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Full text of "The world war book : being a record of the war activities of this community and a brief personal history of those who entered the service of their country"

GENEALOGY 

940.410 

AAICOM 



Sl|e WiBtlh Mar flmortal luuk 
of Etrl|tirlh ^pvm^ 



Slljf Watlb fflar Innk 



Being a Record of the War Activities of this Community, 

and a brief personal history of those who 

entered the service of their country. 




Published by a Committee in behalf of the Citizens of 
Richfield Springs 

Nineteen Himdred and Nineteen 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Allen J. Bloomfield Editor-in-Chief 

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 

The Reverend Father A. J. Kelly 

Clarence Eugene Ackerly 

Miss Ella Winne 

Charles M. Tuller 

Mrs. WUliam T. Welden 

Mrs. Thomas B. Roberts 

Frederick Brenner 

Howard M. Curtis . , Treasurer 



Dedicated as a 

WAR MEMORIAL 

To the Men and Women of this Community 

Who served in the great World War 




The Craftsman Press 
of Syracuse 



iFornuorli 



XN a stately panegyric, whose words still kindle the soul 
as the eye travels along the pictured page, Cicero, the 
prince of orators, bids the Roman senate erect the most 
splendid monument to Roman heroes, living and dead. 
"For," he said, "mighty and marvellous are their services to the 
Republic." In this year, ever memorable, do the citizens of a 
greater Republic erect to nobler soldiers their monuments of 
gratitude and affection, for deeds of might and right in the 
awfulest strife since soldier fought. Marble, bronze, the proud 
page of history, are but the poor and perishable outward sign of 
the rich and living love and memory which America will treasure 
as long as she endures. 

This modest volume records the notable share of Richfield 
Springs in the national memorial. Its form — due to the unfailing 
good taste of one who represents with distinction our sentiments 
— is most apt and pleasing. It resumes for us and expresses 
with cogency the activities and sacrifices of our community dur- 
ing the war. Its pages, with a simplicity that touches the heart, 
show forth not only the sound love of country, but a love that 
has a quick ear and an open hand for every form of need and 
oppression. It recalls the faces and short and simple stories of 
lads with whom we lived, commonplace indeed, who went forth 
from school and shop and farm at the call of Mother America 
and returned, thank God, transfigured by the consecration of a 
Holy War. Some, indeed, bearing lasting scars besides which 
the most brilliant decorations seem paltry. Yet not all. There 
are faces we have lost awhile. Ward H. Shepard and John Leo 
Purcell sleep well in honored graves at home. Joseph Huggick 
sank on a foreign but friendly field of honor, thinking, perchance, 
of the home and neighbors he is nevermore to see. Will not they 
and our thousands of dead be very sacred, unforgotten voices, 
calling from the heights in a golden splendor, calling us up to 
them by the way they went, the way of faith and self-sacrifice? 
God bless them and God rest them. "A great stillness falls ; a 
life's affection is raised beyond chance and change by that last 
of sacraments, a soldier's death on the field of duty, battling for 
a just cause, looking to no reward except faith kept and honor 
vindicated even as he passes to the unseen." It will be for old 
companions-in-arms and for citizens of Richfield Springs through 
long years and perhaps in distant lands a priceless souvenir 

9 



which enshrines sacred memories of a war of men and demons in 
the air as on land and sea and below the waters of the sea and, 
too, of a patriotism that never feared and never faltered, of all of 
which they were a part. 

All the devices of science, all the cruelties of man were ex- 
hausted in mutilating and killing men. They fought a foe who 
did evil designedly, who recognized no law of nations or of 
humanity, in sewer-like trenches, the water up to their belts, 
the mire swallowing them down, in scenes of blood and filth to 
make the heart sick which no one dares to picture and which 
mercifully stun the imagination of the survivors. In the strong 
language of Isaiah: "Hell hath enlarged herself and opened her 
mouth without measure." The malignant frenzy of savage 
hordes was eclipsed by deliberate professors who at ease in their 
laboratories invented new plagues to choke and poison the sol- 
dier of liberty. The perverted ingenuities of science destroyed 
ruthlessly the noblest works of God and man. Incredible things 
happened that stagger and sicken and yet it made no difference. 
The spirit of '76 and '61 overcame an inferno that the superlative 
genius of Dante could not body forth and Chateau-Thierry, Bel- 
leau Woods, the forests of Argonne, St. Mihiel will quicken the 
pulse and brighten the eye of the lovers of freedom in all lands 
and will cause the name of the New World to be held in bene- 
diction by generations yet unborn of the Old. 

All this our soldiers suffered and triumphantly endured for 
their own land ; for, to paraphrase Wendell Phillips, the torpedo 
aimed at the Lusitania was the yell of pirates against the Decla- 
ration of Independence. But in vindicating the liberty and 
honor of the United States of America they fought willingly and 
generously for the freedom of every race and every people 
against the common enemy of all. Patriotism, the love of our 
fathers, their thoughts and hopes, their deeds and aspirations, 
springs from the deeps of our being, and the tender line of 
Horace — "It is a pleasant and glorious thing to die for one's 
country" — has evoked in the human heart an universal response. 
"What land, what people," says Dr. Spalding, "has the sun ever 
illumined more worthy of the heart's deep affection than our 
own?" We love our fatherland not chiefly for the food it gives, 
the property it protects, the security it provides, but for the 
richer, freer, nobler human life which it makes possible. Our 
country is the symbol of all that is most priceless on earth — 
liberty, truth, devotion, loyalty. In the words and in the deeds 
of the patriots who made the Declaration of Independence there 
breathes a lofty and imselfish spirit, which, to the end of time, 

10 



shall thrill every true and generous heart. Their sons have not 
been unworthy of them. Let us, chasing no beautiful rainbows, 
hew to the line of the wise and solid realities of which we are 
the richer heirs. Let not patriotism run to foolish vanity and 
unwise boasting, but set to work in a new day with a new vision 
to purge out the wrongs, the inequalities, the dishonesties still 
clinging to our national life. As we set down this volume, 
reflection will teach us that it is yet higher and more useful to 
live for our country, that chastened in the day of victory we 
should with reverent minds pray the Giver of every good and 
perfect gift: 

. "And Thou, O God, of whom we hold 

Our country and our Freedom fair, 
Within thy tender love enfold 

This land; for all Thy people care. 
Uplift our hearts above our fortunes high, 

Let not the good we have make us forget 
The better things that in Thy heavens lie. 

Keep, still, amid the fever and the fret 
Of all this eager life, our thoughts on Thee 
The Hope, the Strength, the God of all the Free." 

A. J. K. 




JOHN A. LOSEE 

Chairman of the five Liberty Loan Campaigns, whose loyal 

devotion, progressive business methods and delightful 

personality spelled success for the several 

loans in this district. 



THE FIVE LIBERTY LOAN CAMPAIGNS 

The town of Richfield had quotas in the five Liberty Loans that 
totaled $824,900. Its 4,018 subscribers purchased $1,034,900 worth of the 
bonds, an average for the whole of 131 per cent. This record of the 
support given the boys in the front line defense by those at home is 
worthy of a place in this Memorial, for many of these 4,018 buyers of 
bonds did a part in the winning of the war through actual sacrifice in 
the accumulation of sufficient funds to purchase a fifty dollar bond. An 
examination of the list of subscribers in the town of Richfield will reveal 
many such bond owners. 

In the history of the raising and oversubscribing of the quota in 
each of the five campaigns, the work of John A. Losee, chairman for 
each loan, will stand as unforgetable testimony to this man's patriotic 
zeal, his untiring energy and his unshakeable confidence in Richfield's 
desire and ability to meet the demands made upon her. His personality 
and his work were the chief agents in the success of the campaigns. The 
First National Bank of Richfield Springs through its officers and 
directors, notably its cashier, James McKee, was an important factor. 
It made the raising of the quota the chief consideration at all times, and 
its loyal co-operation with the Liberty Loan Committee and the accom- 
modation it accorded subscribers were the two determining influences in 
the oversubscription of the quotas. The Mungor-Ackerly Company in 
the Mercury contributed unlimited space to the advertising of the loans. 
All members of the men's and women's committees did their utmost, 
both by example and by solicitation, to make those at home see and 
fulfill their obligation to the boys of the first line. 

The officers and members of the Liberty Loan Committees for the 
five loans were: John A. Losee, chairman; Thomas J. Wetzel, vice- 
chairman; Lewis A. Williams, secretary; Clarence E. Ackerly, publicity 
manager; Marvin J. Bennett, Allen J. Bloomfield, Murray E. Brace, 
Owen P. Brady, George D. Caney, Olcott A. Chamberlin, Oscar B. 
Chapman, John D. Cary, George H. Cook, Clellan Curtis, Howard M. 
Curtis, Ed. D. Derthick, Earl W. Dimmore, Harry E. Elden, Fred F. 
Fox, Clarence E. Goodale, Isaac J. Kent, Herbert B. Leary, James 
McKee, Richard Owen, George A. Peckham, Louis S. Raymond, Arthur 
J. Rockwood, Charles A. Ross, Willard A. Smith, George Schneider, 
Charles M. Tuller, George E. Tunnicliff, William T. Welden and Charles 
M. Wikoff. 

Mrs. John D. Cary was chairman of the women's committee for 
Richfield Springs and Mrs. George T. Brockway was chairman for Rich- 
field. The other members of these committees were Mrs. C. E. Ackerly, 
Mrs. J. Gordon Black, Mrs. W. P. Borland, Mrs. Murray E. Brace, Mrs. 
Owen P. Brady, Miss Margaret L. Brady, Miss Belle Bullion, Mrs. Harrie 
V. Frink, Mrs. John A. Losee, Miss Dorothy Mason, Mrs. W. G. Robin- 
son, Mrs. David B. Shappee, Mrs. Daniel Shaul, Mrs. George A. Sitts, 
Mrs. William T. Welden, Mrs. Charles M. Wikoff, Mrs. Lewis A, Wil- 
liams, Miss Ella L. Winne and Miss Mae Derrick. 

THE LIBERTY LOAN RECORD 

Quota Subscribers Subscribed Percentage 

First Loan $135,000 307 $136,700 101 

Second Loan $202,500 805 $215,150 106 

Third Loan $109,000 894 $227,000 208 

Fourth Loan $218,000 1246 $255,500 117 

Victory Loan $160,400 766 $200,550 125 

C. E. A. 
13 



WAR RELIEF LEAGUE 

Shortly after the opening of the Great War, when the need for help 
for Belgium was beginning to be known, on November 20, 1914, a meet- 
ing was called by Mrs. William T. Welden at her home on Church 
Street, when a dozen women were present. At that time the War Relief 
League of Richfield Springs was organized, to meet one evening each 
week to sew for the Belgian refugees, and it was planned that money be 
raised by voluntary contributions for the purchase of materials. The 
officers elected were: Mrs. Welden, president; five vice-presidents, rep- 
resenting the various churches, were Mrs. Harry E. Elden, Methodist; 
Mrs. Annette F. Bloomfield, Universalist; Mrs. Claude Soares, St. John's 
Protestant Episcopal; Mrs. John D. Cary, Presbyterian; Mrs. David B. 
Shappee, St. Joseph's Roman Catholic; other officers were Mrs. John A. 
Losee, secretary; Mrs. Clarence E. Ackerly, treasurer. It was also voted 
to extend an invitation to neighboring villages to co-operate, and Mrs. 
Thomas B. Roberts, Miss Elizabeth Buchanan, Mrs. Oscar B. Chapman 
and Mrs. Harrie V. Frink were made a committee for this purpose. 

During the winter of 1914-1915 meetings were held weekly at the 
members' houses, more than one hundred women being in attendance 
or working at home, and six hundred garments were sent to Belgium as 
a result. A tea was held at the home of Mrs. Cary on February 13, 
1915, when $25 was raised; a lecture on Robert Burns was given at the 
same place, when Mr. John Mackie of Utica very courteously contributed 
his services, and additional gifts of money proved ample to provide for 
the payment for materials used. 

The next winter the work was carried on, the officers being: Mrs. 
Welden, president; Mrs. Elden, Mrs. Ward Watson, Miss Marian H. 
Smith, Mrs. Cary and Mrs. Shappee, vice-presidents; Miss Ella L. Winne, 
secretary; Mrs. Ackerly, treasurer; Mrs. Chapman, Mrs. Frink, Mrs. 
Roberts and Mrs. Clarence E. Goodale, directors. In April, 1916, a tea 
was held at the Public Library at which $40 was raised, and during the 
spring several hundred garments were made and forwarded to Belgium. 

On November 9, 1916, a meeting of officers was called at the home 
of Mrs. Welden, when it was voted to discontinue the work of the 
League in favor of the American Red Cross, a chapter of which had 
been formed in October. It was also voted to give $5 to that work and 
the sum remaining in the treasury was sent later to Mrs. Whitney 
Warren for the Secours National. 

During the existence of the League, besides the garments and sev- 
eral pieces of new material sent to Belgium, donations of money were 
sent to the Commission for the Relief of Belgium, the National Allied 
Relief Committee and the War Relief Clearing House as well as to the 
two organizations above mentioned. 

E. W. 



AMERICAN RED CROSS— RICHFIELD SPRINGS 
CHAPTER 

In October, 1916, a meeting of some half dozen members of the 
Canadarago Home Economics Society was held at the home of Mrs. 
Herman H. Baker to consider a project to be taken up as an outside 
interest for the ensuing year. It was decided to form a chapter of the 
American Red Cross and the following officers were elected: Mrs. Baker, 
chairman; Mrs. James McKee, chairman; Mrs. Clarence A. Boutelle, sec- 
retary; Mrs. John A. Losee, treasurer. Meetings were held once a month, 
first at the Public Library, where old linen was made up into hospital 
supplies, and later, as the scope of the work widened, at St. John's Parish 

14 



House. The membership gradually increased to about 200 and the 
women of Monticello, Brighton, Warren, Twelve Thousand and Schuyler 
Lake all asked for work. A branch was formed at the last named place, 
Mrs. George Cushman, chairman, succeeded by Mr. Merton J. Clarke; 
Mrs. John Grey, vice-chairman; Miss Nina Wright, secretary; Mr. C. W, 
Stephenson, treasurer. 

In the summer of 1917, when the meetings were held at the Parish 
House, Miss Wigginton of Baltimore gave instruction in the making of 
muslin bandages and Miss Sara T. Lowman of New York conducted a 
class in surgical dressings, graduating eight pupils. Four of them, Mrs. 
Baker, Mrs. Isaac J. Kent, Miss Daisey Reed and Miss Virginia Swift, 
continued through an advanced course, qualifying themselves to teach. 

In October, 1917, when the work was constantly growing, the 
directors of the First National Bank gave the Chapter the use of three 
large rooms in their building, and furniture and equipment were donated, 
Mr. W. H. H. Holland also giving his services in caring for the rooms. 
The use of the telephone was donated by the Otsego and Delaware Tele- 
phone Company and the electric light by the Southern New York 
Power Company. They were open each afternoon and the new offi- 
cers, who were the Reverend Albert L. Evans, chairman; Mrs. Baker, 
vice-chairman; Miss Daisy Reed, secretary, and Mr. George T. Brock- 
way, treasurer, prepared for a steady increase in work. Chairmen from 
the various churches were in charge and the Chapter has every reason 
to be proud of the amount accomplished. 

In February, 1918, the Reverend Albert L. Evans resigned because 
of his enlistment in the army, when he was sent overseas as chaplain, 
and his place was filled by Mr. Charles M. Tuller, who has served the 
Chapter with faithfulness and zeal. In July Mrs. Baker, whose heart 
was with the work from the first, was obliged, by reason of home respon- 
sibilities, to give up her office. Mrs. H. A. Ward was appointed and 
served with great ability for the remainder of the term, resigning at the 
end of that time. 

The October, 1918, election resulted as follows: Mr. Tuller, chair- 
man; Mrs. M. W. Dawley, vice-chairman; Miss Reed, secretary; Mr. 
Brockway, treasurer, and these officers are now in charge with the 
exception of Miss Reed, who resigned because of numerous other duties 
on March 3, 1919, her place being filled by Mrs. Isaac J. Kent. 

A brief resume of the work done from October, 1917, to June, 1919, 
with those in charge, is as follows: 

Chairman of Supply Service, October, 1917, to October, 1918, 
Mrs. H. A. Ward 

Surgical dressings, Mrs. Kent 4808 

Hospital garments, Mrs. David B. Shappee, October, 1917, to Janu- 
ary, 1918; Mrs. Dawley, January, 1918, to date 314 

Knitted articles, Mrs. R. W. Armstrong 1386 

Miscellaneous articles 2134 

Given for Linen Shower 1227 

Layettes, Mrs. L. F. Barker 12 

The Comfort Kits were in charge of Mrs. Daniel Shaul, who was 
succeeded by Mrs. Harry Derrick; and Miss Anna Louise Tunnicliff 
superintended the preparation of the Christmas packages. 

Thirty-five hvmdred pounds of second-hand clothing were collected 
in the two drives for the Belgian refugees; the first was in charge of 
Scoutmaster George E. Tunnicliff and the Boy Scouts, and the second 
managed by Mrs. Kent. 

15 



An Honor Roll, containing the names of the soldiers, sailors and 
marines and posted on Lake Street, was given and kept up by Mrs. J. 
D. Reed, while the Home Service Department, frequently of service, was 
conducted by Mr. Richard Own. 

Too much cannot be said in praise of Mrs. M. W. Dawley, who has 
been at the rooms daUy since she assumed office and who has shown 
great executive ability in the service of the Chapter. She has been ably 
seconded by Mrs. Kent, who also has been a most faithful worker. 

The financial side has been no less inspiring. A total membership 
of 1946 brought $1,953, of which the Chapter received fifty per cent. In 
the spring drives of 1918, of which Mr. TuUer was chairman, the first, 
with a quota of $1,000, raised $2,400. This was in March, and the money 
so raised was devoted to the use of the Chapter in the purchase of 
materials and the ready to make garments furnished by the American 
Red Cross. The Second Red Cross War Fund in May, with a quota of 
$2,000, brought $3,461.87. Only twenty-five per cent of this was retained 
by the Chapter, the remainder being given to the American Red Cross. 

Mr. A. J. Rockwood of the New York State Highway Department 
was notable in aiding this, as he organized his one himdred men and 
collected $747.90 from them for the fund. 

Benefits for the cause have included a ball given at Bloomfield's in 
June, 1917; a tea given in August by Mrs. Edward D. Ibbotson at her 
summer home, Tarry-a- While; a concert given by the Music Club; a 
concert arranged by Miss Swift and given at Shaial's Theatre in the 
stimmer of 1918, and a delightful little play given by the children of the 
Junior Red Cross at St. John's Parish House. 

The work of Mr. George H. Cook, in whose hands was placed the 
collection of the funds from the various drives, has been especially 
valuable and efficient. He has been assisted in this by Mrs. H. R. Chase, 
Miss Ethel Joslyn and Miss Delia Ross. The two Christmas membership 
drives of 1917 and 1918 were ably managed by Mr. Frederick Bronner. 

E. W. 
JUNIOR RED CROSS 

On February 22, 1918, the Jvinior Red Cross was organized, Mrs. 
Horace G. Getman being appointed chairman; Mrs. John P. Simmons, 
secretary and treasurer. The local school and eight others in the vicinity 
quickly attained a hundred per cent membership, and the receipts to date 
have been $314.56, with 1596 articles made and given. In September, 
1918, Mrs. Getman resigned and Mrs. John A. Losee succeeded to the 
office, which she still holds. 

E. W. 

UNITED WAR WORK CAMPAIGN 

The President of the United States set aside the week of November 
nth to November 18th, 1918, as a time for united effort in behalf of the 
seven great organizations whose activities in camp and field had so 
much to do with maintaining the morale of the vast forces of the 
Republic. The amount to be raised was $170,500,000 and this was to be 
divided according to an agreed percentage among the Young Men's 
Christian Association, the Young Women's Christian Association, Na- 
tional Catholic War Council (Knights of Columbus), Jewish Wel- 
fare Board, War Camp Community Service, American Library Asso- 
ciation, and the Salvation Army. The quota for the town of Richfield 
was $4,838. The Hon. Allen J. Bloomfield, Assemblyman from the 
Otsego district, was made the chairman of the local forces. He 
opened his energetic and successful campaign with a mass meet- 
ing at Shaul's Theater on the Sunday evening preceding the can- 

16 



vass. Under the stimulation of the chairman's efforts and the ex- 
cellent speeches of Mrs. Arthur Ryerson of Springfield Center, who had 
just returned from France, and the Reverend Father Arthur J. Kelly, of 
St. Joseph's Church of Richfield Springs, the sum of $1,400 was pledged 
to the fund at this meeting. Chairman Bloomfield named as his vice- 
chairmen. Rev. A. J. Kelly, Rev. Claude Soares, Rev. A. P. Palmer, 
with the following as the personnel of the executive committee: J. A. 
Losee, W. T. Welden, J. D. Cary, Herbert Leary, H. E. Elden, T. F. 
Hinds, Samuel Grossman, G. D. Caney, James McKee, Charles Wikoff, 
Owen Brady, C. E. Goodale, C. A. Ross, Dr. H. V. Frink, H. M. Curtis, 
George E. Tunnicliff, A. J. Rockwood, John Nugent, S. H. Conklin, C. 
M. Tuller, H. C. Brockway, Fred Bronner, C. E. Ackerly, John Simmons, 
Dr. H. A. Ward, M. E. Brace, M. J. Bennett, Hon. W. G. Bullion, O. A. 
Chamberlin, G. A. Peckham, W. A. Smith, Richard Owen, J. G. Black, 
Dr. M. W. Dawley, O. B. Chapman, Harry Derrick and T. J. Wetzel. 

The committees for the soliciting of the town's quota were named to 
cover the three election districts and their activities were devoted to that 
jurisdiction. For election district No. 1, the chairman named Mrs. Her- 
bert R. Hadcock as the Captain, who was assisted by Mrs. D. B. Shappee, 
Miss Nellie E. Brady, C. A. Ross, Mrs. W. T. Welden, Miss Louise 
Hinds, Mrs. J. D, Cary, Miss Ella Winne, Mrs. T. B. Roberts, Joseph 
Famulare, Miss Daisey Reed, Mrs. J. G. Black, Mrs. A. P. Palmer, Mrs. 
Owen Brady, Mrs. C. E. Ackerly and Miss Delia Ross. In district 
No. 2 John Nugent was captain, with the following aides: Mrs. F. B. 
Getchel, Mrs. W. G. Bullion, T. F. Hinds, Miss Mae Derrick, S. B. 
Sheridan, Miss Cecilia Leary, Miss Marian Smith, Mrs. G. A. Peckham, 
Mrs. I. J. Kent, M. J. Bennett, Charles Wikoff, Mrs. H. R. Chase, Mrs. 
A. D. Risley, Miss Belle BuUion and Miss Anna Jordan. In district No. 
3 Murray E. Brace was the Captain, assisted by Mrs. Everett Ames, Mrs. 
George T. Brockway, Miss Vera Robinson, Thomas Burke, Dr. S. A. 
Haggerty, Miss Mary Dugan, Mrs. Adelbert Atkins, Miss Kittie Fenton, 
Miss Anastasia Branigan and Mrs. R. D. Perkins. Mrs. John D. Cary 
acted as treasurer of the campaign, continuing in her work long after the 
conclusion of the canvass. In the history of the township no such sum 
was ever assessed before for patriotic purposes and yet at the end of 
the week's canvass Richfield was the first town in Otsego to report 
its quota filled, the sum of $5,000 having been subscribed. It is fitting 
to record in conclusion that this patriotic fimd was, with less than a 
half dozen exceptions, given unreservedly to the imited organizations, 
demonstrating in the strongest possible manner the spirit of the citizens 
of the town, F, B. 

STATE MILITARY CENSUS 

On June 6th, 1917, Governor Charles S. Whitman made proclamation 
designating the period from Jime 11 to June 25th for the taking of a 
State Military Census, to comprise all persons in the State of New York 
between the ages of 15 and 50. This remarkable task when completed 
showed in detail the man power of the commonwealth, the vocations of 
her people and the availability of her resources for military purposes. 
It was completed in the limited time and furnished data of immeasurable 
value through the patriotic activity of the volunteer workers. In the 
town of Richfield the Supervisor of the Census was Lewis A. Williams, 
assisted by Clarence E. Ackerly, captain of the 1st election district, 
comprising the village of Richfield Springs, and Murray E, Brace, captain 
of the 2nd district, comprising the village of Richfield. The enumerators 
of the 1st district were Mrs. Daniel Shaul, Mrs. John A, Losee, Mrs, 
James McKee, Mrs. Thomas B, Roberts, Mrs, Clarence E. Ackerly, Miss 
Marian Smith, Miss Ella Winne, Mrs, John D. Cary, Miss Madeline 
Elwood, Mrs, David B. Shappee, Miss Louise Hinds, Mrs, Lewis A, 
Williams, Mrs, Oscar B, Chapman, Mrs, Harrie V, Frink, Mrs, William 
T. Welden; in the 2nd district, Miss Esther Walker, Morris Young, 



Arthur Fenton, Ernest M. Johnson, Munson Barringer, William Leary. 
As a result of their labors the enumeration showed a total of 1079 per- 
sons of both sexes, between 15 and 50 years of age. Of this number, the 
1st district had 362 males, 424 females; the 2nd district, 164 males, 129 
females. F- B. 

WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 

Of the varied war activities of the town of Richfield, the campaign 
for the sale of War Savings Stamps was pushed the least, and yet the 
work accomplished during the week of June 22nd, 1918, set apart for the 
taking of pledges, was very creditable to the commimity and those who 
had the campaign in charge. Lewis A. Williams was the chairman in 
the town of Richfield and he was assisted by the members of Gano- 
wauges Chapter, D. A. R., who secured pledges amoimting to $15,000. 
The stamps were sold at the Richfield Springs postoffice and the Rich- 
field postoffice and the total amovmt taken up of these "little bonds" at 
this writing is $18,768.13 in the Richfield Springs postoffice. F. B. 

THE FOUR MINUTE MEN 

The work of the local Four Minute Men has been very helpful in 
all of the drives for war measures or associated charitable enterprises. 
In all of the campaigns for the sale of Liberty Bonds and War Savings 
Stamps, for Belgian or Armenian Relief, for the Red Cross and the 
United War Work Fvmds, systematic and active use has been made of 
this popular way of appealing to all the people, as an addition to rally 
meetings for education and arousing increased enthusiasm. Mr. Ray 
Shaul, manager of Shaul's Theater, has been uniformly courteous in 
greeting and announcing the different speakers, and practically placing 
the theater and its audience at their service for whatever time was 
asked. The active members of this body have been: J. D. Cary, chair- 
man; the Hon. A. J. Bloomfield, John A. Losee, Prof. C. A. Boutelle, 
Prof. H. E. Elden, the Rev. Claude Soares, Theo. F. Hinds, Richard 
Owen, Richard Owen, Jr., Frederick Bronner, Frederick Bronner, Jr., 
Scoutmaster George E, Timnicliff, A. Ross Eckler, Lucius G. Cary, Wil- 
liam T. Welden, Horace G. Getman, Charles M. Wikoff, Herbert B. 
Leary, Mrs. Thomas B. Roberts, Mrs. Herbert R. Hadcock, Miss Mar- 
gery Cary and Mrs. J. D. Cary. J. D. C. 



18 



TROOP NO, 2, RICHFIELD SPRINGS, BOY SCOUTS 
OF AMERICA. 

The activities, during the four years of the World War, of Troop 2, 
Boy Scouts of America, recruited in Richfield Springs, N. Y., merit a 
prominent place in this volume. Their valuable work was largely 
promoted by Scoutmaster George E. Tunnicliff and Assistant Scout- 
master Charles A. Ross, and there was no phase of the patriotic labor 
through the momentous struggle with which the Troop of thirty-two 
members was not identified. 

Perhaps the most important work with which they are to be credited 
is that performed in behalf of the five great Liberty Loans subscribed in 
this district. It is greatly to their honor to chronicle here that the 
United States government presented nineteen members of Troop 2 with 
medals, which were won by selling individually ten bonds to ten different 
subscribers. For additional sales made by the members, in the suc- 
ceeding campaigns, they were awarded sixteen bars. In each of the 
Loans they served as bill posters and distributors of literatvu-e, ushered 
at mass meetings many times, furnished vocal music on several pro- 
grams and also paraded on many occasions to promote public interest 
in the sales. The splendid total of their efforts as bond salesmen is 
approximately $100,000 and in addition to this they bought patriotically 
of the several issues. 

They raised by public entertainment the sum of $105.00 and turned 
the proceeds over to the Y. M. C. A. In the United War Work Cam- 
paign they not only subscribed liberally to the fund, but posted bills 
and did other work which added materially to the great success of the 
campaign. 

In the sale of War Savings Stamps their purchases aggregate a 
considerable amount and one of the Troop was awarded an ace medal 
for salesmanship. They collected a large quantity of garments for the 
Belgian Relief and packed and shipped them. The Troop with its officers 
was attached to the 3rd Naval District Secret Service Bureau and 
reported or investigated any suspicious circumstance coming to their 
attention. The members also gathered statistical information for the 
government. 

At the funeral obsequies of Ward Shepard and Leo Purcell the 
Troop acted as an escort. In the observance of the French national 
holiday held during the summer of 1918, they paraded and presented a 
very creditable appearance, as on many other occasions. 

It is indeed fitting that their part should be memorialized in this 
way. They will soon be the yoimg men of our village and nation. As 
such they will read the notable record of their activities in the World 
War and will be justly proud of their contribution to the cause of 
humanity. F. B. 



21 



PHILIP D. ALLEN 



The son of Daniel Allen and Rose Daly Allen, was born in the town of 
Exeter, Otsego County, New York, on October 10th, 1899. He attended 
the public schools at Exeter and Schuyler Lake and later graduated from 
the West Winfield High School in the class of 1917. 

He entered Albany Medical College, Union University, in the fall of 
1918, and joined the Students' Army Training Corps at that institution, 
training for service. 

After the Students' Training Corps was disbanded by the Federal 
government, he remained at Union University studying medicine. 



22 




23 



JOHN ALMOND AMES 



The son of Marion D. Ames and Mary L. Ames, was born at Richfield, 
Otsego County, New York, on July 22nd, 1895. He attended the district 
schools at Brighton and Richfield and later entered the High School at 
Richfield Springs. He had been engaged in farming, automobile repair- 
ing and truck driving prior to his induction into the service, August 30th, 
1918. 

He was first assigned to the 4th Co., 152nd Depot Brigade; trans- 
ferred to the 36th Co., same Brigade, at Camp Upton; transferred to the 
3rd Co., Army Service Corps, and went overseas on October 20th, 1918, 
and in France assigned to 305th Motor Truck Co., 402nd Motor Supply 
Train. 

He left France on his trip home on January 10th, 1919, and arrived 
in Hoboken on January 21st. 

His service overseas consisted principally of driving supply trucks 
and for six weeks he was detailed to transport supplies to the front. 

It was while engaged in this hazardous assignment that he was 
blown from a truck which he was driving on the afternoon of November 
7th, 1918, by the explosion of a shell from the German lines, making 
him vmconscious for several hours. He was carrying supplies at the 
time in the Argonne Forest region. He was afterward sent to Blois 
and was ready with another load for the front when the armistice was 
signed, November 11th, 1918. 

While still weak and nervous from the shock he landed in the home 
country and was soon taken with an attack of influenza and sent to the 
military hospital. 



24 




25 



ANTONY BACHANS 



Was born in Lithuania, Russia, in 1890, where he attended school and 
worked at farming. He came to the United States in 1911 and directly 
to Richfield Springs, where he was employed as a farm hand. He 
entered the service May 25th, 1918, and reported to Camp Gordon, Ga., 
with the Depot Brigade, for training. Later he was transferred to Camp 
Meredith, New Jersey, from which point he was shipped overseas with 
Company K, 47th Infantry, in August, 1918. He experienced a great 
deal of active fighting in France, was wounded in the elbow from 
shrapnel, from which he has recovered. 

At the present writing he is with the Army of Occupation in Adenau, 
Germany. 



26 




27 



CHARLES (BACHANS) BONS 



Was bom in Lithuania, Russia, in 1894, where he attended school and 
worked at farming. In 1912 he reached the States, coming directly to 
Richfield Springs, where he began work in Chase's Mills. He entered 
the service May 27th, 1918, and reported to Camp Wadsworth, South 
Carolina, for training. While here, he was appointed Corporal and 
attached to Company A, 60th Pioneer Infantry. He was dispatched for 
duty overseas and had been en route five days when the armistice was 
signed, November 11th, 1918. His ship was called back and he was 
returned to Camp Dix, New Jersey, with the 47th Company, 12th Bat- 
talion, 153rd Depot Brigade, where he was honorably discharged De- 
cember 29th, 1918. He immediately returned to Richfield Springs and 
is at work with the state road forces. 

Through an error in the interpretation of his registration his name 
has been carried on the records as Bons, although his family name is 
Bachans, and he is a brother of Antony Bachans, also in the service. 



28 



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29 



GEORGE BAISTER 



The son of John Baister and Mary Baister, was born in the town of 
Richfield, Otsego County, N. Y., on April 22nd, 1892. He received his 
education in the district schools of the town of Richfield, N. Y., and 
was engaged in farming when he entered the service on May 27th, 1918, 
being later assigned to Co. M, 2nd Pioneer Infantry, training at Camp 
Wadsworth, at Spartanburg, S. C. 

He was sent overseas with the A. E. F. and is at this writing. May 
25th, with the Army of Occupation in Germany. 



30 




31 



HOWARD LOOMIS BEADLE 



The son of Charles W. Beadle and Carrie Beadle, was born at Richfield, 
Otsego County, New York, on September 7th, 1894. He finished his 3rd 
year in the Richfield Springs High School, and later graduated from the 
Utica Business College, entering the employ of the National Cash 
Register Co. as road salesman. , He is the husband of Rita Ostrander 
Beadle. 

At the time he entered the service, on April 12th, 1918, he was suc- 
cessfully conducting a general store, and sold out his business to take 
up his new duties. 

He was first assigned to Supply Company, 304th Infantry, 76th Divi- 
sion. On November 15th, 1918, was transferred to 1st Replacement 
Depot, as a permanent personnel. He received his training at Camp 
Devens, Ayer, Mass., from April 12th to July 7th, 1918. 

His overseas service extended from July 8th, 1918, to March 25th, 
1919. While a member of the A. E. F. he was located at Chateauneuf- 
sur-Cher with the 304th Infantry, which was a Training Unit, where men 
from the States received their final training preliminary to their being 
sent up as replacements. 



On August 1st, 1918, he was made a Corporal. 



32 




33 



RALPH GROVER BENDER 



The son of Charles Bender and Ida Bender, was born at Utica, Oneida 
County, New York, on February 1st, 1889, and is the husband of Clara 
Isabel Peplinski. He was educated in the Utica High School. 

At the time of his call to the service, on September 8th, 1917, he 
was a contracting painter. 

He was assigned to the infantry, and sent to Camp Dix. Was later 
made a Cook in the 310th Supply Company. 

Has seen overseas service, during which he was slightly gassed and 
at one time was thrown fifteen feet by the explosion of a shell. 

Was engaged in the severest of the battles in the Argonne Forest. 



34 




35 



MARY VERONICA BOLTON 



The daughter of John Bolton and Bridget Lannen Bolton, was born at 
Richfield Springs, Otsego County, New York, on March 2nd, 1879, and 
educated preliminarily in the Richfield Springs High School, graduating 
in 1901. Later she entered Syracuse University and also took a course 
at Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y., well qualifying her for the important 
duties she later assumed. 

Before her enlistment in the Red Cross Service, she served as 
Librarian at Far Rockaway, N. Y.; Accountant at the Board of Educa- 
tion Building, New York City; Social Worker in Oneida County and 
New York City. Her success was immediate in each of these positions 
and her record of performance an enviable one. 

She took up her duties as a professional Red Cross Worker on 
October 25th, 1917. She sailed during the latter part of that year for 
France. The Red Cross had singled her out to assist in its work of 
rehabilitating the civilian population of France and she accepted the call 
willingly and gladly. She was a trained social worker with much expe- 
rience gained as county chairman for dependent children and later 
Institutional Inspector for the Department of Public Charities in New 
York City. 

The first task she assumed was to visit the French children's institu- 
tions and relieve their suffering. The tragic condition of these children, 
including the many himdreds of child refugees, demanded immediate 
attention. Under these conditions. Miss Bolton, whom the children 
called "The Red Cross Lady," found a warm welcome, carrying the gifts 
and the help for which the American Red Cross is blessed in every 
corner of France. 

She has been long stationed in Marseilles as the Directrice de la 
Section d'Aide Sociale, where she has visited all the institutions that need 
help and has organized all the social work in that great haven of the 
refugee. This capable young American woman has written a splendid 
page in the history of the Great War. 



36 




37 



JAMES EDWARD BOTSFORD 



The son of T. Edward Botsford and Mary Botsford, was born at Cherry 
Valley, Otsego County, New York, on July 3rd, 1896. His education 
was obtained in the public schools of Cherry Valley and Springfield 
Center. 

Following the example of his forebears, he enlisted in the service 
of his country on April 16th, 1917, being assigned to the 34th Machine 
Gun Co., U. S. Regulars. Later was transferred to the 64th Machine 
Gun Co., then to the 21st Machine Gun Battalion Regulars, with which 
he acted as Runner or Dispatch Carrier in France. 

He was trained at Fort Slocum and sent to Galveston. He then went 
to Fort Bliss and was stationed along the Mexican border, assisting in 
quieting several raids made by Villa on the ranches in the Big Bend 
of the Rio Grande. 

Went overseas in July of 1918, arriving in Liverpool on July 20th, 
and went directly to France. Spent one month in hard training and 
entered the lines in September with his regiment. Fought in several 
battles in Alsace-Lorraine; in the capture of Hill 210, November 1st, 
1918, and also in the Argonne Forest. 

He was on the firing line when the last gun was fired on November 
11th, 1918, at 11:00 A. M., and was then forced to retire under orders to 
go to hospital. Received no wovmds during the war, except suffering 
from a bursted ear drum, caused by the concussion of high explosives. 

He left the service as a 1st Class Private on April 24th, 1919, being 
discharged from Camp Upton. 



38 




39 



THOMAS HERMAN BOYLSTON 



The son of Herman S. Boylston and Anna A. McBride Lynch, was born 
in New York City on January 10th, 1896. He was educated in the Rich- 
field Springs High School and the High School of Commerce, New 
York City, also taking a course in the Utica School of Commerce, Utica, 
N. Y. 

At.the time of his enlistment, on March 16th, 1918, he was employed 
by the S. N. Y. R. R. Company. 

He was assigned to Co. 138, Camp St. Helena, Norfolk, Va., U. S. 
Naval Training Station. 

On April 22nd, 1918, reported aboard the U. S. S. C-192 for active 
duty, at Coast Patrol, defense, and Convoy Duty. 

On Jcmuary 19th, 1919, transferred to Hospital Corps Training School 
at Hampton Roads Naval Operative Base, Va., for training Pharmacy, 
and 1st Aid Independent Duty. 

On February 20th, 1919, placed on inactive status of the 3rd Naval 
District. 



40 




41 



ALMOND CRANDALL BROCKWAY 



The son of George T. Brockway and Maud Cutler Brockway, was 
born at Richfield, Otsego County, New York, on October 15th, 1896. 

He graduated from the Richfield Springs High School in 1914, and 
received his degree of B. S. from Union College, Schenectady, N. Y., 
in June of 1918. 

He enlisted at Albany, N. Y., on May 31st, 1918, in the United States 
Marine Corps, being second man from his township who entered this 
branch of the service. He was inducted into the Marines soon after 
June 21st, 1918, at which time he received notice to appear at Training 
Camp. 

He reported at Paris Island, S. C, the permanent Training Camp 
for the U. S. M. C, and was assigned to the 199th Co., with which he 
was identified for eight weeks; he then entered the Non-Commissioned 
Officers' School, assigned to Co. S, and remained there eleven weeks, 
until discharged from the 416th Co. on March 15th, 1919. 

He was rated as a Corporal on September 26th, 1918. 



42 




43 



KATHERINE FRINK BROCKWAY 



The daughter of Luman Brockway and Marian Frink Brockway, was 
born at Richfield Springs, Otsego County, New York, on August 7th, 
1896, and attended the Richfield Springs public school until 1914, when 
she entered the Training School for Nurses at Grouse Irving Hospital, 
Syracuse, N. Y., graduating therefrom in June of 1917. She did private 
nursing from the time of her graduation to October of 1918. 

She enlisted in the American Red Cross on October 1st, 1918, but 
after entering camp was transferred to the Army Nurses' Corps, and 
was sent to Camp McPherson, Ga., General Hospital No. 6. This insti- 
tution accommodated 2000 patients, made up principally of overseas men 
who were sent there from debarkation hospitals. 

In April, 1919, she was transferred to General Hospital No. 5, at 
Fort Ontario, N. Y., where she is at this writing. 



44 




45 



WALTER CHARLES BROOKS 



The son of Benjamin Brooks and Elizabeth Brooks, was born at Cherry 
Valley, Otsego County, New York, on November 22nd, 1889. He 
attended the Richfield Springs High School and later removed to White 
Plains, N. Y., where he was employed as a buyer for the Tri-State Garage 
when he enlisted in the service on July 1st, 1918. 

He was sent to a training school in New York City, as an automobile 
mechanic, and later transferred to Camp Raritan, Metuchen, N. J., and 
promoted to Corporal, having charge of the gasoline and oil supply. 

He was listed for overseas duty, but did not get away on account 
of the influenza epidemic. 

At this writing. May 15th, 1919, he is still in the service and is rated 
as a 1st Class Automobile Mechanic, at Camp Raritan, N. J. 



46 



WILLIAM ANDREW BROOKS 



The son of Benjamin Brooks and Elizabeth Brooks, was born at Rich- 
field Springs, Otsego County, New York, on June 4th, 1896. He 
attended the Richfield Springs High School and later the White Plains 
High School, to which place his family had moved. He is the husband 
of Edith Friedel Brooks. 

At the time he was called to the service, May 23, 1918, he was 
serving as an accountant for the New York Central R. R. Company. 

He was sent to Camp Hancock, and was later an Instructor in the 
Machine Gun School, being made a Sergeant. 

On March 23rd, 1919, he was sent to the Officers' Training Camp at 
Plattsburg, N. Y., and was discharged from there on April 14th, 1919, 
returning to his former position with the New York Central R. R. 
Company. 



48 




49 



ARTHUR ROSCOE BROWN 



The son of Dewitt Brown and Ella Elliot Conway, was born at Syracuse, 
Onondaga County, New York, on June 20th, 1889, and is the husband 
of Kittie Angermier Brown. 

He entered the service in July, 1918, and was sent to the Buffald 
Technical School, where he remained eight weeks and was later rejected 
on account of physical disability, returning to his position as foreman 
in a knitting company at Whitesboro, N. Y. 



50 



GLENN A. BROWN 



The son of Wesley E. Brown and Mary L. Brown, was born on a farm 
north of the village of Jordanville, Herkimer County, New York, on 
March 12th, 1894. He attended the public school at Richfield Springs 
and finished three years in the High School there. He then took up the 
management of the home farm on R. D. No. 1, out of the Mohawk post- 
office, and after three years of successful work there, he was called to 
the service of his country, on September 21st, 1917. His first assignment 
was with Headquarters Co., 301st Machine Gun Battalion. In August of 
1918 he was transferred to the Motor Transport Service. On September 
20th he was attached to the 79th Division Headquarters as a Dispatch 
Rider, and was sent to Camp Devens, Mass., for training. He was 
located in this camp for seven months, where he was trained as a Bat- 
talion Agent and Signal Man. 

In France he was with the Service of Supply, and in this capacity 
he was largely employed as a driver of a supply truck from the supply 
station to the lines. As a dispatch rider he carried messages from 
division headquarters to the front. This perilous work was on the 
Argonne front at the beginning of the big drive. 

On October 9th, 1918, at about nine o'clock at night he was wounded 
in the right leg when a shell exploded in the road over which he was 
returning on a motorcycle after delivering a message to the front. 



52 




53 



LLOYD WESLEY BROWN 



The son of Wesley E. Brown and Mary L. Brown, was born at Mohawk, 
Herkimer County, New York, on January 25th, 1892, and obtained his 
later education at the Richfield Springs High School. 

At the time of his entering the service he was employed as an 
automobile machinist. He enlisted in the Naval Avia.tion and was 
assigned to Co. 38, at Pensacola, Florida; transferred to Hampton 
Roads, Co. 7, and later to the Great Lakes Naval Station, Co. X. 

He went through the training for Machinist's Mate at Hampton 
Roads and passed the examination, and has been rated as a 1st Class 
Machinist. 

After training he was placed at the Great Lakes Station as an 
Instructor in the Motor School there. 



54 



RAYMOND GEORGE BROWN 



The son of Wesley E. and Mary Brown, was born at Mohawk, N. Y., 
March 5th, 1900. He received his early school training at Richfield 
Springs, after which he took up the duties of farm foreman. He en- 
listed in the Navy April 16, 1917, and was sent to the U. S. Naval Train- 
ing Station at Newport, R. I., where he was under training for five 
weeks. He was then transferred to the U. S. S. Wyoming, the Ports- 
mouth Hospital, then back to the U. S. S. Wyoming, and then to the 
U. S. S. Pennsylvania. He was on a convoy to the U. S. S. George 
Washington on President Wilson's first trip to France, leaving New 
York December 5th, 1918, and returning December 26, 1918. 

During his service he suffered from empyema, which made an oper- 
ation necessary, and was four months in the hospital. 



56 



WILLIAM M'DONALD CARNEY 



The son of William J. Carney and Sarah McDonald Carney, was bom 
at Richfield Springs, Otsego County, New York, on December 29th, 
1903, and was a pupil at the Richfield Springs High School. 

He enlisted on January 2nd, 1917, and without question is the 
yoimgest volunteer from his native village. He entered the Naval 
Training Station at Newport, R. I., as an apprentice seaman, and later 
was sent to the Brooklyn Navy Yard. At the time of his discharge 
he ranked as a petty officer. 

During the war he made two trips to France on the U. S. S. Sierra. 
He has left the service and is now employed with the Durston Gear 
Company at Syracuse, N. Y. 



58 




59 



ALBERT HORTON GARY 



The son of Ezra Gary and Stella Horton Gary, was born at Richfield 
Springs, Otsego Gounty, New York, on May 18th, 1892. He attended 
the Richfield Springs school and later took a business course in Utica, 
N. Y. Was employed as a scenery painter. 

He was called to the service from Utica and left on May 30th, 1918, 
for training at Gamp Wadsworth. He was sent overseas in July of 
1918 and landed in France on August 1st. 

He has been made a Gorporal, assigned to the 301st Engineers, 
A. E. F., and at this writing. May 20th, 1919, is in a vocational school, 
Army of Occupation, Germany. 



60 




61 



RICHARD EDGAR GARY 



The son of John D. Gary and Martha G. White Gary, was born at 
Warren, Herkimer Gounty, New York, on August 20th, 1892, and ob- 
tained his preliminary education in the Richfield Springs High School. 
He attended the Stone School, Gornwall-on-Hudson, 1912-13; Gornell 
University, Agricultural Gollege, 1914-17, enlisting in the U. S. Naval 
Reserve Force on April 21st, 1917, while a student at Gornell. 

While attached to the U. S. N. R. F., he was officer of the guard, 
Gloyne Field Barracks, S. G. 320, S. G. 87, U. S. R. Training Regiment, 
U. S. M. F. (Newport, R. I.), and afterwards ordered to the U. S. S. 
Ganonicus, then lying at 56th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

His ship, the Ganonicus, was of the U. S. Mine Force, Squadron 
One, Atlantic Fleet, and based at Inverness and Invergordon, Scotland, 
from May, 1918, to December, 1918. It mined the North Sea, Orkneys 
to Norway. This famous craft has the record of carrying more mines 
on one excursion than any other planter in the world's service, and that 
in fifteen excursions theirs was the glory to lay more than any other 
in the hazardous service, this being accomplished without accident in 
handling or planting the mines. 

He was commissioned an Ensign in the U. S. N. R. F. on January 
19th, 1918. It is his intention to finish his course at Gornell, entering in 
the fall of 1919. 



62 




63 



JAMES CLAIRE COLWELL 



The son of Clarence Colwell and Angle Colwell, was born at Richfield, 
Otsego County, New York, on May 4th, 1895. He is a graduate of the 
Albany College of Pharmacy, and received his preliminary education 
at the Richfield Springs High School. 

He was engaged as a pharmacist at the time of his call to the 
service, on May 1st, 1918. 

He entered a machine gun company and was sent to Camp Hancock, 
Georgia. Here he was promoted to 1st Sergeant, on June 18th, 1918, 
and later sent to Camp Gordon, Georgia, where he was discharged from 
the service, after a period of ten months from the time of his entrance. 



64 




65 



ALFRED VAN RENSSELAER GRAIN 



The son of Dr. Alfred R. Grain and Harriet S. Manley Grain, was born 
at Richfield Springs, Otsego Gounty, New York, on August 13th, 1899. 
He secured his preliminary education at the Richfield Springs and 
Albany High Schools and later attended the National Military Academy 
at Gomwall-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

He enlisted in the United States Navy on April 24th, 1918. Had 
three months' training at the U. S. Naval Radio School at Newport, 
R. I., and was later assigned to the U. S. S. Evans, doing convoy duty 
between Boston and Liverpool, England. He made three trips across 
the Atlantic. 

Was discharged from the service during February of 1919. 



66 




67 



RUFUS BAKER GRAIN 



The son of Dr. Alfred R, Grain and Harriet S. Manley Grain, was born 
at Richfield Springs, Otsego Gounty, New York, on April 12th, 1888. 
His preliminary education was secured in the public schools of Richfield 
Springs and New York Gity, graduating from the Richfield Springs 
High School in the class of 1907, which he followed with a postgraduate 
course in that institution. 

He obtained his degree as Doctor of Medicine at the Albany Medical 
GoUege, Union University, in 1913, serving as an interne in the Albany 
Hospital during the year 1913-14. He afterwards was an assistant in- 
structor in medicine in the Albany Medical Gollege, 1913-1916, and prac- 
ticed his profession at Gornwall, N. Y., 1916-1917. 

He was called to the service on August 9th, 1917, attached to the 
Medical Gorps, U. S. A., and immediately assigned for foreign service 
with the British Expeditionary Force, France. 

Left for overseas August 29th, 1917, and served with the British 
forces until March 21st, 1919. Transferred to the American Expedi- 
tionary Force on March 25th, 1919. 

He was attached to Holborn Military Hospital, Mitcham, Surrey, 
England, for hospital course of seven weeks. Arrived at Le Havre, 
France, October 29th, 1917. Assigned to Home Gounties FieW Ambu- 
lance, 58th Territorial Division (in Ypres salient). On May 10th, 
1918, transferred to the 3rd Batt., London Regt., Royal Fusiliers, as 
Battalion Medical Officer. 

Promoted to Gaptain on November 14th, 1918. Was gas poisoned 
on April 18th, 1918. 

His experiences on the battle front include the operations about 
Ypres, November, 1917; battle of St. Quentin, March 21st, 1918; defense 
of Amiens, April, 1918; Somme advance, August and September, 1918; 
Lens, October, 1918. 

Gaptain Grain arrived in New York on April 25th, 1919, and was 
discharged from the service on April 29th, 1919. 

On June 11, 1919, notice was sent to Gaptain Grain from Adjutant- 
General W. E. Gole of the forwarding to him of a military cross, awarded 
by the British government. 



68 




69 



LE ROY CAVERLY CRIM 



The son of Jerome Perry Crim and Pamela Crim, was bom at Richfield 
Springs, Otsego County, New York, on August 2nd, 1887. His early 
school training was obtained at the Richfield Springs High School. He 
is a graduate of the Bliss School of Electrical Engineering, Washington, 
D. C, and holds a diploma from the International School of Corre- 
spondence qualifying him in the same line of technical training. After 
concluding his education he was engaged in electrical construction, 
engineering, and power plant operation. At the time of his enlistment, 
January 30th, 1918, had attained a prominent place in his chosen field. 

Enlisted specialist, graduate of Coast Artillery School, Fort Monroe, 
Virginia, and assigned to Headquarters, 50th Co., C. A. C., he was sent 
to Camp Eustis, Virginia, where he had a limited military training, but 
intensive electro-mechanical instruction. 

He remained in France four months, embarking and disembarking 
through Brest, and was attending school at Angers, receiving final 
instruction, when the armistice was signed, November 11th, 1918. 

Received a warrant rating from Washington as Electrician — Ser- 
geant 1st Class, dated July 16th, 1918. He is now engaged with the 
Southern New York Power Company at Hartwick, New York. 



70 




71 



FRANCIS JOHN CRIST 



The son of Frank and Sarah M. Crist, was bom in Cullen, Herkimer 
County, New York, on August 15th, 1897, and received his education in 
the Richfield Springs High School. He assumed various clerical posi- 
tions, but during the war held a responsible position with the Goodyear 
Rubber Company at Akron, Ohio. He entered the service of his country 
August 1st, 1918, reporting for duty to Camp Wadsworth, South Caro- 
lina, where he was attached to the 5th Pioneer Infantry and in training 
for about six weeks. He was then sent overseas, being attached to the 
4th Pioneer Infantry, and landed at Brest. Here he received his final 
training and was in Paris on his way to the front lines when the armis- 
tice was signed, November 11th, 1918. 

At this writing Private Crist is doing military police duty for the 
United States at Brest and expects to be engaged in this service for at 
least six months longer before he is sent back to the United States. 



72 




73 



PULASKI B. CULBERT, JUNIOR 



The son of Pulaski Culbert and Mary Culbert, was bom at Cincinnati, 
Ohio, on June 26th, 1898. He was educated at the Richfield Springs 
High School. 

He had been employed by the D., L. & W. and S. N. Y. R. R. Com- 
pany previous to his enlistment in June, 1918. 

He enlisted in the U. S. Marine Corps, was assigned to the 115th 
Co., 3rd Regiment, and first sent to the General Training Station at 
Paris Island, S. C, where in September, 1918, he earned a marksmanship 
badge. 

From Paris Island he was sent to San Domingo, West Indies, where 
he is stationed at this writing. May 20th, 1919. 



74 




75 



JOHN FRANCIS CURLEY 



The son of Martin Curley and Anna Curley, was born at West 
Exeter, Otsego County, New York, on May 12th, 1895. He attended the 
West Winfield High School and is a graduate of the Utica Business 
Institute. 

He was engaged in clerical work when the call came to man the 
farms and he was employed on the home farm when he was called to 
the greater service, on October 5th, 1917. 

He reported at Camp Devens, Mass., and was assigned to Co. K, 
303rd Infantry. Later transferred to the office of a supply company. 

After training for ten months he was sent overseas in July of 1918. 
First camp was Winchester, England; then to Le Havre, France, and 
finally to Meillant, where the company was engaged in training and 
equipping men for the front when the armistice was signed. 

Then he was moved nearer the front and to a town called Is-em-Tille, 
and here assigned to a Prisoner of War Escort Company, No. 223, being 
engaged in office work and supply purchasing. 

At this writing, May 15th, he is still engaged in the latter position, 
with no knowledge as to the time of his ultimate release from the 
service. 



76 




77 



PALMER GEORGE CUTTS 



The son of Edward B. Cutts and Clara Cowles Cutts, was born at East 
Winfield, Herkimer County, New York, on May 5th, 1894, and attended 
the public school of that neighborhood. 

He had worked at the trade of carpenter, when he entered the service 
on April 4th, 1918, reporting at Camp Dix for military training. He 
was later sent overseas and landed at Folkestone, England, about the 
middle of May, 1918. 

He was a member of Co. M, 309th Infantry, 78th Division. After 
his arrival in England he was moved into France and then put in the 
front line trenches in Italy. 

He was kept in the fighting lines, being in the St. Mihiel sector 
until October 14th, 1918, when he was gassed and wounded, and con- 
fined to the hospital until February, 1919. He was then assigned to 
police and guard duty at Genay, France. 

He shipped home from Bordeaux and landed in New York on May 
30th, 1919, receiving his discharge shortly after his arrival. 



78 




79 



PATRICK JOSEPH DALY 



The son of Edward Daly and Bridget Daly, was born in Exeter, Otsego 
County, New York, on April 21st, 1888. He attended school at Exeter 
and Richfield Springs, and for one year was in the Law School, New 
York University. Later he received an appointment to the New York 
City police force, and was with this municipal department for about 
seven years, severing his connection with it to enter the service, enlisting 
in September of 1917. 

Was at Camp Upton for training, sailing for overseas service the 
latter part of January, 1918. At this writing. May 20th, he is with the 
Army of Occupation overseas. 



80 



JOHN ALBERT DERTHICK, JUNIOR 



The son of John Albert Derthick and Isabel Hadley Derthick, was 
born at Brooklyn, New York, on September 11th, 1897. He graduated 
from PubUc School No. 152, Brooklyn, and Erasmus High School. After 
finishing his education he entered the Bankers' Trust Company of New 
York, where he held an important position as teller when he enlisted in 
April of 1917, with Troop E, 1st New York Cavalry. 

He was sent to the Mexican border for police and guard duty with 
his troop, and in the fall of 1917 was sent to Spartanburg, S. C, and 
became identified with Co. L, 106th Machine Gim Battalion. 

He sailed overseas in May of 1918, landing at Brest, and was sent 
to the front with the British forces under General Haig. 

He was made a Corporal in July of 1918 for an especial act of 
bravery and saving the life of his army chum and intimate personal 
friend. 

He was in continuous fighting with the 27th Division to October, 
1918, until he was taken from the front line trenches on October 17th, 
1918, suffering from pneumonia. He died in the Hospital at Rouen on 
October 27th, 1918. 



82 

















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83 



JOHN DOMBROWSKI 



Was born in Lithuania, Russia, in 1890, where he received his early 
education. He came to the United States in 1912 and worked at mill- 
work and farming in and about Richfield Springs. He entered the serv- 
ice in October, 1917, and was immediately sent to Camp Devens, Mass. 
After preliminary training at Devens he was sent to Camp Gordon, 
Atlanta, Ga., and attached to the 325th Field Hospital. Later he was 
transferred to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, from which Camp he was 
honorably discharged from the service. 



84 




85 



HERBERT ANDREW DYE 



The son of Andrew Dye and Lily Dye, was born at Burlington Flats, 
Otsego County, New York, on March 5th, 1890. He attended school at 
Burlington and was engaged in farming when he entered the service on 
February 27th, 1918. 

He was sent to Camp Upton for training until April 26th, 1918, 
when he went overseas, arriving at Brest, France, on May 4th, 1918, a 
member of Co. E, 302nd Ammunition Train of the 77th Division. Was 
sent to Bordeaux on May 11th, where he remained in training until July 
14th. He then moved up to the Baccarat sector in France, being there 
from July 21st to August 4th; then in the Vesle sector, from August 
nth to the 18th; then in the Oise-Aisne offensive, from August 18th to 
September 16th; then in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, from September 
28th to November 11th. In all these engagements he suffered no dis- 
ability of any sort. 

After the armistice was signed the 77th Division was moved back 
to Chaumont, France, for drilling and training for two months.. On 
February 7th, 1919, the Division was moved to La Marne, where it 
remained imtil April 16th, 1919. Then transferred to Brest, arriving 
there April 22nd. 

On April 26th, 1919, sailed from Brest on the U. S. S. President 
Grant, arriving in New York City on May 6th. Was sent first to Camp 
Mills, then Camp Upton, where he was discharged from the service on 
May 19th, returning to Richfield Springs, his father's home, and intending 
to take up his former occupation of farming. 



86 




87 



ELMER JAMES ELLSWORTH 



The son of Jesse J. Ellsworth and Anna M. Ellsworth, was born at 
Schuyler Lake, Otsego County, New York, on July 2nd, 1898. He was 
educated in the High Schools of Schuyler Lake and Cooperstown. 

He enlisted on April 8th, 1917, in Co. G, N. Y. N. G.; transferred to 
Co. G, 107th U. S. Infantry, 27th Division, October 10th, 1917, and trained 
in the following camps: Van Cortlandt Park, New York, six weeks; 
Camp Wadsworth, S. C, for seven months, in all modern methods of 
warfare, making it one of the best trained combat divisions sent overseas. 

He sailed from Newport News on May 10th, 1918, and served in 
France and Belgium in the following engagements and operations: East 
Poperinghe Line, July 9th to August 20th, 1918; Dickebush sector, Bel- 
gium, August 21st to the 30th, 1918; Hindenburg Line (vicinity of Bony), 
September 27th to the 30th, 1918. 

He was wounded in action with the enemy in the attack on the 
Hindenburg Line, south of Vendhuile, France, September 28th-October 
2nd, 1918, receiving a machine gun bullet in the left shoulder, and was 
operated on in the Hospital at Rouen, France, and was also confined 
later in the hospital at Bristol, England. He was returned to his com- 
pany on December 10th, 1918. 

He arrived in the United States on March 6th, 1919, via the U. S. S. 
Leviathan, and went to Camp Merritt, N. J., parading with the famous 
27th Division in New York City on March 25th, 1919. He was dis- 
charged from Camp Upton on April 2nd, 1919. 



ALBERT LESLIE EVANS 



The son of J. D. Evans and Maria Walrath Evans, was born at Ham- 
mond, New York, on January 10th, 1879. He married Leah Craig, who 
with their three young children is living in Watertown, N. Y., during the 
absence of Lieutenant Evans. 

He attended as a young man, the Potsdam Normal Training School 
and graduated from the Albany Business College. He is a graduate of 
Hamilton College, class of 1904, where he won the Pruyn medal for 
oratory. He is also a graduate of the Auburn Theological Seminary, 
class of 1908, and there won a scholarship which enabled him to study 
social work in England for one summer. 

After this he took up the work at the John Hall Memorial Chapel, 
with its Settlement work, at 342 East 63rd St., New York, under care of 
the Fifth Avenue Church. He served there for seven years and then 
accepted the call to the First Presbyterian Church at Richfield Springs, 
N. Y. 

Although engaged in his life's work, the ministry, he felt the dire 
need of men to serve their country as well as their God, and volunteered 
his services. He was at Camp Meade from February, 1918, to April 7th, 
1918, and was first assigned to Headquarters Army Artillery. 

On arriving in France he was placed with the Headquarters Gen- 
eral Intermediate Supply Depot and later made Senior Post Chaplain, 
bearing the rank of First Lieutenant. 

Chaplain Evans is still located at the largest Supply Depot in France 
and has the supervision of ten other Chaplains, He has recently been 
made School Officer of the post, in addition to his duties as Post Chap- 
lain. 



90 




91 



HARRY SYLVESTER FEDERAL 



The son of J. M. Federal and A. J. Federal, was born in New York City 
on the 31st day of December, 1897. He obtained his education at the 
Sharon Springs High School. Was variously employed previous to his 
enlistment, working at one time as a machinist, and at the time of his 
enlistment, April 18th, 1918, was a conductor on a street car line. 

He was sent to Fort Standish and assigned to the 29th Co. of the 
Coast Artillery Corps. Also trained at Fort Andrew and from there 
was transferred to Camp Eustis, Va., to the 48th Artillery. He was 
then sent to Camp Stuart preparatory to going overseas. Here he was 
taken ill and after his recovery was sent to Camp Hill in a company of 
casuals, finally being assigned to the 45th C. A. C. From Camp Stuart 
he sailed as a member of the A. E. F. and landed at St. Nazaire, France, 
From the rest camp he was sent to southern France and was several 
months at St. Denis, a country place, and was later stationed at Lebourne, 
sailing for home from Bordeaux. 

He was honorably discharged from the service at Camp Dix„ N. J., 
February 12th, 1919, and returned to his place of enlistment. South Bos- 
ton, where the railroad corporation with which he was employed at the 
time of his enlistment put him back in his former position. 



92 




93 



LUTHER FREDERICK FERGUSON 



The son of James Ferguson and Adelia Ferguson, was born at Lynch- 
burg, Virginia, on June 9th, 1886. He attended school at Charleston, 
West Virginia. 

He followed the carpenter's trade and was a machine operator in 
the coal mines. He came north to New York City in 1910 and to Rich- 
field Springs in 1912, following the business of contractor and carpenter. 

He entered the service on May 27th, 1918. Reported to Camp 
Wadsworth, S. C, and was immediately assigned to the 52nd Pioneer 
Infantry, remaining in camp there for six weeks. Was then transferred 
to Camp Upton, Long Island, and shipped overseas on August 2nd, 
1918, landing in Brest on August Uth. 

In France he was held at Napoleon's Old Barracks, awaiting trans- 
portation for the front, for one week. He then entered a Gas School 
and went to the front on August 20th. 

From September 6th he was in range of shell fire continuously until 
November 11th, when the Armistice was signed. 

The principal engagements he participated in were Meuse, Argonne 
and Verdun. He was slightly gassed and lost his speech for two weeks, 
but continued fighting actively during that period. 

Returned from Brest on the U. S. S. "K. I. Luckenback" and was 
discharged from Camp Dix on April 8th, 1918, returning to Richfield 
Springs. 



94 




95 



FRANCIS LAUGHLIN FINN 



The son of Laughlin Finn and Mary L. Finn, was born at Richfield 
Springs, Otsego County, New York, on January 25th, 1891, and attended 
the Richfield Springs public school. 

About 1910 he went to New York City and later received an appoint- 
ment in the postal service. 

He entered the army in July of 1918, and was sent to Fort Ontario, 
Oswego, N. Y., for ten weeks training. Transferred to Camp H. G. 
Wright, Fisher's Island, N. Y., and continued training until December 
18th, 1918, when he was discharged from the service. 

At Camp Wright he was appointed a Corporal, 4th Co., Coast Artil- 
lery Corps. After his discharge he was again made a postal employee. 



96 



WILLIAM CURTIS FRETTS 



The son of Mead W. Fretts and Lula B. Zoller Fretts, was born at 
South Columbia, Herkimer County, New York, on April 29th, 1899, and 
received his education in the local school. 

He was engaged in farming when he enlisted on July 2nd, 1917. Was 
a member of Co. M, 1st New York Infantry. Discharged from the Na- 
tional Guard and mustered into the Federal Army, August 5th, 1917; 
transferred on August 1st, to Co. F, 102nd U. S. Engineers. Trained at 
Camps Weller, Wadsworth, Humphrey and Stuart. 

He was a member of the famous 27th Division, and had nine months 
service overseas, landing at St. Nazaire. Hiked to the Belgium front; 
in Belgium to Arras, to St. Emily. 

Was in the following engagements: Battles, Hindenburg Line, Sep- 
tember 29th and 30th, 1918; Bony, September 30th; Le Selle River, St. 
Souplet, October 17th; Jonc-de-Mer Ridge, October 18th; Vierstraat 
Ridge, August 31st to September 2nd, 1918; the Knoll— Geulement Farm, 
September 27th, 1918; St. Maurice River, October 12th to 30th, 1918. 
Was also in minor engagements on the Poperinghe Line and in the 
Dickebush Sector, in July and August, 1918. 

He was gassed at the Battle of St. Souplet on November 2nd, 1918, 
and was in the Hospital at Amiens for six weeks. 

Was discharged from Camp Upton on April 3rd, 1919. 



98 




99 



DARWIN GARLOCK 



The son of Fred Garlock and Nettie Flint Garlock, was born at Lone 
Rock, Wisconsin, on December 29th, 1890. He received his school train- 
ing in the Richfield Springs public school. 

He had been following the trade of carpenter at the time of his call 
to the service, on June 24th, 1918. He entered the infantry as a private 
in Co. 10, 152nd Depot Brigade, at Camp Upton, Long Island, New York. 
Transferred to the 345th Supply Co., 87th Division, and was appointed 
Wagoner on August 11th, 1918, at Camp Dix. 

At Camp Dix he was engaged in driving a four line mule team, fitting 
him for a very necessary and hazardous arm of the service overseas. 

He sailed for France on August 24th, 1918, and remained in the 
A. E. F. until January 5th, 1919. 

While overseas he served as a wagoner in the Supply Train of the 
345th Infantry at several different bases of supply, both of food and 
ammunition. 



100 




101 



MARSHALL P. GETCHEL 



The son of Frank B. Getchel and Jennie Getchel. was bom at Richfield 
Springs, Otsego County, New York, on January 9th, 1890, and educated 
in the public schools of his native village. 

Previous to his entrance into the service, March 29th, 1918, he had 
been engaged in the observation of the assembling and general manu- 
facturing of typewriters and adding machines, with a view to fitting 
himself for an efficiency and production engineer. 

He was assigned to the 19th Co., 5th Battalion, 159th Depot Brigade, 
Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. Served as line man for about two months 
and taken into the office as Company Clerk, serving as such for about six 
months. Transferred to 1st Training Battalion, 159th Depot Brigade, 
as Sergeant. 

Promoted to Sergeant-Major in 1st Battalion, serving about four 
months. Honorably discharged from 1st Batttalion, 159th Depot Bri- 
gade, April 2nd, 1919, to accept appointment as Army Field Clerk, and 
assigned as such to the 159th Depot Brigade on April 3rd, 1919. 



102 




103 



EARL GOULD 



The son of Charles Gould and Mary Gould, was born at Mount Upton, 
Chenango County, New York, on September 8th, 1892, and was educated 
in the district school of his neighborhood. 

He was engaged in farming when called to the service, on September 
22nd, 1917, and was first assigned to Co. A, 303rd Infantry, then to 301st 
Machine Gun Battalion, H. Q., then Co. C, then 302nd Machine Gun 
Battalion. 

Sent overseas with Co. B, 12th Machine Gun Battalion, from Boston 
on July 8th, 1918, and landed in London on July 22nd. Previous to his 
sailing he had been in training at Ayer, Mass., for a machine gunner. 

For a time he was stationed at Montreshed, France, near St. Nazaire. 

He was at Verdvm, Argonne Forest and went over the top with his 
company three times, suffering no injury. 



104 




105 



WILLIAM DELOS GRIFFIN 



The son of Leon Griffin and Lulu Wolcott Griffin, was bom at Richfield 
Springs, Otsego County, New York, on June 17th, 1896. He attended 
school at Richfield Springs and was employed at the Utica Knitting 
Company mills when he enlisted and was later sent to Camp Dix, April 
4th, 1918. 

He shipped overseas on May 20th, 1918, from Hoboken to Halifax, 
landing at Southampton on June 8th. Then was sent to Folkestone on 
the English coast and on June 13th crossed the Channel for France. 
After being in a rest camp for four days, moved south just back of the 
Arras front, being at Marquay for about a month, then to Vitry. On 
September 10th he went into the lines at the St. Mihiel front. Was 
here in the trenches for twenty-one days. 

From St. Mihiel he started with his Co. H, 309th Infantry, for the 
Argonne woods, going into the lines on the 15th of October and over 
the top on the following day. 

On the morning of the 18th of October, 1918, he went over the top 
again and was woimded in the arm and back. He was in the hospital 
for over a month. At this writing, May 20th, 1919, he was expected to 
go to a seaport town very soon, and from there to ship for home. 



106 




107 



HERBERT ROSS HADCOCK 



The son of James A. Hadcock and Martha Marilla Hadcock, was born 
at Mount Elgin, Ontario, Canada, on July 30th, 1877, and is the husband 
of Grace L. Wikoff Hadcock. His preliminary education was obtained 
in the public schools of Mount Elgin and Ingersoll. In 1901 he gradu- 
ated from the Y. M. C. A. College, located at Springfield, Mass. 

He served as Y. M. C. A. secretary at Warren, Penn., and later 
at Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. 

He enlisted in the 90th Canadian Regiment in the autumn of 1914, 
and was called to military Y. M, C. A. work in April, 1915. As a tech- 
nically trained Y. M. C. A. secretary, his services in the army continued 
along the line of his training. 

During 1915 and 1916 he was supervisor of military Y. M. C. A. 
organizations in the camps located in British Columbia and Alberta, 
visiting and supervising the work in all of the military and internment 
camps in that area. 

He was called overseas by cable in December of 1917, and later 
became the Supervisor of Y. M. C. A. work in the 1st Division of the 
Canadian Army. 

He was commissioned a Lieutenant in February, 1918, and a Captain 
in August, 1918. 

He was gassed in October, 1918, during the final Canadian drive. 



IDS 




109 



GORDON A. HAGGERTY 



The son of Dr. S. A. and Lelia Haggerty, was bom in Richfield March 
18th, 1897. He attended school in Richfield and in Richfield Springs and 
later the School of Pharmacy of Union University. He was a licensed 
pharmacist and spent his vacations during the college year in this line 
of work. He enlisted in the service Jime 21st, 1918, and reported at 
Pelham Bay Park August 5th, 1918, where he was under training for six 
weeks. He was then detailed for a time in an infirmary and February 
19th, 1919, was ordered to the U. S. S. America as pharmacist mate, third 
class. 

As this is written, information is at hand that he has been at sea for 
the past three months, with only twelve days in port and without shore 
leave. He has made the trip back and forth to Brest three times and is 
just about to make the fourth trip. 



110 




Ill 



WILLIAM DANFORD HECOX 



The son of Eugene D. Hecox and Hannah Hecox Brice, was born at 
Springfield Center, Otsego County, New York, on March 28th, 1890, and 
attended school at Springfield Center and Richfield Springs. 

At the date of his call to the service, April 29th, 1918, he was the 
deputy postmaster at Springfield Center, N. Y. 

He was assigned to Co. K, 311th Regiment, infantry, and was sent 
to Camp Dix for training. He was there but a few weeks and sailed for 
France May 20th, 1918, arriving at Southampton, England, Jvme 4th, 
1918. Soon left for Calais, France, where he trained for about three 
months. Was then moved to the St. Mihiel sector, where he put in 
twenty-one days in the front line trenches. Then moved to the Argonne 
and was in fighting trenches there for three weeks. Was being trans- 
ferred to another front when the armistice was signed, November 11th, 
1918. Was sent to Cop-de Ore sector, where 78th Division was stationed, 
for six months. Went to Bordeaux May 4th, 1919, and in six days was 
shipped home, arriving in New York May 22nd. Was sent to Camp 
Merritt, then to Camp Upton, where he was discharged May 30th, 1919. 



112 




113 



PAUL WILLIAM HERDMAN 



The son of Alexander Herdman and Nellie Herdman, was born at 
Springfield, Otsego County, New York, on November 18th, 1896, and 
obtained his education at the Cherry Valley High School. 

He has followed farming and at the time of his call to the service, 
September 9th, 1918, was employed in a garage. 

He was assigned to the artillery. Battalion D, 7th Regiment, F. A. 
R. D.; later to the 26th O. A. R. D., Headquarters Co.; then 3rd Regi- 
ment, F. A. R. D. 

He was sent to Camp Jackson, South Carolina, where he was 
trained for two months and sent to Newport News. He was on board 
the transport when the armistice was signed. 



114 




115 



JOHN E. HIBBARD 



The son of Emerson Hibbard and Vera Hibbard, was born at Vernon 
Center, Oneida County, New York, on September 15th, 1899. He was 
educated in the common schools. 

Enlisted on August 7th, 1916, at the age of 16 years, and will there- 
fore be known as one of the youngest veterans with the A. E. F. He 
joined Co. M, 1st New York Infantry, but was later transferred to Co. 
M, 107th U. S. Infantry, of the famous 27th Division. 

He was trained at Camp Wadsworth, at Spartanburg, S. C, and went 
to France on May 10th, 1918. At his training camp he was drilled in 
bayonet work for one and one-half years. 

He was engaged in the battles at East Poperinghe line (from July 
9th to August 21st) ; Dickebush sector, Belgium, August 21st to August 
30th); Hindenburg line. Bony (September 29th and 30th). 

He was wounded with shrapnel in the stomach and gassed. 



116 




1J7 



E. LOUISE HINDS 



The subject bf this sketch, is well known throughout the east as a reader 
of exceptional talent. Miss Hinds was born at Richfield Springs, Otsego 
County, New York, and is the daughter of the late Eugene A. Hinds, 
many years postmaster of Richfield Springs, and Mary Buchanan Hinds. 

In June of 1917, she offered her services to the "Y" to entertain 
soldiers and sailors in the various camps of the East. She recited before 
large and enthusiastic audiences at Newport, R. I., Syracuse, N. Y., 
Camp Dix, Camp Upton and Camp Merritt. 

Later she was summoned to the tidewater camps and did splendid 
work at Camp Lee, Newport News, Norfolk, Camp Meade and Camp 
Humphrey, receiving from the Director of the Southern Section Activities 
letters of most cordial appreciation. 

Her efforts to strengthen the morale of the soldier and sailor in 
camp and station entitle her to the gratitude of every patriotic citizen 
and the place she won in the hearts of the men who listened to her is 
indeed a large one. 

Her ambition was to go overseas and there is no doubt that her 
services would have been accepted had not illness in her family pre- 
vented. Her work before and after the armistice has endeared her to 
many thousands of the men who preserved the world's peace. 



118 




119 



HERBERT ELMER HOSFORD 



The son of Frank D. Hosford and Clara L. Evans Hosford, was born in 
Warren, Herkimer County, New York, on May 21st, 1895, and received 
his education in the Richfield Springs High School. 

He was employed on his uncle's farm at the time of his being drafted 
into the service on September 6th, 1918. Was first sent to the Syracuse 
Recruiting Camp and assigned to the 92nd Co., 22nd Battalion. In a 
short time he was transferred to the Coast Artillery at Fort Totten, 
Long Island, where he served as a driver for officers and field clerks. 



120 




121 



KENNETH HOWARD HOUSE 



Was born at Richfield Springs, Otsego County, New York, on January 
14th, 1893. He attended the Richfield Springs school. Was employed 
by the Remington Arms for about five years and was with the Utica 
Knitting Company when he entered the service, in August of 1918. 

He reported at Syracuse for training, and was later transferred to 
Camp Merritt, attached to the 340th Guard and Fire Company. 

Was later transferred to Camp Upton and from that place discharged 
from the service on December 30th, 1918, returning to civilian life at 
Richfield Springs. 



122 




123 



JOSEPH HUGGICK 



The son of Albert Huggick and Mary Huggick, was born at South Colum- 
bia, Herkimer County, New York, on February 20th, 1896, and attended 
the district school in his native township. 

He was engaged in farm work on the home farm when he was 
called to the service, about October 18th, 1917. 

He was attached to Co. F, 303rd Infantry, and sent to Camp Devens, 
Mass., and then transferred to Co. M, 60th Infantry, at Camp Green, 
N. C, shipping with that company for France. 

But little is known about this young soldier after he arrived in 
France, but one letter being received by his parents, and this stated that 
he was in the 3rd line trenches. 

He was killed in action about October 25th, 1918. On Sunday 
afternoon, April 18th, 1919, a memorial service was held in his home 
town under the auspices of the Red Cross, the program being in charge 
of Mrs. M. M. Hatch, the president of the South Solumbia Chapter, and 
the address being made by the Rev. Charles Niles of Jordanville, N. Y., 
who with all of the company present paid tribute to this brave son of 
Columbia. 



124 




125 



CLARENCE ROBERT HUYCK 



The son of Edgar Huyck and Minnie Huyck, was born in Exeter, Otsego 
County, New York, on July 9th, 1896, and was educated in the district 
school in his neighborhood. 

He engaged in farming, and at the time of his enlistment, June 8th, 
1917, was employed in the Remington typewriter plant at Ilion, N. Y. 

He enlisted at Schenectady, N. Y., and was sent from there to Pelham 
Bay, N. Y., and then to Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, S. C, where he 
was attached to Co. A, 105th U. S. Infantry, 27th Division. 

Was discharged at Camp Jackson, and took up employment in the 
Remington Arms at Ilion, N. Y., when he was drafted and sent to Camp 
Jackson, where he remained for five months. 

Was listed for overseas service when the armistice was signed and 
remained at Camp Jackson until sent to Camp Mills, Long Island, where 
he was discharged from the service on December 28th, 1918. 



126 




127 



FRED ABBOT JOHNSON 



Was born at Ogdensburg, St. Lawrence County, New York, on March 
3rd, 1893, and was educated in the Richfield Springs public school. 

Previous to his enlistment, on July 15th, 1917, he was in the railroad 
service. He enlisted in Troop G, 1st N. Y. Cavalry, at Utica, N. Y., and 
was later assigned to Co. B, 106th Machine Gun Battalion. Was first 
sent to Brooklyn and then to Spartanburg, S. C, training there for seven 
months. 

He left for overseas on May 10th, 1918, and landed at Brest, May 
26th, 1918. He served in the East Poperinghe line from July 9th to 
August 20th, 1918; Dickebush sector, August 21st to August 30th. Was 
at St. Quentin and Cambrai in September of 1918. 

He was sick in hospital in France from drinking the water from 
poisoned wells and was laid up with pneumonia for two months. 

Was discharged from the service on April 2nd, 1919, as a member 
of the famous 27th Division, 54th Brigade. 



128 




129 



HARRY D. JONES 



The son of David A. Jones and Carrie Baker Jones, was born at Yonkers, 
New York, on August 16th, 1894. He is the husband of Marguerite Sitts 
Jones. 

He enlisted in July of 1917, in Toronto, Canada, and in September 
of that year was transferred to the Royal Flying Corps, graduating in the 
school for aviators at Toronto University. 

He served as an instructor in aviation at Fort Worth, Texas, and 
was discharged from the service in December of 1918. 



130 



EDWIN CLIFFORD KENT 



The son of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac J. Kent, was born at Richfield Springs, 
Otsego County, New York, on August 27th, 1887, and received his pre- 
liminary education at the Richfield Springs High School, later taking a 
course in the Albany Business College. 

He was called to the service on March 15th, 1918, and was assigned 
to the Signal Corps, later being transferred to Department of Aeronautics 
and served with the 92nd Aero Service Squadron. He trained at Waco, 
Texas; Camp Greene, Charlotte, S. C; Mitchell Field, Long Island. 

Served overseas in England as chauffeur, 1st Class, at Yapton Aero- 
drome, Yapton, Sussex, England. He was made a chauffeur in August, 
1918, and promoted to the 1st Class in September, giving him the rank 
of Sergeant, which he held at the time of his discharge. 



132 




133 



MORTIMER J. KEOUGH 



The son of James Keough and Nora Keough, was born at Richfield 
Springs, Otsego County, New York, on December 12th, 1888. He at- 
tended school at the Richfield Springs High School and later assumed 
charge of the homestead farm. 

He enlisted on July 8th, 1917, and was assigned to Co. L, 23rd In- 
fantry, 2nd Division, reporting at once at Syracuse, where he trained 
until September of 1917, sailing overseas on the 7th of that month, land- 
ing at St. Nazaire, France. He remained there nine days completing the 
military organization and was then transferred to Goncourt, France, for 
barracks building. 

In February of 1918 he entered the 1st line trenches. He was en- 
gaged in the Verdun, Toule and Troyon sectors in the early part of that 
year. From June 1st to July 16th, 1918, he was in the continuous fighting 
at Chateau Thierry. He went over the top on July 18th on the Mame 
counter offensive at Soissons, then was sent to Nancy neighborhood for 
about three weeks. Was in the St. Mihiel drive on September 12th. 
In October entered the Champagne drive with the 4th French Army. 

He was wounded on October 5th, 1918, in the Champagne drive by 
high explosive shrapnel in both arms, and was sent to the French hos- 
pital at Toulouse. After six weeks there he was transferred to the 
American hospital at Vichy, France, remaining in that institution until 
the first week of January, 1919. When again fit for duty was sent to 
replacement camp near Tours, and started back for the 2nd Division 
organization on the Rhine. En route he stopped at Toul three weeks 
and entered a casual detachment, and shipped home from Bordeaux. He 
landed in New York on March 24th, 1919. Was sent first to Camp Dix, 
then to Camp Upton, and from that place discharged in April of 1919. 



134 



CHARLES AUGUSTUS KING 



The son of Francis King and Anna King, was born at Richfield Springs, 
Otsego County, New York, on September 4th, 1887, and attended the 
public school at Richfield Springs for eight years. 

Previous to his call to the service on May 27th, 1918, he was engaged 
as a cattle buyer and wholesale butcher. 

He was assigned to Co. D, 52nd Pioneer Infantry, and was with that 
company and regiment from the time it was organized at Camp Wads- 
worth until it was disbanded at Camp Dix on May 19th. He trained at 
Camp Wadsworth at Spartanburg, S. C, and then left for overseas 
service. 

He was for a time engaged in repairing roads for the artillery; 
helped break the Hindenburg Line at Avacourt and the Meuse and was 
in the great Argonne offensive. 

He was discharged from Camp Dix, May 19th, 1919. 



136 



GORDON I. KNOX 



The son of Frank Knox and Ella Knox, was born at Rome, Oneida 
County, New York, on Jiily 2nd, 1902, and was educated in the public 
schools of Utica and Richfield Springs. 

He enlisted in Co. E, 9th Infantry, on April 18th, 1917, before he 
had attained the age of fifteen years. He was large for his age, and for 
this reason succeeded in passing the enlisting officer. 

He was sent to Fort Slccum, then to San Antonio, Texas, then back 
to Syracuse in the 47th Infantry. From Syracuse he was transferred to 
Camp Greene, N. C, in October, 1917; then to Camp Mills, in April, 1918. 

He sailed for overseas on May 10th, 1918, having been made a Ser- 
geant at Camp Mills the preceding January. 

He was in the second battle of the Marne and was in the front line 
at the time the armistice was signed, on November 11th, 1918. Since 
that time he has been with the Army of Occupation in Germany at 
Adenau. 

This young veteran of the A. E. F. has never been sick or wounded 
since the date of his enlistment. 



138 




139 



AUGUST FRANK KURKOWSKI 



The son of Anthony Kurkowski and Pauline Kurkowski, was born at 
Richfield Springs, Otsego County, New York, on February 12th, 1896. 
He attended the Richfield Springs public school. 

At the time of his call to the service, September 9th, 1918, he was 
working on the home farm near this village. He was assigned to Co. B, 
2nd Division, Camp Jackson, S. C, and transferred to Quartermaster's 
Corps, Barracks Co. No. 1, East Utilities Division, located at the same 
camp. Here he was employed as motor truck driver. 

He was at Camp Jackson until March 22nd, 1919, when he was honor- 
ably discharged from the service. 



140 



MAURICE LLEWELLYN LANE 



The son of Henry D. Lane and Flora Llewellyn Lane, was born at 
Richfield Springs, Otsego County, New York, on July 5th, 1895. He 
attended the public school at Richfield Springs and later graduated from 
the Utica School of Commerce, accepting a position as clerk in the 
Citizens' Trust Company, Utica, N. Y., where in 1918 he was advanced 
to teller in the institution. 

He twice tried to enlist in the service, but was not accepted. On 
September 4th, 1918, he was called under the selective draft. He was 
entrained from Cooperstown, N. Y., and sent to Camp Upton, Long 
Island, attached to the 27th Co., 152nd Depot Brigade. After four weeks 
of regular training he was ordered to report as a Company Clerk. In 
October a call came for men to serve as clerks on draft boards and 
he was detailed to his own Local Board in Cooperstown, N. Y. 

Immediately after the signing of the armistice he was ordered to 
Camp Upton by the Personnel Office for duty connected with the dis- 
charging of soldiers. 

On December 21st, 1918, he unexpectedly received the order for his 
discharge, and on the following day was discharged from the service, 
shortly resuming his position as teller with the Citizens' Trust Company 
of Utica, New York. 



142 




143 



CHARLES LAWSON 



The son of Thomas W. Lawson and Susie Doxstater Lawson, was born 
at Fort Plain, Montgomery County, New York, on August 24th, 1882, and 
attended school at Johnstown, N. Y. 

He enlisted on May 2nd, 1917, and reported at Camp Weller, Mo- 
hawk, N. Y., where he remained three weeks. He was then sent to Van 
Cortlandt Park, New York, and was there for one month. Was then 
transferred to Camp Wadsworth, S. C, for nine months' training, at the 
conclusion of which he was sent to Newport News, Va., where he sailed 
overseas in May, 1918. He landed at Brest and immediately went to the 
Belgian front. 

He participated in the following battles and engagements: East 
Poperinghe line, July 9th- August 20th, 1918; Dickebush sector, Belgium, 
August 27th-30th, 1918; Hindenburg Line (vicinity of Bony), September 
29th-30th; Le Selle River (vicinity of Souplet), October 17th, 1918; Jonc 
de Mer Ridge, October 18th, 1918; St. Maurice River, October 19th-20th. 

He was a member of Co. M, 107th Infantry, of the famous 27th Divi- 
sion, and was graded as a Private, 1st Class. After the armistice was 
signed he was stationed at different points in France, doing police and 
guard duty. 

He left Brest in March, 1919, for New York, and was discharged 
from Camp Upton on April 2nd, 1919, 



144 




145 



ARTHUR PAUL LEARY 



The son of John R. Leary and Mary Curley Leary, was born in the town 
of Richfield, Otsego County, New York, on November 21st, 1897, and is 
a graduate of the Richfield Springs High School. 

He was working on the home farm when he entered the service on 
October 5th, 1918, joining the Engineering Corps of the Students' Army 
Training Corps at Union College, Schenectady, N. Y. 

He was discharged from the service on December 6th, 1918, and is 
continuing his course at Union College. 



146 




147 



JOHN JOSEPH LEARY 



The son of John R. Leary and Mary Curley Leary, was born in the town 
of Richfield, Otsego County, New York, on November 27th, 1888. He is 
a graduate of the Richfield Springs High School and of Syracuse Univer- 
sity, Syracuse, N. Y. 

At the time of his entering the service, on July 10th, 1918, he was a 
member of the medical staff of the Utica State Hospital. 

He entered the Medical Corps, Camp Greenleaf, Georgia, remaining 
there for two months; entered State Psychopathic Hospital, Camp Wads- 
worth, S. C, for intensive course in neurology and psychiatry, with 
hospital work. He has also been located at Fort Ontario, N, Y., and 
General Hospital No. 43, National Soldiers' Home, Va. 

In June of 1917 he was commissioned a 1st Lieutenant, and at thi^ 
time, June 1st, 1919, is located in the Hospital at Hampton, Va. 




149 



LEO V. LEARY 



The son of Richard Leary and Mary Ellen Horen Leary, was born near 
Richfield Springs, Otsego County, New York, on January 14th, 1896. 
He was educated at the Richfield Springs High School. 

At the time of his call to the service, on August 26th, 1918, he was 
working on the home farm. 

He entered a machine gun school at Camp Hancock, Georgia, 
finished in double time, and was transported from Camp Merritt, N. J., 
for overseas service on November 8th, 1918, as a member of the 138th 
Machine Gun Company. He arrived in England after the signing of the 
Armistice. 

He was taken into France in a replacement division and at this writ- 
ing is serving as a P. E. S. at Bourges, France. 



150 




151 



JOHN MARCUS LEE 



The son of George Lee and Lida King Lee, was born at Cranberry 
Creek, Fulton County, New York, in November of 1894. He was edu- 
cated in the country schools of his neighborhood. 

Previous to his call to the service, on May 27th, 1918, he had been 
employed at farming and was later an employe in the Remington Arms 
Company plant at Ilion, N. Y. 

He entered the Red Cross Ambulance Corps, in Co. 40, 6th Division. 
He was sent to Spartanburg, S. C, transferred to Camp Mills and went 
overseas in July of 1918. He was in the trenches for a time, but prin- 
cipally was engaged in bandaging the wovmded men and carrying them 
back to motor ambulances for transportation to the base hospitals. 

At the present time he is with the Army of Occupation in Germany. 



152 




153 



BENJAMIN PAUL LENT 



The son of James and Harriet Lent, was born at Richfield Springs March 
25, 1892. He received his early schooling at Richfield Springs, after 
which he took up his duties as a chef and meat cutter and prior to his 
entering the service was working in the Remington Arms plant at Ilion, 
N. Y. 

He entered the service July 31, 1918, and was sent to Camp Upton, 
L. I., where he entered the school for bakers and cooks, taking up this 
training for a regular army cook. He succeeded in this particular line 
of work and passed the examination, graduating as a Mess Sergeant. 
He was honorably discharged from Camp Upton December 13th, 1918, 
and returned immediately to Richfield Springs. 



154 




155 



DELMONT LENT 



The son of James and Harriet Lent, was born at Richfield Springs June 
20, 1894. He received his early education at the High School at Rich- 
field Springs, after which he learned the trade of a barber. He was 
engaged in this work when he entered the service, April 29, 1918. He 
received his first military training at Camp Dix, N. J., being assigned to 
Co. L, 311th Infantry, then later attached to the 36th Co., 9th Battalion, 
152nd Depot Brigade. 

His work at Camp Dix included drilling and guard duty. He was 
discharged from Camp Dix January 13th, 1919, and returned to Richfield 
Springs. 




157 



ERNEST LEONARD 



The son of William Leonard and Julia Leonard, was born at Richfield 
Springs, County of Otsego, New York, on January 15th, 1887. 

He enlisted as a Machinist's Mate, 2nd Class, on November 21st, 
1907. Served in the first cruise on the U. S. S. Connecticut. Discharged 
as a Chief Machinist's Mate. 

He re-enlisted on March 19th, 1912, and served on board the U. S. S. 
Florida two years and six months. 

Was appointed a Machinist on December 28th, 1914, and served 
three years as Engineer Officer of the U. S. S. Ontario. 

He received a temporary commission as Ensign on August 15th, 
1917; made a Lieutenant (junior grade) on March 1st, 1918, and a Lieu- 
tenant on September 1st, 1918. 

Served on board the U. S. S. Housatonic as Engineer Officer from 
December 1st, 1917, to March 15th, 1919. 



158 




159 



RALPH EDWARD LEONARD 



The son of Gilbert Leonard, was bom at Gilbertsville, Otsego County, 
New York, on January 15th, 1894. He attended the Gilbertsville High 
School for two years. 

He was a foreman in the Utica Knitting Co. plant at Richfield 
Springs at the time of his call to the service on June 28th, 1918. 

He was sent to the recruiting camp at Syracuse, N. Y., and later to 
the Poison Gas Plant at Edgewood, Maryland. Was later discharged 
from the service. 



160 




161 



BENJAMIN HARRISON LEWIS 



The son of George E. Lewis and Emerette Murdock Lewis, was born in 
Otsego County, New York, on November 19th, 1894, and is the husband 
of Marion Schooley Lewis. He was educated in the Cooperstown High 
School. 

He was called to the service on July 1st, 1918, and entered a training 
school at Buffalo, N. Y. Attached to band as Chief Musician and also 
had charge of electrical wiring detachment. On August 25th, 1918, was 
transferred to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, Signal Corps. On November 
5th, 1918, sent with battalion to Camp Benjamin Franklin, Md., prepara- 
tory to going overseas. 

In the electrical class at the Buffalo Training School he stood second 
highest. 

He was made Director of Band on September 12th, 1918; promoted 
to 1st Class Private on September 29th, according to Signal Corps regu- 
lations, and again advanced by examination on November 6th, 1918, to 
Corporal. 

He was honorably discharged from Camp Benjamin Franklin, Md., 
January 6th, 1919. 



162 





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163 



DIO ALONZO LEWIS 



The son of A. S. Lewis and Flora E. Lewis, was born in the town of 
Columbia, Herkimer County, New York, on March 5th, 1892, and was 
educated in the district school of his neighborhood, later attending the 
High School at West Winfield. 

He has been employed at farming and in the Library Bureau at 
Ilion, N. Y. 

He was called to the service on October 5th, 1917, assigned to the 
303rd Infantry and sent to Camp Devens, Mass; transferred to the 60th 
Infantry and sent to Camp Greene, N. C, and later to the 79th Field 
Artillery at Camp Merritt, N. J. 

Sent overseas in August of 1918. Landed at Brest and was in train- 
ing in France until the close of the war. Is at this writing. May 15th, 
1919, with the Army of Occupation. 



164 




165 



GUY WALTER LLEWELLYN 



The son of Frank and Elizabeth Llewellyn, was born at Richfield 
Springs, Otsego County, New York, on August 10th, 1893. He attended 
the public school at Richfield Springs and was employed by the Utica 
Knitting Company. 

He entered the service on August 26th, 1918, was sent to Camp 
Gordon, Georgia, and assigned to Co. E, 3rd Infantry, Replacement Regi- 
ment. Trained at Camp Gordon until October 24th, 1918, and then 
sailed for overseas. He did not reach the front, as the armistice was 
signed on November 11 th. Almost upon his arrival in France he was 
sent to Bordeaux and transferred to the cavalry. Later was sent to 
Romagne, France, where he is doing guard duty at this writing. May 
25th, with Co. 16, O. A. R. D., and hopes to reach the United States by 
August 1st, 1919. 



166 




167 



JOHN FRANCIS M'BRIDE 



Was born at Richfield Springs, Otsego County, New York, in 1890 and 
attended the Richfield Springs public school. 

He was engaged in farming when he enlisted in Troop G, 1st N. Y. 
Cavalry, and served in Mexico in border warfare. Was again placed 
in civilian life and enlisted at Utica in the World War forces and was a 
member of the famous 27th Division throughout the war. Was in East 
Poperinghe sector July 9-August 21st; Dickebush sector, August 21st- 
30th, and helped smash the Hindenburg Line, at Bony, September 29th- 
30th. 

He has been discharged from the service and is now with the N. 
Y. State Railway Co. 



168 




169 



CHARLES LYNN M'CREDY 



The son of Harry McCredy and Nettie Hilsinger McCredy, was born at 
Richfield Springs, Otsego County, New York, on November 27th, 1889. 
He was educated at the Richfield Springs High School. He is the hus- 
band of Clara Lewis McCredy. 

At the time of his call to the service he was engaged as salesman 
for a wholesale saddlery and harness company. He entered the army 
on June 23rd, 1918, and was assigned to the 8th Co., 152nd Depot Bri- 
gade, Camp Upton. Transferred to Co. G, 348th Infantry, Camp Dix, 
and while there was again transferred to Machine Gun Co. 348 of the 
Infantry. 

He has to his credit six months' overseas service, being attached to 
the 54th Engineers, doing construction work in Southern France. 



170 




171 



THOMAS M'GUINESS 



Was born in New York City on May 21st, 1890. He enlisted at Rich- 
field, N. Y., on October 6th, 1917, and was assigned to Co. K, 303rd 
Infantry, and served for a time as supply company sergeant, later being 
made a Corporal. 

He sailed for France on July 18th, 1918, and was transferred to the 
162nd Replacement Division. At the present time, June 1st, 1919, he is 
in Paris, acting as a member of a Provost Guard Company. 



172 




173 



FRED J. MALLOY 



Was born in the northern part of New York State and during his boy- 
hood attended school in Mohawk, N. Y. He took up farming after he 
left school, and in April, 1917, he enlisted as an apprentice seaman. He 
was sent to the Naval Training School at Newport, R. I., where he was 
under instruction for several months. Later he was ordered to the 
U. S. S. Wisconsin, where he is now doing duty at sea. 



'■^«^^ 




175 



JAMES HOMER MARTIN 



The son of James Martin and Amanda Burke Martin, was born at Rich- 
field Springs, Otsego County, New York, on November 29th, 1896. 

He graduated from the Richfield Springs High School in 1915, and 
attended Cornell University during 1916-1917. He also spent one year in 
the Remington Arms as machine operator. 

He was called to the service on September 5th, 1918, sent to Camp 
Jackson, S. C, and assigned to Battery E, 7th Regiment, F. A. R. D.; 
transferred to 106th Ordnance Depot Company on December 5th, 1918; 
again transferred to Camp Supply Detachment, Camp Jackson, on 
February 1st, 1919; and discharged from that place on March 20th, 1919. 

He is now employed by the U. S. Government at Camp Jackson, 
May 15th, 1919, as clerk in the Ordnance Department. 



176 




177 



FRANK MEEHAN 



The son of James Meehan and Ellen Meehan, was born in the town of 
Warren, Herkimer Coimty, New York, on November 15th, 1891. He 
attended the Richfield Springs public school. 

He was employed with the Buchanan Hardware Company, Richfield 
Springs, at the time he entered the service, on May 28th, 1918. He 
reported at Camp Wadsworth, S. C, for six weeks' training. He 
shipped overseas from Camp Upton and arrived at Brest in August of 
1918. He was moved up to the front line at once, being placed in the 
Belgian sector. 

Corporal Meehan was a member of Co. D, 52nd Pioneer Infantry, 
and served with the 5th Army Corps of the 1st Army, A. E. F., partici- 
pating in the Meuse, Argonne and Verdun operations from September 
20th, 1918, to November 11th, 1918. 

He was discharged from Camp Dix, N. J., on April 19th, 1919, and 
later assumed his former duties with the Buchanan Hardware Company. 



178 




179 



MATTHEW WILBUR MEEHAN 



The son of James Meehan and Ellen Meehan, was born in the town of 
Warren, Herkimer County, New York, on June 22nd, 1896. He was 
educated in the public school at Richfield Springs. 

He was licensed as a chauffeur previous to his enlistment in the 
service, July 10th, 1918. 

He reported at the Brooklyn Navy Yard on September 30th, 1918, 
and was later transferred to the Naval Training Station at Pelham Bay, 
N. Y. Here he was in training for about one month, when he was 
stricken with pneumonia and was confined to the hospital at Pelham 
Bay for two months. 

After recuperating he was transferred to a shipping regiment, in 
preparation for draft to Siberia as armed guard. For this purpose he 
was examined and on account of his recent illness was ordered home and 
his name placed on the inactive list of the U. S. N. R. F. 

He returned to his home in Richfield Springs and took up his duties 
as mechanic. 



180 




181 



RICHARD AUGUSTINE MEEHAN 



The son of James Meehan and Ellen Meehan, was born in the town of 
Warren, Herkimer County, New York, on May 25th, 1899, He attended 
the public school at Richfield Springs. 

He enlisted in the U. S. Navy on November 2nd, 1917, and reported 
at once to Newport, R. I. Here he attended the Hospital School for 
six months, fitting himself for hospital apprentice. He left Newport 
on draft transfer to Commonwealth Pier, Boston. Was there a short 
time, and then transferred to Chatham, Mass., for six weeks, returning 
later to Commonwealth Pier. 

He was next ordered aboard the U. S. S. Foote, a destroyer, and 
one of the fastest boats in the U. S. N. The Foote convoyed the NC 
fliers in the trans-Atlantic flight, now historic, as one of them, NC-4, 
succeeded in crossing the ocean and established a new record. 

He is rated as a Gunner's Mate, and will presumably remain in the 
service for four years, the period of his enlistment. 



182 




183 



WILLIAM ROBERT MEEHAN 



The son of James Meehan and Ellen Meehan, was born in the town of 
Warren, Herkimer County, New York, on November 3rd, 1889. He was 
educated in the public schools of Warren and Richfield Springs. 

Previous to his enlistment in the U. S. N., on December 14th, 1917, 
he was employed as a clerk in retail stores. 

He reported at Newport, R. I., trained there until January 20th, 
1918, and was then made Junior Instructor of Apprentice Seamen, which 
line of duty he continued until August 15th, 1918. 

He then entered Quartermasters' School at Newport and graduated 
on November 1st, 1918. On November 22nd, 1918, he was transferred 
to the Naval Base, Hampton Roads, Va., where he remained for one 
month. 

On December 28th, 1918, he was transferred to the U. S. S. Clio, as 
Quartermaster, where he is now stationed. 



184 



JAMES ERNEST MOORE 



The son of George Washington and Anna Mary Moore, was bom in 
Sullivan, Michigan, February 16, 1889. He attended the district school at 
Sullivan and later at Richfield Springs. Upon leaving school he took 
up the duties of farming and also worked for the Utica Knitting Com- 
pany for some time. 

He entered the service July 23, 1918, and reported immediately to 
Camp Meade, Md., where he was assigned to the Headquarters Company 
of the 23rd Field Artillery of Lafayette Division. He was later trans- 
ferred to the infantry, 22nd Division, 154th Depot Brigade. He was 
honorably discharged from Camp Meade, Md., December 12th, 1918, and 
returned at once to Richfield Springs, where he resumed his former 
duties on the farm. 



186 




187 



FRANK MROZEK 



Was born in Lithuania, Russia, in 1893, where he attended school. He 
came to the United States when about eighteen years of age and worked 
as a laborer in Schenectady. He came to Richfield Springs in 1917 as a 
farm-hand. He entered the service in July of the same year and was 
sent to Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina, for preliminary training. 
He was soon sent overseas, being attached to the 1st Pioneer Infantry, 
and has seen active military service. 

At this writing Private Mrozek is with the Army of Occupation in 
Andernach, Germany, 



188 




189 



CHARLES M. MULLEN 



The son of John Mullen and Delia Mullen, was born at Richfield Springs, 
Otsego County, New York, on November 11th, 1895. He graduated 
from the Richfield Springs High School in the class of 1914. He later 
took a course in accounting, assuming at its completion a position with 
the D., L. & W. Railroad Company, and before entering the service he 
was the manager of a cigar business. He enlisted on April 4th, 1918, 
and was assigned to Co. H, 309th Infantry, 78th Division. He trained 
at Camp Dix, Wrightstown, N. J., for a few weeks and was then sent 
overseas. He trained on French soil until August 1st, 1918, when his 
company started for the Metz sector, hiking until September 5th. On 
the following day they started straight for the front lines. On Septem- 
ber 16th, 1918, they took over the sector from the Marines on the drive 
to Metz. He remained in the St. Mihiel sector vmtil October 5th, 1918, 
when he was wounded, being struck by shrapnel in the right leg, below 
the knee, and was sent to Base Hospital No. 21. He also had been 
gassed on September 20th, 1918. 

His was the first battalion of the division to take a front line sector, 
and they remained there with the exception of a four days' rest. He 
was promoted to Corporal in July, 1918, and made a Sergeant after 
recovering in Hospital No. 210. 

After his recovery, on February 7th, 1919, he went to St. Aignan and 
then to Brest, where he was put in a Casual Company, No. 1456, and 
returned to the United States on the U. S. S. George Washington. He 
was discharged from Camp Upton, N. J., on April 6th, 1919. 



190 



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191 



FRANCIS MULROONEY 



The son of John Mulrooney and Delia Mulrooney, was born at Richfield 
Springs, Otsego County, New York, on February 11th, 1895, and at- 
tended the Richfield Springs public school. 

He entered the service in April, 1917, and was sent to Syracuse, 
N. Y., where he was under military training until October. He was then 
sent to Camp Greene, S. C, where he finished his training and was sent 
overseas, a member of Co. D, 9th Machine Gun Battalion, 3rd Division. 

His company and entire division saw hard fighting south of the 
Marne during the summer of 1918, and he received a bullet wound in the 
leg during the engagements. 

At this writing. May 20th, 1919, he is with the Army of Occupation 
and does not expect to reach the United States before July or August. 



192 




193 



GEORGE J. MULROONEY 



The son of John Mulrooney and Delia Mulrooney, was born at Richfield 
Springs, Otsego County, New York, on August 14th, 1893, and atttended 
the Richfield Springs public school. 

He entered the service in April of 1917 and was immediately sent to 
El Paso, Texas, for guard duty on the Mexican border. He took part 
in several light skirmishes with Mexican outlaws. In October, 1918, 
he was sent to Camp Merritt, N. J., and shortly shipped overseas. 

He arrived in France about the time the armistice was signed. He 
is a member of Co. L, 34th Infantry, 7th Division. 

At this writing. May 20th, 1919, he is in France with the A. E. F. 



194 




195 



WILLIAM D. NORTHRUP 



The son of Charlie and Jennie Northrup, was born in Syracuse February 
12th, 1893. He attended school in Richfield Springs, after which he 
engaged in farming. He entered the service August 8th, 1918, and re- 
ported immediately to Fort Slocum, New York. In a few days he was 
transferred to Camp McClellan, Alabama, where for six weeks he was 
attached to the Field Artillery. He was discharged from the service 
from this camp September 30th, 1918, bearing a surgeon's certificate of 
disability. He returned at once to Richfield Springs and resumed his 
work on the farm. 



196 




197 



FLOYD J. OSTRANDER 



The son of C. H. Ostrander and Exila Shaul Ostrander, was born in the 
town of Warren, Herkimer County, New York, on November 19th, 
1893. He was educated in the district school of his neighborhood. 

He was called to the service on August 13th, 1917, and was sent to 
Camp Devens, Ayer, Mass.; transferred to Camp Greenee, N. C, on 
February 10th, 1918, and was in the hospital there imtil May 10th, 1918, 
when he was sent to Camp Merritt, N. J., sailing overseas on May 21st, 
1918. 

He arrived in France in June, and while in the A. E. F. was in Co. 
M, 60th Infantry. He returned to the United States in December of 
1918. 



198 




199 



LE ROY E. PALMER 



Was born at Richfield, Otsego County, New York, and is a graduate of 
the Richfield Springs High School, class of 1911, later entering St. Law- 
rence College. 

He enlisted on May 28th, 1917, in the U. S. Marine Corps and was 
sent to Paris Island, S. C, and made an expert machine gunner, with 
rank of Sergeant. 

He was one of the first to be sent overseas, and took an active part 
in the battles that turned the Germans from Paris. He was wounded in 
one of these engagements. 

After his recovery, he went back into the lines and was wounded 
again. Was sent in again at the Argonne, and near the end of the 
fighting sprained an ankle and suffered from the breaking down of the 
arches of the feet, incapacitating him and placing him in a Marine Band, 
connected with a battalion show now going from unit to unit entertain- 
ing the men of the Army of Occupation along the Rhine. 



200 




201 



LOUIS B. PALMER 



Was born at Richfield, Otsego County, New York, and educated at the 
Richfield Springs High School. 

He was called to the service from Akron, Ohio, on May 29th, 1918, 
and was a member of Co. L, 59th Infantry, 4th Division. Trained at 
Camp Gordon, Georgia. Was sent to France early in July, 1918, and 
was in the Argonne fighting for over one month. He came out tm- 
harmed and without illness during these engagements. 

At this writing, May 20th, 1919, he is stationed on the east bank 
of the Rhine, 3 kilometers from Coblenz. 



202 




^03 



RICHARD W. PALMER 



The son of Frank Palmer and Mary Flint Palmer, was born at Little 
Falls, Herkimer County, New York, on May 28th, 1893. He attended the 
Richfield Springs High School. He is the husband of Rose Voight 
Palmer. 

He was employed by the Remington Arms Company, Ilion, N. Y., 
at the time of his call to the service. May 30th, 1918. He was first sent 
to Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, S. C., and later transferred to the 
Arsenal at Edgewood, Maryland, in the Chemical Warfare Department. 

He was discharged from the service in December of 1918 and re- 
turned to Ilion, where he resumed his duties with the Remington Arms 
Company. 



204 




205 



STANLEY EARL PALMER 



The son of Curtis B. Palmer and Nettie Palmer, was born in the town 
of Richfield, Otsego County, New York, on June 8th, 1895. He attended 
the public school at Richfield Springs and later married Violet Brown, 
whose subsequent illness brought about his discharge from the service. 

He first enlisted in Troop G, N. Y. Cavalry, and was with the Border 
Police on the Mexican border for about two months. After his dis- 
charge he again enlisted and was sent to Brooklyn for three months, 
then to Spartanburg, S. C, where he was transferred to the artillery, 
being later discharged through the illness of his wife. 



206 




207 



JOHN LEO PURCELL 



The son of John Purcell and Mary A. Purcell, was born at Richfield 
Springs, Otsego County, New York, on June 19th, 1896. His education 
was obtained at the Richfield Springs public school. 

He was employed at the Remington Arms plant at Ilion, N. Y., at the 
time he volunteered his services on June 3rd, 1918. He reported for 
duty on August 22nd, 1918, at the Pelham Bay Naval Training Station, 
being rated as a 2nd Class Seaman. Here he was stricken with influenza 
and was taken to the hospital on Monday night at 10:45 o'clock, and on 
the Saturday following, October 5th, 1918, he died at 11:40 P. M. 

His body was brought home and buried from St. Joseph's Church 
with military honors, the fvmeral eulogy being delivered by the Reverend 
Father Arthur J. Kelly. Just two weeks previous, to a day, the deceased 
sailor had been home to attend the funeral of a younger brother, James 
Purcell. 



208 




209 



WALTER A. PURCELL 



The son of John Purcell and Mary A. Purcell, was born at Richfield 
Springs, Otsego County, New York, on August 2nd, 1899. He attended 
the public school at Richfield Springs and at the time of his enlistment 
was taking a course in electrical engineering. 

He volimteered his services and entered the great army on April 
16th, 1917, and was assigned to the infantry, being first sent to Fort 
Slocum and later transferred to Texas with the 9th Infantry. En route 
he was stricken with pneumonia and for two weeks of the five of his 
illness he had the remarkable temperature of 104 degrees. His sturdy 
vitality sustained him and he recovered and was transferred to Syracuse, 
where he was detached from the 9th and assigned to the 48th Infantry 
for a time. 

He sailed with the A. E. F., as a member of the 9th Infantry, in 
September of 1917, the first native son of Richfield to go overseas. 

He was engaged in the Verdun, Toul and Troyon sectors in the 
early part of 1918. From Jvme 1st to July 16th, 1918, he was in the 
continuous fighting at Chateau Thierry. He went over the top on July 
18th on the Marne counter offensive at Soissons, then went to a point 
near Nancy for about three weeks. Was in the St. Mihiel drive on 
September 12th, in October entering the Champagne drive with the 4th 
French Army. Then back to the Meuse and Argonne with the Amer- 
ican forces. 

He is at this writing. May 15th, 1919, with the American Army of 
Occupation in Germany. 



210 




211 



CHARLES HORACE RIVETT 



The son of Joseph Rivett and Jessie Rivett, was born at Orwell, Ver- 
mont on January 26th, 1885. He attended school at Granville, N. Y., 
and later worked in the granite and slate quarries. 

He enlisted in the Spanish War and afterward returned to Canas- 
tota and Richfield Springs, where his father resides. 

He enlisted in the regular army in December, 1914, and reported for 
duty at Fort Monroe. Was sent directly to the Panama Canal Zone to 
assist in guarding the interests of the United States, and was held there 
vmtil August, 1918. 

Was sent to Camp Beauregard, La., to prepare for service overseas. 
Here he was stricken with the epidemic then prevailing and was very 
ill with pneumonia. At this camp he was attached to Co. H, 5th In- 
fantry, and was made a Sergeant. 

After about four months at Camp Beauregard he was sent to Camp 
Zachary Taylor, Kentucky, with the same company, where he is now 
located. 

Sergeant Rivett plans to remain in the service and possibly enlist in 
the Army of Occupation in Germany. 



212 




213 



RICHARD MORRIS ROBERTS 



The son of Thomas B. Roberts and Elizabeth A. Roberts, was born at 
Richfield Springs, Otsego County, New York, on November 20th, 1894. 
He is a graduate of the Richfield Springs High School, class of 1914, 
and the following year graduated from the Utica School of Commerce. 

He was first employed at the Borden plant in Richfield Springs as 
bookkeeper; then accepted a position at Cooperstown, N. Y., as clerk 
in the G. F. & P. A. office of the Southern N. Y. Railroad Company, 
being later transferred to Richfield Springs as the soliciting freight and 
passenger agent. 

He enlisted as landsman for Quartermaster Aviation, U. S. N., on 
December 15th, 1917, and was assigned to the Mechanics' School Office 
at Pensacola, Fla. On April 9th, 1918, he was transfer to U. S. Naval 
Air Station, Montauk, Long Island, being assigned to dirigible and kite 
balloon work. On December 3rd, 1918, he was transferred to 8th Regi- 
ment, Pelham Bay Training Camp, and here spent a month in the hos- 
pital. 

On January 8th, 1919, transferred to Officer Material School, Prince- 
ton University. On March 1st, 1919, he was transferred to 2nd Regi- 
ment, Pelham Bay, having qualified for Ensign (Pay Corps), U. S. N. 
R. F. 

His activities in the several corps and schools included yeoman 
work at Pensacola; dirigible and kite balloon work at Montauk, making 
several flights during the summer. At Princeton he studied the duties 
of paymaster and supply office. 

Promoted to Quartermaster, 2nd Class (a), January 1st, 1918. Made 
Quartermaster, 1st Class (a), October 1st, 1918. Chief Storekeeper, No- 
vember 26th, 1918. Honorably discharged from the service on March 
27th, 1919. 

Commissioned Ensign (Pay Corps), U. S. N. R. F., on March 27th, 
1919. 



214 




215 



CLAUDE M'KINLEY ROSE 



The son of Byron D. Rose and Annie M. Rose, was born at Schuyler 
Lake, Otsego County, New York, on October 10th, 1896. He finished 
three years in the Schuyler Lake High School and later took an I. C. S. 
course in electric lighting work. He was two years with the Southern 
New York Railroad Company at Henderson, N. Y.; several months at 
machinist's work and one year as an electrical contractor at Schuyler 
Lake, N. Y. 

He was called to the service on December 26th, 1917, entering as 
L. E. G., and was stationed at Newport, R. I., until February 11th, 1918. 
At this time he was transferred to Naval Radio School at Cambridge, 
Mass., entering Ship's Co. on March 1st, 1918, being engaged there as 
an Electrician until April 15th, 1918. Was transferred then to Naval 
Radio School at Camp Perry, and assigned to Co. B, 7th Regiment. At 
Newport was assigned to the 2nd Regiment, 7th Co. 

Was rated as Electrician, 3rd Class, July 1st, 1918, and as Electrician, 
2nd Class, March 1st, 1919. 



216 




217 



KAZIMERS RYNCHOVITCH 



Was born in Lithuania, Russia, February 20th, 1899, where he attended 
school and learned the trade of a carpenter. He reached the United 
States in 1913, coming directly to Richfield Springs. Here he worked 
for the Utica Knitting Company imtil he entered the service. May 10th, 
1918. He received training in five different camps and the order of his 
transfers was as follows: Fort Slocum, New York; Camp Hancock, 
Georgia; Camp Upton, Long Island; Camp Meredith, New Jersey. 
Then he was sent to the Du Pont factories to do ammimition work for 
about two months, after which he was returned to Camp Dix and 
attached to the Depot Brigade Receiving Detachmeent. He was dis- 
charged from Camp Dix December 23rd, 1918, and returned to Richfield 
Springs, resuming his work in the knitting mills. 



218 




219 



RAYMOND HENRY SCHOOLEY 



The son of Herbert E. Schooley and Minnie E. Llewellyn Schooley, was 
born at Richfield Springs, Otsego County, New York, on March 26th, 
1884. He is the husband of Anna Cecelia George Schooley, and has one 
child. Hazel Anna Louise Schooley. 

He attended the public school at Richfield Springs and graduated 
from the High School in the class of 1902. After leaving school he was 
engaged in the grocery business in New York City. 

He enlisted as apprentice seaman in the U. S. Navy, October 6th, 
1905. Promoted through grades of ordinary seaman, seaman, gunner's 
mate — third, second and first-class — and honorably discharged on com- 
pletion of enlistment, after four years' service, Oct. 5th, 1909, as gunner's 
mate, first-class. He made cruise around the world from December,- 
1907, to February, 1909. Afterward engaged in the advertising business 
and followed it for eight years, 1910 to 1917, inclusive. 

He resigned this position and enlisted in the U. S. Naval Reserve 
Force as Chief Gunner's Mate, on December 31st, 1917. Was sent im- 
mediately to the Officers' Material School at Pelham Bay Park, New 
York City. 

Graduated and appointed Ensign, U. S. N. R. F., March 25th, 1918, 
and ordered to active duty as such on March 26th, 1918. Served as an 
officer in the Third Naval District Patrol Fleet until September 30th, 
and was then transferred to the U. S. S. North Carolina, on convoy and 
transport duty between New York City and Brest, France. 

Upon his own request he was placed on inactive duty, March 21st, 
1919. 



220 




221 



FRANK ALBERT SEELOW 



The son of Albert Seelow and Sarah Seelow, was born at Gloversville, 
New York, on June 21st, 1894, and was educated in the public school and 
business college in his native city. 

He enlisted on December 12th, 1917, in Naval Aviation Corps and 
trained at Pensacola, Florida, and was sent to Pavilly, France, March 1st, 
1918, and to Paimboeuf, France, on April 4th, 1918. Returned to 
Charleston, S. C, on February 1st, 1919, and was discharged from the 
service on February 18th, 1919. 

His overseas service consisted of mechanical work on dirigibles and 
air ships. 



222 




223 



ELMER BRYANT SHAUL 



The son of Alvin W. Shaul and Elizabeth H. Shaul, was born at Rich- 
field Springs, Otsego County, New York, on May 4th, 1887. He re- 
ceived his preliminary education at the Richfield Springs High School, 
and graduated from that institution to enter the Liberal Arts College, 
Syracuse University, where he took a two years' course, and later gradu- 
ated from the Medical College, Syracuse University, Syracuse, N. Y. He 
also took a course in Opthalmology in Philadelphia Polyclinic Hospital 
and College for Graduates in Medicine. He then took up the practice 
of medicine. He is the husband of Ruth Keller Shaul. 

He was called to the service on June 13th, 1917, and assigned to the 
Medical Corps. He was in training at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., until 
August 25th, 1917, and was then transferred to the 306th Sanitary Train, 
and has been serving with that organization ever since. From June 16th, 
1917, to July 10th, 1917, he attended lectures and drills at Medical Officers' 
Training Camp, Camp Greenleaf, Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga.; on July 10th, 1917, 
v/as transferred to the Field Hospital Section at Camp Greenleaf, where 
he was engaged in the training of the enlisted personnel in the section. 

On August 14th, 1917, he was placed in command of Divisional Field 
Hospital A, which later became Field Hospital 322. On August 25th, 
1917, with Field Hospital A, was sent to Camp Jackson, Columbia, S. C. 
While in Camp Jackson they operated as a Camp Hospital until January 
8th, 1918, when the Base Hospital was completed and the Camp Hos- 
pital dismantled. 

From this time to the date of departure overseas, August 8th, 1918, 
he was occupied with the usual duties of routine. 

He arrived overseas on August 20th, 1918, and from that time until 
November 7th, 1918, the 81st Division, to which the 306th Sanitary Train 
was attached, was in training, or occupying a quiet sector. At this 
time he was Director of Ambulance Companies. 

From November 9th to 11th, 1918, in the Belrupt Sector, the 81st 
Division took part in the Meuse Argonne offensive. During these three 
days' fighting the Division suffered over a thousand casualties, which 
were evacuated by the Ambulance Section of the 306th Sanitary Train. 

He was commissioned a First Lieutenant, M. C, May 9th, 1917; Cap- 
tain, M. C, November 13th, 1917; Major, M. C, June 13th, 1918; Lieu- 
tenant Colonel, M. C, February 26th, 1919. 

At this writing. May 25th, Lieut. Col. Shaul is with Headquarters 
Ambulance Section, 306th Sanitary Train, France. 



224 



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225 



WARD H. SHEPARD 



The son of Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel W. Shepard, was born in the Town 
of Wilmurt, Herkimer County, New York, November 23rd, 1891. In 
1910 he married Miss Elvira Brown of Richfield Springs, now deceased. 

He lived about ten years in the Village of Herkimer, N. Y., and for a 
considerable period previous to his call to the service he had been em- 
ployed in the Brockway Garage, at Richfield Springs, N. Y. 

He left Cooperstown, N. Y., on September 9th, 1918, for Camp Jack- 
son, Georgia. Here he was stricken with Spanish influenza and died 
on September 28th, 1918, three weeks after he had left Richfield Springs 
for camp. 

He was the first soldier from the Town of Richfield to give up his 
life in the great cause. His funeral obsequies were very impressive and 
were held from St. John's Church. The body was escorted by a squad 
from Co. M, of Mohawk, N. Y., who fired the military volleys over the 
grave in Lakeview Cemetery. At the grave the Masonic service was 
conducted by the Honorable Allen J. Bloomfield. 



226 





^^1 

s. 





227 



JOHN A. SITTS 



The son of George A. Sitts and Katherine Sitts, was born at Richfield 
Springs, Otsego County, New York, on July 18th, 1888, and was a pupil 
at the Richfield Springs High School. 

At the time of his enlistment, June 12th, 1917, he was about to be 
assigned an engineer's cab on the Delaware and Hudson R. R., which he 
is now forever prevented from doing by the loss of the vision of the 
right eye, incurred in the service. 

He enlisted in the Quartermaster's Corps and was later transferred 
to the Machine Gun Corps. He received his military training at Peeks- 
kill State Camp and at Spartanburg, S. C, under the supervision of 
French and Australian officers. 

He has seen nine months' service overseas, and was fourteen times 
"over the top" in battles in Belgium and France, and in the last one, his 
Division, the famous 27th, broke the Hindenburg line. 

He was seriously wounded by shrapnel in the shoulder and side, and 
lost the sight of his right eye. 



228 




229 



GREGORY PHILIP SMITH 



The son of Michael Smith and Anna Smith, was born in the Town of 
Exeter, Otsego County, New York, on January 2nd, 1897. He obtained 
his preliminary education at the district school in West Exeter and the 
Schuyler Lake Union School, and is now a student at the Utica School 
of Commerce. 

When he was called to the service, on November 13th, 1918, he was 
engaged in farming. 

He was attached to the Infantry and sent to Camp Humphrey, 
Virginia. 



230 




231 



BRYAN CLINTON SNYDER 



The son of Edward Snyder and Alice Snyder, was born at Cullen, Herki- 
mer County, on November 18th, 1896. He attended school at Cullen and 
Richfield Springs. 

He was called to the service on May 10th, 1918, reporting at Fort 
Slocum, and after one week transferred to Camp Hancock, Georgia, in 
the 8th Machine Gun Corps. In two months he was sent to Camp 
Upton and then to Camp Merritt, where he was assigned to the 155th 
Infantry, 39th Division. 

He went overseas on July 21st, 1918, landing at Brest. Here he 
was again transferred to the 355th Infantry, 89th Division, and moved to 
the front. 

He was at St. Mihiel, September 12th to the 23rd; Argonne, Sep- 
tember 26th to November 11th. He was appointed a corporal on May 
25th, 1918, at Camp Hancock. 

He returned on the "Northern Pacific," leaving France on Christmas 
Day, landing on this side on January 5th, 1919, the boat being stranded 
lor four days on Fire Island, 

He was honorably discharged from the service on February 27th, 
1919, from Camp Dix. 



232 




233 



OMAR ROBINSON SOUTHWELL 



The son of George Southwell and Myrtle Robinson Southwell, was born 
at Richfield, Otsego County, New York, on February 19th, 1900. He was 
educated in the Richfield Springs High School. 

He had been employed as a bookkeeper and had been working, previ- 
ous to his enlistment, August 5th, 1918, in the Remington Typewriter 
plant at Ilion, N. Y. 

He enlisted in the Engineering Force of the regular United States 
Navy, and was assigned to the Naval Training Station at Newport, Rhode 
Island. Here he was under training for about two months when he was 
transferred to Ship's Company, in the Main Power Plant. 

He is still in the service and stationed at Newport. 



234 




235 



DEWEY SPONBURG 



The son of George S. and Maria Sponburgh, was born in Richfield 

Springs, July 4th, 1898. He received his early school training in the 

Richfield Springs High School after which he took up his duties as 
knitter with the Utica Knitting Company. 

He entered the service June 21, 1918, and reported at Fort Slocum, 
N. Y., where he was assigned to Company 2. Shortly afterwards he was 
sent to Del Rio, Texas, and there assigned to Troop C, 313th Cavalry. 
Later he was transferred to Camp Knox, Ky., to the 69th Field Artillery, 
Battalion B, where he received training as a motorcyclist. He was dis- 
charged from the service Dec. 20th, 1918, and immediately returned to 
Richfield Springs, where he took up his former work with the Utica 
Knitting Company. 



236 




237 



ROY SPONBURG 



The son of Elmer Sponburgh and Eva F. Sponburgh, was born in Rich- 
field Springs, Otsego County, New York, on November 28th, 1894. His 
wife is Alma Mae Ranney Sponburgh. He was educated at the Richfield 
Springs public school and left that institution after his second year of 
High School work. At the time of his entrance into the service of his 
country, on October 6th, 1917, he was engaged in farming. 

He was first assigned to Co. G, 303rd Regiment of Infantry; later 
transferred to the 157th Depot Brigade, and finally sent to Camp Gordon, 
Ga., preserving the same military assignment. His military training was 
obtained at Camp Devens, Mass. 



238 




239 



RALPH SPEAKER 



The son of Oliver Spraker and Emma Spraker, was bom at Salt Spring- 
ville, New York, on September 1st, 1887. He was educated in the village 
school at that place. Previous to his call to the service on May 27th, 
1918, he had been a farmer. 

He was assigned to Co. D, 52nd Pioneer Infantry, and later trans- 
ferred to Co. G, as cook. 

On September 26th, 1918, he sailed overseas with the 52nd Pioneer 
Infantry and was attached to the First Army and 5th Army Corps and 
was engaged with the 310th Engineers in road construction. He entered 
Argonne Forest during his experiences with A, E. F. 



240 




241 



FRED STEELE 



The son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Steele was born in the Town of Rich- 
field in 1896, and educated in the district schools of his neighborhood. 

He was engaged in farming when he enlisted in the United States 
Navy in October of 1917. 

After a preliminary training at a Naval Station he was ordered to the 
U. S. S. Oklahoma, and at this writing, May 15th, 1919, he is still in 
the service. 



242 




243 



WILLIAM FOLTS STEELE 



The son of Richard and Florence E. A. Steele, was born in the Town 
of Richfield, Otsego County, N. Y., October 7th, 1899. He attended the 
district school after which he engaged in farming. He enlisted as a 
seaman May 30th, 1917, and was in training at Newport, Rhode Island, 
for some time. Later he was ordered to the torpedo destroyer Duncan 
where he is serving at this time. 



244 




245 



HAROLD DERTHICK STERNBERG 



The son of Watson A. Sternberg and Harriet Derthick Sternberg, was 
born at Binghamton, Broome County, New York, on June 20th, 1891. 
His education was obtained at the Richfield Springs public school. 

He enlisted in Troop G, 1st New York Cavalry, on July 8th, 1917, and 
was transferred to Co. C, 106th Machine Battalion. Later was assigned 
to Co. D, 102nd Ammunition Train and remained with that organization 
until the date of his discharge. 

He was sent to Camp Wadsworth, S. C, for his training of nine 
months. 

He left the United States on June 14th, 1918, with the 102nd Ammu- 
nition Train, a port of the 52nd Brigade, Field Artillery, and was at- 
tached to the 2nd American Army, on the Meuse, Argonne Sector. 

He was in nineteen battles, among them being Le Claire, Chatten- 
court, Le Mort Homme 295, Bras Brabout, and Le Torge. 



246 




247 



CECIL H. TAYLOR 



The son of Fearnley and Mary Ellen Taylor, was born at Richfield 
Springs, Otsego County, New York, on November 27th, 1890. He at- 
tended the Richfield Springs School and took up stationary engineering 
until he enlisted on May 11th, 1917. Reported at Fort Totten, Long 
Island, and in training there until July 14th, when he shipped overseas 
and landed at Plymouth, England, July 26th, 1917. Then was sent to 
Camp Borden, England, with the Uth Engineers for gas instruction. 
Ordered to Boulogne, France, and received supplementary gas training at 
Calais on the way to the front. 

He operated on the St. Quentin and Cambrai fronts for five months. 
Was accidentally injured here, breaking his leg, and confined to the Base 
Hospital, No. 9, at Rouen for six weeks. 

On November 29th, 1917, the 11th Engineers, attached to the 3rd 
British Army, were the first American troops in an engagement in the 
battle of Gonsecourt. In April, 1918, was replaced in the 13th Engi- 
neers, attached to the 2nd French Army. Went to Verdun, where he was 
engaged in railroad operating. 

Was later in the St. Mihiel, Meuse and Argonne drive. Sent to Mar- 
seilles, France, on March 17th, 1919, and sailed for the United States 
April 12th, landing in New York on April 28th. Was sent to Camp 
Mills, then Camp Upton, where he was honorably discharged from the 
service on May 14th, 1919, returning to his home in Richfield Springs, 
expecting later to take up his former vocation. 




249 



HARRY ALBERT TAYLOR 



The son of Spencer A, Taylor and Rosa House Taylor, was born in Rich- 
held Springs, New York, September 25th, 1893. He was educated in the 
Richfield Springs High School and later engaged in farming. He entered 
the service August 1st, 1918, and was sent to Camp Wadsworth, S. C. 
On September 1st he was sent to Camp Stuart, Newport News, Va., and 
on September 15th sailed for France. He landed at Brest September 
28th where he remained for three days. He was soon sent up to the 
front and on October 17th was gassed and sent to Base Hospital, No. 
4. After recuperating he was transferred to a training academy at 
Noyon and made an acting corporal and coacher on a rifle range. He 
was later held as a witness to the shooting of a corporal by the Military 
Police. He was sent back to Brest December 27th, 1918, and sailed for 
the United States January 17th, 1919. He arrived in New York January 
26th, was first sent to Camp Mills and then transferred to Camp Upton 
where he was honorably discharged from the service February 5th, 
1919. He immediately returned to Richfield Springs and resumed his 
duties on the farm. 



250 




251 



LEO ELMER TEFFT 



The son of George Tefft and Eliza S. Tefft, was born in Richfield 
Springs, Otsego Covinty, New York, on November 8th, 1894. He received 
his education in the Richfield Springs High School, and at the time the 
young man volunteered his services, he was engaged in farming. 

He enlisted on June 3rd, 1917, and was assigned to the Infantry, Co. 
G, 49th Regiment, but on July 16th, 1918, was transferred to Co. C, 
1st Division Battalion, and was sent for his training to Camp Upton, 
Long Island, spending nineteen months in the different army camps. 
He was stationed at Syracuse, Camp Merritt, New Jersey, in addition to 
the others mentioned above. 

He received his honorable discharge at Fort Slocum on January 9th, 
1919, and at once took up the duties of farming. He is now located at 
Nichols, Tioga County, New York. 



252 




253 



FRED S. TENEYCK 



The son of Salathiel Ten Eyck and Caroline Remington Ten Eyck 
Young, was bom at Ilion, Herkimer County, New York, on March 19th, 
1882, and educated in the Ilion public school. 

Previous to his enlistment he was employed in the Remington Arms 
plant at Ilion, this great business having been founded by his ancestor, 
Eliphalet Remington. He enlisted on March 18th, 1918, and has the 
distinction of being the oldest man to enlist from the Town of Richfield. 

He was assigned to the 50th Infantry, Co. K, 22nd Division, and 
was located at different times at Fort Slocum, Washington, Potomac 
Park, Camp Sevier, S. C, and Camp Dix. 

He was one of the guards stationed to protect the White House and 
Government Buildings at the National Capital, and was about to go over- 
seas, when the epidemic of influenza broke out in his camp and he was 
detained until after the signing of the Armistice. 

He was discharged from the regular army on the 24th day of Feb- 
ruary, 1919, 



254 




255 



WILBUR FISK TEN EYCK 



The son of Salathiel Ten Eyck and Caroline Remington Ten Eyck 
Young, was born at Amsterdam, Montgomery County, New York, on 
February 4th, 1893, and educated in the district schools of that locality. 

He was called to the service in May of 1918, and assigned to the 57th 
Engineers, Co. E. 

He sailed for France from Camp Laurel, Md., and has participated in 
all the engagements credited to his company. 

At the present writing, May 15th, 1919, he is with the American 
Army of Occupation. 

This young veteran is the great grandson of Eliphalet Remington, 
who in 1816 forged the first Remington rifle. 



256 



LESTER CLYDE TICE 



The son of Horace and Anna Tice, was born at Schuyler Lake, N. Y., 
March 18, 1899. He received his school training at Richfield Springs 
after which he took up his duties as a sawyer and was engaged in this 
work at the time of his induction into the service April 16, 1917. 

His military training began at Fort Macintosh, Laredo, Texas, where 
he was first assigned Company M, 37th Infantry, and later transferred to 
the Supply Company of the 37th Infantry. 

His services in Texas consisted largely of guard and border duty 
and he has taken part in several of the border skirmishes with the 
Mexicans. 

At this writing he is still occupied with his police duties on the 
border of Mexico and will probably be stationed there for some little 
time. 

He has two medals, one for Mexican invasion and the other for 
marksmanship. 



258 




259 



EARL T. TINKER 



Was born in Chenango County, New York, and was educated in the 
public school at Waterville, N. Y. 

Previous to his enlistment he had been with the Borden Company 
and at the time of his entrance into the service was a trainman running 
between Richfield Springs and Binghamton, N. Y. 

Sergeant Tinker is a member of Company A, 23rd Infantry, 2nd 
Division, the Division listed as losing the most men of any in the A. E. F, 
His record as an overseas officer dates back to the early part of 1918, 
when he had been three times over the top and in the trenches at 
Verdun for two months. 

He fought with his famous Division at Chateau Thierry, the fourth 
most decisive battle of the war, and was in the thick of it for 41 days. 
The day of May 30th, 1918, they were located in a small French town 
and by daylight moved out in trucks and on June 6th, at 4 o'clock in 
the afternoon began the battle which lasted until the next morning. The 
next night followed another engagement and then on until the American 
forces began to drive the enemy back. Every night they brought back 
their dead at Triangle Farm, near Belleau Wood. They had been with- 
out eating or drinking for about a week and at the end of forty-one days, 
when relieved, they came out of the trenches like living skeletons, with 
uniforms nearly rotted away. 

Next the 2nd Division went to Soissons, where they drove the enemy 
back 13 kilometers, and captured 10,000 prisoners. From Soissons they 
went to St. Mihiel, duplicating their action at the former field. Thence 
to Mt. Blanc, Champagne, and later to the Argonne Forest. 

In the middle of April, 1919, Sergeant Tinker was across the Rhine, 
in a town named Vallendar, with the American Army of Occupation. 



260 




261 



ROBERT PEEKS TOWNSEND 



The son of William Cocks Townsend and Mariana Seaman Townsend, 
was born at Locust Valley, Long Island, New York, on September 24th, 
1884. He was educated in the public school at Locust Valley. He is the 
husband of Grace F. Richardson Townsend. 

Previous to his enlistment he had organized the Matinecock Launch 
& Power Co., at Oyster Bay, N. Y,, acting as its secretary and general 
manager. Retired in 1908 and organized the Nassau Oil Co., serving as 
its president. His health broke down and he came to Richfield Springs, 
N. Y., in 1911. He was the assistant general secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 
at Utica, N. Y., 1913 to 1915. From 1915 to 1917 he served as industrial 
secretary of the Central Branch, Y. M. C. A., Brooklyn, N. Y., which he 
had planned to make his life work, when the need of the hour made 
apparent that his former training in ship building was of greater 
emergency value and he enlisted, being called to active service on July 
25th, 1917. He was sent, as assistant naval constructor, immediately to 
City Island, N. Y., to take charge of the conversion of yachts, taken over 
by the government, and the equipment of the same for naval crews and 
patrol work along the coast. Reconstructed and equipped twenty-three 
vessels by December 15th, 1917. 

He was then ordered to Hoboken, Port of Embarkation, to supervise 
the reconstruction of German, and other ships taken over by the navy, 
making them into troop transports. These included the Leviathan, for- 
merly the Vaterland, the Mount Vernon, formerly the Kronprinzessin 
Cecelie, the Agamemnon, formerly the Kaiser Wilhelm II, the Von Steu- 
ben, formerly the Kronprinz Wilhelm, the America, Covington and 
others. Equipped and kept in care constantly, more than forty trans- 
ports, and at times had over a thousand mechanics to lay out work for 
and supervise. He was stationed there from December 15th, 1917, to 
February 12th, 1919, when he requested that he be placed on the inactive 
list. 

He was commissioned a warrant officer being Chief Carpenter. 



262 




263 



WILLIAM ROBERT VAN DE WALKER 



The son of Gary Van De Walker and Cornelia Cronk Van De Walker, 
who was the granddaughter of Hiram Cronk, the last survivor of the 
War of 1812, was born at Rome, Oneida County, New York, on February 
11th, 1883. He was educated in the Rome High School and is the hus- 
band of Mary Angermier Van De Walker. 

Previous to his enlistment on May 15th, 1917, and to his induction 
into the service on October 15th, 1917, he had for fifteen years worked 
with the New York Telephone Co., in the Utica district. 

He enlisted in the Signal Corps and spent a little time in Camp 
Sherman, Chilicothe, Ohio, and was there made cook in Co. E, 403rd 
Telegraph Battalion in May, 1918, was transfered to Camp Mills, Long 
Island. On June 7th, 1918, sailed for France, and on arrival was again 
transferred to Co. D, 403rd Telegraph Battalion. 

While at Camp Sherman he was promoted at First Class Cook, and 
served as such overseas. 

He was stricken with influenza, which left him with a severe case 
of asthma, being confined several weeks in Base Hospital, No. 20, in 
France. 



264 



o 




265 



KENNETH H. VEDDER 



The son of William H. Vedder and Ida M. Vedder, was born in the 
Town of Stark, Herkimer County, New York, on June 3rd, 1892. His 
education was obtained in the common school, and at the time of his 
entrance into the service, August 26th, 1918, he was working on the home 
farm. 

He was first assigned to the 157th Depot Brigade, and subsequently 
transferred to Auxiliary Remount Depot 309. Was sent for training to 
Fort Slocum and later to Camp McClellan, Ala., where he was a victim 
of the influenza epidemic, and was quarantined for twenty-one days. 

He left Camp McClellan for Camp Upton on March 26th, 1919, and 
was honorably discharged there from the service on April 3rd, 1919. 



266 




•267 



FRANK W. WALKER 



Was reared on the old Derthick Homestead overlooking Canadarago 
Lake. He attended the Richfield Springs High School, and later took 
up his duties on the farm. He was also a licensed chauffeur. He enlisted 
in the Quartermaster's Division December 26th, 1917, and was first sent 
to Fort Slocum, New York, and shortly afterwards to Newport News, 
Va. He sailed for overseas April 12th, 1918, and has been stationed at 
Camp St. Sulpice, Gironde, France, with Company B, 312th Labor Bat- 
talion, Q. M. C, U. S. A. 

At this writing a letter to friends advises he is in good health and 
hopes to get back to the good old United States about July 1st, 1919. 



268 




269 



LYNN WILLIAM WALKER 



The son of George Walker and Cora Walker, was born in the Township 
of Richfield, Otsego County, New York, on November 24th, 1893. He 
attended the rural school and later entered the Richfield Springs High 
School. He is also a graduate of the Greeley School of Elocution and 
Dramatic Art of Boston. For a time he was employed in the Reming- 
ton plant at Ilion, and later went to Ithaca to work for the Thomas- 
Morse Aircraft Corporation. 

He volunteered at the Syracuse Recruiting Station on December 
10th, 1917, and entered the Aviation Section of the Signal Corps, which 
was later segregated into the Air Service, and was enrolled as a Chauf- 
feur. Afterwards was made an Airplane Machinist in the 349th Aero 
Service Squadron, later designated as the 110th. 

During his term of service he was located at Fort Slocum, New 
York; Kelly Field, San Antonio, Texas; Dorr Field, Arcadia, Florida 
He was honorably discharged from the service from Camp Upton. 



270 




271 



JAMES ARTHUR WATERMAN 



The son of Horace V. Waterman and Florence Moore Waterman, was 
born at Winfield, Herkimer County, New York, on October 14th, 1892, 
but a large portion of his youth was spent at Richfield, N. Y., and his 
academic education was obtained in the Richfield Springs High School, 

Enlisted in the fall of 1911 in Co. M, 1st Infantry, N. Y. S. National 
Guard, serving for three years, being honorably discharged therefrom. 

Enlisted in Troop G, N. Y. State Cavalry, some time after and ar- 
rived with his troop at McAllen, Texas, on July 7th, 1916. This organiza- 
tion afterwards went to Hidalgo, Texas, and patroled the Rio Grande 
River for about twenty miles along its borders. 

Enlisted in the U. S. Navy April 7th, 1917, at Albany, New York, 
and after spending one month on receiving ship at New York City was 
transferred to Submarine Base at New London, Conn. Later he was 
again transferred to U. S. Submarine G-3, and then took up optical repair 
work and finished a course in repairing periscopes and other instruments 
used in submarine warfare. 

From the Sub-Base he was transferred to the U. S. S. Tonopah, a 
one-turret monitor, and a tender or mother ship for submarines. He 
arrived at Porila Delgade, in the Azores, on February, 1917, this being a 
U. S. Naval Base, No. 13. The port was shelled by a German submarine 
on July 4th, 1916, and two killed. The enemy was driven off by the 
Collier Orion. 

He was last heard from at Valetta, Malta, on April 18th, 1919, and 
expressed himself as expecting to serve out the remaining two years of 
his enlistment. 



He is rated as a Machinist's Mate, First Class. 



272 




273 



JOHN HENRY WEEKS 



The son of Mark and Anna Weeks, was born in Milford, New York, 
October 15th, 1898. He received his early education in the schools about 
Milford. He entered the service in the summer of 1917 when only nine- 
teen years of age. He was sent to Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina, 
and attached to Company M, 1st New York Infantry, June 21st, 1917. 
In October, 1917, he was transferred to Company F, 102nd Engineers. 
He was shipped overseas and engaged with his company in making roads, 
bridges, etc., to facilitate the moving of men and supplies to the front. 
He was under heavy fire at the construction of the bridge over the La 
Salle River. 



274 




275 



WILLIAM THOMAS WELDEN 



The son of Richard Welden and Catherine Dillon Welden, was born at 
Richfield Springs, Otsego County, New York, on May 4th, 1875. He 
attended the District School and the Richfield Springs High School and 
graduated from the University of Buffalo with the degree of LL.B. He 
is the husband of Mary S. Elwood Welden. He was practicing law and 
serving as postmaster at Richfield Springs when the U. S. declared war, 
and immediately tendered his services as a volunteer. Was notified to 
appear at Manlius, N. Y., in April, 1917, for examination for Officers' 
Training Camp, and was accepted on May 4th. On May 8th, 1917, he 
was called to the service and sworn in for duration of the war. He was 
assigned to Co. 14, U. S. Infantry, 3rd Provisional Train Reg., O. T. C, 
and stationed at Madison Barracks, Sacketts Harbor, N. Y. 

He was mustered into the Officers' Training School and received in- 
tensive training in military strategy and other branches of the service. 

While in training, varicose veins developed and in consequence of 
a medical examination, he was honorably discharged from the service on 
account of this physical disability. 

Returning to Richfield Springs he was appointed by Governoil 
Charles Whitman as one of the members of the Otsego County Home 
Defense Committee. He also served in registering the alien Germans 
for this district, and was a member of the Liberty Loan Committees and 
a Four-Minute Man. He was engaged in the recruiting service and en- 
listed a large number of volunteers. When the draft law, in the fall of 
1918, increased the age for enlistment to forty-five years, he waived all 
exemptions and was expecting to leave for Camp Lee, Va., when the 
Armistice was signed. 



276 




277 



CHARLES LESTER WESTCOTT 



The son of Walter Westcott and Martha A. Baker Westcott, was born at 
Hartwick, Otsego County, New York, on April 6th, 1889. He attended 
school at Hartwick and CuUen, and later took up farm work for a time. 
He is the husband of Bessie Newkirk Wescott. 

At the time of his call to the service, he was employed at Herkimer, 
N. Y., and reported for service on September 27th, 1917, being sent to 
Camp Devens, Mass., where he was promoted to Wagon Master. 

Was sent overseas early in July of 1918. Attended automobile train- 
ing school in France for about two months. 

He is attached to Co. B, Headquarters Battalion, G. H. Q., stationed 
at Chaumont, France, and is engaged in driving and repairing automo- 
biles. 

At this writing. May 15th, 1919, he expects to be detained for service 
in France for at least six months longer. 



278 




279 



WILLIAM BAKER WESTCOTT 



The son of Walter Westcott and Martha A. Baker Westcott, was born 
at Cullen, Herkimer County, on March 31st, 1895. He attended school 
at Cullen and Richfield Springs and became a licensed chauffeur, em- 
ployed in Rochester, N. Y. 

He enlisted in the N. Y. State National Guard, 3rd Infantry, on 
March 9th, 1916, and sent to Camp Whitman for two months. He was 
then sent to Pharr, Texas, with the 3rd N. Y. Infantry, Co. G, for 
police border duty, remaining imtil November, 1916. He then returned to 
civilian life and resumed his former duties. 

In April, 1917, Co. G was called out to do guard duty at Clyde, N. Y., 
and Private Wescott was included in this call. After a few months he 
was relieved from this duty and sent to Spartanburg, S. C. On January 
28th, 1918, he was transferred to Camp Hancock, Augusta, Ga., and at- 
tached to the Motor Mechanics Corps. He was then sent to Camp 
Greene, N. C, April 7th, 1918, and in July, 1918, was sent overseas to 
France, with the Motor Mechanics Corps. 

His duty took him to within fifteen miles of the front lines, where he 
was engaged in the repairing of motors. He experienced three dif- 
ferent air raids without personal injury. 

At this writing. May 15th, 1919, he is stationed at Niver, France, 
with the 412th Machine Shop Truck Unit, and expects to return to the 
States in July, 1919. 



280 




281 



LESTER WINFIELD WHITCOMB 



The son of Arthur Whitcomb and Bertha Whitcomb, was born at Cairo, 
N. Y., on December 19th, 1897. 

He was a member of the famous 27th Division, and enlisted in Mo- 
hawk, N. Y., in Co. M, March 3rd, 1916, with the National State Guard 
until Jvme 27th, 1916. He went to Camp Whitman and returned to 
Mohawk, August 4th, 1918. 

On December 26th, 1916, was promoted to Corporal, and from Feb- 
ruary 4th, 1917, to April 12th, 1917, guarded the New York Aqueduct at 
Peekskill, N. Y. 

On July 15th, 1917, was mustered into the Federal service; August 
18th, went to Van Cortland Park; September 25th, to Spartanburg; Jan- 
uary 15th, 1918, in School for Cooks, qualifying on March 4th. 

On April 23rd, 1918, he married Lillian Tefft, of Richfield Springs, 
and on April 25th was ordered to camp, being transferred from Camp 
Wadsworth, S. C, on April 30th and sent to Newport News, Va. 

On May 11th, 1918, embarked and sailed for France on the U. S. S. 
Susquehanna, landing at Brest, May 25th. On Sept. 25th he was trans- 
ferred to 107th Medical Detachment, as first aid man. Went "over the 
top" with Cos. L and M, and helped dress wounds of men who had be- 
longed to his old Co. M of Mohawk, N. Y. Was in severe engagements 
at St. Quentin and once had canteen shot off his hip, with a bullet 
through his emergency kit. On October 18th, 1918, was gassed and on 
the following day again gassed, being taken to hospital at Rouen. From 
its effects he developed pneumonia and was transferred to South Hamp- 
ton, England, American Base Hospital 37. Here he was ill until he 
started for home on December 14th, 1918, from Gravesend, on the hos- 
pital ship Saxonia, landing on December 26th. He was transferred from 
Debarkation Hospital to Camps Merritt and Upton and on January 25th, 
1919, was honorably discharged from the service. 



282 




283 



JOHN EVERETT WILLIAMS 



The son of John David Williams and Harriet Heacox Williams, was born 
at Richfield Springs, Otsego County, New York, on December 29th, 1889. 
He was educated at the Richfield Springs High School, and after became 
an expert operator of automobiles, serving several well known families 
of Utica as private chauffeur. 

He enlisted May 16th, 1917, and was sent to Fort Slocum, New 
York. Was transferred to Camp America, University of Washington, 
D. C, and attached to the 6th Engineers, Co. D. 

He was sent to France in December, 1917, and was attached to the 
Thirty-fourth British Army Corps. He was severely wounded near 
Amiens on March 28th, 1918, suffering a permanent disability. In addi- 
tion to his wound in the shoulder, upper arm and elbow, he was badly 
gassed, seriously affecting the heart action. He was taken to the dress- 
ing station at Amiens and afterwards transferred to the Hospital at 
Rouen, from which institution he was sent home, arriving at New York 
on August 15th, 1918. 

He was made a Corporal in Co. D, 6th Engineers, at Washington, 
D. C, on August 1st, 1917. He has been sent to several hospitals since 
his arrival in the United States for examination but in spite of his dis- 
ability has secured employment as an automobile salesman. 



284 




285 



EARL WALTER YEOMAN 



The son of John Yeoman and Anna Pearl Johnson Yeoman, was born 
at Utica, Oneida County, New York, on November 3rd, 1898, and was 
educated in the Utica Grammar Schools, supplementing his course with 
three and one-half years in the Utica Free Academy. 

He was a student at the Academy when war was declared and en- 
listed before the end of the term, on April 26th, 1917. He enlisted at 
Utica in Troop G, 1st N. Y. Cavalry, was made into Co. B, 106th Ma- 
chine Gun Battalion, of the famous 27th Division. Was sent to Camp 
Bliss, Brooklyn, and later to Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, S. C. 

He sailed overseas on May 10th, 1918, and did front line duty the 
last part of June, 1918, in France and Belgium. Was in the East Poper- 
inghe line, July 8th, 9th and 20th; Dickebush Sector, August 21st to the 
30th; and was at St. Quentin and Cambrai in September of 1918. 

He was wounded at St. Quentin on September 27th, 1918, while in 
action, on advance. 



286 




287 



The following men entered the service from this community 
but the Committee was unable to secure any further data : 

WILLIAM NORTON 
LESTER BRIGHAM 
JOSEPH OUILLET 
NILES D. MORTENSEN 
GLENN B. COLE 



288