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Full text of "Wyo"

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On April 2y the entire University was called into general 
assembly for the first time this year. The assembly was held on the 
spacious main floor of the new Wyoming Gymnasium. The occa- 
sion was the first vdsit, to the school, of Wyoming's Woman 
Governor, Mrs. Nellie T. Ross. 



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FIGHTEENTH LEGISLATURE 

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OF 





TbeodoreWawras RosttCamerw 



'Frji*tAirf«rs(itt A.S Mercer 









Robert C.Lurtil> 




L.D.MercKant 





Fred Burton 




JokFXook 






W.W. Daley 




Wade Fowler 



CharlesA.Mjers P.W Jenkins 





Uwis H. Brown, 

PSCSIBEKT 




Jd^tiT Jones 




HarriiN.Free 




Thomas Hunter 




Stephen H. Sibley 




ErwinAFroyd ^^^ Frank O.Horton 



C.P.Meek 




Clarence Gardner, 

VICE PRES. 




To this group of men and to Mrs. Nellie T. Ross, governor, the students and faculty 
of the University feel most grateful. 




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HOUSE pF REPRESENTATIVES 

Had it not been for their rejection of certain measures that came up during the 

legislative session the Institution would have suffered the loss of a source of large 

income and would have been set back many years on its path of progress. 



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Fay E. Smith, Fred W. Geddes, Frank A. Holliday. J. M. Schwoob, J. A. Elliott, Dean Prosser 
Mrs. Avery Haggard, IVlrs. Harriett Grieve, Governor Ross, Mrs. Katharine A. Morton, E. 0. Fuller, President Crane 



It was at this meeting of the hoard that important plans 
relative to the future of the University v\^ere discussed. 
These plans were made possible by the generous action of 
the recent Legislature in rejecting legislation that would 
have diverted University revenue into other channels. 



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JUSTUS F. SOULE, A. M. 
Dean of the College of Liberal Arts 



College of Liberal Arts 

The principal objective of the College of Liberal Arts is the enlargement of the 
student's powers and of his understanding of the world ; to give him an intellectual 
grasp on human experience. 

It is not a mere collection of departments grouped for convenience and offering 
a wide range of courses that are mainly, but not exclusively, theoretical. 

It is not chiefly a service institution furnishing fundamental courses to be built 
upon in other schools, and making concessions also to the needs of the many for a 
wide variety of pre-occupational training. 

It is not primarily seeking to prepare men and women for research in the tech- 
nical sense, but it does seek to equip them with that broadness of vision and that 
depth of discernment that will enaljle them, as opportunity offers, to assume leader- 
ship in human affairs, and that will inspire them with the desire to advance knowl- 
edge. 

It agrees to three propositions : First, a certain amount of specialization is 
really essential in a liberal education in order not to sacrifice depth to breadth. 

Second, a certain amount of specialization may properly, though not necessar- 
ily, be determined by a vocational motive, but such studies should be restricted to a 
fourth or less of the student's time, in order that he may not lose sight of the prin- 
cipal end of liberal education, that is enlargement of his powers and of his under- 
standing of the world for its own sake. 

Third, specialized studies determined by a vocational motive should be taken, 
if at all, at the latter end of the arts cvtrriculum in order to insure sufficient prelimi- 
nary grounding in principles and an approach to such subjects in a spirit that is 
scientific, rather than merely utilitarian. 



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Department of Botany 



Ave;n Nelson, A. M., Ph. D., President Emeritus; 
Head of the Department of Botany. 

Edwin B. Payson, M. A., Ph. D., Associate Professor 
of Botany. 




Department of Chemistry 




P. T. Miller, M. A., Head of the Department of 
Chemistry. 

Frank E. Hepner,, M. S., Associate Professor. 

Ernest R. Schierz, Ph. D., Assistant Professor. 

L. E. Walter, M. S., Instructor in Chemistry. 



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Department of English 

Robert M. Smith^ Ph. D., Head of Department of 
English. 

Clara McInTyre, Ph. D., Professor. 

H. H. HiGGiNS, A. B., Pubhc Speaking and Debating 
Coach. 

MaybeIvLE L. De:Kay, M. a., Instructor. 

Elizabeth Russell, A. B., Instructor. 

Gladys G. Gambill, B. A., Instructor. 

Wilson O. Clough, A. B., Instructor. 

Henry P. Constans, A. B., Instructor. 




Department of Modern Languages 



O. C. GebErt, Ph. D., Head of Department of Foreign 
Languages. 

H. A. Varela, B. a., B. Ed., Spanish. 

Crete Wood, B. A., French. 

L. C. Butscher, M. a., Spanish and German. 

Mrs. E. O. Fuller, M. A., French. 

Mrs. Arnold, (Foreign Degree), French. 

O. F. Geisler, M. a., German. 

Mrs. Margaret Voss, B. A., German. 




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1925 WYO 




Department of Geology and Mineralogy 



Samuel H. Knight, Ph. D., Head of the Department. 





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Department of History 



Laura A. White, Ph. D., Head of the Department. 
Lois O. Gibbons, Ph. D., Associate Professor. 



Department of Political Science 



Henry J. Peterson^ Ph. D., Head of the Department. 
Homer C. Mann, B. A., Instructor. 




30 



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Department of Psychology 



JuNEi E. Downey, Ph. D., Head of the Department. 
LvOviSA C. Wagoner, Ph. D., Associate Professor. 
Richard S. Uhrbrock, M. A., Instructor. 




Department of Physical Education for Men 



John Corbett, B. S., Head of the Department. 

William H. Deitz, Football and Baseball Coach. 

Stewart M. Clark, Freshmen Football, Varsity 
Basketball and Varsity Track Coach. 

William Lee, Trainer. 





191.5 W'YO 



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Department of Physical Education for Women 



Margue^rite M. Hussev, B. S., A. M., Director. 
Ruth Campbell, Instructor. 




Department of Physics 




Philo F. Hammond, Ph. D., Head of the Department. 



Department of Zoology 



John W. Scott, Ph. D., Head of the Department. 
Ezra C. Harrah, Ph. D., Associate Professor, 
Harvey M. Smith. Ph. D., Instructor. 
A. H. Stock ARD, Student Assistant. 




1925 WYO 



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Department of Mathematics 



Harry C. Gossard, Ph. D., Head of the 
Department. 

Minnie Holman^ B. A., Instructor. 

O. H. Rechard, M. a., Junior Assistant. 

Bernice Sanford, M. a., Instructor. 




Department of Political Economy 




Grace Raymond Hebard, Ph. D., 
Head of the Department. 

Ralph Con well, B. A., Instructor. 



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Department of Commerce 



E. Ddane Hunton, M. B. a., Head of the Department. 
Ralph E. Berry, M. A., Associate Professor. 
George B. McCowen, Instructor. 
Rosa Colegrove, A. B., Instructor. 



Department of Music 



George Edwin Knapp, Director of the Division of 
Music ; Professor of Music ; Instructor in Voice. 

Roger C. Frisbie^ B. Mus., Professor in Piano, Organ 
and Theory. 

Daisy Wharton, Instructor in VioHn. 

Mabel Babington, Instructor in First Piano. 

Helen H. Hylton^ B. M., Instructor in Piano. 

Gertrude C. McKay, B. Mus., Instructor in Piano. 

Vera NeEly, Instructor in PubHc School Music ; In- 
structor in Voice. 




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JOHN A. HILL, Dean of the College of Agriculture 



College of Agriculture 

It is interesting to note that the enrollment in the Wyoming Agricultural Col- 
lege has increased rapidly during a period when the number of students enrolled in 
agriculture has been decreasing for the United States as a whole. 

I believe this is due to the fact that the young people of Wyoming realize the 
advantages of preparing themselves for rural life and leadership in a state whose 
agricultural possibilities are just beginning to be developed. The increased enroll- 
ment in agriculture and home economics promises well for the whole state. 

Each of the increasing number of graduates who leaves the college and takes 
up life in this state, either as a teacher, investigator, farmer, business man, or home 
maker, will be a new center from which will radiate much of the best that can be 
learned from books and laboratories about problems of agriculture and home mak- 
ing in Wyoming. 

To paraphrase the language of the recently enacted Purnell Law, which gives 
additional federal aid for the study of the problems of the farm and home, each new 
graduate of the Wyoming Agricultural College will assist in "the establishment of a 
permanent and efficient agriculture" and "the development and improvement of the 
rural home and rural life." 




192 3 WYO 



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Department of Bacteriology and Veterinary Science 




Cecil Elder, D. V. M., M. S., Head of the Depart- 
ment. 

Aubrey Lee, D. V. M., Instructor. 



Department of Agronomy 



Alonzo F. Vass, AI. S., Head of the Department. 
Glen Hartman, B. S., Associate Professor. 




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Department of Animal Husbandry 



Fred S. Hultz, M. S., Head of the Department. 

H. S. WiLLARD, M. S., Associate Professor. 

Lew p. Reeve, Assistant Animal Husbandman. 

Frank J. Kohn, B. S., Station Poultryman. 

Robert H. Burns, B. S., M. S., Wool Specialist. 

Earl B. Krantz, M. S., Animal Husbandman in charge 
of U. S. -Wyoming Horse Breeding Station. 




Division of Extension 



Albert E. Bowman, B. S., Director of Extension. 
Guv O'RoKE, Administrative Assistant of Extension. 



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Department of Home Economics 



Elizabeth J. McKittrick, A. B., M. S., Head of the 
Division of Home Economics. 

Katherine a. Waller, A. B., Assistant Professor 
of Clothing and Textiles. (On leave of absence 
1924-1925.) 

Dorothy E. Liggett, Ph. B., Director of the Commons 
and Instructor in Institutional Management. 

Bernice Tucker, B. S., Instructor. 

Mary Carson, A. B., Instructor. 



The profession of home-making is one of the greatest factors in human prog- 
ress because its purpose is to conserve the life of the individual as the basis of all 
advance in human progress. 

To assist the profession of home-making in reaching its ideals, the Home Eco- 
nomics curriculum ofifers work which will enable the young women who complete its 
course to become efficient housewives, teachers, dietitians, extension workers, re- 
search workers and institutional managers. 

Many of our graduates are now serving the state well in various capacities and 
we hope each year to be able more nearly to supply the demand. 





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EARL D. HAY. Dean of the College of Engineering 



College of Engineering 

Wyoming is popularly known as an agricultural state, yet the Government 
census report of 1920 shows that over fifty per cent of the male wage earners of the 
state were employed in occupations of an engineering nature. As time goes on this 
percentage is sure to increase, because Wyoming is rich in coal, petroleum, lumber, 
mineral, and agricultural resources, which as yet are undeveloped or are being 
shipped to other markets in neighboring states, at raw material prices to promote the 
industrial development and enrichment of communities beyond our borders. The 
industrial development of Wyoming alone will stop this bleeding of her resources, 
and, this industrial development will come only through the work of members of 
the engineering profession loyal to the state. 

It is the function of the College of Engineering to train the future leaders in 
this industrial development, to give its students a vision of the industrial possibili- 
ties of this section of the west and to inspire them with an ambition for genuine 
service to the communities in which they live. 




19 2 5 \VY 



Department of Mining Engineering 



E. Prosper McCarty, E. M., Head of the Department 



Department of Mechanical Engineering 




Earl D. Hay, AI. E., Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

C. A. KoEPKE, B. S., Instructor in Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 




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Department of Civil Engineering 



John C. FitTKRER, C. E., Professor of Civil Engi- 
neering. 

A. F. Rakatzky, Ph. B., Instructor in Civil Engineer- 
ing. 




Department of Electrical Engineering 



Gilbert H. Sechrist, M. S., Assistant Professor of 
Electrical Engineering. 

Earl R. Witzel, B. S., Instructor in Electrical Engi- 
neering. 





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CHARLES R. MAXWELL. Dean of the College of Education 



College of Education 



The organization of the University of Wyoming makes it possible for students 
in the College of Education to come in direct contact in the classroom with other 
student groups who are preparing for all sorts of life careers. This tends to give 
the prospective teacher a cosmopolitan attitude, a breadth of vision, a tolerance 
for the opinion of others, and a respect for the intelligence of persons engaged in 
other occupations and professions — elements which are necessary for success in 
the field of teaching. Service in the elementary schools, because of our social 
environment, will continue to be the responsibility of women. Our high schools 
offer equal opportunities to both men and women. Vigorous men of jvidioial 
temperment have unlimited opportunities in the field of administration. 

May the young men and women of this University give serious consideration 
when deciding upon a life career, to the profession of teaching. 




192,3 W\ 




Department of Secondary Education 



CHARLes R. Maxwell, A. M., Head 
of the Department. 

Samuel H. Dadisman, M. A., Asso- 
ciate Professor in Agricultural 
Education. 

Olga M. Hoesley, M. a., Assistant 
Professor of Teacher Training. 



Department of Elementary Education 



RuTJi AdsiT, Head of the Department. 

Amy M. Gardner, Assistant Professor of Industrial 
Arts. 

Edna Fowler, B. A., M. A., Instructor in Industrial 
Arts. 

J. A. Helmreich, Instructor in Project Training. 



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J. GERALD DRISCOLL, JR., Dean of the Law School 



The Law School 



Though the University was organized in 1881, it was not until 1920 that there 
was incorporated in the regular curriculum a professional course of law. In the 
brief period of less than two student generations, the Law School has made most 
gratifying progress. The School has received an "A" classification by the American 
Bar Association, the highest classification given by that body and shared only by the 
strongest schools. The Law School is a member of the Association of American 
Law Schools. Membership in this organization is conditioned upon the adherence 
to rigid standards of entrance and graduation and the maintenance of ample equip- 
ment and adequate teaching force. The current year has been marked by the im- 
provement in the physical equipment of the school, both by way of substantial addi- 
tions to the law library and through the installation of modern court room equip- 
ment. The year has also been marked by an increase in enrollment of over sixty 
per cent. It is hoped that the year's accomplishments will pave the way for greater 
accomplishments in the future. 





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J. Gerald Driscoll, Jr., A. B., LL. B., Dean of the 
Law School. 

Charles G. Haglund, A. B., A. M., J. D., Associate 
Professor of Law. 

Charles H. Kinnane, A. B., LL. B., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Law. 

Thurman W. Arnold, A. B., LL. B., Lecturer in Law. 

Albert W. McCullough, A. B., J. D., Lecturer in 
Law. 

Charles V. Garnett, LL. B., Lecturer in Law. 

Honorable Nellis E. Corthell, Special Lecturer. 



Department of Military Science 
and Tactics . 



Major Beverly C. Daly, Professor of MiHtary Sci- 
ence and Tactics. 

Captain Ronald L. Ring, Assistant Professor of Mil- 
itary Science and Tactics. 

Sergeant Louis Knicker, Military Storekeeper. 

Sergeant Emmet Riggens, Instructor. 





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Edgar Blanchard, Laramie. 
AMA 



Herbert Woodman, Cheyenne. 
2N 
Phi Kappa Phi ; Delta Sigma Rho, Presi- 
dent (4) ; Pi Gamma Mu; Quill Club; Blue 
Pencil ; Iron Skull, Vice President (2) ; 
Episcopal Club, Vice President (2, 3) ; A. 
S. U. W. Vice President (3) ; Editor 
"Wyo"-1924;- Debating (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Orator 
(4) ; "Branding Iron" (1, 2) ; Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet (1) ; Band (1). 



Peare Freeman, Midwest. 
KA 



Elmer Nelson, Laramie. 



Percy Ingham, Laramie. 

Ag Club, Stock Judging Team (2), 



Darwin H. Dalzell, Buffalo. 
AMA 
"W" Club; Ag Club; Stock Judging (3); 
Boxing (1, 2, 3) ; Y. M. C. A. Conference 
(3) ; Student Loan Committee. 



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1925 W'YO 




Sholie Richards, Thermopolis. 

Delta Sigma Rho, Secretary (3) ; Iron 
Skull ; Episcopal Club ; Young Republican's 
Club; Le Cercle Francais; Lyceum Arts; 
Class Secretary (3) ; Junior Prom Commit- 
tee; Debating (1, 2, 3) ; "Wyo" Staff. 



Edward P. Pearson, Belfry, Montana. 
Phi Kappa Phi. 



Walter H. Spears, Baldwin, Kansas. 
"W" Club; Football (2, 3, 4) ; Baseball (4). 



JosEPiNE Wicks, Evanston. 
rz 

Chorus ; Y. W, C. A. ; Education Club. 



Gertrude Steinbach, Laramie. 



Etta H. Miller, Laramie. 



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Stephen F. Sibley, Burns. 

Young Republican Club (3, 4) ; Student 
Loan Committee (3) ; Y. M. C. A. (3) ; A. 
S. U. W. Committee (3) ; Class President 
(3) ; Junior Prom Committee (3) ; "Wyo" 
Staff (3). 



Clyde W. Kurtz, Buffalo. 

Education Clixb, Secretary-Treasurer; A. 
S. U. W. Assistant Manager (2) ; Track 
(1, 2) ; Y. M. C. A., President; Stock Judg- 
ing Team (1) ; Circulation Manager "Wyo." 



Helen Barth, Clay Center, Kansas. 



E. W. House, Quaker City, Ohio. 



Katherine Rihn, Gurley, Nebraska. 
Kappa Phi ; Le Cercle Francais. 



John K. Corbett, Laramie. 
ATO 
Theta Nu; Iron Skull; "W" Club, Secre- 
tary; Frosh Football; Varsity Football (2, 
3, 4); Varsity Basketball (1, 2, 3), Cap- 
tain (3). 








Laura Ekstrom, Cheyenne. 



Eileen O'Mara, Casper. 

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Pan Hellenic. 



Harold Gilbert, Lander. 
2AE 

Phi Kappa Phi; Theta Alpha Phi; "W" 
Club; A. S. U. W. President; Ag Club; 
Iron Skull; Football (2, 3, 4), Captain 
Elect; Debating; Stock Judging Team (1) ; 
Honor Book, Botany; Interfraternity Coun- 
cil (3). 



George Sherard, Cheyenne. 



Boyd L. Ferguson, Viola, Wisconsin, 



W. C. Cantrell, Baggs. 



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Harry Engstrom, Cheyenne. 
2N 

President Episcopal Club ; Chorus (2, 3, 
4) : Orchestra (3) ; Band ( 1, 2, 3, 4) ; Jun- 
ior Prom Commitee; "Wyo" Stafif (3). 



Fred Penland, Baggs. 
2AE 

Business Manager "Wyo" (3) ; Business 
Manager "Branding Iron" (4). 



Louie Schilt, Saratoga. 
K2 
Wrestling (2, 3); A. S. U. W. Commit- 
tee (4). 



L. J. Hanna, Wheatland. 
K2 
Baseball (1, 2, 4) ; Wrestling (1, 2, 3). 



Carl Cinnamon, Cody. 
K2 
Wrestling (2). 



Marjorie Nice, Laramie. 
AAA 
"Branding Iron"; "Wyo" Staff: W. A. A. 




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Harold Hobbs, Cheyenne. 
2AE 
Zeta Phi ; Iron Skull ; Engineering Society ; 
Frosh Football. 



Irene Murphey, Laramie. 
W. A. A. 



Eleanor Chatterton, Riverton. 
Ar 

Phi Kappa Phi; Rho Gamma Mu; Univer- 
sity of Southern California; Wellesley 
(2); W. A. A.; Quill Club, Chancellor 
(4) ;, Junior Prom Committee ; Associate 
Editor "Wyo" (3); President A. W. S. ; 
Secretary A. S. U. W. 



George Ducker, Cheyenne. 

"W" Club : Le Cercle Francais ; Football 
(2, 3). 



George Rice, Douglas. 

A. A. O. E. : Engineering Society ; Irra- 
tional Club. 



Ethlyn Christensen, Laramie. 
KA 
Y. W. C. A., Secretary (2), President (3) ; 
S. C. A., President (4) ; A. W. S. Board 
(3), Vice President (4) ; President Pan 
Hellenic (4). 




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Paul King, Idaho Springs, Colorado. 
University of Colorado (2). 



James O'Brien, Douglas. 
2N 
Delta Sigma Rho ; Quill Club ; Newman 
Club ; Engineering Society ; Student Chap- 
ter A. S. C. E.; Debate (1, 2) ; Class Presi- 
dent (4) ; Cadet Major (4) ; Honor Book 
Military (2) ; "Wyo" Staff (3) ; Chairman 
Junior Prom Committee (3). 

Clair H. Blanchard, Casper. 
2AE 

Football, Varsity (2, 3, 4) Frosh Football 
(1) ; Boxing, Conference Champion (1, 2, 
3), Captain (3) ; "W" Club, President (4), 
Secretary and Treasurer (1). 



Nancy Jones, Laramie. 

nB$ 



Don Sabin, Node. 
AMA 
Ag Club (2, 3, 4) ; Education Club (4) ; 
Track (1); "Branding Iron" Staff (2); 
-Wyo" Staff (3) ; Honor Book, Animal 
Husbandry (3) ; Y. M. C. A. (2, 3) ; Glee 
Club (2). 



Paul Ringert, Buhl, Idaho. 

Debate (1) : Chorus (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Y. M. C. 
A. (1, 2, 3, 4) ; S. C. A. (4) ; Track (4). 




1 9 2 .5 W Y O 



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Georges Faurie, New York City. 

"W" Club ; Theta Alpha Phi ; Football (2, 
3, 4) ; Boxing (3) ; School of Mines, Colo- 
rado. 



Alice Christensen, Hanna. 
AAA 
Kappa Phi ; Home Ec Club, Vice Presi- 
dent (3). 



George Vandeveer, Jr., Casper. 
2AE 
"W" Club; Engineering Society; Varsity 
Football (2, 3, 4), Captain (4). 



Zeva L. Smith, Basin. 

Quill Club, Keeper of Parchments (3) ; 
Blue Pencil ; "Branding Iron" (2) ; Asso- 
ciate Editor (3) ; "Wyo" Staff, (2, 3). 






\ \ /' 

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Robert Atha^ Laramie. 
Guy Backus, Buffalo. 
Millard J. Coffey, Newcastle. 

A. S. U. W. President (3). 

J. Francis Dunn, Casper. 

2AE 

Rolf B. Gilmore, ATitchell, Nebraska. 

James C. Halasey^ Laramie. 

Robert Miller, Laramie. 

Jesse Richardson, Yoder. 
Forward Echelon. 

Meta Rockwell, Cheyenne. 
Wyo Art Stafif. 

Erma L. Stevens, Cheyenne. 
AAA 
Debating (2, 3, 4). 

A. H. Stockard, Laramie. 

John F. Thompson, Laramie. 

Thelma Walton, Laramie. 




j^:^ 



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1925 WYO 



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Neva J. Grain, Bviffalo. 
rz 

Education Club ; Mask and Sandal ; "Brand- 
ing Iron"; W. S. G. A. Board; Glee Club; 
Chorus. 



Warren F. Cretney, Leadville, Colorado. 

W. P. S. ; Intramural Basketball (2, 3) ; 
Track (2, 3) ; "Wyo" Staff (3). 



Everett Murray, Upton. 
Engineering- Society. 



Claud Linton, Emerson, Ark. 
Frosh Football; Baseball (3). 



Albert Nussbaum, Pine Bluffs. 
Independent Club. 
A. S. U. W. Committee (2, 3); "Wyo" 
Staff. 



Roy GreEnburg, Pueblo, Colorado. 

Zeta Phi ; "W" Club ; Engineering Society ; 
American Association of Engineers ; Frosh 
Football; Football (2, 3). 



Bob Lindsey, Farmer City, Illinois. 
Frosh Football. 



•71^' 



Edward Miller, Laramie. 
2AE 
"W" Club; Frosh Football; Varsity Foot- 
ball (2, 3) ; Varsity Track (2, 3.) 



U 



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1923 WYO 



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Martha Prie;s, GreybuU. 

W. A. A. ; Class Basketball (2) ; Hockey (2). 



'^ Robert J. Worthman, Casper. 

TKE 

Theta Alpha Phi ; Phi Alpha Tau ; "Wyo" 
Staff (3) ; Dramatics. 



Elma Garman, Moorcroft. 

Home Ec Club; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; W. 
A. A.; Hockey Team, (2). 



*i Louis ThoDming, Newcastle. 
J Theta Nu ; Independent Club ; German 

Club. 



Dorothy Rogers, Milton, Oregon. 
KA 
Home Ec Club ; Chorus ( 1 ) ; Glee Club ( 1 ) . 



Easter Russell, Fort Pierce, Florida. 




^^^^^ 



19 2,5 WYO 



Homer Fair, Laramie. 
S. C. E. ; Zeta Phi. 



C. O. Frake, Red Bank, New Jersey. 
AMA 
Irrational Club; Episcopalian Club, Ameri- 
can Association of Engineers ; American 
Society of Mechanical Engineers ; "Wyo"' 
Staff. 



Harry Anderson, Rawlins. 
2AE 
Engineering Society ; Intra-mural Basket 
ball (2); Intra-mural Track (1). 



Lois Artist, Wheatland. 

Home Ec Club; W. A. A.; Soph Hockey 
Team; Chorus. 



John Curle, Yellow Pine, Ala. 
Independent Club. 



Horace Thomas, Laramie. 
SAE 

La Charla (3) ; Engineers Society; "Brand- 
ing Iron" Staff (2) ; Intra-mural Basket- 
ball ; Young RepuJjlican Club. 

George Guy, Cheyenne. 
ATO 
Iron Skull ; Theta Alpha Phi ; Debating 
(1); Class President (1); Frosh Football 
(1); Editor 1925 "Wyo" (3); Forward 
Echelon (3). 



Aileen Nelson, GreybuU. 
HE* 
W. A. A. ; Newman Club ; "Branding 
Iron"; "Wyo" Staff (3). 



65 





191.5 V\' \ O 




Lucille O'Reilly, Denver, Colorado. 
Newman Club; "Wyo" Staff (2, 3); Uni- 
versity of Louisville (1); A. W. S. (3); 
Junior Prom Committee ; La Charla Club ; 
Hockey Manager (3). 



.\nna Lawler, Cheyenne. 

rz 

Newman Club : Theta Alpha Phi ; Educa- 
tion Club ; Chorus ; Glee Club ; Wyoming 
Players, '24; "Wyo" Staff. 



LuciLE Pepoon. Gebo. 

Phi Upsilon Omicron ; Kappa Phi ; Home 
Ec Club; Chorus (2, 3). 



Harry D. Ballard, Casper, 
2AE 

Chairman Junior Prom Committee ; "Wyo" 

Staff (2, 3). 



Gilbert Cowden, Laramie. 
2N 
Theta Alpha Phi, Treasurer (2). 



Iris Sudduth, Walden, Colorado. 
KA 
Kappa Phi ; Home Ec Club ; Phi Upsilon 
Omicron ; S. C. A. 




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g^<^g^gGs:gj:£j^^:jSif>^?:^ 



Harold Hunt^ Laramie. 
2N 
Young Republicans Club; Ag Club; Stock 
Judging (2, 3). 



O. Johnson, Cheyenne. 

Football Squad (1, 2, 3) ; Intra-mural Bas- 
ketball. 



Corliss Van Horn, Powell. 



Charles He^mry, Casper. 
2N 
Young Republicans Club; Forward Eche- 
lon; "Wyo" Manager (3). 



Edna Hegewald, Laramie. 

nB* 



M. S. HuHTALA, Hanna. 
Independent Club. 
Engineering Society; A. I. E. E. 



LaMarr Jones, Thermopolis. 
AMA 
Engineering Society; Civil Engineering So- 
ciety; Irrational Club; "Branding Iron'" 
(3) ; Intra-mural Basketball (2, 3) ; "Wyo" 
Staff (3). 



Betty Scott, Hat Creek. 

La Charla (3) ; Episcopal Club; Education 
Club; Chorus (3) ; Glee Club (1). 



jW *•** 



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Esther Konkel, Cheyenne. 

"Branding Iron" Staff (2); W. A. A.; 
Hockey (2). 



#{ 



Francis D. LaNoue, Greybull. 
K2 
Zeta Bigma ; Newman Club; Ag Club; 
Wrestling (1, 2); Frosh Football; Varsity 
Football (3). 



Harry Hornecker, Lander. 
"Wyo" Staff (3). 



Amelia Kershisnik, Rock Springs. 
AAA 
Chorus ; Newman Club ; Republican Club. 



George T. Ross, Cheyenne. 

Delta Sigma Rho ; Iron Skull ; Quill Club; 
Potter Law Club; Interfraternity Council; 
A. S. U. W., Secretary (2) ; Debate (1, 2) ; 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 



Glen Gariepy, Lance Creek. 
Independent Club. 
"W" Club; S. C. A. Council; La Charla. 



m 0^\ 



Kathleen Hemry, Casper. 
rz 

La Charla, Vice President ; "Wyo" Staff. 



OsELiA Stendahl, Laramie. 
rz 

Glee Club (3) ; Chorus (2, 3) ; Y. W. C. A. 



68 



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Kenneth Haywood^ Sheridan. 
"Wyo" Staff; Forward Echelon. 



Francis Hutton, Laramie. 
2AE 



AuRiL Williams, Evanston. 

rz 

Le Cercle Francais; W. A. A. (2). 



Anna Winecoef, Laramie. 
Episcopal Club. 



LuVerne Wales, Basin. 



George Cresswell, Douglas. 

La Charla ; Le Cercle Francais ; Episcopal 
Club ; Democratic Club, Vice President. 



Isabella Buckley, Cheyenne. 
Home Ec Club ; Le Cercle Francais. 



Ted Burnsted, Reliance, South Dakota. 
Independent Club. 
Valparaiso University (1); North Dakota 
University (2); Frosh Football; Intra- 
mural Basketball. 




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Ethijl Simpson, Laramie. 

La Charla (1, 2, 3) ; Quill Club (2, 3) ; Le 
Cercle Francais ; Mask and Sandal, Presi- 
dent (3) ; "Branding Iron" Staff (3). 



"3*. 



WiLMA J. PuGH, Evanston. 

rz 

Le Cercle Francais; "Wyo'' Staff; A. W. S. 
Board (1, 3) ; W. A. A. (2). 






GwEN Roberts, Wind River. 

Education Club ; Episcopal Club ; Glee Club. 



Donald McHenry, Laramie. 
AMA 
Episcopal Club ; Quill Club. 



John A. Lippold, Laramie. 
2AE 

"W" Club; Freshman Football (1); Var- 
sity Football (2). 



R|'1§» 



Clarissa M. Jensen, Laramie. 
nB* 

Phi Upsilon Omicron ; Theta Alpha Phi ; 
W. A. A. ; Home Ec Club ; Hockey. 



Ruth M. Rauner, Laramie. 
KA 

Chorus (1, 2, 3) ; Glee Club (1. 2, 3). 



Katheryn C. Brock, Buffalo. 
nB$ 

Blue Pencil (3); La Charla: Le Cercle 
Francais (1, 2, 3) ; "Branding Iron" Staff; 
"Wyo" Staff; W. A. A.; Chorus (1, 2); 
Glee Club (1,2). 



Lawrence G. Meeboer, Laramie. 

"W" Club; A. S. U. W. Committee: Track 
(2); Frosh Football (1); Honor Book, 
Commerce (2) ; A. S. U. W. Manager (3). 



Clara Young, Green River. 
KA 
Mask and Sandal; Chorus (1, 2); Glee 
Club (1, 2) ; W. A. A.; Hockey Team (2). 



Frances Shier, Mitchell, Nebraska. 
KA 
Iron Skull; Debating (2) ; Kappa Phi; W. 
A. A. 



Pauline Bunting, Cowley. 

Delta Sigma Rho ; Phi Upsilon Omicron ; 
S. p. A; A. W. S.; Home Ec Club; De- 
bating. 



Bertha Crawford, Greybull. 

Le Cercle Francais ; La Charla ; Secretary 
A. W. S. 



Lawrence S. Grzeskowiak, 
Pulaski, Wisconsin. 
Newman Club ; American A. of E. ; A. I. 
of E. E. 



Constance Chattertox, Riverton. 
nB$ 

W. A. A., President ; Pan Hellenic ; Student 
Loan Committee ; Iron Skull ; Basketball 
(1, 3) ; Hockey ( 1, 3) : Track (1, 3). 



Calvin Beagle, Laramie. 
AMA 
Band (1, 2, 3); Forward Echelon; Irra- 
tional Club ; A. A. M. E. ; Engineering So- 
ciety (1, 2, 3) ; Track; Intra-mural Basket- 
ball. 





1925 WYC 



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Ralph Andrus, Casper. 

2AE 

RoYDEN Banta, Greeley, Colorado. 
2AE 
Basketball (1. 2, 3) ; Captain-elect. 

G. H. Burton, Laramie. 

W. H. Dameron, Del Rio, Texas. 

Catherine Delstng, 

Hemingford, Neb. 

Gertrude Delsing, 

Hemingford, Neb. 

Sally Diggs, Casper. 

Frank Emery, Greybull. 
K2 

Football (1, 2); Basketball (3); Track 
(3). 

Freda Falck, Laramie. 
Fern Fanselow, Perry, Iowa. 
Everett Gilbert, Loup City, Neb. 
Mrs. Marie H.vrdy, Laramie. 
Reginald C. Harris, Laramie. 
W. D. Hughes, Midwest. 

Homer Huntzinger, Wheatland. 
Marie Kelly, Lawlor, Iowa. 
Ralph McGee, Huntington, Indiana. 



Margaret Moudy, Laramie, 
rz 

Theta Alpha Phi, President (3). 

Marie C. Mayer, Greybull. 

BiLLiE Murray, Evanston. 
AAA 
Engineer Queen (3). 

Edward Palmer, Laramie. 

Harry Pearson, Lander. 

2AE 

Arthur Pendray, Van Tassel, 
AMA 
Blue Pencil. 

Phillip Pepoon, Gebo. 

Curtis Powell, Laramie. 
K2 
Tumblers; Basketball (1, 3). 

Roy D. Pringle, Laramie. 
K2 

David R. Scott, Laramie. 

Evangeline Simmons, Laramie. 

Lillian Smart, Laramie. 

George A. Thatcher, Laramie. 

Stock Judging Team. 




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KiKK K. Scott, Medicine Bow, 
2N 
Engineering Society; First Lieutenant, R. 
O. T. C. 

Christine Pitt, Cheyenne. 
AAA 
Chorus ; Newman Club ; Young Republicans 
Club; Home Ec Club; Le Cercle Francais. 

Daniel Ingram am, Cody.' 
AMA 

Ag Club; Intra-mural Basketball (1, 2); 
Denver Stock Judging (2); Band (1, 2); 
Track (1). 

Clark F. Biessemeir, Powell 

American Association of Engineers ; A. S. 
of M. E. ; Irrational Club; Engineering So- 
ciety. 

Marie Straley, Greybull. 



WiLLARD IsHERwooD, Evanston, 



Arthur Zaring, Basin. 
"W" Club; Wrestling (1, 2). 

Louis Allsman, Casper. 
2AE 
"W" Club ; Frosh Football ; Varsity Foot- 
ball (2) ; Basketball (2). 

Clark W. Snyder, Elkland, Penn. 
AMA 

A. A. of E.; A. S. of C. E. 

Byron S. Huie, Casper. 
2AE 
"Branding Iron" ; Theta Alpha Phi. 




RuEDELL Lewis, Cowley. 



Harold Newton, Cody. 
K2 

Intra-murals (1, 2) ; Stock Judging Team: 
Ag Club. 




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Edith M. M alone, Laramie. 

Kappa Phi; W. A. A.; Spanish Club; Soph 
Champion Hockey Team. 



Ina Mae Durand, Powell. 
Kappa Phi. 



Mildred McDowell^ Lander. 



NoLA Angle, Sheridan. 

nB$ 

Chorus ; Glee Club. 



Edith E. Ward, Cody. 
HB* 



Margaret Kilgore, Savery. 



Paul M. Garman, Moorcroft. 
Independent Club. 
Band ; Intramural Basketball. 



Florence Fair, Laramie. 



William A. Chester, Rock Springs. 
Independent Club. 



Lawrence Ormsby, Casper. 
2AE 
Frosh Football; Varsity Track "W" Club. 

Robert Burns, Torrington. 

Irrational Club (President); Iron Skull; 
A. A. E. ; A. I. E. E. 



Ralph Eakin, Willard, Colorado. 





192 3 W \ 



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Edward O. Gwyn, Cowley. 



Helen Keller, Worland. 

Iron Skull : Kappa Phi ; Athletics ; Presi- 
dent, Hoyt Hall (2). 



Nettie Gwyn, Cowley. 



IvA May Dunn, Laramie. 

Ted Edleman, Sheridan. 

Mask and Sandal; Band; Episcopal Club; 
Freshman Class Vice President ('24). 

Mary M. McCarthy, Thermopolis. 
KA 
Newman Club ; Education Club ; Chorus. 

Verna Gibson, San Benito, Texas. 

rz 

Marie Holmes, Kemmerer. 
KA 
Mask and Sandal ; Chorus ; Episcopal Club ; 
Young Republicans Club. 

Lois Blenkarn, Laramie. 
W. A. A. ; Basketball ; Hockey. 

Emil F. EbERT, Cody. 
AMA 
A. A. E. ; Irrational Club. 

Sylvl\ Oldman, Encampment. 
KA 
Glee Club; Kappa Phi; W. A. A.; Educa- 
tion Club; Le Cercle Francais ; Mask and 
Sandal : Quill Club ; Blue Pencil ; "Brand- 
ino Iron" Staff; Chorus; "Wyo" Staff; 
Theta Pi. 

James O'Roke, Sabetha, Kansas. 

ATn 

Theta Alpha Phi; A. S. C. E. ; A. A. E. ; 
Engineering Society. 



^^<^ 



192 3 VVYO 



^^^^^ 



Lillian Helsbkrg, Sheridan. 
rz 

La Charla ; Le Cercle Francais ; A. W. S. 
Board. 



Cecil L. Centlivere. Laramie. 
University Orchestra ; Band. 



RoLLiN W. Nyg.\.\rd, Casper. 



Leatrice M. Gregory, Rock River. 

Blue Pencil ; Episcopal Club ; Le Cercle 
Francais ; "Branding Iron" Staff. 

Alice McKean, Moorcrof t. 

rz 

Newman Club ; Education Club. 



Robert R. Peterson, Willard, Colorado. 
AMA 

Ag Club ; S. C. A. ; Stock Judging Team. ,^£#1 



Harold M, Ballengee, Lander. 

2AE 
Assistant Manager A. S. U. W. 

Frank R. Schwoob. 

Oswald SeavERSOn, Rawlins. 
AMA 
A. A. E.; A. T. E. E.; Episcopal Club: 
Irrational Club. 

G. Irvin Redhair, Sheridan. 

2N 
Iron Skull; Frosh Football; Football (2) ; 
Track (2). 

Janie McClintock, Sheridan. 
KA 



DwiGHT F. Hanson, Chanute, Kansas. 

2N 



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1915 WYO 



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GerTrude Skovgard, Basin. 



John Groves, Casper. 
2AE 
"W" Club; Football (2) ; Track (2). 

Thomas Finnerty, Sunrise. 
ATfi 
Newman Club. 



Kathleen (McLaughlin) O'Mara, 
rz Sheridan. 



^ Anna Sandle, Riverton. 



•» Clayton Taylor, Thermopolis. 



Carvel Brown, Driggs, Idaho. 



Wm. Harkin, Belfry, Montana. 
Independent Ckib. 
Intra-mural Basketball. 



George McDonald, Glenrock. 

2N 



Iames R. Marcey, Laramie. 



Lillian Borton, Laramie. 

W. A. A.; Hockey Team (Captain) ; Bas- 
ketball. 





192 3 WYO 



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Raymond Denton, Worland. 

2N 



W. W. Denton, Worland. 
SN 
A. A. E.; "W" Club; A. S. C. E.; Irra- 
tional Club; Football (2); Wrestling (1). 



Edward Joslin, Lebanon, Missouri. 
Independent Club. 



Isabel Van Deusen, Rock Springs. 
Kappa Phi ; Education Club ; Glee Club : 
Volley Ball. 



Ruth South worth, Laramie. 
Quill Club. 



R. Seaverson, Rawlins. 
AMA 



Everett Cook, Evanston. 
AMA 

Josephine Delatour, Sheridan. 
AAA 
Iron Skull; A. W. S. Board; "Branding [;, 
Iron" Staff. ' 

Sherman M. Wyman, Kemmerer. 

La Charla ; Sophomore Social Committee. 

Edgar Merritt, Sheridan. h 

2N I 

Iron Skull; Track (1); Pistol Team (1). * 

Miriam Ewers, Basin. 

Kappa Phi; Mask and Sandal; W. A. A.; 
Education Club ; Hockey. 

Nels a. Bylund, Sheridan. 

Episcopal Club; Intra-mural Track (1, 2) 




1 9 1 .3 VV Y O 



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**"'' Edith Morgan, Hulett. 
Education Club. 



Louise McNiFF, Laramie. 
Theta Alpha Phi. 



Acnes Long, Winnett, Mont. 




191,3 VVYO 



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Hans Leponnen, Hanna. 

Theta Alpha Phi ; Episcopalian Club. 



Louie Whitman, 

2AE Baton Rogue, Louisana. 

Frosh Football. 

Harry M. Astin, Casper. 
2AE 
Iron Skull: Quill; "Branding Iron'' Staff; 
Cheer Leader; Boxing (2). 

Robert Gish, Laramie. 
2AE 
Iron Skull; Frosh Football (1); Varsity 
F9otball (2) ; Intra-murals. 

Willis G. Zingg, Sheridan. 

2N 

Arletta Wyant, Greybull. 

Iron Skull ; Theta Alpha Phi ; "Branding 
Iron" Staff; Education Club. 



Joyce Scott, Rock Springs. 



Maxwell Chapman, Sunrise. 
ATn 

Pre-Medic Club ; Intra-;mural Basketball. 

Alice Gaensslen, Green River. 

W. A. A. (1) ; La Charla (1) ; Education 
Club (2) ; Kappa Phi. 

Warrel Law, Rawlins. 
2N 
Debate (2) ; Tumbling Squad (2). 

Gladden Elliott, Rock River. 
Independent Club. 



Ruth Gilman, Laramie. 
KA 
Kappa Phi ; Educational Club. 





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Oscar Erickson, Cheyenne. 
ATi2 
Iron Skull, "W" Club; Basketball (1). 
Captain (2), All Conference Guard (2) ; 
Football (2). 



J. T. Thompson, Snyder, Oklahoma. 
2AE 



Mildred Finnerty, Sunrise. 



Marjorie Root, Sidney, Nebraska. 
KA 

Helen Haywood, Sheridan. 

nB$ 

Iron Skull, La Charla ; "Branding Iron' 
Staff. 

Mary G. Moore, Cheyenne. 
HB* 
Chorus ; Glee Club. 

Lyle W. Scott, Big Piney. ' 
2AE 

Engineering Society; Wrestling (1, 2). 



Fred SprEng, Laramie. 

2N 

Don C. Hubbard, La Fontaine, Lidiana. 
Frosh Football. 



Katie Bruner, Mullinsville, Kansas. 



Carlton Barkhurst, Laramie. 

2N 

John Bruner, Cheyenne. 
2N 
Iron Skull ; Blue Pencil, President ; Quill 
Club; Episcopal Club; "Branding Iron" 
Staff, Athletic Editor ; Forward Eschlon ; 
Sophmore Class President. 



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1915 WY 



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Genevieve Gatchell, Buffalo. 
AAA 
Episcopal Club ; Spanish Club. 



CozA HuDDLESTON, Boyd, Montana. 
AAA 
Quill Club. 



Geraldine K. Stewart, Diamondville. 
KA 
Mask and Sandal ; Chorus. 





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1915 WYO 



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Harold L. Adamson, Laramie. 

h. J. Adamson, Powell. 

Emma Alleman, Cokeville. 

Edward Andruss, Holden, Mo. 

Marcella Avery, Laramie. 

Ray Baker, Laramie. 
K2 

Richard Bender, Lucerne. 

Arnold Bethurem^ Sheridan. 
Margaret Blyden burgh, Rawlins. 

Kim Britenstein, Rawlins. 

2AE 

Dorothy Brokavv, Rock River. 
William Buchholz, Laramie. 
Helen Blinting, Cowley. 
Alice Carlisle, Cheyenne. 
Dorothy Christensen, Hanna. 

Bob Clausen, Cheyenne. 

2AE 

Fredia Connor, Ten Sleep. 

Louise Cordes, Fort Laramie. 

Bertha Craweord, GreybuU 

Roy CrawEord, Laramie. 
ATO 

Helen Davidson, Laramie. 

Irene Dawson, Laramie. 



Janice Decker, Burnt Fork. 

Franklin DeForest, Laramie-. 
2AE 
Varsity Football ; Varsity Basketball. 

Etta Diggs, Casper. 

Bard Farral, Albuquerque, 

K2 New Mexico 

Spencer Flo, Sidney, Neb. 

Hazel Gran, Douglas. 
Carol Hayden, Laramie. 
John HiCks, Torrington. 
Mrs. Dorothy Hill, Laramie. 
Ralph Jones, Thermopolis. 



Wesley KerpEr, Laramie. 
K2 

Betty Kidd, Casper. 

Bill Lester, Jr.. Casper. 
2AE 
Varsity Football (2) ; Varsity Basket- 
ball (1, 2). 

Alice Linton, Meeteetse. 

Donald McHenry, Laramie. 

Frances McPhee, Laramie. 

George Mabee, Cheyenne. 
ATfi 
Varsity Football (2). 

Mabell Massey, Hanna. 
KA 

Josephine Matson, Hanna. 

Margaret Mumm, Hanna. 
Honor Book, Music (2). 

Paul O'Bryan, Casper. 

2AE 
Varsity Football (2). 

Ted O'Melia, Rawlins. 

2AE 
Theta Alpha Phi. 

Rl^th O'Neil, Laramie. 

Carl Pearson, Lander. 
2AE 

Grace Pluckhahn, Casper. 
KA 

Fred O. Rice, Douglas. 
K2 

Varsity Football (2). 

Hazel M. Robe, Basin. 

Elton Roberts, Greybull. 

Ambrose Ross, Cheyenne. 
K2 





Lily Barbara Hawkes, Parkerton. 
Newman Club ; W. A. A. 

Alice Deck, Egbert, Wyo. 

Maurine Nelson, Cheyenne. 
Glee Club. 

Florence Fla\-in, Laramie. 

Dorothy Eleanor King, 

AAA Montpelier, Idaho. 

Juanita Plasters, Hyattville. 

Nellie Bender, Lucerne. 

Julia Herring, Laramie. 
rz 

Thelma Hinds, Laramie. 
Florence McGlashen, Pine BKiffs. 

Lewis Williams, Laramie. 

2N 

Doris Bailey, Green River. 
KA 



Wedgewood Thompson, Thermopolis. 
ATfi 
Frosh Football ; Frosh President. 

Doris SpEncer, Greybull. 

rz 

Walter Williamson, Sundance. 
Karling jMiller, Rock River. 
Irabess Munson, Lander. 
Beatrice Jack, Rock Springs 
May Brasell, Laramie. 
Robert Guthrie, Cheyenne. 

Josephine Watt, Buffalo. 
Kappa Phi. 





Grace: Richey, Cheyenne. 

rz 

Margaret McClellan, Worland. 

Frank B. Taylor, Casper. 

Adella Sherard, Cheyenne. 

Raynor Moser, Cherokee, Iowa. 

Harry Williams, Evanston. 

Doris Ewers, Basin. 
Kappa Phi. 

Mildred Metzler, Riverton. 
Kappa Phi. 

R. H. Cresswell, Douglas. 

Frances Neele Colt, Chicago, 111 



Dorothy E. Finkbiner, Cheyenne. 

Wayne Scott, Powell. 

Lloyd Colleneurg, Cheyenne. 

Harold E. Luthy, 

Loveland, Colorado, 

Ruby Bower, Worland. 
Home Ec Club. 

LuELLA Sprow, Reading. Michigan. 
Kappa Phi. 

Trena M. Wagner, Midwest. 

Genevieve M. DeJarnette, 



Sheridan. 



Mark J. Taylor, Jr., Gillette. 
AMA 





Virginia J. Sanford, Denver, Colo. 
HE* 

Adolph Hamm, Rozet. 

Helen Rand, Buffalo. 

Stella M. Hollis, Sheridan. 

MerritT Ferrin, Jackson. 

Mildred Anderson, Rock Springs. 

Marlin Kurtz, Buffalo. 

Nell M. Avent, Burlington. 

Eldon Boyd, Laramie. 

2N 



Case Campbell, Ault, Colorado. 
2AE 

Bessie Brewer, Lingle. 
Jessie V. Brewer, Lingle. 

George S. Haywood, Sheridan. 

2N 

James P. Yates, Green River. 

Kay B. Lehr, Midwest. 
Kappa Phi. 

CoNSUELo Stephens, Chappell, Neb. 
KA 

Donald Jackson, New York City. 
K2 




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1925 WYO 



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Emerson Allen, Laramie. 

Doris Lineaweaver, Sheridan. 

Margaret Mark, Mitchell, Nebraska. 
Chorus. 

Mildred Duncan, Laramie. 

Vendla Huhtala, Hanna. 

Robert W. Rider, Hanna. 

2N 

Joe Hanna, Lingle. 

Raymond ]\L Davis, Green River. 
K2 

Dorothy Pearson, Belfry, IMontana. 

G. E. Woods, Hanna. 

2N 



Eileen Clow, Denver, Colorado. 

rz 

Lucy Moon, Thermopolis. 
Jean Mabee, Cheyenne. 

Mae Nordouist, Cody. 
KA 

Helen McCoy, Sheridan. 
KA 

Helen Spriggs, Lander. 

Helen Clark, Cheyenne. 

rz 

Evelyn Klein, Laramie. 
Dorothy Smalley, Cokeville. 
BiLLiE Snyder, Snyderville. 





Lee; Coleman, Lander. 

2AE 

Clara Holm, Cody. 
KA 

Robert Knittle, Casner. 
2AE 

Violet Berthelson, Cowley. 
Mary Whelan, Rock Springs. 

Catherine Prahl, Laramie. 
KA 

Vera L. Jones, Thermopolis. 

Margaret Hays, Buffalo. 

Maude Harvaka, Evanston. 

Pearl Green, Sheridan. 
Kappa Phi. 



Katherine Mason, Glendo. 
J. J. Burns, Brady, Texas. 

Lee Bettis, Newcastle. 
AMA 

Wrestling (2). 

Nellie B. Huston, Moorcroft. 

Emmet Ekdaiil, Cheyenne. 
ATQ 

Fern Willock, Worland. 
Charles Wilson, Worland. 

Helen Hance. Laramie. 

Pearle Jones, Cody. 
KA 




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19 25 WYO 



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Marjoree Sisk, Casper. 

Louise Price, Laramie. 
nB<E> 

Helen Smith, Laramie. 

Alice M. Thompson, Thermopolis. 
HB* 

Josephine Russell, Sheridan. 

Dorothy DeArmon, Cheyenne. 

Mary Jensen, BurHngton. 

Marie Matthew, Buffalo. 
rz 

Bern ice Wells. Glendo. 

William Jordan, High Springs, Fla. 



Elizabeth Stacey, Diamondville. 

Richard H. Madden, Boston, Mass. 
ATfi 

George Young, Cheyenne. 
ATQ 

Dave W. Ochsenschlager, 

2N Aurora, 111. 

Marglierite Johnson, Laramie. 
Virginia H. Colt, River Forest, 111. 
Bertha Cordes, Fort Laramie. 
Mary A. Gaber, Hudson. 

rz 

Miriam A. Jenkins, Big Piney. 

nB$ 

Wynne Clark, Powell. 
ATf) 





John R. Astle, Cheyenne. 
ATQ 

Archy Dixon, Newcastle. 

Claudis Hon^ Sheridan. 
KA 

Mary E. Turner, Laramie. 

Irma Carpenter, Powell. 
Kappa Phi. 

Martha Ramirez, Cheyenne. 

Howard McClEllan, Worland. 

R. R. HousER, Farmer City, Illinois. 
ATO 

P. A. Oberhouser, Eustis, Neb. 

Edward Keefe, Laramie. 
2AE 



Alfred Pence, Pine Bluffs. 

Edna Wallis, Laramie. 

Rae Crall, Laramie. 
KA 

Lucille White, Buffalo. 

Elsie Gilland, Thermopolis. 

Lawrence Williams, Evanston. 

AL\RY HoBBS, Casper. 

nB$ 

Evelyn Cole, Cozad, Nebraska. 

Dick Costin, Laramie. 
2AE 

Rudar Jorgenson, Laramie. 




93 




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Jack Abbott, Laramie. • 

2N 

Florence Ahrens, Basin. 

Harold Anderson. Laramie. 

Stephen J. Anderson, 

Young Woman. 

Norman Baillie, Laramie. 
K2 

Charles Bateman, Laramie. 

Dorothy Bean, Marshall. 

John O. Bennett, Laramie. 

Frances Blair, Laramie. 

Marshall Bosley, Laramie. 

Edith Bower, Worland. 

Irene Bowling, Cheyenne. 

Dean E. Boyer, Casper. 
2AE 

RuLON Bradshaw, Lyman. 

Harold, B. Brown, Laramie. 

Carl Bugas, Wamsntter. 
2AE 

J. Fulton Burdick, Cheyenne. 

Kathryn Cahill, Cheyenne. 

Dean Campbell, Ault, Colo. 

Kathleen Cantlin. 
AAA 

Henry Carpenter, Powell. 
AMA 

Edward Cheesbrough, Medicine Bow. 
K. A. Cornelius, Fort Laramie. 
Edith M. Cox, Red Lodge, Montana. 
Waldo R. Cutler, Lovell. 
Wyman CypherT, Lander. 
Carl Davis, Sheridan. 
Edward Dean, Ucross. 
Dick Denman, Waxahachie, Texas. 
Zaidee Dickinson, Sheridan. 
Wesley Dixon, Morgan. 



Henry Edwards, Cheyenne. 

Ruth Edwards, Armour, S. D. 

Thelia Elliott, Dix, Neb. 

Cora Ellis, Elk Mountain. 

David Ellis, Elk Mountain. 

Helen Ellis, Elk Mountain. 

Victor Evans, Cambridge, Neb. 

Cyril L. Fox, Rochester, Minn. 
2AE 

George Freeman, Natchetoches, La. 

Troy Fullerton, Elkhart, Kan. 

Frances Girard, Superior. 

Sheldon Glasgow, Powell. 

George Goble, Casper. 
2AE 

Helen Goosic, Hastings, Neb. 

William Hacker, Atoka, Okla. 

Mrs. Harriet Hall, Gebo. 

Charles Hanscum, Dubois. 

Lawrence Hart, Riverton. 
2AE 

William Hawkin, Sundance. 

Edith Hill, Cowdrey, Colo. 

Be^Thel Hoel, Basin. 

Dain Holden, Moorcroft. 

William Holland, Belfry, Mcnt. 

Robert Hovick, Laramie. 
AMA 

Ray Iiams, Lander. 

Ray Johnson, Grand Haven, Mich, 

Lloyd Jones, Lincoln, Neb. 
K2 

Frances Josselyn, Sheridan. 

George Kedl, Sheridan. 
AMA 

J. J. Knights, Powell. 
Oswald Koerfer, Aurora, III, 




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r25 WYO 



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Stanley Kreps, Powell. 

Frances Krueger, Egbert. 

Mary Grace Larsen, 

AAA Port Arthur, Texas 

Oscar Larsen, Laramie. 

Robert Lucas, Jackson. 

Lucy McDonald. 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Louis Leichtweiss, Shoshoni. 

Richard Leake, Laramie. 

Helen McGarrity, Riverton. 

Alice Madison, Belfry, Mont. 

Cyril Markert, Buffalo. 

L. A. Merritt, Douglas. 

Fae Mitchell, Lander. 

Ruth Morgareidge, Sheridan. 
KA 

Ethel Morris, Laramie. 

Jay MowrEy, Laramie. 

Clare Mundell, Laramie. 

Edna Neil, Diamondville. 

Burnette Noble. Thermopolis. 

Dorothy Nolan, Laramie. 

AAA 

Viola Ogden, Richfield, Utah. 

Terr^nce O'Mara, Casper. 

Thomas ParmaleE, Denver, Colo. 

James Paschall, Wdlliard, Colo. 

Ora Pierce, Laramie. 
K2 

Donna Rea, Laramie. 

AAA 

Eugene Record, Moorcroft. 



Neil C. Reimann. Buffalo. 

2AE 

Georgina Rendle, Rawlins. 

AAA 

Fred Ringert, Laramie. 

Leon Robertson, Basin. 

Don Roush, Douglas. 
K2 

Stanley Russell. Cody. 

Mary Seals. Midwest. 

Horace Selby, Sheridan. 

Glennon Stanton, Casper. 
ATQ 

Harold Stenswick, Afilllxjurne. 

Marion Stevens, Laramie. 
UB<P 

Harriett Straley. Greybull. 

Gladys Thatcher. Laramie. 

Jean Tompkins, Pasadena, Cal. 

Helen Tune. Sheridan. 

Vera Viner, Laramie. 

Adolph Vorpahl, Laramie. 

Clarence Waegele, Ucross. 

Melvin Watkins, Birmingham, Ala. 

Joe H. Watt. Moorcroft. 

Sidney Weber. Baggs. 

George D. Welty. Deadwood, S. D. 

Lela West, Arvada. 

AAA 

Ruth Whiter, Denver, Colo. 
Irene Wilson, Saratoga. 
Phillip Zingsheim, Rawlins. 




19-2.5 WYO 




NURSES 

Vera George Laramie 

Jessie Grant Glenrock 

Winifred Kunzendorf Laramie 

Elsie Partridge Laramie 



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Grace Buchanan 

Voted the most popular girl in the 

Senior Class 




Erma Stevens 

Voted the most beautiful girl i« the 

Senior Class 




Kathe;ryn Brock 

Voted the most popular girl in the 

Junior Class 




Ann Lawler 

Voted the most beautiful girl in the 

Junior Class 




Alice McKran 

Voted the most popular girl in the 

Sophomore Class 




Ik K NIC Dawson 

Voted the most beautiful girl in the 

Sophomore Class 




Grace Ric'hey 

Voted the most popular girl in the 
Freshman Class 



■ 



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Ruth Edwards 

Voted the most beautiful girl in the 

Freshman Class 



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192.5 VV 




Vandaveer Meeboer Hobbs 



Blanchard Spears Corbett 



Gilbert Taliaferro Greenberg 



Faurie Zaring Kocher Ducker Scliilt Fenex 

Redhair Ormsby Miller Erickson 

Wood Gariepy Scott Lippold 

Allsman DaUell Koerfer Rice 

LaNoue Denton Greth Gish Groves Hanna 



"W" CLUB 

OFFICERS 

Clair Blanchard President 

Walte;r Spears Vice-President 

J. K. Corbett Secretary-Treasurer 

The men's Honorary Athletic Society of the University of Wyoming, com- 
monly known as the "W" Club, consists of all men who have been awarded a "W 
in any branch of Varsity athletics. The object of this organization is to main- 
tain a high standard of sportsmanship and clean athletics. Each year the basketball 
letter men of the Club choose the All-State High School Basketball Team of Wyo- 
ming. At the beginning of the fall term each year the Club informs the Freshmen 
of the school traditions. Through this Club the letter men of the University are 
drawn more closely together and are able to co-operate for the best advantages 
of athletics. 



105 



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HEAVIER— BUT NO^^:1rTER 



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.Wyoming Calfboys Score victory 
' In Thrilling Battle Against C. A. C. \ 
^ : First Year Men on Wyoming Field 




192 5 VVYO 



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THE 1924 FOOTBALL CAMPAIGN 

October 4 — Game with Colorado 
Aggies cancelled on account of the 
death of Governor Ross. 

October 11 — Wyoming, o; Denver 
U, 7. The Pioneers scored a touch- 
down in the last three minutes of play 
after Wyoming had outfought and 
outplayed them all the way. Denver 
outweighed Wyoming fourteen pounds 
to the man. DeForest booted the ball 
95 yards for the longest punt ever 
registered at Broadway Park in 
Denver. 

October 18 — Wyoming, 33 ; Colo- 
rado Teachers, 8. The Cowboys won 
their first victory in two years by 
hanging it on the Teachers in a slow 
game at the University field. Teachers 
scored on a fluke after a kick-ofif. 
Lester scored the first touchdown of the season for the Cowboys. DeForest, 
Spears and Gilbert starred. DeForest and Gilbert were injured in the game. 

October 25 — Homecoming. Wyoming, o; Colorado U, 21. Wyoming played 
the best football of the season, but lost the homecoming game. The score was no 
indication of the closeness of the game. Twice the Cowboys had the ball on the 
one-yard line, but were unable to score. At the half-way mark the score was dead- 
locked at o to o, and the Wyoming team had outplayed the Silver and Gold of 
Colorado State. Colorado used two sets of backs, and size and experience told 
in the last half, and the coming Conference champions were victorious. The 
game was a great credit to the Wyoming team and to Coach Dietz. 

November i- — Wyoming, 3 ; Mines, 6. A tough game to lose, and the Cow- 
boys deserved to win, as they outplayed the Miners in every department of the 
game. Erickson registered a long drop kick for Wyoming's tally and missed an- 
other by a few inches. A fumble after the man had crossed the goal line cost 
the Cowboys the game. Faurie played the best game of the season and covered 
himself with glory at his old school. 

November 5 — Wyoming, 18; Montana State, 17. The most thrilling game 
ever witnessed on the Wyoming football field. Gish scored on the first kickofif, 
when Hatfield of Montana fvmibled the ball. The balance of the game was even, 
with first one team scoring and then the other. Wyoming held the Bobcats for 
four downs on the two-yard line during the last minutes of play. The Cowboys 
were at the peak of their season during this game, and played good football at all 
times. This was the last home game of the season. 

108 



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SQUAD AT SALT LAKE 

Top Row — Coach Dietz, DeForest, Allsman, LaNoue, Erickson. Denton, Gish. Mabee, Vandaveer. 

Second Row — Kocher, Miller, Gilbert, Redhair, Roberts, Wood, Greenberg. 

Third Row — Groves, Lester, Blanchard, Rice, Faurie, O'Bryan, Corbett. 

November ii — Wyoming, 2; Utah Aggies, 25. This was the first game of 
the Utah invasion and the Cowboys played the worst football of the season against 
the Utah Aggies. There was no outstanding man on the team and every player 
was guilty of some misplay during the game. Wyoming's lone score came as a 
result of O'Bryan blocking a Utah kick and an Aggie man recovering the ball back 
of the Wyoming goal line for a safety. 

November 15 — Wyoming, o; Utah U, 28. The Cowboys suffered their sec- 
ond loss of the Utah trip when Utah U trimmed them at Salt Lake. The game 
was rough and the officiating was entirely against the Cowboys. Wyoming held 
the Utes for the first half to 7 points, but in the last stanza everything went against 
the Wyoming team, and the team was demoralized by so many men being taken 
from the game by the officials. Mabee played the best game of his career. He 
was the outstanding man of the Wyoming team. 

November 22 — Wyoming, 3 ; Colorado College, 21. The last game of the sea- 
son was a tough one for the Cowboys, and they lost to the strong Colorado Col- 
lege Tigers at Colorado Springs. Wyoming scored in the first frame via the 
drop-kick route and was leading at the end of the first period. McDougal, the 
flash C. C. back, got away with a number of long runs for touchdowns. The 
Tigers could do nothing against the Cowboys by straight football and had to re- 
sort to long runs. This was the last of five games in three weeks. 

109 



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George M. V and a veer. Tackle 
Captain Van had tough kick when he in- 
jured his knee in the first practice scrim- 
mage of the season and was out of the first 
three games and was unahle to play hut very 
little in the rest. This was Van's third and 
last year on the Varsity. He has been a 
good, consistent player for Wyoming and 
has always had the old spirit, "Wyoming 
never quits." 

Harold Gilbert, Guard 
Gilbert is captain-elect for next year and 
is the wise choice for the position. He is 
the fightingest Cowboy that ever donned 
the Brown and Yellow, and is going to have 
the honor of captaining the best Wyoming 
football team in the history of the school. 
An injured hand early in the season handi- 
capped Gilly this year, but his influence on 
the team was apparent when he wasn't in 
the line-up. 

Irvin Redhair, Quarterback 
Playing his first year on the Varsity, Irv 
did well when he was in the game running 
the team. He has a good head on his shoul- 
ders and will be a valuable man to Coach 
Dietz next year. He came out late for foot- 
ball this season, but made a name for him- 
self during the time he was in the game. 

Oscar Erickson, Center and Tackle 
Ock played his first year of \^arsity foot- 
ball and did a good job of it. He played in 
nearly every position on the line, but was 
used most of the season at center. Ock is 
the boy with the gold toe on the Varsity 
team and handled most of the kicking for 
the team when DeForest was out of the 
game. He scored drop kicks against Mines 
and C. C. Ock will be back next year to 
play for Wyoming. Erickson received hon- 
orable mention on the all-Rocky Mountain 
eleven. 

Elton Roberts, Fullback 
In the Montana game. Heavy played the 
game of his career. Whenever called upon 
to carry the ball he was there and over. A 
number of Wyoming gains were due to 
efiforts of our friend Heavy. This was his 
first year on the Coywboy team and he has 
a nice future for football in the Wyoming 
school. When Heavy gets under way some- 
thing has to move when he hits the line. 





19 2 5 WYO 



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Roy Greenberg 
A steady football player and a plugger all 
the time, is Greenburg. He played his sec- 
ond year on the Varsity this season and will 
be back with Coach Dietz next year. Not 
flashy or sensational, but a man who can 
always be depended upon. A man of this 
type is valuable to any team. Next year 
should be Greenberg's big year with the 
Cowboys. 

Walter Spears, Fullback 
Spears was the first-string Varsity full- 
back this year and played his second year 
on the Wyoming team. In the Colorado U 
game Walt was a consistent ground gainer 
and played one of the best games of his 
life. Walt was thrown into the breach dur- 
ing the Montana game and did much in 
stopping the advance of the Bobcats toward 
the Wyoming goal line. 

Clair ("Okie") Blanch ard 
Qarterback 
The biggest little man in Wyoming wound 
up his athletic career by playing first-string 
quarterback on the Wyoming team. This 
was Okie's third year on the Varsity team 
and he covered himself with glory during 
the season. An injured wrist dn the Teach- 
ers' game hindered him during the balance 
of the season, but he was always there and 
fighting. Okie was the safety man this year 
and made some nice returns on punts. 
Louie Allsman, End 
Hard hitting and dependable. This is 
the way to describe Allsman, the Cowboy's 
lanky end. Playing his first year on the 
Varsity, Louie was in every game, and few 
were the plays that were sent around him. 
He will back next year and will be a valu- 
able man to Coach Dietz. An all-around 
athlete — never sensational — but a man who 
can always be depended upon to do his bit. 

Franklin DeForest, Fullback 
He deserved all-Conference first team, but 
a broken shoulder in the Teachers' game 
kept him out of a number of the midseason 
games. Duke was the boy that chalked up 
the longest kick ever registered in Broadway 
Park, when he booted the pigskin ninety- 
five yards. In the D. U. game DeForest 
was the sensation of the day and played stel- 
lar ball all the way. Duke received honor- 
able mention on the all-Rocky Mountain 
deven for the year. This was his first year 
on the varsity. 



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19 25 WYO 



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George Mabee, End 
Mabee played his first year on the Varsity 
and was one of the best ends developed. 
He shone brightly in the Utah game, and a 
Salt Lake sport writer stated that it was the 
best exhibition of football ever seen on a 
Salt Lake field. There is some doubt about 
George returning to Wyoming next year 
and it will be a job to fill his place at end. 
He was the kind of end who would throw 
himself before the interference and spill all 
of it and sometimes get the rvmner. 

Fred Rice, Halfback 

Rather small in size but full of fight and 
shifty on his feet. Rice accounted for much 
yardage in the Montana game, and it was 
his best game of the season. He was in- 
jured in the Utah U game and was out of 
the lineup for the balance of the season. 
This was Rice's first year on the Varsity and 
he will be with the Brown and Yellow next 
year. He is a little light for the heavy work 
but makes a good, fast half for end runs. 
John Corbett, Half and Fullback 

Corbett finished his football career this 
year at Wyoming and the Cowboy school is 
losing a good man. This was Jack's third 
year on the Varsity and bis loss will be 
keenly felt in football. He was a triple 
threat man, as he could run, pass or kick. 
A man of this type is valuable on any team. 
His feature was a good toe and a good arm 
for throwing forward passes. 

John Groves^ Halfback 

Another little fellow with all the fight in 
the world, played his first year on the Var- 
sity this year and proved himself to be a 
football player of the first class. Groves is 
featured in end runs, and, due to speed 
and shiftiness of foot, he is able to get away 
around the ends for good gains. He 
constant threat with the ball and is always 
good for a gain when his interference is fast 
enough to get away. He will be with the 
Cowboys next year. 

Harold Hobbs, Fullback 

Hobbs is a plugger and a sticker, and for 
his hard work earned his reward this year 
by making his letter. Sickness kept him out 
of the lineup last year, but he was out this 
year and never missed a practice. Always 
there when the Coach wanted him and a man 
the Coach could depend upon to go into the 
game and do as he was told. The just re- 
ward of a faithful Cowboy. 





1^ 

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France^s LaNoue, Guard 
His second year on the team and a 
scrappy football player who will be back 
next year to take another whirl at the great 
college game. Babe played a nice game all 
season at guard. His position was a hard 
one for the opposition to gain through, and 
he could be depended upon to open up a hole 
in the line. Babe played steady ball all year 
and will be a good man in the line next year. 
WoRTHAM Denton, Tackle 
Playing one of the hardest positions on a 
Dietz-coached team, Denton delivered the 
goods and played good football in all the 
games he was in. JefT come ovit late for 
football in the fall, but soon proved his 
worth to Coach Dietz and was one of the 
mainstays of the line during the latter part 
of the season. This was his first year of 
football and he will be back for another try 
next year. 

Edward Miller, End 
Playing end for the second year, Miller 
showed his stuff and was always in the 
game. Miller is credited with saving the 
Montana game when he nailed Hatfield for 
a loss when the latter tried to circle Miller 
from the one-yard line on the last down the 
Montana team had in the game. Miller is a 
hard tackier and a sure man on forward 
passes. Next year will be his last on the 
Wyoming team. 

ZoLLiE Wood, Guard and Tackle 
Another plugger is Zollie Wood. He 
showed his fight and football ability in the 
Colorado game when he fought so hard that 
after the game he had to be assisted from 
the playing field. Always under every play, 
he is a wonderful guard. Several times dur- 
ing the season he was shifted to tackle and 
played as well in this position. This was his 
last year on the team, and the services of 
this valuable man will be missed. 
Karl GrETh, Tackle 
His second year on the Varsity found 
Greth as dependable as ever and a member 
of the squad. He is a man with a lot of 
football experience and a hard worker in 
the line. Not only is he a good man both 
offensively and defensively in the line, but 
he can also punt and has the best arm of the 
squad for forward passes. When called 
back out of the line to pass or kick he gen- 
erally made a good job of it. He will be 
back dn a suit next year for the Cowboys. 





5 WYO 






Ge;orge;s Faurie, Halfback 
First-string halfback for most of the sea- 
son, Buck was always in the game and try- 
ing. He scored for Wyoming this year and 
was one of the most clever men in the Cow- 
boys' backfield. Buck traveled down to 
Alines and before his old classmates and 
against many old friends in Mines played 
the best football he did of the season. If 
every man on the team had played the game 
Faurie did against the Miners, Wyoming- 
would have another victory marked up on 
the final totals. 

William Kocher, Tackle 
Bill was ruled ineligible for football in 
1923, but he was eligible last season and a 
member of the team. He is big and has 
two hundred pounds of fight when he gets 
to going. Bill was responsible for a lot of 
losses for the opposition this year when he 
tore oiif some nice tackles behind the line 
of scrimmage. This was Ball's first and last 
year on the Varsity, as he graduates in June. 

Robert Gish, Center and Tackle 
When Bob Gish steps onto a football field 
he undergoes a complete transformation. 
From a peace-loving individual he turns into 
a fighting fool and fights until the last man 
is down. At center, where he started the 
season, he played sweet ball, and his passes 
were always good. He was shifted several 
times and during the season played tackle, 
center, backfield, and even took a shot at 
end. 

Paul O'Bryan, End 
Here is one of the smartest and hardest 
tackling ends that ever donned a Cowboy 
football suit. He weighs but 145 pounds, 
but he is all fight and won the respect of 
every backfield in the Conference. As his 
name implies, Obie is a good old Irish 
fighter and battles all the time. He played 
stellar ball all season, but showed especially 
bright in the Utah Aggie game. 

Bill Lester, Halfback 
A first-string halfback of the first waters. 
Bill played his first year of college football 
and coaches and fans alike are wild about 
him. He had the honor of making the first 
Cowboy touchdown of the season and inci- 
dentally the first touchdown in two years 
when he scored from the 25-yard line in the 
Teachers' game. He is a scrapper in every 
sense of the word and will be with the Cow- 
boys next year. 

115 




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OSCAR ERICKSON 



DUKE DeFOREST 



ALL-CONFERENCE FOOTBALL 

The highest ambition for football players is to make the All-Conference team. 
The next highest honor is to receve honorable mention on the mythical team, and 
two of Wyoming's sons received this honor. They were Franklin DeForest and 
Oscar Erickson, and no two men in the Conference merited this honor more than 
DeForest and Erickson. Both men played their first year on the Varsity and both 
will be back next year for football. 



Erickson hails from Cheyenne and 
is a graduate of that city's high school. 
During" his time in Cheyenne High he 
was a member of the football and bas- 
ketball teams of Cheyenne and covered 
himself with glory in everything ath- 
letic. Erickson was put into the D. U. 
game at center shortly after the game 
started and held down this position for 
most of the season. A couple of times 
he was shifted to end or tackle in the 
line, and wherever he was put he 
always gave a good accoimt of himself. 
He is a fighter in the line and a power- 
ful defense player. Along with his 
power as a line man he has a good 
kicking toe. 



DeForest is a product of Laramie 
High School and was a member of 
that school's teams until graduation. 
Upon entering the University of Wyo- 
ming, he went out for Freshman foot- 
ball and was elected to pilot the Frosh 
football team. This year, as his first, 
on the team he played halfback and 
was the best ground gainer on the 
Wyoming team. DeForest is a triple 
threat man. He can pass, kick or run. 
His punting was one of the features 
of the Conference this year. Duke 
broke his collar bone in the Teachers' 
game, and was out of all the mid- 
season games. He played in the last 
two games and proved himself worthy 
of all-Conference mention. 




FRESHMAN FOOTBALL SQUAD 
Top Row — Ballengee, manager; Williams, Linsey, Oschsenschlager, Denman, Reimann, Coleman, Ormsby, Linton, 

Prinqle, Bennett, Coach Clark. 

Second Row — Boyd, Stanton, Hubbard, Mowrey, Fullerton, McGrath, Milllgan, Brewster, Whitman. 

Third Row—^VIadden, Krepps, Hanna, Thompson, Abbott, Hart, Clark, Burnstad, Jones. 





i 1:^' -L ^J VV 1 





STEWART M. CLARK 

Coach 

Varsity Basketball, Varsity Track 

and Frosh Football 



TRAINER BILL LEE 



119 




REVIEW OF THE SEASON 

The Cowboys experienced the most successful season they have yet had as 
members of the Rocky Mountain Conference, and placed a close fourth in the 
final standing of the teams in the Conference. The Cowboys opened the new 
gymnasium this year by knocking ol¥ the strong University of Utah team in a 
close and hard-fought battle. The next night the Cowboys lost to the same team. 

The tough break of the season came in the fact that Wyoming was forced 
to play Colorado University and Colorado College early in the season and lost 
both these games away from home. Both games were close and Wyoming sprung 
into the Conference limelight as a possible contender .for the title. The Cowboys 
hit their stride after this game and swept everything before them. 

Denver University went along undefeated and led the Conference until they 
journeyed up to Laramie, and the Cowboys knocked them off for two games and 
tumbled the Pioneers out of the lead. C. C. then became the Conference leaders. 
Wyoming knocked them over for a game at the new gym and the title was any- 
body's in the Conference. 

Aggies took a whirl at the Cowboys on the Wyoming floor and were so hope- 
lessly outclassed that the games weren't even interesting. The Cowboys com- 
pletely snowed the Aggies under with a host of field goals. The Farmers never 
could solve the Cowboys' defense for a short shot. 

Then came the tough luck, and when Wyoming had a chance to finish first 
or second the team had to go to Greeley and take a drubbing at the hands of the 
Teachers in the tiny building they so humorously refer to as a gymnasium. 

The teachers and a referee beat Wyoming in a return game in Cheyenne, 
which did not count as a Conference game. 

The Cowboys did not lose a Conference game on their own floor, and all the 
teams they went up against, except the Aggies, were tough teams to beat. 

Nine men made their letters at the Varsity this year in basketball and they 
will all be back for next year. The letter men were : Captain Erickson. Captain- 
elect Banta, Lester, Fox, Pierce, Allsman, Emery, Koerfer and DeForest. 

BASKETBALL SCORES 



Wyoming 39 

Wyoming yj 

Wyoming 31 

Wyoming 16 

Wyoming 24 

Wyoming 25 

Wyoming 26 

Wyoming 20 

Wyoming 19 

Wyoming 10 

Wyoming t^2 

Wyoming 43 



Kearney Normal 13 

Cheyenne Lidependents 16 

Utah University 29 

Utah University 27 

Colorado University 26 

Colorado College 33 

Colorado College 20 

Denver L^niversity 15 

Denver University 15 

Colorado Teachers 24 

Colorado Aggies 15 

Colorado Aggies 10 



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ALL-CONFERENCE BASKETBALL 

With the completion of the 1925 ba.'^ketball season three men from the Uni- 
versity of Wyoming were placed on the All-Conference team as selected for the 
Spaulding basketball guide. These three men were : Captain Oscar Erickson, on 
the first team ; Ora Pierce, on the second team, and Captain-elect Ted Banta on 
the honorable mention roster. These are the most All-Conference men that Wyo- 
ming has ever received in one year and the school and state are proud of them. 

Erickson was the unanimous choice of all the coaches in the Conference for 
one of the guard positions on the mythical team. He was also selected in this 
position for the Spaulding basketball guide. This was his second year on the 
Wyoming basketball team. At the close of the previous season on the team he 
was selected to captain the 1925 team and he did a good job of it. Ock is well 
versed in the sport and always fighting for the team and school. His position 
is standing guard, and from this position he was one of the four high-scoring 
guards of the season. Many times his long shots looped through the basket when 
the Cowboys needed points. 

The second all-conference honor team included the name of Pierce of Wyo- 
ming, and he was the wise selection. Many were of the opinion that he should 
have been given first team along with Erickson. In commenting on the Wyo- 
ming guards, Herb Dana, premier referee of the Rocky Mountains and an author- 
ity on basketball, stated that the Cowboys had the two best guards in the Confer- 
ence. Pat was used as running guard this year, and his ability to dribble dazzled 
every team that the Cowboys faced in basketball. This was his first year on the 
Wyoming team, and before coming to the University he played with Laramie 
High School and where he was selected on the all-Wyoming team. He was also 
a member of the GreybuU High team for two years before coming to Laramie. 
He will be back with the Cowboys next year. 

The captain-elect for next year's basketball team is Ted Banta, and he was 
the man who received honorable mention on the all-Conference team. Next year 
will be Ted's fourth year on the Wyoming team, with which he has always been 
one of the main performers. He plays at forward and is one of the surest shots 
in the Conference. Ted suffered an off season in the early games and did not 
show his stufif until the latter part of the basketball year, at which time he proved 
his value and ability. Banta received his high school training at Greeley High in 
Colorado and was a member of that school's basketball teams for the four years 
he was in high school. During the time he was in Greeley he was named as for- 
ward on the all-Colorado team, and his running mate was Greeley Timothy of 
the same team and now the best forward in the Rockv Mountains. 



123 




19 2 5 VV\ 





(PF 



HUBBARD 
RIDER 





MUNSON (C) 
HART 



LINTON 
ASTIN 



124 



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1915 WYO 





BOXING 

Boxing at the University of Wyoming is one of the sports in which the Cow- 
boys seem to be most proficient. For the last three years Wyoming fighters have 
either tied or won the first place in the Conference. 

The team this year had a very poor start toward the winning of a Confer- 
ence championship. Blanchard, for three years Conference champion and captain 
of last year's team, was unable to compete on account of injuries sustained in 
football. There was a pai^ticular lack of coaches for the work, and only after 
a long period of lost training season G. R. McConnell was secured to coach. 

When at last a team was ready to enter the Conference dual meets, schools 
with which meets were scheduled failed to produce teams. This meant at the time 
of the Conference finals the Cowboys, all new men, were inexperienced. 

The semi finals of the Conference meet gave Rider and Hart a chance to show 
their stuff. Both of the men were totally lacking in experience, but against old 
heads at the sport did wonderfully well. Both of these men being Freshmen, 
will mean a lot to the University, pugilistically speaking. 

The finals had Mowry, Flubbard, Linton, Munson and Astin. Munson was 
the only one who had fought in the semi-finals, the others either byes or forfeits. 
In the first match of the evening Astin won a decision over the Mines' 115-pound 
man. Munson followed with one over the 125-pound boxer of Boulder. Alowry, 
at 158 pounds, lost the decision to Mines. Mowry, however, is a good, fast 
fighter and, with the development of a punch, should do big things in the Con- 
ference. Hubbard of Wyoming, in his fight with Rut Volk of Mines, had the 
toughest fight on the program. \"olk is a heavy hitter and has had a great deal of 
experience. Hubbard stayed with Volk through three rounds of punishment that 
only the best of courage could have sustained him. Linton won the Conference 
championship on straight forfeits. 

Altogether the boxing season of the University of Wyoming ended just as 
successfully as it had appeared to have started unsuccessfully. 



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WRESTLING 

Wrestling, along with boxing, is one of the bright lights of Wyoming's 
athletics. For several years Wyoming has put out a wrestling squad of which 
she may well be proud. The first meet of the season was held at Greeley. Here 
the Cowboys showed their superiority by taking all bvit two of the matches. 
Bettis, Scott, Zaring, Wood and Russell, in 115, 125, 135, 158 and 175 pound 
classes, respectively, took their matches by falls. Backus lost his match in the 
145 class by a decision and LaNoue lost in the heavy-weight class by a fall. The 
score for the meet was twenty-three to eight. 

Next on the wrestling ticket came a dual meet with Colorado Aggies. The 
team had been weakened by recent illness in the squad and could not do their 
best. Bettis started things by taking his match. Scott, after a long scrap, went 
to a draw. Zaring took his man into camp by lifting him into the air and drop- 
ping him to the mat with force enough to knock him out. Backus lost by de- 
cision. Wood took his match by decision. LaNoue was defeated by decision and 
Linton was thrown to the mat by "Heavy" Smith, who is famous in Rocky Moun- 
tain wrestling circles. The final tabulation showed: Wyoming, 14^ ; Aggies, 14^. 

Wyoming was host to the Conference in its mammoth gymnasium for the 
Conference meet. The first night resulted in Scott being thrown by a fall. Zar- 
ing suffered the same fate. Zollie Wood came out victor in his match. The sec- 
ond night witnessed a large crowd gathered to cheer the Cowboys to victory. 
Bettis took his man by a fall and started the ball rolling. Wood repeated his per- 
formance of the previous night. Again the Aggies split honors with Wyoming, 
but Wyoming was still sure of her superiority and a flip for the Conference cup 
proved that fact. 



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MEEBOER 



1924 TRACK 

Wyoming had a track team that the state and school was proud of, and justly 
so. The Cowboys had two dual meets, one with Teachers and one with Aggies. 
The first meet was held on the Wyoming field and the Cowboys were overwhelm- 
ing victors over the boys from the spud town. The Aggie meet was a reversal, 
and the Cowboys finished second in a dual meet. 

At the Conference meet the Wyoming team took two places and a close 
fifth in the relay, only being nosed out at the finish line by the Aggies, who had 
put their main efforts into the relay race. Eastman placed second to Cogswell 
of Montana in the 220-yard dash, and Ormsby tossed the javeline for a third 
place. 

Wyoming is entering upon a new era in track and the future teams promise 
to place the Wyoming school on the Conference track map in a very prominent 
position. 

The last year's team was captained by Blodgett, who did not return to \Vyo- 
ming for 1925. Eastman, the Cowboys' premier dash man was another who did 
not return but will be back for 1926. 



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CLARK BETTIS 

POWELL 

CORBETT CRETNEY 

LAW 



TUMBLERS 



Tumbling was a new sport at Wyoming this year. Coach Corbett first began 
working with the squad just after the Christmas hohdays. The tumblers performed 
between halves at many of the basketball games and gave an act at the A. S. 
U. W. carnival-circus. The squad was composed of the following: Warren 
Cretney, Warrel Law, Fuzz Powell, Nels Corbett, Art Clark, Bobby Hynd and 
Lee Bettis. 



129 



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1925 WYO 






SWIMMING 

With the opening of the new University Gym and its magnificent pool, swim- 
ming was introduced as a sport open to all. The pool is one hundred by thirty- 
five feet and is white tiled throughout. It is now equipped with an intercollegiate 
five-foot diving board. No swimming team was organized this year, but next 
winter promises to see Cowboy natators take championships from the other insti- 
tutions of the Rockies. 

The picture shows life guards and swimming instructors standing at the south 
end of the pool. 




INTRA-MURAL BASKETBALL 
Top Row — Faurie, Farrel, Rouch, King, Manager; Stouffer, Cretney. 
Second Row — Rice, Johnson, Newton, Gretfi, Fenex. 



INTRA-MURAL BASKETBALL 

The Intra-Mural Basketball series was run off this year on a percentage basis. 
Every team played every other team until the series was played off. Kappa Sigma 
suffered defeat from the Sigma Nu's in their first game and then went straight 
through to the final game, again with Sigma Nu, and this time to victory. Sigma 
Nu had a clean record until they met A. T. O. in the semi-finals. The Alpha 
Taus upset the dope when they nosed out the Sigma Nus and thus put the latter 
on the same percentage basis with the Kappa Sigs. The final game was one of 
the most thrilling intra-mural contests seen on the campus in some time. After 
a tie score and an extra five-minute period, the Kappa Sigs, by Fenex's short- 
field goal, gained victory with a slim one-point lead. 




INTRA-MURAL TRACK 

Intra-mural track was held rather late this year, not occurring until after some 
of the Varsity meets. S. A. E., last year's winner, took the banner for the second 
consecutive time. The Sig Alphs, with a strong, well-balanced team and with 
entrants in every event, amassed over 70 points. Kappa Sigma was second, with 
39. Sigma Nu finished third and A. T. O. fourth. The intra-murals uncovered 
track material that did good service to the Varsity in the Dual and Conference 
meet. Prominent among these "finds" were Wedge Thompson, A. T. O., who 
garnered 7 of Wyoming's 9 points at the Conference meet ; George Goble, S. A. 
E., who took fourth in the half ; Irvin Redhair, S. N., hurdler, and Louie Alls- 
man, S. A. E., dash man and high jumper. Had Louie been eligible for the Con- 
ference meet, Wyoming's standing would have been several notches higher. 





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Too Row — Constance Chatterton, Marcella Avery, Helen Keller, Martha Preis. 

Second Row — Clara Young, Lois Blenkarn. 

Bottom Row — Mildred Finnerty, Irene Murphey. Edith Malone 



W. A. A. 

The Women's Athletic Association is a national organization, encouraging 
college women to participate an various sports. The organization is governed by 
a standardized point system, awards being given for a certain number of points. 
The A. S. U. W. awards a "W" sweater to any person gaining a sufficient num- 
ber of these points. Swimming was added to the list of activities this year, 

W. A. A. was very successful on the campus this year, much due to the fact 
that the women were fortunate enough to send two delegates to the National 
Conference, which was held at the Southern Branch of the University of Cali- 
fornia in Los Angeles. 




FRESHMAN BASKETBALL TEAM 

Top Row — Edith Bower, Lily Hawkes, May Brazell, Claudis Hon, Dorothy Spani. 

Bottom Row— Jessie Brewer, Doris Lineaweaver (captain), Bessie Brewer. 

BASKETBALL 

Basketball created much excitement among the girls this year, owing to the 
fact that there was a lot of keen competition for most of the positions. 

The class tournament was very interesting, the Freshmen, Class of '28, 
snatching the championship, which has been in the hands of the class of '26 for 
the past two years. 

The following games were played : 

Freshman 17 

Freshmen 20 

Sophomore 23 



Sophomore 7 

Junior-Senior 9 

Junior-Senior 10 



The Varsity team elected — Forwards : Helen Kdler, Constance Chatterton. 
Guards: May Brazell, Lillian Borton. Jumping center, Doris Lineaweaver. Run- 
ning center, Claudis Hon. 




SOPHOMORE HOCKEY TEAM 

Top Row — Mildred Finnerty, Helen Keller. Edith Malone, Mirian Ewers, Lillian Borton. 

Bottom Row — Katie Brauer. Edna Johnson, Joyce Scott. Lois Blenkarn, Margaret BIydenburgh, Nettie Gwyn. 



HOCKEY 

Much interest was shown in hockey the past fall. Many of the girls who 
could not take the regular weekly practice made a special effort to be out the last 
week before the games were played. The numljer of Freshmen who tried out for 
the team make prospects for next fall look very promising. 

Although the results of the games show no outstanding ability, there is no 
question but that each team had at least one talented hockey player. Of those who 
saw the games, none will find it difficult to say that Helen Keller was the star 
player of the season. 




VARSITY HOCKEY TEAM 
Top Row — Margaret BIydenburgh, Lillian Borton, Katie Brauer, Jean Toinpkins, Dorothy Pearson. 
Bottom Row — Joyce Scott. Lois Bienkarn. Martha Pries, Nan^y Jonts. CIsrj Young. 



The Freshmen and Sophomores opened the season ; each made one score. 
The Junior-Senior team met the Frosh a week later and defeated them, 3 — o. 
The Junior-Senior team met defeat at the hands of the Sophomores, i — o. The 
score does not indicate the extremely good playing of the Sophomores, who several 
times nearly crossed their opponents' line for a goal. 

Since the championship was won on a percentage basis, the Clsss of ^2^, 
who had not been defeated, became the hockey champions for the second time, 
having won it last year also. 

The following is the mythical varsity team which was chosen : Blenkarn, C. : 
Jones, R. I. ; BIydenburgh, L. I. ; Young, R. W. ; Borton, L. W. ; Pearson, R. H. ; 
Kellar, L. H. ; Scott, C. H. ; Thompkins, R. F. ; Brauer, Price, G. 



137 




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VARSITY VOLLEY BALL TEAM 
Mildred McDowell, Isabel Van Deusen, Bertha Cordes. Helen McCoy (captain). Irene Carlson, Pearl Green 



VOLLEY BALL 

Volley ball was started in the fall by Miss Hussey, the coach. 

Pearl Green was elected manager of the Frosh team, and Mildred McDowell, 
manager of the Sophs. Teams were chosen later and Pearl Green was made cap- 
tain of the Freshman team and Isabel Van Deusen was elected captain of the 
Sophomores. These two teams were the only ones entered in the fight for the 
championship. 

Four games were played. The Frosh won the first two, 15 — 13 and 15 — 10. 
The Sophomores rallied in the third game and came out on the long end of the 
score of 15 — 8. Their luck did not hold, however, and the Frosh whipped them 
in the final game, with a score of 15 — 9. thus making the Frosh the champions 
of this year. 

After the games were p/layed the Varsity volley ball team was chosen : Helen 
McCoy, captain ; Irene Carlson, Bertha Cordes, Isabel Van Deusen, Mildred Mc- 
Dowell and Pearl Green. 





FROSH VOLLEY BALL TEAM 
Bessie Brewer, Frances Kind, Jessie Brewer, Helen M. McCoy, Pearl Green (captain), Irene Carlson, 

Bertha Cordes. 



TENNIS 

Until last year there has been but little interest shown by the women in 
tennis. At that time, however, so many proficient players turned out that a big 
tourney has been planned for this spring. The championship should be hotly 
contested. 



BASEBALL— SPRING OF '24 

In the spring of 1924 the first baseball tournament was held. A great deal 
of interest was shown in the sport in spite of the fact that the team of the class 
of '27 walked away with every game. No official records were kept of the games 
played. The Frosh proved that they were proficient in this sport. This year it 
is expected that more competition will be shown, for there is a much greater num- 
ber of girls out for the sport. 

No varsity team was chosen last spring, but there were many very outstand- 
ing players. 



139 



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SWIMMING 

Swimming being a new sport at Wyoming University, no definite plans have 
been made for contests. There should be some good contests next year, as a tourney 
between Boulder, Denver University, Colorado Aggies and Wyoming will prob- 
ably be held. 

The beginner's classes are filled to overflowing and some very good material 
should be forthcoming from them. 

The advanced classes are perfecting strokes and working for speed. There 
are some excellent swimmers in the classes, among them Lillian Borton and Clara 
Young. i ' i 




19 -2 ,5 VVYO 




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Back Row — Bunting, Conner, Jenkins, Nordquist. Russell. 
Front Row — Crowe, Bowman. Stevens, Richards. Shier. 

WOMEN'S DEBATES 

Triangular Debate : Wyoming vs. Greeley, at Laramie ; won. 

Wyoming vs. C. C, at Cdlorado Springs ; won. 

Wyoming vs. West Virginia, at Laramie ; no decision. 

Wyoming vs. Willamette (men), at Laramie; won. 

Wyoming vs. Nebraska Wesleyan ; won. 

Wyoming vs. Morningside, at Sioux City ; lost. 

Wyoming vs. Western Union College, at La Mar, Iowa ; lost. 

Wyoming vs. Simpson College, at Indianola, Iowa ; no decision. 

Wyoming vs. University of Dubuque ; Forum debate. 

Wyoming vs. Luther College ; Forum debate. 

Wyoming vs. Marquette College, at Milwaukee ; won. 

Wyoming vs. Wheaton College, at Wheaton, Illinois ; won. 

Wyoming vs. Central Normal College, at Danville, Indiana ; won. 

Wyoming vs. Washington University, at St. Louis, Mo. ; won. 

Wyoming vs. University of Kansas, at Lawrence, Kansas ; no decision. 

Wyoming vs. Bethany College, at Lindsbourg, Kansas ; won. 



142 




Back Row — Rider, Guthrie, Sampier, Cutler. 
Front Row — Woodman, Coach Constant, Pence, Law. 



MEN'vS DEBATES 

Resolved, That the Japanese should be admitted into this country on the same 
basis as Europeans. 

Debaters : Waldo Cutler, Robert Guthrie, Edward Keef e, Warrell Law, 
John McGowen, Alfred Pence, Robert Rider, Wesley Sampier, Herbert Wood- 
man. 

DEBATES 

Wyoming vs. University of Denver School of Commerce, dual debate ; won 
by affirmative at Laramie, lost by negative at Denver. 

Wyoming vs. University of Colorado ; won. 

Wyoming vs. University of Utah, at Salt Lake ; lost. 

Wyoming vs. Brigham Young University, at Provo ; Forum, no decision. 

Wyoming vs. Kansas State College, at Laramie ; no decision. 

Wyoming vs. University of Arizona, at Cheyenne ; lost. 

Wyoming vs. University of Southern California, at Laramie. 

143 




192 5 W\ 




THE LAST DRIVE 



AN OLD COW-MAN S REVERY 

By E. A. Brininstool 

Besdde his sagging door he sits and smokes, 

And dreams again of old trail days, long gone. 

His eyes are dim ! his form is bent and old. 

And silvered are the locks about his brow. 

He hears again the thud of pony hoofs, 

The clash of horns, the bellowing of herds, 

The shouts of riders and the pant of steeds, 

And creak of saddle leather as they ride. 

He sees the dust clouds hover o'er the trail, 

Where, snaky-like, the herd winds slowly on. 

He sees broad-hatted men — bronzed, fearless, bold, 

And as he listens, faintly to his ears 

Is borne the echoes of an old trail-song, 

While to his nostrils floats the scent of sage 

And grease wood, cactus and mesquite, that seems 

To lure him back among his ranges wide. 

'Tis night ! And now he sees the bedded herd 

Beneath the studded canopy of heaven ; 

While hardy night-guards keep their vigil drear. 

The stars gleam out, and yonder rocky buttes 

Lyoom strange and weird and dim and spectral-like. 

The wagon top shines brightly by the stream, 

And in the flickering camp fire's feeble glow 

He sees the silent forms of old range pals 

In dreamless slumber in their blanket beds. 

The coyote's melancholy wail floats in 

Upon the silent, pulseless summer air, 

While overhead, on steady, tireless wing. 

The night-hawk whirls and circles in its flight ; 

And down below the babble of the stream 

Makes low-crooned, soothing music, rippling by. 

Morn comes, with crimson bars of light that leap 
To gild the buttes and tint the east with fire. 
The lark's song echoes clear and sweet and strong 
Upon the morning air ; the range grass gleams 
And glitters with its diamond-tinted dew, 
And all the great, wide prairie springs to life. 




Again he sees the straggling herd move on 
In broken line, and in his dreams he seems 
To feel the bronco's steady, tireless pace 
That carries him upon his last long drive. 
Which ends an sleep along the Sunset Trail. 




CHORUS 

The Music Department may be proud of the achievements of the University 
Chorus during the past year. Under the directorship of Mr. Knapp, the Chorus, 
accompanied by the University Orchestra produced two oratorios. The annual 
performance of Handel's Messiah occurred on December 6th. in keeping with the 
holiday season. The excellent solo work of Mrs. Agnes Clark Glaister of Denver, 
Miss Vera Neely and Canon West of Laramie added greatly to the performance. 
On June 3rd, as an attraction of Commencement week, the Chorus made another 
public appearance, producing on this occasion Mendelssohn's beautiful oratorio, 
Elijah. Mrs. Margaret Mcintosh Boice of Cheyenne, Mr. Elwin Smith of Den- 
ver, Miss Vera Neely and Mr. Knapp were the capable soloists in this perform- 
ance. 

The renditions of both of these famous oratorios were admirably done and 
Mr. Knapp is to be congratulated on his excellent work. 



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WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB 




GLEE CLUB 

Under the able leadership of Miss Vera M. Neely, Supervisor of Public 
School Music, and Voice Teacher, an interesting Glee Club of girls was formed 
during the latter part of January. Meetings were held weekly and shortly after 
organization this group made their first public appearance in assembly, singing a 
number of selections with ease and beauty of interpretation. 

Though somewhat tardy in organizing, the work accomplished was beneficial 
not only to the members, but to the student body as well, and everyone is looking 
forward with pleasure to the appearance of this organization on the campus in 
the fall. 



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Back Row — Sergeant Knicker, Sergeant Riggins, Band Leader 

Thompson, Cadet Major Hobbs (Instructor in map reading.) 

Front Row — Major Daly, Captain Ring. 

UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING R. O. T. C. 
INFANTRY UNIT, SENIOR DIVISION 

Beverly C. Daly, Major U. S. A., Retired, Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics, and Commandant of Cadets. 

Ronald L. Ring, Captain, U. S. A., D. O. L. Assistant Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics. 

Louis Knicker, First Sergeant, U. S. A., Retired, Military Storekeeper. 

R. Riggins, Sergeant, U. S. A., D. E. M. L., Headquarters Clerk. 

Harold Hobbs, Cadet Major, Special Assistant in Map Reading and Military 
Sketching. 

Harry Thompson, Cadet Captain, Band Instructor. 

CADET OFFICERS 
SECOND YEAR ADVANCED 



Captain George Guy 
Captain Harry Engstrom 
Captain L. J. Hanna 



Major James O'Brien 

First Lieutenant Percy Ingham 
Second Lieutenant Jesse Richardson 



FIRST YEAR ADVANCED 



First Lieutenant Charles Hemry Second Lieutenant 

First Lieutenant John Bruner Second Lieutenant 

First Lieutenant Gilbert Cowden Second Lieutenant 

First Ivieutenant Robert Gish Second Lieutenant 

First Lieutenant Kenneth Haywood Second Lieutenant 

First Lieutenant C. O. Frake Second Lieutenant 

First Lieutenant Harry Hornecker Second Lieutenant 

First Lieutenant Kirk Scott Second Lieutenant 

Second Lieutenant Calvin Beagle Second Lieutenant 

Second Lieutenant Oscar Erickson Second Lieutenant 

Second Lieutenant John Lippold Second Lieutenant 
Second Lieutenant Roy Greenberg 




Horace Titus 
Donald McMurray 
William Jordan 
Harold Hunt 
John Curie 
Albert Nussbaum 
Willits Brewster 
Royden Banta 
Dean Boyer 
Roy Pringle 
Francis LaNoue 



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Rack Row — Jordan, Gish, Lippold, Hunt, Erickson, Boyer. 

Second Row — Hemry, Greenberg, Curie, Bruner, Nussbaum, Beagle, Frake, Richardson. 

Front Row — Haywood, Ingham, Hanna, Guy, O'Brien, Engstrom, Scott. Cowden, Hornecker. 





R. O. T. C. BAND 



Arthur Munson 
Harold Buchanan 



Ralph Eakin 
C. R. Jorgensen 

Costin, R. 
Ebert, E. 
Edelman, T. 
Garman, P. 
Ingraham, D. 
Kleeman, R. 
Marcy, R. 
Russell, H. 
Anderson, J. 
Baillie, N. 



se;rguants 



CORPORALS 



rRlVATES 



Franklin DeForest 
Roy Crawford 

Robert Knittle 
Henry Carpenter 




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COMPANY "A", SECOND YEAR BASIC 



First Sergeant I. Redhair 
Sergeant R. Burns 
Sergeant H. Astin 
Sergeant J. Merritt 
Sergeant O. Seaverson 
Sergeant R. Seaverson 
Sergeant R. Peterson 
Sergeant S. Wyman 
Corporal N. Bylund 
Corporal C. Barkhurst 
Corporal J. Guthrie 
Corporal R. Nygaard 
Corpora'] W. Isherwood 
Corporal B. Huie 
Private H. Adamson 
Private L. Adamson 
Private L. Allsman 
Private H. Astle 
Private A. Bethurem 
Private C. Biesemier 
Private C. Brown 
Private W. Buchholz 
Private T. Burnstad 
Private C. Centlivere 
Private M. Chapman 
Private W. Chester 
Private K. Clark 
Private E. Cook 
Private W. Cretney 
Private E. Ekdall 
Private G. Elliot 
Private F. Emory 
Private H. Fenex 



Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 




W. Foresman 

C. Fox 

J. Groves 
E. Gwyn 

D. Hanson 
W. Harkin 

H. Huntzinger 
R. Johnson 

E. Joslin 
G. Kedl 

J. Langandorf 
W. Law 
W. Lester 
R. Lewis 
P. Lepponen 
W. Mershon 
C. Miller 
H. Newton 

E. Palmer 
C. Pearson 
P. Peppoon 
R. Phillips 

F. Rice 
F. Schwoob 
L. Scott 

F. Spreng 

G. Stanton 
C. Taylor 
J. Thompson 
L. Wales 
R. Worthman 
G. Young 
W. Zingg 



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COMPANY "B", FIRST YEAR BASIC 



First Sergeant F. Taylor 
Sergeant M. Taylor 
Sergeant T. Boyd 
Sergeant J. Abbott 
Sergeant D. Oschsenschlager 
Corporal A. Hamm 
Corporal G. Bugas 
Corporal J. Yates 
Corporal R. Hovick 
Corporal M. Kurtz 
Corporal A. Pence 
Corporal H. Woods 
Private E. Allen 
Private H. Anderson 
Private C. Bateman 
Private A. Bennett 
Private F. Burdick 
Private I. Burns 
Private E. Cheesbrough 
Private W. Clark 
Private L. Collenburg 
Private R. Creswell 
Private R. Davis 
Private A. Dixon 
Private W. Dixon 
Private D. Ellis 
Private J. Ferrin 
Private T. Fullerton 
Private S. Glasgow 
Private G. Gob'le 
Private D. Goldman 
Private C. Hanscum 
Private L. Hart 
Private W. Hawken 
Private J. Hellewell 
Private R. Houser 
Private R. Hynd 
Private D. Jackson 
Private R. Johnson 
Private L. Jones 




Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 
Priva 



:e E. Keefe 
:e O. Kepford 
e J. Knights 
e O. Koerfer 

S. Kreps 

L. Leichtweis 

D. Leman 
e C. Linton 

H. Luthy 
H. Mayland 
H. McClellan 

E. Miller 

:e T. Milligan 
C. Mundell 

E. Oberhouser 
T. O'Mara 

T. O'Melia 
J. Paschal 

F. Peterson 
O. Pierce 
N. Reimann 
L. Richards 
R. Rider 

;e L. Rigney 

e F. Ringert 

e C. Rollins 

e C. Roush 
W. Sampler 
W. Scott 
H. Selby 

:e C. Snyder 

e R. Snyder 

e W. Thompson 

e J. Watkins 
S. Weber 
W. Whitlock 
L. Whitman 

e H. Williams 

:e C. Wilson 



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THE BRANDING IRON 

The Branding Iron, which experienced the most successful year of its exist- 
ence during the year of 1924-25, was founded in 1898 as a Uterary magazine under 
the name of The Wyoming Student. In 1913 it hecame a weekly newspaper, and 
since that time has grown and prospered with the increase in the student body until 
it is one of the best student papers in the Rocky Mountain region. The paper is 
the official organ of the A. S. U. W. and it has a strong influence in forming cam- 
pus opinion as well as giving accurate accounts of campus activities. 



THE S. C. A. PUBLICATIONS 

"W" BOOK 

This volume, which has been nicknamed the Freshman Bible, was on hand at 
the beginning of the current school year and was distributed free gratis among the 
students. It contained much that was valuable to the new students who were as yet 
unlearned in the ways of university life. This year's volume was the sixth, and 
with Homer Fair as editor was the best that has been produced at the University 
of Wyoming in recent years. 




UNIVERSITY DIRECTORY 

Homer Fair also edited this booklet, which was very popular and had a 
record-breaking sale, because it gave all the addresses and phone numbers of those 
connected with the University, their home residences, fraternity afifiliations, and 
the officers of the different campus organizations. This volume was much larger 
than any previous edition and its growth is typical of the expansion of the 
University. 



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SCENE FROM "THE GREAT DIVIDE" 

THETA ALPHA PHI 

PRESENTS 

"THE GREAT DIVIDE" 

BY 

William Vaughn Moody 
Director of Drama, Mabelle L- DeKay 

Philip Jordan Ted Edelman 

Polly Jordan (Philip's wife) Anne Gilbert 

Mrs. Jordan (his mother) Ruth Atwell 

Ruth Jordan (his sister ) Crete Wood 

Winthrop Newberry Byron Huie 

Stephen Ghent, Harold Gilbert 

Dr. Newberry John Brokaw 

Lon Anderson , Alfred Pence 

Burt Williams William Chester 

Dutch Ted O'Melia 

A Mexican Arthur Pendray 

A Contractor Melvin Watkins 

An Architect Frank Buchanan 

A Boy Robert Hynde 

Assistants : Sylvia Oldman, Ruth Southworth, Julian Snow, Arthur Pendray, 
Louise McNifif, Rudolph Kleeman, Donna Rea, Consuela Stephens, Frances Colt, 
Ethel Simpson, Lucille Moon, Betty Johnston, Jean Mabee, Mary Hobbs, Sarah 
Holmes, Mary Moore, Nola Angle. 

160 



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19 2.5 WYO 




MASK AND SANDAL 

PRESENTS 

"FIRST AND LAST" 

BY 

John Galsworthy 

Keith Darrant Dorothy King 

Laurance Darrant Daniel McCarthy 

Wanda Consuela Stephens 



"REHEARSAL" 

BY 

Christopher Morley 

Christine Jean Mabee 

Marjorie Alice Thompson 

Gertrude Gertude Skovgard 

Barbara Dorothy King 

Sonia Mary Whelan 

Freda Sylvia Oldman 



"SPREADING THE NEWS" 

BY 

Lady Gregory 

Mrs. Tarpey Lucille Moon 

Mrs. Fallon Anne Gilbert 

Mrs. TuUy Alice Thompson 

Jack Smith .James Yates 

Bartley Fallon Pat Pierce 

Magistrate Robert Hynde 

Policeman Ruder Jorgensen 

Shawn Early Joe Hanna 

James O'Ryan Charles Foresman 

Tim Casey William Chester 



161 



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MODERN LANGUAGE PLAYS 

LA MUEIvA DEL JUICIO 
por Miguel Ramos Carrion 

Don Atilano Edna Johnson 

Francisco Jean Thompkins 

Isidra .-. . , ^. Elsie Gilland 

Rocio Martha Preis 

Inocencia Stella Lavergne 

Caballero Fredia Connor 

Raigon Bertha Crawford 

Peraez Wilma Pugh 

Lelis Ruth Southworth 

Garlopa Claudis Hon 

L'ANGLAIS TEL QU'ON LE PARLE 
par Tristan Bernard 

Eugene . Nathan Schreiber 

Hogson Herbert Woodman 

Julien Cicandel George Seyfarth 

Un Inspecteur George Ducker 

Un Garcon Orin Kepf ord 

Un Agent de Police Jack Corbett 

Betty Ethel Simpson 

La Cassiere Anne Gilbert 

EIGENSINN 
hei Roderick Benedix 

Ausdorf Herman Mayland 

Katharina Martha Preis 

Emma Meta Rockwell 

Alfred Homer Mann 

Heinrich Lloyd CoUenberg 

Lisbeth Ruth Atwell 




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Luverne Wales Harold Hunt Donald R. Sabin Fred S. Hultz (Coach). 

Douglas Hutton John Thompson Darwin Dalzell 



Judging teams representing the Agricultural College competed at the Kansas 
City Royal and International Livestock Expositions in November. Twelve teams 
at Kansas City and twenty teams at Chicago, each representing a state or Canadian 
Agricultural College, made up the competition. While Wyoming's teams did not 
win these contests, they made an excellent record as livestock judges and places 
above many older and larger institutions. The trip afforded an excellent opportu- 
nity for members of the teams to become familiar with farming practices and live- 
stock methods in Kansas, Missouri and Iowa. 



164 




Lew P. Reeve (Coach), Homer Huntzinger Carl Pearson Robert Peterson 

Joe Langandorf Daniel Ingraham Wallace Dameron 



The Junior Livestock Judging Team represented the Agricultural College at 
the Western National Stock Show at Denver, Colorado, January 17, 1925. This 
is a preparatory contest for the larger shows which are held in the fall. Wyoming's 
team was first in placing all classes of livestock, best judge of horses, breeding bulls 
and breeding hogs. The two best teams from the corn belt, Kansas and Nebraska, 
as well as Colorado and Wyoming Agricultural Colleges, were represented. Wyo- 
ming stood third in total number of points, with only 37 points out of 4,000 below 
the team which won first. The creditable showing at Denver makes Wyoming's 
team serious contenders for high honors at the big shows next fall. 



165 



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LARAMIE HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL TEAM 
CHAMPIONS OF WYOMING 

Laramie High School repeated its performance of two years ago and won the 
state basket ball title in the Eighth Annual High School basketball tournament held 
at the new Wyoming gymnasium in March. 

The little warriors of the red and white were one of the lightest teams in the 
tourney and were classified in the light-weight division. They waded through 
this class without much competition. Rock Springs was the only hard team 
Laramie had to play in class B. and it took Laramie two games before Rock 
Springs was eliminated from the tourney, no other team in the light-weight class 
being able to hang up a victory over the Miners. 

Laramie then played \^'orland for the state championship and walloped the 
up-stiate boys 25 to 13. The final game was fast and interesting, but the out- 
come was never in doubt after the first three minutes of play. 

With the state championship goes the invitation to the National Interscholastic 
tourney, which is held at Chicago every year under the auspices of the University 
of Chicago. Laramie journeyed to Chicago and was the first Wyoming team to 
win a game at the interscholastic meet. The Laramie team was the smallest team 
at Chicago and finished fifth in the national tourney. This means that Laramie 
High School was one of the five best high school teams in the United States this 
year. Only state champions and interstate champions are invited to the national 
tourney. ..„ 




WORLAND HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL TEAM 
CHAMPIONS OF CLASS A 

In Chicago, Laramie defeated Miami, Florida ; Durham, North CaroHna ; 
and lost to El Reno, Oklahoma, the team that finished second in the national. 

The team was coached by Les Crawford, a former Wyoming athlete. Three 
of the first squad graduate this year and dopsters are already figuring that Laramie 
High has a good chance of copping ofif the title again next year. 

The Worland basketball team waded through class A in the tournament with- 
out a defeat, but lost the championship to Laramie by a score of 25 to 13. This 
is the second time that Laramie and Worland have played for the state title. The 
other time the two teams battled it out for state honors Worland was victorious. 

Coached by Emmett, one of the old stand-bys of the state tourney, the Wor- 
land school presented a fast-going and hard-working basketball team this year, 
and were favored to win their class, and in many cases to win the state title. 
Harkins, captain of the Worland team, was the mainstay of the team and was 
high-point man in the tourney. Most of the Worland team work was built 
around this man, and when Laramie covered him so closely in the final game 
the Worland ship of state went on the rocks. 

Worland was crippled by the loss of Mileski, their center, who was injured 
in one of the tourney games and was out of the finals. If this man had been in 
it is quite possible that the score might have been closer. The finals, however, 
were Laramie's, and the Red and White was not to be denied. 



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BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 



First Se^ries — 

Basin, 32; Yoder, 12. 
Pine Bluffs, 26 ; Hillsdale, 9. 
Kemmerer, 2t, ; Guernsey, 4. 
Saratoga, 26 ; Ivingle, 8. 
Greybull, 16; Sheridan, 14. 
Rock Springs, 39 ; Midwest, 6. 
Worland, 23 ; Moorcroft, 8. 
Laramie, 37 ; Burns, 7. 
Upton, 7; Egbert, i. 
Green River, 17; Lusk, 7. 
Cheyenne, 26 ; Cody, 6. 
Lyman, 19 ; Glendo, 3. 
Casper, 17; Cowley, 16. 
Glenrock, 11 ; Cokeville, 10. 
Buffalo, i^; Riverton, 12. 
Sunrise, 16; Newcastle, 12. 
Lovell, 22; Wheatland, 13. 
Mountain View, 16; Hanna, 9. 
Douglas, 19 ; Fort Laramie, 3. 
Rozet,,i5; La Grange, 7. 
Rawlins, 31 ; Sundance, 13. 

Second Series — 

Buffalo, 25 ; Yoder, 12. ' 
Lusk, 18; Gillette, 14. 
Kemmerer, 23 ; Cheyenne, 22. 
Green River, t,^ ; Lingle, 10. 
Guernsey, 19 ; Moorcroft, 7. 
Rock Springs, 15; Cokeville, 9. 
Worland, 21 ; Sheridan, 8. 
Laramie, 35 ; Midwest 8. 
Basin, 12; Cody, 10. 
Newcastle, 2y ; Glendo, 16. 
Cowley, 23; Greybull, 7. 
Sunrise, 16; Glenrock, 10. 
Casper, 29 ; Upton, 4. 
Mountain View, 16; Burns, 10. 
L®vell, 20; Riverton, 11. 
Hanna, 21 ; Hillsdale, 15. 
Fort Laramie, 20; Egbert, 8. 
Lyman', 36; La Grange, 10. 
Wheatland, 1 1 ; Sundance, 8. 
Pine Bluffs, 11 ; Rozet, 4. 
Rawlins, 22 ; Douglas, 4. 

Third Series — 

Greybull, 16; Upton 5. 
Laramie, 39; Saratoga, 4. 
Worland, 18; Casper, 15. \ 



Rock Springs, 24 ; Gillette, 8. 
Kemmerer, 29; Cowley, 10. 
Green River, 22 ; Newcastle, 17. 
Cheyenne, 27 ; Lovell, 8. 
Sunrise, 9 ; Mountain View, 7. 
Basin, 14; Wheatland, 9. 
Lyman, 2t, ; Hanna, 8. 
Douglas, 23 ; Buffalo, 5. 
Pine Bluffs, 19; Lusk, 7. 
Rawlins, 21 ; Guernsey, 6. 
Glenrock. 14; Rozet, 11. 

Fourth Series — 

Casper, 16; Kemmerer, 15. 
Laramie, 20; Green River, 12. 
Lovell, 22 ; Fort Laramie, 7. 
Mountain View, 19; Saratoga, 8. 
Cheyenne, 22 ; Basin, 10. 
Lyman, 15; Sunrise, 14. 
Worland, 16; Douglas, 7. 
Pine Bluffs, 12 ; Glenrock, 4. 
Rawlins, 18; Greybull, 14. 

Fifth Series — 

Cheyenne, 16; Casper, 9. 
Laramie, 21; Rock Springs. 11. 
Lovell, 19; Basin, 11. 
Green River, 15; Sunrise, 10. 
Worland, 19; Kemmerer, 9. 
Movmtain View, 17; Lyman, 11. 
Rawlins, 24 ; Buffalo, 6. 

Sixth Series — 

W^orland, 21 : Lovell, 6. 

Rock Springs, 8 ; Pine Bluffs, 7. 

Cheyenne, 17; Rawlins, 13. 

Laramie, 14 ; Lyman, 8. 

Green River, 14 ; Mountain View, 13. 

Seventh Series — 

Worland, 18; Rawlins, 9. 

Laramie, 36; Pine Bluffs, 11. 

Rock Springs, 20 ; Green River, 18. 

Semi-Fin ALS — 

Worland, 15 ; Cheyenne, 7. 
Laramie, 16: Rock Springs, 5. 

Finals — 

Laramie, 25 ; Worland, 13. 



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ACADEMIC CONTESTS 

The following High Schools were awarded beautiful bronze Tournament 
Shields : 

Casper, Debate ; Casper, Piano ; Casper, Amateur Typewriting ; Kemmerer, 
Novice Typewriting; Lander, Novice Shorthand; Laramie, Essay; Rock Springs, 
Shorthand; Sheridan, Reading; Sheridan, Extemporaneous Speaking; Worland, 
Vocal. 

ENGLISH— Professor Mclntyre. 

A — Debate — Mr. Norman Hansen and Miss Illeta Schopf , Casper, first ; Mr. 
Harry Hall and Miss Margaret Doland, Pine Bluffs, second. 

B — Reading — Miss Harriet Horton, Sheridan, first place ; Mr. Ernest Newton, 
Cody, second place. 

C — Extemporaneous Speaking — Mr. George McConnaughey, Sheridan, first 
place ; Miss Hettie Coble, Cheyenne, second place. 

D — Essay — Mr. Paul Scott, Laramie, first place, title, "On Traveling" ; Miss 
Mary Flannagan, Glenrock, second place, title, "Book People That Are My 
Friends." 

MUSIC — Professor Frisbie. 

Vocal Solo — Mr. Guida McDaniels, Worland, first place ; Miss Mina Sweetin, 
Powell, second place. 

Piano Solo — -Miss Louise Newell, Casper, first place; Miss Lucille Patterson, 
Sheridan, second place. 

Violin Solo — Mr. Heimi Loya, Rock Springs, first place ; Mr. Joe Rullie, 
Sheridan, second place. 

COMMERCE— Professor Berry. 

Novice Shorthand — Miss Helen Sanderson, Lander, first place, ioo% ; Miss 
Alma Parkka, Rock Springs, second place, 99.63%. 

Amateur Shorthand — Hazel Justin, Rock Springs, first place. 100% ; Miss 
Louise Newell, Casper, second place, 99.63%. 

Novice Typewriting — Ethel Holmes, Kemmerer, first place, 45.8 words per 
minute; Miss Jewell Moore, Moorcroft, second place, 41.3 words per minute. 

Amateur Typewriting — Louise Newell, Casper, first place, 72.2 words per 
minute ; Mr. Ray Thomas, Kemmerer, second place, 60.62 words per minute. 

Kemmerer teams won first place in both Novice and Amateur Typewriting 
Contests. Novice team average, 36.5 words per minute. Amateur team average, 
60.6 words per minute. 



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WHEN COYBOYS JEST 

TENDERFOOT 
I rode a horse today and wore 
My nice, new puttees, and I bore 
Myself with dignity the while — 
But, lo, these whisp'ring cowboys smile 
And close their eyes in grotesque winks : 
A coarse, uncultured lot, methinks, 
That cannot understand this fine 
Yet somewhat shrinking soul of mine. 
Crude creatures of a plane below, 
They do not know — they do not know. 

SEASONED 

I saw it leave the stage today — 

A tenderfoot. Well, I must say, 

I do not blame the boys much now 

For what they did to me. I vow 

This nice, new thing some points to give, 

And, maybe, then I'll let It live. 

Bah ! Soft, white face and fat conceit, 

Just thinks Its knowledge is complete. 

Look at those clothes, the little hat — 

Say, on the square, was I like that? 








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BRONCHO BUSTER REPARTEE 

You top-rail roosters think it fun 
To set up there all safe and run 
Your line of blab, and watch me take 
This here old coffin-head to break. 
"Thumb him !'' say you : well, talk's cheap 
From bluffers 'fraid to ride a sheep. 
Go on and josh ! I notice you 
Blab muchly more than what you do. 

See that ! He's quit his pitchin' ; he 
Has found that I his master be. 
Tomorrow he will be that tame 
A kid can ride him. Jes' the same, 
I don't see none of your loud set 
Who's stuck to take my place jes' yet. 
You give advice, you cheap sports, you, 
And that's 'bout all you ever do. 





-J 13 Vv I o 




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INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL 



Alpha Tau Omega 
Daly 

Taliaferro 
Guy 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
Reeve 
Gilbert 
Anderson 



Delta Mu Alpha 
Peterson 
Wood 



Sigma Nu 

McWhinnie 
McClintock 
Seyfarth 

Kappa Sigma 
Elder 
Coffey 
King 





192 5 VVYO 




ALPHA TAU OMEGA 

Founded at Virginia Military Institute, September ii, 1865 
Wyoming Gamma Psi established March 24, 191 3 
Colors : Sky Blue and Old Gold Flower : White Tea Rose 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 



Major B. C. Daly 

E. B. Payson 



W. A. Hitchcock 
Fred Hultz 



POST graduate; 
Homer Mann 



John Corbett 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Arthur L. Taliaferro 



SE^NIORS 

Thomas Miller 



JUNIORS 



Harold Baker 



Maxwell Chapman 
Roy Crawford 



SOPHOMORES 

Oscar Erickson 
Thomas Finnerty 



FRESH ME^N 



Wedge Thompson 
Glennon Stanton 



Emmet Ekdall 
Jack Astle 
Willits Brew^er 
Joseph Privett 



George Guy 



Daniel McCarthy 
James O'Roke 



Ray Houser 
Robert Hynd 




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SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON 

Founded at the University of Alabama, March 9, 1856 

Wyoming Alpha Chapter estabHshed January 26, 19 17 

Colors : Purple and Gold Flower : Violet 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

E. Deane Hunton Glen Hartman ■ Samuel H. Knight 

L. P. Reeve Albert Day 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 



Clair Blanchard 
Harold Gilbert 



Ralph Andrus 
Harry Anderson 
Harry Ballard 
Royden Banta 

Harry Astin 
Louis Allsman 
Harold Ballengee 
Kim Britenstein 



Dean Boyer 
Edward Keefe 



Harold Buchanan 
Robert Clausen 
Richard Costin 
Robert Spalding 
Cyril Fox 
John Thompson 



SENIORS 

Harold Hobbs 
William Kocher 

JUNIORS 

Francis Dunn 
John Lippold 
Claud Linton 

SOPHOMORES 

Franklin DeForest 
Robert Gish 
John Groves 
Byron Huie 
William Lester 

FRESHMEN 

Richard Leake 

'pledges 
Louis Whitman 
Nelson Corbett 
Carl Bugas 
J. K. Campbell 
Victor Evans 
Troy Fullerton 



Fred Penland 
George Vandeveer 



Arthur Munson 
Harry Pearson 
Horace Thomas 
Edward Miller 

Theodore O'Melia 
Lawrence Ormsby 
Lyle Scott 
Paul O'Bryan 




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SIGMA NU 
First Row — Clyde Kurtz, Stephen Sibley, Dale Barker, George Rice, Harry Engstrom, Herbert Woodman, Harold 
Erickson. Second Row — Kenneth Haywood, George Seyfarth, Lawrence Meeboer, Harold Hunt, James McClintock, 
George Sherard, James O'Brien. Third Row — Rudolph Kleeman, Robert Lindsey, Charles Hemry, Don Hubbard, 
Gilbert Cowden, Harry Hornecker, Frank Schwoob. Fourth Row — Raymond Denton, James Merritt, Nels Bylund, 
Wortham Denton, Kirk Scott, Carlton Barkhurst, John Bruner. Fifth Row — Irvin Redhair, Sherman Wyman, 
Frederick Spreng, Dwight Hanson, Warrel Law, George Haywood, Robert Rider. Sixth Row — Richard Ralph, 
Willis Zingg, John McGowan, Charles Wilson, Marlin Kurtz, Oswald Koerfer, Joe Hellewell. Seventh Row — 
Robert Guthrie, Eldon Boyd, Henry Woods, George McDonald, David Ochsenschlager. 



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SIGMA NU 

Founded at Virginia Military Institute, January i, 1869. 

Epsilon Delta Chapter established October 29, 1920 

Colors : Blacky White and Gold Flower : White Rose 

FRATRRS IN FACULTATE 
R. E. McWhinnie - W. A. Sawdon 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 



Harold Erickson 
Herbert Woodman 
Clyde Kurtz 



George Seyfarth 
Gilbert Cowden 
Harry Hornecker 

Carlton Barkhurst 
John Bruner 
Nels Bylund 
Dwight Hanson 
Don Hubbard 



Eldon Boyd 
Joe Hellewell 
Oswald Koerfer 



Lewis Williams 
Marlin Kurtz 
Willis Zingg 



SENIORS 

James McClintock 
Ralph Con well 
James O'Brien 
George Sherard 

JUNIORS 

Charles Hemry 
Harold Hunt 



SOPHOMORES 

Rudolph Kleeman 
Warrel Law 
Irvin Redhair 
Frederick Spreng 
Sherman Wyman 
Richard Bender 

FRESHMEN 

George McDonald 
John McGowan 

PLEDGES 

Henry Woods 
Jack Abbott 



Harry Engstrom 
George Rice 
Dale Barker 



Kenneth Haywood 
Lawrence Meeboer 
Robert Lindsey 

Kirk Scott 
Raymond Denton 
Wortham Denton 
James Merritt 
Frank Schwoob 




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KAPPA SIGMA 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
Dr. Cecil Elder 

FRATRES IN UNIYERSITATE 



Sam Corson 
Millard Coffey 
T. P. King 



Carl Greth 
Ralph McGee 
Frank Emery 



Ralph Johnson 
L. H. Lepponen 
Harold Newton 



Pat Pierce 



Don Rousch 
Douglas Leman 
Norman Baillie 
Elton Davis 
Richard Denman 



SENIORS 

Georges Faurie 
Louis Schilt 



JUNIORS 

Homer Fenex 
George Ross 
Curtis Powell 

sophomore;s 
Fred Rice 
Arthur Zaring 
Theodore Edleman 



fre;shme;n 



PLEDGES 

Joe Hanna 
Lloyd Jones 
Archie Dixon 
Willard Foresman 
Bard Farrell 



George R. Bailey 
Carl Cinnamon 
L. J. Hanna 



Francis LaNoue 
Warren Cretney 
Blair Stouffer 



Elton Roberts 
John Brokaw 
Ray Baker 



Raymond Davis 



Ashton Freeman 
Leslie Rask 
Donald McMurray 
Spencer Fl© 
Donald Jackson 




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1 INDEPENDENT CLUB J 


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V Organized at the University of Wyoming / 


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. Y Laramie, Wyoming, February 25, 1924 ^ 


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7. Colors : Silver, Gold and Green Flower : Daisy i 


; 


^ MEMBERS ^ 




u se;niors \ 


( 


T Rudolph Anselmi ^ 


\ 


;3 JUNIORS > 


} 


^ Theodore Burnstad Everett Murray Glen B. Gariepy ^ 
V John Curie Albert L. Nussbaum Carl Johnson i 
Richard C. Day M. S. Huhtala Louis Thoeming X 
U William Hughes Jesse Daniels Arthur E. Smothermon \ 


► 


U SOPHOMORES 1 


\ 


■ 1^ Willard Isherwood Kenneth Clark William Chester ' } 
/ Gladden Elliot William A. Harkin Edward Joslin ^ 
J Paul Garman i 


\ 


n FRESHMEN 2 


I 


/* James O. Yates Lloyd Collenburg Ray Mosier } 
^ Howard McClellan J. Wesley Sampier i 




2 PROBATE y 


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STRAY GREEKS 

Eleanor Chatterton, Delta Gamma, University of Southern California, Los 
Angeles ; Walter Spears, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Baker University, Kansas ; C. Fred 
Parks, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Nebraska University, Lincoln ; Bob Worthman, Tau 
Kappa Epsilon, Wisconsin University, Madison ; Gus Larson, Alpha Sigma Phi, 
Nebraska University, Lincoln ; Tad Ring, Pi Kappa Phi, California University, 
Berkeley. 




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SMELL OF SAGE 
Oh, the old red sun is risin' and the air is clean and fine, 

With jes' a little chill that tingles thro', 
And starts your thoughts to millin' that the fire of the cook 

Was made jes' sort o' specially fer you. 
But what jes' makes me glad I simply am. alive, 

My very heart with kindness sweet adornin', 
Is that keen and bracin' scent that drifts across the flats — 

The smell of the sagebrush in the mornin'. 

Have traveled many trails in this camp yovi call the world, 

And lived a life as rough as rough could be ; 
Am jes' a plain old puncher with all a puncher's faults, 

But still there's things that always come to me 
At that there time o' wakin' ; they be thoughts so sweet and fine, 

Which no artist or no poet could go scornin', 
When I catch that keen, clean scent that drifts across the flats — 

The smell of the sagebrush in the mornin'. 

When I cross the Great Divide, and my outfit will no more 

See me around its wagons and its fires, 
I jes' would like to say 'fore I ups and drifts away. 

There's simply jes' one thing my heart desires : 
Put me where the sun comes up, to ride the western range, 

And all the land with gladness fine adornin', 
So my ghost kin sort o' come and sniflf that sweet perfume — 

The smell of the sagebrush in the mornin'. 





Erma Stevens, Constance Chatterton, Ethlyn Christensen, Eileen O'Mara. 
Billie Murray, Clara Young, Dorothy Zaring, IMargaret Moudy. 



WOMEN'S PAN-HELLENIC 

Ethlyn Christensen President 

Constance Chatterton Secretary-Treasurer 



Pi Beta Phi 

Constance Chatterton 
Dorothy Zaring 
Edna King 

Delta Delta Delta 
Erma Stevens 
Bilhe Murray 
Gertrude McKay 



Kappa DeUa 

Ethlyn Christensen 
Clara Young- 
Ethel Eyer 

Gamma Zeta 

Eileen O'Mara 
Margaret Moudy 
Clara Hickerson 









925 VV^'O 



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PI BETA PHI 

Founded at Monmouth College, Monmouth, 111., April 2S, 1867 

Wyoming Alpha Chapter established in 1910 

Colors : Wine and Blue Flower : Wine Carnation 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



Dr. Grace Raymond Hebard, Iowa Zeta 

Marie lones 



Ruth Kimball 



Esther Konkel 
Clarissa Jensen 



Peggy Wyant 
Louise McNiff 
Edna Hegewald 



Meriam Jenkins 
Mary Hobbs 
Alice Thompson 
Virginia Sanford 



Lois King 

Edna King 

Alice Downey Nelson 

Agnes A. Gottschalk 

Beth Cary Bellamy 



SENIORS 

Bernice Appleby 
Nancy Jones 

JUNIORS 

Anne Gilbert 
Katheryn Brock 

SOPHOMORES 

Helen Haywood 
Mary Moore 



PLEDGES 

Loviise Price 
Nell Avent 
Helen McGarrity 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 

Harriet Abbot Corthell 
Lydia Tanner 



Ruth Campbell, Iowa Beta 



Dorothy Zaring 



Constance Chatterton 
Aileen Nelson 



Edith Ward 
Nola Angle 
Elizabeth Johnston 



Sarah Holmes 
Jean Mabee 
Mary Whelan 
Marion Stevens 




Gladys Corthell Hitchcock Meriam Doyle Bogie 

Lois Butler Payson Bertha White 

Mrs. Reistle Laura Crompton Knight 



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1915 WYO 


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b 'A 

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f Founded at Boston University, Thanksgiving Eve., 1888 y 




C Theta Eta Chapter installed February 13, 1913 ' f/ 




"A f 

A Colors : Silver, Gold and Blue Flower : Pansy ?$ 




FRATRES IN FACULTATE ^ 
n Miss Amy Gardner Miss Gladys Gamble- Miss Crete Wood ^ 
yj Miss Mary Carson 5^ 




^ FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE ^ 




/, SENIORS ^ 

/■ Marjorie Nice Alice Christensen Irma Stevens ^ 




^ JUNIORS ^ 

/ Billie Murray Amelia Kershisnik Laura Powell y 
r Hazel Bowman ^ 




> SOPHOMORES ^ 

^ Alice Carlisle Genevieve Gatchell Josephine Delatour / 
y^ Christina Pitt Coza Huddleston Marcella Avery ^ 
, Dorothy Christensen ^ 




A PLEDGES t 

j5 Dorothy King Mary Grace Larsen Donna Rea >^ 
■A Kathleen Cantlin Georgina Rendel Lila West i 
J^ Frances Josselyn Dorothy Nolan Freda Connor ' (, 
Xl Nellie McPhie \ 

U '/ 




yt. RESIDENT MEMBERS C 

u Esther Watson Jones Katherine Nice Ethd Biddick y 
^ Mrs. Edward Johnson Gertrude McKay Maybelle Lee Y 
V Marie Frazer Mrs. Fay Smith Ruth Beckwith t 
Y* Mrs. Mildred Bath Mrs. S. E. West Lucy Holliday V 
^ Mrs. Lee Carroll Evelyn Carruth Helen Holliday V 
i) Mrs. Frank Cordiner Mrs. Alberta Frazer A 




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KAPPA DELTA 
First Row — Alice Spreng, Dorothy Rogers, Pearl Freeman, Ethlyn Christensen, Estelle Augustine, Ida Crowe. 
Second Row — Clara Young, Frances Shier, Ruth Rauner, Iris Sudduth, Irene Smith, Grace Pluckhahn. 
Third Row — Ruth Gilman. Lorene Hobbs, Marjorie Root, Marie Holmes, Mabel Massey, Mary McCarthy. 
Fourth Row — Janie McClintock, Clara Holm, Margaret Hayes, Geraldine Stewart, Inez Dale, Sylvia Oldman. 
Fifth Row — Cathern Prahl, Claudis Hon, Consuelo Stevens, May Nordquist, Ruth Morgariedge. 
Sixth Row — Doris Bailey, Pearle Jones, Zaidee Dickinson, Rae Crall, Helen McCoy. 




192 5 vVY'O 




KAPPA DELTA 

Founded at Virginia State Normal, October 23, 1897 
Rho Chapter established May 15, 19 14 



Colors : Pearl White and Olive Green 



Estelle Augustine 
Pearl Freeman 



Irene Smith 
Frances Shier 



Mary McCarthy 
Lorene Hobbs 



Inez Dale 
Mabel Massey 
Cathern Prahl 
Zaidee Dickinson 
Pearle Jones 
Consuela Stevens 



Mrs. Alice Ames 
Mrs. Amy Rogers 
Eva Mae Smith 



205 



SENIORS 

Ethlyn Christensen 



JUNIORS 

Irene Dawson 
Ruth Rauner 
Dorothy Rogers 

SOPHOMORES 

Marie Holmes 
Grace Pluckhahn 

PLEDGES 

Janie McClintock 
Sylvia Oldman 
Rhae Crahl 
Helen McCoy 
Ruth Morgariedge 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 

Margaret Murphy 
Mrs. Mary McKay 
Laurabelle Boehme 



Flower : White Rose 



Ida Crowe 
Alice Spreng 



Iris Sudduth 
Clara Youngf 



Marjorie Root 
Ruth Gilman 



Geraldine Stewart 
Margaret Hayes 
Doris Bailey 
May Nordquist 
Clara Holm 
Claudis Hon 



Ethel Eyer 
Floribel Krueger 
Opal Crawford 



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GAMMA ZETA 

Established November g, 1920 
Colors: Yellow and White - Flower: Shasta Paisv 

post-graduate;s 



Helen Tyvold 



Dorothy Bergquist 



Grace Buchanan 



se;niors 
Josephine Wicks 



Eileen O'Mara 



Auril Williams 
Neva Grain 



JUNIORS 

Anne Lawler 
Margaret Moudy 
Wilma Pugh 



Oselia Stendahl 
Kathleen Hemrv 



sophomore;s 
Kathleen McLaughlin Lillian Helsburg 



Marie Mathew 
Betty Farthing 
Eileen Glow 



Glara Hickerson 



PLEDGES 

Verna Gibson 
Helen Glark 
Mary Gaber 



Alice McKean 



Grace Richey 
Irene Wilson 
Julia Herring 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 

Marguerite Doubleday Esther Bergquist 





9 '2 ,5 WYC 





211 



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HERBERT WOODMAN 
HAROLD GILBERT 



PHI KAPPA PHI 

The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi elects its student memhers from among 
the upper one-fifth of the Senior Class as judged on a basis of scholarship. This 
society is unique among national honor societies in electing members from any 
college of the University — the criterion being excellence in scholastic achievement, 
whether it be in the sciences or in the arts. Thirty-eight chapters are in existence 
in leading universities and colleges in the United States. At the Wyoming Chap- 
ter, established in 1922, two elections of student members are held each year- 
one after the grades of the fall term are available, the other after the close of the 
winter term. 

The following students were elected on December 16, 1924: 
Charles Harold Gilbert, Agriculture 
Harold Wayne Hobbs, Engineering 
Edward Pillsbury Pearson, Liberal Arts 
Alice Marie Spreng, Liberal Arts 
Herbert Brookhart Woodman, Liberal Arts 

The following students were elected on April 9, 1925 : 
Rudolph Anselmi, Commerce 
Eleanor Chatterton, Liberal Arts 
Carl Cinnamon, Liberal Arts 
Hazel Cossitt, Liberal Arts 
Laura Ekstrom, Liberal Arts 
Harry Engstrom, Commerce 

212 




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vv 





Marcella Avery 
irvin Redhair 
Lorene Hobbs 



Josephine Delatour 
Arietta Wyant 
Edgar WIerrilt 



Robert Gish 
Helen Keller 



Helen Haywood 
Inez Dale 
John Bruner 



Oscar Erickson 

Robert Burns 

Harry Astin 



IRON SKULL 

OFFICERS 

Josephine Delatour President 

Helen Haywood J' ice-President 

Marcella Avery Secretary-Treasurer 

Oscar Erickson Guard 



Inez Dale 
Lorene Hobbs 
Helen Keller 



Arietta Wyant 
Edgar Merritt 
Harry Mills Astin 
John Bruner 



Robert Burns 
Robert Gish 
Irvin Redhair 



Iron Skull is the Honorary Sophomore Society, members for which are chosen 
at the dose of their freshman year and initiated in the fall of their sophomore year. 

It is the purpose of Iron SkvUl to further University traditions, Athletics and 
Scholarship upon the campus, and it was with this in mind that the members 
tackled the seating proposition in the new gymnasium. They were on the job at 
every game and kept the women and men separated. The great improvement in 
the cheering merited this movement. 



213 



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First Row— Arietta Wyant, Robert Worthman, Gilbert Cowden. Clarissa Jensen. Ruth Atwell. 

Second Row — Peter H. Lepponen, Harold Gilbert. Inez Dale. George Guy, Marion Field, Clayton Taylor. 

Third Row — Neva Crain, Byron Huie, Louise MoNiff, Anne Lawler. 

THETA ALPHA PHI 

OFFICERS 

Margaret Moudy President 

Gilbert Cowden J ^ice-President 

Ted O'Melia Secretary 

Ruth Atwell Treasurer 

James O'Roke Georges Faurie P. H. Lepponen 

Byron Huie Crete Wood Wesley Kerper 

Inez Dale Homer Mann Clarissa Jensen 

Harold Gilbert Robert Worthman George Guy 

Arietta Wyant Charles Street Ralph Conwell 

Anne Lawler Neva Crain Irene Dawson 

Louise McNiff Clayton Taylor Marion Field 

FACULTY MEMBERS 

Mrs. Maybelle DeKay Dr. Frances Mclntyre 

Theta Alpha Phi was installed at Wyoming, June 8, 192 1. It is a National 
Dramatic Fraternity and its work on the campus has been of great interest and 
accomplishments. This year it has produced "The Great Divide." 




19 2 .5 VVY 



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Eleanor Chatterton 

Harry Astin George Ross James O'Brien 

Donald McHenry Anne Gilbert John Bruner 

Lorene Hobbs Byron Huie Herbert Woodman Ethel Simpson 

QUILL CLUB 

OFFICERS 

Eleanor Chatterton Chancellor 

Dr. Clara Mclntyre Vicc-Chanccllor 

Lorene Hobbs Scribe 

Erma Stevens Keeper of Parchments 

Mrs. Neva Nelson Ford Warden of the Purse 

Thorne Rune of American College Qtiill Club has been organized on our cam- 
pus for a number of years and has for its purpose that of developing, through 
personal endeavor and by co-operation with others in mutual criticism and discus- 
sion, a higher order of literary ability and expression. Many celebrities who have 
brought honor to Wyoming and their Alma Mater have been Quillers. Election to 
Quill is secured through submitting a manuscript signed with a nom-de-plume. 

The present active membership includes three faculty members and twenty- 
three students. 



213 




MARJORIE NICE JOHN BRUNER 

HAZEL BOWMAN RUTH KIMBALL 

ARTHUR PENDRAY RUTH ATWELL 



BLUE PENCIL 

OFFICERS 

John Bruner President 

Ruth Kimball Secretary 

Arthur Pendray Treasurer 

Ruth Atwell Hazel Bowman 

Marjorie Nice Ralph Conwell 

Blue Pencil is an Honorary Organization and elects to membership students 
who show unusual ability and interest in newspaper work. It aims to encourage 
the highest standards in campus publications, and in newspaper work in general, 
and to foster the study and pursuit of journalism. 




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SHOLIE RICHARDS HERBERT WOODMAN HAZEL BOWMAN 

• ERMA STEVENS MARION FIELD 

JAMES O'BRIEN IDA CROWE GEORGE ROSS 

DELTA SIGMA RHO 

OFFICERS 

Herbert Woodman President 

Sholie Richards ; J'ice-President 

Hazel Bowman Secretary and Treasurer 

James O'Brien George Ross 

Ralph Conwell Homer Mann 

Ida Crowe Pauline Bunting 

Erma Stevens Marion Field 

Delta Sigma Rho is the largest National Honorary Forensic Fraternity. 
The aim of the organization is to promote interest in public speaking by activity 
in debating. To become eligible for membership a student must debate in two 
inter-collegiate debates and take part in debate work two years. 




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THE OLD COWBOY'S LAMENT 
The range's filled up with farmers and there's fences 
ev'rywhere, 
A painted house 'most ev'ry quarter mile ; 
They're raisin' blooded cattle and plantin' sorted seed, 
And puttin' on a painful lot o" style. 

There hain't no grass to speak of and the water holes 
are gone, 

The wire of the farmer holds 'em tight ; 
There's little use to law 'em and little use to kick, 

And mighty sight less use there is to fight. 

There's them coughin' separaters and their dirty, dusty 
crews. 

And wagons runnin' over with the grain ; 
With smoke a-driftin' upward and writin' on the air, 

A story that to me is mighty plain. 



The wolves have left the country and the long-horns 
are no more. 
And all the game worth shootin' at is gone ; 
And it's time fer me to f oiler, 'cause I'm onlv in the 




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Tod Row — Hanna, Richardson, Frake, Nussbaum, Erickson, Engstrom, Gish. Guy. 
Bottom how — Haywood, Hemry, Beagle, O'Brien, Major Daly, Captain Ring. Ingham, Bruner. 



FORWARD ECHELON 

HONORARY MILITARY 
OFFICERS 

Major James O'Brien Coiiiutandiug Officer 

Lieutenant C. O. Frake Officer of tlie Day 

Lieutenant Charles Hemry Finance Officer 

Lieutenant Percy Ingham Adjutant 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

Major Beverly C. Daly Captain Ronald Ring 

The Forward Echelon is an Honorary Military Fraternity, organized this year 
with sixteen cadet officers as charter memhers. The purpose of this organization is 
to ])reserve and develop among its meml^ers the essential qualities of good and 
efficient officers ; to prepare them, as educated men, to take a more active part in the 
mdlitary affairs of the community: and, ahove all, to spread intelligent information 
concerning the military requirements of the United States. These principles are 
along the same lines as those set forth by the National Society of Scabbard and 
Blade, to which organization an application for a charter has been sent by the local 
organization. 

229 



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ZOLLIE WOOD 
JESSE RICHARDSON 

HOMER FAIR 



HAROLD HOBBS 

ELMER K. NELSON 

ROY GREENBERG 
HARRY S. ANDERSON 




ZETA PHI 

OFFICERS 

Harold W. Hobbs Worthy Chief 

Zollie E. Wood High Comnscllor 

Jesse Richardson Recorder 

Roy Greenberg Keeper of Funds 

Harry S. Anderson Sergeant-at-Arms 

Homer Fair Elmer K. Nelson 

Zeta Phi is an Honorary Engineering Fraternity, membership in which is ac- 
corded those who have a high scholastic standing and take an active interest in 
their profession. It seeks to promote scholarship in the College of Engineering as 
well as give its members an insight into the various fields of engineering other than 
their own. The fraternity was established in 1920 and has as its ultimate aim the 
bringing of a chapter of Tau Beta Pi to Wyoming^ which is the oldest national 
honorary engineering fraternity, being founded at Lehigh University in 1885. 



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DR. J. W. SCOTT 

PAUL PHELPS J. K. CORBETT 

EDWARD A. ANDRUS FRANKLIN R. SCHWOOB 

LOUIS THOEMING 



THETA NU 

OFFICERS 

J. K. GDrbett President 

Paul Phelps J 'ice-President 

Louis Thoeming Secretary 

Franklin R. Schwoob Edward A. Andrus 

FACULTY MEMBER 

Dr. John W. Scott 

PLEDGES 

Joseph Hellewell Raymond Johnson 

Maxwell Chapman 

Theta Nu was founded in 1920 for the purpose of developing leadership and 
furthering the study of medicine at the University of Wyoming. 

The organization was made a national in 1922 with the installation of a chap- 
ter at the University of Nebraska. 





Top Row — Eva Mae Smith, Daisy Wharton, Gertrude McKay, Gladys Wilkinson, Doris Ewers. Agnes Long. 
Lower Row — Clara Young, Doris Spencer, Vesta Hart, Sylvia Oldman. 



THETA PI 

OFFICERS 

Vesta Hart President 

Clara Young . . Vice-President 

Doris Spencer Secretary-Treasurer 

Eva Mae Smith Corresponding Secretary 

Theta Pi is a musical sorority organized in February, 1925. Its purpose is 
to develop high musical ideals among its members. Monthly musicales are held 
to promote the cause of music in the University and to develop high musical ideals 
among its members. 

OTHER MEMBERS 

Helen H. Hylton Mrs. Frank Carruth 

Zaidee Dickinson 




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LUCILLE PEPOON 

PEARL FREEMAN 



PHI UPSILON OMICRON 

office;rs 

Clarissa Jensen President 

Margaret Moudy Vice-President 

Iris Sudduth Secretary 

Lucille Pepoon Treasurer 

Pauline Bunting Librarian 

Grace Buchanan Historian 

Pearl Freeman 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

Mrs. Emma Howell Knight Miss Elizabeth J. McKittrick 

Phi Upsilon Omicron is an Honorary Professional Fraternity, founded at the 
College of Agriculture, University of Minnesota, February lo, 1909. Delta Chap- 
ter was installed at the University of Wyoming, November 29, 191 5. 

This is an honorary professional organization, membership in which is ac- 
corded only to those who show proficiency and a keen interest in the Science of 
Home Economics. It aims, furthermore, to establish bonds of friendship and 
extend professional interest and sympathy among its members. 

224 




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A. S. U. W. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Harold Gilbert President 

Arthur Taliaferro Vice-President 

Eleanor Chatterton Secretary 

The Executive Committee of the Student Body began the year under very dis- 
couraging financial conditions, but by careful planning and management they have 
succeeded in making a very substantial reduction in the Student Body deficit. 

In addition to reducing the debt, the Committee, through the help and co- 
operation of each member, has been able to sponsor all branches of Athletics and 
Student Activities and, in addition, successfully sponsor the Conference Boxing 
and Wrestling Meet at Wyoming. 

It can be said that, for the A. S. U. W. Executive Committee, 1924-25 has 
been full of activity and success. 





Top Row— Qwyn, Pugh, Bunting, Konkel, Lehr, Delatour. 
Bottom Row — Crawford, Young, O'Reilly, Chatterton, Pepoon, Christsnsen. 

A. W. S. 

OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE BOARD 

Eleanor Chatterton President 

Ethlyn Christenson Vice-President 

Bertha Crawford Secretary 

Pauline Bunting Treasurer 

The Associated Women Students have been organized upon our campus 
since the spring of 192 1, having passed through several phases of growth. It is 
now a member of the National Organization of the Associated Women Students 
made up of the A. W. S. existing upon practically every College and University 
campus in the United States. Every woman student upon enrolling in the Univer- 
sity becomes ipso facto a member of the A. W. S. The object of this association 
is three-fold : To regulate all matters pertaining to the student life of its members 
which do not fall under the jurisdiction of the faculty nor Associated Students ; 
to further in every way the spirit of unity among the women ; and be a medium 
by which the social standards of the University can be made and kept high. 
Throughout the year mass meetings are held and many social affairs are given. 



227 



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I. BUCKLEY. H. KELLER, F. FAIR. P. BUNTING 
N. GWYN, L. HOBBS, L. PEPOON 



STUDENTS' DEMONSTRATION AGENTS 

OFFICERS 

Pauline Bunting President 

Florence Fair . . . . Secretary-Treasurer 

This is a new organization on the campus this year. It was organized by 
seven girls who are looking forward to future work in the Home Economics Ex- 
tension service. It is sponsored by Miss Rokahr — the State Home Demonstration 
Leader for Wyoming. 

Actual practice in this kind of work has already been done. During Honey 
Week, November i6 to 22, the members gave two demonstrations out in Albany 
County and one in Laramie. 

An extensive study of the work is taken up at each meeting. Members of 
the extension service are the speakers. 



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Top Row — Artist, Pepoon, Bower, McClellan, Suddith, Brauer, Gorman, Madison, Bower. 

Middle Row — Prjihl, Keller, Gwyn, Hobbs, White, Jensen, Fair. 

Bottom Row — Buckley, West, Munson, Dalzell, Jack. 



THE HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 

Iris Sudduth President 

Lucille Pepoon J 'ice-President 

Helen Keller Secretary 

Ura Bess Munson Treasurer 

The Home Economics Club is one whose membership is made up of girls who 
are majoring in Home Economics or are taking one or more subjects pertaining 
to it. 

Its primary pvtrpose is to promote interest in the course and to broaden the 
field of activity. 



229 



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Top Row — Thompson, Wales, Peterson, Hamm. 

Middle Row — Reeve, Paschal, Thatcher, Pearson, Willard. 

Bottom Row — Dalzell, Hunt, Sabin, Dameron, Ingham. 

THE AGRICULTURAL CLUB 

John Thompson President 

W. H. Dameron rice-President 

H. Newton Secretary-Treasurer 



The Ag Club is composed of agricultural students who are interested in the 
modern problems of agriculture. Regular bi-monthly meetings are held at which 
eminent speakers are asked to discuss interesting agricultural problems with the 
Club. The Club gives considerable financial assistance to the stock- judging teams, 
which compete at the International and Western stock-judging contests, and has 
fostered a banquet in honor of each team and its coach. Last October a barbecue 
was put over with the cooperation of other organizations on the campus and the 
Ag faculty ; and it will be continued in the future as a feature of homecoming 
week. The Club's social calendar includes the annual mid-winter dance given at 
the University gym and the famous barn dance given at the University stock farm 
in the spring term. The Club is rapidly growing stronger and is becoming an im- 
portant factor in the Agricultural College as a financial backing for the stock- 
judging teams and as a means of presenting new and interesting j^hases of agri- 
culture to the student farmer. 




Top Row — Allen, Jordan, Watkins. 

Middle Row — Andrus, Schwoob, Whitlock, Brown, Creswell, Thoeming. 

Seated — Turner, Dr. Scott, Chapman, Hellewell. 




PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY 

OFFICERS 

Dr. John W. Scott Honorary President 

M. R. Chapman President 

Louis Thoeming Jl'ce-President 

Edward A. Andrus Secretarx 

The Pre-Medical Society of the University of Wyoming was organized in 
1924, for the purpose of promoting the best interests of the pre-medical students 
in the University. 




i 



Top Row — Emil Ebert, Harry Russell, Clark Biesemeier. Ruedell Lewis, James Thaer, Reynold Seaverson, J. B. 
Scarbrough. Middle Row — LaMar Jones, Wm. W. Denton. Freda Connor, Minnie Holman, Raymond Baker, Wm. 
BuchhoU. Bottom Row — Mark Taylor, Jr.; Phillip Pepoon, O. H. Rechard, H. C. Gossard, James Adamson, 
Robert E. Burns, Oswald Seaverson. Not in picture— Marcella Avery, Nancy Jones. Gretna Newbauer. Viola Stacy. 



IRRATIONAL CLUB 

OFFICERS 

Robert E. Burns Positive Square Roof 

Oswald Seaverson Ncgatii'c Square Root 

Marcella Avery Keeper of Log and Bones 

Gretna Newbauer/ ^^/^^,,. /^',^^,,, ^j f,,^. j,,^!,,, 

Clark Biesemeier ( 



The Irrational Club — alias the Math Club — is one of the youngest depart- 
mental associations on the campus, having been organized in the first term of this 
school year. In its bi-weekly meetings the Club refutes the prevalent idea that 
math is nothing but a dull conglomeration of vague theories, incomprehensible 
formulas, and bothersome problems by presenting the interesting and more pop- 
ular side of this science. The official language of this group as that of the great 
mathematicians. All math students are elgible to membership. 



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1915 WYO 





Top Row — Southworth, Keller. Jones, Clough, Butcher, Varela, Gebert, Seyfarth, Cresswell, Ducker. 

Middle Row — Pitt, Diggs, Sisk, Thompson, Buckley, Gwyn, Wood, Schreiber, Schreiber, Baird, Hellewell. 

Bottom Row — Turner, Crawford, Carlisle, Gregory, Williams, Helsberg, Simpson, Brock, Pugh, Diggs, Oldman. 



LE CERCLE FRANCAIS 

OFl^CERS 

Ethel Simpson President 

Lillian Helsberg ]^ ice-President 

Sallie Diggs Secretary 

Katheryn Brock Treasurer 

Le Cercle Francais is a club whose members consist of advanced French stu- 
dents. Its purpose is to furnish an opportunity for the students to study the 
French language, life and customs. 

The meetings are held once a month. At each reunion a program is presented, 
consisting of short plays, music, or speeches. All conversation is carried on in 
French, and in this way greater fluency is acquired in the speaking of the language. 



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standing — Cordes, Preis, Thoeming, Butscher, Gebert, Brown, Rockwell, Svenson, Munson. 
Seated— Svenson, Berry, Cordes, Svenson, Mayland, Diggs, Trepp, Steniach. 



GERMAN CLUB 

Herman Mayland President 

H. Svenson I 'ice-President 

Etta Diggs Treasurer 

Louise Cordes Secretary 

This club was organized for a combined purpose : To stimulate interest in Ger- 
man Literature and Art, and to acquire fluency in speech by conversation, in a man- 
ner that cannot be obtained in the classroom. The club was organized January 12. 
The meetings, held once a month, are devoted to short plays, talks on literature, 
music or stories. Any student or non-student who can converse in German may 
become a member. 




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Top Row — Southworth, O'Reilly, Cossitt, Crawford, Butscher, Wood, Varela, Gebert, Creswell, Finnerty,. 

Seyfarth, Dirklnson. 
Middle Row — Haywood, Johnson, Scott, McCoy, Straley, Simpson, Helsberg, Lavergne. Gilland, Malone, Burns, 

Mrs. Schreiber, Mr. Sohreiber. 
Seated — Connor, Hon, Hemry, Preis, Thompkins, Murphey, Kind, Hart, Baird, Haywood, Ekstrom. 



LA CHARLA 

Jean Tompkins President 

Martha Preis Seeretary 

Irene Murphey Treasurer 

La Charla, a club made up of those students who are interested in the language 
and customs of the Spanish-speaking countries, has had a very worthwhile year. 
Under the guidance of the new constitution and through the splendid help of the 
advisors, the members have nearly all taken part in some activity of the club. The 
meetings consisted of plays, cross-word puzzles, poems, songs, and talks by the 
various members. 

The final achievement of the Club was the production of "Juan de las Vinas" 
by Hartzenbush, which was given in assembly during the spring term. 




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THE EDUCATION CEUB 

Percy Ingham President 

Arietta W3'ant Vice-President 

Clyde W. Kurtz Secretary-Treasurer 

The Education Club was organized in 1922 for the purpose of fostering good 
fellowship among the future Wyoming teachers in order that the schools of the 
State might become more closely united and look to the University as the center 
of our educational system. Membership is open to all students in the College of 
Education-. Meetings are held once a month, at which time the members get to- 
gether for short social functions or to listen to talks by those who are experts in 
the field of education. 





Top Row — Robert Clausen, Harry Russell, Wendell Smith, LaMar Jones, William Denton, Harold Hobbs. 

Middle Row — Clark Snyder, Richard Day, Horace Titus, Dick Leake, Zollle Wood, Homer Fair, Art Mundell, 

James O'Brien, Reynold Seaverson, Dave Goldman. 

Sitting— Lyie Scott. Arch F. Rakatzky. Prof. J. C. Fitterer. James O'Roke. Raymond Denton. 

Absent — Elmer K. Nelson and Robert Atha. 

vSTUDENT CHAPTER 
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS 

OFFICERS 

Zollie E. Wood President 

Homer Fair Vice-President 

Horace Titus Secretary-Treasurer 

James O'Brien Reporter 

SPONSORS 

Prof. J. C. Fitterer and Arch F. Rakatzky 
To effect a closer contact with the progress of engineering throughout the 
United States, as well as to enhance a fraternal spirit among the engineering stu- 
dents^ application was made for a Student Chapter to the American Society of 
Civil Engineers, which is the oldest of all American engineering societies or asso- 
ciations. This request was approved by the Board of Direction, April 20, 1925, 
which action entitles the student members to many privileges and publications of 
the parent society and also to wear the red shield which is known the world over 
to professional engineers and others. 

237 




I 



Alice Spreng W. F. Urbach Ethlyn Christensen 

Paul RIngerl, Glen Gariepy Homer Fair, Ruth Atwell 

Irvin Redhalr, Irene Smith, Robert Peterson. Helen Barth. Lucille Pepoon. Wayne Scott. 

STUDENTS' CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Ethlyn Christensen President 

AHce Spreng Secretary 

Homer Fair Treasurer 

The Student Christian Association made its first appearance on the University 
of Wyoming campus this year. In the past the Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. A. 
have functioned as separate organizations ; the S. C. A. is but an expression on the 
part of the members of these two former organizations to work together so that 
they may better achieve the ideals for which they stand. The relationship with the 
national Y. M. and Y. W. are still maintained, their national secretaries still visit 
the campus and are ever ready to give of their inspiration in the furtherance of 
the work. 

The S. C. A. is still in the stage of experiment, the Christian Associations of 
other colleges of America are watching the experiment with deep concern, but the 
venture has proceeded far enough to assure those who are interested that it will 
succeed. 

Students who are interested in the life of Christ and are anxious to hold Him 
before the students as the ideal way of life, who are willing to sacrifice time and 
energy to see that He is presented through religious meetings, Bible discussion 
groups, church relationships, deputation teams, and the inviting of Christian states- 
men to the campus to inspire them and their fellow students to higher standards of 
living, are cordially invited to associate themselves with the S. C. A. 

238 



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ENGINEERING SOCIETY 

OFFICERS 

Harold W. Hobbs Chief Engineer 

Zollie E. Wood Assistant Engineer 

Harry S. Anderson Recorder 

George L. Sherard Treasurer 

LaMar Jones ^ Reporter 

The past year has witnessed the consummation of many large and imposing 
engineering projects, as wdl as the inception and promotion of many more whose 
inherent ideas and purposes are both interesting and novel. In fact, the magnitude 
of these engineering enterprises has involved the public funds, and thereby public 
interest, to a greater extent than formerly when private endeavor alone was domi- 
nant in the material development of our natural resources. Furthermore, the 
urgency of adequate conservation of public wealth has marvelously stimulated at- 
tention to its proper protection. The future is promising. 

The Engineering Society has been kept in touch with the trend of material 
events and with the new and perfected methods and processes current in the engi- 
neering world. Both by films and lectures, the student's vision has been widened 
and an outlook beyond the purely academic life projected. The meetings have 
proven their helpfulness in the reaction and interest manifested. 




POTTER LAW CLUB 

Harold Erickson President 

William Garbutt Secretary-Treasurer 

The Potter Law Club is an organization of the law students and faculty and 
is named in honor of Chief Justice Potter. The Club was founded by E. F. 
Albertsworth, the law school's first dean. Under his leadership many interesting 
moot court cases were argued and lectures given by prominent lawyers. 

In the present year, with Dean Driscoll's leadership, the club has argued some 
very interesting cases and has been favored by very interesting lectures given by 
members of the local bar and other prominent attorneys. 



240 




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THE GUN AND PEN CLUB 

The Vocational Students organized the Gun and Pen Club two years ago. 
The object of the Club was to give the ex-service men a chance to get acquainted 
with each other and to more rapidly acquire the school spirit. The Gun and Pen 
Club has not been very active the past year, due to the fact that most of the ex- 
service men have finished school. 

The members of the Gun and Pen Club are rapidly completing their prepara- 
tion for life's work and through the training given them by the Government are 
again enabled to make good for themselves and their country in time of peace as 
they more than made good in time of war. 





Top Row— T. H. Richardson, Scottsbluff; E. J. Oberhouser, Eustis; L. N. Rask, Grand Island; Fred Parks, Sidney. 

Bottom Row — Gertrude Delsing, Hemingsford; Catherine Delsing, Hemingsford; Katherine Rihn. Gurley; Myrtle 

Bang, Norfolk; Frances Shier, Mitchell; Margaret Mark, Mitchell. 



NEBRASKA CLUB 

Leslie N. Rask '. . .President 

The Nebraska Club is an organization whose membership is made up of stu- 
dents who reside in Nebraska. The purpose of this organization is advancement 
along literary and social lines. 

In honor of George G. Neihardt, Nebraska's poet-laureate, a part of his poem 
"Should We Forget" : 

I wonder if the skies would be so blue. 

Or grass so kindly green as 'twas of old ; 
Or would there be such freshness in the dew 

When purple mornings blossom into gold. 
I wonder would the sudden song of birds, 

Thrilling the storm-hushed forest, dripping wet 
After a June shower, be as idle words. 

Should we forget. 



242 



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1923 WY 





Top Row— Delsing, Murphey, Grzeskowiak, Finnerty, Oshsensch lager, Anselmi, Koerfer. Kleeman, Thibault. 

Middle Row — Sandall, Gaber, McKean, Harvoka, Prahl, LIneaweaver, McGarrity, Nelson, Hawks. 

Bottom Row — Delsing, Kershlsnik, McCarty, Smith, O'Reilly, Jack, Scott, Long, Finnerty. 




NEWMAN CLUB 

Rev. J. T. Nicholson Cliaplain 

Lucille O'Reilly President 

John Smith Vice-President 

Beatrice Jack . Secretary-Treasurer 

The Newman Club of the University is an organization of Catholic students 
which was founded by Cardinal John Henry Newman at Oxford University in 
England. Its objects are the promotion of the University and student welfare. 
Any Catholic student may be a member. Others wishing to be affiliated may be 
voted in. i i i! i 



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First Row— Pendray, Creswell, Seaverson, Creswed, Seaverson, Parks, Johnson, Webber, Leponnen. 

, Second Row— Cordes, Hon, West, Scott, Russell, Roberts, White, Hayes. 

Third Row— McNiff, Carlisle, Cordes, Smith, Holmes, Kino, Kilflore, Richards, Hitschew. 

Fourth Row — Qreflory, Youno, Frake, Josselyn, Gibbons, Tune, West, Delatour. 

EPISCOPALIAN CLUB 

Harry Engstrom President 

C. O. Frake Vice-President 

Helen Tune Secretary 

Frances Josselyn Treasurer 

Canon S. E. West Student Pastor 

Miss Lois GibbonsI p^^^^^ Sponsors 

Major Daly j 

The Episcopalian Club is an organization of University students who are 
affiliated with the Episcopal Church. Canon S- E. West, who came as Student 
Pastor in the fall, has ably served the Club and has brought it to its present stage 
of successful activity. 

One of the features of the Club during the past year has been the weekly 
Vesper service on Sunday afternoons conducted by Canon West. The Club 
also publishes "The Chimes," a weekly bulletin containing announcements and news 
items of interest to members. Delegates from the Club were sent to the Colorado 
Episcopal Student Conference held at Denver during the winter. 

244 




9 2 . 





First Row — P. Green, W. Willock, R. White. R. Southworth, M. Meyers. E. Carpenter. M. McDowell, D. Spencer, 

H. Cossitt, F. Ahrens. I. Bowling, D. Ewers. 
Second Row — M. BIydenburgh, I. Durand, I. Dunn, M. Jenkins, M. Ewers, I. Van Duesen, K. Brauer, E. Malone, 

L. Matson, K. Rihn. F. McPhee. 
Third Row — N. Gwyn, L. Sprow, S. LaVerne, Mrs. Geer, M. Barry, Mrs. Hay (sponsor), D. Pearson, M. Metzier, 

B. Lehr, I. Sudduth. M. Mathews, A. Gaensslen. L. Peooon, H. Sorias. 
Fourth Row— N. Bender, E. Dalzell, S. Oldman, H. Keller, M. Massey, J. Watt, R. Atwell, V. Hart, J. S:ott. 



KAPPA PHI 

OFFICERS 

Helen Keller President 

Margaret Mumm Secretary 

Margaret Mumm Vice-President 

Emma Alleman Secretary 

Kathrine Rihn Treasurer 

Eta Chapter of Kappa Phi was established at Wyoming in 1919. Its purpose 
is to unite Methodist girls into fellowship and service, and to promote student 
welfare at the University. One social meeting, such as teas, taffy pulls, hikes, and 
one meeting for discussion of topics interesting to girls of this club, are held each 
month. The membership has increased a great deal this year, including many 
faithful and enthusiastic workers, and Kappa Phi feels as though it has had a suc- 
cessful year. ' 



245 



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THE CATTLEMAN'S NEIGHBOR 

Fer twenty year I've bached it here, 

Good range and water, and no near 

By neighbors, till I sees one day 

Some fool sod-pounder that-o'-way 

Had went and slapped a homestead on 

My best hay ground, and even gone 

And fenced the crick, that's what he'd done. 

Fenced my crick, the son-of-a-gun ! 

Jes' see him once, not much I care, 

I jes' stay here and he stays there ; 

Of friendship we don't make no sign. 

He goes his way and I go mine. 

Then, saddlin' up, one day I hear 

A woman's callin', sweet and clear. 

There hain't a girl in miles o' me. 

What does she vv^ant, who kin she be ? 

"Yes, ma'am, I owns this ranch — nice da] — 

A-huh — a-hem — what's that you say?" 

By Jakes ! she was the settler what 

Had gone and filed on my hay plot! 

"Brother helps me, and," says she, 

"Why don't you act more neighborly?" 

And then I looks at her a while 

And, 'fore I knows it, starts to smile, 

A-thinkin' stranger things come true 

Than bach in love, age forty-two. 

You come right in, unhitch, don't go, 

She's gittin' supper ; fer, you know, 

She filed one claim and then, by gee ! 

The preacher helps her locate me. 



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JUNIOR PROM 

The big event of the year was the Junior Prom, given by the class of '26 for 
the graduating class. The affair w^as held in the new Gym and was the first formal 
to be given there. Shaded lights were the chief decorations. Blue, yellow and rose 
lights alternately threw their gleam upon the dancers, creating mysterious and fas- 
cinating effects. Lattice fences of white, above which peeped the roses that graced 
each tiny tete-a-tete table, added to the general effectiveness and served to screen 
off the tables where the delicious supper was served later in the evening. The pro- 
grams were of the University colors, being made of Tapa cloth which was ordered 
especially for the occasion from the Hawaiian Islands. The Grand March was 
led by Mr. George Seyfarth, President of the Junior Class, and Miss Pearle Jones, 
and as the guests were led through the various formations under the ever-changing 
lights, many remarked that they had never seen a more beautiful dance. Guests 
of honor were Dr. and Mrs. Crane, Dean and Mrs. Driscoll, Professor and Mrs. 
Knight, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Woodford, Miss Bertha White, Mr. Oscar Peterson 
and the class of '25. 

The Wyoming Collegians furnished the music for the dancing, which con- 
tinued until I o'clock. 

Due to the untiring effort of the members of the Junior Class and the whole- 
hearted cooperation from everyone concerned, there is no doubt that the 1925 
Junior Prom will go down as one of tlie loveliest affairs in the history of the 
University. 



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THE CO-ED BALL 

The annual co-ed ball is a tradition at Wyoming which was successfully car- 
ried out this year. Invitations were sent out and plans were made long before 
the eventful night. There were frenzied calls for "dress suits" — and taxies, cor- 
sages and "dates." 

The old gymnasium was not decorated for the occasion — the dancers made a 
more picturesque scene than any other decorations could have done. Fairy and 
prince, pauper and princess danced together regardless of caste or color. Color- 
ful Spanish dancers set off the advantage of the Indian maids and Japanese geisha 
girls. One girl remarked that she had never seen such a "crowd of good-looking 
men" as were there that night. Boys in dress suits, sport clothes, and sailor cos- 
tirnies led the fairer sex around the floor. What mattered if they carried small 
scented handkerchiefs and stopped every now and then to powder their dainty 
noses ? 

Prizes were awarded, and Violet Berthelsen and Bernice Wells, who repre- 
sented an old Civil War couple, were chosen as the prettiest couple on the floor, 
while Amelia Kershisnik and Dorothy King, as "Si and Maria," received the sec- 
ond prize for the cleverest couple. 





THE ENGINEERS' BAEL 

The Engineers outdid all previous records in the planning and execution of 
the 1925 Engineers" ball, which is always one of the big events of the college year. 

The beauty of the new Gym was further enhanced by the use of vari-colored 
lights, the colors of which were reflected in many tiny mirrors, which covered 
a hvtge revolving ball suspended from the center of the ceiling. The effect was 
that of a fairyland with a myriad of ever-changing colors cast upon the floor. 
Many brown and yellow pennants inscribed "Engineers — U. of W." were strung 
across the ceiling of the gym while at one end a constantly changing electrical 
sign "Engineers" and another sign at the other end "Wyoming" added greatly to 
the lighting effect. The favors were attractive little celluloid slide rules with the 
names of the dances cleverly designated and named. Tiny holiday hats of all 
colors and descriptions, serpentine and whistle balloons contributed a festive air. 
At midnight delicious refreshments were served. 

The Engineers announced that Miss Billie Murry had been elected as their 
Queen for the year 1924-25. She was presented with a lovely silver vase of sweet 
peas, upon which was inscribed "Queen of the Engineers — University of Wyo- 
ming, '24-'25." 





BLACK AND WHITE BALL 

The Black and White masquerade, given by the Senior Class, was one of the 
most successful social events of the year. There was the usual crowd of maids 
and waiters, mournful or gleaming according to their taste; chorus girls in black 
and white ruffles, gay gentlemen in dashing attire, and most popular of all, many 
cross-word puzzles. The first prize went to Herbert Woodman and Crete Wood 
as cross-word puzdes, with Dr. and Mrs. Knight winning the consolation prize. 
When the evening was half over the winning puzzles submitted in the cross-word 
puzzles contest were thrown on the screen. The winners were presented with 
cards bearing a highly gilded $15 ($15 in gold, you know). George Guy was the 
lu'cky winner of this contest. Dancing continued until i :30 o'clock. During the 
evening an ice and cakes were served. 



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THE FORTY-NINERS' BALE 

The traditional forty-niners' ball, which is given annually by the Sophomore 
Class was, as usual, very picturesque and entertaining. Bearded miners, brilliant 
dance-hall girls and pale-faced professional gamblers were among the hilarious 
guests. The roar of the .38's was sadly missed, but cowboy yells aided the music 
materially. Dancing was by no means the only entertainment. Beneath bright 
lamps were seated groups of men with tense faces trying their luck at cards. 
Others were crowded about the faro game. Bartenders were busy setting out 
drinks at the long bar for the thirsty ones. Late in the evening prizes were 
awarded to the ones wearing the best costumes. First prize was given to Miss 
Lucille Moon, who was picturesquely garbed in buckskin riding costume, high- 
heel boots and broad Stetson. Miss Moon is a Freshman. Mr. Woodman, a 
Senior, received a prize also. He appeared in much- worn overalls, gunnysacks 
for shoes and long white hair and beard. He was truly a Jed Smith with his 
small pack on his back and the appearance of having trekked long miles through 
virgin forests in search of nev/ lands. 

The present Sophomore Class is to be commended for carrying out this col- 
lege tradition so well. 



FRATERNITY DANCES 

Among the important social events of the year were the fraternity parties 
which were this year exceedingly numerous in number and exceptionally brilliant. 
Four fraternities entertained at f ormals — Sigma Alpha Epsilon, February 1 1 ; 
Gamma Zeta, February 20; Sigma Nu, February 21, and Delta Delta Delta, April 
3. All of these dances were unusually beautiful and successful. S. A. E. gave 
its formal at the Connor Hotel ; Gamma Zeta held hers at the Gymnasium ; Sigma 
Nu secured the new gymnasium, which was beautifully decorated for the occasion, 
and Delta Delta Delta entertained also at the Connor. Other important affairs 
included the Pi Beta Phi May dance, the Sigma Nu Chanticler party, and early in 
the year the various pledge parties. 

The fraternities are to be congratulated upon the excellence of their social 
functions, which undoubtedly add much to the social life of the campus. 



355 






IRON SKULL vSKID 

The Iron Skiill Skid again proved to be one of the outstanding events of 
the year. The old gym was decorated for the occasion in Red and Green, the 
Iron Skull Colors. A huge replica of the Skull and Crossbones was suspended 
from the ceiling and the winking red and green eyes of the skull served to add 
mystery and to complete the decorative effects. At one end of the gym was located 
the "No Hope Cemetery," where a tombstone had been erected over the Wyoming 
Jinx, born long ago, dead forever. 

Excellent music was furnished by the Kappa Sig Orchestra. Punch and 
mints were served and they, too, were an the colors of the fraternity, thus carrying 
out even further the emblems of Iron Skull. During the evening Miss Josephine 
Delatour, president of the organization, announced the list of Freshmen who will 
next year become members of Iron Skull. They were given their bids amid the 
applause of the audience, who, no doubt, were hoping that the new members would 
as faithfully carry out the traditions of the organization, especially with regard 
to the Iron Skull Skid, as the members in the class of '27. Dancing lasted until 
12 o'clock, after which the eyes of the Skull and Crossbones closed on another 
successful Iron Skull Skid. 



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AS WE MOVE 

September 7th ! Just think. Sis. we start for Laramie tomorrow. I wonder 
what it will all be like. They tell me that there is dancing, swimming, boxing, ten- 
nis, and all that. It all ought to be just great. Maybe they'll teach us new dances 
— I'd like to lie able to fox-trot like that city guy who was up here for our last 
dance. Well, let's go over and say good-bye to "Sue," and we're going to be away 
for a year — and it's going to be a grand old year. Gee whiz ! 

September 8th — 

Parents separated from their children and bankroll. 

September pth — 





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September 14th — 

Students go to church. 

September 15th — 
The rush is on. 
Bob Grieve and Cora Likely married. Another good man gone wrong. 

September i6th — 

First assembly. Juniors meet. Kappa Delta Serenade. 

September i/th — 

Wedge Thompson "brought to life." 

September igth — 

Sororities entertain their rushees. 

September 20th — 

Frosh have a party. 

Septem-ber 21st — 

Church affiliation. Dean Sanford entertains her country visitor at the House 
of Commons. 

September 22nd — 

The rush is still on. 

September 2^rd — 

Governor Ross addresses the assembly, and Quill meets with the Tri-Delts. 

September 24th — 

S. C. A. meeting. 

September 26th — 

Pi Phis and Kappa Delts entertain. 

September 2'/th — 

Gamma Zeta rush. A. S. U. W. dance. 

September 28th — ■ 

Silence Day and some rules broken. 
September 2pth — 

Common Bid day. 
October ist — 

S. C. A. meeting. 
October 2nd — 

Our Governor's Death. 
October p'd — ■ , 

Church receptions. 
October 4th — 

Aggie game postponed. 
October jfh — 

Sororities inaugurate a course of Sunday T's. Men have practice in wrist 
gymnastics. Gamma Zetas at "Home." 
261 






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October 6th — 

Helen McGarrity and Virginia S. celebrate a la country style. 

October yth — 

Dr. Gibbons addresses the Newman Club. 

October 8th — 

S. C. A. meeting. 

October pth — 

Shrimp and Astin tie themselves into hard knots working up enthusiasm. 

October lo — 

Pi Phi pledge dance. 




October nth — 

Wyo vs. D. U., 0—7. 

October 12th — 

A New Yorker travels to Wyoming and discovers America. Several girls 
campused. 

October 14th — 

Tri-Delts and Gamma Zetas hear of their campus. 

October if,th — 

S. C. A. meeting. 

October i6th — 

Dr. Gibbons speaks at assembly on her travels abroad. 

October lyth — 

Sig Alph Pledge Dance. 

October i8th — 

Greeley game, ^2 to 8. Yea ! Cowboys ! 

October ipth — 

Kappa Delts and Pi Phis at home. 

October 20th — 

Students show their pep and school is suspended for the day by student 
authority. 





192.3 WYO 




October 21st — 

All in the air over the double-cuts. 

October s^rd — 

Quill meets with the Sigma Nus. The night was made hectic by prowling 
serenaders. 

October 24th — 

Barbecue and Rally. 





YEA^ cowboy! 

October 2^th — 

Homecoming, C. U. vs. Wyo., 21 — o. 

October 28th — 

Junior meeting. All set for the Prom, with Hank as chairman. 

October ^ist — 

Virginia S. and R. Kimball asked to leave the Library as quietly as their two 
feet will allow. 

November ist — 

Mines vs. Wyo., 6 — 3. A. S. U. W. dance. 

November 2nd — 

President Coolidge declares war on Turkey November 27th. Hoyt Hall meet- 
ing. 



263 



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November 4th — 
"Cal" elected. 

November f,th — 

Wyoming vs. Montana, 18-17. 

November 6tli — 

Newman Club meeting. 

November yth — • 

Dr. Smith leaves for his Alma Mater. Gamma Zetas entertain. 

November 8th — 

Kappa Sig dance. 

November Qtli — 

Are we going to beat Utah? 

November loth — 

Pig dinner at Merica. 

November nth — 

Holiday. Junior-Senior girl vs. Sophomore team in Hockey. Sophs cham- 
pions. 

November i^th — 

Just two more weeks until Turkey Day, yea, November 27th. 

November 14th — 

S. A. E.'s entertain. 

November if,th — 

Pi Phi Alumni dance. 
Utah-Wyoming game. 

November i6th — 

Football team returns, with three injured — Rice, Gish and Gilbert. 

November iStli — 
Wyo Staff. 

November 20th — 
Class meetings. 

November 21st- 
Co-ed ball. 

November 22nd — 

C. C. vs. Wyo, 2,2 to 3. 

November 2jrd — 

Very little dating, a'll preparing for examinations. 

Noz' ember 24tli — 
Exams. 



Nominations for Beauty and Popular Co-eds. 




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November 26th — 

More exams. Gang leaves for Home, Sweet Home. 

November 2yth — 

Deep mourning in the Barn Yard, and very little doing for those who remain 
behind. 

December ist — 

Registration Day marred by ap{>earance of 12 weeks' marks. 
Some are born Flvmkers. 

Some achieve Hunking and some have flunking thrust upon them. 
Wyo subscriptions and Sigma Nu serenade. 

December 2nd — 

Hoyt Hall house meetings. 
Wyo Staff. 





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December yth — 

"Rank Women" leave feed for The Scavenger Club. 
Pi Phis at home. 

December 8th — 

Dr. Vayless addresses assembly. 

December loth — 

Quill Club meets with Dr. Mclntyre. 
Newman Club. 

December I2th — 

Leap Year dance. 

December i^th — 

Spring Day. Connie and Walt go for a ride. 

December 14th — 

The largest attendance at Sunday school this year. Christmas is coming. 

December i6th — 
Wyo Staff. 
Oxford debate. 

December i8fh — 

Largest snowstorm this year. 

December igth — 
Powerfully cold. 




December 20th — 
Fare thee well. 

Merry Christmas — 

January 4th — 

Christmas Spirit has a relapse. 

January ^th — 

The How We Hate to Come Back Feeling 
Junior Prom committee meeting. 








January 6th — 

Branding Iron out. 

January yth — 

The Junior Prom is postponed until January 30th. 




January 8th — 

Good Intention Stock takes a slump. 

January pth — 

A. S. U. W. dance. 

January loth — 

Independent dance. 

January i6th — 

W. A. A. dance. 

Episcopal Club meet with Canon West. 

January i^th — 

Kappa Sigma dance. 
Delta Mu Alpha dance. 
Kappa Phi initiataiion. 

January 2^rd — 

Ag Club dance. 

January 24th — 

Basketball game with Bozeman. 

January 2pth — 

Basketball game at Boulder. 
State Legislature pays us a visit. 

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January 30th — 

Chiffon and dress suits. We mean the Junior Prom. 

January jist — 

The Junior Prom is quite the "Aufaite" — whatever that is. 

February 2nd — 

Independent Girls met and drafted a message to Congress demanding more 
favorable w^eather. 

Fehnuary ^rd — 

Theta Alpha Phi play. 
Chorus. 

February 4th — 

Discussion Groups. 

Iron Skull initiation. 

German Club meets at Hoyt Hall. 

Februwy ^th — 

Phi Kappa Phi initiation. 

February 6th — 

D. U. vs. Wyoming, 15 — 19. 
Yea ! Cowboy ! 




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February yth — 
We win again. 

February loth — 

Assembly and No Speaker. 

February nth — 

Student honor discussed. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon formal. 

February 12th — ■ 

Holiday. Tired students snooze peacefully until noon. 

February 13th — • 

Friday, but lucky for old Wyo. C. C.-Wyo., 20 — 26. 

February 14th — 

Conference at Greeley. 
Pi Phi dance. 

February lyth — 

Campus Traditions discussed. 

February 20th — 

Gamma Zeta formal. 
Group departs for Boulder. 

February 21st — 

Sigma Nu formal. 

February 2jrd — 
Holiday. 

February 2^th^— 

Discussion Groups. 

February 26th— 

Debaters launch vocal thunder in assembly. Reverberations jar foundation. 

February 2/th — 

C A. C. vs. Wyo. Why, of course we won. 





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March 4th — 

Exams continued. 

March 5th — 
More. 

March loth — 

Tournament week. 

Our gdrl debaters leave for the east. 

March I ^th — ' I I i ^'■^ 

Our friends, the Seniors, hold forth at the Sigma Nu house. Yes, Ted. we 
will give you the chance to help find the Juniors on Sneak. 

March 21st — 

Independent dance, 

March 2^th — 

Debate with Arizona. 
Engineers' formal. 

March ^oth — 

Debate with Willamette. 

April Fool — 

April srd — 

Tri-Delt formal. 
Gamma Zetas entertain. 

April 4th — 

"W" Club dance. 

April loth — 

Cofifer-Miller Players entertain our youths. 
Delta Sigma Rho entertain at Hoyt. 

April nth — 

Inter-fraternity dance. 

Easter Sunday — 

"Sam" and "Pat" leave for Oregon. 

April isth — 

Newman Club Matinee dance. 





April i/fh — 

Senior Black and White dance. 

April i8th— 

S. C. A. social. 
Kappa Delta dance. 

April 22nd — 

Debate with U. S. C. 

April 24th — 

Kappa Sig dance. 

April 25th — 

Iron Skull Skid. 

April 2yth — 

Kappa Phi party. 

Arbor Day — Sigma Nu Chanticler party. 

End of Six] Weeks. 

Newman Club play. 

271 




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April 28th — 

Well, Ted, why didn't you show up Sneak day ? We sure enough had a one 
grand time. 

April ^oth — 

Oratorical contest. 

A. W. S. Mass Meeting. 

May 1st — 

A. S. U. W. Circus. 

May 8th — 

Alpha Tau Omega dance. 

May pth — 

Kadett Hop. 

May 15th — 

Ag Club dance. 

May i6th — 

Kappa Sigma picnic. 
Independent picnic. 





192 5 W\ 




May 22nd — 

Stunt Night. 

May 2jrd. — 

Sigma Nu picnic. 
Alpha Tau picnic. 

May 24th — 

Theta Alpha Phi picnic. 

May 2yth — 

Pi Phi May dance. 



MUD AND MIRACLES 
Was ridin' down a-past his place, 

And then I thinks I'll 'low- 
To sort o' pass the time o' day 

And speak a friendly, "How !" 

He's mussin' 'round there in the mud, 

A little dam he's got ; 
He 'lows to make a cacti flat 

Into a garden spot. 

I says to him, "The land's no good ; 

Fer farmin' she don't win." 
But all he does is slop around 

And kind o' funny grin. 

I says, "The land's jes useful fer 
Some cows to raise and range" ; 

But he jes' grins and hollers back, 
"There's goin' to be a change." 

He's mussin' 'round there in the mud, 

A little dam he's got ; 
He 'lows to make a cacti flat 

Into a garden spot. 





Hosts Rodeo Luncheon, Eighteenth State Legislature,, State Capitol Building, Cheyenne, Wyoming, 

February 21st. 1925. 

Left to Right— Frank 0. Norton. Dude Wrangler. Senate; R. H. Alcorn, Horse Wrangler. House; A. W. McCol- 

lough. Top Cutter, House; J. C. Underwood, Head Boss, House; John M. Snyder, Timekeeper and Lord of the 

Exchequer; W. W. Daley. Straw Boss, Senate. 





^92,5 WYO T^ 





The beauty judge gets knocked for what the eminent pen artist, John Held, 
Jr., might term "a loop." 



Irate Father — I never heard of such a nerve. A man in your position asking 
for my daughter's hand! 

Suitor — Oh, my position isn't so bad. I have a M^indow on one side and the 
door on the other. 

^ "i* *?* T^ "K 

Fashion magazines remind us 

Ladies' pockets are the bunk. 
So that dates and dances find us 

Loaded down with all their junk. 

"If Cleopatra had lived in a sorority house the Roman Empire would have 
been saved." 

"How is that!" 

"Oh, the house-mother would have sent Anthony home at 10:30!" 

First Co-Ed — They took Dick out of the game for unnecessary roughness. 
Second Co-Ed — How like Dick — many's the time I've sent him home for the 
same thing. 



27S 




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nB$ — ^Joe gave me a drink at the 
Prom last night. Did I do wrong ? 
ATfl — You probably did. 



AAA — Why did Marge move to that 
questionable hotel? 

2AE — Oh, I guess she needed the 
change. 





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Howja like to be a pledge at the Pi PIni House? Two visiting sisters get cooled off 



"That girl reminds me of a leaky roof." 

"How's that?" 

"She needs a shingle." 

* * * * ^; 

Riddle — What is it that walks, talks, sleeps and eats, and still it is dead? 
Answer — A dumb co-ed. 

"How come Minnie lost her swdl job?" 
"Oh, she got to imitating a revolver." 
"What do you mean." 

"Why, she loaded her face with powder and cocked her eye at .all the boys, 
so the boss fired her." 

It was the first night out of Laramie and it was getting cold. Erma Stevens, 
a member of the famous Wyoming Debating Team, felt the need of more covers, 
and, reaching up into the upper berth, she seized the warm, woolly blanket and 
began to pvdl. 

"What do 3^ou want?" growled a grufif voice. 

"Oh, I — I wanted a blanket !" 

"Well, let go of my nightshirt and I'll give you one." 

MEOW^-W-W-W-W 
Tri-Delt — Is he a nice boy? 
Pi Phi— No, I think you'll like him. 

279 



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Football captain, '25-'26. 

Quill Club. 

Junior Prom Committee. 
President of A. W. S., 



WHO'S WHO 

Harold Gilbert— President of the A. S. U. W. 

George Guy — Editor of Wyo. 

Herbert Woodman — Debater. Editor of '24 Wyo. 

Ralph Conwell — Editor of Branding Iron. 

Lucile O'Reilly— President of A. W. S., '25-26. 

Eleanor Chatterton — Secretary of A. S. U. W. 
*24-'25. Chancellor of Quill Club. 

Constance Chatterton — A. W. S. Iron Skull. 

Oscar Erickson — All-Conference guard. Captain of Basketball. 

George Vandeveer — Captain football, 1924. 

Erma Stevens — Debater. Quill Club. Delta Sigma Rho. Voted the most 
beautiful girl in the Senior Class. 

Sholie Richards — Debater. Delta Sigma Rho. Iron Skull. 

Millard Cofifey— President of A. S. U. W., '23-'24. 

Hazel Bowman — Debater. Iron Skull. Blue Pencil. Wyo Staff. 

Ruth Kimball — Organizer and leader. 

Harry Ballard — Chairman Prom Committee. Wyo Staff. 

Ruth Atwell— Wyo Staff. Blue Pencil. Theta Alpha Phi. 

Josephine Delatour — President of Iron Skull. Branding Iron Staff. 

John Bruner — Quill Club. Branding Iron Staff. 

Silvia Oldsman — Theta Alpha Phi. Blue, Pencil. Branding Iron Staff. Quill 
Club. 

Jean Mabee — Dramatics. Girls' athletics. Iron Skull Pledge. 

Wedge Thompson — President of the Freshman Class. Freshman football. 
Trade. Iron Skull Pledge. 

:{? :Js ^ ^ ^ 

THE BALD-HEADED CLUB 
Chief Billiard Ball— P. T. Miller. 
Chief Fly's Skating Rink— O. C. Gebert. 
Hair Restorer Advertisement (the "before") — John Hill. 
Member Pro Tem — The DriscoU baby. 

Members coming up — Herbert Woodman, "Baldy" Whitman, Byron Huie, 
'Shrimp" Spalding. 

ijc ^ ^ ii; ^ 

Johnny Bruner was heard one day reciting the following little rhime over and 
over : "My face, I don't mind it, because I'm behind it !" He might have added : 
"It's the ones out in front that I bore!" 






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As the student broadens his knowledge, and prepares himself for a 
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1915 WYO 



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Blondy Greth to Dorothy Nolan — Oh, well, you're beautiful but dumb ! 
Sweet Dorothy — Well, you aren't even beautiful ! 

Aggie Man — We lost the game on a delayed pass. 

Wyomingite — How's that? 

A. M. — Our star quarterback flunked in math. 

***** 

Hanger — Pat, have you anything to say before we drop the trap? 
Pat — Yes, by gorry, this thing don't look safe. 

"Do you know the difference between a pig skin and a skinned pig?" 

"No." 

"Well — wouldn't you make a hell of a football player !" — ^Juggler. 

Absent-minded Dentist (tinkering inside the hood of his motor car) — Now, 
I'm afraid this is going to hurt you just a little. 

"My reasons are deep seated," replied the Sig Alp pledge when he was asked 
why he did not sit down. 

A necking party is something that makes midnight seem like 9 o'clock. 

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/•I r^ervice and Shoe 

UClilltjf ^Satisfaction 

HAS MADE THIS A POPULAR STORE WITH THE STUDENT 

We appreciate the student business and are glad to have you make our store your 

headquarters 

THE BOOTERY 



2\] SOUTH SECOND STREET 



CLARK-CORDINER CO. 



LANE GARAGE 

106 SOUTH SECOND ST. 




The Wyoming Creamery Company 

Is one of the leading home industries of this community and should 

have your support. Tell your grocer to send you 

OVERLAND CREAMERY BUTTER AND QUALITY ICE CREAM 

We Can't Sell All the Ice Cream 
So We Sell the Best 

A. W. Sterzbach, Manager 

THIRD AND GARFIELD PHONE 3411 



CHAS. L CLARK 



JEWELRY AND GIFT SHOP 



SEE US FOR 



UNIVERSITY PINS. RINGS AND LOVING CUPS 



4cggc?;<X:;^n^<X;jl!>gC;Le><:^^^ 




6^c3cs;G^cs:^X3^<;::y:yi5^sc^5g 7 




IN DENVER- 




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PRACTICALLY ANYTHING YOU NEED IN THE WAY OF 

MACHINERY AND MACHINE SHOP EQUIPMENT 
IRRIGATION SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT 
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT 
HEATING. VENTILATING. ROOFING 
AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLIES 

RADIO AND 

A Varied Stock of General Supplies 
Carried in Stock by 

HENDRIE & BOLTHOFF 

MFG. AND SUPPLY COMPANY 
Denver, Colorado 



Ijprji ;-'!'•'■!•■'-' I ■ 








Spray's Coffee 


Acacia Hotel 


ALWAYS 
FRESH 


COLORADO SPRINGS. 
COLORADO 




■ 


J. W. ATKINSON. 

President and 
Manager 


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The Spray Coffee 
& Spice Co. 




2 n Market St. 


Denver. Colo. 



290 




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GREEK LETTER SECTION 

MU MU CLUB 
(Cat's Club) 

Cat's Whiskers — Ruth Kimball. 

Cat's Meow — Frances Shier. 

Cat's Radio — Sholae Richards. 

Cat's Paw — Alice Carlisle. 

Kittens — Peggy Wyant, Grace Buchanan, Josephine Wicks, Dorothy Chris- 
tensen, Genevieve Gatchell, Cathern Prahl, Helen McCoy, Margaret Hayes — 
most women. 

Fraternity colors — Gray and Black. 

Fraternity flower — Pussy Willow. 

Fraternity Song — Kitten-on-the-Keys. 

Irtsignia — Cat's Tail. 

Password — Meow! Pst ! Pst ! (repeated as many times as necessary). 

CHI BABY CHI 
(Aren't they cute?) 
Chief Cry Baby — Coza Huddleston. 
Chief Assistant — Herbert Woodman. 
He-used-to-cry — Byron Huie. 
You-can-cry-on-his-shoulder — Homer Mann. 

The membership in this club is unlimited. To be a member one merely has 
to shed 4 pints of tears (measured by Dr. Hebard) in or around Main Hall. 
Special consideration is given those who assist the chief gardner in watering. 

IOTA IOTA IOTA 

(Otherwise known as Tri "I" Club) 
President — Sylvia Oldman. 
Vice-President — Wesley Kerper. 
Second Vice-President — Helen McGarrity. 
Third Vice-President — Marjorie Nice. 
Fourth Vice-President — Harry Mills Astin. 
Fifth Vice-President — John Bruner. 
Sixth Vice-President — Mary Whelan. 

(ad infinitum) 
Fraternity song— "I LOVE ME." 

Sole topic of conversation — "I," "I," "I," 'TIIIIII." (Oh, yes, occasionally 
they say "me.") 






For College Annuals and Other Bool^s 



BECKTOLD COVERS 



In the binding of this book you have 
an example of how beautiful and 
practical a Becktold Cover can be. 
Attractiveness, durability, adapta- 
bility and economy are outstanding 
characteristics of Becktold Covers. 
Then they offer an almost unlimited 
range of colors and color combina- 
tions and can be embossed with prac- 
tically any sort of design. 



Year by year the popularity of these 
covers as bindings for College An- 
nuals increases. In the business 
world, too, there is a fast growing 
demand for them on catalogues and 
other books that need a durable and 
attractive dress. 

We shall be glad to send samples to 
any one interested in Becktold Cov- 
ers and to make suggestions as to 
how they can be adapted to any 
book. 



Becktold Printing and Book Mf^. Co. 

Manufacturers of distinctive Covers 

for College Annuals 

ST. LOUIS. MISSOURI 




You should know this pride- 
mark of an unique publishing 
service, in which printing is 
only one detail. 

You Tvill find it in man^ of the 
best school annuals and publica- 
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m5> 



192 5 WYO 





293 










19 2 J WYO 




lank 



LARAMIE. WYOMING 



OLDEST BANK IN LARAMIE 




John W. Hay, President 
A. C. Jones, Vice President 




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FROM THE TRAINING SCHOOL 
Dear Miss Adsit : 

Please ixcuse Johnny today. He will not be at school. He is acting as time- 
keeper for his father. Last night you gave him this ixample, if a field is four miles 
square how long will it take a man walking three miles an hour, to walk two and a 
half times around it? Johnny ain't no man, so we had to send his Daddy. They 
left early this morning and my husband said they ought to be back late tonight 
though it would be hard goin'. Dear Mum, please make the nix problem about 
ladies, as my husband can't afford to lose a day's work. I don't have no time to loaf 
but I can spare a day off occasionally better than my husband kin. 

Resp'y yrs. 



Mrs. Jones. 



* * ;|; sj; :(: 

Dwight Hansen^I can go with any girl I please. 

Dorothy Ndlan — Yes, too bad you don't please any of them. 

A man's reputation can be ruined now by eating a mint. 

:K * ;|; * * 

"Man Found Dead in Auto'' — Headline. 

Some other motorist probably gave him the right of way. 



Cop — Your honor, this man stole a quart of whiskey. 

Judge — This prisoner is dismissed. 

Cop — But, your honor — 

Judge — You can't make a case out of a quart. 

* * * :|; ^ 

THE CIGARETTE STOGY 
I shall light thee, 
Puff on thee, 
Drag on thee 
Until thou art 
"Ashes of my vengeance." 

— The Sagehen. 

' :): * ;|; ;J: :|; 

Harry Astin — What's a six-letter word meaning mushroom?" 
Kim B. — Parlor. 

;1; * * ;;= ;[, 

"Two negations make an affirmation,'' declaimed Prof. Dryasdust. 
"Yup," agreed a youth from the rear who was leaving school anyway, "like 
when a girl says : 'Don't ! Stop that.' " — American Legion. 



Co-Ed — Your new overcoat is rather loud. 
Frosh — It's all right when I put on a muffler. 

:!: * * =1: * 

Speaking of what the army does for you — look at Willets Brewster ! Espe- 
cially when he tells a girl "how very glad he was to dance with her." 



4c:g^ic>;gj:^j^q^^^j:<;;ry<^ 




CAPITOL GRILLS 

CHEYENNE 

211 W. SEVENTEENTH ST. 1608 CAREY AVE. 

EAT WHERE THE 
TOWNSPEOPLE EAT 



WHEN WOU GO TO A STRANGE CITY one of the hardest things 
to find is a good place to eat and be safe. Lots of people drop in any 
old place, get stung, feel sore at themselves all day, and half the pleasure 
of the trip is gone. 

IF YOU ARE PARTICULAR and appreciate good food, always ask 
the townspeople where they eat. They have every opportunity to know 
what places are good places and what are bad ones, and where they 
eat you can depend upon it being safe. 

I AM WILLING TO TAKE MY CHANCES on your patronage if you 
ask any good judge of food in Cheyenne where to eat. 

OUR CLIENTELE is made up very largely of home folks, who eat with 
us day in and day out. You get the same good service here always. 



JOIN THE HAPPY FAMILY. 



— Carl Bailey. 



ii 



Eat More Wheat Foods" 



HEALTHFUL, NUTRITIOUS. ECONOMICAL, WHEN BAKED WITH 

ROYAL FLOUR 





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EVERYTHING MUSICAL 



WORLD 
FAMOUS 
PIANOS 

distributed by 
The Denver Music Co. 

Mason & Hamlin 
Mason & Hamlin 

With the Ampico 
Haines Bros. 
VosE & Sons 
Kimball 
Schumann 
Schulz 
Cable-Nelson 
Whitney 

LUDWIG 

Krakauer 



nrHE DENVER MUSIC COMPANY provides 
L everything known in music for fraternity, college 
groups and general college affairs. Write or wire for 
complete information regarding your musical needs. 



PIANOS 

PLAYERS 

GRANDS 

STRINGED INSTRUMENTS 

SAXOPHONES 

MUSIC ROLLS 



VICTROLAS 
BRUNSWICKS 
SONORAS 
RADIO SETS 
VICTOR RECORDS 



Complete Sheet Music Department 
Send us your mail orders for sheet music — every- 
thing from new, popular numbers to the complete works 
of the Great Masters. 

Mason & Hamlin Concert Grand Piano 

Used by the University of Wyoming 



THE DENVER MUSIC CO, 

1536-40 Stout St.— 40 Years in Denver 






w^ 



^fflij^iJF (T^Eiav ^mpi^ wmM ^^Wj||j% ^JQffipB ^^^^^K 

DESIGHERS AHD PHOTO-EHGrS^ERS 

in CHE OR MDUK COLORS 

For Calralogs. Advertisements or 
otRer purposes 
BARCLAY BI,OCK 




THE VOICE 

I woke, startled by a voice clese behind me. I turned, but covild distinguish 
nothing. All round me was black — an impenetrable darkness, save for a solitary 
shaft of light that pierced the air above. 

Again I heard the voice. It was close to my ear. It said, in a raucous whis- 
per: "You're completely in my power. Your life lies in the hollow of my hand." 

I started. Silence. Then it came again : "Only a moment longer and you 
will be no more." The strain upon my shattered nerves was becoming insufferable. 
Silence again. Suddenly I heard it close to my ear : "Your time has come." 

Completely unstrung, I sprang to my feet and wheeled about. 

"Damn it, woman," I hissed, "isn't this movie bad enough without reading the 
sub-titles aloud ?" — Exchange. 

;|: * ^ * * 

"I shall refer to the Book of Numbers," said Reverend Gish, as he reached 
for the telephone directory. 

Maybe Andy Gump wears no man's collar because he hasn't any roommate. 

* =1: * * * 

THE MARCEL 
The Marcel is a funny fish. 

And most peculiarly behaves. 
Although it ain't got any fins. 
And cannot stand the wet — 
We find it down among the waves. 
All tangled in a net. 

— The Sagehen. 

,-;< * * =(: =|I 

"Damn!" said the dragon at the fashion show, as he stumbled over the base 
drum. 

"Mose, what do you do for colds?" 
"Cough!" 

* ;;< ^ :): * 

My girla, you know her, so beauty, so sweet. 

Her figure so lovely, her temper so nice. 
She lika Spaghetti, and garlic, and onions, 

And always she smella so much lika spice. 
I call her my "Garlica" ; she thinka I nice : 

I lika her onions, she lika mine ; 
And I come from Italia, and tell her, my darling, 

Oh, Garhca, Garlica, you are divine. 
But, oh, when I kissa her, she notta the same, 

Garlica, Garlica, my onion-like queen ; 
For since she gotta here in America 

She usa the stuff they calla "Listerine." 

299 




19 25 WYO 



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International Harvester Company of 

America 



MANUFACTURERS OF McCORMICK AND DEERING HARVESTING 
AND HAYING MACHINERY 

McCormick-Deering Tractors, Manure Spreaders, Engines, 

Tillage Goods and Seeding Machines, P. & O. Plows, 

Primrose Cream Separators and International 

Motor Trucks 

INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER COMPANY 
OF AMERICA 

CHEYENNE. - - - WYOMING 






J^:^&\ 



1915 WYO 



pk>^ 





WE ARE FOR OUR STATE UNIVERSITY FIRST, 
LAST AND ALL THE TIME 



WALTON MOTOR CO. 



CHEYENNE. 



WYOMING 



OIVN YOUR OWN HOME 

MANY PEOPLE DO SO ON OUR PLAN 

WE ISSUE SAVINGS CONTRACTS THAT AFFORD AN ATTRACTIVE 

INVESTMENT 

WE GUARANTEE 8% PER ANNUM 
Compounded semi-annually on loan fund on savings 

Equitable Savings and Loan Association 

A Wyoming Institution Authorized Capital, $10,000,000 

Suite 514 Hynds Bldg. Cheyenne, Wyoming 



GEORGE W. DAIBER 

MIDDLE BLOCK CLOTHIER 

210 W. 17th 

OUR WINDOWS TELL THE STYLES 



CHEYENNE. 



WYOMING 



ASK YOUR GROCER FOR 



"MEADOW QUEEN BUTTER" 

DAILY SPREAD FOR DAILY BREAD 
manufactured by 

Cheyenne Creamery Co. 

CHEYENNE. WYOMING 



303 




"It;:. 













CLASSIFIED ADS 

FOUND 
Beads of perspiration on forehead of student. Try and string them. 
Two inches of space in the shallow end of the swimming pool during a "free" 
period. (This is indeed an unusual find.) 

A girl who doesn't carry a vanity case. (It's Amelia Kershisnik.) 

LOST 
Three gold fillings and a $io bill. Finder please return to Hank Ballard. 
(Hank has the dent that fits the fillings. ) 

One perfectly good sheik. Co-eds thinking they have found him are mistaken. 



A date with a peach. 



WANTED 
(Try a fruit store.) 



The very worst habit 

To get in your head 
Is to send a girl flowers 

Before she is dead. 

* * * * * 

Dr. Knight — I've lived on vegetables for the last twenty years. 

Prof. Hunton — That's nothing, I've lived on earth for the last thirty years. 



303 



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KIND REGARDS 

TO 

STUDENTS AND FACULTY 

Tlie Plains Hotel Company 

HARRY P. HYNDS, Prop. 



W. E. DINNEEN'S GARAGE 

HUDSON— ESSEX— REO 

ACCESSORIES, TIRES, REPAIRING— FILLING STATION 

GAS IN CAR LOTS— BEST OF MECHANICS 

OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

Telephone 101 for Tow Car 
LINCOLN HIGHWAY AND PIONEER AVE. 

'We Solicit Your Trade" Cheyenne, WYOMING 



FREDERIC HUTCHINSON PORTER 

ARCHITECT 

CHEYENNE. -:- WYOMING 



Sheridan, Wyoming 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS 

THE LARGEST AND BEST EQUIPPED 
concern of its KIND IN THE STATE 

State Representatives of Leading Manufacturers of School, Gymnasium, 
Church and Office Equipment 



192 5 WY 





T H I 5 

^ A e: 

Has ha^y Ttvnes 



ftNO NOUJ 



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Go ab +he l<i/^ 






DOES IT PAY? 



Experts tell us that money spent for space in 
church, school, theatre and similar publications is 
the poorest investment an advertiser can make. 
We should like to test the correctness of that 
claim. If you appreciate our support, will you 
please make it a point to mention our advertising 
whenever you are buying at either of our stores? 

The Kimball Drug Stores 

THE REXALL STORES 

Caspe/s- Pioneer Stores. W})oming's Leading 

Drug Stores 

"Two Stores for Your Convenience" 



W^e 1 ake Xhis 
Opportunity — 



TO CONGRATULATE THE FACULTY AND STUDENT BODY ON 
THE SPLENDID PROGRESS MADE BY THE WYOMING U.. AND 
WANT TO ASSURE YOU OF OUR HEARTY CO-OPERATION AT ANY 

TIME IN THE FUTURE 






Dr. Downey gives a test designed to determine literary talent. There is 
one which has to do with completing a third line for a story plot when two of the 
lines are given. Here are some famous completions : 

"The man had an operation for appendicitis. 
When he woke up the hospital was in flames." 
This is what Bobby Hines wrote : 

'*He thought the operation had been unsuccessful." 



"The girl cried all night 
She was married the next day." 
This is what Dean Boyer wrote : 

"People often do queer things after a hard night." 

* * * * * 

God bless the co-ed 
Who with sincere look, 
Recites her lesson 

From an open book. 

* t- * * * 

"I hear Puss Campbell is laid up, a victim of football." 

"But I didn't know he even played the game." 

■"He doesn't. He sprained his larynx at the game Saturday." 

'TWAS EVER THUS 
I went to the "libe" 
Today 
To study. 
I go there 
For that purpose 
Quite often 
But it's always 
The same. 
I sat down 
At a table 

And got my notebook 
And then looked 
At the flapper across from me 
And then at others 
All around me 
And at those that came in — 
Beautiful faces. 
Snappy clothes, 
Divine forms, 
Slender ankles. 
Study? 
Hell ! 

— Sagehen. 



307 



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The Best Made Gun- 

DOES NOT ACCURATELY SHOOT OF ITSELF. 
THE MAN BEHIND THE GUN 

Likewise the best camera and lens do not take pictures of them- 
selves. It's the man behind the camera. The proof of the pud- 
ding is in the eating. The ability of the man behind the camera 
is proved by the pictures he makes. We believe our work merits 
your patronage. Let your next photograph be made by Centlivere, 
the man behind the camera 

Centlivere Studio 




KODAK FINISHING 

MAIL ORDERS 

SOLICITED 




{Q15 VVYO 



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Wyoming State Tribunc-Lcadcr 

•'WYOMING'S ONLY STATE NEWSPAPER" 

CHEYENNE, WYOMING 

The paper that leads the Stale in all movements of public improvement and interest. 
Latest State, National and World News, combined Tviih all the popular features and 
Strip Comics dail^. Page feature comics on Sunday, also a complete Magazine Section 

THE COST IS SMALL 
in comparison with the service given — $6.00 per year in advance 

When you wish Wyoming news, refer to 
The State Tribune-Leader 



Let's all grow with the 
state 



Our Best Wishes to the University of Wyomini 
and its students 



NOW A STATE-WIDE INSTITUTION 

We Now Hane a Modern, Sanitary Food Store in Evanston, Rock Springs, 
Rawlins, Laramie and Cheyenne 

STUDENTS INTERESTED IN THE STUDY 

OF ECONOMICS 

can enlighten themselves much on the subject of economical food distribution through 

observation of 
SKAGGS SHORT CUT METHODS 





*€asfj and Carru" 
STORES ^ 




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"Damn that roommate of mine." 

"What's the matter ? Has he been wearing your clothes again ?" 

"No ; he failed to answer the last letter my girl wrote me." 

^ ;j; :); ;{; >;; 

Miss Russell — What part of speech is "hand"? 

Bright Freshman — It ain't no part of speech unless you're deaf and dumb or 
Jewish. 

>;; ^; ^ ;i; :j; 

"Why did you leave the Dance so early?" 
"It was a case of snap judgment." 
"What decided you ?" 
"My suspenders." 



Famous last words : "I'll call you up some time." 



The average girl has a vocabulary of only 300 words. A small stock but the 
turnover is frequent. 

Frat — What, a new sweater? 
Frater — No, a new pledge. 



The Professor — Dearest, let me teach you to love me! 
Co-Ed — How many credits? 

Waitress at the Midwest — Milk or water? 
Kappa Sig" — Don't tell me, please : let me guess ! 



A Milwaukee undertaker has the following sign on his window : "Dealer 
in underg^round novelties." 

Layin' in bed 

Under the sheet. 
Ain't had no laundry 

For over a week. 

Mother (who as teaching her child the alphabet) — Now, dearie, what comes 
after "g"? 

The Child— Whiz ! 





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WE LOOKED YOUR AD MAN STRAIGHT IN 

THE FACE 

AND WE SAID. SAID WE: 

"Do you consider the Wyo a good advertising medium?" And, without the bat of 
an eye, or the twitch of a muscle, this aggressive, enthusiastic seller of space replied: 

"Good! Why, bless your innocent soul, Mr. Merchant, it's the best medium in 
which you have ever been privileged to buy space." 

"Why," said he, "the best daily paper ad you ever wrote curled heavenward in 
smoke the following morning when the kitchen fire was kindled. But future generations 
will see and read your copy in the 'Wyo.' This great Annual may be lost or stolen, but 
it will never, never be deslro'^edy 

WELL, HERE WE ARE, FOLKS 
Sandwiched in between pretty Co-Eds and those rough football fellows, and should any- 
body, at any time, ask you about a good place in which to purchase Dry Goods, Ladies' 
and Children's Ready-TO-Wear, just do 'em a good turn and send 'em to the 

THREE RULES 

GISH-HUNTER MERC. CO. 



PIGGLY WIGGLY 



"No one," says President Coolidge, "is so poor that he cannot afford to be thrifty. 
No one IS so rich that he does not need to be thrifty. The margins between Success and 
Failure, between respectable place in life and oblivion, is very narrow ; it is measured by 
a single word — ihnji. The one who saves is the one who will win." 

BE THRIFTY 

BUY YOUR GROCERIES, FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES AT 

PIGGLY WIGGLY 



MEAT DEPARTMENT 

THE LARGEST, CLEANEST. BEST EQUIPPED, MOST MODERN 
MARKET IN WYOMING OR COLORADO 



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192 5 VVYO 



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The professor in Short Story Writing was lecturing to his class on the re- 
quirements of a good short story. "Every short story must have a touch of re- 
ligion, a touch of nobility, and a touch of the risque. Now, bring me the begin- 
ning paragraph fulfilling these requirements of a good short story." Thus he 
instructed his class, and some young hopeful did as he was bid. His opening 
sentence was as follows: "My God, said the Princess, take your hand ofif mv 
leg!" 



Dr. White — What happened in 1852? 

Harold Ballengee — Don't know. 

Dr. White — Where do you usually go for your dates? 

H. B.— Hoyt Hall. 

Fe, Fi, Fo, Fum, 
Dorothy Nolan's chewing gum ; 
She used to chew it by the stick. 
But now she takes it by the brick. 

He, Hi, Ho, Hum, 
Again we find her chewing gum. 
It used to make a gentle smack, 
But now a tune she makes it whack. 




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IT IS INTELLIGENCE— 

NOT VANITY— THAT INSPIRES WOMEN TO 
LOOK THEIR BEST. A DISTINCTIVE COIF- 
FURE BESPEAKS CULTURE. 

RAE'S BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Connor Hotel 
CAN GIVE YOU THE DESIRED EFFECT 




MECCA BILLIARD PARLORS 

A Distinct Departure from the Ordinary Billiard Parlor — A Revela- 
tion to Players and Fans 



MECCA LUNCHEONETTE 

High Class in Every Detail 
A lot of Comfort and Pleasure is Worth a Little Insistence. Therefore, Insist on Spendint 

Your Evenings at the Mecca 



H. A. (DID) SMITH 

LARAMIE DISTRIBUTOR 
for the 

Genuine llanna Coal 

original 

ROCK SPRINGS COAL FROM NUMBER ONE AND PARK MINES 

Laramie, North Park and Western Building 

TELEPHONE 2315 



The Manhaftan Cafe 




WELL KNOWN FOR ITS EXCELLENT COOKING and FINE SERVICE 
PRICES WITHIN THE REACH OF ALL 

Fine Surroundings Private Booths for Ladies 

ONE visit will CONVINCE YOU 
Kitchen Open for Inspection at All Times 






Steamboat Captain (who has just fallen overboard) — Don't stand there like 

a fool! Give me a yell, can't you? 

College Student Deckhand — Certainly, sir. Rah ! Rah ! Rah ! Captain !" 

***** 

Dick Phillips was showing a guest through the ex-Kappa Sig House. 
"And is this the lodge room?" asked the guest. 

"Well," answered Dick in his sweetest Bostonian voice, "it is rather lodge; 
but the living room is much lodger." 

^ rj; ^ ^ ;}; 

"Drink,"" quoth Dean Soule, "shortens a man's days." 

"Right you are," rejodned Buck Faurie ; "the longest day of my life was 
spent in a dry town." 

***** 

"Are you a college man?" 

"No, somebody swiped my garters last night." — Octopus. 

***** 

Dollar — The trade name for thirty-eight cents. — Smart Set. 

***** 

"Hell," said the dill pickle, as it turned over in the stomach, "I haven't begun 

to fight yet." 

***** 

Miss Mclntyre — '\Vhen was the revival of learning? 
Laura Powell — The day before exams. 

315 



^o^^ 



1 9 2 .3 




FOOTWEAR 

That Is Constantly ReliaDle 

RIGHT SHOES IN RIGHT STYLES AT RIGHT PRICES 
The R. 6c. D. Boot Shop Caters to Particular People who Desire Quality Footwea" 

and High-Cla.s Store Ser\ice 

Exclusive Laramie Agents for Arch Preserver Shoes 

AND Phoenix Hosiery 

R. & D. BOOT SHOP 



CHEYENNE 



NEAR POSTOFFICE 



KRANZ SHOP 

CorrecV A|p|parcl {or 
Women and Misses 



LARAMIE 



CHEYENNE 



LARAMIE 



YELLOW CAB 

"THE THINKING FELLOW CALLS A YELLOW" 
PHONE 2222 

Seven-Passenger Cars for Mountain Trips 

Baggage and Express 

YELLOW CAB & TRANSFER CO. 

Offices U. P. Depot Laramie. Wyoming 



Phone 2381 A. B. Gibbs. Prop. 

Some sa]) it rvilh Honkers, but ''The Tastz Tells the Tale" in our products 

LARAMIE VALLEY CREAMERY 

Manufacturers and Distributors of 

"Velvet'' Ice Cream and "Valley Gold" Butter 

Wholesale and Retail Pasteurized Milk and Cream 
305 SO. THIRD ST. LARAMIE. WYOMING 




That girl is so dumb she thinks "Hosanna" is a sorority tubbing song. 

* * ^c * ;|; 

Papa (to bright infant) — What's wrong? 

Son (aged six) — I just had a terrific scene with your wife. 

* * * t- ;;■: 

Miss McKitrick — Girls, be sure to arrange the silver so that the legislature can 
iat rrom the outside, in. 

* * ^ * .;< 

"What's the matter, Ferdie?" 

" r\ base, cowardly e^g hit me.'' 

"What kind of an egg is that?"' 
"One that hits you and runs?" 

;,k * ^ ^ ^ 

CHANGING TIMES 
(A Play in Two Acts) 
Act I— 1880 
"Marry Me ?" "Yes." 
"Kiss me?" "No." 
Act II — 1923 
"Marry Me?" "No." 
"Kiss me?" "Yes." 




m>^ 



rcKaifc>gsrc>y!i8:^csgC5ftfo>aifc^cvfn- 



PHONE 3606 

AERO GASOLINE 

HiWAY OrLs AND Greases 

SOLD BY 

Laramie Service Station and 

Rocky Mountain Service Station 

and dealers generally 



AERO OIL COMPANY 

A Wyoming Company 

Metz Brothers 

EXPERT TAILORS 



Alfred Nelson 

CEMENT CONTRACTOR 

AND 

COAL DEALER 

Offices 218 Grand Avenue 
PHONE 2773 



MEMORY AND GRADUATION 
BOOKS 

Make Attractive Gifts at 
Commencement Time 



Bartlett's Art Shop 

Albany Filling Station 




g^^^^-^ 






III m 



Where the Qames of the Eighth Annual Tournament Were Played 

HEARD AT THE COMMONS 
"Say, this meat ds so toMgh you couldn't stick a pick in the gravy." 

;lc ^ ^ ^ :j: 

WYOMING 
The wind it blew, and blew and blew — 
And blew and blew and blew and blew — 
And blew and blew and blew and blew — 

"Where did the automobile hit you, Sam?" 

"Well, Judge, if I'd been carrying a license number it would have been busted 
in a thousand pieces." — Whiz Bang. 

-P T^ '!• 'T' ^ 

"Her cheeks," he said, "are roses red, 

And lovely as can be ; 
Her ruby lips are treasure ships, 

That speak of love to me ;" 
But when to kiss this little miss 

The booby took a notion. 
He found her lips were painted ships 

Upon a painted ocean. 

— -Gobiin. 

319 



r?^^^^^!^?^^^^^:^^?:^^^^^':^^^^ 



3 WYO 




H. Svensons Studio 



Pictures Tell the Story 



In America s 
Best Annual 



^ 




THE 
H. SVENSON STUDIO 




"Won't you join me in a cup of tea?" 

"Well, you get in, and I'll see if there's any room left!" — Octopus. 



Frances Shier (in debate class) — Are the Virginia debaters men, or are they 
coming as women? 

:|c * * * :): 

Derry — I hear you went canoeing with Henry last night. 

Wary — Yes. 

Derry— Oh, ho ! 

Wary — Don't worry, all he hugged was the bank ! — Texas Ranger. 

:|< ;K * * * 

Young Motorist — Pardon me, sis, but would you care to take a ride? 
She — Sir, I'm a lady ! 

Y. M. — Sure, I knew that. If I wanted a man I'd go home and get my 
brother. — Dial. 

* * ;|: * * 

Life is just like fishing — you've got to have a good line and lots of pull. 

* * :!= * * 

There was a young man named Perkins, 
Who had a great fondness for gherkins ; 

He went to a tea, 

And ate twenty-three 
Which pickled his internal workin's. 

321 




v\ 




Everything for the Student 



PARKER AND SHEAFER FOUNTAIN PENS 
DELUXE AND IRVING PITT LOOSE LEAF BOOKS 

DRAFTING SUPPLIES— K. & E. or DIETZGEN 

T-SQUARES. TRIANGLES. SCALES, DRAWING SETS 

CARTER'S INK 

NEW AND SECOND-HAND TEXTBOOKS 



THE CAMPUS BOOK STORE 



THE 



Empress 
Theatre 

APPRECIATES 

YOUR 
PATRONAGE 



Kerper & Rice 



PRESENTS 




WHERE SERVICE AND SATIS- 
FACTION ARE AN EVERY-DAY 
OCCURRENCE AND NOT A 
NOVELTY 

Phone 2876 



322 



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191.5 WYO 



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BOTTOMS UP 

BY BURTON BRALE;Y 

("Bvery now and then I like to drink the wine of life — with 
brandy in it." — Letter of Theodore Roosevelt to Senator Lodge.) 

The Wine of Life ! — Most men prefer 

A vintage bland and smooth and mild, 
Something to make their pulses purr 

With soft enchantment undefiled ; 
But now and then one stalks along 

Whose thirst grows mightier by the minute, 
Who takes his tipple hot and strong : 

The Wine of Life — with Brandy in it! 

Where ordinary folk desire 

Life to be like a watered claret, 
These topers call for liquid fire 

And with their lusty fellows share it. 
In every row with Destiny 

They are the fellows who begin it, 
Guzzling like vikings bold and free 

The Wine of Life — with Brandy in it! 

They swagger to the Bar of Fate 

And slap their roll upon the bar. 
Demanding singeing distillate 

Pit for the hardy souls they are ; 
They take their potent portion neat 

And scorn with icy or fizz to thin it. 
Only one mixture they find sweet — 

The Wine of Life — with Brandy in it! 

Fighters and gamesters, pioneers. 

Whose taste is spoiled for milder things; 
Who rollick down the roaring years. 

Swigging of life that sears and stings ! 
And we — we watch them, and we think : 

"They drink too deep, we're all agin' it!" — 
Yet wish WE had the nerve to drink 

The Wine of Life — with Brandy in it! 




JQ^. 



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W Y O 







VJ) 



The new and unusual — that sparkling reality which is 
known as the life of each school year — is caught and 
held forever within the pages of Bureau built annuals. 
The ability to assist in making permanent such delight* 
ful bits of class spontaneity rests in an organization of 
creative artists guided by some 17 years of College Annual 
work, which experience is the knowledge of balance and 
taste and the fitness of doing things well. In the finest 
year books of American Colleges the sincerity and genu* 
ineness of Bureau Engraving quality instantly impresses, 
one. They are class records that will live forever. 



BUREAU OF ENGRAVING, iNC 

•COLLEGE ANNUAL HEADQUARTERS" 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA 







191,5 WY 




•THE YOUNG MEN'S STORE" 



ONLY LARAMIE HOME OF 

HART SCHAFFNER & MARX 
CLOTHES 

FLORSHEIM AND WALK- 
OVER SHOES 

EMERY SHIRTS 

MUNSINGWEAR 



HOLEPROOF HOSE 

FOR 

MEN AND WOMEN 



Woodford Clothing Co. 



MID^VEST CAFE 

Has Built Its Business and Wmi Its Reputation on Quality and Quantity of 

WELL-PREPARED FOOD 

Pleasing and Courteous Treatment to Everybody 



WHOLESOME ENVIRONMENT 
WELL VENTILATED ROOM 



212 SO. SECOND ST. 



TELEPHONE 2720 



YOU WILL FIND OUR STORE HEADQUARTERS 

FOR 



Furniture, Rugs, Linoleum 
and Hardware 

ROUND OAK RANGES 

B. F. EARLY 



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1-5 WYO 



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Sporting Goods 
Shoes 



Fishing Tackle 
Imported Flies 



Buy at 

WATT'S 



Hats and 

Caps 

Guns 



Gents' 
Furnishings 
Ammunition 



nV . H. Graham 
Meat Market 

MEATS. FRUITS AND 
VEGETABLES 



Phone 2422 



Laramie, Wyo. 



Dr. P. C. McNiff 

DENTIST 

Rooms 3 and 4 Clark Building 
Laramie, Wyoming 




Dr. E.M.TURNER 



Degree in Medicine, University of Iowa, 

1905. Three Years Post-Graduate 

Training in Eye, Ear, Nose 

and Throat 



Practice Includes General Practice, Gen- 
eral Surgery, Eye, Ear, Nose and 
Throat. Glasses Fitted 

lOSYz Second St. LarAMIE, WyO. 

THE SCHILLING 
CHIROPRACTORS 

PALMER graduates 

'Where the Sick Go to Get Well" 

NEURO 
CALOMETER SERVICE 



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Coza Huddleston — George Mabee says that I am the nicest girl on the campus. 
Gen Gatchell — Why don't you let him take you out once in a while ? 
Coza — I don't want to disappoint him. 



The first time that Minnie wore her new bathing suit she couldn't sit down to 
eat her dinner. 



* * * * * 



NATIONAL ANTHEM OF SIAM 
(Repeat as many times as is necessary) 



O wa ta na Siam. 






SEEN ON A FORD 
Don't laugh, girls, you'd look like hell, too, if you didn't have any paint. 



327 




A widow is lucky. She knows all about men and all the men who know any- 
thing about her are dead. 



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^ „ ^ATHLETES 

«A^jt; NEE-D EQUIPMENT 

^■'^'^e'supplythe'NEED 

MIDWEST TRUNKS. 
SPORTING GOODS STORE 

'\Headouarteis Jorai£Ietk 
quipment of all kinds 

Qmfitters ibvUnii^rsit}/ of 
J^omiTi^a^dic teams 



WE ARE PREPARED TO TAKE 

CARE OF YOUR COMPLETE 

FURNISHING PROBLEMS 

OFFERING FURNITURE OF QUALITY 

AND DISTINCTION 

PAYMENTS ACCEPTED 

LARAMIE FXJRNITURE CO. 

WILLIS JENSEN "jENNY" JENSEN 



Harry J. Taylor 

TYPEWRITERS 

SALES— RENTALS— REPAIRS 



DEALER FOR 

Remington Portable and 

Corona Four 

The Standard Keyboard 
Portable Typewriters 



15 SO. SECOND STREET 
Phone 2859 Laramie, Wyo. 



/^^flp= 




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Albany National Bank 



Laramie, Wyoming 



CAPITAL, $100,000.00 



^ 



OFFICERS 

Robert H. Homer. President 
C. D. Spalding, President 
R. G. Fitch, Cashier 
B. F. Miller, Ass't Cashier 
H. A. Baumbach, Asst. Cashier 



directors 
Robert H. Homer 
C. D. Spalding 

N. E. CORTHELL 

A. H. Cordiner 
Lewis Tyvold 



THE YOUNG 
MEN'S STORE 



Value First Clothes 

Heywood Shoes 

Wilson Bros. Furnishing Goods 

ScHOBLE Hats 



F. J. TERRY 



COWDEN'S 
BARBER SHOP 




THE STUDENTS' BARBER 
1 1 1 Thornburg 



^^ 






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5^C:^^^gS^:g^g^^:gJ^CV<^^> 



331 



A COWBOY FATALIST 

Oh, I don't care if it rains or shines, 

Or if it melts or snows ; 
I've no regard fer weather signs, 

Or what the old wind blows. 
Fer I don't want to even think 

Or care which way I'm bound 
But jes' keep a-smilin' and lettin' things slide. 

And keep on a-millin' around. 

Oh, I don't care if the whole works quit, 

Or what bunch moves ahead; 
Or what we're goin' to do or git 

When gone fer keeps and dead. 
Fer I don't want to even think 

Or care which way I'm bound. 
But jes' keep a-smilin' and lettin' things slide, 

And keep on a-millin' around. 

Oh, I don't care what other folks say, 

Or what in me they sees ; 
Fer each man's free to think his way 

And do as he dern please. 
Fer I don't want to even think 

Or care which way I'm bound. 
But jes' keep a-smilin' and lettin' things slide. 

And keep on a-millin' around. 







v\ 



THE UNIVERSITY 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 



LUXURIANT LOCKS 
Are Not Only a Dowry of Nature, but Now- 
a-days a Gift of Science Also 




IN OUR BEAUTY PARLORS OUR CORPS OF TRAINED OPERATORS 
ARE AT YOUR SERVICE FOR PROMOTING THE GROWTH 
OF YOUR HAIR. CLEANSING AND BEAUTIFYING IT. BY 
THE VARIOUS METHODS OUR MODERN ART TEACHES. 

THE COST IS SMALL IN COMPARISON WITH THE BENEFITS 

OPPOSITE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 
162 N. NINTH STREET LARAMIE. WYOMING 



E. E. FITCH 


LARAMIE CANDY 
KITCHEN 




ALL KINDS OF 


%^ 


HOME-MADE CANDIES 




ICE CREAM, ICES, SHERBETS 


REAL ESTATE 


THE BEST 


INSURANCE 


LIGHT LUNCHES 


ABSTRACTS 

NOTARY PUBLIC 


AND 

REFRESHING DRINKS 


^ 


Box Candies Made to Order 




WE MAKE THE FAMOUS 


111 Grand Ave. Laramie, Wyo. 


MECCA CANDY BARS 



332 



'(^<^ 



19 



^YO 




TRY OUR 

SERVICE 



HARDWARE, FURNITURE AND GROCER 
DEPARTMENTS 

QUALITY PRODUCTS 

Vv. 11. iiolliaay C 



NO TIME LIKE 
TODAY 

FOR STARTING A BANK AC 

COUNT AT OUR SAVINGS 

DEPARTMENT 

If You Haven't One — and No Time 

like Today for Adding to Your 

Account If You Have One 

The Once-in-a- While Depositor Seldom 

Gets Rich — the Steady Week by 

Week Depositor Does! 

4% Interest Allowed 



FIRST STATE 
OF LABtAMIE 



Overland 
Plast' 



FOR STRONG 




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STUDENTS 

WE APPRECIATE YOUR 
PATRONAGE 



during the past season, and extend our 
courteous invitation to old and new Stu- 
dents the coming season for their needs in 
Men's Furnishings and Tailoring. 



Be quick to kick if things go wrong 
But kick to us and make it strong. 
To make things right gives us delist. 
If we are wrong and you are right. 



C. 0. Eckdahl 



PHONE 2534 



D. p. SMITH & 
SON 



GROCERS 



RIGHT DOWN UNIVERSITY AVENUE FROM UNIVERSITY HALL 

— IS — 

The 

University Filling 

Station 

OSCAR HAMMOND. Prop. 



SERVICE THAT SERVES 





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\/' 



SAGEBRUSH - 

Pine-plumed the grotesque buttes arise 

Like monsters squat and dumb, 
As shrill the watchful curlew cries, 

"Behold, the armies come !" 
The ghostly ranks pass in review 

'Neath flags of twilight haze; 
The west wind low and thrillingly 

Their martial music plays. 




From column into line they wheel, 

The skirmishers advance; 
Yet ne'er a gleam of bayonet. 

Nor glitter of a lance. 
In silence sad they sweep the plain, 

Like veterans grim with age ; 
Across God's somber-land they march, 

The gray ranks of the sage. 





191.5 W YO 



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S^^^^ 



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SERVICE CAR 



REPAIRS GUARANTEED 



Home of Good Motor Cars 

MAXWELL WILLYS KNIGHT CHRYSLER 
OVERUAND 

Service Available Day or Night 

MODERN SPACIOUS GARAGE 
CUSTOMERS SATISFIED 



-AT- 



MENTZ MOTOR COMPANY 



158 NORTH SECOND 



STORAGE 



ACCESSORIES 



Southern Wyoming Lumber 

Company 



BUILDING MATERIAL HARDWARE ELECTRICAL GOODS 

PAINTS WALL PAPER GLASS 





1915 VVYO 



<d(]V7>. 




BIRNIE'S 

LADIES' WEARING APPAREL 

AND 

MILLINERY 



116 SOUTH SECOND STREET 



NEXT TO EMPRESS 



"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 
We are Headquarters along the Union Pacific Railroad in Wyoming for 
CUT FLOWERS. PLANTS AND GOLDFISH 
A Full Stock of Supplies at All Times for the Above Lines 

MEMBERS AMERICAN TELEGRAPH FLORISTS 

Clippingers Greenhouses 



Thirteenth and Sheridan Sts. 

PHONES 3516-2401 



Third St, and Grand Ave. 
LARAMIE. WYOMING 



DEVITT'S AUTO LIVERY 

GARAGE 

DRIVERLESS FORDS LARGE CARS FOR COUNTRY TRIPS 

STORAGE— GAS AND OIL 



PHONE 2683 



Day and Night Service 



THEISEN LEATHE 

F. C. THEISEN. PROP. 




LEATHER COATS, HANDBAGS AND SUIT CASES 
J. REPAIRED 



23 V 



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FRANKLIN MOTOR CAR 
COMPANY 



DISTRIBUTORS 



' imMM ^rroi^Art \wmm 




STORAGE AND REPAIRS 

4! 2-4 14 South Second Street Phone 2045 

J. A. SANDGREN W. A. SMART 



The 
City Plumbing and Heating 

Company 



BOULDER, COLORADO 



LARAMIE. WYOMING 




QUALITY PLUMBING 

SPECIAL ATTENTION TO STEAM, VAPOR AND 
HOT WATER HEATING 

TIN WORK OF ALL KINDS 

404 SOUTH SECOND STREET 




191,5 WVO 



COMPLIMENTS 




Golden l^ulc Dcpt. Store 



Lindsay & Co. 



125 E. SECOND STREET 



CASPER. WYOMING 



WYOMING'S LARGEST DEPARTMENT STORE 

COMPLETE LINES OF 

DRYGOODS. READY-TO-WEAR. SHOES. 
NOTIONS. CHINAWARE 

j. & T. Cousin and I. Miller Shoes for Women Hickey-Freeman Clothes for Men 

"WE SELL FOR LESS" 



Sattk 

LARGEST BANK IN CENTRAL WYOMING 



3(t0 WfCxnvB anb Sirertflra ar? a (guarantor af ita 
^tr^ngtlf an& ^tabilttij 

B. B. Brooks, President 
Carl F. Shumaker, Vice President and Cashier 
A. C RiKER, Ass't Cashier C. W. Amende. Ass't Cashier 

Roy C. Wyland, Director P. J. O'Connor, Director 

R. H. Nichols, Director C. B. Richardson, Director 



339 



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STUDENTS- 



OUR APPRECIATION 

OF THE BUSINESS ACCORDED US THE PAST YEAR AND OUR SIN- 
CERE WISHES FOR THE SUCCESS OF THOSE STUDENTS WHO ARE 
LEAVING US TO START THEIR CAREERS IN LIFE. AND WE HOPE 
THAT WE MAY CONTINUE TO ENJOY THE GOOD WILL AND 
PATRONAGE OF THOSE STUDENTS WHO ARE TO BE WITH US 

NEXT YEAR 



HOME BAKERY 




/^ (SfATION-WiOE 
INSTITUTION- 



Co 



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enney 

DEPARTMENT STORES 
IN 41 STATES 

STYLE AND VALUE 

At Money-Saving Prices 

STYLE is only worthwhile when it is linked i^ with Value; 
STYLE isn't hard to find and is often mistaken for Value; 
STYLE is desirable; the new things, naturally, are what folks Want. But with Style, 

you want, and get here, worthwhile quality and VALUE; 
VALUE then, at this and every other J. C. Penney Co. Store, is assured, WITH 

Style; WITH Quality — ^it's a winning combination that's winning new friends 

for this store every day; every week; every month. 





i^: 



.J/* .j&j' 



3 







THE ROUNDUP COOK 

There's good cooks and there's bad ones- 
No harm in bein' frank : 

But, speakin' genar'ly, I'll say, 
A roundup cook's a crank. 

There's something aggravatin' in 
The dealin' out of chuck, 

That makes a man not care fer jokes, 
And feel down on his luck. 



If you should think to doubt my word, 

Jes' go and sass a cook ; 
And then fer some deep hole to hide, 

Go take a sudden look. 
While goin's good, you'd better go 

Before the hash-knife falls, 
Before the boss of pots and pans 

Your frame in anger crawls. 

But yet we sort of like the cook, 

And love to hear him say : 
"Oh, you'd better come and git it. 

Or I'll throw it all away !" 
And to his face — tho", privately, 

We cuss him now and then — 
We brag upon his chuck and act 

Like perfect gentlemen. 




^^^s\^ 





TO A RATTLESNAKE 

You try your best to slip away 

Across the sun-baked alkali ; 
And failing, rattle warning fair. 

While I decree that you must di/;. 
My gun roars out, I ride away, 

I've killed a rattlesnake, that's ail; 
No more o'er sun-baked alkali 

Will that dread shape in hatred crawi. 



"In hatred crawl ?'' Speak T the truth • 

I take your life as if I knew 
I had the right ; yet I cannot 

Return that which I took from you. 
A baby has been known to lay 

Its little hands on you in glee. 
And you struck not. Perhaps my hate 

Is what stirs hate in you for me. 




1925 WYO 



1^ 






HOTEL CONNOR 

Caters Especially To 

FRATERNITY AND SOCIETY BANQUETS. PARTIES 

AND DANCES 



A LA CARTE SERVICE 

CLUB BREAKFASTS 

CLUB LUNCHEONS 

TABLE D'HOTE DINNERS 



Member Associated Press 



Full Leased Wire Service 



THE LARAMIE 
REPUBLICAN-BOOMERANG 

DAILY AND SEMI-WEEKLY 



MANY SPECIAL FEATURES 
INCLUDING GASOLINE ALLEY AND THE GUMPS 



SPECIAL CORRESPONDENTS IN ALL PARTS OF 
ALBANY COUNTY 



Daily, 15c per week; 65c per month; $7.80 per year. Semi-Weekly, 
25c per month, $2.50 per year, if paid in advance. 



343 




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THEM DAYS ARE GONE FOREVER 

It should be easy for you to make a list of the conveniences you enjoy 
because of our service. 

Yet, the inconveniences you escape, because of that service, w^ould 
make a far more imposing list. 

For instance : what if you had to clean, till and trim an oil lamp to 
read this copy of the 1925 Wyo? — and what if the oil can had been 
empty? 




y 

WESTERN PUBLIC SERVICE CO. 

LARAMIE, WYOMING 
M. H. SOULE'. Supt. PHONE 2484 

Ine Auditorium Hotel 

Corner 1 4th and Stout Streets 

Denver's Netvesi and Most Modern Hotel — One Block from the Center of the Shopping 

and Theatre District, but on a Quiet Corner 

200 Rooms— Rates: $1.50 to $3.50 Per Day 

FINE MODERATE PRICED CAFE IN CONNECTION 

W. L. Beattie, Prop, and Mgr. 



E. E. BINGHAM 

DRY CLEANING, TAILORING 
DYEING, PLEATING 




'^^^^ 



191.5 VVYO 



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bt«,SBk'ga.im;«.ir<s!y 



to t^t Oloatfi for 
Npxt S?ar 

Mv, 31. (%oo|i) Imn^r. Ottor 

iir. Mpti JoI|«0Ott. 




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192-3 VVY 



THE STAMPEDE 

The thunder bellows o'er the plains, 

The lightning brands the sky ; 
And like a horned and hooved cyclone 

The stampede surges by. 
The storm-gods beat their great war drums, 

Their fury to proclaim, 
And tip the tossing, clashing horns 

With phosphorescent flame. 

The heaving tide of flesh sweeps on ; 

A lone guard vainly strikes 
To turn the plunging, frantic beasts 

That senseless panic drives. 
The broncho stumbles ; yet in death 

The man his mission fills ; 
For, veering from that huddled shape, 

The herd in safety mills. 






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My girl is like the sweet wild rose 

That blooms along the way, 
My girl is like the welcome shower 

Upon a sultry day. 
My girl is like a fungus vine 

That clings to any tree; 
You think her green ? Oh, no, I mean 

The way she lives off me. 

My girl is like the summer breeze 

That sways the willow tree. 
Her wondrous eyes are like the skies, 

As blue as blue can be. 
My girl is like a rippling brook. 

Because she's fast? Oh, never! 
Just take a look at any brook — 

It babbles on forever. 

— Denver Parrakeet. 

Said the Listerine bottle to the onion: "O breath, where is thy sting?" 

"I don't think I'd like to be an agriculturist." 

"Why?" 

"Too many harrowing details." — Amherst Lord Jeff. 

Poor Fish (after breathless moment) — Dearest, am I the first man that ever 
held you in his arms ? 

Fair Fisher — Yes, of course ! Why do you men always ask that the first 
thing ? 

***** 

The Ags' slogan for next year : "Weed 'em and reap !" 

^ ^ "P 'i' V 

Radio broadcasting is not a modern invention — Adam made one out of a rib! 

Professor — How would you define "Premillenniallism?" 
Learned Senior — Very poorly, s^ir. — Mass. Tech, Voo Doo. 

-1^ ^l- -I* •!» -?* 

Gosh — We have a cuckoo clock in our room. 
Josh — Ours won't work, either. 

***** 

"What ho. Erroneous Brutus?" 

"Don't ask dumb questions, Cassius. I told you to use a plow." — Stevens 
Tech. Stone Jug. 




R. P. GOTTSCHALK, President F. A. HoLLlDAY. Vice President 

J. W. COSTIN, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer 

L. J. HoLLiDAY J. Lee Carroll 




192.5 W\ 



r 





192,5 WYC 



.•^"^1 
4 




JUNIOR SNEAK DAY 

When the Seniors were Juniors they thought they were pretty smart. When 
the Seniors were Seniors they still thought they were very smart. As it turned 
out, the Seniors were not so smart as when they were Juniors. When the Seniors 
were Juniors they "snuk" out and had breakfast in the hills one bright morning, 
returning about the time the then Seniors ( 1924) were getting started after them, 
believing that they had really "snuk." 1925 pulled this stall a couple of times and 
then really did sneak. The tradition is that the Juniors sneak and not that they 
take several "breakfasts" out in the hills as pre-sneak day celebrations. 1925 
then broke out with derisive accusations that the Seniors of their day did not live 
up to the traditions of the school ; in fact, they accused 1924 of burying said 
traditions. The Seniors, when they were Juniors, were pretty sraart. The Seniors, 
when they were Seniors, were not so smart. 1926 snuk and spent the whole day 
doing it. 1925 snuk after and spent the whole day doing that. 

The Seniors had "scouts out" from midnight on. Said "scouts" spotted the 
Juniors' pflace of assembly and even watched the assembly to all the important 
details of loading the grub. Then — What Ho! At the most important happen- 
ing of the whole evening — the take-off — the Senior Scouts felt the call of gastro- 
nomical pangs and repaired to Tom Cambor's Eating Emporium, assuming tiiat 
the dumb Juniors would wait at the assembly place for the Seniors to come back 
and follow them out to the Sneaking Place. However, the Juniors were not quite 
that dumb. When the Seniors returned after having satisfied the complainings 
of the gastric juices, the Juniors had snuk to parts unknown. The Seniors took 
after and met the Juniors — coming home. Well, the Seniors, when they were 
Juniors, thought they were pretty smart. The Seniors, when they were Seniors, 
were not so smart! 



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