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Full text of "X Collection 1605"



X Collection 



INDEX 






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AN OUTLINE 



DOS 



ENGLISH 
LITERATURE 



PART 2 - REVISED EDITION 



VAN HOOK 



INCLUDING y~~' < X :< 
50 MODEL EXAMINATION QUESTIONS 



STUDENT OUTLINE NOTES 

COLLEGE SERIES 



Barchas and Schiffer bookstores, inc. 



PUBLISHERS 



NEW YORK 10, N. Y. 



X 



PR lit 




MATERIALS FOR THE STUDY 
OF CHAUCER'S fOETRI 
by ». 8. Francis 





y- PR not 









GUMMERE AND THE CHAUCERIAN 
SHORT E 






by 
Joseph Chubb Develin, Ph. D. 



i^^**^B^lBBBBlBWMB 







X-FR 253, 

"5 



SHAKESPEARE 

A MAN OF THIS WORLD 

by Edward Wagenknecht 



Address Given Before 
The Friends of Literature 



at 



Annual Shakespeare Birthday 
and. Award Dinner 



May 10, 1947 



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X-PR*S99 



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©in© 



\1 









and some observations concerning 
"the subtle blood o' the grape" 



by 
Raymond D. Thomas 






Published by 

ALCOHOL FACTS, Inc. 

A non-profit membership corporation 

WHITE PLAINS, N. Y. 









H 



V 



SHAKESPEARE 



m his 



TRUE COLOURS 



Katharine E. Eggar 



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v-pRim 
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SHAKESPEARE'S 
FAREWELL" 

By 
GWYNNETH BOWEN 


















Prom: Geoffrey Handley- Taylor, 
Arts Theatre Club, London, W.C. 2 , 



wr 



X-PR^iV mm 



Shakespeare ■* 



i^w^ 



Rear- Admiral H. H. Holland, C.B. 

Vice-Presidents: 

Professor Abel Lefranc 

William Kent, F.S.A. 

T. L. Adamson 

J. Shera Atkinson, LL.B.Lond. 

Miss K. Eggar, A.R.A.M. 

Mrs. M. H. Robins 



Hon. Secretary: 

Miss GWYNNETH BOWEN 

Inglethorpe 

Burlington Road 

Buxton, Derbyshire 



Assistant Hon. Secretary: 

Miss H. Amphlett 

5, Rusham Court 

Egham, Surrey 

Telephone: Egham 3300 



Hon. Treasurer: 
T. L. Adamson 
6, Upper Cavendish Avenue 
Finchley 
London, N.3 

Telephone: FINchley 2153 

Hon. Editor of News-Letter: 

William Kent, F.S.A. 

71, Union Road 

London, S.W.4 

Telephone: MACaulay 2007 



\RT 4— PAGE 2 
UGU5T «, 1956 



cJVlagt 



qf33oo£s 








" Shaw keeps rubbing it in that his celebration in Chicago was bigger 

than mine." 



rhe International Literary Spotlight 
Focuses on Bernard Shaw and Chicago 

By Fanny Butcher 

4 MERICA with the lid off "... that is what George Bernard Shaw called Chicago, 
\ his only acquaintance with^which was via rumor and reading, altho two of his plays 

had their world premiere here and "Candida" its first American performance. 

On the centenary of his birth, Chicago proved he might be right. With the imprima- 
r of Mayor Daley, who pro- 
aimed July 26 Bernard Shaw 
ly, Chicago had the only 
orning to midnight celebra- 
jn in the world with a fire- 
orks display of wit and ora- 
ry. . . . In London a few 
riters gathered for a quiet 
;getarian, nonalcoholic repast 
i honor of the arch vegetar- 
n and teetotaler. 
New York's contribution to 
ie occasion was made at an 
rening program here under 
e aegis of the Theatre guild 
id other dramatic groups, 
ith Patrick H. Hoy, president 
I the Sherman hotel, as entre- 
reneur — still aglow over the 
;dication ceremonies in the 
ternoon [toasted in Shaw's 
ivcr : *° tipple, ginger beer] of 
\M permanent George Ber- 
i. iw room in the hotel. 

. . ihe now handsome room 
as formerly a bowling alley. 
In the George Bernard Shaw 
>om at 10 o'clock of a Thurs- 
ly morning more than 550 
len and women gathered to 
sten to a symposium on Shaw 
y six men, who spoke with wit 
ad zest. They were introduced 
y Robert Preble, president of 
ie Encyclopaedia Britannica. 
he day was under the auspices 
f the Adult Education Council 
f Greater Chicago, in coopera- 
on with the American Na- 
onal Theater and Academy, 
ie Shaw Society of America, 
ie Theatre Guild, and the 
ouncil of the living Theatre, 
?hich divided the tributes. 

ymposium of Six 
John Wardrop, a Scotsman 
/ith a mesmerizing burr, spoke 
f Shaw as philosopher. . . . 
Ie was 19 when he met Shaw, 
hen 83, and for the next 11 
ears they had a close working 
riendship. . . . A. C. Spector- 
ky author of "The Exurban- 
1 id assistant to the pub- 

f Playboy magazine, had 
ulr^with the subject, " Shaw 
he Playboy," defining that 
rord as " one who enjoys life 
o the full and with intelli- 
;ence." 



Norman Thomas, America's 
No. 1 Socialist, talked of the 
founder of England's Fabian 
society in the brilliant "off 
with their heads" manner at 
which Shaw was past master. 
... He reminded his audience 
that Shaw wasn't the great po- 
litical thinker Shaw thought he 
was, for Shaw had admired 
Hitler and Mussolini, and to 
the day of his death claimed 
that Stalin was a great states- 
man. 

The specially honored guest 
of the day was 79 year old 
Archibald Henderson, for 52 
years Shaw champion and biog- 
rapher [his latest life, in half a 
million words, will be published 
Nov. 15] and president of the 
George Bernard Shaw Society 
of America, a Chicago chapter 
of which was fomned at the 
dedication of. the Shaw room 
in the afternoon. 

Henderson was studying high- 
er mathematics at the Univer- 
sity of Chicago in 1903, he said, 
when he was inveigled into at- 
tending an amateur perform- 
ance of a play called "You 
Never Can. Tell," by an un- 
known Ifmh playwright. ... It 



was a turning point in his life. 

William Saroyan, who is some- 
thing of an authority on the 
subject himself, spoke on Shaw 
as a poseur. ... He confided 
to his audience that it was be- 
cause he was so bored with 
what others wrote that he began 
writing himself, so that he 
would have something to read. 
He hadn't read much of Shaw 
when, duriiig the war as a GI 
private, he went to call oh the 
83 year old playwriijht at Ayot 
St. Lawrence, armored for the 
interview with a rare war time 
gift, a basket of fresh fruit [$50 
worth]. . . . Shaw greeted him 
as "the wop playwright from 
New York" and his gift with, 
" Why does everyone in Amer- 
ica think I am starving? "... 
Robert Chapman, drama pro- 
fessor at Harvard and himself a 

vriter of plays, spoke on Shaw 
as a playwright. ... He con- 
aiders "Heartbreak- House," he 
said, " the most urgent play of 
today," and its author second 
only to Shakespeare. "But," 
said Chapman, "it is strange 
that Shaw's influence is almost 
nonexistent on playwrights to- 
day." 

Lunch Was Vegetarian 

From the symposium the by 
that time starry eyed audience 



migrated alsws - ; as a body to 
the grand bafiroam, which was 
filled to capacity for a luncheon 
which Shaw, the ardent vege- 
tarian, might have ordered 
Iiimself. . . . Ihe master uf 
ceremonies at Uie ascetic feast 
was R. Sargent Shriver Jr., 
president of Chicago's board of 
education, wl 3 quipped thM it 
had taken six nsen thus far to 
explain Shaw. He introduced 
Maurke F. X. CoaohKe of the 
University A Chicago tad ptes- 
Jent cf tLfl %;inlt Lauci'iou 
Council >if Greater Chicago, 
who iold of the council's ex- 
panded program and quoted 
Shaw pertinently, **As long as 
you continue learning you will 
never waiir to die." 

He pre&.zued an award >'o 
Archibald Henderson. Then 
Herman Fin^r, also of the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, elut?idated 
the theme cf "Back to Me- 
thuselah," two scenes from 
which were presented by the 
First Chicago Drama quartet, 
produced aid directed by Lois 
P. Solomon, whose idea was re- 
sponsible for the fabulous day. 
. . . For news of how it hap- 
pened and the story of the star 
studded evening, stay tuned toi 
this station next week. 












.*-■' 





'mm-- "V 



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11. 7 






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■ 



THE SHAW SOCIETY OF CHICAGO 
presents its 









1957 Reading Series 



of the works of George Bernard Shaw 



THE BERNARD SHAW ROOM 



THE SHERMAN HOTEL 










•*fc- 



The 
Shaw Society 
f Chicago 




1958 reading series 

from the 

plays of Bernard Shaw 




„' 







* 



MAN AND SUPERMAN 

A COMEDY (AND A PHILOSOPHY) 
(Written during 1901 and 1903; 

CHARACTERS 



. , r, j^« ...» Alan Fishburne 
Roebuck Ramsden • ^ Ioimger 

Parlourmaid . . . • B ^- Lek 

Octavius Robinson ££m Gould 

John Tanner. . . . * •//////vera Ward 

[!.... Viola Berwick 

* Rosemary Kelly 

* Pat Stedman 

' Jerry Kaufherr 

Henry Straker ifeckua 

Hector "alone • S?QtoimU 

Mr. Malone "*' 



Ann TShitefield 
Mrs. Whitefield 
Miss Ramsden . 
Violet Robinson 



ACT I: Portland Place. Roebuck Ramsden's Study 

j£ T H: Richmond. The Avenue to Mr,. Whitefield', House. 






The Shaw Socieiu. 0/ Qticaao (a6 jULa coniAioution -to Jthe 
Pan-AmeAican (jameA (judLtuAaJL leAiJLvaJL) pAeAentA Pan-O-DAama: 

| Si.aAAina: Ruin JoAa & ZachaAu. ScoiJL, 

^^ HanA QonAi.ed, Vincent Pju.ce 

Trm.ee. pAoaAanA reatuAxna AmeAican Si.aAA or Si.aae ana ScAeen 

in SoJLo PeAjfoAmanceA . 

Je^tivaL or the AmeAJcaA 

pAeAentation o£ a 
pAoaAam oj- inteA - AmeAican cuJbtuAaL event* io i.ahe 
place, in (Tiicaao du/iina ike month o£ Augudt, 1°59> 
in connection with ine 111 Pan AmeAican (jameA . 





Founded July 26, 1956 

Chicago Chapter of the Shaw Society of America 

The purpose of the Shaw Society of Chicago is to encourage the study of all aspects of the life, philo- 
sophy and writings of Bernard Shaw; to encourage the adequate performance of his plays and of all 
advanced social drama; to arrange for exhibits and displays of Shaviana and related material, and to 
contribute in all possible ways to the eventual civilization of mankind. 

Membership is open to any and all who agree with the above purpose, and to those who wish to 
exercise their Shavian prerogative of intelligent disagreement. 

Applications for membership may be obtained from the Shaw Society of Chicago, Room 370, 
the Sherman Hotel, Clark and Randolph streets, Chicago 1, Illinois. 




L 



X-?*RsSfefe 

7>ze Shaw Society, or (jzicaao. (ad JJla contru.OLdJ.on to the 
Pan-AmeAican QameA (jlU.ua.clL JeAtivat) pAeAentA Pan-O-DAama: 
StaAAing: Ruth JoAa & Zachcvw. Scott, 
HanA Qowtted, l/tncent Pju.ce. 
Trvx.ee. pAoa/ia/nd reatmujig AmeAican StaAA o<h Stage and ScAeen 
in SoJLo PeAjfoAjnanceA . 

jeAtivaJ. or the AmeAJcaA 

pAeAentation o<h a 
pA.oa/iam o<h JunteA - AmeAJLcan cuLLuaxlL event* to take 
place tn Chicago dwung the month. o£ August, 1 Q 5°, 
In connection with the 111 Pan AmeAican QameA . 





Founded July 26, 1956 

Chicago Chapter of the Shaw Society of America 

The purpose of the Shaw Society of Chicago is to encourage the study of all aspects of the life, philo- 
sophy and writings of Bernard Shaw; to encourage the adequate performance of his plays and of all 
advanced social drama; to arrange for exhibits and displays of Shaviana and related material, and to 
contribute in all possible ways to the eventual civilization of mankind. 

Membership is open to any and all who agree with the above purpose, and to those who wish to 
exercise their Shavian prerogative of intelligent disagreement. 

Applications for membership may be obtained from the Shaw Society of Chicago, Room 370, 
the Sherman Hotel, Clark and Randolph streets, Chicago 1, Illinois. 








XJON£ 



Pa.oJ.oqu, 
Now the day is over, 
Night is drawing nigh, 
Shadows of the evening 
Steal across T;he sky. 

i 

sNrgmsssoN 



9NTQMSS90N 







A sick toss'd vessel, 

dashing on each thing; 
Nay, hi3- own shelf: 
My God, I mean myself." 



Jh 



e Seven Staa e^ 

Patrla patrla • 
Quanto ml costl" 



The D. 



'Ajiat. 



His mighty work for the nation, 
Strengthening peace and securing 

union, 
Always at it since on the throne, 
Has saved the country more than 
one billion. " 

The MaAq ij.p 

Oh, Heaven help me, "she prayed, 
to be decorative and to do 
right ." 



fp-Ll.og.ue 



Some natural tears they drop'd, 

but wip'd them soon; 
The world was all before them, 
where to choose. . . " 

Lacrimosa dies ilia 
Qua resurget ex favilla 
ludi candus homo reus". 



1 







I CO 



■ si 

eg 
1 







Wednesday Evening., December ^Oth, J°5° -^tT ~$ \7 

the smw socmy 01 Qtf&gp presents 

CMff) OPERAS 

Produced and duiected by Tom KlitiU 

/. a L£rrg< to gmy ty 

LocUem $okruon bated on(ZNSM{R V£ L9LU& by RobeJvL Hupion n 

Lavjuruia Dickinson An.dLi rOiauvth 

fcnily Dickinson Rosalind Walon 

tyudye Dickinson Sam ReAntch 

Colonel Hiyybruon Stynh OawoLL 
77/(f Wl£: AuyuAt 1~l, 18J0 
THE PLA(£: The. DickinAon Home. 

SCQt 1 7 The PcudoJi 

****** 

//. THE STRONGER by Huyo WeLiyall. Li.beA.eito adapted faom the 

play by Auyvui StAindbeJiy and RichaJid Hani 
Lit a Patnicia Unyen. 

Eiielle Pzgffl Smith 

WcuLteJi CjoJi-don Cjould 

77/<f Wt: Now 

W M£: A cocktail lounye in New LJoaA &L$ 

****** 

//;. THE £PH£S9AN ' MTRON by QuvlUa Dibbin. Libejietto by 

$Aaac BickeAAta^e, bated on a AioJuy In Petn.oniuA 

SAHJR9C0N. 

The mold Patnicia UnyeJi 

The JalheA. Sam ReAnick 

The MaiA.on C^heAine £mma 

The Soldien. RichaJid Knell 

The Hut band ^o/idon Qoicld 
( RJ.P.) 
W TM£: &eek AniioMiiy 

THE PLA(£: A tomb in £phe^uA 

****** 

COSWES (KMT: 

NoJxihweAieJxn UnivejiAity OpeJia WoJik&hop by .on o£ Robert Qay. 



THE SHAW SOCIETY 



; 



/-?R^3t,( 



PUBLICATION NEWS "^4 



Hotel Sherman, Clark and Randolph Sts., Chicago, 111. Tel: FRanklin 2-2 100 



c 



The Shaw Review - How It\Grew 



Bulletin Number One of the Shaw Society of America 



ppeared in February, 1951. It was a modest affair of 
ight pages, but represented much spadework on the part 
f the editor, William D. Chase of the Flint (Mich.) 
ournal. On the first page was a message from G3S, 
/ritten just a few months before he died in November, 
950. Inside were comments of an elegiac turn, and news 
f Shavian interest. 

The second issue took on the dignity of "Volume 1, 
lumber 2," and added some pages of articles and a con- 
inuing current bibliography of Shaviana. By Number 
"hree the journal had definitely grown from Society 
■ rgan to become The Shaw Bulletin, and contained volu- 
ble pieces on Shaw letters and manuscripts, a critique 
.f Buoyant Billions by Felix Grendon, and other 
rticles. 

1953 the journal was well launched - - so well 
hw^ ,mp issues now rank as collector's items. Such, 
or example, as Number Four, which featured "Dickens 
ind Shaw," by Edgar Johnson, biographer of Boz; or 
-lumber Five, which contained Carl J. Weber's revealing 
'A Talk with Bernard Shaw." The fifth issue (May, 
954) announced the transfer of editorial reins to Dan 
\. Laurence of Hofstra College, and the intended puli- 
ation of The Shaw Bulletin on a regular three-a-year 
lasis (January, May and September)--a schedule still 
ollowed in the journal's latest metamorphosis. Later 
ssues in the first volume featured several exciting 
terns in Shavian scholarship—a series on the Blanco 
3 osnet controversey, including little-known pieces by 
haw, Yeats and Joyce; two articles by Archibald 
enderson anticipating his third biography of Shaw; 
rank Scully's revelation of his ghosting of Frank 
larris's Shaw biography; and Mr. Laurence's article 
emonstrating the completeness of Shaw's last "un- 
inished" playlet, Why She Would Not. However with 
ie onset of Mr. Laurence's long illness in 1955, the 
3urnal suspended publication temporarily. 

blication was resumed in 1956 when the present 
transferred the editorial address to The Pennsyl- 
ania State University. The first issue emanating from 
Iniversity Park contained a much-quoted essay by 
ibrettist Alan Jay Lerner on the making of My Fair 
ady from Pygmalion. 



Special 


subscr 


iption to The Shaw 


Review 


for 


members of th 


e Shaw Society of 


Ch 


cago, 




$2.50 a 


year. 












Send checks to: 








The Shaw 


Society of Chicago 








Ho 


rel Sherman, Room 370 








Randolph 


and Clark Street 








Ch 


cago 1 


, Illinois 









Volume II began in 1957 (and ends with the current 
issue), the second number notable for an eightieth birth- 
day salute to authorized Shaw's biographer, Archibald 
Henderson, by Brooks Atkinson and an exhaustive 
bibliography of Hendersonian writings on the modern 
drama by Lucile Kelling. Also prominent was an ex- 
hibit in evidence that the journal did not intend to be or 
to become an apologist for, or panegyrist of, Bernard 
Shaw--in an outspoken article by the rarely printed (in 
America) Henry Miller. Later tables of contents listed 
"Romain Rolland and George Bernard Shaw," "Shaw 
and Resloration Comedy," a symposium on "Ideas and 
the Theatre," and "Saint Joan and Motion Picture 
Censorship. " 

By the end of 1957, the Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity Press (setting an enlightened and challenging 
precedent for the academic press) had become co- 
publisher--with The Shaw Society of America—of the 
journal, a step which has led to continued expansion in 
size and coverage, and (in 1959) a format face-lifting, 
coupled with name change to The Shaw Review. The 
present title, with which the journal opens Volume III 
in 1960, indicates an ability to publish articles of great- 
er length and scope than heretofore, and the intention to 
focus not only upon GBS, but also upon the individuals 
in each generation of his continued creativity upon 
whom his impact was felt, and, in turn, who had some 
effect upon his own thought and work. Past articles in 
Volume II on Granville 3arker and Edward Garnett have 
already indicated this trend. 

Bernard Shaw is, of course the core of the journal; 
thus special issues from time .to time will feature part- 
icular aspects of his work. The present one (September, 
1959) focusses upon the largely neglected and little- 






\- PR gfii 



CThe Storj? of a Friendskip 




A California Reminiscence 

of 
Robert Louis Stevenson 

His few months in Monterey) and his old friend 

JULES SIMONEAU 



/ 



BY 



JOSEPHINE MILDRED BLANCH 






• 



4 JJ3UIS 

fOBEKMSON 
STpv£ 

1850 



1894 




/:■<■■..(,,,., 



SHEFFIELD 



Varies 



V 



X-PR S5"I3 






SWINBURNE'S BOO 






By 
John S. Mayfield 



Bethesda Business Service 

Bethesda, Maryland 

1953 



Copyright 1953 "by John S. Miyfield 





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