absolutely 
free from this noxious waste is by means of the 

J. B. L. Cascade 

This ia a scientific appliance built on the most 
approved medical principles. It thoroughly cleanses 
and purifies the system without the use of drugs. 
Moreover, it helps to strengthen the vital organs 
and aids the entire system to perform its functions 
naturally. It can be used by any one at home 
without the slightest trouble. 



Stopped Chronic Headache 

Dear Doctor — Some three months ago I ordered 
one of your "Cascades." thinking it might do 
something toward relieving me of violent head- 
aches to which I am subject every two or three 
weeks. I knew these headaches were due to clog- 
ging up of the system and to overwork, and looked 
forward to them with dread. I have used the 
"Cascade Treatment" about five times, and at 
such times as I feel the headache coming on. No 
treatment has ever relieved me as has yours. You 
may make use of this if you think it will save 
any one from suffering the distress that I have 
passed through since boyhood days. 

Very trulv yours. „ „ , « 
D. B. fiAND, M. D., Scranton, Pa. 

Get This Free Book 

The sure way to retain and regain perfect health 
is told plainly and comprehensively in our book. 
"Why Man of To-day Is Only 50% Efficient." 
Tou sbo.ulId send for this book at once, as the 
reading of it may mean health and a brighter, 
happier life for you. Write to-day to Dept. 140. 



CHAS. A. TYRRELL, M.D., 134 W. 65th St., New York City 

Canadian Office, 275 College St., Toronto, Ont. 

American Addressing 
and Mailing Co. 

NEW YORK CITY 



56 WARREN STREET 



ADDRESSING: — Envelopes, Postals, Folders or Wrappers Addressed by Hand 

or Typewriter. 
LISTS: — Mailing Lists Furnished for any Business or Profession in the World. 
FOLDING: — Circulars, Reports, etc.. Folded, Enclosed, Stamped and Mailed. 
TYPEWRITING :— Envelopes, etc.. Addressed; Filling In Names and Addresses 

on Fac- Simile Letters. 
FAC-SIMILE LETTERS: — Reproduce actual Typewritten Letters by the best 

known method. 



. 



DIRECT ADVERTISING BRINGS SATISFACTORY RESULTS 
Give us an opportunity to submit estimates 

AMERICAN ADDRESSING AND MAILING CO. 

56 Warren Street New York City 

TELEPHONE BARCLAY 5815 

XCVI 



Makes the 

Deaf Hear Perfectly 

And ta 

Sent On 10 Days* Free Trial 

The fletv Smmd-Rpfrulatlng Acoustlcon Is a imanellotis 
ImpTDVenient in hearing dericeSt for by moving a tiny 
lever the degreps of soiihd ifijly be instantly regU'lated— 
It. AvilJ magnify aumd lipiVabds dx downwafda to exactly 
euit the needs t)f the aiffedttd eftrs, and the cdaditions 
tmdet AVhich ydll dre listemng, 

It has been so unfailingly stlc<:esSf'al that ■»« feel •We 
Cah well affofd to say to all those who are deaf^ "Givti 
us one opportunity to make you hear, if yoU are not 
convenient to our offices take the new Sound-Regulatitig 
Acoiisticon and tl-y- it iii your home for 10 days. If it 
does tiOt make yoli heslr; i-aiii4i it dnd you wiil fllvfe us 

iiothiug.'* 

The Souhd-flegUlatlng ffeatiirg Of £he AebiistidOii is a 
recent achievemeilt ; but tlie rirckif that fevfeii wlthdiit this 
great improvement the Instrimlent was most efficieiit 
lies in the fact that 

The Acoustlcon 

is now being used by over 70,000 Deaf People and over 500 Churches, 

Theatres and Public Buildings 




W. A, 

So if yoiTL are hard of hearing— or, above all, if you Slave made up ^.^^"^^ Send me '^full 
your mind that nothing oan make j-ou ihear— just fill in the cou- ^.j-r^^ detail about teoi 
pon to-day. and at least prore ' t» your own satfef action aoid _,j'r^ davs' fr^ S of 
witih out cost or penalty of any kind, whether this Sound. -^^ ^ 

Regulating Acousticou will do it or not. We are sure 
that it aviU or we would not make you this offer. ^^ 

General Acoustic Co. -''^'^ Name- 

1265 Broadway, New York City _ 

Address- 



the Acousticon. 



City- 



state- 





ATALOG 

PAIGES %ba/Electrical and Wireless 

Supplies, Novelties and Instruments 
for Home Entertainment 

mailed for 6c, stamps or coin, -which you may deduct from first order of ^1.00. 
Great cost of catalog and low prices prohibits distribution 'except to those interested 

Most Elaborate Catalog in Its line l^h" J% s^^n%' 

^^"^^^n^^^^^^^^^^m^m^^i^^^^m^^mmmmmm^ volun t a r i 1 y 
wrote us in a period of only two weeks. There is something 
in this catalog for everybody, and there is nothing but will 
be found to bear the stamp of highest quality. 

20% to 33% Is Saved in Purchasing 

From Us 

On the single item of flash lights we sell them to you at 
most dealers' cost 'price, and this .is true of many other 
articles. 

J. J. DUCK COMPANY 
398-400 St. Clair Street, Toledo, Ohio 

* XCVII 



What Our Catalog 
Contains: 

100 pages wii'eleas dnsts. for 
oonamercial and experimen- 
tal use, with over 30 dia- 
grams and complete direc- 
tions for constructing aerial; 
15 pp. tele^aph insts. ; 35 
pp. toy and commercial mo- 
tors; 15 pp. flash lights 
and miniatiire lamps; 8 pp. 
HJocket knives: 25 pp. Vie- 
trolas and mirrorscopea and 
125 pages of general elec- 
trical Bupplies. 



THIS 



AND 36 PAGE 
ILLUSTRATED 



TREATMENT 




Is anade to any person 
who sincerely wants to 
be cured of Kidney and 
Bladder Ailments. 
Rheumatism, Stomach, 
Liver and Bowel Dis- 
orders, Heart Trouble, Nervous Weakness, Catarrh and 
all other diseases arising from Impure Blood, Uric 
Acid conditions, etc. If you are sick of experimenting:, 
sick of failures, sick of being: sick — write to me. When 
you become my patient I realize a cure is what you 
want. 



Cut Out and 



This COUPON Today 

Dear Doctor: I msh to avail mys^ 
of your offer to get a proof treatment 
free so I can vest it in my own case. 
I have placed a cross X onark before 
the ailments for whioh I desire treat- 
ment, and XX before my worst troubles. 

NAME 

(In full, Mr.. Mrs. or Miss) 

Town iState 

Street. R. F. D. or Box 



Have you ever 
wiritten me before?. 



^ Miark 

^Symptoma 
UHere AGE 

.... If you have rheumatism. 

.... If you have stomach trouble. 

.... If you have pain in your back. 

....If you are (nervous or irritable. 

....If you feel weak and all rum down. 

... .If you have palpitation of your heart. 

... .If you 'have any rectal trouble or 
piles. . - , 

If you have dribbhng or paanful 

urination. 

... .If your bowels are irregular or con- 
stipated. , 

If you have too frequent desire to 

pass water. 

....If you (have boils or pimiples on 
the face or neck. . 

... .If you havie pains in back, loins, 
hips and joints. 

.... If you have catairh. 

If you are hard of hearing. 

.... If your nose stops up easily. 

... .If you spit up mucous or slime. 

. . . ,lf you have riniging, buzzing, crack- 
ing noises in ears. 

rnn UCII Describe in your o^vn words 

ruii mCll any weakness of a private 
nature or impairment of the vital 
organs that you want me to know. 

FOR WOMEN 1365 

... If your sickness is too scanty. 
. . . K your sickness is too profuse. 
. . .If you haye painful Menstruation. 
...If you have Leucorrhoea (whites). 
...If you have bearing down feelings. 
... If you have itching or inflammation. 
...If you have distress due to change 
of life. 

nil Out This Application and Send it TODAY 



The Yasi MajorHy of Patients I Treat are Tliose 
Who Have Failed With Other Treatments 

You may feel discouraged on account of 
past failures; patent medicines may have 
iproven worthless — your home doctor may 
have exhausted himself — ^even pronounced 
your case incoirable — but this does not prove 
that I cannot help yooi. The worst cases 
come to me. My treatment may be a sur- 
prise to you. Set aside your doubts; try once 
more. Try at my expense. You have nothing 
to loise. 

Send No Money 

Just mark with a cross X in the coupon 
any of the different symjptoms you have and 
send it to me, and I will send you the treat- 
ment free so you may make a personal test 
of just what my medicine will do. 

This Treatment Will be Delivered by Mail, 
POSTAGE PAID, Right to Your Own Door 
One Cent of Expense to You 



I repeat — you are under no obligation to 
accept this free offer. No contracts; no ex- 
press charges. I will pay the postage myself 
and deliver the treatment right to your oiwn 
door without one cent of expense to you. Do 
not deQay; do not argue. Just say to yourself 
"If Dr. Jiroch has so much confidence in his 
ability and his treatment to go to all this ex- 
pense I am going to let him try." Put an X 
mark before the symptoms you have, two XX 
marks before your worst symptoms, sign your 
name and- address to the attached coupon, cut 
it out and mail it to me to-day. It will 
obligate you to nothing. Just let me try to 
(hel-p you. 

-^^««Accept My 
^^Liberal Offer 

Fill out the Coujpon Carefully, Mark Your 
Symptoms, Sign Tour Name in Full with 
Your Address . and Mali It to M^e "Without 
Deday. 

DR. F. W. JIROCH 

DepL 1365, 633-635 So. Wabash Ave.. Chicago. III. 



xcvni 



.1.1 f 



[i^ Wearer of 

Brassieres 

If you iiare not as yet 
liad a Brassiere to fit com- 
fortably and form a perfeet 
suppressed bust, ASK YOUK 
DEALER 

F ^^The. Brassieres 

V^OTT^ Y'^^ '^^* 
~ ' '•./ I fade 




^■^^ Mark 

THIS BRASSIERE 

OF ALLOVER EMBROIDERY 

SeUs at $1.00. Others from 5(>c up to $3.00 

Sizes from 3 2 to 4 6 bust. 

Our Brassieres have a Pocket sewn in the Arm 
Holes for holding Talcum, Sachet or other Pow- 
ders to destroy odors of perspiration. 

THE SCOTT sSI^L^Is 

ARE THE LIGHTEST IN WEIGHT MADE 

Have secret Powder Pockets. Made to fit 
right and left arm hole. 

Price, 25c. Silk. 50c. 

If you cannot secure them, take no substitutes, 
but remit direct to ns, giving bust measurement. 

CH-\S. H. SCOTT & CO., IXC. 

205-207 Centre St. NEW YORK CITY 



Partocatarrh 

Gives sufferers from Catarrh, Hay 
Fever. Influenza, Cold in Nose and 
Head prompt and satisfactory re- 
lief. You can depend upon its 
purity and freedom from harmful 
ing-redients. At all drugg-ists, $1.00 
per bottle. Write for free book on 
Partola Family Preparations. -Ad- 
dress, 

Partola Company 

160 Second Avenue, New York City 



WANTED 

Experienced organizers to solicit 
members for the 

OWLS 

The Live Fraternity 

GEORGE D. BEROTH 

138 N. Main St., South Bend, Ind. 



Best for 

Apartment Houses^ 
Factories, Hotels and 
Office Buildings 




WhyHelp 
Make the 
Plumber 
Rich? 

Stopipage i n 
waste pipes 
causes 90% of 
plumbing 
troubles. Par- 
tial stoippage is 
even worse, the col- 
lected matter lying 
unnoticed to breed 
poisonous gases. 
Don't send for the 
plumber. G<et a 

Little Giant Lift 
and Force Pump 

which is 
guaranteed to 

remove the 
most obstin- 
ate obstruc- 
tions from 
and thorough- 
ly clean all 
drain pipes. 
No skill need- 
ed. No bucket, 
hose or other 
tool needed. 
Used by U. S. 
G o vernment. 
School 
Boards. Hos- 
pitals. & c . 
Majde of iheav- 
iiy polished 
brass and pure 
rubber. Lasts 
a lifetime. 

30.DAY 

FREE TRIAL. 

OFFER 

Send me $5 for a Little Giant Pump, ex- 
press prepaid. Keep it 3 days. Then, 
if you are not entirely satisfied and pleased, 
return pump at my expense and your 
money will be refunded at once. Ask your 
dealer or send direct. BOOKI>ET FKEE. 

Representatives Wanted 

J. E. KENNEDY 




Dept. 15 

XCIX 



41 Park Bow, New York 



■<T Ti -1 - 1 I la. 




Liquid Scouring Oil Soap, 
Soap Powders, Disinfectants, 
Kleeneasy Scouring Soap. 

Salespeople Wanted, Both 
Male and Female, In Every 
County; Good Opportunity 

TheHarralSoapCo. 

Established 1885 

Dept. B, 467 Greenwicii St. 
New Yorli City 



r 



..JBl-^bLjA 




^mkm> 



mnE BensingerRapjo'Ddpiicator 

dj IS so -POPULAR AM0N6 RAIL- 



ROADS, STEAMSHIPS, EXPORTERS IM- 
PORTERS "^i PROFESSIONS. It's be- 
cause it r«-<iupl7catesC«9ual to ori- 
ginals) any vvritinft fifty timtf Quiclltr 
than by single manuscript. -^ •>' " 
I cww^ni ouTm size lO'xJS" *5.- \:°^.S^,T i 

^ ^ F ULLY GUARANTEgP TOR ONE YEA R -"^ 

C.W. BENSINGBIR CO. 
32"^ aroNTE, ST., w.v. ciTV. 




YOUR HEART 

Does it Flutter, Palpitate 
or Skin Beats? Have you 
3 ■ Shortness of Breath, Ten- 
- *■ derness. Numbness or Pain 
in left side, IMzziness. 
Fainting- Spells, Spots be- 
fore the eves. Sudden 
Starting: in sleep, Nighl- 
mare, Ilungrry or Weak 
Spells. Oppressed reeling 
in chest. Choking Sensa- 
tion in throat. Painful to lie on. left side. 
Cold Hands or Feet, Difficult Breathing, 
Dropsy, Swelling of the feet or ankles, or 
Neuralgia around the heart? If you have 
one or more o.f the above symptoms of 
heart disease, don't fail to use Dr. King- 
man's Celebrated Heart Tablets, the rem- 
edy which has made so many marvellous 
cures. Not a secret or "patent" medicine. 
One out of four has a weak or diseased 
heart. Tihi"ee- fourths of these do not 
know it, and thousands die who have been 
wrongfully treated for the Stomach, Lungs, 
Kidne.vs or Nerves. Don't drop dead like 
hundreds of others when Dr. Kinsman's 
Heart Tablets will cure you. 

FREE TREATMENT 

Any sufferer sending their name and P. 
O. address to Dr. F. G. Kinsman. Box 860. 
Aug-usta. Maine, will receive a box of Heart 
Tablets for trial by return mail, postpaid, 
free of charge. Don't risk death by delay. 
Send at once. 



Partodiarrhoea 

ibring-s quiok (relief in all cases of 
Diarrhoea, Cholera Morbus, Dysen- 
tery, Cramps and iColic. Should be 
kept constantly on 'hand. I^ts im- 
mediate use will in many instances 
save the life of the child or adult. 
At all drugg-ists, 50c and $1.00 per 
bottle. Wirite for free book on 
Partolia Family Preparations. Ad- 
dress, 

Partola Company 

160 Second Avenue, New York City 



' ^ W^/////////////////////////7F7Z77/ yj ^^^^^^ 



^ 



\ 

I 



To Reach Over 7,000,000 People 

within a radius of 50 inilea of New' York Oity 

ADVERTISE IN THE NEW YORK WORLD ! 

which has a circulation in Greater New York, mornings and Sundays, greater than ifche New 
York Herald. Times, :5un, Tribune and Press COMBINED. 

The World Prints More Ads. Than ANY OTHER New.spai^er On Earth. ANT ADTER- 
nSING AGENT ^^DL GIVE YOU RATES AND PARTICULARS. 




NA/HEEL CHAIRS 

A Wheel Chair is often an invalid's greatest comfort. We oiffer 

over 75 different styles .of these rolling chairs with latest improvements; 

also a line o(f tricycles. Shipments made direct from factory. Send for 

our CATALOGUE giving description of various styles of chairs and 

tricycles, prices, etc. 

We pay the freight, and send on trial 
GOiBDaN aiFG. CO. - - - 390 Madison Avenue, Toledo. Ohio 




I 



COULDN'T Give You a ^ 
Better Hatcher if I <P 
Charged You $100 for It 

Yet My Price Is Only 

Sold on One, Two or Three Months' Test 

OU can't get anytliing better than the best — then why 
pay more than I charge for my World's Championship 
Belle City Incubat'or? 



Y 





FreigrUt 
Paid 
East 
of 

^^.—^ Rookies 

It lias won the double world's HB^H 
championship in over 5,000 hatches — that makes it best of all — no matter what t3ie price. Order from 
this adrertisement if you wish to. Thousands do. Here is a description of the machine ycm will get: 
140-Egg Belle City World's Championsliip Incubator has simple, per* 
feet self-regulator. eoiTect hot water heating system, copper tank and 
boiler. safety-lami>, double walls and double door, with dead air[ 
space all over, with roomy nui-seiy, strong egg tray and high legs. 1 
also supply "Tycos" thtrmometer, egg tester, burner, funnel, every- 
thing you need, including valuable instruction book on operatioo.J 
liatciiing and care of cliicks. 

*1 1'o Combination Offer 



Gels my Belle City 140-E!B:g Incubator and my 140- 
Chiok Hot- Water Brooder; gniaranteed to raise more 
healtliy chicks than any brooder made. It is double - 

walled, hot-water, top-heat- 
ed, metal safety lamp and 
burner, wire nmway yard 
with platform. Absolutely 
the most i>erfect chick raiser 
I made to-day. 





We sMp 
quick from 
St. Paul, 
Buffalo. 
Kansas City 
or Racine. 
140-Egg: 
Incubator 



$7.55 



140-Chick Brooder 



By orderin? together you save 90 cents — by ordering- from this adi'ertise- 
ment, save time. Doesn't it seem leasonable to buy your machine from me, as 
thousands of people do, right from this advertisement » Let me send you 
my portfolio "Hatehinjf Facts." 

BEI.LE CITY INCl BATOR CO., Box 45, Racine, Wis. 
Jiui Rohan, President. 



RUSTANO 




LUXURIOUS NEW RESTAURANT 



West 39th Street, near Broadway 

TABLE D'HOTE DINNER, $1.50 



PARISIAN SPECIALTIES 

Luncheon ] ^ 

Dinner > a la carte 

Supper ) 

Private Dining Rooms 



ca 



DANCING 

SELECT PERFORMANCE 



Tel. 6780 Greeley 



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You Need Not Suffer 

w»™ASTHWIA 

Buy Today of 

Your Druggist 

a FiftyC^ntBox 

of Dr. Kinsman ^8 

Guaranteed 

j , Asthma Remedy 

Instant Relief 

Thousands Cured 

FREE TRIAL TREATMENT 

Sent by mail, postpaid, to any sufferer; 
Write to 

DR. F. G. KINSMAN 

6 Bank Building Augusi^ay Maine 




COMPLEXION 

PIMPLES, BLOTCHES, BLACKHEADS 
or Other Eruptions or SALLOWNESS 
of the Skin are Usually Due to IM- 
PURE BLOOD, IMPROPER DIGESTION 
or Sluggish Liver. 

BRADFORD'S 

Blood Purifying Pills 

(Guaranteed under the Pure Food & Drugs Act) 
Are GUARANTEED to be purely vege- 
talDle and contain no poisons </r injuri- 
ous drugs. 

EXCELIvENT FOB 

CONSTIPATION 

They cleanse the system of all im- 
purities and gases and produce a 
healthy and clear oomplexlon and sweet 
breath. Box of 50 Pills 2oc. 5 ^xe« 
Jjil.OO. 

For Sale at AJll Drug Stores 

or send staimps or money order to 

Bradford Medicine Co. 



I 



400 WEST 23D ST. 



NEW YORK 



Tuberculosis 



Its Diagnosis, Treatment and Cure 




NEW TREATISE ON TUBERCULOSIS 

By Freeman Hall, M. D. 

This valuable medical book tells in 
plain, simple language how Tubercu- 
losis can be cured in your own home. 
If you know of any one suffering 
from Tuberculosis, Catarrh, Bron- 
chitis, Asthma or any throat or lung 
trouble, or are yourself afflicted, this 
book will help you. Even if you are 
in the advanced stage of the disease 
and feel there is no hope, it will in- 
struct you how others, with its aid, 
cured themselves after all remedies 
tried had failed, and they believed 
their case hopeless. 

"Write at once to the Tonkerman 
Co^ 6624 Water St., Kalamazoo, Mich., 
they will gladly send yon the book 
in English, German or Swedish, by 
return mail FREE and also a gener- 
ous supply of the new Treatment ab- 
solutely Free, for they want you to 
have this wonderful remedy before 
it is too late. Don't wait — write to- 
day. It may mean the saving of 
Lvour life, 
cm [ 



University Business 

Education 

By Mail 



Prepares You to Become a 



Baii][er 
Broker 

Factory Accountant 
Cost Accountant 



CertUied PuWlc Accountant Credit Man 

Corporate Secretary Manufacturer 

Accountant Merchant 

Auditor Salesman 



Advertiser 



Real Estate Broker 



Indicate the PROFESSION you wish to enter in writing for 
Book J, which will be sent on request, together with full infor- 
mation regarding your particular needs. 



An Inquiry To-Day 
Will Start You Right 



ADDRESS DEPT. J. 



I 



UNIVERSAL BUSINESS I NSTITUTUnc 

FIFTH AVENUE and 23D STREET 

NEW YORK 



crv 




FRENCH- GERMAN 
SPANISH— ITALIAN 

Is Easily and QuiCldy Mas- 
tered by the 

LANGUAGE • PHONE 

METHOB 

Combiued witih the 

Rosenthal Method of 
Practical Linguistry 

Thi3 ia the natural way to learn a foreign lan- 
guage. You hear the living voice of a native Pro- 
i l^s3or pronounce eacli word and phrase. He speaks 
j as you desire — slowly or quickly, nig'ht or day, for 
minutes or houre a-l a time. 

It is a pleasant, fascinating study; no teddous 
rules or memorizing. Nt>t expensive — all members 
of the family can use it. You simply practice dur- 
ing spare moraeuts or at convenient times, and in 
a surprisingly short time you speak, <read and un- 
derstand a new language. 

The method is higlily endorsed and Teoom- 
mended by well-known membeirs of the faculties 
of the following universities and colleges: 

Yale, Columbia. Chioag-o. Brown. Penn- 
sylTania, Boston, Princeton. Cornell, Syra- 
ciu»e, Minnesota, Jolins Hopkins, Virginia, 
Colorado, !lVIiohlsran, Fordham, Manliattan. 
De La Salle, St. Joseph's, New York, U. S. 
Military Academy. 

Send for interesting booklelt. ■particulars of free 
trial offer and terms for easy payments. 

THE lANGUAGE-PHONE 5IETHOD 

987 Putnam Building:, 2 West 45th St., 

'New York. 



DID YOU DREAK IT? 



BUY A BOTTLE OF 



The Brush 
Electric Lighting Set 



om*.— *<M 





It will permanently mend diina, 
glassware, furniture, meerschaum, vases, 
books, etc. Also Leather and Rubber 
cement. All three kinds i5c per bottle 
from your dealer. 

MAJOR MFG. CO., N. Y. C. 

A. MaJoPj Pres. 



(Miade in sizes from 4 to 20 horse- 
power, eng:ine direct-eonnected to dyna- 
mo; requires small floor sfpace, and is 
suitable for use with gasoline, Icerosene 
or gas. 

I^ie Brush Electric Lighting Set is a 
very compact unit, simple in design and 
construction, and can De readily 'han- 
dled and eared for t)y those who are 
not experts. Tlie quality of electric 
light produced by tliis outfit is su. 
perioj* to that usually furnishecl by 
electric lighting stations, and the cost 
is from one-half to one-quarter the 
price charged by these stations. 

There are very many uses to which 
the electric current may be put be- 
sides that of ligfhting, such B/S cooking, 
washing and ironing and the use of 
dozens of other household conveni- 
ences. 

Our 125-ipage catalogue is the most 
complete work on isolated electric gen- 
erating (plants ever published, and will 
be sent poat-paid to any address upon 
application. 

TiieClias.A.StrelingerCo. 

Detroit, Mich. 

Address Box 142. 



CV 




GOLDMAN'S Handiest, Fastest, Cheapest, DuraDle, Portable, Roliabii 

Arithstyle Computing Machine 

ADDS, SUBTRACTS, MULTIPLIES, DIVIDES 




Keliable Agents Desired. Request Instructive Booklet. 

ARITHSTYLE COHPAN». ^"'"' '• "V^^'^olfl" •'™'" 

References and Testimonials for thr asking! 




99 



•'Not an Advertising Calendar 

Bunch of Dates Calendar 

A Calendar for Every Day in the Year 

Size of Page 3x4 Inches 

Nickel Plated Stand 

Sent Prepaid on Receipt of $1.00 

A Pad Only 50 Cents 

POSTAGE (STAIVEPS AOCEPTBD 

FRANK A. WEEKS, MFG. COMPANY 

93 Jolin Street, New York, IT. S. A. 

For sale by all the leading stationers. 
Send 10 cents in stamps for samples. 

AARON'S CHILLED PLATINUM PENS 

Positively the smoothest points and most durable. 

Made in twenty styles, sxiited to all penmen, and are 
indorsed by 59,000 bankers, court officials, railroads, col- 
TRADB MARK. leges, bookkeepers, etc. 

Manufactured Expressly for the trade by 

THE D. C. AARON PEN CO. co[uMBi;sf cThio 




Partocyl for Eczema and All Skin Diseases 

It is a soothing-, 'relieving-, h'ealing- rsalve that has g-a.ined fame *by its excel- 
lence and success In remedying skin troubles. At all drugig-ists, 50c and $1.00 
per box. Try it. Write for free book on Pvartola Family Prepa-rations. Address 

FARTOZiA COMPANY, 160 Second Avenue, New York City 



WHEN YOU PATRONIZE THE 

ADVERTISERS, KINDLY MENTION 

THE WORLD ALiVlANAC 



cvi 




I. C. S. Students Have Become 



— } — 

3,867 

Proprietors 
and Managers 



3,663 

Electricians 
and Mechanics 



6,762 

Engineers and 
Architects 



6,237 

other 
Occupations 



2,869 2,114 2,704 

Foremen Superintendents Draftsmen 

Twenty-Eight Thousand Two Hundred Sixteen I. C. S. students have 
written to us that the International Correspondence Schools opened to 
them the door to increased pay, promotion, and prosperity in new 
positions and occupations. This is the very best evidence of results 
accomplished by I. C. S. students. 

These men are making their spare time increase their wages, build 
homes, and win inde- 

TC i. " - 

International Correspondence Schools 
Box 1900. SCR ANTON. PA. 



pendence. If you are not 
one of them, you are 
neglecting a great oppor- 
tunity — neglecting your 
duty to yourself and those 
dependent upon you. 

The I. C. S. have 
taken thousands upon 
thousands of men and 
fitted them for larger and 
better-paying positions. 
What we have done for 
others, we can do for you. 

Mark and maU the 
coupon. It will bring full 
information, without cost. 

Send the Coupon NOW 



Please explala, without further obligation oa my part, how I 

can qualify (or a larger salary and advancement to the posi- 
tion, trade, or profession before which I have marked X. 



Salesmanship 


Concrete Construction 


Bookkeeper 


Electrical Engineer 


Stenographer 


Electric Lighting 


Advertising Man 


Mechanical Engineer 


Mechanical Draftsman 


Civil Engineer 


Commercial Ulustrating 


Surveyor 


Civil Service 


Stationary Engineer 


Chemist 


Building Contractor 


Textile Manufacturing 


Architectural Draftsman 


English Branches 


Architect 


Automobile Running 


Structural Emgineer 


Agriculture 


Plumb. & Steam Fitting 


Poultry Farming 


Mining Engineer 



Name. 



St. and No. . 
City 



Stale. 



evil 





i 



Pumping Machinery 
of Proved Economy 

The "American" Trade-Mark 

on a pump is a guarantee of qual- 
ity, because it represents 43 
years' experience specializing in 
pump building, and the designs, 
material and workmanship have 
always been the best produced. 



Moreover "American" Pumps 

succeed where others fail,* be- 
cause they are made in types 
to meet every possible pump- 
ing- condition instead of at- 
tempting to adopt location to 
a single style of pump. 

"American" Centrifugals 

are made in over 50 regular 
styles in any size, in both 
horizontal and vertical types 
and equipped with any power. 
Described in catalog 117. 

"American" Deep Well Tur- 
bine Centrifugals are the 

most successful development 
of the' centrifugal principle of 
pumping for deep w^ells. De- 
scribed in catalog 124. 

"American" Beep Well 
Plunger Pumps have been the 
world's standard in this type 
of pump for many years. De- 
scribed in catalog 110. 



The American Well Works 

General Office and Works: Aurora, 111. 
Chicago Office: First Nat. Bank Bldg. 

CVIII 





What "Rumely" Means 
to the World 

Rumely power-farming machinery is 
reducing the cost of living in all parts of 
the* world. It is providing a better and 
cheaper way for the farmer to do ihis 
plowing, cultivating, threshing, hauling, 
baling, pumping and scores of other 
things about the farm. The Rumely 
Oilpull Tractor alone has made cheaper 
wheat and cheaper bread by opening up 
thousands of acres of virgin land. 

What "Rumely" Means 

Especially to the Individual Farmer 

To every farmer in particular the name Rumely stands for some- 
thing else besides. It represents a solid reputation — 6o years of ex- 
perience in making farm machinery the best way it can be made — 60 
years of selling at fair prices and on fair terms. 

No matter what the size or nature of the farm, there are Rumely 
machines for it. 

Write for catalogs to-day 




(283) 



Rumely Products Company 

(Incorporated) 
FOWXJR-rABMZNCi- MACHHTERT 

LA PORTE, INDIANA, U. S. A* 

cix 




i 

'•1 ^MlEI'tillllHiflllilB'klllU I IIM > \^t n &^- 

J -~ff^7^- iiliiliTlIf HIIIfi IIIU IIMnliisi^^^^SSsSSES £" 







3-.'.'Mv?::ii;.i-fe, 







Are You a Homeseeker? 



•uif:::-.:-::-::v. 












^ If you are you're probably looking for infor- "^^i^ 
^^ mation. Do you know that long Island is the near 

est and most easily reached of any of the suburbs around \^i^ 

New York? Every facility, every comfort is at the fingers' ends 

of the New York business man who makes his home on Long 

Island. The Pennsylvania Station, at 32d Street and 8th Avenue, 

amply serves the man uptown, and the Flatbush Avenue Station, Brook 

lyn, is in easy reach of the man downtown. No matter where you are 

located on Manhattan island you're in close touch with one of these great 

gateways of travel to all 

-LONG ISLAND- 

^ The good fellowship which exists in the country towns, the sociability of 
one's neighbors; the entertainment furnished at the various clubs, com- 
bining country and seashore with all the conveniences and advantages of 
the city, is a new existence for the city man and draws a" distinctive 
line between business and home life. 

ilt used to be fashionable to live in the country. Now with the 
improved transit facilities — the tunnels and swift, clean electric 
'^^ service — it is recognized as the only sane place to live. . 
^J\ There isn't a square foot of "home atmosphere" on Manhat- A 
'#%. tan Island to-day and the sooner you realize it the better. .^^ 
W% The natural outlet is toward Long Island, where there's ^..>^^ 
^^p^ plenty of room for millions of people. da^ 

^^Ss'j. ror information conceming" I^ong* Island ad- 
%5'^^-, dress General Fasseng'er Ag"ent, Iiongr Island 






V;tv.i::.;-.::-"%. 



jar 

.•:■■■•':.''.•■•■': if 



/■■■u-.v^.. ■.,,..■ -..->-~■~i-^.^A.'■;.;^rWJ^^•.l^t^-UV/X■;.■■.:/.^^■;:V:^/■»;■//;ui:•.U^fiff^^ 



Railroad, Room 391, Pennsylvania 
Station, New York City. 








[•! 



I' I 



^^^^^mm:-^:-}^^:-^-^r<i^^^-r^^^^Ti:h^ 



ex 



fmmim^ia^ti^i^^ 



Prove It 
for Yourself 

The curative value of a medicine is 
proven by its record of cures — by 
sworn testimonial letters from reliable 
citizens everywhere, and by actual 
test Dr. Kilmer's Swamp-Root, the 
great Kidney, Liver and Bladder 
Remedy, stands the highest because 
of its remarkable success in the most 
distressing cases of kidney, liver and 
bladder troubles. 

Although there are hundreds of 
preparations advertised, there is only 
one that really stands out pre-eminent 
as a remedy for diseases of the kidneys, 
liver and bladder. 

Dr. Kilmer's Swamp-Root is not 

recommended for everything. 

A sworn Certificate of Purity is with 
every bottle. 

If there is any doubt in your mind, send 
at once for sample bottle, absolutely 
free by mail. 

Address Dr. Kilmer & Co., Binghamton, N. Y. 

For Sale at All Druggists in Bottles 
of Two Sizes, 30o and $I.OO 



FIRE! FIREirFiRE!!! 

THE CRY MAY CAUSE ALARM 

BUT WITH THE PROTECTION OF AN 

"ACME" Fire Extinguisher 

THE DAMAGE IS AVOIDED WHERE 
USUALLY 100 GALLONS OF WATER ARE 
APPLIED. 

Our Celebrated "ACME" Does the Work 




The 

"PHOENIX" 

Automobile Fire 

Extinguisher 

Fits in a brass cup 
which is fastened 
on running board, 
and can be un- 
strapped for use in 
Approved Nov. 15, 1901, 1 two seconds. The 
BY THE s best and quickest 

acting Auto Extin- 
guisher made. 



No Business Place, Factory or Home Should 
Be Without FIRE PROTECTION 



CONSIDER ITS VALUE BEFORE ITS NECESSITY 



Be on the safe side by writing us to-day for 
Free Illustrated Circular, with prices. 



National Fire Protection 
Association. 



LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF 

CHEMICAL FIRE EXTINGUISHERS 

IN THE WORLD 




Mention World Almanac When. Writing. 



MISSOURI LAMP & M FG CO., st 



Ilia ELM STREET, 
. LOUIS, MO., U. S. A. 



CXII 





THE A NEW 



KAMLEE 



Auto Trunk 

ma-kes cross-country tours a real pleasure. Only real dust-proof, water- 
iproof auto trunk on the market. Lt'ght, durab'le, sightly, convenient— per- 
fectly accessible at all times. It is ihandsome in appearance and in keep- 
ing with the high Character of the finest -•^-' -really on addition to the 
appearan'ce of any machine. 

New Interlocking Edge Makes the Kamlee 

ABSOLUTELY 

DUST-PROOF RAIN-PROOF 

Every standard Kamlee has a patent drop front fitted with rubber 
tongue-and-igroove interlocking edge, imaking it absolutely imporvdous to 
d'ust and water. These trunks are equipped with two or more standard 
size sui't oases and are built to conform to the shape of the tonneau of 
any make or type of car. The Kamlee is recognized as the BEST by all 
■disoriminating fm.otorists w'ho want a trunk that ds rigiht in every way. 

Liarge variety of models— complete range of prices— Taest as we!ll as 
oheapest auto trunk in the world. 

SENT ON APPROVAL 

Ask your dealer for a Kamlee. If he can't supply you we'll gladly ship 

you a Kamlee anywhere on approval. See your dealer NOW or write 

direct to 'Us for circular and prices, mentioniing your auto supply dealer's 

name. 



The Kamlee Co. 

250 Broadway, 
Milwaukee, Wis. 




Kamlee trnnlcs are made by trunk 
makers who are motorists. 



II 



— fc.^J., . iwi 



"?Z-'— '- ~' ""^ ' '" 



CXIH 



4i 



HARTFORD" CONE CLUTCH THE BEST 



Furnished with Double Set of Universal 
Joints. Clutch can be removed from car 
as a unit without disturbing other parts. 
We furnish either Pressed Steel or Alumi- 




num G)ne. Weight san. ^ Complete 
equipment 30 lbs. Made two sizes, 
25-30 and 35-40 H. P. Price is right. 



THE BEST SET OF UNIVERSAL JOINTS MADE 




The quality of the Hartford Universal Drives is known to every manu- 
facturer of complete cars; made from faultless steel, and of hest work- 
manship. 

This plant, in addition to bein^ tlie largest of its kind, is also the most 
fully equipped. 

Every Universal Joint going from our shop carries with it a guarantee 
of perfection in material and workmanship. The guarantee protects the 
manufacturer and car owner. We stand ready to make good any part that 
develops flaws or defects. 

The parts manufactured by us are interchangeable and we carry a 
stock sufficiently large to make immediate shipment. We are anxious to get 
in touch with your engineering problems as they apply themselves to our 
product. If you will send us blue prints we will at once send you our speci- 
fications and prices. If you have no blue prints, send us your specifications, 
and we will put same into blue print form and submit prices. 

Remember, our Engineering Department is always at the disposal of 
those icterested, and this free of charge. 

The Hartford Auto Parts Company 

HARTFORD, CONN: 

Marketed by THE J. S. BKJSTZ COMPANY. Sole Selling Agents - New York, - Detroit 

cxrv 






BULL'S EYE SPARK PLUG 

"Why Work in the Dark'' 

FIRING 

The Crystal Ports show you every 
explosion of the engine, enabling you 
to instantly locate any cylinder that 
is missing or working poorly. 

MIXTURE 

The Crystal Ports tell you if your 
mixture is correct. If right, the Ports 
show a blue flame; if wrong a yellow- 
white. If the latter, adjust carburetor 
until the flame shows blue. 

VALVES 

Should one of the plugs in your 
engine show a yellow flame and the 
balance blue you have a leaky valve. 

CARBONIZATION 

The main reason for the carbonization of 
cylinders and plugs is imperfect combustion. 
Look at the ^'BulPs Eye" and correct it, 
saving annoyance and expense. 

GUARANTEE 

The Crystal Ports of the Bull's Eye Spark 

Plug are guaranteed not to break. If they do, re- 
turn by mail and a new plug will be sent free of cost. 
If your dealer does not have them in stock order 
a set direct of the manufacturers. $1.25 each, 
charges prepaid on receipt of check. 

Manufactured by 

G. ۥ Blickensderfer Go. 

STAMFORD, CONN. 

cxv 







Send Your Address 

FOR THIS 

Free Book 



READ this book and 
apply the methods of 
practical farmers and or- 
chardists whose farms and 
orchards yield bigger and 
better crops because of 
the proper use of Red 
Cross Dynamite. 



£)ONT waste time, 
strength and 
money on labori- 
ous farming when 
**The Farmers* 
Handbook of Ex- 
plosives" tells you 
how quickly, easily 
and cheaply you 
can employ 



•V 



Red Cross Dynamite 



If you prefer to 
have a professional 
blasteo" do the dyn- 
amiting •desired, we 
will advise you of 
the nsume and ad- 
dress of feliabla 
blasters. 



"tpOR Stump and Boulder Blasting, Blast- 
■■■ ing. Hardpan, Digging Ditches, Plant- 
ing Trees, Regenerating Old Orchards, 
Boad Making, Excayating, etc« * 



ADDRESS DEFT. 385 



E. I. du Pont de Hemours Powder Co, 



AMERICA'S FIONEES 
F O W D E B MAKERS 



CXVI 



Wilmington, Del* 



Henderson's Invincible Asters 
Mammoth Butterfly Pansies 
Giant Spencer Sweet Peas 



Ponderosa Tomato 
Big Boston Lettuce 
Scarlet Globe Radish 



To demonstrate the superiority of Henderson's Tested Seeds, we 
have made up six of the best we have into a Henderson Collec- 
tion, consisting of one packet each of these great specialties. 



To obtain for our annual catalogue, 
** Everything for the Garden," de- 
scribed below, the largest possible 
distribution, we make the following 
unusual offer : To every one who will 
mail us ten cents, mentioning this 
publication, we will mail the catalogue 
and also send our Henderson Specialty 
Collection as above. 

Every Empty Envelope 
Counts as Cash 

This collection is enclosed in a cou- 
pon envelope, which when emptied 
and returned will be accepted as 25c. 
cash payment on any order of one 
dollar or over. 

"EVERYTHING FOR THE GARDEN*' 

our 1913 catalogue is without exception 
the best we have ever issued; 202 pages, 
5 colored plates, 800 photo engravings, 
showing actual results without exag- 
geration, make it the most complete 
as well as beautiful horticultural pub- 
Hcation of the year. In addition we 
will send to all ordering from this ad- 
vertisement a copy of our new Garden 
Guide and Record. This is a hand- 
book of general garden information, 
planting tables, cooking recipes, 

cultural directions, etc., and in all is one of the most necessary and 

valuable of our many publications. * 







cxvn 



Are You a 



Strong, Vital Man? 



• It is not a matter of stature 
which makes a man strong and 
vigorous. A tall man may be 
weak and unmanly or a small 
man may be a giant of power 
in his community. No matter 
whether you are small or large, 
no matter whether you are 
yoting or elderly, no matter 
what may have sapped your 
courage and left you nervous 
and unstrung, I say to you in 
all seriousness, if I can be sure 
that you will help yourself and 
help me by following the dic- 
tates of Nature's laws, that is, 
if you really WAINT to become 
strong again and will lead a 
healthy, natural life, be true to natural 
life, be true to yourself, then under these 
fine conditions I promise you as man to 
man that if I can resuppiy your system 
with an abundant VITALITY or VITAL 
RESERVE, you should build up and de- 
velop into a strong, virile human being, 
with the same force and power that you 
see displayed in other full-blooded fellows 
about you. Vitali'ty is the greatest single 
power in the world. Take my word for 
it, my friend, for I know whereof 1 speak. 
Over 200,000 debilitated Tnen have Writ- 
ten to me of their ailments during the 
past twenty years. 

My little book, which I send free to 
men, goes intcJ this matter of vitality 
thoroughly and should be read by all 
men. It fully describes my HEAi-TH 
BELT with attachments, a light, inexpen- 
sive appliance which you place comfort- 
ably around your waist upon going to bed 
and wear until morning. Thus, while you 
sleep, it is continually sending a great, 
soft, potent stream of real VITALITY 
and STRENGTH into your nerves, organs 
and blood. It often takes 'the pain or 




weakness out of your back in one appli- 
cation, then before you realize that time 
is passing you cominence to feel betteT, 
stronger, more ambiticus. more manly, 
and will answer, "Never felt better in my 
life" to your friends' greetings, while 
they in turn will secretly marvel at the 
great change in your appearance. I have 
seen this work out in thousands upon 
thousands of cases before you. Remem- 
ber, I am not asking you to buy a 
HEiALTH EELT now. but merely want 
ycM to send for the book, ithen when you 
have thought the matter over I will 
gladly make some proposition whereby 
you can use a HEALTH BELT if you 
want to. but first get the book. 

The truly VITAL man radiates power, 
as you know if you have observed the 
bright men in any assemblage. The 
weakling must stand aside. There are 
no drugs or medicines to take in connec- 
tion with my HEALTH BEILT. Simply 
wear it and absorb its wonderful health - 
giving power. With special attachments 
it is a fine treatment for rheumatism, 
kidney, Jiver, stomach, bladder disorders 
and general ill health. Call or write. 



Let Me Send You THIS BOOK Free 



Let me send you at once my free book- 
let in plain, seailed envelope. It is pro- 
fusely illustrated with ihalftone photos. 
Keep it in your pocket for easy reference. 
Read the chapter on Vitality. Read the 
chap«r on Debility. Read the chapter on 



those subjects which interest every man, 
young or old, who would be strong and 
healthy. It is a -vfcrd of hope, a care- 
fully written, interesting book which 
should be in every one's possession. 
Therefore, send to-day. If in or near 
this city call at my office. Hours 9 to 6. 



I 



ALFRED SANDEN CO. 

1261 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 



cxvrn 



r^4f ^^S T O K» I E^ S 



Home Study *^^J^^^ 

Short Storfes. L,earn how. 
KMERY COURSE, person- 
ally taught by author — 
editor — publisher, Iha- 

jfram-Outline method. Easy 
to learn — Student writes a 
story tinder the personal ROiidance of the 
Instructor by assigned work. Small month- 
ly payiments. Also Emery Courses in Novel 
Writing:, Journalism, Photo Plays. The only 
short story Course that actually trains. 
Write for booklet S S W 
Intercontinental tJniversity, Wash., D. C. 
Foundedby Senator Depew, hel ate Justice David J. 
Brewer, Edward Everett Hale and other famous men. 




BE A liAWYER. 

Study by mail a complete Iiaw 
Course approved by Justices 
Brewer and Brown of the U. S. 
Supreme Court. Home study. 
Degrees granted. Easy pay- 
ments. Courses in Real Estate, 
Business. Correspondence. Con- 
sular Service. 2 00 subjects 
tauffht. Write for booklet L7. 

BE AN OlfcATOR — 

Clerfirs'men. Salesmen — learu to speak 

with force — to talk convincingly. Our course 
develops the chest and gives voice volume. 
I Teaches ynu to "think on your feet."Co»lirse 
I apnroved ^ by Senator Deoew. 
Homo study. Easy monthly payments. Write 
for booklet or. Interoontmental Uni- 
versity. Washington. D. C. Founded by 
Senator Depew.thelate Justice David J. 
Brewer, Edward Everett Hale and others. 




Hoti.D. J. 
Brewer. 

L-awyerg. 



Senator 
Depew. 



THE GRIT THA T'S ROUGH 
THE GRIT THAT'S SHARP 
THE GRIT THAT GRINDS 

ORDER 

Maka-Shel Grit 




MAKA- 
SHEL 
FOR ME 



Hens prefer it to 
gravel, glass or oys- 
ter shell. It contains 
Iiime, Iron, Magnes- 
ium and other ele- 
.iments t'hat are suited 
Ho the digestive pro- 
cesses, and increases 
^g pixKiiiction. 

Ask your dealer or 
send 113 $1.00 for two 
100 lb. bags, f. o. b. 
cars. The original 
SILICA GRIT. 
Avoid substitutes. 
,__. . -^_ » Order to-day. 

TRADE MARK sample free. 

AGENTS WANTED. 
r^SOMCITED TESTOIONIAT.. 
Penn Yan. N. Y.. Jam. 8. 1912. 
Edge Hill Silioa Rock Co. 

Dear Sirs : — 'Enclosed find check for one- 
half ton of "Maka-Shel" Grit delivered. It 
is the best grit we have ever used. Noth- 
ing like it for little chi«ka. 

KBUKA LAKE EGG FARM. 
EDGE HILL SOTLICA ROCK CO. 
Box X New Brunandck, New Jersey 



U 




NEW OPPORTUNITY 

To Make Money 

One 

Minute 

Post 

Cards — 

One 

Minute 

■'>'• Profits 

PoBt Card Gallery * *VA*l.d 

"SSSP" Prof iti 

IN THREE MONTHS 

That is what Lopez Diego earned over Mid 
above a;ll hotel bills, railroad fares and other 
expenses while traveling in Mexico. Browning 
of Miss, S..JT: "Made $16.70 m two houira._ 
William Baker says: "Made $25 in^ srs 
hours. It's the thing the people want J. 
M Weadow writes: "I made $10 in only one 
and one-half hour's work." Hundreds of 
similar letters and reports tell the records of 
quick, big, easy profits with tJhe 

Mandel Post Card 
Machine 

Wonderful discovery. A new, scientific pro- 
cess of photography with a world of moneor- 
making opportunities for ambdtious men with 
small capital and 

No Experience 
Investigate To-dajr 

A macihine that takes, finishes and deliyera 
original post card photos in one minute — 
rigrht on the spatj by the new "MANDEL." 
Positive process without plates, films or 

printinsr. The machine makes five different 
stj'lee of pictures in three sizes; post cards, 
3x4% inches; miniature post cards, 2x3 
inches; and one inch photo buttons. Makes 
portraits, groups, scenes — anj-thing that can 
be iplhotographed. Photo post cards are popu- 
lar everywhere. Big money at picnics, carni- 
vals, fairs, on the streets, ia the country, 
small towns and cities — everywhere. Htmdreds 
are getting rich — why not you? 

Write To-day 

Be a one (minute "post card photographer." 
Complete instructions with outfit — ^you besrin 
work at once. Small investment starts you in 
this new, pleasant, money-making business. 
The sale of your first supplies practically gives 
you back entire original investment. WRITE 
TO-DAY for Complete Free Information. 

CHICAGO FERROTYPE CO. 

DEiPT. W., 



OHDOAGO. IliL. 



cxlix 



PROF. CHAS. MUNTER 

Inventor of NULIFE, Humanity's Greatest Boon for Deep Breatliing 

Introduces 



Ttede 



R«>sts the body. 
Develops the 
chest. Makes 
you breathe 
pure* fresh 
air. 





,Wark 



e. PA^T'D U S & EORORE 



Price $3.00 



A simple, sanitary, self-ad- 
justirug and Mp reducing 

CORSET 

for wx>inen and children. An 
abdominal reducer and spinal 
support for men and 
boys. 

To the millions of 
people wlio have already 
been benefited by "wear- 
ing my world-famous 
NULIFE, and to those 
who know of its benefits, 
I am pleased to an- 
nounce that, after twenty 
years of scientific study 
of physical ailments, I have de- 
veloped and perfected my NU- 
BILD garment for the correct 
support of every human body. 
Price $3.00 at your dealers 
or ixetpaid direct from me. 




Guaran- 
teed to 
reduce 
the 
hips. 





R EC D & 0-A7- D U S & E: U ROPE 

The astonishing simplicity of NUBILD will quickly 
appeal to yow^ 

Creates a Perfect and Fashionable Figure ^8^> 

The ideal figure of every woman can now toe realized by ^C" '^S'f/ 

,1 simply wearing- a NUBILD garment. ^^f' ^fi\ 
■ ' Once on, ycM feel the exhilaration of your body RAISING v-, cz^. ri 

UP, your abdomen replacing itself, your shoulders thrown 

back, youf CHEST OEVELOPTNG and a full, deep breathing j ^ 

which fills your lungs with FRESH AIR. 

For Men, Women, Boys and Girls 

NUBILD for every one. The body support of all man- rwiv ^ 

kind. A hip reducing, scientific corset for women, and a /f l^fy^* 

body Tester and abdominal supiport for men and hoys. /■-- i -h .i ^ V 

Price S3. 00 postpaid 

OK SAL.E EVERYWHERE, OR 'SEND SS.OO WITH • 

ORDER AND GIVE SNUG T^^'AIST MEASURE. TAKEN 

OVER THE UNDER -GARMECNT. WITH ABDOMEN ^' 
DRAWN UP. ^^ 

Send for Illustrated Booklet of surprising' facts ^^ Date 

about your body. .^ P^^f ^has. Munter. 

PROF. CHAS. MUNTER y Z ^ fi|"^ ^" 

T X J! nkTTTx T-c'-B' ^^^DeaT .bir: — Enclosed fmd $o 

Inventor, of Wnmiii ^^ f^j. ^^g regular quality 

13 & 15 WEST 34th STREET V -NUBILD;' garment. Si^e 

Opposite the Waldorf-Astoria y «/ -SUM ^ai^t taken over the 

New York ritv M* luidergarmeuit. witli abdomen 

**■ ^*''-* #* drawn up. is inches. 

* Niame 

PLEASE SEND FKEE BOOKLET AT ONCE. Address 

cxx 




Keep Your Home Clean 

Do away with sweeping and dusting drudgery 

"QON'T drudge mth dust— GET RID OF IT. 

Brooms and sweepers are your enemies — 
not your friends. They only use up energy and 
bring on backache. The harder you work wiish 
broom or sweeper the thicker the 
dust clouds. Conquer dust in the 
modern, sanitary way. Use a 
Vacuum Cleaner that GATHERS 
up dust, dirt, microbes and in- 
sects, and GETS RID OF 
THEM. 

The EASY WAY to clean 
house, and keep it clean, is with 
the 

MONARCH 

Vacuum Cleaner 

The Machine That Cannot Get Out of Order 




Monarch Junior 

Hand-Vacuum Cleaner 

A practical and. efficient 
one-person hand cleaner. 
The Vacuumi Suction is 
positi^^ and continuous. 
Extremely simple, light 
and .strong. Works with- 
out noise. Guaranteed 
for 3 .rears. 

A real vacuum cleaner, 
not a substitute for one. 

Complete $^5.00 
No extras of any kind. 



The modern Vacuum Cleaner iimproved and per- 
fected. Comipact, simple, efflcienit and extremely 
light. Tested and proven ki every way. Adopted, 
after competitive tests, iDy United States Niavy, 
New York Police Department, Public Service Cor- 
porations, hundreds of Churches, Hotels, Clubs 
and Theatres. Used in thousands of homes. 
Works wdthooit noise or vibration. 

GUARANTEEED FOR 10 YEARS 

The Monarch is tihe Machine YOU ought to have. 
Easy to handle, thorough in its work, eoonoimical 
on electric current. 

With all 
equipments. 
No extras. 



PPTPFQ / $75 for Gun Metal Finish ) 

rKii.i:.:> | jgO for Black or Silver Nickel Finish / 

Tlie Monarcli Vaouimi Cleaner Company is rapidly increasing its Asrenc^ 
Porce and lias a promising" proposition to offer ambitious men and women. 
Those interested in securing* a paying* and permanent connection witli a 
responsible company should at once make application to the home office 
for a local ag'ency. 

MONARCH VACUUM CLEANER COMPANY 



1153 Broadway 



CXXl 



New Yoras Otjr 



Whole sale to the Publlo 

Americans Greatest 

Jewelry Values 

Saving You 40 to 50 Per Cent. 

You can now buy jewelry from Maiden Lane, 
"i^J^^Sf^^^^^^^ New York, jewelry headquarters of America 

After 50 years as wholesalers of 
the celebrated Myers jewelry we are now 
dealing direct with the consumer at a saving 
to you of from ^0 to 50 per cent. Try our profit- 
sharing plan by ordering one of these specials 
to-day. 

All articles shown here are solid gold, taken from 
our 1913 Catalog. We guarantee satisfaction. We 
pay all charges. Illustrations are exact size. 

No. W.22 Solid Gold Si^et Scar! Pin witli Initial .... $0.75 

«o. W.23 Solid Gold Tie Clasp 1.00 

Bo. 1.24 Solid Gold Bar Pin 1.50 

No. W.25 Solid Gold Necklace litb Pendant 3.75 

2 imetliysts, 1 Baroque Pearl Drop 
No. W.26 Solid Gold Handy Pin 50 

Write for your copy of our free 200 page illustrated 
Catalog No. 113W, full of valuable information con- 
cerning the latest in Jewelry, Watches, Diamonds, 
at bargain prices. 




g,i30C' 



®0.\^^ 



WHOLESALE JEWELERS "" ^o. 

Oldest Jewelry Catalog House in America 
FOUNDED 1863 BY S» F. MYERS 

6 & 8 MAIDEN LANE NEW YORK, N. Y. 



IN2a: 



CXXIl 



ADVER-riSERS I IM 



me: \A/0FR1.D Al-IVIAIMAO 



A PAGE 

Aaron, D. C, Pen Co cvi 

Abercrombie, David T., Co. . .xxxii 

Achfeldt, M xxxvi 

Acme Staple Co xxvii 

Actina Appliance Co 866-886 

American Addressing & Mail- 
ing Co xcvi 

American Buncher Mfgr. Co.... 854 
American Oorrespondf nee 

Schoolof Law 16-P 

American Ice Co xlii 

American Poultry Advocate 2 

American Seeding Machine 

Co XXXI 

American Steel & Wire Co 896 

American Well Works cviii 

American Wine Growers' 

Ass'n 16-C 

American Writing Machine Co. . . 1 

Anchor Tire Co Ixi 

Ames, F. M 873 

Anderson, Airs. Margaret 871 

Anglo- Amer. Telegraph Co. .xxxiv 

Anheuser-Buscli Brewery cii 

Antikamnia Chemical Co 16-J 

Arithstyle Co cvi 

Atlantic Vehicle Co xlix 

Automatic Adding Machine 

Co Ixxxvi 

B 

Barber, H. L xxv 

Barrow, Wade, Guthrie & Co. ..848 

Bartholomay Brewery Ixviii 

Bay-Roma Co xci 

Beegee Co 16-H 

Belcher & Taylor Ag'l Tool Co.. 856 

Belle City Incubator Co ci 

Bensinger, C. W., Co c-863 

Beroth, Geo, D xcix 

Best Light Co 853 

Betts, M. D rr 862 

Bird, Jones & Kenyon Ixxxvi i 

Black, A. Parks 876 

Blackburn's Case a -Royal 

Pills xxxvi-869 

Blackwell's Durham Tobacco 

Co xvi-Cover 4 

Blanchard Brothers Ixxvii 

Blickensderfer, G. C, Co cxv 

Blickensderfer Mfg. Co xx-xxi 

Booz Brothers Ixxxii 

Borden, M. S. . Co xxxviii 

Bradford Medicine Co ciii 

Brennan Motor Mfg. Co xc 

Bromo-Seltzer xxxviii 

Brooks. O. E 881 

Brown, Eugene C 1 vi 

Brown, S. A., Pharmacy xl 

Brans wick-Balke-Col lender 

Co Ixxvii i 

Burns, Wm. J., Detective Ag'y . .858 

Burpee, W. Atlee, & Co x 

Bustanoby's Restaurant ci 

<J 

Callanan, L. J 851 

Cannaday, Dr. J. E 880 

Canton Cutlery Co 845 

Carter Lytle Drug Co 16-M 

Chalmers Motor Co ii-iii 

Chicago Correspondence School 

of Law 835 

Chicago Correspondence 

Schools 851 

Chicago Ferrotype Co cxix 

Clarke Bros : xvii 

Clarke, C. P., & Co 838 

Cleveland Armature Works 851 

Clipless Paper Fastener Oo viii 

Cluthe Co 16-Q 

Cobb, Geo. W., Jr 16-H 

Cohen, J., & Bro xxxii 



H 



PAG 



K 



C PAOK 

Coleman, Watson E xxiii 

Collins, Capt. W. A 884 

Columbia Warehouses 896 

Consolidated Telegraph <k 

Electrical Subway Co Ixiv 

Conti , Cesare 895 

Cornish Co 837 

Cosmos Electric Co Ixxxii 

Coutant, Dr. Geo. E 861 

Creslo Laboratories 868 

Cyclone Drill Co 837 

D 

Daniels, Dr. A. xxx 

Decker Bait Co Ixxxvi 

Deere, John, Plow Co lix 

Delano, S. T 864 

Denison, D. T. S 835 

Detroit Veterinary Dental Col- 
lege 839 

Devoe, F. W., and C. T.Raynolds 

Co , 847 

DeWerth, Dr. H.Michell... 892-893 , , . . , ., ^ 

Diamond Jewelry Co 862 Jackson Automobile Co vi 

Ditman, A. J 890-891|Ja'gel8 & Bellis xlvi 

Divine, Fred D., Co Ixxxvii^aPi^ Magazine 836 

Double Throat Co 862 J^PaJiese Novelty Co. 863 

Drake Business School 838Jiroch, Dr F W .xcviii 

DuBarrie, Mrae 879''^°^®^' '-'• ^■' Co..^ Iv-lvii 

Dubonnet Wine Ixxl K. 

Duck. J. J., Co xcvii'Kamlee Co cxiii 

Dun, R. G.. & Co 895;Kampfe Bros Cover 2 

Duplex Mil I & Mfg. Co sSS'Kasner, A. H Ixi 

Duplex Printing Press Co. xliv-xlvKeene Co Ixi 

Duplicator Mfg. Co Ixxxviii.Kellermann, Annette iv 

DuPont de Nemours Powder Kellogg, F. J., Co 874 

Co cxviKemp, C. M.. Mfg. Co 867 

Dyke's School of Motoring... Ixxxii Kennedy. J. E xcix 



Heacock 895 

Henderson, Peter, & Co oxvii 

Herschell-Spiliman Co ^.xxix 

Hinds A Noble 850 

Hoffman, Geo, Wm., Co v 

Home Correspondence School, 

xxiii-lviii-lx-xcv-16-B-16-F 

Hopkins, Earl 850 

Hotel Breslin Ixxiii 

Housewife, the xcii 

Hubbs, Chas. F., &Co Iiiii 

Hunt & McCree liii 

I 

Ideal Co Iv 

Independent Chemical Co 16-K 

Inland Poultry Journal xcv 

Intercontinental University, .cxix 
International Correspondence 

Schools cvii-16-G 

International Realty Corpora- 
tion Ixxvi 



V 

Eager C. C. Co 876 

E. C.C. Catarrh- Asthma Cure.. 880 

Edge Hill Silica Rock Co cxix 

Eisen, Wm. M., Co xl 

Electric Respirone Co ..Ixxx 

Electro-Chemical Ring Co 16-0 

Eureka Mower Co Iviii 

Evans, Victor J., & Co xciii 

Evinrude Motor Co xcv 

Excelsior Quilting Co 16-B 

F 

Farquhar, A. B., Co 855 

Parrar, L. G Ixxv 

Federal White Metals Co 850 

Fitzgerald, W. T. , Co xxxvi 

Flintkote Mfg. Co xxii 

Fried, Charles 838 

Frontier Asthma Co 894 

Fuller, Geo.R., Oo Ix 

Funk & Wagnalls Co , .839 

Funsten Brothers & Co Ixxi 

( 

Gall Stone Remedy Co 879 

Gaucher, W. A Ixxxvi 

Gauss, C. E 875 

General Acoustic Co xcvii 

Glen Rock Woolen Co li 

Glide Road Machine Co ixvi 

Globe Truss Co 884 

Goitre Remedies Co 875 

Gold Medal Camp Furniture 

Mfg. Co 845 

Goodman, Chas 895 

Gordon Mfg. Co c 

Gotham Sporting Goods Co 838 

Green's Agency 854 

II 

Haines, Dr. J. W., Co 875 

Hamilton College of Law 839 

Hammond, C.S., «& Co 841 

Hammond Typewriter Co 843 

Harral Soap Co., c 

Hartford Auto Parts Co cxiv 

CXXIII 



Kenton Pharmacal Co 876 

Kerr, Richard A. Ivii 

Kilmer, Dr., & Co cxi 

Kinsman, Dr. P. G c-ciii 

Knickerbocker Ice Co xlii 

Kolesch & Co ...1 

Koskott Laboratory 869 

Koven, L. O., & Bro 859 

L 

Lacey, R. S. & A. B xvii 

La Delle, b'rederick 853 

Langah, D 839 

Language-Phone Method cv 

Latham, E. B., & Co Ixxxiii 

Leach Chemical Co xxxvi 

LeRoy Plow Co 854 

Lewis, J.L 854 

Lewis. Samuel Ixxxii 

Liberty Refining Co Ixvii 

Lincoln Freie Presse 860 

Lockhart, E. J 848 

Loewenstein, M xiv 

London Veterinary Correspond- 
ence School 859 

Long Island Railroad ex 

Lotz, Henry W 895 

Lung Genuine Co xxvii i 

Lynott, Dr. T. Frank 888 

M 

MacDonald, Prof. J. W 846 

Mager & Gougelmann 895 

Magic Foot Draft Co 873 

Major's Mfg. Co cv 

Mantle Lamp Co 846 

Marmola Co 882 

Marvel Hook Co 859 

May, Dr. W. H xl 

McLeod. Ward & Co 848 

Mc Wade, Frank L 849 

Mead Cycle Co. xciv 

Merchant & Evans Co xxxix 

Merriam, G. & 0., Co Ixxxv 

Miami Cycle & Mfg. Co 850 

Michaelson, H. H cxxvii 



iQ^OV£F%Xi3SRS ll\8 THE NA/^OFRLD ALIVIAfMAC 



Misaoari L&mp A Mfg. Oo czii 

Monarioh Maohinsry Oo, . . , .853 

Monarch Vaoaum Olsanef Oo. . ozxi 
Mnller, Wm. H...... o.... = lii-16-N 

Munter, Prof. Oha8,,,.„.. .,,,,. oxx 

Myers, J. A... Oo..,, ..,.cixii 

N 

Nathan Ankiet Support Oo 894 

National Oo-operative Realty 

Oo 865 

National Nassau Bank .......... liv 

National Scale Co 856 

National Sportsman Record 847 

Negreen, J. F 895 

New York Electrical School. . .Ixiii 
New York Institute of Science. .852 

New York Preparatory School 1 

New York Realty Owners liiiv 

New York Sporting Goods Co. .845 

New York World xcv-c-16-F 

Niagara Clip Co 16-L 

North Tonawanda Musical In- 
strument Works. , xxix 

Numismatic Bank 16-F 

<) 

Ogilvie, J. S., Pub. Co 852-863 

Okola Laboratory. 877 

Omnigraph Co 850 

Osgood, Mrs. Caroline 877 

Ostrander, W. M 835 

Othine Ivi 

P 

Pabst Extract Co xlvii 

Paris Medicine Co 879 

Pari in & Orendorff Co 16-E 

Partola Ca Iviii-lx-lxxxii- 

xc-xci-xcix-o-cvi-16-D 

Pease, J. M., Mfg. Co 840 

Pennsylvania Rubber Co 14 

Philo Burt Mfg. Co 867 

Pittsburgh Steel Co Covers 

Plapao Laboratories 894 

Pneumatic Mfg. Co Ix 

Powers Photo-Engraving C0..I6-B 

Prang Company xc 

Press Cd 894 

Press Syndicate 895 

Progressive Incubator Co 857 

Protone Co Ixvi 

Proudtit Loose Leaf Co xxxiii 

Puritan Pa b, Co. 840 

Pyramid Drug Co 866 



R PAGE 

Radford Architectural Co xiii 

Rae, Kloise..,. 872 

Rapid Addressing Machine Co.. 895 

Rathbone, R. C, & Son xxvi 

Ray Detective Agency 16-B 

Ray, William H., Printing Ink 

Mfg. Oo ,, xliii 

Redding & Co.. xxiii 

Reed Mfg. Co 846 

Reliable Incubator & Brooder 

Co Ixxxi 

Renova Co Ixvii 

Republic Fence & Gate Oo 895 

Richmond <fe Backus Co 841 

Rieger, J., & Co 889 

Rife Automatic Ram Co 863 

Riley, W, R., Distilling Co 884 

Romeike, Henry 16- N 

Rose Brick Co 834 

Rumely Products Co cix 

Ryan. P 895 

S 
Safety Oar Heating & Lighting 

Co 895 

Sanden, Alfred, Co cxviii 

Sandholm Drug Co xli 

Sargent Oo 895 

Sargol Co 883 

Schlegei, H. T., Co 870 

Schnoter, J, C, Co.. 869- 870-880-884 

Scholl Mfg. Co lxvii-865 

School of Railway Signaling xci 

Schoverling, Daly & Gales .xix 

Schulte, A 895 

Scientific American Compiling 

Dept Ixxxiv 

Scott, Chas. H., & Co xcix 

Scriven, J. A., Co xviii 

Seitz. M. O 840 

Service Specialty Co xxxiii 

Severance Tnnk and Silo Co.. . .859 

Sheldon School Ixxxix 

Smith. Prof 879 

Spratt's Patent 844 

Springfield Elastic Tread Co.. ..844, 
Springfield Metallic Casket 

Co XXXV 

Sproule, Deafness Specialist 865| 

St. Andrews Bay Nursery and | 

Orchard Co Ixviii-lxxi 

St. Louis Post-Dispatch 842 

Standard Electiic Incubator Co. .Hi 



S PAGE 

Standard Pattern & Mfg. Oo. . . .857 

Steinway&Sons xxiv 

Sterline. W. K 854 

Strelinger, Chas . A. , & Co c v 

Stuart's Dyspepsia Tablets 885 

Styron, D. M., <fc Co xc 

T 

Tauscher, H. W Ixxii 

Taylor Instrument Companies., liii 

Thomas School of Art xxxiii 

Thorburn, J. M., & Co i 

Three-in-One Oil Co xi 

Times Square Automobile Co. xciv 
Toby's Correspondence Schools ... 1 

Travelers Insurance Co 833 

Tyrrell, Chas. A icvi 

U 

Union Trust Co cxxviii 

United States Frame & Picture 

Oo xxxii 

United Vending Machine Co. 

Ixxxvi 
Universal Business Institute... civ 

Universal Import Co 886 

V 

Vacuum Oil Co xlviii 

Vanderbilt Hotel Ixii 

VanVleck, Dr.. Co...: 871 

Vapo-Cresolene Co xci 

Victor Safe &LockOo xt 

Victor Specialty Co 846 

Vom Hofe, Edward, & Oo Ixiii 

W 

Warner Arms Corp lixix 

Wflvterman, Arthur A., & Co.. 16- A. 

Weeks, Frank A., Mfg. Co cvi 

Weis Mfg. Oo ix 

Wilder-Strong Implement Co. . .850 

Willys-Overland Co xii-iiii 

Wilson Ear Drum Co Ixvii 

Winchester «fc Co 16-N 

Wintou Motor Car Oo vii 

Woodlawn Cemetery 895 

Woods, Edward J." 865-873 

Worthington Co Ixv 

IWurlitzer, Rudolph, Oo 849 

Wyci 1 & Co 16-F 

Y 

Yonkerman Co ciii 

Young, Dr. G. C, Co 887 

Young, John J 16-L 



ADVERT! SI IMG 

Abdominal Supporters, page Arcbitects. 
Parks 



Black, A. Parks 876 

Ditinau, A. J 890-891 

Fuller, Geo. R., Co Ix 

Accident Insurance 

Travelers Insurance Co 833 

Addressing* etc. 

American Addressing & 
Mailing Co xcvi 

Advertising Pencils. 

Blanchard Brothers .Ixxvii 

Farrar, L. G Ixxv 

Agents Wanted 

Beroth.Geo. D xcix 

Air Compressors. 

Standard Pattern «fc Mfg. Oo 857 

Ales and Beer. * 

Anheuser-Busch Brewery cii 

Bartholomay Brewery Ixviii 

Amusement Outfitters. 

Herscbell-Splllnian Co xxix 

Appliances for Deafness. 

Coutant,Dr. Geo.E ; 861 

General Acoustic Co... xcvii 

Wilson Ear Drum Co- Ixvii 



PAGE 

Radford Architectural Co.. ..xxiii 



Art Galleries. 

United States Frame <fe Picture 
Co xxxii 

Artificial Eyes. 

Fried, Chas 838 

Artificial liinibs. 

Fuller, Geo. R., Co Ix 

Atbletic Supporters. 

Schnoter. J. C. .Co. . .869-870-880-884 

Automatic musical Instru- 
ments. 

North Tonawanda Musical 
Instrument Works xxix 

Automiobiles. 

Chalmers Motor Co ii-iii 

Jackson Automobile Co vi 

Times Square Automobile Co.xciv 

Willy.s-Overland Co xii-xiii 

Winton Motor Car Co vii 

Automobile Parts. 

Blickensderfer, (J. C. ,Co cxv 

Hartford Auto Parts Co cxiv 

CXXIV 



I INDEX 

Automobile Skates. page 
Young, John Jaj' 16-L 

Automobile Supplies. 

KamleeCo ....cxiii 

Kasner, A. H Ixi 

Penusvlvania Rubber Co 14 

Vacuum Oil Co xlviii 

Automobile Tires. 

Kasiier, A. H 1x1 

Pennsylvania Rubber Co 14 

Automobile Trunks. 

KamleeCo cxiii 



Baby Cliicks. 

Kerr, Richard A Ivii 

Bandages— Suspensories. 

Schnoter, J. C. , Co . .. 869-870-880-884 

Banks and Bankers. 

Clarke Brothers xvii 

Union Trust Co. cxxviii 

Bicycle and Motorcycle 
Tires. 

Pennsylvania Rubber Co 14 

Bicycles. 

Mead Cycle Co xciv 



AOVEFRXISINO INDEX 



Billiard Tables* pasb: 

Brunswick- Balke-CoUender 
Co IxxvUl 

Blank Booics. 

Proudflt Loose Leaf Co xxxHi 

Klchmond & Backus Co 841 

Brassieres. 

^cott, Cbas. H., & Co xcix 

Brick Work. 



Dictionary Indexes. page 

Denlson, D. T. S 835 

D09 Food. 

Spratt's Patent ,., 844 

Drain Pine Pumps. 

Kennedj% J. E xcix 

Dress Shields. 

Scott, Chas. H., & Co xcix 

Duplicating; I>fnchines. 



Rose Brick Co 834 Beusinger, C. W., Co c-863 



Business Opportunities. 

Canton Cutlery Co 845 

Chicago Ferrotype Co cxix 

Cyclone Drill Co 837 

International Realty Corp. . .Ixxvi 
National Co-operative Realty 

Co. 865 

Ostrander, W. M 835 

Pease, J. INI., Mfg. Co 840 

Reed Mfg. Co 846 

St. Andrews Bay Nursery & 

Orchard Co Ixviii-lxxi 

Victor Specialty Co 846 

Cable Unes. 

Anglo - American Telegraph 
Co xxxiv 

Calculating Machines* 

Arithstyle Co evi 

Automatic Adding Machine 

Co Ixxxvi 

Gaucher, W. A Ixxxvi 

Cameras and Kodaks. 

Chicago Ferrotype Co cxix 

Lewis, J. L 854 

Camp Outfitters. 

A bercrombie, David T. , Co. . xxxil 
Gold Medal Camp Furniture 

Mfg. Co 845 

New York Sporting Goods Co . .845 
Schoverling, Daly & Gales.... xix 
Caronsselles. 
Herschell-Spillman Co xxix 

Carpet and Rug Weaving. 

ReedMl'g. Co 846 

Caskets. 

Springfield Metallic Casket 

Co XXXV 

Cement. 

Maj or Mf g . Co , CV 

Centrifugal Pumps. 

American Well Works cviii 

Cider Presses. 

Monarch Machinery Co 853 

Clothing. 

Glen Rock Woolen Co li 

Coal. 

Jagels & Bellis xlvi 

Corn Cures. 

Carter Lytle Drug Co 16-M 

Corpulency Belts. 

Black, A . Parks 876 

Counting Machines. 

National Scale Co 856 

Crutches. 

Ditman. A. J 890-891 

Fuller, Geo. R., Co Ix 



Duplicator M fg. Co. ....... Ixxxviii 

Dusting Cloths 

Loewenstein, M xiv 

Dynamite. 

DuPont de Nemours Powder 
Co cxvi 



Cutlery. 

Canton Cutlery Co 845 

Deep Well Power Pumping 
I>lachinery. 

American Well Works cviii 

Detective Agencies. 

Burns, Wm. J., National De- 
tective Agency .858 

Ray Detective Agency 16-B 

Dictionaries. 

Merriam, G. & C, Co Ixxxv^ 



Educational. 

American Correspondence 

School of Law 16-P 

Betts, M. D 862 

Chicago Correspondence School 

of Law 835 

Chicago Correspondence 

Schools 851 

Cleveland Armature Works. . .851 
Detroit Veterinary Dental CoL 

lege 839 

Drake Business School 838 

Dyke's School of Motoriug.lxxxii 

Funk & WagnallsCo 839 

Hamilton College of Law 839 

Hopkins, Karl 850 

Home Correspondence School 

xxiii-lviii-lx-xcv-16-B-16-F 
Intei'continental University.. cxix 
International Correspondence 

Schools cvii-16-G 

International Realty Corp.. Ixxvi 

La Delle, Frederick 853 

Langah, D 839 

Language- Phone Method cv 

London Veterinary Correspond- 
ence School 859 

McWade, Frank L 849 

National Co-operative Realty 

Co , 865 

New York Electrical Trade 

School Ixiii 

New York Institute of Science. 852 
New York Preparatory School., rl 

Omnigraph Co 850 

Ostrander, W.M 835 

Prang Co xc 

School of Railway Signaling. . .xci 

Sheldon School Ixxxix 

Thomas School of Art. ... xxxiii 
Tobey 's Correspondence Schools. 1 
Universal Business Institute, .cvi 
Wycil&Co 16-F 

Elastic Hosiery. 

Black, A. Parks 876 

Ditman, A. J 890-891 

Fuller, Geo. R., Co Ix 

Electric Belts. 

Sauden, Dr. Alfred, Co cxviii 

Electric Liight Sets. 

Streliuger, Chas. A., Co cv 

Electric Light Subways. 

Consolidated Telegraph & 
Electrical Subway Co Ixiv 

Electric Trucks. 

Atlantic Vehicle Co. ...'. xlix 



Electrical Specialties and 
Supplies. 

Cosmos Electric Co .Ixxxii 

Duck, J. J., Co xcvii 

Hunt & McCree Ixii 

Latham, E.B., & Co Ixxxiii 

Encyclopedias. 

Scientiflo American Compil- 



ing Dept. ., 



Eye Restoratives. page 

Actina Appliance Co 866-886 

Ideal Co iv 

Farm Implements and Ma- 
chinery. 

American Buncher Mfg. Co 854 

American Seeding Machine 

Co xxxi 

Belcher*& Taylor Agi.*TooiCo.856 

Deere, John, Plow Co lix 

Duplex Mill & M Ig. Co 855 

Eureka Mower Co Iviii 

Farquhar, A. B. ,Co 855 

Le Roy Plow Co 854 

Parlin & Orendorff Co 16- K 

Rumely Products Co cix 

Severance Tank & Silo Co 859 

Fencing, Wire. 

American Steel & Wire Co 896 

Pittsburgh Steel Co Covers- 
Republic Fence & Gate Co 895 

Financial. 

Barber, H. L xxv 

Clarke Brothers xvii 

New York Realty Owners. . .Ixxiv 
Union Trust Co cxxviii 

Fireless Cookers. 

Reliable Incubator & Brooder 
Co Ixxxi 

Fire Extingui^shers. 

Missouri Lamp & Mfg. Co...cxli 

Fish Bait. 

Decker Bait Co Ixxxvi 

Japanese Novelty Co 863 

Fishing Clothes. 

Bird, Jones & Kenyon Ixxxvii 

Fishing Tackle. 

Abercrombie, David T. ,Co ..xxxii 

Divine, Fred D., Co Ixxxvii 

Lockhart, E.J 848 

Marvel Hook Co 859 

Michaelson, H. H cxxvii 

New York Sporting Goods Co.. 845 

Schoverling, Daly & Gales xix 

VomHofe, Edward, & Co Ixiii 

Foot Remedies. 

Keeue Co Ixi 

Foot Specialists. 

Achfeldt, M xxxvi 

Nathan Anklet Support Co 894 

Scholl Mfg. Co lxvu-865 

Fountain Pens. 

Waterman, Arthur A., & C0.I6-A 

Fur Buyers. 

Funsten Brothers & Co Ixxi 

Furniture, Office. 

Weis Mfg. Co ,ix 

Gas Engines. 

Standard Pattern & Mfg. Co. ..857 
Streliuger, Chas. A., Co cv 

Gra><oline Tanks. 

Koven,L. O. , & Bro 869 

Groceries. 

Callanan, L. J 851 

Guns, Pistols and Rifles* 

Schoverling, I)aly& Gales xix 

Tauscher, H. W Ixxii 

Warner Arms Co Ixxix 

Hair Remover. 

Osgood, Mrs. Caroline 877 

Hair Restoratives. 

Bay-Roma C«> xci 

Creslo Laboratories 868 

Koskott Laboratory 869 

Hair Stain. 



..IxxxiviKenton PharmaealCo. 



.876 



cxxv 



aove:rti3iim<3! iimdex 



Health Appliances. *',^<^^ 

Actina Appliance Co 866-886 

Brooks, C. E 8«1 

Collins, Capt.W. A 884 

Coutant, Dr.Gea.E 861 

Ditman, A.J 890-891 

Eager, C.C.,Co 876 

Eisen, Wm. M.,Co xl 

Electric Respiione Co Ixxx 

Electro- Chemical Ring Co. . . J6-0 

Fuller, Geo. R., Co Ix 

General Acoustic Co. xcvii 

Ideal Co Iv 

Magic Foot Draft Co 873 

Muuter, Prof. Chas cxx 

Philo Burt Mfg. Co 867 

Plapao Laboratories 894 

Sanden, Dr. Alfred, f 'o cxviii 

Schnoter, J. C. , Co. .869-870-880-884 

Tyrrell, Chas. A xcvi 

Van Vleck,Dr.,Co 871 

Wilson Ear Drum Co Ixvii 

Health Culture. 

Kellermaun, Annette iv 

Heating Pads, Electric. 

Hunt & JNfcCree Ixii 

Hernia Trnsses. 

Black, .\. Parks 876 

Hotels* 

Hotel Breslin Ixxni 

Vanderbilt Hotel Ixix 

Household Furniture. 
Brunswick-Balke-Collender 

Co Ixxviii 

Hunting Clothes. 

Bird, Jones & Kenyon. . . , .Ixxxvu 

Ice. 

American Ice Co , xln 

Knickerbocker Ice Co xlii 

Incubators. 

Belle City Incubator Co ci 

Progre'^sive Incubator Co . , — 857 
Reliable Incubator & Brooder 

Co Ixxxi 

Standard Electric Incubator 

Co lii 

Insurance Brokers. 

Rathboiie, R. C. , & Son xxvi 

Invalids' Chairs. 

Gordon Mfg. Co c 

Worthington Co Ixv 

Janitors' Supplies. 

Lewis, Samuel Ixxxii 

Jewelry. 

Myers, J. A., Co cxxii 

Jockey Straps, 
Schnoter, J. C.,Co.'. .869-870-880-884 
Key Chains and Kings* 
United Vending Machine Co 

Ixxxvi 
l.iai;vn Rollers. 
Wilder-strong Implement Co. 850 
Lamps. 

Mantle Lamp Co 846 

liCad Pencils. 

Blanchard Brothers Ixxvn" 

Farra r, L. (^ Ixxv 

Liife Insurance* 

Travelers Insurance Co 833 

Liigiiting Systems. 

Best Light Co - 853 

Kemp, CM. , Mfg. Co 867 

Liiquor Cures. 

Anderson, Mrs. Margaret 871 

Haines, J. W. , Co , 875 

RenovaCo Ixvii 

Woods, Ed \v. J 865 

Loose l..eaf Systems. 

Proud fit-Loose Leaf Co xxxiii 

Richmond & Backus Co 841 

Lumber, etc* 



3Iachinery. 

American W^ell Works 



Belchev & Taylor Agl. Tool Co. 856 

Brennan Motor Mfg. Co xc 

Cyclone Drill Co 837 

Deere, John, Plow Co li x 

Duplex Mill & Mfg. Co 855 

Eureka Mower Co Iviii 

Evi n rude Motor Co xc v 

Farquhar, A. B.,Co 855 

Glide Road Machine Co xxy| 

Moil 
Parli _. 

Rife Automatic Ram Co 863 

Rumely Products Co cix 

Standard Pattern & Mfg. Co 857 

Strelinger, Clias. A., Co cv 

.llachines for Cripples. 

Worthington Co Ixv 

3Iagaziues* 

Housewife, the xci 

Japan Magazine 836 

Uaps. 

Hammond. C. S., & Co 841 

iUasonic Supplies- 

Redding & Co , xxiii 

:>[aternity Belts. 

Ditman, A. J 890-891 

3Iat tress Pads. 

Excelsior Quilling Co 16-B 

JIatiresses, Pneumatic* 

Pneumatic Mlg. Co Ix 

.lledical* 

Ames, F. M 873 

.Anderson, Mrs. Margaret 871 

Antilvamnia Chemical Co 16 

Blackburn's Casca-Royal 

Pills xxxvi-869 

Borden, M. S.. Co xxxviii 

Bradford Medicine Co ciii 

Bromo-Seltzer xxxviii 

Brown, S. A. .Pharmacy xl 

Cannadav,Dr. J. E 880 

Carter Lj'tle Drug Co 16- M 

Delano, S.T 864 

De Werth, Dr. H. Michel I.. 892-893 

DuBarrie, Mme 879 

E. C. C. Catarrh- Asthma Cure. 880 

Frontier Asthma Co 894 

Gall Stone Remedy Co 879 

Gauss, C. E 875 

Goitre Remedies Co 878 

Haines, J. W. , Co 875 

.Tiroch, Dr. F. W xcviii 

Jones, C. L., Co Iv-lvil 

KeeneCo Ixi 

Ivellogg,F. J., Co 874 

Kilmer, Dr., & Co cxi 

Kinsman, Dr. F. G c-ciii 

[jeach-Chemical Co xxxvii 

Luug-Germine Co xxviii 

Lvnott,Dr. T. Frank 888 

MacDonald, Prof. J. W 846 

Marmola Co , 

May, Dr. W. H xl 

Muller. Wm. H Ixil6-N 

Okola Laboratory 877 

Othine Ivi 

Pabst Extract Co xlvii 

Paris Medicine Co. 879 

Partola Co...lviii-lx-lxxxii-xc 

xci-xcix-c-cvi 16-D 

Protone Co Ixvi 

Pyramid Drug Co 866 

Rae, Eloise 872 

RenovaCo Ixvii 

Sandholm Drug Co xli 

SargolCo 883 

Schlegel, H. T.,Co 870 

Smith, Prof 879 

ISproule, Deafness Specialist. ..865 



PAGE 3Iedical. page 
..cviii YonkermanCo cii 



Young, 



Dr. G. C-, Co 887 

Merrv-Cro-Kounds, etc. 

Hersciiell-Spillmau Co xxix 

.>[etal Polish* 

llottmaii, Geo. Wm., Co v 

Loeweustein, M xiv 

Metals. 

Federal White Metals Co 850 

, ,, , . ^ „.„ Merchants Evans Co xxxix 

arch Machinery Co '^^Motorcycles. 

in & OrendorfTCo^. 16- E (jotham Sporting Goods Co. . . .834 

Green's Agency 858 

Miami Cycle & Mfg. Co 850 

Motors. 

Brennan Motor Mfg. Co xc 

Evin rude Motor Co xcv 

Motor Cars* 

Chalmers Motor Co ii-iii 

Jackson Automobile Co vi 

Willys-Overland Co ...xii-xiii 

Winton Motor Car Co vii 

3Iotor Trucks* 

Atlantic Veliicle Co xlix 

JIusical Instruments. 

Wurlitzer, Rudolph Co 849 

Ne^vspapers. 

Lincoln Freie Presse 860 

New Y^ork World xcv-c-16-F 

St. Louis Post-Dispatch 842 

Novelties. 

Double Throat Co 862 

Numismatics. 

Numismatic Bank 16-F 

Obesity Belts. 

Black, A. Parks 876 

Oflice Furniture. 

Cobb, Geo. W. , Jr 16-H 

Weis Mis. Co ix 

Office Specialties and Sup- 
plies. 

Aaron, D. C, Pen Co cvi 

Acme Staple Co xxvi i 

ArithstyleCo cvi 

Automatic Adding Machine 

Co r Ixxxvi 

Beegee Co ; — 16-H 

Bensinger, C. W., Co c-863 

Clipless Paper ra.<?tener Co. . . viii 

Duplicator Mfg. Co Ixxxviii 

Gaucher, W. A Ixxxvi 

McLeod, Ward&Co 848 

Niagara Clip Co 16-L 

Proudfit Loose Leaf Co . xxxiii 

Richmond & Backus to 841 

Styron, D. M., & Co xc 

Weeks, Frank A., Mfg. Co cv 

Weis Mfg. Co ix 

Oil and Water Tanks. 

Koveu,L.O.,&Bro 859 

Oils and Greases. 

Three-in-OneOilCo xi 

Vacuum Oil Co xlviii 

Old Coins and Gold. 

Clark,C. F.,& Co 838 

Liberty Refining Co Ixvii 

Organs. 

Cornish Co 837 

Organs (Antomatic). 

North Tonawauda IMusical 
Instrument Works xxix 

Orthopaedists. 

p:iseu,Wm. M. ,Co xl 

Philo Burt Mfg. Co 867 

Orthopaedic Appliances. 

Achfeldt. M xxxvl 

Nathan Anklet Support Co 894 

SchoUMfg. Co lxvii-865 

Paint* 

Devoe, F. W. and C. T. Ray- 
nolds Co 847 



Cohen, J.; & Bro xxxiiSterline, W. K 854^ 

Machinery. Stuart's Dyspeosia Tablets 885 

American Buncher Mfg. Co 854 Vapo-CresolvneCo. . : xci 

American Seed i ng Machine Winchester & Co 16- N Paper. 

Ci xxxilWoods, Edward J 865-873, Hubbs, Chas. F.,& Co Ixiil 

CXXVl 



ADVERXISIIMCS ^ISiOEX 



Pniier Fasteners. 

Aciue Stiiple Co xxvii 

CliplesR Paper Fasieuer Co viii 

Patents. 

Brown. Kus:ene C Ivi 

Coleman. Watson E xxiii 

Evans, Victor J . , & Co xciii 

Fitzgerald, W. T. ,& Co xxxvi 

L.ioey, R. S. & A: H xvii 

Peedii Iiifliistry. 

St. Andrews Bay Nnrsery & 

Oi-cliurd Co — Ixviii-lxxi 

Peu8. 

Aaron. T>. C. , Pen Co cvi 

Photo-En^rnviii^. 

Powers Fuoto-Kugruviiig C0.I6-B 

Pianos. 

Cornish Co 837 

Steiuway & Sous xxiv 

Picture Frames and 

Framing. 
United States Frame & Pic- 
ture Co xxxli 

Polish, Metal. 

Hoffman, Geo. \Vm., Co v 

Loewenstein, M xiv 

Poiiltrv Food and Supplies. 

Edge Hill Silica Rock Co cxix 

Inland Poultry Journal xcv 

Spratt's Patent 844 

Poultry Publications. 

American Poultry Advocate 2 

Inland Poultry Journal xcv 

Preminuis. 

Seitz, M. O 840 

Press Clipping Bureaus. 

Romeike, Henry 16-N 

Print inglnkxllanufacturers. 
Ray. Wm. H. , Printing Ink 

Mfg. Co xllii 

Printing Presses. 
Duplex Printing Press Co. 

xliv-xlT 

Press Co 894 

Public Accountants. 
Barrow, Wade, Guthrie & Co... 848 
Publications. 

American Poultry Advocate 2 

Housewife, The xcii 

Inland Poultry Journal- xcv 

Japan Magazine 836 

Lincoln Freie Presse 860 

New York World xcv-c-16-F 

St. Louis Post-Dispatch 842 

Publishers. 

Booz Bros Ixxxii 

Hammond, C.S.,& Co 841 

Merriam, G. &C.,Co Ixxxv 

Ogilvie, J. S.,Pub.Co 852-863 

Prang Co xc 

Puritan Pub. Co 840 

Scientific American Com- 
piling Dept Ixxxiv 

Wvcil &Co 16- F 



Ualiroads. 

Long Island Railroad ex 

Kat Kxteruiinat >rs. 

Independent Chemical Co 16-K 

irazor Sharpeners. 

Victor Specially Co 846 

Razor Strops. 

Kanipfe Bros Cover 2 

Restaurants. 

Bnstanoby's ci 

Rheumatic Rings. 

Electro- Chemical King Co — 16-0 

Uoad Machines. 

Glide Road Machine Co xxvi 

Koller Skates. 

Young, John Jay 16-L 

Hoofing Material. 

Flintkote Mfg. Co xxii 

^^erchant & Evans Co xxxix 

Rubber Heels. 

bpringfield Elastic Tread Co.. ..844 

Rupture Cure. 

Brooks, C. E 881 

Collins, Capt. W. A 884 

plapao Laboratories 894 

Safe Deposit Vaults. 

National Nassau Bank liv 

Safes. 

Victor Safe & Lock Co xv 

Safety Razors. 

Kampfe Bros Cover 2 

Sanitary Appliances. 
Kennedy, J. E. xcix 

National Scale Co 856 

.School Books. 

Hinds & Noble 850 

Seeds and Bulbs. 

Burpee, W. Atlee, & Co x 

Henderson, Peter, & Co cxvii 

Thorbnrn, J. M..& Co i 

Shaving Brushes. 

Kampfe Bros Cover 2 

Shooting Oalleries. 

ervice Specialty Co xxxiii 

Shoulder !i^'aces. 

Ditman, A.J* 890-891 

Fuller, Geo. R. , Co Ix 

Schnoter, J. C, Co. ..869-870-880-884 
Smoking Tobacco. 

Bull" Durham xvi-Cover4 

Soaps. 

Harral Soap Co c 

Sporting Goods. 
Abercrombie, David T. ,Co. .xxxii 

Divine, Fred D., Co Ixxxvii 

Gotham Sporting Goods Co 838 

Michaelson,H. H cxxvii 

New York Sporting Goods Co.. .845 

Schoverling, Daly& Gales xiii 

Vom Hofe, Edw., & Co Ixiii 

Sportsmen Brotherhood. 
National Sportsman Brother- 
hood 847 



Storage Batteries. 

Cosmos Electric Co Ixxxii 

Subways, Power. 
Consolidated Telegraph & 

Electrical Subway Co Ixiv 

Surgical Bandages. 
Schnoter, J. C, Co. ..869-870-880-884 
Surveyors' InstruinentH. 

Kolesch &Co 1 

Suspensories. 

.<chnoter, J. C. Co. . .869-870-880-884 
Telegraph liines. 
Anglo-American Telegraph 

Co xxxiv 

Thermometers. 

Taylor Instrument Co'a liii 

Tobacco Cure. 

Woods . Edw. J 873 

Tool Grinders. 

Duplex Mill & Mfg. Co 855 

Trucks, Electric. 

Atlantic Vehicle Co xlix 

Trusses. 

Black, A. Parks 876 

Cluthe Co 16-Q 

Ditman, A. J 890-891 

Fuller, Geo. R.,Co Ix 

Globe Truss Co 884 

Type^vriters. 

American Writing Machine 

Co 1 

Blickeusderfer Mfg.Co....xx-x.xi 

Hammond Typewriter Co 843 

Underwear. 

•Scriven, J. A., Co xviii 

Vacuum Cleaners. 

Latham, E. B., & Co Ixxxiii 

Monarch Vacuum CleauerCo.cxxi 
Ventilators. 

-Merchant & Evans Co xxxix 

Veterinary Remedies. 

Daniels, Dr. A. C xxx 

Watches. 

Diamond Jewelry Co 862 

Water Supi)ly Systeuis. 

Rife Automatic Ram Co 863 

Well Drilling Machinery 

and Tools. 

Aftierican Well Works cviii 

Cyclone Drill Co 837 

Whiskey. 



Rieger,J., &Co 889 

Riley, W. R. , Distilling Co 884 

Universal Import Co 886 

Wine. 

Dubonnet Ixx 

Wine Groovers. 
American Wine Growers' 

Ass'n 16-C 

Wire Fencing. 

Pittsburgh Steel Co Cover 3 

Wireless Sets. 

Duck, J. J., Co xcvii 

Hunt &McCree Ixn 



H. H. M. CHAMPION STEEL FISHING ROD 

$M A A FLY OR BAIT. GUARANTEED FOR 3 YEARS ^M A A 



1 



n^ 



a3£t 



stSa 



1 



3^ 



x£a^ 



l.OO in oar store— $1.15 by mail 



Any length in feet or half feet, from 4 to* 10. Dead black finish. German silver 
two ring standing guides and three ring top, all -filtings heavily nickeled brass, 
cork grip, reel seat below or above the grasp, put up in cloth partiticn bag. Tour 
money back if the rod is not satisfactory. Write for Catalog 20 — the best bcHife 
of its kind. Lists everything in the line of Sporting Goods. It's free. 



H. H. MICH.\EI.SON, 914 Broadway. Brooklyn 

CXXVII 



N©w Yoffk City 



ISOBH 



CHARTERED 1864 



UNION TRUST COMPANY 
—OF NEW YORK— 

Main Office, 80 Broadway 

Fifth Avenue Branch : Plaza Branch : 

425 Fifth Avenue, corner 38th Street 786 Fifth Avenue, corner 60th Street 

Modern Safe Deposit Vaults at Both Branches 



Capital $1,000,000 Surplus (earned) $7,700,000 

Total Resources (September 9th, 1912) . . . $74,000,000 



The Union Trust Company of New York receives Deposit j 
Accounts of all kinds, large and small, and allows interest on daily 
balances of $1,000 or more, at agreed rates, fixed in accordance 
with prevailing conditions and with the nature of the accounts. 
The Union Trust Company of New York makes a specialty 
of Personal Trusts- — under Will or under Agreement — and main- 
tains a carefully organized Department for handling them. 



OFFICERS 

Edwin G. Merrill, President 

Augustus W. Kelley, Vice-President Carroll C. Rawlings, 

John V. B. Thayer, Vice-President « • • a Vice-Pres. and Trust Officer 

Benjamin A. Morton, Asst. l rust Officer 
Edward R. Merritt, Vice-President T. W. Harlshorne, Asst. Secretary 

W. McMaster Mills, Henry M. Myrick, 

Vice-Pres. Plaza Branch Asst. Secy. 5th Ave. Branch 

Henry M. Popham, Secretary 

TRUSTEES 

W. Emlen Roosevelt, William Woodward, James Gore King, Frank Trumbull, 

Augustus W. Kelley, John V. B. Thayer, Edwin G. Merrill, Ernest Iselin 

N. Parker Shortridge, Walter P. Bliss, M, Orme Wilson, „• u j rx i r- 1 1 

^iiiif 1 r.i..»^ ,, T- .«, Kichard Delafield, 

Charles H. Tweed, Frederic de P. Foster, V. Event Macy, 

James Speyer, Amos F. Eno, W. H. Nichols, Jr. ^^^""'^ ^' ^eW- 

cxxvin I 







fl 



The World Almanac 



HRD 



Enqrclopedia 
1913 



**^\^%^^^%^^.^^^^^'3^^^^*i^* 



r^ 



ISSUED BY 
THE PRESS PUBLISHING CO. (THE NEW YORK WORLD), 

PuLiTSKR Building, 
Nkw Yobk. 

Oopjtlghi, 1912, by The Preas Publlahinc Oo. (The New York World) New York. 



4- 




$13,40Ol on the Side 

Mr. F. H. Dunlap of West Salisbury, N; H., in the past twenty-five 
years Ms cleared $13,400.31 from hens. This is a remarkable record, 
when it is known that Mr. Dunlap" is employed ten hours a day in a 

store and all the time he ihas to put in with his 
hens is what he can get morning*, noon and 
night. This $13,400.31 was all made on the 
side. Nor does Mr. Dunlap get fancy prices 
/iHb'^ '^^^'l^ for w"hat he has to sell. He ships to Boston, 

" and takes current quotations from the commis- 
sion men there. Mr. Dunlap began 'in 1887 
^^i^i^^ii#' ^^^^^tf" with twenty hens. In 1910 his poultry profits 

^« figured out $1188.05 — and this is -all on the 
" side. Mr. Dunlap's hens 'have bought him a 
beautiful home, purchased a horse and car- 
riage, sent three boys to school and college, 
besides saving something for a rainy day. Can others do equally well ? 
"Sure thing," says Mr. Dunlap, "if they will wear out the soles of their 
shoes faster than they do the seats, of their chairs." The story of Mr. 
Dunlap's success and his methods is told in the book, "Side-Line Poultry 
Keeping," and it is only one out of a score of things to set the blood 
tingling and make one resolve to get next to the $600,000,000 spent in 
the United States each year for poultry and Qgg^. ' ' -^ 

gfk f £^^^£\ n % ^- •^- Richardson of Haverhill, Mass, a shoe ■cut- 

J^ ■ ^IIOJ#*«» J. ^^^' '"^^^^ ^^^^ ^^"^ P'^y ^"^ $1,009.31 in 1910, and 
H^ ^7^^ ^^'^•*^ "^ kept working at the bench at the same time. 
How he did it is told in "Side-Line Poultry Keeping." 

^'Side-Line Poultry Keeping" 

is the name of a new book by the author cents a bushel and is without a peer for 
of -'2 00 Eg-gs a Year Per Hen." the most Producing eggs, how to make money with 

T.ine Poultry Keeping" deal?, with tha busi. out th*^ laying he.is. ha-v to put down eggs 
ness side of poultry keeJ^iHg'; a.s ^the ^othvji so that ihey wjil-keeo a year. etc. 
dealt with egg production. ■ It teUs ho'v to Invaluable to every man who wishes to 
make poultry keeping Tpa.f. It describes the i/take inon-ei* on the sid-j. and indispensable 
methods by which F. H. Dunlap of West to the man who is looking forward to the 
•uSalisbury. N. H.. makes over Sl'OeO a riee, iiidtpendent. healthful life of the 
year from eggs, devoting not ovev, two poultry -fai'm. Ninety-six paggs; illus- 
hours a day to his hens. Not a detai'l left '.rated. Price 50 Cents, or with the Ameri- 
out. The book tells how to make a start, can Poultrv Advocate one year 7 5 cents, 
what breeds pay. how. wh«n and w,here to two years' subscrip>tion and ibook for $1.00. 
buy a farm, how to makn <a, 1-ivi.nsr from the or given ^s a pren.ium for two yearly sub- 
first, describes the .most- .Avo^iderful brood- sorlptions at 50 cents each. Our paper is 
ing system in the world.' tells-how fo btiild handsomelv 'illustFated. 44 to 124 pages, 
the most economical poultry houses and 50 cents per year. 3 months' trial 10c. 
trap nests, how to feed for best results, de- Sample free. Catalogue of poultry books 
scribes a feed that can be made for 15 free. 

American Poultry Advocate 

233 Hodgkins Block, Syracuse, N. Y. 



General Index. 



8 



GENERAL INDEX. 



A PAGK 

A. A.U. Records 338,353 

AbyssiuianCliurcli Ailherenis.531 

Acadeniiciaiis, National 583 

" Koyal 584 

Academy of Arts and Letters. .567 

♦• of Design, National 583 

" Science, National 572 

Accidental Deaths in Manhat- 
tan 827 

Accidents, Help in Case of . . 295 

" Railroad. ..217,218,254,255,256 

Accounts.Conimissioner, N. Y.772 

" When Outlawed. 151 

Acknowledgruentof Deeds — 29tj 
Actoi"s, Birthplaces, etc — 599-6oa 

Actors' Church Alliance 549 

" Fundof America 549 

Acts of Congress 514 

Actuarial Society of America. .569 
Administration of Deceased 

Persons' Estates 297 

Advent ists. Number of 532 

Aeronautic Records 407 

Aeroplanes, Races 407 

Afghanistan 421 

A f rica, Statistics of 225,429, 519 

" Division of 439 

Agricultural imple- 
ments 230,232,2.34 

Agriculture Dep' t Officials 445 

" Secretaries of 683 

Airships 407 

Alabama Election Returns 721 

Ala.ska 657,672 

Territory 143 

Alcohol Statistics 249 

Aldermen, N. V. City 771 

Alfred B. Nobel Prizes 15,562 

Algeria 264,421 

Alliance Francaise 549 

Altar Colors 38 

Altitudes, c^realest in States. . . 71 

Aluminum, Production ot 247 

Ambassadors 15, 489, 499 

Amendments to U. 8. Con- 
stitution i«-93 

America, Area and Pop.,etc. 63,.il9 

•* British, Area, etc 429 

American Academy of Arts 

and Letters 585 

" Academy ol Medicine 669 

" Academy Political and 

Social Science 569 

" Anatomists' Association . 569 

" and Foreign Siiipping 177 

** Antiquarian Societ}' 569 

" Asiatic Association ,/.569 

" Association for Advance- 
ment of Science 569 

** Assn. of Obstetricians and 

Gynaecologists .569 

" Assn. of Oriticial Surgeons. 569 
" Assn. of Pathologists and 

Bacteriologists 569 

" Assn. of Societies for 

Organizing Charities — 547 
•' Assn. Public Accountants.. .569 

" Athletics 353-368 

'* Bar Association 569 

" Rattle Oai-^s 35,485,502 

" Bible Society 540 

*' Board Foreign Missions... 542 

" Bonapartes 642 

" Chemical Society 569 

•• Civic Alliance 549 

*• " Association 548 

" Climatological Ass'ns 569 

" Colleges 609 

" Cross of Honor 559 

" Dermatological A.ss'n 569 

" Dialect Society 569 

*' Economic Association 569 



PAGE 

American Electro- Therapeutic 

Association 569 

" Entomological Society. .569 
" Experience Table of Mor- 
tality 292 

" Federation of Arts 582 

" of Catholic So- 
cieties 545 

of Labor 121 

'* Fisheries Society 569 

" Flag Association 557 

' ' Folklore Society 570 

'' Forestry Association. .148,570 

" Geographical Society 570 

'"■ Gynaecological Society.... 570 

*' Historical A.ssociation 570 

" Hog 241 

" Humane Society 549 

" Indian 558 

" Institute of Architects 570 

" Inst. JClectrical ]!:ng'rs 570 

" " of Homceopatliy 570 

" " Mining J!:ngineers... 570 
" for Scieutilio Re- 
search 570 

'* Social Service 549 

" Irish Historical Society. . .570 
" Jewish Historical Society. 570 

" Laryngological Ass'n 570 

" Laryngological, Rhinolog- 
ical and Otological Soc. .570 

" Learned Societies 569-572 

" Library Association 570 

" iNfathematical Society 570 

" IMedical A.ssociation 570 

" Medico Pharmaceutical 

League 570 

" Medico- Psycholog. Ass'n.57U 

" Microscopical Society 570 

'• Multi- Millionaires 632-641 

" Municipalities League 548 

" Museum of Nat. History . .776 

' ' National Red Cross 557 

" Nature Study Society 570 

" Neurological Association. .571 
*' Numismatic Association. .260 

" Society 571 

" Oplithalmological Society. 571 

" priental Society 571 

" Ornithologists' Union ... ..571 
" Orthopedic Association . . .571 

" Osteopathic Societj' 671 

" Otological Society 571 

" Peace and Arbitration 

League 138 

'* Peace Society 825 

" Pediatric Society 571 

'' Philatelic Society .■ ... .571 

' Philological Association. ■571 

'• Philomatbic Ass'n 780 

" Philosophicul Society. , ..571 

" Physical Society 571 

' Pliysicians. Ass'n of :572 

' Proctologic Society 571 

" Psychological Association. 671 

" Public Health Ass' n 571 

"■ Revolution, Dai'.sjhters of.. 553 

" Rivers, Principal 76 

•• Roeiitgen Ray Society 571 

" Scandinavian Societv 515 

" " Foundation. 515 

" Scenic and Historic 

Preservation Society... 549 
" Social Science A ssociation.571 
" Society of Civil Engineers.571 
" Soc'tyof Curio Collectors.571 
" Societyof int'n't'lLaw...l38 
" Society of Mechanical 

J'"ngi neers 571 

" Society of Naturalists 571 

" S.P. C. A 549 

Sociological Society 571 



pa»b: 

American Statistical Ass'n 671 

" Sunday School Union.. ..639 

" Surgical Association 671 

" Telephone &TelegraphCo.l90 

" Therapeutic Society 571 

'"■ Tract Society 640 

'' Turf 337 

" Unitarian Association 541 

** Uroloffical Association 672 

" Vessels Built lol 

*' Veterans Foreign Service 487 

'* Wars, Society of 555 

•* Wood Preservers Ass'n ..246 
America's 20 Best Customers. ..137 
Amusements, N. Y. City. . .775-776 
Ancient and Modern Year. ... 72 
Animals, Dom' tic, U. S. 100,239,241 

Annapolis Naval Academy 482 

Anniversaries, List of 35 

Antarctic Discoveries 518 

Antidotes for Poisons 295 

Antimony Production 246,247 

Anti-Saloon League. The 544 

Apoplexy, Death's from 254,255 

Apothecaries' Weights 82 

Appellate Division, Supreme 

Court, N. Y. Citj' 773 

Appendicitis, Deaths from. 254,255 

A pple Crop 239 

Apportionment of Congress.... 503 

Appraisers, U. S. General 806 

Appropriations by Congress — 265 

Aquarium in N. Y. City 776 

Arabic Numerals 85 

Arbitration Committee of N.-V.774 

" Court of 129-131 

Archaeological Institute.- 572 

Archaeology. ^ . . . ... . .... 521 

Archbishops in U. S. ...... .....531 

Archery Records ....329 

Arctic Club ....572 

"■ Discoveries 517,530 

Area Cities in U.S 669-670 

" Continents 63 

" Foreign Countries 1.5,421 

" of Africa 429,439 

" of Asia 429 

" of British Empire 429 

" of Canada 440 

" of Earth 63 

'' ofGreatLakes 16 

" oflslands 61 

'' of London 435 

•* of Mexico 421,442 

"' of States 672 

*« of United States 100.421 

Areas of Earthquakes 63 

Argentina, Area, etc... 264, 421, 443 

" Army and Navy 414 

" Battleships 420 

Arizona Election Returns 722 

Arkansas Election Returns 722 

Arlington Confederate Monu- 
ment Associal ion 557 

A rmed Strength of World 414 

Armenian Church Followers. 531 
Armies and Navies, Cost of 

Maintaining : 465 

" of the World 414 

Armories, N". Y. City 831 

Armour Familj"^ 641 

Arms, Military 460 

Army and Navy of Confeder- 
ate .States, Society 554 

" and Navy Uniform 414 

" and Navy Union — 666 

" Aviation 407 

" British 414,432 

" Chaplains, U. S 468 

" Enlistment Law 461 

" General Officers Retired. 449 
'• Generals, U.S 449 



FOR INDEX OF NOTEWORTHY ARTICLES IN PRECEDiNO VOLS., SEE PAGE 28. 



General Index— Continued^ 



PAGE 

Army of Camberland Society.. 656 

'• of Potomac Society 656 

" of Santiago Society 560 

" of Tennessee Society 556 

•• of the Philippines 560 

" of U. S., General Staff. ...449 
" of U. S. in New York City. 803 

" PayTable 466 

" RankofOflacers 449,452 

*• Retired List 449-451 

•• U.S., Orgranization 451 

Arrestin Civil Actions 305 

Art Galleries, N.Y 776 

" Progress in U.S 587 

Artillery Corps, Field Ollicers.457 

Artists 583,585 

Arts, Amer, Federation of 582 

" and Letters, Academy.. ..585 

" Commission, Fine 586 

Asbestos Production 246,248 

Ashokan Reservoir 834 

Ash Wednesday ,1913 29 

Asia, Statistics of 63.225,429,519 

Asphaltum Production 246,248 

Assembly New York State.. . . 676 
Assessed Valuation of Prop- 
erty i n U. S 265,669-670 

Assessors, Board of, N.Y. City772 
Assistants Attorney-General.. 636 

Assistant Treasurers, U. S 446 

Associated Press 680 

Associations in N. Y. City 798 

Astor Fiimilj' 634 

" Library, N. Y. City 568 

Astrological Society 572 

Astronomical and Astrophysi- 
cal Society of America... .572 

" Constants 59 

•* Plieuomena for 1913 65-56 

*• Signs and Symbols 55 

Astronomy in 1912 521 

Asylums. N.Y. City 796-797 

Atliletic Records 353,368 

Atmosphere of tlie Karth 61 

Attoriiey.s-General, U.S 683 

Au.stralasia 63,264,429 

Australia Commonwealth 439 

Austria, Diplomaticlutercourse 

499 
*• Hungary, Army and Navy 

414,419,437 

" " Ministry 424 

•• " Royal Family.. 425 

Austro-Huugariau 15m.pire 

264,421,437 

Automobile Accidents 255,256 

'» Industry 232, 321 

*• Records 822-323 

Automobiles Exported 230 

Autumn, Heginniug of, 1913 29 

Aviatiogi 407 

Avolrd\fpoi9 Weight...., 82 

Aztec Club of 1847 551 

B 

Bacon, Production of 241 

Baggage, Examination of 105 

Bait Casting 393 

Ballooning 407.418 

Bank Examiners, Nat'l 806 

Banking Statistics 100, 270,273 

Bankruptcy Law, U. S 302 

Banks in N.Y. City 777-779 

Baptist Ciuirches,N.Y.City783,789 

" World Alliance 547 

" YomiET People's Union 542 

Baptlstfi, Number of 531,632 

Bar As-sociatlon. American 569 

N. Y. City 806 

Barley, Production of 240,241 

Barometer Indications 69 

Ba.s€ball Records 324-329 

Ba.sketBall. 346 

Battle Dates, American. 35, 485,502 
Battleships of Naval Powers. 415 

„ U.S 472 

Battles of Civil War 486 



PAGE 

Bavarian Royal Family 16,426 

Beans, Production of. 239 

Beer Consumption 249 

Belgian Royal Family 425 

Belgium, Debt, Area, etc.. 264, 421 

Army and Navy 414 

Ministry »,....424 

Belmont Family 640 

Benefactions of 1912 16,625-631 

Ben Hur, Tribe of 528 

Benzine Production 245 

Best Athletic Records 358 

" Interscholastic Records . .366 
Beverages, When to vServe — 252 

Bible Society, American 540 

Biblical "Weights 83 

Bicycling Records 15, 400 

Billiard Records 392 

Birth, Deaths from 254,255 

" Statistics... 257 

" Stones 488 

Bishops, English 432 

" of Religious Denomina- 
tions 15,534-536 

Blacklisting Laws H^ 

Blind Persons in U.S 2o7 

Blue Goose, Order of 581 

B'nai B'rith, Order of 628 

Board of Education. N.Y. City. 808 

" of Elections, N. Y. City. ..772 
" of Estimate and Appor- 
tionment, N. Y. City 772 

Boat- Racing Records 341,379 

Boiling Points °^ 

Bolivia, Army of 414 



PAOX 

Brotherhood of Red Diamond. 644 

" of St. Andrew 544 

Buckwheat, Production of 240 

Buddhism 631,632 

Building and Loan Associations. 

Statisticsof 247 

•* Commissioners, Society. . .648 
Buildings Height of, inN Y..817 
Bulgaria Statistics of ,15,264, 414,421 

Bullion, Value of Silver 268 

Bureau of Buildings, N. Y 771 

" of Fisheries 174 

*' of Licenses 771 

" ofMines.U.S 101 

" of Public Buildings.... 771, 806 

Bureaus ot Labor 120 

Bushel Weights , 81 

Business Failures in U. S.. .101,278 
Butter 156,232,239,242 

C 

CabFabesin Manhattan.. . .794 

Cabinet Officers Since 1789 682 

♦' of President Taft 444 

Cables, Submarine 188 

Cable Telegraph Rates 189 

Calendar for 200 Years 37 

" Greek and Russian. ....•,. 38 

•• Gregorian .....'i. 30 

" Jewish 38 

" Mohammedan 38 

" Monthly for 1913 .39-50 

" Ritualistic 38 

Calendars for 1913 and 1914 35 

' ' Ready-Reference. , 36-37 

Call fornia ElectionReturns . . . .723 



Statistics of 264,421,443 .^jjuunja. Dominion of 264,440 

Bonapartes, American •'42 Canadian Sports 323 

Bonapartists <. 428 Canal, Board, N.Y. State 676 

Bonded Debts of States 26o " Panama 15,133-136 



Bonds, Government 262 

Books, Maps, Engravings, Etc. 230 

" Postage 108 

** Production of 580 

" of 1912 673-679 

Boots and Shoes 232 

Borax Production 246 

Borough Presidents, N.Y 

Botanical Gardens in N. Y 776 

" Society 672 

Bonrbon-Orleauist Family 428 

Bowling 368 

Boxing 330-333,393 

Boycotting Laws 119 

Boy Scouts 487 

Brandy, Production of 249 

Brazil, Army and Navv of 414 

" Statistics of ^64, 421,443 

Brazilian Battleships 420 

Bread and Bakeries 232 

Brethren, Number of 532 

Brewers' Ass'n, U.S 248 

Bridge Dept., N. Y. City 771 

Bridges, N. Y. City.'. 800 

Brigadier-Generals, U. S. A.449,452 

B' rith Abraham Order. ... 528 

British Armv 414,432 

" Battleships 415 

" Colonies 264. 429, 433 

** Courts of Tiaw 431 

** Diplomatic Intercourse. . . 

433,502 

«« Dukes 434 

•* -Empire**Statistics.'2'64', 421,429 

" Government 431 

" Measures and Weights 82 

" Ministry 431 

" Navy 414,415,432 

" Parliament 434 

" Population 421,429.435.439 

" Railway Accidents 218 

" Ro.val Family 422,430 

Bronchitis, Deaths from 254,255 

Brooklyn Inst. Arts, Sciences.. 776 

" Navy Yard 817 

Brotherhoodof Am. Yeomen. .628 
" of Andrew and Philip 544 



Canals 187 

Cancer, Deaths from. ..254,255, 256 

Capitals, Foreign 421 

«' of States 672 

Capitol, U. S 88 

Captains, U.S. Army 449 

" Navy 470 

Cardinals, College of 15,534 

Carnegie Corporation of N. Y . .561 

" Family ^ 641 

" Foundation for Advance- 
ment of Teaching 561 

'■' Hero Fund 561 

'• Institution 561 

Carriages and Wagons 232 

Carrying Trade, United States, 

Foreign 226 

Cars. Railroad 221,232 

Casualty Insurance in U. S 292 

Catholic Benevolent Legion. ..528 

" Bishops 15,634 

' ' Churches in N. Y .City.787-792 
•* Church Extension Soc. .546 

•' Education Ass'n 645 

" Foreign Mission Soc 545 

" Knights of America 628 

" Missionary Union 546 

" Mutual Benefit Ass'n.... 628 

" Roman, Hierarchv 634 

' ' School Board , N. Y ..680 

'* Societies, Federation of 645 

" Summer School 569 

Catholics, Number of. .531,632, 535 

CatskiU Aqueduct 824 

Cattle, in U. S 100,239,241 

Cavalry, Army 457 

Cement Production 246 

Cemeteries 830 

*• National 434 

Census Board .N.Y. City 772 

" Officials, U.S 685 

" U.S 132,196,656-668 

Central America Statistics 

264,443 
" and S ou th American 

Trade 443 

Centre of Population 663 



General Index — (Jontlmced. 



5 



PAGE 

Cereal Crops 239 

Certified Public Accountants' 

Examiuat ions 161 

Chagres, Society of the 172 

Cbamberlain, N, Y. C'itj- 771 

Chamber ot Comiuerce, N. V. .801 

U.S... 172 

Champagne Statistics 249 

Charities Board, N. Y 675 

•* and Correction Confer- 
ence 547 

" Dept. , N. V. City 772 

Chaulauqiia Institution 603 

Checkers 337 

Checks and Notes 296 

Cheese 232,289,242 

Chemical Industry Society 572 

Chemicals Manufacture oi.. 232, 239 

" Production of 246 

Chemistry in 1912 522 

Chess X 394 

Childbitth, Deaths from 254 

Children's Bureau 126 

" Court, N. Y. City 773 

Chile, Arniv and Navy 414 

" Statistics of 264,421,443 

Chilian Battleships. 420 

Chi na, A rea,PopulaLion,etc. 264,421 

" Armj' and Navy 414 

Christian & Mission, Alliance. 541 

" Endeavor Society 543 

" Science 532,533,543 

*• Unity Foundation 541 

Cliristians, Number of 531,532 

Clironological Cvcles and Eras. 29 

Cliurcli Uavsin 1913 29 

" Established, of England. .432 

" Fasts 30 

" ofCod 547 

'* Temperance Society 540 

Churches in the U. S 552 

"in tlie World 551 

♦• N. Y. City 783 

• " Seating Capacity of 533 

Cigars and Cigarettes 156 

Cincinnati. Society of 550-551 

Circuit- Courts of U. S 447 

Citie.s, Commission Govern- 
ment of. 671 

" Death rale of 254 

" Debtof 263.669 

" Finances of 669-670 

* • Largest of tlie JCarth 656 

" of U. S. , Population of 

654-667.669 
' ' of U. S., Statistics of.. 669-670 

CityCourt, N. V 773-774 

" Record, N. Y 772 

CivicAss'n, American 548 

" Education of Womeu, 

League 555 

" Federation, Nafl 127 



PAQK 

Collectors of Customs 446,806 

College Athletics 363 

Benefactions 625,631 

Colors 620 

Commencements 615 

Enrolment 608 

Fraternities 621 

of Cardinals 534 

Presidents , 609-616 

Reference Marks 619 

Tuition Fees. etc 617 

Colleges in N. Y. Citj' 808 

'' of U.S., Statistics 605-620 

Collegiate Athletic Ass'n 191 

Colombia, Statistics 264,414,421,443 
Colonels of U. 8. Army ... .449.452 
Colonial Dames of America.. . .552 

"■ Daughters, Society 553 

" Covernors, British 433 

Wars, Society of 559 

Colorado ]!:iection Returns 724 

Color Chart 770 

Colored Masonic Bodies 525 

" Population 661 

Co m e ts 56, 59 

Commanders, U.S. Navy 471 

Commerce Court, U. S 143 

and Labor, Department 

of 445, 684 

Chamber of, N. Y 801 

" U. S 172 

■ Foreign 225 

of Great Lakes 229 

of New York 821 

Commission Government of 

Cities in U. S 671 

on Industrial Relations. ..125 

Commissions, Railroad 199 

Committee.s, National 700-703 

■ State Democratic 700 

"' Repnl)lican 701 

Commoditie.s.W'sale Prices of .280 

Common Schools, U. S 607 

Commons, House of 434 

Commonwealth of Australia. .439 

Compound Interest Table 85 

Com pt rol ler' s Office, N . Y 771 

Concerts 502 

Confectioner J' Manufactures.. 232 
Confederacy, U'ted JJaughters.557 
Confederate States, Army and 

Navy Society 554 

" Veterans 557 

" Camp 399 

Conference for Education in 

South 603 

Confucianism 531 

Congo State 264,421 

Congregational Churches,N. Y. 

City. 783.789 

*• Churches, National Couii 

cil 544 



Urbanizations in U. S 548Congregationalists 531,532 



Civil Action, Arrests in 305 

" Engineers' Societj' 571 

" Lists of Sovereigns 421 

" Service Comm'rs.N.Y. ...675 
" " Comm'r.s, U. S....445 

" " Examination 159 

" N. Y.City 160 

" U. S 158.159 

" War Battles 485 

Claims, U. S. Court of 447 

Clearing-Hou.se Statistics. ..271,777 

Closing of Navigation 77 

Clubs, New York Ci t v 818 

Coal Statistics loo, 244, 246. 248 

Coast & Geodetic Survey,U.S.. 88 

Cocoa 243 

CotTee Production 243 

Coinage at U. S. Mints 269 

" of Nations 266 

Coi ns. Foreign 624 

' ' Foreign, Value of 274 

" Prices Paid for 259 

Coke Production 246 



Congress, Actsof Sixty-second. 514 

" Appropriations by 265 

" on Hygiene and Demog- 
raphy, Int'l 132 

" Librarians of 685 

" Library of 566 

" Party Divisions in 504 

'■'■ Sixty-second 505 

" Sixty-third 509 

" Southern Commercial 463 

Congresisioual Apportionment. 503 
Connecticut Election Returns. 725 
Con.servation of Natural Re- 
sources 148 

Constancy of Employment 830 

Constitution of the U. S 89-93 

Consuls, Foreign, in U. S 493 

N. Y.City 822 

" U. S., Abroad 15,489 

Consular Service Exams 498 

CoMsumplioii, Deaths from 256 

Continents, Statistics of 63 

Contracts, LawQf ,, 305 



PAGK 

Conventions, Political. .., 708 

Copper 100,230,245,246,247,248 

Copyright Law 564 

Corn Crop.Statisticsof . .100,239,241 

Coipners in N. Y. City 771 

Corporation Coimsel,N. Y 771 

Correction Dept., N. Y.City. . .772 
Costa Rica, Statistics. ..264,421,443 

Cost of Food , 515 

of Living 515 

of Membership in Leading 

Exchanges 268 

Cotton Goods. 232,2;;6 

' * Manufactures 230, 232, 239 

" Supply 100,235,236 

Counties, Debts of 263 

'' New York 674 

CountvCourt, New York. 774 

" <1nicers,N. Y.City..* 772 

Countries, Imports and Ex- 
ports 225,226 

" Production of 227 

*' ofthe World 15.421 

Court of Arbitration of TJie 

Hague 129-131 

of Claims , 447 

Commerce 143 

of Customs Appeals 106 

of Honor 528 

Courts, Briti.sh 431 

of New York City 773-774 

" State 678 

State (see each State Elec- 
tion Returns). 

of United States 447 

Cows in U. S 239,241 

Creeds, Population by 531 

Cremation Statistics 267 

Cricket 4o4 

Crimes and Their Penal ties.310-314 
Criminal Courts N. Y.City.... 773 

Crops, Statistics of 236,239 

Cross-Country Runs 387 

Cruisers, United States 473 

Cuba, Commerce of 225 

" Statistics of 142,264,421,443 

Cuban Govermneut 142 

Cubic ISfeasure 80,82 

Cumberland Society, Arm}' — 556 

Curling 348 

Currency Circulation, U.S.. 100. 271 
Customers, America's 20 Best..l.S7 

Custom-House, N. Y.City 8o6 

" " Exammationot 

Baggage 105 

Customs, Collectors, New York 

City 806 

" Court, Appeals. 106 

'* OITicials 446 

" Receipts 279 

Tariir, U. S lb2.279 

Cutlery Manufacture 233 

Cycles, Chronological 2i« 

Cycling Records 400,401 



D 

Dairy PaontTCTS 241 

Dames of the Revolution hhS 

Danish Battleships 419 

Dates, Memorable 15, 34, 35 

Daughters of Confederacy, 

United 557 

" of 1812, United States. 553 

" of Holland Dames 559 

" of Revolution^ 553 

" of the Amer. Revolution. .653 

Daughters of the King 542 

Day of Week.How to Find. ..36-37 

Days Between Two Dates 31 

De'<ifandDumb]\futesin U.S. .257 

Deatli Rol I of 1912 16, 647-650 

" Statistics 2.53-2.^6 

Debtof U.S., Public 100,261 

Debts of Nations 264 

" of States in U.S 263.265 

" When Outlawed 161 

Deceased Persons' Estates 297 



6 



General Index — Continued. 



PAQK 

Declaration of Independence 94-95 
Deeds, Ackuowledgmeut of. ..296 

Deer, Season for tjhootiug 654 

Defective Classes 257 

Delaware Election Retnrns 725 

Democratic Conventions 708 

" Leagueof Clubs 707 

" League, N.y 707 

" National and State Com- 
mittees 700 

" Party Platforms 687-690 

Denmark and Colonies 264,421 

" A rnjy and Navy. 414 

" Ministry 424 

'* Koy a] Fam i I y 425 

Denominations, Religions 531 

Dental Examinations, N. Y.. .. 161 

" Schools in U.S 608 

Deposits iu Banks 

100.253,273,750,751 

Derby, English 337 

Descendants of the Signers 554 

Developed Horse Power 805 

Diabetes, Deaths from 254,255 

1 )ialects 25 

Dialect Society, American 569 

Dickens Fellowship, The 580 

Digestiveness of Foods 281 

Dingley Tariff .102 

Diplomatic Consular Dist — 15,489 

" Jntercomse 499 

Directors of the Mint. 685 

" of U.S. Geological Survey.685 

Dirigible Balloons 413 

Disbursements IT. S. Gov't 279 

Disciples of Christ, Number of. 532 

Discus, Throwing the 360,361 

Displacement of Steamers 183 

Distance and Time from New 

York City 116 

" Projectiles Tlirown 134 

Distances at Sea Level 69 

" Between Cities 116 

"•• to Foreign Ports 184 

Distilled Spirits 232,249 

Di.strlct-Att'y'sOrtice.N.Y.... 773 

U. S 448 

" Courts of U. S 447 

" Leaders, N. Y. City 801 

" of Columbia Gov't 715 

Division of A frica 439 

Divisions of Time 30 

I )i vorce Statistics 306-308 

...772 



Doclc Dept. , N. Y. City 
Domestic Animals iu 

U. S 100,239,241 

" Commerce of Gt. Lakes... li29 

" jMoney Orders 516 

" Hates of Postage 107 

" Weights and Measures. .. 82 

Dominican Hepul)lic 15,421,443 

Dominion of Canada 440 

Dragon, Imperial Order 459 

" Military Order 558 

Drama, The 593-598 

DrauKilic People 599 

Dress Chart, Men's 488 

Drowning, Deaths from 255. 2o6 

Drugs, Di'es, Etc.,Manufact' rs.230 

Druids, Order of 528 

Drv Measu re 80, 82 

Dukes, Table of British 434 

Diuubbells, Records of 360 

Duration of I,ife 63 

Duties, Customs, U. S 102,279 

£ 

Eaglks, Obdkb of. 



PAGE 

Ecuador, statistics of 

264,414,421,443 
Education, Ass'n, Religious. . 538 

" Commissioners of 685 

" Dept. of, N.Y 808 

" General Board 603 

" John F. Slater Fund 603 

" Nat'l Soc. for Broader. . . .603 
" Organizations for Promo- 
tion of 603 

" Southern Board 603 

" St^itistics of 605 

Eggs, Production of 242 

li;gypt. Area, Debt, etc 264, 421 

" International Tribunals. .131 
Eigh t- II on r Labor I^aws . ... 119, 126 
Election, Presidential, of 1916.709 

" Returns 721 

Elections, Board of, N.Y 675 

•' Presidential 709-710,715 

Electoral Vote for President. . . 

710,717 
ElectricalEngineers, American 

Institute 570 

" Machinery 232 

" Progress i n 1912 192-194 

" Society 822 

»' Units 83 

Elect ricLighting 192 

" Power and Transmission . 194 

" Railway Progress 193 

Electro-chemistry 192 

" Metallurgy 192 

Elevated Railroads iu Man- 
hattan 823 

Elks, Order of 528 

Emba.ssies, Secretaries of 492 

" Foreign 492 

Ember and Rogation Daj's 16 

Embezzlements 309 

Emigration from U. S 186 

Employment of Wage Earners.232 

Endurance Records 361 

Engineering 523 

" Education, Society for 

Promotion of 572 

England, see" British." 
** Areaand Population. .429,4.35 

English Derl)v 337 

" Estahlislied Church 432 

" Holidavs 33 

" ]\me. ..'.... 84 

Speaking Religious Com- 

mimities 531 

Enlistment Law, Army 451 

iOniomological Society, Amer. 569 

Euvojs 489 

lOpipha uy 29 

JOplscopal Bishoits »^35 

ICpiscopal iai ls 631 

I'^pochs, Beginning of 29 

I'^pworth League 544 

lOras. Chronological 29 

Esperanto 25 

Estates, Administration and 

Distribution of 297-304 

Estimate Board, N.Y. City 772 

Etiquette, Practical 832 

European Banking Statistics. 

272,273 

" Languages Spoken 63 

" Military Resources 414 

" Ministries 424 

" Railroad Rates 219 

■' Sovereigns 421, 422 

" Civil List 421 



.528 



5 Eu rope, Statistics of 

Eartli, FaclsAbout 62,63| 63,225.421,429,520 

Earthquakes , A reas 68 Evangelists, Number of 532 

Earth's Atmosphere 51, Evening World Bowling 

" Population 63 Championship 388 

Easter in 1913 29 Events, Historical 34,35 

•' Tableof Dates 3l| '' Recordof, 1912.. 16. 257,643, 646 

Eastern Star, Orderof 528 Examinations, Regents 161 

Eclipses iul913 55| iOxchange of Clean ug Houses,. 271 

Ecouomic Ass' u, American 569 Exchanges in N. Y' 813 



PAQIC 

Excise Dept.. N.Y. City 676 

Executions, Legal 314, 702 

Exempt Property, N.Y'.C 828 

Expenditures, U. S. Govt. .. 100,279 
Experience Table of Mortality.292 

Exports 100, 223,224, 225-227, 443 

Expositions 16, 651, 653 

ExpressOlHcesiuN.Y'. City. . .fi2 

" oil Railroads 201-216 

' ' Companies, Reports of 243 

F 

Facts abodt thk Eakth ... 63 

Failures iu U. S 101,278 

Famous Old People of 1913 616 

Farmers' National Congress. 498 

Farm Statistics in U. S 100,239 

Fast Days 30 

Fastest Ocean Passages 184 

" Train Records 220 

Fatalities in Manhattan 827 

Federal Council of Churches 

of Christ 638 

" Employer's Liability 

Commission. 631 

" Employes 159 

" Government.... 444 

" Impeachments. 630 

" Odicers in N. Y. City 806 

•' Offices in U.S 159 

Federation of American Zi- 
onists 544 

" of Catholic Societies 545 

" of Labor,Americau 121 

" of Women's Clubs 653 

Feeble- ::Miuded 257 

Females in U.S 661 

" Proportion of * 63 

Fencing 389 

Fermented Liquors 156.249 

Ferries from New York City. . .805 
Ferromangane.se Production.. .247 

Fertilizer I ndustry 231 

Fiction In 1912 573-579 

PMeld Athletics 3.53 

"• Family 639 

" Omcers U.S. Army 457 

Finance Dep't. N. Y. City 771 

Finances of Larger Cities. ..669-670 

" of N.Y. City 828-829 

'* of Nations .264 

Fine A rts Commission 586 

Finland 264 

Fire Dept..N.Y. City 813 

" Insurance Statistics... . 293 

" Marshals. State 294 

" Rules, iu Case of 294 

Fires,Loss by, iir United States.293 
Fisheries, Commissionei*s of. . .685 

'• of U.S 174 

" U.S. Bureau of 174 

Fishing, Open Seasons lor. 654-655 

Flag, National 93 

Flags, Storm&Weather Signal.. 72 

Flaxseed Crop 289 

Florida Election Returns 726 

Flour 232,240 

Flowers, State 289 

Fly and Bait Casting 393 

Folklore Society, American. . .^70 

Food, Digestiveness of. 281 

" Facts in N. Y'. City 653 

• ' Law, Pure 154 

" Nutritiveness of 156 

" Prices of 280,653 

Football Casualties 406 

' ' J tecords 339, 406 

Force of Gravity 60-62 

Foreign Hank Statistics ...272,273 

" Boru Population 668 

" Candying Trade, U. S 226 

Championships 356 

Coins, Value of 274 

Colleges 624 

Commerce 228 

ConsulsinN. Y. City 822 

Consuls in U. S 493 



General Index — Continued. 



PAQK 

Foreign Countries, Exports and 

1 uiports 227 

" Embassies in U.S 492 

'* liegatiousiu Q. S 492 

" Mails 112-114 

'* Ministries 15.424 

•'■ Missions, American Board 542 

•• Money Oidei-s 114 

" Moneys 83 

•' Sliippmg 177 

'* Trade ot tlie U. S 223,226 

" Wars, Military Order of.. 654 

Foresters, Order of 528 

Forestry Statistics 145-148 

" Division Chiefs of 685 

Forts,N. Y. City 803 

" in U.S 461 

Forty immortals 586 

Fonndere and Patriots of 

America 559 

Foundries, Manu factures 232 

Foundry and Machine Shops.. 233 

Fourth of July Accidents 186 

France and Colonies 264,421 

" Army and Navy 414,436 

'* Diplomatic Intercourse. ..500 

" (Government of 436 

" lliilers of 422 

Fraternal Brotherhood 528 

" Organ! zations...T 527-530 

" Union of AmeriQ^ 528 

Fraternities, College. 621 

Freenia.sonry. 524,525 

Free Sons of Israel 529 

" Thinkers, Number of.... 531 

Freezing and Fnslng Points 86 

Freight Trartic Movement 226 

Frencli Academj' 586 

" and Indian War 502 

" liattleships 417 

" Ministry 424 

" Pretenders 429 

" Uevolutionary Era 34 

Friends ChuVch. Number of.. .532 

Fruits,. Production 239 

Fnnnel Marks of Steamers... 184 
Furniture Manufacturers 232 

ii 

Game Laws 654-655 

Uas, lUum'ating and Heating. 232 

" Production 232 

Oasoline Production 245 

General Appraise rs,U. 8 806 

'* J'JdiicatioM Board 603 

" Land Office Commission- 
ers 686 

Generals, U. S. Armj' 449,452 

<Jeodetic Survey 88 

Geograi)hic Board, U. S 118 

•• Society, National 572 

Geographical Kesearch 519 

" Society! American 570 

Geological Society of America. 672 

'* Strata 65 

Geology 522 

cieometrical Progression 84 

George Washington Memorial 

Association 554 

Georgia Election Ueturns 726 

(J!!rman Army and Navy. 414, 436 

" Battleships ....416 

" J)i plomaticInterconr.se. . .500 

'• Empire 264,421 

" (government 436 

" ivrniistry.... 424 

" Jtoyal Family 426 

(lifts, see "Benefactions." 

(iin. Production of 249 

(ilass Manufacture 231 

(ileaners. Order of 529 

(Joatsin U. S 239,241 

Goelet Family 640 

(Sold Certificates, U.S 100, 269 

" Coined 100 

" in Circulation 100,266,267 

" Mines, Product .....266 



PAGK 

Gold, Premiums on 272 

" Production of 100,247,266 

" Source of, in U. S 267 

Golden Cross, Order of 529 

Golf 335 

Good Friday in 1913 29 

" Templars, Order 526 

Gould Family 633 

Government, City of N. Y 771 

" N.Y. State 675 

" Securities 262 

Governments of the World 423 

Governors of New York 680 

" of States in U.S 673 

Grain Production of U.S 238 

'* Receipts 229 

Grand Armj'of the Republic 486 

Grapes, Production of 239 

Gravitj', Force of 60,62 

" Specitic 86 

Great Britain, see "British." 
Greece, Army and Navy of. 414,420 

" Statistics of 15,264.421 

Greek Calendar for 1913 38 

" Church Adherents 531 

" Royal Family 425 

" Weights and Measures 83 

Gregorian Year 30 

Guam 140,421 

Guatemala, Stat's...->54, 414,491.443 
Gymnastics 348 



PAGK 

Horse Racing Records 337, 390 

Horses 100.239,241 

Hosiery Manufactures 232 

Hospitals, N. Y. City , 795 

Hotel Liquor Licenses, N. Y. . .251 

Hotels in N. Y. City 799 

House of Commons 434 

" of Lords 431,434 

" of Representatives 6C>6, Dlo 

Huguenot Society 569 

Humane Society, American. .54y 

Human Family 63 

Humidity H4 

Hunters' Moon 171 

Hunting and Game I..a\vs. .654-tn5 
Hurdle- Racing Records.... 359,362 
Hurricane Warnings 73 



H 



.794 



Hack and Cab Fakes 

Hague, Court of Arbitration 

129-131 

Halley' s Comet 59 

Hall of Fame 497 

Hammer Throwing Records. ..359 

Hams, Production of 241 

Harness Racing 390 

Harvard Boat Races 341 

Harvest Moon 171 

Have meyer Family 637 

Hawaii 141 

" Commerce with 225 

" Population, etc 421 

Hay~Pauncefote Treaty 136 

Hay, Production of 239,240 

Hay ti, Statistics of ..264, 414.421, 443 
Heads of Governments. .15, 422-423 
Health Dept., N. Y. City 771 

" Officer, Port of NevvY'ork.772 
Heart Disease, Deaths from 264, 265 
Heightof Buildings iuN. Y....817 

" of Mountains'. 63,71 

" of Prominent Points in 

N. Y. City 803 

" and Weight of Men and 

Women 86 

Help in Case of Accidents 296 

Hemp Crop 239 

Heptasoplis, Order of 529 

Hero Fund, Carnegie 561 

Hibernians, Order of 529 

Hierarchy, RomanCatholic.15,534 

High-Tide Tables 74 

Highways, Superintendent 

New York State.. 675 

Hindooism 531 

Historical Ass'n, American . .570 

" Events, Dates of 34,35 

Hockey Records 4o3 

Hog Statistics 241 

Holidays 32,33 

Homes and Asylums in New 
York City 796-797 

" forSoldiers 484 

Homicides lu United States 

255,256,309 

" in Manhattan 827 

Homing Pigeons 384 

Honduras,. statistics o 1. 264. 4^1, 443 
Hook and Ladder Companies 

in New York City 813 

Hops, Production of ... .239 



Ice Manufactured 231 

" Skating 369 

" Y'achting..., 347 

I. C. A. A. A. A. Records 369 

Idaho Election Returns. 728 

Illinois Election Returns 729 

Illiteracy Statistics 604 

Immigration into U. S 185 

" Commissioner, N.Y 8o6 

Impeachments, Federal 630 

" Tatjles 84,85 

Imperial Order of Dragon 459 

Imports 100.223,224,226,227.443 

Income Tax An>endnient 258 

Indebtedness of Nations 264 

Independence Declaration. . 94-95 

India, Government of 433 

" Statisticsof 264,429 

Indian Affairs, Comm'rs of. . .686 

" American 658 

" Commissioners, Board 445 

Indiana Election Returns 730 

Indians. Disbni-sements, U. S.279 
Indoor Athletic Records ..363,362 
Industrial Academy- Sciences. 

Arts, Letters 567 

" Occupations, Population 

Engaged in 123 

'* Relation.s, Commission on. 125 
" Workers of the World.... 124 

fndustriesin U. S 100,2.'52 

Infantile Paralysis 256 

Infant IMortality 256 

Inhabitants of Earth 63 

of U.S., see "Pop- 
ulation," 

Inheritance Laws 297 

Initiative and Referendum — 565 
Injurie.s, Deaths from. .254.255,256 

Insani ty Statistics ^57 

Inspectors of Steam Vessel.s.. . .806 
Insular Possessions of U. S. 139- 141 

Insurance Statistics 290-293 

Intercollegiate Records 263 

" Socialist Society 546 

" Varsity Races 341 

Interest Rates in N. Y. Sav- 
ings Banks 778-779 

*• Tables, Laws 84,151 

Interior Dept. Officials 445 

" Secretaries of the 683 

Internal Revenue Officers. 

N. Y .....806 

" Revenue Receipts 156,279 

Taxes 157 

International Congress on Hy- 
giene and Demography. ..132 

" Labor Unions 121 

" Language 25 

' ' League of Press Clubs. . . .581 
' ' Maritime Conference — 181 

" Money Orders 114 

" Peace Forum T 176 

" Polar Com naiss ion 165 

" Reform Bureau 548 

" Tribuualsof Egypt. ..;.... 131 
lat^rscliolAStic, Records 36) 



8 



General Index — Continued. 



PAGE 

Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion 199,445 

" Commerce Law.... 195 

Intestates' Personal Estate.... 303 

Intimidation Laws 119 

Iowa Election Ketnrns 732 

Ireland, Area and Population, 

429,435 

'• Government of ...431 

Irish Catljolic Beuev. Union. . .529 

Iron and Steel 230,232.245 

" and Steel Tonnage in U.S. 177 
"• Production of.. 245, 246, 247, 248 

I roqnois. Order of 529 

I rrigation Statistics * 149 

Islands, Area of 51 

Italian Battleship.s 418 

" Ooveriunent 15,437 

" Ministry 15,424 

" Roval Family 426 

Italy, Statistics of 264,421 

" Array and Navy of.. .414,43* 
" Diplomatic Intercourse — 501 



Jacobites, Number op 531 

Japan, Area and Population, 

etc... 264, 421 

Japanese Array and Navy. 414, 438 

^^ Battleships 417 

" Government 438 

Jewelry Manufacture 234 

Jewisli Calendar forl913 38 

" Churches inN.Y. City. 783, 790 

" Era 29 

Jews.Nuraher of 16,531 

John F. Slater Fund 603 

Journalism, School of 582 

Judaism 531 

Judgments, Wlien Outlawed . .151 
Jud iciary of New York Ci ty .773-774 

•* of New Vork State 678 

" of State.s. (See Each State 
Election lleiurns. ) 

" of United suites 447 

Julian Period and Year 29 

Jumping Records 359 

Jupiter, Planet 29,62 

Jurors, Commissioner, N.Y... .772 

Jury Dnty,N. V.City 803 

Justices of N. Y. State 678 

" of the U.S. Supreme Court 
Sincel789 684 

" of U. S. Supreme Court. . . .447 
Justice, U. S. Department of. . .445 

K 

Kansas Ef-ection Returns. 733 
Kentucky Election lleturus. ..734 

Khiva, Statistics of 421 

King's Daughters and Sons 542 

Knights and Ladies of Honor.. 529 

" and Ladies of Security 525 

" of Columbus 529 

" of(jolden Eagle 529 

" of Honor 529 

" Of Labor 123 

'* of Maccabees 529 

" of ISfinta 529 

" of Pythias..: 527 

" of Roval Arch 529 

'• 'j;emplars 525 

Knotsand Miles 83 

Korea, Statistics of 264,421 

L. 

Labor Commission, N. Y. 

Static 675 

LaborDept., N.Y. City 772 

" Information 119-124 

Lacrosse Records 35() 

Ladies' Catholic Benev. Ass' n 529 
Ladies of the Maccabees of the 

World 529 

Lake Champlain Association... 658 

» Mohouk Conference 547 



PAGEi 

Lakes. Commerce of 101,229 

" Great, Areaof 16 

Land Forces of JCiirope 414 

" Lowest Point 71 

'* Office Commissionei'S 686 

" Offices, U.S .....150 

Land.s, Public, in U. S 150 

fjanguages Spoken 63 

Lard, Production of 241 

Latitude and Longitude 67 

r.,atter-Day Saints 532.539 

Law Courts, N. Y. City 773-774 

'• E.xaminationsiu N.Y. ...... .161 

•* ^f Contracts 305 

" Sciioolsiu U.S 608 

Lawn Tennis Records 15.379 

Lawyers' Club, N. Y. City.... 806 

Lead 232,246,247 

r^eaders. District, N. Y. City.. 801 
League of American Munici- 
palities 548 

Leap Year * — 37 

Learned Societies,Amen' u.569-572 

feather Manufactures 230,232 

Legal Holidays 32 

Legations, Foreign, in U.S. ..492 
Legislation of New York in 



PAGE 

Luxemburg, Statistics of 264 

Lyuchings 314 

M 

Maccabees, Knights of 529 

Machine Shop Products 233 

Mackay Family 637 

Magnetic Declinatiou.s .".... 66 

*' Pole 33 

Magistrates, N. Y. City 773 

Mails, Domestic and For- 
eign 107,112 

Mail Time to Cities 116 

Maine Election Returns.. 737 

Major-Gen' s, U. S. Army. . .449. 452 

Majors, U.S. Army 449,454 

MalesinU. S 661 

Malt Liquors, Statistics 249 

Manufacturers, Nat' 1 Ass'u of..r28 

Manufactures 230-231 

" of Greater N.Y 225 

Marathon and Long Distance 

Races 387^ 

Marble 232,248 

Marine Corps, United States ...483 

" Disasters, 178 

" Engi neei*s. Society 572 

Insurauce 292 



1912 318- 319 Mariner's Measure 82 



..eiter Family 640 Masonry, Sovereign Sanctuary 525 

<euox Library 568 Masons, Colored 525 

.,entinl913 29 " Kniglits Templar.. 525 



" State 315-318 

Legislature, N. Y. State 676 

Legislatures, Pay and Terras of 

Members 673 

•* (See Each State Election 

Returns.) 
" State.When Next Sessions 

Begin 673 

Leiter 
r 

Le 

Letter Carriers, N. Y. City 815 

" Postage 107,112 

Liberia, Statistics of 264, 421 

Librarians of Congress 685 

Libraries, N. Y. City 782 

fjibrarv of Congress 566 

Licen.se Fees i n N. Y. City 826 

" Comm'rN. Y. City........ 772 

Licenses, Bureau of, N. Y.City. 701 

" Number of Hotel 251 

Lifeboat Requirements 181 

Life, Human, Duration of 63 

" Iusurance,ProgressiuTT.S.292 
" " Statistics. ..290-292 

" Saving League, Women 's.175 

•• " Service 174,175 

Lifting Records 360 

Light- House Service 176 

Lightning, Lo.ss bj' 73 

fiimitatioiis. Statutes of 151 

Lincoln National Memorial 98 

Lincoln's Gettysburg Speech.. 88 

Linear Measure 80 

Liquid Measure 80.82 

Liquor 



Maritime Conference, Inter- 
national.^ 181 

Marriage and Diyorce 306-308 

Marshals, United States. 448 

Mars, Planet 29,62 

Maryland Election Returns 737 

Masonic Grand Lodges, 
U. S 524,525 



Dealers in U. S 

" Stat' tiCR.156,232. 249,250,252 

Literature in 1912 573-579 

Live Stock on Farms, U. S. 239,241 
Loan and Trust Co' s. Statisiics.270 

Locomotives 221 

London Ollicials & Population..435 
Long Distauce Races 387 

"■ Measure 82 

Longitude Table 67 

Lords, Hou.se of 431 

Lorillard Family 641 

FjOuisianaElectionReturns 736 

Loyal Americans of the Re- 
public 529 

" Legion, Military Order 556 

•• Order Moose 529 

Lumber in U. S 145,232,233 

Lutheran Churches in N. Y 

City 784,790 

Lutherans, Number of. ...531,532 
Luther League of America 232,538 



Royal Arch 525 

" Scottish Rite 524 

Massachusetts I'Uection Ret' ns.738 
Material.?, Tensile Strength of. 87 
Mathematical Society, Amer. .570 
Mayflower Descendants Soc. ...554 
Mayors of Cities in U.S... .669-670 

' ' of New Yqrk Ci ty 680 

Measures, Ancient Greek and 

Roman 83 

" Domestic 82 

'' Metric System of 79-81 

" Newspaper 84 

" Used in Great Britain ... . 82 

" Water 87 

Meat Packing Industry 234 

Mechanical Engineers, Ameri- 
can Society 571 

Medal of Honor Legion 555 

Medical Assn.. Southwest 572 

'• Examinations, N. Y 161 

" Sclioolsin U, S 608 

•' Signs and Abbreviations 82 
Medicine, American Academy. 569 

249; Medico Legal Society. 572 

252 Membership in Leading Ex- 
changes, Cost of 268,272 

Memorable Dates 15,34 

Meningitis, Deaths from 255 

Men in United States 661-662 

Mennonites, Number of 533 

Men's Dress Chart 488 

Mei'chant ^^arine 177 

" Naviesof the World .177 

Mercurv, Planet 29,62 

Metals, Production of...247,248,26» 

Methodist Bishops 536 

" Churches in N.Y. City.784, 790 

Methodists, Number of 531.533 

^tetric System 79-81 

Metropolitan Ass' n Champion- 
ship 354 

" Museum of Art 776 

Me.^ico. Army and Navy of — 414 
" Statisticsof. 234,421,442,443 

Mica, Production of 246,248 

Michigan Election Returns. ... ,739 



Ge7ieral Indem — Continued. 



9 



Mileage of Railroads. . 






Mile, English 84 

Miles, Knots and 83 

Militarj- Academy of U. S 467 

" Arms 460 

" Aviation 407 

" Departments, U. S 459 

" Kdncational System 15,464 

Older Foreign Wars 554 

Ijoyal [,eirion 556 

of the Dragon 558 

" " of the Serpent 42u 

'• Resonrces of Kiirope 414 

Militia in N.Y. City 831 

'• Naval 480 

'• of the States 465 

MilkProdnction 239,242 

Millionaires, American. ...632-641 

Mineral Oils 2-30 

'" Products of U. S. ..246,247,248 

Mines. U. S. Bureau 101 

Minimum. Weiglit of Produce. 81 

Mining Industries 2;^ 

Ministers, Foreign, in U. S 4:^2 

" of European Countries 424 

" U.S., Abroad 489 

Ministries of European Coun 

tries 15.424 

Minnesota I'^iection Returns 741 

Mint, Directors of 685 

Mints, Coinage of 269 

Superintendent of 446 

Missionary Education Move- 
ment. 539 

Mis.sions, Am. Board Foreign. 542 

Mississippi Flection Ret' ns 742 

Missouri Election Returns 743 

Model License League 681 

Modern Historic Record 

As.sociation 548 

" Year 72 

Mohammedan Calendar 38 

Moliammedanisni 531 

Molasses 232. 239 

Monarchies and Republics 63 

Monetary Statistics 266-269 

Money in C'irculation li;0,271 

" Orders 517 

I\roneys, Foreign 83 

Monitors, TT. S 473 

Monroe Doctrine 97 

]\rontaua Election Returns 744 

Montenegro, Statistics of 15, 421 

Monthly Calendars iorl9l3 ..39-50 

" Wage Table 85 

Monuments in N. Y. City 781 

Moon, Eclipses of 55 

" Information About ..,,..39-53 

^foonlight Chart forl913 53 

Moon's Phases in 1913 62 

Moose, Order of 529 

Moravians in LT. S 533 

Morgan Family 637 

Morocco, Statistics of 264,421 

Mortality, American Experi- 
ence, Table of 292 

" Statistics 253-256 

Mothers' Day 258 

IStotor Boat Records 379 

Motorcycle l^ecords 351 

]\rou II tains. Highest... .* 63,71 

Mount Vernon Ladies' Associa- 
tion ...555 

Mulesin U. S 100.239,241 

Municipal and Civic Organiza- 
tions 548 

" Civil Service Comm'rs, I 

N.Y^City 772! 

" Courts, N. Y. City 774 

" Statistics 771 

" Statistics Bureau, N. Y. . .771 
Mimicipalities, Amer. League. 548 

ISlurderers, Punishment of 702 

Murders in U.S 309.314 

Museums, N. Y 776 

Music :688-593 



,200-216,218 Musical People, Ages. etc.. 599 602 



M ystic Ci rcle. Order of 5:i0 

•* Shrine, Nobles 525 

" Workers of the World 530 

N 

Names, Expressive 604 

Naphtha Production 245 

National Academy of Design. .583 

•* Academy of Sciences 57: 

" Arts Club 585 

" Ass' n for Study and Pre 

' vention of Tuberculosis. 572 
" Association for Study of 

Epilepsy 572 

'* Ass' n of Manufacturers.. 128 

" *•* of Postma-sters 467 

" A.ssociation of R. B. 

Commis.sioners 219 

" Association of State Uni- 
versities 562 

" Astrological Society 572 

" Bank Examiner, N. Y. 

City 806 

" -Bank Notes 100,269 

" Bank Statistics 270 

" Baptist Convention 547 

" Cemeteries 484 

" Civic Federation 127 

Collegiate Athletic A.sso 



PAQW 

Naval Jfilitia. 480 

' ' Ollicers, Customs 446 

" Order of the United States. 555 
" Veterans, Nat' 1 Ass'n — 565 

Navies of the World 414 

" Cost of Maintaining 665 

Navigation, Opening & Closing. .77 

Navy Aviation ^ 407 

'• British 414.432 

" Captains and Command- 
ens 470-471 

" Chaplains, U.S ...468 

" Dep't Disbursements. .100,279 

" Department OlHcials 444 

" Flag Ollicers 4i!2 

" League of the U.S 46o 

" Olljcials, r.i.st U. S 444 

" Pav Koll 480,481 

" Rank of Ollicers 469,477 

" Recruiting Service 477 

'• Retired f^ist 469 

" Secretaries of the 683 

*• Uniform, Protection of . . .414 

" United States 414,469 

" U. S.,Ve.ssels 472.478 

" Y'ards, United States . .479. 817 

Nebra.ska Election Returns 745 



Necrology of 1912 16,647 

Negro Disfranchisement 26 

'* Population 661 

ciation 19l!Negroesin N. Y. City 825 

Com. onPrison Labor 572 Nepaul,. Statistics 421 

Conference of Charities JNeptune, Planet 62 

and Correction 547'Ne.storians, Number of 531 

Corn Exposition 651 Netherlands and Colonies.. 264, 421 



Council of Congrega 

tioual Churches 544 

Dem. League of Clubs 707 

Encampments, G. A. R. 

Flag 93 

Ceograpliic Society 572 

German- American Alli- 
ance 173 

Grange Patrons of Hu.s- 

bandry 149 

Guard 465.831 

Highways Protect. Soc. 15.549 
Home J)isable<l VolunCs,484 
League for Civic Educa- 
tion of Women 555 

jrodel License League 581 

Municipal and Civic Or 

ganizations 548 

'• League 548 

Parks 144 

Probation Association 314 

Progressive Republican 

League 459 

Pure Food Law 154 

Reform Ass'n 186 

Republican League 707 

Rivers and Harbors Con- 
gress 653 

Sculpture Society 584 

Society for Broader Edu- 
cation 603 

Sl»i ritualists' Association. 543 

Statuary Hall 2*9 

Temperance Society 308 

Union 530 

Unions, Labor 123 

W.C. T.Union 541 

Women' s Life -Saving 

League i.l75 

Nations, Indebtedness of 264 

Wealth of 264 

Natural History, Museum 776 

Naturalists' A nierican Societ.v.571 
Naturalization Laws of United 

States 153 

Naval Academy of U. S 482 

"• and Military Order, Span- 



Army and Navy 414,419 

Ministry 424 

Royal Famil3' of 426 

486' Nevada Flection Returns 746 

NewEnglandOrder Protection. 530 
" Hattipshire Election Re- 
turns 747 

" .Jersey Election Returns.. 746 

" Mexico Election lJeturns.747 

Newspaper Measure, Standard. 84 

" Postage 100 

" Statistics 101, 6S1 

N. Y. CitvBudget 718 

" "■ Catholic Sch'l Board .580 
" " Chamber of Com- 
merce... 801 

" " Civil Service 160 

" " Clearing- House 271 

" " Financesof 828 829 

" " Government 771 

" " Information Begins.. 771 

" " Judiciary 773-774 

*' " INIanufactnres 225 

" " Pop' n.. 656,666,667,670, 812 

" " Public Library 5H8 

" " TuiMiels 223 

New York Board of Charities. .675 
" " Counties, Order of 

Creation 674 

" " Counties, Politicaland 

Judicial Divisions . .674 
" " County Lawy's Ass' n.825 
" " Democratic League.. ..707 

" " Election Returns 748 

" " Electrical Society 822 

" " Government 675 

" " Judiciary 678 

" " Legislation in 1912.318-319 
Pub. Service Comm. I'd 

State Courts... 6.8 

" Legislature 676 

" " " Officers 675 

" " " Probation Com. 388 
" " Stock Exchange... 268-272 

" •• Water Suppiv 824 

" '' Zoological Society.... 5'(2 
Tew Zealand 264 






ish-American War 560;Nicaragua... 264,414,421,443 



Architects, Society of 572 

Enlistment 477 

History Society 171 



Nickel Production 247 

Niglit Signals on Steamers 184 

Nobel Prizes 15.562 



10 



General Index — Continued. 



PAGE PAGE 

Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. ..525 Peanut Crop 239 

Non-Smokers' L.eague 258 Penalties for Usury 151 

North America, Population of. 63j " "Crimes 310-314 

" Car. Election Keturns 752 Pennsylvania IIlect'nlteturn.s.To? 



'• Dakota Election lletnrns..753 
Northern Baptist Convention. 547 

Northfield Conferences 603 

Norway Army and Navy.. 414, 419 



Pension Agencies 445 

Commissioners 685 

Law of 1912 165 

Statistics 166-167.279 



Mi nist ries 424 Pensions, Railroad. 



.219 



Statistics of 264,421 

Norwegian Royal Family 427 

Notes, Promissorv 296 

" When Outlawed 151 

Novels of 1912 573 

Numerals, Roman and Arabic. 85 

Numismatic Ass'n 260 

" Society 571 

Nurses, Registration of 161 

Nurse Training Schools 608 

Nutritiveness of Foods 155 

O 

Oat Crop Statistics 239. 241 

Obituary Roll of 1912 16,647 

Objects Visible atSea-Level. .. 69 
Occupations, Population En- 
gaged in Industrial 123 

Occurrences During Printing. 15 
Ocean, Marine insurance 292 



Oceans, Depth of 63 

Odd Fellowship 526 

Ohio J'JIectior. Returns 754 

Oils, Manufactures 230 

Olilalionia Election Returns. . .755 

Old People of 1912, Famous 646 

Oleomargarine 156 

Olympic Meets 382,386 

One Hundred Years Asro 642 

" '♦ " of Peace.. 652 

Onion Production 239 

Opening of Navigation 77 

Opera, The 588-593 

Optometry Examinations 161 

Order of Washington 554 

Oregon Election Returns 756 

Ores and Minerals 246,247,2^8 

Organization of the Army 451 

Oriental Societ}', A merican 571 

Orioles, Order of 530 

Orleanist Family 428 

Ornithologists' Union, Amer.. .571 

Owl'5, Order of 530 

Oxford-Cambridge Boat Races.342 

P 

Pacing Recorus 390 

Painting and Sculpture 583 

Palm Sunday in 1913 29 

PanamaCanal. 15.133- 136 ,264,421,443 
" Zone. ...!.. ..134,138 

" Exposition 652 

Paper and Wood Pulp .232 

" Manufactures 230,232 

" INIeasure '. 82 

Paradin,...* 2;J0,245 

Parairnay, Statistics of. 264. 421, 443 

Paralysis, Deaths from 2">o 

Parcels Post 115 

Parks, National 144 

" New York City 802,826 

Parliament, Rritish 434 

Parochial Schools N. Y. City.. .580 
Party Divisions in Congress. 504 

" Platforms 687-699 

Passport Regulations 152 

Pastorsof Churches N.Y.Cit V. 783 
Patent Ollice Procedure. . .168-169 
Patents, Commissioners of 6S5 

" Issued 101 

Patriotic Order Sons of Amer' 555 
Pawnbrokers' RegulationH,XY.816 
Peace and Arbitration, League, 

A mer 1.38 

Peace Forum, International... 175 

" Society, American 825 

Peach and Pear Crop 239' 



Per Capita Statistics 100, 266 

Periodic Comets 56 

Periods, Chronological 29 

Perry's Victory Exposition 651 

Persia, Statistics of 264,421 

Personal Estate. Distribution.. 303 

" PropertyinU. S 265,669 

Peru, Anrly 414 

" Statisticsof 264,421,443 

Petroleum 100, 232, 245, 246, 2t8 

Pharmacy Schools iu U.S 608 

Phi Beta Kappa 622 

Philippine Area and Popula 

tion 139,421,672 

'* Commerce 225 

" Islands 139,264 

Philippines, Weights 82 

Philosopliical Society, Am 571 

Phonograph Industry 232 

" ■ ' .571 

.816 



Passages, Fastest 184 Physical Societj', American 

Steamers 182-184 Piers, New York City.. 



Pig Iron Production.. ..100.245,247 

Pigsou Farms U. S .2;i9,241 

Pilot Conimissioners 772 

Pistol Records , 402 

Planetary Con tigu rations, 

1913 55 

Planets 29, 54 

Plant Industry ,U. S.Bureau ot.l49 

Platforms, Poll tical 687-669 

Platinum Production 247 

Plays 593-598 

Pneumonia, Deaths from.. 

254,255,256 

Poisons, Antidotes for 295 

Polar Commission, Interna- 
tional 165 

" Regions, Area and I'opu- 

lation 63 

Discoveries 517.520 

Pole Star, Mean Time 01 Tran- 
sit 54 

Pole Vaulting 359,361 

Police Dept.,N.Y. City 819 

Political ana Social Science 

Academy 569 

Political: 
Apportionment of Congres 

sional Representation 503 

Assembly. New York 676 

Cabinet of President Taft 444 

Committees 700- 703 

Commission Government of 

Cities in U. S 671 

Congress of United States.505, 509 

Conventions 708 

Divisions in Congress 504 

Election Returns 719{^ 

Federal Government 444 

Governoi-s ofStates 673 

House of Representatives.506,610 

Legislature, New York l 

676,687-689 

Legislatures of States 673 

Mayors of Cities in U. s 680 

National Democratic League 

of Clubs 707 

" Republican League,C)f 

U.S 707 

New York Democratic 

League 707 

" State Gov't 675 

Party Platforms 687-689 

Pay and Terms of Legislators.673 
Presidential Election of 1916.709 
" Elections (1789-1912). 

708,710,715 



PAQB 

Political— CtonMntfed. 

Platforms National j. 687-699 

President' s Salary 709 

Prohibition PartyCommittee.703 
Publicity of Contributions ...138 

Qualifications for Voting 704 

Registration of Voters 706 

Senate, New York 676 

" U.S 505,5(t9 

Socialist Labor Party Com. . .7(3 

" Party Committee 7(3 

" Vote 513 

State Elections, When held ..673 

Votes of States 719 

Polo 3i» 

Polytheism 531 

Pool Records 392 

Pope Pius X 534,535 

Popular Vote, President... 710,717 
Populatiou : 

Africa 63,4.39 

All Countries 15,63.421 

America (British) 429 

Asia 63,429 

Australia 429 

Briti.sh Empire 429 

By Geographical Div. in U.s.608 

U.S 658 

By Race, Nativity and Par- 
entageinU. S 661 

^-*j *^e-V •••••••••«•. .••■•».,,,,, .noli 

(Canada 4JI 

Centre of .....!. 663 

Cities of U.S 656,664 669 

Colonial and Revolutionary 

Period 660 

Cuba. 1J2 

Earth, byContineuts 63 

" hyRace 63 

Foreign Born, Male 668 

" Abroad 656 

Foreign Con n tries 16, 421 

" Parentage in U.S 661 

Gt. Britain and Ireland. 429, 435 
Incorporated Places in 

United States 664-667 

Indian inU.S 558 

Industrial Occupations, By. .123 

Largest CI ties of Earth 656 

J^ondon 435,6.56 

Males of Voii ng Age 668 

IMe.xico ;..421 442 

Negroesiu U. S !661 

^^ " ^^ inN. Y.CIty 82-:. 

New York City.... 656, 666, •}7(),812 
One Hundred Largest 

CitieslnU.S 667 

Per Square Mile, U.S 660 

Rank ofStates in U. S.... 662 

United States 100,266 

by Slates 657 

Urban iind 

Rural 669 

Pork, Production of 241 

Porto Rico 140.225,421,672 

Ports of World, Commerce 228 

Portugal and Colonies 264,421 

' " Army and Navy..'. ...414,420 

Portuguese Government .438 

Port Wardens, N. Y. City. .772 

Postal r n formation 107-115 

Savings Banksin N.Y.Cit v815 

Savings System 117 

" Telegraph Co 190 

Postmasters-tieneral, List of. .683 

' National Assn 467 

" of Cities in United States. .446 
Post-Oftice Dep' t OHicials. . 446 

;; N.Y. City 814,815 

r, . . .. 'Statistics 101,516 

PotatoCrop in U. S 239 

Poultry and Eggs, Production. 242 
Precious Metals, Statistics.. 

247,248,268 

Premiums on Gold 272 

Pre.sbyterian Assemblies 537 

" ChurchesiuN.Y.City.785,79l 



General Index — Oo7itinued. 



IV 



PAQK 

Presbyterians, Niimberof. .531, oXJ 

President, Title and Term 715 

President-Elect, How Noti- 
fied 16 

Presidents of tlie U. S 712 

" of tlie U. S. Senate 68] 

" Salary 709 

Presidential Cabinet 444,684 

" Election of 1916 709 

" Elections 709,710,715 

" Primaries 719 

** Succession 714 

" Vote 708,710 

Press CI libs. League 581 

*' Statistics ot 581 

Prices of Commod'ities. 280 

' ' of Leading Stocks 275 

•' Paid for Coins 259 

Primary Elections 719 

Printed JMatter, Postage 108 

Printing Uliice,U.S 172 

" Industry, U. S 232,579 

Prison Association of N.Y 580 

LaborNat'l Committee. 572 
Prisoners' Co ninuitaliouTable.30S 

'* in United States 831 

Prize Fighting Jlecords. ...330,393 
Probation Association, Nat' 1.. 314 

Procreation Commission 258 

Prodnce.Minlmnnx Weig}itsoi. 81 

Production, Countries of 227 

Professional Schools in U. S. ...608 
Progress of United States.. 100-101 
Progressive. National and State 

I Committees 702 

! — " Party Platform 693-697 

Prohibition States 250 

I " National Committee 703 

' " Party Platform 697 

Promissory Notes and Checks. 296 
Propagation of the Faith, Soc. .545 
Property, Valuation U. 8... -265, 669 

" Loss by Fire 2?t3 

Prosecution of Trusts ...15,162,163 

Protected Home Circle 530 

Protestant Episcopal Bishops.. 535 
" " Churches.785,791 

Protestants, Nuujber of 531,533 

Provident Loan Society 816 

Public Administrator, N. Y 772 

" Buildings, N.Y.Citj' 782 

" Debt of Cities in U. 8.669-670 
•' " of States, Cities, 

Counties 263 

•• " ofU. 8 100,261 

' ' Health Ass' n, American. 571 

" " Service.. 173.513 

•' Landsof U. 8 150 

" Roads in U. S... 320 

'* Schools' Athletic League. 372 
•' Schools i u N. Y. City.. 807-811 

• Service Act, N.Y 151 

'• " Com'rs 151,675 

•' Works Dept., N. V. City.. 772 
Publicity of Political Contrib.,.138 
PuDlishing Industry U. S.. .232, 479 

Pugilistic Champions 330,393 

Pupils. School, in U. S 607 

Pu re Food Law 154 

Pytliias, Knights of.... 527 

n 

QciAiaFICATIONS,VOTrNQ 704 

Quarantine, New York 772 

Quicksilver, Production of.. 247, 248 



Race, PopaLATioN by 63 

Races of Mankind 68 

Racquets 350 

Rail roa<l A cci d e n ts. 217, 218, 255, 256 

" Cars, Cost and "Weight 221 

Commissioners 199 

" Nat. Ass' n. 219 

EarningsaDd £xpen8e.201-2l6 



\ ** 



I 



PAQK 

Railroad Employes in U.S 217 

" Equipment 221 

" Expres.ses 201-216 

•' Mileage 200-21t).218 

" onicials 15,200 216 

" Passenger Stations 781 

" Pensions in U. S 219 

" Rates in Europe 219 

'• " Regulation of.. 197-198 

" Speed Records 220 

Railroads, Elevated, in N.Y. 823 

•' Statistics of U. 8 197-2il 

" Stockholders 221 

" Stocks, List 275-278 

Railway Passengers Cariied. . .101 

Hail wars Electric 193 

'♦ "Grouped" by Capital- 
ists 221 

" Operated 101 

Rainfall, Normal, in the U.S.. 70 

'* of Foreign C;ities 71 

Rank of Ollicers, Army and 

Navy 452 

" of States, U.S 662 

Rates of Postage 107 

Ratio of Silver to Gold 267 

Ready-Relerence Calendar.s. 36-37 

Realty and Personally 265,669 

Rear-Admirals, U.S. Navj- 469 

Receipts and Disbui-seinents, 

United States 100,279 

Rechabites, Order of 530 

Record of Events in 1912.16,257,643 

Red Cro.ss, American N at' 1 557 

'"■ Men, Order of 530 

Referendum, Initiative and. ..565 
Reform Association, National .186 
Reformed Churche.s, A lliauce ..587 

" Churches in N. Y 786,792 

" Number of 533 

" Church in America 538 

"• Episcopal Bisliops 536 

Regattas in 1911 341 

Regents Examinations, N. Y.. .161 

" University of N. Y 675 

Registration of Mail Matter . . .111 

'* of Nurses 161 

" of Tratle- Marks 170 

'' of Voiei-s. 706 

Regulation of Railr'dRates.197,198 
Reigning Faniiliesof En rope 15, 425 
Relative Rank in Army 

and Nav.v 452 

Religious Education Ass'n.. .538 

" Statistics 531 

Representatives in Con- 
gress 505,509 

" Salary of 15 

Republic, (ji rand Army of..... ..486 

Republican I>eagiie, National . .707 

" Conventions 708 

'* League, Pro.gre-sive 459 

" National and Stale Com- 
mittees. 701 

" Party Platforms 690-693 

Republics and Monarchies. . .. 63 

Retail Pricesof Food .515 

Retired List, Army 449.451 

" " Navy 469 

Revenue Cutter Service 176 

" of Nations 264 

" Receipts and Taxes ...156,157 
Revennes,U.S.(^overn men 1 100,279 

Revolutionarj'' War 485,502 

Revolver Shooting 402 

Rheumatism, Deaths from.254,255 
Rhode Isl. Election Returns.. .7.i9 

Rhodes Scholarship 567 

Rifle Shooting 336 

Ritualistic Calendar 38 

Rivers, Principal American — 76 

Roads, Public, in U.S 320 

Rockefeller Famil j;; 636 

Roentgen Ray Society 571 

Rogation Days 16 

Roller Skating; 352 



PAGR 

Roman Catholic Churches in 

N.Y. City 787,792 

" Catholic llierarchv 15,534 

" Catholics .^31, 532, 535 

" Era 29 

" Numerals 86 

Roque 389 

Roumania, Statistics of.264, 414, 421 

Rowing Recoi-ds 341 

Itoyal Academy 584 

'• Arch Masons 525 

'' Faniiliesof Eurot)e 425 

" League 5::0 

Rulers of Fiance 422 

of Nations 422,423 

Rules in Case of Fire 2.i4 

Rum, Production of 249 

Running Records .358,361 

Rural Delivery Service 516 

^ Population of U. 8 659 

Ru.ssell Sage Foundation 562 

Russia, Army and Navy. 414,418,436 
'* Diplomatic Intercourse. ..499 

Russian Calendar for 1913 38 

" JOmpire 264,421,436 

" Imperial Family 427 

" Ministry 424 

" Treaty, Abrogation of 1 13 

Rye, Production of 240,241 

S 
Safe Deposit Co.'s in N. Y . .782 

Safety at Sea, IT. 8. Law 180 

Sage Foundation, Russell 562 

Sailing Ships 187 

Salaries of (jovernors 673 

of Members of State Legis- 
latures in U.S 676 

of Representatives iu 

U. 8. Congres.s 15 

of U. S. Cabinet Ollicers . .444 

of U.S. Senators 5o9 

Siilarj'of the President 709 

Saloons iu N. Y. City 251 

Salt 230,246 

Salvador, Statistics. 264,414,421,443 

Sill valion A rmy 533,546 

San Die.go Panama Exp. 1915. . .651 

Santo Domingo, Debt, etc 264 

Saturn, Planet '29, 62 

Savings Ranks of N.Y.Cit3-.778,779 
*' " Statistics of..270,273 

" of Salaried Men 281 

Saxon Royal Family 427 

Scandinavian Soc, American, .515 

Schools In U. 8 607 

" and College Enrolment. ..608 

" Foundation 515 

"• New York City 580,807-8H 

" of Journalism 582 

" o f Pharmacy 608 

'* Parochial 680 

" Professional... 6.!8 

Sciences, Nat' 1 Academy 572 

Scientific Progress in 1912 £21 

Scotland 429.431,435 

Scottish Clans, Order of .530 

"■ Rite Masons 521 

Sculling Champiou.ships 345 

Sculpture , 583 

National Society 584 

Seaports, C reatest 227 

Sea.sons, The 29 

Seating Capacity of Churches. .533 

Secretaries, Cabinet 682 

Secret Service, U.S 98 

Securities, Government 26U 

Seed Planting in U. S 78 

Senaie, N. Y. State 676 

U. S. Presidents pro tem- 
pore. 681 

Senators, Direct Vote 718-719 

U. 8 505,509 

U. S., Salary of 509 

Serpent, Military Order of -^20 

Servian Army 414 



12 



General Index — Continued. 



PAGE 

Servian Royal Family 428 

Servla, Statistics of 15, 264, 421 

Se%'eath Day Adventists.. .632,539 
Seveu Wonders of tlie World. .118 
Sewers, Bureau of, N. Y. City. .772 

Sex Population in U.S 662 

Sliakespearian Table 602 

Sheep ill U. S 100,239,241 

Sheriir, N. Y. City 772 

Sherman Law 164 

Sliield of Honor 530 

Sliipbuildiiigin U. S 177,196 

Sh I ppi iig, A raericau & Foreign. 177 

" Disasters 178.179 

Shooting Records 336,337, 402 

Siiot- Putting Records 359,361 

Siam, Statistics of 264.414,421 

Sidereal Day 30,62 

" Year 30 

Signals, Weather 72-73 

Signers of the Declaration of 

Independence 95 

Silk Manufactures 232 

Silver Bay Association 541 

" Certificates.U.S 100,269 

" Coined 100 

" in Circulation..... 100 

" Mi nes Product 268 

" Production of 100,247 

•• Purchases by U. S 267 

" Ratio toGold 267 

" Sourceof, in U. S 267 

Simple Interest Table 84 

Single Tux 99 

Sinking Fund Comm'rs.N. Y..771 

'' of States .263 

Sixty-second Congress 505 

Sixty- third Congress 15,509 

Skuii Mg Records 369 

Skiing 371 

slater, John. F., Fund 603 

Sini thsonian Institution 563 

Snuff 156 

Soccer Football 339 

Socialist Labor National Com 

mittee 703 

" Party Nat' 1 Committee. . .703 

♦* " Platform 698-699 

" Society Intercollegiate.. .546 

" Vote 513 

Societies in N. Y. City 798 

" Learned 569 

" of War of 1812 552 

Society for Propagation of 

Faith 

'* of American Wars .... 
of the Chagres 



.545 

.555 

172 



PAGE 

Spain, Government of 437 

" Ministry 424 

" Royal Family 427 

" Statistics of 264,421,437 

Spanish War Veterans 560 

Speakers of U. S. House of Rep. 681 

Special Sessions, Ctourt 773 

Specific Gravity 86 

Speed of Railroad Trains 220 

of Steamships 184 

Spindles in Operation 235 

Spirits, Statistics ot 156,249 

Spiritualists, Association 543 

■ Numberof h?A 

Sporting Records 323 

Spring, Beginning of, 1913 29 

Square Measure 80, 82 

Squash Records — 349 

Stage, The 599-602 

Standard Time 30 

Star Table 29,54 

State and Territorial Govern- 
ments 673 

" and Territorial Statistics. 672 
" Banks, Loan & Trust Cos. 270 
" " in N.Y. City.... 777,779 

" Board of Elections.. . .675, 772 

" Capitals 672 

" Committees, Political. 206- 208 

" Dept. Officials 444 

" Fire Marshals 294 

" Flowers 289 

" Labor Bureaus 120 

•• Legislation 315-319 

** Legislatures 

" Militia 465 

" Officers,N. Y 675 

" in N. Y. City 772 

" Officers.. (See Each State 
Election Returns.) 
" Railroad Commissioners. 199 
•• Rank According to Popu- 
lation 662 

" Universities Ass' u 562 

States and the Union , 672 

" Area of 672 

" Debts of 263,265 

Statistical A ss' n , A merican 571 

Statues in Manhattan 781 

Statutes of Limitations 151 

Steam, Temperature of 87 

" Vessel, Inspectors 806 

" Vessels Built loi 

^steamboat Inspection, U.S 75 

Steamship Disasters 178 

steamships from iSf . Y 182-184 



" of The Cincinnati 550 ^'Jf^^.v- ..100,24o,246 

Sociological Society, Amer....571 c-f^^J^ ^^^ ^" HcT^V'-^Vo-iiA 
Solar Day 30 •l^^$,^fp''^"?^-^. Y 268,272 



System 62 

Soldiers' Homes 484 

Solicitors-General, U.S 685 

Sons of America, Patriotic 555 

" of Confederate Veterans ..560 

" of Oneida Society,. . . i 552 

" ofStGeorge 530 

" of the American Revolu- 
tion 551 

" of Temperance 527 

" of the Revolution 551 

" of Veterans, U. S. A 560 

South African Union 439 

" America, Population of ... 63 
" American Armies and 

Navies « 414 

" and Central Amer. Trade.443 
S. Carolina Election Returns.7.59 

8. Dakota Election Returns 760 

SouthernCommercial Congress 463 

" Education Board 603 

" Medical Ass'n 672 

Sovereigns of Europe 421,422 

Spain, Armv and Navy. ...414, 438 

'* Battleships 420 

'• Diplomatic Intercourse... uui 



Stockholders, Railroad .221 

Stocks, Prices of Leading.. .275-278 

Stony Brook Ass'n 538 

Storm Warnings 73 

Strangers' Welfare Fellow 

ship 823 

Street-Cleaning Dept., N.Y.... 771 

" Opening.s. Bureau 743 

St. Andrew, Brotherhood of 544 

St. Vincent de Paul Society 545 

Students in U. S 606,609 

Submarine Cables 188 

Submarines,, U. S 475-476 

Sub-Trea.su ry, N.Y. City 806 

Subway in N. Y 820,822 

Suffrage Qualifications 704 

" Woman 706 

Sugar 232,239,242 

Suicide, Statistics of 253, 254 

Sulphur Production 246,248 

Summer, Begi nuiug of 29 

Sun, Eclipse of 55 

" Mean Distance of 62 

" on Meridian 39-50 

" Rises and Sets 39,50 

Sunday-School Statistics.". 536 



PAGE 

Sunday World Athletic Meets. 377 
Sun's Right Ascension and 

Declination 57-59 

Semi-Diameter and Hor- 
izontal Parallax 59 

Superintendents of Mints 446 

Supreme Court of U. S 447 

'' N. X 678 

Surrogate's Court, N. Y 774 

Surveyors of Customs 446 

Sweden, Army and Navy 414 

Ministry of 424 

Statistics of 264,421 

Swedish Battleships 419 

" Royal Family 428 

Swimming Records 395 

Swine in U.S ;...10O,239,241 

Swiss Government 438 

Switzerland, A rmy of 414 

" Statistics of 264,421 

Syndicalism 124 

T 

Tammany, Society of 559 

Taoism 531 

Tariff Board, The 159 

Rates, U.S 102-104 

Tax Department, N. Y. City . . .744 

" Direct, Receipts of .... 279 

" Income 258 

"• Laws, Inheritance 297 

" Rate, U. S. Cities 669-670 

" Rates of States 265 

" Receiver of, N.Y. City 772 

to 1 1 J g^ 1 (3* • • ■ • • • ••••••••■ • *• ■ ■ • •■•■.■ •?«' 

Taxable Property U. S. Cities. .669 

Taxes, Internal Revenue lo7 

Taxicab Service, N. Y, City 794 

Tea and Coffee 243 

Teachers in U. S. Schools 607 

Technical Schools in U.S 6o5 

Telegraph Statistics 189-190, 193 

Telephone Statistics 190-191,193 

Telescopes 98 

Temperance, Sons of 527 

Temperature of Foreign Cities. 71 

' ' Normal, in U.S 70 

of Steam 87 

Tenement House Dept 772 

Tennessee Election Returns, 

760, 762 

Tennis Records 15,371,379 

Tensile Strength of Materials. . 87 
Territorial Expansion of U.S. .138 
Terri tories of United States.143, 672 

Texas Election Returns 735 

" Land Measure 82 

Theatres, New York City.. 598,775 

Theatrical Runs 593- 598 

Theological Schools in U.S 608 

Theosophical Society, The.. 533,543 

riiermonieters 69 

Thirteenth Armj' Corps Ass'n. 656 
Three Hundredth Anniver- 
sary 653 

TideTables 74 

Timberin U. S 145,233 

Time DilTerence 33 

'* Divisions of 30 

" Measure 82 

Tin, Production of 245,246,247 

Titanic Disaster 180 

Title and Term of President. . .715 
Tobacco Manufacture rs.156,230,232 

" Production of 239,244 

Tonnage, jNlaritime 177 

" of Steamships 182 

Torpedo Boats, U.S 475 

Track and Field Athletics 353 

Trade, (Central & S. American. 443 

'' Foreign, .of U. S 223-224 

*' Marks, Registration.. ..170 
Transatlantic Steamers.... 182. 183 
Trans- Mississippi Commercial 

Congress 825 

Trap Shooting 837 



GcWt^'(il Index — Oontinued. 



13 



tk 



PAQK 

Traveler' s Aid Society 391 

Traveler's Protective Ass' u. ..498 

Treasurersot the U. S 686 

Treiisiiry iJepartmeut Otttcials.444 

" Secretaries ot the b82 

Treaty, Hay- Pauuce fete 136 

■I'rilteof Ben Hur 528 

Trinity Sunday 29 

Triple Alliance 459 

Tripoli 421 

Tropical Year 30 

1 rotting itecords 390 

Trov VVeight 82 

I'rnst Companies 270,780 

Trusts in U. S 282-288 

" Prosecution of. ..16, 162, 163 

Tuberculosis Deaths 254,255 

Tunnels of the World 22*} 

Turl, The American 337,390 

Turkey, Army & Navy of. .414,420 

Turkish Empire 15,264,421 

Tululla 141,421.672 

T w, I ijrh t Tables 39-50 

Typhoid Fever, Deaths. 254, 255, 256 

U 

Union FRATKRXAiiIiEAGirE..530 

" society of Civil War 558 

'* Veteran Legion 558 

Union of South Africa 439 

Union Soc. of Civil War. 558 

, Unions, Ijabor 121,123 

Unitarians, Number of.. ..531.632 
United .A merican Mechanics. . 530 
" Brethren Christian En- 
deavor Union 543 

Christian Churcli.... 540 

Commercial Travellers. .. 630 

Confederate Veterans 657 

Spanish War Veterans 560 

" Workmen, Order of 530 

United States: 

Area 100,421,672 

Army 449 

" in N. Y. City 831 

" PavTable 4t»6 

Assay Omce in N. Y 806 

Assistant Treasurers 446 

Bankruptcy Law 302 

Brewers' Association 248 

Bureau of Fislieries 174 

ofMines lol 

•' of Plant Industry.... 149 

Census 132 

Civil Service 158, 159 

Coast t&Geo'letic Survey 88 

Commerce Court 148 

Constitution 89-93 

Consuls Abroad 15,489 

Courtof Customs Appeals. ..106 

Courts, United States. 447 

" in N. Y. City 773-774 

Customs Duties. 102-ll»4 

Department Officials..444, 682-686 

Di plomatic Intercourse 499 

District- Attorne.ys 448 

Fisheries 174 

Foreign Trade 223 

Forestry Statistics ^145-148 

Forts 461 

Geographic Board 118 

Geological Survey 685 

Government 444 

Printing Office 172 

Industries 100.232 

Insular Possessions 148-150 

InternalRevenueReceipts. . .156 

" Taxes 157 

Interstate Commerce Com. 445 

Judiciary 447 

Land Ollices 150 

Law for Eight Hours' Work 

per diem 126 

Life-Saving Service 174.175 

Light- House Service 176 

Manufactures. 225, 230-232, 233, 234 
Marine Corps 483 



PAGK 

Cnited States— CbnMnu^d. 

Marshals 448 

Merchant Marine 177 

M 11 i tia 465 

IMilitary Academy 467 

Ministers Abroad 16,489 

Naval Academy 482 

♦♦ Chaplains 468 

" Enlistment 477 

Navy 414.469 

" Pay Roll 480 

'* Recruiting Service 477 

" Vessels 472,478 

" Yards 47H 

Pension Agents 445 

" Statistics 166-177 

Population.. ..100, 266, 421,657-668 

Postmasters 446 

Post-Ollice Statistics 516 

Progress 100-101 

Public Debt... 261 

" Health Service 573 

" Lands 150 

Receipts&Disbursenients.lO0,2Ii* 

Revenue Cutter Service 176 

Secret Service 98 

Senate, Presidents pro 

tempore 681 

Senators 505,509 

Shipping Coin' r, N. Y 806 

Steamboat Inspection Ser 

vice 75 

Supreme Court 447 

Treasurers 686 

Volunteer Ass'n 560 

" Life Saving Corps 175 

Wars 485,502 

Warships 653 

Wealth of 94.244 

Universal Brotherhood 543 

Universal ist Gen' 1 Convention. 541 

Univer.salists inU. S 433 

Universities in U. S 605.609 

University Forum 132 

Uranus, Planet 62 

Urban Population of U.S. 659 

Uruguay, Statistics of, 

264,414.421,443 

Usury, Penalty for 151 

Utah Election Returns 737 

V 

Valuation, Assessed, of 

Property in U. S..265,669-670 
Vauderbilt Cup Races 418 

" Family 632 

Vaulting Records 388,39t) 

Vedan ta Society 542 

Velocity of Winds in U. S 73 

Venezuela, A rea& Pop.264,421,443 

*' Army of 414 

Venus, Planet 29. 62 

Vermont Election Returns 737 

Vessels of U. S. Navy 472 

" Built, American 101 

Veterans of Foreign Service ... 68J 
Veterinary Examinations 161 

'• Schools 608 

Vice- Presidents of U.S., List.. .681 



PAQK 

War Dep't Officials 444 

" of 1812 602 

" of 1812, Society of 652 

'* Secretaries of 682 

Wars, U. S 485,602 

Waisiiips,U. S 472 

Washington Election Returns. 767 

Headquarters Ass'n 563 

Order of 654 

Washington's Farewell Ad- 
dress 96 

Waterfalls of the World 488 

Water Measures 87 

" Supply Dept., N. Y. 

City 772 

" Supply. N. Y. City 824 

Wealth of Nations 264 

" of U. S It'O 

Weather Bureau, N. Y'.City. . .806 

" Flags 72 

" lUiles for Foretellij>g 69 

»• Wisdom 69 

Wedding Anniversaries 489 

Weight and Height of Men 

and Women 86 

Weights 80-83 

" Ancient GreekandRoniim83 
Western Union Telegraph C'o. 189 
Westl'ointMili tJii-yAcademy . .467 
W. V'iiginia Election Returns. 767 

Wheat Harvest Calendar 164 

♦' Statistics 100,238,239,241 

Whiskey, Production of 249 

Whistle, Weather Signal 7 2 

White and Negro Population, 

in U. S. 661 

White House Rules 160 

Whitney Family 640 

Wills 314 

Winds, Velocity of, iiiU. S 73 

Wine Production of the World, 249 

" Statistics of 249,252 

Winter, Beginning of 1913 29 

Wireless Telegraphy 193 

Wisconsin Election Returns... 768 
Withdrawals for Consumption .166 

Woman Suttrage 706 

Woman's Christian Temper- 
ance Union ....541 

" Relief Corps... 560 

WomeninU. S 661-663 

Women's Life-Saving League. 175 
Wonders of the World, Seven. 118 
Woodland Area in U^jS. ...... .145 

Wood Manufactures 230 

Wood Preservei-s Association.. 246 
Woodmen, Fraternal Order. . . .630 
Woollen Goods, M'facture.232,234 

Wool, Statistics of 15,237,239 

Words in Languages, No. of — 25 
World, Statistics of Countries 

of l5,Ji64,421 

World's Crop 241 

" Christian CitizenshipCon- 

ference 186 

** Panama Exposition 652 

f* Puritv Federation 538 

" Young Women's Christian 
A ssociation .• 540 



Vote 710 Wrestling: 333-335 



Virginia Election Returns 738 

Vocabularies 466 

Volunteers of America . 646 

Vote for President 708. 710 

' ' of New York City 723 

" Popularand Electoral 710 

" Socialist 513 

Voters, Qualifications for 704 

" Registration of 706 

Voting Age, Population 668 

W 

Wage- Earners in U. S.. .231,830 

Wage Table, Monthly 81 

Wake Island 141 

Wales, Population of 429,435 

War Dep' t Disbursements. 100,^9 



Wiirtemberg, Royal Family. ..428 
Wyoming Election Returns... 769 



Yachting Records 327 

Vale Boat Races 341 

Year, Ancient and Modern 72 

Yeomen of America 530 

Young Men's Christ. A.ss' ns — 540 
"• People's Soc. of Chris- 
tian Endeavor ...539 

Z 

Zinc, Prodhctionof. .245,246,247 

Zoological Gardens in N. Y 770 

" Society , New York 674 



V 






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14 




f HAOE \__f '^'**'" 
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(©ccucccuccs DurCufl JJJn'ntfnii. 15 

Some months are occupied In printing a volume so bulky as The World Almanac, and It Is 
necessarily put to press In parts or "forms." Changes are In the mean Mnic occurring. Advaniage 
Is taken of the going to press of the last form of the First Edition to insert Information of the latest 
possible date, which Is done below. The readers of the Almanac are requested to observe these 
additions, corrections and changes, and It would be well to make note of them on the pages Indicated. 

Table of Memorable Dates — The Balkan Waj-. War declared by Bulgaria, 
Montenegro, Servia and Greece against Turkey. 
13 4. Panama Canal A<;t — On Nov. 13. 1912. President Taft Issued a proclamation 
announcing the rates of toll to be paid by vessels passing through the water- 
way. 
162. Prosecution of Trusts — The Supreme Court of the United States on Nov. 18, 
1912. upheld the decree of dissolution against the Standard Sanitary Manu- 
facturing Company and allied con'cerns, known as the "Bathtub Trust," 
handed down by the B^'edera' Court o.f Maryland. In a sweeping decision the 
Supreme Court of the United Sta.tes held on Dec. 2 that the Harrim&n 
merger of the Union Pacific and Southern Pacific Railroad Companies con- 
stituted a combination in restraint of trade within the meaning of the Sher- 
man Anti-Trust law. and should be dissolved. A civil anti-trust suit against 
the alleged "Candy Trust" was filed in Philadelphia Dec. 1.3 by Attorney- 
General AVicker.sham. A suit to dissolve the Elgin Board of Trade, known 
as the "Butter Board," and the Ajmerican Association of Creamery Butter 
Manufacturers was filed in Chicago Dec. 14 in the Federal Court. 
213. Pennsylvania Railroad — On Nov. 13. 1912,-- President James McCrea resigned 

and was succeeded by Samuel Rea. 
237. Statistics of Wool , — Fleece and pulled scoured, product 1912, 136,866,652 

pounds. 
379. Davis Cup (Tennis) — The English lawn tennis team, challengers, defeated the 
Australian team, defenders, in the matches played at Melbourne. Australia. 3 
imatches to 2, winning cup and world's championship for England. Results 
by matches: Novemiber 2 8, J. C. Parke; (Eng'land) defeated N. E. Brookes 

(Australia), 8 — 6. 6 — 2, 5 7. 6—2; C. P. Dixon (England) defeated R. W.. 

Heath (Australia), 5—7, 6 — 4, 6—4. 6 — 4. November 29, N. E. Brookes 
and A.'^W. Dunlop (Australia) defeated J. C. Parke and A. E. Beamish 
(England). 6 4, 6 — 1, 7 — 5. November 30, J. C. Parke (England) de- 
feated R. W. Heath (Australia). 6 — 2, 6—4. 6 — '4; N. E. Brookes (Aus- 
tralia) defeated C. P. Dixon (England), 6 — 2, 6 — 4, 6 — 4. 
401. Six-day bicycle race held at Madison 'Square Garden, New York City, December 
9 to 14, 3 912, final standing of teams: Rutt and Fogler, 2.601 miles 5 
laps; Bedell and Mitten, 2,661 miles 5 laps; Clarke and Hill. 2.661 miles 5 
^laps; Root and Hehir. 2,661 miles 5 laps; Drobaeh and Collins, 2,661 miles 
5 laps- G'renda and Pye, 2,661 miles 5 laps; Kramer and Moran, 2.661 
miles 4 laps; Perchicot and Egg, 2.661 miles 4 laps; Wells and Walker. 
2,66] miles 3 laps; Brocco and Berthet, 2.602 miles 1 lap; Cameron and 
Thomas, 2,547 miles 3 laps; Carmen and Loftes, 2,466 miles 4 laps; Suter 
Brothers, 2,355 rniles 1 lap. The record, 2,737 miles 1 lap, was made by 
McFarland and Moran in 1908. Six teams were tied for first place and two 
for second at the finish pf the long race, and one rider from each team 
competed in the final mile sprint to decide the places and money prizes. 
The sprint racers finished as follows: First. Rutt; second. Bedell; third, 
Clarke; fourth. Root; fifth, Drobactt^ sixth. Grenda; seventh, Kramer; 
eighth, Perchicot. 
421. Countries of the World — ^Negotiations for cessation of hostilities in the Balkans 
may result in change of area and population of countries affected. On Dec. 
21, 1912, Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Russia and Great Britain agreed 
on the principle of autonomy for Albania, with a provision guaranteeing 
to Servia commercial access to the Adriatic. 

423. Dominican Republic — Eladio Victoria. President, resigned Nov. 28, 1912, and 

was succeeded by Archbishop Mouel as Provisional President. 

424, 437. Italian Ministry and Government — A new ministerial department has heen 

created, that of the Colonies (Tripoli, &c.'). Colonial Minister — Hon. Pietro 
Bertolini. 

42 5. Reigning Families of Europe — Luitpold, Prince Regent of Bavaria, died Dec. 12, 
1912. 

464. Military Educational System. Coast Artillery School — The school year for offi- 
cers and enlisted men is from Jan. 3 to Dec. 15, instead of Sept. 1 to July 1. 

4 89. Diplomatic and Consular Service — Whitelaw Reid, United States Ambassador 1^ 
Great Britain, died December 15. 1912. 

513. Sixty-third Congress— Salaries of Representatives are $7,500 per annum, and 
mileage of 20 cents per mile each way to and from seat of government. Sal- 
ary of the Speaker is $12,000. 

534. Roman Catholic Hierarchy. Dec. 2 — The , Pope at a consistory of ficiallT- an- 
nounced the appointments of the following American prelates: The Right 
Rev. Dennis J. O'Connell, Bishop of Richmond; the Right Rev. Patrick A. 
McGovern. Bishop of Cheyenne; the Right Rev. Austin Dowling, Bishop of 
Des Moines; the Rev. EiJward J. Hanna, Auxiliary Bishop of San Francisco. 
The Pope created a new Cardinal, Charles Baron Hornig, Bishop of Vesz- 
prim. Hungary. At the consistory the red hats were placed on the heads of 
Cardinal Francis X. Magi, Archbishop of Vienna; Cardinal Giuseppe Maria 
Cos y Macho. Archbishop of Valladolid; Cardinal Antonio Vico, Papal Nuncio 
to Spain; Cardinal Francis S. Bauer, Archbishop of Olmuetz, and Cardina' 
'Enrique de Almarez y Santos, Archbishop <xi .Seville; Cardinal A. Capecelatro 
died. 

549. National Highway Protection Society — President, Frederic R. Coudert. Head- 
quarters. 1 W. 3 4th St. 

562. Alfred B. Nobel Prizes— The board of directors of the Nobel Institute an- 
nounced in December that no Peace Prize would be awarded in 1912, 



16 



The Jews of the World. 



OCCURRENCES DURING PRINTING. 



625. 
643. 



647. 



Benefactions — Dr. Morris Loeb. chemist, left nearly a niilUon dollars to scien- 
tific and charitable institutions, including $500,000 to Harvard University, 
Record of Events — On December 9 the British Government presented its protest 
to the Secretary of State of the United States against free tolls in the Pan- 
ama Canal for American coastwise vessels. On Decem'ber 9 a confer- 
ence of the leaders of the Progressive party was held at Chicago and Col. 
Roosevelt was named as candidate for President in 1916. On December 16 
the Turko- Balkan peace conference began at London. 

Death Roll — On December 12, Luitpold, Prince Regent of Bavaria, at Munich, 
aged 91 years. On December 13, Bisho<p Thomas A. Jaggar, Protestant- 
Episcopal Bishop in charge of European churches, Cannes, France, aged 73 
years. On December 15, Paul Smith, Adirondack guide and hotelkeeper. 
surgical operation, (Montreal, aged 87 years. December 15, Peter Doelger, 
brewer, debility. New York City, aged 80 years. December 15, Whitelaw 
Reld, United States Ambassador to Great Britain, pulmonary oedema, Lon- 
don, England, aged 7 5 years. December 15, Lieut. Parke of the British 
Navy and Askell Hardwick, manager of the Handley-Page Aeronautical Com- 
pany, were killed by dropping of a monoplane at Wombley, Eng'land. 



Parcels Post— Packages weighing up to eleven pouhds and of not more than 72 inches iii 
length, breadth and girth combined, may be sent through the mails. See page 115. 



Mile Radius. 


First Pound. 


Each Add] tioaal 
Pound. ' 


Mile Radius. 


First Pound. 


Each Additional. 
Pound. 


50 i 


5c 
6c 
7c 
8c 


3c 
4c 
5c 
6c 


1,000 


9c 
lOc 
lie 


7c 


150 


1,400 


9c 


300 


1,800 


10c 


600 







GHENT UNIVERSAL AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION. 

April to November, 1913. An Exposition showing In detail the latest developments In Art, 
Science, Industry and Commerce, and to encourage universal and lnternat4onal trade relations. 
New York office. 389 Fifth Avenue. 

NOTIFICATION TO THE PRESIDENT-ELECT AND VICE-PRESIDENT- 
ELECT OF THEIR ELECTION. 

THE DETERMINATION OF THE RESULT OF THE 1908 PRESIDENTIAL ELEC- 
TION WAS AS FOLLOWS: 

Feb. 10, 1909. the two Houses being assembled in the Hall of the House of Repre- 
sentatives for the count of the electoral vote, and the count having been duly made 
and certified to, and the announcement thereof made to the two Houses assembled, 
the statement of the Tellers closed in these words: 

"This ajinouncement of the state of the vote by the President of the Senate shall 
be deemed a SUFFICIENT DECLARATION OF THE PERSONS ELECTED PRE&I- 
R^^'^^A^p VICE-PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, each for the term begin- 
ning March 4, 1909, and shall be entered, together with a list of the Azotes, on the 
Journals of the Senate and the House of Representatives. 

♦!,« <^^* ^^^^y °^ the electoral vote having been completed, and the result annourtoed, 
*°®-i^,SL"^ J"®®^^"^ °^ *^h6 two Houses was dissolved: and V 

^'The Senate returned to its Chamber." 



iSmfter autr Mosation Bags. 

na•^^nvilvi'l^°ni'lV^^"ah^^f fi![^K^''^-**"P^'''9^'^^f ^^^ year devoted to prayer and fasting. Ember 
?nd siturdlv t^ter ffi fi^t"^^^^ f°"'^ seasons, and are the Wednesday, Friday, 

Summer- Serthftfp^Hv^f^/^h^w-^^^ \" «pnng; after the feast of Pentecost (Whit Sunday) 

w-r^^^^^pJl/^r^ thi Jflw.*^^^?-^^^^ and after the festival of St. Lucia. Winter. 

Ji/mber Weeks aie tbe weeks in which the Ember Days appear 

cedi^g^A^en?k.^f Day""" ''^ ^^^ ^^'^""^ ""* ^^' *^^'"^' ^^""' ^^' ^""^ """ ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^ immediately pre- 

^rea of t%t (ggrraTaafegg of t^ggnttttr .States. 



Greatest length in miles 

Greatest breadth in miles 

Greatest depth in feet 

Area in square miles 

Drainage in square miles , 

Height above sea- level in feet. 
Latitude, degrees north 



Longitude, degrees west 

Boundary line in miles 

Upited States shore line in miles! 



Superior. 



390 

160 

900 

32.000 

85,000 

600 

460 45V 

480 50V 

840 30V 

920 15V 

300 

955 



Michigan. 



345 

84 

1,800 

22.400 

70,040 

578 

41 o 15\ 

450 55V 

840 40V 

87° 08V 

None 

1,320 



Huron. 



270 

105 

1,000 

23.000 

74,000 

574 

430 20V 

460 lOV 

8O0 lOv 

840 30V 

220 

610 



Erin 



250 

60 

204 

10,000 

39,680 

564 

410 20V 

420 60V 

780 35V 

830 lOv 

200 

370 



Ontario. 



190 

52 

412 

6,700 

29.760 

234 

430 lOV 

440 1(3\ 

760 20V 

790 50V 

160 

230 



^Tifte Jlrtois of tfte smorlDf. 

Jews In the world. 8,876,299 are In Europe, 1,J 



Pi.B«?an p^mS^r^ lid^^V?^^ "^®^.^ 'P ^^^ world. 8,876.2§9 are In Europe, 1.880.579 In America. The 
fMsdnkn^^ll ^St^^i^^J^^ ^" *&® nations with 5.215.805. The United States follows second with 
wInrtQ Kaian ^ifiic,*'i'?yK'^^«'^-^l?^ United States Is very Incomplete. While the city of Warsaw 
PhuldPlnh « hfll '^ni,T'^nn^^n°^°'.^^^ York City alone Includes 905.000 Jews In Iti population. 
fhP Pntir^P T^w.^ ^^\l 100.000 and Chicago 98.000. New York City embraces one-thirteenth of 



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GOOD WINE AND GOOD HEALTH 

Why YOU Should Drink Some Wine Every Day 
With Your Meals. " There's a Reason." 



IF you want to keep in good healMi you should drink some 
good Wine. The simple reason is this: You have in 
Wine food elements and certain (properties that you cannot get in any other 
beverage. 

Just compare Wine wit*h tea and coffee or with any of the so-called soft 
drinks, 'and you will see this is right. While tea, or coffee, or soft drinks are 
oniy good to stop thirst, they are neither a food nor a tonic, but Wine is both a 
food and a tonic. And this important fact should always be remembered: that 
Wine — the juice of the grape — is a natural product of food value, affording both 
pleasure as a drink 'and benefit as a tonic. 

'Let us see what you are drinking when you drink a glass of light table wine 
like claret. Well, you are drinking th^ purest of water distilled by summer's 
sunshine. You are drinking a very little alcohol that comes from the sugar 
in the grape. You are drinking a number of natural fruit acids, such as tartaric, 
malic, racemic, pectic and succinite acid. The acids of the graipe are good for di- 
gestion; they prevent and cure dyspepsia; they drive out the noxious matters that 
clog the system <and cause skin eruptions. Thus, the fruit acids are nature's own 
blood purifiers and good complexion makers. For proof, go to the grape district 
of France and Italy, where every man, woman and child drink wine every day 
of their lives, to see what fine complexions and good digestions they all have. 

Moreover, the acids of wine neutralize in the blood the effete matters that 
impair tihe mind and organs of the body and make them sluggish. You are drink- 
ing in wine imalic acid, the element that makes cider so healthful and refreshing. 
You are drinking in wine albuminous matters which are of course necessary food 
elements. You 'are drinking tannin, one of the most useful properties and good 
for the arteries, for the saying is, "a man is as old as his arteries." You are drink- 
ing in wine phosphorus and iron in the form in which they are available as the 
source of brain and nerve energy. Phosphorus and iron and other mineral salts, 
such as silicates, magnesium, chalk, etc., being held naturally in suspension in 
Wine are easily assimilated in the human body, which is not the case when such 
heavy miineral salts are put up in artificial tonics. If you drink some Wine with 
your food you will not need any medicinal compounds; if you are "run down" 
and need a stimulant, Wine is better -than any patent medicine or any drug. 

'Now, it is a very good sign that the healthful habit of drinking some Wine at 
table with the daily meal is growing in this country. There is plenty of good, 
pure Wine made in the United States, and it is so cheap that almost every one 
can afford to drink a little Wine every day with their dinner. 

"Get the habit" of taking some Wine with your meals, and you will feel bet- 
ter, think better, and "be better. 



Those who would like to know more about our Rood American Wines 
should send for the following valuable booklets: "The Food Value of 
Wines," by Prof. E. H. Twight; "The One Best Drink— Wine," by Louis 
James; "Temperance with Drinking Wine," by Rev. R. D. Sawyer; "How 
to Use Wines," by L. J. Vance. Free by writing to the 

i^^> .;;- AMERICAN WIINE GROWERS' ASSOCIATIOISf 

304 Broadway, !\ew York 

16— C 










Few realize 
the tremen- 
dous dangers of 

CONSTIPATION 

It is one of the 
greatest misery^ 
producers in the 
world. 

It is responsible for many serious diseases 
of the Stomadi and Bowels. Don't wait 
until you are half dead from Constipation, 
Biliousness, Dysentery, Dyspepsia, Indiges- 
tion, etc. Glean the system out to-night — 
get a box of 





TRADE MARK. Rtc.U.S.PAT.Crr. 

^THE DOCTOR IN CANDY FORM 



Chew up just one candy (it's peppermint 
and pleasant), and in the morning you will 
feel like living once more. 

Partola stands without a competitor — it is the 
most marvelous LAXATIVE BLOOD PURIFIER 
known — it does its work gently, thoroughly, without 
pain or griping, simply causing a natural, easy 
bowel movement without nausea. 

Take one every Saturday night, or once a week, and 
you will be an optimist the balance of your life. 

Partola is entirely harmless. It is made from the 
purest and best materials and is guaranteed to do 
all that is claimed for it and more — much more. 
Don't fail to try it and to-night — and remember — 
it is a laxative — gentle- — smooth in action- — NOT a 
Cathartic that tears and purges the system, leaving 
you weak and exhausted. 

At all druggists, 25c., 50c. and $1.00. For Free 
Sample and 100-page book write Partola Company, 
160 Second Avenue, New York City. 



16-D 




Whenever you see an Engine Gang (Plow with the levers pointing to the Center of 
the platform it's a P. & O. Mogul. It is exclusive; no other 
plow is constructed in this way. 

The Coining Universal System of Plowing 



One of the 'lejMJine: farm papers, speak- 
ing of a recent well-known plowing con- 
test, said: "Walking plows nave appar- 
ently disappeared from the eompeting 
ranks. Their place has been more than 
filled by the huge plowing outfits drawn 
by tractors. A traction plowing contest, 
started at noon, held its own in point of 
audience even after a ifaat and close ball 



game was starte'd' on the green. Sulky 
and gang were in 'evidence, but the sight 
of 1,5 00 earnest farmers studying the 
performance of a six-furrow (Mogul) 
traction outfit showed that interest in 
mechanical power is on the increase in 
every section." This is the condition 
wherever an engine gang plow Is at 
work. 



Tlie Whole World an Open Market 

A few years ago tlie Engine Gang was unknown ex- 
cept in a limited area, and was used only on the big 
"Bonanza" farms. To-day the entire farming area of 
North America is an open market for them. Not one 
man in a hundred who needs an engine gang owns one. 
We make three styles from 3 to 12 bottoms. Send for 
our special catalog, "Traction Engine Plowing;" it will 

Help You to Decide Which One You Need 

THE P. & 0. Mogul Engine Gang Plow is made in five sizes, with 5, 6. 
8, 10 and 12 bottoms, small enough for the ordinary farm, and large 
enough for the most extensive fields. The Mogul is protected by patents 
covering its exclusive features, chief among them being the bunching of 
the levers to the center of the platform; the self-castoring gauge wheels; 
the break pins for stony ground; the method of regulating suction; the 
manner of lining up the bottoms, and others. All kinds of bottoms tit 
the one stjde of standards. The simplest and strongest engine plow made, 
and it is Backed By An Unqualified Guarantee. 

We n^ake a full line of Plows, Harrows, Planters 
and Cultiyators, described in a Catalog which we will 
gladly send upon request. Agents everywhere. 

m^ti^^JS lortffi^ &ir Parlin & Orendorif Co., Canton, IIL 

16— E 



IMPROVE YOURSELF 

At slight cost any one may attain to a speaking and reading knowledge of one 
or more of the great- foreign languages. 

That such an attainment is a vast help socially, mentally. , or in business, 
cannot be questioned. 

The only work needed for this is c-ne of the OTTO-SAUER METHODS. The«e 
books take the learner without the aid of a teacher, _from the very -begmning 
through a thoroujg'h course — at the cost of only $1.15. 

Otto's French Method, complete, with Key, $1.25. 

Otto's German Method, complete, with Key, $1.25. 

■Sauer's Italian Method, complete, with Key, $1.25. 

Sauer's Spanish Method, complete, with Key, $1.25. 

10 cents may be deducted from the price ($1.25), making 
it $1.15, postpaid, if this Almiamao is mentioned. 



DALTON'S AUCTION BRIDGE 

Is the only work by a recognized authority dealing- fully with 

ROYALS or LILIES 

Price $1, Postpaid. 



WYCIL & COMPANY 



83 Nassau St. 



N. Y. City. 




HIGH PRECMIUMS PAID. 
WIT PAV $100.00 for dime 1S94 S mint. $25.00 to $750.00 for certain $5.00 
VVIL, 1 rt 1 without motto. $1,000.00 for Calif. $25.00 gold. $100.00 for certain 
185y half dollars, $S.00 for rare 1S53 quarters. $250.00 fcr certain $2.50 gold and 
up to $100.0 for certain giold dollars. $50.00 for certain cents. As much as 
S 2 0,0 00 has been paid for two coins. All dates of perfect U. S. coins com- 
mand premium; ordinary cents, nickels, dimes, quarters, half dollars, etc., 
up to 1912. Many coins worth fortunes are passing from hand to hand in cir- 
culation and can be picked up by those knowing a rare coin when they see one. 
Get Posted. Send only ^-=, ,^„.^^^ ,.. ^,.. ,,^ . 

4c for larKe illustrated fftParf^v '^|K^«><«****..^««^?^^ 
coin circular. You have ^MP IPSiMiil^MMLMfll 
nothine to lose and ^"^'^*^/^lll^^M^*<lJ^&m^^Vl?feT^^^ 
everything to gain. 



DRA^VER 976, DEPT. O. 



FORT WORTH, TEXAS. 




MAKE THE FARM PAY 

Complete Home Study Courses 
in Agriculture, Farm Ac- 
counting and Business 
Methods, Horticulture, 

Floriculture, Landscape 
Gardening, Forestry, Poul- 
try Culture and Veterinary 
;»cience under Prof. Brooks 
of tlie Mass. Agricultural Col- 
lege, Prof. Beal of Cornell 
University and other eminent 
„ „ 'teachers. Over one hundred 

Pkof. Brooks, jj^j^g g^.y^y Courses under 

able professors in leading colleges. 
250 page catalog free. Write to-day. 
The Home Correspondence School 
Dept. 99A. Springtield, Mass. 

' 16^ 




Every Week, Month and Year 

The New York World 

1st — 'Prints More Separate Advertisements Than 
ANY OTHER Newspaper on Earth; 

2d — Has a Circulation in New York City, 
Mornings aud Sundays, Greater Than the 
New York Herald, Times, Sun, Tribune 
and Press COMBINED. 

World Ads. Lead 

Because They Succeed! 









Do You Want This Job? 

It Pays $3,000 a Year 

There are thousands of just such positions awaiting the trained 
man. In every section, in every state, and in every aty there are 
Products to be advertised; business enterpnses to be managed; news- 
^pers and magazines to be pubUshed; sales forces to be organized, 
or office methods to be systematized. 

Who should be in charge of this work? YOU. 

Who should get the high salaries paid for such work? YUU. 

Who should qualify to successfully handle this work? YUU. 

— ' -•■-• is not going to stop, and some one must 

or the other fellow? One thing is certain: 



The progress of this age 
do this work. Will it be you 
it will be the man best 
qualified for the position. 

Let us help you_ to 
qualify for a bigger job. 
What we have done for 
tens of thousands of others 
we can do for you. 

You need only mark 
and mail the attached 
coupon and you will re- 
ceive, without obligation 
or cost, full inforaiation 
about any position in 
which you may be inter- 
ested. 

Mark and Mail the 
Coupon TODAY 



International Correspondence Schools 
Box 1900. SCRANTON. PA. 

Please explain, without further obligation on my part, how 1 
can qualify for a larger salary and advancement to the posi- 
tion, trade, or profession before which I have marked A. 



Salesmanship 

Boolckeeper 

Stenographer 

Advertising Man 

Mechanical Draftsman 

Commercial Illustrating 

Civil Service 

Chemist 

Textile Manufacturing 

English Branches 

Automobile Running 

Agriculture 

Poultry Farming^ 



Concrete Construction 
Electrical Engineer 
Electric Lighting 
Mechanical Engineer 
Civil Engineer 
Surveyor 

Stationary Engineer 
Building Contractor 
Architectural Draftsman 
Architect 

Structural Engineer 
Plumb. & Steam Fitting 
Mining Engineer 



Name. 



St. and No. 

City 



^t€de. 



16— G 



OFFICE FURNITURE 

Desks : Chairs : Tables 

FILING DEVICES 

Leather Goods, etc* 

A Full Itine ofJ^ow Priced 

COMMERCIAL 
FURNITURE 

CATALOGUE W FOR THE ASKING 

CaEO* W. COBB, Jr., newyorkcitV 




TELEPHONE 872 JOHN 



FREE 




Kiiiiiiiiiii 



The "Beegee" Perfect 

Ink Eraser for Five 

Days' Trial 

ENDORSED BY UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Various City and State Governments, and by 

the Largest Corporations and Banks 

The ''Beegee" erases ink as easily as rubber 
erases lead — ^without the use of acids or other 

chemicals. . , " - / I A 

Has an adjustable fibre brush of extreme delicacy and infirite hard- 
ness — keener than the finsst emery. No blade to keep sharp — always ready 
for use — economical and practical. InvaluaNe to every husiness man. Saves 
time, temper and work. 

Five Days' Free Trial 

Ask your stationer, or send us his 
name and address, and we will send 
one of these rare devices for five 
days' trial free. 

Simply forward 50c or return the 
eraser in five days. GET ONE NOW. 

BEEGEE COMPANY 

1 1 33A Broadway, New York City 

stationers and Dealers ^rrite for particulars. 
16— H 








OPROSED TO PAIN. 



FOR SALE AT ALL DRUG STORES 



Fac-Simile 



FOR HEADACHES 




Fac-Slmlle 



g NEURALGIAS, LA GRIPPE, PAIN AND FEVER § 



I" 



B 
B 



8 
8 



8 

I 

B 
8 

I 



8 
8 



8 
8 



ANTIKAMNIA 
TABLETS 

FOR PAIN— (No matter where) 

Dose:— Two tableU. 
COLD-IN-THE-HEAD— (LaQrippe) 

Dose: — Two every three houis. 
FEVER— (Feverish Conditions) 

Dose: — One every two bouis. 
HEADACHE- (AH Kinds) 

Doie:— Two, repeat two noun. 
HEAT EFFECTS— (Dizziness) 

Dose: — Two every three hours. 
MELANCHOLIA— (From Worry) 

Dose: — One every two hours. 
NEURALGIA- (All Kinds) 

Dose: — One every two hoUIS. 
OVERWORK-EXCESSES 

Dose: — One every two hours. 
SHOPPER'S or SIGHTSEER'S 
HEADACHE 

Dose: — Two every three hours. 

Antikamnia Tablets 

THE name itself suggests what 
Antikamnia Tablets are. and 
what their remedial characteristics 
are:— Anti (Greek AvtO, Op- 
posed to — and Kamnia (Greek 
Ka/ivoi), Pain— thus we have 
"ANTIKAMNIA" which 
means "OPPOSED TO 
PAIN," a remedy to relieve pain 
andsuftering. The genuine" Anti- 
kamnia Tablets" always bear the 
/K monogram and the genuine 
"Antikamnia & Codeine Tab- 
lets" bear the ^ monogram. 
Tablets on account of their con- 
venience and accuracy, are recog- 
nized as the most approved form 
(or taking these remedies. For 
sale at ail druggists. 

The Journal of Medicine. 



n« 



•n 





Ih 



GHT ON PAIN 



Antikamnia 2^ Codeine 
TABLETS 

FOR COUGHS AND COLDS 

Dose:-One dissolved on tongue. 
BOWEL TROUBLES— (Diarrhflca 
and Pain) 

Dose: — One every two hours. 
HYSTERICAL CONDITIONS 

Dose: — One every hour or two. 
INSOMNIA-RESTLESSNESS 

Dose: — One at bed-time, 
MIGRAINE— HEMICRANIA 

Dose: — One every hour. 
NERVE SEDATI\'E 

Dose: — One every three hours. 
NEURALGIA— (Grippal) 

Dose: — One every two hours. 
OVARIAN PAIN 

Dose: — One every three hours. 
WOi^iEN'S ACHES AND ILLS 

Dose: — Two every three hours. 

For All Coughs 

To administer Antikanmia & 
Codeine Tablets most satisfac- 
torily for coughs, advise patients to 
allow one or two tablets to dissolve 
slowly upon the tongue and 
swallow the saliva. For night 
coughs, take one on retiring. 

Whert Women Suffer 



Give one or two Antikamnia 
& Codeine Tablets every three 
hours. Indicated in the many nerv- 
ous conditions evidenced at time 
of period. In short, they are a 
most reliable remedy for the con- 
ditions generally known as 
"Women's Aches ^nd Ills." 

The Clinic. 



"I 



8 
8 



8 

a 




I 



Fac-Slmile p^r Samples and Literature, Address Facsimile 

THE ANTIKAMNIA CHEMICAL CO., ST. LOUIS, D. S. A. 



RATS AND MICE 

KILLED BY SCIENCE 




By the aid of the wonderful bacteriological preparation discovered and prepared 
by Dr. Jean Danysz, Director of the LaboTatory of Agricultural Micro-Biology of 
the Pasteur Institute. Paris, science has at last successfully solved the problem of 
exterminating rats and mice. 

DANYSZ VIRUS 

(DANNIS VIRUS) 

contains the germs of a disease peculiar to rats and mouselike rodents only, and is 
harmless to birds, human beings and animals other than mo»uselike rodents. The 
rodents always die in the open because of feverish condition. The disease is con- 
tagious to them. The Virus is easily prepared and applied. 

Danysz Virus is distributed in France and Holland by the Government. At the 
Russian seaport, Odessa, a city c»f over 400,000 inhabitants, the whole city was 
freed from -rats by an application of Danysz Virus. In England Dr. Danysz was 
hailed as a modern Pied Piper. 

The success of Danysz Virus in the United States has been phenomenal. First 
tried by the United States Superintendent of Warehcuses in New York and de- 
clared by him as a complete success, it has been indorsed by the United States 
Naval Academy at Annapolis, college professors, doctors, steamship companies, 
warehousemen, theatre owners, bankers, meat packers, manufacturers, farmers, 
private individuals, &c., throughout the United States and Canada. 

How Much to Fse — A small house, one tube: ordinary dwelling, three tubes 
(if rats are numerciis. not less than six tubesj ; one or two dozen for large stable 
with hayloft and yard, or 5.000 square feet floQr space in factories and ware- 
houses; three to six tubes per acre in case of open fields, game preserves. &c. 
Price, one tube, 75c.; three tubes. $1.75; six tubes, $3.25; one doz^m, $6.00; 
delivered. 

PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

INDEPENDENT CHEMICAL COMP'Y 

No. 72 FRONT ST., NEW YORK 

16— K 







Niagara Clips 








CTNCa No. 1 JUMBO 

<«The Double Grip 
Paper Clip'* 

Leads All Others 

Office Speciatties 

WRITE FOR FREE .SAMPLES 

AND PRIOEJS 

(niustxations 2-3 actual size) 

Manufactured by 

Niagara Clip Company 

_ New York, U. S. A. 

DIS-KO CUP The Largest Clip Makers in the World 




AUTO- 
MOBTLE . 

SKATES 




Girls' Model — No. 1, extension 8 
to 9 in, ; No. 2, extension 9 to 10 in. 
Boys* Model — 'No. 3. extension 9 
to 10 in. ; No. 4, extension 10 to 11 in. 
Mounted "with Steel or Rubber Rolls. 
OPrice $3.75 per pair. 

Boys' Model — 'No. 5, extension 8 

to 10 ia. ;No. 6, extension 10 to 12 in. 

Rubber Tires — i-Inch "SMieels. 

Price $7.30 per pair. 

Men's Model — No. 7, extension 8 to 

10 in. ; No. 8, extension 10 to 12 in. 

Rubber Tires — 5-Inch Wheels. 

Frice $10.OO per pair. 

AUTOMOBILE 
ROAD SKATES 




Automobile ''Cycle" 

Skates Are Particularly 

Adapted for Sidewalk 

use. 

The SKATES are 
recommended by the 
leadinsr Physicians 
as Health Makers 
for Boys and Girls. 



HT-GBADE 

RINK 

SKATES 





Men's Model — No. 9, extension to 
10 in. ; No. 10, extension 10 to 11 in. 
Women'sModel — 'No. 11 extension 
8 <to 9 in. ; No. 12. ext€nsion 9 to 10 
in. Moomted "Witili Steel, {Wood or 
Rubber Rolls — 
[ Price $7.30 per pair. 



Showing' Construction 
and Wood Rolls 

Owing' to their 
superior construc- 
tion and the high- 
grade quality of the 
material through- 
out, thev will out- 
last any other skate 
in the onarket. 



Write for €atalosrue. 



Mounted vdth Boxwood. 
Dogwood or Maple Rolls. 
Price $8.50 per pair. 

Most of the profes- 
sional and amateur 
skaters in the United 
States use the No. 999 
Hy-Spede Racer. 

HY-SPEDE RACER SKATE— 

No. 909. Made in All Sizes. 



Steel 




JOHN JAY YOUNG 



Manufacturer 
Ey-Orade Skates 

16— Li 



155-157 WAVEBLY PI.ACE 
New Yor]£, U. S. A. 



^ HESTOOPS TO CONQUER' 




^KifTHE ORICINAt 



Easily applied, with cork or brush, is not a aalva that is almost iinpo»i 

•ible to apply and is dangerous. Not a bunglesome plaster that 

will eat into the tender flesh around the corn and liable you to 

blood poisinins. MiUions of bottles of "KORNOL" have 

been sold and we have as yet to hear of a complaint. 

"KORNOL" is the Neatest, Cleanest and most Codp 

venient com and callouse remover sold. 

Do not accept a Substitute Mailed Pottpaid 

CARJERLmEDRpcCo? 

BALTrMpRE.MP> 
'KOf^NOL*^ IS ON SALE AT ALL DROCGISTS 





The Specific Pill Is the Best Remedy for 



EXHAUSTED OR 
DEBILITATED 



NERVOUS DEBILITY 

NERVE FORCE 

Contains No Mercuryj Iron. CantharideSj Morphia. Opium or Cocaine 

This pHl is purely vegetable, has been tested and prescribed by physicians 
and proven to be a most effective treatment for restoring vitality, no matter 
how originally impaired. Our remedies are the best of their kind, and contain 
only the best and purest ingredients that money can buy and science produce; 
therefore we cannot offer free samples. 

Price, ONE DOLLAR Per Box No c. 0. D. Of Treatment Schemc 

by Sealed Mail i..«ii^i..»»iii-..ii.»_^.....i^_^..i..»..i.ii.. 

ni-i-io^Ki A I ^^miviii^ivifk DEAR SIRS — ^I 'have used a bottle of your 
PERSOrSlAL OPIlMIOINS — Hypophosphites of Manganese for liver and 
kidney complaints in my own person and received much benefit, so I inclose five 
dollars and will aslc you to send me as mucth as you can by ex'press prepaid for 
that amount, until we can get it through the regular channels. I am confident 
it is just what I have been in search of for many years. I am prescribing your 
Hypopliosphites of L/ime and Soda, and am pleased with the preparation. Yours 
sincerely. Dr. T. J. WEST, Aztec, X. M. 

I linow of no remedy in the whole Materia Medica equal to vour Speoiific Pill 
for Nervous Debility, Weakness, Catarrh of tihe Bladder, etc. — ADOLPH BEHRE, 
M. D., Professor of Organic Chemistry and Physiology, New York. 
SEND FOR FREE TREATMENT, SECURELY SEALED. 

WINCHESTER & CO., Chemists =- 994 Beekman Building, New York 
For Weak Lungs Use WINCHESTER'S HYPOPHOSPHITES. (Est. 1858) 



The Master Cure for 

Used by Specialists and tno-wn since 1861 aS 
the one good medicine for deep-seated and ap- 
parently hopeless cases. A safe, speedy and satis- 
factory treatment. Don't waste time with com- 
pound, cure-alls and liniments. Insist on hav- 
ing Muller's Famous Prescription and success. 
Cures RHetimatistn and Cot»C 

any age or condition. 
At Drogglsts, 75c Bottle. Booklet mailed free* 
WM. H. MULUR, 352 Atlantic Ave., Brooklyo.N.ff. 



Do you use Press Clippings? 



vXi»:iUlO 



if. 



If you dg not, drop a postal card to 

Romeike's 
Press Clipping Bureau 

and we will show you how Press Clippings can be 
used to yoiu- advantage. 

Press Clippings are always interesting and 
profitable; they are indispensable ito iirofessional 
and business men alike. 

Autliors, artists, actors, singers and society 
leaders are supplied with reviews and criticisms. 

We collect obituary notices and bind them in 
scrapbooks. 

Lawjers, bankers, brokers, financial institutes 
depend largely on quick information from the 
columns of the press; we supply them. 

To the manufacturer we show through the 
Clippings new markets for his products. 

The inventor, the politician the social reform- 
er, in fact all who attract tne attention of the 
press, are informed and kept up to date by Press 
Clippings. 

A postal card toill Irring all th Information. 

HENRY ROMEIKE, Inc. 

106-110 Seventh Ave. - New York City 

Telephone 929 Ohelsea 



16— <N 




ELECTRO-CHEMICAL RING 



Lrf^i 




TRADE-MARK E^ 

Copyright. 18H, 'S/6; 1902, 'i and 1909, by W. G. Brovmson. 

RE:F£:RENCE— Xorthern National Bank, Toledo, Ohio. 

YOU WILL FIND US QUOTED IN FINANCIAL RECORDS. 

THE following diseases are caused by acid in the blood and are cured by this ring, 
which takes from one day to two weeks, after the ring commences to work, ac- 
cording to disease and circumstances. The ring and the acid create an electro- 
chemical action, removing the excess of acid, which pures the disease and will keep it 

cured. 

Bright's Diseases, Diabetes — it is not a habit with children. Chorea — St. Vitus's 
Dance, Chlorosis — green sickness — Painful and Excessive Monthly Periods. Uremia, 
Syncope, Epilepsy, Nervous Prostration, Nosebleed, Internal Hemorrhages, Rhinolith — a 
stony concretion formed in the nose — Adenoids, Polypus, Cataract, Goitre, Whooping" 
Cough. Rheumatism — inflammatory, Gout, Lumbago, Articular, Sciatic, Muscular, 
Asthma, Headache, Neuralgia, Neutritis, Valvular Rheumatism of Heart, Rheumatic 
Fever, Rheumatic Paralysis — Brain, Hair, Eyes, Ears, Limbs, Pen, Operators, Type- 
writers. Dropsy, Obesity, Fatty Degeneration of Heart. Appendicitis — Inflammation of 
Bowels, Chronic Dysentery, Acidity of Stomach, which causes the worst kind of con- 
stipation — the other is caused by liver disease. Cancer— carcinoma. Cancerous Tumors*, 
Congestion of Kidneys, Stone in Bladder, Prostatitis, Gravel, Gail-Stone, Calculi. 
Deposit on Teeth, White Spots on Nails, Psoriasis, Salt-rheum, Varicose Veins and 
Ulcers. Varicocele — varicose veins in scrotum. Varicose Veins and Ulcers in Rectum — 
often mistaken for piles and fissure. The after effects of Diphtheria, Scarlet, Typhoid 
and Malarial Fevers. 



This ring is not a cure-all. 
liver diseases. 



The ring will not cure liver disease and none of the 



The ring will not work — deposit on ring and finger — ^unless it is necessary, but when 
it is necessary, it will work every second day and night, if it is a good fit and is used 

and cleaned as directed. 

Price $2.00 ; Gold-covered $4.00. By Mail or will send by Express. Collect on De- 
livery, if you wish to pay charges. Send paper size of finger. Agents wanted at places 
not taken. Send for additional information. The $2.00 ring is sold on a three-weeks* 
guarantee ; ring can be returi^^ and money will be refunded i " not satisfactory. Not 
for sale by jewelers or druggists. Any person who \ises our name or copies from our 
advertising is fraudulently trying to do business on the reputation of this ring and will 
be prosecuted. 

This ring is not for sale by wholesale houses or any person advertising cheap rings 
and can only be obtained from us and our authorized agents. 

PEOPLE WHO ARE SUBJECT TO RHEUMATIC, KIDNT3Y AND ALL ACID 
DISEASES HAVE EXPERIMENTED FOR HUNDREDS OF YEARS AND SPENT 
MILLIONS OF DOLLARS, TAKING AND APPLYING REMEJDIES. The time will 
certainly come when intelligent people will not submit to be experimented with, to see. 
if a medicine can be made to cure acid diseases. 

Any reputable physician will advise you that a permanent cure in that manner is 
impossible, as the acid is liable to accumulate again at any time, after you quit using 
the best remedies or any other treatment. That acid in the blood caused a limited 
number of diseases has always been admitted, but the knowledge of the fact that an 
excess of acid is the cause of so many diseases of hitherto unknown pathology has 
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The World. 17 



K\)t 2imocltr* 



JOSEPH PULITZER* 



April 10. 1847 4* October 29, 1911. 



When Joseph Pulitzer, by the Are and force of brain and conscience, forged In The World 
a mighty weapon for the people fighting against privilege, he said on that 10th of May In 1883: 

"Performance Is better than promise. Exuberant assurances are cheap. I make none. I 
Bimply refer the public to the new World Itself. * * * Truly democratic — dedicated to the 
cause of the people rather than that of purse potentates * *. * — that will expose all fraud and 
sham — flght all public evils and abuses — that will serve and battle for the people with earnest 
sincerity." 

At his death on October 29, 1911, the press of this nation and of all Europe, journalists, pub 
Heists, educators and statesmen. Individually bore eager witness that he and Th^; World had kept 
the faith. By their united testimony the newspapers of the nation were better, stronger, more 
Independent, more successful because of his example, his Inspiration and his life work. 

The entrance of The World Into national politics under Its new owner was In the campaign 
of 1884, which, after a generation, restored the Democratic party to power. Twenty years later 
President Cleveland paid this tribute to Its work: "I recall not less- vividly how brilliantly and 
sturdily The World then fought for Democracy; and In this, the first of Its great party fights under 
present ownership, It was here, there and everywhere In the field, showering deadly blows on the 
enemy. It was steadfast In zeal and untiring In effort until the battle was won; and It was won 
against such odds and by so slight a margin as to reasonably lead to the belief that no contributing 
aid could have been safely spared. At any rate, the contest was so close that It may be said without 
reservation that If It had lacked the forceful and potent advocacy of Democracy at that time by 
The New York World the result might have been reversed." 

Joseph Pulitzer Is dead but The World he guided for twenty-eight years fights on. It has 
proved Itself no less forceful and potent as an advocate of Democracy In a victorious national 
campaign no less notable and vital. 

It exposed to a doubting nation and for two years It has led the warring against Colonel Roose- 
velt's ambitions: It has led the fighting against the false doctrines the ex-Presldent brought forth 
In his long campaign; It has led the nation-wide protest against President Taft's approval of the 
Payne-Aldrlch Tariff bill and his vetoes of tariff reform bills In violation of party election pledges 
that had promised "revision of the tariff downward," and It has continued with untiring vigor Its 
long, unending ftght against bosses and against a vicious campaign contribution corruption system. 

Before the campaign of 1908 The World, on January 6 of that year, when Woodrow Wilson 
was still President of Princeton University, editorially presented him to the Democratic party as 
"an available candidate" "qualified In every respect for the great office of President of the United 
States." The editorial continued c' "Wbo would more turelF ooniin»nd the undivided support of 



18 The World, 



the Independent press? Who would appeal more strongly to the latent moral sense which twice 
elected Cleveland? Who would Inspire a more helpful feeling of security and stability In the minds 
of all business men engaged In honest enterprise?" 

THE FIGHT FOR A FREE PARTY AND A FREE CONVENTION. 

Throughout the preconventlon campaign of 1912 The World called for a free party and a free 
convention. The World declared that the Issue was greater than any man, greater even than the 
Democratic party. "The best wisdom and the best patriotism In the Baltimore convention will be 
none too great to meet this crisis," It said. "For Itself The World Intends to remain free to give 
to the Democratic party the benefit of Its disinterested advice and Its unbiased judgment " Re- 
fusing to chain Itself to the ambition of any candidate, urging with Imipartlallty the careful weighing 
of all. It declared that It could support Oscar W. Underwood, Champ Clark, Woodrow Wilson or 
Judson Harmon "without sacrificing any of our political principles." 

But after the selection of delegates to the national convention had brought to no candidate 
for the Democratic nomination the necessary two-thirds. The World on May 30 editorially came 
out for Governor Woodrow Wilson of New Jersey, showing by plain figures, cold facts and careful 
analysis that he was the ablest man, the wisest statesman and the strongest campaigner; and that 
he would be the most successful vote-getter the party could present to the people. 

"The World believes," It said, "that he would be a progressive constitutional President whom 
the American people could trust and for whom they would never have cause to apologize." 

And In that editorial The World called on Mr. Bryan "lo throw his great political Influence 
upon the side of Governor Wilson and aid the Democratic party to meet adequately this great crisis 
in the Nation's history. He has the most brilliant opportunity for disinterested patriotic leadership 
that has come to any American of this generation." 

The World's hard-hitting editorials throughout the convention battles had been dally before 
the eyes of every delegate. On the day following the nomination. In Its bugle call for this latter-day 
Armageddon The World voiced the verdict of the Democracy: 

"The nomination of Woodrow Wilson for President means a new Democracy. It means ''a 
new epoch In American self-government. The Democratic party at last has broken Its shackles. 
It has emancipated Itself. It has rehabilitated Itself In power and principle. It has turned Its face 
to the rising sun, to re-establish the faith of the American people In their own Institutions. Woodrow 
Wilson will be the next President of the United States. But he will be more than that. He will 
be the first President of the United States In a generation to go Into oflBce owing favors to nobody 
except the American people and under obligations to nothing except the general welfare. 

"No political boss brought about his nomination. No political machine carried his candidacy 
to victory. No coterie of Wall Street financiers provided the money to finance his campaign. He 
has no debts to pay to corrupt politics or to corrupt business. He was nominated by the Irresistible 
force of public opinion, and by that alone. He stands before the country a free man. The American 
people have set out to regain possession of their government, and Woodrow Wilson was nominated 
for President because he embodies that Issue. The bosses and the plutocrats who tried to prevent 
his nomination w^e beaten by the power of the people, and the power that nominated him Is the 
power that will elect him. 

"It Is because Governor Wilson represents this vital principle that The World so persistently 
urged his nomination. It Is because Governor Wilson represents this principle that he will be tri- 
umphantly elected In November. Such a man Is Imperatively needed, and the American people, 

true to their traditions In every crisis, have again found him." 

By an overwhelming electoral majority the States of the Union have put their spal of approval 
on these principles, and rejoicing !n this verdict The World looks forward to the coming four years 
of Democratic administration with confidence In the final verdict of history. 

In the four months' triangular campaign, though the task of reporting adequately the doings 
of three great parties with unusually vigorous State fights taxed the resources of the paper's news 
columns. The World was able to present to Its readers the fullest, clearest exposition of the oppressive 
burdens of the Payne-AIdrlch tariff. The figures were the work of months of Its own experts ably 
assisted by such authorities as R. K. MacLea, and the presentation of the amazing facts vividly, 
plctorlally and with many of the "jokers" required a page a day for sixteen Issues. These features 
The World sent broadcast to Important papers throughout the country. 

THE FIGHT AGAINST HUGE CAMPAIGN CORRUPTION FUNDS. 

It Is with profound satisfaction that The World Impresses on the attention of the public that 
this campaign of 1912 marked the end of a long fight which It has made In season and out of season 
against the corruption of huge campaign funds gotten together by the sale of privilege. "Frying the 
fat" out of tariff-protected Industries was the terse characterization of B. F. Jones of Pittsburgh, 
the Republican National Chairman In 1884; "assessing the corporations" was Mark Hanna's plain, 
blunt, business man's expression when managing McKlnley's campaigns In 1896 and 1900; "you 
and I are practical men" was the phrase In President Roosevelt's letter In 1904 to the man on whom 
he called at the eleventh hour to raise §250,000, "which turned 50.000 votes In New York" In Mr. 
Harrlman's own words. Bad as conditions had been In 1896, In no campaign had this become so 
grave a scandal, or the contributions so scientifically "demanded" as In that campaign of 1904. With 
the unerring Insight of his long experience and keen judgment, Mr. Pulitzer on October 1 of that 
year published In The World an editorial, the longest and most carefully prepared that he ever 
wrote — it filled a page and a half. "How about the great corporations which do contribute to the 
campaign fund?" he asked of the President who was then a candidate for re-election "There is 
no big stick for theirj; qo m3.rjnes, po warships — nothing but Becrecy. silence. solicltatlOQ.' surrender." 



The World. 19 



He then put to the President — "not for the Democratic party but for democratic Institutions: not 
against the Republican party but for the Republic," these ten questions that have become famous: 

How much has the Beef Trust contributed to Mr. Cortelyou? 

HOW much has the Paper Trust contributed to Mr. Cortelyou? 

How much has the Coal Trust contributed to Mr. Cortelyou? 

How much has the Sugar Trust contributed to Mr. Cortelyou? • 

How much has the Oil Trust contributed to Mr. Cortelyou? 

How much has the Tobacco Trust contributed to Mr. Cortelyou? 

How much has the Steel Trust contributed to Mr. Cortelyou? 

How much has the Insurance Trust contributed to Mr. Cortelyou? 

How much have the national banks contributed to Mr. Cortelyou? 

How much have the six great railroad trusts contributed to Mr. Cortelyou? 

Tliere was then no answer. There was a flaming retort from Colonel Roosevelt to Judge Parker 
when the Democratic candidate made on the stump kindred charges at the campaign's end. But 
the truth haa come out — slowly. Indeed, but surely. The first answer was forced out in the Insurance 
Investigation in 1905. which, thanks to The World's persistent digging and Hughes' legal skill, 
became a powerful searchlight revealing a mass of hidden corruption. More appeared when The 
World on April 2, 1907, printed exclusively the famous letter of E. H. Harriman to Sidney Webster. 
And In the testimony before the Senate sub-committee In the Summer and early Autumn the whole 
story came out. The ten questions have been answerefd and The World on October 1 reprinted 
its editorial of eight years before that Its then unheeded warning might carry again its lesson to ears 
at last opened to facts and eyes clear to see and shun danger. Not again will a Mark Hanna raise 
Jrom beneficiaries of privilege a 85,000,000 "slush fund." The World chronicled in November 
that the campaign fund of the successful Democratic party amounted to 81,100.000, contributed 
by over 90,000 Individuals, with not a dollar received from any corporation. 

The World's service in the New York State campaign was not less valuable. Its staff of 
Investigators, aided by eflSclent engineers, was put to work In the State Highways Department 
and showed In a series of articles how the department under the Dlx-Murphy administration had 
been turned Into a powerful political machine to the serious detriment of the roads, how money 
had be«n lavishly spent and how much had been wasted, to say the least, and how by an uncon- 
stitutional "expedited routes" system privileged persons and communities had profited with ex- 
pensive roads at the expense of those for whose benefit the huge highway fund of 850,000,000 had 
been voted by the people. Governor Dlx was not renominated; Boss Murphy kept his hand oft 
the convention; and the Democrats nominated and elected William Sulzer Governor, a man who 
Is pledged to an unbossed administration in which privilege gives way to the people. 

Citizens of the Borough of the Bronx after the November election passed resolutions thanking 
The World for its ten years' fight helping that borough to become a county, an ambition happily 
attained by referendum on Election Day. To Senator Stephen J. Stllweli belongs the individual 
honor, for he, with tireless energy, put through the Legislature the bill that means so much to 
the political future of the Bronx, and, under wise leadership, of the State. 

KEEP THE FAITH ! CARRY OUT PARTY PLEDGES. 

Though the new administration must wait until March 4 to take up Its duties. The World' 
began Immediately after the election of Governor Wilson was assured to blaze the way to success. 
"Keep the Faith!" it cried as It editorially called attention to the fact that pressure had been brought 
to bear upon Woodrow -Wilson not to call Congress in special session to revise the Payne-Aldrich 
schedules, and that pressure has been brought to bear upon the Democratic National Ccyamlttee 
to oppose a special session. 

"This Is a counsel of Infamy to which Mr. Wilson cannot and will not listen, -and to which no 
honest Democrat should listen," said The World editorially. 

"If the Democratic party postpones tariff revision It Is doomed. Delay will be Interpreted 
as proof of timidity and bad faith, and the sentiment of the country will turn at once against the 
Wilson administration. It is the first great duty of the party to stand behind President Wilson 
as a unit and carry out the platform pledges without a day's unnecessary delay. This is no time 
for a second exhibition of Democratic perfidy and dishonor. 'Keep the Faith!* " 

The World at once sent telegrams to every Democrat elected to the new Congress, asking 
him where he stood on the question of calling an extra session to take up tariff reform. The response 
to the poll was instant and overwhelmingly Insistent that the party meet and "Keep the Faith!" 
Governor Wilson, Impressed, asked The World for the answers of the Congressmen and on No- 
vember 15 began his administration by his announcement to the press: 

"I shall call Congress together In extraordinary session not later than April 15. I shall do this 
not only because I think that the pledges of the party ought to be redeemed as promptly as possible, 
but also because I know it to be In the Interest of business that all uncerialnty as to what the par- 
ticular Items of tariff revision are to be should be removed as soon as possible." 

LIGHT ON THE MONEY TRUST. 

The World added another valuable chapter to the many that It has exclusively presented to 
the public by exposing the real Inwardness of the so-called Roosevelt panic of 1907. It had furnished 
to the Stanley committee of Congress invaluable facts as to one outcome — the gobbling up of the 
Tennessee Coal and Iron Company by the Steel Trust with the express permission of President 
Roosevelt. On June 13, while the Pujo committee of Congress investigating the so-called Money 
Trust was taking testimony In New York, The World published the actual facts surrounding the 
loan of $25,000,000 to the brokers on the Stock Exchange on October 24, 1907, the big day of the 
panic. The World showed that this was not the money of J. P. Morgan & Co., the reputed saviors 
of Wall Street, but was money deposited that very day with selected national banks by the Secretary 
of the Treasury, Mr. Cortelyou. 

The facts In brief were thus published: The Secretary of the Treasury on October 23, when 
call money had reached 125 and the gravest fears seemed certain to be realized, found that his mere 
promise of relief had not helped the situation. That night there was another long conference In 
which Mr. Morgan participated. At the close after midnight on the morning of the 24th, Mr. 
Cortelyou Issued this statement: 

"As an evidence of the Treasury's position I have directed deposits fn banks of this city to the 
amount of 825,000,000." 

All the morning, bankers congregated around Mr. Morgan and William Rockefeller, who was 
with him In his office and learned to what extent each would share In the distribution of this money. 
Mr. Morgan was the absolute dictator. As soon as the word went forth that 825.000.000 would be 
loaned out on Stock Exchange collateral by the banks sharing In It. the tension was relieved. Brokers 
gladly paid the high Interest rate — 50 per cent. — demanded. They were told at the close of busluesa 
to send over to Morgan's office and get a memorandum which directed each broker to some bank 
that bad received a deposit of Treasury funds. Mr. Morgan's part was that of being In control of 



20 The World. 



both the bank and the United States Treasury funds, by agreement of Secretary Cortelyou and the 
bankers under his direct or dominant Influence. 

"As soon as I read that exclusive publication In The World this morning," said Samuel Unter- 
myer, counsel for the Pujo committee, "I decided to examine Mr. Cortelyou and subpoena any 
member of J. P. Morgan & Co. I could reach. The testimony of these gentlemen (Mr. Cortelyou 
and Mr. Charles Steele) has borne out fully everything stated In The World, and the evidence Is 
conclusive that It was not the philanthropic Mr. Morgan but the Treasury of the United States 
that came to the rescue of the panic-stricken gamblers of the stock mark«t." 

From the records of the Sub- Treasury and of J. P. Morgan & Co. was put In evidence in conse- 
quence a table showing In brief tliat at this time the United States Treasury deposited In or loaned 
to fouiteen banks $37,697,000; that these fourteen banks agreed to loan brokers $23,550,000; and 
that these fourteen banks actually did loan to brokers $18,945,000. Twelve of these fourteen banks 
are generally recognized as being Important members of the Morgan-Rockefeller group. They are 
the First National, the National City, the Hanover, the Chase, the Fourth National, the Park, the 
Chemical, the Mechanics and Metals, the American Exchange, the Corn Exchange, the National 
Bank of Commerce, and the Bank of America. The other two banks, whose combined loana 
amounted to $800,000 only, were the Bank of the Manhattan Company and the Importers and 
Traders. 

The World on October 20 and on November H added to Its record for public service by pub- 
lishing exclusively valuable analyses of the report prepared by the expert accountants of the Money 
Trust Investigation committee of Congress which showed that the Morgan-Rockefeller Interests 
dominate properties of all classes with capital and funded Indebtedness of $36,711,328,678, over 
one-third of the nation's wealth; and that In particular this same Influence dominated 305 financial 
Institutions (whose names, addresses and resources were given) with a total capital, surplus reserves 
and deposits of $8,097,631,011 — all this through a maze of Interlocking directorates. And The 
World announced that the committee's attorneys will strive to show that It Is absolutely impossible 
for "outsiders" to finance any enterprise without the sanction of the "Money Kings;" that unwelcome 
competitors can be driven from the big pursuits of commerce with comparative ease If they offend 
those who hold the purse strings; and that there are few If any financial Institutions In the country 
which are willing to withstand, or are capable of withstanding, the demands of the great Morgan- 
Rockefeller system of banks. 

THE MURDER OF HERMAN ROSENTHAL. 

Herman Rosenthal, an East Side gambler, who had sought the richer pickings of Broadway and 
the Tenderloin, went before Magistrate Butts at the West Side Police Court on July 12 and made 
an affidavit charging oppression against Police Inspector Cornelius Hayes and Police Captain William 
Day of the West Forty-seventh Street Police Station, and asking for a warrant for their arrest because 
a policeman was being kept on permanent post In his gambling house. No. 104 West Forty-fifth Street 
since April 15, when It had been raided and put oUt of business by Police Lieutenant Charles Becker 
and his "Strong-Arm" squad. The Magistrate denied the request, holding the evidence presented 
insufficient, but all the newspapers printed the story of Rosenthal's futile visit, and an interview 
with blm. He made open charges against the poUce, declared that a lieutenant of police was hla 
partner In the gambling house, having put up $1,500 on a chattel mortgage and collecting 20 per 
cent, of the profits of the house. He said he had laid the facts of the oppression before the District' 
Attorney, and, mentioning names, said he knew the entire system of "protection" and knew the men 
who were getting the thousands of dollars paid In weekly by the gamblers. 

The World knowing that there was a very real basis for the gambler's charges did not drop 
the case. It sent a staff correspondent with Rosenthal's Interview to see District-Attorney Whitman, 
who was at, Newport. Mr. Whitman said: "I have had the charge made by Rosenthal under 
Investigation for some time. I have no sympathy with Rosenthal the gambler. As such he Is 
beyond the pale. But I have real use for Rosenthal, who, abused by the police, proposes to aid 
decency and lawfulness by revealing conditions that are startling. "The boldness of some of the 
operations Is astounding. The trail leads to high places, even If only a small part of the accusation 
of Rosenthal and others Is substantiated. This man will have a chance to tell his story to the Grand 
Jury." 

Another reporter of The World went to see Rosenthal and asked him for the facts to back up 
the accusations In his Interview. Rosenthal demurred, saying that the police system was so strong 
that no newspaper would print the facts. He was told that he was mistaken; that The World 
would print them. Rosenthal then late that Saturday afternoon came to The World office and 
made an affidavit detailing the facts on which he had made his accusation against the police and 
naming Lieutenant Charles Becker as the man who had loaned him $1,500 and as partner had taken 
20 per cent, of the profits of his gambling house. 

Lieutenant Becker, learning of the existence of the affidavit, came down to The World office 
that same Saturday evening with his counsel John W. Hart and was shown it as well as the interview 
with the District-Attorney. Lieutenant Becker said that under the rules of the Police Department 
he was not free to make any statement in regard to the charges, although he emphatically denied 
their truth. The. World on Sunday published exclusively Rosenthal's affidavit In full, the Interview 
with the District-Attorney, and the denials of Lieutenant Becker and his counsel. The publication 
aroused the city. District-Attorney Whitman hurried back to his ofllce to make a thorough Investi- 
gation of the charges presented In the columns of The World. Police Commissioner Waldo started 
back from Toronto, and the gamblers, apprehensive, were in panic. Rosenthal was persistent and 
announced his Intention of going again before Magistrate Butts with additional charges and evidence. 
The police officials had nothing t<o say. 

Mr. Whitman on Monday, July 15, made an appointment with Rosenthal to go over all hla 
evidence at the District-Attorney's office on the following morning. Herman Rosenthal did not 
keep that appointment. In executing that affidavit printed In The World he had unwittingly 
signed his own death warrant. That night, two hours after midnight, he was called out of the cafe 
of the Metropole Hotel on West Forty-third Street a hundred feet from the heart of Broadway and 
shot to death. 

The boldness of the crime was amazing. The city was aroused by its audacity and profoundly 
shocked by the too-evident connection between the System, the Imminent Investigation and the 
murder of the victim that had dared to "squeal." 

The news spread with amazing rapidity. A telephone message from The World office awoke 
District- Attorney Whitman and he hastened at once to the West Forty-seventh Street Police Station, 
where the body of the murdered Informer was taken, and personally assumed charge of the case. 
His promptness was of Inestimable value to the cause of Justice. The murderers, known to be a 

garty of four, had escaped In a gray automobile. A passerby had caught Its number, 41313. and had 
urrled to the polloe station to report it. He had been promptly locked up and other numbers 
appeared on the blotter. A telephone message had also brought Lieutenant Becker to the station 
house. After his flr.st analysis the District- Attorney declared: 

"I accuse the Police Department of New York, through ceptaln members of It, with having 
murdered Herman Rosenthal. Either directly or iQdSrso^S? \% was because of tbem that he was 
Blain Id sold btood. wltSt nevsx s^ chanca for bla Wq'" 



The World. 21 



THE PUBLIC CONSCIENCE AROUSED. 

The Investigation of the crime furnished dramatic disclosures dally. The public conscience 
was aroused In all except the highest o/flclals of the city. The Police Department seemed unable 
or unwilling to find the murderers, but the District-Attorney was tireless and the newspapers of the 
city held up his hands. After a week's Investigation The World was able to name the East Side 
gangsters who were the actual murderers. Evidence accumulated Ia.st. Jack Rose, a gambler 
and a collector of graft for Lieutenant Becker; "Brldgle" Weber, another gambler, with rooms at 
Sixth Avenue and Forty-second Street, and Harry Vallon, all accomplices In the murder, one by one 
gave themselves up to the police and were handed over to Mr. Whitman. On July 29 they confessed 
the plot. The Grand Jury was quickly summoned at night and heard their stories under promise 
of Immunity, Indictments were found at once and Lieutenant Becker was arrested at his desk and 
lodged In the Tombs on a charge of murder. 

At last on August 15 The World printed exclusively and verjaatim "Jack" Rose's confession 
of the crime. The full story filled a page and a half. It startled New York, though the city might 
well have been fed full with sensations. Rose told how he had collected graft money for Lieutenant 
Becker. The District-Attorney had already found bank accounts In the name of the Police Lieu- 
tenant or his wife amounting to $50,000, besides a newly built house, real estate and some stocks and 
bonds. He told further how Becker had called for him, told him that Rosenthal was "getting dan- 
gerous," and that "he must be stopped." Becker, he went on, told him to get some of "Jack" 
Zellg's gang and have Rosenthal "croaked." Rose demurred at murder, but ultimately yielded to 
Becker's strength and dominance. He fixed the job with his friends Vallon and Weber, who had 
money. They got Zellg out of the Tombs, where he was confined on a charge of carrying a revolver 
(a "frame-up" by Becker's men, he declared), and arranged a cold-blooded compact with four of 
Zellg's gang to kill Rosenthal. A fourth figure was brought In after the murder, Sam Schepps, 
who went with Rose when $1,000 of "Brldgle" Weber's^money was paid to the gunmen for their job 
by Becker's orders. 

Justice, thoroughly aroused, moved fast and sure. The District-Attorney put Becker on trial 
before Justice Goff on October 7, and under the latter's steady driving the trial was concluded on 
October 24. when at midnight the jury brought in a verdict of murder In the first degree. The 
police lieutenant Is In Sing Sing under sentence of death. With him are also the four hired gunmen, 
base products of the East Side: Frank Muller, alias "Whltey Lewis;" Fi-ank Clroficl, alias "Dago 
Frank;" Louis Rosenberg, alias "Lefty Louie," and Harry Horowitz, alias "Gyp the Blood." They 
stood trial together before Judge Goff on November 8, and on November 19, after but twenty minutes 
deliberation, all four were also found guilty of murder In the first degree, and they also were sen- 
tenced to death. Rose, Vallon and Weber, having turned State's evidence, were set free. 

The Becker trial consumed but seventeen days. In spite of the long search for gunmen and 
witnesses, a verdict was reached 100 days after Rosenthal was murdered. In celerity and dignity 
the trial has set a new standard for famous ca.ses in New York. 

"Becker has been convicted of the murder of Rosenthal. The System has been convicted of the 
murder of Rosenthal. But what next?" said The World In watchful warning on this serious mu- 
nicipal situation. "Win Becker In the end escape just punishment through an appeal to the tech- 
nicalities of the law? Will the System Itself escape extermination through the Inability of a govern- 
ment of law to cope with a government of crime? Justice Is stUl on trial In New York, In spite of the 
righteous verdict of the Becker jury. It Is on trial In the appeal that Becker's counsel will make 
to the courts of last resort. It Is on trial In the devious and Intricate processes of the law's delay, 
which money can always buy from cunning counsel. It Is on trial In the attitude of State and City 
Government toward a Police Department which can harbor Beckers who traffic In law and traflflc 
In human life. * * * Regardlesss of Becker's conviction, the shadow of the System still hangs 
over New York City. Even to-day the men who testified against him are In terror of their lives. 
The law Is not dealing merely with a handful of miserable wretches who murdered a gambler. It 
Is dealing with a great conspiracy In which murder was purchased to protect the shameless profits 
of oflaclal corruption. This Is the balance In which the administration of the criminal law In New 
York must be weighed. This Is the condition of government which leaves the administration of 
justice on trial so long as the technicalities of criminal procedure stand between Becker and the 
sentence of the court." 

TRIAL AND CONVICTION OF CHARLES H. HYDE FOLLOWED. 

Following these convictions, District-Attorney Whitman at once put Charles H. Hyde on trial 
before Justice Goff In the Supreme Court. Hyde, the protege and former law partner of Mayor Gay- 
nor, had been appointed to the Important office of City Chamberlain by the Niayor, but had resigned 
that office May 3, 1911, after he had been indicted for bribery under Section No. 372 of Article 34 
of the penal law of New York. The specific offense charged was that he had forced Joseph G. Robin, 
head of the Northern Bank, to lend $130,000 to the tottering Carnegie Trust Company on August 
22, 1910, under threat of withdrawal of large city deposits If he refused, and promise of the deposit 
of additional city money If he consented. The crime charged was rare; the proof was technical 
and difficult to get before a jury; and the defendant's long fight for delay and then for acquittal 
had been stubbornly made by able counsel. The trial began on November 19 and ended at midnight 
on the 29th with a speedy verdict of guilty. There was a singular kinship between the case of Hyde 
and the case of Becker. In each there was the grossest abuse of power by a public official; the same 
arrogance of might and a similar official alliance with criminals. "While the memory of Hyde's 
fate remains," said The World the morning of the verdict, "no other City Chamberlain will use 
the money of the people for the profit of crooked finance and criminal banking. Just as the verdict 
of the jury in the Becker case dealt a staggering blow to the police system, so the verdict of the jury 
In the Hyde case has dealt a blow to that other system In which corrupt' buslnesa ia In partnership 
with corrupt politics." 

Robin's bank, the Northern, was closed by the State Banking Department on December 27, 
1910, and soon after that Robin was arrested, charged with having stolen $27,000 from the Wash- 
ington Savings Bank. On January 7, 1911, the Carnegie Trust Company also was closed by the 
State Banking Department. The World had obtained convincing Information that the City 
Chamberlain, Charles H. Hyde, was the key to the situation. Mr. Hyde was not at his post of 
duty; he was often absent, and at this time was said to be on a vacation and his address was refused. 
During the Fall of 1910 a legislative committee was Investigating a scandal about the dispensing 
of a fund of some $500,000 gathered from men eager to have horse racing restored to Its former 
condition In the State. Hyde's name had been freely mentioned as one of a number of men who 
had knowledge of how this fund was spent and a subpoena had been Issued for him. Wide search 
followed. At last a World staff man ran him down, finding him on his houseboat Stop-a- While 
In Florida. Hyde then hurried back to New York, reaching this city after an absence of forty-five 
days on the day after the legislative committee adjourned. The Carnegie Trust Company had 
long been tottering. Hyde, who had become a friend of William J. Cummins, Its president, first 
deposited city, money in that companF Jn March, 1910c He was very helpful to his frienda dnd 
k.ftfi tbe time be left bie office b® bad $1~®®0.®0® g? -sfity leassy o© (3>9)t>3s5$ Sbers. Tboagb be aafi 



22 The World, 



been deliberately sidetracked. Comptroller Prendergast, warned, had taken action Immediately 
on Hyde's departure from the city and had drawn out the city's cash at ttie rate of $50,000 a week, 
so that he had reduced the deposit to S650,000 by the first week of January, 1911. Cummins went 
to Mayor Gaynor's house in Hyde's absence and pleaded for hours with him to direct Hyde's deputy 
to deposit with his company 3500,000 more of the city's money to stave off bankruptcy. The Mayor 
declined to interfere and the next morning the State Banking Department closed the doors of the 
Carnegie Trust. Its affairs were greatly Involved. 

This was the situation that confronted Mr. Hyde on his return. Robin, who had been led to 
believe that he would be "tajken care of," found himself deserted. He chose on March 1 to plead 
guilty and gave the District-Attorney valuable information. Mr. Wiiitman's efforts were bringing 
to light evidence that portended Indictments, when The World, which had been closely following 
the events and aiding the efforts to get at the facts, discovered that the powerful hidden influences 
opposed to the Investigation had reached Governor Dix and had prevailed upon him to send a letter 
to Mr. Whitman taking the entire matter out of his hands and supplanting him with Attorney- 
General Carmody. 

The World promptly turned the searchlight of publicity upon this action and In an exclusive 
page story on March 9, 1911, gave the extraordinary facts to the people. The World took this 
occasion to give the public also a most valuable piece of evidence which It had discovered — a list 
of elgliteen banks which had gotten various sums of city deposits from the City Chamberlain, ranging* 
from $25,000 to S750,000; and had thereupon loaned Cummins's Carnegie Trust Company sums 
ranging from S35,000 to S500,000. The total of city cash concerned was §3,915,567, and the known 
loans were considerably In excess of §2,625,000. The World was able to give a full story of the 
events leading to the Governor's unprecedented action and to name many of the men concerned 
In this effort to blanket Investigation by the prosecuting attorney of the county. 

The World's exposure amazed and aroused the community and was the first great step In 
awakening people to the condition of affairs. It also strangled the plan. Both Whitman and Hyde 
hurried to Albany. Governor Dix, becoming better conversant with the situation, revoked his order 
and told District-Attorney Whitman to go ahead. The investigation went on before the Grand 
Jury; within a fortnight indictments were found against William J. Cummins on which he was con- 
victed, followed soon by Indictments against Joseph E. Relchmann on which this director of the 
Carnegie Trust Company was also convicted; and finally on May 1, 1911, by the Indictment of City 
Chamberlain Hyde. Two days later Hyde resigned his olflce. Further and stronger Indictments 
were found on May 11. Then began a series of legal technical moves and countermoves that delayed 
the trial of the former City Chamberlain until November 19, 1912. The trial then was sensational 
and made notable by the testimony given by eight bankers as to the coincidence of deposits of city 
money and of loans made to Cummins's distressed trust company. 

The meaning of the Hyde verdict and the Becker verdict Is that "New York Is no longer a 
province to be looted," said The World editorially. "The partnership between crime and offldal 
corruption has been dissolved by public sentiment and due process of law. Becker and Hyde were 
both representatives of a single system — a system that for years has been buying and selling gov- 
ernment for the profit of Individual corruption. Becker was an agent of this system In Its lowest, 
most degraded and most sordid form. Hyde was an agent ol the same system in Its more subtle 
and respectable form. Becker sold government to crooks, gamblers and thugs. Hyde sold gov- 
ernment to corrupt bankers and financiers. The long struggle against political graft and corruption 
Is finally bearing Its fruit. New York is no longer cynical and Indifferent, and It is undergoing the 
most notable civic reform that It has undergone since the passing of Tweed." And it Is with deep 
satisfaction that The World recalls Its persistent untiring efforts to rouse the public conscience, 
'clarify and crystallize Intelligent public opinion, and arm and strengtnen public action against In- 
trenched corruption. 

THE STORY OF PANAMA BEFORE A COMMITTEE OF CONGRESS. 

Congressman Henry T. Ralney of Illinois Introduced thfs resolution In Congress: 

"Whereas, as a former President of the United States has declared that he 'took'. Panama from 
the Republic of Colombia without consulting Congress; and 

"Whereas, the Republic of Colombia has ever since petitioned this country to submit to The 
Hague Tribunal the legal and equitable question whether such taking was In accordance with or in 
violation of the well-established principles of the laws of nations; and 

"Whereas, the Government of the United States professes Its desire to submit all International 
controversltles to arbitration, but has steadily refused arbitration to the Republic of Colombia; there- 
fore be It 

"Resolved, that the Committee of Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives be, and the 
same hereby Is, directed to Inquire Into the same; send for books, papers and documents; summon 
witnesses; take testimony; and report the same, with Its opinions and conclusions thereon, to thia 
House with ail convenient speed." 

The House referred the resolution to the Committee on Foreign Affairs, and Its chairman, William 
Sulzer, wrote to The World asking this paper to place at the disposal of his committee the evidence 
bearing on the subject which It had collected In preparation of Its defense In the suit for criminal 
libel Instituted by the Government of the United States against that paper. The World agreed to 
produce so much as was relevant to the Inquiry and sent Henry N. Hall of The World staff to Wash- 
ington to present it to the committee. After Mr. Ralney had set forth the broad points of the case 
Mr. Hall on February 9 was called before the committee and for seven days presented "The Story 
of Panama" with varied documentary evidence. Much of the evidence The World had collected 
was new, as owing to the complete collapse of the Government's case against It the paper's attorneys 
had had no opportunity of bringing It out In court. As he concluded the presentation of the evidence 
Mr. Hall said to the committee: "I have not spoken here as the advocate of Colombia nor aa the 
prosecutor of Mr. Roosevelt. I have endeavored fairly and Impartially to place the truth before you 
as I saw It from the documents gathered by The World. I trust you will arrive at a just and satis- 
factory solution of this momentous question. I sincerely hope you will find some way of settling a 
difference with Colombia which ought to be settled because the United States Is losing In South 
American trade to-day very nearly as much as It Is spending on the construction of the Panama Canal, 
and you are paying for the Panama Canal twice, once In cash and once In trade. But apart from 
sordid or commercial Interests, there are other and higher reasons why this controversy ought to be 
settled. 'Righteousness alone exalteth an nation.' Truth, justice, honor demand that Colombia's 
claims be satisfied; and the Congress and people of this country owe It to themselves to satisfy those 
claims In a manner consistent with the dignity of the United States, and In keeping with Its glorious 
traditions." 

KURD'S STORY OF RESCUE OF TITANIC'S PASSENGERS. 

When the great White Star steamship Titanic, carrying 2,181 men. women and children, 
crashed Into an IceberK off tho Banks i& ihQ night of April 14 and sank, tbe oewapapers 



The World. V 23 ' 



strained every effort to get for their eager readers the facts of the terrible calamity/ Wireless teleg" 
raphy slowly, laboriously, and' well nigh miraculously flashed through the ocean air the names, 
often garbled, of the 705 survivors, but brought little else of news. That waited until the Cunarder 
Carpathla with Its freight of rescued came to port four days afterward. The World was singularly 
favored by fortune. On board the Carpathla, bound out with his wife for a European vacation, waa 
Carlos F. Hurd, a member of the staff of the St. Louis-Post-Dispatch, and therefore of The World. 
It fell to his lot to be a witness of the scenes of rescue and to help minister to the bereaved ones 
on the return to New York. He wrote the full vivid, graphic story of the wreck and rescue, and, 
coming up the bay, tossed the copy safely wrapped In a cigar box over the rail to World men chasing 
alongside In a tug. His story was hurried to The World office, put In type, and before the ship- 
wrecked passengers had left the Cunard pier the full dramatic story of the disaster and rescue was 
being read on the streets and In the homes of New York and being telegraphed to the papers of every 
city and town In the country. 

The World on the earliest wireless report of the sea tragedy declared that It was due to speed- 
madness, demanded an Investigation that would lead to laws compelling better wireless rules, adequate 
lifeboat provision for all passengers and the ship's company at sea. and new steamship lanes south 
of the Ice re^on. Investigation that followed here and In England has already resulted In such 
new laws and regulations; without waiting for the compulsion of law the big lines refitted their steam- 
ships and even rebuilt some on safer plans as dictated by the grim lessons of the disaster. 

INVESTIGATION OF FACTORY CONDITIONS. 

In May and June The World sent to the more Important cities of the State a staff correspondent 
to get first hand knowledge of the conditions of factory life In New York State that were being In- 
vestigated by the New York State Factory Investigating Commission. This commission had been 
at work several months zealously and without pay. Its chairman Is Senator Robert F. Wagner of 
New York, the members being Assenlblymen A. E. Smith, Hamilton, Jackson and Phillips, Mlsa 
Mary E. Dreler, Samuel Gompers. Robert E. Dowllng and Simon Brentano. Abram I. Elkus. 
regent of the State University. Is Its counsel, and Dr. George M. Price Is the director of Investigation. 
The World staff correspondent found conditions similar to those It had uncovered. He found 
ample proof that women are employed In slaughter houses, and In steel and Iron foundries; that 
many employes are underpaid; that they are usually treated with less consideration than the ma- 
chines they operate; that women are doing the work of men because they can be hired cheaper: 
that children are jvorklng long hours under the law; that machines dangerous to life and limb are 
too often operated without efficient safeguards; that ventilation Is often wholly Inadequate; that 
sanitary conditions In many factories are abominable and lead to the breeding of disease; and that 
little precaution Is taken to guard against fatalities by Are. The World correspondent found some 
factories In excellent condition, but, like the commission, found many "sore spots." The World 
printed pages of the reports of his Investigation. Wherever a factory had been named In the testi- 
mony taken by the commission The World offered Its owners an opportunity to make such refu- 
tation as they saw fit and to give Its representative visual proof of any Inaccuracies. The searchers 
for truth met with hearty co-operation from city officials and bitter opposition from manufacturers 
who resented Interference. The Investigation by the commission has already done great good. It 
has remedied conditions In certain factories, awakened the conscience of employers and caused the 
passage of laws which will be exceedingly helpful. Yet there remains much to be accomplished. 

FIGHTING FOR THE PUBLIC GOOD. 

Two State laws remedying grave evils exposed by The World's Investigations were put on 
the statute books In 1912. It has been made a misdemeanor for a druggist to have fraudulent 
drugs In his possession, no matter whether or not he offers them for sale. This drastic provision of 
the penal code was rendered necessarv by the serious condition of affairs In city pharmacies exposed 
by The World In 1911, and corroborated by an Investigation made by ex-Comptroller Herman 
A. Metz and others this year. Then, too, on April 15 went Into effect the Brennan law prohibiting 
the storage of any food products for a period longer than ten months. The law was a direct result 
of The World's agitation In the Interest of pure food. 

The World has one fight always on hand that demands — and gets — eternal vigilance. It Is 
against the persistent black smoke producers who, on the least relaxation of attention, poison the 
air of New York with rolling clouds of black, sooty bituminous coal smoke from the tall chimneys 
of factories, office buildings and apartment houses. It Is cheaper. Simple automatic devices could 
be put In the furnaces and chimneys If the owners had public spirit. As they have not. It was necessary 
for The World to make a three-weeks' campaign In the Summer and. to print the law, the names 
of the violators of that law, and the commissioners and Inspectors responsible for letting them violate 
It before the nuisance was abated. The World expects to be obliged to do this again and again 
If the city is to be kept clean. It will do Its part cheerfully. The law Is plain. 

Another fight against slothful Injustice which The World has kept up has been to Improve 
conditions In the naturalization bureau of the Supreme Court. County Clerk William F. Schneider 
bore this witness In a lecture before the Naturalization Aid League: "The changes which I have 
brought about are due entirely to the publication In the New York World of a series of articles 
entitled 'The Bread Line.' To The World more than to any other agency must be attributed the 
credit for the success I have had in putting a stop to abuses and also the Immense Increase In the 
number of our naturalized citizens during the last two years." 

UPLIFT FOR THE RISING GENERATION. 

The public scliool children of the greater city enjoyed for the seventh year the keen Interest 
and aid of The World. One hundred and fifty-seven schools held field day meets In 1912 under 
the auspices of the Sunday World and the star athletes of these schools, graded for age, size and 
weight, made up the list of fifteen hundred contestants for The World's silver and bronze medals 
and bronze pins at the concluding field and track games at Curtis High School athletic field. Staten 
Island, on October 12. In the preliminary meets 54,000 boys competed. In the seven years of 
Sunday World field days, 938 separate school athletic meets have been held, with 235,000 con- 
testants; 23,000 Sunday World medals have been won, and 1,000 banners have been presented 
by The World as class trophies. 

Still unsatisfied with this success. The World extended Its efforts to cover also the vacation 
playgrounds recently established by the Board of Education. When the Summer months were over 
Dr. Edward W. Stltt, District Superintendent of Schools, and Superintendent of the vacation play- 
grounds and recreation centres, wrote to The World thanking It for "Its most generous support 
and saying that the success was remarkable, the aggregate attendance having been approximately 
6,500,000. He added: - ^ v. 

"To proT^ide healthful recreation and amusement for this vast army of children has been no 
small task, and In co-operating with this department In seeking to establish a definite aim to this 
work The World has rendered a valuable public service. The medals so generously donated by 
The World have enabled us to carry on baseball contests In all the boroughs and to provide suitable 
prizes for the wlnnersc This has served to create among the different playgrounds a spirited and 



M The World. 



healthful rivalry. In also publishing the news of the various meets of the playgrounds The World 
has been a powerful factor In bringing the work of the playgrounds to the attention of the public." 

Hundreds of Sunday World bronze medals and pins were also awarded among the four thousand 
children enrolled In the School Garden Clubs as prizes for field work and for growing seeds In boxes 
at home and In schools. 

In August and September the Sunday World also gave thousands of Individual drinking cup3 
to the school children of New York — "one of the very best things that any newspaper has ever done," 
declared a district superintendent. 

PUBLIC CONFIDENCE IN THE WORLD'S NEWS. 

Public confidence In the accuracy of The World's news columns was shown strikingly by a 
little incident In April. A conference was on In Philadelphia between a committee representing 
the United Mine Workers of Amerfca and another of the operators In the anthracite coal regions to 
arrange a scale. The mine workers, after the final conference, telegraphed to all their local organ- 
izations: "See article In New York World this morning (April 13). Be guided by that In dealing 
with the men." 

Then, too, Warren B. Stone, grand chief of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, chose 
The World as the best medium for placing his exclusive statement of wage-increase demands of his 
great organization before the bar of Public Opinion. In like manner The World has presented the 
Bide of the Industrial Workers of the World In an authorized page Interview with William D. Haywood. 

The year 1913 will see another of The World's ten political planks of 1883 an accomplished 
fact after a thirty years' fight. The amendment to the Constitution which will permit a tax on 
Incomes has been adopted by thirty-four States; four States have rejected It and of the ten whose 
Legislatures have not yet acted It Is certain that two will join their sister States to make the nec- 
essary three-fourths vote. Another piece of public service was a poll of Senators, Congressmen, Gov- 
ernors and public men of the country which disclosed a large majority In favor of one Presidential 
term without re-election. 

The American athletes who formed the winning Olympic team at Stockholm thanked The 
World for placing Its columns at the dlsposaFof their committee to assist In raising the large sum of 
money needed to pay their expenses to and at the games. 

TEN THOUSAND DOLLARS FOR FREE CONCERTS, i 

In December, 1911, The World announced that It had given SIO.OOO for a series of free orchestra 
concerts In the auditoriums of the city's schools, under the personal direction of Prof. Henry T. 
Fleck, head of the Department of Music of the Normal College. Sixty-one successful concerts were 
given and at some the attendance reached 5,000. The total attendance was 125,000. When Mme. 
Frances Alda sang In the Normal College auditorium 2,000 people were turned away unable to gain 
admission. The New York City Orchestra, numbering sixty pieces, added much. The orchestral 
were conducted by Prof. Fleck, Prof. Cornelius Rubner. of Columbia University; Prof. Samuel A. 
Baldwin, of the City College; Leo Schultz, 'cellist of the Philharmonic Society, and Frank Damrosch, 
head of the Musical Institute of Art. Among the soloists were Mme. Schumann-Helnk, contralto; 
Mme. Jomelll, Mme. Alda, Mme. Challa, sopranos; Miss Dagmar Rubner. pianist; Slgnor 
Alessandronl, baritone; Albert Spalding, violinist; Arthur Frledhelm, Albert von Doenhoff, pianists; 
Mile. Borschneck, Slgnor PratI, Edmund Thlele, Mme. Carrie Bridewell, Claud Cunningham, Edith 
Goold, Edward Dethler, Carrie Hlrschman, Harriet Barkley, Virginia Root, Marlon Van Duyn, 
Elsie Epstein, S. Freeman, H. Hepner. Hector Orpheus, M. Rosenzwelg, Vivian Holt, S. Mirtz. 
Mme. Saltzberg, Miss Raphael, L. S. Samolloff, Henrietta Bach and Angelo Secchl. These concerts 
provided for by The World were absolutely free and were primarily for the benefit of the music- 
hungry public which cannot afford to pay the prices asked at the Metropolitan Opera or Carnegie 
Hall. The last concert was given on March 17 In the auditorium of Public School No. 95 In West 
Houston Street. At Its close Borough President George McAneny said: "In behalf of the city I 
recognize what has been done for the city by this series of The World's popular concerts. It has 
been a distinct public service, characteristic alike In conception and In execution of the public spirit 
and genius of that great publisher and splendid citizen, Joseph Pulitzer." Prof. Fleck said: "The 
purpose of the series may fairly be considered to have been accomplished. It was to give the city 
authorities an object lesson In the need for just such popular performances of good music. Thanks 
to The World, It realized the Importance of the subject, and with Its usual public spirit rose to meet 
the people's need, making it possible for me to carry out my Ideas." 

OPENING OF THE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM. 

Joseph Pulitzer's plans for a School of Journalism for the endowment of which he gave $1,000,000 
supplemented by another 81,000,000 by his will, have been put In operation by President Butler and 
the trustees of Columbia University. Aided by the keen Interest and experienced judgment of the 
Advisory Board an efficient teaching staff of twenty-four was selected In the Spring and Dr. Talcott 
Williams, long editor of the Philadelphia Press, was placed at Its head as Dean, a choice worthy of 
the high Ideals of the foundation. The cornerstone of the stately building which Is to be Its home at 
the corner of Broadway and 116th Street was laid by Mrs. Kate Davis Pulitzer, widow of Mr. Pulitzer, 
on July 2 with simple ceremony. Inquiries flowed In during the Summer and September saw 100 
students enrolled, representing twenty-one countries and states. Including China and New Zealand. 
Nine of these are women. The school was formally opened on September 30 with exercises In Eari 
Hall when Dean Williams spoke of the Ideals of Its founder, and set forth the wide scope of the work 
for the year. 

THE EVENING WORLD'S SILVER ANNIVERSARY. 

The Evening World, with pardonable pride, reviewed on October 10 — Its twenty-fifth anni- 
versary — Its more notable journalistic accomplishments during those years. "While the news of 
the world at large Is never slighted and Is always accurately and fairly presented," It said, "The 
Evening World Is essentially a newspaper of New York for New Yorkers and visitors within our 
gates." Reasserting Its principles set forth In Its first editorial utterance on October 10. 1887. It 
continued: "For twenty-fivfe years the people of New York have piled proof upon proof of esteem 
and friendliness for the newspaper thus given Into their keeping. Dtirlng the fl>6t three months 
of Its existence the average dally circulation of The Evening World was 74,000. To-day that 
circulation exceeds 400.000. Its readers number a million and a half. To-day. therefore, this news- 
paper asks no more than proudly to renew Its pledge made a quarter of a century ago to the public 
that has so generously trusted It. The great brain which for twenty-four years directed Its policy 
and enterprise, whose Ideals from the first moment inspired and shaped Its course. Is forever with- 
drawn. But The Evening World dedicates Itself anew to the sacred duty of carrjing fearlessly 
and tirelessly forward the task from which Its founder never turned or faltered — to watcn over and 
further the happiness and well-being of the people to whom by right of solemn declaration and heroin 
eacrlfice the institutions and liberties of this city and country shall from all time descend." 



The Principal Lang^iages of the World, 



25 



lEspccauto* 



THE INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE. 

The following statemont has beeu prepared for The World Almanac: 

Elsperanto Is an artlflclal language Invented by the Russian Dr. L. L. Zamenhof, of Warsaw, Poland. 
It has only one object In view, namely, to serve as an International auxiliary language; It Is not In the least 
Intended to replace the national lauguages. The tirst book In the new language was published In 1S87. 

The Esperanto words are mostly of Latin, but to some extent also of Anglo-German origin, so that 
at the first glance Esperanto has the familiar appearance of a Roman language. 

The great success of Esperanto, wiilch Is now known and studied all over the world, is chiefly due to the 
facility with which It may be mastered. The pronunciation is strictly phonetic, making the .study of spelling 
unnecessary. The grammar does not admit of any exceptions to the rules, and Is so logical and simple 
that it may be learned completely in a few hours by any person who is familiar with the grammar of his 
mother tongue. The vocabulary consists of about 2,500 root words, a large majority of which Is known 
to anyone whose language contains a great number of Latin roots — for instance, English. 

In splt« of this small number of root words Esperanto has been made rich in words and expressions 
by the adoption of certain affixes and certain methods of word combination. By these simple and easy 
means a considerable vocabulary may be obtained. Esperanto Is a well-sounding language when spoken. 

Esperanto Is now used for all civilized purposes by many hundreds of thousands of persons In all 
civilized countries. It made its appearance In the United States In an organized form In 1905, when the 
first society for Its study was formed In Boston, and this was followed soon afterward by societies In New 
York and Philadelphia. It Is now promoted by a large and flourishing national association, the "Esperanto 
Association of North America." 

Esperanto has a large literature, over a hundred periodicals, including a numBfer in the United States, 
being published and a large and powerful "Universal Esperanto Association" maintains a regular .system 
of consulates all over the world, to facilitate the transaction of all kinds of legitimate business for Its mem- 
bers by means of the common tongue. 

International congresses of Esperautlsts have,be«i held at Boulogne, Geneva. Cambridge, Dresden, 
Barcelona. Washington, and Antwerp. The last was attended by delegates representing the Esperau- 
tlsts of forty different nations and languages. 

The Esperantlsts of America have established in Washington an offlce from which may be obtained 
without charge, any desired Information of the movement. Address "Esperanto Offlce," Washing- 
ton. D. C. 



Kf^t pcittcfijal ILanijttafles of tijc 2Motltr. 

There are said to be 3,424 spoken languages or dialects in the world, distributed as follows: 
America, 1,624; Asia, 937; Europe, 587; Africa, 276. 

The English language is spoken by more than 150,000,000 of people. 



German by more than 120,000,000 of people. 
Russian '» '' " 90.000.000 " 
French '♦ " " 60,000,000 



Spanish by more than 55,000,000 of people. 
Italian " " "• 40.000,000 " ' *^ 

Portuguese " " " 30.000,000'' 



The English language contains approximately 600,000 words. Of this total nearly one-half 
consists of scientific terminology seldom met outside of text-books and of archaic, obsolescent or 
obsolete terms. 

Various estimates of the sources of English words have been made at different times. On the 
basis of the Lord's Prayer, George Hickes calculated that nine-tenths of our words were of Saxon 
origin. Sharon Turner' s estimate was that the Norman were to the Saxon as 4 to 6. Trench com- 
puted 60 per cent. Saxon; 30 per cent. Latin, including those received through French; 5 percent. 
Greek, and 5 per cent, other sources. Prof. W. W. skeat in therecently published fourth edition of 
his Dictionary, which contains approximately 20,000 words, shows the following sources: 



163 
20 
99 

272 



135 

32 

102 



Anglo-Saxon and English 3,681 

Low German 126 

Dutch 207 

Scandinavian 693 

German 333 

French from Low German 54 

" Dutch or Middle Dutch 45 

** " Scandinavian 63 

'• '• (1) German 85 

" «* (2'> Middle High German.... 27 

•' •' (3) Old High German 154 

** *' (4) Teutonic 225 

•* (Romance languages) 297 

•♦ fromLatin 4,842 

" " LateLatin.... 828 

•• *• Italian 162 

Celtic 370 

Latin (direct) 2,880 

Provencal, from Latin 25 

Italian 99 

As regards the number ofwordsin the principal other languages no estimate of any practical value 
has been made in recent years, but existing dictionaries show the following facts: , 

The vocabulary of the New Standard Dictionary of the English Language aggregates approximate- 
ly 450,000 words. 

TheOerman word-book (Kurschner's Universal -Konversatlons-Lexikon) contains not more than 
300,000 words, including personal names. 

Grimrois Dictionary of the German Language contain^ approximately 150,000 words; Littre'a 
Dictionary of the French Language, 210,000 svords; Dahl's Dictionary of the Russian Language, 
140,000 words; Carlos de Ochoa's Dictionary of the Spanish Language, 120,000 words; Petrocchi's 
Dictionary of the Italian Language, 140,000 words. 

Thle table wm prepared by Dr. Frank H ViaeteUyi Managing Editor of the Standard Dictionary. 



Spanish 108 

Portuguese 21 

Greek direct or through Latin, LateLatin, 

French or other sources.... 2,493 

Slavonic 31 

Lithuanian 1 

Asiatic: Aryan languages, including Per- 
sian and Sanskrit 

European non- Aryan lauguages 

Semitic: Hebrew 

Arabic 

Asiatic: Non- Aryan, not Semitic, including 
Malay, Chinese, Japanese, Tatar, Aus- 
tralian 

A f rican languages. . , . , 

American 

Hybrid 675 

Unknown 12 



Total 19,160 



26 Negro Disfranchisement. 

ISTtfiro Hisfrancljiisrment, ~" 

Thk total numt)er of Afro-American males of voting age in the United States in 
1910 was 2,459,327, or 9.1 per cent. Many of these voters in the Southern Demo- 
cratic States are practically disfranchised and delsarred from voting. The law pre- 
scribes the qualifications of all voters, without regard to race, color or previous con- 
dition; but the conditions are so hard that few colored voters can meet the tests 
required of them and, technically at least, required of all men. No man can vote 
who has not been registered, and no man can be registered who does net possess 
either an educational or property qualification, the registration officers being the 
.iudges of the educational qualification of voters, and the tax books determining the 
pro'perty requirement. 

ELECTION LAWS OP SOUTHERN STATES. 
The foHowing are sections of some of the election laws of the South: 

Alabama 1st. Those who can read and write any article of the Constitution of 

the United ^States in the English language, and who are physically unable to work; 
and those who can read and •^"rite any article of the Constitution of the United 
States in the English language and who have worked and who have bften re^gularly 
engaged in seme lawful employmnent, business or occupation, trade or calling for the 
greater part of the twelve months next preceding the time they offer to register, and 
those who are una.ble to lead and write, iif such inability is due solely to phj'sical 
disability; or, 

2d. The owner in good faith in his own right, or the husband of a woman who 
is the owner in good faith in her own right, of forty acres of land situated in this 
State upon which they reside; or the owner in good faith in his own right or the 
husband of any w6man who' is the owner in good faith in her own right of any real 
estate situate in the State assessed for taxation at the value of three hundred dollars 
or more, or the owner in good faith in his own right or the husband of any woman 
who is the owner in good faith of her own right of personal proiperty in this State 
assessed at taxation at three hundred dollars or morg; provided, that the taxes due 
upon such real estate or personal property tfor the year next preceding the year for 
which he offers to register shall have been paid un'less the assessment shall have been 
legally contested and is undetermined. 

Georgia — 1st. Electi'O'ns by the people shall 1)6 by ballot, and only those persons 
shall be allo'wpd to vote who have first been registered in accordance with the require- 
ments of law. 

"Par. 2. Eivery male citizen of the State who is a citizen of the United States, 
twenty -one years old or upward, not laboring under any of the disabilities named in 
this article, and TDossessing the qualifications provided by it, shall .be an elector and 
entitled to register and vote at any election by the people; pro'vided, that no soldier, 
sailor or imarine in the military or naval service of the United States shall acquire 
the rights of an electcT by reason of bein^ stationed on duty in this State. 

"Par. 3. To entitle a p^ason to register and vote at any election by the people 
he shall have resided in the state one year next preceding the election, and in the 
county in which he offers to vote six months next preceding the election, and shall 
have paid all taxes which may have been required of him since the adaption of the 
Constitution o^ Georgia of 187 7, that he may have had an opportunity of paying 
agreeably to law. Such payment must have been made at 'least six months prior to 
the election at which he offers to vote, except when such elections are held within 
six months froJn the expiration of the time fixed by law for the payment of such 
taxes. 

"Par. 4. Every im-ale citizen of this State shall he entitled to register as an 
elector and to vote at all elections of said State who i.s not disqualified under the 
provisions of sectic»n 2 of article 2 of this Constitution, and who possesses the quali- 
fications prescribed in paragraphs 2 and 3 of this section, or who will possess them, 
at the date of election occurring next after his registration, and who, in addition 
thereto, comes within either of the classes provided tfor in the five following sub- 
divisions of this (paragraph. 

"1. All persons who have honorajbly served in the land or naval forces of the 
United States in the Revolutionary war, or the war of 1S12, or in the war with 
Mexico, or in any war with the Indians, or in the war 'between the States, or in the 
war with Spain, or who honoralbly served in the land or naval forces of the Con- 
federate States, of the State of Georgia in the war between the States, or, 

"2. All (persons lawfully descended rfrom those embraced in the sub-division next 
above, or, 

"3. All 'Persons who are of good character, and understand the duties and obli- 
gations of citizenship under a republican form of government, or, 

"4. All persons who can correctly read in the English language any paragraph 
of the Constitution of the United States or of this State, and correctly write the same 
in the English language when read to him by any one cf the registrars, and all per- 
sons who, solely because of physical disability, are unable to comply with the above 
requirements, but who can understand and give reasonable interpretation of any para- 
graph of the 'Constitution of the United States or of this State that may be read to 
them by one of the registrars, or, 

"5. Any person who is the owner in good faith in his own right of at least forty 
acres of land situated in this State, upcn wliich he resides, or is the owner in good 
faith in his own right of property situated in this State and assessed for taxation at 
1 the value of five hundred dollars." 

"Par. 5. The right to register under sub -divisions 1 and 2 of paragraph 4 shall 
continue only until January 1. 1915. But the registrars shaW prepare a roster of all 
persons who register under sub -divisions 1 and 2 af pa^ragraph 4. and shall return the 
same t<> the Clerk's office of the Superior Court of their counties, and the Clerks of 
the Superior Court shall send copies of the same to the Secretary of State, and it 
ehall be the duty of these •officers to record and permanently preserve these rosters. 
Any person who has been once registered under either of the sub-divisions 1 or 2 
of paragraph 4 shall thereafter be permitted to vote, provided he meets the require- 
jnents o-f paragraphs 2 and 3 of this section. 

"Par. 6. Any person to whom the right of registration Is denied by the registrara 



Neyro Disfranchisement. 27 

on the ground that he lacks the qua'lifioatipns set fo«rt'h in the five sub -divisions of 
paragraph 4 shall have the right to take lan appeal, and any citizen may enter an 
appeal from the decision of the registrars allowing any person to register under said 
sub-divisions. All appeals must be filed in writing with the registrars within ten 
days from the date of the decision complained of and shall be returned by the reg- 
istrars to the office of the Clerk of the Superior Court tc be tried as other appeals. 

"Par. 7. Pending an appeal and until the final decision of the case, the judg- 
ment of the registrars shall remain in full force. 

"Par. 8. No person sfiall be allowed to participate in a primary of any political 
j)€i/rty or convention o-f any political party in the State who is not a qualified voter." 

Louisiana — "iSection 3. He (the voter) shall be a'ble to read and write, and shall 
demonstrate his a-bility to do so when he applies for registration, by making, under 
oath administered by the registration officer or his deT>uty, written application there- 
for, in the Eng'lish language or his imother tongue, which application shall contain 
the essential faots necessary to show that he is entitled to register and vote, and shall 
be entirely written, dated and signed by him, in the presence of the registration 
officer or his deputy, without assistance or suggestion froim any. person or onemoran- 
dum whatever, except the fiorm of application hereinafter set forth. 

"Section 5. No male person who was on January 1st, 1867, or at any date prior 
thereto, entitled to vote under the Constitution or statutes of any State of the United 
States, wherein he then resided, and no son or grandson of any such person not less 
than twenty -one years of age at the date of the adoption of this Constitution, and no 
male person of foreign birth, who was naturalized prior to the first dasy vi January, 
18 85, shall be denied the right to register and vote in this State by reason of his 
failure to possess the educational or property qualifications prescribed by this Ccn- 
stitution; provided, he shall have resided in this State for five years next preceding 
the date at which he shall apply for registration, and shall have registered in ac- 
cordance with the terms of this article prior to September 1st, 1898, and no persoti 
shall be entitled to register under this section after that date." 

Mississimii — "Section 2 4 4. On and after the first day of January, 1892, every 
elector shall, in addition to the foregoing qualifications, be able to read any sectiG»n of 
the Constitution of this State; or he shall be able to understand the same when read 
to him, or to give a reasonable interpretation thereof." 

North Carolina — "Art. VI — 'Sec. 4. Every person presenting himself for registraticn 
shall be able to read and write any section of the Constitution in the English lan- 
guage, and shall show to the satisifaction o'f the registrar his ability to read and 
write any such section when he apaJlies for registration, and before he is registered; 
provided, however, that no ma-le person wby was, on January first, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-seven, or any time prior thereto, entitled to vote under the 
laws of any -State in the United States where he then resided, and no lineal descendant 
of such person shall be denied the right to register and vote at any election in this 
State by reason of his failure to possess the educational qualifications aforesaid: Pro- 
vided, that it shall be made to appear to the registrar that he or his ancestor was 
entitled to vote prior to January first, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-seven, 
in any State in the United States, as prescribed by article six, section four, of the 
Constitution, and such person, if otherwise qualified, shall be registered, and no 
registrar shall have the right to inquire whether such person can read or write." 

South Carolina — "Section 17 4. Every male citizen of this State and of the United 
States, twenty-one years of age and upward, not laboring under disabilities named 
in the Constitution of 1S9 5 of this State, and who shall have (been a resident of the 
<>tate for two years, in the county one year, in the polling precinct in which the 
elector offers to vote four months before amy election, and shall have paid six 
months before any election any poll tax then due and payable, and who can read and 
write any section of the said Constitution submitted to him by the registration officers, 
or can show that he owns and has paid all taxes collectible due the previ'O'us year on 
property in the State assessed at $300 or more and Tvho shall apply for registration, 
shall be registered." 

Virginia — '"Sec. 20. After the first day of January, nineteen hundred and four, 
every male citizen of the United States, having the qualifications of age and residence 
required in Section Eighteen, shall be entitled to register, provided: 

"First. That he has personally paid to the proper oftficer all State poll taxes as,;, 
sessed or assessable against him. under this or the former Constitution, for the three 
years next preceding that in which he offers to register; or, if he come -c'f age at 
such time that no poll tax shall have been assessable against him for the year pre- 
ceding the year in which he offers to register, has paid one dollar and fifty cents, 
in satisfaction of the first. year's poll tax assessable against him; or. 

"Second. That, unless physically unable, he makes application to register in his 
own handwriting, without aid, suggestion or memorandum, in the presence of the 
registration officers, stating therein his name, age, date and place of birth, residence 
and occupation at the time and for the two years next preceding, and whether he has 
previously voted, and, if so, the State, county, and precinct in which he voted last, 
and, 

"Third. That he answer on oath any and all questions affecting his qualifications 
as an elector, submitted to him iby the officers of registration, which questions, and 
his answers thereto, shall be reduced in writing, certified by the said officers, and 
preserved as a part of their official reooTds. 

"Sec. 21. Anv person registered under either of the last two sections, shall have 
the right to vote for members of the General Assemibly and all officers elective by the 
people, subject to the following conditions: 

"That he, unless exempted by Section Twenty-one, shall, as a prerequisite to the 
right to vote after the first day of January, nineteen hundred aftd four, personally 
pay, at least six months prior to the electixJn, all State poll taxes assessed or as- 
sessable against him. under this Constitution, during the three years next preceding 
that in which he offers to vote; provided that, if he register after the first day or 
January, nineteen hundred and four, he shall, unless physically unable, prepare and 
deposit his ballot, without aid, on such printed form as the law may prescribe: but 
any voter registered prior to that date may be aided in preparation of his ballot by 
such officer of election as be himself may designate," 



2&Noteworthy Articles m I^receding Volumes of World Almanac. 



NOTEWORTHY ARTICLES OR PARAGRAPHS IN PRECEDING VOLUMES OF 

WORLD ALMANAC." 



'THE 



Abticlss. Volume. Paee 

AOK OF THE Eaeth 1912... 16 

Alaska Boundary Award 1904. .148 

Alcoholic Drinks, Consumption of 1890. ..108 

Alien Landholders in the United States..l888... 90 

America, Four Centuries of 1901. ..106 

American Growth in a Century 1910. .165 

Apportionment Act, New 1912. .157 

Arbitration Treaties 1912 . .124 

Arizona Statehood 1912. .157 

Army,U. S. , General Officers WhoHave 

Risen from the Ranks 1900. .409 

Army, U. S. , Regimental Records 1904. ..351 

Australian Ballot System 1892... 90 

Australian Federation 1901. ..383 

Bartholdi Statue Described 1887... 24 

Battle Calendar of the Republic 1899... 85 

Bell Time on Shipboard 1902... 27 

Bible Statistics 1894.. .219 

Boodle Aldermen of New York, List of..l888... 118 
British Throne, Orderof Succession to ..1909.. 398 

Canada, Boundary Line Controversy 1902.. .184 

Canadian Reciprocity 1912.. 164 

Census, Decennial U.S., How Taken.. . .1910. .116 

Centuries Ago 1896... 44 

Chicago, World's Fair 1894... 81 

China Boxer Rising. 1902. .1.53 

Chinese J^ixclusion Act of 1892 1894. ..106 

Chinese Treaty with the U. S 1895.. 100 

CivU War of 1861-65 1899 . . 95 

Columbus to "Veragua, Pedigree 1894... 82 

Comets t 1911... 58 

Conemaugh Flood 1891... 67 

Conflagrations, Great 1911 . .272 

Confederate States of America 1908.. 337 

Conservation of Natural Resources, 

First Con f ereuce of Governors 1909. . 105 

Constitution of the State of New York. .1908. .164 
Constitutional Amendments, Proposed. .1890... 78 

Constitutions, State 1902. ..156 

Counterfeits, Dangerous 1890.. .136 

Country Life, The Commission on 1910. .111 

Cremation, Human 1912. .342 

Cuba, Intervention in 1906 3907. .136 

Cuban Reciprocity Treaty 1904...146 

Currency Actof 1908 1909.. 89 

Cyclones, Statistics for 87 Years 1889... 24 

Czar's Universal Peace Proposal 1899.. .306 

Dispensary Liquor Law of S. Carolina.. .1894.. .108 
Earthquakes, Their Cause and Result... 1910. .444 

Electricity, Death Penalty by 1889.. .114 

Faribault System of Education 1893. ..185 

Fecunditv, Statistics of. 1895. .231 

Financial Stringency of 1907 1908.. 388 

Fire Wastein the U.S 1910. .276 

Floriculture in the United States 1892.. .140 

Free Trade, Movement for 1910. .165 

Generals of the U. S. Army Since 1776. ..1902. .410 

Gold Standard Actof 1900 1901... 91 

Governors of States Since the Adoption 

of Their Constitutions 1906. .120 

Harvest Moon„ 1902... 49 

Hawaii, Joint Resolution Annexing 1899... 96 

High Living Expenses. Causesof 1911. .132 

Hundred Best Books, Lubbock .....~ 1895. .247 

Immigration Law of 1907 1908.. 184 

Income Tax of 18.94 1895.. 92 

Influence of the Moon on the Weather...l898... 52 

Inheritance, Lawof 1903. 229 

Intercontinental Railway 1907. ..245 

Jamestown Exposition 1907. 300 

Japanese and American Agreement 1909. .431 

Labor Movement! n U. S., Chronology of.l892... 93 

Labor Strikes, Tabular History of. 1895... 96 

Lambeth Encyclical 1909 354 

Land Areas in the U. S. and Europe 1890... 96 

Landowners, Alien, Number of, in the 

United States 1888.. 90 

lyegi.slatlve Assemblies of the World. . .1906. .372 
Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition. 1905 12 

Literary Pseudonvms 1904 292 

Lnmlnlferons Ether, The.. 1904.'.". 52 

Mars, The Planet 1902... 30 

Masonry, Degrees in 1902.. .324 



Articles. Volume. Pape. 

Mayflower Passengers 1908. .336 

Medal of Honor, U. S. Military, List of 

Persons Awarded 1899... 84 

Medical and Surgical Progress in the 

Nineteenth Century 1901.. .298 

Meteorites 1903.. 69 

Militia, Actof 1908 1909.. 93 

Millionaires, The American 1902. ..135 

Modernism, Pope's Encyclical on 1909.. 339 

Mormons, The 1897.. .329 

Mottoes and Popular Names of States. . .1910. .162 

National Political Platforms 1910. .203 

Naval Guns, Range of 1892.. .252 

Navy, U. S. , Historic Vessels of 1904. ..:^5 

New Mexico Statehood 1 912 . .157 

New Testament Chronology 1901... 28 

New York Citj\ Reconstruction of 1903. .389 

New York Public Service Act 1 912.. .102 

Nicaragua Canal Treaty 1902. 157 

Novels, Hundred Greatest 1895.. .246 

Occupations in the U. S 1910.. 589 

Panama Canal, Acquisition of 1905.. 126 

Panama, Treaty with 1904. 142 

Pilgrims of 1620 1908.. .336 

Porto Rico, Act for Civil Government. ..1901... 93 

Postage Stamps, Old, Pricesof 1893. .150 

Postal Savings Bank Act 1911 .126 

Prohibition Party, Growth of 1889... 97 

Pseudonj-ms, Literary 1904. .292 

Publicity of Political Contributions 1912.. 162 

Railroad Facts 1892. ..154 

Railroad Strike of July, 1894 1895.. 98 

Railway Between North and South 

America 1907.. 245 

Red Cross Treaty, International 1909.. 102 

Religious Bodies, U. S. Census of 1910. .516 

Roosevelt, Theodore, Pedigree 1908.. 334 

Russian Duma Called 1906. .141 

Russian-Japanese War. First Year 1905 .133 

Russian-Japanese War. Second Year. 1906.. 136 

Samoan Treaty 1901... 92 

Santo Domingo Treaty>, .1908.. .295 

Seismic Disturbances ol 1902 1903. .278 

Ofl903 1904. ..28 

'• Of 1906 1907.. 65 

Senators, V.ff, from 1789 1... 1904... 116 

Ship Subsidy Bill 1908 . .227 

Silver Purcha.se Repeal Legislation 1894. ..102 

Sliver Question 1886... 50 

1888... 68 

Socialist Demands 1907. .119 

Solar En erg J', Source and Maintenance. 1908. .134 

Solar Parallax and Sun's Distance 1912.. 68 

South African War and Map 1900.. 94 

South Carolina Liquor Law 1894. .108 

Spain, Treaty of Peace with 1900.. 88 

Spanish- American War, History of 1899.. 64 

Stars, The Fixed 1900.. 34 

Sub-Treasury Scheme of the Farmers' 

Alliance 1892... 91 

Sunshine, Duration of 1912.. 15 

Sun Spots, Their Influence on theEarth..l901... 49 

Tornadoes, Statistics o?,for 87 Years 1900... 35 

Torrens System 1910.. 130 

Truck Farming in the United States 1892.. .140 

Trusts, Principal 1908.. 306 

Venezuelan Boundary Treaty 1896... 67 

Veto Power of the p:xecutive in All the 

, States 1888... 58 

Vine Cultivation in the United States 1892.. .140 

Volapiik 1892. .195 

Volcanic Deposits of the U. S 1909.. 64 

Wage- Earners, Earnings of 1910. 107 

Warships of U. S. Since 1775 •. . . .1900 366 

Whist Rules, American 1909.. 230 

Women, American, Who Have Married 

Foreign Titles 1908.. .319 

World's Columbian Exposition 1893... 75 

" " " 1894... 81 

World's International Exposltions,List.*1892 .. 74 
World,The, AQuarter Century Hlstoryof 1908... 19 



THE WORLD ALMANAC FOR 1913. 



29 



Thk astronomical calculations in this work were expressly made for it by Dr. J. Morrison, 
and are given in local Mean Time. 



Chronological Eras. 



The year 1913 corresponds to the year 7421-22 of the Byzantine era; the year 7422 com- 
mencing on September 1: 5673-74 of the Jewish era, tlie year 5674 commeucing at sunset on 
October 1; 2666 since the foundation or Rome according to VaiTO; 268'J of tlie Olympiads (or 
the first year of the 673 Olympiad commencing July J); 2573 of the Japanese era, and to the 
first of the Taisei; 1331-32 of the Mohammedan era, the year 1332 beginning on November 
30. The 138th year of the Independence of the United States of America begins on July 4, 1913. 



Dominical Letter E 

Epact 22 



Chronological Cycles* 

Lunar Cycle (Golden iSrumber)14 
Solar Cycle 18 



Roman Indiction 11 

Julian Period 6626 



Date of Beginning of Epochs, Eras, and Periods. 



Name. 

Grecian Mundane Era 

Civil Era of Constantinople., 

Alexandrian Era 

Julian Period 

Mundane Era 

Jewisli Mundane Era 

Era of Abraham'. 

Era of the Olympiads 

Roman Era (A. U. C. ) 

Metonio Cycle 



.B.C. 



I ' K.r. 



Began. 

5598, Sent. 1 

5508, Sept. 1 

5502, Aug. 29 

4713, Jan. 1 

4008, Oct. 

3761, Oct. 

2015, Oct. 

776, July 

753, Apr. 24 

432, July 15 



Name. Began. 

Grecian or Syro- Macedonian Era..B.c. 312, Sept. 1 

Era of Maccabees " 166, Nov.24 

Tvrian Era " 125, Oct. 19 

Sidonian Era " 110, Oct. 1 

lulian Year " 45, Jan. 1 

Spauisli Era " 38, Jan. 1 

Augustan Era " 27, Feb. 14 

Vulgar Christian Era a. d. l,Jan. 1 

Destruction of Jerusalem " 69, Sept. 1 



Mohammedan Era. 



622, July 16 



"Vernal Equinox, 
Summer Solstice, 



Winter Solstice, 







The Seasons. 














D. 


H. 


M. 






Spring 


begins 


March 


21 


12 


10 


A. 


M. 


Summer 


begins 


June , 


21 


8 


1 


P. 


M. 


Autumn 


begius 


September 


23 


10 


45 


A. 


M. 


Winter 


begins 


December 


22 


5 


27 


A. 


^ 



\ 



Washington Mean Time, 



Morning Stars. 



Mercuky— January 1 to February 12; March 
28 to June 1 ; August 4 to September 16 ; Novem- 
ber 23 to end of year, 

Vexus— April 24 to end of year. ' . 

Maks— January 1 to end of year. 

Jupiter— January 1 to July 5. 

Satubn— May 29 to December 7. 



Evening Stars. 



Mercury— February 12 to March 28 ; June 1 to 
August 4 ; September 16 to November 23. 

Venus— January 1 to April 24. 

Mars— Not in this year. 

Jupiter— July 5 to end of year. 

Saturx— January 1 to May 29; December 7 to 
end of year,, 



January. 

1 Wednesday. 

5ii. Sun. aft. Christmas 

6 Epiphanv. 
12 i. Sun. aft. Epiphany 
19 Septuagesima Sunday 

26 Sexagesima Sunday. 

February. 

1 Saturday. 

2 Qulnquagesima Sun. 
6 Ash Wednesday. 

9 i. Sunday in I^ent. 
16ii. '' 
23iii. " 

27 Thurs. (Mi-Careme). 

March. 

1 Saturday. 

2iv. Sundayin Lent. 

9 V. " " 

36 Palm Sunday. 
21 Good F rid a J'. 
23 Easter Sunday. 
25 Annunciation. 
iiO i. Sunday aft. Easter. 



Church Memoranda for 1913, 

April. July. 



1 Tuesday. 

6 ii. Sunday aft. Easter. 
13iii. " 

20 iv " " " 

23 St. George. 
27 V. Sunday aft. Easter. 



May. 

1 Thursday, Ascension 
4 Sunday aft. Ascension 

11 Whit Sunday. 

18 Trinity Sunday. 

25 i. Sunday aft. Trinity. 



June. 

liL Sunday aft. Trinity 

Siii. 
15 iv. 
22 V. '* 

24 St. John (Baptist). 
29 vL Sunday aft. Trinity 



1 Tuesday. 

6 vii. Sun. aft. Trinity. 
13viii. " " 
20 ix. *' " " 

25 St. James the Apostle. 
27 X. Sun. aft. Trinitj'. 

August. 

1 Friday. 

3 xi. Sun. aft. Trinity. 

6 Transfiguration. 
lOxii. Sun. aft. Trinity. 
17xiii. " " 
24xiv. " " " 

31 XV. " " 

September. 

1 Monday. 

7 xvi. Sun. aft. Trinity. 
14 xvii. " " 
21xviii," " 
28xix. " " 

29 Michaelmas. 



October. 

1 Wednesday. 
5 XX. Sun. aft. Trinity. 
12xxi. " " 

18 St. Luke Evangelist. 

19 xxii. Sun. aft. Trinity. 
26xxiii. " " " 



November. 

' 1 Saturday-All Saints. 

2 xxiv.Sun. aft. Trinity. 

9 XXV. " 
16 X xvi." " " 
23 xxvii. " " '• 

30 Ad. .Sun.-St. Andrew. 

December. 

1 Monday. 

7 il. Sunday in Advent. 
14iii. " 

21 iv. " " " 
25 Christmas. 

27 St. John Evangelist 

28 i. Sum. aft. Christmas 

31 Wednesday. 



30 Standard Time. 



(t\)\xxi% jFasts. 



The Roman Catholic Days of fastiti!? are the forty days of Lent, the Ember Days, the Fridavs 
of the four weeks in Advent, and certain vigils or evenings prior to the greater feasts, while all Fri- 
davs of the year are days of ahstinence from flesh meat. In the American Episcopal Church the 
daVs of fasting or abstinence to be observed, according to the Book of Common Prayer, are the 
forty davs of Lent, the Ember Days, the three Rogation Days, and all the Fridays of the year 
except Christmas Day. In the Greek Church the four principal fasts are those in Lent, the 
week succeeding Whitsuntide, the fortnight before the Assumption, and forty days before 
Christmas, 



The interval between two consecutive transits of a fixed star over any meridian or the interval 
during which the earth makes one absolute revolution on its axis is called a Sidereal Day, and is invari- 
able, while the interval between two consecutive transits of the Sun over any meridian is called an 
Apparent 8olar Day, and its length varies from day to day by reason of the variable motion of the 
earth in its orbit and the inclination of this orbit to the equator on which time is measured. 

A Mean Solar Day is the average or mean of all the apparent solar da.vs in a year. Mean Solar 
jTtme is that shown by a well-regulated clock or watch, whWe Apparent Solar I'hne is that shown by-a 
well-constructed sun-dial; the dillerence between the two at anytime is the Equation of Time, and 
mav amount to 16 minutes and 21 seconds.. The Astronomical Day begins at noon and the Civil Day 
at the preceding midnight. The Sidereal and Mean Solar Days are both invariable, bufoue day of the 
latter is equal to 1 daj', 3 minutes, and 56. 555 seconds of the former. 

The interval during which the earth makes one absolute revolution round the Sun is called a Side- 
real Year, and consists of 365 days, 6 hours, 9 minutes, and 9. 6 seconds, whicli is invariable. 

The Tropical Year is the interval between two consecutive returns of the Sun to the Vernal 
Equino-N. If this were a fixed point, the Sidereal and Tropical Years would he identical ; but in conse- 
quence of the disturbing influence of the Moon and planets on the spheroidal figure of the earth, the 
Equinox has a slow, retrograde mean motion of 50". 26 annually, so that the Sun returns to the Equi- 
nox sooner every year than he otherwise would by 20 minutes 23. 6 seconds; the Tropical Year, there- 
fore, consists of '365 days, 5 hours, 48 minutes, and 46 seconds. The Tropical Year is not of uniform 
length ; it is now slowly decreasing at the rate of 595 second per century, but this variation will not 
always continue. 

Julius Csesar, in b. c. 45, was the first to reform the calendar by ordering that every year whose 
date luuuber is exactly divisible by 4 contain 366 days, and all other years 365 daj-s. The intercalary 
day was introduced by counting the Six//j. day before the Kalends of March tivice; hence the name 
bissextile, from bis, twice, and sex, six. He also changed the beginningof the year from Istof March 
to thelstof .lanuary, and also changed the name of the fifth month (Quintilis) to July, after himself. 
The average length of the Julian year is therefore 3t>5J^ days, which, however, is too long by 11 
minutes and 14 seconds, and this would accumulate in 400 years to about three days. The Julian 
Calendar continued in use imtil a. n. 1582, when the date of the beginning of the seasons occurred 10 
days later than in b. c. 45, when this mode of reckoning time was introduced. 

The Gregorian Calendar was introduced by Pope Gregory XIII. with the view of keeping the Equi- 
nox to the same day of the month. It consists of 365 days, but every year exactly divisible by 4 and 
thecenturial years which are exactly divisible by 400 contain 366 da%s;and if in addition to this 
arbitrary arrangement the centurial years exactly divisible b.v 4,000 contain 366 days, the error in the 
Gregorian system will amount to only one day in about 200 centuries I), however, 31 leap years 
were intercalated in 128 years, instead of 32 as at present, the calendar would be practically exact 
and the error would not aiuonnt to more than a day in 100,000 years. The length of the mean 
Gregorian Year may therefore be set down at 365 days', 5hours. 49 minutes. 12seconds. TheGregor- 
ian Calendar was introduced into England and her colonies in 1752, at which time the PZqninox had 
retrograded 11 days since tlie Council of Nice in a. d. 325, when the festival of Easter was established 
and the Equinox occurred on March 21; hence September 3, 1752. wa« called September 14. and 
at the same time the commencement of the legal year was chanered from March 25 toJanuarj'l. so 
that the year 1751 lost the months of January and February and the first 24 daj'S of March. The dif- 
ference between the Julian and Gregorian Calendars is now 13 days. Russia and the Greek Church 
still employ the Julian Calendar for civil and ecclesiastical purposes. 



.Stautrartr ^imr. 

Prjmaeily, for the convenience of the railroads, a standard of time was established by mutual 
agreement in 1883, by which trains are run and local tiine regulated. According to this svstem, the 
United States, extending from 65° to 125° west lougitU("(>, is divided into four time sections, each of 
150 of longitude, exactly equivalent to one hour, commencing with the 75th meridian. The flr.st 
(eastern) section includes all territory between the Atlantic Coast and an irregular line drawn from 
Detroit to <;tiarleston, S. C. , the latter being its most southern point. The second (central) section 
includes all the territory between the last-named line and an irregular line from Bismarck, N. D., to 
the mouth of the Rio Grande. The third (mountain) section includes all territory between the last- 
named line and nearly the western borders of Idaho, Utah, and Arizona, The fourth (Pacific) sec- 
tion covers the rest of the country to the- Pacific Coast. Standard time is uniform Inside each of these 
sections, and the time of each section differs from that next to it by exactly one hour. Thus at 12 
noon in New York City (eastern time), the time at Chicago (central time) is 11 o'clock a.m.; at 
Denver (mountain time), 10 o'clock a.m., and at San Francii^co (Pacific time), 9 o'clock a.m. 
Standard time is 16 minutes slower at Boston than true local time, 4 minutes slower at New York, 8 
minutes faster at Washington, 19 minutes faster at Charleston, 28 minutejj slower at Detroit, 18 
minutes faster at Kansas City, 10 minutes slower at Chicago, 1 minute faster »t St Louis, 28 minutes 
(ftster at Salt Lake City, and 10 minutes faster at San Francisco^ 



Easter Stinday. 



31 



^atilr of Bans i^ctUjfcn K\xiti M^ttn. 



ATABLEOFTHJE NUMBER OP DAYS BETWEEN ANY TWO DAYS WITHIN TWO YEARS. 


1 


1 


32 




d 

< 


i 

s 


a 

3 
"-5 


3 
<-> 




*-* 

If: 


o 

C 


> 
o 


i 




6 
3 


a 
366 


i 

397 




1— 1 
P. 


^ 

S 


a 

3 

»-3 


3 


3 
< 

578 


609 


o 
O 


o 


o 

ft 


1 


60 


91 


121 


152 


182 


213 


244 


274 


305 


335 


425 


456 


486 


517 


547 


639 


670 


700 


2 


2 


S3 


61 


92 


122 


153 


183 


214 


245 


275 


306 


336 


2 


367 


398 


426 


457 


487 


518 


548 


579 


610 


640 


671 


701 


3 


3 


34 


62 


93 


123 


154 


184 


215 


246 


276 


307 


337 


3 


368 


399 


427 


458 


488 


519 


549 


580 


611 


641 


672 


702 


4 


4 


35 


63 


94 


124 


155 


185 


216 


247 


277 


308 


338 


4 


369 


400 


428 


459 


489 


520 


650 


581, 612 


642 


673 


703 


6 


5 


36 


64 


95 


125 


156 


186 


217 


248 


278 


3tt9 


339 


5 


370 


401 


429 


460 


49t 


521 


551 


582 613 


643 


674 


704 


6 


6 


37 


65 


96 


126 


157 


187 


218 


249 


279 


310 


340 


6 


371 


402 


430 


461 


491 


522 


552 


583 


614 


644 


675 


705 


7 


7 


38 


6io 


97 


127 


158 


1»8 


219 


250 


280 


311 


341 


7 


372 


403 


431 


462 


492 


523 


553 


584 


615 


645 


676 


706 


8 


8 


39 


67 


98 


128 


159 


189 


220 


2:)1 


2«1 


312 


342 


8 


373 


404 


4:.S 463 


493 


524 


554 


585 


616 


646 


677 


707 


9 


9 


40 


68 


99 


129 


160 


190 


221 


252 


282 


313 


343 


y 


874 


405 


433' 464 


494 


525 


555 


586 


617 


647 


678 


708 


10 


10 


41 


69 


100 


130 


161 


191 


222 


253 


283 


314 


344 


10 


375 


406 


434 


465 


495 


526 


556 


587 


618 


648 


679 


709 


11 


11 


42 


70 


lol 


131 


162 


iy2 


223 


254 


284 


315 


345 


11 


376 


407 


435 


466 


496 


527 


557 


588 


619 


649 680 


710 


12 


12 


43 


71 


102 


132 


163 


193 


224 


255 


285 


^16 


346 


12 


6i t 


408 


436 


467 


497 


528 


558 


589 


620 


650 681 


711 


13 


13 


14 


72 


103 


133 


164 


194 


225 


256 


2»6 


317 


347 


13 


378 


409 


437 


468 


498 


529 


559 


590 


621 


651 682 


712 


14 


14 


45 


73 


104 


134 


165 


195 


226 


257 


2>i7 


318 


348 


14 


379 


410 


438 


469 


499 


530 


560 


591 


622i 652 683 


713 


15 


15 


46 


74 


105 


136 


166 


196 


22 1' 


25» 


288 


3iy 


349 


15 380 


411 


439 


470 


600 


531 


561 


592 


623 653 684 


714 


16 


16 


47 


75 


106 


136 


167 


197 


22« 


259 


289 


320 


350 


16 


381 


412 


440 


471 


501 


532 


562 


593 


624 654 685 715 


17 


17 


48 


76 


107 


137 


168 198 


2:i9 


2o0 


290 


321 


351 


17 


382 


413 


441 


472 


502 


533 


563 


594 


325 6551 686| 716 


18 


18 


49 


77 


108 


13S 


169 


199 


2;X) 


2*11 


2;tl 


322 


352 


18 


383 


414 


442 


473 


503 


534 


564 


595 626 656 6871 717 


19 


19 


50 


78 


109 


139 


170 


200 


231 


262 


292 


32;i 


353 


1<J 


384 


415 


443 


474 


504 


535 


565 


596 627 657 68&| 718 


20 


20 


51 


79 


110 


140 


171 


201 


232 


2();'. 


293 


324 


354 


2(1 


385 416 


444 


475 


505 


536 


566 


597 628 658 S89; 719 


21 


21 


52 


80 


111 


141 


172 


202 


233 


264 


294 


325 


355 


21 


386 417 


445 


476 


506 


537 


567 


698' 629' 659 690' 720 


22 


22 


53 


81 


112 


142 


173 


203 


234 


265 


295 


326 


356 


2-J. 


387 418 


446 


477 


507 


538 


568 


599i 630: 660, 691, 721 


23 


23 


54 


82 


113 


143 


174 


204 


235 


266 


296 


327 


357 


23 


388; 419 


447 


478 


508 


539 


569 


600: 631 1 6611 692 


722 


24 


24 


55 


83 


114 


144 


175 


205 


236 


267 


297 


328 


358 


24 


389 420 


448 


479 


509 


540 


570 


601 


! 6321 662 693 


723 


25 


25 


56 


84 


115 


145 


176 


206 


237 


268 


298 


329 


359 


25 


390' 421 


449 


480 


510 


541 


571 


602 


1 M 663i 694! 724 


26 


26 


57 


85 


116 


146 


177 


207 


238 


269 


299 


330 


860 


26 


391; 422 


450 


481 


511 


-.42 


572 


603 


634 6641 695| 725 


27 


27 


58 


86 


117 


147 


178 


208 


239 


270 


300 


331 


361 


27 


3921 423 


451 


482 


612 


543 


573 


604 


635 665 


6961 726 


28 


28 


59 


87 


118 


148 


179 


209 


240 


271 


301 


332 


362 


2b 


393 424 


452 


483 


51H 


544 


574 


605 


636 666 


697 


727 


29 


29 




88 


119 


149 


180 


210 


241 272 


302 


333 


363 


29 


394 ... . 


453 


484 


514 


545 


675 


606 


637 667 


698 


728 


30 


30 




89 


120 


150 


181 


211 


242 273 


303 


334 


364 


301 3951 . . . . 


454 


485 


515 


546 


576 


607 


638 668 


699 


729 


31 


31 




90 




151 




212 


243 .... 


304 




365l|31) 3961 ... 


455 




516 





577 


608 


... 6691 . . 


730 



The above talde applies to ordinary years only. For leap year, one day nnist be added to each 
number of dav.s after February 28. 

E.XAMPi.K. — To fiud the number of days between June 3, 1900, and February 16, 1901 : The fig- 
uresopposite the third day in the first June column are 154; tho.-se opposite the sixteenth day in the 
second February column are 412. Subtract the first from the second product — i. e, , 154 from 412, and 
the result is 258, the number of days between the two dates. 



A Table Showing the Date op Easter Sunday in Each Year op the Nineteenth anp 

Twentiet h Centuries. 

1902-Mar. 30. 1935-April 21. 1968— April 14- 

1903-ApriH2. 1936-April 12. 1969-April 6- 

19U4- April 3. 1937-lMar. 28. 1970-Mar. 29- 

1905-April 23. 3938-April 17. 1971-April 11- 

1906-Aprill5. 1939-April 9. 1972-April 2- 

1907-Mar. 31. 1940-Mar. 24. 1973-April 22- 

1908-April 19. 1941-April 13. 1974— April 14- 

1909-April IL iy42-April 5. 1975-]^Jar. 30- 

1910-Mar; 27. 1943 -April 25. 1976-April 18- 

1911— April 16. 1944-April 9. 1977— April 10- 

1912-April 7. 1945-April 1. 1978-]Mar. 26- 

1913-Mar. 23.' 1946-April 21. 1979-April 15- 

1914-April 12. 1947-April 6. 1980-April 6. 

1915-April 4. 1948-War. 28. l!)81-April 19. 

191f.— April 23. 1949-April 17. 1982-April 11. 

1917- April 8. 1950-April 9. 1983-April 3. 

1918-Mar. 31. 1951-Mar. 25. 1984-April 22. 

1919-Apnl20. 1952- April 13.' 1985-April 7. 

1920-April 4. 1953— April 5. 1986— Mar. 30. 

1921-Mar. 27. a954-April 18. 1987-Aprill9. 

1922 -April 16. 3955-April 10. 1988-April 3. 

1923-April' 1. 1956-April 1. 1989-]Mar. 26. 

1924-April20; 1957-April 21. 1990-April 15. 

1925-Aprill2. 1958-April 6 1991-Mar. 31. 

1926-April 4. 1959-Mar. 29. 1992-April 19. 

1927-Aprill7. 1960- April 17. 1993-April 11. 

1928-April 8. 1961-ApriI 2. 1994-April .3. 

1929-IMar. 31. 1962-April 22. 1995-Aprill6. 

1930-Ai)ril20. 1963-April 14. 3996-April 7. 

1931-April 5. li>64-]Mar. 29. 1997-Mar. 30. 

1932-Mar. 27. 1965- April 18. 1998-Aprill2. 

1933-Aprill6. 1966-April 10. 1999-April 4. 

1934- April 1. 1967-Mar. 26. 2000-April 23, 



i§5P 

1802- 

1803- 

1804- 

1805- 

1806- 

1807- 

1808- 

1809- 

1810- 

1811- 

1812- 

1813- 

1814- 

1815- 

1816- 

1817- 

1818- 

1819- 

1820 

1821- 

1822- 

1823- 

1824- 

1825- 

1826- 

1827- 

1828- 

1829- 

1830- 

1831- 

1832- 

1833- 

1884- 



April 5. 
April 18. 
April 10. 
April 1. 
■April 14 
April 6. 
Mar. 29. 
■April 17. 
Ai)ril 2. 
■April 22. 
April 14. 
Mar. 29. 
•Apri: 18. 
April 10. 
Mar. 26. 
April 14. 
April 6. 
Mar. 22. 
-April 11. 
-April 2. 
April 22. 
-April 7. 
Mar. 30. 
April 18 
-April 3. 
-Mar. 26. 
-April 15. 
-April 6. 
-April 19. 
-April 11. 
-April 3. 
-:5:pril22. 
-April 7. 
-Mar. 30. 



1835- 

1836- 

3837- 

1838- 

3839- 

1840- 

1841- 

1842- 

3843- 

1844- 

3845- 

1846- 

3847- 

1848- 

1849- 

3 850- 

3851- 

1852- 

1853- 

1854 

1855- 

3 856- 

1857- 

3858- 

3859- 

1860- 

3863- 

3 862- 

1863- 

1864- 

1865- 

1866- 

1867- 

1868- 



-April 19. 
April 3. 
-Mar. 26. 
April 15. 
-Mar. 31. 
April 39. 
-April 11. 
-Mar. 27. 
April 16. 
-April 7. 
■Mm: 23. 
-April 12. 
April 4. 
-April- 23. 
-April 8. 
Mar. 31. 
-April 20. 
April 11 
-Mar. '^" 
April 
-April 
Mar. 
-April 12 
-April 4. 
-April 24. 
-April 8. 
-Mar. 31. 
-April 20. 
-April 5. 
-Mar. 27. 
-April IH. 
-April 1. 
-April 21. 
-April 12. 



27. 

16. 

8. 

23. 



3869- 
1870- 
1871- 

3872- 

1873- 

3874- 

3875- 

1876 

1877- 

3878- 

1879 

3880 

3881 

3882- 

3883 

3 884 

1885 

3886 

3887 

3888 

1889 

1890 

3891 

1892 

1893 

3894 

3895 

3896 

1897 

3898 

1899 

1900 

1901 



-Mar. 28 
-April 17 
-April 9 
-Mar. 
-April 
-April 
-Mar. 
-April 
-April 
-April 
-A pril 
-INIar. 
-April 
-Ajiril 
-Mar. 
-April 
-April 
-.April 
— Ainil 
—April 
-April 21. 
—.April 6. 
-IMar. 29. 
—April 17. 
-April 2. 
-Mar. 25. 
-April 14. 
-April 5. 
-April 18. 
-April 10. 
-April 2. 
-April 15. 
-April 7. 



31. 
13. 

5. 
28. 
16. 

1. 
21. 
13. 
28. 
17. 

9. 
25. 
13. 

5. 
25. 
10. 

1. 



32 



Legal Holidays in the Various States, 



arsal ll^oliTJafis in ttje Uarious .States, 



January 1. Nkw Year's Day : lu all States 
(including District of Colnmbia, Porto Rico and 
Alaska), except Kansas and Massachusetts. (In 
Maine a bunk holiday only legally). 

Januarys. Anxivkrsary o*" thk Battle 
OF New Orleans : In Louisiana. 

January 19. Lke's Birthday: In Florida, 
Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Vir- 
ginia, Alabama, Mississippi and Arkansas. 

February. Mardi-Gras : lu the parish of 
Orleans, Louisiana. 

February 12. Georgia Day: In Georgia. 

February 12. Lincoln'sBirthi>ay: In Cali- 
fornia, Colorado, Connrecticut, Delaware, Illinois, 
Iowa, Indiana. Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, 
Montana, Nevada. New Jersey, New York, North 
Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Utah, 
Washington, West Virginia and Wyoming. 

February 22. Washington's B[rthday : 
In all the States, District of Columbia, Porto Rico 
and Alaska. 

Marck (Third Tue.sday). Primary Election 
Day: (every Presidential year) in North Dakota. 

March 2. Anniver.saky ok Texan Inde- 
pendence : In Te.xas. 

March 4. Inauguration Day: In District of 
Columbia in years when a President of the U. S. is 
inaugurated. 

March 21, 1913. Good Friday: In Alabama, 
Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Louisiana, Mary- 
laud, Miimesota, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, 
Porto Rico, Tennessee. 

March 22. Emancipation Day; In Porto 
Rico. 

April (First Monday). Annual Spring 
F.LECTION: In Michigan. 

April 12. Halifax Independence Resolu- 
tions: lu North Carolina. 

April 13. Thomas Jefferson's Birthday: 
In Alabama. 

April 19. Patriots' Day : In Maine and 
Massachusetts. 

April 21. Anniversary of the Battle of 
San Jacinto: In Texa.s. 

April 26. Confederate Memorial Day : In 
Alabama, Florida, Georgia and Ali-ssissippi. . 

May 10. Confederate Memorial Day : In 
North Carolina ?ind South Carolina. 

May (Second Friday). Confederate Day: 
In Tennessee. 

May 20. Anniversary op the Signing of 
the Mecklenburg Declaration op Inde- 
pendence : In North Carolina. 

May 30. Decoration Day : In all the States 
(and District of Columbia, Porto Rico and Alaska), 
except Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, 
North Carolina, .South Carolina, Tennessee and 
Texas. 

June 3. Jefferson Davis's Birthday: In 
Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennes- 
see, Texas and South Carolina. In Louisiana, 
known as "Confederate Memorial Day." Iii 
Virginia, in public schools. 

June 11. Kamehameha Day: In Territory 
Hawaii. 

June (Last Wednesday). Primary Election 
Day: In North Dakota. 

July 4. Independence Day: In all the States, 
and District of Columbia, Porto Rico and Ala.ska. 

July 10. Admission Day: In Wyoming, 

July 15. Pioneer Day: In Idaho. 

July 24. Pioneers' Day: In Utah. 

July 26. Landing of American Troops: 
Porto Rico. 

July (Fourth Saturday). Primary Election 
Day : In Texas. 

August. Primary Election Day: In Mis- 
souri. In Michigan (last Tuesday precedingevery 
general November election). 

August 1. Colorado Day: In Colorado. 

August 16. Bennington Battle Day : In 
Vermont. 

Skptkmbsb 1, 1913 Labob Day : In all the 



States (and District of Columbia and Alaska). In 
Louisiana, observed in Orleans Pari.sh. 

September. Primary Election Day: In Wis- 
consin, First Tuesday. In Oregon, even years. 

September (Third Saturday); Regatta Day: 
In Territory of Hawaii. 

Septembers Admission Day: In California. 

September 12. "Old Defenders' Day": 
In Baltimore, Md. 

October 12. Columbus Day: In Arkansas. 
California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, 
Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Mary- 
land, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Mon- 
tana, New Jei"sey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, 
Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, Vermont, 
Washington. ~ 

October 31. Admission Day: In Nevada. 

NovEjkiBERl. All Saints' Day: In Louisiana. 

November (first Friday). Pioneer Day : In 
Montana, observed in public schools. 

NOVEMBKR ^ GENERAL ELECTION DaY: In 

Arizona. California, Color.ado, Delaware, Florida, 
Idaho, Illinois (in Cairo, Chicago, Danville, Fast 
St. Louis, Qalesburg, Rockford and Springfield), 
Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, 
Micliigan, Minnesota, Mi-ssouri, Montana, Ne- 
vada, New Hampshire, New Jersey. New Mexico, 
New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, 
(from 5.30 a.m. to 9 a.m. only), Oklahoma, 
Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Caro- 
lina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texa.s, Virginia, 
West Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin and 
Wj'oming, in the years when elections are held 
therein. In 1913 in States holding such elec- 
tions the date is November 4. 

November bm 1913. Thanksgiving Day 
(usually the last Thursday in November): Is 
observed in all the States, and in the District of 
Columbia, Porto Rico and Alaska, though in some 
States it is not a statutory hoUday. 

December 25. Chrlstmas Day: In all the 
States (except Kansas), and District of Columbia, 
Porto Rico and Alaska. 

Sundays and Fast Days are legal holidays in all 
the States which designate them as such. 

There are no statutory holidays in Mississippi, 
but by common consent the Fourth of July, 
Thanksgiving and Christmas are observed. In New 
Mexico, Washington's Birthday, Decoration Day, 
Labor Day, Flag Day (June 14) and Arbor Day 
are holidays when so designated by the Governor. 
In South Carolina, Thursday of Fair Week is a 
legal holiday. 

ARBOR Day isalegal holiday in many States, al- 
though in some it is observed as designated by the 
Governor. 

Every Saturday after 12 o'clock noon is a legJll 
holiday in California in public offices, Illinois (in 
cities of 200, 000 or more inhabitants), Maryland, 
Michigan, New York, New Jersey, Ohio, Penn- 
sylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, the District of 
Columbia (for banking purposes), and in New 
Orleans, La., and Charleston, S. C. ; in Louisiana 
in all cities exceeding 10,000 inhabitants; in 
Missouri in cities of 100,000 or more inhabi- 
tants; in Tennessee, for State and county oflBcers, 
and in Colorado during June, July ana August; 
in Indiana, first Saturday in June to lastSaturday 
in October, inclusive, for all public offices in coun- 
ties having a county-seat of 100, 000 population or 
more; in New Hampshire in State offices. 

There is no national holiday, not even the 
Fourth of July. Congress has at various times 
appointed special holidays. In the second session 
01 the Fifty-third Congress it passed an act mak- 
ing Labor Day a public, holiday in the District of 
Columbia, and it has recognized the existence of 
certain days as holidays forcommercial purposes, 
but, with the exception named, there is no 
general statute on the subject. The proclamation 
of the President designating a day of Thanksgiv- 
ing only makes it a legal holiday in the District 
of Columbia »nd th® TerritorieSo 



Tlie Magnetic Poles. 



33 



Cime 2ii^0i*tnce» 



Placbi. 



IT IS AT 

Aden.. .T Arabia 

Amsterdam.. V Holland 

Athens 1 Greece 

Berlin Germany 

Bombay India 

Bremen Germany 

Central Time (b) United States 

Constantinople Turkey 

Copenhagen Denmark 

Dublin Ireland 

Eastern Time (a). . . United s-tates 

Hamburg Germany 

Havre France 

Hong Kong China 

Honolulu Hawaii 

Liverpool. England 

London England 

Madrid Spain 

Manila. Philippine Islands 

Mflbourne Australia 

Mountain Time (c). .United States 

Pacific Time(d) United States 

Paris France 

Rome Italy 

Stockholm Sweden 

St. Petersburg Russia 

Vien na Austria 

Yokohama Japan 



Wh«n It Is 12 


O'CLOCK Noon 


At 


ACCOBDING TO 












Eastera 


Central 


Mountaiu 


Pacific 




(») 


(b) 


(c; 


(d) 


London. 


Paris. 


Standard Time in the United States 




8.00 P. M. 


9.00 P.M. 


10.00 P. M. 


11.00 P.M. 


3.00 P. M. 


2.61 p. M. 


6.20 P.M. 


6.20 P. M. 


7.20 P.M. 


8.20 P. M. 


12.20 P. M. 


12.10 p. M. 


6.35 P.M. 


7.35 P. M. 


8.35 P. M. 


9.35 P.M. 


1.35 P. M. 


1.26 P. M. 


5.54 P.M. 


6.64 P. M. 


7.64 P. M. 


8.54 P. M. 


12.64 P. M. 


12.45 P. M. 


9.51 P.M. 


10.51 P. M. 


11.61 P. M. 


12.61 A.M. 


4.61 P. M. 


4.42 P. M. 


6.33 P.M. 


6.33 P. M. 


7.33 P.M. 


8.33 P. M. 


12.33 P. M. 


12.23 P. M. 


11.00 A.M. 




1.00 P. M. 


2.00 P. M. 


6.00 A.M. 


6.51 A. M. 


6.56 P.M. 


7.56 P.M. 


8.56 P. M. 


9.56 P. M. 


1.66 P. M. 


1.47 P. M. 


5,50 P.M. 


6.60 P. M. 


7.60 P. M. 


8.60 P. M. 


12.50 P. M 


12.41 P. M. 


4.34 P.M. 


6.35 P. M. 


6.36 P. M. 


7.35 P.M. 


11.36 A.M. 


11.26 A.M. 


• k • • 


1.00 P.M. 


2.00 P. M. 


3.00 P. M. 


7.00 A.M. 


6.51 A. M. 


5.10 P. M. 


6.40 P.M. 


7.40 P. M. 


8.40 P. M. 


12.40 P. M. 


12.31 P. M. 


5.00 P. M. 


6.00 P. M. 


7.00 P. M. 


8.00 P. M. 


12 NOON 


11.51 A.M. 


12.37 A. M.* 


1.37 A.M.* 


2.37 A. M. » 


3.37 A.M.* 


7.37 P. M. 


7 27 P. M. 


6.29 A.M. 


7.29 A.M. 


8.29 A. M. 


9.29 A.M. 


1.29 A.M. 


1.19 A. M. 


4.48 P. M. 


5.48 P. M. 


6.48 P.M. 


7.48 P. M. 


11.48 A. M. 


11.39 a.m. 


5.00 P. M. 


6.00 P. M. 


7.00 P. M. 


8.00 P. M. 


.... 


11.61 A.M. 


4.45 P.M. 


5.45 P. M. 


6.45 P. M. 


7.45 P.M. 


11.45 A. M. 


11.36 A. M. 


1.04 A.M.* 


2.04 A.M.* 


3.04 A. M.* 


4.04 A.M.* 


8.04 P. M. 


7.54 P. M. 


2.40 A.M.* 


3.40 A.M.* 


4.40 A.M.* 


5.40 A. M.* 


9.40 P.M. 


9.31 P. M. 


10.00 A.M. 


11.00 A.M. 





1.00 P.M. 


5.00 A.M. 


4.61 A.M. 


9.00 A.M. 


10.00 A.M. 


11.00 A.M. 




4.00 A.M. 


3.51 A.M. 


5.09 P.M. 


6.09 p. M. 


7.09 P. M. 


3.09 P. M. 


12.09 P.M. 


, _ 


5.50 P.M. 


6.50 P. M. 


7.50 P. M. 


8.50 P. M. 


12.50 P. M. 


12.41 P.M. 


6.12 P.M. 


7.12 P.M. 


8.12 P.M. 


9.12 P. M. 


1.12 P.M. 


1.03 P.M. 


7.01 P.M. 


8.01 P M. 


9.01 P. M. 


10.01 P. M. 


2.01 P. M. 


1.52 P.M. 


6.06 P. M. 


7.06 P.M. 


8.06 P.M. 


9.06 P.M. 


1.06 P. M. 


12.57 P. M. 


2.19 A.M.* 


3.19 A.M.* 


4.19 A.M.* 


5.19 A.M.* 


9.19 P. M. 


9.09 P. M. 



* At places m.irlted * the time noted is in the morning of the following day. 

(a) " Eastbbn " includes: New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Richmond, Norfolk, Charleston, Buf- 
falo, Pittsburgh, Montreal. Quebec, Ottawa, Toronto, etc. 

(b) " Cfntral" includes : Chicagfo, St. Louis, Minneapolis. St. Pan], Milwaukee, Kansas City, Omaha, Indianapolis, Cin- 
cinnati, Clevsland, Detroit, New Orleans, Memphis, Savaiimih, Pensacola, Winnipeg, etc. 

fc) "Mountain" includes : Denver, Leadville, Colorado Springs, Helena, Kefjina (N, W. T,), etc. 
d) " Pacific " includes : Sau Francisco, Portland (Oregon), Victoria, Vancouver, Tacoma, Seattle, etc. 



These holidays, with their names, had their origin In mediaeval England when the State religion 
was that of the Church of Rome, and they are still observed generally or in some parts of Britain. 



January 6. Twelfth Day, or Twelfth-tide, sometimes 
called Old Christma.s Day, the same as Epiphany. The previous 
evening is Tirelfth Night, with which manj' social rites have long 
been connected. 

February 2. Cavdlhmas : Festival of the Purification of the 
Virgin. Consecration of the lighted candles to be used in the 
church during the year. 

February 14. Old Candlemas : St. Valentine's Day. 

March 25. Lady Day : Annunciation of the Virgin. April 
6 is old Lady Day. 

Jl-ne 24. MiDsuNTMKR Day : Feast of the Nativity of John the 
Baptist. July 7 is old Midsummer Day. 

July 15. St. Swithix's Day. There was an old superstition 
that if rain fell on this day it would continue forty days. 

August 1. Lam.mas Day : Originally in England the festival 
of the wheat harvest. In the Church the festival of St. Peter's 
miraculous deliverance from prison. Old Lammas Day is 
August 13. 



September 29. Michaelmas: Feast of St. Michael, the 
Archangel. Old Michaelmas is October 11. 

NovKMBKR 1. All-hallowmas: All-hallows, or All Saints' 
Day. The previous evening is All-hallow-e'en, observed by home 
gatherings and old-time festive rites. 

November 2, All Souls' Day : Day of prayer for the souls 
of the dead. 



November 11. Martinmas; 
mas is November 23. 

December 28. Childermas 
Lady Day, Midsummer Day, 



Feast of St. Martin. Old Martin- 

• Holy Innocents' Day. 
Michaelmas, and Christmas are 
quarter (rent) days in England, and Whitsunday, Martinmas, 
Candlemas, and Lammas Day in Scotland. 

Shrove Tuesday, the day before Ash Wednesday, and Manndy 
Thursd.ay, the day before Good Friday, are observed by the 
Church. Mothering Sunday is Mid-Lent Sunday, in which the 
old rural custom obtains of visiting one's parents and making them 
presents. 



^l)e l^ajgnttic ^poles* 



The geographical poles of the earth are the extremities of the imaginary line passing 
through its centre of gravity and about which it revolves, and are therefore symmetrically 
located with regard to the equator. 

The magnetic poles, however, are not coincident with the geographical pcles, nor are 
they diametrically opposite to each other. Prior to the recent attempt of Amundsen to 
determine the north magnetic pole, the only other was by Capt. James Ross in June. 1831. 
who found the dip of the magnetic needle to be 89° 59' ,5, in latitude 70° 5' .2 N. and 
longitude 6° 45' .8 W., which is in King William Land. Canada. The result of 
Amundsen's observations has not yet been published by the Norwegian authorities. 

The position of the south magnetic pole has been located in latitude 72° 23' S. and 
longitude 154° E., by Prof. Edward David and Mr. Douglas Marson, members of Lieut. 
Shackleton's expedition to the South Pole, which left New Zealand on January 1, 1908. 

By reason of the annual variation of the magnetic needle, it is believed that the 
magnetic poles are not stationary, but have a slow motion around the geographical poles. 
The subject is shrouded in mystery and constitutes one of the many as yet unsolved 
problems in terrestrial physics. 



34 



The French Eevolutlonary Era. 



K^\^lt of J^rmoratJle Bates* 



B. C. 

1183 
1082 
878 
776 
753 
5SS 
536 
509 
4S0 

55 
4 

A. Dl 

■-■9 

'U 

313 

410 

t'il 

lOoiJ 
1096 
1172 
l-ila 

1265 

1413 

1431 
1453 
1453 
1462 
1471 
)4S6 

1492 
1517 
1519 
1533 
U39 
1558 
1565 
1565 
1572 
1588 
1600 
1603 
1605 
1607 
1609 
1616 
1618 
1620 
1623 
1634 
163B 

1640 

1649 
1653 

1660 
1664 
1664 
1666 
1679 



Fall of Troy. 

Era of the Great Pyramid. 

Carthage founded. 

Olympic Era began. 

Foundation of Home. 

Jerusalem taken by Nebuchadnezzar. 

Uestoration of the Jews under Cyrus. 

Expulsion of I'arquins from Rome. 

Xerxes defeated Greeks at Ther- 

mopylie. 
Csesar conquered Britain. 
Uirth of Jesus Christ. 

The Crucifixion. 

.Jerusalem was destroyed by Titus. 
Coustantiue convened toChristianity 
The Romans abandoned IJritaiu. 
Egbert, first king of all England, 

Oct. 14. 
Battle of Hastings, Norman Conquest 
The Crusades begau. 
Ireland was conquered by Henry 1 1 
King John granted JMagua 

June 15. 
First Representative Parliament lu 

England. 
Battle of Aglncourt, Oct. 25. 
Joan of Arc was burnt, May 30. 
Constantinople taken by the Turks. 
The Wars ot the Roses begau. 
The Bible was first printed at Meutz. 1789 
Caxtou set up his printing press. [l7sy 
The feuds of York and Lancaster 1793 

ended. |l793 

Columbus discovered America, Oct.l2 1796 



settled. by William 



A., c. 

1662 Pennsylvania 

Penn. 
1685 Revocation of the Edict of Xantes, 

Oct. 22. 
1688 .lames II. abdicated, Dec. 11. 
1690 Battle of the Boyne, July 1. 
1690 First newspaper in America; at 

Boston. 
1704 Gibraltar was taken by the English. 

1713 Peace of Utrecht, April 11. 

1714 Accession of House of Hanover, Aug. 1 

1715 First Jacobite Rebellion in Great 
Britain; the second in 1745. 

1720 South Sea Bubble. 

1745 Battle of Fontenoy, April 30. 

1756 Black Hole Suffocation in Calcutta. 

1757 Clive won Battle of Plassey In India. 
1759 Canada was taken from the French. 
1765 Stamp Act enacted. 
1773 Steam engine perfected by Watt. 
1773 Tea destroyed in Boston Harbor, 

Dec. 16. 
Charta, 11775 Battle of Lexington, April 19. 

1775 Battle of Bunker Hill, June 17. 

1776 Declaration of Independence, July 4. 

1777 Burgoyne's surrender, Oct. 17. 
1779 Capt. Cook was killed, Feb. 14. 
17sl Cornwallis' surrender at Yorktown, 

Oct. 19. 
1788 First settlement in Australia, Jan. 26. 
The French Revolution began July 14 
Washington first inaug'ted President 



suc- 



The Reformation began in (Germany 

Cortez began tlTe conquest of Jlexico. 

The first Euglish Bible printed. 

Monasteries were closed in England. 

Accession of Queen Elizabeth, Nov. 17 

Revolt of the Netherlands begau. 

St. Augustine. Florida, settled. 

The St. Bartholomew Massacre, Aug.24 

The Spauish Armada defeated, .luly. 

East India Company first chartered. 

UnioQ of Englanil and Scotland. 

The (iunpowder I'lot in England. 

.lamestown, Va., was settled. 

Hudson River first explored. 

Shakespeare died, April 23. 

Thirty tears' Warin(iermany began. 

Pilgrims by the JIayllower landed. 

Manhattan Island settled. 

Maryland settled by Roman Catholics 

Khode Island settled by Itoger 
■Williams. 

Cromwell's Long Parliament assem- 
bled. 

Charles I. was beheaded, Jan. 30. 

Oliver Cromwell became Lord Pro- 
tector. 

Itestoralion of the Stuart^ . 

New York conquered from the Dutch. 

The great plague of London. 

The great fire of London began Sept.2. 

Habeas Corpus Act passed in Eng- 
land. 



Cotton-gin invented by Whitney 
Louis XVI. of France executed,.Ian.21 
Vaccination discovered by Jeuner. 
179i The Irish Rebellion. 
1799 Battle of Seringapatam ; death of 

Tippoo. ^ 

1799 Bonaparte declared First Consul, 

Nov. 10. 
1801 Union of Great Britain and Ireland, 
Jan. 1 

1803 Louisiana purchased from the French 

1804 Bonaparte became Emperor of France 

1805 Battle of Trafalgar; death of Nelson, 
1807 Fulton's first steamboat voyage. 
1812 Second war with Great Britain. 

1812 The French expedition to Moscow. 

1813 Perry's victory on Lake Erie, Sept. 10 

1814 The printing machine invented. 

1814 Scott's " Waverley " published. 

1815 Battle of New Orleans, Jan. 8. 
1815 Battle of Waterloo, June 18. 

1819 First steamship crossed the Atlantic. 

1820 Missouri Compromise adopted. 
1823 Monroe Doctrine declared, Dec. 2. 
1828 First passenger railroad in U. S. 
1830 llevolution in France, Orleanist suc- 
cession. 

1832 S.Carolina Nullification Ordinance. 
1835 Morse invented, the telegraph. 
1835 Seminole War in Florida began. 
1837 Accession of Queen Victoria, June 20 

1845 Texas annexed. 

1846 Sewing machine completed by Howe. 
1846 The Irish Potato I'amine. 
1846 British Corn laws repealed, June 26. 



A. D. 

1846 War with Mexico began. 

1848 French Revolution. Uepublio 

ceeded. 
1848 Gold discovered in California, Sept. 
1851 Gold discovered in Australia, Feb. 12 

1851 First InlernationalExhibit'n, London. 

1852 Louis Napoleon became Emperor. 

1853 Crimean War begau. 

1854 Japan opened by Commodore Perry. 
1357 The Great Mutiny in ludia. 
1857 The Dred Scott decision. 
1837 First Atlantic cable mes'-age, Aug. 4. 

1859 John Brown's raid into Virginia. 

1860 South Caiolina seceded, Dec. 20. 

1861 Emancipation of the Uussian serfs. 
1863 Lincoln's Emancipation Proclaiua< 

tiou, Jan. 1. 
1863 Battle of Gettysburg, July 1-3. 
1865 Lee surrendered at Appomattox, 

April 9. 
1865 Pres. Lincoln assassinated, April 14. 
1867 l^laximilian of Mexico executed. 
1867 The Dominion of Canada established 

1869 Financial "Black Friday" iu N. Y., 
Sept. 24. 

18T0 Franco-German War began, July 19. 
J870 French capitulated at Sedan, Sept. 1. 

1870 liome became the capital of Italy. 

1871 The German Empire re-established. 
1871 The Irish Church was disestablished. 
1871 The great fire in Chicago, Oct. 8-11 . 
1879 The great fire in Boston, Nov. 9. 
1876 Prof. Bell perfected the telephone. 
1876 Ceutennial Exposlt'n at Philadelphia 
1881 President Garfield shot, July 2. 

1888 Great Blizzard in Eastern p.irt of 
U. S., March 11-14. 

1889 Brazil became a Republic. 
1889 Johnstown, Pa., flood. May 31. 

1893 World's Fair at Chicago. 

1894 Chinese-Japanese War began. 

1895 Cuban Kevolution began, Feb. 

1897 The Turkish-Greek War. 

1898 The Spanish-American War. 

1899 Universal Peace Conference. 

1899 The South African War began. 

1900 Boxer Insurrection in China. 

1900 The Galveston torn:ido, Sept. 8. 

1901 Death of Queen Victoria.' 

1901 Assassination of PresidentMcKinley 

1902 M:ittiiiique destroyed by volrano. 

1903 Uepublic of Panama established. 

1904 The Gre.it Fire in Baltimore, Feb. 7. 
19"4 The Uusso-.Tapaiiest War began. 
1906 Sun Francisco earthquake and con- 
flagration. 

American Battleship fleet nearly cir- 
cumnavigated the Globe. 
Great Earthquake in Southern Italy, 
The North I'ole discovered, April 6. 
Kevolution iu Portugal. ICepublic 
established. 
1911 The Italian-Turkish War began. 
1911 The South Pole discovered, Dec. 14. 

1911 China proclaimed a Republic. 

1912 Steamship Titanic wrecked, Aprl J 14. 



.20. 



1908 

1908 
!909 
1910 



K\)t JFrtnci) ivci)olutionar;» 2Sra. 

In September, 1793, the conveatiou decreed that the common era should be abolished in all civil affairs, and that the new 
French era sliouKl begin on September 22, 1792, the day of the true autumnal equinox, and that each succeeding year should 
begin at the midnight of the day on which the true autumnal equiuox falls. The year was divided into twelve months of 
thirty days each. In ordinary years there were five extra days, from the 17th to the 21st of our September, and at the end of 
every fourth year was a sixth complimentary day. This reckoning was first used on November 22, 1793, and was continued 
until December 31, 1S05, wiien it was discontinued, and the (iregorian calendar, used throughout the rest of Europe, was re- 
sumed. The following were the dates for the year 1804, the last complete year of this style of reckoning : 



Vendemiaire (Vintage), September 23 to October 22. 
Brumaire (.Foggy), October 23 to November 22. 
Frimaire (Sleety), November 22 to December 21. 
Nivose (Snowy), December 22 to January 21. 

Pluviose (Rainy), January 21 to February 20. 

Ventose (Windy), February 20 to JIarch 19. 



Germinal (Budding), March 22 to April 21. 

Floreal (Flowery), April 21 to May 20. 

Prairial (P.asture), May 2l to June 20. 

Messidor (Harvest), June 20 to July 19. 

Thermidor (Hot), July 20 to August 19. 

Fructidor (Fruit), August 19 to September 18. 



The months were divided into three decades of ten days eacn, but to make up the 365 five were added at the end of Sep- 
tember: I'riraidl, dedicated to Virtue; Duodi, to Genius ; Tridl, to Labor , Quartidi, to Opinion, and Quintidi, to Uewards. 
To Leap Year, called Olympic, a sixth day, September 22 or 23, Sextidi, " the day of the Revolution," was added. 

To each tenth d ly, thirty-six in all, were assigned thirty-six " Fetes Deeadaires," decreed by the National Conyention on 
the eighteenth Prairial, In honor of the Supreme Being and Nature, the Human Bace, the French People, Benefactors of Hu- 
manity, Martyrs for Liberty, Liberty and Equality, the Republic, Liberty of the World, Love of Country, Hatred of Tyrants 
and Traitors, Truth, Justice, Modesty, Glory and Immortality, Friendship, Frugality, Courage, Good Faith, Heroism, Dlsln- 
teresteduess. Stoicism, Love, Conjugal Fidelity, Paternal Love, Maternal Tenderness, Filial Piety, Infancy, Childhood, .Mau- 
houd, i)^ Age, .Sickness, Agriculture, Industry, Our Ancestors, Our Po.sterliy, <iooduess. 



















^alCUiTtllMS 


foe 


1913 


autr 


1914 


» 












1 
< 


J5 




1913 




1914 


• 


a 

3 
03 


Mon. 
Tues. 




3 


(I. 






a 

3 


a 
o 


0! 




C 

3 

a 
h 


FrI. 
Sat. 




c 

3 
02 


c 
o 


i 

3 


•6 










02 


a 
o 


i 

3 


•6 


3 
Si 

h 


i 


rt 


Jan. 






1 


2 


3 


4 


ijuly. 






1 


2 


3 


4 5 


Jan. 










1 


o 


3 


July. 








1 


2 3 


4 




5 


6 7 


8 


9110 


11 




6 


7 


8 


910 


11 12 




4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 




5 


6 


7 


8 


9 10 


11 




12'l3ll415'16'17 


18 




13 


1415 


1617 


18!l9 




11 


12 


13ll4jl5!l6 


17 




12113 


14 


15 


16 17 


18 




19i20;2122:23 


24 


25 




20 


21 


22 23 


24 


25 26 




18119 


2021 


22 23 


24 




19 20 


21 


22 


23:24 


25 




2fi 


27 


28 29 


30 


31 






27 


28 


29 30 


31 


1 




2526 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




26,27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




Feb. 














1 


iAug. 










i 2 
















. . 


Aug. 






. . 








i 




2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 




3 


4 


5 6 


7 


8 9 


Feb. 


i 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




10 


11 


12,13 


14 


1516 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


2223 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




16 


17 


IS 


19 


20i21 


22 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 






24 


25 


26 27 


28 


29 30 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


Mar. 














1 




31 






.. 
























30 


31 






, 




, , 




2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


Sept. 




i 


2 3 


4 


5 6 


Mar. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


Sept. 






i 


2 


3 


4 


5 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12113 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 




6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 




Ifi 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 




15 


16 


17 


IS 


19 


20 


21 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 




21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 1 




22 23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




30 


31 














28 


29 


30 












29 30 


31 




.. 








27 


28 


29 


30 








April. 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


Oct. 








1 


2 


3 


4! 


















Oct. 






, 


, 


i 


2 


3 




fi 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 




5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


April. 








1 


2 


3 


4 




4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


y 


10 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




5 


6 


7 


S 


9 


10 


11 




11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 




27 


28 


29 


30 










26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






19 201 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 




25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


























. 










26 


27 


28 


29 


30 














, 


, , 






May. 










1 


2 


3 


Nov. 














1 


May. 












1 


2 


Nov. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


6 


6 


< 




4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 




2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 




3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 




11 


1213;i4 


15 


16 


17 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 




15 16 


i7;i8 


19 


20 


21 




18 


19,2021 


22 


23 


24 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 23 




22123 


24 


25 26 27 


28 




25 


26 27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




23 


24 


25 26 


27 


28 


29; 




24 


25 


26 27 


28 


29 30 




29 30 






, , 




. , 




















30 










.. ! 




31 




























June. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


Dec. 




1 


2 3 


4 


5 


6 


June. 




1 


2 


.3 


4 


.5, 6 


Dec. 






i 


2 


3 


4 


5 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 




7 


8 


910 


11 


12 


13 




7 


8 


9 101 


11 


12 13 




6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 




15 


1617 


IS 


19 


20 


21 




14 


151617 18 


19 


20 




14 


15 16 


17 


18 


19,20 




13 14 


1516 


17 


18 


19 




22 


2324 


25 


26 


27 


28 




2122 23 24 25126 27 




2122 23 


2425 


26l27 




20 21 


22 23 


24 


25 


26 




29 


301.. 












28 29 30 31I..I..I.. 




28i29 30 


. .1. . 


.. .. 




27 28 


29 30 


31 







^nniljersarfc.Q* 



DATES OV HISTOKICAIv EVENTS CUSTOMARII.Y OR OCCASIOXALLY OBSERVED. 



Jan. 



Jan. 


8. 


Jan. 


17. 


Jan. 


19. 


Jan. 


27. 


Jan. 


29. 


Feb. 


12. 


Feb. 


15. 


Feb. 


22. 


March 5. 


Marcl 


il5. 


March 18. 


April 


6. 


April 


9. 


April 


12. 


Anril 


12. 


April 


13. 


April 


14. 


Ap. 18-19. 


April 


19. 


April 


19. 


April 


23. 


April 


27. 


April 


30. 


May 


1. 


May 


13. 


May 


13. 


May 


18. 


May 


20. 


May 


24. 


June 


3. 


June 


14. 


June 


15, 


June 


17. 


June 


18. 


June 


28. 



Emancipation Proclamation by Lincoln, 
1863. 

Battle of Tsew Orleans, 1815. 

Franklin born, 17U6. 

Robert E. Lee born, 1807. 

German Emperor born, 1859. 

William McKiuley born, 1843. 

Abrahani Lincoln born, 1809. 

Battle- ship Maine blown up, 1898. 

George Washington born, 1732. 

Boston Massacre, 1770. 

Andrew Jackson born, 1767. 

Grover Cleveland born, 1837. 

The North Pole reached by Commander 
Robert E. Peary, 1909. 

Lee surrendered at Appomattox, 1865. 

Fort Smnter fired on, 1861. 

Henry Clay born. 1777. 

Thomas Jefferson born, 1743. 

Lincoln assassinated, 1865. 

Earthquake and great conflagration at 
San Francisco, 1906. 

Pri mrose Dav in England, Lord Beacons- 
field died, 1881. 

Battles of Lexington and Concord, 1775. 

Shakespeare born, 1564. 

Gen. U. S. Grant born, 1822. 

Washington was inaugurated first Presi- 
dent, 1789. 

Dewev destroyed the Spanish fleet at 
jNlauila, 1898. 

First English settlement in America, at 
.lamestown. 1607. 

Society of The Cincinnati organized by 
officers of Revohitionary Armj-, 1783. 

The Czar of Russia born. 1868. 

Mecklenburg, N. C. , Declaration of In- 
dependence, 1775. 

Queen Victoria born, 1819. 

King George V. born, 1865. 

Flag Day in the United States. 

King John granted Magna Charter at 
Runnymede, 1215. 

Battle of Bunker Hill, 1775. 

Battle of Waterloo, 1815. 

Battle of Fort Moultrie, Charle.ston, 
S. C. , 1776. 



July 


1 


July 


1-3. 


July 


2 


July 


3. 


July 


4. 


July 


12. 


July 


14. 


July 


16. 


July 


21. 


Aug. 


7. 


Aug. 


13. 


Aug. 


16. 


Aug. 


28. 


Sep, 


1. 


Sep. 


6. 


Sep. 


10. 


Sep, 


IL 


Sep. 


13. 


Sep. 


14. 


Sep. 


15. 


Sep. 


17. 


Sep. 19-20. 


Sep. 


20. 


Oct. i 


i-n. 


Oct, 


12. 


Oct. 


17. 


Oct. 


19. 


Oct. 


27. 


Nov, 


5. 


Nov. 


9. 


Nov. 


10. 


Nov. 


25. 


Dec. 


2. 


Dec. 


14. 


Dec. 


14. 


Dec, 


16. 


Dec. 


16. 


Dec, 


22. 


Dec. 2; 


5-26 


Dec, 


28. 



Dominion Day in Canada. 

Battle of Gettvsburg, 1863, 

President Garfield shot, 1881. 

Cervera's fleet was destroyed off San- 
tiago, 1898. 

Declaration of Independence, 1776. 

Orangemen's Day. 

The Bastile was destroyed, 1789. 

Santiago surrendered. 1898. 

Battle of Bull Run, 1861. 

Gen. Nathanael Greene born, 1742. 

Manila surrendered to Americans, 1898. 

Battle of Bennington, Vt. . 1777. 

Montenegro became a kingdom, 1910. 

Capitulation of Sedan. 1870. 

Presideut McKinley shot at Bu tTalo.1901. 

Battle of Lake Erie, Perrj^'s victory, 
1813. 

Battle of Lake Champlain, McDon- 
ough's victory, 1814. 

Battle of Chapultepec, 1847. 

City of Mexico taken by U. S. troops. 1847. 

William H. Taft born, 1857. 

Battle of Antietam, 1862. 

Battle of Chickamauga, 1863. 

Italians occupied Rome, 1870. 

Great fire of Chicago, 1871. 

Columbus discovered America, 1492 

Burgoyne surrendered at Saratoga, 1777. 

Cornwallis surrendered. Yorktown, 1781. 

Theodore Roosevelt born, 1858. 

Guy FaW'kes Day in England. The Gun- 
powder Plot discovered, 1604. 

Great fire of Boston, 1872. 

Martin Luther born, 1483. 

British evacuated New ^'ork, 1783. 

Battle of Austerlitz, 1805. 

Washington died, 1799. 

The South Pole reached by Capt. Raoul 
Amund.sen, 1911. 

Boston "Tea Party," 1773. 

The great fire in New York, 1835. 

Mavflower pilgrims landed at Plymouth 
Rock, 1620. 

Battle of Trenton, N. J. , 1776. 

Woodrow WiLsou born, 1856. 



36 



Ready -Reference Calendar. — 1. 



J^eaTrg=:2^eftrntce <S:alentrar,— -K 

For ascertaining the Day of the Week for any given Time from the Beginning of the 

Christian Era to the Year 2200. 



KULK—Tb the day of the Month, add Factors for Month, Ontury, and Year, and divide the total by 7. 

Tf tliere is no remainder, the day is Sunday. 
' • 1 is the remainder ' • Monday. 



'• 2 
" 3 
" 4 
" 5 
" 6 



Tuesday. 

Wednesday. 

Thursday. 

Friday. 

Saturday. 



Should the 
total be -less 
than7,itisto 
be taken as a 
remainder. 



EXAMPLE : 

Week-day of Washington's Birthday, February 22, 1913. 

Factors for 



Day. Mouth. Centui-j-. Year. 

22 +5 + 5+2 = 34 

34 divided by 7 leaves 6 remainder, therefore the day 
will be Saturday. 



MONTHS. 
For Leap j-ears figures in heavier tj'pe to be taken. 





Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


o 


2 


5 


5 


1 


3 


6 


1 


4 





2 


5 





1 


4 























CENTURIES (Cardinal Numbers). 
The year 00 of Centuries in heavier type was, or will be, a Leap year. 



Or.D Style. 
ended Sept. 2, 

1752— a 
Wednesday. 



2 


1 
S 


O 


6 


5 
12 


4 


i) 


7 


1.3 


11 


16 


15 


11 









10 



YEARS. 
Leap years in heavier type.* 



00 



17 



23 



28 



34 



12 



18 



8 
13 14 



19 



24 



29 



35 



45 



51 



56 



17 



Nkw Stylk. 

began Sept. 14, 

1752— a 

Thursdaj'. 



18 



zo 



20 



24 



28 



19 



27 



and every succeeding fourtli Century. 



Factors. 



1 



62 



73 



79 



84 



90 







40 



30 



25 



41 



46 



57 



6-^ 



68 



74 



35 



91 



96 



47 



52 53 



36 





4 


9 


10 


15 




20 


21 


26 


27 




32 


37 


38 


43 




48 


49 



58 



69 



70 



80 



86 



59 



64 



70 



81 



87 



97 



92 



98 
3 



54 



65 



71 



70 



82 



93 



99 



60 

66 



77 



83 



88 



94 



o 
11 
16 

22 

33 

39 

44 

50 

61 

67 

7 J 

78 

89 
95 



The system of this Calendar is taken from one printed in Whitaker's (London) Almanac. 



lleadij- Reference Calendar. — 2. 



37 



For ascertaining any Day of the Week for any given Time within Two Hundred 
Years from the introduction of the Netu Style, 1753, to 1952 inclusive. 



YEARS 1753 TO 1952. 




5 

—i 

4 
5 

6 

2 
3 
7 
1 
7 
5 
3 
1 
6 
4 
2 


7 
1 
2 
5 
6 
3 
4 
3 
1 
6 
4 
2 
7 
5 


a 

7 
1 
2 
5 
6 
3 
4 
4 
2 

r- 
i 

5 
3 

1 
6 


1^ 

< 

3 

4 
5 

1 
2 
6 

7 

r- 
/ 

5 
3 
1 
6 
4 
2 


>> 

5 

6 

7 
3 
4 

1 

2 

o 

7 
5 
3 
1 
6 
4 


a 

3 
-^ 

1 
2 
3 
6 
7 
4 
5 
5 
3 
1 
6 
4 
2 


3 

i-J 

3 
4 
5 

1 
2 
6 
7 
7 
5 
3 
1 
6 
4 
2 


si 

3 
< 

6 

7 
1 
4 
5 
•2 
3 
3 
1 
6 
4 
2 
7 
5 


2 
3 

4 
7 
1 
5 
6 
6 
4 
2 

' 

5 

3 

1 


■J 

8 

4 
5 

6 

12 
3 
7 
1 
1 
6 
4 
2 

r" 

5 
3 


> 

7 

1 

O 

5 
6 
3 
4 

4 

2 
7 
5 
3 

1 
6 


, 


1753ff 
1754(1 


1781g 
1782d 


ISOOe 
ISOla 


1828q 
182ya 

1830b 
1831c 


1850q 
1857a 


1884 q 
1885a 


1900g 
1901d 


192811 
I929d 


a 


2 


1755e 
1756p 


1783e 
1784p 


1802b 
1803c 


1858b 
1859c 


1886b 

1887c 


1902e 
1903a 


1930e 
1931a 

1932k 
19331 


b 


3 


17o7c 
175Sf 


1785c 
1786 f 


1804h 
1805d 


1832h 
1833d 


1860h 
1861d 

1862e 
1863a 


1888h 
1889d 

1890e 
1891a 


1904k 
19051 


c 


4 


1759g 
1760q 


1787g 
1788q 


1806e 
1807a 


1834e 
1835a 


1906g 
1907d 

19081 
1909b 


1934g 
1935d 


d 


7 


1761a 
1762b 


1789a 
1790b 


1808k 
1809 f 


1836k 
18371: 


1864k 
lS65f 


1892k 
1893f 


19361 
1937b 


e 


1 


1763c 
1764h 


1791c 
179211 


ISlOg 
1811d 


lS38g 
1839d 


1866g 
1867d 


1894g 
1895d 


1910c 
1911f 


1938c 
1939f 


f 


5 


1765d 
1766e 


1793d 
1794e 


18121 
1813b 


18401 
1841b 


18681 
lS69b 


18961 
1897b 


1912m 
1913e 


,1940m 
1941e 


s 


6 


1767a 
1768k 


1795a 
1796k 


1814c 
1815f 


1842c 
1843f 


1870c 
1871f 


1898c 
1899f 


1914a 
1915b 


1942a 
1943b 


h 


6 


1769 f 
1770gr 


1797 f 
179Sg 


1816m 
1817e 


1844in 
lS45e 


1872 m 
1873e 




1916U 
1917g 


194411 
1945g 


k 


4 


1771d 

17721 


1799d 


1818a 
1819b 


1846a 
1847b 


1874a 
1875b 




1918d 
1919e 


1946d 
1947e 

1948p 
1949c 


1 


2 


1773b 
1774c 




1820)1 
lS21g 


1848a 
1849g 


1876n 
1877g 




1920p 
1921c 


in 


7 


1775E 
1776m 


• 


1822d 
1823e 


1850d 
lS51e 


1878d 
1879e 




1922f 
1923g 


19501 i 
1951g [ 

1952q 


» 


5 


1777e 

1778a 




1824p 
1825c 


18o2p 
1353c 


1880p 
1881c 




1924q 
1925a 


P 


3 


1779b 
178011 




1826 f 
1827g 


1854 f 

1855g 


1882f 
1883g 




1926b 
1927c 




Q 


1 



Note. —The letters in 
the list of ' ' Years from 
1753 to 1952," refer to 
the table headed with the 
Months, the figures in 
which refer to the same 
figures at the head of the 
table of Days. For ex- 
ample : To know on what 
day July 4, 1913, will 
fall look for 1913 in the 
table of Years, "l^he let- 
ter "e" is attached. Look 
for the same letter in the 
t^ble of Months and in a 
parallel line under Jul j' is 
the figure 2, which di- 
rects to eolumu 2 In the 
table of Days below, in 
which it will be seen that 
July 4 falls uu Friday. 



TABLE OF DAYS. 



I 



MoiiUay 

Tuesday 2 

Wednesday 3 

Thursday 4 

Friday 5 

Satnrdav 

SUNDAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesd. 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



l,Tuesdav 1 



SUNDAY 14 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesd. 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

SUXD-iY 21 

Monday 2-J 

Tuesday '23 
1 Wednesd. 24 
[Thursday 25 
[Friday 26 
iSat-urdav 27 
'SUNDAY 28 
iMonday 29 
iTuesday :iii 

Wedaesd. 31 



Wednesday 2 
Thursday 3 
Friday 4 

Saturday 5 
SUNDAY 6 
Monday 7 
Tuesday 8 
Wednesday 9 
Thursday 10 
Friday 11 
Saturday 12 
SUNDAY 13 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesd. 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



SUNDAY 20 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesd. 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

SUNDAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesd. 

Thursday 



Wednesday I 
Thursday 2 
Friday 3 

Saturday 4 
SUNDAY S 
Monday 6 
Tuesday 7 
Wednesday S 
Thursday 9 
Friday 10 
Saturday 1 1 
SUNDAY 12 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesd. 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

SUNDAY 19 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesd. 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 25 

SUNDAY 26 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesd. 

Thursday 

Friday 



Thursilay 

Friday 

Saturday 

SUNDAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 9 

Saturday 10 

SUNDAY 11 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesd. 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



SUNDAY 18 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesd. 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

SUNDAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesd. 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



Friday 
Saturday 
SUNDAY 
^louday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 6 
Thursday 7 
Friday 8 

Saturday 9 
SUNDAY 10 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesd. 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



SUNDAY 17 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesd. 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

SUNDAY 24 

Monday 25 

Tuesday 

Wednesd. 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

SUND.\Y 31 



Saturday 1 

SUNDAY 2 

Monday 3 

Tuesday 4 

Wednesday 5 

Thursday 6 

Friday 

Saturday 

SUNDAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesd. 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

SUNDAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesd. 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



SUNDAY 23 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesd. 

Thursday 

Friday 

Satuiilav 

SUND.\Y 

Monday 



SUNDAY 1 

Monday 2 

Tuesday 3 

Wednesday 4 

Thursday 5 

Friday 

Saturday 

SUNDAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesd. 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



6 

7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 



SUNDAY IS 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesd. 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 



SUNDAY 22 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesd. 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 

SUNDAY 

Monday 

Tuesday 



23 
24 
25 
26 

in 

28 
29 
30 
31 



38 



Mohaniuiedan Calendar^ l'J13. 



Ritualistic Calendar. 

Colors for the Altar in Use in Ritualistic Episcopal Churchks in the United States. 

Tr/i.)7f. —From the First Service (First Vesoers) of Christmas Day to the Octave of Epiphany, 
inclusive (except on the Feasts of Martvrs) ; on Maundy Thursday (for the celebration) ; from the First 
Service of Easter Dav to the Vigil of Pentecost rexcept on Feasts of Martyrs and Rogation Days) ; on 
'J'rinitv Sunday. Conversion of St. Paul. Purification, Annunciation, St. .Tohn Baptist. St. Michael, 
St. Luke, All Saints, Saints who are not Martj'rs. and Patron Saints (Transfiguration and Dedication 
of Church). 

Red. —Yrom First Vespers of Pentecost to the First Vespers of Trinity Sunday (which includes 
Ember Daj-s), Holy Innocents (if on a Sunday), and Feasts of all Martyrs. 

T7o/<?^ — From Septuagesima to Maundy Thursday (p::aster Eve); Advent Sunday to -Christmas 
Eve; Vigils, Ember Days (except in Whitsun V/eek), and Kosation Days; Holy Innocents (unless on 
Sunday). Black. —Good Friday and at funerals. Oreen. —All other days. 

These regulations as to colors are general. A more minute code changing with each year is 
published in the church almanacs. 



Jewish Calendar, 1913. 



Nbw ^Ioon, Fasts, Feasts, etc. 



5673. 

Sebat 1 

Adar 1 

14 

Veadar 1 

^CisHu 1 

15 

Yiar 1 

14 

1 

6 

1 



Si van 
Tarauz 



Xew Moon. 



Purim 

New Moon. 



Passover 

New INIoon 

Second Pa.ssover. 

New Moon 

Pentecost 

New Moon , 



Ab 



Elul 



171 Fast of 'l\amuz. 



New Moon 
Fast of Ab 
.Terusalem). 
New Moon.... 



(Destruction of 



1913 

Tan. 
Feb. 



Mar. 
.April 



Mav 
June 
.Tulv 
Aug. 

Sept. 



9 

8 
21 
10 

8 
22: 

8 

6 
22: 



12 

31 



New Moos, Fasts, Feasts, etc. 



5674. 

Tisri 1 

4 

10 

15 

22 

" 23 

FTesvan 1 

Kislev 1 

' ' 25 

Tebet 1 

Sebat 1 

Adar 1 

14 

Nisan 1 



New Moon (Xew Year) 

Fast of Guadaliah 

" Expiation (Yom Kippur) 

Feast of Tabernacles 

Eighth Day 

' ' Rejoicing with the Law 
New Moon 



Dedication of the Temple. 
New Moon 



Xew Moon . 



Purim 

New Moon. 



1913. 

Oct. 2 

5 

11 

16 

23 

24 

1 

30 

24 

'* oO 

1914. 

.Tan. 28 

Feb. 27 

Mar. 12 

28 



Nov. 

4 t 

Dec. 



The year 5673 is au embolismic perfect j-ear 
year of 354 days. 



of 385 day;?, and the year 5674 an ordinary common 



Greek Church and Russian Calendar, 1913. 



A.D. 1913. A.M. 8022. 



New 
Stvi.k. 



Jan. 



Feb. 
Mar 



14 
19 
15 
16 



Holy Days. 



Circumcision 

Theopliauy (Epiphan.v).... 

llypapante (Purification). 

Carnival Sunday 

19 .Ash Wednesday 

April 7 Annunciation 

20,Palni Sunday 



Oia Stvle. 



Maj' 
June 



Jan. 

Feb. 
INTar. 



April 



Style. 



25 Great Friday 

27 Holy Pasch (Easter). 

6iSt. George . 

27iCoronation of Emperor* Ma.v- 

5. Ascension I •' 

151 Pentecost .Tune 

lelHoly Ghost ' " 



1 

6 

2 

3 

6 

25|1 

7i 

12i, 

14ji 

23P 

14 

23 

2 

3 



Julv 
Aug. 

Sept. 



Oct. 

Nov, 

Dec. 

1914. 
.Tan. 



12 
19 
28 
12 
21 
27 
14 
28 
3 
22 



Holv Davs. 



Peter and Paul (Chief Apostles) 

Transfiguration 

Repose of Theo tokos 

St. Alexander Xevsky* 

Nativity of Theotokos 

Exaltation of the Cross 

Patronage of Theotokos 

First Day of Fast of Nativity 

Entrance of Theotokos 

ConcejJtion of Theotokos 



14 



Nativity (Christmas). 
Circumcision 



01(1 St; 


•le. 


June 


29 


Aug. 


6 


* * 


15 


i ( 


30 


Sept. 


8 


' ' 


14 


Oct. 


1 


Nov. 


15 




20 


Dec. 


9 


I K 


25 


80'J 


;-> 


.Tan 


1 



•Peculiar to Russia. 



Mohammedan Calendar, 1913. 



Ykau. 



Names of INIonlhs. 



l331...jMiiharram (Xew Year) Dec. 

' ' ...ISaphar Jan. 

' ' ...iRabia I Feb. 

' ' ...IRabia II Mar. 

" ...Uomadi I .„ .April 

" ...IJomadi II Mav 

' * ... Rajab Jmie 

' ' ...iShabaan July 



Month Begins. 



11, 1912 
10. 1913 

8, " 
10, ♦' 
8. " 
8, " 
6. " 
6, " 



Year. 



1331. 



( « 
1332". 



Names of Months. 



Ramadan (Month of Absti- 
nence) 

Shawall 

Dulkaada 

Dulheggia 

Muharram (Xew Year) 

Saphar 



Aug. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Nov. 

Dec. 
Rabial 'Jan. 



Month Begins. 



4. 1913 
3, • 
2. '• 

1, '• 
30, " 
30. ' ' 
28, 1914 



1st Month. 








JANUARY, 


1913. 








31 Days. 


o 

o 

V 


ja 
■*» 

O 


Calendar for 

Boston, 

New England, N. Y. State, 

Michigan, Wisconsin, 

N. and S. Dakota, 

Washington, and Oregon, 


Calendar for 

New York City, 

Connecticut, Pennsvlvania, 

Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, 

Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, 

and Northern Cali£orui.i. 


Calendar for 

Washington, 

Virginia, Kentucky, 

Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, 

Utah, Nevada, 

and Central California. 


Calendar for 

Chaelkston, 

Georgia, Alabama, 

Louisiana.ArkanBaB, Texas, 

New Mexico, Arizona, 

and Southern California. 




Su» 
Rises. 


Sun 

Sets. 


Moon 
K. .t s. 


S 
Ri 


UN 
SRS. 


Son 
Sets. 


Moon 

K. A s. 


Sun 
Risks. 


Son 
Skts. 


Moon 

R. A s. 


Sun 
Rises. 


Son 
Sets. 


Moon 

R. ,*3. 


1 


w 


H. M. 

7 30 


H. M. 

4 37 


H. M . 

1 51 


H. 


M. 

24 


H. M. 

4 43 


H. M. 

1 48 


H. M. 

7 19 


H. M. 

4 48 


H . M . 

1 45 


H. 


M. 

4 


U. M. 

5 6 


H. M. 

1 36 


o 


Th 


7 30 


4 38 


3 3 


7 


24 


4 44 


2 59 


7 19 


4 49 


2 54 


t 


4 


5 6 


2 41 


3 


Fr 


7 30 


4 39 


4 14 


i 


24 


4 45 


4 8 


7 19 


4 50 


4 2 


t 


4 


5 6 


3 45 


4 


Sa 


7 30 


4 40 


5 23 


7 


24 


4 46 


5 17 


7 19 


4 51 


5 10 


7 


4 


5 6 


4 49 


5 


S 


7 30 


4 41 


6 27 


/ 


24 


4 47 


G 19 


7 19 


4 52 


6 13 


n 


4 


5 7 


5 49 





M 


7 30 


4 42 


7 22 


/ 


24 


4 48 


7 15 


7 19 


4 53 


7 8 




4 


5 7 


6 45 


1 


Tu 


7 30 


4 43 


sets. 




24 


4 49 


sets. 


7 19 


4 54 


sets. 


7 


4 


5 8 


sets. 


8 


W 


7 30 


4 44 


5 47 


7 


24 


4 50 


5 53 


7 19 


4 55 


5 59 


7 


4 


5 9 


G 27 


9 


Th 


7 29 


4 45 


6 53 


i 


24 


4 51 


6 50 


7 19 


4 56 


7 1 




4 


5 10 


7 15 


10 


Fr 


7 29 


4 46 


7 56 




24 


4 52 


7 59 


7 19 


4 57 


8 2 


7 


4 


5 11 


8 13 


11 


Sa 


7 29 


4 47 


8 58 


< 


23 


4 53 


9 


7 19 


4 58 


9 2 


1 


4 


5 12 


9 8 


12 


S 


7 29 


4 48 


9 59 


7 


23 


4 54 


10 


7 19 


4 59 


10 1 


7 


4 


5 12 


10 3 


13 


M 


7 29 


4 49 


10 58 


/ 


23 


4 55 


10 58 


7 18 


5 


10 57 


7 


4 


5 13 


10 56 


14 


Tu 


7 28 


4 50 


A. M. 




23 


4 56 


11 59 


7 18 


h 1 


11 58 


7 


o 
o 


5 14 


11 53 


15 


W 


7 28 


4 51 


12 1 




22 


4 57 


A. M. 


7 18 


5 2 


A. M. 




3 


5 15 


A.M. 


IG 


Th 


7 27 


4 53 


1 8 


7 


22 


4 58 


1 5 


7 17 


5 3 


1 3 


7 


3 


5 16 


12 53 


17 


Fr 


7 27 


4 54 


2 18 


1 


21 


4 59 


2 14 


7 17 


5 4 


2 10 


7 


o 
O 


5 17 


1 56 


18 


Sa 


7 20 


4 55 


3 32 




21 


5 


3 26 


7 16 


5 5 


3 20 


7 


2 


5 18 


3 2 


19 


S 


7 26 


4 56 


4 46 




20 


5 1 


4 39 


7 16 


5 6 


4 32 


7 


2 


5 19 


4 10 


20 


M 


7 25 


4 58 


5 56 


7 


19 


5 2 


5 48 


7 15 


5 7 


5 41 


7 


2 


5 20 


5 18 


21 


Tu 


7 24 


4 59 


6 56 


7 


18 


5*3 


6 49 


7 14 


5 8 


6 42 




1 


5 21 


G 20 


09 


W 


7 23 


5 


rises. 


7 


18 


5 4 


rises. 


7 14 


5 9 


rises. 


7 


1 


5 22 


rises. 


23 


Th 


7 22 


5 1 


6 29 


7 


17 


5 6 


6 33 


7 13 


5 10 


6 37 


7 


1 


5 23 


6 49 


24 


Fr 


7 21 


5 2 


7 51 


1 


16 


5 7 


7 53 


7 12 


5 11 


7 55 







5 24 


8 3 


25 


Sa 


7 21 


5 3 


9 10 




15 


5 9 


9 11. 


' 7 12 


5 13 


9 12 


7 





5 25 


9 13 


26 


S 


7 20 


5 5 


10 26 


7 


14 


5 10 


10 .25 


7 11 


5 14 


10 24 


6 


59 


5 26 


10 21 


27 


:\i 


7 20 


5 6 


11 40 


7 


14 


5 11 


11 37 


7 10 


5 15 


11 35 


6 59 


5 27 


11 28 


28 


Tu 


7 19 


5 7 


A. M. 


7 


13 


5 12 


A. ^\. 


7 10 


5 16 


A. M. 


6 


58 


5 28 


A.M. 


29 


w 


7 18 


5 9 


12 53 


7 


13 


5 13 


12 49 


7 9 


5 17 


12 46 


G 58 


5 29 


12 33 


30 


Th 


7 17 


5 10 


2 6 


7 


12 


5 15 


2 


7 8 


5 19 


1 55 


6 57 


5 30 


1 39 


31 


Fr 


7 16 


5 11 


3 16 


7 


12 


5 16 


3 9 


7 8 


5 20 


3 2 


6 


57 


5 31 


2 43 











SUN ON 


MERIDIAN. 








Day of 




Day of 






Day of 




Day of 




Day of 




Month. 




Month. 






Mo.nth. 




Month. 




Month. 






H. M. S. 




H. 


M. S.' 




H. M. S. 




H. M. S. 




H. M. S. 


1 


12 3 40 


8 


12 


G 50 


14 


12 9 12 


20 


12 11 11 


26 


12 12 42 


2 


12 4 8 


9 


12 


7 15 


15 


12 9 34 


21 


12 11 28 


27 


12 12 55 


3 


12 4 36 


10 


12 


7 40 


16 


12 9 55 


22 


12 11 45 


28 


12 13 7 


4 


12 5 3 


11 


12 


8 4 


17 


12 10 15 


23 


12 12 


29 


12 13 18 


5 


12 5 31 


12 


12 


8 27 


18 


12 10 34 


24 


12 12 15 


30 


12 13 28 


6 


12 5 57 


13 


12 


8 50 


19 


12 10 53 


25 


12 12 29 


31 


12 13 37 


7 


12 24 





















TWILIGHT. 



Places. 


J. in. 


Begins, a. m. 


Ends, p. M. 


Jau. 


Begins, a. m. 


Ends, p. M. 


J.in. 


Begins, A. M. 


Ends, p. M. 




H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 




H. M. 


H. M. 


Boston 


1 


5 48 


6 19 


11 


5 48 


6 28 


21 


5 46 


G 38 


New York.. 


1 


5 46 


G 21 


11 


5 46 


6 30 


21 


5 44 


G 39 


Wash' ton . 


1 


5 43 


6 24 


11 


5 44 


G 32 


21 


5 42 


6 41 


Charleston.. 


1 


5 35 


G 23 


11 


5 36 


G 40 


21 


5 30 


6 57 





2d Month. 




FEBRUARY, 


1913. 






28 Day.*;. 






Calendar for 


Calendar for 


c 


aleudar for 


Calendar for 






Boston, 


New York Citv, 


w 


ASHIiNGTON, 


Charleston, 


JT. 


j< 


N'ew England, N. Y. State, 
Michigan, Wisconsin, 


Connecticut, Pennsylvania, 


Virginia, Kentucky, | 


Georgia, Alabama. 


a 


^ 


Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, 


Missouri, 


Kansas, Colorado, 


Louisiana, ArkansaB,Tezas, 


s 


^ 


N. and 8. Dakota, 


Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, 


Utah, Nevada, 


New Mexico, Arizona, 


a- 


O 


Washington, and Oregon. 


and Northern California. 


and Central California. 


and Southern California. 




Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sl'n 


Son 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


a 


o 


Rises. 


Skts, 


R. A a. 


Risks. 

H. M. 


Sets. 


R. <t s. 


Rises. 


Skts. 


R. Jt s. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


R. A 8. 






H. M. 


n. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. W". 


1 


Sa 


7 15 


5 13 


4 21 


7 11 


5 17 


4 14 




5 21 


4 7 


6 57 


5 32 


3 44 


•) 


S 


7 14 


5 14 


5 19 


7 10 


5 18 


5 11 


7 6 


5 22 


5 4 


6 56 


5 32 


4 40 


3 


.M 


7 13 


5 15 


6 8 


7 9 


5 19 


6 1 


7 5 


5 23 


5 53 


6 55 


5 33 


5 30 


4 


Til 


7 11 


5 16 


6 47 


7 7 


5 20 


6 40 


7 4 


5 24 


6 33 


6 54 


5 34 


6 14 


5 


\V 


7 10 


5 18 


7 18 


7 6 


5 22 


7 12 


7 3 


5 25 


7 8 


6 53 


5 35 


6 51 


6 


Th 


7 9 


5 19 


sets. 


7 5 


5 23 


sets. 


7 2 


5 26 


sets. 


6 52 


5 36 


sets. 


7 


Fr 


7 8 


5 20 


6 45 


7 4 


5 24 


6 52 


7 1 


5 27 


6 54 


6 51 


5 37 


7 2 


8 


Sa 


7 7 


5 22 


7 51 


7 3 


5 25 


7 52 


7 


5 28 


7 53 


6 50 


5 38 


7 57 


9 


S 


7 6 


5 23 


8 52 


7 2 


5 2() 


8 52 


6 59 


5 29 


8 52 


6 49 


5 39 


8 52 


10 


:\r 


7 5 


5 25 


9 54 


7 1 


5 28 


9 53 


6 58 


5 31 


9 51 


6 48 


5 40 


9 48 


11 


Tu 


7 4 


5 26 


10 58 


7 


5 29 


10 55 


6 57 


5 32 


10 52 


6 47 


5 41 


10 44 


12 


W 


7 2 


5 27 


A.M. 


6 59 


5 30 


A. M. 


6 56 


5 33 


11 56 


6 46 


5 42 


11 44 


13 


Th 


7 1 


5 29 


12 4 


6 58 


5 31 


12 


6 55 


5 34 


A.M. 


6 45 


5 43 


A. M. 


14 


Fr 


7 


5 30 


1 14 


6 67 


5 33 


1 9 


6 54 


5 35 


1 3 


6 44 


5 44 


12 47 


15 


Sa 


6 59 


5 31 


2 25 


6 55 


5 34 


2 19 


6 53 


5 36 


2 12 


6 44 


5 45 


1 52 


10 


S 


6 57 


5 32 


3 36 


6 54 


5 36 


3 28 


6 52 


5 38 


3 21 


6 43 


5 46 


2 58 


17 


M 


6 55 


5 33 


4 39 


6 52 


5 37 


4 32 


6 50 


5 39 


4 24 


6 42 


5 47 


4 2 


18 


Tu 


6 54 


5 35 


5 32 


6 50 


5 38 


5 26 


6 49 


5 40 


5 19 


6 41 


5 48 


4 58 


19 


\V 


6 52 


5 37 


6 15 


6 49 


5 40 


6 10 


6 47 


5 41 


6 4 


6 40 


5 49 


5 47 


20 


Th 


6 50 


5 39 


rises. 


6 48 


5 41 


rises. 


6 46 


5 42 


rises. 


6 39 


5 50 


rises • 


21 


Fr 


6 48 


5 40 


6 40 


6 46 


5 42 


6 43 


6 44 


5 43 


6 44 


6 38 


5 51 


6 49 


22 


Sa 


6 47 


5 42 


8 


6 45 


5 43 


8 


6 43 


5 45 


8 


6 37 


5 51 


8 


23 


S 


6 45 


5 43 


9 16 


6 43 


5 45 


9 15 


41 


5 46 


9 13 


6 36 


5 52 


9 8 


24 


M 


6 44 


5 45 


10 35 


6 42 


5 47 


10 32 


6 40 


5 47 


10 28 


6 35 


5 53 


m 18 


25 


Tu 


6 43 


5 46 


11 51 


6 40 


5 48 


il 46 


6 38 


5 48 


11 41 


6 34 


5 54 


11 26 


26 


W 


6 41 


5 47 


A. M. 


6 38 


5 49 


A.M. 


6 37 


5 49 


A. M. 


6 33 


5 55 


A.M. 


27 


Th 


6 40 


5 48 


1 4 


6 37 


5 50 


12 58 


6 36 


5 50 


12 52 


6 31 


5 56 


12 33 


28 


Fr 


6 38 


5 49 


2 14 


6 36 


5 51 


2 7 


6 35 


5 51 


1 59 


6 30 


5 57 


1 37 

• • • • • 







































• • • • 


1 " " 






- 









SUN ON 


MERIDIAN. 








Day of 




Pay of 




Day of 




Day of 




Day of 




Month. 




Month. 




Month. 




Month. 




Month. 






H . M . S . 




H . M . S . 




H. M. S. 




H. M. 6. 




H. M. S . 


1 


12 13 46 




12 14 20 


13 


12 14 25 


19 


12 14 2 


25 


12 13 16 


2 


12 13 53 


8 


12 14 23 


14 


12 14 23 


20 


12 13 56 


26 


12 13 6 


3 


12 14 


9 


12 14 25 


15 


12 14 20 


21 


12 13 49 


27 


12 12 55 


4 


12 14 


10 


12 14 26 


16 


12 14 17 




12 13 42 


28 


12 12 44 


5 


12 14 12 


11 


12 14 26 


17 


12 14 13 


23 


12 13 34 






6 


12 14 16 


12 


12 14 26 


18 


12 14 8 


24 


12 13 25 













TWILIGHT. 










Places. 


Feb. 


Begins, A. M. 


Ends, P. M. 


Feb. 


Begins, A. M. 

H. M. 


Ends, p. M. 


Feb. 


Begins, a. la. 

H. M. 


Ends, p. M. 






H. M. 


n. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


Boston 


1 


5 37 


6 50 


11 


5 27 


7 1 


21 


5 14 


7 13 


New York. 


1 


5 36 


6 51 


11 


5 27 


7 1 


21 


5 15 


7 13 


Wash ' ton. 


1 


5 35 


6 52 


n 


5 2(-^ 


7 2 


21 


5 15 


7 13 


Charleston 


1 


5 30 


(1 57 


11 


5 24 


7 5 


21 


5 15 


7. 13 





3d Month. 






3IAUCH, l<)i;5. 








31 Days. 






CiileuJar for 


Calen 


Jar for 


r 


aleiidar for 


Calendar for 


• 


. 


Boston , 


Nbw York Citv, | 


w 


A9HINQT0N, 


Charleston, 


fl 


w 


Nd>v Eugland, N. V. State, 


Connecticut, 


Pennsylvania, 


Virginia, Kentucky, | 


Georgia, Alabairia, 


<5 


Ss 


Michigau. Wisconsin, 


Ohio, Indiana, liliuois. 


Missouri 


Kansas, Colorado, 


Louisiana, Arkansas, Tex(t9, 


<« 


N. and S. Dakota, 


Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, 


Utah, Nevada, 


New Mexico, Arizona, 


1 


•3 


Washington, and Oregon. 


and Norther 


n California. 


and Central California. 


and Southern California. 


"6 


Sum 


Suv 


Moon 


Su:* 


Suv 


Moo>r 


Su:< 


Su^f 


' Moon 


St;M 


Sun 


Moon 


Q 


- 


Rises. 


Sets. 


R. 4 S. 


Risks. 


Skts. 


R. .t s. 


Risks. 


Sets. 


R. A s. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


R. Jt 8. 






H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


II. 


M. 


K. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


1 


8a 


6 37 


5 50 


3 15 


6 35 


5 


52 


3 7 


6 34 


5 52 


3 


6 29 


5 57 


2 36 


2 


S 


6 36 


5 50 


4 6 


6 34 


5 


52 


3 59 


6 33 


5 53 


3 51 


6 28 


5 58 


3 28 


3 


M 


6 34 


5 51 


4 49 


6 32 


5 


53 


4 42 


6 31 


5 54 


4 35 


6 27 


5 58 


4 14 


4 


Tu 


6 33 


5 52 


5 22 


6 31 


5 


54 


5 16 


6 30 


5 55 


5 10 


6 26 


5 59 


4 52 


5 


W 


6 31 


5 53 


5 49 


6 29 


5 


55 


5 44 


6 28 


5 56 


5 39 


6 25 


6 


5 25 


6 


Th 


6 29 


5 55 


6 11 


6 28 


5 


56 


6 8 


6 27 


5 57 


6 4 


6 24 


6 1 


5 54 


7 


Fr 


6 28 


5 56 


sets. 


6 27 


5 


57 


sets. 


6 26 


5 58 


sets. 


6 23 


6 1 


sets. 


8 


Sa 


6 26 


5 57 


6 45 


6 25 


5 


59 


6 45 


6 24 


5 59 


6 46 


6 22 


6 2 


6 46 


9 


S 


6 25 


5 59 


7 47 


6 24 


6 





7 47 


6 23 


6 


7 45 


6 21 


6 3 


7 42 


10 


M 


6 23 


6 


8 50 


6 22 


6 


1 


8 48 


6 21 


6 1 


8 45 


6 20 


6 3 


8 38 


11 


Tu 


6 21 


6 1 


9 56 


6 20 


6 


2 


9 51 


6 20 


6 2 


9 48 


6 19 


6 4 


9 37 


12 


W 


6 19 


6 2 


11 4 


6 18 


6 


3 


10 59 


6 IS 


6 3 


10 54 


6 17 


6 5 


10 38 


13 


Th 


6 17 


6 3 


A. M. 


6 16 


6 


4 


A. M. 


6 17 


6 4 


A.M. 


6 16 


6 6 


11 42 


14 


Fr 


6 16 


6 4 


13 14 


6 15 


6 


5 


12 8 


6 15 


6 5 


12 1 


6 15 


6 6 


A. M. 


15 


Sa 


6 14 


6 5 


1 23 


6 13 


6 


6 


1 16 


6 13 


6 6 


1 8 


6 13 


6 7 


12 47 


16 


S 


6 12 


6 7 


2 28 


6 12 


6 


7 


2 20 


6 12 


6 7 


2 12 


6 12 


6 8 


1 49 


17 


M 


6 10 


6 8 


3 23 


6 10 


6 


8 


3 16 


6 10 


6 8 


3 9 


6 10 


6 9 


2 47 


18 


Tu 


6 9 


6 9 


4 7 


6 9 


6 


9 


4 2 


6 9 


6 9 


3 56 


6 9 


6 10 


3 37 


19 


W 


6 7 


6 10 


4 45 


6 7 


6 


10 


4 40 


6 7 


6 10 


4 35 


6 8 


6 11 


4 21 


20 


Th 


6 5 


6 11 


5 15 


6 5 


6 


11 


5 12 


6 5 


6 11 


5 8 


6 6 


6 11 


4 59 


21 


Fr 


6 3 


6 12 


5 40 


6 3 


6 


12 


5 38 


6 3 


6 12 


5 37 


6 5 


6 12 


5 32 


22 


Sa 


6 2 


6 13 


rises. 


6 2 


6 


13 


rises. 


() 2 


6 13 


rises. 


6 3 


6 13 


rises. 


23 


S. 


6 


6 15 


8 8 


6 1 


6 


14 


8 5 


() 1 


6 14 


8 2 


6 2 


6 14 


7 55 


24 


M 


5 59 


6 16 


9 20 


6 


6 


15 


9 22 


6 


6 15 


9 17 


6 1 


6 15 


9 5 


25 


Tu 


5 57 


6 17 


10 44 


5 58 


6 


16 


10 38 


5 oii 


6 1() 


10 32 


5 59 


6 15 


10 15 


26 


W 


5 55 


6 18 


11 58 


5 56 


6 


17 


11 51 


5 56 


6 17 


11 44 


5 58 


6 16 


11^3 


27 


Til 


5 53 


6 20 


A. M. 


5 54 


6 


18 


A. M. 


5 54 


6 18 


A. M. 


5 56 


6 17 


A. M. 


28 


Fr 


5 52 


6 21 


1 5 


5 53 


6 


19 


12 57 


5 53 


6 19 


12 50 


5 55 


6 17 


12 26 


29 


Sa 


5 50 


6 22 


2 1 


5 52 


6 


20 


1 54 


5 52 


6 20 


1 46 


5 54 


6 18 


1 22 


30 


S 


5 48 


6 23 


2 43 


5 50 


6 


21 


2 40 


5 51 


6 20 


2 33 


5 53 


6 19 


2 11 


31 


M 


5 46 


6 24 


3 24 


5 48 


6 




3 18 


5 49 


6 21 


3 11 


5 52 


6 19 


2 52 









SUN ON 


MERIDIAN. 












Day of 




Dav of 




Dav of 






Day <iF 






Dav of 






Month. 




Month. 




IMONTH. 






Month. 






Month. 








H. M. S. 




M . M . S . 




H. 


M . S . 




H. 


M. S. 




H. 


M S. 


1 


12 12 33 


8 


12 11 


14 


12 


9 25 


20 


12 


7 40 


26 


12 


5 50 


2 


12 12 21 


9 


12 10 45 


15 


12 


9 8 


2L 


12 


7 22 


27 


12 


5 32 


3 


12 12 8 


10 


12 10 29 


16 


12 


8 51 




12 


7 4 


28 


12 


5 13 


4 


12 11 56 


11 


12 10 14 


17 


12 


8 33 


23 


12 


6 45 


29 


12 


4 55 


5 


12 11 42 


12 


12 9 58 


18 


12 


8 16 


24 


12 


6 27 


30 


12 


4 37 


6 


12 11 29 


13 


12 9 41 


19 


12 


7 58 


25 


12 


6 9 


31 


12 


4 18 


7 


12 11 14 

























TWILIGHT. 



Places. 


Mar. 


Begins, A . M. 


Enils, p. M. 


Mar. 


Begins, a. m. 


Ends, P. M. 


IMar. 


Begins, A. M. 


Eeds, p. M. 




H. M. 


H. M. 


H. , M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


Boston 


1 


5 2 


7 23 


11 


4 45 


7 35 


21 


4 27 


7 47 


New York 


1 


5 3 


7 22 


11 


4 47 


7 33 


21 


4 30 


7 45 


VV^ash' ton. 


1 


5 4 


7 21 


11 


4 49 


7 31 


21 


4 33 


7 42 


Charleston 


1 


5 6 


7 19 


11 


4 53 


7 27 


21 


4 40 


7 35 



4th Moxth, 



APRIL, 11)13. 



30 Days. 







Calendar for 


Calendar for 


Calendar for 


Calendar for 


. 




Boston , 


Nbw York Citv, 


Washington. 

Virginia, Kentucky, 


Charleston, 


:S 


• 


Xew England, N. V. State, 


Connecticut, Pennsvlvani.i, 


Georgia, Alabama, 


s 


8 


Michigan, WisconslD, 


Ohio, Indiana, Illinois. 


Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, 


Louisiana 


.Arkansas, Texas, 


^ 


55 


N. and 3. Dakota, 


Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, 


Utah, Nevada, 


New Mexico, Arizona, 


* 

5 


-2 

O 
>> 


Washington, and Oregon. 


and Northern Califonii:!. 


and Central California. 


and Son 


theru California. 


O 


Si'v 


Son 


Moon 


SCN 


Sun 


JIOON 


Sun 


Sfs 


Moon 


Sun 


StJN 


Moon 


G 


c 


Risks. 


Skts. 


B. * s. 


Risks. 


Skts. 


11. * S. 


Risks. 


Skts. 


K. A S, 


Risks. 


Sfis. 


K. A s. 






H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


1 


Tu 


5 44 


6 25 


3 53 


5 46 


6 23. 


3 48 


5 47 


6 22 


3 42 


5 50 


6 19 


3 27 


2 


W 


5 43 


6 20 


4 16 


5 45 


6 24 


4 12 


5 46 


6 23 


4 8 


5 49 


6 20 


3 57 


3 


Th 


5 42 


6 28 


4 36 


5 44 


6 26 


4 34 


5 45 


6 24 


4 31 


5 48 


6 21 


4 23 


4 


Fr 


5 40 


6 29 


4 55 


5 42 


6 27 


4 53 


5 43 


6 25 


4 52 


5 46 


6 22 


4 48 


5 


Sa 


5 3S 


6 30 


5 12 


5 40 


6 28 


5 12 


5 41 


6 26 


5 12 


5 45 


6 23 


5 12 


6 


S 


5 36 


6 31 


sets. 


5 38 


6 29 


sets. 


5 40 


6 27 


sets. 


5 44 


6 23 


sets. 


7 


M 


5 34 


6 32 


7 45 


5 36 


6 30 


7 42 


5 38 


6 28 


7 39 


5 42 


6 24 


7 29 


8 


Til 


5 32 


6 33 


8 55 


5 34 


6 31 


8 50 


5 36 


6 29 


8 45 


5 41 


6 25 


8 31 


9 


W 


5 3i 


6 34 


10 5 


5 33 


6 32 


9 59 


5 35 


6 30 


9 53 


5 39 


6 25 


9 35 


10 


Th 


5 29 


6 35 


11 15 


5 31 


6 33 


11 8 


5 33 


6 31 


11 1 


5 38 


6 26 


10 40 


U 


Fr 


5 27 


6 30 


A. M. 


5 29 


6 34 


A. M. 


5 31 


6 32 


A. M. 


5 37 


6 27 


11 43 


12 


Sa 


5 20 


6 37 


12 20 


5 28 


6 35 


12 13 


5 30 


6 33 


12 5 


5 35 


6 27 


A. M. 


13 


S 


5 24 


6 38 


1 20 


5 26 


6 36 


1 12 


5 28 


6 34 


1 4 


5 34 


6 28 


12 42 


14 


M 


5 23 


6 40 


2 6 


5 25 


6 37 


1 59 


5 27 


6 35 


1 5:^ 


5 33 


6 29 


1 32 


15 


Tu 


5 21 


41 


2 43 


5 24 


6 38 


2 38 


5 26 


6 36 


2 33 


5 32 


6 29 


2 16 


16 


W 


5 19 


6 42 


3 14 


5 22 


6 39 


3 11 


5 21 


6 37 


3 7 


5 31 


6 30 


2 55 


17 


Th 


5 18 


6 43 


3 41 


5 21 


6 40 


3 39 


5 23 


6 38 


3 36 


5 30 


6 31 


3 29 


18 


Fr 


5 10 


6 44 


4 4 


5 19 


6 41 


4 4 


5 22 


6 39 


4 3 


5 29 


6 31 


4 1 


19 


Sa 


5 14 


6 45 


4 27 


5 17 


6 42 


4 28 


5 20 


6 40 


4 29 


5 28 


6 32 


4 3L 


20 


S 


5 13 


6 47 


rises. 


5 16 


6 43 


rises. 


5 19 


6 41 


rises. 


5 27 


6 33 


rises. 


21 


u 


5 11 


6 48 


8 16 


5 14 


6 45 


8 12 


5 17 


6 42 


8 7 


5 25 


6 33 


7 51 


22 


Tu 


5 10 


6 49 


9 34 


5 13 


6 46 


9 27 


5 16 


6 43 


9 21 


5 24 


6 34 


9 1 


23 


W 


5 8 


6 50 


10 46 


5 11 


6 47 


10 39 


5 14 


6 44 


10 31 


5 23 


6 35 


10 9 


24 


Th 


5 6 


6 51 


11 49 


5 10 


6 48 


11 42 


5 13 


6 45 


11 34 


5 21 


6 36 


11 11 


25 


Fr 


5 5 


6 52 


A . M . 


5- 9 


6 49 


A.M. 


5 12 


6 46 


A. M. 


5 20 


6 36 


A. M. 


2() 


Sa 


5 3 


6 53 


12 42 


5 7 


6 50 


12 34 


5 10 


6 47 


12 26 


5 19 


6 37 


12 4 


27 


S 


5 2 


6 54 


1 22 


5 6 


6 51 


1 15 


5 9 


6 48 


1 9 


5 18 


6 38 


12 48 


28 


M 


5 1 


6 55 


1 54 


5 5 


6 52 


1 49 


5 8 


6 49 


1 43 


5 17 


6 38 


1 26 


29 


Tu 


4 59 


6 56 


2 20 


5 3 


6 53 


2 16 


5 6 


6 50 


3 11 


5 16 


6 39 


1 58 


30 


W 


4 58 


6 58 


2 41 


5 2 


6 54 


2 38 


5 5 


6 50 


2 35 


5 15 


6 39 


2 26 










' 



















SUN ON 


MERIDIAN. 








Dayof 






Pay of 






Pay of 




Day of 




Day of 




Month. 






Month. 






Month. 




Month. 




Month. 






H. 


M. s. 




H. 


M. S. 




H . M . ■< . 




H. M. S. 




11. M. S. 


1 


12 


4 


7 


12 


2 15 


13 


12 37 


19 


11 59 10 


25 


LI 57 57 


2 


12 


3 42 


8 


12 


1 58 


14 


12 21 


20 


11 58 57 


26 


11 57 47 


3 


12 


3 24 


9 


12 


1 41 


15 


1? 6 


21 


11 58 44 


27 


11 57 37 


4 


12 


3 7 


10 


12 


1 25 


16 


11 59 52 


9-) 

Ml -J 


11 58 31 


28 


11 57 27 


5 


12 


2 49 


11 


12 


1 8 


17 


11 59 37 


23 


11 58 19 


29 


11 57 18 


6 


12 


2 32 


12 


12 


52 


18 


11 59 23 


24 


11 58 8 


30 


11 57 10 



TWILIGHT. 



Places. 


Apr. 


Begins, a. m. 


Ends, p. M. 


Apr. 


Begins, A. M. 


Ends, p. M. 


Apr. 


Begins, A. .M. 


Ends, P. M. 




H. M. 


h. m. 


H, M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H, M. 


Boston 


1 


4 G 


8 2 


11 


3 3b 


8 16 


21 


3 25 


8 32 


New York. 


1 


4 10 


7 58 


11 


3 50 


8 12 


21 


3 31 


8 26 


Wash 'ton. 


1 


4 14 


7 54 


11 


3 56 


8 7 


21 


3 37 


8 20 


Charleston 


1 


4 24 


7 43 


11 


4 10 


7 52 


21 


3 55 


8 2 



< 


5th Month. 








MAY, 1913. 








31 Days. 






Calendar for | 


Calendar for 


Calendar for 


Calendar for 


• 






Boston, 


New 


' YoKK City, 


Washington. 


Charleston, 




•^ 


New England, N. Y. State, 
Michigan, Wisconsin, 


Connecticut, Pennsvlvania,] 


Virginia, Kentuclsy, 


Georgia, Alabama, 


g 


t; 


Ohio, 


Indiana, Illinois, 


Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, 


Louisiana 


, Arkansas, Texas. 


s^ 


^ 


N. and S. Dakota, 


Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, 


Utah, Nevada, 


New Mexico, Arizona, 


<» 


u-t 

o 


WashJn 


jton.and Oregon. 


and Northern California. 


and Central California. 


and Sou 


them California, 


■s 

►« 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Q 


Q 


Risks. 


Skts. 


n. A s. 


Ruses. 

H. M. 


Skts. 


R. Ji s. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


R. A s. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


R. <t s. 






H. M. 


H . M . 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H . M . 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


II. M . 


H. M, 


H. M. 


1 


Th 


4 5(5 


6 59 


3 


5 


6 55 


2 58 


5 3 


6 51 


2 56 


5 14 


6 40 


2 51 


2 


Fr 


4 55 


7 


3 17 


4 59 


6 50 


3 17 


5 2 


6 52 


3 16 


5 13 


6 41 


3 14 


•1 

o 


8a 


4 53 


7 1 


3 35 


4 58 


6 57 


3 36 


5 1 


6 53 


3 37 


5 12 


6 42 


3 39 


4 


S 


4 52 


7 2 


3 53 


4 57 


6 58 


3 55 


5 


6 54 


3 58 


5 11 


6 43 


4 4 


5 


M 


4 50 


7 3 


4 15 


4 56 


6 59 


4 18 


4 59 


6 55 


4 22 


5 10 


6 44 


4 32 





Til 


4 49 


7 4 


sets. 


4 55 


7 


sets. 


4 57 


6 56 


sets. 


5 10 


6 45 


sets. 


7 


VV 


4 48 


7 5 


9 4 


4 54 


7 1 


8 58 


4 56 


6 57 


8 51 


5 9 


6 45 


8 31 


8 


Th 


4 47 


7 6 


10 13 


4 53 


7 2 


10 5 


4 54 


6 58 


9 57 


5 8 


6 46 


9 35 


9 


Fr 


4 46 


7 7 


11 14 


4 52 


7 4 


11 6 


4 53 


6 59 


10 58 


5 7 


6 47 


10 36 


10 


Sa 


4 45 


7 8 


A. M. 


4 51 


7 5 


11 58 


4 52 


7 


11 51 


5 6 


6 47 


11 30 


11 


S 


4 44 


7 9 


12 4 


4 50 


7 6 


A. M. 


4 51 


7 1 


A. M. 


5 5 


6 48 


A. M. 


12 


iM 


4 43 


7 10 


12 45 


4 49 


7 7 


12 39 


4 50 


7 2 


12 33 


5 5 


6 49 


12 16 


13 


Tu 


4 42 


7 11 


1 17 


4 48 


7 8 


1 13 


4 49 


7 3 


1 9 


5 4 


6 49 


12 56 


14 


W 


4 41 


7 12 


1 44 


4 47 


7 9 


1 41 


4 48 


7 4 


1 38 


5 3 


6 50 


1 29 


15 


Th 


4 40 


7 13 


2 7 


4 46 


7 10 


2 6 


4 47 


7 5 


2 5 


5 2 


6 51 


2 1 


16 


Fr 


4 39 


7 14 


2 29 


4 45 


7 11 


2 30 


4 4() 


7 6 


2 30 


5 2 


51 


2 31 


17 


Sa 


4 38 


7 15 


2 52 


4 44 


7 12 


2 54 


4 46 


7 7 


2 55 


5 1 


6 52 


3 1 


18 


S 


4 37 


7 16 


3 15 


4 43 


7 13 


3 19 


4 45 


7 7 


3 22 


5 1 


6 53 


3 32 


19 


M 


4 36 


7 17 


3 43 


4 42 


7 14 


3 48 


4 44 


7 8 


3 53 


5 


6 53 


4 7 


20 


Tu 


4 35 


7 18 


4 17 


4 42 


7 15 


4 23 


4 44 


7 9 


4 25 


5 


6 54 


4 48 


21 


W 


4 34 


7 19 


rises. 


4 41 


7 16 


rises. 


4 43 


7 10 


rises. 


4 59 


6 55 


rises. 


22 


Th 


4 33 


7 20 


10 30 


4 40 


7 17 


10 23 


4 43 


7 10 


10 15 


4 58 


6 55 


9 52 


28 


Fr 


4 32 


7 21 


11 16 


4 39 


7 18 


11 9 


4 42 


7 11 


11 2 


4 58 


6 56 


10 41 


24 


Sa 


4 32 


7 22 


11 52 


4 39 


7 19 


11 46 


4 42 


7 12 


11 40 


4 57 


6 57 


11 22 


25 


S 


4 31 


7 23 


A. M. 


4 38 


7 19 


A. M. 


4 41 


7 13 


A. M. 


4 57 


6 57 


A. M. 


20 


M 


4 30 


7 24 


12 25 


4 37 


7 20 


12 20 


4 40 


7 14 


12 15 


4 56 


6 58 


12 


27 


Tu 


4 30 


7 25 


12 44 


4 36 


7 21 


12 41 


4 40 


7 15 


12 37 


4 56 


6 59 


12 26 


28 


W 


4 29 


7 26 


1 4 


4 36 


7 22 


1 1 


4 39 


7 16 


12 59 


4 55 


6 59 


12 52 


29 


Th 


4 29 


7 27 


1 22 


4 35 


7 22 


1 21 


4 38 


7 16 


1 20 


4 55 


7 


1 17 


30 


Fr 


4 28 


7 28 


1 39 


4 34 


7 23 


1 39 


4 38 


7 17 


1 40 


4 54 


7 


1 41 


31 


Sa 


4 27 


7 28 


1 58 


4 33 


7 24 


1 59 


4 37 


7 18 


2 1 


4 54 


7 1 


2 5 



Day of 
Month. 



SUN ON MERIDIAN. 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 





Day of 




Month . 


H. M. S. 




11 57 2 


8 


11 56 55 


9 


11 56 48 


10 


11 56 42 


11 


11 56 37 


12 


11 56 32 


13 


11 56 27 





11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 



56 
56 
56 
56 
56 
56 





Day of 




Month. 


23 


14 


20 


15 


17 


16 


15 


17 


13 


18 


12 


19 



11 
11 
11 
u 
11 



56 
56 
56 
56 
5(J 
56 





Day of 




Month. 


s. 




121 


20 


12i 


21 


12 


22 


13 


23 


15 


24 


17 


25 





Day of 




Month. 


H. M. S. 




11 56 20 


26 


11 56 23 


27 


11 56 27 


28 


11 56 32 


29 


1 1 56 37 


30 


1 1 56 42 


31 



11 
11 
11 



M. S. 

56 48 



56 
57 



11 57 

11 57 
11 57 



54 
1 

9 
17 
25 



TWILIGHT. 



Places. 



Boston. ... 
New York, 
Wash ' ton. 
Charleston 



May. 


Begins, a. m. 


H. M. 


1 


3 6 


1 


3 13 


1 


3 21 


1 


3 42 



Ends, p. M. 


May. 


H. M. j 


8 48 


11 


8 40 


11 


8 3;i 


11 


8 21 


11 



Begins 


, A. M. 


H, 


M. 


2 


47 





56 


3 


5 


3 30 1 



EuJs, p. M. 


May. 


H. M. 


9 6 


21 


8 56 


21 


8 47 


21 


8 22 


21 



Begins, a. m. 



H. M. 

2 31 
2 42 

2 52 

3 21 



Ends, P. M, 
H. M. 

9 22 
9 11 
9 
8 32 



Gtjj Month. 








JUNE, 19i;^. 








30 Days. 




V 

is 

o 


Calondar for 

Boston, 

New England, N, T, State. 

Michigan, Wisconsin, 

N. and S. Dakota. 

Washington, and Oregon. 


Calendar for 

Nkw York City, 

Connecticut, Pennsylvania, 

Ohio, Indiana, Illinois. 

Iowa, Nebraska. Wyoming, 

and Northern California. 


Calendar for 

Washington, 

Virginia, Kentucky. 

Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, 

Utah, Nevada, 

and Central California. 


Calendar for 

Chaklkbton, 

Georgia, Alabama. 

Louisiana,Arkan8a8, Texas, 

New Mexico, Arizona, 

and Southern California. 


o 


Su.v 

Ul3SS. 


Sun 
Skts. 


Moon 
R. A s. 


Sun 
Risks. 


Sun- 
Shis. 


Moon 

R. 4S. 
H. M. 

2 20 


Sun 
Risks. 


Sun 
Skt.s. 


Moon 

R. S R. 


Sun 
Rises. 


Sun 
Sets. 

H. M. 

7 1 


Moon 
B. *a. 


1 


s 


H. M. 

4 26 


H. M. 

7 2S 


H. M. 

2 17 


H. M. 

4 32 


H. M. 

7 24 


H. M. 

4 37 


H. M. 

7 18 


H. M. 

2 23 


M. M. 

4 54 


R. M. 

2 33 


2 


M 


4 26 


7 30 


3 41 


4 32 


7 24 


2 45 


4 37 


7 19 


2 49 


4 54 


7 2 


3 2 


:^ 


Tu 


4 25 


7 31 


3 9 


4 31 


7 25 


3 15 


4 37 


7 19 


3 21 


4 53 


7 2 


3 37 


4 


W 


4 25 


7 32 


sets. 


4 31 


7 26 


sets. 


4 36 


7 20 


sets. 


4 53 


7 3 


sets. 


5 


Th 


4 24 


7 32 


9 5 


4 30 


7 26 


8 57 


4 36 


7 20 


8 49 


4 53 


7 3 


8 27 


6 


Fr 


4 24 


7 33 


10 


4 30 


7 27 


9 53 


4 36 


7 21 


9 46 


4 53 


7 4 


9 24 




Sa 


4 23 


7 33 


10 44 


4 29 


7 27 


10 39 


4 35 


7 21 


10 32 


4 52 


7 4 


10 14 


8 


S 


4 23 


7 34 


11 20 


4 29 


7 28 


11 15 


4 35 


7 22 


U 10 


4 52 


7 5 


10 56 


9 


M 


4 23 


7 35 


11 48 


4 29 


7 28 


11 45 


4 35 


7 23 


11 41 


4 52 


7 5 


11 32 


10 


Tu 


4 22 


7 36 


A. M. 


4 28 


7 29 


A. M. 


4 34 


7 23 


A. M. 


4 52 


7 6 


A. M. 


11 


\V 


4 22 


7 36 


12 12 


4 28 


7 30 


12 10 


4 34 


7 24 


12 9 


4 52 


7 6 


12 3 


12 


Th 


4 22 


7 37 


12 34 


4 28 


7 30 


12 34 


4 34 


7 24 


12 34 


4 52 


7 7 


12 33 


13 


Fr 


4 22 


7 37 


12 57 


4 28 


7 31 


12 57 


4 34 


7 25 


12 58 


4 52 


7 7 


1 2 


14 


Sa 


4 22 


7 38 


1 18 


4 28 


7 31 


1 21 


4 34 


7 25 


1 24 


4 52 


7 8 


1 32 


15 


S 


4 22 


7 38 


1 44 


4 28 


7 32 


1 48 


4 34 


7 26 


1 53 


4 52 


7 8 


2 6 


10 


M 


4 22 


7 38 


2 15 


4 28 


7 32 


2 20 


4 34 


7 26 


2 26 


4 52 


7 8 


2 43 


17 


Tu 


4 22 


7 39 


2 52 


4 28 


7 32 


2 59 


4 34 


7 26 


3 6 


4 52 


7 9 


3 27 


18 


VV 


4 22 


7 39 


rises. 


4 28 


7 33 


rises. 


4 34 


7 27 


rises. 


4 52 


7 9 


rises. 


19 


Th 


4 22 


7 39 


9 9 


4 28 


7 33 


9 2 


4 34 


7 27 


8 55 


4 52 


7 9 


8 33 


20 


Fr 


4 21 


7 39 


9 49 


4 28 


7 33 


9 43 


4 34 


7 27 


9 36 


4 52 


7 9 


9 17 


21 


Sa 


4 22 


7 39 


10 21 


4 28 


7 33 


10 15 


4 34 


7 27 


10 10 


4 52 


7 10 


9 54 


22 


S 


4 22 


7 39 


10 46 


4 29 


7 33 


10 42 


4 35 


7 27 


10 38 


4 53 


7 10 


10 26 


23 


M 


4 22 


7 40 


11 8 


4 29 


7 34 


11 5 


4 35 


7 28 


11 2 


4 53 


7 10 


10 54 


24 


Tu 


4 23 


7 40 


11 29 


4 29 


7 34 


11 27 


4 35 


7 28 


11 26 


4 53 


7 10 


11 21 


25 


\V 


4 23 


7 40 


11 43 


4 29 


7 34 


11 43 


4 35 


7 28 


11 42 


4 53 


7 11 


11 42 


26 


Th 


4 23 


7 40 


A. M. 


4 29 


7 34 


A. M. 


4 35 


7 28 


A. M. 


4 53 


7 11 


A. M. 


27 


Fr 


4 23 


7 40 


12 1 


4 30 


7 34 


12 2 


4 35 


7 29 


12. 3 


4 54 


7 11 


12 6 


28 


Sa 


4 24 


7 40 


12 20 


4 30 


7 34 


12 22 


4 36 


7 29 


12 24 


4 54 


7 11 


13 31 


29 


S 


4 24 


7 40 


12 41 


4 30 


7 35 


12 45 


4 36 


7 29 


12 48 


4 54 


7 11 


1 


30 

• ■ • 


M 


4 24 


7 40 


1 7 


4 30 


7 35 


1 12 


4 36 


7 29 


1 17 


4 54 


7 11 


1 32 









SUN ON 


MERIDIAN. 










Day OF 




Day of 




Day of 




Day of 






Day op 




Month. 




Month. 




Month. 




Month. 






Month. 






H. M. S. 




H. M. S. 




H. M. S. 




H. 


.M. S.i 




H. M. S. 


1 


11 57 34 


i 


11 58 35'; 


13 


11 59 46 


19 


12 


1 2 


25 


12 2 19 


2 


11 57 43 


8 


11 58 46, 


14 


11 59 58 


20 


12 


1 15 


26 


12 2 32 


3 


11 57 53 


9 


11 58 57 


15 


12 11 


21 


12 


1 28 


27 


12 2 44 


4 


11 58 3 


10 


Yi 59 9 


16 


12 23 


22 


12 


1 41 


28 


12 2 57 


5 


11 58 13 


11 


11 59 21 


17 


12 36 


23 


12 


1 54 


29 


12 3 9 


6 


11 58 24 


12 


11 59 33 


18 


12 49 


24 


12 


2 6 


30 


12 3 31 











TWILIGHT. 










Places. 


June. 


Begins, A. M. 


Ends, p. M. 


June. 


Begins, A. M. 


Ends, P. .M. 


June. 


Begins, a. m. 


Ends, P. M. 




H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


B. M. 


H. M. 


R. M. 


Boston 


1 


2 17 


9 38 


11 


2 9 


9 51 


21 


2 8 


9 55 


New York.. 


1 


2 29 


9 26 


11 


2 23 


9 37 


21 


2 22 


9 41 


Wash' ton.. 


1 


2 41 


9 14 


11 


2 36 


9 24 


21 


2 35 


9 28 


Charleston. 


1 


3 13 


8 43 


11 


3 9 


8 51 


21 


3 9 


8 54 





7tu Month. 






JULY 


, i9i;5. 








31 Da 


vs. 


§ 
IS 

M 


O 

Q 


Calendar for 

Boston, 

Ne-v England, N. Y. State, 

Michifraii, Wisconsin, 

N. and S. Dakota, 

Washington, and Oregon. 


Calend.ir for 

New Yop.ic City, 

Connecticut, Pennsylvania, 

Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, 

Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, 

and Northern California. 


Calendar for 

Washington. 

Virginia, KentucKy, 

Mistiotiri, Kansas, Colorado, 

Utah, Nevada, 

and Central California. 


Calendar for 

Charleston, 

Georgia, Alabama, 

Loui8iana,Arkan8»s, Texas, 

New Mexico, Arizona, 

and Southern California. 


o 


Rises. 


Sux 

Sets. 


Moon 
R. A s. 


Sun 
Risks. 


Sum 
Sets. 


Moon 
R. <t s. 


Son 
Rises. 


Sum 
Sets. 


Moon 

B. A S, 


Son 
Rises. 


SCM 

Sets. 


Moon 

B. AS. 


1 


Til 


H. M. 

4 25 


H. M. 

7 40 


H. M. 

1 40 


H. M. 

4 31 


H. M. 

7 35 


H. M. 

1 46 


H. M. 

4 37 


H. M. 

7 29 


H. M. 

1 53 


H. M. 

4 55 


H. M. 

7 11 


H. M. 

2 11 


2 


\V 


4 25 


7 40 


3 23 


4 31 


7 35 


3 30! 


4 37 


7 39 


2 37 


4 55 


7 11 


2 59 


8 


Th 


4 26 


7 40 


3 18 


4 32 


7 84 


3 26 


4 37 


7 29 


3 34 


4 55 


7 11 


3 56 


4 


Fr 


4 27 


7 40 


sets. 


4 33 


7 34 


sets. 


4 38 


7 29 


sets. 


4 56 


7 11 


sets. 


5 


Sa 


4 27 


7 39 


9 20 


4 34 


7 33 


9 15 


4 38 


7 28 


9 9 


4 56 


7 11 


8 53 


C 


S 


4 28 


7 39 


9 49 


4 35 


7 33 


9 46 


4 39 


7 28 


9 42 


4 57 


7 11 


9 31 




M 


4 29 


7 39 


10 16 


4 35 


7 33 


10 13, 


4 40 


7 28 


10 11 


4 57 


7 11 


10 5 


8 


Til 


4 29 


7 39 


10 39 


4 36 


7 33 


10 38 


4 40 


7 28 


10 38 


4 58 


7 11 


10 36 


9 


VV 


4 30 


7 38 


11 


4 37 


7 32 


11 1 


4 41 


7 27 


11 2 


4 58 


7 11 


11 5 


10 


Th ♦ 


4 31 


7 38 


11 23 


4 37 


7 32 


11 25 


4 42 


7 27 


11 28 


4 59 


7 10 


11 35 


11 


Fr 


4 32 


7^8 


11 47 


4 38 


7 32 


11 51 


4 42 


7 27 


11 55 


5 


7 10 


A. M. 


12 


Sa ■ 


4 33 


7 37 


A. M. 


4 39 


7 31 


A.M. 


4 43 


7 36 


A. M. 


5 


7 10 12 7 


13 


S 


4 33 


7 87 


12 16 


"4 40 


7 31 


13 21 


4 44 


7 26 


12 27 


5 1 


7 10 


13 43 


14 


M 


4 34 


7 36 


12 50 


4 40 


7 30 


12 57 


4 45 


7 25 


1 4 


5 1 


7 9 


1 34 


15 


Tu 


4 35 


7 86 


1 34 


4 41 


7 30 


1 41 


4 45 


7 25 


1 49 


5 2 


7 9 


2 11 


16 


VV 


4 36 


7 35 


2 27 


4 42 


7 29 


3 34 


4 46 


7 24 


2 42 


5 3 


7 9 


3 5 


17 


Th 


4 37 


7 34 


3 28 


4 43 


7 29 


3 35 


4 47 


7 24 


3 43 


5 8 


7 8 


4 5 


18 


Fr 


4 87 


7 34 


rises. 


4 44 


7 28 


rises. 


4 48 


7 23 


rises. 


5 4 


7 8 


rises. 


19 


Sa 


4 38 


7 33 


8 50 


4 45 


7 2^ 


8 45 


4 49 


7 23 


8 40 


5 4 


7 7 


8 37 


20 


S 


4 39 


7 32 


9 10 


4 46 


7 27 


9 7 


4 50 


7 22 


9 4 


5 5 


7 7 


8 54 


21 


M 


4 40 


7 32 


9 30 


4 47 


7 26 


9 28 


4 50 


7 21 


9 26 


5 5 


7 6 


9 30 


22 


Tu 


4 41 


7 31 


9 48 


4 47 


7 26 


9 47 


4 51 


7 21 


9 46 


5 6 


7 6 


9 44 


23 


W 


4 42 


7 30 


10 5 


4 48 


7 25 


10- 5 


4 52 


7 20 


10 6 


5 7 


7 5 


10 8 


24 


Th 


4 43 


7 29 


10 23 


4 49 


7 24|lO 25i 


4 53 


7 19 


10 27 


6 7 


7 5 


10 32 


25 


Fr 


4 44 


7 28 


10 43 


4 50 


7 23 


10 46 


4 54 


7 18 


10 49 


5 8 


7 4 


10 58 


26 


Sa 


4 45 


7 27 


11 6 


4 51 


7 22 


11 10 


4 55 


7 17 


11 15 


5 9 


7 3 


11 28 


27 


S 


4 46 


7 26 


11 35 


4 52 


7 21 


11 41 


4 56 


7 17 


11 47 


5 9 


7 3 A. M. 


28 


M 


4 47 


7 25 


A. M. 


4 53 


7 20 


A. M. 


4 57 


7 16 


A.M. 


5 10 


7 2 


13 4 


29 


Tu 


4 48 


7 24 


12 14 


4 53 


7 19 


13 19 


4 57 


7 15 


12 26 


5 11 


7 1 


12 46 


30 


W 


4 49 


7 23 


1 1 


4 54 


7 18 


1 9 


4 58 


7 14 


1 17 


5 11 


7 1 


1 39 


31 


Th 


4 50 


7 22 


2 4 


4 54 


7 18 


2 11 


4 59 


7 14 


2 19- 


5 13 


7 


2 40 













SUN ON 


MERIDIAN. 










Day of 






Day of 






Day of 






Day of 






Day pF 




Month. 






Month. 






Month. 






Month. 






Month. 






H. 


M. S. 




H. 


M. S. 




h. 


M. S. 




H. 


M. S. 




H. M. S. 


1 


13 


8 33 


8 


13 


4 48 


14 


13 


5 87 


30 


13 


6 8 


26 


13 6 19 


3 


13 


3 45 


9 


13 


4 57 


15 


13 


5 43 


31 


13 


6 11 


37 


13 6 19 


3 


13 


3 56 


10 


13 


5 6 


16 


13 


5 49 


33 


13 


6 14 


38 


13 6 18 


4 


13 


4 7 


11 


13 


5 14 


17 


13 


5 55 


33 


13 


6 16 


39 


13 6 17 


5 


13 


4 18 


13 


13 


5 22 


18 


13 


5 59 


34 


13 


6 17 


80 


13 6 15 


6 


13 


4 28 


13 


13 


5 80 


19 


13 


6 4 


35 


13 


6 18 


81 


13 6 13 


7 


13 


4 88 

























TWILIGHT. 



Places. 



Jiilv. 



Boston 

New York. 
Wash' ton.. 
Charleston. 



1 
1 
1 
1 



Begins, a. m. 


H. M. 


3 14 


3 37 


3 40 


8 13 



Ends, p. M. 


Jnly. 


H. M. 


9 54 


11 


9 40 


11 


9 37 


11 


8 54 


11 



Begins, a. m. 


■. M. 


3 34 


3 37 


3 49 


3 30 



Ends, p. M, 



H. M. 

9 45 
9 34 
9 32 

8 50 



July. 



31 

31 
31 
31 



Begins, a. m. 


H. M. 


3 39 


3 49 


3 


3 39 



Ends, P. M. 
H. M. 

9 34 
9 23 
9 13 
8 43 



8th Month. 






AUGUST, 1913. 








n Days. 


1 


Calendar for 


c 


ilendar for 


Calendar for 


Calendar for 






Boston, 


New 


York City, 


Washington, 


Charleston, 


•*» 


■g 


New England, N. Y. State, 


Connectic 


ut, Pennsylvania, 


Virginia, Kentucky, 


Georgia, Alabama, 


o 


z 


Michigan, Wisconsin, 


Ohio, 


ndiana, Illinois, 


Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, 


Louisiana,Arkan8iia, Tezaa, 


s 


it 


N. and S. Dakota, 


Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, 


Utah, Nevada, 


New Mexico, Arizona, 






Washington, and Oregon. 

t 


and Northern California, j 


and Central California. 


and Southern California. 


>> 


Son 


Sun- 


Moon , 


Sux 


Sun Moon 


Sun 


Son 


Moon 


Son 


Son 


Moon 




fl 


Rises. 


sets. 


R. A S. 


Rises. 


Sets. r. * s. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


R. Jk s. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


S. A B. 






H. M. 


H. M. H. M. 


H. M. 


U. M. { H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M, 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


IFr ! 


4 51 


7 2 L 3 17 


4 55 


7 17; 3 24 


4 59 


7 13 


3 31 


5 13 


6 59 3 51 


2Sa 


4 52 


7 20 sets.' 


4 56 


7 16 sets. : 


5 


7 12 


sets. 


5 14 


6 58: sets. 


3S 


4 53 


7 19^ 8 17 


4 57 


7 15 8 14 


5 1 


7 11 


8 11 


5 14 


6 571 8 3 


4M 


4 54 


7 18 8 41 


4 58 


7 14 8 40 


5 1 


7 10 


8 38 


5 15 


6 56 8 35 


5Ta 


4 55 


7 17i 9 4 


4 59 


7 12, 9 4: 


5 2 


7 9 


9 4 


5 16 


6 55 9 5 


6\V 


4 56 


7 15| 9 27 


5 


7 11 9 29 


5 3 


7 8 


9 30 


5 16 


6 55 


9 37 


7Th 


4 57 


7 14' 9 50 


5 1 


7 10' 9 54! 


5 4 


7 7 


9 57 


5 17 


6 54 10 8 


8,Fr 


4 58 


7 13 10 18 


5 2 


7 9 10 23 


5 5 


7 6 


10 28 


5 18 


6 53 10 43 


9;Sa 


4 50 


7 11 10 51! 


5 3 


7 7 10 57 


5 6 


7 4 


11 4 


5 19 


6 52 11 23 


10 S 


5 


7 1011 32 


5 4 


7 6 11 39: 


5 7 


7 3 


11 46 


-5 19 


6 51 A. M. 


11, M 


5 1 


7 9 a.m. 


5 5 


7 5'a.m. ! 


5 8 


7 2 


A. M. 


5 20 


6 50 12 08 


12 Tu 


5 2 


7 812 21 


5 6 


7 4 12 29 


5 9 


7 


12 37i 


5 21 


6 48 1 


13,W 


5 3 


7 7; 1 19 


5 7 


7 3, 1 27 


5 10 


6 59 


1 35 


5 21 


6 47 


1 57 


14 Th 


5 4 


7 5 2 23: 


5 8 


7 1; 2 30 


5 11 


6 58 


2 37 


5 22 


6 46 2 58 


15'Fr 


5 5 


7 4 3 30 


5 9 


7 3 36 


5 12 


6 57 


3 41 


5 23 


6 45 3 59 


16,Sa 


5 6 


7 2 rises. 


5 10 


6 58 rises. 


5 13 


6 56 


rises. 


5 23 


6 44 rises. 


17 S 


5 7 


7 7 35! 


5 11 


6 57 7 33 


5 14 


6 54 


7 31 


5 24 


6 43 


7 24 


IBM 


5 8 


6 59 7 54 


5 12 


6 55 7 52 


5 15 


6 53 


7 51 


5 25 


6 42 


7 48 


191X11 


5 9 


6 57, 8 10 


5 13 


6 54: 8 11 


5 16 


6 52 


8 11 


5 26 


6 41 


8 11 


20lW 


5 10 


6 56; 8 28 


5 14 


6 52' 8 30. 


5 17 


6 50 


8 31 


5 26 


6 40 8 35 


21 Th 


5 11 


6 54: 8 47 


5 15 


6 50 8 511 


5 18 


6 49 


8 52 


5 27 


6 39 9 


22 Fr 


5 12 


6 53 


9 8 


5 16 


6 49i 9 12; 


5 19 


6 48 


9 16 


5 27 


6 38 9 28 


23 Sa 


5 13 


6 51! 9 34' 


17 


6 48 9 39; 


5 20 


6 46 


9 45, 


5 28 


6 37 10 1 


24S 


5 14 


6 50 10 7j 


5 18 


6 47 10 13 


5 21 


6 45 


10 20 


5 28 


6 36 10 39 


25 


M 


5 15 


6 48 10 49, 


5 19 


6 46 10 57, 


5 21 


6 43 


u 2' 


5 29 


6 34 


11 26 


26 


Tu 


5 16 


6 47 11 45! 


5 20 


6 44 11 52 


5 22 


6 42 


U 59 


5 30 


6 33 


A.M. 


2? 


W 


5 17 


6 46 A. M. ! 


5 21 


6 43' A.M. 


5 23 


6 40 


1 • 

A. M. 


5 31 


6 82 


12 22 


28JTh 


5 18 


6 44 12 51 


5 22 


6 41 12 58 


5 24 


6 38 


1 6 


5 31 


6 31 


1 27 


29; Fr 


5 19 


6 42 2 8; 


5 23 


6 40; 2 14 


5 25 


6 37 


2 20 


5 32 


6 29 


2 39 


30;Sa 


5 20 


i 6 40 3 30 


5 24 


' 6 38 3 35 


5 26 


6 36 


3 40 


5 33 


6 28 


3 24 


aiiS 


5 21 


1 6 39 sets. 


5 25 


' 6 37: sets. 


5 27 


6 34 


i sets. 


5 33 


6 27 


sets. 











SUN ON 


MERIDIAN. 










Day of 


1 


Day of 






-Day of 




Day of 






Day op 




Month. 


1 


Month. 






^lONTH. 




Month. 






Month. 






H. M. S. 




H. 


M. 8.1 




H. M. S. 




H. 


M. S. 




H. M. 8. 


1 


12 6 10 


8 


12 


5 31 


14 


12 4 35 


20 


12 


S' 19 


26 


12 1 46 


2 


12 6 


9 


12 


5 23 


15 


12 4 24! 


21 


12 


3 5 


27 


12 1 30 


3 


12 6 2 


10 


12 


5 15 


16 


12 4 12 


22 


12 


2 50 


28 


12 1 12 


4 


12 5 57 


11 


12 


5 6 


17 


12 3 59, 


23 


12 


2 35 


29 


12 55 


5 


12 5 51 


12 


12 


4 56' 


18 


12 3 46 


24 


12 


2 19 


30 


12 37 


6 


12 5 45 


13 


12 


4 46 


19 


12 3 33 


25 


12 


2 3 


31 


12 19 


7 . 


12 5 39 


i 








1 
1 





















TWILIGHT. 










Places. 


Aug. 


Begins, A. M. 


Ends, p. M. 


Aug. 


Begins, a. m. 


Ends, p. M. 


Aug. 


Begins, a. m. 


Ends, p. M. 






n. M. 


K. M. 


H. M. 


H. U. 


H. M, 


H. M. 


Boston 


1 


2 57 


9 16 


11 


3 13 


8 57 


21 


3 29 


8 37 


New York. 


1 


3 6 


9 6 


11 


3 22 


8 48 


21 


3 85 


8 81 


Wash 'ton. 


1 


3 15 


8 57 


11 


3 29 


8 41 


21 


3 41 


8 24 


Cliarleston, 


1 


3 40 


8 32 


11 


3 50 


8 20 


21 


3 59 


8 7 



9th Month. 



SEPTE^IBEU, 1D1J5. 



30 Days. 







Calen.lar f 


or i 


c 


aienilar f 


or 


Calenilar for : 


Calendar for 


.. 






Boston , 1 


Nkw 


• York Citv, 1 


W ASHINOTON, 


Chari.kstdx, 


J3 


• 


New Etij 


flaiul. N. V. State, 


Connwi-liciit,, lV'nn.s\ ivania, 


Virginia. Kentuokv, 


fleortfia, Alabaiii!», 


s 


S 


Mlchi 


Iran, Wisconsin, 1 


(.)liio, 


Indiana, Illinois, i 


Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, Loiiisiaiu 


LArkanHas, Texmi, 


•? 


^ 


N. aii.l ». DakotR, | 


Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, 


Utah. Nevada, 


Ni'W Mexiro, Arizona, 


9> 




Washin 


fton, and Oregon, i 

i 


and Northern i;alit"oini!i. 


and Central California, 


ftud Sonthern California. 


o 


Sun 


SCN 


Moon 


SCN 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moov 


Sun 


Son 


Moon 


a 


A 


KiSKS. 


Srrs. 


R. * a. 


RlSK.S. 


Sets. 


R. A s. 


UlSKS. 


Skts. 


K. * a. 


Ki.tKs. 


Sbts. 


R. * K. 






H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


. H. M. 


IM 


5 23 


6 37 


7 5 


5 36 


6 35 


7 5 


5 28 


6 33 


7 5 


5 34 


6 36 


7 3 


2Tu 


5 34 


6 35 


7 28 


5 37 


6 34 


7 29; 


5 29 


6 31 


7 30 


5 35 


6 35 


7 34 


3VV 


5 26 


6 33 


7 52, 


5 38 


6 33 


7 55 


5 30 


6 30 


7 58, 


5 35 


6 34 


8 6 


4Th 


5 27 


6 33 


8 19; 


5 39 


6 31 


8 33 


5 31 


6 39 


8 38 


5 31) 


6 33 


8 41 


5Fr 


5 28 


6 30 


8 51 


5 30 


6 39 


8 56 


5 33 


6 37 


9 2' 


5 37 


6 31 


9 20 


6|Sa 


5 29 


6 38 


9 29 


5 31 


6 27 


9 36 


5 33 


6 35 


9 44 


5 37 


6 19 


10 5 


7.S 


5 30 


6 27 


10 17 


5 33 


6 35 


10 24 


5 34 


6 33 


10 32 


5 38 


6 18 


10 55 


8M 


5 31 


6 25 


11 13 


5 33 


6 33 


11 20 


5 35 


G 31 


11 28 


5 39 


16 


11 51 


9Tu 


5 32 


6 23 


A.M. 


5 34 


6 31 


A. M. 


5 36 


6 30 A. M. 


5 40 


6 15 


A. M. 


low 


5 33 


6 21 


12 16 


5 35 


6 19 


13 23 


5 37 


6 18 12 30 


5 40 


6 14 


12 51 


lljTh 


5 34 


6 19 


1 2l| 


5 36 


6 17 


1 27 


5 38 


6 16 


1 33 1 


5 41 


6 12 


1 53 


13Fr 


5 35 


6 17 


2 28 


5 37 


6 16 


2 33| 


5 39 


6 14 


2 38; 


5 43 


6 11 


2 52 


13 Sa 


5 36 


6 15 


3 32; 


5 38 


6 14 


3 36 


5 40 


6 12 


3 39 


5 42 


6 9 


3 50 


UiS 


5 37 


6 14 


4 35 


5 39 


6 13 


4 37 


5 41 


6 10 


4 39 


5 43 


6 8 


4 45 


15iM 


5 38 


6 12 


rises. 


5 40 


6 11 


rises. 


5 41 


6 9 


rises. 


5 44 


6 7 


rises. 


16|Tu 


5 39 


6 10 


6 35 


5 41 


6 9 


6 36 


5 43 


6 7 


6 37 


5 44 


6 6 


6 40 


17 


W 


5 41 


6 8 


6 53 


5 42 


6 7 


6 55 


5 43 


6 5 


6 57 


5 45 


6 5 


7 4 


18 


Th 


5 43 


6 6 


7 13 


5 43 


6 5 


7 17; 


5 44 


6 4 


7 20 


5 45 


6 4 


7 31 


19 


Fr 


5 43 


6 5 


7 38 


5 44 


6 4 


7 42 


5 45 


6 3 


' 7 47 


5 46 


6 3 


8 2 


20 Sa 


5 44 


6 3 


8 7 


5 45 


6 2 


8 13 


5 46 


6 1 


8 19 


5 47 


6 1 


8 37 


31iS 


5 45 


6 ] 


8 45 


5 45 


6 


8 52 


5 47 


6 


8 59 


5 47 


6 


9 20 


22 M 


5 46 


6 


9 33 


5 46 


5 59 


9 40 


5 48 


5 59 


9 48 


5 48 


5 59 


10 13 


33 Tu 


5 47 


5 58 


10 33 


5 47 


5 57 


10 41 


5 49 


5 57 


10 48 


5 48 


5 57 


11 11 


24 W 1 


5 48 


5 56 


11 44 


5 48 


5 56 


U 51 


5 50 


5 56 


11 57 


5 49 


5 55 


A. M, 


35 


Th 


5 50 


5 55 


A.M. 


5 49 


5 54 


A. M. 


5 51 


5 54 


A. M. 


5 50 


5 54 


12 18 


36 


Fr 


5 51 


5 53 


1 2 


5 50 


5 53 


1 7i 


5 53 


5 53 


1 13 


5 50 


5 53 


1 29 


37 Sa 


5 52 


5 51 


2 23 


5 5L 


5 51 


3 26! 


5 53 


5 51 


2 30 


5 51 


5 51 


2 41 


38 S 


5 53 


5 49 


3 44 


5 53 


5 49 


3 46 


i 5 53 


5 49 


3 48 


5 52 


5 m 


3 54 


29 


M 


5 54 


5 47 


5 4 


5 53 


5 48 


•5 5 


5 54 


5 48 


5 5 


5 53 


5 49 


5 6 


30 


Tu 


5 55 


5 46 


sets. 


5 54 


5 47 


set«. 


5 55 


5 46 


sets. 


5 53 


5 48 


sets. 


• • • 


















' 















SUN ON 


MERIDIAN. 








Day of 




Dav op 




Day of 




Dav of 




Day op 




Month. 




MilNTH. 




Month. 




JIOXTH. 




JIONTH. 






H. M. (B. 




H. M. S. 




H. M, fi. 




H. M. .«. 




H . M . s. 


1 


11 


\ 


11 58 3 


13 


11 55 58 


19 


11 53 51 


35 


11 51 45 


2 


11 59 41 


8 


11 57 43 


14 


11 55 37 


30 


11 53 29 


36 


11 51 24 


3 


11 59 22 


9 


11 57 22; 


15 


11 55 16 


31 


11 53 8 


37 


11 51 4 


4 


11 59 3 


10 


11 57 1 


16 


11 54 55 


33 


11 53 47 


28 


11 50 44 


5 


11 58 43 


11 


11 56 40 


17 


11 54 33 


33 


11 53 26 


29 


11 50 24 


6 


11 58 23 


13 


11 56 191 


18 


11 54 12 


34 


11 53 5 


30 


11 50 5 



TWILIGHT. 



Places. 



Boston 

New York . 
Wash' ton . 
Charleston 



Sept. 



1 
1 
1 

1 



Begins, a. m. 


Ends, p. M. 


Sept. 


H. M. 


H. M. 




3 45 


8 14 


11 


3 50 


8 9 


11 


3 55 


8 4 


11 


4 9 


7 51 


11 



Begins 


, A. M. 


H. 


M. 


3 


59 


4 


3 


4 


7 


4 17 



Ends, P. M. 



H. M. 

7 54 

7 50 

7 46 

7 36 



Sept. 



21 
31 
21 
31 



Begins, a. m. 


H. M. 


4 12 


4 15 


4 18 


4 20 



Ends, P. M. 

H. M. 

7 34 

,7 31 

'7 28 

7 30 





10th Month 






OCTOBER, 


1913. 






31 Days. 


§ 

« 
■s 


• 

1 

o 


Calendar for 

Boston, 

New Kngland, N. Y. State, 

Michigan, Wisconsin, 

N. and S. Dakota, 

Washington, and Oregon. 


Calendar for 

New York City, 

Connecticut, Pennsylv.inia, 

Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, 

Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming^ 

and Northern Califoiuia. 


Calendar for 

Washington, 

Virginia, Kentucky, 

Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, 

Utah, Nevada, 

and Central California. 


Calendar for 

Charleston, 

Georgia, Alabama, 

Lonisiaua.ArkanBas, Texas, 

New Mexico, Arizona, 

and Southern California. 


"6 


Sun 
Rises. 


Sun 
Skts. 


Moon 

R. .<> S. 


Sun 
Rises. 


Sun 
Sets. 


Moon 

R. i s. 


Sun 
Rises. 


Sun 
Sets. 


Moon 
R. s s. 


Sun 
Rises. 


Sun \ 
Sets. 


MooM 

R. i S. 


1 


W 


H. M. 

5 56 


H. M. 

5 44 


R. M 

6 17 


H. M. 

5 55 


H. M. 

5 45 


H. M. 

6 21 


H. M. 

5 55 


H. M. 

5 45 


H. M. 

6 24 


H. M. 

5 53 


H. M. 

5 47 


H. M. 

6 35 


3 


Th 


5 57 


5 43 


6 47 


5 56 


5 43 


6 52 


5 56 


5 43 


6 57 


5 54 


5 45 


7 14 


3 


Fr 


5 58 


5 40 


7 24 


5 57 


5 41 


7 30 


5 57 


5 4L 


7 37 


5 55 


5 43 


7 57 


4 


Sa 


5 59 


5 39 


8 9 


5 58 


5 40 


8 16 


5 58 


5 40 


8 24 


5 56 


5 42 


8 47 


5 


S 


6 1 


5 38 


9 4 


6 


5 39 


9 12 


5 59 


5 38 


9 19 


5 57 


5 41 


9 43 


6 


M 


6 2 


5 36 


10 6 


6 1 


5 37 


10 13 


6 


5 36 


10 20 


5 58 


5 40 


10 43 


7 


Tu 


6 3 


5 34 


11 11 


6 2 


5 35 


11 18 


6 1 


5 34 


11 25 


5 59 


5 39 


11 44 


8 


VV 


6 4 


5 33 


A.M. 


6 3 


5 33 


A.M. 


6 2 


5 32 


A. M. 


5 59 


5 37 


A.M. 


9 


Th 


6 5 


5 31 


12 19 


6 4 


5 32 


12 24 


6 3 


5 30 


12 29 


6 


5 36 


12 45 


10 


Fr 


6 6 


5 29 


1 24 


6 '5 


5 30 


1 28 


6 4 


5 29 


1 31 


6 1 


5 35 


1 43 


11 


Sa 


6 8 


5 28 


2 27 


6 6 


5 28 


2 29 


6 5 


5 27 


2 32 


6 1 


5 34 


2 40 


12 


S 


6 9 


5 26 


3 29 


6 7 


5 27 


3 30 


6 6 


5 25 


3 31 


6 2 


5 33 


3 35 


13 


M 


6 10 


5 24 


4 29 


6 8 


5 25 


4 29 


6 7 


5 23 


4 29 


6 3 


5 31 


4 29 


14 


Tu 


6 11 


5 22 


5 31 


6 9 


5 24 


5 29 


6 8 


5 23 


5 38 


6 3 


5 30 


5 24 


15 


W 


6 12 


5 21 


rises. 


6 10 


5 22 


rises. 


6 9 


5 21 


rises. 


6 4 


5 39 


rises. 


16 


Th 


6 13 


5 19 


5 42 


6 11 


5 21 


5 46 


6 10 


5 19 


5 51 


6 5 


5 28 


6 4 


17 


br 


6 14 


5 17 


6 10 


6 12 


5 19 


6 16 


6 11 


5 18 


6 22 


6 6 


5 26 


6 39 


18 


Sa 


6 15 


5 15 


6 45 


6 13 


5 17 


6 52 


6 12 


5 16 


6 59 


6 7 


5 35 


7 19 


19 


S 


6 17 


5 14 


7 30 


6 14 


5 16 


7 37 


6 13 


5 15 


7 45 


6 7 


5 24 


8 7 


20 


M 


6 18 


5 12 


8 25 


6 15 


5 14 


8 33 


6 14 


5 14 


8 40 


6 8 


5 23 


9 3 


21 


Tu 


6 19 


5 11 


9 31 


6 16 


5 13 


9 38 


6 15 


5 13 


9 45 


6 9 


5 22 


10 6 


22 


W 


6 20 


5 9 


10 44 


6 17 


5 12 


10 50 


6 16 


5 11 


10 56 


6 10 


5 21 


11 14 


23 


Th 


6 21 


5 8 


A. M. 


6 18 


5 11 


A. M. 


6 17 


5 10 


A. M. 


6 11 


5 19 


A. M . 


24 


Fr 


6 22 


5 6 


12 1 


6 19 


5 9 


12 5 


6 18 


5 9 


13 10 


6 12 


5 18 


12 23 


25 


iSa 


6 23 


5 4 


1 17 


6 20 


5 8 


1 19 


6 19 


5 8 


1 22 


6 13 


5 17 


1 31 


26 


S 


6 25 


5 2 


2 35 


6 21 


5 6 


2 36 


6 20 


5 7 


2 38 


6 14 


5 16 


2 41 


27 


M 


6 26 


5 


3 55 


6 22 


5 5 


3 55 


6 21 


5 6 


3 54 


6 15 


5 15 


3 53 


28 


Tu 


6 27 


4 59 


5 14 


6 23 


5 3 


5 12 


6 22 


5 5 


5 10 


6 15 


5 14 


5 4 


29 


W 


6 28 


4 58 


sets. 


6 24 


5 2 


sets. 


6 23 


5 4 


sets. 


6 16 


5 14 


sets. 


30 


Th 


6 29 


4 57 


5 16 


6 25 


5 


5 22 


6 24 


5 3 


5 28 


6 17 


5 13 


5 46 


31 


Fr 


6 30 


4 55 


5 59' 


6 27 


4 59 


6 6 


6 25 


5 2 


6 13 


6 17 


5 12 


6 34 









SUN ON 


MERIDIAN. 








Day of 




Day of 




Day of 




Day of 




Day of 




Month. 




Month. 




Month. 




Month. 




Month. 






H. M. s. 




H. M. 8. 




H. M. S. 




h. m* s. 




h. m. s. 


1 


11 49 45 


8 


11 47 39 


14 


11 46 7 


20 


11 44 53 


26 


11 44 4 


2 


11 49 26 


9 


11 47 22' 


15 


11 45 53 


3L 


11 44 43 


27 


11 43 58 


3 


11 49 8 


10 


11 47 6 


16 


11 45 40 


22 


11 44 34 


28 


11 43 53 


4 


11 48 49 


11 


11 46 51 


17- 


11 45 27 


23 


11 44 25 


29 


11 43 49 


5 


11 48 31 


13 


11 46 35 


18 


11 45 15 


24 


11 44 17 


30 


11 43 45 


6 


11 48 13 


13 


11 46 21 


U9 


11 45 4 


25 


11 44 10 


31 


11 43 43 


7 


11 47 56 



















TWILIGHT. 



Placbs. 



Boston 

New York, 
Wash ' ton. 
Charleston. 



Oct. Begins, a. m. Ends, p 



1 
1 
1 

1 



M, 



4 24 
4 26 

4 27 
4 32 



H. M. 

7 15 
7 14 
7 12 

7 7 



Oct. Begins, a. m. 



11 
11 
11 

u 



H, 



4 35 
4 36 
4 37 
4 39 



Ends, p. M. 


Oct. 


H. M. 


6 58 


31 


6 57 


3L 


6 56 


21 


6 54 


21 



Besins. a. m. 


h. m. 


4 46 


4 47 


4 47 


4 47 



Ends, p. M. 

H. M, 

6 43 
6 43 

6 43 
6 43 





11th Month 


• 




NOVEMBER, 


1913. 






30 Days. 






c 


alemlar f«r 


Cnlendar for 


calendar for 


Calendar for 


, 






Boston, 


Nbw York Citv, 


Washington. 
Virginia, Kentuclcv, 


Charleston, 




J4 


New Eiif, 


rhinH. N. Y. SUU, 


Connecticut, Pennsylvania, 


Georgia, Alabama, 


a 


S 


Michigan, Wisi'onsin, 


Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, 


Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, 


Louisiana. Arkansas, Tex.is, 


Ss 


^ 


N. Hiiii S. Dakotft. 


Iowa, Net)raska, Wyoming, 


Utah, Nevada, 


New Mexico, Arizona, 




■s 

o 

5" 


Washlnj 


;toii, aiul Oregon. 


and Northern California. 


and Central California. 


and Southern California. 




Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Q 


o 


Risks. 


Skts. 


II. A S. 


Risks. 


Skts. 


R. Jt s. 


Risks. 


Skts. 


R. * s. 


Risks. 


Skts. 


R. Jk a. 






II. M. 


H. M. 


II. M. 


i H. M. 


II. M. 


II. M. 


II. M. 


U. M. 


H. M. 


II. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


1 


Sa 


6 32 


4 54 


6 50 


6 28 


4 58 


G 58 ; 20 


5 1 


7 6, 


6 18 


5 11 


7 29 


2 


S 


6 3.3 


4 53 


7 51 


6 30 


4 57 


7 59 i 6 27 


5 


8 6 


6 18 


5 10 


8 29 


3 


M 


6 34 


4 52 


8 58 


6 31 


4 56 


9 41 


6 2.S 


4 59 


9 11 


6 19 


5 9 


9 27 


4 


Tu 


6 35 


4 51 


10 51 


6 32 


4 55 


10 ll! 


6 29 


4 58 


10 16 


6 20 


5 8 


10 34 


5 


W 


6 36 


4 50 


11 13 


6 33 


4 54 


11 17 


6 30 


4 57 


11 21 


6 31 


5 7 


11 35 


6 


Th 


6 38 


4 49 


A. AI. 


6 34 


4 m 


A. M. 


6 31 


4 56 


A. M. 


6 33 


5 7 


A. M. 


7 


Fr 


6 39 


4 47 


12 18 


6 35 


4 52 


12 20 


6 33 


4 55 


12 33| 


6 23 


5 6 


12 32 


8 


Sa 


6 40 


4 46 


1 19 


6 36 


4 51 


1 21 ! 6 33 


4 54 


1 33 


6 24 


5 5 


128 


9 


S 


6 43 


4 45 


2 20 


6 38 


4 50 


2 21,1 6 35 


4 '53 


2 21 


6 25 


5 4 


2 23 


10 


M 


6 43 


4 44 


3 21 


' 6 40 


4 40 


3 20 i 6 36 


4 53 


3 20 


6 26 


5 3 


3 17 


11 


l\i 


6 45 


4 43 


4 23 


: 6 41 


4 48 


4 21 


6 37 


4 51 


4 19 


6 27 


5 2 


4 12 


12 


W 


6 46 


4 41 


5 27 


6 43 


4 47 


5 24 


6 39 


4 50 


5 20 


6 38 


5 1 


5 10 


13 


Th 


6 48 


4 40 


rises. 


6 43 


4 46 


rises. 


6 40 


4 49 


rises. 


6 39 


5 1 


rises. 


14 


Fr 


6 50 


4 39 


4 45 


: 6 44 


4 45 


4 53, 


6 41 


4 48 


4 58 


6 30 


5 


5 17 


15 


Sa 


6 51 


4 37 


5 28 


6 46 


4 44 


5 35, 


6 43 


4 47 


5 42; 


6 31 


4 59 


6 4 


16 


S 


6 53 


4 36 


6 21 


6 47 


4 43 


6 39 


6 43 


4 46 


6 36' 


6 32 


4 58 


6 59 


17 


M 


6 54 


4 35 


7 24 


' 6 48 


4 43 


7 31; 


6 44 


4 45 


7 38! 


6 32 


4 58 


8 


18 


Tu 


6 55 


4 34 


8 35 


i 6 49 


4 4\ 


8 4i: 


6 45 


4 44 


8 47! 


6 33 


4 57 


8 59 


19 


W 


6 57 


4 33 


9 50 


6 50 


4 40 


9 54 


6 46 


4 44 


9 591 


6 34 


4 56 


10 14 


20 


Th 


6 58 


4 33 11 5 


6 51 


4 39 


11 9, 


6 47 


4 43 


11 13 


6 35 


4 56 


11 22 


21 


Fr 


6 59 


4 33 A. M. 


6 53 


4 38 


A. xM. 1 


6 48 


4 43 


A. M, 


6 36 


4 55 


A. M. 


22 


Sa 


7 


4 3112 21 


6 53 


4 38 


12 23, 


6 49 


4 43 


12 24 


6 36 


4 55 


12 30 


28 


S 


7 2 


4 31 1 36 


6 54 


4 37 


1 36 


6 50 


4 41 


1 36; 


6 37 


4 55 


1 37 


24 


i\r 


7 3 


4 30 2 51 


6 55 


4 36 


3 5o: 


6 51 


4 41 


2 49 


6 38 


4 54 


2 44 


25 


Tu 


7 4 


4 30; 4 9 


6 56 


4 36 


4 6 i 6 53 


4 41 


4 3 


6 39 


4 54 


3 54 


26 


vv 


7 5 


4 29: 5 29 


6 58 


4 35 


5 24 


6 53 


4 40 


5 20 


6 40 


4 54 


5 6 


27 


Th 


7 6 


4 29 


sets. 


6 59 


4 35 


sets. 


6 54 


4 40 


sets. 


6 40 


4 54 


sets. 


28 


Fr 


7 7 


4 29 


4 35 


7 


4 35 


4 43 


6 55 


4 40 


4 50 


6 41 


4 54 


5 13 


29 


Sa 


7 7 


4 28 


5 31 


7 1 


4 34 


5 41 


6 56 


4 40 


5 49 


6 42 


4 54 


6 12 


30 

• • • 


S 


7 8 


4 28 


6 39 


7 2 


4 34 


6 46 


6 57 
1 • 


4 40 


6 53 


6 43 


4 54 
. ...... 


7 15 









SUN ON 


MERIDIAN. 








Day op 




Day of 




Day OP 




Day of 




Day of 




Month. 




I^IoNTlt. 




Month. 




Month. 




Month. 






n. M. s 




H. M. S. 




II. M. S. 




II. M. .<*. 




H. M. B. 


1 


11 43 41 


7 


11 43 46 


13 


11 44 21 


19 


11 45 26 


25 


11 47 2 


2 


11 43 4()' 


8 


11 43 50 


14 


11 44 30 


20 


11 45 40 


26 


11 47 20 


3 


11 43 39j 


9 


11 43 54 


15 


11 44 39 


21 


11 45 55 


27 


11 47 40 


4 


11 43 4u 


10 


11 44 


16 


11 44 50 


23 


11 46 lo; 


28 


11 48 


5 


11 43 41 


11 


11 44 6 


17 


11 45 1 


23 


11 46 27t 


29 


11 48 21 


6 


11 43 43 


12 


11 44 13 


18 


11 45 13 


24 


11 46 44 


30 


11 48 42 











TWILIGHT. 










Places. 


Nov. 


iiegins, A. M. 


Ends, P. M. 


Nov. 


Begins, a. m. 


EikLs, p. m. 


Nov. 


Begins, A. M. 

H. M. 


Ends, p. M. 




H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


Boston 


1 


4 58 


6 29 


11 


5 9 


6 19 


21 


5 20 


6 12 


New York. 


1 


4 58 


6 29 


11 


5 8 


6 20 


21 


5 18 


6 14 


Wash' ton. 


1 


4 57 


6 30 


11 


5 7 


6 31 


21 


5 16 


6 16 


Charleston 


1 


4 54 


6 33 


11 


5 2 


6 26 


21 


5 10 


6 22 



12th Month, 






DECEMBER, 


1913. 






31 Days. 


• 

1 
1 


■i 
1 
1 

1 


Calendar for 

Boston, 

New England, N. Y. State, 

Michigan, Wisconsin, 

N. and 8. Dakota, 

Washington, and Oregon. 

i 


Calendar for 

Nkw York City, 

Connecticut, Pennsylvania, 

Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, 

Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, 

and Northern California. 


Calendar for 

Washi.notoN, 

Virginia, Kentucky, 

Mieeoiirl, Kansas, Colorado, 

Utah, Nevada, 

and Central California. 


Calendar for 

Charleston, 

Georgia, Alabama, 

Louisiana,Arkansa8, Texas, 

New Mexico, Arizona, 

and Southern California. 




St-N 

Rises. 


Sun 

SUTS. 


Moon 

B. A B. 


Son 

RiKKS. 


Sun 
Sets. 


Moon 
R. i s. 


Sun 
Rises. 


Sun 
Sets. 


Moon 

R. A 8. 


Son 

IllSES. 


Sun 
Sets. 


Moon 
r. a f>. 


1 


M 


H. M. 

7 9 


H. M. 

4 28 


H. U. 

7 48 


H. M. 

7 4 


H. M. 

4 34 


H. M. 

7 54 


H. M. 

6 59 


H. M. 

4 40 


H. M. 

8 


H. M. 

6 44 


H. M. 

4 54 


H. M, 

8 19 


3 


Tu 


7 10 


4 28 


8 57 


7 5 


4 31 


9 2 


7 -0 


4 39 


9 7, 


6 44 


4 54 9 22 


3 


W 


7 11 


4 28 


10 4 


7 6 


4 34 


10 7 


7 1 


4 39 


10 11! 


6 45 


4 54 10 22 


4 


Th 


7 12 


4 28 


11 7 


7 7 


4 34 


11 9 


7 2 


4 39 


11 12 


6 46 


4 54 


11 18 


5 


Fr 


7 13 


4 28 


A.M. 


7 8 4 33 


A.M. 


7 3 


4 39 


A. M. 1 


6 47 


4 54 


A.M. 


6 


Sa 


7 14 


4 28 


12 9 


7 9 4 33 


12 10 


7 4 


4 38 


12 Hi 


6 47 


4 54 


12 14 


7 


S 


7 15 


4 28 


1 9' 


7 10' 4 33 


1 9 


7 5 


4 38 


1 9 


6 48 


4 54 


1 8 


8 


M 


7 16 


4 28 


2 11 


7 111 4 33 


2 9 


7 6 


4 38 


2 8 


6 49 


4 54 


2 3 


9 


Tu 


7 17 


4 28 


3 14 


7 12; 4 33 


3 11 


7 7 


4 38 


3 9 


6 50 


4 54 


2 59 


10 


W 


7 18 


4 28 


4 19 


7 13 4 33 


4 14 


7 8 


4 38 


4 10 


6 50 


4 54 


3 56; 


11 


Th 


7 19 


4 28 


5 26 


7 14' 4 33 


5 21 


7 9 


4 38 


5 15 


6 51 


4 54 


4 58 


12 


Fr 


7 20 


4 28 


6 35 


7 LS, 4 33 


6 28 


7 10 


4 38 


6 22 


6 52 


4 55 


6 2 


13 Sa 


7 21 


4 28 rises. 


7 16 


4 33 


rises. 


7 11 


4 38 


rises. ! 


6 53 


4 55 


rises. 


14 


S 


7 22 


4 28, 5 14 


7 17 


4 33 


5 21 


7 11 


4 39 


5 28 


6 54 


4 55 


5 50 


15 


M 


7 23 


4 28 6 24' 


7 18 4 34 


6 30 


7 12 


4 39 


6 37| 


6 55 


4 56 


6 56 


16 


Tu 


7 24 


4 29, 7 40 


7 18, 4 34 


7 45 


7 13 


4 39 


7 51 


6 56 


4 56 


8 6 


17 


W 


7 24 


4 29; 8 56 


7 19 4 34 


9 


7 14 


4 40 


9 3; 


6 57 


4 57 


9 15 


18 


Th 


7 25 


4 2910 11 


7 19 4 34 


10 13 


7 14 


4 40 


10 16; 


6 58 


4 57 


10 22 


19 


Fr 


7 25 


4 30 11 26 


1 7 20 4 35 


11 26 


7 15 


4 41 


11 27 


6 58 


4 58 


11 29 


20 


Sa 


7 26 


4 30 


A. M. ; 


7 20; 4 35 


A. M. 


7 15 


4 41 


A. M. 


6 59 


4 58 


A.M. 


21 


S 


7 26 


4 30 


12 40 


7 20! 4 35 


12 39 


7 15 


4 42 


12 38 


6 59 


4 59 


12 35 


22 


M 


7 27 


4 30 


1 54 


7 21 


4 35 


1 52 


7 16 


4 42 


1 49 


7 


4 59 


1 42 


28 


Tu 


7 27 


4 31 


3 11 


7 21 


4 36 


3 7 


7 16 


4 43 


3 3 


7 


5 


2 51 


24 


W 


7 28 


4 32 


4 29, 


7 22 


4 36 


4 23 


7 17 


4 44 


4 18 


7 


5 


4 1^ 


25 


Th 


7 28 


4 33 


5 45 


7 22 


4 36 


5 39 


7 17 


4 45 


5 32 


7 


5 1 


5 1^. 


26 


Fr 


7 28 


4 33 


6 56 


7 22 


4 37 


6 49 


7 18 


4 45 


6 41! 


7 1 


5 2 


6 m 


27 Sa 


7 29 


4 34 


sets. 


7 23 


4 37 


sets. 


7 18 4 46 


sets • \ 


7 1 


5 2 


sets;. 


28,S 


7 29 


4 34 


5 28 


7 23 


4 38 


5 34 


7 18 4 46 


5 41: 


7 1 


5 3 


6 ^ 


29 


M 


7 29 


4 35 


6 38, 


7 23 


4 39 


6 43 


7 19 4 47 


6 49 


7 2 


5 3 


7 6 


30 


Tu 


7 30 


4 35 


7 47: 


7 23 


4 40 


7 51 


7 19; 4 47 


7 55 


7 2 


5 4 


8 7 


31 W 


7 30 


4 36 


8 53 


7 24 4 41 


8 56 


7 19; 4 48 


8 59 


7 3 


5 4 


9 7 









SUN ON 


MERIDIAN. 








Day of 




Day op 




Day ot 




Day of 




Day of 




Month. 




Month. 




Month. 




Mo.nth. 




Month. 






II. M. S. 




H. M. S. 




H. M. S. 




H. M. S. 




fl. M. 8. 


1 


11 49 5 


8 


11 51 56 


H 


11 54 42 


20 


11 57 38 


26 


12 38.; 


2 


11 49 27 


9 


11 52 23 


15 


11 55 10 


21 


11 58 8 


27 


12 1 77 


3 


11 49 51 


10 


U 52 50 


16 


11 55 39 


22 


11 58 38 


28 


12 I 37' 


4 


11 50 15 


U 


11 53 17 


17 


11 56 9 


23 


11 59 8 


29 


12 2' 7' 


5 


11 50 40 


12 


11 53 45 


18 


11 56 38 


24 


11 59 38 


30 


12 2 36, 


6 


11 51 5 


13 


11 54 13 


19 


11 57 8 


25 


12 8 


31 


1^ 3 5, 


7 


11 51 30 



















TWIUICHT. 



Flacks. 


Dec. 


Begins, a. m. 


Ends, p. M. 


Dec. 


Begins, a. m. 


Ends, p. M. 


Dec. 


Begfns, A. M. 


Ends, p. M 






H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


i H. M. 


H. M. 


Boston 


1 


5 29 


6 9 


11 


5 38 


6 9 


21 


5 45 


6 12 


New York. 


1 


5 27 


6 11 


11 


5 36 


6 11 


21 


5 42 


6 14 


Wash' ton.. 


1 


5 25 


6 13 


11 


5 33 


6 14 


21 


i 5 40 


6 17; 


Charleston, 


1 


5 17 


6 20 


i 11 


5 25 


6 22 


: 21 


5 31 


6 26i 



Ai'ea of Islaiuls. 



51 



<!^ur J^oon* 



Of all the secondary planets the earth's satellite is by far the most interesting and important. 
The moon completes her circuit around the earth in a period whose mean or average length is 27 
days 7 hours 43. 2 minutes: but inconsequence of her motion in common with the earth around the 
sun, the mean duration of the lunar month, that is, the time from new moon to new moon, is 29 
days 12 hours 44.05 minutes, whicli is called the moon's synodical period. If the earth were mo- 
tionless in space the moon's orbit would be nearly an ellipse, having the earth in one of the foci; 
hence her distance from the earth varies during the course of a lunar month. Her mean distance 
from the earth is 238, 850 miles. Her maximum distance, however, may reach 252. 830 miles, and 
the least distance to which she can approach the earth is 221,520 miles. Her diameter is 2,162 
miles, and if we deduct from her distance from the earth the sum of the two radii of the earth and 
moon, viz. , 3,962 and 1,081 miles, respect! velj', we shall have for the nearest approach of the sur- 
faces of the two bodies 216,477 miles. Her orbit is a very intricate one, because the earth in moving 

aroundthesuncarries the moon along with it; hence the latter is sometimes within and sometimes 
without the earth's orbit. Itsform is that of a serpentine curve, always covcave toward the sun, 
andinclined to theplaneof the earth's orbit at an angle of 5° 9', in consequence of which our satel- 
lite appears sometmies above and sometimes below the plane of the earth's orbit, through which 
she passes twice in a revolution. These points or positions are called nodes, and no two consecutive 
nodes occupy positions diametrically opposite on the lunar orbit. The nodes have a retrograde 
motion, which causes them to make an entire revolution in 18 years, 218 days, 21 hours, 22 minutes 
and 46 seconds. This motion was well known to the ancients, who called it the iSaros, and was 
made use of by them in roughly predicting eclipses. 

The moon always presents the same face to us, as is evident from the permanency of the various 
markings on its surface. This circumstance proves that with respect to the earth slie revolvps on an 
axis, and the time of rotation is exactly equal to the time of revolution around the earth, viz., 
27.32166 daj's. The moon's axis is not perpendicular to the plane of her orbit, but deviates there- 
from by an angle of about 6o 41'. In consequence of this fact, and of the inclination of the lunar 
orbit to that of the ecliptic, the poles of the moon lean alternately to and from the earth. When 
the north pole leans toward the earth we see somewhat more of the region surrounding it, and 
somewhat less when it leans the contrary way. This displacement is known by the name of libra- 
tion in latitude. 

The moon's motion on her axis is uniform, but her angular velocity in her orbit is subject to 
slight variations by reason of the form of her orbit; hence it happens that we sometimes see a little 
more of the eastern or western edge at one time than at another. This phenomenon is known as 
libration in longitude. 

The moon's surface contains about 14,685,000 square miles, or nearly four times the area of 
Europe. Her volume is 1-49 and her mass 1-81 that of the earth, and hence her density is about 
3-5 that of the earth, or about 3 2-5 that of water. At the lunar surface gravity is onl j' 3-20 of what 
it is at the earth, and therefore a body which weighs 20 pounds here would weigh only 3 pounds there. 

The centre of gravity of the earth and moon, or the point about which they both actually revolve 
in their course around the sun, lies r«ti/uH the earth; it is 1,063 miles below the surface. 

The attractive force of the moon acting on the water of our oceans is mainly instrumental in 
raising them into protuberances or tides in such amanner as to give the total mass a spheroidal figui-e 
whose principal axis would continually coincide with the line joining the centres of the earth and 
moon, but in consequence of the resistance which this inovementof the water encounters from con- 
tinents and islands, as well as from the liquid molecules themselves, the tidal wave can never arrive 
at any place until about one hour after the moon has crossed the meridian of the place. 

The moon has no atmosphere and no water. The suddenness with which stars are occulted by 
the moon is regarded as a conclusive proof that a lunar atmosphere does not exist, and the spectro- 
scope furnishes negative evidence of the same character. 

In remote ages the lunar surface was the theatre of violent volcanic action, being elevated into 
cones and ridges exceeding 20,000 feet high, and at other places rent into furrows or depressions of 
corresponding depth. The lunar volcanoes are now extinct. A profound silence reigns over the 
desolate and rugged surface. It is a dead world, utterly unfit to support animal or vegetable life. 



THE EARTH'S ATMOSPHERE. 

The earth's sensible atmosphere is generally supposed to extend some forty miles in height, prob- 
ably further, but becoming at only a few miles from the surface of too great a tenuity to support life. 
The condition and motions of this aerial ocean play a most important part in the determination of 
climate, modifying, by absorbing, the otherwise intense heat of the sun, and, when laden with 
'jlouds, hindering the earth from radiating its acquired heat into space. —Whitaker 



^tta of KslanTrs* 



New Guinea..., 

Borneo 

Madagascar 

Sumatra 

Great Britain... 

Celebes 

Java 

Cuba 

Newfoundland , 

Iceland 

Ireland 

Etayti 



Square 
Miles. 



823,000 

284.000 

227,000 

162,000 

83,700 

68,800 

48,400 

44,164 

40,000 

39,800 

32,600 

28,800J 



Tasmania , 

Ceylon 

Terra del Fuego . . 

Forinosa 

Sicily 

Jamaica 

Cyprus 

Corsica 

Crete 

Trinidad 

Long Island, N. Y 
Tenerjffe 



Square 
Miles. 



26,200 

24,700 

18.500 

15,000 

9,800 

4,200 

3,600 

3,400 

2,900 

1,750 

1,376 

1»010 



Mauritius 

Madeira 

Corfu 

Man ..." , 

ISfartha' s Vinej^aid 

Malta 

Nantucket 

Jersey , 

Hong Kong 

Manhattan 



Square 
Miles. 



710 

510 

430 

230 

120 

100 

60 

45 

30 

22 



52 



The Moon's Phases, 1913. 



K\)t J^ooirs Jlljases, 1913. 



1H 


Phase. 




Boston. 


New Yobk. 


Washington. 


Charleston. 


Chicago. 


tA 




H. M. 




H. M. 




H. M. 




H 


M. 




H. 


M. 




b New Moon. 


7 


5 44 


A.M. 


5 33 


A.M. 


5 20 


A.M. 


5 


9 


A.M. 


4 


39 


A.M. 


s First Quarter. 


15 


11 17 


A.M. 


11 6 


A.M. 


10 53 


A.M. 


10 


42 


A.M. 


10 


11 


A.M. 


fl Full Moon. 


22 


10 56 


A.M. 


10 44 


A.M. 


10 32 


A.M. 


10 


21 


A.M. 


9 


50 


A.M. 


A 


Last Quarter. 


29 
6 


2 50 


A.M. 


2 38 


A.M. 


2 26 


A.M. 


2 


14 

\ 


A.M. 


1 


43 


A.M. 


u 


New Moon. 


12 38 


A.M. 


12 26 


A.M. 


12 14 


A.M. 


12 


2 


A.M. 


5d 11 


31 


P.M. 


First Quarter. 


14 


3 50 


A.M. 


3 38 


A.M. 


3 26 


A.M. 


3 


13 


A.M. 


2 


42 


A.M. 


ti 


Full Moon. 


2U 


9 19 


P.M. 


9 8 


P.M. 


8 55 


P.M. 


8 


44 


P.M. 


8 


13 


P.M. 




Last Quarter. 


2V 
7 


4 31 


P.M . 


4 20 


P.M. 


4 7 


P.M. 


3 


56 


P.M. 


3 


25 


P.M. 


.4 


New Moon. 


7 38 


P.M. 


7 27 


P.M. 


7 14 


P.M. 


7 


3 


P.M. 


6 


32 


P.M. 


u 


First Quarter. 


lb 


4 14 


P.M. 


4 2 


P.M. 


3 50 


P.M. 


3 


38 


P.M. 


3 


8 


P.M. 


1^ 


Full Moon. 


22 


7 12 


A.M. 


7 


A.M. 


6 48 


A.M. 


6 


37 


A.M. 


6 


6 


A.M. 


Last Quarter. 


29 
6 


8 13 


A.M. 


8 2 


A.M. 


7 50 


A.M. 


7 


38 


A.M. 


7 


7 


A.M. 




New Moon. 


1 4 


P.M. 


12 52 


P.M . 


12 40 


P.M . 


12 


29 


P.M. 


11 


58 


A.M. 


T^ 


First Quarter. 


14 


12 55 


A.M. 


12 43 


A.M. 


12 31 


A.M. 


12 


20 


A.M. 


13d 11 


49 


P.M. 


O, 


Full Moon. 


2U 


4 48 


P.M. 


4 37 


P.M. 


4 24 


P.M . 


4 


13 


P.M. 


3 


42 


P.M. 


< 


Last Quarter. 


28 
6 


1 25 


A.M. 


1 13 


A.M. 


1 1 


A.M. 


12 


50 


A.M. 


12 


19 


A.M. 




New Moon. 


3 40 


A.M. 


3 29 


A.M. 


3 16 


A.M. 


3 


5 


A.M. 


2 


34 


A.M. 


May 


First Quarter. 


13 


7 1 


A.M. 


6 49 


A.M. 


6 37 


A.M. 


6 


25 


A.M. 


5 


54 


A.M. 


P'ull Moon. 


20 


2 34 


A.M. 


2 22 


A.M. 


2 10 


A.M. 


1 


59 


A.M. 


1 


28 


A.M. 


j-,ast Quarter. 


2i 
4 


7 19 


P.M. 


7 8 


P.M. 


6 55 


P.M. 


6 


44 


P.M. 


6 


13 


P.M. 


a 


New Moon. 


3 13 


P.M. 


3 1 


P.M. 


2 49 


P.M. 


2 


38 


P.M. 


2 


6 


P.M. 


First Quarter. 


11 


11 53 


A.M. 


11 42 


A.M. 


11 29 


A.M. 


11 


19 


A.M. 


10 


47 


A.M. 


3 


Full Moon. 


18 


1 9 


P.M. 


12 58 


P.M. 


12 45 


P.M. 


12 


34 


P.M. 


12 


3 


P.M. 


>^ 


Last Quarter. 


2b 
4 


12 57 


P.M. 


12 45 


P.M. 


12 33 


P.M. 


12 


21 


P.M. 


11 


50 


A.M. 




New Moon. 


12 22 


A.M. 


12 10 


A.M. 


Sd 11 58 


P.M. 


3d 11 


47 


P.M. 


3d 11 


16 


P.M. 


First Quarter. 


10 


4 53 


P.M. 


4 42 


P..M. 


4 29 


P.M. 


4 


IS 


P.M. 


3 


47 


P.M. 


9 
►^ 


Full Moon. 


IS 


1 22 


A..M. 


1 11 


A.M. 


12 58 


A.M. 


12 


47 


A.M. 


12 


16 


A.M. 


Last Quarter. 


26 
2 


5 14 


A.M. 


5 3 


A.M. 


4 51 


A M. 


4 


39 


A.M. 


4 


8 


A.M. 




New Moon. 


8 14 


A.M. 


8 2 


A.M. 


7 50 


A.M. 


7 


39 


A.M. 


7 


8 


A.M. 


00 


First Quarter. 


S 


11 17 


P.M. 


11 5 


P.M. 


10 53 


P.M. 


10 


42 


P.M . 


10 


11 


P.M, 


3 


Full Moon. 


16 


3 43 


P.M. 


3 31 


P.M. 


3 19 


P.M. 


3 


8 


P.M . 


2 


37 


P.M . 


3 


Last Quarter. 


■24 


7 33 


P.M. 


7 22 


P.M. 


7 10 


P.M. 


6 


58 


P.M. 


6 


27 


P.M. 





New Moon. 


31 

7 


3 54 


P.M. 


3 42 


P.M. 


3 30 


P.M. 


3 


19 


P.M. 


2 


48 


P.M. 


4) 


First Quarter. 


8 21 


A.M. 


8 10 


A.M. 


7 58 


A.M. 


7 


46 


A.M. 


7 


15 


A.M. 


Full Moon. 


15 


8 2 


A.M. 


7 50 


A.M. 


7 38 


A.M. 


7 


26 


A.M. 


6 


65 


A.M. 


■U 

a 


Last Quarter. 


2.S 


7 46 


A.M. 


7 34 


A.M. 


7 22 


A.M. 


7 


11 


A.M. 


6 


39 


A.M. 


New Moon. 


30 
6 


12 13 


A.M. 


12 1 


A.M. 


29d 11 49 


P.M. 


29d 11 


37 


P.M. 


29d 11 


6 


P.M. 


• 


First Quarter. 


9 2 


P.M. 


8 50 


P.M. 


8 38 


P.M. 


8 


27 


P.M. 


7 


56 


P.M. 


.Q 


Full Moon. 


15 


1 23 


A.M. 


1 11 


A.M. 


12 59 


A.M. 


12 


47 


A.M. 


12 


16 


A.M. 


-w 


Last Quarter. 


22 


6 9 


P.M. 


5 57 


P.M. 


5 45 


P.M. 


5 


34 


P.M. 


5 


3 


P.M. 


o 


New Moon. 


29 
5 


9 45 


A.M. 


9 33 


A.M. 


9 21 


A.M. 


9 


10 


A.M. 


8 


39 


A.M. 




First Quarter 


1 50 


P.M. 


1 39 


P.M. 


1 26 


P.M. 


1 


15 


P.M. 


12 


44 


P.M. 


4> 


Full Moon. 


13 


6 27 


P.M. 


6 16 


P.M. 


6 3 


P.M. 


5 


52 


P.M. 


5 


21 


P..M. 


> 


Last Quarter. 


21 


3 12 


A.M. 


3 1 


A.M. 


2 48 


A.M. 


2 


37 


A.M. 


2 


b 


A.M. 


^ 


New Moon. 


27 
5 


8 57 


P.M . 


8 45 


P.M. 


8 33 


P.M. 


8 


22 


P.M. 


7 


61 


P.M. 


a 


First Quarter. 
Full Moon. 


10 14 


A.M. 


10 3 


A.M. 


9 51 


A.M. 


9 


39 


A.M. 


9 


8 


A.M. 


18 


10 16 


A.M. 


10 4 


A.M. 


9 52 


A.M. 


9 


41 


A.M. 


9 


10 


A.M. 


o 


Last Quarter. 


20 


11 31 


A.M. 


11 20 


A.M. 


11 7 


A.M. 


10 


56 


A.M. 


10 


25 


A.M. 


Q 


New Moon. 


27 


10 14 


A.M. 


10 3 


A.M. 


9 60 


A.M. 


9 


39 


A.M. 


9 


8 


A.M. 



Moonlight Chart, 1913. 



53 



if^oonli0ljt <2^ljart, 1913. 



5 

a 
o 

o 
>. 

ei 
Q 



u 

a 



u 

<a 

0) 



J3 



o1 






c 



s 
bo 



ii 




0) 




^ 


• 


a 


i) 


01 


Si 


-m* 


o 


a. 


*J 


<D 


o 


X! 


O 



t-l 

a 
> 

o 



l4 

a 

u 

0) 

Q 




ExPLAXATiox. — The white spaces show the amount of moonlight each night. January?, Feb- 
ruary6, etc., new moon, no niooulight during the whole night; January 15, February 14, etc., the 
moon sets at or near midnight, when the first half of the night has moonlight: January 22, February 
21, etc., full moon when moonlight lasts the whole night; January 29, February27, 6tc.,wheathe 
moon rises at ornear midnight when the latter half of the night has moonlight. 



54 



Pole JStar 



cStac STaiJle* 



FOB TDENTTFYIXf* THE PRTNCIPAL FlX^^n STABS. 



Name op St* p.. 



J' 



aAndromed?e(Alpher'z) 

vPegasi (Algenib) 

'iCassiopeife (schedir)... . 

aArietis 

jSPersei (Algol) 

aTauri (Aldebaran) 

aAurigie (Capellaj 

"Orionis (Betelguese). . . 
aCanis Majoris (Sirius). 
aGeminorura (Castor) .. 
3Geminorum ( Pollux) . . 
oCanis Miuor (Procyou) 



)ecliMal]oii 


O 1 


+ 28 36 


+ 14 42 


+ 56 3 


+ 23 3 


+ 40 37 


+ 16 20 


+ 45 54 


+ 7 23 


- 16 36 


+ 32 5 


+ 28 14 


+ 5 27 



Oil Meridian. 



Upper. 

H. if. 

- 1 18.0 

- 1 13. 2 

- 42. 2 

+ 40. 



39.9 
8.2 
47.6 
27.6 
18.4 
5.7 
16.6 
11.6 



Lower 
H. M. 
+10 40. 
+10 44. 
+11 15. 
+12 38. 
+13 37. 
+15 6. 
+1 
+16 
+17 
+18 
+18 14 
+18 9, 



45 

25. 

16. 

3. 



Namk of .Sta p.. 



aLeonis (Begulus). 
aVirgiuis (Spica)... 
'aBooti.s (Arcturus). 

i^Urste Minori.s 

laCorouae Borealis.. 
laScorpii (Auiares). 

jaLyrae (Vega) 

'aAquihe (Altair)... 

iaCygni (Deneb) 

[aCephei 

nAquarii 

apiscis Australis... 
laPegasi (]Markab).. 



Ufclinatiyji 



O f 

+ 12 24 

— 10 42 
+ 19 38 
+ 74 31 
+ 27 1 

— 26 14 
+ 38 42 
+ 8 38 
+ 44 58 
+ 62 13 

— 45 

— 30 5 
+ 14 44 



Uii Meridian. 



Upper. 

H. M. 

+ 8 40. 1 
+11 56.5 
+12 47.5 
+13 27,5 
+13 49. 7 
+14 59. 3 
+17 9. 3 
+ 18 21.4 
+ 19 13. 5 
+19 51. 5 
+20 35. 8 
+21 27.1 
+21 34. 7 



Lower. 
H. M. 

+20 38. 1 
+L'3 54. 5 
+ 45. 5 
1 25. 5 

1 47 7 

2 57.3 
,573 

+ 6 li' 4 
+ 7 11.5 
+ 7 A'.'. 5 
+ 8 3;,. 8 
+ 9 25. 1 
+ 9 32. 7 



+ 
+ 

+ 
+ 



'J'o liud the time of Ibe star's irausit add or subtract, according to the sign, the numbers 
in tlie second column of flgures to the date of the transit of the pole star given below. Thus, 
for a Andromedag February 1. Lower Transit of Polar Star is 4 li. 43 m. 35 s. a.m., to which add 
10 h. 40 m. and we. have 3 h. 23 m. 35.s. p. m. ; for December 1, we find 7 h. 27 m. 51 s. p. m. , etc. 

APPROXIMATE PARALLAX AND DTSTAXCE IX LIGHT-YEARS OF SOME OF THE 

PRINCIPAL FIXED STARS. 
By light-years is to be understood the number of j^ears liglit requires to travel from the star to us. 



Polaris (Pole Star) 

a AurigJB (Capeila) 

a Canis Majoris (Sirius) 

a Canis Minoris (Procyou). 

a Bootis (Arcturus) 

aCentauri 



Parallax. 



n 

0.073 

0.046 

0.233 

123 

0.127 

0.916 



Light- 
Ye.irs. 



45 

71 
15 

27 
28 
3.6 



a Lyrfe (Vega). 

61 Cygni 

S Cassiopeiae . . . 

V Draconis 

85 Pegasi 



Parallax. 



II 

0.140 
0.348-0.564 
0.187 
0.127 
0.054 



Light- 
Years. 



23 
6-8 
17 
26 
60 



The determination of stellar parallax is one of the most difficult and refined problems in practic:'l 
or observational astronomy. It is to find the angle which the semi-diameter of the earth's orbit 
subtends at the star— an angle always very small, as seen from the above table, and which cannot be 
measured directly, but by various processes too complicated to be explained here. 

lole c^tar, 

MEAN TIME OF TRANSIT (AT WASHINGTON) AND POLAR DISTANCE OF POLARIS. 



I9i 



1913 


JaNUAKY. 


Fkbruauy. 


March. 


Apri 


L. 


:m 


4V. 


JtNE. 


« o 


Upper 
Transit. 


Pol.ar 
Distance. 


Lower 
Transit. 


Polar ■ 
Distance. 


Lower 
Transit. 


Polar 
Distance. 


Lower 
Transit. 


Polar 
Distance . 


Lower 
Transit. 


Polar 1 
Distance. 


Lower 
Transit. 


Polar 
Distance. 


1 

U 
2! 


p. M. 
H. M.S. 
6 44 2 
6 4 33 
5 25 3 


/ // 

1 9 8 
1 9 7 
1 9 7 


A. M. 
K. M. S. 
4 43 35 
4 4 5 
3 24 37 


/ It 

1 9 8 
1 9 8 

1 9 h) 


A. M. 

H. M. S. 

2 53 4 

2 13 37 

1 34 14 


O / II 
1 9 11 

1 9 13 
1 9 17 


A. M. 

K. jr. s. 

12 50 57 
12 11 37 
11 28i'4 P.M. 


r II 

1 9 20 
1 9 23 
1 9 23 


p. M. 
H. M. S. 

10 49 8 

10 9 .=>5 

9 SO 43 


r II 

1 9 29 
1 9 31 
1 9 34 


p. M. 
K. M. S. 
8 47 ::6 
8 8 26 
7 29 18 


t It 

1 9 36 
1 9 •>- 
1 9 ;;7 



1913 


July. 


August. 


Skptkmbkp.. 


■4.1 ~ 
>, = 


Lower 
Transit. 


Polar 
Distance. 


Upper 
Transit. 


Polar 
Distance. 


Upper 
Traii.sit. 


Polar 
Distance. 


1 
11 

21 


p. M. 

H. M. S. 

6 50 11 
6 11 1 
5 31 63 


f It 

1 9 38 
1 9 37 
1 9 36 


A. M. 

K. M. S. 

4 50 48 
I 4 11 :;9 
: 3 32 29 


; It 

1 9 35 
1 9 33 
1 9 30 


A. M. 

n. M. s. 

j 2 49 24 

5 10 13 

1 1 30 59 


1 II 

1 9 27 
1 9 24 
1 9 21 



OCTOBKP.. 



Upper 
Transit. 



A. M. 

H. M. S. 
12 51 44 
12 12 28 
11 29 15 P.M. 



Polar 
Distance. 



I II 

1 9 17 
1 9 13 
1 9 9 



NOVKMBEE. 



Upper 
Transit. 


Polar 
Distance. 


P. M. 
H. M.S. 

10 45 59 

10 6 38 

9 27 15 


1 II 

1 9 5 
1 9 1 

1 8 58 



DKCRMnKK. 



Upper 
Tran.sit. 



p. M. 
H. M.S. 
8 47 51 

8 8 24 
7 28 56 



Pol.ir 
Distance. 



t II 
8 55 
8 53 
8 50 



From June IG to August 1 both the upper and lower transits take place during daylight. 
The azimuth at the time of greatest Eastern or Western elongation can be ea.sily computed from 
the formula: sin j_.?iiLP 

— cos I 
where A denotes the azimuth, v the polar distance, and I the latitude of the place. 

DATE OF GREATEST ELONGATION. 
To find the time of greatest Eastern or Western elongation, let //denote the hour angle, and t 
and p as before, then we shall have 

cos 77" = tan p tan I. 
And the hour angle in mea7i time is 

//m = 11° X 0.0664846. 
This quantity, Hm, added to or subtracted from the time of tran.sit given above, according 
to the elongation required, will give the mean time of the greatcRt elongation at any place whose 
north latitude is I. 



Asti'ononiical Phenomena for the Year 191S. 



55 



Astronomical 33ijenomena for ti)c Year 1913 

ASTRONOMICAL SIGNS AND SYMBOLS. 



The Sun. 
The Moon. 
Mercury. 
Venus. 
Tlie Earth. 



<f 


Mars. 


% 


Jupiter. 


h 


Saturn. 


^ 


Uranus. 


^ 


Neptune. 



<S Conjunction, 

D Quadrature. 

8 Opposition. 

Q, Ascendiijg NocIe# 

Xj De.sceudiiig Nod6* 



Two heavenly bodies are in ' ' conjunction " ( c5 ) when they have the same Rigid Ascension, 
or are on the sawfi meridian, i. e., when one is due north or soK^'t of the other; if the bodies are 
near each other as seen from the earth, they will rise and set at the same time ; they are in 
"opposition" {§) when in opposite quarters of tlie heavens, or when one rises just as the 
other is setting. "Quadrature" (n) is halfway between conjunction and opposition. By 
"greatest elongation" is meant the greatest apparent angular distance from the sun; the 
planet is then generally most favorably situated for observation. Mercury can only be seen 
with the naked eye at tliis time. When a planet is in its ' * ascending " •( Q ) or " descending' ' 
(y) node it is crossing the plane of the earth's orbit. The term "Perihelion" means nearest, 
and ' 'Aphelion ' ' furthest, from tlie sun. An ' ' occultation " of a planet or star is an eclipse of 
it by some other body, usually the moon. 

I.— ECLIPSES. 
In the year 1913 there will be five eclipses, three of the sun and two of the moon, as follows: 
1. A total eclipse of the moon March 22, partly visible In the United States. 



PLACES. 



Boston 

New York. . . . 
Washington . . 
Charleston . . . 

Chicago 

Denver 

San Francisco. 



Moon 


Total 


Total 


Moon 


Enters Shadow. 


Ecllp.se Begins. 

H. M. 


Eclipse Ends. 


Leaves Shadow. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


6 28.3 A.M. 


After Moon Sets. 


After Moon Seta. 


After Moon Sets. 


5 16.8 A.M. 


4 1 ( t t 1 


' tt ti *i 


♦» «« «$ 


5 4.4 A.M. 


6 2.7 A.M. 


«• *. «• 


«• .4 44 


4 53.1 A.M. 


5 51.4 A.M. 




44 44 44 


4 22.3 A.M. 


5 20.5 A.M. 


it It (4 


44 44 •• 


3 12.6 A.M. 


4 10.9 A.M. 


5 44.4 A.M. 


44 44 44 


2 2.9 A.M. 


3 1.2 A.M. 


4 34.7 A.M. 


5 32.9 A.M. 



Magnitude 1.57. Moon's diameter- unity. 

2. A partial eclipse of the sua April 6, visible In Alaska, British Columbia, Alberta, the north- 
western portion of Saskatchewan, Washington, Oregon, Northern California and the northwestern 
portions of Nevada, Idaho and Montana. 

At Seattle the eclipse will begin at 8 hours 25.7 minutes A. M. and end at 9 hours 38.7 minutes 
A. M. The first contact will occur at 65° and the last at 11°.2 from the northern point of the sun's 
limb toward the West In both cases. 

3. A partial eclipse of the sun August 31. visible only In Iceland, Greenland, Labrador, New- 
foundland and the extreme eastern portions of Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia. 

At St. Johns, Newfoundland, the eclipse will begin at 5 hours 33.2 minutes P. M. and end at 
6 hours 9 minutes p. M. 

4. A total eclipse of the moon September 15, visible partly In the United States as follows: 



Places. 


Moon 
Eviters Shadow. 


Total 
Eclipse Begins. 


Total 
Eclipse Ends. 


Moon 
Leaves Shadow. 


Charleston 


H. M. 

5 33.0 A.M. 
5 2.1 A.M. 
3 62.5 A.M. 
2 42.8 A.M. 


H. M. 

After Moon Sets. 

*« «« •■ 

5 1.0 A.M. 
3 61.3 A.M. 


H. M. 

After Moon Sets. 

44 44 44 
44 44 44 

6 25.6 A.M. 


After Moon Sets. 


Chlcaco 


44 44 «4 


Denver 


•4 44 44 


San Francisco 


•4 44 44 



Magnitude 1.43. Moon's diameter -unity. 

5. A partial eclipse of the sun September 29-30. visible only In Madagascar and the southeastera 
portion of Africa. 



IL— PLANETARY CONFIGURATIONS, 19ia 
( Washington Jfeaii time. ) 



D. H. M. 

Jan. 5 2 28 p.m. c5 

5 10 26 p.m. 5 

9 3 P.M. 6 

11 5 21a.m. 6 

1110 A.M. (3 

13 4 P.M. c5 
18 138 a.m. 5 
21 3 P.M. 5 



d€ 






''4tf, 






? cf , 


(f S. 


46'. 


9 C 






V, 


1/ N. 


l3^ 


cf ^', 


11 a. 


47'. 


h€ 






in aphelion. I 



D. H. M. 

Jan. 29 3 A.M. 

29 10 a. m. 

Feb. 2 3 36 p.m. 

3 1 30 p. m. 

5 11 6 a. M 

10 9 5 A. M. 

12 9 A. M. 

12 6 P.M. 



Tj stationary, 

9 inQ 

6 d^ 

6 9€ 

$ gr. along. E. 46° 43' 

6 O superior. 



56 



Periodic Comets. 



ASTRONOMICAL PHENOMENA FOR THE YEAR \%Vi- Continued. 


D. H. M. 








D. H. M. 




Feb. 3 4 10 25 A.M. 


c3 h C 




July 21 8 P.M. 


(5 9 h, h N. loisf. 


16 1 P.M. 


uh^ 






28 10 4 a.m. 


6 dd 


Mar. 2 7 16 A. n. 


6^C 






29 1 3 p.m. 


6h€ 


3 12 p. M. 


2 in perihelion. 






30 2 22 a.m. 


6 9€ 


4 3 22 p.m. 


dcf (E 




Aug 


. 4 6 A.M. 


5 $ inferior. 


6 3 P.M. 


§ ill perilielion. 






6 10 P.M. 


$ gr. hel. lat. 8. 


9 9 45 a.m. 


c3 C 






12 1121p.m. 


6 TiC 


1] 2 A.M. 


§ gr. elong. E. 18 


iol9' 




13 9 P.M. 


5 stationary. 


11 3 22 p.m. 


6 9 C 






22 7 A.M. 


§ gr.elong. W.18o26/ 


13 7 28 p.m. 


6h\ 






2tl2 A.M. 


(3 d" >2 , cf N. 10 9'. 


1711 P.M. 


§ stationary. 






26 146 a.m. 


6h€ 


19 11 A. M. 


§ greatest brilliancy. 




28 3 21a.m. 


6 d€. 


25 10 P.M. 


9 gr. hel. lat. N 


« 




28 6 35 p.m. 


6 9 € 


2711 P.M. 


5 5 O inferior. 






29 1 P.M. 


5 . ill perihelion. 


29 9 21p.m. 


6%€ 






30 1 2 41 P. M. 


d 5(1!: 


Apr. 2 8 23 p.m. 


6^\ 




Sept 


. 4 9 A.M. 


% stationary. 


3 3 A.M. 


9 stationary. 






9 3 38 a.m. 


6^fC 


6 7 P.M. 


m;o 






1011 P.M. 


uhO 


812 A.M. 


6 ? C 






11 3 A.M. 


V iiiQ 


910 A.M. 


stationary. 






1610 A.M. 


6 superior. 


10 5 33 a.m. 


6h (£ 






18 6 A.M. 


cfiii Q 


23 10 P.M. 


cT gr hel. lat S. 






22 10 54 A. M. 


6 h C 


24 8 P.M. 


(S 9 Qiiiferior. 






23 3 14 p. M. 


6 cf C 


24 11 P. M. 


gr.elong.W. 27^12^ 




27 3 26 P.M. 


6 9€ 


26 9 A.M. 


6%<^' 






30 7 P.M. 


h stationary. 


May 2 3 16 a.m. 


6cSi, 






30 7 54 p.m. 


6 §S 


4 2 55 a.m. 






Oct. 


2 10 A. M. 


Ocf 


4 6 51p.m. 


(5 9 (|i^ 






2 9 P.M. 


n 11 


5 4 P. M. 


li stationary. 

o h C 






6 1 13 p. M. 


6 ^C 


7 5 27 p.m. 






12 1 P.M. 


$ in aphelion. 


8 10 P. M. 


6 § ? 






14 5 P. M. 


9 ill perihelion. 


911 P.M. 


5 gr. hel. lat. S. 






19 4 10 p.m. 


6h^ 


1312 A.M. 


9 stationary. 






21 8 p. M. 


6 cf C 


17 10 A. M. 


d* in perihelion. 






27 3 23 p.m. 


6 9<!l 


2011 P.M. 


9 in fj 




Nov 


1 9 P.M. 


§ gr. hel. lat. S. 


23 5 15 p.m. 


6^€ 






Ill P.M. 


gr. elong. E. 230 34f 


25 2 p. M. 


lim 






3 4 9 a.m. 


c5 ^C 


28 11 P. M. 


5 in oQ 






5 2 P.M. 


9 gr. hel, lat. N. 


29 10 A. M. 


c5 >2Q 






12 6 P.M. 


5 stationary. 


3010 P.M. 


9 greatest brilliancy. 




15 7 16 p. M. 


6h<S, 


31 917 a.m. 


c5 cfC 






18 158 p.m. 


6 d€ 


31 1 p.m. 


6^h 






23 1 P.M. 


5 § inferior. 


June 110 56 A.M. 


69€ 






25 12 A M. 


$ in perihelion. 


1 6 P.M. 


c5 5 O superior. 






26 2 25 p.m. 


6 9 C 


4 717 a.m. 


6h€ 






27 6 24 a.m. 


c5 § C 


12 9 P.M. 


§ gr. hel. lat. N 






27 7 A.M. 


cf stationary. 


19 918 p.m. 


(3^(£ 






30 1 57 P. M. 


6%<S, 


24 9 a.m. 


9 in aphelion. 




Dec. 


2 10 A. M. 


5 stationary. 


29 11 56 A. M. 


d cf C 






2 2 P.M. 


c5 9, 5 S. 1035/. 


30 156 p.m. 


6 9 € 






7 4 A. M. 


8 hO 


July 1 10 17 P. M. 


6h^ 






10 9 P.M. 


B gr. elong. W. 2lo2/ 


3 7 P.M. 


in aphelion. 






12 10 50 p.m. 


6h<^ 


310 p. M. 


9 gr. elong. \V. 45 


044/ 




15 4 49 p.m. 


6 d<S, 


5 10 A.M.' 


8 -no 






26 315 a.m. 


6 §C 


7 10 A. M. 


gr.elong.E.26< 


3 13f 




■*26 12 49 P. M. 


c5 9 C 


16 1 P.M. 


§ in aphelion. 






23 7 24 p.m. 


6^€ 


16 8 P.M. 


9 gr. he), lat. S. 






29 6 A.M. 


§ in tj 


16 10 21p.m. 


6'n€ 






ru 4 P.M. 


9 int3 


20 1 P.M. 


5 statior 

* 


lary. 






3112 P.M. 


(f nearest 




ptrtotrU 


ec 


imcts. 












Perihel. 














Perihel. 




» 


Perihelion 


Period 


Dist. 


Eccen- 


1C 




Perihelion 


Period 


Dist. 


Eccen- 


Pi AMK* 


Passjige. 


(Years). 


Earth'.'* 


tricity. 


K 


Ane, 


Passage. 


(Years). 


Earth's 


tricity. 










Orbit— 1. 


0.846 
0.553 












Orbit=l. 




Encke. 


1886, 
1883, 


Mar 7 
Nov. 20 


3 3 
5.2 


0.34 
1.34 


Biela 
D'Ai 




1882, Sept. 23 
1884. Jan. 13 


6.6 
6.7 


0.86 
1.33 


0.755 


Tempel 


•rest 


0.626 


Barnard 


1890, 
1886, 
1879, 


Feb. 17 
Mav 9 
]\rar. 30 


5.4 
5.5 
5.5 


1.28 
1.«'7 
0.59 


0.582 
0. 656 
0.810 


Faye 
Tuttl 
Pon.s 




1881, Jan. 22 
1885, Sept. 11 
1884, Jan. 25 


7.6 
13 8 
71.5 


1.74 
1.02 
0.77 


0. 549 


Tempel-Swift 


e 


0.821 


Brorsen 


-Brooks. 


0.955 


Winnecke.. . 


1886, 
1885, 


Sept. 4 
Sept. 25 


5.8 
6.5 


0.88 
2.0 7 


0. 727 
0.405 


Olbei 
Hal It 


•s 


1887. Oct. 8 
1910, Apr. 19 


72 6 
74.4 


1.20 
0.59 


0.931 


Tempel 


jy- 


0.967 



Tlie Still's Right Ascension and Declination. 



57 



K\yt ^mVn Jiitsljt Ascension antr ilccUuatioiu 

("WASHINGTON — APPARENT NOON.) 



Date — 
1913. 



Feb. 



Jan. 1 . . 
2. . 
3. 
4. . 
6. 
6. 

7. , 

8. , 
9. 

10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18., 
19. 
20.. 
21. , 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
Mar. 1 . 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 



Apparent 


I^Ight Ascension. 


H. M. 


s. 


18 46 


38.01 - 


51 


2.93 


55 


27.53 


59 


51.77 


19 4 


15.60 


8 


39.00 


13 


1.94 


17 


24.38 


21 


46.29 


26 


7.64 


30 


28.41 


34 


48 . 57 


39 


8.10 


43 


26.96 


47 


45.15 


52 


2.65 


56 


19.43 


20 


35.48 


4 


50.78 


9 


5.33 


13 


19.11 


17 


32.13 


21 


44.38 


25 


55.84 


30 


6.51 


34 


16.40 


38 


25.51 


42 


33.82 


46 


41.33 


50 


4S.04 


54 


53.94 


58 


59.03 


21 3 


3.31 


7 


6.78 


11 


9.44 


15 


11.29 


19 


12.33 


23 


12.55 


27 


11.96 


31 


10.56 


35 


8.36 


39 


5.37 


43 


1.59 


46 


57.03 


50 


51.70 


54 


45.61 


5S 


38.77 


22 2 


31.20 


6 


22.91 


10 


13.92 


14 


4.24 


17 


53.89 


21 


42.91 


25 


31.31 


29 


19.11 


33 


6.32 


36 


52.96 


40 


39.06 


44 


24 . 63 


48 


9.68 


51 


54.22 


55 


38.28 


59 


21.89 


23 3 


5.05 


6 


47 . 78 


10 


30 . 10 


14 


12.03 


17 


53 . 57 


21 


34.74 


25 


15.56 


28 


56.05 


32 


36 . 23 


36 


16.12 


39 


55.73 


43 


35.09 


47 


14.22 


50 


53.14 


54 


31.86 



Apparent 
Declination. 



21 



20 



-23 1 

22 56 
50 
44 
37 
30 
2 3 
15 
7 
58 
49 
39 
29 
19 
8 
57 
45 
33 
21 
8 

19 55 
41 
28 
13 

18 59 
44 
28 
13 

17 57 
41 
24 
7 
50 
32 
15 
56 
38 
19 
1 
41 



16 



15 



14 



13 



12 



11 
10 



58 

1 

5 

9 

12 

16 

19 



10.41 
48.82 
27,. 12 
5.32 
43 . 45 
21.53 
59.60 



+ 



2 . 
43 
23 
2 
42 
21 

39 
18 
56 
35 
13 
51 

9 29 
7 

8 45 
22 

7 59 
37 
14 

6 51 

28 

5 

5 42 
18 

4 55 

31 

8 

3 44 
21 

2 57 
34 
10 

1 46 
22 

59 
35 
11 
11 
35 
59 

1 22 
46 

2 9 



12.2 
3.3 

20.8 
23.0 
52.1 
54.3 
29.8 
38.7 
21.4 
38.0 
28.9 
54.3 
54.5 
34.0 
40.8 
27.3 
49.9 
49.0 
24.9 
37.9 
23.3 
56.4 

2.6 
47.3 
10.9 
13.6 
55.8 
17.8 
20.2 

3.2 
27.2 
32.6 
19.9 
49.5 

1.7 
57.0 
36.0 
5S.9 

6.2 
58.4 
35.8 
59.0 

8.4 

4.3 
47.3 
17.8 
36.2 
42.9 
38.3 
22 
56 
20 
34 
39 
34 
21 

0.3 
31.2 
54.5 
10.7 
20.3 
23.7 
21.2 
13 


42 
20 
54 
25 
53 
18 
41.5 

2.6 
22.4 
41.2 
59.3 
17.0 
34.8 
52.9 
48.2 
28.4 

7.3 
44.5 
19.7 
52.6 



.2 
.1 
.4 
.5 
.8 
.6 
.4 
.6 



Date— 
1913. 



April 



Mar. 27 . . 

28. . 

29. , 

30. , 
31. 

1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
20. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
May 1 . 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
June 1 . 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 

15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 

19. 



Apparent 
Right Ascension. 



H. M. 

23 



s. 
37.68 



Apparent 
Declination. 



27 


15.78 


30 


53 . 92 


34 


32.12 


38 


10.40 


41 


48 . 78 


45 


27.28 


49 


5.93 


52 


44.73 


66 


23.70 





2.84 


3 


42,18 


7 


21.75 


11 


1.55 


14 


41.58 


18 


21.86 


22 


2.42 


25 


43.28 


29 


24.44 


33 


5.91 


36 


47.71 


40 


29.86 


44 


12.38 


47 


55.29 


51 


38.60 


55 


22.34 


59 


6.52 


2 


51.15 


6 


36.25 


10 


21.83 


14 


7.91 


17 


54.50 


21 


41.61 


25 


29.26 


29 


17.45 


33 


6.18 


36 


55.47 


40 


45.31 


44. 


35.71 


48 


26.68 


52 


18.21 


56 


10.31 





2.97 


3 


56 . 20 


7 


49.99 


11 


44 . 34 


15 


39.25 


19 


34 . 72 


23 


30.74 


27 


27.31 


31 


24.43 


35 


22.10 


39 


20.33 


43 


19.11 


47 


18.44 


51 


18.32 


55 


18.73 


59 


19.69 


3 


21.18 


7 


23.20 


11 


25.74 


15 


28.78 


19 


32.32 


23 


36.34 


27 


40.83 


31 


45.77 


35 


51.15 


39 


56.95 


44 


3.14 


48 


9.71 


52 


16.04 


56 


23.90 





31.46 


4 


39.30 


8 


47.40 


12 


55.74 


17 


4.29 


21 


13.02 


25 


21.92 


29 


30.97 


33 


40.15 


37 


49.44 


-11 


58.82 


46 


8.26 


60 


17.76 



o 


t 


tt 


■f 2 


33 


22.8 




66 


50.0 


3 


20 


13.9 




43 


34.1 


4 


6 


50.2 




30 


1.9 




53 


8.9 


5 


18 


10.8 




39 


7.1 


6 


1 


57.5 




24 


41.8 




47 


19.5 


7 


9 


50.2 




32 


13.5 




54 


29.2 


8 


16 


36.8 




38 


35.9 


9 





26.2 




22 


7.5 




43 


39.4 


10 


5 


1.5 




26 


13.5 




47 


15.1 


11 


8 


6.0 




28 


45.9 




49 


14.6 


12 


9 


31.7 




29 


36.8 




49 


29.7 


13 


9 


10.1 




28 


37.7 




47 


52.3 


14 


6 


53.3 




25 


40.4 




44 


13.4 


15 


2 


32.1 




20 


35.9 




38 


24.5 




55 


57.7 


16 


13 


15.1 




30 


16.3 




47 


1.9 


17 


3 


29.0 




19 


39.9 




35 


33.4 




51 


9.2 


18 





26.8 




21 


26.1 




36 


6.8 




50 


28.7 


19 


4 


31.5 




18 


14.9 




31 


38.7 




■14 


42.7 




57 


26.5 


20 


9 


49.9 




21 


52.8 




33 


34.9 




44 


56.0 




55 


55.7 


21 


6 


33.9 




16 


50.4 




26 


44.9 




36 


17.2 




45 


27.1 




54 


14.4 


22 


2 


38.8 




10 


40.2 




18 


18.4 




25 


33.3 




32 


24.6 




38 


52.1 




44 


55.8 




50 


35.5 




55 


51.2 


23 





42.7 




5 


9.6 




9 


12.2 




12 


50.4 




16 


4.0 




18 


53.0 




21 


17.3 




23 


ie.9 




24 


51.9 




26 


2.2 



58 



The Suiibs Hight Ascension and Declination. 



THE SUN'S RIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION— Co««7iMed. 



Date — 


Apparent 


Apparent 


Date — 


Apparent 


Apparent 


1913. 


Right Ascension. 


Declination. 


1913. 


Right Ascension. 


Declination. 




H. M. 


8. 





/ 


„ 




H. M. 


s. 


o 


/ 


// 


June 20. . . 


5 54 


27.29 


+ 23 


26 


47.7 


Sept. 14. .. 


11 27 


62.54 


+ 3 


28 


6.6 


21. .. 


58 


36.83 




27 


8.4 


15. .. 


31 


27.78 




5 


2.8 


22.. . 


6 2 


46.36 




27 


4.4 


16. .. 


35 


2.97 


2 


41 


55.6 


23. .. 


6 


55.86 




26 


35.6 


17. .. 


38 


38.15 




18 


45.2 


24... 


11 


5.31 




25 


42.0 


18. . . 


42 


13.34 


1 


55 


32.0 


25. .. 


15 


14.69 




24 


23.6 


19. .. 


45 


48.55 




32 


16.3 


26. .. 


19 


23.97 




22 


40.5 


20. .. 


49 


23.81 




8 


58.4 


27... 


23 


33.13 




20 


32.8 


21. .. 


52 


59.15 





45 


38.6 


28... 


27 


42.15 




18 


0.5 


22. . . 


56 


34.58 


+ 


22 


17.2 


29... 


31 


51.01 




15 


3.6 


23. .. 


12 


10.13 




1 


5.5 


30... 


35 


59.68 




11 


42.1 


24. . . 


3 


45.83 




24 


29.1 


July 1 . . . 


40 


8.13 




7 


56.2 


25. .. 


7 


21.70 




47 


53.3 


2... 


44 


16.34 




3 


45.9 


26. . . 


10 


57.74 


1 


11 


17.7 


3. .. 


48 


24.28 


22 


59 


11.4 


27. .. 


14 


33.98 




34 


42.0 


4... 


52 


31.94 




54 


12.9 


28. .. 


18 


10.43 




58 


5.8 


5. .. 


56 


39.28 




48 


50.4 


29. .. 


21 


47.11 


2 


21 


28.7 


6. .. 


7 


46.27 




43 


4.2 


30... 


25 


24.04 




44 


50.3 


7. . . 


4 


52.90 




36 


54.2 


Oct. ^ 1 . . . 


29 


1.24 


3 


8 


10.2 


8. .. 


8 


59.14 




30 


20.5 


2. .. 


32 


38.72 




31 


28.0 


9. . . 


13 


4.97 




23 


2'3.5 


3. .. 


36 


16.50 




54 


43.4 


10. .. 


17 


10.37 




16 


3.4 


4. .. 


39 


54.59 


4 


17 


56.0 


11 . . . 


21 


15.33 




8 


20.4 


5. .. 


43 


33.00 




41 


5.3 


12. . . 


25 


19.82 







14.6 


6... 


47 


11.77 


5 


4 


11.0 


13. .. 


29 


23.83 


21 


51 


46.2 


7. .. 


50 


50.91 




27 


12.8 


14. . . 


33 


27.35 




42 


55.4 


8. .. 


54 


30.44 




50 


10.4 


15. .. 


37 


30.37 




33 


42.5 


9. . . 


58 


10.38 


6 


13 


3.3 


16. .. 


41 


32.89 




24 


7.6 


10. .. 


13 1 


50.76 




35 


51.1 


17. . . 


45 


34.88 




14 


10.9 


11. . . 


5 


31.59 




58 


33.5 


18. .. 


49 


36.34 




3 


52.6 


12. .. 


9 


12.89 


7 


21 


10.3 


19. .. 


53 


37.28 


20 


53 


13.0 


13. . . 


12 


54.70 




43 


41.1 


20. .. 


57 


37.69 




42 


12.2 


14 . . . 


16 


37.03 


8 


6 


5.5 


21. .. 


8 1 


37 . 55 




30 


60.5 


15. .. 


20 


19.89 




28 


23.1 


22. .. 


5 


36.85 




19 


8.1 


16. . . 


24 


3.30 




50 


33.5 


23. .. 


9 


35.59 




7 


5.3 


17. .. 


27 


47.29 


9 


12 


36.4 


24. . . 


13 


33.77 


19 


54 


42.2 


18. .. 


31 


31.89 




34 


31.5 


25. .. 


17 


31.38 




41 


59.2 


19. . . 


35 


17.11 




56 


18.4 


26. . . 


21 


28.42 




28 


56.5 


20. .. 


39 


2.97 


10 


17 


56.7 


27. . . 


25 


24.88 




15 


34.3 


21. . . 


42 


49.49 




39 


26.0 


28... 


29 


20.76 




1 


53.0 


22. .. 


46 


36.69 


11 





46.0 


29. . . 


33 


16.06 


18 


47 


52.7 


23 . . . 


50 


24.58 




21 


56.3 


30. .. 


37 


10.76 




33 


33.8 


24. .. 


54 


13.18 




42 


56.4 


31. .. 


41 


4.87 




18 


56.4 


25. .. 


58 


2.50 


12 


3 


45.9 


Aug-. 1 . . . 


44 


58.38 




4 


0.9 


26. . . 


14 1 


52.56 




24 


24.4 


2. . . 


48 


51.28 


17 


48 


47.7 


27. .. 


5 


43.37 




44 


51.5 


3. . . 


52 


43.58 




33 


17.2 


28. . . 


9 


34.93 


13 


5 


6.8 


4. . . 


56 


35.26 




17 


29.5 


29. .. 


13 


27.25 




25 


9.8 


5. .. 


9 


26 . 33 




1 


24.9 


30. . . 


17 


20.34 




45 


0.1 


6. . . 


4 


16.78 


16 


45 


3.9 


31... 


21 


14.21 


14 


4 


37.4 


7. . . 


8 


6.62 




28 


26.7 


Nov. 1 . . . 


25 


8.86 




24 


1.1 


8. . . 


11 


55.85 




11 


33.7 


2. .. 


29 


4.30 




43 


10.7 


9. . . 


15 


44 . 48 


15 


54 


25.2 


3... 


33 


0.53 


15 


2 


5.8 


10. . . 


19 


32.50 




37 


1.5 


4. .. 


36 


57.57 




20 


46.1 


11. . . 


23 


19.92 




19 


22.8 


5. .. 


40 


55.41 




39 


11.2 


12. . . 


27 


6.76 




1 


29.6 


6. . . 


44 


54.06 




57 


20.7 


13. . . 


30 


53 . 04 


14 


43 


22.1 


7... 


48 


53.53 


16 


15 


14.2 


14. . . 


34 


38.76 




25 


0.6 


8. .. 


52 


53.83 




32 


51.2 


15. . . 


38 


23.93 




6 


25.4 


9. .. 


56 


54.96 




50 


11.4 


16. . . 


42 


8.56 


13 


47 


36. S 


10. .. 


15 


56.93 


17 


7 


14.5 


17. . . 


45 


52 . 66 




28 


35.0 


11. . . 


4 


59.74 




24 


0.0 


18. . . 


49 


36.25 




9 


20.3 


12. .. 


9 


3.38 




40 


27.5 


19. . . 


53 


19.35 


12 


49 


53.1 


13. .. 


13 


7.86 




56 


36.7 


20. . . 


57 


1.98 




30 


13.8 


14. .. 


17 


13.20 


18 


12 


27.1 


21. . . 


10 


44.14 




10 


22.6 


15. .. 


21 


19.40 




27 


58.4 


22. . . 


4 


25 . 84 


11 


50 


19.6 


16. . . 


25 


26.45 




43 


10.3 


23. . . 


8 


7.10 




30 


5.3 


17. .. 


29 


34.35 




58 


2.4 


24. . . 


11 


47.94 




9 


40.0 


18... 


33 


43.11 


19 


12 


34.3 


25. . . 


15 


28.37 


10 


49 


3.9 


19. .. 


37 


52.71 




26 


45.5 


26. . . 


19 


8.41 




28 


17.4 


20... 


42 


3.16 




40 


35.7 


27. . . 


22 


48.07 




7 


20.8 


LI. .. 


46 


14.45 




54 


4.5 


28. . . 


26 


27.37 


9 


46 


14.4 


22... 


50 


26.56 


20 


7 


11.6 


29. . . 


30 


6.31 




24 


58.6 


23. .. 


54 


39.49 




19 


56.8 


30. . . 


33 


44.91 




3 


33.7 


24. .. 


58 


53.23 




32 


19.6 


31. . . 


37 


23.19 


8 


42 


0.1 


25. .. 


16 3 


7.76 




44 


19.5 


Sept. 1 . . . 


41 


1.15 




20 


18.0 


26. .. 


7 


23.05 




55 


56.1 


2. . . 


44 


38.79 


7 


58 


27.9 


27. .. 


11 


39.08 


21 


7 


9.1 


3. . . 


48 


16.15 




36 


30.2 


28. .. 


15 


55.84 




17 


58.2 


4. . . 


51 


53.23 




14 


25.2 


29. .. 


20 


13.32 




28 


23.2 


5. . . 


55 


30.04 


6 


52 


13.1 


30. .. 


24 


31.49 




38 


23.7 


6. . . 


59 


6.61 




29 


54.5 


Dec. 1 . . . 


28 


50.31 




47 


59.3 


7. . . 


11 2 


42.95 




7 


29.7 


2. . . 


33 


9.76 




57 


9.7 


8. . . 


6 


19.08 


5 


44 


58.9 


3. .. 


37 


29.82 


22 


5 


54.6 


9. . . 


9 


55.01 




22 


22.4 


4. .. 


41 


50.47 




14 


14.0 


10. . . 


13 


30.77 


4 


59 


40.6 


5. .. 


46 


11.68 




22 


7.5 


11. . . 


17 


6.37 




36 


53.9 


6. .. 


50 « 


33.43 




29 


34.8 


12. . . 


20 


41.85 




14 


2.5 


7. .. 


54 


55.69 




36 


35.7 


13. . . 


24 


17.24 


3 


51 


6.6 


8... 


59 


18.44 




43 


10.1 



ITallexfs Comet. 



59 





THE SUN'S RIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION— Con^irawed. 


Date — 


Apparent 


Apparent 


D.\TE 


Apparent 


Apparent 


1913. 


Right Ascension. 


Declination. 


1913. 


Ri.ijht Ascension. 


Declination. 


-• 


H. M. s. 


O / It \ 




H. M. 8. 


o / // 


Dec. 9 . . . 


17 3 41.65 


—22 49 17.7 1 


Dec. 21. . . 


17 56 45.89 


—23 27 2.9 


W. .. 


8 5.28 


54 58.3 


22. . . 


18 1 12.52 


27 9.4 


11. . . 


12 29.31 


23 11.7 : 


23. . . 


5 39.19 


26 47.6 


12. .. 


16 53.72 


4 57.9 , 


24. . . 


10 5.86 


25 57.5 


13. .. 


21 18.48 


9 16.0 


25. .. 


14 32.50 


24 39.1 


14. . . 


25 43.57 


13 7.7 


26. . . 


18 59.07 


22 52.4 


15. . . 


30 8.96 


16 31.0 


27. .. 


23 25.53 


20 37.3 


16. .. 


34 34.62 


19 26.4 


28 . . . 


27 51.84 


17 54.2 


17. .. 


39 . 52 


21 53.9 


29. .. 


32 17.97 


14 42.7 


18. .. 


43 20.62 


23 63.4 


30. .. 


36 43.86 


11 3.3 


19. . . 


47 52.90 


25 24.8 


31. .. 


41 9.48 


—23 6 56.1 


20. .. 


62 19.34 


26 28.0 









K\)t ^\\xC% c^nui'Biamtttr antr ll^ortfontal J^arallax. 



(WASHINGTON — APPARENT NOON.) 





Sun's 


Equatorial 




Sun's 


Equatorial i 




Sun's 


Equatorial 


1913. 


Semi- 


Horizontal 


1913. 


Semi- 


Horizontal 


1913. 


Seml- 


Horizontal 




Diameter. 


Parallax. 




Diameter. 


Parallax. 
II 





Dlameter. 


Parallax. 




1 II 


// 




/ // 


II 


Jan. 1 


16 17.89 


8.95 


May 11 


15 51.62 


8.71 


Sept. 8 


15 54.71 


8.74 


11 


17.67 


8.95 


21 


49.70 


8.69 


18 


57.28 


8.76 


21 


10.99 


8.94 


31 


48.06 


8.68 


^ 28 


59.93 


8.78 


31 


15.75 


8.93 


June 10 


46.85 


8.67 


Oct. 8 


16 2.73 


8.81 


Feb. 10 


14.10 


8.92 


20 


46.08 


8.66 


18 


5.49 


8.83 


20 


12.15 


8.90 


30 


45.68 


8.65 


28 


8.10 


8.86 


March 2 


9.79 


8.88 


July 10 


45.77 


8.66 


Nov. 7 


10.61 


8.88 


12 


7.22 


8.86 


20 


46.30 


8.66 


17 


12.84 


8.90 


22 


4.57 


8.83 


30 


47.21 


8.67 


27 


14.68 


8.92 


April 1 


1.75 


8. SI 


Aug. 9 


48.58 


8.68 


Dec. 7 


16.21 


8.93 


11 


15 59.00 


8.78 


19 


50 . 34 


8.70 


17 


17.25 


8.94 


21 


56.38 


8.76 


29 


52.35 


8.72 


27 


17.77 


8.95 


May 1 


53.85 


8.73 








31 


17.85 


8.95 



^utronomical ^oniistantsi* 



Mean solar parallax, 8". 80. Nutation constant, 9". 21. 

Aberration constant, 20". 47. Annual precession, 50". 2564 

Obliquity of the ecliptic, 23° 27' 8".26— 0".4684 (t— 1900). 

Annual diminution of obliquity, 0".4684. 

Moon's equatorial horizontal parallax, 67' 2". 68. 

Moon's mean distance from the earth (centre to centre), 238.850 miles. 

Sun's mean distance from the earth (astronomical unit), 92,894,800 miles. 

Velocity of light, 186,320 miles per second. 

Light travels unit of distance — viz. 92,894,800 miles In 498.566 seconds. 

Length of the Year — Tropical (equinox to equinox), 365.2421988 days. 

Sidereal or absolute revolution, 365.2563604 days. 
Anomalistic (from perihelion to perihelion), 365.2596413 days. 

Length of the Day — Sidereal, 23 hours 56 minutes 4.091 seconds (mean solar time). Mean 
solar, 24 hours 3 minutes 68.555 seconds (sidereal time). 

Length of the Month — Synodlcal (from new moon to new moon), 29 days 12 hours 44 minutes 
2.8 seconds. Tropical, 27 days 7 hours 43 minutes 4.7 seconds. Sidereal (absolute revolution), 
27 days 7 hours 43 minutes 11.5 seconds. Anomalistic (from perigee to perigee), 27 days 13 hours 
18 minutes 33.1 seconds. 

Dimensions of the Earth — Equatorial radius, 3963.23 miles. Polar radius, 3949.79 miles. 
Eccentricity of the oblate spheroid, 0.0822718. 



Of the ereat number of comets which have temporarily v^=lted our solar system or have become 
ppiinanent members of It none has surpassed Halley's In historical associations. It has a record 
dating back to B. C. 240; Its visitations spread alarm and consternation throughout Europe during 
tiis Middle Ages; was the flrst whose return was predicted by an Astronomer Royal of England, 
and win therefore, for these reasons, be an object of great sclentlflc Interest for all time. For the 
Information of those who appreciate such matters the following are the elements of its orbit as 
deduced from the la-^t visitation: 

Perihelion Passage 1910, April, 19.67. Greenwich Mean Time. 



Eccentricity = 0.967281 
Semi-axis major = 17.9468. 
Perihelion distance = 0.58720. 
Inclination to the plane of the earth's or- 
blt=17° 47' IS". 



Longitude of the ascending node = 57° 16' 12". 
Distance from perihelion to node = 111° 42' 16". 
Dally -motion (mean) =46". 669 
Period = 74.424 years.* 
Motion, retrograde. 



The seml-axls major and the perihelion distance are expressed In terms of the earth's mean 
distance from the sun. taken as unity. See also article on Halley's Comet and on Comets in 
ALMANACS of 1910 and 1911. 



* The periodic time varies considerably by reaaon of the attraction of the planets, 
ration is about 76.5 years. — J. M. 



Its average du- 



60 ®^ijc jForce of (Krabitg, 

(By J. Morrison, M. D., Ph. DJ 

Notwithstanding all the researcties of man Into the arcana of nature, there are several things 
which he with all his boasted powers, cannot define, among which may be mentioned time, space, 
mat«^er and force. We become cognizant of the existence of the first by reason of the dally and 
annual motions of the celestial bodies; but given a blank sky and a continuous vertical sun we would 
have a very Imperfect appreciation of it. If any at all, since there would be no means of measuring 
It It Is a uniformly flowing quantity, of only one dimension, for as regards simpie duration, we 
can only look back to the past and forward to the future. It may therefore be graphically represented 
bv a straight line extending In opposite directions to infinity. ^ ^ , ,. . ,. 

Space, we know, has three dimensions. -length, breadth, and depth or height, each extending 
In opposite directions to Infinity. w * .n,. . 

In a general way we say that mattep Is any substance which occupies space, but this Is no 
definition We know nothing of Its intrinsic nature or essence whatever. There are on the earth 
some 67 or 68 different kinds of matter; we know sometnlng of their physical properties, of their 
combinations and reactions on one another, but beyond that we know nothing about them. 

Everything In the universe, whether visible or Invisible, Is either material or spiritual; If there 
were no spiritual world, It Is certain there would be no material one; matter undoubtedly rests or 

subsists on a spiritual basis. . . , . * . ..,..,„.. .v 

When a portion of matter — a piece of iron for Instance — Is unsupported It falls to the ground, 
and being an Inanimate substance, it cannot move Itself, hence some Invisible power or force moves 
It This force Is called gravity or gravitation and Is due to the attraction of the earth. We cannot 
define force; we know nothing about Its Intrinsic nature. In general language we say. It Is any agent 
or cause which changes or tends to change the state or position of matter with respect to rest or 
motion. Different names are given to forces according to the efifects produced. Thus we speak 
of the force of attraction of the earth which holds ourselves and all movable things on Its surface, 
molecular force which binds the molecules of a body together, repulsive forces, electrical forces, 
vital forces, etc., but they are all alike In their essential quality. All forces are spiritual In their 
nature; they are certainly not material. For Instance the force which holds the moon In Its orbit 
around the earth, does not consist of material bonds or wires. Since then It Is not material, what 
is it? It must necessarily be of a spiritual nature, although It operates through matter. In the 
case of a bodv moving In a circle or of the moon around the earth or of a planet around the sun, we 
have occasion" to speak of centripetal and centrifugal forces about which some erroneous Impressions 
are taught In some works on physics. 

As an Illustration of these forces, let us consider the case of a railway car running on a smooth, 
straight, level track, to enter a circular curve. While moving on the straight track there Is no force 
operating to sway It to one side or the other, but when It enters the curve it Is constrained to move 
In the arc of a circle. The flange on the outer wheels presses against the Inner edge of the outer rail, 
and the inner edge of the outer rail presses against the flanges, these pressures are equal. In 
opposite directions and always at right angles to the direction of motion upon which they have no 
Influence whatever. The former — the pressure of the flange against the rail — Is the centrifugal 
force — away from the centre, and the latter — the pressure of the rail against the flange — Is the cen- 
trioetal force. When the car leaves the curve and enters a straight track, these forces vanish 
instantly. , , ^ 

The mode or manner In which gravltj'- or gravitation acts on matter, was discovered by Sir 
Isaac Newton. Its action Is continuous and according to a certain law which we shall now explain. 

In mathematics and physics a law may be defined to be the constant and continuous operation 
of a cause or agent by which certain effects or phenomena are produced. Thus we have the law 
of a series -which determines the order of succession of the terms; the law of the compressibility of 
gases; the laws of motion; Kepler's laws of the planets; the law of universal gravitation, etc. 

As an Illustration of some of these laws, let us take the series 

1-3 + 3-5 +5-7 +7-9 + . etc., to infinity. 

Here the law of formation of the terms is evident. Each term Increases but can never exceed 
unity and the sum of them all is infinity. 

As another example take the series 1 + 6 + 20 + 56+ 144 + , etc. 

Here the law is not evident, but the subsequent terms are determined by a law as Invariable 
as in the preceding. 

The law of universal gravitation as originally propounded by Sir Isaac Newton is this: "Every 
particle of matter In the universe attracts every other particle with a force which varies directly as 
the mass and Inversely as the square of the distance between them.." 

In accordance with this law it is easy to show mathematically that the attraction of a sphere 
on a body externa! to it. Is exactly the same as If the entire mass of the sphere were condensed or 
collected at the very centre. 

This will be more easily understood from the following Illustration: 

Let CA represent the radius of the earth and the points 2, 3, 4, etc., two, three, etc., radii from the 
centre C; then whatever may be the attraction 
at the surface A, one radius from the centre, at 
2 It Is 1-4; at 3, 1-9; at 4, 1-16 and so on, of what 

It Is at A, that Is to say, the force varies Inversely / ^ . .W t » ■> » s t e ? io etc- 
as the square of the distance. If the mass of the I ^ " "/ i T | i i ! i i 1 1 etc" 
earth, for Instance, were doubled, trebled, etcthe ^ ' ♦ • i? « ^ " s* «' seo 

force would be increased In the same ratio. This 

Is what Is meant by "directly as the mass." 

The mean radius of the earth Is about 3,956 miles — say 4,000 for the sake of Illustration — and at the 
surface It haa been found by actual experiments that a body will fall from rest, 16 feet and one inch — 
say 16 feet to avoid fractions — In one second; then according to the above law, at the distance of two 
radii from the centre or 4,000 miles above the surface, the body would fall only one-fourth of 16 feet 
or 4 feet in a second; at three radii from the centre It would fall one-ninth of 16 feet; at four radii 
one-sixteenth of 16 feet or one foot In a second and so on, decreasing as the square of the distance 
from the centre Increases. At sixty radii — the moon's average distance — It would fall only the 1-3,600 
of 16 feet or about one-nineteenth of an Inch, and this Is what the moon actually does fall or depart 
from the straight line In which It would move If not disturbed by the earth's attraction. This was 
the first verification made by Sir Isaac Newton, of this wonderful law. 

Gravitation Is universal. It holds the universe together in Its tremendous grasp, it prevents the 
planets, the sun and stars from disintegration, that is to say from being torn in fragments by the 
centrifugal force generated by the rqtatlon on their axes; its suspension would wreck the universe. 
li gravity were suspended on the earth only, our atmosphere would Instantly vanish Into space; 
our oceans and lakes would leave their beds and be thrown off like spray; our continents and moun- 
tains, now so solid under our feet, would be torn from their foundations and hurled In countless 
mini 0-13 of fragments Intq the Illimitable regions of space. This, however. Is a catastrophe which can 
never occur. But to return to a consideration of the effect of gravity on the earth's surface, in 
which every one is more or less interested, we flrat remark that It confers weight on bodies. Weight, 
however, b not an essential property of matter like porosity, elasticity, etc. The weight of a body 
Is the meadiice of the attractive lorce of gravity on It and is not the same In all places. A pound of 




The Force of Gravity^ 61 



ran, tor instance, at New York. Is not a pound at Quebec or Panama, but this variation In Its weight 
3 uo "freak of gravity" as some people have Imagined, but in strict agreement with the law of gravlta- 



^' 

tJon and the physical condition of the earth. It would, too, weigh a trifle less on the top o"f a high 
mountain or In a deep mine or pit, than at the surface. Gravity retains the atmosphere around the 
earth. Marine animals live at the bottom of the ocean at tM depth of a mile or two, and, of course, 
are subject to great pressure from the superincumbent water, so likewise we ourselves crawl around 
o.! the surface of the earth at the bottom of an aerial ocean not less than 50 miles In depth and also 
under great pressure. Some people can hardly realize that gases can have weight, but a column 
of alf one Inch square at the base and extending to the top of the atmosphere, weighs about fifteen 
pounds and a square mile of the earth's surface sustains an atmospheric pressure of 30,108,672 tons. 
If our pound of Iron could be taken to the centre of the earth it would have no weight because 
It would be equally attracted In all directions. Again, there Is a point on the line joining the centres 
of the earth and moon, at which It would have no weight, being there equally attracted In opposite 
directions. There Is also another point on the same line produced beyond the moon at which It 
would be equally attracted, but it would have weight because the attractions now act In the same 
direction and It would fall toward the moon. In all these Instances It must be remembered that 
the mass or quantity of matter In the body Is constant In all places, but the weight varies from 
place to place, by reason of causes which will now be explained. Astronomy and geology furnish 
abundant evidence that the earth was once In not only a gaseous but also subs'equently In a plastic 
condition, having been detached or set free from the parent mass which ultimately became the sun. 
At Its birth It would, by the laws of motion, receive not only a motion of translation but also a 
motion of rotation around an axis passing through Its centre of gravity, and by virtue of this latter 
motion It would necessarily take the form of an oblate spheroid, or the shape of the body generated, 
by revolving an ellipse about Its minor axis, that Is to say, a globular body flattened at the poles, 
and protuberant along the equator like a Satsuma orange. This form or shape, first derived from 
theoretical considerations, was subsequently verified by actual measurements of arcs of meridians 
In Lapland, Peru. India. South Africa, England, France, and the United States. The boundary 
line between Maryland and Delaware, having a bearing of N. 3° 43' 30"W. was used for this purpose 
by the English astronomers Mason and Dixon, who also in 1763-8 established the boundary line 
between Maryland and Pennsylvania, the real Mason and Dixon line of ancient American politics. 
The dimensions of the earth deduced from these measurements as well as from the geodetic operations 
In tills country, England. France, India, and Russia are as follows: Equatorial radius 3963.23 miles, 
polar radius 3949.79 miles, difference 13.44 miles, from which It appears that the poles are very 
nearly 13 >^ miles nearer the centre of the earth than any point on the equator Is, and since the 
attraction of the whole spheroid Is the same as If Its entire mass were collected at the centre, the 
force of attraction at the poles Is greater than at any other point on the earth's surface. For this 
reason alone the weight of a body Increases as we approach the poles. 

The earth makes one revolution on Its axis In 24 hours and Its circumference at the equator 
Is 24,900 miles, which gives there a velocity of more than 1.000 miles per hour. This great velocity 
generates a centrifugal force which tends to lift bodies from the surface and therefore to oppose 
gravity. This force has already been referred to in the case of the pressure of the flange of the outer 
wheels of a railway car against the Inner edge of the outer rail while the car Is running on a circular 
track. It may also be easily demonstrated by tying a body to the end of a string and holding the 
other end In the hand, whirl It around; the body will tend to fly off, and if whirled fast enough It 
wlU break the string. This tendency of revolving bodies to depart from the centre of motion Is called 
the centrifugal force and In the case of che earth Is manifestly greatest at the equator and decreases 
ae we approach the poles, where It vanishes. 

Therefore, for this reason also, the weight of a body will Increase as we travel north or south 
from the equator. These two causes, depending on the figure and motion of the earth, conspire to 
Increase the weight of a body as Its latitude Increases. 

Notwithstanding the great velocity at the equator, gravity Is there 289 times greater than the 

centrifugal force, but If the earth revolved 17 times faster (the square root of 289) than at present, 

bodies at the equator would lose their weight and remafei suspended without any visible support. 

The centrifugal force varies directly as the square of the velocity and inversely as the radius 

of the circle In which it moves. 

In ascertaining the difference In weight of a body In different latitudes, common scales with 
weights cannot be employed, because the weights would be affected In the same way as the body 
to be weighed. A delicately and accurately constructed spiral steel spring Is used, to which Is 
attached a carefully graduated scale with a microscope or vernier for accurate reading. The elas- 
ticity of such a spring Is not affected by gravity or the centrifugal force. 

For all accessible heights above the earth gravity Is regarded as a constant force, and is such 
that It will cause a body to fall from rest, 16 feet in the first second; 48 feet In the next second; 80 feet 
in the third second; 112 feet In the fourth second and so on. Increasing as the numbers, 1. 3. 5. 7, etc. 
At the end of the first second Its velocity Is 32 feet, twice the distance It just fell; at the end of the 
next second the velocity is 64 feet, at end of the third second 96 feet and so on. Increasing by 32 
feet at the end of every second. This number, 32 feet per second, is constant and is taken as the 
unit or measure of gravity and denoted by the letter g, in ail works on physics. 

In all these Illustrations, fractions of a foot have not been taken Into account, nor the resist- 
ance and buoyancy of the atmosphere. Strictly speaking, the exact value at the equator Is 32.0902 
feet, at the poles 32.2549 feet, and at New York 32.1071 feet. 

Most people believe that the pressure below the surface of the earth — say 100. 400 or 1.000 
miles below the surface — must be very great, but such Is not the case. Below the surface, gravity 
varies not Inversely as the square of the distance, but directly as the distance from the centre, that Is 
to say. taking 4.000 miles for the radius, at the depth of 1,000 miles, gravity would be three-fourths 
of what It Is at the surface, 2,000 miles down It would be only one-half, at 3,000 miles, one-fourth 
and at the centre it would be zero. 

The law apparently changes below the surface, but this is no "freak of gravity," but In strict 
accord with the law of Inverse square as before stated. The weight or pressure of the material com- 
posing the earth's crust becomes less and less as we descend below the surface. 

Suppose we could go down 1,000 miles, there would then be a sphere of 3.000 miles radius below 
us, imagine this sphere to be removed leaving behind a hollow spherical shell of 1,000 miles In thick- 
ness and we will assume of uniform density, now if a body be placed anywhere within the shell, It 
will have no weight and remain at rest, that Is to say, the attraction of the nearer portions of the 
shell will be exactly neutralized by the opposite portions, but the attraction of the shell on a particle 
exterior to It varies Inversely as the square of the distance from its centre. 

There are some other Interesting facts deduced by the aid of the higher mathematics that serve 
to Impress us with this wonderful force; for Instance, if a hole were cut through the centre of the 
earth from surface to surface, and if a number of bodies were placed at different points in this hole 
— say at the surface, 100. 500. 2,000 and 3,000 miles or only a few feet from the centre, and If all these 
bodies were dropped at the same Instant they would all reach the centre at the same time, but with 
different velocities; the velocity of each, however, would carry It as far beyond the centre as It just 
fell; It would then stop and return, vibrating to and fro forever. This would be a genuine case of 
perpetual motion. The time of falling to the centre from the surface or from any other point In the 



62 



Elements of the Solar System. 



hole is 21 minutes and 7 seconds and the velocity acquired by falling from the surface Is ^14 
miles per second. 

Again, the mass of the earth is such as to give to a body falling, say from the region of the fixed 
stars, a velocity of 6.9505 miles per second when it reaches the surface, or In other words if a body 
could be projected with a velocity greater than this, say seven miles per second, It would never return 
to the earth; gravity would not be strong enough to draw it back. 

We now come to the consideration of a circumstance where It has been assumed that the cen- 
trifugal force, resulting from the diurnal motion of the earth, was suspended or rather reversed for 
a while. It Is recorded in two dlflerent places in the old Testament, viz., II. Kings, chap. XX., also 
Isaiah, chap. XXXVIII., that at a certain time the shadow cast by the style on the sun dial of 
Ahaz, went back ten degrees. Theologians and philosophers in all the churches of Christendom 
have been wrestling with this phenomenon, all down through the centuries, but with negative 
results, regarding it finally as one of the most stupendous miracles ever exhibited, surpassing even 
the performance of Joshua. He only made the sun stand still, but in this case, the sun not only 
stopped but went back In its apparent course ten degrees, which of course Implies that the earth 
stopped in Its diurnal motion, and then rotated back from east to west ten degrees — a movement 
which would have wrecked our globe and torn It into fragments — but notwithstanding its apparent 
Impossibility, there is not the shadow of a doubt but that the phenomenon actually happened as 
recorded. 

When the higher criticism brings the power of the higher mathematics to bear on the subject. 
It tells its own story. It tells us that it is simply an astronomical phenomenon which must occur under 
certain conditions and is no more miraculous than the dally rising and setting of the sun, moon and 
stars. The phenomenon can be demonstrated here In New York as well as in Jerusalem or any other 
part of Palestine, nor Is it necessary to erect a sun dial to show that the shadow of Its style can go 
back ten or even twenty degrees while at the same time the sun moves on in its apparent course 
through the sky. An ocular demonstration of the phenomenon can be shown by simply placing a 
straight stick In a certain position Into the level ground, when the reason or cause will be apparent 
to the spectator. The mathematical discussion of the subject Is too abstruse to be given here. 

Joshua's "Sun standing still" was a meteorological phenomenon whose explanation does not 
fall within the domain of mathematics. 



25ltmtnt3S of tje cSolar <Ssstrm» 



Name 

OF 

Planet. 



Mercury 

Venus , 

Earth 

Mars 

Jupiter 

Saturn 

Uranus 

Neptune 

Name 

OF 

Planet. 



Mean 

Dally 

Motion. 



14732.420 
6767.6696 
3548.192 
1886.5182 
299.1256 
120.4548 
42.2308 
21.530 



Sidereal 
Revolution- 
Days. 



87.96925 
224.70080 
365.25636 
686.97987 
4332.6284 
10759.2225 
30688.5022 
60178.3060 



Distance fkom the Sun. 



Astronomical Units. 
Mean. Greatest. Least. 



0.387099 
0.723331 
1.000000 
1.523688 
5.202803 
9.538838 
19.190978 
30.070672 



0.466693 

0.728260 

1.016746 

1.665877 

5.454395 

10.071570 

20.094454 

30.327506 



0.307505 
0.718402 
0.983254 
1.381499 
4.951211 
9.006106 
18.287502 
29.813838 



In 
Miles. 



35,951.105 

67,193,688 

92,894,800 

141.542,690 

483,313,340 

886,108,900 

1.782,742,060 

2,788,764.300 



Mercury 
Venus. . 
Earth. . . 
Mars . . . 
Jupiter. . 
Saturn. . 
Uranus . 
Neptune 



Eccentricity 

of 

Orbit. 



0.2056167 
0.0068150 
0.0167460 
0.0933198 
0.0483570 
0.0558482 
0.0470781 
0.0085410 



Synodlcal 
Revolution- 
Days. 



115,877 
683,920 

779,936' 

398,866 

378,090 

369,650 

367.482 



Inclination of 
Orbit to 
Ecliptic. 



Orbital Velocity 

Miles 

Per Second. 



7 11.2 
3 23 37.5 

i 5i i.o 

1 18 29.1 

2 29 30.6 

46 21.9 

1 46 41.2 



29.65 

22.61 

18.38 

16.00 

8.06 

5.94 

4.20 

3.35 



Kamk 

OF 

Plankt. 



Mercury . 
Venus. . . 
Earth. . . 
Mars. . . 
Jupiter. . 
Saturn . . 
Uranus. . 
Neptune. 



Mean LoDgitude 
at the 

Epoch.* 



115 4 

165 4 

99 47 

70 45 

242 24 

53 23 

294 57 

111 24 



3.26 
20.94 
20.22 

5.47 
21.96 
10.90 

2.33 
32.14 



llean I<ongitude 

of the 

Perihelion.* 



76 
130 
101 
334 

12 

91 
169 

43 



5 10.9 
19 68.0 

25 37.7 

26 21.8 
54 18.0 
19 26.1 
14 25.8 
51 38.2 



Annu.ll 
Sidereal 
Motion. 



+ 6.7 
+ 0.4 
+ 11.6 
+ 15.9 
+ 7.6 
+ 20.2 
+ 7.4 
—18.9 



Mean Longitude 

of the 
Ascending Node. 



o 


/ 


// 


47 


17 


17 


4 


75 


53 


15 


5 



48 52 42. 

99 33 33. 

112 53 17, 

73 33 2. 

130 48 38. 



Annu.il 
Sidereal 
Motion. 



- 7. 
-17. 



.2 
.9 



-22, 

-13. 

-18.9 

-32.0 

-10.7 



Light at 



Perihelion. 



10.68 



.94 
1.03 
0.62 
0.041 
0.012 
0.003 
0.001 



Aphelion. 



4.59 

1.91 

0.97 

0.36 

0.034 

0.010 

0.0025 

0.001 



*Epoch 1912 January Od Greenwich mean 


time. 












Semi-diameter. 


Volume. 


Mass. 
©=1 


Density. 

® = 1 


Axial 
Rotation. 


Gravity at 
Surface. 

©=1 


Sun 

AND 

Planets. 


At 

Unit 

Distance. 


At Mean 

Least 
Distance. 


In 

Miles 

(Mean). 


Sun 

Mercury . . 
Venus. . . . 
Earth .... 

Mars 

Jupiter. . . 
Saturn. . . . 
Uranus . . . 
Keptune . . 


15 59.6 
3.34 
8.55 

"5;65 

1 37.16 

1 21.17 

33.5 

38.7 


"5!45 
30.90 

23.12 
9.55 
1.84 
1.33 


432183.68 
1504.24 
3850.67 

2274 '.37 
43758.03 
30558.86 
15096.43 
17411.34 


1303371.8 

0.054955 

0.921875 

1.000000 

0.189953 

1352.809 

788.934 

55.550 

85.224 


329390 

0.054898 

0.807328 

1.000000 

0.106478 

314.4985 

94.0684 

14.4033 

16.7199 


0.2527 

0.99895 

0.87574 

1.00000 

0.56055 

0.23247 

0.11923 

0.25928 

0.19619 


D. H. M. s. 

25 7 48 

24 5 ? 

23 21 ? 
23 66 4.09 

24 37 23 
9 55 20 

10 14 24 
Unknown. 
Unknown. 


27.6057 

.37979 

.85236 

1.00000 

.32222 

2.57115 

1.10176 

.98932 

.86338 



Pacts About the Earth. 



63 



iFacts ^tiout tlje 25 art!) ♦ 



According to Clark, the equatorial semi-diameter lb 20,926, 202 feet=3963. 296 miles, and 
the polar serai-diameter is 20,854,895 feet=3950. 738 miles. One degree of latitude at the 
pole==69. 407 miles. One degree of latitude at the equator=68. 704 miles. 





POPULATION OP 


THE EARTH BY 


CONTINENTS. 




CONTl- 


Area in 
Square Miles, 


Inhabitants. ( 


CONTI- 

NKNTAL 

DiVI.SIONS. 


Area in 
Square Miles. 


Inhabitants. 


NKNTAT., 
Divisions. 


Number 

170.000.000 

110.000,000 

35,000.000 

900.000,000 


PerSq. 
Mile. 


Number. 


[Per Sq. 
Mile. 


Africa 

America, N.. 
America, S.. 


11,513.579 
8,037,714 
6.851.306 

17,057,666 


14.76 

13.68 

5.10 

52. 76 


Australasia 

Europe 

Polar Reg... 


3,456,290 
3,754,282 
4,970.265 


8.000.000 

400.000,000 

300,000 


2.31 

106.54 

0.06 


A.sia 


Total 


55,641.102 


1,623,300,000 


29.22 



The estimate in areas in the above table is the newest made by a competent geographer and 
is by Professor Supan of Gotha in his work entitled ' 'Bevolkerung der Erde. ' ' It varies consid- 
erably from previous estimates. Central America and the West Indies are included in the 
estimate for North America. The estimate of population is from Whitaker's (London) Alma- 
nack for 1912, excepting tuat of the Polar Region. 

Ravenstein' s estimate of the eartlf s fertile region, in square miles, is 28, 269,">G00 ; steppe, 
13, 901, 000 ; desert, 4, 180, 000 ; polar regions, 4, 888, 800. 

The population of the earth at the death of the Emperor Augustus, estimated by Bodio, was 
54,000,000. The population of Europe hardly exceeded 50,000,000 before the fifteenth 
century. — M^ilhall, 

The proportion of females to 1,000 males in 1901 was: Great Britain, 1,062; France, 1,033; Ger- 
many, 1,032; United States, 959. — Webb- Mul hall. 

The area and cubic contents of the earth, according to the data of Clark, given above, are: 
Surface, 196, 971, 984 square miles; cubic contents, 259, 944,035,515 cubic miles. 

Murray (Challenger expedition) states the greatest depth of the Atlantic Ocean at 27,366 
feet; Pacific Ocean, 30,000 feet; Indian Ocean, 18,582 feet; Southern Ocean, 25,200 feet; 
Arctic Ocean, 9,000 feet. The United States Collier Nero obtained a depth of 31,614 feet in 
the Pacific Ocean, near Guam, November 14, 1899. The Atlantic Ocean has an area, in square 
miles, of 24,536,000; Pacific Ocean, 50,309,000; Indian Ocean, 17, 084, 000 ; Arctic Ocean, 
4, 781, 000 ; Southern Ocean, 30, 592, 000. The highest mountain is believed to be Deodhunga 
or Everest, one of the Himalayas, 29,002 feet. 

For population of the earth according to creed, see Religious Statistics. 

POPULATION OF THE EARTH ACCORDING TO RACE. 
(Based on latest estimate by John Bartholomew, F. R. G. S. , Edinburgh. ) 



Race. 


Location. 


Number. 


Rack. 


Location. 


Number. 


Indo - Germanic or 
Aryan (white) 

Mongolian or Turan- 
ian (yellow and 
brown) 


Europe, Persia, 
etc.... 


625,000,000 

630.000,000 

65,000,000 

150,000,000 


Hottentot and Bush- 
man (black) 


South Africa 
A u s t ralasia 

& Polynesia 
North & So. 

America 


150,000 


Greater part of 
Asia 


Malay and Polynes- 
ian (brown) 

American Indian 
(red) 


35,000,000 


Semitic or Hamitic 


North Africa, 


15,000,000 


<^ white) 


Total 




Negro and Bantu 
(black) 


Central Africa.... 




1,520,150,000 









The human family is subject to fifty principal governments. As to their form they 
may be classified as follows: Absolute monarchies, Abyssinia, Afghanistan, Morocco, Siam; 
LiniUed monarchies, Austria- Hungary, Belgium, British Empire, Bulgaria, Denmark, Germany, 
Greece, Italy, Japan, Montenegro, Netherlands, Norway, Persia, Roumania, Russia, Servia, 
Sweden, Spain, Turkey; Repuhlics, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa 
Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, France, Guatemala, Hayti, Honduras, Liberia, 
Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Portugal, Salvador, Switzerland, United States 
of America, Uruguay, Venezuela. IBesides these are the undefined despotisms of Central Africa, 
and a few insignificant independent States. 

The average duration of human life is about 33 years. One- quarter of the people on the earth 
die before age 6, one- half before age 16, and only about 1 person of each 100 born lives to 65. 

EUROPEAN LANGUAGES SPOKEN. 



Lan- 

aUAGBS. 



NuMBKR OF Persons 
Sp»ken by. 



1801. 



1911. 



English 
French . 
German. 
Italian ... 
Spanish 



20,520,000 160.000,000 
31.450000 70.000,000 
30, 320, 000 130, 000, 000 
15,070,000 50,000,000 
26,190,000 50,000,000 



Propor- 
tion OF 

the 
Whole. 



1801. 1911. 

12.7 
19.4 
18.7 
9.3 
16.2 



27.3 
11.9 

22.2 
8.6 
'8.6 



Lan- 
guages. 



Portuguese 
Russian 



Total 



Number of Persons 
Spoken by. 



1801. 



1911. 



7,480,0001 25,000,000 
30,770,000 100,000,000 



161 , 800, 000 ,585, 000, 000 



Propor- 
tion of 

the 
Whole. 



1801 . 

4.7 
19.0 




100.0 100.0 



These estimates (that for 1801 being by Mulhall) exhibit the superior growth of the English 
1 anguage. 



64 



Hximidity. 



MEAN RELATIVE HUMIDITY. IN PERCENTAGES. 

From a table prepared by the United States Weather Bureau, showing the monthly and annual 
values of relative humidity at regular Weather Bureau stations in the United States, based upon 
observations made at 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. respectively, 75th meridian time and covering a period of 
about 14 years of record. 



Stations. 



Abilene, Tex 

Albany. N. Y 

Atlanta, Ga 

Atlantic City. N. J. . . 

Baker, Ore 

Baltimore, Md 

Blsmarclc, N. D 

Block Island, R. I. . . 

Boston, Mass 

Buffalo, N. Y 

Carson City, Nev. . . 

Charleston, S. C 

Charlotte, N. C 

Chattanooga, Tenn. . 

Cheyenne, Wyo 

Chicago, 111 

Cincinnati. Ohio 

Cleveland. Ohio 

Denver, Col 

Des Moines, Iowa. . . 

Detroit, Mich 

Dodge City, Kan.. . . 

Duluth, Minn 

Eastport, Me 

El Paso, Tex 

Fort Smith, Ark 

Galveston, Tex 

Grand Haven, Mich. 

Hannibal, Mo 

Hatteras, N. C 

Helena, Mont 

Huron, S. Dak 

Indianapolis, Ind. . . . 
Jacksonville, Fla .... 
Kansas City, Mo.. .'. 

Key West, Fla 

KnoxvUle, Tenn 

Lexington, Ky 

Little Rock, Ark. . . . 
Los Angeles. Cal. . . . 

Louisville, Ky 

Marquette, Mich.. . . 

Memphis, Tenn 

Milwaukee, Wis 

Mobile, Ala 

Montgomery, Ala. . . 

Nashville, Tenn 

New Haven, Ct 

New Orleans, La. . . . 
New York. N. Y. . . . 

Northfleid. Vt 

Oklahoma. Okla 

Omaha. Neb 

Oswego. N. Y 

Parkersburg, W. Va. , 

Philadelphia. Pa 

Pierre. S. Dak 

Pittsburgh. Pa 

Portland. Me 

Portland. Ore 

Raleigh, N. C. . . . 
Rapid City, S. Dak... 

Richmond. Va 

Rochester, N. Y 

St. Louis, Mo 

St. Paul, Minn 

Salt Lake City. Utah. 

San Diego, Cal 

San Francisco, Call. . 

Sante Fe. N. M 

Savannah, Ga 

Shreveport, La 

Spokane, Wash 

Springfield. Ill 

Springfield. Mo 

Tampa. Fla 

Toledo. Ohio 

Vlcksburg. Miss 

Walla Walla. Wash. . 
Washington. D. C. . . 
WlUiston. N. Dak. . . . 
Wilmington. N. C. . . . 
Yuma. ArU , 



.J:in. I'-eb 



69 

80 

76 

81 

75 

72 

74 

76 

72 

78 

64 

77 

72 

76 

52 

82 

77 

78 

53 

78 

83 

72 

80 

73 

47 

73 

84 

87 

75 

84 

68 

SO 

78 

80 

75 

81 

76 

76 

77 

67 

72 

84 

74 

78 

83 

75 

75 

75 

79 

75 

79 

74 

76 

83 

81 

73 

74 

79 

75 

85 

73 

68 

82 

79 

74 

80 

74 

71 

80 

55 

77 

75 

84 

77 

77 

81 

82 

74 

86 

73 

80 

78 

45 J 



68 

79 

73 

79 

72 

70 

74 

76 

71 

78 

58 

77 

70 

72 

59 

81 

74 

77 

55 

76 

81 

72 

78 

73 

40 

71 

85 

87 

77 

84 

66 

79 

76 

79 

76 

79 

72 

73 

72 

69 

71 

81 

72 

78 

83 

74 

73 

73 

80 

74 

76 

72 

75 

82 

80 

72 

73 

77 

74 

81 

73 

71 

78 

79 

74 

80 

70 

72 

78 

55 

77 

71 

77 

76 

76 

81 

80 

72 

79 

71 

80 

79 

42 



ilar. Apr, 

"59" 
77 
70 
SO 
66 
67 
73 
79 
68 
75 
51 
77 
69 
69 
56 
77 
70 
75 
51 
72 
76 
64 
75 
74 
30 
67 
84 
81 
68 
82 
62 
74 
71 
76 
72 
76 
70 
70 
70 
72 
68 
80 
70 
78 
81 
71 
68 
72 
77 
71 
76 
68 
72 
77 
78 
68 
71 
75 
72 
74 
71 
68 
81 
76 
71 
75 
59 
74 
78 
43 
75 
68 
68 
73 
71 
79 
76 
67 
71 
68 
77 
78 
41 



60 

69 

64 

79 

57 

62 

67 

81 

66 

69 

43 

74 

62 

64 

55 

72 

62 

70 

48 

66 

70 

61 

73 

73 

24 

66 

84 

71 

66 

81 

52 

65 

04 

73 

67 

73 

64 

64 

67 

73 

62 

76 

66 

73 

78 

66 

64 

71 

75 

68 

70 

65 

64 

71 

69 

63 

62 

68 

69 

70 

67 

58 

75 

67 

65 

66 

49 

74 

78 

35 

73 

69 

58 

66 

66 

74 

69 

69 

61 

63 

63 

76 

35 



M.iy 



66 

71 

64 

83 

58 

67 

64 

86 

71 

71 

45 

75 

66 

69 

58 

71 

64 

71 

52 

66 

70 

64 

69 

79 

23 

72 

79 

72 

70 

83 

54 

62 

66 

74 

68 

74 

70 

67 

71 

76 

65 

73 

68 

71 

79 

65 

68 

76 

73 

72 

72 

72 

64 

73 

70 

68 

5S 

69 

76 

69 

71 

56 

77 

69 

68 

63 

47 

77 

79 

36 

74 

73 

56 

69 

71 

75 

69 

71 

58 

71 

58 

79 

36 



June July 



63 

72 

71 

83 

55 

69 

69 

87 

72 

72 

40 

79 

72 

74 

68 

73 

65 

71 

46 

70 

70 

63 

72 

82 

28 

73 

80 

73 

69 

84 

52 

67 

66 

79 

70 

76 

74 

70 

74 

75 

66 

73 

73 

73 

79 

70 

69 

77 

77 

72 

75 

72 

67 

73 

73 

68 

60 

70 

76 

69 

73 

57 

76 

67 

68 

68 

38 

78 

80 

31 

79 

76 

52 

70 

75 

81 

70 

76 

53 

73 

64 

81 

35 



59 

72 

76 

84 

44 

70 

65 

87 

71 

71 

36 

80 

75 

75 

61 

70 

65 

68 

49 

67 

37 

62 

71 

83 

45 

71 

77 

70 

69 

84 

44 

65 

63 

80 

68 

74 

77 

71 

74 

76 

65 

72 

74 

71 

83 

76 

70 

78 

78 

74 

77 

69 

66 

73 

72 

70 

56 

68 

76 

64 

77 

51 

79 

67 

66 

66 

35 

80 

84 

47 

81 

75 

44 

67 

73 

82 

67 

79 

42 

74 

59 

83 

43 



Aug. Sept, 

"eiT 

76 

78 

84 

45 

71 

64 

87 

75 

71 

38 

81 

78 

77 

52 

71 

67 

70 

44 

70 

70 

62 

74 

84 

46 

72 

78 

74 

69 

84 

42 

66 

65 

81 

70 

75 

79 

72 

75 

76 

67 

77 

75 

73 

84 

79 

72 

79 

79 

75 

S3 

67 

69 

74 

76 

72 

57 

69 

80 

67 

80 

51 

84 

71 

68 

70 

36 

80 

86 

47 

84 

76 

44 

69 

73 

83 

70 

81 

43 

77 

57 

84 

47 



66 

77 

74 

82 

52 

74 

65 

83 

77 

73 

44 

81 

76 

76 

46 

70 

68 

73 

44 

71 

73 

63 

74 

82 

47 

73 

77 

76 

72 

81 

50 

64 

67 

83 

69 

78 

77 

69 

75 

73 

67 

78 

73 

74 

81 

74 

72 

81 

77 

76 

84 

68 

67 

74 

77 

74 

57 

71 

81 

72 

78 

51 

82 

75 

69 

70 

39 

78 

81 

46 

84 

74 

54 

71 

72 

85 

72 

76 

56 

78 

61 

83 

44 



66 

81 

73 

80 

70 

72 

76 

78 

75 

74 

68 

78 

71 

72 

54 

77 

73 

75 

47 

72 

79 

66 

79 

77 

44 

71 

80 

80 

72 

82 

62 

73 

72 

82 

69 

79 

74 

72 

72 

66 

70 

82 

72 

77 

82 

73 

72 

77 

79 

75 

80 

70 

70 

77 

78 

72 

70 

75 

77 

85 

75 

64 

82 

77 

70 

75 

62 

70 

77 

48 

79 

74 

80 

74 

72 

81 

78 

72 

76 

72 

77 

79 

42 



Oct. Nov. Dec 

"64 
79 
70 
80 
60 
71 
72 
80 
75 
72 
53 
78 
71 
74 
50 
72 
69 
72 
48 
69 
75 
64 
76 
79 
45 
71 
76 
77 
66 
81 
56 
69 
68 
81 
66 
78 
75 
66 
72 
75 
67 
80 
70 
76 
78 
71 
69 
78 
74 
74 
82 
66 
65 
74 
76 
72 
63 
69 
79 
80 
75 
56 
86 
76 
66 
71 
52 
77 
79 
47 
80 
72 
66 
69 
70 
81 
73 
71 
68 
76 
70 
81 
44 



67 

81 

76 

80 

75 

71 

74 

75 

71 

76 

68 

78 

72 

75 

62 

80 

75 

75 

50 

78 

81 

69 

80 

74 

45 

70 

83 

84 

77 

84 

66 

77 

75 

82 

76 

80 

77 

73 

74 

63 

71 

84 

74 

77 

84 

76 

75 

75 

79 

74 

79 

74 

76 

80 

79 

71 

75 

76 

75 

87 

73 

66 

81 

78 

74 

80 

72 

68 

80 

55 

79 

73 

84 

76 

76 

83 

80 

72 

85 

72 

79 

79 

45 



Ann'I 



64 

76 

72 

81 

fil 

70 

70 

81 

72 

73 

50 

78 

71 

73 

54 

75 

69 

73 

49 

71 

74 

67 

75 

78 

39 

71 

80 

78 

71 

83 

66 

70 

69 

79 

70 

77 

74 

70 

73 

72 

68 

79 

72 

76 

81 

72 

71 

76 

77 

73 

78 

70 

69 

76 

76 

70 

65 

72 

75 

76 

74 

60 

80 

73 

70 

72 

53 

75 

80 

45 

78 

73 

64 

71 

73 

80 

74 

74 

65 

72 

69 

80 

42 



The Geological Strata. 



65 



STijr (SJcoloflical <Strata* 



The strata composing the earth' s crust is divided by most geologists into two prreat classes: 
1. Tliose geuerallv attributed to the agency of water. 2. To the action of fire : which may >e 
subdivided as follows: (a) Aqueous formations, stratified, rarely crystalline (sediraentar> 3r 
fossiliferous rocks; metamorphic or unfossiliferous). (6) Igneous "formations, unstratitied, 
crystalline (volcanic, as basalt: plutonic, as granite). 

The geological record is Classified into five main divisions or periods: 1. The Archaean, life- 
less and dawn of life. 2. The Palaeozoic (ancient life). 3. The Mesozoic (middle life). 4. The 
Cenozoic (recent life). 5. Quaternary, the age in which man' s first appearance is indicated. 



Periods. 



Quater- 
nary 
Period. 



Age of Primeval 
Mail. 



^Per'i^^ Age of Mammals. 



Mesozoic 
Period. 



Palaeozoic 
Period. 



Age of Reptiles. 



Eras. 



Quaternary or 
Post Tertiary. 



Series. 



3. Recent. 
2. Champlaia. 
1. Glacial. 



Tertiary Era. 



Cretaceous 
Era. 



Jura- 
Trias. 



.Jurassic 



7. Trias- 

SIC. 



Age of Coal 
Plants. 



Carboniferous 
Era. 



Age of Fishes. 



Devonian Era. 



Age of 
Invertebrates. 



Upper 
Silunau. 



Lower 
Silurian. 



4. Pliocene. 

3. Miocene. 
2. Oligocene. 

1. Eocene. 



Laramie. 

Colorado. 

Dakota. 
Lower. 



Purbeck. 

OoUte. 

Lias. 



lllu«tic. 
Upper. 
Middle. 
Lower. 



3. Permian. 

2. Carboniferous. 

1. Subcarbouifer- 
ous. 



Catsliill and 
Chemung. 
Portage. 

Hamilton. 

Coniferous. 

Oriskany. 



3. Lower 

Helderberg. 

2. Onondaga. 
1. Niagara. 



3. Trenton. 
2. Chaz 



2. Cbaz|^ 
1. Calc^i 



rous. 



Cambrian. 



Archaean Period. 



Eozoic (dawn of life). 
AZOIC (lifeless). 



Pleistocene. 
English Crag. 

Upper Molasse. 

Rupelian and Tongrian of Belgium. 



Upper Chall£. 

Lower Chalk. Chalk Marl. 

Gault. 

Neocomian. Lower Greensand. 

Wealden. 

Purbeck, Portland. Kimmeridge. 
Oxford Oolites. Lower or Batn Oolite. 
1. Lower Lias. 2. Marlstone. 3. Upper 
Lias. 

Kossen beds, Dachstein beds; Alpine 
Kenper [Trias, in part, 

Muscnelkalk Bunter-Saudstein. 



Subdivisions. 



or Rothli- 
[gendes. 



2. Magnesian Limestone. 

1. Lower Red Sandstone, 

3. Upper Coal -Measures. 

2. Lower Coal-Measures. 
1. Millstone Grit. 

Lower Carboniferous. Mountain Lime- 
stone. 

Catskill Red Sandstone. 

Chemung 

Portage. 

Genesee Slate. 

Hamilton beds. 

Marcel I us Shale. 

Upper Helderberg, Scho 

harie. Grit. 
Onskanv Sandstone. 



1 



■ Old Red 
'^ Sandstone. 



Lower Helderberg. 

Onondaga Salt Group. Salina beds. 

Water Lime. 
3. Niagara Group. Wenlock Group. 

2. Clinton Group. t Upper 

1. Medina Sandstone. /Llandovery. 

3. Hudson River bed.s Cinciunaci 
Group. Lower Llandovery. 

Utica Shales. 
1. Trenton Limestone. Caradoc and 

Bala Limestone. 
Black River Limestone. 
Chazy Limestone 

fCalcUerous Sandrock. Magnesian 
\ stone. 

Lower, Middle, and Upper Cambrian. 

1. I^a«r§otian. aurQQiao, 



66 



Table of Magnetic Declinations. 



Gallic of iP^arjuctic H^cclination^i 

Ob Variation of Compass for January, 1913-With the AnnuaIj Change between 1905 

AND 1910 FOR the PRINCIPAL PLACES IN THE UNITED STATES. 

A plus (+) sign to tlie annual change denotes that the declination is increasing, and a minus (— ) 
sign the reverse. 

(Specially prepared for The World Almanac in the Office of the United States Coast and 

Geodetic .Survej'.; 



State or 
Tbreitory. 



Ala 

Alaska... 



Cal 

Col 

Conn 

Del 

Dist. of 

Col 

Florida- 



Georgia. 



Idaho 

Illinois.. 

Infliana. 

Iowa 

Ii.an8as.. 

Ky 

I^a 

Maine. .. 

Md 

Alass 

Ulich 

I>Iinn 

i>[i88 



Station. 



Montgomery- • 

Mobile 

Hunts ville 

Sitka 

Kodiak 

St. Miciiael 

Dutch Harbor. 

Kiska 

Prescott 

Yuma 

Nogales 

Little Kock 

Sacramento.. . 
San Francisco. 
Los Angeles.... 

San Diego 

Denver 

Hartford 

New Haven.... 
Dover 



Washington... 
Tallahassee ... 
Jacksonville... 

Key West 

Atlanta 

Savannah 

Boi.se 

Springfield. ... 

Chicago 

Indianapolis.. 
Fort Wayne... 
Des Moines.... 

Keokuk 

Topeka 

Ness City 

Lexington 

Paducah 

Louisville 

Baton llouge. 
New Orleans. 
Shreveport.... 

Bangor 

Portland 



OS * 






O I 



32 
30 
34 
57 
57 
63 
53 
51 
34 
32 
31 
34 
38 
37 
34 
32 
39 
41 
41 
39 

38 
30 
30 
24 
33 
32 
43 
39 
41 
39 

1^1 
41 
4U 
39 
38 
38 
37 
38 
30 
30 
32 
44 
43 



22 

42 

44 

3 

48152 
29162 
53166 
58182 
34112 
44 114 



o t 



2 
4 
3 

30 
23 
1121 
3215 



110 
92 



34 121 

48122 
4{118 

43117 

45105 

46 

18 
9 



Eastport )44 



Annapolis. 
Baltimore. 

Boston 

Pittsfield... 

Lansing 

Detroit 

Marquette. 

St. Paul 

Duluth 

Jackson 

Oxford 



53 

26 
20 
33 
44 
5 
37 
50 
54 
47 

O 

o 

36 
28 

2 
28 

4 

5 
15 
27 


30 
48 
39 
54 
59 
16 
22 
27 
44 
21 
33 
58 
46 
19 
22 



72 
75 

77 
84 
81 
81 
84 
81 
116 
89 
87 
86 
85 
93 
91 
95 
i*9 
84 
88 
85 
91 
90 
93 
68 
70 
66 
76 
76 
71 
73 
84 
83 
87 
93 
92 
90 
89 



56 10 
31 7 



49 E 
31 E 
43 E 

7E 
57 E 
17 E 
52 E 

50 E 
54 K 

45 E 
9E 

38 E 
49 E 
9E 
25 E 
10 E 

46 E 
12 W 
36 \V 

low 

34W 

38 E 

IE 

25 E 

52 E 

00 E 

54 E 

29 E 

57 E 

36 E 

5W 

2 1-: 

IE 

24 E 

15 E 
36 E 
29 E 

47 E 
8E 

38 E 
24 E 
57 \V 
22 W 
42 W 

9W 
19 \V 
52 W 
57 W 
45 W 
36 W 
27 E 

IE 
45 E 

2E 

16 E 



+ 




a 

— J3 

a 
c 
< 



+ 

+ 

+ 

+ 

+ 

+ 

+ 

+ 

+ 

+ 6 

+ 6 

+ 5 



+ 



+ 2 



State or 

TERRirORY. 



3Io 

Mon 

Neb... 

Nevada, 

N. H 

N. J 

N. Mex. 
N. Y 

N. C 

N. Dak. 
Ohio 

Okla 

Oregon. 
Pa 

R. I 

S. C 

S. Dak.. 

Tenu 

Tex 



Utah. .. 

Vt 

Va 

Wash. 
W. Va. 
Wis... 



Wyo. 



Station. 



Jefferson City... 

St. Louis 

Kansas City 

Helena 

Lincoln 

Omaha 



5-0 
•r; 3 

I- 






92 

90 

94 

112 

96 
95 



t 

9 
16 
38 

2 



P 

"a 



O t 



a 

■4 



Carson City j39 lo 119 

Eureka 

Concord 

Trenton 

Santa Fe 

Albany 

New York 

Ithaca , 

Buffalo 

Raleigh 

Wilmington.. .. 

Bismarck 

Pembina 

Columbus 

Cleveland 

Cincinnati 

Atoka 

Guthrie 

Portland 

Harrisburg 

Philadelphia. .. 
Allegheny .... 

Providence 

Columbia 

Chai-leston 

Pierre 

Yankton 

Na.shville 

Knoxville 

Memphis 

Austin 

San Antonio.... 

Houston 

Galveston 

El Paso 

Salt Lake 

Ogden 

Montpelier 

Burlington 

Richmond 

Norfolk 

Lynchburg 

Olympia 

Walla Walla.... 

Charleston 

Wheeling 

Madi.son 

Milwaukee 

La Crosse 

Cheyenne 



39 
43 
40 
35 
42 
40 
42 
42 
35 
34 
46 
48 
40 
41 
35 
34 
35 
45 
40 
39 
40 
41 
34 
32 
44 
42 
36 
35 
35 
30 
29 
29 
29 
31 
40 
41 
44 
44 
37 
36 
37 
47 
46 
38 
40 
43 
43 
43 
41 



115 
71 

74 

105 
73 
74 
76 
78 
78 
77 

100 
97 
83 
81 
84 
9b 
97 

122 
76 
75 
80 
71 
81 
79 

100 
97 
8t) 
83 
90 
97 
98 
95 
94 



7 7E 
5 SOE 

8 23 i: 
20 22 E 

42 10 19 E 
68 9 43 E 
46;i7 55 E 
58,17 35 E 
29,13 42W 

44 8 40W 
57 13 19 E 

45 11 31 W 



9 36W 
9 35W 
613W 
2 32 W 
2 21W 
14 44 E 



14 11 53 E 



46106 
46111 
13112 



72 

73 

77 

76 

79 

122 

118 

81 

80 

89 

87 

91 

104 



35W 

3 20W 
31E 

8 40E 

9 45E 
22 20 E 

6 59 W 
8 low 

4 12W 
24|l2 42 W 

2 20 W 
56 35 W 
22 I? 14 IC 
25 11 19 E 
48 3 28- E 
4W 

5 21 E 

8 51E 

9 16 E 
8 lOE 

7 50E 
29; 12 28 E 
5417 8E 

0,18 8E 
3214 27 W 



13 12W 

4 33W 

5 8W 
3 7W 

5423 10 E 
2i;21 59 E!-j- 
38 



+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 2 

2 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ _ 
+ 3 
+ 3 
+ 2 
+ 4 

1 
+ 2 
+ 1 
+ 3 
+ 3 
+ 2 
+ 2 
+ 4 
+ 4 
+ 4 
+ 6 
+ 6 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 



4 
4 

3 
5 
5 

2 22W + 3 
2 50 W+ 2 

4 33 E - 1 
2 57 El— 1 

5 40 Ei 
15 11 E + 3 



EXTREME-LVALUES. 


Maii^.. 


..IN, E. Corner...! .. 


1 .. 122 12 Wi+6 11 Alaska. ..IN. E. Corner.. .1 .. 


1 .. 138 57 E|— 1 


a, 
DEPENDENCIES. 



Cuba.. 



Porto 
Rico. 



Havana 
Santiago. 
San Juan, 
Ponce 



23 8 


82 22 


3 OOE 


20 


75 50 


1 8 E-3 


18 29 


66 7 


2 20W + 8 


17 59 


66 40 


2 7W+ 7 



Haw' II 
I.s lands 

Philip, 
pines.... 



Honolulu. 
Hilo 



Manila. 



21 18|157 52 10 45 E 
19 44 155 05i 9 00 E 

14 351120 Ssl Hi 63 E 



Latitude and Ziongltude Table. 



67 



Uatitutrc auTJ ILounitutJe ^aiJle* 



(LONGtTODE RECKON'ED FROM GREEXWICH. ) 

Specially prepared for The World Almanac. 



Acapulco, Mex 10 

Adelaide, S. Australia". .34 

Aden. Arabia 12 

Alhanv, N. V. * 42 

Algiers" .36 4750 N. 

Allegheny. Pa.* 40 27 42 

Ale.Kaudria, Ee^ypt 31 



r n 
50 56 N 
55 38 S. 
; 46 40 N 
39 13 



?<■ 



N 
N. 
S. 
N. 



iN. 

N 

N. 



N, 
N. 
N. 



11 43 

Amherst. Mass.* 42 22 1? N. 

Ann Ardor, IStich. *. ...42 16 48 N. 

Annapolis. Md. * 38 58 54 N. 

Antipodes Island 49 42 S. 

Apia. Samoa 13 48 56 S 

Archangel, Russia 64 32 6 JS' 

Armagh, Ireland' 54 21 13 N 

Aspinwall.S.A ,Ll 9 22 9N 

Astoria, Ore 46 11 19 N 

Athens, Greece* 37 58 21 

Aitu Island, Alaska 52 56 1 

Bahia. Brazil 13 37 

Baltimore. Md 3917 48 

Batavia.Java 6 7 40 S. 

Belize, Honduras 17 29 20 N 

Belle Isle. Lt 5153 ON. 

Eerlin. Prussia* 52 3017 

Bermuda. Dock Yard. .32 19 24 

Bombay* 18 53 45 

Bonn. Germany* 50 43 45 N 

Bordeaux. France" 44 50 17 N. 

Boston Slate House 42 21 28 

Bridgetown Barbadoes.l3 5 42 

Brussels, Belgium* 50 51 10 

Buenos Ayres 34 36 30 S 

Calcgtta 22 33 25 N. 

Callao. Peru,Lt 12 4 3 S. 

Cambridge. Eng * 5212 52 N. 

Cambridge, Mass.*., 42 22 48 N 

Canton. China 23 6 35 JN. 

Cape Cod, Mass. . Lt 42 2 21 N. 

C. Hatieras. N. C. , Lt 35 15 14 N. 

Cape Henry, Va. , Lt 36 55 29 N. 

Cape Horn 55 58 41 S. 

Cape May, N. J. , Lt 38 55 56 N. 

Cape Good Hope, Lt 34 21 12 S. 

Cape Prince of Wales ...65 33 30 N. 

Charleston. S.CLt 32 4144 N. 

Chatlottetoun. P. E.I. ..46 13 55 N 

Cherbourg. France 49 38 54 N. 

Chicago. Til.* 41 50 1 

Christiania, Nor * 59 54 44 

Cincinnati, O. * 39 8 19 

Clinton N. V. * 43 3 17 

Colombo, Ceylon 6 55 40 

Constantinople 41 

Copenhagen* 55 

DemeraraCGeo" lownLt ) 6 

Denver. Col. * 39 

Dublin Ireland* 53 

Edinburgh' 55 

Esqtiimault. B.C. .Lt..T..48 
Father Point. Que. , Lt...4S 

Fayal. Azores 38 

Fernandina, Fla 30 

Florence, Italy* 43 

Funchal. -Madeira 32 

Galveston. Tex 29 

Geneva. Switzerland *.. 4(5 

Glasgow. Scotland* 55 

Gibraltar 36 

Greenwich. Eng * 51 

Halifax. N.S 44 

Hamburs, Ger * 53 

Hanover. N H * A3 

Havana. Cuba 23 

HobartTown, Ta-t 42 

Hong Kong. China" 22 

Honolulu (Reef Lt. ) 21 

Key West. Fla. . lA 24 

Kingston Jamaica ../... 17 

Lisbon. Portugal" 38 

Liverpool* 53 

• Observatories. 



N. 
N. 
N. 
N. 
iV. 
30 N. 

41 13 N 
49 20 N. 
40 36 N. 

23 13 N. 
57 23 N. 
25 40 NT. 

31 25 N. 

32 9 
4018 
46 4 
AS 4 
1817 
1159 

52 43 N 
6 30 X. 

28 38 N 
39 38 

33 7 

42 15 
9 21 

53 25 
18 12 
1 7 55 
32 58 
57 41 
42 31 

24 5 



N. 

N. 

N 

N. 

N. 

X. 



H M. 

6 39 
9 14 
2 59 

4 55 
12 

5 20 
159 

4 50 

5 34 
5 5 

11 54 
11 26 
2 42 
26 
5 19 
8 15 
134 
11 32 

2 34 
5 6 

7 7 
5 52 

3 41 
53 

4 19 
4 51 
28 
O 2 

4 44 
3 58 
017 

3 53 

5 53 
5 9 
O O 

4 41 

7 33 

4 40 

5 2 
5 4 
4 29 

4 59 
113 

1111 

5 19 

4 12 
O 6 

5 50 
42 

6 37 
5 1 
519 
156 
O50 

3 52 
G 59 
25 
12 

8 13 

4 33 
154 

5 25 

45 

1 7 

6 19 
24 
17 
21 

414 
39 

4 49 

5 29 

9 49 

7 36 
10 31 

5 27 

. 5 7 

36 

12 



41.8 W. 
20. 3 E. 
55. 8 E. 

6. 8 W. 

11 4 E 

2. 9 W. 

26. 7 E. 
4.7 W. 

55. 2 W. 

56.5 W. 

52. 3 E. 
59. 7 E. 
14 E. 

35.4 W. 
39 W. 

18.8 W, 
54 9E. 

49. 6 E 
8.4 W. 

26 \V. 
13 7 E. 
46. 7 W. 

29. 5 W. 

34.9 E. 
18 3 W 

15.7 E. 
23. 3 E. 

5. 4 W. 
15. 3 W. 
29. 3 W. 
28 6 E. 
28. 9 W. 

20 7 E. 
3. W. 

22. 7 E. 
31.0 W. 
46. 3 E 

14. 6 W. 
5. W. 
2.0 W. 
5 W. 

50 7 W. 
58. E. 
56. 8 W. 
32 OW. 
27. 5 W. 
32. 5 W. 

26. 7 W. 

53. 8 E. 
41.3 W. 
37. 4 W. 
2L9 E. 

3 7 E. 

18.8 E. 

46.0 W. 
47.6 \V. 

21.1 W. 
43 1 W 

47. 1 W. 

49.2 W. 
16.0 \V. 
51. 1 W. 

1 5E 

35 6 W. 
9 7 W.. 

36 8 E 
10 6 W. 
23 3 W. 
•0.0 - 

21 1 W. 

53. 8 E. 
7 9 W. 

26 W. 
20 5 E. 

41.9 E. 
28 W. 

12 3 W. 
10 7 W. 

44 7 \y. 

17.3 W. 



o 

Madison. Wis.* 43 

Madras, India* 13 

Madrid, Spam* 40 

Manila, Lt 14 

Marseilles* 43 

Melbourne. Vic* 37 

Mexico (city)' 19 

Monrovia, Liberia 6 

Montreal, Que.* 45 

Moscow* 55 

Mount Hamilton. Cal.* 37 

Munich' 48 

Nain. Labrador 56 

Naples* 40 

Nashville. Tenn.*.. 36 

Nassau, Bahamas 25 

Natal, S. Alrica* 29 

New Haven. Ct* 41 

New Orleans (Mint) 29 

New york(Colu. Col. )*40 

Nice. France* 43 

Norfolk, Va. (Navy Yd) 36 

North Cape 71 

Northfleld. Minn.*. 44 

Odessa, Russia* 46 

Ogdeu, Utah* 41 

Oxiord. Eng. (Univ.)*. .51 

Panama 8 

Para. Brazil 1 

Paris. France* 48 

Pensacola, Fla . Lt 30 

Pernambuco. Brazil Lt. 8 
Port an Prince, Hayti. 18 

Philadelphia. Pa.* 39 

Point Barrowt 71 

Portland. Me 43 

Port Louis, Mauritius. .20 

Port Said, Egypt. Lt 31 

Port Spain, Trinidad ...10 
P. Stanley. Falkland Is. 51 
Prague, Bohemia*.... ...50 

Princeton, N. J* 40 

Providence. R. 1.* 41 

Quebec, "Que. * 46 

Richmoud, Va 37 

Rio de Janeiro* 22 

Rochester, N. Y. * 43 

Rome, Italy* 41 

Saigon. Cochin-Chiua*.10 

San Diego, Cai 32 

Sandy Hook.N. J. . Lt...40 

San Francisco. Cal. * 37 

San Juande Porto Rico. 18 

Santiago de Cuba 20 

Savannah. Ga 32 

Seattle. Wash 47 

Shanghai, China 31 

Singapore 1 

St. Helena Island 15 

St. John's. Newlo' land 47 

St. Louis, Mo.* -.38 

St. Petersburg, Russia*. 59 

Stockholm* 59 

Suakim.E. Alrica, Lt. .19 
. .33 



Sydney, N. S. W. 

Tokio. Japan' 35 

Tunis (Goletta Lt. ) 36 

Utrecht, Netherlands* .52 

Valparaiso, Chile 33 

Venice. Italy* 45 

Vera Cruz. Mex. , Lt. . .19 

Victoria. B.C. . Lt 48 

Vienna Austria' .43 

Warsaw. Russia* 53 

Washington, D. C. *. 38 

Wellington. N Z. * 41 

West Point. N. Y. * 41 

Williamsiowii. Mass.* 42 

Yokohama..! apan 35 

Zanzibar (E Consulate) 6 



I 

4 
4 
24 
35 
18 
49 
26 
19 
30 
45 
20 
8 
32 
51 
8 
5 
50 
18 
57 
45 
43 
49 

11 

27 
28 
13 
45 
57 
26 
50 
20 

3 
33 
57 
27 
39 

8 
15 
38 
41 

5 
20 
49 
47 
32 
54 

9 
53 
46 
43 
27 
47 
28 

o 

4 
35 
14 
17 
55 
34 
38 
56 
20 

4 

51 
39 
48 
5 
1 
26 
12 
25 
13 
13 
55 
18 
23 
42 
26 
9 



tf 

37 
8 
30 
25 
18 
53 
2 
5 
17 
20 
24 
45 
51 
46 
54 
37 
47 
36 
46 
23 
17 
33 
O 
42 
37 
8 
34 
6 
59 
12 
47 
22 
54 
7 

28 
46 
45 
39 
10 
19 
58 
46 
59 
16 
24 
17 
54 
47 
6 
40 
28 
56 
16 
52 
54 
42 
11 
O 
2 
4 
30 
33 

41 
17 
36 
10 
53 
10 
29 
26 
55 
6 
15 
1 
22 
30. 
24 
43 



N. 
N. 
N. 
N. 
N. 
S. 
N. 
N. 
N 
N 
N 
N. 
N 
N 
N. 
N 
S. 
N. 
N. 
N 
N. 
N. 
N. 
N 
N. 
N. 
N 
N. 
S. 
N. 
N. 
S. 
N. 
N. 
N. 
N. 
S. 
N. 
N. 
S 
N. 
N. 
N. 
N. 
N. 
S 
N 
N. 
N. 
N. 
N. 
N. 
N. 
N. 
N. 
N. 
N. 
N. 
s 
N 
N 
N. 
N 
N. 
S 
N 
N 
N, 
S 
N. 
N 
N 
N 
N, 
N. 
S 
N 
N. 
N 
S. 



H. M. 8 

5 57 37. 

5 20 69 
14 45. 

8 3 50. 
21 34. 

9 39 54. 

6 36 26 
O 43 15 
4 5418 
2 30 17. 
8 6 34 
46 26. 
4 6 42 
57 1 
6 47 12. 
6 9 27. 
2 4 1. 
4 6142 
6 013 

4 65 53 

29 12. 

6 511 

1 42 40. 
6 12 36. 

2 8 2. 

7 27 59 
5 O 
518 8. 
314 O 
O 9 20. 

5 4914 

2 19 27. 

4 49 28 

5 38 
10 25 0. 

4 41 1 

3 49 57 

2 915. 

4 6 2 

3 51 26. 
57 40. 

4 58 37. 
4 45 37. 

4 44 52. 

5 9 44. 

2 52 41. 
5 10 21. 
49 55 
7 6 48. 

7 48 38. 
4 56 0. 

8 9 42. 

4 24 29. 

5 3 22. 

6 24 21. 
8 919 
8 5 55 
6 55 25 

22 52. 

3 30 4^. 
6 49 
2 113 

1 12 14. 

2 29 16. 
10 4 49. 

918 58 
41 14. 
20 31. 

4 46 34. 

49 22. 
6 24 31 

8 13 33 

1 6 21 
124 7 

5 815. 
1139 6 

4 55 50 
4 52oU 

9 1»36. 

2 36 44. 



8W. 
4E. 
4 W. 

E. 

6 E 

1 E 

7 W. 
7 W. 
7 W. 

2 E 
1 W. 
1 E 

7 W. 

8 E. 
O W. 
8 W. 



E 
VV. 
W. 
W. 



2E. 
W. 
E. 
8 W. 



2 B,. 

6 W. 

4 W 

8 W. 

w. 

9 E 

1 W. 

8 W. 

o w. 

5 W. 
W. 

2 W. 

7 E. 
5E. 
5 W. 
VV. 

3 E. 
5 W. 

5 W. 

6 W. 
W. 

4 W. 
W. 
E. 
E. 
W. 
W. 
W. 
W. 

W. 

7 W. 

9 W. 
7E. 
E. 

W. 
6 \V 

1 W. 
5E. 
E. 
6 E 

5 E. 
OE. 

E. 

E. 

W 

E. 

VV. 

W. 

E. 

E. 

W. 

E. 

VV. 



4 W. 
9E. 

7E. 



Lt. denotes a lighi- house. 



t Highest latitude in U 6 territory. 



68 



Earthquake Areas of the Earth. 



J^accs of J^anttiiitr. 

The following is compiled from the arrangement by Ethnologist Figuler and others: 

WHITF, EACK 

f Teutonic Familj' Scandinavians, Germans, English. 

_, I Latin FamiU- Frencli, Spaniaids, Italians. Moldo-Wallachians. 

iiiiropean . yiavouiau Family Russians, Finns, Bulgarians. Servians, Magyars, Croats, 

Braucu. ] Tchetks. Poles, Lithuanians. 

Greek Familv Greeks, Albanians. 

Libyan Family — Egyptians, Berbers. 

A - rr^oon I Semitic Family Arabs, Jews, Syrians. 

Aiamean . Persian Family Persians, Afghans, Kurds, Armenians, Ossetines, 

iiiaucu. I Georgian Family Georgians. 

L Circassian Family Circassians, Mi ngreiians. 

YELLOW EACE. 

Pynerborean 5 Lapp Family Samoiede. Kamtsehadale, Esquimau, Tenlsslan, Jukaghlrite, 

Branch. \ and Koriak Families. 

C Mongol Family Mongols, Kalmucks, Burlats. 

Mongolian J I'uuguse Family Tunguses, Manchus. 

Branch. | Turk Family Turcomans, Kirghis, Nogays, Osmanlis. 

y Yakut Family Yakuts. 

f5;fnftif> ^ Chinese Family Chinese. 

T? irh \ Japanese Family Japanese. 

israuco. ^ ludo-Chineae Family.. Burmese, Siamese. 

BROWX RACE. 

Hindoo f Hindoo Family Sikhs. Jats, Rajpoots, Mahrattas, Bengalese, Cingalese. 

Branch. t Malabar Family Malabars. Tamais, Teliugas. 

Ethiopian f Aoyssinian Family Abyssinians, Berabras, Gallas. 

Branch. 1 Feilan Family Fellans. 

f Malay Famil y Malays, Javanese, Battas, Bougis. Maccassars. Dyaks, Togals. 

Malay J Polynesian Family Maoris, Tongas, Tanitians, Pomotouaus, Marquesans, Baud- 
Branch. I wichiaus. 

(, Micronesian Family ...Ladrone, Caroline, and Mulgrave Islanders. 

BED RACE. 

o . ( Andian Family Quichuas (orlncas). Antis, Andians, Araucanians. 

Rr ifMi \ f'^nipean Family Patagoniaus, Puelches, Charruas, Tobas, Moxas, Abipous,etc. 

jjraucu. ^ Guarani Familv Gnaranis, Bocoiudos. 

f Southern Family Aztecs, Mayas, Lencas, Othomis, Tarascas, etc. 

Northern J JSfortUeasteru Family.. Cherokees, Hurous, Iroquois, Sioux, Apaches, Comanchea, 
Brancn. | Creeks, etc. 

y Northwestern Family. Chlnooks, Digger Indians, Nootkans, etc. 

BLACK RACE. 

■niT«o»«-„ ( CafifreFamily 

^ral^^n liottentot Family 

Brancn. ) Negro Family 

Eastern ( Papuan Family. Fijians, New Caledonians, etc. 

Branca \ Andaman Family Audamans, Australians. 



iSartftquaUe ^reas of tl^r 25artf)» 

Major DE MoxTEssus DE Baloke, after years of labor, has drawn up a catalogue of 130,000 
8bocks,of wnich trustworthy details have been procured, and this indicates with some scientific 
accuracy how tne symptoms of seismic activity are manifesied over the earth's surface. The period 
of ooservation includes generally the last filty years ; bat there is no reason to suppose that a longer 
time would materially affect the proportionate numbers. The appended figures, drawn fiom M. de 
Moniessus' sstatistics, will gi ve an idea of the general result: 



Area. 



Scandinavia 

British Idles 

France 

Spam and Portugal...... 

Switzerlana 

Italy 

Holland aud North Ger- 
many 

Sicily. 



EsrlD- 
qiftkes. 



646 
1,139 

2.793 

2.656i 

3,895 

27.672 

2,3261 
4 3311 



Abba. 



Greece 

Asia Minor 

India 

Japan 

Africa 

Atlantic Islands 

United States, Pacific 
coast 



EsTin- 
qaakes, 



10,306 

258 

4,451 

813 

27,662' 

179i 

1,704 

4.467 



Abba. 



Earth 
quati;i. 



United States, Atlantic 

coast 

Mexico 

Central America 

West Indies 

South America 

Java 

Australia and Tasmania. 
Xew Zealand 



937 
5,586 
2.739 
2,561 
8.081 
2,155 
83 
1,926 



The most sbaKen countries of the world are Italy. Japan, Greece, South America (the Pacific 
coast), Java, Sicily, >ind Asia Minor. The lands most free from inese convulsions ate Africa. Aus- 
tralia, Russia, Siberia, Scandinavia, and Canada. A.s a rule, where earthquakes are most frequent 
mey are most severe. But lo mis general statement mere are exceptions -Indian shocks, tnough 
less numerous, beingofien very disistrous. Loss of litem many cases depends, however, on density 
of population rather man on the iniensitv of tne earth movement. Numerically, also. France has 
registered more seismic tremors than Spain and Portugal, out France in nisioric times has experienced 
no earthquake disaster approaching tne navoc wrought by the one calamity at LisDoa. 



Rules for Foretelling the Weather. 



69 



jrijtrmomctcrsi. 

Comparative Scales. 



R.-S11- 
oiur, 

SO"". 

76 

72 

68 

63.1 

60 

66 

62 

48 

44 

42. 2 

40 

36 

32 

29.3 

28 

25.8 

24 

21 

20 

16 

12, 

10 

8 

5 

4 

1.3 


-0.9 

- 4 

- 5.0 

- 8 
-9.8 
-12 
-14. 
-16 
-20 
-24 
-28 
-32 



Centi- 


Fahr- 


grade, 


consu, 


\M^ . 


•l\V-. 


96 


203 


90 


194 


85 


185 


78.9 


174 


75 


167 


70 


158 


65 


149 


60 


140 


55 


131 


52.8 


127 


50 


122 


45 


113 


42 2 


108 


40 


104 


36.7 


98 


35 


95 


32. 2 


90 


30 


86 


26.7 


80 


25 


77 


20 


68 


15.3 


60 


12.8 


55 


10 


60 


7.2 


45 


5 


41 


1.7 


35 





32 


- 1.1 


30 


- 5 


23 


- 6.7 


20 


-10 


14 


-12.2 


10 


-15 


5 


-17.8 





-20 


- 4 


-25 


-13 


-30 


-22 


-35 


-31 


-40 


-40 



1 -17 



Water Boils 
AT Ska- 
Level. 



A.lcohol Boils. 



rallow Melts. 



Blood Heat. 



remperate. 



Water 
Freezes. 



Zero Fahr. 



Mules for iForctcUinjtj tljt 213aratfjcr, 

Adapted for U.se with Aneroid Barometers. 

A RISING BARO-METKR. 

A RAPID rise inaicates iiuseiiied weather, 

A gradual rise indicates settled weather. 

A ri.se with drv air and cold increasing iu Summer Indicates 
wind trom the norinwaid, and if raiu lias fallen, better vveatlier 
may oe expected. 

A ri.se with moist air and a low temperature indicates wind and 
rain from the northward. 

A rise wuti souiuetly winds indicates fine weather. 

A STEADY barometer. 

"With dry air and seasouahle temperature indicatesacontluuance 
of very flne weather. 

A FALLING BAROMETER. 

A rapid fall indicates siorruy weatner. 

A rajjKl fan with westerly wind indicates stormy weather from 
the noriliwaid. 

A fall with a northerly wind indicates storm, with rain and hail 
in Summer, and snow in Winter 

A fall with increased moisture In the air, and heat increasing, 
indicates wind and ram from the southward. 

A tall with dry air and cold increasingiu Winterindicaiessnow. 

A fall alter very calm and warm weather indicates rain with 
squally weather. 

The barometer rises for northerly winds, including from north- 
we.st oy north to the eastward for dry. or less wet weatner. lor less 
wind, or tor more than one of these changes, except on a few 
occasion-!, wnea rain, nail, or snow comes from the north waid with 
strong wind. 

The barometer falls for southerly wind, including from south- 
east oy south to the westward, tor wee weatner. for stronger wind 
or for more tnau <iw^. of the.se changes, except on a few occasion.s. 
when moderate wind, with ram or snow, comes f torn the uotm- 
ward. 

The above printed niles are in use by the Seawanhaka Corin- 
thian Yacnt CluD ol iSew YorK. 



DoRATiON OP Different Ivinds of Weather in theSeveral 
Storms— Vicinity ofKew York. 



CaiiiCAL Winds. 

South to Southwe.st 

South lo Souihea.si 

East to Northeast 



Clear 
Hours. 


Cloudy 
Hours. 

8 
13.4 
17.6 


Kkiu 
Hour.*. 

8.3 
15.6 
31 


9 
14 
20 



ClcHring 
Hours 

Ti ' 

15.4 
20.6 



WEATHEK WISDOM. 

SUNSET COLORS.— A gray, lowering sunset, or one where the sky is green or yellowish- 
green, indicates rain. A red sunrise, wicu clouds lowering later in the morning, also indicates rain. 

HALO (SUN DOGS). — By haio we mean the large circles, or parts of circles, about the sun 
or moon. A halo occurring alter fine weather indicates a storm. 

CORONA. — By this term we mean the small colored circles frequently seen around the sun or 
moon, A corona growing smaller inaicaies rain; growing larger, fair weatner. 

RAINBOWS.- A morning rainbow is regarded as a sign of rain; an evening rainbow of fair 

weather. 

•*li.V COLOR. -A deep-blue color of the sky, even when seen through clouds, indicates fair 
weather; a growing whiteness, an approaching storm. 

FOGS.- Fogs indicate settled weather. A morniugfogusually breaks away before noon. 

VISIBILITY.- Unusual clearness of the atmosphere, unusual brightness or twinkling of the 
stars indicate rain. 

FIJOST.— The first frost and last frost are usually preceded by a temperature very much above 
the mean. 

OBJECTS VISIBLE AT SEA-LEVEL IN CLEAR WEATHER. 

The following table shows the distance at sea-level at which objects are visible at certain elevations 



Elkvatiov— Feet. 


Miles. 


Elev AricN — Feet. 


Miles. 


ElBVAIIC.N— f EKT. 


.Miles. 


1 


1.31 

2 96 
3.24 

3 49 
6 73 

3 96 

4 IH i 
D 92 

6 61 


30 


7.25 
7.83 
8.37 

8 87 

9 35 
40 25 
11 U7 i 
11.83 


90 

100 


12 25 


6 


35 

140 

-1.5 


13. 23 


6 


loO 


\^ 22 


7 


200 


18 72 


8 . ... 


50 : 

IfiO 


300 


22 91 


9 


600 

1.000 

1 mild 


2vV 58 


10 

20 . 


170 

|S0 


33 41 
96 10 


25 






• 



70 



N'ormal Temj^erature and Rainfall. 

"Normal ^Temperature antr BainfalL 

Table Showixq thic Normal Tempkrature fob Jaxtary an'd Juj.y, and the Normal 
An'xtial Precipitation" at Weatukb Burkau Station's ix each of tki5 States and 
Territories, Xlso the Highest and Lowest Temperatures ever Reported from 
EACH of said Stations, to January 1, 1912. 

(Prepared in the oQice of the Chief of the Weather Bureau, U. S. Department of Agriculture, for 

The World Almanac for 1913. ) 



00 

o 

H 
w 

A 



5 



< 

m 



Ala. 



Ariz. 



Ark. 



Cal. 



Col. 



Conn. 
D. C. 



Florida. 



Georgia 
Idalio 



Illinois .. 
Indiana. 



lovra.. 



Kansas 



Ky. 
Ija. 



Elaine. 

3Id 

lUass...- 



Mich. 



Minn. 



Miss. 



Mo 



Stations. 



Birmiugham 

Mobile 

IMont^omerj' 

f Flagstaff 

\ PhcEnix 

(.Yuaia 

/Fort Smith 

I Little Rock 

f Fresno 

1 Los Angeles ... 

I Red Bluir. 

j Sacramento 

San Diego 

I San Francisco . . 

r Denver 

\ Grand Junction. 
(Pueblo 

New Haven 

Washington 

C Jacksonville 

I Jupiter 

\ Kej' West 

Pensacola 

L Tampa 

(Atlanta 

\ Augusta 

(.Savannah 

/Boise 

iPocatello 

(Cairo 

\ Chicago 

(Springfield 

Indianapolis 

(Des Moines 

< Dubuque 

(Keokuk 

(Concordia 

-< Dodge 

(Wichita 

Louisville 



/New Orleans. 
I Shi 



Mont. 



reveport. 

/Eastport 

1 Portland 

Baltimore-.. 

Boston 

(Alpena 
Detroit 
Marquette.. 
Port Huron 

(Dnluth 

.; Moorhead... 

(St. Paul 

Vicksburg... 
Kansas City 

St. Louis 

pringfield.. 

lavre , 

Helena 



Temperature 



Mean. 



Si 

3 



43 
5U 
48 
27 
50 
55 
36 
41 
45 
54 
45 
4(j 
54 
50 
29 
25 
29 
27 

aj 

64 
G4 
69 
52 
57 
42 
46 
50 
29 
25 
35 
24 
26 
28 
20 
18 
24 
24 
27 
30 
34 
53 
46 
20 



tremes. 



♦J 
m 

a 

be 



80 104 
80I1U2 
81107 
65 93 
90'119 
91|lli0 
81 1108 

81 [106 

82 115 
70 109 
82|115 
72 110 

101 
101 
105 



a: 



O 



-10 
1 
— 5 
-22 
12 
22 
-15 
-1-^ 



ao 






to 

M 

o 

h 

M 

K 

Q 

< 

Hi 
m 

H 
< 



19.5 
G2.0 
51.2 
23.0 
7.9 
3.1 
41.3 
49.9 



xllont ... 



Neb 

iNevaila. 



20 9.7 
28 15.6 
3 8 25.0 
19 20. 1 

67 101 32 10. 
57 101 29 22. 3 
72 105 —29 14. 
79,104 -16 &3 
74:104 -27 32.0 

72 100-14 47.2 
771104 -15 43.5 
81104 10 53.2; 

81 9!) 24 GO. 2 
84 100 4138.7 
81103 7 56.2 
SOi 96 19 53. li 
78 100 - 8 49.4 
80 105 3 47.9 
o0,105 8 50.3 

73 111 -28 12.7 
71 ! 102 -20 12.9! 
79|106-16 41.7i 
72 103 —23 33.3 
76 107-24,37.0 
76 106 —2541.5 
76!l09-30 82.4 
75 1 106 -32 34.0 
77I1OS-2735.I 
78 110 -25 27.5 

78 lOS —26 20. 8 
9 107-22 30.6 

79 107 -20 44. 3 
81102 7 57.4 

82 110 - 5 45. 7 
60 93 -21 43. 3 

68 103 -17 42.5 
33 77 104— 743.2 
27 71 104 —13 43. 4 
19 66 101 -27 33. 2 
24 72 101 —24 32.2 
16 65 108 -27 32. 6 
22 69 101 —25 30. 6 

10 ii% 99 -41 29. 9 
3 69 102 -48 24. 9 

12 72 104 -4128.7 
47 ^0 101— 1 5a 7 
26 78 106-22 37.4 
31 79 107—22 37.2 
31 76 106—29 44 6 

11 6-. lOS -55 l:; 71 
20167 1031-42 12.81 



N. C 



N. IJiiIc. 

.\. II 

N. J 

N. 3Iex.. 



N. Y 



Ohio. 



Okla 

Oregro-i. 



Pa. 



R. I... 

.S. C... 



S. Dak. 



Tenn.. 



Texas . 



Utah 
Ft. 



Va 

Wash 



\V. Va.. 

Wis 



Wyo. 



Stations. 



/Kalispell 

I. Miles City 

(North Platte...., 
■j Omaha 

(Valentine 

W^innenuicca... 

(Charlotte , 

< Hatteras 

(Wilmington 

/Bismarcic 

IWilliston 

Concord 

5 Atlantic Cit3-.... 

\ Cape Ma3' 

/ lloswell 

1 Santa Fe 

fAlljany 

I Binsrhamton... 

-! Buffalo , 

I New York City. 
(Oswego 

Cincinnati 

Columbus 

Toledo 

Oklahoma j.. . 

( Portland 

(Roseburg 

(Erie 

\ Philadelphia 

(Pittsburgh , 

Block Island 

Charleston , 

(Huron 

^Pierre 

(Yankton 

(Chattanooga 

•< Memphis 

(Nashville 

r Abilene 

I Amarillo 

I El Pa-so 



{ 



Tlfe minus (— ) sign indicates temperature below zero. 



; Galveston 

I Palestine 

ISan Antonio 

Salt Lake City... 

/ Burlington 

INorthtield 

/ Lynchburg 

(.Norfolk 

(Seattle 

< Spokane 

I Walla Walla.... 

(Elkins 

\ Parke rsburg 

/La Crosse 

(.Milwaukee 

(Che.venne 

\ Lander & Wash- 
( akie 



Temperature 



Mean. 



c 

<A 



20 
14 
21 
20 
18 
29 
40 
46 
46 
7 
6 
21 
32 
34 
39 
28 
22 
23 
25 
30 
24 
32 
29 
26 
35 
39 
41 
26 
32 
31 
31 
49 



64 
73 
74 



Ex- 
tremes. 



CO 
bx) 



96 
111 
107 
76J107 
731106 

72 104 
79,102 
79! 93 

79 103 
70 107 
69 107 
69 102 
721 99 

73 96 
79130 

69 97 
72;i04 

70 98 
70 95 
74!lOO 
70 i 100 
78 105 

75 304 

74 302 

80 108 
66 102 
66,106 
72' 96 

76 103 
103 

{.2 



a* 
O 



V. 






-34 16. 9 
-49 13.2 
-3518.9 
-32 '30. 7 
-38,22.5 
-28, 8.4 

- 5' 49. 2 
8 60.8 
5,51.0 

-44 17.6 
-49 1 15.1 
—35,40.1 

- 7140.8 

- 7 40.8 
-29 15.8 
-13 14.5 
-24 36.4 



68 

81 



10 72 
75 
75 

78 
81 
79 

82 



14 
16 
41 
40 
38 
43 
34 
44 
53 



76 
80 
83 



46182 
51 82 



29 
16 
15 
36 
40 



76 
68 
67 
77 
78 
64 
69 
74 
70 
76 

iZ3 



39 

27 

33 

29 

31 

15 

20! 70 

26,67 



104 
108 
110 
107 
101 
104 
104 
110 
105 
11 

98 
108 
108 
102 
100 

98 
102 
102 

9ti 
104 
113 

97 
102 
104 
100 
100 



32.9 
37.3 
44.6 
36.2 



-26 
-14 

- 6 

-23 

-17138.3 
-20 36. 9 
-16 30.6 
-17 31.7 

- 2 45.1 

- 6 34.4 



-16 

- 6 
-20 

— 4 
7 

-43 
-40 



38.6 
41.2 
36.4 
44.4 
5'.4.1 
21.1 
16.6 



-34125.4 
-10 50.7 
- 9I50.3 



17 '68 100 -54 13.9 



13 

- 6 
-16 

- 6 
8 

- 6 
4 



48.5 
24. 7 
22.6 
9.8 
47.1 
43.0 
26.8 



-2016.0 
-2731.6 
-3533.8 
— 6 43.4 

249.5 
lll36.6 
-30,18.8 
-17 17.7 
-21 42.8 
-2740.2 
-43 31.2 
'^'"^ 31. 4 



-38 



13.6 



Greatest Altitude in Each State and Territory. 



71 



temperature antr iiainfall of jforeiun (Srities, 



City or Plack. 



Alexamlria 

Algiers 

Amsterdam 

Archangel 

Astrakhan 

Athens 

Bagdad 

Barcelona 

Berlin 

Bermuda 

Berne 

Birmingham 

Bombay 

Bordeaux 

Brussels 

Budapest 

Buenos Ayres... 

Cairo 

Calcutta 

Canton 

Cape Town 

Caj'enne 

Cherx'apongee*. , 

Christiania 

Constantinople. 

Copenhagen 

Delhi 

Dublin 

Edinhnrsrh 



Mean 


Annu.tl 


Annual 


Average ' 


Temper- 


Rainfall 


ature. 


Inches. 

1 


69.0 


10 


64.3 


27 


49.9 




3:5.0 




50.1 


6 


63.0 


.... 


74.0 




63.0 




48.2 


i24 i 


72.0 


55 


46.0 


46 


48.2 




81.3 


75 ; 


57.0 


30 


50.0 


29 , 


51.9 


17 j 


62.8 


1 


72 2 




82.4 


76 


71.0 


39 


62.0 


23 , 





116 ! 




610 


41.5 




5(3.5 




46.6 


19 


77.0 


24 


50.1 


29 I 


47.1 


38 1 



City or Place. 



Florence 

Frankfort. . , 

Geneva 

Genoa 

Glasgow 

Hamburg 

Havana 

Hongkong . , 
i Honolulu ... 

Iceland , 

Jerusalem... 

Lima 

Li-sbon 

London 

Jjyons 

i Madeira 

Madrid 

Malta 

Manchester , 

Manila 

Maranham ., 
Marseilles. . 
Melboui-ne.., 

Mexico 

Milan 

Montevideo. 
Montreal . . . . 

Moscow 

Munich 



Mean 


Annual 


Annutil 


Averag^e 


Temper- 


liainf.iU 


ature. 


Inches. 


59.2 


41 


50.0 


• • • 


52.7 


32 


61.1 


47 


49.8 


44 


47.0 




79.1 


91 


73.0 


101 


75.0 




39.0 


30 


62.6 


16 


73.3 




61.4 


27 


50.8 


25 


53.0 


28 


66.0 


25 


58.2 


9 


66.0 


20 


48.8 


36 


78.4 






277 


58.3 


23 


57.0 


29 


60.9 




55.1 


38 


62.0 


44 


44.6 




40.0 




48.4 





CiTT OB PLACB. 



Naples 

Nice 

Odessa 

Pai-a 

Paris 

Pekin? 

Port Said , 

Prague 

Quebec 

Quito 

Rio de Janeiro.. 

Rome 

Rotterdam , 

San Domingo — 

Shanghai 

Smyrna 

St. Petersburg.. 

Stockholm 

Sydney 

The Hague ..... 

Tobolsk 

Tokio 

Trieste 

Valdivia , 

Valparaiso 

Venice 

Vera Cruz 

Vienna 



Mean 
Annual 
Temper- 
ature. 



60.3 
58.0 
48.0 
81.0 
51.3 
53.0 

50.2 
40.3 
60.9 
77.2 
60.5 
51.0 
81.3 
59.0 
60.0 
39.6 
42,3 
65. 8 
52.0 
32.0 
56.4 
55.0 
52.0 
64.0 
55.4 
77.0 
51.0 



Annual 

Average 

Rainfall 

Inches. 



30 
29 

71 
22 
27 
2 
14 



29 

31 

23 

108 

■24 
17 
20 
49 



58 

43 

106 



180 
19 



* In Southwestern Assam, It is the wettest place in the world. 
905 inches. 

Note— The mean annual temperature of the globe is 50o Fahr. 



In 1861 the rainfall there reached 
The average rainfall is 36 inches. 



<2J?reatest ^(titutre i\\ 32acl) <State auTr KtxxiX^x^. 

FROM THE RECORDS OF THE UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL, SURVEY. 



State or 
Tekritory. 



Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona... 



Arkansas . 
California. 



Name of Place. 



Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

D. of Columbia. 

Florida 

Georgia 



Hawaii . 
Idaho ... 



Illinois. 



Indiana .... 

Iowa .^■. 

Kansas 

Kentucky. 
Louisiana . 
Maine 



Maryland 

Massachusetts. 
Michigan 



Minnesota . 
Mississippi 

Mis.==onri .... 



Cheaha-Mtn^iUadegaCo.), 

Mt. McKinley 

.San Francisco Mt. (Coco- 
nino Co. ) 

Blue Mt.( Polk- Scott Co. )... 
Mt. Whitney (Invo-Tulare 

Co.) 

Mt. Elbert (Lake Co.).... 
Bear Mt. (Litchfield Co,) 
Centerville (Newcastle Co,) 

Tenley (Northwest) 

Mt. Pleasant(Gadsden Co.) 
Brasstown Bald (Towns- 
Union Co. ) 

Maun a Kea (Hawaii Co.).. 
Hyndman Peak (Blaine- 
Custer Co.) 

Charles Mound (J. Daviess 

Co.) 

Carlos City (Randolph Co.) 
Primghar (O'Brien Co.). 

On West Boundary 

Big Black Mt. (Harlan Co, 

Claiborne Co 

Katahdin Mt, (Piscataquis 

Co.) 

Backbone Mt. (GarrettCo. ) 
Mt.Greylock(Berk.shireCo.) 
Porcupine Mt. (Ontonagon 

Co.) 

Mesibi Range(St. Louis Co.) 
Holly Springs (Marshall 

Co. ) '. 

Taum Satik Mt. (Iron Co.). 



Heig' t 
Feet 



2.407 
20.300 

12.611 

2,800 

14.501 

14,402 

2,355 

440 

421 

301 

4.768 
13,823 

12,078 

1.241 
1.210 
1.800 
4.135 
4.100 
400 

5.200 
3.340 
3.505 

2.023 
2,400 

600 
1, 750 



tSTATE OB 

Territory. 



^Montana.., 
Nebraska , 
Nevada ... 



N. Hampshire. 

New Jersej' 

New Mexico..., 



New York 

North Carolina 
North Dakota . 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 



Pennsylvania... 
Philippines .. 
Porto Rico. . . 
Rhode Island... 

South Carolina. 
South Dakota.. 



Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington .. 
West Virginia.. 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



Name of Place. 



Granite Peak (Carbon Co.), 

s. W. part Banner Co 

Wheeler Peak (White Pine 
Co,) 

Mt. Washington (Coos Co.) 

High Point (Su.ssex Co. )... . 

N. Truchas Peaic (Rio Arri- 
ba Co. ) 

Mt. Marcv (Essex Co. ) 

-Mt. Mitchell (Yancey Co.).. 

Summit in Bowman Co,.. 

Bellefontaine (Logan Co. ),. 

West end of Cimarron Co,. 

Mt. Hood (Clackamas- 
Wasco Co. ) 

Blue Knob ( Bedford Co. ) . . 

Mt. Apo 

Luquillo Mts 

Durfee Hill (Providence 
Co.) 

Sassafras Mt 

Harnej' Peak (Pennington 
Co.) 

Guj'ot 

El Capitan (El PasoCo. ).. 

Kings Peak (Wasatch Co.). 

Mt, Mansfield 

?tlt. Rogers (Grayson Co. )... 

Mt. Rainier (Pierce Co.). . . 

Spruce Knob (Pendleton 
Co.) 

Rib Hill (Marathon Co,),... 

Gannett Peak (Fremont 
Co.) 



Heig't 
Feet. 



12.850 
5,350 

13.058 
6,293 
1,809 

13.30P 
5,344 
6.711 
3.500 
1,540 
4,750 

11,225 
3.136 

10,312 
3,532 

805 
3.548 



7. 
6. 
9. 



242 

636 

020 

13 498 

4,364 

5.719 

14,363 

4,860 
1,940 

13,785 



The lowe.st point of dry land in United States is in Death Valley, Cal. . 276 feet below sea level. 
Note.— The above table was prepared for The World Almaxac by the Topographic branch of the 
United States Geological Survey. It should be stated in connection" with this table that it presents 
only points whose heights are matters of record, and that in several cai^es in the high mountain region 
of the far West and the Pacific Slope it is well known that there are higher points within the State or 
Territory whose heights are not yet known with accuracv, and consequently cannot be given. 
This table was revised by the United States Geological Survey to October 1, 1912, 



72 



The Ancient and Modern Year. 



Simcatijcr JFla^s 

OF THE WEATHER BUREAU, U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

The Weather Bureau furnishes, when practicable, for the benefit of all interests dependent upon 
weather conditions, the "Forecasts" which are prepared daily at the Central Office in Washington, 
J) C. ,and certain designated stations. These forecasts are telegraphed to stations of the Weather 
Bureau, railway officials, postmasters, and many others, to be communicated to the public by 
telegraph, telephone and mail or by mearns of flags or steam whistles. The flags adopted for this pur- 
pose are five in number, and of the fonms and colors indicated below: 



No. 1. 

White Flag. 



EXPLANATION OF WEATHER FLAGS. 

No 2. No. 3. No. 4. No. 5. 

Blue Flag. White and Blue Flag. Black Triangular Flag. White Flag with 

black square in 
centre. 







Fair weather. 



Rain or snow. Local rain or snow. Temperature. 



Cold wave. 



When number 4 is placed above number 1, 2, or 3, it indicates warmer; when below, 
colder; when not displayed, the temperature is expected to remain about stationary. During 
tiie late Spring and early Fall the cold- wave flag is also used to indicate anticipated frosts. 

WHISTLE SIGNALS. 

A warning blast of from fifteen to twenty seconds' duration is sounded to attract atten- 
tion. After this warning the loiiger blasts (of from four to six seconds duration) refer to 
weather, and shorter blasts (of from one to three seconds duration) refer to temperature; those 
for weather are sounded first. 



Blasts, Indicate, 

One long Fair weather. 

Two long Raiu or snow. 

Three long Local rain or snow. 



Bla.sts. Indicate, 

One short .'.....Lower temperature. 

Two short Higher temperature. 

Three short Cold wave. 



By repeating each combination a few times, with intervals of ten seconds, liability to error 
in reading the signals may be avoided. 

As far as practicable the forecast messages are telegraphed at the expense of the 
Weather Bureau ; but if tliis is impracticable, they are furnished at the regular commercial 
rates and sent "collect." In no case are the forecasts sent to a second address in any 
place, except at the expense of the.applicant. 

Persons desiring to display the flags or sound the whistle signals for the benefit of the pub- 
lic should communicate with the Weather Bureau officials in charge of the central stations 
of their respective States, which are as follows : 



Alabama, Montgomery. 
Arizona, Phcenix. 
Arkansas, Little Rock. 
California, San Francisco 
Colorado, Denver. 
Florida, Jacksonville. 
Georgia. Atlanta. 
Idaho, Boise. 
Illinois, Springfield. 
Indiana, Indianapolis. 
Iowa, Dps Moines. 
Kansas, Topeka. 
Kentucky, Louisville. 
Louisiana, New Orleans. 
Maryland, Baltimore 
(for Delaware and Maryland). 



Massachusetts, Boston 

(for New England). 
Michigan, Grand Rapids. 
Minnesota, Minneapolis. 
Mississippi, Vicksburg. 
Missouri, Columbia. 
Montana. Helena. 
Nebraska. Lincoln. 
Nevada, Reno, 
New .Tersey, Atlantic City, 
New Mexico, Santa Fe, 
New York, Ithaca, 
North Carolina. Raleigh. 
North Dakota, Bismarck, 
Ohio, Columbus, 



Oklahoma, Oklahoma. 
Oregon, Portland. 
Pennsylvania, Philadelpliia, 
South Carolina, Columbia. 
South Dakota, Huron. 
Tennessee, Nashville. 
Texas, Houston. 
Utah, Salt Lake City. 
Virginia, Richmond. 
Washington, Seattle, 
West Virginia, Parkersburg. 
Wisconsin. Milwaukee. 
Wyoming, Cheyenne, 



W^t Ancient antr l^otrcrn ¥ear» 

Thk Athenians began the year in June, the Macedonians in September, the Romans first In March 
and afterward in .Ianuar.y, the Persians on August 11, the ancient Mexicans on February 23, the Mo- 
h.ammedans in July. The Chinese year, which begins early in February, is similar to the Moham- 
medan in having 12 months of 29 and 30 days alternately ; but in everj^ nineteen years there are seven 
years which have 13 months. This is not quite correct, and the Chinese have therefore formed a 
pycle of 60 years, in which period 22 intercalary months occur. 



Loss by Lightning in the United States. 



73 



<SmaU ^raCt, Storm autr JO^tttrtcant S^Iarnfufis 

OF THE WEATHER BUREAU, U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

All square flags shown here are red with black centre when displayed as warnings. 



Small craft, 

J2^ 



storm.. 




B 





la 



RED 



Hurricane. 





NW. winds. SW. winds. NE. winds. SE. winds. 

Small Craft Warning— A red pennant indicates that moderately strong winds are expected. 

Sfor)n Wariiing—A. red flag with a black centre indicates that a storm of marked violence is 
expected. 

The pennants displayed with the flags indicate the direction of the wind; white, westerly; 
red. easterly. The peuuaiu above the flag indicates that the wind is expected to blow from the 
northerly quadrants; below, from the southerly quadrants. 

By night a red light indicates easterly winds, and a white light below a red light westerly winds. 

Jiiirricdltie Waming— Two red flags with black centres, displayed one above the other, indicate the 
expected approach of a tropical hurricane, and also one of those extremely severe and dangerous 
storms which occasionally move across the Lakes and Northern Atlantic coast. 

Neither small craft nor hurricane warnings are displayed at uigbt. 



Urlocits oC mun^n in tfje WLwittti ^Uttn. 

Average hourly velocity of the wind at selected stations of the United States Weather Bureau, 
also the highest velocity ever reported for a period of five minutes. (Prepared by \V. L. Moore, Chief 
of the U. S. Weather Bureau, and revised to January 1, 1912, for The World Almaxac. ) 



Stations. 



Abilene, Texas 

Albany, N. Y 

Alpena, Mich 

Atlanta, Ga 

Bismarck, N. D 

Boise, Idaho 

Boston, Mass 

Buffalo, N.Y 

Charlotte, N.C 

Chattanooga, Tenn... 

Chicago, 111 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Custer, Mont.t 

Denver, Col 

Detroit, Mich 

Dodge City. Kan 

Dubuque, Iowa 

Duluth, Minn 

Eastport. jNle 



&,>>H- 


t^i 


vera 
lour 

eloc 




<-> 


S3 c; 
Mi. 


Mi. 


11 


66 


6 


70 


9 


72 


9 


66 


8 


74 


4 


55 


11 


72 


11 


90 


5 


55 


6 


60 


9 


84 


7 


59 


9 


73 


7 


72 


7 


75 


9 


76 


11 


75 


5 


60 


7 


78 


9 


78 



Stations. 



El Paso, Texas 

Fort Smith, Ark 

Galveston, Texas 

Havre, Mont 

Helena, Mont 

Huron, S. D 

.Jacksonville, Fla 

Keokuk, Iowa 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Leavenworth, Kan.t 

Louisville, Ky 

Lynchburg, Va 

Memphis, Tenn 

Montgomery, Ala 

Nashville, Tenn 

New Orleans. La 

New York City, N.Y. 
North Platte, Neb.... 

Omaha, Neb 

Palestine, Texas 






<'■'; 



Mi. 
5 
5 

10 

11 
6 

10 
6 
8 
5 
7 
7 
4 
6 
5 
6 
•7 
9 
9 
8 
8 



... "O 






Mi. 
78 
66 
*84 
76 
60 
69 
70 
60 
84 
66 
60 
50 
75 
54 
75 
68 
83 
96 
66 
60 



Stations. 



Philadelphia, Pa 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Portland, Me 

Red Bluff, Cal 

Rochester, N. Y 

St. Louis, Mo 

St. Paul, Minn 

St. Vincent, Minn.t-. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

San Diego, Cal 

San Francisco, Cal... 

Santa Fe, N. M 

Savannah, Oa 

Sijokane. Wash 

Toledo, Ohio 

Vicksburg, Miss 

Washington, D. C 

Wilmington, N. C 



i = ." 



Mi. 

10 
6 
5 
7 

11 

11 
7 
9 
5 
6 
9 
6 
7 
4 
9 
6 
5 
7 



Mi. ' 

75 

69 

61 

60 

78 

80 
102 

72 

66 

40 

60 

53 

88 

53 

72 

62 

66 

68 



♦Anemometer blew away, at a velocity of 84 miles per hour, Sepiember,1900. tStations discontinued 
STANDARD TABLE SHOWING VELOCITY AND FORCE OF WINDS. 



Dbscription. 



Perceptible 

Just perceptible . 

Gentle breeze 

Pleasant breeze.. 

Brisk wind 



Miles 

per 

Hour. 




Fe«t 

per 

Minute. 



88 

176 

264 

352 

440 

880 

1,320 

1,760 

2.200 



Feet 

per 

Second. 



1.47 

2.93 
4.4 
5.87 
7.33 
14.67 
22.0 
29.3 
36.6 



Force in 

lbs. per 

Square 

Foot. 



.005 

.0-0 

.044 

.079 

.123 

.492 

1.107 

1.968 

3. 075 



Dkscbiption. 



High wind. 



Very high wind. 

Storm. 

Great storm 



Hurricane . 



Miles 


Feet 


Feet 


per 


per 


per 


Hour. 


Minute. 


Second. 


r 30 

1 35 


2,640 


44.0 


3,080 


61.3 


/ 40 

1 45 


3,520 


58.6 


3,960 


66.0 


50 


4,400 


73. .3 


f 60 
1 70 


5,280 


88.0 


6,160 


102. 7 


/ 80 
t 100 


7,040 


117.3 


8.800 


146.6 



Force in 

lbs. per 

Square 

Foot. 

4. 428 

6. 027 

7. 872 
9.963 

12.300 
17.712 
24. 108 
31.488 
49.200 



ILouu "bs 3Ltflljtutn0 Ux tfje WiniUli ^tattn. 




fields, 4,251; value, $129,955. These are the latest available statistics. 

The Chronicle Fire Tables record 3,012 fires caused by lightning in the United States in 1902, the 
property loss occasioned thereby being $3,396,810. These are the latest reported statistics on the subject. 



74 



High-l^ide Tables. 



FOR GOVERNOR'S ISLAND (NEW YORK HARBOR). 

r ^Specially orepared from the Tide- Tables of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey for 

The World ALM:A>f ac. ) 

Eastern Standard Time. 



1913. 


January. 


February. 


Mai 


•nh. 


April. 


May. 


Ju 


ne. 


JJay ot 
Mo n til. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 


p. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 


P. M, 


A. M. 


p. M. 




H. M. 


H. U. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. if. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


1 


2 55 


3 17 


4 27 


5 22 


2 58 > 


4 3 


4 35 


5 30 


4 44 


5 14 


5 13 


5 37 


2 


3 52 


4 24 


5 21 


6 16 


4 5 


6 12 


5 25 


6 5 


6 30 


6 48 


6 55 


6 19 


3 


4 47 


5 27 


6 10 


7 2 


5 3 


6 3 


6 8 


6 35 


6 5 


6 '20 


6 35 


7 1 


4 


5 37 


6 22 


6 54 


7 40 


5 53 


6 42 


6 45 


7 2 


6 40 


6 52 


7 17 


7 43 


5 


6 23 


7 10 


7 35 


8 12 


6 37 


7 14 


7 16 


7 28 


7 10 


7 27 


8 2 


8 28 


6 


7 8 


7 53 


8 8 


8 40 


7 14 


7 40 


7 43 


7 58 


7 42 


8 3i 


8^8 


9 15 


7 


7 50 


8 33 


8 40 


9 4 


7 45 


8 5 


8 W) 


8 28 


8 15 


8 42 


9 40 


10 2 


8 


8 28 


9 7 


9 12 


9 32 


8 15 


8 30 


8 37 


9 3 


8 54 


9 23 


10 30 


10 52 


9 


9 5 


9 40 


9 40 


10 2 


8 40 


8 57 


9 10 


9 42 


9 38 


10 9 


11 27 


11 44 


10 


9 41 


10 13 


10 9 


10 38 


9 7 


9 28 


9 48 


10 2.) 


10 27 


11 




12 28 


11 


10 13 


10 45 


10 43 


11-21 


9 36 


10 5 


10 33 


11 13 


11 25 


11 55 


12 42 


1 31 


12 


10 48 


11 23 


11 22 




10 10 


10 48 


1125 






12 32 


1 45 


2 35 


13 


H 25 




12 10 


12 8 


10 51 


11 36 


12 8 


12 30 


12 58 


1 47 


2 50 


3 37 


14 


12 6 


12 5 


1 8 


1 5 


11 38 




1 15 


1 52 


2 8 


3 


3 57 


4 35 


15 


12 58 


12 52 


2 14 


2 15 


12 33 


12 39 


2 32 


3 20 


3 18 


4 5 


5 2 


5 30 


16 


1 55 


1 48 


3 25 


3 43 


i 40 


1 57 


3 46 


4 30 


4 25 


5 


6 3 


6 20 


17 


2 5 "> 


2 52 


4 32 


5 


2 58 


3 21 


4 50 


5 27 


5 23 


5 53 


6 58 


7 10 


18 


3 57 


4 5 


5 32 


6 4 


4 10 


4 40 


5 48 


6 18 


6 20 


6 42 


7 50 


7 57 


19 


4 53 


6 12 


6 26 


6 58 


5 13 


5 45 


6 40 


7 5 


7 10 


7 28 


8 38 


8 41 


20 


5 48 


6 13 


7 17 


7 48 


6 10 


6 40 


7 28 


7 50 


8 


8 13 


9 25 


9 25 


21 


6 41 


7 10 


8 5 


8 34 


7 


7 27 


8 15 


8 3:; 


8 49 


8 59 


10 9 


10 7 


22 


7 32 


8 1 


8 53 


9 20 


7 47 


8 13 


9 2 


9 19 


9 38 


9 43 


10 51 


10 48 


23 


8 20 


8 51 


9 40 


10 8 


8 33 


8 58 


9 48 


10 5 


10 25 


10 'J8 


11 30 


1128 


24 


9 10 


9 41 


10 27 


10 57 


9 18 


9 43 


10 38 


10 52 


11 15 


11 16 




12 10 


25 


10 


10 32 


11 16 


11 50 


10 5 


10 30 


11 32 


11 42 




12 8 


12 7 


12 50 


26 


10 50 


11 25 




12 12 


10 55 


11 20 




12 35 


12 4 


1 2 


12 45 


1 33 


27 


11 40 




12 47 


1 20 


11 50 




12 37 


1 45 


12 55 


1 54 


1 21 


2 20 


28 


12 21 


12 37 


1 50 


2 40 


12 13 


12 57 


1 43 


2 54 


1 50 


2 45 


2 10 


3 13 


29 


1 23 


1 42 





• • • • 


1 15 


3 2 


2 50 


3 53 


2 43 


3 31 


3 7 


4 6 


30 


2 2! 


2 58 


.... 





2 25 


3 40 


3 52 


4 38 


3 38 


4 13 


4 7 


4 57 


31 


3 27 


4 14 






3 34 


4 43 






4 27 


4 55 







1913. 


Ju 


y. 


August. 


September. 


October. 


November. 


December. 


Day of 
Month. 


A. M. 


p. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 


P. Ji. 


A. M. 


p. M. 


A. M. 


P. JI. 


A. M. 


p. M. 




H. M. 


11. ^f. 


H. M. 


H. Mf. 


K. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


K. Nf. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H.ll. 


1 


5 7 


5 47 


6 45 


7 10 


8 9 


8 30 


8 30 


8 55 


9 43 


10 20 


10 12 


11 


2 


6 5 


8 38 


7 30 


8 


8 57 


9 18 


9 20 


9 45 


10 35 


11 20 


11 1 


11 59 


3 


7 


7 28 


H 30 


8 50 


9 45 


10 6 


10 7 


10 37 


11 30 




11 57 




4 


7 52 


8 15 


9 20 


9 38 


10 35 


10 56 


11 


1135 


12 27 


3 2 29 


12 55 


12 51 


5 


8 43 


9 5 


10 


10 27 


11 25 


11 50 


11 55 




1 35 


1 :;3 


149 


1 49 


6 


9 34 


9 52 


10 58 


1115 




12 20 


12 41 


12 57 


2 38 


2 37 


2 40 


2 45 


7 


10 25 


10 41 


11 50 




12 50 


1 20 


1 56 


2 3 


3 33 


3 35 


3 25 


3 37 


8 


11 18 


11 32 


12 7 


12 45 


2 5 


2 25 


3 10 


3 10 


4 19 


4 27 


4 5 


4 23 


9 




12 12 


1 4 


1 40 


3 23 


3 32 


4 12 


4 10 


4 57 


5 12 


4 44 


5 1 


30 


12 25 


1 8 


2 10 


2 47 


4 22 


4 33 


5 2 


5 3 


5 30 


5 50 


5 21 


5 39 


11 


1 22 


2 9 


3 27 


3 50 


5 35 


5 28 


5 41 


6 47 


6 2 


6 22 


6 


6 13 


12 


2 25 


3 10 


4 42 


4 50 


6 16 


6 15 


6 15 


6 28 


6 33 


6 50 


6 40 


6 31 


13 


3 37 


4 10 


5 47 


5 48 


6 55 


6 59 


6 45 


7 


7 6 


7 18 


7 20 


7 32 


14 


4 48 


5 7 


6 40 


6 37 


7 26 


7 36 


7 12 


7 30 


7 40 


7 49 


8 2 


8 17 


35 


5 54 


6 9 


7 25 


7 20 


7 55 


8 7 


7 40 


7 57 


8 18 


8 27 


8 47 


9 5 


16 


6 51 


6 52 


8 1 


8 1 


8 21 


8 35 


8 10 


8 22 


9 


9 12 


9 33 


957 


17 


7 42 


7 4) 


8 35 


8 38 


8 50 


9 


•8 45 


8 52 


9 45 


10 1 


1022 


10 54 


18 


8 26 


8 23 


9 3 


9 11 


9 18 


9 26 


9 22 


9 30 


10 33 


10 59 


11 13 


11 55 


19 


9 5 


9 4 


9 32 


9 42 


953 


9 57 


10 5 


10 13 


11 29 






12 10 


20 


9 41 


9 41 


10 


10 8 


10 33 


30 38 


10 52 


11 5 


12 5 


12 30 


12 58 


1 12 


21 


10 15 


10 17 


iO 32 


10 35 


11 18 


11 22 


11 4 ) 




1 16 


1 37 


2 2 


2 17 


22 


10 46 


10 50 


11 10 


11 10 




12 11 


12 8 


12 48 


2 27 


2 45 


3 5 


3 25 


23 


11 18 


11 -0 


11 52 


11 50 


12 17 


1 10 


1 24 


1 58 


3 30 


3 49 


4 5 


4 30 


24 


11 53 


11 50 




12 42 


1 25 


2 20 


2 45 


3 10 


4 27 


4 48 


5 


5 30 


25 


.... 


3 2 35 


1 2 '40 


1 40 


2 50 


3 32 


3 52 


4 y.i 


5 20 


5 43 


5 52 


6 27 


26 


12 28 


1 23 


1 40 


2 47 


4 7 


4 37 


4 50 


5 11 


6 10 


6 37 


6 42 


7 19 


27 


1 15 


2 20 


2 54 


3 55 


5 12 


5 35 


5 42 


6 6 


6 5S 


7 -8 


7 30 


8 10 


28 


2 10 


3 20 


4 18 


4 50 


6 5 


6 28 


6 30 


6 55 


7 45 


8 20 


8 17 


8 59 


29 


3 17 


4 '22 


5 30 


5 57 


<; 55 


7 19 


7 18 


7 45 


8 35 


9 11 


9 2 


9 45 


30 


4 35 


5 22 


6 27 


6 50 


7 44 


8 7 


8 •; 


834 


9 21 


10 4 


9 48 


10 30 


81 


5 44 


6 18 


7 20 


7 42 


.... 




8 51 


9 25 






10 32 


11 15 



Vnlted States Steamboat Inspection Seridce. 



75 



H 1 ( T H- T I D K T AB LES— Contin itrd. 



TIME OF HIGH WATEE, AT POINTS OX THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
The local time of hisrli water at the following: places may be found approxinaately for each day by 
adding to or subtracting from the time of high water at Governor's Island, N. Y. , the hours and 
minnies annexed. 



Albany, N. Y add 

Annapolis, IMd add 

Atlantic City, N. J .......sub. 

Baltimore, Md add 

Har Harbor, Me add 

B?aufort, 8. C sub. 

BIoclc Island, K. I sub. 

Boston, Mass add 

Bridgeport, Ct add 

Bristol, R. I sub. 

Cape May, N. J add 

Charleston, S. C sub. 

Eastport, Me add 

Pernandina, Fla sub. 

Gloucester. Mass add 

Hell Gate PVirv, E:ist River, N. Y.add 

Isles of Shoals, N. II add 

.Jacksonville, Fla add 

Key West, Fla add 

League Island, Pa add 

IMarbleliead, Mass add 

Nahant, Mass add 

Nantucket, Mass add 

Newark. N. J add 

New Bedford, Mass sub. 

Newburyport, ISLa^s add 



H. 


M. 


9 


31 


8 


57 




20 


10 


52 


2 


46 




8 




34 


3 


22 


3 


2 




14 




10 




42 


O 







18 


2 


55 


1 


53 


3 


11 




37 


1 


24 


5 


23 


3 


2 


3 


2 


4 


21 




54 




10 


3 


16 



New Haven, Ct 

New London, Ct_ 

Newport, R. I 

Norfolk, Va 

Norwich, Ct 

Old Point Comfort, Va 

Philadelphia. Pa 

Plymouth, Mass 

Point Lookout, Md '. 

Portland, Me 

Portsmouth, N. II 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y 

Providence, R. I 

Richmond, Va 

Rockaway Inlet, N. Y 

Rockland, Me 

Rockport, Mass 

Salem, Mass 

Sandy Hook, N. J 

Savannah, (la 

Southport (Smithville), N. C. 

Vineyard Haven, Mass 

Washington, D. C 

Watch Hill, R. I 

West Point, N. Y 

Wilmington, N. C 



..add 

..add 

,.sub, 

..add 

..add 

..add 

..add 

..add 

..add 

..add 

..add 

...add 

...add 

..add 

.sub. 

..add 

...add 

...add 

.sub. 

...add 

, sub. 

..add 

...add 

...add 

...add 

...add 



H. 
3 

1 



M. 

1 
22 
22 
58 


39 
41 
12 



3 10 
3 J() 
3 5l 



8 48 



3 

2 
3 



3 
12 

2 
1 



1 
50 

9 
32 

7 
43 
36 

1 
42 
47 





E.VAMPLE— To lind the approximate time of high tide at Atlantic City, N. .1. 
first the time of hie-li water at New Y^ork under the desired date, and then subtract 
the above table ; the result is the time of high water required. 



on any day, find 
20 minutes, as in 



AVERAGE RISE AND FALL OF TIDE. 



Places. 



Baltimore, i^'ld... 
Boston, Mass. ... 
Charleston, S.C.. 

Eastport, Me 

Galveston, Tex. 
Key West, Fla... 
Mobile, Ala 



Feet. 


Inches. 


1 


3 


9 


8 


5 


1 


18 


2 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 



Places. 



New London, Ct 

New Orleans, La 

Newport, R. I 

New York, N.Y 

Old Point Comf't,Va 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Portland, Me 



Feet. 


Inches. 


3 


9 


None 


None 


9 


8 


4 


4 


2 


5 


6 





9 


1 



Places. 



San Diego, Cal 

Sandy Hook, N. J.. 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Savannah, Ga 

Seattle, Wash 

Tampa. PTa 

Washington, I). C... 



Feet. 



3 

4 
4 
6 
12 
2 
> 2 



Inches. 



7 
7 
9 
5 
2 
2 
9 



Highest tide at Eastport, Me. , 218 inches. Lowest tide at Galveston, Tex., 13 inches. 

S^nttctr estates .Stcamtsoat inspection <Scrbice* 

The Steamboat Inspection Service, by act of Congress approved February 14, 1903, was trans- 
ferred from the Treasurv Department to the Department of Commerce and Labor. The transfer 
went into effect July 1, 1903. The Supervising Inspector-General of the Steamboat Inspection Ser- 
vice, George Uhler, reported to the Secretary of Commerce and Labor for the fiscal year ended June 
30,1912: Numberof annual certificates of inspection issued to domestic steam, motor, sail vesse.'s, 
and barges, 7,398; number of.certificates issued to foreign steamers, 438; total number of annual cer- 
tificates of inspection issued to domestic and foreign, 7,836. Decrease in number of certificatts to 
domestic ves.sels from previous vear, 469; decrease in number of certificates to foreign vessels from 
previous vear, 30, decrease in number of certificates of till kinds of vessels from previous year, 499. 
Grosstonnageof domestic vessels, all kinds, inspected, 5,370.375; gross tonnage of foreign steamers 
Inspected, 3.384,905. Increase in gross tonnage of foreign steam vessels inspected over previous 
year, 54,638. Increase in tonnage of all kinds domestic vessels Inspected over previous year, 
205,656. Number of officers' licenses issued, 14.030. Increase in number of ofticers' liceusf s 
issued over previous year, 24. Number of new life-preservers lnspected,244, 565, of which number 
2,750 were rejected. Increase in number of new life-preservers inspected over previous year, 34, 306. 
Increa.se in number of life-preservers rejected over previous year, 2,020. Number of marine 
boiler plates inspected at the mills by assistant inspectors, 3.786, being a decrease in number inspect- 
ed from previous year of 130. Nuniber of applicants examined for color blindness, 7,616, of which 
number 206 were found color-blind and rejected and 7,410 were passed. Increase in number of 
applicants examined over previous year, 6,299. Increase in number of applicants passed over 
previous year, 6,123. 



Causes. 



Fire 

Collision 

Explosions or accidental 
cape of steam 



es- 



Accidents. 


LivesLost. 


Causes. 


Accidents. 


Lives Lost. 


3 
17 


4 
31 

14 


Snags, wrecks, and sinking 

Accidental drowning 


11 

• • 


32 
139 




Miscellaneous 


44 


8 


Total 




39 


264 



Decreaseinuumber of accidents from previous year, 9. Decrease In nuniber of lives lost from 
previous year, 128. During the vear 307,092,494 passengers were carried on ves.sels that are re- 
quired by law to report the numberof })asspngers carried. Taking the total loss of life as 264, it is 
seen that 1 165,501 passengers were carried for each life lost, whether of passengers or crew, and 
from all causes^ 



76 



A Table of Principal American Rivers. 



^ ^TaljU of 33riuctpal ^mtrCcan Btberis* 




Jiinciion of Coosa and Talapoosa, Ala 

Allegany Co., N. Y 

Umbagoj Luke, Maine 

JuDctiou of Chattahooctiee and Flint R., Ga 

Uocky Mcun tains, Col 

Adirondack Lakirs, 'S. Y '........ 

Formed by Locost and Mulberry Forks, Ala 

HigtUaiids, 'Icsas 

JuDclioa of Hsvr and Deep Rivers, N. C 

AUeghatiy Mountains, Oa 

Molt and Msberin. N. C 

Llano Esiacado, Ter " 

Junction ot Greeo and Grand Rivers, Utah 

L«wi8 soaClark'sl'O'k 

Connt'cticui Lake, Vi. 

Junction ol Oosienaula and Etowah Rivers, Ga 

Junction of Foo' and Siraigbt Forks, Ky 

Catskill Mountains, N. Y 

Lake Sbetek, Minn 

Alleghany Mountains, Ga 

Allegany County. N. Y 

Sierra Msdre Mountains, K. M '. •••••• 

Soutbsru Iowa 

Hignihnds, Mich . • • • 

Yadkin River, N. C. 

Cumberland Mountains Ky 

Taghanic MoautniLs, Mass ~. 

Lake Santord. Aduondaok Mountains, N. Y ... 

Des Plaines Rifer, Wis. . . 

Jackson and Pastur Rivers, Va 

Highlands, Mich 

JoDctioo of Greenbrier and New Rivers, Va 

Smoky Hill River, Kan 

Grand Prairlf, III 

.Moosthead L<ik«t, iMe 

Forks Cumberland Mountains, Ky 

Rocky Mountains, Ote 

J unci I oil Brule and Mequacamtcum Rivers, Wis 

White Mountains, N. H ... 

Eastern Dakota 

liases Lake, MiOD 

Rocty MouDtslns, junction of Jefiferson, Madison, Gallatin Rivers, Mont. 

Junction ot Tom big bee and Ai.i. R., Ala 

Oneida County, N Y 

Rich Mouatains, W. Va 

JoDcticn ot Swett Water and North Fork, Wyo 

Highlands. W-s 

TabltfUnds, N. C 

Alleghany Mountains, Ga 

Junction of AllegDany and Monongahela, Pa 

OsagfcCouDty, Kan 

East Seboeis Lake, Me 

Alleghany Mountains, Hd 

LIhoo Esiacado, Tex 

Pin« Lak*, Minn 

Rocky Mountalos, Col 

Dan and Staunton, V» 

KosDUonong Laki, Wis 

HigtUancu, Trx 

Sacramento.... I Junction ot Norm and South Forks, Sierra Madre Mountains, Gal 

Sigiiiaw {Highlands, Mien 

8l Cioix |Oi toi.aeoo Rulga, Wis 

St.Fiancts 

8t Jolin 

St Joseph 

San Joaqulo.. . . 

Saotee 

Savannah 

Scioio 

Sasqocbanna .. . 



Alabama 

Alleghany. .. . 
Androscoggin. , 
Appalacbicola. 

Arkansas 

Black 

Black Warrior 
Brazos. ...... 

Cap? Fear .... 

Chattahoochee. 

Chowan 

Colorado 

Colorado 

Columbia 

Conneciicut 

Coosa , . , . ■ 

Cumberland 

Delaw.ire 

Des Moines 

Flint 

Genesee 

Gil* 

Grand ". 

Grand 

Gieat Pedee 

Green 

Housntonic ......... 

Hudsoo 

Illinois 

JsnicB 

Kalamazoo 

KsnawQa 

Kansas 

Kaskaskla 

Kennebec 

K«aiucl;y 

Lewis's Fork 

Menominee 

Mcrrlmac 

Minnesots 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Mobile 

Mohuwk . ........ 

Monoogabeta 

Nebraska 

Neenab 

Neuse 

Ocmulgee 

Ohio /r. 

Osage 

P-nobscot 

Poiomac 

R»d 

Red (of the North).. 

Rio Grande 

Roanoke 

Rock 

Ssbine 



Tallapoosa . 
Tenmsse" . . . 
Tom big bee .. 

Triony 

"Wabash 

Wasbila.. ,, 
White 

Willam'tie . 
WiscoiiSin.. 

Y»iOo 

Yellowstone. 
Xukoo 



Higblands Mo 

Evergladrs. Fla 

Higulaods. lud 

Sierra Nevad.i Mountains, Cal 

Junction ot Waieree «ad Congaree, N.C 

All>-ghaay Mountains, S.C 

Tabl'-lands, O 

E. Brancb. Otseeo Lake, N. Y 

W. Brancb, Allegany .Mountains, N. Y. , 

Mam, .luDc lion of East and West 

Branches, Fa 

Allephauy Mountains, Ga 

N.C 

■• Miss 

Highlands, Tex 

Tablelands, O 

Poiean Hills, Ark 

Boston Mountains, Ark .. . . 

Cascade, Ore 

Ontonagon Ridge, Wis 

Junction ot Coldwat'-r and TalUbatcbee Rivers, Miss. 

National Part, Yellowstone Lake , 

Eaetern Alaska , 



Mobile Ki 

ObioRiyer 

Atlantic Ocean 

Gult of Mexico 

Mlssissipjn Rieer . . . 

Lake Ontario , 

lombigoee River 

Gult of Mexico 

Atlantic Ocean 

Appaiachlcoia River 
Albfmaile Sound.. .. 

Gult of Mexico 

Gult of California. . 

PaciSo Ocean 

Long Island Sound. . 

Alibatna River 

Ohio RlVir . ' 

DeU'vare Bay ... . 
Mississippi liifrr. . 
App.ilachicoia liiver 
Lake Ontario. . . 

Colorado River 

Missouri River 

Lake Michigan 

Atlao .10 Oceaa . . . 

Oblo River 

Long Island Sound. 
New YarkB.iV. .. . 
Mississippi River... 
Chesapsake Bay. . . . 

Lake Micnigau 

Ohio River 

Missouri Risrr 

Mississippi Riv-r... 

Atlantic Uceau 

Ohio River. . ... 
Commbia River.... 

Green B«y 

Atlaniic Ocean ... . 

Mississippi River 

Gulf of Mexico 

Mississippilti ver... 

Gulf of Mexico 

Hudson River 

Ohio River.. ............ 

Missou ri River 

Green Bay 

Pamlico Bound 

Altamaha River 

Mississippi River 

Missouri River 

Atlantic Oceso 

Chesapeake Bsy 

Mississi ppi Ri ver 

Winnipeg Lake.... 

Gulf of Mexico 

Albemarle Soond 

Mississippi River 

Gult of Mexico. ... 

Bay of Sao Francisco... , 

Lake Hnroa 

Mississippi River 

Mississippi River 

Atlantic Ocean. , 

Lak< Michigan. . . 

Bay of San Francisco 

Atlantic Ocean 

Atlantic Ocean 

Onio River 

25b 
Susquehanna River... ?08 
COe=apeal£e Bay 153 



Alabama River .. 

Ohio River 

Mobile River 

Gulf of Mexico ... 

OhloRlVfr 

Red River. ... ... 

Arkansas River.. . 
Columbia Riv-r .. 
Mississippi Rivar. 
Mississippi Rirer . 
Missouri Riv*r. .. . 

Behrica Bav.„... 



Opening and Closing of Kamgation. 



77 



<!^pcuinfl auTr (tX^niw^ of Kaijtfiatfou 

ON THE HUDSON RIVER AND THE ERIE CAI^AL, AND OPENING OF LAKE ERIE 

NAVIGATION. 



Navioatios of thk Huoson Rivkb. 



River Open. 



Feb. 8, 
April 1, 
Mar. 15, 
Mar. 15, 
Mar. 25, 
Mar. 21, 
Feb. 29, 
M.ir. 25, 
April 4, 
Mar. 27, 
Mar. 19, 
Mar. 25, 
Feb. 26, 
M.ir. 24, 
Feb. 4, 
April 13, 
Mar. 18, 
Feb. 24, 
Mar. 18, 
April 7, 
Mar. 22, 
M.ir. 19, 
Mar. 10. 
Feb. 25, 
Mar. •-■8, 
Mar. 23, 
Mar. 17, 
M.ir. 27, 
April 11, 
Feb, 27, 
M.<ir. 20, 
Mar. 13, 
Mar. 6, 
M.ir. 5, 
April 4, 
April 3, 
Mar. 11, 
M.ir. 22, 
Mar. 20, 
Mar. is. 
Mar. 24, 
April .=i, 
M.ar. 31, 
Mar. 12, 
April 7, 
April 16, 
Mar. 19, 
April 13, 
April 1, 
Mar. 30, 
Mar. 14, 
April 4, 
Mar. 5, 
Mar. 21, 
Mar. 8, 
Mar. 29, 
M.ir. 25, 
April 7, 
Mar. 30, 
April 9, 
April 8, 
Mar. 19, 
Open all 
Mar. 22. 
April 1, 
April 1, 
Mar. 18, 
April 2, 
April 17, 
April 29, 
Mar. 14, 
Mar. 29, 
April 9, 
Mar. 28, 
Mar. 17, 
Mar. 14, 
April 4, 
April 8, 
Mnr. 22, 
Mar. 29, 
M-ir. 23, 
Mar. 15, 
Mar. 17, 
Mar. 22, 
Mar. S6, 



1S28.... 
1829.... 
1830..,, 
1831.... 
1832.... 
1836.... 
1834.... 
1835.... 
l-<36.... 
18:;7.... 
1838.... 
1839.... 
1?40.... 
1^41.... 
1842.... 
1843.... 
1844.... 
1^45.... 
1846.... 
1S47.... 
1848.... 
1849.... 
lt<50.... 
]8.>1.... 
1852.... 
1853.... 
185J.... 

1855 

1856 

1857.... 
ls-58.... 
1859.... 
I860.... 
1861.... 
IS'-.a.... 
1863.... 
1864.... 

1865 

1866.... 
1867.... 
1868.... 
1869.... 
1870.... 
1871.... 
1872.... 
187.1.... 
1874.... 

1875 

1876.... 
1877.... 
1878.... 
1879.... 
1880.... 
1881.... 

1682 

1883.... 

1884 

1885.... 
1886.... 
1887...; 
1888.... 

18S9 

Wiuter. 
1891.... 
1892.... 
1893..., 
1894.... 
1895.... 
1896.... 

1897 

1898.... 
1S99 ... 
1900.... 
1901.... 
1902.... 
1903.... 
1904.... 
1905.... 

I!i05 

1907.... 

1908 

1909.... 
1910.... 
1811.... 
1912 



River Closed. 



Dec. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 



23, 
14, 
25, 
6, 
21, 
13, 

15. 



Nov. 30, 

Dec. 7, 

Dec. 14, 

Nov. 25, 

Not. 18, 
Nov. 
Nov. 



Nov. 
D.c. 



5, 
19, 

28, 
10, 



Dec. 17, 
Dec. 3, 



Dec. 

D.T. 



14, 
25, 



Dec. 27, 
Dec. 26, 
Dec. 17, 



Dec. 
Dec. 
De.'. 
Dec. 



14, 

23, 

21, 

8, 



Dec. 20, 

Dec. 14, 

D c. 27, 

De-. 17, 

IVc. 10, 

Dec. 14, 

D c. 2-3, 

Dec. 19, 

Dec. 11, 

Dec. 12, 

Dec. 16, 

D e. 15, 



D;>c. 
Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 



8, 

5, 

9, 

17, 



Nov. 29, 
Dec. 9, 



Nov. 
Dec. 
Nov. 
Dec. 



22, 

12, 

29, 

2, 



Dec. 31, 

Dec. 20, 

Dec. 20, 

Nov. 25, 



Jan. 
Dec. 
Dec. 



2, 

4, 

15, 



Dec. 19, 

D c. 13, 

Dec. 3, 

Dec. 20, 

Dec. 14, 
Open all 

Dec. 3, 

Dec. 24, 

Dec. 22, 
Dec. 
Dec. 

D-:C. 

Dec. 
Dec. 



6. 
24, 

9, 
10, 

7, 

D.c. 12, 
Dec. £8, 



Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 



H, 
1, 
8, 
2. 
4. 



Dec. 15. 
Dec. 5, 



Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
D c. 
Jan. 



6, 

18, 

9, 
3, 



1828..., 

1830 ... 
1830. . . , 

1831 .., 
1832.... 
1833.... 
1834. . . , 
1835.... 
1836.... 
1837.... 
1S38.... 
1839.... 

1841 ... 

1842. . , . 

1-^43..,. 

1844.... 

1845.... 

1846.... 

1S47.... 

1848 ... 

kM9... 

1850.... 

1851.... 

1852.... 

1S.53.... 

1^54.... 

1855 

18.->6.... 

1857 ... 

1858.... 

185.1 , . 

1860... 

18S1 ... 

1862... 

1853.... 

1864.... 

1855.... 

18r.6.... 

1867.... 

1858.... 

1869.... 

1870.... 

1871. .. 

1872. .. 
1873.... 
1874.,.. 

1S75 

1876.... 
1877.... 
1878.... 
1879.... 
ISSO.... 
1882.... 
1882.... 
1883.... 
1884..., 
1885. . . . 
1885.... 
1887. . . . 
U88.... 
Winter.. 

ISOO .,, 
1891..,. 
1892..., 
1893..., 
1894..,. 
1895.... 

1396 

1897..., 

1898 

1899.... 
19''0. ... 
1901..,. 
1902..,. 
1905.... 
1904.... 
19 5.... 
1906.... 
1907.... 
1908.... 
19(19.... 
1910.. . 
1912.... 



Days 
Open. 



220 
286 
283 
262 
289 
277 
291 
268 
244 
261 
257 
286 
2S5 
286 
308 
242 
278 
•-'8:5 
275 
'J63 
292 
286 
282 
293 
270 
274 
266 
•268 
248 
303 
273 
273 
283 
294 
259 
252 
277 
270 
270 
257 
252 
248 
261 
253 
247 
221 
269 
229 
245 
277 
282 
261 
■365 
287 
272 
261 
2o9 
250 
•248 
256 
251 
286 
837 
277 
266 
250 
282 
252 
246 
223 
274 
•375 
246 
248 
266 
263 
244 
257 
260 
253 
271 
283 
268 
288 



Navigation- of thk Erik Canal. 



Canal Open. 



M.tr. 

M.ny 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

Ai.ril 

April 

April 

Apvil 

At.ril 

April 

.April 

May 

April 

April 

April 

May 

M.iv 

M.iy 

April 

April 

April 

April 

May 

Sl.iy 

M.ny 

May 

April 

Av>ril 

April 

May 

May 

Jlay 

April 

May 

May 

Jlay 

May 

May 

May 

April 

Mav 

Jlav 

May 

Jlay 

M.ay 

May 

April 

May 

April 

May 

April 

May 

May 

May 

May 

M.iy 

Mav 

M.ay 

April 

Mav 

Stay 

Jlay 

May 

May 

Miy 

May 

May 

April 

April 

May 

April 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

M.ay 



27, 1828... 

2, 1829... 
30, 1830... 

16, 1831... 
i'5, 1832... 

19, 1833.. . 

17, 1834... 
15, 1835... 
•J5, 1836... 

20, 1837... 
11, 1838... 
20, 1839... 
2(1, 1840... 

24, 1841... 
20, 1842... 

1, 1843... 

18, 1844... 

15, 1845... 

16, 1846... 
1, 1847... 
1, J848... 
1, 1849.. 

22, 1S50... 
15, 1851... 
20, 1852. . 
20, 1853... 

1, 1S54... 

1, 1855... 

6, 1855 ... 

6, 1857... 

28, 1858... 
15, 1-59... 

25, I860..., 
1, 1861... 
1, 18o2 .., 
1, 1863,.., 

30, 1864... 
1, 1865..., 
1, 1866..,, 
6, 1867... 

4, 1868..., 

6, 1879..., 

10, 1870... 
2-1, 1871, . 
13, 1872... 
15, 1873..., 

5, 1874... 
18, 1875..., 

4, 1876..., 
8, 1S77,.. 

15, 1878.... 
8, 1879..., 

16, 1880..., 
I--', 1881..,, 

11, 1882..,, 

7, 1883..,, 

6, 1884..,, 
11, 1885..., 

1, 1886..., 

7, 1887 ... 
10, 1888,.., 

1, 1839.... 
28, 1890.... 

6, 1891.... 
1, 1892.... 

3, 1893.... 
1, 18:14..,. 

3, 1895.... 

1, 1896.... 

8, 1897.... 

7, 1898.... 

26, 1899 ... 
25, 1900.... 

7, 19C1..., 
24, 1902 

2, 1903.... 

5, 1904.... 

4, lyo5 

2, 1906.... 
1, 1907.... 

5, 1908.... 
15, 1909 ... 
15, 1910.... 
15, 1911.... 
1.5, 1912.... 



Canal Closed, 



Dec. 
Dec. 


20 

17 


Dec. 


17 


Dec. 


1 


Dec. 


21 


Dec. 


12 


Dec. 
Nov. 


12 

30 


Nov. 


26 


Dec. 


9 


Nov. 


25 


Dec. 


16 


Dec. 


9 


Nov. 


30 


Nov. 


28 


Nov. 


30 


Nov. 

Nov. 


26 

29 


Nov. 
Nov. 


25 

30 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


6... 


Dec. 
Dec. 


11 

5 


Dec. 


16 


Dec. 


20 


Dec. 


8 


Dec. 


10 


D>c. 


4 


Dec. 


15 


Dec. 
Dec. 


8 

12 


Dec. 


12 


Dec. 
Dec. 


10 

10 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


8 


Dec. 


12 


Dec. 


12 


Dec. 


20 


Dec. 


7 


Dec. 


10 


Dec. 


8 


Dec. 


1 


Dec. 


1 


Dec. 


6 


Dec. 

Nov. 
Dec. 


6 

30 (by Ice).. 


Dec. 


7 


Dec. 


7 


Dec. 
Nov. 
Dec, 


6 

21 (by ice).. 
8 


Dec. 


7 


Deo. 


1 


Dec, 


1 


Dec. 


1 


Dec. 


1 


Dec. 


1 


Dec. 


3 


Nov. 


30 


Nov. 


80 


Dec. 


5 


Dec. 


5 


Nov. 


30 


Nov. 
Dec. 


30 ,. 

5 


Dec. 


1 


Dec. 


1 


Dec. 


10 


Dec. 


1 


Dec. 


1 


Nov. 


30 


Dec. 


4 


Nov. 


28 


Nov. 


26 


Nov. 


28 '. 


Nov. 


28 


Dec. 


10 


Nov. 


30 


Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 


15 

15 

15 



Navigable 
D.ivs. 



269 
230 
242 
230 
241 
238 
240 
230 
216 
234 
228 
241 
228 
221 
222 
214 
222 
228 
234 
214 
223 
219 
234 
235 
239 
245 
217 
224 
214 
223 
225 
242 
232 
224 
2'34 
223 
223 
226 
226 
229 
217 
218 
213 
220 
202 
205 
215 
197 
211 
214 
237 
212 
220 
211 
241 
208 
209 
205 
214 
203 
207 
214 
216 
215 
219 
212 
214 
216 
214 
208 
218 
219 
220 
207 
S24 
210 
205 
209 
211 
224 
210 
185 
185 
186 



Opening of Lake 
Erie.* 



April 

Mav 

May 

May 

April 

April 

April 

May 

April 

May 

March 

April 

April 

April 

March 

May 

March 

April 

April 

April 

April 

March 

March 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

May 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

Mav , 

April 

April 

Mav 

April 

April 

May 

May 

April 

March 

April 

March 

May 

March 

May 

April 

May 

April 

April 

April 

April 

March 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

March 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

May 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 



1, 1828 
10, 1829 

6, 1830 

8, 1831 
27. 18.;2 
23, 1833 

6. 1834 
3. 1835 

27, 18:56 

10, 1837 
31, 1838 

11, 1839 
27, 1840 
14, 1841 

7, 1842 

6, 1843 
14, 1844 

3, 1845 

11, 1846 

23, 1847 

9, 1818 
25, 1849 

25, 1850 

2, 1851 

20, 1852 

14, 1853 
29, 18.=i4 

21, 1855 

2, 1856 

27, 1857 

15, 1858 

7, 1859 

17, 18'0 
13, 1861 

15, 1862 

3, 1863 

13, 1864 

26, 1865 

28, l!>66 

21, 1867 
19, 1868 

1, 1869 

16, 1870 
1, 1871 
6, 1872 

29, 1873 

18, 1874 

12, 1875 

4, 1876 

17, 1877 

24, 1978 

24, 1879 

19, 1H80 

1, 1881 
26, 1882 , 

4, 1883 
26, 1884 

2, 1885 

26, 1886 
17, 1887 
10, 1883 
10, 1889 
31. 1890 
1,5, 1891 

14, 1892 

15, 1893 
28, 1894 

4, 1>95 

19, 1896 
6, 1>97 

25, 1898 

27, 1899 

22, 1900 

20, 1901 
9, 1902 
6, 1903 

10, 1904 
22, 1905 
15, 191.6 
6, 1907 
25, 1908 
22, 1909 
15. 1910 
15, 1911 
S8, 1913 



* At BoSalo. The record in the above table is kept by the State Superintendent of Public Works. 



78 



Seed Planting in the United States. 



<Srrt» l^Iantiurj in tjje sanitctr states. 

(Compiled from reports of the Department of Agriculture.) 
NEW ENGLAND. 



Kind of Crop. 

Corn 

Wbeat 

Oais . 

Barley 

Rye 

Buckwheat 

White Deans... 

Potatoes 

Turnips 

Mang'els.. . . 

Tooacco 

Hay 



Date of Planting. 



May 10 to 30. . . 
l<all or Spring ... 

Apr. to May 

A pi. to June 20. .. 
Apr. to May, Sept. 

Janel to 20 

May to June 

Apr. lb to May 1. 
July 1 to Aug. 3. . 
Apr. 15 lo May 5.. 
Seed bed Apr 



Bfst Soil. 



Amouot ot 

Mao are 

per Acre. 



Sandy or clay loam.. 

Clay loam 

Strong oam 

Stioug loam 

Medium loam 

Light loam 

Sandy loam 

Rich loam 

Sandy- loam 

Strong ueavyloam.. 
Sanay loam." — 



8 to 12 tons .. 
IHions 

6 to 8 tons 

7 lo 8 tons. .. 

7 io8 ions 

4 to 6 tons. ... 

7 to 8 tons.... 
15 to 20 tons. 
10 tons 

8 to lo tons... 
8 to 12 tons... 



Amouot ot 
Sfrd per 
Acre (1 ). 



8 to 12 qts. .. 
2 DUsh . . . 

2 lo 3 Dush. . 
2 lo 3 bush.. . 
5 to 6 pecks. 
1 to 1% bush. 
8 to 16 qis.... 
8 to 20bu.sh.. 

lib 

4 to 6 lbs 



Weeks 
to Ma- 
t'lrllv. 

T4T7 

20 

11 15 
10 15 

40 

10 16 

8 14 

12 20 
10 

17 22 
9-12 



MIDDLE STATES. 



Corn 

Wheat 

Barley 

Rye 

Buckwheat. ... 
White neans. 

Potatoes 

Sweet potatoes. 

Cabbage ...* 

Turnips 

Mangels 

Flax 

Tobacco 

Hay, timothy., 
Hay. clover 



Apr. 20 to May 30 
Sept. 20 to Oct. 20 

Mar. to May 

Max. to May 

Sept. 1 10 Oct. 1. .. 

June to July 

May to J une 

Mar. to May 

May to June 

Mar. to July 

Jury 

MaV 

May... 

Seed bed Mar 

Aug. to Oct 

Feb. to Apr 



Medium loam 

Loam 

Moist Clay Icam 

Clay 10am 

Saud or gravel loam 

Loam... 

Sandy loam 

Loam 

Sandy loam.- 

Clay or sandy loam. . 

Loam 

Loam 

Limestone loaoJ 

Sandy loam 

Clay loam 

Clav loam 



8 tol2 tons manure. 
8 tons; oOOlbs. ter., 
8 tons; 300 lbs. ter. 
8 tons; 300lbs.ler.. 
8 tons; 300 lbs. ter. . 
5 tons. •.....•.•.• 

8 tons 

10 lo 18 tons 



300 to600ibs.fer. 
r6Vo'2b'iou.s'."!!..,! 
Commercial fer. '. . 



6 to 8 Qts 

2 Dush 

2 10 2>6 bush.. 
2 to2}i bush.. 

\% bush 

>6 to 1>6 DUSh 

lit bush 

8 to 15 oush... 
10 to 12 bush. 

4 to8oz. 

2 to 5 lbs 

10 to 15 ijush. 
20 qts 



6 to 8 qts ... 
6 qts 



16 18 
41 43 
16 17 
13 16 
40-43 

8-10 
13 14 
14-22 
10 15 

8-15 
10 12 
15 18 

8 10 
15 20 



CEiNTRAL AND WESTERN STATES. 



Corn lApr.l to June 1... 

Wheal I Fall or Spring. .. 

Oais Apr. 1 to May 1. . 

Barley i Fall or Spring (1). 

Rye Sept 1 to 30 

Buck w neat.. 
White beans, 

Potatoes , 

Turnips , 

Mangels 

¥lax 

Tobacco 

Hay 



June 

May 10 to June 10. 
Mar. 15 to .Inne 1 . 
July 15 to Aug. 30. 
Apr. 1 to Afav 15 . 
Mar 15 to May 15. 

Seed bed, Mar. 

Apr. to May 



Black or .-iaudy loam. 

Strong loam 

Clay loam 

Clay loam 

Light loam 

Clay loam 

Clay loam 

Sandy loam 

Loam or muck 



5 to 10 tons. 

8 tons 

8 tons 

8 tons 

8 ions 

5 tonsr 

8 ton.s 

5 to 10 tons. 

8 to 10 tons. 

Sandy loam 8 to 12 tons 

Loam 

Sandy toana 

Clay loam 



10 to lt> ions... 

8 to 10 tons 

10ton.s 



6 qts 

2 busu 

2 to 3 bush .. 

2 oush 

1 to 2 bush 

1 to 2 bush 
i><jbiisb 

5 to 10 bu=h.. 

1 to 6 I OS 

6 t08lDS 

2 to 3 pecks.. 
Oz. to 6 sq. rd. 
8 to 15 lbs... . 



SOUTHERN STATES. 



Cotton .. 

Corn .. 

Wheat. - 

Oats 

Barley 

Rye 

White beans ... 

Cabbage 

Waiermeloiis... 

Onions 

Potatoes 

Sweet potatoes. 

Pumpkins 

Tomatoes 

Turnips 

Tobacco 

Cosy peas.... luiav 1 to Jul v 15. 



Feb. to May 15 . . 

Feb. to June 

■Sept. to Nos' 

Feb., May, Sept, . 

Apr. lo i\iay 

Sept. 10 Oct 

Mar to May 

Oct. Mar. to May. 
Mar. 1 10 Mav lO . 
Feb. 1 10 Apr. 10.. 
Jan. Feb. to Apr. 

May 10 June 

Apr. 1 to May 1. . 
lan.l LO Feb. 19.. 
Feb , Aug . Apr.. 
Seed bed. Mar 



Sandy loam(2) 

Rich loam 

Clay loam (2). 

Clay loam (2) 

Clay loam (2) 

Clay loam (2) 

Light joam 

Light loam 

Rich, light loam.. 
Loam or mucir . . . 
Light loose loam.. 

Sandy loam 

Rich, hgnt loam.. 
Rich, sandy loam , 
Rich, ligbt loam.. 

Sandy loam 

Sandy loam 



10 bush. cot. seed. . 

8 tons 

8 to 10 tons 

8 lolO tons 

10 tons 

8 tons 

6 to 10 tons 

5 tons; SOOlbs.ler. 



8 to 12 tons. 



8 to 15 tons 

200 to 300 lbs. pho5 



1 to 3 bush. .. 
Sqt.s 

2 bush 

2>6 bu.*h.. 

2Hbiish 

lit bu.sh 

1 to 2 bush. .. 
a loi^ lbs 

2 to 7 lbs 



8 to 10 bush.. 
10 to 12 bush. 

4 to 7 lbs 

4 10 9 oz 

2 toGlbs 

oz. to6sq. rd. 
2 to 5 pecks.. 



16-20 
40 42 
12-14 
11 13 
35 40 
10 12 
12 
10 20 
10 16 
22 24 
15-20 
15-18 



20-30 

18 20 

43 

17 

17 

43 

7-8 

14 

16-20 

16-24 

11 15 

12-15 

17 20 
14-20 

8-12 

18 20 
6 8 



(1) The standard varieties ot seed planted in the several sections of the United States are as fol- 
lows- corn-New Fngland, leaming, santord, flint; Middle States.leammg, white dent,yellow dent; 
central and westeru steles, learning, sanford. flint, white dent: Southern States, hickory king. goard- 
I^M.V^^.^.fi','".! ; ,^ heat-Middle States, fultz; Central and Western States, fultz, poole, Hfe; 
vvLrf.,, i^oit ' '^^U^"" Oats- New England, white; Middle State?, white, black ; Oentral and 
M.rirtfi%t.,rt<f^v-,^o^r?/K^^^ Ru.ssian; Southern States, Texas rustproof. Barlev- 

^rntpi .vhwL vvT^ti ^J'^'\*^,''^'^^/^r''^ Tennessee Winter. Rye- New England, white; Middle 

whP«^ Af^Hil i?I?ii C^^"tral and Western states. Winter; Sooihern States, excelsior Winter, Buck 
arpan mnnrr.L^rf !!.i^ ' s^' ^'^ »" ^ ul I ; Central aod Westem States, silver hull. Potaioes-New England. 
Irafp., ?iPhrr.n ;nroi "^".'^- ''0'^^; ^^'flfJIe States, rose, carmen3. rural 2; Central and Wlstern 
%^^nh^'X^^^'}^nr^J^^^^^^'''^''^: early Ohio. Tobacco -Centra I and Western States, yellow prior, 
vpnV.vVr<rA-^^^n,^H^^ clover-Middle Slates, medium red. Sweet I'oiatoes-MiddleStates: 

LhLor i •l^c,;.^^^^*''^" States, yellow Jersey. Cotton -Southern State.s, Texassiormproof. Soring 
eighteen to tsv^otVweek,^^'"^"''^ '° ^^'^' '°^'*°^' Illinois and many othex States. Itmaturesm 

(2) IQ Texas the black loarn Is a, good soUfor cotton, cora, wheat and most other field crops. 



Metric System. 



79 



S^etric cSsstcm of OTIctuijts antr pieasiures^ 

The Metric System has beea adopted by Mexico, Brazil, Chile, Peru, etc., and except Russia 
and G real Brilain, where ii is permissive, oyall European nations. Various names of the preceding 
systemsare however, frequently used ; I u Germany, H liilogram = 1 pound ; in Switzerland, 3-10 
of a metre = 1 foot, etc. If the tirst iettei-s of the prefixes deAra, hectorkilo, myria, from the Greek, 
ana aeci^cenu.milc, from tne Latin, are used in preference to our plain English, 10, 100. etc. , it is best 
to employ capital letters for the multiples aud small letters for the subdivisions, to avoid amoiguities 
in abbreviations: 1 aelcametreor 10 metres == 1 dm. ; 1 decimetre or 1-10 of a metre = 1 dm. 

The Metre, unit of length, is nearly the ten-millionth part of a quadrant of a meridian, of the 
distance between Equator and Pole. The International Standard Metre is, practically, nothing else 
but a leugtu defined bv the di.siance between two lines on a platinum-iridium bar at 0° Centigrade, 
deposited at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures, Paris, France. 

The Litre, unit of capacity, is derived from the weight of one kilogram pure water at greatest 
density, a cuoe wnose edge is one-tentu of a metre and, therefore, the one- thousandth part of a 
metric ton. 

The Gram, unit of weight, is a cube of pure water at greatest density, whose edge is one-hundredth 
of a metre, and, therefore, the one-tnousandth part of a kilogram, and the one- millionth part of a 
metric too. 



The Metric System was legalized in the United States on July 28, 1866, when Congress enacted as 
follows : 

*' The tables in the schedule hereto annexed shall be recognized in the construction of contracts, 
and in all legal proceedings, as estaolisning, in terms of tne weights and measures now in use in the 
United States, tne equivalents of ttie weights and measures expressed therein in terms of tne metric 
system, ana the tables may lawtuUy be u.sed for computing, determining, and expressing in custbm- 
ary weignisand measures the weignts and measures of the metric system. " 

The followmg are the tables annexed to tne above: 

Measures of Length. 



Metric Denominations and Values. 



Myriametre 10,000 metres. 

Kilometre 1,000 metres. 

Hectometre 100 metres. 

Deicametre 10 metres. 

Metre ., 1 metre. 

Decimetre 1-10 of a metre. 

Centimetre 1-100 ot a metre. 

Millimetre 1-1000 of a metre. 



Equivalents in Denominations in Use, 


6. 2137 
0. 62137 

328 

393 7 
39.37 
3.937 
0. 3937 
0. 0394 


miles. 

mile, or 3,280 feet 10 inches. 

feet 1 inch. 

inches. 

1 nches. 

inches. 

incn. 

inch. 



Measures of Surface. 



Metric Denominations and Values. 



Hectare 10.000 square metres. 

Are 100 square metres. 

Ceniare 1 square metre. 



^' Equivalents in Denominations in Use. 



2. 471 acres. 
119. 6 square yards. 
1,550 square inches. 



Measures of Capacity. 



Metric Denominations and Values 



Names. 



Kilolitre or stere 

Hectolitre 

Dekalitre 

Lure 

Decilitre 

Centilitre. 

MUlilitre 



Num- 
ber or 
Litres. 



Cubic Measure. 



1.000 

100 

10 

1 

1 10 

1-100 

1 1000 



1 cubic metre . 

1 10 of a cubic metre 

10 cubic decimetres 

1 cubic decimetre 

1 10 of a cubic decimetre 

10 cubic centimetres 

1 cubic centimetre .. 



Equivalents in Denominations in Use. 



Dry Measure. 



1 308 cubic yards 

2 busn. and 3. 35 pecks 

9 08 quarts 

0.908 quart 

6 1022 cubic incbes 

6102 cubic incu 

0.061 cubic inch 



Liquid or Wine Measure. 



264. 17 


gallons. 


26 417 


gallons. 


2 6417 


gallons. 


1. 0567 


quarts. 


845 


eill. 


0.338 


fluid ounce. 


27 


fluid dram. 



80 



Metric Systetn. 



METRIC SYSTEM— Con^mnerf. 



WEIGHTS. 



Metric Denominations and Values. . 



Names. 



Miller or tonneau 

Quiuiai 

Mynagram 

Kilogram or kilo 

Hectogram 

DeKagram 

Gram . 

Decigram 

Centigram 

Milligram 



Number 

of 
G rams. 



VVeigtit ot What Quantity of Water 
ai Maximum Deusity. 



1,000.000 

100.000 

10. 000 

1,000 

100 

10 

1 

1 10 

1-100 

1-1000 



1 cubic metre 

1 hectolitre 

10 litres 

1 litre 

1 aecilitre 

10 cubic centimetres 

1 cuDic centimetre 

1-10 of a cubic centimetre 

10 cubic millimetres 

1 cuoic millimetre 



Equivalents in De- 
nominations IN Use. 



Avoirdupois Weight. 



2204. 6 
220. 46 

22. 046 
2. 2046 
3. 5274 
3527 

15. 432 
1.5432 
0. 1543 
0.0154 



pounds. 

pounds, 

pounds. 

pounds. 

ounces. 

ounce. 

graiu.s. 

grains. 

grain. 

grain. 



TABLES FOR THE CONVERSION OF METRIC WEIGHTS AND MEASURES INTO 

CUSTOMARY UNITED STATES EQUIVALENTS AND THE REVERSE. 

From I lie legal equivalents are deduced the following tables for converting United States weights 
and measures: 



METRIC TO CUSTOMARY. 



CUSTOMARY TO METRIC. 



Linear Measure. 



Me- 


Me- 


KUQme- 


las. =Cen- 




Yards = Me- 


Miles'^ Kilo- 


l7efi = I>is 


Me(.re'> = Feet 


?)-e.'5= Yn^ds. 


tres=^ Mites 


timeires 


Feel= Metres. 


tres. 


inett es. 


1= 39.37 


1= 3 28083 


1 = 1.093611 


1-0.62137 


1- 2.54 


1=0.304801 


1=0.914402 


1= 1.60935 


2= 78.74 


2_ 6.56167 


2-2.187222 


2=1.24274 


2= 5.08 


2=0. 609601 


2=1.828804 


2= 3.21869 


3-118.11 


3- 9.84250 


3-3. 280833 


3-1.86411 


3- 7.62 


3=0.914402 


3=2. 743205 


3= 4.82804 


4-157.48 


4-13 12333 


4—4.374444 


4-2.48548 


4-10 16 


4-1.219202 


4=3.657607 


4„ 6.43739 


6-196 85 


5-16.40417 


5-5. 468056 


5-3. I0<:i85 


5=12 70 


5-1.524003 


5-4.572009 


5= 8.04674 


6-236. 22 


6-19 68500 


6-6.561667 


6_3. 72822 


6=15.24 


6=1.828804 


6-5.486411 


6- 9.65608 


7=275 59 


7-22 96583 


7-7.655278 


7-4.34959 


7-17.78 


7-2.133604 


7-6.400813 


7-11,26543 


8=314.96 


8-26. 24667 


8-8 748989 


8_4. 97096 


8-20. 32 


8=2.4384 05 


8=7 315215 


8-12.87478 


9-354 33 


9-29 52750 


9=9 842500 


9_5. 59233 


9-22. 86 


9-2. 743205 


9=8. 229616 


9-14.48412 



Square Measure 












1=0 155 

2=0 310 
3=0 465 
4=0.620 
5=0 775 
6=0 930 
7=1.085 
8=1.240 
9=- 1.395 



^ 


■<, w 


««■ 


^ <> ■ 


c 






1- 


-10.764 


2- 


= 21.528 


3= 


^32. 292 


4- 


= 43.055 


5- 


-53. 819 


6. 


_64.583 


/. 


^75.347 


8, 


_86, 111 



■ <u 



Sc=? 









1.196 
2 392 
3.588 
4.784 
6= 5 980 
6= 7.176 
7= 8.372 
8„ 9.568 
9=10.764 



1. 

2= 
31 
4= 



Cubic Measure. 


o2 .^^ 

o C -a ^ 




1= 35.314 
2= 70.629 
3=105. 943 
4=141 258 
5=176.572 
6=211 887 
7=24 7.201 
8=282.516 
9=317 830 


1=0.02832 
2=0 05663 
3=0.08495 
4 = 0.11327 
5=0. 14159 
6=0 16990 
7=0. 19822 [ 
8=0.22654 
9=0 25485 



Square Measure. 





<c 


V 


« V »- 


t- 


»j f^ V 


c« B :; 1 




^ — ?: ~ 


tr- 


.5 Cr ^ 


•<? 


^ ><;,j 




■*J 


1= 


= 6.452 


2- 


-12.903 


3= 


=19. 354 


4- 


-25. 806 


5. 


=32. 257 


6_ 


-38. 709 


/- 


-45 160 


8- 


-51.612 


9= 


,.58 063 '■ 



<» 


y> -i 


fh. 


^ %.% 


c 


"^ c j; 




_»- -.^ *^ 


.5-^ .S-^ 1 


■o 


<<i 


1. 


=0. 09290 


'2-. 


= 0. 18581 


3. 


=0. 27871 


4- 


=0.37161 


5- 


-0. 46452 


6, 


-0. 55742 


t - 


=0 65032 


8- 


„0 74323 


9- 


-0 83613 



?5 -5 t'i 



^:' 



c^l 



1=0. 636 
2=1.672 
3=2.508 
4=3. 344 
5=4.181 
6_5.017 
7=5. 853 
8=6. 689 
9=7.625 



Liquid Measitre. 



>> 


2 ~ 




— ; c 


^ «. 


J. ® 




C C3 




l^= 


-^ d 


^ C5 


1=0.338 


1=1.0567 


1=0.26417 


2=0 676 


2=2 1134 


2=0.62834 


3=1 014 


3=3. 1700 


3=0. 79251 


4=L352 


4«.4.2267 


4 = 1.05668 


5=1 691 


5=5. 2834 


5=1.32085 


6=2 028 


6=6.3401 


6=1.58502 


7 = 2.367 


7-7.3968 


7= L 84919 


8_2 705 


8-8. 4534 


8=2 113;M} 


9=,3. 043 


0=9. 5101 


9=2 37753 



Dry Measure. 



I i: 






1- 2.8377 
2= 6.6754 
3= 8.6132 
4=11. 3509 
6=14.1887 
6=17 0264 
7=19 8642 
8=22.7019 
9=25. 5396 






Liquid Measure. 



1_0. 35239 
2=0. 70479 
3^1.05718 
4=1. 4095 7 
5=1.76196 
6=2.11436 
7=2. 46676 
8=2.81914 
9=3. 17164 



-■- ^ 




•5^ 5 


I s 




=^=-"C 


'^^o 1 


cy '^ 


io 




1^ 2.957 


1=0.94636 


2= 6.914 


2=1. 89272 


3= 8.872 


3=2. 83908 


4=11 829 


A^i. 78544 


6=14. 786 


6=4. 73180 


6=17.744 


6=5.67816 


7-20.701 


7—6. 62452 


8=23 669 


8-7. 67088 


9=26.616 


9=8.51724 



CiO 








*5 




c 


V 












^ 




1= 


. 3.78643 


2= 


= 7. 


67(V87 


3= 


.11 


35630 


4= 


= 15. 


14174 


6= 


18. 


92717 


6=22. 


71261 


7-. 


.26 


49804 


8_ 


.30. 


28348 


9= 


.34.06891 



Mhibiiiuii 'Weights of Produce. 



81 



METRIC SYSTEM— Co«</««erf. 



WefoWt (Avoirdupois). 



1? = ^ 


• 2 5ft. 




•.-2 2-*- ! 


= -2 




C' IS 

■c si, , ^ 




^^ $ 


-^^ 0-- 


1= 2.20462 


;^^ ^S ! 


6 ^a 


6-^ s 


-Op Us 2 


S^ ^5. 


1=0. 1543 


1= 35.274 


1=0.9842 


1= 6.4799 


1= 28.3495 


1=0. 45359 


1=1.0161 


2=0.3086 


2= 70.548 


2= 4.40924 


2=1.9684 


2=12. 9598 


2= 56.6991 


2=0. 90719 


2=2. 032 I 


3=O.4630 


3=105. 822 


3= 6.61386 


3=2. 9526 


3=19. 4397 


3= 85.0486 


3=1.36078 


3-3. 0482 


4=0.6173 


4=141.096 


4= 8.81849 


4=3. 9368 


4=25 9196 


4=113.3981 


4=1.81437 


4-4. 0642 


5=0.7716 


5=176.370 


5=11.02311 


5=4. 9210 


5=32.3995 


5=141. 7476 


5=2.26796 


5-5. 0803 


6=0. 9259 


6=211.644 


6-13. 22773 


6-5.9052 


6=38.8793 


6=170.0972 


6-2. 72156 


6-6. 0963 


7=1. 0803 


7=246. 918 


7-15.43235 


7=6. 8894 


7=45.3592 


7=198.4467 


7-3.17515 


7-7.1124 


8-1.2346 


S=282. 192 


8-17.63697 


8=7. 8736 


8=51.8391 


8-226. 7962 


8-3.62874 


8-8. 1284 


9=1.3889 


9=317.466 9=19.84159 


9=8.8578 


9=58.3190 


9=255. 1457 


9=4. 08233 


9=9. 1445 



THE METRIC SYSTEM SIMPLIFIED. 

TbeloUowitiK' tables oHhe metric s.vstem of vveights aud :ueasuies bave been simplified as much 
as possible for The World Alm.\nac b.v omitting such denommatious as are uot iu practical, 
everj'day use iu the countries where *.he system is used exclusively. 

TABLES OF THE SYSTEM. 

Lenetli.— Thedeuomluatious iu practical use are millimetres (mm. ;, ceutimetres (cm. ), metres 
(m. ), and kilometres (km. ). 

10 mm. = 1 cm. ; 100 cm. =.1 m. ; 1,000 m. = 1 km. Note. —A decimetre is 10 cm. 

Welsjht.—The denomniatiop>> in use are grams (g. ), kilos* (kg. ), aud tous (metric tous). 

1 000 g. = l kg. ; 1,000 kg. = 1 metric ton. 

<-apncity.— Ihe denominations iu use are cubic centimetres (c. c. ) aud litres (1.). 

1.000 c. c.=.l 1. Note -A hectolitre is 100 i. (seldom used). 

Relation of capacity and weight to length: A cubic decimetre is a litre, and a litre of water weighs 
a kilo. 

APPROXIMATE EQUIVALENTS. 

A metre is about a yard; a kilo Is aoout 2 pound.s; a litre is about a quart; a centimetre is about 
J^inth; a metric ton is about same as a ton; a kilometre is about ^ mile; a cubic centimetre is about a 
thimbleful; a nickel weighs about 5 grams. 



lacre 

Ibustiel 

Iceotimetre 

IciiDicceiitimetre 

ICliOlClOOl 

Icunic inch 

Icubic metre 

1 cuDio metre 

Icuoic yard 

1 foot 

Igallou 

Igrain 

Igram 

Ihectar 

linch... 

Ikilo 

1 kilometre = 

1 litre = 

llitre = 

1 metre == 

•Contraction for 



PRECISE EQUIVALENTS. 

.40 hectar 4047il mile 

35 litres 35.24 Imillimetre.. 

.39 inch 39.37llounce (av d)... 

.061 cubic inch... .0610 1 ounce (Troy).. ■ 
.028 cubic metre. . 0283 1 peck 



^16 cuDic cent, t 16.39 

= 3o cut)ic feet 3.">.31 

= 1 .3 cubic yards... 1 308 

= .7G cuDic metre... .7645 

= 30 centimetres 30. 48 

= 3.8 litres 3.785 

= .OGogram 0648 

= 16 grains 1.5.43 

= 2.5 acres 2.471 

= 25 millimetres. 2.5. 40 

= 2.2 pounds 2.205 

= .62 mile 6214 

= .91 quart (dry)... .9081 

= 1.1 quarts (liq'd) 1.057 

= 3.3 feet 3.281 

kilogram, t Centimetres. 



1 pint... 

1 pound = 

1 quart (dry) > 

1 quart (liquid) = 
Isq. centimetre. ■■ 

Isq. foot 

Isq. inch 

Isq metre ■ 

Isq. metre ■■ 

Isq. yard 

1 ton (2. 000 lbs. )■■ 
1 ton (2, 240 lbs. ) ■■ 

1 ton (metric) 

Iton (metric)... .= 
lyard ..= 



1.6 


kilometres 


1.609 


.039iuch 


. 0394 


2S 


grams 


..28. 35 


31 


grams 


.31.10 


S.8 


litres 


.. 8.809 


.47 


litre 


.. . 4732 


.45 


kilo 


.. .4.5.16 


1.1 


litres 


. 1 101 


.95 


litre 


9464 


.15 


.sq. inch 


.. .J.5.50 


• .093 sq. metre 


.. .0929 


6.5 


sq. c' timet r's 


. 6.4.52 


1.2 


.sq. yards 


. 1 196 


11 


sq. feet 


.10 76 


.84 


sq. metre 


. . 8361 


.91 


metric ton... 


. .9072 


1 


metric ton 


. 1.017 


1.1 


ton (2.-000 lbs. 


) 1. 102 


.98 


ton (2,240 IDS. 


) .9842 


.91 


metre 


. . 9144 



Jttim'mum 212an'fll)ts of }3t*otmcc. 

The following are minimum weights ot certain articles of produce according to the laws of the 
United .-States : 



Per Bushel. 

Wheat 60 lbs. 

Corn, in tneear 70 '• 

Corn, shelled 56 •' 

Rye : 56 " 

Buckwheat 48 " 

Barley 48 " 

Oats 32 »' 

Peas 60 " 

White Beans 60 '• 

Castor Beans 46 '* 



Per Bushel. 

White Potatoes 60 lbs. 

Sweet Potatoes 55 " 

Onions 57 *" 

Turnips 55 '• 

Dried Peaches 33 " 

Dried Applea. 26 •• 

Clover Seed 60 ' ' 

Plax Seed 56 " 

Millet Seed 50 '• 



Per Bushel. 

Hungarian Grass Seed 50 lbs. 

Timothy Seed 45 •' 

Blue Grass Seed 44 " 

Hemp Seed 44 " 

Salt (see note oelow). 

Corn Meal 48 " 

Ground Peas 24 '* 

Malt 34 •' 

Bran... 20 " 



Salt.- Weight pei bushel as adopted oyciiffereut States ranges from 50 to 80 pounds. Cour-sesalt 
in Pennsyivania is reckoned at 80 pounds, ami m Illinois at 5<J pounds per bushel. Flue salt m Peun- 
sylvauia is reckoned at 62 pounds, m Kentucky aud Illinois at 55 pounds pec bushel. 



82" 



Domestic Weights and 3Ieasnres. 



^mnuxtn antr Sisaciuljts of iSJrrat 15rita(n. 

The measures of length and the weights are nearly, practically, the same as those in use In the 
United States. Tbe English ton is 2,240 lbs. avoirdupois, the same as the long ton, or shipping ton 
of the United States. The English hundredweight is 112 lbs. avoirdupois, the same as the long 
hundredweight of the United States. The Euglisli stone is usually equal to one-eighth hundred- 
weight of 112 lbs. , or 14 lbs. avoirdupois. The metre has been legalized at 39. 37079 inches, but the 
length of 39. 370432 inches, as adopted by France, Germany, Belgium, and Russia, is frequently used. 

The Imperial gallon, the basis of the system of capacity, involves an error of about 1 part in 1.836: 
10 lbs. of water = 277. 123 cubic inches. (A late autliority gives the weight of the Imperial gallon as 
10.017 pounds and of the United States gallon as 8.345 pounds. ) 

The English statute mile is 1, 760 yards or 5, 280 feet. The following are measures of capacity : 



Names. 


Pounds of 
Water. 


Cubic Inches. 


Litres. 


United States 
Equivalents. 


4 arills = 1 uint 


1. 25 
2.5 
5 
10 

20 1 S 

320 \^f- 

640 J a 


34.00 

09.32 

133.64 

277. 27 

554. 55 

2218. 19 

8872. 77 

17745.54 


0.56793 

1. 13586 

2.27173 

4. 54346 

9. 08092 

30. 34700 

145.39062 

290. 7813 


1. 20032 liquid pints. 
1.20032 ^' quarts. 
2. 40064 " 


2pints = 1 quart 


Souarts = 1 pottle 


2 pottles ^ 1 gallon ~ 


1. 20032 ' ' gallons. 
1.03152 dry pecks. 
1.03152 " bushels. 


2erallons = 1 3eclc 


4 pecks = 1 bushel 


4 jushels = 1 coomb 


4.12606 " •" 


2 coombs = 1 quarter 


8. 2521 " " 









A cubic foot of pure gold weighs 1,210 pounds; pure silver, 655 pounds ; cast iron, 450 pounds; copper, 550 pounds ; lead, 
710 pounds ; pure platinum, l,2iO pounds ', tin, 456 pounds ; aluiiiinum, ll)3 pounds. 

HBomrstic W^tiQ\)tn anTr jHcastircs, 

Apothecaries' Weight: 20 grains = l scruple; 3 scruples=l dram; 8 drams ^l ounce; 12 
ounces = 1 pound. 

Avoir<fiipoi8 Weight (short ton): 27 11-32 grains = 1 dram ; 10 drams = 1 ounce ; 16 ounces = 1 
pound; 25 pouuds = l quarter; 4 quarters= 1 cwt. ; 20 cwt. = 1 ton. 

Avoirdupois Weight (long ton): 2711-32 grains = 1 dram ; 10 drams =.1 ounce; 16 ounces — 1 
pound; 112 pounds = 1 cwt. ; 20 cwt. = 1 ton. 

Troy Weight: 24 grains = 1 pennyweight; 20 pennyweights = 1 ounce; 12 ounces =.1 pound. 

Circular Measure : 60 seconds = 1 minute ; 00 minutes = 1 degree ; 30 degrees = 1 sign ; 12 signs 
= 1 circle or circumference. 

Cubic 3Ieasure: 1, 728 cubic inches =1 cubic foot; 27 cubic feet =1 cubic yard. 

Dry Measure: 2 pints = 1 quart; 8 quarts = 1 peck; 4 pecks= 1 busheL 

Liquid Pleasure: 4 gills = 1 pint ; 2 pints = 1 quart; 4 quarts = 1 gallon ; 31>^ gallons = 1 barrel; 
2 barrels = 1 hogshead. 

liong illeasure: 12 inches =»1 foot; 3 feet = 1 yard; S^ yards = 1 rod or pole; 40 rods = 1 fur- 
long ; 8 furlongs = 1 statute mile (1, 760 yards or 5. 280 feet) ; 3 miles = 1 league. 

i>Iariners' Measure: 6' feet = 1 fathom; 120 fathoms = 1 cable length; 1)4 cable lengths ■= 1 
mile; 5,280 feet = 1 statute mile; 6,085 feet= 1 nautical mile. 

Paper Pleasure ; 24 sheets = 1 quire ; 20 quires = 1 ream (480 sheets) ; 2 reams = 1 bundle ; 5 
bundles = 1 bale. 

.Square Pleasure : 144 square inches = 1 square foot ; 9 square feet = 1 square yard ; 3C% square 
yards = 1 square rod or perch; 40 square rods = l rood; 4 roods = 1 acre; 040 acres = 1 square mile ; 
30 square nailes (6 miles square) = 1 township. 

Tiuie i>[easure: 60 seconds = l minute; 60 minutes = l hour; 24 hours = l day; 7 days=l 
week ; 365 days = 1 year ; 366 days = 1 leap j'ear. 

MEDICAL SIGNS AND ABBREVIATIONS. 
!]5(Lat, Recipe), take; aa, of each; ft, pound; 5, ounce; 3 , drachm; 3, scruple; TH,, minim, or 
drop; O or o, pint; f 5 , fluid ounce; f 3 , fluid drachm; as, I ss, half an ounce; ^i'^ueounce; | iss, 
one ounce and ahalf; | ij, twoounces; gr., grain; Q. S. , as much as sufficient^ Ft. Mist. , let a mix- 
ture be made; Ft. Haust. , let a draught be made; Ad., add to; Ad lib. , at pleasure; Aq., water; 
M. , mix ; Mac. , macerate ; Pul v. , powder; Pil. , pill; Solv., dissolve; St. , let it stand; Sum., to be 
taken; D., dose; Dil. , dilute; Filt. , filter; Lot., awash; Garg., a gargle; Hor. Decub. , at bed time; 
Inject, injection; Gtt., drops; ss, one-half; Ess., essence. 

TEXAS LAND MEASURE. 
(Also used in Mexico, New Mexico; Arizona, and California. ) 



26,000,000 square varas (square of 5.099 

1.000,000 square varas (square of 1.0(X) 

25,000,000 square varas (square of 5,000 

12,500.000 square varas (square of 3,535. 5 

8,333,333 square varas (square of 2,880.7 

6,250,000 square varas (square of 2.500 

7,225.600 square vara.s (square of 2,688 

3.612,800 square varas (square of 1,900.8 

1,806,400 square varas (square of 1,344 

903,200 square varas (square of 950.44 

451,600 square varas (square of 672 

225,800 square varas (square of^ 475 



varas) =1 league and 1 labor 

varas) = 1 labor 

varas) = 1 league; 

varas) = }4, league 

varas) = J^ league 

varas) = J^ league 

varas) 

varas) = 1 section 

varas) = 1^ section 

varas) = ^ section 

varas) = J^ section 



= 


4,605.5 


acres. 


= 


177. 


136 acres. 


= 


4,428.4 


acres. 


= 


2,214. 


2 


acres. 


.= 


1.476.13 


acres. 


= 


1,107. 


1 


acres. 


= 


1.280 




acres. 


=• 


640 




acres. 


= 


320 




acres. 


B> 


160 




acres. 


ea 


80 




acres. 


= 


40 




acres. 


= 


1 




acre. 



, ^ _.. varas) = 1-16 section 

5, 645.376 square varas (square of 75. 137 varas) = 4, 840 square yards = 

To find the number of acres in any number of square varas, multiply the latter by I77 (or to be 
more exact, by 177J^), and cut oflf six decimals. 

1 vara = 33J^ inche.s. 1,900.8 vara.s = 1 mile. 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES OF THE PHILIPPINES. 



1 pulgffda (12 llnea) 
1 pie 
1 vara 
1 gautah 
1 caban 



.927 


inch. 


1 libra (16 ouzo) 


cs 


1.0144 lb. 


av. 


11.125 


inches. 


1 arroba 


=a 


25.300 lb. 


av. 


33.375 


inches. 


1 cattv (16 tael) 


Ea 


1.;.94 lb. 


av. 


.8796 


gallon. 


1 pecul (100 cattv) 


CQ 


139.482 lb. 


av. 


21.991 


gallons. 











Fi 



oreiyn 



Mo. 



teys. 



83 



Bnots anti pities. 



Thk statute Mile is 5,280 feet. 

Tlie Britisli Admiralty Knot or Nautical Mile ls6. 080 feet. 

Tl)e Statute Knot is 6 082.66 feet, aiul is generally considered the standard. The number of 
feet in astatine knot IS arrived at thus. The circumference of the eartli is divided iato 360 degrees, 
^'Hcli degree contaimnsr 60 knots or (360.k60), 21,600 iinots to ttie circumference. 21.600 divided 
into 131. 38d,4&6—iUe number of feet lu the earth s cucumfeience-gives 6,082 66 feet— tlie tengtn of 
a standard mile. 



Iknot 
2 knots 
iikuous 



, 1. 151 miles 
2 300 miles 
■ 5 4.>4 miles 



4 knots = 

5 Icnot-s ■ 
10 knots : 



4.606 miles 

5.757 miles 

11. 515 miles 



20 knots = 23 030 miles 

25 knots = 28.787 miles 

6 leet = 1 Jailiom 



600 teet 
lO^-able.s 



.= 1 canie 
-= 1 Knot 



Ancient ©rctU «iui> iiomau SSacitjljts auTi ii^ca.ourrs, 



The Roman liora or pound ■- 
The Attica mma oi- ooiiml 
The Aitica talent (60 jnuue 

DKV MI':.\.SITKE. 

The Roman modu> = 1 pk. 2-9 pint. 
The Attic clKjemx = nearly 1% pints. 
The Attic medimnus= 4 pk. 6 1-10 pints. 

LIQUID MKASURK. 

The cotyle = a little over "^ pint. 
The cyathus = a little over 1^ pints. 
The chus = a little over 6^ pints. 

LONG MEASURE. 

The Roman foot = 11 3-5 inches. 
The Roman cubit = 1 ft. b% inches. 
The Roman pace = 4 ft 10 iuclies. 
The Roman furlong = 604 ft. 10 inches. 
The Roman mile = 4,835 feet. 
The Grecian cubit = 1 ft. 6>^ inches. 

•The modern drachma equals 19 3 cents, 
is the value indicated by Tacitus. 

BIBLICAL WEIGHTS 



Uiril A.VIEHK'A.V EQUIVALENTS. 
WEIGHTS 

= lOoz. 18 pwt. 13 5-7gr 
= 11 i)Z. 7 pwt 16 2-7gr 
) = 66 Ids. 11 oz. pwt 1' 

The (Jrecian furlong 
The Grecian mile 



Troy. 
4 1-5 inches. 



$35. 80+, 



Troy. 

Troy 
1-7 gr 
= 504 ft. 
4030 ft. 

MONEV. 

The qnadrans= 1 110 mills. 

The as = 13-10 mills. 

The sestertius = 3 58 -}- cents. 

Thesestertium (1,000 sestertii) ■■ 

Tliedeuarius = 14.35 + cents. 

The .Attic obolus = 2 39 + cent.s. 

The drachma = 14. 35 -f cents * 

The mma (100 drachmse) = !B14.35-f, 

The talent (60 minae) = ?861 00-f . 

The Greek stater = aureus (same as the Roman t) 

= S3. 58,79. 
The stater = daricus = $7 16,66. 

t Did noc remain, at all periods, at this value, but this 
REDUCED TO TROY WEIGHT. 



TlieGerah, one-twentieth oi a Siiekel 

The Bekan. half a Shekel 

The Shekel 

The.Maneh, 60 Shekels 

The Talent, 60 uianehs, or 3,000 Shekels. 



Lbs. 


o,. 


Pwt. 

















5 








10 


2 


6 





125 









Or. 



12 

o 

O 
O 




S2(cctciCtil 2tlm't.o 



Na.me. 

oriiTr~ 

Ampere 

Volt 

Coulomb 
Farad 



Microfarad 
WatL 

Jou 



Svmbol. 



II. 



E 

Q 
K 

Pw. 



Unit of 



Rpsisttvuee 

f'nrrent 

F^.lectromo- 
11 ve force 

Quantity 

Capacity 

Power 
Work 



How Obtained, 



The electrical resistance of a col- 
umn of mercury 106 centimetres 
ong and of 1 square millimetre 
section. 

Is that current of electricity that 
decomposes .0U009324 gramme ol 
water per second. 

One amp6re of current passing 
through a substance having lolim 
of resistance = 1 volt. 

A current of 1 ampere during 1 
second of time. 

The capacity that a current of 1 
ampere for 1 second ( = 1 couiomo) 
charges it to potential ot 1 volt. 

ImiUionth.of farad. 

Power of 1 ampere current pass 
lug through resistance ot 1 oum. 

£s the work done by 1 watt o; 
electrical power iu 1 second. 



C(i;?« 



10^ 

lOi 
108 

lOi 
10;» 

lOi.' 
10' 

10/ 



E<iuivaleiit. 



1 true ohm = 1.0112 Brit- 
ish Association oiiuis. 



Deposits 1. 118 milligram.s 
ot silver per second. 

.926 of a standard Daniel 
cell. 

Deposits 1. 118 milligrams 
of silver. 
2 5 knots of 1). V. S came. 



.0013405 



G'- fii) 



of a 



horse power. 
.238 unit of neat (Therm) 



*C. G. ri. — Ei:Ctro msgiitftiL- iiniis. Consult techou-al works in electricuy. 



Ju 



JForriQu Moneys, 

£nfi[lish .Money: 4 farthings -= 1 penny (J); 12 pence— 1 shilling (.<); 20 shillings— 1 pound C£). 

21 shillings -^ one guinea. 5 shillings — one crown 
Frencli Money: 100 centimes »= 1 franc. 
German 31oney: lOO plennig^ 1 marK. 
Russian .>ioney: lOOcopecK.- ^ 1 ruoie 
Austro-Hunsrariau .>loney : 100 neller-^ 1 urone 
For United States equivalents, see laOle of ' Value ot Foreign Coins In U. S. Money," 



B4 



/Sim2)le J^iterest Table. 



(Whkreby any questions of Geometrical Progression and of Double Ratio may be solved by Inspec- 
tion, the Number of Terms not exceeding 56 ) 



1 


1 


15 


16384 


29 


268435456 


43 


4398046511104 


2 


2 


16 


32768 


30 


536870912 


44 


8796093022208 


3 


4 


17 


65536 


31 


1073741824 


45 


17692116044416 


4 


8 


18 


131072 


32 


2147483648 


46 


35184372088832 


5 


16 


19 


262144 


33 


4294967296 


47 


70368744 177064 


t; 


32 


20 


524288 


34 


8589934592 


4» 


140737488355328 


7 


64 


21 


1048576 


85 


17179869184 


49 


281474976710656 


8 


128 


22 


2097152 


36 


34359738368 


50 


662949963421312 


9 


256 


23 


4194304 


37 


68719476736 


51 


11258999o68426-J4 


10 


512 


24 


8388608 


38 


137438953472 


52 


2251799813686248 


11 


1024 


25 


16777216 


39 


274877906944 


53 


4503599627371)496 


12 


2048 


26 


33554432 


40 


549755813888 


54 


90071 9Q254740992 


13 


4096 


27 


671u8864 


41 


1099511627776 


55 


18U14398509481984 


14 


8192 


28 


134217728 


42 


2199023255552 


56 


36028797018963968 



iLLOSTRATioxs— The 13th power of 2=8192. and the 8th root of 256=2, 



COMPARED WITH OTHER EUROPEAN MEASURES 



English Statute Mile 
English Geog. Miie. 
French Kilometre... 
German Geog. Mile.. 

Russian Verst 

Austrian Mile 

Dutch Ure 

Norwegian Mile 

Swedish Mile 

Danisn Mile 

Swiss Stunde 





w5 


la 

V — 

£5 




c . 

« ^ 


a 
<« . 

<; 
212 




n 
1^ 


•s. 

V- 

m 
0.151 


J3 . 
.2 <B 

a::: 
as 


• 

s-s 


1.000 


867 


1.609 


217 


1.508 


289 


142 


0.213 


335 


1.150 


1.000 


1.855 


0.250 


1 738 


246 


333 


164 


0.169 


0.246 


0.386 


0.621 


0.540 


1.000 


0.135 


937 


0.132 


180 


088 


094 


133 


0.208 


4.610 


4.000 


7.420 


1.000 


6.953 


0.978 


1 333 


657 


<i 694 


0.985 


l..')43 


0.663 


0.575 


1.067 


144 


1.000 


141 


192 


094 


100 


0.142 


0.222 


4.714 


4.089 


7.586 


1. 022 


7.112 


1.000 


1 363 


0.672 


710 


1.006 


1 578 


3.458 


3.000 


5.565 


0.750 


5.215 


734 


1.000 


493 


0.520 


0.738 


1.157 


7 021 


6.091 


11.299 


1.523 


10 589 


1 489 


2 035 


1 000 


1.057 


1 499 


2.350 


6.644 


5.764 


10.692 


1 441 


10 019 


1 409 


1.921 


0.948 


1 000 


1.419 


2 224 


4.682 


4.062 


7 536 


1 016 


7.078 


0.994 


1.354 


667 


0.705 


1 000 


1 567 


2.987 


2. 592 


4.8o8 


648 


4.505 


0.634 


0.864 


425 


0.449 


0.638 


1 000 



StautJacti HcUjspaper ^t^nxivt. 



The 



The Standard Newspaper Measure, as recognized and now in general use is 13 ems pica, 
standard of measurement of all sizes of type is the ' ' em quad, ■ not the letter ' ra. ' ' 

The basis of measurements adopted by ine International Typographical Union is the lower case 
alphabet, from "a" to "z" ipciusive, and the ems used are the same Dody as the type measured. 



4J^ Point 18 ems 

5 Point 17 ems 

bi4 Point 16 ems 

6 Point 16 ems 



7 Point 14 ems 

8 Point 14 ems 

9 Point 13 ems 



10 Point . 13 ems 

11 Point . — ,. 13 ems 

12 Point 13 ems 



.Simplr l^ntntut Kablt. 



(Showing at DiQerentRates tne Interesi on $1 from 1 Month to 1 Y 


ear, 


and on $100 from 1 Day to 1 Year) 




4 Per Cent. 


5 Per Cent 


6 Pee Ci 


JNT. 


7 Per Cent. 


8 Per Cent. 


TlUB. 


£ 




. 1 


OD 






£ 






E 




2 








OS 




a ! 


C5 


2 


i& 


« 




ie 


« 2 


ai 


OS 


2. 


m 






a 






a 






a 
















Q 




3 

7 


D 




4 
8 


a 


o 

1 


5 


s s 

1 


s 

5 

1 


o 

Q 


1 


"Z 


One Dollar 1 month 


6 


2 " 


8 


3 '• 




1 


1 






1 


3 




1 


5 


1 


7 




2 




'* 6 " 




2 








2 


5 




3 




3 


6 




4 




•• 12 " 




4 

1 


1 






6 

1 


3 




6 

1 


6 


.. 7 
1 


9 






8 
2 




OneHundred Dollars 1 day . 
• i ^ i » 2 ^ 


• • 

2 




2 


2 






2 


t 




3 


2 


3 


8 






4 


4 


•• •• 3 " 




3 


4 






4 


1 




5 




6 


8 






6 


7 






4 


6 






5 


3 




6 


6 


7 


7 






8 


9 


*• " 5 " 




5 


6 






6 


9 




8 


2 


9 


4 






11 


1 


• • i t g t > 




6 


i 






8 


3 




io 




lA 


6 






^ 


3 


•• *♦ 1 month 




33 


4 




41 


6 




60 




. 68 


3 




7 


• • t f O k > 




66 


7 




83 


2 


1 






1 16 


fi 


1 


33 


8 


• • ••oil 


1 






1 


25 




1 


60 




1 76 




2 






• • •• g «■ 


2 






2 


60 


, 


3 






3 50 




4 1 




•• .. j2 '• 


4 


,^ 


. . 




6 


. 




6 






7 






81 


..1 


« • 



Roman and Arahic N'unierals. 



85 



i^tompounti Xntcrrst ^Talilr. 

COMPOUND INTEREST ON ONE DOLLAR FOR 100 YEARS. 



AMOt'Nl 


Yp.irs. 


fer 

cent. 


$1 


100 


1 




10«J 


2 




lOi) 


2^ 




100 


3 




lOO 


3V^ 




100 


4 



Acoiiiiiiila' 
tion. 

$2 70.5 
7.24.5 
11 81.4 
19 21.8 
31 19.1 
50.50, 4 



M 




Per 


AMOUNT 


Years. 


cent. 


$1 


100 


4^ 




100 


5 




100 


6 




100 


t 


1 1 


100 


8 


1 1 


lUO 


9 



Accumula- 






Per 


tion. 


Amount 


Years 


cent. 


$81.58,9 


$1 


100 


10 


131 50,1 




100 


11 


339.30.5 




100 


12 


867.72.1 




100 


15 


2,199.78.4 




100 


18 


5,529.04.4 




100 


24 



Accumulation. 



$13. 780 66 
34,064.34 6 
83.621.82,7 
1.174 302 40 
15,424,106.40 
2.198.720,200 



VEARSlNWHICn A (UVEN AMOUNT WILL DOUBLE AT SEVERAL RATES OF INTEREST. 





At Simple 
Interest. 


At Compound Interest, 


Rate. 


At Simple 
Iniciest. 


At Compound Interest. 


R« FK. 


Compounded 
Yiisrl}'. 


Compounded 
Semi-Anna 
ally. 


Compounded 
Qu-iirterly. 


Compound-»d 
Yearly. 


Compounded 
Semi Aunu 
ally 


Compounded 
Quarterly. 


1 

§^ 

4 

4^ 
5 
6f^ 


100 .rears 
66.66 
50.00 
40.00 
33 33 
28. 57 
25.00 
22.22 
20.00 
18 18 


69. 660 
46. 556 
35.003 
28 071 
23. 450 
20. 149 
17.673 
15. 747 
14. 207 
12. 942 


69. 487 
46. 382 
34. 830 
27. 899 
23. 278 
19. 977 
17. 501 
15 576 
14.035 
12. 775 


69. 237 
46. 297 
34. 743 
27. 748 
23 191 
19. 890 
17. 415 
15. 490 
13. 949 
12. 689 


6 

6"^ 

7 

i^ 

9"^ 
10 
12 


16.67 
15.38 
14. 29 
13.33 
12. 50 
11 76 
IT 11 
10 52 
10 00 
8 34 


11 896 
11 007 
10. 245 
9.584 
9 006 
8.497 
8 043 
7 638 
7.273 
6 116 


11 725 
10. 836 
10 074 
9.414 
8.837 
8 327 
7.874 
7.468 
7.103 
5 948 


11 639 
10. 750 
9 966 
9 328 
8 751 
8 241 
7 788 
7 383 
7 018 
5.862 



jHontljlfi l^^^^t STaiJlc, 



Days. 


§10 


$11 


$12 


$13 


$14 


$15 


$16 


$17 


$18 


$19 


§20 


1 

2 

3 


.38 

.77 

1 15 

1 54 

1.92 

2.31 

2.69 

3 08 

3.46 

3.85 

4.23 

4.62 

5.00 

5.38 

5.77 

7.69 

10.00 

20. 00 

30.00 

40 00 

50 (.K) 

60.00 

70.00 

80 00 

90 00 

100.00 

110 00 

120. OJ 


.42 

.85 

1. 27 

1 69 
2.12 

2 54 

2 96 

3 38 
3.81 
4.23 
4.65 
6.08 
6.50 
6 92 
6.35 
8.46 

11.00 

22 00 

33.00 

44.00 

55. 00 

66.00 

77.00 

88. 00 

99.00 

110.00 

121 00 

132 (X) 


.46 

.92 

1.38 

1.85 

2 31 

2.77 

3.23 

3.69 

4.15 

4 62 

5.08 

5.44 

6.00 

6 46 

6.92 

9.23 

12.00 

24.00 

36.00 

48.00 

60 00 

72 00 

84.00 

96.00 

108. 0(J 

120 00 

132 00 

144 00 


.50 

1.00 

1 50 

2.00 

2.50 

3.00 

3.50 

4.00 

4.50 

5.00 

5.50 

6.00 

6.50 

7.00 

7 50 

10.00 

13 00 

26.00 

39 00 

52 00 

65.00 

78.00 

91 00 

104 00 

117 00 

130.00 

143.00 

156 00 


.54 
1.08 
1.62 
2.15 
2.69 
3 23 
3.77 
4.31 
4.85 
5.38 
5.92 
6.46 
7.00 

7 54 

8 08 
10 77 
14 00 
28, 00 
42.00 
56 00 
70.00 
84.00 
98.00 

112 00 
126, 00 
140. 00 
154.00 
168 00 


.58 

1.15 

1.73 

2.31 

2,88 

3 46 

4,04 

4.62 

5.19 

6.77 

6.35 

6.92 

7.50 

8.08 

8 65 

11 54 

15. 00 

30 00 

45 00 

60 00 

75. 00 

90.00 

105 00 

120 00 

135.00 

150.00 

165 00 

180 00 


.62 
1.23 
1.85 
2.46 
3 08 
3.69 
4.31 
4.92 
5.54 

6 15 
6.77 

7 38 
8.00 
8,62 
9.23 

12 31 

16 00 

32. 00 

48.00 

64.00 

80 00 

96 00 

112,00 

128.00 

144 00 

160 00 

176.00 

192 00 


65 
1.31 
1 96 
2.62 
3.27 
3.92 
4.58 
6.23 
6 88 
6.54 
7.19 
7.85 

8 50 
9.15 

9 81 
13.03 
17.00 
34.00 
51.00 
68.00 
85 00 

102.00 
119 00 
136.00 
153. 00 
170 00 
187 00 
204, 00 


69 
1.38 
2.08 
2.77 

3 46 
4.15 

4 85 
5.54 
6.23 
6 92 
7.62 
8.31 
9 00 
9.69 

10 38 

13. 85 

IS 00 

36 00 

54 00 

72.00 

90,00 

108 00 

126 00 

144.00 

162 00 

180 00 

198 00 

216 00 


73 

1 46 

2 19 
2.92 

3 65 

4 38 
5.12 

5 85 
6.58 
7.31 
8.04 
8,77 
9.50 

10 23 

10 96 

14,62 

19 00 

38 00 

57 00 

76 00 

95 00 

114 00 

133 00 

152 00 

171 00 

190 00 

209 00 

228 00 


. 1 t 
1.54 
2.31 


4 


3 08 


5 

6 

7 


3 85 
4.62 
5 38 


8 


6. 15 


9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 


6.92 
7 69 
8.46 
9.23 
10.00 
10. 77 


15 


11.54 


20 

1 jnoiitii 


15 38 
20 00 


2 

3 

4 


40 00 
60 00 
80 00 


5 

o ... ..■•••••• 

7 .'.... 


100. 00 
120 00 
140.00 


8 

9 

10 

11 

i year 


160 00 
180 00 
200,00 
220.00 
240. 00 



*s>ix «?orkiDg days in ttie week. 



ilomau auti ^raijic Kumcral.si* 



■..••••••••■■« ■■••••• 


1 


XI 




.'{i.::::.:-,:..:. : 


2 


XII 




8 


XIII 






4 


XIV 




V 


6 


XV .... . 




Vl 


6 


XVI .. 




vxi 


i 


XVII 




fi*^:::::: :::::: : 


8 


XVIII 




9 
10 


XIX 




X 


XX 





I 



SOtCCCC 400 

40 1) 500 

60 DC 600 

60,I)CC .. 700 

70,I>CCC 800 

80C.>I . 900 

90 > I 1000 

18 C 100i3ICilIXIII 1913 

19 CC 200i31xH .2000 

'20CVC 300) 



IIXX.X 

12XL 

13X 

14 I. X 

ISI.XX 

16 LXXX Of XXC. 

17 X(; 



S6 



Ileiyht and 'Weight of Men. 



cSprciftc ^rayita>* 



* 



Liquids. 



I. 



Tli))ber. 



Sundries. 



Vv'ater 100 Cork 24 

8ea- water 103 Poplar 38 



Dead Sea 124 

Alcohol 84 

Turpentine 99 

W^iue 100 

Urine 101 

Cider 102 

Beer 102 

Woman's milk 102 

Cows " 103 

boat's " 104 

Porter 104 



Fir 55 

Cedar 61 

Pear 66 

Walnut 67 

Cherry 72 

Maple 75 

Ash 84 

Beech 85 

Mahogany 106 

Oak 117 

Ebony 133 



Indigo 77 

Ice 92 

Gunpowder... 93 

Butler 94 

Clay 120 

Coal 130 

Opium 134 

Honey 145 

Ivory 183 

Sulphur 203 

Marble 270 

Chalk 279 

Olass 289 



Metals and Stones. 

Granite 278 

Diamond 853 

Cast iron 721 

Tin 729 

Bar iron 779 

Steel 783 

Brass ^. 840 

Copper 895 

Silver 1,047 

Lead 1.135 

Mercury 1,357 

Gold 1.926 

Platina 2 150 



The weight of a cubic foot of distilled watei at a temperature of 60° F. is 1,000 ounces Avoir- 
dupois, vert/iiearly., therefore the weii^ht (in ounces. Avoirdupois) of a cubic foot of any ot tlie sub- 
stances in the above table is found by multiplying the .specific gravities by 10, thus;— one cubic loot 
of oak weighs 1,170 ounces; one cubic foot of marble 2,700 ounces, and so on. 

* Compared with water. 



iFrrf^ing, JFttsinrj, autr JJoilutjg i^oints. 



SUBSTANCKS. 



Bromine freezes at 

Olive oil freezes at 

Quicksilver freezes at.... 

Water freezes at 

Bismuth metal fuses at. 

Copper fuses at 

Gold fuses at 

Iron fuses at 

Lead fuses at 

Pota.ssium fuses at. 



llesu- 


Centi- 


Kahien- 


mnr. 


grade. 
— 22° 


heit. 
- 7 60 


- 17 60 


8 


10 


50 


- 31 5 


-39 4 


- 39 i 








32 


211 


264 


507 


963 


1. 204 


2.200 


1.105 


1.380 


2.518 


1.250 


1538 


2 800 


260 


325 


617 


50 


62.5 


144 5 



SUBSIANCKS. 



Silver fu.ses at 

Sodium fuses at.., 
.Sulphur fu.ses at . 

Tin fuses at 

Zinc fuses at 

Alcohol boils at... 
Bromine boils at. 

Ether boils at 

Iodine boils at 

Water boils at 



Authorities vary on some of these points. The best are given. 



Ueau 


Centi 


mur. 


grade. 
I, OOOO 


800O 


76.5 


95 6 


92 


115 


182 


228 


329 6 


412 


63 


744 


50 


63 


28 4 


35 5 


140 


17ft 


80 


100 



Fahren- 
hen. 

1.8320 
204 
239 
442 
773 
167 
145 
96 
347 
212 



Jl^cffjljt antr smn'fiijt of ^m. 

Tabt-kof Average Hkight and Weight of Males, Based on Axalysis of 74,162 Acceptkh 

Appmcavts for Life Ixsuraxce as Beported to the A.ssociation 

OF Life Insurance Medical Directob.s, 



Ukioht. 



5 feet 


5 feet 1 inch 


5 feet 2 inches 


5 feet 3 inches 


5 (eet 4 inches. . 
5 leet 6 i nches. . . 




5 ieet 6 inches . 
5 feet 7 inches ... 




5 teel 8 inches.... 


5 feet 9 inches 

5 leet 10 inches. . 




6 leet 11 inches 

6 feet 

6 feet 1 inch 


6 leet 2 inches 


6 feet 3 inches 



Atre. 


Age. 


Age. 


Age. 


Age. 


Age. 


Age, 


Age 


Age. 


15-94 
Pounds. 


25-29 
Pounds. 


3dl34 
Pounds. 


35-39 
Pounds. 


40-44 


45-49 
Pounds 


60-54 


55-59 


60-64 
Pounds. 


Pounds. 


Pi'unils. 


Pounds. 


120 


125 


128 


131 


133 


134 


134 


134 


131 


122 


126 


129 


131 


134 


136 


136 


136 


134 


124 


128 


131 


133 


136 


138 


138 


138 


137 


127 


131 


134 


136 


139 


141 


141 


141 


140 


131 


135 


138 


140 


143 


144 


145 


145 


144 


134 


138 


141 


143 


146 


147 


149 


149 


148 


138 


142- 


145 


147 


150 


151 


153 


153 


153 


142 


147 


150 


152 


155 


156 


158 


158 


158 


146 


151 


154 


157 


160 


161 


163 


163 


163 


150 


155 


159 


162 


165 


166 


167 


168 


168 


154 


159 


164 


167 


170 


171 


172 


173 


174 


159 


164 


169 


173 


175 


177 


177 


178 


180 


165 


170 


175 


179 


180 


183 


182 


183 


185 


170 


177 


181 


185 


186 


189 


188 


189 


189 


176 


184 


188 


192 


194 


196 


194 


194 


192 


181 


190 


195 


200 


203 


204 


201 


198 





Age 
66-69 

Pounds 



140 
143 
147 
151 
156 
162 
168 
174 
180 
185 
189 
192 



A Height and Weight Table compiled bv a Committee of the Medical Section of the National 
Fraternal Congress. 1900. which is tlie analysis of 133.940 applications of selected ri.sks, in u few 
instances differed very slightly from the above. 



HEIGHT AND WEIGHT OF WOMEN. 

The following table gives the relative height and weight of women, all age.s. 
ordinary clothing, however, is included; 



The weight of 



Height. 



Average. 



5 feet ;., 115 

5 feet 1 inch 120 

6 feet 2 inches 125 

5 feet 3 inches 130 

5 feet 4 inches 185 

6 feet 5 inches 140 

6 feel 6 inches 143 



Mini- 


Max) 


UIUUI. 


mum. 


f!8 


132 


102 


138 


106 


144 


111 


150 


115 


155 


119 


161 


121 


166 



TIeioht. Average, 

5 feet 7 inches 145 

5 feet 8 inches 148 

5 feet 9 inches 155 

5 feet 10 inches 160 

5 feet 11 Inches 165 

6 feet 170 



Mlul- 


Mail- 


niuru. 


iiium, 


123 


167 


126 


170 


131 


179 


136 


184 


138 


i9(r 


141 


196 



J'ensile StroKjf/i of ^[(Ua'lals. 



87 



WEIGHT OF WATER. 



1 cubic iiicli .0.3617 pound. 

VI cubic inches .434 pound. 

I cubic foot 62.5 pounds. 

1 cubic foot 7. 48052 U. S. gals. 

1.8 cubic feet 112.0 pounds. 

35 84 cubicfeet 2240.0 pounds. 

1 cylindrical inch. .. .02842pound. 

12 cylindrical inches .341 pound. 

1 cylindrical foot 49 10 pounds. 



1 cylindrical foot... . 6 

2. 282 cylindrical leet.... 112.0 
45 64 cylindrical feet. .. .2240 O 

imperial gallon 10. O 

imperial gallons... 112.0 
imperial sfallons,. .2240. O 

U. S. gallon 8 365 

U. S. Kallons 112.0 

\] 8. i<all()ns 2240 



1 

11.2 
224 
""l 

13.44 

2(JS 8 



U.fc). gals. 

pound.s. 

pounds. 

pounds. 

pounds. 

pounds. 

pound.s. 

pounds. 

j>ounds. 



NorK— The centre of pressure oi water a,£rainst tne side of the containing vessel or reservoir is at 
two- thirds the depth froni the snrlace. One cubic foot salt water weighs 64. 3 pounds. 

THEORETICAL VELOCITY OF WATER IN FEET PER SECOND. 



Head.Fekt. 



10 
12 
15 

]8 
2() 



Velocity. Feet 
per Second. 



25.4 
27.8 
31 1 

34 

35 9 
37.6 



Head. Feet. 



25 
30 
35 
40 
-45 
50 



Velocity. Feet 
pet Second. 



40.1 
43.9 
47.4 
50 7 
53. 8 
56.7 



Head, Feet. 



55 
60 
65 

70 
75 

80 



Velocity, Feet 

per Second. 



69.5 
62.1 
64.7 
67 1 
69 5 
71 8 



Head, Feet. 



85 

90 

95 

100 

125 

150 



Velocity, Feet 
per Second. 



7J.0 
76.1 
78.2 
80.3 
89.7 
98.3 



PRESSURE OF WATER PER SQUARE INCH AT DIFFERENT DEPTHS. 



Depth 






Piessme 


Fkbt. 


(ll,s.) 


6 


2.60 


8 


3 40 


10 


4 33 


15 


6.4;) 


20 


8 66 


25 . 


10 82 


30 


12.99 



Depth 
Fket. 



35 
40 
45 
50 
60 
70 
80 



I'ressiire. 
(lbs.) 

15.16 
17.32 
li>. 49 
21. 65 
25. 99 
;,0. 32 
34.65 



Depth 

IN 

Fkit. 



90 
I0i» 
110 
120 
130 
140 
1.50 



Pressure. 

(Ib.^.) 

38. 98 
43.31 
47 64 
51.98 
56.31 
60.64 
64. 97 



Depth 

IN 

Fket. 



160 
170 
180 
190 
200 
215 
230 



Pressure, 
(lbs.) 



69.31 
73. <a 
77.97 
82 30 
86. 63 
93.14 
99.63 



^nnprratttrc of Sttcim, 

ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE 14.7 LBS. DECREES IN FAHRENHEIT SCALE. 



Pb kssdke 


Dejrrees 


Peesslt.e 


Decrees 


Pres-;ukb 


De^iiees 


Pressure 


DfglefS 


Peb 


of 


Per 


ot 


Per 


of 


PeR 


of 


Sq. Inch. 


Teniptralure. 


Sq. Inch. 


Temperature. 
244.3 


• Sq. Inch. 
32 


Temperature. 
277 


Sq. Inch. 
80 


Temper.itiire. 


1 


216.3 


12 


323 9 


2 


219.4 


14 


248. 3 


34 


279 6 


85 


327.6 


3 


- 222.4 


16 


252 1 


40 


286. 9 


90 


331.1 


4 


225. 2 


18 


255. 7 


45 


292.5 


95 


334. 5 


5 


227. 9 


20 


2.59. 2 


50 


297. 8 


100 


337. 8 


6 


230 5 


22 


262. 5 


Oi> 


302.7 


105 


341.0 


i 


233 


24 


265 6 


60 


307.4 


110 


344.0 


8 


235 4 


26 


268. 6 


65 


3118 


115 


347 


9 


237.7 


28 


271.5 


70 


316.0 


120 


350. 


10 


240.0 


30 


274.3 


75 


320. 


125 


352. 8 


Steam 


flows into atm 


osphere at t 


he rate of 650 


feet per sec 


ond. 







KiwniXt ^Strcnfjtlj of iHatm'al.s, 



Materials. 



METAL.S. 

Aluminum castings,.. 

" sheets 

'* wire 

«' bars 

Nickel ahiminum 

Aluminum bronze . . . . 

Mangiiiese " .... 

Phosphor " 

Tol.in " . . . . 

Bronze gun metal 

Platinum wire (an- 
nealed) 

Platinum wire ( not an- 
nealed) 

Tin 

IJoId (cast). 

Silver (cast) 

Lead 

?lnc 

Brass (csst) 

Copper (cast) 



Lbs.* 



l.i.OOO 
24,000 
50,000 
'2^,000 
40,000 
10,000 
60,000 
46,000 
66,000 
35,000 

39,000 

5fi,000 

3,500 

?0,000 

40,000 

2,000 

5,400 

24,000 

•-•4,000 



JIaterials. 



MKTAl.S. 




Soft copper wire 


35,000 


Hard " " 


60,000 


Cast iron 


20,1)00 


" St. el 


60,000 


Wrou)»ht iroi 


50,000 


Soft steel 


58,000 


Carbon steel (not an- 




nealed ) 


75,000 


Carbon sti:el(annealed; 


80,000 


" " oil temp- 




ered 


85.000 


Xickel steel (annealed ) 


80,000 


" " oil temp- 




ered 


90.0AO 


Rivet steel 


5.5.000 


Steel for bridges 


60.000 


-Medium steel 


65,000 


Vauauiuni steel (cast). 


70,000 


Chromium nickel steel 


81,400 


" vanadi urn 




steel 


100,000 



Lbs. ^ 



Materials. 



METALS. 

Xickel \anadium steel 
Chrome nickel vanad- 
ium steel 

Manganese steeU cast) 
" (roU'd) 

WOODS. 
.\sh 

Black «alnui 

ISeech 

Cedar 

Chestnut 

Elm 

Hemloi k 

Hickory 

Locust 

Lig^num vitae 

Maple 

White oak 

Live " 

Poplar 

Kedw.'od 



Lbs.* 


JIaterials. 


Lbs. * 




WOODS. 




99,700 


Spruce 


14,500 




White pine 


15,0i 


129,100 


Yellow " 


11 00i> 


90.000 


Ked fir 


10,000 


140,000 


Vellow fir 


12,000 




Teak 


14,000 


14,000 






12,000 


MTSCELI.ANEOtrs. 




14.500 


Blue Stone 


1,400 


lO.OiO 


Granite 


(00 


10,000 


Limestone 


I.OoO 


13,400 


M.arble 


7Ci) 


8,700 


Sandstone 


100 


1 5,001 1 


Bricks ( common) 


2nO 


22,000 


" (best hand 




ll.Ot.O 


})ie.ssed) 


400 


IO,oOO 


Ordinarv single 




14,.^00 


leather belting... . 


3,(0rt 


13,000 


Ordinary double 




7.000 


leather belting. . .. 


6.00O 


S.500I 


Cotton belting 


6,000 



TeiiAile Sttreiietti is the resistau.e of tne fib> 
their number, or to the area of its transverse section. 
ft tree. * Tensile strength in pounds per square inch 



e.s or parlicl.-s ot a boJy to sepiraiion. 
The fibres of wood are strongest near the 



It is therefore piojiortionat to 
centre of the truuU or limb of 



88 United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. 

Cfje <S:apitol at 212aas!)intjton» 

The Capitol is situated la latitude 38o 53' 20".4 north aud longitude 77° 00' 36".7 west from 
Greenwich. It fronts east, aud stands on a plateau eighty- eight feet above the level of the Potomac. 

The entire length of the building from north to south is seven hundred and flfty-one feet four 
inches, and its greatest dimension from east to west three hundred and fifty feet. The area covered 
by the building is 153, 112 square feet. 

The dome of the original central building was constructed of wood, covered with copper. This 
was replaced in 1856 by the present structure of cast iron. It was completed in 1865. The entire 
weight of iron used is 8,909,200 pounds. 

The dome is crowned by a bronze statue of Freedom, which is nineteen feet, six inches high 
and weighs 14,985 pounds. It was modelled by Crawford. The height of the dome above the base 
line of the east front is two hundred and eighty-seven feet five inches. The height from tlie top ol 
the balustrade of the building is two hundred and seventeen feet eleven inches. The greatest diam- 
eter at the base is one hundred and thirty- five feet five inches. 

The rotunda is ninety-seveu feet six inches in diameter, aud its height from the floor to the top of 
the canopy is one hundred and eighty feet three inches. 

The 8enate^Chamber is one hundred and thirteen feet three inches in length, by eighty feet three 
inches in width, and thirty-six feet in height. The galleries will accommodate one thousand persons. 

The Representatives' Hall is one hundred and thirty-nine feet in length, by ninety-three feet in 
width, and thirty-six feet in height. 

The southeast corner-stone of the original building was laid September 18, 1793, by President 
Washington with Masonic ceremonies. The corner-stone of the extensions was laid July 4, 1851, by 
President Fillmore. 

The room now occupied by the Supreme Court was, until 1859, occupied as the Senate Chamber. 
Previous to that time the court occupied the room immediately beneath, now used as a law library. 



{Address at the Dedication of Gettysbury Cemetery, November 19, 1863.) 

Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth upon this continent a 
new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are 
created equal. 

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation 
so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of 
that war. We are met to dedicate a portion of it as the final re.sting-place of those who 
here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper 
that we should do this. 

But in a larger sense we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow 
this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here have consecrated it 
far above our power to add or detract. The world will little note nor long remember 
what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us, the living, 
rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work that they have thus far so . nobly 
carried on. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before 
us; that from thase honored dead we take increased devotion to the cause for which 
they here gave the last full measure of devotion; that we here highly resolve that the 
dead shall not have died in vain; that the nation shall, under God, have a new birth of 
freedom, and that government of the people, by -the people, and for the people, shall not 
perish from the earth. 

WLnittn estates <2^oast antr i^cotrnic -Surijr^, 

The Coast and Geodetic Survey of the Department of Commerce and Labor Is charged with 
the survey of the coasts of the United States and coasts under the jurisdiction thereof, and the pub- 
lication of charts covering said coasts. This Includes base measure, trlangulatlon, topography and 
hydrography along .said coasts; the survey of rivers to the head of tide water or ship navigation, 
deep sea soundings, temperature and current observations along said coasts and throughout the 
Gulf and Japan streams, magnetic observations and researches and the publication of maps showing 
the variations of terrestrial magnetism; gravity research, determination of heights, the determina- 
tion of geographic positions by astronomic observations for latitude, longitude and azimuth, and 
by trlangulatlon to furnish reference points for State surveys and to co-ordinate Governmental 
surveys. 

The results obtained are published In annual reports aud In special publications; charts upon 
various scales. Including sailing charts, general charts of the coast and harbor charts; tide tables 
Issued annually In advance; coast pilots with sailing directions covering the navigable wat-ers: 
notices to mariners Issued weekly as a joint publication of the Coast and Geodetic Survey and the 
Bureau of Lighthouses and containing current Information necessary for safe navigation; catalogues 
of charts and publications, and such other puhllcatloud as may he required tt> carry out the 
organic law governing the sqrvey. 



Coustitutioii of the United States. 89 

(Jtoustitution of tl)c SEniteti .States* 

Preamble. Wk, the people of the United states, in order to form a more perfect Union, establish 

justice, insnre domestic tranquillity, provide for the common defence, promote the gen- 
eral welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do 

ordain and establish this ('onstitutiox for the United States of America. 

««. 

ARTICLE I. 

Legislative Skction I. All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested In a Congress of the United States, which 

powers. shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives. 

House of Repre- Section II. 1. The House of Representatives shall be composed of members chosen every second year by the 

sentatives. people of the several States, and the electors in each State shall have the qualiticatioas requisite for electors of the 

most numerous branch of the State Le°:islature. 

Qnallficationsof 2. No person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the age of twenty-five years, and been 

Represent a- seven years a citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant ot that State iu 

tives. which he ah^" he chosen. 

Apportionment 3. Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included with- 

of Repreaen-in this Union according to their respective numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole number of 

tativea. free persons, including those bound to service for a term of years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three-fifths of all 

other persons. The actual enumeration shall be made within three years after the first meeting of the Cciigvess oE 

^ t he United States, and within every subsequent term of ten vears, in such manner as they shall by law direct. The 

number of Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty thousand, but each State shall have at least one 

Representative, and until such enumeration shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to choose 

3; -Massachusetts, 8; Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, 1; Connecticut, 5; New York, 6; New Jersey, 4 ; 

Pennsylvania, S; Delaware, 1; ^laryland, 6; Virginia, 10; North Carolina, 5; Soutli Carolina, 5, and Georgia, 3.* 

Vacancies, how 4." When vacancies happen In the representation from any State, the Executive Authority thereof shall issue 

tilled. writs of election to fill such vacancies. 

Officers, how 5. The House of Representatives shall choose their Speaker and other oflBcers, and shall have the sole power of 

appointed. Impeachment. 
Senate. Sbctios III. 1. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, chosen by 

the Legislature thereof, for six years; and each Senator shall have one vote. 
Classification of 2. Immediately after they shall be assembled in consequence of the first election, they shall be divided as 
Senators. eqnally as may be into three classes. The seats of the Senators of the first class shall be vacated at the expiration 

of the second year, of the second class at the expiration of the fourth year, and of the third cl.iss at the expiration 
of the sixth year, so that one-third may be chosen every second year ; and if vacancies happen by resignation, or 
otherwise, during the recess of the Legislature of any State, the iExecutive thereof may make temporary appoint- 
ment until the next meeting of the Legislature, which shall then fill such vacancies. 
Qualifications of 3. No person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the age of thirty years, and been nine years a 
Senators. citizen of tae United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that State for which he s^all be 

chosen. 
President of the 4. The Vice-President of the United States shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no vote unless they 
Senate. be equally divided. 

5. The Senate shall choose their other officers, and also a President pro tempore, in the absence of the Vice- 
President, or when he shall exercise the office of President of the United States. 
Senate a court 6. The Senate shall have the sole power to trv all impeachments. When sifting for that purpose, they shall be 
for trial of im- on oath or affirm.ition. When the President of tne United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall pieside ; and no 
peachmeiit.s person .shall be convicted without the concurrence of two-thirds of the members present. 
Juiigment in ?. Judgment in cases ot impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from office, and disqualification 

caseof couvic- to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States ; but the party convicted shall never- 
tion. theless be liable and subject to indictment, trial, judgment, and punishment, .iccording to law. 

ElectionsofSen- Skction IV. 1. The times, places, and manner of holding elections tor Senators and Representatives shall be 
ators and Rep- prescribed in each State bv the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by law make or alter such 
resentatives. regulations, e.vcept as to places of choosing Senators. 
Meeting of Con- 2. The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and such meeting shall be on the first Monday in 

gress, December, uuless they shall by law appoint a different day. 

Organization of Sbction V. 1. Each House shall be the judge of the elections, returns, and qualifications of its own members. 

Congress. and a majority of each shall constitute a quorum to do business; but a smaller number may adjourn from day to 

day, and may be authorized to compel the attendance of absent members iu such manner and under such penalties 

as each House may provide. 

Rule of pro- 2. Each House may determine the rules of its proceedings, punish its members for disorderly behavior, and with 

ceedings. the concurrence of two-thirds expel a member. 

Journals of 3. Each House shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and from time to time publish the same, excepting such 
each House, parts as may in their judgment require secrecy ; and the yeas and nays of the members of either House on any 
question shall, at the desire of one-fifth of those present, be entered on the journal. 
Adjournment of 4. Neither House, during the session of Congress, shall, without the consent of the other, adjourn for more 

Congress. than three days, nor to any other pl^ce than that in which the two Houses shall be sitting. 

Pa\ and prlvl- Skction VI. 1. The Senators and Representatives shall receive a comnen.sation for their services, to be ascer- 
leges of mem- tatned by law, and paid out of the Treasury of the United States. They snail in all cases, except treason, felony, 
hers. and breach of the peace, be privileged from arrest during their attendance at the session of their respective Houses, 

and in going to and returning from the same; and for any speech or debate in either House they shall not be ques- 
tioned in any other place. 
Other offices 2. No Senator or Representative shall, during the time for which he was elected, be appointed to an v civil office 
prohibited. under the authority of the United States which shall have been created, or the emoluments whereof shall have been 
i ncreased during such time; and no person holding any office under the United States shall be a member of either 
House during his continuance in office. 
Revenue bills. Ssction VII. 1. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives, but the Senate 

may propose or concur with amendments, as on other bills. 
How bills be- 2. Every bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the Senate shall, before It become a 
come laws. law, be presented to the President of the United States; if he approve, he shall sign it, but if not, he shall return it, 
with his objections, to that House in which it shall have originated, who shall enter the objections at large on their 
j ournal, and proceed to reconsider it. If .after such reconsideration two-thirds of that House shall agree to ptiss the 
b.ll, U shall be sent, together with the objections, to the other House, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered ; 
and if approved by two-thirds of that House it shall become a law. But in all such cases the votes of both Houses 
shall be determined by yeas and nays, and the names of the persons voting for and against the bill shall be entered 
on the journal of each" House respectively. If any bill shall not be returned by the President within ten days 
(Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to him, the same shall be a' Jaw in like manner as If he had 
signed It, uules.>i the Congress by their adjournment prevent its return; iu which case it shall not be a law. 

* See Article XIV., Amendments. 



90 Constitution of the United States. 



Approval and 3. Every order, resolution, or vote to which the concurrence of the Senate and House of Representatives may 
veto powers be necessary (except on a question of adjournuieut) shall be presented to the President of the United States; and 
of the Piesi- before the same shall take effect shall be approved by him, or being disapproved by him, shall be repassed b;^ two- 
dent, thirds of the Senate and the House of Bepreseutatives, according to the rules and limitations prescribed in the 
case of a bill. 
Powers vested Skction VTII. 1. The Congress shall have power: 
in Congress. To lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts, and excises, to pay the debts and provide for the common defence and 
general welfare of tlie United Sutes, but all duties, iuiposta, and excises shall be uniform throughout the United 
States. 

2. To borrow money on the credit of the United States. 

3. To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several State*, and with the Indian tribes. 

4. To establish an uuiturm rule or uacuralizaliuu and uniform laws ou the subject of bankruptcies throughout 
the United States. 

5. To coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, and fix the standard of weights and 
measures. 

6. To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the securities aud current coin of the United States. 
1. To establish post-offices and post-roadis. 

8. To promote the progress of science aud useful arts by securing for limited times to authors and inventors 
the exclusive rights to their respective writings and discoveries. 

y. To constitute tribunals inferior to the Supreme Court, 
lu. To detiue aud puuish piracies aud felonies committed ou the high seas, and offences against the law of 
nations. 

11. To declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, and make rules concerning captures on land and water. 

12. To raise and support armies, but uo appropriation of money to that use sliall be for a longer term than 
two years. 

13. To provide and maintain a navy. 

14. To make rules for the government and regul.ition of the land and naval forces. 

15. To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws o£ the Union, suppress Insurrections, and repel 
invasions. 

16. To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining the militia, and for governing snch part of them as may 
be employed in the service of the United States, reserving to the Slates respectively the appomtment of the oflScers, 
and the authority of training the militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress. 

n. To exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever over such district (not exceeding ten miles sqnare) 
as may, by cession of particular States and the acceptance of Congress, become the seat of Government of the 
United States, and to exercise like authority over all places purchased by the consent of the Legislature of the State 
la winch the same shall be, for the erection of forts, magazines, arsenals, dry-docks, and other needful buildings. 

18. To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and 

all other powers vested by this Constitution iu the Uoverumcnt of the United States, or iu auy department or 

officer thereof. 

Immigrants, .Skction IX. 1. The migration or importation of such persons as any of the States now existing shall think 

how admitted, proper to admit shall not be j)rohibiled by the Congress prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but 

a lax or duty may be imposed on such importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each person. 

Habeas corpus. '.'. The privilege of the writ of habexs corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in cases of rebellion or 

invasion the public safety may require it; 
Attaimier. 3. No bill of attainder or ex post facto law shall be passed. 

Direct taxes, 4. No capitation or other direct tax shall be laid, unless in proportion to the census or enumeration hereinbefore 

directed to be taken. 
Regulations re- 5. No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from any State. 

g.'irUiiig cus- 6. No preference shall be given by any regulation of commerce or revenue to the ports of one State over those of 
toms duties. another, nor shall vessels bound to or from one State be obliged to enter, clear, or pay duties in another. 
Moneys, how 7. No money shall be drawn from the Tre.asury but in consequence of appropriations made by law ; and a reg- 

diawn. nlar statement and account of the receipts aud expenditures of all public money shall' be published from time to 

time. 
Titles of nobil- 8. No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States. And no person holding any office of profit or 
ily prohibited, trust under them shall, without the consent of the Congress, accept of any present, emolument, ot&ce, or title of 
auy kind whatever from any king, prince, or foreign state. 
Powers of Section X. 1. No State shall enter into auy treaty, alliance, or confederation, grant letters of marque and re- 
Slalesdetined. prisal, com money, emit bills of credit, make anything but gold and silver coiu a tender iu payment of debts, pass 
auy bill of attainder, ex post facto law, or law impairing the obligation of contracts, or graut any title of nobility. 

2. No State shall, without the consent of the Congress, lay any impost or duties on imports or exports, except 
what may be absolutely necessary for executing its inspection laws, and the net produce or all duties and imposts, 
] aid by any State on imports or exports, shal 1 be for the use of the Treasury of the United States ; and all such laws 
shall be subject to the revision and control of the Congress. 

3. No State shall, without the consent of Congress, lay any duty of tonnage, keep troops or ships of war in 
time of peace, enter into any agreement or compact with another State, or with a foreign power, or engage in war, 
unless actually invaded, or in such imminent danger as will not admit of delay. 

ARTICLE II. 

Executive pow- Section I. 1. The Executive power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America. He shall 

er, in whom hold his office during the term of four years, aud, together with the Vice-President, chosen for the same term, be 
vested. elected as follows: 

Electors. 2. Each State shall appoint, in snch manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a number of electors, equal 

to the whole number of Senators and Representatives to vimich the State may be entitled in the Congress; but no 
Senator or Representative or person holding an office of trust or profit under tne United States shall be appointed an 
elector. 
Proceedings of 3. [The electors shall meet in their respective States and vote by ballot for two persons, of whom one at least 
electors. shall not be an inhabitant of the same State with themselves. And they shall make a list of all the persons voted 

for, and of the number of votes for each, which list they shall sign and certify and transmit, sealed, to the seat 
of the Government of the United States, directed to the President of the Senate. The Presideutof the Senate shall, 
i n the presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the certificates, and the votes shall then be 
counted. The person having the greatest number of votes shall be the President, if such number be a majority of 
Proceedings of the whole number of electors appointed, and if there be more than one who have such majority, and have an equal 
the House of number of votes, then the House of Representatives shall immediately choose by ballot «ne of them for President ; 
Repre.se u t a -and if no person have a majority, then from the five highest on the list the said House shall in like manner choose 
tivea. the President. But in choosing the President, the vote shiill be taken by States, the representation from each 

State having one vote. A quorum, for this purpose, shall consist of a member or members from two-thirds of the 
States, and a majority of all the States shall be necessary to a choice. In every case, after the choice of the Presi- 
dent, the person having the greatest number of votes of the electors shall lie the Vice-President. But if there 
should remain two or more who have equal votes, the Senate shall choose fron) them by ballot the Vice-Presi- 
dent.]* 
Tims of choos- •!. The Congress may determine the time of choosing the electors and the d.-iv on which they shall give their 
ing electors, votes, which day shall be the same throughout the Uuiwd States. 

-^ * This clause is superseded by Article XII., Amendments^ 



Oonstliutioii of the United States. 91 

(jiial.ficalicnsof 5. No pfsoo except a iiatuial born citizen, or a ciiutn of the United States at the time of the adoption of 

the Ptesideut. this Constitution, shall be eligible to the office of Presidt'ot ; n«ither shall any person be eligible to that om^.e who 
• snail not have attained to the a§e of thirly-tive vears and been fourteen years a resident wiihin the UnjiedSiates. 

ProTision In 6. In case ot tbe removal ot the President from office, or of his death, resigrnation, or inability to discharge the 
casr of his dis- powers and duties of tne said office, the same shall devolve on the Vice-President, and the Congress may bv law 
ability. provide for the case of removal, death, resignation, or inability, both of the President and Vice-President, declaring 

what officer shall then act as President, and such officer soall act accordingly until the disability be removed or a 
Presideut shall be elected. 
Salary of the 7. The President snail, at stated times, receive for his services a compensation which shall neithe' be Increased 
President. nor diininishid doring the period for which he shall have been elected, and lie shall not receive within thai period 
any other emolument from the United Slates, or any of them. 
Oath of the 8. Before be enter on the execution of his office heshall take the foUowiner oath or affirmation : 

Ptesiorci. "1 do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faiihtully execute the office of President of the United States, 

and will, to the tiest of my «biliiy, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States.'' 
Duties ot the Section II 1. The Presideut shall be Comniandcr-in-Chief of the Army aod Navy of the Uuitcd States, and 
President. of tne, miliim of the several Siiiies when callnl into the .ictus' service of the United States ; he may lequiie tne 
opinicn. in n-ntmg, of the principal officer in each ot thi; executive departments upon any subject relaiing to tne 
djties of their lespective offices, and ii" stiall have power to giani reprieves and pardons for offences against, toe 
United Stales except in cases ot impf.achmi-nt. 
May make tiea- 4. He shall nave power, oy aod with in>i advice and consent of the Senate, to make treaties, provide 1 two 
ties, appoint thi>ds cf the Senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by atji with the advice and consent ot the 
ambassadors, .S-^^nate shall appoint ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, judges of the Supreme Court, and all oiher 
judges, etc. cfficers of the United States whose appointments are noi. herein otherwise provided for. and which snali be es 
taOlished by law ; but the Congress mav by law vest the appointmeut ot such interior officers as they think proper 
i n tne President alone, m the coiiru of law, or id th" heads ot departments. 
May fill Tacan- 3. The President shall have power to fill op all vacancies that ma v happen during the recess of the Senate 

cies. by graDtmsr commissions, which shall expire at ihe end of then next, session. 

M.Hv make rec- Skction 111. He shall trotn time t.o time g'lve to thi> Cong'ress information of the state of the Union, ani 
oinmi'udations recommend to tneir consideration such measures ay fie shall iudge oecessarv and expedient, he may, on extrturdi 
to and con nary occasions, convene both Houses, or either ot them, and incase of disagreemenc between them wuh respeci to 
veneCongiess. the time of adjournment, Be mav adjourn ihein to such time as he shall think proper; he sOail receive embassadors 
and other puhlic ministers; he shalltake care that the laws b* taitatully executed, ana sball commission all the 
officers of the Untied States. 
How officers Sectios IV. The President, Vice Presiden',, and all civil officers ot thf United Slates shall be removed from 
mav be re office on impeacnment tor and conviction of treasrrn. bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors. 

°'"^'' ARTICLE III. 

Judicial power. Section I. The judicial power of the United Slates snati be vested in one Supreme Court, and in such inferior 
how invested, courts as the Congress may from lime to time ordaiD af>d estaolish. The judges, both ot tne Supreme and inferior 
courts, shall hold iht-ir offices daring good behavior, aud shall at stated times receive for their services a compensa- 
tion which shall not be diminished during then- continuance m office. 
To wnat cases i t Section 11. I. Th'^ judicial power shall extend to all cases in taw and equity arising ander this Constitotion. 
extends. the laws of the United Stales, and treaties made, or which shall be made, under their authority; lo all cases nlfecting 

ambassadors, other puolic ministers, aod consuls; to all cases of admiralty ani maritime jurisdiction. lo cor.tro 
versies to which thf- Utiiled States shall De a party; to controversies between iwo or more States, nelween a Stale 
and citizens ot another Stare, between citizens of different Slates, between citizens ot thi» same Siat^ claiming latjds 
under grants of different States, and between a State, or the citizens thereof, aoc foreign States, citizens, or subjects. 
Jurisdiction of 'i. In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers, and consuls, and those in whico a Slai- shall oe 
the Supreme party, the Supreme Court shall have original jurisdiction, lo all the other cases Detore-meotiocea the Supreinj 
Court. Court shall nave appellate junsdictioa both as to law and fact, with such excrpuons aod under sucn reguiaiions as 

the Congress shall make. 
Rules respecting 3. Vhe tnal of all crimes, except in cases ot' impeachment, shall be oy jury, and such trial shall be hell in the 
trials. State where the said crimes shall have been committed; out when not committed wiinin any State the iriai shall o; it 

such place or places as the Congress may Dy law nave directed. 
Treason defined. Section III. I. Treason against the United States snail consist only in levying war against them, or 'n 
adhering to their enemies, giving them aid and cointort. No person shall be convicted of treason unless on the 
testimony of tw^o witnesses to the same overt act, cr on confession m open court. 
How punished. 2. T^e Consrre.ss shall nave power fo declare the punishment of treason, out no attainder of treason shall work 

corruption of blood or forfeiture except during the iife of the person attained. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Rightsof States Section" T. Full faith and credit shall be given in each State to the public acts, records, and judicial proceed- 
aod records. ings ot every other State. Aod the Congress may by general laws prescribe the manner in which such acts, record!*, 
and proceeding? snail De proved, and the f ffect thereof. 

Privileges of Sectiov II. 1. The ciiizens of each State shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of citizens in 
citizens. the several States. 

Executive requi- 2. A person charged in an" State with trea.son, felonv, or other crime, who sliail flee from justice, and be found 
sittoos. In anotnei State, shHll, on demand of 'ht> E.xecutive authority of the State from which he fled, be delivered up, lo oe 

removed to the State having jurisdiction ot the crime. 

Laws regulating 3. No person held lo service or labor m GUI' State, under the laws thereof, escaping into another shall, in con- 

service or la- sequence of any law or regulation tbeietn, be discharged from sucti service or labor, but snali be delivered up on 
bcr. claim of the party lo whom such service or labor m:iy be due. 

NewSfate5,now Section IIl^ 1. New Stales may be admitted by the Congress icto this Union; but no new State shall be 
termed a u u formed or erected wiihin th- inrisdiction ot anv other Stale, noi any State oe formed ov the junction of two or more 
admitted. States, or parts of States, wthout the consent of th.- Legisiitures of the States concerned, as well as ot the Congress. 

Power of Con- 2. The Cong'ress shall have power to dispose of and make all needful rules and regulations respecting the tern 

gress over tory or otner cropertv tjelongmg to the United Stales, and nothing in this Constitution shall be so construed as to 
punlic lands, prejudice any claims of the United Slates, or of any particular State. 

Kppuollcan gov- Skction IV. The United States shall guarantee to every Stale in this Union a republican form of government, 

ertiment guar- and snail protect each ot them against invasion, and, on application of ine Legislature, ot ot iDe Executive (when 
anleed. lae uegisiature cannot be convened), against domestic violence. 

ARTICLE V. 

Constitution, The Congress, wbetiever two-thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary, .shall propose amendments to this 

how amended. Ccosi't^lion, or, on the application of the Legislatures of two-lhirds of the several States, shail call a ccnvention fcr 
proposing imendmeois. wnicn, in either case, shall be valid to all intents and purposes, as pan ot this Ccnstitution, 
When ratified bv the Legislature.sof three fourths of the several States, or by conventions in three-fourths thereof, as 
tne one or the other mode of ratification mav be proposed bv the Congress, provided that no amendment which may 
he made prior to the vear one thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any manner affect the first aod fourlo 
clauses in the Ninth Section of the First Article; aod that no State, without its (cnsent, snail be deprived of us 
equal !>uffrage iu the Senate. 

Validity of ARTICLE VI. 

deott recog- '. All d'bts rontracfed and eng.ieements entered into before the adoption of this Constitution shall be as valid 

nized. against the United States under this Constitution as under the Confederation. 



92 Co7istitution of the United States. 



Supreme ]aw of 3. This Constitution ao<i the \&ws ot the United Slates which sbali be made lo parsoance thereof and iii 
tne land de> treaties made, or which shall be madi?, under ide authority of 'the United titates, shall l>e the snpreme law of me. 
£)ied. laoi, and the judges in every ijtate shall be bound thereby, aoytbing in tne Coastitutioo or la«fs of any Htate 

to tne contrary notwithstanding. 
Oaln; of whom 3. The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and tn« members of tDe several Stale Leg^lslatures, and 
required and all executive and judicial oQicers, both of tbe United tiutes and of ttie several Slates, sball be bound by oath or 
for wnat. adirmation to support this Constitution ; but no religious lest snail ever be required as a qnailticatiOD to any office 

or public trust under the United States. 

ARTICLE VII. 

Ratification of The ratification of the Conventions of nine dutes shall be sufficient for the establishmeDt of this CoaBtitutU>Q 
the Constitu- between tne States so ratityine the same. 

"°°" AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION. 

ARTICLE I. 

Kelieion and Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof i 
free speech, "r abndging the freedom of speech or of the press , oi the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to peti- 
tion the Government for a redress of grievances. 

ARTICLE II. 

Right to bear A well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear 
arms. ' arms snail not be infringed. 

ARTICLE III. 

Soldiers in time No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quarterea in any bouse without the consent of the owner, act In time of 
of peace. war but in a manner to be prescribed by law. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Rlghtof search. The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches 
and seizures, shall not be violated, and uo warrants shall issue but upon probable cause, supported by oath or 
affirmation, and partlcuiarly describing tne place to be searcbed, and the persons or things to be bcized. 

ARTICLE V. 

Capital crimes No person shall be held to answer for a capital or other infamous crime unless on a presentment or Indictmeoi 

and arrest of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the militia, when in actual service, lo 

therefor. iinoe of war or public danger ; nor shall any person be subject for thr same offence lobe iwice put in jeopardy of 

life or limb; nor snail be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against nimself, nor be deprived of lite, 

liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be laKen for public use without just 

compeosaiion. 

ARTICLE M. 

Right to speedy In all criminal prosecutions, the accuse! shall en]oy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial 
trial. i ury o£ tne ritate and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, wbicn district shall have been previous- 

ly ascertamod by law, and to be informed of tne nature and causa of ine accusation ; to be ccufronted with the 
witnesses .tgainst him; to nave compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have tne as- 
sistance of counsel for his defence. 

ARTICLE VII. 

Trial by jury. In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury 

shall be preserved, aud no taci Iritd oy a jury shall be otherwise le-examiced in any court of tbe United States 
than according to the rules of the common law. 

ARTICLE VIIL 

Excessive bail. Excessive bail shall not be required, cor excessive hues imposed, oor cruel and unusual punisbmenis inflicted. 

ARTICLE IX. 

Enumeration of The enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights shall not be construed to deny or disparage others re- 
rignts. laiaea by tbe people. 

ARTICLE X. 

Reserved rights The powers not delegated to tbe United States by tlie Constitution, nor prohibited by it to theStates, are re- 
of Stales. served to the States respectively, or to the people. 

ARTICLE XI. 

Judicial power. The judicial power of the United Stales shall not be cousirued to extend to any suit la law or equity, com- 

menced or prosecuted against one of the Uniud States, by citizens of another Slate, or oy citizens or subjects ot 
any foreign State. 

ARTICLE XII. 

Electors in The electors shall meet in their respective Slates, and vote by ballot for President and Vice-President, one of 

Pre sidential whom at least shall not be an iubabitanl of the same State with themselves; ibey shall name in iheir ballots ine 
elections. person voted for as President, and m distinct ballots the person voted for as Vice-President; and tb>y shall make 

distinct iisls of all persons voted for as President, and of all persons volea for as Vice-President, and of the uum- 
btrr of votes for each, which iisl they shall sign and cerlity, and transmit, sealcfd, to ibe heal of the Govemmcni tf 



the United Slates, directed lo the President of the Senate; the Presiaeni of lue Senate shall, in iho presence of ibe 
Senate and House of Representatives, open all tbe cenin.:ates, and ih-* votes shall then be counted ; the person nav- 
ing tne greatest oumber of votes for President shall be the President, if such number be a majority ot the whole 
number of electors appointed; and if no person have such majority, then rrom the persons having the highest num- 
bers, uot exceeding three, on the list of those voted tor as President, the House ot Representatives shall choose im- 
mediately, oy ballot, the President. But in choosing the £^■esident, the votes shall be taken by Swtes, the reprr- 
aentanon from each Stale having one vote ; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or members from 
two-tnirds of the States, and a majority of all the States shall be necessary to a choice. And if lb' Bsusr of Rep- 
resentatives shall not choose a President, whenever the right of choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth 
day of March uext follo^ving, then the Vice-President shall act as President, as in the case of the deain or other 
Vice-President, constitutional disaoiiicy of the fh-esident. Th? person having the greatest number of votes as Vice-Presidcoi snail 
oe the Vice-Presii.'ot, if such number be a majority of tbe whole number of electors appointed, and if no person 
nave a majority, tni;n from the two highest numbers on the list the Senate «hatl choose ihe Vi:e-Presiieol ; a 
quorum for tne purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of Senators, and a majority of the whole 
number snail be necessary to a choice. But uo person roastittttionitiy laeilgible to ihe offi,.e of President unall t,<3 
eligible to that of Vice-President of the United States. 

ARTICLE XIII. 

Slavery pro- 1. Xeiiher slavery nor iovoluuiary servitude, except as a panlshroea: for crime whereof ih« p«ny sb^U 

flibiteJ. aa»< been duly convicted, snali exist wuhiu tbe United States, cr any place suojeot Id their jiifislk'tiou. 

'i. Congress shall have power lo enforce tois article l»y approprute legislation. 



The National Flag, 93 



CONSTITUTION OP THE UNITED STATES— Con<m«ed. 



ARTICLE XIV. 

Protection for 1. All persona born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the 
all dtlzens. United States and of the State wherein thev reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the 
privileges or Immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or 
property without due process of law, nor deny to anv person within Its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. 
Apportionment 2. ilepresentatlves shall be apportioned amon^ tlie several States according to their respective numbers, counting 

of Kepresen- the whole number of persons in esch State, excludm^ Indians not taxed. But when the rignt to vote at any election 
tatives. for the choice of electors for President and Vice-President of the United States, Representatives in Congress, the ex- 

ecutive and judicial officers of a State, or the members of the Legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male mem- 
bers of such State, being of twenty-one years of age, and citizens of the United States, or in any way abridged, ex- 
cept for participation in rebellion or other crime, the basis of representation therein shall be reduced in the propor- 
tion whicn the number of such male citizens shall bear to the whole number of male citizens twenty-one years of 
age in such State. 
Kebe 1 1 i o n 3. No person shall be a Senator or Representatire in Congress, or elector of President and Vice-President, or 

against the holding any office, civil or military, under the United States, or under any State, who, having previously taken an 
United States, oath, as a member of Congress, or as sn officer of the United States, or as a member of any State Legislature, or as 
an executive or judicial officer of any State, to support the Constitution of the United States, shall have engaged in 
insurrection or rebellion against the same, or given aid and comfort to the enemies thereof. But Congress may, by 
a vote of two-thirds of each House, remove such disability. 
The public 4. The validity of the public debt of the United States, authorized by law, including debts incurred for payment 
debt. of pensions and bounties for services in suppressing insurrection and rebellion, shall not be questioned. But neither 

the United States nor any State shall assume or pay any debt or obligation incurred in aid of insurrection or rebellion 
against the United States, or any claim for the loss or emancipation of any slave ; but all such debts, obligations, 
and claims shall be held illegal and void. 

5. The Congress shall have power to enforce by appropriate legislation the provisions of this article. 

AIITICL.E XV. 

Right of suf- I . The right of the citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or 

rrage. by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. 

3. The Congress shall have power to enforce the provisions of this article by appropriate legislation. 



RATIFICATION OF THE CONSTITUTION. 

The Constitution was ratified by the thirteen original States iu the following order : 



Delaware, December 7, 1787, nnanimously. 
Pennsj'lvania, December 12, 1787, vote 46 to 23. 
New Jersey, December 18, 1787, unanimously. 
Georgia, January 2, 1788, unanimously. 
Connecticut, January 9, 1788, vote 128 to 40. 
Massachusetts, February 6, 1788, vote 187 to 168. 
Maryland, April 28, 1788, vote 63 to 12. 



South Carolina, May 23, 1788, vote 149 to 73. 

New Hampshire, June 21, 1788, vote 57 to 46. 

Virginia, June 25, 1788, vote 89 to 79. 

New York, July 26, 1788, vote 30 to 28. 

North Carolina, November 21, 1789, vote 193 to 75, 

Rhode Island, May 29, 1790, vote 34 to 32. 



RATIFICATION OF THE AMENDMENTS. 

I. to X. inclusive were declared in force December 15, 1791 . 

XI. was declared iu force January 8, 1798. 

XII., regulating elections, was ratified by all the States except Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire, which 

rejected it. It was declared in force September 28, 1804. 
XIII. The emancipation amendment was ratified by 31 of the 36 States ; rejected by Delaware and Kentucky, not acted on by Texas ; 

conditionally ratified by AKabama and Mississippi. Proclaimed December 18, 1865. 
XrV. Reconstruction amendment was ratified by 23 Northern States; rejected by Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, and 10 Southern 

States, and not acted on by California. The 10 Southern States subsequently ratified under pressure. Proclaimed July 28, 1868. 
XV. Negro citizenship amendment was not acted on by Tennessee, rejected by California, Delaware, Kentuckv, Marvland, New 

Jersey, and Oregon ; ratified by the remaining 30 States. New York rescinded its ratific.ition January 5, 1870. Proclaimed 

March 30, 1870. ^ 



5ri)c National JFlaij. 

Thk official flag of tlie United States bears forty-eiglit white stars in a blue field, arranged iu six 
rows of eight stars each. Two stars were added iu 1912 bv the admission of Arizona and New- 
Mexico to the Union. The garrison flag of the Army is made of bunting, thirty-six feet flv and 
twenty feet hoist; thirteeti stripes, and in the upper quarter, next the staff", is the field or "union" " 
of stars, equal to the number of States, on blue field, over one-third length of the flag, extendi-ig 
to the lower edge of the fourth red stripe from the top. The storm flagis twenty feetbv ten feet 




------ pei^^ C-— , 

and wlute, the union of the ensign bearing the arms of the United States in dark blue on a white 
field." Thesixteenstripesrepresented the number of States which had been admitted to the Union at 
that time, and no change has been made since, June 14, the anniversary of the adoption of the flair 
is celebrated as Flag Day in a large part of the Union. 

IN ORDER TO SHOW PROPER RESPECT FOR THE FLAG THE FOLLOWING CERE- 
MONY SHOULD BE OBSERVED: 

It should not be hoisted before sunrise nor allowed to remain up after sunset. 

At "retreat," sunset, civilian spectators should stand at "attention" and uncover during tliH 
playing of the "Star Spangled Banner." Military spectators are required by regulation to stand 
at "attention" and give the military salute. 

When the National colors are passing on parade, or in review, the spectator should, if walking, 
halt, and if sitting, arise and stand at attention and uncover. 

When the flag is flown at half staff as a sign of mourning it should be hoisted to full staff at the 
conclusion of the funeral. 

In placing the fla^ at half staflF, it should first be hoisted to the top of the staff and then lowered to 
position, and preliminary to lowering from half staff, it should be first raised to the top. 

On Memorial Day, May 30, the flag should flv at half staff from sunrise to uoon and full staff from 
noon to sunset. Som of the Revolution tn the State of Neio York. 



94 Declaration of Independence. 

declaration of JiuTrcpentrnicr* 

IN CONGRESS JULY 4, 1776. 

The nnauimous declaration of the thirteen "United States of America. "When in the Course of 
human events, it becomes necessary tor one people to dissolve the political bands which have con- 
nected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal sta- 
tion to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's Gou entitles them, a decent respect to the opinions 
of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation. 

We hold these truths to be self-es^ident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by 
their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of 
Happiness. That to secure these rights. Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their jusi 
powers from the consent of tbe governed. That wbenereranv Form of Government becomes destruc- 
tive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it. and to institute new Govern- 
ment, laying Its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form as to them 
Shall seem most likely to efiect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed. wiU dictate that 
Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accoidiugly 
all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufTerable than 
to riebt themselves oy abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But w hen a long train of 
abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under 
absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their diitv. to throw off such Government, ana to provide 
new Guards for their future security. Such has been the patient sufferance of these Co'.auies; and 
such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems ot Government Tbe 
history of the present King ot Great Britain is a history of repeated iniuries and usurpations, all 
having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, 
let Facts be submitteo to a candid world. 

He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good. 

He has forbidden his Governors to pa.ss Laws of immediate and pressing importance, unless sus- 
pended in their operation till his Assent should be obtained; and when so suspended, he has utterly 
neglected to attend to them. 

He has refused to pass other Laws for the accommodation of large districts of people, unless those 
people would relinquish tbe right of Representation in the Legislature, a right; inestimable to them 
and formidable to tyrants only. 

He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the 
depositor^" of their public Records, lor the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his 
measures. 

He has di-ssolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly firmness his inva- 
sions on tue rights of the people. 

Hehasrefused for a long time, aftersuch dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the 
Legislative powers, incapable ot Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exer- 
cise; the State remaining in the meantime exposed to all the dangers tf invasion from without, and 
convulsions within 

He has endeavored to prevent the population of these States; for that purpose obstructing the 
Laws for Naturalization of Foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migrations hither, 
and raising the conditions of new A ppropriations of Lands 

He nas o'bstructed the Administration of Justice, by refusing hi.s Assent to Laws for establishing 
Judiciary Powers. 

He nas made Judges dependent on his Will alone, for the tenure of theiroffices, and the amount 
and pavmeiit ot tneir salaries 

He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers lo hara.ss our peo- 
ple, and eat out their substance 

He nas Kept among us, in times of peace. Standing Armies without the Consent of our legislature. 

Hehasaffecteo to render the Military independent of and superior to the Civil power. 

He nas combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution, and 
unacknowledged oy our laws: giving his Assent to their Acts of pretended Legislation: 

For quartering large bodies ot armed troops among us: 

For protecting ihem, b*' a mock Trial, from puuisnment for any Murders which they should com- 
mit on the Inhabitants of these States: 

For cutting ofTour Trade with all parts of the world: 

Forimposing Taxes on us without our Consent: 

For depriving us m many casetc of the benefiisof Trial by jury: 

Fortransporting us beyond Seas to be triea for pretenaed offences: 

For abolishing the free System ot Englisn f^aws ui a neigbboring Province, establishing therein an 
Arbitrary government, and enlarging us Boundaries so as to render it at once an example and fit 
instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into these Colonies: 

For taking away our Charters, abolishmg our most valuable Laws, and altering fundamentally 
the Forms of ourGovernments. 

For suspending our own fjegislatures, and declaring themselves invested with power to legislate 
for ii-> 10 all cases whatsoever 

He has abdicated Government here, by declaring us out of his Protection and waging War 
against us. 

He nas plundered our seas, ravaged our Coasts, burnt our towns, and destroyed the lives of our 
people 

He is at this time transporting large Armies of foreign Mercenaries to compleat the works of 
death, desolation and lyranny, already nesrun witn circumstances of Crueitj* <fc peifidy scarcely 
paralleled in the most oarbarous ages, and totally unwortby the Head of a civilized nation. 

He nas constrained our lellow-Citizens taken captive on iiie high seas to bear Arms against their 
Country, to become me executioners of their friends and Brethren, or to fall cnemselves by tneir 
Hands. 

He nas excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and h. is endeavored to bring on themnabitants 
of our frontiers, the merciless Indian .-ravages, whose known rule of warfare, id an anaisiinguisned 
destruction of all ages, sexes ana conditions. 

£n every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Redress in the most humole terms: 



Declaration of I)idependence. 



95 



DECLARA.TJON OF iN DEPENUEXCE— Conanuai. 

Our repealed Petitions have been answered only hy repealed injury. A Prince, wiiose cliaracter is 
ilms oiarReu oy every act wtiicii may deline a ryraut, is uudc to be ibe ruler ot a Iree people. 

Nor bave We oeen wanting in attentions to our Bruisli breibren. We hav^ warned them from 
lime to time ot atiemois oy tbeir leijislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us We 
nave reminded tbem oi ine circumstances ot our emigration and setilemeui uere. We liave ap- 
pealeo to tbeir native justice and magnanimity, and we liavecoujured mem ny ibe tiesor our common 
kindred lo disavow tbe<e usurpations, wbion. would inevitaoly interrupt our conuections and corre- 
sponaeuce. They loo nave been deal lO the voice oi lusticeand ot coiisangninity. We must, tnere- 
lore, acquiesce )u tne necessity, wincli denounces our beparation, ana uoltl them, as we xioid lue 
lesLot manKiuu. Enemies in War. In Peace Frieuds. 

WE. THEREFOFiE, the Rkpresk.vtativks of tbe Unitkd statk.s ok America, i.n Genkkal 
CoNGHK.ss, .A-ssemnied. appeuliiia lottie Supreme Judge of me world tot the lectituae or ourioten- 
tiuiis. do. in the Name, auu ov autnority of tbe good People ot tnese Colonies, solemnly pcblish 
and declare, Tliat these United Colonies are. and ot Rigbt ought to be kree and independent 
States; tbai thev are .-Vb.solved trom all .A.llegiance to tbe Briiijiii Crown, and that all political cou 
nectioo between mem .-tnd me State ot Great Britain, is and oiignt to oe totally dissolved ; and mat 
as erek AND iN'DEPE.VDENT 8T A T Es, tbe V uave tull Power to levy War. concUide Peace contract 
Alliances, estaolisb Commerce, ana to do an oiber Acts and Tbiugs wuicb independent STArt-s 
may ot right do. And tor me -suppori of mis Declaration, wim a ttrm reliance on toe protection ot 
Diviue Providence, We mutually pledge loeacuolbet out Lives, our Fortunes anaoursacrea Honor. 

81GXERS OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE, 



Ni-Ml 



Adams, John . . 

Adams, Samuel. ...^.. 

Barileit, Josian 

Bra iton. Carter 

Carroll. Charles 

Chase, Samuel 

Clark, Abrabam 

CIvmer, George 

El'lerv, William 

Floyd, William 

Franklin, Benjamin.. 

Gerry, Elbndge 

Gwionelt, Button 

Hancock, John. 

Hall, Lyman 

Harrison, Benj 

Hart, John 

Hewes, Joseph . . ; . 
Hey ward, Jr., Thos... 

Hooper, Wm 

Hopkins. Steph 

Hopkmson, Francis... 

HuDtinglon, Saml 

Jeflerson. Tiro's 

Lee. Richard Henry . 
Lee. Francis Lighifoot 

Lewis. Franci.s 

Livingston, Philip. . . 
Lynch, J r , Thos.. . . 

M Kean, Thos 

Middletou Arthur... 

Morris, Lewis 

.Morns, Robert .... 

Morton, John 

Nelson, J r., Thos.. . . 

Paca, William 

Paiiie, Robert Treat. .. 

Peuu, Jobn 

Read. George 

Rodney, Caesar 

Ross. George 

Rush. Benjamin 

Rutiedge, Euward.. . 

Snerman, Roger 

Sraitu .fames 

Stockton, Richaia 

Sione, Thos 

Taylor. Geo . . . 
Thornton, Matthew. . 

Walton, George 

Whipple, Wuliam.. .. 

Williams William 

Wilson, .fames 
Witnerspoon, .John.. . . 

Woicoir, Oliver 

Wytne. George 



CoioQy. 


OciupatiOD 


Bori^. 


Mass. Bay.. 


Lawyer , . 


Oct. 30, 1735 


Mass. Bay. 


Merchant . 


Sep. 22. 1722 


N. Hamp . 


Pnysiciau ,. 


Nov . 1729 


Virginia 


Planter.. . 


Sep. 10. 1736 


Maryland.. 


Lawyer. . 


Sep. 20, 1737 


Maryland. 


Lawyer... . 


Apr, 17.1741 


N. Jersey.. 


Lawyer. .. 


Feo. l.->. i726 


Penn 


Merchant . . 


Jan, 2J, 1739 


Ruode Isi . 


f^awyer. . .. 


Dec, 22, 1727 


New VorK. 


Farmer.. . . 


Dec. 17, 1734 


Penn. . . 


Printer 


Jan. 17, 1706 


Mass. Bay. 


Mercnant .. 


July 17, 1744 


Georgia.. . 
Mass. Bay. 


Mercbaut... 


1732 


Mercbant... 


Jan, 12, 1737 


Georgia 


Physician .. 


1731 


Virginia... 


Farmer 


1740 


N. Jersey 


Farmer. ... 


1715 


N. Carolina 
S. Carolina. 
N. Carolina 


fjawj'er. 


1730 


f-awj'er 


1746 


Lawyer 


J line 17. 1742 


Rhode Isi . 


Farmer 


Mar. 7, J 707 


N. Jersey. . 


Lawyer 


1737 


Ct 


Lawyer. . 
Lawyer 


July 3. 1732 
Apr. 13, 1743 


Virginia. . 


Virginia ... 


Soldier.. . . 


Jan. 20. 1732 


Virginia. . 


Farmer 


Oct. 14, 1734 


New York. 


Merchant,. 


Marcn, 1713 


New York 


Mercbant . 


Jan. 15. 1716 


S.Carolina. 


Lawyer. . 


Aug. 5,1749 


Delaware .. 


l^awyer. ... 


Mar. 19, 1734 


«. Carolina. 
New York 


f^awver 


1743 


Farmer ... 


1726 


Penn 


Mercbant.. 


Jan. 20, 1734 


Penn 


Surveyor. .. 


i724 


Virginia .. 


Statesman.. 


Dec. 26. 1738 


Maryland.. 


Lawyer 


Oct. 31. 1740 


Mass Bay. 


Lawver. . 


1731 


N. Carolina. 


l-awj^er. . 


May 17, 1741 


Delaware.. 


Lawyer . . . 


1734 


Delawaie.. 


General ... 


1730 


Penn 


Lawyer . . 


.. 1730 


Penn 


Physician.. 
Lawyer 


Dec 24, 1745 
Nov 1749 


"^.Carolina. 


Ct 


Shoemaker 


Api. It), 1721 


Penn 


Lawyer .. 


^. 1710 


-N. Jersey.. 


I..awver. ... 


Oci. 1, 1730 


Maryland . 


Lawyer . . 


1742 


Penn 


Physician 


1716 


N. Hamp.. 


Pfivsician 


1714 


Georgia 


Lawver 


1740 


Ct 


Sailor 


. . . 1730 


Ct 


Statesman . 


Apr. 8, 1731 


Penn 


Lawyer 


1742 


.N.Jersey.. 


Mini.-ster . . . 


Fen o, 17 22 


Ct 


Physician 


Nov. 26, 1726 


Virginia 


f^awyer. . 


172<j 



lS<ribp!ace. 



Braiottee Ma«s 

Boston Mass 

AmesDury . . . Mass 

Newington Va 

Annapolis Md 

somerset Co Md 

Elizabethtowu, N. J 

Philadelphia Pa 

Newport R 1 

Setauket N , V 

Boston. JMa.os 

Maroiehead. . . . Mass 

i:ngland 

Brain tree iMass 

Ct 

Berkeley Va 

Hopewell .\. J 

Kingston jy. J 

St. Luke's s. c 

Boston . Mass 

Scituate Mass 

Philadelphia Pa 

Windnam Cl 

Shad well Va 

Sirailoid Va 

Strailord Va 

Llaudaff Wales 

Albany N. V 

Pr.Geofse's Co. S. C 

New London Pa 

Middleion Pi. ..S. C 
Morrisania. . . N. Y 

Lancashire Eug 

Ridley Pa 

York Va 

Wye Hail Md 

Boston ,., ". Mass 

Caroline Co Va 

Cecil Co Md 

Dover Del 

Newcastle Dei 

Beroerry Pa 

Cnarleston >>. C 

Newton .. . Ma.ss 

1 1 eland 

Princeton N. J 

Poiiitoia Manor. Md 

i leland 

1 1 el and 

Frederick Co Va 

Kittety Me 

Lebanon Ct 

St. Andrews ...Scot 

Yester .>cot 

Windsor Ct 

ElizaoeihCo. . . . \'a 




July 

Oct. 

May 

Oct 

Nov. 

June 

Sept 

Jan. 

Feb. 

A ug. 

Apr. 

Nov. 

May 

Oct. 



-f.-.>i t 



Apr. 



Nov, 

Mar. 

Oct.. 

July 

May 

Jan 

July 

J u lie 

Api . 

Dec. 

June 

June 

Jan. 

Jan. 

May 

A p r 

Jan. 

May 
Sept. 



July 

Apr. 

Jan. 

July 

July 

Feb. 

Oct. 

Feb. 

June 

Feo. 

Nov. 

Aug. 
Nov, 
Dec 
June 



4.1826 

3,1803 
19.1795 
i 0,1797: 
14. 1832 i 
19,1811 

1794 

23,1813 
15,1820 

1.1821 
17.1790 
23. 1 81 4 
27,1777 

8,1793 

. ,1784 
1791 

.. .1780 
10,1779 

1809 

1790 

13,1785 

9,1791 

5,1796 

4,1826 
19,1794 

1797 

;-;0, 1803 
12.1778 

. .1779 
24, J 81 7 

1,1788 
22,179- 

8, 1806 
....1777 

4.1789 

.. . 1799 

11,1814 

. ...1788 

. ..1798 

..1783 
... 1779 
19,1813 
23,1800 
2.i,179i 
11.1806 
28,1781 

5, 1787 
23,1781 
24,1803 

2.1804 
28, 1 785 

2.1811 
28, 1798 
15,1794 

1,1797 

8.1a06 



< 



91 

»l 

b6 

62 

96 

71 

69 

7o 

93 

87 

85 

71 

45 

57 

53 

51 

60 

49 

63 

49 

79 

54 

ti4 

83 

63 

63 

91 

63 

30 

84 

44 

72 

73 

53 

5x 

5V# 

84 

48 

64 

5.i 

49 

08 

5i 

73 

96 

51 

45 

65 

A^ 

64 

o5 

«l 

o6 

73 



bO 



96 Washiiigtooi^s J^areicell Adchess. 

EXTRACTS ' FROM HIS ADDRESS COUNSELLING THE MAINTENANCE OF THE 
UNION.— CONFINEMENT OF THE GENERAL GOVERNMENT TO ITS CONSTI- 
TUTIONAL LIMITATIONS, AND AVOIDANCE OF RELATIONS 
WITH FOREIGN POLITICAL AFFAIRS. 

{To the People qf t?ie United States on His Approaching Jietirement from the Presidency. ) 

Here, perhaps, I ought to stop; but a solicitude for your welfare, which cannot end 
but with my life, and the apprehension of danger natural to that solicitude, urge me, on 
an occasion like the present, to offer to your solemn contemplation, and to recommend to 
your frequent review, some sentiments, which are the result of much reflection, of no in- 
considerable observation, and which appear to me all-important to the permanency of your 
felicity as a people. These will be afforded to you with the more freedom, as you can 
only see in them the disinterested warnings of a parting friend, who can posslblj' have 
no personal motive to bias his counsel; nor can I forget, as an encouragement to it, 
your indulgent reception of my sentiments on a former and not dissimilar occasion. 

Interwoven as is the love of liberty with every ligament of your hearts, no recom- 
mendation of mine is necessary to fortify or confirm the attachment. 

PRESERVATION OF THE UNION, 

The unity of government, which constitutes you one people, is also now dear to 
yeu. It is justly so; for it is a main pillar in the edifice of your real independence — 
the support of your tranquillity at home, your peace abroad, of your safety, of your 
"prosperity, of that very liberty which you so highly prize. But a.s it is easy to foresee 
that, from different causes and from different quarters, much pains will be taken, 
many artifices employed, to weaken in your minds the conviction of this truth; as this 
is the point in your political fortress against which the batteries of internal and external 
enemies wdll be most constantly and actively (though often covertly and insidiously) 
directed — it is of infinite moment that you should properly estimate the immense value 
of your national union to j^our collective and individual happiness; that you should 
cherish a cordial, habitual and immovable attachment to it; accustoming yourselves to 
think and speak of it as of the palladium of your political safety and prosperity; watch- 
ing for its preservation with jealous anxiety; discountenancing whatever may suggest 
even a suspicion that it can, in any event, be abandoned; and indignantly frowning upon 
the first dawning of every attempt to alienate any portion of our country from the rest, 
or to enfeeble the sacred ties which now link tog'^ther the various parts. 

For this you have every inducement of sympathy and interest. Citizens by birth or 
choice of a common country, that country has a right to concentrate your affections. The 
name of America, which belongs to you in your national capacity, must always exalt 
the just pride of patriotism, more than any appellation derived from local discriminations. 
With slight shades of difference, you have the same religion, manners, habits, and 
political principles. You have, in a common cause, fought and triumphed together; the 
independence and liberty you possess are the work of joint counsels and joint efforts, of 
common dangers, sufferings, and successes. 

ENCROACHMENTS BY THE GOVERNMENT. 

It is important, likewise, that the habits of thinking, in a free country, should in- 
spire caution in those intrusted with its administration, to confine themselves within 
their respective constitutional spheres, avoiding, in the exercise of the powers of one 
department, to encroach upon another. The spirit of encroachment tends to consolidate 
the powers of all the departments in one, and thus to create, whatever the form of 
government, a real despotism.' A just estimate of that love of power, anj proneness to 
abuse it which predominates in the human heart, is sufficient to satisfy us of the truth 
of this position. The necessity of reciprocal checks in the exercise of political power, 
by dividing and distributing it into different depositories, and constituting each the 
guardian of the public weal, against invasio'ns by the others, has been evinced by 
experiments, ancient and modern; some of them in our own country, and under our own 
eyes. To preserve them must be as necessary as to institute them. If, in the opinion 
of the people, the distribution or modification of the constitutional powers be, in any 
particular, wrong, let i"'be corrected by an amendment in the way which the Constitu- 
tion designates. But let there be no change or usurpation; for though this, in one 
instance, may be the instrument of good, it is the customary weapon by which free 
governments are destroyed. The precedent must always greatly overbalance, in perma- 
nent evil, and partial or transient benefit which the use can, at any time, yield. 

Observe good faith and justice toward all nations; cultivate peace and harmony with 
all; religion and morality enjoin this conduct; and can it be that good policy does not 
equally enjoin it? It will be worthy of a free, enlightened, and, at no distant period, a 
great nation, to give to mankind the magnanimous and too novel example of a people 
always guided by an exalted justice and benevolence. Who can doubt that, in the course^ 
of times and things, the fruits of such a plan would richly repaj^ any temporary ad- 
vantages which might be lost by a steady adherence to it? Can it be that Providence 
has not connected the permanent felicitv of a nation with its virtue? The experiment, 
at least, is recommended by every sentiment which ennobles human nature. Alas! is it 
rendered impossible by its vices? 

ENTANGLEMENTS WITH FOUEIGN POWERS. 
Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence il conjure you to beMeve me, fellow- 
citizens) the jealousy of a free people ought to constantlv awake; since history and 
experience prove that foreign influence is one of the most baneful foes of republican 
government. But that jealousy to be useful, must be Impartial; else it becomes the In- 
strument of the verv influence to be avoided, instead of a uefence against it. Excessive 
partiality for one foreign nation, and excessive dislike for another, cause those whom 
they actuate to see danger only on one side, and serve to veil, and even second, the arts 



The Monroe Doctrine. 97 



of influence on the nthor. Re<y patriots, who may resist tlie intrigues of the favorite, 
are liaible to become susperted and oilious. while its tools and dupes usurp the applause 
and confidence of the people, to surrender their interests. 

The great rule of cmiduct for us, in regard to foreign nations. Is. in extending our 
conlfnerclal relations, to have with them as little political connection as possible. So far 
a»s we have already formed engagements, let them be fulfilled with perfect good faith. 
Here let us stop. 

Europe has a set of primary interests, which to us have none, or a very remote 
relation. Hence she must be engaged in frequent controversies, the causes of which are 
essentially foreign to our concerns. Hence, therefore, it must be unwise in us to impli- 
cate ourselves, by artificial ties, in the ordinary vicissitudes of her politics, or the 
ordinary combinaticrks and collisions of her friendships or enmities. 

Our detached and distant situation invites and enables us to pursue a different 
course. If we remain one people under an efficient government, the period is not far off 
when we may defy material injury from external annoyance; when we mav take such 
an attitude as wiil cause the neutrality we m.ay at any time resolve upon, to be 
scrupulously respected; when belligerent nations, under the impossibility of making 
acquisitions upon us, will not lightly hazard the giving us provocation; vvhen we may 
choose peace or war, as our interest, guided by justice, shall counsel. 

PARTING COUNSELS. 

In offering to you. my countrymen, these counsels of an old and affectionate friend, 
I dare not hope that they will make the strong and lasting impression I could wish; that 
they will control the usual current of*the passions, or prevent our nation from running 
the course which hitherto has marked tne destiny of nations; but if I may even flatter my- 
self that they may be productive of some partial benefit, some occasional good; that 
they may now and then recur to moderate -he fury of parts' spirit, to warn against the 
mischiefs of foreign intrigues, to guard against the impostures of pretended patriotism; 
this hope will be full recompense for the solicitude for your welfare by which they have 
been dictated. 

United States, September 17, 1796. GEORGE WASHINGTON. 



W^z JWonror lioctrint* 

*'The Monroe ioctrine" was enunciated in the following words in President ^fonroe's message 
to Congress December 2, 1823 : 

' ' In the discussions to which this interest has given rise, and in the arrangements by which they 
ma}' terminate, the occasion ha»s been deemed proper for asserting, as a prhiciple in which rights and 
interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent 
condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for 
future colonization by any European power. * » * \ve owe it, therefore, to candor and to the 
amicable relations existing between the United States and those powers to declare that we should 
considerany attempt on their part to extend their sj\steui to any portion of this hemisphere as dan- 
gerous to our peace and safety. With the existing colonies or dependencies of any European power 
we have not interfered and shall not interfere. But with the governments who have declared their 
independence and maintain it, and whose independence we have, on great consideration anfl on just 
principles, acknowledged, we could not view any interposition for the purpose of oppressing them or 
controlling in any other manner their destiny by any European power in any other light than as the 
manifestation of an unfriendly disposition toward the United States. ' ' 

Secretary of State Olney in his despatch of July 20. 1895, on the Venezuelan Boundary Dispute, said: 
"It (the Monroe doctrine) does not establish any general protectorate by the United States over 
other American States. It does not relieve any American State from its obligations as fixed by inter- 
national law, nor prevent any European power directlj' interested from enforcing such obligations ot 
from inflicting merited punishment for the breach of them. ' ' 

President Roosevelt in a speech in 1902 upon the results of the Spanish-American war, said: 
"The Monroe doctrine is simply a statement of our very firm belief that the nations now existing 
on this continent must he left to work out their own destinies among themselves, and that this conti- 
nent is no longer to be regarded as the colonizing ground of any European power. The one power on 
the continent that can make the power effective is, of course, ourselves; for in the world as it is, a 
nation which advances a given doctrine, likely to interfere in any wav with other nations, must pos- 
sess the power to back it up, if it wishes the doctrine to be respected.' ' 

The United States Senate on August 2, 1912, adopted the following resolution proposed by 
Senatot Lodge, by a vote of 51 to 4, the negative votes being those of Senators Cummms of Iowa, 
Mcf 'umber of North Dakota, Percy of Mississippi, and Stone of Missouri, 

"Rfsolved. That when any harbor or other place in the American Continent is so situated that 
the occupation thereof for naval or military purposes might threaten the communications or the 
safety of the United States, the Government of the United States could not see without grave concern 
the possession of such harbor or other place by any corporation or association which has such a 
relation to another Government, not Amei'ican, as to give that Government practical power of con- 
trol for national purposes." 

This action of the Senate grew out of the report, that a stretch of territory bordering on Magdalena 
Bay, Mexico, might be acquired by the subjects of a foreign country, and thus through their control 
by their own national Government become the base of permanent naval or military occupation. In 
explanation of the resolution Senator Lodge said; "The declaration rests on a much broader and 
older ground than the Monroe doctrine. This resolution rests on the generally accepted principle 
that every nation has a right to protect its own safety ; and if it feels that the possession of any given 
narbor or place is prejudlcal to its safety. It Is its duty and right to Intervene." The Senate 
added that the opening of the Panama Canal gave to Magdalena Bay an Importance that It had 
never before possessed, as the Panama routes pass in front of It. 

Not being a Joint resolution requiring the concurrence of the House of Representatives and the 
signature of the President, the resolution adopted as above was an expression of opinion of the 
Senate only. The other house took no action. 



98 Telescopes. 



^ ISTattonal JWtmorial to HCncoln 

TO COST TWO MILLION DOLLARS. 

The Slxty-flrst Congress, third session, passed an act, approved February 9, 1911, "to provide 
a commission to secure plans and designs for a monument or memorial to the memory of Abraham 
Lincoln." The text of the act Is as follows: 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Con- 
gress assembled. That William H. Taft, Shelby M. Cullom, Joseph G. Cannon. George Peabody 

Wetmore, Samuel Walker McCall, , and Champ Clark are hereby created a 

commission, to be known as the Lincoln Memorial Commission, to procure and determine upon 
a location, plan, and design for a monument or memorial In the city of Washington, District of 
Columbia, to the memory of Abraham Lincoln, subject to the approval of Congress. 

Sec. 2. That in the discharge of Its duties hereunder said commission Is authorized to employ 
the services of such artists, sculptors, architects, and others as It shall determine to be necessary, 
and to avail itself of the services or advice of the Commission of Fine Arts, created by the act ap- 
proved May 17, 1910. 

Sec. 3. That the construction of the monument or memorial, herein and hereby authorized, 
shall be upon such site as shall be determined by the commission herein created, and approved by 
Congress, and said construction shall be entered upon as speedily as practicable after the plan and 
design therefor Is determined upon and approved by Congress, and shall be prosecuted to completion, 
under the direction of said commission and the supervision of the Secretary of War, under a con- 
tract or contracts hereby authorized to be entered Into by said Secretary In a tptal sum not exceeding 
two million dollars. 

Sec. 4. That vacancies occurring In the membership of the commission shall be filled by 
appointment by the President of the United States. 

Sec. 5. That to defray the necessary expenses of the commission herein created and the cost 
of procuring plans or designs for a memorial or monument, as herein provided, there Is hereby ap- 
propriated the sum of flfty thousand dollars, to be immediately available. 

Sec. 6. That said commission shall annually submit to Congress an estimate of the amount 
of money necessary to be expended each year to carry on the work herein authorized. 

WLxiittti .States Secret «Serbict» 

The Secret Service Division of the Treasury Department Is under the direction of John E. Wllkle. 
chief of the division. The service Is principally engaged In detecting and prosecuting makers and 
dealers In counterfeit paper money and coin. Details are also furnished for the protection of the 
President of the United States, and In the frequent journeylngs of the present President he is always 
accompanied by one or more secret service men. 

The arrests of counterfeiters number about 400 annualb'; other arrests are for bribery. Im- 
personating United States Government officers, perjury, and violating sections of the United States 
Revised Statutes relating to foreign and domestic obligations and coins. 

The Secret Service and the Special Agents Division of the Customs Service have been united 
under one administrative head, Mr. Wllkle being In charge of both divlalona. The forces are used 
jointly In the Investigation of offences against the Customs laws. 



STeUiscopes/ 



There are two kinds of telescopes, viz., refracting and reflecting. In the former the rays of 
light are made to converge to a focus by lenses, while In the latter they are made to converge by 
being reflected from the surface of a slightly concaved, highly polished mirror. 

Tile chief disadvantages of refracting telescopes are the chromatic and spherical aberrations 
of the lenaes. In reflecting telescopes these aberrations can be done away with by using parabolic 
mirrors, but the great objection to the latter are the many mechanical dlflftcultles that have to be 
overcone. 

Owing to the travelling of the earth In Its orbit and revolving about Its axis, stars If viewed by 
a fixed telescope would soon disappear. It Is thus necessary that a telescope be mounted so a star 
win ajways be In Its field. This Is accomplished by using an equatorial mounting. 

In an equatorial mounting there are two axes, one called the "polar" that Is parallel to the 
axis of the earth, and the other the "declination" at right angles to It. Hence, when a star Is to be 
followed, the telescope la clamped In position, and by means of clockwork, follows the star so it 
always remains In view. 

Tho magnifying power of telescopes Is generally expressed In diameters, the practical limit of 
power being 100 diameters per Inch of diameter of the telescope. Thus the 36-lnch telescope, at 
the Lick Observatory, may give a magnifying power of 3,600 diameters. But such high power can 
only be used In a very clear atmosphere, and consequently most astronomical observations are 
made at 1,000 diameters. , 

REFRACTING TELESCOPES. 

The largest In the world are In the United States. The one at Yerkes Observatory, Geneva 
Lake. Wis., has an object lens 40 inches In diameter with a focal length of 64 feet. The movable 
part of the Instrument turning on the polar axis weighs about 12 tons, and the clock 1 H tons. Other 
large telescopes are. the 36-lnch at Lick Observatory, Mt. Hamilton, Cal.. where many Important 
astronomical discoveries have been made; the 26-lnch at the U. S. Observatory, Washington, D. C, 
and the 24-lnch belonging to Harvard University. A 30-lnch refracting telescope was com- 
pleted at the Allegheny Observatory, Rlvervlew Park, Pa. 

Abroad, Is the 30-lnch at the Imperial Observatory, Pulkova (near St. Petersburg), Russia. 
This telescope has a platform at the lower end of the polar axis, from which observers can readily 
operate the Instrument. The Meudon Observatory (near Paris, France) has a 32-lnch, the Pota- 
dam, Prussia, a 31-lnch, and the Royal Observatory, at Greenwich, England, a 28-lnch. 

REFLECTING TELESCOPES. 

One of the most perfect Instruments ever built Is at Mt Wilson Observatory, Cal. The mirror 
B silver on glass, 60 Inches In diameter and weighs nearly a ton. The telescope Is moved by electric 
motors In right ascension and declination. An Important feature In this Instrument Is the different 
focal lengths that can be obtained. The 60-Inch mirror has a 25-foot focus, but by a suitable ar- 
rangement of mirrors. It Is possible to get focal lengths of 80. 100 and 150 feet. At the same 
observatory a 100-Inch reflector Is being constructed. The 150-foot tower for this telescope was 
completed, but difficulties have been experienced In getting suitable lenses. There Is a 36-lnoh 
reflector at Lick Observatory, Harvard University has a 28-lnch, and at the Yerkes Observatory 
Is a 24-lnch. 

Other notable reflectors are the Lord Rosse. at Birr Castle, Ireland, which has a mirror 72 inches 
In diameter of speculum metal and a focal length of 54 feet, a 48-Inch at Melbourne, Australia, « 
60-lnch at Ealing. England, a 4S-lnch at Paris. France, and a 39-Inch at Meudon, France. 



The Single Tax. 99 



^Tije cSiUfllr STax. 



Thb following statement of the single tax principle was written by Henry George, Sr.: 

We assert' as our fundamental principle the self-evident truth enunciated in the Declara- 
tion of American Independence, that all men are created equal and are endowed by their 
Creator with certain inalienable rights. We hold that all men are equally entitled to the 
use and enjoyment of what God has created and of what Is gained by the general growth 
and improvement of the community of which they are a part. Therefore, no one should be 
permitted to hold natural opportunities without a fair return to all for any special priv- 
ilege thus accorded to him, and that that value which the growth and improvement of the 
community attaches to land should be taken for the use of the community; that each is 
entitled to all that his labor produces; therefore, no tax should be levied on the products 
of labor. 

To carry out these principles, we are in favor of raising all .public revenues for 
national. State, county, and municipal purposes by a single tax upon land values, irre- 
spective of improvements, and all the obligations of all forms of direct and indirect 
taxation. 

Since in all our States we now levy -some tax on the value of land, the single tax can 
be instituted by the simple and easy way of abolishing, one after another, all other taxes 
now levied and commensurately increasing the tax on land values until we draw upon 
that one source for all expenses of government, the revenue being divided between local 
governments. State government, and the general government, as the revenue from djrect 
tax is now divided between the local and State governments, or by a direct assessment 
being made by the general governaient upon the States and paid by them from revenues 
collected in this manner. The single tax we propose is not a tax on land, and therefore 
would not fall on the use of land and become a tax on labor. 

It is a tax not on land, but on the value of land. Then it would not fall on all land, 
but only on valuable land, and on that not in proportion to the use made of it, but in pro- 
portion to its value— the premium which the user of land must pay to the owner, either 
in purchase money or rent, for permission to use valuable land. It would thus be a tax 
not on the use and improvement of land, but on the ownership of land, taking what would 
otherwise go to the owner as owner, and not as user. 

In assessments under the single tax all values created by individual use or improve- 
ment would be excluded, and the onlv value taken into consideration would be the value 
attaching to the bare land by reason 'of neighborhood, etc.. to be determined by impartial 
periodical assessments. Thus the farmer would have no more taxes to pay than the specu- 
lator who held a similar piece of land idle, and the man who, on a city lot, erected a 
valuable building would be taxed no more than the man who held a similar lot vacant. 
The single tax, in short, would call upon men to contribute to the public revenues not in 
proportion to what they produce or accumulate, but in proportion to the value of the natu- 
ral opportunities they hold. It would compel them to pay just as much for holding land 
idle as for putting it to its fullest use. The single tax, therefore, would— 

1st. Take the weight of taxation off the agricultural districts, where land has little or 
no value irrespective of improvements, and put it on towns and cities, where bare land 
rises to a value of millions of dollars per acre. 

2d. Dispense with a multiplicity of taxes and a horde of tax-gatherers, simplify gov- 
ernment, and greatly reduce its cost. 

3d. Do away with the fraud, corruption, and gross inequality inseparable from our 
present methods of taxation, which allow the rich to escape while they grind the poor. 
Land cannot be hid or carried off, and its value can be ascertained with greater ease and 
certainty than any other. 

4th. Give us with all the world as perfecl freedom of trade as now exists between the 
States of the Union, thus enabling our people to share through free exchanges in all the 
advantages which nature has given to other countries, or which tlfce peculiar skill of other 
peoples has enabled them to attain. It would destroy the trusts, monopolies, and corrup- 
tions which are the outgrowths of the tariff. It would do away with the fines and pen- 
alties now levied on any one who improves a farm, erects a house, builds a machine, or 
In any way adds to the general stock of wealth. It would leave every one free to apply 
labor or expend capital in production or exchange without fine or restriction, and would 
leave to each the full product of his exertiom. 

5th. It would, on the other hand, by taking for public use that value which attaches 
to land by reason of the growth and improvement of the community, make the holding of 
land unprofitable to the mere owner and profitable only to the user. It would thus make 
it impossible for speculators and monopolists to hold natural opportunities unused or only 
half used, and would throw open to labor the illimitable field of employment which the 
earth offers to man. It would thus solve the labor problem, do away with involuntary 
poverty, raise wages in all occupations to the full earnings of labor, niake overproduction 
impossible until all human wants are satisfied, render labor-saving inventions a blessing 
to all, and cause such an enormous production and such an equitable distribution of wealth 
as would give to all comfort, leisure, and participation in the advantages of an advancing 
civilization, in securing to eaoh individual equal right to the use of the earth. It ?s also 
a proper function of society to maintain and control adl public wavs for the transportation 
of persons and property, and the transmission of Intelligence; arid also to maintain and 
control all public way.s in cities for furnishing water, gas. and all other things that neces^ 
sarily require the use of such common ways. 



100 



I^rogress of the Dnited States. 



J^rofltess of ti)e sanitctJ states 

IN AREA, POPULATION AND MATERIAL INDUSTRIES. 

(Compiled from a statement prepared by the Bureau of Foreign aud Domestic Commerce, Department 

of Commerce aud Labor. ) 



Area h square miles. 

Populatiou c. uo. 

Population per square mile c no. 

Wealth d e , ^.dols. 

Wealth, per capita de dois. 

Public debt, less cash iu Treas- 
ury gf dols. 

Public debt, per capita dols. 

Interest bearing dei)t h dols. 

Auuual interest charge dols. 

Interest per capita dols. 

Gold coined dols. 

Silver coined dols. 

Gold in circulation j dols. 

Silver in circulation j dols. 

Gold ceriiticates in circulation, dols. 

Silver certificates iu circulat'n.dol.s. 

United States notes in circula- 
tion..;.. dols. 

National bank notes incircula- 
tiou dols. 

Miscellaneous currency in cir- 
culation A dols. 

Total circulation of money dols. 

Per capita dols. 

National banks no. 

Capital dols. 

Bank clearings. New York dols. 

Total United States dols. 

Deposits iu National banks dols. 

Deposits in savings banks dols. 

Depositors in savmgs banks no. 

Farms and farm property d. . . .dols. 

Farm products, value d dols. 

Manufacturing establish- 
ments d no. 

Value of products d dols. 

United States Government re- 
ceipts—net ordinary r dols. 

Customs dols. 

Internal revenue dols. 

United States Government, dis- 
bursements, net ordinary s. . .dols. 

War -..•. dols. 

Navy dols. 

Pensions dols . 

Intere^ton public debt dols. 

Imports of merchandise, dols. 

Per capita dols . 

Exports of merchandise dols. 

Per capita dols. 

Imports, silk, raw, lbs. 

Rubber, crude lbs. 

Tin plates y..lbs. 

Iron, steel and manufact- 
urers dols. 

Domestic exports, iron and 
steel manufactures dols. 

Domestic exports, all manu- 
factures of dols . 

Farm animals, value dols. 

Cattle no. 

Horses T. no. 

Sheep no. 

Mules no. 

Swine no. 

Production of gold , dols. 

Silver, commercial value dols. 

Goal tons 

Petroleum gals 

Pigiron tons 

Tin plates lbs. 

Copper tons 

Wool lbs. 

Wheat bush. 



1800. 


1850. 


1880 


' 1900. 


1912 a. 


892,135 


2,997,119 


3,026,789 


3,026,789 


3,026,789 


5,308,483 


23,191,87b 


50,155,783 


75,994,575 


I 95,410.503 


6.47 


7.8^ 


16.86 


25.55 


32.08 


• • ■ * 


7,13o,780,0(M 


42,642,000,00(1 


88,517,306,775 


.'107,104,211,917 


.... 


307.69 


850. 2(j 


1,164.79 


/1, 310, 11 


«2,976,294 


63,452,774 


1,919,326,748 


1,107,711,258 


1,027,574,697 


15.(d3 


2.7<J 


i 38. 27 


1 14.52 


1 10.74 


82.976,294 


63,452,774 


1,723,993,100 


1,023,478,860 


] 963.776,770 


3,402,601 


3,782,39;^ 


79,633,981 


33,545,130 


! 22,787,084 


0.6-^ 


0. 16 


1.59 


0.44 


0.24 


317,761 


31,981,739 


62,308,279 


99,272,943 


r 56,176,823 


224,29b 


1,866,100 


27,411,694 


86,345,321 


16,457,302 


1 16,000,000 


147,395,4ob 


< 225,695,779 
I 68.622 345 


610,806,472 
142,050,334 


k 607 445,193 
A; 211 561,984 


• ■ • * 


.... 


7,963,900 


200,733,019 


942,692.184 








5,789,569 


408,465,574 


469,049,230 


• • • ♦ 





827,895.457 


313,971,545 


837,922,133 


,,.. 




337,415,178 


300,115,112 


705,196,304 


10,500,000 


131,366,526 


.... 


79,008,942 


2,919.095 


26,500,000 


278,761,982 


973,382.228 


2,055,150,998 


3,276,786,613 


5.00 


12.02 


19.41 


26.93 


34,26 


, . . . 


• . . • 


2,076 


3,732 


7.372 




♦ .... 


455,909,565 


621,536,461 


1,033 570,675 


• • • , 


.... 


37,182,128,621 


51,964,588,564 


/ 92,420,120.000 


• • a , 


.... 


. • • • 


84.582,450,081 


(159 373 450.000 


, . , , 




833,701,0.34 


2,458,092,758 


5.825,461,163 


• • • , 


43,481,130 


819,106,973 


2,389,719,954 


i 4,212,583,599 


«... 


251,354 


2,335,582 


. 6,107,083 


9,597,185 


.... 


3,967,343,58(1 


12,180,501,538 


<m20,439,901,164 


//o40,991,449 096 




.... 


2,212,450,927 


4,417,069,973 


p 8,417,000.000 




123.025 


253,852 


512,254 


oq 268.461 





1,019,106,616 


5,369,579,191 


13,004,400,143 


0^20,672,051,870 


10,848,749 


43.592,889 


333,526,501 


567.240,852 


691,140,455 


9.080,933 


39,668,686 


186,522,065 


233.164,871 


311,257,348 


809,397 




124,009,374 


295,327,927 


s 321,536,108 


10,813,971 


40,948,383 


264,847.637 


487,713,792 


654,804,625 


2,560,879 


9,687,025 


38,116,916 


134,774,768 


150,18:^,311 


3,448,716 


7,H04,725 


13,536 985 


55,953,078 


136,556,259 


64,131 


1,866,886 


56,777.174 


140,877,316 


153,596,750 


3.402.601 


3,782,393 


95,757,575 


40,160,333 


22 616,300 


91,252,768 


173,509,526 


667,954,746 


849,941,184 


1,653,264,934 


17.19 


7.48 


U 12. 51 


10.93 


17.08 


70,971,780 


144,375,726 


835,638,658 


1,394,483,082 


2,204,322,409 


13.37 


6.23 


■« 16.43 


17.76 


22. 41 


• • • • 


. • • • 


2,562,236 


11,259.310 


21 609 520 


• • • • 


• • • 


16,826,099 


49,377,1.38, 


110,210,173 


• ■ • • 


.... 


379,902,880 


147,963,804 


6,616,805 


• • • • 


20,145,067 


71,266,699 


20,478,728 


26,551,040 


52,144 


1,953,702 


14,716,524 


121,913,548 


268,154,262 


• • • • 


23.223,106 


121,818,298 


484,846,235' 


1,021,753,918 


• • • • 


544,180,516 


1,576,917,556 


2,228,123,134; 


5,008.149,000 


• • ■ ■ 


17,778,907 


33,258,000 


43,902,414 


57,9o9,00(J 


' ■ • . • 


4,336,719 


11.201,800 


13,.537,524i 


20.508,000 


.... 


21,773,220 


40,765 9(10 


41,883,065' 


52.362.000 


• • ■ > 


559,331 


1,729,500 


2,086,027! 


4.362,000 


■ • • . 


30,354,213 


34,034,1011 


37,079,356 


65,410.000 


. . * • 


50,000,000 


36.000,000 


79.171,(100, 


i 96,23:^,528 


• « . • 


-^ 50,900 


34,717,000 


35,741,100! 


i 31,787,866 


• • • * 


6,266,233 


63,822,8.50 


240,789,330; 


i 443,054,614 


\ .... 




1,104,017,166 


2,672,062.218 


i 9,258,874,422 




563,755 


3,835,191 


13.789,242 


i 23,649,547 


.... 


.... 


1,247,335 


10,188,329 


i 23,676,106 








849,(104.022 


1,619,005,000 




650 


27.000 


270,588 


i 489,836 




52,516,959 


232,500,000 


288,636,621 


i 318.547.900 


••••»• 


100,485.9441 


498,549,8681 


522,229,505 


1621,338,000 



United States Bureau of 31ines. 



101 



PROGRESS OP THE UNITED STATES— Conti7iued. 



Corn bush. 

CJottou bales 

Cane sugar lbs. 

Sugtircousumed lbs. 

Cotton consumed 500-lb. bales 

Domestic cotton exported lbs. 

Riiilways operated miles 

Pas.sengers carried no. 

Freight carried Imile tons. 

Revenue, ton per mile cents 

Passenger cars no. 

Other cars no. 

American vessels built w tons. 

Tradi n g domestic, etc tons. 

Trading foreign tons. 

On G reat Lakes tons. 

Vessels passing through iSault 

Ste. Marie Canal tons. 

Commercial failures , no. 

Amount of liabilities dols. 

Post-Oflices no. 

Receipts of P. O. Department.. dols. 

Telegrams sent a; no. 

Newspape,rs, etc. y no. 

Public vschools, salaries dols. 

Patents issued no. 

Immigrants arrived * no. 



1800. 


1850. 


1880. 


1900. 


1912 «. 


• . > • 


592,071,104 


1,717,434,543 


2,105,102,516 


i 2,631,488,000 


153,509 


2,454,442 


6,605,750 


10,245,602 


i 16,109,349 


* ■ • • 


247,577,000 


178,872,(100 


322,549,011 


696,640,000 






1,979,221.478 


4,477,175,236 


7,869,669,280 


18,829 


422,626 


1.865,922 


3,603,516 


o 4,516,779 





638,381,604 


1,822,061,114 


3,100,583,188 


5,635,125,429 




9,021 


93,267 


194,262 


i 246,124 




.... 


.... 


576,831,251 


i 997,409,882 






. > . • 


141,596,551,161 


1253,783,701,839 






.... 


0.729 


i 0.757 


.... 


.... 


.... 


34,713 


i 49,818 








1,416,125 


« 2,309,517 


108,261 


279.255 


157,409 


393,790 


i 291,ltV2 


301,919 


1,949,743 


2,715,224 


4,338,145 


i 6,766,11« 


669,921 


1,585,711 


1,352,810 


826,694 


/• 872,671 




198,266 


605,102 


1,565,587 


i 2,943,523 




.... 


.1,734,890 


22,315,834 


i 41,653,488 




.... 


4,735 


10,774 


i 13,441 






65,752,000 


138,495,673 


< 191,061,665 


903 


18,417 


42,989 


76,688 


i 58,279 


280,804 


5,499,985 


33,315,479 


102,354,579 


i 237,879,824 


.... 


• • • • 


29,215,509 


63,167,783 


i 77,780,732 


.... 


2,526 


9,723 


20,806 


22,837 






55,942 972 


137,687,746 


oz 253,915,170 




993 


13,947 


26,499 


34,084 


.... 


369,980 


457,257 


448,572 


838,172 



a Figures of 1912 are somewhat preliminary and subject to revision. 6 Exclusive of Alaska and 
islands belonging to the United States, c Census figures, relating to Continental United States; tiie 
figures for 1912 represent an estimate, d Census figures, e True valuation of real and personal prop- 
erty. /'1904, a 1800 to 1850, outstanfling principal of the public debt, January 1. h Figures for the 
years 1800 to 1850 include the total public debt. il911. j Gold and silver can not be stated separ- 
ately prior to 1876. From 1862 to 1875, inclusive, gold and silver were not in circulation, except on 
the Pacific coast, where it is estimated that the average specie circulation was about $25,000,000, 
and this estimate is continued for the three following years under the head of gold. After that period 
gold was available for circulation, k As the result of a special investigation by the Director of the 
Mint, a reduction of $135,000,000 was made in the estimate of gold coin in circulation on July 1, 
1907, as compared with the basis of previous years, and on September 1, 1910, a reduction of $9,700- 
000 was made in the estimate of subsidiary silver, includes notes of Bank of United States; State- 
hank notes: demand notes of 1862 and 1863; fractional currency, 1870; Treasury notes of 1890, 
1900 to date; and currency certificates, act of June 8, 1872-1900. ni Includes valueof buildings, $3,- 
556,689,496, The Twelfth Census was the first to collect statistics of buildings on farms, iilncludes 
valueof buildings, $6,325,451,528. o 1910. pDataof the Department of Agriculture, representing 
wealth production on farms, q Exclusive of neighborhood industries and hand trades, included in years 
previous to 1905. j' "Ordinary receipts" include receipts from customs, internal revenue, direct 
tax, public lauds, and "miscellaneous," but do not Include receipts from loans, premiums. Treasury 
notes, or revenues of Post-0(fice Department, s Includes corporation tax, $28,583,104 in 1912. 
t "Ordinary disbunsements' ' include disbursements for War, Navy, Indians, pensions, payments for 
interest, and ' 'miscellaneous,' ' but do not include payments for premiums, principal of public debt, 
or disbursements for postal service paid from revenues thereof, tt Imviorts for consumption after 
1850, V Domestic exDorts only after 1860. w Includes canal boats and barges prior to 1880. x Fig- 
ures relate to the Western Union only and do not include messages sent over leased wires or under 
rail road contracts after 1900. 7/1800 to 1850, inclusive, from census of 1880; from 1880 to 1900, 
inclusive, from Rowell'sNewspaperDipectory; after 1900, from Ayer's American Newspaper Annual. 
Figuresforl912ir,clude outlying possessions, z Includes salaries for teachers only. *1850, total alien 
passengers arrived ; 1850, 15 months ending December 31 ; after 1850, fiscal years ending June 30. 



sanitetr .States Mnvtan of Mi^tu. 

Chapter 240 of the acts of the second session of the 61st Congress to establish In the Department 
Of the Interior a Bureau of Mines was approved May 16, 1910. The act provided for the e.«itabJlsJiment 
of said bureau and a director "who shall be thoroughly equipped for the duties of said ofiBce by technical 
education and experience." with an annual salary of S6,000. Transfer to the bureau was provided for 
the Investigations of the analyzing and testing of coals, lignites and other mineral fuel substances, and the 
Investigation as to the cause of mine explosions, from the United States Geological Survey. The duties of 
the bureau were prescribed by section 2 of the act, as follows: 

"It shall be the province and duty of said bureau and Its director, under the direction of the Secretary 
of the Interior, to make diligent Investigation of the methods of mining, especially In relation to the safety 
of miners, and the appliances best adapted to prevent accidents, the possible Improvement of conditions 
under which mining operations are carried on, the treatment of ores and o,ther mineral substances, the 
use of explosives and electricity, the prevention of accidents, and other inquiries and technologlo 
Investigations pertinent to said Industries, and from time to time make such public reports of the work. 
Investigations and Information obtained as the Secretary of said department may direct, with the 
recommendations of such bureau." 



102 



United States Customs Duties. 



Slnftttr .States (Customs Mxttitn. 

A TABLE OF LEADING ARTICLES IMPORTED, CIVINC RATES AT ENTRY 

BY THE NEW TARIFF ACT OF 1909, COMPARED WITH 

THE DINCLEY TARIFF ACT OF 1897. 

(The following table covers only the articles of principal imoortance imported Into the United Statea 
The Tariff act of 1909 contains 480 paragraphs each relating to an article or a group of articles'.) 
(ad val. — ad valorem; n.s.p.f. — not specially provided for: n.e. — not enumerated.) 

*In the entire Silk Schedule the classification was so changed In the new law as to make tabulated com- 
parison with the classlflcationg under the Dingley law impracticable. In general increases were made. 



ARTICLES. 



SCHEDULE A— CHEMICALS, OILS AND PAINTS. 
Alcoholic compounds, n.s.p.f 



Alkalies, alkaloids, distilled oils, essential oils and all combinations 

of the foregoing 

Ammonia, carbonite of 

Drugs 



Glue, value not above 10c. per pound 

Oil, castor, gals 

OH, cod liver, gals 

Oil, olive In bottles, etc., gals c 

Oil, whale, gals 

Opium, crude and not adulterated, containing 9 per cent, and over 

of morphia, lbs 

Phosphorus, lbs 

Perfumery, cosmetics, containing alcohol 



Rates op Duty Under. 



Dingley Law 
of 1897. 



New Law of 1909. 



Perfumery, cosmetics, not containing alcohol 

Soap, Castile 

Soap, perfumed toilet 

Soda, bicarbonate of 

SCHEDULE B— EARTHS, EARTHENWARE AND GLASSWARE. 

Cement, Roman, Portland, in barrels and sacks, lbs 

Earthenware, porcelain, decorated 

Earthenware, common 

Glassware, plain and cut, decorated 

Glassware, plain and cut, undecorated 

Marble, manufactures of, except for jewelry 

Sponges 

Sulphur, reflned 

SCHEDLXE C— METALS AND MANUFACTURES OF. 

Iron ore, tons 

Iron in pigs, wrought and cast, tons 

Iron, bar 

Automobiles and finished parts not Including tires 

Cast Iron pipe, lbs. 

Nails, horseshoe 

Copper plates, lbs , 

Pens, metallic, 'except gold pens . . . 

Table and kitchen utensils, metal 

Tin plates 

Pins, not jewelry , . . . 

Iron, manufactures of 

SCHEDULE D- 

Tlmber. 



60c. lb. and 45 p.c. 
ad. val. 

25 p.c. ad val. 
li^c. lb. 
IJiclb.andlOp.c. 

ad val. 
2i^c. lb. 
.35c. gal. 
15c. gal. 
50c. gal. 
8c. gal. 

$1 lb. 

18c. lb. 

60c. lb. and 43 p.c. 

ad val. 
.50 p.c. ad val. 
liic. lb. 
•")0 p.c. ad val. 
34c. lb. 



8c. 100 lbs. 
60 p.c. ad val. 



2o p.c 
60 p.c. 
55 p.c. 



ad val. 
ad val. 
ad val. 
ad val. 



-WOOD AND MANUFACTLTIES OF 



Lumber, boards, planks, not ulaned. 

Lumber, finished on four sides 

Staves. 



Shingles 

Wood, manufactures of, n.s.p.f 

SCHEDULE E— SUGAR, MOLASSES AND MANTJFACTURES OF. 

Sugar (not above No. 16 Dutch standard) 



Sugar (above No. 16 Dutch Standard) and all reflned sugars. 



50 p.c. 

20 p.c. ad vaL 

S8 ton. 



40c. ton. 

S4 ton. 

6- 10c. lb. 

45 p.c. ad val. 

4 1-lOc. lb. 

2^c. lb. 

2^c. lb. 

12c. gross. 

40 p.c. ad val. 

WiC. lb. 

35 n.c. ad val. 

45 p.c. ad val. 



Ic. cubic foot. 
SI per 1,000 feet. 
S4 per 1,000 feet. 
10 p.c. ad val. 
30c. per 1,000. 
35 p.c. ad val. 



Molasses, not above 40 desrees 

Maple sugar 

(ilucose or grape sugar. 

bugar candy, valued at more! iuj.ii lo cents per pound 

SCHEDUI.E F— TOBACCO AND ^LVNUFACTL^ES OF. 

Tobacco, unmanufactured, lbs 



Snuff, lbs 

CIgara aud cigarettes. 



Above 75 degrees 
polarlscope 95- 
100 of Ic. per 
lb. and for each 
additional de- 
gree 35-1000 of 
Ic. per lb. 
Ic. and 90-100 of 

I Ic. per lb. 

20 p.c. ad val. 

4r. lb. 

;iHc lb. 

'50c. ad val. 



I.S1.S5 lb. to 
I S2.50 lb. 
;.'>.'»»!. lb. 
i.$4..50 lb. and 
25 p.c. ad val. 



60c. lb. and 25 p.a ' 
ad. val. 

25 p.c. ad val. 
IJ^c. lb. 
IJic.lb.and 10 p.c 

ad. val. 
2i^c. lb. 
35c. gal. 
15c. gal. 
50c. gal. 
8c. gal. 

$1.50 lb. 

18c. lb. 

60c. lb. and 50 p.c. 

ad. val. 
50 p.c. ad val. 
l^c. lb. 
50 p.c. ad vaL 
5-8c. lb. 



Sc. 100 lbs. 

60 p.r*. ad val. 

25 p.c. ad val. 

60 p.c. ad val. 

55 p.c. ad val. 

50 p.c. ad val. 

20 p.c. ad vaL 

$4 ton. 



15c. ton. 
$1 ton. 
6-lOc. lb. 
45 p.c. ad val. 
lie. lb. 
IHc. lb. 
2i^c. lb. 
12c. gross. 
40 p.c. ad val. 
12- 10c. lb. 
35 p.c. ad val. 
45 p.c. ad val. 



^c. cubic foot. 
50c. per 1,000 feet 
S2.75 per 1,000 ft 
10 p.c. ad val. 
50c. per 1,000. 
35 p.c. ad val. 



Above 75 degrees 
polarlscope 95- 
100 of Ic. per 
lb. and for each 
additional de- 
gree 35-1000 of 
Ic. per lb. 

Ic. and 90-100 of 
Ic. per lb. 

20 p.c. ad val. 

4c. lb. 

I!^c. lb. 

50c. ad val. 



SI. 85 lb. to 

S2.50 lb. 
55c. lb. 
$4.50 lb. and 

25 p.c. ad vaL 



United States Customs Duties. 



103 



UNITED STATES CUSTOMS DUTIES— Co7J<utue(i. 



ARTICLES. 

SCHliUULE O— AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS AND PROVT 
SIGNS. 

Cattle, one year old or over, valued over 514 per head 

Horses, mules, valued at S150 or less 

Horses, mules, valued at over S150 

Barley, bushel 

Barley malt, bushel 

Oats, bushel 

Rice, cleaned, bushel 

Rye, bushel 

Butter and cheese, and substitutes I'u 

Eggs, n.s.p.f., doz 

Hay. 



Rates of Duty Under. 



DIngley Law 
of 1S97. 



New Law of 1909. 



Honey 

Hops 

Potatoes 

Seeds, castor, flaxseed 

Fish, mackerel, halibut, salmon, fresh 

Fish, smoked, salted 

Fruits, apples, peaches 

Fruits, preserved ■/. . 

Fruits, oranges, grapefruit 

Fruits, lemons 

Fruits, pineapples in bulk 

Salt, in sacks and barrels 

Salt, m bulk 

SCHEDULE H— SPIRITS AND WINES. 

Alcohol, proof, gallons 

Brandy, gin, whiskey, cordials, proof, gallons 

Wines, champagne, quarts 

Wines, still. In casks 

Wines, still. In bottles, quarts 

Malt liquors. In bottles, jugs, gallons 

Mineral waters. In bottles, quarts 

SCHEDULE I— COTTON MAXUTACTURES, 

CottCTB thread, according to numbers uncolored 

Cotton thread, colored, bleached, according to numbers. 
Cotton cloth, square yards 

Cotton handkerchiefs 



27H P.c. ad val. 

S30 head. 

25 p.c. ad val. 

30c. bushel. 

45c. bushel. 

15c. bushel. 

2c. lb. 

10c. bushel. 

fie. lb. 

5c. dozen. 

S4 ton. 

20c. gallon. 

12c. lb. 

25c. bushel. 

25c. bushel. 

Ic. lb. 

n.e. 

25c. bushel. 

2c. lb. 

Ic. lb. 

Ic. lb. 

.S7 per 1,000. 

12c. 100 lbs 

Sc. 100 lbs. 



■52.25 gal. 
S2.25 gal. 
SS per doz. 



40c. gallon. 
I.S1.60 per doz. 



40c. gallon. 
.30c. doz. 



!•••««••« 



Cotton clothing, ready made 

Cotton hosiery, pairs 



• «•••••< 



} • » • #••••••••< 



CottoQ shirts, drawers, dozea. 



l./OlitODy plUSXlCSy SQ« y^aTCIS* «••••••• •« •■• «•«•»-«••«•«•«•«•••( wco* • 



SCHEDU'LE J— FLAX. HEMP AND JUTB AND MANDFACT- 
URES OF. 

Flax, yarns, fine 

Flax, straw 

iv^HLLiu^s lur iioois. ••■••••••••••••«••%•••••••••••«•«••««•«••• 

Lace manufactures 

SCHEDULE K— WOOL AND MANUFACTURES OP. 

Wool, class 1 , 

Wool, class 2 

Wool, class 3 : 

Blankets • 



>«•••••«•«•«•«•••« 



Dreasgoods, women's and children**.. 



!•.••.••■>•-»< 



Clothing, ready made , 

Carpets, woven whole for rooms, and ruga.,,,.,,. 

SCHEDULE L— SILK AND SILK GOODS. 

Silk, spun In skeins* .«.,.,. 

Silk, wearing apparel.... ...,,.,, 

Silk, yarns ,, 

SCHEDU-LE M— PULP, PAPER AND BOOKS. 

Wood pulp, ground , 

Wood pulp, chemical. .............•«,..«,,,,,..«.......,...■•( 

E riuiiiig paper, ..••..•««..«.•.....,,.,..,,.,,. #^. . 

Books, pamphlets »,, 

Paper, manufacturers of, nji.p.f ,,........ 



r««t«*flt**«««« •-« • 



»•••«••••• 



3c. lb. to 35c. lb. 

6c. lb. to 81c. lb. 

Ic. sq. yard to 8c. 
sq. j'ard. 

434 c. sq. yard and 
10 p.c. ad val. 

50 p.c. ad val. 

50c. doz. to S2 doz 
«fe 15 p.c. ad val. 

GOc. doz. & 15 p.c. 
ad val. to S2.25 
doz. & 35 p.c. 
ad val. 

9c. sq. yard & 25 
p.c. ad val. to 
12c. sq, yard & 
25 p.c. ad val. 

35 p.c. ad val. 
$5 ton. 
3c. sq. yard. 
60 p.c. ad val. 

lOc lb. to 33c. lb. 
lie. lb. to 12c. lb. 
3c. lb. to 7c. lb. 
22c. lb. & 30 p.c. 

ad val. to 44c. 

lb. & 55 p.c. ad 

vaL 
7c. sq. yard & 50 

p.c. ad val. to 

lie. sq. yard & 

55 p.c. ad val. 
44c. lb. & 60 p.c. 

ad val. 
90c. per sq. yard 

40 p.c. ad val. 

35 p.c. ad val. 
60 p.c. ad val. 
45c. lb. to 60c. lb. 

1-120. lb. 

l-6c. lb. 

3-lOc. lb, to 8-lOc. 

lb. 
25 p.c. ad val. 
35 P.C. ad vaL 



27}i p.c. ad vaL 

S30 head. 

25 p.c. ad val. 

30c. bushel. 

45c. bushel. 

15c. bushel. 

2c. lb. 

10c. bushel. 

Of. lb. 

5c. dozen. 

S4 ton. 

20c. gallon. 

16c. lb. 

25c. bushel. 

25c. bushel. 

Ic. lb. 

%c. lb. 

25c. bushel. 

2c. lb. 

Ic. lb. 

IKc. lb. 

!S8 per 1,000. 

Uc. 100 lbs. 

7o. 100 lb.-;. 

S2.60 g:'.l. 
S2.G0 g,.i. 
S;->.60 p( ;• doz. 
45c. gall.): I. 
S1.85 per doz. 
45c. gallon. 
30c. doz. 



2Kc. lb. to 2Sc. lb 

(jc. lb. to 67c. llj. 

Ic. sq. yard to So 
sq. yard. 

AViC. sq. -yard and 
10 p.c. ad val. 

50 p e. ad VI I. 

70c. doz. to .S2 doz. 
& 15 p.c. ad v.il. 

60c. doz. & 15 p.c. 
ad val. to •S2.25 
doz. & 35 p.c. 
ad val. 

9c. sq. yard & 25 
p.c. ad val. to 
12c. sq. yard & 
25 p.c. ad val. 



35 p.c. ad val. 
S5 ton. 

.3 He- sq. yard. 
60 p.c. ad val. 

10c. lb. to 33c. lb. 
lie. lb. to 12c. lb. 
3c. lb. to 7c. lb. 
22c. lb. & 30 p.c. 

ad val. to 44c. 

lb. & 55 p.c. ad 

val. 
7c. sq. yard & 50 

p.c. ad val. to 

lie. sq. yard & 

55 p.c. ad val. 
44c. lb. & 60 p.c. 

ad val. 
10c. sq. foot & 

40 p.c. ad val. 

35 p.c. ad val. 
60 p.c. ad val. 
45c. lb. to 60c. Ih. 

1-12C. lb. 

l-6c. lb. 

3- 10c. lb. to 8-lOc. 

lb. 
25 p.c. ad val. 
35 p.c. ad vaL 



104 



United States Customs Duties. 



UNITED STATES CUSTOMS DUTIES— fton^/u/u,/. 



ARTICLES. 



SCHEDULE N— SUNDRIES. 

Agricultural Implements , 

Beads. A , , » 



Brusbes 

Bristles 

Coal, bituminous. 

Coke 

Tovs 

Feattiers 



Furs, dressed 

Furs, wearing apparel. . . . 

Hair, human 

Hides o[ cattlef 

Leather, manufactures of. 

Boots and shoes t ■ 

Gloves , 



Gutta Percha .-. 

Musical Instriraients 

Paintings and statuary 

Umbrellas 

tSee note following Free List. 



Rajes of Duty Under. 



Dinglev Law 
of LS97. 



New Law of 1909. 



20 p.c. ad 
35 p.c. ad 
40 p.c. ad 
IVoC. lb. 
67c. ton 
20 p.c. ad 
35 p.c. ad 
15 p c. ad 

50 p.c. ad val 
20 p.c. ad val. 



vaL 

val. 
val. 



val. 
val. 
val. to 



n.e 

20 p.c. 
15 p.c. 
20 p.c. 
25 p.c 



ad val. 

ad val. 

ad val, 

ad val. 
$1.75 doz. to $5.80 

doz. 
35 p.c. ad val. 
45 p.c. ad val. 
20 p.c. ad val. 
50 p.c. ad val. 



15 p.«. ad vaJ. 
35 p.c. ad val. 
40 p.c. ad val. 
IV2C. lb. 
45c. ton. 
20 p.c, ad vaL 
35 p.c. ad val. 
20 p.c. ad val. to 

60 p.c. ad val. 
20 p.c. ad val. 

ad val. 

ad val. 



50 p.c. 
20 p.c. 
Free. 
15 p.c. 
15 p.c. 
$1.25 doz 

doz. 
35 p.c 
45 p.c 
15 p.c 
50 p.c 



ad 
ad 



val. 
val. 
to $5.80 



ad val. 
ad val. 
ad val. 
ad val. 



THE FREE LIST. 

The following Is a list of the principal articles imported, which are put on the Free List by the Tariff of 
1909. There are 236 articles in the list: 

Aconite, agates, unmanufactured; albumftp, n.s.p.f.; amber and ambergris, ammonia, sulphate of: 
arsenic, analine salts, animals for breeding, exhibition or racing purposes; articles of growth or manufac- 
ture of the U. S. returned; barks, quinine; beeswax; birds, land and water fowl; bismuth; books, mans, music, 
engravings, bound or unbound, and charts, printed more than twenty years at the date of importation, 
and publications issued for subscribers or exchanges by scientific and literary associations or academies, 
or publications for gratuitous private circulation, and public documents of foreign governments; books 
and pamnhlets in raised print, used exclusively by the blind; books, maps, music, specially imported, not 
more than two copies in any one invoicf>, for the use of any society or institution solely for religious, philo- 
sophical, educational, scientific or literary purposes; books, libraries, furniture, and similar household 
effects of persons or families from foreign countries, used abroad by them not less than one year; bristles, 
crude; bullion, gold and silver; camphor, crude; chalk, crude; coal, anthracite; coal tar, crude; cocoai-coffee; 
^oins, copper ore^ cotton and cotton waste. Diamonds and other precious stones, rough or uncut, stixl not 
advanced in condition or value from their natural state by cleaving, splitting, cutting, or other process. 
Including glaziers' and engravers' diamonds not set. Drugs, crude, n.s.p.f.; fans, common palm leaf, not 
ornamented; flsh, fresh, frozen, or packed in ice, caught in fresh waters by citizens of the United States, 
and all other fish, the products of American fisheries: furs, imdressed' glass, enamel, white, for watch and 
clock dials: guano, manures; hides (see note); Ice; India rubber, crude* indigo; iodine, crude; Iridium; ivory 
tusks; kyartlte or cyanite; leeches; life boats and life saving apparatus; lithographic stones, not engraved; 
manuscripts; medals of gold, silver, or copper, and other metallic articles accepted as honorary distinctions; 
meerschaum, unmanufactured; minerals, crude, n.s.p.f.; models of inventions; needles, hand, sewing and 
darning: newspapers and periodicals; nuts. Brazil nuts, cream nuls. cocoanuts In the shell and broken 
cocoaniit meat or copra, not prepared; nux vomica; oakum; oil cake; oils, almond, amber, crude and 
rectified ambergris; anise or anise seed, aniline, only for manure, bergamot, caraway, cassia, cinnamon, 
chamomile, citronella or lemon grass, civet, cocoanut, (not refined and deodorized), cotton.seed, croton, 
fennel, ichthyol, jasmine, juniper, lavender; lemon, limes, mace ; naroli or orange flower; liquid and solid 
primal flower essences not compounded; nut oil or oil of nuts, olive oil prepared solely for mechanical or 
Industrial purposes by denaturing or process rendering It unfit for any edible use, attar of roses, palm, 
rosemary, thyme, red or white valerian; and also spermaceti, whale, and other fish oils of Americans- 
fisheries, and all fish and other products ot such ft.sheries; petroleum, crude or refined, including kerosene, 
benzine, gasoline, naphtha, and similar oils produced from petroleum. 

Ores of gold, silver and nickel; paper stock, crude, of every description; paraffin, parchment and vellum. 
Personal effects, not merchandise, of citizens of the United States dying in foreign countries. Philosophical 
and scientific apparatus, specially Imported for religious, philosophical, educational scientific, or literary 
purposes. Phosphates, crude; platinirai, unmanufactured; potash, cru^e. Profe-ssional books, implements, 
fnstruments, and tools of trade, occupation, or employment, in the actual possession at the time of arrival, of 
persons emigrating to the United States. Quinia, sulphate of and .salts of cinchona bark; radium: statuary 
and casts for art and educational purposes only: sausages, bologna. Seeds, ani.se, canary, caraway, cauli- 
flower, cotton, cummin, fennel, hemp, hoarhound, mangelwurzel, mustard, rape, sugar beet, sorghum or 
sugar cane for seed; bulbs and bulbous roots, not edible and n.s.p.f. Shrimps and other shellfish; silk, raw; 
silk cocoons and silkworm eggs; skeletons and other preparations for anatomy; spices, when unground; 
ginger root, unground and not preserved or candied; stamps, foreign postage; stone and sand, n.s.p.f.; 
sulphur, lac or precipitated; sulphuric acid; tapioca, cassava; tar and pitch of wood, tea; teeth, natural. 
Tin ore, and tin in bars, blocks, pigs, or grain or granulated. Provided, all but tin ore shall pay 4c, lb. when 
mines of United States produce 1,500 tons of cassiterite and tin per year. Tobacco stems; turpentine, spirits 
of; turtles; vaccine virus; wax, vegetable or mineral; wearing apparel, articles of personal adornment, toilet 
articles, and similar personal effects of persons arriving in the United States not exceeding SlOO In value. 
Wood, logs and round unmanufactured timber including pulp woods, n.s.p.f.; woods, in the log, rough or 
hewn only; works of art, and science, brought bv professional artists or scientists arriving from abroad, 
temporarily for exhibition or imported In good faith for exhibition and not intended for sale; works of art 
productions of American artists residing temnorarily abroad or other works of art imported expressly for 

Eublic institutions; works of art, which are proved to the satisfaction of the Secretary of the Treasury to 
ave been in existence more than twenty years prior to the date of their importation and are not Intended 
or suitable for purposes of .utility: other works of art (except rugs and carpets), which shall have been 
produced more than one hundred years prior to the date of importation. 

Note — After the Tariff law of 1909 was passed, but before it was signed by the President, the following 
concurrent resolution regarding hides was adopted: 

Hides of cattle, raw or uncured, whether drv, salted, or pickled, shall be admitted free of duty: pro- 
vided, that on and after Oct. 1, 1909, grain, buff, or split leather shall nay a duty of 't]4 per cent, ad valorem; 
that all boots and shoes made wholly or in chief value from cattle hides and cattle skins ol whatever weight, 
of cattle of the bovine .snecies, including calf skins, shall pay a duty ot If) per cent, ad valorem; that harness, 
saddles, and saddlery. In sets or In parts, finished or unfinished, composed wholly or in chief value of leather, 
ehall pay a duty of 20 per cent, ad valorem. 



Custom House Examination of Baggage. 105 

Custom ?l^otise 2£xamination of iJassage. 

The following "Notice to Passengers" was Issued by tbe Treasury Department March 14. 1911: 

709. "Wearing apparel, articles of personal adornment, toilet articles, and similar personal effects 
of persons arriving In the United States; but this exemption shall only Include such articles as actually ac- 
company and are In the use of, and as are necessary and appropriate for the wear and use of such persons, 
for the Immediate purposes of the journey and present comfort and convenience, and shall not be held to 
aprty to merchandise or articles Intended for other persons or for sale: Provided, That In case of residents 
of the United States returning from abroad, all wearing apparel and other personal eflfects taken by them 
out of the United States to foreign countries shall be admitted free of duty, without regard to their value, 
upon their identity being established, under appropriate rales and regulations to be prescribed by the Sec- 
retary of the Treasury, but no more than one hundred dollars in value of articles purchased abroad by such 
residents of the United States shall be admitted free of duty upon their return." 

RESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Residents of the United States must declare all articles which have been obtained abroad by pui - 
cbase or otherwise whether used or unused, and whether on their persons, in their clothing, or in their 
baggage. The foreign value of each article, stated In United States money, must also be declared. 

Articles taken from the United States and remodelled, repaired, or Improved abroad must bt 
declared, and the cost of such remodelling, repairing, or Improving must be separately stated. 

The following articles are dutiable: Household effects, including books, pictures, furniture, table- 
ware, table linen, bed linen, and other similar articles, unless used abroad by the owner for a period of a 
year or more. Goods In the piece. Articles of any nature intended for sale or for other persons. 

The following articles are free If under $100 In value and if necessary for comfort and 
convenience for the purposes of the journey, and not for sale nor for other persons: Clothing. 
Toilet articles, such as combs, brushes, soaps, cosmetics, shaving and manicure sets, etc. Per- 
sonal adornments, jewelry, etc. Similar personal eCtects, which may include — cameras, canes, 
fishing tackle, glasses (field, opera, marine), golf sticks, guns, musical instruments, parasols, photo- 
graphs, smokers' articles, steamer rugs and shawls, toys, trunks, valises, etc. Clothing and other 
personal effects taken out of the United States by the passenger if not increased in value or im- 
proved In conditlsn while abroad. If increased In value or Improved In condition, they are dutiable 
on the cost of tbe repairs. All articles are dutiable unless speciflcallv exempted by law. 

Pack in ©ne trunk, if practicable, all dutiable articles. Receipted bills for foreign purchases 
should be presented whenever possible. Use does not exempt from duty wearing apparel or ether 
articles obtained abroad, but such articles will be appraised at their value In the condition as 
Imported dure allowance being made for depreciation through wear and use. 

NONRESIDENTS OP THE UNITED STATES. 

Nonresldlents of the United States are entitled to bring In free of duty, without regard to the 
one-hundred-dollar exemption, such articles as are In the nature of wearing apparel, articles of per- 
sonal adornment, toilet articles, and similar personal effects, necessary and appropriate for their 
wear and use for the purposes of the journey and present comfort and conyenlence and which are 
not intended for other persons or for sale. 

Citizens of the United States, or persons who have at any time resided In this country, shall be 
deemed to be residents of the United States, unless they shall have abandoned their residence In 
this country and acquired an actual bona-flde residence In a foreign country. 

Such citizens or former residents who desire the privileges granted by law to nonresidents must 
show to the satisfaction of the collector's representative on the pier, subject to the collector's ap- 
proval, that they have given up their residence In the United States and that they have become 
bona-flde residents of a foreign country. 

The residence of a wife follows that of the husband; and the residence of a minor child follows 
that of Its parents. 

GOODS OTHER THAN PERSONAL EFFECTS. 

Household effects of persons or families from foreign countries will be admitted free of duty 
only If actually used abroad by them not less than one year, and If not Intended for any other 
person, nor for sale. Such effects should be declared whether the passenger be a resident or a non- 
resident of the United States. 

Articles intended for use In business, or for other persons, theatrical apparel, properties, and 
sceneries, must be declared by passengers, whether residents or nonresidents. 

CIGARS AND CIGARETTES. 

All Cigars and cigarettes must be declared. Each passenger over eighteen years of age may 
bring in free of duty 50 cigars or 300 cigarettes If for the bona-flde use of such passenger. Such cigars 
and cigarettes will be In addition to the articles Included within the $100 exemption. 

BAGGAGE DECLARATIONS. 

The law provides that every person entering the United States shall make a declaration and 
entry of his or her personal baggage. The law further requires that the values of articles shall be 
determined by customs officers. Irrespective of the statements of passengers relative thereto. 

Passengers should observe that on the sheet given the n there are two forms of declarations; the one printed 
in black is for residents of the United States; the one in red, for nonresidents. 

The exact number of pieces of baggage, including all trunks, valises, boxes, packages, and 
hand bags of any description accompanying the passenger, must be. stated In the declaration. 

The senior member of a family, present as a passenger, may make declaration for the enti-fl 
family. Ladles travelling alone should state that fact In their declarations In order that an expedi- 
tious examination of their baggage may be made. 

When the declaration Is prepared and signed, the coupon at the bottom of the form must be 
detached and retained by the passenger, and the form given to the officer of the ship designated 
to receive the same. A declaration spoiled in Its preparatit>n must not be destroyed, but turned 
over to the purser, who will furnish a new blank to the passenger. 

After all the baggage and effects of the passenger have been landed upon the pier, the coupon 
which has been retained by the passenger must be presented at the inspector's desk, whereupon 
an inspector will be detailed to examine the baggage. Passengers must acknowledge in person, on 
the pier, their signature to their declarations. 

Examination of any baggage may be postponed If the passenger requests the officer taking 
his declaration to have It sent to the appraiser's store. 

Passengers must not deduct the $100 exemption In making out their declarations. Such de- 
ductions win be made by customs officers on the pier. 

CONTESTED VALUATION. 

Passengers dissatisfied with values placed upon dutiable articles by, the customs officers on 
the pier may demand a re-examluatlon, but application therefor should be Immediately made to the 
officers there In charge. If for any reason this course Is impracticable, the packages containing the 
articles should be left In customs custody and application for reappralsement made to the collector 
of customs. In writing, wlthlQ ten days after the orlgl nal appraisement. No request for reappraise- 
ment can be eutertained after the articles hi'>s bizi re nwei fro n customs custody. 

MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS. 

Currency or certified checks only can be accepted In payment of duties, but, upon request. 



106 United States Court of Customs Apjyeals. 

baggage will be retained on the piers for twenty-four hours to enable the owner to secure currency 
or certified checks. The offering of gratuities or bribes to customs officers Is a violation of law. 
BAGGAGE FOR TRANSPORTATION IN BOND. 
lBagga?e intended for delivery at ports In the United States other than the port of arrival, or 
In transit through the United States to a foreign country, may be forwarded thereto without the 
assessment of daty at the port of arrival, by the various railroads and express companies, whose 
representatives will be found on the pier. 

Passengers desiring to have their baggage forwarded In bond should indicate such Intention 
and state the value thereaf la their declarations before any examination of the baggage has been 
made. 

SEALSKIN GARMENTS. 
An act of Congress of 1897, as amended in 1910, expressly forbids the importation into the 
United States of garments made in whole or in part of the skins of seals taken in the waters of the 
Paciflc Ocean; and unless the owner is able to establish by competent evidence and to the satisfaction 
of the Collector that ttie garments are not prohibited, they cannot be admitted. 

PENALTY FOR NOT DECLARING ARTICLES OBTAINED ABROAD. 
'Under Sections 2802 and 3082 of the Revised Statutes of the United States, articles obtained 
abroad and not declared are subject to seizure, and the passenger is liable to criminal prosecution. 

WLnittn .States (^ourt ni (Customs Appeals. 

Presiding Judge-'Roibevt M.Montgomery. Associate Judges — James F. Smith, Orion M. Barber, 
Marion De Vries, George E. Martin. Attorney-General — George W. Wlckersham. Assistant At- 
torney-General — William L. Wemple. Clert, — Arthur B. Shelton ($3,500). Marshal — Frank H. 
Brlggs ($3,000). 

Sec. 188. There shall be a United States Court of Customs Appeals, which shall consist of 
a Presiding Judge and four Associate Judges, each of whom shall be appointed by the President, by 
and with the advice and consent of the Senate, and shall receive a salary of seven thousand dollars 
a year. The Presiding Judge shall be so designated In the order of appointment and in the commission 
Issued to him by the President; aad the Associate Judges shall have precedence according to the 
date of their commissions. Any three members of said court shall constitute a quorum, and the 
concurrence of three members shall be necessary to any decision thereof. In case of a vacancy or 
of the temporary inability, or disquallflcation for any reason of one or two of the Judges of said 
court, the President may, upon the request of the Presiding Judge of said court, designate any qualified 
United States Circuit or District Jud?e or Judges to act in his or their place; and such Circuit or 
District Judges shall be duly qaalliel to so act. 

Sec. 189. The said Court of Customs Appeals shall always be open for the transaction of 
business, and sessions thereof may. in the discretion of the court, be held In the several judicial circuits, 
and at such places as said court may from time to time designate. 

Sec. 195. The Coart of Customs Appeals shall exercise exclusive appellate jurisdiction to 
review by appeal, as herein pnvldsd. flaal decisions by a Boad of General Appraisers in all cases 
as to the construction of the la-v and the facts respecting the classification of merchandise, and the 
rate of duty Imposed thereon uader sioh clas Plication, and the fees and charges connected therewith, 
and all appealable questions as to the jurisdiction of said board, and all appealable guestlons as to 
the laws and regulation goveralng the coUeotion of the customs revenues; and the judgments and 
decrees of said Court of Customs Appeals shall be final In all such cases. 

Sec. 196. No' appeal shall be taken or allowed from any Board of United States General Ap- 
praisers to any other court, and no appellite jurisdiction shall thereafter be exercised or allowed 
by any other courts in cases decided by said Board of United States General Appraisers, but all 
appeals allowed by law from sucti Board of General Appraisers shall be subject to review only in 
the Court of Customs Appeals hereby established, according to the provisions of this chapter: 
Provided. That nothing In this chapter shall be deemed to deprive the Supreme Court of the United 
States of jurisdiction to hear and determine all customs cases which have heretofore been certified 
to said court from the United Stat3S Circuit Courts of Appeals on applications for writs of certiorari 
or otherwise, nor to review by writ of certiorari any customs case heretofore decided or now pending 
and hereafter decided by any Clrcilt Court of Appeals, provided application for said writ be made 
within six months after August fiftH, nineteen hundred and nine: Provided further. That all customs 
cases decided by a Circuit or District Court of the United States or a court of a Territory of the 
United States prior to said date above memtloned, and which have not been removed from said 
courts by appeal or writ of error, and all such cases theretofore submitted for decision in said courts 
and remaining undecided may be reviewed on appeal at the instance of either party by the United 
States Court of Customs Appeals, provided such appeal be taken within one year from the date 
of the entry of the order, judgment, or decrees sought to be reviewed. 

• "< Sec, 197. Immediately upon the organization of the Court of Customs Appeals, all cases 
within the jurisdiction of that court pending and not submitted for decision In any of the United 
States Circuit Courts of Appeals, United States Circuit, Territorial or District Courts, shall, with 
the record and samples therein, be certified by said courts to said Court of Customs Appeals for 
further proceedings In accordance herewith: Provided, That where orders for the taking of further 
testimony before a referee have been made In any of such cases, the taking of such testimony shall 
be completed before such certification. ' 

Sec. 198. If the importer, owner, consignee, or agent of any Imported merchandise, or the 
Collector or Secretary of the Treasury, shall be dissatisfied with the decision of the Board of General 
Appraisers as to the construction of the law and the facts respecting the classification of such mer- 
chandise and the rate of duty Imposed thereon under such classification, or with any other appealable 
decision of said board, they, or either of them, may, within sixty days next after the entry of such 
decree or judgment, and not afterward, apply to the Court of Customs Appeals for a review of the 
questions of law and fact Involved In such decision: Provided, That in Alaska and In the Insular 
and other outside possessions of the United States ninety days shall be allowed for making such 
application to the Court of Customs Appeals. Such application shall be made by filing In the office 
of the clerk of said court a concise statement of errors of law and fact complained of; and a copy of 
such statement shall be served on the collector, or on the Importer, owner, consignee, or agent, as 
the case may be. Thereupon the court shall Immediately order the Board of General Appraisers 
to transmit tO'sald court the record and evidence taken by them, together with the certified state- 
ment of the facts Involved In the case and their decision thereon; and all the evidence taken by and 
before said board shall be competent evidence before said Court of Customs Appeals. The decision 
of said Court of Customs Appeals shall be final, and such cause shall be remanded to said Board 
of General Appraisers /or further proceedings to be taken in pursuance of such determination. 

Sec. 1199. Immediately upon receipt of any record transmitted to said court for determination 

the clerk thereof shall place the same upon the calendar for hearing and submission; and such calendar 

shall be called and all cases thereupon submitted, except for good cause shown, at least once every 

sixty days: Provided, That such calendar need not be called during the months of July and August 

,ot any year. 



I*ostal Information. 107 



postal information. 

(Bevfied fty the Post-Office Department for The World Almanac. ) 

DOMESTIC RATES OF POSTAGE. 

All mailable matter for transmission by the United States mails within the United States is 
divided into four classes, under the foliowingr re rulations. (Doniestic rates apply to mail for 
Canada. Mexico, Cuba, Tutuila, Porto Rico, (4nRtn, Hawaii, the Philippines, the "Canal Zone," the 
Republic of Panama.and Shanghai, China), also ro officers or members of the crew of vessels of war 
of the United States, and officers and men of the United States Navy in the UnitedStates Naval Hos- 
pital, Yokohama, .Japan. 

First-Class Mutter— This class includes letters, postal cards, "postcards," and anythincr 
sealed or otherwise closed against inspection, except sealed packages of proprietary articles described 
under " Fourth-class Matter," or anything containing writing not authorized on second, third or 
fourth-clavss matter. 

First class or letter rate of postage to anj' part of the United States, its possessions, or the above- 
named count ries, two cents per onnce or fraction theieaf. 

Rate.s on local or drop letters at free delivery ottices, two cents per ounce or fraction thereof. At 
oflices where there is no free delivery by carriers, and the addressee cannot be .served by rm-al free 
delivery carriers, one cent per ounce pr fraction thereof. 

Rate.s on postal cards, one cent (double or "replj'" cards, two cents). Postal cards issued by 
the Post-Ollice l>epanment maj* bear writt-en, printed, or other additions as follows : 

(a) The face of the card may be divided by a vertical line placed approximately one-third of the 
distance from the left end of the card ; the space to the left of the line to be used for a message, etc. , 
but the space to the right for the address only. 

(/>) Addresses upon postal cards may be either written, printed, or affixed thereto, at the option 
of the sender. * 

(c) Very thin sheets of paper may be attached to the card on condition that they completely ad- 
here thereto. Such sheets may bear both writing and printing. 

(rf) Advertisements, illustrations, or writing m.ay appear on the back of the card and on the left 
third of the face. 

2. The addition to a postal card of matter other than as above authorized will subject the card , 
whensentin the mails, to postage according to the character of the message— at the letter rate if 
wholly or partly in writing or the third-class rate if entirely in print. In either case the postage 
value of the stamp impressed upon the card will not be impaired. 

3. Postal cards must be treated in all respects as sealed letters, except that when undeliverable 
to the addressed they may not be returned to the sender. Undeliverable "double" postal cards will be 
returned to the sender if known. 

4. Postal cards bearing particles of glass, metal, mica, sand, tin.sel or other similar substances, 
areunmailable, except when inclosed in tightlj' sealed envelopes with proper postage attached, or 
when treated in such manner as will prevent the objectionable substances from being rubbed off or 
injuring persons handling the mails. 

Cards that have been spoiled in printingor otherwise will be redeemed from the original pur chaser a 
at 75 per cent, of their face value if unmutilated. 

Post Cards— (private mailing cards)— bearing written or printed messages are transmissible in 
the mails : 

Private mailing cards (" post cards" ) in the domestic mails must conform to the following con- 
ditions : 

(a) A "postcard" must be an unfolded piece of cardboard not exceeding approximately 3 9-16 
by 5 9-16 inches, nor less than approximately 2% by 4 inches. 

(6) It must in form and in the quality and weight of paper be substantially like the Government 
postal card. 

Ic) It may be of any color not interfering with a legible address and postmark. 

id) It may or may not, at the option of the sender, bear near the top of the face the words ' ' post 
card. ' ' 

(e) The face of the card may be divided by a vertical line ; the left half to be used for a message, 
etc., but that to the right for the address only. 

(/) Very thin sheets of paper may be attached to the card, and then only on condition that they 
Completely^adllere thereto. Such sheets may bear both writing and printing. 

ia) Advertisements and illustrations may appear on the back of the card and on the left half of 
the face. 

2. Cards, without cover, conforming to the foregoing conditions are transmissible in the domestic 
mails (including the possessions of the United States)and to Cuba, Canada, Mexico, the Republic of 
Panama, and Shanghai, China, at the postage rate of 1 cent each. 

3. When post cards are prei>ared by printers and stationers for sale, it is desirable that they bear 
in the upper right hand corner of the face an oblong diagram containing the words ' ' Place postage 
stamp iiere," and at the bottom of the space to the right of the verticle dividing line, the words 
'"This space for the addre.ss." 

4. Cards which do not conform to the conditions prescribed by these regulations are, when sent 
in the mails, chargeable with postage according to the character of the message— at the letter rate, 
if whollj' or partly in writing, or at the third-class rate, if entirely in print, 

5. Cards bearing particles of glass, metal, mica, sand, tinsel, or other similar substances, are 
unm,ailnhle, except when inclosed in tightly sealed envelopes, or when treated in such manner as will 
prevent the objectionable substances from being rubbed off or injuring persons handling the mails. 

Rate on special delivery letters, ten cents on each letter in additio)i to the regular postage. 
This entitles the letter to immediate delivery by special messenger. Special delivery stamps are 
sold at post-offices, and must be affixed to such letters. Ordinary stamps to the value of ten cents 
affixed to a letter or other piece of mail will entitle it to special delivery if it is marked "Special 
Delivery." The deliverj', at carrier offices, extends to the limits of the carrier route.s. At non- 
carrier offices it extends to one mile from the post-office. Postmasters are not obliged to deliver 
beyond these limits, and letters addre.ssed to places beyond must await delivery in the usual way, 
notwithstanding the special deliverv stamp. 

Prepayment by stamps invariably required. Postage on all letters should be /"nWyprepald, but 
If prepaid one full rate and no more, they will be forwarded, and the amount of deficient postage 
collected on delivery; if wholly unpaid, or prepaid with less than one full rate and deposited at a 
post-office, the addressee will be notified to remit postage ; and if he fails to do so, they will be sent 



108 Postal Information. 



POSTAL INFORMATION— C'07i/wmed. 



to the Dead Letter Office; but they will be returned to the sender if he is located at the place of mail* 
ing, and if his address be printed or written upon them. '^ 

Letter rate is charged on typewriting and carbon or letter press copies thereof, and on all printed 
iniitations or reproductions of typewriting or manuscript obtained by raechanical process unless such 
reproductions are presented at post-office windows in the minimum number of twenty Identical 
unsealed copies. 

Letters and other matter prepaid at tlie letter rate— two cents an ounce or fraction thereof— (but 
no other class of mail matter) will be returned to the sender free, if a request to that elTect is printed 
or written on the envelope or wrapper. Tlie limit of weight is four pounds, except for a single book. 

Prepaid letters will be forwarded from one post-olHce to another upon the written request of the 
person addressed, without additional charge for postage. The direction on foi-warded letters may 
be changed as many times as may be necessary to rench the person addressed. Nothing may be added 
to such lettere except the forwarding address without subjecting them to new postage. 

Second-Class' Matter— This class includes all printed newspapers and periodicals that have 
been " Entered as second-class matter, " and are regularly issued at stated intervals as frequently 
as four times a year, from a known office of publication and mailed by the publishers or news agents 
to actual subscribers or as sample copies or to news agents for sale, and newspapers and 
publications of this class mailed by persons other than publishers. Also periodical publications of 
benevolent and fraternal societies, organized under the lodge system and having a membership of a 
thousand persons, and the publications of strictly professienal, literary, historical, and scientific 
societies, and incorporated institutions of learning, trade unions, etc., provided that the.se be 
published at stated intervals not less than four times a year, and that they be formed of printed paper 
sheets without board, cloth, leather or other substantial binding. Publishers who wish to avail them- 
selves of the privileges of the act are required to make formal application to the department through 
the postmaster at the place of publication, producing satisfactery evidence that the organizations, 
societies, and institutions represented ceme within the purview of the law, and that the object of the 
publications is to further the objects and purposes of the ©rganizations. 

Rates of postage to publishers and news agents, one cent a pound or fractional part thereof, 
prepaid in currency. Publications designed primarily for advertising or free circulation, or circulation 
ata nominal rate.or not having a legitimate list of subscribers, are excluded from the pound rate, and 
pay the thinl-class rate. 

Publications sent to actual subscribers in the county where printed and put»lished are free, 
unless mailed fer delivery at a letter-carrier office. 

Rates of postage on second-class newspapers, magazines, or periodicals, mailed by others than the 
ipnhWsherfiOT newfi &^Qntfi, one cent for each four oimces or fraction thereof. It should be observed that 
the rate is one cent for each four ounces, not one cent for each paper contained in the same wrapper. 
This rate applies only when a complete copy is mailed. Parts of second-class publications or partial 
or incomplete copies are i/il7d-ctoss7?ia?<ey. Second-class matter will be entitled to special delivery 
when special delivery stamps (or ten cents in ordinary stamps and the words "Special Delivery" 
placed on the wrapper) are affixed in addition to the regular postage. 

Second-class matter must be so wrapped that it may be easily examined. The sender' s name and 
address inay be written in them or on the wrapper, also the words "sample copy" when sent as 
such, or "marked copy" when it contains a marked item or article. Typographical errors in the 
text may be corrected, but any other writing subjects the matter to letter postage. 

Third-CIass Matter— Mail matter of the third class includes printed books, pamphlets, en- 
gravings, circulars in print (or by the hectograph, electric- pen, or similar process when at least 
twenty identical copies are mailed at post-office windows at one time), and other matter wholly 
in print, proof sheets, corrected proof sheets, and manu.script copy accompanying the same. 

The rate on matter of this class is one cent for each two ounces oi' fraction thereof. Postage must be 
paid by stamps affixed, unless 2,000 or more identical pieces are mailed under special permit when 
the postage at that rate naay be paid in money. 

Manuscript unaccompanied by proof sheets must pay letter rate. 

Third-class matter must admit of easy inspection, otherwise it ■will be charged letter rate on 
delivery. It must be fully prepaid, or it will not be despatched. New postage must be prepaid for 
forwarding to a new address or returning to seaders. 

The limit of weight is four pounds, except single books in separate packages, on which the weight 
is notliinited. It is entitled, like matterof theother classes, to special delivery when special delivery 
stamps are aifixed in addition to the regular postage, or when ten cents in ordinary stamps are affixed 
in addition to the regular postage and the words "Special Delivery" are placed on the wrapper. 

Upon matter of the third class, or upon the wrapper or envelope inclosing the same, or the tag or 
label attached thereto, the sender may write his own name, occupation, and residence or business 
address, preceded by the word "■ from," and may make marks other than by written words to 
call attention to any word or passage in the text, and may correct any typographical errors. 
There may be placed upon the blank leaves or cover of any book, or printed matter of the third 
class, a simple manuscript dedication or inscription not of the nature of a personal correspondence. 
Upon the wrapper or envelope of third-class matter, or the tag or label attached thereto, may be 
placed in writing or otherwise the words " Please do not open until Christmas " or words to that 
effect, and there may be printed any matter mailable as third clas.s. Written designation of the 
contents such as "book," "photo," "printed matter," is also permissible, but there must be left 
on the address side a spacesufficient for a legible address, postmark and tiie necessary stamps. 

Fourth-Class Matter— Fourth-class matter is all mailable matter not included in the three 
preceding classes which is so prepared for mailing as to be easily withdrawn from the wrapper and 
examined, except that sealed packages ef proprietary articles of merchandise (not in themselves 
unmaiiable), such as pills, fancy soaps, tebacco, etc., put up in fixed quantities by the manufacturer 
for sale by himself or others, or'fnr samples, in such manner as to properly protect the articles, so that 
each package in its simplest mercantile cw- sample form may be examined, are mailable as fourth-class 
matter. It embraces merchandise and samples of every description, and coin or specie. 

Rate of postage, one cent for each ounce or fraction thereof (except seeds, roots, bulbs, cuttings, 
scions, and plants, the rate oh which is one cent for earhtivo ounces or fraction thereof). This matter 
must be fully prepaid, or it will not be despatched. Postage must be paid by stamps affixed, unless 
2,000 or more identical pieces are mailed at one time when the postage at that rate may be paid in 
money. New postage must be prepaid for forwarding or returning. The affixingof special delivery 
ten-cent stamps in addition to the regular postage entitles fourth-class matter to special delivery. 
(See remarks under ' ' first-class matter. " ) 

On the wrapper, envelope, tag, or label, in addition to the name and address of the addressee, 
there maybe written or printed the name, occupation, and residence, or business address of the 



Postal Information. "^ 109 

FOSTAL INFORMATION— Co7t^m«ed. 

sender preceded by the word "from," as well as any marks, numbers, names or letters for the pur- 
pose of descripi Ion, also the words "Please do not open until Christmas" or words to that enect, 
and any printed matter which Is not In the nature of personal correspondence. On the address side 
or face of the package there must be left a space sufficient for a legible address, postmark, and the 
necessary postage stamps. A request to the delivering postmaster may also be written a^ing him 
to notify the sender in case the package is not delivered. 

On the matter itself, or upon the tag or label attached thereto, maybe written or printed any 
matter authorized to be placed on the wrapper. 

Wrilteu designation of contents such as "samples,'' "caudj', " "cigars" are permissible 
upon the wrapper of mail matter of the fourth class. 

Inclosnres.— With a package of fourth-class matter, prepaid at proper rate for that class, the 
sender mav inclose anv mailable matter of the third class. A single card bearing the written name 
of the sender and such inscription as "Merry Christmas," "Happy New Year," " With best 
wishes,' ' etc. , may also be inclosed with fourth-class matter without affecting its classification. 

Articles of this class that are liable to injure or deface the mails, such as glass, sugar, needles, nails, 
pens, etc., must be first wrapped in a bag, box, or open envelope and then secured in another outside 
tube or box, made of metal or hard wood, without sharp corners or edges, and having a sliding clasp 
orscrew lid, thus securing the articles in a double package. The public should bear in mind that the first 
object of the department is to transport the mails salely, and every other interest is made subordinate. 

Such articles as poisons, explosives, or inflammable articles, live or dead animals, insects, fruits 
or vegetable matter liable to decomposition, or substances exhaling a biid odor will not be forwarded 
In any case. / 

Firearms may only be sent when it is apparent that they are harmless. 

liiqiiiils, Etc.— The following Postal Laws and Regulations relate to articles absolutely 
excluded from tlie mails, and to the manner in which liquids and other articles liable, unless properly 
protected, to hurt, harm or injure another, or damage, deface, or otherwise injure the mails, must 
be packed before they can be admitted to domestic malLs. These regulations must be strictly com- 
plied with in every particular-^postmasters having no authority to modify or make exceptions to 
them in any case. 

Section 494. All kinds of poison* and all articles and compositions containing poison, and 
all poisonous animals. Insects and reptiles, and explosives of all kinds and Inflammable 
materials, and Infernal machines and mechanical, chemical or other devices or compositions 
which may ignite or explode, and all disease germs or scabs, and all other natural er 
artificial articles, compositions or materials of whatever kind which may kill or In anywise hurt, 
harm, or Injure another, or damage, deface, or otherwise Injure the malls or other property, 
whether sealed as first-class matter or not, are hereby declared to be nonmailable matter, 
and shall not be conveyed In the malls or delivered from any post-offlce or station thereof, 
nor by any letter 'carrier; but the Postmaster- General may permit the transmission In the 
malls, under such rules and regulations as he, shall prescribe as to preparation and packing, 
of any article hereinbefore described which are not outwardly or of their own force dangerous 
or Injurious to life, health, or property: Provided, That all spirituous, vinous, malted, fer- 
mented, or other Intoxicating liquors of any kind, are hereby declared to be nonmailable 
and shall not be deposited In or carried through the malls. Whoever shall knowingly deposit 
or cause to be deposited fop mailing or delivery, or shall knowingly cause to be delivered by 
mall according to the direction thereon, or at any place at which It Is directed to be 
delivered by the person to whom It Is addressed, anything declared by this section to be 
nonmailable unless In accordance with the rules and regulations hereby authorized to be 
prescribed by the Postmaster-General, shall be fined not more than one thousand dollars, 
or Imprisoned not more than two years, or both; and whoever shall knowingly deposit or 
cause to be deposited for mailing or delivery, or shall knowingly cause to be delivered by 
mall according to the direction thereon, or at any place to which It Is directed to be de- 
livered by the person to whom it Is addressed, anything declared by this section to be non- 
mailable, whether transmitted In accordance with the rules and regulations authorized to be 
prescribed by the Postmaster-General or not, with the design. Intent, or purpose to kill, or 
in anywise hurt, harm, or Injure another, or damage, deface, or otherwise Injure the malls 
or other property, shall be fined not more than five thousand dollars, or Imprisoned not more than 
ten years, or both. 

2. Spirituous, vinous, malted, fermented, or other Intoxicating liquors of any kind, 
poisons of every kind, and articles and compositions containing poison (except as prescribed 
In the fourth paragraph hereof, and section 496 below paragraph 12), and poisonous animals. 
Insects, and reptiles, and explosives of every kind, and Inflammable materials (Including 
matches, kerosene oil, gasoline, naphtha, benzine, turpentine, denatured alcohol, etc.), and 
Infernal machines, and mechanical, chemical or other devices or compositions which may 
Ignite or explode, and disease germs or scabs (except as prescribed in ssectlon 495 of Postal 
laws), and other natural or artificial articles, compositions, or materials of whatever kind 
which may kill, or In anywise hurt, harm, or Injure another, or damage, deface, or other- 
wise Injure the mall or other property, live or dead (and not stuffed) animals (except as 
prescribed In section 496 below), raw hides or pelts, guano, or any article exhaling bad 
odor, whether sealed as first-class matter or not, shall not be admitted to the malls. 

3. Liquids not spirituous, vinous, malted, fermented, or otherwise Intoxicating (Including 
samples of altar or communion wine used In church services), and not liable to explosion 
or spontaneous combustion or Ignition by shock or jar, and not Inflammable, fruits or 
vegetable matter liable to decomposition, comb honey, soft soap, paste or confections, oint- 
ments, salves, and articles of similar consistency, may be admitted to the malls for trans- 
mission In the domestic malls when Inclosed In packages In conformity with the conditions 
prescribed In section 496 below. 

4. Medicines composed In part or wholly of poison or poisons, and anaesthetic agents, which 
are not outwardly or of their own force dangerous or Injurious to life, health or property, 
and not In themselves unmailable (see sections 480 and 497, of Postal laws), may be 
admitted to the mails for transmission In the domestic malls from the manufacturer thereof 
or dealer therein to licensed physicians, surgeons, pharmacists and dentists, and not other- 
wise, when Inclosed In packages In conformity with the conditions prescribed in section 496 
below: Provided, That the package bears the label or superscription of the manufacturer 
of or dealer In the article mailed. 

Section 496. Articles of the fourth class, not absolutelv excluded from the malls, 
but which from their form or nature might, unle.ss properly secured, destroy, deface, or 



110 ' Postal Information. 



POSTAL INFORMATION— Co«<m?t€d. 



otherwise damage the contents of 'the maM bag, or harm the pei-son of any one e^ngaKed 
in the poBtal serviice, -may be transmitted In the mails, when thev conform to the fol- 
lowing conditions, except as other^vise herein provided: 

( n Wihen not liquid or liquefiable. they must be placed In a bag. box or remov- 
able e:nvelope or wrappinig, made of paper, cloth or parchment. 

\i>) Such bag, box, envelope or wrapping; must aga-in be placed in a box or tube 
made of metal or some hard wood, with sliding clasp or screw lid. 

(c) In cases of articles liable to break, the inside box. bag. envelope or wrapping 
must be surrounded by sawdust, cotton or other elastic substance. 

"> Admissible liquids and oils (nat exceeding four ounces, liquid measure), 
pastes 'salves or articles easily liquefiable must conform to the following conditions: 

(a) When in glass bottles, such bottles must be very strong and must be in- 
cdosed in a metal, wooden or papier-mache block or tube, and there must be provided, 
between the bottle and the block or tube, a cushion of cotton, felt or other absorbent. 
The block or tube must be of suff.icient stremgth to resist rough handling and support 
the weight of the mails piled in bags. If of wood, it must be at least three-siixteeaitlia 
of an inch thick in the thininest part; if of papier-mache it must be at least five thirty- 
seconds of aai incih thick for bottles holding from two to four ounces, and at .least one- 
eighth of an inch thick for bottles holding two ounces or less. The block or tube muat 
be rendered water-tig-ht by an application of paraffine or other suitable substance, so 
tbat if the bottle be broken in ti-ansit the liquid will not escape or the tube b-ecome 
softened and allow the broken glass to be scattered in the mails. 

{b) When inclosed in a tin cylinder, metal case or tube, such cy'linder. oaisef or 
tube should have a lid or cover so secured as to make the case or tube water tis^t. and 
sihould be securely fastened in a wooden or papier-mache block (open only at one 
end), and not less in thickness and strengrth tihan above described. 

(cj Pastes, salves, etc, not easily liquefiable (not exceeding four ouncee. liquid 
measure), when inclosed in water-tight tin boxes with screw-top lids, may be placed 
in a box of thick corrugated pasteboard, and then well wrapped with strong paper and 
tied with twine. 

3. Manufacturers or dealers intending to transmit articles or samples in consid- 
era/b.le quantities should submit a specimen package, showing tihe mode of packing, to 
the postmaster at the mailing office, who will see that the conditions of 'this section 
are carefully observed. 

4. Where sharp pointed instruments are offered for mailing, the poimts must be 
capped or incased so that they may not by" any means be liable to cut through their 
dnclosure; land where they have blades, such blades musit be bound with wire so that 
they shall remain firm.lv attached to each other and within their handles or sockets. 
Needies must be inclosed in metal or wooden cases so that they cannot by any means 
prick through or pass out of tiheir inclosures. 

5. Seeds or other articles not prohijbited which are liable from ittheir form or 
nature to loss or damage, unless specially protected, must be nut up In sealed envel- 
opes, made of material sufficiently transparent to show the contents clearly without 
opening. 

6. Ink powders, pepper, snuff, or other powders not explosive, or any pulverized 
dry substance, not poisonous, may be sent in the mails when inclosed in the manner 
prescribed herein for liquors, or when inclosed in metal, wooden or papier-mache 
cases in suoh secure manner as to render the escape of any particles of dust from the 
package by ordinary handling innpossible. and of such strength as to bear the weight 
and handling of the mails without breaking; the method of packing to be sub.1ect to 
the approval of the General Superintendent of the Railway Mail Service 

7. Queen bees and their attendant bees, when accompanied by a copy of a certificate of the 
current year from a 8tate or Ciovernment apiary inspector to the eflfect that the apiary from which 
said queen bee^ are shipped is free from disease or by a copy of a statement by the bee-keeper made 
before a notarv public or other officer having a seal that the honey used in making the candy used in 
the queen mailing cage has been diluted and boiled in a closed vessel; beneficial insects, when 
shipped by departments of entomology in agricultural eollpges and persons holding official entomol- 
ogical positions; other live insects, when addressed to the Bureau of Entomology of the United States 
Department of Agriculture, to departments of entomology in State agricultural colleges, and to 
persons holding official entomological positions, and dried insects and dried reptiles, may be sent 
m the mails when so put up as to render it practically impossible that the package shall be broken in 
transit, or the persons handling the same be injured, or the mail bags or their contents soiled. 

8. Nurser.y stock, includingflorists' stock, trees, shrubs, plants, vines, cuttings, crafts, scions, 
buds, bulbs, and roots (which may carry injurious insects), may be admitted to the mails only when 
accompanied by a certificate from a State or Government inspector to the effect that the nursery 
from which the said nursery stock is shipped has, within a year, been inspected and found free from 
injurious insects. 

9. Hard candies or confectionery, yeast cakes, soap in hard cakes, when wrapped 
In strong paper boxes or heavy paper wrappers, adequate to prevent all injury to other 
matter in the same mail bags, are admissible in the domestic mails. 

10. Pistols or revolvers may be sent in the mails, but the postmaster at the mailing office will 
carefully examine such packages, and will receive them only when sure they are harmless. 

11. Nospecifipd mode of iiacking is prescribed for samples of flour, but they .should be put up in 
such manner as to certainly avoid risk of the package breaking or cracking or the flour being scattered 
in the mails, and if this be not done the samples should be excluded. 

12. Articles of fourth-class matter must be so wrapped that their contents may be 
easily and thoroughly examined by postmasters, both with reference to the safet.v of 
the mails and postal employees and to the exclusion of matter chargeable as of the 
first class. (•See section 4 89 of Postal laws.) 

l:i. Proprietary articles of merchandise, not in themselves unmailable (see sec- 
tions 480. 494 and 497 of Postal laws), such as fancy soaps, tobacco, pills, tablets, 
or other harmless medical preparations put up in fixed quantities by the man- 
ufactureir, for sale by himself and others, which may be sealed in such manner as to 
properly protect the article, but to allow examination of such package in its simplest 
mercantile form, will be accepted for mailing. 

Limit of weight of tourtii-oia^s matter lexceptiii'/ liquids and single books), four pounds. 

Third or Fourth ClasN Matter .Mailable Without Stamps— Under special permits post- 
age may be paid iu m.oney for third or fourth class matter mailed in quantities of 2,000 or more 



Postal III formation. Ill 



POSTAL INFORMATION— r.'o/;^///'/f(^ 



identical pieces. For liiformatiou conceruiug the regulatious governing such mailiugs inquiry should 
be made of the postmaster. 

Re«istratiHn— All kinds of postal matter maybe rearistered at the rate of ten cents for each 
porA-aae ill addition to the rei?ular rates of postage, to be fully prepaid by stamps. Each package 
must bear the name and address of the sender, and a receipt wilt be rf'turned from the person to 
whom addressed, when indorsed "• receipt desired," or words of similar import. Mail matter can be 
registered at all post-offices in the United States. 

An indenmitv— not to exceed $50 for anyone registered piece, or the actual value of the piece, if 
It is less than SSO-shall be paid for the loss of flrst-class registered matter mailed at and addressed to 
a United States post-office, and an indemnity not to exceed $25 is paid for domestic th,ird and 
fourth class matter. The limit of indemnity paid for registered articles lost in the International 
mails s 50 francs. 

Doinestici>Ionev Orders— Domestic money orders are issued by money-order post-offices for 
any amount up to SlOO, at the following rates: 

■ For sums not exceeding $2.50. 3 cents ; over $2. 50 to $5. 5 cents; over $5 to $10, 8 cents; over 
$10to$20, lOcents; over $20 to $30, 12 cents; over $30 to $40. 15 cents; over $40 to $50, 18 cents; 
over $50 to $60, 20 cent s ; over $60 to $75, 25 cents ; over $75 to $100, 30 cents. 

Stamped Envelopes— Embossed stamped envelopes and newspaper wrappers of several 
denominations, sizes and colors are kept on sale at post-offices, singly or in quantities, at a small 
advance on the postage rate. Stamps cut from stamped envelopes are valueless, but postmasters 
are authorized to sjive good stamps for stamped envelopes or newspaper wrappers that maybe spoiled 
in directing, if presented in a substantially whole condition. 

Unmailable Matter— Unmailable domestic matter— that is, matter which is not admissible to 
the United States mails for delivery in the United States or .n any of its possessions— includes: 

1. All matter illegibly, incorrectly, or insufficiently addressed. 

2. All second-class matter and all matter of the third or fourth class not wholly prepaid; 
and letters and other first-class matter not prepaid one full rate— 2 cents. 

3. All matter weighing overfourpouiids,exceptsecond-class matter, single books, official matter 
emanating from the Executive Departments and documents printed and circulated by authority of 
Congress. 

4. All matter harmful in its nature, as poisons, explosive or inflammable articles, matches; live 
or dead (but not stuffed) animals, and reptiles, guano, or any article exhaling a bad odor, vinous, 
spirituous or malt liquors, and liquids liable to explosion, spontaneous combustion, or ignition by 
shockor jar. such as kerosene oil, naphtha, benzine, etc. 

5. All indecent, obscene, lewd, lascivious or filthy matter, and every article or thing intended, 
designed, or adapted for any indecent or immoral purpose, or for the prevention of conception 
or procuring abortion, or for any indecent or immoral use. 

6. Postal, post, or other cards mailed without wrappers and all matter bearing up(m the outside 
cover or wrapper any delineations, epithets, terms, or language of au indecent, lewd, lascivious, 
obscene, libelous, scurrilous, defamator.v or threatening character, or calculated by the terms or 
manner or style of display, and obviously intended to refleat injuriously upon the character or 
conduct of another. Dunning postal or post cards are included in this class. 

7. Postcards, bearing particles of glass, metal, mica, sand, tinsel, or other similar substances, 
are unmailable, except as provided under ' • First- Class Matter. ' ' 

8. All matter concerning an.v lottery, gift, enterprise, or similar scheme, offering prizes depend- 
ent in whole or in part upon lot or chance, or concerning schemes devised for the purpose of obtaining 
money or property under false pretences. 

Applications for the establishment of post-offices should be addressed to the First Assistant Post- 
master-General, accompanied by a statement of the necessity therefor. Instructions will then be given 
and blanks furnished to enable the petitioners to provide the department with the necessary infor- 
mation. 

The franking privilege was abolished July 1, 1873, but the following mail matter may be sent free 
by legislative saving clau.ses, viz. : 

1. All public documents printed by order of Congress, the Congressional Record and speeches con- 
tained therein, franked by Members of Congress, or the Secretary of the Senate, or Clerk of the House- 

2. Seeds transmitted by the Secretary of Agriculture, or by any Member of Congress, procured 
from that Department. 

3. Letters and packages relating exclusively to the business of the Government of the United 
States, mailed only bj^ officers of the same, and letters and parcels mailed by the Smithsonian Institu- 
tion. All these must be covered by specially printed "•' penalty' ' envelopes or labels. 

4. The Vice- President, Members and Members-electand Delegates and Delegates-elect toCougress 
may frank any mail matter to any Government official or to any person correspondence, not over 
four ounces in w^eight, upon official or departmental business. 

All communications to Government officers and to Members of Congress are required to be prepaid 
by stamps unless inclosed in "penalty" envelopes furnished for replies. 

!^ugs68tioii8 to the Public— Mail all letters, etc.. as early as practicable, especially when sent 
in large numbers, as is frequently the case with newspapers and circulars. 

All mail matter at large post-offices is necessarily handled in great haste and should therefore in 
all cases be so plainly addressed as tu leave no koom for doubt and yo excuse fop error on 
the part of postal emplo.ves. Names of States should be written in full (or their abbreviations very 
distinctly written) in order to prevent errors which arise from the similaritv oi such abbreviations as 
Cal., Col. ; Pa., Va. , Vt. ; Me., Mo., Md. ; loa., Ind.; N. H- , N. M., N. Y., N. J., N. C. , D. C. ; 
Miss., Minn., Mass.; Nev., Neb. ; Penn., Tenn., etc., when hastily or carelessly written. This is 
especially necessary in addressing mail matter to places of which the names are borne by several 
post-offices in different States. 

Avoid as much as possible using envelopes made of flimsy paper, especially where more than one 
sheet of paper, or any other article than paper, is inclosed. Being often handled, and even in the mail- 
bags subject to pressure, such envelopes not infrequently split open, giving cause of complaint. 

Never send money or any other article of value through the mail except either by means of a money 
order or in a registered letter. Any person who sends money or jewelry in an unregistered letter not 
only runs a risk of losing his property, but exposes to temptation everj' one through whose hands his 
letter passes, and may be the means of ultimately bringing some clerk or letter-carrier to ruin. 

See that every letter or packag'e bears the full name and post-office address of the writer, in order 
to secure the return of the letter, if the person to whom it is directed caunot be found. A much larger 
portion of the undelivered letters could be returned if the names and addresses of the senders were 



112 Foreign Mails. 



POSTAL INFORMATION— Co?i<m?<ed. 



alwaj'S fully aud plainly written or printed inside or on the envelopes. Persons who have large 
correspondence find it most convenient to use "special request envelopes;" but those who only mail 
aanjccasional letter can avoid much trouble by writing a request to " return if not delivered," etc., 
on the envelope. . . . . , 

When dropping a letter, newspaper, etc., into a street maihng-box, or into the receptacle at a 
post-oflace, always see that the packet falls into the box and does notstick in its passage; observe,also, 
particularly, whether the postage stamps remain securely in their places. 

Postage stamps should be placed on the upper right-hand corner of the address side of all mail 
matter. 

The street and number (or box number) should form a part of the address of all mail matter directed 
to cities. In most cities there are many persons, and even firms, bearing the same name. Before 
depositing any package or oiher article for mailing, the sender should assure himself that it is wrapped 
and packed in the manner prescribed by postal regulations; that it does not contain unma liable matter 
nor exceed the limit of weight as fixed bv law; and that it is fully prepaid and properly addressed. 

It is unlawful to send an ordinary letter by express or otherwise outside of the mails uuless it be 
inclosed in a Government-stamped envelope of sufficient value to pay the postage to which it is sub- 
ject. It is alsa unlawful to inclose a letter in an express package unless it pertains wholly to the 
contents of the package. ^^^ . ^, ^ ^ ^ . ^ 

It is forbidden by the regulations of the Post- Office Department for postmasters to give to any 
person Information concerning the mail matter of another, or to disclose the name of a box-holder at 

apost-ofiice. . . .^ , ^, .,-, ^ ,. „ , . . 

Letters addressed to persons temporarily sojourning in a city where the Free Delivery System is in 
operation should be marked "Transient" or "General Delivery," if not addressed to a street aud 
numberor some other designated place of delivery. . , . 

Foreign books, etc. , infringing United States copyright are undeliverable if received in foreign 
mails, or mailed here. 

The foregoing rates, rules, and suggestions apply to postal matters in the United States. 



POSTAGE RATES AND CONDITIONS. 

The rates of postage to all foreign countries aud colonies are as follows : 

Letters first ounce or less, Scents; each additional oHnce Scents. 

Postal cards, each ' • 2 cents. 

Newspapers and other printed matter, per 2 ounces 1 cent. 

Commercial papers (such as legal aud insurance (Packets not in excess of 10 ounces 5 cents. 

papers, deeds, bills of lading, invoices,^ Packets in excess of 10 ounces, for each 2 

manuscript for publication, etc.) I ounces or fraction thereof..... 1 cent. 

G 1 f QT-^v. iriioo / Packets not in excess of 4 ounces 2cents. 

teampiesoimercnauaise. -[packets in excess of 4ounces, for each 2 ounces or fraction thereof 1 cent. 
Registration fee on letters or other articles 10 cents. 

On printed matter aud commercial papers the limit of weight is 4 pounds 6 ounces, except that 
single volumes of books to Salvador, Canada, Mexico, Cuba, and Panama, are unrestricted as to 
weight. Size— The limit of size is 18 inches in any one direction, except that printed matter or com- 
mercial papers in rolls may be 30 inches long by 4 inches in diameter. 

Ordinary letters for countries of the Postal Union (except Canada and Mexico) will be forwarded, 
whether any postage is prepaid on them or not. All other mailable matter must be prepaid at least 
partially. Domestic rates apply to matter for Porto Rico, Guam, Philippine Islands, Cuba, "Canal 
Zone," Republic of Panama, Tutuila, Hawaii, Shanghai City, U. S. Naval Vessels and officers and 
men of the U. S Navy in the U. S. Naval Hospital, Yokohama, Japan. 

EXCEPTIONS. 

GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND AND NEWFOUNDLAND. 
The rate on Letters for these countries is two cents for each ounce or fraction. The Postal Union 
rates apply to postal cards, post cards, printed matter, commercial papers and samples. 

GERMANY. 

The postage rate on Letters for Germany by direct ocean transportation is two cents an ounce. 
Letters paid at the two-cent rate are despatched only by steamers able to laud the mails at a German 
port. Letters paid at the Postal Union rate are despatched by the quickest route. 

A fast steamer sailing for Germauv via Plymouth and Cherbourg carries letters for Germany pre- 
paid at the Postal Union rate and at the two-cent rate— the letters paid at the five-cent ( Postal Union) 
rate are landed at Plymouth (the quickest route), whereas the letters paid at the two-cent rate are 
carried through to Germany by the Transatlantic steamer. 

The Postal Union rates apply to postal car^s, post cards, printed matter, commercial papers and 
samples regardless of the route by which sent, also to Letters despatched via England and France. 

CANADA. 
Matter mailed in the United States addressed to Canada is subject to the same postage rates and 
conditions as it would be if it were addressed for delivery in the United States, except that plants, 
seeds, etc. , are subject to the postage rate of one cent an ounce ; that prints ' ' commercial papers ' ' 
and samples of merchandise are transmissible at the Postal Union postage rates and conditions. Goods 
and merchandise (fourth-class matter), not samples, may be sent in unsealed packages, not over 4 

Eounds in weight, for one cent per ounce. There is no limit of weight to single volumes of printed 
ooks or packages of second-class matter. Sealed articles, other than letters in their usual and 
ordinary form, are unmailable. , .^■^■^j. 

All articles, except the reply half of double postal cards, must be fully prepaid with postage 
stamps at the rate of postase applicable to similar articles in the domestic mails of this country, and 
are required to be delivered free of postage to addressees, except that letters upon which only ene rate 
of postage has been prepaid are required to be forwarded, any deficiency being collected on delivery. 

Any article of correspondence may be registered. Packages of merchandise are subject to the 
regulations of either country to prevent violations of the revenue laws; must not be closed against in- 
spection, and must be so wrapped and inclosed as to be easily examined. Samples must not exceed 
12 ounces in weight. ,..^^ ^n-,- ^ jv.-i. 

Advertising circulars are liable to a specific customs duty at the rate of 15 cents per pound, which 
duty Canadian customs officials are required to collect when such pamphlets arrive by mail, even 



Postal Information, 113 



FOREIGN MAILS— Coniiwued. 



though eacb pamphlet bears a different address. But bona-flde trade catalogues and price lists of 
goods for wholesale, not exceeding three to any one address, are admitted free of customs duty. 
Almanacs, advertising periodicals and printed matter designed to advertise the sale of goods by any 
person in Canada are not included in the exemption from duty granted to "bona-flde trade catalogues' ' 
and "price lists." Only bona-flde trade catalogues and price lists of goods for wholesale in any 
country beyond the limits of Canada, and not exceeding three to one address, are admitted free of 

"^^' CUBA AND PANAMA. 

Matterfor Cuba and the Republic of Panama is mailable at the same rates of postage and under 
the same conditions as it would be if addressed for delivery in the United States, except that 
"samples" and "commercial papers" may be sent subject to the Postal Union postage rates and 
conditions; thatarticles, other than letters in their usual and ordinary form, must be so wrapped or 
inclosed that the contents may be readily and thoroughly examined; that packages— except single 
volumes of printed books— must not exceed 4 pounds 6 ounces in weight, and that (in addition to other 
prohibited articles) liquids (except samples thereof) fatty substances and those which easily liquefy 
are nnmailable. 

Letters and post cards must be despatched even if they do not bear any postage stamps. Other 
articles must be prepaid at least in part. Postage due on short-paid matter will be collected from the 
addressees on delivery. 

MEXICO, 

Matter mailed In the United States addressed to Mexico Is subject to the same postage rates and 
conditions as it would be if it were addressed for delivery in the United States, except that articles of 
miscellaneous merchandise (fourth-class matter) other than liquids, not sent as bona-flde trade 
samples should be sent by" Parcels Post;" and that prints commercial papers and bona-flde trade 
samples are transmissible in the regular mails at the Postal Union postage rate and conditions. 
Limit of weight for commercial papers and printed matter, 4 pounds 6 ounces, except single volumes 
of printed books, to which nolimit is flxed. Articles, other than letters in their usual and ordinary 
form, must be so wrapped that the contents can be easily examined. 

jNfatter addressed to Mexico must, in all cases, bear as part of the address the name of the State In 
which the city or town is located. For example, Acapulco, Guerrero, Mexico ; not Acapulco, Mexioo. 

U. S. NAVAL VESSELS. 

Mail matter for officers or members of the crew of United States vessels of war stationed abroad is 
subject to domestic postage rates and conditions. Articles should be addressed "U. S. S, (name of 
vessel), care of Postmaster, New York, N. Y." and he fuUy prepaid. Mail so addressed will bt for- 
warded to the vessels. 4®" Express packages will not be received at the post- office unless they conform to 
the J^stal liegtUations a7id are placed in the mail ivith the postage properly prepaid. 

SHANGHAI, CHINA. 
Domestic postage rates and conditions apply to articles addressed for delivery in the City of 
Shanghai, but for other places in China the Universal Postal Union (foreign) rates apply. 

SAMPLES OF MERCHANDISE 
must be bona-flde trade samples without any salable value. Wrapping— Samples of merchandise 
must be wrapped so that the contents may be easily examined without Injury to wrappers. 
Permissible Writing— They must bear no writing except the name or the social position of the 
sender, a manufacturer's or trade mark, numbers, prices and indications relating to the weight, size, 
dimensions and quantity to be disposed of, and words which are necessary to precisely indicate the 
origin and nature of the merchandise. Weight— Packages of samples must not exceed 12 ounces in 
weight. Size— The size must not exceed 12 inches in length, 8 inches in breadth, and 4 inches In 
depth, except when in the form of a roll, they may be 12 inches in length and 6 inches in diameter. 
Postage— The postage on samples is 2 cents for the flrst 4 ounces or less, and 1 cent for each 
additional 2 ounces or fraction of 2 ounces. Register all valuable articles. Registration fee 1() cents. 

PARCELS POST. 

Postage, 12 cents a pound or fraction thereof; greatest length (unless specially noted below), 3 
feet 6 inches; greatest length and girth combined (unless specially noted below), 6 feet; limit of 
weight (unless specially noted below), 11 pounds; value (unless specially noted below), not linaited: 
registration fee, 10 cents. 

Unsealed packages of mailable merchandise maybe sent by Parcels Post to Dutch Guiana (par- 
cels cannot be registered. See item " Customs Declarations' ' ), Uruguay (parcels cannot be registe-ed). 
See item "Customs Declarations,") Hungarj% Bermuda, Jamaica, including Cayman Islands/Turks 
Island, Inclndinsr Caicos Islandj, Barbadoes (parcels cannot be registered), the Bahamas, British 
Honduras, Mexico (limit of size, 2 feet in length, 4 feet in girth; limit of weight '"or places named in 
"Postal Guide. ' ' 11 pounds ; forotherplaces, 4 pounds 6 ounces), Leeward Islands (Antigua, Anguilla, 
Barbuda, Dominica, Montserrat, Nevis, Redonda, St. Kitts and the Virgin Islands), Colombia (limit 
of size, 2 feet in length, 4 feet in girth), Costa Rica, Salvador, (see item "Gustoms Declarations, " ) 
British Guiana, Danish West Indies (St. Croix, St. John and St. Thomas), and the Windward Islands 
(Grenada, Grenadines. St. Lucia, and St. Vincent), Trinidad, including Tobago; Venezuela (see item 
"Customs Declarations,") Bolivia, Ecuador (parcels must not exceed $50 in value), Peru and Chile, 
Newfoundland, Honduras (Republic of), Germany; Italy, including: Erythrea. Benadir, Beugazl 
and Tripoli in Tripoli (Barbary) and Republic of San Marino. Netherlands (parcels cannot e reg- 
istered. See item "Customs Declarations"), New Zealand, including Cook and Fanning Islands; 
Nicaragua, Guatemala, Norway, Japan including Formosa, Karafuto (Japanese Saghalien), and 
Korea (parcels must not exceed S80 in value), Hongkong, including Kovvloon, Austria, Belgium, 
France, excludingr Algeria and Corsica (parcels cannot be registered (see item "Customs Declara- 
tions"), Great Britain and Ireland (parcels cannot be registered). Australia, Including Tasmania 
Denmark, Sweden (parcels must not exceed $80 in value), China, the following places only: Amoy, 
Canton, ('hangsha,(5heefoo, Chingkiang, Foochow. Hangchow, Hankow, Hoihao (Hoihow), Hong- 
kong, KIngiang, Liu Kung Tau, Nanking, Newcnwang. Ningpo, Shanghai, Shanghaikwan, Shasi, 
Soochow, Swatow, Peking, Tientsin, Tongku, Wei Hai Wei and Wuku; Manchuria, th3 following 
places only: Antoken (Antung), Bujun (Piishun), Chosbun (Changchun), Dairen (Tairen, Talien, 
formerly Dalny), Daisekkio (Tashichiao), Daitoko (Tatungkou), Furanten (Pulantien), Gaihei 
(Kaiping), Giukaton (Newchatun), Gwaboten (Wafangtien), Hishiko (Pitzuwo), Honkeiko (Pen- 
haslku), Hoten (Mukden), Howojio (Fenghuangcheng), Kalgen (Kalyuen), Kaijio (Haichaeng), 
Kinshu (("hinchow>, Koshurei (Kungchuling), Riojun (Port Arthur), Rioyo (Liaoyang), 
Riujuton(Liushutun), Senkinsai (Chlenchinsai), Shiheierai (Ssnpingchieh), Shinminfn(Shingmingfu), 
Shoto (Changtu), Sokako (Tsaohokow), Sokaton (Suchiatun), Taikozau (Takushau), Tetsure 



lu 



Foreign Mails. 



FOREIGN MAILS— Cow^mt^d. 

(Tiehling), Yendal (Yentai), Yugakajlo (Hsiungyocheng) (parcels must not exceed $80 in value). 
Hayti, Brazil and Turkey, the following places only; Alexandretta, Beirut, Cavalla, Constantinople 
(including Galata, Pera and Stamboul), Dardanelles, Dedeagatch, Durazzo, Haifa, Inebol Jaffa, 
Janina, Jerusalem, Kerassund, Lagos, Mersine, Mitylene, Prevesa, Kitimo (Rethymo), Rhodes, 
galoniki (Sakwipa), Samsoun, San Jean de Medua, Santi Quaranta, Scio (Schios), Scutari, Smyrna, 
nhreblzond, *l%iesme, Tripoli (Syria), Valona. Vathy (Samos;, and the Isle of Crete. Parcels 
must be wrapped so as to permit their contents to be easily examined by postmasters. The presence, 
in an unsealed parcel, of sealed receptacles containing mailable articles which cannot be safely trans- 
mitted in the unsealed receptacles, will not render the parcel unmailable, provided the contents of 
the sealed receptacles are plainly visible, or are unmistakably indicated by the method of packing or 
by a precise statenffeit on the covers. But such sealed receptacles will not be admitted to the Parcels 
Post unless inclosed in an outside cover open to inspection. Any article absolutely prohibited 
admission to the regular mails for any country is also iuadmissable to Parcels Post mails for that 
country; but no article is excluded from Parcels Post mails solely because it is dutiable in the 
country of destination. Liquids, poisonous, explosive, and inflammable substances are excluded. 

CUSTOMS DKCLA RATIONS. 
A "Customs Declaration" Form 4402 (which will be furnished on application at the post-oflBce 
or a station) must be properly and fully filled out, stating the actual contents, value, etc. , of the 

Earcel. General terms, such as "merchandise" or "samples," will notanswer; the contents must 
§' accurately desaribed. "Customs Declarations" must be firmly attached to the cover of the par- 
cel, but not pasted or affixed so that tliey will seal the package and prevent examination of the con- 
tents without damaging the cover. In addition to being tied by means of a cord passing through the 
eyelet, the tag should be bound flfvt to the parcel (with the front or ' 'declaration" side facing out), 
so that the tag cannot be used as a handle to lift the parcel while in transit. 

Two (J) copies of the ''declaration" (Form 4402) must be attached to each parcel for Dntch 
Guiana, Dutch West Indies, Netherlands, Salvador and Uruguay, and three (3) copies to each parcel 
for Venezuela. 

France— Two copies of the special declaration, "Form No. 2 Bis" (4402)6), showing in addition 
to the usual entries the gross weight of the parcel and net weight of the contents, must be attached 
to parcels for France. One copy may be pasted to the package, but the other copy must be affixed in 
such a manner that it can be readily removed at the exchange office where the mail is prepared for 
despatch to France. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS RESPECTING FOREIGN MAILS. 

Rates and conditions to countries not in the Universal Postal Union are tww the same as t?iose to Uni- 
versal Postal Union countries. 

Postage can be prepaid upon articles (other than the reply half of double postal cards) only by 
means of the postage stamps of the country in which the articles are maUed. Hence articles mailed 
in one country addressed to another country which bear postage stamps of the country to which they 
are addressed are treated as if they had no postage stamps attached to them. 

Unpaid letters received from the Postal Union and insuthciently prepaid correspondence of all 
kinds IS chargeable with double the amount of the deficient postage. 

Matter to be sent in the mails at less than letter rates must be so wrapped that it can be readily 
examined at the otfice of delivery, as well as the mailing office, without destroying the wrapper. 

Packages of newspapers and periodicals sent in the mails to foreign countries are restricted tea 
single (outside) address. Those sent to Canada, Cuba, Mexico, Panama, and Shanghai (City), China, 
are tranpmissible as in domestic mails. 

The United States two-cent postal card should be used for card correspondence with foreign coun- 
tries (except Canada, Cuba, Mexico, Panama, and Shanghai City, to which countries the one- 
cent card is transmissible), but where these cards cannot be obtained, it is allowable to use for this 
purpose the United States one-cent postal card with a one-cent United States adhesive postage stamp 
attached thereto. Private cards can be used if conforming in size, etc. , to Government cards, 
such cards should bear the words *'post card. " 

Mail matter of all kinds received from any country of the Postal Union is required to be refor- 
warded at tlie request of the addressee, from one post-office to another, and in the case of articles 
other than Parcels Post packages, to any foreign country embraced in the Postal Union, without ad- 
ditional charge for postage. 

All articles prohibited from domestic mails are also excluded from circulation in the mails to and 
from foreign countries. Postal cards or letters addressed to go around the world will not be for- 
warded, being prohibited. 

FOREIGN (INTERNATIONAL) MONEY ORDERS. 
^Vhen payable in Apia, Austria, Belgium, Bolivia, Cape Colony. Costa Rica, Denmark, Egypt, 
Germany, Great Britain, Honduras, Hongkong, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Liberia, Luxemburg, New 
South Wales, Natal and Zululand, New Zealand, Orange liiver Colony, Peru, Portugal, Queensland, 
Russia, Salv^or, South Australia, Switzerland, Tasmania, the Transvaal, Uruguay a.nd Victoria 
rates are as foITows: 



For sums from S 

From $2. 51 to 

5. 01 to 

•• 7. 61 to 

10. 01 to 

" 16. 01 to 

•• 20.01 to 



0.01 to $2. 60 10 cents 

$5.00 15 " 

7.60 20 ♦• 

10.00 26 •* 

15.00 30 •' 

20.00 35 •• 

30.00 40 *' 



From $30. 01 to $40. 00 45 cents 

60 00 60 '• 

60.00 60 " 

70 00 70 " 

80.00 80 »• 

90.00 90 *' 

*♦ 90.01 to 100.00 Idollar 





40. 01 to 




50. 01 to 




60. 01 to 




70.01 to 




80. 01 to 



When payable in any foreign country not named above rates are as follows: 



Forsumsfrom $0. 01 to$10 00 


10 cents 


From $50.01 to $60. 00 


eOcents 


From $10.01 to $20.00 


20 " 
30 '• 


'* 60. 01 to 70.00 


70 " 


•' 20.01to 30.00 


•• 70. 01 to 80.00 


80 *• 


*• 30. 01 to 40 00 


40 " 

50 " 


•• 80. 01 to 90.00 


90 '• 


*' 40.01to 50.00 


•• 90. 01 to 100. 00 


1 dollar 



Note— It should be understood that these tables are subject to change, it being the aim of the 
Post-Office Department to make reductions whenever conditions warrant such action. 



Parcels Post. 115 



J3arceli5 J^oflt* 



The Sixty-second Congress of the United States. Second Session, enacted the following Postal 
law, effective January 1. 1913.: 

Sec. 8 That hereafter fourth-class mall matter shall embrace all other matter. Including farm 
and factofy products, not now embraced by law In either the first, second, or third class, not exceeding 
eleven pounds In weight, nor greater In size than seventy-two Inches In length and girth combined, 
nor In form or kind likely to Injure the person of any postal employe or damage the mall equipment 
or other mall matter and not of a character perishable within a period reasonably required for 
transportation and delivery. ^ , . „ . . ^ 

That for the puiyjoses of this section the United States and Its several Territories and possessions, 
excepting the Philippine Islands, shall be divided into units of area thirty minutes square, identical 
with a quarter of the area formed by the Intersecting parallels of latitude and meridians of longitude, 
represented on appropriate postal maps or plans, and such units of area shall be the basis of eight 
postal zones, as follows: ^ . . . , , ^ 

The first zone shall Include all territory within such quadrangle. In conjunction with every 
contiguous quadrangle, representing an area having a mean radial distance of approximately fifty 
miles from the centre of any given unit of area. . . ^ . . ^ 

The second zone shall Include all units of area outside the first zone lying In whole or In part 
within a radius of approximately one hundred and fifty miles from the centre of a given unit of area. 

The third zone shall Include all units of area outside the second zone lying In whole or In part 
within a radius of approximately three hundred miles from the centre of a given unit of area. 

The fourth zone shall Include all units of area outside the third zone lying In whole or In part 
within a radius of approximately six hundred miles from the centre of a given unit of area. 

The fifth zone shall include all units of area outside the fourth zone lying In whole or in part 
within a radius of approximately one thousand miles from the centre of a given unit of area. 

The sixth zone shall Include all units of area outside the fifth zone lying In whole or In part 
within a radius of approximately one thousand four hundred miles from the centre of a given unit 
of area. « \ 

The seventh zone shall Include all units of area outside the sixth zone lying In whole or in part 
within a radius of approximately one thousand eight hundred miles from the centre of a given unit 
of area. 

The eighth zone shall include all units of area outside the seventh zone. 

That the rate of postage on fourth-class matter weighing not more than four ounces shall be 
one cent for each ounce or fraction of an ounce: and on such matter in excess of four ounces in 
weight the rate shall be by the pound, as hereinafter provided, the postage in all cases to be prepaid 
by distinctive postage stamps affixed. 

That except as provided In the next preceding paragraph postage on matter of the fourth class 
shall be prepaid at the following rates: * 

On all matter mailed at the post-office from which a rural route starts, for delivery on such 
route, or mailed at any point on such route for delivery at any- other point thereon, or at the office 
from which the routs starts, or on any rural route starting therefrom, and on all matter mailed at 
a city carrier office, or at any point within Its delivery limits, for delivery by carriers from that office, 
or at any office for local delivery, five cents for the first pound or fraction of a pound and one cent 
for each additional pound or fraction of a pound. 

For delivery within the first zone, except as provided In the next preceding paragraph, five 
cents for the first pound or fraction of a pound and three cents for each additional pound or fraction 
of a pound. 

For delivery within the second zone, six cents for the first pound or fraction of a pound and 
four cents for each additional pound or fraction of a pound. 

For delivery within the third zone, seven cents for the first pound or fraction of a pound and 
five cents for each additional pound or fraction of a pound. 

For delivery within the fourth zone, eight cents for the first pound or fraction of a pound and 
six cents for each additional pound or fraction of a pound. 

For delivery within the fifth zone, nine cents for the first pound or fraction of a pound and 
seven cents for each additional pound or fraction of a pound. 

For delivery within the sixth zone, ten cents for the first pound or fraction of a pound and 
nine cents for each additional pound or fraction of a pound. 

For delivery within the seventh zone, eleven cents for the first pound or fraction of a pound 
and ten cents for each additional pound or fraction of a pound. 

For delivery within the eighth zone and between the Philippine Islands and any portion of the 
United States, Including the District of Columbia and the several Territories and possessions, twelve 
cents for the first pound or fraction of a pound and twelve cents for each additional pound or fraction 
of a pound. 

The classification of articles mailable as well as the weight limit, the rates of postage, zone 
or zones and other conditions of mailablllty under this act, if the Postmaster-General shall find on 
experience that they or any of them are such as to prevent the shipment of articles desirable, or to 
permanently render the cost of the service greater than the receipts of the revenue therefrom, he Is 
hereby authorized, subject to the consent of the Interstate Commerce Commission after Investi- 
gation, to reform from time to time such classification, weight limit, rates, zone or zones or con- 
ditions, or either. In order to promote the service to the public or to Insure the receipt of revenue 
from such service adequate to pay the cost thereof. 

The Postmaster-General shall make provision by regulation for the indemnification of shippers, 
for shipment injured or lost, by insurance or otherwise, and, when desired, for the collection on 
delivery of the postage and price of the article shipped, fixing such charges as may be necessary 
to pay the cost of such additional services. 

That the establishment of zones and postage rates of this section shall go into effect January 
first, nineteen hundred and thirteen. 

That this act shall not In any way affect the postage rate on seeds, cuttings, bulbs, roots, scions 
and plants, as fixed by Section 482 of the Postal Laws and Regulations. 

That for the purpose of a further Inquiry into the subject of the general parcels post and all 
related subjects a joint committee of six persons (Members of Congress), three of whom shall be 
appointed by the President of the Senate, and three by the Speaker of the House of Representatives, 
Is constituted, with full power to appoint clerks, stenographers and experts to asdst them In this 
work. That the Postmaster-General and the Interstate Commerce Commission shall furnish such 
data and otherwise render such assistance to the said committee as may be desired or available. 
The committee shall report fully to Congress at the earliest date possible. 

That all laws and parts of laws in conflict with the provisions of this section are hereby repealed. 

Note. — When this edition of the Almanac went tolpress, the geographical boundaries of the 
zones mentioned above were not defined by the Postmaster-General. 



116 



Distances JBeUoeen European Cities. 



Bistanccfi from NeUj ¥orlt to Otttics lu sauttctr .States. 

The distance herein shown Is that via the qulckeat route and the lines carrying the bulk at the malls. 



Cities 



Albany, N. Y. . . . 
Albuquerq'e, N.M. 

Alliance, NeD 

AmarlUo, Tex 

Atlanta, Ga 

Atlantic City, N. J. 

Augusta, Me 

Baltimore, Md. . . 
Birmingham, Ala.. 
Bismarck, N. Dak. 

Boise, Idaho 

Boston, Mass 

Bristol, Tenn 

Buffalo. N.Y 

Burlington, Vt. . . . 

Butte, Mont 

Cape May, N. J. . . 
Carson City, Nev. . 
Charleston, S. C. . . 
Charleston, W. Va. 
Chattanooga.Tenn. 
Cheyenne, Wyo . . . 
Chicago, lU. (N. Y. 

Cent.) 

Chicago. III. (Penn 

R. R.) 

Cln-linatl, O 



Miles, 



143 

2,260 

1,875 

1,920 

875 

150 

410 

185 

989 

1,818 

2,783 

233 

604 

438 

303 

2,498 

173 

3.016 

736 

612 

846 

1,966 

960 

908 
752 



Cities. 



Cleveland, O 

Columbus, O 

Concord, N. H. . . . 

Cumberland, Md. . 

Jeadwood, S. Dak. 

Denver, Col 

Des Moines, la. . . 
Detroit, Mich.. .. 
Duluth, Mln 1. . . . 

El Paso, Tex 

Fargo, N. Dak. . . . 
Ft. Worth, Tex. . . 
Galveston. Tex.. . . 
Gr. Rapids, Mich. 
Jreensboro, N. C. . 
Harrlsburg, Pa.. . . 

tiartf ord, Ct 

Helena, Mont 

aot Springs, Ark. . 
Indianapolis, Ind. . 
Ishpeming. Mich. . 
Jackson, Miss. 
Jacksonville, Fla. . 
Kansas City, Mo. . 
KnoxvlUe, Tenn. . 
Little Rock, Ark... 
Los Angeles, Cal . . 



MUes. 



Cities. 



621 

632 

30SI 

378 

2,053! 

1.9821 

1,31S| 

7981 

1,522! 

2.290 

1,613 

1,738, 

1,742 1 

940i 

615 

19G 

110 

2,500 

1.470 

820 

1.354 

1,238 

979 

1.342 

735 

1.409 

3.106 



Louisville, Ky . . . 
Lynchburg, Va . . 
Manchester, N.H. 
Memphis, Tenn. . 
Meridian, Miss. . . 
Milwaukee, Wis.. 

Mobile, Ala 

Montpelier, Vt . . 
Newark, N. J. . . . 
New Orleans, La 

Norfolk, Va 

Ogden, Utah . . . . 
Oklahoma, Okla. . 

Omaha, Neb 

Parkersb'g W. Va. 
Pen Ueton, Ore.. . . 
Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Phoenix, Ariz 

Pittsburgh, Pa. . . . 

Portland, Me 

Portland, Ore 

Prescott. Ariz. . . . 
Providence, R. I. 

Reno, Nev 

Richmond, Va, . . 
Roanoke, Va. . . . 
St. Louis, Mo. . . ^ 



MUes. 



867 

400 

290 

1,286 

1,142 

1.046 

1,229 

339 

9 

1,344 

346 

2,443 

1,604 

1,455; 

600i 

3,0171 

90 

2,724 

439 

348 

3,248 

2,861 

1861 

2,939 

340 

452 

I.O6OI 



Cities. 



St. Paul, Minn 

Salt Lake City, 

Utah 

San Francisco, Cal. 
Santa Fe, N. Mex. 
Savannah, Ga. . . . 

Seattle, Wash 

Sheridan, Wyo.. . . 
Shreveport, La. . .. 
Sioux Falls, S. Dak 
Spokane. Wash. . . 
Springfield, 111. . . . 
Springfield, Mass.. 

Superior, Wis 

Syracuse, N. Y. . . . 
Tacoma, Wash.. . . 

Tampa, Fla 

Topeka, Kan 

Trenton, N. J 

Vlcksburg, Miss.. . 

Vlnlta, Okla 

Wa-shlngton, D. C. 
Wheeling, W. Va. . 

Wichita, Kan 

Wilmington, Del. . 
Wilmington, N. C. 



Miles. 



1,370 

2,480 
3,183 
2.211 

844 
3,184 
2,209 
1,454 
1,507 
2,8*5 
1,017 

136 
1,427 

290 
3,225 
1.190 
1,409 
57 
1,282 
1.422 

225 

506 
1.566 

116 

707 



MAIL. DISTANCES AND TIINIE TO FORKIGN CITIES FROM THE CITY OF NEW YORK. 
(For Distances. Irrespective of Mail Routes, see Index.) 



By Postal Route to — 



Adelaide, '?»(■« Vancouver. 

Alexandria, via London 

Amsterdam, " " 

Antwerp, " " 

Athens, " '* 

Bahia, Brazil 

Bangkok, Siam, via San Francisco. 

Bangkok. Siam, via London 

Batavia, Java, via London 

Berlin 

Bombay, t»irt London 

Bremen 

Buenos Ayres 

Calcutta, via London 

Cape Town, tnalLiondon 

Constantinople, via London 

Florence, via London 

Glasgow 

Grevtown, via New Orleans 

Halifax, N. S 

Hamburg, direct 

" via London 



statute 


T, 1 


Hiles. 
12.845 


Days. 1 


31 


6,150 


12 


3,985 


8 


4,000 


8 


5,655 


11 


5,870 


14 


12,900 


43 


18,125 


41 


12,800 


34 


4, .38.-) 


8 


9,765 


22 


4,235 


8 


8,045 


24 


11,120 


24 


11,245 


25 


5,810 


11 


4,800 


9 


3,370 


8 


2,815 


7 


645 


2 


4,820 


9 


4,340 


9 



Br Postal Koute to — 



Havana 

Hongkong, via San Francisco. 
Honolulu, via San Francisco. . 

Liverpool 

London 

Madrid, via London 

Melbourne, via Vancouver... 

Mexico City" (railroad) 

Panama .... .w 

Paris .'. . w< i 

Riode Janeiro 

Rome, via London 

Rotterdam, via London 

St. Petersburg, via London 

San Juan, Porto Rico 

Shanghai, via Vancouver 

Shanghai, via London 

Stockholm, via London '... 

•Sydney, via Vancouver 

Valparaiso, via Panama 

Vienna 

Yokohama, via San Francisco. 



statute _ 
Miles. Days- 



1,366 

10.590 
5,645 
3,540 
3,740 
4,925 

12,265 
3,750 
2,355 
4,020 
6,204 
5,030 
3,935 
5,370 
1,730 
9 920 

14,"745 
4,975 

11,570 
5,915 
4,740 
7,345 



3 

27 

12 

7 

7 

9 

30 

5 

6 

8 

17 

9 

8 

9 

6 

25 

37 

10 

29 

22 

9 

20 



Bintanttn Btmttn ISuropcan (i!!:itiBU. 



London 



Liverpool 
Paris! 489 



Madri d 



LiSBox 



TRAVELLING DISTANCES 

BETWEEN THE 

PRINCIPAL CITIES IN EUROPE, 

IN MILES. 



ANTWERP 



HA>JBURG 

Berlix 

BERXK 



TtTRiN 



VlES^KA 

Munich 
Rome 



Trieste 
Warsaw 
Constantinople 
Odessa 



406 



Moscow 
St. Petersburg 
Stockholm I 430 
CJopenhagenI 416 846 



8.36 



1252 



950 
1356 
1510 



1610 



363 
1339 
1733 
2408 
1510 



1205 
842 
8li 
693 

1082 



806 
17^ 
1330 



16n 
1769 
1171 
668 1067 



510 



1276 
21^ 
1800 
2087 
2239 



1731 
1318 



64^ 

487 



702 
15^ 
1226 
1513 
1395 
1084 

67i 



266 
840 
370 
4^ 
1298 
^0 
1247 
399 



ino 

697 



720 



47^ 
414 
391 
1156 
2018 
1680 
1967 
2119 
13.S7 
1047 



297 
535 
295 



639 

533 

1021 

1883 



611 



837 



427 



401 



1048 

888 



398 



1699 



178 



678 



839 



I545I124O 



1832 

1714 

1176 

885 



1209 

1091 

685 

"270 



605 

579 
1180 
1066 

576 
19^ 
1418 
1^ 
1269 
'580 

208 



412 



497 
460 



719 



522 
1033 
1009 

895 
2025 
1737 



1706 
1588 



^93 
620 



1530 



1804 
1889 
1602 
1506 
2157 
1897 



1746 
1828 
25^ 
3345 
3117 
3414 
^86 
2384 
2012 



415 
1119 
1495 
1582 
li83 
1073 
1668 
1477 
1223 
1416 
1^5 
9-718 
2625 
2904 
2874 
1972 
1600 



908 1397 

1323 1812 

211 I 472 

_587]jJ59 
674 i 948 



202 

287 

1195 

1610 

270 

31 
746 



359| 848 i 646 

500 ''989; 787 

849 1182: 980 

582] 970! 768 

907 '1397; 1195 

863 1^ 1150 

1067 1557 1 1355 

1899 '2232 1 2030 

1760 2II9J 1917 

1843:2117ll915 

1699 1976 1774 



12^1491 
812 U81 



1289 
979 



Postal Savings Sy stern. 117 

INFORMATION FOR DEPOSITORS AS ANNOUNCED BY THE POST- 
OFFICE DEPARTMENT. 
Object — 1. The Pastal Savings Svstem Is established for the purpose of providing facilities for 
depositing savings at Interest with the security of the United States Government for repayment. 

Safety — 2. The faith of the United States Is solemnly pledged to the payment of deposits 
made In postal savings depository offices with accrued Interest as provided by the Postal-Savings 

Who May Deposit — 3. Accounts may be opened and deposits made by any person of the 
age of 10 years or over In his or her own name and by a married woman In her own name and free 
from any Interference or control by her husband. No person can have more than one account at 
any one time. 

4. Any person may open a postal-savings account. 

5. All accounts must be opened l.i persoQ by the depositor or, his authorized representative. 
After opening an account a depositor may for,varl subsequent deposits to the post-office by mail. 

6. Deposits will be acceptei only from laJlvlduils, and no accouit will be opened In the name 
of any corporation, association, society, flrai, or partnership, or In the names of two or more persons 
Jointly. , ^ ^ .. . .^ 

7. No account will be opened In the name of one person in trust for or on behaif of another 
person or persons. , . , , 

Service Free — 8. The service of the Postal Savings Systeii Is free, and no charge or fee Is 
collected or reciulreJ in connection with tie opealag of an ascouat or the withdrawal of money 
deposited. 

Privacy of Accounts— 9. No person coaaectei with the Po^t-Olflce Department or the postal 
service Is permitted to disclose th3 ua ne of any depositor or give any infor .-nation concerning an 
account exceot to the depositor hlDaself, unless directed to do so by the Postmaster-General. 

How to Open aa Account — 10. Waen a persoa applies to open an account he must furnish 
the necessary Inforoiatlon for the post naster or his representative to fill out aa application, which 
he will then be reqiulred to sign. If the applicant signs by martc his signature must be witnessed 
by a disinterested person. ^ , 

Deposits — 11. Deposits are evidenced by postal-savings certificates issued m fixed denomi- 
nations of SI, $2, $5. SlO, S20, $50 and SlOO, each bearing the na ne of the depositor, the number 
of his account, the date of issue, the na-ne of the depository o.fic3, and the date on which Interest 
begins. The postmaster or his representative will make out a duplicate of each certificate Issued. 
which the depositor will be required to sign and whl?h tne postmaster will retain In his records. 

,12. No account may be opened for less than SI, nor will fractions of a dollar be accepted for 
deposit. • 

13. No person is permitted to deposit more than SlOO In any one calendar month nor to have a 
total balance to^ls credit at one time of more than S500 exclusive of accumulated Interest. 

14. Savings certificates can not be transferred or negotiated and will be payable only to the 
person to whom Issued. ' ' ^ ,_ ' , ,. 

15. On opening an account a depositor Is supplied with an envelope In which he may keep his 
savings certificates. On this envelope is printed information for his guidance, and also a blank 
ledger record on which to keep an account of his deposits and withdrawals. 

16. In case a savings certificate is lost or destroyed tiie depositor should notify the postmaster. 
If deemed proper, a new certificate will be issued upon compliance by the depositor with the necessary 
requirements. 

17. Postmasters are not permitted to receive savings certificates for safe-keeping. 
Savings Cards and Stamps — 18. Amounts less than SI may be saved for deposit by the 

purchase of 10-cent postal-savings cards and adhesiv^e 10-cent postal-savings stamps. Each postal- 
savings card contains blank spaces to which savings stamps may be affixed from time to time as 
purchased, and a postal-savings card with nine lO-csnt savings stamps thus affixed will be accepted 
as a deposit of SI either in opening an account or la adding to an existing account. 

19. Savings cards and stamps will be redeemed oaly by the Issue of savings certificates and 
are not valid for postage. They will not be received In exchange for postage stamps nor will postage 
stamps be accepted in exchange for postal-savings cards or stamps. 

Interest — 20. Interest will b3 allowed oa all deposits at the rate of 2 per cent, per annum, 
computed on each savings certificate separately, and payable annually. No interest will bo paid 
on money which remains on deposit for a fraction of a year oaly. 

21. Deposits will bear Interest from the first day of the month next following that In which 
deposited. 

22. Interest will continue to accrue on a savin'?g certificate as long as it remains outstanding, 
certificates being valid until paid, without limitation as to time. 

23. Compound Interest is not allowed on aa outstanding certificate, but a depositor may with- 
draw Interest payable and include it in a new deoo;lt, which will bear Interest at the regular rate. 

Wltfaidrawals — 2i. A depositor may at any tlTie withdraw the whole or any part of his deposits 
to his credit with any interest payable by surrendering savings certificates, properly indorsed, for 
the amount desired. 

25. A depositor presenting a certificate for payment In full, with all interest payable, must 
Indorse it on the back in the preseica of the postmaster or his representative and surrender it. The 
postmaster or his representative, if satisfied as to the depositor's identity, will then make payment. 

26. When a depositor desires to withdraw only a part of the amount called for by any certificate 
the postmaster will cancel the certl3cat3 and issue a n?\v certificate covering the amount to be left 
on deposit. The new certificate will be so dated that the depositor will not lose interest on the 
amount remaining continuously oa deposit. 

27. When a depositor desires to withdraw merely the interest payable on any certificate, instead 
of indorsing and surrendering the certificate as in case of full payment, he will be required to give 
his receipt in duplicate for the amount of the Interest paid. The postmaster will enter the interest 
payment on the back of the certificate and return it to the depositor. 

Deposits Not Made in Person— 28. When a person who has opened an account cannot 
appear personally to make an additional deposit, because of infirmity or for other good and sufficient 
reason, the amount to be deposited may be sent by a representative or forwarded by mall. On 
recelot of the amount the postmaster will send to the depositor the duplicate of each savings certificate 
to be Issued. When the duplicate or duplicates thus delivered have been signed by the depositor 
and returned to the depository office, the postmaster will send him the original certificates covering 
the amount of the deposit. New accounts cannot be opened by mall. When an intending depositor 
desiring to open an account Is unable to appear in person he may forward the money by a representa- 
tive, who will be provided with an application form, which must be properly filled out by the Intending 
depositor and returned with the duplicate certificate or certificates. 

Withdrawals Not Made la Person — 29. Wlien under similar circumstances a depositor 



118 



Seven Wonders of the World. 



POSTAL SAVINGS SYSTEM— Core«wMe£«. 



cannot appear In person to make a withdrawal, a blank order will be furnished for his use upon 
request by his representative. When such order has been properly filled In and signed by the de- 
positor, with his signature witnessed by a disinterested person, and has been returned to the post- 
master, together with each certlflcate to be paid properly Indorsed, payment will be made to the 
depositor's representative. 

30. When a depositor who Is unable to appear In person desires to withdraw merely the Interest 
payable on any certificate, the blank order furnished will Include receipts for the interest to be paid, 
upon return of which, properly signed by the depositor, the postmaster will make payment to his 
representative. 

Oeatli of Depositor — 31. In case of the death of a depositor the amount standing to his 
credit will be paid to the executor or administrator of his estate upon compliance with the necessary 
requirements. In case no formal administration Is desired by his relatives, the postmaster may, if 
It is deemed proper, be authorizel to pay the amount of the deposit, on application in proper form, 
to the persons entitled to receive It, without the appointment of an administrator. 

Account of Womaa Wbo Harries — 32. A woman who opens an account and afterward 
marries must present her savings certiTcates at her office In order that the certificates may be Indorsed 
as payable to her In her ne-v name. Tn3 postmaster will receive no further deposits from a depositor 
faiiinj. to comply with this requirement, nor will he make any partial or interest payment to her. 

Postal 'Savings Bonds — 33. A depositor will be permitted to exchange the whole or any 
part of his deposits in su ns of $20, $4J, S60, $80, SlOO, or multiples of SlOO up to and Including 
$500, Into United States registered or coupon bonds bearing Interest at the rate of 2H per cent, per 
annum, payable semi-annually, and redeemable at the pleasure of the United States after one year 
fro n date of Issue, both principal and Interest payable twenty years from such date in United States 
gol I coin. Such exchange may be made under date of January 1 and July 1 of each year, provided 
such bonds are then available. 

■34. A depositor desiring to convert his savings deposits into bonds on January 1 and July 1 
of any year must make application at least fifteen days before either of the dates named to the post- 
master In triplicate on a form which will be supplied him for that purpose. At the time of making 
application he must Indorse and surrender savings certificates covering the amount of the bonds 
desired, for which the posfnaster will give him a receipt. Interest will continue to accrue on cer- 
tificates surrendered until the date on which the bonds are issued. When the bonds applied for are 
received by the postmaster, the depositor will be notified and the bonds will be delivered by the 
postmaster on presentation of the receipt for the certificates surrendered. At the same time all 
Interest due on the certificates surrendered will be paid. 

35. Savings deposits converted Into bonds are not counted as a part of the maximum of S500 
allowed one depositor, and there is no limitation upon the amount of available postal-savings bonds 
which may finally be acquired by a depositor. 

36. Postal-savings bonds are exempt from all taxes or duties of the United States, as well as 
from taxation in any form by or under State, municipal, or local authority. 

37. Postal-savings bonds can only be procured by the conversion of postal-savings deposits, 
and will not be Issued to persons who are not depositors, but whether in registered or coupon form 
they may, upon receipt by the depositor, be sold and assigned at any time to any person desired. 

Informatioa — 38. Further information concerning the Postal Savings System may be obtained 
by application at any depository office or by Inquiry addressed to the Postmaster-General (Postal 
Savings System), .Vashlngton. D. C. 



WLxiiifti estates C5?ttitjrapi)tc J^oartf. 

Chairman, Henry Gannett, Geological Survey, Department of the Interior; Secretary, Charles S. 
Bloane. Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce and Labor; Frank Bond, General Land Office, 
Department of the Interior; Daniel H. Boughton. General 8tafT, Department of War; Andrew Braid, 
Coast and Geodetic Survey, Department of Commerce and Labor: F. W. Hodge, Bureau of Eth- 
nology, Smithsouian lustituti on; G. R. Putnam, Bureau of Light- Houses, Department of Commerce 
and Labor; Frank A. Kidd, Government Printing Office; G. F. Cooper, Hydrographic Office, Depart- 
mentof the Navy; William McNeir. Department of State; C.Hart Merriam, Bureau of Biological 
Survey, Department of Agriculture; John 8. Mills, Department of the Treasury; Fred G. Plnmmer, 
Forest Service, Department of Agriculture; Charles W. Stewart, Library and Naval War Kecords 
Office, Department of the Navy. 

By executive order of August 10, 1906, the official title of the United States Board on Geographic 
Names was changed to United States Geographic Board, and its duties enlarged. The board passe.s 
on ail unsettled questions concerning geographic names which arise in the departments, as well as 
determining, changing, and fixing place names within the United States and its insular po^''essions, 
and all names hereafter suggested by any officer of the Government shall be referred to the board 
Defore publication. The decisions of the board are to be accepted bj' all the departments of the Gov- 
ernment as standard authority. Advisory powers were granted the board concerning the prepara- 
tion of mans compiled, or to be compiled, in the various offices and bureaus of the (Tovernment, witli 
a special view to the avoidance of unnecessary duplication of work; and for the uniflcation and im- 
provementof the scales of maps.of the symbols and conventions used upon them, and of the methods 
of representing relief. Hereafter, all such projects as are of importance shall be submitted to this 
board for ad v'ce before being undertaken. 



0bni SSaontrcrs of tfjc 2l2aoiiTr. 



THE SEVEN WONDERS OF 

THE ANCIENT WORLD. 
Pyramids of Egypt. 
Pharos of Egypt. 
Hanging Gardens of Babylon. 
Temple of Diana at Ephesus. 
Statue of Jupiter by Phidias. 
Mausoleum of Artemisia. 
Qplosgus of Rhodes, 



THE SEVEN WONDERS OF 

THE MIDDLE AGES 
Coliseum of Rome. 
Catacombs of Alexandria 
Great Wall of China. 
Stonehenge. 
Leaning Tower tS Pisa. 
Porcelain Tower of Nankin. 
Mosque of St. Sophia In Con- 
at^utinople. 



THE SEVEN NEW WON- 
DERS OF THE WORLD. 

Wireless. 

Telephone. 

Aeroplane. 

Radium. 

Antiseptics and Antitoxins, 

Spectrum Analysis. 

X-Raya, 



Labor Legislation, 119 



Haijor Hrfiislation* 



BOYCOTTING. BLACKLISTING AND INTIMIDATION LAWS. 

Thk States having laws prohibiting 6oi/co<<mf; in terms are Alabama, Colorado, Illiuois, ludiauu, 
and Texas. 

Tlie States having laws prohibiting blacklisting in terms are Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Con- 
necticut, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota. Mississippi (applies to telegraph 
operators only), Missouri, Montana, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, 
Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. 

A nil laberot States have enacted laws concerning intimUlation. conspiracy against worklngmen, 
and iiiterlerence with employment, viz.: Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho 
(applies to mine employes only), Illinois. Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine. Massachusetts, 
Michigan. Minnesota. Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York. North 
Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Porto Rico, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, 
Vermont, Washington. West Virginia and WLscousin. 

In the following States it is unlawful for an employer to exact any agreement, either written or 
verbal, from an employe not to join or becoiue a member of a labor organization, as a condition of 
employment: California, Colorado, Connecticut. Idaho, Indiana. Kansas, Massachusetts, Minnesota, 
Mississippi (applies to telegraph operators only), Nevada, New Jersey, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, 
Pennsylvania, Porto Rico, South Carolina, Utah, and Wisconsin. 

EIGHT- HOUR LAWS. 

Arizona.— Eight hours constitute a day's labor in all underground mines and workings. 

Arkausas.— Eighthourscoustituteaday's work on public highways and bridges and for railway 
telegraph operators. 

California.— Unless otherwise expressly stipulated, eight hours constitute a day's work. The 
time of service of all laborers, workmen, and mechanics employed upon any public works of, or 
work done for, the State, or for anj' political sub-division thereof, whether the work is to be done by 
contract or otherwise, and of employes in mines and smelters, is limited and restricted to eight hours 
in any one calendar day. 

Colorado.— A day's work for all workingmen employed by the State, or any county, township, 
school district, municipality, or incorporated town, and for all employes in underground or open 
cut mines or workings, and in smelting and refining works, is restricted to eight hours. 

Connecticnt.— Eiglit hours of labor constitute a lawful day's work unless otherwise agreed. 
Railrtjad telegraph operators controlling the movement of trains may work but eight hours, except a^ 
stations kept open only in the daj'time. Engineers, firemen, machinists and other mechanics em.- 
ployed in State institutions maj^ work but eight hours, except in case of emergency. 

Delavrare.— Eight hours constitute a lawful day's work for all municipal employes of the city of 
Wilmington. 

District of Alaska.— Eight hours are a day's labor on the public roads. 

District of Columbia.— A day's work for all laborers and meclianics employed by the District 
of Columbia, or bj' auycontractor or sub-contractor upon any public works of the District, is limited 
to eight hours. 

Ila^vaii.-For all mechanics, clerks, laborers, and other employes on public works and in public 
offices eight hours of actual service constitute a day's work. 

Idaho.- Eight houi-s' actual work constitute a lawful day's labor for manual laborers employed by 
thedaj'on all State, county, and municipal works. Labor in mines and smelters is limited to eight 
hours per day. 

Illinois.— Eight hours are a legal day's work in all mechanical employments, except on farms, 
and when otherwise agreed ; the law does not apply to service by the year, month or week. Eight 
hours constitute a day' s labor on the public highways. 

Indiana.- Eighthours of labor constitute a legal day's work on the public roads, and for all 
cla.sses of mechanics, workingmen, and laborers, excepting those engaged in agricultural and 
domesticlabor. Overwork by agreement and for extra compensation is permitted. 

Iowa.— Eight hours constitute a day's labor on the public roads. , 

liausas.— Eighthours are a day's work for all laborers, mechanics, or other persons employed 
by or on behalf of the State or any county, city, township or other municipality. 

Kentucky.— Eight hours constitute a day's w-ork on all public works of the State. 

Maryland.— No mechanic or laborer employed by the Mayor or City Council of Baltimore, or by 
any agent or contractor under them, shall be required to work more than eight hours as a day's labor. 

3l5iS8achusetts.— Eight hours shall constitute a day's work for all laborers, workmen, and 
mechanics emplo.yed by or on behalf of the Commonwealth or any county therein, or of any city or 
town in the Commonwealth upon acceptance of the statute by a majority of voters present and voting 
upon the same at any general election. 

Minnesota.— Eight hours constitute a day's labor for all laborers, workmen, or mechanics em- 
ployed by or on behalf of the State, whether the work is done by contract or otherwise. 

"i>lississi|>pi.— Eiglit hours, are a day's labor on highways. 

:>Iissonri.— Eight hours constitute a legal day's work. The law does not prevent an agreement 
to work for a longer or a shorter time and does not appl.v to agricultural laborers. It is unlawful for 
employers to work their employes longer than eight hours per daj' in mines and smelters, or as 
train despatchers, etc., on railroads, unless the office is open only during the daytime. Eight hours 
are a day's labor on highwaj's. 

3Iontana.— Eight hours constitute a legal day's work for persons engaged to operate or handle 
holstins: engines at mines. The law applies only to such plants as are in operation sixteen or luore 
hours per day, or at or in mines where the engine develops fifteen or more horse-power, or where 
fifteen or more men are employed underground in the twenty- four hours. A day's labor on public 
works and in smelters, underground mines and in railroad and other tunnels is limited to eight hours. 

Nebraska.— Eight hours con.stitute a day's work on public roads and on all public works In cities 
of the first cla.ss. 

Nevada.— For labor on public highways, in and about all mines. In smelters, plaster and cement 
mills, as train despatcherSi etc., on railroads, and on all works and undertakings carried on or aided 
by the Slate, countj', or municipal erovernments, the hours of labor are fixed at eiglit per day. 
' New Jersey.— Eight hours is the limit of a day's work by any person emploj'ed by or on behalf 
of the state or any municipality thereof. 

New lUexico.— Eight hours constitute a day's labor on public roads and highways. 

New York.— Eight hoiirs constitute a day's work on highways, and on work done by or for the 
State, or a municipal corporation, whether directly by contractors or sub-contractors; also for all 
classes of employes, except in farm or domestic labor, though overwork for extra pay is permittdd In 
private employments. 



120 



State Labor JBureau^. 



LABOR LEGISLATION— Co?t<mwd. 



North Carolina.— Train despatcbers. etc., on railroads may work only eight hours, unless 
otherwise permitted by the corporation commission. 

North Dakota.— Eight liours are a day's labor on public roads. 

Oliio.— Eight hours shall constitute a day's work in all engagements to labor In any mechanical, 
manufacturing or mining business, unless otherwise expressly stipulated in the contract. 

Oklahoma.— Eight hours constitute a day's labor on all public works, and in underground mines. 

Oregon. — Eighthours constitute a day's labor on all public works, and iu underground mines 
yieliing metal. 

Pennsylvania.— Eight hours of labor shall be deemed and held to be a legal day's work In all 
Cfises of labor and service by the day where there is no agreement or contract to the contrary. This 
does not apply to farm or agricultural labor or to service by the year, month or week. Eight 
lionrs constitute a day's labor lor all mechanics, workmen, and laborers in the employ of the State, 
or of any municipal corporation therein, or otherwise engaged on public work.s. This act shall be 
deemed to apply to employes of contractors. Eugiueei"s hoisting workmen at anthracite coalmines 
may work but eight hours per day. 

Philippine I^slands.— Eight hours constitute a day's work on highways. 

Porto llieo.— No laborer maybe compelled to work more than eight hours per day on public 
works. 

South Dakota. —For labor on public highwaj's a daj-'s work is fixed at eight hours. 

Tennessee.— Eight hours shall be a day's work on the highways. 

Texas-— Eight hours constitute a day's work on the highways, and by train despatcbers, etc., 
except at stations where but one operator is employed. 

Utah.— Eight hours constitute a day's labor on all works carried on or aided by the State, county 
or municipal govei-nments, and in all underground mines or workings, and in smelters and all other 
establishments for the reduction of ores. 

Washington.— Eight hours in any calendar day shall constitute a daj''s work on any work done 
for the Sta^^e, or for any countj' or municipality, and in underground coal mines. 

West Virginia.- Eiglit hours shall constitute a daj-'s work for all laborers, workmen, and me 
chanics w)io may be employed by or on behalf of the Ht-ate, and for telegraph operators directing the 
movement of trains where three or more passenger or ten or more freight trains pass in 24 hours. 

Wisconsin.— In all engagements to labor in any manufacturing or mechanical business, where 
there is no express contract to the contrary, a day's work shall consist of eight hours, hut the law does 
not apply to contracts for labor bv the week, month or year. Eight hours constitute a day's labor 
on the public highways. Employes on public works and train "despatchers may be employed but 
eight hours per day. 

Wyoming.— Eight hours' actual work constitute a legal day's labor in all underground mines, in 
smelters, and on all State and municipal works. 

Unitecl imitates. -A day's work lor all laborers, workmen and mechanics who may be employed 
by the United States, or by any contractor or sub-contractor upon any of the public works of the 
United States, is limited to eight hours. , 

The W0RI.D Almaxac is indebted to Commissioner Charles P. Neill of the U. S. Bureau of Labor 
for this Summary of Labor Legisl ation revised to dat e. 

estate ILaiJor iJureaus. 

LIST OF BUREAUS OF LABOR AND LABOR STATISTICS IN UNITED STATES. 



Location. 



DistrictofCol. 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut... 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa • 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana .... 

Maine . 

IMar.vland 

Massachus' tts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

N. Hampshire 
New .Jersey. . . 

New York 

N. Carolina.. . 
North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma.. .. 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 
Rhode Island. 
8. Cirolina . .. 

Texas 

Utah 

Virginia 

Washington.. 
West Virginia 
Wisconsin . . 



■ Title. 



United States Bureau of Labor 

Bureau of Labor Statistics 

Bureau of Labor Statistics 

Bureau of Labor Statistics 

Department of Commerce & Labor — 
Dep'tof Immigrat'n, Labor & Statist. 
Bureau of Immigration & Labor Stat. 

Bureau of Labor stati-stias 

Bureau of Statistics 

Bureau of Labor Statistics 

Bureau of Labor and Industry 

Department of Agriculture, Lab.& Stat. 
Bureau of Labor & Industrial Statistics. 

Ba reau of Labor & I udustry 

Bureau of Industrial Statistics 

Bureau of Statistics of Labor 

Bureau of Labor & Industrial Statistics 

Bureau of Labor 

Bureau of Labor Statistics <fe Inspection 
Bureau of Agriculture, Lab. & Industry 
Bureau of Labor & Industrial Statistics 

Bureau of Labor 

Bureau of Statistics of Lab. & Industries 

Department of Labor 

Bureau of Labor and Printing 

Departmentof Agriculture and Labor. . 

Bureau of Labor Statistics 

Department of Labor ......'...'..v.... 

Bur. Labor Stat. & Insp. Fac. Works'ps 

Bureau of Industrial Statistics 

Bureau of Industrial Statistics 

Dep' t of Agriculture, Coiti.& Industries 

Bureau of Labor Statistics 

Bureau of Imraigrat'n,Iiabor& Statist. 
Bureau of Labor & Industrial Statistics 

Bureau of Labor 

Bureau of Labor... 

Industrial Commission 



Organ- 
ized. 

1885 

1S83 

1887 

1893 

1911 

1911 

1895 

1879 

1879 

1884 

1885 

1876 

191K) 

1887 

1884 

1869 

1883 

1887 

1879 

1893 

1K87 

1893 

1878 

1S83 

1887 

1R9<) 

1877 

1907 

1903 

1872 

1887 

1909 

1909 

1911 

1898 

1897 

1889 

1883 



Chief Officer. 



Charles P. Neill 

J. D. Mackenzie 

E. V. Brake 

William H. Scoville.. 

H. M. Stanley 

Victor S. Clark 

Jas. P. Fallon 

David Ross 

J. L. Peetz , 

E. W. Van Duyn..., 
W. L. A. .Tohnson. . 

M. C. Rankin 

James Byrnes 

Thos. J. Lyons 

Charles J. Fox 

Chas. F. Gettemj' 

R. H. Fletcher 

W. E. McEwen 

.I.e. A.Hiller 

J. A. Ferguson 

W. M. Maupin 

LysanderH. Carroll. 

W. C. Garrison 

.lohn Williams 

M. L. Shipman 

W. C. Gilbreath 

C. H. Wirmel 

Chas. L. Daugherty. 

O.P.Hoff 

.1. L. Rockey 

George H. Webb 

E. J. Watson 

J. S. Myers 



James B. Doherty. 

C. F. Hubbard 

I, V. Barton 

J. D. Beck 



Addrfss. 



Washington. 

San Francisca 

Denver. 

Hartford. 

Atlanta. 

Honolulu. 

Boise. 

Springfield. 

Indianapolis, 

Des Moines. 

Topeka. 

Frankfort. 

New Orleans, La. 

Augusta. 

Baltimore 

Boston. 

Lansing. 

St. Paul 

Jefferson City. 

Helena, 

Lincoln. 

Concord. 

Trenton. 

Albany. 

Raleigh. 

Bismarck. 

Columbus. 

Guthrie. 

Salem. 

Harrisburg. 

Providence. 

Columbia. 

Austin. 

Salt Lake City. 

Richmond. 

Olympia, 

Wheeling, 

Madison. 



&-eneral Labor Organizations. 121 

Central ILatJot <!^tflani|ationi3. 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 

President, Samuel Gompers, 8U1-809 G Street, N.W. , Washington, D. C. ; Secretary, Frank 
Morrison, sameacldress} Treasurer, John B. Leuiion, Bloomiugton, 111. ; First Vice-President, James 
Duncan, Hancock Building, Quincy, Mass. ; Second Vice-President, John Mitchell. 3 Clare- 
mont Avenue, Mt. Veruou, N. Y. ; Third Vice-President, James O'Connell, 512 Ouray 
Building, Washington, D. C. ; Fourth Vice-President, D. A. Hayes, 930 Witherspoon Building, 
Philadelphia, Pa.; Fifth Vice-President, \Vm. D. Huber, Carpenters' Building, Indianapolis, 
Ind. ; Sixth Vice-President. Jos. F. Valentine. Commercial Tribune Building, Cmcinnati, Oliio; 
Seventh Vice-President, John R. Alpine, 401 Bush Temple of Music, Chicago, 111. ; Eighth Vice- 
President. H. B. Perham, Star Building, St. Louis, Mo. 

The Federation Iscomposed of 113 national andinternational unions, representing fipproximately 
27,000 local unions, 5 departments. 41 State branches. 564 city central unions, and 616^1ocal unions. 
The approximate paid membership is 2.000.000. The atTiliated unions publish about 540 weekly 
or monthly papers devoted to the cause of labor. The official organ is the American Federatwnifit^ 
edited by Samuel Gompers. Tliere are 1.659 oreanizers of local unions acting under the orders of 
the American Federation of Labor. The objects and aims of the American Federation of Labor 
are ofliclally stated to render employment and means of subsistence less precarious by securing to 
the workersan equitable share of the fruits of their labor. 

IJfTERNATIONAL UNIONS COMPRISING THE A^MERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 
Asbestos Workers, International Association of Heat and Frost Insulators and. Thomas G. McNa- 

mara, 2616 Slat terv Street, St. Louis, Mo. „ . ^^^ ^ -„. ,_ „,« t^ ^ 

Balierv and Confectionerv Workers' International Union of America. Otto E. Fischer, 212 Bush 

Templeof Music, 221 Chicago Avenue. Chicasro, III. „„„ _ .,,.. ^. o.. '^ t ^• 
Barbers' International Union, Journeymen. Jacob Fischer, 222 East Michigan Street, Indianapolis, 

Bill Posters and Billers of America, International Alliance of. William McCarthy, Fitzgerald 
Building. 1482-90 Broadway, New York City. i^-r. =oc ^r -o ■^^■ 

Blacksmiths, International Brotherhood of. Wm. F. Kramer, Suite 5/0-586 Monon Building, 
C^hiciisro 111 

Boiler Makers and Iron Ship Builders of America, Brotherhood of. W.J. Gilthorpe, Suite 7-12, 
Law Building. Kansas City, Kan. _ , ^^^ „ ^ ,,. , . ^^ x -r 

Bookbinders. International Brotherhood of. James W. Dougherty, 222 East Michigan Street, In- 
dianapolis, Ind. ^i X ^ X -.r 

Boot and Slioe Workers' Union. C. L. Baine. 246 Summer Street, Boston, Mass. 

Brewery Workmen, International Union of the United. Louis Kemper, Vine Street^ near Hollister, 

Cincinnati. Ohio. ■ . , „r-,,- -rr -r. ^ x^ 

Brick, Tilp, and Terra Cot ta Workers' Alliance, International. William Van Bodegraven, Room 

409, 160 North Fifth Avenue. Chicago, 111. . . • „ „ ,^ ,• ; ,„„,„, . 

Bridge and Structural Iron Workers, International Association of. H. S. Hockin, 422-424 American 

Central Life Building, Indianapolis, Ind. ^ ^ -^ ■, ^^-^ ^ ■ , . ^^■ 

Broem and Whisk Makers' Union, International. C. T. Dolan, 39d9 Lincoln Avenue, Chicago, III. 
Brushmakers' International Union. George J. Vltzthun. 2)52 Gates Avenue. Brooklyn,. N. Y. 
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of. Frank Duffy, Carpenters' Building, 

Indianapolis, Ind. . ^ ^. ^ ^ . , „,.,,• „ 

Carriage, Wagon and Automobile Workers of North America, International Union of. William P. 

Mavell. 10 Chapin Block. Buffalo, N. Y. , ^,. ^ ^ ^ ,«oi ,. , o. ^ 

Carvers' Association of North America, International Wood. Thomas J. Lodge, 10 Carlisle Street, 

Cement Workers, American Brotherhood of. Henry Ullner, Room 705 Cluuie Building, California 

and Dilontgomery Streets, San Francisco. Cal. „^ , . ,^ „ .,^. _,,. 

Cigar Makers' International Union of America. George W. Perkins, Monon Building. Chicago, 111. 
Clerks' International Protective Association, Retail. H. J. Conway, Lock Drawer 248, Lafayette, 

Cloth Hat and Cap Makers of North America, United. Max Zuckerman. 62 East Fourth Street, New 

"York CJitv 
commercial Telegraphers' Union of America, The. Wesley Rnssell, 922-930 Monon Building, 

Compressed Air and Foundation Workers Union of the United States and Canada. John Emener, 

155 Meserole Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. „....„ ^ ,r^ ^ ^ .,,■ 

Coopers' International Union of North America. William R. Deal, Suite A, Board of Trade Building, 

Kansas City, Kan. _ ., ^ ^ ,^ ,..- ,,^ . -^ ,_. ,_ . 

Curtain Operatives of America, Amalgamated Lace. - David L. Gould, 54d A\ est Lehigh Avenue, 

Philadelphia, Pa. ^ . „,,, ^. x, . 

Cutting Die and Cutter Makers, International Union of. Harry Reiser, 616 Sixth Avenue, New 

\ nrk OitV 
Diamond Workers' Protective Union of America. Andries Mej'er,323 Washington Street, Brooklyn, 

N Y. 
Electrical Workers of America, International Brotherhood of. Charles P. Ford, Pierick Building, 

Elevator Constructors, Interaatioual Union of. William Young, 1952 North 19th Street, Philadel- 

Dili 3. ^^3i. 

Enginee'rs, International Union of Steam. .James G. Hnnnahan, 6303 Harvard Avenue. Chicago, 111. 
Engravers, International Association of Watch Case. Carl We.sp, Box 263, Canton, Ohio. 
Firemen, International Brotherhood of Stationary, C. L. Shamp, Roo