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Full text of "Yackety yack [serial]"

C6e Ifliratp 

of ll)e 

{Hnluetsitp of Bout Carolina 




Collection of iI2ottS Catolinfana 
from tge %ibtatv. of 

Zebulon Vance Waiser 

1864-1940 
presented by his family 

C5T8 

V ?^ - 



UNIVERSITY OF N.C, AT CHAPEL HILL 

llllllllllillillllll 
00033984877 

This hook must not 
he taken from the 
Lihrary huildin^. 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

University of Nortii Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://www.archive.org/details/yacketyyackseria1910univ 





1 




f arkrtg f ark 



NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TEN 




CONTENTS 



'-/ 



/ / 



Dedication 6 

JosHiA Wauvee Gore S 

Board of Editors 10 

Frontword 12 

Faculty 14 

Calendar 18 

Senior Circus 21 

Senior Class 2(5 

Statistics 21-64 

History 65 

Junior Class 68 

Group 6n 

Roll 70 

History 70 

Memorial 78 

SoPHosioRE Class 81 

Group 82 

Roll S3 

History 80 

Freshman Class 93 

Group 94 

Roll 95 

Graduate Class 114 

Co-Eds 115 

Law Class 117 

Group lis 

Statistics 122-124 

Faculty at Raleu.ii 127 

Senior JIedical Class 12S 

Stati.stics 129-135 

Second Year JIedics 137 

Group 136 

First Year ilEDics 130 

PRE-ilEDICS 142 

Pharmacy 145 

The Dialectic Society 150 

The Piiilanthroimc Society 165 

Debates 160-177 

Musical Association 327 

Band 325 

German Club 265 

Y. M. C. A 275 

Brotherhood of St. Andrew 279 

PUBLICA'nONS 283 

Press Association 271 



Fraternities 179 

A K E 183 

B e n ISO 

2 A E 195 

Z ^k 201 

A T 207 

K A 213 

2 N 219 

K 2 225 

n K A 231 

* A e 237 

<!> X 243 

n T <!■ 2-19 

Xox-Fraternityman 252 

Plii Beta Kappa 254-256 

(iorgon's Head 259 

Gimjrhouls 261 

Golilen Fleece 263 

Our Artists 152 

Dramatic Club 335 

Snap Shots 332 

Ball Managers 281 

Commencement Marshals 280 

Athletics 291 

Officers 292 

Coaches 293 

Football 205 

Baseball 299 

\\earers of "N. C." 303 

Team ilanagers 304 

Team Captains 305 

University Athletics 300 

Traclc Team 309 

Class Football 311-315 

Sophomore Baseball 316 

Tennis 317 

Football Expressions 374 

A Culture Course. Sketch 151 

A Notice, Poem 100 

And So It Goes, .S7,-rtc/i 116 

A Short History of the U. N. C 101 

At Home — Ax College 125 

Before and Aftkr 286 

(iUARDiAN of the Bell. Sketch 330 

Ll-MERICKS 323 







Ou) Pres., I'vciii 150 

Our Colors, Poem 272 

Song of the Jellyfish. I'utiii 25 

That Curving Cheek, I'ocm 329 

The Stroli-er, Poem fll 

Those Beautiful Eyes. Poem i'M) 

To Her, Purm 2(18 

Rumors 287 

Vive La Philosopiiie 153 

When Roses Bloom, Poem 282 

Willie's Off, Poem 33li 

Clubs 337 

Alamance County Club 342 

Bridge Committee 370 

Buies Creek Club 301 

Bimcombe County Club 307 

Cosmopolitan Club 341 

Culian Club 343 

Cavalry 371 

Duplin County Club 351 

Guilford County Club 357 

lamonagrouch 373 

Iredell County Club 3(i3 

Johnston County Club 347 

Lincoln County Club 35!l 



i[trklenl)urg County Clul) 305 

JIoore-Lee County Club 34(i 

Oak Ridge Club 353 

Pitt County Club 302 

Kaeford Institute Club 349 

Robeson County Club 355 

Rockingham County Club 354 

Rutherford College t lub 368 

Rowan County Club 358 

"The Coop" 339 

Trinity Park Club 350 

Warrenton High Sclmo] Cluli 345 

Webb School Club 360 

Whitsett Club 348 

Historical and Scientific Societies. . . 328 

Drags 377 

Foolish Calendar 392 

Foolish E-\aminations 391 

In .\lemoriam. Comic 383 

.Managers' Club 386 

ilental Reservation 370 

Songs 385 

Sparks 384 

The Har Teel 387 

Advertisements 397 






Co 

former 15>rofcssor of l£>f)psirs 

toe DeDicate tljis tentf) uolumc of tJ)c ^nckct^ g^acfe 

as a mark of tf)c respect aiiD esteem of tJ)e 

stu Dents of tftis Oniuersitp 



//. 



Joshua Walker Gore 



JOSHl'A WALKEIl gore, eii.i^iiieer, iilnsieist. Inventor, and professor of 
physics in tin- I'nivfi-sity of ^'oi-tIi Carolina, l)orn in Frederick C'onnty, 
Virginia, on the 10th of Jannarv, 1852, was the son of ]Mahlou Gore and 
Sidney Sophia (Gather) Gore. His earliest ancestor in America was his 
paternal great-grandfather, John (ioro. who came from England as one of a 
colony of Friends and setrk'd in London ('oiuity. X'irginia, ahont 1778. His 
grandfather was Thomas Gore and his grandmother Sarah Walker. His 
maternal great-grandfather came from jSTorthern Ireland shortly after the Revo- 
lutionary \Yar and settled in Frederick County, Virginia. The family had 
originally gone from Scotland, and were of the Covenanters. His maternal 
grandfather, James Gather, was liorn in Glasgow: and his matei'ual grand- 
mother, Nancy Howard, was a native of Belfast, Ireland. James Gather enlisted 
in the War of 1812; he represented his county in the State Legislature in the 
early forties, and was a mendier of the Secession Convention of 1801, voting 
against that measure. ri)on the fir-;t rumor of invasion by Federal siddiers, 
however, he raised a company of home guartls. S\ich is the family hist(]ry of 
the breed, a stock that has given to the country some <if its strongest men. 

Mr. Gore's father, who was a farmer and merchant, died in 18()0, when 
ilr. Gore was but eight years old, and he was deprived of a father's guidance; 
but the devoted mother was both father and mother to the boy. 

He was prepared for college at Loudon N'alley Academy, was a student at 
Richmond College for two years, and spent two yeai-s at the Fuiversity of 
A'irginia, making his degree of Civil Engineer there in 1875. He then spent 
two years at Johns Hopkins (1870-78) as fellow in nuithematics, paying espe- 
cial attention also to physics. 

From his fellowship at Johns Hopkins ^Ir. (xore went to a professorship 
of physics and chemistry in Southwestern Bajjtist I'niversity, and in 1881 
became associated with Colonel Venable in the department of mathematics in 
the University of Virginia. From ^'irginia ]Mr. Gore was called to the I'ni- 
versity of North Carolina in 1882, as j)rofessor of jjhysies. 

At the University of North Carolina he made an en\iable reputation as a 
teacher, and, as dean of the L'niversity, helped to bear the burdens of four admin- 
istrations. He was wholly responsible for the electric light plant, and in large 
measure for the heating and water plants. He was greatly interested in and 



'/. 



aided in the fcmnding of the rniversity Press. The School of Ai)piied Sciences, 
of which he was made dean, owed its establishment largely to his initiative. His 
remarkable executive ability and excellent business sense brought him many 
flattering offers from beyond the liounds of the State, but he preferred to remain 
with the University of North Carolina. 

On Xovember 9, 1883, Professor Gore married iliss ^largaret Coriuthia 
Williams, daughter of l\e\'. J. Will Williams of Tialtimorf, with wlmm his hdiiie 
life was singularly hap]iy. 

Mr. Gore departed this life April 9, 1908, and his good deeds live after 
him. The editors of Yacketv Ywk dedicate this number of the annual to him 
in loving memory of his distinguished services to the University, and his readi- 
ness to help in every way everything that was for the n])lift of the individual 
student or of the student budy. 

CoLLiKi! Cobb. 



\. 



V 



g^ackctp gack OBDitors 



i;i)ITOR-lX-CI[IKF 

THdMAS .1. ikMAXlS. Di. 

BUSINESS MAXAliERS 

COLLIN B. RUFFIX. Piii. 
L. DeK. BELDKX, K i; 






COMMITTEES 



ART 




K. S. TANXF.K. 2 X. Chainmui 
.1. Til LETT, i; A E .1. (il'lOX. A K K 

D. l. struthehs. Ben 

LlTiJiATl Hi; 

D. B. SLOAN. Pin.. Vhairman 

A. H. WOLFE, Di. G. GRAHAM. Di. 

,T. H. BOrSHALL. OKA 

IIUMOI! 

C. THOMl'SON. JR., I'm.. Vhniniiiin 
E. JONES. Z * J. T. JOHNSTON, K S 

D. L. STRUTHERS. B B H 

PHOTO.S 

B. L. FENTRESS. l)l.. Clininniiii 

C. GI!.\HAM. 1)1. \V. li. ROinLW. A T <> 

ST.VTISTICS 

I. F. WITHERINGTON. Pin., Chuirmnii 

V. (i. \A HFINEV, <I> A e J. GLION. A K E 

D. B. SLOAN, Phi. 

ATHLETICS 

J. Tl I.LETT. :S A E. Cliainiiini 
L F. WrillKUlMIION. I'm. \V. TL POWELL. K A 

()RG.\N"IZATIOX.S 

.1. n. BOLSHALL. B K A. Chainmni 
W . H. POWELL. K A W. B. RODMAN, .i T P. 

SPECIAL 

E. .JONES. Z *. Chinrnian 
F. G. WHITNEY, <!> A 6 



//. 




^. 







Frontword 



AFTER many months of toil, iuvolviiii;- Ixith pleasure and 
(1is:i]i]inintinent, wc have at hist adih'd Volume X of 
the ^'ackkty Yack to its long list of predecessors. We 
have done our best, and we hope that the syni])athetic readers 
of this book will appreciate our efforts where appreciation is 
due, and be lenient with us for any of our little oversights and 
shortcomings. 

We have tried to make the "i'AeKKiv VAri-c a pleasant 
summary (jf the events (if the ]ires:>nf college year, and if at any 
]ilace in these pages any student or any member of the faculty 
feels a sting, let them know that nothing vicious has been 
written knowingly. 

Hoping that this volume of the Yackktv Vack has accom- 
])lished its aim in our every-day life at Carolina, we respect- 
fully submit it to our sn])reme critics — our readers. 

Editoes. 



/. 



'L 





I--/^GULVY. 



jTacultp 



\v 




Fkancis Pkeston Venable, Pn. D., D. Sc. LL. D.. President. 

Student of the University of Viiginia and of the Universities of Bonn, Goeltingen, 
and Berlin; A. M., Ph. D.,' University of Goettingen; LL. D., University of Pennsyl- 
vania. University of Alabama, and South Carolina College; D. Sc, LaFayette College; 
Fellow of London Chemical Society; Jlember of German Chemical Society; American 
Science Association; Phi. Society: Author of "Qualitative Analysis;"' "History of 
Chemistry;" "Inovganic Chemistry'" (with Professor J. L. Howe); ''Development of 
the Periodic Law.'" 
Kemp Plummer Battle, LL. D., I'mfr-ssor EiiierUiis of Hislory. 

A. B.. A. M., University of North Carolina; LL. D.. Davidson College; Tutor, 
Professor and President, University of North Carolina. Di. Society; Author of various 
historical treatises on S'orth Carolina; among others. "History of the Supreme Court 
of Nortli Carolina;"' ''Early History of the City of Raleigh;" "Colonial Leaders of 
tlie Cliurch of England;"' ■'History of the University of North Carolina." 
Tiio.MA.s Htme. D. D., LL. D.. I'lofessor Emeritus of Eiiiilish Lilrniliirr. 

A. B., A. Jl., D. D., Richmond College; Student. Viiiversity of Virginia; LL. D.. 
Wake Forest College; Phi. Society. 
Wai.tkh Dali.am Toy, II. A., Professor of (lermanie Lanijutifics. 

.M. A., University of Virginia; Student at Leipzig. Berlin. La Sarbonnc. and College 
de France; Phi, Society; Author of a number of editions of text-books of Modern 
Languages. 
EiiEX Ar.EXA.N'DER, Pll. D., LL. D.. Professor of the tlreik LanyiHuie and Literature, and Dean 
of tlie University. 
A. B., Yale; Ph. D.. Maryville; LL. D.. Cniversity of North Carolina; Instructor, 
University of Tennessee; Professor, Ibiil: United States ilinister to Greece. Roumania, 
and Servia; Phi, Society; Skull and Bones. 
William Cai.'«, C. E.. Professor of Matlieniatics. 

North Carolina Jlilitary and Polytechnic Acadi'niy; t ivil Engineer; Professor 
Carolina Military lu.stitute; Professor South Carolina ililitary Academy; Phi. 
Society; Author of "Tlieory of Voussoir Arclies," "Solid and Braced Arches," "Retain- 
ing Walls." "Stresses in Bridges." '"Notes on Geonu'try and Algebra," "Brief Course 
in the Calculus." 
Henry Horace Williams, A, M., 11, 1)., I'rofcssor uf Pliilosoplni. 

A. B., A. M.. University of Nortli Carolina: B. D.. V:ile; Student and Fellow, 
Harvard ; Professor Trinity College ; Phi. Society. 
Henry Van Peters Wilson, Ph. D., Professor of Zoolot/y. 

A. B., Ph. D,, .Johns Hojikins University: Bruce Fellow. Ibid.; Student in Berlin, 
London, Paris; Assistant United States Fish Coniinissiou: Phi Society; Author of 
"Memoirs and Papers in Coni[iarative Emliryology," "Systematic Zoolog;\'," "Experi- 
mental Morphologj'." 
Collier Cobb, Professor of CihUhjii mid M innalmjii. 

A, M,, Harvard Iniversity; lnstr\U'tor. .\lassacluisetts Institute of Technology. Har- 
vard. Boston University; .Assistant United States Geological Survey: IMii, Society: 
has published various works and treatises on scientific subjects. 
Charles Staples Mangum, A. B., M. D.. Professor of .\natonni. 

A. B,. University of North Carolina, il, D,, .retlVrsim .Medical tVdlege, Assistant and 
Demonstrator, Ibid. Gimghonl. 
Edward Vernon Howell, A. B., Ph. CJ.. Dean of the Seliool of Plianmien. 

A. B., Wake Forest College; Ph. G., Philadelphia College of Pharmacy; Gimghoul. 
Mabcu.s Stephens Ciceron Noble, Professor of Pedayogy. 

University of North Carolina. Davidson College; Commandant. Bingham School; 
Superintendent of Schools, Wilmington, N. C. ; Phi Society; Author of "Williams' 
Beginnei-s' Reader,"' North Carolina Supplement to "Maury's Geography;'' Co-editor 
of "Davies Standard Arithmetic." 



14 





Gnuliuiti-cl at Wf-t, Point ; ntlmilca Suiiinifr 



James Camekox JIcRae. LL. D., Dcnn of the School of Law. ^ , , c. • i 

LL. D., Univiersity of North Carolina: Attorney-at-La« : Jiulcte of Superior and 
Supreme Courts; Phi. Society. 
Patrick He.xby Wixstox, Professor of Luir. 
Student U. N. C, University of Texas 
Law School, U. N. C. ; Gimghoul. 
(.•eorce Howe. Ph. D., Professor of the Latin Lniiiiiiiifie nnd Literature. 

A. B., Princeton; Ph. D., ITniversily of Halle; Student at Oxford, l<-iij;laiiil ; 1 In. 
Society; Author of "Fasti sacerdotum P. P. pulicorum ictatis Im]>eri(nvia'" ( Lnpzig. 
B, G, "Teubner, 100,3); Gimghoul, 
.Iosepu Hyde Pr.\tt, Ph, D„ Professor of Economic Geolociy. 

Ph, B.. Ph. D., Yale University; Instructor in Mineralogy. Ibid.; State Mineralogist, 
North Carolina; State Geologist. North Carolina; Phi. Society; Author of 12fl 
pamphlets and books published in North Carolina and United States Geological Sur- 
veys and Scientific .Journals; Gimghoul, 
lAciu.s Polk McGehee. A. B.. LL. B.. Profcisor of L<nr. 

A. B.. LL. B., University of North Carolina; Assoi'iate Kditnr .\incii(an and Kiiiilisli 
Encyclopedia of Law; Phi. Society; .\iithor of "Due Procrss of Law." 
Charles Holmes Herty, Pii. I)„ /Vo/r.v.so/- ../ Chniiixliii. unit [).,in of the Kehool of .\i,i,tir,l 
Science. 
Ph, B„ Univer.sity of Georgia; I'b. 1).. .b.hn- Hopkins UiiivcrMty; Adjunct Pro- 
fessor. University of Georgia; Student. Cnivi'i-ity Zuiicb and (if Berlin; l)i. Society; 
Gorgon's Head. 
Natiiax Wilsox Walker. A. B.. Projessur of Srhool (>, •imil-.diiu,,. 

A. B., University of North Carolina: I'lii. Sm-icty; t»dil Xiinibcr ( liib. 

William De Ber.xiere JIacNider, M, D,. Profrnsor of Phdnniieolojiji (mil Hint, riolo<ii/. 

Assistant in Anatomy, University of North Carolina; JL D,. Ibid.; Graduate Stu- 
dent, University of Chicago (Suiiiiiicrs of inO(i-07) ; (iorgon's Head. 

Charles Lee Raper, Ph, D,, Professor of Economics mid Finmirr. 

Student in Trinity College and Columbia University: Instnutur, 'Iriiiily College: 
Profes.sor, Greenslioro Female College; University Fellow. Columbia University; Ph. \1., 
Columbia Univei-sity; Phi Society: Author of "The Church and Private Schools of 
North Carolina, a Historical Study," "North Carolina, a Study of English Colonial 
Government," "The Principles of Wealth iind Welfai-e." 

Willia.m Morton Dey, A, M,. Professor of Konuimi Lnniniii'iis. 

A. B„ A, M„ Univer.sity of Virginia, Studied in Paris; A. :\I., Harvar.l: Austin 



Fellowship at Harvard; Ph. D.. Harvanl: 
of Rimianee Languages in Universitv of Mis 



Sliidicd in Spain: Assistant Pnd'cssor 
souri. 
David Holuii Dolley. A. M.. M. D., Professor of llistoloiiii iiml Piilholnmi. 

A, B„ A, M„ Randolph-Macon College; M, D.. .T(dins Ilo|ikin-. University: Assistant 
Demonstrator. Western Reserve University, Research, Ibid,. I'.i04-(l(i: Di. Society: 
Gorgon's Head. 
Edward Kidder Graham, A, M., Professor of EniiUsh Lilcroture, Dean of the I' ninrsit ij. 

Ph, B., University of North Carolina: Librarian, Ibid,; Student, llaivard Uni- 
versity; A, M,, Columbia University; Di. Society: Gorgon's Plead. 
Thomas Ruffin. D. C. L., Profcs.ior of Liiir. 

University of North Carolina; LL. l'.„ LL, M.. (icorgetown Uuiversjly; D. C, L., 
Columbia Universitv; Lecturer on Ab'dicil •lurisprudcnci', Xiulli Carolina Medical 
('(dlege, 1006-07; Gimghoul, 
J':dwix JIims, Ph, D., Professor of Eni/lish Lilenil ui-e. 

A. B., Vanderbilt; Ph, l)„ Cornell: lOditor Soiilli Alluiilir Ijiinrliili/: Professor 
ICnglish Literature, Trinity College: .\iUlioi' "bifi' of Sidmy Lanier." 

William Chambers Coker, Ph, D,, /'/o/r.s.so/ of liuliiini. 

B. S,, South Carolina College: Pli, D., .lolins Hopkins IniveiMlv: Student, liii- 
versity of Bonn: Contributed the Bot;inical S<'ction in "'I lie Balianui Islands," 
Macmillan Co,, 1905, 



X^ 




Itistiu. 
(imiluate Stiulciit. Uni- 
Plii. Sofietv. 



Akciiibald He.xuerson. Pii. D.. Professor of I'lirc ilathemalics. 

A. B.. A. M.. Ph. D., University of North Carolina: Graduate Student, University 
of Chicago; Graduate Fellow. Ibid.; Instructor, University College, and the Uni- 
versity of Chicago; Di. Society; Contributor to Journals and Magazines. Scientific 
and Cultural, American and I'"oreign; Gimghoul. 
James Edward Latta. A. 11.. Professor of Eleetrical En(jhu( rinfi. 

Ph. B., A. JI., University of Xorth Carolina; A. M.. Ilnrvanl rniversity; Graduate 
Student, Cornell; Student Engineer. \\'('stinghiiuse Elect lical and Macliinc (o.; Di. 
Society; (Absent on leave 1909). 
JosEi'i! Gregoire ue Rouliiac Hamilton. Ph. D.. Aliiiinii l'i(,f(x'~(,r of Ilixlan/. 

JI. A., University of the South; Ph. D.. Columbia University; Principal Wilming- 
ton High School; Di Society; Gimghoul. 
P. H. Dacgett. Teiiiporury Professor of Elirl lit-til Emiiitr, r'mii. 

Graduate Electrical Engineering. Harvard; Assistant in Engine ring at Harvard; 
Engineer with A. T. and T. C. 
Andrew Henry Patterson, A. M.. Professor of Phi/sics. 

Ph. B., B. E., University of North Carolina; A. V... A. II.. ll.irvaid University; 

Student, University of Berlin and Charlottenberg Technische Ilnchscliule. Germany; 

Student, Cambridge, England; Sphinx Society (University of Georgia); Gimghoul; 

Author of "On Increasing the Frecineney of Electrical tlscillations." (in conjuncture 

with C. H. Arnold). "Some Points on Lightning Protection.", "The Pinch EiTect in 

Undirectional Electrical Discharges." 

Alvin Sawyer Wheeler. Pii. D., Assoeiate Profcssi.r of itrqunif cln 

A. B., Beloit College: A. Jl.. Ph. I)., Harvard University; 

versity of Chicago, Cornell University; Assistant. Harv;ud: 

Thomas Jame.s Wilson, Jr., Ph. D., .4.s-.sorm/c Professor of Laliii. ^ 

A. B., A. M.. Ph. D.. University of North Carolina; Graduate Student. University 
of Chicago (vSummers, 1903 and 1900); Kegistrar. University of North Carolina; 
Di. Society. 
James Edward Mills, Ph. D.. Associate I'rofessor of Pliysical ('hrn\istrii. 

A. B., Davidson College; Ph. D.. University of North Carolina. 
William Stanley Bernard. A. M.. Associalc Professor of Greek. 

Student, Virginia Theological Seminary (Episcopal); A. B., A. 11.. University of 
North Carolina; Lil)rarian. Ibid.; (iraduate Student, University of Chicago ( Sumiiici 
1906); Phi. Society: Gimghinil; Odd Number. 
Marvin Hexdrix Stacy. A. M.. Assoeinle Professor of f'iril Kiiiiiiinriiifi. 

Ph. B., A. M.. University of Xcoth Carolina; Di. Society; tJraduate Student. 
Cornell University. 
Louis Round Wilson, Ph. D., Librarinn and Assoeiate Professor of Lihrnii/ Adiiiiiiislratioii. 

A. B.. A. M., Ph. D.. University of North Carolina ; Di. Society. 
Robert Baker Lawson, M. D., Associate Professor of Anatoinij. Pln/sienl Director. Coneh of 
Vnrsitii I{,i.<sebaU Team. J!)10. 
Student, University of North Carolina: M. D.. University of Maryland. 
Palmer Cobb, Ph. D.. .issnciate Profes-mr of (lirinmi. 

Ph. B.. I'nivei'sity of North Carolina; A. M.. Ph. D.. Columbia University: Student, 
University of .Jena and Kiel University; Gimghoul. 
James Finch Roy.ster. Ph. D.. Associate Professor of Ihe English Lamiiniiie. 

A. B., Wake Forest College; Graduate Student, University of Chicago; Student, 
University of Berlin; Senior Fellow, University of Chicago; Ph. D.. Ibid.; Acting 
Instructor. University of Colorado; Associate. University of Chicago: Gimghoul. 
Henry McGilbert Wagstaff. Ph. D.. Professor of History. 

Ph. B.. University of North Carolina; Ph. D., Johns Hopkins University; Professor, 
Rutherford College (N. C.) ; Acting Professor, Allegheny College (Pa.). 
George McFarlaxd McKik. A. M., Assoeiate Professor of PiiljUc Hpeakiiui. 

A. B., A. M., University of North Carolina: Student. Harvard University. 
Lsaac Hall Manning. M. D., Dean of the MeiUcal Department, i'hniicl llitl. 
John Manning Booker, .\ssociate Professor of English. 

A. B., Johns Hopkins University; studied at Municli, Heidlelierg: Dix-tor's Degree, 
University of Heidleberg. 
Oliver Towles, Associate Professor of the Pomance Languages. 

A. B., University of Virginia; Student at Johns Hopkins University. 



16 



/ 



//y 





Unstniftors anD assistants 



George \Yestox Mitchell. Instructor in Dimrinii. 

Thomas Felix Hickersox. A. M., Inxtiiirtor in Matlionatic 

Harry Nelson Eatox, A. il.. Insfnicfor in Geology. 

James Hoses Graixoek. A. "SI.. Inslruclur in English. 

Adolphe Vermont, Inslnicior in Romance Lnnguaye.i. 

George Kexxeth Graxt Hexky, A. jM.. Instructor in Latin. 

Juliax Colgate Hixes, A. M., Instructor in ilathcnidfir^. 

Thomas Joseph JIcJIaxis, Instructor in Phy-sict. 

C'LAiD Howard, A. il.. Instructor in English. 

COLIX CuTHBEKT ALEXANDER, A. M., Instructor in English. 

JoxAs McCavley Costxer. a. B.. In.itruclor in Muthcnidtics. 

Joiix Grover Beard, Plmr. G., In.^tructor in Pharnuici/. 

Hamdex Htll, S. B., Instructor in Chemistry. 

Walter H, Grimes, Instructor in Lau-. 

KuGENE J. Newell, A. B., Fellow in Chemistry. 

Erxest N. Tillett, A. 51.. Fellow in Chemistry. 

William L. Long, A. B.. Fellow in Greek. 

Harry C. Roberts, A.^>sistant in Anatomy. 

JoHX E. Ray, A. B.. Assistant in Bacteriology. 

Elden Bayley, Assi.itanf in Botany. 

DuxcAX MacRae, S. B., .i.isistant in Chemistry. 

Thomas P. Nash, Jr., Assistant in Chemistry. 

Wn.LiAM M, Gates, A. B., Assistant in Chemistry. 

James H. Wharton, Assistant in Chemistry. 

RosfOE F. AlArsER. A. B.. .-IssLttant in Physiologiral Chrniisl 

William H. Fry. Assistant in Geology. 

Fraxcis E. Wixslow, A. B., Assistant in Gintuni. 

Charles E. McIntosh. Assistant in History. 

James W. Farrior, M. E., .is.sistant in Histology. 

Frank Wrenx, A. B.. Assistant in Histology. 

William S. Coilter. A. B., Fclloa- in Latin. 

James JI. Harper, A.'i.iistant Dcmonstralar in Cli 

William R. Edmonds, .Assistant in Physics. 

Alexander L. Field, A.'i.sistant in Physics. 

Junius S. Koiner, Jr.. Assi.tlant in I'hy.-<ics. 

Hal F. Boatwrigiit, A. B,. A.s.ii.ilant in Zaolagy. 

Orhex W. Hymax, .\.9si.<itan1 in Zoology. 

OTHER OFFICERS 
Walter Dallam Toy. M. A.. Sccntan/ of Ihi' Fanillii 
KiSEX .Vlexaxdkr. Ph. T).. T.T,. I).. Su/iirrisr.r of thr Lihrari, 
Louis Round Wilsox, Ph. D.. Librarian. 
Nax Spottswood Strudwick. Assistant fJhrnrian. 
Robert Baker Lawsox, M. D.. Gymnasium Di reel or. 
.\LBERT Edgar Woltz, A. 51., Ilursar. 
Charles Thomas Woolen, Proctor. 
Thomas James Wilson. Jr.. Ph. D.. Itegislrar. 
Marvin Hexdrix Stacy. A. 51.. Recorder of .Usences. 
Eugene Epperson Barxett, A. B., General Secretary Y. 



vl I'dlholoini 



17 



X. 




Calcn Dae— 31909 



:%~ 



June 7 tu 17 — Suniiner renii for IVaclicrs. 

Juiii' I(i to August 27 — Summer Law School. 

Se|iti'iiilier 1-4 — Wednesday tu Saturdiii/ — Exuniiiialiiins for Itciiidval 

of Conditions. 
September (i-S — Monday In W'rdiii sday — Kxaniiiiatiims for Ailiiiis- 

sion. Re<iistration. 
Se]itc>nilier 9 — Tliiiisday — Lectures be^in. College Night. 
September 12— N»«</./.i/— V. .\1. C. A. Weleome Meeting. Si>eeeli by 

Mr. .1. W. liailey. of Raleigh. 
October |-2—7/(r.sv/n,y— University Day. Acl.lre^e- by I're-ident 
.\litcliell. of the University of South Carcilina, and Attonuy- 
tieneral Biekett. 
Xoveniber 25 — Thanksgiving Day. 
December '23 — Thursday — Cliristnias Recess begins. 

1910. 
January 3-4 — Monday to Tuesday — Registration. 

January 7-9 — I'riday to Snndai/ — Dr. David Starr -lordau. President 
of Lelaml Stanford, Jr.. University, deliver^ the .lohu Calvin 
.\lcXair Leetvires. 
January 17-27 — Mid-Year E.\aminations. 
Januarj- 28 — Friday — Lectures begin. 
February o — Wednesday — Law Class goes liefore Supreme Court for 

license. 
February 22 — Tuesday — Washington's birthday. 
April 30 — ^laturday — Election of Commencement Orators. 
.May HI— .l/oH,/<///— Last day for delivery of (Jraduation Tliese> at 

Registrar^ Ollice. 
May iH^Salurday — Senior (lass Day Society Re\niion and Inter- 
Society Banquet, 
ilay 29 — Sunday — Baccalaureate Sermcju by Dr. Diek.son, of Chicago. 

V. M. C. A. Sermon. 
May 30 — Monday — Alumni Day. 

Morning — Address by .lunius I'arker. of Xew York. Class 
Reunions. Alumni l.unclieon at Commons' Hall. Meeting 
of Board of Trustees. 
Evening — Inter-Society Debate. I'aeulty Reception. 

May 31 — Tuesday — Commencement Day. 

Morning — Commencement Address by Cluirle, Foster Smith. 

of the University of Wisconsin. (Jradualiu^ E.\ereise-. 
Afternoon — Afternoon Hop. 
Xight— Senior Ball. 
tunc 1 — Wednesday. 

Morning — Cotillion. 

Afternoon — German. 

igh^f/nal Ball. 



m 



^C 



\ 




• IdiiN .liiNKs l!(ii;i;i!rs. A. U.. ls:)S. 
Will. 1AM IIknuv Day. Isol. 

IlKN.IAMlN lloWKII, l\ll!KI>Ari!l( K. 1 S'.IS. 
liYliAN WaIKINS \\ IIITI-Il I.I), -\. I'... 1S4!I. 

(iAn s \ViiiTKii:i.i>, IS.iii. 
(;i;()H(;k WiiiwiKLii. isri.i. 
Wii.Lis Alston, A. H.. IsiiT. 
William Samiel Davidson, mil. 
.loii.x Worth >kALi.i.sTi;i!. I'm. I'... ISii,"). 
Reiisk.x David Rkid. IST'.l. 
.loiix Fkankm.n .Maddhv, IS'.is. 
Tiio.mas (1. AkMuiiKAL. l!M):i. 
Chaules Ma-M.v l?i siikk, ISd.S. 
•T. H. CoopKii. l!ill. 
W. I. C'A.MKHdN. nil:). 
W. T. DouK II. l!il;i. 




j[3ature iFakirs 



THE SENIOR CIRCUS— 1909 

MANACiERS: 

RICHARD EAMES KOBERT WAT'lS JOHN JOHNSTON 

THE PARTS 

Venus (Ic Milo. the fat Lady Milo Jones 

Tlie Ham-Bone Skeleton Sam lluvdle 

J'.aBa, tlie Brainless Kemp Battle 

Tlie Wild Man \V. 1). Cox (She Hals 'Em Alive) 

The .Mellin's Food Bahy Don MeUae. and T. J. Aniistionf; (I'se Mellin's Fooil) 

Strong Man Uriah Baueom 

Barkers: TilleU, Winshnv. Umslend, (on, ilastcn. 
Clowns: Hanes, JIanninf;. Don >Iel!ae. I'xdlaniy. JcriTiiin, S|iiicr. Ihiy. 

MEKAGERIE 

Bear, Professor George Duncan McRae 

Girafle Ben Jones and V. C. Eilvvards 

Lion fj. O. Rogers 

Eleplumt .Monlsin<;er ;ind Credle 

(Animals are Dangerous. Don't go Too Near.) 

21 





:^^i^. 







il / ./ 




TWIXT THE CUP AND THE LIP 

Squire Barbee Bob McNeil 

Dr. Ven Russell Robinson 

Hornv-hanil Henry ilajor Willis 

Jug Wliital:er „. .S. V. Bowen 

]?oatwright Boatwriglit 

'J'illett Bruce Lewis 

Frank Graliani H. K. C'lonts 

MINSTRELS 

Middle-ilan W. M. Gaddy 

Dr. Robert O. J. Coffin 

Tank's Koon George Thomas 

Bill McDade W. A. Houck 

"Po" Dave J. W. Umstead 

Horny-baud Henry Norman Willis 

"Johnson" H. P. Osborne 

"Rube" J. M. Costner 

Kenneth Dunston J. H. Allen 

Policeman R. M. Wilson 

Policeman F. P. Graham 

WHANG DOODLE BAND 

Leader C. F. Kirkpatrick 

First Cornet H. C. Barbee 

Second Cornet E. C. Byerly 

Horn C. C. Frazier 

Horn L A. Moore 

Drum W. J. Parrish 





^A 



Cfte ^ong of tf)c 3icIIpft'sf) 



Respectfully ileilic-ateil tu "Lady" Vreeland, 
"Fatty" Harris, and "Slimy"' Long. 



As the waves slip over my cuticle sleek, 

They tickle my soul with glee, 
Aiid I shake with a visceral, saccherine joy. 

In the place where my ribs should be. 
For Fm simply a lump of limpid lard. 

With a gluey sort of a wish 
To pass my time in the oozing slime, 

In the home of the Jellyfish. 



\ 



\\ 



But I'm happy in having no bones to break 

In my unctuous, wavering form. 
And I haven't a trace — nor indeed any place 

For the dangerous vermiform ; 
For I'm built on the strictest economy ]ilan. 

And the model was made in a rush, 
While essaying to think almost dirves mr tu drink, 

For I'm simply a mass of musli. 

At night, when I slide on the sandy beach, 

And the moonbeams pierce me llirough. 
The tears arise in my gelatine eyes. 

And I gurgle a sob or two; 
For I wonder — ah me! — in the time to come. 

When the days are no lunger young, 
What Fish's digestion will suH'ir congestion, 

Wlicii till' end of inv son" is sun". 



/, 




OFFICERS 

A. H. WOLFK President 

W. R. EDJIOXDS Vice-President 

J. A. HIGHSillTH Secretary 

S. F. TEAGUE Treasurer 

T. P. NASH Poet 

D. R. KRAJIER Statistician 

J. M. REEVES Prophet 

J. R. NIXON Historian 

W. H. RAMSOUR Architect of Last Will and Testament 



y\ 



0. 




Lenoir Thomas Avert, ilorgnnton, N. C. 
Bid mc discourse, I loill enchant thine ear. 

Age 20; height 5 feet 111,4 inches; weight 150. 

German C lub : Di Society ; Y. M. C. A. ; Tennis 
Association; Athletic Association; Class Tennis 
Team (1): Class Baseball Team (1. 2. 3); Cap- 
tain ( 2 ) ; Class Football Team ( ] . 2, 3, 4 ) , Captain 
(4) ; Assistant Manager Varsity Baseball Team (3) ; 
Chemical Journal Chib; Historical Society; Presi- 
dent Bingliam School Club; President German Club 
(4); Textile Engineering; Chief Ball Manager 
Commencement ( 4 ) ; A T fi. 

"Jiidyc" 

An all 'round man, student, atlilete, ladies' man, 
dance leader, joke-artist, and good egg. One of our 
mainstays in class athletics. Has helped 1910 win 
many a game on both the gridiron and diamonil. 
•fudge likes to tell his jokes, of which liis stock is 
limited. 




oCi/yioxA (. [i u-Ovu. 



CoNNTE Cazette Bahhioe. Diirliiini, X. C. 

For mi/ pari if a lie mail do Hire ffrace, 
I'll f/ild it iritli the hapjiirsl term 1 have. 

Age 20; height 6 feet; weight 148. 

100008 Trinity College; Athletic Associati.m ; 
Tennis Association; Historical Society, Cliemical 
•Tciurnal Chil); Vicp-Presi(hMit 'I'rinitv Park School 
( lul) (4). 

■T. r." 

Was iJi-diiKitcd from Trinity in mir .lunior year. 
Looks as if he knows more tlnin he will tell, but we 
doubt it. Spends most of his time smoking a pipe, 
and telling yarns whose chief ]ioint is their mar- 
vielous divergence from trulh. 




;\. 



I W- 




Michael Setii Beam, Henry. X. C. 



//■ II he 
rnruiblr ir 



possible, as much as Urth in you, live 
nil all wen. 



ulit .') feet S inelie^: weiglit )o(). 
Di Suoietx : V. JI. C. A.; Atiiletic AssDciaticm: 
Hi^tniieal Siiciety: t'oimiieneement Debater. 

■■Mil.f- 

A calm and peaeeful mail. I'ligages in neillier 
V, iaiij;ii' ■ nnr disputes. .\sks nc questions, Imt pi'.i- 
Mies liis •■(lip" in an orderly and decorous manner. 
Has not taken tlie trouble to beeome acquainted witb 
nianv of us. 



Loris 1)1-: Keyskb P.euiek. Wilniintiton. N. C. 



Hint he has mi faiill. 

.■) ine^ie^: weifilit Hill. 
(1, 2): Captain Scrub and 



His oiilij fault 

Age "21 ; heiglit ."> 

Scrub Football '' ei 
Var.sitv Sub. (2): Varsitv Football Team (:!. 41: 
Scrub Baseball Team { 1 ) ; " Vice-President Xew Han- 
over County Club; Cliemical -Journal Club; Athletic 
Association; Class Baseball Team (2,-3); Ba.skct 
ball Association; Member of X. C. Club; Assistant 
Leader Panbebnic Iloji ( :i I : Commencement P. •;! 
Manager (4); Cirmaii Club; K i). 

•■Dirkir 
Is put up ill a small ]iackage but is all tlicn- wbcii 
it comes to a sliow down, \\lien Dicky hits the line 
there is usually son" tiling doing. Is one uf the 
Business Managers of the Yackety Yack, but that 
doesn't seem to have hurt his reputation. Got in 
the habit of taking first French in his Freshman 
year and hasn't cured himself of it yet. As popular 
as he deserves to be — which is saying rather much. 




/.M'- /iJJ^ 



y 



//. 




c<r CA^^t'-i^ji^,^ ^B-'i^^TLAj-T^ 



Levy Ames Browx, Greenville. X. C. 
Oh (joUlen hingcx moving. 

Age 18: lieiglit 5 feet 11 inches; weight 170. 

Pie.sident Pitt County Club: Phi Soeietv: Scrub 
Football Team (2. 3) : ' Varsity Football Team (4) : 
Wearer of X. C. flub: Track "Squad (3): Associate 
Kditor Til,- Hid. 

"Antes'* 

Ames has a very large head, and it has been said 
that if his body were as large as his liead, he would 
not have hail to work so hard to make his N. C. 
sweater. 1 he council saw fit to take his room-mate 
from him last fall, and he has been a widower ever 
since. Has such a beautiful swing to his walk that 
he appears to be dancing when he is merely saiuiter- 
ing around the campus. Is an exponent of the so- 
called Honor Svstem. '1 he voungest man in the 
class. 



\ 1 



// 

llril 



Edwin W.m.i. IShtaxt. I.a\irinliurg. X. !' 
■rr,l w/in Dial cr.r 



Ih, itiihlrHl 
or •■III II III, 



Age 20: hoight ."> feet S indies: 
Phi Society: Atlih^tic Assm-iation : 

■■Cuiisiii lUUIir" 



■i-iglit 1(1(1. 
V. -M. C. 



Quiet and soft of speecli. Looks like a saint, but 
lielies his looks. His pious mien and well-fed ])er- 
son might lead one to suspect that he was a rein- 
carnation of a iiinnk of the good old Mediipval 
times. A mixture of philosophy, Stoicism, and 
silence. 




£ . Id. fi^. o^-^ 




John Heck Boushaix, Raleigh, N. C. 

Ill the spring a young man's faiwy lightly funis to 
thoughts of love. 

Age 19; height feet; weiglit 155. 

Y. M. C. A.: Athletic Association: Phi Society; 
Basket-ball Association ; Press Association; Track 
Squad (1, 3, 4) ; President Wake County Club (3) ; 
Vice-President Y. M. C. A. (3, 4) ; Manager Class 
Football Team (4) ; Assistant JIarshal Commence- 
ment (3): Associate Editor Vackety Yack (4|: 
Senior Banquet Speaker: German Club; n K A. 

-Jacir 

Takes life seriously, and is a hard worker. He 
tried for three years to overtake a track sweater, 
but liasn't quite succeeded yet. His only weakness 
is girls. Jack loves so many of the dear creatures 
that he can't help being somewhat of a flirt. Aspires 
to be a lieart smaslier. 



^/d«--,^-.d^ 



Clemext Coote Brow.N'E. .Jr.. Wihiiin^iton. X. C. 

I'liile nm I in my s/jcfc/i. 

Age 21; heiglit 5 feet S inches; weiglit 140. 
(4ym Team (1. 2. 3) Gym X. C. (2); Wearer of 
(lull; New Hanover County Club. Gimgbonl; 

"CiKiIrr" 

A deciple of -ilajor." Has taken all tlie Matli. 
in College, and is always armed with a slide-rule. 
A quondam g\ mnast, but of late the "rheumatiz" 
lias put an eml to his convulsions on the horizontal 
bar. Is the most lluent and graceful cusser in the 





Sajiuel Coopersmitii, New York, N. Y. 

To Truth's house thcic is ii single door, 
Which is experience. 

Age 22; height 5 feet 10 inches; weight 100. 
Di Society; Print Shop Brigand. 

"Koopcr" 

A man with a history. First started out as a 
iled, last year he was a Sopli, and now we find 
liim a Senior. His strong points are Chemistry and 
speech-maicing. Of liis acconiplisliment in tlie latter. 
lie gave us ample proof at our chiss banquet in 
December. Hails from East Side, and is a man of 
many e.xperienees. 



^to*«-ccey^!i»^Hii/t<j/*-»*<^^^ 



STERLI^■^. RriTix f'ARHTMiTO.N, Diirliani. X. ('. 

'Tis rciiiurldlilr thiil Ihi-ii hill niosl irho hiur Hit 
Inisf lo sail. 

Age 20; lieight 11 feel 1 Va inches; weiglit 102. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association: 
Philosophical Club: Vice-President Le Cercle de 
Conversation de Francaise (3, 4); Secretary- 
Trea-surer Tennis Association (41; Editor Magazine 
(4) ; Gym Sijuad. 

•■l^niUlhi)." ■■Ctirrir- 

His chief interests are his work, tlic Magazini', 
the Oym. and the adornment of his extremely at- 
tenuated form. Works liis mouth overtime witliout 
having yet said anything to .startle the world. Has 
never been known to do an>thing worse than bore 
a crowd with Dnc. Kluttz's phonograph. 




// 




Harvey Oscar CRA^'ER, Enterprise, N. C. 

Not body enough to cover mind decently irith ; 
liis intellect is improperly exposed. 

Age 27; height 5 feet 10 inches; weight 150. 
Di Society; Kcononiics Club; Davidson County 
('lul>; V. il. C. A.; Press Association. 

'•H. 0." 

C^)uiet and hard working. Never says much, but 
takes it all out in .studying. Is thin and meagre in 
Ills hjoks. and lii.s smile is about the only substantial 
thing about him. Achieved fame by his spectacular 
chase in pursuit of an amateur negro thief. Speaks 
a good word for everybody. 



.^ (P y^A^ayz^^^ 



•Tame.'! Kahi. C'Rosswf;i.i,. \Vilniinj;ton. N. C. 

H7io iiii.nd rr(i>:oii irilli piciisine. and irisdoni with 
mirth. 

Age 20; height 6 feet: weit'ht 1(55. 

Class Baseball Team (1, 2. 3): Wearer of the 
X. C. Club; Scrub Football Team (1); Varsity 
Football (2. 3, 4); Athletic Association; New Han- 
over County Club; Oernian Club: Leader .lunior 
Prom.; Press Association; Ciorgon's Head: Golden 
Fleece: 2 A E. 

•■I'mrV' 

Another star of the tiridiron. "Pearl" is not so 
ladylike as his nickname might lead you to think; 
however, this is not meant as a reflection upon his 
character. One of our few ornamental men. Is a 
winner with the ladies, and generally liked among 
the men. Believes in studying enough to pass his 
work, and enjoys life the rest of the time. 



\ 




,. C CnJ^^yiuJiJ^^ 



y 





William Arthik Dahdkn. Fremont. N. C. 

/ think he icould not n'ifili liimficlf anyiohcie but 
where he in. 

Age 20: Iieiglit U ft-et ; weight 150. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic A.ssciciation. 

■■Biir 

A good, easy-uoing fellow whose wise look is not 
a bluff, but just liis natural expression. Seems to 
be on good terms with tlie world, and is never ii 
grouch. JIakes gnnd marks, but is not usually 
lieard from when oil class. 



y^y^S~^ '^'-^^''^^■', 



E.VRNKsT Stanlky 1 )i-:I.a.moy. Mattlii'w^. X. (' 



'ujhi of Irnininii liifhlhi lit' 



^ye(ll■in!l all thai 
a flower. 

Age 21: heiglit (i feet 1 incli; weight l.-iO. 
Di Society: Athletic Association. 

-Dirh--' 

One of our really brainy men. Loves Greek like 
some men love booze. Has taken about all the Greek 
put down in the catalogue and made good marks 
on it. Has a prize-winning boot on Bully, tliougli 
both he and Bully would deny it. Doesn't know 
many men in college, probably from choice. 







Russell Conway Bellinger, Lincolnton, N. C. 

Men of fete icords are tlip best men. 

Age 20; height 6 feet; weight 150. 

Di Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; 



Tennis Association. 



"Ifiiss" 



He looks like a real live man and we will have to 
take tliis as evidence that he is. Doesn't shoot otf 
his lip mucli around a crowd, so we have every rea- 
son to think that he is a man of good sense. A 
model of good manners and right doing. Never 
allows anything to ruffle the serenity of his calm 
and peaceful existence. 



Hi 



Kdkkkt Dhank, Eih'iitoii, X. C. 
uiiittd irilhoiif tliat's innocent n-illiiii. 



Age 22; height 5 feet 6 inches; weight 138. 

Phi Society; Athletic Association; Tennis Associ- 
ation; Albeniarle-Pahnieo Club; Class Tennis 
Team ( 2 ) ; ilanager Interclass Tournament ( 2 ) ; 
Class Baseball Team (2, 3); Manager Class Foot- 
hall (3); Manager All-Class Football Team (3); 
Junior Week Committee; Sub-Leader Junior Prom.; 
Vice-President First Year Med. Class (4); Assist- 
ant Manager Varsity Baseball Team (3): Manager 
Varsity Baseball Team (4); Ball ilanager Com- 
mencement (41: Gorgon's Head; A K E. 

■■Dot" 

The exception that jiroves the rule that all minis- 
ters sons are allied witli the devil. Wouldn't dream 
of using so vioh'nt an expression as "doggone it,"' 
tliough we will have to confess that he sometimes 
uses language nearly as strong when very provoked. 
Likes everybody he knows and vice versa. 




"-KeJLsLir C3^*^<w-A_ 





Joseph Daniels Easox, .Tr., Stantonslmrg, N. C. 
I' lie forcr If III VII. 
Aoe 25: height feet; weight 100. 
I'lii Society; Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A.; 
(arcilina-Pennsylvania Scrub Debate: Economics 
Club: Press Association; Historical Sociely, De- 
liatiug Union. 

•■./. D." 

'I'liis man bears the nuirk of sombre melancholy. 
His features never relax into a smile, but always 
wear their cloak of pessimistic gloom. You would 
tliink that lie was trying unsuccessfully to work out 
tile salvation of tlie world — ])i'rha])s he is. We had 
lioped during tlie four years lliat we were with him 
to catch liim witli liis mask oil, Imt our liopes have 
lieen in vain. 



QP^A.<^<n^ 



William Rrrrs KiiMnNos. Elkin. \. f. 

He thinks lao nnirh: such nun iin iliiiiiinniis. 

Age 25; heiglit feet 1 incli; weight 10(1. 

Di Society; Scrub Del)atcr lltn"; .Soph-.Iunior D<'- 
bater 1908; Commencement Debater 1!)0S; Winner of 
Bingham INIedal 1008; ilember of University Council; 
Washington and Lee Debater (4); President De- 
bating Union (4); Vice-President Senior Class; 
Assistant in Physics. 

■■Ell." 

A philosoplier of the mountains. Long and lank of 
body, slow of speech, and (U'ep of mind. Iliinks 
long about what lie is going to say. and takes his 
time in saying it. Has tried liis hand at that old. 
old game of trying to blind Horace. Has a peculiar 
brand of dry humor in which lie indulges when 
there is no weighty problem on Iiis mind. Tbougli 
he hails from the land of ■'moonshine," lie is one of 
the oppressors of this much slandered, joy-giving 
spirit of the corn. 




X-^ 





James Aiphonso Everett. Palmyra. X. C. 

By my iroth I teas seelinrj for a fool tclicit I found 
you. 

Age 22; height 5 feet 11 inches: weiglit I'M. 

Phi Society, Track Team (1. 2, 3); Wearer of 
N. C. Club;" Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; 
Hi.storical Society: Trinity Park Club; Martin 
County Club; Tennis Association. 

••.y," ■Wlphon.'ic" 

Ho really seems to enjoy being witli himself and 
his books. Can always lie found in liis mum when 
not in class, as he has too much sympathy for his 
fellow students to mix with them. Gets very ex- 
cited and wrought-up when called upon to answer 
a question. Occasionally leaves his room to gallop 
a few miles around the track. 



9^. /^Ll/2^tM} ^z^eAjdt: 



Baxter Lee Fentres.s, Sununerfiehl. X. C. 
77ir irorld may iraii at irill, no 1 liavr my riyar. 

Age 20: height 5 feet inches; weight 135. 

Di Society; Athletic Association; Tennis Associa- 
tion; Second Vice-President of Class (1); Class 
Banquet Speaker (2| ; Commencement Marshal (3) ; 
Yackety Yack Editor (4) ; President Oak Ridge 
Club (4) ; Vice-President Ouilford County Club 
(4) ; Chemical Journal Club: Oerman Club. 

-Lrr" 

He is a small man. hut that doesn't kec|i him 
quiet. Can get up and make a speech on any sub- 
ject whenever called upon, or when any opportunity 
is presented. Dresses well and always keeps a good 
niclcel cigar on hand to give him a sporty look. 
Lee made a real nifty looking Marshal, and we were 
even more proud of him than he was of himself. 




. ^ ■ c<J^^i:-<^^^€^:^^£..^ 



//y 





\\'ii.Li.\.M Henry Fry. Fayettpville, X. C. 
Let rvcnj man miniJ his tnni biinliwss. 

Age 21: height 5 feet 10 inches; weight 130. 

Phi Society. t'limbevlainl County Club; Le 
Cercle tie Conveisation Fianf;aise; Geological Semi- 
nary. Olid Xuniber Club; Athletic Association; 
Licentiate in Geology; Elisha Mitcliell Scientific 
Society ; Assistant in Geology' ; Associate Editor 
Magazine. 

••Hill" 

Bill never tliinks as other people do. and doesn't 
mind saying what he think.s. I.s o|)posed to reform 
and ethics. He is said to be the best read man in 
t ollege. His chief forms of amusement are reading 
some combustible book, talking with "Collier" or 
about "Horace." and keeping company with the 
ladies. His contributions to the I'liircrsifi) ilaga- 
~ine have been of such a cliaractcr as to necessitate 
liinding it in asbestos. 



O/tiUi 



'a>*<^ c^ pi^i^ 



W'li.i.iAM ll.XKj.i.i! Fi.Uia SON. Kendal. X. C 

//■ /■/ !,<■ /in.'i.sihir. as mllcll as In III in Ijoil. lirr 
jirarcfiillii irilli nil iiini. 

Di Society; Atlileti,- A^M.cialinn; V. M. C. A.: 
Manager ( liiss Football 'Iimtm (1): (lass Football 
Team (1); Sub \'ar>ity Football Team Ci. :i. 4). 

••Hill" 

Looks lazy and sluggish, but ha> proved tlial he 
is not by making Sub on Varsity Football Team 
for three years. Is quiet and studious and bus 
that admirable but rare art of keei)ing his mouth 
shut. Has the job of inducing this galaxy of beauti- 
ful seniors to place their photographs in tlie Yack- 
ETY Yack, to be handed down to the admiring eyes of 
posterity. 




^ 




Edward Lee Feanck, Richlands, N. C. 

Besides, he was a shrewd philosopher, and had 
read u-'ri/ text and r/lass over. 

Age 24; 5 feet 11 inches; weight 17(1. 
Atliletic Association; Plii Society. 

■■riiitu" 

Doesn't make enough noise to be conspicuous, ex- 
cept when on class. Ought to know something, as he 
lias written two theses on "The Origin of Knowl- 
edge." Really believes that something can be got- 
ten out of Psych. — besides fives and sixes — , and 
lias taken so much work under Horace that he has 
about assimilated Horace's method of thinking. 




John Broaduurst Farrior, Asheville. N. C. 

Much study is a weariness of the flesh. 
Age 21; height 5 feet lOy. inches; weight l.'id 
Buncombe Count v Chili; Dramatic t'lul 



■man 
Class Football Team 
(4): Deader Easter 



Club; Athletic Association; 
( 3 ) ; Scrub Football Team 
German ( 3 ) ; Ben. 

•'.John" 

Looks as lazy as he is. but isn't quite as lazy as 
he looks. Easy going, good natured. and tow-headed. 
Answers to the name of -'Whitey" on the Scrub 
Football Team. .John is another one of our ladies' 
men, and loves a society life. Has designs on the 
Medical Profession. 









Francisco Virgii.io Fuentes, Camagiiey, Cuba. 

FiU'd the air irith barbarovs dissonance. 

Age 21; height 5 feet 6 inches; weight 120. 
Secretary of Cuban Cluli l!)08-09; Treasurer 

inno-in. 

-Fiinitrs" 

A sojuunior from the Isle of Cuba. His surname 
was about tlie only thing we could ever come close 
to pronouncing; so by that we have called him 
during our four years acquaintance with him. We 
have even learned to understand his conversation — 
provided we know beforehand what he is going to 
say. Is addicted to blinding his professors. 




l^^Zu^^t^iy^Q^^^a^ 



(KCII, Cl.AIiK (iAHHKTT, .lullall. X. ('. 

rfrc./.S' Ihriiisclrrs. Ihoin/ll linth. spulcr Imtil I h 



Ag<^ 21; lic'i^lit i; feet if indict: wci;L;li( l!l.i, 
»i Society: V. M. C. A.: Athletic Assm-iatiuii ; 
(hiilford County Club; ^'ice•Presidcnt County Cbili 
i;i|; President County Clul) (4); .Member c.l 
Wearers of X. C. Club;' Scrub Football Team (1|; 
\arsitv Football Team (2, li, 4) ; Captain Varsitv 
I'ootbilll Team (4); All South Atlantic Tackle 
1;miS; Economies Society; Historical Society; 
(iolden Flm'e. 

■■Ickji" 

Of fame as captain of Vai-sity Footl>all Team. 
.Ml-Southcrn Tackle. Has the long limbs and angular 
build of Washington Irving's famous pedagogue; 
hcTice his appellntidii. Has tli,. cadavenms lool 
one that is wise fiom nuich study. 



)/ / 



vV^ 







Aiioi.i'His Hauti-; <ji!KK.\\V(U)i). l^iuiiarilsvilk'. X. C. 
rhiiil.iiH/ ;.s- hill (III iillc inixir of I lioin/lil . 

Asir 21: lirifihl 5 tVcl, 11 inolifs: wcijilit 1(1(1. 

Ili-toiit-al Scificty, ]5iul(if;ii-i(l .loiinuil (liih; Kli 
-]\:i MiU'lu'lI Si-icntific Socii'tx': l'>ni)(i;iiilic Ciniiilv 
I lull ; President, County Club' ( :! ) . 

-Hull" 

we inlu'iitcil him ficmi I'.KIS. Looks on Die wovlil 
iiinl i(~ iloini;s uilli anuis<'nu'nt. Has an aversion to 
anytliinj; like \vc^rk. but would like to get a "dip." 
if it isn't too nineli tvoulile. Has tried extensively 
to ;;('t a "jaek" to Major's second JIatli. but nnsiie 
eessfully. so lias to trust to Inek like the lest of 
the class. 



^^^^^r^*^!^^^^ 



• loll.\ .\mi;s (Iiio.N, Xewliern. X. ('. 

I ,1111 tlir mil pint nf rniiilrnji. 

A,se 111; lieiijlit .3 feet S inches; weieht i:i-i. 
Yackkty Vaik Hoard; ^ K E. 

■■Aliins- 

Looks after his own atl'airs and doesn't say much. 
Is very punctual in his habits, which are above 
reproach. Observes due decorum in all that he 
does. C'ojirteous to everybody, and extremely re- 
spectful to his professors. Hi.s studiousness has been 
rewarded by excellent marks on all his studies. 



y 



\J 





Uii.i-TAii Hexrt Hathcock, Albemarle. N. C. 

YVjo loir they huihl, icho build beneath the stars. 

Age 21; height 5 feet 9 inches: weight 138. 
Di Society; Historical Society; Athletic Asso- 



■Baiil.; 



■Halhr ■■Little One" 



Has a calm look, and uses anti-friction metal in 
his bearings. Is not conspicuously interested in any 
phase of life except morality. Has an exalted 
sense of duty, and needs about ninety per cent, of 
the Honor System distilled out of him. Works in 
Horace's bank, but can"t be enticed into Horace's 
I'lassroom. 



yiM:i4^fU:j:J^,_^ 



Oscar .\i,i:xani)KI! Hamilton, riiioiiville. N. C. 
Iloninir in piirrhas'd li,,/ 'Ireils ire ,lo. 

Age 2.S; height fe«>t ; weight HiS. 

Di Society; Golden Fleece: Athletic Association; 
X. C. Association; Economic Club: Historical So 
cietv; Varsity Baseball Team (1, 2. .S). Captain 
(.3)"; Vice-President Cla.ss (3): Marshal (3); 
Commencement Ball Manager (4); Chemical .lonr- 
nal Chdi; Vice-President Athletic Association |4|. 



■I'al. 



■Hill, 



A baseballist of repute. Has an enyiable record 
(jn college diamonds. Captained the best team Caro- 
lina has had for years and with phenomenal success. 
The pride of the "Old West." [s one of the best 
pggs in college, and nniyersally |)opular. 



\ 




Q:n~y\a^tyt^i.t.^l&< 



'% 



/- 



/ / 




\V. p. Hexley. 

There is no Ihiir for a man In rcrovcr Iiis Iiair 
that groics huhl hij iidlurc. 

Age 31; lieifjlil 5 feet 5 inches; weight 150. 
B. S.; Guilford College; Di Society: Athletic 
Association; V. il. (_'. A.; Alamance County Clul). 

■■Oh' Hen" 

Oi-ent in age, Init shoi't in stature. His chief mark 
(if ilistinotion is his auburn hair, which is rather 
scarce in ]>laces. Was captured last fall up about 
(iuilford College, and is reported to have good 
traits. We are glad to say he has done well while 
here. 



David S.vmiei. H.^hris 
Geninx is- ii rajwcilii for 



Enfield. X. C. 
ratViiui hrinl inirJ:. 



Age 21: height 5 feet 11 inches; weight KiH. 
Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A.; Iliilifax 
County Club. 

■■Don" 

Has a very sleepy hiok. and often justifies this 
look by liis ' actions. Does not care much about 
hard work, but will catch ball all the afternoon. 
He is a near-Electrical Engineer, and if he lives 
long enough, and some others die. will get a job 
some day. Has always envied Tom Rose and Doc 
Kramer their boot on Ed Latta. 




,:/J~^^, .^=^^^-i*o2-<„^k^ 



,/^\ 




James Albert HicnsMiTn. Currie, N. C. 

Wiser in his oirn conceit than seven men can ren- 
der a reason. 

Age 24; height feet: weight 158. 

Phi Society; Athletic Association; B. C. A. Club; 
Class Historian (1); Class Treasurer (2); Fresh- 
Soph Debater (2); Class Secretary (4); Economics 
Sciciety (3); Historical Society (3); Commenee- 
iiient Debater (3) ; Commencement Marshal (3) ; 
V. M. C. A.: Secretary Debating Union (4). 

"Doc" 

We have before us a debater, an orator, a scholar, 
and a reformer. Is a big bug in the Y. M. C. A.; 
and is the instigator and leader of the "Anti-Hell- 

raising Society." However, there are rumors ; 

liut, pardon me, the facts are what we want. 
\\ ears pince-nez. aft'ects an oratorical style of speech, 
and strives to invest liimsclf with the garb of au- 
thoritative dignitv. 



\. 



f)i!i!i;\ Wii,i,i.\,\rs IIVMAN. Tarhoro, \. C. 

An- unforiiirinfi eye. and a damned disinlii rit in(i 
eountenanre. 

Age Ifl; heiglit 5 feet (< inches; wciglil 12."). 

Phi Societv; Y. .M. C. A.; C. A. A.; T. A. P. A.; 
Cnhh^n Fleece; Tennis Team: Wearer of X. C. ; 
1-Mitor-in-cliief Tar lle>l. Head A,sistanl in Zuuh.gy. 

■■N,,y," 

Sap is read-Iieadcd and very small nf stature, 
wliich is good ]iroof that great n'len arc not all large. 
Is boss of the Tar Heel and takes great pride in his 
literary efforts. He never says nuicli to us, but puts 
it all over us in his paper. Used to be rather much 
of a lawn tennis artist, but now has no time for such 
trifles. Has plenty of nerve, and never uses it. 




\\ 




\V. Lewis .Ikkkhies. -Tefferson City, 'rcnii. 
I.<i (I fool hold his loiH/iir null lie irill jinxs for o 



Age 20; height .l tVel s iiiolies; wciglit 150. 
Der Deutsche N'mciii: ('heiiiioal .ln\inuil Club. 

-./r/l" 

We (Idu't know very niuili iilKUit him. :is lie has not 
been with us very long, liut whiit we do know is very 
good. Comes to us from a college in Tennessee with 
a name about a mile long. He infests the Chemical 
I.alMiratory. ami is an aspirant for atliletii' honors. 
Diii'sn'l talk iiiucli. and lias a rc|iut:it imi for liMining. 



-^^ 



Ehnkst .[(iNic; 



Mi/iihr 



'<! ifiifrr (i<iiifif. 



Ag!> 11: height (I feet 1 ',4 inches; weight l.'iO. 

(;inii;houl : (Jcrnian Club; Athletic Association: 
\V. II.' S. Club; Y.\C'KETY Y.\cK Editor (4) ; Secre- 
tary (ierimui Clul) (4) : 7. •■}'. 

■■I.riii/lhi/- 

-Mmost as long on talk as he is on lieiglit. Has a 
conglomeration of peculiar ideas ami theories wliich 
to believe. Has a habit of getting bored 



(I refreshing himself with 



to graduate, so does tc 



Needs fev 



it himself. Believes 



and has not let his studies 



iterfere with his college education. 



/\ 




id- 




"2< /^Jy>iM_ 



James Xoah Joyxer. Raleigh. N. C. 

Go to Ihe nut. thou sluggard; coii.siiti r her irnys, 
and be irise. 

Age 21 : height o feet 7 inches ; weight 137. 

Gorgon's Head; Golden Fleece; (ieriiian t'luh; 
Phi Sofietv; Class Football (1. 2. 3) ; Captain Class 
Football ('2): Class Baseball (1); Assistant Man- 
ager Football Team (3) ; Manager Football Teani 
( 4 ) ; Class Treasurer ( 3 ) ; Assistant Leader of 
Gorgon's Head Dance ( 3 ) ; Z ^. 

••■fiiir 

Has the reputation of being the laziest man in 
college. Wrested this coveted honor from Tommy 
Wilson, after a four years' struggle. Believes in do- 
ing to-morrow what should be done to-day. Had 
some of the laziness worked out of him managing 
the Varsitv Football Team, but has relapsed into liis 
old form. ' Was a brilliant Class Footl)all player for 
two years, after which he tir?d of the work inv<dved. 
Singsl ■/) constantly, loafs in between times, and 
makes <.'ood marks. Is pujnilar with all. and de- 
served I v so. 



• losKi'ii Hkxhv .Tohnmox. Chapel Hill. X. C. 

Krcrii iiiiiii has his ftiiiU. and huiirslii is his. 

Age 2(1; lieight 5 feet Xl'A inches; weight l(i7. 

■■Hcnr,r 

One of our solid men. As steady and reliable as an 
eight-day clock. Says and does what he thinks, and 
he usually thinks right. The kind of man that gives 
strengtli to his lOass. .\ good student, and also 
something of an atlilete. 





LAXtiDOX CiiKvis Kerr, Clinton. N. C. 

/ Ikiic Icai-iicil. ill irhatsoercr state I ciiii, tlicre- 
iritti to he coiitt iitcd. 

Age 21; lieiglit 5 feet 1(1 inclies ; weight 145. 

Plii Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; 
Soph-.Tunior Debate (2) ; Commencement Debate (3) ; 
Meniliev Debating Union (3, 4) ; Secretaiy Debating 
Union (3): Y. Y. Board (3); Secretary Athletic 
Association (4); Wearer of Gym N. C. "(2. 3. 4): 
Class Football Team (2. 3, 4) ; Class Baseball Team 
(3) ; German Clnb; 2 A E. 

■■ClKi-is" 

Chevis is never in a liinrv. and doesn't tliink any 
one (dse ouiihl l(i lie. Is very fond of borrowing 
things from his neiglibors with an indefinite time- 
limit. Made his N. C. in the Gym, and is one of the 
stockholders of the Library. Has been a great lielp 
to liis class in more than one pliase of college inter- 
ests. Hanks gnod in liis books and fair in debate. 




^. \ . Ixjirun^ 



D.\xiEL K.WMOXD Kramer. Elizabeth City, X. C. 
With feathers croirii'd, irith (jay embroidery dress'd. 

Age 22; height (i feet 1 inch; weight 108. 

Phi Society; Atlilelic .Vssociation ; German Club: 
Vice-President Class (1); Assistant Leader .Tunior 
Prom ; Class Statistician ( 4 ) . 

"T-iV/c-' 

Tlie hottest sport in captivity. Tige is tlic iimI 
article, government insjieeted and guaranteed. W'ear.-- 
"biled" shirts and carries out the color scheme in 
ties, handkerchiefs, socks, et cetera. Is pro- 
fusely adorned with a mop of straw-colored hair 
which harmonizes beautifully with his favorite set of 
lavender haberdasliery. Talks by the cubic yard and 
has a taste for wit. 




ramer~ 





John Abohibald Leitch, Jr., Rowland, N. C. 
A very gentle beast, and of a good conscience. 

Age 19; height 5 feet 7 inches; weight 135. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.; President Roberson 
Count}' Club; Economics Society; Athletic Associa- 
tion; Tennis Association. 

■V. A." 

We won't tell what the Sophs did to him when he 
was young and fresh, as it might embarrass him. 
Slow in speech and movements, but knows how to 
think cpiickly. Follows the old saying that "Chil- 
dren slKJuid be seen and not heard." Has the great 
name "Archibald." so ought to make his mark in tlie 
world. 



i.(X.. %iAtcJl_^ ^ 



Orin Cottrell Lloyd, Durliam. X. C. 

Days of absence, I iiiii irciini! 
She I love is far aicdij. 

Age 111; height .■) feet lOVi inches; weight l.'.l. 

V. -M. C. A.; Athletic Association; •renins .\s,ci- 
ciution; Class Baseball Team (4); tierman Club; 
Z *. 

"Onn" 

Came ti> lis from \'. .\1. I. two years ago in niiii- 
|inny with "Valence" Daniels. Never bothers himself 
wilh studying, hut nevertheless makes ones and twos 
cm all his work. Lsn't nearly so fierce as he looks, 
tliniigh he loves to raise rough-house occa.sionally. 
.\n all-round good fellow, but a little too crazy about 
the girls — (or a girl?). 




A 



\ 



vV 



\! I / /, 



// 





John W'aynk I.aslev, .Ik.. P>iivlin<irtnii. N. C. 
He that ix full of himself ix eiitplii. 

Aj.e 18; liei^lit .■) feet !)•/, inches; \veif;lit 123. 

Di Society; Y. il. C. A.; Athletic Association; 
Press Association; Alamance County Club; President 
(4) : Manager \"arsit.y Tennis Team (4) ; Associate 
Kilitor Tar Heel (4) ; President Tennis Association 
(4): Class Ke])resentative (2); Class Tennis Team 
Ci. 41; Chairman Class Banquet Committee (4); 
Seniitinalist in College Tournament (3) ; Vice-Presi- 
dent Infant Cluh (1); ilanager Class Tennis Team 
(4) ; Scorer for Varsity Foothall and Baseball Teams 
(4) ; etc. Amen. 

We congratulate ourselves everytime we see him. 
as tliere wuuhl liave been no Tennis Team if he had 
gone siimewlicre else. He really is smart — but let 
him tell you about that. He had rather look througli 
a transit tlian train his glasses on the sliowgirls in 
Durliam. Is afflicted witli tlie liallucination tliat lie 
can sing, liut it is ho]ied lluit he will soon recover 
from it. I'sed to think lie knew more Maili than 
"Major." but lias found out that he doesn't. 



Leon M( Cru.oiil. (ircensboro. X. C. 

That fellinr srem.t to me to /,o.y.sr.s-.v hill one iilrii. 
1111,1 thiit is II in-oiiij one. 

Age 23; height .5 feet ti inches; weight 12.5. 
Y. M. C. A.; Guilford County Club; Ui Society: 
.\thletic Association. 

"Muck," "Leon" 

A man who has never learned how to loaf. Works 
so hard tliat his classmates all appear "lione-heads." 
Can make a slide-rule beat a trombone, when it comes 
to real sliding. Will be famous some day. if any- 
body discovers a use for poetical Math, (iets peculiar 
ideas into his head, and won't give tlieni up. Is 
fond of disputing theory with Rose and Koiner. 




X-.^ ??lcAcJ^!^ 



.-^ 




Albert Rufvs Morgan. W'liyncsvilU-. X. ('. 

Althoinih I mil a /tioiifs iiniii. I 'iiii iml llir Ir.ss ti mail. 

Age 24; height li feet : wciglit 172. 
]>i Societv: Y. M. C. A.; NUlimlci'V liniid: S.-nih 
Fdothiill {\.-l). 

■■Uufiis- 

His chief liobhy i.s wurl<. ami he rhles it hiird. 
Spends the rest of his time in heiiii; leligiuus, not 
niildlv religions, bnt strennonsly religious. Aflfeets 
the (•n\vl)oy style of dress. This', with his eagle eye. 
lends him a truly nnnantie a|ip;'anuiee. 



TiioM-Vs l>.\i.Mi:i< Xa.sm. .III.. I';iizalpit h City. N. C 

.1// olhris: nil- hill nlllill/. 

.\ge 111; height .") feet 7 inelie>: wiaght l:iS. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.: Athletie .\s~n,iati.in ; 
President Class (3); Odd Xumlier Clul); Chemicil 
.limrnal Club; Modern Literature Chib; JOdilor 
.Magazine (2, 3); Editorini-liief (4 1: Kditor Tnr 
Ifrcl (3): Assistant in Chemistry: (Johlen Fleece: 
Hunter T.ee Harris Memorial; Mendier I'niver^ity 
Coinicil (3) : Secretary Class {■>) : Prcsid.Mil 'I' P. K. 

"Tom mil" 

One of mir great men in politio. Sludic> liard. and 
n^allv believes liis teachers will knuw a- mucli as lie 
does' if tliey live long enongli. Holds the big slick 
of <I> B K and owns the Magazine. l,o(d<s san<'tified 
and thinks he has a few ])eo]de blulVed. Has taken 
lots of work under .Mills and Hertv. and speaks w(dl 
of both. 




^^ 




Joseph Koheut Nixon. Lim-olntdn. X. C. 
They always talk irlw iwcer tliink. 

Age 22: height 6 feet 1 inch; weight 1G8. 

Di Society; Secretary Historical Society: K. C. 
C'liil); Athletic Association; Tennis Association; 
I'ress Association; Class Football Team (2. 3. 4) ; 
Captain Scrul) Baseball Team (2, 3); President 
Class (1) : Historian of Class (4). 

-I'lrs" -Mel" 

Xick is one of tlujsc lazy-looking kind id fellows 
wild seem to get there nevertheless. Talks slowly and 
volnniinonsly, and isn't particular about facts. Does 
he pleases and asks noliody any odds. Is a crank 
and baseball. He was the first to pre- 
davs of our indiscretion. 



about ltist(ny 
side over us in th 



.J.^IIE.S SOXTIIEllI.AMl I'.\TTK1!S 

The hand of lilll,- rniiiloiin 



. Cliapel Hill. X. C. 
il hath the (laiiitiei 



Age 20; height .') feet !t inches; weight 130. 

Gimghoul ; (iernian Club ; Di Society ; Y. M. C^ 
A.; Eeononiics Society: Secretary and Treasurer W. 
H. S. Club (2): Class Footliall' Team ; Conniience- 
nient Marshal (3) : A T P.. 

■■■Iimn,,r 

Small and )Kdite. U well pleased willi lite and 
the things thereof; witness his uninterrupted smile 
of peaceful contentment. What he does to pass a\\ay 
the time is a mystery. Doubtless, if we all knew the 
secret, we would be as happy as he is. 



\^ 





/uy-a— M— 



XixoN Sakdy Plummer, Greensboro. N. C. 
If he had any faults, he has left us in donit. 

Age 22; height 5 feet dy^ inches; weight 146. 

A^isistant Editor Magazine; Associate Editor Tar 
Heel; Guilford County Cluli : Athletic Association; 
Di Society. 

■•yici.-' 

Xot very huge. l)ut makes up in brains what he 
huks in size. When it comes right down to hard 
work, combined witli common sense. Nick is liard to 
heat. Ran the Printing Shop, and ran it well. 
Has a serious look, and is lacking in conunon. every- 
day faults. 



WiLUAM Hoke Ramsaii!. Cliina drove. X. C. 
There's nothing ill run iln-itl in xnch n l<ini>li. 

Age 19; height 5 feet OVi inches; weiglit 14.>. 

Di Society; Writer of Last Will and Tcstanuiil i.l 
Senior Class (4); Editor Magazine (4); I'nsichiil 
Kowan County Club (4); Class liaiKpu't Speaker 
; 4 ) ; Library Assistant (3, 4 ) . 

'•Hoke" 

Serious minded and has a ])urpose in life. But 
that doesn't prevent him from being a g(H)d fellow. 
Runs the V. M. C. A. and studies during his spare 
time. Has a slow and deliberate style of speech, but 
doesn't use it very often. Is as straight as they arc 
made, and necessarily popular. 




W^^^feS^,..v'^..<^-.PW^ 



v\^ 




IClUAKDO FkAXCI.'- 



I.,i,iils /(. cinihl iiir,i.sun: tr 



lioiMiliiric/.. Sagua La Oraiule 
Cul)a. 



<ii\i} tiih s iiiauyc. 



Af;e 24; hciylit (i tVet ; weight 17.5. 

I)i Society; V. iM. C. A.: Class Football Ti'aiii 
(2. :!. 4) ; All-Class Football (3) ; President Cuban 
CInh i:i): \Aliitsctt Club: Athletic Association: 
Tenuis A>siiciatiiin : Civil Kuj;ineering. 

Anolher nf ■■Majnr's" devotees. Spends half of liis 
lime tianijiing around witli a transit on his slioulder, 
and tlu> other half loating with the members of the 
■Cuban C(don.v," of wliich he is the leader and cham- 
pion spirit. 



vD cl.*-»-oir^cA*j J*. |X*yJ.^«.«— <y*^ui.^ 



W IM.IAM r.ioiNT l!iii).\i.\.N. .Ii!.. Charhdii'. X. C. 
/ »».v iirvi,- Uss ,ilu„r Hum irlirn In/ iini^df. 

Age 2a; height 5 feet llli,:, inches : weight l.".:i. 

Sei-retary (Jerman Club Ci) : Athletic Association: 
\'ice-President Historical Societv: Editor V.vckktv 
Yack ( 4 ) ; .\ T v.. 

■■I'lilhr 

A confirmed recluse. Is occasionally seen on his 
way to a classroom, or to the Post-olliee. How he 
occupies his time we can't find out. Prefers his own 
societv to that of other ])eo|)le. and seems to be satis- 
fied witli his choice. We would like to see more of 
liim. as he is a i;ood fellow wlien von know him. 





.loiix Mercee Reeves, Mimnt Airy, X. C. 



\i„I 



itcli sircct ladies 



villi 



iinj 



1,1 lool:> 



.\:^v 22: liciyht (i feet % inch; weight Kio. 

l)i S(H-icty: Atliletic Association; Tennis Associa- 
licm: Dniiiiatie Club (4); Y. M. C. A.; Secretai-j- 
Oak Kidye Club (3); Vice-President (4); Surry 
('i)inity Clul): X. C. Historical 8ociety : Editor Mag- 
azine (4) ; Chief Conmieneenient Marshal ( :) ) : Class 
I'oet II); Class Prophet (4); Ceriuan Club; Press 
Association: Class Football (3). 

''Foot" 

Jerry's "little brother." As our chief marshal last 
roinnienceuicnt. he was right on the job. The drama 
is his stronj; foile. and he makes a real fiood-lookinij 
lady when he doesn't f-et |)art of his false anatomy 
in crooked. Is one of the Connnencemcnt Rail ilan- 
aj^ers. and. for the benefit of the ladies, we advise him 
111 lake "Small's brief ciuirs;' in danciii";." 



CiiAiii.Ks (lAKi.KV IbmixsoN. ICI i/.-.i lict li Cily. N. ( '. 
/ iKin- i,„t lorcl thr irorlil. nor Ih, ir,„l,l nu . 

A^'c21; lieif.lit .1 feet 11 inilu>s; weifjlit I.V.. 

V. AT. C. A.; Athletic Association; Phi Society; 
.Mbeniarlc-Palniico Club; German Club; .Vssislaiil 
Manager Varsity Football Team (I!) : Class Fo.il 
liall Tejim (3);" Scrub Football Team (4); Kilil..r 
Tiir Heel (3) ; Editor Yackety Vack (3) ; Tciuii- 
.\ssociation ; Press Association; Leader So|)h ll(i|i 
(2) ; (iorgon's Head: 2 A E. 



•I'lirnd," ■■Etn" 



lb 



W 



The original champion grouili 
easionally thaws out suflicicnlly In ciiiil a fcflilr 
smile. Somewhat of a social bull and near-|ioliliciaii. 
Is a follower of "Billy" and "Collier," and makc^ 
good grades under both. An astute business man, a 
tourist, and a man of the world. Grades fair in scruli 
football, but best in grouchiness. This last i^ nuislly 
a nuisk, and not his real nature. 





C^^e-4,;^7'^C-^^--W'«^«-'C-<>'t — ^ 



\i/ 





// 





ilAKCUS Salvador ItoDisRiiEZ. Cit'ucntes. Cul>a. 

//r is a 1(77/ proper man. 

Age 2:i: lii-iglit o feet SVi inches; weiglit V.W. 
A. 15. 1:104. Hareeliiiia Institute, S\k\\\\: Treasurer 
Culian dull 1:!) : President Cuban Cluli (4). 

-Littlr Itofl" 

A ty[iii'al Spauisli gentlenuin. (.'orrert in attire and 
punetiliuus in manners. He i.s as aeciuate in Ins 
work as an adding -maehiiie, and his xviird on any sub- 
ject settles any further talk. Does not know what it 
means to get "blinded" and never falls on anj-thing. 



<^ ITf^^g^^t^..^^^ 



Tii(i.\i.\s DrxcAX lio.sK, Favetteville. N. C. 



Yrl the lifr of 
ir/ir/, lore is iloi 



rkoir life ilir 



Age 211: lieiglit .5 feel lOVi inclies ; weiglit l-"i(i. 
PhiSocietv: (Jernian Club : Class Baseball ( 1. 2 ) ; 
Scrub Footliall (3. 4) : Ccugim's Head; 2 A E. 

"i'orpttrar' 

Our ]iri/.e winner in good looks. Has lots of friends 
and is always making nuu'e. Dresses well, but cati 
make himself right at home in a pair of overalls 
doctoring motors, dynamos, and engines. Knows 
wluit he is about and takes no back talk. Had a 
beautiful boot on Ed Eatta. but deserved it. Has 
been unfortunate in love, and it took him until 
Christmas to regain his normal happy mood. 




CJ. fer^ 



0<UZ^ 




'/. 




David Bryan Sloan. lugoUl. X. C. 
Begone, dull Care! thou and I slidU luricr agree. 

Age 20; height 5 feet 9 inches; weight 155. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.; Chemical Journal Club ; 
Cla.ss Baseball Team (1, 2. .3); Manager and Cap- 
tain Cla.ss Ba.seball Team (3) ; Cla.ss Football Team 
( 3 ) ; Commencement Ball ilanager ( 3 ) : Yackety 
Y.\(.K Board (4). 

■■Dair" 

A good example of the University man. Studies 
some, but not too much, passes most of his work, 
pitches good class and scrub ball, and takes an inter- 
est in the good things of life. Never seems to be 
worried about anything, and we doubt if he has any- 
thing to be worried about. A good mixer and very 
companionable. Said to be an adept with tlie ■•bones." 



trl3./lcr^^<^ 



Wii.i.iAM Mai:\in S.MriKK. SalNbury. \. C. 
//( neeer did harm Hull I heard of. 

Age 20; height 5 feet !)'/o inches; weight 130. 

Hi .Sdcicty: Y. if. C. A.; Athletic Association; 
I'rcss As^oiiatiiiii: Sub-Editor Yackety Yack (2); 
liciwan (iiuiily (hib; Tennis Association: Economics 
Society: llisturiial Society; German Club: 11 K .\. 

Snipe" 

Looks timid and bashful and we are afraid that 
he is. Where he keeps himself no one knows, as he 
is only seen about once a week. As we can't think of 
any other way that he could spend his time in hiding, 
we have come to the conclusion that he studies. Says 
he is going to be an osteopath, out it is to be hoped 
that nothing so terrible will ha|)pen to him. 









Samiel Bradlky StkoH'. Ardeii. X. C. 
(live the ticiil his due. 

Aye 25; lieight 5 feet "Vi inches: weight 132. 

Di Society; Y. M. C A.; Athletic Association; 
Odd Xinnlier Club ; Buncombe County Club ; Press 
Association; ilusical Association; Manager Class 
Track Team (4). 



Note his close rcsenililance to Upper's characters in 
the comic papers. Used to be Doc Kluttz' right-hand 
man. Does good work so far as we know. Has 
helped us all get our pictures taken this spring. Is 
a good mixer, and is known by all of us. Saj-s he is 
going to be a preacher — well, you can't always tell. 



Damii Lindsay Stkitiiehs. Grists. X. C. 
Man (Irlif/hls iiir not: no. nor iroman neither. 

Age 20; height .^ feet 0'/, inches; weight 150. 

German Club; Athletic Association; Class Foot 
ball Team (1. 2. 3) ; Captain Class Football Team 
(3) ; All-Class Team (3) ; Commencement JIarshal 
(3); Scrub Football Team (4): Editor Yackety 
Y'ack (4) ; Ben. 

••>S7ri/r' 

Usually on a continuous "s. g." but occa.sionally 
relaxes enough to indulge in a little harmonious dis- 
cord. Is not particularly in love with the faculty, 
especially those addicted to dishing out "fives" and 
"sixes." Plays good class and scrub football, and 
spends the rest of liis time delving in the mysteries 
of higher mathematics, and attending the "Pick- 
wick." 




/o^ Q Iaa^vJUkaa/:^ 



<X 



v^ 




Horace Edxey Stacy, Behvootl. X. C. 

He has an oar in every man's boat and a finger in 
every pie." 

Age 23; height 5 feet 10 incites ; weight 185. 

Di Society: Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; 
Class Football (3); All-Class Football (3); Tulane 
Debater (3): Class Historian (1); Class Omtor 
(41; Debating Union (41: Wasliingtnn :iih1 Lee 
Debater (4). 

■•//«■•■ 

Climbed np to us from the class below. Is one of 
Horace's pets. Keeps up the reputaticm of the house 
of Slacy as big talkers. Is a good debater and a hard 
working student. Way up high on the political lad- 
der, and expects to reach the top. it it doesn't break. 
Kee]is a watchful eye on Xash and Robinson, and runs 
the L'niversity in his spare time. 






>^W^ 



Leon Glad.stoxe Steven.s, Smithfield. \. C. 

.1/1 honest man. elose-liiittou'd to the ehiii. 

Age 20; height feet 1 incli : wciglit l(i.">. 

••St< r<" 

A taciturn man, usually occupied witli liis own af 
fairs. Plays some baseball and studies the rest of 
the time. Dropped out of College one term, but will 
graduate with ns nevertheless. Never gets mixed up 
in politics, and is as reliable and straight as can be 
found. 




:^ 




DossEY Battle Teaoie, Caiiieion. N. V. 



He talks a I nanloiii 



the 



Hllfl. 



Age 25; lici,i:lit (i let- 1 : wcij/lit 100. 

Plii Society: (J. A. A.; T. A.: Georgin Deljater 
( ;i ) : Golden Kleeee; I'.iisiiicss ilanai;er Magazine 
(M) : Cosmopolitan Club. 

■7*. /(.■• 

One of the few men wlio lake University life seri- 
iiiisly. AiUieies elosely to the teachings of Horace. 
Iiut as yet nothinj; serious has happened to him on 
that account. Is deeply imbibed with the principles 
of luinor. looks after tlie College, and kee])s up a 
"strong man's" frown. The Y. M. C. A. hearkens 
\nit(i liis voice, and debating Unions cry for him. He 
ha^ l>een a liig lielp to his class as a gas agent. "D. B.'' 
is held in liigh esteem by all of us. and we wish there 
were more like him. 



S^> 



Sami'EL F.\rris Tkaoie. Cameron. X. C. 



rhr 



i-,i hairs of I/O 



tirrid HIT (ill itiinihcrrd. 



Age 24: height Ij feet 2 inches: weight 170. 

Phi Society; V. JI. C. A.: Athletic Association; 
Historical Society; Economics Club; Moore- Lee 
County Club; Buies Creek Club; Varsity Track 
Team '(3, 4); Class Football (2, 3. 4); Wearer of 
\. C. ; Sopli-.Tunior Debater: Secretary Class ( :1 ) ; 
Class Treasurer (4). 

".S. ;•'..•• ••I.oiifiiis" 

A longer edition of the other one. beautifully pol- 
ished dn top. Indulges to excess in Herpicide, and 
has each separate hair on liis head named and classi- 
fied. Gives the impression of always having some- 
thing important to do. lint if he has. we have never 
caught him doing it. His long legs won him a track 
sweater last spring. 




/^ 




Bkx.iamik Franklix Taylor. Bogue. N. C. 

Tlic purest treasure mortal times afford is spotless 
reputation. 

Age 23; lieiglit 5 feet S iiielies; \vei;;lit KiS. 
Plii Soeielv: Atliletio Assot-iation : Senior Fdotliall 
Teniii (41: 'v. .M. C. A.; Histoiieal Suciety. 

■•lieu" 

rs,.(l t(^ l>c >eeii often, but tlii> year lie is olilined to 
study, so don't liotlier liini. He is eariying more 
lionrs tlian tliere are on the elock. and lias good pros- 
]ierts of getting tlieni otl'. Lool<s liealtliy, tends to his 
own linsiness and is liked by both students and 
faenlty. Has a good reputation and lives u]i to it. 



Lkwis X.\tii.\niki. Tayloi!. <)xfiinl. N. C 
// iruuhl lull.-. I.uni: linir il lulled! 

Age 20; heiglit .'> feet liV;, inelirs; weight 1211. 

Phi Soeiety: Recording Secretary Y. M. V. A. (4) ; 
Cabinet OHieer V. .M. C. A. (4); "Press Association 
12. 3, 4); Secretary and Treasurer (3); French 
Dramatic t'lub (3 );' Dramatic Club (4); Associate 
Fditor Tar Heel (4); Associate Editor ilagazine 
|4); S. A. Y>. r. ; Tennis Association; Athletic .\s- 
sociation ; P.asket-ball .Association: Historical So 
ciefv; Infant Club; President Cranville Couiily 
Clu'b (4). 

•■/•".'/■' 

.\s loquaciiais as he is small. Can make more noise 
than a gasoline engine, and keeps it up longer. Looks 
like a young cherub when he smiles, which is always. 
We wish we had the receipt for bis good humor. 
However. '"Piig"' is alright, anrl onr only 7-egret i': that 
Hieic is not more of him. 




Q)CCUltWf 



\% 



/^-. 




Lee Franklin Turlington. SmithfieUl. N. C. 

Will Honeycomb calls these over-offciideil Imlni Ike 
outrageously r iitiioiis. 

Age 20; height 5 feet 10% inches: weight 170. 

Phi Society: CMass Baseball Team; Chiss Football 
Team; Chemical Journal Club; Biological Journal 
Chili: J(ihn~t(in County Club; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet: 
.\tliletic .\ss<iiiation : Press Association; President 
Johnston County Club (4). 

"Lee" 

Says he is a good boy, so we will have to take his 
word for it. Looks unnatural outside of the Y. M. 
C. A., but sometimes he is allowed to associat? with 
tlu' unredeemed. Usually rvuis with Barnett and him- 
si'lf. He is harmless, and only needs some of the 
V. il. C A. veneer rubbed off of him in order to 
make a successful man. One of tlie nrif;inal "Ileroe^ 
of Cemeteiy Ridge." 



^ t/^ ,y^t..^''U.^^<-^p^^^i^-^-<-^. 



Hion Alex.vndei! Tiio.mi'son. Raleigh. X. C. 
I. el us cat anil ilr'nik : for to-moiroir ire slirili ilir. 

Age 19; height .'y feet 11 inches; weight 14.i. 
Gorgon's Head: .\thletic Association: Tennis Asso- 
ciation; German Club: Z M'. 

•■//»f;7r- 

A man of many tastes. Believes in c<imhining 
work with play, with the latter ingredient in tlie 
majority. Has the habit of passing all his work. Is 
one of those rare mortals who likes 'TJunchy's" 
Dutch. Doesn't like anything that smacks of monot- 
ony. A sometime lover and an authority on Shakes- 
pea re. 




■/^^«— ' ^ 



/./' 




\|x9U-L^^pJ^^ 



KiciiAKD Alexaxder Urquhart, Lewiston. N. C. 

Claret is the liquor for hoys, port for men; but he 
u-ho aspires to he a hero luvst drink brandy. 

Age 20; height 5 feet 10 inches; weight 140. 
(Jorgon's Head : K A. 

••,'^t,/" 

A tnu' niid Inyal fullnwer iif K|iiciii-us. Hclicves in 
getting all that' is coming ti> him unt of the good 
things of life. Hasn't been iieifectly hai)))y since 
"hou" Gilliam left ns. Has a brilliant niind, but 
wisely refrains from imposing on it with too much 
study. Like every true Soutliern gentleman, he 
sticks to the theory that mint jiilips were made fur 
the delectation of mankind. 



( 'iiahi.es Scutt Vexari.e. Chapid Hill. X. ('. 
(hit of loo much Irarniuf/ hrroiur mini. 

Age IS; height 5 feet lOy, inches; weight ISO. 

(i(]rg<in's Head; German Club; Phi Society; Class 
I'.ascball Team (3); Class Tennis Teani"(l. 2); 
Secretary-Treasurer (2), and President (3| Tennis 
Association; Varsity Tennis Team (4); W'cariT of 
X. C; Orange County Club; Chemical .lomiial 
Club; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; A K K. 

Of studious and retiring habits; which former 
habit helped him acquire a key. His orderly pas- 
sions are Chemistry and Tennis. You seldom see liim 
that he is not on his way from the Chemistry Hall to 
I lie tennis courts, or the other way amurid. .\n 
ne.Kcd a tennis N. C. in his Senior year. 




\ 



CAoAA^LX^/^rt^ai^ 



\v 



/x 



'/ 





QjWUo......^. 



JOHX jrAX.\IN(i Ve.nahi.k, Cli.ipcl Hiil, X. (_'. 
And holh ircie young, and oiie irna hcuulifnl. 

\liv 18; lu-ifilil 5 feet liy^ inchess; \vci;;lit 154. 

<;i>igoii's Hcjul ; Cosiii()])()litaii Club: Wearer of 
X. C. : Coiiiiiieiicemeiit Hall Maiiai;er (3): Leader 
Spring Gernian (4) : Class liaseliall Team (•>. 3) ; 
Class Football Team (3): Varsitv Kootball Team 
(4): Gym Team (4); Phi Society; V. -\1. C. A.; 
-Mliletic Assoeiation; German Clnl>: Orange Countv 
Club; A K E. 

"Yen" 

A twin unto tbe other, but doesn't look it. Jlixes 
ninn' with his fellow students, and is not so studious. 
Ihi-. a taste for atlileties. and made a football 
sweater in his Senior year. Has an angelie eoun- 
tenanee and dispusitidn. but is nut as liashfnl as he 

hinUs. 



If.VROI.D 


VOX 


Pki.t 


Vi!F.i;i,.\xi) 


Charl 


otte. 


X. (. 


lt,,<isl ,n 


/ llir 


//7/r.v 


„/■ „.,nr an 


■r.slnry. 


hini 


r I/O Kill.' 



Thiifn- Ihrir /Kj-sscssiuiix. nunc „j yuui.i. 

.Vye lid; height 5 feet 10 inches: weight 1S3. 
llistorii-:il Society: Jlecklenbnrg County Club. 

■■H(inil<r 

Divine of form and beautiful of eenuitenance. Tries 
to get rid of some of his "wretehed color" by smok- 
ing, but it diicsn't work. Dropped out of college for 
a while, but will graduate with his class. Loves to 
talk about his great ancestors across tlie sea. Is 
well up on literature. 




X' 



■% 




Dai^iel JIcGregor Williams. Xewton. X. C. 
Hath liny man seen hint at llic ttaiber'sf 

Age 19: height 5 feet 11 inches; weight 179. 

Di .Society ; Athletic Association; Treasurer Ath- 
letic Association (4): Class Football Team (1. 2); 
All-Class Football Team (1); Scrub Football Team 
|2| ; Varsity Football Team I :?. 4l : \'arsity Track 
Team ( 1. 2. ."J I ; Captain \'aisity Trai-I< Team (4) ; 
Wearer of X. ( '. 

-Mar" 

"Mac" ~ho\\~ >ij;ns of beini;' a bi;; man — so far as 
size is concerned. Has an X. C. in botli football and 
track. Doe.s not care very much about his studies, 
but is enough interested to get on classes befoie they 
are dismissiKl. Has a strong dislike for the razor, 
until his b?ard grows an inch or two. Is c|uite a 
handv man to have around at a c-las- meeting or 
football game. 



^.^^^i.^^1^ 



■^T-e^e^T^^ 



Adolpjhs Uahisison Wolfi.. I'^lkiii. X. C. 
Ill tliat fierce lii/lil irhieli heats iiiii,,i a llii;iir. 

Age 28: height li feet: weight 170. 

Di Society, Y. .\I. C. A.. Cabinet Olliccr V. JI. C. A., 
Cla.ss Football (3. 4): Cla.ss Historian (3): Fresh- 
Soph Debater (2): Business ilanager Tar Ihcl 
(4): Y. Y. Board (4): President Class (41: 
(ioldcn FliKM-e: Surry County Club: Licen- 
tiate in Physics (3.4): I'nivcrsity Council. 

■■Itiil fi,- 

That he is our president, shows how nuich wc think 
of him. Leads us along the ])ath of righteousness, and 
chastises those who stray therefrom. Is a good 
debater and scholar, and somewhat of an honor-bull. 
Is mild-mannered and kee]is out of strifes and con- 
tentions. Is a friend nf u- all. 





T. (;. WiiiciiT. Imliiin. K c. 

Coiiipaiuj. rilliiiiKiKs foiiipiiiiij. liatk been the spoil 
of me. 

Age 20; lieiglit .i feet 7 indies; weiglit IT-'). 

■■niiijhf 

Came to us ficnii Wake Forest, so can't be liekl 
responsible for anything lie does. Jimmy Royster 
bails from the same j)laee, but didn't have enough 
brothei-ly love to prevent him from throwing a stu- 
dent of his Alma Mater. Wright was also so unfor- 
tunate as to luive his "Zoo" notes swiped, so hit the 
dust on that liighlv entertaining course. 






//. 



Senior Class History 



TIIE record uf the Class of lOlO is that of a iialiiral, hariuiiiiii us develop- 
iiieiit from uiieonth Freshiiianhood to diiiiiitied Seniority. The following 

record, thmigh l)rief and ineoni])lete, will show that the class as Freshmen 
was muchly fresh, hut that later the class in its growth and varions activities 
made a brilliant record. 

The class entered the University the fall of 190G, numbering as Freshmen 
one hundred and eighty-five. Our experience the first year was about the same 
as that of any other Freshman Class ; but we were not aware of the fact then. 
After having paid our just initiation fees, and having given the balance to Dr. 
Kluttz, the class was turned over to the committee on entertainment. We Avere 
hazed more than any class had been in years. The law of supply and demand 
was apparently in vogue. The nightly renditions in speech and song seemed to 
greatly delight our Sophomore audiences ; and langiiage on the University 
campus did not endure the raw, uncultured Freshman articulations; rather, it 
suffered direful results. Unable to sui'vive amid our Freshman slaughter of 
English speech and fact, the leaves from scholarly oak and classic po]ilar expired 
and were a premature ])rey to Judge Erockwell's rake: also, fn-ni a similar 
cause that fall, the learned ivy of the Old South gave a final gasp for lireath 
and died. From hazing, however, the class derived one good result; this was 
the system of class polity. The government of the class, as monitor Nixon 
showed more by examjile ihan by ])r<'ce])t, was the same ])reciscly that Professor 
Williams defined on Psych as ideal democracy : "Every man can attend to his 
own business better than another man can fur him." The class distinguished 
itself by giving "Big" Thompson t)o the varsity football team, and O. A. 
Hamilton to the varsity baseball team ; outside of athletics the class did 
nothing distinctively worthy of mention. 

A summer's vacation decreased our nnniber as So]ihoniores to one hundred 
and thirty-five. Some were lost, others sirayeil, and a few were stolen. P. Ti. 
Teagiie was chosen to pilot the class, and he was the right man in the right 
jilace. The class reversed the usual order of So]>honi(]ric activities by abolishing 
from its program the worst forms of hazing. A new feature of University life 
was added when the 1910 Class allowed the Freshmen to hold j)eaceably their 
more important meetings. r)es])ite the fact that our class had been so severely 




.\^ 




hazed, and that all S(i])hom<irc's have "euvfaiu iiialiciiaMc l■il:llt^;,"' tin- cdass was 
willing t(i sacrifice smiie nf its Siijihdiiiiirir aiifhdi-ity Id iii\-e the Freshiuan a 
iiKire free and denidcvafic ]idsiiidii in I'liix-ersity life. Six df the class this 
year nuule the \-arsity fodthall s(inad: (iarrett, Thdnqisdn. and ( 'rosswell as 
sweater men, ami lieldeii, Fi-riiiisiui, and Harris as snlisfinites. In the ayiuiia- 
siiini cdiitests S. Xash, Kerr, and ( '. ( ". ISrown wirn s\veat;'rs, and I). M. 
Williams won his track mundyram. In the ehiss tennis tdurnanu-nt, llyman and 
N'enaMe, < '. S., wnn tlu' (dnmi]iidnshi]i witlidul a single defeat. 

^\gain a snmmer's vacatidn ]iassed, and ninety duniers ans\vere(l te rdll 
call. The hcindv df (dass jiresident with its service was given to the firm, 
cdnseientidiis, nnliiased Tom Xash. This year the class hist most nf its 
resendilanees td other (dasses. and todk a high stand in the varimis activities of 
college life. The class fodthall team showed its sn|ieridvity liy winning the 
cla.ss cham|iidnshi]) without its lieing crdssed a single time. On the I rack, S. V. 
Teagne, I), if. AVilliams, and J. .\. Everett won sweaters and made euviahl? 
records. L. DeK. IJelden and I). M. Williams were added to the football 
sweater men, and (). W. llyman wdn his jilaee on tlu' varsity tennis team. 
.\s ca])tain of the invincihle \arsiiy liasehall team that made a brilliant recdrd 
both Xorth and Sonth, Hamilton was first in war, first in peace, and first in the 
hearty admiration of his felldW-stndenfs. In intercdllegiate deliates the 
11)10 Class was represented by D. IS. 'i'eagne and II. K. Slaey. .V gddd nnndier 
of men survived the ileathly condiats against .Math and Psych with sufficient 
.-itrength to join the Phi Beta Kajipa. During the past several years many evils 
in college have been eliminated by a strong reformative movement; 1910 men 
have always been in the front ranks in these reforms. Working silently and 
unassumingly, without desire of public plaudits, the class has done invaluable 
labor in ujiholding the high ideals of our college community. 

Another vacatiou was enjoyed and the call made for the last charge. 
Eighty-five men, a very large class, assembled as Senidrs td stri\e for ]iarticiiia- 
tioii in the ]irivileges of the Dax'ie Pdplar and ^Memorial Hall. The real 
strength of the class, a clean, unassuming, resolute adherence to duty, now 
exemplified itself. The broadness of sympathy and variety of activity in the 
class can well be seen in the high stands taken by its men this year. A. IT. 
Wolfe, as president of the class, excellently carried into effect the honor and 
duty conferred upon him. "Icabod" Garrett was cajitain of the varsity football 
team; L. A. Brown and J. ^I. Venable won their football sweaters; D. M. Wil- 
liams was captain of the track team; J. W. Lasley was president of the Tennis 



Z/' 




Association ; C. 8. Venable and his teammate were victorious in every meet 
with the \"arsity tennis team. In singles Venable lost but two sets out of a total 
uf seventeen sets in matches with Davidson College, Guilford College, Richmond 
College, Washing-ton and Lee University, and the T^niversity of Virginia. The 
college publications have I'.tlO men at their head: O. AV. llyiiuni is cditdi'-iii- 
chief of the Tar Heel and T. P. .Vasb is edit(ir-in-ehief id' the C iii rfrsil 1/ 
Magazine. The Y. ]\r. C. A. has had an ctficiciit administratidii under the 
presidency of Hoke Kauisaur. In the climinatiDU of college evils the ('hiss of 
litlO has ever taken an active |iart. .V cmiqiarisdn of ci>nditions here in I'.XIti 
ti) thdse of lillO will substantiate this fact. Patiently enduring the tierce crifi- 
cisnis hurled at any r(d'orniers, these men have calmly, unassumingly, y(>t slernly 
jii-osecuted their duties in abolishing college evils, purifying college life, and up- 
holding the high ideals of the University. 

The foregoing brief record renders evident that the ('bi>s of I'.ilO is char- 
acterized by broadness of activity, democracy of s])irit, and nnassunnng prose- 
cution of duty. Such qualities e.\])lain the brilliant record in football, baseball, 
gymnasium, tennis, track, deliatc, college publications, reforms, religious 
activity, and the like. Uossessing but few lagging dregs of ihe botioni, and 
little of the tickle foam cd' the top, tlii' class as one strong, harnioiuoiis, nurturing, 
mtiin curri-nt, taught and directed in personal initiative liy the I'liixcrsity, shall 
continue to select and direi'l contidenlly its own coni'se among the upheax'als 
and de[)ressions pecnliai' to the topography of life. 

J. K. N. 



V\ 



V\ 



\^ 







iimiiiiiimiiwmfim//f/mr/mf//(/m^/7/r^ 



OFFICERS 

B. ('. STKWAUT Presidkxt 

JOll X TIIJ JCIT Vice-President 

I!. L, DEAl, Secretary 

CYRUS THOiri'SOX Treasurer 

(',. \V. THO.MPS( )X Historian 

J. S. C'OWLES Captain Football Team 

\^■. ]'". TAYLOR Manager Baseball Team 

W. R. THOMAS Captain Baseball Team 

J. W. CHESHTRE Manager Football 'Hcam 






/ / 



// 



/ / 



Junior Clas0 HoII 

ALEXANDER, ODOM Charlotte. N. C. 

Athletic Association; Baskpt-Viall Association (2) ; ^Mecklenlniv" ('o\inty Chib; War- 
rent<m High Selu.ol Cluh: Class Baseball {■>} : Drainatic Clul) ( :! I ; Oeniian Club; 
2 A E. 

ALLISON, JAMES RICHARD Pisgah Forest, N. C. 

Gymnasium Team (2); Gymnasium Squad (1. 2. 3); North Carolina Cluh (3); 
Y. M. C. A.; Di Society; Elisha :\litclii'll Scicntilic Society: Buncombe County Club; 
Athletic Association; Class Football ( :> i . 

BAILEY, CARL BROSWELL Elm City, X. C. 

Phi Society; Tennis Club; Basket-ball Association (2): Class Tennis Team (3); 
Captain Class Baseball (2) ; Oak Riiljjc Club; Y. M. C. A. 

BARNHARDT, EUGENE C. JR Concord. N. C. 

Athletic Association; Gernum Club; Y. il. C. A.; K 2. 

BATTLE. JOHN MANNING Rocky Mount. N C. 

Athletic Association; Edficcombc County Club: Manager Class Baseball (ll; Class 
Baseball (1) : Scrub Baseball (2) : History Society: Gorgon's Head; K A. 

BELK, WILLIAM PARK Charlotte. X. C. 

Di Society; Y. M. C. A.: Athletic Association; ilecklenburg County Club; Class 
Football (1); Scrub Football (2): Varsity Fontball ( :! ) ; Cajitain Class Track (3). 

BLUE. ALEXANDER McNEAL! Carthage. N. C. 

Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A.: Moore-Lee County Club; Ciunmencement ilar- 
shal (3). 

BRYAN, DANIEL BUNYAN Apex. N. C. 

Phi Society; Y. il. C. A.: Athletic Association: Buie's Creek Academy Club: V. M. 
C. A. Delegate (3). 

BROWN. ROY TILSON Erwin. Tenn. 

Y. M. C. A. ; Cosmopolitan Club. 

BROADFOOT, CHARLES WETMORE Fayetteville. N. C. 

Phi Society: Athletic Association; (icrman Club; Palais de Roi : A T Q. 

BUCHAN. EDWARD ROBIXSOX Manley, X. C. 

Plri Society. Moore-Lee County Club; Athletic Association; Buie's Creek Academy 
Cluh. 

BURGWIX, KEXXETH OGDEN Pittsburg. Pa. 

German Club; Vice-President Cosmopolitan Club Ci) ; Athletic Association; A T P.. 

CHESHIRE, JAJIES WEBB Pvaleigh. N. C. 

Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A.; Manager Class Football (3) ; (iorgon's Llead ; Z <!>. 

CLAVTOR, ROBERT HTOIE University. X. C. 

Di Society; Oak Ridge Club; V. M. C. A.; Athletic Association. 

COL\'ARD, JOSEPH B0\\"E1? Jefferson, N. C. 

Di Society, Athletic Association; Tennis Association; Class Football (3); Com- 
mencement Ball Manager { 3 ) . 

COOK. WALTER WATSON Fayetteville. N. C. 

Phi Society; Y. JI. C. A.; Cumberland County Club: BOB. 

COOPER, WILLIAM LEE. JR (iraham. X. C. 

Di Society; Y. M. C. A.; Class Footliall (3) : Scrub Football (2) ; Ministerial Band. 

70 



COWLES. JOSEPH SANFORD Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Di Society; Class Football (2, :5); Captain Football (3); Athletic Association; 
Historical Society; Class Baseliall (2); Chief Coiiimencenient Jlarslia! (3). 

COWPER. BRYAN GRIMES Ralcisli. X. C. 

Press Association; Athletic Association; Binj;hani School Club; Trinity Park Scliool 
Club; Class Baseball (2) : German Clnl): Class Football (3) : 11 K A. 

COX, FOSTER NUGENT Lcaksville. N. C. 

Di Society; President Rockingham County Club (."!); Carolina-Peiin. Scriib IX'bater 
(2) ; Y. M. C. A.; Assistant in Library (3). 

CROUSE, DAVID STOWE Lincolnton. N. C. 

Athletic Association; Tennis Association; (icrinan C'lub; (Jicc Clul> (2); Dramatic 
Club (2, 3) ; Cliief Ball Manager of Freshman Hop (11; i) A E. 

DANIELS, GEORGE A Goldsljoro, N. C. 

Treasurer German Club (3) ; GorgonVs Head; K A. 

DA\VSON. JOSEPH GREEN Xc\vl>erii. N. C. 

Phi Society; Athletic A-.-(ci\tion ; Cbi-^ Football ( 1. 2. 3|. 

DEAL, ROY LENNY Tay Inrsvillc. N. C. 

Di Society: Athletic A^sociatinn ; V. M. C. A.; Vicc-Pri'sident Basket-ball Association 
(2) ; Band (1. 2. 3) ; French-Dramatic Club (2) ; Class Secretary (3). 

DEANS, ARCHIBALD BATTLE Wilson, X. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Assoi^iation ; Xorth Caroliua Chib; Oak Kiddie Cbib ; Dramatic 
Club (2) ; Varsity Football ( ], 2, 3) : -l- A (». 

DEES, WILLIAM ARCHIE I'ikevillc, N. C. 

Di Society; Y. Jl. C. A.: Athletic Association; Huie's Creek Club; l,e Cerch> de Con- 
versation Francais; Fresii-Sopli Dcliater. 

DICKSON, PAUL liacfnrd, N. C. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; Uolicson Coouty Cluli; Scrul) I'oot- 
ball (1); Class Football (2); President Raeford Institute Cbil) |3); Tenuis Associa- 
tion; Press Association; Assistant Manaf;er Mafjazine (3 1. 

DOBBINS, JAMES TALMAGE Kockford. X. C. 

Di Society; Y. XL C. A.; Atliletic Association. 

DULS, FERDINAND JOHN Wilmington. N. C. 

Di Society, Athletic Association; Basket-ball AsscKialion (2| ; .New Hanover County 
Club; Sub Varsity Baseball (2) ; Class Football ( 2. 3 ) ; (iym S<puid (1.2. 3) ; Dcntscher 
Verein; Commencement Marsluil (3). 

EASOX, JOSHUA LAWRENCE Stantoi)>liurg. N. C. 

Phi Society; V. M. C. A.; Historical Society; Secretary .Ministerial I'.and (2). 

ELLIS, WILLIAM BUKWFLL. .lU W iuston-Sah.m. N. C. 

Athletic Association; >'. AL ( '. A.; IniNcrsily liand (1, 2, 3); (ilce Club (1, 2); 
Tennis A.ssoeiation ; GernKii) Clnb. 

EVERETT, WILLIAM NAST, .11! Kockint!liain, N. C. 

Athletic Association ; Tennis .\ssociation ; German Cluli; K A. 

FIELD, ALEXANDER LlTTLEJOllN Ualeigli. X. C. 

Phi Society; Athletic Association; Tennis Association; .Modern Literature Club; 
Track Squad (1, 2); Wake County Club; Y. M. C. A.; Assistant in Physics; Greek 
Prize (2); German Cluli; <!' A H. 

71 






FREEMAN, JOHN WEBSTER Mooresville, N. C. 

Buie's Creek Cluli: Di Society; V. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; Iredell County 
Club; Ministerial Band; Volunteer Band. 

GEORGE, WESLEY CRITZ Elkin, X. C. 

Di Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association. 

GRAHAM, GEORGE Charlotte, N. C. 

Di Society; Athletic Association: Y. Jl. C. A.; Mocklenburj; County Club; W. H. S. 
Club; Class Secretary (1|; Assistant Football Mana';er 12): Class Historian (2); 
Tennis Association ; Yackety Y'ack Editor ( 3 ) . 

GUE.SS, WILLIAM CONRAD Apex. N. C. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; Tennis Association; Wake County 
Club; Buie's Creek Club; French-Dramatic Club (2). 

GUNTER, CHARLES WALKER Santord, N. C. 

Di Society; \'. M. C. A.; Athletic Association: Moore-Lee County Club; President 
Dramatic Club (2); Class President (2); University Council (2); Dramatic Club 
(1, 2, 3) ; Debating Union (3). 

HACKNEY", JAMES ACRA Wilson, N. C. 

Athletic Association: Oak Ridge Club; Class Football (2. 3) ; North Carolina Club; 
German Club; Connncncement Ball Jlanajier (3) ; ^'arsity Baseball (1, 2) ; 2 N. 

HALL, ROGER BAIvER Lenoir, N. C. 

HALLIBLTJTON. JOHN BREVARD Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Di Society: Athletic Association; Deutscher \'erein ; Mecklenburg County Club; 
Tennis Association; Assistant Manager Basket-ball Association. 

HARDISON, OSBORNE BENNETT Wadesboro. N. C. 

Di Society; Athletic Association: Y. M. C. A.: (iernian Club; <l> A 9. 

HARRIS, JOHN \^•HARTON Reidsville, N. C. 

Rockingham County Club; Tennis .\ssociation ; Corpulent Club (1. -. 3). 

/ HOl'GH, FRANK Birmingham, Ala. 

Tennis Association; Cosmopolitan Club. 

HIATT, CHARLES EDWARD Pilot Jlountain, N. C. 

Di Society; Deutscher Verein; Tennis Association; Class Football (2). 

HODCilN, ANGUS JAMES Red Springs, N. C. 

Athletic Association ; Phi Society ; Y. M. C. A. ; Robeson County Club. 

HUGHES, ISRAEL HARDING Chai)el Hill. N. C. 

Phi Society; Y'. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; Tennis Association; Dramatic Club 
(3) ; Assistant Editor Tar Heel (3). 

HL'NTER, ROBERT LEE Afton, N. C. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.: Athletic Association: U K A. 

JOHNSTON, JA3IES TALBOT Aberdeen, N. C. 

Athletic Association; Y". M. C. A.; Di Society: Manager Class Football (1) ; Dramatic 
Club; Bingham Club; Raeford Institute Club: Moore-Lee County Club; German 
Club; Yackety Yack Editor (3) ; K 2. 

JOYNER, WILLIAM THOMAS Raleigh, N. C. 

Phi Society; Class Football (1, 2. 3); All-Class Football (2); Vice-President (2); 
Athletic Association ; Y'. M. C. A. ; Assistant Manager ( 3 ) ; Vice-President German 
Club (3) ; Leader of Sophomore German; Tar Heel Board (3) ; Gorgon's Head; Z *. 

72 



JOXES, WILLIAM HEXRY Yanceyville N. C. 

Di Society; Athletic Association: Y. iL C. A.: Historical Society; Rockingham 
County Club; Association Lil)i'aiy (3); Fresh-Soph Debater (2). 
KOIKEY, ARTHUR CH.\RM Burlington. N. C. 

Di Soc'iety: Y. M. C. A.: Athletic Association: Tennis Association; Alamance 
County Club. 

KNIGHT, BURKE HAYWOOD Williamston N. C. 

KOIXER, JUNIUS SPAETH, .JR Conover. N. C. 

Di Society; Athletic Association; Y. II. C. A.; Assistant in Physics (3). 
KUPERSCHMIDT, SAilUEL New York, N. Y. 

Di Society. 
LEE, .JOSEPH RAYMOND :\Iount Olive. N. C. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association. 
LEONARD, SAMUEL EDWIN Lexington. N. C. 

Di Society; Y. M. C. A.; Davidson County Clnb; Class Fo<itball (2. .'i). 
LLORENS, FELIX LUCIANO Santiago, Cuba. 

Cuban Club; Tennis Association. 
L]X)RENS, FRANCIS Santiago, Cuba. 

Cuban Club. 
LLORENS, THOMAS VICENTE Santiago, Cuba. 

Cuban Club. 
LYON, HENRY WISE Windsor, N. C. 

Oak Ridge Club; Class Baseball (1) ; Varsity Baseball 21 : North Carolina Club; K A. 

.Mcculloch, f:dgar p^ranklin. jr white Oak, n. c. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association: Manager Class Baseball (2) ; Assist- 
ant Manager Varsity Baseball (.S) ; Historical Society. 
McCOOOAN, JOHN ARCHIBALD Shannon. N. C. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.: Atblelic A— ociation: Robeson County Club; Raeford 
Institute Club; .Soph-Junior Debater I ;i i : Sojih Debater (2|. 

-Mclv,\Y, JOHN ARCHIBALD Rule's (reek, N. C. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.: Athletic Association: Buie"s Creek Club: Fresh-Soph 
Debater (1); Soph-Junior (2). 

.McIXTOSH, CHARLES EUGENE Denver, N. C. 

Di Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; Fresh-Soph Debater (1) ; Soph-.Junior 
Debater (2) ; Scrub Debater (2) ; Scrub Football (2) ; Vice-President Class (2) ; Class 
Football (3). 

McLEAN. ERNEST COBB (;ibsonville, N. C. 

Di Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; Secretary (iuilford County Club (2) ; 
Class Football (1); Scrub Football (2); Captain Scrub Kootball (3): Scrub Baseball 
(1, 2) ; Whitsett Institute Club; Press .Association: .Assistant Leader .lunior Prom. (3). 

.McLEAN. ROBERT CLAY Brevard. N. C. 

Di Society; Y. M. C. A.; Class Football (1) : Scrub Football (2) : N'arsity Football 
(3) ; North Carolina Club. 

McLEAN, JOHN DUNCAN Barium Springs, N. C. 

Di Society, Athletic Association: .Moore-l.ee Cciunty Club: liedell County Club: Oak 
Ridge Club. 

73 



V 



/\. 



McEAE, ALFRED EVELYN CLAYTOR Fayetteville, X. C. 

Di Society; Cumberland County Club; Ilistoiieal Siiciety; iluilein ],iteravy Clulj; 
Assistant Editor Magazine (3). 

MANN, GROVER CARLYLE Franklin. X. C. 

Di Society; Y. iL C. A.; President Slacon County Club; Le Cerele de Conversation 
Frangaise; Licentiate in JIath. (3). 

MARTIN, HERBERT LEE Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Phi Society; Y. il. C. A.: Atliletic Association; Albennirle-Palniico County Club; 
Sub Drum Beater (3) : Cciinan Cluli. 

MAUPIN, WILLlAil FIREY Washiiijjton. D. C. 

Di Society; Y. M. C. A.; Class Prophet (1) ; Secretary Kuwan County Cluli; Chemical 
Journal Club; Class Baseball (2) ; Class Footl)aIl Team (3| : P.asket-liall Association. 

.MEISEXHEIMER, CHARLES AUGUSTUS, JR Charlotte, X. C. 

Di Society; Scrub Football (2, 3) ; Class Baseball (2. 3) ; Jlecklcnburg County Club; 
German Club; $ A 9. 

MORGAN, JOSEPH PATRICK Shawl)oro. X. C. 

Tennis Association; Class Tennis Club (1): Class Baseball (1); (Jlcc Club 
( 1, 2, 3) ; German Club. 

MOSER, JRA CLEVELAXD Rock Creek, N. C. 

Di Society; Athletic Association: Oak Ridge Club; .Alamance County Club; Historical 
Society; Class Baseball (1); Soph-Junior Debater (3). 

MULLIGAN, NAAMAN SPENCER Clenunons, N. C. 

Di Soeiet}'; Y. M. 0. A.; Athletic Association; Tennis Association; Deutscher Verein; 
Licentiate in Math. (3). 

O'BRIEN, JOHN JOSEPH Durliam. X. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; German Club; Giniglionl ; Z >!'. 

OLIVER, JAilES FRANCIS Mount Olive, N. C. 

Phi Society; Y. il. C. A.; Athletic Association; Class Poet (2 1 : Class Football (1) ; 
Scrub Football (2, 3). 

OSBORNE, VERGIL WAITE Brevard, N. C. 

Di Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association: North Carolina Cluli: (iym Team (2.1 ; 
\"arsity Ti-ack Team (2). 

PALMER. GUS Gulf, X. C. 

Phi Society; Y. il. C. A.: Athletic Association; Oak Ridt.e Cluli; JIoore-Lee County 
Club. 

PARKER, SAMUEL GREEX Kinston, X. C. 

Phi Society. 

PATTERSON, EARL VICTOR Burlington, N. C. 

Di Society, Alamance County Club. 

PARSLEY, WILLIAM MURIX)CK .Wilniingtcn, N. C. 

Athletic Association; New Hanover County Club; Class Football (1, 2, 3); Gym; 
Varsity (3) ; Gjnn Team (1, 2, 3) ; Tennis Association; Track Squad; N'orth Carolina 
Club; German Club; Sub-Leader (icrman Club Dance (3) : S N. 

RAY', HERBERT Raleigh, N. C. 

Phi Society. 

RHODES, ADRIAN BURBANK Wilmington. N. C. 

Di Society; Y'. M. C. A.; Atliletic Association: New Hanover County Club; 'J'ennis 
Association; Class Football (1, 3): Scrnli Footliall (2): Class Baseball (1, 2); Ger- 
man Club ; * A e. 

74 



RHODES, GEORGE WASHINGTON Riverdale, N. C. 

Phi Society; Y. JI. C. A. 
ROBERSON, HOYT GODDARD Pollot-ksville, N. C. 

Phi Society. 
ROBERTS, GEORGE H.. JR Newbeni. N. C. 

German Club; K -. 
RODJIAN, NATHANIEL FULFORD Cluulotte, N. C^ 

Phi Society; Y. il. C. A.; Athletic Association: Oak Ridge Clul) : Fireside Chili; 
Mecklenburg County Club; German Club; A T D. 

ROYALL, SAMUEL J Wiiniinjiton. N. C. 

Historical Society; Athletic Association; German Club; K i). 

RUTZLER, GEORGE FREDERICK, JR Charlotte, N. C. 

Athletic Association; Varsity Track Team | 1. 2) ; ilecklenburg County Club. 

SHIELDS, .JOHN MONTGOMERY Enfield. X. C. 

Phi Society; Halifax County Clul). 

SLADE. THOilAS BOG. JR Hamilton. N. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Ass,iciati(]n ; Mailin County Club: (iernuin Club; K Z. 

SMALL, WALTER LOWRY Elizabeth City. X. C. 

Phi Society; Athletic Association; Albemarle- Pamlico County Club; Scrub Football 
(1, 2, 3) ; German Club; Leader Junior Prom. (3) ; Ben. 

SMITH, HENRY CLARK Charlotte. X. C. 

Di Society; V. .M. C. A.: Athletic Association; Dramatic Cluli (2l; X'ice-l'rcsident 
Dramatic Club (3) : Cym Team 12) : French Dr;unatic Cluli (2) : V. M. C. A. Cabinet 
{3);2N. 

SMITH, RICHARD RAYJIOND Rock Hill. S. C. 

Athletic Association; V. .M. C. .\.: South Carolina Club; Cor-moiiolitan Club. 

SOLOJIOX, HARRY MEYER Wilmington, N. C. 

Athletic Association; Tennis A.ssociation; Basket-ball Association; Class Football 
(1, 2, 3) ; New Hanover County Club; Orchestra (1. 2. 3) ; Varsity Track Squad (2) ; 
Deutscher Verein. 

STEWART, BONNIE CLEVELAND 0. K., S. C. 

Di Society; Cosmopolitan CIuli; Basket ball .Association; Athletic Association; Tennis 
Association; Seeretaiy North Carolina Club; Presi<lent Class (3); Varsity Baseball 
Team ( 1, 2) ; Captain Varsity Baseball (3). 

STOCKTON, RICHARD GORDON Winston-Salcm. X. C. 

Di Society; Y. II. C. A.; Athletic Association; Tennis Association; Pi-ess Association: 
Assistant Manager Football Team (3); .\lanajj;cr \arsity Track Team (3); B e H. 

TANNER, KENNETH SPENCER Charlotte, N. 0. 

Athletic Association; Di S<x-iety; A'ackety Yack Editor (3); Tennis Association; 
Mecklenburg County Club: (ierinan Club; Sub-leader Fall German (3); Press 
Association; Gimhoul; 22 X. 

TAYLOR, WALTER FRANK Faison. N. C. 

Phi Society; Athletic Association : llislc>ri<al Society; Vice-President Duplin County 
Club; Licentiate in Latin (3) : Y. M. C. A.: .Manager Class Baseball (3). 

TIIOM.VS, CHARLES RANDOLPH. J It Newbern, N. C. 

Captain Class Football U903) ; Class Football Team (li)O(l) : Phi .Society; K 2. 

75 



\ I 



A 



THOMAS, WILLIAM WRENN Hiddenite, N. C. 

Class Baseball (1); Band (1, 2. 3); Ordiestia (2); Class Captain Baseball Team 
(3); Di Society; Athletic Association. 

THOMPSON, CYRUS, JR Jacksonville, X. C. 

Phi Society; Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A.; Tennis Association; Press Association; 
Assistant Editor Tai- Heel (2); Secretary and Treasurer Class (2): Vice-President 
W. H. S. Club (2) ; Treasurer Class (3) ; Assistant Business ilana^er 7V(r Heel (3). 

THOMPSON, EARL ASBURY Mount Holly, N. C. 

President Gaston County Club; Atliletic Association; Y. M. C. A.; Di Society; 
Varsity Football (1, 2, 3). 

THOMPSON, GORDON WESLEY Spray, N. C. 

Di Society; Athletic Association; \'. M. C. A.: Coniniencenient Debater (3). 

TILLRTT, JOHN Charlotte, N. C. 

Athletic Association; Di Society ; Y. il. C. A.; MecUlenl)urg County Club; Y. il. C. 
A. Cabinet (3); Class Treasurer (1); Class Representative (2); Yackety Yack 
Editor (3); Sub Varsity Baseball (1); Ca|)tain Class Football (1); Scrub Baseball 
(2); Varsity Football (2); Sub Varsity Fontliall (3); Vice-President Class (3); 
Ginighoul. 

TROTTER, BENJAMIN CARTER Reidsville, N. C. 

Di Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association: i;ockinj>hani County Club. 

TURLINGTON, EDGAR WILLIS Sniithfield, N. C. 

Phi Society; Y. Jl. C. A.; Athletic Association; S. A. D. Club; Basket-ball Associa- 
tion (2) ; Tennis Association; President Johnston County Club (2) ; Coniniencenient 
Maislial (3). 

TYSON, CLAID PHILLIPPS Carthage, N. C. 

Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A.: Abi(iic-I.cc County Club; Tennis Association; 
Bingham Club; German Club. 

VANSTORY, ROBERT McLEAN Greensboro. N. C. 

Di Society; Y. M. C. A.; Atliletic Assucialioii ; Sccretnry Guilford County Club (3) ; 
Tennis Association; C. M. F. ; Assistant Leader Junior Prom. (3); German Club; 

Ben. 

VOGLER, HERBERT AUGUSTA Winston-Salem. N. C. 

Di Society; Y'. Jl. C. A.: Athletic Associ;itiim : Tenuis .Vssociation : Chemical Journal 
Club; Band (1, 2, 3) ; Orchestra (2. 3) : (imiiaii Club. 

VOILS, THAD. WILLIAMS Mooresville, N. C. 

Y'. M. C. A.; Athletic Association: Basket-ball Association; President Iredell County 
Club. 

WALKER, J( tSEPH GABRIEL Graham, N. C. 

Y. il. C. A.; Di Society; Ministerial Band; AUiiiuiMce County Club. 

WARD, EUGENE CARROLL Waynesville, N. C. 

Di Society; Y'. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; Basket-ball Association; Press Asso- 
ciation: Tennis Association; HaywcKid County Cluli: Historical Society. 

WALLACE, FITZHUGH EARNEST KenansviUe, N. C. 

Athletic Association: Historical Society; nii]iliii County Club; Press Association; 
German Club. 

WARREN, EDGAR POE Bushy Fork, N. C. 

Athletic Association; Phi Society; Class Baseball (2). 

76 



//. 



WEBB, RICHARD THOMPSON Bell Buckle, Tenn. 

Di Society; Y. M. C. A.: Athletic Association; Tennis Association; Manager Class 
Tennis Team (1); Cosmopolitan Club: Webb School Club; Tar Heel Editor (3); 
Commencement Marshal; n K E. 

WELLOXS, ELMER JAMES Smithfield, N. C. 

Phi Society; Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A.; S. A. 1>. Club; Johnston County 
Club; Secretarj' and Treasurer Johnston County Club. 

WHITXEY, FLOYD GILBERT Bessemer City, X. C. 

Y'. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; German Clul); Assistant Leader Freshman Hop; 
Yackety Yack Editor (3) ; Track Squad (2) ; Commencement Marshal (3) ; * A 9. 

WEST, XOEL ELLIOT Salemburg, X. C. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association. 

WHITAKER, LYMAX BECKWITH Winston-Salem, X. C. 

Orchestra (3); Band (3). 

WILLIAMS, CLAWSOX LEE Sanford, X. C. 

Di Society; Y. il. C. A.: Athletic Association: Treasurer Moore-Lee County Club; 
Assistant Football ilanager (.'i) ; Fresli-Sopli Debater (2) : Commencement Debater (3). 

WILLIAMS, EDWARD LOCKE Greensboro, X. C. 

Athletic Association; Guilford County Club; Y. M. C. A,; Historical Society; Track 
Team (2). 

WILLIAMS, LOUIS HICKS Faison, X. C. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Assuciation: President Duplin County Club; Ten- 
nis Association; Class Baseball (2) ; German Club. 

WILLARD, CHARLES WILSOX Winston-Salem, X. C. 

Di Society. 

WITHERIXGTOX, ISHAM FAISOX Faison, X. C. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.; .\tliletic Association: Treasurer Dujilin County Club (3) ; 
Class Baseball (1); Scrub Baseball (2); Yai kktv Va( k Editor ( :! I : (Jerman Club; 
Commencement Marshal (3) ; B 9 11. 

WOOD, JOHX ELLIOTT Elizabeth City, X. C. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic As.sociation : T. P. S. and T. P. C. Clubs. 

W YATT, .MARSHALL BOYLAX Durham, X. C. 

Phi S<x;iety; Y. M. C. A.; Atliletic Assoc-iation ; Musical Association; Band (1,2,3) ; 
Orchestra (1. 2, 3) ; Class Tennis Team (3) : Tennis Association; Manager Class Tennis 
Team (3). 

ZOLLICOFFER, ALGERXOX ACGUSTUS Henderson. X. C. 

Athletic Association: German Club: A K E. 

ZOLLICOFFER, JERE PERRY Henderson, N. C. 

Athletic Association: (ierman Cluli: A K E. 



/ 



Co tfje mcmorp of 

MtUtam Samuel iaht&Bnn 

Cf)is page is affectionatelp DcDicateD 6p fjis 
classmates of tije Class of 19U 



g-tiiDcnt at the aniuersttiJ 1907-1909 
Situ l«at! 25, 1909 



/, 



^■/ 




Junior Class History 



DriilXG the suiniiicr oi lllOT the ("uiversity sent out a call for reeiiforce- 
ineiits. and we. the (']a<s nf lUll. answered that eall liv enlistiuii' twn 
hundred and ten men. Uur ser\iees were "uly tliose which any hody of 
raw recruits cau offer to a well-organized army. ,Vt'ter a year's discipline in 
the various phases of college routine we returned cixer one hundred and fifty 
men strong, seized OTir weapons, and placed ourselves nn Imth the nffensixe and 
defensive. Having cou'jileted this branch of college tactics, we returned lasi 
fall one hundred and thirty-six men stnmg. and liegan to select, with that 
freed(jm which is grantecl a .Innidr, the alluring and uncertain studies nf 
psyeholiigy, French, ami Shakespearian English. Vm- the results — ask any 
.lunior. 

.Vs a hand of Freshmen we were very active. We were the first class of 
Freshmen that ever elected their officers in (Jerrard Hall. ^Eoreover. we had 
the distiiiciidn of winning the class football cliam]u<inship in that year. And in 
raji the climax wt- were the first Freshman Clas^ that was ever given the 
privilege of ha\'iiig a dance at ( 'ummenceiiiciit. rngcther with all these lesser 
(listinctiniis We had the es]]ecial distincticju of being the lai'gcst class that ever 
registered at the riiiversity and this recdrd we helil until I'.M)'.). 

We returned in I'.tos ;i-^ ihe largest Si.plKiiiKin- ('la>^ in the rniversity's 
history, and immrdiately placcci nnrschcs under the K^adeiship of ( '. W. (iuuter 
— "Little Gunter." Thi- year i~ e<]ieeially iidtable in the history of the (dass 
for its unifying intluenees. Where we had bei'ii a conglonieratiou of separate 
units, w<.> now became one body in s])irii. pnr|iosc, and endea\or. .\s a nnitter 
of history we suffered oidy one defeat, and that defeat we |ilace upon a lack of 
coiieentration of forces; we were o\-er]iowereil by a -u]ierior force in a clash of 
ai'uis with rhe i'l'eshmeii at ihe Fresh-So|ili baseball iiame. ()nr greatest mis- 
fortune. liowe\'er, wa^ the ]ia.-.>iug of one of our most >iucei'e and earuesl class- 
unites. J. II. ('oo]ier. ( )f our grief il is only necess;ii-y lo say that words and 
actions did not belie il~ de|]th. Thro\inh all our struiigle the piloting hand and 
unifying intlueiice of "Little dnntei'" was always seen. 

A\ the beginning of this year, with an uminimons \dfe we elected "ili'ddy"" 
Slewart as our leader. Ills unopposed election nol only shows the esteem in 
which his classmates luild him. but it al-o points oul (dearly the harmony and 

79 



V 







miity which exist in the class. Then, too, the class has a perfect right to hold 
''Redely" in such high esteem, for he was not only the chief winning factor in 
last year's varsity baseball team, but is also ca])taiii of this year's team. 

Besides furnishing the varsity baseball team "Keddy'' and "Jim" 
Hackney, and others, the class has contributed her quota of scholars, debaters, 
and Y. M. V. A. men to the life of the University. Nor must we forget that 
1911 furnished "'Pat" Deans and "Big" Thompson to last fall's football team, 
iloreover, besides giving several of our men to both scrub teams, we had the 
pleasure of recapturing the class fudtball (■liampiiuisbi]) of liM)!l. h is note- 
worthy that 1911 "is always there with the goods'" whenever college atfairs 
are concerned. Only one thing has marred the pleasure of this year's victories, 
and that was the loss by death of amither loyal member of the class — W. S. 
Davidson. 

But the particular thing of which we are proud is the unity, harmony and 
democratic spirit which pervades the class. We are one and all imbued with 
the Carolina spirit. We have no classes, Init are one in hoj^es and endeavors. 
To strengthen Carolina in nundx'rs and intlucnco has become one of our most 
ardent desires. It is our intentiim to give her a Senior Class with more than 
one hundred members, the nuudiers of which will not be its only merit. If 
harmony and unity can accomplish anything, surely 19 11 will work wonders. 
But whatsoever our accomplishments may or may no| be our cry still continues 
to be "Carolina now, Carolina forever I" 

HiSTCiRIAN. 






SOPHOMOkt 
CLASS -. 




'U 



OFFICERS 

F. B. BARKER President 

L. X. MORGAN VrePresident 

(:. C. WOOD Secretary-Treasurer 

h. X. JOHNSTON Historian 

FRED DRANE MANAtiER Football Team 

.T. E. HEARD Captain Football Team 

C. W. E. PITTMAN Manager Baseball Team 

W. T. MeLEAN Captain Baseball Team 



I/// 




/ 



^opljomorc CIa0S Roll 

ALLEN, CONNER JIIDDLETON Kinston. N. C. 

German Club; K 2. 
ARMSTRONG, CLEATON OTIS Ayden, N. C. 

Phi Society; JUnisterial Band. 
ATKINSON. ALEXANDER JIORSE Knfield. N. C. 

Athletic Association ; Track Team ( 1 ) : Halifax County Chili. 
BARBEE, WALTER DORSEY ' Morrisville, N. C. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.; B. C. A. Club. 
BAYNES, RALPH HENRY Busliy Fork. N. C. 

Phi Society: Athletic Association. 
BARKER, FRANK PENDLETON Pembroke. Ky. 

Di Society; Secretarj- and Treasury Cosmopolitan Club; Y'. M. C. A.; German Club; 

Tennis Association; Athletic Association; Class Historian (1); Class Football (1); 

Class Tennis (1) ; Class President (2) ; Scrub Football (2) ; Sub-Editor Tar Heel (2) ; 

University Council (2) ; A K E. 

BELLAMY, EMjMETT HARGRAVE Wilniin^on. N. C. 

Phi Society: Class Football (2); Athletic Association: Historic;tl Society; German 
Club; 2 A E. 
BLAIR. HENRY' NEAL > Boone. N. C. 

Di Society. 
BOBBITT, ROBEIST WILLIS Henderson, N. C. 

Phi Society; Tennis Association; B. C. A. Club. 

BOOTH, JAMES LYNCH Oxford, N. C. 

BOUSHALL, .TOSEPH DOZIER, .IR Raleiffh, N. C. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.: Allilitic Association; A-sistant Manajjer Varsity Foot- 
ball Team (.1) ; German Club; II K A. 

BRINSON, CLARENCE WALTER Greenwood, 8. C. 

BROADFOOT, CHARLES WETMORE Fayetteville, N. C. 

Phi Society; Athletic Association : Y. M. C. A.: (icrnian Club; A T 0. 
BURCH, BAXTER ARNOLD Roxboro, N. C. 

Phi Society; Y. ]\L C. A.; Athletic Association. 
BURGESS, CALEB KNTGHT Old Trap. N. C. 

Phi Society; Y. JI. C. A.; Historical Society; Whitsett Club; Athletic Association. 

CARPENTER, CARL CECIL Lynchburg, Va. 

CARTER. WALTER Salisburi-, N. C. 

GjTn Team (2) : Secretary and Treasurer Ro«an Couutv Club. 

GATES, CLYDE LUCIUS ' ' Chapel Hill. N. C. 

CHAMBERS, HARDY SUSONG \shcville. N. C. 

Athletic Association: Tennis Association; Class Football (2| ; Buncomlx' County Club. 

CHILD8, WADE HAMPTON Lincolnton! N. C. 

CLINARD, WALTER BASCOM Ilif..hi)oint, N. C. 

Di Society; Y. M. C. A.; (iuilford County Cluli. 
OLINGMAN, JOHN BURTON ! Winston Salem. N. C. 

Di Society; Y. M. C. A. 
COBB, WILLIAM BATTI.E Cliaprl Hill, N. C. 

Phi Society; Athletic Association. 
COOK, WALTER WATSON Fayetteville, N. C. 

83 



COOKE, liEXJAMlN EDWARD .Mu^;k()■i(•c. Okla. 

Phi Society; AtlileticAssooiatii.il; Y. :\l. (.', A. ; Class Foutliall (1); Scviili Fd.it- 
ball (2) ; German CUib; B n. 
COOKK, CHARLES SPLTRGEON Cluiilcttc.. X. C. 

Di Society; Athletic Association: Tennis Association; liasUct-liall Assoi-iation ; 
Press Association: Y. M. C. A.: Ilistcriral Society: Kiviirli Dramatic Chili (II. 
COI^DOX, JOSKl'H PALAMOUXTAIX Clayton, X. C. 

Phi Society: Athletic Association ;■ Tennis As-ociation ; Class rciinis il); .\lan;i,i;er 
Class Tennis (2) : .lolinston County Cliili. 
( '( )X. RICHARD BE^f.IA.M IX Washinytmi. X. C. 

Phi Society. 

I'OWAX. I..\\\ liKXCK IIACCHTOX Durham. X. C. 

CUAN'EX, .lA.MKS ROLAXD Charlotte. X. C. 

Athletic Association: Mccklcnl.in.i; ('ouiity (;hili: I ». 1!. 1. Clnh; Sciuli Koot- 
. ball (1. 21. 
(HAVER, HEX'RY CEEVEI.AXD Enter|ni/.c, X. C. 

Di Society: Davidson Comity (lull. 

CREWS, NUMA HADEX Henderson. X. C. 

CKCTCHFIELD, WILLIAM JESSE Greensboro. N. C. 

Di Society: Athletic Association ; Class Football (1); Scrub Football (2): (iuil- 
ford County Clnb. 

CCMMIXGS, ELISHA PACE Reidsville, X, C. 

DANIEL, .TAAIES JIANLV. .IR .....' Denton, X. C. 

Di Society; Y'. Jl. C. A.: Athletic A.ssoeiation. 

DAVIS. THt'RJIAX JEFFERSOX Tullahnma. Tciin. 

DENTON, BEECHER TATE Charlctte. X. C. 

Di Societ.v, Y. U. C. A.: Athletic AssiK-iation : French Draniatic Clnb (1) : Mccklen- 
burii' County Club. 
DIXON, STILES SEDBERRY Fayetteville, N, C. 

Athletic Association: German Clnb: "i> A 6. 
DOl'B. HENRY WARD Tobaccoville. X. C. 

Di Society; Y. M. C. A, 
DP, AXE. FREDERICK BOUXT Edenton. X. C. 

Phi Society: Y'. M. C. A.; Athletic Association: Class Football (1): Maiia;ier 
Class Football (2) : Track S(|iiad I 1 ) : A K E, 
EGERTON, WELDON DAVIS Louislmiu. X. C. 

Phi Society; Y'. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; Tenuis Association: German l.'lub: 

* A e. 

EAKER, CHARLES LEE Cherryville. N. C. 

FALKENER, WILLIAM WHITE Warrenton, N. C. 

Athletic Association; W. H. S. Club; (Jermaii CIuli; II K A. 
FEXNER, JAMES SillTH PAUT Ralei-h. N. C. 

Plii Society; Athletic Association: Y. M. C. A.; Press Association; Halifax County 
Club. 
FOLGER, ALONZO DILLARD Dobson. N. C. 

Di Society; Athletic Association; Surrey County Clnh. 
GATTIS, SAMLEL JIALLETTE. JK Hillsboro. N. C. 

Di Society; Y. il. C. A.; W. II. S. Clnh. 
GRAHAM, ALEXANDER HAWKINS Hillsboro, N, C. 

Di Society; Y'. M. C. A.: Athletic Association: German Club; Z *. 

84 




GRAHAM, AUGUSTUS WASHIXOTOX, .JR Oxford. N. C. 

Di Society; Athletic Association; A K E. 
GRI JISLEY, HARRY B.\RNETTE Gieeiisljoro, N. C. 

Di Society; Y. il. C. A.; Athletic Association; Manager Class Football (1) ; Class 
Football (1, 2) ; Track Squad ( 1 ) ; Guilford County Club: German Club; S N. 
CW YXX, PRICE HENDERSON, JR Spray, N. C. 

Athletic Association ; Tennis Association; Secretary Rockin<;hani Comity C'lub. 
HANES, ROBERT MARCH WinstonSalcni. N. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; German Club; 2 A E. 
HEARD, JOSEPH EUGENE Brownsville, Tenn. 

Di Society; Y. il. C. A.: Athletic Association: Cosmopolitan Club; Class Football 
(1, 2); Captain Class Football (2) ; (Jerman Club: BOH. 
HEMPHILL, FRED HERBERT Nebo. N. C. 

Di Society; Class Football (1. 21 : Track S(|uad ll). 
HENDRICKS, WILLIAM FR.\NKLIN Unionville, N. 0. 

Di Society; Athletic Association: FrcshSoph Debater (1) ; Soph-Junior Debater 
(2) ; Class Baseball (1) ; Assistant :\lana.uer Football (3) ; :\recklcnburj; County Club. 

HENRY, VANCE Lilesville. N. C. 

HICKS, OTHO \YARDSWORTH „ Franklinton. N. C. 

HIGGINS. CARLISLE Eunice, N. C. 

Di Society; Atlilctic Assoi-iatimi : Historical Society. 
HILL, JOEL RAGSDALE Lexington. N. C. 

Athletic Association; Davidxiii County Club. 
IIOBBS. GRAHAM KERR Newton Grove. N. C. 

Phi Society; Athletic Association; Class lia-cball I 1 ) : SahMnburt; Club. 
IIOBGOOD, ANDREW JACKSON, .TU Itattlelioro, N. C. 

Phi Society; Tennis Association: Cla>s Baseball (1): Class Tennis (2l; (Jcniian 
Club ; * A e. 
HOOKER, FRANK BRUCE ( ;recnville, N. C. 

Phi Society; Athletic Association: Pitt County Chd). 

HOSSFELD. FREDERICK W1LLIA:\1. JR Morfranton. N. C. 

HOSSFELD. WILLIAM EMIL Morganton. N. C. 

HUtiHES, .lOHN WINDER Newbern. N. C. 

Athletic Association ; Y. M. C. A.: Class Fo<.tl)all (2) : W. H. S. Club; A K E. 
HUTCHINS, GEORGE WATKINS I'.altimorc, Md. 

Di Society; Y. M. C. A.; Cosmopolitan Cluli; Scrub l',i(.tl)all (2), 
JARRETT, HARRY HAillLTON \sheville. N. C. 

]>i Society; Athletic Association; \'ice- President Jhu-im County Cluli; Si-nd> Fool- 
ball (2). 
JONAS, HARVEY ADOLPHUS Linc,.liit(in. N. C. 

Di Society; Lincoln County Club; Kutlicrfonl Ccdlcjje Club. 
JAMES, FAIRLEY PATTERSON.' l.aurinl.urf;. N. C. 

Athletic Association; Y. il. C, .\.; .\lana-cr Class liascball (1) ; i: A E. 
JtJHNSOX. CLARENCE WALTON I'our Oaks, X. C. 

Phi Society; Tennis Association: ^'. M. C. .\.; .lohnston County Club; H. C. .\. Club. 
JOHNSTON, RICHARD HORACE ' Charlotte, N. C. 

Historical Society; Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A. 
JOHNSTON. LESLEY NEWCURK Wilmin-ton, N. C. 

Plii Society: V. M. C. A.; B. C. A. Club. 

85 




KING. ROBERT Rl'FFIN, JR Gipensboro, N. G 

Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A.: Glass Baseball (1): Glee Chil> (1); Dramatic 
Club (1) ; German Club; Ben. 
LAMB, LUKE Willianiston. N. C. 

Phi Society; German Club; Class Tennis (1); llanager Class Tennis (1); Martin 
County Club. 
LANIER, JAMES CONRAD Greenville. N. C. 

Phi Society; Athletic Association; Tennis Association: Pitt County Club. 
LARKIX, .JOHN TYER Carthage. N. C. 

Di Society; Y. M. C. A.: Athletic Association; (ilee Club (1) ; Quartette (1) ; Presi- 
dent Trinity Park Club: K A. 
LASSITER. .JESSE CLEVELAND Liberty, N. C. 

Di Society; Athletic Association. 
LOCKHARDT, .JOHN CLEGG Chapel Hill. N. C. 

Di Society; Vice-President Class (1) ; Atbli'tic Association; Secretary T. P. S. Club 
(I) ; George Washington Scrub Debater ( ll ; Fresh-Soph Debater (2). 
LONG. HENRY FAIRLEY Rockingham. N. C. 

Athletic Association; German Clul); Bingham School Clul>: Track Squad (1); 2 N. 
LOVE. .TAMES FRANK Statesville, N. C. 

Di Society: Y. M. C. A.; Class Football (1); Serul) Football (2); Iredell County 
Club. 
LYOX. BROCKTON (ireensboro, N. C. 

Athletic Association; V. M. C. A.: (iuilford County Club; (ierman Club; K 2. 
McADFN. .JOEL .JENKINS Charlotte, N. C. 

Di Society; Athletic Association; \V. U. S. Club; Mecklenburg County Club; 
Dramatic Club ( 1 ) ; German Club ; 2 A E. 
JIcIVER, MONROE ANDERSON Gulf, N. C. 

Di Society; Athletic Association: Y. M. C. A.; (German Club; A K E. 

JIcKOY. WILLIAM ANCRUM Wilmington. N. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association: Class Football (1. 2) ; German Club; 2 N. 
McLEAN, WILLIAM THADDEl'S Raeford. N. C. 

Phi Society; Atliletic Association ; Y. M. C. A.; Captain Baseball Team (1). 
MANNING, JAMES SMITH. JR Durham. N. C. 

Phi Society; Athletic Association; German Club; Z ^V. 
MARROW, HENRY BURWELL Henderson. N. C. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; Raeford Instit\itc Club; Robeson 
County Club; Class Baseball (1). 
MOORE. WILLI A JI PETER Fonta Flora, N. C. 

Di Society; Athletic Association; Class Football (1. 2). 
MORGAN, JOSEPH PATRICK Shawboro, N. C. 

Athletic Association: Glee Club ( 1 ) ; Trinity Park Club. 
MORGAN. LAWRENCE NELSON Goldsboro, N. C. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.; Vice-President Cla.ss (2) ; Associate Editor Tar Heel (2). 
MORRIS, JAMES WARD, .IR Tampa, Fla. 

Phi Society; Athletic Association: Y. Jl. C. A.: Cosmopolitan Club; Historical 
Society; German Club; A T 0. 
MURCHISON, DAVID REID Wilmington, N. C. 

Athletic Association: Track Squad (1) ; German Club; 2 A E. 
NIMMOCKS, ALFRED BYRON Fayetteville, N. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; Tennis Association; Class Baseball (1). 



//y 




NICHOLS, SPENCER VAXN liOKIvELEN Wilminylon. N. C. 

NORMAN. CLARENCE EDWARD Contoiil. N. C. 

Di Society; Athletic Association ; V. iL C. A.; Press Association: ]5i:'\il>cliin- ^■en■in. 
OATES. \VILLL\M HOLT Henilcrson\ illc. N. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; Atliletie Association. 
lli;i!. .JAMES LAWRENCE Wihniiiulon. N. C. 

Plii Society; Athletic Association; Class Football (1. 2). 
PACE. THADDEUS SHAW l!iK-iic. X. C. 

Di Society; Athletic Association ; V. ,M.C. A.; Class Baseball (1); K A. 

PARRISH. HARRY LYNCH IlilKb.ivo. X. C. 

PARKER, RORERT HUNT Kiilicl.l. X. C. 

Phi Society; Athletic Association; (icrnian Clnb; K 2. 
I'KliUY. REDDINC; FRANCIS llcn.lciN,.ii. X. C. 

.\tliletic Association; W. H. S. Club: A K K. 
I'llll.l.lPS. .JA.MES DICKSON .Mcrcilitb, Kla. 

Atlilelic Association: Ceinian Clnb: II K \. 

I'lilJ.I.IPS. WILLIAM ALSTON Fall- Cr.cU. N. C. 

IM Tr.\l,\X, COLUMBUS WASlllXCTOX KA(;l.KS Wliilakcr>, X. ( '. 

Phi Society: Athletic Association : V. .\l. C. A.; Gym Team ( 2 t ; :\hinaj;ci- l!a>cball 
Team (1). 
I'lIICE. THO.MAS .MOORE .Ma.llson. N. C. 

Di Society; Y. M. C. A.: Athletic As-.ociati(m : Rockinuhani C<.un(y ( Inh. 
(,)riXCFY. CAP.Y PERRY .\lciiy Hill. X. C. 

Phi Society; Athletic Association; Y. .\l, C. A. 
l;.\XI). .lAMES HALL SMiilhlicl.l. X. C. 

Phi Society; Athletic Association ; Tennis .\s>ociali(ni ; .lolinston Cmuily Clnb. 
RANKIN. EDGAR RALPH (;a-,lonia. X. C. 

Di Society; Athletic Association; ^. .\l. C. A.: Gaslon County Club. 
REECE, JAMES THADDEUS Yndkinvilb-, X. C. 

Di Society: Y. M. C. .\.: Atlilelh' AsM.ciation. 
RIMMER, EUGENE FREELAXI) I lill~b,^ni. X. C. 

Di Society; Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A.; Noith Carolina liisluiical Society. 
KOBERTS. GEORGE HOLLISTEl!. .lU Newbern, N. C. 

Athletic .Association: (Jerman Clnl); K i:. 
ROBERTS. EVERETT ANSON W unlicsler. N. H. 

Athletic Association; K rs. 
ROGERS. WILLIAM WHITE Tinibcrlakc. N. C. 

Phi Soc-iety; Y. M. C. A.: Athletic Association. 
KOBERSON, CHARLES ABRA.M i;obcT>nn\ illc N. C. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.; Alhldic .\-.snciation ; .Martin County CIul>. 

KOYSTER, THO.MAS SA.MPSON .Towncville. N. C. 

SHORE, ARCHIBALD DEAN Ea-t l!cn,l. X. C. 

Di Society; Athletic Association; O. R. T. CInli. 
SI.OAN. JESSE RICHARD KranUlin. X. C. 

Di Society; Y. Jl. C. A,; .\thletic Association ; Tennis .Association : .Macon County 
Club. 
SPAINHOUR, CARL .MICHAKI Moi-anlon. N. C. 

Athletic Association: Y. .\l. C. A.; Class na-diall (I) : Sciub Football (ll ; Varsity 
Football (2). 

87 



;y 




STACY. LICILS EIXJEXK. .IR , Trinity, N. C. 

Di Society: Atlilctit- Association; Class Basel)all (1). 
STEVEXSOX. D. B Mississippi. 

Di Society; ilccklenliuij; County C'lul). 
STUBBS, HARRY JIURDEX Willianiston. X. C. 

Y. il. C. A.: Athletic Association: Tennis A^s.niatitm : .Martin County Club. 
TALLEY. EKAXK '. Uandlenian. Tenn. 

Di Society; Atliletic Ass<;eiatic.n : Trinity Park Cluli. 
TEAGUE. CEAUI) JiDW ARD , Cameron. X. C. 

Phi Society; Y. JI. C. A.: Atliletic Association; Tennis Association; B. C. A. Club. 

IX^WERS, EDWIX GARDXER WEED Xorth Conway, X. H. 

TUCKER, ROYCE ERXEST Greenville, X. C. 

Phi Society: Athletic Association : Y. M. C. A.; Dramatic Club (ll. 
TURLIXGTOX, ROSCOE ALLEX Clinton. X. C. 

Phi Society: Y. 11. C. A.: Athletic .\ssociatioM ; I'.askcl-liall .\ssociation. Salemburg 
Club. 
TURXAGE. ALLEX HAL Farmville. X. C. 

Phi Society; Y. 11. C. A.; .\tliletic Association: Class Baseball (1). 
TURXAGE, DAVID LEE Farmville. X. C. 

Phi Society: Y. M. C. A.; Atlibtic .Association; Historical Society: Pitt County Club. 
VAX POOLE. ROBERT LIXX Salisbury. X. C. 

Di Society. 
WAKELY, WILLIAM EASTOX Orange, X. J. 

Athletic Association: Cosmoiiolitan Club; Scrub Football (1. 2) : Varsity Track (1) ; 
German Club; — X. 
WARREX. AXDRE\\' .TACKSOX Bushy Fork. N. C. 

Phi Society. 
WILCOX, EDMOXD HARMOX Carthage. X. C. 

Di Society: Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; Moore-Lee County Club. 
WILKERSOX. THADDEUS EARLE. .TR Rocksboro, X. C. 

Phi Society; Trinity Park Club. 
WILLIAMS, ISHAM ROLAXD F,iison. X. C. 

Phi Society; Y. M. C. A.: Atliletic Association; Duplin County Club; Captain Class 
Baseball ( 1 ) ; German Club. 
WINSTOX. ROBERT WATSOX. .IR Raleigh, N. C. 

Athletic Association; Y'. M. C. A.: German Club; Class Football (1) ; Varsity Foot- 
ball (2); Varsity Track (ll; Assistant Manager Varsity Baseball (3); Sub-Leader 
Thanksgiving German (2) : Z 4'. 
WOOD, GEORGE COLLIXS Edenton. X. C. 

Phi Society; Athletic Association; Gennan Club; Class Football (1) : All-Class Foot- 
ball (1) : Scrub Football (2) ; Manager Scrub Football (3) ; Varsity Track (1) ; North 
Carolina Club; A K E. 
YELVERTOX. EMMOR HARRISOX Goldsboro, X. C. 

German Club ; Dramatic Club ( 1 ) ; * A 6. 
YOUXG, BEXXETT ST. CLAIR East Durham. X. C. 

Athletic Association. 



//y 




\ 



Class History 




01 li rhiss entered willi mie luiiidrefl iuid iiiiiel v-l wo nieiiiliers. The Class 
(if \'M-2 is nut the l:iri;cst (dass that ever eiitei'ed the riiiversity as far 
as iiiniiliei's i;ii. IJiit (piality is whal eniinls and imt iniiidiers. We 
eame hark this year with nne inindred and ihii'ty-nine nieniliers tn liejiin the 
year in whicdi we fear un rvW. 

\\'h^^^[ "Shnrty*" Junes was makiin: hi- inani^nral addi'os Id his diseijiles 
down (in the athletie fitdd th:'re were simie ]iei-seeni(n-> Inrkin^ in the (hu'kness. 
The fn-ntih's siKin distnrlied the eancns df e(in-(denl inns e;infe(h'rates, and put 
them t(i a flight tliat had in it llie ediisnhii inn tliat he whn I'nns lives to fight 
another day. 

In the spriiiii. at the Fi'esleSnph liaseliall _i;aine, the liattle wa- feniiht. We 




liiiil ii'iveii Imt ;i few yells fm- lUli' when the Sii]ili>; made their ehiiriie. ('harge 
after chariie was made till I'.ili' |ii'(,\c(l iiself the fii'sf Frcshniaii Class td defeat 
the SophiiiiKires on the side lines and the diaiiKnid tim. From this \icti)ry we 
fouii'ht with a new eniiraiic, and as a result the (dass rhain]ii(iiislii|i liaseball 
eatne (nir way. 

Fiirthernmre, we are i;lad to li;i\e (Uir niendiers aetixely intert'sted in every 
]diase i)f college life. In athletics «:■ haw lieen re]iresented in \arsitv foothall, 
lia^ehall. and tracd< teams; a lariie nnudier nf (Hir men ai-e luemliers df the 
^'. .M. ( '. .\.: in the (dassi'ddm we hidk furwai'd tn a lariic har\i'st n\' Phi lieta 
Kappa men. and in the literaiy seeieties we ha\'e the material fn devclnp 
ettieient deliaters. \\'ith sneh a liei;innini; in the first Iwu veaiv uf nnr cdnrse 



HisroiM.v.x. I'.ilJ. 





//y 



Cf)e ^trollcc 



Last night I strolled across the Campus 

As drunk as a son of a gun, 
Two moons rose over the South Building 

Where there should have heen but one. 

I heard the Sophomores singing, 
And even while tliey did sing. 

The bell in the Old South Building 
Slowly began to ring. 

There was a lot of drinking. 

And also many a shout; 
The Freshmen feared a blacking. 

And began "'a sleeping out." 



But the Sophomores grew sober. 

For they knew all too well 
That if the "Council" caught them 

They'd catch "particular hell." 

C. JI. Sl'AIXIIOl'R. 



^' 




Who Says I'm Ai'Haid uv .\ Scirii'. 



1 A 



■^ 




OFFICERS 

N. ST. G. VAXN Phksident 

M. W. BLAIR VlCK-I'RKSIDENT 

R. \V. STRANOE Sk.crktary 

V. W. TUNIS Thkasureh 



JFrcsbman Class UoII 



ARMSTRONG, CHARLES WALLACE Troy 

ALDERMAN. ERNEST HAMLIN Greensboro 

ARMENTROUT. HIRAM MILLER Higl, Point 

AXLEY, LOWRY Murpliy 

BAGWELL. .JAilES EDGAR Lorey 

HAILEY. HERBERT .JESSE Apex 

BAILEY, ISAAC ilAYO Smithfielil 

BARBOUR, SWADE EMMITT Clayton 

BASNIGHT, STEIN HUGHES • Newbern 

BELL. BAXTER ISRAEL Swan Quarter 

BELLOIS, GEORGE WILLIAM \\illiam 

BENDER. ERNEST LINWOOD I'olloeksville 

BENNETT. PAUL ARCHER Winston 

BIVENS. SAMUEL ROBERT ilonroe 

BLAIR, MERRILL WILLIAM Wilniinfrton 

BLALOCK. MERRITT EDWAUD. .1 R Norwood 

BOURNE, LOUIS illLTON. .IR Asheville 

BOWDEN. GEORGE EDWARD Wibnintjton 

BOYKIN, RODNEY LAW Witde.sboro 

BRANDON, WILLIAJI UAViD Statesville 

BRIGHT, OLIVER .TAY Leaksville 

BROWN, CHARLES KDWARD Boll Cross 

BRYAN, ROBERT PAUL Goldsboro 

BUCHANAN, GRANT McDONAN Conoonl 

BUCKLEY. MELVILLE Windsor, I'lorida 

BURCH, PHILLIPS Kinj;sdale 

BURLESON, WILLIAJI BROWN Phinitree 

BURRELL. WILLIAil ARJIISIEAD. .IR Warrinjjton 

BUSBEE. .lOHN COWELL .Salisbury 

BYRD. ROBERT FULTOX ; layettiville 

BVRD, WILLIAM TALMACiE ibmm. Olive 

CLADER, HUGH COURTNEY Wilmington 

CALDWELL, JOSEPH YOUNG Stalesville 

'CAJIERON. WILLIAM Hillsboro 

CAHMK HAEL. GEORGE Wilniino-ton 

CARRIN(;T()N. (;K()R(;E LIXCKKOHD Uurlnun 

CARTER. CARNIE BLAKE Morganton 

CARTER, .JAMES WASIIlN(iTOX Morganton 

CLARK, WILFONG WALDRON ■ Jlorganton 

CLINARD, .JONES WESTON ; Hickory 

COOK, HENRY LILLY. .IR Fayetteville 

COOK. WILLIAM .TONES Miiskogoe. Oklalioma 

CORBETT. RAVJIOND YANCEY Cary 

COULTER, VICTOR ALDINE Newton 

CRAIG. GILLIAM Mount Olive 

CRAWFORD, .lOHN REID Fayetteville 

'Deceased. 



\ 



95 



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CRUMPLER, LAWRENCE OSJIOND Clinton 

CUTHRELL, WILLIAM DANIEL Rcx-ky .Monnt 

DAVENPORT. RALPH W ARREN Monnt Holly 

DE LOACHE. 1 HOMAS BAYARD Conway 

DEVANE. THOMAS ASHEORD Red Springs 

DILLARD, WALTER THOilAS Corbett 

"DORTCH, WILLIAM THEOPHILUS Goldsboro 

DOWNING, FREDERICK BLAIR Carthage 

ERBS, DANIEL VOORHEES Trnst 

ELLINGTON, WALTER CLINK Chapel Hill 

ELLIOT, GEORGE DOUGLAS Duke 

EULESS, FIELDS LILBORN Bell Buckle, Tennessee 

FLOYD, FRED Cherokee 

FORNEY', WELBORNE JOHNSON Greensboro 

FREEMAN, GEORGE KIRBY Goldsboro 

FRY, FIELDING LEWIS Greensboro 

FCRGUSON. HENRY BEAl'REGUARD Halifax 

GALBRAITH, WILBUR FLOY'D Coal Center, Pennsylvania 

GLOVER, WILLIAil DUC KWORTH Elizabeth City 

GRAY, ROBERT FREDERICK Wadesboro 

GRICE, FRANK McMULLAN Elizabeth City 

GRIFFITH, THOMAS GUION Charlotte 

GUNTER, LOFTON BRUICE Holly Springs 

HAMILTON, ALVAH L Atalanta 

HANCOCK, TH05IAS W., JR Winston-Salem 

HAKDISON. Mc-DONAI.D Jamesville 

HARGRETT, HANIES HI LSMAN Tiftoii. Georgia 

HARRIS, ELISHA CARTER Elizabeth City 

HARRIS. WESLEY Chapel Hill 

HATCHER, .JOHN THOMAS Rose Hill 

IIATtHER, MARTIN ARMIS'IEAD Rose Hill 

llAr(;HTON, JOHN HAWKINS Charlotte 

IIKXDKICKS, HOWELL Fayetteville 

HENDERSON. LEONARD WILLIS Franklinton 

HUFFMAN, FRED Higdonville 

HINE, IRA WALTER Old Town 

HINKLE, HENRY GRADY Lexington 

HOKE, CLARENCE Lenoir 

HILLARD, JOSEPH GRAt ON Marion 

HOOVER. FROY JAY High Point 

HOWARD, FRED ERWIN Mount Holly 

HUFFMAN, ROBERT ABEDIAX • Morganton 

HUGHES, THOMAS SPURGEON Elizabeth City 

HUNTER, JOHN SPEIGHT Greensboro 

HUSKE, BENJAMIN ROBINSON Fayetteville 

INGRAil, M ITCHELL RAY Taylorsville 

ISLEY, WALTER WALDON Liberty 

.rOHNSON, WILLIAM HARRIS Ruthei-wood 

•Deceased. 



HI 




JONES, HARVEY BLAIR Sanford 

JONES, OTIS VANCE Swan Quarter 

JONES, THOMAS ATKINSON, JR Asheville 

JOYNER, ELI8HA W ESLEY Asheville 

JOURNEY, ROBERT CAJ\IPBELL Winston Salem 

KEIGER, CYRUS CLIFFORD Tobaccoville 

KELLY, JAJIES CLYDE Carthage 

KENNEDY, FRANK HUNTER Houstonville 

KIRKSEY, WILLIAM ALBERT Morganton 

LABBERTON, JOHN JIADISON Winston-Salem 

LACKEY, FRANKLIN HARRIS Faleston 

LAilBE, PAUL CRECY ' Elizabeth City 

LITTLE, JAMES LEAK; Little's Mill 

LOVE, RUFUS PRES8LEY Statesville 

LYNCH, JOHN FRANKLIN Burlington 

McCABE, JOSEPH LEVERING Elizabeth City 

McEACHERN, ARCHIE McLEOD Jacksonville. Florida 

McKIE, JAilES WILLIAMS. JR Raleigh 

McIVER, JOHN WESLEY Sanford 

ilcliAY, ARNOLD ARDIMUS Ma.xton 

McKAY', JOHN ARCHIE Red Springs 

JIcLEAN, LOCKAMY LO\'E Barium Springs 

MANNING, HORACE LEE Wilson 

MARKS, ALBERT ROSENTHAL Newbern 

MASON, GEORGE BASON Dallas 

MASON, ROBERT BRUCE Durham 

MEANS, PAUL BARRlX(iER. JR Concord 

MEBANE, BANKS HOLT Spray 

MERRITT, RUFUS Greensboro 

.MONROE, RAYMOND Laurinburg 

MURCHISON, BRYAN CAMERON Charleston, South Carolina 

NICHOLS, PAUL ERWIN Uougemont 

OLDHAM, JOHN BENSON Chai)el Hill 

()L1\ER. ADLAl STEVENSON Selnia 

OVERCASH, JAMES OLIVER Statesville 

PASTE, CARL BUSBEE Maxton 

PARKER, DUNCAN CHALMERS Duke 

PARKER, IRA BRANSON Elizabeth City 

PARIvER, J. LLOYD Ahoskie 

PARRISH, ROBERT EUNICE Smitlifield 

PEELE, THOMAS NORFLEET Lewistown 

PERRETT, VIRGIL ADDISON Wlutsett 

PETREE, PAUL AUGUSTUS Gcrmantown 

PETTEWAY, HUBERT CONNER Freeman, Florida 

PETTEWAY, WALTER RALEIGH Tampa, Florida 

PHILIPS, GUY BERRYiLAN Trinity 

PHILIPS, JASPER LOUIS Kinston 

POOLE, WILLIAM LAWRENCE Raeford 

POItTER, ANDREW LINDSAY Rural Retreat, Virginia 





97 



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POST, WILLIAJI NICHOLSOX \Vilniin,yton 

I'RU'K. CORXELirs ALEXANDKI! Clmrlolte 

RACEV, ( HAKLE.s HAROLD, JR Jcusi'ii, Florida 

RAMSAUR, THOMAS iHTCPIELL China Grove 

RAV, HKKMAN Raleigh 

1!H( )I)ES, LELARD Hl!( )\\X Kinston 

1!K IIARDSOX, DAVID CAUL Beaufort 

RIGHTS, DOUGLAS L Winston-Salem 

ROSS, ALMA FRAXK Norwood 

ROYSTER. JAMES HUNT Townsville 

RUSSELL. CHARLES REID Denton 

RUSSELL. .TAXXIE CARLISLE Alberniarle 

SAUXDERS, SHELDOX ASA Orlando 

SCARHOROUGH. BLAIXE .L\MES Monnt Gilead 

SCOTT, LUTH l';P, N'ERXOX Siloam 

SCOTT, ROBERT JSLACKBURN Greensboro 

SCOTT, REE( E WEBSTER Jlonroe 

SHAMBURGER. LACY LEE Biseoe 

SISK. HORACE Waco 

SLOAX. IIEXRV WALL Jonesboro 

SMITH, FRANK S TEED Green.sboro 

SMITH, PEVTOX ilcGUIRE Elizabeth City 

SMITH, WILLIAM ALEXAXDER, .)R Hendersonville 

SPEARS. JIARSHALL TURNER Liilington 

STEELE, FRANK ORLANDO Patterson 

STE\"EXSOX, HENRY FRAXCIS By nuni 

S'iOCKTOX, GILCHRIST BAKER Jacksonville, Florida 

S'l OK ES. WALTER. JR Nashville, Tenne.sstv 

STOUGH. SAMUEL TERTIUS Cornelius 

STRANGE, ROBER T. JR Wilmington 

STRANCiE, ROBERT WRKiHT, JR Wilmington 

SUGGS, ARTHUR :M ASOX Yorkville, South Carolina 

SUMilER. ROY DEWITT Fleteher 

SWIXK. JOXAS HERilAX Woodruff. South Carolina 

I E.M I'LE. WADE HAMPTON t hapel Hill 

THO.M AS. JAMES BENTOX Raeford 

J'HO.MPSOX. FRAXK THORNTON Aslieville 

ITLLETT. WILLIAM SMITH Charlotte 

TO'lTEN. HENRY ROLAND Yadkin College 

K )\\ XSEXD. .1 ACKSOX Marietta 

\AX AVERY, GEORGE WATSON High Point 

\AXX. XORMAN ST. fJEORGE Charlotte 

WALDROP, HARLOWE CARPENTER Hendersonville 

WALKER. DAVID JOSHUA Union Ridge 

WALKER. JOHN BARRETT Union Ridge 

WARD. EDWIN SMITHWICK Williamston 

WEAN'El!. FLEMMING ROSS CJreensboro 

W HITAKER. ATIIA THOMAS Bell Buckle, Tennessee 

WH ITFIELD, LEW IS EVANDER Clinton 

98 




'Z 



WIGGINS. ARCHIBALD LKE MANNING Durliaiii 

WILLIAMS. HENRY ELLIO'I' Eiiyctti-ville 

WILSON, ALBERT ROBERT, .IR Greensboro 

WILSON. CARL Greenville 

WILSON. GEORGE PICKETT San Dan. \'ir,i;iniii 

WINTERS. SELLIE ROBERT i )Nf..r.l 

WOLTZ, CLAUD BERNARD l)ol,s,,n 

WOODY. 'IHOMAS BROOK Hrllicl lliil 

WORKMAN, JOHN HILARY ( liairville 

YARBORO. JOHN AR( HiBALD ( 'ary 

YOrXCi. HARRY ASliLKV W ils> n 




a Ji3otice 



To whom it may concern: 

Cupid wishes to explain 
Tliat now when lie is wanted 

He'll come in an aeroplane. 
It was always inconvenient 

To have wings screwed on day ;i 
But, thanks to his friend Wilbur, 

His new machine's all Wright. 



Fanxie E. S. Heck. 



Ffliruarv, lIUO. 



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^/y 




A Short History of 
The University of North Carolina 



By IvKiip P. Battle, LL. D. 

THE University of Korth Carolina is a ]iart of the Constitution of the State 
adopted in 17T(i. The mandate was inijioscd on the General Assembly, 
"All usefnl learning shall be duly enconrai;ed and promoted in one or 
more Universities." It is a wonderfnl proof of the sagacity of our ancestors, 
that, amid the direfnl stress of war, they should provide for future generations. 

Xaturally during the anxieties and privations of the Revolutionary period 
and unsettled times immediately succeeding, and then the absorbing struggle 
attending the adoption of a common government, the University provision 
slumbered. But when in November, 17S9, after securing the promise of certain 
amendments which some considered necessary, Xorfh Carolina entered the 
American T^niou, the friends of higher education concluded to act. The chief 
of these ]iatriotic men was William Richardson Davie, distinguished in the 
Revolutionary War, afterwards Giivernin- and sjiecia] ambassador to France, 
aiding to avert a war witli that jidwcrfnl naiinn wlu^n guided by the genius 
of Xa])oleon. 

On December 11, IT^'.l, a charter was grantt'd, but no money. Gifts of 
certain claims were made, probably because the General Assembly despaired of 
reducing them to money. One was "arrearages due from Sheriffs and other 
officers" prior to January 1, ITs:^,. nunc less than six years old, ami some more. 

Escheats were also granted, among them hind warrants voted to soldiei'S 
of the Continental Line, i. e., regulars, where the soldiers died without isstie 
or did not appear to claim the lionnty. There was a very hirge number of these, 
Imt tlu're was a formidalile ditHcnlty in llii> way. The warrants were to be 
liK-ated in West Tennessee and the land nn which they were to be located was 
claimed by the Chickasaw Indians and also by Tennessee — at first a territory 
and in I79fi admitted as a state — claiming all the lands in her borders. By 
sending Judge Murphey to intei'view her General Assembly, and by the employ- 
ment of able lawyers, the University aftir many years received over two him- 
ilrcd thousand dollars by way of coni|ironiise. |iart of which was secured at an 
earliei' date and ex]icn(l<Ml in erecting the Old West Dnilding, in adding a story 
to the Old East, and re])airing the South iJnilding. The residue constituted 
the endowment lost in the wreck of the Civil War. 



X:^ 



All iiif'(iriii;tl meeting of the iMUird of 'rriistces \v;is liclil, the S|ieakei' of 
llic SeiKile, Cliiirles Johnson, ])i'esi(ling, on the eiglitceiitli of I )eceiiilier, ITS',). 
One of llic truslees, Benjainin Smith, afterwards (ioveriior. through (leiieral 




William \l. I)a\ic, doiialcil to ilie I 'iii\-iM-sit y warrants for Iweiity thousand 
acres of land, ]iart of wdiiidi helongeil to him as a I!c\olntionarv sohlier and the 
rest he had houglit. Tliey were iiiia\aihdile for seciiriiig money, ho\ve\'er, until 

the United States hoiight out the title of the tril f the Chiekasaw Indians, 

and Tennessee aUowed their location. These lands wert- sold in 1S;!-I: for 
fourteen thousand dollars. 

102 




Successful steps were taken to raise monev by subscription, the total 
reeeijJts being six thousand four hunclred and sixty-fonr dollars and seventy 
cents. The largest subscribers were Judge x\lfred Moore of Brunswick and 
William Cain of Orange, two hundred dollars each. In December, 1791, the 
General Assembly, by the powerfid ailvocaey of Davie and others, was induced 
to lend the infant institution ten thmisanil dollars, aftei'wards cnnverted into a 
gift. It shoidd be remembered that in those days, before railroads were 
invented and the dirt roads were even nmre execrable than imw, money was 
excessively scarce. 

On August 1, 1792, there was a well-attended Board of Trustees brought 
together by special notice that the location would be made. It was resolved 
to select by ballot the centre of a circle thirty miles in diameter and locate 
the University in that circle. The winning point was Cyprett's (now Prince's) 
Bridge over K^ew Hope, on the r<>ad fi'om Raleigh to Pittsboro. The committee 
of location was chosen by ballot. They were Fred Hargett, Chairman, of Jones, 
William Porter of Rutherford, John Hamilton of Guilford, Alex Mebane of 
Orange, Willie Jones of Halifax, David Stone of Bertie, William H. Hill of 
iSTew Hanover, James Hogg of Cumberland (afterwards Orange). Hargett, Hill, 
]\rebane. Stone, and Jones acted. Only Cary and Haywood could be considered 
foi-midable rivals of Chapel Hill, wbieli was chosen because of the more liberal 
donations of land, amounting tn cmc tlmusand two hun<1rc(l and eighty acres, of 
which over eight hundred acres wci-e in one body. 

The corner-stone of the first Imilding, the Old East, was laid with ilasonic 
ceremony by Grandmaster William Ilichai'dsou Davie, on October 12, 1793. 
The address was by an eminent prcaclicr and tiaehcr. Dr. Samuel E. McCorekle. 
A lai'ge and distinguished eom]iany was in attendance. On the same day the 
lots in the village, which had been i)revious]y surveyed and ])lotted, were sold 
at auction for thi-ee thousand one hundred and sixty-eight dollars. ISTo de- 
scendant of any of those purdiasers now owus a foot of land in the village. 

Davie was imbued with ]irrju(lic(s against the business aliility of clergy- 
men. Other Trustees agreed with him and as there was no layman available 
it was resolved to have no President of the rnivcrsity, liut only a Presiding 
Professor. Rev. David Ker, an alumnus of Trinity College, Dublin, who had 
l)een a successful teacher and prracher in this State was chosen. 

The doors were open for the reception of students January 15, 189.5, and 
Governor Spaight with other State officers came to honor the occasion. It was 
a dismal time for there was a cold winter rain, and ikiI one studei(t. 



V 





Uctainr'd l)y the l)ad muds and swdllcn streams the first student came on 
the twelfth of Feln-uarv. This was Ilintmi .Tames, aftenvards an engineer on the 
lower Cape Fear and member of tlic Legislature from Kew Hanover. A fort- 
night later came two sons of .Iiidgc Alfred iloore, Maurice and Alfred; three 
sons of Koliert H. T!nrt(in of (ii'anvillc, Hutchins G., Robert H., and Francis; 
John Taylor, sun nf the sti'ward. and liichard Eagles, a cousin of the iloores. 
Ijv June the iiiiiidirr Was swelled tn forty, aud if became necessary to eni])liiy 
a tutor. 

This lufiir. ('liarlcs Wilson Harris, was a graduate of Princeton with high 
lionor. He was a man of talents and iiolishecl manners. Fn a few nionlhs he 
was elevated lo the |irofessorshi|i of .Mathematics, and when 1 )r. Ker resign<Ml 
was made Presiding Professor. 1 )r. Iver's enfofced resignation was because 
he had imbibed intidel o])inions, and was ojien in ex|iressing them. When he 
had exchanged the ministry for the law. he was appointed by .lelfersou judge of 
the ]\lissi.ssip))i Territory. 

Harris resigned, settled in Halifax, and was admitted by (Joxernor Davie 
to a share in his large practice. With Haltering prospects, he died early of 
jiulmonary c(]nsnmprion. Before he left the Pniversity he induced the Trustees 
to <'lect, Professoi' of IMatheunitics, .Iose]di Caldwell, tutor in Princeti.in, a man 
of learniug, ability, |)erseverance, and undaunted ])hick. 

Caldwell reached Chajiel Hill on the first of November, 1700, and imtil 
his death in January, 183.5, was the soul of the rni\ersity. Even when in 
ISli' u])on his urgent request the Trustees made Rev. Robert Chapnuin of 
Xew ^'ork President, he was the jiower greater than the President. On Chaj)- 
man's resignation in 1816, the jiresidency was again pressed uj)on him although 
he preferred his pnd'essorshi]! of .M afhenuitics, his favorite study. From want 
of money and from the wild sjiii-il of the age invading the student body even 
in what was called by Wm. Hukintielcl. "This remote and dormitory part of the 
universe," he had reverses, yet he had triumphs as well. 

President I'olk, \'ice-President King. Francis S. Hawks, Bishojis Otey, 
Cicero ILnvks, and (ii'cen. Dr. Robert Hall ]\Iorrisun; Chief .Justice Pearson, 
-Judges of the Supreme Court, ]\Hiri)hey, To<imer, Daniel, P>attle, Rodman, 
ilanly, and Ashe; I'nited States Seimtors Graham, Bedford Brown, lMang^un, 
Branch, Haywood, Clingman, Benton, P)lair, King, Eaton, Xiclmlson; Cabinet 
Officers, ]\rasiin. J'aton, liranch, (iraham, Dobbin, Thom])son, Aaron I]rown; 
Foreign [Ministers, King, ilason, Eaton, Saunders, Barringer, ^Hller, .Mann, 
Rencher ; more than three score Representatives in Congress; Governors of 
States, ililler. Branch, Burton, Owen, Swain, Spaight, ilorehead, Graham, 

104 





Manly, Wiiislow, Clark, Polk, Aanm nmwii, .Musfly, Tbompsdu, Eaton, 
Kenc-her, and many others, eminent in all jn-ofessions and pnrsnits, were 
]irodncts in jiart of bis wise guidance and lofty exami)le. lie gathered aronnd 
him ])rofessors of eminent merit: for example, William Uiiigham, the elder, 
founder of the Bingham Sehool ; Arehiliald ^ilurphey, afterwards jndge; 
Denison Olmsted, afterwards professor and anthor at Yale; Ethan A. Andrews, 
Latin scholar and anthor; Hentz, anthority on insects, especially the Arachnidse; 
Elisha Mitchell, anther and ex])lorer; James Philli])s, acnte mathematician; 
Walker Anderson, afterwards Chief Jnstice of Florida. Near the close of his 
life he linilt the tirst asri'imomical oliscrxalory comiected with a university or 
colli'ge in the I'nited States — aliandoned after his death. lie was an able 
paui]ibleteer in advocating the Imilding of railroads, and the inauguration of 




Cajipi s— is.'iO 

the public school system. He was the scientific ex])ert in tracing the bonndary 
line between North Carolina and South Carolina. Ihning been traineil at 
Princeton, Dr. Cablwell naturally caused the ailoptioii of the wavs of that 
college, and hence imjiorted whtit is called the Ltitiii. (ireek, ami .Mathematics 
cnrricidiim, superseding the scheme drawn up by l)a\ie. This Davie scheme 
allowed free election (jf stmlies and is substantially in ojieration in the liniver- 
sity at the present day. If was tibout twenty years iti ad\ance of Jefferson's at 
the rinversity of \'iri;iiii;i, but .lett'erson's was ])eruuinent — onrs lasted less 
than ten years. 

Da\id Lowery Swain siteceeded lo tile presidency in IS-'b'i, tind held it 
until bsijs. He was for a ^liort while a sluilent of the I'niversily, had a 
brilliant career at the bar ami in the legislature, was State Solicitor, Jndg-e, 
and (b)vernor and then at the age of thirty-tivc had charge of the University. 
He was eminent for a bright mind, pleasant, tactful manners, snpjolemented 



N. 



/. 



by a strong -will, great kindness df heart and retentive memory. His knowl- 
edge of State hist(irv and family annals was a great help to him in his new 
duties. Careful and successful in the care of his own business, he carried 
economy into the management of the University. He gave the ]ireference 
to the erection of new bviildings rather than to the purchase of new books 
and apparatus for instruction. His policy, aided by the opening of railroad 
lines throughout the land, and the absence of Southern universities accept- 
able to the people, led to marked increase of numbers in the University. After 
twenty years there were nearly tivc hundred students, one hundred and eighty-five 
of whom were from other states. Then the disastrous war came on and the 
students rushed into the service with all the plan of Sduthern temperament. 
The extent of this enthusiasm is indicated liy the fact that nf the younger 
alunnii, fmni ls,")fl to 1862, eight hundred and forty-two out of one thousand 
fi\-e hmidred and twenty-eight entered the Army, or fifty-seven out ot e\'ery 
hundred. The University had in service one Lieutenant General, one Major 
General, fifty Colonels, twenty-eight Lieutenant Colonels, forty Majors, forty-six 
Adjutants, seventy-one Surgeons, two hundred and fifty-four Captains, one hun- 
dred and fifty-five Lieutenants, thirty-eight non-Commissioned officers, and three 
hundred and sixty-five privates. Of these, three hundred and twelve, or thirty- 
four per cent., lost their lives. 

Out of a faculty of fourteen, six volunteered in the Army, the others 
being clergymen or too old fur service. 

Notwithstanding these losses president Swain induced the Trustees to 
keep the doors open throughout the bitter struggle. The privations endured 
by the professors, on account of the depreciation of the currency with which 
their salaries were paid, were pitiable. Li the fall of 18f)2 flour was eighteen 
dollars, in 1863 thirty-five dollars, in 18fi4 one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars, and in ]\rarch five hundred dollars per barrel, and other necessaries 
in like proportion. 

After the war, though the resolution of president Swain was as strong 
as ever, matters grew worse rather than better. The insolvency of the Bank 
of ISTorth Carolina, in which the University owned stock, destroyed its in- 
vestment and left it in debt one hundred and ten thousand dollars. The sal- 
aries of the "Faculty were paid only in part. The Professor of Chemistry, 
Colonel W. J. Martin, was forced by necessity to resign. The Professor of 
"Rhetoric (Hejiburn'), before the end of the war, for like reason, took charge 
of a congregation in Wilmington. Almost the only means of support of the 
Faculty was tuition fees and there were few stxidents. Even in the darkness 

106 



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President Swaiu resolved, as if by an object lesson, to bring the University 
again before the public. He induced the President of the United States, 
Andrew Johnson, with Secretary Seward, Postmaster-General Eandall, and Gen- 
eral Sichler to attend the Commencement of 18C7, as he had procured visits from 
President Polk in IS-tT and President Buchanan in 1859. President John- 
son, in answer to the sj)eech of welcome, told how, when a lad, on his way 
to Tennessee on foot, he tramped through our main street and begged food 
and lodging in the dwelling of James Craig, and how the kindly Scotch-Irish- 
man welcomed him to bed and board, and next morning filled his bag with 
sa\ory viands to refresh him on his long journey. Mr. Craig was entertain- 
ing not by any means an angel, but the executive head of the great Kepublie 
of the world. His dwelling still stands, a modest reminder of old days, at 
the west end of the village. 

The final catastrophe was at hand. The Reconstruction laws went into 
operation in 1868. The new Constitutiou dispersed the nld Trustees and gave 
the nomination of the new Trustees to the lioard of Education, cDiitrolled 
entirely by Governor Holden, an enemy of the L'niversity as constituted. 
They promptly declared vacant the chairs of the Faculty. President Swain 
was spared the hinniliatiou of being forced to vacate his residence by meeting 
with a fatal accident from a runaway horse, dying August 211, 1S()S. His 
wife removed to Raleigh and erected a handsome momunent nvw his grave 
in Oakwood cemetery. His name and services were accorded the chief place 
in the stately Memorial Hall cnunuemuratiug the great men of ilic rui\crsiry. 
Six months afterwards the new Trustees elected a new Faculty: .Mr. 
Solomon P(jol, who had been Assistant Professor, President; .Mr. Alexander 
ilclver, who had been Professor of Mathematics in Davidson College, to the 
same position here; Mr. David S. Patrick, a teacher in Arkansas, Professor 
of Latin; Mr. Fisk P. Brewer, teacher of a colored school in Raleigh, an ex-tu- 
tor in Yale, Professor of Greek ; James A. Martling, Professor of English, 
and George Dixon, Professor of Agriculture. The session's exercises began in 
February, 18G9, but the patronage was so meager, ])rinci]ially of boys not of 
university acquirements, that in 1870 the Trustees closed the dmirs. 

The Facility, with the exception of President Pool, who had a jiosition 
in the revenue service, under the General Government, sonn sought other work. 
Professor Mclver, a first honor graduate, who had liecume Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, endeavored to resuscitate the insiitutinn by securing the 
resignations of the Trustees and placing the management in the hands of the 
Alunmi, but the scheme proved impracticable. A constifutidual amendment, 

107 



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(X 



giving' the eleetiim n{ the Tnistces to the General Assembly, was essential. 
This amendment was submitted to the people and adopted in IsT-'!. 

The General Assembly in lsT-1- elected a new IJoard of sixry-t'onr Trus- 
tees — in 1877 increased it to seventy-two and in issi to eighty. These pro- 
ceeded to organize, but Governor (.'aldwell took the ground that the Constitution 
conferred on him the power of a]ipointnient of Trustees as well as other 
officers and that therefore the election was void. ]\lr. Pool followed the Gov- 
ernor and refused to surrender the buildings, grounds, books and apparatus. 
Suit was instituted, which was decided by the Sujireuie Court in January, 
1S7.'), in favor of the new Board. IJut the ditticulty of I'eviving the ruiversity 
seemed hai^eless to all except a few stout hearts. 

The land scrip granted the State for the estal)lishment of a college, in 
which, in addition to the classics and sciences usually taught, s])ecial instruc- 
tion should be given in the branches ixdating to Agriculture and the Mechanic 
Arts, was vested in the I'nivei'sity with instruction to carry into effect the 
act of Congress. The scrip was sold and one hundred and twenty-five thousand 
dollars of the proceeds was invested by the late Board partly in valid State 
bonds, but chiefiy in special tax lionds, which had been repudiatecl. The act of 
Congress provided that the State should rejiay any loss of the funds. 

The fii'st ste]> taken by the new lioard was to ask the General Assembly 
to ]iay the T'nivcrsity seven thousand. ti\-c hundred dollars a year, the interest 
CiU one hundred and I wcnty-tive ihoii^anil dollar^. An act was jiassed to this 
effect and the Trustees then proceede(l to clcrt a Faculty ;ind to open the 
doors for students September 6, 1875. 

It was resolved to have no President the first year. Kcv. Clnnles Phillips, 
D. D. being Chairman of the Faculty. The plan did not work well and the 
next year Kemp P. liattlc, the Secretary and Treasurer, was chosen President. 
He was a graduate of the ruiversity in 1849, was then Tutor of Mathenmtics 
four years, was a Trustee in President Swain's administration and. since 
1874, also a mendjcr of the Executive Committee. His lo\'e for the I'niversity 
was all the more intense l)ecause he was a resident of Clia]iel Hill in his boy- 
hood and his parents lived there until 1808. Jle had shown successful en- 
thusiasm by procuring, as Chairman of a committee, from Alumni and friends 
of education, subserijitions to the amount of twenty thousand dollars for 
repairing the buildings. The vote for him was over two-thirds. 

He was President fifteen years, the students increased from sixt3--nine 
in 1875-7fi to two huiidre<| in Iss'.l-'.M), one year two hundred and tliirty-one. 
The Faculty increased from seven to eighteen. lie was bitterly opjiosed by a 

108 



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7. 



few friend* of rhe denoininational colleges, who wrongly supposed that their 
institutions would lie ruined bv the rise of the University. Yet, although the 
State had never before his day given any mniual sum for tlie institution, he 
obtained from the General Assembly tive thousand dollars annually in 1881, 
and fifteen thousand dollars additional annually in 1885. 

From 1877-84, inc]usi\-c, tlie Tui versify eondueted in \-aeatious a 
rcuuirkable Summer Xoruial Si-liool, wliicdi began the creatinu of miu-h of the 
success of public education in the State. Abnut two thousand leaeliers of 
the State, under expert instructors selected from the Xorth and South, came 
too-ether without charge and in the halls and librarb'- uf the rni\(Tsiiy, learned 



. !/ 




Gebrari) II.m.i. liKFoiii: Sorrii Ai'|m»ia( ii Was Torn Down 

from the best masters what to teach and bow liesi Ui tea(dh The Su|h rintcnd- 
ent for three years was John .1. Ladd of \'ermout, then o\cr ilic graded 
schools of Staunton, Virginia, folbiwed by Dr. Henry E. Siiepbcni. 
Superintendent of the Graded Schools of IJalriniore. and then Julius L. Tom- 
linsun. of the Graded Schools of Wilsim and nf Winston, but Presi(bMit lialfle 
bad the general numagement. There were from twelve to eighteen instruetors. 
The number of pupils and teachers averaged nearly four liiindi<(l annu- 
ally. It was the first Summer Xormal School in America comiected with 
a university or college, and has Ixien followed by Virginia, South Carolina, 
Mississippi, Harvard and elsewhere. IJev. T)r. Sears, SuiK?rintendeut of the 
i'eahody Fund, gave the schools enthusiastic ]n-aise, and Governor Vance 
said that it was the greatest mo\-emcnf for ]io]iubir education ever made in the 




\\ 



State. In 1885, in granting twenty thousand dollars annually to the Uni- 
versity, the General Assembly deemed it more convenient to the different 
sections of the State to divert the two thousand dollars granted to the Univer- 
sity for Kormal School purposes to establish four similar schools in each of 
these sections. 

The increase of the anuuitj- to twenty llioiisand ddlhirs caused a much- 
needed accession to the Faculty as well as a uiuc'li-nt'cded division of the 
duties of the existing professors. I\ev. Dr. Thonuis Hume became Professor 
of English Language and Literature, Mr. jS^elsoii B. Henry Professor of the 
Science and Art of Teaching, iMr. Walter U. Toy Professor of Modern Lan- 
guages, Dr. William B. Phillips Professor of Agricultural Chemistry and 
Mining, James Lee Love Assistant (afterwards Associate) Professor of 
Mathematics, George F. Atkinson Assistant Professor of I^s^atural History. 
French was transferred from Prof. Hooper to Prof. Toy, English from Dr. 
]\Langum to Dr. Hume, German from Pvoi. Winstdu to Prof. Toy, Agricul- 
tural Chemistry from Dr. Venable to Dr. Phillijis, and Prof. Holmes yielded 
a part of his Natural History to Mr. Atkinson. Thus Prof. Hooper, and, 
after his resignation. Prof. Solomon C. Weill, and then Dr. Alexander, were 
'/' confined to Greek and Prof. Winston to Latin. 

Two years afterwards, when seven tliuusaud, ti\-c lumdred dollars a year 
was taken from the I'niversity's income in (inlcr 1(j have a separate College 
of Agriculture and Mechanic xVrts, it became necessary to dispense with the 
professors specially engaged in instructing in the branches peculiarly belong- 
/ /•', '' ing to that institution and those having in their classes the least number of 

students. Thus we lost Messrs. Henry, Phillips and Atkinson, through no 
fault of theirs, to the great regret of the Trustees and Faculty. 

In this "white year" of the University, Ibtio, was dedicated the ilemorial 
JLill, large enough to accommodate two thousand four hundred visitors seated, 
and on its walls are commemorated the illustrious Alumni and officers of the 
University. 

In 188!), till' anniversary of the granting the charter, a Centennial Cele- 
bration of such grant was held, which was worth)' of the institution. A large 
number of the Alumni, coming from distant points, were present, class re- 
unions were enthusiastically held and eloquent speeches galore were made. 
There was a banquet for all Alumni and distinguished visitors and congratu- 
latory speeches made by State oificers and representatives of other institutions. 



After this there were two enterprises successfully inaugurated by the 
Alumni, the building of Alunmi Hall and the foundation of the History Chair. 
Mr. Julian S. Carr was the largest subscriber to the latter — ten thousand dol- 
lars — after having built at his own expense the Carr Euildiug, a dormitory 
for students. 

In ]S91 aftei a laborious service of fifteen years President Battle con- 
clndcd to resign his office. By patience and by numerous addresses in all 
sections of the State and by the high stand and honorable condiict of the 
Alumni in all the walks of life, especially in the General Assembly, in fine, 
by the successful work of the University the good will of the people of the 
State had been conciliated. The Trustees in evidence of their appreciation 
at once elected him to the Ahiiimi cliair of History. 

The new President uiKuiiiiKJiisly elected was George Pavloe Winston, a 
man of large brains, and wiin<lerfnl energy, who had shown himself worthy 
of his high office by his work as professor, liy his ability as an author, and the 
strength and eloquence of his oratory. He raised the number of students to 
three hundred and ninety-four and was advancing to still greater success when 
he resigned the Presidency of the University. 

He procured from the General Assemlily ailditional iippnipiiations for 
annual support and for improvements. 

President Winston likewise imlnced tile 'i'l'iistees to reopen the Summer 
School under the management nt I'l'. Alileriiiau, assistt'd by an able corps 
of teachers. The number reached in niie year cme luniilre<l and inrly. He 
procured funds for building and (jpeniiig a ('(imnions Hall, where board can 
be procured at cost. 

The next President was Kdwiii .Vudei'son ^Mdennan, I). C. L., Ll^. I). 
He is a man of rare gifts as an urator, df a well-stored mind, a first graduate 
of the University, and of pleasing address. His sHperi(]i' as au orator and 
writer of graceful and jjure English could imt ]inibalily lie fdund in the South- 
land, indeed through the whole country. He had been a su])erintendent of a 
graded school and then, as assistant to the Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, he gave instruction in subjects and methods to the teachers of many coim- 
ties. He was Professor of Pedagogy in the Normal College for Women, 
thence transferred to this University as Pi'ofessor of History and Philosophy 
of Education. In these changes he had a constantly growing reputation and 
there was unanimous concurrence in his election as President. 

He performed the executive duties of the University with fidelity and 
skill and constantly increasing reputation. 

Ill 



\\ 



A^ 



/ 



y 



/ 



111 Dr. Aldcniian's Presidencv the Goncval Assoiiilily wns iiidnced to 
grant seven tlmnsand five linndi'ed ddllars ])er annnni in additiun To ihe fovnicr 
appropriation. 

The number (jf students increased to tive luuidi-cd and Uvelve, with a 
Faculty of thirty-three. 

In 1800 Dr. Alderman iiave iKitiee of his resiiinatinn of his utiiec in ordi'r 
to acce]it the Presidencv of Tulane I'liiversity, which he subsequenlly ex- 
changed for that of the rniversity of Virginia. Tly a large majority nf tli? 
Trustees, Francis Presfdii \'enalile, Professor (d' Chemisirv in our 1 'ni\crsity, 
was elected to his ])lace. He liad shown himself ]iossess;'d of the jtroper 
attributes of head and ln'art l)y ci'ns]iiruous ability in his deiiartment — recog- 
nized throughout the scientific circles of the coniitrv. Pie has shown marked 
executive ]iower. Plis juiblic addresses are (diaracterized by sound sense, 
clearness and strength, ruder his administration the nuiid>er of students is 
greater than ever before. He has olitainef] from llie (ieiieral .Vsseuibly a]i])i'o- 
])riations of fifty thousand dollars annually in addition to former a|ipro]u-ia- 
tions. I]esi<les this foi' jii'rmanent impro\cMiieiils there have been gi\en by 
ihe Legislature one hundred and tifty-seven thousand dollars. 

There have been established new ]irofessorshi|)s and assistant professor- 
ships and the University is at the ladght id' its prosperity in iis instruction, 
, its corps of teachers, its buildings and its numbers. 

/Dr. Venable's term has been distinguished by the iiumbcr of new build- 
. ■ ing's, elegant and commodious. The Chemical, the ISiologieal, the Library, 
the Bynuni Gymuasium, the Young Men's ('hristian Assoeiation, tlie .Mary 
Ann Smith Dormitory, the new lutinmiry, tlie I'residciirs House, all imieh 
needed. A large part of the cost id' the Alumin IJuilding was secured by 
him. It was by his counsels that the Ilottd and tiie I'liivcrsity luu property 
was bought at a cost of twenty thousand dollars, also the new Power House, 
Water Works, Heat and Light Works were installed. Tlie nmnber of students 
has reached eight hundred and twenty. Tlie imniber (jf teachers has been 
increased correspondingly. 

The catalogue of 1008-00 shows, besides the President, thirty Professors, 
eleven Assistant Professors, twelve Instructors, t'venty-eight Assistants in the 

Laboratories, besides twelve Officers, connected with the Library, Gymmisium, 

Eegistrar's Office, etc. Whereas in President Swain's best year, 1S5S-50, 
when there were fimr hundred and sixty-one students, there were only ten 




.-^' 



Professors and seven Tutors. The number of students was uenrly <li>ubled, 
while, omitting the assistants in the Laboratories, (if whdui I here were none 
in 1858, the teachers arc trcliled. Counting the Assistants, the teachi-rs and 
those who aid them, there are o\-er four times those emphived in the former 
days. 



X^^ 




(S^raDiuite CIa$s 



w 




CLAUDE HOWARD. M. A President 

E. McK. HIGHSMITH. A. B Vice-Presidext 

V. C. PRITtHETT, jM. A Secretary ami Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

V. L. BLYTHE, A. B ( andidate for M. A. 

K. E. BARNETT, A. B Special 

E. BAYLEY Candidate for M. S. 

J. il. COSTXER, A. B Candidate for il. A. 

W. S. COULTER, A. B Candidate for II. A. 

MRS. R. S. FAIRES, JI. A Special 

P. G. GUXTER, A. B .' Candidate for M. A. 

C. HOWARD, M. A Candidate for Ph. D. 

R. W. HOGUE, A. B Candidate for Ph. D. 

G. K. G. HENRY, JI. A Candidate for Ph. D. 

E. McK. HIGHSiMITH, A. B Candidate for Jl. A. 

J. C. HINES, M. S Candidate fcir Pli. D. 

R. W. McCULLOCH, A. B Candidate fur .\1. A. 

D. McRAE. B. S Special 

Y. MINAKUCHI Candidate for M. A. 

E. J. NEWELL, A. B Candidate for M. A. 

W. N. GATES, A. B Candidate for M. A. 

V. C. PRITCHETT, M. A Candidat*' for M. S. 

W. R. ROYALL Special 

J. I. REECE, A. B Candidate for M. A. 

E. N. TILLETT. M. A Candidate for Ph. U. 

A. VERMONT, M. A tandidate for IMi. D. 

T. J. WILSON, A. B Candidate for M. A. 

E. S. WELBORX Candidate for JI. A. 

G. T. WHITLEY, JI. A Candidate for Ph. D. 

ifISS HELEN WHARTON Special 





€o=€DS 



"As for tlic wciiiii'ii, thoiiiili \vc MMini :iii<l llniil 'cm 
without 'em." 



iiuiv live witli. liMl i'nii:io1 live 



OFFICERS 

Miss Hklex Whakto.n President 

Miss H. Wiiartox Vice-President 

Miss Whartox Secretary-Treasurer 

CLASS ROLL 
iliss Helen Wiiahtox . Wnvncsvillc 




"And So It Goes" 



\cr T. 

Place — ( ' 1/ I'lnnn jisoii'k nxiiii. 

TiMK — yifilil hrjorc I'si/cholafii/ cni iiiiiifiHoit. 

{('ij is sitliii;/ S)iiiflli/ oil Ills ctiiij ninii'r. rcrilniij I'.^iirhnhujii liiml- Jnj 
Jiriirf. Eiilcr Hriiii/ SiiiHli. irilli lirniiij in ir I'siiclitildijfi hnnl,- iiikIit Ins ann. ) 

IIkxry — IIollii, ('v. 1 liiivi- ciiiiu' iivci' t(i i;i'i VDii t(i ciiafli 1110 n]i a little 
(111 my "Psych."" I luiv(^ just liccii ddwii t(i Kliittz"s and liduiilit a liook. 

Cv — Sit diiwii, aiiil \vr"ll SIT what \vr can iln tui' diir friend Hora'.^e. 

IIkNBY (I'llL-ilKJ II rhilir) (rood! 

Cy — Well, do yi'U know the law of rclativily^ 
Henry — Nope. 

(Cy recites the tnir of rrhllirily. rrrlnltnii . iriilioiit rrfcmin/ to thr hoolc — 
even oiire.) 

Cy — I li'iiess ymi know what is meant l>y "seusatiens are jiriniarily cuii- 
iiitive."" 

1Ii;m;y — Xnjie. 

( (' 1/ iniaiii ri'cUcs rrrlnlliiii fiinii linol,-. Anil so on iiiitit llir liillil irinLs 
III :'lcrrn-foriij-fire. Exit llrnvij.) 

!'v ]in'])aves l(i rdirc, iiud of ediiis:- ihc cm tain falls. 

Act 11. 

Tl.MK — One irrrh- tiller. 

Plack — Unit uf Aliunni lliiilitiinj. 

ScKM-: 1 — .1 t)iincli of ■liiniois iiii> cniinhnij luoiiinl tlir llri/isi nii's 
iluoi: Snditrnli/ Ilrnnj Sniilli /iiisliis Ins inn/ out llinini/ti the croiril. iiiiii 
inns iliiirn tlir halt i/'tlini/. "I iiitssnl. I iiiissril." Ilr iiicrls ( ' i/ half inn/ 
itoiiii the hall ami einliraeis In in. 

1Ik.m;y — ( II (7A ((//)( aioiinil ( i/'s neck) Cy, it was yiuir coaching that 
|iassed mc, i know it was. ]>er"s go see whal you made. I bet you made a 
one. 

('I III'!/ (JO toiranis lici/istiai's Office. Ihc crowd [tarts tike the Red iSea 
lie fine the (hitdren of Jsniel. and lets ( ' 1/ /lass on into the office, as if to say, 
"There ijoes another \\ insloir." ) 

ScEXK 2 — (h'eyi.strar's Office. Dr. Wilson is sitlinij at his desi,-. irilh 
his hand on record book. Enter Cy.) 

Cy — (modeslly) Doctor, what did I izef, [ileasc. sir^ 

Doctor— F I V E ! 

C\—(for the first time in his life] 11 E P P ! 

G. G. 



/^ 



//> 




1^ 

^^ ' 

Ol-KR'EHS. 1-"a|,I. 'I'kUM 

\\". \V. PEIHCE I'KKSIDENT 

J. ( . .M. VAXX VlCK-l'RKSIDE.NT 

1'. P. (illAIIAM SECIiETARY A.Nl) TrkASIRER 

S. J. STERX Judge 

(iKORGE M. FOUXTAIN * Solicitor 

L. J. P0I8S0N Clerk 

f. J. SMITH Sheriff 

Officers, Sprinc; Term 

C. J. SMITH President 

PAUL CAPELLE Vuk-President 

]{. R. ROGERS Secretary and Treasurer 

laSSELL ROBIXSON Judge 

I ; KO. F. MEARES Solicitor 

W. S. COULTER Clebk 

( '. B. SPICER Shebiff 



0^^ 




y.y 



-y 



\ 



HaUJ ^tu Dents 



AUSTIN, JAJtES ALLEN Ni'w London 

J'.ANKS, BENJAMIN LEONIDAS Elizabotli City 

15ATTJ,E. KEMP DAVIS Hocky .M.mnl 

BECHEEDITE, WILLIAM HUGH Winston-Salem 

BELLAMY, CHESLEY CALHOUN \\iIinington 

r.ENNETT, OSCAR KIMSEY Wuvnesville 

i:i\INS, EDWARD CHATHAM Durham 

JiLACKilAN, RICHMOND PIERSON Salisbury 

liLACKWELDER, BERRY BASCOM Hickory 

BLOUNT, JUDSON HASSELL Bethel 

BONNER, JOHN HARE Washington 

]!UIE, DUGAL McREE Joneshoro. Florida 

C.\LLOWAY, ARTHUR WILLIAJI M"ler 

CAPELLE, PAUL REECE R'"ky ilount, 

CARPENTER, CARL EDWARD Stanley 

CLEMENT, JOHN Knowiili', Tennessee 

CLEMENT, THOMAS DEWITT • Aslieville 

( OCIIRAN, CLAUDE ALLEN ' Troy 

( OCKE. TIMOTHY DEWITT Asheville 

( OPELAND, ERNEST WINSLOW Greenslwro 

COUGHENOUR, WILLIAM CHAMBERS Snlisl)ury 

COX, OLIVER CROMWELL LraUsville 

CURRIE, WALTER LEE Camden 

DALTON, WILLIAM REED .■ Reidsville 

DANIELS, FRANK BORDEN Goldsboro 

DA\ENPORT, LOUIS LEIDFORD Rocky Mount 

DAY, NERE ELEXUS 15oone 

DOUGLASS, CLYDE AUGUSTUS Raleigh 

DOUGLASS, MARTIN FRANCIS Greensboro 

ELLINGTON, KENNETH RAYNER Clayton 

FOLGER, JOSEPH MATHER Ciutclitield 

FOUNTAIN, GEORGE ilARION 'larboro 

FOUSHEE, WILLIAM LINWOOD Durlinm 

GAVIN, CHARLES RAIFORD JU-Coll. Smilh Carolina 

Gl I:L1 AJI. IX)NNELL Tarboro 

( JLADSTONE. DAVID HENRY Durbam 

GUDGER, HERMAN ALEXANDER Asbevil 

(iUlON. WILLIAJI BLOUNT RO]).\L\N Ni' 

HARRIS, WILLIAM CLINTON Hak'ifrli 

HELSABECK, CHARLES ROBERT Rural Hall 

HESTER, FRANCIS EUGENE Wcndidl 

IIAYLE, SAMUEL RICHARD Sanford 

1 1 1 'DSON, STEPHENS GLENN Greensboro 

HUTCHINSON, JOHN WADSWORTH Charlotte 

JENKINS, CHARLES HENRY Durham 

119 




JONES, EITNIC'E SIMPSON Rockingham 

KELLY. FRANK CLEMENT Pliilndpliiliia, Ponns\ Ivaiiia 

KING, DANIEL BRYANT Sanford 

LEWIS, HENRY ECCLES StatesviHe 

LEWIS, JOHN DRAY StatesviHe 

LIPINSKY. LOUIS Aslieville 

LONG. WUJJAM LrXSFORD Garysburgh 

McCALL, HERBERT JOSEPH Young Harris, Georgia 

AloCASKILL. BACON WENTWORTH Fayetteville 

McLEAN, JAMES DICKSON Laurinburg 

JlrNAIRY, WYATT McCOY Greensboro 

McNEELY, ROBERT NEY Monroe 

McRAE. DONALD CONROY Chanel Hill 

M FARES, GEORGE FOLGER Wilmington 

MILLIKEN, JESSE FEARINGTON Pittsboro 

MOORE, THOMAS Webster 

PARKER, RAYMOND GAY Jackson 

I'AKKISII. FBKDKPvICK ilORTIMER Hadensville. Virginia 

r'IERS( )X. JOSKPIT EDMUNDS Riggsbee 

PIERCE. WENTWORTH WILLIS Warsaw 

PERRY. DANIEL ELIJAH Kinston 

PERRY, HENRY LESLIE Henderson 

PETREE, WALTER GARFIELD Danburg 

PHARR. EDGAR WALKER Charlotte 

PIERCE. CHARLES CLAY Spring Hope 

I'OINDEXTER. CLINTON BROOKS Booneville 

POrSSON. LOUIS JULIUS Wilmington 

POWELL. WALTER HOGUE Whiteville 

QLTEEN, JOHN MONTREVILLE Waynesville 

RAWLS. ZEBULON VANCE Bayboro 

ROBERTS, WALTER BARRY Taberts 

ROBINSON, JOHN MOSELEY Goklsbovo 

ROBINSON, RUSSELL MARABLE Gohlsboro 

ROtJERS. ROMULUS R Marshall 

RUFFIN. COLIN BRADLEY' Tarboro 

SCHULKEN. MARTIN HENRY Whiteville 

SLAGLE, EDWIN KIRKPATRICK Andrews 

SMITH, CLARENCE JAMES Duke 

SJIITH, LINDSAY HOWELL Raleigh 

SPICER. CHARLES BOOKER North Wilkesboro 

SPRUILL, JAMES FRANKLIN Ashewood 

STERN. SIDNEY JOSEPH Greensboro 

STRAYHORN. WILLIAM FLETCHER Durham 

SMITH. CLAUD NORMAN Durham 

TAYLOR, JOHN HERBERT Aurelian Springs 

TAYLOR, PAUL Kinston 

THOMAS, FRANCIS EDGAR Wadesboro 

TILLETT, CHARLES WALTER Charlotte 

TODD, DONALD BAIN Jefferson 



120 




TOMS, BATE CARPENTER Ruthcrfordton 

TURXER, OSLER BLOUNT Teacliy 

VAXN. JOHN COLIN -MacRAE Wilmiiiffton 

WALL. ROBERT WINFRED Moisianton 

WHITFIELD. NATHAN FITZ HUGH LEE Clinton 

WINSLOW. FRANCIS EDWARD Hertford 

WISSBURG, ABRAHAJI LINCOLN Durham 

WOODARD, FRED HILL Wesser 

WOOTEN. ERNEST LEE Maxton 



X 




121 




liE-X.TAJlIN I.EO.NIDAS BaXKS. .11!.. Klizilhot ll C'itv. 

N. C. 



'/•//( priu-lwal iimii fuinits. 
iS; lii'iulil .") feet 6 inches; wcijilit IS.i. 
cR'ii'lv; A, 1!. IMdS. U. X. C. ; Hiisiiicss Maiia- 



;2fv Vaikktv VacK lilDH: President Athletie Assoein- 
linii I'.Kl'.l. 

•■liiir 

ll;is just ■■liiiitoln-il"' his hat and shoes, and lost. 
Hence tlie look of ]ilnlosophical resi<;nation to his 
. f:ile. Banks f;raduated in 1908. and was judKe<l 
tlie linancial "Bnll" of his class, is still proficient 
in tlie art. With the law in his system, he will 
li;;iire liinisi'lf into a fortune in a shoit time, is 
destined to lie •■Secretary of the ■i'reasnry.' Beii 
i^, al\\.i\s liusv and pleasant. 



Irftininfi. 



.\j;c L'.-); hei.i;lil .") feet (1 inclies; wei>;h1 U.'i. 
A. B. 'I'rinily. I'.ios. 

■■(•lull" 

The liasehall artist, and jnst the sort that takes 
with tlie ■■llossies.'' Is i-oninionly known anion.t; the 
"fans" as "'Shortii'." lias quite a reputation as 
left fielder. Bivens <;radiiated at Trinity in 1908. 
and took one year of law there. Came to us in 
the fall and captured hi~ license in I''elirnarv. 
•■Chat" is a i;c.nd fellow and evervliodv likes him. 




^kdl^USL^ 




Fha.ncis Eugene Hester, Wendell, N. C. 
Deep icatcrs run still. 

Age 30: lu'i.^lit o feet 11 inches: \\ci,i;lit ITjII. 

Di Snciety: V. il. C. A.; Junior ex. I'.IHT ; Atlilcti 
Association. 

Althoufih tnttfivd mid t(.in witli tlic stoinis o 
nmny winters, he came aniony- ns with the smiles ii 
yonth. Hester took three years of college worl 
and tlunight he was through, but falling a victim 
((I the charms of a "feme sole" came hack to 
stmly marri.ed women's rights. He is a good stu- 
dent, makes friends, and says nothing ahoit it. 
Iclcal is to become a good lawyer and serve his 
state. 



^,^tyi.^^-^i^y-£ 



K<m:iir TI. ilcXior.i.Y. MMcroc X. C 

Hilil fflloir irrll mvl . 

Age 2(i: height .i fert U in -lies: wri^dil \iV. 
Di Society: Y. M. C. A.; Democratic- l'art\ 



•Ac,/,' 



■Ma 



'I lie cnll of law is to him an imiierativi' one. 
Always knows how the Supreme Court of Xorlli 
Carolina holds on any point. Kniereil college in 
1(10,5 and took one year of Academic work, licgnn 
law the following fall .nnd secured his lic'cnsc in 
Kehruary. 1007. Since then has bi'cn praci icing law 
in Monroe. Soon distinguished liims(df anil was 
chosen to represent his county in (In' last Legis- 
lature, which he did with hcnmr. ■Mai" came back 
this year for advanced work, lie is alert, ener- 
getic and chatty. A ilcmocrat, a good mixer, and 
is going to make good as a la\v\er if he doesn't 
stray ofl' into politics. 






'■/u^aJUL 



James Fba.nklin Spruill, Orient, N. C. 

Of soul sincere. 
In artion fnillifnl. and in honor clear. 

A,L:e '27; lifif;lit o feet 7 iiu'lies ; weight 150. 

I'lii S(n-ii'tv: V. M. C A.: Law Representjitive of 
rniv.Tsitv Council; I'lvsideiit of L. F. B. Class; Ph. 
H. 1!)07. ' 



•■•/. /•'.•■ 



He Silt u]i late juiIhIiij his fellow men. and ask- 
inj;' whfre they hail been. Would arjjue with a 
\Vel)ster or fi<;ht a steam mastodon. Left college 
after gradiuition and tried tlie world for a while, Imt 
came hack to take law. If his success depends on good 
judgment, it is assured. He thinks and speaks accord- 
ingly. His hohhy is his work and his plaything is 
class piditics. ''.T. l"." has nuiny friends. 



//y 



jFacultp at Ralcigf) 



HERBERT ASHLEY ROYSTEE, A. B.. M. D. 

PUOFKSSOR OF (iYXECOLOGY 

WISCONSIN ILLINOIS ROYSTER, M. D. 

PROFKSSOR OF JfEDICIXE 

AUGUSTUS WASHINGTON KNOX, M. D. 

PROFESSOl! OK SlRCEItV 

RICHARD HENRY LEWIS, A. B.. JI. D. 

PRdl'KSSOU OF DISEASES OF THE EYE AM) OK (.ENEKAI. IIYCIENE 

KEMP PLUMMER BATTLE. JR., A. B.. ^\. U. 

PROFESSOR OF DI.SKASES OK THE EAR, NOSE AM) THROAT 

HENRY McKEE TUCKER. M. I). 

J'ROFESSOR OF OIISTKTRU s 

CLAUi:) OLIVER ABERNETHV. S. I!.. M. I). 

PROFESSOR OF DISEASES (IF THE SKI.N A.Nl) OF THE CEN ITO-V Rl \A HY SYSTEM 

.TAMES McKEE, M. 1). 

CI.IMCAI. PROKESSCK OK MENlAr. AM) Minor 

.FAMES WILEIA.M .M(K1:E. .11!.. .M. 1). 

PROFESSOR OF DISEASES OF ('II I I.J)RE.\ 

ROBERT SHERWOOD MrGEACHY. M. D. 

IXSTRll'TOR IN TIIKRAPEITICS AM) STEVEXs' AN.ESTIIKTICS 

Pv()BEP>T SANDERS, M. D. 

DEMO.N.STRATOR OK CI.l.MCAE PATHOl.OliY 

T. JI. JORDAN 

IMIYSKTAX-IN-CIIIKF TO THE DISPE.NSARY AND DEMONS IRA TOli OK AN.KSTHETICf 

JAMKS .\L\I)ISI)X ll.MM'KI! 

ASSISTANT DEMONS'IRAI'OR OF (I.INKM. PAIH01,( 




// 




Senior 99cDical Class 



OFFICERS 

C F. GOLD President 

A. B. RODRIGUKZ ViCF.l'RrjsiDENT 

W. D. MOSER Secketary 

GEO. W. GENTRY Treasurer 

G. S. BARBEE Historian 



//. 







George Speight Barbee, Movrisville, N. C. 

/ icill neither yield to song or siren nor the 
roice of liyfna, the fears of th-e crorkorlile nor the 
howling of the wolf. 

Age 23; height 6 feet IV2 inches; weight 15G. 
C'hiss Baseball; Glee Club; U. N. C. Metlical So- 
rietv; Class Historian. 1010. 



\' 



MoRDECAi Lee Barefoot. Dunn. N. ('. 
fihe, not brains, iniilr men. 

Age 27, ninre or less; lieiglit 5 feet !l ini'bes: 
weight 205 pounds. 

n. ('. A. flub; r. N. C. -Medical Scu'ietv: V 
M. C. A. 






AnxiifR Kdwari) Bkides. Bioc-ton. Jlass. 
Tin, liiihls in-r lnUrr thnn our. 

Age 24: lieif;lit (i feet y, iiieli; weight 210. 

Vale 190!): I'. X. C. 1010: Ynian; Coacli Football 
I'. X. ('. lOlll: Vale Xii Siaiiia Xu; Vale Plii Gamma 
Dvlta : Yale Delta, K]i-iinn Iota; Welleston Iota 
Zcln. 



Ai/rox Cook ('ami'i;ki.i., Jonp^ilioin. X. C. 
Ihilli Ihii lull l.rpt llicc from Ihy prnccfid shiiiihrr:' 
A;;e 2(;: liciiilil ."i feet i»i; iiu'hes: weight 102. 
Trinity Park Cliih; V. X. C. iledieal Society. 




^.(?,. ^V^- 



/- vy 





Oscar Easox. Archer. X. C. 

Ill iroiiiriii'." nnilh-iKsn n„il lorr^iuiir hnit on iiil 
so poor— shall li, iiii, a nnnnriil . 

A,ye 2(j; licij;lit o feel 1 1 ' :, iiii-lifs; wi-iglit 1.51). 
Phi Society; I'. X. f. .Meilical Society: Clas 
Secretiirv-Treasuri'r 1 llilil. 



\\'ii.i,i.\.\r I,i:ii()V Fi,i:min<.. llas-,cll. N. (. 

Thr ilrl-il irill r,l I ill ll I „i ilsir, j,. ml. ill his posl . 

A;;.- 2.1; lici.ijlit .'> feet KM,, iiiclics; wciolil l.",.-,. 
Chiss FiMilliiill •ri-aiii: II. ( '. .\. (Iiili; Marlii 
(■i.iiiilv Chih; r. X. C. Mcli.nl S,«icU. 






Oeorcif. Wf.slky Gkxtry. Roxborn. N. C. 

/ (iiii xloir mill Ktiiiihi. I ttficiih- in ii iiioiistrous voice. 

Am' 2(i; lieiy:lit ;"> feet 8 inches; weight 155. 



V. ('. 1907-08; Football; 
LitcrMi'v Sopietv. 



Treasurer Class 



C'liARi.ES I'oRTUNE GoLD, Shelby. N. C. 

Yon hiok wise, please correct thai error. 

Age 25; height 5 feet 10 inches; weight 145. 

Di Society ; Class Secretaiy 1907 ; Class President 

910; U. N. C. Medical Society; Omega Upsilon I'In. 




^^/C^.^y 




'Z, 




James JIadison H\rper, Kinston, N. C. 

My beauty haunts me in my sleep. 

Age 33 : height 5 feet 8 inches ; weight ] 50. 
Phi Society; Vice-President 1908: Assistant in 
Clinical Pathology; U. N. C. iledieal Society. 



.Joseph Kobkkt Hestek. Windell. N. ('. 

Young men think old men (ire fnols : hut olil nun 
l^nou- yoiiny men are foots. 

Age 28; height G feet -ly. inches; weight llii. 
Phi Society; Academic ino:j-04; U. X. C. Medical 
Society; Pi-esiileiit Class lltO'.l. 





CM-<^t51r^ ^^-^ 



\\ ii.i.iA.M De.xtiok ilosKH, Burlinj^ton, N. C. 

Thoi iKirr /».s7r ir]io inrrr driiik. Iliri/ Khnii/s Irdk 
I, In, ,i,r,r Ihiiit. 

A,l;i' ■!'.)■. Iicij^lil li fiHt I incli; wci.ulit 10.5. 

I)i S(uirtv; ^^ M. ('. A.; T. \. C. .Mi'dical So- 
cicU : .\l:iiii:iiiiM. ('(miit\- Cliili; Srnili and Sub 
\ai'-il\ Foiilliall: Ai-adiMJiic I'.KI.-.IMi; Sccictaiy 
( la" illlll. 



Aiioi.Ko 1!.\i;tii(ii.(i.m I KiiiiiiiiirKZ. Sayuii, Cuba. 

Who ih„s Hill l.-ii,.,r. „i,il i/t,™ ,,(,1 l:,io,r lit, it li, 
does not Inioir. 

Age 27: bci.Lilit .) fci'l Id iiu-bc^; «c-i;;lit 170. 
Cuban Club; Vioc-l'ivsideiit Class I'.llO; U. X. C. 
Jledical Society. 




<^'^<^^ ttT^^il^ 




.Ikssk Ahmed Stbicklami. Wilson. X. C. 

/ iicrcr xinr ii iiiiiii hciiiit xtiiiimi sii iii iich . irliti 
ended sai/inii .so liltlr. 

Aiie 311: lieij;lit .1 fe<-t S iiK-lii'>; woi^lit ISO, 
ciiKs F,:,itl.;ill: (tak nUh^v (lull; f. X. C, McdiiMJ 
Sni-iciv, I'lii Clii. 



QXl/S^^^ 



Am(is MdMiciK \\ii(]Ti;n. Koiiiilaiii. X, ( '. 

77i( surrsi inn/ hi liil a inniKlii's liriirl in In iill.r 
aim /.iireliil!,. 

Ape 25; lieiylit 5 feet 10 inclics : \vei.i;lit l.'iO. 

rinss Football and Baseball: V. X. C. Medical 
Soeietv: I'itt (unntv Clnb: Vice l>r,'si,l,.n( IIMIH: 
nni<-a Tpsilnii I'lii. 




.i^^Je:^^^*^^*^-^'^^ 



^^ 





M*!^ 


: '-.i^' ^ 


.1 



^'!^_>^- 









m^ 






//y 



V' 




\ 




OFFICERS 

J. W. MOORE President 

J. E. RAY, JR .•_ Vice-President 

G. C. BATTLE SECRiiTAiiY and Treasurer 



V 



/ / 




^econD gJear Q^eDical Class KoII 

AUSTIN, HENEY E Clayton 

BATTLE, GEORGE CULLEN Rocky Mount 

BEAJI, RUSSELL S Eutherfordton 

BEARD, GROVER CLEVELAND Stedman 

BLALOCK, BURJL\N CARL Norwood 

BOATWHIGHT, HAL FULLERTON Wilmington 

BUCHANAN. SIDNEY ELI Concord 

CANNON, WILLIAJI FRANKLIN. JR Concord 

DANIELS, RALPH LIVINGSTONT: Oriental 

DAVIS, JOSEPH FRANKLIN Glendon 

FARRIOR, JAMES WILLIAM KenansWlle 

GRAUL, FREDERICK W Waniersville 

HARDEE. WALTER PERSON Stem 

HARTSELL. JOE ALBERT Concord 

HINNANT. iHLFORD Selma 

JOHNSON. WILEY CARROLL Canton 

JONES. HERBERT P Rutherford College 

JONES, JOHN PAUL Franklin 

LITTLETON, HENRY WARD Albemarle 

McGOOGAN, BENJAMIN JANTi Rennert 

MANN, IRA THUEJIAN High Point 

MAUSER, EOSCOE FREDERICK Hickorj- 

MOORE, JOHN WALKER McConnellsville. S. C. 

RAY, JOHN EDWIX, JR Raleigh 

ROBERTS, HENRY CLAY Eowland 

STEVENS. WILLIAM LEARY Indian To\vn 

WALKER, DbVANE DUNCAN Warsaw 

WEATHERLY. TALilAGE BRYAN Garman 

WEST, LOUIS NELSON Raleigh 

WILSON, OSCAR BRITAIN Rock Hill, S. C. 

WRENN, FRANK Silver City 




// / 



//. 





HStVEICTiIse), 



OFFICERS 

H. JI. HEDOEPETH President 

ROBERT DRANE Vice-Pkesident 

K. R. COCKE SECHETAIiV AM) Tkeasireii 

C. C. HENDERSOX SiRciEOM 



J/ 




/ 



jfirst geiar QpcDical Class HoII 



ALEXANDER, SAMUEL ALLEN.......... Creswell 

BEAVEBS, JOHN THOMAS .'...;... Durham 

COCKE, EUGENE R.\NK1N Asheville 

DRANE, ROBERT .■ Edenton 

ELDER, DAVID LANE Trinity 

FLOWERS, CHARLES ELY Ca.sli Corner 

GASTON, DAVID HOLDER Duncan, S. C. 

HARRIS, JACK HAWLEV Raleigh 

HEDGEPETH. HARRY MALCOMB Fayi-tteville 

HEMPHILL. CLYDE HOKE Nobo 

HENDERSON. CLAIR CROUSE LowoU 

KING, OGDEN DORE.MIS Mlieniarle 

LUCAS, PHILLIP EDWARD , Cunic 

MOSER, CLARENCE BROADWAY •...;.... Wayiii'svillc 

MOSER, HERBERT HENRY La Follettc Tenn. 

SPEIGHT. JAMES AJIHl-EU WhitaUers 

STOCKTON, WALTER EUW IN (ilenilon 

THOMPSON, SANFORD WE15B , Falls 

WEAVER, ARTHUR HALE Weaversville 

W HEELER. GEORGE ALEXANDER Higgins 

WILKINS, JOHN WILLIAM Rose Hill 

WlLLlAilS, LESTER LONNIE Old Fori 

W ITHERS, GEORGE LEE Davidson 

W YATT, WORTHAM Wadesboro 



/ /■ 



Pre==^cDics 



OFFICERS 

W. B. BURLESON 1'uesidknt 

P. I. NICHOLS Vice-President 

L. B. BEAAI Secretary 







CLASS ROLL 






ARMSTRONG, C. 


\V. 


DILLAIM), \V. T. 


PACE. C. B 




BURLESON. W. 


B. 


DOWNlNCi. F. B. 


PARRISII. li 


. !■: 


BRANDON. VV. D 


. R 


JONES, O. V. 


PETHEE. I'. 


A. 


BEAM, L. B. 




KING, K. 


PARKER, R. 


B. 


BOWDOIN, G. E. 




LAMB, P. C. 


RAY, H. 




BELL, B. 1. 




LACKEY, S. H. 


SAUNDERS, 


S. 


BENDER, D. L. 




MEANS, P. B. 


SUMNER. R 


D 


DUNCAN. V. D. 




NICHOLS, P. I. 


WALKER. .) 


B. 


FLOYD, F. L 




OLIVER, A. S. 









V 




Coi.oiis— (11(1 (i.ij.l :iii.l l'iir|ilr 
Cu 1!— I'lKirniM.-ciilirnl .l,,iinial (lull 

OFFICERS 

W. 1!. WIl ri'K Presidknt 

II. y\. VAUVY Vice-Presiuent 

J. E. MURRAY Secretary and Treasiirer 

M. A. PORRO Historian 



v\- 



\ \l 



'// 



// 




Walter Rodwfxl White. Warrenton. N. C. 

Thr daintiest last, to iiuikc llic end must sweet. 

Ase -21: height li feet: weiylit 140. 
Pifsiilcnt Class lilOO-lO; Phannacfutioal Joui-nal 
Cluli: Wain-nton Hi.tili Scluml Cluli. 

"rSoiics." 

His nioknaiiie is iiiisleailiiig. for he is neitlier 
•■bone-lieadcd" nor so awfully "bony.' You can find 
liini at "Picks" most any time (often when he should 
be on class), and his excuse is always, '"sick:" but 
"Bones" is not goiuf; to die any time soon for he is 
decidedly a "live one." He is the only man in the 
class that has w<in a prize for excellent work, and 
can do anything from telegraphing to mixing medi- 
cines. He is always in a good humor; easy to get ac- 
quainted with, and not very talkative, but can be 
depended on to say something, and is an all round 
"good egg." 



daJi^q^^^j^ 



Hexky ilooDY Gaiiiiy. Pu'il Springs. X. C. 
Do in-ll and rifiht. and lit the world sink: 
Age 21: height 5 feet 11 inches; weight 140. 
Vice-President Class 1909-10; Pharmaceutical Jour- 
nal Club; Robe.son County Club: Press Association: 
Class Baseball Team 1909. 

■•Muodfi:- 
There never was another like him, for nature made 
him, and then broke the mo<lel. He is the life of the 
class, and we are proud of him. He knows pharmacy 
from alpha to omega. Took the Xorth Carolina State 
Board in November, and. as luck would have it, tied 
for the highest mark. He has a smile for each day 
in the week and glides along in his inadvertent way 
with no thought of to-morrow. He is the best we 
have and is sure to make good in the profession he 
has chosen. 




^ 




JoHx Edward Muerav. Duihani, N. C. 
Bom for digeslion, tltat is, merely to eui and drink. 

Age 19; heiglit 5 feet 11 inches; weight 14(1. 

Secretary and Treasurer Class 1!I(I9-10: Trinity 
Park Cluh; Pliarmaceutical Journal Chili; Class 
r.aseball Team 1909. 

•'Kid." 

Frcmi the ••]!ull City." and is a ■"liull" at liuilding 
air castles. He is a <;reat ji)l<er and i^. very talkative, 
and altluivii^li he has not made lirilliant marks in his 
studies, it is not for his lack of sense, but for his like 
for a good time. Wears a number seven ami three- 
cifihts hat and his heart is as hi;; as his head. 



.\Il(;UEI, Al.liKRTO PoRRd. Cama'iue 



.1 ehanc/e of paxtiircs 



uah; 



fut. 



Age 21 ; height 5 feet fl inches; weight I •'>•'). 
Pharmaceutical Journal Clulp; Cla~~ r.a~c%all Tiani 
1909; Class Historian 1909-10. 

"I'orro."' 

'•A stranger in a strange land."' Caii:c In cdlli'iic 
and could speak nothing hut Spanish, lie \wm\ ■ a 
specialty of Engli.sh his first year, and fur llic la^l two 
years has been studying pharmacy, lie lia> a "lady- 
like" dis|)osition which accounts for the many I'ricnils 
he has made. His favorite stunt is wnikiiif; in Hie lal). 
He will some day he a "bull pharmaii^t." 





^v^, 



'^ 



Pftarmacp 



OFFICERS 



W. C. F. HARRIS Pkesident 

F. W. STR-WHORN Vice-President 

C. W. REED • ■ ■ • Secretary and Trea.si;rer 

C. M. VAN POOLE Historian 



CLASS ROLL 

COLEMAN. HENRY GRADY New Bmiy, S. C. 

DUPREE. LOROiL\N CLEVELAND Dunn 

FINLEY, GRAY BYNUil Marion 

GADDY, HENRY MOODY ( 2 ) Red Springs 

GODFREY, PAUL WERNER Elizabeth City 

G\\'YN, HUGH LITTLETON Mount Airy 

HARRIS, WALTER CHESTER FIELDS Stoke Mills 

HEARNE. BL'NN Cliapel Hill 

1 1 ESTERLY, LOUIS EULOE Henclcrsoiiville 

HOFFMAN, JOE FILSON Higli Point 

IK )RNE, CHARLES JAJIES Greenville 

IHNNICUTT, THADDEUS JEFFICRSON Raleigh 

IHTCHINS. JAMES A Chappl Hill 

IxVSER, HOWELL ROYSTER RocUy Mc.iiiit 

LINN. LUTHER A I.aiidrs 

JIANN, CHARLES LESTER Knuikliii 

MURRAY, JOHN EDWARD (2) Dvuliani 

NORWOOD, ESTON GIBBONS Chaiiel Hill 

OliRlAN. JENNINCiS BURIN Rockingham 

I'ORRO, M. ALBERTO (2) Cuba 

REED, CHARLES \\TN(;ATE Washington, D. C. 

RHINEHART, CHARLES BIAS Asheville 

RHYNE, WAYNE FRANK (2) Gastonia 

VAN POOLE, CARLMON MARCELLUS Salisbury 

WATTERS, GEORGE WALTER, JR -. Goldsboro 

WEBB, RICHARD HENDRICKS Shelby 

WHITE, WALTER RODilAN (2) Warrenton 

WILKINSON, JOSEPH LAWRENCE Durliam 

WILLIAMS, A. H. A Oxford 

WILLIAMS, FLEET Heddenite 

WILLIAMS, JOHN CLAUDE Godwin 

WILSON, WILLIAM BROWN Ashford 

ZUCKERMAN, LSAAC LOUIS Durban] 



/ / 



[/ 



% 




DID pres. 



Oh. do not call him old. for still there lingers 
Upon his smile and in his cheerj' voice 

Till' spirit of youth, and even Time's iron fing-ers 
I'.iit show him yi'arly new cause to rejoiee. 

Witli each incoming class his youth renewing. 
As a young eagle, high with them he soars; 

With each outgoing class, their steps pursuing. 
He knocks anew at Fortune's waiting doors. 

Not old: but some (hiy. its clay casket rending. 

That strong, jiure soul will hear a voice. "Arise 
To meet thy God." Angelic hosts attending 

Its flight, 'twill mount beyond the vaulted skies. 

And then a thousand years of peaceful lying 
By Heaven's fair river resting there shall be, 

Wliere there is no more sin nor pain nor crying. 
\Miile mortal puts on immortality. 



Tlien when the .Judge reads from the Book what writ is 
Of him, "Well done," he'll hear with joyous thrill, 

And say. when offered kingship of ten cities, 
"I thank Thee, Lord, I'll just take Chapel Hill." 

H. R. T. 



150 




A Culture Course 



WE met at the west entrance of the campus at two thirty sharp, ])r(']>are(I 
to go on, what imr teacher called, a short geology traniii. When 
everybody was ready, our teacher led oflF with the crowd, and a juke 
at the same time. He had told the joke several times on class before — l>nt at 
no previous time had it received such njiriiaring apidause. The mule ^laud 
would have been green with envy. 

Since this joke seemed to have made a hit, he said that it remindeil him 
of another that he once heard on niir of his tri])s abroad. And so ho rehited 
his far-fetched joke — which, by tlie way, had just appeared in flic last issue 
of the Ladies' Home Journal. 

A whole hour of this, over brooks, brambles, stumps and hills, and still 
our leader showed neither weariness nf tongue nur limb. On the contrary 
he began to walk more briskly and relate mure zealously experience's and 
jokes which he introduced by saying: "When I was in France for the third 
time," or "When I was delivering an address before the International Geolog- 
ical Society several months ago. ' 

And thiis we were finally drawing nc'ar uur destination — three and a 
lialf miles out. We were expecting to see no less than a gold mine. Our leader 
suddenly stopped near the bank of a little l)rook and fished u]i an ugly, 
rough looking rock, about one-half the size nf his head — rather large I dare 
say — but it could have easily been placccl in the laboratory for iusjiection. 

"This, gentlemen," he said, "is a Pttrctny's Mill conglomerate rock. Pass 
it around, and I want you to remember in (■(inncclidu with it that the ancient 
geologist, Leonardo da Yinci, who made a special study nf the rucks of this 
class, invented the wheelbarrow and painted the Lasf Supper. Well, gentle- 
men, I have called the roll. You have seen the rock. Consider yourselves 
dismissed." 



.\. 




Our Artists 



THE illnstratiiins <if an animal express its most appealiiii;- feature. A 
jiiKir literary c(intri])ution is read, criticisecl and fdriivittcii, Init a mediocre 
illiistratiou gives the same browai taste to the (jM alumnus, when he 
glances at his book for the thousandth time, that it did when, as an under- 
graduate, he zealously ins]iected it for the first time. 

We have been unusually fortunate this year in Inninu' such a large nundier 
of excellent di'awings to select from, and in many eases it was difficult to de- 
cide which to use. We are fully satisfied with the material handed in and 
have no apologies to nuike for our artists. For doing what art could do for 
the book, we arc indebted to the following: To Messrs. C. C. Frazier and T. 
J. McManis for the cover design, and for the border desig-n to Miss Josephine 
Pritchard; to Miss Phoebe PInnter for the frontispiece and other color 
pieces; to Miss M. H. Gwyn for wash drawing; to Misses Mary Hauser, 
Eloise Robinson, Kate Jefferies, Edith Bond, and Leah Rodman and Messrs. 
Stiles Dixon, Leon Winslow, W. S. Harney, C. W. Reed, Marvin Llelm and 
Thomas Dodamede for ]ien and ink sketches ; to Messrs. James Hntchinson, 
Willie Meade Prince, C C. Frazier, W. S. Llarney and W. E. Wakeley for 
pen and inlc cartoons; to ^lessrs. Joe Hill and K. Tanner for mechanical 
designs. 

K. T. 

152 




Vive La Philosophic 

Dkamatis PeR80XAE 

Prof. II. II. Williams Hero 

Dr. Cok.M- Villain 

Dr. II. Wilsdii Vssistaut Villain 

Act I. 

ScEXE — Daric Jf/ill. smnnl flain: Drs. Cnl-cr iiiiil Wilson discovered in ^> 
ciiriirsl i-oii rersalion 

\)k. Cokki; — .VlasI The wcict'ul talc jirciw.s larger sti I 

|):ar Dnctnr. E'en imw I have eiiseriUcd ii|i<in 
My liali'fiil rule fcir fnrty naiiics of ymilliful 
liiitaiiisfs lui^cniiiiiafecl slill. 

I)r;. Wilson — And 1 have eiiihry-six i<{ enibrvo zonlnyists. 
My! My! We mnsr do .somethini; tn do up 
Thi.s dastard ronvsr. Kaeli year I throw a iico 
Number yet it naniiht a\ails. 

Dr. Cokee — And yet we must keeji tlirowini;' m<ire and more. 
One instant if we durst let ii|i. then all is lost. 

Di;. Wii.sox — Aha! I have an idea. Then- is a hoary 
Old Stronti'lyoeentratns in the dejiarlmeni 
Of Philosophy who dost des])ise onr 1mIo\ci| 
Mistress, Scienee, and his lifeai ])leasnrc 
Is eaidi year to throw more men than 
Any faenlly mendii'r. ^\"(■ll now'~ our elianee. 
AVe'll break that old man's |n'iili' and |inl 

The name of \\'illiams in the dnsi. 

And for (jni'scKcs i;ain !.;rcal repute. 

l)i;. CoKiu;— A iioo,|ly thouiihl : We'll ,|n i|„- thini; 
.lu>l as ihou luisl ii outlined. I!ui 
Iieinenilier then that we ninsi throw 
Sixty per cent, al the very least. 
Farewell till .laniiary. 

153 

\ 




'// 




Act II. 

ScEXE — Horace's stmhj. I'nif. WilHains nihhiiuj his hands J)cforr thr 
chcrrfiil hhizc. A languid cigarcUe droops coiiU'iilnlh/ from liis mouth. A 
hofllc of cocu-rolu at his elbow. 

Pkof. Wii.i^ia.ms — ^Magnificent I Suhliniel The la rjivst class 

That e'er I've had in psych. Full seventy-seven 

Tender juniors among whom it shall be 

]\r_v ])rivilegc and pleasure to I'aut ahuut 

And wrend and tear and dash down whom 

I please. Ah ! Well do I now know 

That I deserve that enviahle rcjiutation 

Of throwing more men than any man 

In college. But this year, such a chance! 

I'll make myself secure for years to come. 

By Zoroaster, I shall throw so numy 

That all the others shall give up 

In hopeless knowledge of defeat. 

Act III. 

Scene — Registrar's office, (irades hciug turned in. Prof. Williams at 
ease smiling. Drs. Coker and Wllsmi trgiug to hide their satisfaction. 

PitoF. Williams — Twenty-three young hopes hax'e lijighted lieen 
By that dread hotany and only forty took it. 
On easy Frogology. {Smiles from Biologg group). 
And then on ]isych. Let's see! 
Oh well full twenty men have passed the course 
And seventv-seven took it. 



Dr. Cokee — Ye Algae ! 

Both — We are undone. (Exeimt). 



O. W. II. 



//. 




D 

I 
A 

L 
E 
C 
T 
I 
C 



LITERARY 
SOGETIES 



J.\ ; i' v-s ' : ' K ' i ! ^>'. ' ?' ' *, ' ■ * '.' 'f!% 9 ^^y,P ' } ' W:" - 



A 

H 

R 
D 

E 



Wl735hl3IH ffr 



/ 




y\ 



^ 



The Dialectic Literary Society 



WrniOrT disparagement to the other organized iniinences in University 
att'airs, the literary society may safely claim preeminence. It embodies 
within its scope, in fact, ninch for which other agencies exercise their 
whole endeavor, and, to these, adds a phase which is distinctly its own. The lit- 
erary society appreciates true social relations, and fostei"s them by recognizing 
worth wherever found. It stands for high moral character, and, b}- demanding of 
its members an irreproachable standard of conduct, fortifies against the hour of 
trial. It believes in true scholarshi]) rather than amassed facts and strives 
fur things correlated rather than for things gleaned. But all these are incident 
to its chief aim — training in debate. 

The Dialectic Society was fomided in IT'-'."), and since that time it has 
met regularly for its impurtant wnrk. Fruui its hall have gmw fdrtli a Presi- 
dent of the United States, several etlicient Cabinet Secretaries, numerous Sena- 
toi's. Governors, Judges, and Educators — to say nothing of the multitude of use- 
ful men in less conspicuous walks. Their portraits hang in the Dialectic Hall 
to-day, and serve as memorabilia of the splendid work of the past. 

But the present gives evidence of ctpial vigor. During the current college 
generation eight contests have been held with our sister, the Philanthrojiic So- 
ciety, and in these contests the Imiinrs lia\c Ix'cu divided e(|ually. During the 
same period twelve intercollegiate- deliates lia\c ncrurred, recpiii'ing twenty-four 
men, and of these twenty-four, sixteen have liecn members of the Dialectic 
Society. Of the twelve debates held, Carolina has won eight and lost four. It 
is ap)iarent then that the Dialectic Society is ])]aying her part in the 
University's life. 

ilay her future carry on the work begun. 

C. E. M. 




tOiiilcrtic iLiterari? «i^ocicty UoII 



7 




Allison, J. H. 
Alexander, O. 
Austin. J. A. 

AXLEY, L. 
Alderman, K. H. 
iiARNETT, E. E. 
Blaih. H. N. 
Beam. L. P.. 
BLYniE. F. 1.. 
Bakkek. V. 1'. 
Beckerditk. \\ . 1 
Busby. .1. ('. 
Bennett. 1'. A. 
BOWDOIN. (i. E. 
BoYi.iN. I!. L. 
BiviNS. S. i;. 
Bagwell. .1. i:. 
BucnANAX, (i. M 
Caldwell, .J. Y. 
Gates, C. L. 
Clinard, W. B. 
Clinard, J. \V. 
c'lincjian. j. ]!. 
Cook. C. S. 
Cowles. J. S. 
Cox. F. N. 
Craven. 11. (). 
CUAVEI!. 11. C. 
Critciifuold. 
Cooi>i;i!. \V. K. 

CUHDS, \V. II. 

Coulter. L. 
Coulter. V. A. 
Clark, N. W. 
Daniels, .1. Jl. 
Deal. R. ].. 
DeLaney, E. S. 
Dobbins, J. T. 
Doub. H. W". 
DuLS. F. J. 
Denton. T. B. 
Davenport, li. \\ 
DoWNINti, 1''. B. 
Eakeh. C. L. 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 
Kll.Md.NDS. W. 1!. 

Fentress. B. L. 
Ferciuson. H. 1!. 
FoLGER. A. ]:>. 
Freeman, J. \\". 
Garrett. C. C. 
C.vrns. S. N. 

(iEDllCK. \\". C. 
(JRAIIA.M. (J. 

Graham. A. II. 
Graham. A. W . 
Grimsley. H. B. 

(iUNTER. C. W. 
GwYN. ir. L. 
Hunter, F. C. 
Halliburton. .1. 1! 
Hemphill. F. H. 
Hendrix. W. F. 

HiGGINS. C. 

Hiatt. C. E. 
Heard, .T. E. 
Hendrick. H. 
Hancock, T. W. 
Howard, F. E. 
Hough MAN, R. O. 
Hoover, T. ,T. 
Houghton. .Ino. 
Hoke. C. B. 
Hargrett, H. H. 
Ingram, M. R. 
Isley, R. \V. 
Jarrett, H. H. 
Johnson, .J. T. 
Johnson, W. H. 
john.ston, j. h. 
Jonas, H. A. 
Journey, R. C. 
Jones, H. B. 
Jones, T. A. 
.Jones, \V. A. 
.Jones, C 8. 
KiMREY, A. C. 

KOINER, J. S. 

Kennedy, F. II. 



Keiger, C. C. 
King. 0. D. 
Lassiter, J. C. 
i^arkin, j. c. 
Leonard. S. E. 
Love. J. !•'. 
Lasley. .1. \V. 
I^abeerton. .1. .M. 
Lynch. .1. F. 
lockiiart. .1. c. 
McEachern. a. 
McIntosh. C. E. 
MclVKR. .\l. A. 
JklVER, .1. \V. 

McLean. K. C. 
McLean. L. L. 
JIcKay. W. a. 
ilAUlMN. W. F. 
JloOliE. .1. -1. 
ilOORE. W . P. 

Morgan. A. U. 

JIO.SER. 1. C. 

jiullicax. e. s. 
Meba.ne. B. H. 
JiA.SOX, B. 
ilEANS, p. B. 

Xance, p. H. 
xor.max. c. e. 

XlXON, J. 1^. 
P,\GE. C. D. 

Pahrish. H. L. 
PiiiLLlPPS, G. B. 
I'lULLIl'PS, W. A. 

Plummeh. X. S. 

I'RICE. T. M. 

Patterson. 1']. \'. 
P.iTTEliSON. -L S. 
PlIARR. E. W. 

Perreti'. y. A. 
Rams.\ur. H. 
Ramsaur, T. M. 
Rankin, E. R. 
Rankin, R. G. 
Reece, J. T. 



100 



Reeves. J. J[. 
RlMMER. K. F. 
RlDISILI,. \V. A. 
Rights. D. 1,. 
Ross, O. K. 
RUSSEL, C. R. 

Russell. J. C. 
Reagan, H. G. 
SuoRE, A. D. 
Sloax, J. R. 
Solomon, H. 
Stacy, H. E. 
Stacy, L. E. 
Stroup, S, 
Stevensox, B. 1) 
SisK. H. 
Swink, .1. H. 
Scott, L. V. 



Am;ky, I.. I'. 
Beau, JI. L. 
Belk, W. 1'. 
Bright, (i. J. 
Claytor, U. II. 
Colvari), .1. Ji. 
Dellinuek, R. C. 
Graham, F. P. 
Greenwood, .\. li. 
Hamilton. O. .\. 
Uardison. f). ]'.. 
Hall, 1!. B. 
Hemphill, C. H. 



Scarborough, J. B. 
Stough. S. T. 
Scott. K. \V. 
Steele. V. 0. 
Sloan, 1!. R. 
Stevenson. H. V. 
Stockton. K. g. 
Stockton, (i. ]5. 
Smith. F. S. 
Tally, F. 
Thompson. F. 1". 
Thompson, (f. W. 
Trotter. B. 
Tanner, K. 
Tillett, W. S. 
Trotter, R. R. 
Vann. T. X. St. G.. .It 

^'ANP00LE. R. L. 

INACTIVE MEMBERS 

Hester. !•". K. 
Henley. W. T. 
Jones, J. B. 
Kipersciimidt. S. 

I. INN. ].. A. 

.Mann, (;. G. 
-McLean, J. D. 

McClLLOCII, L. 

McIUe. a. 
McLean. F,. C. 
.\IcManis. T. .1. 
.\looHi:. T. 
OsiiORNE, v. W. 



Van.stoi!y. R. M. 
Walker, J. (;. 
Ward, E. V. 
Williams, D. M. 
Williams. G. L. 
WlLLAKl). G. \\ . 
Wolfe, A. H. 
Wright, J. A. 
Wilcox. K. H. 
W.'U.L. L. B. 
Woody. T. D. 
Workman, J. H. 
Woltz, C. B. 
Walker. D. J. 
Wiggins. A. H. 

WiLI.IS. I. 

Waix, R. W. 



IJoseman. p. I). 
l!liO])Es, A. B. 
Ritzler, (;. 
Stewart. B. G. 
Tillett. G. W. 
Tillett, J. 
Thomas, W. R. 
VanPoole, G. .M. 
Vann, J. 
Withers, G. 
Wilson, T. L. 
WEBn, R. T. 




The Philanthrophic Society 



Motto: "Virtus, Lil)eratiis, et Scientia" 

THE Philauthropic Society dates its beginning only a few months after the 
founding- of the University in 1795. Its life has ever been closely and 
vitally connected with that of the University. It has successfully partici- 
pated in Iniildiug donnitories, in endowing the University Library, in gov- 
erning the student body when all students were required to belong to either 
the i)i or Phi prior to 1891, and in equipping them morally and mentally to 
meet the battles of life. 

Its purpose is to train its niemliers in debating and in parliamentary prac- 
tice. In this mental arena, one learns to speak and to think before men — in 
short, leai-ns to be a leader of men. The Phi and Di have three annual inter- 
society debates. The Phi shares the pahii nf victdry sparingly with the Di. 
The two societies have made enviai)le reputations in interenllegiate debate. 
Xo institution in the South surpasses the Tniversity of Xorth Carolina in its 
reputation for intercollegiate debating. 

Amciug the other activities of the sneieties may be menfinneil tlic p\iblica- 
tion of the Unircrsity Magazine and issuing a copy free to each member, the 
publication of this annual in connection with the fraternities, the financing of 
the Star Course of lectures for the benefit of their members financially, and 
the giving of an intersoeiety banquet during each conniiencement. 

The strength of the Philanthrojiic Society lies in its dealing with the indi- 
vidual. Its noblest aim is to promote among its members a lasting friendship. 
It lays aside social and class distinctions, and awards its honors to its deserving 
members. These members with ability have gone into the State's highest offices, 
into Presidents' Cabinets, to the Senate nf the United States and to college facul- 
ties, to give the benefit of their training received from the Phi Society to our 
State and nation. It has a gloi'ious history and a future bright with hope. M 
its two weekly meetings, the youthful voices <if future judges, senators, govern- 
ors, and other leaders enthiisiastieally debate the live (juestions of the day. Its 
usefvdness and growth keej) pace with the usefulness and gTo\\'th of the Uni- 
versity. 

G. T. W. 










'/y 



Pfjilantfjropic ILiterarp ^ocictp Roll 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



FBESIIMAX AM) SOPHOMORK 



AlillKTIiOXG. C. (). 
15A1LEY, H. J. 
15AILEY. I. M. 

Baynes, R. H. 
Basnigiit, S. H. 

HoiiBITT, R. \Y. 

bou shall, j. d. 
J5ko\vn, C. K. 
Brown. P. R. 
Birch, B. A. 
Blrgess, C. K. 
BiRWELL, \\ . A.. Jr. 
Byru, \V. L. 
Bellamy. E. H. 
Barbee. \V. D. 

C'ARRIXIiTOX. G. L. 

Cobb, W. B. 
Cook. B. K. 
Cook, \V. .T. 
Coreett. R. Y. 
Cox. R. ]?. 

('Rr.MPLER. L. O. 

Cordon, J. P. 
CowELL, C. I'\ 
Deloaciie. T. ]'). 

DORTCII. \\ . r.. .In. 

Drank. !•'. 1!. 

Di ncan. V. V. I). 

I>evank. T. a. 

KlH.ERTON, \V. D. 



Broadfoot, C. \V. 

p.itvAN. n. B. 

Cook. W. W. 
Dawson, .1. C. 
l)r:Ks. W. .\. 
I)I(KS(..\. I'. 
Ka.son. .1. h. 
Keili). .\. 1,. 
(Jricss. W. C. 
lloiiCl.N. .\. .1. 
Ill MKI:. i;. I,. 



Fenner, J. S. P. 
Freeman. G. K. 
Galbraith. \V. F. 
GlTNTEH. L. B. 
Grice. F. il.. .Jr. 
Hamilton. A. L. 
Hardison, ilcD. 
Hatcher, .J. T. 
Hatcher. M. A. 
HoHBs. G. K. 
Honcooi). .\. .T.. .Tr. 
Hooker. F. B. 
noDGE.s, L. S. 
Harris, E. C. 
HU.SKE, B. R., .Tu. 
.loiix.soN. C. \V. 
.Johnson. L. X. 
.loYNER. E. W. 

Kelly, .1. C. 
Lamb, Like 
Lanier, .1. C. 

ilANNIN(.. .1. S.. .In. 
Marks. A. I!. 
Marrow. II. H. 
McGiOE. .1. W. 
.\kl.KAN. W. L. 
.Monroe. 1!. X. 
.Morgan. I.. X. 
Morris. .1. W . 
Orr. .1. I.. 
I'arker. K. II. 



IhGIIKS, I. II. 
.loY.NER. U. T. 

Lee, .L 1!. 
McCi;llocii, E. F. 

McGOt)GAN, J. A. 
.McKay. .). A. 
Martin. H. L. 
Oliver. .1. F. 

I'AL.MKR. Grs 

l!iioi)Es. ( ;. W. 

iioD.MAN. X. I'. 



Parker, .T. L. 
Parker. D. C. 
Petteway. \V. R. 
Petteway. H. C. 
PlIII.LIPS. .1. L. 
Pitt.man. C. \V. E. 
Peele. T. X. 
QUINCEY, C. P. 
Rand. .L H. 

KollERSON. C. A. 

i; .i i;s. \V. \V. 

K(ivsii:r. T. S. 
Ueciiardson, n. C. 
lilloDES. L. B. 
S.MITII. p. iL 

Spears, JL T. 
Strange, R. \V. 
Strange. R.. .7r. 
Thomas. .1. B. 
i'ownsend, ,1, 
Ticker, R. E. 

Tl Rl.lNGTOX. R. A. 

Ti rxa(;e. a. II. 
Tl RNA(iE. 1). L. 
Tkaci e. C. F. 

W AliRKN. K. .1. 
\\ MII'KIKI.I). L. E. 
\\ ll.KER.SON. 'P. E. 

Williams. I. I!. 
Wood. G. C. 



l!oliKi:so\. II. C. 
Smai.e.. W. I.. 
Shields. .1. .M. 
Taylor. W. I-'. 

TllOMPSO.N. ('.. .Ir, 
Tl RLINGTON. K. W'. 

W'El.I.ONS. !•:. .1. 

WlTlllRL\(iTON. I. I'". 

Wood. .1. E. 
W1I.I.IA.MS. I.. II. 

West. X. K. 




■iKMOK 



l!ol SMALL. .1. II. 

Carrixgton, S. i; 
Darden. W. a. 
Eason, .]. D. 
I';\erett. .i. A. 



llDillS.MlTH. .1. -\. 
• loVNER. .1. X. 

Kerr. I,. C. 
Leitcii. .1. .\. 
Lyon, W. K. 
Xakh, T. p. 



Tayu)R, L. N. 
Teagie, ]), B. 

TlCAGl'E, S. F. 
'l'CRLIN(iTON. L. F 

X'enaeile, (\ S. 



1C7 



PROFESSIONAI, 



Davkntout. L. L. 

FOUKTAIN, G. il. 



gunter, p. g. 
Peirce, W. W. 
Rawles, Z. v. 



Scnui.KEN, M. H. 
Sterx. S. J. 




INACTIVE MEMBERS 



Bailey. K. B. 
BuciiAN. E. R. 



Parker. S. 
Ray. H. R. 



Warren. E. R. 
\^"yatt. M. B. 



,/ 



Brown, L. A. 
Bryant, E. W. 
Drane, Robert 
Franck, E. L. 



Hyman, O. W. 
Kraiier. D. R. 
Rom.vsoN. C. 0. 
Rodman, W. B. 
Rose, T. D. 



Sloan. 1). B. 
Taylor. B. F. 
Thomi>.son, H. a. 
Venable, J. M. 



profe.ssional 



Banks. B. L. 
costnkr, j. m. 
doiolas. c. a. 
Flowers. C. E. 
Fry. \A-. H. 
Gilliam. D. 



HiNNANT. il. 

Long, \V. I.. 
JIcCaskell. B. \V. 
McGooGAN, B. F. 
McLean. .T. D. 
Perry, H. L. 



Ruffin. C. B. 
Spencer. C. B. 
Stevens. \V. L. 
Walker, D. B. 

WiLKINS. J. W. 




DcfacUing Onion 



W. 1!. K1)-M(>XJ)S. Di. . . 
.1. A. IlHillSMITH. PlII 



M. K. STACY. ])i 
I.. C. KKI!!!. I'm 



.Pl!KSII>K.\T 

Skckktahy 



C. \V. GUX'l'KR. Hi 
J. D. EASOX. .11!.. I'm 



4 



PennsplDania=Ctirolina Debate 




Query: 

Ilcfiojfccl. That aside fioni all constitutional ques- 
tions involved, tlie national liovernnient should \e\y 
a tax on inlii'iitaiic-cs. 

Akkiumative: 

Pennsylvania 

Neoative: 

Carolina 

Won liy Carolina. 

Carolina represented by: 

EUGENE E. BARNETT 

E. Mcknight highsmith 




mammtott mn Let''€arolina DcOate 




stntt 



QUEET: 

I'llnd. That all (■orporations duini; an iiiler- 
(.■oimiic'ii/c Im^-iiK'^'* sIkiuIiI ho rcijiiin-d to pid- 
a federal eliartei- under >ueli term-, as Congress 
w may ]ire>erihe. ednstituticmality j;rauted. 

Al'Tlri.MATlX E: 

Wasliinjiton and Lee 

Xl-XiATlVE: 

Carolina 

Carolina reiire>enlcd hy : 

11. K. STACY 

W. K. KDMOXDS 





V^ 



(Dcorgia=CaroUna Dr&ate 




Query: 

Itrsolriil. Tliiit all corpomtions doing an inter- 
state coiiiiiierfc business should be required to pro- 
eiire federal charters in accordance with such laws 
as Cunuress may prescribe, constitutionality granted. 

Affirmative : 

Georgia 

Xeuative : 



IjKnAThKS FOR CAROLINA 



C. K. ikIXTOSH 





Commencement Debate 




(^l ERY: 

UiKoU-eii. That the 

ticiiial "overnment sli 

establish a central lia 

Affirmativk: Di 

Xkcatim:: Phi 

. W. THOMl'SOX— ]) 

I.. WILLIAMS— ])i 
, M. TURLTNGTOX- 
. V. TAVLCII!— I'hi 




\\ 




^oiib=3iunioc Debate 





(,>LK1{V : 

-111. Ill, I l,r all.iwnl to 
nvi-c till, liylit i.f siif- 
liiif,'!- in (he Unit f il 
Stall's. 

Ai'i-in.MATivic: Plii 

XEIiATlVK: l)i 
.1. A. ilcGOOGAX— I'lii 
L. X. JOHXSTOX— Plii 
I. C. MOSER— Di 
W. V. HEXDRICKS— JJi 





/. 



//y 



Jfrcsft'^opl) Debate 




Ql EI!V: 

l{rso!vtd. that Aiucii- 
.■an 111 u 11 i c i p a 1 i t i (• - 
should adopt the conimis- 
sion fiirm of governmriit. 

Affirmativk: Di 
Negative: Phi 

('. LOCKHART— Di 

W . SCOTT— ni 

K. inKGKSS— Phi 
( . PETTIWAV— Phi 



\ 




Our Debating Record 



■' / 




1S97-1910: Twenty-six Dkbates — ISTixeteen Victoeies 

A r;'ea])itiilatii)n cif Carnliiia's iiitcrccillciiiatc il('l)atiiig recunl will 
shew llial iliiriiiii' tlu' past t\V('l\i' yi'ai's she has ciilci'cd iufn twciitv-seveu iiiter- 
fiillcyialc il:'l)aU's and tliat slu' has hcri) \'ictnri(ins in nineteen i;)f these. Fiji- 
ui'ed on the hasis of l)asehall ]ieieentai:cs, this wonhl i;ive her a standini;' of 
7ll4 in tile pefeentaae eolnnin, and. nnless some otliev Southern institution can 
eome forward with a liefter iceord, we sliall considci' ourselves entitled to and 
herehy lay ehiiin to ihe Southern chainpioiishiii in del)ate. 

A look thronuh this reeord will re\eal the fact that we have not only de- 
hated woi'thy foes, hut that in every series, exee])linu- a single one with Wash- 
ington and I^ee Tniversity. whieh is all we have had with them at the writing 
of this arti(de, we have won. This i^ a record thai, so far as our information 
goes, stands unchallenged in Siiuthern dehating history, and is Carolina's most 
lirilliant intercollegiate achievement. 

This s])lendid reeord is due to two causes, the encouragement and help- 
fulness of the Faculty Dehating (.'onimitlee, and the intei'est tak<'n in literary 
society work, "i'his committee has heeu a ])ilot to our teams, and the men who 
ha\-e entered iIk'sc intercollegiate contests can well testify to the wisdom of the 
guiding hand. To it has heen due in no small measure our great success. 

The other factor in this record is our two literai'v societies, the Dialectic 
and Plii!antliro]iie. These societies hohl a uuii|ue place in the history of the 
Tniversity — uni(pic hccause they date their heginning hack, with the institu- 
tion itself, to the year ll'-K). and, with the exception of that ]ieriod from 18C8 
to IST."! when the Fniversity was closed, have had a conlinuons existence ever 
since. .\ii<l although mend)ershi]i in them is \-oluntary, cacdi of them has an 
approximat<' iiicmlier^hip of two hnnilreil men, the jiick (jf college life, and they 
are the largest, most unifying, disciplining, and elevating single factor in the 
rni\'crsity to-ilay. Their di-weekly deliates, in which from twenty to thirty 
men |)art icipate, and their fi'e(pa'nt intersociety contests, furnish tlie labo- 
ratory practice for the intcrcolli'giate contestants. And it is to this work, 
and a tradition that, among all of Carolina's honors, there i^ not a higher 
one than to he a niemher of one <A these teams, that our debating success is, 
in large measure, due. D. B. T. 



^/ 



'7. 




^pnopsis of Debates 




TIk- followiiif; is Carolina's intercollegiate debating record and debaters 
1897 — Georgia, H. tJ. Connor and D. B. Sniitli. won by Oorgia. 
1898 — Greorgia, W. .1. Brogden and E. K. (irahani, won by Carolina. 
1899 — Georgia, E. D. Broadluirst and T. C. Bowie, won by Carolina. 
1900 — Vanderbilt, W. S. Bernard and \Miitehead Kluttz, won bj' Carolina. 
1900 — Georgia. W. H. Swift and P. Parker, won by Cai'olina. 
1901— Vanderl)ilt. H. B. Lane and \V. H. Swift, won by Carolina. 
1901 — Georgia. D. P. Stern and R. K. Williams, won by Georgia. 
1902 — Vanderbilt. T. A. Adam.s and C. Ross, won by Carolina. 
1902 — C. A. Bynuni and R. W. Herring, Avon by Georgia. 
I!)fl2 — .Johns Hopkins, O. P. Stern and R. R. Williams, won by Carolina. 
1903 — lolins Hopkins. S. S. Robins and R. O. Everett, won by Carolina. 
1904 — Georgia, I. C. Wright and A. H. .Johnston, won by Carolina. 
190.1 — Washington and Lee, I. C. Wright and A. H. King, won by WashingUiii 
190.) — Georgia, H. S. I..ewis and C. C. Barnhardt. won by (ieorgia. 
190(> — Georgia, W. B. Love and .J. .J. Parker, won by Carolina. 
1907 — Virginia. J. .1. Parker and E. S. W. Danieron, won by Carolina. 
1907— (Jeorge Washington. W. P. Stacy and R. C. Day, won by (iwirge W asliington, 
1907 — (ieorgia, L. P. Matthews and C. J. Katzenstein, won by Carolina. 
1907 — Pennsylvania. P. Jl. Williams and T. W. Andrews, won by Pennsyl\ ania. 
1908— (ieorge Washington. W. P. Stacy and T. W. Andrews. w(.ii liy Candina. 
1908— (Jeorgia, C. W. Tillett. dr.. and O. R. Rand. vNon by ( andiiia. 
loas— Virginia, .7. T. .lohnston and .1. W. Hester, won by Caridina. 
1908 — Pennsylvania, .1. W. Umstead. .Ir.. and K. P. Battle, won by Carolina. 
1909 — Virginia, .J. W. Umsteail. .Ir.. and .1. ('. M. Vann. won by Virginia. 
1909 — Georgia, D. B. Teagnc and W . 1'. (irier. won by Georgia. 
1909— Tulane, H. E. Stacy and 1.. I'. Matthews, won by Candina. 
1909— Pennsvlvania. K. M. lli"li~niith and K. V.. Barnett. won liv Carolina. 



Commencement ll)onors— 31une, 1909 






I / 



The Maii<,niin .MocUil in Oratory K. D. Battle 

(Awarded to lliat member of fhe Senior Cltifin irho delivers the best oration at 
('onimenceineiil.) 

The Binghiuu Prize in Deliate W. R. Edmonds 

{fliren aniiualli/ for eaceUeiiee in debate.) 

President Phi Beta Kappa T. P. Nash, Jr. 

Secretary Phi Beta Kappa A. H. Wolfe 

The Holt Medal in Mathematics 0. P. Rhyne 

The Greek Prize A. L. Feilo 

The Worth Prize in Philosophy T. J. Armstrong 

The W. J. Bryan Prize in Political Science O. C. Cox 

Tlie Early English Text Society Prize Claud Howabd 

(Offered miniialli/ by the Karli/ F.nfitish Tr.et Soeietij of London for adranced 
work in An</lo-S,uioii Middle /vz/vZ/.v/i. ) 

Tlie Harris Prize in Medicine A. Shamaskin 

The Bradshaw Prize in Pharmacy J. C. Beard 

Tlie Henry R. Bryan Prize in Law S. T. Stanch, 

Freshman Prize in English L. N. JIOROAN 

Tlie Colonial Dames' Prize in History D. D. Olivkr. First; F. E. Wixslow, Second 

Fellow in Greek W. L. Long 

Toch Fellowship in Chemisti-y E. J. Neweix 

Southerland Fellowship in Cheniistiy H. N. Dumas 

Library Fellows W. G. Sparkman and G. T. Whitle-j 



anconsistencp 



You smiled, :iiul love li;ul 

Hlossonicil fnuii your licart : 
You froxMieJ, ami love lay 

Dead within your eyes; 
All, when you smiled, my life 

Seemed filled with song — 
But then you frowned. How 

Soon a life-dream dies! 



Long years have ))assed sinee 

J^ast 1 saw you, dear — 
Lo, Time has liealed. and new 

Loves have l)i>i;uili'd. 
And memory liolcls ymu frown 

Xo longer yet 

Why ean 1 not forget tliat time 

You smile<ly 

R 1-. H. 



i. 




ism^^^^^s:^ 



Delta Kappa Epsilon 



Founded in 1844 at Yale 

Colors — ('riuismi. llliic ami (iuld 
Publication — J(iiini:il : Di'lhi Kn/ipa Epsilon Qiniiiciiij 



W \l 



'Beta Ctjaptcr of Delta l^appa OBpsilon 



(Establislieil in 1851) 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
PRKS. V. P. VEXAP.I.K HAMPDEN HILL 

DP. PAL:\IER colli! H. X. EATON 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
(.'I.ASS OK UllO 



CHARLES S. VENABLE 
JOHN U. VENABLE 



ROBERT DRANE 
JOHN A. OriON 



Class of 1911 

JERK P. ZOLLICOFFER AUGUSTUS A. ZOLLICOFFER 

THURMAX J. DA^aS R. THOilPSON WEBB 

Class ok 111 12 
FRANK P. BARKER AU(U'STUS W. (iRAHAM 

J. WINDER HUGHES il. A. MoIVER 

FRED B. DRANE REDDINC; F. PERRY 

CiEOROE C. W I )On 

Law 
W. B. R. GUION PAUL R. CAPELLE 

C. C. BELLAMY IXIX GILLIAM 

H. LESLIE PERRY 

Memcink 
ROBERT DRANE 



w^^ 



^^^ 




w 



Beta Theta Pi 



V 



Founded at Miami College in 1839 

Colors — Pink and Blue 

Fraterxity JoruNAL- — Beta Theta Pi 



V 



OBta TBeta Chapter of TBeta Cfteta Pi 

(Foumleil as "Star of Sonlli" Cliaiiter nf "ilystic S.-vt-n" 
I Fratcinitv n.ii-i liilalcd witli lU'ta Tlicia I'i ill 1SS!I| 



FRATER IN FACULTATE 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

(LASS (II- llllO 



V 



.mux JUIUADiUKST FAKlilOi; 



l)A\ll) I.IXDSAV S'llU rilEKh 



Class of lull 




1. FAISON WlTHERIX(iT()X llKUlll'.l! T AlcrsiTS \(l(;i.Kl! 

WAETKR LdWRY SilALL KKIIAKI) (i(li;i)(lX ST( K'KTOX 

ROBF.RT McLKAX VANSIORV 

Class (1K I'.ll'i 
HKX.IAMIX KDW Ai;i) I DDK |;( li'.Kirr KIFFIX KIXC. .11! 

y .lO.SEPH ErCiKXK llEAKI) 



IIEK.MAX AI.EXAXDEl! (iLi:)(;Ei; 'nMOTHV DiAVITT ( OCKE 

\V11,1.1A:\1 1!K11) dai.tox 



s^r 



ilKDRIXE 
EL'GEXE RAXKIX COCKE 



//. 



:^l»*^ 



HJ^V^ - 



■m*^ 



,^ 



^1^ 




Sigma Alpha Epsilon 



Finindrcl at tlie I'liivcrsity of Ala1)aiiia in 1850 
Colors — Old (!(ild and Purple 
Flower — Violet 
Publication's — The liccord and I'lii AfjiJid. ( Secret ) 



jl3ortf) Carolina li CJjapter of ^igma aipba Cpsilon 

(Kstahli>heil ISoT ) ( Siispciidi^d 1S(;2| ( Ue-establisliiMl ISS.J) 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
EDWARD KIDDER GRAHAM ANDREW IIKXRV I'ATTERSOX 

EDWAIU) \I;R.\(IN llllWEI.l. 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Law 
KK.Ml' DAVIS IJALTLE CHARLES WALTER TILI,ETT 

\V1LLL\M lA XSKdRi:) LOXG 

Class of UiliJ 
.lAJlES EARL CRUSSWELL LAXCiDOX CIIEVIS KEKR 

CHARLES OAKLEV ItOlilXSOX THcnLVS DIXCAX ROSE 

Class or 1!U1 
.loHX TILLETT DAVID STOWE CROUSE 

ODO.M ALEXAXDER 

Class of 1!)12 

WILLIAM ME\ERS .lOXES E:MiIETT HARORAVE BELLAMY 

DAVID REID JURCHISOX EAIRLEY PATTERSOX .TAMES 

JOEL JEXKIXS MrADEX ROBERT MARCH RAXES 



/ yy. 



// 







Zeta Psi 



Established 1.S.5S, SnspciulccI ISOS. l!c(,i;;;uii/.c<l 1885 
C'ul.oi; — Wbilr 



Clpsilon Chapter of "jem psi 



^ 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
CllAKI.KS STAI'LKS .MAXlIlM CKOlUiK S. lloWK 



/ / 



fratres in collegio 

Law 
lUSSEl. M. 1!()]!I.\S()N 




Class of lillO 

JAMES NOEL .lOVXKl! lir(;il ALEXAXDKK IlK i.Ml'SOX 

ERNEST JOXES olUX ( . LU)VD 



Ci^vss OF lini 

WILLIAM THOMAS .lUYXElt JAMES WEBB CHESHIRE 

JonX .l()SEI>ll OJilUAX 

Class of 1',i12 

ALEXAXDEi; HAWKIXS (iRAHAM JAMES SMLfH MAXXIXG. JR. 

Rt)BERT WATSUX W IXSTOX 





x; 



.1/ 



Alpha Tau Omega 

[•'rjiMKloil ill ISHo at ^'ir;;inia ^Military lii^titiilt 

Col.oKS— ()M (n.1,1 Mll.l Sky llhi.. 

Fl.OWKIJ Wllilc 'l"cM IJdSC 

Pnsi.icATio.x — 77/ (' I 'aim 



, ^ I 1/ 



\: 



aipfja Delta €j)aiitcr of aipba Can flOmega 

( Kstal>lislic(l ISTll) 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
JOSKI'll IIVDK PRATT. I'll. 1). lllnM.XS Kl KI-IX. D. 1. 1. 



FRATRES IN URBE 



KrcKXK K. I!.\1!XETT 



1!. S. Macrae 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

JAMES DIXON Jki.EAX UUXC'AX McRAE 

LiKADlATE 

DUNCAN .McRAE 

Cr.As.s (II- mill 

ROBERT STRANGE McNEILL .l.\MKS Si Hill EKI.AXD PATTERSON 

LEXOIR THOMAS AVERY W I l.l.l.\.\l lU.dlXT RODilAN 

ELDEX IJ.WI.EV 

Class of llJll 
KENNETH OGDEN lU KCWIX 

CLASfi OF 1'.112 

CHAREES WETMORE BROADEOOT .l.\MES W.VKl) MdlMilS 

BELKNAP BATTLE 



y\ 



'L 



K.^i 



Ki 







< \ 



V 



/ 



\ 



Kappa Alpha 

( SOLTHiatX ) 



rounded at \Vasliin<;1on and l.of in ISli.') 
I'riil.ic .\-|-l(i.\s--A'. .1. ■/iiiiriHil iiiid M rssfmjcr dud S/ii'ciii/ (Secret 



Op$ilon Ci)apter of H^appa aiplja 

(F.stablislifd ISS!) 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
.IDSKIMI (1. DkK. llAMIl.TdN. I'll. 1). ( IIAIM.KS IKlLMKS IIKKTV. I'll. I). 

iiri;i':iM' c. iKivs'i'Kit 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Ci.-Ks.s or l!ilii 

i;iiii.\i;i) c. I i;(,irii.\i;T ckokck s. damki.s 

Class ok lull 
IIKXl'.V W. l.-ldN' WlLlJAil N. KVKUriT 

.loiix .m.wxixi; n.viTLK 

(_'l..\ss OK 1II1-2 
IH ADDKl S SHAW PACK .lOHX T. I..\KK1X 



W.M.'IKU II. I'OWKI.L 



K. I!. KI.I.IXCTUX 



Medicine 
1.(1 lis NK L.SOX WEST 



//. 




■n- 




ww^ 



Sigma Nu 



[■'ciiiiiili'il Ml \'iif,'ii)in Military liiNliUilc in ISIlil 

e'ni...i:s— Hhick. Wllitc ail, I (i(.M 

Fj.owki; — White \ln-n- 

Journal — The Delia 



A\ \^- 



s^ 



Psi Chapter of ^igma r3u 



( KimiiiU'd ill 1S,S8) 



FRATEES IN FACULTATE 
AK( Illl-iALIJ llEXDKIISON WILLIAM I)i:I1K1;MJ:1!K .McMDKI; 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Class or llllll 
( LLMKXT COOTK I'.lidWXK. .IIL 
( I,ASS i>i- I ill 1 



W ILLIAM MrUlllH II I'AKSLKN 
KKXXKTll TAXXKi; 



.lAMKS ACKA IIACKXhA 
IIKXKV CLAUK S.MITll 



Class ok l'.t\-2 

W ILLIAM KASTOX WAKKI.KV W II.I.IA.M AXl lU .M .McKUY 

W ILLIAM lidSSKI! W II.SOX IIKXl'.V KAILKV LOXd 

IIAKKV IJAKXKTT tUUMSLKY 



Law 

l.oriS .IILIAX I'lilSSdX FKAXCl.S KDWARD WIXSLOW 

HASCOX r.. lil.At KWELDKl! JESSK FEARIXdTOX JIILLIKEX 

lill lIMOXn I'KAIiSOX lil.ArKMEU 



Mkukinl 

i;av kkxxedv adajis 



Gkaiiuatf- 
EARXEST XOEL TILLETT 



/ 



\\ 



-4(01^ x^ 






M$^^^^ 




Kappa Sigma 



CoLolis — Scarlet, White and Kiiierald (ireeii 

Fi.owEi; — Lily of the N'alley 

PuLiCATiox.s — Caducctis and ( 'icsccnl and SInr (Secret) 




aipfta 0011 £t)cij]tcr of Uappa ^igma 



M. C. S. NOBLE 
.1. E. HILLS 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Class of in 10 
LOUIS DkK. BELDEN 



J. OrvOVER BEARD 
('. T. WOOLLEN 



Class of 1911 
.]. TALBOTT JOHNSON EVERETT A. ROBERTS 

EUGENE C. BARNHARDT THOMAS B. SLADE 

SAMUEL .1. ROY ALL 




GEORGE H. ROBERTS 
COXNOK M. ALLEN 



Class of 1!)12 



HOWELL SJHTH 
Medicine 



J. WALKER MOORE 



BROCKTON LYON 
R. HUNT BARKER 



JOE A. HARTSELL 



V. 



Pi Kappa Alpha 

(SOUTHERN) 



l''inin(leil at the UniviTsity of Virginia in 18GS 

Colors — (Jai'iid and Old Gold 
Floweks — Lily uf the Vallcv and (iuld Standard 'I'ldip 
Pi-i!LicATio.\s — The SJiii'hl (iiiil Pidiiiijiifl and 'I'lir Ditn'/ir mid Kcij (Secret) \ 



N^ 



Can Chapter of Idi Uayya aUifja 



(Estal)lislied 1S<I5 



FHATER IN FACTTLTATE 
AUCIUSTIS WASHIXfJTON KXOX. M. D. 



V 



FEATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
(.'LASS OI.' 1010 

KiIlX H. HOrSHALL 
Wll.I.IAM MARION SXIDER 

Class of mil 
BRYAN GRlMKS COWl'ER liOI'.ERT T.EE HIXTER 

Class of 1!U2 
JOSEPH DOZIER BOUSHALL, JR. THOJIAS SAMPSON ROYSTER 

WILLIAil WHITE FALKNER JAMES DICKSON PHILLIPS 

Law 

JOllX COLIN -McRAi: VAXX GEORGE FOLGER ilEARES 



Phi Delta Theta 



Founded at iliami University in 1S4S 

Colors — Argent :ni(l Aziirr 

Fi.owKii — White ( 'aniMtinn 

PrBl.lCA'l'KiXs — Scroll iilid I'dllililiii ni ( Scrrct') 



\. 



v\. 



Jl^ortf) €tironna 'Beta Cftaptcr of pf)i Delta Cfjcta 



(Establislied 188+) 



V/ 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

W ILLlAil STANLEY BERNAUD. A. .M. 

DAVID DOLLEY. A. M.. M. D. 

PATRICK HENRY WINSTON, A. B. 

THOMAS FELIX HICKERSON. Pii. B.. C. E.. S. B. 



FRATER IN URBE 
KliEDEUlCK ta!i;Kl! PATIERSON 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Class of iniO 

JOHN HILL WHARTON 

Class of 1911 

ARCHIBALD BATTLE DEANS ALEXANDER LITTLE.IOHN FEILD 

OSBORNE BENNETT HARDISON CLAl'D PHILLIPS TYSON 

ADRLYN BURBANCK RHODES FLOYD (HLBEItT WHITNEY 

CHARLES AlorSTlS .MEISENHEIMER, JR. 

Class ok 1!U2 
EJIOK HARRISON V1;L\ER T( >N ANDREW JACKSON HOBGOOD 

STILES SEDBERRY DLXON WELDON DAVIS E(;ERTON 

Medicine 



WdUTHAM WYATT 



JACK HAW LEV HAi;i;i> 



Pharsiacy 
PAUL VERNON GODFREY 



Law 
JUDSON HASSEL BLOUNT 



//. 



^ 



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1^^^ (|^:'*'4(pje>»- 


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Ikk.'^^^H^^l 




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V 


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^ 


^^^-rX'^SI^ 


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V '' ' 


^^B^jRf' "'^mi^^^^^^^^^^^i 




^ — ' vi^Ll^ ^^. ^^W Jk^^^^B 


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>"^i-^i^i- ^wr 


H . 


^''^'■^., ...^ ^- 


fKK 



V 



Phi Chi 



CoLOKS — (inrn and White 
Flowek — I.ilv (if I 111- \';ill(.'V 



243 



A^. 



^igma Cljeta CJjapter of Pbi €J)i 



FRATRES IN TJNIVERSITATE 

t'l.ASS (IF 1010 

J. A. STIUL'KLAXD 

Class of Mill 
WILLIAM A. SHAW^ 

C'L.vss OF 1912 
FRANK WREXX 1. THURMAX MANX 

J. WALKER JIOORK L. JACK SMITH 

.lOHX ]■:. RAY. .Hi. O. B. WILSOX 
JOE A. riAUTs:ELL RAY K. A1).\MS 

Cla.ss of 1913 
ROBERT PR AXE EUGENE COCKE 




v^-. 



/- 



Omega Upsilon Phi 



Colors — Cvimson ami (iuld 
Flowkr — Ked C'arnatiim 



^- ^ ^- 



SDmicron Chapter of ©mega dpsilon pi)i 



CHARLES F. GOLD 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
(.'LASS OF llllO 



Class of 1!»12 



AMOS M. WiioTKX 



HENRY W. LITTLETON HENRY E. AUSTIN 

\V. L. STE\'ENS 



FRED \V. GRANT 



Class of 111 13 



SAII \V. THOMl>S()N 



D. S. ELDEF! 



The Non-Fraternityman 



TIIl^ Xdii-Frateniityman is ;i imicli (Icfincil indi\idu:il. Ti_) him have 
l)ccii adi'ilmtcil, in sum tntal, ]iri4ty cniiqilctcly all the virtues that be. 
His (IciiKiiTacy has l)oeii t'a\-(ii'al)]\- cdiilrasteil with the alleged absolutism 
of the tValci'uily. His iiide]ienilcnc(' nf thiJiii;ht and action, aiiil the sponta- 
neity (if his fi-icndshi]) have been jiraiscd abo\-<' ihc frateniit,^anan's institutional 
allegiance. ^^'hat are, really, the charaeteristics that distinguish a non- 
fraternitynian ^ 

The fact of ndii-frateniityisni may ha\'c <ine of several explanations. A 
man may be a non-fraternityman despite his own liking; to that man cordial 
recognition is not accorded by either party. Or a man may be a non-frater- 
nityniaii from prejudice, asking no justification of the fraternity's position, 
and. in his igiiorance, conceiving it to be wholly bad; that man evidences, 
in snperlative degree, the very characteristics which he condemns. Or a 
man may lie a non-fraternityman from teui])erament and choice, though unex- 
ercised, a]i]ircciating the princijdes and the faults and virtues in both his own 
and the nther man's decision; that man is the true reiiresentative of non-fva- 
ternilyism. 

What, then, are the jirincijiles of udn-fraternityism ^ Fur what do(;s the 
fraternity stand i 

Tile true min-fraternityman's quarrel with the fraternity is not that of 
the indiviilual against the organizatinn as sutdi. The true non-fraternitynum 
is a true rniscrsity num, and we must think nf the triie Tniversity man as 
a man broad- and fair-minded ; certainly he believes in organization. No, 
the nou-frateruityman's quarrel with the fraternity is that of the individual 
with a selfish institution. 

The fraternity is by nature, and should be in action, a social instirutinn. 
Its logical relation to the University life is, socially, what the Y. ]M. C. A. 
is religiously. Not so many years ago the Y. M. ('. A. had no wider influeuce 
than that resultant from the practice <if a handful of men who locked them- 
selves in a ri»im a]>art, and sang Hallelujah, to their own great glory and 
ad\-aneeiii('ut, Imf with an easy disregard nf the snul needs of their fellows on the 
other side of the door. But the Y. ^I. 0. A. has found its way to institutional 
unselfishness; it has developed iuto an I'niversity organization. Frateruity- 

252 



^ 



men and non-fratemitvmen enjov, equally, the privileges which it offers. 
The fraternity has not yet learned its lesson of usefulness. Its privileges are 
for the men who wear its pin of memliershiji ; it gives a dance and the non-fra- 
ternityman looks on from the gallery. AMieu the fraternity comes to itself — 
and it is good to Ijelieve that that time is ])erce]itil)ly near — this article will 
describe, then, the University man. 

The fraternity has iv<\ learned its lesson. It recogiiizes the birth of jiosition 
above the birth of nartire. It believes in the ai-istoeraey of blood. It diseomits 
brain, l)ut passes the dollar at face value. When the fraternitynian realizes 
that the idtimate source of his power is not iu the organization bttt in his 
own self: when ability is made the measur:> of a man's worth, the fraternity 
will ha\"e worked out its jJi'oblem. 

The true non-fraternityman lielieves in, and is jiroud of, his denioeraey. 
He gives to a man, and demands foi- himself, aecnrding to his mei'it. lie 
res]jects a man for wliat he has shown himself to be. Ilis is the eternal heri- 
tage of nnti'ammeled Thought and unjiledgeci aetjon. His, too, is the eternal 
\'isilanee that he fall not into the rut of party disei-imination ; and there 
lie those classed as non-fraiernirymeii who liav<- yet to k'arn noii-frateriiity- 
ism's first lesson. 

A man is a man under all e;indifions. and, wlietliei- a man ln> a fratt^rni- 
lynian oj- a uon-fraternitynuin. the iinality of manliood must show itself. 
Ami manhood never fails to I'eceive its due measure of reeo^inition and resiieet. 



^ . 1/ 



T. P. Kash, Ji!. 






I ^--. 



Phi Beta Kappa 

(Founded at William and Mofy Co//ege.Oecember S. It 76l 
(Alpha of herfh Carolina fitablished /fOt ) 
Officers 
Thomas Palmer Nash, Jr„ President 

Adolp/ius Harrison WoJfe. Secretary 

Thomas J«»i^esWilsor<,Jr.,PA£? Rermanenr Treasurer 




Members 

Francis Prest-on Menab\e .PkO.. LL.D.. 
Eben f\\itanAvx,PhD..LLa,v'c,/e 
W/lliam Chambers Coker, Ph.D. JoAnS Hopkins 

George Howe, /^AZ7, Princeton 
Henry Mc Gilbert Wagstaf f, PhU, Jofins Hopkins 
Harry NJelson Eaton, A.M., Co/ga^ 
W 1 1 / i a m D ej, /%. n, Harvare/ 
C/ass of 1994 
Thomas James Wilson, Jr, /%./j! 

Archibald Henderson/.A<, Edward Kidder Graham /4./il 
C/ass of/Sf9 
Louis Round \N'i\son.Ph.O. 



V 



7 



Class of I W 
Palmer Cobb, /%./7 
Cl<jss of/fOZ 
MrsArchlbaldHenderson.M.MarvinHendrix Stacy A/W 
Class cf(f03 
Nathan Wilson Wdlker.A^ 
Class of H08 
GeorgeThaddeus Whitley,/!^ 



C/as5 of/W'i 
Francis Edward W)nslowA£?, Frank PorferSrahamA^ 
KempDavis Battle.A,fl 

William LunsfordLong.Afi! 

Jonds MacAulay Costner,/l.5 
Charles Walter Tilletr,A5 
Class of 1910 
Thomas RalmerNasKJc, Adolphus Harrison Wolfe 
Leon McGulloch 

Orren Williams Hyman 
Charles Sco^f Venable 
John Wayne Lasleyjr 



//. 



w 



"The: Order of the: Gorgon's Heiad 





(3oroon 8 IHcab 



Frank Borden Daniels 
Frank Kennon Borden 

David Hugh Dolley, M. D. 
Richard Davis Fames 
Donald (Jilliam, Jr. 

Edward Kidder Graham, A. M. 
Charles Holmes Herty, Ph. D. 
William Pickard Jacocks 
William Borden Jerman 
Robert Strange McNeil 

William DeBerniere McNider 
William George Thomas 

Charles Thomas Woollen 
William Clinton Harris 
Louis deKeyser Belden 

James Earl Crosswell 
Robert Dillard Dixon 
Robert Drane 

Louis Chamberlain Gilliam 
Isaac Wayne Hughes 
James Noah Joyner 

Charles Oakley Robinson 
Thomas Duncan Rose 

Richard Alexander Urquhart 
Charles Scott Venable 
John Manning Venable 

George Seabrook Daniels 
John Manning Battle 
William Thomas Joyner 
James Webb Cheshire 




SDrDcr of (Sirngftouls 



<;iiii — ( liiii — (iini — tliini;liiinl-. 
Tllinitl). lh\c| t\ i;i(| 
;;rxl)l)l'v(nv(| hr luiii 
liiUprr jlw ylikr \vlij;c 
Irtxe Mil mir(lr.sl)gliy 
l)f xsk to<;<] g^V(|Ill. 

VAl.MAl; X X 

SUBJECTS 



10:i FATTl-:i!S()N. A. 1 
170 MANUlil, C. S. 
174 HENDERSON. A. 
ISO HOWELI,. E. V. 
11)3 BEr.NAPvD. W. S. 
201 RUFEIN, T. 
221 JIOSES. H. H. 
241 HA5III/r<)N. .1. (i. 
248 HOWE. (iEO. 
24.> PKATT. .7. H. 



247 li.VTTI.K. K. 1). 

24S ItOBlNSOX. 1!. M. 

2.-)() ilcRAlC. D. 

2.->l TILLETT. C. W.. .11! 

2.-)4 LOX(i, \V. I.. 

2.-).5 (;UAllAiM, K. 1>. 

2(i0 UOVSTKR. .J. V. 

2i:l CORK, P. 

2(12 PAT'IERSOX. .T. S. 

204 WEST. L. N. 



.M<I!.\K. O. C. 
11 ■Ili.LKTT. .1. 
7 iriiKIKX. .1. .1. 
S .lOXES. E. 
) IIAKTSELL, .1. E. 

AVI'MiY. L. T. 

1 lUiOWX. ('.('. 

2 WIXSTOX. P. H. 
7:! TAXXER. K. S. 



f^^ 



Hat- -^'^ 



ipr^- 



%^ #»► 



'fl^ipi 



j^^ Iff 



(Bolbcn J^leece 



IHonorar)? members 

Edward Kidder Graham 

Henry Horace Williams 

Eben Alexander 

active nDemDers 

Frank Porter Graham, '09 
Kemp Davis Battle, '09 

Charles Walter Tillet, '09 

Colin Bradley Ruffin, '09 

Francis Edward Winslow, '09 

Thomas Palmer Nash, Jr., '10 
DossEY Battle Teague, '10 

James Earle Crosswell, '10 
James Noah Joyner, '10 

Adolphus Harrison Wolfe, '10 

Oscar Alexander Hamilton, '10 
Orren Williams Hyman, '10 

Cecil Clark Garrett, 'io 



aipfta chapter of Ct)i €ta ^u 



(Foiiiiil<-(l al till' Inivcrsitv ni Xuitli ( ;ir(iliiia in 1!MJ>S) 



C. H. HERr\ 

J. E. MILLS 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 



A. S. WHEELER 

HAMPDEN HILL 



L. DkK. BELDEN 

E. L. hunter 

\V. L. JEFFRIES 

E. J. NEWELL 



W. JL OATES 

K. TANNER 

V. S. VKNAIILE 

H. A. VOGLER 











o 






CD 







tm^ 






©erman Club 



L. T. AVERY President 

W. T. JOYNER Vice-President 

E. JONES Secretary 

G. S. DANIELS • Treasi:rer 



Avery. L. T. 
Ai.r.EX. C. JI. 
Ai exander. O. 
Adams. R. K. 
Rar.niiardt. E. C. 

I'.ROWN. C. C. 
BURGWYN, K. 0. 

Bkabd, J. G. 
boushall, j. h. 
boatwbight, h. 
boykin, j. w. 
Battle. K. D. 
Bellamy, C. C. 
Belden, L. DeK. 
Broadfoot. C. 
Blunt, .J. 
Barker, F. R. 
BoUSHALL. .J. D., .hi. 

buie. d. j\r. 

( rouse, S. 
( (iwpEB B. G., Jr. 
Cocke, E. R. 
c rosswell. .t. e. 
Cook. B. E. 
Capelle, p. 
Daniels, G. S. 
Dixon, S. 
Davis, J. T. 
Everett, W. N. 
Ellis, W. B. 
Edoerton. W. W. 
Ellington. K. R. 
Kkh.d. a. L. 
Faulkner. \\'. W. 
Fentress, B. L. 
OuioN, W. B. 

GUDGER, H. A. 
Godfrey, P. V. 
Grimsley', H. B. 
Graham, A. H. 
Hackney, J. A. 
Hartsell, J. A. 
Hardlson, 0. B. 
Heard. J. E. 

HOBGOOD. J. 

Habbis, J. 
Hughes, W. 
Hanes, R. M. 
Hunteb, T. W. 



MEMBERS 

•Johnson, J. T. 
Joyner, J. U. 
Joyner, \V. T. 
Jones, E. 
Kerr. L. C. 
Kramer. D. R. 
Kyser, T. 
La.mb, Luke 
Lloyd. O. C. 
Long, H. F. 
Long, B. R. 

MlSENIIEIMER. ('. A. 

Manning. J. S. 
MuRCiii.soN. D. R. 

MiLLIKEN. J, F. 
MOBRIS, J. 

lIcKoY. \V. 

JICIVER. W. 

McRae. D. 
McRae. D. C. 
McNeal. R. S. 
McAden. .T. 
Nichols. S. V. B. 
O'Brien, J. J. 
Parsley, \V. JL 
Perry, H. L. 
Powell, W. H. 
PolSSON, L. 

Patterson. J. S. 
Parker. R. H. 
Phillips. J. D. 
P.osE. T. D. 
Rhodes. A. B. 
ROHIXSC N. C. O. 
RoiilNSON. R. W. 
ROD.MAN. N. 
I!0DM.\N. \V. p.. 

rutzler, ,t. f. 
Roberts. G. 
Reeves, J. M. 
Small, W. F. 
Slade, T. B. 
Snider, W. W. 
Smith, H. L. 
Tanner, K. 

TiLLETT, J. 

Tyson, C. P. 
Thompson, H. A. 
Vann. J. C. M. 



Vogler. H. a. 
Venable, J. W. 
Ven.\ble. C. S. 
Vanstoby'. R. 
West. L. N. 
Whitney, F. G. 
Witheeington, F. 
Whabton, J. H. 
Wood, G. 
Wakeley, W. E. 
Wilson, W. R. 
Winston, R. W. 
Williams, H. 
Williams. R. 
Wallace. F. E. 
Yelverton. H. 

ZoLLICOFFER. A. A. 
ZoLLICOFFEB, J. P. 




267 



A> 



Co IDer 



/ 



\^\ 



Di'ur ]-nily l.ovi'. awliile agi>. 

As I sat chcarv. dozing lieic. 
A lairv t\i-w dnwii from the fviuiic 

Voiir pictuiv's ill. close to my ear. 
'And said. "'I lie lovclii'st visitor 

Is waiting at tlic doov tor yon." 
••Please bring licr in." 1 \vliis|icrcd baek. 

I wondered if 'twas really true. 



It was. An angel glided in, 

And she was just your size. 
With just such roses in Iwr cheeks 

As yours, and just such star-liright eyes. 
Her dainty little feet were hare. 

And freshly-hrnshed her shining hair. 
She wore a kimona of lilue. 

Dear T.adv Love. sav. was it you'r 




•A 



She kissed me. Heaven shone in her smile 

Her breath was sweet like violets, di-ai. 
She told me she'd come many a mile 

From Dreamland's port to see me liere. 
Had traveled in a fairy boat 

Upon the moonlit clouds aHoat. 
She said she liveil at , too. 

I almost know that it was yon. 



She read nic from n fairy hook 

.M> life to come, tliat lovely sage. 
Then at its pictures let me look. 

And you were there on every pagi". 
Too soon she went, with sweet good-byes 

Pressed on my forehead, warm and liglit. 
'•Oh. stay." I breathed with ardent sighs. 

Smilingly, she vanished in the night. 



^' 



/I 



Vanished; but. iii this lonely room, 

There must be violets in bloom, 
It is so sweet, and where her kiss 

Fell on my forehead throbs with bliss. 
If }'ou, dear Dreamland wraith, can give 

Such happiness, such bli.ss to me. 
What will that life that we shall live 

Together, oh, Heart's Dearest, be! 



Sweet, dill you dream yourself to sleep 

Sitting there by your bedtime fire. 
And. sleeping, dream yourself to me. 

Drawn by fond, too strong desire? 
Dear Love. I thank thee for the grace 

That glorifies this poor, rough plaee. 
To-Minrrow night at eleven-ten. 

i>ear Lady Love, please call again. 



V 



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tlniticrsitp 19rcss Association 



0. 
10. 

11. 

12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
10. 
17. 
IS. 

m. 

20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
2(1. 
27. 
28. 
20. 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 
35. 
3fi. 
37. 
3S. 
30. 
10. 
41. 



47. 


W 


48. 


s. 


•J<i. 


J. 


.")0. 


H. 


51. 


J. 



C. S. Cook .'. : ... . . . Charlotte News 

T. A. Jones. Jr -. .Asheville Citizen 

I. H. Hughes .'. Washinfrton News 

J. W. Clinard . . . '. Hickon- Democrat 

W. T. JIcLean Raeford Facts and Figxires 

P.. C. Trotter Webster's Weekly 

W. B. Wilson Marion Trocrress 

A. L. M. Wiggins Morning Herald — Durham Recorder 

Norman Vann Charlotte Chronicle 

E. C. Ward Waynesville Courier 

S. H. Basnight Newbern Sun 

F. P. Graham Charlotte Observer. Richmond Times-Dispatch. Atlanta Journal 

A. S. JIullican Winston Sentinel 

John W. Lasley Siler City Grit 

Kenneth Tanner Rutherford Sun 

D. L. Rights Winston Journal 

C. B. Woltz Orange County Observer 

Cyrils Thompson. Jr Eastern Carolina News 

William Burwell Warrentxin Record 

L. N. Taylor '. .Virginian Pilot Oxford Ledger 

D. B. Bryan ......'. Chatham Record 

S. F. Teague Sanford Express 

S. B. Stroiip Asheville Gazette-News 

J. A. Hackney Wilson Times 

W. M. Snider -. . Salisbury Post 

W. L. Cooper Alamance (ileaner 

J. F. Love Rtatesville Sentinel 

C. E. Norman Concord Times 

T. W. Voils Mooresville Enterprise 

P. Dickson Fayetteville Obser\-er 

E. C. SIcLean Grcensl)oro 'I'elegram 

H. M. Solomon Wilmington Star 

Jack Harris Raleigh News and OI)ser\er 

Claude Tyson Carthage Blade 

J. S. P. Fenner Scotland Neck Comnionwcalth 

A. C. Kimrey Biirlington News 

L. A. Brown : . ... Greenville Reflector 

H. B. ilarrow Henderson Gold Leaf 

J. S. Cowles Wilkes Patriot 

L. F. Turlington _ Smithfield Journal 

J. A. McGoogan Roln-sonian 

H. M. Gaddy ; Red Springs Citizen 

H. 0. Craver Ty<'xingt()n Leader 

W. H. Ferguson North Wilkeslioro Hustler 

W. H. Jones Yancey ville News 

N. S. Plunnner Greensbcro News. Washington Post, .\tlanta Georgian 

C. George Elkin Times 

G. Parker .■ Kinston Free Press 

R. Nixon Lincoln County Times 

Sisk Cleveland Star 

P. Cordon Clayton Enterprise 

L. L. Davenport and \V. D. Cuthrell Rockv Mount Record 

J. H. Boushall ". Raleigh ' Evening Times 

L. C. Kerr Sampson County Democrat 

H. M. Stubbs .,. Williamston Enter])rise 

Fred Drane Albermarle Observer 

Joe F. HofTman High Point Review 

XoTK — There were only forty-seven inciiibers pn-scnt when tlie group was pliotographed. 

271 



SDiir Colors 



Wliy are our college colors always 

White and blue? 
Vcui wish to kiiiiw? Why. thru I" 

Tell it vou. 



To elioipse from, there were colors 

Xot a few — 
P.ut think you there are any that 

Quite equals blue! 



The very skies above are of this 

Pleasing hue — 
And .so we can but love it. when 

'Tis Heaven's own blue! 



"I'is llie idliir sweethearts and lovers 

Think will do. 
For when they send a token they 

Choose a lover's knot of blue. 



White makes one dream of all 
Things pure and chaste. 

And so the coml)ination is in 
Pleasing taste. 



And so you see our College colore 

M'liilc and Blue 
Stand always for everything 

That's Pure and True! 



\ 



//y 






V 



V 



V 




"^ 



X 



Officers of g. 90. C. a. 



W. Hoke Ramsaub President 

J. H. BouSHALL Vice-President 

i;. T. Webb Treasurer 

L N. Taylor Recording Secretary 

Eugene E. Barnett General Secretary 

CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES 

D. B. Teague (llember of Cabinet ) Bible Study 

J. II. CoSTNEH (Member of Cabinet) Membership 

.ToHX Tillett (Member of Cabinet) Social 

R. T. Webb Finance 

L. N. Taylor Work for New Students 

A. R. Morgan (Member of Cabinet) Mission Study 

A. H. Wolfe (Member of Cabinet ) Rclifjious Meetings 

H. C. Smith (Member of Cabinet) Publications 

L. F. Tuklington (Member of Cabinet) Lyceum 

J. A. Austin Neighborhood Work 

S. F. Teagie Music 

F. P. Graham ( Member of Cabinet ) Conferences 

W. L. Cooper Leader of Ministerial Band 

•T. W. Freeman Leader of Volunteer Band 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

K. K. Graham, 1898. Chairman Chapel Hill 

L. R. Wilson, 1899, Secretaiy and Treasurer Chapel Hill 

F. p. Venable .' Chapel Hill 

George Ste\-ens, 1899 Charlotte 

Robert Strange, 1877 Wilmington 

J. H. Pratt Chapel Hill 

A. H. Patterson, 1891 Chapel Hill 

W. D. Weatherford Nashville, Teini. 

A. M. Scales Greensboro 

.(. K. Pfohl, 1898 Winston-Salem 

.L S. Hill, 1880 Durham 

M. H. Stacy, 1902 Chapel Hill 

R. H. Lewis Halcigli 

W. Hoke ILvmsalr E.\ Ollicio 



275 




The Spirit of the Y. M. C. A. 




TIIK Ydinii; Glen's Cliristian Associatidii is n |i;irt of the riiivcrsity 
life wliicli this 1 k rc]ir('spnts. It is not a se])aratcil |)art liiit it is ;i rclatfd 

|.ai'f that (■(lutrihiitcs t.i ihc life nf tlic wlmli'. 'I'hc ^■. M. ('. A. hclirvcs in 
t!i(^ JIiiiKir Svstciii as it steadily cvdlvcs out cif a strdiiy seiitiiiicnt ami 
^vpw's into a system iikut crt'cctixc ami niiirc vitally related td the student 
t'onsc'ionsness. It lielieves in liie ]iidilieatii>iis as they I'cHect the (i]iiiii(in on 
the ea)]i])tis and iii\-e expressidii tn student life, sim])le and demoeratic. It 
believes in the I)i and Phi Sdcietie.s, tlxise twn miffhty iiillars of the rniversity 
structure, trainini; canijis of iii'cat men aud aenemns eontriliutnrs to ihe life 
of the State. The Y. M. ('. A. helieve^ in the alhleties ,d' the I'niversity, 
as iiradnally adjustini; lier>e|f lo the oliservance cd' a hiiih athletic standard 
she conies to Ikm- own in Soulh Atlantic athletics. 

The Y. M. ('. A. helicves in the students of the 1 'nivei'sity. their ])liysi- 
cal welMieini:'. iheir social instinct, and their inhoi-u ndiiiious life. On such 
a Ix'lief in y<iun,ii' uien it was foumled and its jiroAVth has Ik-cu one e.\tending' 
miraide all the way from the time when Sii- (ieoriic Williams gathered a few 
yoiiuii- men alioul him in the city of London, in 1S44, down to the ])resent 
time, as it reaches into every (pnirter (d' ihe i;l(]lie emhracine' in the scope 
of its work tile yoinit;- men of the city, the army, ili<' navy, the railroad, the 
factory, and the collece. 

in all these tii'lds (d' its work the V. .M. (". A. stands fV)r the develoiniient 
of hoily, mind and soul. In the cities and elsewhere the Y. ^I. ('. A. de- 
velo])es the body in the oymnasiuias and the mind in the classroom. In 
the colleo-e, howe\-ei-, tlie collejie siymnasium and the collea'e classroom su])plant 
these ])arts of the .\ssociation's work: and the Association cd" this Tniversity 
while end<irsing a full rounded develo]>nu'iit is niakiui;- its jiarticular plea to the 
highest self. It a])])eals to what after all are three id' the dominant things 
in life, social instinct, desire for social service, and innate religious nature. 

The Y. ^1. ('. A. a])]ieals in the tirst |)lace to the social instinct. Its 
hnilding, as a center of college activities, is the social center of the campus. 
Its game and reading rooms and its hall as a gathering jilaee form comfortable 
places for haphazard student meetings. The religious classes give the oppor- 
tunity for that social interchange of scdves that comes in no other way. The 
general si.icial rece])tions give a chance for the whole student body to meet 




togethei' dVL'i' a lilass <if leiiiuiiade tir a l)arrfl of ai^plcs. A social 
organization, it is a democratic social organization. It believes in the uni- 
versal brothcrhiiod of man and the bliieness of all blood. Tender its inilnencf, 
the man fmni the West, as strong and rugged as those m<inutains among which 
he was reared, and the man fmm the East, as polished and finished as the 
drawing room he graces; the man of the professional school and the man of 
the academic school ; the senior and the freshman ; the feeble and athletic ; 
the "good egg" and the "grind;"' the frat and the uon-frat — all meet together 
on a common ground in a common cause. The Y. il. C. A. is thus a force 
for the harmonization of those varied elements that make up the complex 
University social life. 

Besides being thus a furee for college unity the Y. M. C. A. has other 
definite purposes of service and makes a fui'ther apjieal to the desire for 
social usefulness. A social organization, it has o])]i(irrunity for social ser- 
vice. In fact the very existence of the Y. ^f. ('. A., like the existence of any 
social organization with a nmi^al ]nir]>()se, is cif incalculable good. In the 
hurry of every-day student life the students dften take the Y. M. C. A. for 
granted and it is glad that is so. They all ha\'e the advantages nf its reading 
and game I'ooms, its eduiniiftee rcjums for conference, study, and eluh meet- 
ings; they have the jirivileges and receive the benefits of its religious meetings, 
and it is well. It is just that sort of service that the Y. ]\I. C. A. believes 
in, the service that willioiit fii>s and fiii-oiv really scr\-es. 

However in<litfereiit a stiideiil may lie lo many of the activities of 
such an oi'gani/.ation, it beeonies incuiidient npon bini in ihe name of good 
eitizenship to sn]i]iort an organization which in its incidental life has inter- 
woxx'ii itself so intiiiiali'ly into lii~ ;-\crv-day social exislcu<'e. The best ])arf 
of an organization's life, as ihe best |)art of a good niaiTs life, is "those little 
nnrememliere(l acts cif kiuilncss and of love." The Y. M. V. A. stands as 
iin <intlet for these little, iinrcincmlici'cd acts, as an outlet for unselfish social 
service. The work for new students, the information bureati, the self-hel]) 
de])artinent, hook exchange, student handbook, and college directory are all 
contributions of the Y. M. C. A. to student life. The Bible classes with an 
enrollment of 3S0, and the Mission classes with an enrollment of 310, have 
quickened an interest in Bible study and Missionary activity that has con- 
trilmted to the higher tone of camiuis life. The fact that an alunmus secretary, 
Engene E. Barnett, is to he largely siip|.oii:'d liy ihe stndcnts and faculty on 
the foreign field has lironght the I'niversity into more vital relation with the 





!/ 



/ 




volunteer mnvcmeiit and has i-eactod with increasing power upon University life. 
The neighh(irh( 1(1(1 Sunday-school work, carried on by twenty students who 
walk miles every Sunday afternoon into the rural districts, affords an oppor- 
tunity for genuine service and diminishes the truth of the saying that the 
University of North Carolina is a mighty lighthouse that casts its clear light 
far across the borders of the State while its base is dark and in ignorance. 

For any service to be genuine and Wdvtb while it must bring out of 
the inner, spiritual essence; it shduld have a rcligidus basis. The Y. M. C. 
A. makes its third ajijieal to this s])iritual self. The Assuciatiou, as has been 
said, appeals to the social instinct which finds its expression in the universal 
brotherhood of man dedicated to service. And now, finally, it believes that 
such a brotherhood f)f man should be based upon the Fatherhood of God. True 
religion, it believes, is not only rightly relating oneself to his fellowman and 
feeling genuinely a brother to every mau, but it is also rightly relating 
oneself to God and feeling deeply the dignity (if a sou of God. It believes that 
life uiust l)e at once socialized and sjiiritiuili/cd. Christ has given the only 
example of the perfect social and spiritual life, lie has been the sympathetic 
brother to man and the strong Sdu of God. Tt is the Christ life, after all, that 
the y. M. C. A. is trying to bring before the students of this University. 

It is well at this formative period in the student's life, when the ])lastic 
mind takes on its life mould and when the growing character takes its life 
trend, that such a life as His should have a part in that mind-making and in that 
character-building. At this period — when views of life by reason of a study 
of the sciences and philosophy undergo revdlutiduarv changes, when some of 
the old religions views conflict with reason, the world seems turned upside 
dowm and all things seem out of joint — it is well to have an organized 
religious force at work in the students' lives straightening out these intellec- 
tual tangles and to hear above this tumult of mind and soul a voice, 
clear and strong, saying: "Let not your heart be troubled neither let it be 
afraid." In the strength of that voice, however far adrift he may be amid 
the eddying currents of a cold intellectualism, his heart becomes steadied, 
his faith anchors, and he knows that the world processes move on in their 
divine and scientific plan, that there is nothing out of joint, that he is still 
related in this world program to his fellow man as brother and to his God 
as Father. Such is the spirit of the Young Men's Christian Association of 
this University. 

F. P. G. 



V. 




T5rotf)er[)ooD of %tt. 3nDretu 

Chapter No. 13o2 



OFFICEBS 

REV. R. W. HOGUE Rector 

L. X. lAYLOR DiBECTOB 

F. B. DRANE > Vice-Director 

H. C. SMITH Secretary 

A. J. HOBGOOD Treasurer 

St. Andrew's Day — Xovomber 2Stli. 

OBJECT 

Tlie object of the Brotlierliood of St. Andrew is the spread of (lirisfs king(h>m 
among men, espeeially young men. The rides are two: Tlie Rule of Prayer ami the Rule of 
Service. The Rule of Prayer is to pray daily for the sjiread of Christ's Uingdom among men 
and for God's blessing upon the work of tlie Brotherhood. The Rule of Service is to make an 
earnest effort each week to liring at least one young man within hearing of the Gospel of 
Jesus Christ. The Brotherhood extends a cordial welcome to new men. 



X 



^A 




BnOADFOOT. C. \\". 
Cox. F. N, 
Uhane. F. B. 
Fe.\m;h. .1. S. 1'. 
rionoooi). A. .1. 



MEMBERS 

Miciiics. 1. II. MoKOAX, A. R. 

.ToNKS. T. A. iloBKI.S, J. W. 

La.mi!, L. Nichols. S. V. B. 

.MtliAE, U. Taylor, L. N. 

-MiUai:. U. C. Thompson. F. 



Towers. E. G. W. 
Stroup, Sam. 
Stubbs, it. M. 
Vann, X. 




^L3 WITH 

COMMEXCEMEXT JIaRSIIAI.S 



y 




'''^AyiLTO^ 



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'■^Ckh€< 



^0Ly^9^ 



Ball Managers 



/-, 



mbtn the Uoses 151 oom 



In the Spring, each slender rose vine 
Bends beneath its fragrant load, 

flliether in the well-kept garden 
Or along the country road. 



Flaming deep and rich in sciirlet. 

Shining soft and clear and wliite. 
Or in pink, with dainty blushes — 

Who could wish a fairer sight? 



In the many lives about us. 

These three roses we may find, 
Not as flowers, but yet as truly 

In the blossoms of the mind: 



'I// 



First tilt" red. tin- dashing courage. 

Hot, young blood with high linpes rife; 
Then the white, which gently tells us 

Of a pure and unstained life. 



But the pink, the greatest treasure, 
This we find the best at last : 

For 'tis love the pink rose stands for, 
Love that withers everv blast. 



In the liumble cottage, sometimes 
In the stately palace hall. 

Matters not or high or lowly. 
Roses bloom — a rose for all. 



y\ 



'L 



PutJlications 



Yackety Yack: Publislicd annually by tlie Literary Societies and Fraternities. 

T. J. McManis Editor-in-Chief 

('. B. EufRn, L. DeK. Beldcii Business Managers 

University Magazine: l'ul)lisluMl six times a year by the Literary Societies. 

T. P. Nash Editor-in-Chief 

C . B. Spieer Business Manager 

The Tar Heel: Published weekly by the Athletic Associations. 

O. W. Hyman Editor-in-Chief 

A. H. Wolfe Business Manager 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society .Iocunai,: I'ublislipil quarterly by tlu' Klislia 
Mitchell Scientific Society. 

UiNlVEESITY Recoru: Pulilislied (|uart('rly by the adiniiiistrativi- ollicers of the 
University. 

The Catalogue: Published annually by the University. 

University Bulletin: Publislied weekly by the Faculty Bulletin Committee. 

Cosmopolitan Bulletin: Published annually by the Cosmopolitan Club. 

U. N. C. Hanubdok: Published annually by the V. ..M. C. A. 

U. N. C. Directory: Published annually by the V. il. C. A. 

Alumni Bulletin: Published quarterly by the University. 

James Sprunt Historical .Mo.nograph : Published annually by the University. 

Journal of Philosophy: Published annually by the University. 




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3ej-o 



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ank ciYVev^ me T^eoeUVTc 



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Rumors 



Beans are good for fcKul, Init this is imt tlie nnly use to which they may 
be jjiit. One of our .students who is red-headed — thongh that really has little 
to do with the point — was standing a difficnlt ■■Practical" on a left hind leg 
of a frog. The professor, a dozen or so heans in each hand, was behind him 
looking over his shoulder. For every question answered correctly the pro- 
fessor dro])ped a little bean into his right-hand coat pocket ; for the answers 
that were wrong, a beau was placed in the left-hand pocket. A specially 
hard question was answered correctly, while the professor was calling a negro 
named Reuben to water the remaining frog legs. The professor dropped a 
bean into the left-hand pocket and, while sucking his ujijier front tooth thought- 
fully, was ])opping another question. Eut he was rlu'cked. A wiry, red-haired 
hand was pointed toward the drt'emling pnckei and a detiant red face, set 
with sharj) little eyes, was turned upon the iinifcsscir. A decisive voice said 
curtly: "Dnctor, you got that bean in the wmiii;' jxicketl" P. 



They meet at the well. 

"Hello, Bill, whadjii stau" on to-day f 

"Math." 

"Have 'im spodded (" 

"Never got blinded so liad in merlife." 

"Whadju have ?" 

"Psych." 

"Didju kill 'im?" 

"Damfino. Got 'uTthinc ter smoke ?" 




"Hello Jim, old man, did you hear aljout the tight down at Gooche's 
to-night V 

"No, what was the excitement ?" 

"From what I can hear about the matter. Ben Banks and Charlie Robin- 
son went in to get something to eat. George, the Greek waiter, asked them 
if they would have beans, and they thought he said, 'Have beens,' and they 
beat him up l)efore anybody could find 'Jug' Whitaker." M. 



A\ 




"Well," said Ferd Diils, just after reading the Xcir York Timex, "I see 
where that fellow Tammany was elected after all." 




Big Ike Kelly was standing at the Post-office ])rond as could be of an 
enormous shine on his "tans"' just recently obtained. "Lengthy" Jones, in 
passing, iinconsciously tread on one of Ike's jiedal extremities, aud forthwith 
came a good-natured ejaculation: "Say, kid! \\'hat d'you take 'em for, door 
mats ^ You dou't see 'AYelcouie" written across the toji, do you f " 



The A. T. O. Hall had just recently liurned down. Kenneth IJurgwyn 
was wandering aimlessly down College Avenue when a \ery intimate friend 
approached and compassionately inquired, "Say Ken ole man, was everything 
burned ? Didn't yoti even save the records '." 

"No," replied Kenneth dejectedly, "Every record was burned," ami then 
brightening tip he added, "but we saved the graphojihoiie all right." 



Prof. Latta was arranging a date for the fall term examination which 
would be agreeable to all members of the el ass in eleventh physics. The class 
was about to decide upon Thursday as the day, when it was disturbed by 
the deep voice of "Bish" Towers. 

"That date Wdu't do. Prof. Latta. I'm going to walk to Hillsboro 
Thursday." 



L)r. Henderson had ex])lained the "Theory of Limits" for nearly an 
hour. Every one in the class tinderstood it except one exceedingly brighl 
Sophomore, who was taking the cnurse IVir tlie second time. It seemed as if 
he just couldn't absorb it. Dr. Henderson determined to try a realistic 
explanation. He drew a chalk line across the floor, ordered the Sophomore 
to stand at one end while he himself stood at the other. "Now" said he, 
"Come half way to me." 

"Come half way again." 

"After each stoji come half of the renuiining distance." 

This was kept u]i until the Sophomore was near to Dr. Henderson. 
"Now." said Dr. Hendersdu, "What are you approaching as a limits' 

"Zero"' was the Sophomore's undaunted and innnediate reply. S. 



# 




The Ecouomics lecture was flragging verv sldwly. All that had liccu 
heard for the last half hour was cotton, cotton, cnrtiin, and in the midst of 
their fleecy discoiii*se Joe O'Erian had fallen asleep. Suddenly the stibject 
was changed to pig iron. ''Well, ilr. Oliver," said the Professor, "what are 
the main uses of this article f ' O'Brian ( awaking, and still dreaming of 
cotton), ""Well — er, the people of the tropical regimis use it a great deal for 
clothing, yarn is nuide from it and it's ahmit the largest agricultural ]iroduct 
that the South has." S. 

Some time ago I was at a ]iarty in my home tdwn, and there was present 
a Freshman from the l'ni\crsity. His attemjits to occupy an important 
position in the social set could not fail to attract attention. He spoke 
nnich and learnedly of all serious cpiestions discussed, and, whenever an 
(>])portiinity ])resentcd itself, he "lioosted" highly the record of ihc I'nivcrsity 
in letters, debates and reseandi work, neglecting, howex'er. fri\dlou< matters. 
as athletics and the like. ^^'h(•n a young lady from .MiTodiih ('ollege. 
whose interest he ha<l di'awn, asked him how high rlie enrriculuiii i> o\cr here, 
he hesitated, and then replied: "I am not exactly sure how high ihe hlooming 
thing is, but you can see Durham from the top of it !"" W. <'. (J. 



Cftose a3eautiful OBpcs 



Blue eyes, True e^cs 

In wliose orbs 
Purity lies; 
Hue of tlip skies. 



Gray e3es. Peerless eyes, 

In wliose depths 
Character lies; 

Keen and clear. 

Lurks no fear. 



Brown eyes, nove-like eyes, 

Loyal, sad and sweet ; 
Volumes of love within 
Their shadows lies. 

And speaks of the dreamy deep. 




€oacf)es 



■'■ ""\^ «^V ^ 



<» 



ROBERT BAKER LAWSON 

BASEBALL 

Was ;i iiiciiil)er of the U. X. C. jjasckill Twuii seasons 
of 1897-08-99; Captain of U. X. C. Team one year; 
Pitched for Orange Athletic Clulj of New Jersej'; 
Pitelied two years on University of JIarj'land Team ; 
Captain of University of Maryland Team one year; 
with Boston Nationals one year; Baltimore Americans 
one year; Woonsocket, R. I., two years; Strnudsburg, 
I'a.. tliree years; Coach U. N. C. Team two years — 
lOOo-OO. 



ARTHUR K. BRIDES 

I-OoniALL 

flrailnate of Vale llKIll; f. X. C. 1910. Phayed 
Tai-Ule. En.l and Half hack on VaU> learn season 1908- 
ll'.l. Mcntiimeil as an all-Ann'rican liy several papers. 





N. .!. CAUTMELL 



Finished his athletic career at University of Penn- 
sylvania in spring of 1908; held world's amateur record 
for 220 yards ; holds world's official professional record 
220 yards, time 21^/4 seconds; won at Stoke-on- 
Trent, England. 




/ / 




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ANALYTICS 



l^arsitp jFootftall Ccam, 1909 



Robert Watson Wixstox 
Harry ^Talcomb Hedcepkti 
Robert Clay ^rcT.EAN .... 
Archibald Rattle Dea.v.s. 

Levi Ames Browx 

Earl A. Tiio.mpsox 

C'KCTL Clark Carrett. . . . 
Carl Michael Spaixholr. 
■ToHX Maxxixo Vexable . . 
liiciiARD Fleet Williams. 

Will Parks Belk 

•loHX Tlllett 

James Earl Crossweli 

CoLLixs Bradley Ruffix . 
i.oi IS De Kaiser Relden . 
IXvxiEL McOrecor Williams 
AxDREW Lindsay Porter.... 



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170 


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:.CRUB 

FOOTBALL TEAM 

BLALOC'K AND WOOD Loft Kml 

COLEMAN AND HUTl'HIXS Left Tackle 

CRAVEN Left Guard 

(HrTCHFlELD Centre 

FERGUSON AXi) LOVE Right Guard 

COOK Riaht Tackle 

ROIilNSON. STRUTHERS and SMALL Right End 

ROSE AXi) BARKER Quartcrliack 

McLEAN (Cai>tai.\) and FARRIOR Left Halflmek 

JOHNSTON, ELDER and THOJIPSON. Right Halfliack 
WAKELEV Fullback 




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I^arsitp Ceam, 1909 



Williani I'lOvv Mnmc ('. 

Oscar AlcxaiuliM- lliiiniltdii. 1(107-118-0!) 1 H. 

Vernon \'an Duko DiiiUMn :i\'>. 

John Hancv Winn. Jr S. S. 

Cliarles Wailao- Arnistron;; :ili. 

(ieorge ilarion Fountain, S. S. 11107-08 I.. I'. 

James Acra Hackney, 1!)0.S-0!I f. !■'. 

Henry Wise Lyon K. I'. 

Barney Cleveland Stewart, 1008-Oit I'. 

Harrv Jlalconih He(lf;epetii 1'. 

Ferdinand .lolm Dais, l!)0S-0!)— substitute I'. 

Harvey liryan Wadsxvortli, 11)08-0!)— substitute. . . C. 

Walter ilo'ore Landietli — substitute !■'. 



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'Baseball Scores, 1909 



March 13 Bingham (Mebane), at Cliapel Hill 

20 Oak Ridge, at Chapel Hill 

26 Elon, at Chapel Hill 

29 Amherst, at Chapel Hill 

30 Amherst, at Chapel Hill 

April 1 Colgate, at Chapel Hill 

2 Colgate, at Chapel Hill 

3 Lafayette, at Chapel Hill 

" 5 Lafayette, at Chapel Hill 

8 Villanoya, at Chapel Hill 

" 10 Guilford, at Greensboro 

" 12 Winston League, at Winston 

13 St. John's, at Charlotte 

'■ 14 Dayidson, at Charlotte 

15 Delaware, at Chapel Hill 

Hi Dela^vare, at Chapel Hill 

■' lil Virginia, at Greensboro 

•• 21 Guilford, at Chapel Hill 

23 Dayidson, at Chapel Hill 

30 Virginia, at Charlottesyille 

-May 1 Villanoya, at Philadeli)liin 

" 3 Pennsylyania. at I'liiladelpliia 

" 4 Georgeto\yn, at Washington 

7 Central Lniyersity of Kentucky, at Cliapi'l Hill 

" 8 Central Cniyer-ity nf Kc^ntucky, at Chapel 11.11 



OPPOXEXTS 


N. 


2 


3 





3 





6 


1 





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7 





3 


3 


1 


2 


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5 


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"V: 




shearers of tije "J]5. C." 



OFFICERS 

C. B. RUFFIX President 

G. M. FOUXTAIX Vice-President 

B. C. STE\V.\BT Secretary 

JOHX TILLETT Historian 

FACULTY MEMBERS 

DR. K. V. HOWELL I)K. A. H. PATTERSOX 

DR. R. B. LAWSOX 1)1;. C. S. MAX(iUlI 

IN UNIVERSITY 
FOOTHAI.L 

W. P. BELK L. DeK. BELDEX 

J. E. CROSSWELL L. A. BROWN 

H. iL HEDGEPETH C. C. GARRETT 

R. G. PARKER R. C. McLEAN 

C. B. RUFFIN A. L. PORTER 

E. A. THOMPSOX ('. JL 8PA1XH0UR 

J. M. VEXABLE JOHX TILLETT 

R. F. WILLIAMS D. M. WILLIAMS 

1!. W. WIXSTOX 

BASEIIALL 

C. W. AUMSTKOXG (L JL FOUXTAIX 

O. A. lIA.MII/niN 11. M. llEDCiEPETH 

V. 1). DIXC.VX II. W. LYOX 

B. V. SIKW .\I!T .). A. II.XCKXEY 



\ 



•L A. EVERETT 

S. F. TEAGUr: 

R. W. WIXSTOX 



(i. ('. WOOD 
D. il. WILLIAMS 
W . A. SHAW 



G, .M. ForXT.MX (). W. iiv:\L\x 

C. S. VEXABLE 



J. R. ALLISOX 
L. C. KERR 



GYMNASIUM 



V. W. OSBORNE 
303 



r. C. BROWNE 
DUNCAN JIcRAE 




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University Athletics 



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THE must satisfviiig and l);'sr rcimnlcil riii\ersiry lifi' eiiilnTii'i's a trinity 
(if activities and pursnits. Perhaps it niav lie needless tn add that we 
have consigned to the gentle guidance of the ^'. il. C. A. tmr sjiiritital 
life in the University, to the teachers of the College the major portion of onr 
mental life, and to the gymnasium and otir football, baseball, track, and tennis 
teams onr physical education. 

The life that o\'erdevelo])s nne or two df these three to the neglect and 
detriment <if the cithers is inccimplete and, to the extent of the neglect, a failure. 
This does not mean that the college life of every man who is of the rniversity 
comnmnity is a niin if he becomes not a deeply religions worker (ir an intellect- 
nal prodigy or a physical giant. Foolish, indee<l, it would be to say that it 
lies within the power of any mere man to be an aggregation of all things 
desirable. But, snrely, the jimdigv i^ not under the (•(luijiulsinii df bi^dng 
steadfastly a weakling, even in order to cnntinue a jirodigy. Experience and 
physicians have ever insisted that the intellect of the jihysically atrophied 
is niiable to conqiete with the ]>roductions of the balanced man; no more can 
it cope so well with the exigencies of a dilemma nnr cuntiniially battle with 
the rontiue of every-day life. The reason tor it is simple. Xnt ability alone, 
but work conpled with ability is the real answer to the iirolilein of every 
success; and surely no one will ilcny the vicious sa])])ing of the wasted body 
on the endurance of the mind. It were qtiite a waste of words to comjjare 
the reciirds of the athletes in days after college with those of the men who 
do not go in for physical devcliiiimeut. The contrast wotild incontrovertibly 
show the enhanced endurance of the former and a couseciuent greater longevity 
of tisefulness. The sway of the physical over the sjiiritual is less evident 
to the senses but, nevertheless, fully as real. The dyspeptic is seldom your 
constrnctive Christian advocate. The articles of his diet will yield precedence 
to no other religion. Mtich the same relation would hold trtte for the connections 
of the other two to each other. Each element of the trinity is dejiendent ujion 
both of the other two for its powers of endurance. 

Probably no class of men have a clearer conception of the obligation of 
physical development than college men. The recoguiliou of this duty is the 
organized pursuit of athletics. 



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To say, however, that student pursuit of athletics is based entirely upon 
a sense of physical duty or even of college pride would be wholly erroneoiis. 
To the student, the sheer pleasure of the muscular activity of the contest 
expresses the acme of living. The pure joy of physical motion is enticing 
and ever alluring. The life of your real cdllege athlete is often centered 
entirely in his few hours on the field or in the gvuinasium. For this, in truth, 
he lives and moves and has his being. The extrcnu' cxaiiijik's are the men who 
have come to college and stayed and studied a whole ycnr — fur that they shall 
pass their work is required — for a few afterndous jihiyiug during oue term. 

The athlete receives more than the direct biau'tit frnui these primary 
causes for which he satisfies the craving of the physical. Thi- indirect influence 
of the dictates of fair play tend to ingrain into him the powerful moral 
habits of cleanness and right decisions ; and he becomes a man able to block the 
tindermining encroachments of evil influence. Intellectually, too, the crises 
of athletic games have their admitted result in CDuduciug to the keenness of 
relial>l(' judgment — ever essential to the snccessful nutcnme nl the ventures of 
any occupation. The value of working against other men to make the team 
has inherent in it the social attainiiieut of self-forgetfidness, bred of the 
merging of single desires into the larger interests of team ])lay. ^Ye wish 
not to indulge in any comiilaccnt jilatitudes on athletics, hut, surely, the 
eye may perceive that the college athlete is different from the ordinary man, 
that he has got something which the other lacks. 

It is easy to see that the effect of having teams on those men who do not 
play, the college as a whole, though less ])otential, is none the less actual — intel- 
lectually and socially — in bringing to jiass llir unifying of the college. We 
forget our artificial distinctions of caste under tlii' ]c\('ling influence rd' a 
man-to-man contest. Whether, then, we ai'e filled with Kichmond's cu]) (d" 
joy after victory or submerge our sorrows after dcfeiil. the genuine struggle 
of the game is developmental of the higher (pialitii's of lioth the athlete and 
the non-participant in their caiiacity as indixidnal^ ;ind as members of the 
University community. 

That athletics at the University is widenini: its scope and each year 
enfolds a higher jiercentage of the men in college should be a justifiable cause 
of self-gratulation to the men who arc lending it their ~n|iiiort. Comparisons 
of the oldest pessimist to the contrary notwithstanding, the high-water mark 
of general interest in athletics has been ajiproacdied tlii^ year. The low ebli 
of our athletic activity has assuredly passed and, coidd we afford to turn 
aside to prophesy, our forecast would be une(piivoeally that the full tide of 

307 



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our athletic powur lias lieiiuii — ])crlia)is sluwlv as yet, liiit muui.stakably begun 
its rise. It has taken ns this amount nf time tii adjust ourselves thoroughly 
after the overthrow of professionalism in 1903, the ending of our five years 
svar in the final triumph of the honor system of the college expressing itself 
in ])urity (if athletics. 

The leap forward in thi' year miw jiassiug has been hardly ])aralleled 
in the jn-ogress of the University's athletics. The c.xjiansion has been most 
(•ous])icuous in the gathering in of the classes into track athletics by the 
institutinu of "Field Day," in the cumiug uf a eunqieteut track trainer, and 
in the awakened enthusiasm for Icuuis, an enthusiasm which will necessitate 
the ciinstructinn of u<'w courts befure next year in additinu to ihe recent enlarge- 
uieut. The sacrificing respnnse of the students t(i the ajipeal nf the deficit 
(if the fddtball season would have brought a gbiw (if wai-mth td the heart of the 
blufi'est alunmus nf the insritufidu. Tt. indeed, was a \i\'id exhibition of 
the new athletic si)irit df the cdllegc. Td state statistically the breadth of 
the athletic culture here in the ruivcisity. there are udW about forty members 
of the '"Wearers of the X. C" Club, rweiity-tixc nf whdui have been added in 
the jiast year. In the I'liiversity (if a little ludfe than eight hundred students 
there are over two hundred men wlm Inive made a team (if sumo kind, varsity, 
scrub nr class. This reckniiiug dnes udt include the utmiber, which aggregates 
jierhaps half as uuiuy lUdre, nf these wbd try and fail t:i make any team. The 
athletic showing of the cnllege slmuld al<d in(dude the cdiiimdualty of students, 
who constitute a Imdy (if the athletically inclined, those who regularly and 
systematically partake df the tennis court or the milder forms of exercise in 
the gymnasium (ir a tvdt thrdugh IJattle's Park. 

In sjiite (if the sizable sbdwiiig df men engaged in athletics, the I'uiversity 
is still afar dfi' from the danger of becoming too alliletic, df sacrificing mental 
or moral culture for jihysical. The more general the participation, indeed, 
the less the danger, because such a danger could come only when all our 
athletics were concentrated in a few giants; it could not be under the inevitable 
minute siiccialization which universal strident participation in athletics would 
require. The athletics of the University are maintaining laudably their pur- 
pose of not encroaching uixm the realm df either the spiritual or the mental. 
Disclaiming the suggestion of a desire to see the animal of man overdeveloped, 
yet thoroughly appreciating the jireemiuent worth of a clear head and a sound 
brain, we devoutly endite a concluding ]irayer that the athletics of the Uni- 
versity may become consistently whole-souled and all-embracing. 

S. R. C. 



//y 





TRACK 



nni'.Kiri' watsox winstox, jr 

mil v;inls iiinl 220 yards. IflOO. 

(iKOKCI': rUKDKlilCK lU'TZl.EP, 

Kill vMi-.U anil 2211 yards. lilOS ami liMIII. 

\\1I.I.L\.M .VI.IiKK SHAW. Oi|itain 

1211 yanU luii-iUes and oiii- mile. I'.KIS ami lilllll. 

CEOKCli tOLLlXS WOOD 

22(1 y.inU low hurdle. HHI'J. 

SA:\irEI, FAlUilS TKA(U"E 
(.luartcr mile, 1009. 

HKM.Uil) D.WIS EAMES 
I'c.li- vault. I'JOS and 1000. 

DAXiKi. .\1i(;i;K(;iiI! wii.lia.ms 

lliL:li jmi |i anil lnnail juni|i. 101)7. IIMIS ami lOII'.l. 
JA.MKS Al.l'lidXSO EVEKEir 

Half n;iU. ami nne mili'. 101)7. lOIIS ami 101)0. 

C. I'.K.Mll.KV IMFFIX 

120 anil 220 vai.ls Iniidlcs. 1000. 



BUR.MAX KARL ULALOCK 
Relay, 1009. 

HARRY MEYER SOLOMOX 

220 yards and half mile, 1000. 

WIEI.IAM E. WAKEI.EV 

Relay anil half mile. 1000. 

EDWARO LARKE W ll.LIAMS 
Relay and quarter mile, 1009. 

FREDERICK i.LOUXT DRANE 

1 mile, 1000. 

CECIL CLARK (J.MIRKTT 
Weights, 1000, 

ALEXANDER M. ATKIXSOX 

Hammer, 1909. 
CHARLICS EDWIX ilEXEFEE, 

Relay. 1000. 

VIROIX WAITE OSBORXE 
Pole vault, 1000. 




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x: 



Ccnni0 a0Sociation, 1909=10 




OFFICERS 

J W. LASLEV, .IR • President 

S. R. CARRINGTC )X Secretaky and Treasukeb 

MEMBERS 

rJAKXETT. E. E. HUlUJUOl). A. ,]. .MoKCJAX. I.. X. 

BATTLE. K. D. HEXUEHSOX. L. W. MARKS. A. 1!. 

BAILEV. K. B. HOW AHl). ( I.All) MEI5AXE. li. 11. 

/ BEXXETT. 1>. A. HARDISOX. ( >. B. .Ml XAKIXTII. V. li. 

I'.AKKEI!. F. I'. lUSKE. B. R. MORfJAX. .1. P. 

BIRWELL. W. A. IILUHES. 1. II. XEWEI.L. E. .1. 

BROWX. I.. A. .lOHXSOX. C. \V. XIXOX. ,1. R. 

BOYKIX, 1. M. KERR. L. C. XlMMOfKS. A. B. 

BATTLE. .1. M. KlilREY. A. C. XICHOLS. S. V. B. 

BOBBllT. K. W. LARKIX. J. T. PARSLEY. W. 11. 

[' . BOIRXE. S. M. LLOREXS. E. L. PALMER, (i. 

-' ' CARR1X(!T()X. (J. L. LASLEY. .1. \Y. REEVES. J. M. 

CARRixcrrox, s. r. la.mb. like RI-n^CE, .1. R. 

COOK. f. S. LVOX. 11. W . ROYSTER. J. H. 

COLVARD. .J. B. LAXIER. .1. C. RODRIGUEZ. E. F. 

COX. R. B. M( EACHERX. iUL. RAMSAUR. T. M. 

CROrSE. D. S. SCARBOROrciH. .1. B. 

ITTHRELL. \V. D. SllAMBrR(;ER, L. E. 

CAR.MICHAEL. (i. ^ ^^^^ STEWART. B. C. 

CORDOX. .1. P. / ^~~"\ S.MITH. PEYTOX 

CHA.MBERS. H. S. J \ .SOLO.MOX. H. M. 

DARDEX. \V. A. /^ ^^>:,^_^ >i STRAXOE. ROBERT. .IR. 

DELLIXGER, R. [^ ^ ^^ A STOCKTOX. R. (J. 

EILESS FIELDS / ""TlBlij^^^ V TVSOX. C. P. 

EDCiERTOX. \V. I). j /\ ^ ^^^^^bS^^^ ) TIIOM PSOX. lY 

ELLIS. \V. B. \ 'W <^^ ^^^Hfv® 1 TIl.LETT. C. W, .IR. 

FEXTRESS. LEE ^^^>i /^^^T \ l'-'^''^''-- "• >*■ 

FERGLSOX. II. B. ^Sl^A^^^B \ '"''-•^^'ll'^- ^- ^■ 

FREE.MAX. G. K. \ U -^' \ TICKER. R. E. 

FOIXTAIX. G. .\I. \ V- ^ ' TILLETT. \V. S. 

GALBRAITH. \V. H. \ V^/j^ltJ TIRLIXGTOX. E. \V. 

GRAHAM. (iEOKGE ^^Kt 't\ WYATT. M. B. 

_ HYMAX. O. W. ^i^t^hy^PwK W IIITAKER. L. B. 

- HARGRETT, H. H. m^Kil^li'^ WILSOX. C. B. 

HALLIBURTOX. J. B ^/j/m 1 1 1 i 1 1 ' " XOl.LICOFFEK. .1. P. 






N> 



\Ai!>riv Ikam 



Ccnnis Counmmcnts 



[/ 



TEAH 

G. M. FdrxTAix C. S. Venable 

SCORES OK MEETS OF l!t09. 

-Carolina vs. Giilford at Chapel Hill. X. C. N. C. 

Doubles 3 

Singles ( Fountain ) 3 

SingU's ( Venable) 3 

-tAROLlXA VS. RaXUOLPII-MaCON AT ASIILAXD, Va. N. C. 

Doubles 3 

Singles ( Fountain ) 3 

Singles ( Venable ) 3 

-Carolina vs. Huiimond toLLECE at Ruiijigxd, Va. X. C. 

Doubles 3 

Singles ( Fountain ) 3 

Singles ( Venable) 3 

-Carolin.\ vs. Virginia at Charlottesville. Va. X. C. 

Doubles 3 

Singles ( Fountain ) 3 

Singles ( Venable ) 3 

-Carolina vs. Washington and Lee at Lexington. Va. X. C. 

Doubles 3 

Singles ( Fountain ) 2 

Singles ( Venable ) 3 

—Carolina vs. David.son at Davidson, X". C. X'. C. 

Doubles 3 

Singles ( Fountain ) 3 

Singles ( Venable ) 3 

Total points: Carolina. .")7l). Opponents. 30. 



G. 




R.-M. 




R. C. 






1 

\V. & L. 

3 
1 

Day. 
1 




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N 



lLimerick0 



■llicre was a Crrck trac-licr llciiianl. 

Who on class wore an as|i<vt i|nil<' liarcl. 

But wlien lie was fnc 

Sprvcil Euplirosinc; 

Anil Racelins In- took tin- lii> "ml. 



W",. iiavc a |>i-of,.ssor, ■■.Tamos 
Who can cari'fnlly l.ntf— tliat% 
His wit was thought kcc-n 
I'ntil it was seen 
That he horrows from Shaw . 



ell." 
I'ini'h. 



V 



'I'hcro was a |iidfi's; 
Who never did read 
But he graded each lail 
Hy the hoot that he lia.l 
Xow ain't thai a hell of 



named Ua|ier. 
luiz |i.i|,er: 



A dinky French teacher namci 
Col charge of Flench I i wondi 
He said, "1 am new. 
And a •rep' nnist pursue." 
So he threw all his jnipils. ihi 




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\V. 71 ELLIS. .11!.. \V. R. riIO>L\S First Cornets 

V. V,. 1!A( Y, Jb Second < ornct 

J. A. :\IcKAY, V. C. PliriCHETT Tronibones 

\V. P.. WYATT Piccolo 

I). L. RIfiHTS '._.. Kiisl Clarinet 

.T. R. WTLDJIAN '. 8.-eon,l (. larinet 

K. E. PARRISH, L. E. WIllTFTELD. \\\ Q. PTCKARD Altos 

T. A. DeVAXE, H. a. V()(iLEl! Baritones 

R. L. DEAL Bass 

L P. WHITAKER Snare Drum 

II. M. SOLOilOX Bass Drum 




I; 




V 







\ 



Q^usical a0Sociation 



AIcXKIL. R. S President 

ELLIS, W. H Viee-Piesidont 

WILDJL4X, J. K Secretary and Trtasurcr 

BEARD, J. R ■ Business Manager 



2Drcf)estra 



W. B. WYATT ; Flute 

DOIGLAS WRIGHT ( huinct 

\V. B. ELLIS, JR First Cornet 

\V. R. THOMAS ;::;:....: Second Cornet 

H. M. SOLOMOX, C. T. WOOLEX First Violins 

\'. C, PRITCHETT. \V. B. McKOY Trombones 

J. E. RAY Bass Violin 

J. R. WILDMAX Piano 

L. B. WHITAKER Drum 





(Ecological ^cmhuup 



(Organized 1802) 



OFFICERS 

COLLIER COBB President 

F N. EATON Vice-President 

(Olislja e0itct)cII <^cicntific ^^ocictp 






/ / 




OFFICERS 

PATTERSON, A. H • President 

W. H. FRY . . . 3 Secretary 

:MILLS. J. E Vice-President 

VENABLE, F. P Conesponding Secretary 

WHEELER, A. S Recording Secretary 

EDITORIAL COMMITTEE 
MILLS, J. E. COKER. \Y. C. HENDERSON. A. 



Philological Club 



OFFICERS 

J. F. ROYSTPZR President 

W. S. BERNARD Vice-President 

L. R. WILSON Permanent Secretary 

C. HOWARD Sccretiirv and 'I'reasurer 



IBioIogical Journal Club 



DR. H. V. WILSON 



PRESIDING MEMBERS 
DR. W. C. COKER 



DR. I. H. MANNING 



J^ortf) Carolina !))istorical ©ocictp 



OFFICERS 



J. G. DeROULHAC HAMILTON President 

KEMP PLtlMMER BATTLE Alumni Vice-President 

W. B. RODilAN, JR Second Vice-President 

J. R. NIXON Recording Secretary 

C. E. McINTOSH Corresjjonding Secretary 

Le Ccrclc De Conversation jFrancaise 



OFFICERS 

DR. W. H. DEY President 

S. R. CARRINGTON Vice-President 

J. A. McKAY Secretary and Treasurer 

A. VERMONT Permanent Secretary 



328 




\ 



Cljat Curuing Ctjeek 



There is u tnii^ic swct'tiii—^ in tli;it <'ur\'i' 
Wlierc LiK'v's sdft flieek liinis tci inci't licr tliidat 
That eaptivati'S nie, will mil li-l iiic note. 
Save with iiiiseeinf; eye~. her other ehnriiis. 
Her snowv neek and romuli'il ehihl-like arni-s. 



With that same eiirve a hliish-white ru.-eliiid meets 
Its calyx. Lucy's face is. like the Mower, 
I know: hut it lias not for n.e the power 
Of that sweet curve. That ^ive- me poijiuant liliss, 
.\ly lijis salute il Willi imagined ki-s. 



I'll trust thee, l.ucy. with Ihi- iiiaj;ic secret: 
If ever thou should'st fear my heart to waiide 
Or ever wish my fond love to !;row fonder. 
Turn those red lips nway and do not speak. 
But let me note anew thai ciir\iim cheek. 



The Guardian of the Bell 



WHAT is wisiliiiii lint iiond i-niminin h(irse sensed And what dues it 
inatter, in trnth, if wisdom he expressed in polished, i<v nn])iilished, 
laiio-uagc, just s(i the sense is clear ^ Doesn't the nnni whri has liraved 
life patiently for fifty yeais or more through thick and thin, through siiifering 
of slavery, poverty, and hard work, have as much of the pure wisdom as the 
student who has spent years in the analysis of the philosophies of Plato, 
Aristotle, Kant and Hegel ( It is triie that such a man does not have the 
broad ])erspective of the student, l)ut at hottom. in the very de]iths of his 
heart, will he found the same essential qualities of wisdom that are found 
in the hearts of the educated. 

Such a man is Henry Smith — "Ole Henry." He is a negro; but you 
will forget that fact if you talk to him. If you ask him what he believes the 
pur])ose of man's existence is he will say, as he draws himself straight to his 
six feet or more of stattirc, and lets his eye wander into s])ace, that man's 
]iur]iose in this world, your ]iur]iose and mine, he'll ]iut il, is to fultill the 
]ilan of the Almighty who creatiMl ns. Ask him why, and he'll rejily: 
■'It's born in my blood." The same answer that the iihiloso])her gives when 
he says that man adajits himself to his circumstances l)y reason of the goo<l 
faith that is in him. 

If you will, watch Old Henry as he goes across the Campus. His arms 
are either full of mail for the University, or his horny hands are swinging from 
his short coat sleeve as he shuffles hurriedly to ring the bell. He ti]is his hat 
to everybody, and gives the whole sidewalk. AYatch him after he has ]mlled 
the bell rope five minxites for morning Chapel. He lights an old coincoli \<\po, 
takes his seat at the west end of the South Building, and waits with thoughtful 
countenance while the students are at jirayers. Ask him what he is thinking 
about, either as yoti meet him on the Canii)us or as you see him sitting 
here, and, after a sufficient nmnber of old-fashioned bows, he'll partly cover 
his mouth with his hand and remark about the weather. lint if you ]iress 
him with a leading remark he may tell yott of the perversity of the youthful 
part of the negro race, or of famous University men he has known. He will 
gi\-e you a sound answer on most any cpiestion concerning which yon make 
a leading remark. 

330 



Vy 



He was asked recently what the tri:ail>le is with the vouthfnl generation 
of the negroes and what should he dune to them. He said the trouhle was 
they wei'e trying too mnch to do like other people. That they were forgetting 
their place. He said they should be sent to the farms where they belong, 
and where they coidd do more good. They should be educated, he said, and 
taught the religion of their fathers. Henry himself spends the evenings 
reading the Bible to his children and hearing them recite their lesson. But 
notwithstanding that, one of his sons took the wayward path recently; with 
him he tmik a ]iair itf shoes. The law marked him, however, and Henry 
ho])es fur his sou's salvation. 

Henry has a sense of hiinidr, with all of his seriousness. He philosophizes 
when it's time for that, and jokes when it's time for joking. He was found 
niw morning at the foot of the stairs in the basement of the Alnmui building 
feeling his head with his hand. In front of him was a gTeat big wooden 
lx)x, standing at one comer against the wall. Being asked what was the 
triiuMe, he said: "This rheumatic leg o' mine missed a step up there and 
inc and the Imix ti'ied to reach the bottom at the same time. I'm trying to 
find niit which side nf my head hit the tlour iirst." 

Without Henry what would the college liell do ^ "Billy" Xoble said 
uiice that this rniversity with its uKirc than a hundred years of history and 
traditinu, and promptness in time of need, could he thro\ni behind by the 
failure of Henry Smith to ring the college bell. He should have stated that 
Henry's watch is a dollar Ingersoll, and that it had not been set to the Western 
Tnion timepiece in the Bursar's office since seven in the morning. And he 
>hijuld have added that the seven o'clock bell is on time. He should not have 
l>ut the blame of a tardy l)ell on Henry. Henry is always on time. His 
watcdi is not, though. 

Twenty years of faithful service has Henry given to the rnivorsity. 
Dnriug that time he has known many of the famous men of the State. He 
will say of them that they "shore wuz tine students, and haiulsome gentlemen 
just as shore as you're born and livin' in this world." 

XixoN S. Pi.fMM];R. 



\ 



// 



/// 




LOAFING 




BUSINESS IS PRESSING 




AMENOER OF SOULS 



/\ 



//. 




THE. TWO TH0MP50N5E5 



OUR CHEMISTRY BULL 






OUR LIGHT MOUSE 




A BUNCH OF STIFFS 




y 



// 




^Unmn^sc eiuB 



C.tU (Butter 
BLBanKsJr. 




Frtsident 

Secretary 
listrutto*- 



P^esenTci m (gevrard kill Oct. 3 
Ocsmatis Personae- 



CWSunTcf 
rf.>n. -Reeves 



Aflilifs 'C»pt.o(l4<it«,t5) 

rorre r 




Mlillie's SDff 

(TrxE: -My Wife's Oonp to tlie Country) 
Willie's otr the Hill, boys. Hurray! Hurray! 

He took his dram, and said "By daniii. 
I'll meet no elass to-day." 
He's on his way to Raleigh. Hurray! Oh, Shay! 

We love you Bill lint oh. you grats. 
We'll have one more to-dav. 




l+cnrter Ji^ 



CliH)0 UoII 



"THE coor" 

( OSMOPi )1,1TAX fLUP. 

ALA-MAXt'E COUXTV CLUB 
CUIiAX CLUB 

MOORE COUXTY CLUB 

WARREXTOX HIGH SCHOOL V]A V. 
.lOHXSOX COUXTV CLUB 
WHITSETT CLIB 
RAEFORD IXSTITUTE CLUB 
TRINITY PARK SCHOOL CLUB 
DL'PLIX COUNTY CLUB 
OAK RIDGE CLUB 
ROCKINGHAM COUNTY CLUB 
ROBESOX COUNTY CLUB 
(UJLFORD COUXTY CLUB 
PiOWAX COUXTY CLUB 
LINCOLN COUXTY CLUB 
BUIES CREEK CLUB 
PITT COUNTY CLLB 

IREDELL COUXTV CLUB 

MECKLEXBURG COUXTV CLU)! 
WEBB SCHOOL CLUl! 
BUXCOMBE CLUP. 
RUTHEKFOIID COLLEGE CLUB 






Cfte Coop 


^ 


vVjjr/^ 


MARSE 


JESSE JONES. ((.cK-i 
FOWLS 


' tmk-Wai.k 


Wi 


PEARL CROSSWELL 




I'llKXd Kdl'.lXSdX 


/«\ \/ 


LENGTHY JOXES 




TOM ROSE 


/ \a\ir 


ORRIN LLOYD 


Law 
JESSE JIILLIKEX 

mil 


III'CH THOMPSON 

i 


Jbf^^ 






ODOM ALEX,\NDER 


( 


iEOROE DANIELS 


1^ ■''^^' 


STOWE CROl'SE 


1012 


KENNETH TANNER — ^ 


H^k^ ^ y 








V 


^L-fT ii 


BOB HANES 


1 


'.ILL WAKELEY J^ 


^Xn 1 1 


SHORTY JONES 


BOB WINSTON 
339 


DAVE MURCHISON T^ 


« 




N 



\ 



Cosmopolitan Club 




!•: E. BARXKTT, Florida Presiilent 

C. HOWARD, Tcrus First Viee-Presiilent 

K. O. BURGWYX, i;„,ii<,ulnnii„ Sccoiul Vice-President 

I. M. BOYKIX, Hoiith Cinjliim Tliird Vice-President 

F. P. BARKER, Kcnltid:// Secretary and Treasurer 



lilidWX. K. T.. Term.— ee VICXAIU.K. .1. M., Xr.rtl 

COOK, ]i. !•:.. OklaluiMia WAKKI.ICV. \V. K.. 

COOK, W. .).. Oklahoma WIIIIAKia!. A. T. 

COLEJIAN, H. G., South Carulina WEliii, I!. T., Te 

EULICSS, F. L., Tennessee 

GRAHAM, F. P., North Carolina 
GRAIL. F. \V., Pennsylvania 

GALBRAITH, \V. ¥.. Pennsylvania 
HEARD, J. E., Teiniessee 
HUTCHINS, {;. \V.. Maryland 
HOUGH, F.. Alabama 
HOWARD, C, Texas 

llAliOKTT, H. H.. Geor-jia 
Mi'MAXIS. T. J.. Xew Vork 
MolililS. .1. W., .11!., Florida 
.MrRClllSON. li. ('.. Smith Ca 
MITCHELL. (;. W.. Virfiinia 
PHILLIPS. .1. ]).. Florida 



SMrril. R. R.. Soulli Can.liiia 
STEWART, B. C, South Carolin 
STOKES, W., Tennessee 



TEAGUE, D. B., X.irtli Carolina 




aiamancc Countp CluD 

, OKI'KEliS SPKIX(i TERM 

J. W. LASLEY, JE President 

W. L. COOPER. Ji; Vice- President 

I. C. JIOSER Secretary and Treasurer 

A. C. K I M RE Y Corresponding Secretary 

OFFICEH.S — FALL TERM 

W. P. HEXLEY President 

A. C. KOIREY Vice-President 

\ . A. PERRl'. r 1 Secretary and Treasurer 

\V. L. COOPER, JR Corresponding Secretary 

MEMBERS 

COOPER, \V. L. PATl-ERSOX. E. V. 

MOSER, I. C. PE1!RETT. V. A. 

LASLEY. J. \y. 

\\ALKER, J. G. LYNCH J F 

PRITCHETT, V. C. KOIREY^ A. C. 

ISLEY, R. \^•. HEXLEY. \V. P. 



^rr-^ 



/. 



y y 




Cuban Clut) 



M. s. i;(ii)i;i(;i i;/ 
F. I.. iJ.(ii;i:xs 

F. V. FIFXTFS... 



I'lV-id.'lll 

. Si'crclaiy 
Treasurer 



MEMBERS 

hodukjuf:/, .m. s. 
j.lorkns. f. j.. 
fikxtics. f. v. 

l.LOKFXS, T. V. 

kodiuglkz. .\. b. 
rodriguf:z. k. f. 
llokens, f. 

I'ORKO, A. 51. 



n-is 



X. 



/ / 



,/ 





Mlartemon Ipigj) «^cl)ool Club 



OFFICERS 

T. S. )!( )VS-| El! President 

W . W. KALKKXKU Vice-President 

J. W. HUGHES Secretary 

\V. M. .J. COOK Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



ALKXANJJKI!. d. 
BATTLE. K. D. 
]51T!\VEI.E. \V. A. 
fOOK, W. J. 
COHIi. W. 

FALKKXEI!. W. W. 
(iKAIlA.M. C. 

(iKAIl.\.M. F. ['. 
GATTIS. S. M., .IK. 
GHIFITTH. G. 

Il()]!(iOOD. A. .1.. . 

mcillES. .1. \V. 

IIEXDEKSOX. 



• MIXES. K. 
LITTLE. .1. 
Ml ADEN. .1. .1. 
.MAWIXG, IL L. 
PATTKR.SOX, .1. S. 
PEKRV. R. F. 
P.OVSTEIL .1. 11. 
ROVSTEi!. T, S. 
SPEUaiT. .1. .\, 
THO:\IPS()X. G.. 
\\\XX. X. 
WIIITK. W. 
VdLXC. . 




\l 




/ // 




w 




•x/ 




//. 




mbitscn Club 



OFFICERS 

(i. \V. THOill'SC )X President 

( •. P. (,1UINCY Vice-President 

C. K. BURGESS Seeretary 

MEMBERS 

BROWN. C. E. 

DeLOACHE, T. B. 
HAillLTOX. A. L. 
HARBISON. ilcD. 
ISLEY, R. \V. 

JOYNER, E. W. 

PERRETT, V. A. 

RODRIGUEZ, E. F. 
RUSSEL, J. C. 

WILLAED. C. W. 




\ 



UadorD Institute Club 



OFFICERS 

PAl'l. ni( KSOX President 

\V. T, :\I(LKAN Vice-President 

J. BI':.\T( ).\ THOMAS Secretary 

ARNOLD A. lIcKOY Trciisurer 

C. E. Mcintosh Honorary Menil)er 



MEMBERS 



.1. A. McCOOCAN 

\v. I.. (ri;i;iK 

.lAMKS TAI.imr .lOllXSOX 

.lAMIvS ('IAT)K KKM.V 

liAVMONi) .MONROE 

W. I.AWRKXCE POOLE 
■ ]. BEXTOX TMO^LAS 
OEORCiK IX ELLIOT 
ARNOLD A. McKOV 
W. T. JIcLEAN 
PAUL DICKSON 

L. BRUCE GUNTER 
B. J. McOOOGAN 





Duplin Countp Club 

OFFICERS 
I.. II. W 1 I.LIA.MS I'HKSIDKNT 

W . F. TAVI.oi; Vice-Prksident 

.1. \\. W II.KIXS SlCCIETAKY 

I. I'. W ITlll'UIXCTliV TnKASiiiKR 

MEMBERS 

i\\i;];hm;. .i. w. 
iiAK iiKi;. .1. r. 

llAICIIKi;. M. A. 
I WlJlli. W. K. 
TlKXKi:. (). li. 

WAI.l.ACK, F. !•:. 
WAI.KEl!, 1). I). 
WILKIXS, .1. W. 
Wn.I.TAMS. I. i;. 
WILLIAMS, L. IL 

WITHICKIXCTON. 1. F. 



w 






H^ 



•>I^F^ 



^;s-' 



\J 






<Dak RiDge Club 



OFFICERS 

B. L. FENTRESS Presidknt 

J. IF. REEVES Vice-President 

J. A. Al'STIX Secretary 

K. B. BAILEY ...T,.'. .■•.,'......:. Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



AUSTIN. J. A. 
AUSTIN, H. K. 
BAILEV 
BARBOUR 
CLAYTOR 
CRAVEN 
CUinUNtiS 
DANIEL 
DANIELS 
DILLARD 
FENTRESS 
GUION 
HACKNEY 
KENNEDY 
McLEAN 



.MOSER 
PALMER 
PAYNE 
PRICE 
REEVES 
PEIRCE 
R()DAL\N, \V. B. 
RODJIAN, N. F. 
SHORE 
SMITH 
STOCKTON 
TOWNSEND 
WALKER 
WELBORNE 




Bockingijtim County Club 

OFFICERS 

V. \. COX President 

I',. ( '. 'I'lK )'riKl! Vice-Pkksiiient 

1'. II. (;\\^^■^' S|:(1!KTAI!Y ami XliKASlHKI! 

,1. W . II \l;U|S ( nl:i:i:si'(,\lilNc; Ski HKTAltV 

MEMBERS 

I'.ini.irr. o. .i. 

( IIX. I'. X. 

UALIOX, \V. I!. 

cwvxx. p. II. 

TIAIiPvlS. .1. W. 

.loXKS. W. .\. 

MKI'.-WK. II. II. 
PlllCK. T. .M. 

•ntdTTER. B. ('. 

354 

'7. 




X 



Uobcson Couiup Cliiti 



.1. A. i.Krrcii. .11!. . . 

II. ('. itoiiKiris, . , . 

II. .1. .\I((;()()(:ax 

A. .1. HOIMJIX. . 



I'UKSIDENT 

Vici; Presidunt 

. . .SrCCRETAKY 
. 'ritKASVRKl! 



I)K\AXK. r. A. 

DICKSdX, PAll, 
(i.\l)l)'i'. II. .M. 

IIODIJIX. .\. .1. 
I. Kill II. .1. .\.. .11! 

.\ii <;ii(i(;.\x. !!. .1. 

MrlilMXI.XX. .1. .\. 



.\i( K.\^. .\. .\. 

.McKAV. .1. A. 
MtlJCAX. \V. T. 
PACK. ('. li. 

Komcins. H. ('. 

TOWNSKXI). .I.\fK 

WdOTKX. E. L. 



/- 




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auilforD County Club 



C. C. GARRKTT. .. . 

B. L. FKXTRESS.. 

E. H. ALDERMAN. 

R. B. SCOTT 



ARMEXTROUT. II. 
(TJXARD. \V. I!. 
C urn UK IK 1,1). W 
KORNEV. \V. .1. 



KliV. F. I.. 

Cin.MSI.KV. II. I! 
IKlFK.MAN. .1. K. 
lirXTKi;. .1. ( . 
IIODXKi;. T. .1. 

Kixc. i;. i;.. .ii{. 

I.VOX. H. K. 
MAXX. .1. T. 
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UoUian Counti? Club 



W. II. UAMSAIi; , 

i;. I,. \.\x rooi.K 

WALIICK CAiriKI! 



\'k-i;-I'1!i;sii)i;nt 

. Secuktaiiy ami 'ri!i:A.sri;Ei! 



BUSBKE, .T. C. 
CARTl-n;. WALTKi; 



RAJI8AUR, \V. 11. 
ROSEMAN, P. D. 



UAMSArU. T. .\l. 



LINN, L. A. 
.M.\l PIX. \V. V. 



SNIDER. W. M. 
VAN POOLE, C. M. 



/■ 




Lincoln €ountj> Club 

OFFICERS 

J. R. NIXON Trksidknt 

R. e. DELLIXGEH Vke-I'kksidkxt 

C. L. EAKEH Secisktary anu 'ruEAsiRKR 

MEMBERS 

BEAM. L. B. ( IIOL'SE. 1). 8. 

BEAM. M. S. JONAS. II. .\. 

CIIIEDS, H. .MciXTdSIl, ('. E. 





V 



N, 



.V 



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ISuits Creek Clul) 



OFFICESS 

II. ( ■. ROBERTS Pbesident 

W. A. DEES ■ Vice-President 

1). 15. HR VAX , Secretary 

\\ . C. GUESS : Treasukbjr 

MEMBERS 

I5ARBEE, W. D. .lOILNSTOX. I.. X. 

RKARD. C. C. .lOXES, T. S. 

BOBBITT, 1!. W . McKAV. J. A. 

BRAXDOX. W. I). K. OI.DHA.M. .1. 1). 

BRVAX, D. H. PARKER. ]). C. 

BLCHAX. E. i;. PEELE. T. X. 

BVRD, R. F. PETTIWAV. H. C. 

DEES. W. A. PETIMWAV, W. I!. 

DTPREE. L. C. r><)l!EI!TS. ]|. ( '. 

FREEMAX, .]. W. SAIXDERS, S. A. 

GUESS, \V. C. TEAGUJi. C. B. 

GUNTER, B. I,. TEAGUE. D. B. 

HKiHSMITH. !•:. M. TEAGUE, S. F. 

IIIGHS.MITII, .1. A. WILSON. .1. P. 

JOIIXSOX, C. \V. 






Pitt Coiintp Club 



OFFICERS 

W. R. WILSON President 

C. 0. ARMSTRONG Vice-President 

J. C. LANIER Secretary 

MEMBERS 

BLOUNT, J. H. TICKI'TR. R. E. 

BROWN, L. A. TURNAGE, A. H. 

HOOKER, E. B. TURNAGE, D. L. 

HORNE, C. J. 0. WILSON. C. 

ROSS, T. R. W OOTKN, A. JF. 





areDell Countp Cliifi 



OFFICERS 

T. W". VOILS President 

.1. V. LOVE Vice-Pkesidekt 

.1. 1). MeI.EAX Secretary 

J. i;. I.ICW IS Treasirek 




li.\(i\\KI.I.. J. K. 
lUiANDOX. W. ]). 
CALDWKLl,, .). V. 
FKEK.AIAX, J. \V. 
KENNEDY. 1". II. 
LEWIS. J. (i. 
LEWIS, 11. E 



i.dVK. .r. V. 

LU\E, R. P. 

McLEAX. J. ]). 
XIcLEAX, L. L. 

OVERCASH. .L ( ).. 
VOILS. T. W . 
WTITTE. M. A. 



t^'^^^- 



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d^eckltnbmq Countp Club 



W. M. .lOXES. . . 

W . v. BELK 

K. S. T.\XXER.. 
X. ST. G. VAXX. 



President 

. VlfE-PRESIl)p;NT 

Secretary 

Treamirer 



ALEXAXDEP,. OlJdM 
BELK, \V. P. 
HLYTHE. V. I., 
COOK, C. S. 
(HAVEX. .r. K. 
DEXTOX, B. T. 
GRAHA.M. F. P. 
GRAHAII. GEO. 
GRIFFITH. T. .1. 
HAIGHTOX. .1. n. 
HUXTER, F. C. 
HUTCHIXSOX. J. W. 
JOHXSTOX. R. H. 
,IOXE,S, II. 
.TOXES, \V. II. 
ilcADEX. .1. J. 



-MKISKXIIEIMER. C. A. 
PIIAKR. E. W. 
PRICE. C. A. 
kod:\i AX. X. V. 
RODMAX. W. P... .11!. 
SLOAX. R. R. 
SMITH. H. C. 
STEPHEXSOX, B. I). 
STOUGH. S. T. 
TAXXER, K. S. 
TILLETT. C. W., .JR. 
TILLETT, JOHX 
TILLI'TIT. W. S. 
VAXX', X. ST. G. 
VREELAXD. H. V. 
WITHERS, G. L. 




V 




/ 

'/ / 



mcbb ^cl)ool Club 



OFFICERS 



CHAS. \V. TILLKTT. JR President 

J. L. HEARD Secketaky akd Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



BARKKR. F. P. 
BATTJ.E, J. .M. 

EIXES8, FIEi.U 

STOKES. WALTER. .IR. 



TILLETT. .TOIIX 

TILLETT, WILLIAM 
WEBB. R. T. 

WHITAKER. A THA 



15uncombe Countp GIu6 



E. R. COCKE. 
S. H. STROUP. 
II. .1. (iCDCEl! 



President 

Vice-Presiuent \ 

. SiicEiKiAKY AXi) Theasiukr 



ALLISOX, .1. A. 

BATTLE. BELKNAP 
BOURNE, L. .M., .Mi. 
CHAMBERS, H. S. 

CHA.MBERS. DeW ITT 
COCKE, E. R. 
COCKE, T. D. 

FARRIOR, J. B. 
GREENWOOD, A. 



JONES, TOit, .TR. 

RKACJAN, H. li. 

REKD, C. W. 

RIIINEHEARDT, C. B. 
STROIP. S. B. 
SUiniER, R. B. 
THOMPSON, F. T. 
WEAVER, A. U. 




UutbcrforD College Club 




OFFICERS 



0. K. BENNETT President 

M. S. BEAM ' VicE-PRKSinENT 

J. R. NIXON Secretaby 

H. E. STACY Treasurer 



HONORARY MEMBER 
I'liol'. W ACSIAKK 



HIONNKTT, O. k. 
liEAJI, y\. S. 
lUVENS. w . r. 
BEAM, K. S. 
EAKER. t'. 1.. 
.TONES. H. P. 
JONAS, II. A. 
irclNTOSII. C. E. 



NIXON, J. R. 
STACY. H. E. 

STl'MCLE. I<\ 
SISK. II. S. 

WilJ.lAMS, FLEET 
WIELIS, I. 

^VHITNEY, F. ( 




1/ 




ongeno Barnctr 
vailviiMd R. siuitli — eh. A. 
j. ;illi('rt hliihsiiiiili — clKiii'iiian 
w. rnt'\is ('DuKiiiils 

(■ceil c. Garrett 
(1. liattle tEniiiU' 

jiaiil (liCk^'iii 
addlplms h. wOlte 

n. s. ]iluMliiel' 

a. rnfiis Murgan 
]iatrick wlnstim 

horace sTacy 

lee f. Turlinn-ton 
jaines all En aiistin 

f. ]irHillEl'iii liavker 



370 





GKIMSJ.KV r.uTAi.N 

THOMl'SDN '. ; VuiHT l.iKi tk.naxt 

KAV SKCOiN'l) J.IEITENA.NT 

J.\l!i;i;i T ■ First Sergeant 

I^EKGEAXTS 

liAKtiKKTT .MAKliOW 

VOULER vol Nc 

Coiil'OKALS 

KEUdUSON 

GUDGKH .AIOSEU 

JONES I'OWKI.L 

TOTTEN 

PUIVATES 

Al'STlN IIACKXKV 

EVERITT HKUlSMIIll 

GUION hElTCH 

HARTSEEL lIcGOOGAX 

STRICKI.AM) McKAV 

VARB(ili(U(;il SPEIGHT 

MISS NKDIS ITXKIS WILLIAMS Sponsou 

HASMGiri' Stahu; 1!ov 



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372 




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aamonagtoiiclj 



FdiiiuU'i! liy Dior;:'iies. 
Colok: (ircciii-h Villow KrowKH: Wurin \V( 

J)i:iM<: \'iiicij;ar .MciTXii: ■•Siiurc~l Ii'Iiiith nuikcs Ijc^t ilriiik" 

PHiLICATloN : hnh l.rii.hiil. Klizalirt ll City. X. (•. 



1)1!. Ki.rnz 



FEATRES IN FACULTATE 
DK. l)(il.l.i:V 

Di;. i)i:\ 

II. \'. WlLSdX 

DR. WHKKLKl! 

-DK.W" T.Wl.dl! 

FRATRES IN URBE 
W II. I. IK li. SOKKKI.I. W. II. r.iKIKU i I'lc.l-od) 



X, 



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FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

CII.VKI.IK lILLKri- ■•FlioSTV XKWKLl, 

llilll 
C. (). KdlilXSdX II. .\. ■niD.MPSdX 

••SAI'" m.M.VX d. C. I.l.d^ I) 



1). S. (KdlSK 

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11. II. KXHillT 

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r. s. ( ( i( IK 

II. .\l. STl l',l!> 



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rd.M SL.\])K 
C. ]•:. .MclNTdSII 

r. I', rvsdx 



(US (a;.\ii.\.M 

K. K. l'Kl!i:V 



Law 

l.lNSKdlU) l.dXd 




1!. K. .\I).\.M!- 



iiKNKV I, rn I. KIOX 



l'llAi:.\IAl V 

II. (i. Cdl. K.MAX 
(•(I Kii.s 
MISS .IdSKI'lllXK .1. .Mc.VDKX 
MISS .\l.\LnK (I. VKLVKKTOX 
MISS II.MiUIKT \'.\X P. VKKKLAXU 



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'i^ fl FOUL TflCKLE. 



374 



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^i. 







Oniwcrsitp Omental Re0er\)ation 



V 



(Annex at Mor(;antoii) 

Chief Keeper of the l.ocms Horace Wiluams 

Chief Cause for Insanity P.sYCHOLOtiY 

Matron Motheu Dickson 

Huhject — Chief Hallucination. Cause of Incarceration, ami Condition of Patient. 

1. D. R. Kramer — Thinks he is a gasoline engini' — inlu-nnt weak-niimledness — we ilon't like 

his looks, but he is probably harmless. 

2. D. S. Harris — Thinks he is the smell that Kramer makes — association witli Koincr and 

.\tkinson — hopeless. 

3. ''Sap" Hyman — Imagines liimself a red licadi-d f;oat — tar heel — perfectly harmless. 

4. Horace E. Stacy — Thinks he is the llywheel of the I'niversity — ^watch works — hydro- 

cephalu.s — bullish. 
.'). Dr. Dey— Thinks he is ,7— Frencli I— failini;. 
(i. B. Wheeler — Believes lie inn I a dark brown soliiti f acetic acid — tifth Cliemistry. 1010. 

7. Stowe Crouse — Tliinks he is a pink roseliud — plucked too early by a lilind maiden — 

Subject to time cause. 

8. Prof. ('. Cobb — Tliinks he is a dinosaur — (!Veri;ro\vn iniajrination — amusinj;. 
!). Alex. Fcild — Thinks he is a portion of faenlty. 

Anxious. 



y\ 



Drags 




He had made more of this life had he not stopped some sixty times in 
everv hour and shouted to himself "Consiratulations." — Laslev. 

''Conceit in weakest liodies strongest works." — D. Stowe Cronse. 

The great Home Run of the Seasnn. — Christmas Holidays. 

What dill they find mider the Caldwell nniniiiiienf when they raised it? — 
Jim Hackney. 

The long and short of Tniversity life. — "Ic" Garrett — "Cy" Thomi).son. 

A very valiant trencherman. — D. B. Teagne. 

Freshman Directory. — "Dean" Taylnr. 

(rut Salome skinned a thimsand miles in her mii\-ciuents. — ''JMiss Emma" 
Yelverton. 

A five-cent iiiece with the aud)iti(in of a (piartei'. — "Hap]iy" Ilutchins. 

\\'hy am 1 a Freshman? — Tommy .Tones. 

The Human Insect. — Jim Patterson. 

Parrish — "What is a viaduct?" 
Gattis — "Duck jiafh." 

The liiggest mess id' frc'-hness and nerxiness nul of h . — L. U. Guntcr. 

377 



// 



/ / 



./ 




In History VIII— 

Prof. Wagstart' — "ilr. Zollicoffer, what was the fate of the only two 
Sjiartan.s who oscajitMl from the hattle of Tlieriuo])vl;v f 

Zollicoffer — "I don't know what liecanic of both of them, hnt one was 
killed in the hattle." 

Moore — "(ice I hnt T feel sorrv for yon.'' 

Knight — "Why f* 

Mooi'; — "liecanse the I)il)le says there will he no night in heaven." 

Terrilile in mien and monstrous in stride. — fJooker. 

"Yes, sir, I was jnst going to take np that ])oint." — Prof. T. Kiiffin. 

Nothing long drawn ont. — Freshman ("arrington. 

Believe me, "Spigot," tho rieh the gifts. 

The giver's ehatter nnd\es them nothing worth. 

Why am I go(,d looking ^—('n misc. 

Cares not a ]iin what they say or may say. — "Sa|)" Hynum. 

Stifl' Ilonse (^nai-tett( — "Knniniy" Wrenn, "IJeddie" Hartsell, dohn Kay 
and "P'armcr" ,Moore. 

.1. J. Me Aden — "Qneenie, I'm in love." 

Disea.sed natnre oftentimes breaks forth in strange eruptions. — Lasiey, 
"Happy" Hntehins, Basnight. 

l\dl him that his faee is well powdered, that his tie is in the exaet ])osition, 
and he will smile on you ait]irovingly. — i.nke Lamli. 

Freslnnan Bennett to Larkin : Is the Inn run on the Eurojiean or 
American ]dan i 

Somebody ought to tell her husband. — jMeC'askill. 

My only hooks were woman's looks 

And folly's all they taught me. — Spencer Nichols. 

"Tige" Kramer — "Why am I great { Because I room with Tommy Nash 
and know Ben Banks." 

378 



//> 



Short Bill J(.ines to liiiiiself, with a bundle of soiled clothes under his arm 
and an empty wallet in his ])i)cket — "Dar's a saying dat ebery man's got his 
own faults, but, 'fo' God, 1 b'lieve ]\Iarse Meares got his'n an' sonieun else's, too." 

A Freshman, after looking in the diteh where the men had been unstopping 
the sewer pipe, said: "I'll bet we dim't get any heat to-miirniw." 

"Thou hast got more hair mi thy ehin than Dubbin, my fill-horse, has on 
his tail." — "Reddie" Meares. 

Freshman Mnrehiscm — "Well, what do you think of a Freshman f 

"Horny-Handed" Henry — "Say, Imjss, what do you think of yourself f ^> 

"Sarcasm sarcastically jiersoniticd." — I >r. .limmie IJoyster. 

Bill (an inquisitive So]ih.) — "Who is tlie jiresident of your cbiss. .lohnT' 
John (a Freshman) — "It hasn't got one, four Charlotte Frcslmicu lia\'e 
elected them one, though." 

'T)r. Venable, shall I >il on llic I'oslriim with the rest of the faculty^" — 
"Dean" Taylor, of the I'rep. Latin Dept. 

A Human Grasshoiiper. — Booker. 

McC. — "Come down to the Inn lo-morrow and see our line of haber- 
dashery." 

McGoogan — "I just bought :.nr from .1. Tillett."' 

Their own ]»ets. — Laslcy, II. K. Stacy, Xormaii, Basnight. 

J. ^\'. Lasley was recently refused admission into the Society for Mutual 

Admiration. The C'ommitt( f .Mem])ership licbl llial the geiillenian's self- 

iidmiration was too strong ever to liccome mutual. 

First Freshman — "Are you going out lo heai- I)i\ I »cy speak tonight f 
Second Freshman — "Xaw." 

First F^'eshman — "^'ou'<l better come on and hear him. Leaving out Dr. 
Mullikcn, he is the bigycst man in the faculty." 



">,'ight after night he sat and l)iear:'d his eyes with books."— F]. W. 
Turlington. 

3T9 



X 



'I; 



Tapper Classman to Freshman — ""Who have yo^i got German nnder ?" 
Freshman — "I don't know what his right name is, but they call him 

■I!niK'h-er-Jiiy.' " 

'{"he three wise men of ('ha]>el Hill. — Jarrctt, Carpenter, iSTorman. 

>>'iitiin' hangs out a sign nf simplicity in the face nf a fool. — W. C. Guess. 

Thru he will talk, g.K„l gn,ls 1 li.,\v he will talkl— L. L. .Mcl.eau. 

Frcslmian Ilenderscm — "Wdnder if 1 can get relieve nf absence to go 
oxer til I )iirham 'C 

Freshman Jinsbee on Latin Exam. — "Cieem went away and learned a 
langnagx' that is not spoken, and thus we have what is called philnsuphy." 

lie would be a good egg if he wasn't so rotten. — F. Oliver. 

Freshman Basnight — "Is that boy they call 'Dr. Alex' a professor^" 
15. Murehison (confideutially ) — "?\o, he's just a jirofessorine." 

'Tis sweet to sleej) all night, but 'tis sweeter to sleeji all day. — "Tige" 
Kramer. 

If I don't look imjiortant, my looks deceive me. — lohn Tillett. 

Kot to know him is to think him peculiar. — ■•('hii'k'" Alexander. 

Dr. Wheeler (to new Pharmacy .student in ('hem. Lab.) — "(^'ork that 
bottle of H^, S tightly to keep it from spoiling." 

Pharnuicy Student (opening the bottle and smelling cautiously) — "It's 
already s]ioilt, Doctor." 

Prof. Collier Cobb (who is giving an illustrated lecture on Lakes) — "Now, 
here is another one of those dnmmcd lakes." 

Jim Cheshire (above the tumultuous roar) — "He, haw, ah! Wha, ha, 
ha, wha !" 

What agony he must sutfer wdieu depriveil of his wad of chewing gum. — 
W. C. Guess. 



'X, 




Another man who has been to a feast rif languages and stolen the scraps. — 
S. R. Carring-ton. 

Freshman — "Who are the three iiiggest liars in college ?" 
Senior — George ILnve is one and Collier dilib is the other two.'' 

'Tis said all creatures have their use (the exception jimves the rule). — 
Geo. Elliot. 

Some day, let's hojie, he will have a thought. — Luke Lamb. 

He aims at nothing aud lie hits the mark. — "Pos" Cowan. 

He was so fresh that full-grown Idades of grass 

Turned pale with envy as he chanced to pass. — Freshuiau Jleaui. 

It is better to trust in Goil iluin to trust in .Man. — "Doc'" Kiuttz. 

They comjiassed uie al)out ; yea, they com])assed uie about: Imt in the 
name of the Lord I will ilestroy theui. — "Horace." 

Some ])eo])le"s ])raius were not made to grow hair anyway. — S. F. Teagne 
aud C. (). Armstrong. 

Xot So fresh as he looks — aud tli;it"s saying ii lot. — r)owdoin. 

Perha]is s(ime day he may lie as great as he now thiid<s he is. — S])eight 
Hunter. 

We recommend that ]\Iajor Cain use benzine to get the spots out of 
Second Math. 

We also reconnnend that Johnnie Lnsley get his head shaved, a]i])ly a 
Haxseed jioulfice and see if he can't get it to come to :i lieail, so ihal he can 
pick it and then ])erhaps he will be mofc agreeable. 

We recommend that .\shley \'onng join the V. .M. C. .\. and sto]i trying 
to be a rounder — he's a flat failure at it. 

Commons Waiter (setting down cofl'ee ) — "Looks like rain, doesn't it r' 
Loarder (snithng) — Yes, bnf if smells like cofl'ee. 






1/ / 



7/// 



/ 




Local Application of Stovaine 



/■> 



//. 



IN 
MEMORIAM 






-fi 










^ 



Sparking in the Brushes 




Poor Insulation 



^ 



V 





An Air Gap 



//. 



1 f.^^ '■ 




w 



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UNO. SONGS 



,ill iHiw listen Id a splciMlid rcmlitidii nf diii' cdllciic sdiii^s \>y Dr. 



Klnttz and his fanmns uraiilidplinni'. All rradv, I )dcidr. let In 



'1">"I 



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( ) 2 :i 7 1 1 -i:', U 



: X X X z z 



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"SdiTv, t'clldwx. Imr slii'V inn ddwn anil I can't 1ind llic ri'ank. 1 >id \-dn 



av Vdn wan 



led Id Imv sdinrtliim:^ (Jddil niiilit I (' 



nic ardiiiid td-nidi'i'dw niulil 



il hear the cduccrt \\1 



1(11 vdii can stay lonncr. 



v^ 



Q^anagef Clu6 



J. \V. LASLEY, JR. . 
LASLEY, J. \V., JR. 

JOHN LASLEY 

KID LASLEY 

BABY LASLEY . 



President 

Vice-President 

.Secretary and Treasurer 

Manager 

Mascot 



MEMBERS 
MR. JOHN \V. LASLEY. JR.. Burlington, N. C. 



Motto : 
.Tis "real to be creat and know you are great, though it may grate on other people 



y\ 



HAR TEEL 



AROLINA, CHAPE HILL, N. C, FRIDAY, APRIL. 1, 1910 



NO. 1 



ORGAN OF THE lAMONAGROUCH FRATERNITY 



PROF. HILUAMS' REMARKABLE INVENTION 



PATENT HEN NEST REQUIRES EACH HEN TO LAY OR 
STARVE 



Ctntract for 50,000 Crales of Eggs for Commoo's Hall. 
E?er;bod; Except Hem Enlliiisiastic 

Since it was publicly announced that 
he has perfected a neat which makes it 
impossible for a hen to shirk lier supreme 
duty and greatest responsibility, Prof. 
H. H. Hilliams, of the Philosophy De- 
partment of the University of North 
Carolina, has been flooded with letters 
from farmers, poult rvmen, and principals 
of schools and colleges all over the 
State, urging him to disclose the details 
of his remarkable contrivance. Prof. 
Hilliams, who is probably the most suc- 
cessful farmer and horse trader in 
Orange county, by making a practical 
application of his superior knowledge of 
psychological problems, has made a num- 
ber of important and remunerative con- 
tributions to science and industry; but 
this invention, which is the result of long 
years of close and intelligent observa- 
tion and psychological study of the hen, 
promises to put strictly fresh eggs within 
the reach of all and make the inventor 
wealthy. 

All who have heard of, the invention, 
and especially the inhabitants of Orange 
county, who have great confidence in 
Prof. Hilliams' multifarious and bene- 
ficial projects and discoveriee, have be- 
come enthusiastic over the outlook. 
Already the boarding-house keepers of 
Chape J- Hill have' contracted with Prof. 
Hilliams for a great quantity of eggs, 
and it is understood that the University 
authorities are negotiating a -contract 
providing for 50,000 crates of fresh eggs 
at a special rate to be used at Common's 
Hall during the coming session. The 
whole community feels grateful to Prof. 
Hilliams, since he can now, to a great 
advantage to himself, supply the market 
witli eggs in great quantities at very 
reasonable prices, and thus in some meas- 
ure minimize the present high cost of 
living. 

The hens of this section, however, are 
not so enthusiastic. Several indignation 
meetings have already been held, and the 
hens, contending that the invention in- 
fringes upon their personal right of free- 
dom of the will, since it n<*essitates 
longer hours of work and increased men- 
tal strain, have threatened to go on a 
strike. Some have gone so far as to 



assume a hostile attitude toward the 
inventor. 

Prof. Hilliams, however, stated to his 
psychology class yesterday morning that 
he is confident that he can prevail over 
the obstinacy of the hens, since, under- 
standing the feminine hen mind as he 
does, he has so constructed his remark- 
able nest that he can require of each hen 
an egg for every meal. Refusal on the 
hen's part to lay at each meal time, he 
says, means stan-ation. Prof Hilliams 
is, therefore, perfectly confident that 
he can stand out against any opposition 
the hens may put up, and, as he stated 
to our reporter this morning, has the 
absolute a.ssurance that lie can supply the 
whole of Orange county with fresh eggs 
at a very reasonable price, and yet do a 
lucrative business. 

Although the professor has been offer- 
ed an enormous sum for the patent right 
on his invention, he has refused to sell 
outright anil has even kept entirely secret 
the details of the wonderful nest, think- 
ing, no doubt, it more profitable to 
monopolize the egg industry of his sec- 
tion, and at the same time reduce the 
high cost of living. 



JIARRIAGKS. 



Miss Joel J. McAden to Mr. D. B. 
Todd.- The bride was becomingly attired 
in lavender silk socks and tan pumps, 
with her trousers rolled up to her knees. 
The bride left on the afternoon train 
fur tour to University Station. 

Miss Nedus P. Williams was united 
to Mr. B. Haywood Knight. The bride 
is seemingly an intelligent woman, de- 
voted to psychology. The groom is 
known far and wide as a splendid student 
of Spanish and has recently taken up a 
revision of Webster's Dictionarv. We 
certainly wish them success and trust 
that they will have no big troubles. 



BIRTHS. 



Early in September a little ray of 
sunshine came to brighten number 10 
Old Ea.st. Little Paul is doing nicely, 
but the Old East neighbors are suffering 
from his childish- prattle. 

Bom to the faculty — triplets — Alex. 
Fields, "Dean" Taylor and Dr. Mullican. 
-• :o:^^ 



DEYED. 



French I. 
Spanish I. 
French A. 



WELL KNOWN COUPLE AT ODDS 



Mrs. Tom Moore Sues Her Husband Hon. B. H. Knight 
for Divorce 

Freshman Strange Rumored as Co-respondenl. Fate of 
Their Child Not Yet Determined 

An indelible blot was stamped upon the 
fair name and fame of the University 
when it became known this noon that 
Mrs. Tom Moore had instituted divorce 
proceedings against her husband, the 
Hon. B. H. Knight, the well known lin- 
guist. 

The ease was tried before that ignorant 
and dignified exponder of the law. Judge 
H. E. Stacy, The livid details of the 
case were such as to bring a rosy tint 
to the cherubic cheeks of our amicable 
judge and clear the room of all Univer- 
sity council members. 

ills. Moore, the plaintiff, based her 
case on the following allegations: 

1. That her husband, said Knight, is 
of a temperament entirely incompatible 
with her own. 

2. That he is, besides, insane. In 
support of which she gave the following 
instance: On the night of February 5tli 
said Knight did come in not entirely 
himself. Then did proceed to use lan- 
guage not one word of which was intelli- 
gible to human beings, using such expres- 
sions as curses on herself — Mrs, Moore 
doth swear. 

3. That he is a prestidigitatcur. (He 
has been known, by his use of bombastic 
verbosity to make Welisler's Unabridged 
walk out or the room in disgust.) 

In defense against these several alle- 
gations Hon. Knight, through his coun- 
sel, jtassed by the first as puerile. In 
answer to the second he claimed that at 
present he was almost insane, but that 
Mrs. Jloore was the source and cause 
of his condition and should he made to 
bear the consequences. As a rebuff to the 
final charge, Mr. Knight had only this 
to say, that his wording of his phrase- 
ology was entirely correc-t and that W. 
Unabridged was at fault, not himself. 

Judge Stacy being a man of the utmost 
giavity. the outcome of the case will not 
be known till some time next month. 

It has come to our knowledge that 
Mr. Knight will sue Freshman Strange 
(either) for the alienation of his wife's 
affections. 

It is not yet known which parent will 
assume possession of little Willie Wil- 
son, their cunning little daughter. An- 
other suit will probably decide. 



THE HAR TEEL 

IXIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



K. N. OcKER EdLtor-in-Chief. 

L. Abe Round Asst. Editor-in-Chief. 

1. HAJiDiNo NuGHES .... Sporting Editor. 

Jay W. Leastly Social Editor. 

ELUtN Organ Woman's Column. 

Plug Staylor Religious Items. 

P. B. Farker .'. . .City Editor. 

Ennis p. Lummeb Local Editor. 

A. Harry Wolf Business Manager. 

Sigh Toms Thumb. .Asst. Business Mgi'. 



Published every once in a while by the 
lamonagrouch Fraternity. 

Entered as first elass freight and label- 
ed dangerous at the depot, Chapel Hill. 
N. C. 



Subscription Price, 150 lemons per year 
Single Copies, 1 lemons. 



If things were run properly he wovild only 
have to press a button placed convenient- 
ly at his bedside and find his room im- 
mediately glimmering in the luminous 
rays of an eighty-three candle-power 
tungsten. 

Matters of such prime importance as 
this should be investigated. The proper 
authorities should take action. If neces- 
sarj' the University Council should expel 
the present guardian of the power-house 
and should call together a meeting of 
the student body which could, by uni- 
fied action, obtain lights for the College 
at anv and all hours of the night. 



Some things in the course of human 
events are reasonable as can be, while 
others are as far be.vond man's power of 
reasonalje conception as a one on psy- 
chology-. To the latter -class belongs 
the present management of a part of the 
University, a part that is of prime im- 
portance to ever}' man in the University, 
and a dire necessity to every room in 
college — the lighting system of our insti- 
tution. 

\\e do not all see why the lights must 
be turned out precisely at twelve o'clock! 
How does the man at the power-house 
know that we wish to retire at exactly 
that time? One fellow may lie at the 
most interesting part of an economics 
lesson, another may be discussing the 
depths of psychology' with some friends 
and a third may have around his cozy 
corner ten or fifteen of the most enter- 
taining loafers in college, when, without 
a moment's warning, the lights grow dim 
and suddenly go out, leaving every room 
as dark as the campus on the outside. 

And even after one has retired he may 
have need of a light. Suppose one should 
awake in the middle of the night with a 
violent nightmare, imagine himself at- 
tacked by a band of Hindu savages, car- 
rying shields of French I grammar and 
shooting darts of Spanish technique, what 
could the jKior individual do? Nothing. 
He would have to grin and bear the dark- 
ness as he does at the 12.30 period under 
Dr. Wagstaff, and stand helpless in the 
shivering shrouds of dismal darkness. 



W.ANT COLUMN 



Wanted- 
Wanted- 



-A wife — "Bully" Bernard. 
-A Co-Ed— .1. C. Hines. 



ON THE CAMPUS 



Wanted — A less exalted opinion — B. 
Murchison. 

Wanted — Callers — Miss MeCaskill of 
the Law School. 

Wanted — A pair of shoes big enough to 
encompass his feet — Bob Winston. 

Wanted — A less angelic face — D. Stowe 
Crouse. 

Wanted — Chance to smell like a man 
— Tommy Jones. 

Wanted — By French and Spanish Stu- 
dents — to Kuklux Towles and to Copen- 
hagen Dey. 

Wanted — Some one who can talk more 
foolishly than Maupin. 

Wanted — To know it Vreeland uses 
rouge — Luke Lamb. 

Wanted — Some more suckers for the 
candy syndicate. Apply at Harris- 
Woolen's and Kluttz's. 

Wanted — To know what Belden butted 
with his nose. 

Wanted — To know Wolfe's principles. 

Wanted — A new drag committee — ^Dey, 
Crouse, C. Cobb, Lasley and Basnight. 

Wanted — A place to lie down — Luns 
Long. 

Wanted — A chance to butt somebody. 
— Dr. Archibald. 

Wanted — Something for a long, lean, 
lanky look — K. O. Burgwin. 

Wanted — A pass over fir.st Math. — 
Ben Taylor. 

Wanted — A bare seventy bn Spanish I 
— Struthers. 

Wanted — Another form — ^Vreeland. 

Wanted — To be rounders — Yelverton, 
R. H. Parker and Ashley Young. * 



Mr. Grimsley, after attending his 
classes on Wednesday, returned to Dur- 
ham. 

We regret to say that Mr. James 
Booth was not able to attend the moving 
picture show on Wednesday evening. 

Prof. Luns Long met his Greek class 
on Wednesday morning. 

We are glad to see that Mr. S. V. B. 
Nichols has succeeded in passing a 
physics quiz. 

Prof. Collier Cobb returned last even- 
ing from Lfni versify Station where he 
addressed the United Brotherhood of 
Oriental and Occidental Geologists. It ia 
rumored that he has a new joke for 
geology three. 

It is reported on the campus that Dr. 
.\lex. Field has applied for position as 
head of ,.ie Physics Department to suc- 
ceed Dr. Latta. 

^Messrs. "Sol" L'rquhart and "Rube" 
Oliver returned to Chapel Hill after 
spending Saturday and Sunday in the 
city. — Goldsburg Argosy. 

The Curiosity CUib will meet in the 
Y. M. C. A. on Thursday evening at 8 
o'clock. Mr. "Punk" Williams will make 
an address on the difference between 
Knight ana Basnight. Mr. Roberson will 
differentiate between wad and tight-wad. 

For coaciiing in psjicholpgy — see Mc- 
intosh and Hughes. 

E. J. Wellons, No. 2 Old East, will do 
your typewTiting at unreasonable prices 
and guarantee you dissatisfaction. 

For misfit in hand-me-dowii Paris-de- 
signed clothing — see W. H. Bugger of 
The Yarsity Tailoring Co. The most 
out-of-date styles guaranteed. 

Pranks & Joineb, 
College Agents. 



PAY A VISIT to D. McHawley's Curi- 
osity Shop — Dealer in fine antiques. Op- 
posite Methodist Church. Books, shoes, 
druggests, crockeryware, etc., etc., ten 
I yeaie old at the original price. 



3LOST 



Lost — John Tillet's boot on Collier 
Cobb. Reward to finder and no questions 
asked. 

Loet — B7 Spanish Class, all lore for 
Dey. 

Lost — The voice of first Pickwicker. 

Lost — The dignity of a lawyer — Mc- 
Neely. 

Lost — -A good, big, generous heart — 
Tom Hunter. 

Lost — A pair of brains slightly used — 
B. Murchison. Finder please notify 
Superintendent of Atlantic Coast Line. 

Lost — An Easter dance — Everybody. 

Lost — His ability to look pleasant — 
,0. O. Robinson. 

Lost — A night's sleep trying to be fun- 
ny — Y. Y. Humor Committee. 

Lost — A safety pin — Baby Gray. 

Lost — A yard of cloth with my name 
on it — J. W. Lasley. Finder please noti- 
fy Y. Y. office. 



FOTJISrD 



Found — Voice of first Pickwicker— 
John Larkin. 

Found — Tom Hunter's big generous 
heart— Fair Co-Ed. 

Found — No encouragement from Dey — 
Spanish L 

Found — Ar. important" look — Alex. 
Fields, 

Found — A girl who can stand for my 
face — Tige Kramer. 

Found — A bunch of conceit — Horace 
Williams. 



CA^RDS 



Those desiring information on any 
subject should see me. My advice and 
opinion given free of charge. G. T. 
Whitley (Dean Math A Dep't) . 



Handy Literal Translations on First 
Math, and Pedagogy for sale by J. C. 
Hines, and Billy Noble, of the firm of 
Hines A Noble. 



WE GROW PROFESSORS FOR ALL AMERICA! 



WHAT WE ARE DOING 



We are preparing a large number of bright, capable young pro- 
fessors every year for responsible, high-salaried positions in all tiia 
most prominent institutions of learning in America. 

OUR PAST RECORD 

During the past ten years we have trained more men for con- 
spicuous positions than any other institution in the South. Professors 
who have gone out from our school are found in many of the fore- 
most colleges and Universities throughout the land. 

WHAT WE DO FOR OUR GRADUAHS 

We give to all of our most capable graduates several years of 
practical experience in teaching in our own school. 

WHAT WE PAY THESE HEN 

The least possible salaries — just enou^ to live on until their 
efficiency has been proven. Then we encourage their going _to fill 
rich-salaried positions in other institutions. 



OUR AM 



It is our purpose to supply all the leading colleges and universi- 
ties of America with our choicest educators — those whom we need 
most to carry on the work of our school. 

Institutions in need of proficient teachers are advised to draw 
upon our liberal store for their needs. 

For fuller and more definite information address the "Professorial 
Supply Department." 



THE NORTH STATE TRAINING SCHOOL 

CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA 



Outside — a dark and stormy night, 

And winter's snowy blast. 
The frozen turf bedecks with white; 

It's getting colder fast. 
It's getting colder fast, my boys, 

And we must, ere the mom. 
With black concoction, without noise. 

The freshest fresh adorn. 

The Carr Barn's chocking full to-night, 

They think the council's wise. 
But ere the morning brings its light. 

They'll have a great surprise. 
They'll have a great surprise, my fren'. 

And then another round! 
Not grat? Who cares for classes when 

The snow is on the ground? 



TffO^iLLOI ffli CO. 

614 Stenth Street 

ukpmt cruiy Rural m oijismnecon, C. D. 



Capacity 100,000 Gallons 



(,»«»«";?'■■""'''//„ 




Price list for students' delivery: 

"Tipo Ghianti" $.75 per gallon 
Sherry, Extra Dry $2.50 per gallon 
Virginia Dare 75c. per gallon 
Peach Brandy $1.75 per gallon 
Green River $1.00 per gallon 
N. C. Scup. Wine 50c. per gallon 

$2.00 per month secures right for tap on IV. C. Pipe Line 
for NEAR BEER 

All goods shipped in plain sealed packages, in quantities 
of not less than two gallons. Sample quarts sent 
• free to prospective customers on application. 
Our goods are an absolute guarantee 
against headache. Goods unsatisfac- 
tory may be exchanged at near- 
est Drug Store. See our 
local agent or address us direct. 



BILLIE BUNCOMBE SORRELLIE— 
Machinist, and Clock Tinker. Local 
agent for the famous Ingersoll and Wa- 
terbury watches. A complete line of 
poultry, eggs, music, photographic sup- 
plies, chinaware. Rolled gold-plated jew- 
elry a specialty. Graphite and bicycles 
also. Terms strictly cash. Prices un- 
reasonable. Two doors from Dr. Klutt- 
stein's. 



NEW MAGNET LIBRARY— Issued 
weekly, price five cents. Splendid stories 
of nerve, grit, sand, determination, and 
detectives. Tip Tops, Buffalo Bill, 
Young Wild West, Nick Carter, King 
Brady. All splendid literature for the 
coming American youth. Sweet & 
Smith, publishers. For all information 
concerning these classics see Geo. Free- 
man and B. H. Knight, successors to 
Montague & Fountain Co. 



Goose's Cafe 

Hot Hen Fruit on Stale Bread 
at all Hours 

Indigestion Guaranteed 

Dead Oysters a Specially 

Soiled Linen Abundance of Flies 

QUICK SERVICE TO THOSE WHO WAIT 

Grand Fire and 

Clearance Sale 



Beginning on the tenth of May, I 
will sell to students of the University, 
at 40 per cent, (discount) added to 
the original price, all dry goods, wet 
goods, soiled goods, and nogoods. 
Why go across the street and get 
stung when we are anxious to do you? 

Free Matinee given after each meal 
at mail time. 



Adam Abraham Klutt-Stein 



Jfoolisi) (lamination, Current dBuents 



I. If fifty-three average human beings attain an average velocity of five on jisycliology. 
how many men capable of the same velocity would pass on first French ? 

XoTE. — Apply law of falling bodies. 

II. If these same men slmuld meet Dey in the dark after falling a liundied meters, 
how many calories of heat would be produced V 

III. If the total an.ouni of licat determined in example II could lie conserved and 
applied, how many years would il take to thaw Dr. "Hen" nut after i>ne iif his freezc-ups on 
athletics? 

IV. .Mr. C. W. .Mchitosli. of the History Ucpartment. was thrown innn I'sycli. with an 
initial velocity of five; after falling in his own estimation for two weeks, he hits a spike and 
drives it into a Commons biscuit. How far did the spike pierce the biscuit if the resisting 
force of the biscuit is -iOO.OOO lbs. per crust inch? 

\'. Light travels 1S(J,000 miles per second. If it takes an illuminated i.lea iMie and a 

half years to find its way into Spencer Nichcd's brain cavity, wliat is the den-.ity of said 

cavity at the freezing jioint on a centigrade scale. (Ise methods for dcternuning gases ligliter 
than air.) 

\'l. (iiveii a tun of self-esteem with a density of --i.^. The fornuila fiu- kinetic energy 
is K. E.^y^ .M \-. If We assume that Stowe Crouse is bra^jacketed ami is one-half as fast 
as he thinks he is, how imieb <if an impression would he make on a giil from .Missouri '! 

VII. If Ken Taylor can pass first Math, in four year~. and -Dicky" Belden can pass 
first French in the same length of time, how long before we will have a trolley line between 
here and Mars? 

VIII. Tci what class of tan-gents does (dd Henry belong? 

IX. Why is Little Bennett an imjuoper fraction? 

X. W'hicli of the follnwing is Thad. Page charged with: Electricity, soda water, or 
two months' board? 



Foolish Calendar 



1900. 

S('])tc'iiilK'i' 1 — Tile wav lit' tile I raiisiircssdi- is liard ( rciii(i\-al of (■(iiiditiiiiis ). 

Septemlier 5 — IiiHiix <if fcudcrly iKnirishcd iiti'sjn'int;'. Peculiar jihenume- 
iioii tif tilt' Hill takini;- (in in unlcr the a]i]i('ai-anci.' nf scintillating emerald. 

Sejitember Ti-G — Snnlcnts i-elieved nt' all valnalilcs in linrsar's Office. 

Septendier !1 — V. .M. ('. A. Polal.i I'celini; I'luudi Kee;-iiti;in. 

Oetiilier \-2 — I'nixcrsity l)ay. Hinncr hell ardnses several hnndred stu- 
dents fnini nap in ^IcnKirial Hall. 

Oetuher .".O — I'nd'esscr ISduker's walk wins the eake. 

X()vend)er 11 — TieMen gets andtlier ad. fdr the V. V. 

Xdvenilier 2.") — Xn game. Athletic Assdcialinn falls into the ditch of 
tinancial endiarrassnieiit. 

December 17 — (Jeneral rejuicing. E.xams are ]i(ist]irined until after Xmas ! 

December 20 — We begin td dodge dnr washerwomen and jiressing bills. 

December 25 — C'dllier C'olib vej'bosely extemjiorizes to the effect that the 
Boston rejiort of his death is utterly false. 

I'.llO. 
Janiuirv 2 — Ove-r eight hnndred students .seriously hurt in the region of 
the jierricardium. 

January •'!-."i — Another h(ildn|i in .Mnmni Hall. 

Januaiy 7 — EverylxJily looks wise, but nobody understands. filcXair 
lectures. ) 

Jaimaa-y 17-20 — Simply Hell. Oh, that the exams had come before 
Xmas! 

February 10 — "Broc" caught liuying a lemonade. "Phena'' also caught 
in the act liut escatied from the crowd. 



\. 



February 22 — We cannot tell a lie, we did it with onr little pot of 
lampblack. 

Washing-ton deprived of bis birthday. 

February 28 — "Rube" Oliver begins to succeed H. E. Stacy as college 
politician. 

March 1 — A. Rufus begins to consider getting a spring hair cut and Jim 
Cheshire trims his spring hat. 

April 1--2 — All over. Was it a dream ? 

Aj)ril 4 — Students go to work for consolation. 

April 1.") — "Bish" tinds cake of soap, borrows a razor and retires with 
towel to ''meeting of the waters." 

May 1 — George dreamed that he graduated. Hot air slingers selected 
for Commencement. 

ilay 5 — Seniors begin to look anxious. 

May 10 — Their troubles begin. 

May 16 — Senior copybooks are handed in. 

May 16-26— Hell again. 

May 29 — Senior benches l>urned. Smoking of the peace pipe. 

June 1-2 — General good time and everybody leaves the Hill. 



A^ 



IWTERmSSION 



ONE YEAR 
/ARRIVING ' 

MAY 

UNTIL ' 



N 



\x. 




'/ 



% 



\\ 



a<H><H>CKKH>aH«H><HKH><H>CHlO<H><KKH>0<H^ 



^1 



WALKER 

mak.es them better 

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DO YOU? 



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(n) HIGH-CLASS TAILORS AND FURNISHERS 



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It is doubtless true that 
rollege men not only take 
readily to advance styles ii 
dress, but really 
ORIGINATE 
MANY SUCH IDEAS 
Knowing this, we cater to 
ilie wants of the colleee ma 
make such clothes a 
specialty; and you can be 
SURE of petting the kind ( 
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all t 



And besides, we always ha 
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CLOTHfEf^S A/VO MBN'S FUffNtSHINGS 



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KING & STEWART. Agents 

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MANUFACTURER OF THE 

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TAILORS, FURNISHERS 
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Tailors to Men Who Know. College Representatives, Stewart & Tiliett. 



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General 

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BINDERS AND BLANK BOOK MAKERS 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



Durham Cigar Store 
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for fall 
planting 



H. STEINMETZ, Florist T^ Raleigh, N. C 



T. C. Toomey Company 



l|rattug, f lumbtng 



AND 



(Sag iFttttug 



HEATING A SPECIALTY 



ESTIMATES FURNISHED 
ON APPLICATION 



Charlotte, N. C. 

CKKH><H><HKH><H><HXH>CH>a<H>0<HKHK^a^ 



DAVE W. LEVY Fashionable 

I . and up-to-date 

^ , ^ .r , bailor 

Durham, I\ortn Larolina ^^=,^^=^=^^= 

R. L. S T R O W D 

General Merchandise 

FURNITURE A SPECIALTY 

INSPECT MY LINE BEFORE BUYING 

Cbe north Carolina State normal 
and Industrial College 

Greensboro, North Carolina 



THE North Carolina State Normal and Industrial College offers to the young 
women of the State an education both liberal and practical. There are 
regular courses leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Science, Bachelor of Pedagogy and Bachelor of Music. Special courses are 
offered in the Theory and Practice of Teaching, in the Industrial and Domestic 
Arts, in Stenography and Typewriting, and in Vocal and Instrumental Music. For 
graduates from other colleges: Advanced Courses, Special and Review Courses, 
and Pracftice Work in the Training School for Teachers. For catalogue and other 
information. Address 

JULIUS I. FOUST, President, Greensboro, North Carolina 



CHKHKH><H>a<H>CK>0<HKKKHKHKH>l><KH><KHKH>CHK!O^^ O^KStKKl^XKKHKl 



O<h><Kh>sJ<h:KhKh><hKh><h><hKk>0<h>^^ 

Law Books for Students, Par Excellence 

The attention of law students is directed to the following works, 
especially intended for their use. They are among the most practi- 
cal and useful extant ; 

Biirdick on Torts 

A concise treatise on the Civic Liability at Common Law and under Mod- 
ern Statutes for actionable wrongs to person and property. By Prof K. M. 
Burdick, Dwight Professor of Law in Columbia University. Author of 
"Cases on Torts," a companion volume. These works have been written 
for the special use of students, and have been adopted in many of the lead- 
ing universities of the country as the official text-books. 

Price of Burdick on Torts, law canvas . . . . . . $j oo 

Price of Cases on Torts . . . . . . . . .4.00 

Chase's Blackstoiie 

By Prof. George Chase, of the llniversity of the City of New York. So 
abridged as to retain all portions of the original work which are of historical 
and practical \alue. Accompanied by Notes of American and English cases. 
Glossary of words and phrases used in the text and translations of passages 
from foreign languages. An ideal work for students 

Price $11.00 

American Cases on Contract 

By Profs. Huffcut and Woodruft, of Cornell University. Intended to accom- 
pany any standard elementary work on contracts. 

Price, buckram . . . . . . . . . . $4 00 

Gonld's Pleadings 

Sixth Edition. By A. P. Will, LL. M-, of the New York City Bar. A 
work more frequently cited as direifl authority than any other on Pleadings 
in this country. The new edition, just published, has thoroughly modern- 
ized this great work, and brings a Legal Classic abreast of the times. Sev- 
enteen new chapters, entire work rewritten. .\11 important late cases cited. 

Price, law canvas . . . . . . . . • .$1150 

BroM'ne on Bailments 

Sheep S3. 00 

Bro>vne's Short Stndies in Evidence 

Sheep $2.00 

Danaher's I.,a>v of Bailments 

Sheep . . . . $2 00 Buckram .... Si. 75 

.ADDI^ESS AI,L ORDERS TO THE PUBLISHERS 

BANKS & CO., Albany, New York 

OCH><H>0-CKK><H><H3H«KKK>O<H>{><H>iKHKH>iKH^ 



0^><HKK>CH><KKHKHKH>CH>CH><HKHJ<K^ 

^ i>:Ki ■ ■ t iM B rimMJfJm^ 

AN Ideal Christian Home Schooi. I'reparatorj- and Collegiate courses. Art, 
Expression, Physical Culture, Pedagogy, Business, etc. Conservatory ol 
Music. High standard maintained by large staff of experienced, college- 
trained Instructors. Takes only ninety boarders and teaches the individual. 
Unsurpassed health record. Brick buildings. Steam heat. Excellent table. 
Large gymnasium. Park-like campus. Concerts, lectures, tennis, basket- 
ball, write (or our catalog before selecting thecollege lor your daughter. 
HCNRY JEROME STOCKARD. A- M.. Pres., Raleigh, N. C. 




Behind All Good 
Banquets You Will Find 



" Marse " Jesse 



THE RIGKS HOTEL 

ROCKY :m<:ht?st, n. c. 

Rates : S2..'50 niid I^p 

Seventy-five Rooms, 50 with Bath and T T OT A ]\T O ^Vr^Wv 

AU Other Modern Conveniences J. L-i. Ui-,J-\l\ U, Li U\J I 



If You are Seeding a Good College 

for Girls and Young Women 

WRIFE FOR INFORMATION TO 

Salem Academy and College 

WINSTON-SALEM. N. C. 

Attendance tliis year four luindred and 
sixty. Founded more than a eeutur.v ai;o. 
Sixteen slates ami tliree foreiijti eoutilries 
represented. 



MILBURN, HEISTER & CO. 

Arrhitfrta 



AVASHINGTON, I). C. 



All the New Buildings at the University 
WERE DESIGNED BY THIS FIRM 



Yarborough ..^u^.^ 

House ... Raleigh, North Carolina 




aiKH><K><H><HKKKK><K>0<H>CKKKK><H><KKHXH^ 



Mutual 



Legal Reserve 



The Security Life and Annuity Company 



of GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Guaranty Capital, $100,000.00 

Deposited with the Insurance Commissioner 
of North Carolina 



Splendid record in Home State. All policies are registered 

and the legal reserve deposited with Insurance 

Commissioner of North Carolina 

in securities as required 

by law 



J. VAN LINDLEY. 
President 



GEO. A. GRIMSLEY, 

Secretary 



Wilmington Granite 
and Marble Works 



R. D. TUCKER. Piopriet. 




Monuments 

and 

Headstones 



Illustrated 

Catalogue on 

application 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 

$<HKH><HKHJ<HKHCH><H><H>0<H>!>CH;-t: 



WHEN IN RALEIGH 
VISIT THE 



dicker iSuiltiing 
3^1)armac|) 

4^ 



Your Drinks 

Smokes 

Etc. 




Greensboro Female College 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



^ Elegant new buildings with modern comforts and 
conveniences, and new Furniture and Equipment 
throughout. 

^ Literary, Scientific, Classical and Business Courses 

^ Schools of Music, Art and Expression. 

<| Full corps of able and experienced teachers, special- 
ists in their several departments. 

Fall Term opens Septemher 14th. 1910. Terms moderate. For 
jurther injoimalion apply to 

LUC^ H. ROBERTSON, President 



JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY CO. 

JEWELERS AND OPTOMETRISTS 

Kine Watch and .lovelry Hepairiiij^ a Specialty 

No. 128 Fayetteville Street, Raleigh. N. C. 

WKKHKK 

/ 2 3 '^ 




0<HS<HJ<HKHJ<HKHJ<HJ<H><HKKJ<H>0<HKH>CH>^^ 

HOTEL CtUILFORD 

GREEISSBORO. N. C. 

Medical College of Virginia 

I STATE INSTITUTION ^i 



Founded 1838. Oldest medical College in the South, which has been in continuous 
operation since its establishment, being the only one which did not close its doors during 
the Civil War. Fully equipped for teaching Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmacy. Write 
for catalogue. CHRISTOPHER TOMPKINS, M. D.. Dean. Richmond, Va. 



POPULAR tyrr''/^ y^ reliable 

PRICES M^/y///??//^/Oj}/ki GOODS 



Ik 

CRAWFORD SHOES 

STETSON HATS 

HIGH-CLASS TAILORING 

POPULAR PRICES 

OUR PRICES .^ ^ . ^ .. c* {.wvm 

ARE RIGHT 10 East rlartin St. see us 



O<K><H><K><Hj<H>CH>a<H><H>CH>O<KH>0<K><K><H^ 



QLLEGE 
CUT 



From the Classiest Tailoring Line in 
the Country 




"®1|^ l|o|iktna" 



THE SNAPPIEST SHOES FOR YOUNG MEN OF TASTE 

Our Furnishing Goods are Selected 
Especially for College Trade 

The Holt-Cates Co. 

BURLINGTON. NORTH CAROLINA 

DRANE & MOSER, Agents 

CH>{>{K>0<KKHXHKH>a<K><H>CH>CHKHKHXHK^ 



CHKHKHKr-^HKHKHKH^OiKKHKHJO-^HKH^SHK^^ 




Capital . . . 
Surplus and Profits 
Deposits 
Assets 



lOSEPH G. BROWN, President 
Col. A B. ANDREWS. Vice-Pres'l 
HENRY E. LI fCHFORD. Cashiei 
Hon. R. H. BATTLE. Attorney 



<> 



Pickwick 

Theatre 



High-class Motion PiElures 

Vocal and Instrumental 

Music 

Only highest class pictures shown. Com- 
plete change of programme. Open from 
6:>o A. M. to ii.oo P. M. 

James T. Foister, Manager 



LUMIMA ttRIOHTJMLU BEACH .:-iC. >» 



^ '^;zr: s^i^a t»^a as j 



^-^v^r; t^^ 






Wrightsville Beach is Conceded by all to be the 
Finest Beach on the Atlantic Coast 



THE ENTERTAINMENTS AT LUMINA THIS SEASON WILL SURPASS 
ANY YET GIVEN AT LUMINA 



CHXK>CHXKKH><H>i>iKH><KK><>a<HKHKHKK>0<KKH>^^ 



a<Ifi<Kj<HKH><K><HKKKHl<HKKKKKH>CKKK><H^ 

LEMMERT 

BALTIMORE, MD. 




The Popular Stu- 
dent Tailor and 
Maker of Stylish 

CLOTHES 




Our Prices al 
each student. 



ithin the reach of 



See our representative when 
he calls at the College, or 
write us. 

N. B. — We invite you to make our 
store your headquarters when in 
Baltimore. : :::::::::::::: 



a<H><HXKKHKH><Hj<KKK>CKKKKKH3<KXH><><>^ 



KLUTTZ 

AT THE BOOK STORE— THE PLACE TO Bl'Y YOUR SUPPLIES 



THK LATKST IN FINE STATIONKRV, COLLEGE 

SOUVENIRS, DIE-STAMPED STATIONERY 

CARDS AND CALENDARS 

WATERMAN'S FOUNTAIN PENS 

BLAIR'S KEYSTONE STATIONERY 

EVERYTHING FOR THE STUDENT 

^7T Up-to-date Furnishings, Latest 
^ Fads in Fancy Shirts, Collars, 
Ties, Hats and Shoes. Seledl 
Jewelry for men. Crossett's Shoes — 
The Best Styles and Most Comfort- 
able Wearing. ::::::: 



EVERYTHING THE BEST AND UP TO DATE 

SOMETHING NICE TO EAT— 

LOWNEY'S FINE CANDIES 

CAKES, CRACKERS, PICKLES 

OLIVES, POTTED MEATS 



BOYS. IKADE WITH 
THK OLD RELIABLE 



:; A. A. KLUTTZ 



0<H>a<K><:<KH><H><H><H><H><Hj<H>O<H><Hl<H><H^ 



i*<KKHKKKHJ<K><HKH>CH>0<HXH>CKKH><KKK^ 




BOVS. WHEN IN IH h CITY (,I\E IS A CALL 

TUCKER BUILDING BARBER SHOP 

Febrv Noblf, Propriflnr 

SHINGLES, SHAVES, SHOE SHINES, HOT AND COLD BATHS 

Under Tucker Building Pharmacy RALEIGH. NORTH CAROLINA 



JEWELRY 

Made or remodeled to your order 



IF you desire a special design in a Ring, Pin or Brooch, or some 
antique piece reproduced in new jewelry — or if you have 
any old-fashioned jewelry you would like remodeled — we 
can do it for you as well, as artistically and as economically as 
it can be done anywhere. We will be pleased to furnish sug- 
gestions and estimates for any work of this nature, including 
special designs for BADGES and MEDALS. PINS, etc., for 
fraternal orders. 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



PICTURES 

Framed to order 

at the 

HARDWARE STORE 

S. L. HfKNDoN, Proprietor 



L. C. Richardson 

Heating and Plumbing 
Contractor 



DURHAM. NORTH CAROLINA 



P<H><HKHKH>&<HKHJ<H>CHJ<HKHKHJO<HKH><HKH>^^ 




College of Physicians and Sitrgeons 

of baltimore, maryland 

Thirty-Ninth Annual Session will begin Oaober U, 1910 

New buildings: modern eiiuipment; unsurpassed laboratories; largo and independent Lying-in-Apylum 
for practical Obstetrics. Department for prevention of Hydrt)phobia. and many Hospitals for Clinical 
Work present to the Medical Student EVERY ADVANTAGE. For catalogue and other information apply to 



CHARLES F. BEVAN, M. D., De 



Calvert and Saratoga Str 



a<Hl0<K>a<H>CKHKHKKHKHKH>CKKK><KKK>a<^^ 

W[ NEED SIX GOOD m\ 



E^ 



THE man who has as his possession an unswerving devotion to 
success in business founded upon character, has the best asset 
on earth upon which to begin business. A young man starting 
with such an asset is more certain of success than he who starts 
with a bank account or much property'. We have associated 
with us, and in our employ, a number of young men of this stamp. Sev- 
eral of them are university men. They have started with us upon a busi- 
ness career of permanent and substantial success. Their future is estab- 
lished : they can make it what they will. Such men are hard to find. 
WE W .^ \ T SIX .MORE OF THEM NO W 

Southern Life & Trust Company 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS. $470,000.00 



A. \V. McAusTER, Prest. and Mgr. 

R. G. Vaughn. 1st Vice-Prest. 



A. M. Scales. 2nd Vi 
R. J. Mebane. 3rd Vice-Prest. 



Established 18^5 

Southern Stock Fire Insurance Company 

B. D. He.\th President 

The Southern Underwriters 

D. A. Tompkins President 



Underwriters of Greensboro 

J. Van Lindley President 

A. W. McALISTER, Mgr. 

PAUL W. SCHENCK. Assistant Mgr. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Pioneers in Southern 
Insurance Development 

All funds are invested in the 
South for the South's up-building. 

Have established an enviable rep- 
utation for prompt and equitable 
adjustment of loss claims. 

These three Fire Insurance Com- 
panies — " The Original Three " — 
maintaining a just balance between 
progress and conservatism, have 
been consistently and permanently 
successful. 



A Fe» Oood .Men 
manenl and Kesp 



Per 



CK>00<HKH>D-CH><>0<H><H>CH>a<H>0<HKH>oa<K^ 



0<HJ<H><KXHKKKKK><HjO<K><Hl<>*a<Hj^^ 

I THE ODELL MANTEL COMPANY 

OF GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Odell Hardware Company. Owners 




Invites attention to its large and 
well assorted stock of 

Hardw^ood 
Mantels 

All approved designs, including 
those adapted to Colonial archi- 
tecfture. Special finishes furnished 
if desired. Grates, tile and hard- 
ware to harmonize. Correspon- 
dence invited. Catalogue free to 
those who are interested. 



Pickard's Livery Stable 



GEO. C. PICKARD. Manager 



Fine Horses, Stylish Carriages, Fancy 
Rubber-tired Buggies. We make a 
specialty of College trade. Open 
day and night. ^^^®©®^^S© 



TELEPHONE NO. 30 



CHAPEL HILL, North Carolina 

jVkak l el e phone exchange 



a<H><K>0-";H:KK><H>CHXH><H>0<HJCH><HKHXH^ 




J. p. BELL COMPANY 



i><H>CK><KKHKKXK><HKHKHS<K><HKK><^^ 

y A SCHOOL WITH A REPU- 

One of the best equipped schools in the South. THE LARGEST. The strongest faculty. 
MORE GRADUATES IN POSITIONS than all other business schools in the State. 
BOOKKEEPING, SHORTHAND and ENGLISH. Write for Handsome Catalogue. 

Address KING'S BUSINESS COLLEGE, Raleigh, N.C., or Charlotte, N.C. 

We also teach Bookkeeping, Shorthand, Penmanship, etc., by mail. 
Send for Home Study Circular. 



COLUMBIA LAUNDRY CO. 

Artt0lir Siauniiprpra 



DYERS AND CLEANERS 



AGENTS WANTED EVERYWHERE 



114-116 Fayetleville St., Greensboro, N. C. 



WHEN HUNGRY GO TO 

Gooch's Cafe 




OPEN AT ALL HOURS 



HUNTER'S STABLE 



^ 



Classy Teams 

DANCE AND COMMENCEMENT 
ENGAGEMENTS SOLICITED. 
Satisfactory Service Guaranteed. 



W f{i f (! f(i f^ W f L! f£} Mf^ M 



W. J. HUNTER, Proprietor 



riiiiyc^<POi<ti><tii<ti>c^^ 



Warrenton Hi^li School 



HAT Warrenton High School boys are leaders in various phases 
of University life is shown by the following statistics for the 
year igoS-igog ; One instructor in Latin, two members of the 
Phi Beta Kappa, two class presidents, two class secretaries, 
one class historian. President of Senior Medical class. Treasurer 
of Senior Pharmacy class, winner of Wiley P. Mangum medal, 
President of Young Men's Christian Association, debater 
against University of Pennsylvania, Editor in Chief of Tar 

Heel, one staff editor, two editors on Yacketv-Yack board. See cut of Warrenton 

High School Club in Yacketv-Yack. For catalogue, address. 



John Graham, Principal 




^>a<HKHS<HKHKKKHKKj<H><KKHKHKHKH2 



NORTH 



CAROLINA 
- 1910 



Warrenton, N. C. 



CHARLOTTE STEAM LAUNDRY 



Launderers, Cleaners, Dyers 



OUT-OF-TOWN ORDERS SOLICITED 

Schiffman Jewelry Company 
Cfatitng: gcturlrra 

IBianiontifif • : • Matcl)es 

Greensboro, North Carolina 

0<HKhKhKh><h><kKhKHKh>Ch>CkKh>{h>c^^ 



O<KKKKHWH><K><KKKKHKHj<H>0-CK>CHKH><M><HJ^^ 



1899 



RESOURCES $160,000.00 



1910 



M. C. S. NOBLE, President D. McCAULEY, Vice-President 

J. C. TAYLOR. Cashier 

Bank of Chapel Hill 

CHAPEL HIEL, NORTH CAROLINA 



Capitiil 
Surplus - 



SI 0,000.00 
6,000.00 




INVITES YOUR PATRONAGE 

TO EVERYONE OUR BEST SERVICE IS 
OFFERED, q WHETHER CUSTOMER OR 
NOT, YOUR WELCOME HERE b ASSUR- 
ED, q DEPOSIT YOUR FUNDS IN THE 





DIRECTORS : 




J. S. Carr 


T. F. Lloyd 


H. H. Patterson 


Clyde Eubanks 


D. McCauley 


L W. Pritchard 


C. H. Herty 


J. B. Mason 


Thos. Ruffin 


A. A. Kluttz 


M. C. S. Noble 


R. L. Strowd 


C. L. Lindsay 




J. C. Taylor 



CKKH><><HKH><H><H><K><H><HKH>mKH><HKHJ^^ 




A STRICTLY FIRST-CLASS HOTEL 



The pa^ three years the 
mo^ successful in its hi^ory 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



?HKHKKH><HS<H><KKHKHKH>a<HXK><H><H><KKH><^^ 



CHKHKHj<K>0<KKHj<H><HXH>0<H>tHKK><Kl<KH><H^ 

Norfolk & Southern 
Railway 



New Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

EXPRESS TRAIN SERVICE 



Between 



Raleigh, Wilson, Greenville, Goldsboro, Kinston, 

Newbern, Morehead City, Washington, 

Plymouth, Elizabeth City, 

Virginia Beach and 

Norfolk, Va. 



Via Norfolk to North and East 
Via Raleigh to South and West 



H. C. HUDGINS 

Gen. Pass. Agent 
NORFOLK, VA. 



w. w. croxton 

Asst. Gen. Pass. Agent 

NORFOLK, VA. 



CHS<HKHKH><K>0<KKHJ<HJ<H><HJ<HKKKHJ<KJ<H>^^ 

BOHEE HALL 



THE STUDENTS' SELF-HELP COLONY 

accommodates a number of students whose education 
can be secured only by self-help. It is a large home, 
beautiful location and spacious lot. Those wish- 
ing to help worthy students and secure this prop- 
erty for the University can contribute through the 
Bursar of the University. :::::::::::::::: 



liMShji^i^ii^Wi^W^^ 



WINCHESTER 



SMOKELESS POWDER SHOTGUN SHELLS 

There are more "Leader" and "Repeater" loaded shells used 
than any other brand. Their superior shooting is the reason 
why. For pattern, penetration and uniformity they are 
unequalled. They hold all important records and trophies. 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR THE RED W BRAND. 



TRABE MARK 
REC. IN U.S. 
PAT. OFFICE. 



TRADE MARK 
REC. IN U.S. 
PAT. OFFICE. 




0<H><Hj<Hj<HJ<H><H>a<KKK><HKH><HKH:><KJ<^^ 



CHi<HKHj<K>iJ<KKHKKKH>CHXHKKKKj<HXHKM><^^ 



ARE YOU INSURED IN THE 

JEFFERSON? 

STRONGEST IN THE SOUTH 




CONDinON DECEMBER 31sl, 1909 

Assets $ 747.508.68 

Reserve Liability 282,748.21 

Surplus to Policyholders 464,760.47 

INSURANCE IN FORCE $7,020,162.00 



Jefferson Standard Life Insurance Co. 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



JOS. G. BROWN 
President 



C. W. GOLD P. D. GOLD. Jr. 

Secy. «& Supt. Agencies 1st Vice-Pres. & Gen. Mfir 



■O<H>O<H>tJ<H><H>CHXHKHXH>0-CH:J<KHj<HKH^ 



l«H«H><H>0<Kl<H><HKH><HKKKHKH>CH><HKKKH>Crtl<H^ 



N. UNDERWOOD 

DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 

Contrador and Builder 



RECENTLY COMPLETED CONTRACTS 



^ Davie Hall. University of N. C, Chapel Hill, N C. 
^ President's Residence, University of N. C, Chapel 
Hill, N. C. ^ Chemical Laboratory, University of N. 
C, Chapel Hill, N. C. ^ Memorial M. E. Church, 
South, Durham. N. C. ^ U. S. Po^office Building, 
Durham, N. C. ^ State Hospital Annex, Raleigh, N. C. 
B. Duke's and J. E. Stagg's Residences, Durham, N. C. 



a<K><KKK><HKH><KK><H><HJ<H><H><Hj<HKK><H><HKH^ 



SPORTING GOODS 

See Our Jlgenls for Full Line of 

Reach Base Ball Goods 

Wright & Diison Tennis Supplies 

BROWN -ROGERS CO. 

The Largesi'Dislribulion of Sporting Goods in the State'^-ffl WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 




BOYS 

FOR SLICK SHAVES 

SMOOTH HAIR CUTS 

Have a Seat in LLOYD'S BARBER SHOP 

NEXT TO CENTRAL HOTEL 


H.H.PATTERSON 

( opposite Campus i 

iFrpal) (Eannpit ^oniis 

Picliles and Other Ealahlei 

Shoes and Shirts biS] 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL 

RALEIGH. NORTH CAROLINA 

Jfnr O^trlB au& f nmtg Montpn 

^ The Diocesan School of the Carolinas. The 68th annual session opens September, 
1910. Saint Mary's offers instrudlions in, 1 , The College ; 2, The Music School ; 3, The 
Business School ; 4, The Art School ; 5, The Preparatory School. For information address 

Rev. GEORGE W. LAY, Rector. 

THE JEFFERSON, Richmond, Va. 

The Most Magnificent Hotel in the South 

EWHOPEAN PLAN 

400 Rooms Rooms Single and En Suite Turkish and 

300 Baths with and without private baths Roman Baths 

SI'ACIOUS S.A.IiIPI^K ROOMS I.ARGK CONVKNTION IIA.1^1, 

5l><H><HKKKHKH>0<K>O<Hj<HKHa<H><HJ<HKH^ 



£H>t><«HXK><KKKXH>0<KKKHKH><KKH>O<H>a<K>^^ 






The University 
North CaroHna 



offers courses in the following schools : 

Academic, Graduate, Law, 
Medicine, Pharmacy, Chemi- 
cal, Civil, Electrical and 
Mining Engineering ^^^^ 



0<HKH><K1<KKH>CH>0<HKHKH>CHKKJ<HKH>C^^ 






QPiece 




T 

■ /^UR New "3 Bolt— 3 Piece" 1909 Model gun has the simplest and fastest lock ever put in a gun. Some 
H I J makers claim a three-piece lock but do not show or count the main spring — now we both show and 
H ^^ count the main spring— see cut above. Please note we have cut out all cocking bars, levers and 

■ push rods and hook right on to the toe of the hammer. This not only makes a lock with large strong parts. 
H but a lock that works as smooth as oil. We use an unbreakable coil top lever spring, also a coil main spring 
H which acts directly on the hammer, and a horizontal sear, which makes a very fast lock with a nuick, clean 
H sharp and snappy pull. The hammer has only a half inch to travel as compared with over an inch travel in 
H other guns, which makes the lock 50 per cent, faster. If you are a trap shooter you will readily see the 
H advantages of this lock -we figure it will increase your score 5 per cent. We make dainty little 20-gauge 
H guns in all grades hamnierless. Send for Art Catalog fully describing our roo<_i Model gun. Re.juest special 
H prices on our entire line, iS grades. Sr--.~=. net t«. S];<.>o.oo list. 



ITHACA GUN CO., DEFT No. 5 F, ITHACA, N. Y. 



0<kKkKh><kKk><hJ<h>CH><hKkJ<><kKhKkJ^^ 

ELEGANT FURINITURE 




lAKES a beautiful and attractive home. We are Mill Jobbers 
and State Agents for the leading carpet and rug mills and 
furniture factories of the country. We can furnish every 
room in the house and for much less money than smaller 
dealers can buy the goods. 

We cordially invite all readers of the Yackety YACKi^to 
visit one of our stores. If m need of anything in our line 
and if it is .not convenient to call on us— write, and we will 
have a salesman come to your home with samples, photographs and prices. 
For the last quarter of a centur>' we have been furnishing mo^ of the 
happy homes, large schools and handsome churches in this and adjoining 
States. We offer you these long years of actual experience without extra 
co^ for the asking. 

No want is too small for our moS careful attention and no order too 
large for us to handle promptly and intelligently. 

Rovall & Borden 



GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



DURHAM, N. C. 



EIMER & AMEND 

205-21 1 THIRD AVENUE, COR. 18th ST. 
XIGW YOMlv 

LABORATORY SUPPLIES, CHEMICAL and BACTERIOLOGICAL 

APPARATUS, C. P. and TECHNICAL CHEMICALS, 

Etc. ASSAYERS' SUPPLIES 

WE HANDLE THE BEST OF EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY 

u.M{(iKSi' Wiill-K IN THE UNITKD STATE.S 



DR. S. RAPPORT 

Eyesight 
Specialist 

Limits his practice on the eye to defects 

of vision requiring correction by 

the use of GLASSES 



GREAT STATE FAIR 

.\.\NU,\L KEUNIUN OF THE PEOPLE 
At Raleigh. October 17-22. 1910 

$12,000 IN PREMIUMS 

Over one thousand exhibitors. Last year 
douljled in exhibits. Fastest racing in the 
South. Biggest midway in the South. Only 
(-■lean shows admitted. Important improve- 
ments and enlargements of buildings and 
grounds. Many new seats and free bleachers. 
Midway macadamized. City drinking wat«r 
in abundance. Advance field-crop premium 
list ready .soon. J. H. CLIRKIE, Pros. 

Address JOS. E. I'OGUE, Sec, Raleigh, N. U. 



DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



TheOnePerfeci 
VisibleT^ewriter 





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E. A. WRIGHT 

College Enjjiraver, Printer and Stationer 
1 108 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 



'0. 

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Commencement 

Invilalions 

Dance Invitations 

and Programs 

Menus 

Fraternity Inserts 

and Stationery 

Class Pins 
IJisiting Cards 

Wedding 

Announcements 

and 

Invitations 



SAMPLES CHEERFULLY 
SENr ON REQUEST 







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New from Cover to Cover 

WEBSTER'S 

NEW 

INTERNATIONAL 

DICTIONARY 

JUST ISSUED. Ed. b Chief, Dr. 
W. T. Harris, former U. S. Com. of Edn- 
cation. General Information Practically 
Doubled, a Divided Page : Important Words 
Above, Less Important Below. Contains 
More Information of Interest to More 

People Than Any Other Dictionary. 
2r00 PAGES. 6000 ILLUSTRATIONS. 

400,000 WORDS AND PHRASES. 
GET THE BEST in Scholarship, 

Convenience, Authority, Utility. 





TAKE A CHANCE at 
a pair of our 

"College Maid Shoes for 
College Men" 

CALLAHAN-DOBSON SHOE CO. 

RoBT A. Sills. Mur. 

GREENSBORO. N. C. 



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All Photographs in this Book Made 
by the Official College Photographer 




WALLER HOLLADAY 




DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 











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Southern Railway 



THROUGH TRAINS 



Quickest 
Route to 
All 

Points 

North 

South 

East 

West 



BETWEEN 



ALL PRINCIPAL CITIES AND RESORTS 

AFFORDING FIRST-CLASS ACCOMMODATIONS 



UP-TO-DATE 

PULLMAN SLEEPING CARS ON 

ALL THROUGH TRAINS 

DINING. CLUB AND 
OBSERVATION CARS 

THROUGH 

TOURIST SLEEPING CARS 

WASHINGTON, D. C, TO SAN 

FRANCISCO, CAL. 



. Speed and Cu 



. Employ 



Southern Railway 

Don't forget to look for announcement 
of very low Round Trip Summer Ex- 
cursion Tickets ; also reduced rates for 
all special occasions. 



For Information Regarding Rates, Schedules, Pullman Res 
tions, etc., address the undersigned, and they 
\vill gladly furnish you with same 



R. H. DeBUTTS 

Traveling Passenger Agent 
RALEIGH. N. C. 



H. F. GARY 

General Passenger Agent 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



R. L. VERNON 

District Passenger Agent 

CHARLOnE. N. C. 



S. H. HARDWICK, Passenger Traffic Manager, Washington, D. C. 

J. H. WOOD, DiSlria Passenger Agent, Asheville, N. C. 



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