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Full text of "Yackety yack [serial]"

Library 

OF THE 

University' of NortH Carolina 

This book was presented by the 

(ariijly of the late 

KEMP I'LUMMER BATTLE, 

Pr<":iileut of thp University of North Carolina 

from 1876 to 1890 



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UNIVERSITY OF N,C AT CHAPEL HILL 



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DEDICATION 



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HENEVER a visitor is shown over the University of North Carolina, one 
of the first places to which he is taken is the Chemistry Building. The 
reason is not primarily because the building is a good building and the 
laboratories good laboratories. They are really excellent ; but the main 
reason is that they are always full of people who are working hard, and seem to be glad 
of it. The visitor does not need to be told that notable work has been produced and is 
being produced there. He knows at once that he has struck a live, productive spot. If he 
is a wise visitor, he doesn't ask what peculiar local conditions make chemistry so important. 
He knows the answer. He knows that the atmosphere of successful, cheerful, hard work 
must be the reflection of a personality at the head of the laboratories. 

Dr. Charles Holmes Herty is just rounding out a decade of service as head of the 
Department of Chemistry. He was born in Georgia, and received his early training in 
the Georgia Military and Agricultural College, and in the University of Georgia (Ph.B. 
1886). He received his doctor's degree at Johns Hopkins in 1890, and then studied in 
Berlin and Ziirich. He was Adjunct Professor of Chemistry in the University of 
Georgia, and after that, before coming to the University of North Carolina as full pro- 
fessor in 1905, did practical work in the turpentine forests of the South that may be said 
to have revolutionized the great turpentine industry. His cup and gutter system of gather- 
ing turpentine, according to figures given in the World's Work, increases the profits of the 
turpentine business thirteen millions of dollars a year. 

After making such a contribution to the progress of his section, a man might be 
excused if he relaxed his energies a trifle. But Doctor Herty has steadily increased and 
widened his activities. He is a member of the leading organizations in his field of knowl- 
edge, both in this country and abroad, and a councillor-at-large of the American Chemical 
Society. 

In addition to the work of carrying on a department that has three full professors 
and numerous assistants, Doctor Herty has shown the most loyal and lively interest in all 



1^ 



DEDICATION 

the affairs of the college. In his own student days he was a successful athlete, and ever 
since he has kept a strong and sympathetic connection with all student activities. The 
athletic field at the University of Georgia bears his name, and ever since he has been 
in North Carolina he has given generously of his time and thought to the vexing questions 
of athletic managen-.ent. He has served on the Faculty Committee on Athletics for 
almost ten years, and on other committees without number, where his tact, sympathy, and 
broad-visioned wisdom have been invaluable. 

It has been the same way in the affairs of the town. In business affairs, and in 
the affairs of citizenship. Doctor Herty has been a leading factor in bringing to a success- 
ful issue many things that had long been desired, but that for one reason or another could 
not be carr:ed out. As school commissioner and as alderman, he was a leader in success- 
ful campaigns for a better school, for better sanitation in the town, for better roads in the 
county. Always good-tempered and tolerant, and ready to give thought, money, energy, 
and whatever else the occasion required. Doctor Herty has been one of the best citizens 
the town of Chapel Hill has ever had. 

The Yackety Yack is dedicated to him not merely as a teacher, a scientist, a 
good citizen; but as a combination of all these. He is the fine sort of college professor 
that the big men in his special field cannot help but admire, and the average man on the 
street cannot help hut like. 




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CONTENTS 

I— BOOK OF NORTH CAROLINA pages 9 to 24 

m 5 

II— BOOK OF THE COLLEGE YEAR .... pages 25 to ao 

m ~B 

III^QOOK OF THE CLASSES pages 4/ to we 

a "" m 

l\/^BOOK OF ACTIVITIES pages 149 to 204 

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y^BOOK OF ORGANIZATIONS .... pages 205 to 284 

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VI— BOOK OF HUMOR ■ • pages 285 to 303 

eight 



NORTH CAROLINA 




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NORTH CAROLINA 




MITCHEIL — MONARCH OF THE EAST 
6711 FEET ABOVE SEA LEVEL 



FROM THE MOUNTAINS — 



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NORTH CAROLINA 



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SURF NEAR HATTERAS 



-TO THE SEA 



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fMORTH CAROLINA 




llLiNDRED EIGHTV-SIX lU.sHM.s |m INK \( lU I \KM 



'^ORTH CAROLINA'S NEW AGRICULTURAL REGIME IS LITERALLY 

DOUBLING THE EARNING CAPACITY OF THE STATE'S 

FARMING POPULATION 



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NORTH CAROLINA 




MOUNT AIRY GRANITE QUARRY 01" THE NORTH CAROLINA GRANITE CORPORATION — SURRY COUNTY 



•^ORTH CAROLINA'S i 



LDING STONE AND CLAY PRODUCTS 
ALUE IN ALL STATES EAST OF 
THE MISSISSIPPI. 



THIRTEEN 



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NORTH CAROLINA 




BLEWETT FALLS DAM OF lAOKIN RIVER POWER COMPANY — RICHMONU AND ANSON COUNTIES 



VORTH CAROLINA HAS IN HER WATERPOWER A NATURAL 
RESOURCE OF GREAT INDUSTRIAL VALUE 



FOURTEEh 



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NORTH CAROLINA 



■FROM THE UNIVERSITY MUST EMANATE 
THE FORCES POTENTIAL IN OUR DEVEL- 
OPMENT: THERE ARE MOLDED THE IDEALS 
THAT DETERMINE OUR LIFE." 

-LOCKE CRAIG 



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NORTH CAROLINA 




WHERE THERE IS ALWAYS 
BREATH OF FREEDOM IN THE A 



NORTH CAROLINA 




' STRANGE THINGS ARE HEREIN REGISTERED ' 



SEVENTeEI\ 



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NINETEEiN 



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EDWARD KIDDER GRAHAM. ACTING PRESIDENT 



TWENTY-ONE 



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FACULTY 



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Onio'Oi's ot ,'\<lii\if>lsi;ratioa 

Francis Preston Venable, Ph.D., LL.D President 

Edward Kidder Graham, A.M ...Acting President 

Marvin Hendrix Stacy, A.M Acting Dean of the College of Liberal Arts 

Andrew Henry Patterson, A.M Dean of the School of Applied Science 

Charles Lee Raper, Ph.D. Dean of the Graduate Schoul 

Lucius Polk McGehee, A.B Dean of the School of Law 

Isaac Hall Manning, M.D Dean of the School of Medicine 

Edward Vernon Howell, A.B., Ph.G Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

Marcus Cicero Stephens Noble ... Dean of the School of Education 

■h + 

Oi'iioor.s «)i' liis'cruociod 

Francis Preston Venable, Ph.D., D.Sc, LL.D. Professor of Chemistrv 

Kemp Plummer Battle, A.M., LL.D Professor Emeritus of History 

Walter Dallam Toy, M.A Professor of the Germanic Languages and Literature 

William Cain, A.M. Professor of Mathematics 

Henry Horace Williams, A.M., B.D Professor of Philosophy 

Henry VanPeters Wilson, Ph.D. Professor of Zoology 

Collier Cobb, A. M Professor of Geology and Mineralogy 

Charles Staples Mangum, A.B., M.D Professor of Anatomy 

Edward Vernon Howell, A.B., Ph.G Professor of Pharmacy 

Marcus Cicero Stephens Noble Professor of Pedagogy 

Isaac Hall Manning, M.D Professor of Physiology 

TWENTY-TWO 



FACULTY 

Grorge Howf,, Ph.D - Professor of the Latin Language and Literature 

Joseph Hyde Pratt, Ph.D Professor of Economic Ceologv 

Charles Holmes Herty, Ph.D., Smith Professor of General and Industrial Chemistry 

Nathan Wilson Walker, A.B _._ Professor of Secondarv Education 

William DeBerniere MacNider, M.D. _ Professor of Pharmacology 

Charles Lee Rarer, Ph.D Professor of Economics 

Edward Kidder Graham, A.M. : Professor of English 

William Chambers Coker, Ph.D Professor of Botany 

Archibald Henderson, Ph.D Professor of Pure Mathenmtics 

Joseph Gregoire deRoulhac Hamilton, Ph.D. Alumni Professor of History 

Andrew Henry Patterson, A.M Professor of Physics 

Henry McGilbert Wagstaff, Ph.D Professor of History 

Patrick Henr^' Winston Professor of Law 

William Morton Dey, Ph.D. Professor of the IRomance Languages and Literature 

Mar\IN Hendrix Stacy, A.M. Professor of Civil Engineering 

James Finch Royster, Ph.D. Professor of English 

Lucius Polk McGehee, A.B. Professor of Larv 

Charles Wesley Bain, M.A., LL.D Professor of Creek 

Atwell Campbell McIntosh, A.M Professor of Law 

Harry WoodBURN Chase, Ph.D. Professor of the Philosophy of Education 

James Bell Bullett, M.A., M.D. Professor of Pathology 

Aln'in Sawyer Wheeler, Ph.D. Professor of Organic Chemistry 

Louis Round Wilson, Ph.D. Professor of Library Administration 

Ldwin Greenlaw, Ph.D Professor of English 

Thomas James Wilson, Jr., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Latin 

TWENTY-THREE 



FACULTY 

William Sianlly Bernard, A.M Associate Professor of Creek 

Robert Baker LaWSON, M.D. Associate Professor of Anatom\i 

George McFaRLAND McKie. A.M. Associate Professor of Public Spealfing 

John Manning Booker, Ph.D .Associate Professor of English 

Oli\'ER I'oWLES, Ph.D Associate Professor of the Romance Languages 

Thomas Felix Hickerson, A.M., S.B. Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 

Parker Haywood Daggett, S.B Professor of Electrical Engineering 

James Muncie Bell, Ph.D. Professor of Physical Chemistry 

Kent James Brown, Ph.D Associate Professor of German 

Leicester A. Williams, Ph.D. Professor of School Organization 

ZebuloN Judd, Ph.D Professor of f-iural Economics 

Robert L. James, C. E Associate Professor of Drawing 



Orestes P. Rhyne, Ph.D 

George Kennith Grant Henry, A.M. 
John Groner Beard, Ph.G. 
Vi\'iAN Leroy Chrisler, A.m. 
William Walier Rankin, A.M. 
George Mark Sneath, A.M. 
John Wayne Lasley, A.M. 
Daniel Huger Bacot, Jr., A.M. 

Wilbur High Royster, A.M 

Wesley Critz George, A.M 

William Lewis Jefferies, A.M._ Instructor in Chen}istr\> 

Eugene Fred Parker, A.M. Instructor in the I^omance Languages 

John Eliphalet Smith, M.S. Instructor in Geology 

James MaRCI-.LLUS Stedman, A.M. -- Instructor in E.nglish 



Associate Professor of German 

_ Instructor in Latm 

Instructor in Pharmacy 

Instructor in Physics 

Instructor in Alathentatics 

Instructor in English 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Instructor m History 

Instructor in Latin 

Instructor in Zoology 



TWENTY-FOUR 



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N THE mark! Get set! And Carolina is off for the year's course — 
rejoxing as a strong man to run a race. A record registration, a changed 
attitude toward Freshmen, and high faith in the year at hand marked the start. 
Of course those little things usual in the start were in evidence — 
)ck selhng of radiators to the new occupants of a room, letters from parents to 
esident remmding him to meet William at the evening tram, and certain various 
;t-year men who called for rooms at Commons Hall, or who registered the r 
arch denomination as First Baptist, Second Presbyterian, and Elm Street Methodist, 
who kept the assigned Chapel seats at mass meetings and public addresses, and could 
t be "gagged" into staying away from Chapel on Saturday. 

Yet through the separate incidents and life mass ran the confident strength and 
ppiness of awakened life. The Sophomores were among the leaders in helping Fresh- 
n to register and get settled right. Representative student leaders on College Night 
reduced the new men to activifes and life of the campus. The reception to Freshmen 
en in the Library is memorable for its green boughs, flowers, music, and six hundred 
jple. Out on the Varsity field, the squad was rounding into the second week of early 
ictice, and the natural fact was developing that the Carolina team would be made 
gely out of the unsuccessful material of the previous Fall. Over a hundred men were 
training on the class field. By Wednesday of the second week, it had got into the 
ide of youthful heads that the class-room rather than the athletic field was the center 
life here. And the steady pace of the year was on. 

Catch the significance of an opening in which there was no bell ringing, no random 
tol firing, no cries of f-r-e-s-h, no bands of even playful hazers, no noise except that 
ident to the joyful re-meeting of friends, the unloading of trunks, and the stir of 
jectant life, and you have the year 1913-1914 — off with a bound. 



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UOLLEGE YEAR 



UmvERsnY T),AY 



HE first lap on the race brings us to October 
twelve, known to University men everywhere as 
University Day. I wish I could show it to you 
as I have seen it, felt it — not a holiday, merely. 




h a long double-line of visitors, faculty, and students marching across the campus into 
ig building to hear talk after talk about the University, but a day when we celebrate the 

hundredth-twentieth birthday of this old campus, of that intangible feeling we call the 
iversity. The day starts out about as any other day, except that we feel a I'ttle strange 

to be on class as we line up in front of the Alumni Building. The band strikes up, 
I the procession starts. Alumni, Faculty in Doctors' caps and gowns, professional stu- 
its, the Seniors, and so on to Freshmen. It is impressive, you know. Slowly it winds 
•.r the campus and into Memorial Hall. A new sort of spirit begins to catch hold of 
The commonplace, everyday campus .seems imbued with an added dignity. We 
er the big Hall, and file silently into the benches row behind row. The lofty roof; the 
g cathedral-like windows down to the floor; the marble tablets lining the walls wth 

names of the soldiers, jurists, statesmen, the University's distinguished dead — all 
)ress us, and lend an air of antiquity to our surroundings. As we bow our head to the 
ocation. our imaginations turn instinctively to old England's Universities — King's 
liege. Oxford, and somebody's description of them. Through wide-open windows we 
'.e out, and suddenly realize the sunshine of a glorious October day. Then we hear the 
sing words of our prayer — "our University. Amen." We rise: nearly a thousand 
ces swell forth into the University hymn. Down to the veriest Freshman, our blood 
?les, and we feel strangely proud about something. It is not intellectual; we can't 
:n express it; we simply feel it. But it is worth more than the next two hours of 
eches by alumni, men who have sat where we are sitting, and are come back to try to 

us what Carolina means. But for the moment we know we have felt the \oice of the 
liversity; and never shall we quite forget it. 










TWENTY-NINE 



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wo months of preliminary football, two weeks of more than usually pur- 
poseful coaching, two days of mass-meetings, and "On to Richmond" have 
left the campus, football mad. Such is the situation the day before Thanks- 
giving. Recitations are a failure; pervading everything is an air of 
jectancy and preparation which grows more intense as the afternoon advances. It is a 
ronic annual malady, as inevitable as the poi,son-oak in the spring, and as virulent. For 
ihere is one relief, and only one — to wit : an excursion ticket, and a half-interest in a 
rth on the Richmond special. Men who were determined to stay behind, becoming 
ected with the common spirit, beg or borrow the necessary wherewithal. By nine 
:lock the streets are full of men in gala attire, and with overcoats and suitcases. Noise 
d excitement prevail. The members of the band wander about with their instruments 
torture, making weird sounds. The cafes are full. Jimmy Neville's is beseiged by a 
)wd buying tickets, armbands, and megaphones. In front of the postoffice, a mob is 
icticing yells for tomorrow. Contrast the scene two hours later. The town seems to 
ve moved itself bodily to West End. There, in the semi-darkness, confusion reigns 
Dreme; men stumbling over suitcases trying to find their respective cars and sections; the 
isting Chapel Hill darkies, now polite to the point of pain, depend not in vain on their 
oung masters " to take them along. Finally all are crowded on. With straining and 
oaning of the overloaded tra'n, Carolina is off again on her annual pilgrimage to 
ichmond. 






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ITH the pleasant stream of autumnal dnersions, the mterest of football, the 
trip to Richmond, the dances, and finally home for the holidays, we have 
fallen into rather an easy gait. But now, after Christmas, there is in the air 
the promise of a quickening, a reckoning immment. Those who are versfd 
the signs of the times are seen to drag forth neglected text-books, dust-covered, to search 
r forgotten spots. Then suddenly, about the middle of January, the prophesy arrives 
its fulfillment. It comes in the form of exams — a nerve-racking cataclysm. Wise with 
; wisdom of painful experience, the older heads go about it coolly. They know that to 
t excited is a probable step toward disaster; that midnight oil is mferior to midnight 
iep as a passer of exams. But even at that, it is an unrestful time of tension, of anxiety — 
ten-days' bad dream. How about the less experienced? For them it is a real night- 
are. Some, warned in time, have followed the advice of the veterans, and fare as well, 
thers, mindful of nothing, continue their heedless way. They find the fast pace kill- 
g; soon begin to stagger and falter in distress. A few by natural strength manage 
labor along. Many fall by the wayside, borne down by fives and sixes. It is truly 
1 awful time. Much more of it, and we feel that life would really not be worth 
e weary struggle. But it has been said that all things have an end ; and at length 
en this period of horror expires. The unusual sprint is over. The runners drop 
ick into the old pace. Notebooks are lost; text-books begin to accumulate the accustomed 
gnity of dust; the existence of athletics is remembered; we again find time to sit in front 
Patterson's, and admire the Goddess of the Pickwick, as her majesty takes the air. In 
ort, life is resumed at the same old stand. 













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Politics 






SI EELZEBUB was the first politician. He gained a kingdom, and the title 

"His Satanic Majesty." Here we reap great receipts, and are honored as 

"Manager." Think not, however, that the difference in the rewards noted 

above is due to a superior native ability of His Honor, the Devil. Far 

1 it. The ability we have; our field is limited, and it is the firm belief of many that 

"Beelz" himself sits in the gallery of Gerrard Hall whenever any great coup is 

uted, trusting to pick up some fine points of the game ; and at all elections he has at 

one reporter. 

Naturally, we are proud of our politicians. Who else, indeed, could finance our 
letic Association? This they have done; and have so well managed as to run only 
housand dollars in debt. And who else could make us a factor (in spite of our 
rd) in the South Atlantic Championship? Not the athlete. He tried, and failed, 
the politician — the wily, cunning, subtle politician — this he can and has achieved. 

'l et, despite their noble achievements, the politicians have suffered heavily from 
Ity criticism. One consideration alone has so far saved them. It is argued, and 
justice, that politics is democratic; it is the only spur under the sun sharp enough to 
e a man of self-respect greet his greasy fellow, a distant acquaintance of water and 
tal stranger to soap, with the social salutation, "Hail Brother!" And we are nothing 
)t democratic. 

Would that this were a salutatory, prophecying the glory that will come to all 
icians; but it is not. The age is decadent, all things noble suffer, and even now the 
in tolls the knell of parting politics. 






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Junior Y/sex 



HE\ used to have a couple of dances Junior Week, the same as after 
Thanksgiving, thinking that was enough. But my word! that just begins it 
now. Back m 1909, George Thomas said, "Let's have a Junior Prom"; 
and they did. And now, every year, either the Juniors or the Sophs give a 
mce, depending on which Class has the most dancing men. Of course the German Club 
mes across, and the Juniors take turn about, and anybody else who has any money turns 
loose somehow. The Senior Class mixes up every single funny thing that has happened 
ice the Davie Poplar was a pup, and gets revenge on the faculty in a dazzling dramatic 
irolina specialty known as the Senior Stunt. And that isn't all. Sneath's songbirds 
rrow dress suits, and do their little stunts; and Henry Meeks discusses love in the famous 
ange blossom tenor. George McKie can't have anything put over on him; so he dresses 
i Weeks and Barney Pitts, and they imitate John Drew and Billy Burke, and think they 
e getting away with it. The dear old Di and Phi (or Phi and Di) hopped on the band 
igon two years ago, and now the voice of the orator is heard in the land, a-thundering 
out Deemockrasee — and all for the honor of the Carr medal. Baseball games and 
ick meets overflow what is left. And all this in the m ddle of the term? Sure — any 
nehead can double-cross the faculty. Shift that George Washington Birthday holiday 
a bit, and bring your Easter Holidays all together, and you will have the greatest part 
the week free for yourself and the girls. 

The girls — there's the keynote of Junior week. They cause the whole doggone 
;ss. They are the ones for whom orchestras play, and Vernon Castles dance, and 
eeks and Coggins act, and Rabbit Bailey slides, and everything else. They reign 
areme. They flit from Frat Hall to Frat Hall, raising their dear voices up to the skies, 
rghing, teasing, and conquering. From Cherokee to Currituck they swarm to Chapel 
ill to reap the fresh harvest. And bul-lieve me, they can get away with it every day ■ 
the week, and Sunday too. 
That's Junior Week! 












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=^]ljl INAL exams are over, and the end of the last lap is in sight. Another year 
^W|l of work and play, of growth and development, is past. But it means more 
r^Pf than that to some of us. It means the culmination of four years of life, in 
' many respects the best four years. We entered raw boys; we are leaving 
lough with the newness of it still with us. Never again, no matter what we encounter, 
similar length of time mean so much to us. We are too close to it yet to appreciate 
But even now, as we look back, each is conscious somehow of a feeling of 
slishment. We have passed our work. We have done something in athletics, 
ive taken part in varied activities. Best of all, we have rubbed shoulders with 
nen, all sorts of men, and we have been broadened by the rubbing. And now there 
a man of us who does not know that it has been worth while. Also, what we 
ily do not realize, there is not a man of us who will not carry the marks of the four 
omewhere upon him for the rest of his life. 

There is a touch of sadness in the picture, too, as we prepare to leave what to us 
5n home for so long. Then, we feel rather lost. Heretofore there has always been 
ing lo fight for, to work for. We stand upon the pinnacle that we have longed for 
;ars to reach, and it is for the moment disappointing. The pleasures of anticipation 
le, and the joys of realization are flat. But it is only for a moment. As we turn a 
idly from gazing down the slope in the twilight, dawn breaks, and the view opens 
the front. Instead of at the pinnacle, we stand upon the merest foothill. The lofty 
; towers above, still to be won. The world lies before us. The Finish is but the 
ling; truly we are at the Commencement. 



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THIRTY-NINE 



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COLLEGE YEAR 









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"good bye. everybody ! ' 









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SEN/OR CLASS OFFICERS 
OSCAR LEACH 

S. W. WHITING V 

J. S. CANSLER SECRETARY 

L. R. JOHNSON TREASURER 

FORTY-ONE 



C(,,'V^s l^yTCivi 




OUR years ago, we gathered on this carrpus, fresh and green. 
To pursue the theme of knowledge, and the gems of wisdom glean. 
Four years we've worked together, in sympathy and cheer; 
In fellowship we've striven to surpass each former year. 

The field is large, and wisdom infinite ; 
Our brains too small to garner time's full store. 
Yei we have labored with determmed might 
To gather to our harvest one pearl more. 

We're on the sands of learnmg's boundless shore; 
The ocean depths we have not yet explored ; 
We've skimmed the surface of ancient lore. 
But drunk not of the beauties therein stored. 

What boots it that we've labored w'th our might, 
And scanned the wisdom sages handed down, 
If we do not diffuse a beam of light 
And in our simple service wear a crown? 

The ages past have pointed to today ; 
The present is our time to win or fail. 
Then 'tis our glorious privilege to say 
That justice, truth, and mercy shall prevail. 

In parting now, our faith we plight anew; 
Each other's friendship we will ever need. 
Our inner souls command us to be true. 
And bid each one a rexerend godspeed. 



FORTY-TWO 



9il 



]iS 



Senior Top o or Af ^rv 




^ HE human mind is a wonderful thing in its behavior: often comical, always 
^F interesting. But much more wonderful, more comical, more interesting, is 
a collection of human minds, when trained upon a common subject. Like 
the points of a circle, each sees the object at the center from its own angle, 
with its own separate, private, little individual point of view. And as the 
points in a circle, so Archibald says, are infinite, and separated by a distance inllnitesimally 

small, so are there as many points of view on a subject 

as there are minds grouped around it, separated by dis- 
tinctions so inllnitesimally small that two often seem 
identical. And that, you anticipate, is the "graph" 
at the senior vote? Not yet. Imagine your circle as 
composed of only eighty-odd points — think of tha.. 
Strong, you are merely a dot — each endowed with 
magnetism according to its own caliber, attracting 
others to its point of view, or being attracted. The 
circle is distorted, but more human. Imagine your 
center, upon which all are trained, changed into a 
little circle of the same eighty-odd pomts. And — 
you have complicated the problem. I defy even 
Collins and Taylor to solve it by the best of their 
formulae. But let that irregular curve speak, and we 
shall find out what the Seniors think of themselves. 

At the question as to The Most Seriou 
Occupation, verily the lid of Pandora's box was 
smashed in. We have everything from farming to 
flying machines. 

We confess, as a favorite way of killing time, 
to loafing and sleeping principally. But some sug- 
gestions were unique. One deep thinker is at a loss 
to choose between hanging and electrocution for the 
purpose. "Thnking of my beloved" raves one lunatic, 
another, too good to be true. 

We love ch'ckens — that is, we like to eat chicken. 




'Going to church" vociferate 



Also peanuts and elephant 



ears. In our drinks, our tastes are strange, water being professedly the favorite, with the 
innocent milkshake second. However, a few desperate characters call for dopes and sloe 
gin. Nearly half the class are non-smokers, the rest smoking from El Principe to rabbit 
tobacco. One reckless youth admits that he is satisfied with anything that will burn. 



FORTY-THREE 



7iL 



1^ 



In a misguided moment, we asked the question, what is your favorite postmark? 
Answers galore, from Manteo to Murphy, places we never knew before existed. Did 
you ever hear of Stern? Where is Lake Landmg? 

What is your favorite machine? We answered every kind of automobile known, 
and some that were not known. In addition, there were locomotives, aeroplanes, wheel- 
barrows, a hay-burner, and one steam shovel. Surely variety is the red-pepper of 
existence. 

The biggest thing some of us have done while here is to pass certain dreaded 
courses, mostly malh. One bragged, however, that he had escaped 4" B K ; another that 
he had made it. One rejoiced that he had taken Greek; his neighbor boasted that he had 
had sense enough to drop it. Some were glad they stayed 
here; one hero that he had got suspended. And so it goes. 
We are ambitious to achieve many things; fame, honor, 
wealth; to pass Greek Two; to graduate; to succeed; just to 
exist; to get out of debt; and any number, ye gods, to get 
married. 

We claim greatest indifference to courses we have 
flunked; to professors who have thrown us; to people and 
things we dont like; and to what we have not and are not 
in general. 

Sixty per cent, either confess, affirm, or boast that they 
are in love. 1 hirty per cent, deny the charge. One poor 
soul is uncertain. The rest either inform us that it is none 
of our business, or keep a discreet silence. Watch these 
last — they are either incurables, or have just received the 
Manus Borealis on the back of the neck. 

For best representative, there are some ten con- 
testants; but few are more than spasmodic; and Chambers, 
the reliable, comes up to be crowned, with the others barely 
in sight. 

Most popular? Always an interesting question. I 

wonder what man you would pick. Right! None other 

"■'^^'^^ than the senior president — good old, slow-talking Oscar Leach. 

These Seniors must have thought most versatile had something to do with beauty ; 

for half the class voted for themselves. At least, almost that many got one vote. The 

rest, realizing the true meaning of the term, divided equally for Chambers and Strong. 

Another question that caused trouble was who has developed most since that 

September Morn-ing nearly four years ago? Immediately things became as lively as a 




FORTY-FOUR 



^E 



■"•^""T^ 



"^1^ 



Sophomore election ; and when the smoke cleared away, Strong, chest out and head in 
the air, led Whiting by two votes, with Ratty, T. I., Spider, both Lees, and all three 
Holmes' tieing for third honors. 

Services upon the gridiron were not forgotten either, and to Big Ab's monogram 
and three stars was added the title of having done the most for Carolina. 

For the least appreciated. Chambers and Parker tied; but if they get too proud 
we will tell how few votes they got. Neglected indeed was the man who didn't get a vote. 

In the general argument, a half-dozen votes decided that Leach was the man 
most likely to succeed; the other twenty 
contestants had for a solace the thought 
that the thing was as close as — 

There was a four-cornered con- 
test for the wearer of the greatest 
amount of dignity — Carlton, Whiting, 
and Cansler pressing Oates close for 
the honor, at first. But, as the final 
ballots came in, the only Smack, Sky- 
Blue Boy, showed that he had been 
just trifling — that if it came to a show 
down, not even the Chapel Household 
Gods, Moore and the Hermes, nor 
Dr. V. himself, had it on that Orful 
Oates in the matter of dignity — 
serene, calm, and unruffled. 

Little doubt was present as to 
the best athlete. Chambers' three 
monograms, with stars here and there, 
was too much for even Big Ab. 

And now. who is to be judged 
wearer of the laurels at the platform — 
an important quest'.on on this campus 
of glorious forensic history? As de- hubert 

baler, the largest Holmes, that is to say Albert, easily stands first; wh'le Webster, like 
his great predecessor, silences all others by his silver-tongued oratory. 

As best writer, there were few aspirants. No one who reads the Tarheel edi- 
torials could doubt where this title, loo, must rest. His clear, simple, forceful pen has 
won it for Chambers. 

There was a hot contest for the premier business man. Johnson and Dunnagan 
fought for it, nip and tuck; and both were deserving. Johnson at length drew ahead by 
a shadow — and we think it would have broken his heart otherwise. 




FORTY-FIVE 



7iL 



1^ 



Hardest fighter? Ratty Ranson ! unanimous but for two votes. What a pity 
they could not be disregarded. For pure, bhnd, unreasoning sheer fight his equal is 
not known. 

For broadesl-minded. Whiting is the only one with any considerable collection of 
ballots, a large number being scattered. Likewise, for most independent there were so 
many entries that no one could get more than a half-dozen votes. With that many. Strong 
and Jones tied. 

Then the politicians assembled to choose their champion. But the caucus was 
scarcely in session before the second raters began to remember engagements elsewhere. 

In a few mmutes, the floor was left to Drew 
and Webster. As we go to press, the Tar- 
heel comes out with an extra, declaring that 
in the deadlock no signs of a break appear. 
Further, there is no dark horse with spirit 
enough to even neigh in the same district as 
these two battle-scarred champions. Frank 
swears it is a frame-up against his fa r repu- 
tation — that the one thing he dislikes is poli- 
t'cs. "Tick" — short for politic — on the 
other hand is sure he is present through some 
mistake. And we? Well, we think each 
"doth protest too much." 

Jealous of his class-room honors, the 
less fortunate have voted Collins the hardest 
Grind. 

It is rumored that Perry's middle 
name is Dissent. Anyway, he is the official 
class objector. 

Of romancers, versed in the flowery 

wiles of mendacity, there was indeed a 

poodly flock. But none dared crowd upon 

the heels of the bell-wether, Ike Strayhorn. 

Jimmy Holmes, president of the Y. 

-though there was a certain neatly-written little 




M. C. A., has the religon of the class- 



vole tor Mr. Dunnagan. 

Ratty Ranson again bobbed up into the much-sought white glare, th's time as 
most officious member. 

Then rose the question of who could be depended on, and who would be certain 
to prove an aHbi — or is it an alias — when wanted? The positive virtue fell to the lot 



FORTY-SIX 



9i£ 



ISi 



of Leach. For most undependable, everybody \oted for his closest friend, but George 
Hohon, by virtue of his posit-on as Yacketv ^'ack photographer, was presented with 
the lemon. 

Hart is the sleepiest member; Struthers the noisest, without a doubt; Peele the 
biggest bluff. And everybody travels, but Cy Long the most. 

As to the least productive — well, we fear that many of us would lose some of 
our self-importance if we could read this long list of names. But it had to be divided 
between Hart, James, and Andrews. 

Of course, nobody drmks! But there was a surmse as to who would probably 
prove the thirstiest. There were many names, but only one who seemed possessed of a 
genume Sahara Desert, Richmond-on-Thanksgiving-Day, kmd of a thirst. For obvious 
reasons, his name will remain a dire secret, but — he is a short, dark, tall, blonde, sort 
of a fellow. Maybe you can identify h'm. 



Thus did our magnetized, twisted, irregular circle of eighty-odd dots speak, 
naming one dot this, calling another that. And if in the verdict one should seem to be 
exalted high above his fellows, let him be thankful; 't is high praise; but let him also not 
forget that he is still but a dot, one of eightv-odd. And if one should seem to be forgotten, 
let him not be downcast; he is still one of the eighty-odd. And if one should seem to be 
laughed at, let him laugh with the rest at the joke that was intended as an exidence of 
friendship to him from the eighty-odd. For they are one circle, a unit for a little while. 
Let each one feel his part, that it may be a joyous merrory to him long after the circle is 
broken, the parts scattered to four winds. 




FORTY-SEVEN 



9iZ. 



3iS 




weight, 194. 

"Abby." the best-known and best- 
loved figure that walks the campus. A 
big, simple, kmdiy soul; giant in stature; 
slow, but everlastrngly there. And 
strong — m playful moods, he tosses one 
around as an elephant would. Four years 
of Varsity football, with captamcy m his 
Senior year, speak for themselves; and 
Captain Abernathv takes his honored 
place beside Tillett, Wrn;ton, and other 
Carolma heroef, a name to conjure with 
in Tarheel land. 



Secretary of Class (2); 
Treasurer Oak R.dge Clib 
(2); Vars.ly Football (I. 
2, 3. 4); Captam Virs.tv 
Football Team (4); Meck- 
lenburg County Club; 'l . 
M. C. A.; Track Squad 
(I, 2); Vice-Pres.dent 
North Carolina Club (3). 



Class Football (I, 2, 3); 
Class Baseball (I, 2, 3); 
Varsity Football (4); Y. 
M. C. A.; Tennis Asso- 
ciation ; Associate Editor 
of Yackety Yack (3); 
Commencement Marshal 
(3); Bones; K -, 



FORTY-EIGHT 



TiUZ 



]iS 




Trov Monroe Andrews 
Chapel Hill. N. C. 



Age, 19; height. 5 feet 10 mche 
weight. 150. 

Troy is one of the two "Trojans" 
our Class. If you simply see him. you 
would think that he is asleep nearly 
the lime; but he is not thai sleepy. He 
will never hurt himself at work. This 
is nol because he is not able to work, but 
because he is nol poing to do anything 
that he can possibly avoid. 



Di. Society; 
County Club. 



Orange 




"Luke" came to us a knee-pani lad, 
but soon outgrew this. He is a great 
athlete — not that he has made any Var- 
sity team, but because he has made all 
of the class teams. History is his favorite 
study, and has been ever since his Fresh- 
man year. His home is in the mountains, 
as you would suppose, foi angels dwell 
in high places. 



Macon County Club; 
Class Football; Class Base- 
ball; Class Basket-ball; 
Y. M. C. A. 



KC 



FORTY-NINE 



1& 




Age, 20; height. 5 
weight. 153. 

Just because he doesn't say any more 
about himself than he does about any- 
thing else, you might think that "Ben" 
didn't do anythmg here on the campus. 
A very few trips to the baseball field, 
however, would let you see that he is 
somebody at Chape! Hill. His silence 
there can't keep you from knowing that 
he IS our premier pitcher. "Ben" is the 
kmd of man whom you'd judge to have a 
"one and only"; and a quiet rumor says 
that you are right about it. 



"Brink" entered with 1915. but has 
steamed up above the speed limit in order 
to have the honor of graduating with us. 
"We thank him for the complii 
congratulate him on his good work. Since 
he came here, he has never missed a foot- 
ball or baseball game, or a Star Course 
r an opportunity of sleeping 
through breakfast. 



Phi. Society; Wayne 
County Club: Class Base- 
ball (I. 2); Varsity Base- 
ball (3); Wearer of N. C; 
3 X 




Phi. Society; ^'. M. C. 
A.; Tennis Association; 
Wilson County Club. 




Age. 19; h 
weight. 155 

"Brownie." as he is known 
the mountains. He entered 
in his early youth. During his sojourn 
here, he has taken plenty of recreation 
from his books, but made * B K in the 
meantime. He says that he is going to 
enter the medical profession, and we be- 
lieve he will make good. 



Y. M. C. A.; Tennis 
Association ; Buncombr 
County Club; Asheville 
Club; German Club; 
Zoblogy Club; Elisha Mit- 
chell Scientific Socipiv; 
Assistant in Zoology (3); 
1> B K. 




FoHN Scott Cansler 
21; height. 5 feet 10 inches; 
weight. 130. 

The face of a hermit, the legs of a 
sparrow, and the clothes of a tailorins 
model, but the happy possessor of the 
sanest and best-balanced mental equip- 
t in the Class. From Malh. I through 
Philosophy 4. and into Law. they all 
look alike to this intellectual beauty; 
facts go in and "ones" come out; though 
none of your freakish genius is here. A 
bit of a lover, too — the quietest on record, 
and always ready to explain those trips as 
Glee Club business. "General" has 
done his share of developing in the past 
four years, and he faces graduation with a 
record that is bound to carry him far. 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. 
A.; Mecklenburg County 
Club; German Club; Pres. 
Tennis Asso. (3); Class 
Sec'y (4); Treas. German 
Club (4); High School 
Debating Union (4); Asso. 
Ed. Tarheel (4); Asso. 
Ed. Yackety Yack (4) ; 
Greater Council (4); Mgr. 
Clee Club (4); Ball Mgr. 
Pan-Hellenic Council (4); 
Amphoterothen; Golden 
Fleece; Sec'v 'I' B K ; BOH. 



gjj™ 




one of the good Baptist 
spends a part of his time 
these days. He is so 
quiet that some of his classmates did not 
even know that he was here until he was 
elected President of the Class at the 
end of his Sophomore year. He is as 
dignified as Malcolm Gates. S. 
imagine how he performed the duties of 
h,s office. 



Di. Society; Y. M. C. 
A.; Class President (3); 
President Oak Ridge Club 
(3) ; Secretary Student 
Cquncil (3); Secretary 
Greater Council (3) ; Junior 
Oratorical Contest. 



FIFTY-TWO 



Athletic Asso.; Y. M. C. 
A.: Scrub Football and 
ket-ball (I); Varsity 
Football (2); Varsity Ten- 
nis (2, 3, 4); Varsitv 
Basket-ball (2, 3, 4) ; Capt. 
(3) ; Vice-Pres. Class (2) : 
Historian (4) ; Greater 
Council (3); Co 

II Mgr. (3, 4) 
Yacketv Yack Ed. (3) 
Asso. Ed. Tarhcd (3) 
Managinq Ed. (3); Ed, 
in-Chief (4); Germ a 
Coop : Amphoterothen ; Golde 



Club 

Fleece; Gimghoul ; *BK; 2T; i: .\ K 



%E 



]i^ 




.ght. 112. 

The original Marathon guy had nolhine 
I this one. "Skeet" has been famous 
his Freshman days for his ability to 
(^■et over ground. Short of stature, but 
long of stride, he flings the miles over his 
shoulder as nonchalantly as Doc Klultz 
pockets your change. Nat Cartmell is his 
Czar, and the cinder track his Heaven. 
Beyond this, he fusses over road engineer- 
ing, and lives with Bascom Field in a 
funny little house where in the silence of 
the nighttime he dreams of ten-foot giants. 



C, A 

Association: Warren ton 
High School Club; Varsity 
Track Team (1. 2. 3, 4); 
North Carolina Club: Sec- 
retary and Treasurer of 
North Carolma Club (2); 
Phi. Society: Cross Country 
Team. 



Phi. Society: Wa 
County Club; Y. M. 
A.: Ehsha Mitchell Scien- 
tific Society: Class Foot- 
ball (4) ; Assistant in Civil 
Engmeering (4); Winner 
of Cain Mathmetical Medal 
(3): President of * B K . 



FIFTY-THREE 



7iL 



!<& 




A quiet, dignified 
attends strictly to his 
sixteen hours of acad 
first-year medicine, and 
Making the ■!■ B K w, 
career of a 
course in th 
opened his 
ing, he is 
ruffled, neve 
panionable 



a deta 
lan who has slaughte 
Chemistry building ■ 
outh. Too modest and retir- 
an almighty worker, never 
in a hurry, and a most com- 
when you dig beneath the 



Henry Leon Cox 
Cullowhee. N. C. 

Age, 19; height, 5 feet 11 
weight, 148. 

"Kid," or "Handsome Harry" (' 
will answer to either), came to us froi 
the wilds of Cullowhee. Born, bred, and 
educated in the slicks, this veritable child 
of nature just can't help delving into her 
secrets. Thrives in the fumes of buleric 
acid, hydrogen sulphide, and carbon disul- 
phide. But when it comes to sleeping, he 
has the ancient Somnus beal a mile. His 
besetline sin is falling in love with every 
girl he sees. 



Di. Society; Y. M. C. 
A.; Tennis Asso.; Chemi- 
cal Journal; Alembic Club; 
Elisha Mitchell Scientific 
Society; Zoology Club; 
Medical Society; Assl. in 
Chemistry (3. 4); Com- 
mencement Marshal (3)' 

<f>BK; .\Xi:; 'I'.X; il A K 



Di. Society; Alembic 
Club; Elisha Mitchell 
Scientific Society; Babbitt 
Scholarship; Y. M. C. A.; 
'^ B K ■ A X ^ 



FIFTY-FOUR 



KC 



1& 




"Bill" turned his efforts toward Ikey's 
department during his Sophomore year, 
but his fondness and natural endowment 
for Math, and Physics redirected his 
course, and saved him to the academic 
ranks. Bill has roomed with Swmdi 
for four years, and he slicketh closer thai 
a brother. This close relationship ha 
caused him to be looked upon as Swin 
dell's cradle. 



If there is anybody in 
doesn't like Paul, he shows hi^ 
judgment, and keeps mighty quiet about it. 
Paul hasn I done many startling things 
to the College; as far as marks and mono- 
grams go, he IS not any belter off than 
most of the rest of us. But what he has 
failed to gain in fame, he has won in the 
good-will of the College. He 
away from here not pins and statistics, but 
the best wishes of all for his success in 
life, and, of course, love. 



Athletic Association 
Phi. Society; Murphy Edu 
cational Club; Historica 
Society; Y. M. C. A. 
Hyde County Club. 




Y. M. C. A.; Phi. So- 
ciety; Wayne County Club: 
Class Football (2. 3, 4); 
Captain Class Football 
(4); Class Baseball (I. 2, 
3, 4). 



FIFTY-FIVE 



SiC 



L^ 




George Frank Drew 

Live Oak. Fla. 
23; height. 5 feel 10 inches; 
dt. 155. 
The genllesl-voiced. mildesl-mannered. 
best-looking, and shrewdest politician who 
ever put across a wise deal. Loves to 
handle men and offices, but is equally suc- 
cessful on the ballroom floor, or selling 
football tickets, or ranging the Florida 
swamps with a shotgun and a camping 
kit. Carries about forty hours of "puds" 
his Senior year, and still keeps up that 
old habit of not going to bed during 
exams. A prince of good fellows, a sound 
business head, and a remarkable capacity 
to withstand the introduction into his brain 
of the beauties of "Second French." 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C, 
A.; Athl. Asso.; Tennis 
Asso.; Sec'y and Treas. 
Florida Club (2); Vice- 
Pres. Junior Class (3); 
Yackety Yack Ed. (3); 
Asst. Mgr. Varsity Foolba 
(3); Pres. Florida Club 
(3); Athletic Council (3. 
4); Assl. Leader G. 
Club Dance (3); Asst. 
Leader Gimghoul Dance 
(3) : Commencement Ball 
Mgr. (3); Mgr. Varsity 
Football Team (4); Rep. in General 
Alumni Athl. Com. (3, 4); Coop; Senior 
Order of the Golden Fleece; Leader of 
Gimghoul Dance (4) ; Pres. German 
Club (4); Pres. Pan-Hellenic Council 
(4); Gimghoul; A 1 9.. 



Mike" 
't treat you to a genuinely hearty laugh, 
fact, he loves fun. and courtesy makes 
him laugh at another's jokes, whether they 
are humorous or not. As might be ex- 
pected of a fellow of his temperament, he 
is a worshiper at the shrine of the fair sex. 
But to his jollity he adds seriousness of 
purpose. His good, sound sense got him 
the position of business manager of the 
Ma^aTine. MiKE is one of the strong, 
l-headed men of the Class, and he is 
bound to succeed. 



Di. Society; Y. M. C. 
A.; Tarheel Ed. (2); Class 
Historian (2) ; Sec'y Press 
Asso. (3); Asst. Mgr. 
Cnivcrsilt) Magazine (3); 
Cor. Sec'y Forsyth County 
Club; Vice-Pres. Athletic 
Asso.; Sec'y Surry-Yadkin 
County Club; Dramatic 
Club; Commencement Mar- 
shal: Senior StunI Com- 
cittee; High-School Debat- 
ing Union Committee; Bus. 
Mgr. Univenilv Magazine 




Phi. Society; Medical 
Society; Athletic Asso- 
ciation; Tennis Associa- 
tion; Y. M. C. A.; 
Zoological Club; Claso 
Football (3) ; Historian 
Class; i:X; 'l. X. 



FIFTY-SEVEt- 



7iL 



ISi 




John Gilmer Feezor 
Silver Hill. N. C. 

Age, 25; height, 5 
weight, 145. 

Feezor is one of the hardest workers 
of our Class. When he is not studying, he 
IS working at something else. You see 
him when he comes around after laundry, 
and hardly at any other time. He knows 
practically everybody in college, and can 
tell you where they room. 



Di. Society: Educational 

Club; Davidson County 

Club; Botanical Journal 
Club. 



Thomas Wiley Ferguson 

Kendal, N. C. 

Age, 25; height. 6 feet; weight, 165. 

Children are to be seen, not heard; 
"FuRc" must think that, in spite of his six- 
odd feet height, that he is still a child. He 
can't keep people from seeing him. but he 
certainly can prevent their hearing. He 
goes about his work, plays Class football, 
and doesn't care a rap what people think, 
say, or do. In other words, he has 
ns, and lives up to them. 



Class Football (2, 3, 4); 
Di. Society; Historical So- 
,^ ciety; Educational Club; 
Y. M. C. A. 



FIFTY-EIGHT 



Til 



UK 




Arthur James Flume 
Palatine Bridge. N. Y. 

Age, 25; height, 5 feet lYi inches; 
eight, 140. 

Flume is the little fellow from the 
h-Nul" vicinity. Immediately after 
he hit the "Hill." he fell in love with .t, 
even if he .s an admirer of br.llianlly 
lighted cabarets. "A. J." says he is going 
to be a chemist, and already he has shown 
his ability by landing a job as assistant in 
Chemistry while an undergraduate. He 
has the grit, and will make oood. 



Alembic Club; [ournal 

Club; Ehsha Mitchell 

Scientific Society; Y. M. 
C. A.; AX:i. 




John Robert Gentry 
Waynesviiie, Tn. C. 

Age, 24; height, 6 feel; weight. 170. 

"Bob" is one of the four-year Y. M. 
C. A. men. He has an expression about 
him that reminds one of a Sunday School 
or a Bible Class. Bob has also developed 
the social side of his nature. If it were 
not for the ladies' love of mike (Dun- 
nagan). he would be the leading ladies' 
man of our class. In Class football, he 
will be remembered as a star. 



Di. Society: Y. M. C. 
A.; Class Football (3. 4); 
Y. M. C. A. Cabmet 

(3. 4). 



FIFTY-NINE 



TiL 



ISi 




Di. Sociely; Y. M. C. 
A.; Guilford County Club; 
Class Foolball COS. "10. 
'12); Manager Class Foot- 
ball ('08); Scrub Footba 
(•09); Sub-Varsitv Foo 
ball (■|3); Class Baseba 
('09. '11, '13); Varsit 
Track Team ('10); i: N. 



TiZ 



ISi 




Meade Hart 

Age. 20: hclghl, 



Mooresv.lle. N. C. / j 
5 feel 10 ,nch. 
weight. 143 

When Meade is not in bed. you may 
look for him at the Library, or at the 
Peabody Bu.ldmg. These are his ch.ef 
places of resort. He can tell you when 
every magazine is due at the Library, 
whether or not it is on time, and what 
pictures are in it. He is so fond of edu- 
cation that he was elected Vice-President 
of the Archibald DeBow Murphv Edu- 
cational Club. As a side line, he takes 
Greek. Philosophy. F.nglish. and Music. 



"J. T." entered the Class of 1913. but 
dropped out one year, and decided to come 
back and get his diploma with us. What 
1913 lost in him we have gained. He is 
one of the best players in Class Football. 
Any one will tell you that Hatcher was 
the best tackle on the class field. 



Di. Sonet 
County Club. 




Phi. Society; Y. M. C. 
A.; Duplin County Club; 
Class Football. 



SIXTY-ONE 



9iL 




of "politicking'* into the stage of construc- 
tive action. Dependable for sound advic* 
and thorough work, which quality the Y 
M. C. A. recognized, when, taking ad 
vantage of his good nature, it made h 
Treasurer. 



Di 


Society; 


President 


Alam 


ance County 


Club 


(A): 


Y. M. C. 


A. Cabinet 


(4V. 


Greater C 


ouncil 


(4); 


Class 


Football 


(3. 


4): 


Class 


Treasurer 


(3) 


Y. 


M. C. A. Treasurer 


(4); 


Commencement 


Ueb 


a t e r 


(3); 


Wmner o 


t Bi 


rsham 


Prize 


(3). 






SIXTY-TWO 










James 


Eugene Holmes 




Graham, N. C. 


Age. 


23; 


height, 5 feet 8 Inches; 


weight. 


137. 




JlMMIE is lea 


der of the famous "homely" 


trio, althoui>h i 


n height he cannot compete 


with hi 


brothe 


Albert. Early in his col- 


lepe CO 


urse. he 


became as attached to our 


neighbo 


rmg Si 


nday Schools as Ralph 


Rank.n 


IS to o 


ur State High Schools. In 


this lie 


d he V 


vas discovered to us as a 


faithfu 


worker 


, and we made him Presi- 


dent ol 


the Y. 


M. C. A. Jimmie's chief 


interest 


now 1 


es in aiding and abetting 


Frank 


Grahan 


in "plotting against the 


whites.' 







Di. Society; Alamance 
County Club; Educational 
Club; Histo^cal Society; 
President Y. M. C. A. 
(4). 



SiC 



3iS 




weight. 135 

Last of th 

nol in menial equipment, as witness his 
* B K key. Supports his brothers and the 
other good citizens in any worthy Class, 
Di. Society, or Y. M. C. A. effort, but 
doesn't talk much about it. Showed all- 
'round development by making the Class 
football team. 



Di. Society; Y. 


M. c. y 


A.; Alamance 


County 


Club; Associate 


Editor 


Yackety Yack 


(4); 


*BK. 





DI. Society; Tennis 
Association; Y. M. C. A.; 
Class Football (/, 3. 4); 
Manager Football Team 
f4); Vice-President For- 
syth County Club (3. 4); 
Educational Club; Athletic 
Association ; German Club. 



SIXTY-THREE 



9iL 



]£« 




Albert Warren James 
Laurinburg, N. C. 
Age. 19; height, 6 feet; weight, 150. 
Buz exercises exceedingly scrupulous 
care in selecting how and with whom he 
shall spend his time. Rumor has it that 
often his spirit, because of certain irresist- 
ible attraction, is elsewhere. H 
that may be, a man who can bat down nini 
exams, in ten days must have the concen 
tration that accompanies success. 



Warrenlon High Scho 
Club. 




; came into his own when Euless 
d over to him the billheads of the 
Tarheel. Revels in the music of ihc type- 
writer, gloats over his "Please Remits." 
and dreams of siening checks. Outside of 
the business world, he takes himself and 
Horace too seriously, disagrees with Chase. 
and has been known to sIid down lo Elon. 
where he reigns supreme. Energetic, in- 
dustrious, and efficient, he goes after this 
business of education in a get-there fashion 
— as he does everything. 



Alamance County Club; 



Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; 
Manager Class Track (3); 
Assistant Business Mgr. 
Tarheel (3); Busmess Mgf. 
Tarheel (4): Tennis Asso. ; 
Elisha Mitchell Scientific 
Society; Sec'y of Class 
(2); Class Treas. (4); 
Commencement Marshal 
(3). 



SIXTY-FOUR 



7iL 



1& 




Di. Society: PresidenI 
Blue Ridge Club (3); 
Press Association ; Asso- 
ciate Editor Yackety Yack 
(3, 4). 



Phi. Society; Y. M. C. 

A.: Tennis Association; 

Class Football (1); Class 

aseball (2); Student 

Washington and Lee (3); 



SIXTY-FIVE 



9iL 



m 




Daniel Lambert Knowles 
Mount Olive. N. C. 

Age. 21; heighl. 5 feet 10 Inches; 
reighl. 150. 

Monte is from Mount Olive, do 
lere where they raise neaches and tube- 
you know. But MoNT isn't exactly 
peach, nor is he a tuberose. But he does 
indle the big mitt as easily as though it 
ere a kid glove, and came near makin" 
monogram for so doing. He did enough 
ork to get by with a safe margin, and 
ed no tears when he made "fours." 



Phi. Society; Tenni 
Association; Y. M. C. A. 
Athletic Association 
Wavne County Club 
Scrub Baseball (1, 2) 
Varsity Baseball (3) 
Class Football (3. 4) 
Dramatic Association; L 
W., Medicine. 




Lasley is in some respects the most in- 
different man in the Class. In fact, he is 
so indifferent that he had as soon eat with 
a knife as a fork. He is a lover of Math, 
up to the fourth dimension, and thinks that 
he cannot go beyond this. 



Di, Society; Rockins- 
ham County Club; Y. M, 
C. A.; TK.\. 



SIXTY-SIX 



KL 



]k^ 




weight, 130 

You just couldn't ihink of "Orscar" 
doing anything at any time except the 
thing that was scheduled (or that time. 
His upright manner of life, and his patient 
regard for the other fellow's opinion, fit 
him to wear the toga of the mayor of the 
Campus. W,th Dr. Booker. ' Prof 
Walker, and several more of the boys 
backing him, he has risen to such an 
eminence that he can see Raleigh: and 
Superintendent Joyner had better walch 
his job. 



V, 

ciety; 

Baseb. 

Cabins 

Counc 

dent 

dent 

Officio 

Counc 

othen: 



M. C. A.; Phi. So- 
Assislant Managei 
(3); Y. M. C. A 
t (3); Alhlet 

(4); Class P 
(4); President Stu 
Council (4) ; Ex 
■ President Create 
(4) ; Amphoter 
Golden Fleece: Ger 
Club. 



Society: Y. M. 
A.: Press Association; 
Educational Club: Histori- 
cal Society: High School 
Debating Union: Fresh- 
Soph Debate (2). 



SIXTY-SEVEN 



9iL 



ISi 




Phi. Society; Y. M. C 
A.; Progressive Club; 

Johnson Counly Club. 



ball (1, 2); 
Class Track (2); Va 
Baseball (3). 



SIXTY-EIGHT 



9iCZ 



ISi 




20; height. 5 feel 10 
weight, 153. 

"Can't you give us some light on this 
subject. Mr. Long? " Cv awakes with 
a start: "Eh? What did you say. Pro- 
fessor? I did not hear the question." 
Thai's typical. Bui his dreams profit him 
more than much hard work has done for 
us; for Cy is one of those gifted few thai 
have "I' B K thrust upon them. A key 
looks as natural on him as water in the 



Mecklenburg County 
Club; Dl. Society; Class 
Football (I); Class Base- 
ball and Class Football (2. 
3. 4); Varsity Basket-ball 
(1); North Carolina Club; 
Associate Editor YackeTY 
YacK (3); German Club; 
Manager Class Baseball 
(3); Manager Varsity 
Basket-ball (4) ; Athletic 
Council; Bones; Oasis; 
■t B K; K .\. 




William Campbell Lord 
Wilmington. N. C. 
Age. 21 ; height, 5 ft. 91/2; wight. 146. 
Happy as an arctic day i; 

fesses that his chief accom- 
plishment since he has been in 
has been lo exist, and his chief ambition 
to keep on existing. From which one 
might judge that he is lazy; bul rather, 
we think, a physical economist. He 
his work as a sort of an unavoid- 
ble evil, and is somewhat of an athlete 
II the class and scrub circles. Bul where 
bines is at the dances. His 
ability as a dancer, along, be it said, with 
his other charms, is the cause of much 
distress at Thanksgiving, Junior Week, 
and Commencement. 



Sub. Varsity Football 
(4); Scrub Football (3) 
Class Football (I. 2. 3) 
Class Baseball (I. 2, 3) 
Captain Class Baseball (3) 
Yackety Yack Board 
(2); Pres. New Hanover 
Co. Club (4); Phi. So- 
ciety; Glee Club and Man- 
dolin Club (4); Vice-Pres 
German Club (4); Asst. 
Leader Spring Dance (3); 
Asst. Leader Fall Dance 
(4); Ball Mgr. (4); :: X. 



9iL 



SIXTY-NINE 



IR 




Age, 23; he.ghl, 5 feel 8 inches; 
weight, 150. 

"Frank" bulled in from somewhere — 
we know nol where. Judging from his 
lalk. one would think he came from South 
Carolina. But judging from his work, 
one would think he came from Buie's 
Creek. From the way he is training in 
Economics, one would think he is going 
to make a million; but. as a matter of 
fact, he IS too lazy to cultivate the cash. 



Class Football (I. 4); 
Scrub Football (2); Glet 
Club (4); Di. Society. 



ady to put across a wise busi- 

r to pass a soul-nourishing 

oke and a "little game." 

? sense than the average col- 

bv dodgine college 

"smecures." Rooming with Oscar, he 

has led an upright life. "iViAc" is a man 

who carries out what he undertakes; 

gelic and dependable, he is bound to 

ke good. 



Di. Society; Y. M. C. 
A.; Press Association; 
Tennis Association; Presi- 
dent Gaston-Lincoln County 
Club (4); Assistant Mana- 
ger Tarheel (3). 



WL 



]f8 




Roy Bowman McKnicht 

Age. 21; height. 5 feel IP, inche 
weight. 155. 

"Mack" Is a mixture of Y. M. C. A.. 
Bohemia. Geology, and Washmgton and 
Lee. He is rather fair to look upon, and 
knows It; but he Is too bashful to push 
this natural advantage with the pirls. 
Mack'.s regrets are two; first, that Collier 
did not also leach Greek, and second, that 
basket-ball N. C.'s are not more plentiful. 







Ashevllle 


. N 


C 


Age. 
weight. 


21; 
140 


height. 


5 f 


eel 



you ha 
him. for 
ingly fe 



Di. Society; Mecklen- 
burg County Club; Y. M. 
C. A.; Y. M. C. A. Cabi- 
net (2) ; Class Football (1. 
4); Scrub Football (2); 
Scrub Basket-ball (I); 
Sub-Varsity Basket -ball 
(2) ; Captain Class Basket- 
ball (4); Geology Semm- 
ary; German Club; Stu- 
dent at Washington and 
Lee (3); i) X. 




"Cholly" is such a hard worker that 
he is seldom seen, and less often heard. 
You can usually find him at hi; 
either boning hard or counting his money. 
On Stale occasions, you may see him 
strolling around with his friends. But 
to hear Cholly to appreciate 
s soft, sweet voice and charm- 
nine ways place him beyond 
question In the Boseman. Kerr. M'Dender 
trio. He contemplates studying medicine. 
May his success at [efferson be even more 
brilliant than his record here. 



Athletic Association; Y. 
M. C. A.; Band; Cle 
Club ; Buncombe County 
Club; Class Tennis Team 
(3); O-AH. 



SEVENTY-ONE 



9iZ 



ISi 




Age. 20 ; height 
weight. 150. 

The most skilled tennis arm. the d 
ingest feet, and the stiffesi back whereof 
the University can boast. Voted the most 
dignified man in the Class, he smiles the 
ball-room smile, straightens his shoulders 
impossibly straighter. runs his finger along 
the razor edge of his trousers, pats his 
hair down, adjusts his lie one-eighth of an 
inch to the right, and strides off to P. H. 
D.'s lab with Carl and big Ah. Back 
of it all IS the conscious worker, and, on 
occasions, the dreamer of dreams, and the 
lover's sigh. 



Di. Society; Y. M. C. 
A.: Mecklenburg County 
Club; German Club; Ten- 
nis Asso.; Coop; Varsity 
Tennis Team (2. 3, 4); 
Scrub Football (I); Class 
Football (2. 3); Gimghoul; 
Associate Ed. Yackety 
Yack (3); Wearer of N. 
C; Pan-Hellenic Council 
(3); Chief Ball Manager; 

Ben. 



Frank Redding Owen 
Yadkin College. N. C. 

Age. 22; height. 5 feel 6 
ght. 138. 

"Pug" is the Horatian of 
He has taken every course in philosophy 
that is given here, except one. and would 
have taken it if he could have gotten it. 
He is also a member of the Gym. Te 
You may expect to hear from him as a 
educational leader, for he has the 




Di. Society; Y. M. C. 
A.; Gym Squad (4); 
Davidson County Club. 



SEVENTY-TWO 



7iL 



]iJ5 




Di. Society; Medical So- 
ciety; Y. M. C. A,; Class 
Baseball (I, 2); Greater 
Council: Scotland-Sampson 
County Club. 



SEVENTY-THREE 



7iL 



1^ 




Elbert Sidney Peele 
Williamslon, N. C. 

„ . 19; height, 5 feel 10 ,nche 
weight, 160. 

Sleep + B. S. = *BK + A. B. After 
seeing this reaction lake place in Peele, 
Dr. Herly must admit thai alchemy is a 
true science. Peele received his ear , 
education at Buie's Creek; consequently, 
he IS good at laughing, bluffing, and debat- 
ing. He had rather hear a ioke tha 
lo a fire. Peele says thai he is goii 
to be a teacher. He will make 
one. if he can refrain from laughing at 
and encouraging young America's pranks. 



Phi. Society; Tennis 
Associallon; Press Associa- 
tion; Educational Club; 
Historical Association ; 
Winner Freshman Debate; 
Commencement Debater; 
Debalmg Union; * B K. 



N. C. 

Age. 3-4; height. 5 feet 10 inches; 
weight. 155. 

"E. J." is one of the patriarchs of the 
Class. He keeps to- himself, and has 
spent his four years almost exclusively in 
taking two degrees. The fact that he 
has never been to the Pickwick explains 
why he has never raised any objection to 
any of Brockwell's methods of operating 
the Movies. In Perrv, we have an 
ardent disciple of Charlie Lee. 



Phi. Society; Secrela 
Wilson County Club; Cla 
Poet (4). 



SEVENTY-FOUR 



ISt 




VviLLiAM Fraklin Pitt 
Elm City. N. C. 

22; height, 5 feel II 
weight, 175. 

A tower of strength in I9l4's football 
backfield, and an artist with the ball and 
bat when spring days come around, 
"BlLLv" has grown with the Class, and 
on many an afternoon has helped to make 
Class history. He believes in not letting 
Ignorance interfere with college work, 
and, therefore, has always held up his 
end against the teacher. 



Phi. Society; Class Foot 
ball (2, 3, 4); Class Base 
ball {2, 3); Class Basket 
ball (4); Twm Count) 
Club; Athletic Association 
L. W., Medicine. 




JOSEPH Robert Prev.^tt 
Lumberton, N. C. 

21; height, 5 feet 8 mche 
140. 

"Pre" is a jack-of-all-trades — studies, 
politics, athletics — the which he touches, 
values, and passes in his quest for life. 
His propensity for making himself a part 
of all that he has met gave him a fair 
chance to become famous, but he let 
Sirulhers and Ranson beat him out. 
However, in one field he is master — and 
we believe he'll achieve heaven by rolling 
on St. Peter's ten. 



Class Baseball (I, 2, 3); 
Class Football f2, 3); 
Robeson County Club; Y. 
M. C. A.; Phi. Society. 



SEVENTY-FIVE 



9iL 



1& 




Age, 27; height, 6 feet 1 inch; 
weight, 145. 

a quiel fellow, who never im- 
poses himself upon others. He spends 
most of his time at his room, and has never 
believed campus life better than private. 
He IS one of the solid kmd. and 
whose word is his bond. He loves Math.. 
and no doubt he will some day design 
a big dam or bridge which will add luster 
to himself and his Class. 



William Nelson Pritchard. Jr. 

Chapel Hill. N. C. 

Age, 21; height. 5 feel 9^/^ inche 

'e kmd of a 
3u wish lo interview him. you 
find him working in the Chem- 
istry Laboratory. He seems lo like Math. 
I, m that he specialized in it under the 
regime of Fally. He is also possessed 
with a fine voice. We are expecting 
illy" to discover one of the unknown 
ements some day in Chemistry. 



Di. Society; Y. M. C. A. 




Journal Club ; American 
Chemical Society; Glee 
Club (3. 4); Orange 
County Club; Assistant in 
Chemistry (4) ; A X 1. 



SEVENTY-SIX 



9iL 



ISi 




Age. 24; height. 5 feet 
weight, 173. 

When you want to put a good man be 
hind a good cause, call on JlM. From hi 
youth up. Jim has listened 
the vox populi. and can always give 
lips as to which way the wind is 
blowing. A man of public importance; 
possessed of a superabundance of good- 
heartedness. which even managing the 
Yackety Yack hasn't evaporated; carry- 
ing contagious enthusiasm whi 
hoarse throat can gasp "Big ray-ray fo 
the le-eam!"; deservedly popular with th. 
whole campus. 



Y. M. C. A.; Di. So- 
ciety; Sec'y Debating 
Union (3); Pres. Debating 
Union (4); Glee Club (3. 
4); Class Football (2); 
Scrub Football (3); Asst. 
Mgr. Track Team (3); 
Sec'y Athl. Asso.; Jr. Ban- 
quet Speaker (4); Pres. 
Caldwell Co. Club; Chief 
Marshal f 3) ; Bus. Mgr. 
Yackety Yack (4) ; 
Cheer Leader (4) ; German 
Club; Amphoterothen ; 
Golden Fleece; .\ T !>. 



Miss Puett? Whv, man. she saved 
from being a co-ed-less Class. Thai's 
but she is more. She's rather 
modest and shy. but a true Tarheel and 
1914 product, even if she did come lo us 
in the last lap. with a degree from Chicora 
College. S. C. Rumor makes her a good 
cook. She paints — on paper. She is 
ays in a good humor, thoughtful, not 
ly provoked, but— has an opinion of 
own. seldom expresses it unless neces- 
sary, and then with a sweet 
which she denies. These and other good 
qualities command our respect and admira- 
tion. 




A. B. Chicora College, 
Greenville, S. C; Vice- 
President Gaston - Lincoln 
County Club. 



TiZ 



ISi 




"Jesse," true lo his name, 
sweet maiden graces. He h 
hard, and made English a specialty 
might infer from the ease with which he 
"bhnds" Dr. Booker m Enghsh 10. De- 
voted most of his Senior year to dramatics 
and the Library. He will succeed, be- 
he will work. 



Tennis Association; 'l . 
M. C. A.; Ph,. Societv; 
High School Debating 
Union: Dramatic Associa- 
tion; Dramatic Club; Junior 
Orator's Contest; — T. 



SEVE.NTy-E.ISHT 




Age. 21; height, 5 feet 6 inches; 
weight. 126. 

The Lord never made a fiercer fighter. 
If his body had been bigger and his head 
he would be wearino four N. C.'s 
nstead of being an eternal scrub. The 
ivest wire m the Class, independent lo 
swaybackness. officious, talkative, attend- 
ing to everybody's business. "R.^TTy" has 
made himself terribly important in athletics. 
in politics, in running the University, in 
everything. The Freshmen think him a 
god. Nat smiles on him with indulgence, 
and his classmates — oh. they lake off their 
hat5 in admiration and wonder. 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. 
A.; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 
(4); Educational Club; 
Dramatic Asso. ; Pres. 

Mecklenburg Co. Club (3); 
Asst. Mgr. Basket-ball (3) ; 
Class Track Team (2. 3); 
Track Squad (2.3); Class 
Baseball (1. 2. 3); Class 
Basket-ball (4); Scrub 
Basket-ball (1. 2); Basket- 
ball Squad (3); Class 
Football (1. 2); Scrub 
Football (3. 4); Cross 
Country Team (3) ; Mgr. Class Basket- 
ball (4) ; Press Association. 



KiC 



liiC 




Phi. Society; Archibald 
Debol Murphv Club. 



9iL 



seventy-nine: 



liSl 




Kenneth Claiborne Royall 
Goldsboro, N. C. 

Age, 19; height, 6 feet 3 il 
weight, 1 

A man of substance, th 
ter you know, the more 
pendent, he forms his own opinions, re- 
gardless of whom they offend. Once 
formed, they are the guide of his actions; 
and from the course they designate, swerve 
he will not. His mental grasp permits his 
self-reliance: and the other man admits 
the error. True and loyal to his friends, 
he's ever sincere, Damascus stee 



Class Football (2) ; Class 
Basket-ball (4) ; Class 
Tennis (3); Soph-funior 
Debate f 3) ; Pres. Wayne 
County Club; YacKETV 
Yack Board (3, 4); Pres, 
Tennis Asso, ; Phi. Society; 
e s ; Amphoterothen : 
Corgons Head; Pan-Hel- 
lenic Council; "f B K ; 
-IKE. 



Di. Society; Yadkin- 
Surry County Club; Ex- 
ecutive Committee of His- 
torical Societv; Educational 
Club. 



SiC 



liS 




Age, 23; heighl, 5 feet 6 inches; 
weight. 150. 

Baby came here from Horner, and 
at once jumped into athletics. He has 
made some track man of himself, as his 
stars and track captaincy will show. He 
is quiet, but congenial; a friend to a friend, 
and knows no enemies. You should hear 
him talk about his lady, as some of his in- 
timates do. 



Caplam Class Trar 
Team (2); Varsity Trac 
Team (2. 3) ; Captain Var 
sity Track Team (4) 
North Carolma Club; I 
W.. Electrical Engineer 



ing; 



X. 



Harold Thomas Sloan 
Franklin. N. C. 

Age, 21; height, 5 feel 9 
weight, 145. 

When Harold goes across the campus, 
with his squat, earthly stride, he plainlv 
proclaims his origin from ihe cornfields of 
the Blue Ridge. No one can shuffle a 
better foot or pick a belter banjo string, 
or raise more corn to the acre than this 
true disciple of old Ben. and as for foot- 
ball, well, we Seniors lost our chances 
when HarolJ) broke his leg. They say that 
he had aspirations for a <!' B K key. and 
flirted them away at the Pickwick; but you 
will have to ask him about that. 



Di. Society; Y. M. C. 
A.; Class Football Team 
(3. 4): Class Baseball (3). 



EIGHTY-ONE 



TiUHL 



IIR 




President Class (2) ; 
Medical Soclely; Secretary 
Wayne County Club; Ger- 
man Club; Ki;; nX; 
A X r. 



Phi. Society; Tennis 
Association; German Club; 
Class Treasurer (2) ; Man- 
ager Class Football (2); 
Freshman Debater; Track 
Team (1, 2. 3); Cross 
Country Team (3); Wearer 
of N. C; Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet; Treasurer of Fn-I 
^•ear Med. Class; <1> B K ; 
A K K 



VaZ. 



]£C 




Society; Durham 
Club; Historical 
Society; Student University 
of Virginia (3); Soph- 
Junior Debater (2). 



Phi. Society: Varsity 
Gym Team (1, 2. 3); Var- 
nly Track Team (I. 2. 3); 
\Xearer of N. C; Yacketv 
Yack Board (2. 3); Class 
Football (3, 4); Asst. 
Leader Fall German (3); 
Junior Oratorical Contest; 
Mgr. Yackety Yack 
(4); Leader Fall German 
(4) ; Leader Gorgon's Head 
Dance (4); Ball Mgr.; 
Ampholerothen ; Golden 
Fleece; Bones; Order of 
Gorgon's Head; '!> H K; Z M'. 



9iZ 



lis 




Age. 21; 
weight, 1 38. 

If you want a big n 
Speed, too. when he shuts his mouth and 
shakes his leg. "Strut" is one of Nat 
Carlmell's disciples, which means that he 
is a hard worker, and a lover of the 
cinder path. Has developed a lot there, 
and even quit making 5's his Senior year 
—passed first Dutch with a whole 3. 



Lewis Holmi:s Swindell 
Swan Quarter. N. C. 
Swindell is from Swan Quarter, 
you know where that is. He spea 
"Esperanto" fluently. espi 
Zoology II. Ask Dr. W.lson. He 
wield the dissecting knife with speed 
accuracy, and is one of Dr. Char 
"Ten gods." See Swindell's treatise < 
"The Dissection of Ducts of the Ductle 
Glands." Swindell is All right. 



Class Track Team (2. 
3, 4); Track Squad (3); 
Class Football (4); Phr 
Society; Alembic Club; 
Horner Club; Y. M. C. A. 




Y. M. C. A.; Phi. 

ciely; Medical Soc 
Class Baseball (1). 



EIGHTY-FOUR 



9iZ 



1& 




Carl Duffv Taylor 
Newbern. N. C. 

Age. 23; heighl, 5 feel 8 
weight. 158. 

The rare combination, upon our rather 
too critical campus, of a popular man and 
one who does things. His middl 
is steady, and when he starts out to do 
anything he is as stubborn as a mule 
against all opposition. He began making 
the Gym. Team and "Ones" on Math, 
his first year, and has been doing both 
ever since — that is until he used up all 
the Math. In his Senior year, with 
"Pap." monarch of mats. rings. and 
parallel bars. In addition, he managed 
the baseball team, just to show his versa- 
tility. A good all-'round man. Carl's 
four years here have been far from 
wasted. Both he and the campus are 
better for his stay. 



Class Football (I. 2); 
Gym. Team (1. 2. 3. 4); 
Assistant Gym Instructor 
(3. 4): Electrical Engin- 
eering Society; Assistant 
Manager Baseball (3) ; 
Manager Baseball (4) ; 
Secretary Athletic Council 
(4); Tar Bahv Board 
(2); Class Prophet (4); 
German Club; Gimghoul ; 







Teer 


N. C. 




Age, 
weight. 


27; 
150. 


height 


5 f 


eet 81 2 inch 


es; 


"Tomihy" 


hails 


from 


Chatham. 


the 


county 
for a ; 


of rabbits. He 
oke on anybody. 


IS always re 
Four months 


ady 
of 


his time has 


been 


spent 


on the campus. 



and the remainder of it has been roomed 
as far away from College as possible. 
He cannot decide which he likes the 
better. Mathematics I or French II 
Tommy is always busy, but is never seen 
studying. 




Di. Society; Y. M. C. A. 



KL 



ISl 




Norman St. George V'ann 

Charlolle. N. C. 

As-e. 23; heighl. 5 feel 11 inches; 
weight. 160. 

"Nip," "Nap." "Tinpan," "George." 
"Norman" and "Red." The Beau Brum- 
mel of ihe Med. Class. Takes the world 
as it is. and cares not what a day may 
bring forth. Associate Professor of 
Embryology, and holds the chair m the 
storeroom course. Rubs elbows with the 
faculty under the slightest pretext, 
illy Mac" and Norman are buddies. 
All the boys like "George." "Nap" is 
bright, and you can expect to hear frcm 
him in his chosen profession. 



John Alfred Walker 
Germanton, N. C. 

Age, 24; height, 6 feel, weight, 150. 

J-J-Jawn is quiet, unobtr 
genial, and wholly white. He is a dis- 
ciple of Benjamin Franklin, and bids 
fair to do more with that mysterious sub- 
stance called electricity than did his 
mighty predecessor. He haunts the lab- 
oratories all day. and with unalloyed 
pleasure listens to Nat Carlmcll until bed- 



Di. Society; Medical So- 
ciety; Assistant in l^mbry- 
oloBv; German Club; 
ZoSlogv Club; IIK.\; 
■1' X. 




Di. Society; ^'. M. C. 
A.; Tennis Association; 
Forsyth County Club. 



EIGHTY-SIX 



7iL 



in 




Felix Litaker Webster 
Wilkesboro. N. C. 

Age. 23; height. 3 feet 8 inches; 
weight. 137. 

The spirit of Busby. Hendrix. L, N. 
Johnson, and Doc Will.ams hves in this 
son of the everlasting hills, to whom the 
dear old Di is the law and the gospel, 
the sun. the moon, and the stars. For 
fiery oratory, or radical independence, or 
the secret caucus. "Tick" Webster is your 
man — and you will have to get up early 
in the morning to beat him. A hard 
fighter against any odds, he delights most 
m crowds and the rostrum, flapping arms, 
and "Give me liberty or give me death." 
with tears in his eyes and throbs in his 
throat. Inevitably destined for legisla- 
tive halls, and bound to be at least noisy 
wherever he goes. 



Di. Society; Y. M. C 
A.; Oak Ridge Club; 
Winner Junior Oratorical 
Contest; Commencement 
Debater (3); Golden 
Fleece. 




WiLLi.AM Pell Whitaker. Jr. 
Wilson. N. C. 
Age. 19; height. 5 feet 7 inches; 
weight. 152. 

Scarcely the plural of size, don't doubt 
that he is a man. and a good one. Solemn 
when he is silent, his laugh spo'ls the 
effect. It is contagious. As "Pap" 
struts his dignified way across the campus, 
he rather enjoys life. Passes his work 
in a hurry, lo get il out of the way of his 
more serious occupations. With Taylor, 
ioinl owner of the Gym., where he can 
do anything. But the chief joy of his Ife 
is checkers. He doesn't go out of his 
way for popularity, but there is some- 
thing seriously wrong with the man who 
doesn't like him. 




German Cl"b; Cla : 
Baseball (2); Instructor m 
Gvm (4): Gym Team (2. 
\ 4); Ass'slant Manager 
Track Team (3); Manastr 
Track Team f4) ; Athletic 
Corncil f4); Coop; Gimg- 
hoj|; Z >!'. 



Ki 



ISi 




that wav whi 

folks a while lo find h 

would have lo do that, foi 



Seymour Webster Whiting 
Raleigh. N. C. 
Age, 21; height. 6 feel; weighl. 150. 
It is a question whether he has de- 
veloped tremendously, or whether he was 
he came here and it took 
You 
Id not 
come lo lell you about it. Anyway, he 
has it. Original, versatile, capable, he 
is characterized by the ability lo think 
straight into a subject. Also, he goes 
deeper than most of us, and can be relied 
on lo be on the right side. Writes and 
debates well; won a monogram on the 
track (where he is beauty [? J itself). 
But his strong point is in the man himself. 
Combines courtesy with independence, and 
is probably the broadest man in ihe Class. 



Phi. Bella Kappa; Var- 
sity Track Team; Wearer 
of N. C; Editor-in-Chief 
of YacKETV YacK ; Asso- 
ciate Editor Tarheel: Vice- 
Pres.dent of Class; Greater 
Council; Debating Union; 
German Club; ' Bones; 
Amphoterothen ; Golden 
Fleece. 



Small in body, but big in enthusiasm 
and push. Reared under Ed. Hall 
ful charge. Stuart has become a mighty 
factor in Y. M. C. A., campus, and 
neighborhood action. His grace and good 

ks make him a successful canvasser. 
The original head of the Y. M. C. A. 
Colored Supplement Department. Attends 
all conventions, from Wake Forest to 
Kansas City, and is the righthand man 
of MotI and Weatherford. 




Guilford County Club; 
Di. Society; Soph-Junior 
Debate (3) ; Debating 
Union; Class Track Team 
(2); Track Squad (3); 
Vice-President Y. M. C. 
A. (4). 



s<c 



]fS 



JUNIORS 




EIGHTY-NINE 



9iL 



ISi 



JuN ( Oil ( ' I . A.S.S C)Tr -^ ( (yi.yits 



W. p. FULLER 
G. W. EUTSLER 
B. L. FIELD 
PHILIP WOOLLCOTT 



Pf^ESIDENT 

Vice-President 

cretary and treasurer 

Historian 

/es on greater council 




JUMIOlUS 



Kenneth Hubert Ba:ley Wakefield. N. C. 

Daniel Long Bell _ Graham. N. C. 

Phi. Soclelv; Y. M. C. A.: Alamance Cou.ily 
Club; German Club; i: X. 

Ferrall Leighton Blount _ Belhel. N. C. 

* B K. 

Claude Alfred Boseman Enfield. N. C. 

Thomas Callendine Boushall RaUigh. N. C. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A. Cabmel (3); 
President Wake County Club (2); Freshman 
Debater: Fresh-Soph Debater (I); Soph-Jun or 
Debater (2); Secretary Debating Union (3); 
Greater Council (2. 3) ; Student Representative 
on Council (3) ; Athletic Council (3) ; Assisfant 
Manager Varsity Football (3); Associate Editor 
YackETY YaCK (2. 3); Associate Editor Maga- 
zine (3); German Club; Ampholerolhen ; -N. 

Joseph Shepard Bryan Scotis Hill. N. C. 

Phi. Society; German Club; Y. M. C. A.; 
Dramatic Club (2); Busmess Manager Dramatic 
Association (3); Associate Editor Magazine (3): 
Secretary and Treasurer Pender-Sampson County 
Club (3); Manager Class Tennis Team (3)'; 
Commencement Marshal. 

Robert T. Bryan, Jr Chapel Hill. N. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; Phi. Society; Duplin County 
Club; German Club. 

Austin Heaton Carr Durham. N. C. 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (3); Class 
Football (I); Manager Class Baseball (I); Vice- 
President Durham County Club (I); Business 
Manager Students Directory (2); .Assistant Man- 
ager of Glee Club; Order of Oasis; Gorgon's 
Head; Coop; Z >!'. 

Wu FONG Walden Clarke Morganton. N. C. 

Robert Floyd Coats Angie.. N. C. 

Phi. Society; Johnson County Club. 





Edwin Fuller Conrad Winston-Salem. N. C. 

Di. Society; Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society: 
Historical Society; Executive Commitlee Historical 
Society; President Forsyth County Club. 



Howard Clarence Conrad Pfatfiown. N. C. 

Di. Society; Murphy Educational Club; Dram- 
atic Association (I, 2, 3); Dramatic Club (1. 2. 
3); Secretary Dramatic Association; Forsyth 
County Club. 



Alkrld Ewing CuMMlNCS Winston-Salem. N. C. 



John Tucker Day Walkertown, N. C. 

Di. Society; Murphy Educational Club; Presi- 
dent Republican Club. 

M. J. Davis. Warrenlon. N. C. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Halifax County 
Club; Warrenton High School Club. 

William Carey Dowd Charlotte, N. C. 

Varsity Basket-ball (3); Wearer of N. C. 

Earlie Dock Edgerton Fremont. N. C. 

O. G. Edwards Spring Hope, N. C. 

GuRNEY Edverett Edcerton Fremont. N. C. 

George Willard Eustler Greensboro, N. C. 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (3); Man- 
ager Class Track (3) ; President Guilford County 
Club (3); .Associate Edilor Magazine (3); -T; 
- X. 



Jascom Lee Field Greensboro, N. C. 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Guilford County 
Club; Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society; Assistant 
Business Manager Tarheel (3); Secretary Class 
(2); Secretary and Treasurer Class (3); Class 
Football (2, 3); Scrub Baseball (2. 3); Soph- 
Junior Debater (2); Commencement Marshal. 



Robert Creesom Fitzgerald Linwood. N. C. 

Henry Price Foust Greensboro, N. C. 

Manley Fulcher Atlantic, N. C. 

Walter Pliny Fuller Bradentown. Fla. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (3); Vice- 
President Florida Club; Captain Class Baseball 
(1); Class Baseball (2); Football (2); Scrub 
Basket-ball (I, 2); Varsity Football (3); Wearer 
of N. C; Winner Freshman Prize in English; 
Assistant Tarheel (2) ; Managing Editor Tarheel 
(3); Edllor-m-Chief Magazhe (3); Associate 
Editor Yackety Yack (3) ; Greater Council (2, 
3); Student Council (3); President Class (3); 
Progressive Club; Dramatic Club; Tennis Asso- 
ciation; Ball Manager; German Club; Pan- 
Hellenic Council; Ampholerolhen; — T; 1' X. 



Alfred Long Gaither Statesville. N. C. 



Laughton Bruce Gunter 
Phi. Society; Tennis Ass 
Club; Amphoterothen. 



Graham Harden 

German Club; II K .\ . 



William Renny Hardin>c 



Raleigh. N. C. 
ation ; Wake County 



Turlington. N. C. 



Yadku 



Allen Bostic Harper Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Historical Society; Correspond- 
ing Secretary Wake County Club; Class Basket- 
ball. 





WiLLJAM Henry Harrell Willlamston. N. C. 

Donald Ryan Harris Arden. N. C. 

Dramallc Club (3); German Club; SKK. 

Thomas Fuller Hill Durham, N. C. 

Di. Society: Y. M. C. A.; Tennis Association; 
Durham County Club; German Club; BOn. 

William Oliver Huske Fayeiieville, N. C. 

Phi. Society: Leader Sophomore Hop; Varsity 

Baseball (2. 3); Wearer of N. C. ; German Club; 
A T !.'. 

Charles Louis Johnson. Knoxville. Tenn. 

D,. Society; i: X. 

F. S. Johnson Franklin, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Macon County Club; Y. M. C. 
A.; Tennis Association; German Club; •^ A 9. 

W. DouB Kerr Greensboro, N. C. 

Edward \'ates Keesler Charlotte, N. C. 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Tennis Association; 
Secrelary Mecklenburg County Club (3) ; Scrub 
Basket-ball; German Club; 1' A E. 

David Herbert Killeffer Bradeniown, Fla. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Florida Club; 
Associate Editor Tarheel (3); Chemical Journal 
Club; Alembic Club; ZT. 

Wade Kornegay ...Chapel Hill. N. C. 

Phi. Society; Orange County Club; Y. M. C. 
A.; Freshman Debater; Fresh-Soph Debater (2); 
High School Debatmg Union (3). 



Gabriel DeLono Lambert High Pomi. N. C. 

Dl. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Guilford County 
Club; Brolherhood of St. Andrew. 

Henry Dionvsius Lambert ._ ...Angier, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Johnson County Club; Tenn's 
Association. 



Edmund Jones Lilly, Jr. Favetieville, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. .A.; Class Baseball 
(1); Varsity Gym. Team (2); Wearer of N. C; 
Assistant Manager Varsity Baseball (3) ; Assistant 
Leader Sophomore Hop; Assistant Leader Gimg- 
houl Dance (3): Coop; Gimghoul ; ATI!. 



SlGMUND BaacH LlNDAU Greensboro, N. C. 

Dl. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Class Football (1, 
2. 3); Manager Class Football (3); President 
Menorah Society. 



Robert Eugene Little. Jr Wadesboro. N. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; Class Football (I); Scrub Fool- 
ball (2. 3); Assistant Leader Sophomore Hop; 
Assistant Manager Varsity Baseball (3): Chief 
Marshal; German Club; Oasis; Coop; K-. 



Edward Willis Lupton Swan Quarter. N. C. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A. 



Frederick Bays McCall Charlotte. N. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; Dl. Society; Tennis Association; 
Class Baseball (2); Treasurer Mecklenburg 
County Club; Associate Editor Yackety Yack ; 
- X. 



Frederick Cain Manning 

Class Football (1); Class 
Captain Class Baseball (2); 
Club; German Club; Coop; 
Head; /->!'. 



Raleigh. N. C. 
Baseball (I. 2); 
Durham County 
Oasis; Gorgon's 



Owen Meredith Marshburn Kmghisdale. N. C. 



Crover Adlai Martin East Bend. N. ( 

Y. M. C. a.; Di. Society; Winner Freshman 
Debate; Fresh-Soph Debate f I ) ; Fresh-Soph 
Debate (2); Debating Union (3); Tennis Asso- 
ciation. 





George Allen Mebane, Jr Spray. N. C. 

Y. M. C. A,; Dl. Soc.ely; Class Football (1, 
2. 3); Class Baseball (1. 2); Class Tennis 
Champion (21; Class Track (2); Manas-er Class 
Track (2) ; BanqucI Sneaker (2) ; Class YacKETY 
Yack Representative (3) ; Associate Editor Tar- 
heel (3); Associate EcJitor YackETY Yack (3); 
Assistant Manager Varsity Baseball (3) ; Rock- 
ingham County Club; German Club; Coop; Oasis; 
Gorgon's Head; /. M'. 



William Owen Baldwin Maxwell Charlotte, N. C. 
German Club; Associate Editor Yackety Yack 
(3); A Tn. 



George Curtis Meckel 
•I' ^ e. 



Henry Meeks 



Ind. 



Orphir Carmal Nance High Point, N. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; Di, Society; La Cercle Fran- 
caise; Class Football (2, 3); All-Class Football 
(3); Class Baseball (1, 2); Commence 
shal. 



nt Ma 



.Albert Roy Newsome 



Marshv 



James Valentine Price, Jr. Spray, N. C. 

Di. Society; Oak Ridge Club: President Rock- 
ingham County Club. 



William Dossey Pruden. Jr. Edenion. N. C. 

Phi. Society; Assistant Manager Varsity Basket- 
ball (3): German Club: -i K Iv 



John Allen Wilkins Draughan, N. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; Phi. Society; Class Football (3). 



Claude B. Woltz Dobson. N. C. 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A,; Surry County Club: 
Class Football (3); Glee Club (3). 



RoscoE Edward Parker Selma. N. C. 

Phi. Society: Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (3); John- 
son County Club; Murphy Educational Club; 
Class Football (2. 3). 

B. F. PatY Tullahoma, Tenn. 

Di. Society; Assistant Manager Varsity Foot- 
ball (3); German Club; -i K E. 

XX'iLLiAM Trent Ragland Salisbury, N. C. 

Treasurer Tennis Association (3) ; Class Tennis 
(I); German Club; BB II. 

William Kirkpatrick Reid Gastonia. N. C. 

Di. Society; Tennis Association; Gaston- 
Lincoln County Club. 

Clarence Robinson. Atlantic. N. C. 

Phi. Society; Educational Club; Historical 
Society. 

Joseph Vance Rowe Small. N. C. 

Leon Maroot Sahac Teheran. Persia 

Phi. Society; Dramatic Associ.-lion; Yackety 
Yack and Magazine Artist. 

Charles Austin Sloan Lexington. N. C. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Vice-President 
Sampson-Pender County Club; Secretary and 
Treasurer Warrenton High School Club. 

Saihuel Floyd Scott Haw River. N. C. 

William Raymond Taylor Louisburg. N. C. 

Phi. Society; Dramatic Association; President 
Franklin County Club; Le Cercle Francaise. 





4MES Alfred Thompson Haw River. N. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; Varsilv Baseball (2); Wearer 
of N. C; Class Football (2. 3); Alamance County 
Club. 



William Raney Stanford Teer. N. C. 

Claiborne Thweatt Smith Scotland Neck. N. C. 
President ^^■arrenton Hi^h Schcol Club; Gimg- 
houl; V.-\'. 

\Xilliam Capehart Walke Avoca. N. C. 

Class Tennis Team (2. 3); Tennis Association: 
German Club; K -\. 

.Albert Thomas Weatherly Gorman. N. C. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Murphy Educa- 
tional Club; Dramatic Association; Durham 
Counlv Club. 



Willie Person Mancum Weeks. Washington, D. C. 
Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.: Tennis Association; 
Member Cast of Dramatic Club (2, 3); Presi- 
dent of Dramatic Association (3). 

Zack Lanier Whitaker Oak Ridge. N. C. 

Di. Society; Class Baseball (I. 2); Manager 
Class Baseball (2); Class Football (3); Asso- 
ciate Edi'or Yackety Yack (3); Guilford 
County Club; President Oak Ridge Club; 
.Afsislant Manager Varsity Track (3); Ball Man- 



Paul Linwood White Scotland Neck. N. C. 

Phi. Society; Halifax County Club. 

Philip Woollcott Raleigh. N. C. 

Phi. Sociely; Y. M. C. A.; Soph-Junior 
Debater (3); Class Football (I. 2, 3); Cap- 
tain Class Football (3); President Class (2): 
Greater Council (2, 3); Student Council (2. 3); 
AssistanI Business Manager Magazine (3) ; 
Associate Editor Yackety Yack (3) ; Varsity 
Track (1. 2. 3); Wearer of N. C; Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet; Commencement Marshal; Class Histor- 
ian; German Club; A K E. 



James Vivian Whitfield Wallace. N. C. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Tennis Association; 
Dramatic Club (2); Dramatic Association; 
Horner Club; Assistant Manager of Magazine. 



3n jHeniorp of 



BIS going has left a heaviness m our hearts, 
and an emptiness in our lives. 
For a week "Little Abby" came on 
the football field and fought his hardest, when 
he knew he was sick. With a determination seldom 
equaled, he kept fighting until he fainted at break- 
fast table, in Greensboro, while with the team on 
the way to play Washington and Lee. Friends 
tenderly cared for him until he was sent home with 
the typhoid fever. He was unconscious almost con- 
tmually until the end. 

Richard B. Abernathy was born April 16, 1890. 

He died December 9, 1913. 

We seldom meet such a quiet, strong, unassuming 
hero as he was. 



NINETY-NINE 



3^ 





GOOD ROADS DAY IN CHAPEL HILL 



ONE HUNDRED 



7iL 



1^ 



SOPHOMORES 




SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 



7kL 



ONE HUNDRED ONE 



1^ 



SOPHOMORES 



SOPHOMORF, Cl./VSS 



Herbert Edwin Allen Asheville, N. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; Buncombe County Club. 

Andrew Vance Anderson Eagle Rock, N. C. 

Benjamin Franklin Auld Baltimore, Md. 

Phi. Society; Dramatic Association; Y. M. C. A.; Winner of Freshman Prize in English. 

Herbert Victor Bailey Neuse, N. C. 

Lawrence Corbin Barber Asheville, N. C. 

■I' A o. 

Rudolph Barnes Chyton, N. C. 

Hoke Barrymore Black Greenville, S. C. 

South Carolina Club; Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Class Orator (2); German Club; .V T V.. 

James Gornaro Blaine Franklin, N. C. 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Macon County Club. 

Hubert Morse Blalock Raleigh. N. C. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Tennis Association; Wake County Club; Historical Society; 
Dramatic Association ; Dramatic Club. 

Shepard Allen Booth Oxford, N. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; Dramatic Club (1, 2): Tennis Association (I): Athletic Association 
(1, 2); Granville County Club Secretary (1). 

Francis Churchill Bourne Asheville, N. C. 

Francis Foster Bradshaw Hillsboro, N. C. 

Robert Plato Brooks Woodsdale, N. C. 

Albert Othel Bryan Battleboro, N. C. 

William Jonathan Capehart Roxobel, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Oak Ridge Club; Tennis Association; Athletic Association. 

Francis Edward Capps Lucama, N. C. 

Whitfield Chapman Carmichael, Jr. Asheville, N. C. 

ONE HUNDRED TWO 



I — 







SOPHOMORES 

Allen Thurman Castelloe Aulander, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A. 

Ralph Vivian Clark Clarkton, N. C. 

Francis Osborne Clarkson Charlotte, N. C. 

Di. Socely; Y. M. C. A, Cabinet (2); German Club: Vice-President Class (2); 
Assistant Manager Dramatic Club (2) ; -i K E. 

Louis Heyl Clement, Jr.. Salisbury, N. C. 

William Borden Cobb , Goldsboro. N. C. 

Associate Editor Yackety Yack (2); Tennis Association; Wayne County Club; German 
Club; Phi. Society; 2 N. 

Charles Lee Coggins Salisbury, N. C. 

Secretary Class (2); Vice-President Dramatic Association; Band (I, 2); Dramatic 
Club (1. 2): Rowan County Club; Y. M. C. A.; Di. Society; Athletic Association. 

Howard Johnson Combs Columbia, S. C. 

Warrenton High School Club; Athletic .Association; Tennis Team. 

Herman Cone Greensboro, N. C. 

German Club; Freshman Tennis Team. 

Druid Homer Conrad ...Lexington, N. C. 

Davidson County Club; Secretary of Davidson County Club; Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; 
Membership Committee of Y. M. C. .A.; Athletic Association; Class Basket-ball. 

Frank Hodges Cooper Washington, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Tennis Association; Beaufort County Club; ,'\thletlc Asso- 
ciation ; Dramatic Association. 

George Long Cooper Graham, N. C. 

James Gerald Cowan .AsheviUe, N. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; Di. Society; Tennis Association; Class Basket-ball; German Club; - A E. 

James Marmaduke Cox Norfolk, Va. 

George Winston Craig Asheville, N. C. 

Montford Club; Athletic .Association; Class Football (I); Buncombe Club. 

Rush Floyd Crouse Nile, N. C 

Blue Ridge Club; Di. Society. 
ONE HUNDRED FOUR 



SOPHOMORES 

Edwin Holt Currie Raeford, N. C. 

Douglas Beaman Darden. Fremont, N. C. 

LeeRoy Davis Bladenboro, N. C. 

Robert Vernon Davis Fremont, N. C. 

Fred Hyams Deaton Statesville, N. C. 

Di. Society; Iredell County Club. 

Julius G. Dixon Raeford, N. C. 

Charles Nelson Dobbins - ^'adkinville, N. C. 

Herbert Jackson Drew Live Oak, Fla. 

John Overtan Dysart Lenoir, N. C". 

Y. M. C. A.; Di. Society; Dramatic Club; Fresh-Soph Debate. 

Graham Burwell Egerton Louisburg, N. C. 

Secretary Franklin County Club; •!■ A H. 

Lee Henry Edwards Holly Springs, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Wake County Club. 

Aubrey McCoy Eliot Charlotte, N. C. 

Di. Society; Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A.; Mecklenburg County Club; Soi-lh Caro- 
lina Club. 

Floyd Howard Elsom Hendersonville, N. C. 

Athletic Association; Di. Society: Y. M. C. A.; Henderson County Club. 

Charles Eugene English - - Asheville, N. C. 

Athletic Association; Vice-President Buncombe County Club; Asheville Club; 
Y. M. C. A. 

Preston Herschel Epps Durham, N. C. 

Di. Society; Glee Club; Durham County Club. 

Leslie James Farmer Wilson, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Tennis Association. 

Amos Gregson Fearrington Edenton, N. C. 

ONE HUNDRED FIVE 




SOPHOMORES 

Clyde Lathrop Fore Charlotte, N. C. 

Di. Society; German Club; Class Foolball; BaEkel-ball Squad; Webb School Club: 
Mecklenburg County Club; — N. 

John Melvin Glenn Marion, N. C. 

McDowell County Club; Class Foolball. 

Osborne LeRoy Goforth Durham, N. C 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Durham County Club; Horner School Club; Treasurer Iredell 
County Club; Brotherhood of St. Andrew. 

James Frank Hackler Sparta, N. C. 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Blue Ridge Club; Wmner of Freshman Debate; Soph- 
Junior Debate. 

Lucius Coleman Hall Webster, N. C. 

Harvey Hamilton Atlantic, N. C. 

Franklin Wills Hancock, Jr .Oxford, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Tennis Association; Class Baseball; Athletic Association; German Club; 
Vice-President Granville County Club; Horner Club; Warrenton Club; K .\. 

Herman Henry Hardison Wadesboro, N. C. 

James Archibald Hardison, Jr Wadesboro, N. C. 

George Arthur Harper... Chapel Hill, N. C. 

William Troy Harper Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Joseph Johnson Harris Louisburg, N. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; Phi. Society; Dramatic Club; Frankim County Club. 

James Leftwich Harrison ..Raleigh, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Track Squad; Wake County Club; German Club; -i K E. 

Hugh Bryan Hester Hester, N. C 

Oak Ridge Club; Granville County Club; Dramatic Club; Phi. Society; Athletic Asso- 
ciation; Freshman Baseball Team. 

Ernest Glenn Hogan Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Curtis Avent Holland Greensboro, N. C. 

Di. Society; Guilford County Club; Athletic Association. 

ONE HUNDRED SIX 



»^^ r- - -(sS <?^^-^;>^^:^ £) i gg 



SOPHOMO/?£S 

John Ransom Holt, Jr.. Princeton, N. C. 

Walter Lawrence Holt, Jr Fayetteville, N. C. 

Roy McRae Homewood Burlington, N. C. 

Varsily Football (I, 2); Scrub Baskel-ball ; Class Track; Varsily Track Team; Treas- 
urer Alamance County Club. 

William John Hooner Bell Buckle. Tenn. 

Robert Burton House Thelma, N. C. 

Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Phi. Society; Halifax County Club; Warrenton High School 
Club; President University Association of County Clubs; Class Football Team; Class His- 
torian. 

Hinton Gardener Hudson Smithfield, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Tennis .Association; Dramatic Club; Freshman Debater; 
Fresh-Soph Debate; Johnson County Club. 

Da\id Wills Hunter Greensboro, N. C. 

Wade Russell Hunter Alexander, N. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; Di. Society; Woodrow Wilson Club 

John Manning Huske _ Fayetteville, N. C. 

Joseph Strange Huske Fayetteville, N. C. 

John Franklin Jarrell Chapel Hill, Tenn. 

Di. Society; Tennis Association; Athletic Association. 

Herman Jernigan Benson, N. C. 

Herschel Vespasian Johnson Charlotte, N. C. 

Di. Society; Athletic Association; Dramatic Association; Dramatic Club; Mecklenburg 
County Club; North Carolina Historical Society; Class Historian (2); German Club; —X. 

John Haywood Jones . Newbern, N. C. 

German Club; Clajs Football (2); 2 X. 

Edward Gray Joyner Littleton, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Halifax County Club; Ministerial Club; Brotherhood of St. Andrew. 

William Henry Joyner. Princeton. N. C. 

Phi. Society; Treasurer John:on County Club; Class Baseball; Athletic Association. 

ONE HUNDRED SEVEN 



s;tz==:^gg^^r^%^:^ i g 



SOPHOMORES 

William Clarence Kanoy - Biscoe, N. C. 

John Archelaus Kent. Lenoir, N. C. 

Di. Society; Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A.; Caldwell County Club. 

Baston McGee Lackey Lincolnton, N. C. 

James Horace Lassiter . - Rich Square, N. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; Glee Club (1); Phi. Society. 

McDaniel Lewis Kinston, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Dramatic Association; Athletic Association; Tennis Asso- 
ciation; Class Football (1, 2); Varsity Scrub Baseball; Historical Society: Assistant Editor 
Tarheel. 

Thomas Calvin Linn, Jr Salisbury, N. C. 

Di. Society; Tennis Association; Y. M. C. A.; President of Class (2); Student Council 
(2); Magazine Board; Tarheel Board; Yackety Yack Board; German Club; ST; 

i; .\ E. 
Giles Mebane Long Charlotte, N. C. 

Athletic Association; Tennis .Association; Y. M. C. A.; President of "The Company" 
(2); Secretary and Treasurer of the Mecklenburg County Club (I); Glee Club (2); Mandolin 
Club (2); Tarheel Board (2); Yackety Y.ack Board (2); Manager of Class Football (2); 
Class Football; Scrub Baseball (1); Varsity Baskel-ball (1, 2); Captain (2); ^ T ; K A. 

George Barnes Loughran Asheville, N. C. 

James Franklin Lo\'e Lincolnton, N. C. 

Gaston-Lincoln County Club; Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A.; Class Baseball (1); 
Sub Varsity (2). 

Edward Willis Lupton Swan Quarter, N. C. 

John Dob McCurry -..- Marion, N. C. 

Ward V. McKee .. .. Leicester, N. C. 

Historical Society; Buncombe County Club. 

Edward Baxter Marsh Marshville, N. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; Rowan County Club; Dramatic Club; Athletic Association. 

Oscar VonKochtityky Merritt Mount Airy, N. C. 

Y. M. C. A.; Di. Society; Surry County Club. 

Louis B. Meyer Enfield, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Athletic Association; Halifax County Club; Y. M. C. A.; Football (1). 



ONE HUNDRED EIGHT 






St ^^^^s^t^^^i^r^^^M^ zng 



SOPHOMORES 

Harry Miller Stony Point, N. C. 

Di. Soc.ely; Iredell County Club. 

Julian Alison Moore, _ __ .___ Wilmington, N. C. 

Ph,. Society; Alhlelic Association; New Hanover County Club. 

James Roy Moore Lenoir, N. C. 

Caldwell County Club; Y. M. C. A. 

Carlyle Morris Fremont, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Tennis Association; Wayne County Club. 

Frank Wisconsin Norris ...Jacksonville, Fla. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A. Greater Council (2); Florida Club; Class Football (I. 2); 
Captain Class Football (2); Sub- Varsity Baseball (I); German Club; <I' -i H. 

Evan Wilkins Norwood Goldsboro, N. C. 

Robert Newton Page, Jr Biscoe, N. C. 

Athletic Association; Tennis Association; Y. M. C. A.; Janitor of "The Company"; 
Class Baseball; Glee Club (I. 2); K -\. 

John Merrel Parker Bradentown, Fla. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Dramatic Club; Class Football (I); Varsity Football (2); 
Sub Basket-ball (I); Secretary Florida Club; Athletic Association. 

William Baylies Parker Goldsboro, N. C. 

Wayne County Club; .Athletic .Association. 

Hazel Patterson Burlington, N. C. 

Class Track; Cross Country Team; Varsity Track; Georgetown Relay; .Alamance 
County Club; Manager Track Squad. 

William Edward Pell Raleigh, N. C. 

Samuel Clark Pike Liberty, N. C. 

Di. Society; Alamance County Club; Dramatic Association; Vice-President Randolph 
County Club: Class Football. 

William Barney Pitts Charlotte, N. C. 

Athletic Association; Dramatic Association (1. 2); Dramatic Club (1. 2); Mecklen- 
burg County Club; Le Cercle Francaise. 

ONE HUNDRED NINE 

gji -IS' 



s!t ^s:^^^:^^ — i^ 



SOPHOMORES 

Harvey McKay Pleasants Rowland, N. C. 

U K A. 

Ralph Craven Pridgen Labor, N. C. 

William Isaac Procter Raleigh, N. C. 

Tennis Association; German Club; Phi. Society; K A. 

Oscar Holt Racland Oxford, N. C. 

Zena Olen Ratcliff Pantego, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; Beaufort County Club; Tennis 
Association; Gym. 

James Clyde Roy Hillsboro. N. C. 

Edward Soloman Reid, Jr Charlotte, N. C. 

Warrenlon High School Club; Mecklenburg County Club; German Club; Y. M. C. A.; 
Athletic Association; Class Football (1); SubVarnty Football (2); :: A E. 

Samuel Leslie Reid Lowell, N. C. 

Daniel Reynor - Raleigh, N. C. 

Dramatic Association; Wake County Club; Athletic Association; Vice-President Menorah 
Association. 

John Charles Roberts, Jr. - Lyon, N. C. 

Marius Emmett Robinson, Jr. - Goldsboro, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Athletic Association; Tennis Association; Y. M. C. A.; Editor Students' 
Directory; Treasurer Wayne County Club; German Club; Z >!'. 

James Parks Rousseau Wilkesboro, N. C. 

George Claiborne Royall, Jr Goldsboro, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; German Club; Class Football; Wayne County Club; A K E. 

Benerly Sampson Royster, Jr ._ Oxford, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Athletic Association; Tennis Association; Class Baseball; KA. 

David Wyeth Royster Shelby, N. C. 

Di. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Secretary Cleveland County Club; Freshman Debate; Manager 
Class Football Team; Athletic Association. 

ONE HUNDRED TEN 

^'i -"lie 



SOPHOMORES 

Thomas White Ruffin Louisburg, N. C. 

William Cecil Rymer _. Hendersonville, N. C. 

D.. Society; President Henderson County Club; Athletic Association; Y. M. C. A.; 
Tennis Association. 

Moses Shapiro Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Jacob Philip Shrago Goldsboro, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Wayne County Club; Y. M. C. A.; Menorah Society; Athletic Association. 

Roger Shore Siddall Sumter, S. C. 

Di. Society. 

Enoch Spencer Simmons Washington, N. C. 

Cleveland LaFayette Smith Indian Trail, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Treasurer New Hanover County Club; Athletic Association. 

William Oliver Smith Raleigh, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Dramatic Association; Freshman Debate (1); Y. M. C. A.; German Club; 
K ^. 

Robert Baxter Spencer Hobucken, N. C. 

John Porter Stedman, Jr. Oxford, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Dramatic Club; Athletic Association; Treasurer Granville County Club; 
Y. M. C. A. 

SiLFAX Eugene Sugg Chapel Hill, N. C. 

David Thomas Tayloe . Washington, N. C. 

James Alexander Taylor Oxford, N. C. 

Phi. Society; Y. M. C. A.; Athletic Association; Class Baseball; Glee Club; German 
Club; K.\. 

Herman BeRTON Temko Greensboro, N. C. 

Di. Society; Athletic Association; Guilford County Club; Deutsch Verein; Menorah 
Society. 

Earle Hinson Thompson ,, Kenansville, N. C. 

Duplin County Club. 

Adam Tredwell Thorp Rocky Mount, N. C. 

ONE HUNDRED ELEVEN 

gj i "l ie 



SOPHOMORES 



Francis Justice Timberlake 
Henry Clay Turner 



^ oungsville, N. C. 
. Norwood, N. C. 



Stem, N. C. 



William Bradley Umstead _ Bahama, N. C. 

Phi. Society ; V'. M. C. A.; Hislorical Society; Dramalic Association; President Durham 
County Club; Winner of Freshman Prize in Phi. Society; Soph- Junior . Debate. 

Robert Cansler Vaughan Winston-Salem. N. C. 

Di. Society; Forsyth County Club; Dramatic Club; Tennis Association; Y. M. C. A. 

Elbert Lambert Veasey 

Athletic Association; Phi. Society; Durham County Club. 

Charles Ernest Walker ...Morganton, N. C. 

Dramatic Association; Blue Ridge Club. 

Robert Henry Winborne Welch, Jr. Hertford, N. C. 

Tennis Association; ^'. M. C. A.; Phi. Society; Albemarle Club; Athletic Association. 

William Stronach Wilkinson, Jr Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Marshall McDaniel Williams, Jr. Faison, N. C. 

Phi. Society; German Club; Scrub Baseball; Secretary and Treasurer Duplm County 
Club; Athletic Association. 

Hillary GooDE Winslow Hertford, N. C. 

Phi. Society; German Club; ^■. M. C. A.. .Mbemarle County Club; .\ T H. 

Fred Philips Wood Edenton. N. C. 

Phi. Society; Y. M C. A.; German Club; Class Baseball (I); AK E 

Joseph Ernest Wooten Snow Hill, N. C. 

John Laurens Wright Wilmington, N. C. 

Tennis Association; Glee Club; German Club; Secretary New Hanover County Club: 

Robert Hazelhurst Wright, Jr. Nashville, Tenn. 

Nathaniel Bayard \'arborough Gary, N. C. 

Robert Samuel "^'arborough Lexington, N. C. 

Allen Caulincourt Zollicoffer Weldon, N. C. 



ONE HUNDRED TWELVE 



9iL 



ISi 



FRESHMEN 




FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS 



O/VE HUNDRED THIRTEEf 



]iS 



FRESHMEN 



'.'OlCi^UMA^l IlOLL 



Walter Jarvis Adams ...Holly Springs, N. C. 

Harris Percy Alderman Wilmington, N. C. 

William Reynolds Allen, Jr Goldsboro, N. C. 

Frank Ewing Allred Aberdeen, N. C. 

Claud Fleming Andrews High Point, N. C. 

Ezra Preston Andrews Charlotte, N. C. 

Ralph Preston Andrews , Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Arthur Aronson Raleigh, N. C. 

William Bryant Austin _ Bumthill, N. C. 

Edward Onslow Bacon ...Newton, N. C. 

Venon Baggett ;... Salemburg 

Herbert Victor Bailey Neuse, N. C. 

Charles Wortley Bain Chapel Hill, N. C 

Herbert Glenn Baity Harmony, N. C. 

Thomas Atlas Borden ; ...Burgaw, N. C. 

James Carl Barnard Franklin, N C. 

Troy Thomas Barnes Lucama, N. C. 

William Braddy Barnes Lucama, N. C. 

Clifton Linwood Bell ^.. .-, Swan Quarter, N. C. 

Benjamin Carroll Berry Hertford, N. C. 

Richard Frederick Bethume... : St. Pauls, N. C. 

Ernest Spurgeon Booth ". East Durham. N. C. 

Cary Carlyle Boshamer... :..... Statesville, N. C. 

Da\id Brady Durham, N. C. 

Edgar Burwell Brinkley Elon College. N. C. 

Burr Coley Brock Farm^ngton. N. C. 

Duncan Douglas Bullock Rowland, N. C. 

Henry Vernon Burden Aulander. N. C. 

Charles Earl Burnett Wilmington, N. C. 

Robert Shepard Burnett Wilmington. N. C. 

Charles Brown Byrd Live Oak. Fla. 

Milton Clyde Campbell Taylorsville. 

James Arthur Capps Bessemer City. 

Whitfield Chapman Carmichael, Jr AsheviUe, 

Leo Carr Teacheys, 

David Vance Carter Liberty, 

Leroy Clark Wakefield, N. C. 

ONE HUNDRED FOURTEEN 



N. 


C. 


N. 


C. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 


N 


c. 



N. 


C. 


N. 


C. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 


a, ' 


Ga. 


N. 


C. 


N. 


C. 


N. 


C. 


N. 


C. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 



FRESHMAN 

Walter Bingam Cochran ...Harrisburg, 

James Miller Coleman Asheville, 

Alvah Hobb Combs Columbia, 

Charles Kearney Cook Louisburg, 

Horace Baxter Cowell Washington, 

Adlai Roy Cox Pisgah, 

George Winston Craig Raleigh, 

Farrell Moffatt Crawford Cornelia, 

Carl Brooks Crawford Sugar Hill, 

Ernest James Dail Kernersville, 

George Robert Daii . Kernersville, 

Thomas Richard Dale Morganton, 

Wilson Bidding Dalton Winston-Salem, 

Charles Cleares Daniels Wilson, 

Leland Macky Daniels Oriental, 

Robert Cowan Da\'is Wilmington, 

Thomas Paul Davis Burlington, N. C. 

Charles Oliver Delaney Weddington, N. C. 

Edgar Alexandria Dobbins /. Ledgerwood, N. C. 

Herbert Jackson Drew Live Oak, Fla. 

Daniel Eugene Eagle ;..Statesville, 

Robert Lee Edwards. Guilford, 

John Grady Eldridge.. Beasley, 

Miguel Grausman Elias Raleigh, 

Floyd Howard Elsom Hendersonville, 

Clarance M. English Asheville. 

William Harry Entwistle Rockingham, 

Samuel James Erwin, Jr Morganton, N. 

Vessel Clyde Ferguson Teer. 

Charles Mortimer Fleming Wilson, 

Carl Louis Folger Dobson, 

Marion Butler Fowler East Durham. 

Kemp Funderburk Monroe, N. 

Leslie Paul Gardener Goldsboro, N. C. 

Russell Leonard Ginn Goldsboro, N. C. 

John Melvin Glenn. Marion, N. C. 

Henry Grady Goode Connelly Springs, N. C. 

Robert Reid Goodson Salisbury, N. C. 

ONE HUNDRED SIXTEEN 

^r — T i^ 



N. 


C. 


N. 


C. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 



FRESHMAN 

Burton McKinnon Graham Rowland, N. C. 

William Herbert Gregory Stovall, N. C. 

James Irvin Groome Greensboro. N. C. 

Paul Ballinger Groom Greensboro, N. C. 

Coffee Harlan Grvder Taylorsville, N. C. 

Leroy Parks Gwaltney Hiddenite, N. C 

Joseph Watkins Hale Louisburg, N. C. 

Ernest Stokes Hamilton Unionville, N. C. 

Joseph Hammond Hardison Fayetteville, N. C. 

Henry Green Harper, Jr Charlotte, N. C. 

Charles Spurgeon Harris Sulphur Springs, N. C. 

Julian Earle Harris Henderson, N. C. 

Joseph Johnson Harris. Laurinburg, N. C. 

Robert Burton Harris Greensboro, N. C. 

Matthew James Hatcher Mount Olive, N. C. 

Joseph Hawthorne Concord, N. C. 

Frank McKinley Higdon Higdonville, N. C. 

Charles William Higgins Greensboro, N. C. 

Dudley Brown Hill Warsaw, N. C. 

Edward Ashton Hill Winston-Salem, N. C. 

John Bright Hill Warsaw, N. C. 

Samuel Huntington Hobbs, Jr Clinton, N. C. 

James Raymond Hobgood Maplesville, N. C. 

Samuel Clarance Hodgin Randleman, N. C. 

G. Skiles Hoffman.. High Point, N. C. 

John MacCraven Holbrook Huntersvllle, N. C. 

Kenneth Holloway Raleigh, N. C. 

Richard Thornton Hood Kinston, N. C. 

Iames Earl Hoover High Point, N. C. 

Basil Horsfield Oxford, N. C. 

Willie Frederick Howell Goldsboro, N. C. 

Herbert Henry Huff Soudan, Va. 

Harry Grinmell Hunter HendersonviUe, N. C. 

BuEL Benners Hyatt Waynesville, N. C. 

Carl Britt Hyatt Bumsville, N. C. 

Victor Hugo Idol High Point, N. C. 

Roy Bynum Isley Burlington. N. C. 

Webster Nimms Jackson Jarksonville. N. C. 



ONE HUNDRED SEVENTEE/^ 



1& 



FRESHMAN 

Henry McNair Johnson Burgaw, N. C. 

John Gray Johnson Lynchburg, Va. 

James Martin Johnson Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Aaron Oscar Jones Stratford, N. C. 

Eugene Patterson Jones. Lenoir, N. C. 

Jesse Weimer Jones Franklin, N. C. 

Francis Cameron Jordan.. ....Greensboro, N. C. 

Edward Gray Joyner Lillington, N. C. 

Everett Allen Kendall Asheboro, N. C. 

Frank Erwin Kendrick Dillon, S. C. 

Garry Lee Kendrick Cherryville, N. C. 

James Edwin King Pelham, N. C. 

William Wilson Kirk Jacksonville, Fla. 

James Jackson Kirksey Morganton, N. C. 

Edwin Carlyle Klingman Greensboro, N. C. 

Ralph Roy Koons Chadbourne, N. C. 

John Ferebee Lamb Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Allie Clifford Lamm Lucama, N. C. 

Chauncey Hoke Leggett Hobgood, N. C. 

Harvey Lewis Faison, N. C. 

Alfred Milton Lindau Greensboro, N. C. 

Donald Dean Loftin Trenton, N. C. 

Thomas Marvin Lynch Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Charles Hardy McCurry Day Book, N. C. 

Ward Vann McGee Leicester, N. C. 

Duncan Evander McIver, Jr Sanford, N. C. 

Ernest Lloyd Mackie Yadkinville, N. C. 

Paul Vestal McPherson Liberty, N. C. 

George Wea\er Mann Prentiss, N. C. 

BlaCKWELL MaRKHAM Durham, N. C. 

William Anderson Marlowe Wilson, N. C. 

Stanley Robert Martin Salisbury, N. C. 

Dennis Mason, Jr Atlantic, N. C. 

Murray Hilliard Mathews Florala. Ala. 

Sanford Eugene Mathews Siloam, N. C. 

Justin Ward Maxwell .' Raleigh, N. C. 

Belvin Womble Maynard Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Clyde Caswell Miller... Blowing Rock, N. C. 



ONE HUNDRED EIGHTEEh 



7iL 



FRESHMAN 

Henry Bascom Mock Pfafftown, N. C. 

William Galpin Monroe Wilmington, N. C. 

DuBrutz Cutlar Moore Burgaw, N. C. 

Tamerlane Moore _ Farmville, N. C. 

Eli Morgan Morgan Benson, N. C. 

Frederick Boyden Nims, Jr Mount Holly, N. C. 

Earl O'Brient ._ Durham, N. C. 

Joe Lee Orr Matthews, N. C. 

Kenneth Peshane Otten Wilmington, N. C. 

George Facrar Parker Asheville, N. C. 

James Curtis Parker Monroe, N. C. 

Noel Edward Paton Fayetteville, N. C. 

Edward Lapsley Patton Newport News, Va. 

James Ralph Patton, Jr Durham, N. C 

John Miller Pierce Warsaw, N. C. 

John William Perdew Wilmington, N. C. 

Ely Jackson Perry Kinston, N. C. 

David Vergil Pike Siler City, N. C. 

James William Pless Marion, N. C. 

William Tannehill Polk Warrenton, N. C. 

Thurman Allen Porter KernersviUe, N. C. 

Ralph Craven Pridgen Tabor, N. C. 

Edward Knox Proctor ...Lumberton, N. C. 

Frank Elbert Ovinn Warsaw, N. C. 

Isadore Raiff Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Albert Lyle Ramsey Franklin, N. C. 

James Graham Ramsay Salisbury, N. C. 

Olin'er Rand Smithfield, N. C. 

Marion Herbert Randolph Charlotte, N. C. 

James Oliver Ransom Huntersville, N. C. 

Lennox Daniel Rawlincs Wilson. N. C. 

James Clyde Ray : Hillsboro, N. C. 

James Raynor Benson, N. C. 

Norman Reasoner Oroco, Fla. 

John Calvin Reed Siler City, N. C. 

Walter Marion Reed Fairview, N. C. 

Harvey Jackson Renn Oxford, N. C. 

Charles John Roberts. Jr Lyons, N. C. 

ONElHUNDRED NINETEEN 



FRESHMAN 

Owen Spencer Robertson Hillsboro, N. C. 

ToRRENCE Baxter Rogers Lincolnton, N. C. 

Robert Marion Ross, Jr Shelby, N. C. 

Moses Rountree. Wilson, N. C. 

James Parks Rousseau Wilkesboro, N. C, 

David Blvthe Rovster. Shelby, N. C. 

Harold Anthony Schiffman Greensboro, N. C. 

Frank Dudley Shamberger Biscoe, N. C. 

Howard Sharpe. , Stony Point, N. C. 

Horace Cleveland Sherrill Lincolnton, N. C. 

Fabius Busbee Shipp Raleigh, N. C. 

Henry Isaac Shrago Goldsboro, N. C. 

Clinton Lockwood Shuford Fairview, N. C. 

George Adams Shuford AsheviUe, N. C. 

Bernard Andrew Siddall Sumter, S. C. 

Clyde Neely Sloan Charlotte, N. C. 

Carter Siler Sloan. Franklin, N. C. 

George Slover Newbem, N. C. 

Joseph Elmer Smith Wilson, N. C. 

Paul Faison Smith Raleigh, N. C. 

Sherman Bryan Smithey North Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Randolph Worth Sparger Mount Olive, N. C. 

Westcott Oliver Sparrow Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Robert Baxter Spencer... Hobucker. N. C. 

Claud Babbington Squires Charlotte, N. C. 

Robert Brooks Starr... Wilkesboro, N. C. 

John Spencer Stell Raleigh, N. C. 

Charlie Leary Stevens... Indiantown, N. C. 

Henry Leonidas Stevens Warsaw, N. C. 

Thomas Wright Strange Wilmington, N. C. 

Walter Roby Strickland Four Oaks, N. C. 

Willis Clyde Suddreth Lenoir, N. C. 

Herbert Linwood Swain Jerry, N. C. 

George Wendall Tardy .- Jacksonville, N. C. 

Charles Lacy Tate Chadboume, N. C. 

William Grimsley Taylor Greensboro, N. C. 

Everett Simon Teague Taylorsville, N. C. 

ONE HUNDRED TWENTY 



FRESHMAN 

Samuel Fowle Telfair Raleigh, N. C. 

Charles Aycock Thompson Goldsboro, N. C. 

Lewis Sumner Thorpe Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Francis Justice Timberlake. _ _ .._ "i'oungsville, N. C. 

George Washington Tomlinson Lucama, N. C. 

Ray Sawyer Toxey. Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Edward Llewellyn Travis Halifax, N. C. 

Richard Starrey Turlington Clinton, N. C. 

Arthur Lynwood Tyler Henderson, N. C. 

Joseph Hezekiah Vance. Huntersvjlle, N. C. 

Robert Richmond Walker Union Ridge, N. C. 

Frank Privette Wall Wendell, N. C. 

George Collins Wall Hillsboro, N. C. 

Eli Beecher Wardew . Yadkinville, N. C. 

James Eastham Ware Charlotte, N. C. 

Henry Clinton Warlick Newells, N. C. 

Edd Warlick Sioux, N. C. 

Robert Young Watkins Thomasville, N. C. 

William Randolph Watson, Jr Darlington, S. C. 

Jennings Bryan Webster Siler City. N. C. 

Wilbert Freeman Wellons Selma, N. C. 

Randolph Leon White .Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Macon McCorkle Williams Newton, N. C. 

ViRGiNius Faison Williams Faison. N. C. 

Allen Davidson Williamson AsheviUe, N. C. 

Fred Lee Wilson Charlotte, N. C. 

John Nestor Wilson, Jr. Greensboro, N. C. 

John Thomas Wilson Rural Hall, N. C. 

Max Wilson Durham, N. C. 

Edward Lester Woodall Smithfield, N. C. 

Floyd Pugh Wooten Kinston, N. C. 

Herbert Smith Worthington Winterville, N. C. 

James Thomas Carr Wright. Hunting Creek, N. C. 

Theodore Oran Wright Pleasant Garden, N. C. 

William Cullen Wright, Jr Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Arthur Thomas Wyatt Raleigh. N. C. 

Grover Cleveland Yates Chadboume, N. C. 

William Bayard Yelnerton Goldsboro, N. C. 

ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE 




SNOW TIME 




® ®®® ®® 



C/ 



ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE 



YaL 



1^ 



Law Class Oitficers 



first term 
Ezra Parker 

B. C. Trotter 

L. E. Jones 

L. E. Jones 



SECOND TERM 

President C. W. HiGGINS 

Vice-President MiSS MARGARET Berry 

Secretary^ A. W. Graham 

Treasurer L. E. JoNES 




FIRST TERM SECOND TERM 

W. F. Taylor Solicitor B. C. Trotter 

J. G. Leatherwood Sheriff J. M. Williams 

C. B. BoLicK Clerk J- A. Burnett 

ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR 

gj i "l ie 




im he is always the sam° well-me 
r. Ezra is a good all-round man 
makes friends, and has no enemies 
He is deeply interested in his profession 
has good prospects, and we hope to hear 
from him m the future, and to learn ih 
he has made good. 



"Frank" is theoretical, practical, and. 
if there is any other intellectual element, 
we are willing to slate he's that loo. In 
short. Frank is an all-round man of the 
best brand. If any one good quality can 
be said to stand out above another, per- 
haps his debating should be placed first. 
For proof of his efficiency in this respect, 
we refer you to Pennsylvania and Vir- 
ginia, both of whose teams fell before his 
arguments. 



Phi. Society; President Law Class 
(Fall 1913): Johnson County Club; 
President Johnson County Club. 



A. B. 1911; Pennsvlvania Debater 
(1910); Virginia Debater (1913); 
Commencement Debater (1910); Presi- 
dent Law Class (Soring. 1913); Golden 
Fleece; * B K ; T K A. 



ONE HUNDRED^TWENTY-SIX 



9iL 



1& 



Sj^NlOTl 1/AV/ 



LoWRY AXLEY Murphy 

Charles Boone Bolick Franklin 

William Boughan Campbell Washington 

Claude Carl Canady , Benson 

Orville Thomas Davis Waynesville 

WiLKiNs Ferryman Horton Durham 

Leslie Edwards Jones Swan Quarter 

John A. Kenyon Newton 

Joseph Gilmer Leatherwood ...Waynesville 

Joseph Raymond Lee Faison 

William Holt Gates Hendersonville 

Alexander Bate Outlaw Elizabeth City 

Ezra Parker Benson 

FiTZRAY Donald Phillips Laurinburg 

Julius Addison Rousseau Wilkesboro 

Ernest Cofield Ruffin Whitakers 

Panes Cecil Smith Swannanoa 

Walter Frank Taylor Faison 

Samuel Farris Teague Goidsboro 

Edward Lloyd Tilley Bahama 

Henry Albert Folsom Newport 

Benjamin Carter Trotter Reidsville 

Ernest Randolph Tyler. Roxobel 

Fitzhugh Ernest Wallace Kernersville 

William Claude West Franklin 

James McBride Williams Godwin 



ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-SEVEIs 



7iL 



ISt 



JiJNion Law 



Clifton Warren Beckwith Raleigh 

Miss Margaret Hallock Perry Chapel Hill 

Frank Basil Brittian Asheboro 

Henry Frank Buchanan Charlotte 

James Alexander Burke Asheville 

John Scott Cansler Charlotte 

Walter Watson Cook Fayelteville 

William Summey Coulter Newton 

Joseph San ford Cowles .". Wilkesboro 

William Henry Harrison Cowles Statesville 

James Manly Daniel Denton 

William Cleveland Davis Charlotte 

Julian G. Dees Grantsboro 

Alonza Dillard Folger Dobson 

Tom Ethridge Gilman Jacksonville 

Lee CuRRiE Gooch Oxford 

Augustus Washington Graham Oxford 

Robert Emmett Hamlett Mount Gilead 

Edwin Sholtz Hartshorne ...Asheville 

Carlyle Wallace Hicgins Sparta 

Julius Johnson, Jr .-. Yancey ville 

Frank Carleton Jones Plymouth 

LeRoy Joyner Rocky Mount 

Vester Washington Keith Creedmore 

Ralph Vincent Kidd ..Charlotte 

Dallas Cecil Kirby Rural Hall 

Charles Lee Lindsay. Chapel Hill 

Sterling Albert Lipscombe Durham 

Paul McKane Charlotte 

Lauchlin McNeill Burgaw 

James Hinton Pou Raleigh 

Paul Roberts Raper Lexington 

Thomas Major Smith ; Reidsville 

Marshall Turner Spears Lillington 

Moses Stewart Strickland Scotland Neck 

George Vauchan Strong Raleigh 

Matthew Augustus Stroup Cherry ville 

Harry Murden Stubbs.. Williamslon 

William Clark Thompson Woodville 

Joseph M. Turb^-ville Waynesville 

James Martin Waggoner Efland 

LeRoy Byron Wall Tobaccoville 

Henry Adams Whitfield Goldsboro 

Seymour Webster Whiting Raleigh 

Warren Rand Williams Sanford 

ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-EIGHT 




ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-NINE 



9iL 



ISi 






MEDICAL 



^ECONl)"Y:CAll iVliCDlCAl, 



4- -J- 

OFFICERS 

W. A. Smith , President 

A. M. Couch . Vicc-PresiJeni 

J. G. Pate Secretary and Treasurer 

C. W. Eley .,.....:. Hidorian 

4. 4. 

CLASS ROLL 
Thomas Preston Burrus , Fairfield. N. C. 

Medical Society. 
AuLEY McRae Couch Roberdel. N. C. 

Assistant in Anatomy; Medical Society; Band (I. 2. 3); Richmond County Club. 
Clayton Will.^rd Eley Woodland. N. C. 

Phi. Society; Medical Society; Athletic Association; Tennis Association; Y. M. C. A.; 
Zoological Club; Class Football (2); Historian Class; -X; <I> X. 
Paul William Fetzer- - Reidsville. N. C. 

Assistant at Infirmary; Medical Society; ■!> X. 
Adolphus Barte Greenwood _ _-- Asheville, N. C. 

A. B. 1910; Assistant in Bacteriology and Pharmacology (1912-1914); President 
Medical Societv; President First Year Medical Class ( 1912-l'913) ; President Buncombe 
County Club; Di. Society; Zoblogy Club; -X; <!■ X. 
Mark Alexander Griffin__ - -— Wingale. N. C. 

Di. Society; Medical Society; Union County Club; President of Pre-Medical Class 
(1911-1912). 
Dewitt Talmage Hunter Matthews, N. C, 

Medical Society; Di. Society; Union County Club. 
Fairley Patterson James Laurinburg. N. C. 

A. B. 1912; Medical Society; German Club; i) A E ; * X. 
Olin Henry Jennings - Paris Knob. N. C. 

Medical Society; Varsity Football Team <I9I2). 
Henry Rowland Kritzer Spencer. N. C. 

Di. Society; Medical Society; Rowan County Club; Athletic Association. 
Roy Hamilton Long - Monroe. N. C. 

Medical Society; Glee Club (1912-1913); German Club; Union County Club; K A; + X. 
Allen Hoyt Moore -- -- Washington. N. C. 

Medical Society; German Club; Beaufort County Club; ATfi; * X. 
Benjamin Whitehead McKenzie._ _ Salisbury. N. C 

Medical Society; Di. Society; Rowan County Club; -X; * X. 
William Peter McKay - Red Springs. N. C. 

Medical Society; Roberson County Club; Zoology Club; * X. 

ONE HUNDRED THIRTY 



MEDICAL 

James Gibson Pate Gibson. 

Di. Society; Medical Society; Y. M, C. A.; Class Baseball (1. 2); Greater Counc 
Scotland-Sampson County Club. 

Thomas Royster - - Townsville. 

Phi. Society; Censor Medical Society; Warrenton High School Club; German Clt 
A. B. 1912; A.M. 1913; Zoblogy Club; Pan-Hellenic Council; Chemical Journal Ck 
Yackety Yack Editor 19ir-12; H K .\ ; '!> X. 

William Alexander Smith -- .— Goldsboro. 

President Class (2); Medical Society; Secretary Wayne County Club; German CK 
K :S; *X; AXi:. 

Lewis Holmes Swindell- - - Swan Quarter, 

Y. M. C. A.; Phi. Society; Medical Society; Class Baseball Team (1). 

Henry Franklin Starr - - - Salisbury. 

Di. Society; Medical Society; Rowan County Club; Assistant in Histology. 

Edward Foy Uzzle Raleigh, 

Medical Society; Vice-President Y. M. C. A.; Wake County Club. 

Norman St. George Vann -- --- - --- Charlotte, 

Di. Society; Medical Society; Assistant in Embryology; German Club; Zoology Cli 
n K .\. 



N. C. 

I; 



N. C 



lb; 
lb; 




N. 
lb; 


C. 


N. 


C. 


N. 


C. 


N. 


c. 


. N. 
■ b; 


c. 




ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-TWO 



7iL 



3KI 



FiR.ST • Y'l^. A ;l ?/('!C I ) ( Al , 



+ + 

OFFICERS 

R. M. Cox ....President 

H. L. Brockman Secretary 

R. C. SpenCe Treasurer 



CLASS ROLL 

Paul Archer Bennett Winston-Salem, N. C. 

David Andrew Bigger Rock Hill, S. C. 

Joseph Dozier Boushall Raleigh, N. C. 

Harry Lyndon Brockman Greensboro, N. C. 

Cola Castelloe Auiander, N. C. 

Thomas Craven Charlotte, N. C. 

John White Gainey Parkion, N. C. 

John Melville Huff Henderson, N. C. 

Christian Leonard Isley, Jr Burlington, N. C. 

George Grady Johnson Durham, N. C. 

Robert Thomas Joyner Rocky Mount, N. C 

Cleveland Fane Kirkpatrick Clyde, N. C. 

Dewitt KlUTTZ , Chester, S. C. 

Henry Grady Lassiter Lasker. N. C. 

Joseph Roscoe Latham Belhaven, N. C. 

Charles Aycock Litchfield : Aurora, N. C. 

William Everard Massey Rock Hill, S. C. 

Samuel Raphael Newman Washington. N. C. 

Charles Strickland Norburn Acton, N C. 

Mercer Cranor Parrott Kinslon, N. C. 

David Franklin Perrell Germanton. N. C 

ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-THREE 




Zl^ 



John Lewis Rawls Yaiesville. 

Frank Sabiston Jacksonville. 

William Trautham Shaver Salisbury. 

George Currie Singlet ary Chapel Hill. 

Ralph Case Spence Kipling. 

Samuel Clarence Spoon Haw River, 

John Moorhaj Tamraz Tabriz, 

Henry Clinton Warlick, Jr Newell, 

Clifton Forrest West Dover, N. C. 

William Christopher Williams.. Durham, N. C. 

Junius Holt Wright Siler City, N. C 

Frank Davis Conroy Cullowhce. N. C. 

Harry Gordon Thigpen Tarboro, N. C. 

Russell Mills Cox iWashinglon. N. C. 



N. 


C. 


N. 


C. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 


Persia 


N. 


c. 




ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-FOUR 



SSE 



]fS 




S5CZ: 



MEDICAL 



Pre-Medicai. c'i,a.s.s 



E. K. McLean Presidenl 

+ + 

CLASS ROLL 

Junius Mebane Andrews Mebane. N. C. 

FuRMAN Angel Franklin, N. C. 

Felix Orton Bell Linden, N. C. 

John Bryan Bonner Bonnerton, N. C. 

Carl Hendrix Byrd Morrisville, N. C, 

William Maurice Coppridge Roanoke, N. C. 

Paul Bern ays Folger ;. Dobson. N. C. 

Theodore Lyman Harrison Enfield, N. C. 

Eugene Hawks Mount Airy, N. C. 

Vannie Monroe Hicks Greensboro, N. C. 

John Ransom Holt, Jr Princeton, N. C. 

Frederick Cecil Hubbard Wilkesboro, N. C, 

Emerson Wiley Jarman Farmville. Va. 

James Craig Joyner Princeton, N. C. 

Gabriel Lee Kendrix Cherryville, N. C. 

Edward Thomas Koonce Richlands. N. C. 

Benjamin Jones Lawrence Creedmore, N. C. 

Joseph Kindred Long Seaboard, N. C. 

Charles M. McCall Charlotte, N. C. 

Brodie Banks McDade Hillsboro, N. C. 

BuRRUss Boyd McGuire Norton, N. C. 

EwEN Kenneth McLean Buia, N. C. 

Andrew Edward McNamara -. : Jacksonville, Fla. 

Jasper Talmace Massencill Four Oaks, N. C. 

ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-SIX 

g^ i T i^ 



Milton Norman _ Halifax N C 

Angus Lafaette Payne, Jr Rural Hall. N. C. 

Harry Wooding PRrrcHETT Danville, Va. 

Albert Lee Scott PollocksviUe. N. C. 

Leon Grady Shields Hobgood. N. C. 

Leslie Ogburn Stone Kliirell, N. C. 

George Raby Tennent Asheville, N. C. 

Dennis Roscoe Walff Rural Hall, N. C. 

Nathaniel Bayard Yarboro Gary, N. C. 




ONE. HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT 



%E 



PHARMACY 




ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-NINE 



:3^ 



PHARMACY 



First Year 
R. W. Jernigan 
R. A. McDuFFiE.. 



Pharmacy Ci.as5 

OFFICERS 



Senior 

President K. A. KlRBY 

Vice-President .... Paul Brantley 



R. S. Shaw Secretary and Treasurer R. H. ANDREWS 




ONE HUNDRED FORTY 



VtL 



1st 




"Stub." one of the youngest 
Class, but not in knowledge. He is a 
bright boy. and has a bright future before 
him. He is a great lover of sport, and 
can be found when wanted at a punch - 
board down at the Orange Drug Com- 
pany, pulling for a home run at five cenls 
a pull. He is also a lover of art. and 
often will be found at Foister's art store 
flirting with the lady clerk. But he in- 
tends to brighten his future by going 
higher in his profession. Here's hoping 
he will succeed. 



"Red." the most popu 
Class, hails from ^X'lIson. the garden spot 
of the world for pretty girls. It is uni- 
versally conceded that he knows more 
materia medica than anyone else in the 
Class. So it will be no great surprise if 
he writes a text-book on materia medica 
before he finishes his college career. He 
is a good egg. and well liked by 
in the Class. It is his intention to make his 
debut lo the medical world next year. It 
is felt that "Red" will make good in this 
field, and the whole Class wish him much 
success. 



Secretary of Class ; Secretary of 
Orange County Club ; Vice-President 
Pharmaceutical Journal Club. 



Wilson County Club; William Simpson 
Pharmaceutical Society; Journal Club; 
Y. M. C. A.: German Club; Class Sec- 
retary 1912; Vice-President; '1' A B. 



0/V£ HUNDRED FORTY-ONE 



ISS, 




Age, 22; height, 5 feet 7 
weight. 140. 

"Pride goelh before 
haiighl^ spkil hef. 

"Cas." as he is commonly known, came 
to us from the Class of '12. having 
dropped out one year to decide upon what 
course he might pursue. He finally came 
Id the conclusion that he would follow (he 
profession of Pharmacy, and get his 
diploma. Cas is a constant visitor to the 
Normal. Why. I don't know, unless he 
has something in view more than merely 
the trip. Cas is a diligent worker, try- 
ing to discover something new so as to 
escape the daily toil behind the prescrip- 
tion desk. We predict for him a bright 
and prosperous future. 



David is a good boy. for he 
play his harp, but he is a consistent 
worker. This fact is evidenced by his 
lal boring — for the Pickwick. 
Out of the nine-hundred-and-fifty-eight 
official preparations and crude drug=. he 
has learned one. sarsaparilla. and he says 
that if his soap will ever lather, he will 
put out one of the best shaving soaps that 
ever went on the market. 



Wilkes County Club; Historian of 



South Carolma Club; William Simpson 
Pharmaceutical Society; Pharmaceulical 
Journal Club; K i:. 



ONE HUNDRED FORTY-TWO 



w. 



38! 




Age. 20; heighl, 5 feet 
eight. 170. 

■■flonesl toil b 

"HiC, ' as he IS best known 
the brightest boys in his Class. He is a 
fellow that never gives up, but keeps on 
trying. If you can't find him at his 
room, you can find him at the Pharmacy 
Lab. making soap; for he is a fellow that 
believes m keeping clean. His aim is not 
Id roll pills behind a prescription desk. 
but to go higher in his profession, which 
we all know he will. 



of fic.ir 

"Kirby" looks as lazy as he is. but isn't 
quite as lazy as he looks. Easy going, 
good natured. and tow-headed. Has a 
good line of "dope." and alvays makes a 
hit with the ladies. Taking notes on Dr. 
Howell's jokes is his hobby. Kirby is a 
good egg, and we wish our president a 
prosperous future. 



Buncombe County Club; William 
Simpson Pharmaceutical Society; Presi- 
dent Pharmaceutical Club; Journal Club; 
Treasurer of Class; Scrub Football; 
Class Baseball 1913. 



President of Class; Greater Council; 
Student Council; President of McDowell 
County Club; Y. M. C. A.; 'William 
Simpson Pharmaceutical Society ; Journal 
Club; Class Baseball; German Club; 
.\ T U. 



S^C 



ONE HUNDRED FORTY-THREE 



ISi 




"In ihe Spring a young man's fancy 
Lightly turns to thoughts of love" 

"Edison." Do not get him confused 
with Thomas A. If you did, he would 
convince you that he was named after him. 
He has a ladylike disposition, which 
accounts for the many friends he has 
made. His favorite stunt is workmg in 
the "Pharmacy Lab." He will some day 
be a "bull Pharmacist." as he has re- 
ceived experience under "Home." 



"Beef. Talks much ; says nothing. 
He can when he wants to, but seldom 
wants to. You can find him at the post- 
office every day. looking for a letter 
from Peace Institute. He is the largest, 
ugliest, and one of the brightest members 
of h.s Class. His aim is high. He in- 
tends to go to Philadelphia next year. 
Wherever he goes, he will make good. 



Robeson County Club; Secretary and 
Treasurer of Pharmaceutical Journal 
Club; Greater Council; Vice-President 
of X^'illiam S.mpson Club; ^i *E. 



Granville County Club; Y. M. C. A.; 
Phi. Society; Class Baseball 1912; Cap- 
lam of Pharmacy Baseball Team 1913. 



ONE HUNDRED FORTY-FOUR 



9iL 



1^ 




Age. 28; heighl. 5 feel 8 Inche 
weight, 150. 



"Wilh the hope of passing the Board, he 
'Jags' along" 



"Daddy." as his age indicates, i 


s the 


oldest one of the Class. He says 


litlle. 


but thinks lots (mostly of the ladies). 


He 


claims one never gets loo old to flirt 


w,lh 


the girls. His greatest ambition is to 


pass 


the Board; for he is always at his 


room 


studying. "Dad" is a good egg. a 


nd IS 


liked by all who know him. even the 


girls. 


We all wish him much success in the 


pro- 


fession as a "pill roller." 





Johnson County Club; Pharmaceutical 
Journal Club; President of Pharmac- 
eutical Journal Club. 




ONE HUNDRED FORTY-FIVE 



9iL 



ISi 



PHARMACY 



^l^n,'\lliV(ACY— ] 



Wilbur Cable Adams Rowland. N. C. 

Wilson William Allen Hendersonville, N. C. 

William Hubert Anderson Mars Hill, N. C. 

Stroud Otis Brewer ;...Thomasville, N. C. 

Robert Cooper Covington .^ Laurinburg. N. C. 

Arthur Levi Fishel ." ...a..... Winslon-Salem. N. C. 

William Mortimer Fowlkes Rockingham. N. C. 

Leland Berk Grantham Mount Olive, N. C. 

Clyde Dale Guin Unionville. N. C. 

John Robert Hamilton... , Oxford, N. C. 

John Sugg Harper Snow Hill. N. C. 

Joe Baxter Haymore ; ; Mount Airy, N. C. 

William Snelling Hicks .■ Raleigh. N. C. 

Rupert Watson Jernigan Mount Olive, N. C. 

William Autrey McDaniel Enfield, N. C. 

Roger Atkinson McDuffey Greensboro, N. C. 

Ellis Talmage McInnis Troy, N. C. 

Hector Bruce McPhaul Lumberion, N. C. 

Norway Morris Atlantic, N. C. 

Calvin Blackwell Morrisette Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Lonnie Weightman Murphrey , Raleigh, N. C. 

James Henry Parsons ..Newton Grove, N. C. 

Fred Marion Patterson Concord. N. C. 

George Calvin Peeler Salisbury. N. C, 

Frank Howard Pender. Jr ' Tarboro. N. C. 

Fred Smith Petrea Glass, 

William Crawford Pope Mars Hill. 

Carl David Rosenbaum Tarboro. 

RuFus Sugg Shaw Halifax. 

Hansford Randolph Simmons '. Graham. 

Jesse Eli Turlington Benson. 

William P. Whitmire... ...Hendersonville, N. C. 

ONE HUNDRED FORTY-SIX 

gj ' —t ig 



N. 


C. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 


N. 


c. 




X> ESTFLOt-T \ o n 




C A B \ M a-r 



CH APE,u HiLU 




i^^'ij^j'rL^'^.s.':!!^^^^ 



GOVERNMENT 



GoVICRNiVliNT 




strict watch on ] 
answered: "A rr 
This incident of twenty y 
which created here both the desir 
maintain it. The campus cons 
establish working conditLons with 
terests might operate not antagonisticall] 
est possible efficiency to the whole bod 



d in the atmosphere of the Carolina campus went to teach m another 

When he was about to hold his first examination, the chairman of 

Committee said to him. "You come from Chapel Hill, and I have 

you have what is called the Honor System, and do not watch men on 

t remember, we don't do business that way here, ^'ou must keep a 

'our students today." The Carolina man 

lan whom I must watch I will not leach." 

ears ago expressed the high sense of honor 

e for student government and the ability to 

ciousness demanded that the individuals 

each other in order that their separate in- 

but in agreement, giving the great- 

and the greatest possible develop- 



FIRST ANNUAL INTER- 
SCHOLASTIC MEET 



ment to each part. To attain this result — to secure "wort 

IS the aim of student government. Inevitably, the first 

toward this result was the adoption of the Honor System, 

student on his honor lo act like a man, ridding him of the 

epsionage, and allowmg him to hold up erect on hi 

Honor System, the Student Council was organized, and was given the poM 



ditions" — 

tep in progress 

rh.c.i placed the 

rutch of faculty 

own backbone. As ; 



One Hundred Young Athletes 

Will Contest For Cups 

and Medals 




6RE1TER council IS DOUG GREil WORI 

concrete expression of the 
to act for the student body. 

Our government 
was fairly launched. 
Then came the par- 
tisan politician. No 
natural party lines 
being found in our 
community, a r 1 1 - 
ficial ones were set 
up. The non-fral 
became the a n t i - 
fral; the Greek 
presented a solid 
front to the bar- 
barian. Such a 
condition placed on 
the Student Council 
men who became 
intoxicated while 
they shipped others 
for the same of- 



Student Council 
Standing: CowLEs, Smith, Leach, Fuller 
Sitling: LiNN, WooLLCOTT, Boushall 



fense. Such a con- 
dition placed in 
charge of our ath- 
letic teams men 
who returned pal- 
pa b 1 y diminished 
receipts lo the treas- 



%: 



ONE HUNDRED FORTY-NINE 



]k^ 



GOVERNMENT 



Slake. 
nnJeJn 



ury. burying the Association m debl. Such a condition subordinated efficiency to faction, 
government in the mud of pohtics. 

A severe lest confronted ihe student, to prove his abihty to 
good of the whole. The success of student government was at 
ward in the campus consciousness. To honor was added fair-n 
slow in forming, sprang naturally from the first; the sense of 
student faith in the independent action of his brother. .And thi; 
ernmenl. It was seen that in order to secure the best results 
sideralion. When at one time two fraternity men are the only 
two non-fraternitymen are the only nominees for Class preside! 
obtained a place among student ideals, and that government v. 
working conditions for the good of the whole. 

The genius of government, quickened by the sense of honor, and rounded out by the spirit of 
fair-mindedness, has expressed its higher power in the organization of the Greater Council. The old 
Student Council confined its attention to repressing wrong. The Greater Council, composed of members of 
the Student Council with additional representatives from each Class, is organized as a central committee to 
work for the constructive promotion of the welfare of college life. But the Council is only a 
of the student body. Government is not confined to a few; it is the activity of all the students, 
ever be as high as sti-denl consciousness reaches and as effective as student interest demands. 



ntain working conditions for the 
Then a new element came for- 
sj. This second element, though 
ght in his own conduct inspired in the 
afforded a more complete view of gov- 
section could be banished from con- 
for manager, or at another time 
s realized that fair-mmdedness has 
by better able to attain its end— 



agent 



th. 




Greater Council 
Top Row: Lytch, Pharmacy; Leach, Senior; KlRBV, Pharmacy; Newsom, 

Junior; Whiting, Senior; Cansler, La^. 
Sci:onJ Roa: WooLLCOTT. Junior; FuLLER. Junior; BousHALI,, Junior; 

Holmes. Senior; Rand. Frahnmn. 
Bollom Ron,: Smith, Mdicinc: Linn, Sophomore; CoWLES, Lan: ; Pate, 
Medicine ; AxLEV, CraJuale. 



ONE HUNDRED FIFTY 



9iC. 



ISi 



vSocjAi, (/(;i^!i: 



SOCIAL LIFE 





AN is moral, phy- 
sical, intellectual, 
and social. 
These sides of his 
nature must de- 
velop harmoniously. The de- 
nial of any one of them results 
in deformity. Such are the 
truths of man's nature. 

From the compelling neces- 
sity of social life generally, turn 
to it as expressed here. ^ ou 
find it existing distinctly within 

and as a part of the University. How could it be otherwise? The students, severed from 
their earlier associates, have no opportunity of outside social intercourse, such as is given 
students located in larger towns and cities. They are driven upon themselves; their social 
cravings must be satisfied by their fellows. 

Even though so distinctly a part of the University, social life here is almost in- 
tangible. In the outside world, formal calls and part-es do not satiate the social want; 
what do so are accidental meetings on the streets, neighborly chats, informal card games — 
anything, in short, not restrained, but natural. So it is with the University. The Y. M. 

C. A. reception, college day, 
the dances — neither all nor any 
constitute the student's social 
life. On these occasions he 
merely takes his company man- 
ners out for an airing. His 
social nature is in reality sat's- 
fied by the everyday meetings 
on the campus, the athletic 
field, at meals, at the post- 
office, and in his room. 

You old alumnus, dreaming 
before the fire of days gone by, 
or you young undergraduate, 
-ome summer's night, you do 
not remember this or that re- 




ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-ONE 



az 



liS 



SOCIAL LIFE 

ception or dance. But how it makes your heart ache, and how it brings tears to your 
eyes to recall those gather;ngs in your room; to see again the faces of your chums through 
a haze of tobacco smoke; to almost hear their voices — now serious in weighty discussion, 
and now gay in quick repartee; to go again to the mail, storm the doors of Commons 
Hall, cheer on the football team! And such are the things that compose the students' 
social life. Essentials are they to man's social nature. Without them. University life 
would be but an unbearable sucess on of endless, irksome tasks. 

As organized expressions of social life, one finds the Fraternities, but these have 
largely abandoned their earlier purely social purpose. They have become fields of en- 
deavor, in which the student may exercise — organizat ons into which one gravitates, drawn 
by ties of kinship and local influences. They bind their members ; but friendships origi- 
nated solely through their influence lack spontaneity and that sure foundation of genuine 
sympathy. 

The Fraternity is the luxury of social life, as the Pullman is of travel. In the 
Fraternity, as in the Pullman, life is perhaps easier, more comfortable; but social life 
outside the fraternal orders is none the less real, is equally as genume, and is actually far 
greater. 




ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-TV 



m\ 



cQ- 




DEBA TING 



V>f.wx\:mc, 




AROLINA should be proud of many of her records; but of her debating 
achievements she should be proudest of all. Out of thirty-eight debates 
held with the foremost Universities of the South, and one of the North. 
Carolina has been victorious twenty-eight times. Virginia, the ancient rival ; 
Hopkins, the University of national fame; Tulane of the Far South; and 
Pennsylvania, representing the North, have all fallen before the genius of Carolina 
debaters. In fact, out of the last nneteen debates, but three have been lost. 

This IS a record of 

which any institution would be 
proud ; but why has there been 
such marked success? There 
are at least two fundamental 
causes that can be assigned for 
the existence of the boastable 
record. First, the inter-society 
debates, of which there are four 
each year ; and second, the fact 
that both inter-soc!ety and inter- 
collegiate debating at Carol na 
are upon the competitive basis. 

For a long time the Dialec- 
tic and Philanthropic Literary 
Soceties have been holding inter- 
sociely debates; the Fresh-Soph, 
the Soph-Junior, and the Com- 
mencement Junor Debate. Even before a man becomes eligible to these contests, he has 
an opportunity to try for a place on the Freshman Debate, an inter-society affair, and 
should he be the most successful of the four speakers he receives a cash prize of ten dollars. 
At every stage of his college life, a man has a chance here to perfect himself in debating, 
to try out his oratorical powers; and when he arrives at the senior period he is well 
qualified to represent Carolina in an inter-collegiate debate. 

Even this great number of opportunities to become familiar with argument and 
delivery is not the primary virtue of the Carolma system; for often men in their Senior 
year have, without preliminary training, been able to repreent the University very credit- 
ably against the sister institutions. The system is corrpetitive. Every man who is on 
any debate representing his society or college has won his place in a preliminary contest. 

ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-FOUR 




mL 



DEBATING 



He is on the team because he can 
speak best, argue best, put up the 
best appearance. Popularity, pull, 
nor politics will aid anyone. He 
must simply be the best at Carolina, 
and it is to be said with pride that 
Carolina's best is always better. 
Competition decides who is best, 
and competition eliminates every 
ihmg but men and genius. 

It is with competition, with a 
system of development of men in 
their first college years, that Caro- 
lina has won out in the past. She 
can lose twenty out of the next 
twenty-two debates, and still be 
ahead of Ty Cobb's batting aver- 
age. And who says that Carolina 
can't win the next twenty-two? 

T. C. BOUSHALL 




Debating Union 
Martin. Di ; Boushall. Phi; Willis, Di; 
Peel. Phi: Pritchett, Di : Whiting, Phi. 



C/Ui-olioa's .Dooatos 



Against Georgia 

Against Philo Society of Pennsylvania 

Against Virginia 

Against Vanderbilt 

Against Hopkins 

Against Tulane ..-. 

Against George Washington - - 

Against Washington and Lee 




ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-FIVE 



9iL 



]iS 




Dift&i rt& FOR i r 



^POUTltlfr IT- 00-r 




DEBATING 



! ( O P K ( M.S . C ) AR O I . (M A I ) :C '.) AT iC 





C. W. HlGCINS 



J. A. Holmes 



p.ucry 

Re.SOL\'ED: That the political interests of the United States demand the abandonment 
of the Monroe Doctrine. 

Affirmative — CAROLINA 
Negative — HoPKINS 



ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-SEVEt' 



9iL 



ISi 



DEBATING 



V ( il c V( iN ( A ■ ( / A ;l c) I , I iM A I ) :-: \) \ f 





K. C. ROVALL 



F. L. Webster 



Q<c.).-y 

Resol\ED: That the poHtical interests of the United States demand the abandonment 
of the Monroe Doctrine. 

Affirmative — VIRGINIA 
Negative — CAROLINA 



ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-EIGHT 



IS^ 



C O M iVnCiMC 'IM ;CMT :!■;'?> AT 'l 





J. A. Holmes, Di F. L. Webster, DI. 

0/iv)ry 

Resol\ED: That those decisions of State Courts of last resort, declaring unconsti- 
tutional legislation passed by the Slate Legislative body, should be subject to recall 
by the voters of the State. 

Affirmative — Dl 
Negalive — Phi 
Won by the Affirmative 
Bingham Medal won by J. A. Holmes 




E. S, Peel, Phi. 




S. W. Whiting. Ph, 



vSoPI (OiV(0;l?r.^ JuMHlR 1) i'Vii ATl^: 





Philip Woollcott, Phi. \\' . B. Umstead. Phi. 

Resolved: That Labor Unions are justified in demanding the closed shop. 
Affimalive — Phi 
Negative — Dl 

Won by Negative 





B. Holder. Di. 



J. F. Hackler. Di. 



Yw ;^! (M AN .^SOV! lOIVlOR 'l '0 '^\) ATll 




W. O. Smith, Ph 




V. F. Williams, Phi 



Qii'oi'y 



Re.=OL\ED: That the true solution ot the Trust Problem lies in the regulation of com- 
b nation, rather than in the breaking up of combination and the restoring of com- 
petition. 

Affirmative — Phi 
Negative — Dl 





J. F. Hackler, Di. 



R. M. Ross, Di. 



Jc/iNioii Oii.vroii.s 









F. L. Webster 



D. H. Carlton 



Carr Medal won by 
F. L. Webster 





G. v. Strong 



J. F. 1' 



DRAMATICS 




©K/^5^/^^a€ 






ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-THREE 



DRAMATICS 



:Ora?/(atics 




Ina has ceased to be a 
ighl of this space for a 



ted 



tha 



IIF.CAUSE the Dramatic Club of the University of North Ca 
minor activity in the realm of college activities do we claim th 
sketch of its history and success. 

The history of Dramatics at Carolina begins with the unparalleled success o 
George Broadhurst's roaring comedy. "What Happened to Jones," produced under ih 
direction of Professors McKie, Booker, and Cross, and acted by such stars as Coggins and Weeks. Th< 
selection of this play was a fortunate one. It was just the play to give work to inexperienced actors 
and at the same lime leave the impression that makes the audience look us up again. 

The "Jones" year — 1912-13 — has this history: the troop visited nine different towns, p 
"What Happened to Jones" eleven different times, pulled the ticket box for gross receipts to the 
of $1,037. after covering a territory of seven hundred and fifty miles and appearing before more 
three thousand people. 

Beginning the season of 1913-14 with more experienced men. and with an established reputation 
throughout Eastern North Carolina, the faculty committee, composed this time of Professors McKie and 
Booker, selected the celebrated English Comedy. "The Magistrate." by Sir Arthur Wing Pinero. 

As evidence of the successful presentation of 
this difficult play, a clipping from the next day's issue 
of the yVeUJs and Observer will suffice; a portion of 
which reads: "Dramatics at the University of North 
Carolina reached its highest point last night, when the 
University Dramatic Club successfully staged the cele- 
brated English comedy. 'The Magistrate.' in Gerrard 
Hall, before an audience of over five hundred persons." 
That the season will have an unparalleled success is at 
this time evident, though at the time of the writing, 
only two performances have been given. 

Whatever happens, the Carolina spirit is behind 
the Dramatic Club. And with this student support it 
already has. coupled with the talent which is being con- 
stantly developed by competent coaches, the students of 
Carolina will see before many years have passed the 
Dramatic Club at this institution in the same class, and 
moving in the same circles, with the Dramatic Club of 
Yale. Princeton, or Harvard. 



^V 





ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-FOUR 



gjr 



]iS 




THE DRAMATIC CLUB 
ABOUT TO LEAVE THE "hILL" FOR THE TOUR OF EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA 

From reader's left to right: I. Slieparrl lirvan (manager): T. A. Caiips. T. F. Pugli, ..I. R. Dunna 
W. n. Kerr, H. ( . Conrad. 1. F.. Hoovef. T. V. Whitficl.r, C. A. Doscnian, W. B. Pitts, E. I!. Ma 
II. M. Blalock. r. I. Coggin, .1. M. Cox.' 

Till-; u.xivicRsrrv of north c.\roi.i.\.\ i.r.\m.\ii( t i.rn 

PRICSFXT.'^ 

n\ SIR AicnnK wixc, imm:r(i 
C-\ST OF ( ii.\R.\i ti:k.-^ 

I The plavcrs come on tlie program in the oriler tliat tliey ai>pear on the stage) 

Beatie Tomlinson la sixtecnyearold music mistress) Claude A. Bo 

Gis Harrington ( the Magistrate's sporty stepson ) W. B. Pitts 

Wyke (an English Butler) J. A. Capps 

Popham (the housemaid) J. Forbes Pugh 

Mrs. Posket (a remarried widow of .ii(?) W. Doub Kerr 

Mr. BuUamy (a London magistrate) J. M. Cox 

MR. POSKET (THE MAGISTRATE) W. P. M. WEEKS 

Charlotte Verrinder (Mrs. Poskefs sister I H. C. Conrad 

Isidore (a French waiter) J. E. Hoover 

Blonde (the hotel keeper) E. B. Marsh 

Col. Lukyn (a retired army officer) Charles L. Coggin 

Horace Vale (a military captain— Charlotte's fiance) J. V. Whitfield 

Messiter (a police inspector) H. M. Blalock 

Lugg la sergeant of police) M. R. Dunnagan 

Wormington ( an old court clerk) Mr. Blalock 

S'S'.VOP.SIS: Act I— Drawing room in .Mr. Posket's home. .\ct II — Private dining-room at Hotel Des 

Princes. Act III — Scene i — .Ante-room to courtroom, Mulberry Street; Scene j — Same as Act I. 
F.XECUTIVE STAFF — J. Shepard Bryan, General Manager: E. B. Marsh, Stage Manager; F. O. 

Clarkson. Advertising Manager. 
FACl'LTV DIRECTORS— Prof. George McFarland .McKie. Chairman: Dr. John Manning Booker. 




£-| [ "r^^ '[*~*^ Dramalic Order of Satyrs is an order composed of men of the very best Dramatu 



talent m College. Only members of this order are wearers of the "N. C." The coaches of 
the Dramatic Club annually recommend the best actors from the cast, and only the 
men are taken m if passed on by the order. 

The organization is secret. The present members arc as follows: 

Blalock, H. M. Capps. J. A. HARRtss. Dan Parrott. M. C. 

BOSEMAN, C. A. COCCIN. C. L. JOHN.SON'. H. V. PtTTS. W. B. 

Bryan, J. S. Conrad. H. C. Kerr. M. C. Weeks, W. P. M. 

Whitfield. J. V. 









:!,,t,5') tow's ''"•!'^ 



\ftt 









iJS^Y 



\ 



BRVANN m\i\l SAU ■ 

E?<i«i. Trip ^itisiactwy in I 

l..n Way. f 



OLK KLIUKIJ AS VUULU Bl IHt PRt.55 



GLEE CLUB 



'^^i.V'/.l (yl.C/IJ 




Mr. George M. Sneath. 

Mr. M. H. Meeks. Jr _ 

Mr. J. S. Cansler 

Mr. H. L. Brockman 



Direclor 

President 

Manager 

.Treasurer 



ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
Dr. Howell 
Messrs. Sneath, Royster, and Meeks 



ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-EIGHT 



GLEE CLUB 



GlS£ Cl.Uii 



First Tenors: 
G. Harden 
E. W. Jarman 
M. H. Meeks 

W. A. RUDISILL 

M. Stubbs 
W. C. Wright 



First Bass: 
C. W. Beckwith 
p. H. Epps 
G. M. Long 
R. N. Page 
W. C. Lord 
J. E. Harris 



Second Tenors: 
L. H. Clement 

F. W. Hancock 
J. T. Pritchett 
J. A. Taylor 

E. A. Hill 

G. M. Sneath 



Second Buss: 

H. L. Brockman 
W. M. Hicks 
E. P. Jones 
J. F. Love 
W. N. Pritchard 

C. B. WOLTZ 



Man-lolin CAnh 
G. M. Long W. C. Wright 

H. M. Meeks L. H. Clement 

W. A. RuDisiLL E. P. Jones 

-I ^ 

Meeks, Sneath, Epps, Brockman 
+ + 
Pianist: FIarris 



W. C. Lord 

H. Cone 

J. L. Wright 



ONE HUNDRED SEVENTH 



m 



PUBLICATIONS 




7iL 



ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-ONE 



]£S 






^^^ FUlUn CANSLE/i miTfiK£R 

YACKETY YACK BOARD "'''""'^ 






7i 

J£ff/f/£5 PATrOM M^CAU c/OJ^jfS MEBANE 





mr//ifG pmcH£rr stromo mjo/y lo/vo 




SOUSMLL WIM£5 LWJV 



MXIV/U C0S6 



PUBLICATIONS 




'TiiE T.ARMEEL 

Lenoir Chambers, Jr Ed'.lor-in-Chicf 

Walter Fuller Managing Editor 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
S. W. Whiting McDaniel Lewis John Cansler 

D. KiLLiFER T. C. Linn G. M. Long 

TARHEEL MANAGERS 

L. R. Johnson _ Business Manager 

C. E. Erwin Assistant Manager 

B. L. Field Assistant Manager 

ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-THREE 




i ^^^-.,, 

W. p. Fuller Editor-in-Chief 

LOWRV AXLEY . ..Aisiilant Edilor-in-Chief 

G. W. EusTLER Literary Editor J. S. Bryan ^"Around the Well" 

T. C. BoUSHALL Literary Editor C. A. BosEMAN Exchariges 

T. r. Linn Sketches M. R. DunnaGAN Business Manager 

J. V. Whitefield I 

P Wnni roTT i Assistant Business Managers 

ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-FOUR 

^r— — — ^^^ 



ATHLETICS 




ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-FIVE 



'fiZ 



ISi 



ATHLETICS 



A'Tid/i'mas AT yn^ Umivi'.ti.'sity 



|HEN ihe news of our defeat at Richmond in 1912 was flashed over the Slate, a feeling 
of discouragement everywhere ensued. "Are we never to be able to win from Virginia?" 
was the question heard on all sides. It was not long, however, until there arose out of the 
, . old rags of despair a new spirit of determination, which made itself felt all over the Stale. 
-^i 1 his manifested ilself in a resolve of the alumni to ascertain the cause of our continued 
defeats, and lo effect a remedy for ihem. In this respect our defeat had a salutary effect. It awakened 
everyone to the fact that half-heartedness on the part of the students and alumni m athletics at the 
University had to end; that only by bard work and enthusiasm was it possible for us to achieve success. 




In pursuance cf this resolve, a number of representative alumni held a 
faculty at the University shortly before Christmas. At this meeting, new pla 
at the University were decided upon. The Tarheel of that date says it wa; 
that has been taken in Carolina athletics in many years. The definite result 



joint conference w-th the 
is for conducting athletics 

"the most significant step 
)f the conference was the 



endation thai lw( 




I committees be formed, on both of which the 
committee to have charge of procuring coach 
agement of athletic affairs, schedules, supplies, 
old system, by which coaches have been secur 
from another, was unanimously condemned 



umni are to be represented — one 

, the other to have actual man- 

and of looking for material. The 

red, now from one institution, now 

The plan proposed by the alumni 



IS made up from plans now being use 
tinguished by introducing the feature 
procured for not less than three years, 
ing that will be distinctively Caroliniai 



J at Princeton and Harvard. It is dis- 

)f continuity. T^e head coach is lo be 

He may thus evolve a system of coach- 

A nucleus of men who have already 



been trained shall be left to start the next year with." The alumni agreed to 
make good the deficiencies beyond a certain limit which the Athletic Associa- 



tion might make, and decided further that "there 
committee, composed of two faculty members, the 
dent of the Athletic Association, and the head c 
the power of making schedules and local arrangerr 
scouring the Stale for material." 



should be . 
graduate m 
.ach— this c 
mis. purcha 



sident athletic 
^er. the presi- 
nittee lo have 
supplies, and 



On January 27, at a second conference between the faculty, alumni, and 

representative students, Mr. T. C. Trenchard was elected head coach for three 

years, and several days later he signed a contract to this effect. This first material 

step toward the revitalization of Carolina's athletics was hailed by the students 

"Doggie's" unfailing interest In the University, his record as a football player, his 

and his ability to instill fight into a team, had already procla'med him the man for head 

in February, Mr. Trenchard came to the Hill, and began his work of pulling Carolina's 

f the rut in which they had been for ten years. 



ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-Sf. 



KC 



L^ 



ATHLETICS 



The new system of athletics was not instituted until after the baseball season began, and. con- 
sequently, Carohna's rather poor showing in that branch of athletics cannot be attributed to the new 
system. 

During the Spring, two new institutions were inaugurated at the University, spring foolball prac- 
tice, and the High School track meet. On the first of March. 
Spring football started on the class field. The art of passing, 
catching, and kicking were taught anyone who came out, re- 
gardless of whether he were a Varsity man or a near-claEs 
player. In a contest held in May, five sweaters were awarded, 
one each lo the man who had done the best work m drop 
kick-ng. in passing, in catching, and in tackling. The High 
School track meet was an event which did much to focus the 
attention of the State on the University, and to arouse interest 
among the high schools of the State in athletics. High schools 
sent teams to represent them in this contest. As yet. it is too 
early to estimate the effects of the meet on athletics at the 
University, but it is hoped that by creating a lively interest in 
athletics among the 
high school students 
(he University may 

veloped material in- 
stead of the un- 
trained men hitherto 
received. 

An agitation which 
r e a c hed successful 
a plan of a compulsory athleliL 
fee. suggested last Sprmg. The plan received the endorse- 
ment of the student body, and subsequently that of the trustees. 
This amounts to five dollars, half of it being paid at the Fall 
and half of it at the Spring registration. It admits every stu- 
dent lo all athletic contests held in Chapel Hill, and while it 
IS a means of some revenue to the Association, it also secures a 
large and representative University attendance at all the 
games. 

Since football is the most important branch of college 
athletics, the real test came last Fall. After all the activity 
of the Spring and Summer, after all the newspaper comment, 
after all the rumors of the good material coming lo us from the 




culn 



last Summer 




%E 



ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-SEVEN 



ISi 



ATHLETICS 



prep and high schools, everyone was anxious to kno\s jusl what had developed. Football practice began 
on the first of September, and to those oi us who as yet had not left home, the rumors from Chapel Hill 
about our excellent team-to-be were, indeed, pleasing. This we knew; If good coaching amount to any- 
thing. Carolina will show up well. 

In addition to Mr. Tienchard, head coach. Talbot Pendleton. Tom Wilson, and Arthur Blue- 
tenthal made the Carolina team what it was last Fall. Pendleton, who comes from Berkley Springs. 
W. Va., first played football at Episcopal High School. Alexandria, Va.. where he made all-Stale 
prep, school halfback. In track also he won distinction, making the hundred-yard dash in nine and 
four-fifths seconds. At Princeton, he played class football during his Freshman year, and in the 
ensuing years he made the Varsity team, being captain in his Senior year. Tom Wilson, of Bing- 
hampton. N. Y.. played guard on Dartmouth, and was thus disqualified for playing on the Freshman 
team at Princeton. Wilson, however, played guard on the Varsity team for two years. After his 
graduation, he returned to Princeton as head line coach, and during the Fall of 1912 developed, out 
of the lightest material seen at Princeton in many years, one of the best teams that has ever repre- 
sented the college. Two weeks before the Thanksgiving game. Arthur Bluetenlhal, of Wilmington, N. 
C assistant head line coach at Princeton, came down from Princeton to give the Carolina team a final 
lesson in coaching. Bluey went to Princeton in 1908 from Exeter, where he played center. In his 
first year he made the Freshman team, and in the ensuing years the Varsity. 

Although one might think the past season a failure if he looks only at the scores, it has been 
successful. The past season has witnessed, as it might be termed, a rebirth of Carolina's athletics, the 
overthrow of old methods, the instituting of new. One year at least was necessary to get a working 
basis for the then untried system. \X'e did not hope to develop a universally successful team last year. 
Our hope was not so much to make high scores ourselves, as to hold our opponents to small ones. 
Of similar nature and purpose to the high-school track meet was the high-school football contest, the 
final game of which was played at the University, and won by Raleigh from Washington. 

About the baseball season, which is opening just as this book is going to press, it is too early 
to make prophesies. We believe, however, that with Earle Mack as coach, with the help of the alumni, 
and with enthusiastic response from the students. Carolina's baseball season will be much more suc- 
cessful than It was last vear. 




ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-EIGHT 



VaL 



38! 



Abernathy Right Tackle 

"Big Ab" doesn't show it off; he doesn't talk 
about it; but he's just "there" in offense and defense, 
into the midst of every play. Four years on the 
team; All-South Atlantic two years; Carolina's 
Captain. 




Tayloe . Left Halfback 

Easily the best ground gainer in our backfield. 
Knows and loves the game. "Dave" is a good field 
general, and fitted for the captaincy in 1914. 



^&^S 



-1-l.ER . Rjghl Halfback 

"Pling" leaped into fame with a seventy-yard 
n for a touchdown against Virginia. Back of this 
eclacular performance is the head and spirit of a 
rd, consistent player. 



"Red ' proves the possibihties of ( 

Worked three years for 1914. and th. 
to quarterback the Varsity. 



Quarterback 

lass football, 
n was called 





Krwin Fullback 

"C. E." is a strong, dependable fullback. Worked 
up by steady effort, and is now one of the best line 
plungers m the Soulh. 



Tandy _ Center 

Of centers, the best. Excels not in one but in 

every department of the game. "George" is the 
find of the year. 



■fc:*^'' 





"S " Parker Fullback 



A play IS a good one that succeeds in getting 
past "Pete," for he is a bulwark on defense. On 
offensive work also he has shown his ability to make 



HoMEWOOD Right End 

"Homewook makes the tackle. Time out" got 
pretty familiar at the continuous reports. Not rough- 
ness, but clean hard lacklmg. Mentioned by several 
papers for All-South Atlantic. 



HUSKE Left End 

You rarely see a better end than "BlLLY," in 
breaking interferences and covering punts. Works 
with all his might, and has made unusual develop- 



CowELL .- Left Guard 

"Fatty" is a steady and consistent player, both 
on defense and offense. In interference, he is espe- 
cially good for a line man. 




..,■>.' 






]^A 





FousT 

"Foostie" won fame by hi; 



-, opponent 



ry game, and ga 



. Right Guard 

Outpunled his 
ed much for his 



Ramsay - - Left Tacl^lc 

"Graham." according to Coach Wilson, is the 



"best seventeen-year-old fo 
country." To have a Freshm 
much for Carolina football. 



II player in the 
of his ability means 




FOOTBALL 



]u:)OTiyALL 




lAROLlNA m. 

It doe 
sure step fri 
irative showl: 
alkover at ih. 
best team (hat Virginia has ever had, is undoubtedly p 
season gratifying, for the team had more on its 
shoulders than its own success. A system was at 
Etake: and the moderate victory for the team was 
a glorious triumph for the system. Our defeats as 
well as our victories trace the progress of the team 
from the beginning to the end of the season. 

When, on September 27, we defeated Wake 
Forest only 7 to 0. the prophesies for the season 
were very dark. The small score was a disappoint- 
ment, as was the lack of life and practice shown by 
the learn. 

A week later, a bright spark of hope came 
to us. when the team showed good machine work 
strong line by scoring two touchdowns and a 



and Carolina well-wishers are well satisfied with the 1913 football 
not take a very far-seeing mind to read mio the season a swift as well as 
n the fool towards the head of the Southern football class. If com- 
l alone formed the criterion, jat is faction is to be expected. From a 
hands of a fair Virginia team to a hard-fought struggle with about the 
And not only for its actual scores is the 



and a 
safety 
points 



Medical Co 



for 15 



the ' 
to 
nd a 



/ictory 



against 
ckfield 



- than 
game 
of the 




' V-"' 



against Virgin 

against their 0. 

"Back in the 

hard fight gave us only a 7 

Davidson. Poor generalship 

kept us from a larger score. 

On October 18. the team earned mort 
the 13 to 3 defeat of South Carolina. This 
showed a very great improvement in the work 
team. 

Fumbling was the only art the team seemed to have in the first three quarters of the next game. 
When they finally did pull together and show football ability, it was too late. 
The score was V. P. I. 14. Carolina 7. 

Our team was in almost perfect working order on November I, but 
poor tactics in taking the defensive too much lost the game to Georgia and 
McWhorter. 19 to 6. 

Just about the time we were getting ready to score against Wash- 
ington and Lee, on November 8. the game was called. But even the 14 to 



BAPTISTS THIS TIME 

Usini Many Subslilutes, Tar- 

lieels Easily Make the 

Score 29 to 



ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-TWO 



7iL 



Hi 



FOOTBALL 



against us convinced the doubt- 
ers that we had a real team. 

The Varsity, the scrubs. 

and then some, all helped to 

beat Wake Forest 27 to on 

the following Saturday. This 

game gave some idea of how 

we had improved during the 

season. 

Twenty-six to seven wouldn't give the impression of a hard-fought game, in which it was difficult 

vhich team outplayed; but you are not hearing Carolina's side of it alone, when we tell you that 

'as the case in Richmond. The game was a fitting climax to a season of faithful training and 

nt coaching, for ihe team showed its power to fighl, and fight hard. 

When it comes to give proper praise for our successful season, we cannot but divide it. The 

persistence and ability of the Varsity squad — not only the letter men, but also the hard-working scrubs, 

like Lord, Burnett. R.. Boshamer. Reid. Edwards. Grimsley. Philips. Burnett. J.. McCall. and others— 

the work of all the men who played on the Varsity field deserves the highest credit. These men were 



CAROLINA LOSES IN A STUBBORN CONTEST AGAINST VIRGINIA 

Score of 26 to 7 Fails Entirely to Tell tlie Story— Fuller Scores Toucti- 
down on Seventy -Yard Run — First in Eigtit Years 

GIROLINA GAINS MORE GROUND ON LINE PLtrS THAN DOES THE VIRGINIA TEAM 



lo lell 
such w 
excelle 




ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-THREE 



'SiC 



ISi 



FOOTBALL 



the material, and ihanks are due to the coaches — Trenchard, Pendleton, and Wilson — for the develop- 
ment of a team from it. Finally, manlcs should go from the whole University to the alumni who made 
possible this system of coaching. 




1 



WaKe Torest Gra 



-^^^fj 




Va. MeoL. GrcLmne 



PALMETTOS BOW 

TO TARHEELS 

Team Journeys to Columbia 

and Checks Gamecocks, 

Comeback Crow 



ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-FOUR 



SiC 



lis 



Cl.'Vs.^ "l\,'\iV(3 




RL.-IIMAN )OOTBA 



lan.luiK: SlraiiKe, Manager; Williamson, Lett linil ; I'lOcloi 
Sub-Cuartl: liurnett. Right Tackle; Arrenson, Sub-Tackle 
Kullock, Right Guard; Coleman, Left Halfback; Ranson- 
SuliOuarterback; Hill. Sub-Center; Kluttz, Coach. 

ittingT Hoffman, Right Halfback; Davis, Fullback; Ware 
Left Tackle; Stell. .Sub-End; Telfair, Left Guard; Munroi 
Riuht Knd : IClias, Sub-Center; Smith, Center; .Mdermar 
( )nrirterback. ' 



Goldsboro 

21 - Goldsboro 

34 Greensboro 

51 Greensboro 

6 Raleigh 7 

HF.SE figures give the 
success of the Kluttz 
1917 machine. With 
the exception of Junior 
scores, the champion- 
ship Raleigh eleven 
scored the only touch- 
dovt'n made across the Freshmen goal 
line. In the class race, the Freshmen 
were prevented from winning the 
championship sweaters by the Juniors. 
The Freshmen totaled 130 points 
against their opponents' 23. Coleman, 
fullback, was the best feature of the 
class field. Bullock was a strong for- 
ward. Hoffman, fleetfooted half, was 
the surest ground-gainer. Williamson, 
end, quick-thinking and daring, stood 
out over any other class player, and 
with more weight will make the Var- 
sity stuff. 



-Sooaoii\Oi".)S 




HE Soph 
with Ho 

and Huske in the van 
charge, easily double- 
quicked across War- 
renton's goal lines, and 
were stopped in their class champion- 
ship stride by the Freshmen. Zolli- 
coffer was the overtopping center of 
ihem all, and his defensive play ranged 
from end to end. Bryan was the 
third best if not the second best end 
of the four pairs. Norris was the 
only punter in Coleman s neighbor- 
hood. 




SOPHOMORE FOOTBALL TEAM 

Tuii Row: Kluttz, Coach; Jones, Right Tackle; Siuil 

Guard; Pike, Left Guard; Long, LeTt Halfback; I. ;■ 

Rin-ht Guard; ZollicolTer, Center. 
.Middle Row: Hogan, Right Tackle; Royal, Rigl 

Loughran, Right End; 1. M. Huske, Right Halfbi 

wards. Left Guard. 
I'.ottom Row: Glenn. Right Halfback; Fore, Fullbacl. 

Duarterback; .Vorris (Cartain), Left Tackle; Brv 

I'lid; Ilarl, Left I'.uard. 



Class ^Ceams 




JUNIOR FOOTBALL TEAM 
Top Row: Muore. Coach; \ance, Fullbacl 

back: Fitzgerald, Right Tackle; Lipscor 

Field, Left Tackle; Woltz, Sub-Guard. 
Middle Row; Gillman, Right Halfback 

Blount, Sub-End. 
Bottom Row: Cummings, Sub-Tackle; Thompson, Right End 

Holder, .Sub-Guard ; Woollcott. Captain and Quarterback 

Wilkins, Left Guard ; Whitaker. Left End. 



Paty, Left Half 
:, Right Guard ; 



rker, Cente 



Juniors 

10 -- Freshmen 

6 Freshmen 

Sophomores 2 

__ Sophomores 7 

^ HE Juniors had the best 
material of the four 
classes. Their coach, 
Allen Moore, was a 
second-year medical stu- 
dent; and the only time 
that a second-year med- 
ical student has off from work in the 
week is a little while on Saturday after- 
noon, which tradition and social pressure 
have dedicated to a gym shower. The 
Juniors missed the fierce tackhng 
spirit of "Little Moore," and tied up 
the race which they should have won. 
The Juniors were strong in Fitzgerald 
and Leak, aggressive tackles; Thomp- 
son, a left-fie!ding end; Nance, de- 
fensive fulh and Woolcott, with his 
off-tackle run and drop kick. 



Seniors 



Seniors 6 Freshmen 1 3 

Seniors 6 Sophomores 10 

Seniors 7 Juniors 9 



HF Seniors were not in 
the championship tie- 
up. The change in 
mid-season from a bal 
anced formation to ih^ 
Mmnesota shift r ' 
suited in many di 
bles. The Seniors e 




astr< 



hibited a certain stubborn strength, but 
lacked the punch to put their weight 
across. Several of them got in some 
sort of shape to coach high school 
teams next year. Hatcher, expe- 
rienced and heavy, was the strongest 
tackle on the four teams. The center 
positions were impregnable. For raw 
men. Reid and Knowles showed un- 
usual ability. The Seniors never 
won a game, scored in every game, 
and lost after hard fighting. 




SENIOR FOOTBALL TEAM 
landing: Graham, Coach; Ferguson. Left Tackle; Darden 

(Captain), Center; Pendereraph. Ulalock. Left Halfback; 

Angel. Left End; Pitt, Fullback, 
itting: Strong, Quarterback; Hatcher. Right Tackle: Reid. 

Fullback; J. Holmes. Left Guard; McKnight, Fullback; 

Struthers. Quarterback; Kelly, R. Holmes, End; Love, 

Center. 





Edwards Shortstop 

"CapTAJN Burr" is an especially fast Infielder, 
with a good peg, and dependable with the stick. 
Followed Coach to Winston and — well, you know 
all about him from the newspapers. 



Bailey, K Second Ba 

No second baseman in the State has anything i 
"Rabbit"; the team showed good judgment 
making him next captain. His speed in fielding ai 
base running is a feature of every game. 



Leak First Base 

Jimmy is always the same, and that means that he 
IS always good. Harbors any kind of a throw to 
first. Experienced, and always heady. 





Hart Catche 

Enthusiastic and hard working. "Julian" ha 
started well, and bids fair to go better. A sur< 
man behind the bat. 



Williams Third Ba 



"Rody's" first year; but he 
fielder and a good batter. A 



showed up as a fast 
Lire throw from third. 




^iil^is«tiL^^^^ 



?'A ■'^_.- 





Aycock Pitcher 

"Ben" has speed, curves, and an effective change 
of pace. Keeps ihe "old head," too; all of which 
means a first-class pill-lwister. 



Thompson LefifielJ 

"Shag" covers left field to perfection. An all- 
round ball player; ask Kelly, or Connie Mack. 



Graves Pitcher 

Speed and spitball are Henry's strong points; 
absence of control is his weakness. This latter, 
however, is due to his lack of experience, which 
time will remedy. 



Bailey, H CenierfieU 

Broke up the Virginia game in Greensboro with 
a ihree-sacker; this is almost a habit of his. 
Hubert" is there in centerfield, loo, every time. 



Johnston Ri^hlfielJ 

by 



"Phoebe" made himself pron 
the ball. Captains that don't kl 
to run bases. "Phoebe" attend: 





Iting 
him pick him 
ght field on 




BASEBALL 



Baseball 




O THOSE of us given to prophesying, our baseball team of 1913 seemed 
destined to travel the same rocky road which had been traversed by the foot- 
ball and basket-ball teams of the same year. The fact that only three 
I Varsity men — Captain Edwards, Second Baseman Bailey, and First Base- 
man Leak — had returned to college, and also the fact that no available Varsity material 
was in sight, led many of us to conclude that the 1913 team was going to be somewhat 
below the usual high standard of the University baseball teams. It was a clear case of 
having to build up a team almost entirely of raw material. 

In the early Spring, before the arrival of Coach Bowers, Captain Edwards, with 
his customary "pep" and ginger, sent out 
a call for candidates; and, as our pitch- 
ing staff had been sadly depleted by the 
loss of all the dependable Varsity men, he 
urged the pitchers especially to come out 
for a trial. In response to his call, a great 
swarm of men, some fifty or sixty in num- 
ber, reported to the Varsity field. 

As the practice season advanced, the 
more unpromising material was by the 
process of elimination relegated to the 
class field, and Coach Bowers began to get 
a line on the prospective Varsity players. 
They seemed to line up about as follows: 
Pitchers, Aycock, Graves, and Craven ; 
Catchers, Hart and Knowles ; First Base, 
Leak ; SeconJ Base, Bailey ; Shortstop, 
Edwards; Third Base, Williams, Left- 
field, Long; Centerfield, Thompson or H. Bailey; Rightfield, Johnson. This represented 
a much stronger line-up than it was thought possible to obtain from the material at hand. 




ONE HUNDRED 



7iZ 



]iS 



BASEBALL 



In the first game of the season, the team met defeat at the hands of the Atlantic 
Coast Lme team in Wilmmgton. The team next went up against the strong Princeton 
nine, in Greensboro, and was again defeated through combinations of hard luck. Pass- 
ing over that part of the season before the Virginia games — for the average Carolina 
student gauges the success of the season not so much by the number of games the team 
wins or loses as by the outcome of the Virginia games — we will find that Carolina broke 

even with her ancient rivals in a two-game 
series. At Greensboro, we defeated Vir- 
ginia in a beautifully contested game by the 
score of 5 to 4. However, at Charlottesville, 
Virginia evened things up by beating us 1 2 
to 9. Another game of importance which 
might be mentioned was the one played in 
Raleigh with our sister institut on, A. & M. College. In this, the first baseball game 
between the two institutions in seven years, we were forced to accept the smaller end of 
the score. 



BAILEY AND AYCOCK LIFT THE GREENSBORO 

NS, 5 TO 4 



Virginia Beaten in an Exciting Game, Bailey's Three-Bagger 

Puts It on Ice, and Aycock's Superb 

Pilcliing Keeps It Ttiere 




SiE 



ONE HUNDRED 



]iiS 




BASEBALL 



zmf^ 



VIRGINIA EVENS Princeton 9. ^. University 

DiCCDJil CCPICC rennsylvania btate I University 

bAitbALL itHlt5 Atlantic Coast Une 7 University 

^^, ~ ,. , Guilford 9 University 

Wins a Freaky Game 12 to ^^_^_ , University 

8, After Carolina Had a Lafayette 5_ _ .._ Umversity 

Six-Run Lead Lafayette 3 University 

Amherst 5 , ..University 

Davidson ! University 

Davidson 1 University 

Virginia Military Institute 5 University 

Virginia 4 University 

Wake Forest 8 . University 

Wake Forest 8 University 

Virginia 12 University 

Virginia Military Institute 2 . University 

Washington & Lee 9 University 

A. and M. of North Carohna 7. University 



of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 
of North 



Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 
Carolina 




ONE HUNDRED NINETY-TWO 



9i£ 



ISi 



Track 




Tlie Team 

ASON gone! Wakeley. Parker. Price. Barker, and Carter here no more! Six of our 
Lest men taken from the team. But with Captain Earle Patterson, Cobb. Strong, Spence. 
^Xoollcott. and Blalock — all sweater men — to build around, the prospects were not so bad. 
Then those hard workers — Whitmg. Struthers. Axley. Abernathy. Parker, and 
Smith — sticking all the lime, promised wonderful things. And those Freshmen — "Little 
Pat." Wright, and Homewood — all looked good. Practice and condition soon showed 
that Nat Cartmell had developed a team even better than that of 1912. All these men 



showed up fine during 

Ths vScascn 

The schedule, includmg A. & M., V. P. I.. W. 
A. A. at Baltimore, was cut down to only three meets as folio 



L.. the Slate 



el. and the S. A. I. 




■i ''. 




Woollcott 



A T'a s\' S w i ^ 



^ 



ONE. HUNDRED NINETY-FOUR 



9iL 



]«: 













"— < 



^x 



° p 

^1 



^2 °^X 



^X 



-S t/2 o 



S> 



> - 

Q§ 



Tm A. 'A M. Mot)t 



A. & M. had a good leam we heard; ihey had hopes, loo, we also heard. "Nat" kepi quiet, 
though, until the fourth of April, when his boys walked off with the meet 80 to 36. takino nine first 
places. Spence took first in the mile and the half-mile. Little Pal look second in the quarter. Sears 
look first in the 100. and Smith look first in the 220. Big Pat took first m the two-mile. Strong and 



Blalock 



the 



nil 



A, AND M. FARMERS 
BEATEN, 80 TO 36 



Illy. Strulhers took ihe low hurdles, and \Xoollcott the high hurdles and the 
high jump. A. & M. got first in the broad jump, hammer, shot, and quarter. 



Nat Garlmell's Buncli Buns 

Away From Opponents 

In First l^eet 



came next, on April 26. again in Raleigh. There was much interest in the 
meet this year, because of ihe fact that Carolina had twice won the cup 
offered by the Raleigh Chamber of Commerce, and would come into 
permanent possession of it if she should win again. A. & M., Wake Forest, 
and Trinity were determined to give us a fight for the prize. We were de- 
termined to gain our third straight victory and our cup. Again "Nat" had 
been on the job. Fifty-three and one-half of the 142 points came our way. Thirly-six went to A. & M.. 
twenty-eight and one-half lo Wake Forest, and twenty-four to Trinity. Even in such a big meet, seven 
first places were won bv Carolina. "Baby" Sears ran awav with the 
100 and 220, Little Pat came back and won ihe quarter from the man 
who had beaten him in the A. & M. meet. Whiting took the half, and 
* ■ « \ 1/ Spence the mile. Cobb g-ot second on the two-mile: Axley took second in 

«^^ mTi- . \ F '*"■ ^'^°'- Strong broke the Stale record by vaulting eleven feet flat. 

Woollcoll won in the high jump and high hurdles. To give a Carolina 
finish lo a Carolma victory, the While" and Blue walked off with the 
relay, thereby winning another cup offered for this event. The third meet 
has been won: the State cup is ours. 




Tho ^. A, (, -A, .A. iV(«Qt 

The showing made at Baltimore was not as good as was ex- 
pected. In 1912. Carolina took second; in 1913. with a better team, she 
could not place so well. But we can't hope for victory all the time. Off 
days come often in practice; they will surely come sometimes in the meet 



old 



But just the same, ou 
len came up to their : 
were developed mto hrst-cla 
places for 1914. 



eason as a whole was a great success. The 
ndards; ?ome broke them. The new men 
athletes; they are now ready to lake their 



STATE TRACK MEET 

For Ttiird Consecutive Year 

Slie Is Champion of 

the State 



ONE HUNDRED NIfiEiT Y-SI. 



VaL 



i l^^ 



BASKET-BALL 



!WsX!i:T!i,'M.i. 




HE season 1913-14 in basket-ball opened up with the brightest prospects for 
Carolina since the introduction of the sport into the Unversity. Chambers, 
Long, and Homewood were the only relics of last year's squad to report 
at the closing of the football season. Ranson, the only o-Ritch-inal offspring of the game 
as demonstrated in the early ages, regretfully gave up this one-of-twenty of his pastimes, 
and decided to devote for once in his life his whole time to one thing; that one thing hap- 
pened not to be basket-ball. New men were not lacking, however, and the new squad 
proxed strong. Among the most promising candidates were John- pApniiLi ifTCR TUC 
son, a substitute, from Lynchburg; Tennent, a member of the Ashe- STATE CHAMPIONSHIP 

ville team for four years; Edwards, Guilford's big center of last Tandy Scores 19 Points Out Of 

T- 1 r Til- ■ 1 ■ 1 . 28 Igainst Wake Forest 

year; 1 andy, a new man rrom Illinois, and one mentioned for 

South Atlantic football center for the season; Keesler, Davis, Pou, Goodson, Flemmg. 

and many others. The results of the first several games were unusually gratifying, and 

showed Carolina s team up in an excellent hght. 

VA SWAMPS CAROLINA T\\c returns from the mid-term examinations almost ruined any 

WitllOUt a Center Ilia Team P'ospects for State or South Atlantic honors. On account of the 

" eight-hour law, we lost both of our centers, Edwards and Tandy. 

As a result, in the midst of our season we were forced to transfer Johnson from his guard 

position to center, and start over again. Right at this point, before we had practiced a 

s'ngle night with our new line-up, we met Virginia, with the strongest team she had ever 

put out, and a team that was then high on the rungs toward championship honors. Vir- 



ONE HUNDRED NINETY-EIGHT 



BASKET-BALL 



ginia swamped us on the floor at Raleigh. This defeat was a source of stimulus, and 
with a team, crippled, yet stronger than usual, the rest of the season was finished up in a 
fairly creditable manner. 

+ + 

University of North Carolina .Basket-ball Scibedule 

I913--14 




December 


9- 


December 


14- 


December 


29- 


December 


30- 


January 


14- 


January 


30- 


January 


31- 


February 


6- 


February 


9- 


February 


14- 


February 


16- 


February 


19- 


February 


24- 


February 


27- 


February 


28- 


March 


2- 


March 


3- 


March 


4- 



-Elon Chapel Hill 

— Du>-ham Chapel Hill 

-Charlotte Charlotte 

—Charlotte . Charlotte 

—Durham Durham 

—Guilford Guilford 

—Elon Elon 

-Wake Forest Chapel Hill 

-Virginia Raleigh 

—Wake Forest Wake Forest 

-Durham Raleigh 

-Guilford Chapel Hill 

-Wake Forest Raleigh 

— Woodberry Orange 

-V. M. I Lexington 

-Staunton Staunton 

-Lynchburg . Lynchburg 

-Virginia Charlottesville 



TWO HUNDRED 



9iC 



ISt 




GATES AND CHAMBERS 




Or-MM/VSKiiVl 'CiC.'VM 



Dr. R. B. Lawson. Physical Director 
C. D. Taylor Inslrudon W. P. Whitaker 







MEMBERS 






R. 


E. Devereux 


W. R. Parker 


F. 


O. Clarkson 


C. 


D. ISLEV 


G. V. Strong 


F. 


R. Owen 


E. 


J. Lilly 


L. B. Rhodes 


T. 


M. Price 



LITERARY SOCIETIES 




RIVALS BETVYEEK 

THEMSELVES - 
BROTHERS BE:foKE 
THE VtoaLD. 




TWO HUNDRED FIVE 



7i\ 



]K 



LITERARY SOCIETIES 



1^1 ((i,AM-ri (!ioH(^. l^rncRAiiY >Soc(!i/rY 



Holl of Actiy.) iV(-oiiiI)'.)rs 



Adams, W. J. 
Allen, W. R., Jr. 
Anderson, A. V. 
AuLD, B. F. 
Baggett, J. V. 
Barnes, W. B. 
Barnes, T. T. 
Barden, T. a. 
Bailey, H. V. 
Bailey, R. H. 
Bailey, I. M. 
Bell, D. L. 
Blalock, H. M. 
Blue, L. A. 
Boseman, C. a. 
boushall, t. c. 
Brady, D. 
Brooks, R. P. 
Bryan, A. O. 
Bryan, R. T., Jr. 
Bryan, J. S. 
Carr, L. 
Capps, E. F. 
Castelloe, a. T. 
Campbell, E. T. 
Clark, L. R. 
Clark, R. V. 
Cook, C. R. 
Cobb, W. B. 
Cooper, F. H. 



Coats, R. F. 
Cox, J. M. 
Cobb, Collier, Jr. 
Colline, H. W. 
Cradle, B. A. 
Cradle, W. T. 
currie, e. h. 
Dail, E. J. 
Dail, G. R. 
Daniel, C. C. 
Daniel, L. M. 
Darden, D. B. 
Davis, M. J. 
Dees, G. R. 
Drew, Frank 
Edwards, L. H. 
Edgerton. G. E. 
Edgerton, E. D. 
Eldridge, J. G. 
Eldridge, J. 
Farmer, L. J. 
Fuller, W. P. 
Gunter, L. B. 
Hale, J. W. 
Hamilton, H. 
Hancock, F. W., Jr. 
Harrison, J. L. 
Harper, A. B. 
Hatcher, J. T. 
Harris, J. J. 



Harris, J. E. 
Hatcher, M. 
Hart. J. G. 
Hester, H. B. 
Hill, D. B. 
Howell, W. F. 
hobgood, j. r. 
HoBBs, S. H., Jr. 
Hood, R. T. 
Hooper, J. A. 
Holloway, K. 
House, R. B. 
Hudson, G. H. 
HUSKE, J. M. 
HUSKE, J. S. 
HusKE, W. O. 
Jernigan, H. 
Johnson 
Johnson, H. M. 
Jones, Z. B. V. 
joyner, e. g. 
Knowles, D. L. 
KoRNEGAY, Wade 
Lann, a. C. 
Lawrence, B. J. 
Lassiter, H. G. 
Lassiter, J. H. 
Latham, J. R. 
Lee. J. L 
Lee, J. G. 



TWO HUNDRED SIX 



9iL 



LITERARY SOCIETIES 



Lewis, M. H. 
Lewis, M. D. 
Lilly, E. J. 
Marsh BURN, O. M. 
Mason, D. 
Maxwell, J. M. 
Marlowe, W. A. 
McCants, J. M. 
McNeil, L. 
Meyers, L. B. 
Moore. W, 
Moore, D. B. 
Moore, J. A. 
Morris. C. 

NORRIS, F. W. 
Patton. J. R., Jr. 
Parker, J. M. 
Parker, W. R. 
Peel. E. S. 
Perry, E. J. 
Perry, Eli 
Pendergraph, H. a. 
Peird, J. M. 
Pearson. L. W. 
Pre\att, J. R. 
Proctor, W. I. 
Proctor, E. K. 
Pruden, W. D. 



Aycock, B. F. 
Beckwith, C. W. 
Cox, R. M. 
Darden. p. C. 
Edwards, O. G. 
GiLMAN, T. E. 



PUGH, J. F. 
Rand, O. 
Ratcliff, Z. O. 
Raynor, J. 
Renn, H. J. 
Reasoner, N. a. 
Rhodes, W. H. 
Roberts, C. J. 
Robinson, C. 
Robinson, M. E. 
Robinson, M. 
Rouse, W. B. 
RowE. J. V. 
Royster. B. S. 
Royall. K. C. 
RoYALL. R. C. Jr. 
Shrago, H. L 
Shrago, J. P. 
Sloan, C. A. 
Smith, G. W, 
Smith. W. O. 
Smith, J. E. 
Spencer, R. B. 
Stedman, J. P. 
Stevens, H. L. 
Stell, J. S. 
Sto\'er, G. 
Swain, H. L. 



Taylor, J. A. 
Taylor, W. R. 
Thorpe, L. S. 
Thompson, C. A. 
Tomlinson. G. 
Travis, E. L. 
Turlington, R. S. 
Tyler, A. L. 
Umstead. W. B. 
Veazey. E. L. 
Wall, F. P. 
Wellons, W. F. 
Welch. R. H. W., Jr. 
Weatherly, R. T. 
West, R. R. 
White, P. L. 
Whitfield, J. V. 
Williams, V. F. 
Williams, M. 
Winslow, H. G. 

WiLKERSON, W. S. 

Wilkins, J. A. 
Warthington, H. S. 
woodall, e. l. 
Wood, F. P. 
woollcott, p. 
Yelverton, W. B. 
zollicoffer, a. c. 



of inactivo ?/li^ial)ot\s 



Jones, L. E. 
KiLLIFER, D. H. 
Lipscomb, S. A. 
Lord, W. C. 
Pitts, W. F. 
ruffin, t. w. 



Spence, R. E. 
Strong, G. V. 
Struthers, J. A. 
Tamraz, J. M. 
Turlington, J. E. 
West, C. F. 



Whiting, S. W 



Williams, J. M. 



TWO HUNDRED EIGHT 



SiC 



]iS 



LITERARY SOCIETIES 



Dialectic I.,/Iterary Society 



Roll of Act.iv8 ?/lemhers 



Andrews, C. F. 
Austin, W. B. 
Baity. H. G. 
Barnard, J. C. 
Black, H. B. 
Blaine, J. C. 
bosheimer, c. c. 
Bradshaw, F. F. 
Brockman, H. L. 
Capps, J. A. 
Cansler, J. S. 
Carleton, D. H. 
Carter, D. V. 
Clarkson, F. O. 
Coggins, C. L. 
Coleman, J. M. 
Conrad, D. H. 
Conrad, E. F. 
Crawford, F. M. 
Crowell, G. B. 
Crouse, R. F. 
cummings, a. e. 
Dale, T. C. 
Dalton, W. B. 
Davis, T. P. 
Day, J. T. 
Deaton, E. M. 
Deaton, F. H. 
DeLaney, C. O. 
Deveraux, R. E. 
Dobbins, E. A. 
DUNNAGAN, M. R. 
Dysart, J. O. 



Eagle, E. A. 
Elliott, A. M. 
Elson, F. H. 
Epps, p. H. 
Eustler, G. W. 
Ferguson. T. W. 
Field, B. L. 
Folger, C. F. 
Fore, C. L. 
Fowler, M. B. 
Gentry, J. R. 
goforth, o. l. 
Goode, H. G. 
Groone, J. T. 
Gryder, O. H. 
Gwaltney. L. p. 
Hackler, J. F. 
Hamilton, E. S. 
Harper, H. G. 
Hart. M. 
Harden, G. 
Hartshorn, E. S. 
Harris, R. B. 
Harris, C. S. 
Hawthorne, J. 
HiGGINS, W. C. 
HOFDEN, S. C. 
HOGAN, E. G. 

Holder, B. B. 
Holmes, J. A. 
Holmes, J. E. 
Holmes, R. W. 
Holland, C. G. 



Holton, G. a. 
Hooner. J. E. 
Hubbard, F. F. 
Hunter, W. R. 
Hunter, H. G. 
Hyatt, C. B. 
Hyatt, B. B. 
Idol, V. H. 
Jarrel, J. F. 
Johnson, L. R. 
Johnson, H. V. 
Johnson. J. M. 
JoiNES, A. O. 
Jones, T. I. 
Jones. E. P. 
Jones. J. W. 
Keesler, E. Y. 
Kendall. E. A. 
Kent, J. A. 
Kerr, W. D. 
King, J. E. 
Klingman, E. C. 
Kirk, W. W. 

KiRKSEY, J. J. 

Lackey, B. M. 
Lambert. G. L. 
Lasley. R. L. 
LlNDAU. S. B. 
Lindau, a. M. 
Linn, T. C. 
Love 

F^ovelace. O. M. 
MacKie, O. M. 



7iL 



TWO HUNDRED NINE 



ISi 



LITERARY SOCIETIES 



Marsh, E. B. 
Marsh, L. G. 
Martin, G. A. 
Matthews, M. H. 
Mebane, T. a. 
Merritt. O. K. 
Miller, H. 
Mitchell, Q. C. 

McCURRY, J. T. 

McIntosh, J. W. 
McKnight, R. B. 
Nance, O. C. 
Newsome. a. R. 
NiMs, F. B. 
Owen, F. R. 
Parker, J. C. 
Payne, A. L. 
Pell, W. E. 
Pike, D. V. 



Pike, S. C. 
Pless, J. M. 
Pritchett, J. T. 
Ramsey, J. T. 
Ranson, L. H. 
Ray, J. C. 
Ross, R. M. 
ROYSTER, D. W. 
Rymer, W. C. 
Sharp, D. H. 
Siddall, R. S. 
Siddall, B. a. 
Sloan, H. T. 
Smith, C. L. 
Smithay, H. B. 
Sparger, R. W. 
Strayhorn. I. R. 
suddreth, w. c. 
Teague, E. S. 
Temko, H. B. 



Terleyfell, J. W. 
Vaughan, R. C. 
Wall, G. C. 
Walker, R. R. 
Warrick, Ed. 
Watson, W. R. 
Webster. F. L. 
Weeks, W. P. M. 
Whitaker, Z. S. 
Willis, H. S. 
Williamson, A. 
Wilson, J. N. 
Wilson, J. T. 
Woodruff. F. G. 
WOLTZ, C. B. 
Wright, T. O. 
Wright. W. C. 
Wright. J. T. C. 
Yarborough, R. S. 



Andrews, T. M. 
Austin, D. R. 
AXLEY, L. 

Bennett, P. A. 
Carr, a. H. 
Conrad, H. C. 

CONROY, F. 

Cox, H. L. 
Coulter, V. A. 
Daniels, J. M. 
Ervin, C. E. 
Feezor, J. G. 
FOLGER, A. D. 
Graham, A. W. 
Graham, F. P. 
Griffin, M. A. 
Hill, T. F. 



Iloll of (nnotiv.) Wo:(i\l)"or.s 

Hunter, D. T. 
ISLEY, C. L. 
Johnson, C. L. 
Kritzer, H. R. 
Long, H. C, Jr. 
McCall, F. B. 
McDuffie, R. a. 
McIntosh, J. W. 
McIVER, J. W. 
McKenzie. B. W. 
McLendon. L. P. 
Dates, M. N. 
Pate, J. G. 
Paty, B. F. 
Perrie, D. J. 
Price, J. V. 
Price, L. A. 



Price, T. M. 
Ragland. W. T. 
Rankin, E. R. 
Rankin. W. W.. Jr. 
Reid, R. a. 
Scarborough, J. B. 
Scott, S. F. 
Scott, L. V. 
Shax'er, W. G. 
Smith, M. T. 
Stanford, W. R. 
Stroup, M. a. 
Thompson, W. R. 
Totten, H. R. 
Vann, N. 
Wall, L. B. 
Weaver, J. R. 



TWO HUNDRED TEN 



WaL 



1^ 



The Young Mwm's CHRi^nAw Association 




nd the spiriti 



l-i-:W facts will tell the central things in the V-.ung Men's Christian Association. The 
I'.ihle Study work was organized on the group basis, with a total enrollment of three 
imii.hed and twelve, ana a persisting average weekly attenaance of one hundred and forty. 
I Ins work was made responsible by a system of group secretarial reports to the chairman, 
aihl was sustained through the year by three normal classes for the twenty -two student 
Ir.nlcrs, who held their groups to the end. The motive of the Bible Study work was to 
I iiKtiicipate the minds of the young men from the tyranny of a mechanical conception of 
the iiible and religion, and to put them in more individual touch with the lived ideals 
al personality of Christ as a savior of men to their higher natures. 



The neighborhood work conducted by the students 
directions three- and four-mile walks. A training class 
was very pleasant, among a kind and hospitable people, 
held during the year. Members of the University faculty 
The neighborhood work was also concerned with starting 
country-side. 



in the rural communities re, 
or the student leaders met we 
Box parties, Christmas trees, 
made talks in the churches a 



ched out in all 
•kly. This work 
ind picnics were 

, and schoolhouses. 

ng the boys of the 







meetings, came three important 
id Religion"; the second on "North Carolina Problems' ; and the thii 
e book exchange did a good business, handling over twelve hundred books 
^change continued through the nine months. The self-help department 
ek for permanent positions and odd jobs. 



es on "The 
"Life Work 
and $530.00 
the lookout 



dolla 



had been contributed to the work of Eugene 
to follow. The reach of Barnett's life is inestimable in 
they give their money to his work at one of the decisive 

on to be 



By February the first two hundred and 
K. Barnett, in China, with a prospective sum 
raising the faith of the men of this college, as 
centers of the Cliristian advance. 

The Association secured Dr. L. R. Wils 
financial system has been further organized on a business-like 
realize that it is a business as_ well as a religious organizatio 
osition that business needs religion. 

Two other notable things in the year were the evangelistic campaio-n and the Kansas City Con- 
vention. Mr. E. C. Mercer and Charles D. Hurrey, without the surface stirring of emotions, brought 
men face to face with the facts of sin and religion and life in a way that will remain. The five 
students who represented the University at the Student Volunteer Convention at Kansas City 
came back with a new sense of the spiritual values, with the inspiration of a great cause, and with a 
vision of the world's needs that carried over into the life of every day. 



nd that there 



THE WORKERS 

I.\MES E. HOLMES President R. C. 

If. S. WILLIS Vice-President T. A. 

FRAXK P. GR.\1I.\M Gei 



SPENCE Secretary 

HOLMES Treasurer 

leral Secretarv 




RELIGIOUS MEETINGS 

(, i:. I'.\KKKR thairman 

'.EDRdE K. IIOLTOX ..Advertising Manager 
Speakers in the "College Men and Religion" 



Prof. II. W. Cb; 



Ke 



W. D. .Mos' 



Willi: 

Speakers in the "North Carolina Problem" 
Series: "Education," Prof. M. H. Stacv and 
I'rof. N. W. Walker; People of the Mountain 
Forests." Prof. C. Cobb; "The Proposed Con- 
stitutional Amendments." Dr. T. G. deR. Hamil- 
ton; "Health," Dr. C. S. Mangum; "Religion," 
Dr. W. K. L. Smith. 

Speakers in the Series Devoted to the Study 
of "Negro Life in the South" : Dr. C. L. Raper, 
Kev. W. I). Moss, Prof. H. W. Chase, Dr. W. 
deB. MacXider, Prof. M. H. Stacy, and H. S. 
Willis. 

Special Topics: "Church Unity," Prof. A. H. 
Patterson ; "Personal Purity," Rev. Homer W. 



Uni' 



Isaiah. 



Addr 



by Prof. H. H. Willi; 
ranged a series 



For the Spring, were 
•Life Work' addresses. 

For the spring, was given a series of "Life 
Work" addresses: Missions in China, W. D. 
rt'eatherford and Rev. George Worth; Missions 
n Japan, Rev. Heckelmann ; and Missions in the 
A'..rl.l. W. 11. Ramsaur. 



Bible Study: T. C. Boushall. Chm. 

Leaders of Normal Groups: "Men 
of the Old Testament," Prof.'H. W. 
Chase; "Life of Christ," Rev. W. D. 
.Moss; "Xew Studies of the Acts," F. 
P. Graham. 

Leaders of Student Groups: J. V. 
Whitfield, F. W. Norris. W. P. Fuller, 
J. I.. Harrison, G. W. Eutsler, C>W. 
Ileckwith, J. O. Dysart, H. W. Collins, 
L. H. kanson, J. S. Bryan, R. T. 
Bryan, 1. E. Turlington, F. O. Clark- 
son, E. V. Keesler, P. Woollcott, John 
W. Lasley. J. M. Parker, D. H. Killifer, 
C. A. Boseman, R. B. House, Roger 
McDuffie, and W. F. Taylor. S. B. 
Lindau and R. S. Newman were lead- 
ers of the local chapter of the Hebrew 
.Menorali Society, which was devoted 
partly to a study of the Old Testament- 

NEIGHBORHOOD WORK 

V. P. FULLER Chairman 

i. F. AULD Secretary 

Clark's Chapel; J. M. Parker, N. A. Reasoner, 

Graham, L I.- Lee, 

, and J. N. Bynum. 

Walker, J. V. Scott, 

anil B. F. Auld. 



COLORED WORK: 

H. S. WILLIS Chairman 

Sunday Schools: T. R. Gentry, ,R. C. Mitchell, 
and II. S. Willis. 

Night School— Spelling: C. L. Fore and W. 
C. Wright. 

Grammar: Cecil Rymer and Thomas A. 
Jones, Jr. 

Writing: Flovd Elsom and B. F. Auld. 

History: C. W. Beckwith. 

Arithmetic; S. B. Lindau and R. H. W. 
VVelcli, Ir. 

Supply Teachers: C. F. Andrews, P. Wooll- 
cott. Paul Smith, and Adam Thorpe. 



arion V 


owler 




Rankin' 


s Chapel: 


Frank 


. U. .\h 


;Dade, A. 


L. Tyler 


Mount 


Carmel: 


R. R. V 


id 11. 1 


'.. Hester. 




Orange 


; K. F. 


Bradshaw 


Calvand 


er: J. E 


;. Holmes 


Ephesus 


:: R. C. 


Vaughn 




ORGANIZATIONS 

.iVrotjittiimooo '0\f 3t, Andiiey/ 

-t -^ 

REV. W. H. STARR. Rector 
4- 4- 

OFFICERS 

J. N. Bynum Director 

F. O. Clarkson Vice-Direclor 

R. A. McDuFFIE Secretary and Treasurer 

* 

MEMBERS 



J. N. Bynum 
F. O. Clarkson 

E. G. JOYNER 
D. H. KiLLIFER 



B. M. Lackey 
G. L. Lambeth 
R. A. McDuFFiE 
W. G. Wilson 



J. N. Wilson 
M. P. M. Weeks 
A. L. Tyler 
J. J. Harris 



B. B. Hyatt 
■i- 

HE rule of prayer is to pray daily for the spread of Christ's Kingdom among 
men, especially young men, and for God's blessings upon the labors of the 
Brotherhood. 

The rule of service is to make at least one earnest effort each week to 



lead some man nearer to Christ through His Church. 




TWO HUNDRED FOURTEEN 



WiL 




I\'\?i.! (:':(;i.iCiN(c: (Ayc/MCfi. 



Frank. Drew, a t q 



President 



D. R. Harris, ARE 
J. S. Cansler, B m n 

E. S. Reid, :s a e 
G. V. Strong, Z ^ 
M. T. Spears, k A 
G. C. Meckel, * A w 
W. C. Lord, 2 N 

\X'. P. Fuller, i x 
D. A. Bigger, k :£ 
T. S. Rovster, n K ,\ 
N. S. Vann, <J) X 






1 


H^w 


1 




3 



Founded at Yale m 1844 
Colors: Crimson. Blue, and Cold Publications: Delta Kappa Eps'don. Quarlerl]) Journal 

liotn (/hapi-,'Oi' of "O'olta !<.a;)oa ^osilon 

Established in 1851 

FRATER IN FACULTATE 

William Morton Dey 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

CLASS 1914 



Kenneth Claiborne Royall 



Donald Rwn Harris 

■VX illiam Lewis Thorp 



CLASS 1915 
B r P^^\ 



Ralph Case Spence 



William Dossev Pruden 
Philip Woollcott 



CLASS 1916 
Francis Osborne Clarkson John Manning Hlske Frederick Philips Wood 

James Leftwich Harrison Evan Wilkins Norwood Robert Hazelhurst Wright. Jr. 

AX ILLIAM John Hoover George Claiborne Royall. Jr. Allen Caulincourt Zollicoffer 

LAW 

AucLsTLis Washington Graham 









BETA CHAPTER OF DELTA KAPPA EPSILON 








r 



Pm 




Colors: Pinh ami Bhc 



Flower: Rose 



Founded al Miami College in 1839 
Publication: Bela Theta Pi 

■i- ■^ 

iiota Chapt.)^ o'{ iVotn 'ThoU Pi 

Founded as "Slar of ihe South" Chapter of "Mvslic Seven Fraternity." 
Consol.dated with Beta Thela Pi in 1889 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Alvin Sawyer Wheeler Ph D Kent James Brown. Ph.D. 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

CLASS 1914 



John Scott Cansler 
Henri Price Foust 
DuviD Wills Hunter 

John Roci^well kEN'iON 



CLASS 1915 

Thomas Fuller Hill 

CLASS 1916 

LAW 



Malcolm Norval Oates 
William Trent Ragland 
George Barnes Louchran 
William Holt Oates 




^^ 






(>> 




\ -^wix \\\\\\\\^\ -<^;^ \\\ 



BETA CHAPTER OF BETA THETA PI 



FRATERNITIES 





r 



LJ 

c::SS 

rr::i 




SlG?/lA .A(/.\!IA l">lVS(.l,OM 



Flower: VioUl 



Founded al the University of Alabama in 1856 
Colors: Old CoU and Purple 

Publications: The Record. Phi Alpha (Secret) 



Xi Chaptor of ^Si;^iiva AloUn F.milon 

Established 1857. Suspended 1862. Re-established 1885 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
Edward Kidder Graham. A.M. Vernon Howell Ancrew Henry Patterson. Ph B. 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

CLASS 1914 



Joseph Lenoir Chambers, Jr. 



James Gerald Cowan 



CLASS 1915 
Edward Yates Keesler 

CLASS 1916 

Thomas Calvin Linn, Jr. 

MEDICAL 
Fairley Patterson James 



Frank Davies Conroy 



Edward Soloman Reid. Jr. 




FRATERNITIES 




CHI CHAPTER OF SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON 




^1 




'/.ETA l^Sl 

Established 1858. Suspended 1868. Re-orsanized 18S5 
Color: White 

CJo.siloa Chaptor of '/^-ota !Vi 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
Charles Staple Mancum George Howe 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

CLASS 1914 

George Vaughan Strong William Pell Whitaker 

CLASS 1915 

Heaton Carr Frederick Cain Manning George Allen Mebane, Jr. 

Claiborne Thweat Smith 

CLASS 1916 
Meritus Emmett Robinson Adam Treadwell Thorpe 





FRATERNITIES 




UPSILON CHAPTER OF ZETA PSI 





/\l/,^.l(A 'VmJ OiVCCGA 



Founded In 1865. al ihe Virginia Mil.lary Inslilule 

Colors: OIJ ColJ and Sky Blue Flower: While Tea Rose 

Publication: The Palm 

■V -i- 

Alijan Oolcu C,lvai)i-.'.)r of Ali^ha Cnn Oiivo;^<\ 

Ellabl.shed m 1879 
FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
Joseph Hyde Pratt Atwell Campbell McIntosh 

FRATRES IN URBE 
R. S. McRae C. F. McRae 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

CLASS 1914 

George Frank Drew, Jr. James T. Pritchett 

CLASS 1915 
Baldwin Maxwell 
CLASS 1916 
Hoke Barrymore Black 

H. G. WlNSLOW 

MEDICINE 
Allen Hoyt Moore 

PHARMACY 
Kenneth Alexander Kirby 



Edmund J. Lilly, Jr 
Joseph Strange Huske 



William Oliver Huske 

Walter L. Holt 




FRATERNITIES 







H \ I M O M I 





K A P \\;\ A f , 1^] ( A (.S OU r i [ I.: ;IN) 

Founded al Washington and Lee in I8b3 

Colors: OIJ Cold and Crimson Flowers: Red Rose and Magnolu 

Publications: Kappa Alpha Journal and Messenger and Special (Secret) 

IJiWiloii Chaoi'Oi' of Kappa Alplia 

Established in 1881 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Joseph Gregoire deRoulhac Hamilton, Ph.D. 

Charles Holmes Herty. Ph.D. Lucius Polk McCehee, A.B.. LL.B. 

D. H. Bacot, A.M. 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

CLASS 1914 

Henry Cyrus Long 

CLASS 1915 

William Capehart Walke Luther Avon Blue 

CLASS 1916 

Frank C. Hancock 

James Alexander Taylor 

LAW 

Marshall Turner Spears 

William Clark Thompson 

MEDICINE 

Roy Hamilton Long 



Robert Newton Page 
Beverly S. Royster 



Kenneth Raynor Ellington 



Paul Archer Bennett 



William Isaac Procter 
Giles Mebane Long 



Joseph Sanford Cowles 



EmiLrson Wiley Jarman 




?r 




m r 



FRATERNITIES 




BETA CHAPTER OF PHI DELTA THETA 




.gffi^m 










w^v 




f^^ 




1 




vSkvma 'Mu 

Founded al X'nsinia Mililaiy Inslilule m 1868 

Colors: SUi. H'liiU-. and Cold Flower: While Ro^e 

PUBI IC ATIOS : Dc/(u uf Sioma A 1/ 

V%\ Cbapiar of -Si^^ma Nu 

L.lablished n. 1888 

FRAIRES IN FACULTAl 1. 

WuLiAM DeBlrnilkl Mai NiDtR, M.D. Archibald Henderson. Ph.D. 

FRAIRtS IN UNIVERSITATE 

CLASS 1914 

William Campbell Lord Harry Barnette Grimsley Carl Dukfy Iavlor 

CL.ASS 1915 
Thomas Callendine Boushall William Tull Grimsley 

CLASS 1916 

William Borden Cobb Clyde Lancden Fore John Haywood Jones 

David Thomas Tayloe Carl Barden Wilson John Laurens Wright 

LAXX' 

Joseph Raymond Lee 

MEDICINE 

Benjamin Whitehead McKenzie 




FRATERNITIES 




^.x 



^^^ 




vSuaViA Cm 

Founded al Miami College m 1855 

Colors: Old Cold and 5^y Blue Flower; White Rose 

Publications: The Sigma Chi Quarlerh: The Sigma Chi Bulletin (Secret) 

4- + 

a'\l]>l\a Tau Chai'ioi' oi\Sl;^raa Chi 

Established 1888. Suspended 1901. Re-eslablished 1913 

FR.ATRES IN FACULT.ATE 

James Finch Royster, Ph.D. Wesley Critz George. A.B., A.M. 

William Lewis Jeffries. A.B., A.M. John Wayne Lasley. A.B., A.M. 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
GRADUATE 



John Wesley MiIver. A.B. 
Benjamin Franklin Aycocr 



Karl Braswell Bailey, A.B. 
Benjamin Belver Sears 



CLASS 1914 

Roy Bowman McKnight 

CLASS 1915 

Fred Bays McCall Walter PlIjNy Fuller William Carey Dowd, Jr. Daniel Long Bell 

Charles Edgar Erwin Charles Lewis Johnson George Willard Eustler 

CLASS 1916 

Herschel Vespasian Johnson Douglas Beaman Darden James Parks Rousseau 

MEDICINE 
Clayton Willard Eley Adolphus Barte Greenwood 




FRATERNITIES 




m% 



I g>-isa?;:^"v'-a! 



ifiiiia^aiiiHK:. 

ALPHA TAU CHAPTER OF SIGMA CHI 







'^m 

?; 









^=%^' 



t:::ao- 




KaP1V\ >S(CuV(A 



Founded at the University of Bologna in 1400, and Established in America at the University of 

Virginia. December. 1867 

Colors: Scarlet. While, and Emerald Creen Flower : Lily of the Valley 

Publications: Caduceus and Crescent and Star (Secret) 

Alp'an iV(<( Coaot'or of Kapoa Si;^mn 

FRATRES IN F.ACULTATE 

C. T. Woollen M. C. S. Noble Grover Beard 

FRATER IN URBE 

L. P. McLendon 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

CLASS 1914 



R. T. Allen 
R. E. Little 
J. A. Hardison 

G. L. DORTCH 




CLASS 1915 

CLASS 1916 

LAW 
F. D. Phillips 
MEDICINE 
W. A. Smith 
PHARMACY 
F. M. Patterson 



W. B. TOWNSEND 

Z. L. Whitaker 
William Oliver Smith 

F. E. Wallace 

DeW. Kluttz 

Hansford Simmons 



k^^fi f 




FRATERNITIES 




ALPHA MU CHAPTER OF KAPPA SIGMA 







■■^^^mX^ Wi.W 



:G2£g: 





P\ Kappa .Av^i^^ia 



Founded al Univeisity of Virginia in 1868 

Colors: Camel ami Old CnlJ Flowers: Lily oj ihe yalley and Cold Standard Tulip 

Publications: 77k.- Shi.ld and Diamond. The Dagger and Key (Secret) 

■i- + 

Tau Ciia])t«r of Pi Kappa Alpim 

Established in 1893 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

CLASS 1915 

Graham Harden 

CLASS 1916 

James Marmaduke Cox Harvey McKay Pleasants 

LAW 

William H Cowles 

MEDICINE 

Norman St George Vann Sampson Thomas Royster Joseph D. Boushall 













FRATERNITIES 




TAU CHAPTER OF PI KAPPA ALPHA 







-4-/ 



r=^ " / 




Colors: Olive Creen 



Pill Ca\] 

(Medical) 
nJ While Flower: Lily of the Valle), 

Publication: Phi Chi Quarterly 



nJ leave 



S'v/.nYA Tivoi;a Chni'tor of Vh\ CM 

FRATRES IN UNIVFRSITATE 



Rov Hamilton Long 
Fairle'v Patterson James 
U 11 LiAM Alexander Smith 

Allen Moore 



CLASS 1914 
Clayton Willard Eley Thomas Sampson Royster 

William Peter McKay Norman St. George Vann 

Adolphlis Barte Greenwood Paul W. Fetzer 
Benjamin Whitehead McKenzie 



CLASS 1915 
David Andrew Bigger 
Joseph Dozier Boushall 



Henry F. Kirkpatrick 
Paul Archer Bennett 





SIGMA THETA CHAPTER OF PHI CHI 





Colors: Prussian Blue 



(Chemical) 
Founded al bnive.s.ly of ^nconsm 1902 
J Chrome )'ellnn> Flower: Re,l Carnaiion 

Publication: The Hexagon 

Established m 1912 
FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

F. P. Venable. Ph.D., LL.D. C. H. Herty, Ph.D. W. L. Jefferies. M. A. 

J. M. Bell. Ph.D. A. S. Wheeler. Ph.D. 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

C. B. Carter 

CLASS 19U 

W. N. Pritchard 

CLASS 1915 
W. H. Harrell 
CLASS 1916 
L. C. Hall 
MEDICINE 
W. A. Smith 



J. T. Dobbins 
A. J. Flume 



F. D. Conroy 



V. A. Coulter 
A L. Cox 




ORGANIZATIONS 



'[^[[■■l 0;0):!:;l 0[^ -ri(:C 0,'VSI.S 



Sheik 
Austin H. Carr 

Wong-Lees 
F. C. Manning 
G. A. Mebane 
M. H. Meeks 

H. C. Long 



© 



Pasha 

George V. Strong 

IVo-Langs 
W. C. Thompson 
M. T. Spears 
W. P. Whitaker, Jr. 
R. H. Long 



Confucii 
Strong, G. V. 
A. H. Carr 
F^. W. Winston, Jr. 
R. E. Little, Jr. 
San FORD CowLES 
P. A. Bennett 



TWO HUNDRED SIXTY-EIGHT 



%e: 



313 



Order of G'tmgVioviis 



UcoUuzs bbcUnsnnu 
D(cfbu\cn»b\i'] <li zbtjrn 

— V»1mar XXV 



HUL£RS 



K. D. S. 



r YAIXRIG 



K. M. K. 
N. G. P. 



o 272 PatricU Htnr*} Winston 

■ n 278 CUaricB We»\c»j Bai« 

282 Lennox Po\^ McLencion 

285 H«rri) Woodburn Cbas* 

'.Bernard 292 CU»born« ThwcaH Swi^b 

d^RouWiAC Hon^iUon 

293 Edmwnd Jones Lill>j, Jr. 

U 295 Davtd Andrew Big^«r 

296 M«\co\m Norva\ 0«t«a 

297 Jobn ScoH Cans\cr 
2&8 Dew.t KluUz 



T"MS (k^iUUIN'.^ } LiAB 




ORGANIZATIONS 



AiVll'IlOiXXOlMliCiN 



Dk I ('.. deR. Hamilton 



IVI; 1 . .■^WI.AKS 



C. W. HiCGlNS 



Oscar I.FArn 



J. L. Chambers 



J. T. Pritchett 



s. \V. Whiting 



J. >. I. AN^LtK 

W. p. Fuller 



T. C\ Rol SHALL 



K. C. ROVALL 

G. V. Strong 



L. B. GUNTER 



TWO HUNDRED SEVENTY-FOUR 



9i\ 



ORGANIZATIONS 





AU KAPPA ALPHA is a national organization of men who have rep- 
resented their University in intercollegiate debating or oratorical contests. 
I Members of the Carolina Chapter are (from left to right) : 



K. C. ROYALL 

J. A. Holmes 



%: 



MEMBERS 
R. L. Lasley 

C. W. HiGGINS 

F. P. Graham 



W. F. Taylor 
F. L. Webster 



TWO HUNDRED SEVENTY-FIVE 



liS 



ORGANIZATIONS 



Ieta Kappa 

Founded at William and Mary College, December 5. 1776. 

Alpha O-f Mori; (1 c'aroliaa 

Established 1904 

OFFICERS 

H. W. Collins i _ President 

J. S. Cansler Secretary 

T. J. Wilson, Jr., Ph.D Permanent Treasurer 

■h 

MEMBERS 

F. P. Venable, Ph.D.. LL.D. E. A. Greenlaw, Ph.D. M. H. Stacy, A.M.. '02 

George Howe, Ph.D., Princeton E. K. Graham, A.M., '98 N. W. Walker, A.B., '03 

W. M. Dey, Ph.D., Harvard L. R. Wilson, Ph.D.. '99 C. W. Bain. A.M. 

H. W. Chase, Ph.D.. Clarke K. J. Brown, Ph.D. J. W. Lasley. A.M.. '10 

A. S. Wheeler. Ph.D., Harvard T. J. Wilson. Jr.. Ph.D., '94 J. B. Bui Lett. A.M.. M.D. 
W. C. Coker. Ph.D.. Johns Hopkins Mrs. Archibald Henderson. A M.. '02 

H. M. Wacstaff. Ph.D.. Johns Hopkins .Archibald Henderson. Ph.D.. '98 

CLASS 1909 
Frank Porter Graham 

CLASS I9II 
W. F. Taylor 

CLASS 1914 

A. R. Brownson F. D. Conroy H. C. Long. Jr. - 

J. S. Cansler H. L. Cox E. S. Peele 

J. L. Chambers. Jr. James Eldridge K. C. Royall 

H. W. Collins R. W. Holmes R. C. Spence 

G. V. Strong S. W. Whiting 

TWO HUNDRED SEVENTY-SIX 



ORGANIZATIONS 



^{C b ( A W 1\S ( I . O M ( L (- C !CR ATI Y ) 



Founded al Vanderbill in 1906 



Colors: Creen and ColJ Flower: Jonquil 



0>'1<1 N'iKioor Clvnf)i-oi' of.Sl;^ian CJpslloa 

Established in 1907 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
Prof. Edward Kidder Graham W. C. George 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

E. R. Rankin J. L. Orr Lowry Axley 

CLASS 1914 
J. F. PuGH [. Lenoir Chambers 

CLASS 1915 

B. F. AuLD G. W. Eustler 

W. P. Fuller D. H. Killifer 

CLASS 1916 
T. C. Linn G. M. Long 

TWO HUNDRED SEVENTY-EIGHT 

s^ r- T ig 



ORGANIZATIONS 




.11 MUMA LI': 



TWO HUNDRED SEVENTY-NINE 



7iL 



im 



('j:l:UV(AM Om\] 



R. 



Bailey, 1. M. 
Bennet, p. a. 
Bell, D. L. 
Bigger, D. A. 
Black, H. B. 
Blount, F. L. 
Blue, L. A., Jr. 
boushall, j. d. 
Boushall, T. C 
Bryan, J. S. 
Bryan, R. T. 
Brownson. a 
Cansler. J. S. 
Carr, a. H. 
Cobb. W. B. 
Cone. Herman 
conroy. f. d. 
Chambers, J. L., 
Clarkson, F. O. 
Cowan, J. G. 
DowD, W. C, Jr. 
Drew, G. F. 
Ellington, K 
Erwin, C. E. 
Fore, C, L. 
FousT, H. P. 
Fuller. W. P. 
Grimsley, H. B 
Harrel. W. H. 



R. 



Harris, D. R. 
Harrison, J. L. 
Hart, J. G. 
Harden, Graham 
Hicks, W. S. 
Hill. T. F. 
holton, g. r, 
Hunter, D. W. 
HUSKE, J. S. 
Huske, W. O. 
Jones, J. H. 
Johnson, F. S. 
Keesler. E. Y. 
Kluttz, D. W. 
Leach, Oscar 
Lilly, E. J., Jr. 
Linn, T. C, Jr. 
Little, R. E., Jr. 
Loughran, G. B. 
Lord, W. C. 
Manning, F, C. 
Maxwell. W. B. 
Mebane. G. a.. Jr. 
Meeks. M. H.. Jr. 
Moore, A. H. 
McKnight, R. B. 
Gates, M. N. 
Page. R. N.. Jr. 
Parker. W. R. 



Patterson, Fred 
Paty, B. F. 
Prevatt, J. R. 
Pritchett, J, T, 
Proctor, W, L 
Pruden, W. D. 
Racland, W. T. 
Reid, E. S., Jr. 
Robinson, M. E. 
Royster, T. S. 
royall, k. c. 
ruffin, t. w. 
Spears. M. T. 
Spence, R. C. 
Smith, W. A. 
Strong, G. V. 
Taylor. C. D. 
Taylor. J. A. 
Townsend. W. B. 
Vann. N. S. 
Wallace, F. E. 
Williams, M. M. 
Wilson. C. B. 
WiNSLOW, H. G. 
Whiting. S. W. 
Whitaker. W. p., 
",'00D, F. P. 
WooLLCOTT, Philip 

ZOLLICOFFER. A. C. 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



ORGANIZATIONS 




Coov 



I I,^RR^n^ Nevilix 
Jrm Stroud 



Spurceon Spears 
Avon Blue 
Yeddy Manning 
Henri Meeks 
Smack Oates 
Dave Bigger 

Red Ellington 



-Cock °' >hc Walk 
Assisianl 



MEMBERS 
Archie Bennett 
Teg Thompson 
Kitty Little 
Doc Kluttz 
Frank Drew 
Lenoir Chambers 

Billy Whitaker 



Austin Carr 
Bitty Mebane 
Joe Boushall 
Gay Dortch 
Bob Winston 
Tad Lilley 



TWO HUNDRED EIGHTY-TWO 



HZ 



St 




BALL MANAGERS, COMMENCEMENT, 1914 




MARSHALS. COMMENCEMENT, 1914 




^^^r,^':ii^r4C':4^r^c'jt 




CHAPEL HILL PULLMAN 




BACK FROM RICHMOND 



(i'ootiJaTI 'T^rms 




H GcLr-0\lhcL \-4lMe-UP, 






n 




TLoucHsMQ TburxK cLovNr. , R G^o 3. /I Pavv- Catch. 



LEFFER—SURE . HES A GOOD EGG— IF HIS SHELL IS A LITTLE SOFT 



Marsh — You say there was a lot of "Rough House" at the show? 
Fuller — Yes. Two drunk town fellows were on my left, a drunk clothing agent was 
behind me, and Tom Gilman was on my right. 



Dr. Booker — I want some wineglasses, Mr. Patterson. 

Fitzgerald (tries audibly to smother a roar of laughter). 

Dr. Booker — That's all right, Fitzgerald; you needn't take this for anything. These 

are for the play. 
Fitzgerald — I would like to join that Dramatic Club, Doctor. (Curtain.) (Pro- 
longed applause.) 

•ir "ir "It 

This set of questions was put to the Freshman Class, and some of the answers follow. 

1. Who pays Trenchard's salary? Alumnae. 

2. Who elects the Business Manager of the Glee Club? English Departnieni. 

3. Is basket-ball a major or minor sport? Generally considered a minor, but players 

receive monograws. 

4. What organization finances the Star Course? Henry/ Meel(s. Litlerature Sociel}). 

5. How much work must a man pass to indulge in Varsity athletics? Four hours. 

Twelve hours. 

6. What is our Scholarship rule in our athletic requirements? Nothing hul tuition. 
If you mal^e the team, you gel your tuition free. No man who has a scholarship 
may indulge in alhleiics. 

7. How many fraternities in college? Twenty-three. 

8. Name as many as you can. Golden Fleece. German Club. Fi Kappa Thela. 
Sigma Kai. Kappa Alph. Law K. A. Kappa Alpha. Zeta Psi. Sigma 
Nue. Amaihopham. Cogn Head. 

9. How are Y. M. C. A. officers nominated? By Faculty. 

10. What is the Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, and who selects it? The Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 
is a form of bookcase which contains boolfs. The Secretary usually selects it. 

14. What is the Pan-Hellenic Council? To give characteristic names to the Freshmen. 

It is an organization in the Creel( Department. 

15. What officers compose the Athletic Council? Coach Trenchard. E. B. Rankin. 



%E 



TWO HUNDRED EIGHT Y-SEVE/^ 



im 



I will have this printing done quicker than a lamb can wag its narrative. 



two dolla 



-1- •1' 4* 

have a new picture made for the Yackety Yack. A new negative will cost only 



President — All in favor of the motion say — 

ParlIAIHENTARIAN — Mr. President, I object. To carry that motion we will have to vote tor the 
^e. and that will kill the motion. 

't 4' 4* 



TyT)o;^i'ai)hical ii^rj'ors 



"Dr. Weatherford's two books on the Negro Problem have added much to the geological knowl- 
of the South." 
George Eulsler has handled eight hundred and fifty cooks for two hundred and fifty men in the 
Exchange this year. 
A 100 Yard . 



"TARHEEL board" 



?^?-'^V, 





THE MAN THAT PUT THE BILL IN 
SOUTH BUILDING 



THE BELL THAT PUT THE DING 
IN SOUTH BUILDING 



PUBLIC OFFICE 



PUBLIC CUSS 



•A LITTLE HARD LUCK NOW AND THEN 
HAPPENS TO THE BEST OF MEN' 




THE PRESIDENT TRYING TO PRESERVE ORDER 



FIRST-HAND KNOWLEDGE OF SPECIFIC GRAVITY 




WHERE LOGARITHMS FAIL 



Til;; .Sayu>;^.s of Ru'ty 

( I hal IS. ihose ihat are fit lo print.) 

"Sanford" (home of his roommale) "has morning, noon, and night — nothmg else." 

Gooch's Cafe: "I want some flyspecks." 

"We haven't any such things." 

"Then take ihcm off your bill of fare." 



bet 



ed Cabbage one tii 



nd he 



lit ahead.' 



"Hoskie Parker's automobile cylinders talk to each other." 
"What do they say?" 

" 'You do il this lime, and I'll do it next.' Coming up a hill the other day 1 heard one 
say. "You're a liar. I did it last time. It's your turn now. " 

A man died in front of the posloffice at Clayton (friend's home town), on Christmas D 
they found him four days later. v 



if them 
iy. and 



\oman nose roams 



Thai's nothing. My father had a cc 

McIvER: Buttermilk? 

Sure, what else could she give but hi 



I went to see the palmist, and got 
but he got his nose red. 



his face, 
a cow that 1 
milk^ 
hand read, I don't k 



twentv-four quarts of buttermilk. 



where "Rabbit" Bailev went; 




RABBIT: X^ hat is that thing around the tree for? 
Rudy: To keep the tree from leaving. 



BUT IT DIDN T WORK 



<ES MANY RATTYCAL STAT£M£^ 



TWO HUNDRED NINETY 



SiE 



3k^ 



'It takes the powder rag to make her Ian go." 
Said Pa; and Bill said. "Yes, I might say, too. 
It lakes the 'Powder Rag* lo make her tango." 
And both remarks were made of Sisler Sue. 
—J. L. Orr 

4* 4^ 4* 




TR AC K TELA M 




■iO SLEEPS UPSTAIRS? SO DO , 



vS(if(Ya:^oi:i:'.; .S:v;i:io(\ 




100 -Rea^soMS 4o>* ynoMari 



A.5 ir Ought to Be. 




K a. V e IT. 




THt LATEST COME-OFF 



I sipped the nectar from her ruby lips. 
As on the couch we sat; 
And I wondered if ever another guy 
Had s;pped from a mug hke that. 

—Polly Parrot 



The dance was fast and furious. 

The negro sat by her lonesome, eating her 
dish of cream. A gallant buck, who had been 
furtively eyemg her. sidled up as she was licking 
the spoon. 

"Is yo program full?" he asked. 

"Go on. Nigger, does you think one 
saucer of cream will fill my program?" 



GEOLOGY STUDENT (.TAKING PREFERRED ROCKER) 
"thank YOU: I LIKE TO ROCK" 



At "tin; Oidli'or'l 

'Sir, do you I'ke auburn hair?" 
The waitress slyly dared ; 
And hung with dread an auburn head. 
Like one who really cared. 

'You bet I do," the student smiled, 
"And that's why I like you." 

"^ ou 11 be well tried," the maiden sighed, 
"For there's one in your stew. " 

J. L. Orr 



A sweet suffragette surnamed Anna, 
While tripping her way through Savannah, 

Fell flat in the street. 

And sad to repeat. 
The cops they proceeded to can her. 

Then proudly she floated the banner. 
And said in her manliest manner: 

"I really refuse 

To admit it was booze. 
But I must have struck a banana." 

W. D. Kerr 



A sprightly young sister named Sparrow 
Pa'd pop calls in a wheelbarrow. 
She sighed with a smile, 
"Though quite in the style, 
I fear that my skirt is too narrow." 

W. D. Kerr 

"not /.'■ SAID THE COW. "MOO. MOO'' 

"such a thing I NEVER DO.' QUOTH ERVIN 

"BULL" SAID MCKNIGHT 



KC 



TWO HUNDRED NINET Y-THREiF. 



IR 



Now didn't he do it, though? 

He was before the Faculty charged with being drunk. 

•■"I'ou say vou were not drunk?" demanded the President. 

"Yes. sir." 

"^ oung gentleman, what would you call be'ng drunk?" 

"Well you see. Dotor, a man is drunk when he sees double. Now sec those two men over the 

they look like four men, you are drunk." 

"^'oung man. there is ontv one man there." 




At the Summer School, Professor Patterson was 
slated for a lecture on liquid air. The liquid air was lo 
be secured from the Government at Washington. During 
the day. the following telegram was received: 



Dfessor Patterson 

Chapel Hill. N, C. 
The refrigeration plant temporarily 
supply frozen air. Change to hot- 

He did. 



disabled, 
ir lecture 



ISN T IT PECULtAR THAT THE STUDY 
OF ROCKS SHOULD BE CALLED EASY? 

PrOFFESSOR Howell (discussing the question of taking notes) —Some 
some by note. I believe 1 prefer those who play by note." 

4< 4* ^ 

Professor Sncath had lo miss a Freshman Class of English, but he wanti 
lesson. He went to W. W. Rankin. "Rankin, can you hold my class of En 
them their spelling lesson?" 

"I have a class that hour, but I will be glad to put it on the hoard ft 



■d to 
glish 



play by 



ive the 
ext ho 



spelln 
nd <,'■ 



The secret of Dr. Ra 
Elephanters. 3's. 



•ir 'ir 'ir 

as follow;: Bull Moosers gel I' 
'ir 'ir 'ir 



Notice — Meeting of the Progressive Party at 12; Alumni at 7.30 sharp. A full attenda 
cted. 



.^S SCARBOROUGH, 



-LEG 5URVE > 



VO HUNDRED NINETY-FOUR 



%c 



]K 




ZliS 



[i'roia tlv.) W'O.h) lM'(ol)Oolcs 

Bonnie Doone was Burnss sweetheart. 

Ballads are kindly superstitious poems. 

A ballard is a poem that has been handed down. 

He would not have accompliced anything. 

Among the best epic poems are Paradise Lost, the Iliad, the Anead, and Bear 
Wolf (Beowulf). 

Question: What is the chief use of H-S? 
Answer: H-S 's used chiefly in 3A Chemistry. 

The man started to run, the bullet staking him somewhere between the fence 
cori.er and front gate, inflicting a superfical wound. 

The solubility of gas depends on its esthetic properties. 

Infinity aids the speed of reaction. 

Polarization is the effect of the hydrogen bubbles which form on the positive 
plates, causing less surface to be exposed to the liquid, and interferes with the potencity. 

The molecular theory of magnetism is where the molecules of the magnet become'; 
magnetized are each one a magnet before the bar of iron becomes a magnet. Each 
molecule is separated from the others, but when magnetized they cling to each other 
and are a magnet. 

An atom is the smallest living being. It is so small it cannot be imag'ned. 

Atoms vary in size from a small shot to a baseball. 

There are two theories in regard to the X-Rays. One of these is that the pene- 
trative powers of the rays is great enough to force their way through certain substances. 
The other is that certain substances allow the rays to pass through without resistance. 

A prospective student wrote to President Graham, and said he wanted to enter 
the "Pre-Meditation Class." 

ANTONYMS: BULLET. FOUR 

TWO HUNDRED NINETY-FIVE 



1 1 W 



'/Yiint's m n Namo?'"— yacilty 



A sea food m lis uncooked stale — RoYSTER. 

A pedeslrian — Walker. 

Thriving manufacturing towns in North 
Carohna — Graham and Winston. 

Enjoyed by sport:men — Chase. 

A fabric used for clothing in a cold 
climate — Woollen. 

Used in coloring clothes— DeV. 

Proclaimer of liberty— Bell. 

What the bell does — ToWLES. 



9. Growth on the north side of trees- Moss. 

10. A forty-thousand-dollar prize — Noble. 

11. An article of apparel — McIntosh. 

12. A child's plaything — ToY. 

13. A disfiguring appendage sometimes found 
on the chin of the genus homo — BearD. 

14. Nextdoor neighbor lo the moon — Starr. 

1 5. What Adam and Eve raised — Cain. 

16. Dangerously like a swear word — DacGETT. 



"Billy" McNider drinks nothing but cide 
"Ikey" and "Bobby" drink tea. 

"Charley" will take any kind of reviver. 
Bui BullitI says. "Water for me '" 



{V;)('ilofi'.s iCxooriiiioai; 



*Poffloff stood in the laboratory. 

Whence all but he had fled; 
He had a pithed frog in his hand 

And an idea in his head. 



He amputated froggy s le 

Hung it on a clamp; 

And said. "Now durn yoi 



punky 



camp. 



He rigged a smoked revolving drum. 

Pressed froggy's loe to it. 
And with a small induction coil 

He sent two amperes through it. 

Frogpv's leg waked up at once 

And— you may think I'm lying. 

But on the drum it plainly wrote 
"Tell mother 1 am dying." 



"That's not enough." Old Poffloff 

"just add your address, too." 
Froggy 's great loe moved again — 
"Bullfrog Street. 2-0-2.' 



-P. M. 



DON'T CRITICISE THE SOUTHER 



LROAD GOD MADE ALL CREEPING THINGS- 



TWO HUNDRED NINETY-SIX 



JUL 



ISi 



SteaDMAN — Let's get a cigar. 

Rankin — Let's go over where there is a Humidor. 

Steadman — I have never heard of that kind. Is i 



ten-cent brand? 



O! Horrors! 

What's in a name? A lily by any olher name would be jusl as pure, and a rose just as sweet. 
But would Chapel be the same if it were called Carborough ? 

In Chapel Hill, our bell rings every D(e)y. A Battle is on the campus, and a Bullett comes 
our way occasionally, and this is a Ba(i)n of our existence. Graham raises Cain, and the Sophomores 
Howell, and since the Seniors are a Noble class, there is a Toy for each of them. Howe they Prat(t) 
about the things they are going to do after graduation. Rankin(g) themselves with the Ph.D.'s of Harvard 
and Yale. Theirs was an easy lot. though when Stacy sailed down the matrimonial Rhi(y)ne, teaching 
his Bernard, meanwhile, to eat (R)oster(s). 

Booker T. is a Parker, and Hickerson said to Smith, "Law-son, what a Beard you have." 

Then the Juniors came out, with James as a leader, and did things up Brovm, even wiping up the 
Campus with a WoUen rag. 

After the War(r) 'en hostilities were over. Towles ' 
Walk-er 'Wag-staff, and Herty drove up m his four-wheeler 
George Wil(l)son be Manning a squad to quell the tumuli. 

Las(l)l(e)y. I will say that it 'Sneath my dignity to elaborate further on the "Ethics of Na 



)llected from all those who did not 
eive his share of the Cobb. Henry 




OUR BEST JOKE FOR SOLUTION. SEE OTHER PACE 



-fO PUT THE Ff. 



TWO HUNDRED NINETY-SEVEN 



9iL 



\Si 



^ ou're it! There is no joke about those pictures. We wanted those pictures to go in. ancJ 
had no other place for them to go; so we just put them there. 




"Why does this picture remind you of 
Charlie Coggm's jokes?" 
"A cinch — so shady." 



EVERLASTINGLY UNDECIDED 



A TIME EXPOSURE 



A lla«.k Joke 

While Prince Albert, the Sovereign of Old Virginia, was ndlng through the Piedmont section 
on his famous Brown Mule, he met Miss Fatima, the Queen of Omar at the Pell Mell Theater. Leav- 
ing his mule with Hassen. his slave, with orders to lake it through the old English Curve Cut, by way 
of Chesterfield, he look her to the Two Oaks above the Old Mill Between the Acts, and they sat down 
upon the Velvet. While he took off his Tuxedo, on account of the warmth, he said. "My dear. I 
would have to Stag tonight were it not for 
my queen. You will be the Sensation." 

"Could I leave John, Jr.. and Hen 
Besides, I am Red J,'s Favorite." 

So she IS still the Pride of Reidsvill, 



It was a Lucky Strike when I met you. Come, be 
irge as Two Orphans, and go with you? Ne 



At ilv.) R,oyal 



"Waiter, any soup on that bill of fare?' 
"No, sir; I just wiped it off." 



PEN. BETWEEN POST 



TWO HUNDRED NINETY-EIGHT 



IKC 



lis 



Loi^k (I 



of abo 

quiet. 



other pause of 
to deposit him- 

; follows a dis- 



"Bailey, Brinkley, Capps" — A pause 
two minutes to allow stragglers to become 

"Chambers. Dowd. Eldridge"— Pause of 
about three minutes to wail for the Education 5 
boys to take their seats. 

"Gentry. Gunler. Holmes"— An 
two minutes lo allow Mr. McNei 
self and his law books. 

After the roll is finished, (he 
cussion of Truth. 

"Yes." says Mr. Williams; "all things lead to- 
gether lo Truth. They are bound to. But the 
only trouble is that they don't. Is that quite 
clear?" 

Silence gives consent. 

"To proceed, then. Truth is Unity." 

Mr. McNeil— "Bui what is Unity?" 

Mr. Williams — "There is none." 

Mr. McNeil — "How about Newlon's Law of 
Gravitation?" 



Mr. W. — "There is no Law of Gravitation. It 
is only a theory, which I myself can defeat when- 
ever I want to." 

Mr. McNeil— "Then why do apples fall?" 

Mr. W.— "All apples don't fall. Some are 
picked from the trees; some dry up on the trees. 
That, I think, proves that there is no such thing as 
a Law of Gravitation. " 

"Now to go on lo Deduction. Mr. Brinkley. 
what deduction would you derive from the fact that 
chickens live on dry land while fish live in water?" 

Mr. B.— "Well. sir. I would make the deduc- 
tion that fish have watery dispositions." 

"I don't see that that is at all necessary, " in- 
terrupts Mr. McNeil. 

"Well." proceeds Mr. Williams. "We won't 
get into a discussion of that now. Are there any 
questions?" 

"T. I." Jones — "Yes. sir; I'd like lo know how 
lone It will be before the bell rings." 




AND OSCAR PERMITTED THIS 



vIONEY FOR LITERATURE INSTEAD OF PICKWICKS? 



TWO HUNDRED NINETY-NINE 



VjL 



liS 



Big McCall came up to the Hotel desk in Atlanta during the football trip, and extended the 
following bill: 

"By 13 trips on elevator ft 10c— $1.30. 

"There's a mistake." said Mac. "I walked up once." 




THE HEART OF THE C.\MPL S 



A dog strayed in. Professor Bullett inquired. 



n very glad lo see yt 
Pardon me— I can't recall your i 



It was Histology Class, the day after the e 
"What kind of a dog is that?" 
"A Bull. Professor." 
"\\ell run him out of here. He doesn't belong in this Class.' 

W. B. UlUSTEAD— Good morning. Professor McKie. I am 
well. Had a nice vacation? 

Professor McKie— Very nice, sir; thank 
never forget your face. 

■i- 4- 

Doc Harding (after a futile attempt to solve the problem) — Professor Bacot, w 
tell me what this is you have written on my paper? 

Professor BACOT~\Xhy. Mr. Hardmg. I just said "Good history, but bad wi 
+ 4- 

Professor VIilliams (on 4th)— Mr. Holder, whv didn't Christ answer Pilate's qi 
is truth?" 

Holer — Because. I think. Christ was a philosopher. 
+ + 

Quoth the cold wind to the Third English Class. "Take off vour hats to me. 
Apostle that put Ed in BEd." 



oking so 
name, but I'll 

/ill you please 
-iting." 

jestion, "What 
for I am the 



bought the "Titanic." 



Peel has the habit of tacking the phrase "etc." on the end of his answers, which possibly(?) 
explains the following: 

Dr. Booker had blinded the whole Class the day after the big circus in Durham. 
"Did you go to Durham too. Mr. Peel?" 
"^'es, sir. and etc.." replied Peel. 

-t- 4- 

Billy Pitt — Doc, my feet still hurt. 

Doctor — Didn't that Allen's footease help them any? 

Pitt — Not a bit. and I took a large dose. too. 

■|7 — Mr. Parker, does it cost vou much to run your car? 
HOSKIE— "Well, I guess It does." I have worn out eight pairs of shoes 

+ 4- 
"How about 'Too Much Johnson' for a good play? " said the manager. 
"For God's sake, no," cried Booker. "We had that last year " 

■i- + 
Fred McCall was trying to tell an old familiar joke. 
McIVER (hopelessly)— "Noah, come claim thy own." 

+ + 
Dr. Wilson (on Registration Day) — Mr. Burnett, have you taken Physics? 
"Scipio" — Er-er-yes, sir. Ma gave me a dose of salts the day before I left home. 

■i- -h 
Whiting was trying to expound H. H. Wisen. 

"Now." he says, "My attitude during the Spring exams, while working for * B K, might be 
described as one of Faith." 

P. WOOLLCOTT — Well, Seymour; 1 don't want to be personal, but it seems to me that your 
case demanded a good measure of Charity also. 




AND HE FELL ON HIS NECK AND WEPT 



/S A CUBIST 7 



' ONE WHO TEACHES BLOCKHEADS 




FOUR COACHES 




Ratty — "Froggie" Wilson says that a frog will lay one 
hundred eggs a week. 

Fresh — Why not graft a frog on a hen. and flood the 
market with eggs? 

Rattv — You fool, the frog would die. 

Fresh — Then sell the hops to Anhauser Busch. 

Ratty was making a report on the Kansas City Conven- 
tion. He discussed the various speakers. "I could talk an hour 
on W. J. Bryan, but 1 will only tell you what he said." 

First Geology Student — Does Professor Cobb know 
anything about the geological strata around Chicago? 

Graduate in Geology — No; but he can tell you all about 
I hem. just the same. 

+ ■*■ 

"They say you matriculated yesterday." 

Fresh — It's a lie, I don't care who says it. 

OUR LIBRARY ;S CARNEGIE'S SOUL CLAIM