(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Wyncote, Pennsylvania : the history, development, architecture and preservation of a Victorian Philadelphia suburb"

UNIVERSITY^ 

PENN5YL\^\NIA. 

UBRAR1E5 




y 



WYNCOTE, PENNSYLVANIA: THE HISTOPY, DEVELOPMENT, ARCHITECTURE 
AND PRESERVATION OF A VICTORIAN PHILADELPHIA SUBURB 



Doreen L. Foust 

A THESIS 
in 
Historic Preservation 



Presented to the faculties of the University of Pennsylvania 
in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of 



MASTER OF SCIENCE 



1985 




fvid G. De Long, Chairman 



^ 



FINE ARTS 

NA 

02 

1985 

F782 



UNIVERSITY 

OF 

PENNSYLVANIA 

LIBRARIES 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Acknowledgements iii 

List of Illustrations v 

Introduction 1 

Part One: History 4 

Chapter One : Cheltenham Township 5 

Chapter Two: Wyncote 15 

Part Two: Victorian Wyncote 30 

Chapter One : Suburban Development 31 

Chapter Two: Commercial Activity 52 

Chapter Three: Architecture 63 

Part Three: Preservation 103 

Conclusion 121 

Bibliography 125 

Appendix A: Catalogue of Architect's Commissions 

in proposed historic district 129 

Appendix B: Completed Nomination Forms for listing 
Victorian Wyncote on the National 

Register of Historic Places 153 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

I am indebted to many present and former residents of 
Wyncote who generously provided information for this 
project. Mr. Carl W. Gatter, who is recognized as the "local 
historian" in Vvyncote and Elaine Rothschild, author of 
The History of Cheltenham Township , were especially 
helpful in supplying historical maps and documents. I am 
grateful to the Cheltenham Township authorities, especially 
Commissioner Robert Haakenson and Anthony V. Sorrenti, 
Director of Engineering and Zoning, and his assistants, as 
well as Eileen Lee, President of the Cheltenham Township 
Historical Commission. All Hallows Episcopal Church and 
Calvary Presbyterian Church opened their files relating 
to the history of their buildings, which proved of great 
help. 

Sandra L. Tatman and Bruce Laverty of the Philadelphia 
Athenaeum kindly directed me to important architectural 
sources. Hy thanks go also to the architectural firm of 
Hazzard and Warrokessel for allowing me to review the papers of 
J. Linden Heacock and Heacock and Hokanson and to Frederick 
Piatt for his information on Horace Trumbauer's commissions 
in Wyncote. 

iii 



The Staffs of the Jenkintown Library, the Historical 
Society of Pennsylvania, the Montgomery Historical Society 
and the Recorder of Deeds Office in Montgomery County were 
most cooperative. 

For old photographs and postcards, I am indebted to Carl 
W. Gatter, Robert Harper, the John J. O'Donnell Plum>bing 
Company, William Johns, Robert M. Skaler, the Wyncote 
Pharmacy, and Arnold Zaslow. 

Especially I thank Dr. George E. Thomas for his guidance 
and helpful suggestions as my advisor, and for permitting me 
to use the Clio Index on suburban architects. I thank Dr. 
Roger W. Moss for reviewing my thesis as well as Dr. David G. 
De Long for his continued interest in my work. I am 
particularly grateful to Julie Johnson for her careful 
editing and typing of my thesis. 



IV 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

Except where otherwise noted, photographs are by the author. 

Frontispiece: Tiffany Window in All Hallows Episcopal Church, 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania, 1985 

1. Map of Philadelphia and Vicinity, 1984 3 

2. Map of Cheltenham Township, 1982 6 

3. J.D. Scott Atlas of Montgomery County, 1877 10 

4. G.M. Hopkins Atlas, 1883 16 

5. Wyncote Business District in 1931, postcard 
courtesy of the Wyncote Pharmacy 25 

6. Wyncote Business District in 1985 25 

7. Ralph Morgan Park in 1984 28 

8. Woodland Road and Wanamaker Pond in 1893, 
photograph courtesy of Dr. Carl W. Gatter 28 

9. Willis P. Hazard Plot Plan, 1885 34 

10. G. William Baist Atlas, 1891 36 

11. Martin L. Kohler Plot Plan, 1886 38 

12. A.H. Mueller Railroad Atlas, 1897 45 

13. A.H. Mueller Property Atlas, 1909 47 

14. F.H.M. Klinge Atlas, 1927, Section of Wyncote ... 48 

15. F.H.M. Klinge Atlas, 1927, Bent and Accomac 

Roads 49 



16. James Nile Building, erected c. 1895, 

photograph courtesy of Mr. Carl W. Gatter 54 

17. Wyncote Business District c. 1918, photograph 
courtesy of John J. O'Donnell Plumbing Company, 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 54 

18. J. Barton Benson Smithery c. 1940, photograph 
courtesy of ATD American Company, Wyncote, 
Pennsylvania 57 

19. Store and Dwelling and John J. O'Donnell 
Plumbing Company, erected c. 1895, Greenwood 
Avenue, 1985 57 

20. Commercial buildings on Greenwood Avenue c. 1976, 
before rehabilitation by ATD American Company 

in 1979, photograph courtesy of ATD American 

Company ^ ^ 

21. Exterior of ATD American Company building after 
rehabilitation, 1979 60 

22. Jenkintown Railroad Station, erected 1931, 

1985 62a 

23. Boyhood home of Reggie Jackson, 149 Greenwood 

Avenue, c. 1900, 1984 62a 

24. 305 Maple Avenue, erected 1894, from .Scientific 
Amecigan. 1894 65 



25. 305 Maple Avenue, 1985 



65 



26. 146 Fernbrook Avenue, erected 1894, from 
Scientif ic American. 1894 66 

26a. 146 Fernbrook Avenue, 1984 66 

27. 211 Greenwood Avenue, erected c. 1870, 1984 *.... 69 

28. 414 Greenwood Avenue, erected prior to 1873, 

1984 70 

29. 143 Woodland Road, erected c. 1887, 1981 70 



VI 



30. 203-205 Greenwood Avenue, erected c. 1890, 

1984 71 

31. 308 Maple Avenue, erected c. 1886, 1984 71 

32. 119 Woodland Road, erected c. 1887, 1985 76 

33. 105-107 Cliff Terrace, erected c. 1905, 1985 77 

34. 147-149 Fernbrook Avenue, erected c. 1886, 

1985 80 

35. 107 Woodland Road, erected c. 1890, 1985 80 

36. 107 Woodland Road, detail of tower, 1985 81 

37. 323 Bent Road, erected 1892, 1985 81 

38. 343 Bent Road, erected 1892, c. 1906 postcard 
courtesy of Robert M. Skaler 86 

39. 343 Bent Road, 1985 86 

40. 305 Bent Road, erected 1892, c. 1906 postcard 
courtesy of Robert M. Skaler 87 

41. 305 Bent Road, detail of porch, 1985 87 

42. 305 Bent Road, detail of tower, 1985 88 

43. 100-104 Woodland Road, erected c. 1888, c. 1906 
postcard courtesy of Robert Harper, Wyncote, 
Pennsylvania 89 

44. 100-104 Woodland Road, 1981 89 

45. 308 Bent Road, erected c. 1896, 1985 91 

46. Episcopal Rectory, 270 Bent Road, erected 1909, 

1985 91 

47. 332-334 Greenwood Avenue, erected c. 1899, 

1985 93 



Vll 



48. 124-126 and I28-I3O Greenwood Avenue, erected 

c. 1910, 1984 93 

49. 318 Bent Road, erected 1914, 1985 95 

50. 108 Webster Avenue, erected c. 1925, 1985 95 

51. All Hallows Episcopal Church, erected 1896, and 
Parish House, erected 1926, 1985 98 

52. Calvary Presbyterian Church, southeast elevation, 
erected 1898, additions 1927, 1985 98 

53. Calvary Presbyterian Church, West Tower, erected 
1898, 1985 100 

54. 160 Fernbrook Avenue, erected c. 1890, detail 

of west porch, 1984 101 

55. 157 Fernbrook Avenue, erected 1894, detail of 

back porch, 1984 101 

56. 162 Fernbrook Avenue, erected c. 1887, boyhood 

of the poet Ezra Pound, 1984 102 

57. Proposed Historic District in Wyncote, 
Pennsylvania 106 



Vlll 




TIFFANY WINDOV; 
IN 
All Hallows Episcopal Church 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 



INTRODUCTION 

Wyncote, a residential suburb of approximately one 
square mile located ten miles north of Philadelphia, contains 
108 acres of significant Victorian architectural styles 
dating from the late nineteenth and early twentieth cen- 
turies. This Victorian suburb has survived essentially as it 
was built, and consequently warrants recognition by being 
listed on the National Register of Historic Places. My 
research on the history and architecture of Cheltenham Town- 
ship and Wyncote, and m.ore specifically on the area being 
proposed as a historic district, is reported in this thesis 
as well as background material for the ultimate purpose of 
National Register listing. It is my hope that this survey 
and official recognition will stimulate interest among the 
residents of Wyncote and encourage preservation efforts. 

The completion of this thesis has fulfilled two aspects 
of historic preservation — 1) a theoretical analysis of the 
social and architectural history of a suburban community, and 
2) a practical, hands-on experience of placing a historic 
district on the National Register of Historic Places, a 
procedure that has involved many residents of Wyncote. 



Real estate development in Wyncote began in 1885; this 
centennial year is thus an appropriate tiroe to undertake such 
a task. Although Wyncote has been included in various his- 
tories of Cheltenham Township, an independent account of this 
community has not been written until now. The research and 
documentation necessary for the National Register nomination 
process has uncovered considerable information, particularly 
with regard to the names, dates, and areas of its early 
development. 

Part One of this paper serves as historical background 
for Cheltenham Township and the area that became Wyncote in 
the 1880s. Part Two concentrates on the development of 
Wyncote and its architectural fabric. In this section, it 
should be noted, "Wyncote" refers to this Victorian section 
which is being proposed as an historic district, rather than 
to the municipality as a whole. Part Three discusses preser- 
vation issues as they relate to Victorian Wyncote, together 
with recommendations for official recognition and preserva- 
tion of this suburban community. Finally, completed nomina- 
tion forms for listing on the National Register of Historic 
Places are included in this thesis as Appendix B. 




Figure 1, 

Wyncote shown in inset. 



PART ONE: HISTORY 



CHAPTER ONE: CHELTENHAM TOWNSHIP 
Egrly Settlement 

Wyncote is situated on land originally owned by William 
Frampton who purchased five hundred acres frcir. William Penn 
in 1683. [Figure 2] This was part of a purchase by fifteen 
English Quakers who formed Cheltenham Township and named it 
after their former location in Chelterham. England. William 
Frampton, a successful merchant prominent in Philadelphia 
politics, apparently never lived in the township. He died in 
1686 and his son Thomas is said to have disposed of the land 
around 1710.1 

Cheltenham Township's economy remained essentially agri- 
cultural until the end of the 18th century, when grist mills 
and small industries were established. 2 in the nineteenth 
century the township began to attract families seeking em- 
ployment on the farms and in the village industries. The 
1850 census shows "Farmer" as the principal occupation, with 
various trades represented, such as blacksmith, wheelwright, 



Elaine Rothschild, A History of Cheltenham Township . 
Cheltenham Township Historical Commission, Montgomery County, 
PA, 1976, pp. 1, 2. 

Jean Barth Toll and Michael J. Schwager, Eds., 
Montgom ery County: The Second Hundred Years . Vol. I., 1st 
edition, Montgomery County Federation of Historical 
Societies, 1983, 








/ 



fill. 







^....4^f?1 




:i 



'• -^ /W;'^''''^"" t^j '~"''"~\~^ '■■''"FT-'' ;■ I 











^'^^mmw^'i 






-i37f^ 






^7 



M_ 



-:.;^-t':>^ 



ii '\ 

—-'';, ' V,' 






=2: 



(T- 



I! 



Li IHi.ii 



Q. 




(I) 




+i 


::: 




W) 
C 


(/) 






x: 








3 


»- 




j:: C 







CO Q) <U 


H ? 




•H ;C: ^ 






« W EH -P 


u; 




CM -H 






I>- > Ch 






CJN'H • 


''^ ^ 




H Ti to 






^ ¥> • 


>' Zt 




«-H (1) ^ -P 


U £ 




ft q CO nj c 

•H a nj ft a 


H S 




A U s^ U 


_j l:: 




ra C3 w 




• 


C Jh nj 


UJ s 


CM 


5 -d ;3 ^-d 


^ y 




C ft C 


U 2 


CD 


Eh rf +J cd 


S^ 


1-^ ^ 0) H^l 




;3 


S w 


U- 


W) 


nJ g C C 





•H 


^ C M -H 




[i. 


C <U <U -P 


:i 




cdPm E C ft 




■P Ki-H S 


< 




H S C aJ 


yu 




x; -H ^ ^ PL, 
H -P 










H -H x: s 






l+H -H ^ M rf 






03 -H 






rH Ctj rH 






ft 0CO <U H 






CO ^\0 U-r^ 


- 




S -P H cC3 



shoemaker, baker, mason, and sawyer. A high percentage of the 
population is listed as "Laborers." The census indicates 
that 45% of the township's population was foreign-born, with 
25% of these from Ireland. 3 It is also significant that 
domestic service occupations such as "Butler" and "Gardener" 
were listed, indicating that by the mid-nineteenth century 
large tracts of farmland were being purchased by wealthy 
Philadelphians for their country seats. 4 No professional 
occupations were reported, other than that of "School 
Teacher." A small percentage of the population was reported 
as "Black." 

Early industry in the Wyncote area was represented by 
the mill of Isaac Mather, a major landowner. It was erected 
near what is now Chelten Hills Drive and Washington Lane. 
Another mill was established in 1725 by Isaac Knight, Sr., at 
the corner of what is now Glenside Avenue and Rice's Mill 
Road. Knight's Mill became Paxson's Mill about 1808, the 
next owner being Daniel Rice, for whom Rice's Mill Road was 
named. The thoroughfare had been formerly known simply as Mill 
Road. This road connected to Limekiln Pike to the south- 
west, which local farmers used to transport their goods to 
Philadelphia. In the twentieth century. Rice's Grist Mill was 



^ 1850 United States Census, Pennsylvania Historical 
Society. 

Elwood C. Parry, Jr., "Promised Land," in 
Old York Road Historical S ociety Bulletin. Vol. IV, 1960, pp. 
18-39. 



converted into a carpentry mill by a local builder, W. John 
Stevens, who began contracting in the community about 1901, 
supplying manufactured window and door frames, sashes, shut- 
ters, blinds, stair work and hardwood interior finishes. An 
average of fifty men were employed in the mill. 5 

According to the W.E. Morris Map of 1848, roads had been 
established in the area that would become Wyncote, connecting 
it to Abington Township to the northeast and other parts of 
Cheltenham Township. 6 At this time the area was still 
mainly large tracts of farmland. In the 1850s, William C. 
Kent, a Philadelphia merchant, purchased large tracts of land 
from Benjamin Webster, John Mather, and Joseph Heacock. 
These purchases were typical of the mid-nineteenth-century 
real estate expansion, when successful businessmen acquired 
large tracts in suburban areas. Purchases of these tracts 
were either for the establishment of country homes or for 
investment in anticipation of future development. At that 
time the area was known as "Chelten Hills;" with the land 
purchases of Kent, the area near the railroad line became 
known as "Kent's Woods." The 1848 map identifies houses, 
mills, stores, churches, post offices, meeting houses and 
bridges in the township. 



5 Rothschild, pp. 31-32. 

° Map of Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, 1848, William 
E. Morris Company, Smith and Wistar, Philadelphia PA. 

' Deed Book 91, p. 165, March 21, 1854; Deed Book 88, 
p. 453, September 3, 1852; Deed Book 79, p. 178, September 
30, 1853; Deed Book 88, p. 350, September 30, 1853. 



Establishment o f Railroads 

The advent of railroad service to Cheltenham Township 
marked the end of its rural self-sufficiency. Instead, it 
was brought into closer contact with and dependence on Phila- 
delphia and the outside world. The railroad line bisected 
the township, extending from the Oak Lane Station at the city 
limits to a point on its northern boundary in the Wyncote 
area, as shown on the J.D. Scott Map of 1877. [Figure 3] 

The North Pennsylvania Railroad Company laid its initial 
line in 1855 from Philadelphia to Gwynedd, a suburban com- 
munity to the northwest. 8 The Philadelphia Inquirer de- 
scribed the opening of the First Division of the North Penn- 
sylvania Railroad as follows: 

The cars left the new and very commodious 
Station and were drawn by mules to Master 
Street, where a locomotive was attached to 
the train and we were whirled along with 
great speed over an exceedingly beautiful 
country. After leaving the brick built 
suburbs of the city, we enjoyed a succession 
of rural and picturesque scenery, while it 
was pleasing to observe the abundance and 
perfection of the crops — particularly of 
wheat, rye and oats. 9 

In 1856 the Doylestown Branch was opened for public use, and 

1857 saw completion of the road to Freemansburg, about two 



^ Jay V. Hare, "The Coming of the North Pennsylvania 
Railroad," Old York Road Historical Society Bulletin. Vol. 
IV, 1940, p. 31. 

9 Ibid., p. 33. 










'^■uvAjnjf su jf 



^"V 



;»^+» 
■^./^J/ 



. — 1::' >.-^:-:ri'^i ^.=>><^ 

10 



miles east of Bethlehem and nine miles west of Easton in 
northeast Pennsylvania, where connection was made with the 
Lehigh Valley Railroad. 10 

In 1876, in anticipation of the opening of the Centen- 
nial Exposition in Philadelphia, a Delaware River Branch 
connecting with the Delaware and Bound Brook Railroad and the 
Central Railroad Company of New Jersey provided a transporta- 
tion link between Philadelphia and New York City. 11 The 
primary purpose of establishing these railroad lines was to 
further trade with the rich coal and iron region in northeast 
Pennsylvania. In 1852 the committee proposing the new lines 
circulated the following notice which illustrates the aggres- 
siveness of the business community in Philadelphia at this 
time and the keen rivalry between this city and New York. 

Philadelphians, Hark! The "FORKS" of the 
Delaware echo to the whistle of the locomo- 
tive that is come to bear away to a neighbor 
city in a neighbour state the trade and 
treasure of the Keystone valleys. THIS CAN BE 
PREVENTED BY A DIRECT RAILROAD TO THE LEHIGH 
RIVER. Therefore, arouse, for where the 
interests of all are at stake, it is the duty 
of all to ACT. You cannot stand still — 
action is imperative — if you do not advance 
you will go backwards. Without a railroad 
leading from Philadelphia to the northeast 
region of our State, to compete with the rail- 
road now open from that region to another 
city, you cannot hope long to retain its 
business nor enjoy its profits. Then let the 
MERCHANT, the CAPITALIST, the owner of Real 
Estate, the MANUFACTURER, MECHANIC AND WORK- 
INGMAN forgo other engagements for an hour or 



10 Ibid., p. 31. 

■^■^ Ibid., pp. 38-39. 



11 



two and attend the meeting which will be 
addressed by: John M. Read, Esq., John 
Garrick Mallery and Isaac Hazlehurst, Esq. of 
this city, and Hon. James M. Porten, M.H. 
Jones, Esq. of EASTON, and Others. 

Easy communication with the coal-producing regions was 

significant in the settlement of Wyncote as several of those 

families who moved to this suburb came from the Lehigh River 

Valley area. Wyncote, located at the crossroads of these 

railroad lines, was to attract settlers from points east, 

west, and north, as well as from Philadelphia. However, a 

time lag occurred in Wyncote's suburban development, for it 

did not begin until 1885 — a period of thirty years. In the 

meantime, the area continued to attract wealthy landowners 

who established themselves on large estates. 

Country Seats 

Prior to 1850 the population in Cheltenham Township 
increased slowly, but from 1850 to 1880 the number of inhabi- 
tants in the township rose from 3,236 to 12,292.13 while 
45% of the population were foreign-born in the 1850 census, 
only 20% were reported as foreign-born in the 1880 census. 
There was also a wider range of occupations among the popula- 
tion, including a substantial number of men in the 



]l Ibid., p. 22. 

^^ Arthur Hoskins Jones, Cheltenh am Township: A 
Dissertation in Socio logy. University of Pennsylvania Press, 
Philadelphia, 1950, p. 19. 



12 



professions, as well as authors, ministers, real estate 

agents, carpenter/builders and a listing of "Gentlemen." 

The first planned development took place in the mid 

nineteenth century, as described by Lippincott: 

In 1854 Edward M. Davis formed a land company 
called "Chelten Hills Association" which 
bought 1000 acres from Quaker farmers and 
divided it up among prominent Philadelphians 
who constructed handsome country residences 
amongst us. The tract lay in the heart of 
Chelten Hills, west of York Road, east of 
Washington Lane, and between City Line and 
Jenkintown. Penrose Mather and his mother's 
kinsmen were drawn into this venture and with 
other owners disposed of their land at a low 
price to Thomas Mellor, Charles Sharpless, 
Henry and Joshua Lippincott, Jay Cooke, 
Edward Starr, John Wanamaker and Morris 
Hallowell. Other purchasers were John W. 
Thomas and Frederick Fraley, all prominent 
businessmen. 15 

Many of those who came to Cheltenham Township to establish 
prestigious country homes represented "first-generation" 
wealth: merchants, manufacturers, traction kings, industri- 
alists and financiers. Wealthy Quaker merchants now joined 
the Quaker families who were early settlers in the township. 
Not all of the new arrivals were native Philadelphians: Jay 
Cooke, (1821-1905), nationally-known financier, came to 



1880 United States Census, Pennsylvania Historical 
Society. 

Horace Mather Lippincott, A Narrative Account of 
Chestnut Hill. Philadelphia, and Some Account of Whitemarsh. 
Springfield, and Cheltenham ^ Old York Road Publishing 
Company, 1948, p. 180. 



13 



Philadelphia from Sandusky, Ohio. He chose Cheltenham Town- 
ship for the setting of his 52-room Victorian mansion, which, 
according to popular reports, he named "Ogontz", after an 
Indian chief whom he had known in Ohio. 16 This legend has 
been disputed in a recent article by Lila Finck, who, after 
extensive research of public records in Ohio, reports that 
although Chief Ogontz was a well-known figure in Ohio, he 
died in 1812, nine years before Jay Cooke was born. She 

theorizes that Cooke "may have romanticized his boyhood re- 

17 
collection of riding on the chief's mighty shoulders." 

Old maps of Cheltenham Township show an area labeled Ogontz, 
and the name became a popular one in the Philadelphia area: a 
girls' school established in Cooke's mansion after his death 
and an important street in Philadelphia are just a few ex- 
amples of its continued use. The establishment of such 
attractive homes in Cheltenham Township set the stage for 
other prominent, albeit less wealthy, businessmen to single 
out this area for the location of their homes and the accom- 
modation of their country lifestyles. 



^^ C. Robert Nugent, A House T.ives and Dies . Cassidy 
Printing, Inc., Abington PA, 1974, pp. 22, 27. 

^' Lila Finck, "The Legend of Ogontz," Old Y< 
Hi^t-nrica] .qocietv Bulletin . Vol. XLIV, 1984, p. 42. 



14 



CHAPTER TWO: WYNCOTE 

Establishment of Wyncote as a Village 

The part of Cheltenham Township that would become 
Wyncote is shown on the G.M. Hopkins Map of 1883 as an essen- 
tially rural area. [Figure 4] However, some of the farmland 
had begun to be broken up for the establishment of country 
residences and for permanent homes. Greenwood and Glenside 
Avenues were in place; they still serve as the district's main 
arteries. By the early 1880s this area was beginning to 
assume its own character, distinct from the other eight 
"villages" in the township. 18 The earliest houses were 
constructed between 1885 and 1888 on three tracts (Kent, H.H. 
Lippincott, and Heacock) close to the railroad. 

The Barker family, originally from Massachusetts, came 
to Chelten Hills in the 1860s and settled on 170 acres. They 
are credited with giving the name "Wyncote" to what had 



^^ Jones, p. 21. The other well-defined communities in 
Cheltenham Township are: Cheltenham, Edge Hill, Elkins Park, 
Glenside, La Mott, Melrose Park and Rowland Park. 



15 




Figure 4. Wyncote in 1883. 
Section from G. M. Hopkins 
Atlas of I883. 



16 



formerly been known as Chelten Hills and Kent's Woods. The 
story has circulated that this name derived from Dr. S. Weir 
Mitchell's romantic novel Hugh Wynn . which featured a Welsh 
estate called ''Wyncote."19 Lippincott recalls "...there was 
great opposition when Wharton Barker fastened the wholly 
inappropriate name of "Wyncote" upon the beloved Chelten 
Hills about 1885. "20 Nevertheless, Wyncote became the offi- 
cial name of the community with the establishment about 1887 
of the Wyncote Post Office. 

Wyncote Society 

At the turn of the century, weekly notices under the 
heading of "Wyncote Jottings" appeared in the local papers, 
and their contents give life and personality to the names 
found in deeds and maps. This chatty column had a small town 
flavor, reporting matter-of-factly on the new fence around 
someone's property, a local robbery, or a church social, with 
occasional editorial spice. 21 Wyncote resident Christopher 
Morley expressed his delight in such columns in one of his 



19 

Dr. Mitchell, a physician, author, prominent 

Phialdelphian, and a Trustee of the University of 
Pennsylvania, is mentioned frequently in E. Digby Baltzell's 
Philadel phia Gentlemen. Quadrangle Books, Chicago, 
1958. 

^1: Lippincott, p. 188. 

Reported in the Jenkintown Times r from April 7, 1894 
through December 26, 1894; and in the Times Chronicle ^ from 
December 26, 1894. Mircrofilm copies, the Montgomery Pub- 
lishing Company, Fort Washington, Pa. 



17 



stories: "... I wanted to read those Society Notes, the most 

22 
deliciously unconscious betrayals known to sociology." 

Newspaper accounts tell us that Wyncote in the 1890s 
was halfway between a resort community and a permanently- 
settled suburb. The railroad and trolley cars, established 
in 1895 on the nearby Old York Road, brought daily, weekly 
and monthly visitors in great numbers. Boarding houses here, 
as in other Philadelphia suburbs, were extremely popular 
among vacationers, but local residents had mixed feelings 
about these intruders: "Wyncote is overloaded with visitors 
on Sunday afternoon ... up on the trolleys, many are seen en- 
joying the shade of trees," and "Wyncote is overloaded with 
strangers looking for board. "23 

Newspapers report frenetic real estate activity, es- 
pecially in the summer months. Many summer renters eventual- 
ly became permanent residents and professional developers and 
interim speculators erected houses for rental purposes. In 
addition, permanent residents, once having purchased and 
settled in a house, would often rent it out for the season, 
while they summered in such places as Europe, the West, 
Long Island or New England. There was tremendous mobility 
within the permanent community — buying, selling, renting. 



^^ Christopher Morley, "Old Loopy," in Morley's 
Variet y. World Publishing Company, New York, 1944, p. 544. 
Times Chronicle . May 11, 1895; June 22, 1895. 



18 



exchanging and boarding. Two sample entries in the column 

"Wyncote Jottings:" 

We understand that Mr. J. A. Herrick has sold 
his residence on Webster Avenue to ^5rs. Roma 
M. Meade of Hackensack, New Jersey. Mr. 
Herrick has rented Mr. Webber's [sic - 
"Weber"] house on Helian Avenue, formerly 
occupied by D.G. Cresswell. 

and 

Mr. J.C. Leidy and children are boarding with 
W.D. Croasdale; his home is now occupied by 
Mr. and Mrs. J.H. Scheetz of Philadelphia. 24 

The Mr. Scheetz mentioned above was eventually to build a 
substantial home in the community, following a practice which 
was common in Wyncote. According to several long-term resi- 
dents of Wyncote, prospective homeowners first rented houses 
to make sure they would be socially accepted into this class- 
conscious community. Legend has it that Woodland Road was 
dubbed "Probationary Hill." 

Wyncote's population in its formative years (1885-1915) 
embraced a wide range of socio-economic classes. Stone 
masons lived close to factory owners on the picturesque 
hills being settled above the railroad line. Social notices 
gave as much space to how the local grocer entertained and 
vacationed as to the European voyages of its most prominent 
citizen, Cyrus H.K. Curtis. On the other hand, the column 
reflected the ethnic prejudices of a middle-class community 

24 Ibid. 



19 



in the late nineteenth century: "Just fif;y more Italians in 
Wyncote. Is our budding hope that this piace will be entire- 
ly aristocratic squelched?"25 By the end of the nineteenth 
century, the ethnic make-up of Wyncote comprised mostly those 
of white, Protestant backgrounds. Erj.ish, German, and to a 
lesser extent Irish names predominate .. The social column 
did not hesitate to single out a p .r cicular ethnic group: "A 
German working on the farm of Bert ' arzelere near Meadowbrook 
got drunk and threatened to shoe t Mr. Larzelere...." 26 A 
stronghold of Protestantism at th .- turn of the century, 
Wyncote's religious prejudices are expressed in a typical ad: 
"Wanted: A good Protestant girl for general housework." ^^ 
Members of the Roman Cathciic faith were forced to attend 
Mass across the railroad tracks in Jenkintown, where the 
nearest Catholic church war: located. 

"Wyncote Jottings" has helped to determine the 
social, physical and political history of Wyncote. Real 
estate transactions werf. reported regularly, with names, 
locations, costs, and builders cited, giving invaluable aid 
in determining construction dates of many houses. The 
columns also indicate the emergence of a cohesive, stable and 
proud community, ir. cpite of its early nervous mobility and 
somewhat transient quality. However, Wyncote's attraction as 



2^ Ibid. , May 23, 1896. 
26 Ibid. , May 26, 1894. 
^' Ibid , April 26, 1896. 



20 



a summer resort waned after 1910 when the boarding houses 
closed their doors and the automobile began to carry vaca- 
tioners beyond the limits of Cheltenham Township. The perma- 
nent residents of Wyncote arrived as pioneers in an unde- 
veloped suburb with no ties to an already established place 
or area; they organized a society of a particular level and 
standard and strove to maintain it. In the 1890s residents of 
Wyncote formed the "Wyncote Improvement Association" which 
held regular meetings to protect their interests. 28 

In summary, Wyncote's citizens were upper middle class 
individuals with upper class aspirations. Few were members of 
the "elite" power structure described by Baltzell in Phila- 
delphia Gentlemen , nor were they representative of the upper 
class of inherited wealth which chose to live in the Main 
Line and Chestnut Hill suburbs. 29 However, these financiers, 
merchants, manufacturers and industrialists represent a 
strong faction of American business which capitalized on the 
rapidly expanding industrial economy between the Civil War 
and the First World War. Their fame and fortunes are not as 
well known as those of the Elkins, Wideners, Harrisons and 
Cookes, but more attention should be given to this class of 
individual, and Wyncote is an excellent place to start. 



2^ Ibid., January 26, 1895, 
29 Baltzell, p. 6. 



21 



Christopher Motley in Wvncote 

Christopher Morley, who lived at 127 Fernbrook Avenue at 
the time of World War I, parodied this community in his col- 
lection of essays, Mince Pie . "Marathon" was his pseudonym 
for Wyncote, and he observed with good humor the superfici- 
alities in this self-conscious upper middle class community 
at the time of World War 1, "... a village so genteel and 
comely that ... I would like to have some pictures of it for 
future generations." 30 Morley was a member of the commuting 
clan on the daily "Cinder and Bloodshot," which sustained 
life in Wyncote: 

Marathon is a suburban Xanadu gently caressed 
by the train service of the Cinder and Blood- 
shot. It may be recognized as an artisto- 
cratic and patrician stronghold by the fact 
that while luxuries are readily obtainable, 
necessaries are had only by prayer and advow- 
son. The drug store will deliver ice cream 
to your very refrigerator, but it is impos- 
sible to get your garbage collected. The 
cook goes off for her Thursday evening in a 
taxi, but you will have to mend the roof, 
stanch the plumbing and curry the furnace 
with your own hands. There are ten trains to 
take you to town of an evening, but only two 
to bring you home. Yet going to town is a 
luxury, coming home is a necessity. 

"Another proof that Marathon is patrician at heart is that 

nothing is known by its right name!" wrote Morley. "The drug 

store is a 'pharmacy,' Sunday is 'the Sabbath,' a house is a 



^ Christopher Morley, Mince Pie , George H. Doran 

Company, New York, 1919, p. 92. 
^^ Ibid., p. 93. 



22 



'residence,' a girls' school is a 'young ladies' seminary." 
Even the cobbler, good fellow, has caught the trick: he 
calls nis shop the 'Italo-American Shoe Hospital.'" 32 

Morley commented humorously on Wyncote's landscape, in 
eluding the exposed sides of its sheer cliffs. 

The landscape round Marathon is lovely, but 
it has itself well in hand. The hills all 
pretend to be gentle declivities. There is a 
beautiful little stream of water, reflecting 
the trailery of willows ... In a robuster 
community it would be a swimming hole — but 
with us, an "ornamental lake." Only in one 
spot has Nature forgotten herself and been so 
brusque and rough as to jut up a very sizable 
cliff. This is the loveliest thing in Mara- 
thon: sunlight and shadow break and angle in 
cubist magnificence among the oddly veined 
knobs and prisms of brown stone. Yet this 
cliff or quarry is by common consent taboo 
among us. It is our indelicacy, our indecen- 
cy. Such "residences" as are near turn their 
kitchens toward it. Only the blacksmith and 
the gas tanks are hardy enough to face this 
nakedness of Mother Earth — they, and excel- 
lent Pat Lemon, Marathon's humblest and 
blackest citizen, who contemplates that rug- 
ged and honest beauty as he tills his garden 
on land abandoned by squeamish burghers. 

The Pat Lemon referred was employed as a domestic by one of 

Wyncote's families and is shown in Figure 5 with his market 

cart, headed toward Jenkintown. 34 



•^^ Ibid., pp. 93-94. 
33 Ibid., pp. 94-95. 

Identified as Pat Lemon by Mr. Carl Gatter, long- 
time resident and local historian of Wyncote. 



23 



Despite the affection evident behind his jibes, Morley ends 

this particular essay on a serious note: 

I had been hoping that the war would knock 
some of this ... nonsense out of us. 
Maybe it has. Sometimes I see on the faces 
of our commuters the unaccustomed agitation 
of thought. At least we still have the grace 
to call ourselves a suburb, and not (what we 
fancy ourselves) a superurb. But I don't 
like the pretense that runs like a jarring 
note through the music of our life. 35 

Wyncote Today 

In 1940 Arthur H. Jones, in his sociological study of 

Cheltenham Township, described Wyncote as follows: 

The houses are comfortable but for the most 
part are not as large as the homes in Elkins 
Park. The population is Protestant, middle- 
class and white. Wyncote, even more than Elkins 
Park, is a community with self-consciousness 
and definite community organization. Its 
churches and clubs are self-sufficient. Its 
people think of themselves as living in Wyncote, 
not in Cheltenham Township. A number of 
estates of several acres are located in 
Wyncote, but their proprietors take little 
part in the affairs of the community. 

Much of the "self-consciousness" persists in this some- 
what detached community, but in the last forty-five years 
Wyncote has mellowed and become more democratic. The ethni- 
city of the population has broadened to include many faiths, 
including an increasing number of Jewish families. Wyncote's 
two churches (Episcopal and Presbyterian) are witnessing 



^^ Morley, Mince Pie , pp. 96-97, 
36 Jones, p. 27. 

24 



Wyncote's Main Intersection - 1931 and 1985 




Figure 5. Business district in 1931. Pat Lemon is at left. 
Photo courtesy of Wyncote Pharmacy. 



\' 



^i 




^:S?ixH-'' 



■r- 






.-^.t;. .« 







Figure 6. Above intersection in 1985, 



25 



declining congregations, but continue as centers of social 
and religious activity, their homogeneous memberships main- 
taining the distinction established at the turn of the cen- 
tury. Older residents have gradually moved to other areas, 
many to retirement homes. Wyncote continues to have an 
overwhelmingly white population, except for the few black 
families residing in the eight houses on Hilltop Lane near 
the railroad station. 

The Victorian District is now surrounded by modern 
dwellings, mostly built after World War II. However, younger 
families are looking to the Victorian homes as more desirable 
than modern homes. Many of those moving into these older 
homes are in the academic profession or are engaged in 
literary or artistic occupations. Incoming residents, it is 
safe to say, are less class-conscious than their predeces- 
sors. 

Wyncote has remained a residential community, with com- 
mercial activity restricted to a limited area at the inter- 
section of Greenwood and Glenside Avenues. [Figure 6] Busi- 
ness and professional offices located in Wyncote do not serve 
the immediate community; other than the delicatessen, phar- 
macy and service station, Wyncote is dependent for all ser- 
vices on non-local businesses. 

The convenience, quiet and attractiveness of Wyncote has 
led to the establishment of nursing and retirement homes. At 



26 



present there are four such establishments: the Hopkins Nurs- 
ing and Rehabilitation Center, the Oaks Nursing Home, the 
Crestview Convalescent Home, and the Wyncote Church Home. 

Educational facilities are now limited to the Wyncote 
Elementary School, built in 1947 at the corner of Rice's 
Mill and Church Roads. Wyncote's first public school, built 
in 1896 on Greenwood Avenue, is now used for professional 
office space. In 1982 the Reconstructionist Rabbinical 
College was established in one of Wyncote's old homes on 
Church Road. Other than the elementary school and the 
Wyncote Post Office, there are no public buildings, such as a 
library or a hospital, in the commmunity. Nor is there a 
cemetery. 

The oldest park in the community, comprising 4-1/2 
acres, lies immediately west of the Jenkintown Railroad 
Station. [Figure 7] It was recently named in memory of Ralph 
Morgan, a Cheltenham Township Commissioner and an active 
environmentalist. At one time the property was owned by John 
Wanamaker, the Philadelphia merchant, who dammed the Tookany 
Creek in the 1890s to provide a skating pond for the benefit 
of the community. An 1893 photograph shows the lower end of 
Woodland Road looking down toward the pond, with the railroad 
station in the background. [Figure 8] 

The Thomas Williams Park, in the heart of Wyncote, was 
laid out into ball parks and tennis courts in the 1950s when 
an elementary school on this site was razed after the' 

27 




Figure 7. Ralph Morgan Park in a 1984 photo, 




Figure 8. Woodland Road and Wanamaker Pond in 1893. Photo 
courtesy of Mr. Carl W. Gatter. 



28 



construction of a new school at the corner of Rice's Mill and 
Church Road in 1947. 

In addition, Wyncote has long been known as a haven for 
birdwatchers, and boasts two bird sanctuaries — the George 
A. Perley Bird Sanctuary on the southwest corner of Rice's 
Mill Road and Glenside Avenue, and the Chelten Bird Sanctuary 
on a green strip of land north and south of Washington Lane 
to the west of the railroad line. 



29 



PART TWO: VICTORIAN WYNCOTE 



30 



CHAPTER ONE: SUBURBAN DEVELOPMENT 

Wyncote remained one of the last areas in Cheltenham 
Township to be developed as a suburban community, notwith- 
standing the fact that railroad service had come to its 
doorstep as early as 1855. It was inevitable that it would 
succumb CO the demand for suburban lifestyles and consequent 
real estate speculation. The Philadelphia Real Estate Record 
and Builders' Guinp^ in 1887, summarized the trend of the 
times : 

A good deal of suburban property is being 
purchased for building and speculative 
purposes. During the past few years cases 
have come to light where about eight farms, 
some of them of very large extent, have been 
purchased for investments. These steps are 
evidently the preliminary ones for a quite 
general movement to acquire suburban 
properties of one, two or three-acre plots. 

As the industrial and commercial operations 
of the city expand, the wealthier classes 
will be more and more anxious to exchange city 
for suburban homes. In times past city" 
residences were preferred to those who 
acquired them ten, twenty or thirty years 
ago, but the young scions of the old stock 
have no attachments to the old homesteads. 
They want air, style and room and they will 
go the the suburban localities for it. Wise 
opportunities in real estate are anticipating 
this tendency. 1 



Philadelphia Real Estate Record and Builders' Guide 
(hereinafter referred to as PRERBG ) , Vol. II, No. 22, June 6, 
1887, p. 1. 



31 



Accelerated land development in Wyncote began in 1885, 
and by 1915 nearly all of the houses were in place, resulting 
in the community's Victorian character. The five principal 
developers who purchased tracts of land, had them surveyed 
with the establishment of building lots, and offered them for 
sale were: 



Name of Developer 

Willis P. Hazard 
Martin Luther Kohler 
Estate of Joseph Heacock 
Edwin Tyson 
Bradley Redfield 
William E. Weber 



AppcPxilT^te 
Date Number of Acres 



1885 
1886 
1888 
1898 
1891 
1900 



19 acres 
10 
25 
5 

45 
10 



Hazard and Kohler represented non-local professional 
developers, although Kohler's activities in real estate op- 
erations and building were extensive in nearby Jenkintown and 
Glenside. The subdivision of the Heacock land, on which the 
family had lived since the late 1850s, illustrates the will- 
ingness of local landowners to take advantage of real estate 
opportunities. Joseph Heacock came from Quakertown, Pennsyl- 
vania in the 1920s and settled in the Jenkintown area before 
moving to Wyncote in 1857.2 William E. Weber, a successful 
Philadelphia merchant and a newcomer to Wyncote in the late 
1880s, was typical of the many businessmen who indulged in 
real estate speculation. Bradley Redfield also belonged to 
this group, although there is no record of his having lived 
in the Wyncote area. 



2 Annie Heacock, Reminiscences . April, 1926, Old York 
Road Historical Society, Jenkintown Library, Jenkintown PA. 



32 



Willis P . Hazard 

Willis Pope Hazard was a gentleman dairy farmer of 
Delaware County, and as an historian contributed to the 
revised edition of Watson's Annals . He was the son of Samuel 
Hazard, well known for his historical accounts of Philadel- 
phia; both father and son were engaged in the publishing 
business during their lifetimes. In 1885 the Estate of 
William C. Kent sold 19.61 acres of land to Willis Hazard for 
$15,000. 3 The PRERBG reported the transaction as follows: 

W.P. Hazard of West Chester, who purchased 19 
acres of the Kent Farm, adjoining the Jenkin- 
town Station, divided his purchase into 57 
lots of 60 X 150 feet, nearly all of which 
have been disposed of at prices ranging from 
$400. to $700. Several houses, ranging in 
cost from $2,500. to $6,500. have been com- 
pleted, and the erection of an additional 
number will be begun as soon as the weather 
will permit. 

These lots were laid out on the north side of Greenwood 

Avenue and on both sides of a new road called Woodland Avenue 

which was cut through from Glenside Avenue. The recorded 

Plot Plan, surveyed by Joseph W. Hunter, is shown in Figure 

9. 5 At the same time, a 20-foot wide road, running east and 



^ Deed Book 289, p. 280. 

4 PRERBG . Vol. 1, January 25, 1886, p. 27. 
^ Microfilm, Plan Case #2, Recorder of Deeds Office, 
Norristown PA. 



33 




Figure 9. Plan of Willis P. Hazard, 1885, 



34 



west, was laid out between Woodland Avenue and Greenwood 
Avenue I which is now known as Hilltop Lajieo 

Many of these lots were purchased by Dr. I. Newton Evans 
and Samuel J. Garner, residents in nearby Hatboro; they 
served as "interim developers," reselling the unimproved 
lots, or erecting houses either for resale or for rental 
purposes. Dr. J.E. Peters, a resident of Jenkintown, also 
purchased a group of lots, with similar intentions. 

Tax records indicate that the first two houses to be 
built on Woodland Avenue (now called Woodland Road) were 
built in 1885 — one at number 133 for Franz Hellerman, 
blacksmith, and one at number 139 for August Corts, machin- 
ist. 6 Building activity on other lots followed quickly; the 
William Baist Map of 1891 shows 15 houses in place on Wood- 
land Avenue, with four single dwellings and one double house 
on the north side of Greenwood Avenue, in addition to the new 
Wyncote Post Office on the northwest corner of Greenwood and 
Glenside Avenues. [Figure 10] The two single houses shown 
west of the Woodland and Greenwood Avenues intersection, and 
now known as numbers 209 and 211 Greenwood Avenue, predate 
the 1885 development. 



Cheltenham Township tax records in possession of the 
Montgomery County Historical Society, Norristown PA. 



35 







• T 



'^3 







Figure 10. Section of G. William Baist Map, 1891 



36 



Martin Luther Kohlpr 

Martin Luther Kohler came to Philadelphia from Trappe, 
Pennsylvania, was educated at the University of Pennsylvania, 
practiced law in Philadelphia, moved to Jenkintown in 1883, 
and to a house in Glenside designed by J. Linden Heacock in 
1895. 7 Upon his move to the suburbs he devoted himself 
entirely to real estate and building operations. He formed a 
syndicate with wealthy Philadelphians and developed large 
tracts of land in Cheltenham and Abington townships. He was 
killed in an automobile accident in 1916, leaving an estate 
valued at about $300,000, ^ 

Kohler developed a ten-acre area south of Greenwood 

Avenue in 1886, after purchasing the land from H. H. 

Lippincott earlier the same year, as shown on the copy of the 

Kohler Plan. 9 [Figure 11] In 1887 the PRERBG reported 

There is a new town starting at the Jenkin- 
town Station to be known as WYNCOTE. They 
have already a post office, and fifty trains 
pass the town daily. There are about a dozen 
buildings in course of construction and more 
will be added. Mr. M.L. Kohler, who is a 
member of the bar, has opened an office there 
for the transaction of real estate business, 
and will erect several houses himself. 10 



7 

Architectural records of j. Linden Heacock in posses- 
sion gf Hazzard and Jr.'arrakesg^el, architects, Warrington PA. 

Interview with Mr. Frederick Bates, grandson of Mr. 
Kohleg, 104 Runnymeade Avenue, Jenkintown PA, April 29, 1985. 

Microfilm, Plan Case #2, Recorder of Deeds Office, 
Norristown PA. 

PRF R Pgf Vol. II, February 21, 1887, p. 78. 



37 






'Sv>kjr/^t/> 



I ^. T*^ 



Z-l^ 



m^ni -»A 



( -»' -t A:^/u^ 




.J>*X^>4iA^ 



Tvact^lanii toUL Sy H H lApp 
Or 

.Moj-lcn. -ZmjOut Xohlei 



Figure 11. Martin Luther Kohler Plot Plan, 1886 



38 



Fernbrook, Helion and Curacoa avenues were established 
at this time — Helion Avenue later to be a continuation of 
Fernbrook Avenue, and Curacoa Avenue to be renamed Maple 
Avenue. Kohler sold four parcels in this tract to Lewis C. 
Leidy, an employee of the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia. Leidy, 
another interim developer, constructed houses for resale, 
including the house at 166 Fernbrook Avenue, which was bought 
by another Mint employee. Homer L. Pound. Homer and his wife 
Isobel were the parents of poet Ezra Pound. 11 Lots on 
this tract were also sold to members of the Weber family, who 
were proprietors of the F. Weber and Company in Philadelphia, 
suppliers of artists' materials. William E. Weber lived at 
162 Fernbrook Avenue. 12 

Kohler also sold lots on this tract to the local build- 
ers, Burke & Dolhenty, who had established an office on 
Greenwood Avenue in the 1890s. This partnership was later 
advertised as "architects," and as either builders or archi- 
tects were responsible for constructing many houses in Vic- 
torian Wyncote, as well as the Calvary Presbyterian Church 
designed by the Philadelphia architectural firm of Dull & 
Peterson. One of their dwellings, 305 Maple Avenue, was 



Deed Book 304, p. 133, November 9, 1886; Deed Book 
309, P. 244, April 18, 1887; Deed Book 331, p. 72, December 
31, 1888; Deed Book 354, p. 3222, March 24, 1891. 

12 M.L. Kohler to W.E. Weber, Deed Book 319, p. 72, 
October 26, 1887; Deed Book 335, p. 186, May 6, 1889; Deed 
Book 340, p. 408, December 20, 1899; M.L. Kohler to Henry J. 
Weber: Deed Book 347, p. 215, May 29, 1890. 



39 



advertised in Scientific American in 1894, with the notation 
that Messrs. Burke & Dolhenty, Wyncote, Pennsylvania, were 
the architects and builders. 13 [See Figure 24] A photograph 
taken in 1985 compares the original design with its present 
appearance. [See Figure 25] 

Heacock Development 

Unlike Hazard and Kohler, who were professional devel- 
opers, the Quaker Heacock family were early permanent resi- 
dents in the area, having purchased 22 acres of land from 
William C. Kent in 1857, and an additional seven acres from 
Isaac Mather in 1859. 14 Following the death of Joseph 
Heacock in 1883, his sons, as Executors of his Estate, chose 
to subdivide 25 acres into 57 lots, as shown on the Baist Map 
of 1891. [See Figure 10] Restrictions in deeds for the 
resale of these lots stated that no building should cost less 
then $3,000, and that houses erected on said lots should be 
set back at least 40 feet from the front property line. Deed 
research indicates that sale of these lots began in 1888. 
Many of the lots were granted directly to the children of 



13 

Scientif ic American . Vol. 17, No. 2, February 1894, 

pp. 22. 30. 

W.C. Kent to Joseph Heacock: Deed Book 105, p. 495, 

April 1, 1857; Isaac Mather to Joseph Heacock: Deed Book 126, 

p. 126, April 1, 1859. 



40 



Joseph Heacock. The new streets of Webster and Mather Ave- 
nues, extending westward from Glenside Avenue to Maple Ave- 
nue, were laid out at this time, as were lots on the north 
side of Washington Lane and on the west side of Glenside 
Avenue. A block of land bordered by Glenside, Maple, Mather 
and Webster Avenues remained in family ownership, and was the 
site of the Heacock greenhouses — famous for their roses and 
palms, which were distributed worldwide. 

In 1857 the Heacock sisters established a day and board- 
ing school on the family compound. In 1881 this school moved 
to a house on Mather Avenue, where it continued to function 
until 1902.15 Hotchkin, in 1892, reported on the Heacock 
development 

The Haycock [sic] property of about 25 acres 
is selling off rapidly in building lots. 
Several houses have been built recently, in- 
cluding one by Angus S. Wade, the architect 
of Philadelphia, two by Mr. Kerr and brother; 
another by Mr. Aiman, and an $8,000. resi- 
dence by Mr. Bryan of Philadelphia. The 
buildings on this tract are of substantial 
character ranging in price from $4,000. to 
$8,000.-^^ 

Angus S. Wade purchased lots #30 and #31 on the north side of 

Washington Lane on the Heacock development, where he built 

similarly styled houses for resale. 17 



15 

Times Chronigle, 75th Anniversary Issue, 1969. 
16 Hotchkin, p. 181. 

Deed Book 347, p. 148, April 1, 1890; Deed Book 337, 
p. 95, April 29, 1889. These houses are not part of the Victorian 
District. 



41 



Edward Heacock, son of Joseph Heacock, was reported to 
be active in the building market; he built two double houses 
at 114-16 and 118-20 Webster Avenue, receiving notice in the 
local newspaper: "Mr. Heacock's new houses on Webster Avenue 
are being rapidly pushed to completion." 18 

Bradley Redfield 

The Shoemaker farm lying in the southwesterly portion of 
Wyncote's Victorian District was developed by Bradley Red- 
field in 1890, when he established 37 building lots bordering 
the newly established Bent and Accomac Roads. On August 1, 
1890, Redfield purchased 45.61 acres from Isaiah Matlack for 
$55,000.19 On July 31, 1890, Matlack is shown in this same 
deed as having purchased the tract from Mary Shoemaker, widow 
of Isaac Shoemaker; the tract was surveyed by Joseph W. 
Hunter on August 1, 1891, as plotted on the Baist Map of 
1891.20 [See Figure 10] The lots were of varying sizes, with 
the larger lots situated closer to Church Road. Restrictions 
contained in deeds for the sale of these lots specified that 



18 

Times Chronicle , Montgomery Publishing Company, May 

9, 1896. 

Deed Book 348, p. 464, August 1, 1890. 
20 Deed Book 348, p. 464, August 1, 1890: "Being the 
same tract which Mary Shoemaker and others by indenture 
leasing date the thirty-first day of July, 1891 and lodged 
for record in the office for recording deeds at Norristown 
granted and conveyed unto the said Isaiah Matlack in fee." 



42 



houses must be erected at least 100 feet from the front 
property line, to cost not less than $7,500. 

Lots 27 through 37 on the east side of Bent Road closest 
to Greenwood Avenue became the property of All Hallows Epis- 
copal Church and the Calvary Presbyterian Church. Sub- 
sequently a new road named Kent Road was cut through Bent 
Road to connect with Helion Avenue, thus separating the 
church properties from Lot number 25. 

The occupations of both Redfield and Matlack are given 
as "commission merchants" in Deed Book 348, p. 464. Redfield 
is listed in an 1891 Philadelphia City Directory as associ- 
ated with L.W. Seaman & Company, residing at 1511 Allegheny 
Avenue, Philadelphia. 22 Bradley Redfield is perhaps better 
known as the father of Edward Redfield, (1868-1965) inter- 
nationally recognized as a landscape painter. At the tim.e of 
the sale of 2.5 acres to William A. Cochran in September, 
1891, he is shown as residing in Montgomery County. 23 The 
Grantor index in Norristown indicates that Redfield was not a 
major developer, and that the Wyncote development constituted 
his main venture in the real estate market. Isaiah Matlack, 
on the other hand, was involved with many more transactions, 
buying and reselling in quick succession. For example, he 



^^ Bradley Redfield to William A. Cochran: Deed Book 
360, p. 449, September 22, 1891. 

^^ Gopsill's Philadelphia City Directory, p. 1511. 

23 Deed Book 360, p. 449, Bradley Redfield to William 
A. Cochran, September 22, 1891. 



43 



purchased lots 7,8,9 and 10 on the Hazard development, estab- 
lished in 1885; on March 18, 1887 he resold these lots to 
developer M.L. Kohler. Descendants of Martin Luther Kohler 
report that he developed Bent and Accomac Roads. Deed 
records do not indicate that he was involved in the ownership 
of the Redfield lots; however, it is likely that Kohler acted 
as an agent for Bradley Redfield for the sale of these 
properties. 

William E. Weber 

A prominent civic and church leader, Weber undertook the 
last development in Victorian Wyncote, closest to the rail- 
road. He had acquired this choice parcel of land in 1894 as 
shown on the A.H. Mueller Map of 1897. [Figure 12] The sale 
was reported in the local newspaper: 

The coal firm of Thomas Nicholson was bought 
by J.L. Grauer, to be run in the name of 
"Grauer & Bros." The lot of six acres 
belonging to Thomas Nicholson on the south 
side of Greenwood Avenue was sold to Mr. 
Weber of this place last week for $12,000. 24 

Weber's holdings were subdivided into building lots, 

according to a survey made by Joseph W. Hunter on December 

16, 1902, and a new road called "Cliff Terrace" was cut through 

from Glenside Avenue. Plans for a closed road within the 

block, extending from the south side of Greenwood Avenue and 



24 

T3.mes Chconi-cle, vol. I, September 22, 1894. 



44 







Figure 12. Railroad Atlas of Cheltenham, Abington and 
Springfield Townships, 1897, A.H. Mueller Company. 



45 



turning at a right angle to meet Glenside Avenue were never 
executed, nor were houses built on lots 30 through 34. This 
space was used subsequently for community tennis courts. The 
numbered lots are recorded on the A.H. Mueller Map of 1909. 
[Figure 13] 

Mr. Weber built six double houses, three on each side of 
the street, on the new established Cliff Terrace. A semi- 
detached unit on the corner of Glenside Avenue and Cliff 
Terrace sold for $3,500 in 1903. Houses within the block 
sold for $3,250.25 These houses were in the cottage-type 
Queen Anne style, one and one-half stories high, with 
alternating gable and gambrel roofs. 

With the erection of five double houses on the south 
side of Greenwood Avenue in 1915, building on the Weber 
development was nearly completed. Each semi-detached unit 
sold at that time for $5,000. 26 These houses are recorded 
on the F.H.M. Klinge Map of 1927. [Figures 14 and 15] 

Edwin Tyson 

Mention should also be made in the development story of 
Victorian Wyncote of the operations of Edwin Tyson — local 
plumbing and hardware merchant — who, on November 1, 1898 



^^ Deed Book 500, p. 246, May 1, 1903; Deed Book 503, 
p. 160. June 8, 1903. 

^° Deed Book 633, p. 205, May 23, 1910. 



46 







// 



'^ 




k^>., 






•O^ ',^T/> 





Rail- 
road 
Station 



t-^=we:Bs,;S"^-7iSpM. 



TJrr 



I Z/ 



20 

a 



«/4<M*' 



/9 



f'// 



16 

a 






*7 7yujn«r| 



^ 












i£3i^2r? 



a 



Figure 14. F.H.M. Klinge Atlas, 1927. Outline of proposed 
district near the railroad. 



48 




Church Road 



Figure 15. F.H.M. Klinge Atlas, 1927. Outline of Bent 
Accomac Roads in proposed district. 



anc 



49 



purchased, in the name of his wife Geraldine, four and tv;o- 
tenths acres of land from the Estate of James Nile for $2,900 
at public auction. 27 This purchase included an Italianate 
Style dwelling that pre-dates 1873. 28 Mr. Tyson subdivided 
this acreage, according to a survey made by Frederick G. 
Thorn, Jr., with the establishment of a new street called 
Greenwood Place leading from Greenwood Avenue to the present 
Walt Lane. Mr. Tyson erected six double houses for rental 
purposes on this tract. The pair of double houses on Green- 
wood Avenue were built in the Shingle Style; another pair on 
Greenwood place were built in the cottage Queen Anne style; 
and a third pair of brick double houses on Greenwood Place 
suggest the Arts and Crafts Movement popular at this time. 

Summary 

Wyncote remained one of the last areas in Cheltenham 
Township to be developed as a suburban community, even 
though railroad service had been instituted as early as 
1857. The PRERBG reported in 1887 that "the Reading Rail- • 
road has not attracted the attention of other lines. "29 
Development of Victorian VJyncote was accomplished by both 



I 



2^ Deed Book 444, p. 471, November 1, 1898. 

28 Deed Book 220, p. 64, January 17, 1873, John M. 
Fenton to James Nile: an existing building is specified in 
this deed; the building is also shown on the G.M. Hopkins map 
of 1883. 

^^ PRERBG . Vol. 1, No. 6, February 15, 1886, p. 71. 



50 



outside and local individuals. Once begun, the breaking up 
of large tracts of land proceeded rapidly, in response to the 
high demand for suburban lots. Willis P. Hazard established 
the first sub-division in 1885 and by 1887 had disposed of 
all 57 lots; his name disappears from the Cheltenham Town- 
ship tax records, as owner, by that date. Wyncote escaped 
mass development at the hands of a single developer or syndi- 
cate. The operations of the five principal developers of 
different backgrounds resulted in varied and interesting 
streetscapes with individualistically styled dwellings. The 
only recognizable "development" rows are those on Cliff 
Terrace and the south side of Greenwood Avenue, representing 
only a small part of the built environment. Local builders 
played an important role, functioning as contractors and 
speculators, buying and selling lots and erecting homes on 
speculation or for commissioned clients. The contributions 
of professional architects will be discussed in the section 
on architecture. Restrictions contained in deeds controlling 
the cost of dwellings and their location on the lot, as 
specified in the Heacock and Redfield deeds, helped assure 
the quality and appearance of the neighborhood. Quick turn- 
over of both unimproved and improved lots in the late nine- 
teenth century was characteristic of the early settlement of 
Victorian Wyncote. After 1915, transference of property was 
less frequent, reflecting greater stability in the community. 



51 



CHAPTER TWO: COMMERCIAL ACTIVITY IN WYNCOTE 

In the late 1880s a small business district began to 
develop in Wyncote near the main intersection of Greenwood 
and Glenside Avenues. The Thomas Nicholson Coal and Lumber 
Yard near the railroad had been established as early as 1883, 
as shown on the G. M. Hopkins map of that date. [See Figure 
4] The William Baist map of 1891 lists a structure on the 
corner of the intersection that according to Hotchkin con- 
tained a post office and store. 1 [See Figure 10] 

The Hexamer Insurance Map of 1898 records a number of 
commercial structures on the north side of Greenwood Avenue, 
extending from Glenside Avenue to the row of five houses on 
the west end of the block. 2 These included three "store and 
dwelling" units that served as the hub of the community, 
accommodating stores as well as inns and restaurants, with 
spaces overhead for schools, political and social meetings, 
and business offices. 3 By the mid-1890s L.M. Bean's Livery 
Stable and Edwin Tyson's Hardware and Plumbing Store had been 
built. A late nineteenth-century photograph records the 



^ Hotchkin, The York Road Old and new . Binder & Kelly, 
Philadelphia, 1892, p. 180. 

Insurance Maps of the Sub urbs of Philadelphia , Vol. I, 
Ernest Hexamer & Son, Philadelphia, p. 33. 

As reported in the Times Chronicle . 1894-1897; 
microfilm copies Montgomery Publishing Company, Fort 
Washington, Pennsylvania. 



52 



appearance of the James Nile Building, designed by Horace 
Trumbauer in 1896, on the northwest corner of this intersec- 
tion. [Figure 16] Shortly thereafter, two additional store 
and dwelling buildings v/ere erected to the west of the Trum- 
bauer building; all three buildings are shown in Figures 5 
and 17. 

Also shown on the 1898 map are building headquarters for 
M.E. Hauser and Burke & Dolhenty. By 1909, the A.H. Mueller 
Atlas no longer lists Burke & Dolhenty, but continues to 
show M.E. Hauser, with the addition of W. John Stevens, Inc. 
and S.L. Schively, as builders. It is reported that Schively 
employed black workers and built houses for them in Hilltop 
Lane, a narro./ Ltreet rising above Greenwood Avenue to the 
north, thus establishing a black community in Wyncote that 
continues to this day. 4 Reggie Jackson, outfielder for the 
California Angels and a 1964 Cheltenham High School graduate, 
grew up at 149 Greenwood Avenue, where his father also had 
his tailor shop. [See Figure 23] 

By 1900 Wyncote had become established as an upper 
middle-class neighborhood whose residents, proud of their 
attractive environment, discouraged commercial growth in the 
community. Consequently, business operations were contained 



^ As reported by Mr. Carl W. Gatter, longtime resident 
of Wyncote. 



53 




Figure l6. 

James Nile Building, Greenwood Avenue, erected c. I893, 

Horace Trumbauer, architect. 

Photograph courtesy Carl Wo Gatter. 




Figure 17« 

Wyncote Business District, Greenwood Avenue c. I9I8, 
Photograph courtesy of John Jo O'Donnell Company, 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania. 



54 



in the first block of Greenwood Avenue. The Jenkintown & 
Cheltenham Gas Company and the Montgomery County Ice and Cold 
Storage Company established complexes of services buildings 
near the railroad with connecting rail spurs shortly after 
1900. These buildings have long since been removed, and the 
space is now used as auxiliary parking for the Jenkintown 
Railroad Station. 

William E. Weber's land on the south side of Greenwood 
would have presented a prime opportunity for commercial ex- 
pansion. [See Figures 12 and 13] Instead, all of Weber's 
lots were sold for the construction of dwellings, with the 
exception of the lot at the southwest corner of Greenwood and 
Glenside Avenues, where the Wyncote Pharmacy was constructed. 
The deeds of sale of the rest of the lots contained explicit 
restrictions against the erection of commercial structures. 
The 1920s and 1930s witnessed the peak of commercial activity 
in Wyncote and the last years in which businesses located in 
Wyncote directly served the community. Branches of the Glen- 
side Bank & Trust Company and the Jenkintown Electric Company 
were established in buildings on Greenwood Avenue in the 
1920s. The Wyncote Pharmacy building, designed by J. Linden 
Heacock, was built in the mid-1920s. As the pace of residen- 
tial development slowed, builders' offices disappeared, and 



^ e.g. Deed Book 674, p. 168, William E. Weber to 
Michael E. Hauser, 1912. 



55 



the decreased need for ice, coal, and to some extent oas, 
resulted in the removal of the utility companies near the 
railroad. 

Wyncote was not exempt from the effects of the Great 
Depression of the 1930s and World War II. Chauffeur-driven 
cars no longer brought affluent businessmen to the daily 
trains at the Jenkintown Station. The Glenside Bank & Trust 
Company failed in 1931, and the Jenkintown Electric Company 
closed its branch office as well. 6 During the war, ammuni- 
tion was manufactured in a large stone warehouse at 147 
Greenwood Avenue that had been converted into a foundry. 
This is the closest Wyncote ever came to supporting heavy 
industry. In the same decade, a one-story brick building 
between the foundry and the old livery stable housed the "J. 
Barton Benson Smithery" which produced ornamental iron work. 
[Figure 18] 

Wyncote's reluctance to disturb its residential ambience 
with conspicuous commercial structures was illustrated in the 
1940s when a small precision manufacturing firm established 
operations at 125 Greenwood Avenue. To mitigate the impact 
of the industrial operation, the owner erected a Colonial 



Times Chronicle ^ 75th Anniversary Issue, October 2, 
1969, p. 52. 

Lillian Kelley, "Japanese Film Wyncote Office 
Building," T jm e s C h r on icle, July 14, 1983, p. 1. 



56 




Figure 18 o 

Jo, Barton Benson Smithery (on left) and former Levi M. Bean 
Livery Stable (on right) o Photograph c. 19^0 courtesy of 
ATD American Company, Wyncote, Pennsylvania o 



Figure 19 « 

Store and Dwelling (on right) erected c. 1895, J. Linden 
Heacock, architect; former Edwin Tyson Plumbing Store 
(on left) erected c. I896, Greenwood Avenue. 
Photograph 1985. 



57 



Revival house close to the street, to which he attached a large 
building in the rear. The result was a unique coiribination of 
historicism and f unctionalism. 

In the 1950s, the James Nile Building was demolished to 
make way for a service station, and in 1969 the commercial/ 
residential structure next door, which dated from the mid- 
1890s, was razed in order to expand the station. The third 
commercial/residential building, designed by J. Linden 
Heacock in 1896, survives, as does the Tyson hardware store 
building next to it. [Figure 19] The latter building is now 
occupied by the John J. O'Donnell Plumbing Company. 

A large stone warehouse was built in the 1950s on the 
west side of Glenside Avenue, south of Cliff Terrace, and is 
now leased by the Bell Telephone Company as garage space. A 
previous building on the site, owned by T.B. Harper, had been 
used for cement-producing and well-digging operations. 

With the 1970s came fine examples of adaptive use of 
historic structures. The ATD American Company, wholesale 
suppliers of textiles and office furnishings, purchased the 
livery stable, foundry, and a warehouse on Greenwood Avenue 
from the Quaker Distributing Company in 1976. All three 
buildings were vacant at the time. They launched a spectacu- 
lar rehabilitation of these buildings, which won awards from 



58 



the Montgomery Planning Commission and the Board of Commis- 
sioners of Cheltenham Township. 8 With John Sudofsky of 
Norristown as architect and Worthington Associates of 
Bristol, Pennsylvania as the contractor, modern office in- 
teriors were created within the original stone walls of the 
foundry and livery stable. The 1940 brick smithery building 
was removed and replaced with a stone building to match the 
rest of the complex, using original and additional quarried 
stones from the cliff behind the buildings. Timberwork, 
steel beams, and stones were recycled by expert craftsmen. 
In 1980, Thomas Hine, architectural critic of the Philade l- 
phia Inquirer» praised this rehabilitation project, writing 

the three Zaslow brothers who own this insti- 
tutional purchasing and distribution business 
set out to build a good place for themselves, 
their employees, and for their neighbors. 
The result is a building whose generosity 
points up the meanness of most of the rest of 
what is being built nowadays. 9 

The fame of this project has spread overseas, and recently a 
Japanese television camera crew filmed the buildings. 10 
Figure 20 is a view of the buildings before the rehabilita- 
tion, and Figure 21 is a photograph of the new exteriors. 



o 

Special Planning Award presented to the ATD American 
Company by the Montgomery Planning Commission, January 13, 
1982; A Resolution of the Board of Commissioners of 
Cheltenham Township, September 21, 1982. 

Thomas Hine, "Caring Helps Make it Good," PMli 
Inquire r. September 14, 1980. 
^^^^Lillian Kelley, p. 1. 



59 




Figure 20. 

Commercial buildings on Greenwood Avenue c. 1976 before 
rehabilitation by ATD American Company in 1979 » 
Photograph courtesy of ATD American Company. 




Figure 21. 

Exterior of ATD American Company after rehabilitation in 1979 ^ 

John Sudofsky, architect. 

Photograph 1985. 



60 



Wyncote boasts other examples of adaptive use. The first 
floor spaces of several c. 1910 semi-detached houses have 
been adapted for use as professional office space, and the 
1896 Wyncote Elementary School at 400 Greenwood Avenue has 
had its interior space remodelled and houses an accounting 
firm on the first floor and an engineering consulting firm on 
the second. The exterior has not been altered. 

The 1980s are witnessing further change, specifically 
the major adaptation of the 1931 Horace Trumbauer Jenkintown 
Railroad Station for a 168-seat restaurant.il [Figure 22] 
Modern glass enclosures will alter the appearance of the 
historic station, although the building itself will remain 
essentially intact. Interestingly, a restaurant was located 
in the turn-of-the-century station that was demolished to 
make way for the Trumbauer station. Plus ca change, plus 
c'est la meme chnc;,=.. 

Wyncote has experienced a variety of commercial activity 
over the last hundred years. Two significant forces have 
effectively maintained the high integrity of this mainly 



^^ Michael Riedel, Philadel phia Ing uirpr. August 29, 
1985. Confirmation of restaurant to be built at the 
Jenkintown Railroad Station by Anthony DiMarco of Abington, 
Pennsylvania, by arrangement with SEPTA, owner of the 
Station. 



61 



residential suburb: 1) containment of business operations 
within a limited area by determination of Wyncote's 
residents; and 2) the preservation of Wyncote's historic 
buildings through adaptive use. 



62 




Figure 22. 

Jenkintown Railroad Station, erected 1931, 

Horace Trumbauer, architect. 

Photograph 1985 o 




Figure 23. 

Boyhood home of Reggie Jackson 
1^9 Greenwood Avenue (original 
building c. 1900) o 
Photograph 198^. 



62a 



CHAPTER THREE: THE ARCHITECTURE OF VICTORIAN WYNCOTE 

Choice of Style 

Several factors determined the style of the houses built 
in this new suburban community. Generally, choices consisted 
of domestic styles popular at the time of construction, 
particularly those which had already appeared in the 
surrounding area. Developers, homeowners and architects all 
had a voice in the selection of the style. The developer, 
guided by his knowledge of the marketplace and building 
technology, offered a house that he believed would satisfy 
the needs of prospective purchasers at the right price. 
Enlightened buyers, familiar with current architectural 
fashions and the social image they conveyed, doubtless 
conferred with the builder or architect on the design of 
their houses. The designs which the architect J. Linden 
Heacock prepared for his client. Dr. H. Vance Peters, would 
seem to be a good example of this. A first set of drawings 
presented a fairly simple Queen Anne house, while a second 
set introduced greater complexity in outline and window 
arrangements. Dr. Peters, desirous of added embellishment, 
could very well have proposed these changes. 1 



■'■ 132 Webster Avenue, c.1895. Drawings of J. Linden 
Heacock, Collection of the Athenaeum of Philadelphia. 



63 



Role of the Professional Architect 

A significant number of houses in Wyncote have been 
identified with well-known Philadelphia architects. Recent 
research has provided documentation for the names of the 
architects and the structures they designed in Wyncote. A 
listing of these architects appears in Appendix A. In com- 
missioning architects to design many of their houses and all 
of their churches, Wyncote's residents achieved architec- 
tural distinction for their town, as well as a physical 
expression of their social standing. The expanding role of 
the professional architect in the design of middle-class 
houses is well demonstrated in this new community. 
Unfortunately, the list of architects who worked in Wyncote 
must remain incomplete, for there are significant houses in 
the district that appear to be architect-designed but for 
which no documentation can be found. 

Professional builders also constructed many of Wyncote's 
houses, and their designs compare favorably with those de- 
signed by architects. An example is a house designed by the 
local firm of Burke and Dolhenty [Figures 24 and 25] and a 
house designed by Angus S. Wade [Figures 26 and 26a], who was 
an architect/builder associated with large developments in 
suburban Philadelphia areas. "^ 



^ Scientific American . Vol. 17, No. 2, February 1894, 
p. 22 illus. p. 30; Ibid., Vol. 17, No. 3, March 1894, p. 35, 
illus. p. 43. 



64 




1:^ \ l^ji'fH 



Figure 2^. 

§05 Maple Avenue, 1894- . Burke & Dolhenty, architects. 

As illustrated in Scientific American . 1894. 




Figure 25. 

305 Maple Avenue, 1894. Burke & Dolhenty, architects, 

Photograph 1985 . 



65 




Figure 26. 

1^6 Fembrook Avenue, 189^. Angus S. Wade, architect. 

As illustrated in Scientific American, 1894. 




Figure 26a. 

1^6 Fernbrook Avenue, 1894. 
Angus S. Wade, architect. 
Photograph 1984. 



66 



The general reference to Wyncote as a "Victorian" neigh- 
borhood disguises the fact that it contains a variety of 
architectural styles popular in the late nineteenth and 
early twentieth centuries. A tour of the area reveals the 
progression of American architectural styles during this 
period. 

Using the terminology and identifying characteristics 
that architectural historians have ascribed to domestic 
architecture of this period, it is possible to recognize the 
following styles in Wyncote: vernacular farmhouses, vernacu- 
lar Victorian, Italianate, Second Empire, Stick, Queen Anne, 
Shingle, Tudor and Colonial Revival. Queen Anne and Shingle 
style houses, built before 1915, make up most of the archi- 
tectural fabric of the district. A limited number of Tudor 
and Colonial Revival houses were built after 1900 through the 
1920s. More recently, in the 1950 and 1960s, a few Colonial 
Revival houses have been built, mostly in the Cape Cod man- 
ner, on the remaining undeveloped lots. 

It is sometimes difficult to assign a style to a parti- 
cular house, as builders and architects moved easily from one 
style to another as a consequence of the architectural free- 
dom of the times and the ready availability of mass-produced 
parts, resulting in considerable overlapping of specific 
types. 



67 



Houses p re-datina 1885 

Only three dwellings were in place when Wyncote was 
created as a new village in 1885. Two of these were in the 
vernacular farmhouse style, located at 209 and 211 Greenwood 
Avenue, one of which is illustrated in Figure 27. These 
houses were once part of a large farm, as shown on the G.M. 
Hopkins Atlas of 1883. [See Figure 4], An Italianate dwell- 
ing, recorded in a deed of 1873, survives at 414 Greenwood 
Avenue. 3 [Figure 28] 

Vernacular Victorian 

Between 1885 and 1890 five frame houses were built on 
Wyncote's first development on Woodland Road. 4 They repre- 
sent the plain, utilitarian type of house built by anonymous 
builders. [Figure 29] 

Second Empire 

A few examples of mansard-roofed houses, typical of the 
Second Empire style popular in the 1850s and 1860s, were 
constructed in Wyncote, one of which is illustrated in Figure 
30. One significant Second Empire house was built in the 
late 1880s at 308 Maple Avenue as a country residence for the 



^ Deed Book 220, p. 64. 

^ Located at 131, 133, 139, 141 and 143 Woodland Road. 



68 







Figure 27. 

211 Greenwood Avenue, c, 1870. 

Photograph 1984. 



69 




Figure 28. 

4l5 Greenwood Avenue, erected prior to I873 

Photograph 198^ 




Figure 29. 

143 Woodland Road, c. I887. 

Photograph I98I. 



70 




Figure 30. 

203-205 Greenwood Avenue, c. I890. 

Photograph 198^. 




Figure 31. 

308 Maple Avenue, c. 1886, 

Photograph 198^. 



71 



German Consul, William A. Selser.5 [Figure 31] This is a 
symmetrical house constructed of brownstone, with a prominent 
round tower placed in the northwest corner, and a wide porch 
encircling the entire structure. 

Sti ck St yle 

The Stick Style, popularized by Henry Hudson Holly in 
the 1860s, earned its name for its applied wood detailing 
suggesting the skeleton frame. 6 Asymmetrical and upright, it 
had little archaeological borrowing and incorporated porches 
into its design. There are no pure examples of this style in 
Wyncote, for by the time this community was developed in the 
mid-1880s the Queen Anne style had become the principal style. 

Queen Anne Style 

The majority of houses in the district belong to the 
Queen Anne style, which is more broadly considered as "Vic- 
torian" architecture. The development of this style had 
many influences; therefore, a brief review of the styles 
that preceded it and the forces that produced it is appro- 
priate. 

Two types of domestic architecture dominated at the 
opening of the nineteenth century — the Georgian, based on 



c 

Shown on the G. William Baist Atlas of 1891 [Figure 
10]. 

Henry Hudson Holly, Country Seats . 1863. Reprint, 
American Life Foundation, Watkins Glen, NY, 1977. 



72 



English precedent, and the Greek Revival, based on classical 
tradition. In the 1840s, primarily through the publications 
of Andrew Jackson Downing, the Gothic Revival fashion 
gained public attention.7 By mid-century, the Second Empire 
and Italianate styles were being copied for both residential 
and commercial buildings, with varying degrees of faithful- 
ness to the original model. Simultaneously, established 
vernacular building forms continued to be built. 

In the 1860s and 1870s, with the increasing role of the 
professional architect, as well as an influential architec- 
tural press, the architectural profession began to look in 
two directions in search of a new, and perhaps, national 
style. On the one hand, they recalled nostalgically 
America's colonial past, and on the other, they sought a free 
interpretation of all historic styles. Such free interpreta- 
tion, on both sides of the Atlantic, represented a break with 
the earlier Gothic Revival mode. 

In the second half of the 19th century the accumulation 
of historical styles, the continuation of the vernacular, 
combined with the new Queen Anne and the Colonial Revival, 
not to mention some interest in the Japanesque, produced a 



Hon^p! n"^A^^i ^^'^''r" Downing, The Architecture of Cnnn^ry 
Eqm^^, D. Appleton & Company, 1850. Dover Reprint, 1969. 



73 



rampant eclecticism in domestic architecture. Industrializa- 
tion, the expanding economy and the rise of the newly pros- 
perous middle class who demanded better homes and "style" 
contributed to this eclecticism. 

The Queen Anne style was named and popularized by a 
group of nineteenth-century architects, beginning in the 
1860s, among whom Richard Norman Shaw (1831-1912) was the 
most widely copied in this country. The name is rather 
inappropriate, for, as Hitchcock points out, it would be more 
accurate to label the new stylistic modes beginning just 
before 1870 in England and slightly later in the United 
States by the names of their principal proponents: 'Shavian' 
for Richard Norman Shaw and 'Richardsonian' for Henry Hobson 
Richardson (1838-1886). 9 Shaw's contribution to the 
American Queen Anne was profound, mostly stemming from his 
manorial houses with their picturesque, asymmetrical 
outlines, window treatment, and the free interpretation of 
Medieval, Elizabethan and eighteenth-century styles. Henry 



Q 

The theory and development of the Queen Anne, and the 
Shingle Style which derived from it, together with the 
Colonial Revival, is reported fully in Hitchcock's Architec- 
ture: Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries . (Fourth edition, 
Penguin Books, New York, 1983), as well as in Vincent 
Scully's The Shingle Style , (Yale University Press, New 
Haven, 1955). An interesting and well-illustrated account of 
the Queen Anne Movement in England, with some comments on the 
American Queen Anne, is presented in Mark Girouard's Sweet- 
ness and Light . (Yale University Press, New Haven, 1977). 
^ Hitchcock, p. 291. 



74 



Hobson Richardson created a uniquely American style by ap- 
plying discipline and order to the Queen Anne, simplifying 
volumes and masses, reducing ornament, using stone and 
shingles, and adding the Romanesque arch. His designs were 
assimilated in the new Shingle Style. Richardson certainly 
did not initiate the Shingle Style but he took it over in 
1880 and made it very much his own. 10 

The Centennial Exposition at Philadelphia in 1876 
brought the Queen Anne fashion clearly into the limelight, 
with the construction of Thomas Harris' British Exhibition 
buildings in the Old English Cottage Style. 11 Similarly, 
America began to look to its colonial period, its artifacts 
and architecture, with renewed interest. A New England 
kitchen of 1776 was exhibited at the Philadelphia Exposition, 
and in the 1870s the architectural profession began to 
explore the homey attributes and picturesque qualities of 
colonial houses. 12 

Description of Wyncote's Queen Anne Houses 

Wyncote's Queen Anne houses, built on narrow lots on the 
steep hills near the railroad, present a jagged outline 
against the sky. They are unified in scale by their two and 
one-half story heights capped by prominent rooflines, with 



1° Ibid., p. 366. 
11 Scully, p. 19 
•^^ Ibid. , p. 28 if^ 



75 




Figure 32. 

119 Woodland Road, c. 188 7, 

Photograph 1985. 




Figure 33. 

105-107 Cliff Terrace, c. I905. 

Photograph 1985 . 



76 



bays and projections contributing to their asymmetrical 
forms. [Figure 32] Although described as "two and one-half" 
stories, they are closer to three stories, as the floor to 
ceiling height in the attic provides almost a full story. 
They were constructed with balloon frame skeletons, a type of 
framing that was easy to build, economical, and accommodated 
the irregular shapes of the Queen Anne. 13 The high, angular 
hipped roof is especially noticeable in VJyncote, and is 
nearly always penetrated with intersecting gables over side 
bays and projections. The gambrel roof, suggesting the Col- 
onial Revival, is also well represented in Wyncote.l4 [Figure 
33] Wyncote is noted for its use of local stone for its 
foundations and on all or part of the upper structure. Vic- 
torian Wyncote was fortunate in having ample deposits of 
"Wissahickon schist" in its steep hills. Quarrying opera- 
tions have been discontinued, but the grey, sparkling stone, 
still exposed in the sides of the cliffs in Wyncote, bear 
witness to this valuable resource. J. Linden Heacock, a 
local architect, is known to have published an article on 
"Chestnut Hill stone" (similar to the stone in Wyncote) in 
1916. 15 A favorite combination of exterior materials was 



1 -3 

The balloon framing method was developed in the 
midwest in the mid-nineteenth century, as described by Sieg- 
fried Giedion in Space. Time and Architecture , Harvard Uni- 
versiiy Press, Cambridge, 1963. 

Late nineteenth century houses with gambrel roofs 
are frequently classified as Colonial Revival. 

J. Linden Heacock, "Ledge-stone V7ork of Philadelphia 
and Vicinity," Architectural Review . Vol. 2, 1913, pp. 279-286 

77 



the use of stone at the first floor level, with wood framing 
above, either in clapboard or shingle sheathing. Typical of 
the period, the variety of cut shingles in contrasting bands 
and in gables calls attention to exterior texture. Examples 
of houses completely clad in shingles may be seen at 126 and 
130 Woodland Road and on the double houses at 1 and 2, 11 and 
12, and 7 and 8 Greenwood Place. 

Brick construction, suggesting urban rowhouses, is seen 
to a lesser extent in Wyncote. However, a handsome all-brick 
double house at 147-149 Fernbrook Avenue was built in 1886. 16 
[Figure 34] Partial brick exteriors are incorporated into 
the design of a few houses. The large Tudor-styled Parish 
Hall of All Hallows Episcopal Church, built in 1926, is 
constructed of light-colored brick with stucco and half- 
timber detail. 17 Stucco, sometimes referred to in building 
accounts as "pebble dash," was often used in combination with 
half-timber detail on upper stories. The five double houses 
on the south side of Greenwood Avenue (numbers 108 through 
130) were originally built c. 1910 with all-stucco exterior 
surfaces. 

Towers — square, round, and polygonal — are a conspi- 
cuous architectural feature on many of Wyncote's houses. They 



^^ Shown on the Kohler Plot Plan of 1886 [Figure 11]. 
17 PRERBG . Vol. XLI, 30, July 28, 1926. 



78 



were built of stone or wood and placed on corners, centered 
on facades, or attached to the side or rear elevations. 
[Figures 31, 35, 36 and 56] 

Porches were a popular architectural feature of the 
time, and their varying appearance — full-width, corner, 
recessed and wrap-around types — contribute to the Victorian 
feeling in this community. The elevated first floor levels 
of the houses necessitated a series of steps leading from the 
ground level, and the sequential order of entry they estab- 
lished lent importance to the porch itself. [Figures 29, 31, 
32, 33, 34, 41, 54 and 55] 

Window treatments in Wyncote are decorative as well as 
utilitarian. An infinite variety of glazing and window sizes 
appear in square, round and arched frames. The majority of 
windows are double-hung, with examples of casement sash ap- 
pearing more frequently after 1900. The customary Victorian 
type of window sash — 1/1, 2/1, 2/2 and 4/4 styles — are 
seen in great numbers. Multi-paned sash over a single light 
below were also built in houses at the turn of the century, 
as were Palladian type windows. 18 Large "picture" windows 
are noticeably absent in the Victorian district. 



1 8 

An equal number of small panes in the upper and 

lower sash is usually an indication that the original window 

has been replaced. 



79 




Figure 34. 

1^7-1^9 Fern brook Avenue, c. 1886. 

Photograph 1985. 




Figure 35. 

107 Woodland Road, c. 1890. 
Thomas F. Miller, architect. 
Photograph 1985. 

80 



Figure 36. 
107 Woodland Road, c. I890. 
Detail of Tower 
Thomas F. Miller, architect. 
Photograph 1985 . 




Figure 37. 

323 Bent Road, I892. 
Angus S. Ivade, architect, 
Photograph 1985 . 

81 



Wyncote's houses were much more colorful than they ap- 
pear today. The following color scheme was described for a 
Queen Anne cottage built in Wyncote in 1894: [See Figures 24 
and 25] 

The clapboards and line of shingles are 
painted a light yellow, with the shingled 
band in chrome. The roof is left to weather. 
The trimmings are of olive green, sash and 
muntins being dark red. 19 

During the "colonialization" of Wyncote, the muted browns, 
golds and reds were obscured with white paint. Paint samples 
and reports from older residents confirm the use of the dark, 
muddied colors of the late nineteenth century, as described 
in A Century of Color . 20 Many of today's residents are re- 
turning to the colors of the Victorian period. 

Houses designed by Angus S. Wade in Wyncote exemplify 
the eclectic Queen Anne style popular at the end of the 
nineteenth century. Wade designed the first house built on 
Bent Road on the Redfield development. Charles D. Cramp, of 
the Cramp shipbuilding firm in Philadelphia, commissioned a 
design for a country house in 1893. 21 [Figure 37] Wade's 
design for Harry Anderson at 304 Bent Road in the mid-1890s 



^^ Scientific American . Vol. 17, No. 2, February 1894, 

^^ Roger W. Moss, A Century of Color. The American Life 
Foundation, Watkins Glen NY, 1981. 

^-"^ Sandra L. Tatman and Roger W. Moss, Biographical 
Dictionary of Philadelphia Architect s. 1700-1930. G.K. Hall & 
Company, Boston, 1985, p. 816. This house has been recently 
reclad with asbestos siding. 



82 



is a side-gambrel roofed house of frame construction. 22 Two 
houses built for William E. Weber at 146 and 150 Fernbrook 
Avenue, described at the time as "Queen Anne cottages," 
demonstrate the design options available in the 1890e and 
which guarded against monotony in these suburban streets. 23 
The house at 146 Fernbrook was illustrated in Scientific 
American and suggests Shingle Style influences. 24 [Figures 
26 and 26a] Its neighbor, at 150 Fernbrook, suggests the 
Colonial Revival with its box-like form. In 1896 Wade was 
commissioned by Dr. C.H. Kunkle, the patent medicine king, 
to design a substantial house. 25 The result was a full- 
blown example of the picturesque Queen Anne, with a multi- 
plicity of bays, gables, projections and towers. 

The Shingle Style 

The Shingle Style, a new form of American domestic 
architecture, developed in the 1870s and 1880s principally 
for resort and country houses. It is therefore appropriate 
that this style found its way to Wyncote, a semi-resort 
community from 1885 to 1910. This style assimilated Colonial 
English and Richardsonian influences, as had the Queen Anne, 
but it minimized the picturesque combination of architectural 



22 

Tatman and Moss, p. 816. 

23 Ibid. 

Scientif ic American . Vol. 17, No. 2, February 1894, 
p. 19x illus. p. 26 

Tatman and Moss, p. 817. 



83 



parts, emphasized exterior texture and massing, and brought 
down the verticality of the Queen Anne. 

In the late 1880s two double houses in the Shingle Style 
were built on narrow lots at 100-102 and 104-106 Woodland 
Road as rental properties for summer visitors. 26 The 1893 
appearance of the house at 100-104 Woodland Road is illus- 
trated in Figure 8. Figure 43 records its appearance c. 1906 
in an old postcard view, and Figure 44 is a partial view of 
the front broad gable, which has survived in its original 
form. However, the twin half in the left hand side of the 
photograph was severely "colonialized" in the 1920s, although 
the original porch and first floor stone walls were retained. 
The other half, on the right side of the photograph, shows 
the original shingle cladding, but also shows the addition of 
a forward extension with a "ferry-boat" roof and a new stucco 
surface at the first floor level. Houses such as these, 
occupying almost the entire width of their narrow suburban 
lots, are described by Samuel Bass Warner as "having the 
effect of looking individual, prosperous and private. "27 

Horace Trumbauer's work in Wyncote reflected the 
stylistic trends of the Shingle and Richardsonian styles. It 

26 

TT ^i ^ These double houses as well as additional houses on 
Woodland Road were built by Dr. I. Newton Evans and Samuel J 
Garner as rental properties. 

. Samuel Bass Warner, Streetcar Suburbs , Harvard 
University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1962, p. 145. 



84 



also represented a phase in his long career that lies between 
his early vernacular frame houses and his later more 
classically inspired mansions. 28 Five Trumbauer houses, all 
built in the 1890s, survive in Wyncote.29 Three of these 
houses, built of stone with wood and shingle detailing, 
rightfully belong to the Queen Anne, as illustrated in the 
W.A. Cochran house of 1892. [Figures 38 and 39] However, his 
house for Henry K. Walt of the same year, with its sweeping 
roof lines and simplified volumes, suggests the Shingle 
Style. [Figures 40, 41, and 42] This is one of the four 
Trumbauer houses that was built on spacious grounds on the 
new Redfield development at Bent and Accomac Roads, where 
site consideration was a major factor. An example of the 
relationship of house to site is well demonstrated in a turn- 
of-the-century postcard view of the Walt house, built on high 
ground on a six-acre site. [See Figures 40, 41, and 42] The 
large porch, an important element in the overall design, 
commanded a view of the landscaped gardens and ornamental 
lake below. 



28 

See Frederick Piatt, "Horace Trumbauer in 

Jenkintown," Old York Road Historical Society Bulletin. 

Volume XLIV, 1984, pp. 13-26, for his discussion of 

vernacular Victorian houses built by Trumbauer in Jenkintown. 

^ Located at 305, 322 and 343 Bent Road; southeast 

corner of Accomac and Church Roads; and 168 Fernbrook Avenue. 



85 




Figure 38. 

3^3 Bent Road, I892. 

Horace Trumbauer, architect. 

c. 1906 postcard courtesy of Robert 11. Skaler. 




Figure 39. 

3^3 Bent Road, 1892. 

Horace Trumbauer, architect. 

Photograph I985. 

86 




Figure kO. 

305 Bent Road, 1892. 

Horace Trumbauer, architect. 

c. 1906 postcard courtesy of Robert M. Skaler. 




Figure ^1. 

305 Bent Road, 1892. 

Horace Trumbauer, architect. 

Photograph 1985. 

87 



Detail of north porch, 




Figure ^2. 

305 Bent Road, 1892. 
Detail of stone tower, 
Horace Trumbauer, architect. 
Photograph 1985. 




Figure 43. 

100-104 VJoodland Road, c. 1888. 

c. 1906 postcard courtesy of Robert Harper, Wyncote. 

Pennsylvania. ^ . jr c. 




Figure 44. 

100-104 Woodland Road, c. 1888, 

Photograph 1981. 



89 



The last house Trumbauer built in Wyncote was con- 
structed in 1896 on a narrow lot at 168 Fernbrook Avenue for 
the Herrick family. 30 Its design, with the centered broad 
tower encircled by a porch at the first floor level, was 
repeated by Trumbauer for houses in the Overbrook Farms and 
Pelham developments in Philadelphia at the end of the 
nineteenth century. The variety of window forms — round, 
square, and Gothic headed, singly and in pairs and bands — 
is one of the most pleasing design features of Trumbauer's 
houses in Wyncote, though they are less visible in the 
Herrick house on the side elevations than in the other houses 
with their more open views. 

The Tudor Revival Style 

It was not until 1900 that a full expression of the 
Tudor Revival style was built in Wyncote. Tudor details were 
incorporated in the remodelling of the Schellinger house at 
308 Bent Road by William L. Price in 1902. 31 [Figure 45] In 
1909 Thomas, Churchman and Molitor designed the Episcopal 
Rectory on Bent Road for All Hallows Church. 32 [Figure 46] In 
1911 Herman Louis Duhring, Jr. designed a house for Charles 
Wentz at 1221 Church Road that reflected both Craftsman and 
Tudor influences. 33 A house at 132 Webster Avenue, built 



^^ Tatman and Moss, p. 800, 

31 Ibid., p. 631. 

22 Ibid., p. 784. 

33 Ibid., p. 222. 



90 




Figure ^5. 

308 Bent Road, c. I896. 

Alterations and additions by William L. Price, 1902. 

Photograph 1985 . 




Figure ^6. 

All Hallows Episcopal Church Rectory, I909. 

270 Bent Road 

Thomas, Churchman and Molitor, architects. 

Photograph 1985. 



91 



C.1915, is a rectangular block constructed of brick, stucco 
and half-timbering, with a full-width front porch. In 1923 
an English Tudor styled house was designed by DeArmond, 
Ashmead and Bickley for Cheltenham Township Commissioner 
Ralph Morgan on the southeast corner of Bent and Church 
Roads. It was one of the first houses in Wyncote to have a 
built-in garage. 34 

Transitional Styles 

Two double houses (332-334 Greenwood Avenue) designed 
by the firm of Heacock and Hokanson in 1899 represent a 
transition between the picturesque Queen Anne and the full- 
fledged expression of the Colonial Revival. 35 [Figure 47] 
They present an angular appearance with their geometric 
massing and steeply pitched gable roofs. Porches are 
relegated to a less important role than in the Queen Anne and 
Shingle styles; however, exterior textures continue to 
continue to express the architects' interest in texture with 
the use of stone, stucco, shingles and half-timbering. 

The five double houses built between 1910 and 1915 on 
the south side of Greenwood Avenue (numbers 108 through 130), 
designed by the firm of Dull and Peterson, are similarly 
constructed, with a central block, side bays, corner porches 



James F. Morgan family records. 
35 Ibid., p. 357; Philadelphia Inquirer . August 2, 1899, 
p.5. 



92 




Figure ^7. 

332-33^ Greenwood Avenue, c. I899, 
Heacock and Hokanson, architects. 
Photograph 1985. 




Figure ^8. 

12^-126 and 128-130 Greenwood Avenue, c. I910. 

Dull and Peterson, architects. 

Photograph 1985 . 

93 



and pronounced rooflines. 36 [Figure 48] However, these 
houses feature more decorative detailing such as the project- 
ing, grilled balconettes that suggest the influence of the 
Beaux Arts tradition popular at this time. This row of 
houses was built for the developer William E. Weber; to avoid 
the appearance of a "development row" and to lend variety to 
the streetscape, alternating roof types, either gable- or 
gambrel-f ront, gave some individuality to each house. 

Colonia l Revival 

An example of a change in architectural fashion is 
illustrated with two houses built in Wyncote for the W.C. 
Kent family. In 1894 architect Edward C. Kent designed a 
house in the Queen Anne style for his mother at 313 Bent 
Road. 37 According to family records, the family sold this 
house in 1909 and moved to a fine Colonial Revival house 
nearby at 333 Bent Road. Three additional significant 
Colonial Revival houses were established on large lots at 
312, 318, and 353 Bent Road after 1900. The house located at 
318 Bent Road was designed by Mantle Fielding, Jr. in 1914. 
[Figure 49] 

With these houses, the development of the Victorian 
part of Wyncote was completed, except for a few remaining 



^^ Philadelphia Inquirer . June 27, 1899, p. 12. 

37 Tatman and Moss, p. 442. 

^^ Ibid., p. 269; PRERBG . Vol. XXIX, No. 6, February 11, 
1914. 



94 




Figure ^9. 

318 Bent Road, 191^. 

Mantle Fielding, Jr. , architect. 

Photograph 1985. 




Figure 50. 

108 V/ebster Avenue, c. 1925. 

Photograph 1985. 



95 



lots. 39 In the 1920s the foursquare "classic box" was built 
at numbers 100, 104 and 108 Webster Avenue. 40 [Figure 50] 

Modern Houses 

Only tv/o houses were built in the district in the 1940s, 
both in the one and one-half story Cape Cod style. A small 
version was built at 6 Greenwood Place, and a significant 
dwelling, designed by Barney and Banwell, was built at 101 
Woodland Road in 1947.41 in the 1950s six small one and 
one-half story houses were built in the district: 139 and 143 
Fernbrook Avenue, 10 and 13 Greenwood Place, and 107 and 123 
Webster Avenue. 42 Only one house v;as built in the district 
in the 1960s — a ranch style house at 119 Webster Avenue. 43 

Wyncote's Churches 

Wyncote's two churches in the heart of the district 
separate the "village" houses built on narrow lots near the 
railroad and those built after 1890 on more spacious grounds. 
The All Hallows Episcopal Church, designed in 1896 by Furness 
and Evans, 44 and the Calvary Presbyterian Church, designed by 
Dull and Peterson in 1898,45 are contained in six acres of 



39 

Recorder of Deeds Office, Montgomery County. 
40 Ibid. 

Ibid. ; Tatman and Moss, p. 47. 
42 Recorder of Deeds Office, Montgomery County. 

44 ^^^''• 

Tatman and Moss, p. 292; PRERBG , Vol. VIII, No. 15, 

April 12, 1893 and Vol. XI, No. 14, April 1, 1896. 

Documented by church records. 



96 



rising ground. The arrangement of these church properties in 
one picturesque grouping affords one of the most attractive 
ecclesiastical settings to be found in any Philadelphia 
suburb. 

Both churches were designed in the English Country 
Gothic style. All Hallows, the smaller of the two, has a 
compact nave and transept arrangement, with a quaint Gothic 
entry porch. [Figure 51] The Presbyterian church is larger 
and presents a more irregular outline due to the 1927 
additions. [Figure 52] Its central space is in the form of an 
auditorium, a more egalitarian interior than the traditional 
nave and transept of All Hallows. 

The elders of the Presbyterian Church commissioned Frank 
Miles Day to design their Parish House, which was built in 
1894, four years before the completion of the church. 46 The 
Parish House was originally constructed of stone on the first 
floor with pebble dash above, with a full-width front porch. 
Today its appearance is quite changed; it has been entirely 
reclad with stucco, and the porch has been removed. 

In the 1920s a large L-shaped Tudor-style Parish House 
was built for the Episcopal church to the designs of Frank R. 
Watson. 47 it is connected to the church by a one-story stone 
cloister built in memory of William C. Kent. 



^^ Jenkintown Times . September 29, 1894. 
47 PRERBG . Vol. XLI, No. 30, July 28, 1926. 



97 




Figure 51 • 

All Hallows Episcopal Church (on left), I896. 

Furness and Evans, architects. 

Parish House (on right), 1926. 

Frank R. VJatson, architect. 

Photograph 1985. 




Figure 52. 

Calvary Presbyterian Church, I898. 

Dull and Peterson, architects. 

Additions and alterations, 1927, George Espie Savage, architec 

Photograph I985. 

98 



The passage of one hundred years has resulted in 
remarkably few changes in the appearance of Wyncote's houses. 
There have been no drastic modernizations of the Victorian 
dwellings. Over the years, additions and alterations have 
accommodated changing lifestyles and the need for modern 
conveniences; many porches have been enclosed for additional 
living space, for conservatories, or for additional kitchen 
space, carriage houses have been converted into garages or 
for use as artists' studios. One of the most obvious changes 
has been the covering of original stone, wood and shingled 
surfaces with asbestos siding or shingles, which took place 
mostly in the 1950s when a wave of enthusiasm for this new 
material swept through the neighborhood. So far, the current 
popularity of aluminum siding has escaped the notice of 
Victorian Wyncote. 



99 




Figure 53. 

Calvary Presbyterian Chvirch, I898, 

West tower. 

Dull and Peterson, architects. 

Photograph 1985 . 



100 




Figure 5^. 

160 Fern brook Avenue, c. 
Detail of west porch. 
Photograph 1984. 



1890. 




Figure 55. 

157 Fernbrook Avenue, 189^. 
Detail of back porch. 
Angus S. VJade, architect. 
Photograph 1984. 



101 



*? '". Jh 




Figure 5^' 

162 Fern brook Avenue, c. 188?. 
Boyhood home of poet Ezra Pound, 
Photograph 1984. 



102 



PART THREE: PRESERVATION 



103 



Although many residents of Victorian Wyncote are aware 
that their communmity is noted for its significant Victorian 
architecture, no concerted effort has been made to recognize 
this fact officially. Consequently, this writer undertook to 
stimulate citizens' interest by holding a meeting on April 1, 
1984, at 119 Woodland Road, Wyncote, after first consulting 
with township Commissioner Dr. Robert Haakenson, who resides 
at 122 Woodland Road. Many residents attended the meeting to 
learn of the possibility of nominating Woodland Road and 
Hilltop Lane to the National Register of Historic Places. 
After learning more about the National Register process, they 
enthusiastically endorsed the project. During the dis- 
cussion, it appeared their main concerns were: 1) any pos- 
sible increases in property taxes, and 2) possible prohibi- 
tion of alterations or changes to the property. They were 
advised that no additional tax assessment would be levied as 
a direct result of National Register listing. Indirectly, if 
the neighborhood became a more desirable place to live, 
property values could be affected. Secondly, they were as- 
sured that National Register listing does not impose any 
restrictions on private alterations, additions, or demolition 
of buildings. On April 3 a letter confirming the proceedings 
of the April 1 meeting was mailed to all residents of Wood- 
land Road and Hilltop Lane, thus announcing the initial steps 
toward formal recognition of Victorian Wyncote as an Historic 



104 



District. Subsequently, on the recommendation of Dr. George 
Thomas of the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation at 
the University of Pennsylvania, the proposed district was 
enlarged to include additional significant Victorian archi- 
tecture. A Preliminary Resource Form was completed and sub- 
mitted to the Bureau of Historic Preservation of the Pennsyl- 
vania Historical and Museum Commission in Harrisburg on July 
24, 1984, advising that "the proposed Wyncote Historic Dis- 
trict appears eligible for nomination to the National Regi- 
ster of Historic Places in the area of architecture." 

On September 5, 1984, a site visit was made by Mr. Greg 
Ramsey, Chief, Division of Preservation Services, Bureau for 
Historic Preservation, Pennsylvania Historical and Museum 
Commission, and Dr. Richard Tyler, Historian, Philadelphia 
Historical Commission. Following inspection of the proposed 
district, Mr. Ramsey and Dr. Tyler recommended that the 
boundaries be extended still further to include key Victorian 
houses adjacent to the area outlined in the Preliminary 
Resource Form. [Figure 57] 

On November 9, 1984 plans for the proposed Victorian 
Wyncote District were presented to members of the Cheltenham 
Historical Commission at one of their scheduled meetings. 
Slides of the district accompanied the presentation. The 
Commission approved the project and expressed their thanks to 
this writer for undertaking the survey and completing the 
necessary forms. 

105 



VICTOSJAN A'VNCOTE 
CHtaEKhSU TO*r)*SHiP 

BOOKQftRitS' -= = --= = 



:n~n = Cxu«CM PBOPESTlti 



(l T »TH,VS10H 







Figure 57. Proposed Historic District in Wyncote, Pa. 
National Regist er of H j storic Places 



106 



Established by the Secretary of the Interior under pro- 
vision of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the 
National Register is the official list of the nation's cul- 
tural properties worthy of preservation. 1 The program is 
administered by an Advisory Council on Historic Preservation 
composed of seventeen members, with the cooperation of the 
Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission and Federal 
preservation representatives. 

The advantages of National Register listing are chiefly: 

1. The establishment of the district as an historic 
resource 

2. Entitlement to tax incentives for rehabilitation 

3. Consideration by Federal and State authorities 
before any Federal undertaking would have an adverse 
effect on the district ^ 

Creating an historic district supplies permanent documenta- 
tion for buildings, ownership, and the district's history. 
Such a body of information is a valuable sociological and 
historical resource. 



•^ National Historic Preservation Act of 1966: An Act to 
Establish a Program for the Preservation of Additional His- 
toric Properties throughout the Nation, and for Other Pur- 
poses. Approved October 15, 1966 (Public Law 89-665; 80 
STAT. 915; 16 U.S.C. 470) as amended by Public Law 93-54, 
Public Law 94-422, and Public Law 94-458. 

^ Ibid., Title II, Sec. 201 (a); Title I, Sec. 106. 



107 



The National Register does not provide for any controls 
or regulations of structures within the district. Such list- 
ing give blanket recognition and status, allows tax credits 
for rehabilitation, protects from Federal intervention, but 
does not control or regulate in any way the property owner's 
right to alter the appearance of his property. 

Local Ordinances 

An historic area may also be certified by a Local Ordi- 
nance, as provided by State Laws. 3 This is done through the 
cooperation of the State of Pennsylvania Bureau of Historic 
Preservation with local authorities, with the Historic Dis- 
trict being placed on the Pennsylvania List of Historic 
Places. As a certified district, it is eligible for tax 
benefits. Certification by a local ordinance has a greater 
degree of protection for the historic fabric of the neighbor- 
hood, as any alterations, additions or demolition must be 
approved by a local Architectural Review Board created speci- 
fically for regulation of that particular district. 



3 

The Pennsylvania General Assembly passed legislation 
in 1961 (P.L. 282, No. 167) to enable municipalities, 
including counties, to designate certain areas as historic 
districts and to permit regulation of architectural elements 
in those areas. 



108 



At present, Cheltenham contains one Historic District, 

known as the La Mott Historic District, established in 1975. '* 

Section 1810 of Cheltenham Township Ordinance 1343 states 

... no building or structure designated as an 
historic building or structure within said 
Historical District by the Board of Histori- 
cal Architectural Review ... shall hereafter 
be erected, altered, or restored, razed, or 
demolished within said Historical District, 
unless an application for certificate of 
appropriateness shall have been approved by 
the Board of Historical Review, as to ex- 
terior architectural features, including 
signs. 

With the passage of Ordinance No. 1343 a Board of His- 
torical Architectural Review was created, comprising the 
township Building Inspector, a member of the Cheltenham His- 
torical Commission, a registered architect, a real estate 
broker, and five Citizens-at-large from within the specified 
district. 5 in the event additional districts are estab- 
lished, new Boards of Historical Review will be created, with 
residents of the new districts filling the Citizens-at-Large 
positions. The Architectural Review Board for the La Mott 



The La Mott Historic District, located in the south 
central part of Cheltenham Township, commemorates one of the 
first integrated communities, as well as the site of Camp 
William Penn, a training center for Negro soldiers during the 
Civil War. The District is named after Lucretia Mott (1793- 
1880) X an influential abolitionist, who resided in the area. 

Listing of the Cheltenham Township Board of 
Architectural Review as of March 11, 1985: Building 
Inspector, Anthony V. Sorrenti; Member of Historical 
Commission, Richard Cutting; Registered Architect, Gerald 
Schwam; Real Estate Broker, Arthur G. Segal; Citizens-at- 
Large: Mack Washington, Jay J. Lambert, Mrs. Florence Alpert, 
Mrs. Sylvia Wells, and Aaron Bass. 



109 



District is in constant communication with residents in that 
district, sometimes using "friendly persuasion" to achieve 
desired results. 6 

Creation of an historic district can act as an overlay 
zone to an already existing multi-zone area as in the case of 
the La Mott District. Ordinance No. 1343 is, in effect, an 
amendment of Cheltenham Township's Zoning Ordinance of 1929, 
amended as of 1964. 
Tgx Incentives 

Historic properties, whether certified by Federal or 
State programs, are eligible for tax benefits as determined 
by the Internal Revenue Code. The Internal Revenue Service, 
acting in cooperation with preservation interests, has since 
1976 encouraged capital investment in historic buildings and 
the revitalization of historic neighborhoods with specific 
Congressional legislation. 7 The Economic Recovery Tax Act 
of 1981 increased the tax benefits by providing a 25% invest- 
ment tax credit for rehabilitation of historic commercial, 
industrial and rental residential buildings, which can be 
combined with a 15-year cost recovery period for the adjusted 
basis of the building. 8 This Act has occasioned an 



° Interview with Mr. Nicholas D. Melair, Jr., 
Cheltenham Township Manager and Secretary, March 11, 1985. 

' Tax Reform Act of 1976 (P.L. 94-455), as amended by 
the Revenue Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-600) and the Tax Treatment 
Extension Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-541). 

8 Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 (P.L. 97-34). 



110 



unprecedented spurt in rehabilitation activity of certified 
historic properties. 

To qualify for the tax credits, the rehabilitation must 
meet the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabili- 
tation. A two-part Historic Preservation Certification Appli- 
cation is submitted to the Bureau of Historic Preservation of 
the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission for review, 
after which it is forwarded to the Philadelphia Regional 
Office of the National Park Service for further review and 
approval. Notification of approval is sent directly to the 
property owner. The taxpayer then claims his tax credit, 
which is a direct deduction from the net amount of tax owed, 
by providing necessary information on his income tax return. 9 

Tax credits are based on property values, rehabiliation 
costs, and depreciation allowances. The Internal Revenue 
Service's Publication 572, Investment Credit . November, 1983, 
is a helpful and concise explanation of the procedure to be 
followed in applying for the tax credits. The property for 
which one is claiming a tax credit must be an income-pro- 
ducing property; the rehabilitation must be "substantial," 
with the costs exceeding the greater of $5,000 or the ad- 
justed basis of the building; and 75% of the existing ex- 
terior walls must remain in place as external walls in the 



Tax Incentives for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings , 
United States Department of the Interior, National Park 
Service, Washington DC, May 1982, p. 7. 



Ill 



rehabilitation process. Expenditures or losses resulting from 
the demolition of a certified structure may not be deducted 
as an expense. 10 
N<?n-c e rti£ie<3 H i s tocig Puildj,ngg 

Provisions in the Tax Act allow tax credits for the 
rehabilitation of non-certified older properties, namely a 
15% credit for the rehabilitation of non-residential com- 
mercial income-producing buildings at least 30 years old, 
and a 20% credit for those at least 40 years old. This 
credit is available if the buildings meet the "substantial 
rehabilitation" and "75%" tests. There are no mandatory 
reviews or certifications regarding the historic significance 
or quality of renovation work, nor are there 15 and 20 per 
cent credits available for buildings used for residential 
rentals. One other distinction between the historic and non- 
historic building credits is the adjustment to basis required 
when a credit is taken. For certified historic structures, 
basis must be reduced by one-half the value of the credit 
claimed; for all other properties, the reduction is the full 
value of the tax credit. This affects the amount of the 
annual depreciation deduction and adds to the differential 
between historic and non-historic rehabilitation credits. 



10 Ibid., pp. 2-3, 5. 

Federal Tax Law and Historic Preser v ation; A Report 
to the President and th e Congr epPr 1983, Advisory Council on 
Historic Preservation, p. 12. 



112 



Decertification 

A property owner may apply for decertification of his 
property by claiming it is not significant to an historic 
district. This would enable him to take advantage of the 
lesser non-historic tax credits for older buildings, without 
the process of review by the U.S. Department of the Interior. 12 
However, controls imposed by the local Architectural Review 
Board could deny a building permit for any rehabilitation 
that is in conflict with the historic character of the dis- 
trict. 



Impact of Certification on the Proposed Victorian Wyncote 

P istr ict 



Recognition: Certification, either by the National 
Register process or by local ordinance, lends prestige and 
distinction to the district. Residents become more aware of 
the historic value of their community by sharing a common 
interest that encourages preservation efforts in maintaining 
the historic character of their neighborhood. 

Controls: Certification under the National Register 
process affords recognition and possible tax benefits, but 
imposes no controls on the physical environment, whereas 



^^ Tax Incentives for Rehabilitating Historic 
BiilldingSf p. 7. 



113 



listing by local ordinance imposes a high degree of both 
architectural and land use control. At present, a situation 
exists in Victorian Wyncote that could be affected by which 
means of certification is established. The one remaining 
large tract of land (approximately ten acres) was purchased 
in 1979 by the Wyncote Church Home (United Brethren of 
Christ). The tract contains significant buildings, including 
one residence designed by Horace Trumbauer in 1893 and an- 
other designed by the firm of Heacock and Hokanson in 1898. 
The Wyncote Church Home has applied to the township for a 
building permit to erect a retirement home on this site. To 
date no permit has been issued. 13 Under National Register 
listing there would be no legal means of preventing the 
demolition of these significant dwellings, other than com- 
munity pressure to save them. Under local ordinance, the 
township could prevent the destruction of these dwellings and 
deny a building permit for the erection of a retirement home. 

Tax benefits : Under either method of certification, tax 
benefits probably would not be of prime concern to residents 
of Victorian Wyncote. Since the district is 95% residential, 
and the market value of the buildings is relatively high, 
rehabilitation costs would have to exceed the adjusted basis 
of the building. The adjusted basis is the actual cost of 



13 

From records of the Building Permits Department, 

Cheltenham Township, March 11, 1985. 



114 



the building minus any depreciation. For example, the 
adjusted basis of a building costing $60,000 that has been in 
service (income-producing) for five years and depreciated at 
the rate of $3,000 per year (by 20-year straight-line 
method), or $15,000, would be $45,000 ($60,000 less $15,000). 
The rehabilitation costs, therefore, must exceed $45,000 to 
qualify for the tax credit. 14 Also, the majority of homes 
are owner-occupied and not used for rental purposes. Except 
for the few buildings in the district that are used for 
rental purposes and are in need of rehabilitation, the high 
integrity of the houses would preclude the need for sub- 
stantial rehabilitation. Tax incentives could more readily 
apply to commercial activity in the district. There would be 
no restraints for demolition of historic structures or the 
construction of new buildings under National Register list- 
ing. However, under the controls of a local ordinance, any 
radical change in commercial development would be subject to 
approval by the township. 

Funding ; The National Preservation Act of 1966 provides 
for Grants-in-Aid for preservation purposes, to be admini- 
stered at the state level. 15 Owing to the recent cut-backs 
in government expenditures, such funding has been drastically 



14 Tax Ince ntives, p. 4. 

I"' National Preservation Act of 1966, Title I, Section 
101(2). 



115 



reduced. 16 The National Trust for Historic Preservation has 
allowable funds such as their Main Street Program, the Pre- 
servation Services Fund and their National Preservation Loan 
Fund available for local preservation efforts. 17 Cheltenham 
Township allocates $4,000 per year to the Cheltenham Histori- 
cal Commission for their discretionary use. This is fre- 
quently combined with money raised by individuals through 
fund-raising projects. The citizens of the La Mott District 
have raised substantial amounts for their preservation ef- 
forts, and the Historical Commission continues to sponsor 
events for the on-going restoration of the Wall House. 18 

Adverse Response to Preservation 

A recent survey of Historic Districts reports instances 
where residents within a district have objected to restric- 
tions under a local ordinance. The survey reports that, in 
general, districts in operation have been successful. Many 
districts felt a need for greater communication in the dis- 
trict, a need that was also reported for the La Mott District 
in Cheltenham Township. Increase in tax values — in some 
cases, substantial increases — were reported by several 



^^ As reported March 5, 1985, by Mr. Greg Ramsey, 
Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. 

As reported in Preservation News , National Trust for 
Historic Preservation, Vol. XXVIII, No. 3, March 1985, p. 

As reported by Mr. Nicholas D. Melair, Jr., March 
11, 1985. 



116 



districts. Delays in obtaining building permits and politi- 

1 Q 

cal conflicts were also reported. 

The legality of the regulation of property under his- 
toric district ordinances has been challenged. The most 
famous case has been that of Penn Central Transportation 
Company v. City of New York in 1978 when Penn Central pro- 
posed to lease the air space above the building for the 
erection of a 55-story office tower. The decision of the 
Supreme Court, which was handed down in favor of the City of 
New York on June 26, 1978, was a stunning victory for his- 
toric preservation efforts across the country, and set an 
important precedent for supporting the validity of local laws 
creating landmark and historic commissions. 20 

Two cases have arisen in Pennsylvania from Act 167, the 
first being a request in 1976 by the First Presbyterian 
Church of York to demolish the historic York House, and 
another a request in 1979 for the demolition of two buildings 
in the Harrisburg Historic District. 21 In both instances 



19 

D.G. Schlosser, Historic Districts in Pennsy lvania, 

Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, Municipal 

Information Center, Department of Community Affairs, 2nd 

edition, January 1981, pp. 8-11. 

■t^ Ibid., pp. 12-14. 

Ibid., p. 14. The First Presbyterian Church of 

York, Pennsylvania v. City Council of the City of York, 360 

A.2d. 257, 25 Pa. Cmwlth. 1954, 1976; Cleckner v. Harrisburg, 

10 D & AC. 3d 393, 1979. 



117 



permits for demolition were denied; court rulings found these 
buildings historically significant and that demolition would 
have been against the interests of the public welfare. 

Recommendations 

The above comparison between National Register and local 
ordinance listing offers alternatives for recognizing Vic- 
torian W'yncote as a significant historic resource. It is 
recommended that procedures for listing under the National 
Register of Historic Places be continued, as the Preliminary 
Resource Form and the proposed boundaries have been approved 
at the state level as well as by the Cheltenham Historical 
Commission. A copy of the completed Nomination form is 
attached to this report as Appendix B. It is further recom- 
mended that Victorian Wyncote be also listed on the Pennsyl- 
vania List of Historic Places by means of a local ordinance, 
thus insuring the Victorian integrity of this architecturally 
significant area. 

Before proceeding with the local ordinance, the opinions 
of the residents should be solicited and their approval 
registered. To accomplish this, a small committee should be 
created to plan for community participation and the dissemi- 
nation of information with respect to how listing by local 
ordinance will affect residents individually. At present, 
there is no neighborhood association through which to channel 
a proposed local ordinance district. A modern counterpart to 

118 



the "Wyncote Improvement Association" could prove very useful 
in meeting objections to the restrictions of a local ordi- 
nance. 

Organization for listing of the La Mott Historic Dis- 
trict in Cheltenham Township followed a reverse procedure. 
The "Citizens of Historic La Mott," fearing their neighbor- 
hood would be affected by developers, enlisted the help of 
the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission to recog- 
nize their neighborhood as an historic area. The Commission 
responded by recommending that the district be listed under 
local ordinance and placed on the Pennsylvania List of His- 
toric Places. 22 in contrast to the Victorian Wyncote, La 
Mott is a low-income, minority neighborhood. The residents 
concern for the preservation of their area is commendable, 
and is an example of how concerted effort can achieve good 
results. 

To pursue the process of listing Victorian Wyncote as an 
historic district by local ordinance should involve a large 
number of residents. Close cooperation with the township is 
necessary. The major hurdle, and the most time-consuming. 



^^ As reported March 1, 1985 by Mr. Perry Triplett, 
7322 Butcher Avenue, La Mott, PA. The Triplett family was 
one of the earliest families to settle in the district in the 
nineteenth century. Several generations have been active in 
preserving this neighborhood. 



119 



would be gaining local support. Documentation necessary for 
the National Register listing could also be used for listing 
on the Pennsylvania List of Historic Places. 



120 



CONCLUSION 

A survey of Wyncote, past and present, has been under- 
taken as a necessary background for listing its Victorian 
area on the National Register of Historic Places as an His- 
toric District. Through extensive research, its patterns of 
growth over the last one hundred years have been traced, its 
buildings documented, and its place in relation to other late 
nineteenth-century suburban developments determined. 

In 1885 Wyncote began as a small village, its diverse 
population including both permanent and summer residents. 
Its early settlers were represented by tradesmen as well as 
affluent merchants and entrepreneurs who established country 
homes. Its village atmosphere continued well into the twen- 
tieth century, even though many of its residents commuted to 
Philadelphia on the nearby railroad. 

Gradually Wyncote became known less as a resort area and 
more as the domain of a "nouveau riche" class of society who 
established themselves in this picturesque and somewhat rural 
community, making Wyncote their very own proud and exclusive 
enclave. The stage had been set for first-generation wealth 
to move to Cheltenham Township in the 1860s when well-known 
figures such as financier Jay Cooke, traction kings P.A.B. 
Widener and William L. Elkins, and the merchant John 

121 



Wanamaker built prestigious country seats in the township. 
Both the rich and powerful and the less affluent nouveau 
riche of Wyncote were outside the mainstream of Philadel- 
phia's elite society. 

Wyncote was conveniently located near the North 
Pennsylvania Railroad line which extended northward to the 
rich coal-mining regions of the Lehigh River Valley as well 
as eastward to the New Jersey and New York City corridors. 
Thus, it attracted families from these areas, particularly 
from upstate Pennsylvania, in addition to those who came from 
Philadelphia. 

Once settled in the community, residents exercised ef- 
fective control over their environment by discouraging com- 
mercial expansion, arranging for community services, beauti- 
fying their grounds, maintaining their houses, and guarding 
against disturbing intrusions. It is this protective atti- 
tude which has guaranteed the survival of the district's 
original architectural fabric. 

Two of the most challenging aspects of this thesis have 
been the investigation of Wyncote's development pattern 
and the documentation of the architects and architectural 
firms responsible for Wyncote's built environment. Research 
has produced the names of six developers who were respon- 
sible for establishing building lots on the approximately 
108 acres comprising the Historic District. Four of these 



122 



developers lived in the area, and thus had a proprietary 
interest in it. This stands in contrast to the planned mass 
development which occurred in Overbrook Farms and Pelham in 
Philadelphia and in North Wayne west of Philadelphia. All 
of these were financed by a single group of investors and 
managed and advertised by the professional developers 
Wendell & Smith. 

Many architects and architectural firms have been iden- 
tified with structures in Wyncote. These are listed in 
Appendix A, and should contribute to the current scholarship 
of architectural activity in Philadelphia's suburbs during 
this period. Precise identification is sometimes difficult; 
for example, an entry in the Biographical Dictionary of 
Philadelphia Architects which reads "five houses for William 
E. Weber" provides few leads. 

In the review of commercial operations in Wyncote from 
the time of its early small business that served the im- 
mediate community to the present mostly non-community related 
activities particular attention has been paid to how Wyncote 
has wisely exercised the principle of adaptive use for its 
historic buildings. The final chapter addresses other pre- 
servation issues and how they would apply to residents of the 
Historic District. As discussed, the two means of receiving 
official recognition as an historic district are 1) listing 
on the National Register of Historic Places and 2) by Local 
Ordinance. The former affords status to the community and 

123 



would encourage an awareness among its citizens but would 
establish no control over the built environment, whereas 
listing under a Local Ordinance, administered by a local 
Review Board, would provide control over any changes, addi- 
tions, or demolition affecting the architectural character 
of the community. 

It is recommended that the nomination process be con- 
tinued to its conclusion. In addition, when approval has 
been granted, steps should be taken to register Victorian 
Wyncote under a Local Ordinance in order to fully protect 
this extraordinarily well-preserved example of late nine- 
teenth and early twentieth century domestic architecture. 



124 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Bean, T.W. , Ed. History of Monta nmpry County. Everts & Peck, 
Philadelphia, 1884. 

Benenson, Carol, r^erchfpt- vi 1 1 p- N pw Jersey: Survey and Pre- 
servation Report , unpublished Master's thesis. Universi- 
ty of Pennsylvania, 1984. 

Bicknell, A.J. "Detail, Cottage and Constructive Architec- 
ture," 1873. Reprinted in Victoria n Architecture. 
American Life Foundation, Watkins Glen, New York, 1977. 

Clio Index, Clio Group, Inc., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Collins, Peter. Changin g Ideals in Modern Architecture , 

McGill-Queen's University Press, Montreal, 1965; re- 
printed 1978. 

Comstock, William T. "Modern Architectural Designs and 

Details," 1881; reprinted in Victoria n Architecture. 
American Life Foundation, Watkins Glen, New York, 1977. 

Donohoe, Victoria. "Architectural in Montgomery County," in 
Montgomery County: The Se cond Hundred Years. 1983. 

Dow, Joy Wheeler. American Renaissance . William T. Comstock, 
New York, 1904. 

Downing, Andrew Jackson. The Architecture of Country Houses , 
New York, 1850; Dover reprint, 1969. 

Federal Tax Law and Historic Preservatio n : A RePO Ct tO the 

President and the Congress ^ Advisory Council on Historic 
Preservation, 1983. 

Gardner, E.C. The House That Jill Built . Fords, Howard & 
Hulbert, 1882. 

Homes and All About Them . James R. Osgood & 



Company, Boston, 1885. 

Gillon, Edmund V. Jr. and Clay Lancaster. Victorian Houses; A 
Treasury of Lesser Known Examples . Dover, New York, 1973. 

Gowans, Alan. Images of Americ an Living. J.B. Lippincott 
Company, Philadelphia, 1964. 



125 



Hare, J.V. "The Coming of the North Pennsylvania Railroad," 
md York Road Historical Society Bu ll etin . Volume IV, 
1940. 

Heacock, Annie. Reminiscences . Old York Road Historical 

Society, Jenkintown Library, Jenkintown, Pennsylvania. 

Hitchcock, Henry-Russell. Architecture; Nineteenth and 

Twentieth Centuries , revised edition. Penguin Books, New 
York, 1983. 

. The Architecture of H.H. Richardson and His 



Times , revised edition, MIT Press, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, 1966. 

Hobbs, Isaac. Hobbs' Architecture . J.B. Lippincott Company, 
Philadelphia, 1873. 

Holly, Henry Hudson. "Country Seats," reprinted in Country 
Seats and Modern Dwel l ingS f American Life Foundation, 
Watkins Glen, New York, 1977. 

.. "Modern Dwellings", reprinted in Country 



Seats and M odern Dwellings . American Life Foundation, 
Watkins Glen, New York, 1977. 

Hotchkin, Reverend S.F. The York Road Old and New . Binder & 
Kelly, Philadelphia, 1892. 

Jones, Arthur Hoskins. Cheltenham Township: A Dissertation in 
Sociology . University of Pennsylvania Press, 
Philadelphia, 1950. 

Lippincott, Horace Mather. A Narrative Account of Chestnut 
Hill. Philadelphia, and Some Account of Whitemarsh. 
Springfield, and Cheltenham . Old York Road Publishing 
Company, 1948. 

Maass, John. The Victorian Home in America . Hawthorn, New 
York, 1972. 

McAlester, Virginia and Lee. A Field Guide to American Houses. 
Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1984. 

Morgan, Ralph and Horace M. Lippincott. "Wyncote," in 

Cheltenham Township: 260th Anniversary . Cheltenham Town- 
ship, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, 1950. 

Horley, Christopher. M ince Pie . George H. Doran Company, New 
York, 1919. 



126 



. [^([^rlp y's Variety . World Publishing Company, New 

York, 1944. 

Moss, Roger W. A Century of Color , American Life Foundation, 
Watkins Glen, New York, 1981. 

Mumford, Lewis, Sticks an d Stones. W.W. Norton & Company, New 
York, 1924. 

Nugent, C. Robert. A House L ives and Dies. Cassidy Printing, 
Inc., Abington, Pennsylvania, 1974. 

Parry, Elwood C. Jr., "Promised Land," Old York Road Histori- 
cal Society Bulletin . Volume IV, 1960. 

Price, Bruce. "The Suburban House," in Homes in the Citv and 
Country . Russell Sturgis, ed., Charles Scribner's Sons, 
New York, 1893. 

Rifkind, Carole. A Field Guide to American Architec tULe> New 
American Library, New York, 1980. 

Rothschild, Elaine W. A History of Che l tenham Township , 

Cheltenham Township Historical Commission, Cheltenham 
Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, 1976. 

Schlosser, D.G. Historic District s in Pennsylvania, 

Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, Harris- 
burg, Pennsylvania, 1981. 

Schmidt, Carl F. The Victorian Era in the United States, 
Scottsville, New York, 1971. 

Schuyler, Montgomery. American Archit ecture Studies. Harper 
& Brothers, New York, 1892. 

Scully, Vincent J. Jr. The Shingle Style . Yale University 
Press, New Haven, 1955. 

Sheldon, George W. Artistic Country Seats. New York, 1886. 

Shoppell, R.W. ^lodern Houses . Cooperative Building Plan 
Association, Ossining, New York, 1887. 

Sturgis, Russell, ed. Homes in the City and Country , Charles 
Scribners' Sons, New York, 1893. 

Tatman, Sandra L. and Roger W. Moss. Biographical Dictionary 
rvf phi1^d'=>1 p>-^Ta Architects. 1700-1930. G.K. Hall and 
Company, Boston, 1985. 



127 



Tax Incentives f or Reha bilitating Historic Bui ldings. U.S. 

Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Wash- 
ington, D.C., 1982. 

Thomas, George E. "Architectural Patronage and Social 

Stratification in Philadelphia Between 1840 and 1920," 
in The Divided M etropolis , William W. Cutler and Howard 
Gillette, Jr., eds. Greenwood Press, Westport, Connecti- 
cut, 1980. 

Thomas, George E. and Carl E. Doebley, Cape May. Queen of the 
Seaside Resorts , Art Alliance Press, Philadelphia, 1976. 

Toll, Jean Barth and Michael J. Schwager, eds. Montgomery 
County: The Second Hundred Years . Montgomery County 
Federation of Historical Societies, 1983. 

Warner, Samuel Bass. Streetcar Suburbs . Harvard University 
Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1962. 

Wrenn, Tony P. and Elizabeth D. Mulloy, America's Forgotten 
Architecture , National Trust for Historic Preservation, 
Washington, D.C., 1976. 

Trade PubligatJons jM Newspapecs 

Builder & Decorator . 1886-1889, The Free Library of 
Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Builder. Decorator. & Woodworker , 1889-1891, The Free Library 
of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

The Jenkintown Times . 5/19/1894 to 12/31/1894, microfilm 

copies, Montgomery Publishing Company, Fort Washington, 
Pennsylvania. 

Philadelphia Real Estate Record and Builders' Guide . 1886 and 
1898, microfilm copies. The Free Library of Philadelphia 
and the Philadelphia Athenaeum, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Scientific American Builders' Edition , February and March, 

1894, The Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Times Chronicle . 1/2/1895 to 12/31/1909, microfilm copies, 

Montgomery Publishing Company, Fort Washington, Pennsyl- 
vania. 



128 



APPENDIX A. 

Catalogue 
of 
Architects and Architectural Firms 



APPENDIX A 
Catalogue of Architects and Architectural Firms 

Information on architects working in Victorian Wyncote 
has been obtained principally from the Clio Index files 
and the Biographical Dictionary of Philadelphia Architects 
1700 - 1930 (BDPA). 1 Additional documentation has been ob- 
tained from newspaper accounts, church files, and personal 
interviews, as shown on each entry. This list is restricted 
to the area being proposed to the National Register of His- 
toric Places as an Historic District. 2 Deed records and 
maps have aided in the identification of specific buildings 
and their locations. A brief biographical sketch is included 
in this Catalogue. 



1 A substantial amount of information in the Clio Index 
files and the Biographical Dictionary of Philadelphia Archi- 
tects 1700 - 1930 is based on primary documentation provided 

by the Philadelphia Real Estate Record and Builders' Guide 
( PRERBG ), the Philadelphia Inquirer . Builder and Decorator , 
Builder. Decorator, and Woodworker , and Scientific American. 

2 Information supplied by the sources cited would 
provide an expanded list of all architects working in the 
Wyncote area over a longer time period. 



129 



Rarnpy and Banwell 

Address: 101 V7oodland Road 

Date: 1947 

Reference: BDPA . p. 48. 

Built for: J. Eggley 

Description: one and one-half story Cape Cod 

style dwelling 

William Pope Barney (1890-1970) was born in Georgia where he 
studied at the Georgia Institute of Technology. In 1912 and 
1913 he received a B.S. and M.S. in Architecture from the 
University of Pennsylvania, following which he worked in the 
firms of Paul P. Cret and Zanzinger, Borie and Medary. He 
later joined the firm of Day and Klauder where he was engaged 
in collegiate work. In 1929 Barney established his own firm 
with Roy W. Banwell, which lasted under various names until 
Barney's retirement in 1958. Roy Wendell Banwell (1893-1973) 
was born in Canada. He received his B.S. in Architecture 
from the University of Pennsylvania in 1918, afterwards 
working in the firms of Marcus Burrows, Albert Kahn, John 
Russell Pope and Day and Klauder. 

A.J. Burke and T.J. Dolhenty 

Address: 305 Maple Avenue 

Date: 1894 

Reference: Scientific American . Vol. 17, No. 1, 

February 2, 1894, p. 22, illus. p. 30, 
Built for: George E. Washburn 

Description: Two and one-half story stone and 

frame Queen Anne cottage 



130 



Burke and Dolhenty established offices on Greenwood 
Avenue in Wyncote in the 1890s. First listed as "builders," 
they later advertised themselves as "architects." Hotchkin 
and the Times Chronicle report that they constructed dwell- 
ings in Wyncote for other developers as well as themselves. 3 
They were the contractors for the 1894 Calvary Presbyterian 
Church Manse designed by Frank Miles Day and the church 
(1898) designed by Dull and Peterson. 

A.C. Chil d (fl. 1890-1892^ 



Address: 309 Maple Avenue 

Date: 1890 

Reference: BDPA, P. 145. 

Built for: C.W. Kraft (sometimes spelled 

"Craft") 
Description: Two and one-half story stone and 

frame Queen Anne cottage 



A.C. and Edward S. Child were owners of the National 
Architects Union, listed in the Philadelphia City Directory 
for 1889 and 1890. A.C. Child was mentioned in the PRERBG in 
1890 and thereafter as a designer of houses in the suburbs of 
Philadelphia and in towns throughout the state. He was the 
author of Sensible Low Cost Houses , published in Philadelphia 
in 1893. 



3 

Reverend A.F. Hotchkin, The York Road Old and New . 
Binder & Kelly, Philadelphia, 1892, p. 180; Times Chronicl e. 
1894, 1895, 1896. 



131 



Frank Miles Day and Frank E. Mead 

Address: 213 Fernbrook Avenue 

Date: 1894 

Reference: Church records and Jenkinto wn Times, 

September 29, 1894. 
Built for: Calvary Presbyterian Church 

Description: Church manse; two and one-half 

story, three-bay stone and stucco 

dwelling 

Frank Miles Day (1861-1918) attended the University of Penn- 
sylvania, after which he spent three years in London studying 
at the South Kensington School of Art. Upon returning to 
Philadelphia, he became associated with George T. Pearson and 
Addison Hutton before establishing his own office in 1887. 
Day followed the new direction in domestic architecture being 
set by Walter Cope, Wilson Eyre, William L. Price and John 
Stewardson. He was a leading figure in the architectural 
field in Philadelphia at the turn of the century. Frank E. 
Head (fl. 1889-1920) is not reported in the BDPA as a partner 
of Frank Miles Day. However, church records show both Day 
and Mead as architects of the manse. Mead came to Philadel- 
phia from Cleveland, Ohio, where he entered the office of 
Frank Miles Day in 1890 before establishing the firm of Keen 
and Mead in 1895-96, which lasted until 1900. The firm 
designed residences for Wendell and Smith in Overbrook, Pel- 
ham and Wayne in the Philadelphia area. 



132 



DeArmond. Ashmead and Bicklev 



Address: Southeast corner Bent and Accomac 

Roads 
Date: 1923 

Reference: James F. Morgan, 1479 Woodland Road, 

Rydal, Pennsylvania, son of original 

owner 
Built for: Ralph Morgan 

Description: Two and one-half story Tudor-style 

brick and stucco dwelling with 

built-in garage. 



According to Mr. James F. Morgan, Duffield Ashmead designed 
his father's house at this location. Duffield Ashmead (1883- 
1952) was born in Philadelphia, attended the William Penn 
Charter School and graduated from the University of Pennsyl- 
vania in 1906 with a B.S. in architecture, after which he 
worked in various architectural offices, including those of 
Wilson Eyre and John T. Windrim. By 1911 he had joined with 
Clarence DeArmond and George H. Bickley to form the firm of 
DeArmond, Ashmead and Bickley. By 1938 Bickley had died, and 
by Wo rid War II the firm had been dissolved. Both DeArmond 
and Bickley attended the University of Pennsylvania. This 
firm is particularly known for its design of residences in 
the Colonial Revival and English Cotswold styles. 



133 



William E. Dobbins 

Address: 221 Maple Avenue 

Date: c. 1888 

Reference: PRERBG . Vol. II, No. 22, June 6, 

1887, p. 255 and BDPA, p. 215. 
Built for: Theodore Glentworth 

Description: Two and one-half story stone and 

shingle Queen Anne dwelling 

William E. Dobbins (c. 1862-1914) was the son of well-known 
Philadelphia builder and developer Richard J. Dobbins, who 
developed large tracts of land in Cheltenham and Abington 
Townships and was also the contractor for buildings at the 
Phialdelphia Centennial Exposition of 1876. William Dobbins 
is listed in Philadelphia city directories as "architect" in 
1886. His list of projects in the Biographical Dictionary 
includes residences in Cheltenham Township and in Hatboro, 
Pennsylvania. 

Herman Louis Duhring. Jr. 



Address: 1221 Church Road 

Date: 1911 

Reference: BDPA . p. 223 

Built for: Charles V/entz 

Description: Two and one-half story Tudor-style 

stone, stucco and half-timber 

residence 



Herman Louis Duhring, Jr. (1874-1953) was born in Philadel- 
phia where he attended public schools. He graduated from the 
University of Pennsylvania in 1895, after which he worked in 
the offices of Mantle Fielding, Jr. and Furness and Evans. 
He established his own firm in 1899, and later entered the 

134 



partnership of Duhring, Okie and Ziegler, which continued in 
operation until 1918, when Duhring resigned. Beginning in 
1910, Duhring designed residences for George Vvoodward, the 
developer of St. Martins and Chestnut Hill in Philadelphia. 

Dull and Peterson. Bolton and D ull, and Dull and Coates 



Address: Calvary Presbyterian Church, corner 

of Bent and Ken Roads 
Date: 1898 

Reference: Church records 

Built for: Calvary Presbyterian Church 

Description: English Country Gothic stone church 

with prominent square castellated 

tower 



Address: Numbers 108 through 130 Greenwood 

Avenue: row of five double houses 

Date: 1899-1910 

Reference: Phi l ade l phia Inquirer , June 27, 

1899, p. 12 

Built for: William E. Weber 

Description: Five two and one-half story stone 

and frame double houses 

The following projects have been reported but not identified: 

1898: Three residences, Wyncote (Dull and Peterson), 

PRERBG. Vol. XIII, No. 44, November 2, 1898; BDPA . p. 
227. 

1906: Twin residence for William E. Weber (Charles Bolton & 
Son), PRERBG, Vol. XXI, No. 10, March 7, 1906; BDPA . 
p. 82. (This entry may be included in the five 
double houses reported in the Philadelphia Inquirer 
of June 27, 1899.) 

1902: M.C. Bolton residence, Wyncote, Pennsylvania (Dull 
and Peterson), BDPA , p. 227. 



135 



John J. Dull (1859-1949) worked in the office of the 
Wilson Brothers before establishing his own firm in 1893. In 
the course of his career, he became associated with Robert 
Evans Peterson II (1865-1935), H. Crawford Coates (1866- 
1944), and Charles W. Bolton (1855-1942), a leading ecclesi- 
astical architect. Dull was well-known as a water colorist, 
and was closely associated with design studios at the Drexel 
Institute and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. The 
architectural firms of Dull and his associates are recognized 
for their church designs, particularly those from Bull's 
association with Charles W. Bolton. They also designed 
clubs, office buildings, and factories, in addition to many 
residences. 

Mantle Fielding. Jr. 



Address: 318 Bent Road 

Date: 1914 

Reference: PRERBG . Vol. XXIX, No. 6, February 

11, 1914; BDPA . p. 269. 
Built for: Harold S. Eckels 

Description: Two and one-half story Colonial 

Revival stone residence 



Mantle Fielding, Jr. (1865-1941) was born in New York City, 
graduated from Germantown Academy in 1883 and studied archi- 
tecture for one year at M.I.T. By 1889 he had launched his 
own architectural firm. Fielding was well-known as an 
authority on colonial painting; he began publishing in. the 

136 



field of art history in 1904. His best known work is his 
Dictio nary of A merican Painters. Scul ptors, and Engravers , 
published in 1926. Fielding favored Colonial-style architec- 
ture, and designed many residences in this style for well-to- 
do clients in the Philadelphia area, particularly in German- 
town and Chestnut Hill. 

Furness and Evans 

Address: All Hallows Episcopal Church, 

Greenwood Avenue and Bent Road 

Date: 1896 

Reference: PRERBG . Vol. VIII, No. 15, April 12, 

1893 and Vol. XI, No. 14, April 1, 
1896; BDPA . p. 292. 

Built for: All Hallows Episcopal Church 

Description: English Country Gothic stone church 

Although long disdained for what was considered the eccentri- 
city of his architectural designs, Frank Furness (1839-1912) 
has in recent years enjoyed immense popularity. Born in 
Philadelphia, the son of Reverend William Henry Furness, a 
Unitarian minister, Frank Furness was educated in private 
schools. He was apprenticed to John Eraser (1825-1906) in 
1857, but soon joined the New York atelier of Richard Morris 
Hunt (1827-1895). There he learned the medievalized eclectic 
forms which he would later popularize in the Philadelphia 
area. In 1864 he opened his own practice in Philadelphia, 
and soon after joined with John Fraser and George Hewitt to 
form the firm of Fraser, Furness and Hewitt. He later formed 
a partnership v;ith Allen Evans (1849-1925), his chief drafts- 

137 



man, as the firm of Furness and Evans. Evans was born in 
Paoli, Pennsylvania, and studied at the Philadelphia Poly- 
technic College for two years from 1866-1868. In 1869 he was 
in the office of Samuel Sloan (1815-1884), and in 1871 became 
associated with Frank Furness. Their practice included de- 
signs for railroad stations, banks, office buildings, 
churches and residences. 



John Harlow 



Address: 
Date: 

Reference: 
Built for: 
Description: 



130 Woodland Road 

c. 1890 

Hotchkin, p. 176. 

Gilbert Parker 

Two and one-half story twin tower 

shingled Queen Anne residence 



John Harlow is the only non-Philadelphia architect reported 
as working in Wyncote; Hotchkin's reference reads as follows: 
"Mr. Gilbert Parker has erected a remarkably fine and well- 
planned frame house here; John Harlow of Boston was the 
architect and builder. He brought the mechanics from 
Boston." Withey does not list a John Harlow. 4 A John Harlow 
is shown as a resident of Woodland Road in Wyncote as early 
as 1889.5 He is also shown on the A.H. Mueller Map of 1909 
as residing at 118 Woodland Road. 



^ Henry L. and Elsie R. Withey, pjographical Diction- 
ary of American Architects. Deceased . Hennessey & Ingalls, 
Los Angeles, 1970. 



Boyd's Philadel 
Philadelphia, 1889-90. 



,, C.E. Howe Company, 



138 



Joseph Linden Heacock and Heacock and Hokanson 



Address: 126 Webster Avenue 

Date: c. 1890 

Reference: Victoria Donohoe, "Architecture in 

Montgomery County," Montgomery 
County: The Second Hundred Years . 
Vol. II, Jean Barth Toll and Michael 
J. Schwager, eds., Montgomery County 
Federation of Historical Societies, 
1983, p. 1451. 

Built for: J.C. Aiman 

Description: Two and one-half story stone and 

frame Queen Anne cottage 



Address: 135 Webster Avenue 

Date: c. 1895 

Reference: Victoria Donohoe, p. 1451; BDPA , p. 

357 
Built for: Dr. J. Vance Peters 

Description: Two and one-half story stone and 

frame Queen Anne residence 



Address: 111-113 Greenwood Avenue 

Date: c. 1895 

Reference: Victoria Donohoe, p. 1451; BDPA , p. 

357 
Built for: James F. Walsh 

Description: Two and one-half story stone and 

frame Queen Anne store and dwelling 



Address: 309 Bent Road 

Date: 1898 

Reference: Victoria Donohoe, p. 1451; BDPA , p. 

357 
Built for: H.K. Walt 

Description: Two and one-half story stone and 

stucco Queen Anne residence 



139 



Address: 328-330 and 332-334 Greenwood Avenue 

Date: 1899 

Reference: Victoria Donohoe, p. 1451; BDPA , p. 

357, Philade l phia Inquirer . August 

2, 1899, p. 5. 
Description: Pair of stone and half-timber double 

houses 



Address: 406-408 and 410-412 Greenwood Avenue 

Date: 1900 

Reference: PRERB G, Vol. XV, No. 5, January 31, 

1900 and Vol. XV, No. 6, February 7, 

1900 
Built for: Edwin Tyson 

Description: Pair of stone and frame double 

houses 



Address: 7 Walt Lane 

Date: 1902 

Reference: PRERBG . Vol. XVII, No. 20, May 14, 

1902 
Built for: H.K. Walt 

Description: Two-story frame gardener's cottage 



Address: 100 Greenwood Avenue 

Date: c. 1925 

Reference: Victoria Donohoe, p. 1451 

Built for: James F. Walsh 

Description: Two-story Tudor-style commercial 

building; original and present 
location of the Wyncote Pharmacy 



Joseph Linden Heacock (1873-1961) was the son of Edward and 
Helen Heacock of Wyncote, members of the Quaker Heacock 
family who settled in Cheltenham Township in the early nine- 
teenth century. Edward Heacock was a local contractor and 
built several houses himself for investment purposes. Joseph 
Linden Heacock received his degree in architecture from the 
University of Pennsylvania in 1895, and opened an office in 
Wyncote the following year. In 1899, Heacock was joined by 

140 



Oscar Mons Hokanson (1871-1951), a classmate at the University 
of Pennsylvania, to form the firm of Heacock and Hokanson, a 
partnership that lasted forty years. Joseph Linden Heacock, 
Jr. succeeded his father in the firm. The firm carried out 
about 1,500 commissions, including those for 350 schools. 6 

fiddison Hutton 

Address: 304 Bent Road 

Date: 1906 

Reference: PRERBG, Vol. XXI, No. 17, April 25, 

1906 
Built for: H. Anderson 1892 by Angus S. Wade 

Description: Alterations and two-story frame 

addition to one and one-half story 

frame Queen Anne dwelling for I.H. 

Mirkil 

Addison Hutton (1834-1916) was a principal architect in the 
late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. He was born a 
birthright Quaker in Westmoreland County. Before coming to 
Philadelphia in 1857 he worked as a carpenter and school 
teacher. He was associated with Samuel Sloan between 1857 
and 1861. In 1863 he established his own office and formed 
partnerships with his nephews Albert and Addison Slavery and 
William Sheetz. His career spanned 53 years; for approxi- 
mately forty of them he worked alone, accepting residential, 
school, ecclesiastical and hospital commissions. 



^ Victoria Donohoe, p. 1451. 



141 



Edward C. Kent ffl. T885-1902) 



Address: 313 Bent Road 

Date: 1894 

Reference: BDPA. p. 442; Mr. Kent Haydock, 

descendant of original owner, 10 

Winding Lane, Darien, Connecticut, 

06820 
Built for: Mrs. Anna C. Kent 

Description: Two and one-half story stone and 

frame Queen Anne residence 



Edward C. Kent was a member of the prominent Kent family in 
Wyncote, and was therefore, with Joseph Linden Heacock, one 
of community's native architects. He is represented in Wyn- 
cote by the design of his mother's house at 313 Bent Road. 
He attended the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts from 1885 
to 1887, and in 1888 he received a scholarship prize from the 
Philadelphia Chapter of the AIA for the design of a city 
residence. 

Thomas F rank Miller 



Address: 162 Fernbrook Avenue 

Date: 1887 

Reference: BDPA . p. 536 

Built for: William E. Weber 

Description: Two and one-half story stone, 

shingle and stucco Queen Anne 
residence suggesting the Swiss 
Chalet influence 

Address: 107 Woodland Road 

Date: 1890 

Reference: gPPA, p. 536 

Built for: George Magee 

Description: Two and one-half story twin towered 

stone and frame Queen Anne residence 

in the Eastlake manner 



142 



Little is known of T. Frank Miller (1863-1939), although his 
was an active practice which from 1887 to 1929 produced a 
long list of residences, stores, commercial buildings, 
churches, school and apartment houses. He was born in Cecil 
County, Maryland, and was educated in the Philadelphia city 
schools. Miller appears in Philadelphia city directories from 
1883 to 1908, first as a draftsman, and as an architect from 
1885 onward. 

figrry Pealer Jr. 



Address: unidentified 

Date: 1897 

Reference: PPPA , p. 594-5; Philadelphia Inquir- 

er . October 14, 1897, p. 12. 

Built for: Samuel Small 

Description: Three-story stone and brick twin 

houses 



Harry Peale, Jr. (1869-?) studied at the Pennsylvania Museum 
and School of Industrial Art, and by 1892 was working in the 
office of Frank Miles Day. His first independent projects 
are recorded in the PRERBG in 1895. He disappears from 
Philadelphia city directories after 1900, but was located in 
Washington, D.C. by 1924. His projects included residences, 
hotels and commercial buildings in Overbrook, Jenkintown, 
Philadelphia, Cape May and Atlantic City. 



In 1909 Samuel Small is recorded as the owner of a 
large Second Empire style house at 308 Maple Avenue — ob- 
viously not one of the houses in this listing. 



143 



William L. Price 

Address: 308 Bent Road 

Date: 1902 

Reference: BDPA . p. 631 

Built for: W. S. Schellinger, c. 1896 
Description: Additions and alterations to two and 

one-half story stone, stucco and 
half-timber Queen Anne residence 



William L. Price is one of the most illustrious architects to 
be represented in Victorian Wyncote, although his work here 
is limited to additions and alterations. He attended the 
Westtown School, but left in 1877 to practice carpentry, 
abandoning that for architecture when he entered the office 
of Addison Hutton in 1878. By 1881 Price and his brother 
Frank had established a partnership that would last until 
1895. Their commissions included houses for Wendell & Smith, 
the developers of Wayne and St. Davids, Pennsylvania, as well 
as the Pelham and Overbrook neighborhoods of Philadelphia. 
Price practiced independently until 1903, when he established 
a partnership with M. Hawley McLanahan that lasted until 
Price's death. Price contributed to the establishment of an 
important school of regional domestic architecture. He 
achieved distinction for the designs of the Traymore and 
Blenheim hotels in Atlantic City, and created a model com- 
munity in Rose Valley, Pennsylvania, based on the English 
Arts and Crafts Movement. 



144 



George Espie Savage 

Address: Calvary Presbyterian Church, corner 

of Bent and Kent roads 
Date: 1927 

Reference: BDPA r p. 688 

Built for: Calvary Presbyterian Church 
Description: Additions and alterations 

George Espie Savage (1874-1948) was born in Scotland and 
graduated from the Central High School in Philadelphia in 
1892. He received his Certificate of Building Construction 
from the Drexel Institute in 1900, After v/orking for three 
years in the office of Charles W. Bolton, an eminent church 
architect, he established his own firm, which was devoted 
principally to church design. 

John Sudofsky 

Address: 135-147 Greenwood Avenue 

Date: 1979 

Reference: ATD American Company files and 

biographical information supplied by 
John Sudofsky 

Description: Major rehabilitation of three 

nineteenth-century commercial 
buildings converted into a modern 
office complex for the ATD American 
Company, wholesale suppliers of 
textiles and office furnishings 

John Sudofsky (1927- ), whose architectural offices are 
located in Norristown, Pennsylvania, attended Philadelphia 
city schools. He graduated from the University of Pennsyl- 
vania in 1956, where he studied under Louis Kahn and Aldo 



145 



Giurgula. Since then he has engaged in commercial, indus- 
trial and residential work. In 1963 he was part of the 
"International Architects" group in Rome who were engaged in 
plans for the University of Lagos in Nigeria. His rehabili- 
tation of the ATD American Company complex in Wyncote earned 
awards from the Montgomery County Planning Commission and the 
Board of Commissioners in Cheltenham Township. 

Thomas. Churchman and Molitor 

Address: 270 Bent Road 

Date: 1909 

Reference: PRERBG . Vol. XXIV, No. 11, March 

17, 1909; BDPA . p. 784 
Built for: All Hallows Episcopal Church 

Description: Two and one-half story Tudor-style 

stone, stucco and half-timber 

rectory 

Walter H. Thomas (1876-1948) attended Episcopal Academy and 
the University of Pennsylvania, where he graduated with a 
B.S. in architecture in 1899. He afterwards studied at the 
Ecole des Beaux Arts for three years. In 1905 he set up an 
office in Philadelphia with C. Wharton Churchman (1877-1948), 
and in 1919 they were joined by John Molitor (1872-1928). 
Both Thomas and Molitor served as City Architects of Phila- 
delphia. Churchman and Molitor worked in the offices of 
Wilson Eyre, Cope and Stewardson and James H. Windrim before 
entering into partnership with Thomas. The firm's commmis- 
sions from 1901 through 1930 included churches and related 
buildings, public buildings, hotels, hospitals, theaters and 
residences. 



146 



Edwin N. Thorne ( fl . 1885-1898) 



Address: 170 Fernbrook Avenue 

Date: 1888 

Reference: Illustrated in Builder and Decora- 

tor . Vol. VI, No. 3, May 1888. 

Built for: Isaac Ashmead 

Description: Two and one-half story stone and 

frame Queen Anne residence 



Edwin C. Thorne was listed in the Philadelphia city direc- 
tories in 1854 as a carpenter; in 1886 he is shown as an 
architect. The Biographical Dictionary lists 83 commissions 
for Thorne, mainly for residential work in the Delaware 
Valley area, but including some commercial designs as well, 

Horace Trumbauer 



Address: Southeast corner Accomac and Church 

Roads 
Date: 1892 

Reference: PRERBG . Vol. VII, No. 23, June 8, 

1892; BDPA . p. 800 
Built for: M.M. Brown 

Description: Two and one-half story stone, frame 

and shingle Queen Anne/Shingle Style 

dwelling and stable 



Address: 343 Bent Road 

Date: 1892 

Reference: PRERBG ,, Vol. VII, No. 11, March 16, 

1892; BDPA . p. 800 
Built for: W.A. Chochran 

Description: Two and one-half story stone, frame 

and shingle Queen Anne/Shingle Style 

dwelling and stable 



147 



Address: 332 Accomac Road 

Date: 1892 

Reference: PRERBG . Vol. VII, No. 13, March 30, 

1892; BDPA , p. 800 

Built for: James J. Sill 

Description: Two and one-half story stone, fram 

and shingle Queen Anne/Shingle Style 
residence and stable (remodelled in 
a psuedo-Gothic manner following a 
serious fire in the 1970s) 



Address: 301-305 Bent Road 

Date: 1892/3 

Reference: PRERBG . Vol. VIII, No. 17, April 20, 

1893; BDPA , p. 800 
Built for: H.K. Walt 

Description: Two and one-half story stone, frame 

and shingle Shingle Style residence 

and stable 



Address: Northwest corner Glenside and 

Greenwood Avenues 
Date: c. 1893 

Reference: PRERBG . Vol. VIII, No. 36, September 

6, 1893; BDPA . p. 800 
Built for: James Nile 

Description: Three-story stone, frame and shingle 

store and dwelling (demolished in 

the 1950s) 



Address: 168 Fernbrook Avenue 

Date: 1896 

Reference: B PPA , p. 800 

Built for: Mary A. Herrick 

Description: Two and one-half story stone, frame 

and half-timber Shingle Style 

residence 



148 



Address: Jenkintown Railroad Station complex 

comprising main station and detached 
waiting room and baggage room. 

Date: 1931 

Reference: Frederick Piatt, "Horace Trumbauer 

in Jenkintown," Old York Road His- 
torical Society Bulletin . Vol. XLIV, 
1984, pp. 24-26 

Built for: Reading Railroad Company 

Description: One and one-half story Tudor-style 

stone buildings with limestone trim 

Horace Trumbauer (1868-1938), like so many of his generation, 
had no formal training as an architect. Born in Philadelphia, 
he moved to Jenkintown from Frankford with his family in 
1878. At the age of 16, he was employed in the Philadelphia 
architectural firm of George W. and W.D. Hewitt as a drafts- 
man. In 1890 he opened his own office on Chestnut Street, 
launching his career with a series of designs for the build- 
ers and developers Wendell & Smith for houses in the Pelham 
and Overbrook sections of Philadelphia, in St. Davids and 
Wayne, Pennsylvania, and in Essex Falls, New Jersey. By 1891, 
with the commission for William Welsh Harrison's Glenside 
mansion "Gray Towers," he began designing the large-scale 
residences for which he is famous. He was a favorite archi- 
tect of the P.A.B. Widener and William Elkins families and 
designed many of their Cheltenham Township residences. He is 
also well-known for his designs of public buildings, includ- 
ing libraries, clubs and schools. The Biographical Diction- 
ary suggests that his style relates more significantly to 
such New York firms as Carrere and Hastings and McKim, Mead 
and White than it does to the Philadelphia school of design. 



149 



Angus S. Wade 



Address: 
Date: 

Reference: 
Built for: 
Description; 



304 Bent Road 

1892 

BDPA . p. 816 

H. Anderson 

One and one-half story frame Queen 

Anne residence 



Address: 
Date: 

Reference: 
Built for: 
Description; 



332 Bent Road 

1892 

BDPA . p. 816 

Charles D. Cramp 

Two and one-half story stone and 

frame Queen Anne residence and 

stable 



Address: 

Date: 

Reference: 



Built for: 
Description; 



142 Fernbrook Avenue 

1894 

BDPA . p. 816 (one of the "five 

residences for William E. Weber, 

1894) 

William E. Weber 

Two and one-half story frame 

Queen Anne residence 



Address: 

Date: 

Reference: 



Built for: 
Description; 



146 Fernbrook Avenue 

1894 

BDPA . p. 817 (one of the "five 

residences for William E. Weber, 

1894); .qcientific American . Vol. 17, 

No. 3, March 1894, p. 35, illus. p. 

43 

William E. Weber 

Two and one-half story frame, stucco 

and half-timber Queen Anne cottage 



150 



Address: 150 Fernbrook Avenue 

Date: 1894 

Reference: BDPA . p. 817 (one of the "five 

residences for William E. Weber, 
1894); Scientific American . Vol. 17, 
No. 3, March 1894, p. 35, illus. p. 
43 

Built for: William E. Weber 

Description: Two and one-half story frame 

Queen Anne cottage 



Address: 157 Fernbrook Avenue 

Date: 1894 

Reference: BDPA . p. 817; Times Chronicle. Vol. 

II, No. 19, August 11, 1894 
Built for: Dr. C. H. Kunkle 

Description: Two and one-half story stone, 

clapboard and shingle Queen Anne 

residence 

The remaining two residences of the "five residences for 
William E. Weber, 1894" have not been identified. 

Angus S. Wade (1865-1932) was born in Montpelier, Vermont. 
He came to Philadelphia about 1883 and worked in the office 
of Willis G. Hale. In 1886 he established the firms of Wade, 
Gilpin and Company and Wade and Bell, both of which capital- 
ized on development building. Their work is well-represented 
in the North Wayne development west of Philadelphia and in 
the Overbrook Farms and Pelham developments in Philadelphia. 
In 1904 Wade disappears from the Philadelphia city direct- 
ories. While in Philadelphia he was a member of the Union 
League, the Philadelphia Art Club and the AIA. It is known 
that the later years of his career were spent in New Jersey 
and Brooklyn, New York. The BiogcaphJC-al PictJPnacy lists 
142 projects from 1886 to 1904. 



151 



FranK R. Watson 



Address: Episcopal Parish House, Bent Road 

Date: 1926 

Reference: PRERBG . Vol. XLI, No. 30, July 28, 

1926 

Built for: All Hallows Episcopal Church 

Description: L-shaped two and one-half story 

Tudor-style brick and half-timber 
parish house, connected to church by 
a one-story stone cloister 



Frank R. Watson (1859-1940) was one of the most important 
architects in church design in Philadelphia during the late 
nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. After graduating 
from Central High School, he was employed for five years in 
the office of Edward F. Durang, an eminent ecclesiastical 
architect who designed principally for the Philadelphia Roman 
Catholic archdiocese. Watson established his own firm in 
1882/83. In 1901 Watson formed a partnership with Samuel 
Huckel, and as Watson and Huckel the firm prospered until 
Huckel's death in 1917. In 1922 Watson was joined by two 
younger architects, George E. Edkins (1883-1966) and William 
H. Thompson (1892-1974) to form the firm of Watson, Edkins 
and Thompson. In addition to designs for churches, Watson's 
practice included commissions for residences and commercial 
buildings. 



152 



•APPENDIX B. 

National Register of Historic Places Nomination Forms 

for 
WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT 



153 



NPS Form 10 900 
(3-«2) 



0MB No 1024-0018 
Exp. 10-31-84 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
inventory — Nomination Form 

See instructions in How to Complete National Register Forms 
Type all entries — complete applicable sections 

1. Name 

historic Wyncote Historic District 



For NPS use only 
received 
date entered 



and or common 



N/A 



2. Location 

bounded by a£Jr"i'A Railroad to the east, Glenview Avenue 
street & number to th e no rth, Webster Avenue to the south, and not for publication 

Churcli Road t~o~the southwest^ 



city, town Wyncote 



vicinity of 



state 



Pennsylvania 



county 



lontgomery 



3. Classification 



Category 

X district 


Ownership 

public 


building(s) 


private 


Rtriirfiirp 


both 


site 


Public Acquisition 


object 


in process 
being considered 



^atus 

■^ occupied 



unoccupied 

work in progress 

Accessible 

A yes: restricted 

yes: unrestricted 

no 



Present Use 

agriculture 
■^ commercial 

educational 

entertainment 

government 

industrial 

military 



JT 



museum 

park 

private residence 

religious 

scientific 

X transportation 

other: 



4. Owner of Property 



Multiple Ownership (see attached list) 



street & number 



N/A 



city, town 



N/A 



vicinity of 



5. Location of Legal Description 



courthouse, registry of deeds, etc. 



Recorder of Deeds Office, Montgomery County 



street & number 



city, town 



Norristown 



state 



Pa. 



6. Representation in Existing Surveys 

' I'ennsylvania Historical and y^ 

title Museum Commission has this property been determined eligible? yes no 



date 1984 



federal ^^ state XX county local 



depository for survey records Pennsylvania Hist orical and M useum Com mission 

city, town Harris burg state Pa. 

T?7r 



/. uescripiion 



Condition Check one Check one 

__ excellent _ deteriorated unaiu.ed original site 
good ruins altered moved date 

— -'^'' unexposed ^^'y^cote Historic District - Montgomery County 

Describe the present and original (if known) physical appearance 

Wyncote, a suburban community ten miles north of Philadelphia, was 
created as a semi-resort village in 1385, which attracted both summer 
and permanent residents. The irregularly-shaped VJyncote Historic 
District comprises 108 acres of wooded, hilly streexscapes on one of 
the highest points in Cheltenham Township. It extends for three- 
quarters of a mile from the Jenkintown Railroad Station in the east 
to Church Road in the southwest, and for one-half mile from Glenview 
Avenue in the north to Webster Avenue in the south. All of its streets 
branch off from its two main arteries, Greenwood Avenue running east 
and west, and Glenside Avenue running north and south. Examples of 
late 19th and early 20th century architecture survive as originally 
built between 1885 and 1915. Of the 192 buildings in the district, 
1^ are non-contributing. 

The district encompasses a large residential area, a small business 
center, the Jenkintown Railroad Station complex, a 5-acre public park, 
and a 5-acre tract containing church properties. The earliest develop- 
ment occurred neax the railroad where single and serai-detached houses 
were built on narrow lots. Later development provided for significant 
houses on spacious grounds further removed from the railroad. Separat- 
ing the two areas are the church buildings. 

Houses built near the railroad reflect the Victorian vernacular, Second 
Empire, Queen Anne and Shingle styles of domestic architecture popular 
at the t\irn of the century. Prior to the time of development three 
houses were in place--two vernacular farmhouses dating to the 1370s 
and one Italiamte-etyled house of the mid I860s, all three once part of 
large farms. By 1390 about 50 new houses had been constructed in the 
village. 

The Queen Anne and Shingle styles predominate throughout the district, 
which are unified by their similar size, 2i story heights, prominent 
roof lines, assymetrical silhouettes, and a vertical rather than 
horizontal emphasis. Abundant examples of original, patterned slate 
roofs survive. Houses are further unified by their stone foundations 
and exterior surfaces of stone, stucco and wood, including an excep- 
tional display of shinglework. Grey, sparkling schist stone, quarried 
from steep cliffs in the neighborhood, used in the construction of 
many of the buildings, lends an attractive regional characteristic. 
Ubiquitous porches, many enclosed with wood lattice-work, and con- 
spicuous towers--square, round or polygonal--con tribute to the archi- 
tectural distinction in this Victorian community. 

Significant houses built in the less-populated southwest section 
continue to reflect the Queen Anne and Shingle styles, as represented 
by the designs of Angus 3. Wade, Horace Trumbauer and Addison Hutton. 
After 1900, the district adopted the Tudor and Colonial Revival styles. 
Examples of the Tudor Revival style were designed by DeArmond, Ashmead 
and Bickley, Louis Herman Duhring, Jr. and Thomas, Churchman and Molitor, 
The Colonial Revival style is represented by the designs of Mantle 
Fielding, Jr. 

155 



NPS Form 10-9OO-i 



OHB So. 1034-0011 
Cxplrej lO-Jl-a? 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 

VJyncote Historic District - Montgomery County 
Continuation sheet DescriDtion 'tem numtser 



F<ir NPS u«» onJy 



received 



<late enlered 



7 



Page 



Situated in the heart of the district are the All Hallows Episcopal 
Church, designed in I896 by Furness and Evans, and the Calvary Presby- 
terian Church, designed in I898 by Dull and Peterson. In the 20th 
century the Episcopal Church added two Tudor-styled buildings--a 
Rectory designed by Thomas, Churchman and Molitor in 1909 and a large 
Parish House designed by Frank R. Watson in I926. A 1-story stone 
cloister connects the Furness church to the Parish house. Prior to 
the erection of the Presbyterian Church, the church had commissioned 
Frank Miles Day to design their Church Manse in 189^. The smaller 
Episcopal Church features the traditional T-shaped nave and transept 
arrangement, while the larger Presbyterian Church is built around a 
semi-circular auditorium. 

The Jenkintown Railroad Station, designed by Horace Trumbauer in 1931» 
forms part of the eastern border of the district. The Station, and 
Baggage and '.Vaiting Rooms, are in the Tudor Revival style, constructed 
of local stone with limestone trim. An abandoned 3-story square brick 
Watch Tower stands a few yards north of the Station, surviving as a 
document of railroad history when watchmen in the tower signalled the 
steam-powered commuting trains. 

The 5-acre Ralph Morgaji Park adjoins the station complex to the west, 
and serves as a picturesque entry into the district. The historic 
Tookany Greek, which once provided water power for local grist mills, 
flows through the Park. The Park, owned and maintained by Cheltenham 
Township, contains two wooden bridges, walking paths and tiered stairs 
leading to street levels; the Park was named in memory of Ralph 
Morgan, a long-time resident of V/yncote, a Commissioner of Cheltenham 
Township and well-known as am environmentalist. In the late 19th cen- 
tury this Park was part of land owned by John VJanamaker; in the 1890s 
Wanamaker dammed up the Tookany Creek to provide a skating pond for 
Wyncote's residents and was known as "V/anamaker's Pond." 

The largest single privately-owned property of approximately six acres 
lies within view of Wyncote's churches and survives as the site of 
the late 19th century family compound of industrialist Henry K. Walt 
who commissioned Horace Trumbauer, J. Linden Heacock and Heacock and 
Hokanson to build houses for himself and members of his family. This 
landscaped tract, containing an ornamental lake, has remained unchanged 
over the years. 

Wyncote's business district no longer suggests the flourishing acti- 
vity that existed at the turn of the century when its small shops 
served the local populace. Today's commercial operations do not relate 
to the community, except for those of the Wyncote Pharmacy, the John 
J. O'Donnell Plumbing Company and a small deli-grocery store, all housed 
in late 19th and early 20th century buildings. The Mobil Oil Service 
Station, built in the 1960s in the main intersection, replaced an 

I893 Trumbauer building. 

156 



N^Fom, 10-.00.. ^^^ ^^ 1074-001, 



Mnited Slates Department of the Interior ^...y,,. .„^.. .. ■_.,.,„,,„.^...,„, 

National Park Service ^^ps u» ^^zX ■ - ? . 

National Register of Historic Places [^vod " 

Inventory — Nomination Form fcteen<«red .^,.^^, '0 

Wyncote Historic District - Montgomery County ft^' . -rri ^ n-ir . fif i i m' , .-;" '~„m^„';' , mi m X» 

Ikintinuation sheet Description Item numbe r 7 Page 3 

The principle of adaptive use has been successfully exercised with the 
conversion of 19th century buildings for use as modern office space. An 
outstanding example is the rehabilitation in 1979 by the AID American 
Company, v/holesale suppliers of textiles and office furnishings, of a 
19th century livery stable, ornamental iron v/orkshop and a large stone 
warehouse. Their modern office complex has won awards from the Mont- 
gomery Planning Commission and Cheltenham Township. 

Professional offices are now located in some of the first floor spaces 
of the double houses designed by Dull and Peterson on the south side 
of Greenwood Avenue. The 189^ Wyncote Elementary School has been 
a-dapted for use as office space without alteration of the building" s 
exterior. 

Streets vary in width from 30 to 50 feet and are laid out on VJyncote's 
hills in a winding, attractive manner. Most of the streets are flanked 
by curbs and six to seven-foot wide sidewalks in double width squares. 
Houses near the railroad are set back from the street 30 to 40 feet, 
while those in the more rural area are centered in the midst of land- 
scaped grounds. Only one traffic light has been installed in the distrid 
in its main intersection of Greenwood and Glenside Avenues. Retaining 
walls and low stone fences with square or round pillars at entrance- 
ways afford a most pleasing element in the landscape. There are no 
alleys in the district. Mature, deciduous oak, beech, ash, maple, 
tulip, linden and locust trees, together with varieties of evergreen 
plantings, provide a woodland setting throughout the district. Flower- 
ing trees such as dogwood, crabapple and cherry specimens bring seasonal 
color and beauty to this suburban community. 

Houses have been continually occupied and well maintained by their 
various owners. Drastic alterations of residential buildings have not 
impaired the district's original appearance; alterations have been 
mainly porch enclosures and some re-cladding of exterior surfaces. 

The residential area, comprising 90/"^ of the district, survives as a 
micro-cosra of a turn- of -the -century community, its buildings serving as 
an important link in the story of America's domestic architecture. 
Of the 192 buildings in the district, 172 represent dwelling units, 154 
of which were built prior to 1915. Nine of the non-contributmg dwel- 
lings and five of the non-contributing commercial buildings are listed 
as intrusions by reason of age (after 193^)- 



157 



8. Significance 



Period Areas of Significance — Cheok and justify below 

prehistoric . .- archeology-prehistoric '^ community planning landscape architecture religion 

1400-1499 archeology-historic conservation law science 

1500-1599 ^ _ agriculture economics literature sculpture 

1600-1699 _ architecture education military social/ 

1700-1799 _ art _ engineering music humanitarian 

X_ 1800-1899 commerce __ exploration settlement philosophy theater 

^ 1900- communications industry politics government transportation 

WynCOte Historic District --invention _ other (spec.ty) 

M o n t gome r y County 

Specific dates 18 70-19?^ Builder/Architect See attached llSt 

Statement of Significance (in one paragraph) 

The iVyncote Historic District is significant as a railroad suburb estab- 
lished in 1885 that has remained architecturally unchanged since 1915 • 
Its development, over a 30-year period, v;as stimulated by its conven- 
ient location near the North Pennsylvania Railroad line, real estate 
expansion, and the rising expectations of a newly-prosperous middle 
class. Secondly, it is significant as a role model for nouveau-riche 
life-styles in other suburban communities. Thirdly, it is significant 
for its concentration of well-preserved Queen Anne and Shingle style 
houses. The district demonstrates how effectively its group of dedica- 
ted residents were able to control the quality of its environment and 
determine its growth pattern. Beginning in the 1890s, the community 
has engaged in an ongoing preservation program; its most recent efforts 
have been the successful adaptation of 19th century buildings for modern 
usage. 

Wyncote, located in the northeast corner of Cheltenham Township, was 
once part of a land grant of 500 acres by 'Jilliam Penn to William 
Frampton in I683. This land was later divided into large tracts of farm 
laind, occupied mainly by Quaker families, familiar names being Lippin- 
cott, Morris, I-lather ajid Shoemaker. 

Traction kings P. A. B. VJidener and William L. ELkins, financier Jay 
Cooke, manufacturer John B. Stetson, publisher Cyrus H. K. Curtis and 
merchant John V/anamaker, all representing first-generation wealth, pre- 
established prestigious country homes in Cheltenham Township, thus 
setting the stage for a nouveau-riche element of society to follow. 

The Wyncote area v/as known as Chelten Hills in the south and Kent's 
Woods in the north until the Wyncote Post Office was established in 1888, 
giving the region its own, officially-at-tained identity. The new village 
lay west of the railroad line, while its sister community of Jenkinton 
in Abington Township rose to the east. The name "VJyncote" is attributed 
by local historians to Abraham Barker, a financier and agent for Baring 
Brothers in London, who established a 170-acre estate in the 1870s in 
the Wyncote area. Perhaps he took the name from the popular 1880s novel 
Hugh Wynn by Dr. S. V/eir Mitchell in which a VJelsh estate was called 
"Wyncote." Such naming, of course, corresponds to the honorific dis- 
tinction of modem suburban developments and helped set the norm for 
advertising hype. Eight subsequent developments in areas surrounding 
Wyncote included the name "Wyncote" as part of their subdivision titles. 

Unlike the planned, mass developments which occurred in the 1880s and 1890s 
in North Wayne and in Overbrook Farms and Pelham in Philadelphia, develop- 
ment of Wyncote took place on a piece-meal basis by six individual develop- 
ers, four of whom lived in the community and thus had a proprietary in- 
terest in it. 



NM ^OfTB IfrWO-* OMS Mo. 1074-OOlt 

O^S) Cxpiras 10-31-a7 



United States Department of the Interior 






!fm >! Jiv.j i mmm 



National Park Service f jp<ir nps G» on)y 

National Register of Historic Places W^^M;.- 
Inventory — Momination Form W^l^^:..':'-^^,-^-^! 



-, . — ...^i^^-^^v.^ 



Wyncote Historic District - Montgomery County 

Continuation sheet Si gnificance Item numbef o Page 9 

The first development in Wyncote dates to 1885 when Willis Pope Hazard of 
West Chester, Pennsylvania purchased 192- acres from the Estate of IVilliam 
C. Kent and laid out 57 building lots, averaging 60' x 100* , near the 
Jenkintown Railroad Station. Other developers v/ere Martin Luther Kohler 
(1886), the Estate of Joseph Heacock (1888), Bradley Redfield (1390), 
IVilliam z. Weber (I898) and 2dwin Tyson (1900), all of which account for 
the 108 acres in the district. 

With the exception of Kohler, these developers typified the late 19th cen- 
tury amateur speculator whose real estate operations represented an avocation 
rather than a prime source of income. Kohler, a resident of 'Wyncote, was 
a ma:jor participant in syndicates for the development of land in nearby 
Jenkintown and Glenside. Willis Pope Hazard was a gentleman dairy farmer in 
Delaware County, and as an historian contributed to the writing of Watson's 
Annals . He v/as the son of Samuel Hazard, known for his historical accounts 
of Philadelphia; both father and son were engaged in the publishing business 
during their lifetimes. Bradley Redfield was listed as a commission mer- 
chant residing in Philadelphia at the time of his purchase of ^5 acres of 
the Shoemaker farm in 1390. He is perhaps better Icnown as the father of 
Edward Redfield (I868-1965). a landscape painter v/ho received international 
recognition. 

Once building lots were established, affluent residents, acting as interim 
speculators, purchased blocks of lots, thereby enabling them to control 
future building and oversee potential purchasers. Two cases in point were 
those of William E. Weber and William W. Frazier. Weber, partner in the 
artists' supplies firm of F. Weber & Company in Philadelphia, bought up a 
quantity of lots on the Kohler development, on some of which he commissioned 
the architect/builder Angus S. Wade to design Queen Anne "cottages." 
Frazier purchased a large block of lots on the Redfield tract and hired 
Martin Luther Kohler as his agent for re-sale of the lots. Wyncote' s infra- 
structure of resident-church member-developer was evidenced by the Calvary 
Presbyterian Church being erected on land owned by Weber and the All Hal- 
lows Episcopal Church built on land owned by Frazier--both individuals were 
influential members of their respective church congregations. A further bond 
in this closely-knit community was the extraordinarily high number of families 
who were related to each other--newcomers in the 1880s and 1890s saw their 
married children comfortably established in Wyncote' s homes by the early 
twentieth century. 

The location of Wyncote near the North Pennsylvania Railroad line influenced 
,the increasing population of the new village. The railroad brought summer 
visitors to Wyncote' s picturesque, wooded hills, as well as attracting per- 
manent residents. New construction could scarcely satisfy the demand for 
summer rentals. In March, I897, the local newspaper reported: "House 
hunters are beginning to make their appearance here. It is evident that if 
Wyncote had 50 more houses they would all be taken during the coming summer." 

159 



NPS Form 10-900-1 OWfl No. 1034-0018 

0-S2) expires 10-11-87 

United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service per nps us» cm)v 

National Register of Historic Places n^mwd 

Inventory — Nomination Form Idateemered 

Wyncote Historic District - I.'ontgomery County ^^.iL...:......,......^..^^ 



Continuation sheet Significance Item number 3 Page 3 

The North Pennsylvania Railroad extended to the rich coal-mining regions 
of the Lehigh River Valley and to New Jersey and New York City, thus 
attracting families from Upstate Pennsylvania and the east. Consequently, 
Wyncote' s population reflected a wider geographic background than the more 
Philadelphia-oriented communities of Over brook Farms, Pelham, Chestnut 
Hill and North IVayne. 

Houses built near the railroad cost between $2,500. and $7,000., while 
those built on the Redfield tract further removed were limited by deed 
restrictions to a minimum cost of $7»500. and a set-back of at least 
100 feet. Such houses and lot sizes were nearly 300?^ of the norm of the 
day and were typically architect designed by Duhring, Fielding, Heacock, 
Hut ton, Trumbauer and Wade. 

Individuals who settled in V^yncote represented a powerful faction in the 
late nineteenth century industrial and business economy, including indus- 
trialists, manufacturers, merchants, sales agents, lawyers and doctors, 
all forming part of a cohesive, well-to-do community. In the twentieth 
century the district's physical beauty attracted a coterie of artists, 
including Benton Spruance and Frank Whiteside. In the literary field, 
Christopher Morley and the poet Ezra Pound, son of a resident, are the 
best known. Morley, who lived in VJyncote during World War I, humorously 
satirizes 'Wyncote' s foibles and artificialities in his collection of es- 
says in Mince Pie published in 1919. Baseball player Reggie Jackson grew 
up in Wyncote where his father had a tailor shop on Greenwood Avenue. 

Wyncote, once established, earned the reputation of an exclusive and 
wealthy community. Its early cosmopolitan population embraced both pro- 
fessional and capitalist who jointly controlled the quality of their 
village and set up their own social hierarchy. IVyncote's self-determi- 
nation was illustrated by the operations of the V/yncote Improvement 
Association, organized in the 1890s, which organization suggested to the 
home-owner various improvements, obtained his signature, then placed the 
contract with the lowest bidder and supervised the work until it was 
finished. Wyncote' s pride and self -consciousness is suggested in the 
following newspaper notice of 1897' 

...some of the best known and wealthiest business people live 
in these elegant mansions, and a person residing here should 
consider himself blessed as few others are so far as residence 
is concerned. 

Many of the "elegant mansions" were designed by some of Philadelphia's 
leading architects, representing the increasing role of the professional 
architect for the design of upper middle-income houses. 



160 



NPS Forni 10-900-1 0MB Ho. 1024-0018 

D-S2) Expires 10-31-87 

United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service |f<h- nps U8» only 



National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form Idateentered 

Wyncote Historic District - Montgomery County 

Continuation sheet 3igjiif icance Item number 3 Page U- 



K'"":'"" -i 



Horace Trumbauer's five houses represent a stylistic phase in his career 
between the Victorian vernacular and his better-known classically-inspired 
mansions. The versatile designs of Angus S. V/ade are represented by 
his Queen Anne "cottages" and the significant Queen Anne houses designed 
for Charles D. Cramp of the William Cramp Ship and Engine x3uilding Com- 
pany of Philadelphia and for Dr. C. H. Kunkle, renowned for his patent 
medicines. The designs of native architect Jo Linden Heacock are sig- 
nificant as transitional styles between the Queen Anne and Colonial 
Revival. 

Wyncote's church buildings, designed by prestigious Philadelphia archi- 
tects, exemplify the important role the church played in the social and 
religious life of the community in the Victorian era. Contained in one 
picturesque tract, these buildings provide an ecclesiastical setting 
unequalled in any other Philadelphia suburb. 

The district's Queen Anne and Shingle styles are significant as (1) they 
are unified in scale, height and materials, and (2) they have survived 
as a concentrated representation of these styles. Apart from its early 
innovation as a development that would serve as a proto-type for later 
suburbs, the district's greatest significance lies in its architectural 
integrity and the fact that an intact Victorian community offers the same 
attractive vistas today that it did at the turn of the century. 

The residential district survives essentially as it was built between 
1885 and 1915--a well-preserved, somewhat isolated enclave of substantial, 
distinctive and unostentatious homes which reflect the life styles of their 
original owners, undisturbed by commercial intrusions or multiple -dwelling 
buildings. Contributing to the district's significance is the survival 
of its original landscape plan which retains the rural, village atmosphere 
intended by its developers. 

Less than lOfo of the built environment represents commercial operations. 
The community's policy of discouraging commercial growth and its increas- 
ing dependence on outside services has resulted in the spotty survival 
rate of its nineteenth century commercial buildings. However, with the 
conversion of some of these buildings for modern office space, residents 
of Wyncote continue their preservation efforts with the same zeal they 
exercised in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. 



161 



NPS Form 10-9OO-1 



0H3 So . 


1024 


-ooia 




Bx pices 


10- 


31-87 




|-F<K NPS Ufi» onjy 








Inscaived 








lldate en{«red 






1 
J 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 

IVyncote Historic District - Montgomery County 
Continuation sheet Significance Item number 8 Page 5 



1985 marks the 100th anniversary of Wyncote's establishment, and it 
is, therefore, appropriate that official recognition be given to this 
historic district, not only as an important social and architect'oral 
document in Philadelphia's suburban history, but also as a suburban 
community that has retained its architectural integrity through the 
self-determination of its citizens. 



162 



9. Major Bibliographical References 



See attached, 



10. Geographical Data 



Acreage of nominated property approxim ately 108 acres 

Quadrangle name ^rmaTVtown^Quadr angle Quadrangle scale 1 = 2^' ^^^_ 

UTM References 



jj I L^J I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



^l|8| I I I 

Zone Easting Northing Zone Easting Northing 

c^J I I I I I I I I I I I I . I I dUJ I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 

eL^ I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I fL^ I I I I , I I I I I I I I , I 

gLU I I I I I I I I i I i I I i I HLU I I . I I I I I I I ■ I ■ I I 



Verbal boundary description and justification 

Begin at the most northerly point of the district, approximately ll40' north 
of the intersection of Greenwood and Glenside Avenues, thence (following the 
irregularly-shaped northern boundary of the Ralph Morgan Park) southerly 182' 

List all states and counties for properties overlapping state or county boundaries 

state code county code 

state code county code 



11. Form Prepared By 



name/title Doreen L. Foust 



organization date 



street & number 2925 Oak Ridge Farm telephone (215) 659-133^ 

city or town Huntingdon Valley state Pa. , I9006 

12. State Historic Preservation Officer Certification 

The evaluated significance of this property within the state is: 
national state local 



As the designated State Historic Preservation Officer for the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (Public Law 89- 
665), I hereby nominate this properly for inclusion in the National Register and certify that it has been evaluated 
according to the criteria and procedures set forth by the National Park Service. 



State Histo ric Prese rvation Officer signature 

title 



For NPS use only 

I hereby certify that this property is included in the National Register 



date 



Keeper of the National Register 

Attest: date 



Chief of Registration 



N^S Fomi 10-900-* g^B Ho. 1024-OOlt 

0*3) tMpirat 10-31-»7 

United States Department of the Interior pw« i sv j y.yj^i^i;^/Au^y»i"ui«^« 

National Park Service p^NPSu«»onjy " * '" ;gr2 

National Register of Historic Places |r«ceived ^^^ 

Inventory — Nomination Form &^t^^ .^ i: j 

VJyncote Historic District - Montgomery County ^<i^i! i ^^ . ^i^ . i:i'' ■ 9-,-^ihi'rr.-^Si . S<- . 
Continuation sheet Ma.jor Bibliographical Item number 9 Page \ 

lieierences 

1. Clio Index , Clio Group, Inc., 396I Baltimore Avenue, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

2. Hare, J. V., "The Coming of the North Pennsylvauiia Railroad," 

Old York Road Historical Society Bulletin . Vol. IV, 194-0, pp. 13-39. 

3. Hitchcock, Henry-Russell, Architecture : Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Centuries . Penguin Books, 3rd rd. I969, New York, I983. 

4. Jones, Arthur Hoskins, Cheltenham Township : A Dissertation in 
Sociology , University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, 1950. 

5. McAlester, Virginia and Lee, A Field Guide to American Houses , 
Alfred A. Knopf, New York, N.Y., 198^. 

6. Rothschild, Elaine vV. , A History of Cheltenham Township, Cheltenham 
Township Historical Commission, Cheltenham Township, r.Iontgomery 
County, Pennsylvania, 1976. 

7. Scully, Vincent J., Jr., The Shingle Style , Yale University Press, 
New Haven, Connecticut, 1955* 

8. Tatman, Sandra L. and Roger Vi. r-Ioss, Biographical Dictionary of 
PhiladelTJhia Architects 1700 - 1930 . G. K. Hall and Company, 
Boston, Massachusetts, I985. 



Substantial information and assistance has been provided by the following 
sources : 

1. Cheltenham Township Offices, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania. 

2. Recorder of Deeds Office, Montgomery County, Norristown, Pennsylvania. 

3. Montgomery County Historical Society, Norristo^Ti, Pennsylvania. 

4. Microfilm copies of the J enk intern Times and the Times Chronicle , 
1895 through 1909, Montgomery County Publishing Company, 

Fort '.'.'ashing ton, Pennsylvania. 

5. Information supplied by present and former residents of V/yncote, 
Pennsylvania. 



164 



Wyncote Historic District - Montgomery County 





wnitwa states ueparxmeni ot ine inferior 

National Park Service 

National Register off Historic Places 
inventory — Nomination Form 

Vyncote Historic District , Montgomery County 
Continuation sheet Item numtser 10 Page 1 

Verbal Boundary Description 

Begin at the most northerly point of the district, approximately 
11^0' north of the intersection of Greenwood and Glenside Avenues, 
thence (following the irregularly- shaped northern boundary of 
the Ralph Morgan Park}, southerly 182* , thence southwesterly 112* , 
thence northwesterly 4l« , thence southeasterly 72* , thence westerly 
182' , crossing Glenside Avenue, thence southwesterly approximately 
15* along the northwest property line of ^12 Glenside Avenue, 
thence southeasterly approximately 145' along the southeast pro- 
perty line of said property, thence southeasterly approximately 
450' along the rear of properties on the north side of Woodland 
Raad (numbers 111, 119, 121 and 127), thence t\irning in a more 
easterly direction along the rear of properties on the northwest 
side of Woodland Road (numbers 127, 131. 133, 139, 1^1 and 1^3), 
thence easterly 150' along the southeast property line of 14-3 
Woodland Road, thence southeasterly 200' along Woodland Road, 
thence turning northwesterly 150' along the northeast property 
lines of 203 and 205 Greenwood Avenue, thence tirrning southeasterly 
293' along the rear of properties at 207, 209 and 211 Greenwood 
Avenue, thence turning southeasterly approximately 130' along the 
southeast property line of 211 Greenwood Avenue to meet Greenwood 
Avenue. 

Thence the boundary line continues southeasterly approximately 
1575' along the south side of Greenwood Avenue, thence turning 
southeasterly approximately 825* along the rear of properties 
on the west side of Greenwood Place (numbers I3, 12, 11 and 10), 
thence turning southerly approximately ^25' along the southwest 
property lines of the rear of properties on the west side of 
Bent Road (numbers 337 and 343) and 2^3' along the southwest property 
line of 1221 Church Road, thence turning easterly approximately 
1300* along the north side of Church Road, thence turning north- 
easterly approximately 200* along the rear of property on tie south- 
east corner of Accomac and Church Roads, thence txirning northwester- 
ly approximately I60' along the northeast border of said property, 
crossing Accomac Road, and continuing along the northeast property 
line of 8100 Accomac Road, thence turning southerly approximately 
75' along the rear of this property, thence tiirning westerly ap- 
proximately 200' on the northeast border of 250 Bent Road, thence 
turning northeasterly approximately 500' along the front property 
lines of 3^3, 337, 335 and 333 Bent Road, thence turning south- 
easterly approximately 1^0' along the rear southeastern property 
line of 322 Bent Road, crossing Accomac Road, thence turning 
northeasterly approximately 150* along the southeastern property 
line of ^10 Accomac Road, thence turning northwesterly approximately 
70' along the rear of property line of 5lO Accomac Road, thence 
turning northwesterly approximately 225' along the rear northeast 
property lines' of ^06 Accomac Road and 308 Bent Road, thence 
turning northeasterly approximately 150* along the rear southeast 

166 




NPS FormlO-MW-* 0MB So. 1024-0018 

(M2) • Expires 10-31-B7 

United States Department of the Interior 

^ National Park Service 

National Register off Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 

W}rnoote Historic District, Montgomery County 
Conti nuation sheet Item number 10 Page 2 

Verbal Boundary Description 

borders of 30^ and 300 Bent Road, crossing Kent Road, and cont- 
inuing along the east property lines of the Calvary Presbyterian 
Church and 213, 209 • 205 and 201 Fernbrook Avenue. 

At the intersection of Fernbrook and Maple Avenues the boundary 
line continues southeasterly along the southeast side of Maple 
Avenue, bordering the southwest property lines of 211 Maple Avenue 
and 135 and I32 Webster Avenue, thence turning northeasterly approxi- 
mately 1300 ' along the rear south property lines of houses on the 
south side of Webster Avenue (numbers 132 to and including 100 
Webster Avenue) to the intersection of Glenside and Webster Avenues, 
thence turning northwesterly along the west side of Glenside Avenue 
to the intersection of Greenwood and Glenside Avenues, crossing over 
Greenwood Avenue to the northwest corner of this intersection, 
thence turning easterly along the north border of the bridge over- 
pass .approximately 325' ito the stone wall enclosing the station 
complex on the east side, thence turning northerly along the stone 
wall to the north side of the north stairwell leading from the 
street to the station platform, a distance of approximately 380' , 
thence turning westerly along the north side of the stairwell, re- 
crossing the railroad tracks , immediately tiorning northerly along 
the railroad tracks to the nortn side of the brick Tower House, a 
distance of approximately 230* , thence turning westerly along the 
north side of the Tower House, continuing in a straight line, 
across the Parking Lot, to the boundary line of the Ralph Morgan 
Park, a distance of approximately 125' • thus including all of the 
buildings in the railroad complex, thence proceeding in a northerly 
• direction to meet the most northerly point of the Park, the place 
of beginning. 



167 



NPS Form lO-no-a 0«fl Wo. 1034-0011 

0-*2) Expirms 10-21-87 

United States Department of the Interior W'-y''^ ' ^.^ikri<^ ^ -^> ' yMW ' >'^»^^m^ 

National Park Service tj^w^im^'v^ ''-'^'^-''^'"^^ 

rocaived '-■ '''''~'~A 



'date Altered • i 



National Register of Historic Places 
Inventory — Nomination Form 

'.Vyncote Historic District - Montgomery County 
Continuation slieet Item number 10 Page 3 

Justification of Boundaries: 

Boundaries of this irregularly-shaped district v/ere designed to 
include the highest concentration of houses built between 1385 
and 1915 in IJyncote. 

The district lies immediately west of the Jenkintovm Railroad 
Station and proceeds in a somewhax linear direction to Church Road 
to the southv/est, a distance of approximately three-quarters of a 
mile. The residential section, including a small business district 
located near the Glenside and Greenwood Avenue intersection, extends 
from the intersection of Glenview and Glenside Avenues on the north 
to VJebster Avenue on the south, a distance of approximately one-half 
of a mile. 

r Because of the important interaction between the community and the 
railroad line, especially at the turn of the century, the Jenkintown 
Station and auxiliary buildings are shown as part of the district. 
These are particularly significant as the Station, VJaiting Room 
and Baggage Room were designed by Horace Trumbauer. Included in xhe 
railroad complex is a 3-story brick Tower House constructed in the 
I89OS and a Neo-colonial small Office Building built in the early 
20th century. 

The Ralph IJorgan Park, which adjoins the railroad complex to the 
west, is also included as part of the district, as it (1) provides _ 
part of the picturesque landscaping of the district, and (2) contains 
a section of the historic Tookany Creek which at one time supplied 
water power for mills in Cheltenham Township. 

Although there are some Victorian houses scattered throughout Wyn-_ 
cote outside of the proposed district, the majority of houses outside 
of the district were built in the 1950s and 1960s in the Tudor, Colonial 
Revival and modern Ranch styles. Such houses reflect life styles 
more dependent on the automobile than on the railroad. 



168 



VICTORIAN WVNC0T6 

= COMIRIBUTIKO 

S|&«if lCor»T 




4-6^ 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 1 



East Glenside Avenue 



412; 



406 



1896/ Queen Anne two and one-half story 
four-bay stone and shingle house. 
Gambrel roof with smaller intersecting 
gambrel roofs. Partial front porch. 
Various double-hung casement and Palladian 
windows. Contributing 

c. 1885, Stick Style one and one-half 
story four-bay frame house. Gabled roof 
with shed gable over rear elevation. Par- 
tial side and front porch. Prominent 
centered square tower at second floor 
level. Various Queen Anne window sash. 
Contributing 



Jenkintown Railroad Stat ion Buildings, northeast side 
Glenside and Greenwood Avenues 



Station: 



Waiting Room: 



Baggage Room: 



Office Building 



1931, one and one-half story Tudor-style 
stone building, 42' x 96'. Gabled roof 
over central block, with cross gables on 
north and south elevations. Double-hung 
and casement windows. Parapeted dormer 
windows above first floor cornice level. 
Two prominent stone chimneys. Horace 
Trumbauer, architect. Contributing 

1931 one-story Tudor-style stone building, 
15' X 52". East of railroad tracks. 
Horace Trumbauer, architect. Con- 
tributing 

1931 one-story Tudor-style stone building, 
14' X 52'. East of railroad tracks. 
Horace Trumbauer, architect. Con- 
tributing 

c. 1920, one-story brick building, 20' x 

30". Colonial styling with hitTt:" roof. 
Queen Anne Windows. Contributing 



17.0 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 2 



Glenside Avenu e (continued) 



Watch Tower: c. 1895, three-story rectangular brick 
building. Hipped roof with wide over- 
hanging eaves. Queen Anne windows. Brick 
chimney. Contributing 



North side Woodland Road 



101 



107 



111 



119 



1947, Colonial Revival one and one-half 
story five-bay random stone house. Multi- 
paned double-hung sash. Dormer windows. 
Gabled roof. Barney and Banwell, archi- 
tects. Intrusion, by reason of age 

c. 1890, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
five-bay stone, clapboard and shingle 
house with prominent round and square 
towers. Hipped roof with intersecting 
gables. Dormer windows. Multi-paned win- 
dow sash, some with stained glass. 
Carriage house. Thomas F. Miller, archi- 
tect. Significant* 

c. 1887, Queen Anne two and ciie-half story 
five-bay stone, clapboard and shingle 
house. Front gable roof with intersecting 
gables. Wrap-around front porch. Various 
multi-paned window sash. Dormer windows. 
Carriage house. Contributing 

c. 1887, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
five-bay stone, clapboard and shingle 

house. Front gable roof with intersecting 
gables. Front and side porch. Various 

multi-paned sash with stained glass. 

Significant 



* Those buiieir^ classifif- as "S j gnif icart" have been 
selected as particularly fine examples of each architectural 
style — e.g. Victorian vernacular. Second Empire, Queen 
Anne, etc. 



171 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 3 



Woodland Road ( continued) 



121: c. 1925, one and one-half story four-bay 

Dutch Colonial frame cottage, reclad with 
asbestos siding. Gambrel roof, with shed 
dormer on facade and rear elevation. En- 
try porch. 1/1 window sash. (House moved 

to this location from a nearby site.) 

Contributing 

127: 1889, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
five-bay stone, clapboard and shingle 
house. Hipped roof with cross gables. 
Polygonal tower on facade. Porte-cochere. 
1/1 windows and Queen Anne sash. Glass- 
enclosed front porch. Large carriage 
house. Contributing 

131: 1885, Vernacular Victorian two and one- 

half story two-bay frame house. Front- 
and side-gabled roof. 1/1 and Queen Anne 

window sash. Full-width front porch. 

Contributing 

133: 1885, Vernacular Victorian two and one- 
half story three-bay frair.e house. Side- 
gabled roof. 2/2 window sash. Full-width 
front porch. Contributing 

139: 1885, Vernacular Victorian two and one- 
half story three-bay frame house. Side- 
gabled roof with front cross gable. Full- 
width front porch. 2/2 windows. Con- 
tributing 

141: 1887, Vernacular Victorian two and one- 
half story three-bay fraire house, reclad 
with asbestos sioincj. Front- and side- 
gabled roof. 1/1 and 2/1 window sash. 
Frcnt and side porches, C:' tr itut irg 

143; 1887, Vernacular Victorian two and one- 
half story two-bay frair.e ana shirnyxt 
house. Prominent gable over front L, with 
intersecting rear cross gable. Side 
porch. 1/1 and 2/1 sash. Significant 



172 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 4 



Sniil-h sjt^p Woodl and Road 

100: c. 1888, Shingle Style two and one-half 
story four-bay stone, clapboard and 
shingle semi-detached house. Prominent 
front gable with intersecting side gable 
in roofline. 6/6 window sash. Dormer 
windows. Corner porch. Contributing 

102: c. 1888, Shingle Style two and one-half 
story four-bay stone, clapboard and 
shingle semi-detached house. Prominent 
front gable with intersecting side gable 
in roofline. Various Queen Anne window 
sash. Dormer windows. Original corner 
porch extended forward with hipped roof. 
Contributing 

104: c. 1888, Shingle Style two and one-half 
story four-bay stone, clapboard and 
shingle semi-detached house. Prominent 
front gable with intersecting side cable 
in roofline. Various Queen Anne window 
sash. Dormer windows. Fine Palladian win- 
dow in second floor, east elevation. Cor- 
ner porch. Significant 

106: c. 1888, Shingle Style two and one-half 
story four-bay stone, clapboard and 
shingle semi-detached house. Prominent 
front gable with intersecting side gable 
in roofline. Various Queen Anne window 
sash. Dormer windows. Fine Palladian win- 
dow in second floor, west elevation. Cor- 
ner porch. Significant 

108: c. 1887, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

three-bay frame house, reclac with asbes- 
tos siding. Front and side gables in 
roofline. 1/1 and Queen Anne window sash. 

i ront anu side poicii. Dormer v,iridov&. 

Contributing 



173 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 5 



Woodland Road (continued) 



114; c. 1887 Queen Anne two and one-half story 

three-bay clapboard and shingle house. 
Front- and side-gabled roof. 1/1 and Queen 
Anne window sash. Dormer windows. Front 
porch. — Contributing 

119; * c. 1887 Queen Anne two and one-half story 
four-bay clapboard and shingle house. 
Front-and side-gabled roof. 1/1 window 
sash. Dormer windows. Front and side 
porch. Patterned stickwork in front 
gable. Contributing 

122: c. 1889, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
three-bay clapboard and shingle house. 
Front and side gables in roofline. 1/1 
window sash. Dormer windows. Enclosed 
second story porch. Front and side porch 
first floor, Contributing 

126: c. 1890, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
four-bay clapboard and shingle house. 
Front-and side-gabled roof. 1/1 window 
sash. Dormer windows. Front and side 
porch. John Harlow, architect. Con- 
tributing 

130: c. 1890, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

three-bay all-shingled house. Hipped roof 
with intersecting gables. 1/1 windows. 
Dormer windows. Front and side porch. 

Three-stcry polygonal tower capped wtih 
polygonal steeply pitched roof on north- 
east elevation and twc-story polygonal 
tower capped with low polygonal roof 
pierced v:th dormer v.-irdow on southvert 
elf: vat. - Ca^i'^j.'^e house. jcin riarlow, 
architect. Contributing 



li^ 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 6 



South side Hillt op Lane 

144: c. 1900, Vernacular Victorian two-story 
two-bay brick semi-detached house. 
Shallow hipped roof. 1/1 window sash. Full 
width front porch. Contributing 

146: c. 1900, Vernacular Victorian two-story 
two-bay brick semi-detached house. 
Shallow hipped roof. 1/1 window sash. Full 
width front porch. Contributing 

148: c. 1900 Vernacular Victorian two-stroy 
two-bay brick semi-detached house. 
Shallow hipped roof. 1/1 and 2/1 sash. 
Full-width front porch. Contributing 

150: c. 1900 Vernacular Victorian two-stroy 
two-bay brick semi-detached house. 
Shallow hipped roof. 1/1 and 2/1 sash. 
Full-width front porch. Contributing 

154: c. 1900, Vernacular Victorian two and one- 
half story three-bay frame house, now 
reload with asbestos siding. Side-gabled 
roof. 1/1 window sash. Full-width front 
porch. Contributing 

158: c. 1888, Vernacular Victorian one and one- 
half story three-bay all-stucco house with 
one-story addition with shed aroof and 
attached two-bay wood garage. Cambrel 
roof over original one and one-half story 
structure. 1/1 window sash and modern 
four-light sash. Contributing 

160: c. 1888, Vernacular Victorian two-story 
four-bay front-gabled house, now greatly 
altered with two shed-roofed extensions on 
east side. All clad with asbestos siding. 
Sir— 11 entry porcr witn shec. rooi. i/l and 
Queen Anne sash. Contributing 



175 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 7 



M Or<">^ s l <^p Gree ny""^ Avenue 

101-107: 1969, Mobil Service Station. One-story 

brick construction. Gable roof. Intru- 
sion 

m_113. c. 1895, Queen Anne two and one-half 

story, four-bay stone and frame store and 
residence, reclad with asbestos siding 
second floor. Front-facing gambrel 
roof. Store front windows first floor. 
Various multi-paned and 1/1 window sash. 
Palladian window second floor facade. J. 
Linden Heacock, architect. Significant 

115-119- c. 1895, two-story, four-bay frame com- 
mercial building. Flat roof. Store front 
window first floor. 1/1 window sash second 
story. Contributing 

125: c. 1945, Colonial Revival one and one-half 
story three-bay random stone house with 
gabled roof. Matching bay windows flanking 
center first floor entrance. Dormer win- 
dows set in facade wall and partially 
extencing above eave level, c 196r modern 
addition^attached on east elevation: L- 
shaped two-story structure enclosing a 
stairwell which provides entrance to a 
two-story stucco structure, approximately 
60' X 80', built onto rear. Intrusion 

135-147: 1979, office building complex of the ATD 

American Company. One- and two-story re- 
habilitation of former nineteenth-century 
livery stable, foundry and storehouse. 
Excellent example of ad:; tive use: oricj- 
nal stone walls, steel beams, wood trusses 
and lumber useo in rehabilitation. Awards 
iL^eived from tne McntgcTi'.eiy Fj-ani-irg 
Commission in 1981 and Cheltenham Township 

in 1982. John Sudoiski, architect. 

Intrusion 



176 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 8 



Greenwood Avenue (con tinued^ 

149; c. 1900, two-story two-bay commercial 
building, reclad with board and batten 
siding. Gable roof. Store front windows 
first floor. Contributing 

151; c. 1895, Second Empire symmetrical two and 
one-half story four-bay stone semi- 
detached house. Mansard roof with front 
cross-gable. Full-width porch, partially 
enclosed. 2/2 window sash. Dormer windows. 
Contributing 

153: c. 1895, Second Empire symmetrical two and 
one-half story four-bay stone semi- 
detached house. Mansard roof with front 
cross-gable. Full-width porch, partially 
enclosed. 2/2 window sash. Dormer windows. 
Contributing 

155: c. 1895, Second Empire symmetrical two and 
one-half story three-bay travertine stone 
house. Mansard roof. 1/1 and 2/2 window 
sash. Dormer windows. Significant 

157: c. 1890. Queen Anne two and one-half story 
three-bay stone and frame house, with 
shingle detail. Gambrel roof. Full-width 
front porch. 1/1 window sash. Palladian 
window in attic level on facade. Dormer 
windows. Contributing 

159; c. 1890 Queen Anne two and one-half story 

three-bay stone and frame house, reclad 
with asbestos siding. Intersecting gables 
in roof. Multi-paned Queen Anne window 
sas. Dormer windows. Front and sice 
porch. — Contributing 

161: c. lEI-S Vernacular Victorian symii:fc.tr ical 
two and one-half story five-bay frame 
house. Sic'e-c-r : ei rocf with ir--.rr. Virg 
front cross gable. 1/1 window sash. Dor- 
mer windows. Full-width front porch. 

Contributing 



177 

' 7« 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 9 



greenwood Avenue (continued). 

203: c. 1890, Second Empire symmetrical two and 
one-half story two-bay frame semi-detached 
house. Mansard roof. 2/2 window sash. 
Dormer windows. Full-width front porch. 
Contributing 

205: c. 1890, Second Empire symmetrical two and 
one-half story two-bay frame semi-detached 
house. Mansard roof. 2/2 window sash. 
Dormer windows. Full-width front porch. 
Contributing 

207: c. 1898, Vernacular Victorian two and one- 
half story three-bay frame house, reclad 
with asbestos siding. Front- and side- 
gabled roof. 1/1 and multi-paned window 
sash. Front and side porch. Con- 
tributing 

209: c. 1870, Vernacular Victorian symmetrical 
two and one-half story three-bay random 
stone house. Side-gabled roof. 1/1 and 
2/1 window sash. Dormer windows. Full 
width front porch. Contributing 

211: c. 1870, Vernacular Victorian symmetrical 
two and one-half story three-bay random 
stone house. Side-gabled roof with front 
cross gable. 1/1 and 2/1 window sash. 
Entry porch. Contributing 



^qouth side Gree nvx^d Avenue 

100: c. 1525 two-story Tudor Revival comrr^ercicl 
building of stone, brick, stucco and half- 
timbor construction. Shallow hipoed roof 
with per.L locf. Contains Vji-cczt i'hc.rr.:3>:y 
and store space on first floor, office 
space on seconc, £tore front vinacv.r 
first floor. Multi-paned window sash on 
second floor. Heacock and Hokanson, archi- 
tects. Contributing 



178 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 10 



Greenwood Avenue (continued) 



108: c. 1910, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay stone, stucco and half-timber 
semi-detached house. Prominent front- and 
side-gabled roof. Various Queen Anne 
double-hung and casement sash. Three-sided 
bay window supported on brackets second 
floor facade. Front and side corner porch. 
Dull & Peterson, architects. Con- 
tributing 

110: c. 1910, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay stone, stucco and half-timber 
semi-detached house. Prominent front- and 
side-gabled roof. Various Queen Anne 
double-hung and casement sash. Three-sided 
bay window supported on brackets second 
floor facade. Front and side corner porch. 
Dull & Peterson, architects. Con- 
tributing 

114: c. 1910, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay stone, stucco and half-timber 
semi-detached house. Prominent front and 
side gambrel roof. Various Queen Anne 
double-hung and casement sash. Recessed 
balconette on front attic level. Front 
and side corner porch. Dull & Peterson, 
architects. Contributing 

116: c. 1910, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-tay stone, stucco and half-timber 
semi-detached house. Prominent front and 
sice cambiei roof. Varicus Queen Anne 
double-hung and casement sash. Recessed 
balconette on front attic level. Original 
corner perch itouilt anc eniirged to piu- 
vide office space. Dull & Peterson, archi- 
tects. Contributing 



179 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 11 



Greenwood Avenu e (continued^ 

120: c. 1910, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay stone, stucco and half-timber 
semi-detached house. Prominent front- and 
side-gabled roof. Various Queen Anne 
double-hung and casement sash. Three-sided 
bay window supported on brackets second 
floor facade. Front and side corner porch. 
Dull & Peterson, architects. Con- 
tributing 

122: c. 1910, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay stone, stucco and half-timber 
semi-detached house. Prominent front- and 
side-gabled roof. Various Queen Anne 
double-hung and casement sash. Three-sided 
bay window supported on brackets second 
floor facade. Original corner porch en- 
closed with bow window facing street. 
Dull & Peterson, architects. Con- 
tributing 

124: c. 1910, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay stone, stucco and half-timber 
semi-detached house. Prominent front and 
side gambrel roof. Various Queen Anne 
double-hung and casement sash. Recessed 
balconette front attic level. Front and 
side corner porch. Dull & Peterson, archi- 
tects. Contributing 

126: c. 1910, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay stone, stucco and half-timber 
semi-detached house. Prominent front and 
side gambrel roof. Various Queen Anne 
double-hung and casement Bash. Recessed 
bdlconcut. front attic level. Original 
corner porch enclosed to provide profes- 
sional office space. Du2 "l c Peterson, 
arcnitects. Contiibuciny 



180 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 12 



Greenwood Avenue (continued) 



128: c. 1910, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

two-bay stone, stucco and half-timber 
semi-detached house. Prominent front- and 
side-gabled roof. Various Queen Anne 
double-hung and casement sash. Three-sided 
bay window supported on brackets second 
floor level facade. Front and side corner 

porch. Dull & Peterson, architects. 

Contributing 

130: c. 1910, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

two-bay stone, stucco and half-timber 
semi-detached house. Prominent front- and 
side-gabled roof. Various Queen Anne 
double-hung and casement sash. Three-sided 
bay window supported on brackets second 
floor level facade. Original corner porch 
rebuilt to provide professional office 

space. Dull & Peterson, architects. 

Contributing 

146: c. 1892, Queen Anne symmetrical two and 
one-half story three-bay random stone 
house. Hipped roof with cross gables. 
Various window types including 1/1 and 
Queen Anne. Tall, narrow 36-light stair- 
well window on west elevation. Full-width 
front porch, glass enclosed. Con- 
tributing 

148: c. 1892, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

three-bay stone and shingle house. Hipped 
roof with twin gables on facade. 1/1 

window sash. Full-width front porch. 

Contributing 

150: c. 1890, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
three-bay stone house. Kirped rocf with 
i ;•-•'. Ptctir.C; gables. Variius C^et.. Ani.c 
window sash. Recessed entry porch with 
front and side stone arches. Con- 
tributing 



181 



81 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 13 



Greenwoo d Avenue fcontinued) 



152: c. 1890, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
three-bay house. Present brick and asbes- 
tos siding surface not original. Promi- 
nent f ront-and-side-gabled roof. 1/1 win- 
dow sash. Contributing 

154: c. 1895, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay frame house. Intersecting gables 
on roof. Sharply peaked front gable with 
flared eaves on facade. 1/1 and Queen 
Anne window sash. Front and side porch. 
Polygonal one-story bay with matching roof 
east elevation. Contributing 

156: c. 1890, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
three-bay stone and frame house, reclad 
with asbestos siding. Hipped roof with 
twin gables on facade. 1/1 window sash. 
Front and side porch. Contributing 

206: c. 1905, Colonial Revival two and one-half 
story three-bay house. Random stone first 
floor, asbestos siding above. Pent roof 
between first and second floor elevations. 
Side-gabled roof. Kulti-paned Colonial 
type window sash. Contributing 

328: 1899, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay stone, stucco and half-timber 
semi-detached house. Prominent front- and 
side-gabled roof. Various Queen Anne 
double-hung and casement sash. Front and 
side corner porch, glass-enclosed. Heacock 
and Hokanson, architects. Contributing 

330: 1899, Queen P.'^'^.- tvc and cnr--h£" '" rtcry 
two-bay stone, stucco and half-timber 
semi-detached house. Prominent front- and 
sice-qafcl ^d rOuf. Varic ~ (^i-^ ^r^ hn-r^ 
double-hung and casement sash. Front and 
side corner porch, now enclcsec?. Keecock 
and Hokanson, architects. Contributing 



x.>2 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 14 



Greenwood Avenu e fcontinued) 



332: 1899, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay stone, stucco and half-timber 
semi-detached house. Prominent front- and 
side-gabled roof. Various Queen Anne 
double-hung and casement sash. Front and 
side corner porch. Heacock and Hokanson, 
architects. Contributing 

334: -' 1899, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay stone, stucco and half-timber 
semi-detached house. Prominent front- and 
side-gabled roof. Various Queen Anne 
double-hung and casement sash. Front and 
side corner porch. Heacock and Hokanson, 
architects. Contributing 

400: 1894 Wyncote Elementary School converted 
into office space. One and one-half story 
five-bay random stone construction. T- 
shaped, with prominent front-gabled wing 
facing street, with principal east/west 
block attached with gambrel roof. 4/4 and 
2/2 single and paired window sash. Paired 
dormer windows. Contributing 

406: c. 1900, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay stone and shingle semi-detached 
house. Side-gabled roof with intersecting 
side gambrel roof. 1/1 window sash. 
Front and side corner porch. Heacock and 
Hokanson, architects. Contributing 

408: c. 1900, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

two-bay stone and shingle semi-detached 
house. Prominent front gable roof with 
intersecting --ide cairbrel re rf. Vcrious 
1/1 and multi-paned window Eash. Full 
width front porch. Heacock and Hokanson, 
arc..itect£. Contr ibutir.g 



183 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 15 



Greenwood Avenue (continued) 



410: c. 1900, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

two-bay stone and shingle semi-detached 
house, reclad with asbestos siding second 
and attic levels. Hipped roof with inter- 
secting side gambrel roof with hipped roof 
extended to form gable over central porch 
on facade. Various 1/1 and multi-paned 
window sash. Full-width front porch. 
Modern second and third floor addition 
with brick chimney on east elevation. 

Heacock and Hokanson, architects. 

Contributing 

412: c. 1900, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

two-bay stone and shingle semi-detached 
house, reclad with asbestos siding second 
and attic levels. Hipped roof with inter- 
secting side gambrel roof with hipped roof 
extended to form gable over central porch 
on facade. Various 1/1 and multi-paned 
window sash. Full-width front porch. 

Heacock and Hokanson, architects. 

Contributing 

414: c. 1865, Ital iana te-sty led three-story, 

three-bay stucco house, with stone quoins 
on facade corners. Shallow hipped roof 
with wide bracketed overhang. 1/1 sash. 
Full-width front porch. Two-story bay west 
elevation. Contributing 



North Sid e Cliff Terrace 



101? c. 1899, Queen Anne one zr,d on'^-balf -tory 
two-bay stone, stucco and frame hali- 
timber semi-detached house. Front-gabled 
r'. '.. f. VcricuE 1/1 and r,ul ti-t-nc j vi..dow 
sash. Palladian-type window first floor 
facade. Two-sided bay vindov en brac.'t 
second floor. Various dormer windows. 
Two-story projection east elevation. Re- 
cessed corner porch. Contributing 



184 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 16 



Cliff Terrace (continued^ 



103: c. 1899, Queen Anne one and one-half story 
two-bay stone, stucco and frame half- 
timber semi-detached house. Front-gabled 
roof. Various 1/1 and multi-paned window 
sash. Three-sided bay window second floor 
facade. Various dormer windows. Two- 
story projection west elevation. Original 
corner porch enclosed. Contributing 

105: c. 1899, Queen Anne one and one-half story 
two-bay stone and shingle semi-detached 
house. Prominent gambrel roof. Various 
multi-paned window sash. Pal ladian-type 
window first floor facade. Three-sided 
bay window second floor. Various dormer 
windows. Recessed corner porch. Con- 
tributing 

107: c. 1899, Queen Anne one and one-half story 
two-bay stone and shingle semi-detached 
house. Prominent gambrel roof. Various 
multi-paned window sash. Pal ladian-type 
window first floor facade. Various dormer 
windows. Partially enclosed corner porch. 
Contributing 

109: c. 1899, Queen Anne one and one-half story 
two-bay stone and asbestos shingle semi- 
detached house. Prominent gambrel roof 
with intersecting side gables. Various 
Queen Anne window sash and dormer windows. 
Original recessed porch extended forward. 
Contributing 

111: c. 1899, Queen Anne one and one-half story 

two-bay stone and asbestos syincle semi- 
detached house. Prominent gamoiel roof 
with intersecting side gables. Various 
Cuee; Anne v.-nd:- :L..c.sh ciic C'tr^i y^r'.covz. 
Original recessed porch extended forward. 
Contributing 



185 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 17 



South side Cliff Terrace 

100: c. 1899, Queen Anne one and one-half story 
two-bay stone and shingle semi-detached 
house. Prominent gambrel roof with inter- 
secting side gables. 1/1 and Queen Anne 
window sash. Palladian-type window first 
floor facade. Paired Gothic-headed windows 
in attic level. Dormer windows. Enclosed 
recessed corner porch. Contributing 

102: c. 1899, Queen Anne one and one-half story 
two-bay stone and shingle semi-detached 
house. Prominent gambrel roof with inter- 
secting side gables. 1/1 and Queen Anne 
window sash. Palladian-type window first 
floor facade. Paired Gothic-headed windows 
in attic level. Dormer windows. Open re- 
cessed corner porch. Contributing 

104: c. 1899, Queen Anne one and one-half story 

two-bay stone and shingle semi-detached 

Chouse. Front-gabled roof with intersect- 
ing side gables. Various Queen Anne window 
sash. Dormer windows. Open recessed cor- 
ner porch. Contributing 

106: c. 1899, Oueen F-.r.re one end ore-half ytoiy 

tv. ' -bay stone and si.mgle semi-cetachtd 
house. Front-gabled roof with intersect- 

»ing side gables. Various Queen Anne window 
sash. Dormer windows. Open recessed cor- 
ner porch. Contributing 

' 108: c. 1899, Queen Anne one and one-half story 

two-bay stone and shingle semi-detached 
house. Front and side gambrel roof. 1/1 
and Queen Anne window sash. Palladian 
type window first floor fecsde. Dormer 

windows. Open recessed corner porch. 

Contributing 

110: c. 1899, Queen Anne one and one-half story 

two-bay ^tcne and shingle seri-detachr^c' 
house. Front and sloe gambitl roof. 1/1 
and Queen Anne window sash. Palladian 
type window first floor facade. Dormer 
windows. Original corner porch extended 
forward with gabled roof. Contributing 

186 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 18 



East Glenside Avenue 

38: c. 1950 large warehouse building, approxi- 
mately 100' X 140*. One-story, random 
stone with gambrel roof of corrugated 
iron. Multi-paned window sash. Intru- 
sion 

c. 1950 three-bay stone garage, approxi- 
mately 30' X 60'. Intrusion 

1920s one-story office building, approxi- 
mately 20' X 30', stucco exterior, hipped 
roof, multi-paned window sash. Con- 
tributing 



North side Webster Avenue 



103: c. 1890, Shingle Style two and one-half 
story seven-bay stone house with stucco 
exterior. Prominent center gable roof 
with intersecting side gables. 1/1 win- 
dows. Dormer windows. Circular three- 
story tower on southeast elevation. Rec- 
tangular front porch on first floor south- 
east. Carricge house. Ccntr ibtting 

105: c. 1895, Queen Anne tv.'O and one-half story 
three-bay stone and shingle house, now 
reclad with asbestos shingles. Front 
gambrel roof with intersecting side 
gables. 1/1 and various multi-paned window 
sash. Palladian window in front gambrel. 
Dormer windows. Full-width front porch. 
Contributing 

107: 1958, Colonial-style one and one-hslf 

story tLiee-uay stone and bricK house. 
Side-gabled roof. Multi-paned Colonial 

tyit v; -j:;v.£ v. .tii broac attic dor;,.-,..' win- 
dow. Intrusion 



187 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 19 



Wphster Avenue fcontinued) 

109: c. 1890, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
three-bay frame house, reclad with asbes- 
tos shingles. Side-gabled roof with in- 
tersecting gables. 1/1 sash with dormer 
windows. Full-width front porch. 
Carriage house. Contributing 

115: 1923, Colonial Revival two and one-half 
story five-bay stucco and shingle house. 
Side-gabled roof. Multi-paned Colonial 
type window sash. Open porch on southwest 
elevation. Contributing 

119: 1965, Ranch-style one-story three-bay brick 

house with large terrace deck over under- 
ground garage. Intersecting gable roofs. 

Multi-paned Colonial-type window sash. 

Intrusion 

123: 1958, Ranch-style one-story four-bay stone 
and frame house. Gable roof. Multi-paned 
Colonial type window sash. Intrusion 

127: c. 1889, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

two-bay st<"-re, frair.e cnr: -^.imlf- hoi^s-:. 
Sharply pitched front catjie root with 
intersecting side gables. 1/1 and various 
Queen Anne window sash. Dormer windows. 
Front and side porch with ornate spindle- 
work. Porte cochere on west elevation. 
Carriage house. Contributing 

131: c. 1892, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
four-bay stone, clapboard and shingle 
house. Intersecting gable roofs. 1/1 
windows. Dorirc: wirdous. Two-itcry pcZy- 
gonal tower southwest elevation. Con- 
tributing 

135: c. 1895, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay stone ar,5 shine] e hcDse. Steer' v 
pitched intersecting gaLle roofs. 1/1 and 
various Queen Anne window sash. Some win- 
dows with diamond-shaped panes in upper 
sash. Front and side porch. J. Linden 
Heacock, architect. Significant 



188 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 20 



South side Webster Avenue 

100: 1923, Colonial Revival symitietrical two- 
story three-bay frame house. Side gambrel 
roof with gabled roof overhead. Multi- 
paned Colonial type window sash. Open 
porch east elevation. Contributing 

102: 1925, Colonial Revival symmetrical two- 
story three-bay frame house. Side gambrel 
roof with gabled roof overhead. Multi- 
paned Colonial type window sash. Open 
porch east elevation. Contributing 

108: 1925, Colonial Revival symmetrical two and 
one-half story two-bay clapboard and 
shingle house. Hipped roof. Multi-paned 
Colonial type window sash. Dormer win- 
dows. Full-width front porch. Con- 
tributing 

110: c. 1905, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
three-bay stone and shingle semi-detached 
house. Hipped roof with intersecting front 
gable. Various multi-paned Queen Anne 
window sash. Dormer windows. Front and 
side perch. Ccn-ri 1 ''.•''■ 'c 

112: c. 1905, Queen Anne twc and one-half story 

three-bay stone and shingle semi-detached 
house. Hipped roof with intersecting front 
gable. Various multi-paned Queen Anne 
window sash. Dormer windows. Front and 
side porch. Contributing 

2.14: c. 1895, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

three-bay stone, stucco, shincle and half- 

timter se-^i-(fet£cr,rc' Yoji:. ...ppcc reef 
with intersecting side gables. Various 
Queen ?\nne window sash. Dormer windows. 
Front und sicc lozc:,. Ccn^r ibutin^ 



189 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 21 



Webster Avenue (rnntinued) 

]^2g. c. 1896, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
three-bay stone, stucco, shingle and half- 
timber semi-detached house. Hipped roof 
with intersecting side gables. Various 
Queen Anne window sash. Dormer windows. 
Front and side porch. Contributing 

IIQ. c. 1890, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay stucco and shingle semi-detached 
house. Front and side gambrel roofs. 1/1 
windows. Dormer windows. Open porch east 
elevation. Contributing 

220: c. 1890, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
three-bay stucco and shingle house. Front 
and side gambrel roofs. 1/1 windows. 
Dormer windows. Open porch west elevation. 
Contributing 

222* c. 1893, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay stone and frame house, reclad with 
asbestos siding. Sharply pitched front 
gable with intersecting side gables. 1/1 
and Queen Anne window sash. Con- 
tributing 

124- c. 1900, Colonial Revival symmetrical two 
and one-half story two-bay stone and frame 
house, reclad with asbestos siding. Front 
gabled roof with intersecting side gables. 
1/1 and Queen Anne window sash. Dormer 
windows. Full-width front porch. Con- 
tributing 

126: c. 1890, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
twc-br" rtcT^e srd fraTT' I ■'■. Frcr - 
gableo roof with intersecting side gable. 
1/] windows. Front and side porch. J. 
Lint.. . Leacock, arciiitec-^. Con- 
tributing 



190 
i9i 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 22 



Webster Avenue (continued^ 



128: c. 1900, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay stuccoed house. Gambrel roof. 1/1 
and Queen Anne window sash. Full-width 
front porch. Two-story polygonal tower 
partially recessed in east end of facade. 
Contributing 

130: c. 1900, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
four-bay stone and frame house, reclad 
with asbestos shingles. Intersecting 
gable roofs. Various types Queen Anne 
window sash. Dormer windows. Front and 
side porch. Contributing 

132: c. 1910, Tudor Revival two and one-half 
story five-bay brick, stucco and half- 
timber house. Intersecting gable roofs. 
Various types of Queen Anne window sash. 
Dormer windows. Full-width front porch. 
Carriage house. Contributing 



East side Fernbrook Avenue 



136: 1926, Late Queen Anne two and one-half 
story two-bay semi-detachecl house, with 
all-stucco exterior. Front gabled roof 
with intersecting side gable. Queen Anne- 
type multi-paned windows. Dormer windows. 
Front and side corner porch. Con- 
tributing 

138: 1926, Late Queen Anne two and one-half 
story two-bay semi-detached house,- with 
aii-£twCC-' ;;terior. Front c,uwlf^ ^oof 
with intersecting side gable. Queen Anne- 
type mult -paned windows. Dormer windows. 
Front anc tioe corner porcii. Con- 
tributing 



191 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 23 



FerntprcoK Avenue (cpntinueij) 



142: 1894, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
three-bay frame and shingle house, now 
reclad with asbestos siding. Two-story 
polygonal tower southwest elevation. En- 
closed full-width front porch. Carport 
north elevation. Steeply pitched side- 
gabled roof. 4/1 windows. Dormer windows. 
Large carriage house. Angus S. Wade, 
architect. Contributing 

146: 1894, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
three-bay frame, stucco and half-timber 
house. Side-gabled roof with front inter- 
secting gable. Multi-paned Queen Anne 
window sash, with paired Gothic-headed 
windows in front top gable. Dormer win- 
dows. Front and side corner porch. Angus 
S. Wade, architect. Illustrated in Scien- 
tific American . Vol. 17, No. 2, February 
1894, pp. 19, 26. Contributing 

150: 1894, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

three-bay frame and shingle house. Hipped 
rcof with inter£ecting hipped roof over 
fr:.nt secc.r-.Q-:3i.ci i pj.c jecticii. Multi- 
paned Queen Anne window sash. Dormer win- 
dows. Front and side entry porch. Angus 
S. Wade, architect. Illustrated in Scien- 
tific American . Vol. 17, No. 3, March 
1894, pp. 35, 43. Contributing 

160: c. 1890, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
four-bay stone, frame and shingle house. 
Hipped roof with various intersecting 
gabled roofs. Polygonal tower on front 
northwest e^ev^tion. Brr-iG stone tower on 
southeast elevation. 1/1 windows. Dormer 
winc'ov.'s. Frort arr^ siCf zjrrches with 
otr.ariental woccworK. Contributing 



192 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 24 



Fernbrook Avenue fcontinued^ 



162: c. 1887, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
three-bay stone, shingle and stucco house. 
Intersecting gabled roofs with prominent 
attic front gable. Detailing suggests 
Swiss Chalet influences. 1/1 windows, with 
bank of windows in front gable supported 
on curved brackets. Dormer windows. 
Front and side porch. Thomas F. Miller, 
architect. Significant 

166: 1888, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
three-bay frame house, now reeled with 
asbestos siding. Front-gabled roof with 
intersecting side gables. 1/1 v/indows. 
Paired windows in gables. Dormer windows. 
Three-story square tower with hipped roof 
on northeast elevation. Front and side 
porch with pediment over entry. Boyhood 
home of poet Ezra Pound. Contributing 

168: 1896, Queen Anne/Shingle Style two and 

one-half story three-bay stone, frame and 
half-timber house, now reclad with asbes- 
tos siding. Prominent front-frcing gairi- 
tiel roof v-:itr; ir.terEectii:g sloe gabltc. 
1/1 and multi-paned window sash. Dormer 
windows. Broad tower on front facade at 
second floor level encircled by a first 
floor porch with hipped roof. 1/1, multi- 
paned Queen Anne window sash in square-and 
round-headed frames. Dormer windows. 
Horace Trumbauer, architect. Con- 
tributing 

170: 1888, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

three-bay stone and frame house, now re- 
clad with asbestos shingles. Hipped roof 

with ir.tersectino hipped end C3^1ec! reefs. 
1/1 ano Queen Ar.ne windows. Dormer win- 
dows. Polygonal two-story bay northeast 
elevation. Front and lide p.rch. L.w. 
Thorne, architect. Illustrated in p ui;Lder, 
Decorator and Woodworker . Vol. VI, No. 3, 
May 1888. Contributing 

193 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 25 



Fernbrook Avenue fcontinued) 



172: c. 1888, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

three-bay stone and shingle house. Hipped 
roof with front attic gable with inter- 
secting smaller gable. 1/1 windows. Dor- 
mer windows. Bay projections east and west 
elevations. Centered front porch with 
hipped roof supported on square stone 

piers. William E. Dobbins, architect. 

Contributing 

174: c. 1888, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay stone, frame and shingle semi- 
detached house. (See 221 Maple Avenue) 
Side gabled roof over north elevation 
projection. Multi-paned Queen Anne window 
sash. Dormer windows. William E. Dobbins, 
architect. Contributing 



West side Fernbrook Avenue 



139: 1956, Ranch-style one and one-half story 
three-bay stone house with geble roof. 
?'"ul ti-paned vindow sash. Rec&ci^td porch. 
Intrusion 

143: 1956, Ranch-style one and one-half story 
three-bay stone house with gable roof. 
Multi-paned window sash. Recessed porch. 
Intrusion 

147: c. 1886, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay semi-detached house. Hipped roof 
with intersecting hipped roofs over side 
projection. 1/1 and 2/1 window sash. 
Prominent dormer windows. Front and side 
porch, with ornamental woodwork. Cor- 



194 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 26 



Fernbrook Avenu e (continued^ 

149: c. 1886, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay seir.i-detached house. Hipped roof 
with intersecting hipped roofs over side 
projection. 1/1 and 2/1 window sash. 
Prominent dormer windows. Front and side 
porch, with ornamental woodwork. Con- 
tributing 

157: 1894, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
stone, frame and shingle house. Hipped 
roof with intersecting hipped and gabled 
roofs. 1/1 windows. Dormer windows. Poly- 
gonal tower southeast elevation. Front and 
side porches with ornamental woodwork. 
Angus S. Wade, architect. Significant 

169: c. 1895, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
three-bay stone and frame house. Hipped 
roof with intersecting hipped and gabled 
roofs. 1/1 windows. Dormer windows. Front 
and side porch. Contributing 

173: c. 1891, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

fourObay stone and clapboard house. 
Eipptd roc. with ints: - :.c ting side gabies. 
1/1 windows. Dormer windows. Front and 
side porch. Contributing 

205: 1923, Colonial Revivial two and one-half 
story three-bay frame house, now reclad 
with asbestos siding. Gambrel roof with 
gabled roof overhead. 6/6 Colonial type 
window sash. Pent roof between first and 
second stories. Contributing 

209: c. 1890, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

four-bay stone house. Steeply pitched 

hipped rcof wif- intprseC: ■>:' c"''>rircrr 
cables. 1/1 window Sash. i lo^fccc^ng twc- 

story bay on southeast elevation. 

Contributing 



195 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 27 



Fernbrook Avenue (continued) 



213: 1894, Calvary Presbyterian Church Fellow- 
ship Hall. Symmetrical two-story rectangu- 
lar building. Hipped roof. Originally 
stone on first floor with shingles above, 
now all-stucco. Large multi-paned window 
sash. Frank Miles Day and Frank E. Mead, 
architects. Contributing 



East sjije Ma ple A venue 



221: c. 1888, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
four-bay stone semi-detached house. 
Gabled roof with intersecting gables. 1/1 
and Queen Anne window sash. Dormer win- 
dows. Entry porch. William E. Dobbins, 
architect. (East half listed as 174 Fern- 
brook Avenue.) Contributing 

305: 1894, Qu^en /.nne two and one-half story 

three-bay stone, frame and shingle house. 
Hipped roof with intersecting gables, with 
prominent steeply pitched gambrel roof on 
facade. 1/1 window sash. Dormer windows. 
Entrance porch with prominent stone arch. 
Open porch with ornamental woodwork south 
elevation. Burke & Dolhenty, architects. 
Illustrated in Scientific American . Vol. 

17, No. 2, February 1894, p. 30.) 

Contributing 

309: 1890, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

three-' 3" rtr.-f sr-d shingle bcuFe. 
I.ippe^ Lcof v^^th xnteisecting ga^j-ts. 1/1 
windows. Dormer windows. Full-width front 
porch. A.C. Child, architect. Con- 
tributing 



196 



ei 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 28 



Maple Avenue (continued) 



313: c. 1895, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

three-bay stone, clapboard and shingle 
house. Hipped roof with intersecting 
gables. 1/1 windows. Dormer windows. 
Front and side porch. Porte-cochere north 

elevation. Large carriage house. 

Contributing 



315: c. 1895, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
three-bay stone, clapboard and shingle 
house. Hipped roof with intersecting 
gables. 1/1 windows. Dormer windows. 
Front and side porch. Contributing 



West si<3 e Wa ple Avenue 



300: c. 1920, Cclcnial Pevi 1 Eyr.nictr ical two 
and one-half story three-bay stone house. 
Side-gabled roof. 6/1 window sash. Dormer 
windows. Center entry porch. Con- 
tributing 

308: c. 1886, Second Empire two and one-half 

story three-bay brownstone house. Convex 
mansard roof. 1/1 and multi-paned window 
sash. Paired windows with gable roofs in 
attic level. Porch encircling house on 
all four sides. Prominent two-story stone 
tower routhwest elevation with doired roof. 
Large C£rria'~,e house. --- Contributing, 



197 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 29 



East side Bent Road 



Corner Bent and 

Greenwood: 1896, All Hallows Episcopal Church. 

English Gothic style, one-story random 
stone, approximately 95' x 40'. Front- 
gabled roof with intersecting hipped roofs 
over north and south transepts. Stained 
glass Gothic windows, including two 
Tiffany windows. West portal with gabled 
roof and wood supporting members. Furness 
and Evans, architects. Significant 

c. 1926, Episcopal Cloister, approximately 
28' X 12', connecting church to parish 
house. Unglazed gothic windows, with 
arched openings adjacent to parish house 
for vehicular traffic. Significant 

1926, Episcopal Parish House, Tudor-style 
two and one-half story five-bay random 
stone, brick and half-timber structure, 
approximately 90' x 60', with side-gabled 
roof with intersecting cross gables. 
Various Got)- Ic crd CEsemert window sash. 
Tvc-stcry cn::r£r-f Dc_ en facecf, Pror i- 
nent patterned brick chimney. Frank R. 
Watson, architect. Significant 

270: 1909, Rectory, Tudor-style two and one- 
half story four-bay stone, stucco and 
half-timber structure. Gabled roof with 
cross gables. 1/1 windows. Dormer windows. 
Front porch. Thomas, Churchman and 
Molitor, architects. Significant 

Corner Bert and 

Kent Roads: 1898, Calvary Presbyterian Church, English 

Gothic sty.^t. one-itory Etcr:-- str'jct-jie. 
Kam gabieo roof witi. mt-i^i^tct^nig nipt-ed 
roofs. Prominent square tower west eleva- 
tion with one-story ],c.tal with cat lee' 
roof and decorated bargeboards, with sup- 
porting wood members. Dull and Peterson, 
architects. Significant 



198 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 30 



Bent Roa d (continued) 



300: 1892, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

three-bay stucco house. Hipped roof with 
intersecting gables. Dormer windows and 
1/1 window sash. Round second-story tower 
northwest elevation. Front and side porch 
with pedimented extension on northwest 
corner. Contributing 

304: c. 1892, Queen Anne one and one-half story 

three-bay clapboard and shingle house. 
Side gambrel roof, with intersecting gam- 
brel roof in rear. 1/1 and multi-paned 
Queen Anne window sash. Partial-width 
front porch. Enclosed porch southwest 
elevation. Dormer windows. Angus S. 
Wade, architect. Additions and altera- 
tions, Addison Hutton, architect. 

308: c. 1896 Queen Anne two and one-half story 
six-bay stone, stucco and half-timber 
house. Side-gabled roof with intersecting 
gables. Various multi-paned windows. Dor- 
mer windows. Carriage house. Alterations 
and additions by Willicir L. Price, 1902. 
Ccr tr ibuti.-ig 

312: c. 1906, Colonial Revival two and one-half 
story three-bay stone house. Hipped roof. 
Prominent modillioned cornice under hipped 
roof. Full-width front porch in classical 
manner. Balustrade on crest of roof. 
Multi-paned window sash, with prominent 
Palladian window in attic level. Dormer 
windows. Contributing 

318: 1914, Colonial Revival two and one-half 

story three-bay stone house. Hipped roof. 

1/1 windows in sincle, paired and trip]e 
a: rangements. Pron.meric U-si-.L^eo entiy 
porch in classical manner. One-story 
enclosed porcn southeast elevsticr.. 
Carriage house. Mantle Fielding, Jr., 
architect. Significant 



199 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 31 



Bent Roa d (continued^ 



Southeast corner 

Bent and Church: 1923, Tudor-style two and one-half story 
five-bay brick and stucco rectangularly- 
shaped house. Side-gabled roof. Project- 
ing two-story bay with intersecting gabled 
roof on facade. Multi-paned casement win- 
dows. Enclosed one-story porch with bal- 
cony overhead south elevation. Built-in 
garage, north elevation. DeArmond, 
Ashmead and Bickley, architects. Con- 
tributing 



West side Bent Road 



301-305: 1892, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
five-bay stone, clapboard and shingle 
house. Steeply pitched roof over central 
block, with intersecting gabled roofs. 
Broad round two-story stone tower north- 
east elevation. Large U-shaped porch. 
Various 1/1 and multi-paned window SEFh, 
in square-heede5 and pointed erche.-^ open- 
ings. Carriage house. Horace Trumbauer, 
architect. Significant 

309: 1898, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
four-bay stone and stucco house. Inter- 
secting gable roofs. Various multi-paned 
sash and 1/1 windows. Dormer windows. 
Porch on front and two sides. J. Linden 
Heacock, architect. Contributing 

313: 1894, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
six-bay stone, clapboard and shingle 
h:uEe. Large front garrtrel rocf v:ith 
i::c£rsecLing gan.biel roc.s. 1/1, inu_ti- 
paned and diamond-shaped window sash. 
Dormer windows. Entry pc. ^h. First and 
second floor porches north elevation. 
Enclosed porch southwest elevation. 
Carriage house. Edward C. Kent, archi- 
tect. Contributing 



200 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 32 



gent Roaig (continued) 



319: 1909, colonial Revival two and one-half 

story five-bay stone and stucco house with 
pent roof between first and second floor 
levels. Side-gabled roof with twin gables 
piercing roofline on facade. Various 
multi-paned window sash. Dormer windows. 
Contributing 

323: 1892, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
four-bay stone and clapboard house, now 
reclad with asbestos siding. Side-gabled 
roof with intersecting gables. Prominent 
two and one-half story round tower south- 
east elevation with acorn-shaped roof. 
Porch on front and two sides. 1/1 windows. 
Dormer windows. Angus S. Wade, architect. 
Contributing 

325: 1892, Carriage house at rear of 323 Bent 

Road. One and one-half story frame build- 
ing, with side-gabled roof. Multi-paned 

window sash. Dormer windows. Con- 

tr ir,u*" ing 

333: 1907, Colonial Revival two and one-half 
story five-bay stone house. Side-gabled 
roof. Hipped roof over central entry porch 
extending over three bays on facade. 
Multi-paned window sash. Dormer windows. 
One-story open porch southeast elevation. 
Contributing 

335: 1907, carriage house at rear of 333 Bent 
Road. One and one-half story stone and 
frame building. Various modern and multi- 
pan?-^ window sash. Contr itut: - c 

337: 1892, carriage house at rear of 343 Bent 
Road. Two and cne-half stciy three-bay 
stucco house. Intersecting gabled roofs. 
Multi-paned window sash. Open porch south 
elevation. Contributing 

201 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 33 



Pent rg£d (cgntinue'3) 



343: 1892, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
four-bay stone, clapboard and shingle 
house. Hipped roof with variety of inter- 
secting gables. Various window sash, in- 
cluding Queen Anne. Gothic and modern 
types. Enclosed porch northeast elevation 
with stepped gable stone entrance. Horace 
Trumbauer, architect. Contributing 

353: c. 1904, Colonial Revival two and one-half 
story stone house. Side-gabled roof, one 
and one-half story wing northeast eleva- 
tion. Multi-paned window sash. Doririer 
windows. First and second floor porches 
southwest elevation. Central entrance 
porch. Contributing 

East side Church Road 



1221: 1911, Tudor-style two and one-half story 

three-Lay rtcre stucco and half tijrL_i- 
house. Sioe-gabled tile roof. Multi-pared 
window sash. Dcririer windows. Two-story 
wing north elevation with gabled roof. 
One-story wing south elevation with gabled 
roof. Center entry porch with paired 
wood supporting members. Carriage house. 

Herman Louis Duhring, Jr., architect. 

Contributing 

Eert si de Acc ^^ sr Rcac? 



406: c. 189€, Tvdor-style tvo anc one-h£.lf 

story three-bay stone, stucco and half- 
tiir.ber house. Intersecting cable roc is. 
1/1 amd multi-paned double-hung and case- 
ment sash. Two-story polygonal tower 
northwest elevation. One-story stuccoed 
modern addition west elevation. Carriage 
house. Contributing 

202 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 34 



Accomac Road fcontinued) 



Rear 406: c. 1900, carriage house on H.H. Lippincott 
estate, modernized. Contributing 

410: c. 1896, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

three-bay stone house. Hipped roof with 
intersecting hipped and gabled roofs. 1/1 
and Queen Anne type windows. Dormer win- 
dows. Prominent two-story bay on facade 
with open balcony in attic level. Second 
floor porch on facade. First floor porch 

on front and side. Carriage house. 

Contributing 

Southeast 

corner Accomac 

and Chuch Roads: 1892, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

eight-bay stone, frame and shingle house. 
Hipped roof with intersecting roofs. 
Various window types, including 1/1, 
multi-paned and stained glass windows. 
Round tower with conical roof southwest 
elevation. Porte-cochere with hipped 
roof, Etprcrtec ty twin colur.air rertipg on 
stone piers. Horace Trumoauer, architect. 
Significant 



West side Accomac Road 



322: 1892, Queen Anne two-story four-bay stone 
house. Remodelled in Gothic manner after 
fire in the 1970s. Now with castellated 
parapet surrounding flat roof, kound 
tower southeast elevation. One-story en- 
trance pavillion wiht ar-ched fr'—ence and 
c-£tellatfcc roof. Vaiie.ub 1/1, muiti- 
paned and Gothic-headed windows. Horace 
Trur.bajer, architect. Ccntr iDutir.g 



203 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 35 



Accomac Road (continued^ 



8100: c. 1897, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
four-bay stone house, now reclad with 
stucco and half-timber. Gabled roof with 
intersecting gables. Prominent tower with 
conical roof southeast elevation. 1/1 
window sash. Dormer windows. Circular 
porch on front and side. Carriage house. 
Contributing 



East side Greenwood Place 



1: c. 1902, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay shingled semi-detached house. 
Mansard roof. 1/1 windows. Dormer windows. 
Front corner porch. Contributing. 

2: c. 1902, Queen Anne two end one-half story 
two-bey shire led semi-detached house. 
Mansard roci. 1/1 windows. Dormer windows. 
Front corner porch. Contributing. 

3: c. 1902, Queen Anne two and one-half story 

two-bay clapboard and shingle semi- 
detached house. Front gambrel roof. 1/1 
windows. Dormer windows. Front and side 

corner porch with pedimented gable. 

Contributing. 

4: c. 1902, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay clapboard and shingle semi- 
detached house. Front gambrel roof. 1/1 
windows. Dormer windows. Tvo-story addi- 
tion southeast elevation. Con- 
tributing, 



204 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 36 



Wpst sid p Greenwood Place 



13; c. 1950, Colonial Revival Cape Cod-style 

one and one-half story three-bay brick and 
clapboard house. Side gabled roof. Multi- 
paned window sash. Dormer windows. Small 
northwest wing with picture window and 
chimney. Intrusion 

12: c. 1902, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay shingled semi-detached house. 
Rectangularly shaped with wide overhang, 
suggesting Arts and Crafts influence. 
Hipped roof. 1/1 windows with tripartite 
windows in prominent dormer frames. Ori- 
ginal corner porch enclosed. Front stoop 
with gabled roof. Contributing. 

llj c. 1902, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay shingled semi-detached house. 
Rectangularly shaped with wide overhang, 
suggesting Arts and Crafts influence. 
Hipped roof. 1/1 windows with tripartite 
windows in prominent dormer frames. Ori- 
ginal corner porch enclosed. Front stoop 
with gabled roof. Contributing. 

10: c. 1957, Colonial Revival one and one-half 
story five-bay stucco house. Side-gabled 
roof. Multi-paned window sash. Front- 
gabled projection west elevation. 

Intrusicri 



iic'-tr: 5-'o.g Gie fP'--''^'^*^ Place 

Q. c. 1902, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay shingled semi-detached house. 
Rectangularly shaped with wide overhang, 
suggesting Arts and Crafts influence. 
Hipped roof. Multi-paned window sash. 
Dormer windows. Corner recessed 
poiv-h. Contr ibJtir.o . 

205 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 37 



Greenwood Place (continued^ 



c. 1902, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
two-bay shingled semi-detached house. 
Rectangularly shaped with wide overhang, 
suggesting Arts and Crafts influence. 
Hipped roof. Multi-paned window sash. 
Dormer windows. Corner recessed 
porch. Contributing. 

1947, Cape Cod-style one and one-half 
story three-bay brick and clapboard house. 
Side gambrel roof, with shed dormer win- 
dows. Multi-paned window sash. Attached 
garage. Intrusion 



East side Walt lane 



7: c. 1902, Queen Anne vernacular two-bay 
frame gardener's cottage. Front-gabled 
roof. Two-story wirg with porch on first 
floor level vith living space above en 
soLtheast elevation. 2/2 and 4/1 windows. 
Dorn.er windows. Heacock and Hokanson, 
architects. Contributing 

2: c. 1905, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
four-bay shingled house. Side-gabled roof 
with twin pedimented gables on facade. 1/1 
and multi-paned window sash. Small addi- 
tion north elevation with shed rocT. En- 
closed front porch. Dormer windows. 

Contributing 



W££t £ic £ Wslt Lane 

10: c. 1901, Queen Anne two and one-half story 
four-bay shingled house. Side-gabled 
roof. 6/1 and multi-paned window sash. 
Dormer windows. Entry porch with gabled 
roof. Contributing 

206 



INVENTORY OF WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 38 



East Glenside Avenup 



Northeast corner 

Glenside and 

Greenwood Aves. : Ralph Morgan Park, comprising Tookany 

Creek, two small footbridges, three tiers 
of stairs, and a small plaque in memory of 
Ralph Morgan. 



207 



OWNERS' NAMES AND ADDRESSES 

WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



The attached list of Ovmers* Names and Addresses is arranged 
geographically from Glenside Avenue (northeast) to Church Road 
(southwest). An alphabetical listing of streets, with corres- 
ponding pages, is shown below i 



Street 


Page number 


Accomac Road 


18 


Bent Road 


16,17 


Church Road 


18 


Cliff Terrace 


9,10 


Fernbrook Avenue 


13.1^.15 


East Glenside Avenue 


1,10 


Greenwood Avenue 


4,5,6,7,8 


Greenwood Place 


18,19 


Hilltop Lane 


4 


Maple Avenue 


15 


Walt Lane 


19.20 


Webster Avenue 


10,11,12 


Woodland Rod 


2,3 



208 



OWNER'S NAME AND ADDRESS 
WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT 



- MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 1 



Location 

East Glenside Avenue 
412 East Glenside Avenue 

k06 East Glenside Avenue 



Jenkintown Railroad 
Station Buildings 
N/E side Glenside and 
Greenwood Avenues 

Station 



Waiting Room 



Baggage Room 



Office Building 



Watch Tower 



Ralph Morgar. Park 
N/E comer Glenside 
and Greeitwood Avenues 



Owner's Name amd Address 



Carlos Kampmeier 

412 East Glenside Avenue 

Wyncote, Pennsylyginia 19095 

Nathan and Kathleen Z. ' Holtzman 
4o6 East Glenside Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



Southeastern Pennsylvania Transpor- 
tation Authority (SEPTA) 
841 Chestnut Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvauiia 1910? 

Southeastern Pennsylvania Transpor- 
tation Authority (SEPTA) 
841 Chestnut Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 

Southeastern Pennsylvania Transpor- 
tation Authority (SEPTA) 
841 Chestnut Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1910? 

Southeastern Pennsylvania Trzinspor- 
tation Authority (SEPTA) 
841 Chestnut Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1910? 

Southeastern Pennsylvania Transpor- 
tation Authority (SEPTA) 
841 Chestnut Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1910? 

Cheltenham Towi^iship 

8230 Old York F::sd 

Elkins Park, Pennsylvania 19117 



209 



OWNER'S NAME AND ADDRESS 

WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 2 



Location 
Woodland Road, north side 
101 Woodland Road 

107 Woodland Road 

111 Woodland Road 

119 Woodland Road 

121 Woodland Road 

127 Woodland Road 

131 Woodland Road 

133 Woodland Road 

139 Woodland Road 

I4l Woodland Road 

1^*3 Woodland Road 



Owner's Name and Address 



Robert C. and Anne B. Baldridge 

101 Woodland Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

John S. ajid Rita E. Burrows 

107 Woodland Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

John J. and Sandra R. Moore 

111 Woodland Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

George C. and Doreen L. Foust 

2925 Oak Ridge Farm 

Hiontingdon Valley, Pennsylvania I9OO6 

Bernard A. and Barbara B. Doikert 

121 Woodland Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

David C. and Patricia P. Lachman 

127 Woodland Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvaxiia 19095 

William M. and Bonnie B, Mettler 

131 Woodland Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Leo J. Harkins 

133 Woodland Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvsuiia 19095 

Edward P. and Patricia S. Griffith 

139 Woodland Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Emanuel and Janet Boxer 

l4l Woodland Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Daniel T. , Jr. and Mary K. Deane 

1^3 Woodland Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



210 



OWNER'S NAME AND ADDRESS 

WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 3 



Location 
Woodland Road, south side 
100 Woodland Road 

102 Woodland Road 

104 Woodland Road 

106 Woodland Road 

108 Woodland Road 

114 Woodland Road 

118 Woodland Road 

122 Woodland Road 

126 Woodland Road 

130 Woodland Road 



Owner's Name sind Address 



Eleanore Alcorn 

100 Woodland Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Homer L. and Claire J. Wightmein 

102 Woodland Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Theodore and Dora Mitchell 

104 Woodland Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

David C. and Martha M. Ray 

106 Woodland Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Helen S. McCray 

108 Woodland Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

William H. and Phyllis P. Kennedy 

114 Woodland Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

George C. and Doreen L. Foust 

2925 Oak Ridge Farm 

Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania I9OO6 

Robert and Margaret Ann Haakenson 

122 Woodland Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Thomas K. aind Dorothy C. Desch 

126 Woodland Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

John F. McGonigal 

130 V;:.odl--d Ro^i 

Wi-Ticote, Pennsylvania 19095 



211 



OWNER'S NAME AND ADDRESS 

WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 4 



Location 

Hilltop Lane, south side 
Ikk Hilltop Lane 

1^6 Hilltop Lane 

148 Hilltop Lane 

150 Hilltop Lane 

15^^ Hilltop Lane 

158 Hilltop Lane 

160 Hilltop Lsme 

Greenwood Avenue, north side 
101-107 Greenwood Avenue 

111-113 Greenwood Avenue 

115-119 Greenwood Avenue 



Owner's Name and Address 



Audrey A. Fairfax 

144 Hilltop Lane 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Rosetta Watts 

146 Hilltop Lane 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Louise Garrett 

148 Hilltop Lane 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Gladys M. Simpson 

150 Hilltop Lane 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

James K. Rivers 

154 Hilltop Lane 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Garth and Joan I. Miller 

2540 Turner Road 

Willow Grove* Pennsylvania 190?0 

Louise Hill 

160 Hilltop Lane 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



Mobil Oil Corporation 

P. 0. Box 839, Tax Department 

Valley Forge, Pennsylvania 19481 

Samuel and Margaret A. Schwartz 

502 Spring Avenue 

Elkins Park, Pennsylvania 19117 

John J. and Mary D. O'Donnell 

1030 Beverly Road 

J enk in town, Pennsylvania 19046 



212 



•MS 



OWNER'S NAME AND ADDRESS 

WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 5 



Greenwood Avenue, north side (continued) 



Location 



123-131 Greenwood Avenue 



135-l'+7 Greenwood Avenue 



1^9 Greenwood Avenue 



151 Greenwood Avenue 



153 Greenwood Avenue 



155 Greenwood Avenue 



157 Greenwood Avenue 



159 Greenwood Avenue 



161 Greenwood Avenue 



203 Greenwood Avenue 



Owner's Name and Address 

Montgomery Cida 

115 West Germantown Avenue 

Norristown, PennsylvEinia 19^01 

Jerome M. , Spencer and Arnold 

Zaslow 

135-139 Greenwood Avenue 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

E. Philip and Saul H. Rosenberg 
and Jack Weinstein 
201 Old York Road 
Jenkintown, Pennsylvania 19046 

Rudolph C. and Evelyn Kastenhuber 
151 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Peter Molnar 

153 Greenwood Avenue 

Wyncote, PennsylvaJiia 19095 

Andriunas Feliksas 
155 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Richard and Mavra lano 
157 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Paul J. and Barbara S. Sling baum 
159 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Caurol Anne Hresko 
161 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Marie V. Ahem 

2C3 Greenwood Avenue 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



'>13 



OWNER'S NAME AND ADDRESS 

WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 6 



Location 
Greenwood Avenue, north side (continued) 



Owner's Name and Address 



205 Greenwood Avenue 

207 Greenwood Avenue 

209 Greenwood Avenue 

211 Greenwood Avenue 

Greenwood Avenue, south side 
100 Greenwood Avenue 

108 Greenwood Avenue 

110 Greenwood Avenue 

114 Greenwood Avenue 

116 Greenwood Avenue 

120 Greenwood Avenue 

122 Greenwood Avenue 



Marie V. Ahem 

203 Greenwood Avenue 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Herman aind Margaret M. Karsch 
207 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Edwin G. Mlodzinski 
209 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvajiia 19095 

Daniel A. and Sharon Chittick 
211 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



Gordon and Paula Jeffrey 

1480 Noble Road 

Rydal, Pennsylvania 19046 

John F. and Joaji Ann Reardon 
108 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Terri L. Saltzman 

217 Benson Manor 

Jenkintown, Pennsylvania 19046 

Joseph R. and Margaret J. Riling 
114 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Joseph I. and Barbara B. Sady 
116 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Allen A. and Florence A. Cloud 
120 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Laws on W. and Barbaira A. Gordon 
122 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



214 



OWNER'S NAME AND ADDRESS 

WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 7 



Location 



Owner's Name and Address 



Greenwood Avenue, south side (continued) 



12^ Greenwood Avenue 



126 Greenwood Avenue 



128 Greenwood Avenue 



130 Greenwood Avenue 



1^6 Greenwood Avenue 



148 Greenwood Avenue 



150 Greenwood Avenue 



152 Greenwood Avenue 



154 Greenwood Avenue 



156 Greenwood Avenue 



206 Greenwood Avenue 



David Cutler 

1110 Rock Creek Drive 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Laurence B. and Wendy Cohen 
126 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvamia 19095 

Donald D. and Katherine Bullock 
128 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Lipmsin L, and Claire Cohen 
130 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Eugene J. and Jean Fridey 
146 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Dana W. and Cynthia A. Devore 
l48 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Patricia L. O'Neill 
150 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Jonathan L. and Barbara W. Rose 
152 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

James H. and Patricia A. Kane 
154 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Perinsylvania 19095 

Anita B. Slater 

156 Greenwood Avenue 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

David A. • Jr. and Anna Montgomery 
206 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



215 



OWNER'S NAME AND ADDRESS 

WYNCOTB HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY - Page 8 



Location 

Greenwood Avenue, south side 



Owner's Name auid Address 

(continued) 



328 Greenwood Avenue 



330 Greenwood Avenue 



332 Greenwood Avenue 



33^ Greenwood Avenue 



400 Greenwood Avenue 



4o6 Greenwood Avenue 



^08 Greenwood Avenue 



410 Greenwood Avenue 



412 Greenwood Avenue 



klk Greenwood Avenue 



Benkt R, and Dorothy G. Wennberg 
328 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvsuiia 19095 

Louis H. and Ruth A. Tremain 
330 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote t Pennsylvania 19095 

William D. and Helen F. Newell 
332 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Harold J. and Rita R. Kaufmann 
334 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Montgomery Cida c/o Landesberg - 

S. Green Co. 

307 Curtis Drive 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Edward F. and Marjory M. Bringhurst 
k06 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Thomas D. and Anne H. Dwyer 
408 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Frank H. and Caroline M, Riepen 
410 Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Carl R. Heinlen 

412 Greenwood Avenue 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Richar--: E. Flj'rj-i 
klh Greenwood Avenue 
Wj.-ncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



216 



OWNER'S NAME AND ADDRESS 

WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 9 



Location 
Cliff Terrace, north side 

101 Cliff Terrace 

103 Cliff Terrace 

105 Cliff Terrace 

107 Cliff Terrace 

109 Cliff Terrace 

111 Cliff Terrace 

Cliff Terrace, south side 
100 Cliff Terrace 

102 Cliff Terrace 
10^ Cliff Terrace 

106 Cliff Terrace 



Ovmer's Name and Address 



Peter F. and Carol Y. Wieck 

101 Cliff Terrace 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Alan R. and Meryl R. Hocks tein 

103 Cliff Terrace 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Margaret L. Brecht and Donald R, 

Campbell 

105 Cliff Terrace 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Charles E. Eind Anne M. Barton 

107 Cliff Terrace 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Glenn A. and Virginia Barnes 

109 Cliff Terrace 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

William C. and Irene M. Garrett 

111 Cliff Terrace 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



Warren and Shirley Gross 

100 Cliff Terrace 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Randy and Franc ine Kirsch 

102 Cliff Terrace 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Gail R. Fox 

104 Cliff Terrace 

Vvx-ncote, Per.nry.v^uiia 19095 

David A. and Susan L, Kettner 

lOo Cliff Terrace 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



217 



OWNER'S NAME AND ADDRESS 

WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 10 



Location Owner's Name and Address 

Cliff Terrace I south side (continued) 



108 Cliff Terrace 



110 Cliff Terrace 



East Glenside Avenue 

Warehouse 

38 East Glenside Avenue 



Garage 

38 East Glenside Avenue 



Office Building 

38 East Glenside Avenue 



Webster Avenue, north side 
103 Webster Avenue 



105 Webster Avenue 



107 Webster Avenue 



109 Webster Avenue 



Thomas F. emd Alexandra Norton 

108 Cliff Terrace 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Michael S, euid Karen I. Fischer 

110 Cliff Terrace 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



N. Kenneth McKinney and Edward S. 
Forst, Sr. 

38 East Glenside Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

N. Kenneth McKinney and Edward S, 
Forst, Sr. 

38 East Glenside Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

N. Kenneth McKinney and Edward S. 
Forst, Sr. 

38 East Glenside Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



Dorothy H. Lloyd, Claire Warren 

and N. Hinsey 

103 Webster Avenue 

Wyncote, Pennsylvsmia 19095 

John and Agnes Durkin 
105 Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Alfred V. and Honora M. Mistele 
IC Webstrr ..' .u^ 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

James A. , Jr. and Elinor A. Eglinton 
109 Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



218 



OWNER'S NAME AND ADDRESS 

WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 11 



Location 
Webster Avenue, north side 



Owner *s Name and Address 
(continued) 



115 Webster Avenue 

119 Webster Avenue 

123 Webster Avenue 

127 Webster Avenue 

131 Webster Avenue 

135 Webster Avenue 

Webster Avenue ■ south side 
100 Webster Avenue 

lO'l Webster Avenue 
108 Webster Avenue 
110 Webster Avenue 



Edward J., Jr. and Patricia S. Friel 
115 Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

David S. and Ruth W. Mars ton 
119 Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Michael W. and Liane Jerdan 
123 Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Walter J., ajid Elizabeth Olawski 
127 Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Peter and Marion Puwlyk 
131 Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Jerome F. and Shirley Sagin 
135 Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



Elizabeth J. Kaercher and 
Kathryn K. Jeffrey 
100 Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Thomas R. and Kathryn K. Jeffrey 

104 Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

George E. and Gertrude K. Cohee 

10 5 Webster Avenue 

Vv';,Ticote, Pennr^ylvar.ia 19095 

Edmund D. , Jr. and Sandra L. Haigler 
110 Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



219 



OWNER'S NAME AND ADDRESS 

WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 12 



Location 
Webster Avenue, south side 
11-2 Webster Avenue 

114 Webster Avenue 

116 Webster Avenue 

118 Webster Avenue 

120 Webster Avenue 

122 Webster Avenue 

12^ Webster Avenue 
126 Webster Avenue 
128 Webster Avenue 
130 Webster Avenue 
132 Webster Avenue 



Owner's Name and Address 

(continued) 

Michael and Nancy Brockman 
112 Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylveinia 19095 

Francis A. and Marie B. Szalwinski 
114- Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Carolyn Dearnley 
116 Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

J. Sydney and Celeste B. Duke 
118 Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Michael David Shapiro and Diane 

Lois Mandell 

120 Webster Avenue 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Robert N. Verdecchio and 
Margaret A. McKinnon 
122 Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

John P. and Susan B. Gallsigher 
12^ Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Mahlon H. and Martha D. Gehman 
126 Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

James T, and Jeanne K. Lacy 
12c Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Michael V. and Ann Aheam 
130 Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Roderick G. and Linda C T. Gunn 
132 Webster Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



220 



OWNER'S NAME AND ADDRESS 

VnfNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 13 



Location 
Fembrook Avenue, east side 
136 Fembrook Avenue 

138 Fembrook Avenue 

1^2 Fembrook Avenue 

146 Fembrook Avenue 

150 Fembrook Avenue 

160 Fembrook Avenue 

Fembrook Avenue, south side 
162 Fembrook Avenue 

166 Fembrook Avenue 

168 Fembrook Avenue 

170 Fembrook Avenue 



Owner's Name and Address 



Richard D. and Patricia M. Bushnell 
136 Fembrook Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Richard D. and Helen U. Bushnell 
138 Fembrook Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

John C. O'Connor and Jay Vanwagenen 
1^2 Fernbrook Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Paul M. and Barbara Anne Herr 
146 Fernbrook Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Gerald F. , Jr. and Alice Miller 
150 Fembrook Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Robert S, Lee, Jr. and Sandra Folzer 
160 Fernbrook Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



Eric emd Jajiet A. Wischia 
162 Fembrook Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Carl W. Gatter 

166 Fembrook Avenue 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Richard H. an'^ Nina A. Deats 
IwO Fernbrook avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania I9095 

Dell R. and Virginia P. hevell 
170 Fernbrool: Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



221 



OWNER'S NAME AND ADDRESS 

WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page Ik 



Location 
Fernbrook Avenue, south side 



Owner's Name and Address 
(continued) 



172 Fernbrook Avenue 

17^ Fernbrook Avenue 

Fernbrook Avenue, west side 
139 Fernbrook Avenue 

143 Fernbrook Avenue 

1^7 Fernbrook Avenue 

149 Fernbrook Avenue 

157 Fernbrook Avenue 

Fernbrook Avenue, north side 
169 Fernbrook Avenue 

173 Fernbrook Avenue 
205 Fernbrook Avenue 



Robert A. and Judith A. M. Murray 
172 Fernbrook Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Reformed Church Home for the Aged 
Maple and Fernbrook Avenues 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



Robert J. Cimprich and Roberta L. 

Schneider 

139 Fernbrook Avenue 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Steven M. and Marcella V. Ridenour 
1^3 Fernbrook Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Joseph G. and Nancy M. Capizzi 
1^7 Fernbrook Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Chen and Linda Sue Lee 
149 Fernbrook Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Arsenius Goregliad 
157 Fernbrook Avenue 
Wyncote I Pennsylvania 19095 



Bruce K. Leinweber 
169 Ferr.brook Aver.ue 
Wyncoxfc, Penrxsylvania 19095 

Frank A, e.nd. yi2.rgiierlxe N.. Kahcney 
1/3 Fernbrook Avenue 
W\Ticote, Penr^ylvania 19095 

Thomas J. and Kathleen M. Cleary 
205 Fernbrook Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



222 



OWNER'S NAME AND ADDRESS 

WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 15 



Location 
Fembrook Avenue, north side 



Owner's Name and Address 
(continued) 



209 Fembrook Avenue 

213 Fembrook Avenue 

Maple Avenue, east side 
221 Maple Avenue 

305 Maple Avenue 

309 Maple Avenue 

313 Maple Avenue 

315 Maple Avenue 

Maple Avenue, west side 
300 Maple Avenue 

308 Maple Avenue 



Robert F. and Joan B. Johnston 
209 Fembrook Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Calvary Presbyt erian Ch\irch 
213 Fernbrook Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



Reformed Church Home for the Aged 
Maple and Fernbrook Avenues 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

John P. D\inphy 

305 Maple Avenue 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Joseph and Patricia Scorsone 

309 Maple Avenue 

Wyncote, Pennsylvainia 19095 

Mildred Obie 

313 I'^ple Avenue 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Eugene and Ruth Arnold 

315 Maple Avenue 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



Reformed Church Home for the Aged 
Maple and Fernbrook Avenues 

Wyncote, Penr^ylvania 19095 

David J. and Ann E. Kreines 

3c - -aplc- Ave'.... 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



223 



OWNER'S NAME AND ADDRESS 

WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 16 



Location 



Owner's Name and Address 



Bent Road, east side 

Church 

Bent Road and Greenwood 

Avenue 

Parish House 

Bent Road and Greenwood 

Avenue 

Rectory 

270 Bent Road 



Church 

Bent ajid Kent Roads 



300 Bent Road 



30^ Bent Road 



308 Bent Road 



312 Bent Road 



3I8 Bent Road 



S/E corner Ber.t and 
Cnurcx. r..:^d£, 



All Hallows Episcopal Church 
Bent Road and Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

All Hallows Episcopal Church 
Bent Road and Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

All Hallows Episcopal Church 
Bent Road and Greenwood Avenue 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Calvary Presbyterian Chvirch 
Bent and Kent Roads 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Angelo M. and Nancy S. Zosa 

300 Bent Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Craig and Donna Miller 

30^ Bent Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Paul F, , Jr. and Stephanie A. Stewart 

308 Bent Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Laurence B, and Wendy Cohen 

321 Bent Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

H. Craig and Gertrude M. Bell 

3I8 Bent Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Marvin W. Schsll 
23' ft e 3 tir.OT: ■^ /' ■. enu r 
Lavallette, New Jersey 08735 



22A 



OWNER'S NAME AND ADDRESS 

WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 1? 



Location 

Bent Road, west side 
301-305 Bent Road 

309 Bent Road 

313 Bent Road 

319 Bent Road 

323 Bent Road 

325 Bent Road 

333 Bent Road 

335 Bent Road 

337 Bent Road 

343 Bent Road 

333 Bent Road 



Owner's Name and Address 



Wyncote Church Home 

Maple and Fernbrook Avenues 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Wyncote Church Home 

Maple and Fernbrook Avenues 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Irvin and Ruth G. Rosenfeld 

313 Bent Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

David C. and Leslie P. Martin 

319 Bent Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Isma II R. and Lois R. Alfaruqui 

323 Bent Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

William J. and Edith J. McLaughlin 

325 Bent Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Steven R. and Barbara Cohen 

333 Bent Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Peter F. and Ruth Y. Cicinelli 

335 Bent Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvajiia 19095 

Lawrence S. and Betty Ann Schmidt 

337 Bent Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvanis ]Q095 

Kenneth H. , Jr. and Elsa M. Long 



■^ Ber. 



:oEc 



Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

John T, and D. Jacquelyn Connerxy 

353 Bent Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



225 



OWNER'S NAME AND ADDRESS 

WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 18 



Location 
Church Road, east side 
1221 Church Road 

Accomac Road, east side 
406 Accomac Road 

Rear 4o6 Accomac Road 

410 Accomac Road 



S/E comer Accomac and 
Church Roads 



Accomac Road, west side 
322 Accomac Road 

8100 Accomac Road 

Greenwood Place, east side 

1 Greenwood Place 

2 Greenwood Place 

3 Greenwood Place 



Owner's Name and Address 



Donald F, and Vera BHayer 

1221 Church Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



Sidney L. and Anne R. Wickenhaver 

406 Accomac Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Sidney L. and Anne R. Wickenhaver 

406 Accomac Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Robert A. and Joyce L. Cantor 

410 Accomac Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Industrial Bank and Trust Co., Trustee 
York Road and West Avenue 
Jenkintown, Pennsylvania 19046 



Sandor and Maria Palinkas 

322 Accomac Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

E. Stuart and Anne C. Tuthill 

8100 Accomac Road 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



John C. anil Dorothy C. Hoiliday 

1 Greenwood Place 
V.^Ticote, Pennrylvania 19095 

Richard A. and Nancy B. Winter 

2 ureenviood Place 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Robert H. and Jane F. Lewellyn 

3 Greenwood Place 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



OWNER'S NAME AND ADDRESS 

WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 19 



Location Ovmer's Name and Address 

Greenwood Place, east side (continued) 



4 Greenwood Place 

Greenwood Place, west side 

11 Greenwood Place 

12 Greenwood Place 

13 Greenwood Place 
10 Greenwood Place 

Greenwood Place, south side 

6 Greenwood Place 

7 Greenwood Place 

8 Greenwood Place 

Walt Lane, east side 
7 Wait Lane 



Mark and Susan R. Goodman 

k Greenwood Place 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



Rodney W. Napier 

11 Greenwood Place 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Frank and Karen R. Bramble tt 

12 Greenwood Place 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Dorothy Sinclair Fur man 

13 Greenwood Place 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Walter J. and Geraldine C. Kinderman 
10 Greenwood Place 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



Jerome T, and Anne H. Yodis 

6 Greenwood Place 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Joel and Arlene Taub 

7 Greenwood Place 
Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

Warren H. and Paula 0. C. Suss 

8 Greenwood Place 
Wyncote, Penn£:ylvania 19095 



Wyncote Church Home 

Maple and Fembrook Avenues 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 



227 



OWNER'S NAME AND ADDRESS 

WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - MONTGOMERY COUNTY Page 20 



Location 
Walter Lane, west side 
2 Walt Lane 

10 Walt Lane 



Owner's Name and Address 



Richard G. and Ellen F. Watson 

2 Walt Lane 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 19095 

William A., Ill and Sandra T. Duffy 

10 Walt Lane 

Wyncote, Pennsylvainia 19095 



228 



Wyncote Historic District - Montgomery County 
Photographs 

Streetscapes ; 

1. Intersection of Greenwood and Glenside Avenues. 

2. 115-119 and III-II3 Greenwood Avenue. 

3. 12^-126 and 128-130 Greenwood Avenue. 
^■. 157. 155 and 153 Greenwood Avenue. 

5. 109. 105-107 and 101-103 Cliff Terrace. 

6. 109, 107 .and 105 Webster Avenue. 

7. 213, 209 and 205 Fernbrook and 300 Maple Avenue. 

8. 309 and 305 Maple Avenue and 173 Fernbrook Avenue, 

9. 156 Greenwood and 315 and 313 I<laple Avenue. 

10. Bent Road, Church properties. 
Individual Views ; 

11. S/E comer Accomac and Church Roads. 

12. 308 Bent Road. 

13. 119 Woodland Road. 
1-f. l^f'J Fernbroc-c Avenue. 

15. 107 'Joodland Road. 

16. 100 and 102 Woodland Road. 

17. 108 Webster Avenue. 

18. Carriafre house rear 313 M^ple Avenve. 

19. 139 Fe::ibroG:: Avenue. 

20. Ralph Morgan Park and Tookany Creek. 
Streetscaps outside of Victorian VJyncote District! 

21. Greenwood Avenue Bridge looking toward Jenkintown. 

22. 112 and 114 East Glenside Avenue. 

23. 206, 208 and 212 Stonehouse Lane. 
2^. Old York Road, Jenkintown, Pa. 
25. Easton Road, Glenside, Pa. 



229 



WYNCOTE HISTORIC DISTRICT - WCNTGOr.lSRY COUNTY 
Address Key to Slides 

1. Woodland Road in 1893 

2. Wanamaker Pond in 1893 

3. Jenkintown Railroad Station, Horace Trumoauer, architect. 
^. Ralph Morgan Park and Tookany Creek. 

5. Intersection Glenside and Greenwood Avenues, 

6. 119 Woodland Road. 

7. 1^3 Woodland Road. 

8. 111-113 and 115-119 Greenwood Avenue, J. Linden Heacock, architect, 

111-113 Greenwood Avenue. 

9. 12^-126 and I28-I30 Greenwood Avenue, Dull and Peterson, architects. 

10. 189^ Wyncote Elementary School, 400 Greenwood Avenue. 

11 . 105 and 107 Cliff Terrace. 

12. 127 Webster Avenue. 

13. 105 Webster Avenue. 

1^. 157 Fembrook Avenue, Angus S. Wade, architect. 

15. 168 Fembrook Avenue, Horace Trumbauer, architect. 

16. 2C9 Fembrook Avenue. 

17. 1C3 V»'ebsxer Avenue. 

IS, All Hallows Episcopal Church, Fumess and Evans, architects. 

19. " " M Parish House, Frank R. Watson, arcnitect. 

20. " " " Rectory, Thomas, Churchmain and Molitor, architec 

21. 305 Bent Read, Horace Truxbauer, architect. 

22. 3CS Sent Road, A/A V.'illiarr. L. Price, architect. 

23. 3I8 Bent Road, Mantle Fielding, Jr., architect. 
2^. 323 Bent Road, Angus S. Wade, architect. 

25. 3^3 Bent Road, Horace Trumbauer, architect. 

26. 10 Walt Lane 

27. 107 Woodland Road, T. Frank Miller, architect. 



230 



Anne & Jerome Fisher 
FINE ARTS LIBRARY 

University ot Pennsylvania 

Please return this book as soon as you have finished with 
it. It must be returned by the latest date stamped below. 




MAY 1 5 1986 




/ina/D4'=175/3'=152X 




■ -:■•.- -^:i-:^J^^: 



.-. -^^-^-.is 



u* .— • - 7— «r. 



-ifei 



■-UECrr^^ 



/?|S^-, -— ^-