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Full text of "Yackety yack [serial]"

Library 

OF THE 

University of NortK Carolina 

This book was presented by the family 
of the late 

KEMP PLUMMEB BATTLE, '49 

President of the University of North Carolina 

from 1876 to 1890 



IS ^ UP/ 





UNIVERSITY OF N.C AT CHAPEL I 



This book mustnot be B| 
taken from the Library 
building 



: 



26M«r46 ' 



THE YACKETY YACK 

Volume Thirteen 

Nineteen Hundred and 

Thirteen 



COPYRIGHT, 1913 

A. L. M. Wiggins 
I. M. Bailey, and 
M, T. Spears 



YACKETY YACK 
I 




• EDITED BY THE • 
DIALECTIC AND PHILANTHROPIC 
LITERARY SOCIETIES ANDTHE 
FRATERNITIES OF THE 

U NIVER SITY OF 
NORTH CAROLINA 

• CHAPEL HILL- 



DIVISION OF BOOKS 

6 







BOOK ONE 
Our University 

+ 

BOOK. TWO 

The Classes 

BOOK THREE 

The Professional Schools 

BOOK FOUR 
Athletics 

BOOK FIVE 
Organizations 



BOOK SIX 
College Life 




Cls-^Hjl^ 



To 

Junius Parker 

of New York and Nortk Carolina 

tke Editors offer tkis volume 

as a reminder of years spent at tke University 

and as a token of esteem and respect 

for a strong and loyal son 

of Alma Mater 




Junius Parker 

f^^*'*' HE YACKETY YACK for 1913 is fortunate in associating with itself the 
M ^m name of a loyal son of the University, who represents with honor to her and 
to the State her best traditions in a distant and exacting field — Mr. Junius 
Parker, of New \ ork, N. Y., general counsel of the American Tobacco Company. 

Junius Parker comes by inheritance to the legal profession. His father, CapL 
Edward S. Parker, is a prominent lawyer of Graham, who has filled the office of Solicitor 
of the old Fifth District, and has served in the State Senate. 

Junius Parker was born September 24, 1867, at Smithfield, but he entered the 
University in 1 885 from Graham. As an undergraduate student, he remained only two 
years. He returned, however, to study law under Dr. Manning, and was admitted to the 
Bar in 1889. 

Mr. Parker practiced his profession for about five years at Durham. Those 
years were most important in his future life, since they brought him into contact with 
Mr. James B. Duke, the head of the American Tobacco Company, and Mr. W. W. 
Fuller, who as general counsel of the Company so ably conducted its legal affairs. Yet 
not for several years was he to become connected with that Company. In 1 894, he 
removed to Knoxville, Tenn., where in a short time he built up a large and remunerative 
practice. He married, in 1 899, Miss Mary W. Locke, of Knoxville; and the same year he 
removed to New York as assistant general counsel of the American Tobacco Company. 
Two years ago, when the United States Supreme Court rendered its decree in the famous 
case of the American Tobacco Company — a case which Mr. Parker argued before that 
Court with Messrs. John G. Johnson and DeLancey Nicoll — the Company was dissolved 
in conformity with the decree, and Mr. Parker became general counsel of the American 
Tobacco Company as reorganized. 

During his residence in New York, Mr. Parker has maintained a warm and loyal 
interest in the affairs of his native State and of his Alma Mater. He is a member of the 
New York Southern Society, of the North Carolina Society (of which he was president 
in 1909), of the University of North Carolina Alumni Association in New York, and 
of the New York Alumni Chapter of the Southern Kappa Alpha. 

In spite of the conspicuous ability which Mr. Parker has demonstrated in the 
position he occupies, his friends may naturally feel a sense of disappointment that his 
devotion to the affairs of a single great corporation has prevented his taking the position 



before the public as an advocate and as a leader of the bar to which his powers and 
acquirements would have surely entitled him. His capacious intellect, his acute powers 
of analysis and mastery of legal principles, together with his happy and lucid method of 
exposition, make in many particulars the ideal equipment of a great lawyer. Some of 
the readers of the YACKETY Yack who heard his admirable address as alumni speaker two 
years ago will remember his rich, flexible, and impressive voice, and his winning manner 
of speaking. 

As Mr. Parker has had few occasions to appear in the courts of his native State 
in recent years, the impression which he made upon one of our most distinguished judges, 
in the trial of a long and intricate case two years ago, will be of interest. Judge Connor, 
of the Federal District Court, in a letter to the writer speaks of having been impressed 
when he was on the Superior Bench in the early days of Mr. Parker's career "with his 
remarkable clearness of mind, his grasp and comprehension of legal principles, and his 
power of expression," and of having his impressions confirmed when he recently appeared 
before him as leading counsel in the case mentioned. After referring in detail to Mr. 
Parker's masterly conduct of the case, both in regard to its facts and the principles of 
law involved, his courtesy and tact, his strong and clear statements, his frankness and 
fairness on the trial, he adds: "Upon the whole, as a lawyer and a man, I have met, 
during a somewhat extended experience on the bench, but few who have impressed me more 
strongly and favorably. The only feeling of regret which I experienced in my associa- 
tion with Mr. Parker was that he had gone from his native State, and was not a member 
of the North Carolina Bar." 

Mr. W. W. Fuller, whose experience has thrown him in intimate associat'on 
with many of the greatest leaders of the American bar, declares of Mr. Parker that 
"Considering his knowledge of the law, and his wisdom in applying it; his love of justice, 
and ability to distinguish it; his fairness, his courage, and his candor, Junius Parker is the 
best lawyer that I know — or have known." 

To this laus a laudalis viris there is nothing to add as to Mr. Parker's professional 
ability. The writer's thoughts turn rather to an old and tried friend, a delightful com- 
panion of wide sympathies and keen intellectual interests, to hours of pleasant intercourse, 
lit up by the play of his genial, quiet humor. 

— L. P. M. 



/ 




In M 



emonam 



James Alvis Walker, '53 
Alfred Moore Waddell, '53 
John Douglass Taylor, '53 
Richard Henry Battle, '5H 
George H. Gregory, '58 
M. L. Eure, '59 
A. K. Edmondson, '61 
W. H. S. Burgwyn, '68 
James Randlet Monroe, '85 
Hal F. Boarwright, '09 

H. E. Riggs, '12 

I. W. Rand, '16 



TOTKE SOItS s'THE UNIVERSITY WHO ENTERED 



/ [THE WAR V I86I-65 WHOSE HEROISM TAUGHT THE LElS ONyTHBRJ 

GREATCDMMANDERTHAT DUTY 15 THE 3UBLIMESTWORDINTHE ENGLISH LAMGUA6E f 




BOOK ONE 

THE PRIDE 0' CAROLINA 

OUR UNIVERSITY 



aw l *PB»* *mam* 



-LittJns**-*-*- 






Faculhj 



Francis Preston Venable, Ph.D., D. Sc, LL. D President 

Kemp Plummer Battle, A.M., LL.D Professor Emeritus of History 

Walter Dallam Toy, M.A. Professor of the Germanic Languages and Literature 

WILLIAM Cain, A.M Professor of Mathematics 

Henry Horace Williams, A.M., B.D Professor of Philosophy 

Henry VanPeters Wilson, Ph.D ..Professor of Zoology 

COLLIER Cobb, A.M Professor of Geology and Mineralogy 

Charles Staple Mangum, A.B., M.D Professor of Anatomy 

Edward Vernon Howell, A.B., Ph.G. Professor of Pharmacy 

Marcus Cicero Stephens Noble ..Professor of Pedagogy 

Isaac Hall Manning, M.D Professor of Physiology 

GEORGE Howe, Ph.D. Professor of the Latin Language and Literature 

Joseph Hyde Pratt, Ph.D Professor of Economic Geology 

CHARLES HOLMES Herty. Ph.D., Smith Professor of General and Industrial Chemistry 

Nathan Wilson Walker, A.B... Professor of Secondary Education 

William DeBerniere MacNider Professor of Pharmacology 

„,,_.,_._ I Professor of Economics 

Charles Lee Raper, Ph.D. ■,' , , _ . „ , , 

| Dean of the Graduate School 

„ „ _ ... f Professor of English 

Fdward Kidder Graham, A.M. { „ , _ ,, . ., , . 

( Dean of the College of Liberal Arts 

William Chambers Coker Professor of Botany 

Archibald Henderson, Ph.D Professor of Pure Mathematics 

Joseph Gregoire deRoulhac Hamilton, Ph.D Alumni Professor of History 

a ii i-. » » m I Professor of Physics 

Andrew Henry Patterson, A.M ' , . _ . , .. , , 

I Dean of the School of Applied Science 

Henry McGilbert Wagstaff, Ph.D. ...Professor of History 

Patrick Henry Winston Professor of Laxv 

WILLIAM Morton Dey, Ph.D Professor of the Romance Languages and Literature 

Marvin HENDRIX Stacy, A.M Professor of Civil Engineering 

James Finch Royster, Ph.D.. Professor of English 

Lucius Polk McGehee, A.B J ro ' essor °> aTV 

I Dean of the LaTV School 
Charles Wesley Bain, A.M. Professor of Greek 









Atwell Campbell McIntosh, A.M... Professor of Law 

Harry Woodburn Chase, Ph.D Professor of the Philosophy of Education 

Tom Peete Cross, Ph.D Professor of English 

Warren Stone Gordis, Ph.D. ...Professor of Latin 

Wade Hampton Brown, B.S., M.D Professor of Pathology 

Louis Round Wilson, Ph.D ..Professor of Library Administration 

Alvin Sawyer WHEELER, Ph.D Associate Professor of Organic Chemistry 

Thomas James Wilson, Jr., Ph.D... ..Associate Professor of Latin 

William Stanley Bernard, A.M ..Associate Professor of Creek 

ROBERT Baker Lawson, M.D Associate Professor of Anatomy 

George McFARLAND McKlE, A.M Associate Professor of Public Speaking 

John Manning Booker, A.B Associate Professor of English 

Olive TOWLES, A.B Associate Professor of the Romance Languages 

THOMAS FELIX HlCKERSON, A.M. Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 

PARKER Haywood DAGGETT, S.B Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 

JAMES MUNCIE Bell, Ph.D Associate Professor of Physical Chemistry 

Kent James Brown, Ph.D Associate Professor of German 

George Grant Kenneth Henry, A.M Instructor in Latin 

John Grover Beard, Ph.G Instructor in Pharmacy 

Vivian Leroy Chrisler, A.M. ...Instructor in Physics 

Theophilus Randolph Eagles, Jr , A.B. Instructor in Mathematics 

George Mark Sneath, A.M Instructor in English 

John Wayne Lasley. A.M Instructor in Mathematics 

John E. Smith, M.S Instructor in Geology 

Charles Scott Venable, A.M Instructor in Chemistry 

Wilbur High Royster, A.M Instructor in Latin 

Daniel Huger Bacot, Jr., A.M Instructor in History 

Alexander Morse Atkinson, A.B Instructor in Drawing 

Wesley Critz George, A.B Instructor in Zoology 

FELLOWS AND ASSISTANTS 

Burke Haywood Knight Fellow in Chemistry 

William Lewis Jeffries, A.B... Toch Fellow in Chemistry 

James Talmage Dobbins, A.B LaDoux Fellow in Chemistry 

Lucius Eugene Stacy, Jr. Fellow in Organic Chemistry 



TH/R7EE.X 












Victor Aldine Coulter Babbitt Fellowship 

Clarence Ballew Hoke Assistant in Chemistry 

Cornie Blake Carter Assistant in Chemistry 

Jackson Townsend .. Assistant in Chemistry 

Paul Roby Bryan.. Assistant in Chemistry 

Frank Daniels Conroy Assistant in Chemistry 

Grady Rudicill Roberts Assistant in Anatomy 

William Battle Cobb Assistant in Botany 

John Madison Labberton .....Assistant in Electrical Engineering 

Louis DeKeyser Belden, S.B Assistant in Physiology 

Robert Campbell Jurney Assistant in Geology 

John Jay Henderson Assistant in German 

James Stevens Simmons Assistant in Histology 

John Robert Gentry _ ......Assistant in the Library 

Jesse Forbes Pugh Assistant in the Library 

Thomas Michael Ramsaur .....Assistant in the Library 

Edgar Ralph Rankin Assistant in the Library 

George Pickett Wilson.. Assistant in the Library 

William Walter Rankin, B.E. Assistant in Mathematics 

Julian Nolley Tolar .....Assistant in Pathology 

GREENWOOD, A.B.... Assistant in Pharmacology 

James Blaine Scarborough Assistant in Physics 

Jesse Lewis Phillips Assistant in Surveying 

Allyn Raymond Brownson Assistant in Zoology 

Robert Cannon Sample ..Assistant in the Infirmary 

THOMAS SPURGEON HUGHES Assistant in the Gymnasium 

CARL Duffy TAYLOR Assistant in the Gymnasium 

OTHER OFFICERS 

Julius Algernon Warren. Treasurer 

Charles Thomas Woollen Proctor 

Thomas James Wilson, Jr., Ph.D Registrar 

Marvin Hendrix Stacy, A.M. Recorder of Absences 

Edmund Pleasant Hall, General Secretary of the Young Men's Christian Association 



FOURTEEN 



a turning from the old, tirr.e-beaten ways of managing athletics at Carolina were represen- 
tative alumni gathered from all points of the compass. By names they were: Walter 
Murphy and Staple Linn, of Salisbury; Albert L. Cox, Dr. Claud Abernathy, and Perrin 
Busbee, of Raleigh; Brent Drane, George Thomas, and J. A. Parker, of Charlotte; 
W. F. Carr and Dr. Foy Roberson, of Durham; J. M. Thompson, of Graham; and 
James A. Gray, Jr., of Winston-Salem. Representing the faculty at the meeting were 
President Venable, Professors Herty, Mangum, Raper, Howell, Henderson, Royster, 
Graham, Patterson, and Winston. Student representatives were: L. P. McLendon, 
graduate manager; W. E. Wakeley, pres'dent of the Athletic Association; W. S. Tillett, 
former capta'n of the football team ; and the new captain, L. L. Abernathy ; Walter 
Stokes and Frank Graham from the Greater Council; and G. L. Carrington, Editor of 
the Tar Heel. 

The significant, far-reaching step taken by these members of the alumni, in con- 
ference with representatives from the faculty and students, in its ultimate analys's, 
signifies the gaining of a large control of the administration of athletics at the University 
by the alumni. It was the cropping out and realization of a feeling that has been silently 
nurtured by the alumni of the State that they should be duly recognized in the administraton 
of athletic affairs at Carolina. They were 
hostile to any view that athletics should be 
an open-and-shut-game between faculty 
and students. The plan as submitted by 
the alumni, and approved by students and 
faculty, provides for the adoption of an 
alumni system of coaching to the degree 
of: providing for an alumni council com- 
posed of four alumni, a member of the 
faculty and two students ; this committee 
to have complete control of coach'ng and 
provide for the expenses of coaching : then 
with representation on a resident committee, with the power to make schedules, purchase 
supplies, make local arrangements, etc., the alumni are assured a large hand in controlling 
athletic affairs. The plan thus adopted, in its final form, is an admixture of the plans of 
administration of athletics in force at Harvard and Princeton Universities. Additional to 
the inauguration of a distinct feature of the alumni system, the year has furnished the 
athletic system with the long-desired virtue of a contmuity in the management of all athletic 
teams and all athletic activities by the method of providing for a graduate manager and 
treasurer. These offices are capably filled, respectively, by L. P. McLendon and 
Proctor C T. Woollen. Still another advanced step towards building athletics on a 
more substantial basis is the newly instituted five-dollar fee for membership in the Athletic 
Association, which entitles every member to see every athletic contest on the home grounds. 




riVE.vry- three 













Commenting on this "home-source revenue plan," Frank Graham, writing in the Alumni 
Review, says: "With this more substantial financial basis, and with concentrated respon- 
sibility in an efficient council to supplant 
what proved to be desultory, inexperienced, 
and unbusinesslike management, athletics 
at the University are on a foundation for 
gradual growth into greater effectiveness." 

The Greater Council 

Paitly as an outgrowth of the stu- 
dent council proper, and in a large 
measure a branching off into a distinct field 
of its own, the present college year has 
given birth to a student organization known 
as "The Greater Council." The function of this new creation, arising to meet the 
demands of the increasing con plexily of college life, is not of judgment for the 
rightng of grievances or the punshment of evildoers, but is an organization of rep- 
resentative students striving to offer solutions for the problems of student life — 
endeavoring to associate harmoniously the units of college life, relate them, and thus 
promote interests of the University as well as student life on the campus. A typical illustra- 
tion of the work undertaken by the "Greater Council" can be ascertained from a para- 
graph in the November issue of the University Magazine, by the president of the council, 
Walter Stokes, Jr., under the nom de plume "R. J. Sekots Retlaw": "We are striving 
for perfect social health. The social health of our community is more solid now than at 
any previous time during the writer's sojourn in it. Yet we must evolve further if we 
would have perfect social health. The whole, composed of systemat'zed, well-balanced 
units, may be a forward step." Then Mr. Stokes proceeds to offer a salient remedy 
towards bettering social life by making the academic classes the units of the whole through 
the medium of having the classes room by themselves. This is only one of the many 
problems of campus l'fe to which The Greater Council will direct its careful attention; 
and its activities in many fields of reform imke it unmstakably certain thai it has a mission 
in college life, and is an organization here to stay. This year's Council is composed of 
the following students representing the various classes: Regular Council, W. G. Harry, 
Frank Graham, A. L. Hamilton, J. N. Tolar, D. H. Carlton, Phillip Woollcott, and 
Walter Stokes, Jr. ; Graduate Class, P. H. Gwynn, Jr. ; Senior Class, M. T. Spears and 
G. B. Phillips; Junior Class, Leno : r Chambers, Jr.; and S. W. Whilmg; Sophomore 
Class, W. P. Fuller and T. C. Boushall; Medical Class, J. S. Milliken; Law Class, 
J. T. Johnston; Pharmacy Class, C. L. Cox. 

The Central Organization of County Clubs 

Analagous to the other definite movements of the college year toward weaving the 
University and the State into a Siamese-twin relationship, is the perfection of a central 



TirE.XTr-FtTR 









organization of all the County Clubs. The work devolving upon this newly-created 
organization of Association of County Clubs is aptly expressed in the preamble of the 
Constitution adopted by the Association: The members of the County Clubs in the 
University, being keenly aware of their obligation to the State that is training them, to the 
communities in which they have been reared, and to themselves as individuals in a demo- 
cratic society, and knowing the difficult problems that stand in the way of progress of the 
various counties and the State; and being eager to serve intelligently through a more 
accurate knowledge of conditions, do organize this Club, to be known as the North Caro- 
lina Civic Association of the University of North Carolina. The officers of the organiza- 
tion are: I. M. Bailey, of Smithfield, pres : dent; Frank Graham, of Charlotte, first vice- 
president; G. B. Phillips, of Trinity, second vice-president; F. W. Morrison, of Spencer, 
secretary; E. M. Coulter, of Connelly Springs, treasurer; Prof. E. K. Graham, C. L. 
Raper, and M. C. S. Noble, executive committee. 

University Law Class Wins Prize 

The Univers'ty Law Department numbers its leaders in councils of State and 
Nation by the thousands. Each year since the founding of the school more than a half- 
century ago its sons have been products of the best legal talent in the State or Nation. 
The class of 1912-1913 will add a memorable chapter to this proud record of fifty years' 
standing of the Law School. The class, through its display of legal talent, has already 
obtained national recognit on through the medium of the mock trial contest of "The Case 
of Jennie Brice" as instituted by Everybody's Magazine. Other than receiving the h'gh 
honor of national recognition, the class was awarded the first State prize of $100.00 in 
the Union-wide contest. Credit for th's distinct triumph is duly attached to the following 
young attorneys: John W. Hester, of Hester; James W. Morris, of Tampa, Fla. ; 
W. L. Warlick, of Newton; Horace E. Stacy, of Shelby; George H. Ward, of Waynes- 
ville; L. A. Swicegood, of Salisbury; J. J. Henderson, of Mebane; and W. F. Taylor, 
of Faison. 

The University Dramatic Club 

Convincingly true is the contention that athletics and debating are vitally essential 
in the make-up of student activities; just so has dramatics an important role in the develop- 
ment of student life. Revived and rejuvenated, dramatics as expressed in the very best 
dramatic talent picked from a wide range, embracing a hundred or more candidates, has 
contrbuted abundantly to the things that have made the year an eventful one. The single 
production of the comedy, "What Happened to Jones," alone will outdistance the bounds 
of a brief college year, and set a high standard for dramatic talent of the years to follow. 

Other Changes 

There are many other history-making events in the college year 1912-1913, that 
ends with the crowning event of a visit from Vice-President Thomas R. Marshall, that 
are of equal significance as those already treated separately and somewhat in detail; but 



TIVEN7 Y-FIVE 



Y-YACK 



the briefness and incompleteness of an article of this nature makes it not feasible to expand 
further than giving a few sentences to each of the other steps contributing to the making 
of a Greater University. 

With the rapid expans on of the institution in increased number of students, and 
the annexat'on of new branches of work, the year has recorded the erection of three new 
buildings. The first of these, the Caldwell Hall, has provided sufficient accommodations 
for the growing medical school. The new dormitory, whose three sections are named 




after Pres. K. P. Battle, Gov. Zeb B. Vance, and Gen. J. J. Pettigrew, has been com- 
pleted, and contains quarters for seventy-two students. Then, too, the erection of a new 
educational building, made possible by the Peabody Fund, will mark the rise of the school 
of education. 

The activities of the faculty have set a standard unsurpassed in previous years. 
This standard was voiced by a younger alumnus in his speech on University Day, when he 
asserted that there was a prevailing sentiment in the State that the University should, like 
the University of Wisconsin, spend itself more directly in the service of the people. It is 
doing this, in solving the problems of public health, in bringing about better methods of 
taxation, in giving expert advice to townships and counties engaged in the construction of 
highways, in carrying literature on all kinds of everyday, actual problems to any citizen 
in the State who might be in need of special information; in doing all those helpful, needful 
things embraced under the head of intelligent "University Extension." 



TWENTY-SIX 




BOOK TWO 

THE CLASSES 

0' THE UNIVERSITY 




icers 



Walter Stokes, Jr.... President 

Miss Watson Kasey Vice-President 

J. Y. Caldwell Secretary 

Horace Sisk Treasurer 

D. J. WALKER - Statistician 

M. T. Spears Historian 

Miss MARGARET BERRY Architect of Last Wdl and Testament 

J. C. Busby Class Orator 

S. R. BlVENS Class Poet 

A. L. M. WIGGINS - Class Representative 



I HI \ TY-NINE 






CI 



ass roem 



* * * Haply some day we meel again; 
Yet ne'er the selfsame men shall meel; 
The years shall make us other men. 

— Sir Richard Burton 



Ah, 'tis true, the years will change us. 

We shall never meel again; 
Bui would time be held quiescent. 

Though together we remain? 
Let there be no sense of sorrow. 

For the present self, we find. 
E'er remains, and liveth only 

In the kingdom of the mind. 
It is not ourselves hereafter 

That we know and love at heart; 
And the men We are at present 

Neither space nor lime can part. 

Through the menial panorama. 

In the years. We'll walk at will; 
There with college friends and classmates 

Live in sweet communion still. 
They'll inspire our best endeavor. 

Lend us hope life's load to bear; 
There they'll join in joy and laughter. 

And the dropping tear will share; 
There the co-eds will enchant us 

For they'll still seem young and fair. 

Each has been a mutual helper 

Through the years together passed; 
Each will tone the other's spirit 

While our life's long labors last. 
So we drift not on an ocean, 

Leaving friends We've made behind. 
All are staid, are firmly anchored. 

In the harbor of the mind. 



-S. R. B., *13 




• 



Senior Class History 



, i * - HIRTEEN ! ah, it makes one shudder to think of that number. If we had been 

■ '^k given our choice, we would probably have refused " 1 3" as our class numerals, 

^■^^ but it was a case of "have to" with us, so we cheerily paid our money to the 

Bursar, and at the same time made up our minds that we would prove that the number 

"13" does not always bring misfortune and disaster. 

The first few nights we spent on the Hill were literally a "reign of terror" for us. 
The Sophomores "rose nobly to the occasion," and gave us a warm reception. They 
seemed glad to see us, and even took special pains to find every one of us, even if we did 
spend the night in Battle's Park. After a few days, we mustered up courage enough to 
meet under the cover of darkness on the outskirts of the town, and 

elect our officers. After much politicking, "Nap" Vann was SENIORS DECIDE TO 
chosen as the leader of our class, which numbered 1 88. START SOMETHING 

As Freshmen, we were treated in a similar way to those 

who had preceded us. In fact, the Sophomores were always "on Al a Class Smoker They Re- 
the job," and we never lacked attention at their hands. During solve to.Qoit Knocking 

this year, we exhibited nothing that would distinguish us from and Boost 

the average Freshman Class. We were simply Freshmen, and 

we were treated as such. It was during the Spring of this year that death visited our 
ranks, and saddened our hearts by taking from our midst two of our most prom sing mem- 
bers, W. T. Dortch and William Cameron. 

After the summer vacation, we returned to the Hill much 
delighted to be Sophomores. Our class now numbered 1 55. R. W. 
Scott was elected to pilot us through this year. We, as a class, 
passed resolutions pledging ourselves not to engage in hazing. This 
was one of the most important acts of our class. It was truly a 
forward step in the right direction. From now on we were a class 
that believed in change, :n progress. 

In athletics, our class did not develop any stars. Our 
class football team again failed to cross their opponents' goal line. 
It seemed like the numerals "13" were truly a Jonah for our 
football team. But we got together during the Spring, and man- 
aged to capture the class baseball championship. Our men were 
now beginning to take an active part in all phases of college 






THIRTY-ONF. 



UNIVERSITY &£ NORTH CAROLINfi 



'ACKETY-YACK 



MR. WARREN'S PARTY CAUSE UlM TO 
BE ADOPTED BY THE SENIORS 
Mingling insrlhri in Hie best 






■ hi K lil 



!,!« bj , 



ailing 



by all prcsi 
especially enjoya 
several side 

of four pages from "Hufftr 
Book ol Pons" by Doug Rights, 
the christening o! Mr. Warren asl 
-Ibe first child born to Ibe Class 
of 1'iijbv M T. Sticars, and the' 
obstinate refusal of Jim Carter 

•r, ;_».. of Uib CliSS Miss 



activities. We were beginning to place ourselves, and to find out our duty to ourselves 

and to the University. The true meaning of college life was gradually dawning upon us. 
Another summer passed, and we again gathered around the well, but there was 

a feeling of sadness in our hearts, for death had visited our ranks during the summer and 

claimed as its victim Melvin Buckley. The beginning of our Junior year was signalized 

by the unanimous election of "Bob" Huffman as president. This 

election exemplified the sentiment of the class, and was an index 

to the fact that the spirit of harmony prevailed among us. During 

the fall of this year, we furnished to the varsity football team, 

Tillett, Strange, and Ritch. In class football, we were again 

unable to cope with our opponents, but the record made by our 

varsity representatives fully offset our poor showing on the class 

field. With the coming of sprng, the desire of change which has 

characterized our class agam manifested itself, in that the class 

after much wrangling and discussion decided that the Junior 

"Prom" must go. In its place was substituted a reception given 

to the Seniors and members of the faculty. In class baseball, we 
failed to win the championship as in the pre- 
ceding year, but our team was, nevertheless, a creditable one. To 
the varsity baseball team we gave Swink, and to the track team 
Blalock. Thirteen of our men were elected to membership in the 
(") B K. This was the largest number ever furnished by any class 
here, and we were justly proud of this fact. Although by abolish- 
ing the Junior Prom some dissension arose between some of our 
members, yet this was soon forgotten, and our class again became 
a compact body, and harmony once more prevailed among us. 
We now prided ourselves on the fact that we were a democratic 
body. The spirit of progress again showed itself in our ranks. 
This time it decreed that we hold our class election in the spring, 
and thus have everything in readiness when we returned in Sep- 
tember to resume our work. Walter Stokes, Jr., was selected a. : 
the one best able to uphold the dignity of our class. Miss Kasey, 
one of our co-eds, was chosen vice-president. 

Summer passed, and eighty Seniors answered to the roll 
call. We were now on our last lap, and as we entered it, we d d so 




Jv>»'-..'.-- . '- V »,, 



->. . 



THIRTY- TirO 





UNIVERSITY y 



RTH CAROLINAr-J, 



YACKETY-YACK 



fully resolved that the spirit of haromny, progress, and unity which had characterized us 
thus far should continue to prevail in our class. To further this idea, we instituted the 
custom of class smokers. They proved to be a success in every sense of the word. To the 
varsity football team we gave Tillett (Captain) and Strange. On the class field, our 
football team again fa led to cross their opponents' line. Thus we hold an "unparallelled 
record." 

Our men are now actively engaged in many phases of college life. D. L. Rights 
is president of the Y. M. C. A., and also editor-in-chief of the Magazine. G. L. Car- 

nngton is editor-. n-chief of the Tar Heel. A. L. 
M. Wiggins is editor-in-chief of the YACKETY 
Yack. All these men have filled their respective 
positions with honor and credit to the class. 

We have gathered around the festive board 

for the last time as undergraduates. We can 

^■*"VlcttinD .1 />• hardly realize that our college career, which has 

"s "TP^* 1 ''" V 7 a /"•"> been intermingled with joys and disappointments, 

■. 5 wm^m Vm i '/""- w '" soon ^ e a tnm S °f tne P ast - As we go forth 

from these sacred walls to make our way in the 
world, we do so with a feeling of sadness, for during these four years here we have come 
to love and cherish this institution and the many friendships formed while here. May 
God's blessings go with each and every one of us, and may we prove a credit to ourselves, 
an honor to our University, and loyal and patriotic citizens of our State. 

— M. T. S. 





THIRI V I IINl I 




Ernest Hamlin Alderman Greensboro 

Age 21; height 5 feet 9 inches 
weight 134 pounds 

"/ have my soul a lordly pleasure-house 
IVheretn for aye to dwell." 

"Ernest" is the champion non-fuss raiser on 
the campus. Believes in keeping a still tongue 
and a cool head whether we beat Virginia or not. 
After two or three trials, he finally domesticated 
Math 1, and has had smooth sailing ever since. 
Ernest is really an "earnest" worker; a quiet, 
solid chap; and a credit 
to the class. He says 
he is going to study pill- 
rolling, and we look for 
all sickness to vanish 
soon after he learns the 
art of doctoring. 



Di. Society; Athletic 
Association ; Guilford 
County Club; Y. M. C. 
A.; Magazine Board: 
L. W. Medicine. 




LOWRY AXLEY Murphy 

Age 23; he.ght 5 feet 10" 2 mches 
weight 165 pounds 

"Lool?, then, into thine heart, and Jvrite." 

You can tell by his soulful eyes that the "Lad" 
a poet. Will talk to you for hours about Eng- 
s into hysterics when you 
Some unfeeling fellow 
," but that does not keep him 
three years. He takes life 
in a calm, undisturbed, 
optimistic way. He is 
especially fond 



sh and poetry, but 
mention Physics I. 
dubbed him "Mutt, 
fr 



plays, and girls, 
bination which 
to beat — that is. 
in proper doses. 



of art, 
a corn- 
is hard 
f taken 



Di. Society; Varsity 
Track (I); Class foot- 
ball (3) ; Associate 
Editor of Magazine (4); 
Class Prophet (4); Ath- 
letic Association; Dram- 
atic Club; Press Asso- 
ciation. 




Isaac Mayo Bailey Smithfield 

Age 21 ; height 6 feet 
weight 1 50 pounds 



"There is always room fo 



"Bailey" is another c 
D's of our class. You ca 
written on his countenanc 
him on the campus you w 
fellow. Won't graduate 
doesn't want to, not because he can t 
big ideas he is going to give a try- 
these days. 



of numerous John 
ee "strictly business" 
but if you waylay 
find him a congenial 
'ith us — because he 
Has some 



Swade Emmitt Barbour Clayton 

Age 20; height 5 feet 9 inches 
weight 160 pounds 



"Ma 



jbstance clad in shadows" 



Phi. 


Society ; 


Press 


Assoc 


ation ; 


Band; 


Dramat 


c Club; 


Class 


Foolbal 


Team; 


Soph. 


Debater 


Junior Orator; 


Presider 


t of J 


ohnston 


County 


Club (4) 


; Busi- 


ness M 


in.ger Y 


ACKETY 


YACK; 


L. W. L 


1W. 




"Swade" is a decidedly unobstreperous youth. 
Slightly resembles "Seal" Barbee in form, but 
insists there is no relat on. Was a charter mem- 
ber of "The No. 5 South Building Club"; but 
with this handicap he might have made the 
* B K if it hadn't been for Johnny Booker. Is 
well-liked, but loves 
Math, too well to be 
bothered with anything 
else. His daily menu is 
Patter-son for break- 
fast, Major for dinner, 
and Daggett for supper. 



Athletic Association; 
Oak Ridge Club; Sec- 
retary Oak Ridge Club 
(3) ; Johnston County 
Club, Preside-' <^1 • 
*A6. 



(3); 



THIRTY-FIVE 




Stein Hughes Basnight Newbern 

Age 21 i height 5 feet V/ 2 inches 
weight 1 37 pounds 

"Pleased with a rattle; tickle J with a straw" 
"Bas" won the belt for Simon-pure freshness 
in his freshman year, and has held it against all 
new-comers. He is as tenacious as a bull pup, 
and this quality has brought him a place as trap- 
drummer in the college orchestra. Be ng the 
hottest sport of the class, he has had several love 
escapades during his pursuit of higher education, 
but still looks as well as the most of us. He is 
a likeable chap, and 
though we don't know 
whether he will further 
cultivate his taste for 
trap-drumming, or pur- 
sue the eternal feminine, 
we do know that he will 

make friends wherever {?* 

he goes. 



Phi. Society; Athlet' 
Association; Band 
Press Association 
Orchestra; Tennis Asso 
iciation; Glee Club 
Dramatic Club. 



Paul Archer Bennett Winston-Salem 

Age 20; height 5 feet 9 inches 
weight 121 pounds 

of his mouth, and keeps 



furnace 
u bur nil 




"Who wake 
his chit 

Four years ago little Paul, blissful ray of sun- 
shine, arrived at number five Old East, under the 
careful guidance of Lyman Whilaker and Tommy 
Slade. He soon grew up to blessed young man- 
hood. For one whole year he was unquestion- 
ably Collier's pet, to the extent of two healthy 
"4's." Ask him about the Pickwick tragedy, and 
he will say: "Fine — yes 
—$6.95." Paul might 
have been champion 



loafer of the 
he fell from j 
Senior year. 



but 

his 



Di. 


Soc 


ety; 


Y. 


M. 


C. A 


; Athleti 


c A 




ciation 


Fc 


rsyth 


Coi 


nly 


Club; 


U 


rman 


CI 


ub; 


Coop; 


K 


A; 


L. 


W. 


Aviation. 









THIRTY-SIX 




Margaret Kollock Berry Chapel Hill 

Age 20; height 5 feet 3 inches 
weight 1 10 pounds 

"Hon> pretty her blushing was, and how she 
blushed again." 

Miss Berry took a degree at the Normal, and 
then decided lo come and graduate with us. To 
do this, she has worked in literature and astron- 
omy. Blinds Johnny Booker regularly, but has 
a great habit of blusrrng when she does. In fact, 
she is rather shy among 
her classmates. Her win- 
some looks have added 
much to the appear- 
ance of the campus. We 
are glad she forsook the 
Normal. 



Samuel Robert Bivens Monr 

Age 29; height 5 feet 11 inches 



right 156 pounds 
"/ would the gods had made i 



poetical" 



"Sam" is a rare combination of poet, farmer, 
philosopher, and stump speaker. He has of late 



led a hermit's lif. 
experiments, juit to 
his pen and snatch' 
" Possums in Unic 
politics. Sam is in h 
for his friends, and 



B. S. Slate Normal 
College, 1912; Reader 
of Last Will and Testa- 
ment of Class. 




Chemistry Hall. Between 
hile the time away, he takes 
off two or three poems on 
' or "Cel.nda's Eyes." In 
element, but he politics only 
as never allowed himself to 
be run for office, which 
goes to show that he is 
the right kind of a poli- 
tician. Sam says he is 
going to be a farmer; 
we believe him. He fur- 
ther asserts that he is 
going lo be a good 
farmer; again we believe 
him. 



Di. Soc.ety; Y. M. 
C. A.; Athletic Asso- 
ciation ; Educational 
Club; Geological Jour- 



n a 1 


Club; Chemical 


Jour 


lal Club; President 


Unio 


n County Club (4) ; 


Class 


Poet (4); L. W. 


Agr, 


:ulture. 



THIRTY-SEVEN 




David Remus Blalock Rougemont Merritt Edward Blalock, Jr Norwood 



Age 27; height 5 feet 6 inches 
weight 140 pounds 

"Next to faith in CoJ. is faith in labor" 

"Davy" started out with 1912. and reformed 
by dropping out a year, and now he is with us. 
He rooms out in town somewhere — we don t 
know where; but he comes on the campus to 
attend classes, football games, and a few other 
things. Has made prog- 
ress as a debater here, 
and may be depended 
upon to keep it up. 



Age 23 ; height 5 feet 9 inches 
weight 132 pounds 

"Put your best foot foremost" 

Speaking of deer, have you ever seen "Molly" 
run? Be it football or be it track, he is there 



Ph.. Society. Tennis 
Association; Y. M. C. 
A.; Historical Society. 




with 


the 


goods. He is a satellite c 


n the 


:inder 


path 


for 


there he is at his best. In 


other 1 


vords. 


here 


you 


have an athlete. But you 


haven' 


t said 


all. 


He 


just goes about his business 


without 


com- 


men! 


d. 


regarding the "grandstand 


absol 


utely; 








and when y 


>u hear 
deed 


about 









him it's hi 


and 








not his mou 


th you 


hear. 



Athletic Association; 
Y. M. C. A.; Track 
Squad (1); Varsity 
Track Team (2, 3); 
Assistant Manager Track 
Team (3); Class foot- 
ball (1); Scrub football 
(2, 3. 4) ; Wearer of N. 
C. ; Horner Club. 



THIRTY-EIGHT 




Bryan Goldsbo 



Age 22; height 5 feel II 
weight 135 pounds 



"It 



eJs brains to be 



real fool: 



"Kildee" is the slimmest embodiment of pro- 
longed physique in the class. His body strings 
out like a watermelon vine ; but he has a good 
head tacked on lo him, and uses it. He has taken 
every bull chemistry course in the curriculum, and 
swears by "Captain Charlie." Has an eccentric- 
ity of exploding dangerous chemicals. Yet, Paul is 
a good mixer, both chem- 
ically and socially. 



Phl. 


Societ) 


; Athletic 


Associ 


ation ; 


Wayne 


County 


Club; 


Secretary 


Wayne 


Cou 


nty Club 


(4); 


Vice 


- President 


Kodak 


Club; 


Dramatic 


Club; 


Geolog 


ical Jour- 


n a I 


Club; 


Alembic 


Club; 


Associ 


ate Mem- 


ber 


Elisha 


Mitchell 


Scienti 


c Socit 


iy (3.4); 


Assistant in 


Chemistry 


(3. 4) 


; A X 


2. 




John Carroll Busby Salisbury 

Age 21; height 5 feet II inches 
weight 135 pounds 
''Continued eloquence worries" 
"Calhoun" has demonstrated fully the qual- 
ities of his nicknamesake. He has cultivated the 
noble art of articulation until Professor McKie 
can point with pride, and say to all the world: 
"Good for you. Mr. Busby." The lure of the 
footlights attracted John, and he has starred both 
as actor and promoter of dramatics. His greatest 
ability is shown as a debater. For four long 
years he has plucked platform honors, and shows 
no signs of cessation. 
He will be heard from 
in this Old North State. 



Di. Society; Press 
Association; Athletic 
Association; Tennis As- 
sociation ; Class Tennis 
Team (3, 4) ; Dramatic 
Club (2. 3, 4); Presi- 
dent (3) ; Manager (4) ; 
Freshman. Fresh-Soph, 
Soph-Junior, Commen- 
cement, Washington and 
Lee Debaters; Carr 
Oratorical Contest; 
Winner Bingham 
Medal; Debating Union; 
Class Orator; Rowan 
County Club; TKA; 
L. W. Law. 



THIRTY-NINE 




Joe Yongue Caldwell Statesville 

Age 20; height 5 feet 9 inches 
weight 140 pounds 

" 'Ttvas the noblest Roman of them all" 

"Joe" pulled down the medal for being the 
most dignified man in the class, and deserves the 
honor. Has been treasurer of every organiza- 
tion from the Press Association to the League of 
Pickwick Theater-goers. He still looks pros- 
perous, however, and wears "1 ve-just-had-a-bath 
expression. We were go ng to say that he s a 
good fellow, a good stu- 
dent, and all that rot, 
but Joe deserves higher 
praise, so we'll have to 
leave the rest to the 
imagination. 



Di. Society; Athletic 
Association; Y. M. C 
A.; Class Treasure! 
(3); Class Football (2 
3) ; Associate Editoi 
Yackety Yack; Am 
photerothen ; Commence 
ment Marshal; A. T 
O.; L. W. Law. 




George Carmichael Wilmington 

Age 20; height 5 feet 9 inches 
weight 130 pounds 

"The /(Tiom/eJge of thyself will preserve thee from 
vanity" 

The ladies cry for "RosSY." Where the light 
fantastic is, there George reigns supreme. 
"Rossy" appreciates to the fullest "the wild joys 
of living," and yet he has his ups and downs 
that he must tell about. Likes to appear before 
the public well-groomed, and does it. But never 
you mind, ideas are born 
in that head that hit the 
spot, and when he 
"spresses hisself" he's 
'most generally right. 



Athletic Association ; 
New Hanover County 
Club ; German Club ; 
Vice-President German 
Club (4); Leader Ger- 
man Club Dance (4); 
Coop ; G i m g h o u 1 ; 
2 AE. 




George Lunsford Carrington Durham 

Age 20; height 6 feet 3 inches 
weight 1 78 pounds 

"Of all those arts in which the wise excel. 
Nature's chief masterpiece is writing well." 

If "Lengthy" just wouldn't try to sing! 
Once a week he takes pen in hand, quietly folds 
up his legs — ten parasangs long — and evolves 
some hieroglyphics, which being interpreted are 
editorials for the Tar Heel. Is conspicuous in 
class football and varsity basket-ball. But find 
him when you will, he is 
always working and 
accomplishing something, 
from editor-in-chief of 
Tar Heel to 6 B K. 



Phi. Society; Ath- 
letic Council; Y. M. C. 
A. Cabinet; Class Fool- 
ball (2, 3, 4), Captain 
(3); Varsity Basket-ball 
(3. 4); Wearer of N. 
C.J Amphoterothen ; 
Golden Fleece; Asso- 
ciate Editor Yackety 
Yack (4); Tar Heel 
(2, 3); Editor-in-Chief 
Tar Heel (4); BBK; 



.Morganton 




Carnie Blake Carter 



Age 22; height 5 feet IO'/ 2 inches 
weight 160 pounds 

"Patience, and shuffle thy feel" 

"Carnie," "C. B." If you want him, you'll 
find him in the chemical laboratory; if he is not 
there, he is sick, and bad off, too. He has been 
seen on the campus once or twice, but this was 
in his Freshman year, and he wanted to show the 
bloodthirsty Sophs that he wasn't afraid. Comes 
from Morganton, but if you read the frequent 
contributions that Carnie 
makes to the Journal 
Club you'll decide that 
Morganton is well rep- 
resented in the gray 
matter line. An unas- 
suming lad; he says 
noth ng and saws wood, 
and is as safe and as 
dependable as they 
make 'em. 



M e m b er Chemical 
Journal Club; Alembic 
Club; Blue Ridge Club; 
Assistant in Chemistry; 
AX 2. 



FORTY-ONi. 



";;->^V 




James Washington Carter. 



Morganton 



Age 24; height 5 feet II inches 
weight 160 pounds 

"Alas! n>e are the sport of destiny" 

"Jim" is a great artist in certain lines. Among 
other things, he is a specialst in writing model 
love letters. He is also something of a geologist. 
His greatest fault is in his exhibition of geologi- 
cal training by telling stale jokes. 



Class football team 
(2, 3); Di. Society; 
Blue Ridge Club. 




Ellis Merton Coulter Connelly Sprngs 

Age 21; height 5 feet 6 inches 
weight 135 pounds 
"For knowledge is of things, a part" 
"Mert" lispeth in a childish tenor, and has 
been accused of singing duets every morning 
with his roommate, Euless. Mert is a campus 
busybody. Sticks up Y. M. C. A. signs, runs 
down sketches for the Magazine, and was man- 
ager and official sponge-bearer of the Senior 
football team. Upheld his dignity as a Senior 
until he was caught playing Hull-Gull with a 
Freshman. Thinks that studying is as much a 
duty as attending Y. M. 
C. A. meetings or going 
home Christmas. En- 
joys a good laugh, and 
often indulges. 

Di. Society; Y. M. 
C. A.; Athletic Asso- 
elation; Assocate Editor 
Magazine (4) ; Manager 
Class Football Team 
(4); Recording Secre- 
tary North Carolina 
Historical Society (4) ; 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 
(4); Secretary Archi- 
bald D. Murphy Edu- 
cation Club; Dramatic 
Club; Secretary and 
Treasurer Blue Ridge 
Club; L. W. Teach- 
ing; Law. 



FORT}'- Tlfi 




Victor Aldine Coulter Newton 

Age 20; height 5 feet 9 inches 
weight 145 pounds 

"A good heart's north gold" 

"Vic" is one of our best students. His industry 
and love of learning made him secretary of 
8 B K. He is rather hard to get acquainted 
with, but you like him when you know him. 
Bids fair to make a successful chemist. He has 
a strong mental endowment, for he has roomed 
for four years with Bob 
Huffman, and has not 
yet succumbed to his 
villainous puns. 



Di. Society; Y. M 
C. A.; Athletic Asso 
ciation; Chemical Jour 
nal Club; Elisha Mil 
chell Scientific Society 
Geological Journal Club 
Holder of Babbitt Schol 
arship (4) ; Associate 
Editor nf Yacketv 
Yack (4) ; Secretary of 
O B K ; Alembic ; A X 
— ; L. W. Chemistry. 



Gilliam Craic 



Age 19; height 5 feet \QY 2 inches 
weight 140 pounds 



"This fellow pectus up mil 



pige 



Gilliam acquired the title of "Shakespeare" 
by his diligent work in Shakespearean research. 
Sometimes adorns the class baseball field witS 
his presence. He has been accused of straying 
into a serious mood once, but declares that he 
can prove an alibi. 




Phi. Society; Athletic 
Association; Union 
County Club; Class 
Baseball. 



FOKTV- THRlili 




Fields Lilburn Euless Bell Buckle, Te 



'The 



weight 145 pounds 
always iallf v>ho never ih'u 



"Useless" claims sunny Tennessee a 
native State, but is a real Tar Heel in 
other way. Is working the "Tar Heel" f 
it is worth, and is going to make it self-su| 
ing, thereby breaking all precedent. Is the 
of courtesy, with his angry red hair, and is a 
favorite with dreamy-eyed ma-dens. We 
him, too, except when he is talking insuran 
some other wildcat scheme. A great and 
business man is "Use- 
less," and he would 
have made the 9BK, only 
somebody told him there 
was no money in it. For 
further information about 
this extraordinary char- 
acter, see statistics be- 
low. 



> his 
every 



pink 

great 

like 



Di 
A.; 
lion; 
tion; 



Society; Y. M. C. 

Athletic Associa- 
Tennis Associa- 
Secretary and 
Treasurer of Tennis 
Association (3) ; Webb 
School Club; Assistant 
Manager Tar Heel (3) ; 
Business Manager Tar 
Heel (4); Historical 
Society; L. W. Insur- 
ance. 




Robert Frederick Gray Wadesboro 

Age 18; height 5 feet 9 inches 
weight 132 pounds 

"Patterned after a cherub" 
"Fred" came to Chapel Hill a "wee bit of a 
tot" in short pants. He was then young and 
bashful. Three years of college life have 
worked wonders, and he is now almost big 
enough to play senior football. He worked faith- 
fully in the gym up to this year, but has given 
that up as unbecoming to a Senior. He is a 
great reader of fict'on. but not of the "Diamond 
Dick" kind. Has passed 
his work with ease, espe- 
he began to 



cally sir 
dabbl, 



Cha 



Athletic Association ; 



FORTY-FOUR 




Alvah Lawrence Hamilton Atlantic 

Age 24; height 6 feel 2 inches 
weight 184 pounds 



Woodfin Grady Harry Gv 



"Tho 



n>ho hast the fatal gift of beauty" 



Tall, 



"Ham" upholds the dignity of our clasi 
and distinguished looking, he has never done any- 
thing more derogatory to his dignity than to take 
an occasional smoke. Reminds us of Charles Lee 
Raper — very particular about particulars. Ham 
has achieved some success as a debater and a 
politician. He has only 
one regret in his college 
life— and that is Phy- 



23; height 5 feet 10 inches 
weight 150 pounds 



"A deep 



ited 



for all things tru 



Phi. Society; Y. M. 
C. A.; Class Secretary 
(4); Soph- Junior De 
bater (2) ; Whitse 
Club; Press Associa 
tion; High School De 
bating Committee; Mem 
ber of Council. 



Behold the champion Bull Moose of the Uni- 
versity. Won great fame in the debate with the 
Wilson Club by his defense of the peerless 
Teddy. "W. G." is one of the strong men of 
the clars, who is not afraid lo say what he thinks. 




Di. Society; Y. M. 
C. A.; Cleveland 
County Club; Athletic 
Association ; Tennis 
Association ; Dramatic 
Club; Educational So- 
ciety; Senior Represen- 
tative on Council; Presi- 
dent Progressive Club; 
Political Club; L. W. 
Law. 



FORTy-FJl I. 




Edwin Badger Hart Winslon-Salem 

Age 20; height 5 feet 10 inches 
weight 156 pounds 

"He does it Tvith a good grace; but I do it more 
natural." 

Hart is an adopted brother, welcomed most 
heartily by the best class ever — er — modesty pre- 
vents any more. He has an attachment for the 
sciences; indulges freely in chemistry; and, since 
he has moved to Winston-Salem, will pass aM 
geology. 



Martin Armstead Hatcher Rose Hill 



Chemical Journal 
Club; Alembic Club; 
American Chemical So- 
ciety; Geological Journal 
Club; Athletic Associa- 
tion ; German Club ; 
AX 2 (Chemical); 
*18. 



!I; height 5 feel 11 
weight 160 pounds 



"To truth's hou 



the 



ngle doo 



'Martin" walks around the 
calm and self-possessed that 




ampus. looking 

ou would think 

nothing in the world could rattle him. He left 

us the first half of his Junior year, but didn't 

let a thing like that keep him from being with us 

at the drawing of the sheepskins. Is a good 

friend to those who 

know him. 



Phi. 


Society ; 


Y. M. 


C. A 


; Athleti 


: Asso- 


ciation 


; Histori 


cal So- 


ciely ; 


Duplin 


Counfy 


Club; 


Murphv 


Educa- 


tional 


^.lub; Progressive 


Club; 


Class B 


aseball. 



FORTY-SIX 




Fred Huffman Higdon Higdonville 

Age 21 ; height 5 feet 9 inches 
weight 1 72 pounds 



Clarence B. Hoke Lenoir 



"Obs 



ed life sets down a lijpe of bliss" 



"Fred" is not quite so loquacious as some 
people, but he "gets there" just the same. Is a 
good student and good fellow. Worked up quite 
a rep on the class football team last year but 
will probably live it down. 



Age 23; height 5 feet II inches 
weight 1 5^> pounds 



"Ever)) m 
"C. B.' 



the 



chitect of his own fortune" 



Di. Society; Y. M. 
C. A.; Athletic Asso- 
ciation ; President 
Macon County Club; 
Class Football; Scrub 
Football; Class Base- 
ball; Press Association. 




inhabits the chemical laboratory, and 
is never seen farther south than the Old West 
Building. Never lets anyone think for him, 
however; and this quality ought to help him along. 
Plays the games of class football and class poli- 
tics with equal fervor, and in the meantime tries 
his hand at chemical experiments. Hoke has 
done four years of hard, 
consistent work, and 
shows no signs of let- 
ting up, which, being in- 
terpreted, means he will 
have something worth 
while to his credit at the 
final settlement. 



Di, 


Soci 


ety; 


Athletic 


Assoc 


lation 


; Ch 


iss Foot- 


ball 


(4); 


Blu 


e Ridge 


Club; 


M 


smbic 


Club; 


Chemical J 


ournal Club; 


AX 2; L. 


w. 


Chemis- 


try. 









FORTY-SEVEN 




Troy Jay Hoover High Pomt 

Age 23; height 5 feet 10 inches 

weight 160 pounds 

"Man is free who is protected from injury" 

"T. J." stands up for principle. A cl 
stay, even though he d" oc 
body. All 



"T. J." stands up for principle. A class main- 
stay, even though he doesn't agree with every- 
body. All was proceeding nicely until he joined 
the ranks of the Bull Moosers. He defended 
the cause, even to Armageddon. Troy is unas- 
suming; he takes things with a level head. Quite 
a bit of logic stored up near his hatband. Has 
the hobby of other great 
and near-great men, viz., 
seeking comfort in the 
depths of solitude. 



Robert Obediah Huffman Morganton 

Age 22; height 5 ft. 10 ins.; weight 140 lb. 
"How subject we old men are to this vice of lying" 
"Huff!" Behold the scholar! Somebody 
called him "HufTmaniac" ; and he must be, for 
a man who can't keep from making ones on his 
work is different from most of us. Bob is a 
Duke's Mixture sort of a fellow — plays the fid- 
dle, sings be — o — otifully, chews tobacco, spits 
German like a native, mixes with everybody. 



puns disgustingly, 
change of the mo 
else to occupv hi: 






Di. Society; Athlete 
Association; Scrub Foot- 
ball (2. 4) ; Class Foot- 
ball (1, 3). 




to the Noi 
When he hasn 
e, he studies a 
makes ones. 
nostication is 
quick wits a 
disposition v 
him do som. 
usual before 
then we'll b< 



every 



tht 



t anything 

little, and 

Prog- 

ihat his 
id likable 
ill make 
thing un- 
long, and 

glad of 
l these 



ets. 



Di. Societv: Athletic 
Asso.; Mgr. "Class Base- 
ball (2); Assl. Mgr. 
Varsitv Baseball (3) : 
Mgr. Varsity Basketball 
Team (4); Class Pres. 
(3) ; Class Football (4) ; 
Glee Club; Orchestra; 
Band; Eben Alexander 
Greek Prize; Golden 
Fleece; Pres. * B K. 



FORTY- EIGHT 




Age 21 ; height 5 feet 6 
weight 1 35 pounds 



/ H> 



"Death nWl/i /lis /ance n>ouW /a\j 
Be/ore /'J yield me lo a foe." 

"Tommie" can oullwisl a corkscrew. Went 
in the gym when he arrived here, and has been 
there ever since. But ask him about "her." and 
you'll see by his blushes that the "line of the 
skirt" has a hold on him, too. He doesn't lose 
any sleep about books, but rather enjoys the 
simple life, unmolested by class-room cares. He 
much prefers to stand on 
his left hind eyebrow. 
and wiggle his right lit- 
tle toe. 



(2); 



Age 21 ; height 5 feet 10], 2 inches 
weight 153 pounds 



'The glass of fashi, 



nd the mould of fo 



Gym Monogr, 
Captain Gym Te 

(3) ; Instructor in Gym 

(4) ; Baseball Squad 
(1); Class Football 
Team (3) ; Athletic 
Association; Phi. So- 
ciety; German Club; 
Tennis Association ; 

<t>se. 




"Speicht." Dressed in neatness itself, he 
gambols o'er the campus green with airiness that 
almost makes the birds sing. Is of grand oper- 
atic variety himself, so gives the Glee Club all 
the music of h.s soul. Skilled in the intricacies 
of tennis, he emphasizes that pastime. Is good- 
looking, ;ets it off with the best clothes; but, be 
assured, he gives his 
books their full dues. 



Athletic Association; 
President Tennis Asso- 
ciation (3) ; Class Ten- 
n s Team (2, 4) ; Class 
Baseball (I, 2, 3); 
Captain Baseball Team 
(2); Guilford County 
Club; Y. M. C. A.; 
Assistant Manager Glee 
Club (3); Manager Glee 
Club (4) ; German 
Club; Associate Editor 
Yackety Yack (3) ; 
Commencement Mar- 
shal (3); Ben. 




Mitchell Roy Ingram Taylorsville 

Age 24; height 5 feel 5 inches 
weight 135 pounds 

"1 am myself indifferent honest" 

"Mitch" was crowned with the title of "Bee" 
by virtue of his studious habits. Buzzes hither 
and thither, and acquires knowledge galore. 
Will take two degrees this year. Although quite 
diminutive physically, "Bee" has patriotically 
represented the class on the gridiron this Fall. 
In his studies he is somewhat partial to French. 



Robert Waldon Isley Liberty 

Age 28; height 5 feet 6| /> inches 
weight 1 36 pounds 

"Our ideals are our belter selves" 



"Robert" is famous as a leading spirit in a club 
formally known here as the Bull-Moosers. Bob's 
capacity for "learning" is probably unexcelled in 
our class. He has the tenacity of a bulldog, and 
usually gains his point. Courteous and pleasant 
to all, he attends strictly to his own affairs. 
"Billygogy" is his specialty. 



Di. Society; Y. M. 
C. A.; Historical So- 
ciety; Blue Ridge Club; 
Archibald D. Murphy 
Educational Society; 
Dramatic Club; Class 
Football (4); Le Cercle 
Francaise. 




Whitsett High School 
Club; Y. M. C. A.; 
Alamance County Club; 
Educatonal Club; Di. 
Society ; Debating 
Union ; Commencement 
Debate; L. W. Teach- 




Elisha Wiley Joyner Nashville 

Age 28; height 5 feel 8J/2 inches 

weight 150 pounds 

"He's armed without who's innocent within" 

"Elisha" has a good name, and tries hard to 
live up to it. Is a little late at times, due to the 
infirmities of age, no doubt, but is behind every 
worthy movement. Has periodic fits of bellow- 
ing, alias singing, but everyone escapes before the 
performance begins, except at Y. M. C. A. meet- 
ings, and down at the Methodist Church. Earn- 
est, conscientious, and diligent hard work has 
always been commend- 
ed, and we know that it 
will have its reward in 
Elisha's case. 



Phi. Society; Y. M. 
C. A.; Athletic Asso- 
ciation; Press Associa- 
tion; Elisha Mitchell 
Sc.entific Society (4); 
Archibald D. Murphy 
Educational Society 
(4) ; President Twin- 
County Club (4) ; Pres- 
ident Whitsett Club 
(4); L. W. Teaching. 



Robert Campbell Jurney .Winston-Salem 

Age 25; height 5 feet II inches 

weight 150 pounds 

"Few things are impossible to diligence and sf(ill" 

"Bob" comes from Salem, and can't play a 

horn, but has a l I J B K key which is just as good. 

Bob never tires you with his presence; if you 

want to see him, you will have to ambush him 

at the Geology laboratory. Fell into the wily 

graces and slimy caresses of Collier Cobb early 

in life, and is destined to remain a geologist as 

long as he lives. He'll make a good one, though, 

if he survives the stories (?) about huge dinosaurs 

and lizards thousands of 




feet 

Bob 



We hope 
rill "succeed in find- 
ut what this old 
is. anyhow; be- 
all of us have a 
ty to know. 



Di. Society; Y. M. C. 
A.; Forsyth County 
Club; Historical Society; 
Elisha Mitchell Scienti- 
fic Society; Assistant in 
Geology (4); Geologi- 
cal Journal Club; Ath- 
letic Association; L. W. 
Geology ; * B K. 







Watson Kasey Houston, Va. 

Age 22; heighl 5 feet 2 inches 
weight 108 pounds 

"A fool more light, a step more true 

Ne'er from the healh-flomer dash'd the Jew" 

"LITTLE Kasey." Take a keen intellect, add 
worlds of self-composure, mix in the daintiness 
of the dandel on's petal, and flavor with a smile 
for everybody — there you have her, this bit of 
feminin ty that can "out-Billy-Cain" calculus, 
that can preside over a class with all the grace in 
the world, and can make things happier by a 
right word in the right 
place. Withal, a true 
woman. 



James Clyde Kelly Carthage 

Age 25; height 5 feet 10 inches 
weight 140 pounds 

"A loyal, just, and upright gentleman" 

"Kelly" is a typical Moore County Scotch- 
man, who loves a laugh as well as the average 
Scotchman likes his — . In fact, he loves It — 
the laugh — belter than he does his studies; but 
he has done enough of the latter to have the 
laugh on many of us. Don't know what his final 
obituary will be, but he thinks straight, and you 
know the story. 



Associate Editor of 
the Tar Heel; Vice- 
President of Class. 




Phi. Society: Athletic 
Association; Y. M. C. 
A,; Moore-Lee County 
Club; Raeford Institute 
Club; Class Baseball 
Team (2, 3); All-Class 
Baseball Team (2). 



FIFTY- Til' 




Frank Hunter Kennedy Houstonvill 

Age 20; height 6 feet 11 2 inches 
weight 165 pounds 
"To Jo nothing is in every man's pov/er." 
"Frank" professes an unnatural fondness fo 
John Busby, but nobody knows why. Since b 
made the * B K without any troubl 
erally take his word for everyth 
Rooms with the old patriarch, D. J 
plays class ball; and is popular 
really worth knowing. Quiet and ur 
is as solid as Uncle Sam's Treasurj 
that his head has other uses than mf 
hatrack. Will make a 
big fuss in the cold, cold 
world. 



Di. Society; Y. M. C. 
A.; Secretary-Treasurer 
Tennis Association (4); 
Oak Ridge Club; Treas- 
urer (3) and President 
(4) Iredell County Club; 
All-Class Baseball Team 
(2); Scrub Baseball 
(3); Chief Marshal 
(3); <I'BK; L. W. 
Law. 



William Albert Kirksey Morganton 

Age 23; height 5 feet 9 inches 
weight 140 pounds 

"Neither our virtues nor vices are all our orvn" 



>Ie, we gen- 


"KiRK" has bee 


n too busy or too retiring in 


g he does. 


disposition to mix 


with or know many of us; 


J. Walker; 


however, those of 


us who know him find him a 


ecause he is 


jolly good fellow. 


He is a German "Bull," has 


assuming, he 


taken all the Gern 


an courses in college, and has 


, and thinks 


made ones on them 


Incidentally, he picked up a 


-rely being a 


* B K key. It is 


rumored that Bill is the cham- 






pion checker player in 






his town. 




Di. Society; 




John Madison Labberton Winston-Salem 

Age 19; height 5 feet 10 inches 

weight 1 30 pounds 
"Behold! a verp proper person" 
"Lab" is so prim and neat that we call him 
"Johnny." and he's Johnny-on-the-spot when it 
comes to Math. If you talk to him for a few 
minutes, he puts a bad taste :n your mouth; talk 
with him longer, you'll finally agree that he's 
about right. As an instructor, he has Mullican, 
Scarborough, and the like, beat a country mile. 
It is said that he is something of a ladies' man. 
and that they all like him; and if love-making 
is a science we don't 
wonder a bit, for he 
knows every science 
from Physics to Chris- 
tian Science. You can 
-rest contented that 
Johnny will turn his 
talent where it will 
count most. 



Forsyth County Club; 
Elisha Mitchell Scien- 
tific Society; Electrical 
Engineering Society; 
German Club; Di. So- 
ciety; *BK. 




Albert Rosenthal Marks Newbern 

Age 19; height 5 feet 8 inches 
weight 137 pounds 

"/ am a pari of all thai I have not" 

A little trip now and then, early to bed, and 
late to rise, relieves the monotony of 'most any 
situation in which Albert finds himself. Just 
simply gloated over Eddie Mims. and right then 
and there a literary seed takes root. The secret 
of his success in class work lies in his discretion 
in choosing courses in 
which he does not have 
"to tie his little bull out- 



Phi. Society; Y. M. 
C. A.; Tennis Asso- 
ciation ; Athletic Asso- 
ciation; L. W. Busi- 



FJFTV-FOLK 




Matthew Locke McCorkle Newlon 

Age 19; height 5 feel \0 ] / z inches 
weight 142 pounds 

"Music the fiercest grief can charm" 

"Mac" was not satisfied with a degree from 
Catawba. He showed his good taste by joining 
us on the last lap. Plays any instrument from 
an accordeon to a graphophone, and uses a rich 
bass voice as an accompaniment. He is a born 
lady-charmer, who intends to take medicine as 
a side line. 



John Wesley McIver Sanford 

Age 19; height 6 feet 

weight 155 pounds 

"The march of the human mind is slow" 

"Mac" — for description. see last year's 

Yackety Yack. "Slow and gentle, will stand 

without hitching." Came here as Charlie Gun- 

ter's boy, and instantly gained notoriety as the 

president, general promoter, and end man of 

"The No. 5 South Building Club." Said club 



furnished entertain 
defunct Pickw.ck.an 
program every ever 



Glee Club; 
a; BB II. 




ith 



tied and 

change of 
Those days are gone 
now, and Wesley reads 
sporting life, and 
muses. An ideal side- 
linesman ; he knows 
everybody's batting aver- 
age from T. Cobb to C. 
Cobb, Sr. Is as harm- 
less as a jack rabbit, 
except when he tackles 
Daggett's math — but he 
makes the fur fly then. 
We wish him well, 
knowing full we 
he wishes t h e 
good luck for 
body else. 

Y. M. C. A. 

letic Association 
Society; Tennis 
ciation; Class 
ball (3); 2KA 



II that 

same 

every- 

Ath- 

; Di. 

Asso- 

Base- 



FIFTV-FIfE 




Arnold Artemus McKay.-- Maxlon 

Age 22; height 5 feel II inches 
weight 140 pounds 

"1 dare not mrile 
As funny as I can" 

Distinctively literary, even unto cut plug and 
flowing locks. Won a Magazine prize in his 
Freshman year. Sampled English courses freely. 
Applied his Senior literary genius to The Mag- 
azine with skill and ab lity. He has the goods, 
and needs only the inspiration. An enthusiastic 
member of the "I-Can'l- 
Stand-Pat Club." 



Phi. Society; Y. M. 
C. A.; Historical So- 
ciety; Tennis Associa- 
tion; Athletic Associa- 
tion; Press Associaton; 
Associate Editor Tar 
Heel (3) ; Associate 
Editor Magazine (4); 
Chairman High School 
Debating Union; Presi- 
dent Robeson County 
Club; Treasurer Dram- 
atic Club; — T. 




Banks Holt Mebane... Spray 

Age 21 ; he.ght 5 feet 10 inches 
weight 140 pounds 
"Poetry is evidently a contagious complain!" 
The eternal quest on : "Where is Banks?" 
The inevitable answer: "I don't know." He 
moves, lives, and has his being enshrouded in 
mystery. In him a faint glimmer of poetic fire 
once flickered, but it seemingly expired. In its 
place the flame of oratory sprang up, and burned 
victoriously. Now the warm glow of philoso- 
phy exists in this man of thoughts and deeds. 
He has become the leading Epicurean phil- 
osopher of the class. 



Di. Society; V. M. 
C. A.; Manager Class 
Football (1); Assistant 
Dance Leader (2) ; 
Class Tennis (2); Class 
Poet (2) ; Bingham 
Club; Tar Baby 
Board (3) ; Associate 
Editor Yackety Yack 
(3) ; Assistant Editor 
Tar Heel (3); Vice- 
President Class (3) ; 
Winner Junior Oratori- 
cal Contest; Assistant 
Manager Varsity Foot- 
ball (3) ; Manager Var- 
sity Football (4); Gol- 
den Fleece; Gorgon's 
Head; 2 T; Z *. 



FIFTY -SIX 




Fred Wilson Morrison Spe 

Age 22; height 5 feel II inches 



"Literature 



weight 155 pounds 
is the thought of thinking souh" 



A real genuine ( I> B K 
"bull" courses in the i 
conclusively that hard wc 
it be Fourth Math, or F. 
would be a grind if it w 
he antidotes stud'es with gym stunts, and als 
with a wonderfully pleasant sociability. H 
works when he works, 
and plays what littl 
tme he has left. 



man. He took all the 
jrnculum. and proved 
k secures ones, whether 
urteenth English. Fred 
re not for the fact that 



Di. Society; Y. M. 
C. A.; Athletic Asso- 
ciation; Class Baseball 
(2); Class Football (3); 
President Rowan County 
Club; Associate Editor 
Tar Heel; 'I'BK. 




Thomas Hart Norwood Goldsboro 

Age 20 ; height 5 feet 7 inches 
weight 140 pounds 

"Each mind has its onm method'' 

"Tommie" came to us after a year at Wake 
Forest, adding one to the list of good men of 
1913. Funny, but he never has had the least 
des re to return. He is president of the Wayne 
County Club, but he w.ll probably outlive this. 
Expects to be a banker, and as there are seven 
other successful bankers in his family we know 
he will also succeed. Can be found any after- 
noon reading Charlie 
Lee's dope in the library. 
"Tommie" is quiet, greets 
you with a pleasant 
smile, and is well liked. 



Phi. Soc-ely; Y. M. 
C. A.; Athletic Asso- 
ciation; Tennis Associa- 
tion; President Wayne 
County Club; Associate 
Editor Yackety Yack. 
(3) ; C o m m e n cement 
Ball Manager (3); Ger- 
man Club; *A9 ; L. 
W. Banking. 



FIFTY -S/ I I. \ 




James Oliver Overcash Stalesville 

Age 22; height 5 feet 6 inches 
weight 135 pounds 

"InJustry can Jo anything genius can Jo" 

"Polly" — we can't explain his cognomen; it 
followed him from Stalesville. Polly is another 
of our number who has stuck to the printed page. 
He is a hard worker, and also somewhat of a 
ladies' man. Quiet and reserved, but loves to 
talk about his girl to his best friends. Makes 
language a specialty, with "Bully" Bernard the 
favorite. Polly has the 
stick-lo-it-iveness requi- 
site for success. 



Di. Society; Ath- 
letic Association; Y. M. 
C. A.; Treasurer Ire- 
dell County Club (3). 



Virgil A. Perrett Whitsett 

Age 28; height 5 feet 8 inches 
weight 1 50 pounds 

"Adversity's sweet milk — philosophy" 

"Father" is not as old as he appears to be, 
but he has had a rich experience with life. He 
comes as near knowing everybody in college as 
can be imagined. He is sincere in his mquisitive- 
ness. Is a steady fellow, does good work, and 
promises to be able to absorb all the shocks 
that rubbing against the world may bring to him. 




Y. M. C. A.; D, 
Society; Whitsett Club 
Alamance County Club 
Woodrow Wilson Club 
Educational Club; His 
torical Society; Clas 
Baseball (3); L. W 
Teaching. 



FIFTY-EIGHT 




Hubert Connor PETTEWAY....Brooksville, 

Age 20; height 5 feet 8J/7 inches 
weight 145 pounds 

"Silence is more eloquent than words' 



lie 



e come the Petteways. "H. C." is the 
partner and closest adviser of his uncle. 



W. R. Like his uncle, he is addicted to the 
debating habit. He has made so many debates 
that he will never recover, and he won't be satis- 
fied until he makes this old world sit up and take 
notice of his siren song. 



Walter Raleigh Petteway. Tampa, Fla. 

Age 21 ; height 5 feet 6 inches 
weight 150 pounds 
"There is no gambling lil?e politics" 
"Walter Raleigh" hails from the Land of 
Flowers and Alligators. A native from Caro- 
lina, who returned to get started right. Has a 
laugh all his own. but uses it so often that every- 
body is used to it. He is a politician from the 
ground up. and can give inside information con- 
cerning any cand date. He is short of stature, 
but makes up for it by frequent long arguments. 
He is the kind of stuff out of which good law- 
yers are made. 



Phi. Society; Tenni 
Association; A th 1 e t i 
Association; B iv i e ' 
Creek Club; Florid 
Club; Class Footbal 
(4); Freshman Debate 
Sophomore Debate 
Commencement Debate 
Washington and Let 
Debate ; T K A ; L. W 
Law. 




Phi. Society; Y. M. 
C. A.; Athletic Associa- 
tion; Historical Society; 
Vice-President of Flor- 
ida Club (3); Secretary 
of Florida Club (4); 
" ek 

(4 
(2 

Fres 

man Debate Prize; 
Fresh-Soph. Debate 
( I ) ; Soph-Junior Debate 
(3) ; Commencement De- 
bate (3); President of 
Debating Un : on (4) ; 
L. W. Law. 



Pr 


side 


nt 


Buie's 


Creel 


Ac 


aden 


IV 


Club 


(4) 


Class 


Sec 


retary 


(2) 


w 


nner 


of 


Phi. 


Fresh 



FIFTY-NINE 







Guy Berryman Phillips Trinity 

Age 21; height 5 feet II inches 
weight 1 70 pounds 
"Measures, not men, have always been my marl?" 
Erect a monument to "G. B." on the class 
athletic field. He was a martyr to the forlorn 
hope of our class reputation, and was captain of 
the Senior team. Boosts the Y. M. C. A. suc- 
cessfully; therefore, he is good. Boots George 
McKie unsuccessfully; therefore, he is bad. 
Which? Neither, for Guy is the "guy" that 
lives in contradiction to the current idea that to 
be a Sunday School teacher is to be puny. 



Jasper Louis Phillips Kinston 

Age 22; height 5 feet 9 inches 
weight 130 pounds 

"My mind to me a kingdom is" 

Early in his college course, "J. L." became 
attached to the gods of mathematics, and he has 
been a devout worshipper ever since. Is not seen 
much on the campus, because his time is taken up 
with serious things. However, he always attends 
class games, and roots lustily for 1913. Is one 
of the hardest students : n the class. 



Di. Society; Y. M. C. 
A.; Athletic Associa- 
tion; Press Association; 
Dramatic Club; Y. M. 
C. A. Cabinet; Presi- 
dent Randolph County 
Club; Educational Club'; 
Class Baseball (1.2. 3); 
Captain Class Baseball 
Team (3) ; Catcher All- 
Class Baseball Team 
(2); Class Football (3, 
4) ; Capta : n Class Fool- 
ball Team (4); Greater 
Council. 




Phi. Society; Y. M. 
C. A.; Press Associa- 
tion; Elisha Mitchell 
Scientific Society ; 
Assistant in Surveying 
(4) ; Vice-President Re- 
publican Club (4) ; 
* B K ; L. W. Civil En- 
gineering. 



<^7 




William Nicholas Post Wil 

Age 20; height 5 feel 7 inches 
weight 120 pounds 
** 'jTi's a cute itoench" 



Give "Nick" 


250 pages of lessons, come back 


in an hour, he 


can recite it verbatim, et literal m, 


et punctuatum. 
come back in 


Give "Nick" some math lo work, 
an hour, he can do it. G ve 


"Nick" a Seni 
an hour, he car 
a dress, el cele 
the metamorphc 
easiest, because 
nation may be 


3r stunt to work up, come back in 
deliver the goods. Give "Nick" 
a, comes back in an hour, behold 
sis into a girl. That last is the 
he really is ladylike. Procrasti- 
the thief 


of time; but 
stole from th : s 


he never m^mj^mmmm 



Thomas Michael Ramsaur ..China Grove 

Age 20; height 5 feet 10 inches 

weight 161 pounds 

"Happiness is the natural floTvcr of July" 

Answers to ihe name of "Mike," and is very 

friendly. The girls say he is "cute," but not 

know ng what that means we guess they are 

right. He is a devout worshiper at the shrine 

of Venus, but is nevertheless on speaking terms 

with his books. Possesses such magnetic power 

over the fair sex that "for tre love of 'Mike'" 

they will do most anything. A corking good 



Phi. 


Society; 


Y. M. 


C. A. 


; Athletic 


Asso- 


elation 


Tennis 


Asso- 


ciation 


Dramati 


: Club; 


New 


Hanover 


County 


Club; 


German 


Club; 


* B K 


K A ; L. 


W.Ar- 



chiteclure. 




nd clean youth is "Mike,* 
and if the heathen 
Ch nese don't get him, 
we expect to hear a 
chapel talk about him 
some day. 



Di. Society; Press 
Association ; Dramatic 
Club (3, 4); Assistant 
Manager Varsity Base- 
ball Team (3); Com- 
mencement Marshal (3); 
President Rowan County 
Club (3) ; Assistant in 
L.brary (3, 4); Y. M. 
C. A. Cabinet ; Class 
Tennis Team (3). 




Edgar Ralph Rankin ....Gastonia 

Age 21; height 5 feel II inches 
weight 165 pounds 

"An unrestrained but quiet man" 

"Ralph" is one of those Rock-of-Gibraltar 
type of fellows who never ?ays a word unless 
he means it. He thinks it a sacred duty to pass 
all his work with good marks, but doesn't let that 
keep him from being sociable. He became inter- 
ested in the High School Debating Union this 
year, and was largely instrumental in making : t 
a success. Belongs in class A- 1. 



Di. Society; Y. M. 
C. A.; Athletic Asso- 
ciation; Press Associa- 
tion; Historical Society; 
Class Football Team (3, 
4) ; President Caslon- 
Uncoln Club (4) ; Vice- 
President Murphy Edu- 
cation Club (4) ; Asso- 
ciate Editor Tar Heel 
(4) ; Library Assis- 
t a n t (4) ; Secretary 
High School Debating 
Committee (4) ; 2 T. 




Leland Brown Rhodes Chapel Hil! 

Age 21; height 5 feel 10 inches 
weight 135 pounds 
"Taste the joy that springs from labor" 
Someone found him while doing chemical 
research work in the dark room last Spring. At 
first he was thought to be a new element, but 
he insisted that he had been here three years; 
whereupon he was dubbed "Helium." He 
asserts emphatically that he did not establish the 
Rhodes Scholarship. Sometimes he has been seen 
scooting across the campus, or performing with 
boa-constrictoral contortions at the gym. He 
believes in being seldom 
seen and. never heard. 
When he learns anything 
important, he records it 
in his notebook. He 
takes college life seri- 
ously and, although a 
recluse, is very agree- 
able. 



Phi. Society; Chemi- 
cal Journal Club; Ten- 
nis Association ; Alembic 
Club; L. W. Chemistry. 




Douglas L. Rights Winston-Salem 

Age 21 ; height 5 feet 6|/2 inches 
weight 130 pounds 

-Cod hath made thee a noble man" 

"Doug" is one of the rankest punsters that 
ever dallied with a word. "Douc" runs the 
Magazine and the Y. M. C. A., chases the pig- 
sk'n, and fills the air with barbarous sounds of 
fife and other inhuman instruments. He is the 
hvest article in the class, notwithstanding the fact 
that he is going to be a preacher. 



President Musical 
Association; Band; Glee 
Club; President Y. M. 
C. A.; Assistant Editor 
Tar Heel; Editor-in- 
chief University Maga- 
zine; Hunter Lee Harris 
Medal; Class Football; 
Class Baseball; Minis- 
tenal Band; Orchesha 
Director; Di. Society; 
A t h 1 e tic Association; 
Golden Fleece; Secre- 
tary Press Association; 
Pres dent Forsyth County 
Club; Class Secretary 
(3); 2T; <I>BK. 




James Hunt Royster Townesville 

Age 20; height 6 feet 
weight 160 pounds 
"The motto of chivalry is also the motto of wis- 
dom; to serve all, but love only one" 
Quiet, calm, and deliberate, "Jim" has wor- 
ried through four long years, trying to suppress his 
masculine pulchritude so as to keep out of the 
snares of visiting "Prom" girls. He even took 
to wearing glasses, hoping that the added dignity 
in his appearance might help him in his task. In 
reality, however, those glasses were not altogether 
for ornamentaticn, for Jim is a good student, and 
pores over his books 
religiously and method- 
ically. However, Jim 
takes lime lo mix with 
the boys on certain occa- 
sions, and sometimes 
with (he g rls. 



Athletic Association; 
Y. M. C. A.; Tennis 
Association; Class Foot- 
ball (3. 4); Associate 
Editor Yackety Yack 
(3) ; Warrenton High 
School Club; German 
Club; L. W. Medicine. 



SIXTY- THRl I 




James Blaine Scarborough Mount Gil 

Age 27; height 5 feet II inches 
weight 170 pounds 

"In mathematics he Tvas greater ih 
Brahe or Erra Pater" 



i Tycho 

Doctor" 
s untrue, 
fed. 



Last year a Y. Y. drag said that 
worked while others slept. That was untrue 
for "Doctor" worked while others loafed. H< 
capured the Wlliam Cain Math, medal in addi 
tion to a coveted * B K key. Unless "Doctor' 
marries a wife who will love him unreasonably 
we are going to hear from him. 



Di. Society; Y. M. 
C. A.; Athletic Asso- 
ciation; Tennis Associa- 
te (I. 2); Pre.s Asso- 
ciation; Elisha Mitchell 
Scientific Society; Cain 
Math. Medal (3); 
Licentiate in Phys-cs 
(3) ; Assistant in Phy- 
sics (4); *BK; L. W. 
Mathematical Physics. 




Age 22; height 5 feet 4 inches 
weight 145 pounds 
"Thy modesty is a candle to thy merit" 
"Shamy" hails from Biscoe, where mostly 
Pages grow. However, there are other things 
which make him like the cigarette, "d ; slinctly 
individual." He has the only boot on old man 
Archer, which he got by the mutual swapping 
of yarns the long winter evenings of his Fresh- 
man year. He has faithfully upheld the chapel 
choir, and through his persistency secured a place 
in the Glee Club. He is a good student, and 
somewhat of a gym bull. 
Is always a "hail fello 
well met.** 



D,. 


Society; Y. M 


C. A 


; Tennis Associa- 


tion; 


Athletic Associa- 


tion; 


Class Tennis 


Team 


(1); Manager 


Class 


Tennis (2. 3) ; 


Class 


Baseball (3, 4); 


Glee 


Club (4); UK A; 


L. W 


Capitalist. 




Horace Sisk Waco 

Age 28; height 6 feet 

weight 175 pounds 

"Our self-made men are the g/orlj of our inslitu- 

"Horace" worships at the shrine of the god 
of smiles, and in fact is a high priest in his sanc- 
tuary. It is rumored, among other things, thai 
he is a good student, and that he will use his 
talents to instruct the rising youth in the way 
that they should go. Horace is a man of great 
business sagacity, as :s shown by the fact that 
the class made him chief of its financial depait- 
ment. Be it said, how- 
ever, that this is not the 



only dist : 
ferred on h 
class; but 
vents, etc. 

Di. Society; 
Association; Y. 
A. Cabinet (4); 
atic Club; Class 
urer (4); Clas 
ball (3. 4); Presid 
Cleveland County Club 
(2, 3); Rutherford 

College Club: Press 
Association; Historical 
Society; Educational 
Club; High School De- 
bating Committee; L. W. 
Teaching. 



by 



Athletic 

M. C 

Dram 

Treas 

i Fool 



Peyton McGuire Smith Elzal 

Age 21 ; height 5 feet 10 inch, 

weight 163 pounds 

"We cannot all be 



masters 



Lured nlo the maze of Math. "Peyton" has 
trod all the puzzling paths, and comes out with 
only one scar — curses on second! A good ath- 
lete, but he refused to try until last Fall, when he 
got to going very good on the gridiron. "Peyton" 
worries nobody, and nobody worries him. Is as 
steady as he looks and, man, he loves a joke! 




Class Football (1, 2, 
3); Scrub (4); Gym. 
Team (4) ; Gorgon's 
Head; A K E. 



SfXTi I 1 1 I 




?v!arshall Turner Spears Lillington 

Age 23; height 5 feet 8 inches 

weight 128 pounds 

"Art ma)) make a suit of clothes,; but nature must 

produce a man" 

"Spurgeon" is a man of many interests. In 

every department of his activity he is valued as 

a hard, earnest, and efficient worker. His friends 

are many. They congratulate him upon his 

splendid managing of this book, and above all 

on his exemplary citizenship. We call his kind 

"gilt edge," and we predct for him great success 

"after the last handclasp." 



Athletic Association; 
Phi. Society; Y. M. C 
A.; Secretary of Debat 
ing Union (3) ; Assist 
ant Business Manage 
Tar Heel (3); Assist 
ant Editor of Magazine 
(3); German Club; 
Cla;s Historian (4); 
Greater Council; Busi- 
ness Manager of 
YacKETY Yack; Coop; 
Ampholerothen ; Gor- 
gon's Head ; K A; L. 
W. Law. 




Walter Stokes, Jr -..Nashville, Tenn. 

Age 21; height 5 ft. 1 I ins.; weight 131 lbs. 
"Cod never made anything ehe so beautiful as 
man" 
Here is the consummate realization of a man. 
Born and bred in a sister State, he came to us 
unheralded. But his live idea:., h s genuine spirit. 
and his real popularity predicted him inevitably 
our senior president, in which capacity he batted 
a "thousand." Here's to the "Pres.", attract- 
ive to the most freakish, anvable to the most 
snobbish, sensible to the most simple, genuine to 
the core, and a true University man. 

Phi. Society; Debat- 
ing Union ; Junior Ora- 
torical contest; Dram- 
atic Club; Asso. Ed. 
Yackety Yack (3) ; 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; 
Mgr. of the Star Course; 
Pres. Webb School 
Club; Leader Easter 
German (3) ; Mgr 
Varsity Track Team; 
Athletic Council; Cheer 
Leader; Class Football 
(2. 3); Tennis Asso. 
Pres, Student Council 
Pres. Greater Council 
Coop; German Club 
Gorgon's Head; Amphc 
terothen ; Golden Fleece 
Chairman Pan-Helleni 
Council; Pres. Sen c 



Cla 



A K E. 




Thomas Edgar Story Blowing Rock 

Age 24; heght 5 feel 10 inches 
weight 143 pound; 

"To be most useful is the greatest virtue" 

"Mike" is a conscientious fellow, who has car- 
ried on his school work, and likewise made him- 
self indispensable at the Baptist Church and in 
the Y. M. C. A. He is a remarkably strong, 
defensive politician, a devoted disc-pie of 
"Teddy." His indomitable energy will count in 
life. 



Robert Strange, Jr 

Age 21 ; height 5 feel 



..Wilm 
inches 



weight 150 pounds 
n'st not then be false to any man" 
vho can combine a football N. C. 
ball managership with the best egg 
is out of the ordinary. When you 



"Thou 

A man 
and a ba 
in the class is 
add social su 

insight, and base it all on a 
dalion of character, you have 
acqu sition to any institution, 
out like a klaxon, his smile is 
Barbee. and his eyes take i 



nd th 



Di. Society; Y. M. 
C. A.; Athletic Asso- 
ciation; Educational 
Club; Dramatic Club; 
Class Football (3, 4); 
Class Track (3); High 
School Debating Com- 
mittee; L. W. Teach- 
ing. 




politician's keen 
rock-bottom foun- 
the "Bishop," an 
His laugh rings 
lile is as broad as "Seal" 
lake in everything from 
feminine charms to tariff 
legislation. All the way 
and back again, he is a 
credit to the University. 

Y. M. C. A.; Ath- 
let:c Association; Ten- 
nis Association ; Phi. 
Society; Firemen's 
Union; Commencement 
Marshal ; Class Foot- 
ball (I. 2); Varsity 
Football (3. 4); Assist- 
ant Baseball Manage. 
(3) ; Varsitv Baseball 
Manager (4) ; Wearer 
N. C; German Club; 
Ampholerothen ; Coop; 
Gimghoul; Athletic 
Council; Golden Fleece; 
1 A E 




Rachel Lawrence Summers Statesvil'e 

Age 22; height 5 feel 5] 2 inches 
weight I 16 pounds 
"She wears the face of beauty like a smile" 
"Rachel," although no one dares call her by 
that part of her name, is one of the Trinity. She 
made her debut among us in our Junior year; but 
so much preferred her own companionship to 
ours that few of us knew much about her beyond 
the fact that she was a co-ed. This year, how- 
ever, through the beneficence of physics, botany, 
and class smokers, we have come to know her 
belter. Needless to say. all her classmates like 
her greatly, and predict 
for her, as for everyone 
who receives a "senior 
write-up," a glorious 
future. 



W.lliam Smith Tillett Charlotte 

Age 21 ; height 5 ft. 1 1 ins.; weight 145 lbs. 
"He stood four square to every mind that blen>" 
Seven square inches of form contour, contain- 
ing five thousand Ions of fight, is "BoXEY," and 
our greatest athlete. To gam five yards, or to 
accomplish any other task, he can equally be 
depended upon. W orse than Frank Graham in 
his aversion of limelight, he has a hard time 
escaping its discriminating glare. "Boxey" has 



He 



and a peculiar strength i 

a good student, and to 

he is the best of fellows 

fast friend. We 



i stat- 
^hom- 



Member of 
County Club. 




alsc 


add 


that the 


adies 


tin 


ik hi 


T> "th 




utest 


thir 


g I < 


ver saw." 






^lass 


Footb 


all 


and 


Ba 


seball 


(1) 


Scrub 


Ba 


seball 


and 


Foe 


tball 


(2 


; Class 


Baseball 


(3] 


; \ 


arsity 


Fo 


Dtball 


(3, 


4); 


Capt. 


V 


arsity 


Fo 


>tball 


(4); 


V 


arsity 


Ba 


»ket-ba 


11 (2, 


3, 


4): 



Track Squad (3) ; Asst. 
Mgr. Basket-ball (3) ; 
Wearer of N. C; Ath- 
letic Asso.; Mecklenburg 
Co. Club; Webb School 
Club; German Club; 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 
(4); Di. Society; Gol- 
den Fleece; Gimghoul; 
Cood; 2T; Z A E. 



SIXTX-BIGH1 




H. R. TOTTEN Yadkin College 

Age 20; height 5 feet 6}/ 2 inches 
weight 135 pounds 



"A Christie 



the highest style of man" 



"Tot" is preeminently a botanist, a connois- 
seur of mushrooms, so to speak. Diligence 
contentment, and a fiery red head are his adorn- 
ments. He has tendencies toward the now pro 
verbial Booker-trot. If he continues in In- 
direction, he had better beware, for the ladle; 
may give him cause to worry. 



Di. Society; Y. M. 
C. A.; Athletic Asso- 
ciation; Davidson Countv 
Club; Class Football 
(4). 




Jackson Townsend Marietta 

Age 23; height 5 feet 10 inches 
weight 140 pounds 

"The first step to greatness is to be honest" 

"Jack!" Test-tubes, acids, molecules, and 
chemical equations obey bis every command with- 
out a murmur. The Chemistry "lab" is his 
paradise, where he revels. Lo. and behold, he 
brought forth a '!' H K key. Doesn't worry so 
long as he has "Vic" Coulter and his pipe. 
Remove them; he'll not say much, but he gets 
down in ihe moulh. He could be a big noise, but 
prefers the simple life. 



Phi. Society; Athletic 
Association; Chemical 
Journal Club; Press As- 
sociation; Geological 
Journal Club; Dramatic 
Club; Robeson County 
Club; Oak R.dge Club; 
Assistant Manager Uni- 
versity Magazine (3); 
Manager University 
Magazine (4); Elisha 
Mitchell Scientific So- 
ciety; Alembic; * B K; 
A X 2 ; L. W. Chem- 
istry. 



SIX! Y-NINE 




II 



Daniel Joshua Walker Union R dge 

Age 25; height 6 feel 
weighl 1 70 pounds 

"Sleep that (■noBs no waging" 

So there appeared in our midst a mighty man 
of valor, whose name was Joshua, of the house 
of Walker. And he did many wondrous things, 
often discoursing exhaustively on the merits of 
the "best girl in the world." Did indulge strenu- 
ously in athletics, chief among which was sleep- 
ing — a sport in which he excelled greatly. Was 
honored and loved by all as the one great patri- 
arch, l' e man who made 
Alamance famous. 



Di. Society; Y. M. 
C. A.; Athletic Associa- 
tion; Oak Ridge Club; 
Alamance County Club; 
Vice-President of Class 
(2) ; Associate Editor 
Yackety Yack (3) ; 
Commencement Marshal 
(3); Class Statistician 
(4). 




Archibald Lee Manning Wiggins Durham 

Age 22; heghl 5 feel 8 inches 
weight 130 pounds 

"He has a head to contrive, a tongue to persuade, 
and a hand to execute" 

"A. L. M." is the man who made work 
famous. He is everywhere, all the time, doing 
everything. A freak? No! A genius? No! 
Name him for yourself. Anybody who can be 
Editor-in-chief of the Yackety Yack ; run the 
print shop and dramatic club; take law; inci- 
dentally graduate; and be about the best egg on 
the campus, is more than 
a freak or a gen us. 
Brimful of business, and 
bubbling with content- 
ment, he is the limelight 
itself. 



Di. Society; Y. M. 
C. A. Cabinet (3, 4); 
Treasurer Y. M. C. A. 
(4) ; Athletic Council 
(4); Manager Univer- 
sity Press (2, 3, 4); 
Editor-in-chief Yackety 
Yack (4); Class Rep- 
resentative (4) ; Presi- 
dent Dramatic Club (4) ; 
Amphoterothen ; Golden 
Fleece ; 2 T. 



S£ VENTY 




Isham Rowland Williams 

Age 22; height 5 fe 

weight 145 pc 

"Truly (/lis world can go or 

would but think so" 

"Rody" is the bureau of 

campus doings, from the pe 

crowds up to faculty meetings 

He can put to s'lame any 

comes to predic 

friends with ev. 



•ithoul 



Fais 



if me 



they w 
" of the 



onnel of blacking 

md college politics. 

airvoyant when it 

ng election results. He makes 

ybody, no matter what kind of 



"Rody" is one of the "good 



Albert Robert Wilson, Jr Greensboro 

Age 22. height 5 feet II inches 

weight 1 30 pounds 

-Idleness h the sepulcher of a living male" 

"NevV is lo "Red" as a hollow tree is to 
a hibernating bear. He will substitute a chat 
w'th "Nat" for any pleasure this old world has 
lo offer him. He keeps his pockets full of his 
own opinions, and gives to him who asks. In 
spite of his abstinence from study, fives are not in 
his line. Flour'shes in "Chaseology," and droops 
in "Bookerture." 



Phi. Society; Y. M. 
C. A.; Vice-President 
Athletic Association; 
President H. M. S. 
Club (4); Class Base- 
ball (I. 2); Captain 
(I) and Manager (2), 



Class 


Baseball; 


All- 


Class 


Baseb 


nil 


(2); 


Capta 


n Scrub 


Be 


seball 


(3) 


Commenc 


ement 


Marsh 


al (3) 




Class 


Footb. 


II (4); 


'm. 


nager 


Class 


Football 


(3) 


Ger- 


man 


Club; 


Treasurer 


(4); 


Coop; 


Asso~iat* 


Editor 


Yackety 


Yac:< 


(3. 4) 


; 2 T ; 


K 1 






Guilford Count' 
Club; Athletic Asso 
elation. 




George Pickett Wilson Soudan, Va. 

Age 24; height 5 feel 6 inches 
weight 125 pounds 
"Employment gives health, sobriety, and morals" 
"G. O. P." rooms with the poet-philosopher 
of our class — "Mutt Axley"— which accounts for 
his philosophical turn of mind. George is a deep- 
dyed student of French. His repertoire of 
French courses is as complete as he can make it. 
He is small of stature, but dignified and self- 
possessed and — assistant professor of the library. 
George :s a quiet, steady-going fellow, the kind 
you can depend on. 



John Hilary Andrew Workma 



..Che 

iches 



yville 



Age 25; height 5 feet II 
weight 1 70 pounds 

"Thou art a fellow of good report" 

"CalaRITy" hails from Gaston County, and s 
proud of it. He distinguished himself early for 
his interest in practical economics, and has not 
lost that distinction yet. Though he may not 
appear so, he takes seriously such things as the 
world, love affairs, and pedagogy. Has an alto- 
gether good boot on "Billy" Noble, which will 
probably cause him to be a "Billygogist." 



Phi. Society; Press 
Association; Dra"ia:i- 
Club; Le Cercle Fran- 
caise; Buie's Creek 
Academy Club; Edu- 
cational Club; Assistant 
Editor Magazine (3) ; 
Associate Editor-in-chief 
Magazine (4) ; Assist- 
ant at Library (3, 4). 




Di. Society; Y. M. C. 
A.; Secretary Gaston- 
Lincoln County Club 
(4); Class Football (3, 
4); Historical Societv; 
Reading Conference; 
Archibald D. Murphy 
Educational Club; Pied- 
mont High School Club; 
Progressive Club; 
County Club Associa- 
lion; L. W. Teaching. 



s/ / EA I Y- III' 










TH CAR.OLINA-J3- YACKETY-YACK 



>emor 



Vote 



M ■TTER the smoke and cinders of a hot campa.gn, the clouds of election have 

J*—M rolled away and exposed to the world the results of the Senior vote. 

W J Of course there was electioneering, cheap cigars, and, according to 

' Horace Sisk, some Steam-Roller work. However, notwithstanding the 

manifold capacities, accomplishments, acquirements, and eccentricities of the Univers ty's 

greatest class, the distinguishing character'stics have made possible a selection satisfactory 

to all candidates. 

To begn with, the most popular member of the most popular 
class is, of course, Walter Stokes, Jr. Not content with this, however, 
he played the Woodrow Wilson act with the position as the biggest ladies' 
man, although closely pursued by M ke Ramsaur. 

The class united in pliant* the well-deserved wreath of laurels 
on the brow of our best athlete. Bill Tillett. As to the question of good 
clothes, the tailors' art has reached perfection in the attire of Speight 
Hunter. Quite a wrangle ensued over the favor of Venus. Scarbor- 
ough tried to cap the position with two votes, Paul Bryan put in a claim, 
Euless traded a year's subscr ption to the Tar Heel for one vote, while 
Lee Wiggins evidently voted for himself. Hamilton came dangerously 
near settling the question, but Mike Ramsaur — golden-haired, tender- 
eyed, lovable Mike — was awarded the Golden Apple. Nick Post 
defeated the enemy at her own game, and exulted even oxer Miss Watson 
Kasey in being the most ladylike. 

From unmistakable evidence, it seems that Jim Carter defeats fourteen other can- 
didates for biggest bluffer. 1 here are only three good business men in 
the class. Wiggins led; Euless put up a strong fight; Bennett made a 
bad third, with one vote. All-round men are numerous, but Doug 
Rights used some of the greatest politician's (Lee Wiggins') cigars 
successfully for this position. Patrons of John D.'s midnight fluid range 
from Fred Morrison down to Ahoskie Parker, odds decidedly in favor 
of the former. Edgar Story's saintly express ; on gave him victory over 
even the president of the Y. M. C. A. as the most religious. John 
Workman didn't have any trouble; only John Labberton made any 
creditable show against him for tightest wad. The ready pen of 
George Carrington marks him as our best writer. The emblem of 
',r«A dignity presents itself in Joe Caldwell. Banks Mebane controls a 
strange comb-nation, truly a triumvirate — best orator, laziest man, and 
biggest rounder. Scarborough made another unsuccessful attempt at 
the grindstone; Morrison likewise — for J. L. Phillips outgrinds all 





SEVENTY- Til REK 









\±EJ£ 









A -13- YACKETY-YACK 



grinds. No, John Busby didn't get best orator's place, but he sho' did corner on the 
debating question. After unsuccessful attempts for a position. Bob Strange got just what 
he deserved, position as best egg. Hot air is abundant, but two members of the Busy B. 
Club, Busby and Basmght, came first and second respectively as gas bags of greatest 
magnitude. There was no question about the hottest sport; that was settled the first 
day Stein H. Basnight struck Chapel Hill. Some anxiety was occasioned about the 
hookworm question ; Fred Morrison was mentioned, but Brush Wilson is proclaimed the 
biggest loafer. But hush! Behold the Ananias Club! 
Enters Huffman, closely followed by Busby, leading Pa 
Bennett. The Prevarication Chorus, Bivens, McKay, Hamil- 
ton, Marks, Wilson, Phillips, G. B., and Jim Carter, sing 
cheerily. Loud noise from rear ; enters our hero, Horace Sisk. 
All rush from stage, leaving Horace playing a lyre, and sing- 
ing "I Did It With My Little Hatchet." 

Biggest Punster: Huffman, 35; Rights, 24; Work- 
man, 1 . 

The most popular member of the faculty is Professor 
Graham. Professor Williams is second favorite. 

It is really surprising to learn what 1913 eats for 
breakfast. Here is the menu of favorites: Puffed rice, beef 
gravy, fried chicken, cakes, hen fruit, oak leaves, steak, any- 
thing but steak, dill pickles, don't like breakfast at all, first thing ready, 
grape fruit, pickled prunes, grits, ham, fried cabbage (Bob Strange), 
actually includes E. K. Graham. 

With its high reputation, the class accordingly is 
temperate. The prohibition vote numbers eighteen. The soft 
goods variety includes the popular chocolate shake, hard cider, 
coco-cola, tea, grape juice, coffee, and buttermilk. But shades 
of Carrie Nation! Hold your breath while the official vote 
records these favorites: peach brandy, vodka, Scotch highball, 
"\ mountain dew, rye whiskey on rising in the morning, milk punch, 
Budweiser, "mixed," Upper Ten, Jefferson Club, champagne, 
while someone modestly scribbled "not for publication." 

Notwithstanding the past season of smokers, nineteen 
members are not smokers, while the votes elicited from the 
co-educational department the declaration that they are perfect 
adies. For those afflicted or gifted with the habit. Prince 
Albert stands the favorite, followed by a multitude of con- 
temporaries. Bull Durham, Royal Robe, Cinco, Retino, EI 
Pnstno, Piedmonts, El Toro, Nurica, Cheroots, a "44" 




Gooch's special, 
id one paper 




SEVENTY-FOUR 



UNIVER 




R.OLINA- 



cigar. La Preferencia, corncob pipe, any good cigar, Philip Morris's cigarettes, rabbit 

tobacco, black smoke, and train smoke are ment oned as favorite smokes. 

In the field of literature, numerous authors were mentioned as favorites. Robert 

Burns and O. Henry are the accepted leaders, while the various tastes demand this wide 

variety of favorites: Guy de Maupassant, Bud Fisher, Carlyle, Carlisle, Scott, 

Steinmetz, A. Conan Doyle, Stevenson, Shakespeare, Wordsworth, John Fox, Jr., Poe, 

Dickens, Hugo, Kipling, Major Cain, George Barr McCutcheon, Hines and Noble, 

Tennyson, Emerson, Board of YACKETY Yack Editors, Harold Bell Wright, Cooper, 

Irving, Gouverneur Morns, Browning, Rostand, and Sam Bivins. 
Books likewise include a wide range. Although this 

is a college community, seven members express a preference for 

the Bible. Of the variety of literature included, these samples 

bear witness: Cyrano de Bergerac, Vanity Fair, bank book, 

Ivanhoe, Sartor Resartus, 'Simmons and Taters (Bivins), 

Kipling's Jungle Book, the Dictionary, Lucille, Freshman 

Bible, That Pup, Trail of the Lonesome Pine, U. N. C. Mag- 
azine, Les Miserables, Carhart's Physics, David Copperfield, 

and the YACKETY Yack (Miss Kasey). 

What to do next year is answered by twenty-three 

students "Instruct the youth of the land." Those who intend 

to continue studying, or a pretense of same, are thirteen in 

number. For nine members there are no plans for the future. 

The remainder of the class has such intentions as: Live, do 

the Colonel for another year, office work, civil engineering, 

geologize, capitalize, insurance bus ; ness, what father says do, be a good boy, whatever 

is foreordained, work or teach, and work or starve. 

After careful cons'deration, five men have come to the conclusion that the biggest 
thing they have done in college is "nothing." The answer came from 
four more "loafed." Then comes a joyful mention of battles won and 
courses passed. Math I, Physics I, Latin 2, English 14, and Math 2, 
come in for full applause. 

Other great things done were: Learn a few men, broaden my 
view, gained twenty pounds, tell one successful joke, <I> B K, pass public 
speaking 1 , stay sober, giant's swmg, room in Old East, mix my activities, 
earn a living, and make Senior Football team. One member states that 
the biggest thing he has done is Fatty Bagwell. 

In spite of the beauty and attractiveness displayed by the class, 
the majority have never reached that station next to matrimony. Twenty- 
two admit that they have been engaged, some as many as three or four 
times. For some reason, quite a number refuse to answer. 





SEVENTY- FIVE 









TH CAROLINA-/3- YACKETY-YACK 



The range of income five years from now rises thus: nothing, two cents per day, 
$3.43 exactly, $5.00 per, $1000, not less than $3000, less than I hope, $5000, 
$10,000 conservative estimate (C. B. Carter). 

The lowest price paid for a college education was $600. Moreover, thirteen 
members got through on less than a thousand dollars. The majority, however, ranged 
between $1000 and $2000. The h'ghest was $3,500. 

The Sunday night's occupation was generally conceded to be attending church 
and writing letters. In response, however, more answers read: various and sundry things, 
study. A suffragist vote states suggestively, "Go to church first." Some few members, 
however, admit that they sleep on Sunday night. 

The favorite walks include the principal points of interest and beauty, and some 
more. The wide extent of perarrbulat'ons include Battle's Park, to the postoffice, any 
old place, Cameron Avenue, Faculty Row, King's Mill, Coker's Tower, Piney Prospect, 
Venable, haven't one. Chemistry Hall, Purefoy's Mill, and any old place. To the 
boarding-house is the most popular. 

Regarding matrimonial expectations, nearly everyone is optimistic. Euless says 
not later than 1915; Paul Bryan, June 30, 1913; Perrett, at the first opportunity. 
Others say: When a girl with a million comes along and agrees to face privation, hard- 
ship, toil, and starvation with me; she has not decided; at night; pretty durned soon; 
first chance (co-ed) ; on my fiance's birthday (also a co-ed) ; and when I cease to be 
single. Nine cold-hearted monsters croak with the Raven "Nevermore." 

Under normal conditions, the class does most of its sleeping between 1 1.30 p. m. 
and 8.00 a. m. 

Harvard is the second favorite school. A. & M. takes next place. There are 
also mentioned Yale, Columbia, Princeton, Davidson, Wake Forest, Vanderb'lt, and 
oh girls! Elon, Meredith, G. F. C, and State Normal, not to mention Keeley Institute. 

Thus endeth the scroll. 




s/ I / WTY-SIX 



mm Slliili 




% 



Officers 

D. H. Carlton President 

Frank Drew Vice-President 

L. R. Johnston Secretary 

J. A. Holmes Treasurer 

B. D. Applewhite Historian 

W. S. Beam Poet 



SEVENTY-SEVEN 




Histonj o{ Hie Junior Class 

S*^^*'' HEY met at the seashore during the sumrrer of 1913. It was night. He was 

A <"^^ happy. The lapping of the waves, a brand new silver moon, the brine-spiced 

m W breeze, a stray wisp of her hair brushirg his bronzed cheek now and then — 

all made him happy. His heart swelled within h ; m, and he longed to tell her 

something, anyth'ng, everything. Yes; you know that feeling! Anyway, he felt very 

proud when she toyed over his shining new class pin, the one he had purchased just before 

he left the University in June. 

"Which class? " she asked, smilng up at him — w ; th a dimple. 

"1914! " he promptly answered, swelling out his chest proudly at both the query 
and the touch of her soft, dainty fingers, as they played at the pin on h s breast. He was 
thr lied into immediate speech, and gushed forth, while she listened in rapt attention — 
mirroring two little moonbeams in the soft depths of her eyes. 

"1914 — dear old 1914! " he began. "Why, to me it is the best old class there 
is, was, and ever shall be. I am going to recall through all my life its friendsh : ps, trials, 
work, and fun. Just let me tell you of the year we landed at the University as Freshmen, 
green as the very grass that grew beneath the Old Davie Poolar. We had a gay, turbu- 
lent tirre the night we elected our class officers out at the little depot, surrounded by a 
yellirg handful of upperclassmen. The Sophomores charged at us; and one time Porter, 
the Varsity fullback, charged right through us, ard came out on the further side of our 
ranks without his — er — er — trousers, if you prefer." 

"O-oh ! " she whispered, and laughed softly. 

"Then," he continued, "after we had once settled down, we began to wake up 
as a Class, ard as an 'ntegral part of the University. For the following three years we 
did rotable deeds in practically every college activity. As Sophomores, we were the 
first Cl?ss to allow the Freshmen to meet in the chapel. As a body, we have never coun- 
tenanced hazing, and in mary ways have tried to prevent this d sreputable practice. In 
scholarship, we have stood high as a whole, and have a large number of <t> B K honor men. 
We have done well in literary activities. In athlet'cs, we have established a bis? record, 
and set an example for succeeding classes — having eighteen men to make "N. C." 
sweaters in the:'r first two years at the University. We have won three Inter-Class 
Champ OTishps — in baseball, track, and football. 

"We h»d 203 men in our Freshman year; 139 men in our Sophomore year: a^d 
85 men in our Jun : or year. We are going back next year to get our dips. Some of the 
fellows won't be back — fellows that we used to greet daily on the campus. Our thoughts, 
however, will bring them back to mind just the same, in the spirit of dear friendship and 
jolly rerrin'scence. Say," he finally blurted out, "1914 is a great old Class! 

She smiled up at him, nodding her head coyly. He unfastened his shining new 
class pin, ard handed it over to her. 

Well, that is how the "affair" began. — HISTORIAN 



SEVENTY-BIGHT 



lumor 



CI 



ass 



Lonnie Lee Abernethy Charlotte 

Y. M. C. A.; North Carolina Club; Varsity 
Football (1, 2, 3); Track Team (1, 2); Treas- 
urer Oak Ridge Club (2) ; Mecklenburg County 
Club; Secretary Cla:s (2). 

Reynold Tatum Allen Kinsion 

Associate Ed tor Yackety Yack ; Athletic 
Association; Class Football (I, 2, 3); Class 
Baseball (1, 2); Tennis Association; Y. M. 
C. A.; K2. 



Troy Monroe Andrews Chapel Hill 

Lewis Angel Franklin 

Scrub Basket-ball Team; Class Baseball 
Team; Class Football Team (3); Secretary- 
Treasurer Macon County Club (3). 

Blake Deans Applewhite Wilson 

Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A.; Phi. 
Society; Wilson County Club; North Carolina 
Club; Winner of Freshman Prize in EngFsh; 
Press Assocation; Manager Class Football 
Team (1); Scrub Baseball Team (1); Track 
Squad (1, 2); Historian of Class (3); Dramatic 
Club; Associate Editor Yackety Yack (3); 
Asrociate Editor Magazine (3) ; Associate Ed'tor 
Tar Heel (3) ; Varsity Football Team (I. 2. 3) ; 
German Club; 2T; * A fi. 

Benjamin Franklin Aycock Fremoni 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Wayne County 
Club; Class Baseball (I. 2). 

George Alderman Barrier Bowman, Tex 
Tennis Association; Athletic Association; 
Y. M. C. A.; Secretary-Treasurer Webb 
School Club; Class Football Team. 

Reuben Holland Bell Swan Quarter 

Phi. Society; Athletic Association. 

Octavius Blanchard Bonner Chapel Hill 

Horner Club; Manager Class Baseball Team 
(2); Clas= Baseball Team (I. 2); Secretary- 
Treasurer Cotillion Club; German Club; Athletic 
Association ; — K A. 

Allyn Raymond Brownson ...Asheville 

Athletic Association; Tennis Association; 
Elisha Mitchell Society; Zoology Club; 

Y. M. C. A. 





SEVENTY-NINE 




III! 






Junior Class 




John Scott Cansler Charlotte 

Athletic Association; Di. Society; Mecklen- 
burg County Club; President Tennis Associa- 
tion; Ben. 

David Hill Carlton Kernersvill 

Di. Society; Press Association; Y. M. C. A. 
Dramatic Club; President Oak Ridge Club 
Secretary Student Council and Greater Council 
President of Class (3). 

Joseph Lenoir Chambers, Jr Charlotte 

Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A.; Sub. 
Football Team (I); Football Team (2); Scrub 
Baseball (1); Basketball Team (2. 3); Captain 
Basket-ball Team (3); Tennis Association; 
Tennis Team (2. 3); North Carolina Club; 
Associate Editor Tar Heel (2) ; Manag ng 
Editor (3); Vice-President of Class (2); Asso- 
ciate Editor Yackety Yack (3) ; Amphote- 
rothen ; German Club; Coop; Gimghoul ; — T; 
2 A E. 

Collier Cobb. Jr Chapel Hill 

Phi. Society; Athletic Asociation; Y. M. 
C. A.; Varsity Track Team; Secretary-Treas- 
urer North Carolina Club; Warrenton High 
School Club; Cross Country Team (3). 

Hubert Walter Collins Holly Springs 

Y. M. C. A.; Phi. Society; Wake County 
Club. 

Frank Davis Conroy Cullowhee 

Athlete Association; Elisha Mitchell Scien- 
tific Society; Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Alembic 
Club; AX 2. 

Henry Leon Cox Cullowhee 

William Frontis Credle Swan Quarter 

Athletic Association; Phi. Society; Y. M. 
C A. 

Paul Clifford Darden Fremont 

Y. M. C. A. (I, 2. 3); Ph.. Society; Class 
Baseball Team (I, 2); Assistant Manager Foot- 
ball Team; Class Football Team. 



Thomas Ashford DeVane Red Springs 

Athletic Associaton; Tennis Association; Ph. 
Robeson County Club; 
Football (1. 3); Scrub 
b Varsity (2); Sub. 



Band (1); 

C. A.; Class 

(I, 2); Sc 



Society 

Y. M. 

Foolbal 
Varsity 
Club (3); ATS. 



Football (3); Glee Club (3); German 





Junior Class 

George Frank Drew Live Oak. Fla. 

Phi. Society; Athletic Association; Y. M. 
C. A.; German Club; Secretary-Treasurer 
Florida Club (2) ; Vice-President of Junior 
Class; Associate Editor Yackety Yack 
Assistant Manager Varsity Football Team 
Pres,dent Florida Club (3); Athletic Council 
Assistant Leader of Fall German; Gimshoul 
A T o 



Macon Rush Dunnagan . ...Yadkinvil) 

D.. Society; Secretary Press Association 
Corresponding Secretary Forsyth County Club 
Tar Heel Editor (2); Class Historian (2) 
Dramatic Club; Assistant Manager Magazine. 

Wiley Benjamin Edwards Wilson 

Oak Ridge Club; \thlelic Associaton; 
Varsity Baseball; Football Squad (I. 2); North 
Carolina Club; Captain Baseball Team (3); 
$ 111. 

James Eldr:dge Dunn 

Phi. Society; Press Association; Secretary 
Johnston County Club (2); Treasurer Johnston 
County Club (3). 

Clayton Wiley Eley Menola 

Phi. Society; Tennis Association. 

John Gilmer Feezor Silver Hill 

Di. Society; Vice-President Davidson County 
Club; Press Association; Education Club; 
Secretary of Republican Club. 

Thomas Wiley Ferguson Kendal 

Di. Society; Historical Society; Y. M. C. A.; 
Oak Ridge Club; Blue Ridge County Club; 
Class Football (2. 3); Athletic Association. 



iiiii 



Arthur J. Flume Palatine Bridge. N. Y. 



John Robert Gentry Waynesville 



Charles Benjamin Green K : ttrell 

Athletic Associaton; Tennis Association; 
Y. M. C. A.; Phi. Society. 



EIGHTY-ONE 





Junior Class 

Harry Barnette Grimsley Greensboro 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Guilford Counly 
Club; Class Football f08-'09) ; Manager Class 
Football C08); Class Baseball ('11); Varsity 
Track Team ('10); German Club; 2 N. 

Meade Hart _ ...Mocksville 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Rowan County 
Club; Education Club. 

Samuel Grady Hartley Yadkin Cottage 

John Thomas Hatcher Rose Hill 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Class Football 
(2); Scrub Football; Athletic Association. 

John Albert Holmes Graham 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Alamance County 
Club; Class Football (3); Class Treasurer (3). 

James Eugene Holmes Graham 

Di. Society; Alamance County Club; Y. M. 
C. A.; Press Association; Ministerial Band. 

Ralph Wendell Holmes Graham 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Alamance County 
Club. 

George Ricks Holton Winston-Salem 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Forsyth County 
Club; Class Football (2, 3); Tennis Association. 

Clinton Kelly Hughes Asheville 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A. 

Albert Warren James Laurinburg 

Athletic Association; Warrenton High 
School Club; Education Club. 



EIGHTY- TWO 



Junior Class 



Roy Lemuel Johnston ...Haw River 

Athletic Association; Alamance County Club; 
Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Manager Class 
Track Team; Assistant Business Manager Tar 
Heel; Secretary of Class (2); Corresponding 
Secretary Alamance County Club. 

Troy Isaiah Jones Helton 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Dramatic Club; 
President of Blue Ridge Club; As:ociate Editor 
Yackety Yack. 

Daniel Lamont Knowles Mount Olive 

Ph : . Society; Tennis Association; AtMetic 
Association; Wayne County Club; Scrub Foot- 
ball (1. 2); Class Football (3). 



hrnmEB 



Robert Law Lasley Wentwort'i 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Press Association; 
Rockingham County Club. 

Oscar Leach Raeford 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Press 
Assoc ; alion; Manager Varsity Ba:eball Team; 
Ampholerothen. 



Joseph Ira Lee Four Oaks 

Phi. Society; Johnston County Club; Pro- 
gress^ Club. 

James Crover Lee Roxboro 

Freih-Soph. Debate; Phi. Society; Y. M. 
C A.; Press Association; H slorical Association. 

Henry Cyrus Lonc, Jr Charlotte 

Di. Society; Mecklenburg County Club; 
Y. M. C. A.; Tennis Association; Cla:s Fool- 
ball (I); Class Baseball (I); Scrub Football 
(2, 3); Vars.ly Basket-ball (I); North Carolina 
Club; Assistant Manager Baseball (3); Asso- 
ciate Editor Yackety Yack; German Club; 
K A. 

Albert Anderson Long Farmington 

Class Baseball (1.2); Class Track Team (2)j 
Tennis Association. 

William Campbell Lord Wilmington 

Scrub Baseball Team (3); Class Football 
Team (I, 2, 3); Class Baseball (I, 2); German 
Club; YACKETY Yack Board; New Hanover 
County Club; Phi. Society; Athletic Associa- 
tion; — N. 



EIGHTY- THREE 



Junior Class 

John William McIntosh Denver 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Associa- 
tion; Tennis Associaion; Ass-stant Manager 
Tar Heel (3); Vice-President Gaston-Lincoln 
Club; Press Association. 

William Peter McKay Red Springs 

Malcolm Norval Oates Charlotte 

Athletic AssociaLon; Tennis Association; 
Y. M. C. A.; Di. Society; Mecklenburg County 
Club; Class Football (3); Associate Editor 
Yackety Yack; Varsity Tennis Team (2 3); 
North Ca.olina Club; German Club; Scrub 
Football (I); B6 II. 

Frank Redding Owen Yadkin College 

Di. Society; Davidson County Club. 

Walter Ray Parker Goldsboro 

Phi. Society; Wayne County Club; Dramatic 
Club; Press Association. 

Elbert S.dney Peel Williamston 

Henry Austen Pendercraph. Durham 

Edwin Jerry Perry Wilson 

William Franklin Pitt Macclesfield 

Phi. Society; Athletic Association; Class 
Baseball (2); Class Football (2, 3); Warren- 
ton High School Club. 

Madison Hampton Pratt Madison 

Horner School Club; Rockingham County 
Club; Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A.; Di. 
Society. 






EIGHTY-FOUR 





Junior Class 



Joseph Robert Prevatt Lumberion 

Class Baseball (2); Class Football (3); 
Y. M. C. A.; Phi. Society; Robeson County 
Club; Athletic Association. 



William Nelson Pritchard. Jr Chapel Hill 



James Turner Pritchett Lenoir 

Y. M. C. A.; Di. Society; Athletic Assoc'a- 
tion; Glee Club (3); Class Football (2); Scrub 
Football (3) ; Wnner of Freshman Debater's 
Pfize; Secretary of Intercollegiate Debating 
Club. 

Jesse Forbes Puch Old Trap 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Dramal c Club; 
Tennis Association. 

Lucius Henry Ransom ...Huntersville 

D.. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Afso- 
cahon; Scrub Basket-ball (I. 2); President 
Mecklenburg County Club; Class Baseball 
(2, 3); Class Football (I. 2); Football Squad; 
Track Team (2. 3); Assistant Manager Basket- 
ball Team; Press Association; Dramat c Club. 



Me 



Robinson Atlanta 



Kenneth Claiborne Royall Goldsboro 

Phi. Society; Athletic Assoc'ation; German 
Club; Tennis Association; Wayne County 
Club; Class Football (2); Class Tennis (3); 
Soph-Junior Debate (3) ; YacKETY Yack 
Board (3); AK E. 



Luther Vernon Scott Silvan 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Historical Society; 
Education Club. 

Royal Crady Shoaf Lexington 

Di. Society; Davidson County Club; Y. M. 
C. A.; Press Association. 



Harold Thomas Sloan Franklin 

Di. Society; Macon County Club. 






• 



inn 



F.IGHTY-FIVR 



Junior Class 



Q 



Benjamin Belver Sears Como 

Class Football (1); Captain Track Team (2); 
Varsily Track Team (2); North Carolina Club; 
Horner Club; 2 K A. 

Junius McRae Smith Charlotte 

Assistant Manager Glee Club; Mecklenburg 
County Club; Athletic Asso:ialion; Vars.ty 
Ba=kel-ball (1, 2); North Carolina Club; Y. M. 



C. A 

(2. 3) 
A X 2 



Cla3S Tennis (1, 2); Class Football 
Di. Society; Scrub Football Team (3); 
2 A E. 



Ralph Case Spence. Kpling 

Phi. Soc : ety; Tennis Association; Athletic 
Association; German Clb; Class Treasurer (2) 
Manager Class Football; Freshman Debater 
Track Team (1, 2); Cross Country Team (3) 
North Carolina Club; Y. M. C. A.; A K E. 

George Vaughan Strong Raleigh 

Phi. Society; Athletx Association; German 
Club; Gym. Team (I, 2); Varsity Track Team 
(1, 2); North Carolina Club; Yackety Yack 
Board (2. 3); Class Football Team (3); 
Assislant Leader Fall German; Gorgon's Head; 
* A 6. 

James Arthur Struthers Grists 



il'.i 



Lewis Holmes Swindell, Jr Swan Quarter 

Carl Duffy Taylor Newbern 

Class Football (1, 2); Varsity Gym. Team 
(1, 2. 3); Assistant Instructor in Gym. (3); 
North Carolina Club; Assistant Manager Varsity 
Baseball Team (3); Electrical Engineering So- 
ciety; German Club; Athletic Association; 2 N. 

William Bartel Townsend Red Springs 

Athletic Association; Phi. Society; German 
Club; Robeson County Club; Y. M. C. A.; 
K 2. 

William Clarke Thompson Lewiston 

Warrenton High School Club; Athlete Asso- 
ciation; Coop; K A. 



Willjam Reid Thompson Teer 

Y. M. C. A.; Di. Society, Press Association. 



j-:n;f/rv-six 



lumor 



CI 



ass 



John Alfred Walker Germantown 

Athletic Association; Di. Society; Tennis 
Association; Y. M. C. A.; Treasurer Forsyth 
County Club. 




I 



Felix Litaker Webster...., W-lkesboro 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Oak Ridge Club; 
Blue Ridge Club; Athletic Association. 



William Pell Whitaker, Jr Durham 

Gym. Team (2. 3); Class Baseball (2); 
Gimghoul ; Assistant Manager of Track Team 
(3); Z*. 



Seymour Webster Whiting Raleigh 

Fresh-Soph. Debater (I); Soph-Junior 
Debater (2); Athletic Association; Track 
Squad; Cross-Country Team; Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet; Associate Editor Yackety Yack ; 
Debating Union. 



Henry Stuart Willis High Point 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Track Squad (2. 
3); Class Track Team (2); Guilford County 
Club; Athletic Associaton; Soph-Junior 
Debater (3). 



E1GHTY-SEVE.X 




Philip Woolcott 

C. E. Ervin 

B. L. Field 

G. B. Whitaker 
W. P. Fuller 



Off 



icers 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 
Treasurer 

Historian 



EIGHTY-NINE 


























A— 13 



History o{ Hie Sophomore Class 

IN THE Fall of 1911, two hundred and ten atoms of verdant ignorance 
collected from the various streams of life to rejuvenate and perpetuate this pool 
of knowledge. From Persia to Florida were they gathered. The first thing 
was to organize. Following the time-honored custom, meetings were held in trembling 
and stealth at the depot. There, factions, representing a negligible minority, attempted to 
rule. Candidates sprang up on all sides, secret meetings were held, petitions circulated, 
rumors winged around. But all this plotting and counter-plotting was stopped when the 
Sophomores took the unprecedented step of allowing the Freshmen to meet in peace. In 
Gerrard Hall they met in "peace," amid a shower of books, gravel, and epithets, and 
elected "Pres." Jones as leader of their college babyhood. After the confusion and 
excitement of college opening, the class members began to settle down and take their places 
in the various activities of University life. Thus they labored quietly for a year. 

When the class next gathered, it was seen that fifty-three had perished in the 
whirlpools and cross-currents of the sea of knowledge, and only one hundred and fifty- 
seven had reached Sophomoric shores. Here they organized anew, and wisely chose "P." 
Woolcott as their President. They faced this troublesome year with sentiment over- 
whelm'ngly against hazing; but Fate, as if in mockery, sent an awful calamity in the shape 
of death to sadden and chasten all. Who or what may be to blame it is hard to say. At 
all events, the class as a whole did its little best to repair what had been done. Through 
and on account of all of these experiences there has grown up a close and strong union, 
which becomes greater and greater as the various individuals of the class begm to become 
prominent in the recitation-room, on the athletic field, on the platform, and in the Y. M. 
C. A. Truly the class is proud of its record. 

— Historian 










Sof>k 



omore Ulass 



a 



Richard Blythe Abernethy Charlotte 

Y. M. C. A. (I, 2); Oak Ridge Club; Mecklenburg County Club; Sub. Varsity Football; 
Scrub Baseball; Class Secretary; Varsity Football. 

Thomas Harllee Anderson Statesville 

DeWitt Roy Austin Charlotte 

Di. Society; Young Men's Christian Association. 

Kenneth Hubert Bailey Wakefield 

Daniel Long Bell Graham 

Y. M. C. A.; Dramatic Club; Phi. Society; Alamance County Club; Secretary 
Alamance County Club. 

Luther Avon Blue Wilmington 

Claud Alfred Rosemond Enfield 

Thomas Callendine Boushall Raleigh 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; Tennis Association; German Club; 
Freshman Debater; Fresh-Soph Debater; Soph-Juniar Debater; Manager Class Tennis Team; 
President Wake County Club; Greater Council (2); Associate Editor YacKETY YacK (2); 
- N. 

Joseph Shepard Bryan Scotts Hill 

Y. M. C. A.; Phi. Society; Horner School Club; Dramatic Club; Member of Dramatis 
Personae; Press Association. 

Bacchus Bright Byrd Swiss 

Di. Society; Athletic Association. 

Austin Heaton Carr Durham 

Class Football (1); Y. M. C. A. (I); Di. Society; Manage. Freshman Baseball Team; 
Athletic Association (1. 2); Vice-President Durham County Club; German Club; Business 
Manager of Y. M. C. A. Student Directory; Z *. 

Frank Winfried Carter Maxton 



\/.\j:t) rii' 









Edgar Thomas Campbeli Jessaca 

Y. M. C. A.; Tennis Association. 

Richard Willard Cantwell Wilmmgton 

Athletic Association; Phi. Society; German Club; - N. 

Robert Floyd Coats Angier 

Edwin Fuller Conrad Winston-Salem 

Di. Society; Woodrow Wilson Club; Secretary Forsyth County Club. 

Howard Clarance Conrad Pfafftown 

Di. Society; Dramatic Club; Forsyth County Club; Y. M. C. A.; Woodrow Wilson Club 

Robert Edward Lee Cook Tarboro 

Glee Club; Brotherhood of St. Andrew; Corresponding Secretary Twin County Club; 
Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Warrenton High School Club; * A 0. 

Tom Craven Charlotte 

Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; Oak Ridge Club; Scrub Football (I); Scrub 
Baseball (I). 

John Robert Crawford Goldsboro 

Wayne County Club; Tennis Association; Warrenton High School Club; Athletic 
Association. 

Alfred Ewing Cummings Winston-Salem 

Athletic Association; Tennis Association; Oalc Ridge Club. 

John Tucker Day. Walkertown 

Official Wood-Sawer Commons Hall; Licensed Barber; Second V lc e-President Forsyth 
County Club; Di. Society; Press Association; President Republican Club. 

James Gillespie Dickson ...Raeford 

Earlie Deck Edgerton Fremont 

Gurvey Everett Edgerton Fremont 

Walter Clink Ellington Sanford 



V/A'i I ) I IIKI I 









George Willard Eutsler Greensboro 

Bascom Lee Field Greensboro 

Di. Society; Secretary Class; Scrub Football; Class Football; Y. M. C. A. 

Robert Greeson Fitzgerald. Linwood 

Adger Carter Forney Greensboro 

Tennis Association; Di. Society; Guilford County Club. 
Henry PRICE FoUST Greensboro 

Y. M. C. A.; Atblehc Association; Tenn's Association; German Club; Manager Class 
Football Team; Class Baseball; B II. 

Walter Pling Fuller Bradentown, Fla. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Florida Club; Scrub Basket-ball (1); Captain Class Base- 
ball (1); Class Football (1. 2); Winner of Fieshman Prize in English; Assistant Editor 
Tar Heel; Greater Council; — T. 

Alfred Long Gaither.., Statesville 

Thomas Ethridge Gilman Jacksonville 

Walter Leon Goldston Goldston 

Henry Lewis Graves .Carthage 

Wilson Gregory Guthrie Charlotte 

Y. M. C. A.; Tennis Association; Mecklenburg County Club; Webb School Club; 
Class Football (I, 2). 

Graham Harden Burlington 

Di. Society; Tennis Association; n K A. 

Willie Reing Harding Yadkinville 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association. 

Allen Bastic Harper Chapel Hill 

William Henry Harrell ...Williamston 

Donald Ryan Harris Arden 

Athletic Association; German Club; Dramatic Club; Football Squad; A K E. 



XIXETY-FOUR 






R.OLINA 



Aubrey Carlisle Hatch Mount Ol 



ive 



William Snelling Hicks Raleigh 

German Club. 

Thomas Fuller Hill Durham 

Brantson Beeson Holder Wilkertown 

Di. Society; Secretary of Republican Club. 

Curtis Avent Holland Greensboro 

James Boettner Hughes Black Mountain 

William Oliver Huske Cumberland 

Christian Leonard Isley Burlington 

Charles Lewis Johnston Knoxville, Tenn. 

Di. Society; Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A.; - K A. 

Abraham Ottie Kanner Sanford, Fla. 

Phi. Society; Florida Club. 

Edward Yates Keesler ..Charlotte 

David Herbert Killeffer Bradentown, Fla. 

Y. M. C. A.; Brotherhood of St. Andrew; Phi. Society; Chemical Journal Club; 
Dramatic Club; Press Association; Secretary-Treasurer Florida Club. 

Wade Kornegay Chapel Hill 

Clifton Samuel Kurfees Germantown 

Gabriel Deloro Lambert High Point 

Di. Society. 

Henry Dionysius Lambert Angier 

Phi. Society; Johnston County Club. 

James Oliver Latham Huntersville, Ala. 

Di. Society; Athletic Association; Webb School Club; Y. M. C. A.; Class Football (2). 

James Augustus Leak Wadesboro 



.X/.XFTY-FrrE 









Charles Dennis Lee Faison 

Edmund Jones Lilly, Jr Fayetteville 

Phi. Society; Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A.; Tennis Association; German Club; 
A Tfi. 

SlGMUND Bach LlNDAU Greensboro 

Sterling Albert Lipscombe Durham 

Robert Eugene Little Wadesboro 

Freshman Football Team; Scrub Football Team; German Club. 



Edward Willis Lupton... Swan Quarter 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Press Association. 

Frederick Bays McCall Charlotte 

Di. Society; - K A. 

John Marion McCants Guthriesville 

James Reginald Mallett Salisbury 

Di. Society; Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A.; Ministerial Club; Orchestra: Rowan 
County Club. 

Frederick Cain Manning Durham 

Athletic Association; Durham County Club; Class Baseball; Class Football; German 
Club; Z*. 

Owen Meredith Marshburn.. Knightsdale 

Phi. Society; Athletic Association; Dramatic Club; Wake County Club; Buies Creek Club. 

Dennis Raymond Martin Elizabeth City 

Phi. Soc : ely; Y. M. C. A.; Class Football. 

Grover Adlai Martin East Bend 

Di. Society; Winner of Freshman Debate; Tennis Association; Athletic Association. 

Harry Augustus Martin Asheville 

William Owen Baldwin Maxwell Charlotte 

George Allen Mebane Spray 

Class Football Team; Class Tennis Team; Class Baseball; Manager Class Track Team; 
Athletic Association; Tennis Association; Y. M. C. A.; Di. Society; German Club; Z *. 



NINETY-SIX 









Thomas Lenoir Michael.. Canton 

Thomas Yancey Milburn Washington, D. C. 

Charles White Millender Asheville 

David Columbus Moore Greenville 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; Tennis Association; Class Baseball 
Team; President of Pitt County Club. 

John William Moser Rural Hall 

Ophir Carmal Nance High Point 

Di. Society; Progressive Club. 

Albert Roy Newsom Marshville 

John Daffie Odom ..Rocky Mount 

William Mansfield Owen Welcome 

Di. Society; Class Football; Y. M. C. A.; Davidson County Club. 

Benjamin Care Parker Monroe 

Roscar Edward Parker Selma 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; Johnston County Club; Conference 
on Reading. 

Mercer Craynor Parrott Kinston 

Dramatic Club. 
B. F. Patv Tullahoma, Tenn. 

Di. Society; Y. Pvl. C. A.; Athlete Association; Tennis Association; Second Vice- 
President of Webb School Club; Class Football (2); German Club; AK E. 

Lewis Banks Payne Norfolk 

Jesse Shephard Pell Spartanburg, S. C. 

Emmett Judson Pope Mount Olive 

Joseph Robert Prevatt Lumberton 



.V/.\7-;7>'-.S£I7T.V 






James Valentine Price Spray 

William Nelson Pritchard, Jr Chapel Hill 

William Dossey Pruden, Jr Edenton 

Phi. Sociely; Y. M. C. A.; Alhletic Association; Secretary-T.easurer Webb High 
School Club; Class Football (2); German Club; AK E. 

William Trent Ragland Salisbury 

William Henry Rhodes Chapel Hill 

Clarence Robinson Atlantic 

Oscar Holt Ragland Oxford 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Horner School Club; Granville County Club. 

Joseph Vance Rowe Small 

Phi. Society. 

Leon MaROOT SAHAG Teheran, Persia 

Phi. Society; Yackety Yack Artist. 

Samuel Floyd Scott Haw River 

John Frank Sinclair Maxton 

Phi. Society; Robeson County Club; Oak R dge Club; Y. M. C. A. 

Charles Austin Sloan Garland 

Claiborne Thweat Smith Scotland Neck 

Athletic Association; Manager Class Football; President Halifax County Club; President 
Warrenton High School Club; Press Association; '/ 4". 

Major Thomas Smith Reidsville 

Samuel Spence Kinston 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A. 

Robert Baxter Spencer Hobucken 

Samuel Clarence Spoon Haw River 

William Raney Stanford Teer 

Matthew Augustus Stroup Cherryville 



NINE! Y-EIGH1 



•— Ti i—Hiiir 



John Benton Stacy Ruffin 

Di. Society; Tennis Association; Freshman Baseball Team. 

William Raymond Taylor Louisburg 

Franklin County Club; Ph\ Society; Dramatic Club. 

Frank LaFayette Thigpen Tarboro 

Athletic Association; Tennis Association; VX arrenton High School; Twin County Club. 

William Wayt Thomason Charlotte 

James Alfred Thompson Haw River 

William Lewis Thorp Rocky Mount 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; Tennis Association; Wairenton High 
School Club; Geiman Club; A K E. 

Edward Lloyd Tilley Bahama 

Athletic Association; Durham County Club; Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A. 

Jesse Eli Turlington Benson 

Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; Phi. Society. 

Bertram Edward Twine Edenton 

Phi. Society; Tennis Association; Y. M. C. A. 

William Copehart Walke Avoca 

Athletic Association; Tennis Association; Soph. Tennis Team; German Club; K A. 

Basil Manly Walton Morganton 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Ministerial Band; Brotherhood of St. Andrew; Horner 
Club; Blue Ridge Club. 

William Farel Warlick Reepsville 

Gaston-Lincoln County Club; Di. Society; Director of Brass Band; Orchestra. 

Albert Thomas Weatherly Gorman 

Phi. Society. 

Clifton Forrest West Dover 

George Bottom Whitaker Winston-Salem 

Thomas Bascom Whitaker Oak Ridge 



NINL I Y-NINE 







Zack Lomca Whitaker Oak Ridge 

Paul Linwood White Scotland Neck 

Phi. Society; Halifax Counly Club. 

James Vivan Whitfield Wallace 

Phi. Society; Dramatic Club; Athletic Association; Tennis Associates; Homer Club. 

John Allen Wilkins Draughan 

Warren Rand Williams Sanford 

Philip Woollcott. Raleigh 

Phi. Society; Athletic Association; Class Track Team (I); Manager Class Track 

Team (I); Varsity T.ack (I. 2); Class Football (I. 2); Member North Carolina Club; 

President of Class (2); Tar Heel Board (2); Student Council (2); Vice-President Wake 
County Club; Y. M. C. A.; iKE. 

Richard Becton Yelverton Fremont 

Roy Lee Yelverton Fremont 




ONE HUNDRED 




off 



..icers 

B. P. Beard President 

J. L. Huske Vice-President 

C. W. BECKWITH Secretary and Treasurer 



ONE HUNDRED ONE 









History of Hie Freshman Class 

,^«^fev' HE career of a Sophomore Class is usually shaped by circumslances; the character of a 
M ^^k Junior Class is often determined by its peculiar environments; and the destiny of a Senior 
^^^^^ Class may be molded by the hand of one strong man. 

But the life of a Freshman Class — oh my muse, what a theme! All other classes 
a,e open to the effects of a thousand and varied influences; so that in the writing of the history of any 
one of them much is to be said that has never been said before. But the history of one Freshman Class 
is (he sad history of every other. They all conform to one miserable little pattern. Years may come 
and years may go; but. alas! Freshmen are Freshmen forever. In them there is no change, no chance 
of change. 

What, then, can be our history, that I should care to write it, or you to read it? And yet, 
because I must, here goes. 

We came timidly straggling up to the Hill on or about September the ninth, of the year past. 
From North, South, East, and West we came, in groups of two and three, or singly. Having arrived, 
we devoted the first few days to silent suffering, as it was only right and proper that we should. For 
the exclusive right to be utterly miserable is the only privilege to which we Freshmen have a clear title; 
and that is our birthright, as it were. 

And in those first days we were scared, every one of us; scared down to the very marrow in 
oui bones; and now we are honest enough to make this humiliating confession to the public because we 
know — well, we know that the public already knows that of course we were. 

So then, after a due period of time had been given over to indulgence in homesickness and 
general misery along all l.nes, a meeting of the Class of 1916 was called (or rather whispered), for 
the purpose of pulling the class spirit out from under the bed, so that it might be induced to stand up 
and take a look around. This first meeting accomplished its end, and at a later convention the class 
officers were elected. It is a matter of little or no concern on whom these misfortunes fell. Every 
worthy cause must have its martyrs, and a Freshman class mus-t have its officers. 

At this meeting, too, a mot. on was laid before the house that the class levy an assessment to 
the amount of one quarter per capita, the proceeds to cover current expenses. This proposal met with 
more or less opposition at the time, but was finally carried through by the progressive wing of the class. 
It is rumored that the president and the treasurer have been able to collect between themselves fully two 
dollars and thirty-three cents already. 

And, so, for lack of funds, this writing must come to an untimely close. I leave you to infer 
that volumes have been left unsa d. 

— Historian 



UXF HLWDh-ED TWO 



"**>:*■•" 






Freshman Class 

Herbert Edwin Allen Asheyille 

Andrew Vance Anderson Eagle Rock 

Benjamin Franklin Auld Baltimore, Md. 

Herbert Victor Bailey Neuse 

Lawrence Corbin Barber Buncombe 

Rudolph Barnes Clayton 

Brvce Parker Beard Salisbury 

Clifton Warren Beckwith. Raleigh 

Eric Franklin Bell Dunn 

ORVAL BYRD Murphy 

Hoke Barrvmore Black Greenville 

William Wentmore Black.. Cherryville 

James Cornaro Blaine Franklin 

Lacy William Black Ramsaur 

Tully Daniel Blair Greensboro 

Hubert Morse Blalock Raleigh 

Sheppard Allen Booth Oxford 

Francis Churchill Bourne Asheville 

Zebulon Vance Bradford Huntersville 

Francis Foster Bradshaw Hillsboro 

George Grady Brinson Reelsboro 

Robert Plato Brooks Woodsdale 

Marcellus Buchanan Sylva 

Joseph Nicholas Bynum ...Farmville 

Claude Carl Canady Benson 

William Jonothan Capehart Roxobel 

Edward Francis Capps Lucama 

Whitfield Chapman Carmichael Asheville 

John Wesley Carter Maxton 

Allen Thurman Castelloe Aulander 

Fred Oscar Christopher Murphy 

Ralph Vivian Clark Clarkton 

Francis Osborne Clarkson Charlotte 

Louis Heyl Clement, Jr Salisbury 

William Barden Cobb ..... Goldsboro 

Charles Lee Coggin Salisbury 

JOHN HAYNES COLLETT Sal sbury 

Howard Johnson Combs Columbia 

HERMAN CONE Greensboro 

David Homer Conrad Lexington 



ONE HUNDRED Fi <l R 









Frank Hayes Couper Washington 

George Long Cooper Graham 

James Allison Cooper Henderson 

James Gerald Cowan Asheville 

James Mormanduke Cox Norfolk, Va. 

George Winston Craig Asheville 

Rush Floyd Crouse Nile 

Edward Holt Currie Raeford 

James Elmer Crutcher. - Whitakers 

William Bennett Dalton — Madison 

Bryan Grimes Dancey. Baltimore, Md. 

Douglas Beaman Darden .' Fremont 

Robert Vernon Davis Fremont 

Fred Hyams Deaton Statesville 

Charles Nelson Dobbins. Yadkinville 

Julius G. Deas .....Grantsboro 

MYNOR CECIL DONNELL Greensboro 

Herbert Jackson Drew Live Oak. Fla. 

Wade Stafford Dunbar Oak Ridge 

Early Edward Walters Duncan Woodsdale 

George Soloman Duncan Holly, Tenn. 

Thurston Forney Duval Whiteville 

John Overton Dysart Lenoir 

Henry Lee Edwards Holly Springs 

Aubrey McCoy Elliott Charlotte 

Floyd Howard Elson Hendersonv lie 

Charles Eugene English Asheville 

Preston Herschell Epps Durham 

Stephen Edward Eure Taylor 

William Robert Everett Palmyra 

Archie Blair Fairley Monroe 

Leslie James Farmer Wilson 

Amos Greyson Fearington Edenton 

Clyde Lathrop Fore. Charlotte 

Manly -Fulcher Atlantic 

Jacob Fulton, Jr Walnut Cove 

John White Ganily Hope Mills 

Paris Cleveland Gardiner Shelby 

John Melvin Glenn Marion 

Winston Cleveland Garrett Jul an 

Osborne Leroy Goforth Mooresville 

James Frank Hackler Sparta 

Harvey Hamilton Atlantic 



d.v/i' trr.xnRED mi 



""^r%*l 



RTH CA ROLINA-JJ- YAL 



Franklin Well Hancock Oxford 

Henry Grady Harding .....Mocksville 

Henry Herman Hardison Wadesboro 

James Archibald Hardison, Jr Wadesboro 

George Arthur Harper Chapel Hill 

William Troy Harper Chapel Hill 

Bumer Clifford Harrell Marshville 

Joseph Johnson Harris Louisburg 

James Leftwich Harrison Raleigh 

Jackson Bruce Hash Piney Creek 

Roy Washington Hayworth Asheboro 

Joe Wertz Hendrix Concord 

John Walkes Henson, Jr Leaksville 

Hugh Bryan Hester Hester 

Ernest Glenn Hogan Chapel Hill 

Edward Nicholas Holt. Greensboro 

John Ranson Holt Princeton 

Walter Lawrence Holt, Jr. Fayetteville 

Roy McRae Homerwood Burlington 

James Clarance Hooks Fremont 

William John Hoover Bell Buckle, Tenn. 

Albert Graham Horton Wakefield 

Robert Burton House Thelma 

Hinton Gardener Hudson Smithfield 

John Melville Huff ..Henderson 

Edward Outlaw Hunt Oxford 

David Wells Hunter Greensboro 

William Lewis Hunter Fayetteville 

Wade Russell Hunter Alexander 

John Harris Hurdle. Reidsville 

John Manning Huske Fayetteville 

Joseph Strange Huske Fayetteville 

John Frank Jarreli Chapel Hill 

Herman Jernigan Benson 

Herschel Vespasian Johnson Charlotte 

Julius Johnson, Jr , Yanceyville 

Frank Carlton Jones Plymouth 

John Haywood Jones Newbem 

Edward Grey Joyner Littleton 

Robert Thomas Joyner ..Rocky Mount 

William Henry Joyner Princeton 

Robert Campbell Jurney Winston-Salem 

Van Buren Jurney 01 ; n 



ONE HUNDRED SIX 






William Clarance Canoy Biscoe 

John Archelaus Kent Lenoir 

Baston McGee Lockey Lincolnton 

Charles Edward Lambeth Fayetteville 

James Horace Lassiter Rich Square 

Joseph Rose Latham Belhaven 

Isaac Laurence Lawrence Pilot Mountain 

Alvis Thaddeus Lewallen Asheboro 

McDanjel Lewis Kinston 

Robert Lee Link Salisbury 

Thomas Calvin Lynn Salisbury 

Risen Tyer Bennett Little Wadesboro 

Giles Mebane Long Charlotte 

James Franklin Love Lincolnton 

William Parrett Love Shelby 

David McPherson McArthur Red Springs 

John Dob McCurrie Marion 

Roger Atkinson McDuffie Greensboro 

Joseph Dixon McGlohon Greenville 

Joseph Boyd McLean Whitsett 

Joseph Ernest Mann New Hill 

Edward Baxter Marsh Salisbury 

Luther Grier Marsh Marshville 

Philip Bool Marshall. Winston-Salem 

Sidney Eure Matthews Winston 

George Curtis Meckel Anderson, Ind. 

Oscar Von Hochtitzky Merritt Mount Airy 

Louis B. Meyers Endfield 

Harry Miller Stony Point 

Barney Cooper Moffitt Sanford 

Julian Allison Moore Wilmington 

James Bernice Moore.. Burgaw 

James Roy Moore Lenoir 

Paul Newhill Morgan ..Burlington 

Carlyle Morris Fremont 

Marner William Morton Roxboro 

Charlie Lee Cole Murphy Salisbury 

Robert Wells Neilson Winston-Salem 

Samuel Raphael Newman Washington 

Frank Wisconsin Norris Jacksonville, Fla. 

Evan Wilkins Norwood Goldsboro 

Don Franklin Odom Mount Olive 



ONE HUNDRED SEVEN 






Robert Newton Page Biscoe 

John Merrel Parker Bradentown, Fla. 

William Baylies Parker Goldsboro 

William Edward Pell Winston-Salem 

Claude Pfaff Pfafftown 

Samuel Clarke Pike Liberty 

William Barney Pitts Charlotte 

Harney McKay Pleasants. Rowland 

Edward Farrior Powell Whiteville 

Joseph Hampton Price Monroe 

Ralph Craven Pridgen.. Tarboro 

William Isaac Proctor Raleigh 

Oscar Holt Ragland Oxford 

Isaac William Rand Smithfield 

Paul Roberts Raper Lexington 

Zeno Owen Ratcliff Pantego 

James Clyde Ray Hillsboro 

Edward Soloman Reid, Jr Charlotte 

Samuel Leslie Reid Lowell 

William Kirkpatrick Reid Gastonia 

Daniel Raynor Raleigh 

Charles John Roberts. Lyons 

Morins Emmet Robinson Goldsboro 

Walter Bryan Rouse Chapel Hill 

James Parks Rousseau Wilkesboro 

George Claiborne Royal, Jr Goldsboro 

Beverly Sanford Royster Oxford 

David Wyeth Royster Shelby 

William Cecil Rymer HendersonvJle 

FRANK SABISTON Jacksonville, Fla. 

HAWAY Grey SANDERFORD Creedmoor 

LEROY Edgar ScHIFFMAN Greensboro 

Moses Shapiro Winston-Salem 

George Graham Sharpe Burlington 

William Trantham Shaver.. Salisbury 

Harry Olim Sheely. Chapin, S. C. 

Jacob Philip Shiago Goldsboro 

Roger Shove Siddall Sumter, S. C. 

Enoch Spencer Simmons Washington 

Luther Raleigh Sims Lenoir 

Cleveland LaFayette Smith Indian Trail 

George Wallace Smith Wilmington 

William Oliver Smith Raleigh 



ONE III \PRF.D RIGHT 









Elias Carr Speight Whitakers 

John Porterfield Stedman Oxford 

Charles Leary Stevens... Indiantown 

Charles Edward Stuart Pembroke 

Eugene Silfax Sugg Chapel Hill 

David Thomas Tayloe, Jr Washington 

James Alexander Taylor Oxford 

Herman Burton Temko Greensboro 

Alonzo Thomas, Jr Beaufort 

Earle Hinson Thompson Red Springs 

Malcomb James Thornton.. Newton Grove 

Adam Tredwell Thorp Rocky Mount 

Francis Justice Timberlake Youngsville 

James Cleohpas Tifton Bumsv lie 

Richard Hugh Towns Murphy 

Roy Aaron Traywick Marshville 

Henry Clay Turner Norwood 

William Bradley Umstead Bahatm 

Robert Candler Vaughan Winston-Salem 

Elbert Lambert Veazey Stems 

Charles Ernest Walker Morganton 

Leroy Byron Wall Tobaccoville 

Henry Clinton Warlick Newells 

Maurice Dunstan Watts Wilhamston 

Wiley Person Mangum Weeks Washington, D. C. 

Bascom Covington Weill Rockingham 

Robert Henry Winborne Welch Hertford 

Benjamin Fletcher Wellons . Smithfield 

Robert Andrew Wellons Smithfield 

Thomas White Oxford 

William Stronach Wilkerson Rocky Mount 

Norman Grady Williams Franklin 

William Christopher Williams Durham 

Harry Wilson Durham 

Hillary Goode Winslow ...Hertford 

Fred Philips Wood Edenton 

Julian Wood, Jr Edenton 

Joseph Ernest Wooten Snow Hill 

Robert Hazelhurst Wright Nashvlle, Tenn. 

John Lamens Wright. Wilmington 

Nathaniel Bayard Yar^orough Cary 

Robert Samuel Yarborough. Lexington 

Allen C. Zollicoffer Weldon 



ONE HUNDRED NINE 



Isaac William Rand 

Born 
September 1, 1892 

Died 
September 13, 1912 



ONE Hi SDRF.D TEN 




Co-Ed Roll 

Lelia Leavitt Barnes Norfolk, Va. 

Margaret Berry Chapel Hill 

ROSABELLE SlMONTON FaIRES Chapel Hill 

Watson Kasey Houston, Va. 

Hazel Patterson.. Burlington 

Rachel Lawrence Summers Statesville 



ONE HUNDRED ELEVEN 






'■ > ■ i yiY-.-f-— .«i -.7-a- ." g>- - i i ii ! ■ i i ir»- tfg ajaM^—M 



Graduate Department 



Name Year 
Cobb, William Battle ..1 Chapel Hill 

A. B. 1912; Botany; Geology; German; Candidate for A.M. 

Cox, Rufus Carson 1 Liberty 

Ph.B. 1903, Elon College; Education; History; English; Candidate for A.M. 

Dobbins, James Talmadge 2 Yadkinville 

A.M. 1912; Chemstry; Physics; Geology; Candidate for Ph.D. 

George, Wesley Critz.. 2 Elkir. 

A.M. 1912; Zoology; Physiology; Bacteriology; Candidate for Ph.D. 

Henry, George Kenneth Grant 5 Chapel Hill 

A.B. 1900; A.M. 1904; Hamilton College; Greek; Candidate for Ph.D. 

Jeffries, William Lewis .2 Edgefield 

B.A. 1910; M.A. 1912; Chemistry; Physics; Mineralogy; Candidate for Ph.D. 

Knight, Burke Haywood 2.. Williamston 

A.B. 1911; Chemistry; Geology; English; Candidate for A.M. 

Lasley, John Wayne, Jr 2 Burlington 

A.B. 1910; A.M. 1911; Mathematics; Candidate for Ph.D. 

McLendon, Lennox Polk 1 Wadesboro 

B.S. 1910; A. and M. of North Carolina; LL.B. 1912; English; Philosophy; Economics; 
Candidate for A.M. 

McMillan, Thomas Ellwood 1 Ben Franklin, Tex. 

A.B. 1911, East Texas Normal College; History; Economics; Education; Candidate 
for A.M. 

Miller, Herbert Craig 1 '. Newton 

A.B. 1910; Leno'r College; Education; English; Economics; Candidate for A.M. 

Rankin, William Walter • 2 Charlotte 

B.E., A. and M. of North Carolina; M. A.; Mathematics; Physics; Education; Can- 
didate for Ph.D. 

Stacy, Lucius Eugene, Jr. 1 Shelby 

A.B. 1912; Chemistry; Physics; Economics; Candidate for A.M. 

Stanbury, Walter Adair .2 Chapel Hill 

A.B. 1908; Trinity College; Philosophy; Greek. 

Starr, Homer Worthington 2 Chapel Hill 

English; History; Economcs; Candidate for Ph.D. 

Venable, Charles Scott Chapel Hill 

A.B. 1910; A.M. 1911; Chemistry; Candidate for Ph.D. 



ONE HUNDRED TWELVl 






Special Students 



Name Year Course 

Barnes, Lelia Leavitt . 1 Special ... Creswell 

Beard, Bryce Parker 1 Special Norfolk, Va. 

BELL, Eric FRANKLIN 1 Elective Pharmacy Salisbury 

Black, William Wetmore 1 Special Cherryville 

Brittain, Basil Frank ...1 Elective Law Asheboro 

Bynum, Joseph Nicholas 1 Special Farmville 

Canady, Claude Carl 1 Elective Law. Benson 

Cantwell, Richard Willard 2 Elective Law Wilmington 

Cole, FURNIE 1 ...Elective Law Beasley 

Cole, Nathan 1 Elective Law Beasley 

Credle, Blount I Elective Law ..... Hyde 

Daniels, Charles Albin 1 Elective Law Newbern 

Davis, Oryille Thomas 1 Law Waynesville 

EDWARDS, Opie Gray 1 Elective Medicine Spring Hope 

Edwards, Wiley Benjamin 2 Special Wilson 

Faires, Mrs. RoSABELLE German Chapel Hill 

Gardner, Paris Cleveland 1 Elective Law Shelby 

Hash, Jackson Bruce 1 Teaching Piney Creek 

Jones, Leslie Edward 2 Law Swan Quarter 

Kanner, Abraham Otto 2 Elective Law Sanford, Fla. 

Lindsay, Charles Lee 1 Law Chapel Hill 

LITTLE, R. E., Jr '. 2 Special Wadesboro 

McArthur, D. McP 1. Special Red Springs 

Meeks, Marcus Henry 1 Elective Law Nashville, Tenn. 

Moore, Charles Joyce 1 Elective Law Washington 

Payne, Lewis Banks 2 Medicine Norfolk, Va. 

Rouse, Walter Bryant 1 Elective Law Chapel Hill 

Stacy, John Benton... 2.. Elective Law Ruffin 

Stroup, Matthew Augustus 2 Law. Cherryville 

Traywick, Roy Aaron. 1... . ..Elective Law Marshville 

Wall, Leroy Byron 1 Elective Law Tobaccoville 

Wellons, Ben Fletcher I ...Law Smithfield 

Winters, Sellie Robert 3 Elective Journalism.. Stem 



ONE HUNDRED I mi; 1 1 I \ 







i ' ■ - 








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-- * 








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" •'* $±p-^ ■'• : ••■ 





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kf-»- 



Officers 

E. A. THOMPSON, President Mount Holly 

Miss Grace Dry, Secretary Garner 

Miss Charlotte Young, Historian Cullowhee 

J. L. ORR, Poet Mars Hill 

I. P. Davis, Treasurer Milton 

ONf ill WAV D in 1 1 I \ 










y-YACK 




University o{ North Carolina Summer School 

^^^•"^ HE first summer school for teachers founded in connection with a University 
M *^k in the United States was opened at Chapel Hill, June, 1877. Prof. John J. 
^^^^ Ladd, Superintendent City Schools of Staunton, Va., and a graduate of Brown 
University, was in charge. The State appropriated $2,000 annually for its 
support, and out of the Peabody funds Dr. Barnas Sears gave $500 annually to help 
students who needed such aid. A bureau of education was established in connection 
with the school. It was here that Mclver, Joyner, Noble, and Alderman received then- 
training for their future service to public education. 

In 1 880, Professor Ladd was succeeded by Judge Henry E. Sheperd, Super- 
intendent of Baltimore City Schools. The average attendance at that time was from 
two to four hundred. In 1884, the funds were divided, and schools located at Asheville, 
Newton, and Elizabeth City, which continued a few summers longer. Another summer 
school was opened while Dr. Winston was president of the Univers'ty, with Prof. M. C. S. 
Noble in charge. Its object was to prepare students to enter the University. It con- 
tinued but a few years. 



' \ /■. HUNDRED S/XTE£ \ 




UNIVER 







The University of North Carolina Summer School for Teachers, under the 
present regime, was opened in 1 908 by Prof. N. W. Walker, Professor of High School 
Education in the University. The session of 1912 was very successful, showing a growth 
in the five years from 53 to 463. Besides the twenty-six counties of North Carolina 
sending students, the following States, South Carolina, Virginia, Mississippi, and Florida, 
were represented. There were twenty-seven instructors, and twenty special lecturers, 
instruction being given in fifty-four courses. 

Besides the serious work in the class, there are other things which make this 
session memorable. There was that day when the fire department was called out to 
save the power-house. And there was the ovation given Mr. Vermont on the morning 
following the success of his play, Esther Wake. And who can forget the day of the 
election of officers, when Meredith's daughters turned suffragette, and marched en masse 
to Gerrard Hall, ostensibly to capture the offices — horse, foot, and dragoon? But it 
turned out to be a joke. And there was the sixteenth of June, with its bonfires and mass 
meetings, and "Rah! Rah! Rah! " for Dr. Howe, when the news was flashed that Wilson 
had been nominated. All this is now but a memory; yet those days on the pleasant 
campus and within those hallowed walls will live in responsive hearts forever. 

— Historian 



' \ / III MIR l ■:// SE I h.XThli.X 



f.TTTT- \' 

SACKETY-YACK 



Summer School 

FACULTY AND OFFICERS 

Francis Preston Venable, Ph. D., D. Sc, LL.D President 

Nathan Wilson Walker, A. B Director 

Oscar Leach Secretary 

Mrs. Clifton L. Whitaker Matron Can Building 

Mrs. J. T. YEARGAN Matron Mary Ann Smith Building 

INSTRUCTORS 

George Howe, Ph.D. Nathan Wilson Walker, A.B. 

Joseph Gregoire deRoulhac Hamilton, Ph.D. 

Andrew Henry Patterson, A.M. Marvin Hendrix Stacy, A.M. 

Adolphe Vermont, A.M. Louis Round Wilson, Ph.D. 

Miss Mary Goodwin Griggs Thomas Perrin Harrison, Ph.D. 

Harry Woodburn Chase, Ph.D. Thomas James Wilson, Jr., Ph.D. 

Miss Mary Owen Graham George McFarland McKie, A.M. 

George Thaddeus Whitley, A.M. Collier Cobb, A.M. 

James Finch Royster, Ph.D. Henry McGilbert Wagstaff, Ph.D. 

Henry Patrick Harding, A.B. James Muncie Bell, Ph.D. 

Edwin R. Jackson, B.S. Vivian LeRoy Chrisler, A.M. 

Mrs. Lenore A. Eldred Karl Jansen 

Miss May Alexander J. H. Woodruff 

Elizabeth Burtt Hagedorn Gustav Hagedorn 

SPECIAL LECTURERS 

Robert Diggs Wimberly Connor Charles DeGarmo, Ph.D. 
Lautrec Cranmer Brogden Dr. Watson S. Rankin 

Joseph Addison Bivins Miss Winnie W. Leatherman 

Edwin R. Jackson 

PUBLIC LECTURERS 

Dr. F. P. Venable Dr. P. P. Claxton 

Dr. J. Y. Joyner Dr. Kemp P. Battle 

Dr. J. I. Foust Hon. Josephus Daniels 

Dr. Edwin Mims Mr. Edward Kidder Graham 

Mr. A. H. Patterson Mr. Collier Cobb 

Mr. Edwin R. Jackson Mr. Karl Jansen 

Prof. Harold Barnes Mr. M. C. S. Noble 

Dr. Joseph Hyde Pratt Dr. Charles DeGarmo 
Dr. William Perry Reaves 



O.XE HUNDRED EIGHTH EX 



University of North Carolina 
Students, 191! 



iwmmcr 



Sen 



001 



Abernethy, Francis 
Abernethy, Lucy 
Aiken, Hattie 
Alexander, Hattie 
Alexander. May 
Alspaugh, Stella 
Anderson, Dora A. 
Arthur, Lucile E. 
Ashburn, Hattie F. 
Atkinson, Katie E. 
Avent, Fannie 
Aycock, Wm. B. 
Baccett, Sara 
Baker, Lelia M. 
Banks, Etta Ruth 
Barker, Floy 
Barkley, Sallie 
Barnhardt, Maggie 
Barnhill, Sallie C. 
Barrett, Mabel 
Bassett, Claude 
Battle, Sallie H. 
Baucham, Maggie Sue 
Beam. Mike S. 
Beam, Wm. Speight 
Benson, Stella 
Best, Mary J. 
Bidwell, Beulah 
Birdsonc, Heber 
Bivens, C. L. 
Bivens, S. R. 
Black. Mrs. T. B. 
Blake, Irene 
Blalock, Blanche 
Blalock. H. M. 
Blanchard, L. E. 
Bobbitt, Bettie 
Bobbitt, M. T. 
Bobbitt, R. W. 
Bolick. Mary 
Bost, Mabel 
Bourne. M.*ry P. 
Bowen, Margaret 
Prewer. H. L. 
Bridges. I. B. 
Brght, Carrie H. 
Broadfoot. Kate H. 
Brown, Mary Ethel 



Brown, Mary K. 
Bruton, Winnie D. 
Bryan, D. B. 
Bryan. Mrs. D. B. 
Bryan, Mary S. 
Buchan. Ethel L. 
Buchanan, Anna Met 
Buck, G. C. 
Bulla. Lillie E. 
Bulwinkle, Muriel 
Bethea, Curtis 
Burgess, Blanche 
Burcess. C. K. 
Burcess, Cletus 
Burkett, Sallie O. 
Burnette. Mary 
Burns. Ada May 
Burt, Mabel 
Byrd, T. Ethel 
Campbell. A. C. 
Campbell. L. H. 
Canaday. Emily J. 
Carlton. Emma G. 
Carter, D. V. 
Carter, T. C. 
Chandler. Bessie B. 
Chandler. Emma 
Clark. Nell B 
Clayton, Janie H. 
Clayton, R. H. 
Ciinard. W. B. 
Coats, Bessie D. 
Cobb. Fllen D. 
Cobb. Mallie P. 
Cobb. Margaret E. 
Cobb, W. B. 
Coke, Louise D. 
Collier, Mayme 
Cooke, Annie R. 
Cooke. Mary M. 
Cooper. W. L.. Ir 
Coulter. Victor 
Covington. Mary 
Cox, Olivia 
Cox, Pearle 
Craver, H. O. 
Creole, B. A. 
Cridlebaugh, W. L. 



Crudup. Lillian 
Crumpler, Martha L. 
Dalrymple. Janie 
Dameron, Temple H. 
Daniel. Mary L. 
Darden. Martha E. 
Davis. I. P. 
Davis, L. C. 
Davis. Lucy E. 
Day, Jerry 
Dees. W. A. 
DeLoatch. W. S. 
Dimmette, Walter 
Dixon, Alice L. 
Doccett, Eva 
Donnell, Mrs. G. E. 
Dowd, J. E. 
Dowd, Mrs. J. E. 
Duncan, Joseph L. 
Dunford. Mary N. 
Dunford. Ruth 
Dry, Grace D. 
Edcerton, Annie May 
Edwards. Dolly 
Edwards, J. F. 
Edwards. Mamie C. 
Eldridce, Bertha E. 
Ellis, Ruby C. 
Evans, Eunice L. 
Evans, Rebecca W. 
Evans, Will'etta 
Farrior, John A. 
Farrior. Kenneth McK. 
Feild, A. L. 
Fenner. Kate N. 
Ferguson, Kate 
Fercuson, Mamie L. 
Finch, Era G. 
Fisher, C. O. 
Fitzgerald. Stella 
Fonville. C. C. 
Fountain, Alma 
Franklin, E. R. 
Franklin. May B. 
Franklin. Minnie L. 
Freeman. Alice 
Freeman, J. W. 
Funderburk, Ray 



ONE HIWDRED NINETEEN 















Garrard, Lorena 
Garrett, W. C. 
Gattis, Ethel 
Giles, Ola 
Gill, Leila May 
Goodwin, Minnie 
Goodwin, Pearl 
Gorham, Fannie 
Gosney, Minney S. 
Graham. Belle 
Graham, Mary 
Graham, Violet 
Grantham, Emma 
Green, Allene B. 
Green, Vercie E. 
Griffin, Lola 
Griffin, Mavis 
Grimes, Alice 
Grinnan, Isabelle R. 
Guess, W. C. 
Gulledce, Mary W. 
Hall, Bessie 
Hamrick, Euzel'a 
Hare, Frank 
Hargrave, L. L. 
Harper, Annie Lee 
Harper, W. T. 
Harris. L. Maud 
Harris, Susie S. 
Harrison, |. L. 
Harrison, Mamie 
Harrison, Neva 1. 
Harrison. T. P., Jr. 
Hassell. Edith 
Hawley, Florence 
Hawley, Louise 
Henderson, Mrs. L. D. 
Hendley. Chas. J. 
Henry, Vance 
Herman, Bertha 
Herrinc, Annie F. 
Herrinc. Clyde 
Herring. Margaret 
Herty, C. H., Jr. 
Hicks, O. V. 

HOLEMAN, HaLLIE 

Holeman, Jean 
Holloman, Mjna 
Holman, Bertha 
Holman, Mary B. 
Hooten, Evelyn 
Hooten, Maude 
Horney, Magcie E. 



Howard, Gladys 
Howell, Rosalind 
Hudson, Bertha 
Hudson, Martha A. 
Hume, Thos., Jr. 
Hummell, Magdalene 
Hunter, Ngrfleet 
Hunter. Susie F. 
Hunter. W. R. 
Huske. Eleanor 
Hutchison, C. C. 
Irwin, Mary L. 
Ives, Claude L. 
Ivey, Bessie F. 
Jarvis, Annie B. 
Jarvis, Margaret S. 
Johnson, Addie Lois 
Johnston, Annie M. 
Johnston. J. H. 
Jones, Annabel 
Jones. H. B. 
Jones, Laura M. 
Jones, Margaret C. 
Jones, Pauline 
Jordan. Sallie M. 
joyner. g. h. 
Kelley, Anna Lee 
Kennedy, Mary H. 
King, Annie 
Kiser, Lucy 

KlTTRELL, Fl.ORlE E. 

Kittrell. R. G. 
Koonce. Lucy 
Kornegay, Mrs. L. T. 
Lackey, Pearl 
Lambeth, Mary M. 
Lansdell, Nan 
Leach, Corrie 
Leach, Floy J. 
Ledbetter. Belle 
Ledbetter, J. C. 
Lee. Mamie F. 
Lee. Nancy D. 
Leighton. A. F. 
Lindsay. Annie O. 
Lindsay. Katie 
Lindsay, S. G. 
Lippard. David S. 
Llewellyn. Fi.izabeth P. 
Long, Jesse M. 
Lucas, Elizabeth 
Lunsford, Jennie 
Lynch, Rachel S. 



Lynch, Thomas 
Mallett, Fmma 
Mallett, Siddie 
Markham, Lela Bell 
Marrow. H. B. 
Mason, Allie 
Mason, Edith 
Massey. H. J. 
Massey, Iola 
Massey, Jessie E. 
Massey, Mamie 
Massey, Winona G. 
McCallum. Grace 
McCauley, Mrs. Carr e 
McColman, Sallie 
McCullers, Alice 
McEachern, Gladys 
McEachin, Karleton 
McGoogan, Mary S. 
McIntosh, Fannie 
McIntyre, Cara 
McIntyre, Lutie 
McKeown, H. H. 
McKeown. Laura J. 
McLean, Marion 
McLeod. Isabelle 
McLeod, W. G. 
MacNeill, Archie 
McNeill, Sallie W. 
McNeill. R. S. 
McWhorter Jaynie 
Merritt. R. P. 
Miller, Mary S. 
Mitchell, Mata 
Mizelle, Margaret 
Moffatt, J. S., Jr. 
Moore, Agnes 
Moore, Alice 
Moore. Fannie B. 
Moore. Laura E. B. 
Moore. Lucille R. 
Mocre, Rosa L. 
Moore. W. E. 
Moore, W. P. 
Morgan, H. G. 
Moose. Lena E. 
Morr's, Bessie 
Morrow, Byrd 
Morrow, Effie 
Morton, Bertha 
Morton. M. Embra 
Moser. J. W. 
Moss, Mattie 



ONE HUNDRED TWENTY 






UNI 



■■. : lin. 






Moss, Z. V. 
Mullen, Flaud Lee 
Nash, Bettie L. 
Nash, Mary Armond 
Nelson, C. E. 
Norwood, Annie 
Olive, Loula B. 
Olive, L. B. 
Oliver, Lannie 
Ormond, Mabel Bessie 
Orr, J. L. 
Orr. O. H. 
Outlaw, Mvra 
Outlaw, Ruth 
Owen, Henrietta 
Owens, Annie J. 
Page, Florence N. 
Page, Minnie 
Paris, Addie 
Paris, Nemmie G. 
Par.sh, Katie 
Parker, Grace R. 
Parker, Josie C. 
Parker, Pearl 
Parker, S. I. 
Pasmore, [ulia 
Paul, J. D. 
Payne. Annie B. 
Pearson, L. W. 
Penland, F. A. 
Penny, Celestia L. 
Perry, Fronie 
Perry, Mattie 
Phillips, Ardell 
Pike, Dorothy E. 
Prevost, R. W. 
Price, Jennie 
Pritchard, W. N., Jr. 
Proctor. R. S. 
Ranson, R. E. 
Ratcliff, Ina 
Ray, Artee 
Ray, J. C. 
Redford. Laurie 
Reeks, Josephine 
Rhodes. Cora Lee 
Rhodes, G. W. 
Rhodes. W. H. 
Rhodes, W. H.. (r. 
Richardson, Jessie E. 
Richardson. Frances 
Richardson, Nellie 
Roberts, Lena V. 



Robertson, Kathleen 
Robinson, Elizabeth H. 
Rodgers, J. O. 
Rogers, G. O. 
Rowe, Mary 
Royster. Sall;e 
Rudisill, J. A. 
Ruffin, Ida 
Ruffin, Mamie 
Russell, Mrs. Lucy P. 
Sawyer. Lila 
Searcy, Corrie 
Setzer, Pearl 
Sharp, Cora I. 
Sharp, Lizzie J. 
Sheetz, Nannie 
Shields. Madge 
Shine. Mary Lee 
Shu ford. C. L. 
Shuford, N. C. 
Smith. Alma 
Smith. Mildred 
Smith. Sadie L. 
Smyre. Clara R. 
Spauch, Ethel 
Spencer. Robert B. 
Springs. Marguer'Te 
Stacy, L. E. 
Starr, Hannah J. 
Steppe, N. F. 
Stewart. Horace 
Stipe. Lui.a M. 
Stone, Lila May 
Strider, W. E. 
Stroud, M. Wellons 
Sugg, Annie R. 
Sucg, Eugene S. 
Sugg. Mattie B. 
Summerell, Mary 
Sykes, Hettie 
Sykes, Mattie 
Tadlock, Mamie L. 
Tayloe. Bessie 
Taylor. Beryl M. 
Taylor, Kader W. 
Taylor. Mary 
Teague. C E. 
Teague, J. S. 
Teague, Pearl 
Teague, S. F. 
Thomas, Alma 
Thomas, Louise V. 
Thomas. Mary P. 



Thompson. Earl 
Thompson. Edna A. 
Thompson. Ida A. 
Tinnin, Mary I. 
Tolson, H. A. 
Townsend, Jackson 
Trexler, Daisy E. 
Trivette, D. T. 
Tucker. Harry 
Tucker, Lottie 
Tuttle, Dora 
Umstead, Urma 
Vann, Eddie May 
Veasey, Maggie 
Veazey, Ora A. 
Waddell, Gussje 
Waldo, Effie 
Wall, Cordia 
Wallace, Euna 
Watkins, Sue H. 
Watson, Helen G. 
Watson. Pearla 
Weaver. J. R. 
Webster. Annie G. 
Weeks, Mary 
Wellons, Vealarie 
Wells, Swann 
West, Annie I. 
Whitaker. C. L. 
Whitaker, C. L., Jr. 
Whitaker. Margaret 
Whitaker, Susie 
White. Lucy OB. 
Whitehead, Margaret 
Whitley. Marina R. 
Wicker, Valesta 
Wiggins, Alienne 
Williams. May R. 
Williams, Jessie 
Winkler, Claudia A. 
Wise, Nola Mae 
Withers, May 
Woodard, Mary O. 
Woodward, Mary J. 
Wrenn, Lula C. 
Wright, G. A. 
Wright. Hattie 
Wynne, Daisey 
Yearcin. J. T. 
Yeargin. Mrs. J. T. 
Yoder, Fred R. 
Young. Charlotte 
Yount, M. E. 



ONI HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE 



EsHier Wake 

/*^r^^"^ HE play, "Esther Wake," was presented on the campus, on July 4, 1912, 

A ■ by the Summer School Dramatic Club. "It is of special interest, because 

^^ ~ it deals with local affairs during the Revolution, because of its historical value, 

and more especially because it was written by Mr. A. Vermont, Superintendent of the 

Smithfield Graded Schools, and Professor of the Modern Languages at the University." 

— Winston-Salem Journal. 

In the play, Esther Wake, the sister-in-law of Governor Tryon, sympathizes 
with the oppressed people of the colony, and although the fiancee of Colonel Fanning, 
enemy of the Regulators, pleads the cause of the latter, and comes to love their leader, 
James Pugh. He is condemned to die on the scaffold. Pugh refuses the proffer of 
mercy if he will flee with Esther, and dies with his friends on the gallows. Esther leaves 
her brother's coutt, and returns to England, and in her going Fanning loses her hand. 

W ; th Miss Martha Hudson, of Smithfield, in the title role, and Messrs. G. M. 
McKie, I. C. Moser, and William Rhodes playing the parts of James Pugh, Governor 
Tryon, and Colonel Fanning, the play was admirably rendered. The support throughout 
was good, and to W. B. Clinard as a servant, N. C. Shuford and W. P. Moore, the 
turbulent Regulators, special applause was given. 

The play is splendidly conceived, and rich in stirring situations. It is in essence 
a play of the people. While its theme is local, and in that respect of peculiar interest 
to North Carolinians, it is also universal, in that it represents the feelings of a great people 
rising in their might against oppression. 

The porch of the Law Building served as a stage. Those who have not seen the 
stately columns of the fine old Greek Temple, nor watched the effect of the starlight upon 
the wind-stirred festoons of ivy falling from the cornice, can little imagine the beauty of 
the scene. 

The play is still in manuscript form. The author is at work, however, on its 
revision. By the time this number of the YACKETY YacK appears, it may be in the 
hands of the printer, and probably in the hands of the public. 

On the request of numerous spectators, the play will be repeated more gorgeously 
and elaborately on the coming Fourth of July. 



0.\E Hl\\DA'l-:i> TWENTY-TWO 










Esther Wake 



CAST OF CHARACTERS 

Governor Tryon 1. C. Moser 

Parson Husbands, a Quaker Preacher I. C. Moser 

General Waddell J. Townsend 

Colonel Caswell W. P. Moore 

Pearson, a Farmer S. R. Bivins 

William, a Boy T. P. Harrison, Jr. 

James Pugh, a Gunsmith G. M. McKie 

Fanning, Clerk of the Court _ W. H. Rhodes 

Wood, Sheriff W. E. Strider 

Allan, Old Servant I. P. Davis 

Dick, Old Servant W. B, Clinard 

FlTZNOODLE, an English Count W. B. Cobb 

Courtiers W. B. Cobb. S. I. Parker, G. O. Rogers, H. B. Marrow 

Esther Wake, S ; ster-in-Law to Tryon Miss Martha Hudson 

Marcaret, a Sapor's Widow Miss Lelia M. Baker 

Effie, Daughter of Margaret Ara Hooks 

Court Ladies Misses Jayne McWharton, Bertha Morton, Sallie Barnhill, Sallie Burkitt 

D „ dc f Messrs. W. B. Cobb. Hoyt Roberson. J. W. Freeman 

Keculators and British Soldiers •! i d r-> i\r r c it; o /- 

I 1. P. Davis, W. E. Str der. W. B. Clinard 



Director, A. Vermont 



Costumers. A. T. Jones & Sons 



ONE HI 'NDRl n 1 WENTY- THREE 



PHARMACY 




A VV 




BOOK THREE 

THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS 

V THE UNIVERSITY 




Law Class Officers 

Fall Spring 

W. L. Warlick President W. F. Taylor 

G. H. Ward Vice-President T. B. Woody 

W. F. Taylor Secretary-Treasurer J. R. Branch 
F. P. Graham, Representative on Student Council 
MOOT COURT OFFICERS 

Judges: Professors McGehee, McIntosh, and Winston 

John W. Hester Sheriff Z. V. Babbitt 

H. E. Stacy Solicitor P. H. Gwynn. Jr. 

E. F. McCulloch Clerk J- L. Roberts 



O.Y£ HU.XDRED III I \ I I SI: 1/ ^ 



^.'i i .■■■ iw.tJiiii, .i'iiiii OT'awta.riJag^^dL^J 



The School o{ Law 



^^^™""* HE University of North Carolina Law School has lived the allotted three 

■ 'M score and ten years, having been established in 1 843. At its head then was 

^^•^ Hon. William H. Battle, father of the boy who at that time had not yet 

entered the University, but who was destined to become its head and to give it many 

years of loving and useful service — President Kemp P Battle. 

At the time Judge Battle was chosen head of the law school, he was a judge of 
the Supreme Court. He was appo:nted a justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court 
in May, 1848, but his commission expired in December, 1848, and he was re-elected 
to the Superior Court at that time. In 1853, he again became a justice of the Supreme 
Court, and served until the reconstruction in 1868. 

During this period, there had been an average of twelve or fifteen law students. 
In announcing the course in 1845-46, the catalog states that, "The Professor of Law 
and members of the Independent Class will not be subject to any of the ordinary college 
regulations." 

At the reorganization of the University in 1875, Judge Battle was again announced 
in the catalog as Professor of Law. In 1881, Dr. John Manning took charge of the 
school, and the number of students increased from eighteen to eighty at his death in 1 899, 
when the late Judge James C. MacRae was chosen dean of the school. At his death, 
in 1909, Prof. Luc us P. McGehee was chosen dean, and is now serving in that capacity, 
being assisted by two professors, all three men giving their full time to teaching in the 
Law School. The number of students has steadily increased, and the school is now in 
a flourishing condition, with a total of one hundred and th : rty-nine students, an increase 
of fifteen over the preceding year. 

— P. H. Winston 




ONE HIWDRED TWENTY- EIGHT 




■EMI 




Karl Braswell Bailey 
Elm City 

Age 22 ; height 5 feet 8 inches 
weight 1 35 pounds 

"Of plain, sound sense, life's current coin is 
made" 

"Rabbit" certainly lives up to his 
nickname by the way he bobs around the 
keystone sack, but the ladies say "he 
slows up on the bases" in society. "Rab- 
bit" holds the record in passing hours in 
his Senior year, and his luck is still with 
him in Law. He will surely make a 
success in practice, for no amount of 
evidence will ever convince him that he 
is wrong. 



Kenneth Ravnor Ellington 
Clayton 

Age 24 ; height 5 feet 1 inches 
weight 1 50 pounds 

"Hail fellow, Kelt mei" 

"Red" smashed consistency into splint- 
ers when he was not born rich. He 
creates the impression of being the laziest 
man in college, and is as good a fellow 
as he is lazy. The personification of 
indifference, he is known to only a few. 
Those who really know "Red," see 
beneath his apparent inertia a most super'or 
bunch of ideas, and above all a gentle- 
man of the highest tone. 



Phi. Society; Oak Ridge Club; Class Tennis 
(2, 3); Varsity Tennis (4. 5); Captain Class 
Baseball (2); Scrub Baseball (3, 4): Varsity 
Baseball (5); A.B. 1911. 



German Club; Class Baseball (2); Yackety 
Yack Board (3); Coop; Johnston County 
Club; Leader Gorgon's Head Thanksgiving 
Dance (4); Lukulux; Firemen's Union; Ogle 
Club; McGinnick (2); F. L. (4); Phi. Society; 
Gorgon's Head; K A, 



ONI III VDRED THIRTY 




Wilson Lee Warlick 

Newton 

Age 21 ; height 6 feet 
weight 1 70 pounds 
" They that govern most make least noise 
"Coot" blew in on us from Lenoir, and 
registered for the straight Law Course. 
He has stuck to it l'ke a man. Was one 
of the seven who survived the Slaughter 
of the Innocents in 1912. Has an ora- 
torical turn as well as a predisposition 
toward bulldogs, hosiery, and vests. 
However, he is president of his Class, and 
makes a practice of winning his Moot 
Court cases and passing his exams. 



Thomas B. Woody 
Bethel Hill 

Age 22; height 5 feet 10 inches 
weight I 40 pounds 

44 Books cannot always please, however good ; 
Minds are not ever craving their food" 

Some take the citations as an outlet for 
nervous energy ; some out of courtesy to 
the professors; some for future reference. 
"Woody" takes them to read, and reads 
them. He also reads the texts, the ency- 
clopedias, and looks up words in the dic- 
tionary. His motto is "You can't down a 
workingman." He is as steady as an 
eight-day clock. The canons of descent 
and the statute of limitations have no terrors 
for him. He is another one of those rare 
specimens who survived the Slaughter of 
the Innocents. In spite of it all, he retains 
his good sense of humor. 



Cerman Club ; Athletic Association ; Class Di. Society ; Y. 

Treasurer (I); Class President (2); A. B. ball 1912; Law 

Catawba College, 1910; AT!) President Law Class 



M. C. A.; Law Class Ba: 
Librarian 1912-13; Vi< 
1913. 



ONI HUNDRED THIRTY-ONE 



Senior Law 

Molton T. Alexander Creswell 

Carl Braswell Bailey Elm City 

William Babbitt Byrd ...Asheville 

Watson Lewis Daniel Winston 

Frank. Porter Graham Charlotte 

Harry Baywyn Hannah Siler City 

John William Hester Hester 

John Edward Hines Pollocksville 

John Thomas Johnson Chapel Hill 

Luke Lamb Williamston 

James Ward Morris Tampa, Fla. 

Robert Johnson Ship ...Newton 

William Henry Smathers Waynesville 

Percy Townsend Stiers. Wentworth 

George Hahn Ward . ...Waynesville 

Wilson Lee Warlick Newton 

Lloyd Armstrong Wells Wilson 

Thomas Brooks Woody Bethel Hill 

ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-TWO 









Junior Law 



Virgil Gustavus Beckham Hiddenite 

James Rebert Branch Wilmington 

Charles MacDonald Coffey North Wilkesboro 

George Herbert Cox Winterville 

Orville Thomas Davis Waynesville 

Gaston Lewis Dortch .... Goldsboro 

Alan Chase Emerson Wilmington 

Paul Charmichael Garrison Goldsboro 

Samuel Mallett Gattis Hillsboro 

Cecil Norwood Gibbs Lake Landing 

John Bell Glover, Jr Statesville 

Alexander Hawkins Graham Hillsboro 

Harry Springfield Harkins ...Asheville 

Edgar Thomas Harris Pinetown 

Julian Gilliam Hart Mount Airy 

John Jay Henderson West Lafayette, Ohio 

Julius Fig Horney High Point 

John Richard Jordan Winton 

John Rockwell Kenyon Newton 

Robert Ruffin King, Jr. Greensboro 

Joseph Gilmer Leatherwood Waynesville 

Charles Lee Lindsay Chapel Hill 

Henry Alexander McKinnon Maxton 

Frederick Hamilton May Wendell 

Carl Donna Moore Charlotte 

William Holt Oates Hendersonville 

Alexander Bate Outlaw Elizabeth City 

Thaddeus Shaw Page Biscoe 



ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-THREE 










Ezra Parker Benson 

Earl Victor Patterson Burlington 

Jesse Lee Roberts Wentworth 

Julius Addison Rousseau. Wilkesboro 

John Andrew Scott Statesville 

Paris Cecil Smith Swannanoa 

Jesse Clyde Stancill Charlotte 

Charles Miller Strong Charlotte 

Lewis Alexander Swicegood Salisbury 

Walter Frank Taylor Faison 

Henry Albert Tolson Newport 

Jesse Clinton Webber Earl 

FURMAN ERASTUS WEST West Mill 

William Claud West .. West Mill 

Floyd Gilbert Whitney Bessemer City 

Cicero Arthur York High Point 



Special Law Students 



Zebulon Vance Babbitt Bayboro 

Stein Hughes Basnight Newbern 

William Speight Beam Shelby 

Richard Willard Cantwell Wilmington 

Edgar Franklin McCullock White Oak 

Albert Rosenthal Marks Newbern 

Charles William Martin Touchet, Wash. 

John Watson Mitchell Winton 

Horace Edgar Stacy Chapel Hill 

Julius Faison Thompson Faison 

Daniel Joshua Walker Union Ridge 

Archibald Lee Manning Wiggins Durham 



ONE H V.XDRED 7H/R1 V-FOL R 




Officers of Medical Classes 



Second Year 
J. N. Tolar 
W. E. Wakeley 
W. G. Francis 
W. H. House 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary- Treasurer 

Interne 

Chapel one 



First Year 
A. B. Greenwood 
P. W. Fetzer 
A. H. Moore 
C. W. Eley 
Dr. C. S. Mangum 



t'.VF III XIiRED THIRTY-FIVE 



















\CK 



The School of Medicine 



ONLY after a long and hard struggle has the Medical School reached its present 
enviable position. The beginning was indeed humble, when in 1879 Dr. 
Thomas Harris attempted for the first time to give a two years' course in 
medicine in Chapel Hill, which was a complete failure. In 1890, however, the school 
was reorganized by Dr. R. Whitehead, as a one-year course in elementary subjects. 
Later a two-year course, and in 1 902 the full four 
years was again given. Owing to the lack of 
clinical material, the last two years have been done 
away with since 1909, and all the efforts of the 
department are concentrated upon the first and 
second years of medicine. Nor have their efforts 
been in vain, for today the school ranks with the 
best, has a splendid new building fully equipped 
with modern apparatus, is in charge of a competent faculty, and best of all turns out a 
class of men who average well when compared with those from other schools. 





ONE HUNDRED THIRTY SIX 




M 



Second -Year Medical Class 

Louis deKeyser Belden Wilmington 

Baxter Israel Bell Swan Quarter 

Ernest Linwood Bender Pollocksville 

Alexander McNeil Blue Carthage 

Octavius Blanchard Blue Chapel Hill 

William Ernest Brackett Townsdale 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Cleveland County Club; P.edmont High School Club; 
Member of Medical Society. 

Russell Mills Cox Washington 

Forest Elliott Shelby 

V. M. C. A.; Cleveland County Club; Piedmont High School Club. 

Carl Edgar Ervin. Troutmans 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Iredell County Club; Horner Club; Press Association (2); 
Track Team (1); Sub. Varsity Football Team (1. 2); Vice-President of Class (2). 

William White Falkener Warrenton 

Ollie Edwin Finch Kittrell 

Medical Society. 

William Gifford Francis — Waynesville 

Secretary and Treasurer of Medical Class; Vice-Pres dent Medical Society; Y. M. C. A. 

John Ray Hege Lexington 

Medical Society; Davidson County Club; Y. M. C. A. 

Wooster Hassell House Stokes 

Pitt County Club; Phi. Society; Medical Society. 

Chester Lawrence Lassiter Wilson Mills 

Medical Society; Treasurer Johnston County Club (2); Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A. 

Charles Preston Mangum Kinston 

William Everard Massey ..Rock Hill, S. C. 



ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGH1 









James Shepard Milliken Pittsboro 

German Club; i: X ; * X. 

Thomas Lacy Morrow Mebane 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Alamance County Club; Medical Associat on. 

Ralph Waldo Oldham Raleigh 

Ivan Marriett Proctor, Jr Raleigh 

Grady Rudisill Roberts Lincolnton 

Di. Society; Treasurer Medical Society; Assistant in Anatomy I. 

Robert Cameron Sample Hendersonville 

B.S. Davidson 1911; Medical Society; Assistant in the Infirmary; * X. 

James Stevens Simmons Graham 

B.S. Davidson; Med : cal Society; President Alamance County Club; Assistant in 
Embryology 1912; Assistant in Histology and Pathology 1912-13; Associate Editor YacKETY 
Yack; German Club; Pan-Hellenic Council; Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society; K 2; * X. 

William Henry Sloan Garland 

Ralph Edwin Stevens Sanford, Fla. 

Medical Society; Florida Club; Mus : cal Association; Football 1912; * X. 

Tracy Stockard Reidsville 

Thomas Johnson Summey Brevard 

Medical Society. 

Roy DeWitt Sumner Fletcher 

Medical Society. 

John Moorley TAMRAZ Tabriz, Persia 

Phi. Society; Tennis Association. 

Julian Nolley Tolar Sanford, Fla. 

President Second-Year Medical Class; Florida Club; Musical Association; Medical 
Society; Assistant in Histology and Pathology (R.P.) ; * X. 

William Eaton Wakeley Orange, N. J. 



ONE IIIWDRI l> THIRTY-NINE 






i 'Mil A- . . ^■W"g::::;ffllia 

ROLINA-J3- YACKETY-YACK 



First -Year Medical Class 



Eddie Basil Barker Trenton 

Jonas Herring Barnes Kenley 

Vernon Meredith Barnes Taylor 

David Andrew Bigger Rock Hill 

Joseph Dozier Boushall, Jr Raleigh 

Y. M. C. A.; Phi. Society; Wake County Club; President First-Year Medical Class; 
German Club; * X ; UK V. 

Harry Lyndon Brockmann Greensboro 

Albert Othel Bryan Battleboro 

Thomas Preston Burrus Fairfield 

Auley McRae Couch Roberdel 

Robert Eddens Devereux Spencer 

Opie Gray Edwards Spring Hope 

Clayton Willard Eley Woodland 

Phi. Society; Tennis Association; Class Football (2); Class Historian. 

Victor Elmo Everett Plymouth 

Paul William Fetzer Reidsville 

Eugene Littlejohn Flippin Mount Airy 

Adolphus Barte Greenwood Asheville 

Mark Alexander Griffin Wingate 

Lucius Caleman Hall Webster 

Amme Bernice Hamilton Atlantic 

DeWitt Talmage Hunter Matthews 

Di. Society; Union County Club. 

Fairley Patterson James ..Laurinburg 

Oliver Henry Jennings.. Paris Knob 

Henry Richard Kritzer Spencer 

Roy Hamilton Long Monroe 

William Peters McKay Red Springs 

Benjamin Whitehead McKenzie Salisbury 

Di. Society; Rowan County Club. 



ONE HUNDRED FORTY 



" JA ^ 












ROLINA-/3- YAC YACK 



Walter Guy McLead Maxton 

Allen Hoyt Moore Washington 

German Club; Secretary Class- Kodak Club; AT"; •!■ X. 

Henry K. Morrison ...Harrisburg 

William Clyde Oates Grover 

William Lehman Oppenheimer Rocky Mount 

James Gibson Pate Gibson 

David Franklin Perrel Germantown 

D. Society; Whitselt Club; Forsyth County Club. 

Paul Vernon Phillips Goldsboro 

Thomas Sampson Royster Townesv : lle 

German Club; Chemical Journal Club; A.B. 1912; Philological Club; Phi. Society; II K A. 

William Alexander Smith ..Goldsboro 

Class Treasurer; K i: ; ■{• X ■ A XX 

Henry Frank Starr Salisbury 

Dialectic Society. 

Lewis Holmes Swindell, Jr. Swan Quarter 

Ph.. Soc.ety; Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A.; Class Ba eball. 

Harry Gordon Thigpen Tarboro 

Edward Foy Uzzle Raleigh 

Y. M. C. A.; Wake County Club. 

Fred Gwynn Woodruff... Sparta 

Junius Holt Wright Siler City 




)NE HUNDRED FORTY-TWO 




Officers of Pharmacy Classes 



Second Year 
L. H. Winstead 
C. L. Cox 
Caney Foster 
F. H. Lunn 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



First Year 
R. C. Canady 
J. L. Henderson 
Paul Brantley 
W. S. Wolfe 



ONE HUNDRED FORTY-THREE 



School of Pharmacy 



S*^^-* HE School of Pharmacy, founded in 1897, was opened for students in Sep- 
d '^ tember of that year. The University assures to the students the most modern 
^^^ scientific instruction, with all the laboratory facilities of the undergraduate 
department, as well as courses of instruction in the allied branches. These opportunities 
meet the requirements of a large number of the students, who were compelled heretofore 
to obtain their pharmaceutical education in other States. 

Only seventeen students enrolled 
for the first session's work in 1897. Up 
to and including the year 1912-1913, 
4 1 6 students had registered for the 
Pharmacy course. Of this number, 340 
have taken one years work, 127 have 
continued in the second year, while 5 1 
have graduated with the degree of Ph. G. 
The faculty of the Pharmacy 
School is composed of seven Professors,~three Associate Professors, two Instructors, eight 

Assistants, numbering altogether twenty. 

Courses are offered in the various 
branches of pharmacy and chemistry, in bot- 
any, materia medica, pharmacology, physics, 
physiology, zoology, and bacteriology. 

The degree of graduate in pharmacy 
is conferred upon those students who satis- 
factorily complete the work required during 
the two sessions of nine months each. 
The department was moved during the summer of 1912, from the new West 
Building, which had been occupied by the school since its establishment, to Person Hall, 
its present quarters. This building affords three large, well-ventilated laboratories, two 
lecture-rooms, two experimental-rooms, a large prescription-room, which is equipped with 
desks and all the apparatus necessary to carry on prescription work, and a well-selected 
library and reading-room, inaugurated by the class of 1897. 





ONI HUNDRED FORTY- FOCR 




Charlie Lee Cox 

Warsaw 

Age 2 1 ; height 5 feet 1 inches 

weight I 40 pounds 

"My hair is red. and my eyes are blue ; 

I am a pill-roller through and through." 

There never was another just like 
"Red," for Nature made him and then 
broke the model. He is the life of the 
class, and we are proud of him. He is 
always at the postoffice during mail hours, 
and is always expecting a letter from his 
girl. He has a smile for each day in the 
week, and glides along in his advertant 
way with no thought of tomorrow. "Red" 
is a good egg, and will leap a great har- 
vest in the end. 



Caney Foster 

Asheville 

Age 24 ; height 5 feet 7 inches 

weight 1 35 pounds 

"If he had any faults, he has left us in doubt." 

"Foss" is a great joker, and very 
talkative. He can do anything from 
telegraphing to mixing medicine. He 
knows Pharmacy from alpha to oxega. 
He is generally found in the lab., and 
can make anything from a corn salve to 
a face cream. He came to us from the 
Class of 1911, and was gladly wel- 
comed. He passed the North Carolina 
State Board in December. 



Vice-President of Cla 
Pharmaceutical Society. 



Willi. 



Simpso 



Secretary of Class (2) ; 
Pharmaceutical Society. 



William Simpson 



ONI HUNDRED FORI Y-FIVE 




Frank Halliburton Lunn 

Wilkesboro 

Age 22 ; height 5 feet 9 inches 

weight 1 36 pounds 

"The surest wa\) to hit a woman's heart is to 
ia\e aim kneeling." 

"Frank" is a man who never tires in 
his work. He studies from morn till night; 
and is fond of Tennis, and plays when 
he has time. He has to blow his own 
horn, for he belongs to the band. He has 
no special loafing place, but can be found 
mostly in the lab. at third Chemistry. He 
has not failed to make good grades, and 
was there with the goods at the North 
Carolina State Board in December. 



William Simpson Pharmaceutical Society; 
Blue Ridge Club; Band; Tennis Association; 
Class Treasurer; - K A. 



ONE HISDRFD FORTY-SIX 






FirsV-Year Pharmacyj Class 

Richard Homer Andrews Chapel Hill 

Robert Lloyd Brinkley Elm City 

Paul Brantley Wilson 

Olinan Byron Butler Clinton 

Ralph Clarence Canady Benson 

Joseph Palamountain Carden Clayton 

Lester Fisher Concord 

Arnold Pugh Foy Pollocksville 

David Heath Rock Hill, S. C. 

John LeCrand Henderson Hickory 

HUMMEY BYRD HlGGINS Leicester 

Ralph Parker Hilliard Clayton 

Henry Odessa Holland Apex 

Robert Stroud Houston Monroe 

Joseph Hunter Jones Reidsville 

Kennith Alexander Kirby Marion 

Thomas Richard Koonce Chadburn 

James Edison Lytch Rowland 

Fred Harold Manley Lenoir 

Alexander Simmons Monroe Rockingham 

Herman Leslie Redman Marshall 

John Lambeth Rogers Creedmoor 

Edward Harvey Ward Tarboro 

Junius Campbell Warren Benson 

Frazier Williams Goldsboro 

Lamar Herbert Winstead Wilson 

William Samuel Wolfe Mount Airy 

Elmer Clifton Worthington Ayden 



ONE lll.MiRri) FORTY-SEVEA 



H n fcag w w ntu ma ■ iiWiJ ii i a n<jjjip i p — w aa- i ii m px 



BOOK FOUR 

ATHLETICS 

AT THE UNIVERSITY 




Athletic Council 



L. P. McLENDON Graduate Manager 

W. E. WAKELEY President of Athletic Association 

Frank Drew Manager Football Team 

Robert Strange, Jr Manager Baseball Team 

Walter Stokes, Jr Manager Track Team 

R. O. HUFFMAN ...Manager Buskel-Ball Team 

G. L. CARRINGTON Editor-in-Chief of Tar Heel 

A. L. M. WlGGINS Representative-at-Large 

Dr. C. H. Herty Faculty Member 

OFFICERS OF THE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

President W. E. WAKELEY 

Vice-President I. R. WILLIAMS 

Secretary J. Y. CALDWELL 

Treasurer C. T. WOOLLEN 



ONE III SDRED III TY-ONE 




COACH CARTMELL 
Nat J. Cartmell, one of 
the world's greatest sprinters, 
developed at Pennsylvania 
under the master hand of 
Mike Murphy. He twice 
won both the 100- and 220- 
yard dashes at the intercol- 
legiates, and he twice repre- 
sented America at the Olym- 
pic Games. Since becoming 
professional, he has raced 
with the best runners in this 
country and abroad, and has 
more than held his own. He 
came to Carolina in the 
Spring of 1910, and has had 
wonderful success in coaching 
track teams. In 1912, he 
was made Athletic Director. 
He holds the world's official 
professional record for the 
220 — 21'/2 seconds — made 
at Stoke-on-Trent, England. 



COACH MARTIN 
W. C. Martin first gained 
athletic prominence at Whit- 
man College, where he was a 
member of the Football and 
Track teams. At Notre 
Dame, in 1910, he played a 
star end on the team that beat 
Michigan, and his sprinting 
ability on the track gained for 
him wide fame throughout the 
West. He won the 1 00-yard 
dash at the National Ama- 
teur games at Pittsburg in 
1910, and the same thing at 
the Pennsylvania Relay Meet 
in 1911. He went to the 
University of Pennsylvania in 
191 1-1912, but was unable 
to compete on account of the 
one-year rule. He coached 
the Carolina Football team 
in 1912. 





COACH CLANCY 

Charles A. Clancy played 
on Western High School of 
Washington, D. C, and later 
on Georgetown University. 
His professional career covers 
a wide field: The Connecticut 
League; the Northeastern 
League ; Montreal in the 
Eastern (now International) 
League; Rutland, Vt., in the 
Northern League; Wilming- 
ton, Del., in the State League. 
In 1910, he managed the 
Fayetteville team in Eastern 
Carolina League, and won 
the pennant; in 1911 and 
1912 he managed the Win- 
ston-Salem team in the Caro- 
lina League, winning the pen- 
nant one year and finishing 
second the other year. In 
1911 and 1912, he coached 
the Carolina Baseball team. 



ONE HUNDRED FIFTY- TWO 



FOOT BALL 










Varsity Football Team, 1912 



Left End HusKE 

Left Tackle.. STEVENS 

Left Guard. JOHNSON 

Left Guard DoRTCH 

Center Jones 

Right Guard . JENNINGS 

R ; ght Tackle Abernathy, L. L. 



Right End Hc-MEWOOD 

Right End Strange 

Quarter TlLLETT 

Left Half Taylor 

Left Half Wakeley 

Right Half ..Moore 

Full Abernathy, R. 



Full Applewhite 

4- -1- * 

FOOTBALL RECORD, 1912 



University 
University 
University 
University 
University 
Univers ty 
University 
University 



of North Carohna 13 

of North Carolina 9 

of North Carolina 47 

of North Carolina 

of North Carolina 10 

of North Carolina 6 

of North Carolina 

of North Carolina 

85 



Davdson 

Wake Forest 2 

Bingham 

Virginia Polytechnc Institute 26 

Georgetown 37 

South Carolina 6 

Waslrngton and Lee 31 

Virginia 66 



WE HUNDRED FIFTY-FOUR 



BASE5ALL 







:k 



Varsity Baseball Team, 1912 



Pitcher J. R. Lee 

Pitcher E. H. Wood 

Catcher J. H. SwiNK 

First Base J. A. Leak, Jr. 

Second Base K. B. BaILEY 



Third Base W. B. EDWARDS 

Shortstop L. H. WlNSTEAD 

Left Field G. P. Irby 

Center F^eld T. S. PAGE 

Right Field .....J. W. Hanes 



Substitutes 

Pitcher J. C. Lanier Outfielder W. B. YoUNG 

First Base J. C. WHITAKER 

4* 4" ~ir 



BASEBALL RECORD, 1912 



Universiy 
University 
University 
Un'versity 
University 
Un versity 
University 
University 
University 
Un'versity 
University 
University 
University 
University 
University 
University 
University 
Un versity 



of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 



Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolna 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 



Horner 

Wake Forest 1 

Swarthrrore 

Swarthrrore .... . 3 

Amherst 5 

Amherst iO 



Randolph -Macon 
Virginia 












3 


4 




....... 


n 




....... 4 







1 


4 




5 


7 




....... 2 


6 




5 


? 




5 


8 


Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

Virginia Polytechnic Inst'tute 


6 
6 



ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-EIGHT 



pai-r^--- ^ r ».-.-..— -,.***■* 



The Athletic Situation at Carolina 



{Continued from page 1 56) 
Experienced and well coached football material, however, Carolina has never 
had, and probably will not have for years. North Carolina is not a football State in the 
sense that it is a baseball State. Every North Carolinian plays baseball as soon as he 
can run, but football is essentially a city and a school product, and North Carolina has 
neither large cities nor good preparatory schools. The high schools are beginning to play 
the game scientifically, but they are just beginning, and up to the present time they have 
furnished but little available material. It is from country boys who have never been under 
a coach that Carolina draws her players, and very obviously such players, however well 
equipped physically, cannot easily be transformed into a winning team. The average 
Varsity man has served his turn on class and scrub teams before he learns the game well 
enough to become Varsity material. As soon as he begins to get a fair working knowledge, 
he is ready to graduate, or, because he wants to play on a winning team, he goes to 
another institution. 

(Continued on page 164) 




O.XE HV-\DRED SIXTY 



T R~ AC IV 




L . _ 



Track Team, 1912 



George B. Mason 100- and 220-yard dashes 

B. B. Sears 100- and 220-yard dashes 

S. I. Parker 220-yard dash and quarter 

W. E. WAKELEY Quarter 

G. T. Clark Quarter 

R. C. SPENCE _ Half and mile 

S. W. Whiting Half 

L. H. Ranson Half 

E. V. Patterson Half and mile 

Collier Cobb, Jr. Mile and two nv'les 

H. S. Willis Two Miles 

M. E. BLALOCK Broad jump 

PHILIP WOOLLCOTT High jump and hurdles 

T. M. Price Hurdles 

George V. Strong Pole vault 

Walter Carter Pole vault 

B. C. Parker Weights 

L. L. Abernathy Weights 

RECORD OF TRACK TEAM, 1912 DUAL MEETS 

University of North Carolina 82 Wake Forest 35 

University of North Carolina 66 Virginia Polytechnic Institute 51 

STATE MEET 

University of North Carolina 67 1 /? Davidson 12 

Wake Forest 33 Trinity ... 4 

Agricultural and Mechanical 24'/2 Guilford 2 

SOUTH ATLANTIC MEET 

Johns Hopkins 48'/i Virgina Polytechnic Inst'tute. ..23'/2 

University of North Carolina 28 Washington and Lee 15 

Agricultural and Mechanical 24 Georgetown 13 



ONE HUNDRED SIXTY- TIVO 












Trie Athletic Situation at Carolina 

(Continued from page 160) 

In the face of these facts, the coaching system in the past has been based on 
altogether the wrong idea. Northern stars have been hired at large salaries and short 
terms of service. A Pennsylvania man would come for a year, be unsuccessful, and 
leave. A Yale man, trying it next, would face material half familiar with one system. 
He would have to go back to the beginning and teach fundamentals, and the season 
would be half over before the team would begin to progress. The result has been year 
after year of humiliating defeat, culminating in the 66 to slaughter of last Thanks- 
giving Day. 

Not until then was the right step taken. With a fine sense of loyalty, the Alumni 
came forward and demanded a share in Athletic control. They propose the only plan 
that can hope to produce winning teams at Carolina — a system of coaching character- 
ized by continuity, a system which will teach the same sort of football year after year 
until all Carolina men are imbued with it so that they in turn may come back and impart 

(Continued on page 168) 




ONE HI WD RED SIX TY-FOUR 



ASIUT RALL 




*.ami/J3Zi liM'n^B 



Vars'ihj Basket- Ball Team, 1913 

Left Forward LONG Right Forward TlLLETT 

Center CARRINGTON 

Left Guard Chambers Right Guard Redman 



Homewood 



Substitutes 
Ransom 



Parker 



BASKETBALL RECORD, 1 91 3 

University North Carolina 22 Durham V. M. C. A.. 

University North Carolina 42 

University North Carolina 41 

University North Carolina 1 7 

University North Carolina 19 

University North Carolina 21 

University North Carolina 18 

University North Carolina 29 

University North Carolina 21 

University North Carolina 19 

University North Carolina 19 



23 



Davidson 8 

Elon 1 1 

Emory and Henry 20 

Virgina 30 

Wake Forest 22 

A. & M 26 

Virginia Polytechnic Institute.. 9 

Guilford 44 

Elon .... 23 

Wake Forest 15 



ONM HCXDRED SIXTY-SIX 



The Athletic Situation at Carolina 

(Continued from page 164) 

it to others. The Alumni propose to hire a head coach for not less than three years; 
from time to time Alumni coaches shall come to Chapel Hill to aid him. In his first 
year he can hardly hope to win, but he can build for the future. In his second year he 
will be successful if he wins any of his big games; but all the while he will be erecting 
his structure. By the third year, results should be seen. In that three years, men should 
have developed from awkward and ignorant country boys to finished players; and Caro- 
linians may reasonably expect a victorious team. 

That such a system may be successful is accurately exemplified in the track 
records of the past few years. Five years ago the track team was where the football 
team is now. Then Nat Cartmell cane. H's first team was not a champion team, but 
in his second year he did better, and in his third year he came into his own with a team 
that not only swept the State, but came out second at the South Atlantic meet. During 
this time no wonderful material has been imported; Cartmell has had to work with 

(Continued on page 172) 




ONE HUNERED SIXTY-EIGHT 




TENNIS 




Tennis Association 



J. S. CANSLER. President F. H. KENNEDY ...Treasurer 

TENNIS TEAM FOR 191 1-1912 

J. L. Chambers, Jr. M. N. Oates 

RECORD FOR 1911-1912 

North Carolina vs. Trinity 

Singles 

Oates, 2 ; Opponent, 1 Chambers, 2 ; Opponent, 

Doubles 

North Carolina, 3 ; Opponents, 

North Carolina vs. South Carolina 

Singles 

Oates, 1 ; Opponent, 2 Chambers, 2 ; Opponent, 1 

Doubles 

North Carolina, 2 ; Opponents, 3 

North Carolina vs. South Carolina 

Oates, 2 ; Opponent, Chambers, 2 ; Opponent 

North Carolina, 3; Opponents, 1 

TENNIS TEAM FOR 1912-1913 

J. L. Chambers, Jr. M. N. Oates 

CLASS TENNIS TEAMS 

Freshman 

Herman Cone H. J. Combs 

Sophomore 
G. A. Mebane W. C. Walke 

Junior 
Charles W. Millender K. C. Royal 

Senior 
J. S. Hunter J- c - BusBY 



ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY 



The Athletic Situation at Carolina 

(Continued from page 168) 

ordinary North Carolina boys, and few people know less about track athletics. This 
material has simply been developed after it entered college. Track stars of the first 
magnitude have been made out of men who never had on a track shoe before they came 
to Chapel Hill, simply because each succeeding year they started where they left off the 
preceding year. They d d not have to unlearn. They were produced by the system. 

Carolina men are confident that such a record can be duplicated in football. 
But it will be slow and discouraging work, and will call for the stamina that Caro- 
linians possess. If success does come, it will be due mainly to the Alumni. They have 
rallied to the support of the thing they love, and their love should inspire the under- 
graduates to make every effort. It is with respect and reverence that we salute the 
Carolina Alumni. 

-L. C, Jr. 




ONE HC.Xf'RED SEVENTY-TWO 








Hi 
* * 




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' 




c jj 


.3? * 4 


1 ■• 




c ■ 


E? c 


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IP 


1 


- Zj? 


• V 1 


1 


Pi 


*4® 




Li: 


^■C ■ 


¥a* itm 









*4 ) 

V 




CLASS TENNIS TEAMS 




ABOUT Tint FOR A (?ooTBRm 5T5WE 



i**r^ 



Organizations 





I o 



[FOW! 



BOOK FIVE 

ORGANIZATIONS 

AT THE UNIVERSITY 




^smsk '^m^^m^t 



»■ i— i wAti 









The Dialectic and Philanthropic Literarvj Societies 

VF^Q ^k E HAVE been told that in the early history of our republic regular debating 

^k ^f I societies were an important part of school and social life in this country; 

\^^/ and in North Carolina, at least one town, old Bath, had her public library 

and debating society several years before the close of the seventeenth 

century. All our schools accentuated classical learning; and the fact that the noble 

Greeks and Romans had their sons taught oratory and instructed in disputation had its 

influence in our classical schools. 

Very early in our history there were excellent schools in Pasquotank County, at 
Ldenton, and at Newbern; and Dr. John Brickwell, a naturalist of note who traveled 
through North Carolina in the early part of the eighteenth century, found "schoolmasters 
dispersed through the whole province." These were in most cases men who had been 
educated in England or in Scotland ; and when the Germans came, both Lutherans and 
Moravians, we had among us schoolmasters with the tra ning of the German schools. The 
lemnants of the small and well-selected libraries of this early time show many books of 
controvers'al character. 

Toward the close of the eighteenth century, we find most of our preparatory 
schools conducted by Presbyterian preachers, graduates of Princeton, ever ready to give 
a reason for the faith that was in them. I he Lutheran preachers, too, and the Moravians 
as well, had their lrsdit : ons of disputations; and even 
Luther himself had enjoyed this kind of fray, as in his 
famous scrap of 1527 with Zwingli. The preacher's 
propens ty for disputation, and the schoolmaster s 
debating society, fanned the scattered sparks of patriot- 
ism into the fires of cur American Revolution; and the 
literary societies of Old Nassau had much to do with 
keeping the fires ablaze. 

Among the founders of our University were 
several graduates of Princeton; and the name of 
Charles W. Harris, of Cabarrus County, A.B. Prince- 
ton 1 789, heads the list of those who formed "The 
Debating Society" at the University of North Carolina, 
on the th'rd of June, 1 795. Harris was a tutor in the 
University, who had had the benefit of debating in the 
Whig Society whle a student at Princeton. James 
Mebane, of Orange, was elected first president of our 
Socety, whose objects were stated to be the cultiva- 
tion of lasting friendship and the promotion of useful 
knowledge. The society met on Thursday evenings, and its members were divded into 
three classes; these read, spoke, and presented compositions alternately on following 




uxE /iu.xDKt:n EiGtn Y-ONE 

























Thursdays. The Society took for its motto, "Love of virtue and science." Two adverse 
votes would prevent a student's election to membership. The first vote passed was for 
the purchase of books; the first quotation debated was, "Is the study of ancient authors 
useful? " and of course the affirmative won. 

At a second meet-ng of the society, June 1 1 , it was agreed to admit no more new 
members. On the twenty-fifth of June, 1 795, Maurice Moore moved that the Society be 
divided ; action on the motion was postponed for one week, and on July 2 it was carried. 
The new organization was called the Concord Soc : ety, and adopted the modified motto, 
"Liberty, virtue, and science." But Moore and his brother remamed in the original 
Society for a time, as did Hinton James, who had been the first student to enter the 
University. It was not long, however, before the three had joined the Concord Society, 
and John Pettigrew followed them a year later. The first meeting of the new Society was 
held August 10, 1795. David Gllespie was the first president. Two questions dis- 
cussed were, "Is war ever justifiable? " and "Shall 
corporal pun shment be introduced into the Univer- 
sity? " The Debating Society soon became the 
Dialectic, and the Concord Society changed its 
name to Philanthropic. 

Party feeling ran high in North Carolina 
then, and tradition has it that Republicans were 
ignored in the organization of the society, Federal- 
ists getting all the offices; and further that the Fed- 
eralist censor morum was unreasonably severe in 
his criticisms of some of the members. The Moores 
and H : nton James for a time belonged to both 
Societies, or until duplicate membership was for- 
bidden, when they elected the new one. This 
political division soon became a geographical one, 
the western part of the State and a town or two in 
the east being firmly Federalist, while the east was 
for the most part Republican in pohtics. These 
geographical divisions of political opinion continued 
to hold when the Whigs stood for the Federalist view and the Dexocrats adopted the 
Republicanism of Jefferson. 

Within a year following the organization of the Concord Society, it came to be 
an unwritten law that every student in the University must become a member of one or the 
other of the Societies, and this custom was adhered to for nearly a hundred years. During 
the school year 1884-'85, one or more men were blackballed by one of the Societies, on 
account of the condition of college politcs, and their friends withdrew in a body from the 
Society. The faculty, when appealed to, declined to require the return of the seceders. 
In 1892, the President of the University required a man to become a member of one of 




ONE HUyiiRh.l) EIGHTY-TWO 



the Societies against his will, in order to force official action on the matter ; and since that 

date membership has been altogether voluntary. 

The University owned but a meager collection of books before the erection of 

Smith Hall, the old library building, in 1850; 

but the Soc.ety libraries had grown until they 

filled two large rooms on the lop floor of the 

South Building when work was begun on the 

New East and New West Buildings in 185 7. 

The whole upper floor of each of the new build- 
ings was designed and fitted for the library, and 

the two Societies received many gifts of valuable 

books, until their shelves were well filled, and by 

the time of the Civil War we had in Chapel Hill the 

best library south of the Potomac, thanks to the 

two Literary Societies. They very generously gave 

their libraries to the University, in 1886; but the 

two collections were not consolidated until several 

years after, when many duplicate volumes were 

presented to the State Normal and Industrial Col- 
lege, at Greensboro. 

The part that these Societies have played 

in fitting men for life, and their phenomenal success 

in intercollegiate debate, have been treated in 
previous issues of Yackety Yack. They 
soon won for themselves a high position, which they 
have held and strengthened for considerably more than 
a century. Prof. Albert Bushnell Hart, of Harvard, 
visited the University in the early spring of I 892, and 
when he returned to Cambridge he told his students that 
he had heard a debate in the United States House of 
Representatives and one in the Dialectic Society, and 
that the collegiate boys had beat the congressmen. In 
his chapter on The Art of Debate, in Brookings and 
Ringwalt's "Briefs for Debate," Dr. Hart discusses 
the machinery for debate, as "taking its most effective 
form in two rival societies, such as the Whig and Clio 
at Princeton, the Philanthropic and Dialectic of the 
University of North Carolina, the Philolexian and 
Barnard of Columbia, and the Un'on and Forum of 
Harvard." 

— Collier Cobb 





ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-THREE 






Dialectic Literary Society 



Austin, D. R. 
Andrews, T. M. 
Alderman, E. H. 
Axley, L. 
Bird, O. 
Black, W. W. 
Black, H. B. 
Blair, T. D. 
Bradshaw, F. F. 
Brinklev, W. F. 
Byrd. B. B. 
Barrier, G. A. 
Bersly. J. C. 
Collet, J. H. 
Clarkson, F. D. 
Christopher, F. D. 
Coggins, C. L. 
Conrad, D. H. 
Cooper, G. L. 
Crouse, R. A. 
Conrad, E. F. 
Conrad, H. C. 
Carr, A. H. 
Carlton, D. H. 
Causler, J. S. 
Cox, H. L. 
Caldwell, J. Y. 
Carter, J. W. 
Coulter, E. M. 
Cox. R. C. 
Dalton, W. B. 
Deaton, F. H. 



ROLL OF ACTIVE MEMBERS 

Devereux, R. E. 
Duncan, G. S. 
Dysart, J. O. 
Day, J. T. 
Dunnagan, M. R. 
Elliot, A. M. 
Elson, T. H. 
Eustler, G. W. 
Ervin, C. E. 
Euless, F. L. 
Fairley, A. B. 
Field, B. S. 
Forney, A. C. 
Ferguson. T. W. 
Goforth, O. L. 
Gentry. J. R. 
Harrell, B. C. 
Hendrix, J. W. 
Hackler, J. F. 
Henson, J. W., Jr. 
Hunter, W. R. 
Harding, W. R. 
Hill. T. F. 
Holder, B. B. 
Hardin, Graham 
Hart, Meade 
Holmes, J. E. 
Holmes, R. W. 
Holmes, J. A. 
Holton, G. R. 
Harry. W. G. 
Higdon, F. H. 



Hoover, T. J. 
Isley, C. L. 
Isley, R. W. 
Jarrell, J. F. 
Johnson, H. V. 
Johnson, C. L. 
Johnston, L. R. 
Jones, T. I. 
Jurney, R. C. 
Kent, J. A. 
Kurfees, C. S. 
Kennedy, F. H. 
Linn, J. C. 
Lawrence, I. L. 
Lackey, B. M. 
Lindau, S. B. 
Latham, J. O. 
Lambert, G, L. 
Lasley, R. L. 
Marsh, E. B. 
Marsh, L. G. 
Milles, Harry 
Merritt, O. K. 
Murphy, C. S. 
McIver, J. M. 
McMillan, T. E. 
Mebane, G. A. 
Moser, J. W. 
Martin, G A. 
McCall, F. B. 
Mallet, J. R. 
Michael, T. L. 



ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-SIX 







u > fc~ • 









i 




to*. 












Morrison, F. W. 
Neilson, R. W. 
Nance, O. C. 
Newsom, A. R. 
Owen. W. M. 
Owen, F. R. 
Overcash, J. O. 
Pell, W. E. 
Price, J. H. 
Parker, B. C. 
Paty, B. F. 
Price, J. V. 
Prichett, J. T. 
Pratt, H. 
Perrett, V. A. 
Phillips, G. B. 
Ray, J. C. 
Reid, S. L. 

ROYSTER, D. W. 



Rymer, W. C. 
Ragland, W. T. 
Ramseur, S. H. 
Reid, R. A. 
Rights, D. L. 
Ramsaur, T. M. 
Rankin, E. R. 
Shaver, W. T. 
Schiffman, L. E. 
Sims, L. R. 
Smith, C. L. 
Smith, M. T. 
Stanford, W. R. 
Scott, S. F. 
Starr, H. F. 
Stacy, J. B. 
Shoaf, R. G. 
Sloan, H. T. 
Sisk, Horace 



Story, T. E. 
Shamberger, L. L. 
Tipton, J. C. 
Towns, R. 
Temko, H. B. 
Traywick, R. A. 
Thompson, W. R. 
Totten, H. R. 
Vaughan, R. C. 
Walton, B. M. 
Weeks, W. P. M. 
Whitakers, G. B. 
Williams, W. R. 
Webster, F. L. 
Willis, H. G 
Workman, J. H. 
Wiggins, A. L. M. 
Walker, D. J. 
Yarborough, R. S. 



ROLL OF INACTIVE MEMBERS 



Bivens, S. R. 
Bennet, P. A. 
Bagwell, E. 
Brackett, W. E. 
Beam, W. S. 
Coulter, V. A. 
Conroy, Frank 
Freezor, J. G. 
Griffin, M. A. 
Hartley, S. G 
Hoke, C. B. 
Hunter, D. T. 
Huffman, R. O. 



Ingram, M. R. 
Kirksey, W. A. 
Kritser, H. R. 
Labberton, J. M. 
Long, H. C. 
McLendon, L. P. 
Mebane, B. H. 
McKensie, B. W. 
McIntosh, J. W. 
Oates, M. N. 
Perrell, D. J. 
Page, T. S. 
Price, L. A. 



Pate, J. G 
Patterson, E. V. 
Roberts, J. L. 
Roberts, G R. 
Rankin, W. W. 
Scarborough, J. E 
Smith, J. M. 
Tillett, W. S. 
Vann, Norman 
Wall, L. R. 
Weaver, J. R. 
Ward, G H. 
Walker, J. A. 



ONE HUNDRED EIGH1 Y -EIGHT 



W**M*t 



A 









TH CAROLINA-/3- YACKETY-YACK 



■ 



Synopsis of Debates 



The following is Carolina's intercollegiate debating record and debaters 
tli 



1897 — Georgia, H. G. Connor and D. B. S 
won by Georgia. 

1898— Georgia, W. J. Brogden and E. K. 
Graham; won by Carolina. 

1899— Georgia. E. D. Broadhurst and T. C. 
Bowie; won by Carolina. 

1900— Vanderbill, W. S. Bernard and White- 
head Kluttz; won by Carolina. 

1900— Georgia, W. H. Swift and P. Parker; 
won by Carolina. 

1901— Vanderbilt, B. B. Lane and W. H. Swift; 
won by Carolina. 

1901— Georgia, D. P. Stern and R. R. Williams; 

won by Carolina. 

1902— Vanderbilt, T. A. Adams and C. Ross; 
won by Carolina. 

1902— Johns Hopkins, D. P. Stern and R. R. 
Williams; won by Carol'na. 

1902— Georgia, C. A. Bynum and R. W. Her- 
ring; won by Georgia. 

1903— Johns Hopkins, S. S. Robins and R. O. 

Everett; won by Carolina. 

1904— Georgia, I. C. Wright and A. H. Johnson; 
won by Carolina. 

1905— Washington and Lee, I. C. Wright and 
A. H. King; won by Washington and Lee. 

1905— Georgia, H. S. Lewis and C. C. Bern- 
hart; won by Georgia. 

1906— Georgia, W. B. Love and J. J. Parker; 
won by Carolina. 

1907— Virginia, J. J. Parker and E. S. W. 
Dameron; won by Carolina. 

1907— George Washington. W. P. Stacy and 
R. C. Day; won by George Washington. 

1907— Georgia, L. P. Matthews and C. J. 
Katzenstein; won by Carolina. 



1907— Pennsylvania, P. M. Williams and T. W. 
Andrews; won by Pennsylvania. 

1908— George Washington, W. P. Stacy and 
T. W. Andrews; won by Carolina. 

1903— Georgia, C. W. Tilletl, Jr., and O. R. 
Rand ; won by Carolina. 

1908— Virgnia, J. T. Johnson and J. W. Hester; 
won by Carolina. 

1908— Pennsylvania, J. W. Umstead, Jr., and 
K. P. Battle; won by Carolina. 

1909— Virginia, J. W. Umstead, Jr.. and J. C. 
M. Vann; won by Virginia. 

1909— Georgia, D. B. Teague and W. P. Grier; 
won by Georgia. 

1909— Tulane, H. E. Stacy and L. P. Matthews; 
won by Carolina. 

1909 — Pennsylvania, E. M. Highsmith and E. E. 
Barnett; won by Carolina. 

1910— Washington and Lee, W. R. Edmunds and 
H. E. Stacy; won by Carol'na. 

1910— Georgia, F. N. Cox and C. E. Mcintosh; 
won by Carolina. 

1910— Pennsylvania, C. L. Williams and W. F. 
Taylor; won by Carolina. 

1911— Virginia, W. T. Joyner and W. A. 
Dees; won by Virginia. 

1911— Georgia, I. C. Moser and D. A. Lynch; 
won by Carolina. 

1911— Pennsylvania, C. R. Wharton and F. P. 
Barker; won by Carolina. 

1912— Vanderbilt, C. E. Teague and C. D. 
Hogue; won by Carolina. 

1912— Tulane. C. K. Burgess and L. P. 
McLendon ; won by Carolina. 

1912— Pennsylvania, F. P. Barker and C. R. 
Wharton; won by Carolina. 



ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY- NINE 



PWilanHirojfMC LWerarvj Society 



Anderson, A. V. 
Auld, B. F. 
Alexander, M. T. 
Applewhite, B. D. 
Aycock, B. F. 
Bailey, H. V. 
Bailey, K. H. 
Bailey, I. M. 
Beckwith, C. W. 
Bell, E. F. 
Bell, D. L. 
Bell, R. H. 
Brooks, R. P. 
Blalock, H. M. 
Blue, L. A. 
Boseman, C. A. 
Boushall, T. C. 
Bynum, J. N. 
Brinkley, R. L. 
Bullock, J. D. 
Bryan, J. S. 
Brown, C. E. 
Carrington, G. L. 
Craig, Gilliam 
Capps, E. F. 
Capehart, W. J. 
Castelloe, A. T. 
Clark, R. V. 
Cole, N. 

Cobb, Collier, Jr. 
Cobb, W. B. 
Cook, R. E. L., Jr. 
Cooper, F. H. 



ROLL OF ACTIVE MEMBERS 

Credle, W. B. 
Credle, W. F. 
Currie, E. H. 
Cannady, C. C. 
Cantwell, R. W. 
Carr, M. L. 
Coats, R. F. 
Cox, R. M. 
Cox, J. M. 
Campbell, E. T. 
Collins, H. W. 
Darden, P. C. 
Darden, D. B. 
Drew, Frank 
DeVane, T. A. 
Davis, R. V. 
Duncan, E. E. 
Eure, S. E., Jr. 
Edgerton, E. D. 
Edgerton, G. E. 
Edwards, O. G. 
Eldridge, J. 
Farmer, L. J. 
Fulcher, Manly 
Fuller, W. P. 
Gibbs, C. N. 
Graves, H. L. 
Gilmer, T. E. 
Hamilton, H. 
Hamilton, A. B. 
Hamilton, A. L. 
Hatcher, M. A. 
Hatcher, J. T. 



Hancock, F. H., Jr. 
Harrison, J. L. 
Harper, A. B. 
Harper, G. A. 
Harrell, W. H. 
Harris, E. C. 
Hester, H. B. 
Harris, J. J. 
Hooper, J. C. 
Horton, A. G. 
Huske, W. O. 
Huske, J. S. 
Huske, J. M. 
Hudson, H. G 
House, R. B. 
Joyner, E. W. 

JOYNER, E. G. 

Jernigan, H. 
Kanner, A. O. 
Killifer, D. H. 
k.nowles, d. l. 
Kornegay, Wade 
Lambeth, H. D. 
Latham, J. R. 
Lassiter, J. H. 
Lassiter, H. G. 
Lewis, M. D. 
Lee, C. D. 
Lee, J. G. 
Lee, J. I. 
Lipscomb, S. A. 
Lilly, E. J. 
Lord, W. C. 



ONE HUNDRED NINETY- TWO 



Lupton, E. W. 
Mann, J. E. 
Marshburn, O. M. 
Martin, D. R. 
May, F. H. 
Meyer, L. B. 
McCants, J. M. 
McKay, A. A. 
Marks, A. R. 
Moore, J. A. 
Moore, D. C. 
Morris, C. 
Morton, W. M. 
Norwood, T. H. 
Norwood, E. W. 
Norris, F. W. 
Odom, D. F. 
Odom, J. F. 
Outlaw, A. B. 
Parker, J. L. 
Parker, Ezra 
Parker, W. R. 
Parker, R. E. 
Parker, J. M. 
Perry, E. J. 
Peel, E. S. 
Petteway, W. R. 
Petteway, H. C. 
Phillips, J. L. 
Phillips, J. H. 
Powell, E. F. 
Proctor, W. G. 
Pruden, W. O. 
Pope, E. I. 



Plgh, J. F. 
Prevatt, J. R. 
Pitt, W. F. 
Pendergraft, H. A. 
Ragland, O. H. 
Ratcliff, Z. O. 
Ray, R. M. 
Rhodes, W. H. 
Rhodes, L. B. 
Rowe, J. V. 
Roberts, C. J. 
Robinson, C. 
Rogers, J. L. 
Rouse, W. B. 
Robinson, M. F. 
Royster, B. S. 
Robinson. M. 

ROYALL, K. C. 

Royall, I. C. Jr. 
Sanderford. H. G. 
Sahag, L. M. 
Spears, M. T. 
Stokes, W., Jr. 
Strange. R.. Jr 
Spence, R. C. 
Spence, S. 
Strong, G. V. 
Struthers. J. A. 
Smith, W. O. 
Smith, G. W. 
Smith, J. L. 
Sloan, C. A. 
Sinclair, J. F. 
Shiago, J. P. 
Simmons, F. S. 



Stedman, J. P. 
Stewart, C. E. 
Spencer, R. B. 
Taylor, J. A. 
Taylor, W. R. 
Tamaraz, J. M. 
Sharp, W. L. 
Thornton, M. J. 
Tilley, E. L. 

FOWNSEND, J. 

Tolson, H. A. 
Turlington, J. E. 
Twine, J. E. 
Umstead, W. B. 
Veazey, E. L. 
Weatherly, A. T. 
Wellons, B. F. 
Wells, L. A. 
Wellons. R. A. 
Welch. R. H., Jr 
West, C. F. 
White, P. L. 
Winslow, H. G. 
Wilkins. J. A. 
Williams, J. R. 
Whiting, S. W. 
Whitfield, J. V. 
Wood, Julian 
Wood, F. P. 
Wooten, J. E. 

WOOLLCOTT, P. 

Yelverton, R. V. 
Yelverton, R. L. 
Zolicoffer, A. C. 



Barker, E. B. 
Basnight, S H. 

BOUSHALL, J. D. 

Kelly, J. C. 



ROLL OF IN/CTIVE MEMBERS 

Lamb, Luke Post, W. N. 



Marks. A. R. 
Morris, J W. 
Marrow, H. B. 



Royster, T. S. 
Well, L. A. 
Wilson, G. P. 



WE HUNDRED NINETY-FOUR 




Debating Union 



President W. R. PETTEWAY, Phi. 

Secretary J. T. Pritchett, Di. 

Walter Stokes, Jr., Phi. 

R. W. Isley, Di. 

S. W. Whiting, Phi. 

J. C. Busby, Di. 



ONE HUNDRED NINETY-FIVE 















TH 




Intercollegiate Debating at Carolina 

f' *"Y*^ STEMATIC organized debating had its beginmng at 
/^^^j I arolina in 1795, when the "Debating Society" was 
' born. The Carolinian's love of argument soon led to the 

establishment of the two Societies as we now have them. From 
that time until now, these Societies have exercised entire control of 
all debates. In 1897, intercolleg'ate debat'ng was inaugurated. 
Although Carolina lost her first debate, she has been so successful 
in subsequent ones that not a year has passed since that time with- 
out one or more intercollegiate debates. 

A wonderful success has been the result of Carolina's debating activities. During 
a period of fifteen years she has won twenty-seven intercollegiate debates, and lost only- 
nine. Of the last seventeen debates she has lost only three. Of all her intercollegiate 
activities, debating has been by far the most successful. The debaters' "N. C." has 
become the most coveted of all Carolina's insignia. 

Aside from the success Carolina has won in this field, debating occupies a unique 
place among the list of student activities. The tremendous amount of enthusiasm manifested 
by the students at large, the zealous rivalry among competitors, and the splendid aid and 
cooperation of the Faculty all bear witness to the fact that debating holds a high place 
at Carolina. 



ONE HUNDRED NINETY-SIX 












Carolina - Virginia Debate 




Query 

Resolved That, Without Regard for the 

Obligations of the Hay-Pauncefote Treaty, the 

Panama Tolls Should be the Same for the 
Merchant Vessels of All Nations. 



J. C. Busby 



Affirmative: VIRGINIA 
Negative: CAROLINA 




\V. F. Taylor 



ONF HUNDRED XI. XI 1 V SI l/.X 



Carolina-Johns Hopkins Debate 




Query 

Resolved That, Without Regard for the 

Obhgations of the Hay-Pauncefote Treaty, the 

Panama Tolls Should be the Same for the 
Merchant Vessels of all Nations. 



W. S. TlLLETT 



Affirmative: CAROLINA 

Negative: Johns HOPKINS 




F. P. Graham 



'A 7- HUNDRED XIXETY-EHIHT 





Commence- 
ment 
Debate 
1912 



H. C. Petteway, Phi. W. R. Pettewav. Phi. 

Resolved, That the federal government should own and operate the telegraphs. 



Affirmative 

Phi. 

Negative 

Di. 

Won by Affirmativ 

B'ngham Medal 

won by 

J. C. Busby 





R. W. Isley, Di. 



J. C. Busby, Di. 



ONE HUNDRED NINETY-NINE 












JLJA. 



,^OLINA-/3- YACKETY-YACK 




B. L. Field, Di 



H. S. Willis, Di 



Resolved, That coastwise ships should be allowed to pass through the Panama Canal 
without paying tolls. 




Affirmative 

Di. 

Negative 

Phi. 

Won by Negative 




T. C. BOUSHALL, Phi, 



K. C. ROVALL, Phi, 



TWi ' IIIXPKlli 






IST"*? 







Freshman- 

Sophcmore 
Debate 




G. A. Martin, '15 



J. O. Dvsart, '16 



QUERY 

Resolved, That government interference in the affairs of corporations should not go 
beyond the requirement of full publicity of the transact ons of the corporations. 




Affirmative 
Di. 

Negative 
Pill. 




Wade Kornegay, '15 



H. G. Hudson, '16 



TITO HV.WRF.D ONE 










Juni 



mor 



razors' 
Contest 




B. H. Mebane, D\ 
'Democracy and Education' 



Walter Stok.es, Jr., Phi. 

"The Progressive Movement 

in the South" 




Won by 
H. Mebane 




J. C. Busby, Di. 

'The Spirit of Southern 

Progressiveness" 



I. M. Bailey, Ph.. 
"The New Democracy' 



TWO HVSDRED TWO 




f jP * HE TAU KAPPA ALPHA SOCIETY is a national organization, founded 
■ ^m for the twofold purpose of recognizing excellence in public speaking, and of 
^™^^ developng interest in oratory and debate among the undergraduates of 
American colleges and universities. The charter of the North Carolma Chapter was 
granted by the National Council May 30, 1910. Any student who represents this 
University in intercollegiate debate is ent tied to membership in the Society. 

Members 

Prof. Edward Kidder Graham 

Prof. William Stanley Bernard 

L. P. McLendon 

W. F. Taylor 

W. S. Tillett 

F. P. Graham 

J. C. Busby 

B. H. Mebane 



JH'O III WDRin THREE 









7TOT 



■#- B ; ' itiiA^ 






;- VACK£ry-vACK 




Founded at William and Mary College. December 5. 1776 
Alpha of North Carolina, established 1904 

OFFICERS 

Robert Obadiah Huffman President 

Victor Aldine Coulter Secretar ji 

Thomas James Wilson, Jr., Ph.D Permanent Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Francis Preston Venable, Ph.D., LL.D. 

William Chambers Coker, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

George Howe, Ph.D., Princeton 

Henry MacGilbert Wacstaff. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

William Morton Dey. Ph.D., Harvard 

Harry Woodbine Chase, Ph.D., Clarke 

Alvin Sawyer Wheeler. Ph.D.. Harvard 

Mrs. Archibald Henderson. A.M.. '02 

Archibald Henderson, Ph.D.. '98 

Edward Kidder Graham. A.M., '98 

Louis Round Wilson, Ph.D., '99 

Kent J. Brown. Ph.D. 

Warren Stone Cordis, Ph.D. 

Thomas James Wilson. Jr.. Ph.D.. '94 

Marvin Hendrix Stacy. A.M., '02 

Nathan Wilson Walker. A.B., '03 

John Wayne Lasley, A.M.. 10 

CLASS 1910 

Frank Porter Graham 

CLASS 1911 

Walter Frank Taylor 

CLASS 1912 

Price Henderson Gwynn. Jr. 

CLASS 1913 

Victor Aldine Coulter 

Frank Hunter Kennedy 

George Lunsford Carrington 

Robert Obadiah Huffman 

Robert Campbell Jurney 

William Albert Kirksey 

John Madison Labberton 

Fred Wilson Morrison 

Jasper Louis Phillips 

William Nicholas Post 

Douglas Le Telle Rights 

James Blaine Scarborough 

Jackson Town-send 



7 ICO HUNDRED FOUR 



The Young Men's Christian Association 




(hi! 



^^^^^ HERE is an organization at Chape] Hil 
M /«^^ for those things which are highest and be:t 
A 1 life. More than 

^^^^ to this high 
aim. It offers 

a welcome and its helpful 

service to every University 



that stands 
i University 
v to live up 



posal for rest, re 
cially invited to 
ices, and the vai 



The Freshman upon the 
threshold of a higher educa- 
tion finds this institution a 
friend indeed. Information 
and friendly aid are offered 
to every new man. The 
building is ever at their dis- 
ding, and pleasant pastime. New men are espe- 
attend and lake part in religious meetings, serv- 
given with a view to strengthening 



naturally religious, 
1 invitation to take 
11-known, learned, 
k the students 



the relig-ous life of the students. 

The primary object of the institution 

and to all men, young and old, there is a con 

part in its activities. From time to lime l 

and interesting speakers conduct meetings. Each 

themselves meet together for a quiet prayer-meeting. Bible study 

and Mission Study Classes assemble on Sundays throughout the 

year. Teachers are trained to take part in the Sunday School 

work in the surrounding community. Thus :n many ways this institution acts as a guide and anchorage 

for the youth in the important stages 
of his development. 

The social feature should not be 





overlo 
and f< 
the b. 



>ked. Good reading, games, 
Uowship are ever to be found in 
lilding. Socials, receptions, and 
celebrations are held here and 
this year the building has been one of 
the most frequented and popular spots 
of the University. 

An earnest, genial secretary is ever 
ady to confer and advise with students. 

Thus this institution, conducted by 
students themselves, has been of immense 
value to students of previous years, 
and stands ready to continue and 
increase in good works, with an invi- 
tation, a welcome, and a promise to 
every son of Carol ma. 

— D. L. R. 



TWO HUNDRED SIX 




Young Men's Christian Association 

OFFICERS 

D. L. Rights President E. M. Coulter ..Secretary 

A. L. M. WIGGINS. Treasurer Ed. P. Hali General Secretary 



CABINET 

S. W. Whiting ...Bible Study 

J. R. Gentry Mission Study 

E. M. COULTER Religious Meetings 

G. B. Phillips ] 



T. E. Story 
H. S. Willis 



Neighborhood Work 
. New Siudenh 



Horace Sisk .. ... Self Help 

W. S. TlLLETT ... Socio/ 

Walter Stok.es, Jr Lyceum 

G. L. CARRINGTON. .... Publications 

Oscar Leach House Committee 
E. W. Joyner Membership 



A. L. M. Wiggins Fin 



ADVISORY BOARD 

E. K. Graham Chairman, '98 
C. L. Raper 
F. P. Venasle 
George Stevens, '96 Charlotte 
E. H. Ronthaler, '98 Winston 
R. H. Lewis, '71 Raleigh 



L. R. Wilson Secretary-Treasurer '99 

A. Henderson 

A. H. Patterson. '91 

A. M. Scales, '93 Greensboro 

J. S. Hill. '89 Durham 

Robert Strange, '79 Wilmington 



I II ii HI SDR I- // Si. I I \ 



imn Tr 












TH < -13- Y/ 



Ministerial Club 



D. L. Rights 
J. N. Bynum... 



OFFICERS 

President J. E. Holmes Vice-President 

.Secretary J. R. Mallett Treasurer 



B. M. Walton 

E. G. JOYNER 



MEMBERS 
B. M. Lackey 
T. M. Ramsaur 



S. A. Matthews 
Rupert Merrit 



The Brotherhood of Saint Andrew 



Rev. H. W. Starr Rector 

J. Reginald Mallett Vice-President 



G L. Lambert Director 

W. Dorset Pruden Sec'v. end Treas. 



J. N. Bynum 
R. E. L. Cooke 
O. L. Goforth 
W. H. Joyner 
B. M. Lackey 



MEMBERS 
G L. Lambert 
J. R. Mallett 
S. A. Matthews 
W. D. Pruden 
W. P. M. Weeks 
E. S. Simmons 



F. O. Clarkson 
W. L. Holt 
J. L. Huske 
D. H. Killiffer 
M. H. Pratt 



The rule of prayer is to pray daily for the spread of Christ's Kingdom among 
men, especially young men, and for God's blessing upon the labors of the Brotherhood. 

The rule of service is to make at least one earnest effort each week to lead soire 
man nearer to Christ through His Church. 



TWO HUNDRED E1GH1 






Pan- Hellenic Council 



Walter Stokes, Jr., a K E, Chairman 
W. S. Tillett, 2 A E, Secretary) 
J. S. Hunter, B n 

George Strong, Z * 

E. F. McCulloch, ATfl 
M. T. Spears, k A 

F. G. Whitney, 4> A © 
W. E. Wakeley, 5 N 
I. R. Williams, K 2 

Steve Simmons, <^> X 

L. L. Shamberger, n K A 



TWO HL'yDRKD TF..X 




o 




9m*>Q 








Delta IVappaLpailor 



Delta Kappa Ejps'ilon 



Founded al Yale in 1844 



Colors 
Crimson, Blue, and Gold 



Publications 
Delta Kappa Epsilon Quarterly 
Journal 



Beta Chapter of Delta Kappa Eps'ilon 

Established in 1851 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

President F. P. Venable 

Dr. William S. Morton Dev Charles Scott Venable 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Class 1913 

Walter Stokes, Jr. Peyton McG. Smith 

Class 1914 
Kenneth C. Rovall Ralph C. Spence 

Class 1915 

Donald R. Harris B. F. Patv W. Dossey Pruden 

William L. Thorp Philip Woollcott 

E. W. Norwood 



TWO HUNDRED TWELVE 




. 




Beta Theta Pi 

Founded at Miami College in 1839 



Colors Fraternity Journal Flower 

Pink and Blue Beta Theta Pi Rose 

Beta Chapter o{ Beta TWeta Pi 

Founded as "Star of the South" Chapter, of "Myst c Seven Fraternity." Consolidated with Beta Theta 

P, in 1889 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
Alvin S. Wheeler, Ph.D. Kent J. Brown, Ph.D. 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Class 1913 

John Speight Hunter Matthew Locke McCorkle 

Class 1914 

John Scott Cansler Malcolm Norval Oates 

Lewis Banks Payne 

Class 1915 
Henry Price Foust Henry Louis Graves Thomas Fuller Hill 

Law 
Robert Ruffin King, Jr. Robert Johnson Shipp 

John Rockwell Kenyon 



TWO III NDRF.D SIXTEEN 



itSSK 



tWLy, 


'8 




ivip 


"d 




St" 
Pa] 


Vr : -; ^ 


^ '8 


•i.\ | 


w 1 


. | f 






^ ^ tI 




! 








i " a 1 










/ .*^Sr 


R >~ • 


k 


i 


%ry< 


% 








■3 

U J. 

H 






*▼ 






F'' 




■ 



NS2ZHU 



jK 



w- 



v . ^ ^,0 



.-:,]? 



wMW§ 



A > 







Sigma Alpha Ejps'ilon 

Founded al ihe University of Alabama in 18 



Colors 
Old Gold and Purple 



Publications 
The Record, Phi Alpha (secret) 



Flower 
Violet 



XI Chapter o{ Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Establ,shed, 1857. Suspended. 1862. Re-established, 1885 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Edward Kidder Graham, A.B., A.M. 

Edward Vernon Howell, A.B., Ph. G. 

Andrew Henry Patterson, Ph. B., B.E. 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

William Smith Tillett 



Class 1913 
George Carmichael Robert Strange, Jr. 



Class 1914 
Joseph Lenoir Chambers, Jr. Junius MacRae Smith 

Frank Davis Conroy 



Class 1915 



George Betton Whitaker 



Edward Yates Keesler 



medicine 
Fairley Patterson James 



TWO HUNDRED TWE1\ 1 Y 




Zeta Ps'i 



Established. 1858. Suspended. 1868. Reorganized. 1885 



Color: White 

Ups'ilon Chapter o{ Zeta Ps'i 

FRATRE IN FACULTATE 
Charles Staple Mangum 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Law 

Alexander Hawkins Graham 

Class 1913 
Banks Holt Mebane 

Class 1914 
George Vaughan Strong William Pell Whitaker, Jr. 

Class 1915 

Austin Heaton Carr George Allen Mebane 

Frederick Cain Manning Claiborne Thweatt Smith 



I II , ' HI NDRED TU'E.XTY-FOl'R 




Alpha Tau Omega 

Founded in 1865. at the Virginia Miliary Institute 



Colors Publication Flower 

Old Gold and Sky Blue The Palm White Tea Rose 

Alpha Delta Chapter o{ Alpha Tau Omega 

Established in 1879 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
Joseph Hyde Pratt, Ph.D. Atwell Campbell McIntosh, A.M. 

FRATRES IN URBE 

Robert Strange McRae James Southerland Patterson, A.B. 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Class 1913 — Joe Yogne Caldwell 

Class 1914— George Frank Drew; Thomas Ashford DeVane 

Class 1915 

William Oliver Huske Edmund Jones Lilly 

William Baldwin Maxwell Allan Hoyt Moore 

Pharmacy — Edwin Harvey Ward 

Law 

James Ward Morris, Jr. Luke Lamb Edward Franklin McCulloch 

Wilson Lee Warlick William Bobbitt Byrd 

William Speight Beam 



TH O M.XliREn TWESTY-E1GHT 



!l$l! 







SUpija 3Eau ©mega 





& <4& A < 




j, 




Kappa Alpha (Southern) 



Founded at Washington and Le 



1865 



Colors Flowers 

Old Gold and Crimson Red Rose and Magnolia 

Publications 
Kappa Alpha Journal and Messenger and Special (secret) 

Upsilon Chapter of Kappa Alpha 

Established in 1881 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Joseph Gregoire DeRoulhac Hamilton, Ph.D. 

Charles Holmes Herty, Ph.D. Lucius Polk McGehee, A.B. LL.B. 

Hubert Ashley Royster, A.B., M.D. 
D. H. Bacot, A.M. Tom Peete Cross, Ph.D. 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Class 1913 

Marshall Turner Spears William Nicholas Post 

Paul Archer Bennett 

Class 1914 — William Clark Thompson; Henry Cyrus Long 

Class 1915 
William C. Walke Thomas Harllee Anderson 

Joseph H. Hurdle Luther Avon Blue, Jr. 

Law — Thaddeus Shaw Page; Kenneth Raynor Ellington 
Medicine — Ray Hamilton Long 



Till) HIWliKI-.D 1H1RTY-TWO 




?W\ Delta Theta 

Founded at Miami University in 1848 



Colors: Argent and Azure Flower: White Carnation 

Publications 

Scroll and Palladium (secret) 

Beta Chapter o{ Phi Delta Theta 

Established in 1885 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

William Stanley Bernard, A.M., Ph.D. Patrick Henry Winston, A.B. 

Thomas Felix Hickerson, Ph.B., C.E., S.B. 

FRATER IN URBE 

Frederick Greer Patterson 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Class 1913 

Swade Emmet Barbour Edwin Badger Hart 

Thomas Spurgeon Hughes Thomas Hart Norwood 

Class 1914 

Blake Deans Applewhite Wiley Benjamin Edwards 

Charles White Millender Marcus Henry Meeks, Jr. 

Class 1915 — Robert Edward Lee Cook, Jr.; Thomas Ethridge Gilmer 

Law — Floyd Gilbert Whitney; Lloyd Lee Gravely 

Pharmacy — Paul Clayton Brantley 



III III M'Khli THIRTY-SIX 



d®> 




$Hji Delta Efjeta 





Sigma Nu 



Founded at Virginia Military Institute in 1868 



Colors 
Black, White, and Gold 



Flower: White Rose 

Psi Chapter of Sigma Nu 

Established I88S 



Publication 
Delta of Sigma Nu 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

William DeBerniere MacNider, M.D. Archibald Henderson, Ph.D. 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Class 1913 — Thomas Michael Ramsaur 

Class 1914 

William Campbell Lord Carl Duffy Taylor 

Harry Bernette Grimsley 

Class 1915 

Richard Willard Cantwell Tracy Stockard 

Luby Alexander Harper Thomas Callendine Boushall 

Charles Preston Mangum William Tull Grimsley 

Law 

Allen Cowan Emerson John Watson Mitchell 

Charles William Martin 

Pharmacy — Robert Stroud Houston 

Medicine — James Shepard Milliken; William Easton Wakeley 



TWO HUNDRED FORTY 




Kafc>ba Si^ma 



Founded at the University of Bologna in 1400, and Established in America, at the University of Virginia 

December, 1867 



Colors Flower 

Scarlet, White, and Emerald Green Lily of the Valley 

Publications 
Caducsus and Crescent and Star (secret) 

Alpha Mu Chapter o{ Kappa Sigma 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Marcus Cicero Steph " Noble Charles Thomas Woollen 

John Grover Beard 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Class 1913 

Robert Frederick Gray Isham Rowland Williams 

Class 1914 

William Bartel Townsend Reynold Tatum Allen 

Class 1915 

Thomas Lenoir Michael Z. L. Whitaker Robert E. Little 

Medicine 

Louis de Keyser Belden James Steven Simmons 

William Alexander Smith David Andrew Bigger 

Law — Gaston Lewis Dortch; Lennox Polk McLendon 

Pharmacy — David Heath 



TWO HUNDRED h'OKTV-FOUR 




Pi Ka|p$>a Alpha 



Founded al University of Virginia in If 



Colors 
Garnet and Old Gold 



Flowers 
Lily of the Valley and Gold Standard Tulip 

Publications 
The Shield and Diamond, The Dagget and Key (secret) 

Tau Chapter of Pi Kappa Alpha 

Established in 1895 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Class 1913 
Lacy Lee Shamburger James Hunt Royster 

Class 1915 
Jesse Shepherd Pell Graham Harden 

Law 

John Scott, Jr. Watson Louis Daniel 

John Richard Jordan Harry Hannah 

Medicine 

Thomas Sampson Royster Joseph Dozier Boushall, Jr. 

Norman St. George Vann William White Falkener 



TWO HU.Xl'KEU FORTY-EIGH1 






m 




#\ llappa aiplin 





Colors 
Olive Green and White 



Phi Chi 

(MEDICAL) 



Flower 
Lilv of the Vallev and Leaves 



Publication 
Phi Chi Quarterly 

Sigma Theta Chapter o{ Phi CVi'i 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 



Class 1915 
Julian Nolley Tolar 

James S. Milliken 
Robert Cannon Sample, B.S. 



Alexander McNeill Blue, A.B. 
William Easton Wakeley 
James Stevens Simmons, B.S. 

Class 1916 

Allen Hoyt Moore Ray Hamilton Long 

David Andrew Bigger A. Barte Greenwood, A.B. 

Norman St. George Vann 

William Alexander Smith Joseph Dozier Boushall, Jr., A.B. 

Paul William Fetzer Benjamin Whitehead McKenzie C. W. Ely 



TU O HUNDRED FIFTY-TWi 



A\pVia CVii Sigma 

(CHEMICAL) 

Founded at University of Wisconsin. 1902 

Colors Flower 

Prussian Blue and Chrome Yellow Red Carnation 

Publication 
The Hexagon 

Rrio Chapter o{ Alpha CVii Sigma 

Establisl.ed n 1912 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Francis Preston Venable, Ph.D., D. Sc, LL.D. 

Charles Holmes Herty, Ph.D. Alvin Sawyer Wheeler, Ph.D. 

James Muncie Bell, Ph.D. Charles Scott Venable, A.M. 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Class 1913 

Paul Robey Bryan Carnie Blake Carter 

Victor Aldine Coulter Edwin Badger Hart 

Clarance Ballew Hoke Jackson Townsend 

Class 1914 

Frank Davies Conroy Arthur James Flume 

Junius McRae Smith 

Graduate 
James Talmage Dobbins William Lewis Jefferies 

Medicine 
Lewis deKeyser Belden William A. Smith 



Iiro HLWDKEl) hlFlY-SI.X 



•iSi! 




Slpfja Cfji g>igma (Chemical) 




Sigma Kappa Delta 

(Local) 



Alpha Chapter o^ Sigma Kappa Delta 

Established in 1912 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Graduate 
W. L. Jeffries J. W. Lasley, Jr. 

Class 1913 
J. W. McIver 

Class 1914 
B. F. Avcock F. D. Conroy O. B. Bonner B. B. Sears 

Class 1915 
C. L. Johnson F. B. McCall C. D. Lee 

Law 
K. B. Bailey 

Pharmacy 
F. H. Lunn 



TlfO HUNDRED FIFTY -EIGHT 





Sigma Upsilotl (Literary) 
Founded al Vanderb.lt ,n 1906 



Colors: Green and Gold Flower: Jonquil 

Odd Number Chapter o{ Sigma Upsilon 

Established in 1907 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Prof. Edward Kidder Graham W. C. George 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Class 1913 

B. H. Mebane George L. Carrington D. L. Rights A. L. M. Wiggins 

E. R. Rankin A. A. McKay 

Class 1914 — Blake Applewhite; Lenoir Chambers, Jr. 

Class 1915— W. P. Fuller 

Law — J. T. Johnston; W. S. Beam; 7. P. Graham 




The Gorgon's Head 




AmphoVerothen 

MEMBERS 
J. D. de R. Hamilton 
Jr. 
A. L. M 
G. L. < 

■iERS, Jr. 

I. R. William 



: i'EARS 

Oscar Leach 
J. T. Pritchett 

TlLLETT 




BALL MANAGERS 




COMMENCEMENT MARSHALS 




Publications 



Yackety Yack 

The Tar Heel 

University Magazine 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society Journal 

The Catalog 

Y. M. C. A. Handbook and Directory 

Alumni Bulletin 

James Sprunt Historical Monograph 

Journal of Philology 

Journal of Philosophy 

Alumni Review 



TWO HUNDRED SEVENTY-ONE 









EDITOR-IN-CHIEF AND BUSINESS MANAGERS 




BOARD OF EDITORS 






















The Tar Heel 



G. L. Carrington 
F. L. Euless 



Edilor-in-Chiej Lenoir Chambers, Jr Managing Editor 

Business Manager L. R. Johnson Assistant Business Manager 

J. W. MclNTOSH Assistant Business Manager 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

E. R. Rankin 

Miss Watson Kasey 
W. P. Fuller 

F. W. Morrison 
B. D. Applewhite 
Philip Woollcott 




TWO HCSDRED SEVENTY- FOUR 
















University Magazine 

D. L. Rights Editor-in-Chief 

G. P. Wilson. Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

J. ToWNSEND Business Manager 

M. R. DUNNAGAN Assistant Business Manager 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 



E. H. Alderman 
E. M. Coulter 




A. A. McKay 

B. D. Applewhite 
L. W. Axley 



TWO HUNDRED St. VEA 1Y-FIVE 




WHAT HAPPENED TO JONES 




Dramatic Club 

Musical Association 

German Club 

Coop 

Florida Club 

Horner Club 

Oak Ridge Club 

Warrenton High School Clue 

Webb School Club 

Whitsett Institute Club 

County Clubs 



TWO HU.XDRED SEVEN! Y-SEl E.\ 










— n 






mIIm'i t . 













OFFICERS 




A. L. M. Wiggins President 

T. M. Ramsaur Secretary 

A. A. McKay. Treasurer 

J. C. BusBY Business Manager 

BLAKE APPLEWHITE Assistant Business Manager 

.j, $. 4, 

FACULTY COMMITTEE ON DRAMATICS 

Prof. G. McF. McKie 

Prof. J. M. Booker 

Dr. T. P. Cross 




1WO HUNDRED SEVENTY-EIGH1 












"What Haf>f>cnca \o Jones" 

CAST OF CHARACTERS 

JONES, Who Travels for a Hymn-Book House C. L. CoGGINS 

Ebenezer Goodly, a Professor of Anatomy W. P. M. WEEKS 
Antony Goodly, D.D.. Bishop of Ballarat J. V. Whitfield 
Richard Heatherly, Engaged to Marjorie J. S. Bryan 

Thomas Holder, a Policeman 

B. D. Applewhite 
William Bigbee, an Inmate of the Sanatorium 
M. C. Parrott 
Henry Fuller, Superintendent of the 

Sanatorium ... J. C. Busby 

Zf Mrs. Goodly, Ebenezer's Wife h. V. John:on 

Wy CI3SY, Ebenezer's Ward H. C. CoNRAD 

^i MARJORIE, Ebenezer's Daughter C. A. Boseman 

4 MlNLRVA, Ebenezsr's Daughter W. N. Post 

, '^^ Alvina Starlight, Mrs. Goodly's S'ster W. B. Pitts 

\i . ' ^bt Helma, Swedish Servant-G : rl... . Don Harris 





two HUNDRED SB VENTY-nine 






il i i win li :iii-aii- 




Umvers'ihj of North Carolina 
Musical Association 

D. L. Rights .President 

J. S. Hunter ....Manager 

J. M. SMITH Assistant Manager 

G. M. Sneath....... ....Director 

C. T. Woollen Director 



TWO HUNDRED EIGHTY 





















J. R. Smith 
H. M. Stubbs 



R. E. L. Cook, Jr. 
R. O. Huffman 



D. L. Rights 

C. W. MlLLENDER 
M. C. McCoRKLE 

L. L. Shamburger 



Glee Club 

First Tenor 
R. W. Page 
J. T. Love 

Second Tenor 
T. A. Devane 
L. H. Clement, Jr. 
J. T. Prichett 

First Bass 

L. B. Payne 
R. H. Long 

Second Bass 

J. E. Hines 
W. N. Pritchard 
J. R. Branch 
4, 4, 4, 

Quartet' 



M. H. Meeks, Jr. 
J. W. Henson 

J. A. Tayloe, Jr. 
J. H. Lassiter 



S. H. Basnight 
B. G. Dancy 

C. Moore 

H. L. Brockman 



First Tenor M. H. Meeks, Jr. 

First Bass B. G. Dancy 



Second Tenor G. M. Sneath 

Second Bass.. M. L. McCoRKLE 



Payne 



Meeks 



4, 4. 4, 
Mandolin Club 

4, 4. 4. 
Orchestra 



Dancy 



Henson 



Pianist 



C. T. Woollen Director J. R. Mallett 

W. H. Royster, M. L. McCorkle, R. O. Huffman, Violins 

W. F. Warlick, J. W. Henson, R. L. Yelverton, Cornets 

M. H. Meeks, Bass Violin D. L. Rights, Clarionet 

J. T. Henderson, Trombone 



TWO HiWDRFD EIGHTY- TWO 













H CAROL/? YACK 






rerman 



Club 



President A. H. Graham 

Vice-President GEORGE CARMICHAEL 

Secretary and Treasurer - -I. R- WILLIAMS 



Applewhite, B. D. 
Beam, Speight 
Bennett, P. A. 
Biggers, D. A. 
B;rd, W. B. 
Blue, L. A. 
Branch, J. R. 
Boushall, T. C. 
Chambers, J. L., Jr. 
Cansler, J. S. 
Cantwell, R. C. 
Carr, Austin H. 
Devane, T. A. 
Dortch, G. L. 
Drew, Frank 
Faulkner, W. W. 
Foust, Henry 
Graham, A. H. 
Grimsley, Harry 
Harrell, \V. H. 
Harris, Donald 
Hart, Badger E. 
Hicks, W. S. 



Hill, T. F. 
Hunter, J. S. 
Huske, W. O. 
King, R. R. 
Lilly, E. J., Jr. 
Lamb, Luke 
Little, E. R., Jr. 
Lord, W. C. 
Mangum, Chas. 
Manning, F. C. 
Maxwell, W. B. 
Mebane, B. H. 
Mebane, G. A. 
Meeks, H. M. 
McLendon, L P. 
Moore, A. H. 
Morris. W. J. 
Norwood, T. H. 
Oates, M. N. 
Page, T. S. 
Paty, B. F. 
Payne, L. B. 
Post, W. N. 



Proctor, I. M. 
Ragland, Trent 
Royall, K. C. 
Royster, J. H. 
royster, t. s. 
Simmons, Steve 
Spears, M. T. 
Spence, R. C. 
Stokes, W. 
Smith, P. M. 
Swathers, W. 
Strange, R., Jr. 
Strong, G V. 
Taylor, Carl 
Thorp, W. D. 

TlLLETT, W. S. 
TOWNSEND.W. B. 

Vann, N. G. 
Wakeley, W. E. 
Ward, E. H. 
Warlick, W. L. 
Whitaker.W. P. 
Williams, I. R. 



TWO HI WDRED EIGHTY-FOUR 







*&^ ^l^^^JmMH' ^ * 






•> 

i 
J 


"■ 

^ 
**>^ 


,1 


i 




' 4*1 






f 


^Vfc.^i^p-1^ ; 





jl 









ACKET 




The Coop 

Harrison Neville Cock o' the Walk Jule 

DIRECTORS 
Sandy Graham Walter Stokes 

MEMBERS 



Boxey Tillett 
Bob Strange 
Red. Ellington 
Banks Mebane 
Floyd Whitney 
Spurgeon Spears 
Dick Belden 




....Assistant Cock 
Bill Wakeley 



Bob King 
Paul Bennett 
Rock Carmichael 
Lenoir Chambers 
Henry Meeks 
O. Toole Williams 
Jeg Thompson 



TWO HU.XDREP ETGHTY-SfX 




22? 



Florida Club 




Frank Drew President 

D. H. KlLLEFFER Secretary and Treasurer 

W. R. Petteway Corresponding Secretary 

Members 
Dr. C. H. Herty 
Dr. W. S. Cordis 
J. W. Morris 
R. E. Stevens 
A. O. Kanner 
J. M. Parker 
R. V. Clarke 
J. N. Tolar 
H. C. Petteway 
W. P. Fuller 
F. W. Norr-s 
H B. Drew 



TWO III Mih-I-Ji EIGHTY-SI II ,\ 













Horner School Club 



Officers 



I. R. Williams.. 
C. E. Ervin 



H. M. Stubbs 

J. A. Struthers 

M. H. Pratt 

Johnson 

I. R. Williams 

P. B. Beard 

P. C. Garrison 

Luke Lamb 

B. B. Sears 

O. B. Bonner 

F. W. Hancock, Jr. 



..Secretary B. B. Sears.. 

Members 
J. W. Morris 
F. J. Timberlake 



..President 
.Treasurer 




J. V. Whitfield 
B. M. Walton 
O. L. Goforth 
P. R. Raper 
H. M. Pleasant 
J. S. Bryan 
C. E. Ervin 
T. O. Whitney 
E. O. Hunt 
O. H. Racland 
M. E. Blalock 
E. G. Joyner 



TIIV HC.XDRED EIGHTY-EIGHT 




fli 



Oak R'tdge Club 



D. H. Carlton. 
A. B. Hamilton.. 



Members 
W. S. Dunbar 
W. B. Edwards 
John Hester 
Hugh B. Hester 
F. Sabiston 
F. L. Webster 
Jack Townsend 
Frank Kennedy 
E. L. Flippin 
A. E. Cummincs 
T. W. Ferguson 
D. J. Walker 
D. H. Carlton 
L. L. Abernathy 
R. B. Abernathy 



Officers 

President R. B. Abernathy Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 




Z. L. Whitaker 
W. F. Carter 
Tom Craven 
Manly Fulcher 
J. V. Price 
J. F. Sinclair 
T. B. Whitaker 
Carl Bailey 
Swade Barber 
V. M. Barnes 
R. P. Hillard 
W. B. Dalton 
D. B. McCurry 
j. a. cutchin 
William Capehart 
J. R. Jordan 



TWO lir\I>KF.l> EIGHTY-NINE 




WarrenVon High School Club 



Claiborne T. Smith 

W. Dcrsey Pruden, Jr.. 



Officers 

..President J. Allison Cooper Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



F. Sampson Royster 
William W. Falkner 
James H. Royster 
Collier Cobb, Jr. 
Charles A. Sloan 
Norman St. George Vann 
William C. Walke 
W. L. Thorp. Jr. 
Harry Thxpen 
Robert B. House 
E. Carr Speight 
H. G. Combs 
R. E. L. Cook 
J. A. Cooper 



Members 
William B. Cobb 
William F. Pitt 
William C. Thompson 
John R. Crawford, Jr. 
Claiborne T. Smith 




Charles P. Mangum 

John D. Odom 

Albert W. Iames 

W. Dorsey Pruden, Jr. 

Frank L. Thigpen 

W. R. Everett 
W. R. Hunter 
F. C Jones 
W. I. Proctor 

A. C. Zollicoffer 
C. T. Smith 

O. G. Edwards 
J. H. Barnes 
F. Hancock 

B. S. Royster 



THO H IWDKE D NINETY 













* 1 r 

Webb School Club 

Officers 

Walter Stokes .President 

B. F. PATY Vice-President 

G A. Barrier Secretary 

Members 
W. S. Tillett Frank Jarrell 

F. L. Euless Clyde Fore 

Oliver Latham Robert Wright 

George Duncan P. W. Craig 

Wilson Guthrie John Huske 

Jack Hoover 




TWO HUNDRED WW/) 







Wh'ifaett Institute Club 



E. W. JOYNER 

V. A. Perrett 



A. L. Hamilton 
E. T. Campbell 

M. ROBERSON 

H. A. Tolson 
J. W. Moser 
D. F. Perrel 



Officers 

President R. W. IsLEY Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Members 

J. B. McLean 
J. G. Dees 

J. E. WOOTEN 

R. B. Spencer 
E. H. Curry 




Tiro HUNDRED NINETY- TWO 



JEbe IBurlington IRews. 



St^EWSPat^ 



WINSTON-SALEM JOURNAL f^^l 



the Gastonja gazette 

CASrow* IS A BUSV in... 

GREENSBORO DAILY NEWS 
THE PROGRESS. 



™««n»f WUIIFJGJJ.P. 



THE LANDMARK. 
Ilje gmittfttlb % 



HS- -Ti THE EVENING TELEGRAM. :'""' 



The News and Observer 





Alamance Counhi Club 

!% J 

Officers 

I J. S. Simmons President T. L. Morro... Vice-President 

U£&*- D. L. Bell Secretary S. F. Scott Treasurer 

p}j^.- L. R. Johnson Corresponding Secretary 

KT'-,, Members 

D. L. Bell R. W. Isley V. A. Perrett 

'f . Graham Harden L. R. Johnson s C Pike 

J. A. Holmes J. W. Laslev, Jr. g F Sc0TT 

J. E. Holmes Tr. W. S. Lonc 

-■ "' George Sharp 

,> ''-, R. W. Holmes T. L. Morrow 

n v ii t? \; d J- S. Simmons 

R. A. Homewood L. V. Patterson 

C. L. Isley H. Patterson Clarance Spoon 

J. A. Thompson D. J. Walker W. R. Stanford 



TWO HUNDRED NINETY-FOUR 










Davidson Counhj Club 



Officers 

H. R. ToTTEN Fresident J. G. FEEZOR Vice-President 

A. G. Fitzgerald ..Secretary 

Members 



F. R. Owen 
W. M. Owen 
S. G. Hartley 
R. G Shoaf 
Roy Hege 




W. F. Brinkley 
R. S. Yarboro 
Paul Raper 
D. H. Conrad 
W. O. Burgin 



I Un 111 \l>hl H MM- TY-l-ll h 










ForsyHt County Club 

Officers 

D. L. Rights President G. R. Holton i 

E. F. Conrad Secretary J. T. Day 

J. A. Walker Treasurer R. A. Reed J 

M. R. Dunnagan Corresponding Secretary 

Members 
R. C. Jurney 
J. M. Labberton 
P. A. Bennett 
D. L. Rights 
Badger Hart 
G. R. Holton 
J. A. Walker 
R. A. Reed 
D. H. Carlton 
L. B. Wall 
M. R. Dunnagan 
H. C. Conrad 

Honorary Members 
A. H. Patterson C. T. Woollen 




E. F. Conrad 

B. B. Holder 
J. T. Day 

A. E. Cummincs 
D. F. Perrell 
Julian Hart 
P. B. Marshall 

C. R. Pfaff 
Robert Vaughan 
William Pell 
Moses Shapiro 

F. R. Lunn 
Roy Hece 



J. G. Beard 



Til O HUNDRED NINETY-SIX 







R. Rankin 
H. Workman 



Gaston - Lincoln County Club 

Officers 
President J. W. McIntosh 



lice-President 
Secretary 



Members 
G. R. Roberts 
E. R. Rankin 
S. L. Reid 
W. K. Reid 
J. W. McIntosh 




B. M. Lackey 
W. F. Warlick 
F. G. Whitney 
M. A. Stroup 
J. H. Workman 
Frank Love 



Tiro HiwnnEu .\/.\/i7 y s/:r/i.\ 




Guilford Counhj Club 



E. H. Alderman. 
H. Cone 



Officers 
iWenl G. 



W. EuTSLER.. 



H. Cone 
S. B. Lindau 
T. D. Blair 

D. W. Hunter 
H. P. Foust 

E. H. Alderman 
R. R. King 

B. L. Field 
H. S. Willis 
T. J. Hoover 
O. C. Nance 

M. C. DONNELL 



Members 

L. ScHIFFMAN 

H. Temko 

R. A. McDuffie 






Vice-PresiJen 

..Secretary and Treasure] 

G. W. EUTSLER 

A. R. Wilson 
J. S. Hunter 
H. L. Brockman 
J. G. Lambert 
A. C. Forney 
J. B. McLean 
T. B. Whitaker 
Z. L. Whitaker 
W. S. Dunbar 
W. C. Garrett 
H. G. Grimsley 



TWO HUNDRED NINE TV-EIGHT 




Halifax County) Club 

Officers 

Claiborne T. Smith President 

Claud A. Boseman. Vice-President 

Louis B. Meyer, Jr. Secretary and Treasurer 

Members 



Daniel L. Bell 
A. Morse Atkinson 
Robert B. House 
W. Robert Everett 




Allen C. Zollicoffer 
Claiborne T. Smith 
Paul L. White 
Claude A. Boseman 
Louis B. Meyer, Jr. 



TWO HI VDRED VINETY-NINF. 




Iredell Counhj Club 

Officers 

F. H. Kennedy President 

j. E. Bagwell Vice-President 

j. O. R. Overcash.. Treasurer 

A. L. Gaither Secretary 

C. E. ERV'IN Corresponding Secretary 

Members 
Miss Rachel Summers J. Y. Caldwell T. H. Anderson 

V. B. Jurney J. B. Glover O. L. Goforth 

T. H. Deaton J. A. Scott, Jr. H. Miller 




THREE HUNDRED 







I. M. Bailey 

J. E. Turlington. 



I. M. Bailey 
Gardener Hudson 
Robert Wellons 
C. C. Canady 
R. Canady 
J. C. Warren 

R. HlLLIARD 

Rudolph Barnes 
J. H. Barnes 
Ferny Cole 
Herman Jernican 
Ezra Parker 



Johnston County) Club 

Officers 

President Ezra Parker 

Secretary James Eldridge.. 

Members 
B. F. Wellons 



-President 
Treasurer 



R. E. Parker 




W. H. Joyner 
J. R. Holt 
Nathan Cole 
J. P. Corden 
James Eldridge 
Chester Lassiter 
S. E. Barbour 
J. E. Turlington 
R. F. Coats 
H. D. Lambert 
J. I. Lee 
E. T. Bell 



THREE III WIIRF.D OXE 







Mecklenburg Counhj Club 

Officers 

L. H. Ransom President W. S. TlLLETT Vice-President 

G. M. Long Secretary and Treasurer 



L. L. Abernathy 
R. B. Abernathy 
F. D. Clarkson 
Tom Craven 
H. C. Long, Jr. 
F. M. McCall 
W. O. B. Maxwell 
D. R. Austin 
C. P. Buchanan 
J. S. Cansler 
J. L. Chambers 
C. D. Moore 
M. N. Oates 
W. B. Pitts 



Members 
W. C. Davis 
A. M. Elliott 
C. L. Fore 
F. P. Graham 




P. W. Greer 
W. G. Guthrie 
H. V. Johnson 
G M. Lonc 
W. W. Rankin, Jr. 
L. H. Ransom 
E. S. Reid 
J. M. Smith 
J. C. Stancil 
C. M. Strong. Jr. 
C. D. Taliaferro 
W. S. Tillett 
N. S. Vann 
H. C. Warlick 



THREE Hi'.XDRED TWO 

















Nash- Edgecombe Coimhj Club 

Officers 

E. W. JOYNER President W. L. Thorpe Vice-President 

j. D. Odom Secrelar]) and Treasurer 

R. E. L. Cook, Jr Corresponding Secretary 

W. L. THORPE Corresponding Secretary 

Members 



THREE HE. XT' REE) THREE 





Rowan Counhj Club 

Officers 

Fred Morrison President 

Frank Starr. ...Vice-President 

j. C. BUSBY Corresponding Secretary 

T. C. Linn, Jr - Treasurer 

Members 

Will Shaver Hayes Collet 

R. Kritzer C. Murphy 

Ed. Marsh W. McKenzie 

Bob. Deveroux M. Ramsaur 

B. Beard L. Clement 

C. Coggin Reginald Mallet 
Trent Ragland Louis Swicegood 

Lester Fisher 

THREE HUNDRED FOUR 



"*v?jW^£" T'*9WE& T -' 



^OLINA-J3- YAC< \CK 




Wake County Club 

Officers 

T. C. BousHALL Presidenl 

PHILIP WooLLCOTT Vice-President 

O. M. Marshburn Secretary and Treasurer 

Members 

V. Anderson A. B. Harper A. G. Horton O. B. Marshburn 

K. H. Bailey F. H. May 

II. V. Bailed ■■%>' |;. mn F. W. Norris 

II M. Blalock - AJB^H fGrm ^ AN ^ EYNER 

T. C. Boushall I W. B. Rouse 

C. W. Beckwith a Prof. W. H. Royster 

H. W. Collins I F. Uzzle 

O. G. Edwards wF\( V * I S. W. Whiting 

K. T. Harper ^^^^^" lL B. Yarboro 

THREE HUNDRED FIVE 




















T. H. Norwood, President 



B. F. Aycock 
P. R. Bryan 

Barden Cobb 

R. M. Cox 

J. R. Crawford 

D. B. Darden 
P. C Darden 
R. V. Davis 
G. L. Dortch 

E. P. Edcerton 
G. E. Edgerton 
Paul Garrison 
A. C. Hatch 

J. E. Hooks 



Waxjne Covmhj Club 

Officers 
P. C. Darden, Vice-President 
K. C. RoYALL, Treasurer 
Members 
D. L. Kkowles 
Rea Parker 
William Parker 
P. V. Phillips 




P. R. Bryan, Secretary 



E. J. Pope 
C. Morris 
E. W. Norwood 
T. H. Norwood 
G. C. Royall, Jr. 
K. C. Royall 
M. E. Robinson, Jr. 
W. A. Smith 
Jacob Shiaco 
Alfred Thompson 
J. G. Tyson 
Frazier Williams 
R. B. Yelverton 
R. L. Yelverton 



THREE HUNDRED S/X 




BOOK SIX 

COLLEGE LIFE 

AT THE UNIVERSITY 




The Sayings o\ Jones 

f' "~y* CATTERED throughout this issue of College Life, staring at you from every 
V^^fe paye. and confronting you in all kinds ol unexpected places ami corners ol this 
^— S metaphorical earth, are the "Sayings of Jones." These sayings are the bright, 
brilliant, and breezy essays of a vociferous set of vocal chords, collected and scattered 
through "College L'fe" for the amusement and safety of the not ungentle reader. The 
sayings, as we said, are satiating. The sayer is not a mythological character, as some 
might be led to believe from the classic d gnity of his "sayings." He is a live, flesh-and- 
blood being — still at large. 

For the benefit of the dense (?) we have placed footnotes to some of his other- 
wise esoteric remarks. After reading the footnotes, in the composition of which we are 
indebted to Mr. Jones for valuable aid and information — the reader will begin to get 
some comprehension of the profundity of acumen with which college wits are sprinkled. 

4. 4. 4. 

Freshman Parker to Fuller — "I think I'll go to some school when I leave here, 
and study for an electrical engineer." 

Fuller — "Well, where are you going? 

Parker — "Well, I've heard a lot of talk about that electoral college in Wash- 
ington. I guess I'll go there. Ain't it a pretty good college? 

4. 4, 4, 
Am! Little Hand 



I 
Ah, little hand, shall I forget. 

While life delays its flight, 
The little hand I held in mine 

One long gone summer night? 



II 

My hopes were faint, and yet I plunged 
My heart ceased beating; then 

A grating voice broke on my ear, 
"I'm in, and raise you ten." 



THREE HUNDRED NINE 












Our Tar Heel Correspondent 

Chapel Hill, N. C, April 3, 1913 

ONE of the most sensational cases that has been on the docket here in years was 
tried before Mayor Roberson here, day before yesterday morning. Mr. P. A. 
Bennett was charged by Mr. W. H. Boger, the senior member of the firm of 
Po?er and family, with impersonating an offices - continually and habitually. 
Mr. Boger presented evidence to prove that Bennett, alias P — , was in the habit of loafing 
around his store, and sampling peanuts, cakes, raisins, and bananas the same as though 
he were holding a job on "Jug" Whitaker's force. Mr. Boger said that two officers are 
all he can support and still make a profit. Mayor Roberson, however, took cognizance of 
the dubious nature of the allegation that anyone should des re to impersonate an officer 
a second time on Boger's peanuts, and so divided the costs between the two. 

Prof. H. H. Williams, who has some of the finest beeves in the country, made 
another speech on class this week about "Good Roads and Bonds." Whenever Horace 
speaks, the students listen. 

Dr. Venable began his series of Chapel talks over again today. He finished 
his series last week with a touching appeal for the Literary Societies. Today he spoke 
on his favorite, "The Honor System," mentioning as usual that he likes to call the students 
"Young Gentlemen." The next time Pres. talks it will be on "Athletics." This will 
conclude the series again. 

The baseball season is on ; but since this letter was written just before the Christ- 
mas Holidays began, we can't give you any definite information as to the disputed score 

of the next game. 

4 4 4. 

"Bivens, why did you join the Y. M. C. A.?" 

"To add more statistics to my name." 

4 4. 4 

It was McCall's turn to deliver his supposedly memorized speech in second 
Public Speaking. 

"Professor, I can't speak today. I left my glasses at home." 



THREE HCXDREIt TE.X 












Official Account of Yackety Yack Staff 

GATHERED from the scattered records of the business managers, and published 
with the hope of quelling the preposterous perturbations of the prattling popu- 
lace and with the view of putting a quietus on those indefinite rumors that persist 
in exist'ng. 

Expenditures 

Binding for Yackety Yack $ 19.21 

Engraving for Yackety Yack ! 34.78 

Printing for Yackety Yack 11.11 

Office fixtures— mostly Morris chairs and dining-tables 950.00 

Morn : ng's Morning for Staff 300.00 

Premium of life insurance policy for drag writer 94.16 

Traveling expenses for Spears to Richmond, Thanksgiving 171 .03 

Bail for Spears, morning after game 500.00 

Refreshments for staff— Bailey absent 1 55.00 

Refreshments for staff— Bailey present 307.00 

Comb and brush for Tillett, before Senior picture .15 

Laughing-gas for Carrngton - 8.25 

For prevention of competition from Euless.. 300.00 

Butlers, chambermaids, valets, and stenographers 2,325.00 

Hush money for T. I. Jones .95 

Drugs to soothe editor-in-cfref's debilimenls 16.50 

Stamps for business correspondence .04 

Peppers, gingers, and other invigorating stimuli for staff 320.00 

Dress suit and false face for Whiting 87.00 

W. S. Tillell. for comp ling this statement .02 

Bailey's endowment fund for County Clubs 3,000.00 

Drays hired to carry off near-lilerature 159.00 

Purchase of perpetual motion mach ne, to get contributions from Cy Long 5,000 00 

Trips to Durham and Raleigh for advertisements 759.82 

Lost on Venable, Blackwood, and University Transportation Line 1 300.00 

Total $?,???.?? 

Receipts 

From regular advertising $12,300.00 

From organizations .37 

From Horace and Charlie Lee — hush money 15.00 

From Cobb and Henderson— public'ty bureau 200 00 

From Stokes, for photos published 10.00 

From Kluttz— special advertisement for while elephants. 3.16 

From will and estate of Barbee and Lockhart .93 

From Bennett and Carmichael, for flattering Senior write-ups 75.00 

From sale of books 1.000.00 

From unsold books, purchased by Max Bane's meal market 116.23 



Total $5?.???.?? 

Deficit Ach Hinimel! 



7//A7A in .\/>h-r a /■:/./•: r/-:.\ 




WHERE PRESENT GREATNESS SAT ENTHRONED 




A FUTURE CAROLINA BASEBALL NINE 















A Matchless Tale 

*■ """, UK.E STACY and Fatty Bagwell rounded the corner of the Old West on 
/ their way to the postoffice. It was cold; and the winter wind whipped the 
^M—^^ loose cloth in the legs of Fatty's trousers until they took on the appearance of 
two flapping sails. Luke was talking. Finally he said: 

"Fatty, gimme a match! 

Fatty delved into the mysterious and cavernous depths of a pocket in his volu- 
minous trousers, and drew forth the requested article. Luke took the match, and con- 
tinued talking. When he reached the corner of the old Med. Building, Luke placed his 
pipe in his mouth, and, sheltering the bowl with one hand, reached out with the other and 
scratched the match against the side of the building. The flame spurted out into the 
winter breeze, flickered a moment, and went out. 

"Devilish carbon bisulphide! Gimme 'nother match, Fatty!" 

Fatty fished around in his pocket, and drew forth one more. Luke took the 
match, and this time sheltered the bowl with his hat. The match scraped against the 
bricks, flared up, sputtered, and went out. 

"Hell! Fatty, give me 'nother one of the darn things!" 

This kept up until a half-dozen partly-burnt matches lay scattered at Luke's feet. 
Fatty began a search throughout all his pockets for one more. Finally he fished out a 
long, lean parlor match. 

"Here, Luke; this is the last match I've got. You'd better save it!" 

Luke took the last survival by the nape of its neck, and retreated to the north 
entrance of the Old West. Here he remained a moment. Soon he reappeared, puffing 
out a cloud of smoke, and holding the lighted match in his hand. As he walked out into 
the wind, the match continued to burn. Luke noticed this, and began to talk. 

"Fatty, look at this son-of-a-gun of a match. Just now I couldn't get one to burn 
for a darn. Now I've got a light, the damned thing won't go out. Look at it. Just like 
some folks around college. Nobody wants it to burn now; but look at it burn right here 
in the wind. Burn! you long-legged sinner, burn! Who wants your old light anyway? 
Burn! doggone you; burn!" 

Here the flame of the match scorched Luke's finger, and he threw the charred stick 
away. He smiled knowingly at Fatty. He placed his pipe in his mouth, and took a long, 
deep pull. 

It was out. — B. D. A. 



THREE HUNDRED FOURTEEN 









A Farcical Tragedy 

TIME: November 17, 1912. 2.30 Sunday morning. 
PLACE: Durham. Police Stat-on. Cell. 
OCCASION: Driving off Brockwell's Cadillac. 
REASON : To give the Lad ; es a Good Time. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Tar Heel, Durham Sun, Town Talk, and Desk Sergeant's 
Police Blotter. 

CHARACTERS: "Puppso" Glover, "Beau Brumynel" Moore, Law Students(?). 

Glover: Why did we drive that car off? 

Moore: Why did you persuade me to go? 

Glover: Would that I were back at Washington and Lee! 

Moore: Would that I were back at Ed Mellon's Gents' Emporium! 

Both: Thank Heavens! Here come those Trinity boys to get us out! 



VjOWEtt?" 




•fr 4? 4 1 

Ray! Ray! Ray! Toot! Toot! Toot! Dr. Venable's Institute!!! 



THREE HCSDRED SIXTEEN 




CITY SCENES AND CHARACTERS 






The Hot Shot Ladies' Man 

Gaily the Troubadour danced round the Water Butt, 
Until a Half-a-brick hit him on the Cocoanut. 

^^fc—' HERE was a Young Man, who had it handed to htm that he was some hot 
M ^^ stuff with the Ladies. Time and again he would don his Royal Entourage, 
^L^W and saunter forth amongst the haunts of the Skirts, and Each Time would go 
to his room whistling "See the Conquering Hero Comes." He was always 
saying: "Believe me, I am what you might call A- 1 w.nner! " He played the old rag- 
time with a rollicking motion of his head, and continuously hummed: "Everybody's Dotn' 
It." He had never failed to fetch home the flour and bacon, and naturally considered 
h:mself a Cock o' the Walk. He was constantly in demand at the Bloody Pink Teas 
and similar steps in the Social Cellar. It is even whispered that some of the girls, in secret 
conclave, called him a "Devilishly Fascinating Creature." In consequence of all this, he 
elected himself the Property of a Visiting G rl, and Threw the Rush to Her, as had 
been his wont in his Native Heath. "Methinks," he muttered, " 'tis Time that Female 
was Falling for some of this Cheese I've been feedin' her this past week." When he 
fetched her to a Refreshment Joint, his Chest grew into a Port.co, and he condescend- 
ingly introduced her with a corresponding flourish. "Pretty good sort, that fellow there," 
he would say: "I'll let you meet him some time." This Lochinvar was the kind that 
always goes back in the Kitchenette, where the Old Folks are, and helps dish out the 
original refreshment: Ice Cream and Van.lla Wafers. On the occasion referred to, he did 
this. That is how he lost his hoe cake. He always will call himself a "Blooming Jay, 
don'tcherknow" for leaving her. 

But he did leave her. Whereupon she returned him his Meal Ticket, a few 
Poker Chips, a Pledge he'd given her to Quit getting Soused, and some Love Letters an 
Adoring Slave Back Home had graven him — "She was all to the buckwheat, you see; but 
not my style exactly, since I\e been around the Country and gotten an Eye Blinked by a 
Few Dames. See?" His ego dropped several points below par as she eased him a 
Glassy Stare the next day hard by the Druggery. Whereupon, with an air of Reckless 
Bravado and Devil-May-Care-but-She-Don't-Love-Me-No-More gesture, he hied away, 
and got Shot on a Pint of Pop-Skull. His successful Rival, a Member of the Council, 
promptly reported him next Day, thus causing his Collegiate Death. Whereupon a Mass 
Meetng was had, and several Interesting and Instructive Talks made by Members of the 
Faculty, after which was sung that undying eulogy: "Hark the Sound of Hard-Boiled 
Eggs." 

MORAL: Never give 'em a Chance to Call your Bluff. Jump into the 
Discard with both Eyes Shut! — W. S. B. 

•h 4? 4 1 

"I am so foolish that when I have a nightmare I dream of riding a jackass" 
— Jones. 



THREE HLWDRED EIGHTEE.X 







3- YAC 



Adam 

Everybody works but Adam, 

And he s'ts around all day. 
Swearing bout bogus checks. 

He well could be throwing away. 
Pickard runs all the business; 

Doc chews cigar butts ; 
Everybody works in this place 

But Adam Applejack Kluttz. 

— Wm. Loafer Shakespeare 



Jones — "Where are going, Perrett?" 

Perrett — "I am going crazy." 

Jones — "I guess that you will be back in a minute, heh?" 



Dr. Wagstaff — "What was the bloody act of English history?" 
Jones — "Why, Doctor, it was the act of Henry the Eighth, cutting his wives' 
heads off." 

4* 4* 4* 

The sunbeams kss the hilltops. 

The zephyrs kiss the dawn — 
If something doesn't make me stop, 

I'll kss you all day long. 

— C. G. 

4* 4* 4? 

"Warlick is by far the most progressive student here; for during his Sophomore 
year he took his M. A. in-law." 

4, 4, 4. 

Bush]) — "I reckon that I was the biggest fool when I was a freshman." 
Jones — "I am glad to see you holding your own so well." 



THREE HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO 






NORTH CAROLINA-/3- YACKET 



Places of Interest in and Around Chapel Hill 

BY DR. K. P. BATTLE 

IN OLD times, two roads crossed opposite the school-house. A chapel of the 
Church of England was located here. The spring from which the worshippers 
drank is still called Chapel Spring. Exactly where the building was is unknown, 
but the wife of Dr. James Phillips stated that, when she arrived in 1 826, the 
bricks of the underpinning were seen in the south end of the garden of Mrs. Helen Graves. 
The eminence on which it was built was called New Hope Chapel, the word hope in 
South Scotland meaning haven or refuge ; and the preacher in charge was Parson Mickle- 
john, a strong-headed Scotchman. I conjecture that he coined the names. 

The streams of the locality find their way to Bowlin's Creek on the North, and 
Morgan Creek on the South. These creeks make their 
way into what was a million or more years ago an arm 
of the ocean, its mouth near Staten Island, and permeat- 
ing the various States as far as Georgia. Chapel Hill is 
a promontory of the old coastline, two hundred and fifty 
feet higher than the old sea-bottom, which for millions of 
years has been dry land. The ravines and level mead- 
ows, the hills and vales, caused by the streams finding 
their way to the creeks, and thence into the Triassic Sea, 
on their way to New Hope Creek, Haw River, and 
Cape Fear, and thence 
to the ocean, are the 
prime authors of the 
lovely scenery around 
our village. 

The space allotted to 
me will not allow a mi- 
nute description of the 
places of interest around 
Chapel Hill, nor of the 

paths leading to them. I must assume that any desiring 
to visit them can do so, aided by inquiry of those who know. 
I will follow the compass. 

To the north, a bold, in some places a steep, moun- 
ta : n-like ridge, called Mt. Bolus, the nickname of old presi- 
dent Caldwell, Dia-Bolus, or the devil. Opposite this 
eminence, south of the creek, is Lone Pine Spring, a fine 
mountain spring named from a lofty pine, called so because 
it was the only large tree in the copse of woods. Not far 





THREE HIWDRFD TWENTY- FOUR 



















**^XJC, - 






A ROLINA- 






on the east of this copse of wood are two beautiful springs, which, as Bishop Green of 

Mississippi, then Professor Green of the University, once owned the land, we will call 

Green-Glade Springs. 

On the east of the village, in the grove where about a half-dozen professors have 

recently settled, are the Love Rocks, a charming place to visit, except in red-bug season. 

Not far off, but better reached from the Durham 

Road, is a romantic dell, in which is a flush spring 

of excellent water, named Roaring Fountain, so 

called because in former days the water trickled 

out of a bank eight feet above the pool. 

Further to the east is the home of the 

Country Club, which contains, besides beautiful 

views, facilities for golf and other games. 

On the Durham Road is the Mineral 

Spring, and deviating from that highway along a 

plantation road we find the Druid Spring, sur- 
rounded by twelve oaks. In a copse of woodland 

on the opposite side of the massive hill from 

which the spring gushes, is Black Tom's Lair, or 

Robber's Den, once the hiding place of a run- 
away slave. 

Nearer to the village is a forest, with rough 

paths cut through it by a former president of the 

University, and hence called Battle Park. In this 

there are sundry romantic spots — Trysting Pop- 
lar, Fairy Vale, Python Grapevine, Lion Rocks, Anemone Spring, Fairy Spring, etc. 

Further to the east from Battle Park is Piney Prospect, with its extensive view; and on the 

same hill is Lovers' Chair, Dromgoolle's 
Tomb, and Confederate Rifle Pits. 

Crossing the Raleigh Road, we find 
Miss Fannie's Spring, frequented by the 
legendary sweetheart of Dromgoolle; and 
on the summit of the hill was, unt ; l a 
recent storm, a lofty tower, built by Dr. 
W. C. Coker, and called by him the 
Kemp P. Battle Tower. 

1 o the south of Chapel Hill are 
the Overstream Poplar, the Meeting of 
the Waters, the Judge's Spring (walled 
up by Judge Dick seventy years ago), 
the King of Pines, and Queen of Pines. 





THREE HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE 










W "*Wffi£ 



MMMia 



iL 










Over a mile to the south of these are Laurel Hill (really rhododendrons) ; 
and, higher up the creek, Otey's Retreat, and, above that, Purefoy's Millpond, on the 
Pittsboro Road. 

West of the village, at the distance of several nrles, are two interesting objects. 
One is the Extinct Volcano, and the other, in a wood on a lofty hill, is the tomb of a revo- 
lutionary hero — John Taylor, usually called Buck Taylor, the first steward of the Univer- 
sity. He chose the spot for two reasons: First it is too rocky for cultivation, and second 
he could watch the negroes and make them work. 

Nearer to the village is Iron Mountain, University Waterworks; and down the 
creek one of the most lovely scenes imaginable. The creek murmurs on one side of the 




path, and on the other for several hundred yards the hillsides are covered with ferns, green 
in winter and summer. The name of the place is Fern Banks. On the summit of these 
hills, along the ridge, is a walk called Evergreen, overhung by cedars and pines. Below 
the Fern Banks is the remnant of a mill-dam, once very picturesque. It was used for 
skating and swimming by the boys, but is now without a dam. 

To the east of the damless pond is a series of gulleys remarkable for their depth. 
They have been humorously called "The Canyons of the Colorado." 

In the eastern part of the campus is a beautiful Arboretum, laid out and planned 
by our skillful professor, W. C. Coker, who is constantly adding to it. 

In visiting any of these places, the views to the right and the left are a delight to 
the pedestrian. 

■f, 4. 4, 

The man with the 8.30 sprang from the table. "Well, I guess I will have to 
tut my cakes this morning." 

Joyner — "Yes; I am going to cut my cakes this morning, too"; he said, as he 
picked up his knife and fork. 



THREE HUNDRED TWENTY-SIX 














YACK 



Limericks 

Young Alexander, the poet 

(And over anxious to show it). 
Wrote each day a verse — 
They grew worse and worse 

'Til at last we just couldn't go it. 

A student who liked not a tramp 
Complained that his feet would get damp, 

But Collier — you know — 

Our Geology show 
Said "you'll go if it gives you the cramp." 

In the Law was a student called Babbit 
(The fellows soon changed it to Blabbitt), 
Who talked all the time. 
Without reason or rhyme — 
His nickname grew out of that habit. 

Our friend Alexander M. T. 

(Well named, you can readily see) 
Used to talk a whole heap 
But his talk was not deep — 

We don't call him M. T., but empty. 

There was a cab driver called Tank, 
Who put a few rocks in the bank ; 

There was also a nig 

Who practiced Tank's sig. 
And drew it all out — the blamed crank. 

There was, too, a jury of men. 
Who sat on the case of Tank's yen; 
They found that the nig 
Forged aforesaid Tank's sig. 
And now he repents in the pen. 



THREE HUNDRED TWENTY-SEVEN 








13- VAc 

I I ! ■ M ■ I 1 . — — — — — — — ■* 



There was a great lawyer called Gattis, 
Who, of all the great lawyers the fattest, 

When a client named Dey 

Said he charged him too high 
Said, "I'd get lean if I did my work gratis." 

There was a cab driver called Coon, 
Who could stretch his arms up to the moon. 

He arose from his hay 

At the first peep of day. 
But he never got straight 'til to'rds noon. 

There was once a merchant called Kluttz, 
Who sold peanuts, books, postcards, and nuts. 

When asked why his price 

Was his cost taken twice 
Replied, "I must live, you darned Mutts." 

On the Hill was a party called Pic, 
Who could cuss a man out double quick; 

On the campaign went out. 

Put Tip Dorsett to rout, 
And he came back elected, by Nick! 

There was a young lady named Yount, 
Just the same shape behind as in front; 
For a cloak wore a cape. 
To cover her shape — 
Now warn't that a hell of a stunt! 
■fc 4* 4" 
P. Bennett — "Did you hear what I got off on Jimmie Neville?" 
Jones- — "No; what was it — a bogus check?" 

4. 4. ■§< 
Jones, to Med. student, who carries a skull — "It looks like you could demon- 
strate a bonehead without that." 



THREE HUNDRED TUE.XTY - E1GH1 









ii.A'T 






H 



CK 

-i» — -ii i in i — — — i 



Learn Your University First 



DEPARTMENT OF CATALOGOLOGY 

Offers courses of instruction, under able and unscrupulous professors 

Henry Horace Johnston, B.S., P.C. 
Professor of Catalogology 

Francis Preston Rights, N.G. 
Assistant in Catalogology 



THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 

RECORD 



THE CATALOGUE 
1911. 1912 



I. Rapid reading of the catalog. The aim of this course is to give a general 
knowledge of the courses of instruction, and to acquaint the student with the various titles 
of the faculty members. Required of Freshmen; Fall term, two hours — Mr. Rights. 

II. Detailed study of the catalog. Simple exercises, emphasizing the classic 
and scientific pr'nciples underlying this work. Prerequisite, a head full of Freshman 
innocence. Fall term: five hours — Professor Johnston. 

NOTICE— GRADES ON THESE COURSES DO NOT COUNT 
TOWARD THE *BK. 



THREE HUNDRED THIRTY 







' v fwsa*zwww**i 



The Sad Story of Bill, the Skipper 

BILL was unable to pay his board bill, so he skipped. Being a skipper, he went 
to sea. After a few days, a storm arose, and the ship was sunk. But Bill 
kept his presence of mind. He reached into his pocket, pulled out his cake of 
Ivory Soap, and washed himself ashore. Ashore, he was greeted by a band 
of savages, but he had to toot his own horn. They tied him to a tree, and went away to 
get fuel to roast him. Bill gave the tree a wrench (he always carried one with him), and 
up it came. The cannibals came running toward him. Too late! Bill had already 
taken the shortest root (route) home. — D. H. KlLLEFFER. 



Little Ctrl 

'Little girl, you look so small! 
Don't you wear no clothes at all? 
Don't you wear a shimmy-shirt? 
Don't you wear a petty-skirt? 
Just your corsets and your hose — 
Are these all your underclothes? 

'Little girl, when on the street 
You appear to be all feet; 
With your dress so very tight 
You surely are an awful sight. 
Nothing on to keep you warm — 
Crazy just to show your form. 

'Little girl, you won't live long. 
Just because you dress all wrong. 
Can't you wear more underclothes 
Than just your corsets and your hose? 
After while, I do believe, 
You will dress like mother Eve." 

— Selected 



THREE HUNDRED THIRTY-ONE 



Ill 






He Replied 

Answer to a letter ending "With an ocean full of love, and a kiss on each wave." 

If I could be a shipwrecked man 

Upon that ocean fair, 
I'd let each "wave" roll over me 

Until I gasped for air. 
I would not struggle, fight for life, 

I would not die in pain — 
I'd pray God for another life 

That I might die again. 

And when that prayer was granted 

By Him who rules above, 
I'd go back to that ocean 

Which you have christened Love. 
I'd swim where the water was deepest. 

And where the waves would fall 
In Heavenly showers above me. 

And still for more I'd call. 

But now my soul is perishing 

Within another sea. 
It roars o'er rocks of trouble. 

And will come near drowning me. 
For now I am a shipwrecked man 

On the sea of hard exams; 
So pardon this short note, I pray, 

While your humble servant crams. 

— W. S., Jr. 
4» 4* ■ *b 

M. R. Dunnagan rooms with Sallie Winters. Last fall he accompanied Miss 
Summers to Gerrard Hal! to hear Miss Spring recite. We admire him for his seasonable 
attitude. 



fHKhh HLWllkhU 1HIRTY-TWO 






W^xWtW 












■MWWBH 




Comfort that words cannot express — 
Comfort that's real, and hath power to bless, 
I find in thee — and thy holiness. 



Killeffer was given the following sentence to translate on the board into German: 
"You should have prepared your lesson better." He made six mistakes. 

Professor Toy (after looking the sentence over carefully) — "The sentence is 
correct." 

+ -1- + 

She lightly tripped across the floor. 

Her lover had forsook her. 
When suddenly with radiant eyes 

She smiled on Johnny Booker. 



Silence is Oppressive when Two Deaf Mutes disagree. 



THREE HISDRED THIRTY- THREE 









MmiL 










He hasn't combed his hair since. 



"The drink is on you, I guess, Old Boy " ; said the Wag, as the glass of water 
turned over. 

4, 4. 4, 

For Sale — A Horse 

In good condition. 
Cheap, on account of competition; 
Well-broken, easy on his bridle; 
With curb or snaffle never idle. 
A very little child can ride him. 
And carry three or four beside him. 
Why plod when you can ride so cheaply? 
There is no need to ponder deeply. 
I'll warrant he'll not bite nor kick you. 
I've not the slightest wish to stick you. 
However short you are, you're suited; 
For low-stand men can mount when booted — 
Come! buy my steed with manner gracious, 
He'll aid your reading of Horace. 

— W. P. F. 
4, 4. 4, 

Student — "Give me a dime's worth of apples." 

Dr. Kluttz — "What do you want with the rest of your money?" 



THREE nr.XPRED THIRTY-FOUR 



"^W^OT^ 



u. 









TH CAROLIN 



::: JSfl 

VCX 




♦ ♦ ♦ 
First Soph (in disgust l — "Shep, how long are you going to wear that pomp?' 
Second Soph — "I don't kn — 
Fresh — "About three inches, I guess." 

+ + + 




"What Happened to Jones? 



THREE HUNDRED THIRTY-FIVE 






I Long to Hold You 

I long to hold you tightly in my arms. 

And press you close unto my heart 
Where never anything but love and charms 

Can live — and hear you sigh and start. 

To feel you settle closer on my breast, 

And know that you are my love light ; 
To hear you say for me there is sweet rest ; 

This all to me is calm delight. 

Thy love will make me fight for good and true; 

And by the love looks in your eyes 
I go to seek and war for Truth and You, 

Returning soon to claim my prize. 

But in between the times, I'll cry to you, 

When all is sad and dark and drear ; 
And hear you say, with all the world untrue, 
"I am your only dearest, dear." 

— W. S. B. 
4. 4. 4. 

Coach (at Richmond for Thanksgiving game) — "Well now, boys, is there any- 
thing you want to know before the game?" 

Jennings — "Coach, tell me this: What makes the ceiling go up when we get in 
the elevator?" 

4. 4, 4, 

Out in the pastures with the kine 

My eyes grow brighter with thoughts of thine — 

Surrounded with daisies and goldenrod, 

O'er-whelmed, sweet maid, with thoughts of thee; 

For thou didst once traverse the sod 

Left now in loneliness with me. 

— C. G. 



THREE HLWPRED THIRTY-SIX 







WAITERS AT COMMONS HALL 
4* 4* -j. 



Elisha Joyner (rising) — "I have a man in mind that — 
W. G. Harry — "That man is certainly in a close place. 



t#nr 








£ 




^■^■^"^ ' ■- w '4fl 






^»^L . 


i 




^j 






, -" * ' 'iw 







Shep, dyked in his loudest and best. 
Of his picture would fain be possessed; 

So he went down the street, 

R. Foister to meet, 
While he in h:s finest was dressed. 

In his face great surprise could be seen. 

When the man said, "That sure you can't mean. 

This is the place 

Where I take your face. 
What you need's a talking machine!" 

D. H. KlLLEFFER 



THREE 111 NDRRD THIRTY-SI II \ 



A Co-Ed's Dream 

I've heard of the places of torment — 
Gehenna, and Hades, and Hell; 

I've read the most blood-curdling stones, 
Whose equal I never could tell. 

I've heard of the tortures inflicted 

On martyrs who willingly died; 
I've seen their pain-twisted features. 

And blood as it gushed from the side. 

I've smelt the most horrible odors. 

And heard the most terrible sounds. 

From every imaginable creature; 

Yea — even the howling of hounds. 

But never was I so tormented, 

So pestered, so worried, until 
I came to this blustering village, 

This place that is called Chapel Hill. 

The tortures inflicted were simple; 

The water was not very chill ; 
But it came from a well on that campus. 

Right down under that Chapel Hill. 

I know it may seem quite ungrateful 
To say that this town is a pill ; 

But all of my sadness and madness 

I caught in this cheap Chapel Hill. 

My trials, temptations, and sorrows, 

Might be numbered and then multiplied, 
But I'll stop here to write, 
Though I'm blacked every night, 
"I hope to leave here as a BRIDE!" 

— W. S. B. 



THREE HUNDRED THIRTY -EIGHT 




THE BLACK HAND AT THE UNIVERSITY 
•{• 4« 4, 

A Letter to the Yackety Yack 

A. L. M. Wiggins Chapel Hill. N. C, January 28, 1912 

Chapel Hill. N. C. 

My Dear Mr. Wiggins: — It gives me great pleasure to hand you herewith a 
one-page exotic derascatory theme, to be used in connection with your scurrilous publica- 
tion commonly known as the YACKETY Yack. 

This copy, I hope, w:ll be satisfactory; and, should it prove otherwise, kindly 
put me wise. 

Remember the rates agreed upon, 37'/2C per word; extra large words, 40c. 

With best wishes for dramatics, ethics, metaphysics, domestics, printersticks, et 
cetera, I remain Yours dutifully 

Doug. Rights 



lllh-l I HIWPHF.D THIRTY-. ,Y/.VA' 



Let's fro frne Love-Making 

The silvery moon is shining on the valley ; 

Old stars are winking wisely to their wives; 
The constellations dancing to the music 

The spheres have been a-playing all their lives. 
Why stand we idle? 

The little baby stars are even flirting. 

And courting in the shadowy Milky Way; 
Old Mars and Venus long have been a-planning 

The wherefores of their secret marriage day. 
What of our bridal? 

The winds have long been sighing for the tree tops, 

And they in turn have lisped a low love song; 
The shadows in the woods are always kissing, 

And growing older as the day grows long. 
Come to the love-making! 

The waters in the stream are softly soothing 

The rocks, and they are never out of tune; 
The moss along the bank is still a-listening 

To catch the murmurs that may die too soon. 
Let's to the love-making! 

The Universal Love in Mother Nature 

Is making all its children choose a mate — 
Then why dost thou draw back? Why dost thou falter? 
You must be mine ! Come, we will follow Fate ! 
Away to the Love-Making! 

— W. S. B. 
4* 4 1 4* 

Wanted — A respectable colored woman wants a washing. Apply No. 6 
che Street. 



THREE HUNDRED FORTY 




A HIGHLY COLORED STATEMENT 
4. 4. 4, 

From the Outside Listening 

'What's in that dish?" 

"Nothing." 

'Hey, there; get some more of it." 

"You hear about Bacot?" 

"What's the gag?" 

"Nothing. There ain't no gag." 

"Well, what is it then?" 

"Nothing, but Bacot said that Viles was a peculiar kind of fellow." (Noise of 
laughter.) 

"You swear he did?" 

"Yes. He told that to Marbly the other day they were talking together. 
Bread, please. I say, pass the bread; you deaf log, you." 

"Well, I swan that was funny." 

"What's that?" "Viles was funny — who said it?" 

"Bacot said it." 



THREE HLWDRED EORTY-OSE 



"Hu-hu-hun?" 

"Got any hot biscuits?" 

"Do you want some?" 

"No, you idiot; I was only making a platonic inquiry into the state of biscuits 
in Chapel Hill." 

"That's the best kind to make. An empiricist would meet his death here. Pass 
those breads, please." 

"Who's that getting poetical. Say, young man, we don't allow anything like 
that around this table. You have to do such things as that at the Freshman table." 

"Oahre, cheese it; won't you? What county are you from, anyhow? 

"Wake." 

"Well, give the baby some soothing syrup then." 

"I say, why-the-devil don't they give us some meat at this table? That darn 
fool of a waiter's got a grudge against us. He never does give us anything. Hey, 
there; have you got any meat?" 

"Do you want some?" 

"Yes; I'll swear and make an affidavit to that effect before Squire Barbee if 
that will do any good." 

"Remember, and be not wrought up." 

"No, for in that case sulphur dioxide might get into a finely divided state." 
(Noises other than those caused by the grinding of teeth.) 

"I say, Jacky; what about some of those turnips down at that end of the table — 
and some of that meat, with a little cornbread too — and ship a few of the fried music- 
roots on the same train with the butter." 

"Say, Bill; go downtown, and get Mr. Pendergraph to come up here and move 
the table down to Skinny, please. We can't keep enough stuff to fill the hole in his head." 

"Oh, do be quiet — can't you see I got in late, and everything had been eaten." 

"No, but I can see the visible effects caused by your presence." 

"Don't see how you see the invisible. Say, there; how's the dessert today." 

"Apple pie; fair!" 

"Match you for yours." 

"Let's make it three in. Odd man wins." 

"No; let's let the odd man — " 

"Give you a cigar for yours today." 



THREE HUNDRED FORTY-TWO 



" — drop out; and then the other two match it off." 

"Good! Shoot it!" 

"Do you gather me, Joseph?" 

"More turnips coming — Did you know? — What's eating yer now?" 

— G. L. C. 
4. 4. 4. 

VanUas VanUorum ! 



O, Henry Smith, Sr., Janitor, I salute thee! 

Thou ringer of the bell and sweeper of the floors ! 

Thou of the battered derby hat! the dusky visage! 

Whose head sitteth upon one side like a Judy, and 

Of whose teeth there lacketh many that are needed ! Hail ! 

To thee, O time-honored servant of thy University, Cano ! 

To thee, whose ungainly and disgraceful gait cometh from 

Running thy shoes over at the side, arma et virumque! 

Behold thy trousers, which are upheld only by the juxtaposition 

Of a string attached to them across your shoulders, but still 

This relieved not the prime necessity, O DIDO, for the addition 

Of another patch of a different hue to the worn and sadly 

Showing aperture in your arrearage ! Dulce et decorum est. 

— W. S. B. 
4. 4. 4. 

P. B. K.. (Senior) — "Well, how's your football team coming?" 
Soph — "Pretty good. How's yours?" 

P. B. K. — "Oh, as well as could be expected. We will find out how good 
when we play you Friday." 

Soph — "Yes, we will have a sort of quiz, so to speak." 
P. B. K. — "Sure! Hope we get a six." 
4, 4, 4. 

John Johnson — "I have a Democrat Donkey wandering about in my brain." 
Babbitt — "I hope that it will not kick your brains out." 
4. 4. 4, 

Why is a German "Club?" Ask Dr. Viles. 




THREE HUNDRED FORTY- THREE 






Ponerian Ode to a Jack 

Mounted upon thy back, oh trusty steed! 

Winged Pegasus of the speedy form ; 

How often have I soared to heights above; 

Sat with the gods on old Olympus' peak 

And heard their iridescent shouts of joy. 

As down the classic line the brimming cup 

Of nectar sweet was passed to while away 

The day! Or else, preparing for another class. 

Have roamed through Pluto's great estate of gloom, 

Where many famous heroes move beyond 

The region of old Charon and the Styx ; 

And there, where Darkness holds eternal sway. 

Draw out their lives among the spirits of 

Their kind ! Or yet again, changing to meet 

The changing ways of men, I ride upon 

The fruitful face of this old ball to where 

Men fight like gods with everlasting din. 

And carve with wondrous skill their enemies, 

Until the triple Fates with sad decree 

O'erwhelm and send them wand'ring o'er the sea, 

On hostile wave, 'neath starless, stormy sky. 

Unto a pleasant land where balmy breezes 

Touch fields and flowers, grapes and juice of vine! 

So, Jack, old steed; war-scarred and trusty friend; 

I ride upon thy back, secure in faith 

That Hinds has done his work and Noble wrought. 

— G. L. C. 
■4* 4? 4" 
Prof. — "Tell me something about the origin of the Christian religion." 
Freshman — "It originated with Abraham, grew somewhat weak later, and was 
greatly strengthened at the birth of Christ." 

4r 4* 4* 
Wild West Brothers — presenting the pristine puissance of Pikeville Precinct. 



THRIVE HIWDRF.D FORTY-FOUR 







The Silver Gleam 



Flushed with the sweet intoxication of an hour with her, he went straight to his 
room and did it. 

A nose, upturned, that challenges the world, 
With freckled tip; a mouth, perversely sweet. 
That queries everything with puckered doubt. 
Yet, smiling, flashes fairer than the dawn 
On summer day, or rippling wavelets kissed 
By sunbeams in the morn — and, flashing, lights 
The world; eyes, serenely pure and blue. 
That, sparkling, twinkle like the joyous stars 
On winter night, that, cooling, purify 
Like dew on violets in early morn, 
That, laughing, mock the world, yet, loving, hold 
One true unto the Great Ideal — that cheer. 
And purify, and make one strong; and hair. 
Pure wavy gold, that sunshine loves to play 
Upon, and little moonbeams touch with awe. 
She loves the window of a strange, dim church — 
An angel rapt with love and childlike faith — 
That softly hallows all the place within. 

II 

When she did not answer either of his letters, he decided that he had not been 
at all serious about it; but had merely had a "Fling With a Flirt." 

I met a maiden fair and gay, 
A winsome little summer girl. 
We stopped and flirted by the way 
And then — I lost her in the whirl. 

I told her that I loved her well ; 
She gave her parasol a twirl ; 



THREE 1/r.XDKkD FORTY-FIl E 



She blushed; she said, "Gee, ain't that swell?" 
And then — of course — then came the whirl. 

Ill 

Two weeks later, however, he came to himself, and took a dose of calomel (two 
more letters had been ignored). 

Moan on, alas; oh Muse, alack; 

With sorrow ne'er appeased; 
For since my liver's out of whack, 

My heart's become diseased. 

IV 

Three days later, he had again glimpsed the Silver Gleam, and was following 
after new gods: 

Oh, Muse of mine 
Had I the time 
I'd be perverse 
And write some verse 
About my love so dear. 

But since I haven't 

And also dasen't 

I'll be content 

If you'll consent 

To drop the matter here. — G. L. C. 

4. 4, 4, 
Grad (hurrying to breakfast) — "Got an 8.30; 8.08 now." 
Fresh (butting in) — "And you haven't ate yet." 

4. 4. 4. 
"Please move the stove, I am getting too hot" (Wilson at the Athletic Store). 



THREE HLWDRED FORTY- SIX 



My Fair 

Thy presence siveeler is than most 
Of all that joy has brought to men; 
Thy voice is as the chord once lost, 
That now has been regained again. 

And in thine eyes of deepest blue 
The calm of summer seas I see; 
And read therein thy heart so true, 
To lead one on, dear maid, to thee. 

I heard a songbird's pipe one day; 
I breathed a wish to see thee soon; 
The bird has ceased — the song must slay; 
That song is now my dearest boon! 

For norv my heart has left me poor. 

And thou dost have a double share — 

/ xvander o'er the lonely moor. 

And cry aloud for thee, my Fair! 

— W. S. B. 
4? •!■ <fr 

Judge Wall to Dr. Raper — "Dr. Raper, if this new banking system is adopted, 
what will be the relation of the Insurance Companies to a crisis?" 

Dr. Raper — "Wall, I can't see your point. It may be my ignorance ; but if it 
is may God help me. What suggested this question to your mind, anyhow, Mr. Wall?" 

Wall — "Why an insurance agent." 

Dr. Raper — "It is quite clear to my mind that insurance agents bring things to 
bear upon the minds of simple people." 



If Killeffer were to buy a German Toy, would he have to pay French Towles? 
No; not unless the authorities made him Booker. 



IHMili HU.XDRED FORTY SI \ I- X 










•J, if* 4. 

Mourning at the Bar 

Here is joy to those that have passed. 
And sorrow to those that have failed ; 
Torment to those who have yet to try. 
And Hell to those who fail. 



THREE HIWDRED FORTY-EIGHT 






Yackehj Yack Staff 



A. L. M. Wiggins Edilor-in-Chief 

I. M. Bailey, M. T. Spears Business Managers 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

J. S. Simmons Art S. W. Whiting Organizations 

J. L. Chambers, Jr Athletics J. Y. Caldwell Photographs 

G. L. Carrington Humor W. S. Beam Special 

Blake Applewhite Literature I. R. Williams Statistics 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
R. T. Allen T. C. Boushall V. A. Coulter Frank Drew 

T. I. Jones H. C Lonc Malcolm Oates Kenneth Royal 

T. S. Royster George V. Strong 



The Way We Feel About It 

IN the balmy days of youth, did you ever walk a mile and a half on an August 
day to a circus, and then dive into the cool, sparkling, immeasurable depths of 
a two-for-five glass of pink lemonade? It is with such inexpressible joy and 
delight that after a long and arduous task of collecting, compiling, arranging, 
rearranging, adding, subtracting, proofreading, smothering profanity, and informing 
multitudes of interested friends that the publication will be out in a few weeks, we now 
mop the perspiration from our brow and present to the awaiting pubhc a full measure 
of the cream of college life as extracted by our pet, patent, irrepressible, unpardonable 
separator, The YACKETY Yack. 

All good things have a purpose, and the purpose of this book is to give you a true 
picture and clear idea of University life. It is not a guidebook to the flowery paths of 
knowledge; it is not a masterpiece of composition; it is not necessarily a message of grave 
importance to humanity. It is Chapel H'll as we have seen it, felt it, and lived it. 

An undiscovered manuscript of the carbon'ferous era discloses that the three 
obligations of every man are to publish a book, build a house, and marry a wife. We 
now pass on to the second and third, after having fulfilled the first obligat : on by herewith 
presenting to you The YACKETY Yack for 1913. — R. 



Credit Where Credit is Due 

We would not for a moment have our readers bel eve that th?s book is the product 
of the Editors alone. We would not care to shoulder the credit or blame that will be 
attached to the publication of this book, and for this reason if no other, we wish to 



THREE HrSDRl-.11 FORTY- SISF. 






acknowledge the names and addresses of our co-consp'rators, and set forth their part 
in the crime. 

Our printers. The Observer Printing House, of Charlotte, N. C, need no words of 
praise except a display of this book. From manager to printers' devil, they have been 
on the job every minute, and have enabled us to perform the unprecedented stunt of pub- 
lishing the book on time. The designing and arranging of the book is largely the work of 
Mr. J. J. Sher, of the Bureau of Engraving, who also furnished the engravings. We are 
glad to have this opportunity of thanking Mr. Walter Holladay for the highly satisfac- 
tory manner in which he handled our photographic work. For the most part, the 
numerous snapshots throughout the book are contributed by George Holton. We beg 
to thank Miss Watson Kasey, of the senior class, for the valuable assistance she has 
rendered in correcting the proofs. 

The following artists are responsible: Russel Henderson, J. J. Sher, A. M. Atkin- 
son, Steve Simmons, Bureau of Engraving, W. P. M. Weeks, C. D. Taylor and Miss 
Watson Kasey. 

Give the above mentioned all the blame you can, and we will take what's left. 

— The Editors 




THREE HUNDRED FIFTY 



• 



iiiiiiriiiiii!! 1 !:,! 



'■" ; = 



"THE ORIGINAL FOUR" 

GREENSBORO FIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES 

Southern Stock Fire Insurance Company Southern Underwriters 

Underwriters of Greensboro Home Insurance Company 

(Consolidated with Southern Underwriters 1908) 

EIGHTEEN YEARS OF CONTINUOUS GROWTH 

See that your property is insured in Home Companies 
Write us if you want an agency for a Home Company 

Paid Over One Million Dollars in Losses in Eighteen Years 
A. W. McALISTER, Manager C. A. MEBANE, Assistant Manager 



OPPORTUNITY 

Master of human destiny am I ; 

Fame, love, and fortune on my footsteps wait. 

Cities and fields I walk ; I penetrate 

Deserts and seas remote, and passing by 

Hovel and mart and palace, soon or late 

1 knock, unbidden, once at every gate. 

If sleeping, wake ; if feasting, rise. 

Before I turn away. It is the hour of fate, 

And they who follow me reach every s!ale 

Mortals desire, and conquer every foe 

Save Death. But they who doubt or hesitate — 

Condemned to failure, penury, and woe — 

Seek me in vain, and uselessly implore. 

I answer not, and 1 leturn no moie. 



YOUNG MAM 

This famous sonnet, by Hon. John J. Ingalls, 
orator and statesman, may be speaking to you. 
For ten years the Southern Life and Trust 
Company has been "The Pilot" — each new 
year surpassing the last in volume of business 
produced, and holding the record for dividends. 
To handle this ever-increasing business, u'e need 
men, and this may be your opportunity for 
establishing yourself with a large and growing 
Southern Company that is pledged to Southern 
development and has made good If inter- 
ested, wiite at once. 



Southern Life and Trust Company- 
Greensboro, N. C. 

A. W. McAlister, Manager R. J. Mebane, Assistant Manager 



lli!!l|:!!:;!llJJ]liJIIJ:IIJJlli;:il;;IIJ:IIJ|jl|jJl:,:ii;iiillJ,I!lil 




HJffrt? 






bits mill r IeBiiIII! i I ii 11,11.1111 iijiiii rii:iiii.i::i.i,.iii n : 1 1; iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii mia! ni: :■ . mil iiiip| 



1783 1913 

The University of North 
Carolina 

OFFERS COURSES 
IN THE FOLLOWING SCHOOLS: 

Academic, Graduate, Law, Medicine, 

Pharmacy, Chemical, Civil, 

Electrical and Road 

Engineering, School 

of Education 



FOR CATALOG, APPLY TO 

THE REGISTRAR, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Illlllil!!lill!illlllllll!i«!!!lll!llli!l!!!!9» 



!:..i:.r..i i; r,.i nm 1 1 ;. li ' 1 1 ;..,i i , ' : v •& l;, .,- : 



fiio ! (ill 'vStQckaril c^rnpniiy 

TAILORS and FURNISHERS 
to COLLEGE MEN 



OUR CLOTHES ARE MADE IN 
OUR OWN SHOP 

Better values than you have ever gotten at the 
price you have always paid 

ALL GARMENTS FITTED BY AN EXPERT 
SEE US FOR YOUR NEXT SUIT 

Tivo ! (ill ^StookavU Company 

"At the Sign of the Scissors" 
cYlVfcmSftOllO, N, 0. 



■"'TT! ! ' i ' ' Film ' ; : ! ' ' : i ■ i ■ ' ' Pit; ! i ; :i ' ; 1 1 ' i : ... rm 



The North Carolina State Normal 
and Industrial College 



GREENSBORO. N. C. 



THE North Carolina State Normal and Industrial College offers to the 
young women of the State an education both liberal and practical. 
There are regular courses leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Pedagogy, and Bachelor of Music. Special 
courses are offered in the Theory and Practice of Teaching, in the Indus- 
trial and Domestic Arts, in Stenography and Typewriting, and in Vocal and 
Instrumental Music. For graduates from other colleges: Advanced 
Courses, Special and Review Courses, and Practice Work in the Training 
School for Teachers. For catalog and other information, address 

JULIUS I. FOUST, President 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Greensboro College for Women 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Elegant new buildings, with modern comforts 
and conveniences and new furniture and equip- 
ment throughout. 

Literary, Scientific, Classical, and Business 
Courses. 

Schools of Music, Art, and Expression. 

Full coips of able and experienced teachers, 
specialists in iheir several departments. 

Fall Term opens September 10, 1913. Terms moderate. For 
further information, apply to 

REV. S. B. TURRENTINE, President 






■■in 



FRESH CUT FLOWERS AT ALL TIMES 

SCHOLTZ 

THE FLORIST 



306 North Tryon Street ^ T r A r^r /^vr-rc M C 

p\, nn - 144^ CHAKLU1 lb, IN. C 



Phone 1443 



AIN'T THEGRAVYGOOD 

At Frazier's Cafe? 

229 WEST TRADE STREET 
CHARLOTTE :-: :-: NORTH CAROLINA 



CLEAN, QUICK, AND POLITE SERVICE 
COOKING BY EXPERT COOKS 

COME IN AND TRY ONE OF OUR 
THIRTY-FIVE CENT DINNERS 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



vi 'i ' r ,:'■',: r' ,■'",,'' : ':'','''.'' '- 



Old Man Experience Says : 

"Young Man, Protect Your Future Home, Your 
Present Obligations, and Your Probable Old Age, 

TODAY, WHILE YOU MAY 

by banking a portion of your earnings in the highest 
value contract, at the lowest net cost, in the oldest life 
insurance company." 

BE UNCONVENTIONAL 

and write now for particulars about the special 
proposition I am offering to CAROLINA BUYERS 
OR SELLERS. 

CYRUS THOMPSON, Jr. 

SPECIAL AGENT 
RALEIGH AND DURHAM, N. C. 

(Ask yourself and the man next to you what this Ad really means) 



llv! ijijl] ' ■: ii:il .. !: iilh! , , I I : : ! ! i.!l L I I . , I , , i I .,1,1.1,, I L .. u„: 



;!ll[|!!1lii;il[!ill!!II!ll!!]!iiiini!i!l[!:ii:!;n!:ll 



AMERICAN TRUST COMPANY 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



COMMERCIAL AND SAVINGS 
BANKING 

Capital and Undivided Profits 
$580,000.00 

Four per cent, paid on Savings 
and Time Certificates. 




TRUST DEPARTMENT 

Acts as Executor 

Administrator 

Guardian, Receiver 

Trustee, Agent 

Etc. 



George Stephens, President B. N. Duke, Vice-President IV. S. Lee, Vice-President 

Word H Wood, Treasurer J. E. Daois, Assistant Treasurer 

P. C. Whitlock, Trust Officer 



INSURANCE 

IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 

In the Strongest Old -Line Companies. When in the 
market for Accident, Casualty, Plate Glass, Fire, Tornado, 
Steam Boiler, Fly Wheel Insurance, Write us for Rates 
and Other Information. Surety Bonds a Specialty. 

AMERICAN TRUST COMPANY 

HARVEY LAMBETH, Manager Insurance Department 
..:;,.. , . ■ ' :. i , ' ; ■ . . : I ; I :,:..■', i 



'-'W! ! i:.i L.iri : ; 



r 



f^& 




(^bserber "Printing House 

B. R. CATES, M»ici> 

DESIGNERS. ENGRAVERS 



PRINTERS. PUBLISHERS 



L 



Cfjarlottc, J2. C. 



Z5M£I 



J 



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UIIl!llfllll!lllllll!lllll!IIII!!l!!!!li:!lll!l!lll!IIUIl!!!!lllll!!IDIIII!l 



KLUTTZ 



AT THE BOOKSTORE-THE PLACE 
TO BUY YOUR SUPPLIES 



?U 



SjTlHE Latest in Fine Stationery, College 
JKpLj Souvenirs, Die-Stamped Stationery, 
fml\ Cards and Calendars, Waterman's 
Fountain Pens, Blair's Keystone Sta- 



tionery, Everything for the Student. 

Up-to-Date Furnishings ; Latest Fads in 
Fancy Shirts, Collars, Ties, Hats, and Shoes ; 
Select Jewelry for Men. Crossett's Shoes — 
the Best Style and Most Comfortable Wear- 
ing. Everything the Best and Up-to-Date. 

SOMETHING NICE TO EAT — Cakes, 

Crackers, Pickles, Olives, and Potted Meats. 

Lowney's Fine Candies. 




BOYS, TRADE WITH 
THE OLD RELIABLE 



A. A. KLUTTZ 



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AUTO SCHEDULE 



BETWEEN 



CHAPEL HILL AND DURHAM 



LEA VE CHAPEL HILL 
LEA VE DURHAM 



8.50 A. M. 
1.45 P. M. 



This enables you to make connections at Durham with Southern trains 
East and West, also with Seaboard Air Line trains for Richmond and Norfolk- 

C. S. PENDERGRAFT 

The Pioneer Aula Liceryman, of Chapel Hill, N. C. 



H. H. PATTERSON 



Fancy Groceries, Shoes, 

Dry Goods, Notions, 

Hardware, Etc. 



CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



University Supply 
Company 



Athletic Supplies on Hand 
at all Times 



Candies, Cold Drinks, Cigars, 
Cigarettes, and Tobaccos 



/. M. NEVILLE, Manager 



Ml l:ll,i!ll!IIB!«l!1l!I!I!!!ffl 



MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA 

MEDICINE, DENTISTRY, AND PHARMACY 

State Institution. Has been in continuous operation since 1838. 
For Catalog, address 

J. R. McCAULEY, Registrar Richmond, Va. 



CfcNTR.'YI, 


I10TSCI, 


Charlotte, M, 


C, 


AMERICAN PLAN 


A. A. PERKINS 

MANAGER 



WARRENTON HIGH SCHOOL 

WARRENTON, N. C. 

COEDUCATIONAL 

Separate Boarding Departments for Boys and Girls 

Sixteen units required for a full certificate 

Fourteen units required for partial certificate 

ATHLETICS SCHOLARSHIP 

CHARACTER 

See picture of Warrenton High School Club in Yackety Yack 

JOHN GRAHAM, Principal 



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RESOURCES, 1200,000.00 

M. C. S. NOBLE, President H. H. PATTt-RSON, Vice-President 

J. C. TAYLOR, Cashier 

THE BANK OF CHAPEL HILL 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



Capital - - - $15,000.00 

Net Profits - - - 4,326.91 



Oldest and Strongest Bank in Orange County 



DIRECTORS 



J. S. CARR C. L. LINDSAY H. H. PATTERSON 

CLYDE EUBANKS HENRY LOYD I. W. PRITCHARD 

C. H. HERTY J. B. MASON R. L. STROWD 

A. A. KLUTTZ M. C. S. NOBLE J. C. TAYLOR 



GEO. C. P1CKARD & SON 

PICKARD'S LIVERY STABLE 



AUTOMOBILE 
SERVICE AT 
ALL HOURS 



Fine Horses, Stylish Carriages, Fancy Rubber-Tired Buggies. We make a 
specialty of college trade. 

OPEN DAY AND NIGHT TELEPHONE NO. 30 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

NEAR TELEPHONE EXCHANGE 



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WHITING & HORTON 

1 East Martin Street 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



CLOTHIERS AND MEN'S FURNISHERS 



We cordially invite you to make our store 
your Headquarters when in Raleigh. Our 
stock comprises everything to be found in a 
First-Class up-to-the-minute Man's Store. 



WHITING & HORTON 

THE HOME OF GOOD CLOTHES 






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^^flXTY- SECOND year; thirty-ninth 
j L J under the present management. 
Prepares for the Universities and 
leading Colleges, including West Point and 
Annapolis. Departments of Music, Book- 
keeping, and Shorthand. 

For Catalog, address 

J. A. & M. H. HOLT 

PROPRIETORS 

OAK RIDGE - NORTH CAROLINA 



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Diamonds 


Watches 


Jewelry 


Class and Fraternity Emblems made to 
Always something new in 

Graduation and Wedding Gifts 


order. 


JOLLY 

RALEIGH 


& WYNNE, JEWELERS 

NORTH CAROLINA 



SAVE YOUR DOLLARS BY TRADING WITH 

C. R. BOONE 

De Luxe Clothier 

Guaranteed Clothing, Furnishings, Tailoring For Men 
and Boys, Shoes, Hats 

226 Fayetteville Street - - RALEIGH, N. C. 

■■COME AND SEE" is all we ask 

We pay for Parcel Post Orders by Mail 




WHEN IN RALEIGH 
VISIT THE 

TUCKER 

BUILDING 

PHARMACY 



FOR 
YOUR DRINKS 
SMOKES, ETC. 




AND 

The Raleigh Savings Bank 
and Trust Company 

Capital and Surplus - $ 450,000.00 

Deposits 2,100,000.00 

Assets 2,750,000.00 



Joseph G. Brown, President 

Col. A. B. Andrews, Vice-President 

Henry E. Litchkord, Cashier 

Four Per Cent, interest Paid in Savings 
Bank, Payable Quarterly 



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WHEN IN RALEIGH. EAT AT 

Wright'* Onto 

The leading Lunch - Room of 
Raleigh, and the most up-to-date 
Lunch-Room in the State. 
Quick and Polite Service; prices 
very reasonable. 



On the Corner, under ihe Academy of Music 
WIRE 

WRIGHTS HOTEL 

FOR ROOMS 



H. P. S. KELLER 

ARCHITECT 

w 



OFFICE: rtCKER BUILDING 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



BELL PHOSE 244 



- 



Ill 



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Most Direct Line to All Points 

m o sir i i , -s o u-iM (, 'A A.sr , w ^sf 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities ; through Tourist Cars to San 
Francisco and other California points. 

All-year Tourist tickets on sale to principal Western points. 

Convenient local, as well as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. 

Complete Dining-car service on all through trains. 

Ask representative of Southern Railway about special rates account Christmas 
holidays ; also various other special occasions. 

If you are contemplating a trip to any point, communicate with representa- 
tives of Southern Railway before completing your arrangements for same. He 
will gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the cheapest and 
most comfortable way in which to make the trip. 

Will also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you. 



H. F. CARY J. O. JONES 

General Passnger Agent Traveling Passenger Agent 

Washington, D. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



3[ Illii niTfll^irHllliIIIIIPII'.lllllllll "IT!! 111! 'IT!, ill III! ITTTT'lITi :i ITlTlUn J IT.! TEIM 



Bin 1:1 '...ii:: minni; n:-i""i!"ni-i:-n: ,,, i l ' ,, i l " nn 1 ' r; mm ■ nrrr : :.i i. n:Tiij:::jm:i:i!;:::Tmim 



PEACE INSTITUTE 



FOR 



YOUNG WOMEN 



An ideal Christian Home School. Preparatory and Collegiate courses. Art, Expression, Phy- 
sical Culture, Pedagogy, Business, etc. Conservatory of Music. High standard maintained by 
large staff of experienced, college-trained instructors. Takes only one hundred boarders, and 
teaches the individual. Unsurpassed health record. Prick buildings. Steam heat. Excellent 
table. Large gymnasium. Park-like campus. Concerts, lectures, tennis, basket-ball. Write for 
our catalog before selecting the college for your daughter. 



GEO. T. RAMSAY, M. A., LL.D., President 



Raleigh, N. C. 



YACKETY YACK! 

If YOU are as smart and sprightly in your dress as your Annual is in its make-up, you will let 
US make your clothes and furnish you with all accessories! Ours is 

AN OLD LONDON SHOP FOR YOUNG AMERICANS! 

We handle only the finest, choicest goods — swagger, authentic toggery for just such fellows as YOU! 
Mail orders are given prompt and very careful attention. Satisfaction guaranteed ! 

FEREBEE, JONES & CO. 

25 1 Granby Street NORFOLK, VA. 



FOISTER'S ART STORE 



PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES 

ART GOODS 

PICTURES, POSTCARDS, STATIONERY 




VELOX PAPER 



PAPER 



KODAK FINISHING 

The very best work at the lowest 
prices. We use CYKO and VELOX 
PAPER for Printing. 

Send us Your Films 



PICTURES FRAMED TO ORDER 



Cut HiillJ;:!! '':'".: IlIEHHi 



:.;i in;., 



itiiiptil rrriiii rii'i htm:.! ilili: ::i.n 



HINTS from HINTON 

Get out of the READY-MADE RUT, and have your clothes made to 
your measure. Will fit you better, look neater, wear longer, and cost less. 

$18.50 to $50.00 

WE MAKE TO YOUR ORDER 

a suit that cannot be surpassed by any tailor on earth. Choice of the handsomest fabrics 
ever shown in the State of North Carolina, consisting of all the latest designs and patterns 
in Browns. New Fawn Grays, the Jungle Browns, The Santans, Olive Shades, and the 
Elephant Gray. In fact, all the shades that go through the looms, as we are showing over 
hree thousand Suit Patterns. 

A. C. HINTON 

NORTH CAROLINA'S FOREMOST TAILOR 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



The Royall & Borden Company 

1 06 and 1 08 West Main Street 
DURHAM, N. C. 

SELL ALL KINDS OF 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS 

Have been in business twenty-five years, and in that 
time have furnished most of the colleges and churches in 
this and adjoining States. No order too big for us to handle 
satisfactorily, and no order too small for our best attention. 

Call, or write for pictures, samples, and prices of 
anything you need to go in the home. 



iiiiiitai ,!.:□": nun nui-iimn 



I»lll!|ll!!lll!ll!l»lliill!!!::]!lli;ii!:!!!lllll!l 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL, Raleigh, N. C. 

The Diocesan School of the Carolinas for Young Women and Girls 

COLLEGE - MUSIC - ART - ELOCUTION 

BUSINESS - PREPARATORY 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

72d Annual Session Opens September 18, 1913 
For Bulletins and Information, Address REV. GEO. W. LAY, Rector 



Ellington's Studio 

High -Class Photography— Prices Moderate; Satisfaction guaranteed. Framing a Specialty 



120 Fayetteville Street 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



The Fifty-third great North Carolina State Fair will be held at Raleigh, N. C. in the month of 
October, 1913, and will be on a grander scale than ever before. Everybody and his wife and 
sweetheart cordially invited. The grounds will be enlarged, and important buildings erected 
lhis year . JOHN A. MILLS, President JOS. E. POGUE, Secretary 



THE NORTH CAROLINA 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
AND MECHANIC ARTS 

THE STATES'INDUSTRIAL COLLEGE 

Four - year courses in Agriculture ; 
in Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical 
Engineering; in Chemistry; in Cot- 
ton Manufacturing and Dyeing. Two- 
year courses in Mechanic Arts and in 
Textile Art. One-year and Two-year 
courses in Agriculture. These courses 
are both practical and scientific. Ex- 
aminations for admission are held by 
the County Superintendent at all 
county seats on July 11. 

For Catalog, address 

THK REGISTRAR 

West Raleigh, N. C. 



E. M. UZZELL & CO. 

GENERAL PRINTERS 

Binders and Blank - Book Makers 

Agents for the Best Loose-Leaf 

Ledger on the Market 



RALEIGH 



NORTH CAROLINA 



COLUMBIA LAUNDRY 
COMPANY 

Artistic Launderers, Dyers, and Cleaners 
Agents Wanted Everywhere 

114-16 Fayettteville Street 
GREENSBORO NORTH CAROLINA 



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Is Developed and Inspired by the 
Habitual Class-Room Use of 




Waterm 



Regular, Safety 

and Self -Filling 

Types. 

$2.50 

Up 



Without 

a Peer 

in Pendom 

ntainPen 

Your Dealer for Waterman's Ideals 

aterman Company, 173 Broadway, New York 



Boys, when in the City, give us a call 

Tucker Building Barber Shop 

FERRY NOBLE, Proprietor 

SINGES, SHAVES, SHOE SHINES, 
HOT AND COLD BATHS 

Under Tucker Building Pharmacy 

RALEIGH - NORTH CAROLINA 



HARRISON NEVILLE 

SUCCESSOR TO 

"MARSE" JESSE 

For Banquets and "Feeds" 
SEE ME 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 
>« = 

m | 

WebsterS 
( New International I 

-TheMerriamWebster 

1 Even as you read this publication you ^ 

= likely question the meaning of some = 

= neicword. Af riendasks: "What makes = 

= mortar harden?" You seek the location = 

= of Loch Katrine or the pronunciation of = 

= jujutsu. 'What is white coal? ThisNEW § 

= CREATION answers all kinds of ques- g 

= tionsin Language, History, Biography, = 

s Fiction, Foreign Words, Trades, Arts s 

= and Sciences, with final authority. 

I 40O,000WordsandFhrasesDefined. § 

= 6000 Illustrations. 

= Cost $400,000. f 

| 2700 Fages. 

1 The only dictionary with ,i^&£5^* s 

= the new divided page,— f' 

= characterized as "A •' i 

= Stroke of Genius." yv/' '/ / . 

= Write for specimen pages, .,:/, ■*•'.- 




siliMiiiiiiiiiiiniiimiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiB 



m i" !:;i:ijt; u:t ''^iiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 




It Wins 

its way hy service 



L. C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 

(Ball Bearing— Long Wearing) 
In buying a typewriter you want a satisfactory answer to three questions: 

What will it do for me ? 
How well will it do it? 
How long will it do it ? 

By answering these queries with the needs of the typewriter owner and 
user in mind, the L. C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter Company has attained 
the front rank in the typewriter field. 

Some people think that a typewriter is a typewriter 
and that is all there is to it. Machines may look alike 
but there is a lot of difference in efficiency. 

The new Model Five is built not only for straight 
correspondence but for tabulating, billing, and in fact 
for every service needed in the average business. 

Its ball bearings at all points where friction developes 
through action, permit close adjustment and insure 
correct and accurate typewriting. 



We would like the opportunity to tell yo 

more about it. 

Write for free book of our new Model Fi 




L. C. SMITH & BROS. TYPEWRITER CO. 



Head Office for Domestic and For 



SYRACUSE, N. Y., U. S. A. 



inches in all Pri-cijal Citi, 



J. E. CRAYTON & CO., General Dealers 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



all , 



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eeii] 



!!!iK 





^jwrwiAaa* 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Learn Bookkeeping, Shorthand, Touch Typewriting, Penmanship, and the commercial branches 
in one of the oldest, most reliable business colleges in the Carolinas. Lessons by mail. School 
in session the year round. Able and experienced teachers. Address the school for full information. 



IE. HAVE DESIGNED ALL THE NEW BUILDINGS AT THE UNIVERSITY 
OF NORTH CAROLINA 

MILBURN. HEISTER & CO. 



ARCHITECTS 



WASHINGTON. D. C. 



Automobile service at all hours. See me 
when you get ready to go to Durham. 
Rates reasonable. 



The Bingham School! 

jfir^ ^V Orange County, near | 




Orange County, 
Mebane, North Carolina 

Establish*,/ 17S3. 

A busv ami lovable home for boys. 

Southern Railway, in the 

A location famous for 

health and beauty. 

g" graduate 



rnr\ 



giving constant 
and individual attention. Mili- 
tary discipline, firm yet affec- 
tionate. Outdoor life, with 
Tennis and other healthful sports. 
Hazing abhorred. Bible, Physical 
Culture and fine Penmanship, 
jipecialtfes. Full Classical, Com- 



BOGER 


'S 


Fruits and Confectioneries. Ever 


f thing that the 


Student Eats. 




GRIFFIN BUILDING 



When Hungry 
Go To 

GOOCH'S 
CAFE 



Open at all Hours 



--;,,. 



^ ' i' :\> \ ,' > ' >t ,:f- ; xi v> , - „> . . 



Pickwick Theater 

HIGH-CLASS MOTION PICTURES 

Instrumental Music 

Only highest-class pictures shown Complete change of program 

Open from 6.30 p. m. to 10.30 p. m. 

S. J. BROCKWELL, Manager 




Unexcelled Automobile Service at Your 
Command at All Hours 

S. J. BROCKWELL 



BillllllllllllllU 



AllO AMI UNit 



Reaches the South, Southwest, West, and East by the Shortest and 

most Direct Way, offering Unexcelled Double 

Daily Vestibule Pullman Train Service. 

DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE TO 

New York, Washington, Norfolk, Atlanta, Birmingham, New Orleans, 
Memphis, Savannah, Jacksonville, Tampa, Chat- 
tanooga, Nashville, St. Louis. 

DIRECT CONNECTION AT 

Memphis, New Orleans, St. Louis, Chicago, for all Points in Texas, 

California, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Colorado, and all 

Western and Noithwestein Points. 

CONVENIENT LOCAL TRAINS 



WATCH FOR ANNOUNCEMENT OF 

Low Summer Excursion Rates and Reduced Rates for Special 

Occasions 

WITH STOPOVER PRIVILEGES VIA DIVERSE ROUTES 



For Rates, Schedules, Pullman Reservations, etc., call on any Seaboard Agent 
or Representative, or 

C. B. RYAN H. S. LEARD 

General Passenger Agent Division Passenger Agent 

Portsmouth, Va. Raleigh, N. C. 



Sillilillllllilllllilllliilllillllil 



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LEMMERT 

TAILOR 
IMPORTER 

There is genuine satisfaction in wearing 

Lemmert Made - to - Measure Clothes, 

Priced from $25.00 up. They 

are the right kind to wear. 

LEMMERT 

1 9 East Fayette Street, Baltimore 



Good tailoring is not secured until satisfaction 
stamps its approval on what you wear. 

LEMMERT clothes give this satisfaction. 



Illll!!!ll!lllilllll!!lllllllll!ill!!llli!llii! 



lYTIIEira^ 



All Photographs in this book made by 
the Official College Photographers 



(OLLAi)AY 

snmo 



i,,*_e^".a — &&—e: 



9-^a 




COLLEGE WORK A 
SPECIALTY 



Durh 



am 



North Carolina 



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Traymore Tailoring Company 

633, 635, and 637 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

EXPERT TAILORS 



Display the Most Up-To-Date Patterns 
of the Season Twice a Year. 

FIT AND WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED 

McKay and Petteway, College Representatives 



ROYAL CAFE 

DURHAM, N. C. 

University Boys always stop with us. 
We give Perfect Satisfaction. 



SEE 

"Long Bill" Jones 

FOR PRESSING 



THE HOUSE OF BETTER SHOES 

Individuality in correct footwear finds 
its most apt expression in the Lowenberg 
models, which embrace advance season's 
styles suitable for the needs of any 



THE D. LOWENBERG 

BOOT AND SHOE COMPANY 

248-250 Granby Street NORFOLK. VA. 



iiiinir>iiiMiii!!iii[iiiK!imimiiiii[irnin!i!inniniiiiiiiiniiiiiiuininiiii!i[iiiiiiiiii[iiii]iiiiiiiiiiiuiii 



JEFFERSON STANDARD LIFE 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 
THE SOUTH'S GREAT CONSERVATIVE COMPANY 

Admitted Assets, December 31. 1912 . . $3,846,191.91 
Admitted Surplus to Policyholders . . 663.591.53 

Total Insurance in Force, paid for basis . . 38,039,302.00 

"Jl Conservative With a Mooe On" 
New Business Averaging Over $1,000,000.00 per Month 

Entered in District of Columbia, Virginia, North Carolina, 
South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Tennessee 

GEO A GRIMSLEY President C. C. TAYLOR. Secretary JULIAN PRICE, Manager Agents 

CHAS. W. GOLD. Treasurer DR. J. P. TURNER. Medical Director 



WALLACE CLOTHING COMPANY 

GREENSBORO, N. C 

Largest Clothiers and Hatters in the State 
Will Refund Your Railroad Fare One Way on Every Ten- 
Dollar Purchase. Mention Ad. 



THE HENNESSEE CAFE 

342 South Elm Street, GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Near the Railway Passenger Station 

Home Cooking is the plan of this Popular Eating Place 

Look for f* A T7C The Best and Cleanest CAT 

the Big V>x\r L-i Sign Place for Everybody to LLti~\ 1 



i'llllll!!iIi™,1!l!:iII»lillli:il!!!IIIIIIII]ll!lll!II 



I. 


G. 


LAWERENCE 

CONTRACTOR 

DURHAM, N. C. 




ERECTED THE FOLLOWING BUILDINGS: 

Caldwell Hall, University of North Carolina 

Vance, Battle, and Pettigrew Dormitories, University of North 

Carolina 

City High School, Durham, N. C. 

Union Station, Durham, N. C. 

Smith Tobacco Storage — Largest in the World — Durham, N. C. 

Imperial Tobacco Factory, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Imperial Tobacco Factory, Mullen, S. C. 



Ti" p "T ' ' i ' ' 



]!if:i!l|!!:i!!!:|!!|ii:<:;i!ll|!fll||!f;I!l 



A School with a reputation for 
fy^/%/ doing High-Grade Work 
y ' Capital Stock, $30,000.00 

INCORPORATED 

One of the best equipped schools in the South. THE LARGEST. The strongest 
:ulty. MORE GRADUATES IN POSITIONS than all other business schools 
the State. Bookkeeping, Shorthand, and English. Write for our handsome catalog 



We also teach Bookkeeping, Shorthand. Penman! 
etc., by mail. Send \a horn- study circular. 
Address J. H. KING. President. Raleigh, N. C 






King's Business College 

Raleigh, N. C. or Charlotte, N. C. 



PATTERSON BROTHERS 

1)R UGGIS TS 
CHAPEL HILL :-: :-: :-: NORTH CAROLINA 







The United States Government buys Ithaca Guns for Navy Officers— Uncle Sam always buys the best, t] Look at the locks- 
you can see they are simple — they talk for themselves. <J Hammer one piece, no toggles or stirrups attached— no cocking levers, bars, or 
push rods-gun cocks direct from toe of hammer-coil mainspring guaranteed forever, tj Hammer falls less than a half-inch in I -625 
of a second— timed at Cornell Universiiv— fastest lock ever invented. ^ Stocks dovetailed into frame to prevent splitting and spreading 
-not cut away for hammeis or lock plates. «J We furnish small bore guns in light weights as they should be-28 guage 4\ to 5't 
pounds— 20 guage 5 ' 4 to 5,' 4 pounds- 1 6 guage 5K to 6',' pounds. «J Beautiful catalog FREE— describes I8grades guns-$l7.75 
ITU AT A riTM rnMDAMV BQX ^3 ITHACA, N. Y. 



ITHACA GUN COMPANY 



4 



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"GET IT AT ODELL'S" 

COMPLETE ATHLETIC OUTFITTERS 

Baseball Uniforms, Baseball and Tennis Goods. Basket -Ball, 
Football, Striking Bags, and Gymnasium Supplies, Sweaters, 
Jerseys, etc. 

Mail orders given personal attention 

ODELL HARDWARE COMPANY 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Agents for Ansco Cameras and Photo Supplies 



Zinzendorf THEY ARE NOW The Guilford 

lVIVj ( ( - 1 ^ ' O' < .)) &k'Sj 

3|E l vyi.ii^iscors 3|g 

Try The Guilford, Under 

Wins.on- Salem N. C. Zinzendorf Management r,rwnsb ° ro ' N ' c ' 



SCHIFFMAN JEWELRY COMPANY 

LEADING JEWELERS 
Diamonds, Watches GREENSBORO, N. C. 



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N. UNDERWOOD 



Contractor and Builder 

DURHAM, N. C. 



•PHONE 441 



OFFICE, 517 DUKE BUILDING 




DAVIE HALL. UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

BUILDINGS RECENTLY ERECTED 

RESIDENCES: Mrs. L. L. Morehead, Durham, N. C. 

B. N. Duke, Durham, N. C. 
J. F. Stagg, Durham, N. C. 
J. C. Angier, Durham, N. C. 
W. P. Henrv, Durham. N. C. 

C. M. Carr, Durham, N. C. 

Dr. F. P. Venable, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
COLLEGE Peabody Building, University of North Carolina. 

BUILDINGS : Biological Laboratory, University of North Carolina. 

Chemical Laboratory. University of North Carolina. 

Infirmary Building, University of North Carolina. 

Library Building, Trinity College, Durham, N. C. 

Duke Dormitory, Trinity College, Durham, N. C. 

West Dormitory, Trinity College. Durham, N. C 

Academic Building, Trinity College, Durham, N. C. 

Prof. R. L. Flowers' Residence, Trinity College, Durham, N. C. 

Southern Conservatorv of Music, Durham. N. C. 
OFFICE Loan and Trust Building, Durham, N. C. 

BUILDINGS: Temple Building, Durham, N. C. 

Municipal Building, Durham, N. C. 

Tucker Building, Raleigh, N. C. 
CHURCH: Memorial Methodist Episcopal Church, Durham, N. C. 

GARAGE: E. B. Lyon Motor Car Company, Durham, N. C 

POSTOFFICE: United States Postoffice, Durham, N. C. 



6,n!iKl!i„ ' ' 



Norfolk Southern 
Railroad 



NEW SHORT LINE 
THROUGH EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA 



TRIPLE DAILY EXPRESS SERVICE 

BETWEEN 

Raleigh, Wilson, Greenville, Goldsboro, Kinston, 

Newbern, Morehead City, Washington, 

Plymouth, Elizabeth City, Virginia 

Beach, and Norfolk 



Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Car Service 

via Norfolk to North and East 
via Raleigh to South and West 



W. W. CROXTON D. V. CONN 

General Passenger Agent General Agent 

Norfolk. Va. Raleigh, N. C. 




YOUNG MAN, DO YOU EVER STOP TO CONSIDER THE 
FUTURE — THE OBLIGATION IMPOSED UPON EVERY 
SELF- RESPECTING CITIZEN TO PROVIDE HAPPINESS 
FOR HIS FAMILY? 

YOU CANT EXPECT TO PROVIDE 
HAPPINESS WITH AN EMPTY POCKET 



Begin to save NOW— deposit a dollar or two in this bank each week, and 
watch your account grow 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

DURHAM, N. C. 
Capital, $150,000.00 Surplus, $170,000.00 Deposits, $1,850,000.00 

JULIAN S. CARR, President W. J. HOLLOW AY, Cashier 



WE KNOW YOUR WANTS, AND WANT YOUR BUSINESS" 



Illllll!ll!llllll!llllili;!!!llllllllllll 



iHrtiMimfcimiiniiMn wii ii mi 



Contents 



Division of Books 2 

Dedication 5 

Junius Parker 6, 7 

In Memonam 8 

BOOK ONE— Our University 9 

President and Deans of Departments (illustration) 12-14 

President and Deans of Departments (illustration) II 

Alumni Building (illustration) 15 

Library (illustration) 16 

Law Building (illustration) 1 7 

Medical Building (illustration) 18 

Battle-Vance- Pettigrew Dormitory (illustration) 19 

The Year of Nineteen Hundred and Thirteen 20-26 

BOOK. TWO— The Classes 27 

Officers 29 

Poem 30 

History 31-33 

Roll 34-72 

.73-76 

Officers _ 77 

History _ 78 

Roll 79-87 

Sophomore Class Officers _ 89 

Sophomore Class History _ 90 

Sophomore Class (illustration) 91 

Sophomore Class Roll 92-100 

Freshman Class Officers 101 

Freshman Class History 102 

Freshman Class (illustration) 103 

Freshman Class Roll 104-109 

Isaac William Rand— In Memonam 110 

Co-Ed Roll Ill 

Graduate Department 1 12 

Special Students 113 

Distribution of Students by Counties and States (illustration).— 114 

Summer School Officers 1 I 5 

University of North Carolina Summer School _ 116, 117 

Summer School Faculty and Officers I 18 



Senior 


Clas 


Senior 


Clas 


Senior 


Cla 


Senior 


Clas 


Senior 


Vol 


Junior 


Clas 


Junior 


Clas 


Junor 


Clas 



Page 

Summer School Roll 119-121 

Summer School Dramatic Club 122 

Esther Wake— Cast of Character, 1 23 

BOOK THREE— The Professional Schools 125 

Law Class Officers _ 127 

The School of Law _ 128 

Law Class (illustration). ... 129 

Law Class Seniors 130, 131 

Senior Law Roll 132 

Junior Law Roll 133. 134 

Special Law Students 134 

Officers of Medical Cla-ses 135 

The School of Medicine 136 

Second-Year Medical Class (illustration) 137 

Second-Year Medical Class Roll 138. 139 

First-Year Medical Class Roll _ 140, 142 

First-Year Medical Class (illustration) 141 

Officers of Pharmacy Classe? _ 143 

The School of Pharmacy 144 

Pharmacy Class Seniors 1 45, 1 46 

First- Year Pharmacy Class Roll 147 

Pharmacy Class (t/iuslralion) 148 

BOOK FOUR— Athletics 149 

Athletic Council 151 

Coaches 152 

Varsity Football Team and Record, 1912 154 

Varsity Football Team (illustration) 155 

The Athletic Situation at Carolina 156. 160. 164. 168, 172 

Varsity Baseball Team and Record, 1912 158 

Vanity Baseball Team (illustration) . 159 

Varsity Track Team and Record, 1912 162 

Varsity Track Team (i/iuslralton) 163 

Varsity Basket-Bali Team and Record, 1913 166 

Varsity Basket-Ball Team (illustration) 167 

Tennis Asiociaiion 170 

Tennis Association (illustration) 171 

Class Athletics 173 

Championship Class Baseball Team (illustration) 1 74 

Class Football Teams (illustrations) 175 

Class Tennis Teams (illustrations) 176 

Campus Scenes, 1913 (illustration) 178 



BOOK. FIVE— Organizations 179 

The Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies 181-183 

Dialectic Literary Society Hall (illustration) 1 84 

Dialectic Literary Society Roll 186, 183 

Dialectic Literary Society (illustration) 187 

Synopsis of Debates „ 189 

Philanthropic Literary Society Hall (illustration) 190 

Philanthropic Literary Society Roll 192, 194 

Philanthropic Literary Society (illustration) 193 

Debating Union 195 

Intercollegiate Debating at Carolina 196 

Carolina-Virginia Debate 197 

Carolina-Johns Hopkins Debate 198 

Commencement Debate, 1912 199 

Sophomore- Junior Debate 200 

Freshman -Sophomore Debate 201 

Junior Orators' Contest 202 

Tau Kappa Alpha 203 

Phi Beta Kappa 204 

Phi Beta Kappa (illustration) 205 

Young Men's Christian Association 206, 207 

Ministerial Club 203 

Brotherhood of Saint Andrew 203 

Fraternities 209 

Pan- Hellenic Council 210 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 21 1-213 

Beta Theta Pi 2 15-217 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 219-221 

Zeta Psi 223-225 

Alpha Tau Omega 227-229 

Kappa Alpha 231-233 

Phi Delta Theta 235-237 

Sigma Nu 239-241 

Kappa Sigma 243-245 

Pi Kappa Alpha 247-249 

Phi Chi 251-253 

Alpha Chi Sigma 255-257 

Sigma Kappa Delta 258, 259 

Sigma Upsilon 260 

Order of Gimghouls 261 









Page 

The Gorgon's Head 263, 265 

Senior Order of the Golden Fleece 266, 267 

Amphoterothen 268 

Ball Managers (illustration) ...269 

Commencement Marshals (illustration) 270 

Publications 271 

Yackety Yack (illustrations) 272, 273 

The Tar Heel 274 

University Magazine 275 

"What Happened to Jones" (illustration) 276 

Clubs 277 

Dramatic Club 278, 279 

University of North Carolina Musical Asfocation 280-282 

German Club 283-285 

The Coop 286 

Florida Club 287 

Horner School Club 283 

Oak Ridge Club 289 

Warrenton High School Club 290 

Webb School Club 291 

Whitsett Institute Club .292 

County Clubs 293-306 

BOOK SIX— College Life 307 

College Life 309-348 

Editorial 349, 350 




Our Advertisers 



BALTIMORE, MD. 

Lemmert 
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 

Boger's 

F. W. Booker 

Foister's Art Store 

Gooch's Cafe 

"Long Bill" Jones 

A. A. Kluttz 

McKay & Petteway 

Harrison Neville 

Patterson Brothers 

H. H. Patterson 

C. S. Pendergraft 

Pickard's Livery Stable 

Pickwick Theater 

The Bank of Chapel Hill 

University of North Carolina 

University Supply Company 

CHARLOTTE. N. C. 

American Trust Company 

Central Hotel 

J. E. Craylon & Co. 

Frazier's Cafe 

King's Business College 

Observer Printing House 

Scholtz, the Florist 

DURHAM, N. C. 

Holladay Studio 
I. G. Lawerence 
Markham-Harris Company 
Royal Cafe 

The First National Bank 
The Royall & Borden Compa 
Cyrus Thompson, Jr. 
N. Underwood 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Columbia Laundry Company 
Greensboro College for Women 
Greensboro Commercial School 



Jefferson Standard Life In 
North Carolina State Norn 

College 
Odell Hardware Company 
Schiffman Jewelry Company 
Southern Life and Trust Comp 
The Guilford 
The Hennessee Cafe 
The Hill-Stockard Company 
Wallace Clothing Company 

ITHACA, N. Y. 

Ithaca Gun Company 

MEBANE, N. C. 
Bingham School 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Bureau of Engraving 

NEW YORK. N. Y. 

L. E. Waterman Company 

NORFOLK. VA. 

Ferebee. Jones & Co. 
Norfolk Southern Railroad 
The D. Lowenberg Bool 
Company 

OAK RIDGE, N. C. 

Oak Ridge Institute 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Traymore Tailoring Company 
E. A. Wright 



ranee Company 
1 and Industrial 



PORTSMOUTH. VA. 

Seaboard Air Line 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

C. R. Boone 

Citizens National Bank 

Ellington's Studio 

A. C. Hinton 

Jolly & Wynne 

H. P. S. Keller 

King's Busness College 

Norfolk Southern Railroad 

North Carolina State Fair 

Peace Institute 

St. Mary's School 

Seaboard Air Line 

Southern Railway 

H. Steinmelz 

Cyrus Thompson, Jr. 

Tucker Building Barber Shop 

Tucker Building Pharmacy 

E. M. Uzzell & Co. 

Whiting & Horton 

Wright's Cafe 

RICHMOND. VA. 

Medical College of Virginia 

SPRINGFIELD. MASS. 

G. & C. Merriam Company 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

L. C. Smith & Brother Typewriter Com- 
pany 



WARRENTON. N. C. 

Warrenton High School 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 

Milburn. Hei;ter & Co. 
Southern Railway 

WEST RALEIGH. N. C. 

North Carolina College of Agriculture and 
Mechanic Arts 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

The Zinzendorf 

EDUCATIONAL 

Bingham School, Mebane, N. C. 

Greensboro College for Women. Greens- 
boro, N. C. 

Greetnsboro Commercial School, Greens- 
boro, N. C. 

King's Business College, Charlotte and 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Medical College of Virginia. Richmond, Va. 

North Carolina College of Agriculture and 
Mechanic Arts, West Raleigh, N. C. 

North Carolina State Normal and Industrial 
College. Greensboro, N. C. 

Oak Ridge Institute, Oak Ridge, N. C. 

Peace Institute, Raleigh, N. C. 

St. Mary's School. Raleigh, N. C. 

University of North Carolina. Chapel Hill, 
N. C. 

Warrenton High School, Warrenton, N. C. 



THIS VOLUME OF 

Yackety Yack 



THE OBSERVER PRINTING HOUSE 



CHARLOTTE. N. C. 
19 13