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Full text of "X Collection 410"



X Collection 



INDEX 



Page:_ 




Call Number 









M.U'bH?7.C3 



GAM-WlD 












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MEWflyHAPOAHOM KOHrPECCE AHTPOnOJlOrOB H 

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COMMUNICATIONS DE LA DELEGATION SOVIETIQUE All VI 
CONGRES INTERNATIONAL DES SCIENCES 
ANTHROPOLOGIQUES ET ETHNOLOGIQUES 



O A. ITAHllKAfl, r C. MACJIOBA, JX- B. HAHflHH. 

PyCCKHH HCTOPMKO-3THOrPA*HHECKHH 
ATJIAC 



O. GANTSKAIA, G. MASLOVA, D. NAIDITCH 

L'ATLAS D'ETHNOGRAPHIE HISTORIQUE DE LA 

RUSSIE 




MocKBa 1960 



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COMMUNICATIONS DE LA DELEGATION SOVIETIQUE AU VI 
CONORES INTERNATIONAL DES SCIENCES 
ANTHROPOLOGIQUES ET ETHNOLOGIQUES 



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OCHOBHblE OPOBJIEMbl 3THOrPA*H , tE-eK0f ; e— ^ -, 
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V. KROUPIANSKAIA, L. POTAPOV, L. TERENTIEVA 

PROBLEMES ESSENTIELS DE L'ETUDE 
ETHNOGRAPHIQUE DES PEUPLES DE L'URSS 






Mockuu 19 60 



X-GN2/ 







Reprinted for private circulation from 
The American Journal or Semitic Languages and Literatures 
Vol. LI, No. 3, April, 1935 

PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. 




IRAQ 
The Field Museum Anthropological Expedition to the Near East, spon- 
sored by Marshall Field, recently concluded an anthropometric survey of the 
peoples of Iraq, and made similar studies in Persia and the Caucasus Moun- 
tains of the U.S.S.R. The leader of the expedition, Henry Field, assistant 
curator of physical anthropology, began this survey in 1925. He was ac- 
companied on the recent expedition by Richard A. Martin, who, as photog- 
rapher, took seven thousand photographs, and assisted in the anthropological 

work. 

The main objective was to determine the physical relationships of the 
ancient and modern inhabitants of the Near East to their contemporaries of 
Africa, Europe, and Asia. This problem is of great scientific importance, since 

207 



X*GN2/ 




Reprinted from The Scientific Monthly, July, 1935, Vol. XLI, 
pages 61-65 



SCIENCE SERVICE RADIO TALKS 

PRESENTED OVER THE COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

THE STORY OF MAN 

By HENRY FIELD 

FIELD MOSETJH OF NATURAL HISTOEY 






The story of man — past, present and 
future — concerns every living person. 
Man's past, however, is a much longer 
story than the average person appre- 
ciates. Many people realize that in 
order to understand the present and 
plan intelligently for the future we must 
have some knowledge of the past. But 
those same people may turn to ancient 
Egypt, to Greece and Rome, to William 
the Conqueror and Alexander the Great, 
and feel that they are going back to the 
beginnings of history. 

Man's struggles and victories began 
hundreds of thousands of years before 
Alexander undertook his brave expedi- 
tions — and those struggles were against 
greater odds, those victories more in- 
spiring, than any man has known since 
the time that history was first written. 

Let us review in outline the main 
features in the dramatic story of man 
during the past million years. In pass- 
ing from the darkness of our knowledge 
of the first men down to the dawn of 
history, we are continually aware of the 
limitations of available information. We 
owe an eternal debt of gratitude, how- 
ever, to the scientists who have con- 
tributed fragmentary pages to the book 
of knowledge, which is the story of man. 

Who was the first man, and where did 
he come from? It is difficult to trace 
the unwritten record of man, since 
many of the details lie buried in the 
earth or are lost beyond recall. During 
the past few centuries it was believed 
that the world was created in the year 
4004 B.C. and that man was the result of 
special creation. At the close of the first 
third of the twentieth century scientific 



workers have shown absolute proof that 
hundreds of millions of years passed 
before any animal that could definitely 
be recognized as human had evolved 
upon the earth. Study of both living 
and fossil forms reveals the fact that a 
labored evolutionary progress from sim- 
ple one-celled organisms to many-celled, 
from fish to amphibians, from reptiles to 
birds and mammals, was necessary to 
produce the most advanced form — man. 

Branching off from the main primate 
stock several million years ago, our an- 
cestors possessed many physical charac- 
teristics in common with the anthropoid 
apes. As time passed, the gap between 
the two branches grew ever wider. We 
do not know just when or where the first 
humans evolved, but the evidence that 
man did develop in such a manner is 
undeniable, and gradually the facts are 
being pieced together to form an increas- 
ingly clear picture. 

On the northern border of Europe — 
in England — and on the eastern fringe 
of Asia — near Peiping — the earliest 
traces of man have been found. Primi- 
tive evidence has also been unearthed in 
Africa; so that even hundreds of thou- 
sands of years ago mankind had spread 
far and wide. The data, consisting of 
fragmentary human remains, stone tools, 
animal bones and the charcoal of hearth 
fires, are still too few to draw any but 
the crudest picture of the earliest mem- 
bers of the human race. There is abun- 
dant evidence of man 's existence a quar- 
ter of a million years ago, however, in 
western Europe. The climate was mild. 
The elephant, rhinoceros and hippo- 
potamus were the dominant forms of 



61 



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• & 







10 

8 
46 



PAINTED POTTERY FROM JEMDET NASR, IRAQ 



HENRY FIELD and RICHARD A. MARTIN 



[Reprinted from the American Journal of Archaeology, Vol. XXXIX (1935), No. 3] 



X-GN2/ 



■ f. 



^Reprinted from The Open Court. January 1936) 



RACIAL TYPES FROM SOUTH ARABIA 

BY HENRY FIELD 

Assistant Curator, Field Museum of Natural History. 

THE PHYSICAL characters of the South Arabs reveal the fact 
that they are remarkably different from the northern Arabs. 
Extremely round-headed, the South Arab has a small brain ca- 
pacity ; his hair is fuzzy and on face and body may be almost absent. 
The skin color is often dark and swarthy. 

The North Arab, on the other hand, is long-headed, of lighter 
complexion and possesses dark brown hair with low waves. The 
great desert of Rub'al Khali serves as a formidable geographic bar- 
rier to prevent migrations. Between the North and the South Arab 
there has thus been little racial admixture in recent times. 

Racial affinities of the South Arab lie in northeast Africa; a Ne- 
groid strain occurs in the belt from Africa through South Arabia 
to Melanesia, including the Dravidians of southern India. Infer- 
ences of these relationships may be drawn from photographs of 
racial tvpes in South Arabia. Several years ago Mr. A. R. M. 
Rickards journeyed to Nisab, one of the larger Atilaqi towns, and 
along the Wadi Beihan, taking a number of photographs of the 
people he encountered. Through his general cooperation a series of 
his pictures illustrates these brief notes. 1 The photographs of the 
men from Dhufar and the Wadi Beihan show remarkable variations 
in physical type. Differences between the inhabitants of North 
and South Arabia can readily be seen when these photographs are 
compared to those of the Arabs and Beduins of Iraq. 2 Bertram 
Thomas has measured and photographed a small number of South 
Arab tribesmen. 3 In the near future we can expect to see the pubhea- 

lFnr further details =ee "The Ancient and Modern Inhabitants oi 
Aral J? Tne O L SS*. Vol. XL1V, No. 919. December 1932, pp. 847-87 1 

2 See "Arabs of Central Iraq, their History .Ethnology and Physical 
Ch»»SeVWu ««■ »'<>*- Hist -> A"thr. Me,n. Vol. IV, ^f^}^ 

3 See Arabia Felix. New York. 1932. Especially Appendix 1. The Racial 
Characters of the Southern Arabs" by Sir Arthur Keith and W. M. Krog- 
man; also other publications by Thomas. 




c 



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Field, Henry 

1936. The Arabs of Iraq 

Am. J. Phys. Anthrop., v. 21, no. 1, Jan.-Mar. 




Physical anthropology 

. , f racial position 
ra S \ physical characteristics 



Homo, Arabs 



The Wistae Institute Press 
Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



= '.''■■ ' ■-.: ■ 



X-GN2/ 
•fs 



Reprinted for private circulation from 

The American Journal or Semitic Languages and Literatures 

Vol. LV, Xo. 3, July, 1938 

PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. 







U.S.S.R. 

North Caucasus 

According to a recent survey the oldest excavated gold objects from this 
region are the ornaments and vessels, now in the Hermitage Museum, found 
in 1897 in a tumulus near Maikop (Kohan region) dated to the latter part of 
the third millennium B.C. Fourteen sites excavated between 1869 and 1907 
yielded gold objects from the third and second millenniums B.C. All except one 
northern site are located within the Maikop region. Toward the end of the 
second millennium b.c. gold disappears in North Caucasian burials. It has 
not been found in contemporaneous or earlier sites farther east. The North 
Caucasian Bronze Age, dated to the end of the second and the beginning of 
the first millennium b.c, is represented by many sites of Koban culture in 
North Ossetio and generally in the mountainous regions of the North Cau- 
casus. With the exception of a very few gold spiral rings from Ossetia, gold 
objects were not found at Koban culture sites. 

The "Scythian epoch" (last six or seven centuries B.C.) is very rich in gold. 

333 



X-GN2/ 






Reprinted for private circulation from 

THE AMERrCAN JOURNAL OF SEMITIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Vol. LVI, No. i, January, 1939 

PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. 




HENRY FIELD 



X-GNZ/ 



t ■ 

A 



Archaeology in the Ukraine 

u. o. O.K.. 



BY 



HENRY FIELD and EUGENE PROSTOV 



Reprinted from Antiquity for March 1939. PP- 99-i°i 



X-SN2/ 



5 



THE PHYSICAL CHARACTERS OF 

THE MODERN INHABITANTS 

OF IRAN 



BY 

DR. HENRY FIELD 



(Reprinted from "The Asiatic Review," July, 1939) 











"THE ASIATIC REVIEW" 
3, VICTORIA STREET, LONDON, S.W.I 

1939 



A.R.R, 



x- mn 






Reprinted for private circulation from 

The American Journal of Semitic Languages and Literatures 

Vol. LVI, Xo. 3, July, igsg 

PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. 




THE ORIENTAL INSTITUTE ARCHEOLOGICAL REPORT 

U.S.S.R. 



JC-GN2/ '• 

- 

THE IRANIAN PLATEAU 




By HENRY FIELD 



Reprinted from /\ X I /\ April 



il 1940 



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ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCHES IN THE U.S.S.R., 1938-1939 



HENRY FIELD and EUGENE PROSTOV 




10 

8 
46 



Reprinted from American anthropologist, Vol. 42, No. 2, 
April-June, 1940 



X-GNZ/ 









U.S.S.R. 

AN EXCERPT FROM THE ORIENTAL INSTITUTE ARCHEOLOGICAL 
REPORT ON THE NEAR EAST 




HENRY FIELD and EUGENE PROSTOV 



Reprinted for private circulation from 

The American Journal or Semitic Languages and Literatures 

Vol. LVII, No. 2, April 1940 



PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. 



tl 



Field, Henry 
1940. The "Mongoloid Spot" in Turkey and Iraq. 
Am, J. Pays. Anthrop., v. 27, no. 1, June 29. 



g¥^JJ# 



Physical anthropology 
Genetics 



Homo 



PRESS OF 

THE WISTAR INSTITUTE 

OF ANATOMY AND BIOLOGY 

PHILADELPHIA 



u n 



V 



U.S.SJR. 



EXCERPT FROM THE ORIENTAL INSTITUTE ARCHEOLOGICAL 
REPORT ON THE NEAR EAST 




HENRY FIELD and EUGENE PROSTOV 



/ 



Reprinted for private circulation from 

The American Journal of Semitic Languages and Literatures 

Vol. LVII, No. 3, July 1940 



PBINTED IN THE C.S.A. 



LIST OF DOCUMENTS MICROFILMED, 1941 — 1948 

by 
HENRY FIELD 



Introduction. -- The following articles have been placed on microfilm in 
the American Documentation Institute (ADI), 1719 N Street, N. W., Wash- 
ington 6, D. C, where microfilm or photostat copies may be purchased. 
This material consists of the following: 

(a) Original contributions. 

(b) Articles, Statistical Tables, and photographs supplementing pub- 
lished materials. 

Since publication costs have increased to such an extent during the 
past decade, I decided to place on microfilm in ADI all raw data of anthro- 
pometric statistics, supplementary photographs, and some original texts of 
Russian articles published. In this way the material (3970 pages) is avail- 
able as microfilm or photostat copies. 

I have prepared the following list of microfilmed material in ADI, 
which supplements my anthropogeographical studies of Southwestern Asia, 
begun in 1925. In addition, articles on Soviet archeology have been in- 
cluded. The Russian publications have been presented to the Peabody 
Museum at Harvard. 

For convenience, the material has been arranged in the following 
groups: Southwestern Asia, USSR, Europe, China, Caribbean, South 
America and Miscellanea. 

My gratitude must be expressed to Mr. Watson Davis, Director of 
Science Service in Washington, and long-time exponent of microfilming 
and to Mr. H. L. Flemer, Bibliofilm Service, Room 1543, South Building, 
U. S. Department of Agriculture, Washington 25, D. C, who supervised 
the microfilming for the American Documentation Institute. 

The reader is also referred to my "Bibliografia" in Boletin Biblio- 
grafia de Antropologia. Americana, vol. 9, pp. 325-333, 1946, printed in 
Mexico City, 1947. 

2713 Dumbarton Avenue, N. W. May 11, 1949 

Washington 7, D. C. 



y-<?A/j/ 

.Fs- 




NOTES ON MEDICINAL PLANTS 

A- G-M 2/ USED IN TEPOZTLAN, 
• ?S MORELOS, MEX. 1 

By Henry Field 
(United States) 

Sumario 

El autor nos presenta una interesante Hsta de plantas 
medieinales utilizadas en la farmacopea indigena de Te- 
poztlan, Estado de Morelos (Mexico) ; los datos fueron reco- 
gidos por el Dr. Field, graeias a la informacion de una 
curandeia de dicha iocaiidad llamada Maria de Jesus de 
Ayala. La Hsta comprende 36 referencias, cada una de las 
cuales especifica el nombre en castellano, el nombre en n,a- 
huatl.^el nombre cientifico, cuando es posible, la enfermedad 
para que se usa, su pieparacion y prescripcion. Esta aporta- 
eion cs complemento de la lista que el Dr. Redfield, bien 
conccido por sus valiosos trabajos etnograficos en Tepoztlan, 
publico en 1328 con el titulo de "Remedial Plants of Tepoz- 
tlan. A Mexican Folk Herbal". 

Introduction 

In order to complement and supplement the ethnohotanical notes 
published by Redfield 2 and because I had collected similar data* in 
Iran and Iraq, the following notes were obtained from the leading 
curandera of Tepoztlan, Maria de Jesus de Ayala. to whom patients 
also come from the outlying barrios and neighboring villages. Ma- 
ria, who is about sixty-five years old. lives in a single-room adobe 
house, about 20 X 15 feet. Just inside the door stands a cane bed which 
is used for patients, guests or sleeping. Another similar bed faces the 
door. A third is pushed against the wall to the right of the entrance. 
From the ceiTTng hang dried herbs used in her medicine. On the floor 

1 This list was very kindly cheeked in part by Dr. Faustino Miranda and 
Dr. Maximino Martinez in the Institute) de Biologia, Lago de Chapultepec. Mexico 
City. For special references see Maximino Martinez. "Las plantas Medieinales de 
Mexico*'; Luis G. Cabrera, "Plantas curativas de Mexico". Third ed.. Mexico. 1945; 
and Pio Arias Carvajal, "Plantas que euran y plantas que matan", Mexico. For 
general botanical references to Tepoztlan see Debora Ramirez Cantu. "Nntas eene- 
rales sohre la vegetaeion de la Sierra de Tepoztlan, Mor. 1"' presented in 1944 as 
a thesis to the Departamento de Biologia. Universidad Naeional de Mexico, and 
"Algunas plantas notables de Tepoztlan, Mor.". Annies del Instituto de Biologia 
1945, vol. 16, N° 2, pp. 353-357. 

2 Robert Redfield. "Remedial Plants of Tepoztlan: A Mexican Folk Herbal", 
Journal of the Washington Academy :>f Sciences, April 19, 1928, vol. 18, N* 8 
pp. 216-226. 

3 David Hooper and Henry Field, Useful Plants and Druge of Iran and hay. 
Field Museum of Natural History, Botanical Series, 1937, vol. 9, N' 3, pp. 71-241. 



America Indigena. — Vol. XIII, N? 4. — Octubre, 1953. 



X-6N 21 
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ELTO MODIGLIANI 



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NELLA FAMIGLIA E NELLA SOCIETA 






Italia NUOVA AHT0I,06IA, Yoi. XXIII, Ferie III 

(Kascicolo del 1° Settembre 1889) 



ROMA 

TIPOGRAFIA DELI,A CAMERA DEI DEI'L'TATI 

(STABILIHKNTI DEI. FIBRENo) 

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Dott. ELIO MODIGLIANI 



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con una Carta originate del viaggio. 



ROMA 

PRESSO LA SOCIETA GEOGRAFICA ITALIANA 
Via del Collegia Romano, 26. 

1891 



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PUBBLICATO A CUKA 

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COMMEMORAZIONE 



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PAOLO MANTEGAZZA 



Estratto dalTA-cftrao per ? Antvopologia e la FJnologia 
Vol. XL. fasc. 8.°-4.° — 1910 



Jfc 



FIRENZE 

TIPOGRAFIA 1)1 MARIA NO.EIOOI 

Via San Gailo, N. 31. 

1911 



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ELIO MODIGLIANI 



IL TATUAGGIO DEGLI INDIGENI 

DELL' ISOLA SIPORA 



ARCIPELAGO MENTAVEI 



Estratfco tMi'ArcJuvio per TAntrapoloyia <■ la Etnoloyia 
Vol. XL, fase. 3.°-4.° — liHO 



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FIRENZE 

T I P G R A F I A DI MARIANO RICC1 
Via San (lallo, N. 31. 

1911 



E. M D I G L I A N I 



1NDAGINI SU ALTRE GROTTE 

DEI PRESSI DI TOIRANO 



LIGUK I A 



Estratto dall' Arrhicio [><i- V Anfi'opofoffia <• lo Etnaiot/h 
Vol. XLTV Fast. 1." — 1914. 




F1RKNZK 

T 1 POGH A V 1 A I> I M. 1! 1 r (' 1 
Via San Gallo. 21. 31 

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E. MODIGLIANI 



L' opera del Comitato per le Ricerche 

di Paleontologia umana in Italia 

nell'anno 1913 



Eatratto dall' Arckivio per V Antro/joloyki t la Etnologm 
Vol. XLIV, Fase. l.° — 1914 




FIRENZE 

T T P O a H A V I A D 1 M. H I C C I 
Via San Gallo, N. 31 

1914 















MODIGLIAM. — L'opera del Comitato nel 1914. 

II primo anno di vita del nostro Comitato fu un periodo di 
orientamento e di prova. Nel lf'14. trovata orrnai la nostra via, 
abbiamo potuto seguire un deliberato programme meglio diretto 
ai fini che ci siamo imposti. 

E cioe da una parte si sono aggrediti problemi fonclamentali 
della cronologia qnaternaria — come quello della suecessione della 
industria di tipo mousteriano alia, fades a manufatti amigdaloidi — 
e Taltro della fauna che al mousteriano si accompagna in Ita- 
lia ; ed a tale scopo abbiamo portato le ricerche sui terrazzi 
umbri del Tevere ed a Scalea, ossia in localita che per molti 
indizi sembravano adatte a risolvere tali questioni. 

Dall'altra parte abbiamo voluto rendere piu sistematica l'esplo- 
razione delle grotte italiane non disperdendo ie nostre forze piu 
qua o piu la, ma concentrandole su una serie di caverne d'una 
stessa regione ; per modo da controllare i resultati d'una ricerca 
con quelli di deposit! similiari e prossimi e — ■ una volta tro- 
vati in questa grotta i depositi pleistocenici — da aumentare 
notevolmente la probability di reperti relativi all' uomo fossile, 
che sono quelli che piu c' interessano. La serie di grotte su cui 
fermammo la nostra scelta fu quella delle Alpi Apuane e piu 
specialmente del loro versante versiliese : ne esplorammo mol- 
tissime e 1' esplorazione fu come vedremo proficua. 



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of Canada *3\ 

I9l0tol960 

Loris S. Russell 




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ARCHAEOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS IN CENTRAL ASIA, 1917-37 



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Henry Field and Eugene Prostov 



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REPRINTED FROM VOL. V, PT. 2, OF ARS ISLAMICA: MCMXXXVIII