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Full text of "Yackety yack [serial]"

C&e li&tarp 

of tl)e 

Qnitiersitp of J3ottl) Carolina 



Collection of Bott^ CaroUniana 



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00033984957 
This book must not 
be taken from the 
Library building. 



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ilftttorij nf '51 



® Menxarv. tI|Du galiiru kfy 

So tlyr goliint barrrin boor, 
Sijat aafrlo guario our antrth Ijaarhs: 

Slip tl^ougljtB of iJaya of uorp: 
3n brigbtrst b«fs tliat titou rauat fuaf 

(Sine itB uiliat tljoit hast Ijolb — 
®Ijp rarest m\h tl|p fatrpat from 

iSpJftnD tl?a Jioora of gol6 ! 

G. B. P. '21. 






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$ubltsl|rl) Annually by 

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an& 5tjp iFratmitlira of 

®ljc llnrorrHtty nf Jforth (Carolina 
CflljappI Mill, ^. (E. 



(Ha 

(Srntlrman, Patrint. iPrtntb of Houtli 
in apprpriattou of the 
#trcngtl| mxh S^uipptitraB of a 5Coblr ICtfr 
rpaprrlfully atili afffrttonatrly JiriJiratr tljta book 



:yackety YACK' 



dIamrH i>|iruut 



JAMES SPRUNT, of Wilmington and Orton, Doctor of Laws of the Univer- 
sity, is a native of Glasgow, Scotland. He came to Wilmington at the age 
of six years and became so thoroughly imbued with the spirit and temper of 
the Lower Cape Fear that no nati\e is more completely racy of that soil so fertile 
in the production and nurture of men — high-toned gentlemen, men of decisions, 
men of affairs. 

He received his early education in Glasgov\-, Kenansville, and Wilmington, 
the Civil War breaking out just in time to interrupt his studies and destroy his 
plan of entering the University. Instead, like thousands of Southern boys of his 
age, it forced him to begin the process of self-education, chiefly in the grim realities 
of war. 

Though still a youth, he was an officer of a blockade-runner, when upon the 
success of blockade-running depended the continued existence of the Confederacy. 
Captured, he saw the inside of a Northern prison, but escaping its horrors through 
cool daring, he turned once more to his hazardous but fascinating occupation. 
The war soon ended, however, and he returned home to enter a business career 
which was to prove notable in the annals of the State. From the proceeds of a 
private venture through the blockade, he formed, with his father, the cotton export- 
ing firm of Alexander Sprunt and Sons, and upon his father's death some years 
later he became the senior and directing partner. By this time the venture had 
already, in spite of many obstacles, proved a success, and under his wise and skillful 
management it thro\'e and prospered until it finally became the greatest cotton 
exporting firm in the world (with more than fifty direct agencies in foreign countries), 
and made of Wilmington one of the leading cotton ports of the United States. 

During this period Mr. Sprunt visited seventeen foreign countries, not only 
establishing invaluable business connections, storing up impressions, gaining 
knowledge, and making acquaintances, which were later to prove immensely im- 
portant in a business way, but also developing a wide range of intellectual interests 
which have entered largely into the making of the mature man. He has seen, in 
the process of making, much of the history of the past sixty years, and his recol- 
lections, if recorded, would read like a romance. 

In the creative part he has played in the rebuilding of the commonv\ealth, in 
his hospitable and delightful home with his family and friends, in all the varied 
phases of social and religious life in his community, in the wide intellectual environ- 
ment which he has moulded for himself — in all his relations — his has been, in the 
largest sense of the term, a full life. 

Mr. Sprunt has held many positions of trust and honor. Succeeding his father 
in the post, he was for many years British vice-consul, and, for a time also the 
Imperial German vice-consul, in Wilmington, winning high commendation from 
both governments for his valuable services. He has been President of the Produce 
Exchange, President of the Seaman's Friendly Society. President of the "\'. M. C. A., 

Seven 



:yackety yack: 



and Chairman of the Board of Commissioners of Navigation and Pilotage. He 
has also been President of the State Literary and Historical Association and the 
North Carolina Folk Lore Society. Deeply interested in education, he was for 
years on the school board of Wilmington, and has been since 1899 a trustee of the 
University. 

In spite of the pressure of these many activities, Mr. Sprunt has found time 
for wide reading and study and has made literary contributions of value to the 
State. His publications, most of them in relation to the history of the Lower Cape 
Fear, are numerous, the best known being his books, "Chronicles of the Cape 
Fear," and "Derelicts." In recognition of the excellence of his historical work, the 
mother chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa Society at the College of William and 
Mary, in 191 5 elected him to membership. 

North Carolina knows him as one of its foremost captains of industry and 
deservedly values him highly for the great service he has rendered the State in that 
capacity. But North Carolina knows him in other phases and values him in these 
even more highly. As a public-spirited citizen, possessed of a high sense of responsi- 
bility, he has always stood for the things which would best tend toward the per- 
manent upbuilding of community and commonwealth. Deeply and sincerely 
philanthropic, he has regarded his wealth as a public trust and has used it w ith 
unsparing generosity in relieving distress, in giving equality of opportunity to 
youth, and in advancing the cause of the Kingdom of God. Thoroughly loyal to 
the land of his adoption, he has rendered it high service in devoting time, money, 
ability, and labor to the preservation of her history, and as the chronicler of the 
Lower Cape Fear he has won deserved reputation as a writer and investigator. 
Throughout the State he is held in esteem and honor. 

The University claims him in a still closer way as her own. A son by adoption. 
he is as loyal as any alumnus who lived his four years on this old campus, and 
delights to hold himself a Carolina man. As a member of the Board of Trustees 
he has been one of the most interested of her supporters. Through his generosity 
the James Sprunt Historical Publications were founded. His devoted wife was 
instrumental in the establishment of theMurchison Scholarships, and in her beloved 
memory he has only this year presented to the University, the community, and 
the State a noble church edifice — the Sprunt Memorial Presbyterian Church. 

It is impossible to calculate in any set way the vast possibilities for good of 
this splendid gift, but all, nevertheless, recognize them in deep appreciation and 
gratitude. He has by it and his other benefactions, by his interest and affection, 
definitely impressed himself into University history, for countless generations of 
Carolina men and women will know him as one of the University's immortals. 

J. G. deR. H. 



Eight 



/ll^kur uniirrgraiiualr iays iiraiu to a rlnsr m\h 
V!l/ ujp ar? anon to go fortli to tl^r lifr anh 
professions to mlttrb mr Iiaur so long aspirrti. 
Alma iHalpr lias sougljt to prrparf us mrll for 
tl)osp tilings mliirli wr liaup grt to Irarn in tlir 
grrat srliool of rxprrtrnrr. fflay wr Purr br 
bonnii togrtljrr in tljp purposrs of a Iiigli anii 
ronimon rauae lljat tup, by uirtur of our oppor- 
tunities, may finft prrarnt ;oy in ttjp spruirp of 
tbp morlti in tlipsp Jiiaorbprpfi timps. fHay ttjp 
1921 larkpltj Ijark finb its jualifiratiou in 
bringing to miui» tbp bittpr-smppt mpinorips of 
glorious aaaoriationa anil priuilpgps w\}ui\ all 
(Earolina mpn pn;oy. 



1 UniV>er6if^ 

Alumni 

Adminisiraiion 
Classes -scl)ools 

I i\f<)ldits 

3 Ac<ibifics 

4 Si-gflniiotionc 

5 ^ampuG bourse 




7he University 



•YACKETY YACK' 




^TThy hopes — pioneer of our greatness 
— are today realized 



; 



•YACKETY YACK" 




In the heart of Carolina s daily 
activities 



•YACKETY YACK! 




Qy Davie Poplar to Alumni 
Building 



:yackety YACK" 




^Ae place of the Chief Guardian 
of our health 



•YACKETY YACK' 




P)own Cameron Avenue to South 
Building 



:yackety yack: 




prom New East down to 
Chemistry Hall 



\L 



•YACKETY YACK! 




"T^/ie Sentinel keeping watch over 
Carolina Heroes 



■YACKETY YACK: 




Qy the Well to Old East 
and Alumni 



:yackety YACK' 




d glimpse of Law, South 
and the Well 



•YACKETY YACK! 




£)avie Hall from the 
Arboretum 



:yackety yack: 







'^he President's Walk through the 
Arboretum 



:yackety yack: 




'^hc President's Mansion 



:yackety yack- 





:yackety yack: 



(Haroltna AUtmttt 

THE men who face us on the follow ing pages are there not so much from the 
students' choice of them as pre-eminent among the University alumni but 
as representative of the University and the State. The outlook of their 
faces largely tells why they are there. Their interests and activities bespeak the 
interests and activities of North Carolina. Murphy, Stephens, Hoey, Scales, 
Roberson, Connor, Lewis, Parker, Thompson, Shuford, Long, Cameron, Clarke, 
Winston, Mangum, Graves, Everett, McNider, Wilson, Manning and Henderson 
represent, in fact are, a cross section of the vigor and variety of North Carolina 
leadership in agriculture, manufacturing, commerce, law, medicine, politics, litera- 
ture, education, religion, and public service. They drank from the old well and then 
went out into the State carrying the waters of life. They sought for the truth, 
interpreted the truth, and in their \'arious ways became bearers of the truth to 
the people. 

The three alumni professors in the group exemplify the University idea of the 
truth reaching out in service. Dr. McNider seeks the truth in laborious days and 
nights over test-tubes and microscope, and a bit of new truth is revealed in relation 
to nephritis and metabolism. Dr. Henderson seizes the truth in events, thoughts, 
and movements, and interprets it. set to the living page. Dr. Wilson takes the 
truth found and interpreted and sets it free to go into its career of service among 
the people. The sons of the University in the State, as illustrated in the lives of 
the men here pictured, catch up the truth as found, and extend, add to it, re-inter- 
pret it, and make it a part of the life of the people. They are the University alive 
and at work for North Carolina. 



Twelve 



■YACKETY YACK: 




Thirteen 



■YACKETY YACK" 




Fourteen 



•YACKETY YACK: 




HAYWOOD PARKER 

Class of 1887 

Attorney 

Asheville, N. C. 




CYRUS THOMPSON 

Class of 1911 

Insurance 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Fifteen 



"YACKETY YACK: 




Sixteen 



rVACKETY YACK: 




WALTER CLARKE 

Class of 1864 
Chief Justice Supri _ 
Court, Raleigh, N. C. 



FRANCIS D. WINSTON 

Class of 1879 

Ex-Lieut. Gov. N. C. 

Windsor, N. C. 




Seventeen 



■YACKETY YACK: 




Eighteen 



:yackety YACK" 




Nineteen 



:yackety yack- 




\l ^ .1 K \1. *..R* il 




:yackety YACK" 




H. W. CHASE 



"YACKETY YACK' 




GEORGE HOWE 
Dean College of Liberal Arts 



John Grover Beard, Ph G. 

Professor of Pharniacy 



James Bell Bullitt, A.M., M.D. 
Professor of Histology 



James Munsie Bell, Ph.D. 
Professor of Physical Chemistry 



WiLLLAM Cain, A.M., LL.D 
Kenan Professor of Matheryiatics 



William Stanley Bernard, A.M. 
Professor of Greek 



WiLLi.AM Ch.^mbers Coker, Ph.D. 

Professor of Botany 



Major Frederick William Boye 
Professor of Military Training 



Parker Howard Daggett, B.S. 
Professor of Electrical Engineering 



Eugene Cunningham Branson, A.M. Joseph Gregory DeRouhlac 

r, r ( o I c ■ Hamilton, Ph.D. 

Professor of Rural Economies 

Professor of History 



James Holly Hanford, Ph.D. 
Professor of English 



Twenty-four 



rVACKETY YACK: 




ANDREW HENRY PATTERSON 
Dean School of Applied Science 



Archibald Henderson, Ph.D. 
Professor of Pure Mathematics 

Edgar Wallace Knight, Ph.D. 
Professor of Rural Education 

Frederick Henry Koch. .AM. 
Professor of Dramatic Literature 

John Emery Lear, E.E. 

Professor of Engineering Sciences 



Charles Staples Manglm, M.D. 
Professor of Anatomy 

Atwell Campbell McIntosh, A.M. 
Professor of Law 

John Harris Mlstard, B.S. 

Professor of Electrical Engineering 

Joseph Hyde Pratt, Ph.D. 
Professor of Economic Geology 



WiLLi.AM DeBerniere McNider, M.D. William Frederick Prolty, Ph.D. 
Kenan Professor of Pharmacology Professor of Geology 

J. F. Steiner 
Social 'Welfare 



Twenty-five 



•YACKETY YACK: 




EDWIN GREENLAW 
Dean of the Graduate School 



Walter Dallam Toy, A.M. 
Professor of Germanic Languages 



Henry Van Peters Wilson, Ph.D. 
Kenan Professor of Zoology 



FrancisPreston Venable, Ph.D., LL.D. Henry Horace Willl'^lMS, A.M. 



Kenan Professor of Chemistry 

Henry McGilbert Wagstaff, Ph.D. 

Professor of History 

Paul John Weaver, A.B. 
Professor of Music 

Alvin Sawyer Wheller, Ph.D. 
Professor of Organic Chemistry 



Professor of Philosophy 

Lester Alonzo Williams, Ph.D. 
Professor of School Administration 

Louis Round Wilson, Ph.D. 

Professor of Library Administration 

Patrick Henry Winston 
Professor of Laic 



Thomas James Wilson, Jr., Ph.D. 
Registrar 



Twenty-six 



:yackety yack: 




MARCUS CICERO STEPHENS NOBLE 
Dean School of Education 



John Manning Booker, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of English 



T. H. Hamilton 
Associate Professor of Music 



Kent James Brown, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of German 

John Frederick Dashiell, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Psychology 



Thomas Felix HicKERSON, B.S., A.M. 

Associate Professor of Civil 
Engineering 

John Wayne Lasley, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 



James Talmage Dobbins, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 



Robert Baker L.wvson, M.D. 
Associate Professor of Anatomy 



W. C. George, M D. 
Phvsician 



Stlrgis Elleno Le.witt, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages 



George McFarlan McKie, A.M. 
Professor of Public Sl:>eaking 



Twenty-seven 



:yackety YACK" 




DUDLEY' DeWITT CARROLL 
Dean of School of Commerce 



E. E. Peacock 

Associate Professor of Economics 

William Whatley Pierson, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of History 

Thorndike Saville, C. E. 

Associate Professor of Sanitary 
Engineering 

Otto Stuhlman 

Associate Professor of Physics 

Charles Melxtlle Baker, A.M 
Assistant Librarian 



Lenoir Chambers, A.B. 
Assistant Professor of Journalism 

Henry McCune Dargan, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 

J. J. Davis 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Oscar Ogblrn Efird 

Assistant Projessor of Law 

Frank Porter Graham, A.M. 
Assistant Professor of History 



C. E. green, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 

GusTANE Adolphus Harrer. Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Latin 



Twenty-eight 



:yackety YACK" 




FRANCIS F. BRADSHAW, A.B. 
Dean of Students 



George Kenneth Grant Henry, Ph.D. Norman Merton Paul, B.S. 



Assistant Professor of Latin 



Instructor in Mathematics 



Clarence Addison Hibbard, A.M. 
Assistant Professor of Journalism 

Allen Wilson Hobbs, Ph.D. 
Instructor in Mathematics 



Herman Henry Staab, A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Romance 
Languages 

W. F. Thrall 
Assistant Professor of English 



Samuel Hlintington Hobbs 

Assistant Professor of Rural Econoniics 



Arthur Simeon Winsor, A.M. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 



H. R. HusE 

Assistant Professor of Romance 
Languages 



J. B. WOOLSEY 

Assistant Professor of Economics 



Twenty-nine 







(Eommtttprs nf t\}t nnxBtnB 








lExpruttup (Cnmmtttrp 








Cameron Morrison . 








ex-officio Chairman 


E. C. 


Brooks 




R 


H. 


Lewis 


Claudius Dockery 




C 


L. 


Smith 


J. w. 


Graham 




Ch 


arles Whedbee 


J. B. 


Grimes 




J- 


S. 


Manning 


Walter Murphy 


- 


F. 


D, 


Winston 






Utatttttg CEnmmittPP 








Z. V. 


Walser 




W 


M 


. Person 


Stanley Winborne 




Thom 


\s H. Battle 


Thirty 












1 



lYACKETY YACK: 



•XCDCC'C:'-" 



> ^=1 CS"^ o C^" ' 



3ENIOR5 



c^ 




Thirty-one 



:yackety YACK" 



all|p QlmUpUH 



'3 Ijaup an t&pal for llj? Ilntupratty. 
iHi} iirstrr utoulJi Iiaur it a plarr 
BJhrrr thcrr is alumya a brratlj of 
iFrfriom in llir air; uiliprp thr life 
Ktxb trarhings of Srsus (Christ furnisli 
iforth tlir iiral of right anii trur man- 
Hooft: uilirrr all rlassrs anii rnniiitions 
Anb brlirfs arc mrlromr anb mtix man 
Sisr in rarnrst strtuing by thr might 
(0f merit: mltrrc mralth is no prriuiirp 
Anil pourrty no sltantr. mljrrr lionorablr 
IGabor. rum labor of tlir lianiis. is 
(SlorifipJi bu liigh purposr anb atrrnuoua 
Qpsirr for thr rlrarrr air anJi tlir 
IGargrr uirui; mlirrr thrrp is a mill to 
B'trm all thr Ijiglj mis of a atatr strug- 
(&ling up out of ignoranrr into grnrral 
Pomrr. mlirrr mrn arr trainrii to obsrrur 
(Elosrly, tn imaginr uiuiJiln. to rrasnn 
Arruratrly. anti to Itaur altout ttirm 
€'omr liumility anJi somr tolrratton; 
ffihrrr finally, truth, shining patiently 
ICikr a star, bibs us aiuanrr, anh vae 
Will not turn aaiir." 



Thirty-three 



YACKETY YACK 


(I^ffirfrB of tlip ^nitor QJlasB 


Walter Reece Berryhill ....... President 


Lawrence Girard Wilson 


Vice-President 


John Duncan Shaw . 


Secretary-Treasurer 


WiLLLMVl LeGETTE BlYTHE 


Historian 


William Donald Carmichael, Jr. 


Writer of Last Will and Testament 


Paul E. Green 


Poet 


Johnathan Worth Daniels 


Prophet 


Frank Robbins Lowe 


Statistician 


John Hosea Kerr, Jr. 


Campus Cabinet Representative 


lExpruttttP (Enmmtttpp nf tlip i'mior (Claaa 


Bryant Council Brown ........ Chairman 


William Donald Carmichael, Jr. Boyd Harden 


Jesse Harper Erwin, Jr. Elbert Hoke Martin 


William Roy Francis Alfred Luther Purrington, Jr 


Daniel Lindsey Grant John Duncan Shaw 


Arthur Gwynn Griffin Tyre Crumpler Taylor 


Thirty-four 





:yackety YACK" 




Btstnry of tbr QIlaBH nf 1921 

YESTERDAY' afternoon I took a walk through Battle Park, 
past Judge Brockwell's, and on up the path through the pines 
to the old Dromgouhle rock. Here I paused for a moment 
and recalled the tragic legend associated with the old gray stone, 
and then following the rocky trail on the right down to the cairn, 
started several years ago by Dr. Battle, I climbed up on top of it 
and saw spread out before me the old familiar yet ever appealing 
panorama of Piney Prospect. As I stood watching the 
shadows lengthen in the valley below until they had 
almost reached the little farmhouse down there, mem- 
ories, at first vague and indistinct, like some sweet 
dream of childhood, and then stronger and more vivid 
with each moment's reflection, surged upon me and 
carried me back into the past — only four years, it is 
true; but four years of such intensity and soul-stirring 
effort that they might have been spread over a half 
BERRYHiLL ccntury of ordinary time. 

Bal All Twuwl /^ • I 

And then I thought of President Chase s talk to 
us that night just before Christmas of our Senior \ear when we were 
holding our class smoker in the Inn. 

'"Your class," he said, "is the connecting link 
between the old Uni\-ersity and the new." 

Never before had 1 realized to such an extent the 
absolute truth in Dr. Chase's statement that night, and 
with this fuller realization there came to me a stronger 
love for this class and a greater pride in her for what 
she has accomplished while on the "Hill." Entering 
the University three hundred and sixty strong — the 
old Uni\ersity — we have gone through the greatest 
change in the history of the institution, and have 
finished with almost half that number, a percentage that would have 
been \-ery good under entirely favorable circumstances. 

Yet it is not in the number of students that under the most 
trying conditions have been able to finish with the class that we find 




Thirty-five 



•YACKETY YACK: 



W^ 




cause for the deepest satisfaction. It is, rather, in the fact that 
through our whole stay here we have been a united class. We very 
early began to get together, and each succeeding year has strengthened 
the ties that join us in common brotherhood — that of 
the Carolina man and the '21 man. For a year we 
sat in chapel and listened to the counsels of President 
Graham, Dean Stacy, and our beloved "Old Pres" 
Battle, and we shall always love the memory of these 
three and shall never forget what a privilege we en- 
joyed in having them with us that first year. 

There was another man, too, whom we all loved. 
And as I thought of Captain Allen I turned from the 
path and went through the woods to the trenches over i^;^/ ^Ters^k 
there above "Judge's" house. There they were — the 

main line trenches, the communication lines, machine 
gun nests with sand bags piled around them, the two 
dugouts, the listening posts — as complete as the 
Hindenburg line the day before the thirtieth division 
hit it. And over in front were barbed wire entangle- 
ments. It was almost night now, and looking out there 
1 saw slipping under the wire a dark form, and then 
another, and another, and — I was almost startled out 
of my wits at C. Holding's bellowing command 
/;""",(■ "Charge! Company B!". And here they came, boiling 

out of the trenchestomeetC Holding's 
"enemy" fellows of Company A. 

Of course I had been day-dreaming, and as the 
illusion vanished I saw the trenches as they realh" 
were — demolished, washed out, the dugouts fallen in, 
the barbed wire gone, here a sign, almost down and 
ludicrous looking, announcing that this particular 
sector is "Ypres," and another lying over there on 
the ground marked '"Verdun." But I could not forget 
Captain "J. Stuart," nor the endless drilling, and the 
field work, and the lectures, and all the stuff that goes 
with the preparation for war. On the way back to the campus I 
passed the cemetery, where it is said, strange, ghostlike figures are 





Thirty-six 



rVACKETY YACK" 




GRANT 

Best Busiucas Man 



accustomed to appear at certain times in the fall and spring, wander- 
ing about among the tombstones to the accompaniment of many 
vociferously wielded paddles. 

Reaching the point where the path turns' off to the 
left of the Raleigh Road, I ducked under the strand 
of wire there, and found myself at the east end of 
Emerson Field — the identical place where Alf Scales, 
class president during our Freshman year, who died a 
year later in the Service, had made many a thirty- 
yard run, and where "Runt"" Lowe on Thanksgiving 
Day, 1 9 19, fell across the goal for a touchdown that 
added another victory against Virginia. It was on this 
field, also, that "Lefty" Wilson won the worlds record 

for the least number of pitched balls in a game in the 

1920 game with Trinity. 

On m\- way back to South I ran rapidly oxer 
three succeeding years. During the spring of our 
Freshman year many of the fellows began dropping 
out to enlist in the Service: Captain Allen sent some 
to Oglethorpe, and then summer came and quite a 
number of us went to Plattsburg. We were scattered 
everywhere. When school opened and ushered in the 
nightmare of the S.A.T.C, the old "Carolina Spirit" 

that we had learned to cherish the year before was 
"nil." Everything was demoralized and 2nd lieuten- 
ants from Maine and Georgia were sent to plague us. 
Dr. Graham fell a victim to the heavy responsibilities 
of Regional Director of the S. A.T. C, and died during 
the fall. 

Upon our return after Christmas, from the regime 
of the S. A. T. C, overseas, training camps, and 
everywhere, we were astonished and delighted to find 
that Carolina was not completely dead in spirit, and 
at once we set out to build up with the little life that 
remained a strong and vigorous vitality. Studies were resumed and 
student activities came in for their place in normal University life. 




BOBBITT 

Dehaler^BesI Orator 



L_— ^^H[-,--i 



KEHU 
ilosi Dignified 
Biggest Politician 



Thirty-seven 



:yackety YACK" 



Baseball, basketball, and track started off with renewed life, and the 
intercollegiate triangular debates were continued. Three out of the 
four Carolina men — Bobbitt, Boyd, and Patterson — represented '21. 
Under the leadership of Bailey Liipfert, the class had made another 
start and was about to recover from the interruption incident to the 
war, when the death of Dean Stacy, followed in a few 
weeks by that of Dr. Battle, cast a gloom over the 
^^^ whole campus. 

L^^ ''^&H The next year marks the most important period 

^^^ ^3I^B in the history of the class; in fact, one of the turning 
^^^ jH points in the whole course of the University. With 
W J^M John Kerr at the helm we plunged into the sea of 

'—'''^ ^^™ campus problems, and under his enthusiastic guidance 
a movement was inaugurated that had for its purpose 
c !,/,«( j-j^g abolishment of a condition that up to that time 

had been a menacing one. During the previous history of Carolina, 
the fraternity question had been a very live one. There was a 
noticeable aloofness between the fraternity man and the non- 
fraternity man. 1 he situation was not serious, except in the fact 
that it might have tended to threaten the unity of the student body, 
especially at the time of the University's continued 
growth and ever-increasing tendency to decentralize 
into the various schools. Our class had always been 
very open and frank in its relations, both with other 
groups and among ourselves, and realizing that we 
owed it to Carolina to perpetuate this condition 
among the classes that followed us, we at once began 
planning a remedy for the existing conditions. The 
whole question was brought out into the open and 
frankly discussed by the class, and to '21 and John 
Kerr as leader, the campus owes to a great extent 
the present excellent feeling and complete understanding and sym- 
pathy between the two groups. There is no delineation. A man is 
judged by the standard of the Carolina man. 

Carolina's wonderful success in the various intercollegiate con- 
tests was another characteristic of the Junior year. The State 




Thirty-eight 



:yackety yack: 



l'^^'^^ 




Championship was won in football, baseball, and track; Johns Hop- 
kins and Virginia were defeated in debating — Grant, Kerr, and 
Yaylor represented '21 — and Virginia and North Carolina State fell 
before the Blue and White football team; Hodgin won the National 
Oratorical Contest; and, in brief, the year was a successful one in 
almost every field. At commencement, eighteen men 
from the Class of 1921 — the highest number ever 
elected from any class at Carolina — were initiated into 
Phi Beta Kappa — Cook, president; Beers, secretary; 
Ashby, Berryhill, Blythe, Bobbitt, Boyd, Miss Cobb, 
Davis, Edmundson, Gardner, Hudson, Patterson, 
Sheppard, Shore, Stevens, Tucker, Miss Venable, and 
Wilson were the winners of the gold key. 

And as I thought of Class Day and how John 
Washburn, the president of the graduating class, had 
turned over to us the campus with the admonition to transmit it 
as good and even better than it was when we received it. And when 
Berryhill had given our pledge and had accepted it in the name of 
the Class of 192 1 we marched away from Old Davie Poplar as the 
masters and guardians of the "Hill." 

The last year passed by more swiftly than any 
of the others. We accomplished a great deal, how- 
ever. Foreseeing that it would not be long before 
our days at Carolina would be over, we set to work 
to make more vital our class unity and class fellow- 
ship. Smokers were held once a month — some of 
them in the various fraternity halls, and at other 
campus centers — and the class got to know itself as a 
big family, each member loving the other brothers 
and all honoring and esteeming one great mother 
that we call Carolina. We have achieved well on the campus and 
it is our determination to keep up the record that we are now living. 

This morning I was aroused through the combined efforts of a 
very insistent alarm clock and an unidentified object on the campus. 
Going to the window, I saw that the offending noisemaker was the 




Thirty-nine 



:yackety yack: 



University dray Ford, manned by two or three of Mr. Pickard's 
hands and under full steam. From its peculiar antics and the high 
quality jazz that was issuing from it I judged that it was either 
mighty hoarse or else suffering from auto-intoxication. 

At Gooch's I gulped down a hasty breakfast, and then grabbing 
"Bull's" car, beat it for Carboro. At the window 1 got a ticket, and 
having checked my trunk, I swung on the "dinkey," just in time to 
slump into a seat before Captain Smith shouted "Board! Get 
aboard!" Getting up courage and steam, the pride of the Southern 
moved slowly off. The station was passed and one by one the piles 
of oak crossties were left behind. Crossing the aisle to get out of the 
sunlight, I took out my Cosmopolitan and settled down comfortably 
to read. 

I was an alumnus of the University of North Carolina. 

W. L. B., Historian 





RUFFIN 

Handsomest 



MISS HUGHES 

PreltiMl Co-ed 




Forty 



:yackety yack: 





FRED MONROE ,'\RRO\VOOD 
Bessemer Cit\, N. C. 
Age, 28; Weight, ly;: Height, ; feel ;r inches 
Di Society. Y. M. C. A.; Gaston Country Club. 

ARROWOOD came over a few years ahead 
of the rest of us, but could not stand the 
pressure: so in order to avoid an overdose of 
four straight years, he stood by and joined us 
as we came along. He spent the interlude in 
Uncle Sam's army seeing Francais. We are 
thinking he cut a wide figure in gay Paree. 
Arrowood says very little, which is not very 
good, in view of the fact that very little is 
being said nowadays. 



CLARENCE LINDEN GARNETT ASHBY 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Age, 20: Weight, 14;: Height, ; feel 11 inches 

Phi Societv; Freshman Debate: North Carolina Club: Gym 
Team; Wearer of N. C; Wake County Club: Secretary (4); 
Junior Executive Committee. 

* B K. 

HE is one of these remarkable animals, 
that know how to reconcile a Phi Beta 
Kappa key to an N. C, being one of the 
cohorts of Dr. Lawson in the gym, as well as 
a proselyte of Joe Cook's tribe. Moreover, 
this one is what may be termed a mnemonic 
bull; the so-and-so's memory course in seven 
spasms is the reason. His friend and follower, 
Bingham Owens, styles him as a master of 
the seven spasms, and Bingham himself is 
not to be laughed at. "Name fifteen objects 
and I'll name them over from memory, then 
Ashby will give em to you backwards," says 
Bingham, and away they go. Ah Memory, 
what a jewel you are! 





Forty-one 



:yackety yack: 





SHELDON CLYDE AUSTIN 

Richfield, N. C. 

Age, 20; Weight, 140: Height, j feet 7 inches 

Secretarv and Treasi 
Society. '41; Elisha 
Club. 



WE can't pass by "Puss" without thinking 
of the time when, as he was helping 
survey some county road, he nearcd a rustic 
domicile. The honest granger perceived this 
proximity of the redoubtable Sheldon C, 
and called to his naive female offspring to 
gather up all the \aluables in sight and seek 
the inmost walls of the domestic edifice. Now 
what .significance might be attached to this 
interesting behavior of the simple folk, we 
can't presume to dictate. Sheldon C. admits 
that he might have been a bit soiled of phys- 
iognomy at the time. Still we must always 
. recall this when we see him sail by all dressed 
up like a page from the Home Library edition 
of Hart, Schaffner &1 Marx, 



FRANK ROBBINS BACON 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Age, 2;,' Weight. 120: Height, ; feet 6 inches 

Catawba College. '16-'I8; Catawba County Club, '18-'40; 
Mecklenburg Count.v Club; Di Societ.v; Elisha Mitchell 
Scientific Societ.v; Civil Engineering Society; Class Foot- 
ball (41. 

NOW "Gorilla " Bell won out in the great 
beauty-nix classics, but his victory was 
due as much to F. R. Bacon's campaign 
manager, as to the merits "Gorilla " displayed 
in the contest. This boy is known to work 
some sort of charm on the hearts of fair dam- 
sels, and is also believed to receive pink 
envelopes at frequent periods, but he must 
always bear in mind that there are some 
blind elements in this world, and among them 
are Mammoth Cave fish, ordinary dead 
Mexicans, and Love — these three — and the 
greatest of these is Love. 





Forty-two 



:yackety YACK" 





JL'LIUS EDMLXD BANZET 
Ridgway. N. C. 
Age, 22; Weight. 14}: Height. 6 feet 

Phi Socifty; Warren Counlv Cluh; Assistant Business Man- 
ager Tar Heel: International Polity Club, Secretary (3). 

JE " is among those who early fell for the 
. line of J. Eiooker. and he is still flat on his 
back and gasping. Johnny does them 
that way. sometimes. Barcett has the further 
distinction of being in the crowd which 
initiated "OldCarr" Barn in the palmy Fresh- 
man days, when we had to rise and report by 
the bugle and when verdancy was in bloom. 
It is a question to be settled by the Class 
Historian whether he ever fell a victim to 
the roughhouses given in Carr iq under the 
auspices of C. P. Powell. But we remember 
him over there and he is still the quiet, well- 
meaning lad, of course, only as much so as 
Johnny has let him remain. 



a-L\RLES D.\l,E BEERS 

Asheville. N. C. 

Age. 20; Weight. 170: Height. 6 feel i inch 

Di Society; Buncombe County Club. President (3): Assist- 
ant in Botany (i); Gym Squad (3); Associate Editor Tar 
Heel (a, 3): Commencement Marshal; El Centro Hispano; 
Y.icKETT Y.\CK Board (4): Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society 
.Assistant in Zoology; Carolina-Penns.vhania Debate (4); 
Secretary, Phi Beta Kappa. 

* B K; -iX-l 

WE shall always picture "C. D." with his 
Phi Beta Kappa key, sitting in the 
library studying industriously, trying to be 
as scholarly as one Joe Cook will let him. 
Becoming restive of the cloisters, he broke 
into the forensic world just as the denouement 
was starting and became an intercollegiate 
debater. We present herewith a profound 
student of theology, philosophy, literature, 
politics, and. incidentally, of medicine. With- 
out doubt there is brewing somewhere in 
him a great deal that is worth while. 





Forty-three 



:yackety YACK" 





FRANK DURHAM BELL 

Tuxedo, N. C. 

Age, 2j: Weight, iS;: Height, ; feet ii inches 

Di Sociel 
Scrub Fo 

2 AE. 

' A THING of beauty is a joy forever." Thus 
-'»■ do we hail thee, O, uniaurelled Apollo; 
thus do we commemorate thy mighty deeds 
while ye brake bread in this city of dreams — 
dreams of fair women, dreams of feats of 
football, dreams of intermingled hours rf ease. 
But it is still a distinction to be the best in 
your line, even though the line be home- 
liness. Yet it is hard to reconcile the victory 
to open politics when it is known that H. C. 
Heffner. F R, Bacon, and J. T. Penny were 
heard in the race. We point to him with 
pride as the worthy successor to the honors of 
Heartt Bryant, and we believe that he would 
make a creditable race for all-.-\merican 
honors. Yea, "Gorilla" has the goods. 



WALTER REECE BERRYHILL 

Charlotte, N. C. 
Age, 20, \i'eight, lyz; Height. 6 feet i inch 



Di Societv. Secretar 
Debate Hi: Winner 
Editor r.K /;. J ' 



Treasurer (3); Intra-Society 
lex:in.ler Prize («); Assistant 
I, K.litor Tar Heel (.■)); .Vsiio- 
li! '/ \..i-t;int Editor Yackety 

.< i; ■■'■ ' . I Accutive Committee (3); 

t( I1-- \ I'rp -[ ! M - i;.Unt Council (4): Campus 
(4:; CrealiT I'niver-it.v Committee (4): Holder 
. Carr Fellowship (4); Mecklenburg County Club, 
sident (31; North Carolina Club; German Club. 

Ji ; * B K ; A :s *. 



WE want to remember you not only as 
Berryhill, Phi Beta Kappa. President 
ot 2 1 and the rest, but as Reece, who could 
pass a pleasant and a jovial smile, whose 
laugh was (rec. whose heart was ours, and one 
ot whose leadership we were proud. 





Forty-four 



■YACKETY YACK' 





CLARENCE DORIAN BLAIR 

Greensboro, N. C. 

Age, 2;; Weight, 140; Height, ; feel lo inches 



TIS said that no man ever came to town 
with greater quietness or with life more 
plain; no gentler, simpler soul has trod our 
halls; no better meaning lad in overalls; no 
browner eyes (less brown because his owni 
the clouded light of day has ever shown ; notreer 
smile has greeted co-eds ever or beamed to 
light a face or make warm heart quiver; no 
blacker hair, parted with the aid of olive-oil. 
ever glittered at a nod. 




RlRTS HIS MfllR IN THE niDDLE 
^"TH THE HELP OF OLIYE OIL 



WlLLl.AA-l LeGETTE BLYTHE 

Huntersville. N. C. 

Age, 20; Weight, 14;: Height. 3 jeet 10 inches 

r>i <,,..i,,iv M,ol:l..nlMirf r.„,niv CI,,!.: r|„-. Secretary (31; 

CI;,- lli-i,.r, ,,, t (I ... \:^ I,.. < Itw (3); Class 

F ■ I \-- ■■'.:■ ■ / /,' :'•'; Associate 

E.li: r 1/. :, .. ; , Mi ,-. .- I :. ■: Tar Bally (3); 

E<lil..r \. ,M. C. .V. Hj...". ,. ; . V. -\1. C. A. Cabinet 
H. .-!:; Carolina Playmakera ilj; Wiiiucr Hunter Lee Harris 
Memorial Medal (3). 
2 T;S2 A; *B K; A T i. 

IMAGINE a tortoise that refused to race 
with the somnolently inclined hare; 
imagine then the hare that was too ardent a 
lover of ease to even listen to the tortoise's 
refusal of a race, put your mental picture to 
sleep and what you then see will be a laded 
likeness of "Gette. Now the interesting 
thing about it all is this: He made Phi Beta 
Kappa, distinguished himselt in many literary 
ways, and actively participated in class ath- 
letics. How did he do it with all that inertia 
to oNercome;" Perhaps he was told to make 
Phi Beta Kappa and the rest and just wouldn't 
go to the trouble to frame a decent excuse. 




Forty-five 



:yackety yack: 





\V1LLI,-\M HAYWOOD BOBBITT 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Age, 21 : Weight, 14Q: Height, f feet 7 inche.s 

Dialectic Society, Secretary ii), Vice-President (3); Archives 
Keeper (3), President U);' Intra-Societ.v Freshman Debate; 
Inter-Societ.v Freshman Debate; .lunior Oratorical Contest; 
Junior Commencement Debate, Bingham Medal; Carolina- 
Johns Hopkins Debate; Southern Intercollegiate Oratorical 
Contest; Class Historian (i); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (?); The 
Debate Council (3), Secretary Debate Council (i): The 
Athletic Council (3); Manager, Freshman Track Team; 
Mecklenburg Count.v Club; North Carolina Club; Ampho- 
terothen; Golden Fleece. 

* B K; TK-\ 

We always felt that he was hating, hours 
he was not debating. 
But he surely was not balking, since he was 

forever talking. 
When he told the jokes he laughed, too; (we 

were glad we didn't have to) ; 
But to make the story short, he was still a 
decent sort. 



HENRY SPLTi.GEO\- BOYCE 

Tyner, N. C. 

Age, 22; Weight, lyo; Height. ; feet 10 inches 

Phi Society; North Carolina Club; Buies Creek Club. Presi- 
dent (4); Geological Club; Class Basketball (1); Class Foot- 
ball (4); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (4); Elisha Mitchell Scientific 
Society; Assistant Geology (4); Order of Nautilus. 

"\\ TELL gentlemen, 'the pudding' is served, ' 
VV and Boyce has been pulling the geologi- 
cal plum each time that Collier has made the 
above age-old and time-worn statement. 
Henry did not take the courses for the "pud " 
values, for, when Dr. Cobb left to study 
shore lines and possibly other lines in the 
Orient, he kept right on dissecting "Mother 
Earth " A loyal class man, whether on the 
football field or helping out at a class smoker, 
he has won the esteem of his associates in the 
class. 



"l UOULd'«T MWDTH/ITGUY 
I 5IMLWG nt GOLD 'HC'MD 
MY PHI BmUfiPFA KEY, Dl 
ISOCIETY FOBS, GOLDEN 

Cc"^ fifE'E dNB MPHonmrHA 

^■JJWS MY BINGHW MB 
|OTH[i; MEMLS BUI I 
WISH HE HAD nn 
UNIVERSITY MEWS 





Forty-six 



'YACKETY YACK' 





CHARLES THEODORE BOYD 

Gastonia. N. C. 

Age, 21 : ^'eight, i;o; Height, ; feel 8 inches. 

Di Society; Freshman Debate; M.-,ry D. Wright -Memorial 
Debate; Commencement Debate (3); Carolina-Virginia 
Debate (J); Carolina-Pennsylvania Debate (4); Debate 
Council; Gaston County Club, President; Tar Heel Board; 
Magazine Board; Amphoterothen. 

n A; E * A; T K .\; * B K; ,i T A 

IN those realms of philosophical specula- 
tion, "C. T." shines as Sirius in the night. 
This question was expounded to the club: 
"If your mother were to die, and a man of 
the community were to take the last long 
sleep, leaving a daughter; after which a 
courtship were to grow into marriage between 
>ou and the surviving mother of the aforesaid 
daughter, then your father were to marry the 
daughter, and from each union a son become 
the product, in the course of time, in what 
relation would you stand to the family?" 
"C. T." spake from a far corner: "Why, I'd 
be my own granddaddy." Coronation. 



JAMIE BRLINNELL BRO.^CH 
Hurdle Mills, N. C. 
Age, 22: Weight, 140: Height, j feet 7 inches 
Society; North 

RED heads and freckled faces are declared 
by the great court of public opinion to 
be sure signs of a mischievous disposition and 
a great amount of energy. Broach has the 
drive, working steadily, evenly, and without 
noise. He is sure of his end, but makes no 
great flurry in accomplishing it. Running 
true to red-headed form, he has an over- 
mastering and all-compelling desire to get in 
any and all pictures being taken, the sight of 
a camera by "J. B." bringing forth a prompt 
and exaggerated gulp of joy. Diversion? 
Co-eds and everything. 





== %.m 



Forty-seven 



— YACKETY YACK" 




FREDERICK PHILLIPS BROOKS 

Kinston, N. C. 

Age. zo; Weight, 12.7; Height, 5 feet 7 inches 

EUsha Mitchell Scientific Society; North Carolina Club; 
1 Club; Assistant in Chemistry. 



PHILLIPS Started his career as a first 
class student, by getting a "one" under 
Dr. Hanford; and sad to recall he has been 
getting raw deals ever since. He has ne\er 
been able to understand what a four, or a 
three, or even a two was doing on his reports. 
He has at last been crowned assistant in 
something or other and now, to his worry of 
being undergraded, is added his chagrin at 
being underpaid. Ma\be it came about by 
your being undersized, Phillip. 





BRYANT COUNCIL BROWN 

Sneed's Ferry, N. C. 

Age, 26; Weight, 178: Height, } feet 11 inches 



r-Soc-ety Soph-Junior 
1: Orai^anizer Carolina 
Iriii.rical Contest (3); 

ii il Relations Club 

, fir.-ater University 
-M.Ci. Cabinet (i): 



Phi Society, Treasurer (: 
Debate (i); Secretary toPr. 
Business School (3); Winn. 
Commencement Debate i.i 
(3); Business Manager /;/., 
Student Committee (4). Tri> 
Grail; .\mphoterothen. 

E *.ii n i. 

IT is said that P\ thagoras once, upon being 
asked of what he was master, replied: "I 
am a philosopher." If there is anything that 
"B. C. " likes better than philosophy, it is 
discussing ethics. 

He spent some time during the war, in the 
guise of a gob, rising from an insignificant 
hash-slinger to the dignity of ensign — what- 
ever that process may be. Without an\ 
great effort of memory, we can see him, walk- 
ing along cool paths, 'neath the lisping leave's, 
among groves, beside magnificent flowerbeds, 
and always with that somber mien, which so 
well marked him for what he represents, keep- 
ing watch by his side. 




Forty-eight 



:yackety yack: 





CHARLES J LIN I US BRYAN 

Goldsboro, N. C. 

Age, 21: Weight, t j;: Height. 5 feet g inches 

WayDe County Club; V. M. I. Club: Elisha Mitchell Scien- 
tific Society; A. I. E. E.; German Club. 

*Z N. 

NOW when he draws his chair close up to 
his desk and fingers a deck of cards and 
spreads them out in the solitaire way, you've 
a treat in store for you, Bards. He's also a 
demon on those de\'ilish problems assigned by 
E. E. professors. Whatever it takes to work 
the darn' things, this one, forsooth, doth 
possess her. 

But this is what gets our goat ; when u e 
didn't ha\'e a chance, he brings not one but 
three fair maids to his first commencement 
dance: and although he comes from V. M. 1., 
cartooned a baby with bottle in hand, this 
makes us think as we pass by chat this is 
the work of a man. 



AUGUSTUS RLrPUS BU1.LOCK 
Creedmore, N. C. 
Age, 2j: Weight. 1J4: Height, f feet ir inches 
Debate: Granville County Club 

THIS one is well named, being as strong as 
the Regal 0,\. Few men of his build 
possess such an unusual amount of bodily 
vigor: but abos'e all his strength and agility, 
it is almost a feat be\cnd accomplishment for 
him to climb to his bunk, which is in the 
Heaven position of a stack of three. Now the 
Heaven stage is this: The Professor of Dra- 
matic Literature tried to make the old stage 
arrangement clear to his class by drawing the 
analogy to our present bunk arrangement, 
the upper being Heaven: the middle. Earth: 
and the lowest. Hell. And, too, Bullock still 
holds tenaciously to those qualities which 
mark the true son of the soil. 




EHRl-V PORTRHiT 




Forty-nine 



:yackety yack: 





WILLIAM DONALD CARMICHAEL 

Durham, N. C. 

Age, 20: Weight, 160: Height. ; feet q}4 inches 

Phi Society; Durham County Club; Glee Club (1); Minstrel 
(1); Secretary Class (S); Winner Preston Cup in Journalism 
(2); Varsity Basketball (1, 9, 3), Captain (3); Class Execu- 
tive Committee (4); Writer Last Will and Testament (4); 
Editor-iu-Chief Tar Baby (4); Secretary Pan-Hellenic 
Council (4); Leader Fall German Club Dance (4); Chief 
Commencement Ball Manpger (4); German Club; Coop: 
Gimghoul. 

2 T; K 2. 

BILLY" can play, play on the basketball 
court like an Hawaiian in water; can 
work, work for the Tar Baby like Horace 
Greeley weeding college men from "other 
horned cattle; can write, write to the tune 
of the Journalistic Cup; can pull those provok- 
ing practical jokes — jokes that associate him 
and Will Ruffin with Tom Sawyer and Huck 
Finn; can make love, make love like Romeo 
subjected to a shower of moonbeams reflected 
by Juliet s radiant face while Hymen smiles 
in peace around the corner. 



DUNCAN McCOLL CARROLL 

Bennettsville, S. C. 

Age, 2j. Weight. 146: Height, ; feet g inches 

WHERE this "Sand-Lapper" came from 
when he joined the forces of '21, and 
what he intends to do, is all a mystery. 
Chemistry is his hobby, Kent's German his 
pudding. .Adding these unusual qualities to 
a forceful appearance, a direct, plain-spoken 
man, all predictions for the future tail; so we 
leave "Dune" an unknown quantity, as 
before. 





Fifty 



rVACKETY YACK" 





LUCY MARIA COBB 

Chapel Hill. N. C. 

Age, .'; Weight, go; Height, 4 feet 11 inches 

Graduate St. Mary's; Student N. C. C. W.; V. N. C. 
"Woman's Association; Graduate Club; North Carolina 
Club; Carolina Playmakers. 

WHEN the argument came down to mat- 
ters of literature, Miss Cobb took the 
floor like a Philadelphia lawyer. No matter 
whether enlightenment was required on "The 
Symposium." or "The Legend of Sleepy Hol- 
low," or "In\ictus." she would give it with 
no hesitancy. It is not for us to say what was 
her "one fa\orite," but it has been rumored 
that it is poetry. 

She IS affable, sprightly, quick of wit, and 
small You can learn her haply, rightly, bit 
bv bit. that's all. 



MARY LOUISA COBB 
Chapel Hill. N. C. 
Age, ?; Weight, 84; Height, ; feet 

Orange County Club: V. N. C. Woman's Association, 
Treasurer {1), President (4). 

* B K. 

SHE is small and quiet as we all know; but 
no doubt, there are some among us who 
little know how long headed she is. We have 
often seen her dri\-e by in a great big car , but 
few of us knew that she has a real nickname, 
yet she has, which same is nothing other 
than "Gibby." 

She is always cheerful, and though quiet, 
is lighthearted. This quality enabled her to 
go after her lessons with a zest, and she made 
Phi Beta Kappa smilingly. She takes up 
very little of the landscape, but she requires 
no background to gain a place in memory. 





Fifty-one 



:yackety YACK" 





RICHARD GAY COKER 

Hartsville. S, C. 

Age, 2/; Weight. ;_J7. Height, 5 feet q inches 

South Carolina Club; Associate Editor Yackett Yack (S): 
German Club. 

nK A. 

'l~^iCK" is another of those Democrats who 
i — ' came up from South Carolina in more or 
less of a missionary spirit, hearing that we 
have something like ten Republicans in the 
House. He is noted for saying nothing upon 
every occasion upon which he has nothing to 
say. We have been unable to decide just what 
he does best, but we have learned that he is a 
good student of literature, a good writer, has 
a pleasant sense of humor, and we believe 
that he is a creditable advertising man, for he 
has been here four years, during which time a 
dozen men have joined our camp from within 
a small radius of his dugout in the sister State. 
If he has had nothing to do with this, it is at 
least pleasingly coincidental. 




JOSEPH LINDSAY COOK 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Age, 2j; Weight. 160: Height, 6 feet i inch 

Di Society; Forsjih Count.v Club; North Carolina Club; 
Sub-.\ssistant Manager Baseball; Elisha Mitchell Scien- 
tific Society; Assistant in Librar.v (2); Assistant in Zoology 
(3); Medical Society. 

* B K; *X;eX 

HERE is the student of them all: The 
exalted Nekus Hekus of the sanctorum 
of Phi Beta Kappa. "Joe" was as much 
surprised to sec that two on his report — the 
onl\- tivo he got during the whole four years' 
war — as Adam was when he first roused from 
the arms of Morpheus to behold the figure of 
Eve. We understand that the Twin-City 
garcon kept that prof so blind in the sequel 
courses that if made Homer look like Sherlock 
Holmes. "Joe's marks have never been sur- 
passed and only twice equalled — another 
matter for the Historian. Most anyone 
can make a one, professors willing, but it 
takes a man to digest such a string of them. 



H SOUTH CRROUI N P 
C R V e: fn r n 




Fifty-two 



:yackety YACK" 





HENRY BLIRWELL COOPER 

Henderson, N. C. 

Age, 21. VC'eight, 160: Height, f feet 11 inches 

Vance County Cliih; President (4): Class Baseball H): 
Ya 



AKE. 

HENRY isn't so lazy. He just looks that 
way. They say that his brother used 
two kinds of oil. the midnight and the olive. 
We don't know whether Henry uses the mid- 
night brand or not. You have heard of that 
Southern drawl; well. Henry is an ardent 
disciple of this method of enunciation, and it 
gets results, too. If you want to see him in 
his native element, catch him in a "bull ses- 
sion " or at the gym during the dances. The 
girls invariably fall for Henry, and he, being 
of sympathetic heart and hating to see them 
forlorn and lonely, falls too. He usually 
manages to wiggle out in time for another 
set of dances. 



LENOX GORE COOPER 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Age, 20; Weight, i;;; Height, j feet 1 1 inches 

The Citadel, '17-'I9; New Hanover County Club; Cabin; 
German Club. 

n K A. 

COUNT de Spoof " acquired this name, 
designating him as one of the very noble, 
by his truly royal n;anner. Carrying the air 
of a noble, never forgetting his dignity, and 
possessed of a face which, according to some 
critics, is in marvelous contrast to Medusa's, 
Lenox has been a prime favorite with the 
honored few, but never has mixed greatly 
with the "common peepul." 





Fifty-three 



:yackety yack: 




JOHN COLUMBUS COWAN 

Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Age, 21 : Weight, lyS; Height, ; feet yyi inches 

Di Society; Rutherford County Club. President (4); North 
Carolina Club; German Club, 
n A; A 2 *. 

WHEN we came to "Jake s' name, we 
paused a minute, then his roommate 
and good friend, B. N. Roberts, came by and 
supplied us with the following dope. To 
preface his remarks, "B. N." said: "His pic- 
ture makes him look like a personified Chinese 
idol." Then he mentioned that he has a girl 
in Gilke; that he has some very cryptic say- 
ings written on his jimmy pipe, such as. "1 
am the man from Rutherford, chief speaker 
of the alumni banquet there i i-i 1-20; ' that 
he is always averring that he will report anv 
man he catches playing poker in his room; 
swears not, eternally talks about his "wife;" 
boundless lover of Byron's poetry — Further, 
B. N. said he was unable to disclose, "for 
■Jake' is a peach of a fellow." 




JONATHAN WOR 11 1 DANIELS 

Raleigh. N, C 

Age. iq: height. 14s: Height. 5 feet 8 inches 

Phi Society; Wake County Club; Latin-American Club: 
Philosophy Club: Tar Baby Board («, 3); Editor-in-Chiet 
Y. M. C. A. Handbook (2); Magazine Board (3); Managing 
Editor Tar Heel (.S); Class Executive Committee («): 
Carolina Haymakers (1.4, 3); Satyrs; German Club. 

S AX; A K E 

DICE" reads voraciously, likes best of all 
the modernists, has decided taste for 
realism, can't give Hawthorne much, but 
hands it out to Leonard Merrick and like 
school. He is very impressionable to any- 
thing that smacks of innovation just so it 
threatens some old. traditional custom; there- 
fore, he is of that coterie styled as the left 
wing of Carolina thinkers. 

He walks with a plowing gait, although his 
hands are innocent of plow-handles; he smiles 
with sarcasm, ofttimes; he speculates in terms 
of scepticism; "Dice" laughs with his soul. 





Fifty-four 



:yackety YACK" 





ROBERT MAYO DAVIS 

Tarboro, N. C. 

Age, 27; Weight. 168; Height, ; feet // inches 

Phi Society; Edgecombe County Club; Le Cerele Francais; 
Class Basketball (S); Class Football (3); Varsity Football 
Squad (4). 

* B K. 

ACHEERFLT- smile — perhaps "grin" is 
sticking closer to facts — is one thing 
without which "Eiob" is never seen. If it 
were not for this grin and the fact that he has 
been a steady aspirant for the Varsity eleven 
for four years, you would suppose that "Bob" 
brought the proverbial laziness and sluggish- 
ness of the eastern part of the State to this 
Hill of Knowledge ; but regardless of all other 
factors, the way in which he has marched to 
Phi Beta Kappa has proven that he can work 
on necessary occasions. 



ROBERT ODUS DEITZ. Jr. 
Scatesville, N. C. 
.\ge. 21. 'height, i;;: Height, 6 feet 
AX Z: A T A. 

BOB" early learned the purpose of his 
presence at the "Hill." and has long 

since settled down to his books, his profession, 
and his research. His particular line is chem- 
istry, and he has oecome one of the familiar 
figures down there in the laboratory, along 
with Phillips Brooks and others. \Ve don't 
know for a positive fact that he is thinking 
about anything in particular except chem- 
istry, but these Iredell lads as a rule are quite 
proficient in the ways of Cupid, and it stands 
to reason that he is no exception to the rule. 
We ve been told so, anvwav. 





Fifty-five 



•YACKETY YACK: 





ROBERT CLYDE DORSETTE 

SilcrCit>, N. C. 

Age, 2}; Weight, 14;; Height. } feet ti inches 

Phi Society, Supervisor (S), Vice-President (3). Special 
Constitutional Committee (3); Chatham County Club, 
President (3): Buies Creek Cluh. President (3); North Caro- 
lina Club; Class Tennis (i); Business Manager Carolina 
Magazine (4). 

AFTER following closely the teachings ot 
Dean Noble and the department of 
education for four years, Dorsette will begin 
this year on the task of bringing the present 
educational condition of North Carolina to a 
more satisfactory status. He has developed 
a habit of catching the jitney over to the 
Bovine Metropolis where he visits a certain 
"femme." A Trinity class ring which he 
wears on the little finger of his starboard 
hand arouses a suspicion that he favors 
co-education — in its place. 



D.AVID ST. PIERRE DuBOSE 

Badin, N. C. 
Age, 22,- Weight, 170: Height, 6 feel 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society; A. I. E. E.; German Club; 

*Z N; 2 A E 

' T JUST think he is the best looking man!" — 
1 so exclaimed a beautiful ( ?) co-ed on gazing 
for the first time on this lovely face of Apollo, 
That is largely true, too, but deserting this 
frivolous vein, let us say that, though "Pete" 
has just affiliated with the class this year, he 
has nevertheless made many friends among 
the boys, as well as among Chapel Hill's 
fairer sex. Of the latter he has an admirable 
collection of pictures. When he comes in 
some nights, his exuberance finds vent in 
these words "It's a fine night to fight." 





Fifty-six 



:yackety YACK" 





BENJAMIN OWENS DUPREE 
Age, 21 ; Weight. i}o: Height, i feet 
Phi Society; North Carolioa Club; S. A. T. C. 

DLIPRAY." as Freddie Koch used to call 
him de\elopcd a splendid interest in 
literature before he went out in the world to 
seek that fortune which has ne\'er yet been 
put into a book. And he gets along in litera- 
ture, too. he even took the famed Bacon 
course, and came into Comp't Lit. And it is 
this that makes it hard to reconcile his eternal 
clinging to Carr Barn; he could no more 
shake the "Barns" than could Dr. Jekyl 
shake Mr. Hyde. The only conceivable 
explanation is probably in this: that he never 
says "quit." If other instances must be had 
of his pertinacity, we must needs only men- 
tion that mustachio he carrieo around so 
long. Some Freshmen asked him one day if 
it wasn't growing on him. There are statutes 
on certain books that restrain us from giving 
his answer in full. .Another verdant hombre 
took him for a French prof. 



HAYWOOD EDML^NDSON 



feet 1 1 inches 

in Club; 



Raleigh. N. C. 

Age. 20: Weight, i}o; Height, 

Phi Societ.v; Wake Count.v Club; Gern 
Y.tcK Board (."i): Class Football; Latin- 

* B K; Z *. 



AVER.AGING over qiM in his studies, 
earning a Cadillac, and making a bunch 
of Iriends during his first three years with the 
Class of '21. he came back his Senior year, 
first to enjoy college life, second, to make 
more friends, and third, to pull in a few more 
good grades. Never taking anything seriously 
except Phi Beta Kappa and his lo\e affairs, 
he presents a startling example of how a man 
can study hard and still correspond regularly 
with a half dozen members of the gentler sex 
in different sections of the country. When 
he goes down on the farm, the campus will 
ha\e lost a man on whom you could bet your 
last dollar and feel sure of winning. 





Fifty-seven 



•YACKETY YACK: 




JOSEPH WILSON ERVIN 

Morganton. N. C. 
Age. ig; Weight, 170; Height, j feel 11 inches 
\ Manager Yackett 

I MYSELF must mix with action, lest I 
wither by despair."' We dcn't know what 
it was that made "Joe " work so frantically on 
the Yackety Yack. unless it was that he 
had been "crossed in hopeless love. " Yes. he 
works frantically, so frantically that he came 
near trying the fibre of some of his good 
friends; he worked successfully, so success- 
fully that he has a large share in this book's 
feebleness, and successfully further, because 
the friendships stood during his most exasper- 
ating moments. He went to New York in 
the interest of his li T ol' .-Annual, where he 
saw "Bob " Gwynn and advised a Pullman 
porter to tell his troubles to the engineer. 
Mention politics to him and he will grin and 
tell you to go see John Kerr and Tyre Taylor. 
He is going into the study of "The Law, " a 
profession for which he is not only fitted but 
destined. 





I ESSE HARPER ERWIN 

Durham. N. C 

Age, 20; Weight, i;8; Height. ;Jeet8y2 inches 

Class Basketball (1, 2>; Class Football (3. 4); Assistant 
Manager Freshman Baseball l3); Manager Freshman 
Football (3); Athletic Council (3); Y.^ckety Y.\ck Board 
(«); Durham County Club; Class Executive Committee 
(3, 4); Y'. M. C. A. Cabinet (4); Leader Sophomore Hop 
Assistant Leader Junior Prom; Commencement Bail Man 
ager (3, 4); Varsity Basketball (3, 4); Wearer of N. C. 
German Club; Cabin; Grail; Gimghoul. 

kTil 

JESS" hails from the city of Derms. His 
long suit is his dress suit; his short one 
is politics. When the argument comes 
down to basketball, Jesse Harper has the 
points. 

On the score of studies, he qualifies for 
having helped J . Booker run English bi . For 
the sake of irony, we will say that he chews 
tobacco, cause he doesn't. Of the other 
habits, six are known of, but not definitely; 
he savs that three of these have been broken, 
and three remain intact. Not even a course in 
philosophy served to make him commit him- 
self on them. 




Fifty-eight 



lYACKETY YACK: 





ERASMUS HERVEY EVANS 

Laurinburg, N. C. 

Age, 20; Weight, 160; Height, ; feel 11 inches 

Di Society; Scotland-Marlborough County Club: S. A. T. C . 

2 AE. 

HERVEY" is of the NOBILITY: the 
"Margrave of Laurinburg" is he; Jay 
Bivens is also of the crowd, while Bobbitt s 
"Duke" it is allowed; Baron Hardin is on the 
list — Lord Brawley's the last, and him we've 
missed. "The Margrave" has a girl over in 
Raleigh "obtaining a schooling." This item 
is about the extent of his likes; but he has 
some very strong dislikes, among which is 
politics. He claims politics is indeed exe- 
crable. There is but one instance of his ever 
falling to its use. and that instance, he claims, 
is totally excusable; it is this; "Gorilla" Bell 
was elected the ugliest man in the class. 
Madam Rumor has it that "The Margrave" 
stooped to politics to save one of the nobility 
from being given such recognition. But 
"The Margrave" has a line of syllables. 




J.AMES C. P./SlSS FE.ARRINGTON 

Winston-Salem. N. C. 

Age. 22; Weight, ij;; Height. ; feet 10 inches 

Di Society; Forsrth County Club; Class Football (1); 
Class Tennis (1); S. A. T. C. Football; Varsity Football (3); 
German Club; Cabin. 

2 AE 

WHEN "Pass" got down here from the 
Twin-City, he proceeded to make a 
football player out of himself, and he played 
a last backfield ; but pretty soon he e\'idenced 
a remarkable proclivity for unceremoniously 
yanking the cots from beneath somnolent 
cedar-birds at ungodly hours of the night. 
In common parlance he was a "bear at dump- 
ing." But "Pass" has now put away childish 
things and de\'Otes himself to the doings of 
Da\'ie Hall in a manner to make Charles 
Darwin look like a coal-hea\er on a tramp 
steamer. He spends his summers down on 
the farm, and looks forward to the da\- when 
he can "pass" pills and panaceas on the 
unsuspecting populace protected by a por- 
tentious M. D. 





Fifty-nine 



•YACKETY YACK: 





LEONARD EARL FIELDS 

Kinston, N. C. 

Age, 2.3: Weight, 148; Height. ; feel 8 inches 



THIS is the redoubtable "Al G," the horse- 
shoe king and the doctor; yes. the unlet- 
tered M. D.. the zoological proctor. This is 
the way it was: Some one strolled into "Al's" 
room one day and asked him how he was 
getting along with medicine. Now this 
inquisitive youth had no idea what Alec Pope 
was talking about when he said; "Fools rush 
in where angels fear to tread;" so that's 
settled, but when Al gave him to understand 
that medicine was fightin' language with 
him, and in wonderfully decorated diction, 
the unwitting fellow clawed his way through 
the sulphurous atmosphere to fresher air. 



VV1LL1,-\M FEIMSTER FOOTE 

Statesville, N. C. 

Age, 2j: Weight. 18;; Height, 6 Jeet 2 inches 

Iredell Countv Club; Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society; 
A. I. E. E. 

* Z \. 

DO it with electricity" is his motto. He is 
another one of the quiet birds of the 
campus, but along with this quietness he 
carries a capacity for work. Of course, now 
and then he takes a night off, and when he 
docs — well. \ou probabU- know the result. 
But on the whole he sticks to his work like a 
cootie to an army shirt. But the buildings 
are still standing. "Bill." old boy. and Com- 
mencement is scheduled for the middle of 
June, so arise on that happy day and come 
down and join your class. 





Sixty 



:yackety yack: 





CHARLES WORTH FOWLER 

Greensboro, N. C- 

Age, 21 : Weight. 142: Height, y feet 8 inches 



' L," ACH of us is an omnibus on which all of 
•I—' our ancestors ride." Try something like 
that on Worth and watch him grin. He'll 
know what you are talking about; for his 
exposure to geology — pronounced \ery rap- 
idly — was of something like four years' dura- 
tion. Furthermore, he's a geology bull, that 
boy; he can tell you the hardness of icicles. 
Although he still claims that he is where he is, 
largely because he's what he is, he's got it 
.down to a fairly fine point. Some may think 
that Worth doesn't put out much work. 
They are wrong; when it comes to work he's a 
cascaret. Ma\- he and Roy Francis fore\'er 
dwell peacefully together on this page. 



WlLLLWl ROY FRANCIS 

Waynesville, N. C. 

Age. 22; Weight, 16;: Height. 3 feet 11 inches 

Di Society; Freshman Debate: Junior Oratorical Contest; 
Havwood Countv Club. President (i, 3); Secretary (4); 
Class Basketball (1, i). 

ex. 

Sprinkle, sprinkle, little bull, how I marvel 
at your pull ; 

In this world of men so high, you the test of 
fact defy. 

Give me rope of any kind, and I'll fashion me 
a line. 

Then \\\ lasso all the cattle that a trusty line 
can battle. 

When the test of work shall come, 1 will take 
a little drum, 

And stand before the march of time, brandish- 
ing mv line sublime. 





Sixly-orxe 



:yackety yack: 





HOWARD EDW.ARD FULTON 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Age, 22; Weight, 160: Height, 5 feet 8 inches 

Class Football (1 ), Manager (3): Class Basketball (1. 4. 3, 4); 
Manager Class Baseball («); Varsity Football Squad (3, 4); 
Secretary Athletic Association; Commencement ^larshal 
(3); German Club. 

n K *. 

WE all were Freshmen; therefore, so was 
Howard, but you would never think it 
to see him execute the office of "Dean of 
Co-eds." With his cherubic smile and his 
unusually controllable golden locks, he handles 
his incumbency gracefully. You would 
hardly think that he is the same bird that is 
such a bundle of fury in a football uniform, 
called b> the crowd "Fats." He is called the 
"Deacon" on various occasions. 

He is such a model fellow and does his work 
so above reproach, that it is difficult to find 
anything to say about him. since he likes not 
the soft words, and we like not to hand them 
out. 



WADE ANDERSON GARDNER 
Wilson, N. C. 
Age, iS; Weigh, 122: Height. ; feet jyi inches 

Phi Society; Wilson County Club, President (3); Class 
Tennis {i, S), Manager and Captain (3); Class Executive 
Committee (3): Magazine Board (3), Assistant Business 
Manager (3); Manager Varsity Tennis 141; Athletic Coun- 
cil (4); German Club; Commencement Ball Manager (4). 

* B K , .A 2 *. 

W.\DE is a diminutive particle of human- 
ity, but with all that he made Phi Beta 
Kappa, and not Phi Beta Kappa only, but 
the tennis team. But you can't keep a 
squirrel on the ground in timber country, 
and Wade can grin just like a squirrel. 

It might be said that Wade can dance, and 
let the statement stand or fall on whether or 
not there were more credence than quibble 
in the readers make up; but to insure belief, 
let it be known that he learned to pirouette 
and glide during the summer as head waiter 
of the Wardman Park Inn, somewhere in 
D. C. 





Sixty-two 



:yackety yack: 




DANIEL LINDSAY GRANT 
Sneed's Ferry, N. C. 
Age. 2j: Weight. 14^: Height, 6 feet 

Phi Society. Secretary (9), Treasurer (3). Vice-President (3), 
Speaker (4): Freshman Debate; Sophomore Debate; Mary 
D. Wright Debate: Junior Oratorical Contest; Carolina- 
Washington and Lee Debate; Debating Council W, 3, 4); 
Yackf.tt Yack Board (4, 3); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; North 
Carolina Club; Sub-Assistant Manager Varsity Track (4), 
Assistant Manager {3); Class Executive Committee (4, 3); 
Secretary to the President H. 3); Athletic Council (4); 
Editor-in-Cbief Tar ;/frf (4); Amphoterothen; Grail; 
Gorgon's Head; Golden Fleece. 

TK A; E * A; AT.i 

'T~^AN" was one of the self-help students, 
•L^ and he certainly helped himself. He is 
a worth\' successor of Nat Gooding. His 
Tar Heel is a revelation to the campus: it not 
only appears twice a week, but makes port 
on time; and. then, it is a real publication. 

"Dan" is an organizer. "Dan" is a debater, 
a good one. one who wins debates on clear 
thinking. And too, "Dan" is a good fellow. 




LEE OVERMAN GREGORY 

Salisbury, N. C. 

Age, 2j; Weight, iso: Height, ; feet gK inches 

Rowan County Club; German Club; Class Football (1); 
Assistant Leader Spring German (3); Yackety Yack 
Board i4); Coop; Grail; Gimghoul. 

K S 

OLT?. Lee Overman is a namesake ; and we 
think he is a good one, whatever the 
qualifications be. There is a certain young 
person living at Danville who draws most of 
his literary efforts since he finished Freshman 
English; probably it is not in order to wonder 
who or what will draw his mathematical out- 
bursts now that he has relegated Freshman 
math to the credit side of his account with 
T. J. W., Jr. He majored, as we all know, in 
Freshman math; liked it so well that he took 
it for four years. He is a worshipper of the 
god Terpsichore; a leader of the "light, fan- 
tastic toe" carnivals. 





Sixty-three 



:yackety YACK' 




ARTHLIR GWYNN GRIFFIN 

Marshville, N. C. 

Age, 20; Weight, 160: Height, s f^^t g inches 



"I come back again to Union, 
Sweet Union, for a visit all 
Too brief, to that part of 
Union so dear to my heart." 

GRIFFIN is as much of Union County as 
the Democrat; are of South Carolina, 
which is one way of expressing absolute, 
indisputable, undivided totality. He wears 
glasses, and you know the kind of man that 
wears em. He's studious, he s quiet, he s 
unpresumptuous. he's imperturbable, he's 
sound to the core, and frank. "In union 
there is strength. " 



JOHN WORTH GLIARD 

Coinjock, N C. 

Age, 2j; Weight. 140; Height, s feet ; inches 

EHsli.T Mitchell Scientific Society: Chemical Journal Club: 
Assistant in Chemistry (3); American Chemical Society: 
Carolina Chmist, .\ssistant Business Manager (3), Business 
ilanager (4): Currituck Count.v Club, Vice-President. 

AXS. 

WHY, oh why, is it that Guard has such an 
insatiable desire to spend his time and 
kale in Norfolk'' And he has plenty of kale 
at hand fcr these frequent trips, too; we are 
not unmindful of that. Probably he has his 
reasons, though, and far be it from us to 
impute that reasons cannot be had. It is cur 
artless surmise, however, that the natives of 
Norfolk are of a temperament that has no 
wholesome regard for the nuisance commonly 
styled work. If this be true, we see why 
Guard spends so much time and kale there. 




'-^■m^. 




CHEMISTRY taul. 



Sixty-four 



•YACKETY YACK" 





WILLIAM WARD HAGOOD 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Age, 20; Weight, 160; Height, 6 feet 



K A. 

WILLI.AM has been trying to break in a 
pipe ever since he came to these ivied 
walls of learning back in the day of iqi7. 
when he achie\ed a one on Mr. Rankin s 
math classes and Captain Allen "held a fretful 
realm in awe." He is illustrious for having 
spent a dateless summer school session on 
this very "Hill." Maybe the folks who make 
ones on Freshman math don t e\er recover. 

,And say, did you ever hear "Bill" play a 
mandolin? Well, the ways in which that boy 
can twist, pucker, and otherwise contort 
those lips of his, would make Roger Ogburn 
look like a stone image, almost, but be it 
said of Roger, not qviite. .^nd — "Bill" has 
carried the traditions of Charlotte on and on. 



HOWARD ALEX.ANDER HAXBY 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Age, 22; Weight, 186; Height, ; feet g inches 

New Hanover Countv Club; First Year Resen-es Football 
(3); First Year Basketball Team (S); Varsity Football (4); 
Varsity Basketball (4); Wearer of N. C. 

n K *. 

HOW.-XRD, hailing from Wilmington, 
became heathen-weary of studying the 
ministry at \\"ake Forest last year, and so he 
came over to herd with the "goats" awhile. 
Whether or not he came to con\ert the 
"heathen" of this fair clime, we are unable 
to say; but he certainly has succeeded in con- 
quering where\er he has turned his hand. He 
was a veritable bulwark of strength on the 
Varsity eleven, a star guard on the basketball 
team, and through his politeness and never- 
failing courtesy, he has captured the hearts 
of his felloA-toilers in the race for the diploma. 





Sixty-fiie 



•YACKETY YACK: 





BOYD HARDEN 

Burlington. N. C. 
Age, 2/; ^'eighl, iSi: Height, s feet qK inches 



Di Society; Ala 



riub. 

<2 A; B e n. 



Pn-^ident (S, 3, 4); 
liiii.l ,'. 3. -t); VRfsitv 
iiln.' rnnimittee (■»)'; 
\' Ki r^ V\cK Board 



BOYD has that quality of versatility that 
allows one to start his college career on 
the track and end up Editor-in-Chief of the 
Yackety Yack. And that is not all: He is 
a formidable man in the backfield of any 
man's football team, which does not hinder 
him from getting the beauty out of Keats' 
"Urn " or the stirring spirit out of Tennyson's 
"Locksley Hall." 

He knows his way around the cinder track; 
he won an N. C. in the quarter mile. And 
never a more killing event was ever devised 
to test an athlete than a quarter-mile run. 



JOHN McKENZlE HARGETT 

Trenton. N. C. 

Age, 21 ; Weight, lyS; Height. ; Jeet ii inches 

HARGETT is one of those rare specimen 
who has remained with the "very ver- 
dant " in Carr "Barn " for all four of these 
eventful years. Whether he enjoys the noise 
and the pranks of the steers or just doesn't 
believe in innovations and changes, we are 
unable to say definitely, but we do venture to 
say that rooming with the Freshmen in Carr 
Building each year has taken him further 
and further away from the class, and it has 
missed some of the support which he was 
capable of giving. 





Sixty-six 



:yackety YACK! 





\VILL1.\M BLiRRUSS HARRELL 
Moyock, N. C. 
j\ge, 2.4; Weight, 14;: Height. ; Jeet ;; inches 
A. E. F. riuh. Economics Cluli. 

LORD of the Library." "High Keeper of 
the Archives, "Custodian of the Sacred 
Volume." might all be applied to Harrell 
with impunity; for by dispensing Scott, 
Cooper, Einstein, Shakespeare, and some 
equally well known "fossils over the Library 
desk, he has become best known to Freshmen 
and graduates alike. Never forgetting the 
dignity of his high office enough to become 
intimate with the class, he has still won the 
respect of his contemporaries by his polite- 
ness and willingness to oblige. 



CHARLES ROBERTS HARRIS 

Arden, N, C. 

Age. 22,' Weight, 14;; Height, 6 feet 

Buncombe Count.v Club; Elisha Mitchell Scientific Societ.v; 
Carolina Chemhtt, .\ssistant Business Manager (3); Chem- 
istr.v Journal Club. 

A X2 

TO "Pete" the gods have given one of those 
dispositions that exults in ease, basks in 
the warm light of tardiness, and is withal one 
of the most equable and amiable dispositions 
in this neck of the woods. The mention of 
woods: sh — , how "Pete" does like to hunt — 
hunt till the muse of Diana is grown impa- 
tient of favors and refuses her propitiou,^ 
consideration of his chases; hence "Pete" 
often comes home empty-handed, slowly, 
late, but ready to smile. But stay — "Pete" 
now believes that "Be it ever so humble 
there s no brew like vour own. 





Sixty-seven 



'YACKETY YACK" 





NATHANIEL PERKINSON HAYES 

Wise, N. C. 

Age, ig; Weight, ijy, Height. ; feet 8 inches 

Phi Society, Secretary (4), Vice-President (3); Vice-Presi- 
dent Warren County Club; Vice-President C. E. Society (i): 
North Carolina Club; Class Baseball (1, i, 3); Assistant in 
Civil Engineering; Math Club. 

"XT P.", "Aurora Borealls. " "Et Cetera," 
J- > • these are the appellations with which 
this lightly constructed being has been bur- 
dened. Despite all of these handicaps, we 
can well point to "Nat" as a wise individual. 
He is always awaiting for that lavender 
envelope to find its way into his box in Uncle 
Sam's office building, located across the plaza 
from the newer dorms. For four years he 
lived among the cat-sized rats of South Build- 
ing, in which he solved more than one math 
mystery produced by Sir Archibald's cohorts. 
With all of this store of experience, it is safe 
to predict that he will make some C. E. a 
good bush chopper. 




Club (9); Tar Heel Board, 

n* F''t*o- '1^; Contributing 

' ' Catawba County 

I' :. ' r, (3), Executive 

;> ' 1. Both" (3), Sir 

, .\.:/., i4i, Steve in "Sujy- 



HLfBERT CROL^ZE HEFFN'ER 

Maiden, N. C. 

Age. iq; Weight, 14s, Height, 6 feet 2 inches 

Di Society; Latin-Ai 
A-ssociate Editor ^SV 
Editor Magazinr \ 
Club, President \ . 
Board (4), Cast ^i. 
Andrew AguechtiL in 
pressed Desires" (4). 
n A. 

IF you were to see some exiguous, bamboo- 
designed individual walking along jerkily 
with a volume that looks like the works of 
Alan Seeger under his arms, and in the com- 
pany of one known in these parts as P. 
Greene, your recognizer will immediately 
register Hubertski Heffner. the famed Dod- 
gaster. A promiscuous member of the Phi- 
losophy Club, he takes ontological delusions 
right off the griddle. In his last play, camou- 
flaged "The Whichness of Thus." he has at 
last revealed to a gaping world that there are 
some things that remain to be seen. 



THE FATHER 
OF 

"dod Cast ye both' 




5^' 



Sixty-eight 



:yackety yack: 





RAY LORENZO HEFFNER 

Maiden, N. C. 

Age, i8; Weight, i}o: Height, } feet io}4 inches 

Catawba County Club. Secretarv and Treasurer (3); North 
Carolina Club; Class Football (3, i); Geologj- Club; Latin- 
American Club. 

THERE are some things "Boots" refuses 
to do, among them are these; He shaves 
not, neither does he study (he has almost a 
polo-team of whiskers ; we understand that it 
requires but a few for this). It is a generally 
accepted fact that he was disappointed in 
Lo\e (not J. Wilbert, however) some time in 
his >'outh, for which he is not insufferably off 
the soft stuff. He has been accused of poetry 
by R. O. Smith, and Smith is an honorable 
man. Moreover, it is said that he has never 
written to a girl in his life. How .nultifarious 
are his idiosyncrasies! He himself asked that 
this be said, too: "He studies awfully hard," 
to which Wilbert Love amended: "Just 
before exams." It is alleged that "Boots" 
understands this password: "Eddie." 



W.AVERLY MAULDIN HESTER 

Tryon, N. C. 

Age, 21; Weight, 144: Height, 6 feet 

German Club; Cabin. 

A Tn. 

LEAVING his established vocation as a 
vender of grapes in Tryon, Waverly 
came to us four years ago — sophisticated in 
all of the ways of the world. With a devil- 
may-care air, taking everything as it came, 
he waited until his Senior year to put in his 
hard work for graduation. Quiet and reserved 
as a rule, yet enjoying a good party with the 
best of them, Waverly has drifted through 
college, scarcely making any serious ripples 
on the placid surface of campus affairs. 





Sixty-nine 



•YACKETY YACK" 





PHILLIP HETTLEMAN 

Goldsboro, N. C. 

Age. 2/. Weight. i6q: Height, s feet ;o inches 

Phi Societv. Serreta 



Dehi 



CM: Fr...hln. 
II. 



Inl 



Carolina Club; Circulation .Ma 
ciate Editor Tar Ileet (4). Bus! 
Club; Amphoterothen. 

WELL, he came over here three years ago. 
and finding that board was high, books 
higher, and time dear, decided that four 
years was too much chronological tax for a 
diploma, so he has extracted one in three. 
Meanwhile he has fiddled around with the 
Tars — Heel and Baby — and the Carolina 
Magazine, usually in a business-like fashion, 
but occasionally in a literary effort, making 
no insignificant record for himself. Philip 
believes in work, spending very few idle 
hours. 



Age. 



THERA EARL HINSON 

Monroe, N. C. 
Weight. i}6: Height. ; feet 7 inches 



Union County Club: A. I. E. E.. Vice-President («). Treas- 
urer (31; Class Basketball (3); Class Ba.seball (3): Class 
Football (i. 3. 4). 

TLBBY" was almost an officer once. 
Learning to "cuss" as ist Sergeant of 
the S. A. T C , he has kept up this elegant 
accomplishment to the present day by sling- 
ing various endearing epithets at brothers 
Thorndike and Johnny Mustard of the elec 
trical engineering department. In his Junior 
year he joined Johnny Foster at his business 
graft at the E.xchange. "Tubby" must have 
made a success of this graft, for. in class foot, 
basket, or base, ball, he can always find a 
new uniform when other mortals cannot find 
even a sock. 





Seventy 



:yackety YACK" 





BENJAMIN IVEY HOFFNER 

Salisbury, N. C. 

Age. 2j: Weight. ;j6. Height, y feel 6 inches 

Di Society; Rowan County Club, President (4): Math Clul>. 

' T KE" entered school as an innocent member 
1 of the Class of '20, but the war got him 
for a while, and then Uncle Sam dumped him 
on us. (This is just a fling at him to even it 
up for those snowballs he used to toss at us 
ever so gently.) We are glad to have him. 
and we expect that he will make Wall Street 
hum one of these days. He already has a 
very creditable collection of portraits of 
mademoiselles, and the scented en\'elopes 
arriving in each mail indicate that he will 
choose one of them to be the madam. But 
"Ike" does not wish to be quoted as saying 
that love is a primrose affair. And, oh yes! 
He is known to have been cedar birded out 
of a dollar his Senior year, after avowing to 
the perpetrator that he was not a cedar bird. 



EDWIN MICHAEL HOLT 
Duke, N, C 
Age, 2j, Weight. 160: Height. 5 fi'et 10 inches 
Phi Society: Oak Ridge Club; Harnett County Club. 

EDWIN will also answer to the appellation 
of "Mike." He did some time at Oak 
Ridge Institute preparatory to coming to seek 
the "flaming torch" held high in the shadows 
ol old Davie Poplar, and his serene, even if a 
bit severe, face would seem to attest to his 
success on his quest. He is somewhat "salty, 
according to the use of the term by those who 
follow the mast to rough and foreign ports, 
for he has seen the wa\es break from the 
plowing prow and in the adventurous waters 
of the Spanish Main When he came to us 
four years ago, along with him came "Hooley 
Stack, which youth roamed with him when he 
was seeing the Southern Seas. But he is 
apparently satisfied now to seek his Romance 
"around the corner" — a place where it is 
most often lurking. 





Seventy-oi^e 



•YACKETY YACK: 





EDGAR FRANK HOOKER 

Kinston, N. C. 

Age, 2/; Weight, ii8; Height, } feet 6 inches 

Phi Society; Lenoir County Club: German Club; Cabin- 

SN. 

Oh, vake un call mc early, mommer dear, 
Pfor I'se ter be dcr Quveen uf der May! 

Oh, gif me time to hunt my new pink shirt, 
Oh, gif me time to make my glad array. 

FRANK is a seeker in the field of medicine ; 
and that fact probably throws light on the 
following bit of lore. As he was coming off a 
lecture on evolution, he was once asked, "Did 
you get all that line, Frank!'" Frank replied; 
"Well, no; 1 followed him until he implied 
that I was related to a cricket, but then he 
left me," This is not an allegory; it is just a 
local legend unadorned. Frank was ever 
ready to give a cheery "hellc, ' and we hold 
this in our memorv when wc think of him. 




JUNIUS MOORE HORNER 

Age. 2o; Weight, i6o: Height. 6 feet 2 inches 
Asheville, N. C. 

Di Society: Buncombe County Club; Assistant Manager 
Varsitv Baseball (3): Pan-Hellenic Council; German Club. 

z *. 

J LINE" comes from "The Land of the Sky," 
and as far as appearances go, is true to 
the type; for to look at him as he walks 
thoughtfully along some mall, you would 
think he never says a word to anyone; but 
what we are talking about is this; he's got an 
awful line when he gets strung out — it is a 
veritable lasso — perhaps he gets his sober 
mien honestly, as his father is a bishop. 

He spent some time at Plattsburg during 
the argument with William der Gruff. Then 
he came back down to the "Hill" and did 
some one-two-three-four, after which he was 
to go somewhere in Georgia. While awaiting 
orders to entrain, an order came telling them 
".As you were" — the Heinies had signed 
another scrap of paper. Since then "June" 
has applied himself to the studious pursuit 
of a scrap ol sheepskin. 




Sevei^ty-tico 



:yackety yack: 





W1LLL\RD PEYTON HLIDSON 

Sparta, N. C. 

Age, 2_j; Weight, i ;o; Height. ; feet g inches 

Di Society, First Corrector (31; Allegheny County Club, 
President; Associate Editor Tar Heel; Contributing Editor 
Carolina Magazine; Latin-American Club. 
£2 A; E * A; * B K. 

'"VA /■ P." roomed with Charley Phillips; per- 
VV . haps that explained some of his excellent 
qualities, and these same excellent qualities 
ha\e kept him from doing anything but ye 
excellent work; ergo, he does not go in for 
sensationalism. He has never stooped to 
politics; he never imbibed anything save 
Carolina spirit, but he is one of the charter 
members of the Young Men's Crapshooting 
.'Xssociation. 

His greatest worries in college have been 
just before examinations — as have many 
others' worries, be it said — at which times he 
has given much evidence of serious concern 
whether or not he will make a one or a two. 



ADELINE EDMONDS HUGHES 

Henderson, N. C. 

Age, .',■ Weight, ii6: Height, ; Jeet 2 inches 



, '18; U. N. C. Womar 
; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 



Association; 



YOU may talk of the lassies of fair Scotia's 
hills, ■ 
Whose smiles are a bane to worries and ills; 
Of the maidens whose graces and beauties 

enhance 
The witchery of Egypt, the glory of France ; 
Of those whose loveliness sweetly doth reign 
In faraway Persia or picturesque Spain; 
Or the blossoms of naive Nippon, you may 

choose ; 
But none will compare with our own .Aline 

Hughes. 





Seventy-three 



•YACKETY YACK" 




RLIFL'S AVERA HLINTER 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Age, 21, Weight, i;o; Height. ; feet loyz inches 
Wake County Club: German Club. 
Z *. 

RUFUS missed one fourth of his college 
career, entering the University as a 
lucky Soph after a year at Wake Forest 
Funny part of the story is that despite his 
good start in the other direction, he has 
turned out to be one of the necessary acces- 
sories when the dances are "tripped," "shim- 
mied." or "toddled," as the case might be. 
And when he bandolines his hair, powders his 
beaming face, and otherwise prepares for 
these dances, he makes a perfect mark for 
Cupids arrows. We would not lea\e the 
impression that Rufus is just "social" and 
nothing else, because that is a misapprehen- 
sion. He has, by diligent application to his 
work, succeeded in overcoming the effects of 
the "naval land" forces during the S. A. T. C, 
and is graduating in the insurance business — 
and possibly matrimony 




H-e iMimtS IT WICITEDI 

Seventy-four 



3n mrmariam 

A, S. M. KENNED" 

1898-1920 

A UGL'STL'S Summerfield Merrimon 
-'*■ Kenney was born in Raleigh, N. C, 
on December 20. i8q8. He was the only 
child of John B. and Margaret Merrimon 
Kennev His early childhood days were 
spent in Raleigh, and after the death of 
his father he and his mother moved to 
Salisbury. N. C, where they made their 
home with Mr. and Mrs. Edwin C 
Gregory 

Graduating from the Salisbury High 
School, he spent a year at Horner's School 
in Charlotte and entered the L'niversity 
in the spring of iqi8, being a member of 
the Class of igii. At the conclusion of his 
third year in Chapel Hill, he accepted a 
position with the Liggett & Myers To- 
bacco Company, and it was while in the 
employ of this company that he con- 
tracted the illness that resulted in his 
death at the University Infirmary, on 
November 2, iqio. 

While at the University he took part in 
numerous activities He was a member 
of the Kappa Sigma Fraternity, the Coop, 
the Order of the Minotaur, the Invisible 
Order of Stygians, Ascistant Cheerleader, 
Vice-President of the School of Commerce 
and leader of several dances. 

To know Merrimon Kenney was to love 
him He made friends wherever he went, 
and he went everywhere. His carefree, 
jovial disposition made him a great favor- 
ite and his unusual personality always 
made a lasting impression. His originality, 
his humorous ingenuity, added to any 
occasion and his happy, cheerful smile 
was of the kind that makes the world a 
better place to live in Sympathetic in 
times of sorrow, cheery in times of depres- 
sion, hilarious in times of merriment, he 
blended his mood to fit any occasion, and 
his three years on the campus added much 
to the pleasure of those with whom he 
came into contact. 



■YACKETY YACK" 




JOHN HOSEA KERR. Jr. 
Warrenton, N- C. 
Age, 2;; Weight, 120: Height, 5 feel g inche. 
County Cluh (1); S( 



Secretary Warren-Haliti 
Society ("i). Speaks 



Phi 



(3). Sl)r:.k.- 



Inter-Society Debate (1); Intercoll 
mencement Debate (3): Debating ("".mki. i! .'1 Iiit-r-SiKiotv 
Sophomore Debate (^); Latin-Ameri.Mii Cliib. S,-. r.hiry ('2). 
President (3); Tar Heel Board W). Managing Editor (3); 
Magazine Board (5. 3); President Class (3); Student Coun- 
cil, Secretary (3); Campus Cabinet (3, t). President (4); 
Y. M. C. A.' Cabinet (-4); Greater University Student Com- 
mittee (4): International Polity Club; Philosophy Club; 
German Club; Cabin; Golden Fleece; Grail; Amphote- 

n A; S T: T K A; K A. 

VALIANTLY did "Jawn' fight the fight 
of the "Pcepul," mightily did he extol 
the virtues of the down-trodden. ;.ealously did 
he organize movements to uplift em. He 
led the Junior? in his day as only a leader of 
the "pecpul" can lead, and the Juniors, they 
followed im as only Juniors can follow. 




HAYWOOD GORDON KINCAID 

Gastonia, N. C. 

Age, 22. Weight, 140: Height, } feel Syi inches 

Di Society. Censor Morum (i). Corrector («. 3); Gaston 
County Club; Philosopy Club; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 1 1 . 

US: ATA. 

HERR Mutt" has had a very varied career. 
During his short stay in this world he 
has engaged in real estate and insurance 
business in the capacit\ of office boy. served 
some three months as cub scandal-monger for 
the Gastonia "Gazitt." and been the guest of 
L'ncle Sam during the summer of iqi8 at 
Plattsburg. And we almost forgot to say 
that he has been involved in one or two more 
or less serious encounters with Miss Venus. 
It is understood that the "Herr" intends to 
return to the capitol of Gaston County and 
assume high responsibilities as a manufac- 
turer 





Seventy-five 



:yackety yack: 




CHARLES HDMLIND KISI'LER 

Morganton. N. C. 

Age, 2;; Weight, 14;: Height, ; feet gyi inches 

Burke County Club; Cliiss Football (I, i, 3); German Club. 

Ben. 

NOW you can say that you have saw a 
speed king, but here is a boy who put at 
least two of the e's in speed. He dances, 
smokes ye old weed, patronizes Pickwick 
Palace, makes flying week-end trips, keeps 
up-to-the-minute files of the debutantes, 
then, if there is any time left, he accommo- 
dates a lesson or two 

Not infrequently has he taken breakfast in 
Durham, lunch in .^sheville, supper in Kno.\- 
ville. and gone to a dance in Lexington, 
Kentucky, that night. If there were such a 
thing as wind tax, he would have to have a 
Burroughs attachment somewhere on that 
Mercury boat of his. It is impossible to 
associate him with anything but traveling; 
he travels like a bushel of bullets. 




ROBERT NEWTON LEDFORD 
Hot Springs, N. C. 
Age, 26; Weight, i;o: Height, ; feet q inches 
Mars Hill Club; A. E. F. Club. 

JOHN Marshall was a judge of the law of 
the land, Lord Chesterfield was the judge 
of a well-dressed man, Abe Liquorman was 
the judge of good corn whiskey, and Ledford, 
having spent many vacations here, is a 
"judge" cf a summer school girl. Besides, 
"Judge" is king of the horseshoe tossers. 
probably getting hi. experience in this gentle 
game while playing with the Bosches during 
recent years. If you went to know more 
about this specimen, ask the soda-jerkers or 
the frequenters of the New Dorms Athletic 
Field. 





Seventy-six 



:yackety yack: 





COLVIN THEOEX3RE LEONARD 

Greensboro, N. C 

Age. 2j; Weight, iji: Height, 5 feet 7 inches 

Di Society; Giiilford Counly Club, President f4): Tar Heel 

nl) Yackety Yack Board (4); Class Baseball 

Oxi: S T; 2 -\ X. 

HE is one of the professional journalists. 
He made his first Record with the Greens- 
boro ditto. The Scandinavian locks of him 
bespeak, or should bespeak, a fairness of 
mind and heart that is no less than a mile 
deep. The blue eyes of him attest, or should 
attest, a fidelity of purpose and soul that 
extends beyond to-day. The free smile of 
him betrays, or should betrav, something of 
the secret that has enabled him to marshal 
that limitless circle of friends. The excellent 
ensemble of him tells you, or most certainl\- 
should tell you. why" we hate to lose the 
beauty of his friendship. 



BENJAMIN BAILEY LIIPFERT 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Age. 23: Weight, 17;; Height, 6 feet 1 inch 

Di Society; Fors.vth County Club: President of Class <i)- 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (3. 3); Student Council (3, 4); Com- 
mencement Marshal (3); Class Baseball (1); Varsity Foot- 
ball Squad (3. 4); Varsity Basketball (1, 3, 8. 4): Wearer of 
N. C; German Club; Coop; Grail; Gimghoui. ""'^""f 
E * .i; * A *; i K E. 

B .A I LEY stands high in the esteem of his 
fellowmen; .Attest: twice on the Student 
Council. 

A recruit stood under a shower on far away 
Paris Island. Then a voice was heard near 
by; that voice so easily known even in such a 
tangle of voices. It was "Bengie," and 
neither the recruit nor he knew of the other's 
presence. But the recruit relates now that 
at the sound of that familiar voice, Paris 
Island stock went up immediately. So'highlv 
does Bailey live in the hearts of his friends 
they like to have him near. And the world 
will like him when it learns him. 





Seventy-seven 



:yackety yack: 





ARCHIBALD CALEB LINEBERGER. Jr 

Belmont, N. C. 
Age, 2/; Weight, 140: Height. 5 feet 7 inches 

Di Society; Gaston County Club, Vice-President (■?); North 
Carolina Club; Class Baseball («); Class Football (S); 
Chairman Class Executive Committee (3); Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet; Commencement Marshal; German Club. 

Ben. 

WE point with pndc to another one ol 
our red-headed members. He is doubt- 
less better remembered by many as the 
"deported Red " We ne\er knew him to 
commit a rash act. unless it was in connec- 
tion with snowballing the Freshmen, and 
everybody likes the "doe things. He always 
has the same smile for everybody, and it is 
always returned You couldn't help it if you 
tried. "Red" was chairman of our Junior 
Class Executive Committee and was one of 
those who were responsible for the fine spirit 
of class unity and campus unity that was 
initiated during that year. 



iha Mitchell Scientific Society; Lalin- 
ntro Hispano; Le Cercle Franfais; 



FERNANDO LLORENS 

Santiago de Cuba. Cuba 

Age, 21. Weight, 14S: Height, ; feet 4 inches 

Medical Society; 
American Club; 
German Club. 

*X; A T.i. 

TLORENS was not onto the ways of the 
J—/ world when he came to us four years ago; 
he got a room in Carr "Barn . He has always 
been sweet on the ladies; he had one back 
then, and had her so completely that she let 
him ha\e her dear little canary bird to sing 
to him of her as he labored o\er biology; all 
of which was very well until the inevitable 
cat came on the stage, then the cat lost all nine 
of his lives in the settlement. Llorens was 
imported from balmy and palmy Cuba, where 
the signoritas smile at one provokingly from 
behind green lattice, where the cool shade of 
a palmetto and a breeze-catching hammock 
is a god's share. 





Seventy-eight 



:yackety yack: 





BURG IN EDISON LOHR 

Lincolnton, N C. 

Age, 2j; Weight. i6o: Height, j feet loyi inches 

Di Society; Freshman Debating Society (1), President: 
Elisba Mitchell Scientific Societv; Geological Club; Class 
Football; Class Basketball; Carolina Playmakers. 

ET 'em try to come through. I'll fix em " 
A big. clumsy-looking lellow on the class 
football field appeared to be able to back up 
his statement. .And when it came to charging 
— the Sophs crumbled. Going at this rate 
throughout four years, professors or courses 
never seemed to give "B. E. " much trouble — 
he got by, even if sometimes it was on all 
fours. 




FR.ANK ROBBINS LOWE 

Winston-Salem, N, C. 

Age, 2/; Weight, 1-2; Height. 5 feet Q}'i inches 

Di Societv; Vice-President Class (1); Greater Council (1); 
Class Baseball (1. iV. Varsilv Baseball (.1. 4); First Year 
Reserves Football (1); S. A. T. C. Football ii): Varsity 
Football (3. 4); Elected Captain for 19il; Assistant Leader 
Fail German (31; Assistant Leader Gorgons Head Dance 
(31; Commencement Ball Manager( 3); German Club, Presi- 
dent (4); President Athletic .Vssociation (4); Coop; Mino- 
taur; Grail: Gorgon's Head. 

K2. 

I .AM thinking, good friend "Runt. " that 
Cailyle taught you how to punt; 
For when it comes to manly kicking, you've 

the toe that 1 am picking. 

.And when \ou lea\'e our loyal campus, the 

girls all say "He's come to vamp us. " 

"Faint heart ne er won fair lady — they all 

know this from Sue to Sadie; 

.And when you set your face to start, you 

break a line or break a heart. 
We know you well and well we know, that 
you're a man. vou old "Runt " Lowe. 




Seventy-nine 



•YACKETY YACK: 





ELBERT HOKE MARTIN 

Charlotte, N. C 

Age, 20; Weight, 160; Height, ; feet 11 inches 

Di Society; Mecklenburg County Cluh; North Carolina 
Club; Math Club; Class Baseball («): Class Football (■»); 
Class Executiye Committee (4); Germao Club. 
A 2 *. 

HE'S our undisputed all-American horse- 
shoe hound, his record being 30 ringers 
and 3 leaners out of 40 hea\es : both unbeat- 
able and unauthenticated, Hoke s smiling 
physiognomy is a sight not unknown tc the 
indefatigable frequenters of that grotto of 
the peanutted pantomime, known in the 
patois of the proletariat by the Dickensic 
name of "Pickwick Palace." Yes. "Hoke's" 
been there. He eats chemistry after a fashion 
calculated to make Boyle kick his coffin in 
envy. Is he capable of love? Aye; he loves 
"Asia" Minor for that six on zoology so 
deeply that it warps his toenails. 



J. AMES SPEED MASSENBURG 
Age, 23; Weight. 137: Height, s /««' 7 inches 

Phi Society. Secretarj- (i). Vice-President (3); Intra-Fresh- 
man Debate; Intra-Freshman-Sophomore Debate: Varsity 
Track; Manager S. A, T. C. Football; .\ssistant Manager 
Varsity Football (3); Franklin County Club, Secretary- 
Treasurer {i\. President (4); Class Basketball (i): Tar 
Riyer Club; Latin-American Club; North Carolina Club; 
Campus Cabinet. Secretary (S); Chairman Athletic Com- 
mittee Campus Cabinet; Class Treasurer (3); Class Execu- 
tiye Committee (31; Alternate Carolina-Hopkins Debate; 
Manager Tar Heel '3); Y.vckety Y.^ck Board (3), Manager 
Y.vcKETV Y'ack 14); Chief Commencement Marshal (3); 
German Club; Elks Club. 

2 * E. 

HE answers to "Speed," meaning he's 
somewhat of a track hound : "Old Dear," 
meaning that he's neither old nor dear: 
"Bully, implying that he has cowboy pro- 
clivities; "Dill Pickle. " suggesting spice; "Old 
Thing, " proclaiming that he's more or less of 
a joke . Now there is one thing about these folks 
that collect a big assortment of nicknames : 
■When \'OU find a bird who dangles five from 
his belt, you are safe in an even bet that he's 
been a rounder. 







Eighty 



rVACKETY YACK' 





THONUS MORTIMER McKNIGHT 

Mooresville, N. C. 

Age, 20; Weight, 144; Height, s feet 7 inches 

'' I "OM" is convinced beyond the shadow of 
1 a doubt that he is an excellent dancer; he 
worships at the shrine of Terpsichore diurn- 
ally as well as noctumalK'. When he became 
a Senior, he developed a prodigious social 
penchant Everyone knows he is red-headed, 
therefore there is no need of mentioning that ; 
hence, the name "Red;" but he says that he 
cannot understand why people call him "Red" 
just because his hair is a little pink- Bad as 
we hate to tell it, "Tom" has a collection of 
hair oils, tonics, and cosmetics that would 
gladden the heart of Cleopatra, if it did not 
poison it with envy. This is hard ^o reconcile 
with the fact that he is a lover of baseball; he 
catches when it is not too hot. but the sun 
makes life pretty tough for "Tom." A cer- 
tain prof used to call him "Mcester Mick- 
Night." Oh, it was a treat to hear it! 



LOUIS deROSSET K'IACMILLAN 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Age, 21 ; Weight, rjS: Height, j feet 7 inches 
New Hanover County Club. Vice-President (1): North 
Carolina Club; Class Basketball (i), JIanager (i); Class 
Football {i. 3, 4); German Club: Cabin. 

<!> X; A T v.. 

JOINING the "vacation boys" in his Sopho- 
more year and pre-med pro\ed too much 
for "Bully." and therefore he dropped 
out a year just to graduate with '21. Rooming 
at Mrs. Bain's near the center of Chapel 
Hill's social circle, he can get up an impromptu 
dance, and being blessed with speed, he can 
hold up his end on a class football line with 
equal ease. "Bully's" unassuming manner 
and his good humor ha\'e made him a good 
comrade for the last four years. 





Eighty-one 



'YACKETY YACK' 





LEON VINCENT MILTON 
Greensboro. N. C. 
Age, 22; Weight. i;o: Height, } feel 7 inches 
Class Football (1): Class Baseball 'D; Member A. I. E. E.; 
Guilford County Club; Manager Freshman Basketball; 
Assistant Manager Tar Ueet: Varsity Baseball; Wearer of 
N. C. 

*ZN:eX. 

I REMEMBER, I remember, as Tom Hood 
used to say. 

When Powell led the Tar Heel crew, and 
Roberts used to play; 

I remember. I remember (Hood repeated, too) 

When Feimster took the reins in hand to run 
the husky crew ; 

Then comes a picture to my mind, a lazy, 
shambling one, 

Dick Milton with his dubious smile, his play- 
ing had begun. 

Yet I remember streaks of speed, lightning 
flashes they, 

.Around the field about shortstop, where 
Milton used to play. 



THO.M.AS OWEN MOORE 

New Bern, N. C. 

Age, 20; Weight, 1S4: Height, 6 feet yi inch 

PreMdent Craven Countv Club (4); Phi Societv; V. M. I. 
Club; Carolina Playmakers; German Club. 

A K E. 

TOM" was imported from V. M. I., and we 
soon found out that he was a regular 
born Carolina fellow. Professor Koch dis- 
co\cred him before he was here \'ery long, and 
he IS now connected with the Playmakers 
regime and the "Drammer of the Peepul." 
He is quiet and unobtrusive, but don't hint 
that he is bashful, for when the dances come 
around and the gym blossoms forth in its 
glory. "Tom " is Johnny on the spot. We 
ha\e found no superficiality about him. We 
are glad that he saw fit to join the Class of "21. 





Eighty-two 



:yackety yack- 




■^ge, 21 



JOHN De morris 
Roxboro N C. 
Weight, i8o: Height, j feel g inches 



Person County Cluh; Elisba Mitchell ScienliBc Societv; 
K'liVa „*■;•> X?.''"*-^' Basketball Squad (1); Varsity Basket- 
ball (8, 3 4); Wearer of N. C; Minstrels (1); Glee Club (3); 
Uerman Club. 

* z N; Ben. 

WHEN dressed for the game in which he is 
most proficient — basketball — his strik- 
ing resemblance to Modest, the lady from 
Milo, has earned for John the title of Venus. 
Taking civil engineering as a side line, playing 
basketball, picking a guitar, and singing' the 
"Bull" for amusement. "Johnny" has jour- 
nc\cd through four years of college, adding 
to the pleasure of others by his happy faculty 
of always having the good word and a pleasant 
smile. 




BARNETTE NAIMAN 

Greensboro, N. C. 

'■\ge, 22,- Weight, ijo: Height. } feet 6 inches 

Phi Society; Guilford County Club; Elisha Mitchell Scien- 
Ii6c Societv; American Chemical Societv; Assistant in 
Chemistry (S, 3. 4); Chemical Journal Club. 

NAIMAN is one of the species known in 
these parts as a "math bull;" he is also 
a very close student. That is not all — he has 
the home brew mania. Now he is not to be 
confused with the species of home brew 
hounds, for his interest in the pesky stuff is 
purely scientific, as he works only to ascer- 
tain the rapidity of fermentation and not the 
titillation of evaporation. 





Eighty-three 



:yackety YACK! 





LOUIS MANN NELSON 

Florence, S. C. 

Age, 2;; Weight, i4j; Height, ; feet 11 inches 

President South Carolina Club (■•); Elista Mitchell Scien- 
tific Society; Associate Editor Carolina Chemist: German 
Club. 

AX 2. 

OUIET, unassuming, polite, and chemically 
inclined. Louis is one of the reliable men 
of the class, even though he does come from 
the land of the hot-headed "Sand-Lappers," 
Spending most of the time at the Chemistry 
building, heating and inhaling vile fumes, he 
has not had time to give to "chewing the 
rag," which makes for a wide number of 
acquaintances: but during his sojourn on the 
"Hill" he has made fast friends of the people 
with whom he has come in contact. 



MARCUS CICERO STEPHENS NOBLE. 
JR 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Age, 21; Weight, 1S4; Height, ; feet q inches 
New Hanover County Club; Glee Club; Mandolin Club; 
Orchestra; S. A. T. C. Minstrels; Music Clubs, Vice-Presi- 
dent, President; Class Tennis; Associate Editor Tar Heel 
(Summer School); German Club. 

K X. 

MARCUS Cicero Stephens Huckleberry 
Finn Washington Irving Cobb Noble, 
Junior. Freshman, Sophomore. Seenyer, will 
appear here tonight supported by Miss Helen 
General and the Carolina Glee Club. Thus 
did they draw the floor-breaking crowds 
wherever they went. "Mark" is without 
dispute the most lettered man in the class. 
His initial velocity is something tremendous. 
"What's in a name?" a citizen of Stratford 
inquires, and "Mark" camouflages his face 
with a grin. 




LORD NfL50N 

South umuNA 




Eighty-four 



:yackety YACK' 





KENNETH B..\RNiES NOE 

Beaufort, N. C. 

Age, 22; Weight, 16;: Height, 6 feel 



THE most outstanding feature of Noe is 
his height; his mcst cherished diversion is 
civil engineering; his worst habit has always 
been "Car Barns. " .Among his distinctive 
qualities is one most unusual in these domains. 
Enuring the rages of the S. .A. T C, he was 
wont to rise at four A. M., dress, and lone- 
somely wait the clarion notes of reveille. 
You're a better man than I am, "Kussen 
Ken. " 

Noe presents one of those most interesting 
(in his age) studies in humanity typified by 
the Sphinx of far-off Egypt; he is given 
little to words If we are literalist. we but 
need hearken to the old adage. "Silence is 
golden," to convince ourselves that in him 
we have a second Rockefellow. 



ROGER WENDELL OGBLIRN 

Kernersville, N. C. 

.Age, 21: Weight, 16}; Height, ; Jeel 11 inches 

Di Socielv; Glee Club (S, 3); Vice-President (3); Forsyth 
County Club; Class Football (i); Class Baseball (S, 3). 

SLiPPOSE that you were sitting over in 
Battle Park studying for a quiz on Eng- 
lish four and were to hear a voice in the 
bushes saying: "My name is Ozymandias, 
king of kings: look on my works, ye mighty, 
and despair." You. of course, look up. You 
see a \'isage contorted to the most utterly 
ludicrous, stupid, asinine, grotesque, degree 
of the fantastic; to such a degree as to make 
a gargoyle look like a Francis X. Bushman. 
Ah ! you know him, it's none other than Roger 
"Eyebrow " Ogburn. Sarter Resartus has the 
same effect on him that ether has on some 
people. He carries a heart breaking, pair of 
dreamy eyes. He slings soft, falsetto lines, 
ones that make em sigh demtirely. We call 
attention to his going into medicine and offer 
two to one that he 11 be a heart specialist. 





Eighty-Jive 



■YACKETY YACK: 




SIHON CICERO OGBURN. Jr 

Winston-Salem. N. C 
Age, 20: Weight. 170; Height, 6 feet 

Di Societv; Forsvth County Club: Carolina Minstrels (1); 
Captain V. N. C. Battalion (11; Elisha Mitchell ScientiBc 
Society: American Chemical Society: Assistant in Chem- 
istry (2, 3): Chemical Journal Club; German Club. 

AX 2. 

TRAVEL back in mind to the days when 
C J. Hardee and Bob Devereux kept 
house in Old East 25, the days when Cicero 
was a Freshman. "Cy," as C. J. called him, 
was started off in the way he should have 
gone, for they used to apply the hairbrush to 
the squirming and vociferous youngster 
nightly, just to remind him that he was 
young, but pretty soon C. J. left and "Cy" 
grew out from under the watchful eye of 
Bob . ,so next we see him pullingthe troubadour 
act at Duke's in Durham, with his violin. 
Ah! he was a grand screnader; how his 
aureate locks would scintillate in the moon s 
rays. Now as it were: 

But those days are shoved behind me 

long ago and far away ; 
Now 1 never play my harp to anv one but 
Bessie Mac 





HARRY EDWARD ONEAL 

Scranton, N, C. 
Age, 20: Weight. /j6. Height. 5 feet 7 inches 



BECAL'SE he was so very quiet and 
retiring, we did not realize what a fine 
fellow we had in him until he was about to 
leave us. He never says a word out of place; 
and he would go for days without saying 
anything if someone did not interrupt his 
introspection. 

We also found out that he could write — 
write those feelingful. colorful, moodful things 
that fill you with a weird and infinite appre- 
ciation He writes about poetic things; about 
the tender p;tals of roses, about the witchery 
of the moonlight, about the doom that hangs 
in the clouds over cemeteries. 



NOBODV DOtir 




V<,NOW IVUTHIN 




'bout this 




SUr» so WHnr 




CBN flFELi-DH' 00; 




IM «orrn M'Kn 




REHDEHf 




s^W). 


s 



Eighty-six 



rVACKETY YACK' 








ADOLPHUS BINGHAM OWENS 
Charlotte, N C, 
Age, 20: Weight, 180: Height 6 feet 2 inches 
Di Society; Mecklenburg County Club; Elisha Mitchell 
Scientific Society; American Chemical Society; Chemical 
Journal Club; Assistant in Economics( 4); Class Basketball 
(8); S. A. T. C. Football; Varsity Football Squad (3); 
Varsity Football (4); Assistant Business Manager Yackety 
\ack (4); German Club. 

" pARDON me, gentlemen, for interrupting 
J^ your privacy, but 1 am A. B Owens of 
Charlotte 1 do not want vou to know me 
for my ability to boot Dr, Bell, nor because 1 
went out for Varsity, religiouslv, and as relig- 
iously came in, so to speak; but 1 want you 
to keep in Ttiind this: that just because one 
fails to make a football team or Phi Beta 
Kappa, or the Tar Baby staff, it does not 
necessarily say that he is not a 'bull of a man. 
I thank vou.-' 



BAILEY PATRICK 
Hickory. N. C. 
Age, 2]: VCeight, 140; Height, 6 feet 
A, E. F, Club, 
11 K A. 

JUDGING from the products that we have 
seen, Davidson must produce social butter- 
flies. Look at Neal Pharr and Tommy 
Hawkins. Both keep a long mailing list to 
\-arious cities of the State. But Bailev even 
surpasses these two as a ladies' man. Quiet 
and a good student, you would scarcely sus- 
pect It of him. This is a fact, though he has 
so rnany good chances with the ladies that he 
can t settle on any one. and thus has come to 
be considered only fickle and inconstant. 





Eighty-seven 



•YACKETY YACK: 





HOWARD ALEXANDER PATTERSON 

Chapel Hill, N. C, 

Age, i8: Weight, ijs: Height, } Jeet loyi inches 

Orange County Club; Class Raseball; Sub-Assistant Man- 
ager Varsily Foutball (i); German Club; Gimghoul. 

■i-BK; S AE. 

' T TAP ' is the youngest of the cohorts of '2 1 . 
I 1 As all great men have hobbies, he has 
begun his qualifications early by picking out 
three: dancing, women, and frogs. Not a 
small coincidence was it that his voice went 
through that doubtful period of change during 
his Senior year while he was making an 
exhaustive study of the vocal cords of amphi- 
bians. But happy to say, "Hap" is now in 
fine fetter to even talk in shadowy bowers, 
beneath real moons. 

Besides and above this. "Hap" is none 
other than he who put up such a valiant fight 
for President of Phi Beta Kappa that Joe Cook 
had to make all ones but one to beat him. 



J.AMES THEOPHILUS PENNEY 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Age, 20; Weight, 144: Height, s feet qyi inches 

Di Society; Sophomore Inter-Society Debate (2); Mecklen- 
burg County Club; Sub-.\ssistant Manager Varsity Basket- 
ball («); German Club. 

AS*. 

' T THEOPHILUS" first came into the pub- 
I . !ic eye in the Soph debate; since then he 
has tantalized it variously, first in track 
and then with playing pinochle, at which he is a 
wizard. He has burned cussed little holes in 
more than one pair of perfectly good pants 
by dropping acid on em in the Chemistry 
Lab. He takes chemistry like Hoke Martin 
does horseshoes. One man has characterized 
him as the happiest man on the campus — 
probably there is someone in Baltimore who 
can throw light on this — "J. T." was also a 
source of great worry to Frank Bell in his 
politickin' for the class' most notably ugly 
gentleman; and ever since Frank got the 
votes, he has been ashamed to look "J. T. ' 
in the face. 








TOE m<.t FCK PBfS/PENT OF PHI BfTA MPPfl 



Eighly-eighl 



"YACKETY YACK: 





Age. 



RUTH PENNY 
Clayton, N. C. 
Weight, qq: Height, } feel 4 inches 



Elon College. 'le-'lS: Johnson County Club; U. N. C. 
Woman's Associalion. Secretary (3); Women's Honor 
Committee; Carolina Playmakers. 

SHE is what may be termed a good English 
student. In the Dante Seminar she took 
in all Dr. Grandgent said and seemed to 
understand it. Moreover, she heard him in 
Gerrard Hall, and instead of looking like 
Milton (didn't I. she seemed to see it all. 

When Fred Koch's assembly convened, she 
was always among the "aye's". She held a 
high position in his hierarchy ; his regime 
would have been incomplete without her. She 
is said to be an enthusiastic reader of Hubert 
Heffner's works, as well as an admirer of the 
author. Next in her estimation stands 
Macbeth. 



JOSEPH ARRINGTON PERSON 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Age, 20; Weight, i8j: Height, ; feet 10 inches 

Di Society; Jlccklenbure County Club; North Carolina 
Club; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (3); Sophomore Stunt; Assistant 
Manager Varsity Basketball (.S), Manager (4); .\ssistant in 
Gym (3, 4); Athletic Council U): Class Basketball (3, 3); 
Gym Team (S, 3. 4,); Wearer of the N. C. 

WE enter "Joe " in the contest for Inter- 
national "Troflodyte. Lor', how he can 
do the giant swing; the whole house used to 
hold its breath in its fist. And when he 
would come out from the managerial dugout 
to make some announcement or other, how 
they would cheer. Cheer! we used to think 
from the noise of it that some great figure, 
like "President " Turner, was addressing the 
populace, or otherwise titillating the public 
eye. Joseph has the goods, he's a professional, 
that boy. He even walks like Apollo; and it's 
quite certain that he has oriental heritage 
from the wonderful amount of oil of olives he 
uses on his head. 





Eighty-nine 



•YACKETY YACK: 





CHARLES WILEY PHILLIPS 

Trinity. N. C. 
Age. 23: Weight. 170: Height, 6 feet 

Freshman Dehating Society; Di Society, First Censor 
Morum (■i). Vice-President (3); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (1. 2,- 
3, 4). Vii,-Pr.-,iclent (4), General Secretary (4): Randolph 
Countv (lull. Pr.-,i.lent (1. 4, 3); Class Basketball (3); 
Varsil\ K....tl>all Squad (3); Representative-at-Larae on 
StudenI C, un.il '41: .Vssociate EditorCarolina .U<lJo:/'i' 14). 

E * A: :s T. 

IN the sanctum sanctorum of the old 
Y. M C. A., you could always find him 
learning how to pass the time away, for he 
wanted most of all just to learn how he could 
live, just a quiet, noble life; just a simple take 
and give. And at all times he was merry, he 
would meet you in your joke, he would 
always listen smiling at any fun you'd poke 
Though you held the people's heart and a 
heart at N. C. W.. we'll have to search to find 
just such a friend again, "C. W," 



NELL ABB IE PATTERSON PICK.ARD 

Chapel Hill. N. C. 

Age, ?. ^'eight, loS: Height, ; feet ; inches 

MISS Pickard showed her loyalty and 
standing in the class by going out for 
the basketball team when the co-eds organ- 
ized. .Although she is an excellent student, 
she just had to take astronomy. It is unknown 
what she is interested in — the stars or the 
moon. As Will Shakespeare once praised: 
"Her voice was ever low, an excellent thing in 
woman." 

Now her heart's choice is French; she took 
all of it that she could get in without majoring 
in it. Prof. \ erdant is her permanent choice 
as a teacher. 





Ninel\ 



•YACKETY YACK! 





PHILIP BASIL POLLOCK 

Trenton. N. C. 

Age, 2;." Weight, 140: Height, ; feet ;yi inches 

Phi Sorietv: Onslow-Jones Counlv Club; North Carolina 
Clul): Brotherhood of Siant Andrew; S. P. S.; Military 
Band (1); S. A. T. C. Band: German Cluh. 

Kn. 

POLLOCK dances like a swan, all graceful 
like and gliding. He is one of those who 
represented us at Chapel Hill Courts ; uh huh, 
like so many others, he is a ladies' man, you 
guessed it right the first time. He is going 
into the study ct medicine, so they will 
probably hear from him further, but we are 
not his press agents, so we will not say. Other- 
wise he has stayed by himself a good deal; 
didn't come out very much: interested in his 
books, also, we suspect. 



CH.-\RLES PERCY POWELL 

Winston-Salem. N. C. 

Age, 21: Weight, 140, Height. ; feet j>2 inches 



Di Societv; Secretary and Treasurer (elect) of Class (8): 
Class Football (!)■ S. A. T. C. Football (S); Varsil.y Football 
S(|uad (4). 

TAKE 142 pounds of alligator, stretch it 
out five feet five inches, as nearly as 
possible like a wildcat in make-up. place two 
almond eyes so that they squint when a brick- 
colored face grins, and top off with a cluster 
of scarlet sage and you have an imperfect 
image of Percy Powell "Shrimp" is about the 
hardest bundle of man flesh that ever threw 
a chair through the windows of iq Carr. 




n HOPEl-ESS CHS 



HOW ^^^^p 

MUCH 1!.^. ^F^^ 



Ninetv-oi^e 



•YACKETY YACK: 





WILLIAM GRADY PRITCHARD 

Chapel Hill, N, C. 

Age, 22; Weight, 180: Height, ; feet 11 inches 

Orange Countv Cliih: First Year Reserved Football, "le" 
Cla.ss Baseball; Varsity Football (3. 4h Wearer of N. C; 
N. C. Club: Conimencement Marshal (3\. 

n K *. 

GRADY is quoted as saving, once upon a 
time, when a preacher happened to stray 
into the building inhabited by himself: "Git 
that man out o here; this ain t no place for a 
preacher." Now just what lay behind that 
statement we cannot say authentically, for 
the twists and turns of Grady s meanings are 
devious. And let it be known that Grady 
wears his N. C. after a fashion to be admired 
and envied, also, no man has ever yet testi- 
fied that he came up from one of Grady's 
serious tackles without a vivid sensation of 
having just come off Astronomy Lab. 




ALFRED LLTHER PLRRINGTON 

Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Age, iS: "height, 140: Height, 5 feet g inches 

Pbi Society; Halifax Count.v Club; Varsit.v Track Teaui 
(3, 4); Assistant Manager Varsit.v Track (31, M.anager 
Varsitv Track (4): Wearer of N. C; Class Football; Tar 
Heel Board {i. 3); Y-\ckf.tv Yick Board (4): Class Execu- 
tive Committee (4); German Club; Coop; Grail. 

n A; Z T; Z *. 

AL" is what may be termed talkative with- 
out being garrulous on class. We make 
the qualified statement not so much that he 
was not garrulous but because there are others 
who rate such mention above him. He has, 
however, a favorable eye for the co-eds, but 
this is not so blamable, since it might be attrib- 
uted to his tender years. Far be it from us to 
implv that his chest protrudes any farther 
this vear than it did last, since it is entitled 
to be adorned with an N. C. He won such 
distinction for having outplayed his oppo- 
nents in the combination bullfrog-rabbit exhi- 
bition (commonly referred to as the hurdles) 
on the track last spring. 




One W.AY TO BUSS 



Ninety-two 



:yackety yack: 





EDWARD LEE QUILLIN 
Spencer, N. C. 
Age 22; Weight, i-^; Height, 6 feet 
Rowao County Club; German Club 

ex. 

"OD" served some time at A & E before 
i-^ coming over to go to school, but he 
learned that there was too much damage 
already done; the pressure got too high and 
he quit the game. He is one of those fellows 
that make .Apollo ashamed of himself; that 
smite with one look the hearts of fair maidens ; 
that charm with his silvery tongue all those 
with whom he does business — in his own 
opinion. He belongs to that "fraternity" of 
immortals who pass through this world on 
their faces and hypnotic lines, "Ed." more- 
over, has interests in the line of railroading; 
he quit his study desk and went out into the 
world of action, during his Senior vear. 



JLfLIUS ROWAN RARER 

Linwood, N. C. 

Age, 21; Weight, 170: Height, 6 feet 

Dav-idson County Club; President (.■!, l); Cla.ss Basketball 
(3, 4), Manager (4); North Carolina Club. 

ex. 

IF you ever desire to obtain any information 
concerning amorous issues, confer with 
this young worshioer of the Goddess Venus. 
Coming to Carolina from Elon College two 
years ago. "Jack" has adjusted himself well 
to the less pleasant phases of life on the 
"Hill." .As His Honor, Go\-. "Cam," would 
put it in the vernacular of the age of Jazz 
and near-beer. "From Nfanteo to Murph\-" 
can be found members of the female of the 
species who are numbered among the friends 
of "Jack." He has taken enough time from 
his duties as correspondent to help our class 
win the basketball championship several 
times. 





.\''., ^'■■. V.,, 1,, ,. 



Ninety-three 



:yackety YACK" 





SAMUEL HLFNTER REAA4S 

Durham, N. C. 

Age, 21 : Weight, 14;; Height. 6 feet 

rsity TrHtk (4); Latin-Aoi 



And here's a toast to Hunter Reams 
And all the beauties of his dreams; 
Although a Marine of every clime, 
He never kept a date on time. 

Here's to a stable youth and true. 
But never missed a chance, he. 
To lie beneath the central blue 
And sail away in fanc>'. 

HLNTER took English 1 1 and took praise 
from the prof and friendly envy from 
his mates: he followed it up with recognition 
by the Republic. But will someone tell us 
why he took astronomv'' 



WILLIAM ALEXANDER REDFEARN 

Age, 2y, Weight, 160; Height, ; feet 10 inches 

Di Society; Union County CUih. Vire-Pre^ident (+); .\. E. F. 
Club; Geological Club. 

IN the course of human events it seldom 
happens that people are named appro- 
priately. In this case, however, while the 
scalping knot does not look strictly like a 
fern it is undeniably red — yes, very red. To 
offset this handicap, "Red is endowed with 
so much surplus energy, and finds so much 
trouble letting it out, that he is forced to use 
an innocent Freshman's head as a punching 
bag every time he partakes of the savory 
viands of "Swine Hall " 





Ninety-four 



'YACKETY YACK: 





HARVEY CALDWELL RENEGAR 

StatesviUe. N. C. 

Age, 2j; Weight, iSo: Height. ; Jeet lo inches 

Di Societv: President Iredc-U County Cluh (t); I.atin- 
American Club; Elisha Mitchell Scientific Societv; Com- 
merciiil Club; The North Carolina Club; Le Cercle Franfais. 

YOLI all know Renegar; he is one of those 
unpresumptuous kind of fellows who say 
not very much on all occasions, but sometimes 
turns loose a man's size lasso on particular 
subjects. He had a chronic way of coming 
to the Di 5>ociety about once e\ery quarter 
and opening up an absolutely indomitable 
line; one that looked like a cattle stampede 
in Mexico. But to do him justice, let it be 
known that such stampedes were not at very- 
frequent intervals. .And another thing about 
Renegar, he likes pretty girls, sweet girls, 
lovable girls, although he's bashful-like and 
doesn't like a crowd, say more than half a 
dozen. Also, he can do light work, evidencing 
this by holding down, in a chair, an assistant's 
billet in physics. 




EDWIN EARL RIVES 

Greensboro. N. C. 

Age, 22," Weight, 14;; Height, 5 feet 6 inches 

Di Societv; Vice-President Guilford County Club (3); Class 
Football (1, .t, 1); Commencement Marshal (3); Cheer 
Leader (2 3, 4); Vice-President Class( 3); Wearer of N. C; 
Class Executive Committee (3); Secretary Law Class (3); 
Y. M. C. -\. Cabinet (3, 4); German Club; Grail. 

SOMETIME during the years iqi7-i8, 
"Scrubby " got soused with Carolina 
spirit and he has neve sobered. Show him a 
contest of most an\- variety and he is presto 
a combination of dynamo, cat — with all nine 
lives. He never savs die, and Carolina spirit 
still. 

Breathes there a man with mem ry so dull, 
who can't unto himself recall the mighty con- 
tests of the ball; if such there breathes go 
fetch him here, we'll teach him for another 
year the things that he had best recall; we'll 
teach him what our campus stands for, what 
a contest and a man s for. why men win and 
why men fail, how they die and never quail; 
we'll show him one man who knows these 
and that man's none but "Scrubby " Rives. 




Ninety -five 



•YACKETY YACK: 




JESSE MANLY ROBBINS 

Asheboro, N. C. 

Age, 22; Weig/i(. 13(1, Height. } feet 11 inches 

Di Society; Randolph Tountv Club, Vice-President (3). 
President ■(■»); Class Baseball (1); Class Football (3, 41; 
Varsity Baseball {i. 3, i); Wearer of N. C. 

YES, "Robbie" was always just as lanky 
as he is to-day. and these lanky fellows 
can always swat baseballs, but there is one 
particular in which "Robbie" has developed 
an unexpected turn — and we are not saying 
that he has lost any of his naivete either — he 
is known to have written some didactic verse 
during the last two years of diploma hunting. 
But perhaps he didn't mean to offend, just let 
the didacticism in without thought. 




NELLIE ROBERSON 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Age. .'; Weight, ijo: Height. } Jeel 6 inches 
Carolina Playmakers; U. N. C. Woman's Association. 

NELLIE is such a regular good sport that 
we can hardly resist the temptation to 
joke through this sketch, but we will do our 
best to stand on firm ground. 

Why women will go to a man's school 
rather than a woman's, and require every- 
thing to be set up after the Louis XIV court 
life plan, is more than we. after very thought- 
ful consideration, can understand. With 
Miss Roberson it is — er — different. She has 
that quality of knowing how to deal with 
human situations which makes of her a 
thoughtful, considerate good fellow, whom 
we all admire and respect. 




Ninety-six 




:YACKETY t a ■_; K.- 





BRYAN NAZER ROBERTS 

Hillsboro, N. C. 

Age, 22. Weight. 200: Height, 6 feei 



THE most interesting thing about 
"Scrooge. " since he sold his erratic Ford 
and quit playing his three-string violin, is 
that he writes to a fraulein in far-away Ger- 
many. And she writes him some of the 
sweetest bits of naive English, for instance: 
"Mr. Roberts. I like American chocolate 
very much." Could that possibly be beaten? 
"B. N.," as suggested above, has a talent for 
music: Whene\er he became rapt in the 
Muse of Orpheus, he used to make his three- 
stringed violin whisper and cry. He had a 
peculiar habit of practicing in the music 
room long after the midnight hour, while the 
"moping owl" did to the moon complain. It 
is also known that he carries a chest of yegg- 
man's tools in his trunk, and that he sells 
books when not searching treasures from 
them in school. His friend "Engstrang" 
Cowan declares that he has a heart as big as 
a cabbage. \ s- 




WILLIAM ASBURY ROURK 

Shallotte, N. C. 

Age, 22. ^'eighl, ijz: Height, ; feet 8)4 inches 

New Hanover County Club, Vice-President (3); Class Base- 
ball; Class Football: Class Basketball (1, S); Varsity Basket- 
ball (3): Wearer of N. C; -Medical Society. 

E<l>A;*X;A*.i. 

'rDILL" is one of the "gentlemen from 
\—i Shallotte." He represents Mecklenburg 
in much the same style as the rest. Not soon 
will the scenes of his cavorting around the 
basketball court fade from our memory. "Bill" 
is going into medicine, and if he is as suc- 
cessful in that as he has been in killing 
opponents on the court, and in making col- 
lections as he was in making life wearisome 
for the opposing forwards, he ma\' still retain 
his likeness to a whirlwind to a ripe and pipe- 
smoking old age. 




Such FORt^ 



Ninety-seven 



:yackety YACK" 





WILLIAM ALLEN ROY ALL 

Goldsboro, N. C. 

Age, 2j: Weight. 145: Height. 5 Jeel 10 inches 

Wayne County Club, President (i): A. E. F. Club; Carolina 
Playniakers; Manager Dramatic Club, Cast (■2^: Yackett 
Yack Board {i, 4); Assistant Manager Varsity Basketball; 
Class Football (3, 4): Captain (4); Varsity Track (3, 3, 4), 
Captain (4); Wearer ot N. C; German Club. 

2 A E 

PROFESSOR Koch explained that the 
success of "Bill's" "The Vamp" was due 
to the fact that the author "knew his char- 
acters. If you ve never seen a red-headed, 
freckled-faced he-vamp, then lamp "Bill." 
When it comes to running on the cinder 
track, writing plays or shaking the jazzy toe, 
"Bill's" on the job, red hair and all. Captain 
of Senior Class Football and Varsity Track, 
he has a reputation on the athletic field and 
with the profs, and as for the rest — ask the 
ladies. 



WlLLl.AM HAYWOOD RLFFIN, Jr. 

Louisburg, N. C. 

.\ge, 22.- \i'eight. 140: Height. ; feel qyi inches 

Phi Society; Franklin County Club; Porter Military Acad- 
emy Cluhf Class Baseball; Manager Varsity Baseball (4); 
Athletic Council (4); Yackety Yack Board (4); Class 
Executive Committee (3); President "Coop" (4); Assistant 
Leader Sophomore Hop; .\ssistant Leader Fall (limghoul 
(3); Leader Spring Gimghoul (4); Commencement Ball 
Manager (4); German Club; Coop; Gimghoul. 

K 2. 

IN every group of men there is bound to be 
one who is, of them all, the homeliest, the 
ugliest, the most handicapped by Nature; 
likewise there is some one who is. of them all, 
the handsomest, the least repulsive to the 
sense of beauty, the highest endowed by the 
Dame as to ph\'siognomy. We are grateful 
to Frank Bell for supplying the necessary- 
assortment of characteristics for choice as the 
first, while we admit that one William Ruffin 
was chosen to ser\e as the second. 

Girls! ah! they adore heem; he can talk 
to them in ze French — ah' 








Ninety-eight 



:yackety YACK' 




JOHN DUNCAN SHAW 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Age, 2/; Weight, 16;; Height, 6 feet 

Di Society; Lalin-American Chih; Class Football (1 1; Class 
Baseball; Greater Council (IV Y. M C A Cabinet i2, 3>; 

YaCKETV YaCK Board (^l; \■;i^.il^ H:,..l,.,|| S,|UH.l (S); 

Varsity Football Squad i:)i; M.iml'. r Ir. .|n,,,ii H;i-eball 
(3); Athletic Council (S), Vi. -I'lr.,,!, „. t , ^. . r, l.iry and 
Treasurer of Class (4); Caroluu I'hn luakir^. S.ilvr.; Pan- 
Hellenic Council (■»); Assistant Leader Sophomore Hop; 
Assistant Leader Gorgon's Head Ball; Commencement Ball 
Manaijer; Cabin; German Club; Golden Fleece; Gorgon's 
Head. 

Z A E. 

HE was a silent politician; he should have 
been elected class statistician; he had 
no intentions of studying law until he talked 
to Horace; he used to call a certain professor 
"prof" in class and the latter called him 
"John;" used to take eccentric notions, to 
wit: wanted to learn typewriting, so that he 
could go to a business school in the Nawth. 
He is said to be the author of "What College 
Politics Will Do For You;" a book which 
appeared on the campus from an anonymous 
author. He has decided to go to Harvard in 
behalf of 'the law." 





FREDERICK C.ARLYLE SHEPARD 

Wilmington. N. C. 

Age, 2}; Weight, 140; Height, s feet 7K inches 

New Hanoyer County Club; A. E. F. Club; International 
Relations Club; Le Cercle Fran^ais; Latin-American Club; 
Yackett Yack Board (3); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (1. 4); Class 
Football (1, «, .3. 4). Captain (1, 3); Class Baseball (1, i, 3) 
Captain (1); Class Basketball (1, i): Captain («); Varsity 
Track Squad (i); Varsity Basketball (4. 3. 4). Captain- 
elect (3) Captain (4); Assistant Manager First Y'ear Foot- 
ball (3), Manager-elect (3); N. C. Club; Wearer of N. C; 
German Club: Golden Fletce. 

* B K; n K * 

C.ARLYLE was originally from the Class 
of 'iq, but he was out for two years, 
which time was spent in the air service of 
L'ncle Sam. Perhaps his work in military 
affairs gives him his penchant for hanging 
around Major Boye's R. O. T. C. It might 
be that he is going to run for General. We all 
know him best for his work on the basketball 
court. He is the "skipper" of that outfit 
this year. He made all-Southern forward, 
and not only made it but deserved it. Car- 
lyle comes from the "City-by-the-Sea," where 
the plangent waves sob, and the dancing 
billows sing, while youths and maidens sport 
on their crests like the chorus of Euphrosyne. 




Ninety-nine 



"W 



■YACKETY YACK- 





WESLEY HILL SHINE 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

.4^1?, ig. Weight. 14;: Height, 6 feet 

SHINE enlisted from When 
he came in he was remarkable for his 
need of growth, which same he has obtained 
since then, mostly after the manner of a 
mushroom — grew up over night- In spite of 
the handicaps of age, etc.. Shine has shown a 
remarkable quality of constancy in his work 
which bids to be a fair companion in life. 
We, of course, wish for him the best. 



ROSS IE STEELMAN SHORE 

Yadkinville, N. C. 

Age. 20: Weight, iiy. Height. } feet 6 inches 

Di Society; Yadkin Count.v Club. Secretar.v U); Cla.ss 
Tennis (1). 

* B K 

RS." started with the Class of '20 and was 
. one of the best students in the class. He 
was out a year and dropped back into '21. 
This was in his Junior year and that spring he 
was one of the Phi Beta Kappa initiates. 
.Anything but dead wood handed down to us! 
Along with the key he carries a iovial good 
nature. 





HE snpiES f^ivp Eflrs 



One Hundred 



:yackety YACK' 





CHARLES HENRY SMIIH 

Reidsville. X C. 

Age, 22, Weight. ij6: Height, s feet 8 inches 

Di Society; Freshman Debating Society; Rockingham 
County Club. Vice-President, President; Carolina Salesman 
Association, Secretar,v, President. 

HEARKEN back with me to the time when 
"Charlie" stood in Swain Hall and 
engaged one Sherrill in gentle ccnvereation 
while the shrieking multitude hurled biscuits 
at them in high glee. Do you recall the way 
"Charlie" put his hand, lightly as the eider- 
down from the xirgin nest, on Friend Sherrill'? 
indignant shoulder and said; "I beg to differ 
with you, Mr. Sherrill." "Charlie" walk? 
with a staccato tread that suggests a man 
driving tacks with his heels, bobbing his 
head the while like a chicken picking up ccm. 
When he gets where he is going he has a ser- 
iousness of purpose that breaks down any 
such suggestion. He is a proficient Greek 
student and reads the documents in the 
original. His long suit is religion, he is said 
to be working out a new creed, one that will 
take in Sherrill and the rest of us. 




PHILIP C.ARXER SMITH 

Caprin, V'a. 

Age, 21 : V."eight. ibo. Height, s feel loyi inches 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific Socictv: A. I. E. E., PresidentC 4). 
Assistant in E, E. 

* ZN; A T A. 

WITH his noiseless efificiencx- and clarity 
of thought. Philip has made himself 
felt on the campus as a real student of engi- 
neering. He is one of those rare men who 
combine frankness with reserve, the tvpe 
which though little seen is long remembered. 
He has a natural smile which he flashes quite 
often and which is but a reflection of his fine 
spirit. Clean-cut, handsome, energetic, he is 
one of those men whom one takes delight in 
knowing. 




One Hundred One 



'YACKETY YACK" 



G 


1 

' 


** 






ROBERT OWEN SMITH 

Liberty, N. C. 

Age, 20: Weight, igo: Height, 6 feet 2 inches 

Di Society; Randolph County Club; North Carolina Club; 



Geology Club; Ge 



1 Club. 



CONFOUND this guy! Never will we 
forget those chilly encounters with the 
nine or ten so-called showers in the cellar of 
the Bynum emporium of exercise. As head 
stoker and rub-down man of the Lawson 
Man-Building corporation, this Son of Lib- 
erty has been the indirect cause of many 
failures to obey the law of cleanliness. He 
states that he does not want any business 
man to know that he is a college graduate. 
And we do not entertain any ideas of any of 
them having any suspicions that "R. O." 
holds a dip. However, we will try to forget 
those cold water episodes and wish him "top 
of the morning." 




ELLIOTT WALKER STEVENS 

Warsaw, N. C. 

Age, 2/; Weight, zio: Height. ; feel u}4 inches 

Duplin County Club; First Year Reseryes Football (1); 
Class Football (3. 3); Class Baseball (i, 3); German Club. 

i; X. 

FATTY" is and always has been a pud 
hunter; therefore, lie turned loose of 
economics like a hot brick when Charlie Lee 
left and jumped on Prof. McKie's forensic 
dope. Now here, gentlemen, is the official 
chaperon of the Freshmen, there's no doubt 
about it. One of them once asked a Soph, as 
"Fatty" hove in sight, if that was John 
Terrv coming down the road. We must 
admit that the question if not entirely beyond 
reprehension was at least venial. Since Capt. 
,Allen demobilized his army "Fatty" has had 
no chance to exhibit his sprite-like grace; for 
he was a drum-major in that illustrious outfit 
— how he could pirouette! Finally, he was 
the Sir John Mandeville of the campus. 



l^ELONCOLLEG-E"j 




One Hundred Two 



:yackety YACK" 





SAMLEL WHITFIELD STEVENSON 

Charlotte. N. C. 

Age, 22; Weight, 14}: Height, 5 feet 11 inches 

Iredell County Club; Mecklenburg County Club. 

DOC" has not done right by the campus: 
he possesses an extraordinary talent for 
music, but would never go out and exhibit it; 
he is a real piano player. He is more than an 
ordinary student, and those who are best 
acquainted with him declare that he is a 
pretty good sub for Britannica. He is able 
to use his pen after an enviable fashion, but 
most of his efforts at writing are read by 
some unknown person in Washington, and 
this unknown one answers back with beauti- 
fully-tinted envelopes. 

"Doc" will answer to the nan-'.eof 'Samuel", 
if pronounced with the right inflection. He 
will then recite the Rubyiat if asked in a 
diplomatic way; and sometimes he can be 
found in the right frame of mind to read his 
Jamous "Ode to Green Socks." 



ROBERT TULA STIMPSON 
Siloam, N. C. 
Age, 21: Weight, 138; Height, 5 feel 6 inches 
Dl Society; Yadkin County Club, President (4). 

SIMPSON had all the advantages a good 
chaperon could give when he came to us 
four vears ago, for he was under the able 
\igilance of "Big Stuff" Joyner, who. as he 
brought him down from Yadkinville and put 
him in the come, room on the second floor 
of the south end of Old West, started him as a 
youth should go. And his protege has gone 
through, Okeh: quiet, diligent and without 
pause. Nothing ruffles him. he ruffles no 
one. He is a gcxxl friend to those who know 
him as is the warp and woof of those reared 
in the shadow of the mountains. 




HNOTHER COOD WN GONE WRONG 




One Hundred Three 



■YACKETY YACK' 





WILBUR WHITE STOUT 

Burlington, N. C. 

Age, 22; Weight, 160: Height, 6 feet 

Di Sodetv; Alamance County Club, Vice-President (3, 4); 
y. M. C. A. Cabinet {i. S. 4); North Carolina Club; Sopho- 
more Stunt; .\ssociate Kditor Tar Heel (3), Assignment 
Editor (4); Associate Editor Blue Riilge; Contributing 
Editor Magazine (4); Tar Bahy Board (4); Carolina Plav- 
makers Cast, "Dod Gnst IV Bnlh," ■■Twelflli Nighl;" 
Assistant in Librar.v. 
n A; 2 T. 

X \ rlLBLIR had a hard time deciding how 
VV to express himself, but he finally hit 
upon a certain sort of dialect verse that 
suited his imperturbable drawl, and he now 
spends many pleasant hours trying to tease 
an encore from the Literary Digest. Listen. 
— he is known to have halt a dozen copies of 
that publication hid away with some one or 
two faded and dried roses somewhere. Wil- 
bur's long suit is English, which seems quite 
natural; since we all agree, Frenchmen 
excepted, that English is easier than French. 



J.^IES LEMON r.APP 

Columbia, S. C. 

Age, 2;,- Weight, i;y. Height, ; feet q inches 

Universit.v South Carolina, '17-'!!); Columbia University 
Summer School, '18-'I9; South Carolina Club; German 
Club. 

' \ /f Y name is Dinah, from South Carolina, 
i V 1 and I ain't studyin' Horace's philosophy 
jes' for fun." 

Tapp came out of the land famous for 
cotton, rice, John C. Calhoun, and Demo- 
crats. He says that before he came to North 
Carolina, no one in his family had seen a 
Republican since his grandfather saw one in 
1871. His home is Columbia, the city of 
beauty, of tradition, of romance; his long suit 
is philosophy, the study cf life and of doubt- 
ful use to romancers. 





THIS 6UV CAME" 



One Hundred Four 



:yackety yack: 





CHARLES IRWIN TAYLOR 

Pikeville, N. C. 

Age, 2j; Weight, 14;: Height, s feel 10 inches 

Phi Society; Inter-Sociely Debate f3); A. E. F. Club (3, 4). 

E * A. 

CI." entered the halls of Carolina with 
. the Class of '18, but Uncle Sam's little 
bout with Bill Hohenzollern took several 
months of time from his pursuit after that 
somewhat intangible thing, the spirit of 
education. After helping" lick the "War 
lord of Europe," he returned to the States 
and resumed his chase after knowledge with 
our class. In addition to being a world-war 
veteran, this young native of Pikeville is 
somewhat of a bovine artist, having partici- 
pated in a number of inter-socety debates. 
Of course, we must not be so prejudiced as to 
allow the fact that he has been a member of 
the School of Commerce to cause us to under- 
estimate the worth of this imported class- 
mate. 



JOSEPH WHITE TAYLOR 

Oxford. N. C. 

Age, 21; Weight, ijo; Height, j feet 8 inches 

Phi Society; C. E. Society: Granville County Club; \. I, 
E. E.; Math Club. 

WHEN he found that he and the depart- 
ment of electrical engineering could 
not agree on certain matters, "Joe" gave up 
his grasp on Prof. Daggett's coat tail and 
made a flying tackle at Thorndike Saville of 
the civil engineering branch. Whether or 
not he will make a better chain carrier than 
reader of electric light meters, we cannot say. 
With slouch and easy-going stride to fall 
back on, we would adx-ance the contention 
that he would make a good follower of the 
plow. He is one of those Sphinx-like human 
beings who leave the gassing to the other 
fellow while they indulge in skull practice. 





One Hundred Five 



:yackety yack: 




TYRE CRLIMPLER TAYLOR 

Sparta. N. C. 
Age, 22: Weight. t68: Height, s feet 11 inches 

Di Society, President (4); Winner of Xlarv D. Wright 
Memorial Medal (3): Carolina-Johns Hopkins Debate (3); 
Carolina-Pennsylvania Debate (4); Editor-in-Chief Caro- 
lina Magtizirir: Amphoterothen. 

AT A. 

BACK m the days when '21 upheld the 
\crdancy of the campus. "T. C." was 
introduced for the first time to the Di Hall, 
with these words. "We ha\e with us tonight 
a man from the mountains of this State, who 
is an orator than whom there is none more 
silvery." Tyre still lives up to his first intro- 
duction, but what has ever perplexed us is 
this: why did not his introducer bring him in 
with a lariat around bis neck and make a 
complete job of it ■■ 

This same "T. C." has made a name for 
himself here, but nothing eclipses his record 
in la politique- 





K.ARL ERNEST THIES 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Age. 20; VV"eig/i(, ij8: Height, y feet 7 inches 

Di Society; Mecklenburg County Club; Economies Club; 
Pan-Hellenic Council (3); German Club. 

AS*. 

NOW we attempt no arraignment of any 
man just because he is a follower of 
Terpsichore, nor do we hold any brief for any 
man for breaking a date when we say that 
they are things excellently adapted to being 
broken; but we do say that when a bird 
invites a young person to this rustic "Hill" 
for saltitorial purposes, and then aposta- 
tizes Terpsichore for Morpheus and slings a 
nap that would make Endymion look like 
an owl suflering from insomnia, we plead that 
patience soon reaches a point of total desue- 
tude. Now wc shall offer just this bit of coun- 
sel: never make a woman mad. and they get 
mad when they are disappointed, and the 
world knows that the>' are disappointed when 
they are all dolled up and nowhere to go. and 
and above all, never sleep through a date 
if you would have female equanimity. 




One Hundred Six 



:yackety YACK" 




CYRUS BERKELEY THOMAS 
Broadway. N. C. 
Age, 7.J; Weight, 146; Height. } feet 8 inches 
Phi Society; North Carolina Club. 

JONESBORO is the original place of abode 
of Cyrus. Thus, take the Jones part of 
his home town — Jones is no \ery great 
name, and the Cyrus part of his name — this 
is a very illustrious handle. Think of Cyrus 
the Great and Cyrus McCormick — and blend- 
ing the two, we ha\'e the happy means 
between extreme greatness and e.xtreme small- 
ness. Thomas — from Thomas Beckett or 
Thomas the Footman, we really don t know, 
but it makes a good analogy — has gotten an 
honorable discharge after four years in his 
favorite course, A. B. 





Age, 



E.A.RLE HINSON THOMPSON 

Sa\'annah, Ga. 
2). 'K'eight. i2j: Height, ; jeet q inches 



Duplin Countv Clul> (1): North Carolina Club (2); Spanish 
Club (3); Economics Club (3)i International Polity Club 
(J): Carolina Corporation of Commerce, Director; .\mpho- 

RED" came to the "Hill" ten years ago 
and started his quest for that elusi\e 
thing termed loosely, education. He is the 
man who went in to see President Venable 
about said education and told the President 
that he had thirty-five cents to invest in it. 
He did not come back after Christmas, losing 
fall credits thereby. He was out during the 
war in the service of a well known Uncle. 

Although "Red" is one cf the most quiet 
and unpresumptuous men on the campus, he 
can deliver when the showdown comes. He 
is a "bull" on Spanish and a shark on account- 
ing. Since he has been off and on the "Hill 
so often, he can tell you some very fitting 
things to be done in this neck of the woods. 




One Hundred Seven 



:yackety yack: 





FRANKLIN THOMPSON 

Jacksonville, N. C. 

Age. 24: Weight, 138; Height, s feet 7 inches 

HE ij "Cys" little brother. He came to 
these diggings back in igi4, but sickness 
and a contract with Baker, Pershing, Inc., 
kept him back. The contract necessitated 
bis spending something like two years abroad, 
during which time he won cross-country 
meets around old man Foch's farm and did a 
great deal of rowboat work in the River 
Rhine. Yes: he is understood to have been 
over there. Unlike most others who put in 
foreign service, Frank does not rave and rant 
about the women folks. You rarely ever 
hear him mention one — and then never inter- 
estingly. 

Let it be known for all time that when it 
comes to handling the Economic profs, he has 
the goods; he uses psychology on 'em — he 
worked 'em like Napoleon worked the mon- 
archs of the old line. Furthermore he is not 
only a good .student but a creditable player 
of the game rook. 

THIS IS 
^ CYTHOMR50WS 
LITTiF BROTHER 




WINFRED ERWIN TILSON 

Biltmore, N. C. 

Age, 21; Weight, 132; Height, ^ jeet 8 inches 

Buncombe County Club, Secretan- and Treasurer (4); 
Mars Hill Club, Presidenl (3): Lalin-Anierican Club. 



WINFRED left the "Hill " at the end of 
the fall quarter of our Senior year, hav- 
ing proved to Tommy I. that he was due a 
diploma without further expenditure of gray 
matter. There has been some mystery as to 
his activity since he forsook the haunts of his 
college existence. One rumor carries the 
information that he a'ssumed the burdens of 
serving as the president of an institution of 
learning of the elementary type in the rural 
parts of Harnett County, about forty miles 
south of the state capital. However, it is 
believed that this is only a temporary matter, 
due to recent interest which Tilson has 
acquired in the Pamlico state with which he 
will probably cast his fate. 




One Hundred Eight 



:yackety YACK" 





JOSEPH GRANBERY TL'CKER 
Plymouth, N C 
Age, 21 : Weight, 140; Height. 5 feet 6 inches 
German Club; Pan-Hellenic Council (4). 
* B K; A S *. 

TUCKER comes walking primly out of the 
lecture room after standing an examina- 
tion, worrying just a little whether he got a 
q6J4 or just even qb on the course. He takes 
a neat package of Chesterfields from his 
pocket, and holding one between his thumb 
and forefinger lights it from a match struck 
on the sole of his shoe. Now, this is one 
\oungster who has a deep esteem for his 
family coat of arms and a lasting re\erence 
for his episcopal church. If yoj are not an 
episcopalian you lose just that much, that s 
all. But to do him justice, we must amend to 
this extent — he now smokes Herbert Tarey- 
tons and holds them between his middle and 
forefinger, while the matches are scratched in 
the same old wav. 



DONNELL VAN NOPPEN 

Greensboro, N. C. 

Age, II : Weight, iso: Height, j feet 8 inches 

Di Society: Glee Club (1); Class B.asketball (1, 4, 3); Class 
Tennis fl); Class Executive Committee (3); Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet Ci, 31; Chairman Carolina Smoker (3); President 
Y. M. C. A. I.'!); Assistant Manager Varsitv Football (3); 
Manager Var.~itv Football U): Director Class Athletics (4); 
German Club; Grail. 
E * A; n A; 2 T; n K * 

CHRONOLOGICALLY the first thing to 
mention about Donnell is his piccoloing 
like a sylvan deity in Capt. Allen's army. 
W'e remember yet the times he was excused 
from drill that he might go down with the 
quick-time orchestra and practice. From this 
one would naturally suspect him to be more 
or less susceptible to the charms of wood 
nymphs; and so he is; but he is known to have 
come in at eleven when he should have stayed 
out until one. As President of the Y. M. C. A., 
he has held high the torch of fellowship and 
his years here have been a living attestation 
to it. 




One Hundred Nine 



rVACKETY YACK- 




OSCAR BLAINE WELCH 
Charlotte, N. C. 
Age, 23; Weight, 170: Height, ; feet 11 inches 

WHERE ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be 
married." No attempt is made to show 
any peculiar fitness of the remark other than 
that this Welch rabbit is said to be on the 
verge of going down the aisle of time in double- 
harness. Now use your imagination. He 
passes as one of the numerous specimens 
from Mecklenburg, but that must be a devil 
of a big farm, such being only a parenthetical 
remark. And let it further be asserted that 
if love be blind, marriage is an eye-opener. 
Rough stuff, rough stuff, how beautiful is love. 




ROBERT BENJ.\M1N WHITE 

Concord, N. C. 
Age, 22; Weight, t;;: Height, 6 feet 

Cabarrus County Club; German Club. 
il \. 

BENJ,AM1N came over from Davidson as 
soon as they taught him something. He 
is a creditable addition to our tribe, as he has 
several accomplishments that should not be 
overlooked while we are taking inventory. He 
has some time or other in his past felt the 
breath of Orpheus, and to this day he is often 
heard singing, or playing sprightly airs on 
the piano. He is quite a crack tennis player, 
getting as far as runner-up in the tournament. 
This would be an incomplete chronicle if 
we failed to mention the high place Concord 
occupies in his estimation; due, and this is 
authentic, to a certam young person's bright- 
ening that village with her living there. And 
he is a disciple of Dud Carroll. 





One Hundred Ten 



:yackety yack: 





BRAINARD SYDNOR WHITING 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Age, 22; Weight, 170: Height, 6 feet i inch 

Wake County Club; Freshman Football, '16; Tar Heel 
Board (4); Sub-Assistant Manager Varsitv Basketball (2); 
Varsity Football Squad (3, 4); German Club. 
2X. 

"tDEN" has been termed "the laziest man" 
i— 5 on the campus, but it might all be hear- 
say — who knows? At any rate, he sleeps as 
late as the bell will let him, but still he makes 
decent marks, so there you are. His most 
delicate faculties lie in the field of English. 
He is another who is always hunting a 
new girl: and when he gets one, he will lie 
out under the moon and bark at it. He has 
been said to have written some good poetry 
once or twice, but no great prolificacy could 
be expected from one so ardently in love 
with ease. He is a fair business man — if 
anyone is in the market for a business man 
just his size and looks. He used to sit in class 
and draw railroad maps. 



ALGER BRIGHT W ILK INS 

Linden, N C. 

Age, 20." \( eight, 12;: Height, ; feel 6 inches 

WE are willing to bet that the Editor of 
Life is the soberest looking gentleman 
since Cromwell's time. At any rate, Wilkins, 
ardent supporter of that well-known humor- 
ous and justly famous Tar Baby, is one ot the 
most reserved men on the campus. The Tar 
Baby work takes a good deal of time, but 
when "A. B." becomes rushed, he calmly 
saunters over to Peabody Building and takes 
three or four of Dean M C. S. Noble's courses, 
so that he can get a good and much needed 
rest. 





One Hundred Eleven 



:yackety yack: 





LAWRENCE GIRARD WILSON 

Dunn, N. C. 

Age, 2j; Weight, i;s: Height, ; feet lo inches 

Phi Socictv; Harnett County Club. Vice-President (S), 
President (4); C. E. Societv; First Year Reserves Baseball 
(1); Class Foolball (3), Vice-President Class (4); Varsitv 
Baseball (4, 3, 4), Captain (4); Wearer of N. C; Grail. 

ex 

■ TEFTY" can make friends; can grapple 
J—/ them to his breast with hooks of steel 
He cannot only qualify as a pitcher, but can 
also master German. "Lefty" can pitch, 
besides. "Great Smoke — can pitch his team 
to three victories and a championship in five 
days. It might be stated that he shares the 
name of Wilson with another, who has been 
mentioned by the papers occasionally of 
recent years, but he knows of no relationship 
other than that one has served two terms 
as President while the other is an humble 
democrat. 




THOMAS WILSON 

Rural Hall, N. C. 

Age, 2;: Weight. 12;: Height, s feet 6 inches 

Di Societ.v. First Censor (i): Freshman Debate. '14; Forsyth 
Count.v Club: North Carolina Club; Economics Club; Inter- 
national Polit.v Club (3, 4); Carolina Corporation o( Com- 
merce. Director. 

TOMMY" cut his way out of Rural Hall 
and slipped off down here back in iqi3. 
.After hanging around awhile he decided to 
take to foreign travel, whereupon he joined 
the A. E. F. Now he can speak of the I^rench 
from first-hand knowledge — and we are going 
over the first chance we get, but that is inci- 
dental. "Tommy once took a friend home 
to that delightful little hamlet, and when the 
fellow crowded off the train there, he re- 
marked: "I see where you get the first part of 
the name, but where is the Hall?" 
Now this is one of the finest men 
in the finest class. That's straight! What 
do you think of this: it is said that he kissed 
a social welfare worker who had innocently 
wandered under a sprig of mistletoe. 



tiE (fffS ^cT5 OF smoite; 




Orxe Hundred Twelve 



:yackety yack- 





THOMAS JAMES WILSON, III 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Age, i8: Weight, 178: Height. 6 feet j inches 

Orange Countv Club, President 1-2): Churchman's Club 
a, .S, 4), Secretary and Treasurer (3, i); Sub-Assistant Man- 
ager Varsity Basketball (2), Assistant Manager (31; Tar 
Baby Board (3); Varsity Tennis (3); German Club. 

* B K, Z *. 

THOMAS J . Wilson the third, is not only 
the third of his line but the third on our 
list, so we believe it is not improper to give 
him credit for it. He, a? another of the 
Chapel Hill continfjent, is in the class at the 
extreme end of puerility, as "Hap" Patterson 
and he are the two youngest of the lot. His 
most remarkable function has been to 
keep all dope on Freshmen. As his 
father before, "Tommy J." has the gift of 
racquet; as the "old school" used to speak, 
he is a tennis hound of no mean ability. The 
latest dope on him is that he is going to 
France tc study the art of registrar, that he 
might be a true son of his father. Thus 
endeth the tale of the Wilsons galore, who 
will raise a whole army before the next war. 




ALAN BRANTLEY WRIGHT 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Age, 2/,- Weight, 167: Height. 6 feel i inch 

Di Society; Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society; A. I. E. E.; 
First Year Reserve Football; Varsity Football Squad (3, 41; 
Class Basketball (3): Manager Class Football (4); Min- 
strels (1); Carolina Playmakers (4); Assistant Leader Junior 
Prom (3); Assistant Leader Spring German (4). 
*Z\;AZX;*Ae 

ALAN is one of that doughty bunch that 
L came down from Winston-Salem and 
boosted the football team for a number of 
years. This bunch was composed of "Pass" 
Fearrington, "Fats" Fulton, "Red" Powell, 
"Runt ' Lowe, and "Bengie ' Liipfert, while 
.Alan made the sixth member of the crew — 
all 'zi. Alan is out to be an engineer. 
He reads plays assigned by F. Koch 
for pastime. Obviously laying much store 
by special stuff, and probably believing that 
facial uniqueness would further his cause, he 
perpetrated a mustache last year. Oh mus- 
tachios. what foul crimes are committed in 
thv name! 




One Hundred Thirteen 



'YACKETY YACK" 




GEORGE BRANSON ROBBINS 

Jamestown, N. C. 

Age, 2;; Weight, 148; Height, } feet 4}4 inches 

Di Society; Freshn 



ROBBIE came to us from an atmosphere 
of Djer Kiss, darkies, and diplomats to, 
in a very quiet manner, contribute to a grow- 
ing school spirit, which has now assumed 
enormous proportions. He is reserved and 
unassuming, yet, his vociferous enunciations 
proclaim him a running mate for Marion 
Butler when political affiliations are spoken 
of: We predict that Robbie will some day 
return to Jamestown and start through life 
with a ploughing gait. 



Thus endeth the tale of each of the class. 
Let nothing be added till all of us pass. 
Our object has been, in the case of each one, 
To poke just a little of innocent fun. 

Now no one's been favored and no one's been spared, 
For each by a friend of himself was prepared, 
You've laughed at the others', so laugh at your own; 
Be a sport, or you'll find that you're moping alone. 

— Med. Scope 
One Hundred Fourteen 



•YACKETY YACK" 



JiiOi5. 




"YACKETY YACK' 



(l^fitrfrs of tl)? SimtDr (ElasB 

Marion Wesley Nash ........ President 

David Benthner Jacobi ....... Vice-President 

Edward Martin Sweetman, Jr. .... Secretary-Treasurer 



Suntnr Qllaaa i£xtt\xtiw (Cnmmtttpp 

John Dewey Dorsett Robert Henry Griffith 

Clyde Reitzel Hedrick William Edwin Horner 

Joseph Altira McLean Clarence Reece Sumner 

Claude James Willi.\ms, Jr. 



One Hundred Sixteen 



•YACKETY YACK' 



OSCAR MARVIN ABERNATHY 



ERNEST HENRY ABERNETHY 



. Hickory, N.C. 

Di Society; Catawba County Club, Secretary (i); Lenoir College Club; 
Managing Editor Yackett Y'ack (2); Football Squad (^); Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet (4); Business Manager Directors' (3); Business llanager Y. M. 
C. A. Handbook (2); Business Manager Tar Baby (2, 3), Secretary- and 
Treasurer Tar Baby (3). 

JAMES MOFFATT ALEXANDER . Statesville, N. C. 

Iredell County Club; Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society; Assistant in 



ROBERT GLENN ALEXANDER 



FELIX EUGENE ALLEY, JR. 



WILLIAM FRANCIS ALLSTON 



RICHARD SPEIGHT ANDERSON 



WILLIAM PURYEAR ANDERSON 



Statesville, N. C. 



Waynesville, N. C. 



Flat Rock, N. C. 



Whitakers, N. C. 



Phi Society; Wilson County Club, Secretary and Treasurer, (l.i) 
Sub-.\ssistant >Ianager Varsity Baseball (2); Assistant Manager Var- 
sity Baseball (3); Cabin; Sax; German Club; Z *. 




One Hundred Seventeen 



:yackety yack: 




JACKSON LAFAYETTE APPLE 



Greensboro, N. C. 



SAM0EL LEWIS ARMNGTON Rocky Mount. N. C. 

Phi Socitty: Xash-Edgecombe County Club; Ruffin Law Club; G X. 



WADE HAMPTON ATKINSON 



JAMES HERMAN AUSTIN 



JOHN GLENN BARDEN 



BENJAMIN HUME BARBIN 



Washington, D. C. 



Charlotte, N. C. 



Goldsboro, N. C. 



Wilson, N. C. 



Phi So<ict\-; Freshman Debating Society: Oak Ridge Club; Wilson 
C,>untv Club; Tar Heel Board (3); Class Tennis (I, i) Varsity Tennis; 
Wearer i.t N. C. 



ROBERT MALCOLM BARDIN 



WILLIAM JEFFERSON BAREFOOT 

Phi Soeiety; Harnelt County Club. 



Wilson, N. C. 



Benson,"N. C. 



One Hundred Eighteen 



'YACKETY YACK" 



EDWARD WALL BARR 

V. M. I. Club; German Club; S X. 



EDGAR VERNON BENBOW 



JOHN ALPHEUS BENDER 



STUART OSBORNE BOND0RANT 



Winchester, Va. 



East Bend, N. C. 



PoUoksville, N. C. 



LeaksviUe, N. C. 



JOHN HAVENS BONNER Raleigh, N. C. 



GARVIN BOWLES 



ROBERT EDWIN BOYD 



JAMES NEVELAND BRAND, JR. 



Winchester, Va. 



Gastonia, N. C. 



Wilmington, N. C. 




One Hundred Nineteen 



:yackety yack: 




JAMES CRAIG BRASWELL, JR. 



Rocky Mount, N. C. 



Phi Society; Latin-American Club; North Carolina Club; 19^1 
Yackett Yack Board; * A 6. 



JOSEPH BEAMAN BREWER 



CLYDE KENNETH BROOKS 



HARRY LEROY BRUNSON 



HENRY HARRISON BULLOCK 



REGINALD ARCHIBALD lELLMAN 



Rocky Mount, N. C. 



Greensboro, N. C. 



Tallahassee, Ala. 



Fuqua Springs, N.C. 



Kinston, N. C. 



DANIEL BYRD 



ROBERT E. LEE CARSON 



One Hundred Twenty 



:yackety YACK" 



EMERY LEROY CARTER 



ROY MADISON CASPER 



HENRY VAUGHN CHAPPELL 



ROBERT LEE COBURN 



JOHN WILEY COKER 

Di Society; Tar Heel Board (3); Ge 



JAMES CHASE COLLINS 



Hickory, N. C. 



Belvedere, N. C. 



Rock HiU, N. C. 



Catharine Lake, N. C. 



NINA HORNER COOPER Orford, N. C. 



HAROLD COCHRAN CORPENING 




One Hundred Twentv-one 



•YACKETY YACK' 



ANDREW MARCUS COURTNEY 



RAYMOND LEE CRAIG 




ALBERT EARL DENTON 



Fayetteville, N. C. 



Greenwood, Miss. 



Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Charlotte, N. C. 



Huntley, N. C. 



Chapel Hill, N. C. 



GEORGE VERNON DENNY, JR. . Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Asheville, N. C. 



One Hundred Twenty-two 



•YACKETY YACK! 



HOWARD HUGH DOGGETT 



JOHN DEWEY DORSETT 



Forest City, N. C. 



Siler City, N. C. 



Di Society; Chatham County Club; North Carolina Club; Captain 
Class Baseball (1); Class Football; Varsity Baseball Squad; ATA. 



DAVID DUDLEY DUNCAN 



CLAYTON EDWARDS 



Beaufort, N. C. 



McIVER WILLIAMSON EDWARDS Darlington, S. C. 

South Carolina Club; Class Football (1); n K *. 



ALVIN JAMES ELEY 



Woodland, N. C. 



JOHN OGLETHORPE ELLINGTON, JR. Clayton, N. C. 



WILLIAM FRANK FALLS 



Salisbury, N. C. 




One Hundred Twenty-three 



:yackety YACK' 




GIDEON VAN POOLE FESPERMAN East Spencer, N. C. 



GORDON TURNER FINGER 



Charlotte, N. C. 



LOUIS WILLIAM FISCHEL Chester, S. C. 



ALICE LEE GATTIS 



WILLLAM DARBY GLENN 



Chapel Hill, N. C. 



MACK CUTCraN GORHAM 



. Rocky Mount, N. C. 



PAUL MILTON GRAY Charlotte, N. C. 

Eli-ha Mitchell Scientitic Society; Math Club; A. I. E. E. 



ROBERT HENRY GRIFFITH 



Charlotte, N. C. 



Mecklenburg County Club; Campus Cabinet (1); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 
(1, ^, 3); Leader Sophomore Hop (i); Sub-Assistant Manager Varsity 
Baseball (4), Assistant Manager (3); Varsity Basketball Squad (1. 4, 3); 
Varsity Football {i, 3); Wearer of N. C; German Club; Coop; A K E. 



One Hundred Twenty-four 



:yackety yack: 



FELIX ALEXANDER GRISSETTE 



Collettsville, N. C. 



r< lary (il. Treasurer (3); Caldwell Countv Club, Secre- 
l,,r \ I'r.-ident (3); Winner Inler-Societ.v Freshman Debate: 

W I - irtv Sophomore Debate; President Freshman Debating 

>'i ' I - l"..tball (1); Class Basketball (1): Class Baseball (1): 

\ iir-ii.\ lKi>fh:ul Squad (5, 3); Carolina Plavmakers (1, 5); Latin-Ameri- 
can Club; Nurtli Carolina Club; Y. M. C. A. 



CLAYTON LLOYD GDION 



ROBERT HARDEN HACKLER, JR. 



SAMUEL CANNADY HALL. 



Mo 



, N. C. 



DOUGLAS HAMER, JR. 



JOHN HAYWOOD HARDIN 



Oxford, N. C. 



■ Club; Varsity Baseball 



WaynesviUe, N. C. 



Wilmington, N. C. 



\ew Hanover County Club; Associate Editor Yackety Yack (41 
Manager Freshman Track (3); Assistant Leader Fall German (3) 
German Club; Pan-Hellenic Council; Cabin; Minotaur; Gorgon's Head 



MARION DIXON HARPER 

s e E. 



LaGrange, N. C. 




One Hundred Twenty-five 



:yackety YACK! 




HENRY CLAYTON HARRIS 



LUTHER THOMPSON HARTSELL, JR. 



Pike Road, N. C. 



Di Society; Winner Intra-Socictv Freshman Debate (1); Cabarrus 
County Club; German Club; K S. 



FOREST GAGE HEATH 



Statesville, N. C. 



Iredell County Chili; Class Football (1. 31; S. A. T. C. Football Squa 
Class Baseball (4); Varsity Baseball Squad (i). 



JOSEPH PLANNER HENDREN, JR. . Elkin, N. C. 

.Surry County Club; Winner Junior Class Tennis Tournament; 9 X. 



PAUL DOMINIC HERRING 



Clinton, N. C. 



WILLIAM SHEPARD HESTER . Reidsville, N. C. 

Commencement Marshal; German Club; Z 9 E. 



GEORGE WATTS HILL .... Durham, N. C. 

Di Society; Durham County Club; Y.\ckety Y'ack Board (5); .\ssistant 
Manager Varsity Football (3); Cabin; 2 A E. 



KENNETH PAGE HOGAN 
B G n 



Winston-Salem, N. C. 



One Hundred Twenty-six 



rVACKETY YACK' 



JOHN WILL HUNNICUTT 



WILLIAM EDWIN HORNER 



CORBETT ETHEREDGE HOWARD 



FRANK PATTERSON HUNTER 
German Club; Coop; Z *. 



DAVID BENTHNER JACOBI 



Durham, N. C. 



Pink Hill, N. C. 



Warrenton, N. C. 



Wilmington. N. C. 



Phi Society; Vice-President Class (3); Assistant Manager Varsity Bas- 
ketball (3): Varsity Football (i. 3); Wearer of N. C; Monogram Club; 
German Club. 



EARL DeWITT JENNINGS ... Charlotte, N. C. 

Di Society; Mecklenburg County Club; .\ X S. 



JAMES D0NCAN JOHNSON 



RDFUS MANFRED JOHNSON 

Di Society; Gaston County Club; AS*. 



Atkinson, N. C. 



Gastonia, N. C. 




One Hundred Twenty-seven 



:yackety yack: 




HAYWOOD BENJAMIN KENDRICK 



HENRY LESTER KISER 



CherryviUe, N. C. 



Bessemer City, N. C. 



Di Society; Gaston County Club; Latin-American Club; Y. M. C. A. 
Cabiuet; Intra-Societv Freshman Debate; Inter-Societv Sophomore 
Debate: Mary D. Wright Debate. 



BEN HALSEY KNIGHT 



EDGAR MONTGOMERY KNOX . 
C. E. Society; German Club; S X. 



MARSHALL EDGAR LAKE 



CHARLES GRADIS LANCASTER 



SIDNEY JOHNSON LANE, JR. 



CHARLES GASTON LEE, JR. 



Winton, N. C. 



Charlotte, N. C. 



Lexington, N. C. 



Henderson, N. C. 



AsheviUe, N. C. 



One Hundred Twenty-eight 



:yackety YACK! 



RALEIGH BRADFORD LEE 



WILLIAM EARL LENNON 



WARNER MERIWETHER LEWIS 



WILLIAM LORD LONDON 



IRA GILLESPIE LONG 



JAMES WILBERT LOVE 



JEROME WORTH LYNN 



JOSEPH THOMAS.MADDRY 



Manteo, N. C. 



Darlington, S. C. 



Pittsboro, N. C. 



Seaboard.'N. C. 




One Hundred Twenty-nine 



:yackety yack: 




ROBERT FRANKLIN MARSHBURN 



FLOYD ALEXANDER MARTIN 



OSCAR EUGENE MARTIN . 



WILLIAM EDWIN MATTHEWS 



WaUace, N. C. 



East Bend, N. C 



East Bend, N. C. 



Huntington, W. Va. 



Di Society; Mecklenburg Countv Club; Y. il. C. A. Cabinet; Tar Heel 
Board (i). Assistant Editor (3); Tar Baby Board (i>. Managing Editor 
(3); Assistant Business Manager Maoazinc (3); Class Executive Com- 
mittee. 



SAMUEL RALPH McCLURD 



JOSEPH LEVY McEWEN 



JOSEPH ALTIRA McLEAN 



HARLAN LOFTIN McPHERSON 



CherryviUe, N.C 



Charlotte, N. C. 



Gibsonville, N. C. 



Burlington, N. C. 



One Hundred Thirty 



•YACKETY YACK' 



ABRAM HAYWOOD MERRITT 



EDWARD BRUCE MEWBORNE 



ERNST OTTO MOEHLMANN 



STUART RHODES MOFFITT 

Randolph County Club; German Club; AS*. 



CLIFTON LEONARD MOORE 



ROBERT ASHE MOORE 



Mount Airy, N. C. 



Ashboro, N. C. 



JOSEPH HARLEY MOURANE 



WILLlAja CANNON MURCHISON 



StatesviUe, N. C. 



Durham, N. C. 



Greensboro, N. C, 



Guilford County Club; Class Football (i); Class Baseball (1. *), Man- 
ager IS); Class Basketball (1, i. 3). Manager (2, 3); All Class Basketball 
[i): Track Squad (1, J); Varsity Football (3); Assistant JIanager 
Track (3); Commencement Marshal l3). 




One Hundred Thirtx-one 



"YACKETY YACK' 




THOMAS GLENN MURDOCK 



DWIGHT LOFTIN MYERS 



SaUsbury, N. C. 
Board; Geological Cluli; 



MARION WESLEY NASH 



Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Di Socielv; Commerce Clnb; Taroliua Corporation of Commerce. 
Director; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; President of Class (3); Campus Cabinet 
(3): Student Council (3); Sub-Assistant Manager Tar Heel d). Assistant 
Manager Tar Heel (S); Manager Class Football (9). 



HUBERT NEVILLE 



ISAAC BEAR NEWMAN 



RUSSELL LEE NORBURN 



Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Wilmington, N. C. 



Di Society; Buncombe Co\mt.v Club; Assistant in Physics; Assistant i 



JOHN NORWOOD 



JOHN WILLIAM ODEN 



Goldsboro, N. C. 



Washington, N. C. 



One Hundred Thirty-two 



:yackety yack: 



WILLIAM EARLE OVERCASH 



StatesvUle, N. C. 



Di Society; Iredell County Club; Ellsba Mitchell Scientific Socielv; 
Assistant in Physics (9, 3). 



HAROLD DAWES PARCELL 



EDWIN FULLER PARHAM 
-IKE. 



CHARLES JACKSON PARKER 



TALBOT FORT PARKER 



Henderson, N. C. 



Goldsboro, N. C. 

Phi Societv; W'a\-ne County Club: North Carolina Club; Sub-Assistant 
Man:iger Varsilv Baseball («); Class Track Squad; Varsity Track 
Squad; Class Football (3); CaroUna Playmakers. 



LUTHER JAMES PHIPPS 



WYATT ANDREW PICKENS 



HOWELL GRADY PICKETT 



Chapel HiU, N. C. 



High Point, N. C 



Madison, N. C. 




One Hundred Thirty-three 



:yackety yack: 




GARLAND BURNS PORTER 



Kernersville, N. C. 



Di Society. Corrector (3). Vice-President (3); Tar Baby Board (3); 
Contributing Editor Carolina Magazine (3); Yackett Yack Board (3): 
Amplioterothen; S2 A; S T; 2 ii X. 



JOSEPH LOWRY PRESSLEY 



HEATH PRICE 



PERRY DAVIS PRIEST 



Charlotte, N. C. 



Monroe, N. C. 



Ridgecrest, N. C. 



Nortli Carolina Club: Buncombe Countv Club: Mars Hill Club: Latin- 
American Club: Class Baseball (1): Class Basketball: Class Football: 
Assistant in Psychology: German Club: ATA. 



ROBERT WRIGHT PROCTOR 



WILLIAM CLYDE PROCTOR 



LINA TUCKER PRUDEN 



EMMETT GLADSTONE RAND 



Lumberton, N. C. 



Durham, N. C. 



Edenton, N. C. 



Garner, N. C. 



One Hundred Thirty-four 



:yackety yack" 



HENRY ASHBY RANKIN, JR. 



PAUL JONES RANSON 



FayetteviUe, N. C. 



Huntersville, N. C. 



Di Society; Mecklenburg County Club. Secretarj- and Treasurer {i); 
Class Football (1, 2); Varsity Football Squad (3); Varsity Track (1, S); 
Wearer of N. C. 



HOYLE CLIFTON RIPPLE 



GEORGE BRANSON ROBBINS 



EXOM ALLEN ROGERS 



MILO A. JACKSON ROSEMAN 

Ruwan County Club; X. E. F. Club. 



CARL PRESTON SAVAGE 



Welcome, N. C. 



Jamestown, N. C. 



Rose ffiU, N. C. 



ALBERT LEWIS SMITH .... Concord, N. C. 

Cabarrus County Club; A. F,. F. Club; A. F. and A. .M. 




One Hundred Thirty-five 



■YACKETY YACK: 



NATHANIEL|McNAIR SMITH . 



THOMAS CLARKE SMITH 



Charlotte, N. C. 



WILLIAM BRITTINGHAMISMOOT 



Salisbury, N. C. 



COLLIER BRYSON SPARGER 



Mount Airy, N. C. 



ABRAM WILLS STALEY 



Greensboro, N. C. 



Di Society; Intra-Soriety Freshman Debate; Inter-Society Freshman 
Debate; High School Debating Union Committee (^, 3); Guilford 
County Club; North Carolina Club; Latin-American Club. 



THOMAS WARWICK STEED 



Richlands, N. C. 



IRVING JOSEPH STEPHENSON 



LEO DEATON SDMMEY 



:yackety yack: 



CLARENCE REESE SUMNER 



, West AsheviUe, N. C. 



Class Historian (1. ih Campus Cabinet (i); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Clas, 
Executive Committee: Tar Baby Board (i. 3); Art Editor (2, 3), Editor- 
in-Chief (3); Tar Heel Board (1,4); Y.trKETV Y.ICK Board (3); Scribblers; 



HOWARD LEON SUMNER 



BENJAMIN LEWIS SUSMAN, JR. 



EDWARD MARTIN SWEETMAN, JR. 



SANFJORD BROGDyNE_TEU 



. West Aslieville, N. C. 



Washington.'N. C. 



KnoxviUe, Term. 



Godwin, N. C. 



ERNEST HAYNES THOMPSON . . Goldsboro, N. C. 

Wayne County Club; Glee Club; Tnr Hahtj Five; German Club; * .i O. 



ISAAC DAVENPORT THORPE 



Rocky Mount, N. C. 



Xash-Edgecombe County Club; Latin-.\merican Club; Sub-.\s3istant 
Manager Varsity Basketball (4); Leader Sophomore Hop; German Club; 
Coop; Minotaur; Z *. 



MARSHALL PAUL BYERLY 



Lexington, N. C. 




One Hundred Thirty-seven 



:yackety YACK" 




WILLIAM FRANCIS TOMS 



WILLIAM MONFORD TRANSOU 



Greensboro, N. C. 



Guilford Countv Tluli; Assistant Manastr Freshman Basketball <i). 
Manager (3); Class Foolball II, 3, 31; Class Basketball (1, i, 3); Class 
Baseball (1. 2, 3); Athletic Council (3); Commencement Marshal (3); 
German Club; "13"; 2 X. 



RALPH VAN LANDINGHAM, JR. Charlotte, N. C. 

^lecklenburg County Club; German Club; Cabin; Gimghoul; 2 A E. 



LEON STEPHENS VENTERS 



JAMES BREEDEN WADDILL 



HUGH DINSMORE WALDROP 



JACK WARREN 



THOMAS LAFAYETTE WARREN 



Richlands, N. C 



Wilmington, N. C. 



Hendersonville, N. C. 



Washington, N. C. 



One Hundred Thirly-eight 



:yackety YACK" 



JAMES SIMS WEARN 



ROBERT MORRISON WEARN 



Charlotte, N. C. 



Mecklenburg County Cluh; A. I. E. E.; Sub-Assistant Manager Varsitv 
Basketball li); Varsity Football Squad (i); German Club; S N. 



ROBERT SILAS WEEKS 



DARE ABERNETHY WELLS 



DANIEL JAY WHITENER 



WALTER ERASMUS WILES 



Whitakers, N. C. 



AsheviUe, N. C. 



Furches, N. C. 



ALFRED WILLIAMS, JR. 



CLAUDE JAMES WILLIAMS, JR. 



Concord, N. C. 




One Hundred Thirty-nine 



rVACKETY YACK" 




WOODWARD WHITE WILLIAMS . . Durham, N. C 

Durham Countv Club; Glee Club; Mandolin Club; Class Tennis (1); 
Varsity Tennis (8. 3): Wearer of N. C; German Club; n K A. 



ARTHUR WILLIAMSON 



JUNIUS CHESTON WOODALL 



WALTER EFROYMSON WOLF 



STERLING DILLON WOOTEN 



CURTIS WALTER WRJICE 



MARY TRAILL YELLOTT 



Salemburg, N. C. 



JAMES SAUNDERS WILLIAMSON . . Burlington, N. C. 



JOHN LINDSAY WINSTEAD 



Charlotte, N. C. 



Indianapolis, Ind. 



Goldsboro, N. C. 



Graham, N. C. 



One Hundred Forty 



:yackety yack: 




rVACKETY YACK" 




(iffir^rB 0f tl)e ^0pl|0mnr? Ollaaa 



Angus Morris McDonald, Jr. 
Romulus Zachariah Linney, Jr. 
Julius Jennings Wade . 



President 

. Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



One Hundred Forty-three 



rVACKETY YACK: 




§'nplT0m0r? (ElaaB iSnll 



Ader, O. L. . 






Advance, N. C 


Alexander, E J. 






. Asheville, N. C 


Alexander. L. V. 






. Asheville, N. C 


Allen, J. T. . 






GibsonviUe, N. C 


Allen. O H 






Goldsboro, N. C 


Anderson, R. F 






Greensboro, N. C 


Angel, C. C. 






Bryson City, N. C 


Angel. T. W. 






Franklin, N. C. 


Apple. W. J 






Burlington, N. C. 


.ASHFORD. C H 






. New Bern, N. C. 


.Aycock. F. B 






Fremont N. C. 


Aycock. J. Y. 






Black Creek, N. C. 


.Avdlett. W. R. 






Harbinger. N. C. 


Barefoot. N. C. 






Benson. N. C. 


Barnes. John T. 






Wilson, N. C. 


Barnes. J. T., Jr. 






Wilson. N. C. 


B.mtle, J. S. 






Tarboro, N. C. 


Battle. N. P. 






Tarboro, N. C. 


Beale, J. J 






Potecasi. N. C. 


Bell. R P 






Concord, N. C. 


Bellamy. C G 






Wilmington, N. C. 


Best, J. H. . 






Greensboro, N. C. 


Blake. VV E 






Burgaw, N. C. 


Blount. J. D. 






Wilson, N. C. 


BODDIE. VV. C. 






Nashville, N. C. 


Bradford, J. H. 






Huntersville. N. C. 


Brown. E. \V. 






Rich Square. N. C. 


Brown. H M 






Hillsboro. N. C. 


Brown. J. M 






Wilkesboro. N. C. 


Brown. R E 






Statesville, N. C. 


Brown. W, L. 






Greensboro N. C. 


Bryan, S D. 






. Apex, N. C- 


Bryson. H J. 






West Asheville, N. C. 


Burleson. M. E. 






Erwin, Term. 


Bltler. D C. 






Rowland, N. C. 


Carmichael. R. C. 




Durham, N C. 


Carpenter, R. E. . 




Cliffside, N. C. 


Cashatt. !. W. 






. Jamestown, N. C. 


Castor. F. S. 






Concord, N. C. 


Cathey. S M 






Skvland N. C. 


Cathey. W. . 






Charlotte N. C. 


Chapman. J. W 






Charlotte N. C 


Cheeseborough, J. 


C 




Asheville N. C. 


Choate, J B. 






Huntersville N. C. 


Clark. W G 






Tarboro. N. C 


Cline. J. I. 






Granite Falls. N. C. 


CoGCESHALL. W. D. 






Darlington, S. C. 


Combs. J. J. . 






Columbia, N. C. 


Cooper, E. B 






Dunn. N. C. 


Cooper. J. H 






Oxford, N. C. 


Cooper, M. Y. 






. Henderson, N. C. 


Corbett, H W 






. Whitakers. N. C. 


Couch, W. T. 






Chapel Hill, N. C. 


Crowson, O F. 






Burlington, N. C. 


Cunningham, H. C. 






. Greensboro, N. C. 



One Hundred Forty-four 



:yackety YACK" 



Dabbs, H L 






Lilesville, N. C. 


Dalton, P H. 






Concord. N. C. 


Daniels. S. F. 






. New Bern, N. C 


Davis, R P. . 






Kinston N. C. 


Davis, S L., Jr. 






. High Point, N. C 


Dellinger, E. E 






Cherryville, N. C 


Derossett, M. B. 






Wilmington. N. C 


Dickson. G. G, 






Raeford. N. C 


QOUGHTON, J. H. 






Laurel Springs, N. C 


Downing. A. 0. 






Norfolk, Va. 


Dry, C. H. . 






Concord, N. C 


Dula, F. M. . 






Lenoir. N. C. 


Duval, L. D. 






Charlotte. N. C. 


Eagles, J. B. 






Walstonburg. N. C 


Eaton, G. W. 






Hickory, N- C 


Edgerton, v. B. 






Kenly. N. C 


Edwards, P. H. 






. Darlington, S. C 


Elkins, W. J. 






Elkton. N. C 


Encstrum. E. F. 






New Bern. N. C 


Engstrlim. T. G. 






. New Bern. N. C 


Essie. A. F. . 






Chapel Hill, N. C 


Everett. J. L 






Rockingham, N. C 


F.\NN1NG. F. D. 






Durham, N. C 


Felton, R. L , Jr. 






Fayetteville. N. C 


Flemminc. G. G. 






Fuquay Springs, N. C 


Fogleman, H. S. 






Burlington, N. C 


Froneberger, p. C 






Bessemer City. N. C 


Gaither. W. H. 






Hertford, N. C 


Gambill. W. J. 






Piney Creek, N. C 


Gattis. W. F. 






Louisburg, N. C- 


Gay. B. S. 






Jackson, N. C; 


Gaylord. J F 






Phoenix, N C 


Gholson. T. p. 






. Henderson, N. C 


Graham. T. P 






. Charlotte. N. C 


Grainger. J. W. 






Kinston. N. C 


Gray. R L . 






Newport News. Va 


Green, H. F. 






Wilmington. N. C 


Greenwood, J. C. 






AsheviUe. N. C 


Groce. T. a. 






Candler, N. C 


GULLICK. J. G 






Belmont, N. C 


Hall, S. C . 






Oxford. N. C: 


Kampton, G. C. 






Chapel Hill, N.C 


Hamrick, F. W. 






Shelby. N. C 


Hannah. W. T. 






Wavnesville, N. C 


Harding, T. L. 






YadkinviUe. N. C: 


H\rding, W. K. 






Charlotte. N. C 


Harmon. J. O. 






Pittsboro, N. C; 


Harris. W. L. 






Henderson. N. C 


Harris. W. V. 






Salisbury, N. C 


Hartshorn. M L. 






Asheville, N. C 


Ha\'ner, a. S. 






Rutherford College, N C 


Hendrix. O. C 






.Advance. N. C. 


Herron. F. J 






Biltmore. N. C. 


Highsmith. J F. 






Fayetteville. N. C. 


Hill. G D . 






Beaufort, N. C. 


HOBBIE. S. E. 






Clayton, N. C. 


Hodge, L. L. 






. Burlington, N. C. 


Hodgin, D R. 






Sanford, N. C. 


Holden, W. L. 






. Wilmington. N. C. 


Holderness, H. 






Tarboro, N. C 




One Hundred Forty-five 



:yackety YACK" 




holloman. w. m. 
Holmes. C. C. 
Holt. P. K . 
Holt, W P. 
honeycutt, g m. 
Hook. W. W. 
Hose A. W. 
Howard, T. S. 
Humphrey, B. E. 
Hl'ncerford. L. p. 
Hunt. E, C. 
Hunt, G. P. . 
Huss, W. H. . 

HUTTON, G. N. 
|.\MES, A. E. . 

jenkins, s. g. 
jernigan, e. c. 
Johnson, E. W. 
Johnson, J. L. 
Johnson, J. T. 
Justice, R. H. 

Kerr, J. Y. . 
Kesler, B B, 
Key, D E. . 

KiMBROUGH, J. W. 

King. A. K. . 



Koontz, R- G. 
Lackey, J. C. 
Langford, G. W. 
Leak, J. P. . 
Leftwitch. M. F. 
I^ehman, E. E. 
Leonard, G. H. 
Lillycrop. W. a. 
Linker, W. M. 
LlNNEY. R. Z. 
Little, J. T. 
Little, T. A. 
Long, Z. F. 
LuTz, D. A. . 
Lyerly, W. R. 

\I,\( AULEY, O. C. . 
\1\. AuLEY. O. C. . 
\li ( lamrock, J. R. 
-McCorkle, E. H. , 
McCoy, G. W. 
McGraw. J. T. W. 
McDonald, A. M. 
McGee, a. M. 
McLennon, D. C. . 
\h Mullan, W. O. 
\l( Mlrry. E. L. . 
\ Ink I IN. E. L. 
\ 1a 1 1 hews. C. L 
Matthews, R. E. . 



Ahoskic, 

CounciL 

Burlington, 

Duke, 

Chapel Hill, 

Charlotte, 

Wilmington, 

Pink Hill. 

Wilmington, 

Charlotte, 

Le.xington, 

Oxford, 

Cherryville, 

Hickory, 



N C. 
N C. 
N C. 

N. C. 
N C. 
N C. 
N C. 
N C. 
NC. 
N C. 
N C. 
N C. 
N C. 
N C 



Wilson, N. C 
Tarboro, N. C. 
Benson, N C. 
Kipling, N. C. 
. Apex, N. C. 
Durham, N. C. 
Greensboro, N. C. 



Warrenton, N C. 

Salisbury, N. C. 

Elkin. N. C. 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Morrill, Neb. 



Mocksville. 

Hamlet, 

Harmony, 

Rockingham, 

Biltmore, 

Rosemary, 

Lexington, 

Charlotte, 

Salisbury, 

Charlotte, 

Greenville, 

Marshville. 

Rockingham, 

Granite Falls. 

. Ashevilk, 



Huntersville, 

Huntersville, 

Greensboro, 

Charlotte, 

Asheville, 

Wilson, 

Charlotte, 

Goldsboro, 

Chapel Hill, 

Elizabeth City. 

Columbus. 

Charlotte. 

Clinton. 

Wilson, 



N. C. 
N, C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N C. 
N. C. 
N C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N C. 
N C. 

N. C. 
N, C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C 



One Hundred Forty-six 



:yackety yack: 



Matthews. S. E. 
Mauney, C. G. 
Maupin, W. C. 
Maxwell, S. W. 
May. R C. 
Mebane, W. M. 
Mendenhall, J. H. 
Menzies, a. a. S. 
Menzies, S. F. 
Merritt, C. Z. 
Meyer, G. M. 
Miller. A. A. 
Mitchell. J. G. 
MlTCHUM, W. C. 
Morris. F. D. 
Morris, R. W. 
Moser, a. M. 
Murdock, T. G 

Ne\ille, C, H. 
Newbern, J. S. 
Nixon, J. G. 

Orr, as.. 

Parham, S. J. 
Parker. \V."V. 
Parrot. ). M. 
Pate. J."M. . 
Pemberton. H. L. 
Pfndergraft, p. 
Penton, H. a. 
Perry, C. H. 
Phillips, L. V. 
Pickle, R. L. 
poindexter, c. c. 
Powell, W, E. 
Prescott, C. E. 
Price, R C. 
Pl'rrincton, P 

Ragsdale, J. E. 
Rand, C. H. . 
Rawls, H. J. 
Ray, J. W. . 
Reavis, p. a. 
Rhue, J. R. . 

RlCKERT. J. A. 

RiKE, R. C, . 
Ritchie, W. A. 
Ross, H. L. . 



Sanders, W. M. 
Shepard, T. H. 
Sinclair, D. C. 
Smiley, T. B. 
Smith, C. C. . 
Smith, C. G. . 
Smith, C. U. . 



Jr. 



Turkey, 

Maiden, 

Salisbury, 

Charlotte. 

Lenoir, 

Newton, 

Greensboro, 

Hickory, 

Hickory, 

New Bern, 

Charlotte, 

Goldsboro, 

Oxford, 

Gastonia, 

Ga.stonia, 

Gastonia, 

Swannanoa, 

Salisbury, 



Whitakers, N. C 

. Olds, N. C 

Hertford, N. C 

Charlotte, N. C. 



Louisburg 

Monroe 

Kinston 

Goldsboro 

Concord 

Chapel Hi 

Wilmington, 

Balsam. 

Columbia 

.Advance, 

Franklin, 

Wilmington, 

Ayden, 

. Greensboro, 

Scotland Neck. 



Florence, S. C 

Garner, N. C 

Robersonville, N. C 

. Waynesville, N. C 

Louisburg, N. C 

Stella, N. C 

Ashexille, N. C 

- Randleman, N. C 

Concord, N. C 

. Greensboro, N. C 



Smithfield, N. C, 

Edenton, N. C. 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Bryson City, N. C, 

Dunn. N. C 

Tarboro. N. C. 

Capron. Va. 




One Hundred Forty-seven 



YACKETY YACK 1 






Smith, C. W. 


Wilmington, N. C. 




F^iiv^^iittH ji '^ "' 


Smith, G. H., Jr. . 


Wilmington, N. C. 




■ ^U'V^f^^Bft'ij 


Smith, J. M. . 


Greenville, N. C. 




B^ ^j9jiyKll^'° Vk!9^ fi 


Smith, W. L. 


Greenville, N. C. 




w^mmttU^^Ejl^ ^^' 


Spain, J. H. . 


. Greenville, N. C. 




^^^^^^^^■^ 


SPAUGH, R. E. 


Winston-Salem, N. C. 




^K^^^^^^^^^K^ ^>V >* "^1. ' 


Speck, T. W. 


York, S. C. 






Spruill, J. W. 


Sanatorium, N. C. 




mM^K^' Wf'-^ 


Stevenson, S. H. . 


Loray, N. C. 




SfOUDEMIRE, S. A. 


Spencer, N. C. 




^mOS/^^K 


^rouT, G. R. 


Julian, N. C. 




praK^HiP 


NlRlBLING, J. W. 


Atlanta, Ga. 




W^lffM^ t ' !i^t 


Stroud, C. E. 


. Greensboro, N. C. 




Stroupe, C. R. 


Altamont, N. C. 




^mmnui^Km^^P^"^ ' '"'' 


Strol'pe. F. L. 


Altamont, N. C. 




HHk^^^B ^ 


Sl_XLI\-AN, \V. A. 


Asheville, N. C. 




HRr^^B s- 


Swtnk, H. 


China Grove, N. C. 




MB!yj^^W| j^^^|i^)&^ 


Swtnk, \V. J. 


China Grove. N. C. 




W^^amBk mt/BS^'M 


Sylnester, R. D. . 


. Richlands, N. C. 




hhHh H^HhIIL 


Taylor, J. M. 


Chocowinity, N. C. 




^^^Hm^H^^^^^^^^I^^ 


Taylor, W. J. 


Rutherfordton, N. C. 




^^^BiSHfli^'nHHMHHF^ 


Teague, L. E. 


High Point, N. C. 




L^iail.^'B 


Ihompson, E. a. . 


. Greensboro, N. C. 




1 hompson. g. w. . 
1 hompson, R. a. . 


. Goldsboro, N. C. 
Wilson, N. C. 




lPr!w';J3 


Thompson R. L. 


. New York, N. Y. 




Ilirner, T. 


High Point. N. C. 










L'PCHURCH, R. W. . 


Oxford, N. C. 




^I^K^- ^^'"'pc'^v^i.^H^ 


LZIELL, L. V. 


Chapel Hill, N. C. 




pHBttv jfiv ijM^H 


Lzzell, p. . 


Chapel Hill, N. C. 




^^^V^K^I^ 


\ ICKERS, W. G. 


Durham, N. C. 




v^ ' «> -^^' ^^ ' 


W ard, H, T. . 


Hickory, N. C. 




gfr ^P *^ .^^ 


Wal'gh, H. E. 


North Wilkesboro, N. C. 




■'■--->• 


Weeks. R. S.. Jr. . 


. Whitakers, N. C. 




-JiL^^^'N^ 


Weitzel. F. J. 


Tuscumbia, Ala. 




flMr'"V-' 


W'hedbee, S. M. 


. Hertford, N. C 




PP^ «- 


White, R. B. 


Concord. N. C. 




{^\J^^^ -w ^ 


Wicker, M. E. 


Sanford, N. C. 




Wiles, W. E. 


Furches, N. C. 




^■LI"''-^ 


Williams, C. E. 


Benson, N. C. 




Williams, L. P. 


Pee Dee, N. C. 




Williamson, B. N. 


Louisburg, N. C. 




Bi^^^Br^ 


Workman, F. L. 


Burlington, N. C. 




^c>^^ 


Worsham, B. B. 


Reithbend, Va. 




^K -'j^^|^.^^/lcw ^^^* 


>'ates, J. G. . 


Asheville, N. C. 




Iates, W. J. 

'lELVERTON, O. W. 


Charlotte, N. C. 
Fremont, N, C. 






'I'OUNG, V. V. 


Durham, N. C. 




p^ 


^'OUNGBLOOD, S. H. 


. Charlotte, N. C. 


One Hundred Forty-eight 









rVACKETY YACK: 



FRESHMEN 




•YACKETY YACK! 




O^fitrprH nf tlir iFrfBl|man (Ulaaa 



B. M. GiLLON 

W. F. Rice . 

J. W. MOBLEY 



. President 

Vice-President 

Secretar\'-Treasurer 



One Hundred Fifty-one 



:yackety YACK' 




iFrpal^man (ElasB iSnll 



R. 



\bRAMOW!TZ, J. B. 

\dams, J. E. 
Alexander, J. 
Allen, E. G. 
Allen, S. N, 
Allred, C. M. 
.\llsbrook, J. R. 
Alsop, W. S, 

Ambler, J. V. 
Anderson, L. L. 
Andrews, C. M, 
Atkins, C. S. 

\lsband, G a. 
Aycock, C. p. 

Barden, J. M. 
[Barnes, J. B. 
Barnes, Jas. T., Jr. 
Barnes, L, P. 
Barnette, W. 
Barrincton, J. M. 
Baum, a. E. . 
[V\UM, E, O. . 
Mi LL. C. B. . 
I'l llamv. J. E. 

I^F-NNETT, J. T, 
I '.I THE A, J M. 
lil.XS, C H. . 

Birkhead. J, W., Jr. 

liL.^CKWELDER, D. M. 

Blackwelder, R. G. 
Blake, P. O. 

BOATWRICHT, W. 

BoNEY, P., Jr. 
Bonner, M. D. 

I'.c-iNNER, W. S. 

B..10TH, H. E. 
Host, a. E, , 
i^ostick, s. 
1'.owde"n, B. S. 

15(1VVDEN, M. C. 
I?CWMAN, E. F. 
BoYLES, A. 

Bradley, A., Jr. 
Bradley, J. A. 
liRANCH, J. S. 
Britt, C. R, . 
i-^ROWN, C. E. 

I^ROWN, D. A. 

Brown, E. H., Jr. 
Brown, G. 
liROWN, K. E. 

Brown, L. P. 

l^ROWN, W. C. 

Bryson, T. D., 
Burns, T, A. . 
l^L'RTON, J. H. 
Ba rton, R. H. 



H 



Jr. 



Wilmington, N, C. 

Hamlet, N. C. 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Louisburg, N- C. 

Sea Grove, N. C. 

Climax, N. C. 

Roanoke Rapids, N. C, 

Enfield, N. C. 

. Asheville, N. C. 

Advance, N. C. 

Schoolfield, V'a. 

Greensboro. N. C. 

High Point, N. C 

Pantego, N, C. 

Burgaw, N. C. 
Sims, N. C. 
Kenly, N. C. 
Florence, S. C. 
Huntersville, N. C. 
Gibson, N. C. 
Fairfield, N. C. 
Poplar Branch, N. C. 
Trov, N. C, 
Enfield, N C. 
Rockingham, N. C. 
Dillon, S. C. 
Salisbury, N. C. 
Ashboro, N. C. 
Lenoir, N. G. 
Concord, N. C. 
Chadbourn, N. C. 
Darlington, S. C. 
Goldsboro, N. C. 
Aurora, N. C. 
Washington, N. C. 
Catawba, N. G. 
Matthews, N. G. 
Charlotte, N. G. 
Burgaw, N. G. 
. Faison, N. G. 
Newton, N. C. 
Rock Hill, S. C. 
Burlington, N. G. 
Florence, S. G. 
Enfield, N. G. 
Lumberton, N. G. 
Charlotte, N. C 
Jamcsville, N. G. 
Concord, N. G. 
Elkin. N. G. 
Waverly, N. G. 
Hartford, Conn. 
. Burlington, N. G. 
Bryson City, N. C, 
Ashboro, N. C. 
Rcidsville, N. C. 
Roxboro, N C. 



One Hundred Fifty-two 



:yackety yack: 



Butler, A. D. 
Butler, E. K. 
Butt, W. H. . 
Byrum, a. G. 



Capps. H. S. . 
Carroll, B. S. 
Carroll, R. S. 
Cates, C. C. 
Cates, J. W. 
Caton, G. a., Jr. 
Caudle, E. B. 
Caveness, S. B. 
Chaney, J. F. 
Charles, W. J. 
Clarke, O. S. 
Clarke, J. M. 
Clarke, S. H. 
Clark, W. A. 
Cobb, R. B. . 
Coble, F. G. 
Coffey, J. N. 

COGCESHALL, B. E. 
COLEY, C. Y . 
COLTON. C. B. 

Connor, M. B. 
Cooper, D, J. 

CORBITT, D. L. 
Corey, J. P. . 
Cornelius, C. E. 
Cowan, C. E.. 
Cox, V. H. . 
CozART, U. H., Jr. 
Crichton, J. H. 
Crisp, G. R. . 
Crisp, R. B. . 
Cross, W. T. 
Crowell, R. a. 



Dalton, B. B. 
Daniels, A. S. 
Darden, R. D. 
Daughtry, E. M. 
Davis, A. L. . 
Davis, E. J. . 
Davis, L. E. . 
Deans, J. E. 
De Harte, H. M. 
Deviny, E. D. 
Dixon, W. T. 
Dodderer, W. A. 
Doyle, W. H. 
DuLs, H. D. . 
Dunn, W. E. 
Durham, C. W 

Eaves, R. S. . 
Echols, W. B. 
Edmundson, L. B. 



Liberty, N. C. 

St. Paul, N. C. 

Bonnerton, N. C. 

Edenton, N. C. 



Hendersonville. N. C. 

Winterville, N. C. 

Bethel, N. C. 

Edenton, N. C. 

Edenton, N. C. 

New Bern, N, C 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Greensboro. N. C. 

Chester, S. C. 

Philadelphia. Pa. 

Leaksville, N. C. 

. Statesville, N. C. 

Waxhaw, N. C. 

Fayetteville, N. C. 

Fremont, N. C. 

. Greensboro. N. C 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Darlington. S. C, 

Rockingham. N. C. 

Boston. Mass. 

Belhaven, N. C. 

Henderson, N. C. 

Greenville, N. C. 

Greenville. N. C. 

Moorsville, N. C. 

Windsor. N, C. 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

.Wilson, N. C. 

Charlotte. N. C. 

Kinston. N. C. 

Lenoir, N. C. 

Gatesville, N. C. 

Albemarle, N. C. 



Red Springs. 

Hilton Villa! 

Wilmington, 

Roanoke Rapids, 

Statesville, 

Beaufort, 

Albemarle, 

North Wilksboro, 

Bryson City 

Julian 

Kinston 

Waynesville 

Charlotte 

Charlotte 

Kinston 

Chapel Hill 



N. C. 
e. Va. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N, C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
R C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 



Rutherfordton. N. C. 

Kernersville. N. C. 

Goldsboro, N. C. 




One Hundred Fifty-three 



•YACKETY YACK" 




Efird, a B. 
Ellis, C B 
Elsom, G. M. 
Evans, C R. 

Farr, \\'.. Jr. 
Farrior. M- L. 
Faucett, W. J. 
Feagan, a. a 
Ferclson. C- L 
Fetter. E. M 
Fields, C. M, 
Fish. G. R. .^ 
Flinton. C. W. 
fortescue. z. i. 
Fountain, B. F. 
foushee, j. m. 
Freeman. J. F. 
Freeman, J. N. 
Freeman, O. W. 
Fulton. \V. F. 



Galimorb, G. D 
Gallagher. P. N. 
Gaskins, J. R. 
Giersch. O. L 
Gilbert, J. N. 
GiLLON, B. M 
Gilreath, R. a 
Glenn, A. G. 
Glover, F, O. 
gordsdn. c. s. 
gorham, h. j. 
Graham. D. L. 
Green, C W 
Green, U . W. 
Greenwood. C P. 
Greec, J. M 
Gregory. J. T. 
Griffin, E. F. 

I mlFFIN, H. P. 
C iKIFFIN. J. H. 

tjRiMES. J. W, Jr. 
GwvN. \V. W 

Haizlip, J. O. 
Hall, J. P. . 
Hamer, L D. 
Hardin. E B. 
Harding. F. D. B. 
Hare. R. B. 
Hartsell, E. H. 
Hayes. L O. 
Head, W G . 
Hedrick, E. L. 
Hedrick, O L. 
Hege. R. W, 
Henderson, G. 
Herrick, H. J 
Hill, B. T. . 



Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Burlington, N. C. 

Henderson N C. 

Manteo. N. C. 



.Asheville, 

Rose Hill, 

Durham, 

Columbus. 

W'aynesville, 

Greensboro, 

Pleasant Garden, 

. Clyde, 

Cullowhee, 

Scranton, 

Tarboro, 

Greensboro, 

Spencer, 

Dobson, 

West Orange 

Winston-Salem, 



Lexington. 

Durham, 

Greenville, 

Raleigh, 

StatesviUe, 

Concord, 

Hendersonville, 

Sugar Grove, 

Salisbury, 

Hartsville, 

Tarboro, 

Red Springs, 

.Asheville, 

Wilmington, 

Biltmore, 

Burlington, 

Salisbury, 

Louisburg, 

Reidsville. 

Biltmore, 

Asheville, 

Leaksville, 

Reidsville, 

Oxford, 

.\shcville, 

\\ ilmington, 

Yadkinville, 

Florence, 

Stanfield, 

Fremont , 

Rockingham, 

Taylorsville, 

Lenoir, 

Clemmons, 

Graham, 

Williamston, 

Wadesboro, 



N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 



N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C, 
N.J. 
N. C. 



N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 

N. C. 
N. C. 
N C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
, S. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 



One Hundred Fifty-four 



•YACKETY YACK: 



Hill, J. A. . 






Raleigh, N. C 


Hill, V. A. . 




Polkton. N. C 


HOCAN, H. S. 




Chapel Hill, N. C 


HOIDERNESS, W. H. 




Tarboro, N C 


HOLSHOUSER, C. A. 




Salisbury, N. C 


Holshouser, H. 




Winston-Salem, N. C 


HONEYCUTT, C. B. 






Raleigh, N. C 


HousER, F. M. 






Cherryville, N. C 


HUGGINS, L. V. 






Hendersonville, N. C 


Hunt, W. B.. Jr. 






Pleasant Garden, N. C 


Hunter, W. F. 






Statesville, N. C 


Hyatt, P. R. 






Waynesville, N. C 


Iceman, C, Jr. .... Monroe, N. C 


ISBELL, VV. H. .... Lenoir, N. C 


Jacocks, T. B Tarboro, N. C 


Jarman, B. T. 






Burlington, N. C 


Jenkins, H. H. 






Anondale, N. C 


Johnson, B. W. 






Gastonia. N. C 


Johnson, E. J. 






Burgaw, N. C 


Johnson, H. E. 






High Point. N. C 


Johnson, S. A. 






Goldsboro. N. C 


Johnson, V. C. 






Ashboro, N. C 


Johnson, .A. A. 






Rockv Mount. N C 


Jones, W. 






. High Point. N. C 


Jordan, M. M. 




Hamlet. NC 


JOYNER, J. 




Garysburg. N. C 


Kenney, S. E. W. . . Windsor. N. C 


Kesler, J. C. 




Salisbury, N. C 


King, C. S. . 




. Asheville, N. C 


King, W. E. . 






. Wise, N. C 


Kirkman, G. E. 






Randleman, N, C 


KiSTLER, A. R. 






Lawndale. N. C 


Kitchen. M. R. 






Biltmore. N. C 


Lamb. F. W. . . . . Greensboro. N. C 


Lambeth. H L. 






Thomasville, N. C 


Laney. E. a. 






Monroe, N. C 


Langston. W. L. 






. Goldsboro, N. C 


Larsen, T. 






Burlington, N. C 


L.\ssiter, L. I. 






Rich Square. N. C 


Lathery, E. F. 






Cornelius. N. C 


Lee, a. E. . 






Monroe, N. C 


Lee. J. L. 






Mount Olixe. N. C 


Leggett, W. T. 






Tarboro, N. C 


LiLES. L. P. . 






Wilson's Mills, N. C 


LiLES, N. P. . 






Lilesville, N. C 


LiNDGREN. P. T. 






Charlotte, N. C 


LiNEBERGER, H. A. 






Belmont, N. C 


London, A. H. 






Pittsboro, N. C 


Long. \V. M. 






Concord. N. C 


LUPTON, J. H. 






Scranton, N. C 


McCall, J. V Charlotte, N. C 


McCoLLUM, C. E. . . . Norfolk, Va 


McCoy, C. M. 






. Cove City. N. C 




One Hundred Fifty-five 



:yackety yack: 




McDonald. P. C. . 
K^acFayden, p. R., Jr. 
McGalliard, J. C. 
McGlaughon, F. E. 
McIntvre, L. F. 
McKaughan, G. E. 
McLean, J. S. 
McNairy, C. B. 
McRae, C. B. 
Malpass, B. L. 
Mann, F. B. . 
Mangum, E. p. 
Martin, N. . 
Mason, C. E. 
Mast, J. B. . 
Matthews, P. G. 
m.^xwell, h. g. 
May, B., Jr. . 
Mebane. W. M. 
Meekins, P. W. 
Michael, J. W. 
MiDYETTE, B. B. 
Midyette. S. B. 
.Miles, L. B. . 
.Milstead, .a. D. 

MOBLEY. J. W. 

Moore. C. A. 
Moore. L. H. 
.Moore. L. I., Jr. 
Moore, N. G. 
Murphy, G. M. 

Neiman, a. B. 
Nesbitt, J. T. C. 
Newby, G. E . Jr. 
Newton, Z. B. 
norfleet, c. e. 
Norwood, J.J. 

OBrien. W L,, Jr 
ONeil, C- L. 
Or.mond. J. W. 



P.'kLMER, .-X. W. 

Parham. S. p. 
Parkerson, J. E. 
Parshley, p. F. 
Patrick, J. Q. 
Patton, G. T.. Jr 
Peeler. C. A. 
Pendercrass. E. J 
Peterson. R. D. 
Petree. S. E. 
Petteway, E J. 

PiCKLER. Nl R. 

Pittman. N. R. 
Pless, E. J. . 
Plyer. D. 
Pollard, \V. .-X. 
Prescott, C. E 



Jr. 



Timberland, 

Concord, 

Connolly Springs, 

Wilmington, 

Goldsboro, 

Kernersville, 

Lillington, 

Kinston, 

Fayetteville, 

Goldsboro, 

Franklin, 

Kinston, 

Asheville, 

Kings Mountain, 

. Mast, 

Black Mountain, 

Goldsboro, 

Sanford. 

Newton. 

Manteo, 

Woodrow, 

.•\urora, 

Jackson, 

Mooresville, 

Charlotte, 

Charlotte, 

Charlotte. 

Faison. 

New Bern, 

Mooresville, 

Wilmington. 



N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 

N. c. 
N. c. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
R C. 
N. C 



N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N. C. 
N C. 



Charlotte, N. C. 

Chapel Hill. N. C. 

Hertford, N. C. 

. Hope Mills, N. C: 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Winston-Salem. N. C. 

Clayton. N. C. 

Bessemer City. N. C. 



. Gulf, N. C. 

Henderson. N. C. 

Greenville, N. C. 

Clinton, N. C. 

Grifton, N. C. 

Darlington, S. C. 

Salisbury, N. C. 

Florence, S. C. 

Erwin, Tenn. 

Danbury, N. C. 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

Salisbury. N. C. 

Fayetteville, N. C. 

Marion, N. C. 

Monroe, N. C. 

Farmville, N. C. 

.•\vden, N. C. 



One Hundred Fifty-six 





YACKETY YACK 1 


Presnell, W. C. . 


Ashboro, N. C. 1 


mmei'i: r^»HBH|^^HMBH| 




Pr?vette, a. . 


. Wakefield, N. C. ' 




Purser, J. R.. Jr. . 


Charlotte, N. C. 


^^^^^^^^H 




QuiNN, RE. 
Ragsdale, G. Y. . 


Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Smithfield, N. C. 


hBHII^^^^^^ 


"^ 






~'"1 


Ranson, M. D. 


Huntersville, N. C. 


sff iik 


■ 




Raper, a. F. 


Welcome, N. C. 


Hf! flD 


■ 




Ray, B. B. . 


Selma, N. C. 


Wi'l c? 


■ 




Ray, F. C 


Leaksville, N. C. 


if ^t^ 


1 




Ray, J. S. . 


. Haw River, N.C. 


m' .^^^B 


m 




Redwine, T. W. . 


Monroe, N. C. 


pi j^^^D 


.---H 




Reedy. L. L. 


. Clio, N. C. 


■i'Mt 9^^H 


■ 




Reid, C. L. . 


Rutherfordton, N. C, 


^^■<J^^9|| ] H 




Reit:el, J. B. 


. High Point, N. C. 


in Ml 1 




i Reynolds, H. K. . 


. High Point, N. C. 




Rice, W. F. . 


.-Xsheville. N. C. 




Roberts, G. L, 


Fairfield. N. C. j 


^^^Hl jL.'i "1 w 




Robinson, E, E . 
Rogers, LB. 


Concord, N. C. ; 
.Ashcville. N. C. f 


nMH In 1 Ir 




,^| j^^^B|~ll j 


Rollins, E, Vl, 
Sawyer, C, J, 


. Henderson, N. C. r 
Windsor, N. C. 


"Jfaj^^-J^JJ 4-y _i 




W^Ff ^ 


Schneider, L. I. . 


Gastonia, N. C 




Schwartz, B. 


Charlotte, N C 


■rat fl 




Scott, W. De R. . 


Graham, N, C~ 


■jpi M 




Settle R R 


Rawlin<7s N C 


m^^L^ ..^M 




Sevier, J. T., Jr. . 


'. AsheviUei N^ C 


_^^fl| 




Shackell. a. E. . 


Tarboro, N, C 


'SBj^^H 




Shearouse, F. La R. 
Shell, W. S. 


Brooklet, Ga. 
Hickory, N. C. | 






''' 




Shephard, M. L. . 


Burlington, N. C. 1 


• 




Shephard, R. p. . 


Rockingham, N. C. i 






Shoulais, J. a. 


Rich Square, N. C. | 


, 1 




Shuford, W. T. . 


Spencer, N. C. j 




Siewers, C. N. 
SiSK, C. J. . 


Winston-Salem, N. C. \ 
Bryson City, N. C. ! 


tt 


m&SHx^^..~..' .^ri 




1 


Sloan, T. M. 


Charlotte, N. C. ] 






Smith, C. F. . 


Mount Airy, N. C. j 


JKHHs^ft 




Smith, C. L. . 


Greenville, N. C. i 




Smith, E. B. . 


. Asheville, N. C. 1 






Smith, H B. 


Freemont, N. C. i 


^ ^WF 




Smith, J. E. . 


Pilot Mountain, N. C. ( 




Smith, P. . . . 


Pikesville, N. C. 


-' * 




Smith, T. J. . 


Davidson, N. C. I 


.^y J 1 




Smith, W. E. 


Scotland Neck, N. C. | 






Smith, W. G. 


Faison, N. C. \ 


-jy^^y 1 JP;' M^ 




Smith, W. J. . 


. Greenville, N. C. i 


^LWUl^Klf^AlHI^^^^am 




Somers, W. F. 


Salisbury, N. C. 


Wjl^^^B'i^p'f^^^^^m 




Spaugh, F. M. 


Winston-Salern, N. C. 


n9^i ^^.^■BQl^^^l 




Spencer, C. E. 


Rosemary, N. C. , 


■^Ir^ ■'"M~^^^^^^^^t 




Stanton, J. C. 


Stantonburg. N. C. ! 


■ '^'*-| 




Starnes, jr. 


Ashcville, N, C. 


1 




Staton, H. V. 


Hendersonville, N. C. 


1 




Stauber, L. E. 
Stuart, G. S. 


. Rural Hall, N. C. 
. Trov, N. C. 


'bsmemtsmssi .^j 




■■■■■■■■II& ^tfHHHHH 


Sumner, J. D. 


Franklinville, N. C. 


^^^^^^^K> J^^^^^l 




Swain, J. H. 


. Jerrv. N. C. 


^^^^^^^HbKKHHBHI^^^^^^I 




Swain, W. J. 


. Jerry, N. C. 


^^^^^^^^HHhBhJ^H^^^^^^I 




Sykes, G. T, 


Efland, N. C. 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^l^^^^l 






One Hundred Fifty-seven 


1 1 



:yackety yack: 




Jr. 



Talton, W J. 

Tanner, J. S. 
Iavlor, L. B. 
1 \YLOR. R. W. 

I HOMAS, L. A. 

Thomas, L. A. 
Thompson, P. M. 
Thompson, W. M., 
Thompson. W. 
Timberlake. J. P. 
Turnage, J. W. 
Turner, C. A. 
Turner, S. M. 
Tyson. T. B. 
Tyson, W. S. 
Underwood, A. D 
Vance, J. A., Jr. 
Waddell, W. B. 
Wainer. D S. 
Wall, J. H. . 
Wall, T, D, . 
Ward, D. L 
Ware, F. S. 
Waters, J. S. 
Watkine, S. H. 
Watson. E. G. G. 
Weaver, R. S. 
Webb. G 
Weil. A 
Wells, J. T. 
West, J. D. . 
Wheeler. W. C. 
W'hitker. H. F. 
White. G. H. 
White. H. G. 
White, J. A. 
White, J. F. . 
White. W. D. 
Whitehurst. v. N. 
Whittincton, C. T 
Wilkinson, M. ,^. 
Williams, F. W. 
Williamson, J. H. 
Williamson, W. E. 
Wilson, C. G. 
Wilson, J. V. 
Winders. H. M 

W'lNDLEY, J. L. 
W'OFFORD. W. T. 

Wolfe. F. J. 
Woodard. J. E. 
w'oodard, t. h. 
Woodward. W. L. 
wooten. r. s. 
Wright. T. B. 
Yarborough. J. E. 
Yarley, C. B. 
Young. W. F. 
Young blood, N. E 
Zollicoffer, J. H. 



Jr. 



Kin 



Jr. 



. Selma, N. C. 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Pikesville. N. C. 

Oxford, N. C. 

Greensboro, N. C. 

Asheville, N. C. 

Mebane. N.-C. 

Jacksonville. N. C. 

Winston-Salem. N. C. 

Louisburg. N. C. 

Avdcn. N. C. 

Parmele. N. C. 

North Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Carthage, N. C. 

Greenville, N. C. 

Bailey, N. C. 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Henderson, N. C. 

Carthage. N. C. 

Chester, S. C. 

Pee Dee, N. C. 

New Bern, N. C. 

gs Mountain, N. C. 

Ruffin. N. C. 

Henderson. N. C. 

.Aurora, N. C. 

Rich Square, N. C. 

Asheville. N. C. 

Goldsboro, N. C. 

Burgaw, N, C. 

Kinston. N. C. 

Chapel Hill. N. C. 

Philadelphia. Pa. 

Livingston, Tenn. 

Asheville, N. C. 

Whitkers, N. C. 

Oxford. N. C. 

Beaufort. N. C. 

Bethel. N. C. 

Greensboro. N. C. 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

South Mills. N. C. 

Carthage. N. C. 

Asheville. N. C. 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Lumberton, N. C. 

Fremont, N. C. 

Swan Quarter, N. C. 

Roanoke Rapids. N. C. 

Asheville, N. C. 

Wilson, N. C. 

Wilson, N. C. 

Whartonsville, N. C. 

. Mt. Olive, N. C. 

. Greensboro, N. C. 

Spring Hope, N. C. 

. Walterboro, S. C. 

Wilson, N. C. 

Fayetteville, N. C. 

. Henderson, N. C. 



One Hundred Fifty-eight 



■YACKETY YACK- 




'^^^mi^0BmMiii2iMii0imimM 




:yackety yack: 




LUCIUS POLK McGEHEE 

Dean of the Law School 



OPfitrrrs of tbr IGaui irbnol 



i>pnuir IGaui (ElaaH 



William Reynolds Allen, Jr. 
Edwin Earle Rives 
William Whitfield Sledge . 



President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



3)mttnr ICatu (Claaa 

Frank Shepard Spruill, Jr. ....... President 

Frank Lutirell Grier Vice-President 

Charles Hampton Oliver Secretary-Treasurer 



One Hundred Sixty 



rVACKETY YACK' 





WILLIAM KLXRION ALLEN 

Elkin, N" C. 
Age. 22; Weight, t6o: Height. 6 feel 

Di Society: Surry County Club. Vice-President.l8; Claas 
Baseball.'lT; Pilot U. S. Armv Aviation,'19; President 
Iredell Law Club; German Clul). 

'TDILL is another survivor of the ante- 
D bellum period, having traveled the route 
from Carolina to L'ncle Sam's air service and 
back again. He has a way with the ladies and 
the art of making friends We predict his 
success and that "They'" will live happily 
ever after. 



NATHAN ROSCOE B.ASS 

Lucama, N. C. 

Age. 2;. ^' eight. 134: Height. ^ feet 10 inches 

■Wilson County Club; Iredell Law Club: Y. M. C. A.; 
German Club. 

e X. 

B.ASS, like his home town, is very quiet and 
unassuming, but once behind the "box 
cars of his reserve you find him a genuine 
fellow and a true sport He believes in 
studying at all times and attending classes 
regularly — if there is nothing else to do. In 
addition to his work here he is taking cor- 
respondence courses at N. C. C. W.. and N. Mere- 
dith W hen with the ladies, his reserve is 
scattered to the proverbial tour winds, and 
he becomes a combination of the original 
cave man and Harold Lloyd. With this 
combination, ladies to the front, please. 





One Hundred Sixty-one 



:yackety YACK" 





JAY BIVENS 
Aquadale. N. C. 
Age, 2;; Weight. ij8; Height, 6 feet 
S. A. T. C; Clerk Ruffin Law Club. 

JAY always marveled at the scope of "The 
Law"; Jay once got into the Library and 
became so lost in the maze of \olumes that 
he had to call on a friend to show him out. 
Jay never lost a friend, except in being un- 
able to keep account of them all Jay once 
edited a newspaper in which he had a privi- 
leged "colyum" headed. 'This is the truth — 
as near as we dare print it." But Jay would 
never turn in his briefs and abstracts at the 
Law School until the "Old Man" found a 
little keg and fashioned a slit in the top, 
over which he placed a sign: "Drop your 
abstracts here," since which time Jay has 
ever been ahead. 




DWIGHT BRANTLEY 

Spring Hope, N. C. 

Age. 22; Weight, ib;: Height, 6 feet 

.K. E. F. Club; President McGehee Law Club; German 
Club; Cabin. 

* A *; * ^ e. 

DWIGHT is reliable, energetic, loyal, and 
efficient. He is a good student — not a 
pedant — a good mi.xer and an all-round man. 
Coming from Nash County, where, in the 
days before the great American Continent 
became a desert, other good things came 
from, he has been a credit on this campus, 
to his country, and his Alma Mater. On 
the ballroom floor, in class, or at a student 
gathering. "D" is "there with the goods". 
Like a number of Carolina men he left the 
pursuit of knowledge to do his bit in the A. 
E. F. We are not predicting great success 
for him simply because such is the custom of 
ye scribes, but we sincerely believe that the 
years will bring to him abundant reward — 
the kind that is secured only by efficiency, 
energy, and reliability. 




One Hundred Sixty-two 



:yackety yack: 





FRANK ERTEL C.ARLYLE 

Lumberton. N. C. 

Age, 22; Weight, 160: Height, ; feet q inches 

MAKING it a settled principle, despite 
Mr. Mcintosh's Contracts and Mr. 
Efird s Persons, never to miss a Carolina 
dance during his stay on the "Hill. " Ertel 
has come to know intimately the majority 
of the girls from the strands of the tempestu- 
ous Hatteras to the moon-lit hills of the 
"Land of the Sky " His neatness and unfail- 
ing good humor ha\e made him popular with 
our fair visitors. His popularity, however, 
is not confined to the fair visitors to the 
"Hill, but by his calmness and reserve 
among strangers, he has won tne esteem of 
his friends by his ability to hold up his end 
in "slinging the bull" in any question, any 
time, and at any place, being especially pro- 
ficient, however, in fraternity dope. 



THOMAS DL"XC.AX COOPER 

Graham, N. C. 

Age, 22.' ^"eight, 170: Height, ; feet 11 inches 

.\laniance County Club; A. E. F. Club; Clark Law Club; 
Law School Ba.=eball.'40; Law Ba.«ketball.'«0; Glee Club. 
"SO; German Club. 

* A *. 

COOP " is another one of the boys who 
was delayed in beginning Blackstone's 
Permits, because of the well known recent 
world uar. Howc\er. he has put the same 
energy and seriousness in his work in the law 
school as he did in the Hun-fighting, when 
his regiment. 120th Infantry, began making 
life hell for the ole Hindenberg line. Cooper 
has spent most of his time here on his studies, 
but he has gi\en hearty support to worth- 
while activities of the college. 





How rf nil jfo*ted 



One Hundred Sixty-three 



'YACKETY YACK: 





PAUL BLIRT EDMLINDSON 

Goldsboro, N. C. 

Age, 24, Weight. 130, Height. ; feel /o inches 

Wayne County Club; McGehee Law Club; Pan-Hellenic 
Council; German Club; Coop. 

2 N. 

'■pjAUL." one of the old standardbearers of 
L the Class of iqiQ. was called away to 
fill an appointment with the Kaiser. After 
this duty was well performed, he returned 
for the legal course. 

He is an enthusiastic man to be "reckoned" 
with as a member of the "Knights of the 
Round Table." 

Something, we know not what, "but it is 
reported she is from Fayetteville," is causing 
him quite a bit of worry, and his noble brow 
becomes more prominent under his fast re- 
ceding locks. 

We predict that with this mark of distinc- 
tion and his ability he will be among the 
leading barristers of the State. 



■Age. 2. 



Li.NOS flLIiR liDWARDS 

Polkton. N C. 
, 'height. 145: Height, ; feel 7 inches 



EDW.ARDS joined our class at the begin- 
ning of our Junior year, therefore we 
only know him as a law student. He is a 
steadfast and consistent worker, always 
anxious to discuss some legal question. To 
be a lawver is his desire; in that we wish him 





One Hundred Sixty-four 



:yackety YACK' 





-d 



WILLIAM DLIRHAM HARRIS 

Sanford, N. C. 

Age, 24: Weight, i6s: Height, 6 feet 

A.B., 'Williams and Mary College,'16; Graduate Student 
University Chicago.'16; North Carolina Club; A. E. F. 
Club; Clark Law Club; Capt. E. A. Reserve Corps, U. S. A. 
2 T; * d *; 2 X. 

'TWILL" came to us from the army in iqiq. 
JI3 He presents that rare combination of a 
good egg and a good student and is a well 
rounded and deep thinking youth- If any 
one good quality can be said to stand out 
above another, perhaps his skill as a writer 
should be placed first. "Bill" looks forward 
to the time when he will be the proud pos- 
sessor of a bungalow and all that goes with 
it. The call of law, to him, is an imperative 
one. We are expecting great things from 
"Bill," even unto sending his clients to the 
electric chair or the poorhouse. 



M 



ROBERT ROY HAWFIELD 

Matthews, N. C. 
;. Weight, iqo; Height, 6 feet 2 inches 



ROY'S good nature has won a place in the 
hearts of all who know him. He is a 
good mixer and a good sport. He refuses, 
however, to take his college life seriously, but 
firmly believes that he is going to make Caruso 
lie down and die when he starts his law and 
vocal career. \Vc give him the credit for doing 
his very best to help out in the Glee Club, 
though it does seem a rather useless expendi- 
ture on his part, and a spiketail looks good 
on him. 




%l 




One Hundred Sixty-five 



:yackety yack: 





JASPER BENJAMIN HICKS 

Henderson, N. C. 

Age. 22; Weight 142: Height, ; feet 8 inches 

Phi Society: Vance Countv Club. President,'19: North 
Carolina Cluh. 

e X. 

' T B." is one of the most popular men in 
J . the class. He swears by Blackstone. 
quotes Tiffany . and defies anyone to blind 
him on real property. He is constantly on the 
job. and when it comes to absorbing "legal 
dope" he has no equal. An exceptionally 
bright student, a quick thinker, withal a 
good fellow, his keen intellect and energy 
will mean much to his profession. So here's 
to "J. B.," may he live long and happy, but 
never forget the bright stars which shone in 
the blue about the night of December 15, 

IQ20. 



CLEM BOLTON HOLDING 

Neuse. N. C. 

Age. 24: Vi'eight. 210: Height. 6 feet 4 inches 

■\.B..'18; President Wake Countv Club, '19. 'SO; Cleric 
McGehee Law Club.40; Ml Class Basketball.'iO; Student 
Council.'iO; Campus Cabinet.'iO.'il; President Pan- 
Hellenic.'^O.'^l; Coop; Gimghoul. 

* A *: B e n. 

ID rather be first in a Tuscan village than 
second in Rome." With a will of a Caesar 
and a tongue of a modern Cicero, "C ' has 
marked his place in e\ery undertaking. A 
man in stature and a man in action, he 
marches from a lengthy Freshman to an 
honored Senior captain, from a servile sea- 
man to a worthy ensign, from a layman to a 
lawyer. And now he leaves us. We wish him 
bon voyage, "For dearly must we prize thee; 
who find in thee a bulwark for the cause of 





One Hundred Sixty-six 



:yackety YACK" 





LAWRENCE WOOTEN JARMAN 

Seven Springs, N. C. 

Age, 22.- Weight, i6o: Height, f feet qyi inches 

Wayne County Club; Phi Society. Vice-President (3), 
President (4). Commencement Debate (3); Manager Swain 
Hall. 
E * A. 

JARMAN is the best known boy in Chapel 
Hill, as he is the headknocker at "Swine 
Hall." Hailing from Seven Springs, a won- 
derful village somewhere in Carolina, he has 
come here to make a record. He received an 
A.B. last year, and now he is here to tackle 
the paupers' poorhouse profession — law. He 
might make good, we hope not. "L. W." 
is a hard worker, for he mus'' work to feed 
seven hundred hungry stomachs at "Swine." 
He will be a live wire in his town, for he 
believes in doing big things. We are counting 
on him to do great things in law. and at 
least to know how to feed a wife and family. 



MACK MLIRPHY JERNIGAN 

Dunn, N. C. 

Age. 26, Weight. 16}. Height. ; feet 1 1 inches 

Phi Society; Sampson Countv Club, President; North 
Carolina Club; Ruffin Law Club, Vice-President: Law 
Library; Student Member North Carolina Reconstruction 
Committee, 

M.\CK is his name. Even the girls of 
N. C. C. W. have learned that. But 
Mack is first a student and is thoroughly 
grounded in his work, zealous in his pursuit 
of his studies in law and zealous of his reputa- 
tion in his work, and admires his profs as do 
the profs admire him. War broke in on his 
law, but he has now buckled down and it 
comes to him like a baby handling a candy 
roll. He is efficient in all that he tackles and 
we know that he is going to play hell with 
the law. 





One Hundred Sixty-seven 



•YACKETY YACK" 





S.AXILIEL DAVID JOHNSON 
Angicr, N. C. 
Age, 21. "height, ijo: Height, ; feel ii inches 

JOHNSON is one of those rare fellows whom 
we instinctively look upon as a future 
leader. His two years with us in the Law 
School have impressed upon us the correct- 
ness of our first impression. Johnson hails 
from the good old county of Johnston and 
he says it is the best in the State. Since his 
sincerity cannot be questioned, we accept it, 
but, as he says, "with the Clause of Defences." 
He is an excellent student, has a highly con- 
structive mind, and we predict, will make a 
good office boy for some good lawyer. 



CLEMENT MANLY LEWELLYN 

Dobson, N. C. 

Age, 2;; Weight, iqS; Height, 6 feet 2 inches 

Surry County Club, President (3); Oak Ridge Club, Vice- 
President (4); Battle Law Club; Class Football («, 3); Class 
Basketball (3); Varsity Baseball (1, i. 3, 4); Wearer of 
"N. C." 

e X. 

LEW" came to the L'nivcrsity from Oak 
-y Ridge Institute back in the "ante-bellum" 
days of pulchritude, and had the distinction 
of making Varsity baseball during his first 
year. He was forced out of his old class 
when he answered the challenge of "Bill der 
Gross." "Lew" is made up of a peculiar mix- 
ture that forces itself upon you; his "Fair- 
bank's" smile and athletic ability have made 
him popular with all students. We see before 
us a budding young barrister aspiring to fame 
in the world of Cobb, Jackson, and Speaker. 




gixm' 




One Hundred Sixty-eight 



:yackety YACK" 





WILLIAM ELMLR MA ITHEWS 

Clinton, N. C. 
Age, 24; Weight, i6y. Height, 6 feet 

Phi Society; Freshman Debate; Sampson County Club; 
Y. M. C. A.; North Carolina Club; Manager University 
Inn; University Law Club; Ruffin Law Club; Masonic 
Club; A. F. A. M. 

WE " entered with the Class of '18, but 
. his college course was interrupted by 
the war, and for two years he was out, but 
with the same determination with which he 
went for the "Hun ' he came back and took 
up the study of law. Throughout his whole 
college career he has made a splendid record. 
During the five years he has been with us he 
has been connected with various college 
activities, and in each of them he has shown 
his worth. He has a splendid business ability, 
and an inexhaustible line which he relies on 
to carry his point. In the practice of law, 
which he has chosen to make his life's work 
and for which he is so thoroughly qualified, 
we predict for him a brilliant success. 



2EBULON ARCHIBALD McCALL 

Elmo, N. C. 

Age. 22, Weight, 145: Height, ; feel g inches 

ZEB " came to us in iqiq, after getting his 
B. S. at N. C. State, being politically 
inclined, he decided to study law. 

It seems that "Zeb" has withheld from any 
participation in campus life here, but this 
can be accounted for by the fact that he was 
active and a leader in every move at State. 
To prove the above, take a glance at the 
medals he wears. 

To know "Zeb" is to know a comrade in 
every way. He is firm, but enjoys lots of fun 
and persists in wearing the unique vest. 




AC3!f 




One Hundred Sixty-nine 



:yackety yack: 





FOREST GLENWOOD MILES 

Warrenton. N. C. 

Age, 22; Weight, 14;; Height. > feet 7 inches 

A.B., U. N. C.,'19; Tar Heel Boar<l,'17.'18.'19. Edilor-in- 
Chiet,'19; Magazine Board. Assistant Editor-in-Chief.'19; 
Yackety Yack Board,'18; Assistant Manager Varsity 
Baseball,'19; Athletic Council,'19; Phi Society, Secretary. 
'17. Vice-President,'18; Debating Council.'lS; Warrenton 
High School Club. President; Warren Count.v Club, Presi- 
dent.'lS; North Carolina Club; Latin-American Club; 
Freshman Debater's Medal, '15; Inter-Society Sophomore 
Debate.'17; Sophomore-Junior Debate.'lS; Commence- 
ment Debate.'lS; Winner Bingham Medal.'lS; Senior Class 
Orator.'19; McGehee Law Club.'«0,'il: German Club. 

A T A. 

HERE is a true son of Carolina. Six years 
spent under the fostering care of 
U. N. C. has given him poise without con- 
ceit, and qualifications without affectations. 
From "booloo' to Editor-in-Chief of the Tar 
Heel is progress for any pilgrim. He skated 
on the a\'enue of nearly every college activity. 
— skated because he often fell. But he knew 
that a worm is the only thing that never falls, 
so each time: "Resurgum" — Excelsior. 




CH.ARLES LESLIE NICHOLS 

Brevard. N. C. 

Age, zt: "^"eight, i;o; Height, s feet ii inches 

Class Baseball; Class Basketball; Class Tennis; Candidate 
Varsity Tennis; Treasurer Junior Law Class; Di Society; 
North" Carolina Club; Y. M. C. A.; "9019" (Trinity); 
Clark Law Club, President,'i!l; Glee Club,'19,'40, Mana- 
ger.'il; German Club. 
2 T; A T A. 

THOUGH ha\ing been with us but two 
years. " Nick " has entered heartily into 
our life at Carolina, having participated in class 
athletics, literary work, and the management 
of the musical clubs; the latter with a degree 
of excellence hitherto unknown. He is one 
of our best law students and is a candidate 
for the .•\. B. With the ladies, he lets his lights 
shine that they may praise his good works. 
A hard student and a good fellow. "Nick" 
is going to pay all his debts in the world 
and leave us all in debt. But when he starts 
law, let the court crier yell. "God Save 
the State!" 




One Hundred Seventy 



:yackety yack: 





JOHN HILL PAYLOR 
Laurinburg. N'. C 
Age, 24: ^''eight. 160: Height, s feel 



inche 



' JOHNNIE" is the embodiment of just those 
I principles and traits which enables us to 
predict for him a sure and successful 
future. His fi\ e years with us are symbolized 
by his A. B..LL.B. degree, but his outward 
polish and refinement and his inxxard person- 
ality bear witness also. .And ^24 Sundays 
without a single "grat" on the sabbath school 
has added a vital element to his composite 
whole. Democratic, affable, and accom- 
plished, he is a fine fellow and proficient in 
his profession. 



WILLI.AM BLRBANK PEN^NY 

Hendersonville, N. C. 

Age, 20: Weight, i gi; Height, ; feet 7 inches 

BILL" entered the University in the fall of 
18. but after one year of S. A. T. C. 
education, lest we forget, he was following 
the line of the least resistance, he decided to 
identify himself with the "heirs-apparent of 
the wig and mantle of ':he Hon. Justice Black- 
stone. He has not appropriated the entire 
cord, but we believe and hope that the future 
holds for him a great position in law. Here 
we leave him to the Bar. 





One Hundred Seventy-one 



:yackety yack: 





NEAL YATES PHARR 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Age. 2j: Vi'eighl, i6o: Height, 6 feet 

A.B., David-oii Ci)llcgc,'19; Iredell Law Club; Pan-Hellenic 
Council,'21; Coop. 

2 T; * i *; K A. 

HERE is a true son of Davidson, we hope, 
with a Carolina "finish", and a lawyer's 
curiosity. Neal is one of our best law students 
with an additional ability to take more note? 
in fifteen minutes than the rest of the class 
can in an hour. Neal prepares his work in 
the afternoons, on account of his eyes, and 
claims to be getting his college education by 
degrees. We believe him. But his happiest 
hours are spent when the Gym is a celestial 
elysium, and the "Hill" is adorned with fine 
feathered birds. Give him a guitar and a 
pipe, and it's like dropping a nickel in the 
slot. Neal is a good hand for holding friend- 
ships, and this fact together with his general 
good nature and a knowledge of the law, will 
score for him success in his chosen profession. 



JOHN ALBERT PRITCHETT 

Rawlings, V'a. 
Age, 24; Weight, 1 }o: Height, j feet 10 inches 

PRITCH'S " college days embody a period 
of supreme service to himself and his 
University. He began in the field of physics 
and history, later became Instructor in Phy- 
sics, and finally ended in the realm of Black- 
stone, Littleton and Coke. His profound sin- 
cerity and high de\otion to right has won for 
him a place of confidence and trust in the 
hearts of his fellows. 





One Hundred Seventy-two 



•YACKETY YACK: 





DAWSON EMERSON SCARBOROUGH 

Hoffman. N. C. 

Age, 21 : Weight. i;o: Height. ; feet q inches 

EMERSON came to us from the sandhills 
accompanied by pluck and indecision. 
For two years, indecision held him in the bal- 
ance, but pluck held its own A B did not 
suit him. he wanted something exact in which 
his business-like mind could ha\e full sway, 
so in iqi8 he chose law as his profession. We 
feel that in the near future he will "do things. ' 
serving to his utmost capacity as a lawyer of 
the people, for he has character and ability, 
the essential attributes of a real man. 

Rumor trumpets that the "fair sex" are 
weaving the threads of his heart with the 
spindle of fate. It must be as he says, "sooner 
or later the noblest passion must ebb or 
plough into the life of man In order for him 
to appreciate and develop the richest, truest 
life." 



WILLLAM WHITFIELD SLEDGE 

Weldon. N. C. 

Age. 2}: Weight. 13;; Height, ; feet q inches 

WHIT" became dissatisfied with being the 
youngest bank cashier in the State, and 
entered Carolina to train himself for a field of 
wider opportunities. The two years which he 
spent at the L'niversitv of Virginia, if we are 
to judge them by the two years which he has 
spent here, was not time thrown away. 
.Although entering a full term behind us. by 
diligent and consistent efforts he has grad- 
uallv worked his way to the front. Surely 
no one with a knowledge of all the facts would 
predict for him anything but a brilliant and 
successful future. 





One Hundred Seventy-three 



•YACKETY YACK" 





LEWIS EVERETT TEAGLfE 

High Point. N. C. 

Age. 22. Weight. i;s: Height, s feet 1 1 1'l inches 

' T UKE" is a man of fact and matter of 

J / agreeable and generous disposition, who 

carries a nature as serious as his loyalty to his 
friends is deep, and a character that is marked 
by dependability and a scrupulous care as to 
sincerity and principle. 



ROBERT LEE WHITMIRE 

Hendersonville. N. C. 

Age, 2j. Weight, i6o; Height. 5 feet 10 inches 

WHITMIRE received his academic train- 
ing at Washington and Lee University 
and Trinity College, served in the .American 
E.xpeditionary Forces, and upon being dis- 
charged, came to Carolina to study law. He 
is a persistent worker and his work has shown 
a sustained high character. 





One Hundred Seventy-four 



'YACKETY YACK' 





GEORGE LEWIS WIMBERLY 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Age. ;26. Weight, 15s: Height, ; feet 10 inches 

Twin County Club: Dramatic Club.'15,'16.'l-, President, 
'19; Glee Club,'15,'16,'17; Satyrs; Vaudeville Club,'15,'16, 
'17; Tar Heel Board.'lT; Cheer Leader,'17; Class Basket- 
ball.'n; Class Baseball,'17; Law Baseball.'iO; President 
Battle Law Club.'il; Leader Sophomore Hop,'17; Leader 
Spring German,'21; German Club; Coop; Gorgon's Head. 

*^ *: A KE. 

A SECOND Jack Falstaff, though not 
quite so pompous, running a secret joke 
shop and delving in legal literature to his 
heart's content, and combining both to the 
satisfaction of his friends. Behind a free, 
open smile he wears an iron will which Black- 
stone alone has been able to confound: "Law 
is a jealous mistress, and he who would serve 
her must serve none other." We very strongly 
suspect that "Buck" would rather make as 
his a little more liberal and "live in a house 
by the side of the road to be a friend to man." 



WILLIAM BRANTLEY WOMBLE 

Gary, N. G, 

Age, 24: Weight, 14;; Height, ; feet 11 inches 

IF Brantley has an enemy, such a character 
has not had that quantity of boldness to 
assert him.self. We sometimes think that 
such men as he would be performing his 
purpose if he did nothing more than to 
take the grind out of the daily routine of life. 
To be near Brantley is to be optimistic, 
active, thoughtful. Like a true Southern 
gentleman, with sparkling eyes and smiling 
lips, with a gushing play of divinely amorous 
pleasantries, he overwhelms, he conquers. 
God Save the Queens!!! 





One Hundred Seventy-five 



•YACKETY YACK: 




W ILLIAM BAYARD YEL\ERTON 

Goldsboro. N. C. 

Age, 24: W'eighl. 140; Height. } feet 8 inches 

THIS young gentleman, like many others of 
his time, took that sightseeing tour and 
participated in the fireworks spectacle which 
Uncle Sam staged in contest with one W'ilhelm 
tijer Alles He left immediately after grad- 
uation in the spring of 17. His true qualities 
of energy and ability, of quietness and decision 
which came to the surface in the Service have 
been portrayed to us since his return to study 
law. He makes it a policy to seldom speak, 
but always says something when he does 




^,^ ./.w^ „„/,^^.,/ ^4/, 



One Hundred Seventy-six 



YACKETY YACK 1 




3lmnnr IGaiit OIlasH 






(Elaaa 


loll 




Arrington, S. L. 


Rocky Mount, X. G. 


Kernodle, L. H. 


Graham. N. C. 


ASHBY, C. L. G. 


Raleigh, N. G. 


MCAULEY, H. \1. 


Charlotte, N. C. 


Aycock, J . ^'. . 


Black Greek, N. G. 


McMichael.J.E. 


Winston-Salem, N. C. 


Bal'Gham, W. M. 


Rich Square, N. G. 


Maupin, W. G 


Salisbury, N. C. 


Bell, C. B. . 


. Troy, N. G. 


Melton, D. J. 


Monroe, N. C. 


Blackwelder, B 


W. Goncord, N. G. 


Moody, R. M 


Murphy, N. C. 


Brown, R. E. L. 


Ghadbourne, N. G. 


Moore, T. 0. . 


. New Bern, N. G. 


Carroll, A. M. 


. Burlington. N. G. 


Morris, S. J. . 


. Mesic, N. G. 


Cashatt, I. W. 


. Jamestown, N. G. 


Newman, I. B. 


. Wilmington, N. G. 


Gates, J. L. 


Burlington, N, G. 


Oliver, G H. . 


. Oak Ridge, N. C. 


GOBURN, R. L. 


Dardens, N. G. 


Perdue, W. G 


Henderson, N. G. 


Gomes, A. R. 


. Leaksville, N. G. 


Prescott, M. B 


Ayden, N. G. 


Growell, J. L. 


Goncord, N. G. 


Prevatt, W. J. 


. Lumberton, N. G. 


Davis, W. A. . 


. Warrenton, N. G. 


Rendleman. J. L. 


Jr. Salisbury, N. G. 


Elsom, G. M. . 


Hendersonville, N. G. 


Ripple, H. C. . 


Welcome, N. C. 


Fesperman, G. V 


East Spencer, N. G. 


Robinson, A. H. 


. Asheville, N. G. 


Francis, W. R. 


Waynesville, N. G. 


Rucker, R. 


Winston-Salem, N. G. 


Frazier, R. H. 


. Greensboro, N. G. 


Shaw, E. G. 


. Greensboro, N. C. 


Gardner, W. A. 


Wilson, N. G. 


Shaw, W. T. . 


Raleigh, N. G. 


Grier, F. L. . 


Statesville, N. G. 


Spruill, F. S., Jr 


Rocky Mount, N. G. 


Hawkins, T. W. 


Charlotte, N. G. 


Stokes, T. D. . 


. Reidsville, N. C. 


Herman, P. W. 


Gonover, N. G 


Sullivan, W. A. 


. Asheville, N. C. 


Herring, P. D. 


Clinton, N. C. 


Thorpe, I. D. . 


Rocky Mount, N. G. 


Hill, B. T. . 


. Wadesboro, N. C. 


Tucker, J. G. 


. Plymouth, N. G. 


Horton, p. E. 


Winston-Salem, N. G. 


Williams, A., Jr. 


Raleigh, N. C. 


Jenkins, K. 


■loanoke Rapids, N. G. 


Wilson, H. R. 


. Rose Hill, N. G. 


One Hundred Seventy-eight 






1 . . J 



■YACKETY YACK' 




:yackety yack- 




DR. ISAAC HALL MANNING 
Dean of the Medical School 



WfCxtnB at titp Mvhmi grhnol 

^wonb ^rar (Claaa 

G. F. Parker . . President 

O. S. Goodwin Vice-President 

G. D. Elliot ........ Secretary-Treasurer 

iFirst ^rar (Class 

F. M Patterson President 

J. M. Parker Vice-President 

P. T. Martin Secretary-Treasurer 



One Hundred Eighty 



:yackety yack- 





ALAN RAMSEUR ANDERSON 

Stateville, N. C. 

Age, 2j; W'eigA/, ;6o; Height, ; feet to inches 

Trinity College A. B.; Tennis Coach, 20; Director Class Ath- 
letics, '20,'«1; Assistant in Pharmacology; Gorgon's Head. 

*X;K A. 

ALAN'S academic accomplishments record 
1. athletic championships, scholarship hon- 
ors, trusts and responsibilities. His brief 
time at Carolina is found to be of distinctive 
credit and worth. A leader in all phases of 
L'niversity life, eager for the best, ready to 
help all, ever on the go, always looking and 
climbing upward. 



WILLIAM WALDO BOONE 

Durham, N. C. 

Age, 22,- Weight, 14;; Height, $ feet S inches 

County Club; Medical 

HE entered Carolina a regular neophyte 
and has the distinction, with some sev- 
enty-five others, of adapting himself well to 
the circumstances of present life. He is a 
good student and allows nothing to come be- 
fore his duties at Caldwell Hall, as well as 
Swain Hall. He has a ready ability for 
handling practical matters and is fortunate 
in that he has picked a profession for which 
he has an intense love. 





One Hundred Eighty-one 



•YACKETY YACK: 





THOMAS PRESTON BR INN 
Hertford, N. C. 
Age, 21. 'height, i}y. Height. ; feet S inches 
A.B.,'19; Jledical Sot-iety. 

* B K. * X. 

"T^ P." made his mark in the Liniversity 
1 . before he entered the Med S>chool. but 
he need not have a key pendant hanging from 
his chain to pass his mcd work. He staggered 
through quite well Due to the remarkable 
tenacity with which he separated the ilium 
from the ilium, he was chosen the assistant 
in anatomy, and has filled the place in a 
creditable manner He is a good student, 
though at times a Bacchical desire for levity 
and revelry prompts him to take a night off 
and visit the "Pick." But Brinn generally 
gets what he is going after, and with as little 
trouble as anyone, though if you are expecting 
to see him get an "X" you will b)e disappointed. 



DANIEL GREENLEE CALDWELL 
Concord, N. C. 
Age, 21, Weight. ;65, Height, ; feel 8 inches 

Davidson College.'16-'18; Cabarrus County Club; Medical 

Society. 

K *; A T A. 

IF "Greelee" will pardon us, we shall be so 
audacious as to assert that in him one 
reallv beholds an actual epitome of imper- 
turbability and calmness. The great thing 
about "Greelee" is that he keeps his ship on 
an even keel, as he has that rare and priceless 
qualification of being an expert helmsman. 
For he steers a ship which moves steadily, 
unswervingly, consistently, eagerly, success- 
fully onward, disdainful of the bits of drift- 
wood that lie scattered in the course. .And 
when one picks the right course, has a definite 
destination, and sticks to that course, what 
more need be said for the final goal to be 
reached. 





One Hundred Eighty-two 



•YACKETY YACK" 





OSCAR SEXTON GOODWIN 

Apex, N. C. 

Age, 26; Weight, ij;; Height. ; feel 4 inches 

Medical Society; Vice-Presideot Senior Class; Wake County 
Club; Mars Hill Club. 

K *. 

NEVER down-hearted, peppy, vivacious, 
eager to win — "Osky wow wow!" With 
the marines in France his performances 
merited him citations and decorations. 
Although we have none such to offer here, we 
hold him high in our estimation, and believe 
him to be one of the most practical men in 
the class. His level head and a spirit of 
daring with ability to handle any situation 
arising will carry him over all obstacles safe 
to a seat in Valhalla. 



ROBERT THEODORE HAMBRICK 
Roxboro, N. C. 
Age, 24: Weight, i8q: Height, 6 feel 2 inches 
Trinity College A.B..'19; Medical Society. 

ONE; * X; 2 * E. 

BOB'S" troubles with deans ended when he 
left Trinity, as he and Dean Andy have 
been excellent friends for two years. The 
officials of the University did not want to 
wear out their good buildings, so they put 
"Bob" in Carr Barn where he has roared for 
two years. His navy ways are especially 
pleasing and he never gets tired of telling of 
Paris Island. We know that the inmates of 
Carr will bid him Godspeed when he leaves, 
though in a different spirit to what we do, 
for we shall always think of "Bob" as a jolly, 
pleasing good fellow. 





One Hundred Eighty-three 



■YACKETY YACK' 





CHARLES BERNARD HERMAN 

Conover. N. C. 

Age, 2;. W'eighl, ;62, Height, ; feet 7 inches 

Lenoir College A.B.,'19: Medical Society: Calawha County 
Club. 

ANY go<xl citizen of Catawba County 
r\ could tell you where Conover is located, 
and it has been Herman's job at Chapel Hill 
to tell us where that fair retreat is. When 
quite young he took a look over his territory 
and decided that the community needed a 
first-class doctor and nurse He has not told 
us yet just who the nurse will be. 

Herman has been a steady worker in med. a 
conservative in politics, and has adopted as 
his religious creed; "Nature never does 
anything in a hurry". We all agree with him 
that the process of absorption is slow, but we 
believe we shall all arrive at our destination 
if we continue to absorb. 



CHARLES CASWELL M.^SSEY 

Princeton, N. C. 

Age, 24: Weight, 13;: Height, s feel 8 inches 

Phi Society; Medical Society; Elisha Mitchell Scientific 
Society; Y. M. C. A.; A. E. F. Club; Buies Creek Club; 
.(ohnson County Club; Masonic Club; Assistant in Zoology 
George Peabody College. Summer 1920. 

K *. 

CC." displays such an appealing person- 
. ality that he never fails to cheer the fair 
ones whenever he meets them. One of the 
fundamental tenets of "C.s ' philosophy 
demands that he take life easy, and to make 
sure that he ne\er violates this principle. In 
fact, there are two things that we admire 
about our ladies' man ; his behavior as a good 
sport on all occasions, and his habit of assign- 
ing to everything the place that rightly 
belongs to it. 





One Hundred Eighty-four 



lYACKETY YACK- 





ZERAN LEWIS MERRITT 
Bolton, N. C. 
Age, 22. WVig/i/. /JO, Height, 5 feel 5 inches 
A.B.,'19, Trinit.v College; Medical. 

K *. 

Lis small in stature but big in heart. 
. The warmth in his heart is so great that 
at times we actually believe it shines out of 
his fine brown eyes. He and Bob Hambrick 
hang together like two brothers 7 Though they 
are so antithetical in stature, they have none 
of the differences characteristic of David and 
Goliath. Mutt and Jeff, or other notable 
pairs. He is unselfish to an unusual degree. 
His qualities are of the best type, because 
they improve with age, like good wine, books 
or friends. 



CLEMENT ROSENBL'RG MONROE 

Biscoe. N. C. 

Age, 21; Weight, 148: Height, ; Jeel 8 inches 

Di Societ.v; Elisha Mitchell .Scientific Society; Medical 
Society, President {i); North Carolina Club; Jlontgomery 
County Club. 

Ji Ti; K *. 

CLEMENT is one of those men who exist 
mainly in our ideals. Like Garrick. he 
is a salad: "For in him we see oil. vinegar, salt 
and sweetness agree." Warm and frank, yet 
enough reserved; industrious, with enough of 
play — a jewel because he is consistent. The 
fact that he admires and practices the Caro- 
lina spirit is no doubt the reason for our liking 
him so well. Success awaits any strong man, 
and his strength is of that rare variety. Two- 
fold 





One Hundred Eighty-five 



:yackety YACK' 





GEORGE ALEXANDER RICHARDSON 

Dover, N. C. 
Age. 2}. ^'eighl, ijo; Height. 5 feet 10 inches 

Trinity College.'lT-'lQ; Medical Society. 

K*. 

RUSK IN once wrote an essay that he 
called "The Dignity of Labour." Now 
"Dick" is all that and more. He is as digni- 
fied as a proverbial judge, and even more 
laborious than was Hercules on Stable Detail. 
His industry gives to the rest of us uneasy 
and uncomfortable feelings, for in comparison 
to him, it appears that "we toil not neither 
do we spin." And yet, he is not all work 
and energy nor dignity. Witness his daily- 
capers with Bob Hambrick; listen to his 
tales of prowess with the ladies. "Dick" is 
thoroughlv in love with his work. 



RANDALL COLLINS SMITH 

New Bern, N. C. 

Age. 2.j: \VV(g/t(, 750. Height. 6 feet 

Phi Society- Medical Society; Cra\en County Club; 
North Carolina Club. 

K *. 

SMITH has a variety of names. Like Wil- 
liam Jennings he also ran one dark night ; 
hence, we often call him. "Ran." He is of 
the slow and easy type, amiable, friendly, 
undisturbed, and accommodating. His char- 
acteristic ot being undisturbed is wonderful; 
he fairly radiates, "for I go on forever" 
Never too busy to help, and ne\'er too hurried 
to pass along the good word. "Ran" is well 
fitted for just those things that will some day 
help him to push a Ford for some good doctor. 





One Hundred Eighty-six 



•YACKETY YACK: 





ROBERT EDWTN SMITH 
Mount Airy. N. C. 
Age, 2.J; Weight. /j2; Height, j feel 7 inches 
Medical Society: Surry County Club H); Coop. 
* X; 2 N. 

"\ yflGHTY' takes a pardonable amount of 
i V 1 pride in his pseudonym, and rightly so. 
for we must remember that it is only his 
undying devotion to his work that has kept 
him from entering the hammer-throw in the 
springtime. "Mighty" has been with us now 
for several years, and has become a most 
important factor in that invulnerable com- 
bination of Smith. Schenck. and Taylor. We 
predict some brilliant operations from this 
trio. 



GEORGE HERBERT SLMNER 

Franklinville, N. C. 
20. \^'eight. ijz: Height, } feet 4 inches 
IT; Medical Society; Raadolph County 

K *. 

GEORGE is an optimist. By his hard work 
he has shown that he can stick to his 
work by hard toil, and by his results he 
typifies a regular med student. Our observa- 
tions of George lead us to belie\e that our 
worthy friend Bacon was partly wrong when 
he said, "reading maketh a full man." for 
reading and study seem to ha\e made George 
a sleepy man. Being interested in his future 
welfare, it gives us satisfaction to know that 
there is one affiliation which will never trouble 
him — that is insomnia. 





One Hundred Eighty-seven 



•YACKETY YACK" 





VANCE EVERETT SWIFT 

Altamahaw, N- C. 

Age, 22; Weight, 160: Height, ; Jeel 11 inches 

Elisha jMitchell Scientific Society; Jledical Society; Ala- 
mance-Caswell County Club: North Carolina Club; Class 
Football,' IT-' 18; Class Basketball.'lS.'lO; Freshman Base- 
ball,'17; Varsity Baseball,'18,'19,'40; Wearer of N.C. 

* X; e X. 

HIS medical record has not detracted from 
his former excellence, but has only ser\ed 
to enhance his even, composed temperament. 
He has frequently shown his baseball sense 
in bacteriology, mixing up the slow answers 
(when he was sure) with the fast ones (when 
he wasn t). Although not a member of the 
rural population, we should like to point out 
for the younger students that this exemplary 
gentleman walked into school every morning 
and out again at night. He has a genuine 
zeal for work. 



BENJ.AMIN BUNN WIMBERLY 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Age, 2j: Weight, 140; Height, 5 feet 7 inches 

B.S.. V. M. I.. '19; jredical Society, Treasurer,'20; Gym- 
nasium Team; Leader Fall Gorgon's Head German; Gor- 
gan's Head; Wearer of N.C; C;)bin. 

* X; A K E. 

HERE is an active mobile organism. He is 
highly pathogenic for the female sex 
when inoculated, during the fall dances. 
"Bunny went to V. M. 1, four glorious years, 
and strange to say, has been radiantly happy 
every Sunday morning after football returns. 
Let's see: what teams ha\e not been defeated 
this season' Well, there is Harvard, Georgia 
Tech, Trinity, V. M. I., etc. That is the way 
it goes. Our final admonition to him is that 
he had best avoid practicing for nervous 





One Hundred Eighty-eight 



:yackety yack- 




PALL ALLISON VODER 

Hickory, N. C. 

Age. 2;: Weight, /50; Height, 5 feet 7 inches 

A.B.,'16, Lenoir College; Medical Society; Catawba 
County Club. 

K t. 

ALTHOUGH Voder came to us from 
.. another college, he has become so assim- 
ilated that today he is of the best type of 
Carolina man. He is fully as steady and 
accurate in the laboratory as he is on the 
baseball field where he won his fame. His 
qualities are sterling, and therefore, lasting. 
His pep is of the short-step variety; never 
lagging during the game, and not exhausted 
at the end of the ninth inning. Voder is a 
man who inspires confidence, and after he 
inspires it, he holds it. 




One Hundred Eighty-nine 



1 YACKETY YACK 1 


JtrBt l^ar Mthxtni QUasa 


(ElaaB %aU 


Richard Speight Anderson Whitakers, N. C. 


Thomas Milton Arrasmith 






. Hillsboro, N. C. 1 


Thomas Baron Aycock 






. PikeviUe, N. C. 


James Halbert Conoly 






Maxton, N. C. 


Joseph Lindsay Cook 






. Winston-Salem, N. C. 


Walter Vance Costner 






Lincolnton, N. C. 


Arthur Lee Daughtridge 






. Rocky Mount, N. C. 


Daniel Allen Fields 






Laurinburg, N. C. 


Louis McCargo Fowler 






Greensboro, N. C. 


Norman Albright Fox 






Guilford College, N. C. 


WiLLIARD CoE GoLEY 






Graham, N. C. 


James Gordon Groome 






Greensboro, N. C. 


John Warren Henderlite 






Raleigh, N. C. 


Forest Ruel Jarman 






Seven Springs, N. C. 


Robert DuVall Jones 






. New Bern, N. C. 


Harry Lester Johnson 






. Siler City, N. C. 


Eugene Leroy Kellum 






Norfolk, Va. 


David Kimberly, Jr. 






. AsheviUe, N. C. 


Julian Murrill McGee 






Mount Olive, N. C. 


Paul Todd Martin . 






Salisbury, N. C. 


Allen Alexander Miner . 






Augusta, Ga. 


Thomas Brice Mitchell . 






Shelby. N. C. 


George Dillon Morris 






. Goldsboro, N. C. 


John Merrel Parker 






Reidsville, N. C. 


Fred Marion Patterson . 






Concord, N. C. 


Hazel McLeod Riggins 






. Matthews, N. C. 


Bennett Watson Roberts 






Gatesviile, N. C. 


Edwin Mason Robertson . 






Woodsdale, N. C. 


William Ashby Rourk 






. Shallotte, N. C. 


Blackwell Sawyer . 






Elizabeth City. N. C. 


Norman Owen Spikes 






East Durham, N. C. 


Bryan Pope Warren 






Blunt's Creek, N. C. 


Edward Watts Morris Whitehead 






Salisbury, N. C. 


Leonard Livingston Wilson 






Mount Olive, N. C. 


John Lindsay Winstead . 






. Elm City, N. C. 


Nathan Anthony Womack 






Reidsville, N. C. 


Frank Ray Yarborough . 






. Gary, N. C. 


One Hundred Ninety-one 





:yackety yack: 




"YACKETY YACK: 




EDWARD \ERNON HOWELL 
Dean of the School oj Pharmacy 



i§f[unB at tl)F piarmarij ^rl]anl 



Senior ^ll^armari} (HinsB 



James Louis Cobb 
John William Harrell 



President 
Secreta ry- Treasu rer 



Suniar pi|armary QIlaHB 



Joseph Paul Gamble 
Walter Presley Baker 



President 
Secretary-Treasurer 



One Hundred Ninety-four 



:yackety YACK" 





CHARLES DAVID BEDDINGFIELD 

Wakefield, N. C, 
Age, 20; Weight, 160; Height, ; jeet q inches 
Simpson Pharmaceutical Society: Franklin County Club. 

WE call young Beddingfield "Senator." 
He acquired this cognomen appendix 
through a high state of dignity which he per- 
sists in constantly wearing about on his chest, 
rather than being identified with any political 
sect prevailing at this University knowledge 
shop. Charles David woke up in Raleigh 
after the N. C.-N. C. State game last fall to 
discover two gold fishes floating aimlessly 
about in his pocket and he immediately 
adopted them as his chief object of adoration. 
He has taught them various fancy dives and 
strokes which has made of them remarkable 
creatures to behold. Stored somewhere in 
his remarkable sense of balance he cherishes 
the fond hope of being a model citizen in 
more ways than one. and to judge from local 
progress we would say that he has laid a very 
good foundation on which to begin. "Sen- 
ator" will be back with us next year to take a 
post graduate course in Chemistry. 

Mr. Beddingfield — Ladies and Gentlemen. 




JAMES LOUIS COBB 

Mount Olive. N. C. 

Age. 21; Weight, i;;: Height, ; feel 8 inches 



Simpson Pharmaceutical Society, Secretary and Trt 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Tar Baby Board; President Senior 
Pharmacy Class; Student Council; Elisha Mitchell Scien- 
tific Society; Assistant in Pharmacy. 

COBB came to us from we know not where ; 
all we know is that we looked around 
one morning and here he was in full bloom. 
He literally drank in the Carolina Spirit. We 
would not go wrong by saying that he is a 
man of many talents. He is an artist (writes 
beautiful love letters), a musician (snores 
wonderfully well), an actress (plays the part 
of a female), and a would-be scientist. It is 
hard to say just what will become of this 
young man but. since every man is born 
another s equal, he has about as much chance 
getting to the Hall of Fame as the next one. 




One Hundred Ninety-five 



•YACKETY YACK: 





OTHO CROW'ELL EDWARDS 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Age, 22; Weight, 13s: Height. 5 feel o inches 

Simpson Pharmaceutical Society; Wake County Club; 
Masonic Club. 

"/^LEO" is one of the direct descendants of 
vy the great Lord Oleo Margarine, the man 
who made synthetic butter famous. This 
lad is not of the aristocratic type either; he 
is a very quiet fellow in class, but when he's 
with a bunch of friends he can make as much 
fuss as a thirty-five cent coffee grinder — got a 
gocxJ line too!!! Edwards is planning to take 
the Pharmacy Board this year and settle 
down in Raleigh with a certain little lady, 
whose name we will refrain from mentioning. 
Here's to "Oleo." may he have plenty of 
feathers and evervthing in the Love Nest. 




.ALLSION McL.ALRlN GIBSON 

Gibson. N. C. 

Age, 20; \Ceighl. 148: Height, j feet g inches 

Simpson Pharmaceutical Society; Scotland County Club; 
Canadian Club. 

K *. 

WE have for your careful consideration 
the most actix'e member of the .Amal- 
gamated Order of Pickwick Goers. Sleep, 
being one of the necessities of good living, 
prevents "Pete " from carrying out his inner- 
most desire of establishing himself on Pick- 
wick Row. He came to the University with 
the thoughts of an .A. B. uppermost in his 
mind and failed to give us a reason for shift- 
ing over to Pharmacy \ery suddenly. It is 
rumored that Dr. E Vernon soon made a 
remarkable discovery and disclosed two or 
three reasons to Dr. Thomas J. around the 
Christmas holidays. You may desire to 
know what he spends his leisure hours doing. 
He studies — studies industriously — letters of 
a pink and lavender hue which come in as 
often as the consistency of mail delivery in 
Chapel Hill permits. 




One Hundred Ninety-six 



:yackety YACK" 





HOWELL NEWTON GUION 

Unionville. N. C. 

Age. 20; Weight. /J4; Height. 6 feel 1 inch 

Simpson Pharmaceutical Society; Union County Club. 

GUION has a nickname of "Pap. " but he 
is usually spoken of as Dr. Guion. due 
to the fact that he is a \'ery learned \oung 
man. This figure graced our halls during the 
days of the S. .A. T. C. and after the .'\rmistice 
he left us to return in the fall of the past year. 
We regretfully admit that this is no ladies- 
man, because the whole school lives up to 
that reputation He has been known to 
walk blocks to a\oid coming in the neighbor- 
hood of a rustle. Having so diligently worked, 
he has raised himself to the best student in 
his class. 




JOHN WILLl.-Wl H.ARRELL 

Beaufort, N. C. 

Age, 21: Weight. 138: Height, //^e( 7 inches 

.\ssistant in Pharmac.v; Simpson Pharmaceuticai Society, 
President (4): Secretar.v and Treasurer Senior Pharmacy 
Class; Elisha Jlitchell Scientific Society; Cartaret County 
Club. 

K *. 

WE have heard that there is rhythm in 
the vociferations of infancy — well — 
you should see "Shorty" walk. His whole 
system seems to automatically respond to the 
motion of "Jazz." We think this is due to the 
fact that he is a musician. .As his nickname 
implies, he always believes in taking short 
cuts, especially across the campus when there 
is an opportunity to grat a class. "Shorty" 
never studies except the night before exams. 
His favorite expression is, "Say Charley, I 
sure did get knocked cold that time" His 
best pal is his trap drum outfit, and he's an 
artist with the chop sticks. We can picture 
him some fifty >ears from now wearing a 
celluloid collar and selling Epsom Salts. 




One Hundred Ninety-seven 



:yackety yack: 




EVERETT LEE PADGETT 

Marion, N. C. 

Age. 24: Weight, 142: Height. } feet 10 inches 

Simpson Pharmaceutical Society; .McDowell County Cluh. 



VAMPUS." as he is known by the Phar- 
macy School, is one of the boys of the old 
school. He first faced Tommy J. back in 
iqi?, after which he decided to work a few 
years before completing his course. "Vampus"' 
is a quiet and studious chap when alone or 
with stags; but, when thrown among the fair 
sex, it doesn't take him long to get wound 
up — and, so we've been told, he has an irre- 
sistible line. Padgett smokes perfumed 
cigarettes of a foreign brand, and uses French 
perfumes and face powders exclusively. His 
favorite pastime is dreaming, and he studies 
when he has no dreaming to do. "Vampus " 
says he's going into the Retail Pill Business, 




WILLIAM ALLEN PROUT 

Louisville, Ky. 

Age. 2j; ^'eight. ij8; Height. } feet q inches 

Kentucky Pharmaceutical Association, 

AFTER a two-year sojourn at Washington 
and Lee, Prout decided that Pharmacy 
was his calling, so he came to Carolina for 
the acquisition of the fundamentals in that 
profession. He is a man of few words, but of 
deep thought, and though this is his first 
year here, he is a popular member of his class. 
He is a good student and a good egg, and 
what more need be said of a man. 





One Hundred Ninety-eight 



:yackety yack- 





EDWIN LEROY REAVES 

Raeford, N. C. 

Age, 21 : Weight, ijo: Height, ; feet ; inches 

Simpson Pharmaceutical Society; Hoke County Club; 
German Club. 

K *. 

"D IP Van is one of the handsomest young 
In. men on the Hill, and we suppose it is 
because he never loses any of his beauty sleep! 
He has been afflicted with "sleeping sickness" 
for a long time. He believes that it is nice to 
get up in the morning (but it is better to stay 
in bed). It is a pity that they do not let 
professional students wear Phi Beta Kappa 
keys, for Reaves never makes less than a two 
on any course. We are afraid tc predict Roy's 
future. 




HOLLEMAN HARRIS ROBBINS 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Age. 22. Weight, /6/,' Height, ; feel g inches 

Simpson Pharmaceutical Society; Wake County Club." 
Class Football ('19, '20); German Club. 

K *. 

RED" came to Carolina in iqiQ from Ran- 
dolph-Mason .Academy. He first thought 
of taking academic work, but something per- 
suaded him to register for Pharmacy. We 
hope he enjoyed it. He stuck to Pharmacy 
long enough to get a senior rating, and then 
joined the forces of Blackstone, Littleton and 
Coke, Inc. "Red" believes that a well- 
rounded man should have a little knowledge 
of all of the professions. Consequently, we 
are expecting him to go into Welfare Work in 
the near future. Of course he is a good student; 
he believes in "Bull Sessions," stag parties, 
and even likes to hang around the fair sex. 
We are afraid to say what will finally become 
of "Red," but are betting two to one that he 
will follow the ministry. 




One Hundred Ninetv-nine 



•YACKETY YACK: 




GRADY CORNELL SISKE 

Pleasant Garden. N. C. 

Age, 20: Weight, iqz: Height, 6 feet i inch 

Simpson Pharmiiceutical Society; Guilford County Club; 
German Club. 

K *. 

BIG Stuff's" motto is "never let work inter- 
fere with pleasure." and he always keeps 
this motto in mind. He is very popular with 
the ladies, and on the dance floor he shakes a 
wicked hip. During the war he received his 
military training at U. N. C. in Martin's 
awkward squad, and was ready to become a 
first class private when the war ended. He 
has not forgotten the commands "squads 
East " and "squads West " He is good at his 
studies when he is not at the bridge table. If 
he will only roll pills like he rolls horse-shoes 
he will make some pharmacist. 




Two Hundred 





3litntnr f I|armari| Snll 


E. G. Arps Plvmouth, N. C. 


W. P. Baker . 














Raeford 


N. C. 


B. B. Black 














Marshville 


N. C. 


Addie L. Bradshaw 














Florence 


.S. C. 


E. B. Bristow . 














. Hertford 


N. C. 


F. G. Brooks 














Greensboro 


N. C. 


R. B. Burgess . 














Rich Springs 


N. C. 


F. E. Campbell 














Fayetteville 


N. C. 


C. V. Davis 














. Southport 


N. C. 


P. V. Davis 














Greensboro 


N. C. 


A. E. Denton 














. Asheville 


N. C, 


F. Lee Furr 
















Star 


N. C. 


J. P. Gamble 
















Waxhaw 


N. C. 


J. S. Glenn 
















Pittsboro 


N C. 


C. L. Guion 
















Monroe 


N. C. 


J. A. GuiTON 
















St. Paul 


N. C. 


H. W. Harris . 
















Catawba 


N. C. 


H. T. Hicks 
















Raleigh 


N. C. 


C. H. Hunt 
















Henderson 


N. C. 


L. Jackson 
















Cooper 


N. C. 


J. E. Johnson . 
















Wallace 


N. C. 


D. L. Jordan 
















Aberdeen 


N. C. 


L. M. Lamm 
















Lucama 


N. C. 


R. E. Langdon . 
















Coats 


N. C. 


C. C. Layton 
















Harmony 


N. C. 


M. A. Leeper . 
















Belmont 


N. C. 


D. M. Livingston 














Lumber Bridge 


N. C. 


W. R. McDonald Jr. 














Waxhaw 


N. C. 


N. 0. McDowell 














Charlotte 


N. C. 


M. B. Melvin . 














Roseborough 


N. C. 


E. D. Millaway 














Greensboro 


N. C. 


W. W. Miller . 














. Rock Hil 


,S. C. 


E. E. Moore 














Granite Falls 


N. C. 


J. C. Mundy 














Newton 


N. C. 


M. B. Phillips . 
















Wilson 


N. C. 


G. D. Propst 
















Concord 


N. C. 


H. W. Richardson 
















Asheboro 


N. C. 


R. M. RiMMER 
















Mebane 


N. C. 


P. L. Senter 
















Raleigh 


N. C. 


A. P. Turnmire . 
















Caldwell 


N. C. 


H. S. Utley 
















Benson 


N. C. 


A. D. Walker . 
















Currie 


N. C. 


J. A, White 
















Belhaven 


N. C. 


J. C. Williams . 














Bessemer City 


N. C. 


R. M. Willis . 














. Southport 


N. C. 


C. W. Wrike 














Randleman 


N. C. 


Two Hundred One 





V\'''/// 




lYACKETY YACK' 



^ 





WILLIAM McK. FETZER 

IF, in your tra\els through Hindustan, Cape Town, Singapore or any other 
remote corner of the world, it should ever be required of you to give the name 
of a gentleman in athletics, you have the liberty to give in reply, William McK. 
Fetzer. Carolina has met this believer in clean athletics in teams which always 
put up a hard fight, because he had drilled into each individual the fact that a 
game is never won until it is o\er. 

In no department of the activities of the University is a man afforded a greater 
opportunity for the development of a fine school spirit than in athletics played 
openly and above board. The record of Coach Fetzer proves him to be well worthy 
of the trust accorded him of fostering and maintaining that nobler Carolina Spirit, 
as expressed in the persons of men like Dr. Battle, Dr. Graham, and Dean Stacy. 



Two Hundred Three 



•YACKETY YACK: 






w 



^? 



William Lourcey 
Baseball Coach 



.a 




m a I 




LXx TOR R B La\vs(in 
Physical Director 




Myron E. Fuller 
Football Coach 




Dr K J. Brown 
Track Coach 



Major F. W. Boye 
Basketball Coach 



Two Hundred Four 



rVACKETY YACK: 



(Ehp Athkttr Qlnunnl 




Shr (Eaunrtl anh Aaaortatian ©ffirtra 



Charles T. Woolen . 
Dr. a. W. Hobbs 
F. RoBBiNS Lowe 
John D. Shaw- 
Fred Pharr 
Fred M. Patterson 
Daniel L. Grant 
DoNNELL Van Noppen 
William H. Ruffin 
Joseph A. Person 
A. Luther Purrington 
Wade A. Gardner 
J. Saunders Williamson 
Robert W. Proctor 
William M. Transou . 
John H. Hardin 



Chairman 

Representative from the Faculty 

President Athletic Association 

Vice-President Athletic Association 

Secretary of the Athletic Association 

Representative from the Athletic Association 

Representative from "The Tar Heel" 

Manager Varsity Football 

Manager Varsity Baseball 

Manager Varsity Basketball 

Manager Varsity Track 

Manager Varsity Tennis 

Manager Freshman Football 

Manager Freshman Baseball 

Manager Freshman Basketball 

Manager Freshman Track 



Two Hundred Five 



rVACKETY YACK- 



B. C. Harrell 
F. R. Lowe 
Fred Pharr 
E. W. Tenny 
A. M. McDonald 

J. M. HUTCHINS 



Fred Pharr 
j. m. robbins 
J. A. McLean 
F. R. Lowe 



W. D. Carmichael 
R. C. Carmichael 
j. H. Erwin 



C. L. G. ASHBY 

W. H. Butt 



W. A. ROYALL 

P. J. Ranson 
A. C. Norfleet 



®l|p N. 01. (Ulub 



jFnotbaU 

O. M. Abernethy 
R. H. Griffith 

F. C. Cochran 

G. D. Morris 

C. C. Poindexter 

D. B. Jacobi 

IBaapball 

L. G. Wilson 
C. M. Lewellyn 
V. E. Swift 
L. V. Milton 

laakftball 

H. A. Hanby 

B. B. LlIPFERT 

A. M. McDonald 

dym 

C. S. Coffey 
F. M. Dula 

(itrark 

J. E. NORRIS 

A. L. Purrington 
O. G. Rand 

Qlfttnta 



Wood Williams 
E. C. Jernigan 



E. V. Howell 
R. B. Lawson 



JParuUu mpmbprfi 



Two Hundred Six 



lb 

Y 




W. G. Pritchard 






R. A. Spaugh 






T. H. Shepard 






H. A. Hanby 






L. H. Kernodle 






A. M. McGhee 






E. M. Sweetman 






L. V. Milton 






F. M. Patterson 






J. D. Morris 






W. A. Rourk 






F. C. Shepard 






R. F. M^rshblrn 






B. B. Wimberly 






Boyd Harden 






T. C. Smith 


B. 


H. 


Barden 


W 


A 


Gardner 


C. 


S. 


Mangum 


A. 


H. 


Patterson 



•YACKETY YACK: 




:yackety YACK" 



laBPball 



William Lolrcey 
W. C. Feimster 
E. E. White 



(^faaott of 1920) 



Coach 
Captain 
Manager 



Qlljf (Upam 



YOUNCE 
JOYNER . 

Wilson 

Lewellyn 

Swift 

Lowe 

McLean 

Stewart 



Catcher 

Pitcher 

Pitcher 

Pitcher 

Pitcher 

First Base 

Second Base 

Right Field 



Pharr . 

ROBBINS 

Milton 

Feimster 
Saunders 
Sweetman 
Lewis . 
Graham 



Shortstop 

Shortstop 

Shortstop 

Third Base 

Center Field 

Left Field 

Right Field 

Ri^ht Field 



^t\]sMU 



April 


f 


U. N. C. 3— Maryland State 3 


April 


iq 


U. N^ C. 


I— Wake Forest 8 






(1 1 innings) 


April 


21 


U N. C. 


I — Trinity 


April 


1 


U. N. C. 8 — Winston-Salem (league) q 


April 


14 


LI N. C. 


7 — Virginia 8 


April 


6 


U. N. C 3— Yale 5 


April 


10 


U. N. C 


2 — Catholic University 4 


April 


7 


U. N. C. 3 — Davidson 2 


Mav 


I 


U. N. C. 


4 — Maryland State 3 


April 


8 


U. N. C. 5— A. & E. fa 








(10 innings) 


April 


lO 


U. N. C. 3— Virginia 4 


Mav 


4 


U N. C. 


I — Swarthmore 3 


April 


1 1 


U. N. C. 3 — Washington and Lee 3 


May 


5 


U. N. C. 


I — Pennsylvania 2 






(called in qth, rain) 


Mav 


8 


U. N. C. 


8 — Wake Forest 


April 


14 


U. N. C. 3— Elon 2 


Mav 


10 


U. N. C. 


fa— A. & E. 2 


April 


lb 


U. N^ C. q— A. & E, 


May 


I 2 


U. N. C. 


2 — Trinity i 



Two Hundred Nine 



:yackety yack: 




QI1]F i'paHOtt 



Captain Feimster 



THE season of 1920 is a notable one in 
the Baseball annals of the University. 
Despite the fact that the team won but 8 
out of the 19 games scheduled, it walked away 
with the state championship and at least one 
world s record. We came by the undisputed 
laurels of state championship after successfully 
and decisively defeating Wake Forest, A. & E. 
and Trinity in the last three contests of the 
season and by the world's record because 
"Lefty" Wilson used such an unheard of 
quantity of pitched balls in defeating Trinity 
in the last game of the season, 52 in nine 
innings. 

From a ragged and unpromising start to 
an enviable and undeniable position as champions is the record of Coach Lourceys 
and Captain Feimster's heirlings. A jinxpersistentlyhoveredoverthenineduring the 
first part of the season, and we had the ill luck of dropping several games by one 
and two-point margins, Wecame backstrongat A. & E, however, and walloped herat 
Chapel Hill9 too; but then we lost ignominiously to Wake Forest, taking thesmall end 
of an 8 to I score ; but that defeat marked the end of the downward trail. From then 
on we set about staging one of the gamest come-backs e\er accomplished by any team. 
The Northern tour, although we won but one game, is to be considered a success, 
as we met and held to one and two-point margins the best teams in the East. 
Pennsylvania, Catholic University. Swarthmore, Maryland State, and Virginia 
were the nines encountered on this trip. 

The series with Virginia ran but two games, the Orange and Blue 
grabbing them both. The first was at Charlottesville, where Baughman 
lifted the ball out of the park in the ninth for a homer, which changed 
the figures on the scoreboard from a 3 to 3 tie to a 4 to 3 victory for 
them. At Greensboro there occurred one of the most thrilling contests 
of the year, and again Virginia won in the ninth. For eight innings the 
score had see-sawed back and forth. Carolina entered the ninth, two 
runs in the lead, but this did not prove sufficient, for Virginia seemed to 
have just the right number up her slee\e to win, and win she did, 8 to 7, 



Two Hundred Ten 



•YACKETY YACK: 



The games with A. &.' E. ran to a three game series, the Blue 

and White bagging the necessary two. State grabbed the first 

I -1 after a wonderful struggle in Raleigh, b to 5. but the next two 

'A went to Carolina ; the second at Chapel Hill 9 to o, and the rubber 

1\ .y 3t Raleigh b to 2. 

'*" F The series with Wake Forest resulted in an even break, but 

V 

since Wake Forest had been twice defeated by State there was 

no need of a third contest to decide the State 

M A Championship. The first game went to the 

Old Gold and Black at Chapel Hill 8 to i, 
but revenge was secured in full when we shut 
them out at Wake Forest 9 to o. 



# • 






i 




4^1 



/^ 




^'^i 



Two Hundred Eleven 



■YACKETY YACK: 



Trinity died hard, hut against the sphinx-like riddle of Wilson's 
pitching she was helpless and lost both games; the first at Durham 
I to o, and the second on Emerson Field 2 to i , the latter going 
eleven innings. It was this last game of the season that definitely 
clinched the State Banner for us. There it was also that Wilson 
hung up his world's record, and uas acknowledged premier twirler 
of the state, and voted one of the best in the South. It was a 
just reward, therefore, for his record in the bo.x, that at the ban- 
quet following the Trinit\' game he was unanimously elected 
captain of the 1921 team. 






^% 




% 



\ 

,.2^ 



i 




I I 

3 I 



Two Hundred Twelve 



rVACKETY YACK' 




.N.C. STATE GAME SEVENTH INNING 




:yackety yack: 





Wilson 
Captain-Elect 



RUFFIN 
Manager-Elect 



laa^ball 



(^raaon nf 1921) 



William McK. Fetzer 
Lawrence G. Wilson 
William H. Ruffin . 



S»rljpliulp 



March 


23 


March 


28 


March 


11 


April 


2 


April 


4 


April 


7 


April 


8 


April 


P 


April 


12 


April 


lb 


April 


2 I 


April 


21 


April 


2"; 


April 


30 



New York University — Chapel Hill May 

Davidson College — Winston-Salem 
N. C. State— Chapel Hill May 

University of Virginia — Charlottes- 
ville, Va. May- 
Washington and Lee University — 

Lexington, Va. May 

LIniversity of Maryland — Chapel Hill 
L'niversity of Florida — Chapel Hill May 

Wake Forest College — Wake Forest 
Davidson College— Chapel Hill May 

Trinity College — Chapel Hill 
Guilford College — Chapel Hill May 

University of Virginia — Greensboro 
LIniversity of Virginia — Chapel Hill May 

N. C. State — Raleigh May 



Coach 
Captain 
Manager 



2, Georgetown L'niversity — Washing- 

ton, DC. 

3, Uni\ersitv of Marvland — College 

Park, Md. 

4, Fordham L'ni\'ersitv — New York. 

N. Y. 

5, New York University — New York, 

N. Y. 

6, College of the City of New York — 

New York, N. Y. 

7, Swarthmore College — Swarthmore, 

Pa. 

q, Virginia Military Institute — Lex- 
ington, Va. 

II, Wake Forest College — Chapel Hill 

4, Trinity College — Durham 



Two Hundred Fourteen 



:yackety YACK" 





:yackety YACK' 



F00tbaU 



Myron E. Fuller 
Beemer C. Harrell 
Donnell Van Noppen 



(g'taaan of 1320) 



Coach 
Captain 
Manager 



Emm 



Jacobi 


Center 


Poindexter 


Guard 


Pritchard 


Guard 


Harrell 


Tackle 


Hanby 


Tackle 


Morris 


Tackle 


Kernodle 


Tackle 


HUTCHINS 


End 


Cochrane 


End 




Eenm 



Sheperd 


End 


Creighton 


End 


Pharr Quarterback 
McDonald 

Quarterback 


Lowe 


Halfback 


Tenny 
McGee 
Abernethy 
Spaugh 


Halfback 
Halfback 
Halfback 
Fullback 



S'rijp&ulp 



Carolina 


7 


Wake Forest 





Carolina 


o 


Yale . 


21 


Carolina 


b 


South Carolina . 


o 


Carolina 


3 


N. C. State 


'3 


Carolina 


o 


Maryland State . 


13 


Carolina 


o 


V. M. I. 


23 


Carolina 


o 


Davidson 


7 


Carolina 


o 


Virginia 


14 



Two Hundred Seventeen 



•YACKETY YACK* 




Slip ^raann 



THE season frankly was unsuccessful. The 
team got away with a bad start and 
seemed to never be able to gain a hold of 
sufficient strength to do such effective work as 
had characterized the two seasons previous. 
Many explanations have been advanced as to 
the cause of this slump, — the coaching system, 
lack of student support, and the like. But it is 
not our premise to here dwell upon the whys 
and wherefores of the failure. Suffice to say that 
the record of last season, though, upon the face 
of it, bad, shall appear so as a record of scores 
only, and never as the true testimony of the 
spirit and energy shown by the members of the 
squad who daily went out and, on the dust 
and mud of Emerson Field, ga\'e their best 
to Carolina 



That something was w rong we all know, 
and that the radical changes in policy and 
equipment necessary to bring about the proper 
corrections will be made before the next season 
we are equally certain. A bad season, though 
rare, is not entirely unknown in the athletic 
records of the University. Our predecessors 
have weathered the storm and so may we. 
Certainly the student body of Carolina may 
never be termed "fair weather sailors" onlv. 




Lowe 
Captain-elect 



Two Hundred Eighteen 



:yackety YACK' 




The season's first encounter was with Wake Forest. Sup- 
porters flocked in from all over the state, expecting to see Coach 
Fuller's machine swamp the Baptists. The score was b to o and 
Carolina's showing a hitter disappointment. 

The contest with Yale at New Ha\en instilled new hope into 
the hearts of the supporters of the Blue and White. The score was 
21 to o in favor of Eli. but represented a much better showing than 
had been made the Saturday previous. 

South Carolina at Chapel Hill was the next 
game for the eleven. Hanby recovered Lowe's 
blocked punt and scored the only touchdown 
of the game which ended b to o. This contest 
marked the last victory of the season, and 
marked the beginning of the downward trail. 







Two Hundred Nineteen 



'YACKETY YACK" 



State College, Maryland, and V.M. I. followed in succession. 
State put up decidedly the better game and won 1 3 to 3. Caro- 
lina's only score resulting from a field goal by Lowe during the 
first period. In this important contest, Pharr, veteran Varsity 
halfback, broke his ankle and was forced to retire for the 
remainder of the season. Maryland was ne.xt met at Chapel 
Hill. The score was 13 to o, Carolina failed 
to register. Against the flying squadron of V. ^ 

M. I. the Blue and White was helpless. The 
reconstructed team that Coach Fuller sent in 
to stop the onslaught was unequal to the task, 
and Leach and Stuart ran wild. Score : 24 to o. 



w 



^.5W 






J! 



Two Hundred Twenty 



:yackety yack- 




The Da\idson encounter pro\ed a decided surprise, and the 
Wildcats humiliated Carolina, who, entering the game with a 
crippled team and a season-old jinx, never exhibited any marked 
punch on the offensive, and fell down at the crucial moment on 
the defensixe, losing 7 to o. 

The \ irginia game, played in Charlottes\ille for the first 
time since the commencement of the series, 
jJ5l twenty-five years ago, marked the end of the 

season. The Tar Heels put up a game and de- 
termined fight, but were unable to score against 
the Virginians who uere undoubtedly superior, 
and 14 to o was the score that rang down the 
curtain upon the season of 1920. 







Two Hundred Twenty-one 



:yackety yack: 




N.C.-N.C. STATE GAME 




I N.C.- MARYLAND STATE GAME 




LOWE PUNTfNG 



WORKING FOR 
VICTORY 



'YACKETY YACK: 




®rark 



YACKETY YACK ■ 


(Urark 








(graaott of 1320) 








Dr. Kent J. Brown 






Coach 


Earl M. Spencer 






Captain 


Houston S. Everett 






Manager 


olltp ©ram 








W. A. ROYALL 0. 


G. 


Rand 




P. J. Ranson E. 


M 


Spencer 




T. C. Smith W 


J- 


Nichols 




A. L. PURRINGTON BOYD HaRDEN 




®t|p ^rireiiulp 








Trinity Meet 








April 7th 








Carolina 






70 points 


Trinity 






5b points 


Carolina — Virginia — V. M. I 


M 


eet 




Charlottesville 








April 24th 








Carolina ........ 






Second Place 


Virginia 






First Place 


V. M. I 






Third Place 


The State Meet 








Chapel Hill 








May I St 








Carolina ........ 






52 points 


Trinity . ■ 






28K points 


N. C. State 






28 points 


Davidson 






25 points 


Wake Forest 






1 7/4 points 


TheS. I. A. A. Meet 








Blacksburg 








May 8th 












Two Hundred Twenty-five 



■YACKETY YACK" 




t: 



®rark 

^RACK last year stepped 
full into its rightful place 
, as a major college sport 

f I here. Although recei\'ing a less 

Spencer— Ca/)(a(n degree of support than would 

seem compatible to its position, Captain Spencer's team, under the 
guidance of Dr. Kent Brown, who volunteered his services as coach, 
hung up a record that will long hold light with the records set by 
some of the famous pre-war aggregations. 

The team won handily from Trinity in the opener, took second 
place in the North Carolina, V. M. I., Virginia Meet, captured first 
place in the State Meet, and placed fourth in the S. I. A. A. Meet, in 
which only eight men were entered. In this last meet Nichols dis- 
tinguished himself by winning three out of four "firsts'" that we car- 
ried away. In the State Meet, Spencer broke the record of 1 1 feet 
flat, set by George Strong some years ago, by going over at 1 1 feet 2. 
Harden won the 440 with difficulty in 52^5 seconds. 

Although including these individual stars, "first " men in the 
vernacular of the path, the team was composed also of an unusually 
dependable number of men who could always be relied upon to 
bring home the bacon in the form of "seconds" and "thirds," and 
it was due to them, equally with the stars, that the season was the 
success that it was. 



EXERETT— A/ana^ff 




Two Hundred Twenty-six 



rVACKETY YACK: 




0. DASH STATE MEET 440 YD. DASH STATE MEET 





STATE RECORD J/'^/ELi! 



•YACKETY YACK: 



Qlrark 

(^saoan 1921) 



Dr. K. J. Brown 

William A. Royall . 

A. Luther Purrington, Jr. 



Coach 
Captain 
Manager 









0^ 


•--• 


.V». 


.rM 

















i i 


- ''■ ■ 




mm 








iCTB 


!ii 









Purrington 




Manager 


April 9 




April 1(3 




April 23 




May 8 




May lb 






^^*4W*' 




Trinity at Durham 

University of South Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Virginia and V. M. I. at Charlottesville, Va. 

State Meet at Chapel Hill 

South Atlantic Meet at Baltimore 



Two Hundred Twenty-eight 



•YACKETY YACK" 




lask^tball 



:yackety yack- 



Major Bove 
Carlyle Shepard 
Joseph Person . 



(Beasm 1321) 



Coach 
Captain 
Manager 




j.iaa^isMaua»k!u. 



Shepard — Captain 



January 14 
January 19 
January 26 
February i 
February 2 
February 3 
February 4 
February 5 
February 7 
February 8 
February 9 
February 10 
February 14 
February 18 
February 19 
February 23 
February 2b 
March 2 
March 5 




^rt|c&ulp 



U. N. 
U. N. 
U. N. 
U. N. 
U. N. 
U. N. 
U, N. 
U. N. 
U. N. 
U. N. 
U. N. 
U. N. 
U. N. 
U. N. 
U. N. 
U. N. 
U. N. 
U. N. 
U. N. 



Person — Manager 



C. 38— U. S. C. 15 

C. 37 — Elon 12 

C. 22 — Trinity 25 

C. 28 — Virginia 2b 

C. 29 — Washington and Lee 25 

C. 23— V. M. I. 38 

C. 22 — Georgetown 38 

C. 2b — Army 34 



30 — Yale 32 
24 — Navy 50 
38— Elk's A. C. 15 
44 — Durham "Y" 25 
37 — Davidson 20 
b2— A. & E. 10 
41 — Trinity 19 
43 — Virginia 12 
31— A. Sz E. 32 
55 — Trinity 19 



Two Hundred Thirty-one 




rt 



YACKETY YACK 

THE Season of 1921 may, without doubt, be set down J «* % 
as the most successful in the basketball history of %««.»^ 
Carolina. The quint lost but two games within the 
state, and those to Trinity and State by margins of only 
one and tuo points. Beside this record of excellence in 
the state, the team undertook with success a more ex- 
tensive Northern tour than was ever before attempted by 
a Southern five. Nine games were played on this trip, 
and the strongest aggregations in the East encountered. 
Three games were won and six lost, but all of the defeats 
were by very close scores, and the Carolina quint was highly 
praised for its unexcelled passing game by the Northern 
papers. 

Four letter men. Captain Shepard, Erwin, Liipfert, and 
Morris formed the nucleus about which the flying quint 
was built : and with Woodall, last year sub, and Carmichael, 
Hanby, McDonald, Williams, and Eaton from last year's 
crack Freshman aggregation, there was no better material 
for a winning quint in Dixie. Coach Boye, who had acted 
as Coach last year, soon whipped them into shape, and ere 
the team was ready to set out upon its Northern rampage, 
it was endowed with tricks and combinations of the game 
that were to cause much trouble to the great Northern 
quints, even of Army and Eli. 

Back from the long Northern tour, the team set out upon 
a victorious march through the state that never ceased 
until the best North Carolina quints had been overwhelm- 
ingly defeated and the laurels of state championship were 
safe for Carolina. 

Every man who played upon the Blue and White 
quint of 1921 was a star. In the first Trinity game Car- 
^ michael led as goal getter, in the second Trinity contest it >^ 

^ was Hanby, and in the last Virginia game the honor fell * 

^^^k to Captain Shepard. McDonald won a name by his clever P^^ 
■^^B passing, and many of his team-mates' goals are due to his Jjj^^B 
•^^W artful "feeding ". As for Erwin at guard, a glance at the tf^W 
j . record of opposing forwards is sufficient testimony to the ' -k 

VI excellence of his play. Liipfert played a consistent and \ R 

■W dependable game until injuries in the Yale game disabled ■ w 

M P him. To Major Boye there goes no small amount of credit Mm 

^ for his commendable work as coach. ^i£^ 

Two Hundred Thirty-two 




•YACKETY YACK: 




©^nuiB 



:yackety yack: 






®?mtta 



VARSITY Tennis last year assumed its place among University athletics for 
the first time since 191 8. Ben Cone was manager and arranged one inter- 
collegiate match with V. M. I. Carolina was represented by Jernigan, 
Barden and Williams in the singles and Barden and Gardner, and Williams and 
Wilson, in the doubles. The match was won by V. M. I. in that she won two of 
the three single matches and one of the two doubles. 

Trinity was played in the early fall. Carolina lost this match also by losing 
three out of four singles, though she won one double and tied the other. A tourna- 
ment was held during the fall to select a Captain of the '21 Varsity. Jernigan won 
this place. Another tournament to determine the members of the team will be 
held sometime later in the spring. 

Manager Gardner has arranged an excellent schedule including state teams, 
as well as those from Virginia, V. iVl. I., and Washington and Lee. 



Two Hundred Thirty-four 



:yackety YACK" 




a/,o-r?!?A/)«^ 



"YACKETY YACK- 



(^^tn 



THE Gymnasium appears to have come into its own again. Last year's record 
would indicate tiiat this branch of college activity has fully recovered from 
the set hack due to the war. The team consisted of six able athletes, and 
was conceded by many to be the best lately turned out. 

The year opened with a marked shortage of trained material, as only three 
letter men were back, C. S. Coffe\-, 
C. P. Spruill, and P. P. Lynch. A 
host of aspirants frequented the 
floor every afternoon, and out of 
these there were four who succeeded 
in winning their monograms. They 
were: W. H. Butt, R. F. Marshburn, 
R. L. Ranson, and B. B. Wimberh- 
The team first leapt into the 
limelight when the exhibitions 
staged by the members of the team 
during the intermissions of the 
j^a ""j^^t^j^^ ^ basketball games in Bynum Gym- 
Hu^K^^^lBfl nasium began to attract wide atten- 
^BftBrni^^^^^ tion. So successful were they in 
^K^^BilHBHBB these attractions that they pre\'ailed 
PPHMHIPBRPHI upon them to gi\'e like exhibitions 
*" ■■ " at Durham, and Oxford, and also to 
take an important part in the Society 
Circus at Raleigh. 

Similar plans for the present year are under way, and the team, though some- 
what weakened by graduations, and the unfortunate injury to one of its leading 
lights. Joe Person, has already been augmented by addition of two recruits, 
C. L. G. Ashby, and F. M. Dula, who were successful in the fall try-outs. There is 
also every indication that it will be further strengthened by subsequent additions 
during the spring. 





Two Hundred Thirty-seven 



:yackety yack* 




[-RESHMAN FOOIBAIJ, TEAM 



(UlaHB FoDlball 1920 

CLASS Football this year definitely took its place as the major class sport. 
Each of the four classes put out live and snappy elevens, and the race for the 
championship was no dull affair. The Juniors, '22, who walked away with 
the rag last year, proved a distinct disappointment in their shouing this year and 
did not win a single game. The Freshmen entered into the race with vigor, but 
were eliminated in the latter stages of the season by the Seniors and Sophs, between 
whom things stood even until the last contest of the season, which broke the dead- 
lock with the Soph victory by one touchdown. Consequently the honors again rest 
with the Sophomore Class, but this time in the safe keeping of "23. 



Two Hundred Thirty-eight 



:yackety yack: 



» -> 




j^-^^ f ^ 



SOPHOMORE FOOTBALL TEAKi—Class Chamt^ions 




'UN I OR FOOTBALL TEAM 




SENIOR FOOTBALL TEAM 




o -t 



E S 






u 



'en 
QCQUO 






(1) cij <u fu a; 

> > > > > 

i„ S- S- t- 1- 

a> OJ (i> <u u 

C/) c/l c/5 c/l c/l 

^ Oj (U (U fD 



-a 
^-^ 

o 

o 






xJ jJ > > > 

ti o o o o 

oozzz 



< . 

o q: 
T o 



- ^ 

(/) Q 

z z 

o ^ 



ca o 

u Q 
z 

— ' Hi 

z J 



o 5 



H H < 

a^ < < -) J 
^ 1 1 J - 



@ 



:yackety yack- 




iFirHt f par laB? ball EtsnntB 





(g'paamt 1920) 




F. M. Patterson . 




Coach 


J. D. Shaw . 




Manager 



April 5 




April 11 




April 22 




April 23 




April 30 




May 4 




May 7 




May 8 





Reserves o — Oak Ridge o 

Reserves i8 — Woodberry Forest g 

Reserves 8 — Fishburn b 

Reserves 5 — Virginia Freshmen i 

Reserves 9 — Virginia Freshmen o 

Reserves 4 — A. & E. Scrubs 4 (seven innings) 

Reserves 9 — A. & E. Scrubs o 

Reserves 2 — Oak Ridge 3 



Two Hundred Forty-one 



'YACKETY YACK" 




Jl^trat ^mr laakptball l^^apru^B 



'Billy" Carmichael 
'Bill" Transou 



Coach 
Manager 



U^i}e ibeam 



Ambler 


Green 


Purser 


Clark 


Mahler 


Wright 


Dodderer 


Moore 


Neiman 



Jan. 


17 


Jan. 


2b 


Feb. 


8 


Feb. 


10 


Feb. 


lb 


Feb. 


17 


Feb. 


18 


Feb. 


19 



Reserves 48 — Oak Ridge 28 
Reserves 72 — Greensboro High School 9 
Reserves 89 — C. H. H. S. 33 
Reserves 28 — Durham "Y" 41 
Reserves 58 — Oak Ridge 40 
Reserves 36 — A. M. A. 39 
Reserves 39 — Woodberry Forest 23 
Reserves 28 — Virginia Reserves 18 



Two Hundred Forty-two 




Activities 



•YACKETY YACK' 




el)p ^tulirnt (Eumuil 



Walter Reece Berryhill 
Marion Wesley Nash . 



President 
Secretary 



Ernest McArthur Clrrie 
Angus Morris McDonald 
Robert Lebby Murray 
James Louis Cobb 
Charles Wiley Phillips 
Benjamin Bailey Liipfert 



Representative from the Law School 

Representative from the Sophomore Class 

Representative from the Medical School 

Representative from the Pharmacy School 

Representative Chosen by the Student Body 

Representative Chosen by the Council 



Two Hundred Forty-three 



:yackety yack: 




sill? dampuB OlabtttFt 



John Hosea Kerr, Jr. . 
Alan Marshall McGee 



President 

Secretary 



Walter Reece Berryhill 
Marion Wesley Nash 
Angus Morris McDonald 
Clem Bolton Holding 
Fred Pharr 
Baxter Gillon 
Charles Wiley Phillips 



President of the Senior Class 

President of the Junior Class 

President of the Sophomore Class 

President of the Pan-Hellenic Council 

Representative from the Junior Class 

Representative from the Freshman Class 

Representative Chosen at Large 



Two Hundred Forty-four 



•YACKETY YACK: 




©l^r |. m, 01. A. (Hubxmt 



C. p. Spruill 

C. W. Phillips 
G. B. Porter 

D. L. Grant 

H. S. BOYCE 

R. H. Griffith 



\V. W. Stout 
L. V. Milton 
B. C. Brown 
\V. F. Falls 
J. H. Erwin. Jr. 
E. E. Rives 



mmttvB df % i. m. oi. a. 



Donnell Van Noppen . 
Charles Wiley Phillips 
Walter Reece Berryhill 
W. F. Falls 
Jesse H. Erwtn, Jr. 



President 

\ ice-President and General Secretary 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Manager Financial Campaign 



Two Hundred Forty-five 



•YACKETY YACK: 



(HIi^ |. m, (E. A. 



THERE is always a third element uniting two others. The "Y" is the third 
element in the organism ue call a Uni\ersit\- — a medium of exchange, a 

clearing house. 

It brings President and student more closely together and enables them to do 
business more efficiently with each other. 

It is the unity of town and campus, securing helpers for the various homes; 
holding the social function, where the people and the young men gather and learn 
to know each other; and finding recruits for the various ci\ic programmes insti- 
tuted by the community. 

It is the unity of individual students, gi\ing them an exchange of social values 
among themselves; electing them as officers, thereby placing responsibility in 
their hands; organizing them for Sunday school in the country and night school 
among the colored folk. 

It is the unity of the student and his home, interpreting son to parent and 
parent to son. 

It is the unity of the student and himself, helping him in his individual prob- 
lems, watching over him with the affectionate care of an unobtrusive personal 
evangelism, relating him thoughtfully to the church and bringing him to see 
religion not as theory or convention but as life. 

In this manner the Association has rendered a splendid ser\'ice to the Univer- 
sity and is growing daily into a larger usefulness. 

Such unifying power in a community calls for an administrator w ho is of the 
spirit; and in its present secretary, Mr. C. W. Phillips, the institution has been 
most happy in such an official 




Two Hundred Forty-six. 



■YACKETY YACK' 



Av 



Yi i^'. 



1 Tj 



^N. 




i ?: n k 




'4 

lip 



"1 



L-J'tf^I^CIChc-- 



"YACKETY YACK: 




M. N. C Woman's ABanrtatton 



©ffircra 



Mary L. Cobb 
Nell Pickard 
Ruth Penny 
Adeline Denham . 
Mrs. M. H. Stacy 



President 

\ ice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Advisor to Women 



MtmhtvB 



Reuben Alley 
Mabel Bacon 
Addie Bradshaw 
Elsie Clecg 
Marie Clegg 
Lucy Cobb 
Mary Cobb 
Esther Cooper 
Nina Cooper 
Catharine Cross 
Lillie Cutlar 
Adeline Denham 



Elizabeth DeVaughn 
Margaret Eubanks 
Alice Gattis 
Dorothy Greenlaw 
Melisa Hawkins 
Aline Hughes 
Ruth Joyner 
Sylvia Latshaw 
Elizabeth Lay 
Ellen Lay 
Ruth Long 
Beulah Martin 
Elizabeth McKie 



Ruth Penny 
LiNA Pruden 
Nellie Roberson 
Lou Shine 
Alma Stone 
Lucille Thompson 
Mary Thompson 
Pauline L'zzelle 
Vallie L'zzelle 
Louise Venable 
Mary Verner 
Mary Yellott 



Two Hundred Forty-eight 



•YACKETY YACK" 




DEBATING 



"YACKETY YACK: 




ILi}t ifbatiug Qlnunnl 



©fitrrra 

Bryant Council Brown 

William Haywood Bobbitt (Resigned) 

Felix Alexander Grissette 



President 
Secretary 



Stalrrttr 

Charles Theodore Boyd Tyre Crlmpler Taylor 



pililanlljrnptr 



Daniel Lindsey Grant 



David Reid Hodgin 



Two Hundred Fifty 



:yackety yack- 




^/ie PRESIDENTS 
oft/^e 

DIALECTIC 
LITERARY 

SOCIETY 










— - ■ill J0!t 'V^' 



<IV ftlte. 



*>fi^' 



^(RRP- 









^>0^^ 







4f 



%^9^. 



YACKETY YACK 




i 
( 


itakrttr i^Dnrtg 








Soil of Mtmbets 








Unarttbf Hcmbpra 






Abernethy, O. M. 


London, W. L. 


Ranson. p. J. 




COKER, J W. 


Moehlmann, E. 0. 


Ripple, H. C. 




Hamer, D. 


MOURAINE, J. H. 


Smith, C. H. 




Hartsell. L. T. 


Murdock, T. G. 


Smith, T. C. 




Hester. W. S. 


Nichols, C. L. 


Summey, L. D. 




Jennings. E. D. 


OVERCASH, W. E. 


Sweetman. E. M. 




Lancaster. C. G. 


Pickens. W. A. 


Toms, W. F. 




Wells, 


D. A. Williamson 


J. S. 




Arrowood. F. M. 


Horner. J. M. 


Rives, E. E. 




Beers, C. D. 


Kincaid. H. G 


Robbins, G. B. 




Berryhill. W. R. 


Lowe, F. R. 


Roberts, B. N. 




Boyd, C. T. 


Lohr, B. E. 


Scarborough, D. E. 




Blythe, W. L. 


Martin, E. H. 


Shaw, J. D. 




Ervin. J. W. 


Ogburn, R. W. 


Smith, R. C. 




Cowan, J, C. 


Ogburn. S. C. 


Stimpson, R. G. 




Francis, W. R. 


Penny, J. T. 


Stout, W. W. 




Griffin, A. G. 


Person. J. A. 


Taylor, T, C. 




Harden, B, 


Phillips. C. W. 


Thies, K. E. 




Heffner. H, C. 


Powell. C. P. 


Wright, A. B. 




Hoffner, B. 1. 


Ridge, C. B, 
Suniora 






Apple, J. L. 


Hill. G. W, 


Sparger, C. B 




Benbow. E. V. 


KiSER. H. L. 


Staley, a. W. 




Bondurant, S. O. 


Lee, C. G., Jr. 


Sumner, C. R. 




Boyd. R. E. 


Mathews, W. E. 


Trotter, J. P. 




Corpening, H. C. 


McLean, J. A. 


Warren, T. L. 




Crawford, R. B 


Myers, D. L. 


Wells, D. A. 




Edwards, C. 


Nash, M. W. 


Wiles. W. e. 




Falls. W. F. 


Rendleman. J. L., Jr. 


Williams. C. J. 




Grissette. F. a. 


RiGGINS. H. M. 


Two Hundred Fifty-three 













BapifamartB 




Alexander, E. J, 


Halsey. L. K. 


McCoy, G W 


Allen, J. T 


H.'VMRiCK. Forest 


McClurd, S. R. 


Brown, J. M. 


Harding. \V. K. 


McMurray, E. L. 


Brown, R. E. 


Hendri.x. O, C. 


Merritt, a. H. 


Carroll. C. C. 


Herron, F. J. 


Mitchum, W. C. 


Castor, F. S. 


Hook, W. W. 


Moser, a. M. 


Cathey, S. M. 


Hunt, E. C. 


Parker. W. V. 


Cathey, Wilton 


Key. D. E. 


Perry, C. H. 


Chapman, J. W. 


King, A. K. 


Poindexter. C. C. 


Cheeseborough, J. C. 


KOONTZ. R. G. 


Price, R C. 


Cunningham, H. C, 


Lancford. G \V. 


Slondemire, S. a. 


Dillinger, E. E. 


Leonard. G. H. 


Thompson, R. L,, Jr. 


Edwards, P. H. 


LlLLYCROP, W. A. 


Ward, H. T. 


Downing, A. O. 


Lindsay, E. S. 


Weitzel, F. J. 


Ellis, H. B 


Little, T. A. 


Whedbee, S. M. 


Fesperman, G. V. 


LiVENGOOD, B. A. 


Whitmire, D. J. 


Gambill, \V. J. 


Manney, C. J. 


Y.^TES. W. J. 


GULLICK. J. G. 


McCorkle, E. H 

3freB\fmsn 


Youngblood. S. H. 


Andrews, C. M. 


Gleen. a. G. 


Milstead. a. D 


Anderson. L. L. 


GWYNN. W. W. 


Peeler, C. S. 


Barnette, W. 


Haizlip, J. O. 


Petree. S. E. 


Brown, G. 


Hartsell, E. H, 


Presnell. W. C. 


Butler. A. D. 


Hauser, F. M. 


R.anson, M. D. 


Capps, H. S. 


HOLSHAUSER. H. 


Raper, a. F. 


Carroll, R. L. 


Holshauser. C. a. 


Reid. C. L. 


Cornwall. A. M. 


Huggins. L. v. 


Schneider. L. L 


COLEY, C. Y. 


Johnson. H. E. 


Schwartz, B. 


Calton, C. B. 


Justus, E. L. 


Settle, R. R. 


Crichton, J . H. 


Kesler, J. C. 


Shepherd. M. L. 


Dickson. R. L. 


KiSTLER. A, K. 


Shuford. W. L. 


Donnelly, G. L. 


Kitchin, M. R. 


Smith. C. F. 


DowD, A. L. 


Laney. E. a. 


Sowers. W. F. 


Dulls, H. D. 


Lathey, E. F. 


Thompson. P. M. 


Eaves, R. S. 


Mann, F. B. 


Turner. S. M. 


Entsler, R. B. 


May, B., Jr. 


Waters, J. S. 


Feacan, a. a. 


McCall, J. V. 


White, W. E. 


Freeman, J. F. 


McGalliard, J. C. 


Wynne, G. B. 


Freeman, J. N. 


Mebane, W. M. 


Yanley, C. B. 


Two Hundred Fifty-four 









'YACKETY YACK; 



me PRESIDENTS 

PHILANTHRQPIC 

LITERAJRV 

SOCIETY 




YACKETY YACK 


pi|tlantl)r0ptr IGtt?rari| ^nrtptg 




Soil of jKnttbrrs 






Sritinra 




ASHBY, C. L. G. 


Gardner, W. A. 


O'Neil. H. E. 


BOYCE. H. S. 


Grant. D. L. 


Pollock, P. B. 


Brooks. F. P. 


Green, P. E. 


PURRINGTON. A. L. 


Brown, B. C. 


Hettleman, p. 


Shine. W. H. 


Bullock. A. R 


Hayes, N. P. 


Wilson, L. G. 


Daniels, J. W. 


Holt, E. M. 


Woodard, W. V. 


Davis, R. M. 


Jernigan. M. M. 


WORTHINGTON, S. 0. 


DORSETTE, R. C. 


Kerr, J. H. 


Massenburg, J. S. 


DUPREE, B. 0. 


Moore, T. O. 


Thomas, C. B. 


Edmundson, H. 


Naiman, B. 
Norris, J. E. 

iluninrB 


Taylor, C. L. 


Anderson, W. P. 


Dautridge, a. L. 


Mills, J. C. 


Anderson, R. S. 


Eley, a. J. 


Newman, I. B. 


Arrington, S. L. 


Ellington, J. 0., Jr. 


Parker, T. F. 


Atkinson, W. H. 


Harper, M. D. 


Phipps, L. J. 


Barden, B. H. 


Harris, H. C. 


Proctor, R. W. 


Barden, R. i\I. 


Herring. P. D. 


Rogers, E. A. 


Bardin, J. G. 


Horner, W. E. 


Rand. E. G. 


Barefoot, W. J. 


Howard, C. E. 


Savage, C. P. 


Bender, J. A. 


Isear, D. W. 


Shoal. J. L. 


Brand, J. N., Jr. 


Jacobi, D. B. 


Shaw. W. T. 


Byrd, D. 


Kellum. E. L. 


Smith. N. McN. 


Beal, J.J. 


Knight, B. H. 


Stephenson. I. J. 


Braswell, J. C. 


Knowles, W. B. 


Teu, S. B. 


Carson, R. L. 


Lane, S. J., Jr. 


Tillman. R. A. 


Chappel, H. V. 


Lee, R. B, 


Venters. L. S. 


Collins, J. C. 


Maddrey, J. T. 


Williamson, A. 


Crumpler, C. 0. 


Marshburn, R. F. 
Mewborne, E. B. 


WOMBLE, W. B. 
Two Hundred Fifty-seven 



YACKETY YACK 




^nphomiirrB 


1 
1 


Allan, C. M. 


Gray, R. L. 


Moore, C. L. 


Allen, D. 


Hampton, G. C. 


Parham, S J, Jr. | 


Aycock, F. B. 


Harmon. 0. J. 


Parrott, J. M. 


Bryan, S. D. 


Harris, W. L. 


Pierson, N. H. 


Butler, D. C. 


Hodgin, D. R. 


Prescott, M. B. 


Combs, J.J 


HOLDEN 


Proctor, \V C. 


Cooper, J. H. 


Holmes, C. C. 


Purrington, P. p. 


Dabbs, H. L. 


Holt, W. P. 


Reavis, p. a., Jr. 


Downing, D G. 


Howard, T. S. 


Rhue, J. R. 


Eagles, J. B. 


Hosea, W. H. 


Sinclair. D. C , Jr. 


Epstein, H. G. 


Jernigan, E. C. 


Smith, C. C. 


Felton, R. L. 


Kerr, J. Y. 


Smith, C. G. 


FUQUAY, L. 


KiMBROUGH, J. W. 


Spain. J. H. 


Galson, T. T. 


Matthews, C. I. 


White. W. D. 


Gay, B. S. 


Matthews, S. T. 


Wilson. 0. L , Jr. 


Granger, J. W. 


Matthewson, R. A. 
Merritt, C. Z. 

IFrraliuirn 


Young. V. 


Allsbrook, J. R. 


Hill. J. A. 


Rollins, E. M. 


Aydlette, W. R. 


Johnson, S. J. 


RowE, A. F. 


Barrington, J. M. 


Johnson, L. B. 


Shackle, A. E. 


Baum, E. 0. 


Jordan, M. M. 


Smith, W. E. 


BOWDEN, B. S. 


LiLES, L. P. 


Spencer, C. E. 


Bradley, J. A. 


McLean, J. S. 


Swain, J. H. 


Britt, C. R. 


McRae, C. B. 


Swain. W. J. 


Butler, E. K. 


MlDYETTE, S. B. 


Talton. W. J. 


Gates, C. C. 


Moore, L. H. 


Taylor, L. B, 


Dalton. B. B. 


Mlrphy, G. M. 


Ward. D L., Jr. 


Farrell, H. D. 


Newby, G. E. 


Weill, A. 


Farrier, M. L. 


Patrick, J. Q. 


Wells, J. T. 


Faucette, W. F. 


Prescott, C. E. 


Woffard, W. T. 


FoRTEScuE, Z. T., Jr. 


Prescott, J. C. 


Woodward, W. T. 


Griffin, H. F. 


Ragsdale, G. Y. 


Young, W. 0. 


Herrick, H. J. 




Youngblood, N. E. 


Two Hundred Fifty-eight 







rVACKETY YACK: 



(Earnltna-Hopktns-W. .^ IG. 




R. B GwvNN 



Affirmative 
Carolina 

Xegative 
W. & L. 



\\ on by 
Affirmative 





Resolved: That A System Of 
Universal Military Training 
For "^'oung Men Should Be 
Adopted By The United 
States. 



Xegative 
Carolina 

Affirmative 

Johns 

Hopkins 

Won by 
Negative 



J. H. Kerr 



D. L. Grant 




T. C. Tailor 
Two Hundred Fifty-nine 



:yackety YACK" 



(EaroUna-ppititHyluattia 




C. D. Beers 
Resolved: That A Federal Law Should Be Passed Rigidly Excluding 
Immigrants For A Period Of The Next Two ^'ears 



^^BBBIH 


^ 


Affirmative 


^m^ 1 


^ 


Carolina 


ff ^*^' 


i 


Negative 
Pennsylnaxia 


^^^B 

^m^ 


f 


Won by 
Aftirmati\e 


C. T. Boyd 






Two Hundred Sixty 








T. C. Taylor 



:yackety yack- 



Olnmutfurrmntt i^bat? 




C Brown 



W. H. BOBBITT 



Affirmative 

Philanthropic 

Society 

Negative 

Dialectic 

Society' 



Resolved: That The League 
Of Nations As Provided For 
In The Paris Covenant To 
The Versailles Treaty 
Should Be Ratified By 
The United States Senate 
Without Reservation Or 
Amendment. 





Bingham 

Medal 

Won h>- 

W. H. Bobhitt 



J. H Kerr 




C. T. Boyd 
Two Hundred Sixty-one 







— YACKtlV YACK 








! 


Wxinj f . mangmtt (EnnlPBt 






■ 


H^ 








H 


L ^^; 








^M 










B 


Hk^l^ Jj^HI 








^n 


1^/- jP/Cl 








^■^ 


^^H™ '*vjirf' iwK< ^^ ^v ^^^1 








^IB 


*^^^^UIy'"^i ^ f 'i»^ ^^sM(^^MIII^8^B 








^W .^HTi 


^^^H 








F. L. TOWNSEND 




Subject: "Shall the L 


Mifed States Continue Its Policy of Traditional Isola- 




lion or Shall It Arise 


to Meet the Derriands of the Tiventieth Century" 




Two Hundred Sixty-two 





lYACKETY YACK- 



^nutl|fru (^ratoriral (Eont^Ht 




W. H. BOBBITT 

Subject: "The Present Crisis In American Democracy' 

First Prize: Kentucky 

Second Prize: North Carolina 

Third Prize: Johns Hopkins 

Qlantp0littg Untufraittpa 



University of Virginia 
University of Alabama 
University of North Carolina 



University of Kentucky 
Vanderbilt University 
Johns Hopkins University 



Two Hundred Sixty-three 



•YACKETY YACK: 



l^tntt (§t<xtav\tni (flnnt^Ht 




D. R. HODGIN 

Slbject: "The League Of Sations' 

First Prize: Won hy Trinity 
Second Prize: Won hv Carolina 



Two Hundred Sixty-four 



■YACKETY YACK- 



3lmttnr (^ralnrtral (Contrst 




W. H. BOBBITT, Dl 



W. R. Francis, Di 



Subject: "The Test Of Democracy 




C. Brown. Phi 




D. L. Grant. Phi 

Two Hundred Sixty-five 



:yackety yack: 



i'npbomorp 3ntprsnnpti| i^batc 




Affirmative 

Dialectic 
Society 

.\e,s.ative 

Philanthropic 
Society 




F. A. Grissette, Di 



H. L. Kiser, Di 



Resolved: That I'he United 
States Should Adopt The 
League of Nations Without 
Reser\^ations. 




Dan Byrd. PIu 
Two Hundred Sixt\-SLX 



Won !?>■ 
Neaati\'e 




Phillip Hettleman, Phi 



:yackety yack- 



Mixvi} i. Mrtglit mpmartal BtbnU 




Affirmative 

Dialectic 
Society 

Xegative 

Philanthropic 
Society 




S. O. BONDLRANT. Di 



H L KisER, Di 



Resolved: That The Policy 
Of the United States In 
Requiring Its Ships To 
Pay Panama Canal Tolls 
Should Be Maintained. 




W. E. Horner. Phi 



Won b\' 
\'egati\'e 

Medal 

Won by 

C. L. Moore 




C. L. Moore, Phi 
Two Hundred Sixty-seven 



:yackety YACK" 



iFrrBl^mau JutFrsorirtij irhatr 




Affirmative 

Philanthropic 
Society 

Xegative 

Dialectic 
Society 




D. G. Downing, Phi 



M. B. Prescott, Phi 



Resolved: That The United 
States Should Adopt The 
League Of Nations Without 
Reservations. 




\\ on by 
Negative 




E. C. Hlnt, Di 
Two Hundred Sixty-eight 



W . C. Mitchum, Di 



rVACKETY YACK: 



Mmu^rHitg ^ublirattnttB 



THE ^'ACKET^' ^'ACK 
Published annually by the Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies and 
the Fraternities. Editor-in-Chief, Boyd Harden; Business Managers, James S. 
Massenburg, Joseph W. Er\in. 

THE TAR BABY 
Published fifteen times each year by The Tar Baby Co., Inc. ; Editor-in-Chief, 
William D. Carmichael, Jr.; Business Manager, Ernest H. Abernethy. 

THE MAGAZINE 
Published monthly by the Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies; 
Editor-in-Chief, T\'re C. Taylor; Business Manager, P. A. Reavis, Jr. 

THE ALUMNI REVIEW 
Published monthly by the Alumni Association. Editor. L. R. Wilson; Man- 
aging Editor, E. R. Rankin; News Editor, J. L. Chambers. 

THE TAR HEEL 
Published semi-weekly by the Athletic Association. Editor-in-Chief, Daniel 
L. Grant; Business Manager, Phillip Hettleman. 

THE ELISRA MITCHELL SCIENTIFIC JOURNAL 
Published quarterly by The Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society. Editors. W. C. 
Coker, Collier Cobb, J. M. Bell 

STUDIES IN PHILOLOGY 
Published quarterly by the Philology Club. Editors. Edwin Greenlaw, George 
Howe, William Dey. 

THE UNIVERSITY' OF NORTH CAROLINA RECORD 
Published periodically by the Lni\ersity. 

THE CAROLINA HANDBOOK 
Published annually by the "^'. M. C. A. 

THE JAMES SPRUNT HISTORICAL PUBLICATIONS 
Published periodically by the Uni\'ersity. Editors, J. G. deR. Hamilton, 
H. McG. Wagstaff, W. W". Pierson. 

THE CAROLINA CHEMIST 
Published periodically by the Department of Chemistry. Editor, I, W. 
Smithey. 

Two Hundred Sixty-nine 



:yackety YACK" 




®I)r f ark^tu f ark 



Boyd Harden 
Joseph Wilson Ervin 
James Speed Massenblirg 



Editor-in-Chief 
Business Manager 
Business Manager 



^oarh of iEfittarH 



Charles J. Parker, J 
John T. Barnes 
Charles Ashford 
W. Reece Berryhill 
William A. Royall 
a. l. purrington 
Garland B. Porter 
Clarence R. Sumner 
Brantley Womble 
C. T. Leonard 
Lee O. Gregory 
C. Dale Beers 
J. Louis Cobb 
Silas M. Whedbee, 
J. C. Braswell Jr 



Athletic Editor 
llhistration and Art Editor 
Photographic Editor 
Assistant Editor 
Assistant Editor 
Assistant Editor 
Associate Editor 
Associate Editor 
Associate Editor 
Associate Editor 
Assistant Editor 
Assistant Editor 
Assistant Editor 
Associate Editor 
Associate Editor 



Two Hundred Seventy 



:yackety yack: 




PARKER WMEDBEE BARNES 



GRAY 




1921 

Y^CKETY YACK 
BOARD 




LEONARD 



PURRINGTON 



BERRYMILL 



•YACKETY YACK: 




®I|0 (Har labg 



W. D. Carmichael 
E. H. Abernethy 
Edwin Matthews 
C. R. Sumner 
S. E. Hughes 



Editor-in-Chief 

Business Manager 

Managing Editor 

Art Editor 

Circulation Manager 



Aoaortatf loarii 



W. L. Blythe 
J. S. Williamson 
C. J. Parker, Jr. 
G. B. Porter 



Jonathan Daniels 
J. P. Trotter 
W. E. Horner 
W. W. Stout 



J. L Cobb 
John T. Barnes 



Art g'taff 



Ed. Carpenter 
T. M. Arrowsmith 



Two Hundred Seventy-two 



■YACKETY YACK" 




c 

HUGHES TAR WADE 

BABY 
BOAR^ 



TROTTER 





de ROSSETTE DANIELS 



PORTER 




BLYTHE JOHN T BARNES COBB, 



•YACKETY YACK" 




THE TAR 


HEEL 






...,-. ,, . ". .„ 


,„ ■;- 


W;ifEs. 


z^"^ 




™j>^ 










iliS'"^' 


?«iSt 


'''-?J=~'^'^^^' 


SSSrr-- 



GRANTl 



IHETTLEMAN 



^l}t ®ar i^pfl 



'The Leading Southern College Semi-Weekly Newspaper.' 
Member of North Carolina Collegiate Press Association 



Published twice e\ery week of the college year, and is the Official 
Organ of the Athletic Association of the University of 
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. Subscrip- 
tion price $z.oo Local, and $2.50 Out 
of Town, for the College Year. 



Entered at the Postoffice, Chapel Hill 
matter. 



N. C, as Second Class 



Editorial and Business Office, Y. \I. C. A. Building 
Daniel L. Grant .... 
H. C. Heffner i 
\V. E. Horner 

Jonathan Daniels .... 
Wilbur W. Stout .... 



Editor-in-Chief 

Assistant Editors 

Managing Editor 
Assignment Editor 



J. A. Bender 
Hume Bardin 
G. W. McCoy 
C. J. Parker 
Phillip Hettleman 
M W. Nash \ 

C. H. Stephenson I ' 



W. S. Hester 
J. E. Ragsdale 
S. E. Hobbie 



Aaaortatf lEiitora 

J. G. Barden 
R. L. Gray 
J. Y. Kerr 

J. I. W.ADE 



^ub-Aaaiatanla 



H. L. Brunson 



Thos. Turner 
l. d. summei' 
W. H. Atkinson 

M. C. GORHAM 

Business Manager 
Assistant Managers 



G. E. KiRKMAN 

M. Y. Cooper 
Lawson Davis 



Two Hundred Seventy-four 



•YACKETY YACK" 




:yackety yack: 




\JkW HORNER ^tw^ PROCTOR 

METTLEMAN MATTMEIVS WILLIAMS 



:YACKETy YACK*" 




The aim of the Carolina Play- 
makers is to translate the Spirit 
of Carolina into plays represent- 
ative of the life of the people 



— Frederick H. Koch 



"YACKETY YACK' 



®l|0 OIar0Una patimatoB 

Frederick H. Koch. Director 

THE aim of the Carolina Playmakers is to build up a native literature in North 
Carolina drawn from the abundant store of tradition as well as from the 
life of the present day. No section of the United States affords a richer 
background for the making of native folk-plays. 

Our Playmakers are striving to satisfy the craving of the people everywhere 
for a drama which will be genuinely communal — for a theatre democratic, which 
will adequately interpret their own times, gi\ingtoevery man a meansof expressing 
his own desire in creative play. 

The Carolina Folk-Plays are written in English 31, the University course in 
Dramatic Composition. The characters are drawn from the playw right's observa- 
tion — often from his actual experience. The productions are home-made. The 
stage equipment, lighting, scenery, settings and costumes are designed and executed 
by the Playmakers at Chapel Hill. 

The plays thus far produced have revealed a wide range of material and forms. 
The first season presented an interesting variety: VVTien \( itches Ride, by Elizabeth 
Lay of Beaufort, a play of Carolina folk-superstition; The Return of Buck Gavin, 
by Thomas Wolfe of Asheville, a tragedy of a mountain outlaw; What VCiil Barbara 
Say? by Minnie Shepherd Sparrow , of Gaston County, a comedy of Chapel Hill life; 
The Fighting Corporal, by Louisa Rcid of Gastonia, a comedy of negro life; and 
Peggy, by Harold Williamson of Carthage, a tragedy of the tenant farmer, pre- 
senting the hopeless condition of children txjund to the soil. 

The second year revealed new traditions and other picturesque characters 
appeared: The Third Night, by Thomas Wolfe of Asheville, a mountain play of the 
supernatural; The Hag, by Elizabeth Lay of Beaufort, a comedy of folk-supersti- 
tion; \V7io Pays^ by Nlinnie Shepherd Sparrow, of Gaston County, a tragedy of 
the present day industrial conflict in the South; Dod Cast Ye Both! by Hubert Heff- 
ner of Catawba County, a comedy of mountain moonshiners; The Bell Buoy, by 
Dougall MacMillan of Wilmington, a tragedy of the Carolina Coast; and The Last 
of the Loivries, by Paul Greene of Lillington, a play of the Croatan outlaws of 
Robeson County. 

The first series of the plays this year has contributed new variety and char- 
acter to the materials. The Miser, by Paul Greene of Lillington, is a farm tragedy; 
The Old Man of Edenton, by the same author, is a melodrama of the witchcraft 
times in North Carolina; and The \ amp, by William A. Royall of Goldsboro, is a 
comedy of college life at Chapel Hill. 

The rapid development of the work has made necessary the establishment of 
a Playmakers Theatre Fund, to provide for equipment for new productions and for 
touring the State. Ultimately it is expected that this fund will grow to meet the 
need for a theatre building — not only to accommodate the audiences, but to 
furnish an adequate workshop for the construction of State equipment, and a 
store-room for scenery and properties. The net profits from all performances will 
be devoted to the building at Chapel Hill, as soon as practicable. Of a model Com- 
munity Theatre, designed to serve as a producing center for the promotion of a 
native drama in North Carolina. 

In their work the Carolina Playmakers are hoping to contribute permanent 
value to a new folk-literature. 

Two Hundred Seventy-eight 



:yackety YACK" 




:yackety yack: 



. \ Tragedy of the \'orth Carolina Coast 
hy Dougald McMillan 

The Bell Buoy is based on the story of 
the finding of the lost portrait of Theodosia 
Burr. 

The treacherous sand-banks off the North 
Carolina coast a hundred years ago were 
almost completely cut off from contact with 
the mainland, and many of the "bankers" 
became "land pirates" who lured vessels to 
the bank by the means of false lights, and 
then murdered the crew and plundered the 
•~hips as the pirates at sea had done before 
them. 

In December of 1812, Theodosia Burr 
sailed on a small boat. The Patriot, from 
Georgetown. South Carolina, intending to 
\isit her father, Aaron Burr, in New York. 
The Patriot was lost somewhere on this 
voyage, nor was any trace of ship or crew ever 
found. 

About fifty years later a doctor, called in 
to see a sick woman on one of the sand-banks 
near Nag's Head, was surprised to find the 
portrait of a beautiful young woman hang- 
ing in the rude hut of the "banker." and obtained possession of it. 

In the play, a storm is raging over the lonely sand-banks near Nag's Head; within the hut of 
the old fisherman the bell buoy can be heard abo\-e the roaring of the surf. The fisherman and 
his daughter are worried about the safety of the Old Woman who lives with them. She isn't 
"right in her head." and they're "scared o' what shell do " when the storm makes her hear the 
strange voices which call to her. To the fisherman's hut comes a doctor, summoned to see the 
fisherman's wife. The doctor is surprised to find in the hut a portrait, which he is convinced is 
that of the lost Theodosia Burr. He offers to buy it. declaring that it must be the key to the 
mystery of the disappearance of .Aaron Burr's daughter. At the mention of the name "Theodosia 
Burr," the demented Old Woman who has crept into the room, seizing the portrait declares that 
it is a picture of her, and reveals the fact that she herself was Theodosia Burr. When she has gone 
out, the doctor wrings from the "banker" the confession that this woman was rescued from a 
vessel wrecked long ago on the dunes by the land pirates. Just then a loud cry is heard above the 
roar of the surf, and the ringing of the bell buoy. The Old Woman has rushed into the surf with 
her picture and has been drowned. 




QIljarartprB nf tl)p Plaij 



An Old Fisherman . . 

The "Gal. " his daughter 

The Sick Woman, the fisherman's wife 

The Doctor ..... 

The Old Woman .... 



JoNATHON Daniels 

Mildred Sherrill 

.Aline Hughes 

David Reid Hodgin 

Elizabeth Taylor 



Tivo Hun.dred Eighty 



:yackety yack: 




.4 Comedy of Mountain Moonshiners by Hubert Heffner 

"Dod Gast Ye Both is a play of moonshiners operating in a remote section of the Carolina 
Mountains It is a comedy of folk characters and portrays an interesting group of mountaineers 
typical of folk with whom the author is familiar. 

Noah Setzer, a mountain moonshiner, "boss of the ridge." has always boasted that "they 
ain't no revenoor got him yit an' they ain't never gonna do hit " But he and his bootleggers are 
disturbed by the suspicion that Lawrence Abner is more than a harmless "stranger in these 
parts." They fear that he is a "revenoor" and has been paying attention to Noah's daughter. Mary, 
in order that he may capture the gang Noah, in a towering rage, swears that he'll put a stop 
to this. "I'll take old beck over thar (pointing to his guni an' I'll fix this here dodgasted. ding- 
fuzzeled revenoor like 1 did tother'n. Then I'll take that gal o' mine . ." But he is inter- 

rupted here by a pistol shot as the "revenoor " enters with "the gal" and captures the whole gang. 
.After much fuming. Noah is persuaded by his IxxDtleggers to "give him the gal" in return for 
their freedom. When Noah explosively consents to this proposition with ""Well, marry him . . . 
and damn ye both!" Abner and Mary burst out laughing. They explain that .Abner is not a 
"revenoor" but a magazine scribbler, and the plot was stated to prove that he "want no reve- 
noor" so that they could be married. Since Noah has promised before all his gang, he cant go 
back on his word. So he gives a reluctant consent that Abner shall marry Mary Handing them 
a quart of his best "mountain dew," he fumes out his blessing, '"Take this here quart and clear 
out o" here an" . . . stay out . . . an" dod gast ve both!" 



(UljarartprB of tljp piag 

Noah Setzer. a mountain moonshiner 
Walt, his son. an e.\-member of the .A E F. 
Mary, his daughter .... 
Bill Spivins, a rough mountaineer 

j, , i> bootleggers for Noah ... 

Lawrence Abner, a ""revenoor" ...... 



George Denny 

\\"iLBLR Stout 

lONE Markham 

burgin lohr 

Chester Burton 

Hubert Heffner 

George Crawford 



Two Hundred Eighty-one 



'YACKETY YACK! 




®1|0 ICaat 0f tJ|0 IGDUineH 

/\ Play oj Roheson Ccunty Outlaws by Paul Greene 

The Last of the Lowrics was drawn from the "Lowric History, " by Mrs. Norment, whose 
husband was killed by the outlaws. 

The Lowrie gang was a famous band of outlaws of mixed blood, part Croatan Indian. In 
the latter part of the Civil War many of the Croatans in Robeson County were opposed to the 
conscription of men bv the Confederate Go\ernment for work on the fortifications along the 
Cape Fear. Among these were the Lowrie boys, who killed an army officer sent to arrest them for 
evading the law. After this, the Lowries concealed themselves in Scuffletown swamp, where 
they were supplied with food by their sympathizers. .As the gang grew in size it began to act on 
the offensive instead of the dcfensi\e and soon it spread terror throughout the county, robbing, 
plundering, and killing when necessary. For more than ten years the gang held out against the 
officers of the law and only in 1874 was the last Lowrie killed. 

The parents of the Lowrie boys were, as far as is known, both law-abiding and religious 
people. 

Cumba, the old mother of the Lowrie gang, has lost all her sons e.xcept Henry Berry. Steve 
has been killed only a week before but his wife, Mayno. and Cumbas daughter. Jane, have tried 
to keep this from the old woman She believes them safe in Georgia, "li\ing straight lives at 
last," But Henry Berry has lost heart and is o\ercome by the loneliness of the swamp He 
comes back to see his old mother and to pla\- his banjo once more before he gi\es up. Then, 
hearing signals outside, he leaves Cumba and Jane, saying "Steve's waitin' fer me out thar." 
His mother cries out in despair, "There he goes now. Ill never see him again. His spirit's broke, 
an' he won't be goin' back to Georgy. I see it in his face that he's a-gi\in' in " Then, just as 
she finds Steve's blood-stained clothes, comes the sound of a shot. Mayno runs in with Henry 
Berry's coat, telling how he shot himself before the Sheriff's gang could take him. .And Cumba 
drops down over the clothes of her dead sons. "Thar's all that's left o' them I lo\ed. . a bundle 
of clothes to show for a husband, an' four grown sons they're all at peace at last . . but what's 
the use of my livin . . now! " 

(StjarartrrB of thr $lag 

Cumba. the aged mother of the Lowries Eliz.'^beth T.'^ylor 

Jane, her daughter . . Ruth Penny 

Mayno, Cumbas daughter-in-law ....... Rachel Freeman 

Heriry Berry Lowrie, last of the outlaw gang . Ernest Neiman 

Scene: Scuffletown. The rough home of the Lowrie gang in a swamp\- region in Robeson 
County, North Carolina 

Time: A night in the winter of the year 1874. 



Two Hundred Eighty-two 



•YACKETY YACK: 




(Hhp MxBn 



A Tragedy of Farm Life by Paul Greerxe 

Old Wash Lucas is known as the stingiest man in Harnett County. The only thing he ever 
loved was his son. Perry, whom he drove off with a curse seven years ago when he wanted to 
marry and move to the mills. His daughter. Ida, lives alone with him. Old Wash has been 
paralyzed since his quarrel with Perry, but he has power enough still to drive a hard bargain and 
to cheat Tim. once Ida's beau, out of all that he has saved. Tim comes to Ida now to tell her that 
Perry is starving, and that his wife will die unless money for a specialist is to be had at once. Ida 
declares that her father hates Perry, and that it is no use to try to get money from him. He has 
been driving another bargain with a man from the bank. Tim tells Ida that he has fixed it up with 
Josie to be married, and that they are planning to move to the mills. He says. "1 thought a lot 
o' you, Ida, and I reckon we d a got on all right. . but ten years is a long time to wait. ' Utterly 
without hope for the future. Ida resolves to get some money from Wash, and when Tim is gone 
she demands the key to the money-box. Goaded to desperation by Wash's taunts, she is about 
to kill bim with a knile when he tells her that the money has been put in the Bank. Tim has 
just told her that the Bank had failed. Now when Perry comes in to beg his father for help and 
Wash finally consents. Ida knows that it is no use. Tim returns presently with the news that 
Perry's wife is dead and Wash, on hearing that his money is gone, himself sinks back in his wheel 
chair, dead. Just then is heard the sound of Christmas serenaders singing "Holy Night' and Ida 
cries out. "Thar's them young folks havin' a good time on Christmas Eve while we . . while we ..." 
And she sinks hopelessly into a chair as the full misery of the situation breaks o\er her. 



(!Il|arartrrB uf ttif piay 

"^Vash Lucas, the stingiest man in the county 

Ida Lucas, his daughter ...... 

Perry Lucas, his son ... 

Tim .Adams, a farm hand, once Ida's beau 

Scene: Near Duke, in Harnett County. North Carolina. 

Time: Christmas Eve. iqic. 



Anthony Combs 

Katherine G.\lloway Batts 

James Greenwood 

David Reid Hodgin 



Two Hundred Eighty-three 



:yackety yack: 




(51)r Hamp 



A Comedy of Chapel Hill by William A. Royall 

Mildred Mason, according to Fatty Armstrong, "good-lookin' as the devil," 
is a "baby-vamp"' from Georgia. While at a fraternity dance on the Hill, with 
her soft voice, "wonderful eyes, kissable mouth, plenty of rouge, spit-curl and 
everything", she succeeds in vamping both students and professor. She willingly 
enters into a conspiracy to vamp poor Julius Young, a bashful Senior. But she 
does not stop there, for Professor Dobson, of the Economics Department, is vamped. 
Even sophisticated Fatty Armstrong who is certainly "big enough to take care of 
himself falls an easy victim to her irresistible charms. The climax is reached, 
when like a bright butterfly, this "attractive little devil" flits away with "some 
guy in a new Stutz ' to spread joy elsewhere, leaving her latest admirers without 
even one farewell smile. 

QIliararlprB nf tljr Plaj} 

Mildred Mason, the "vamp" from Georgia 
Professor Dobson, of the Economics Department 
Fatty Armstrong ...... 

Julius Young, a bashful Senior . . 

Vema Powell, Fatty's girl .... 

Martha Dixon 1 

Sam Dixon \ conspirators ....... 

Wayne Scott J 

Max Jordan, from Charlotte ....... 

Brother Johnson, the Pi Di negro servant ..... 

Scene: The Pi Di House at the University of North Carolina. 

Time; An evening during the fall dances of igio. 



Dorothy Greenlaw 

Bill Royall 

MacNair Smith 

Tom Moore 

Marion Crawford 

Mary Yellott 

Talbot Parker 

Walter Hook 

Alan Wright 

John Shaw 



Tivo Hundred Eighty-four 



:yackety YACK' 




all]p mh Mnn of ii^ntnit 

A Melodrama of ^'itchcrajl Times by Paul Greene 

Joe Jules, now old and feeble, once a strong and influential man in Edenton, has lived for ten 
years in such seclusion that he is suspected of ha\-ing murdered his young wife and even of having 
sold his soul to the Devil. Hearing that a warrant has been issued for his arrest on a charge of 
having bewitched the Governor's daughter, the Old Man has summoned The Constable. The 
Notary, and a Minister of Edenton to hear his story. As their knock is heard he commands his 
slave. Mumbo. to help him up. pointing to the door beyond which strange moaning cries are 
heard. He speaks gently. "Yes. yes! .A little while." Then to Mumbo. "I'm going down there 
to make ready." As he passes Mumbo's horrible .African idol he says. "Cover him up if you 
don't want strangers to see your God " This is done and Mumbo opens the door to the three town 
dignitaries. Left alone to await the return of the Old Man they become thoroughly frightened 
by the moaning sounds, the gloom, the wind, and by recalling tales of the Old Man's murder of 
his young wife, and of his witchcraft. Finally the Constable, in his restlessness, comes upon 
Mumbo's idol, uncox-ers it. and in horror shoots at it. Mumbo, entering at this moment, springs 
upon him to avenge the injury done his god. But the Old Man restrains him. He now reveals 
to the frightened men the secret of his life. He calls in his wife that she may play once more on 
her spinet and reveals the terrible truth that she "for ten years has lived chained to keep her 
from killing herself. " Tonight he has determined to end it all. and has called the town officers 
there that they may report how he lived ten years with a leper wife because of his love tor her. 
According to his pre\iously arranged plans. Mumbo sets fire to the house and the Old Man takes 
poison. But Mumbo. on account of the insult to his idol, refusing to obey his master, will not 
permit the officers from Edenton to escape from the house. The flames fill the room and abo\'e 
the moaning of the \ ictims comes the clear, sweet tinkle of the spinet played by the leper wife of 
the Old Man of Edenton. 



CliarartrrH of tljc 3^laij 



foe Jules, reputed witch-man 
Mumbo, his mute African slave 
The Town Constable, of Edenton 
The Notary, of Edenton 
A Minister, of the Church of England 
The Leper, wife of Joe Jules 



George Dennv 

Fr.\nk John Haronian 

LeGrande Everett 

Almonte Howell 

Charles McColll'm 

Melissa Hankins 



Scene: The Old Man's House on Salmon Creek outside of Edenton. 
Time: A winter night in 1750. 



Three Hundred Eighty-five 



•YACKETY YACK: 



(ill|p IForFfit Sliralrr 




Wc have in the venerable oaks of Battle Park an ideal site for our Forest Theatre 



'YACKETY YACK" 




:yackety YACK" 



mustral (Eluba 

BtuBon (1920-1921) 



Thomas H. H.amilton 
M. C. S. Noble. Jr. 
Ch.-\s. L. Nichols 
WiLLLAM Powell . 



Director 

President 

Business Manager 

Leader Mandolin Ciiib 



O. K. Craven 
"Red"" Barden 



(glpp Club 

PERSONNEL 
First Tenors 



C. C. Holmes 
"Bobby"" Wunsch 



Second Tenors 

"Charlie" Nichols 
"Bill" Poixdexter 

■"Pike" Trotter 



"Mark" Noble 
Hugh Waldrop 



First Basses 



Roger Ogblrn 

"CaPLDINE" HiCKS 



Prof. Howell 



Second Basses 



LeGrande E\ erett 
Ralph Spalgh 



Fred Spalgh 
George Thompson 



"Woody" Willi.ams 
"Charlie" Siewers 



""Charlie" Stephenson 



"Bill" Powell 



©rrliratra 

Violins 
"Ed"' Lindsay 



Cornets 
■"Charlie" Siewers 

Fred Spalgh 

Piano 
Mr. Hamilton 



"Gene"" Shaw 

Bass 
"Prof" Howell 

Drums 
"Shike " Ross 



Two Hundred Eighty-nine 



•YACKETY YACK" 



iManlioltn-(guilar (Clubs 





V iolin 






Powell. Leader 






Mandolins 




Trotter 




Hicks 


Thompson 




Spaugh 


Noble 


Guitars 


Everett 


Nichols 




Stephenson 


Si EWERS 




Williams 



\ iolin 
Powell 

Saxaphone 
Shaw 



ear Saby JPiof 



Piano 
Ernest Thompson 



Banjo 
George Thompson 

Drums 
Ross 



(Ilripo 

The igio-'ii season of the Musical Clubs, formerly combined under the head 
of the Glee Club, has been by far the most successful that this organization has 
ever had from every aspect. The Clubs have taken two full- week tours throughout 
the State, together with various local engagements, during which concerts were 
rendered at the following places: 





Fail Tour 






Spring 


Tour 


Nov. 14 


Raleigh 


Feb. 


17 




Durham 


Nov. lb 


Chapel Hill 


Feb. 


21 






\\ ilson 


Nov. 17 


Charlotte 


Feb. 


22 






Rocky Mount 


Nov. 18 


Spartanburg 


Feb. 


23 






Tarboro 


Nov. 19 


. Salisbury 


Feb. 


24 






Washington 


Nov. 10 


Winston-Salem 


Feb. 


25 






Kinston 


Nov. 21 


Greensboro 


Feb. 

Mar. 


26 

2 






Goldsboro 
Chapel Hill 



The program was live, \aried, and complete, including chorus songs varying 
from the classical to negro spirituals; solos, classical, popular, and comical; quartet 
songs of every description, including the "caleiope four;" \aried orchestral selec- 
tions; and "jazz de lu.xe" by the Tar Baby Five. Newspaper comments throughout 
the State were unanimous in the expression that the program never failed to please 
the entire audience, and that the Clubs this year were the best that had ever 
represented the University — a credit to any institution. 



Two Hundred Ninety 



:yackety yack: 




rVACKETY YACK: 







William D. Carmichael. Jr 
Warner M. Lewis 
John H. Harden 



Leader 
Assistant Leader 
Assistant Leader 



Qli}t d^nrgon's i^tnh lall 




Benjamin B. W imberli 
John D. Shaw 
Marcus E. Biz:ell 



Leader 
Assistant Leader 
Assistant Leader 



Two Hundred Ninety-two 



— YACKETY YACK: 



(Ullp (gtmgl^nul lall 




William H. Rlffin, Jr, 
Jesse H. Erwin, Jr. 
Frank S. Spruill. Jr. 



Leader 
Assistant Leader 
Assistant Leader 



(5l|p ^prtujpi O^prmau (EUtb ianrr 





George L. Wimberly 
Alan B. Wright 
Roland P. McClamrock 



Leader 
Assistant Leader 
Assistant Leader 



Two Hundred Ninety-three 



•YACKETY YACK' 



(lihr 3lmttor ^rnm 




Robert H. Grif fi hi 
Robert W. Proctor 
Woodward Williams 



Leader 
Assistant Leader 
Assistant Leader 



(Hi)? ^0phnmnrr i^ap 



Marsden B. de Rossette 
Julius J. Wade 
Alan M. McGee . 



Leader 
Assistant Leader 
Assistant Leader 



Two Hundred Ninety-Jour 



'YACKETY YACK' 




WILLIAMSON 



rVACKETY YACK: 



> 



MCLEAN 





MURCHISON 



COMMENCEMENT 
m MAJ^HALLS 





Organizations 





QII)? JPan-^fUptiir (!l0unrtl 


Clem Bolton Holding, President Ben 


William Donald Carmichael, Jr., Secretary 






K 2 


Benjamin Bailey Liipfert 






AK E 


John Duncan Shaw .... 






2 A E 


Junius Moore Horner .... 






Z ^ 


James Saunders Williamson . 






A T fi 


Neal Yates Pharr .... 






K A 


Junius Cheston Woodall 






* AG 


Paul Burt Edmundson .... 






SN 


Roland Prince McClamrock 






2 X 


Lenox Gore Cooper .... 






n K A 


Howard Edward Fulton 






n K * 


Joseph Cranberry Tucker 






A 2 $ 


Alvin James Eley .... 






e X 


James Speed Massenburg 






2 $ E 


Two Hundred Ninety-seven 1 





•YACKETY YACK: 




Founded at Yale. 1S44 
Colors: Crimen Blue, and Gold Plblication; Delta Kappa Epsilon Quarterly 

Mttn (Ehaptpr of irlla iKappa lEpailnu 

Established. iS^i 

JffratrPB in Ifarultatf 

Francis Preston Venable, Ph.D. 

3FratrfB in Ininrraitalp 

Class of 1920 
Claude Clinton Ramsay 

Class of 192 1 
Henry Blrwell Cooper Jonathan Worth Daniels 

Thomas Owen Moore 

Class of 1922 
William Camillus Bourne Edwin Fuller Parham 

Robert Henry Griffith Robert Wright Proctor 

James Edward Wood 

Class of 1923 
John C. Cheeseborough Samuel Gatlin Jenkins 

William Grimes Clark, Jr. James Thomas McGraw 

Marshall Young Cooper William Oscar McMullan 

Howard Holderness Thomas Harrison Shepard 

Law 
Benjamin Bailey Liipfert John Gilliam Proctor 

Edward Knox Proctor Frank Shepard Spruill, Jr. 

George Lewis Wimberly 

Medicine 
Edward ^Morris Whitehead Benjamin Bunn Wimberly 

Two Hundred Ninety-nine 



■YACKETY YACK: 




Founded at Miami L niversily. iSjq 

Colors : Blue and Pink Flower : Rose 

Pl BLiCATiON : Beta Theta Pi 

Sta Ifta (Ehaptpr nf Ipta (Hbpla f i 

Established, iSy2 

iFratrrs in iFarultatf 

Alvin Sawyer Wheeler. Ph D Kent James Brown. Ph.D. 

iFratrra in Mntopraitatr 

Class of 1920 
RuFus Arthur Spalgh 

Class of 1 92 1 
Boyd Harden .Archibald Caleb Lineberger, Jr. 

Charles Edmund Kistler John De Morris 

Class of 1922 
Kenneth Page Hog.an Henry Ashby Rankin 

Class of 1923 
Robert Plrdy Bell J.\mes Pickett Leak 

J,«viES LeGrande Exerett Ralph Edward Spalgh 

Frederick Dexeal Fanning .Alan Marshall McGee 

Lloyd Preston Willi.ams 

Law 
Clem Bolton Holding Phineas Edgar Horton 

Robert Haines Frazier 

Medicine 
Thomas Bryce Mitchell John Alexander Shaw 

Nathan Anthony Womack 

Three Hundred One 



:yackety yack: 




^tgma Alplia lEpsilnn 

Founded at the University of Alabania, 18^6 

Colors: Old Gold and Purple Flower: Violet 

Publications: The Record. Phi Alpha (secret) 

Xi (Eliaptpr of ^tgma Alplia Spatlnn 

Established, 18 ^j 

iFratrra in iFarultatP 

J. Lenoir Chambers, A.M. Andrew Henry Patterson, A.M. 

Edward Vernon Howell, Ph.D. William Watley Pierson, Ph.D. 

iFratr^a ttt Uniupraitatf 

Class of 192 1 
Frank Durham Bell James Cornelius Pass Fearrington 

David St. Pierre DuBose Howard Alexander Patterson 

Erasmus Hervey Evans William Allen Royall 

John Duncan Shaw 

Class of 1922 
George Watts Hill William Marshall Prince 

RuFus Little LeGrande Ralph Van Landingham 

William Lord London Harry Foote Whitaker 

Class of 1923 
Lyndall Vaughn Alexander Marsden Bellamy de Rossette 

Clayton Giles Bellamy David Cunningham Sinclair 

George Herbert Smith 

Medicine 
George Douglas Elliott George Farrar Parker 

Three Hundred Three 



1 YACKETY YACK — 1 




iiluBtral (Eluba 




graamt (1920-1921) 


Thomas H. H.\milton Director 

M. C. S. Noble, Jr. ....... President 

Chas. L. Nichols ..... Business Manager 

W'lLLLAM Powell ...... Leader Mandolin Club 




mn (Elub 




PERSONNEL 




First Tenors 




O. K. Craven C. C. Holmes 
"Red"" Barden ""Bobby" Wunsch 




Second Tenors 




■"Charlie" Nichols ""Mark" Noble 
'"Bill" Poindexter Hugh Waldrop 
■"Pike" Trotter 




First Basses 




Roger Ogblrx Fred Spalgh 
"'Capldine' Hicks George Thompson 
Prof. Howell 




Second Basses 




LeGrande Everett ""Woody" \\'illi.a.ms 
Ralph Spaugh "Charlie" Siewers 

"Charlie" Stephenson 




®rrl|fatra 




\ 'iolms 

""Bill" Powell "Gene" Shaw 

"Ed"" Lindsay 




Cornets Bass 
""Charlie " Siewers "Prof" Howell 
Fred Spaugh 




Piano Drums 
Mr. Hamilton ""Shike" Ross 




Two Hundred Eighty-nine 





:yackety YACK! 



iimt&oltn-(Suttar Olluba 





\ lolin 






Powell. Leader 






Mandolins 




Trotter 




Hicks 


Thompson 




Spaugh 


Noble 


Guitars 


E\ERETT 


Nichols 




Stephenson 


SlEWERS 




Williams 



Violin 
Powell 



Saxaphone 



Shaw 



Sar Sabg 3f\rst 



Piano 
Ernest Thompson 



Banjo 
George Thompson 



Drums 



Ross 



Sripa 

The 1 920" z I season of the Musical Clubs, formerly combined under the head 
of the Glee Club, has been bv far the most successful that this organization has 
e\-er had from e\ery aspect. The Clubs have taken two full-week tours throughout 
the State, together with various local engagements, during which concerts were 
rendered at the following places: 







Fall Tour 


Nov. 


14 


Raleigh 


Nov. 


lb 




Chapel Hill 


Nov. 


17 




Charlotte 


Nov. 


18 




Spartanburg 


Nov. 


19 




. Salisburv 


Nov. 


10 




Winston-Salem 


Nov. 


21 




Greensboro 



Feb. 1 7 
Feb. 2 1 
Feb. 22 
Feb. 23 
Feb. 24 
Feb. 25 
Feb. 26 
Mar. 2 



Spring Tour 



Durham 

Wilson 

Rocky Mount 

Tarboro 

Washington 

Kinston 

Goldsboro 

Chapel Hill 



The program was li\e, \aried, and complete, including chorus songs varying 
from the classical to negro spirituals; solos, classical, popular, and comical; quartet 
songs of e\er>- description, including the "caleiope four;' \aried orchestral selec- 
tions; and "jazz de lu.xe" by the Tar Baby Five. Newspaper comments throughout 
the State were unanimous in the expression that the program never failed to please 
the entire audience, and that the Clubs this year were the best that had ever 
represented the University — a credit to any institution. 



Two Hundred Ninety 



:yackety YACK' 





V 


ij^^B^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^I 




^^m- ^^-•^'- 8* 


^mm=J-' Jf 


^mmb^' — — --^ 


^Hk Hi 


I^B«^=^SB 


■^^7^ 


M 


^g^H 




W^^k 



— YACKETY YACK: 



(HilP iFall O^prman dlub ianrr 




William 


D. 


Carmichael, Jr . 




Leader 


Warner 


M. 


Lewis 




Assistant 


Leader 


John H. 


Harden 




Assistant 


Leader 






®1tf 


O^nrgnn'a 


i^^txh lall 






Benjamin B. Wimberlv 
John D. Shaw- 
Marcus E. Bizzell 



Leader 

Assistant Leader 
Assistant Leader 



Two Hundred Ninetv-two 



:yackety yack: 



®ltr (f^tmgl)nul lall 




William H. Ruffin, Jr. 
Jesse H. Erwin, Jr. 
Frank S. Spruill, Jr. 



Leader 
Assistant Leader 
Assistant Leader 



®ljp i>|irtu9 (gprman OlUtb ianrp 




George L. Wlmberly 
Alan B. Wright 
Roland P. McClamrock 



Leader 
Assistant Leader 
Assistant Leader 

Two Hundred Ninety-three 



•YACKETY YACK' 



^bt iluntnr Mrnm 




Robert H. Griffith 
Robert W. Proctor 
Woodward Williams 



Leader 
Assistant Leader 
Assistant Leader 



ull|f ^fl^l^nmnrr Ifn^j 



Marsden B. de Rossette 
Jllil'S J. Wade 
Alan M. McGee . 



Leader 
Assistant Leader 
Assistant Leader 



Two Hundred Ninety-four 



•YACKETY YACK: 




'^ 






% 1^ 

RUFFIN 



ERWIN 



V I RUFFIN Vv'^^^^^V 



THORPE 




"YACKETY YACK: 





COMMENCEMENT 
MARSHALLS ^ ;: 



HESTER 




'YACKETY YACK: 



all|f 5P^«-^^llf«ir ©nunrtl 



Clem Bolton Holding, President 

William Donald Carmichael, Jr., Secretary 

Benjamin Bailey Liipfert 

John Duncan Shaw .... 

Jlnius Moore Horner .... 

James Saunders Williamson . 

Neal Yates Pharr .... 

Junius Cheston Woodall 

Paul Burt Edmundson .... 

Roland Prince McClamrock 

Leno.x Gore Cooper .... 

Howard Edward Fulton 

Joseph Cranberry Tucker 

Alvin James Eley . . ... 

James Speed Massenburg 



Ben 

K2 

AK E 

:; A E 

z ^ 

A T n 

K A 

* A e 

2 N 
2 X 

n K A 
n K $ 

A 2 $ 

e X 

2 * E 



Two Hundred Ninety-seven 



"YACKETY YACK: 




Founded at Yale. 1S44 
Colors: Crimson Blue, and Cold Publication: Delia Kappa Epsilon Quarterly 

iFla dhaptpr of irlla 2vappa tpatlnu 

Established. iSsi 



iFratrpB in iFarultatf 

Francis Preston Venable, Ph.D. 

iFrntrra in InioprBitalf 

Class of 1920 
Claude Clinton Ramsay 

Class of 1 91 1 
Henry Burwell Cooper Jonathan Worth Daniels 

Thomas Owen Moore 



William Camillus Bourne 
Robert Henry Griffith 



Class of 1922 



John C. Cheeseborough 
William Grimes Clark. Ji 
Marshall ^'oung Cooper 
Howard Holderness 



James Edward Wood 
Class of 1923 



Edwin Fuller Parham 
Robert Wright Proctor 



Law 



Benjamin Bailey Liipfert 
Edward Knox Proctor 



Edward Morris Whitehead 



George Lewis Wimberly 
Medicine 



Samuel Gatlin Jenkins 
James Thomas N'IcGraw 
William Oscar McMullan 
Thomas Harrison Shepard 

John Gilliam Proctor 
Frank Shepard Spruill, Jr. 



Benjamin Bunn Wimberly 

Two Hundred Ninety-nine 



:yackety yack: 




Founded at M'ami L niversity. iSjq 

Colors: Blue and Pmk Flower: Rose 

Plblication : Beta Theta Pi 

Eta Ipta (Eitaptfr of Ipta iJhpta ^i 

Established. 18^2 

iFratrfa in Jfarultatr 

Alvin Sawyer \\"heeler. Ph D. Kent James Brown, Ph D. 

IfrtxtrtB in Htttntrsitatr 

Class of 1920 
RuFLS Arthur Spaugh 

Class of 1911 
Boyd Harden Archibald Caleb Lineberger, Jr. 

Charles Edmlnd Kistler John De Morris 

Class of 1922 
Kenneth Page Hogan Henry Ashby Rankin 

Class of 1923 
Robert Plrdy Bell James Pickett Leak 

James LeGrande E\erett Ralph Edward Spalgh 

Frederick Deveal Fanning Alan Marshall McGee 

Lloyd Preston Williams 

Law 
Clem Bolton Holding Phineas Edgar Horton 

Robert Haines Frazier 

i\ ledicine 
Thomas Bryce Mitchell John Alexander Shaw 

Nathan Anthony U'omack 

Three Hundred One 



'YACKETY YACK: 




i^tgma Alpl^a lEpsilnn 

Founded at the Lniversity of Alabama, iS^6 

Colors: Old Gold and Purple Flower: X'iolel 

Publications: The Record. Phi Alpha (secret) 

X\ (Cljaptpr of ^tgma Alplja iEpatlnn 

Established. i8y7 

ilfratrra in iParultatP 

J. Lenoir Chambers, A.M. .Andrew Henry Patterson, A.M. 

Edward Vernon Howell, Ph D. \\ illiam Watley Pierson, Ph.D. 

iFratrpH in ^niuprailatp 

Class of 192 1 
Frank Durham Bell James Cornelius Pass Fearrington 

David St. Pierre DuBose Howard Alexander Patterson 

Erasmus Hervey Evans William Allen Royall 

John Duncan Shaw 

Class of igzz 
George Watts Hill William Marshall Prince 

RuFus Little LeGrande Ralph Van Landingham 

William Lord London Harry Foote Whitaker 

Class of 1923 
Lyndall Vaughn Alexander Marsden Bellamy de Rossette 

Clayton Giles Bell.^my David Cunningham Sinclair 

George Herbert Smith 

Medicine 
George Douglas Elliott George Farrar Parker 

Three Hundred Three 



•YACKETY YACK: 




p IKa^pa W 



Founded at the College of Charleston. iqo4 
Colors : Gold and White Flower : Red Rose 

Publications : The Star and Lamp. The Scroll 

aCappa (Chaptpr nf ft Kappa f hi 

Established, 1Q14 

iFrat«a in iFarultalP 

Dldley DeWitt Carroll, A.M. 

iFratrps in ^nturraitatp 

Class of 191 7 
Beemer Clifford Harrell 

Class of 1920 
CoRYDON Perry Sprltll 

Class of 1 92 1 
Howard Edward Fulton William Grady Pritchard 

Howard Alexander Hanby Frederick Carlyle Shepard 

Donnell Van Noppen 

Class of 1922 
James Newland Brand William Frank Falls 

George Vernon Denny Thomas Clarke Smith 

George Curtis Watson 

Class of 1923 
Richard Fenner Anderson Thornton Patton Gholsom 

Preston Hampton Edwards Thomas Pegram Graham 

McIver Edwards William Lysander Harris 

Charles Edward Stroud 
Medicine 
Arthur Lee Daughtridge David Kimberly 

Robert Ashe Moore 

Three Twenty-one 



r 



•YACKETY YACK: 




Founded at the College of the City of .\'eu' York. iSqq 

Colors: Xile Green and White Flower: Carnation 

Pl'BLICation : The Carnation 

Alpha irlta (Uliaptpr of irlta ^tgma f lit 

Established, iqjo 

3xvAxiB in IltitDProttatP 

Class of 1 92 1 
Sheldon Clyde Austin Elbert Howe Martin 

Walter Reece Berryhill JaiMEs Theophilus Penny 

John Collmbls Cowan Karl Ernest Thies 

Wade Anderson Gardner Joseph Cranberry Tucker 

Class of 1922 
RuFus Manfred Johnson, Jr. Stuart Rhodes Moffit 

Class of 1923 
Carl Sumner Goodson Robert Ervin James 

George Butler Thompson 



Medicine 
Carlton Alderman Davenport Thaddeus Elmore Jones 

Pharmacy 
HoBART William Richardson 



Three Hundred Twenty-three 



•YACKETY YACK: 




^bm Qlht 



Founded at Xorwich University. i8)6 

Colors: Military Red and \Chite Flower: Red Carnation 

Publication : The Rattler 

Alpha i£ta (Uhaptpr nf Shpta (Elit 

Established, igio 

iFralrps in ifatultatt 

SaiMlel Huntington Hobbs 

iFralrps tit Uninrraitalc 

William Roy Francis Edward Lee Quillin 

Leon Vincent Milton Julius Rowan Raper 

Lawrence Girard Wilson 

Class of 1922 
Samuel Lee Davis Joseph Flanner Hendren 

Alvin James Eley Joseph Thomas Maddrey 

Class of 1923 
JaiMes Walter Gentry Harold Lace Ross 

Ernest Raeford Shirley 

Law 
Samuel Lewis Arrington Clement Manly Lewellyn 

Nathan Roscoe Bass Zebulon Archibald McCall 

Gideon Van Poole Fesperman John Luther Rendleman, Jr. 

Jasper Benjamin Hicks Hoyle Clifton Ripple 

William Brantley Womble 

Medicine 
Joseph Lindsey Cook Vance Everett Swift 

Three Hundred Twenty-five 



•YACKETY YACK: 




Bx^mtx pit iEpHtlou 

Founded at Richmond College, igoi 

Colors: Purple and Red Flowers; American Beauty Rose and \ iolet 

Publication: Sigma Phi Epsilon Journal 

irlta (Eliaptpr af i». f. IE. 

Established, iqii 

iFratrpa tn llniuprattatf 

Class of 1 92 1 
James Speed Massenburg 

Class of 1922 

J. HORTON DOUGHTON MaRVIN DlXON HaRPER 

William Tucker Hannah William Shepard Hester 

James Breeden Waddill 

Law 
J. Carlton Pittman William Bayard Yelverton 

Medicine 
Robert Theodore Hambrick 

Graduate 
Albert Pettigrew Elliott 

Three Hur\dred Twenty-seven 



'YACKETY YACK" 




irlta ©ait iplta 

Founded at Bethany College, iS^q 

Colors: Purj^le, Gold and While Flower: Pansy 

Publication: The Rainboiv Quarterly 

(Samma ©ntpga (Hi^nptn nf Srlta ®a« irlta 

Established. iQii 

iFratrra in llnttirrBttatP 

Class of 1 9 1 8 
John Skally Terry 

Class of 1920 
William Henry Andrews. Jr. 

Class of 192 1 
Charles Dale Beers Daniel Lindsey Grant 

William LeGette Blythe Haywood Gordon Kincaid 

Charles Theodore Boyd Fernando Llorens 

Robert Odus Deit:. Jr. Philip Carver Smith 

Tyre Crumpler Taylor 

Class of 1922 
Thomas Randall Bryan, Jr. Samuel Ralph McClurd 

John Dewey Dorsett Marion Wesley Nash 

Douglas Hamer, Jr. Parry Davis Priest 

William Brittingham Smoot 

Class of 1923 

William Lorence Holden Peter Augustus Reavis, Jr. 

John Manning Hutchins Calvin Upsher Smith 

John Small Newbern Benjamin Napier Williamson 

Law 

Forest Glenwood Miles Charles Leslie Nichols 

Medicine 

Daniel Greenlee Caldwell Clement Rosenberg Monroe 

Sellers Mark Crisp William Asbury Rourk 

Three Hundred Twenty-nine 



:yackety YACK" 




iHriitral JFratprnitg 

Founded at LouisviUe Medical School, i8qj 
Colors: Green and \('hite Flower: Lily of the \'alley 

Plblication: Phi Chi Quarterly 

i'lgma alhrta (Ettaptrr of PW (Eht 



JFralrpa in IFaruUatr 



James Bell Blllitt, MD 



William DeBerniere McNider, M.D. 



WosLEY Critz George, M.D. 



JFratrra in Htttoratlatr 

Class of iqii 



.Alan Ramseur Anderson 
Thomas Preston Brinn 
Robert Theodore Hambrick 
Fernando Llorens 
John Alexander Shaw 
Robert Edwin Smith 
Joshua Tayloe 
Calvert Rogers Toy 
Edward Morris Whitehead 

Thomas Milton Arrowsmith 
Arthur Lee Dauchtridce 
Willard Coe Goley 
Robert DuVal Jones. Jr. 
George Dillon Morris 
John Merrell Parker 
Blackwell Sawyer 
Bryan Clinton West 



Class of iqi2 



Marcus Edward Bizzell 
George Douglass Elliott 
Samuel Edwin Hughes 
George Farr,ar Parker 
Samuel Moore Schenck 
Vance Everett Swift 
John Skally Terry 
Carl Wilma White 
Benjamin Bunn Wimberly 

Joseph Linx>say Cook 
Daniel Allan Fields 
John W.^rren Hentjerlite 
Paul Todd Martin 
Thomas Brice Mitchell 
William Ashbury Rourk 
Bryan Pope Warren 
Nathan Anthony Womack 



Three Hundred Thirty-one 



•YACKETY YACK: 




IKa^ipa ^Bx 



mpjitral iFratprnitij 

Founded. May ]o. i8/q 

Colors : Red and Gray Flower : Red Carnation 

Publications: The Mask (exoteric). The Agora (esoteric) 

Mttn Jii (Hljaptpr of Kappa l^s\ 

Established, iqiy 



iFratrpB tii iFarullatr 

John Grover Beard. Ph D. Edward Vernon Howell, Ph.G. 

iFratrra in Ilrbf 



Carl Thomas Dljrham 



Wesley Grimes Byerlv 
Sellers Mark Crisp, Jr. 
Charles Caswell Massey 
Fred Marion Patterson 
Randall Collins Smith 
Thomas Bayron Aycock 
Thaddeus Elmore Jones 
Eugene LeRoy Kellum 
Allen Alexander Minor 
Hazel McLeod Riggins 
George Herbert Sumner 
Richard Speight .Anderson 
James Gordon Groome 



Edwin Leroy Reaves 
Walter Pressley Baker 
Henry Thomas Hicks 
Allsion McLaurin Gibson 
Garah Denson Propst 
Robert Ransom Speed 



C. S. Hemphill, M.D. 

Jfratrps in llniuersitatp 

Medical 

Daniel Greenlee Caldwell 
Oscar Sexton Goodwin 
Zeran Lewis Merritt 
George Ale.xander Richardson 
Paul .Allison Voder 
Walter Vance Costner 
Clement Roseburg Monroe 
David Kimberly 
Robert Lebby Murray 
Bennett Watson Roberts 
Frank Ray Yarborough 
Carlton Alderman Davenport 
Herber Hewitt Fritz 
Louis McCargo Fowler 
Pharmacy 

Marion Lee Jacobs 
John William Harrell, Jr. 
Otho Crowell Edwards 
Grady Cornell Siske 
William Allen Prout 
Holleman Harris Robbins 



Three Hundred Thirty-three 





^^^^i^hI 




^^^^^V^l 







•YACKETY YACK" 




Al|il)a OIl)t ^tgma 



(EI|pmtral ll^ratprntti| 

Founded at the Lniversity of W isconsin. iqo2 
Colors; Prussian Blue. Chrome Yelloiv Flower: Red Carnation 

Pl'blication : The Hexagon 

Slin (Eijaptpr nf Alplta (Ehi i'tgma 

Established, iqii 

Jffralrra in iFarultatr 

James Munsie Bell, Ph.D. Al\in Sawyer Wheeler, Ph.D. 

Francis Preston Venable, Ph.D. James Talmage Dobbins, Ph.D. 

iFratrpa in Uniupraitatr 

Class of 191b 
Troy Monroe Andrews 

Class of 191 8 
Isaac Vilas Giles 

Class of 19 1 9 
Thomas Pugh Dawson 

Class of 1920 
Duncan McCall Carroll Haywood Maurice Taylor 

Class of 1921 
SiHON Cicero Ogburn, Jr. Robert Odus Deitz, Jr. 

Jonathan Worth Guard Louis Mann Nelson 

Charles Robert Harris 

Class of 1922 

Howell Grady Pickett Willi.am Brittingham Smoot 

Earl DeWitt Jennings 

Three Hundred Thirty-five 



•YACKETY YACK" 




Pl|t idta W 



Founded at the University of Michigan. iStq 

Colors: Azure and W" me Color Flower: The Jacqueminot 

Publication: The Brief 

Hanrp 3nn (Et^apttr of W S^lta W 

Chartered, December, iqiq 

iFratrPs in iFarultatP 

Lucius Polk McGehee, A,B. Atwell Campbell McIntosh, A.M. 

Oscar Ogburn Efird 

iFralrpa in llninpraitate 

Senior Law Class 
William Reynolds Allen Dwight Brantley 

Thomas Duncan Cooper Ernest McArthur Currie 

William Durham Harris Clem Bolton Holding 

John Yates Jordan, Jr. Benjamin Bailey Liipfert 

Neal Yates Pharr Oliver Gray Rand 

William Whitfield Sledge Henry Leonidas Stevens 

Robert Lee Whitmire George Lewis Wimberly 

William Bayard Yelverton 

Junior Law Class 
Adrian Meredith Carroll Robert Haynes Frazier 

Frank Luttrell Grier John Will Hunnicutt 

Frank Shepherd Spruill 

Three Hundred Thirty-seven 




Slrrtrtral S^ratfrutltr (Inral) 

Founded at the University of North Carolina, igig 
Colors: Scarlet and Emerald Flower: Red Rose 

Alplia (Cliaptrr nf 3PI|t Hrta Nu 

Jffratrra in iFaruUatP 

Parker Haywood Daggett, B.S. John Harris Mustard, B.S. 

John Emery Lear, E.E. T. B. Walke 

iFralrpa in HttincrHitati* 

Class of 192 1 

Allan Brantley Wright John de Morris 

Philip Carver Smith Leon Vincent Milton 

Charles Junius Bryan William Feimster Foote 



David St. Pierre DuBose 
Marshall Edgar Lake 
Dare Abernethy Wells 
Thomas Bryan Smiley 

Three Hundred Thirty-eight 



Class of igiz 



Paul Milton Gray 
Robert Morrison Wearn 
James Walter Gentry 
Calmn Upshur Smith 



(?5m?aa Delta 



.VRi;ili:>.\lJ^ 1 H-NJliRSON ■ 

)o!iN Manning Bookbr 
ivnwiN Cjreenlaw 

CitORGE MOWE 

WiLi.iAM Stanley liEPMARii 
Oliver Towles 
j/VV!ES Hoi i.y Hani-ord 
OLiX'tiR Gray Rand 
WiLLLwi DorCALD MacMill 
Jof'N Skaluy Terry 
(^\i.vERT Rogers Toy 
RuFus Ar'hur Spavgm 
joHSi Hosr.A Kerr 
lu5WARD Watts WiinHiiEAD 

W'lLLLWi ROBERr WUNSCH 

Cr)LviN Theodore Leonard 

I il'BERT CrOI'ZE HeFFNER 

Bry\nt Coxjncil Brown 
W'illard Peyton Huoson 
William Frank Falls 
'^n<1^^^s Hamilton 



i'-'rederiCK Henry Koch 
William LeGette Blythe 



Boyd Harden 
LoLns Cobb 

Cmarles Theodore Boyd 
JOHN Lee Aycock 
Clarence Reece SujMner 
Garland Burns Porter 
Joseph Altir\ McLean 
Alfred Luther Purring ton, Jr. 
Douglas Hamer 
Wai.ter Reece Berryhill 
KIarion Wesley Nash 
Edwin Maithews 
John Columbus Cowan, Jr. 
FIayvi-ood Gordon Kincaid 
ARTHiiR Gwynn Griffin 
Wilbur White Stout 
RoBERi Benjamin White 
Clarence Addison FIibbard 
Troiter 



■■:i 




■^.7^P:^ti^rfm<:!W^K 



A.'^,^ 






2t Indianap 

PUBLICAT 



Founded at Indianapolis, iqoS 
Colors: Dark and Light Purple Publication: Speakers of Tau Kappa Alpha 



WiLLiAiM Stanley Bernard, A.M. Frank Porter Graham, A.M. 

Francis Foster Bradsh.aw 

Ara&pmtr ^rl^ool 

William Haywood Bobbitt Charles Theodore Boyd 

John Hosea Kerr Daniel Lindsey Grant 

D.A\iD Reid Hodgin 



Three Hundred Thirty-nine 




Fcunded at W'llUam and Mary College, December ;, 17-6 

Alpita (El|aptpr at Nnrtl| Olarnltna. pi^t Ipta Kappa 



J. G. deR. Hamilton, Ph.D. 

William and Marv 
T. J. Wilson, Jr., Ph.D. 

North Carolina 
F. P. Venable. Ph.D. 

North Carolina 
J, B. Bullitt. M.D. 

Washington and Lee 
H W. Chase, Ph.D. 

Dartmouth 
H. McG. Wacstaff, Ph.D. 

North Carolina 
George Howe, Ph D. 

Princeton 

H. G B 
North 



Upmbrra in iFarully 

K. J. Brown, PhD. 

Dickinson 
Edwin Greenlaw, Ph D 

Northwestern 
J. M Bell, Ph.D. 

Toronto 
J. B. Linker, A.M. 

North Carolina 
W. M Dey, Ph.D. 

Virginia 
J. H. Hanford, Ph.D. 

Rochester 
Archibald Henderson, Ph.1 

North Carolina 
aity, A.B. C, 

Carolina 



W. C. Coker, Ph.D. 

Hopkins 
A. S. Wheeler, Ph.D. 

Harvard 
L. R. Wilson. Ph.D. 

North Carolina 
J. L. Chambers, A.M. 

North Carolina 
N. W. Walker. A.B. 

North Carolina 
F, P. Graham, A.M. 

North Carolina 

D, Thorndyke Saville, C.E. 

North Carolina 

E. Green, A.M. 
Syracuse 



Thomas Preston Brinn 
Houston Spencer Everett 



Class of iqib 
Francis Foster Bradshaw 

Class of 1Q17 
Oliver Gray Rand 

Class of iqiq 

John Skally Terry 
Class of iq2o 

CoRYDON Perry Sprliill 
Cal\ept Rogers Toy 



Clarence Linden Garnett Ashby 
Charles Dale Beers 
Walter Reece Berryhill 
William LeGette Blythe 
William H.\ywood Bobbitt 
Charles Theodore Boyd 
Joseph Linds.^y Cook 
Robert Mayo Da\ts 
Haywood Edmundson 



Class of iQii 



Wade Anderson Gardner 
Willard Peyton Hudson 
Howard Alexander Patterson 
Frederick Carlyle Shepherd 
George Dewey Shore 
Joseph Granbery Tl'cker 
Thomas J.\mes Wilson. Ill 
M.ary Louise Cobb 
Louise Manning Venable 



Fr.\nk Ray Y.'\rborough 



Three Hundred Forty-one 



\ 



Vviiiiam fl. fiubbitt 

'- uarltrs T Boyd 

) rttocis F. Bradsbaw 

(iryaiil C. BruWB 

J. Ltriiuu Ctmmberii 

Oamct L. Grant 

Juscpb G. JeR. BamUtoa 

HbilUp Qcnlemau 



Dauicl R. Hudgia 
Jobu H. Kcrt 
Joseph A. McLean 
Marion W. N»sh 
Garlajnd B. Porter 
OUver Rand 
Tyre C. Taylor 
Kiurst H. Thomp:iou 




Ghoul-Oboiil>dfu|duml 



JkyYttix 

Yvfyd ^ 
TiVf.aw 









348 Benjar ' •,;!«■ 1 . . 

347 Howaid Alexander Paticrs. ; 

346 Williara Haywood Rnffin, )r 

346 Lee Ovennan Gregory 

349 V/Jlliam Donald Cftirnir, 



Wafc«i3T!'* f^t: 



103 Andrew Henry Patterson 

170 Charles Staples ManRum 

174 Archibald Henderson 

180 Edward Verdon Howell 

193 William Stanley Bernard 

241 Joseph G.d>v 

244 George How 

246 Joseph Hyde Pratt 

266 Frank Porter Graham 

272 Patrick HearyWlnston 

286 Hany Woodbum CI 

288 Joseph Lenoir Chau i 

307 Winiam Reynolds Allea 

319 WiUiam Watley Pearson 

320 Samuel Moore Schenk 



George Farrar Parker 
Clem Bolton Holding 
Tltbmas Felix Hlckerson 
Robert DuVal Jones 
Calvert Rogers Toy 
Dudley DeWitt Carroll 
Jesse Harper Erwin, Jr. 
Frederick William Boye 



Frank Shepard Spruillj Jr. 
Warner Meriwether Lewis 
Ralph Van Landingham, Jr. 
James Saunders WiUiaajson 








M 
















5^^^;'^^ 







./•'■;.;N.'*;'.<;; 










Eht dorgnti's Ifpah 



iirmbrra 

James Bell Bullitt, \i.D. 

JOHN Manning Booker, Ph.[^. 

William Morton Dey, Ph D. 

Edwin Greenlaw, Ph.D. 

James Holly Hanford, Ph.D. 

Clarence .Addison Hibbard, A.M. 

\ViLLiA.M DeBerniere McNiDf » Mn 

Lucius Polk McGemee, ,^.B 

Oliver Towles, Ph.D. 

Charles Thomas Woollen 
Joshua Tayloe John Duncan Shaw 

Marcus Edward Bizzell Rufus Little LeGrand 

George Lewis Wimberly John Haywood Hardin 

Claude Clinton Ramsay John Norwood 

Frank Robbins Lowe George Dillon Morris 

liiWARD Morris Whitehead Daniel Lindsey Grant 

Benjamin Bunn Wimberly Henry Burwell Cooper 

Isaac Da\enport Thorpe Eric Norfleet 

.Allan Ramseur .Anderson 



Three Hundred Forty-three 



•YACK YACK" 



^ 




Mtmbns 

Class of 1883 
Henry Horace Williams 

Class of 1905 
Charles Thomas Woollen 

Class of 1909 
Frank Porter Graham 

Class of 1914 
Joseph Lenoir Chambers Edgar Ralph Rankin 

Class of 1910 
Francis Foster Bradshaw Merrill Parker 

Class of 1917 
Herman Glenn Baity Oliner Gray Rand 

Class of 191 8 
Joe Burton Linker 

Class of 1919 
Edwin S.amuel Lindsey 

Class of 1920 
CoRYDON Perry Spruill 

Class of 1 92 1 

William Hayavood Bobbitt John Hosea Kerr 

Daniel Lindsay Grant John Duncan Shaw 

Beemer Clifford Harrell Frederick Carlyle Shepard 

Three Hundred Forty-Jive 



I, 



"f^*^ 



VACttmY YAOK! 



♦ 




^i»? 



-~ J»' fn 






UnHYioxuTi to h-avnan "kVrtd " 



:"yv/- 




i ^ 



r 




MiTsden Bellimv 



Ralph Clay Put 



Blount, Booe, Cobb, Cooper, Ficklin. Faulkner, Grimes, Grandin, Harv. 

McKimmon, Powell, Ogburn, ShamT.u/gtr, Stmdwiek. Taylor, Townsend 



" 




1 . 



^igma MpHtlon 



Founded at the University of Sorth Carolina and X'anderbiU L'niversity. iqob 

Colors: Dark Green and Cold Flower; Jonquil 

Publication: The Journal of Sigma L'psilon 

®bb Number (Eltaptpr nf i'tgma Ipatlnn 
Jfratrfa tn iFarultalf 

William Stanly Bernard. A.M. Edwin Greenlaw, Ph.D. 

John Manning Booker. Ph D. .Archibald Hentjerson, Ph.D. 

Norman Foerster. Ph.D. Frederick Henry Koch. A.M. 

George McFarlant) McKie. .A.B. 

3Pratrra in Uinucrattat? 



John Lee Aycock 

Herman Glents' B.mty 

Walter Reece Berryhill 

William Legette Blythe 

William Donald Car.\iichael, Jr. 

Pall Elliott Green 

William Durham Harris 

John Hosea Kerr 

CoL\ IN Theodore Leon.^rd 

Edwin Samuel Lint>sey 

William Dougald McMillan 

WlLLI.AM 



Edwin Matthews 
Charles Leslie Nichols 
Charles J.ackson Parker. Jr. 
Neal Yates Ph-^rr 
Garland Burns Porter 
.Alfred Luther Purrington 
Charles Wiley Phillips 
Corydon Perry Sprlmll 
Wilbur White Stout 
John Skally Terry 
DoN-NELL Van Noppen 
Robert Wunsch 



Three Hundred Forty-seven 



•>'" 










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lE^atlnu 


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Colors; /^eJ amy B;i(4^ Flower: VVi.s(i.'ria 

iFarultyi IHrmbrrs 

Francis Foster Br.^dshanv Willlam Moss, D.D. 

Archibald Henderson, PhD. William Watley Pierson, Ph.D. 

Clarence .Addison Hibbard, A.M. Henry McGilbert Wagstaff, Ph.D. 






jflcmbpra 




Stuart O. Bondurant 
Charles T. Boyd 
Bryant C. Brown 
Daniel L. Grant 
Willi.^m E. Horner 
WiLLiARD P. Hudson 
Lawrence W. Jarman 
B. Bailey Liipfert 
Marion \V. Nash 


Charles W. Phillips 
Perry D. Priest 
Charles I. Taylor 
Tyre C. Taylor 
John Skally Terry 
Yasou Toketoni 
DoNNELL Van Noppen 
Claude J, Williams 
William Robert Wunsch 




Three Hundred Forty-eight 







i^i 



.-^ 



ally? mhtt 0f B\^?xks 



-Uton Hampton Robin^r.^ . , 
Jtilius Jenniugs Wade . . . , 
V's 
James LeGrande Everett 
Komulus Zachariah Linney 
Cbaries HaU Ashford 
AQm MarshaU McGee 
Howard Holdeniess 
Clayton Giles Bellamy 
James Pickett Leak 
WHliam Grimes Clark, Jr. 
gustus Owens Downing 
;iver Harrison. ABen 
William Oscar McMuIJac 
Thomas Harribon Shepard 
Marshall Yoimg Cooper 




The rnocing finger write*: and having writ. 
Moves on: Nor all your piety nor wit 
Shall lure it back to earu-el half a line, 
Nor a:l your tears wash out a word of it. 




R. A. Spalgh 
J. W". Daniels 
G. v. Den-NY 

D. R. HODGIN 

W. S. Bernard 
W. M. Dey 
F. H. Koch 



B>atijrB 



J. D. Shav 

G. L. WiMBERLY 

R. W. Proctor 
LeGrande E\erett 
George Howe 
Edwin Greenlaw 
G. M. McKie 



Three Hundred Forty-nine 



rVACKETY > 




William H. Ruffin, Jr. 
Benjamin B. Liipff.rt 



"Bill" Allen 
"Raby" Allen 
"Charlie" Ashford 
"J. T" Barnes 
"Jim" Battle 
"Eddie" Bizzell 

Clayton Bellamy 
"Dan" Boney 
"Billy" Carmichael 
"Cart" Carmichael 
"Suey" Cochran 
"Squash" Cooper 
"Bill" Clark 
"Beanie" Crayton 
"Tanny" deRossett 
"Gus" Downing 

Paul Edmundson 

John Eller 
"Doug" Elliott 



iflrmbpra 

LeGrand E\erett 

Lee Gregory 
"Bob" Griffith 
"Chick" Holderness 
"C" Holding 
"Pat" Hunter 
"Sam" Jenkins 
"Bobby" Jones 
"Pick" Leak 
"Dick" Lewis 

Bailey Liipfert 
"Icy" Little 

Roland McClamrock 
"Monk" McDonald 
"Jack" McDowell 

Allan McGee 
"Midget" Morris 

John Norwood 
"Piggie" Parker 

Neal Pharr 



President 
Manager 



"Chuck" Pharr 

Ralph Price 

Luther Purrington 
"Claudeo" Ramsay 
"Jimmie" Ragsdale 

Alton Robinson 
"Bill" Ruffin 
"Sam" Schenk 
"Turk" Shaw 
"Mighty" Smith 
"Whit" Sledge 
"Toddy" Spaugh 

Ralph Spaugh 

Frank Spruill 
"Josh" Tayloe 
"Ike" Thorpe 
"Doc" Whitehead 

Saunders Williamson 
"Buck" Wimberly 
"Jim" Wood 



Three Hundred Fifty 



Alan B. Wright 
John G. Proctor 
Augustus O. Downing 
Clayton Bellamy 
Haywood Edmundson 
Alton H. Robinson 
James Y. Kerr 
Julius J. Wade 
Isaac D. Thorpe 
Rufus Hunter 
William H. Gaither 
Dwight Brantley 
William J. Yates 




William D. Harris 
James T. Little 
Wood W. Williams 
Lenox Gore Cooper 
George P. Hunt 
John C. Cheeseborough 
J. C. Pass Fearrington 
Lawrence V. Phillips 
Alan M. McGee 
William M. Transou 
Charles G. Lee, Jr. 
Frank Hooker 
Lloyd P. Williams 



'YACKETY YACK: 




John D. Shaw 
John H. Hardin 



"Bl'll'i" MacMillan 

"Al" Williams 

Plss" Hooker 
Joe" Brewer 
John Mitchell 
Eric Norfleet 
John Kerr 
Waverly Hester 

"Ram" Anderson 
Lenox Cooper 

"Ed" Hughes 

"Jess" Erwin 

"Bill" Poindexter 

"Barnie" Douglas 



Oll^p dabtn 



President 
Secretary 



John Hardin 

F. E. Carlyle 

W. P. Anderson 
■Jake" Wade 
"Chappie" Lee 

John Shaw 

Watts Hill 

Rlfus LeGrande 
"Pete" DuBose 
"Jack" London 

Ralph Van Landingham 
"Zach" Linney 
"Pass" Fearringtin 
"Blnny" Wimberly 
"Chess" Woodall 



R. B. Crawford 
Walter Hook 
Bingo" White 
Allan Wright 
'Al" Orr 

Cubby" Alexander 
Dwight Brantley 
Raymond Craig 
Bob" Wright 
Bill" Hagood 
Rab" Wearn 
Da\'e" Sinclair 
Rob" Proctor 
Jack" Cheeseborough 



Three Hundred Fifty-one 



— YACKETY YACK 1 

tl 


1 
1 




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(Utittl lEugin^^rtug ^ortptg 


©flfirrrs 




S. C. Austin ..... 


Pre.siiifnf 


N. P. Hayes 


Vice-President 


T. B. GuNTER. Jr. 


Secretary 


O. E. Martin ....... 


Treasurer 


jHputbpra 




AuSBAND, G. A. Fanning. F. D. 


Phipps. L J 


Bacon, F. R. Fischel, L \V 


Speck. T W . Jr 


Barnes, J. B. Foushee, J. M 


Stephenson. 1. J. 


Boyd, R E Hartshorn. M L 


ViCKERS. W. G. 


Broach, J. B. Hook, W. W. 


Wearn. J. S. 


Coffey, J. N. Johnson. B. W. 


Webb. Graham 


Clawson, J. P. Kenney, S. E. \V. 


Wicker. M. E. 


Cross, W. T., Jr. Knox. E. M 


Wilson, L. G. 


Darden, R. D. Lassiter. L. 1. 


Wright, R. H. 


Doyle, W. H., Jr. May, R. C. 


Wytmne, G. B. 


Edwards, C. Mobley. J. W.. Jr. 


Prof. N. A. Paul 


Engstrum, E. F. Morton. R. J. 


Prof. T. F. Hickerson 


Engstrum. T. G. Noe, K. B. 


Prof. T. Saville 


Norwood, John 




Three Hundred Fifty-two 







1 -YACKETY YACK 1 




^ ^ '-> r^ ^ ^ ^ '-^ wk 






j^uMmmmmimm. 




■f 'V » ' t , 1 , ,#'% a 




L t^t^tfUf nrifl 
















(§f&tnB 


J. W. Harrell .... President 


C. D. Beddingfield ........ Vice-President 


J. L. Cobb .......... Secretary 


G C. SlSKE ... .... Treasurer 


Upmbrrs in JParultg 


John Grover Beard, Ph D. Edward Vernon Howell. Ph.D. 


iipmbfr0 


SENIOR PH.ARMACY CL,\SS 


C. D, Beddingfield H. N. Guion E, L. Reaves 


J. L. Cobb J. \V. Harrell H. H. Robbins 


Otho C. Edwards E. L. Padgett G C Siske 


A. M. Gibson 


JUNIOR PH,^RMACY- CLASS 


\V. P. Baker H. T. Hicks E E. Moore 


B. B. Black C. H. Hunt J. C. Mundy 


E. B. Bristow J E. Johnson W. B. Phillips 


F. G. Brooks D. L. Jordan H. W. Richardson 


R. V. Burgess L, M. Lamm R. M. Rimmer 


F. E. Campbell R. E, Langdon A. P. Turnmire 


C. V. Davis D. M. Li\tngston H. S. Utley 


Lee F. Furr W R. McDonald A. D. Walker 


J. P. Gamble N. O. McDowell. Jr. J.A.White 


J. S. Glenn M. B. Melvin J. C. Williams 


J. A. Guiton E. D. Millaway R. M. Willis 


H. W. Harris W. W. Miller C. W. Wrike 


Three Hundred Fifty-three 





rVACKETY. YA*:k: 






# W iflf VI f» ▼ '' 






Atttprtrau JnatttutP nf iElrrlnral lEnginFprB 

llntuprsttg nf Nnrth (Earnltna Iranrli 



p. C. Smith 
M. E. Lake 
T. B. Smiley 
R. A. Tillman 



Adickes, W. 
Allston, W. F 
Alsop, W. S. 
Bowman, E. F. 
Brown. G. 
Brown, L. P 
Bryson, T. D , 
Butt. W. H. 
Casper, R. M. 
Charles, W. J. 
Daggett, Prof. 1 
Dalton, p. H. 
Dauchtry, E. \\ 



Jr. 



©ffirrrs 



Mtrnhns 



Dellinger, E, E. 
DuBosE. D St P 
Finger, G. T. 
Foots. \V. F. 
Freeman. O. W. 
Giersch. O L. 
h.-^rding. w. k. 
Hinson, T. E. 
Humphrey. 
Iacocks. T. 
Key, D. E. 
Koontz, R. 
Larsen, T. 



B. E. 



Wells, 



Leftwich. M. F. 
Lehm.^n. E. E. 
LlLES. L P. 
Mauney. C. G. 
McIntyre. L F. 
Meyer. G M. 
Michal. J. W. 
Moore. W C. 
Mustard, Prof. J. H. 
Paull, Prof. N. M. 
PiCKLER, \i. R. 
Pless, E. J. 
PuRSUR, J. R., Jr. 
D. A. 



President 

\ ice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



R.AY. F C 
Seyffert. G. F. 
Smith. C F 
Smith. C L'. 
Spauch. F. M. 
Stuart, G. S. 
Sumner, J. D. 
Thompson, E. A. 
Thompson, R. A 
Thompson, W. 
Vance, J. A. 
Ware, F. S. 
Waugh, H. E 



Three Hundred Fifty-four 



Lee Ovcrmaa Gfego:7;' 
Isaac Bear Ne-v^maa . 
Joseph Aitira McLean. 



Msmbsts 



Walter Reece Benyhill 
Bryant Council Brown 
Jaiaes Loais Cobb 
Jesse Harper Erwic, Jr. 
liaaiel Lindsey Grant 
Perry Granville Grant 
Lee Overman Gregory 
David Jacobs 
John Hosea Kerr, Jr. 
Beajaain Bailey" Liipfert 



Frank Robbins Lowe 
Joseph Altira McLean 
Angus Monis McDonald 
Isaac Bear Ne-R'maa 
Alfred Luther Purringtan 
Peter Augustus Reavis, Jr. 
Edwin Earle Bives 
Wiiliam Asbiirj' Rourk 
Dcnnell Van Noppen 
Lloyd Preston Williams 



La^rsaee Girard Wflson 



:yacke yack: 




A. E J. dlub 



(iffi«ra 



D. C. BONEY 






President 


O. G. Rand 






Vice-President 


DwiGHT Brantley 






Secretary 


E. \V. Tenney . 




MttabttB 


Treasurer 


Allen. HOth Inf. 


W. D. Hk 


Ris. !4in,l F. A. 


M. B. Prescott. U. S. S. Pittsburgh 


. Allston-. U. .S. N. R. F. 


M. R. Ha 


SH-4W. ind Div. 


E. K. Proctor, 8Ist Div. 


. Anderson. 341st lof. 


W. G. He. 


D. v. S. S. S. C. 


W. A. Redfe-^rn. 304th Am. Tn. 


. Andrews. 318th F. Sig. Bn. 


P. W. Heb 


M.\N. 113th M. G. Bn. 


H. C. Reneg.ir. U. S. N. 


. Arhowood, 8th F. A. 


F. G. Her 


RON, M. C. U. S. N. 


M. A. J. RosEMAN, 8nd Bat. T. A. 


Aycock. 3i4lh Inf. 


.1. W. Hon 


EVCl TT. 30th Div. A. of 0. 


A. F. RowE, U. S. S. Caesar 


. B.ilTV. 1st Armv Am. D. 


D. W. IsE 


»R. 4th Div. 


F. C. Shepard, 6th Bal. Sq. 


B.iTTLE. 119th Inf. 


R. E. .I.iM 


3. 105th .Supplv Tn. 


M. L. Shepard. 331st Inf. 


. B.ITTLE. 48th Inf. 


T. E. JoNP 


s USth F. A. 


C. I. SiLl.N. U.S.A. Amb. Service with 


. Bell. IMth Inf. 


W. B. Jon 


ES, 148th Engrs. 


A. L. Smith, B. H. No. 65 


. Brown. U. S, S. Maui 


J. Y. JOHD., 


N. Am. Vice-Consul, Brest. Fran 


e F. S. Spruill, SSnd Inf. 


J. B. BiLLiTT, B. H. No. 65 


S. B. Lee. 


6th Reg. F. A. R. D. 


H. L. Stephens. 318th M. G. Bat. 


. CARROLL. ■iSrd Engrs. 


G. H. Leo 


VARD. Silst Inf. 


C. I. Taylor. SSind Inf. 


. C.iSH.lTT. i6th Inf. 


T. P. L... 


n 3->3r,l F H, 


R. L. Thompson, Jr., 6th JIarines 


. Cooper, lioth Inf. 


0. E. Mvi 


II-. .Vh M.innes 


H. R. Totten. 318th F. A. 


:. Cornelius. 113th F. .\. 


R. A. M , 


- 1 H F. A. R. R. 


Oliver Towles 3iind Int. 


. COHNW.iLL, A. of 0. 


N. 0. y\. 


'1 \ K F. 


A. P. TfHNMiHE. 5l«nd Engrs 


. Crisp, 40Snd T. B. 


D. C. .M. 


1 -.-..-■.. .IJM Inf. 


Bryon Warren, ^!nd Div. 


cA. CCEBIE, 140lh Inf. 


J. S. .MiT( 


iell. 311th Div. 


J. T. Wells, linih Inf. 


. Downing, U. S. S. C. C. iiu 


J. B. MiLi 


ER, A\r Service 


L. T. West, V. S. S. Utah 


FuRR, U. S. N. 


E. E. Moc 


RE. 10.5th Engrs. 


R. L. Whitmire. C. a. C. 


;. Golev. ISOth Inf. 


A. M. Mo 


SEH, 318th F. A. 


W. E. Wiles. I . S. M. C. 


Goodwin. 6th Marines 


Ehic i\ori 


LEET. 116th Inf. 


J. C. Williams. 115th M. G. Bn. 


ON Green, 56th Pioneer Inf. 


J. E. iNoR 


Ris. 306th Am. Tn. 


L. P. Willlujs. a. a. Service 


deR. H.^milton. Armv Ed.Co 


r.G. F. P.lR 


<ER. 344lh Inf. 


Thoius Wilson, ioih Engrs. 


. H.«iilton, 118th Inf. 


F. M. P.« 


TEHSON. 113th F. A. 


G. L. WlMBERLY. Transport Service 


H.^RMON, USth F. A. 


L. V. Phi 


LLIPS, 115th Engrs. 


J. B. WoOLSEY, 318tb M. G. Bat. 


3. H.tRRELL, 4th Corps A. P. 


N. R. Pit 


TMAN. U. S. Marines 


C. W. Wrike, ISOth Inf. 



Three Hundred Fifty-five 



rVACKETY YACK" 




(Ull? ilaanmr Qllub 

(§ptn to all iiaatpr UlaHnna in tlip Hmwrattg 



Mtmbeta in iFaruUg 



John J. Davis 
C. E. Green 
Edgar W. Knight 



R. B. Lawson 
S. E. Leavitt 

S. I. SiLIN 



H. C. Amick 
H. G. Baity 
Frank D. Bell 
Leo Carr 
R. L. Dickson 
G. L. Donnelly 

J. D. DoRSETTE 

0. C. Edwards 

1. V. Giles 

O. S. Goodwin 
E. C. Johnson 



Mptttbpra in Mniupraity 

W. B. Jones 
L. I. Lassiter 
J. B. Linker 
H. M. MacCauley 
W. E. Matthews 
N. H. Merritt 
Z. L. Merritt 
C. H. Oliver 
\V. L. Pool 
VV. A. Prout 
R. M. Rimmer 
B. N. Roberts 



W. T. Shaw 

A. L. Smith 

I. W. Smithey 
R R. Speed 
J. W. Taylor 
J. S. Terry 
A- D. L'nderwood 

B. P. Warren 
G. S. Wilson 
Thos. Wilson 
F.'R. Yarborough 



Three Hundred Fifty-six 



•YACKETY YACK" 




(5l|f iCatttt-AmFrtran OIlub 



M. B. Prescott 
P. A. Reavis, Jr. 



©ffirpra 



President 
Secrelarv 



Braswell. J. C. 
Bryson, H. J. 
Cathey. S. M. 
Chappell, H. D. 
Caudle. C. B. 
Cooper, J. H. 
Crowson, O. F. 
Daniels, J. W. 
Downing, D. G. 
Edmundson. H. 
gullick, j. g. 
Grissette, F. a. 
Hamer, Douglas 
Hannah, W. T. 
Holt. P. K. 



MinxbvTB 

Hudson, W P 

HONEYCUTT, C. B- 

Kaiser, H. L. 
Kerr, J. Y. 
Leavitt, Dr. S. E. 
Martin, L. D. 
Mustard, Dr. J h 
Miller, J. B. 
Owens, A. B. 
Parham, S. J. 
Pierson, Dr. W. V 
Pickens, W. A. 
Poindexter. C. C. 
Prescott, M. B. 
Priest. P. D. 



purrington, p. p. 
Re.ams, S. H. 
Rea\ts, p. A., Jr. 

ROBBINS, G. B. 

RowE, A. F. 
Shaw, J. D. 
Shepard, F. C. 
Spencer. J. C. 
Staley, .a. W. 
Taylor, T. C. 
Teu, S. B. 
Thorpe, I. D. 
TiLSON, W. E. 
Wiles, W. E. 
Wilson, O. L. 



Three Hundred Fifty-seven 



:yackety YACK' 



^nulh Olarnlitta OIlub 




(Oft'uinfi 



L. M. Nelson 
R. E. James 



President 
Secretary and Treasurer 



3Ftsl)burn (Ulitb 




®ffirprfl 



R. W. Morris 

J. C. WOODALL 

A. M. McDonald, Jr. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



Three Hundred Fifty-eight 



:yackzty YACK" 



W. E. TiLSON 

J. M. Brown 



ilara fill CHIitb 




©ffirpra 



President 
Secretary and Treasurer 



Alamanrp CUouutij (Elub 




©fitrrrs 



Boyd Harden 

W. C. GOLEY 



President 
Secretary and Treasurer 

Three Hundred Fifty-nine 



rVACKETY YACK" 



AttHnn Ql0unti| Qllub 




©ffirrra 



E. T. Edwards 
H. L. Dabbs 



President 
Secretary and Treasurer 



lunrnmbp domilij (Uhib 




©ffirrrs 



Dan Hodges 

W. E. TiLSON 



President 
Secretary and Treasurer 



Three Hundred Sixty 



:yacke^ r yack; 



Olabarrua OInuntg Qllub 




(Dffirrra 



A. M. WiDENHOUSE 

R. P. Bell . 



President 
Secretary and Treasurer 




Harold C. Corpening 
Fellx a. Grissette 
Clyde A. Hedrick 
Addie Lee Bradshaw 



©flEtrpra 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Three Hundred Sixty-one 



:yackety yack: 




M. A Hill . 
J. P. Clawson 



©fltrpra 



President 
Secretary and Treasurer 



(Cljatliam Olnimtjj (fflub 

m '-'. r) 




(iffirpra 



j. d. dorsette 
Arthur H. London 

Three Hundred Sixty-two 



President 
Secretarv and Treasurer 



:yackety yack: 



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W. B. Harrell 
W. H. Harrell 



President 
Secretary and Treasurer 



Sautbaon OInmttg OIlub 




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J. R. Raper 
Chas. Lancaster 
E. C. Hunt . 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



Three Hundred Sixty-three 



:yackety yack: 




©ffirpra 



J. S. Massenburg 
P. A. Reavis, Jr. 



President 
Secretarv and Treasurer 



(^UBtan (Eouutg Qllub 




C. T. Boyd . 
S. R. McClurd 



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President 
Secretarv and Treasurer 



Three Hundred Sixty-four 



•YACKETY YACK: 



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C. T. Leonard 
E. E. Rives . 
R. F. Anderson 



President 

\' ice-President 

Secretarv and Treasurer 



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W. T. Hannah 
W. R. Francis 



President 
Secretary and Treasurer 

Three Hundred Sixty-five 



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^mhnBan Olnuutg Club 




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R. L. Whitmire 

L. v. HUGGINS 



President 
Secretary and Treasurer 



3^nMi Olnunty (Ulub 




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A. R. Anderson 
R. O. Deitz . 

W. E. OVERCASH 



President 

\ ice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



Three Hundred Sixtx-six 



rVACKETY YACK: 



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E. H. Martin 
William Yates 
Henry Duls 
J. T. Penney 



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President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Nortl|ampt0n (Enuntg (Elub 

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E. L. Boone 
Eugene Brown 



President 
Secretary and Treasurer 



Three Hundred Sixty-seven 



:yackety yack: 



(inalnui-3lonp0 (Enmttii OIlub 

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Frank Thompson 
S. L. Venters 



President 
Secretarx and Treasurer 



(irangf Olouutg Ollub 




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L. J. Phipps 

D. C. McLennon . 

Miss Nell Pickard 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretarx and Treasurer 



Three Hundred Sixty-eight 



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gpit&pr Qlnuntij OIlub 




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J. D. Johnson 
C. L. Moore 



President 
Secretary and Treasurer 



f m (Enunty (Elub 




M. B. Prescott 
D. G, Smith 



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President 
Secretary and Treasurer 

Three Hundred Sixty-nine 



:yackety yack: 



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J. M. ROBBINS 

R. C. Pike . 



President 
Secretarx and Treasurer 



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J. P. Leak . 
Chas. McMullen 



President 
Secretarx and Treasurer 



Three Hundred Seventy 



•YACKETY YACK: 



Unman OInuntij OIlub 




B. I. HOFFNER 

L. M. Casper 

E. M. SWEETMAN 



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President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



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J. C. Cowan 
C. G. Grose 



President 
Secretary and Treasurer 

Three Hundred Seventy-one 



•YACKETY YACK" 



^ampHon (County dlub 




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P. D. Herring 
M. M. Jernigan 



President 
Secretary and Treasurer 




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A. G. Griffin ........ President 

W. A. Redfearn ....... Vice-President 

J. L. McEwen ..... Secretary and Treasurer 

Three Hundred Seventy-two 



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•YACKETY YACK: 



Battr? (Enunlt) (Elub 




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H. B. Cooper 
T. P. Gholsom 



President 
Secretary and Treasurer 



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C. S. Coffey President 

W. E, Comer \' ice-President 

H. E. Waugh ..... Secretary and Treasurer 

Three Hundred Seventy-three 



•YACKETY YACK' 




Colors: Blues 



Flower: Morning Glory 



ill? "NFU^r- Again" Ollub 

Founded Every Year 
Publications: Annuals 
1 92 1 Chapter N. A. C. 

3Fratrpa in Irbp N. f . 

Otto May 



iFratrra ICabnrpH 

Baker, Jones, Hausauer, Inc. White Studios 

Minneapolis Bureau of Engraving 

Boyd Harden Joe Ervin 

?£ piunbuH llnum 

J. Speed Massenburg 

Iritftpr nan Arbntrn 

G. Burns Porter J. Thomas Barnes, Jr. 

S. Martini Whedbee 

Three Hundred Seventy-four 



:yackety yack: 




■YACKETY YACK' 



3natntrtnr0 

Major Frederick \V. Boye P. M. S. & T. 

Sergeant James P. Bennett E. M. D. L. Assistant P. M. S. & T. 




THE R. O. T. C. COLORS 




(Eaipt ©fftrrra 



George V. Denny 
Jesse G. Yates 
George W. Eaton 
Thomas G. Murdock 
Matthew LeF. Hartshorn 
Harold G. White 



Captain 

First Lieutenant 

First Lieutenant 

Second Lieutenant 

Second Lieutenant 

Second Lieutenant 



Three Hundred Seventy-six 



•YACKETY YACK" 



l^Hfrtif (§fCittvB Olratntng (tnvps 

Iniuprattu of Nortt| (Earnltna 



ROSTER OF MEN ENROLLED BY CLASSES 



Adams, J. E. 
Allred, C. M. 
Ambler, J. V. 
Atkins, C. S. 
Aycock, a. p. 
Barrincton, J. M 
Baum, F O 
Blake. O P. 

BiRKHEAD. J W. 

Booth, M. E. 
BosT, E. A. 
Bostick, S. 
bowden, m. c. 

BoWDEN, B. S 
BOYLES. A. 

Britt, C. R. 
Brown, D. A. 
Butler, A. D. 
Byrum, a. G. 
Capps, H. S. 
Caviness, B. S. 
Chaney, F 
Coffey. J. N. 
Cornwall, A. M. 
Cowan, C. E, 



First Year Basic 

Davis, E. J. 
Deviney, E D 
DuLS, H. D 
Eaves, R, S. 
Eustler. R. B. 
Faucette. W. J 
Ferguson. W. J. 
Fields. C. M 
focleman, h. s. 
Freeman, J. N. 
Gregg, J. M. 
Griffin, H P 
Hare. R B 
Hedrick. E. L 
Hill. J. A. 
HuGGiNS. L. v. 
Hunt. W. B. 
Johnson. E. J. 
Jordan. M. M. 
Kistler, a. R. 
Lamm, L. M. 
Laney, F. a. 
Lothery, E. F. 
McCall, J. V. 
McCoy, M. C. 
McDonald. P. C 



Mann. B. F. 
Matthews. P. Y 
Millaway. p. D. 
Moore. L H. 
Moore. N. G. 
Patrick. J. Q. 
Prescott, O. E. 
Presnell. W. C. 
Ranson. M. D. 
Ray, F. C. 
Reid, G. L. 
Roberts. G. L. 
Seyffert, G. F. 
Shakell, a. F. 
Smithwick, J. E. 
Stillwell. H. C. 
Talton, W. J. 
Turnage, J. 
Turner, C. A. 
Underwood, A. D. 
Waters. J. S. 
West. J. D. 
Whitehurst. v. N. 
Whittincton. C. T. 
Windley. J. L. 



Allen, C. M. 
Aycock, F. B. 
Aydlett, J. H. 
Bradford. J H 
Butler. D. C 
Cunningham, D. C 
Dabbs, H L. 
Dry, C. H 
Folton, R. L. 
Fronerberger. p. C. 



Second Year Basic 

Gambill, W. J 
Gray, R. L. 
Halsey, L. K. 
Harrell, W. H 
Hartsell, E. H, 
Havner, a. S 
Holmes. C. C 
Honeycutt. G M 
Huss, W. H. 
Kimborouch. J. W. 
McAuley, O. C. 



Mason, C. E. 
Matthews, C. L 
MiTCHUM, W. C. 
Parker, W, V. 
Pemberton, a. L. 
Scruggs, W. J. 
Stribling. J. W. 
Taylor. L. B. 
Yarley. C. B. 
Young. V. V. 



Brunson. H. L. 
Bullock. H. H. 
Cashatt, I. W. 



First Year Advar\ced Course 

Chappell. H. V. 
Eaton. G. W 
Griffith, J., H. 



Hartshorn. M. LcF. 
Lambeth. H. L. 
MURDOCK. T. G. 



Secorxd Year Advanced Course 
Denney. G. V. Yates, J. G. 



Three Hundred Seventy-eight 




M 




.T 




THE TAR HELL 



Volume XXI 



CHAPEL HILL, N. C, TUESDAY, JULY 5, 192L 



Number 9 



GREAT SPEECH HEARD 



FAREWELL FEAST HELD 



THE READ 'EM 'N' WEPT 



Varsity basketball Manager, Joe 
Person, delivered an address Satur- 
day night to the whole student 
body, which had assembled in the 
gymnasium for the purpose of hear- 
ing him speak. Manager Person is 
one of the few really influential and 
brainy men on the campus, and he 
has the rare good fortune of know- 
ing this fact himself. Besides these 
mental and social graces he is one 
of the South's leading Gym men, 
holding among other honors the 
World's Collegiate record for stand- 
ing on his head. His only rival in 
this line was Theo, the Thug, the 
great Whatisit, whose endurance 
capacity in this line puzzled medi- 
cal men the nation over, and who 
was dissected upon his death to 
determine the cause of his mirac- 
ulous power. 



{Continued on Page 3) 



FRONEBERGER FALLS 

Adolphus X. Froneberger, the 
pride of Carr-Barn, has returned to 
the Hill aftera week's sojourn in the 
great metropolis of University 
station. He brings back a tale of 
persecution and prosecution at the 
hands of the slick city folks. It 
seems that in the heart of this roar- 
ing vertex of humanity there dwelt 
a maiden whose fair form and face 
but barely cloaked a vampirish soul 
of sin. One day she observed young 
Frondy walking the streets and 
noted his rustic look and also his 
roll. She dropped her hankerchief. 
Our hero gracefully returned it to 
her with a gentlemanly bow. He 
gazed into those cruel fascinating 
eyes. He was a ruined man. 

Broken in heart and finances he 
stumbled back the railroad track to 
Carrboro. The world was cold and 
cruel. The birds did not sing in the 
high tree tops any longer. She 
had lured him into an ice-cream 
parlor and he had spent his last 
cent buying her nut Sundaes. When 
the last cent of his fortune had slip- 
ped into the cash register she gave | 
him the cold shoulder and went out > 
on the street to find another victim. 
Her husband ran the shop. 



Smith Building Monday after- 
noon was the scene of a farewell 
banquet to Candidate Moore, the 
great politician, just before his de- 
parture into the cold, cruel world. 
, S. M, Turner, erstwhile his deadly 
enemy in campus politics, forgot the 
old feud for the time being and in 
one of his well-known orations gush- 
ed forth the virtues of the Candi- 
date with tears starting from his 
eyes. It was an emotional moment. 
Hardened sinners wept silently on 
their shirt tails, while life-long tee- 
totalers bellowed for strong drink. 

After the speaking a banquet was 
held on the third floor of Smith 
Building. The first course con- 
sisted of hard-tack and corn whiskey. 
Delicious onion sandwiches fol- 
lowed accompanied by Brown's 
Mule Chewing Tobacco, and the 
dinner was completed by Pre-Di 
punch served in old hair-tonic bot- 
tles to give it a distinctive flavor. 
One Eleven cigarettes were handed 
around and an enjoyable smoker 
was held. 

After the feast Ed. Meisen- 
heimer, as toast-master, called upon 
several of the notables present for 
short talks on timely subjects. 
Charlie Phillips elucidated for 
fifteen minutes on the gentle art of 
Moonshining; Yegods McMichael, 
the hero of the A. E. F., gave a 
lecture entitled: "And two more 
Germans bit the dust", or "Half- 
Shot". Reece Berryhill spoke 
shortly on "The Mysterious Red- 
headed Bootlegger". Dan Grant 
ended the informal discussion by 
an insight into the matter of draw- 
ing to in.side straights. 

The denizens of Smith then ac- 
companied the candidate to Carr- 
boro en masse. En route Alec 
Miller gave several inspiring sel- 
ections on trombone. Just before 



Page J) 



C. HOLDING 

Elected President 

BIG FOOT CLUB 



W. Reece Berryhill, Tyre C. 
Taylor and D. Dice Daniels are 
taking their meals in the village 
lock-up at present as the results of a 
raid by Jug Whitaker, the local 
sleuth, upon the basement of the 
Baptist Church. They were all 
caught red-handed in an interesting 
game of Carrboro tiddle-de-winks 
and were sentenced to thirty days in 
the city pound. Yegods McMicheal 
is taking Berryhill's place on the 
student council until his release. 

The details of the capture are the 
most thrilling in the annals of the 
local police force. It seems that 
for several weeks they had been 
enjoying and profiting by the com- 
pany of John Kerr, who at last was 
driven to the wall by constant 
losses and forced to give them a 
worthless check. As a result of 
this Berryhill had him called before 
the student council and he was given 
one more chance to win the money 
back or to go to jail. He accepted 
the proferred chance and the student 
council i'djourned to the basement 
of the Baptist Church. The bones 
were produced. Berryhill seized 
the ivories. He crapped. Tyre 
Taylor crapped. Daniels made t\vo 
passes and then crapped. Kerr 
grabbed the dominos. With expert 
hand he rolled seven after eleven 
'til even the redoubtable Daniels 
blushed for his skill. Soon Berry- 
hill and Taylor began to grow short 
of change. Kerr comes out with 
"Little Joe" and Berryhill throws 
his shoes in the pot. Kerr rolls 
"Little Joe" and grabs the shoes. 
Thirty minutes later Kerr's op- 
ponents all needed barrels. It was 
at this juncture that the famous 
sleuth put in his appearance ac- 
companied by Oscar the Ethiopean 
Herring Hound. Kerr escaped but 
the other gentlemen could not and 
were captured. 



GREAT CATASTROPHE 

STIRS STUDENT BODY 

Mew Movement to Meet Situation 

(See Page Thirteen) 



THE TAR HELL, JULY 5, 1921. 



THB TAR HELL 

OrFICL\L ORGAN OF THE CAROLINA SPIRIT 



Published When The Spirit Moves Us 



Editor — William E. Horny 
Assistant Editor — W. Ambiguous Horny 
Managing Editor — W. Agnostic Horny 
Assassination Editor — Willie Lenine Horny 
Associate Editor — W. Eddie Horny 
Business Manager — W. IzzY Horny 



You buy everything advertised in the TAR HELL at your own 

risk. We are not responsible for any patent 

medicines or political candidates 



Vol. XXI 



Chapel Hill, N. C, Tuesday, July 5, 1921 



No. 9 



EDITORIAL 



When I first saw with startled and incredulous eye that outburst of 
boyish glee, which was directed at the Carolina Haymakers, I immedi- 
ately attributed it to the constant inbibing of the corn when it is white, 
which is a method used today and yesterday by all manner of geniuses 
to obtain a kind of an inspired style. It certainly inspired this young 
fellow's style. I sympathize with him as I do with every struggling young 
journaUst and at various points in his career I have tried to give him 
some constructive criticism. He really ought to do the bulk of his writing 
between the third and fourth drinks and not wait for the inspiration of 
the seventh weary drink that has wended its way into his pickled system. 

The last outburst of his, however, which is to be read in this i-ssue, 
is a more serious thing, and the learned man by reading between the 
lines can see where our young hopeful has forsaken the white and beaded 
fluid for Predigested Beef Juice and Ed. Pinaud's Lilac de France. His 
violent threats and ragings are suggestive of Bay Rum. Its effect on the 
infant intellect can be plainly seen. 

It is to be trusted that in the future he will confine himself to the 
orthodox substance and be more moderate in his use of the same. Doing 
this and applying himself with diligence some fourteen or fifteen hours 
per day to the study of Journalism at the end of twenty or thirty years 
he should be practically able to hold an apprentice position as cub-re- 
porter on the Chapel Hill News. 



DESIRE FOR CHANGE 

ENVELOPES CAROLINA 

Old Regime Doomed 

The Old Regime must go! By 
the Old Regime we mean every- 
thing. Now that we have decided, 
let's consider. Too many years 
the campus has struggled under the 
minions of Capital. Charlie Woolen 
must go, No, he musn't go. He 
must hang. Yes, hang to the 
highest limb of the old Davie 
Poplar. J. X. Warren must die 
also. Frank Graham's death sen- 
tence has already been passed. He, 
too, is a conservative. Jimmy Bell 
and Smithev are doomed. To the 
block with "Billy Noble! Daggett 
shall be electrocuted. Lear shall 
follow likewise. All the faculty 
must perish. Only Prof. Green 
shall live. When he has blotted all 
out we shall bring in nothing short 
of the real warm stuff to teach young 
CaroUna, and have De Red Hodgin 
head of the philosophy department. 



Issues Challenge 

.\11 those who criticised mj- criti- 
cisms of the Carolina Pla\Tnakers 
are none other but an ignorant 
bunch of hypocritical parasites. 
After carefully questioning all the 
really great literary lights of the 
campus in regard to the merits of 
my critici.sm, I am now able to state 
truthfully and modestly that it is 
the best article that has ever ap- 
peared in the Tar Heel. J. W. 
Turnage, the great literary critic of 
the Freshman class and future Vice- 
President of the Booloo club, said 
so himself. 

Only those whose taste for good 
dramatics has been drugged and 
blunted to insensibility by the 
maudlin sop thrown out at the 
Pickwick can fail to see the utter 
absurdity of the whole affair. 

J. Holly Hanford, seeks for 
personal ends to discredit my 
blushing art. To him and all other 
corrupters of innocent merit I issue 
the following challenge to see 
whether they are men of determina- 
tion or if they have a yellow streak: 
Shotguns, at three paces on the 
stadium at midnight! 'Tis thus the 
true artist ever avenges his art. 



THE TAR HELL, JULY 5, 1921. 



Page Three 



POTTER'S FIELD 
TOPICS 

By Long Bill Jo^"E^? 



Miss Castoria Jenkins Saturday 
morning at six-thirty became the 
blushing bride of Mr. Booker T. 
Lincoln, jjrominent society man of 
Potter's Field. The service was 
performed by the Right Reverend 
Augustus G. Jabbo, pastor of the 
27th church of the Holy Rollers 
Somnombulant. The bride wore a 
suede dejeuner trimmed with mal 
de mere and carried a large boquet 
of dandelions. After the ceremony 
the couple left for an extended bridal 
tour of Carrboro and other foreign 
ports. 



E. Clyde Hunt, student attend- 
ing the University of North Caro- 
lina, was captured in Carrboro the 
other night and charged with being 
a Democrat. He was hailed before 
the Justice of the Peace and given 
his choice between signing the 
pledge and lynching. After three 
attempts at suicide he was finally 
released on account of being non 
compres mentis. 



Charles G. Koniac is on an ex- 
tended business trip to Northern 
cities for his uncle Arsenic L. 
Koniac, w-hose still was captured 
Thursday. 



D. T. Redeye has 'em again. 
This time they are pink with green 
stripes. 

Great Speech Heard 

{Continu nt from Page 1) 

No brain was found. However, 
we are sure that this is not the case 
with Joe Person. In addition to all 
of these accomplishments he is a 
man of unusual personal beaut}', 
being in the opinion of all the most 
handsome man in Chapel Hill. 

In his farewell address he re- 
iterated the fact that we all were 
present, that the sky was blue, that 
the girls were beautiful, that the 
gentlemen were not to be allowed 
to sit on the front seat, and in- 
cidentally that Carolina would 
play the Universitj' of Virginia in 
the Gym shortly. 

Having heard this speech, Caro- 
lina could do no other than lick 
Virginia 43 to 12. 




STOP! LOOK! AND COME IN! IT PAYS TO TRADE AT FOISTER'S 



Farewell Feast Held 

[CorUiimed from Page 1) 

embarking on the dinkey the exile 
turned and made what was probably 
his last speech in the neighborhood 
of Chapel Hill. "Fellow-sufferers", 
he said, "I must now lay bare the 
dark secret reason why I am shak- 
ing the dust of your fair village 
forever from vay brogans. Turner 
and I, realizing that the campus was 
too small a place to hold two such 
notables, decided early in the Fall 
term that the one of us who made 
the low grades was to leave forever, 
never to return. Turner received 
two fives and a six, (I suspect him 
of bribing T. J.), while I only re- 
ceived two sixes and a five". Thus 
another master mind flitted intu 
the great unknown. 



J. Dune Shaw 



POLITICAL 



CAMPAIGNS 



Main and Cameron 



TROUBLE? 



SEE 



or "ML" 



WE KNOW THE LAW 



License applied for 





VOTE FOR 




ME 


s. 


M. TURNER 


The 


People's Choice 



"AL. G." FIELDS 

Varsity Horseshoes 

HOKE MARTIN. AGENT 



Page Four 



THE TAR HELL, JULY 5, 1921. 



CONQUERING HERO 

COMES BACK HOME 

Yegods McMichael Given 
Big Reception 

Today Carolina welcomed back 
to her bosom one of her sons who 
for years has been facing the foe in 
far-off France. Returned now 
safe and sound with honor and glory 
Yegods McMichael was given a 
fatting reception by the University. 
Promptly at four-thirty this after- 
noon the parade formed in front of 
the Post Office, headed by the great 
University band personally con- 
ducted by John Paul Weaver him- 
self. Immediately behind the band 
drove a brand new Rolls-Royce, 
bought especially for the occasion, 
in which were seated, Yegods Mc- 
Michael, Harry Chase, Wilhain 
Jennings Bryan, and Josephus 
Daniels. Gayly decorated auto- 
mobiles and floats followed, each 
float bearing a scene representing 
one of the modest youth's exploits 
in France. The floats extended all 
the way from the Post Office to the 
mid-way bridge. They were two 
hours and thirty minutes passing 
the reviewing stand. Behind them 
came the R. O. T. C. 

After he had been presented tn 
the entire student body in Memorial 
Hall, the blushing hero spoke for a 
matter of five hours or so on his ex- 
periences in the army and the proper 
way to run the government. 

Reporters from all the leading 
papers in the country were present 
to cover his speech. 



LOVERS OF MUSIC 

HEAR NOTED PLAYER 



Bringing his audience time and 
again to their feet. Turner Unger, 
the extraordinary guitarist, brought 
down the house in Gerrard Hall last 
night. The concert was given under 
the auspices of the Commission for 
the reUef of starving Polacks, of 
which Mr. Finger is one. All kinds 
of presents were bestowed upon him 
at the concert, including three fine 
heads of cabbage, one large cucum- 
ber and many dozens of fine old 
eggs, which however although be- 
sides were delivered in an unfort- 
unate manner and reached their 
destination intact but did not re- 
main so long after getting there. 

Young Finger can play almost 
anything on a guitar, among which 
are "Casey Jones" and "Over 
There". He rarely ever strikes a 
false note; that is to say, he gets the 
majority of them right. He has a 
great future before him if he ever 
lives down his past. 




5ee ED PINAUD 

FOR^ 

TOILET ARTICLES 

LOTIONS A SPECIALTY 



PHILOSOPHY CLUB HAS 

FREE FOR ALL FIGHT 

Heffner and Daniels 

Produce Storm Center 



The philosophy club met Sunday 
afternoon in its weekly session, 
upon which occasion Charles Boyd 
introduced the following topic for 
hash: Can a man's better self rise 
above himself? Immediately upon 
the topic's being stated, Mr. B. C. 
Brown, eminent member, took the 
floor and made an impassioned ad- 
dress to the effect that a man's bet- 
ter self could do such thing. 

"The Kingdom of God is within", 
shouted Brown. "I say to you that 
man is a transcendent animal, so is 
his better self". The speaker 
looked toward the floor thought- 
fully and sorrowfully. "Now I 
don't know whether j'ou gentlemen 
think I am serious about this or not, 
but I am — I am as serious as it is 
possible for one of my nature to be''. 

Following Mr. Brown, Mr. Dice 
Daniels took the floor. He was of 
the opinion that such was not the 
ca.se: that a man's better .self could 
not rise above himself. That man 
is essentially bound to the flesh, to 
the earthy, to the world. Dice be- 
came quite absorbed in his subject 
and made two or three statements 
not altogether complimentary to 
those who might differ from his 
views. 

Next Mr. John Terry took a 
great portion of the floor and panted 
out an opinion. Mr. Terry was of 
the opinion that both the gentlemen 
who had preceded him were wrong. 
Terry called on D. Red Hodgin to 
hand down an opinion; but D. Red 
said he was not pre])ared to make 
an asseveration at that time, but 
that he was thoroughly in favor of 
change, if that had any bearing on 
the subject. Mr. Hubert Heffner 
rose and said that that did itol have 
any bearing on the subject; that 
Hodgin was a bullsheviki. Hodgin 
replied by charging that Heffner 
was an agnostic, to which Heffner 
answered yes, and that he was 
proud of the fact; that it was a 
broadminded view. 

P. Greene then took his feet to 
defend his good friend, Hubert. 
Dice Daniels came to his feet again 
{Continued on Page o) 



THE TAR HELL, JULY 5, 1921. 



Page Five 



{Continued From Page 4> 

and reminded the club that tho 
subject was one hardly fit for their 
deep cogitation. 'Twas a tense 
moment. Dice uttered words that 
Hubert could not brook and retain 
any semblance of .self respect. 
Hubert replied with more desperate 
charges. There was personal 
questioning. Then Dice yelled: 

"Ve Yokels, I propose that we 
suspend the constitution and settle 
this question in a manly fashion". 
He punctuated his .suggestion with 
deahng Brown a mighty clout on 
the occiput with a chair. Brown 
licked dust of weeks from the floor 
and groaned. The fight was on. 

Good friends glared malevo- 
lently at one another and swore like 
men. Men of philosopliical pen- 
chant called on their gods to defend 
them from the wrath of Dice. The 
moment was too much for mere 
man and Heffner pulled a flying 
tackle and brought Dice to the mat. 
He fastened a scis.sors around Dice's 
manly neck and that pain-ridden 
youth yelled in rage, vituperating 
Heffner in two languages. 

At this juncture Charles Boyd 
became convulsed with laughter 
and rolled from his chair shaking 
with mirth. \Mlhe Horner entered 
the door ju.st in time to see Hodgin 
take a fall out of Brown, who was 
just rising from the effect of Dice's 
wallop. Horner pinned Hodgin to 
the wall and clawed for his eyes. 
Hodgin was beside himself with 
Uvid fury and sputtered in no way be- 
coming to a philosopher, at being 
thus assailed by so insignificant a 
yokel. Yegods McJMichael, a visi- 
tor at the meeting, made a des- 
perate dash for freedom, but found 
his precipitate try for the door 
blocked by P. Greene, who was 
choking with anger but managed to 
say that no man was going to escape 
the terrible consequences of his 
wrath like that; that he did not 
know who Yegods was, but that he 
too must answer for being in at- 
tendance on such a discussion. 
Yegods' ruddy cheek became pallid 
and he begged Green's good wiU 
like a true sufferer. He pleaded 
that he was not at heart a philoso- 
pher; that the present was his first 
offense of that kind; that he had 
never done any creature any harm; 
that he had great plans which such 
a mighty conflict would imperial — 
but Greene was obdurate and hand- 
ed Yegods a fair left to the kisser. 

Continueii on Page 6 



The PickwickTheater 

SATURDAY 

D. RED HODGIN 

Assisted by Dorothy Gish 

IN 

THREE BUCKETS OF BLOOD 



MONDAY 
CHARLE5 CHAPLIN 

IN 

HAMLET OR THE FAIR OPHELIA 

A heart-touching tragedy of Danish Roj-alty — by Bill Shakespere 
Come and see the scheming uncle get it in the neck. 



TUESDAY 
Fred. H. Koch Inc., 

presents 

Raleigh-He Spit on the Ocean 

There is an all star-cast in this play including Long Bill Jones and 
the original Bad-eye. The dramatic talent of these artists lay long 
hidden and it remained for the Koch Co. to bring forth their latent 
merit. 



NOTICE 



Please refrain from dropping Ughted cigarettes down the backs 
of the ladies sitting in front of you. Xo gentleman would do such 
a thing. Please do not throw any missiles larger than half-bricks 
as such stricking other than students on the head might cause 
serious injury. 



First Show 6 :43 



Second Show 8:00 



Mary Pickjord al ihe Piano and Doug. Fairbanks sells the Helmets. 

COME ONE— COME ALL 



Page Six 



THE TAR HELL, JULY 5, 1921. 



(Continued From Page. 3) 

Yegods yelled in mingled pain and 
rage and went to the mat with 
Greene, fighting valiantly. Greene 
tried his best to produce another 
tragedy. 

At this point Dice had succeeded 
in breaking the terrible scissors that 
Hubert had been holding on his 
neck while they fought. Dice rose 
like one drunk on home brew and 
dashed through the door, not taking 
time to open it and taking panels 
with him. The noise of the crash 
was more thnn .Inhn Terry's make- 
up coulil ^hiihl Mild he crawled from 
his iiaiiiful |iiisilion beneath the 
table and tuuk the window at a 
single bound. The glass crashed as 
J ohn hurled his three hundred pounds 
avoirdupois against it. It so hap- 
pened that Dice was just rounding 
the corner as John came to earth. 
Right here was the single serious 
accident of the fray. John landed 
on Dice. John is in the Infirmary 
suffering from three kinds of con- 
cussions and two sprained ankles. 

The fury of the meeting burned 
itself out after several minutes of 
action. Some members departed 
in haste as they were able to disen- 
tangle themselves from the mass. 
Others limped off with visages con- 
torted. All are expected to be in 
trim for the next meeting at which 
time the subject for discussion will 
be: Is Chapel Hill a suitable spot 
for a philosopher to flourish and will 
Swine Hall lend itself to true 
Epicureanism? 



Fanned onward by a gentle eve- 
ning breeze, learned Lipsus, the 
dear little culi-rcpuiter, this after- 
noon i-(iiidusccii<l('il t(i intiTvicw a 
few of the Senior supcrlativrs for 
the Tar Hell. The Editf)r-in-Chief 
wishes to take this opportunity to 
thank him for his kindness. Inter- 
views follow below. 

With mingled awe and admira- 
tion I approached the door of 
Walter Reece Berryhill, who is the 
one and only great "I AM" of the 
campus. Timidly I knocked on his 
door and expected to be rudely 
ordered away. On the contrary it 
was opened by a kindly old gentle- 
man with a pair of horn rimmed 
eyeglasses and an inspired breath. 



"Come in" he said, "Berryhill is 
waiting on you". I went forward 
and shook hands with the celebrity. 
"You are from the Tar Hell, doubt- 
less?" asked Berryhill. I nodded. 
"Then you will be in a position to 
give us a little publicity doubtless?" 
I didn't doubt it. "Well", he said, 
"if you will guarantee the publicity 
I will guarantee the interview". I 
guaranteed it. The interview will 
ajjpear after the Spring elections. 
"Berry" is the best all round and the 
liest egg. I don't .see how he beat 
John Terry for the first named 
position, but it is easy to see how he 
got elected to the last after having 
had close acquaintance with the 
good old Swain Hall eggs. 

J. L. Cook was my next victim. 
I found him in his study, studying 
himself to death by stud.ving. He 
is the most studious student in the 
Senior Class. He learned to read 
when he was .six month- oM ami liy 
the time he was three ii.ul.l ~|Hak 
seven languages including pruiune. 
However he ilnes not let liis studies 
interfere with liis athletics and plays 
an exceptional hand of poker. 

"Runt" Lowe, the athletic bull, 
also began specializing early in his 
career. They had to put him in a 
straight-jacket before he was out of 
the cradle and they say he cut his 
teeth on a broken bottle. Notwith- 
standing these features he is an ex- 
cejitionally bright young fellow and 
writes articles for the magazine. 

The most energetic and popular 
man in the Senior Class is of course 
"Scrubby" Rives. He displays a 
great deal of energj' leading cheers 
at the games and in getting to din- 
ner on time. He beheves in the effi- 
cacy of prayer, in drawing to inside 
straights and in standing Ace-high 
with the ladies. 

Legette Blythe got elected the 
best writer in the Senior Class. It 
is a good thing for him D. Red 
Hodgin, one of poets of passion, 
wasn't a Senior. 

Dan Grant beat P. Hettleman out 
for the best business man, but P' 
says, "I should worry. Who gar- 
ners the most shekels. 

Bill Bobbitt is the big noise 
aroiHid this place. The best debater 
and the best orator in his class he is 
still discontented because he was 
not elected prettiest. For Wilham 
is ambitious. No star is too high for 
him to hitch his wagon to. He is 
going to be President of the United 
States some day. He admits it 
himself. 



John Kerr is the most dignified 
politician in the Class of Twenty- 
One. He wields the clique. They 
are his soul and body. However 
John is a pretty honest sort of a 
pohtician and never resorts to any- 
thing lower than blackmail or 
bribery. He is a success at his busi- 
ness too, for he defeated the power- 
ful machine which .lohn Shaw had 
•spent all his rollej;e ilays in building 
to elect himself to that office. 

The writer found Will Ruffin 
busy powdering his nose for the 
dance that night at which he was 
to be guest of honor. Will is one of 
our handsome boys and promises to 
eclipse Cleopatra some day. He 
also found Bill busily engaged in 
mending cameras and engaging in 
a running argument with Hubert 
Heffner over the merits of the latter 
for the position which he holds. 

Roger Ogburn was at work on 
his newest invention which is to do 
away with all forms of machinery 
when it is perfected. Roger was 
elected the most original member of 
his class because he passed German 
Three under Dr. Kent Brown. 

I started to go to see Miss Hughes 
to interview her, but lost my nerve 
before I got to the door and so the 
song of her beauty is lost to an eager 
student body. The truth might as 
well be stated here though that she 
was not really elected. That "Puss" 
Hooker was elected, but that one 
of the vote-counters who was struck 
by her beauty tore up all his ballots. 

I found Rufus Hunter doing a 
few fancy dance steps before the 
looking glass. Rufus came here 
originally from Wake Forest, from 
whence he was shipped for toddling. 
Needless to say he is the best dancer 
in the class with the possible ex- 
ception of \V. H. Shine. 

TjTe C. Taylor holds the repu- 
tation of being the witty guy. He 
always has a nifty come-back to all 
the old bites and is the fellow who 
invented the joke about the Ford 
automobile. He is the editor of the 
Carolina magazine and the twenty 
men who read that publication all 
swear he is nothing short of the real 
warm stuff. I don't know about 
that, never having been reckless 
enough of my soul to read said 
magazine. 

The last person I saw on my 
wanderings was Red Robbins. Red 
is said to be lazj'. I couldn't find 
anything much about his lazy 
habits except that he goes to bed 
with his shoes on. 



iiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiininiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 



OLD SERIES VOL. 77 NUMBER 10 NEW SERIES VOL. 13 



May, 1921 

^^^ The New 

Carolina 

Magazine 

IN THIS ISSUE 
Can a Man's Better Self Rise Above Himself? 

By CHARLES BOYD 

The Kingdom of God is Within 

By BRYANT BROWN 

This University Ain't Run Right: The Truth About Carolina 

By WILLIE HORNER. Author of -We are all Going to the Slaughter- 

The Passing of Christianity 

By HUBERT HEFFNER 

Pause, Ye Creatures of Sham, and Harken 

By the RED HODGIN 

Love, Oh Gentle Breath of Venus 

A Poem. By JONATHAN DANIELS 

Death to You and All Concerned 

A Tragedy. By PAUL GREENE 

Politics: A Reviev\^ and Justification 

By TYRE C. TAYLOR— One Who Knows 

Two Where There Were Formerly One 

An Economic Treatise on Shekeles 

By PHILLIP HETTLEMAN 

Progress Number . . . . March 

PRICE—TWOPENCE (If You Are A Sucker) 



The New Carolina Magazine 



Published three weeks late 



Old Series Vol. 77 



New Series Vol. 13 



Board of Editors 
CLASS OF ENGLISH I. 

(We guessed this from the contents) 



Management 
WE DON'T CLAIM TO HAVE ANY 



Editorial 



Anybody'' s Opportunity 



In a few days the regular elections will be staged. In short, the regular spring politicking 
is about to begin. All those who would be successful, harken to the following words, for they 
flow from the pen of one experienced in the above-named art, and proficient in the schemes that 
are to follow. You must have the regular midnight sessions, make individual canvasses, and 
pledge supports. Study the faces in the latest Yackety Yack with care, and be sure to learn 
the first name and nickname of every man in the catalogue. Don't forget to appeal to the regular 
number of prejudices, to tell the regular number of lies — without evil intent, of course — and do 
not mind how many scars you leave behind to remind men in after years of the measures taken 
to elect or defeat them by their fellow classmates. 

Men must be spoken to and called by name who before have passed unnoticed; you must 
pat men on the back who until now have remained unpatted. IVIake it a point to see that the 
business of the drug stores picks up — go to the extreme and feed the voters so that they will go 
away rejoicing and swearing that they have been treated royally. They will remember it on 
election day. Fraternity men should become seized with an attachment for democratic principles 
and be happy to mingle with the proletariat. If you can find enough people to fall for it, try the 
steam-roller method. However, it is best to try all of the above named methods if you would 
be successful, for they have been tried every year with success. — The Editor. 



The True Renaissance 



(Being a fragment stolen from the unread pages of the 

future. The date is 5021. The theme is: Dr. 

Mythians, world renowned Philologist, has 

come down to the site of ancient Chapel 

Hill to give a series of lectures to a 

group of advanced students.) 

Ladies and Gerdleinen:— It gives me a peculiar and 
unique pleasure to talk to you at this time on the True 
Renaissance. Three thousand one hundred years ago 
there flourished on this spot a band of writers and sing- 
ers than which the world has witnessed no mightier. 
On the spot that is now covered by the walls of Allislost 
University, there stood in 1921 the envied and noble 
walls of the University of North Carolina. Within these 
walls flourished in all his splendor. .lonathan Daniels, 



the right follower of Anacheron, Sappho, and probably 
Burns, in the line of succession of the poets of passion! 
Here also lived and wrote P. Greene, who had such a 
varied career on Broadway, the New York center of 
frolic, who eclipsed one Shakespere of the Avon! Here 
also lived and loved and died the amorous writer of plays 
and painter of life, Heffner, whose life was one great 
succession of love that was fire and who put it all in 
those ninety folios of works so well known to you. There 
are others but they will be taken up in turn. 

Daniels, whose boundless spirit still lives on this spot, 
wrote of love. No whit smaller than Sappho's was his 
ardor and his passion. Witness these hues from one of 
his most original and blankest verses: 

"Dark hair and white skin. 

.\ Catholic Service. 

Dark circled eyes. 

Old enamels. 

Luxury. 

Love.'' 



THE NEW CAROLINA MAOAZINE 



What could be imagined more strikingly sincere, 
more truly of life, than those lines that blazen the 
author's name in the annals of literature with rubies 
that will never fade? The lines are from his great piece 
of blank verse, "Flesh Pots". Another bit of pure 
passion in a wilderness of ashes is this; it is from his "I 
see. Love, in Your Wonder Hair": 

"My dearest one, your hair's soft silk 
Is like an ancient lover's hit 
Who playing for his love at night 
Sings all for love and love's delight. 
So let me dream your hair for me 
Was spun by fairies joyously". 
There are two other stanzas to this gem, but you 
can read them for yourselves. They are nothing short 
of the real, warm article. Yes, Daniels belongs with 
that select coterie of Anacheron, Sappho and Burns, 
with the last named running hard to keep up. Justly 
has he gained for himself the name : Sweet bard of 
Purefoy's Creek. 

And then comes Heffner who loved so, who wrote 
so, who died so. Abellard had his Eloise, Dante his, 
Beatrice, Petrarch his Laura, and Heffner his Ro.salind. 
And he wrote of her as no other woman was ever 
written of; wrote of her in his sweet, new- style. His 
works have survived the ages, as well they should have. 
He stood high in an age when men stood high around 
him. He would have been a sohtary luminary in any 
age but his, his age which gave life to such figures as 
Greene, Daniels, Hodgin, and that great reformer and 
philosopher, Horner. Their race was not to gain a 
place beside the great figures that had gone before nor 
to strive for a place by those to follow, but to assure 
themselves of the final resting place for centuries to 
come beside their magnificent contemporaries. And 
they all stand there, alone in their eminence, unap- 
proached by the generations on either side, lonely in their 
greatness. Ah, 3100 years ago there hved men! Men 
who made a true Renaissance, one such that it makes 
that of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries look 
like a lull in the world's advancement, a pause in 
thought. How these breezes that play now in the tree 
tops that have risen from the dust of so noble a race, 
whisper to me to-night of those spirits that still hover 
here! How you young students of so noble a band of 
predecessors are blessed by such a heritage! 

And now we come to Hodgin. Hodgin, that mighty 
name that has rolled down the centuries like some vast 
mountain of thought. And his name also holds the 
mantle of poetry. It is still a source of conjecture to 
those who have gone deep into the life of this golden 
age whether or not he was crossed in hopeless love. 
Take these for study; 

" 'Nought in a name'?' came from the youth — 

'That's older than the hills! 

But tell me why, when I hear Her name. 

My heart with rapture thrills?' " 
This is cited by those who contend that this new 
Demosthenes, w-ho has hurled his thunderbolts down 
through one and thirty centuries, was so crossed, while 
there is a school who contend that he never knew the 
rapturous delights of great love as did Daniels and 
Heffner. They point to this bit which is from a poem 
pubhshed in the same glorious time of his greatness: 



"Oh! how I love the girls! 

Pinch toes and golden curls — 
And all between! 

One that is almost grown, — 

I want one all my own, 

Oh! hear my sad, sad moan, 
I want a girl! 
Now young students, we see here very telling evidence 
of two distinct imports. It is rather for me to give them 
to you for your own consideration than to tell you what 
I think ; but if you ask me what I do think, I shall say 
that my researches in this field have revealed this: 
The last quoted bit was published in the issue of the 
New Carolina Magazine for November, 1920, while 
the first quoted appeared in the same publication for 
February, 1921. This would suggest that in November 
he had not yet found a girl, but that by February 
following, he had found his great love, and his soul had 
burst into song, yea, into everlasting song, song that 
rivals even the impassioned verse of Daniels himself. 

And not only has Hodgin sung for the ages, but he 
has spoken down with the tongue of ages, he has told 
men how to live, have told them in words of fire that 
they are paying tribute to the shrine of sham. The 
world has moved apace since Daniels sang and Hodgin 
roared with his message to men, but it has followed 
the train pointed to by this Luther of his age. Hodgin 
now sleeps in a peace that came at last, but it must 
do his soul good to see that men have heard his 
message aright. 

And so, youth that lives in the shadows of the mighty, 
yours in an enviable heritage. Look back through those 
one and thirty centuries at the boundless dreams of 
those men and fit yourselves to bear the torch. Carry 
on. Show yourselves worthy of such pioneers. Take 
up their message and their song and shout them to the 
generations to come * * * To-morrow we shall take up 
some of the works of these masters in detail. Go in 
peace * * * 

A Review of Noteworthy Books 
on the Campus 

THERE have appeared recently on the 
campus quite a number of really big 
books from the pens of local authors. 
It is very gratifying to note the excellence of 
the productions of the local writers, and there 
is all the evidence in the world that we have 
the Renaissance right here with us. There is 
no doubt but that future ages will look back 
at us with reverential awe and point not to the 
sixteenth centiny. but to the twentieth as the 
great age of rebirth. They will look at us with 
the perspective of thousands of years and the 
names of some of our chosen singers of song 
and writers of romance will stand out as beacon 
lights along the glittering trail that Hterature 
has broken throughout the ages. 

Prominent among the books that have ap- 
peared recently is the masterlj' and exhaustive 



THE 



NEW 



CAROLINA MAGAZINE 



treatise of politics by Mr. John Duncan Shaw 
entitled "What College Politics Will Do For 
You". Shaw has given a life to the study and 
experience of this subject and his efforts have 
yielded abundant proof thereof. The intro- 
duction was written by Mr. Tyre C. Taylor, a 
man no less fitted than the author himself. 
They are both at theii' best in this book, and 
we find them revelling in their favorite field. 
In the introduction Mr. Taylor alternates in 
mood from the jocular to the sarcastic, while 
Mr. Shaw holds a rigid sedateness throughout 
the book. Quite an addition to the political 
works of the year. 

Another book that everybody is reading at 
this time is Dr. J. Holly Hanford's scholarly 
treatise entitled, "When Mihon Winks His 
Eye". This is easily the most original and in- 
teresting addition to the Miltonian letters of 
the last sixteen years. Dr. Hanford holds a 
facetious pen for the first part of the ordeal but 
when he begins to expatiate on Paradise Lost, 
the pressure gets too high and you can literally 
hear him snoring between the hnes. He de- 
votes two liundred pages to a sprightly dis- 
cussion of whether the old Puritan winked his 
right eye exclusively or whether we was wont 
to alternate it with his good left. He finally 
comes to the conclusion that he doesn't know, 
due to the utter improbability of fragmentary 
evidence. It will be recalled that Dr. I. G. 
Long, surmaned "Slick" by the Literati, came 
to about the same conclusion in his monmnent- 
ary works of the subject which appeared about 
a year ago. Dr. Long is no insignificant 
scholar in this field, and when he speaks we 
all wake up. Now Long came to one con- 
clusion that Hanford contests in his present 
treatise; namel.y, that there is sufficient evidence 
to prove that Milton was crossed-eyed and 
that this being so, it is a tenable view to say 
that he often winked his left eye when he 
thought he was winking his right. Dr. Hanford 
scores this point quite sharply by quoting the 
entire poem of II Perseroso. Dr. Long also 
made the point that John wore a mask, point- 
ing to the appearance of this word directly 
after one of his titles, namely, "Comus". Dr. 
Long argues that this is really of an autobio- 
graphical nature and should be read: "Comb 
us, but first remove our masks". Dr. Hanford 
frankly admits that he is at sea on this point, 
but will not make such an admission aljout his 
other points. 



We have had quite a number of plays of the 
first order during the past few months; shining 
among these is Dr. Fred Koch's seatrical drama 
entitled, "Raleigh, He Spit on The Ocean". 
This is a brilliant work and portrays the spirit 
of Raleigh admirably. The theme of the drama 
is this: Raleigh, a handsome busk courting 
outrageously with the (jueen, falls in love with 
a bright-eyed lady in waiting. He shifts his 
love making, but the cunning ciueen learns of 
it and has him sent to Ireland to learn a lesson 
in ruling at home, whereupon Raleigh becomes 
so exasperated that he spits on the Atlantic 
Ocean to show his exceeding wrath at the gods. 
The drama as a whole is probably more de- 
signed to catch the favorable eye of the news- 
papers than to add to the historical field in 
anyway. But the newsboys were right good to 
it. One of them wrote a re\'iew for it and he 
gave the author great laud for his highly dra- 
matic ending in which Sir Raleigh comes out 
on the front stage and chnching his fists says: 
"And so to show my wrath to the gods, I will 
spit great mouthfuls of goo;! old Mrginia to- 
bacco juice all over the ocean!" A skilfully 
handled scene. 

Dr. Hubert Heffner's latest play, "Dod Cast 
The World", has proven an excellent sequel to 
his first play in which only two were gasted. 
It is a gigantic propaganda play in which two 
major tenents are made dynamic. The first is 
this: the utter instabihty of human endeavor; 
the second, since there is sin in the world, down 
with the world. Dr. Heffner finally works 
around to his climax in which he shows graphi- 
cally that the workl should be gasted by having 
his characters all shooting at the moon with 
a pop-gun. (^ther plaj's from his pen are: 
"How ^lucli Monev Is A Handful of Dimes?"; 
"The Cedar Bn-d'sMate"; "The Whichness Of 
Thus"; and a few others. 

Mr. D. Red Hodgin has placed on the market 
a beautifully bound volume of verse. Mr. 
Hodgin chose as his opening ode, a few lines 
inscribed to Spring, entitled: "Ah, Spring, 
I Hear You Come On Scented Wing". Another 
which has attracted my attention is, "I Want A 
Girl". Mr. Hodgin shows a marvelous faculty 
of saying nothing in a whole lot of words. It is 
great poetry; you can read it all day without so 
much as a single thought. It never harmed 
anyone and never will. He has mastered the 
style of blank verse and has gone a long way 
toward proficiency in the free variety. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

NEWS L E T T K R 



MAY 15, 1925 



CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



VoL XIII, No. 13 



New Movement Very Favorable At Tliis lime 

John Terry Meets John Washburn 
at Carrboro and Spills News 

John Washburn is just back from 
five years in orient . He was met at 
Carrboro by John Terrj', who told 
him of the progress of the great 
movement which was started on the 
campus in 1921. Following is an 
account of the meeting between the 
two Johns as covered by a News- 
letter reporter. 

The Carrboro limited rolled in 
amid a swirl of dust and cinders. 
The anxious face of the seasoned 
conductor peered from the platform 
as the limited came to a standstill. 
John Washburn, standing at his 
elbow, asked him if the train was 
indeed standing still and if it were 
safe to alight. The conductor as- 
sured him that it was. John stepped 
off and was hailed by John Terry. 

"Hello, John, so you are still 
here?" said Washburn. 

Terrj' moved toward him, larding 
the lean earth as he walked along. 

"Greetings, John", he panted. 
"Yes; I'm still here. I have seven 
more courses to get off before I have 
credit for everything in the cata- 
logue." 

"I'm certainly glad to see an old 
face", Washburn smiled. "Tell me, 
what has happened .since I left'?" 

The two gentlemen fell into step 
and began looking for a hack. 

"Well, you remember the great 
movement started back in 1921? 
Yes; well, it is coming along wonder- 
fully. They have a committee at 
work now getting some of the best 
men in the coimtrj' to come over 
and help us. Turner is chairman of 
the committee. And say. Turner 
is the stuff. Up to date they have 
been able to get acceptances from 
man}- notables, including such men 
as Hoover and Gene Debs." Mr. 
Terry paused and breathed a bit 
before continuing. 

"Yes; Hoover has been obtained 
as head waiter at Swine Hall. He is 
already on the hill and has some 
men at work cleaning the knives and 
forks. Gene Debs has promised to 
come up and take charge of the 
sociology- department as soon as he 



has finished a previous contract in 
.Atlanta. Irvin S. Cobb is going to 
have the chair of English; he has 
already given a large order, thru the 
book exchange, for Blum's .Almanac. 
He is going to give a seminar in 
Blum's this winter, for which course 
I am registered up. Turner himself 

1 is offering a splendid course in folk 
play writing. I'm taking it. 

"We have been very fortunate in 
getting Admiral Sims to take com- 
mand of the swimming pool in the 

I gym. He is installing a new system 
of showers. General Pershing now 
has charge of the R. O. T. C. He 
has two full squads of freshmen and 
drills them eight hours daily. Theda 
Bara is Kenan Professor of welfare 
working. She has added life to the 
campus. Jeannette Rankin is dean 
of co-eds. Trotsky is professor of 
education, with D. Red Hodgin as 

; assistant. Willie Horney is official 
campus statistician. Connie Mack 
is head coach of baseball. Einstein 

I is head of the math department. 
W. B. Wilson has taken George 

1 Pickard's place. 

"We are especially proud of the 
great things being done at the Pick. 
Doug Fairbanks is taking up tickets 
while Mary Pickford is making a 
great hit at the ticket window. 

i Fatty .\rbuckle is usher; he also 

I fans ladies who have fainted when 
the}- get het up during a tense 
moment of the picture. Bebe 
Daniels plays the piano; .she's 
the honess of the campus. You 
must hear her play: 'Oh, do be a 
Daddy to me'. 

"Now, in the administration we 
have Lenine for dean of students. 
Ole man Bradstreet himself is regis- 
trar. Mc.\doo has Warren's old 
job and he certainly handles the 
shekels to the queen's taste. Of 
cour.se you know- that Woodrow 
Wilson is president. The adminis- 
tration is working in complete har- 
mony with the campus; the only- 
case of discord to present was when 

I old man Bradstreet jumped on 
Herbert Hoover for ser\-ing sour soup 
at Swine three times on Sunday. 

"Thomas .\. Edison is in charge 
of the electrical engineering depart- 

I ment. .\nother great improvement 
over the old system is the election 
of Yegods McSlichael as permanent 



president of the student council. 
He has held this post for two years 
now and has acquitted himself w-ith 
glory. He tried to ship Fatty .Aj- 
buckle for conduct unbecoming a 
Carolina man the other day; but 
Fatty pled that one of the boys had 
sprinkled some home brew on his 
shirt front while he was looking the 
other way and that he was not him- 
self while he was running amuck. 
Yegods let him off with Fatty's 
telling him who the man who had 
had the home brew was. 

"The firm of Grosset and Dunlap 
has taken over the book exchange. 
Robert W. Chambers is teaching 
philosophy. W. J. Bryan is teach- 
ing pubUc speaking. H. G. Wells is 
holding down the job of professor 
of history. He has been on the hill 
for three weeks and has been in a 
mamouth bull session with .Archi- 
bald Henderson for the entire time. 
William H. Taft is dean of the law 
school. Old man Grandgent is head 
of the Romance Languages depart- 
ment. Ibanez is ha%ang a great 
time teaching Spanish, being ably 
assisted by Prof. Green. Albert S. 
Burleson has been appointed post- 
master. Fairfax Harrison is station 
agent at Carrboro. 

"Theda Bara has already begim 
a splendid lab course for her wel- 
fare workers. She has divided the 
dormitories up into districts and 
two workers are placed in charge of 
each of the districts. One clorm 
constitutes a district. Prof. Bara is 
very well pleased with the progress. 
Lillian Russell is teaching domestic 
science. Paderewski is head of the 
music department. Hiram Johnson 
is Kenan Professor of political 
science. Tom Watson holds the 
chair of rural sociology. Yes; we 
are doing great things". 

John Terry has lost two pounds 
in the last month ; however, he hopes 
to gain them back as he has changed 
boarding houses. 

Hiram Johnson was caught opera- 
ting a home brew plant in his 
kitchen last week. Yegods Mc- 
Michael has Hungry Hi's case under 
consideration. He will probably be 
put on probation. 

Prof. Bara was ad\ased to add a 
little length to her skirt by the co-ed 
club a few days ago. 



Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Dear Pa: Sept. 22, 1920. 

Well here I am safe and sound at last and I didn't let any of those slick city 
guys in Raleigh skin me either. I come mighty nigh losing my way though and I 
don't know what I would of done if they hadn't been another feller up here in the 
Union Depot what was going to Chapel Hill too and had already been there be- 
fore and knew the way. He said he u'as Soph. O. Moore. I asked him was he any 
kin to old man Zeke Moore what runs the grist mill down the crik a piece below 
Salter's store. He said he wont, but I think maybe he must be one of his cousins 
or supmthin bekawse he sure does resemble him. Kinda short, slender, red-headed 
little feller with a mean look in his left eye. He had a room up to Chapel Hill last 
year and he is going to sell me a fine almost brand new radiator cheap. There was 
a lot more fellers going down there for the first time like me, only they didn't have 
as much sense as I have got. 

We changed the train for another instrument at University Station, which is 
the only place in the United States where you can buy Coca-Colas for 5c. We had 
many exsiting advenchures on the way: one time a poor cow laid down on the 
track and died and the pilot thought she was asleep and waited six hours for her 
to wake up. Another time the wind got to blowing too strong and we couldn't 
make no headway. When we landed it was not at Chapel Hill but at a wild and 
unsilvilized town named Carrboro. Moore showed me the tree where they hung 
four poor fellers in 191b for voting the democratic ticket. He showed me the big 
distillery they have got there disguised as a cotton mill. It shore does hang over 
the old copper kittle out in the smoke house. Pa. 

When I got off the train a big nigger comes up and takes my trunk check away 
from me and then a tall feller with the rear end of a seegar in his mouth grabs me 
by the arm and shoves me into one of these new-fangled contrapshuns which re- 
sembles a Ford but ain't. He musta just took out a life-insurance politic and by 
golly by the time we reached Chapel Hill I wish I had one too. 

1 got off at the Y. M. C. A. and thanked the man nicely for bringing me here, 
it certainly were kind of him. I turned around and started to go in when a feller 
named Graham, I think he must be the constable or deputy sheriff, grabbed me by 
the arm and said in a low tense whisper that you could almost hear, Carolina men 
pays the War Taxes ". I give him a quarter and he wanted a quarter more. I give 
it to him. 

It is time to go to bed now. My trunk hasn't come up from the station yet 
but I am going to spend the night at the house of the Ky Yi fraternity bekav\se the 
boys invited me out there. It is a pretty house with big white pillows holding up 
the front porch on the main street. There is only one bed empty and a guy named 
Harry Chase is sleeping in that hut they said he wouldn't mind me spending the 
night with him as it is a big bed. 

Well, good-night. I an tres beans, as we say at Carolina. Hoping you have 
got three too, your intilektewally inlitened offsprung. 

So. Green. 

Three Hundred Ninety-two 



Here is an interesting specimen 
of "inspired'' literature 



Dear Agnes: 



Chapel Hill 
The other day. 



Victory! At last I have conquered the table, the vile, treacherous table, the 
table with the green eyes that has been looking cross-eyed at me^ To you, fairest 
one of all the Russias, belongs the victory. I crown your \ision with a wreath of 
corkscrews! Ah, I remember well the swell little forget-me-nots that you used to 
season our tea with. I would write to you of love wild and wooly but for the 
bureau. It is in conspiracy with the night, and is growing longer and longer and 
always sliding to the left. The pink mice are all right; they run up and down and 
blend nicely with the wall paper. The pet elephant has turned against me, but I 
have him locked up in the closet and can't get out. Red is under the bed chasing 
the squirrels so I thought it would be a fine time to write to you. 

In regards to the other people, give them my regards, as for you, keep them. 
Always beware of Orange county corn, Gertrude, it will betray you when you need 
a friend most and after it has thrown you it will swear it never did it. I know. I 
know everything. I have infinite knowledge. I only go to college out of kindness 
to the professors. I regard them with condescension, for only the great can afford 
to be foolish. Greatness itself is only nine-tenths publicity and one-tenth insanity. 
I am great. Napoleon and Joe Person are great men also. I concede it. Only the 
great can recognize perfect greatness. But I digress. I have been digressing ever 
since I began. 

Will you marry me, Susan, for better or for worse? Say the word and we will 
build a sweet little igloo up in Eskimo where we can shimmy through life. If not, 
life is an utter misery to me and nothing is left fo me to do but die fighting for the 
freedom of the Fiji Islands. 

Give my love to the gold-fish, 
Percy Tight. 



Three Hundred Ninety-three 



Haw River, N. C. 

Wednesday 
My Dear Dr. Chase: 

I take my pen in hand and sit down to w rite >ou a little note just to tell you 
how much I enjoyed my stay at your University during the past nine months. I 
want to thank you for your kindness and personal attention which you gave 
through your professors and Student Council. 

You see, I thought you would be interested to know just how much good my 
education has done for me already. Why Dock, I am the whole cheese around 
Haw River now. Why men, women, and children all cry for me like they do for 
corn, cardui, and Peter's castoria, to ask my advice on every kind of subject. They 
say that since I have got so much education in one year that when I get through 
your University they are going to make me run for mayor. I have been thinking 
how you can come down and delix'er my inaugural address; but as John Bunyon 
said, or was it Johnny Booker, "Dont count your chickens before they hatch '. 
You know the Bible says that "all things come to him who will but wait", so if you 
will but wait long enough, Dock, you may see me mayor some sweet day. Give 
my love to all the alme martyrs at Carolina, and remember when she needs my 
help I am ready, waiting to answer her every beck and call. 

Most dutifully, 

"^'our devoted student, 
So. Green. 



Three Hundred Ninety-four 




GrTliosfi 

T@ 

,l2)\fIKTiSE 



TliKlTA^irlg/^g) 



— \/! ^ 





395 



YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



COLLEGE -CUT SUITS 

for 

YOUNG MEN 

Markham - Rogers Company 

Tailors • Furnishers • Clothiers • Hatters 

DURHAM. N. C. 



First 

National Bank 
of 

Durham, N.C. 



CAPITAL AND SURPLUS 

OVER 
ONE MILLION DOLLARS 



TOILET ARTICLES 
DRUGS :: SODAS 



The Busy Corner 
Welcomes You 



COLLEGE STUDENTS' 
TRADE SOLICITED 



MAIN STREET 
PHARMACY 

DURHAM, N. C. 



SYNONYMS; 



CY THOMPSON 



AND 



Superior Life Insurance 
Service 



TO 



CAROLINA MEN 









CARR- BRYANT 


OUR 
MAIL ORDER 

DEPART- 
MENT WILL 
BE GLAD TO 
TAKE CARE 

OF 

YOUR SHOE 

WANTS 




A COMPLETE LINE OF 

High-Grade SHOES 

/or MEN, WOMEN 
and CHILDREN 








CARR-BRYANT BOOT AND SHOE CO. 

106-108 WEST MAIN STREET, DURHAM, N. C. 





ELECTRIC 
FIXTURES 



ELECTRIC 
SUPPLIES 



MAIL ORDERS GIVEN 
PROMPT ATTENTION 



Durham Traction 

Company 

DURHAM, N. C. 




ROYALL & BORDEN 
COMPANY 

Corner West Main and Market Street 
DURHAM, N. C. 

FURNITURE 

and 

RUGS 



Agents for 

COLUMBIA GRAFONOLAS 
and RECORDS 



No order too small for our best attention and 
no order too large for correct, prompt service 



''That's Our Boy'' 



Probably there is nothing that so thrills the 
father and mother as does the graduation of their 
son from the University. 

We congratulate the fathers and mothers of 
the Class of 192 1. for their boys ha\e trax'eled a 
long way on the road to success. 

NOW, if you would be admitted into the 
business office on a fa\'orable basis, provide your- 
self with the kevs that will open the door, namelv, 
a BUSINESS EDUCATION. 

We suggest that you send toda\' for a hand- 
some catalogue and full particulars. 

DURHAM BUSINESS SCHOOL 

Mrs. \\'.\lter Lee Lednlm, President 



THE FIDELITY BANK 

DL^RHAM N. C. 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS - - $ 700,000.00 
RESOURCES OVER - - - - $6,000,000.00 

4'-} paid on sa\'ings accounts, compounded quarterh' 

HA\'E YOL' TRIED OUR SLPERB 
BANKING SYSTEM? 



The News and Observer 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
North Carolina's Greatest Daily 



IN THE HEART OF THE STATE 
FOR ALL THE STATE 



JOSEPHUS DANIELS, President 











OUR 
CAFE 

IS 
THE 
BEST 


The 
Yarborough 

Raleigh's Leading 
and Largest Hotel 

B. H. GRIFFIN HOTEL COMPANY 
PROPRIETORS 











O. p. HOPKINS 

RALEIGH. N. C. 






EVENING 
GOWNS 

LADIES' 
APPAREL 











North Carolina State 
College of Agriculture 
and Engineering 

WEST RALEIGH, N. C. 

The State's College of Technology. 
Courses in Agriculture, Engineer- 
ing, Chemistry andTextileScience. 
Teacher Training in Agriculture. 
Short Courses in Practical Agricul- 
ture for Adult Farmers. Summer 
School for Teachers. 

For Catalogue and Illustrated 
Circular, write 

E. B. OWEN, 

Registrar 



402 



ST. MARY'S, RALEIGH, N. C. 

Founded by the Rev. Aldert Smedes, D. D., in 1842 

For the Education of Girls and Young Women 

Eightieth Annual Session Begins September 15, 1921 

"The best education is impossible without a foundation of moral teaching 
which will produce character, and the best education is useless unless directed 
by strong moral principles toward the best ends for the benefit of society." 

"Those things called traditions, which come down from one generation 
to another, in which each new generation of pupils take a pride, belong to 
the very soul of the life at St. Mary's School." 

For Information, Address 

REV. WARREN W. WAY, Rector 



For the Home and the Fraternity there is 
Nothing so Valuable as Music 

We Have That Value in 

PIANOS — PHONOGRAPHS — RECORDS 



Your Wants Provided For Immediately 



J. T. BOWLES MUSIC COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



403 



Pic 



Victrolas 



Sheet and Record Music 



For the home nothing can be more pleasing than a 

VICTROLA or PIANO 

n n n 

Mail Orders for Records will be handled promptly 

nan 
Donnell -Thomas Music House 

RALEIGH, N. C 



"Come to The Vogue First" 
THE 

VOGUE SHOP 

For Men 

D 

Always something new in 
Haberdashery and Hats 

D 
Vogue Suits Me 

RALEIGH 

Vogue Suits Me 



For Dances, Receptions, 
Rallies and Banquets 

write 

. . . The . . . 

J. F. Hatch Orchestras 

Service Guaranteed 

D 
J. F. HATCH 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



404 



PEACE INSTITUTE 

I. College Courses 

II. Courses Preparatory to Standard Colleges 

III. Four Years Preparatory School 

DIPLOMAS AWARDED IN 
Piano, Voice, Art, Expression and Home Economics 

CERTIFICATES IN 
Business and Secretarial Courses 

D D 

MISS MARY OWEN GRAHAM, President 
RALEIGH. N. C. 



Open Day and Night 

Motor Service Company 
of Raleigh, Inc. 

D 

One Minute from Three Leading Hotels 

D 

STORAGE, ACCESSORIES. 
REPAIRS, SERVICE 

D 

24,000 Sq. Feet Floor Space 
Capacity, 200 Cars 



Anything a First-Class Drug 
Store Should Carry 

D 
K claims 

and 

Supplies 

D 

HICKS-CRABTREE 
DRUG CO. 

Raleigh, N. C. 



An investment of permanent value which 
gives everlasting happiness. In choosing a 
Jesse French Piano you not only secure a 
wonderful fine tone piano, but a source of 
pleasure beyond price. 

Columbia Grafonolas 
and Records 




Jesse French Piano Company 
RALEIGH, N. C. 




Get Your Vidrolas 
and Victor Records 

from 
Music Department 

Royall & Borden 
Furniture Co. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 




Bingham ' 









1 — — ^^= ' 

For 

DANCES 

of any kind, write for the 

"Pied Pipers" 








B. F. BUCKLEY 

Yarborough Hotel 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



For the Best Service in the South 
in Comfort, Locate at 

''THE O' HENRY'' 



Cafe Service 
a Specialty 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 




Buy it at . . . 

"ODELL'S, INC." 

Where Quality Tells 

WE ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR SPORTING GOODS 

If it's sporting goods, we have it. Base Balls, Base 
Ball Suits, Bats, Tennis Rackets, Balls and Nets. 
We also carry a complete line of wool sweaters. 



Mail orders have our 
prompt attention 



ODELL'S, Incorporated 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



The Greensboro Daily News 

Should appeal especially to college men and women who are 
interested in advancing North Carolina, not only in an educa- 
tional way, but in an agricultural and manufacturing way. 

Price, $9.00 per year 



WANTED 



An opportunity to tell you how to get into the automobile 
business with very little capital. A Postal Card will bring you 
some interesting information. 

AMER 1 CAN - SOUTHERN MOTORS 

CORPORATION 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



The Jefferson 

Standard Life Insurance 

Company 

GREENSBORO, N. C 



Is proof that in one line of business 
the South can build as wisely and as 
Well as any other part of the country 



INSURANCE IN FORCE 
OVER $163,000,000.00 



409 



FOR TWENTY-EIGHT YEARS 

A Jewelry Store selling merchandise representing supreme skill in 
Gem Carving and Jewel Handiwork 

A store that can fill your every need in the jewelry line 

SCHIFFMAN JEWELRY COMPANY 

Leading Jewelers 
GREENSBORO. N. C. 



BROADWAY CAFE 

Caters to College Men 
OPPOSITE POST OFFICE n D GREENSBORO. N. C. 

GREENSBORO COLLEGE 

The A-Grade Woman's College of the two Methodist 
Conferences of North Carolina 

Classed in Group A by State Board of Examiners. Chartered 1838. Confers the degrees of 
A. B. and B.S. in the literary department, and B. M. in the music department. 
In addition to our regular classical courses, special attention is called to the departments 
of Home Economics. Expression. Art. Education. Sunday School Teacher Training. Piano 
Pedagogy, and to our complete School of Music. Modern new $50,000 Dormitory completed 
1918. Conservatory of Music costing $100,000 to be erected. 

Dr. S. B. TURRENTINE, President, GREENSBORO. N. C. 



OUR MOTTO 
" The Largest Service to the Largest Number" 




BELIEVES 

in co-operation and for that reason has provided its agents 
with a Hne of poHcies that makes it easier to sell 

Our Complete Protection Plan is ideal in that it provides 
protection against 

DEATH • ACCIDENT 

PERMANENT DISABILITY 
TEMPORARY DISABILITY 

WRITE US FOR PARTICULARS 

Southern Life and Trust Company 

Home Office: GREENSBORO. N. C. 
Capital, $1,000,000.00 

A. W. McALISTER ARTHUR WATT H. B. GUNTER 

President Secretary Agency Mgr. 



The Provident Life and Trust Company 

Lowest Net Cost OF PHILADELPHIA Absolute Security 

What an Alumnus says of the Provident 

"I carry insurance in the Provident. . . . An investigation of the 
Provident convinced me that the Company is managed with un- 
usual care, that its mortality ratio and its cost of management are 
both low, resulting in a very low net cost to the insurer." 

HERMAN CONE, Greensboro, N. C. 

What a Professor says of the Provident 

"I am greatly pleased with the insurance which 1 have in the 
Provident. In my opinion the Company more nearly conforms 
to the true principles of insurance than any other company with 
which I am acquainted. I am most agreeably surprised in the 
amount of dividend at the end of the first policy year." 

DR. D. D. CARROLL, University of N. C. 

PAUL W. SCHENCK 

General Agent for North Carolina 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



Hotel Guilford 

and 

Guilford Cafes 

R. T. ROSEMOND, Mgr. 

D D 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 



JVe Sell 
MEN'S CLOTHES 

Men's Hats Men's Shirts 
and all accessories 

D 

The Kind That May be Depended on 
for What You Want 

D 

H. Weil & Bros. 

GOLDSBORO, N. C. 



M. ROBINS C. L. WEILL 

ROBINS & WEILL 

INSURANCE 
SPECIALISTS 



An Insurance Firm That Believes in 
North Carolina and Her University 



The Observer Printing House 

(INCORPORATED) 

Printers and Blanl^ Book Manufacturers 
Office Furniture Office Equipment 

D D 
CHARLOTTE. N. C. 

B. R. GATES, President and Manager 



413 



Largest Automobile Distributors in the^ South 

THE MOTOR CO. 

Offers you service in 

ESSEX . BUICK 
HUDSON 

AUTOMOBILES 




.4 good automobile puts more minutes in an hour 
— more hours in a day — more davs in a vear! 



THE MOTOR CO. 

Distributors 

WINSTON- SALEM, N. C. 




Rosemary 

Manufacturing 

Company 

ROANOKE RAPIDS, N. C. 
Manufacturers of 

COTTON DAMASKS 
YARD GOODS 

PATTERN CLOTHS 

TABLE TOPS 

NAPKINS 



415 



DELIGHTED ! 

Yes, it's a real pleasure to show your Kodak 
Pictures, especially when they are developed 
and printed at FOISTER'S. 

ASK ANY CAROLINA MAN 

Send your Kodak Films for high- class develop- 
ing, printing and enlarging to 

R. W. FOISTER, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Twenty-four Hour Service 
on mail orders. 



Kodaks and Supplies. 
Mail Orders Solicited. 



Statement of the Condition of 

THE BANK OF CHAPEL HILL 

Oldest and Strongest Bank in Orange County 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C 

Made to the Corporation Commission at the close of business, Feb. 21, 1921 
RESOURCES LIABILITIES 

Loans and Discounts - - $523,557.00 Capital $ 25,000.00 

U. S. Bonds 25,000.00 Surplus and Profits - - - 48,952.20 

Other Stocks and Bonds - 10.000,00 Bills Payable 20,000.00 

Banking House - - - - 13,322.00 Cashiers Checks - - - 2,297.42 

Furniture and Fixtures - - 5,250.00 Accrued Interest - - - - 2,941.21 

Cash and due from Banks - 67,992.78 Deposits 545,930.95 

$645,121.78 $645,121.78 

Upon the strength of the above statement and the backing of our Directors 
we solicit your business, promising every accommodation consistent with 
sound banking. No account too small to receive our most careful attention. 

IT PLEASES US TO PLEASE YOU 

M. C. S. NOBLE, Pres. R. L. STROUD, l^ice-Pres. M. E. HOGAN, Cashier 

416 



A. A. Kluttz Company 

n n 

FLORSHEIM SHOES 
SCHOBLE HATS 

A Complete Line of 

WILSON BROS. GOODS 

n n 

A Better Acquaintance Will Net Greater Returns to the Student 



/^r?/ 




Have You 
Mastered 
These ^ 
New ^ 
Words • 

VITAMINE BOLSHEVIKI 

ESCADRILLE ACE 

TAUBE FREUDIAN 

CAMOUFLAGE FOURTH ARM 

TANK BOCHE 

ROTARIAN UKULELE 

SOVIET LORRY 
BRISANCE 

and hundreds of others are defined and 
pronounced in 

Webster's New International 
Dictionary 

"The Supreme Authority" 

Do these words embarrass you ? 

Why not let the New International serve you ^ 

WriUSoT Specimen Page!. Elc. 

G. & C. MERRIAM CO. 

SPRINGFIELD. MASS. 




The University of 
North Carolina 

n n 

MAXIMUM OF SERVICE TO THE PEOPLE 
OF THE STATE 

D D 



A. The College of Liberal Arts 

B. The School of Applied Science 

( 1 ) Chemical Engineering 

(2) Electrical Engineering 

(3) Civil and Road Engineering 
(4l Soil Investigation 

C. The Graduate School 

D. The School of Law 

E. The School of Medicine 

F. The School of Pharmacy 



G. The School of Education 

H. The Summer School 

/. The Bureau of Extension 

( I ) General Information 

(2) Instruction by Lectures 

(3) Correspondence Courses 

(4) Debate and Declamation 

(5) County Economic and Social 

Surveys 

i6l Municipal and Legislative Ref- 
erence 

(7i Educational Information and 
Assistance 

/. The School of Commerce 



D D 

WRITE TO THE UNIVERSITY 
WHEN YOU NEED HELP 



CHAPEL HILL, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



PATTERSON 
BROS. 

DRUGGISTS 



Whitman and Nor r is 
Candies 



GOOCH'S 
CAFE 



EQUIPMENT 
SANITATION 



I 6 Years at Carolina's 
Service 




THE CAMPUS. AT 2 A. M. 



ESSIE BROS. 

Student Headquarters 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



SODA FOUNTAIN 

DRINKS 

FRESH CANDIES 

FRUIT CIGARS 



BILL GOODMAN'S 

University Boot Shop 

1 06- 1 08 George Street 
NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



Originator of College Snappy Footwear 



See local agent: CHAS. LEE 



E. A. WRIGHT COMPANY 

Broad and Huntingdon Streets 
Philadelphia, Penn. 

ENGRAVERS, PRINTERS 
STATIONERS 

Commencement Invitations 
Dance Programs Class Jewelry 

Calling Cards Menus 

Stationery Leather Souvenirs 

Wedding Stationery 



ESTABLISHED IBIS 




©mtlcnifns furnishing ©ooiiB. 



Clothing both ready made and to measure 

Garments for outdoor sports 

Travelers' Outfittings Imported Furnishings 

Hats and Shoes 

OUR TAILORING IS DONE BY SKILLED WORKMEN 

Samples, Prices and Directions for self-measurement 
will be sent upon application 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 
NEWPORT 



O S T O N 

XMONTCOR BOn.STOI« 



WHEREVER Athletic Sports are indulged in. 
IJ(\PALDINI)"I ^^^" '" far-off Japan, China and the Philip- 

vaO/-^/"^ pines, Spalding Equipment is used exclusively by 



the best teams. 

WHEN YOU BUY 

SPALDING EQUIPMENT 

You are to be satisfied, for all defective goods are replaced without 
question. Catalogue mailed on request. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

125-128 Nassau Street 520 Fifth Avenue 

NEW YORK CITY 

And all large cities in the United States 



421 



fin 


W Schloss Bros, and Company 

'fflw Incorporated 


j^ Master Tailors and Designers 


^^^ 


BALTIMORE NEW YORK 




PROGRESS 




Is the spirit of the age — nowhere more noticeable than 




in the SCHLOSS DESIGNING AND TAILORING. 




The "CLOTHES BEAUTIFUL", designed and 




tailored by these celebrated master tailors add 




enormously to the personality of the College Chap — 




they cost no more than the ordinary kind. They may 




be ordered at the College through 




W. B. WOMBLE 



rAYLOft I 

'L/remier QualHu 

TENNIS- GOLF 

BASE BALL 
TRACK. CAM R 

ilEXTAYlORse 




.4 quarter of a century's cater- 
ing to the needs of College and 
School Athletes has qualified 
us to render quality and service 
in athletic equipment of an 
exceptional character. 

CALL ON 

THE BOOK EXCHANGE 

FOR TA^'LOR GOODS 

Alex Taylor & Co., Inc. 




What Is Research? 



UPPOSE that a stove burns too much coal for the amount of 

heat that it radiates. The manufacturer hires a man famihar 

with the principles of combustion and heat radiation to make 

experiments which will indicate desirable changes in design. The 

stove selected as the most efficient is the result of research. 

Suppose that you want to make a ruby in a factory — not a mere 
imitation, but a real ruby, indistinguishable by any chemical or 
physical test from the natural stone. You begin by analyzing rubies 
chemically and physically. Then you try to make rubies just as 
nature did, with the same chemicals and under similar conditions. 
Your rubies are the result of research — research of a different type 
from that required to improve the stove. 

Suppose, as you melted up your chemicals to produce rubies and 
experimented with high temperatures, you began to wonder how hot 
the earth must have been millions of years ago when rubies were first 
crystallized, and what were the forces at play that made this planet 
what it is. You begin an investigation that leads you far from 
rubies and causes you to formulate theories to explain how the earth, 
and, for that matter, how the whole solar system was created. That 
would be research of a still different type — pioneering into the 
unknown to satisfy an insatiable curiosity. 

Research of all three types is conducted in the Laboratories of the 
General Electric Company. But it is the third type of research — 
pioneering into the unknown — that means most, in the long run, 
even though it is undertaken with no practical benefit in view. 

At the present time, for example, the Research Laboratories of 
the General Electric Company are exploring matter with X-rays in 
order to discover not only how the atoms in different substances are 
arranged but how the atoms themselves are built up. The more you 
know about a substance, the more you can do with it. Some day 
this X-ray work will enable scientists to answer more definitely than 
they can now the question: Why is iron magnetic? And then the 
electrical industry will take a great step forward, and more real 
progress will be made in five years than can be made in a century 
oi experimenting with existing electrical apparatus. 

You can add wings and stories to an old house. But to build a 
new house, you must begin with the foundation. 



GeiieraiI®Electric 

COIXlpSinV Schenectady, N.Y. 



Geaeral Office 



423 



STYLE QUALITY FIT 

That is what you get when we tailor your suit 

M. MOSES & SON, Inc. 

High-Grade Clothiers 



BALTIMORE, MD 



Andrews Cash Store, Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Iqpl 


ELL 


EERt that 


if she is going 


to have 


really 


fash 


ionable iveda 


Ung invitations. 


those 


which 




are 


correct in form, artistic in 


workmanship 




and 


of the finest 


material, order 


samples from 




the 














J. P. Stevens Engraving 


'Co. 








103 Peach 


tree St., Atlanta, G 


a. 






and 


they will be 


forwarded free 


of cha 


rge. 

1 



424 



ENTHUSIASM 

H/nthusiasm is the one factor that has 
kept the Greentree Organization the 
youngest in the South. Fired with the 
full vigor of youthful enthusiasm, we are 
ever on the alert for those makers who 
blaze fresh paths to better ideas and 
ideals. 

kJut organization is virtually a clearing house for 
the United States (Europe as well). Here under 
one roof we gather together those modes, models 
and materials, which when faultlessly tailored, 
constitute 

GREENTREE CLOTHES 

KSruided by this youthful enthusiasm, we are tem- 
pered by the experience, gained through forty 
years of catering to a refined clientele. 





-»»»« A ^ r"*'"—! 




j^ V^TJ RQftP AT SEVENTH 

Richmond, Virginia 



425 



ASTMAM 



Prepares thoroly for Business and the Civil Service and obtains employment 
for students who can be recommended for efficiency and good character 



Persons seeking the best advantages for instruction, study, and practice will be qualified for the mos 
employments open to beginners in a single year or less. 

If you have the intelligence, ambition and grit needed for acquiring thoro proficiency, and can aford I 
tional training oflered at ELastman, you may be assured of rapid promotion to executive positions and high s 

The school offers intensive, finishing courses for high school and college students, afording specific 



Accounting. Banking. Commercial Law. etc. 
CivilService iGovernment Employments.* 
Bookkeeping. Penmanship. Correspondence, etc. 
Normal (for teachers of commercial branches. 



Business Training. Salesmanship. English, etc. 
Secretarial i Private or Executive. 
Stenography. Typewriting, Office Practice, etc. 



I opportunity for self-help and advancement to capable young people of the better sort, 
lal trammg tor persons who need to be interested, encouraged, taught how to study, and made self-reliant 

Experienced, efficient, faithful teachers. Strong lecture courses. Ideal location. 

References -More than 50.000 successful alumni. 

Moderate expenses — $160 pays the total cost of tuition, books, and board for a term of 13 weeks 
ates to good musicians. No vacations. New students enroll and begin work any w£ek day. 

If you want a good start in business, write for our handsome, illustrated prospectus. 



Addr, 



CLEMENT C. GAINES, M. A., LL.D., 



Complimentary 



"T"^ QUIPPED with many years' experience for making 
■'— ' photographs of all sorts, desirable for illustrating 
college annuals. Best obtainable artists, workmanship 
and the capacity for prompt and unequalled service. 



IVhite Studio 

PHOTOGRAPHERS TO 
"1921 YACKETY YACK" 



Address requests for information to our Executive offices 

546 BROADWAY New York City 



Studios also conveniently located at 
220 West 42nd Street New York City 

WEST POINT. N. Y. SOUTH HADLEY. MASS. 

ITHACA, N. Y. HANOVER. N. H. 







SUPREMACY 

For the past fifteen years the Educa- 
tional Department of the Bureau of 
Engraving, Inc., has been collecting a 
vast fund of information from the ex- 
periences of hundreds of editors and 
managers of Annuals. 

This data covering organization, financ- 
ing, advertising, construction, selling and 
original features has been systematically 
tabulated and forms the subject matter 
for our series of reference books. These 
are furnished free to those securing 
"Bureau" co-operation in the making 
of engravings for their books. 

Begin where others have left off. Profit 
by their experience and assure success 
for your Annual. 

BUREAU OF ENGRAVINGiNC 

17 SOUTH SIXTH STREET 

MINNEAPOLIS 



428 



Beautiful forms 
and compositions 
are not made by 
ciiance, nor can 
tiiey ever, in any 
material, be made 
at small expense. 

A composition 
far cheapness and 
not for excellence 
of workmanship, 
is the most fre- 
quent and certain 
cause of the rapid 
decay and entire 
destruction of 
arts and manu- 
factures. 

—Ruskin 




OUR claim to your considera- 
tion lies in the fact that we 
have applied to our own business 
the thought contained in this 
quotation from one of the world 's 
greatest thinkers and practical 
workers. 

If there is anything attractive 
beyond the ordinary, in the page 
arrangement, cover decoration, 
presswork, and general harmony 
which distinguish our work, be 
assured it has not been due to 
chance. 

We leave nothing to chance. 
Every line, page, volume, as it 
comes from our establishment, 
is the result of a carefully laid, 
conscientiously executed plan. 

The thought and the super- 
vision which our system provides 
is your guarantee of excellence. 

If you have anything to be 
printed, write us; if we under- 
take it, we will do it well. 



Baker, Jones, Hausauer, Inc. 

45-51 Carroll Street 
Buffalo, N. Y. 



The "Yackety Yack" is one of our Products. 
429 



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Autographs 



Autographs 



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