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Full text of "X Collection 1604"



X Collection 
INDEX 



LIBRftRY OF CONGRESS 

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JX 















Inventing — 

AS A BUSINESS 



A PLAN 

TO SAFEGUARD 

INVENTORS 



By 

HUGO GERNSBACK 

99 Hudson Street New York, N. Y. 



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Copyright 1933 by Hugo Gornsbaek, Now York 




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CHRISTMAS 1946 ^ 2Sst 

Digest of Digests 

ARTICLES OF WASTING IJ«TEREST/:-3^ ^~" 

Publisher's Page . .2 

TKe Electronic Baby Coroner 3 

Giamorontc Women Noman 8 

Super Book Condensation 9 

. . . and Sodden Death Reaper's Digest 10 

Drunk Checker . 13 

Edisoniana . Uncork 14 

The Egg and YOU Hexology 16 

Unprofessional M.D.'s Medieval Economics 18 

Love in These United States Your Wife 21 

The Radio Brain Ratio Digest 22 

The Human Factor Science Divest 24 

The Superfect Crime EUery Queer's Magazine 26 

Relativity 30 

Why TIME sued Gernsback Reader's Slope 31 

Wolf Detector .33 

A Great Literary Event OmniJook 34 

Forever Amber, Book Supercondensation 34 

lJltta>Condensation 3g 




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HUGO 6ERNSBACK, Emitor 



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RADIO-ELECTRONITWITS WITH ALL THEIR PHONIES 





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POPULAR 
NECKANICS 



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CHRISTMAS 1947 



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DOCUMENTATION 
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LEARN-WHILE-YOU-SLEEP METHOD 

By HUGO GERNSBACK 



THE Learn-while-you-sleep method of 
instruction has lately been described in 
a number of publications. Imparting 
knowledge to the sleeping individual has 
the following advantages: 

1. The period while ■we are asleep is usual- 
ly wasted, when it could 'be used to impart 
useful knowledge to the subconscious men- 
tality. 

2. Many individuals cannot master cer- 
tain subjects while awake, whereas it has 
been proved by actual experience that they 
can master them while soundly asleep, for 
instance learning the telegraphic code. 

Recently a number of individuals have 
been given credit in various magazine arti- 
cles as having originated the learn-while- 
you-sleep method. It is for this reason that 
the writer has found it necessary to publish 
the present detailed documentation. 

As will be observed from the photographic 
reproductions in this presentation, the writer 
originated the learn-while-you-sleep method 
in 1911. 

It was first described in detail in the 
writer's magazine MODERN ELECTRICS 
monthly in his science fiction novel RALPH 
124C 41+. This novel was serialized in 
MODERN ELECTRICS, the first radio 
magazine in the world. The installment con- 
taining the Hypnobioscope (the learn-while- 
you-sleep instrumentality) appeared in the 
June, 1911, issue. (Circulation at that time 
near 100,000.) 

A second article giving further details on 
the learn-while-you-sleep method appeared 
in SCIENCE AND INVENTION magazine, 
December, 1921, issue, under the title 
"Work and Learn While You Sleep." (Cir- 
culation at that time 200,000 copies.) 

A third article describing how the writer's 
original learn-while-you-sleep theory was 
first put into practice ran in RADIO NEWS 
magazine for October, 1923, under the title 
"Learn While You Sleep." (Circulation at 
that time 400,000 copies.) In this article. 
Chief Radioman J. N. Phinney, U. S. Navy, 
relates his actual work with the method, at 
the Navy Training School at Pensacola, Flor- 
ida, in 1922. Here students were successfully 
taught Continental Code while they slept. 
(See page 7.) 

In recent years a number of magazines — 
all with large national circulation — pub- 
lished articles on the learn-while-you-sleep 
method giving the writer credit as the 
originator of the method: 

1. TIME magazine, for January }, 1944, 
published an article about the writer in 



which the Hypnobioscope and the subcon- 
scious learn-while-you-sleep method were 
described. 

2. CORONET magazine in July, 1944, 
printed an article by the well-known writer 
Howard Whitman who discussed the learn- 
while-you-sleep method in an account de- 
voted to the writer's -work. 

3. MAGAZINE DIGEST for January, 
1948. A further article discussing the Hyp- 
nobioscope, learn-while-you-sleep idea ap- 
peared in this magazine. 

In addition to this, the method has been 
described throughout the years in various 
languages in many scientific magazines. 

Some recent writers who should know 
better, have quoted Aldous Huxley, in his 
novel BRAVE NEW WORLD, as the origi- 
nator of the idea. This claim is preposterous 
for the simple reason that Huxley's novel 
did not appear until 1932 — 21 years after 
the -writer published his original method. 

A number of imitators are now using the 
earphone method which the writer original- 
ly described in SCIENCE AND INVEN- 
TION, December, 1921. This arrangement is 
completely obsolete in the writer's opinion 
because you cannot wear earphones and 
sleep comfortably with them. The method of 
using an earphone on top or in the bed pil- 
low is inefficient, because it leaves one ear 
open, infiltrating distracting outside noises. 
This confuses the subconscious and makes it 
impossible to get the most efficient reten- 
tivity of the directed sounds. 

The vriter has pointed this out to a num- 
ber of people who have used his method 
either commercially or for research purposes. 

Throughout the years the writer's method 
has been greatly improved and a mass-use 
method of the learn-while-you-sleep idea 
will come into use shortly. In the writer's 
new development no ear or headphones are 
used. 

At present this newer method is in the 
final development stage and until it is intro- 
duced to the public, no details can be given. 

It should furthermore be noted — for the 
record — that the so-called brain w^ave pat- 
terns which are often pointed out in connec- 
tion with the learn-while-you-sleep method, 
were also predicted by the writer at length 
in his imaginary Menograph in 1911, pub- 
lished in his novel RALPH 124C 41+ (see 
page 4). 

Dr. Hollowell Davis, of Harvard Medical 
School, first demonstrated the brain thought 
waves in 1935, exactly as the writer had 
conceived them 2 J years before. 



MARCH, 1950 



R. A. Fallath, PUBLICITY 
ItAlllO "" Rector 2-8630 

£I.1:«:TIUI8IC8 J^^''Mi^^^ 

— NEWS RELEASE 

25 WEST BROADWAY 

NEW YORK 7, N. Y. 

r 

FOR RELEASE DECEMBER 21, 1951 
The bride and groom of tomorrow ■will ■walk down the aisle knowing exactly how 
much chance their marriage has of succeeding for they will have taken and passed 
an electronic compatibility test. ^Then they drive off on their honeymoon — they 
will ride secure in the knowledge that their car has been collision-proofed by 
electronics. 

Trlfhen, at last, they settle down in their own, little, dust and noise-free 
love nest, it will be equipped with a 3-dimensional, full color " telebiovision" 
set which will relay not only sight and sound but odors, tastes and sensations. 

So says Hugo Gernsback, publisher of RADIO-ELECTRONICS magazine gmd Number 1 
Science Prophet, in his annual Christmas greeting "Forecast 1952". Gernsback 
has been sending these unique greetings since the early '30s. 

In "Forecast 1952", he predicts, in addition to the devices mentioned, such 
scientific strides forward as telecasting the sun's awesome corona from outer 
space, airplane shelterways, thermo furniture, multiple TV sets and sleep condi- 
tioners. 

The uninitiated may arch an eyebrow at Hugo Gernsback' s "outlandish" fore- 
casts, but those who know his remarkable record for deadly accurate scientific 
prophecy, will take a more serious view. In his book, "Ralph 124C 41+", written 
in 1911, he foretold - in accurate detail - television, radar, blood transfusions, 
radio communication with the moon and many, many, other achievements — called 
ridiculous in 1911, but fact today. 

L't. Gernsback, partially explains his remarkable penchant for accurate 
prophecy by pointing out that his predictions are not wild flights of fancy, but 

the logical and natural projections of established scientific facts. 

i if ir 



c 




X-PS3513. 



Address Read Before i "^ ^ 

10th WORLD SCIENCE FICTION CONVENTION -*' -A'//U On/ For Release 



CHICAGO AUGUST 30 - 195 2 \ • - | -i ^ ^^ U August 31 



C 



t 



THE IMPACT OF SCIENCE FICTION ON WORLD PROGRESS 

By Hugo Gernsback 

An imperceptible revolution has quietly taken place during the past 25 years a 

revolution probably unparalleled in man's history. The revolution is the terrific 
in5)act of Science Fiction on the world and world progress. Curiously enough, the agency 
responsible for Science Fiction- -the authors, the publishers, and the readers, seem 

ittle aware of this revolution and the real meaning and import of the dynamic force 
that carries it forward. 

Let me clarify the term Science Fiction. When I speak of Science Fiction I mean 
the truly, scientific, prophetic Science Fiction with the full accent on SCIENCE. I 
emphatically do not mean the fairy tale brand, the weird or fantastic type of what 
mistakenly masquerades under the name of Science Fiction today. I find no fault with 
fairy tales, weird and fantastic stories. Some of them are excellent for their enter- 
tainment value, as amply proved by Edgar Allen Poe, but when they are advertised as 
Science Fiction, then I must firmly protest. 

Twenty- five years ago, before Science Fiction had become an organized and recognized 

force the broad smoothly- flowing literary river it is today we had but a weak trickle 

of occasional stories and here and there a book or two. It was a rarity when an author 
wrote more than one or two Science Fiction stories. Rarer yet were a series of Science 
iction books, such as those of the masters Jules Verne and H. G. Wells. 

The truth is that in the early, formative years Science Fiction was hardly considered 




:--<i 









Testimonial 



X-PS3513 v^j 



to 



Hugo gernsback 



"Father of Science-Fiction 



1903-1953 















His Pipe Dreams Are 
Tomorrow's Inventions 

,*-•— — II ■■■ I 

ERIC HUTTON 



Reprinted from 

MAGAZINE DIGEST 

TORONTO, ONTARIO 




1944 CORr 






A REPRINT FROM Jl LY 



A glimpse into tlie incubator of Science 
which will prohably cause you to lean back 
and gasp, "My gosh, little man! What next? 



f 



Truth Catches Up with His Fiction 




by Howard Whitman 

A British newspaper once called 
Hugo Gernsback the greatest 
living prophet. Right to that tide 
was earned by Gernsback in show- 
ing the world long in advance the 
forms of such modem realities as 
radio loudspeakers, chain broad- 
casting, television, radar, rocket 
planes and robot tanks. 

The modern Leonardo da Vinci 
is an inventor and publisher. He 
communes with the future in an 
old-fashioned downtown office in 
New York near the Woolworth 
Building. Among his 80 inven- 
tions are the "osophone," — to en- 
able deaf persons to hear through 
their teeth, and the "hypnobio- 
scope," a device by which people 
may absorb education while they 
sleep. This may develop to be the 
complete answer to children's 
school homework worries, he says. 

At 59, Gernsback says of himself, 
"I am a fountain of ideas, with 
neither the time nor the patience 
to translate them into money. 
People of my type arc never good 
businessmen." 

In 36 years of publishing, Gems- 
back has foimded some two dozen 



X-PS35 13 

publications,, mosr oPtfem in the 
science field, with occasional diver- 
sions into other lines, such as sex 
and beauty. In 1911, when he was 
publishing a little magazine called 
Modern Electrics, he wrote the first 
of the scientific chiUer-thriUer se- 
rials, a story called "Ralph 124C 
41 -f," a forerunner of the popular 
"science fiction." 

Gernsback called the yarn ".A. 
Romance of the Year 2660" and 
packed it with such visions as inter- 
planetary communications, space 
flyers, a futuristic battle between 
an earthly lover and a Martian 
rival, potent rays of many types, 
a gadget to produce invisibility, 
and other grist which the "science 
fiction" mills of today still are 
grinding upon. 

The tide was a pun— Ralph One 
to fore-see. Get it? It's pretty bad. 
The 41-|- was Ralph's serial num- 
ber, used instead of a name in the 
year 2660. But in the scientific 
' predictions Gernsback showed his 
looking-toward-the-future stuff". 

Ralph was a great scientist on 
earth in the 27th century. The 
story starts off" when through the 





MAR ^9 





o 



Tlic controz'crsial tiiicstioii : 
••ll'ho first used radar/" has never 
been aiisz^-ered to everyone's satis- 
facfioii.. Hoivcver the question: 
-Who first suggested its teehiiical 
use '" is easier to solve. 

In vie-M of the jaet that the gov- 
ernment no'.i' has lifted all restric- 
tions on radar, it will come as a 
surprise to many that the first 
authentic technical record of radar 
affeared in Xovember 1911. Tin- 
article 7<.'as printed in the Decem- 
ber 1911 issue of Modem Elec- 
trics as shozcn on the right. It zvill 
be seen that all of the present 
radar conceptions zccre embodied 
in this, the first authentic techni- 
cal record of radar. Note particu- 
larly the ivords "pulsating . . . 
wave" — here first used. Radar 
cannot operate ivithout pulsating 
ivavcs. 

In a letter dated December 20. 
1944 to Hugo Gernsback, Dr. 
Lee De Forest, father of radio, 
and inventor of the vacuum tube 
said as follows : 

"Your fanciful suggestion as 
far back as 1911 should certainly 
have suggested to a later investi- 
gator of ultra-high frequency ra- 
dio beams the possibility of using 
that principle as radar has nozv 
been used, for the detection of 
hostile airplanes. The chances are, 
hozcever, that no investigator of 
UHF (Ultra High Frcciuency) 
radiations in the 1930'.? had ever 
read z^hat you zvrotc in 1911. Vou 
may, hozcever, take justifiable 
pride in the farsightedness of 
many of your startling sugges- 
tions.'' 

The title of the article is a 
mythical character living in the 
year 2000. The article was one of 
a series of pseudo scientific specu- 
lations, nevertheless it is as techni- 
cally sound as though zuritten to- 
day by a serious radar engineer. 

Radio-Craft 



X»po35-13 

' RADAR in ISlf^ ' 

The first authentic technical record of 
RADAR to appear in print. 

Reprinted from Modern Electrics, Vol. 4, 
No. 9, page 593, December 1911 issue. 



VOL. IV. 



DECEMBER, 1911. 



No. 9. 



MODERN ELECTRICS 

Ralph 124C 41 + 



593 



AT first thought it might be considered a 
difficult feat accurately to locate a ma- 
chine thousands of miles distant from 
the earth, speeding in an unknown direction 
somewhere in the bottomless universe. The 
feat, while remarkable, is easy tp accomplish 
by any up-to-date scientist. As far back as 
the year 1800 astronomers accurately meas- 
ured the distance between the earth and small 
celestial bodies, but it was not until the year 
2659 that the famous scientist 124C 41 suc- 
ceeded in accurately determining the location 
and distance of space flyers, far out in space, 
where not even the most powerful telescope 
could follow any more. 

It has long been known that a puUaling 
polarised ether wave, if directed on a metal 
object, could be reflected in the same fashion 
as a light ray can be reflected from a bright 
surface or from a mirror. Moreover, the re- 
flection factor varies with different metals 
Thus the reflection factor from silver is 1,000 
units, the reflection from iron 645, alomag- 
nesium 460, etc. If, therefore, a polarized 
wave generator were trained towards the 
open space, the waves would take a direction 
as shown in diagram, providing the parabolic 
wave reflector was used as shown. By mani- 
pulating the entire apparatus like a searchlight, 
waves would be sent over a large area. 
Sooner or later, if the search is kept up, these 
waves must come in the direction of a space 
flyer. Then a small part of the waves would 
strike the metal body of the flyer, and these 
waves would be reflected back to the sending 
apparatus. Here they would fall on the 
• Wave Reflector 



(Continued.) 
By H. Gernsback. 

earth and the flyer is then accurately c.ilculat- 
ed with but little trouble. 

The reflection factor of magnelium (the 
metal of which Fernand 60O lO's machine was 
constructed) being 1060, Ralph located his 
rival's space flyer in less th.in five hours' 
search. He found that 60O lO's machine at 
that time was about 4OO.C0O miles distant from 
the earth and that the abductor of his sweet- 
heart apparently was headed in the direction 
of the planet Venus. A few seconds' calcu- 
lation showed that he was flying at the rate 
of about 45.000 miles per hour. This was a 
great surprise for Ralph and it delighted him 
at first. He knew that 60O lO's machine was 
capable of makine at least 75,000 miles an 
hour. This was certainly as strange as it was 
puzzling Ralph reasoned that if he were in 
his rival's place, he certainly would speed up 
the flyer to tite utmost. Why then was 60O 
10 flying so leisurely? Did he think himself 



secure? Did he think that nobody could or 
would follow? Or did he have trouble with 
the Anti-Gravilatorf Ralph could not under- 
stand it. However, his mind had already been 
made up. He would of course chase his rival, 
head him off, and, if necessary,— yes, he would 
kill him. 

He gave sharp and quick orders to his at- 
tendants and ordered his space flyer, the 
"Cassiopeia," to be made ready within one 
hour. Provisions sufficient to last for six 
months were put on board and Ralph himself 
brought a large number of scientific instru- 
ments to the flyer, many of which he calculat- 
ed might turn out to be useful. He also or- 



ACTJNOSCOPf 




\ POUABIXED 
^ WAVE>^PPARATua 

Aclinoscope (see diagram), which records 
only the reflected waves, not the direct ones. 
From the actinoscope the reflection factor 
is then determined, which accurately shows 
from which metal the reflection comes. From 
the intensity and the elapsed time of the re- 
flected impulses, the distance between the 



, Note — Thi» Norel itaited in Ibe April N -imhe-r Back issues coutamiug aU lostanments *U1 beturj 
^ (Copyright 1911 by U. Gernsback. AU rljhts reseived.) 



SPACE n-TEP 



dered a large amount of duplicate parts of the 
flyer's machinery to be put on board in case 
of emergency, and he then bade farewell to 
his family. 

Although this was, of course, not the first 
time he journeyed into space, the members of 
his immediate family were g reatly concerned. 

.ished at 10c cacb} 






ATOMIC BUN IK 19 IS 



in 
a. 

X 






ago, 



4 ,. *,.,„•„, nf WnrIA War II and the effects of the atomic bomb accurately predicted in 1915 — 30 years 

,'y tt'TditTTTHE^EfEC™^^ now Editor of RADIO-ELECTRONICS 

"4 vtachine zdiich at one stroke can annihilate several Army Corps" . . . to end all wars. 
"Setting off spontaneously the dormant energy of the atom . . . concrete, steel, men and guns . . . gone 
^conupletely. Only a dense cloud of vapor hanging in the air remams" ... 

"A city of 300 000 souls (note that Hiroshima had 320,000) . . . houses, churches, bridges, parks . . . gone 
up in a 'titanic vapor cloud; -only a vast crater in the ground where the thriving city once stood remains ... 

"After this demonstration the enemy sues for peace: resistance zvould he folly. The country is conquered. 

RADIO-ELECTRONICS MAGAZINE 
25 West Broadivay, N. Y. 



November. 1915 



THE ELECTRICAL EXPERIMENTER 3 ~ IVlAi ^^1 31S 

Warfare of the Future 



( 



THE European War has clearly dem- 
onstrated what a tremendous part 
modern science plays in the offense 
as well as in the defense of the contending 
armies. It has often been said during the 
past twelve months that this is not a war 
so much of men as of machines- Noth- 
ing couli be truer. In fact, it might be 
said that this is a war of internal machines 
against more diabolical machines. 

It has been stated editorially in this 
journal that there will be war always, or 
at least till we arrive at a period when 
some scientific genius (or shall be call 
him devil?) invents a machine which at 
one stroke is capable of annihilating one 
or several army corps. When that time 
arrives, soldiers, no matter how cour- 
ageous, will think a long time before they 
will offer themselves to be slaughtered by 
the hundred thousand. 

In the meantime, probably for many gen- 
erations to come, the war death-dance will 
go on without any doubt whatsoever. Hu- 
manity simply has not advanced to suoi a 
state where disarmament is possible- Our 
real civilization only dates back less than 
100 years, and as human progress is ex- 
tremely slow, it may take a thousand years 
and more before humans will learn how to 
trust each other implicitly. As long as we 
require policemen and jails to keep us out 
of mischief, we are not able to take care 
of ourselves and we cannot call ourselves 
emancipated— we are still held in bondage 
by the brute in ourselves, which threatens 
to break out at any opportune moment, as 
is witnessed in the present war: 

Therefore, the pacificists, particularly 
those in our country who think that this 
is the "last war" and who go around shout- 
ing peace at any price, are not only a sorry 
lot. but they are cheerfully oblivious of 
the teachings, of history as well as of 
.human evolution. 

These good people would shout murder 
if you dared suggest to them to dismiss 
at once all policemen and patrolmen of 
their home town, but they would trust a 
strange nation implicitly from making war 
on this country, simply because that nation 
pledged itself on a piece of paper not to 
make warl . 1. •. 

If the present war is ghastly with its 
poison shells, its deadly chlonne gas, its 
bomb^throwing aeroplanes, its fire-spraying 
guns, its murderous machine guns, etc., 
what cin we expect of the wars of the 
future? . . , 

What will happen when the saentists of 
a hundred years hence begin making war 
on each other? 

[Suppose that by that time our saentists 
have solved the puiile of the atom and 
have succeeded in liberating its prodi«oas 
forces. Imagine that at that time one atom 
can be disintegrated at will, instantly into 
another, what will happen? The results 
will simply be overwhelmingly astounding 
and almost incomprehensible to our present 
minds. ., ,. 

' It has been calculated that if we could 
liberate the latent energy at present '<>«<" 
up in a coppir one cent piece we would be 
enabled to propel a train with 50 freight 



By Hugo Gemsback 

will you make yourself the first Master of 
this Planet?" 

The War Lord promptly asks for a se- 
cret demonstration of the new "Atomie 
Gun," and what he sees intoxicates his 
imagination to such a degree that he de- 
cides to make war on the entire world as 
soon as his generals have assured him that 
enough atomic guns have been manufac- 
tured to make success certain. And one 
beautiful spring morning our War Lord 
finds a perfectly logical pretext to make 
war on a few nations, and the latest war 
dance is on. 

Within a few hours the first atomic gun. 
popularly known as the "Radium De- 
stroyer," has crossed the enemy's frontier 
The Radium Destroyer is mounted on 
fast moving auto trucks and is controlled 
entirely by Radio energy. No man is with- 
in a mile of the Destroyer— it is too dan- 
gerous to be near it when in action. A 
young lieutenant with phones clapped over 
his head and who follows the Destroyer in 
the "Control Auto," and who gets his own 
orders from the General Staff by Wireless, 
guides each and every motion of the 
distant Radium Destroyer simply by mov- 
ing certain keys and twitches in front of 
him. 

Soon his Destroyer has arrived in front 
of the enemy's first line of concreted steel 
trenches, protecting the land behind them. 
In front of the trenches the ground has 
been purposely cut up to impede the 
progress of ordinary vehicles. The Gen- 
eral Staff, of course, knew this,, and built 
the Destroyer accordingly Our friend 
the lieutenant stops the Destroyer's truck 
and moves a lever. Immediately the De- 
stroyer hops from the truck and begins 
to jump with amazing speed oyer the cut- 
up ground, in grasshopper fashion. A' few 
hundred feet from the well-concealed con- 
crete trenches the Destroyer is made to 
halt. Our lieutenant moves a few 
switches, turns a knob and presses a key — 
then lol the inferno begins. * 

A solid green "Radium-K" emanation 
ray bursts from the top of the Destroyer 
and hiU the concreted steel trench. Our 
front cover gives but a faint idea of what 
happens. The Radium-K emanation has 
the property of setting off spontaneously 
the dormant energy of the Atom of any 
element it encounters except lead. So 
when the ray hits the trench it went up in 
dust, concrete, steel, men and guns behind 
it, everything. After spraying the trench 
lengthwise for a few minutes it is gone 
completely. Only a dense cloud of vapor 
hanging in the air remains. ^ 

The fleet of Radium Destroyers now en- 
ters through the gap, destroyinjf everything 
in their path. No gun can hit the Radium 
Destroyer for ere the gun can get the 
proper range, the Radium-K Ray has hit 
the gun or the ground below it and has 
sent it up in vapor, including the men be- 
hind it As a demonstration, the Com- 
manding General asks that the first town 
encountered, a city of 300,000 souls, be 
vacated within three hours, the terrorized 
inhabitants are forced to comply with the 
request, whereupon a dozen Destroyers 
line up on the hills and spray the unlucky 



I 



night the War Lord has conquered the 
entire world and has proclaimed himself »» 
the First Planet Emperor. I 

What happens afterwards when the se- 
cret of the Radium Destroyer is discov- 
ered by the War Lord's enemies is in- 
other chapter, so we will desist 1 

The above may read very fantastical and 
extremely fanciful. It . is, however, not 
only very possible but highly probable 

Modern Science knows not the word 
Impossible. 

ANENT WARLIKE INVENTIONS. 
It is one of the anomalies of w»rUre 
that the machinery for lighting and killmg 
has been brought to its present Beastly per- 
fection not by swashbuckling, bloodthirsty 
soldiers, but by the mild-mannered, peace- 
loving civilians, says the Review ofKe- 
views, true, both army and navy officers 
have exercised their ingenuity to heighten 
the terrors ol battle, but theirs are rather 
academic improvements on the more daring 
contrivances of civilian mechanics and en- 

^'who gave us the turrfted ironclad? Not 
a naval ofRcer, but Ericson, a marine en- 
gineer. Who invented the machine gun. 
which squirts death every day on » J"" 
European battlegrounds? Not a colonel or 
a captain, but Hiram Maxim, a brilliant 
American mechanic. Who gave the battle- 
ship its quick-acting gun-eleviling mecBa- 
nism? Not an ensign or a commodore. l>ut 
Janney, an American mechanical engineer. 
Who invented the motors for turning tur- 
rets rapidly? Not a lieutenant, but M 
Ward Leonard, one of Edison's former as- 
sistants. Who planned the submariner 
Not a Hull or a Nelson, but Robert Fulton, 

an artist. . 

So. one after another, the really impor- 
tant, the really epoch-making inventions 
comprising the mechanism of warfare 
prove to be the conceptions of rom.intically 
imaginative but lamb-like private «'"""'. 
Usually their contrivances are anything Dut 
perfect. They must be deveteped. and U 
is in their development that the profes- 
sional soldier has been most serviceable. 

It is thus not only with the guns and 
submarines of war, but also with the tele- 
phones and electric lights of peace; for the 
inventions that have made the United 
States and other countries commercially 
great came not from within given indua- 
tries. but from without. 

Always it is a dreamy pioneer, an in- 
trepid free-lance, aflame with enthusiasm, 
who enriches his country with a radically 
new labor-saving device or way of ntilii- 
ing energy Morse was a portrait painter 
when he first turned his attention to the 
telegraph; Bell was a teacher of deaf 
mutes when he began his experiments with 
the telephone: Edison was a patentee ot 
telegraphs and phonographs when he gave 
us the incandescent lamp ; Marconi wat « 
mere lad with a liking for physics when he 
conducted his first .successful experiments 
in wireless telegraphy. 

With the single conspicuous exception ot 
Edison not one of the inventors who h»»e 
blazed new trails gave to the world devicet 
that could be marketed at once. Develop- 

.. . »— *«>9^v H^v^lrtnm^nt hv leSS 



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and the 



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MIGRANTS 



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BY GEORGE TH OMASUM IRON 










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EDGAR A. GUEST 



THE POET OF THE PEOPLE 



JAN, 1 TO DEC 31 1941