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Full text of "Yackety yack [serial]"

>L OF PHARMACY 



THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 

AT CHAPEL HILL 




THE COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINIANA 




UNIVERSITY OF NC AT CHAPEL h 



00016902853 



This book may be kept out one month unless a recall 
notice is sent to you. It must be brought to the North 
Carolina Collection (in Wilson Library) for renewal. 



SEP 29 2008 



Form No A-369 



Digitized by tine Internet Archive 

in 2010 witin funding from 

University of Nortin Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://www.archive.org/details/yacketyyackseria1931univ 



THE PUBLICATIONS UNION OF THE UNIVERSITY 
OF NORTH CAROLINA, CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



THE YACKETY YACK 



THE 

YACKETY YACK 

Official Annual of 
The University of North Carolina 



VOLUME XLI 



Edited by 

W. CLYDE DUNN 



CHAPEL HILL 
THE PUBLICATIONS UNION 

1931 



Copyright, 1931, by 
TRAVIS T. BROWN, Business Manager, 1931 Yackety Yack 



Composed and Printed by J. P. BELL COMPANY, Inc., Lynchburg, Va. 






1^^ 




FRANK PORTER GRAHAM 



DEDICATION 

This volume of the Yackety Yack is dedicated to Frank Porter Graham 
by that university generation which knew him in the classroom as a sterling 
teacher, master workman in his chosen field, and blood-brother in the spirit 
to all who labor for human justice everywhere. By this dedication we express 
our affectionate gratitude to a student-comrade and teacher and our confident 
hopes for Alma Mater under his guidance. 



FOREW^ORD 

IN the North Carolina Room in the University Library is a 
book-shelf on which stands the file of the University annuals — 
the HeUenian, 1890 to 1900, the Yackety Yack, 1901 to 1930. 
The HeUenian, published by the fraternities, portrayed the total 
campus scene as visualized by fraternity men. The Yackety 
Yack, staffed by representatives from all organizations of the 
campus, has unfolded annually a more extensive view. 

The Yackety Yack for 1931, the 41st in the combined 
series, embodying the organizations, activities, and traditions of 
its predecessors, maintains their essential unity and carries them 
in new directions. 

The book itself marks a departure in its physical form and 
dress. It becomes a small folio ; sticks to simple black and white, 
without borders, in letter press; introduces the delicacy of the 
etcher's art in its illustrations ; and presents itself in a binding of 
rough red buckram, white backbone, and gold lettering similar to 
the more artistically printed books of the best modern presses. 

Inside the cover other added features appear. R. D. W. 
Connor presents an historical sketch of the University with por- 
traits of Davie and eight presidents. An article on the University 
Administration, including not only the deans but all the admin- 
istrative officers, shows the University organization at work. 
Another division, devoted to the General Alumni Association, the 
Alumni Loyalty Fund, and other related alumni interests, puts 
the campus in touch with what these important organizations do 
outside the University. 

The 1931 Class Poem, History, Last Will and Testament, 
Prophecy, and Statistics, formerly reserved for Class Day, con- 
stitute the final adieu of Nineteen Thirty-one, and round out a 
volume that will stir the imagination of the campus, and, in time, 
worthily take its place on the library shelf with its predecessors. 

Chapel Hill, 1931. Louis R. Wilson. 



INTRODUCTION 

THIS book is designed to be a jjicture of the University, painted 
with pigments of a hundred and thirty-six years' colorful 
endeavor and enriched by the refreshing effort of a year. Editions 
somewhat similar have preceded ; others shall follow. The present 
volume purports to be the picture as it appears in 1931. 

This picture-story of student life in Chapel Hill during the 
scholastic year, 1930-31, treats of the University — its history, 
alumni, administration, and physical aspects — and the student 
body — its personnel, organizations, athletics, fraternities, and 
dances. In preparing the book I have held, so far as possible, to 
the ideals of beauty and utility. The beauty of the thing may be 
judged by comparison with editions generally approved by know- 
ing critics. The utility of the volume may be measured by its 
completeness as a record, its truthfulness as an interpreter, and 
its effectiveness as an agent to make memories for the future. All 
of which has been remembered constantly in the process of prep- 
aration. Readers naturally will quibble with the editor for his 
inclusion of this and his exclusion of that. So much I freely con- 
cede. But the effort has been honest. May the judgment be fair. 

Whatever of special merit the present volume may have 
besides the inherent value of such a compilation, is due to the gen- 
erous co-operation of many persons. I desire gratefully to ac- 
knowledge the loyal efforts of the students who have so worthily 
comprised the editorial and business staffs. Special thanks are due 
to Mr. W. T. Couch, of the University Press, for his valuable sug- 
gestions in working out many important details of design and 
composition ; to Mr. J. Maryon Saunders, Executive Secretary of 
the University Alumni Association, for his aid in the preparation 
of several sections ; to Dr. R. D. W. Connor, Head of the University 
Department of History and Government, for his contribution of 
an historical sketch of the University; and to Dr. L. R. Wilson, 
University Librarian, for his helpful criticisms of the book as it 
progressed. I owe particular gratitude to Mr. J. Merritt Lear, 
Professor of Economics in the University, for effectively continu- 
ing the good counsel he has given for years, as Treasurer of the 
Publications Union Board, to staffs of the Yackety Yack. 

Now for the true worth of this volume. As to its correctness, 
anyone is at liberty to find as many faults and inaccuracies as he 
can in the following pages. All I can claim is that I have desired 
and purposed to picture the University in its several phases, so far 
as I know them. But to portray the University correctly is really 
a more difficult task than one would suppose who has not tried it. 

The Editor. 
Chapel Hill, 1931 



3n iilemoriam 



Alder J. Blethan, '34 

Seattle, Wash. 

1910-1930 



Cunningham Wilson Constantine, '31 

Birmingham, Ala. 

1908-1930 



Morgan P. Moorer, '33 

Asheville, N. C. 

1913-1930 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Foreword viii 

Introduction ix 

Historical Sketch 1 

Alumni 9 

Administration 17 

Student Body 37 

Organizations 195 

Athletics 225 

Fraternities 267 

Dances 371 

Kaleidoscope 387 

Advertisements 395 



ETCHINGS BY W^ILLIAM STEENE 

PAGE 

Frank Porter Graham vii 

Davie Poplar 1 

Alumni Building 9 

The Old Well 17 

Old East Building 37 

The Chapel of the Cross 195 

Kenan Memorial Stadium 225 

GiMGHOUL Castle 267 

The Arboretum 371 

Playmaker Theatre . 387 




DAVIE POPLAR 



Historical Sketch 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

An Historical Sketch 

THE University of North Carolina, conceived in the year of independence 
and born with the founding of the Republic, is the child of the American 
Revolution. Revolutionary constitution-makers believed that the success of 
their experiments in democracy and self-government depended upon an 
educated citizenship. "Liberty and law," declared the orator at the laying of 




General William Richardson Davie 



the cornerstone of the University of North Carolina in 1793, "call for general 
knowledge in the people and extensive knowledge in matters of the State, and 
these in turn demand public places of education." This idea gave a decided im- 
pulse to higher education in America. In 1775 there were only nine colleges in 
the colonies; within a decade after Yorktown there were eighteen. 

[3] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Joseph Caldwell 



The most significant contribution of the period 
to higher education was the state university, and 
in this contribution North Carolina led the way. 
The North Carolina Constitution of 1776 required 
the Legislature to establish one or more univer- 
sities. Twenty-three years passed, however, before 
the Legislature obeyed this mandate, and the in- 
spiration which finally induced it to do so came 
from the same enlightened statesmanship that had 
just inspired North Carolina to ratify the Federal 
Constitution. The Constitution was ratified 
November 21, 1789; the University was chartered 
December 11, following. In these two acts, Kemp 
P. Battle, the historian of the University, discov- 
ered "a comprehensive plan." In the Legislature 
the charter of the University was put through by 
the same men who in the Constitutional Conven- 
tion had just procured the ratification of the 
Federal Constitution. Indeed, William R. Davie 
passed almost immediately from the Legislature 
where, on November 12, he had introduced the bill to charter the University, 
into the Convention where, on November 21, he moved the ratification of the 
Constitution of the United States. Of the first forty trustees of the University, 
twenty-eight had served in the Constitutional Convention of 1789, where twen- 
ty-one of them had voted for ratification. Indeed, so clearly was the early 
University primarily a Federalist enterprise that the Anti-Federalists charged 
it with making "every effort to give direction to the minds of the students on 
political subjects, favorable to a high-toned aristocratic government." 

The trustees held their first meeting December 18, 1789. Since the Legis- 
lature had left the infant University to support itself or starve, the trustees 
turned their immediate attention to the task of 
financing it. Their only resources were a gift 
of land warrants for 20,000 acres, and cash 
amounting to only $2,706.41. The trustees were 
forced, therefore, to apply to the Legislature for 
aid. Again Davie came to the rescue and by sheer 
power of logic and eloquence, wrung from an un- 
willing Legislature a loan of $10,000 (afterwards 
converted into a gift), which enabled the trustees 
to take the first step in the founding of the Uni- 
versity. 

Their first problem was the selection of a site. 
After examining several places, they selected New 
Hope Chapel, in Orange County. On October 12, 
1793, in the presence of a distinguished company, 
surrounded by a forest of oaks, maples and dog- 
wood brilliant with the red and yellow hues of 
autumn, William R. Davie, Grand Master of 
Masons, laid the cornerstone of the first building. 
On January 15, 1795, the formal opening cer- dawd lowrv Swain 

[41 




HISI'ORICAL SKETCH 




Kemp Plummer Battle 



emonies were held, but the first student did not 
appear until February 12. Before the end of the 
term the faculty of two professors found their time 
fully occupied with their forty-one students. 

The founding of the University was North 
Carolina's first real step in the process of modern 
state-building. In his "Plan of Study," Davie, 
whose services gained for him the title "Father 
of the University," declared that it was "designed 
to form useful and respectable members of soci- 
ety — citizens capable of comprehending, improving 
and defending the principles of government, cit- 
izens who from the highest possible impulse, a 
just sense of their own and the general happiness, 
would be induced to practice the duties of social 
morality." It was this conception of public service 
as the chief function of a state university, rather 
than the ideal of general culture, that character- 
ized the University of North Carolina before 1860, 
and from it came the inspiration for the various 
movements from 1815 to 1860 which became the foundations on which the 
modern state has been built. 

The University struggled for existence against active opposition. Nu- 
merous causes were responsible for its unpopularity, — public disappointment 
that it had not met early expectations; the "indiscretion and misconduct of 
students" ; the common laelief that it was a hotbed for skepticism and infidel- 
ity ; and the belief in Republican circles that it was the fountainhead of Fed- 
eralism in North Carolina. 

For a decade after its establishment the University's work was di- 
rected by a presiding professor. In 1804 the need for stronger measures of 
internal discipline and for defense against external 
attack led to the decision of the trustees to elect a 
president. Rev. Joseph Caldwell was chosen and 
served until 1812. His successor was Rev. Robert 
H. Chapman, who resigned after four years of 
unsuccessful eff'orts to cope with a rebellious stu- 
dent body. Thereupon the trustees persuaded 
Caldwell to accept the presidency again. He served 
until his death in 1835. David L. Swain, who had 
just completed his third term as governor and 
wished to retire from politics, was the next presi- 
dent, serving until he was dispossessed of his 
office by the Reconstruction government in 1868. 
Before 1815 the University was a typical 
liberal arts college, laying chief emphasis upon the 
classics and mathematics. After 1815 two other 
lines of development are noticeable. One was the 
introduction into the curriculum of the natural 
sciences. In 1815 professorships of chemistry and 
of geology were established, and gave a tremendous george tayloe Winston 




Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Edwin Anderson Alderman 



impetus to scientific studies at the University. In 
1824 the trustees sent President Caldwell to Eur- 
ope to purchase scientific apparatus for the labora- 
tories. Thus the natural sciences were given a 
place in the curriculum on terms of equality with 
the humanities. 

The second line of development was in the 
study of such subjects as were designed to prepare 
men for public service. History, law, rhetoric, 
public speaking and debating were especially en- 
couraged. The two literary societies — Dialectic 
and Philanthropic — whose history is coincident 
with that of the University, took an active part in 
student life. In 1843, President Swain organized 
at Chapel Hill the North Carolina Historical Soci- 
ety, and in 1845 established a department of law. 
"The ideal of public service over-shadowed general 
culture prior to 1860." The result is seen in the 
long list of public officials who were University 
alumni, including before 1860, one President of 
the United States, one Vice-President, seven Cabinet officials, ten United States 
senators, forty-one representatives in Congress, fifteen state governors, and 
state judges and legislators too numerous to be counted. To the learned pro- 
fessions, business, agriculture, and war, the University's contributions were 
no less notable. 

President Swain's wide acquaintance in the state, coupled with his per- 
sonality and policies, wrought a change in public sentiment toward the Uni- 
versity and popularized the institution. When he became '^resident in 1835 
the enrollment was 104; before 1860 it reached 430. Its student body was 
drawn from the entire South; of the 576 graduates between 1850 and 1859, 
159 were from other states than North Carolina. 

In common with all other southern colleges 
the Civil War wrought havoc with the University 
of North Carolina, although it managed to keep 
its doors open throughout the war. In 1860 its 
student body represented every southern state, 
and as Dr. Battle says : "As each state passed an 
ordinance of secession, its citizens at the Univer- 
sity hurried home fired with zeal to take up arms." 
Of the Freshman class of eighty students but one 
individual remained to graduate, and his services 
had been declined by the army for physical dis- 
ability. In 1864-65 only sixty-fiVe students matric- 
ulated. In the meantime one-third of the members 
of the faculty had entered military service. 

In 1863 the Conscription Act threatened to 
close the University. President Swain urged the 
President of the Confederacy to exempt students 
until after graduation. "They can make no appre- 
ciable addition to the army," he wrote, "but their Francis preston Venable 

[6] 




HISTORICAL SK1<:TCH 




Edward Kidder Graham 



withdrawal may very seriously affect our organi- 
zation, and in its ultimate effects cause us to close 
the doors of the oldest university at present acces- 
sible to the students of the Confederacy." Presi- 
dent Davis agreed to the suggestion, saying that 
"the seed corn should not be ground up." But 
within the year the necessities of war required the 
rescinding of his order and every student in the 
University capable of bearing arms immediately 
joined the colors. Of the fifteen members of the 
class of 1865, fourteen enlisted and the fifteenth 
was rejected because physically unfit. 

Nevertheless, the University continued its 
work. To prevent the suspension of exercises, the 
faculty offered to serve without salary. Even after 
the Confederacy had fallen and the University 
buildings had been turned into barracks and 
stables for the 4,000 Michigan cavalry that occu- 
pied Chapel Hill, the college bell was rung daily 
and a dozen students attended classes. In 1865 
four seniors, three of whom were battle-scarred veterans of Lee and Jackson, 
received their diplomas. 

The University survived the war; Reconstruction closed its doors. The 
causes of this catastrophe were two — poverty and politics. The war wiped out 
the University's endowment, leaving it with liabilities amounting to $100,000. 
An appropriation of $7,000, made by the Legislature and small sums from 
other sources enabled it to keep going until it was strangled by partisan 
politics. 

In 1868 the "Carpet-bag" state government turned out the old non- 
political, self-perpetuating Board of Trustees and replaced it with a political 
board. The new board was composed entirely of 
Republicans and included some of the most noto- 
riously corrupt carpet-baggers in the state. Par- 
tisan politics dictated its policies. At its first 
meeting it ousted President Swain and soon made 
a clean sweep of the old faculty. The new presi- 
dent, Solomon Pool (1869-1870), and certain of 
the new professors were near and needy relatives 
of prominent politicians who were also trustees. 
The new professor of Greek, who was formerly 
head of a negro school in Raleigh, advocated the 
conversion of the University into a negro college, 
promising that funds for its support "would be 
forthcoming from the North at once." 

Sorrow and indignation at the use of the Uni- 
versity for political spoils filed the breasts of its 
alumni and other friends. "Oh, how I sorrow for 
Chapel Hill !" lamented Zeb Vance. "How worse 
than desolate it must look under the oaks!" For 
two sessions the new faculty waited in vain for harry Woudbukn Chase 

[7] 




Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 

students ; money then began to give out ; the Legislature refused to make ap- 
propriations; and in 1870 the doors of the University were closed. A student, 
more realistic than sentimental, expressed the general feeling when he wrote 
on the wall of one of the recitation rooms, "This old University has busted 
and gone to hell today !" 

The friends of the University were jubilant at the "grand fizzle." Hoping 
to regain control and revive it on the old basis, they began at once a campaign to 
arouse popular interest. Particularly effective was Mrs. Cornelia Phillips 
Spencer, who wrote letters to everyijody of influence, contributed numerous 
articles to the press, and in her widely published "Pen and Ink Sketches of the 
University," painted conditions at Chapel Hill in unforgettable phrases. She 
was supported by many prominent men, chief of whom was Kemp P. Battle. 

Their efforts finally succeeded in 1873, when an amendment to the Consti- 
tution was adopted which took the selection of trustees out of politics. A new 
board, chosen in 1874, assumed charge in 1875, reorganized the University, 
elected a new faculty, and in September reopened its doors with fifty-nine stu- 
dents in attendance, and Dr. Charles Phillips as presiding professor. The next 
year the trustees elected Kemp P. Battle president, and under his direction "the 
University began slowly to climb back to health and strength," free from any 
taint of politics. 

From its re-opening to 1931, the University has had seven presidents, each 
of whom made a distinct contribution to its development. President Battle 
(1876-1891 ) , who "called it back to life amid the ruins of its former greatness," 
laid a broad and firm foundation for the future structure, earning the title of 
"Father of the new University." His successor, George Tayloe Winston (1891- 
1896) , made its campus the dwelling place of dynamic democracy and a citadel 
against the forces of intolerance and bigotry. Edwin Anderson Alderman 
(1896-1900), threw open its doors to women, proclaimed its mission to seek 
out and teach Truth, and interpreted to the people its place as the conservator 
of learning and culture in the democracy. The "architect of her material re- 
building," Francis Preston Venable (1900-1914), also, by his insistence upon 
sound and thorough work, "inwrought into her standard the ideals of modern 
scholarship." Taking up the task as President Venable laid it down, Edward 
Kidder Graham (1914-1918), recognized in the University the most efficient 
"instrument of democracy for realizing all the high and healthful aspirations 
of the State," and placing this instrument at the service of the State in the 
solution of its varied pi'oblems of industry, commerce, education, government, 
and social development, made the University "a great service bureau for the 
State, eager to serve, and eagerly sought for its counsel." Harry Woodburn 
Chase (1919-1930), bringing to the University a national outlook, guided it 
through a period of rapid material expansion and growth, while guarding with 
jealous care its standards of scholarship and defending its right to freedom of 
research and teaching. 

The latest successor of these leaders, Frank Porter Graham, chosen to suc- 
ceed President Chase in 1930, has been in office so brief a time that one must 
speak of his administration in the language not of history but of prophecy. 
Imbued with the high ideals and rich traditions of his alma mater, one may 
confidently predict that he will rear upon the foundation laid by his predeces- 
sors a yet greater and nobler structure. R D W Connor 

Chapel Hill, 1931. 

[8] 




THE ALUMNI BUILDING 



Alumni 



GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 




Fkmx Harkvev, 
President 
Deceased 
Kinston 



K. P. Lf.vvis, 00 W. D. Carmichaei,. Jr., '21 J. Marvcjn Saimieus, 25 

PresiJeiit Viec-Fresident Exeeutive Secretary 

Durham New York City Chapel Hill 



ORGANIZED in 1843 the General Alumni 
Association in\'ites participation by every 
former student of the University of North Caro- 
lina in a program of alumni service that is now 
nearly a century in age. 

For the three fold purpose of perpetuating as- 
sociations formed in collegiate years, promoting 
the welfare of Alma Mater, and promoting the 
cause of education generally, the Alumni Associa- 
tion was created. And since that 
time has striven to follow as 
guiding principles the motives 
which actuated its organization. 

The record of the alumni of 
the University is a historj' of 
the institution's contribution to 
the life of the State and Na- 
tion was created. And since that 
human endeavor the Universit\- 
has sent forth her sons and — 
more recently — her daughters. 
The achievements these have 
made have brought added pres- 
tige to the University, even as 
association with the University 
has brought prestige to the in- 
dividual alumnus. 

As a unifying force for Uni- 
versity welfare the Alumni 




Association calls upon alumni to express through 
it their loyalty for Alma Mater. Working in co- 
operation with the University administration the 
Association seeks to coordinate the alumni in- 
terest in bringing to focus public and private 
support in the building of a greater Univer- 
sity. 

With its high purposes yet there comes to the 
individual alunmus associated by membership 
in the General Alumni Associ- 
ation the recompensing pleas- 
ures of renewing University 
friendships in local alumni 
meetings, class reunions, home- 
comings and other alumni 
assemblages. Through its pub- 
lication, The Ahiinni Reviciv, 
the Association offers a means 
whereby an alumnus ma\' more 
easily keep informed about 
alumni and University aft'airs. 
And through its Central 
.\lumni Office in Chapel Hill 
the Association constantly 
avails itself of opportunities 
of alumni service and pres- 
ervation and perpetuation of 
University traditions. 

— J. Maryon Sanders. 



["] 



YACKETY YACK 





John H. Thorpe, "6i 

Rocky Mount 

Laiv\er 



George Gordon Battle, '85 

New York City 

Lmv\wr 





Haywooh Parker, "87 

AsHEVILLE 

Laiijycr and Unk'crsitv Trustee 



John Moti.ev Morehi:ad, '91 

Stockholm, Sweden 

Diplomat 



[I- 



ALUMNI 





Garland S. Ferguson, Jr., '98 

Washington, D. C. 

Chairman. Federal Trade Commission 



Louis Graves, '02 

Chapel Hill 

Editor. Chapel Hill Weekly 




Dr. William ueB. ^IacXider. '03 

Ch.M'EL Hill 

Kenan Research Professor of 

Pharmacology 




Oscar A. Hamilton, "id 

WiLMI.N'GTOX 

Superintendent of Schools 



[13] 



Y A C K E T ^^ Y A C K 




Samuel H. Hobbs, Jr., 'iG 

Chapel Hill 

Ecoiwiiiisf and Teacher 




Robert C. deRosset, 'i8 

Charleston, S. C. 

Banker 




Thomas Wolfe, 'ji 

AsHEVILLE 

Author 




George Watts Hill, 
Durham 
Financier 



[14] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 



THE ALUMNI LOYALTY FUND 

RF.CEXT BENEFACTORS 

Anonymous donor of Music Auditorium and Pipe Organ. 

Anonymous donor of funds for completion of Graham Memorial. 

Col. C. B. Blethen, $J,ooo Loan Fund. 

The Hanes Family, Hanes Book Study Foundation. 

Mrs. Graham Kenan, $25,000 Endowment for Southern Historical Collection. 

John Motley Morehead, Rufus Lenoir Patterson, Funds with which to construct 

the Morehead-Patterson Memorial Tower. 
Mrs. Henrietta K. Pogue. $1,000 Joseph E. Pogue Loan Fund. 
C. \V. Toms, $5,000, George Newby Toms Scholarship Fund. 
Mrs. Jesse Kenan Wise, $50,000 Scholarship Endowment Fund. 
Small unrestricted gifts from 2,054 alumni. 

THE Alumni Loyalty Fund, administered and directed by a committe of alumni, exists for the 
purpose of rendering a greater service to Alma Alater through the stimulation of gifts from 
private sources. 

Bequests, Memorials, gifts for specific purposes, and small unrestricted gifts from evervone 
are essential if Carolina is to remain apace with other institutions of like standing. This work the 
Alumni Loyalty Fund strives to accomplish. 

Funds so derived will only supplement State appropriations and not replace them. Private 
gifts will be used only for such emergencies and for such quality work as can not be financed 
from any other source. 

No gift can be too small to render a genuine service. A very small sum from each of our 
15,000 living alumni would aggregate a total which would be of inestimable value to the great Uni- 
versity which has meant so much to all of us. Carolina sons and daughters are loyal enough to 
respond generously if only given the opportunity. 

— Felix A. Grisette, '22. 




.\LLE.V J. B.ARWICK. 

Chairman 



FUND OFFICERS 
[15] 



Felix A. Grisette, 
Director 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 



3n ilemoriam 



Emokv Graham Alexander, '02 

Philadelphia. Penn. 

1880-1930 


John Edgar Fowler, '94 

Clinton, N. C. 

1868-1930 


Stephen White Kenney, '98 

Windsor, K. C. 

1874-1930 


Tames Robinson Price, '94 

Albemarle, N. C. 

1868-1930 


James Garrett Anderson. '06 

Asheville. N. C. 

1888-1930 


VoiGE McDuFFiE Gardner, '28 

Greensboro, N. C. 

1907-1931 


Clement S. Kitchen, '25 

Scotland Neck, N. C. 

1902-1930 


James Dick Proctor, '07 

Lumberton, N. C. 

18S5-1930 


John Madison Arnette. 'is 

Wagram. N. C. 

1872-1930 


Elsie Swink Grady, '30 

Kenly. .\. C. 

1912-1930 


Franklin Harris Lackey. '13 

Fallston. N. C. 

1S89-1930 


Thomas J. Proffitt, '98 
Elk Park. N. C. 

1873-1930 


Samuel Horton Askew. '28 
Rome. Ga. 
1899-1930 


GeorgeW. Graham, Jr., '03 

Charlotte, N. C. 

1881-1930 


Charles Lauchinhouse. '92 

Raleigh, N. C. 

1871-1930 


Daniel Webster Raper.'i I 

Norfolk, N. C. 

1930 


Benjamin Leonidas Banks. '08 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 

1882-1930 


William A. Graham, '84 

Charlotte, N. C. 

1865-1930 


Orin C. Lloyd, '10 

New York. .\.V. 

1890-1931 


Thomas Worth Redwine, '24 

Monroe, .\. C. 

1901-igjo 


Stephen C. Bracaw. '90 

Washington, N. C. 

1868-1930 


William Cicero Hammer, '91 

Asheboro, N. C. 

1865-1930 


James Edward Lytch, '14 

Rowland, N. C. 

1892-1930 


James Cole Roberts. '84 

Golden. Colo. 

1865-1930 


Thomas Clayton Brewer. '20 

Marshville. N. C. 

1898-1930 


Edward Manning Hardin, '14 

Wilmington, N. C. 

1893-1930 


Addison Goodloe Mangum, '93 

Gastonia, N. C. 

1S68-1930 


Thomas Scott Rollins, '94 

Asheville, N. C. 

1872-1930 


Edward White Bristol, '29 

Morganton, N. C. 

1907-1930 


Elisha Carter Harris. '13 

Durham, \. C. 

1887-1930 


John Henry M.^RTiN, '95 

Washington, D. C. 

1869-1930 


Eugene Malcolm Snipes, '94 

Durham, N. C. 

1868-1930 


Thomas Cooke Brooks, 'So 

Roxboro. N. C. 

1859-1930 


Charles Felix Harvey, '92 

Kinston, N. C. 

1872-1931 


J. D. Mavnerd, '08 

Wadesboro, N. C. 

1SS4-1931 


John Leak Spencer, 'oo 

Charlotte, N. C. 

1878-1930 


Henry Linwood Brothers. '06 

Fayetteville. N. C. 

1874-1930 


Ottis Lee Hedrick, '24 

Lenoir, N. C. 

1902-1930 


Thomas James McAdoo, '96 

Greensboro, N. C. 

1871-1930 


Charles Manly Stedman, '61 

Oeensboro, N. C. 

1841-1930 


Mary Katherine Brown, '28 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

1930 


Richard B. Henderson. '79 

Franklinton. N. C. 

1858.1931 


John Alton McIver. 'Si 
Carthage, N. C. 
• 1861-1930 


Mrs. G. H. Sutherland, '24 

Washington, D. C. 

19001930 


Zeno Brown, '81 

Greenville, N. C. 

1861-1930 


Benjamin Simms Herring. '98 

Wilson. N. C. 

1877-1930 


Harvey Hopper McKay, '98 

Gastonia. N. C. 

1877-1930 


Henry Augustus Tillett. '82 

Abilene, Texas 

1860-1930 


RoscoE Butler. '20 

Clinton, N. C. 

1895-1930 


Charles Gideon Hill. '99 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

1 878- 1 930 


Willi.am E. Mewborn. -86 

Kinston. N. C. 

1862-1930 


Thomas Shepherd Webb, '62 

Knoxville, Tenn. 

1840-1930 


George Pollock Burgyn, 'gg 

Jackson, N. C. 

1878-1930 


George Courts Holland, '87 

Dallas, N. C. 

1864-1931 


Edward Warren Meyers. '95 

Greensboro. N. C. 

1S73-1930 


Duncan M. Williams. 'So 

Wilmington, N. C. 

1858-1930 


Robert J. Burrington, '30 

North East, Penn. 

1907-1930 


Jacob G. VanBuren Hord, '88 

Kings Mountain, N. C. 

1863-1930 


Yancey Davis Moore, '86 

Lenoir, N. C. 

1860-1930 


Louis Hicks Williams, -11 

Faison. N. C. 

1890-1931 


Charles Colerworth Cobb, '80 

Dallas, Texas 

1858-1930 


Edward Vernon Howell, '00 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

1872-1931 


Thomas McMullen, '22 

Hertford, N. C. 

1901-1930 


Dane M. Wilsey. •2g 

Palo Alto. Cal. 

1906-193U 


James Park Coffin, '^9 

Batesville. Ark. 

1838-1930 


John Daniel Humphries. -9. 

Danbury, N. C. 

1867-1930 


J.V.MLS K. NORFLEET, "gO 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
1870-1930 


Council Simmons Wooten. '61 

Mt. Olive, N. C. 

1840-1930 


Walter Wooten Dawson. '95 

Grifton. N. C. 

1874-1930 


Edwin Newell Irving. '23 

Charlotte. N. C. 

1902-1930 


BenjaminF. Pearco, -24 

Princeton, N. C. 

1900-1930 


Charles William Worth, '82 

Wilmington, N. C. 

1861-1930 


John Henry Dillard. 'Si 

Murphy, N. C. 

1862-1931 


Samuel Spencer Jackson. '86 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

1865-1930 


Willie Mangum Person, '87 

Louisberg, N. C. 

1862-1930 


Richard Thomas Wyche, '93 

Washington, D. C. 

1867-1930 


James William Ferguson, '94 

Waynesville, N. C. 

1873-1930 


Harry Hyman Jacobs, '05 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

1886-1930 


John Henry Pitts, '70 

Catawba, N. C. 

1850-1930 


Rollin Gordon Younce, '30 

.Spencer, N. C. 

1908-1930 


Alpheus Fields, '84 

Norfolk, Va. 

1S68-1930 






William Leslie Young, '14 

Lexington, N. C. 

1888-1930 



16 




■Vs.' t^t^^s-v* j^r »^w- .l^vj v. 








THE OLD WELL 



A dminis tra tion 




THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 

PICTURED here for your memory is the student story of the 
136th University year. Organizations, activities, scenes, 
and faces in the green garden of this book are kept forever 
fresh to the turn of these pages. In this year, distinctive for the 
financial depression and an unconquerable spirit, you have 
mightily helped the University to come through. You have borne 
the deep budget cut in a spirit that rises above its damaging 
gashes and that will hold on for the better day that is to come. 
May the testing of these times prove you worthy of greater tests 
beyond the days treasured here. A life of widening usefulness 
and deepening happiness is the affectionate hope of alma mater 
for each one of you. 

Frank P. Graham, 

President of the University. 

[19] 



YACKETY YACK 





ROBERT B. HOUSE 
Executive Seeretary 

"DuBERT B. House came back to his Alma 
■'-^ Mater in 1926 to fill a newl\'-created job as 
Executive Secretary of the University. And 
since that time by judicious application of his 
energies he has earned for himself an important 
place in University administration. 

The job of Executive Secretary was created 
by the Trustees that the President might be re- 
lieved of many duties of administration, and to 
that end Mr. House has devoted his efforts. 
He dispatches many obligations of the presi- 
dential correspondence, handles many inter- 
views necessary in the administration of schol- 
arship awards, works with student groups, as- 
sists in the executive work of faculty commit- 
tees, and in general serves as an officer of liai- 
son between the President and his faculty and 
the student body. In short, Mr. House is an 
ever present helpmate to the President of the 
University. This he has been now to two 
Presidents. 

And Mr. House is also one of the official 
"contact" men of the University. He makes 
numerous addresses before civic clubs, alumni 
groups, commencement audiences, and other 
similar gatherings. He enjoys thoroughly his 
contacts with people and finds a quick entree 
to the good graces of those with whom he comes 
into contact. 



CHARLES T. WOOLLEN 
Business Manager 

SERVING loyally and efficiently in the admin- 
istrations of four University Presidents, 
Charles T. Woollen has become as much a part 
of Chapel Hill and the L^niversity as the oaks 
of the campus. 

As a freshman in 1901 Mr. Woollen began 
his service in University administration when 
he was appointed Registrar. While still an un- 
dergraduate he was appointed Secretary of the 
L^niversity, the duties of that office being in 
addition to those as Registrar. Also as an un- 
dergraduate he became Purchasing Agent, a 
position he still retains. From 1908 to 1914 he 
was University Proctor. In 1914 he became 
Business Manager of the L^niversity. Also he 
is now Graduate Manager of Athletics, being 
appointed to that position in 1913. 

Charged with the direction of the business 
f)ffice, the collection of student fees, the han- 
dling of University funds, the purchase of sup- 
plies and equipment, the supervision of the 
University Service Plants, the management of 
athletics, and numerous other duties, Mr. Wool- 
len leads a busy life. Yet he finds time enough 
to remain intimate with many students and 
alumni. 

Alumni tell interestingly of Mr. Woollen's 
musical proclivities in the earlier years of the 
century. He was leader of the band and a 
director in the University orchestra and glee 
club. 



[20] 



A DM I N I ST RAT \nX 





THOMAS J. WILSON, Jr. 
Dean of Admissions 

T^R. Tommy J. is an institution with Carolina 
'^'^ men. 

For twenty-two years Dr. Wilson has been 
Registrar of the University. It has been Dr. 
W'ilson who passed upon the entrance require- 
ments of those who made application to come 
to Chapel Hill. His is the hand that has re- 
corded the grades of University students in 
the book of scholastic attainment or failure. 
And it is he who finally passes upon the credits 
of candidates for degrees. 

A Cerberus of the scholastic standards of the 
University. Dr. W^ilson has handled again and 
again the record sheets of Carolina students. 
And in his retentive mind he carries a prodigi- 
ous number of facts about the scholastic accom- 
plishments of University students and alumni. 

Dr. Wilson as a senior in the University in 
1894 helped organize the local scholarship fra- 
ternity which in 1904 became the North Caro- 
lina Aljiha chajiter of Phi Beta Kappa. He has 
served since its organization as faculty secretary 
and treasurer of the chapter. 

Recognizing and rewarding his long service 
the University Trustees this year changed Dr. 
Wilson's title from that of Registrar to Dean of 
Admissions and Registrar. 



FRANCIS F. LiRADSHAW 
Dean of Students 

Tn the position of Dean of Students one might 
■^ expect to find a person intently bent upon 
making students conform to rigid rules of dis- 
cipline. Certainly not true is this of Francis 
F. Bradshaw, Dean of Students at the Uni- 
versity since 1920. 

Mr. Bradshaw is a psychologist both by na- 
ture and in training. He seeks to know and 
understand the students whose welfare is his 
official and personal concern. .'\nd because of 
this attitude he has the confidence of the stu- 
dent body. 

Closely associated with the officers of stu- 
dent government, Mr. Bradshaw's office pro- 
vides helpful assistance in student governing. 
The problems of student life are his concern 
and he is constantly occupied with investigat- 
ing the need for and recommending student 
loans, gathering and disseminating vocational 
information, preparing chapel programs, inspir- 
ing dormitory organization, assisting with fra- 
ternity problems, and in other similar students 
interests. 

In the field of personnel work he has gained 
national prominence. This year Columbia Uni- 
versity awarded him its Ph.D. degree for work 
of psychological rating scales. Yet with all 
the business of establishing and testing stand- 
ards of measurement, he is always at home to 
the individual student seeking counsel and di- 
rection. 



[21] 



YACKETY YACK 




DEAN ALLAN WILSON HOBBS 
A LLAN Wilson Hobbs, Dean of the College 
■"■ of Liberal Arts, has been a member of the 
University faculty for thirteen years. Prior 
to his appointment last year as Dean, he, in 
addition to his teaching, had rendered valuable 
service to the University as a member of the 
administrative boards of the College of Liberal 
Arts, the School of Engineering, and the 
School of Applied Science, as a member of the 
President's advisory committee, the faculty 
executive committee, and the student self-help 
committee, and as chairman of the University 
Athletic Council. Dean Hobbs was born in 
Guilford County in this State, and was grad- 
uated from Guilford College with the A.B. 
degree in 1907. He was awarded another A.B. 
at Haverford College in 1908, and in 191 7 he 
won the Ph.D. degree at Johns Hopkins. 



rpHE College of Liberal Arts is the mother 
"^ of all the colleges in the University. It was 
foreseen in the first Constitution of North Car- 
olina and was provided for in the charter 
granted by the General Assembly in 1789. 
Twenty-one departments of instruction, each 
functioning under its own head, are contained 
within the College — botany, chemistry, classical 
languages and literatures, comparative litera- 
ture, economics, education, English, geology, 
Germanic languages, history and government, 
journalism, library science, mathematics, music, 
philosophy, physics, psychology, Romance lan- 
guages, rural social economics, sociology, and 
zoology. The course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts is designed to provide a gen- 
eral, well-rounded, liberal education. It is the 
purpose of the College of Liberal Arts to secure 
for the student intellectual development and in- 
telligent action through the pursuit of learning 
which is of cultural, preparatory and vocational 
value. 




[22 



ADM I N I ST K AT ION 




THE ScHOOI, f)F AlTLlKD SciENCK includcS 
four curricula leadinj:; to the degree of 
F>achelor of Science: Bachelor of Science in 
Chemistry ; Bachelor of Science in Medicine : 
Bachelor of Science in Geology, and Bachelor 
of Science in Pharmacy. In addition there are 
two-year Premedical and Predental courses, 
and a one-year Predental course. Each curri- 
culum comhines instruction in certain sciences 
and their application to the arts, with certain 
other general courses deemed essential to a 
general education. These curricula are de- 
signed to furnish the fundamental instruction 
and to prepare students to pursue the techni- 
cal profession to which they lead. 



DEAN JAMES MUNSIE BELL 

JAMES MuNSiE Bell was appointed Dean of 
the School of Applied Science in June, 1929. 
following the death of Dean Andrew H. Pat- 
terson. A native of Chesley in the Province 
of Ontario, Canada, Dr. Bell received his A.B. 
at the University of Toronto in 1902 and his 
A.M. at the same institution in 1905. He 
became a naturalized citizen of the United 
States in 1908, after he had received his 
Ph.D. at Cornell L^niversity in 1905. For five 
years he was a chemist with the United States 
Bureau of Soils, and in 1910 he came to the 
University as a member of the Chemistry De- 
partment faculty. In 1921 he became head of 
the Chemistry Department. During the World 
War he was in the Chemical Warfare Service 
of the United States government. Dean Bell 
has served the University as a member of the 
faculty committees on English Composition. 
Foreign Study, McNair Lectures, and Travel 
Study in America, besides his duties as a mem- 
ber of the Facult)' Advisory Committee. He is 
a member of a number of scientific and profes- 
sional organizations, including the American 
Chemistry Society and the American Associa- 
tion of Universitv Professors. 




[23] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




DEAN GUSTAVE MAURICE BRAUNE 
Deceased 

THE late Gustave Maurice Braune. Dean 
of the School of Engineering; from 1922 
till his death Noveniher 26, 1930. came to 
the University in 1921 to organize and head the 
then new School of Engineering. Under his 
capable administration, the School began a peri- 
ofl of progress which soon placed it among the 
foremost schools of engineering. Dean Braune 
inaugurated the co-operative plan in the School 
which has since become a feature in engineering 
education. A native of Alabama. Dean Braune 
was a graduate of Spring Hill College. Mobile, 
Alabama, in 188S with the degree of B.S. He 
later studied and was graduated in civil engi- 
neering at the Royal Polytechnic, Dresden, 
Saxony, in 1895. From 1897 to 1912 he was 
identified with many large engineering con- 
cerns, accepting in 191 2 a professorship in civi 
engineering in the University of Cincinnati. 
He later became head of the department in that 
institution. In 1921 he accepted the call from 
the ITniversity of North Carolina. Few teach- 
ers have ever been more loved and admirec 
by their students than was Dean Braune. His 
untimely death was a blow to the Universitv 
and to all who knew him. 



ALTHOUGH it was not until June, 1922, that 
the Board of Trustees of the University 
established the School of Engineering as a 
unit apart from the School of Applied Sci- 
ence, the University was one of the pioneers 
of America in otTering to students courses 
in engineering. Since 1S53, when Professor 
Charles Phillips was named head of the de- 
partment of civil engineering, the engineering 
departments have advanced rapidl}'. Included 
in the present School are departments of civil, 
electrical, mechanical, and chemical engineer- 
ing. The department of mechanical engineer- 
ing offers an option in aeronautical engineering 
in the senior year. The engineering courses 
have been developed along broad and cultural 
lines, and the necessity of cultural training as 
a part of a thoroughly technical education has 
been kept con.stantly in mind. The instruction 
consists of four-year courses leading to the de- 
grees of Bachelor of Science in Chemical, Civil, 
Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering. A 
prominent feature of the training offered by 
the School is the co-operative plan, by which 
each student, during his junior year, comes 
into close contact for a twelve-week period with 
outside industries. Thus the training is de- 
signed to be both theoretical and practical. 




[24] 



A 1) M r X I ST R A T I O X 




DEAN MARCUS C. S. NOBLE 

MARCUS Cicero Stevens Noble, long rec- 
ognized as the "grand old man" of edu- 
cation in North Carohna, was appointed Dean 
of the School of Education in 191 3, and he 
has held the position since that time. No 
state has had a citizen more devoted to its 
schools and more tireless in promoting their 
growth than is Dr. Noble. Since he came to 
the University from the Wilmington public 
schools in 1898 as Professor of Pedagogy, he 
has seen a poverty-stricken University grow 
large and strong — and his has been no small 
part in that growth. Despite his 76 years. Dr. 
X^oble carries out his duties as educator, bank 
president, churchman, and author with his usual 
light step, and his well-known roach of hair is 
as thick and turbulent as ever. He is a mem- 
ber of the University Class of 1879. Recentlv 
he published the first of a two-volume History 
of the Public Schools of North Carolina, a work 
which required no end of research and appli- 
cation. This history is his dominating interest 
at present. \\'hen interrupted he e.xclaims, with 
his usual kindl\- humor, "Don't bother me. Eve 
got to finish this history before I die." 



WITH the eniirmons increase in elemen- 
tary, high hchuol and college education 
within recent years, the equii)]iing of ])r()- 
s])ective teachers and educational workers with 
the knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary 
for successful teaching and administration 
has become of tremendous importance. The 
primary function of the University School of 
Education is the prei)aration of young men and 
young women for the more responsible teach- 
ing positions, principalships, and superintend- 
encies. By an act of the General Assembly of 
1887. free tuition is given to teachers in the 
schools of North Carolina and to prospective 
teachers who are residents of the State. Two 
curricula, both leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts in Education, are ofl^ered — the one is 
designed for the preparation of teachers for the 
secondary schools, and the other for the prep- 
aration of teachers for the primary and gram- 
mar grades. A training school, made possible 
through an appropriation from the General 
Education Board of New York in 1926 for a 
five-year period, is operated in connection with 
the School of Education. Through it "directed 
teaching" is given, with students in the Chapel 
Hill schools as subjects. This spring approxi- 
mately 65 seniors will receive degrees in the 
School of Education, and the total enrollment 
is around 350. 




[25] 



Y A C K E T ^' Y A C K 




DEAN DUDLEY DeWITT CARROLL 



D^ 



>EAN of the School of Commerce since its 
estabhshment in 1919, Dudley DeWitt 
Carroll has been instrumental in bringing 
about the remarkable development of that 
division of the University. Its enrollment has 
increased from 125 in 1919 to 625 last fall, and 
under Dean Carroll's leadership it has won na- 
tional recognition. Born at Mizpah in Stokes 
County, North Carolina, Dean Carroll, together 
with Dean Hobbs of the Liberal Arts School, 
was awarded A.B. degrees in 1907 by Guilford 
College and in 1908 by Haverford College in 
Pennsylvania. Returning to Guilford in 1909, 
he served there for five years as Professor of 
History and Economics and Dean. In 1916 he 
was awarded an M.A. at Columbia University, 
and he taught at Hunter College in New York 
City for the next two years. He came to the 
University in 1918 as Professor of Economics, 
and the following year was placed at the head 
of the newly-organized School of Commerce. 
Dean Carroll says that in his long experience 
as a teacher he has never worked harder than 
in 1908, when he taught no less than 17 classes 
each day at Mountain View Institute in his 
home village of Mizpah, besides serving as 
principal of the institution! Besides his duties 
as Dean and Professor of Economics, he is a 
member of the Board of Governors of the In- 
stitute in Social Science, and of the faculty 
committees on Chapel and Entrance Require- 
ments and of the Faculty Advisory body. 



THE School of Commerce was established 
in 1919 when the General Assembly en- 
acted the necessary legislation in response to 
the recommendations of the President and 
the Board of Trustees. The course of study, 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Commerce, covers a period of four years 
and is designed to give a foundation of broad 
and general culture, and, at the same time, 
supply a definite and practical training to those 
who intend to engage in any of the great lines 
of industrial and commercial activity. It is the 
purpose of the School of Commerce to provide 
its students with as thorough and scientific 
business training as it is possible to give within 
the range of the subjects which it attempts to 
cover. The student must supplement his gen- 
eral survey with a specialized study of any one 
of the following: the administration of pro- 
duction ; the management of finance ; market- 
ing and selling ; management of personnel ; the 
avoidance or distribution of risk ; dealing with 
problems of transportation ; conforming with 
legal requirements ; handling the problem of 
accounting ; foreign trade. The School of Com- 
merce has had a phenomenal growth, and it is 
now recognized as a leader in its field. 




[26] 



A D M I N I S T 1? A T I O N 




DIRECTOR HOWARD W. ODUM 

HOWARD Washington Odum has been Di- 
rector of the School of PubHc Welfare 
and Kenan Professor of Sociology since 1920. 
He is recognized throughout the United States 
as a foremost authority in the social sciences. 
In addition to his numerous other duties at 
the University he is Director of the Institute 
for Research in Social Science. His scho- 
lastic degrees include an A.B. from Emory 
University, an M.A. from the University of 
Mississippi, and doctorates from Clark Univer- 
sity and Columbia University. He has taught 
at various Southern universities, and he was 
Dean of Liberal Arts at Emory before coming 
here. Author of numerous scientific works and 
novels. Dr. Odum has a wide reputation as a 
writer. He is at present on leave of absence 
in Chicago, where he is Director of Social Sci- 
ence exhibits for the World Fair to be held in 
1933- 



ALTHOUGH the School of Public Welfare 
• has been in existence little more than a 
decade, it has provided for the specific needs 
of the State and the South for well-trained 
social workers and community leaders and 
for research in social ])roblems. Plans for 
effective organization of the school were be- 
gun and tasks entered upon during the Sum- 
mer School of 1920. A four-fold service is 
jjrovided : the first emphasizes instruction in 
Sociology and Social Problems ; the second em- 
phasizes training for special work and commu- 
nity leadership ; the third aspect of the work 
deals with direct and indirect community serv- 
ice, or social engineering ; the fourth aspect 
emphasizes social research, scientific inquiry, 
and publication of results estimated to be of 
value to the State, the University, and to the 
general public welfare and social progress. The 
plan of instruction follows these divisions : Gen- 
eral Social Theory ; The Home and Family ; 
The Community and Association ; The State, 
Government, and Public Institutions; The 
School and Education : Play and Recreation ; 
Industry and Work ; Methods of Organization 
and Administration ; Field Work ; and Summer 
Institutes of Public Welfare. 




[27] 



\' A C K E T Y Y .\ C K 




DEAN WILLIAM W. PIERSON, Jr. 

WILLIAM Whatley Pierson. Jr., Pro- 
ffssor of History aiul Clovernnient and 
niL'iuljer of the Universit_\- faculty for fifteen 
years, was appointed permanent Dean of the 
Graduate School last July. Considered one of 
the foremost living authorities on Hispanic 
American History, Dean Pierson is one of the 
liest known exponents of the Southern school 
of historians foundeil hy the late William A. 
Dunning, long the Nestor of American histo- 
rians. Born at Brundige, Alabama, Dr. Pier- 
son won A.B. and M.A. degrees at the Uni- 
versity of Alabama in 1910 and 191 1, an M.A. 
at Columbia University in 1912, and his doc- 
torate at Columbia in 1916. His education at 
Columbia was followed by study at several 
S]>anish and French institutions. He is the au- 
thor of several historical works, and he has 
now in preparation books on The History of 
I'cni, The Government of l^cnezuehi, and The 
Administration of Governor Montiano. A mem- 
l)er of several scientific and historical societies, 
he is on the editorial board of The Hispanic 
American Historical Reviez<'. Dean Pierson is 
serving the University as a memlier of the fac- 
ulty committees on Foreign Study, English 
Com])osition and Library Books, and is a mem- 
ber of the President's Advisory Committee. 
Already under Dean Pierson's leadership a 
great Southern graduate school has been de- 
veloped at Chapel Hill, and the University is 
drawing scholars from the South in particular 
and the entire country in general. 



FRO.M the founding of the LTniversity 136 
years ago research as well as instruction 
lias been encouraged, although the first formal 
action toward establishment of graduate study 
was taken in 1881. It was in 1904 that 
the graduate de]5artment was formally organ- 
ized as a distinct school of the University, and 
its progress has been steadv since that time, 
until it is now generally recognized that 
Texas and North Carolina have the two fore- 
most graduate schools in the South. Authori- 
ties believe that the Chapel Hill school is the 
better balanced of the two. During the past 
decade the Graduate School has made its great- 
est advances, and the enrollment has increased 
from 145 in 1920 to 734 in 1930. Professional 
training for teachers and research have gone 
hand in hand in the development of the Uni- 
versity Graduate School. Languages and Lit- 
eratures, Philosophy, Political and Social Sci- 
ences, Mathematics and the Natural Sciences — 
all are given special attention in the Graduate 
School, with special facilities for research and 
instruction in them. The former lMar\- Ann 
Smith dormitory has been converted into the 
Graduate Club, where a majority of the grad- 
uate students room and take their meals. Much 
benefit has been derived from the Club, since 
it brings together students with similar interests. 




[28] 



A D M I X T S T R A T T O N 




DIRECTOR NATHAN W. WALKER 

NATHAX \\'iLS0N Walker, Director of the 
University Summer School for twenty-two 
years and Acting Dean of the School of 
Education since 1921. has earned a wide repu- 
tation as an efficient executive and educator. 
Under his leadership the Summer School has 
expanded rapidly until it now has an enroll- 
ment well over 3,000. It was in 1903 that Mr. 
Walker graduated from the University with 
the A.B. degree. He became Professor of 
Education in 1905, and he has been a member 
of the faculty since that time. Air. Walker has 
a Master's degree from Harvard University. 
Among his many services to the University are 
those of membership on the Board of Gover- 
nors of the University Press, the faculty com- 
mittee on Entrance Requirements, and the Presi- 
dent's Advisory Committee. He is a member 
and official of several southern educational asso- 
ciations. 



VKRV few persons, even those intimately 
connected with the University, realize that 
tlie first summer school for teachers, known 
in those days as the "Summer Normal," was 
established here in 1877. That first summer 
school ran for eight years, being suspended 
in 1884. Revived in 1894, it ran for eleven 
more years, and was revived again in 1907. 
Since that time it has continued to expand 
and prosper. Today the Summer School is 
one of the most important divisions of the 
University. Last summer there were 131 in- 
structors, 31 of whom were visiting professors, 
and 290 courses were offered. The total enroll- 
ment was 3,005, and approximately 125 degrees 
were conferred. 53 of them by the Graduate 
School. Courses are given in Art, History, 
Biology. Botany, Chemistry, Commerce and 
Economics, Education, Engineering, English, 
Geology. German, Greek, History and Govern- 
ment, Latin. Library Science, Mathematics. 
Music, Pharmacy, Physics. Psychology. French. 
Spanish. Rural Social Economics. Sociology. 
Zoologv. Elementary Education, Fine Arts. 
Physical Education. Practical and Industrial 
Arts, Natural Science, Social Science, and 
Writing. These courses are planned for all 
teachers of primary and grammar grades, high 
school teachers and principals, county and city 
superintendents and supervisors, librarians, col- 
lege and university students and teachers desir- 
ing credit towards graduate and undergraduate 
degrees. 




[29] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




DIRECTOR R. M. GRUMMAN 

RUSSELL Marvin Grumman has been Direc- 
tor of the Extension Division since 1928. 
He came to the University in 1925 as Asso- 
ciate Director of the Division, and was Act- 
ing Director from 1926 until 1928. To him 
is attributed much of the credit for the rapid 
expansion of the University's extension service, 
and he has been indefatigable in improving his 
department. A native of Brooklyn, New York, 
he graduated from the International Y. M. C. A. 
College at Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1918, 
and studied at Teachers' College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, in 1919 and 1920. 



STARTING as a Bureau of Extension in 1912 
under the leadership of Dr. L. R. Wilson, 
University librarian, the idea of university 
extension was clarified and expanded under the 
administration of the late President Edward 
Kidder Graham. In 1921, in conformity with 
standards established by the National Univer- 
sity E.xtension Association, the work was or- 
ganized as a major division of the University 
by President Harry W. Chase. Chester D. Snell 
served as director of the Division from then 
until 1928, during which time there took place, 
both in the organization and in its field of serv- 
ice to the state, a remarkably rapid period of 
growth and expansion. 

The Extension Division of the University 
of North Carolina is the administrative agency 
through which are conducted the extension ac- 
tivities of the various University departments. 
By means of correspondence instruction, exten- 
sion classes located in all parts of the state, 
radio lectures, extension library service, read- 
ing courses, community dramatics, interscho- 
lastic activities, and a variety of publications, 
the University is relating itself effectively with 
the life of the state. 

A total of at least forty thousand individuals 
receive each year some regular educational serv- 
ice through the various activities and publica- 
tions of the Division. Last year instruction 
was offered to 3,614 otif-campus students who 
enrolled in extension classes and correspond- 
ence courses. 



!«'** EXTENSION DIVISION '^ 



nSwwTT /[>:<> "! i ^ tn m":' nCcmisfmKkiimtcmmts' 



^^ 



THlSTAKISTHiaW 




[30] 



A D M I N T S T R /\ 'I' I O N 




DEAN CHARLES T. McCORMICK 

CHARLES TiLFORD McCoRMiCK, Dean of the 
Law School since 1927, is noted for his 
thoroughness and the efficiency of his ad- 
ministration. Much of the exceptional prog- 
ress of the Law School within recent years is 
attributed to his influence. Born at Dallas, 
Texas, he received an A.B. degree at the Uni- 
versity of Texas in 1909, and an LL.B. cum 
laude at Harvard in 191 2. For eight years he 
practiced law as a member of the firm of Ethe- 
ridge, McCormick and Mromberg. In 1922 he 
became a Professor of Law at the University of 
Texas, coming here in 1926 in the same capac- 
ity. A year later he was made Dean of the 
University Law School, and he has served in 
that position since. He has taught in the sum- 
mer sessions of the Cornell and Yale Law 
Schools. Author of a number of articles for 
leading law journals, he is a member of the 
American Bar Association and the North Caro- 
lina Bar Association. Damages, Evidence and 
Personal Property are the subjects he teaches 
in the Law School. 



DURING the ])ast decade the Law School has 
in all proijability raised its standards to 
a greater extent than any other division of 
the University. In 1924 it was raised to "Class 
A" to conform to the standards of leading 
law schools throughout the country. Two 
years of academic work as prerequisite for en- 
trance have been required since that time. The 
Law School is a member of the Association of 
American Law Schools, composed of 62 of the 
leading law .schools in the United States, in- 
cluding such schools as Harvard, Yale, Cornell 
and Chicago. Since 1923 the School has occu- 
pied Manning Hall, named for the late John 
Manning, once a distinguished professor of law 
here. Modern and commodious, the building is 
particularly noted for its beauty of design. The 
library is one of the largest law libraries in 
the South, containing more than 21,000 vol- 
umes. In 1843 the law school which develo])ed 
into the School of Law of the University was 
founded at Chapel Hill as a private school by 
William H. Battle, then a judge of the Superior 
Court, later a justice of the State Supreme 
Court. It was not until 1899 that the school 
was completely incorporated into the University, 
although it had maintained a close connection 
with the institution since its establishment. 







[31] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




DEAN ISAAC HALL MANNING 

ISAAC Hall Manning is probably better 
known in the medical profession than any 
other man in North Carolina. Dean of the 
University School of Medicine and Professor 
of Physiology here since 1 90 1, he is one of the 
oldest' in point of service and most respected 
members of the faculty. Born in the neighbor- 
ing town of Pittsboro, he came to Chapel Hill 
in 1882 and entered the University, studying 
here for four years. He received his M.D. 
degree from Long Island College Hospital in 
1897, later studying at Harvard University and 
the University of Chicago. Dean Manning was 
recently elected a Fellow of the American Col- 
lege of Physicians, one of the highest honors 
that may be bestowed upon a member of the 
medical profession in this country. 



THE School of Medicine was established 
in 1879 under the direction of Dr. Thomas 
W. Harris. A course in theoretical and prac- 
tical medicine was oftered under the prece^i- 
torial system, but the plan was found imprac- 
ticable and was abandoned in 1886. In 1890 
the school was reopened with a more orderly 
and logical arrangement of courses. At first 
the course covered only one year, but in 1896 
a two-year course was inaugurated. In 1900 
the School of Medicine was incorporated as 
an integral part of the University and was 
reorganized to meet the requirements for the 
first two years of the full four-year course lead- 
ing to the degree of doctor of medicine. In 
1902 it was expanded into a four-year school, 
and the clinical subjects of the third and fourth 
year were otYered in Raleigh. After a few years 
of successful operation, this plan was aban- 
doned because of lack of financial support, and 
the clinical subjects were dropped. In 1908 the 
school was admitted to membership in the As- 
sociation of American Medical Colleges, and 
is now ranked in the class "A" group by the 
American Medical Association. The subjects 
included in the four-year course in medicine 
are arranged in two main groups, the so-called 
laboratory and clinical groups, and two years of 
study are devoted to each. This division makes 
it possible for a student to pursue the labora- 
tory subjects in one institution and the clinical 
subjects in another without loss of continuity 
and with no disadvantage. Students who have 
successfully completed the two-year course in 
the laboratory subjects offered here are pre- 
pared to begin the study of the clinical subjects 
and may be transferred, without examination 
and with full credit, to the third year of other 
medical colleges of the highest rank. 




[3-'] 



ADMINISTRATION 




DEAN EDWARD VERNON HOWELL 
Deceased 

EDWARD Vernon Howell, founder of the 
LTniversity School of Pharmacy and its 
Dean for thirty-three years, died in Chapel Hill 
February 14, 1931. It was in 1897 that he 
came to Chapel Hill and began the work of 
establishing a School of Pharmac}-. Much of 
the Pharmacy School's remarkable expansion 
and success under frequently adverse condi- 
tions was due to Dean Howell. His was an 
unusually vivid personality, and his students 
were deeply impressed by his kindliness and 
depth of knowledge. He was born at Raleigh 
and was graduated from Wake Forest College, 
receiving his Ph.G. at the Philadelphia College 
of Pharmacy. A member of the North Caro- 
lina Pharmaceutical Association, he was a for- 
mer vice-president and executive committee- 
man of the American Association of Colleges 
of Pharmacv. 



FOUNDED in iSSo in connection with the 
School of ^ledicine, the first Pharmacy 
School at the University was abandoned six 
vears later when the Medical .School passed 
out of existence. "In the fall of 1889 the school 
was revived by Dr. Richard A. Whitehearl, but 
again its career was cut short. It was in March, 
1897, that the present Pharmacy School was 
established with the late Edward Vernon Howell 
as Dean and Professor of Pharmacy. The 
course of study extended over two sessions of 
nine months each and led to the degree of Grad- 
uate in Pharmacy (Ph.G.). At that time the 
school occupied the lower floor of New West 
Building. In the summer of 1912 the school 
was moved to Person Hall, and in 1914 two 
new courses in pharmacy were added to the 
curriculum ; one, a three-year course, led to the 
degree of Doctor of Pharmacy ( P.D.) ; the 
other, also a three-year course, led to the degree 
of Pharmaceutical Chemist (Ph.C). In 1917 
the school was admitted to membership in the 
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 
The degrees of Doctor of Pharmacy and Phar- 
maceutical Chemist were abandoned in 1925 
in order to meet with the Association's newly- 
made requirements, and the course of study 
leading to the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy 
was advanced from two to three years. A four- 
year course was added leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy ( S. B. in 
Pharmacy). In the fall of 1925 the School of 
Pharmacy moved into its building. Pharmacy 
Hall. Upon the death of Dean E. Vernon 
Howell on February 14, 1931, Professor John 
Grover Beard was appointed to succeed him. 




[33] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




DR. LOUIS ROUND WILSON 

ALREADY one of the University's busiest men. 
• Louis Round Wilson will assume another 
duty of major proportions next fall when the 
new School of Library Science is established 
here. Dr. Wilson has been appointed director 
of the -school. Since 1901 he has been Uni- 
versity librarian ; during the intervening three 
decades the library has developed from a col- 
lection of less than 25,000 volumes to a mod- 
ern, fully-equipped department, housed in one 
of the largest and most beautiful buildings 
in the South, with a total of approximately 
300,000 volumes. Born at Lenoir in this State, 
Dr. Wilson attended Haverford College in 
Pennsylvania for three years, entering the L'ni- 
versity in 1898 and receiving the A.B. degree 
here a year later. He also has earned M.A. and 
Ph.D. degrees here. He is Director of the Uni- 
versity Press and Professor of Library Admin- 
istration, as well as President of the Southeast- 
ern and Southern Librarians' Associations. 
Among his literary activities is the associate 
editorship of Studies in Philology, and he has 
written several books of an educational and 
technical nature. 



DURING the past seven years more than 
123,000 \'olumes have been added to the 
library; less than 100.000 were collected by it 
during the 126 years from its founding in 
1795 until that time! A magnificent structure 
costing $625,000 was dedicated as the new 
University library in 1929, with nine stories of 
stacks capable of shelving approximately 400,- 
000 books. Space has been provided for exten- 
sions which will bring the capacity well over 
a million volumes. Ideally speaking, the new 
library is the expression of the dignity of learn- 
ing: practically, it is planned with cold and re- 
morseless efficiency, with ever)' inch of space 
utilized to the best advantage. At present the 
library receives 2500 periodicals annually and 
houses approximately 225,000 volumes. A need 
that has been increasing for many years in the 
.South will be fulfilled next fall, when a library 
school will be established here as the result of 
a gift of $100,000 from the Carnegie Founda- 
tion. In this school librarians, like lawyers and 
doctors and teachers, may secure expert pro- 
fessional training. The University of North 
Carolina Press, incorporated in June, 1922, has 
the following objectives : the publication of 
periodicals devoted to the advancement of learn- 
ing and produced at the University by or under 
the direction of the Faculty; publication of 
catalogues, periodicals, and other documents 
pertaining to the University and its various 
schools and dcjiartments ; and the promotion, 
through the publication of deserving works, of 
the advancement of arts and sciences and the 
development of literature. Approximately 106 
books have been published by the Press since 
its establishment, in addition to a number of 
periodicals and series of studies. 



^ 


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;| 1 "tPl^P^HBffi^ 


:^i] 


! 1 1 i i^^m%l 


■--■J![!''T53«Wi|tld!*''' i™ 



[34] 



A D MINISTRATION 




THE Wii.i.iAM Preston Bvnum, Jr. (ivM- 
XASIUM was completed in 1904. It is fur- 
nished with modern j;;^ymnasium a])])aratus. a 
swimming ])ool. l)aths. and nnininw track, and 
contains a trophy room and the office of the 
Director. Gym classes are held for all fresh- 
men, who must attend them three hours a week 
imless excused. In the fall a thorough physical 
examination of each new student is made, and 
the heart, the lungs, the eyes and the ears are 
tested in order that students defective in ph3'S- 
ical development may be given special work 
under the personal supervision of the Director 
of the Gymnasium. Most of the campus dances 
are given in this building. In recent years the 
Gymnasium has become inadequate for the 
needs of the rapidly-expanding University, 
however, and efforts have been made for several 
years to secure an appropriation from the State 
Legislature for a larger and better equipped 
building. 



DR. ROBERT BAKER LAWSON 

ROBERT Baker Law.son, Physical Director 
of the University since 1906, was born 
at Brookneal, Virginia. He was a student at 
the University from 1897 to 1900, the last 
two years in Medicine, and received his M.D. 
degree from the University of Maryland in 
1902. During his student days he was a five- 
letter man, playing on the baseball, football, 
track, tennis and gym teams. After gradua- 
tion he played professional baseball with sev- 
eral major and minor league clubs, returning 
to the University in 1905 as coach of the base- 
ball team. Since 1906 he has been Associate 
Professor of Physical Education, in addition to 
Phvsical Director. 




[35] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




THE original Uni\'ersity infirmary was con- 
structed about 25 years ago near the cen- 
ter of the campus. In 1910 it was replaced by 
a wooden structure containing 24 beds, with 
one negro man in the capacity of nurse. After 
the war in 1918 the present infirmary was built, 
said to be the best planned college infirmary in 
the United States. It is modeled on the British 
hr)S])ital plan, with a number of small units con- 
taining four beds each. Under the immediate 
supervision of the University Ph_\-sician, it is 
provided with two experienced nurses. At the 
discretion of the University Physician a stu- 
dent may be admitted to its wards, and for such 
services as ma\' be rendered by the stafif no 
charge is made. During the last school year 
1,135 cases were treated at the infirmary, and 
approximately 500 of them were placed in bed. 



DR. ERIC ALONZO ABERNETHY 

ff-p^oc Ab" has been practicing medicine in 
-L ' Chapel Hill since the fall of 1904, and 
has been University Physician since 1919 and 
Summer School Physician since 191J. He was 
a student here from 1895 until 1900, the last 
two years in Medicine. Receiving M.D. de- 
grees from the University of Virginia in 1901 
and Columbia University in 1903, he re-entered 
the University in 1906 to secure his B.S. de- 
gree. During the war "Doc Ab" achieved a 
distinguished record, serving with the Belgian 
Army until the American forces arrived in 
France. He was Commanding Officer of a 
Sanitary Train during the St. Mihiel drive, 
served in the Meuse-Argonne salient, and was 
wounded in Belgium. His rank was Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel. During the past year or two "Doc 
Ab" has been in poor health, and he recently 
returned from New York where he was a 
patient under a famous specialist for several 
months. His condition is much improved now, 
however. 






[36: 



OLD EAST BUILDING 



Student Body 




SENIOR CLASS 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Patterson 



Manning 



Vaughn 



Baucum 



OFFICERS 
Henry Newton Patterson J^rcsidcnt 

Isaac Hall Manning, Jr I'lcc-Prcsidcnt 

Evan James Vaughn Secretary 

Clifford Randall Baucom Treasurer 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



K. C. Ramsay, Chairman 
Robert E. Betts 
Curtis Blackwood 
Milton Cohen 
Ellis Crew 
Charles De Wolfe 
J. C. Goodwin 




John Idol 
William S. Lindsay 
William Moore 
Harry Shaner 
Arthur Sickles 
Sam Silvertein 
Ranson Whittenton 



SENIOR CLASS 




GOODRIDGE 



Idol 



SENIOR WEEK COMMITTEE 



Clyde Dunn, Chaininin 
Fred Ferguson 
Bert Haywood 



Billy Lindsay 
Kermit Wheary 
Will Yarborough, Jr. 



SENIOR GIFT COMMITTEE 



Noah Goodridge, Chairman 
Joe Eagles 
Wallace Shelton 
Buddy Hubbard 



Beverly Moore 
Adam Fisher 
Brody Arnold 
Paul Gilbert 



Mayne Albright 



SENIOR DANCE COMMITTEE 



John Idol, Chairman 
Sam Silverstein 
Cliff Baucom 



Williams Cooper 
Ike Manning 
Art Sickles 



[41] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 





Robert AIaynk Albright 
raleigh, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B. 

Secretary Student Council, (4) ; Speaker Phi Assem- 
hly, (3); Assistant Editor of Yackety Yack; Varsity 
Wrestling, (3, 4); Monogram Club; Debate Council, 
(3I: Interfraternity Council, (4): German Club Exec- 
utive Committee, (3); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Treas- 
urer of Grail, C3) : Sheiks; Amphoterothen. 
7. -I', T K A, E * ii, * B K 



Joseph McDonald Aldex 

ARDEN, N. C. 
Age: 26 Degree: A.B. Education 





Allen Leander Alexander 
statesville, n. c. 



Robert Lee Alphix 
wendell, n. c. 

Degre< 



[42] 



SENIOR r T, A S S 





Louis Appel 
brooklyn, n. y. 

Degree: B.S. 
Elisha Mitchell Society. 



Simon Weil Arenson 
baltimore, md. 

Age; 22 Degree: B.S. Pharmacy 





Broddie Duke Arnold 
fuquay springs, n. c. 

Age: Ji Degree: B. S. Pharmacy 

Monogram Club; Freshman Track; Varsity Track, 

(-', 3, 4). 
K * 



John Bulla Ashcraft 

MONROE, N. c. 
Age: 20 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

n K A 



[43] 



YACKETY YACK 




George Lewis Bagby 
charlotte, n. c. 

Age; 22 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

Freshman Track; German Club; Coop; Leader Sopho- 
more Dance; Minotaurs; Varsity Track, (2, 3, 4); 
Monogram Club; Interfraternity Council; Student 
Council (Summer Session); Gimghouls; Assistant 

Leader of Midwinter Dances. 
K 2 




Merritt Clarance Baker 
buffalo, n. y. 

; 22 Degree: A.B. Educati( 





Otis W. Baker 
carthage, n. c. 

Age: J2 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

Freshman Football; Varsity Football Squad, (2). 



Thomas R. Baldwin 
randleman, n. c. 

I Degre 

Phi Assembly. 



[44] 



SENIOR CLASS 





James Major Baley, Jr- 
asheville, n. c. 



Debate Team. 



Lexie Glenn Barefoot 

Age : 24 



A * A, K * 



FOUR OAKS, N. C. 

Degr 
Student Council. 




Thomas Hays Barker, Jr. 

leaksville, n. c. 



Age: 

Vice-P. 
* M A, * B K 



■ ident of Phi Be 




Clifford Randall Baucom 
marshville, n. c. 

Age: 23 Degree: A.B. 

Freshman Cross-country; Varsity Cross-country, (2. 3); 
Captain, (4) : Freshman Track; Varsity Track. 
(2, 3, 4); Boxing Squad, (4); Monogram Club; 
Dialectic Seriate; Treasurer of Senior Class; Senior 
Class Dance Committee; Summer School Student 



[45] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




John Coleman Beaklev 
asheville, n. c. 

Age: 2 1 Degree: A.l 




D. J. Beam, Jr. 

VALE, N. C. 



Degree: A.B. 




Clay Covington Bell 
rockingham, n. c. 

Age: 19 Degree: A.B. 

Freshman Boxing; \'arsity Wrestling. 




Mills Scott Benton 
sunbury, n. c. 

I Degree: LL.B. 



[46] 



SENIOR r I. A S S 




RuBKKT Edward Betts 

RALEIGH, N. C. 




Age: 23 
Associate Editor of B 

Committee : Sport; 



A.B. 

Executive 
Staff of Tar Heel. 



\\ iLLiAM Archibald Biggs, Jr. 

ROCKINGHAM, N. C. 
Age: 2i Degree: B.S. Chemistry 

* M A, A X : 




John S. Bivens 
monroe, n. c. 

Degree: A.B. 




Thomas Joel Bivens 
monroe, n. c. 

2 Degree: A.B. Education 



[47J 



YACKETY YACK 




Stanley Redding Blair 

TRINITY, N. c. 
20 Degree: B.S. Coi 




George Patterson Bourdelot 
wagram, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: B. S. Commerce 

A 2 n 




Age: 

e A <!■ 



Hazel Judith Lee Bowers 
spencer, n. c. 

Degree: A. 
Merryville College, i, 2, 3. 




Thomas Contee Bowie, Jr. 

west JEFFERSON, N. C. 
Age: 22 Degree: A.B. 

German Club; Di Society; Ass't Manager Box 

n K * 



[48] 



SENIOR CLASS 




Brandol Lee Boyette 
murfreesboro, n. c. 

!i Degree; B.S. Commerce 




James Thomas Boysworth 
norwood, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: B.S. Elec. Engineering 

A. I. E. E. 





William Thomas Braswell, Jr. 
whitakers, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: A.B. 



Alexander Macleod Brown 
southern pines, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: A.l 



[49] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 





Bonnie Curlee Brown 

ELKIN, N. c. 



Degree: Ph.G. 



Eugene Field Brown 
hillsboro, n. c. 

Age:' 21 Degree: B.S. Co 




John Leonard Brown, Jr. 
concord, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Civil Engineering 

German Club; Cabin; A. S. C. E.; Taylor Society. 




Landis Gold Brown 

SELMA, N. C. 

Degree: B.S. 



[50] 



SENIOR CLASS 





Norman Luther Bryan, Jr. 
winter park, fla. 

:: 20 Degree: B.S. in C.E. 

Society of Civil Engineers; Taylor Society; 
I'reshman Tennis; Varsity Tennis, (j, 3). 
T B n 



Ag. 



Walter Moore Bryson 
asheville, n. c. 

Age; 23 Degree: LL.B. 

Playmakers: Advertising Manager Tar Heel; Colun 
and Dramatic Critic for Tar Heel; Buccaneer; Yac 
Yack; Wigue and Masque; Treasurer and Busi 
Manager Wigue and Masque; German Club; J' 
ciate Director Law School Association; North Cart 



11 K '1', '1> A A 



Re 





Ruby Delight Buck 
bald mountain, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B. 

Secretary of Pan-hellenic Council. 



Mary Black Buie 
jackson springs, n. c. 

Age: 19 Degree: A.B. Journali: 

Tar Heel; The Carolina Magazine 



[51 



YACKETY YACK 





Fred Brenning Bunch, Jr. 
statesville, n. c. 



William Levi Burke, Jr. 
burlington, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S. Commerce 




Richard Joseph Caiola 

ASTORIA, long ISLAND, N. Y. 




Age: 
n B * 



Alice Alexander Carr 
mooresville, n. c. 

20 Degree: A.B. Education 



[52 



SENIOR CLASS 





William Wright Carroll 

COOPER, N. c. 
Age: 21 Degree: Ph.G. 



Daniel Weamer Carter 
pitman, n. j. 

Age: 2i Degree: A.B. Educatin 





Mary Anderson Carter 
fayetteville, tenn. 

Age: 23 Degree: A.B. Educatic 



Thomas James Chaconas 
washington, d. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: A.B. 



[53] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




William J. Chandler 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Age: 22 Degree: A.B. 

Playmakers, (i); Y. M. C. A.; Secretary Y. M. C. A., 

(3): Chief Cheer Leader, (3); Clerk Dialectic Senate, 




Page Choate 
salisbury, n. c. 

Degree: B.S. Elec. Engineering 
Basketball, (2, 3, 4); Taylor Society. 



(3); Student Council, (3}. 



A i II, e K. N 




Howard F. Chrisco 
chapel hill. n. c. 

Age: 2 1 Degree: B.S. Chem. Engii 

A. I. Chem. Engineers. 
T B II, A .\ T 




Thomas Montgomery t leland 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Age: 25 Degree: A.B. 

Basketball, (3, 4). 



54] 



SENIOR CLASS 




Clarence Lee Clodfelter 
thomasville, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: Ph.G. 

Pharmaceutical Association 




Senio 
* A 



AIlLTON COIIEX 
FLUSHING, L. I. 
:: 21 Degree: B.S. Co 

Class Executive Committee; Advertising Staff 
of Tar Heel; Interfraternity Council. 





Kate Drusilla Collins 
wingate, n. c. 

Age: 2i Degree: A.B. Education 



Williams Cooper 
OXFORD, N. c. 

Degree: B.S. Commerce 
nan Club; U. N. C. Rifle Team. 



[55] 



YACKETY YACK 





Marion Rountree Cowper 
kinston, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S. Civil Engineering 

Football squad, (2, 3, 4); Wrestling, (i, 2. 3. 4); 
American Society of Civil Engineers; Chairman Exec- 
utive Committee of German Club; Assistant Dance 

Leader, (3); Gorgon's Head; Monogram Club. 
Z * 



Elsa Snowden Craig 
chapel hill, n. c. 

;o Degree: A.B. Education 





Age: 
A X, 1 



Ray Palmer Craig 

stanley, n. c. 

Degree : 
rican Pharmaceutical Associatioi 



Frank Lathan Crane 

WAXHAW, N. c. 
Age: 24 Degree: A.B. Education 

Freshman Cross Country; Freshman Basketball 
man Track; Varsity Cross Count 



ball; Varsity Track. 



Fresh- 
sity Basket- 



[56] 



SENIOR CLASS 





Claude Jackson Craven 
charlotte, n. c. 

Age; zz Degree: A.B. Education 



Walter Scott Crawford 
chapel hill, n. c. 

: 2 1 Degree: B.S. Elec. Engineering 




BuRNiCE Leon Creole 

SWAN quarter, N. C. 
Age: ZQ Degree: B.S. Commerce 




Stanley Ellis Crew 

PLEASANT hill, N. C. 
Age: ;o Degree: A.] 

r A 



[57] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




John H. Croom 
fayetteville, n. c. 

Degree: A.B. 




CuLBERT Frederick Crutchfield 

NORTH WILKESBORO, N. C. 

Age: 2z Degree: A.B. Education 

Carolina Tar Heel Orchestra, (2, 3. 4). 




Ida Withers Currie 
clarkton, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B. 

President Woman's Athletic Association. 




John Alexander Currie 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 
22 Degree: 



58] 



S K N I O R C L A S S 




Walter Ai.ex I^aley 
orlando, fla. 

Age: Ji Degree: A.B. 

Cahin. (2, 3, 4); Interfraternity Council, (3): Gc 

man Club. 

tie 




Emerson Pe.xx D.\meron 
clinton. n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: A.B. 

Basketball, (2. j. 4J.;. Track. (2. 3, 4I; Monogr 



N 



Club; Phi Assembly, Cabii 




Harriet Lane Daniel 

CHAPEL hill, N. C. 
Age: 21 Degree: A. B. 

men's Student Co 




Clarence Davis 

WAXHAW, N. c. 

Degree: A.B. Education 



[59J 



YACKETY YACK 




Edgar Lee Davis 
hamlet, n. c. 

Degree: B.S. Elec. Engineering 




G. Obie Davis 

OMAHA, TEXAS 
Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Geology 

Freshman Football; Freshman Boxing; Varsity Box- 
ing, (2, 3. 4); Varsity Baseball, (3, 4); Monogram 
Club; Treasurer Junior Class. 





Ralph Watson Davis 

harmony, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Commerce 



Gaston Lee Deese 
monroe, n. c. 

Age: 2;t, Degree: A.B. Educatii 



[60] 



SENIOR CLASS 




Henry McLurd Bellinger 

stanley, n. c. 

Age: ig Degree: Ph.G. 
Ar ■ ~" 




Pharmaceutical Associati( 



Daniel Charles DeWolfe. Jr. 

MONROE, conn. 
Age: 23 Degree: A.B 

* A e 





Canfield Smith Dickie 
pittsfield, mass. 

Age: -'3 Degree: B.S. Civil Enginei 

A. S. C. E.; Taylor Society. 



Z 



Nicholas West Dockerv 
rockingham, n. c. 

Age: ^2 Degree: B.S. Chemistry 

Blue Key Order; Student Chapter of A. I. of Chem. 
Eng.- Alembic Club; Freshma- Boxing; Y. M. C. A.; 
Yackety Yack Photography Editor, (i, 2, 3, 4); Assist- 
ant Business Manager of Yackety Yack; Sub-Assistant 

Basket-ball Manager; Di Seiitate: German Club. 
S X; A X 2 



[61 



YACKETY YACK 




Felix Gladstone Doggett 
brown summit, n. c. 

Age: Ji Degree: B.S. Civil Engineering 

A. S. C. E. 




Jerry Whitsett Doughtie 
columbus, ga. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S. Civil Engineering 

Coop; (ierman Club; Taylor Society; A. S. C. E. 
A T J 




Thomas Basil Douglas 
HIGH point, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S. in Chemistry. 

Holt Scholarship, (jl. 




Virginia Adams Douglas 
greensboro, n. c. 

Age: JO Degree; A.B. 

Tar Heel Editorial Board; Phi Assembly. 



[62: 



SENIOR CLASS 




Ink/. Sparrow J)luij:y 
lake landing, n. c. 

Age: iQ Degree: A.B. Educati( 

Woman's Association. 




Charles Chapman Duffy 
new bern, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: A.B. 

r.lee Club, (.2. 3, 4); Secretary of Glee Club, (4); 



A r * 



Phi Assembly. 




RoDOLPH Duffy 

NEW BERN, N. C. 
Age: JJ Degree: LL.B. 

i 2 ♦, + .\ A 




Clyde Mason Duncan 
beaufort, n. c. 

Age: ig Degree: A B. 

Yackety Yack Staff, (3). 
n B * 



[63 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 





William Dunn, Jr. 
new bern, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: A.B 

Giraghouls; Minotaurs; Manag 



ittee of Ge 
nter Dances, C4) ; 



f Track; Executive 

Club, (j); Leader uf Mid- 

etary of First Year Law 



A K E, •!> B K 



Cla 



William Clyde Dunn 
kinston, n. c. 

Age: 2D Degree: A.B. 

Editor 1 93 1 Yackety Yack; Leader Fall (German Club 
Dances, (4); President Publications Union Board, (3); 
President International Relations Club: Executive Com- 
mittee Human Relations Institute: Class Executive 
Committee, (3); President Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, (2); 
Tar Heel Staff, (i, 2); Class Treasurer, (1): Coop; 

Golden Fleece. 
K 2, * B K, E * A 




Morris Dworin 
new york, n. y. 

Degree: B.S. Medic 




Joe Colin Eagles 

WILSON, N. c. 
Age: 20 Degree: A.B. 

President Phi Beta Kappa; Manager Freshman Bas- 
ketball; President Episcopal Student Vestry; Secretary 
Y. M. C. A., (3); Sport Editor The Tar Heel, (2); 
German Club Commencement Ball Manager; Sheiks: 
Gorgon's Head; Grail; Amphoterothcn; Cabin; Golden 

Fleece. 
K S, * B K 



SENIOR CLASS 





Charles Perry Erickson 
oak park, ill. 

Age: 33 Degree: B.S. Civil Engineering 

Varsity Football, (2, 3. 4); A. S. C. E.; Secretary, 
U): Vice-President, (3); Treasurer, (4); German 

Club; Tavlor Society. 
A T Si 



Ervid Elvin Ericsox 
chapel hill, n. c. 

Age: 19 Degree: A.' 




^^^^■I^^lfj 


1 


■f -^^1 


1 


^^^^Bjf ::,,0,i^ ^M 


1 


H^4 


1 


Y^ '"m 


1 


^^...rii^ 


J 



Hugh Tate Ervin 
morganton, n. c. 

Age: 3; Degree: B. S. Civil Engineering 



[65] 



lusKl'H GOODSON FAULKiNh-k 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 
22 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

Interfraternity Council. 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




James L. Ferebee, Jr. 
milwaukee, wis. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Civil Engineering 

oop; A. S. C. E.; Taylor Society; German Club. 




Fred J. Ferguson 

DELI. WOOD, N. C. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Commen 

Wrestling; Monogram Club; Grail. 





Adam Fisher, Jr. 
charlotte, n, c. 

Age: 20 Degree: B.S. Chem. Engin 



Coop; A. I. C. E 

ciety; Wrestling Squad; Y. 

Scientific Society; \'ice-I 



Treasurer; Taylor So- 
C. A.; Elisha Mitchell 
ident Tavlor Society. 



James Bankerd Fisher 
pittsburgh, pa. 

Age: 22 Degree: A.B. Education 

University of Pittsburgh, (i); Student Entertainment 

+ B K 



Committe 



[66: 



SENIOR CLASS 




RoscoE Brown Fisher 

SALISBURY, N. C. 
Age: J I Degree: A.B. 

Assembly; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet: Varsity Debatii 




Thomas Jacob Forney 
lawndale, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B. Educati( 






A A T, T K A, K A A 





Bedford Broisen Forrest 
hillsboro, n. c. 

: ^o Degree: Ph.G. 



Joseph Thomas Fovvi.er 
chapel hill, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Coi 



[67 



YACKETY YACK 




Age 

e K + 



Haskell Wright Fox 
troutman, n. c. 

22 Degree: B.S. MeJicin 




JusEPH Philip Fox 

METHUEN, MASS. 
Age: 23 Degree: A.B 

Carolina Playmakers; Assistant Editor of 
ATA 




Glenn David Freeman 
rutherfordton, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: A.B. Education 




Berry Godwin French 
lumberton, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

* r ,i 



[68] 



SENIOR CLASS 





Nahum Friedman 
brooklyn, n. y. 

Degree: A.B. 



Edna Elizabeth Garlick 
henderson, n. c. 

Age; -■-' Degree; t 




Howard Richard Garrett 
washington, d. c. 

Age: 23 Degree; AJ 




Ralph Bernard Garrison 

GLEN alpine, N. C. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S. Medicine 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society; American Medical 



A E K 



Association. 



[69J 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 





Eugene Larry Gaskill 
sea level, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B. Edm 



Harry Marion Gilbert 
darlington, s. c. 

Age: 2 1 Degree: 

i r i, A A T 





Paul Lestrade Gilbert 
statesville, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Civil Engineering 

man Club; Cabin; Arnerican_ Society of Civil Engi- 



Taylor Society. 



Matthew Pollock Gilmour 
wilmington, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: A.B. 

German Club; Cabin; Student Entertainraant Committe 
2 A E, * B K 



[7°; 



SENIOR CLASS 




Charles Sydney Glickman 
brooklyn, n. y. 

Age: 22 Degree: A.B. 

Freshman Track; Spanish Cluh; French Club; Ata 

Romani. 




Marjorie Good 
columbia, s. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B. 

Playmakers; Chicora College. 




Y. M. C. A, 



Noah Goodridge 

new YORK, N. Y. 

Degree: A.B. 
; Freshman Boxing; Varsity Boxing, 



(2, 3); Captain, (4); Monogram Club; Cabin; 

ulive Committee Junior Class; Grail; Golden Fleece. 

1 A E 




James Clivie Goodwin 

CLIFTON forge, VA. 



[71 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Thomas Wilson Gordon 
hillsboro, n. c. 

Age: 19 DeErpc: Ph.G. 




Abner Gorfain 
flushing, l. i. 

Age; ^i Degr 



B.S. 



Pharmaceutical As: 



Elisha Mitchell Society; Football Squad, (4). 



^ X 




James Samuel Gorham, Jr. 

ROCKY mount, N. C. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

Sub-Assistant Manager Track, {2); Treasurer 
Sophomore "Y" Cabinet: Vice-President Y. M. C. 

(4); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, (2, 3, 4); Coop. 
* K 2, A K * 




James Melvin Graham 
baltimore, md. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Commerce 



[72] 



SENIOR CLASS 




Kate Chestney Graham 
durham. n. c. 

2 1 Degree: A.B. Education 




John Cameron Grainger 
wilmington, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: A.B 

Cabin: "13" Club; Yackety-Yack Staff, (2). 
J *, * B K 





1 -i.izAi;i-;i II MiMiLi.AN Grant 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 
Age: 19 Degree: A.B. Educatioi 



Mary Irene Griffith 
ruffin, n. c. 

21 Degree: B.S. 

Playmakers; Woman's Association. 



72,] 



YACKETY YACK 




J. Walter C. Grotyohann 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Age: 25 Degree: A.B. 

Playmakers. 




June U. Gunter 
sanford, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B. 

* E, * B K 




William Aubrey Gurganus 
washington, n. c. 

5e: 22 Degree; A.B. Education 




Wade Hampton Hadley, Jr. 
siler city, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S. Geology 



74. 



SENIOR CLASS 





I'Idward Ryan Hamer 
mccoll, s. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B. Education 

Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Treasurer, (3); President. (4); 



Associate Editor Yackety Yack; Sub-Assistant Ma 
Basketball; Track Squad; Grail; Minotaurs; Cabin; 
Di Senate; Executive Committee Class (3); Student 
Entertainment Committee, {4); Commencement Mar- 
shall, (3); President. North Carolina Student Cabinet 

of Y. M. C. A.; Golden Fleece; German Club. 
: X. E + A 



Lawrence Townley Hammond 
asheboro, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B. 

Orchestra, (1); Glee Club, (3); Di Senate; Yackety 

Yack Staff, (3). 
I * E, E * .i 





Marie Elizabeth Hamrick 
boiling springs, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree; A.B. Educati( 



Robert V. Hanscome 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
I Degree; B.S. Commerce 



[75, 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 





John Madison Harrington 

FREEPORT, N. Y. 
Age: J3 Degree: A.B. 



James C. Harris 
INEZ, n. c. 
Age; J I Degree: A.B. 

Philanthropic Assembly (i, 2. 3. 4); Reading Clerk; 
Treasurer; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (i, 2, 3, 4); Inter- 
collegiate Debater; Debate Council, (3); Cross Coun- 
try Squad, (2, 3): Tar Heel Business Staff, {2, 3); 
Collection Manager, (3); Buccaneer Staff, (2, 3, 4); 

Collectibn Manager, (3); Business Manager, (4). 
T K .\, E * -i 




Clyde Lee Hawkins 
bessemer city, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: A.B. Education 

Dialectic Senate; Freshman Football. 




Charlotte Clinard Hayes 

EL PASOj TEXAS 



Age: 
A '1' ^ 



N. C. C. W. 



76: 



SENIOR CLASS 





Charles Patton Hayes, Jr. 
asheville, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Elec. Engineering 

Secretary, American Institute of Electrical Engineei 
(2, 4); Student Representative A. I. E. E. Southe 

Convention: Taylor Society. 
G *, T B n, * E K 



Egbert Lynch Haywood 
durham, n. c. 

Age: 19 Degree: A.B. 

Intercollegiate Debater; Winner Mangum Con 
ment Debate; Phi Assembly; Sergeant-at-Arms; Speaker 
Pro-Tern; Executive Committee; ''13" Club; Leader 
Fall German, (3): Interfraternity Council; Assistant 
Manager of Baseball; Manager of Freshman Baseball; 

X *, T K .V 





Wilbur Floy-d Haywood 
candor, n. c. 

Age: 25 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

Philanthropic Assembly; Taylor Society; Football 

Squad, (4). 



Herbert Hechexbleikxer 
charlotte, x. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: A.B. 



[77 



YACKETY YACK 




Peter Henderson, Jr. 
jersey city, n. j. 

Age: 22 Degree: A.B. Journa 

Freshman Football; Freshman Baseball; Rifl^ 
Coop; German Club; Playmakers, (i, 2, 3. 
Heel Staff. 




Willis Irwin Henderson 
charlotte, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, (i, 2, 3, 4); "u" Club; Leader 
Junior Prom; Commencement Ball Manager; Gorgon's 
Head; Dialectic Senate; Coop; Golf Squad, (2, 3); 

Boxing Squad, (4); German Club, 
r N, .^ K * 




Charles Howard Henry 
plainfield, n. j. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S 

Cheer Leader, (2, 3, 4I 

e K N 




Matthew 


Georc 


E 


Henry 




CHAPEL 


HILL, 


N 


C. 


^ge: 20 








Degree: 


. c. a. 


Cabinet, 
■ss Staff, 


%'aA 


4) 


; Buccan 
Club. 


A X S, 


* ,B K 









[78] 



SENIOR CLASS 




Eugene Griffin Hixes 
goldsboro, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S. Comn 

N, A K + 




Robert Mitchell Hodges 
winston-salem, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B. 

Editorial Board Tar Heel, (2, 3); Magazine, (2); 

Buccaneer, (3). 




Elmer George Hoeffer 
chapel hill, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S. Elec. Engine 

A. I. E. E.; German Club; Taylor Soc 




James Durward Hofler 
hobbsville, n. c. 

Age: Z'j Degree: B.S. Comme 



[79] 



YACKETY YACK 





Haywood Dail Holderness 
tarboro, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: A.B. 

Sheiks; Gorgon's Head; Interfraternity Council; Var- 



Herman Webb Hopper 
leaksville, n. c. 

21 Degree: B.S. Com 



^ K E 



;ing, (4). 





Giles Foushee Horney 
greensboro, n. c. 

Age: 23 Degree: B.S. Elec Engin, 

* Z N. T B 4> 



[80] 



Henry Charles House 

WELDON, N. c. 
Age: 21 Degree: A.B. 

Freshman Football; Freshman Baseball; Varsity Foot- 
ball. (2, 3, 4); Varsity Baseball, (2, 3, 4); "13" Club; 
Sheiks; Grail; Cabin; Vice-President of Monogram 
Club; Vice-President Athletic Association; Leader of 
Junior Prom; Gorgon's Head; Executive Committee of 
German Club. 
K A 



SENIOR CLASS 




Robert Edmund Hubbard 

CLINTON, N. c. 
Age: 23 Degree: B.S. Elec. Engin 

Cabin; German Club; Taylor Society; A. I. I 
Treasurer, (4) ; Interfraternity Council. 

* r .i. .). z X, T B n 




William Beekman Huger 
savannah, ga. 

Age: 23 Degree: A.B. 

Gimghoul. 
2 A E 




Clyde Elbert Hilun 
laurinburg, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. (2); Dormitory Council, (31 

President, (4). 




[81] 



W'lLLIA.M LaXIER Hu.VT 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Age: 25 Degree: A.B. 

Glee Club, (i, 2, 3, 4); Playmakers; Elisha Mitchell 

Scientific Society; Chapel Hill Community Chorus; 

Articles and Lectures on Horticulture; Cercle Francais; 

Sinfonia. 
* K 2. * M .4 



YACKETY YACK 





I'RED Sample Hunter 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 
Age: 24 Degree: A.B. Education 



JdHX Frank Huskins 

BURNSVILLE, N. C. 
9 Degree: A.] 




John Dempsey Idol 
high point, n. c. 

Age: .'.' Degree: B.S. 

Grail; Glee Club, (i); Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; German 
Club. 




Henry Tull Jackson 
MT. olive, n. c. 

»i Degree: A.B. Education 

Phi Assembly. 



[82: 



SENIOR CLASS 




LiLLiE Williams Jackson 

MT. PLEASANT, TENN. 
Age: 21 Degree: A.B. 

n B * 




Francis Atherton Jacocks 
tarboro, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Elec. Engineering 

Glee Club, (i, 2, 3, 4); Vice-President Glee Club, (3); 
President Glee Club, (3); Interfraternity Council, (4); 

Wigue and Masque, (4). 
Z -p 




John Snow Jemison, Jr. 
birmingham, ala. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Comtner 

Coop; German Club; Tar Heel Business Staff, 
3); President of the Coop, (4). 




Clyde Johnson 

milwaukee, n. c. 

Degree: 



[83] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




j.\.■^l■),K (.Ai.viN Johnson 

MORVENj N. C. 
Age: 20 Degree: A.B. 




PiNKNEY Greer Johnson, Jr. 

ASHEVILLE, N. C. 
Age: 20 Degree: B.S. Elec. Engineering 

American Institute of Electrical Engineers; Rifle Team, 
(3); Taylor Society; Dialectic Senate, (i). 
* Z N 




Herbert William Jones 
greensboro, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S. Commerc 

Freshman Friendship Council, (i); Band, (i, 2, 3, 4); 



sident 
K, •!• .M A 



and, (4) ; Interfraternity Co 




Joe Piper Jones 
berryville, va. 

Age: 22 Degree: A.' 

Grail; Amphoterothen. 



[84: 



SENIOR CLASS 





Patty Mathews Jordan 
salisbury, n. c. 

^ee: 20 Degree: A.B. Edticatii 

Playmakers. 



niacv CI 
(3): A. 



Robert Glenn Kale 
catawba, n. c. 

'• 22 Degree: Ph.G. 

iident Pharmacy Class, (i); President Phar- 
ass, (-•): President Pharmacy Student Body, 
Ph. A.; Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society. 
X, X T 





Thurman R. D. Karriker 
mooresville, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

Y. M. C. A., (i, 2, 3, 4): Dialectic Senate; Clerk 
of Dialectic Senate; Tar Heel Staff; Assistant Col- 
lection Manager, (2); Collection Manager, {3). 
2 * E, E * A 



Martin Kellogg, Jr. 
sunbury, n. c. 

'- Degree: A.B., 



[85 



YACKETY YACK 




Benjamin Burks Kendrick 
greensboro, n. c. 

je: JO Degree: B.S. Commen 

i i: II 




Benjamin H. Kent 
LENOIR, N. c. 

Dcgiei 





Archibald Douglas Kincaid 
norfolk, va. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B. 

Freshman Track Team; Varsity Track Sr.uad, (2). 
(3); Yackety Yack Staff, (i, 2, 3, 4); Associate 

Editor, (4); Y. M. C. A. Cabinets; German Club. 
A E E 



Jacob Sidney Kirk 
mocksville, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S. Elec. Engii 



[86] 



SENIOR CLASS 




John James Kirkpatrick 
caldwell, n. j. 

Age; 21 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

German Club; Secretary and Treasurer, Coop; Wigue 
and Masque; Secretary; Advertising Manager Play- 
makers: Interfraternity Council; Glee Club, (i, 2). 
* K : 




Worth LeRoy Kiser 
bessemer city, n. c. 

o Degree: B.S. Commerce 

Taylor Society. 




Kate Parks Kitchin 
scotland neck, n. c. 

Age: 19 Degree: A.B. 

House President Spencer Hall. 




Pedro Pablo Kjellesvig 
havana, cuba 

Age: 22 Degree: A.B. 

: *, E e d 



[87] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




George Martin Koehi. 
college point, n. y. 

Age: .'I Degree: A.B. Educatit 

Varsity Football Squad. 




Wallace H. Kltralt 
springfield. mass. 

Age: 23 Degree: B.S. CV 

Taylor Society; Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society. 
4> B K 




Age : 24 
n K A, * il 



Howard Lester Lackey 

CARLISLE, pa. 

Degree: 1 




Helen F. Lance 

milton, n. c. 

Degree: A.B. Education 
Woman's Association 



[88] 



SENIOR CLASS 




Benjamin Benson Lane, Jr. 
chapel hill, n. c. 

Age: .'O Degree: B.S., C.E. 

erican Society of Civil Engineers; Taylor Society. 




William Ray Lathan 

monroe, n. c. 

23 Degree; A.B. Educatii 





William Norris Lawrence 
asheville, n. c. 

[e: 19 Degree; B.S. Commerce 



Mebane Thomas Lea 

WILSON, N. c. 
>i Degree; A.B. 



[89] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Robert O. Levitt 
brooklyn, n. y. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B. 

Spanish Club; Tar Heel Staff; Esperanto Club; Ata 




Ro 



Club. 



William S. Lindsay' 
camden, s. c. 

_'i Degree: B.S. Commerce 

mcnt Marshall; German Club; Yackety Yack 
Staff, (2); Coop; Gorgon's Head. 




J. DoDD Linker 

SALISBURY, N. C. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B. 

e Club, (i, 2, 3, 4); Dialectic Senate; Freshn 

Boxing Squad; Der Deutsche Verein. 




Edward Russell Lipscomb 
greensboro, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: A.B. 

Vice-President Freshman Class; Assistant Leader 

Sophomore Hop; Minotaurs; Gorgon's Head; Football. 

(3, 4); President Monogram Club, (4). 



[90] 



SENIOR CLASS 




James Millard Little 
winston-salem. n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B.. LL.B. 




Lawrence Foushee London 
pittsboro. n. c. 

Age: 22 _ Degr 

A E, * B K 



Cabin. 




Edwin G. Long 

ROXBORO, N. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: B.S., Civil Engineering 

Taylor Society; A. S. C. E. 




Adelaide Madison McAnally 

HIGH POINT, N. C. 
Age: 20 Degree: A.B 

Spcretary of Council of Woman's Association. 



[91] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Jesse B. McArthur 

wakulla, n. c. 

Age; Jj Degree: A.l 




LoY Macon McCombs 

SALISBURY, N. C. 



Age: 
* A X 




John Daniel McConnell 
gastonia, n. c. 

:: ^3 Degree: B.S. Elec. Engineerin 

Wigue and Masque. 




Claude R. McIver 
summerfield, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: A.B. Education 



[92] 



SENIOR CLASS 




Clyde \'ernon McKinney 
reidsville, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: A.B. Education 

Freshman Football; Baseball; Track; Varsity Baseball 

Squad, (3, 4): Varsity Football Squad, (2); Wrestling 

Squad, (2, 3, 4). 




Haywood A. McLawhorn 

WINTERVILLE, N. C. 
: -'4 Degree: A.B. Educati< 




Ollen D. McLeod 
chapel hill, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B, 

German Club. 




William Primrose jMcPherson 
raleigh, n. c. 

Ag'i-: 21 Degree: B.S. Elcc. Engineering 



[93 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 





Cameron V. McKaI': 

RICHMOND, VA. 
Age: 21 Degree: B.S. Medii 



Imjitii Ho(jp?:r Mangum 
lexington, n. c. 

Age: 10 Degree: A.B. Educatic 

II B •(■ 




Isaac Hall Manning 
chapel hill, n. c. 

Age: 1 8 Degree 

Cross Country Squad; Track Squad; Ger 
Commencement Marshall; Vice-President Se 
Grail; Gorgon's Head; 

* K i, E * A 



V. M. C. A. Cabinet. 



A.B. 

.an Club 
lor Class 




Arthur Robert jMarpet 
yonkers, n. y. 

Age: 21 Degree: A.B. 

Freshman Basketball; Freshman Baseball; Varsity 
ketball, (2, 3, 4); Captain. (4); Vice-President Ju 

Class; Monogram Club. 
T E * 



[94] 



SENIOR CLASS 




Age: 22 
A S *, 2 T 



Alan Ashworth Marshall 
wilmington, n. c. 

Degree: A.' 




Philip Ward Mattocks 
gillett, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Geology 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society; Phi Assembly 




Clyde David Mauney 
cherryville, n. c. 

Age: 23 Degree: B.S. Commerce 




William Clinton Medford 
rainbow springs, n. c. 

y*^'- -1 Degree: A.B. 

President Dialectic Senate. 



[95 



YACKETY YACK 




Herman Stroupe Merrell 
fairview, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Comnlerc 

Tar Heel Business Staff, (2) ; Yackety Yack Bu: 

Staff, (3). 
2 * E 




Bonner Sutherland Mills, Jr. 
greenville, s. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

German Club. 




James Ray Mohorn 
littleton, n. c. 

Age: 25 Degree: A.B. Education 




Albert Rother Monroe 

SALISBURY, N. C. 

Age: 20 Degree: B.S. Geology 

University Band, (i, 2, 3, 4). 



[96] 



SENIOR CLASS 





George Dougald Moody 
charlotte, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: A.B. 

Sheiks. 



Beverly Cooper Moore 
greensboro, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: A.B. 

Chairman Human Relations Institute; Columnist, As- 
sistant Editor, Associate Editor, Chairman Editorial 
Board Tar Heel; Associate Editor Carolina Magazine; 
Yackety Yack Staff; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Mary D. 
Wright Debate Medal; Polity Forum; Central Ad- 
ministrative Council; Interfraternity Council; Dialectic 
Senate; German Club; Secretary Sophomore Class; 
President Cosmopolitan Club; Amphoterothen; \'ice- 
President North Carolina Student Council on Social 

Progress, 
n K *, + B K, E + ^ 





Fred H. J. Moore 

STANTONSBURG, N. C. 
Age: 20 Degree: B.S. Commerce 



Reeme Moore 
dallas, texas 

20 Degree: A.B. 

President of Woman's Association. 



[97] 



YACKETY YACK 




klCHARl) HkNKV i\1o(]RK 

BATTLEBORO, N. C. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S. Civil Engineering 

Monogram Club; Varsity Wrestling- \Vm. Cain So 

ciety of Civil Engineers. 




William Benjamin Moore 
reidsville, n. c. 

Age: 23 Degree: A.B. Educatii 




William Walter Moore 
rocky mount, n. c. 

Age: IQ Degree: B.S. Comm 




RoscoE Howard Morgan 
marshville, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B.. LL.B. 

Dialectic Senate; Holt Scholarship. 



[98] 



SENIOR CLASS 





Mary Wadlky Morris 
columbus, ga. 

20 Degree: A.B. 



ElJNA E. MoRRISETTE 
ELIZABETH CITY, N. C. 





Alfred Alexander Mount 
college point, n. y. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Comme 

; n. 2 ■t> z 



Ralph Howard Munch 
chapel hill, n. c. 

Age: 19 Degree: B.S. Chemical 



[99] 



YACKETY YACK 





William Benjamin Napier 
wilmington, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: A.B. 



Edward Strudwick Nash, Jr. 
charleston, s. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

President Freshman Class; Freshman Football; V: 
sity Football, (2, 3, 4); Coop; Minotaurs; Gimghoi 

Taylor Society; Captain Football, (4). 
r A E 





Herbert Robert Nettles 

ARDEN, N. C. 
23 Degree: A.B. 



[ 100] 



George Franklin Newman, Jr. 
greensboro, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

Executive Committee, German Club, (3); Assistant 

Manager Track, (3); Manager Cross Country, (4). 
n K * 



SENIOR CLASS 





e *, * B K 



Jesse Strickland Newsom 
sandersville, ga. 

:: 2! Degree: B.S. Mcch. Engineering 

Taylor Society; Boxing Squad. 



James Lloyd Norris 

DUNN, N. C. 
I Degree: B.S. Chem. Engineering 

:an Society of Ciiemical Engineering. 





George Motley Oliver 
yanceyville, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: A.B. 

Freshman Football; Varsity Football Squad. 



William Bridges Oliver 
pine level, n. c. 

22 Degree: B.S. Comn 

Coop; German Club. 



[lOl] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 





Charles Beatty Overman 
washington. d. c. 

e: 2} Degree: B.S. Chem. Engineering. 

Manager. (4); 



Institute 



of Chemical Engin 
Society. 



Taylo 



Daniel Jack Pachman 
brooklyn. n. y. 

Age; ig Degree: A.B. 

Z B T 




Milton P. Park 

GREENSBORO. N. C. 
Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

shman Track; Freshman Basketball: Varsity Track; 
Varsity Baseball; Glee Club. 




Leland Frederic Parrish 
smithfield, n. c. 

Age: 26 Degree: Ph.G. 

Pharmaceutical Association. 



[102] 



SENIOR CLASS 





James Franklin Parrott, Jr. 

kinston, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Commert 

e X, ^ :; n 



Robert Aubrey Parsley, 
wilmington, n. c. 

Age; 22 Degree: B.S. Mech. Engii 

Coop; Grail; Executive Committee German Club; Gii 



ghoul; 

(2 



3); 



Freshman Football; Varsity Football S<4uad. 
sity Football, (4); Monogram Club; 



A. S. M. E. 



k E, '!■ IS K, T B n 





Gold 
Manage 



Fie 



Henry N. Patterson 
high point, n. c. 

2 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

ce; President Senior Class; Grail; Busir 
Heel; Business Manager 



Buccaneer; 
Manager Carolina Magazine; Student Coun- 
cil, (2, 3, 4); Amphoterothen; Coop; German Club; 
Leader Senior Ball; Executive Committee Sophomore 
and Junior Classes; Y. M. C. A. Cabinets; Senior Ad- 
visor Freshman Friendship Council; Dialectic Senate. 
* r A, A K * 



Branch Edwards Paxton 
greenville, s. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

iity Baseball, (2, 3. 4); Monograir. Club; Cabi: 

German Club. 



YACKETY YACK 





Germ 
X + 



Arthur Gregory Peeler 
salisbury, n. c. 

: 20 Degree; B.S. 

Club; Assistant Leader Junior Prom; Sub- 
Assistant Football Manager. 



Armando ;\Iendez Perez 
la coruna, spain 

Age: 23 Degree: B.S. Elec. Engine. 

A. I. E. E.; Spanish Club. 
.\ T, E * A 





Age 
Minotau 
Cabin: 



Edgar Cooper Person, Jr. 
pikeville, n. c. 

: 20 Degree: A.B. 

German Club; Phi Senate; 



Gorgon's Head; 
esident Cabin, (4) ; Commencement 
Manager; Freshman Basketball. 



Florence Lorraine Phillips 
fredericksburg. va. 

Age: 21 Degree: A.B. Education 



Ball 



[104] 



SENIOR CLASS 




Clifton Edward Pleasants 
winston-salem, n. c. 

'^sc: 20 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

n K 4., A K * 




Millard Quentin Plumblee 
mars hill, n. c. 

Age: 23 Degree: A.B. Educatio 

Mars Hill College, (i, 2, 3). 




Robert Croxly Plummer 
wilmington, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Mech. Engineering 

A. S. M. E.; Taylor Society. 




Robert Lemuel Poplin, Jr. 
statesville, n. c. 

/^8^- ^3 Degree: B.S. Chemistry 



105] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




WjLI.IAM 11. I'dlilK 
BEAUFORT, N. C. 

Degree: A.B. Educatii 
Varsity Baseball, (2, 3, 4). 




John Aaron Prevost 
waynesville^ n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: B.S. 

Yackcty Vack Business Staff; Ge 
A X A 





Whitener Harris Prevost 
waynesville, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Coitimerce 

Taylor Society. 
« A, A 2 n 



Henkel Moser Price 
hickory, n. c. 

Age: ::i Degree: A.B. 

German Club; Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society 

;, e K * 



ro6 



SENIOR CLASS 





Mary Watkins Price 
greensboro, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: 

Tar Heel Reporter, (3, 4) ; Exchange Editor B 

Editorial Staff Buccaneer, (3, 4). 
X S! 



Robert Huntington Proctor, Jr. 
hollis, long island 

Age: 21 Degree: A.B. 

distant Manager Carolina Playmakers; German Club; 

Stage Manager Carolina Playmakers. 





Oliver M. Proffit 
goshen, n. c. 

Degree: A.B. Education 



James Clayton Purser 
unionville, n. c. 

Age: 24 Degree: A.B. 

Freshman Cross Country and Track; \'arsity C 
Country. 



[ 107 ] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 





George Joseph Quinn, Jr. 
east orange, n. j. 

Age: 23 Degree: B.S. Civil Engineering 

Interfraternity Council; A. S. C. E. ; Taylor Society. 
.4 T S!, T B n 



Kerr Craige Ramsay 

salisbury, n. c. 

Age: ly Degree: A.B 

President Publications Union Board; President 
lectic Senate; Daily Tar Heel StalT; City Editor, 
Sports Editor. (4); Grail; German Club; Comr 
ment Ball .Manager; Chairman Executive Com 
Senior Class; Class Statistician; Sub-Assistant 
ager Football and Track; Y. M. C. A. Cat: 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society; Coop. 
I X; * B K, E * .1 



(3); 

littee 
Man- 
nets; 





Joseph King Ray 

leaksville, n. c. 



Elizabeth Gatewood Reed 
beaumont, texas 



[los; 



Age: 
Z T A 



SENIOR CLASS 





Mary Adelaide Reed 
beaumont, texas 

Degree: A.B. 



Robert Reeves 
cincinnati, ohio 

Degree: A.B. 




Claude Everet Reitzel, Jr. 
high point, n. c. 

Age: 25 Degree: LL.l 

A S *, * A J 




Arthur Eugene Reynolds, Jr. 
salisbury, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Civil Engineering 

A. S. C. E.; Taylor Society; Cabin; German Club; 

Band, (i). 
* r :i 



[109] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 





Albert Moore Rhett 
charleston, s. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: A.B. 



Paul Heilig Rhodes 
albemarle, n. c. 

> Degree: 




Thomas Moore Riddick 
gatesville, n. c. 

Age: 23 Degree: B.S. Civil Engine 

German Club; A. S. C. E. 




George Harold Roach 
greensboro, n. c. 

21 Degree: B.S. Commerce 



[IIO] 



SENIOR CLASS 




Henry Roane 
winston-salem, n. c. 

!6 Degree: LL.B. 




Clyde Morris Roberts 
marshall, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: A.B. Educatii 

Dialectic Senate ' 




Elise Williams Roberts 
charlotte, n. c. 

-' Degree: . 

Staff of Agora. 




AsHBY Coleman Robertson 

BURLINGTON. N. C. 

Age: 20 Degree: B.S. Elec. Engineerii 

Taylor Society; A. I. E. E. 



[Ill] 



YACKETY YACK 





Marie Rogers 
kinston, n. c. 

Degn 



Abraham Rosenblatt 
brooklyn, n. y. 

Age: 22 Degree: A.B. Education 

Wm. Cain Mathematical Medal, (3). 





Age: 
A. I. Che 
Club; Gr, 



Raymond John Ruble 
chapel hill, n. c. 

B.S. Chem. Engineering 



n. E.; Varsity Tr, 

il Award for Tr 

Taylor S 



ck, (2, 3, 4) 
ick, (3); Ge 



Monogram 
man Club; 



Peter Browne Ruffin 
wilmington, n. c. 

Age: M Degree: A.B. 

Sheiks: Gimghouls; Coop; Manager Football. 

S A E 



[112] 



SENIOR CLASS 





Serah Elizabeth Rushixc, 
marshville, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B. Educati( 



John Claude Sales, Jr. 
fletcher, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S. Commerce 




Andrew Tyer Sawyer 
elizabeth city, n. c. 

Age; 21 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

Interfraten ty Council; Coop; German Club. 

n K A 




Sidney William Sayre 

TRYON, N. c. 
Age: 19 Degree; B.S. Commerce 



[113] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 





Wallace Bryan Scales. Jr. 
salisbury, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree; A.B. 

Coop; German Club. 



Erwin Ralph Scott 
cummington, mass. 

Age: 23 Degree: B.S. Geology 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society 




Malcolm Blue Seawell 
sanford, n. c. 




Emil N. Schaffner 
winston-salem, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: A.B. 

•■13" Club; German Club; Cabin. 



[114] 



SENIOR C L y\ S S 




Harry Linden Shaner, Jr. 
winston-salem, n. c. 

Age; 21 Degree: A.B. 

Club: German Club; Executive Committee Se 

Class. 




James H.\K(ii.d Sheffield 

CANTON, N. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

Freshman Boxing Team; Varsity Boxing, (2, 3); 

Monogram Club; Taylor Society. 




Wallace Augustus Shelton ' 
mount airy, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: A.B. 

Heel Staff; Assistant Director Intramural Ath- 
letics. 




William Aaron Sherrill 
granite falls, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S. Commerce 



[115] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 





James Ray Shirlen 
swannanoa, n. c. 

Age: 28 Degree: B.S. C 



William Arthur Shulenrerger, Jr. 
charlotte, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: A.B. Journalism 

Tar Heel Staff; Track Squad. (3); Cross Countr 

Squad, (3). 





Arthur deLoss Sickles 
rochester, n. y. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

Freshman Friendship Council; Freshman Basketball; 
Tar Heel Staff; Wigue and Masque; Playmakers; Ger- 
man Club: Assistant Leader Midwinters; Commence- 
ment Ball Manager; Baseball Manager; Monogram 
Club; Senior Class Executive Committee; Blue Key; 

President May Frolic. 
2 X; A K + 



Byron Augustus Sieder 
south orange, n. j. 

Age: 2i Degree: B.S. Commerce 

President Taylor .Society. 



ii6j 



SENIOR CLASS 





Charles Culpepper Sikes 

MONROE, N. c. 
Age: 21 Degree; A.B. 



Sam Silverstein 
washington, d. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

Executive Committee Senior Class; Y. M. C. A. Cab- 
inet; Manager Freshman Baseball; Assistant Business 
JIanager and Advertising Manager Yackety Yack; 
Assistant Advertising Manager Buccaneer; Librarian 
Tar Heel; Interfraternity Council; Dialectic Senate; 
Senior Class Dance Committee. 





Joseph Carlyle Sitterson 
kinston, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B. 

Phi Assembly; Sophomore Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Grail. 
E * A 



Wilfred Nixon Sisk 
rockingham, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree; A.B. 

Phi Assembly; Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society; Glee 

Club. 



[117] 



V A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Leo Brown Skeen 

BISCOE, N. c. 

Degree: B.S. Medic 
Band, (i, 2, 3, 4). 




John Gary Slater 
new bern, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

Urail; Varsity Basketball, (3, 4); German Club; Tay- 

Inr Society. 
II K -h, A K '1', ■!• H K 




Age; 21 



Stanley W. Smiley 
fort bragg, n. c. 

Degree: B.S. Commerce 




Benjamin Hawkins Smith, Jr. 
cranford, n. j. 

Age: 22 Degree: A.B. Education 



[118J 



SENIOR CLASS 





BuDD Elmon Smith 

BENSON,, N. C. 

Age: JO Degree: A.B. Education 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society. 



Claude Alexander Smith 
asheboro, n. c. 

e: 2i Degree: A.B. Eilucatii 





James Kenneth Smith 
washington, d. c. 

Age: 54 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

Freshman Track; Varsity Track, (2, 3, 4); Monogr 
Club. 



Thomas Carlisle Smith, Jr. 
asheville, n. c. 

Age: 23 Degree: LL.B. 



[ "9 ] 



YACKETY YACK 




William Boylan Snow, Jr. 
asheville, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree; A.B. 

Sub-Assistant Manager Baseball; Amphoterothen; Gor- 
gon's Head; Vice-President German Club. 
Z -1', * B K 




Age: 
A .\ T 



Philip Sowers 
salisbury, n. c. 

Degree: B.S. Co 





Frank Parker Spruill, Jr. 
rocky mount, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B. 

Cabin; Glee Club; Law School Association; Freshman 
Friendship Council; Sophomore Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; 

Playmakers. 
* K r, * B K 



William Agurs Starbuck 
winston-salem, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: .\.B., LL.I 



[120] 



SENIOR CLASS 





John Henry Stewart 
greensboro, n. c. 

^2 Degree: A.B. Education 

Glee Club, (2, 3, 4). 



Orvis Daniel Stinson 
goldston, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Civil Engineering 

Taylor Society; Wm. Cain Chapter of A. S. C. E. 





Robert Glenn Stovall 
virgilina, va. 

Age: 22 Degree: 



William Archie Sugg 
greenville, n. c. 

21 Degree: B.S. Comn 

Coop; German Club; Band. 



[ I-'I ] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




George Richard Sulkin 
dorchester, mass. 

..„ Degree; A. 

Buccaneer Staff; Orchestra; Baiul. 




Albert Irving Suskin 
new bern, n. c. 

Age: JO Degree: A.B. Education 




William Shields Tabb 
wilmington, n. c. 

Age: 2^ Degree: B.S. Commerce 

Freshman and Varsity Football; Monogram Club, (3,4). 




John Tucker Tallev 
new hill, n. c. 

Age; 21 Degree; B.S- Comn 



[122] 



SENIOR CLASS 




Charles Edward Taylor 
newburgh, x. v. 

^ee: 22 Degree; A.B. 

, , Playmakers. 




Henry Carrison Thomas 
charleston, s. c. 

: ^' Degree: B.S. Chemistry 




George Dewey Thompson 
goldsboro, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Elec Engineering 

Minotaurs; Gimghouls; Varsity Football; Varsity 

Wrestling: -Monogram Club. 
Z *, * B K, T B n, * Z N 








William Cannon Thompson- 
rosemary, N. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: B.S. Commerce 

Band, (i, :■, 3, 4); Orchestra; Buccaneer Orchestr 

Tar Heel Orchestra. 



[123 J 



YACKETY YACK 




William Sydnor Thompson 
atlanta, ga. 

ge: 21 Degree: A.B. 

Cabin. 




Laurence Houston Todd 
yadkinville. n. c. 

Age; 28 Degree: A.B. 

« B K 



Dialectic Senate 





James Rousseau Tomlinson 
north wilkesboro, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Commerce 



William Adolph Triess 
nutley, n. j. 

Age: 24 Degree: B.S. Commer^ 



[124] 



SENIOR CLASS 




Virginia Turner 

WELDON, N. c. 




Thomas Albert Uzzell. Jr. 
greexsboro, n. c. 

Age: 25 Degree: LL.B. 

en,* A J, 




EvAX James Vaughax 

NANTICOKE, PA. 
Age: 24 Degree: A.B. Education 

Freshman Bo.xing; Varsity Boxing, (2, 3); Carolina 
Playmakers; Secretary Senior Class; Sophomore Y. M. 
-^ • Sophomore Dance Committee; Mono- 
gram Club. 



C. A. Cabi. 




John Southgate Vaughax 
woodland, n. c. 

:e: 21 Degree: A.B. 



[125] 



YACKETY YACK 





John Golden Wadsvvokth 
williamston, n. c. 

e: 22 Degree: B.S. Civil Engineer 

S. C. E.: Taylor Society: German CI 



William Rae Wall 
tobaccoville, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B. Educatii 

Cain Mathematical Medal. 





Bernard Rudolph Ward 
fairmont, n. c. 

22 Degree: B.S. Phari 



Sarah Klizabeth Ward 

CONWAY, s. c. 

Age; 22 Degree: A.B. Education 



[126] 



SENIOR CLASS 




John AIcCullen Warren 
durham, n. c. 

Age: 2J Degree: A.B. 

Freshman Football and Boxing: Varsity Football, (2); 

N'arsity Boxing, (2, 3, 4). 




Alston Stoddard Watkins 
ditrham, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: B.S. Coranie; 

J K E, A K * 





John Seabron Weathers 
ocala, fla. 

Age: 19 Degree: A.B. Ediicati( 



John Alton Weaver 

CLIN, N. c. 

Age: 24 Degree: Ph.G. 



[127] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 





Kuui.Ki I'Lsius Welch 

ELIZABETHTON, TENN. 
21 Degree: B.S. Commerce 



Watson Wharton 
smithfield. n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: A.. 





Kermit Wheary 
crewe, virginia 

Age: 25 Degree: A.B. 

Editor Buccaneer; Assistant Editor Carolina Maga- 
zine: Cabin. 
S T S 



I 128 ] 



Ruth Elaine Wheaton 
ogdensburg, n. y. 

Age: -'I Degree: A.B. 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society; Women's Student 
n B *, A + .i 



Council. 



SENIOR CLASS 





Howard Preston \\'hisxaxt 
belmont, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B. 

Freshman Football; Senior Executive Committee; Di; 

lectic Senate; Student Council. 



Roy Gilbert Whitaker 
chapel hill, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: A.B. Education 




Rankin Jones White 
chapel hill, n. c. 

Age: 2b Degree: B.S. Civil Engine! 

resident A. S. C. E.; Freshman Football; 
Football Squad. 
Z, T B n 




Iley Chester Whiteley 
morganton, n. c. 



[129] 



YACKETY YACK 




Robert Vance Whitener 
high point, n. c. 

Age; JO Degree: B.S. Elec. Engiiiee; 

Taylo 




\'a 



Wrestling, U 



William Ransom Whittenton 
benson, n. c. 

Age: 21 Degree: A.B. Edueation 

^ cutive Committee; Y. M. " 



iiiets; Phi Assembly; Speaker Pro-Te 



nf Phi, 





Graham Wilburn 
lillington, n. c. 

Degree: B.S. Ci 



Catherine Thomas Wilds 
chattanooga, tenn. 

Age: 20 Degree: A 



[130: 



SENIOR CLASS 




Ruth Ellen WiLLL\iLS 

MORVEN, N. C. 

Age: ig Degree: A.B. Educatio 

Phi Assembly: Woman's Association. 




AIkade Homer WrLLLs, Jr. 

WINSTON-.SALEM, X. C. 

Age: 20 Degree: A.B. 

Golf Team, (_>. 3. 4); Captain. (4); Minotaurs: Ba 

ketball Squad; .Monogram Club: German Club 
i K K 




George Tayloe \\'ixstox 
chapel hill, n. c. 

Age: 20 Degree: B.S. Civil Engineering 

Freshman Friendship Council; A. S. C. E. ; Glee CInh, 

(2, 3. 4); Taylor Society; A. I. E. E. 
* K 1 




Mary Laurexs Withers 
raleigh. n. c. 

Age: .g Degree: A.B. Education 



[ 131 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 





AIaurice \\'olf 
brooklyn. n. y. 

Degree: A.B. 
nd Varsity Tenni,s; Esperanto Cliilj; Ata 



Sylvia W'olk 
wilmington, n. 



Ro 



Club. 





Joseph Guye Womble 

FOREST city, N. C. 
Age: 22 Degree: A.B. 



Donald Leigh Wood 



kinston, n. c. 



Age: 23 
Glee Club, (2 
Yack Staff, (2 



[ 132] 



Degree: A.B. Education 
3); Tar Heel Staff, (2, 3); Yackety 
. 3) ; Phi Assembly, (1, 2) ; Freshman 
Intercollegiate Debate; Inter-Society Debating; Y. M. 
C. A. Cabinets; Le Cercle Francais; Black and White 
Revue; Wigue and Masque; Buccaneer Staff; Caro- 
lina Playmakers, (3. 4); German Club. 
* 2 K 



SENIOR CLASS 





Edward Jenney Wood 

wilmington, n. c. 

Age: 22 Degree: A.B. 



James Cullen Wood 

APEX, N. c. 
♦ Degree: B.S. C. 





Barney Lelon Woodard 

KENLEY, N. C. 
Age: 23 Degree: B.S. Medii 



Marvin Erastus Woodard 
goldsboro, n. c. 

': 22 Degree: B.S. Commerce 



[133] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Ernest Hughes Wyche 
greensboro, n. c. 

.■1 Degree: B.S. Chen 




William Henry Yarborough, Jr. 
louisburg, n. c. 

Age: 23 Degree: A.B. Journalism 

Tar Heel Staff, (i); Sports Editor, (2); Managms 
Editor Har Heel, (3); Editor, (4); German Club; 
Executive Committee German Club, (3, 4): Secretary- 
Treasurer German Club (3, 4); Yackety Yack. (3); 
President Publications Union Board, (::); tnterfra- 
ternity Council, (4) ; Class Executive Committee, (3, 

4); Coop; Sheiks; Golden Fleece. 
1 .\ E 



(^.^■«^<f7)CL^^-^,rse.«^^<?^ 



Class Poem 



III a iiiilkTi.'ccd's pud. drinkuuj the zchitc .«;/>, 

Suing, protected, wcll-ordcrcd. and aligned. 

Alike as scales on a sucker's back. 

Lie the young seeds, imporfitnatc, iiiilricd. 

Tomorrow they will drift the windy ineudoivs. 

Each under his ozvn snowy wing. 

And no omnipotence may pack them in again. 

Tiered, dovetailed, shoulder to shoulder. 

I 

Look at them before they scatter azvay. 

Closely, to see under the little flaws and differences 

The inevitable oneness of their pattern; 

Beneath the spats and affectation of one. 

The flannel luidenvear and dullness of another. 

Beneath the whims, the shams, the loud talk. 

The drunken, synthetic laughter, the studious asceticism 

Under hypocrisy and sincerity, pride and humility. 

The varying interests, the petty aspirations 

For campus honors, bloated to spurious value 

By the unfocused, giddy eyes of youth. 

Under if all beats a common pulse, an ache. 

A steady cadence of ambition that yearns to strike 

The lifted note of a dim thing called happiness. 

[134] 



HI 



They go hunting it now. 

All following one scent; 

But with as many different gaits 

As there are members of the pack; 

And each giz'cs tongue in his ozvn 7cay. 

Pseudo-dileftants, athletes, genuine stitdcnis. 

Lank mountain boy, stony-shouldered. 

The strength of gnarled hackwood in his arms 

A feiv fools, a fezv complacent szviiic. 

Perhaps a genius or tzvo ; playboys, grinds. 

And a hundred colorless, plodding zvights 

Who may pull doivn the quarry 

Where the others have gone heedless by. 

Reckless and blind in haste. 

II 

Chapel Hill zvill see them again some day. 
"Limping up the wind," 
Covering their wistfulness with laughter. 
And handshakes, and boisterous greetings. 

— Joe p. Jones, Class Poet. 




CLASS HISTORY 

AS we try to recollect those scenes and events which con- 
iVstitute our history for the past four years we are seized 
at once with a feeling of loss and a sense of gain — perhaps 
it would not be incorrect to say accomplishment. In retro- 
spect the Class of '31 seems to have passed through four 
crowded years. Many things have happened, and many changes 
have been wrought. In fact, our period of academic life has 
been one of transition : the campus has changed its appearance ; 
ModRE professors have come and gone; new institutions have been 

established, and old ones have been altered. But these changes have not been 
revolutionary or sudden ; there has been no hectic struggle between the old and 
the new. There has not even been a really live intellectual issue which has 
roused the whole student body (which members of bygone classes lead us to 
believe was the case in previous years) ; there has been nothing of this sort 
to divide our ranks. Thus, while we have witnessed changes, and while we 
ourselves no doubt have been transformed in many ways, our growth has been 
quiet. And this quiet educational process we have passed through has given 
us time to absorb some of the atmosphere of the University and color of Chapel 
Hill, which things are the very stuff of our regret in completing our four 
years here ; for having learned to love the University and to appreciate the term 
alma mater, we suddenly find that we must leave. We feel, in leaving, that we 
are losing something which we are just beginning to understand. Our loss, 
however, is tempered by our progress as individuals, by our having been shown 
the direction of education, by our friendships, and by personalities and in- 
cidents which will always live in our memories. 

Our class has seen the campus extend its proportions to an extent which 
is almost phenomenal. The Library, Bingham Hall, Kenan Memorial Stadium, 
"I" Dormitory, and nine fraternity houses were added to the surroundings. 
New West and New East were renovated, and then followed the remodelling 
of Peabody. Old Memorial Hall was condemned and razed, and a new struc- 
ture was built on its site. Through the generosity of donors whose identities 
are unknown, the new music building and auditorium were erected, and funds 
for the completion of Graham Memorial Building were provided. Although we 
probably shall not see the Morehead-Patterson Tower completed, we at least 
saw its beginning. As we leave, Carr Building is being transformed into a club 
for lawyers, and some of us will avail ourselves in the future of the advantages 
of this renovation. With the erection of new buildings the South Campus has 
taken on a new importance, and none of us will be surprised to see new dormi- 
tories and classroom buildings grouped in a few years — after the depression — 
around Kenan Stadium. 

Other important changes concern campus institutions. Possibly the most 
revolutionary of these was the decision on the part of that time-honored 

[135] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 

organization, the Philanthropic Assembly, to admit females to membership. The 
Di has not, as yet, seen fit to do this. Probably the most important innovation 
was the Daihj Tar Heel. News daily instead of tri-weekly has improved our 
dispositions at the breakfast table considerably. The Magazine, a supplement 
of the daily, now appears semi-monthly. Another significant establishment was 
the Entertainment Committee, which provided us with a much more entertain- 
ing and artistic program than we had before. 

Early in our history we had political battles among ourselves which at 
first appeared likely to divide our house. However, although the great game 
of politics is practically in the same state at the present as when we first had 
contact with it, campaigns against each other, it cannot be said, never made 
us bitter toward each other. After the melee of each election vanquished con- 
gratulated victor, and things went on peacefully. We have been particularly 
fortunate in our leadership. Our class presidents during the four years have 
been most able. Under strong leaders much progress has been made in student 
government, which is gradually growing more popular and efficient. There is 
no student organization on the campus which has not experienced and which 
has not been affected by members of our class. We are justly proud of those 
men who have brought honor to our colors. 

We are the largest class in the history of the University, and rivals might 
attribute our many superlatives to this fact alone. Nevertheless, there are 
more Phi Beta Kappa keys and athletic monograms attached to members of 
our class than to those of any other. Moreover, we are the most cosmopolitan 
group, almost one-sixth of our members being residents of other states and 
foreign countries. 

The Class of '31 made an unusual contribution to the University in its 
donating five hundred dollars to the Second Quadrennial Institute on Human 
Relations. When it became evident that the Institute Committee could not 
secure adequate funds, the class stepped in and saved the day. This gift of the 
class to the Institute, as a gift to the University, will not only be a permanent 
monument to the Class of '31 ; it will be as well an everlasting tribute to its 
members. 

When we entered the University the market was bullish, we were optimis- 
tic, and the future seemed to hold in store for us a multitude of good things. 
Now we face a bearish market, we are rather discouraged about the future, 
and we wonder whether the depression will last two years longer or ten. But 
even if our hearts are not light, they are not heavy. We leave knowing that the 
University will continue to go forward, for it could not do otherwise under the 
administration of so able and beloved a man as our new leader. President 
Frank Graham. And perhaps — this is not conceit — some of our own mem- 
bers may be able to pull us out of all this chaos. After all, who can tell? 

Beverly Moore, Historian. 

[136] 



Last Will and Testament of the Class 

State of North Carolina, Orange County, City of Chapel Hill, University of 

North Carolina 




w 



E, the class of '31, of the aforesaid State, county, city, 
and university, notwithstanding 8:30 classes, term 
papers, comprehensive exams, Swain Hall food, etc., do claim 
to be of sound mind; and in consideration of the approaching 
end of our collegiate existence, do make and declare this our 
will and testament. We do hereby give, bequeath, devise, con- 
vey and dispose of the following hereinafter provided. 

Little 

1. Our executor, hereinafter named, shall give to our memory a decent 
resting place, suitable to the wishes of our friends and relatives, and pay all 
expenses to the Hall of Fame, together with all our just and recognizable 
debts, out of moneys which may belong to our estate, including any laundry 
deposit, laboratory, and locker refunds accruing thereto. 

2. To the University : A sufficient sum to finance the erection and main- 
tenance of a building with walls six feet thick, wherein shall be put separate 
rooms for the use of immature orchestras, would-be glee clubs, and chronic 
devotees of boisterous bull-sessions ; also money for the employment of a full 
time Yiddish interpreter for "I" dormitory. 

3. To the Faculty : As a sincere and honest tribute to what they have 
meant to us during our four-year stay, our undying gratitude ; also to their 
watchful care we do intrust Davie Poplar, the old well, Graham Memorial 
building, and other such venerable landmarks on the campus; and for their 
slight edification, greater wonder, and still greater amusement, we do com- 
mit our four year's collection of quizzes, to serve as a flagrant example of the 
depths to which even the exam system is capable of descending. 

4. To the student body coming after us : Our experience and knowledge 
of the gentle art of "bumming," and how to judge accurately the exact num- 
ber and beauty of bathing girls in any given "pic" merely from seeing 
placards in front of the theater, and how inauspiciously and imperceptibly to 
participate in that ancient and over-worked activity known as "booting." 

5. To the Juniors : Those ephemeral but venerated figments of imagina- 
tion known as "senior privileges," including being able to smoke cigars with 
some appearance of pleasure, cut classes with greater regularity than catch 
them, provide amusement for the rest of the campus by what might be called a 

[ 137 ] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 

second fraternity initiation week, the donning of senior regalia; and atten- 
dence on Sociology II; also heterogeneous collection of fraternity pins, Phi 
Beta Kappa keys ; athletic letters, chapel notices ; probation slips ; and other 
worldly honors of little use to one about to embark upon the other life. 

6. To the Greeks: Several well-tested solutions of the situation re- 
sulting when three "one-and-onlys" wire last minute acceptances of bids to 
the dance ; and abundance of hard wood paddle material ; and the manual en- 
titled "How to Pay for the House in One Year," by Rushmore Richfellows. 

7. To the Non-P>aternity men : A sum to provide for the installation in 
each dormitory of a "fire" alarm and window raiser, to work automatically 
upon the approach of any member of the illusive sex ; a special supply of hot 
water for the third floor showers between five and six o'clock in the after- 
noon; and finally a recommendation for investigation of over-emphasis and 
professionalism in intramural football. 

8. To the Co-eds: A tearful and heart-felt good-bye, with sincerest 
wishes that they may always be as successful in life as they have ever been 
at Grai dances. 

9. As sole executor and administrator of this will we do hereby appoint 
that the dean of deans — Dean Paulsen — to execute this our last will and 
testament, according to the true intents and meaning of the same, and every 
part of the clause thereof — hereby revoking and declaring utterly void all 
other wills and testaments by us heretofore made. 

In witness whereof we, the said class of '31, do hereunto set our hand and 
seal. 

The Class of 31 (SEAL) 

James M. Little, Jr., Class Lawyer. 



[138] 



CLASS PROPHECY 



"^TOT long ago it was my good fortune to visit the grotto of 



^pm^^^H -L "N that mysterious and venerable, but altogether charming 

W ^^^H old recluse, Abul Ben Drumghoul, jDrophet and sage. After 

H<!^jPi^^| listening, for a while, to his interesting and learned discourse 

^^ ^^^^H ^^ various topics of passing concern to the contemporary world, 

^^^^p^H I made so bold as to ask the kind old father to tell me something 

^^Mg^^M of the future. 

^^K^^H "And what would you know of that which lies before, my 

Marshall SOn?" he asked. 

"Only that which my fellows wish to know, father," I answered. "For 
long have my colleagues debated the future and many and varied have been 
the conjectures made by them over the tomorrow, both for themselves and 
the members of their college class." 

"Then that I shall gladly tell you ; for I have watched, with the interest 
of one who sees both the past and that which lies before, your class of '31. 
Youth and its prospect has ever held me for its audience." 

And without further comment the Ancient, with still clear eyes fixed 
steadily on a distant hill-top, spoke slowly and rhythmically in a low but 
resonant monotone. 

"The future spreads itself before me like a splendid multi-colored tapes- 
try, whereon is pictured the i^lain and the spectacular delineations of the 
years-to-be. To my forseeing eye they are clear and vivid. To you and your 
fellows they do not yet appear. But take heed lest you see them not when 
the time is ripe. I see the future of your class interwoven with the future 
of your state. The strong threads of men spun fine and true beneath the guid- 
ing hand of a mother institution run smoothly through the threads of a mother 
commonwealth. The fabric is a perfect blending of the two, each supporting 
the other and so closely knit that the whole is made a symphony in men and 
ideals. Here and there are bright shades of individualism which lend music 
to the even monotone of a background, deep and rich. Here and there bright 
hues stand out and sing in overtones of chromatic splendor the qualities that 
make leaders of men. Bright hues that sparkle and reflect the rays of the light 
of knowledge; bright, effervescent hues that shine from noble men. Clear 
tones that give life to the threads of leadership, firm but gentle and brilliant 
but not gaudy. Threads that show fineness, threads that bind the whole, 
threads that weave an unperceivable Gordian knot and weave at once a pic- 
ture of truth. And yet the brightness of these striking pictures does not in 
any way detach them from the tapestry itself. The weak and the strong, the 
drab and the colorful entwine to create the whole. The great merge with the 

[139] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 

obscure and the line of relation is unseen. Each is a part of the other. The 
microcosm becomes macrocosm and the macrocosm the microcosm. All is the 
picture. The chromatic blending of the dull with the dazzling presents the 
sublime harmony of a symphonic whole. Truth, you see, shall lend its univer- 
sal force in the forging of a greater state from the individual and the mass. 
The strong threads support the weak ; the brilliant tones shed a soft and en- 
veloping glow upon the drab. 

I see the intricately woven scenes of every field of human endeavor. In 
each of them your classmates stand firmly as masters of their particular vo- 
cation. Here in colors strong and bold are painted men of science, lead only 
by a spiritual desire to ameliorate human suffering. Here are learned men 
whose only guide is the imparting of their knowledge to a virile youth. There 
are statesmen at the helm of state, their sextant is the people and their north 
star is the truth. And clear is the portrayal of judges and lawyers lead only 
by the hand of a blind goddess. Leaders of commerce and industry harness 
nature for mankind's betterment in one gigantic display of power. And here 
are ministers of things spiritual whose teachings are ever tempered with 
tolerance. Many and varied are these colossal scenes and beautiful and good 
are they to see. But behind all of them and back of each of them and interwo- 
ven with them is the smooth and ever-flowing wave of an enlightened people. 
And this monotone is the life of the picture; through this unifying entity 
throbs the pulse of a greater state. The tapestry is sublime and its delinea- 
tions are superb. The threads woven by your fellows are noteworthy. All of 
them show the influence of their university, instilled in them in student days 
long since gone. And these pictures of the tapestry of future time shall even- 
tually spread themselves before you. Take heed lest you and your fellows see 
them not. Let each be watchful lest he be destined for a greater thread. The 
light of truth imported to each while seeking an elusive thing called knowl- 
edge brought to him, unseen but nevertheless real, ability and ideals that serve 
leaders when the hour comes. Take heed — heed!" 

The white head of the old man dropped forward upon the breast of his 
heavy and flowing mantle. The last soft glow of an evening's tired sun spread 
gently over the delicate and sensitive features of the ancient sage. All was 
quiet and still. And then, as if starting from a dream, I broke the silence. 

"Father it is very strange and I do not understand." 

"Yes, my son, very strange — strange. But you and your fellows will see. 
You will see." 

"But father," I asked," in all your mysterious panorama is there not one 
dark picture for some poor unfortunates?" 

"Yes, lad, there is. There is one dark spot. It is reserved for those people 
who like class prophecies." ^^^^ ^ Marshall, Class Prophet. 

[140] 




Ramsay 



CLASS STATISTICS 

CHAPEL HILL, North Carolina, September 21, 1927— to 
this Village on that date 845 freshmen, from the farms 
and cities of this state and nation, from the preparatory and 
the high schools, came to enter the University for the first 
time. The class of 1931 was larger than any class before or 
since by 126 members. 

North Carolina sent 85.47 per cent of the group here, 
while the other states and foreign countries made up the re- 
maining 14.53 per cent. 

The College of Liberal Arts attracted the largest group, 260 in numbers ; 
the School of Education enrolled 136; the School of Commerce, 213; the 
School of Applied Science, 145 ; the School of Engineering, 91. 

Doctor Lawson, director of the gymnasium, together with his assistants, 
gave the class a thorough physical examination, and found that they were a 
healthy lot. Freshman football attracted 82 of the group, and cross country 
claimed 52. Thus there were 134 who did not have to take gym class during 
their first quarter here. 

During the four years the class of 1931 has distinguished itself in extra- 
curricular activities and in scholarship. 32 won the distinction of making 
Phi Beta Kappa in their junior year. The N. C. has been awarded to 54 
members of the class. 

The publications and other activities have attracted many. It is inter- 
esting to note that for the past three years, the president of the Publications 
Union Board has been a member of this year's graduating class. 

Golden Fleece, the most coveted honor on the campus, bestowed member- 
ship upon 6 of the class in the junior year. 

The four years of achievement will be climaxed June 9, when the Gover- 
nor of North Carolina will award approximately 350 members of the senior 
class, their diplomas and their Bibles. 

K. C. Ramsay, Statistician. 



[141] 



YACKETY YACK 



P 



& 



Mayne Albright 
Alost Versatile 
Best Sfeatier 




Will Varborough 
Best Executive 




Ed Hamer 

Most Influential 

Most Pofulor 




y 



I 



iV 





V'iRGINIA TuRXER 


( 


1 Uil 


1)1 




JuE EAliLES 


Clvije Duncan 


Prettiest Co-ed 


Mo 


si 111 


telle 


elual 


Best Student 


Most Popular Co-ed 







Best Business Mtiii 



tlENRY House 
Best Athlete 



Joe Jones 
Best Writer 



XOAH GoODRIDGE 
Best .Witured 












Paul (jiLiihiM 
Most Original 



Geuk(.e 1 hompson Marion Cowper 

Best Looking Most Social 

SENIOR SUPERLATIVES 
[142] 



Frank Jacocks 
Most Dramatic 



The Quadrennial Institute on Human Relations 

IN the spring of 1927 there occurred the first Institute on Human Relations at the University. 
Its program emphasized three major areas of contemporary Social Prohlems, namely. Interna- 
tional Relations, Industrial Relations, and Interracial Relations. Two days of consideration and 
through Friday JMarch J^th. Specialists in these three fields were brought to the campus to lead 
the program through platform addresses and classroom seminars. During the week there were 
twenty public mass meetings, and sixty-one classroom seminars. The total attendance upon the 
eightv-one meetings was approximately 21,000, mostly students and faculty of the University, 
as very little effort was made to get outside attendance. Seventeen leaders and speaker participated 
in the program. Other than platform meetings and classroom seminars a very important third 
feature of the week's program was an Exhibit of books, literature, posters, flags, charts, biblio- 
graphy, etc., constituting a wide variety of materials bearing on the subjects under consideration. 
The 1927 Institute was sponsored by the Departments of History and Government, Social Sciences, 
Economics and Commerce, and the Y. M. C. A., with responsibility for the program lodged in a 
Committee representative of these four departments. 

In the mind of the first group which met in 1926 to consider plans for an Institute on Human 
Relations the dominant idea was that it should occur quadrennially as the all-campus effort at a 
thorough awakening of Social Consciousness on the campus, and in the state, once in each student 
generation. Therefore, the second Quadrennial Institute on Human Relations was set up and 
took place the week of May 3rd through 9th, 1931. The second Institute was conducted on the 
same general range of subject matter, but on a larger scale than in 1927. 

The University will ever be indebted to the Class of '31, for an act of unprecedented generosi- 
ty which made it possible for the campus to hold this Second Institute in proper quadrennial 
rhythm. Due to the inability of the Committee to secure necessary funds for the program, in these 
times of ecomonic depression, the vote to postpone till another year was about to carry when the 
Class of '31 appropriated out of its memorial gift funds the sum of five hundred dollars ($500.00) 
to complete the necessary budget for the 1931 Institute. The Committee wishes to use this and 
every other visible means of memorializing this act of the Class of '31, by which they have estab- 
lished a spiritual memorial to the enrichment of present and future campus life. 

The Institute Committee in 1927 was composed of nine students and nine faculty ; the present 
Committee, of eleven students and eleven faculty members. 

— Harry F. Comer. 



1 93 1 Institute Committee: 
STUDENTS 
Beverly jMoore, Chairman 
Ed Hamer 
Clyde Dunn 
Mayne Albright 
Joe Eagles 
Noah Goodridge 
Will Yarborough 
John Lang 
Ralph Green 
Pat Patterson 
Jack Dungan 



FACULTY 
Frank P. Graham 
H. W. Odcm 

D. D. Carroll 
H. D. jMever 

F. F. Bradshaw 
K. C. Frazer 

E. W. Knight 

T. J. \\'00FTER, Jr. 

R. B. House 
W. D. Moss 
H. F. ComeRj Executive Sec. 



[143] 



The 136th Annual Commencement 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
June 6th to qth, 193 i 

PROGRAMME 

Saturdav, Junk Sixth — Class Day 
9:30 A. M. Senior Prayers in Gerrard Hall 
io:(JO A. M. Senior Class Exercises under Davie Poplar 
5 :30-6:3o p. m. President's Recejition t<j Seniors and Guests 

Sunday, June Seventh — Baccalaureate Sunday 

11:00 A.M. Baccalaureate Sermon, Memorial Hall, hv Rev. E. McNeill 
Poteat, Jr. 

4 :oo p. M. Glee Club Concert, Memorial Hall 

5 :oo p. M. Band Concert, Davie Poplar 

7:30?. M. Vesper Service under Davie Poplar, Rev. W. D. Moss 

Monday, June Eighth — Alumni Day 
10 130 A. M. Cieneral Meeting, Gerrard Hall 
I :oo p. M. Alumni Luncheon, Swain Hall 
4 130 p. M. Band Concert, Davie Poplar 

5 :oo p. M. Introduction of '31 into Alumni Body 

6 :oo-8 :oo p. m. Reunion Class Suppers 

8:30 p. M. President's Reception and .\luinni Ball 

Tuesday, June Ninth — Commencement Day 

10:30 A. M. Academic Procession forms at Alumni Building 

II :oo A. M. Commencement Exerci.ses, Memorial Hall 
Address, Mr. Claude G. Bowers 
Pre.sentation of Diplomas, Hon. O. Max Ganlner 



I 144 




JUNIOR CLASS 



YACKETY YACK 




U EEKS 



OFFICERS 

T H ERO N Re N FRY Bro w N President 

Charles Dick Rollins : Vice-President 

Orin Haywood Weeks Secretary 

Jack Brody Farris Treasurer 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Harlan Jameson, Chair)nan 
Jack E. Duncan 
John Phil Cooper 
George Edward French 
McBride Fleming-Iones 




Hamilton Harris Hobgood 
Stephen Andrew Lynch, Jr. 
Casper Marion Austin 
James Pettigrew Bunn, Jr. 
Adrian Nathan Daniel 



Jameso.n 



[146] 



JUNIOR CLASS 




.il /i 



Stanley II Abklmix Milton A. Abernethv T. \\ . Alexander. Tr. George Haywood Alford 

Freepori, X. Y. Hickory, \. C. Charlotte, N. C. " Holly Sprixgs, N. C. 

* A -i K E 




Lawrence Milton Allen Harry Caldwell Allison Philip King Alston Henry London Anderson 
Be.nsom, N. C. Concord, N. C. Raleigh, N. C. Raleigh, N. C. 

r F. B e n, r T 




Clyde Monroe Andrew 

Greensboro, N. C. 



John Andrews Walton William Angel David Etheldred Askew 

BiLTMORE, N. C. Swiss, N. C. Snow Hill, N. C. 



[147] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Fred Epwakh A i n i h 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



William Mayo Atkinson Howard Frank Auman Casper Marion Austin 

Wilmington, N. C. Seagrove, N. C. Wixston-Salem, N. C. 

S A E - Z 




Robert Hill Avery 
New Brunswick, N. J. 



William Claude Barfield John Daniel Barnes Theodore A. Baroody 

Newport, N. C. Wilmington, N. C. Florence, S. C. 

A * O, E * A 




Eloise Barvvick 
Raleigh, N. C. 



James Anson Bateman 
Roper, N. C. 



George W. Bates 

GiLKEV, N. C. 



William Albert Beal 
Gulf, N. C. 



[148] 



JUNIOR CLASS 




John William Beaman 

Xew Bern, N. C. 



Will McRae Bell Svbille Kahn Berwanger Attilio E. Bevacoua 

Rockingham, N. C. Raleigh, X. C. Mt. \"ernon, X. Y. 

E* J 




Frank W. Blackwelder William Merlin Bliss 
Griffin, Ga. Orlando, Fla. 

* FA 



Clovd Eubaxks Blythe Howard Graydox Bowman 

HUNTERSVILLE, N. C. StaTESVILLE, X. C. 




Jack Hardee Boyd 
Greenville, N. C. 



Samuel Jefferson Breen Theodore \\' alter Bremer W illiam Ashley Bridgers 

Rocky Mount, N. C. Wilmington, N. C. Wilson, X. C. 

T E * * i K K 2 



[149] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Theron Renfry Brown Janet Murray Browne 

Greensboro, N. C. Ahoskie, N. C. 

n K * 



XoRwooii Easox Bryan \\ ii.liam I). Bryan, Ir. 

New Grove, N. C. Tarboro. \. C. 




Earle Osgood Bryant Elmer W. Buchanan 

Clinton, N. C. Greensboro, N. C. 

AX 2 



Robert A. Buchanan John McNair Buie 

Greensboro, N. C. Wagram, N. C. 

is n 




Robert T. Burnett 
Tryon, n. c. 



Paul Carway Butler 
Liberty, N. C. 



Roy Hill Campbell 
Parkion, N. C. 



Thom A^ J L nu Campbell 
Lake Wales, Fla. 



[150] 



JUNIOR CLASS 




RoRERT Laurencf Canxon George Dewey Caraway Alpheus Branch Carr Wallace Talmadge Case 

Ayden, N. C. Snow Hill, N. C. Wilson, X. C. Southern Pines. N. C. 




Richard M. Chameerlaix Ernest Bernard Clapp 

Winston-Salem, X. C. Greensboro, X. C. 

AZ4> 



Morris Shaw Ci.akv 

Rosemary, X. C. 



John W . Clinard, Jr. 
High Point, X. C. 
* r \ A K *. * M A 




Lee Cohen 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Robert Ervin CoKER. Jr. Anne Jeannette Comer Jack C. Connolly 

Chapel Hill, N. C. Chapel Hill, N. C. Taylorsvtlle, X. C. 

X * n B * A X A, * M A 



[151] 



Y A C K E T V Y A C K 




I-.IIW \kll \ U inl; C(.lNKAD DuX AI,D PaKK HURST CoOKE J(]H.\ PhI|A(MII'HK SvDNOR M. CoZART 

W tsi ()K\\(.t, N. J. Gardiner, Me. Raleu.h, N. C. Wilson, N. C. 

1 Z, K * Jl ■!' V A 1 X, A K + K i; 




Vernon Baldwin Crook Walter Monroe Crouch ^VlLLL^M Stanford Crouch Orville Culpepper 

CoNCOBD, N. C. High Point, N. C. Leaksvili.e, N. C. Greenville, Ga. 

r N. A K * K + X a 




Frank STERurNC Dale 

ESTATOE, N. C. 



Lacv Augusta Dalton 
Red Springs. N. C. 



Adrlin N. Daniel. Ir. 

Wilson, N. C. 
II K* 



John Wilson Daniel 

Charlotte, N. C. 



[15^] 



JUNIOR CLASS 




J. Holmes Davis. Ir. 

Wilmington, N. C 



Thomas PiTTM AN Davis Martha McGii.l Delanf.v Harold Juuson Dillehay 

Roanoke, Va. Charlotte, N. C. Southern Pines, N. C. 

11 K * X '.! ■!• i: K 




John Franklin Donnelly Andrew E. Douglass 
Sutherland, N. C. Brandon, Vt. 



Carl Duncan Downing William Franklin Draper 

Favetteville, N. C. Charlotte, N. C. 

Ben, E*iS 




Oscar \\ . Dresslar 
Nashville, Tenn. 
1 e n, A K * 



Mary Evelyn Duncan Owen Edgar Duncan 

Chapel Hill, N. C. Xorth Wilkesboro, N. C. 



John Schnell Edwards 
St. Louis, Mo. 



[153] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Georgia May Elgar 

Chapel Hill. N. C. 



Robert William Elliott 

Mollis, N. C. 



Mary Aileen Ewart 



Traver Harwood Farmer 
Wilson, N. C. 




Jack Brodie Farris 
Charlotte, N. C. 



Lankford J. Felton 

EURE, N. C. 



Richard Mathes Fenker 
Nashville, Tenn. 

Ben 



Ellen Kathleen Fennell 

QUINTON, Va. 




Harry Clinton Fi.vch 
Wilson, N. C. 



William C. Fitzgerald 
Albemarle, N. C. 



Sam Wallace Fleming 
Jamesville, N. C. 



Robert AI. F"leming-Jones 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 
T K A, i; * J 



154 



T U N I O R C L A S S 




Lucy TvviTTY Fletcher Thomas Barber Foli.in 

AsHEViLLE, N. C. Winston-Salem, N. C. 

B e n 



Edward M. Fonvielle Daniel Russell Foster, Jr. 
Wilmington, N. C. Wilmington, N. C. 

* A e ex 




Milton Freiberg George E. French, Jr. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. Statesville, N. C. 

n K A, E * i 



Earl M. Furr 
Stanfield, N. C. 



John Bunyan Gaddv, Jp 
Wingate, N. C. 




tLoYD McCoy Garner Benjamin Gordon Gentry' Edward Hiram Gibson, Jr. Peter Spence Gilchrist 
Newport, N. C. Reidsville, N. C. Kernersville, N. C. Charlotte, N. C. 

*ZK Z*, AX2 

[155] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




John McIver Gillespie 
Greensboro, N. C. 

nK* 



James Thedd Ginn 

Snow Hill, N. C. 



Robert Wilson Goebel Margaret Alice Goodson 

High Point, N. C. Mt. Olive, N. C. 




James WiLKERsoN Gordon Edward Kidder Graham Harry Gump 

Pilot Mountain, N. C. Chapel Hill, X. C. Greensboro, N. C. 

ji V 4. z * /. i; T 



Edmond \'incent Hai.lv 
New Rochelle, N. V. 




Alfred T. Hamilton 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
K A 



Blanche Baker Hanff Bain LaFayette Heffner Harry Howell Hendlin 

Scotland Neck, N. C. Greensboro, N. C. Bronx, N. Y. 

11 B* 

[156] 



•JUNIOR CLASS 




Thomas Allison Henry Horace Hines 

New Bern, N. C. Black Mountain, N. C. 

: X n K A 



George R. Hinton Albert Carl Hitchcock 

Kenley, N. C. Flushing, N. Y. 

e A K 




Hamilton Harris HoEGooD Clyde Holder Lillian Mae Hottenstein George Phifer Houston 

BuNN, N. C. Winston-Salem, N. C. Lebanon, Pa. Charlotte, N. C. 

t K A X n K :: 




Annie Laurie Hudson James Anderson Hudson Joseph Elmo Huffman 
Wilson, N. C. Salisbury, N. C. Thomasville, N. C. 

X* 17. 



Duncan G. Hughes 
Parkton, N. C. 



[157] 



YACKETY YACK 




WoFFORD F. Humphries Eleanora Gwyn Hunt Vernon Welch Idol, Jr. Francis G. Jacocks, Jr. 

ASHEVILLE, N. C. ASHEVILLE, N. C. HiGH PoiNT, N. C. ELIZABETH CiTY, N. C. 

♦ MA ex i: X 




F. M.James 

Wilmington, N. C. 



Harlan Jameson William H. Jarman 

Winter Haven, Fla. Wilmington, N. C. 

e X, A K * 





Raymond Taylor Jenkins Thomas S.Jenrette Luby Baggett Jernigan 

KiNSTON, N. C. Marietta, N. C. Cooper, N. C. 

* i K 

I158] 



William B.Johnson 

DiLLAN, S. C. 



JUNIOR CLASS 




William Franklin Jones ConstantineHege Kapp Arthur W. Kaufman Bloomfield Kendall 

Charlotte, N. C. Winston-Salem, N. C. Essex Fells, N. J. Shelby, N. C. 

A T ,i •!• K S 




Van Leslie Kenyon 

IIlLLSBORO, N. c. 



John Wise Kerr Edward Benedict Kidd, Jr. Kolbein L. Kjellesvig 

Statesville, N. C. Charlotte, N. C. Habana, Cuba 




John A. Kleemeier, Jr. Oscar Wilbur Kochtizky Jean McIver Lane 

Greensboko, N. C. Mt. Airy, N. C. Sanford, N. C. 

K2 nK* 



Alfred S. Lawrence, Jr. 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 



[159] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Fred Gordon Lewis 
Beaufort, N. C. 



Martha Battle Lewis Edward Cecil Longest 

Oxford. N. C. Bf.aufort, N. C. 

n I! * e K X 



Thomas Lycette Lov 
Hagerstown, Md. 




Mariu.\ I ■". 
Danville, \ 



Lewis Joseph Loveland Brittain Ely Lukens, Jr. 

TONAWANDA, N. Y. NORFOLK, Va, 



Virginia D. Lumpkin 

Danville, Va, 



[i6o 



JUNIOR CLASS 




Myra Peyton Lynch 

ASHEVILLE, N. C. 



Stephen A. Lynch, Jr. Alexander G. Macfadyer Gabrielle Palmer McColl 

AsHEviLLE, N. C. Concord, N. C. Bennetsville, S. C. 

r X, A K +, + M A A T n n B * 




Millard Taft McDaniel Tad Lincoln McLaughlin Cvrus Brown McKurie Jule McMichael 

Badin, N. C. Mercersburg, Penna. Rutherfordton, N. C. Wentworth, N. C. 

* ^ e *-i e 




Maky Louise McWhirter Willard McCoy Marley Steve Parker Marsh Walter LaFayette Maso> 

Salisbury. N. C. Goshen, N. C. Marshville, N. C. Mebane, N. C. 



[i6i] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Jesse Bevnard Mass Hiram Alexander Melvin Philip Graeme Menzies Hyman Meyers 

New York City, N. Y. Elizabethtown, N. C. Hickory, N. C. Goldsboro, N. C. 




Lorimer Willard Midgett 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 
e KN 



John Philip Milhous 

Fayetteville, Tenn. 



Hubert Russel Miller 

MiDDLETOWN, CoNN. 

A X A 



John Edward Miller 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
A X A 




John AIakio.n Miller 
Sava.nkah. Ga. 
ATA 



Charles C^lexx M( 



James Dsblkne Moore 

Charlotte. N. C. 
A T A 



Hkkbekt Everett Moseley 

Kl.NSTON, N. C. 



[i6_' 



JUNIOR CT. ASS 




Fred Morris Moss 

Lowell, N. C. 
■AX 



Bruno C. Mulieri William T. Myers 

Augusta, Ga. Charlotte, N. C. 

i X 



Ben Holland Neville 
Whitakers, N. C. 




Ruth Toms Newby 

Hertford, N. C. 
II B* 



Joseph H. Norman, III Jo White Norwood Elizabeth Nicholls Nunn 

Raleigh, N. C. Louisville, Ky. New Bern, N. C. 

X + xa n B * 




Warren FizzellOlmstead Frank Neely Owens John Alsey Park 

Southern Pines, N. C. Charlotte, N. C. Raleigh, N. C. 

ATA S N 

[163] 



Josephine Patton Parker 
Asheville, N. C. 

n B * 



YACKETY YACK 




WlLL\RD Lh.h. PVRRISH 
Rucki Mount, N. C. 



Closs Cul ki -I . I'l 

Henderson. -N L 
n B * 



Calvert Gooslev Peebles Arthur Brian Phillips 

Chapel Hill, N. C. Brooklyn, N. Y. 




Arthur Polonskv Russell Caffery Poxd Eppie Charles Powell 

New York City, N. Y. New Orleans, La. Middlesex, N. C. 

-i T ^, A X : A * n 



Joel Cook Pretlow 
Wilmington, N. C. 






Julian Ellsworth Raper I'redijick Ray, Jr. Charles William Reavis 

Elizabeih CiTV, N. C. San FORI., X. C. Raleigh, N. C. 

K * 



Charles R. Rhodes, Jr. 

Hamlet, N. C. 



[164] 



JUNIOR CLASS 




Roy John Roberts 
Landis, N. C. 



Carleton Robinson 

Atlantic, N. C. 



Warwick D. Robinson 
LaGrange, III. 

Ben 



Charles Dick Rollins 
Henderson, N. C. 
ATA 




Sidney G. Roth 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Donald Jacob Rules 

Wilmington, N. C. 



Doretta Russell 
Augusta, Ga. 



J. Cari.yle Rutledce 

Stanley, N. C. 




William R. Satterfield.Jr. 
Memphis, Tenn. 



Robert Howard Schnell 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 



John Leicester Sehon 
Huntington, W. Va. 



Joseph M. Shachtman 

Greensboro, N. C. 
TE* 



[i6= 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Sidney Irving Shapiro William Blake Shedd Louis Sherfesee, Jr. 

Spartanburg, S. C. Leonia, N. J. Greenville, N. C. 



J. Sherman Shore, Jr. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 




Clyde Allison Shreve 

Reidsville, X. C. 



Eleanor C. Smith 

Newport News, Va. 



John Goodrich Smith James Bryan Spell 

Scotland Xeck, X. C. Red Springs, X. C. 

Z + A \ A 




Allen Joseph Stahr 
South Orange, N. J. 



John William Stallings Bernice E. Strickland Charles B. Strickland 
Wilson, N. C. Middlesex, N. C. Stedman, N. C. 



[166; 



rUXIOR CLASS 




W ILLIAM L. Strickland Joseph Allen Suther 

Stedman, N. C- Statesville, N. C. 

A X ;, A * n 



E. Lloyd Swain 
VValkertown, \. C. 



Amos Hill Taylor 
Bell Buckle. Texn. 




Herbert H. Taylor, Jr. 

KiNSTON, N. C. 



James \ oung Taylor Marion Coly'ene Tatum James Clifton Te.\chey 

MoRGANTox. N. C. Raleigh, N. C. Greensboro, N. C. 



^^^nI^^^ 






m 



RuFus Henry Temple George W ard Thompson Doc Jones Thurston, Jr. Paul Allen Tillery, Jr. 

KiNSTON, N. C. Elizabeth City, N. C. Clayton, N. C. Raleigh, N. C. 

i: * E n K A Z 'I- 



[167] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Mark Felton Tinkham Calvin Grier Todd, Jr. 

EuRE, N. C. Belton, S. C. 



Calvin Luther Todd 
Pensacola, Fla. 



William S. Tomlinsox 

XORTH WiLKESBORO, N. C. 




Arthur Fulkerson Toole Homer C. Triplett 

AsHEviLLE, N. C. Maple Springs, N. C. 



Graham Foard Trott 
Wilmington, N. C. 



George Irvine Trull 
Elizabeth, N. J. 
•I' K 'I', * M A 




Carl Mii.lon Tucker, Jr. 

Pagela,vd, S. C. 



James Page Tyson Edwin Victor Umstead Malcolm T. Upchurch 

Mebane, N. C. Stem, N. C. Apex, N. C. 

[168] 



T IT XM O R C L A S S 




Peter Clyde Usher \\ ii.liam Egbert I'zzell George Louis \ a.v Echop Herman \ i.\so.\ 

Chapel Hill. X. C. Louisbur... N. C. Charlotte, N. C. Autrvvelle, N. C. 

XI r K. T K A 1 'M 




Albert Sionev Walker Edwin Craig Wall 



James Graham Wall 
Bexson, N. C. 



John Edgar \\ all. |r. 
Bexsox.X.C. 




Horace (jRifun W ard Charles D. Wardi.aw. Jr, Fred Coi.man Wardlaw 
Rose Hill, N. C. Plaixfield, N. T. Plaixfield, N. I. 

i; e II " u e 11 



Ektie Boyd Warren 
L.ttletox, N. C. 



[169. 



YACKETY YACK 




James Craig Watkixs 
Cliffside, N. C. 



James R. Weaver, Jr. 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Elizaheth iJnANt Webb 

HiLLSBORO, N. C. 



Thomas Xorfleet W ebb 

HiLLSBORO. N. C. 
Z * 




Orin Haywood Weeks 
swansboro, n. c. 



Tom White Weeks 

EM71KFTH r,TY. N. C. 



Lionel S. Weil 

GOLDSBORO. N. C. 



Rayford Lee Weinstein 
Fairmont, N. C. 




Reeves Herman Wells 
Leicester, N. C. 



Katharine D. Wheaton 

Ogdensburg, N. Y. 
II B* 



Charles Harry Wheubee 

Greenville, N. C. 
: N, i e * 



[1/0] 



JuCELYN E. W HEDBEE 
Hertford, N. C. 
n B* 



u N I () i-^ c: L A s s 




John Sumner White, Jr. William T. Whitsett, Jr. Robert J. Whittingtox, Jr. Lynn Wilder. Jr. 



Whitsett, N. C. Greensboro, N. C. R.^leigh, N. C. 

<l>r-i. *2K Z* 




WmmOmX: mi 



John Sh.\rpe Williams John Archbell Wilkinson Eva .\ntionette Wiseman Dldlay H. Wood 

Lewisville, N. C. P.\nteco, N. C. Spencer, \. C. Columbus, Ga. 

-i - * X <!>, T K A, E * ^ 



[ IJI ] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 





BuiCK Wade VVoohlev 

El.LERBE, N. C. 



FloRENCK C. N ANIEV 
Marion, N. C. 
K A e 




Sam Motz Yancey 
Marion, N. C. 





Edward Yarborough 

LoUISBURG, N. C. 

- A B 



[ I/-' ] 



John Hale ^ oki.ei 

Mount Aiky, N. C. 
UK* 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Nevvland 



Ju.NtS 



McCampbell 



OFFICERS 

David Probasco Henry President 

Howard Theodore Newland Vice-President 

Mark Manard Jones Secretary 

John Caldwell McCampbell Treasurer 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
W. H. Karle, Chainiiaii 



R. H. Staton 
D. C. McDuffie 
Howard M. Lee 
Frank Hawley 
R. E. Brooks 
Hugh Wilson 



Robert Davis 
W. A. Lane 
Howard Wilson 
Thomas Watkins 
Sparks Griffin 
George Weaver 



[174 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Abels, L. C. 
Abernathy, G. S. 
Abernathy, W. E. 
Abrams, S. H. 
Adams, G. C. S. 
Adams, J. B. 
Adams, J. S. 
Adams, W. E. 
Adkins, T. F. 
Aiken, C. H. 
Alexander. W. H. 
Allen, B. A. 
Allen, G. L. 
Allen, H. M. 
Allison, C. W. 
Allsbrook. W. R. 
Ames, N. 
Anderson, F. I. 
Armstrong, W. E. 
Arthur, W. 
Atwood, R. C. 
Avman, J. M. 
Bacon, W. M. 
Bacot, W. W. 
Baird, J. L. 
Baker, A. L. 
Baker, J. T. 
Balding, C. L. 
Baldwin, H. P. 
Baldwin, R. E. 
Ballenger, E. G. 
Barber, M. A. 
Barnes, B. H. 
Barnes, W. E. 
Barnett, R. W. 
Barnwell, G. G. 
Barrett, A. W. 
Barry, H. M. 
Baumstone, H. 
Beale, S. M. 
Beale, W. E. 
Beam, D. P. 
Beam, H. F. 
Beam, W. B. 
Bender, F. T. 
Bendigo, C. W. 
Benjamin, A. 
Bennett, F. 
Berlind, S. G. 
Bernhardt, R. L. 
Bessen, J. 
Best, L. P. 
Biggs, A. G. 
Biggs, G. H. 
Bisanar, E. a. 
Black, F. S. 
Black, Miss L. B. 
Black, Miss N. M. 
Blackwood, I. S. 



Blauman, G. 
Bloom, A. 
Blue, J. A. 
Blueglass. G. W. 
Bonner, N. J. 
Bontomase, J. 
Booker, J. 
Boone, E. T. 
Boyd, H. A. 
Bradley, C. L. 
Bradley, J. H. 
Brady, S. V. 
Brawley, C. H. 
Bray, B. B. 
Brennan, E. J. 
Brenner, E. 
Bridger, H. C. 
Bridgers, J. K. 
Briggs, V. L. 
Brock, R. B. 
Brooks, A. L. 
Brooks, H. A. 
Brooks, R. E. 
Brower, I. C. 
Brown, C. R. 
Brown, G. H. 
Brown, M. S. 
Brown, V. L. 
Brownstein, S. 
Bryant, G. B. 
Bryson, H. 
Bunn, J. H. 
Bunn, T. B. 
Burnett, J. T. 
Burroughs, J. K. 
Butler, C. M. 
Butler, H. P. 
Butler, P. C. 
Bynum, Miss S. 
Cain, F. C. 
Caldwell, A. T. 
Caldwell, R. S. 
Cameron, M. T. 
Cameron, N. C. 
Campbell, C. L. 
Campen, T. B. 
Camper, T. B. 
Cantrell, C. H. 
Capehart, G. W. 
Carleton, C. W. 
Carlisle, F. M. 
Carmichael, R. H. 
Carroway, a. O. 
Carter, S. R. 
Carver, F. O. 
Cassada, H. H. 
Gate, A. S. 
Chambers, E. J. 
Chandler, S. M. 



Chatham, R. H. 
Cheek, A. M. 
Clark, C. B. 
Clawson, F. D. 
Coates, N. N. 
Cobb, D. L. 
cockerham, z. v. 
Cole, A. V. 
Collier, W. E. 
Collins, B. P. 
Cone, H. S. 
conklin, d. r. 
Conn ally, W. E. 
connell, d. f. 
Conner, H. G. 
CoOKE, L. A. 
CORDLE, T. L. 
CORNWELL, G. T. 

CoRRELL, Miss M. L. 
Couch, J. H. 
Covington, R. L. 
Covington, W. V. 
Cowhig, R. K. 
Craig, L. S. 
Crews, C. F. 
Croom, J. D. 
Croom, W. D. 
Crowell, a. W. 
Crum, C. F. 
culbreath, w. h. 
Culpepper, E. M. 
Curl, A. O. 
Curtis, L. M. 
Daley, C. C. 
Daniel, A. N. 
Daniel, E. A. 
Daniel, E. C. 
Daniel. J. W. 
Daniel, Miss R. G. 
Daniels, O. C. 
Daughtridge, U. 
Davis, A. K. 
Davis, D. B. 
Davis, F. P. 
Davis, J. O. 
Davis, R. D. 
Davis, W. G. 
Davis, W. T. 
Deans, E. V. 
Deans. James Lloyd 
Deans, John Lacy 
DeHart, C. R. 
Deitz, C. J. 
Dellinger, F. G. 
DeVane, J. S. 
Dillard, J. E. 

DiNSTMAN, J. 

Dixon, J. G. 
DixsoN, W. N. 



Donnell, G. S. 
Donnelly, J. F. 

DOUTHIT, J. V. 

Doyle, J. J. 
Dozier, J. S. 
Drago, S. F. 
Drane, R. W. 
Dudley, E. 
Dudley, J. W. 
Dudley, L. A. 
Dupree, F. T. 
Durand, J. D. 
Durand, R. Y. 
Edwards, K. F. 
Edwards, R. G. 
Egan, E. G. 
Eisenberg, L. 
Eisner, J. 
Elledge, C. C. 
Ellington, A. J. 
Elliseerg, B. E. 
Engstrom, a. G. 
Errico, F. J. 
Evans, T. C. 
Fallon, E. L. 
Farmer, B. D. 
Ferebee, E. C. 
Ferguson, E. B. 
Ferrel, J. F. 
Fine, H. H. 
First, L. W. 
Fischer, J. L. 
Fisher, E. W. 
Fitzgerald, W. B. 
Fleishman, M. 
Fleming, R. G. 
Fleming-Jones, M. 
Flltsser, B. a. 
Flynt, R. H. 
Fox, C. D. 
Fox, P. P. 
Frasier, H. G. 
Frazier, B. B. 
Freeman, R. B. 
Fronberger, R. E. 
Fulcher, H. S. 
Furchgott. a. C. 
Gaither, M. Z. 
Galloway, J. K. 
Gant, J. E. 
Garland, P. W. 
Gartzman, H. 
Gault, C. B. 
Geiger, J. F. 
Gibson, E. H. 
GiDNEY, R. S. 
Glascock, T. A. 
Glover, F. M. 
GooDES, B. L. 



[175 



YACKETY YACK 



Goodman, H. R. 
goodson, j. m. 
gorham, g. w. 

GoRRELL, J. S. 

Gottlieb, J. 
Grant. B. M. 
Gray, D. E. 
Gray, W. L. 
Greer, L. J. 
Griffin, I. C. 
Griffin, J. S. 
Griffin, W. H. 
Griffith, J. T. 
Griffith, M. J. 
Groome, I. A. 
Haines, H. A. 
Hamilton, A. T. 
Hamilton, R. V. 
Hamlett, C. C. 
Hammond, W. L. 
Hampton, K. D. 
Hancock, C. C. 
Harlee, F. E. 
Harper, W. B. 
Harrell, D. a. 
Harrell, R. H. S. 
Harris, W. 
Hartley, J. S. 
Hartshorn, D. S. 
Haw ley, F. M. 
Hayes, W. M. 
Hedrick, p. E. 
Henry, D. P. 
Herkiner, B. J. 
Hewitt, W. W. 
Hill, J. T. 
Hiller, R. L. 
Hinds, J. J. 
Hines, W. M. 
Hinkle, W. L. 
Hinshaw, R. M. 
HiNSON, J. N. 
Hinson, S. W. 
HiRSCH, S. L. 
HOBBS, O. B. 
Hockaday, J. B. 
Hocutt, H. Q. 
Hodges, H. B. 
Hodges, H. M. 
Hoffman, W. R. 
Hogan, N. T. 
Holland, J. S. 
Holland, N. W. 
Holmes, J. R. 
Holshouser, C. S. 
Hoover, W. L. 
Hornaday, F. D. 
Hosea, a. 
Houser, p. J. 



Howard, W. A. 
Hubbard, J. R. 
Hubbard, R. B. 
Huff, F. E. 
Hughes, I. W. 
Hughes, R. E. 
Hunt, C. L. 
Hunt, J. B. 
Hunter, C. E. 
Hutchinson, J. C. 
Hyman, a. 
Idol, P. C. 
Irvin, E. J. 
Irvin, F. R. 
Isley, J. M. 
Isley, S. C. 
Jackson, C. C. 
Jackson, P. R. 
Jean, J. VV. 
Jenkins, D. M. 
Jensen, C. A. 
Johnson, C. E. 
Johnson, J. D. 
Johnson, J. S. 
Johnson, L. B. 
Johnson, R. W. 
Johnson, T. L. 
Johnson. W. W. 
Johnston, J. R. 
Jones, G. L. 
Jones, M. U. 
Jones, W. A. 
Karle, W. H. 
Kaufmann, p. K. 
Keefe, J. E. 
Kellenberger, C. D. 
Kelly, D. A. 
Kenan, J. G. 
Kenneth, T. W. 
Kestler, C. B. 
Kincaid, R. T. 
Koch, F. H., Jr. 
Koeman, S. 
Kornegay, a. D. 
Kraus, H. 
kurfees, j. g. 
Landis, p. W. 
Lane, W. A. 
Lankford, R. H. 
Lasley, W. T. 
Lassiter, J. H. 
Lathan, B. W. 
Lawrence, A. A. 
Laxton, F. M. 
Leary, H. a. 
Ledbetter. J. M. 
Lee, E. L. 
Leonard, C. W. 
Leonard, F. A. 



Levinson, M. 
Levy, T. D. 
Lewis, F. G. 
Liberstein, \V. 
Liles. G. a. 
Lindeman. J. B. 
Lineberger. J. W. 
Lineberry, a, B. 
Lingerfeldt, T. H. 
loftin, c. l 
London, (j. E. 
LoNi;, VV. L 
Lubetkin, H. L. 
Lucas. W. W. 
ludeman. r. o. 

LUKON, L. 

lukens, b. e. 
Lumpkin. N. W. 
Lynch. D. 
Lynch. J. M. 
Lyon, W. H. 
jMacNeill. J. C. 
McAllister, H. C. 
McArthur, W. S. 
McCampbell, J. C. 
McCaskill, N. ]. 
McCoy, C. L. 
McCracken, H. H. 
McDade, R. a, 
McDonald, H. J. 
MCDUFFIE, D. C. 
McDuffie, W. C. 
McGauley. J. J. 
McGiLL, S. F. " 
McKee, W. W. 
McKinnon, L. 
McLean, J. A. 
McLean, M. A. 
McNeill, J. C. 
McNeill, J. D. 
MacFadyen, a. G. 
Madison, R. P. 
Manheim, F. J. 
Manning, H. S. 
Manning, J. T. 
Margolis, J. H. 
Margulies, L M. 
Markham, W. S. 
Martin, R. T. 
Marvin, J. R. 
Mason, R. H. 
Mason, W. B. 
Massengill, W. W. 
Maybank, T. 
Mebane, R. J. 
Merritt. J. F. 
Miller, W. A. 
Miller, W. G. 
Misenheimer. C. p. 



Mitcham, W. C. 
Mitchelle, W. E. 
Moore, O. J. 
Moore, W. H. 
Moore. W. N. 
morisey, j. c. 
Morris. J. A. 
MORRISSON. M. S. 
Moss, F. M. 
movvery, h. b. 
Murphy, G. S. 
Nahikian, H. M. 
Neville, B. H. 
Newcombe, E. H. 
Newland, H. T. 
Newton. J. L. 
Nichols. C. L 
Nisbet. J. E. 
Novins. R. T- 
O'Brien, \V. J. 
Oberfell, G. F. 
Oden, W. a. 
(Jliverio, a. 
Urbaugh, R. E. 
overstreet. h. 

Ov\EN, O. C. 

Paisley, L. C. 
Palmer, A. T. 
Parsley, H. N. 
Patrick. B. J. 
Patterson. F. G. 
Patterson, W. B. 
Pattisale. R. O. 
Peacock. J. T. 
Peacock, J. W. 
Peacock, P. N. 
Pearson, G. W. 
Pearson. T. G. 
Peetz, W. W. 
Pegram, L. L. 
Penn, C. a. 
Peres, L S. 
Peterson, E. L. 
Petty, A. B. 
Phillips, G. A. 
Phillips, J. E. 
Philpott, B. C. 
Phipps, J. T. 
Pickett, A. M. 
Poindexter, H. O. 
Powell, A. V. 
Powell, E. C. 
Powell, W. C. 
Powell, W. L. 
Pratt, J. H. 
Presberg, M. 
Prince, B. C. 
Proctor, B. C. 
Propst, G. p. 



[176] 



SOPHOMORE C T> A S S 



Rabinowitz, S. a. 
Radford, G. E. 
Ramsay, A. W. 
Raxkin, B. J. 
Raper, J. R. 
Ratcliffe, T. E. 
Raymer, D. L. 
Reddin. T. S. 
Reid, G. 
Reid, J. W. 
Renegar, C. J. 
Renn, C. A. 
Rice, I. 

Richardson, L, G. 
Riddle, R. B. 
Ridenhour. W. B. 
RiGGS, L. S. 
Riley, J. R. 
Ritchie, H. R. 
robbins, j. c. 
Roberts, M. M. 
Roberts, W. G. 
Robey, \V. M. 
Robinson, C. 
Robinson, W. A. 
Rodin, B. 
Rogers, C. P. 
Rose, C. G. 
Roseman, J. M. S. 
Ross, L. W. 
Roth, W. L. 
Rouse, L. L. 
Rowland, L. O. 
Royster, T. S. 
Sale, H. S. 
Sawyer, C. M. 
Saylor, C. 
Scarboro, S. S. 
Scarborough, V. H. 
Schoenrich, O. 
Seawell, D. R. 
Sharpe, p. L. 
Sh elder, a. E. 
Shemwell, E. B. 



Shepherd, W. V. 
Sherrill, J. A. 
Shlefstein, I. H. L. 
Shpack, G. 
Shuford, J. A. 
Shuford, J. H. 

SlEC.EL, H. 

Simmons, N. L. 
Skinner, A. C. 
Skinner, L. C. 
Slate, L. H. 
Slate, O. T. 
Slater, J. E. 
Sloop, J. D. 
Small, H. R. 
Smith, A. P. 
Smith, C. VV. 
Smith, J. F. 
Smith, J. H. 
Smith, Jas, H. 
Smith, J. S. 
Smith, P. H. 
Snell, L. H. 
Snider, A. H. 
Spicer, B. F. 
Spigel, J. N. 
Spitzer, L. L. 
Spradlin, W. H. 
St. Clair, D. JM. 
Stafford, C. G. 
Stallings, J. O. 
Stallings, W. R. 
Standley, W. H. 
Staples, E. W. 
Staton, R. H. 
Steere, J. E. 
Stikeleather, J. G. 
Stone, G. G. 
Stone, M. F. 
Stone, R. E. 
Strickland, J. F. 
SUPRENANT, L. C. 
Suther, J. A. 
Sutton, T. K. 



Taylor, J. K. 
Taylor, T. R. 
Teachey, W. R. 
Teer, T. W. 
Tennant, W. D. 
Tenney, J. B. 
Thomas, J. L. 
Thomasson. G. E. 
Thompson, J. 
Thompson, J. B. 
Thompson, K. L. 
Thompson, P. M. 
Tilford, p. p. 
Tilley, a. W. 

TiMMONS, M. M. 
TOLER, V. \V. 

Trotter, W. L. 
Turner, C. L. 
Underwood, N. A. 
Upchurch, M. T. 
Urband. a. 
Valk, a. deT. 
Vann, E. M. 
Verburg, p. L. 
VicK, G. D. 
Vinson, A. S. 
Walker, E. G. 
Walker, T. H. 
Walker, W. W. 
Wall, C. H. 
Wallace, J. 
Wallin, W. C. 
Wanderman, I. L. 
Warren, H. T. 
Warshaver, S. E. 
Wasserman, J. L. 
Watson, T. S. 
Weaver, G. B. 
Webb, A. 
Webb, E. L. 
Weiland, H. J. J. 
Weinstein, M. D. 
Wells, N. E. 
White, T. L. 



White, T. S. 
White, W. L. 
Whitehead, L W. 
Wilder, C. E. 
Wilkins, E. V. 
Wilkins, J. M. 
Williams, B. B. 
Williams, F". D. 
Williams, J. R. 
Williams, J. N. 
Williams, J. W. 
Williamson, A. C. 
Williford, J. R. 
Willis. E. C. 
Wilson, G. W. 
Wilson, H. M. 
Wilson, K. 
Wilson, P. F. 
Wilson, P. 
Wilson, W. H. 

WiMBISH, H. S, 

Winecoff, G. M. 
WiNiG, B. G. 
W instead, C. C. 

WiNSTEAD, J. D. 
WiTKIN, B. 

Wood, H. 
worrall, t. ai. 
worsley, g. c. 
Worth, T. C. 
Wright, G. P. 
Wright, K. O. 
Wright, L. C. 
Wright, T. H. 
Yarborough, K. p. 
Yarborough, R. F. 
Yeomans, a. H. 
Young, G. M. 
Young, J. B. 
Zaglin, J. G. 
Zazik, I. 
Zelley, H. N. 



[ 17/ ] 



YACKETY YACK 




[i78_ 




FRESHMAN CLASS 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




McIVER 



OFFICERS 

Edwin Avdlett Minor President 

Jdhn Knox Barrow, Jr ]' ice-President 

John Duncan Leake Secretarx 

Evan Gordon McIver, Jr Treasurer 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Champ Land, Chairinan 



Barrie Blackwelder 
Clyde Boyles 
Pendleton Gray 
Jack Hammer 
David McCachern 
Al Olmstead 



Clarence Peacock 
John Phipps 
Otto Prochaska 
Hugh Sawyer 
Don Shoemaker 
Bernard Soloman 



Joe Tobin 



iSo 



FRESH M A N CLASS 



Abramson, J. 

ACEE, J. M. 

Adair. J. C. 
Adams, V. H. 
Adams. W. Carey 
Adams, W. Clyde 
Adderton, R. S. 
Akers. a. E. 
Alexander. D. B. 
Alexander. J. F. 
Allen, J. E. 
Allen. R. A. 
Allred, F. J. 
Allsbrook. W. a. 
Aman, C. W. 
Andrews, A. B. 
Anthony, L. A. 
Anlicauskas, R. p. 
Armistead. }., Tr- 
Ashe. W. G. 
Ashkenas. S. a. 
Ashley. F. W. 
Atkinson. J. 
Avent, C. B. 
Avery. DuB. 
Badgett. E. W. 
Baldwin. W. B. 
Balis, S. 
Balyo. C. G. 
Barclay, G. T. 
Barham, R. D. 
Barnes, J. H. 
Barnett, W. G. 
Baringer, a. S. 
Barnhill. M. V. 
Barrow. J. K., Jr. 
Bartholomew. C. 
Bateman. W. li. 
Bates. A. J. 
Batts, W. C. 
Beachi-m. a. E. 
Beck. C. L. 
Beebe. H. W. 
Bell. M. C. 
Bennett, M. H, 
Bennett, T. S. 
Best, M. J. 
Best, P. L. 
Bethune, G. G. 

BiSSELL. C. W. 

Bivins, J. D. 
Blackhurst, J. W. 
Blackwelder. B. B 
Blackwell T. W. 
Bloi'nt. \V. F. 
Blue. D. A. 
Blythe. F, W. 
Blythe. W. W. 
Bobbitt, J. M. 



Boddie. W. W. 
Bonner, W. W. 
Boone, C. 
Boyette, S, E. 
Boyle, B. L 
BOYLES, C. !•". 
Bradley, R. W. 
Branch, J. G. 
Brandt, G. I'"". 
Brantley, J. C). 
Braxton. D. F". 
Bretsch. C. B. 
Brickell. H. O. 
Brooks. J. A. 
Brooks, T. H. 
Brookshire, H. G, 
Broughton. T. H. 
Brown, J, B., Jr. 
Brown. J. M. 
Brown. M. J. 
Brown. P. R. 
Brown, T. D. 
Brown, W. D. 
Brown, \^^ E. 
Brunda. F. 
Buck. H. L., Jr. 
BUDD. S. O. 
BUFORD. H. B. 

Bullock. J. 
Bullock. W. H. 
Bunn. J. P. 
Bunn. p. C. 
Burgwyn. J. G. 

Bl'TLER. [. P. 

Bynum. \\'. 
Byrd, J. B. 
Byrd. J. McK. 
Cahoon. C. E. 
Caiola. R. J. 
Caldwell. L. McC. 
Calloway.H.W..Jr. 
Cameron. C. B. 
Cameron. C. P. 
Campbell. D. P. 
Ca mpbell. M. A., Jr. 
Cannon. M. L., Jr. 
Carey. A. P. 
Garland. E. 
Carmichael. C. K. 
Carr. C. McD. 
Carroll. T. S. 
Carruth. J. R. 
Carson. M. J. 
Cartland. E. D. 
Catlette. J. 
Chafetz. N. R. 
Chandler.G.W.,Jr. 
Chapin, R. B. 
Chapin, W. B, 



Chapman. H. C. 
Cherry, L. T. 
Chrisco. (X S. 
Ciancio, J. V. 
Clapp, H. I\. 
Clark. H. A. 
Clayton. E. L. 
Cle.mmons. R. R. 
Clifford. J. H. 
Cobb. H. 
Cobb. W., Jr. 
Coble, W. (J. 
Cocke, G. I). 
Cohen. A. A. 
Coleman. W. J. 
Coleman. W. R. 
collett. n. w. 
colyer. h. l. 
Colyer. R. F. 
Conley, B. H. 
Cook, J. E. 
Cook, J. F. 
Cook. W. AL 
Cope, A. 
Copeland, ^^'. R. 
Cortland. E. D. 
CosTNER, B. p. 
Council, C. D. 
Cowan, A. J. 
Cox. I H. 
Cox, J. M. 
Cox. M. R. 
Craig. D. W. 
Craig. I. M. 
Crane. V. H. 
Crawford. A. C. 
Crawley. A\'. K. 
Creech. J. R. 
Cromartie. a. S. 
Crouch. F. P. 
Crotts. R. C. 
Crowell. F. H. 
Cruch. J. R.. Jr. 
Crum. R. S. 
Crutch FIELD, J. B. 
Crutch field, J. L. 
Cltlbreth. F. M. 
Culbreth. O. C. 
Cullom. J. C. 
Culver N. F. E. 
culvern. r. m. 
cummings. z. c. 
Clirrie, G. H. 

ClTRTIS. L. I. 

Cl'tchin. J. McK. 
Cuthrell. J. E. 
Daggett. P. H., Jr. 
Dailey, R. M. 
Daniel. T. M. 

[i8i] 



Davis, B. C. 
Davis, J. W. 
Davis. L. R. 
Davis. O. F. 
Davis. P. W. 
Davis. W. E. 
Dawes. W. R. 
D'Alemberte.J. H.. Jr 
Dease. J. C. 
DeRose! a. J. 
1')elbau.m. J. 
Dellinger. J. H. 
Dillard. I. R. 
Doar. J. G. 
DoBosii. G. v.. 

DOCKERY. A. S. 
DoCKERY. J. C. 
DORAN, J. H. 
DORFMAN. G. 

Doris. P.. Jr. 
Dorsett. F. W. 

IVlTY. H. 

Duflock. W. G. 
Duncan. C. W. 
Dunn. J. R. 
Dunn. M. B. 
Dunn. M. H. 
Dunn. W. L. 
Dunston. R. a. 
Fanes. .S. S. 
I-'ddleman. W. R. 
Edmonson. F.. [r. 
Efland. S. L. 
Ehrhardt, H. W. 
Elkins, R. L., Jr. 
Elliott, F. W. 
Enloe. W. a., Jr. 
Entvvistle. J. W. C. 
Esbinsky. L. 
EsposiTO, F. A. 
Evans. C. B. 
ezzell, d. h. 
Faircloth. J. \\'. 
Farmer. W. \\'. 
P'arr. J. B. 
Feit, D. M. 
Feldman. H. a. 
Felts. J. R. 
Fieldman. G. M. 
Fields. C. G. 
Finger. R. B. 
Fink. H. L. 
Finlater. J. H. 
Fisher. K. F. 
Fitzgerald. J. E. 

FiXEL. I. 

Fletcher. T. G. 
Foster. R. F. 
Foster, R. M. 



Foster. R. W. 
Fountain. L. H. 
Fox, D. B. 
Fox, L. W. 
Frankel. J. C. 
Franklin. S. 
P'ranklin. W . H. 
Franklyn. B. L. 
Frazier. R. V. 
Freedland. J. 
French. A. D. 
Friedman. A. 
F^roneberger. a. K. 
Fryer. C. B. 
Fulk. C. W. 
F"underburke. E. C. 

fJABRIEL. A. J. 

Gadwin. J. L. 
(Jam BILL. B. B. 
Gambill. R. AL 
Gardner. J. A. 
Garland. J. D. 
Garner. W. G. 
Garoffolo. y. N. 
( Harrison. C. M. 
(jaskill. E. a., Jr. 
Gavin. H. W. 
Geddie. H. a. 

(jELLER. S. 

Gentry. H. W. 
Gentry. J. S. 
George. G. L. 
Gibbs. H. L. 
Gibbs. R. E. 
Ginsberg. F. 
Gitlin. M. 
Glascock. S. B. 
Glenn, A. B. 
Glenn. E. L. 
Glenn. M. W. 
Glover. C. C. 

(lODWIN. J. L. 

Gold. R. W. 
goldston. j. c. 
Goodkowitz. J. S. 
Goodman. C). J. 
Goodwin. B. C, Jr. 
Gordon, S. J. 
Grady. \\'. C. 
Grady. E. B., Ir. 
Gray. F. P. 
Gray. T. B. 
Green. D. A. 
Greenberg. R. 
Greensberg. S. H. 
Grier. T. G. 
Griffin. M. A. 
Griffin. M. S. 
Griffin, W. C. 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 



Groover, W. R. 
Grossman, E. E. 
GuioN, L, I. 
Guthrie, L. K. 
Guthrie, V. C. 
Hackney, Jas. P. 
Hackney, N. A. 
Hagans, J. T. 
Hairston, p. W, 
Hall, B. W. 
Hall, M. L. 
Hall, R, G. 
Ham, W. W. 
Hamer, M. S. 
Hammer. J. L. 
Hardin, J. A. 
Hargrett, C. F. 
Harper, F. G. 
Harper, R. C. 
Harrington, M. A 
Harrington, C. R. 
Harris, F. M. 
Harris, G. W. 
Harris, R. E. 
Harris, R. P. 
Harris, W. C. 
Hart, J. N. 
Hartman, C. F. 
Hauser, E. L. 
Hayes, P. R. 
Hayes, W. A. 
Hayes, W. S. 
Hazelwood, E. H. 
Heavner, R. W. 
Healey, J. T. 

HETiER, M. M. 

Hedrick, H. D. 
Heist, S. H. 
Henley, J. D. 
Henley, R. D. 
Henriques, J. P. 
Henson, T. a. 
Herman, J. 
Herring, T. 
Hewitt, W. C. 
Heyward, H. 
Heyward, N. J. 
Hiatt, J. C. 
HiGBY, F. D. 
HiLLER, M. p. 

Hilleard, K. J. 
HoBBS, B. F. 
Hodges, A. L. 
Hodges, J. L. 
Hoffman, M. J. 
holbrook, j. s. 
Holliday, B. 
hollowell, d. h. 
Hollingsworth.J 



holloway, f. m. 
Holt, D. H, 
Holt. R. C. 
Holt, R. L. 
HORD, J. B. 
HORNEY, J. B. 

House, J. A. 
Howard, J. M. 
Howard, R. S. 
Howard, O. D. 
Howell, R. P. 
Hudson, P. L, 
Hummel, G. K. 
Humphreys, R. D. 

HUNEYCUTT. E. H. 

Hunt. E. W. 
Hunt, W. W. 
Hunter, J- E. 
Hunter, W. F. 
Hurley, R. P. 
Hurtean, J. W. 
HrssEY, W. H. 
hussey, w. t. 
Hutchins, W. W. 
Hlttchinson, L. L. 
Ingrao. V. C. 
Irwin, J. P.. Jr. 
Isaacs, D. 
Jackson, J. A. 
Jacobs, A. L. 
Jacobson, I. H. 
Taffee, J. E. 
Jaramillo, E., Jr. 
Tenkins, a. M. 
Jenkins, W. J. 
Jennings. N. A. 
Jenrette. J. P. 
Jess, E, M. 
Johnson, C. L. 
Johnson, E. C. 
Johnson, F. B. 
Johnson, J. M. 
Johnson, R. D. 
Johnson, T. M. 
Johnson, W. R. 
Johnson, G. P. 
Johnston, W. D. 
Joiner, F. C. 
Jones, C. M. 
Jones. C. P. 
Jones, F. T. 
Jones, F. W. 
Jones, J. W. 
Jones, R. L. 
Jones. W. R. 
joyner, a. b. 
joyner, f. c. 
Kahn, E. B. 
R. Keener, C. 



Kelso. J. E. 
Kennedy, J. 
Kennedy, K. D. 
Kennerley, T. R. 
Kerr, E. W. 
Kimrey, D. S. 
King, O. A. 
Kinney, V. C. 
Kirby, J. W. 
Kjellesvig, E. N. 
Klein, J. B. 
Knox, H. L. 
Koch, G. J. 
Kochendorfer, R. a. 
Kolby, B. B. 
Krock, S. 
Lacy, D. M. 
Lamb, C. M. 
Lamm, P. P. 
Land, E. C. 
Langdon, B. B. 
Langston, D. O. 
Lanier, B. 
Lasko, C. 
Laws, L. G. 
Lazeroff, H. J. 
Leak, J. D. 
Lee, H. M. 
Lee, W. F. 

LeGore, F. R. 

Leibowitz. W. 

Lentz, F. H. 

Leon, M. R. 

Lester, C. L. 

Lester, G. C. 

Lewis, J. R. 

Lipscomb, J. j\I. 

Little, G. R. 

Little, J. B. 

Lively, G. D. 

Lockhart, S. p., Jr. 

Lodge, W. J., Jr. 

Lorberbaum. S. 

lowder, c. b. 

lowery, s. m. 

Lowrance, W. T. 

lupton, e. s. 

Lynch, J. H. 

Lynn, D. W. 

Lyon, E. B. 

Lyons, H. T. 

MacArtan, N. D. 

MacFarlane. R. G. 

MacKay, J. W. 

MacLean, a. W. 

McAdams, C. E. 

McAllister.W.M..Jr, 

McBrair, H. C. 

McBryde, W. G. 

[182] 



McCachren. D. D. 
^IcCanless, W. C. 
McCoy, C. E. 
McDade, C. C. 
McDonald, R. L. 
McDowell, R. G. 
McGee, W, H., Jr. 
McGiLL, M. J. 
McGlenn, J. a. 
McIntyre, D. B. 
McIvER, E. G. 
McIver, L. 
McKenzie, T. J. 
McKinney, R. H. 
McLaughlin, W. R. 
McLean, T. L. 
McLeod, D. G. 
McMillan, R. D. 
McMillan, R. M. 
McNair, C. M. 
McRae, E. E. 
McRorie. R. G. 
McShain, J. J. 

McWiLLIAMS," R. W. 

Mace, W. A.. Jr. 
Maguire. S. O., Jr. 
Maher, E. D. 
Malone, G. H. 
Maner, J. F. 
Mann. L. B.. Jr. 
Martin, C. T." 
Martin, L. C. 
Martin, R. L. 
Ma.sten, W. a. 
Matheson, F. M. 
Matheson. J. D. 
Mathews, J. L. 
Mathewson. C. 
Matlin, I. M. 
Matticks. T. C. 
Mauney, J. L. 
Mead. H. G. 
Meares. W. E. 
Menge. B. 
Meyer, J. H. 
Meyers, S. S. 
Michaels, E. G. 
Millar, G. P. 
Miller, A. H. 
Miller, H. L. 
Miller, L. 
Minges, C. R. 
AIiNOR. E. A. 
Moffit, H. a. 
Monaghan, }. M. 
Moore, R. M. 
. Moore, W. K. 
Morgan, D. B. 
Mortenson, a. L. 



Morton, R. D. 
Morton, S. E. 
Mozingo, R. 
Mulligan, J. J. 

AIULLIS, O. L. 
MURDOCK, F. J. 
Muse, J. B. 
Myers, J. N. 
Myers, R. D. 
Myers, W. J. 
Nalle, B. C. 
Nash, W. V. 
Needham, J. K. 
Neese, p. V. 
New, a. 

Nicholson, J. A. 
Nicholson, P. A. 
Nisbet, T. G. 
Noe, W. R. 
Nofal, p. a. 
Norwood, G. J. 
nowell, j. n. 
O'Bryan, a. D. 
O'Hara, T. F. 
O'Neal, R. M. 
O'Neil. J. T. 
Oakley, R. W. 
Oates, C. C. 
Odltm, E. p. 
Odum, J. W. 
Oettinger, a. a. 
Oettinger, E. R. 
Old, W. T. 

Olive. D. J. 
Olmstead, a. L. 

overstreet, h. 

Overton, J. H. 

Pace, J. G. 

Pace, L. B. 

Page, M. F. 

Page, P. E. 

Palmer, H. H. 

Pansoe, S. 

Park, A. P. 

Parker, F. M. 

Parker, J. A. 

Parker, R. W. 

Parker. W. B. 

Parks. R. A. 

Parsons. W. M. 

Pasketsky, M. 

Patterson, J. A. 

Patterson, J. H. 

Patton, J. W. 

Peacock, C. W. 

Peacock, E. B. 

Penn, E, V. 

Perry, D. T. 

Perry, J. K. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Person, J. B. 
Peterson. W. H. 
Pfohl, J. C. 
Philips, J. B. 
Philips, U. B. 
Phipps, H. L. 
Phipps, J. M. 

PiCKARD, H. M. 

Pierce, W. M. 

PiLAND, N. E. 

Pitkin, S. H. 
Pittard, L. L. 

PiTTMAN, J. J. 

Pittman, J, L, 
Plummer, J. F. 
PoE, C. A. 
Pollard, A. J. 
Pool, G. C. 
Pope. G. M. 
Powell, A. H. 
Powell, D. A. 
Powell, R. L. 
Pratt, C. A, 
Prescott, W, C. 
Pressly, J. E, 
Priest, G. W, 
Prochazka, O. W. 
Proctor, C. M. 
Puckett, U. S. 
Purciies, F. J. 
Queen, J. S. 
Query, R. M. 
Ramsey, J. E. 
Rand, R. G. 
Randel, O. M. 
Randolph, J. V. 
Rankin, L. A. 
Rankin. W. M. 
Ratcliff, J. L. 
Ridenhour, W. B. 
rothrock, t. h. 
Raymer, F. B. 
Register, J. W. 
Reid. R. 
Rennie, J. M. 
Renshaw. J. R, 
Reynolds, R. R. 
Reynolds, R. S. 
Reynolds, W. O. 
Rhodes, C. M. 
Rice, S. 



Richardson, H. C 
Richardson, R. I"^. 

RlDDICK, H. B. 

Ridenhour, W. 

RiLEY, W. E. 

Ritchie. W. L. 
Ritter, J. C. 
Roberson, C. E, 
Roberston, S, 
Robinson, T. J, 

ROCKHILL, W. R, 

Rollins, R. T. 
Rosen, S. H. 
Rosenblum, S. S. 
rosenstrauch, l. s. 
Rosenthal, S. M. 
Ross, J. N. 

ROSTAN, A. 

Roth MAN, E. 
Rouiller, C. a. 
Royster, W. D. 
Salmini, a. T. 
Samson, S. 
Sasscer. H, S. 
Sasser. p. 
Sawyer, H. 
scoggin, s. w. 
Scott, S. D. 
Schmukler, M. 
Schreiber, G. 
Sellers, C. W. 
Sharpe, a. 
Shearin, J. E. 
Shelton, J. B. 
Shepherd, G. F, 
Sherrill, O. N. 
Shevick, I. N. 
Shoemaker, D, C. 
Shore. B. J. 
Shuford, H. F. 
Shuford, J. C. 
Shuford, J. F. 
Silverman, H. L. 
Simmons, L, W. 
Simons, J. B. 
Sims, C. 
SisK, R. A, 
Sloan, H. J. 
Sloan, W. W. 
Sloop, W. M. 
Slung, L. 



Smith. A. A. 
Smith, E. W. 
Smith, R. A. 
Snead, a. 
Snell, H, J, 
Solomon, B. S. 
Somers, L. p. 
Spence, U. L. 
Spencer, C. M. 
Spencer, C. O. 
Spencer, T. B. 
Sprinkle, K. 
Spruill, E. N. 
Stamper, G. W. 
Stamps, W. 
St. Clair, D. M. 
Stein, H. B. 
Stein, H. M. 
Stein, R. O. 
Steinhauser, J. A. 
Steinreich, O. S. 
Stewart, H. F. 
Stewart, T. R. 
Stikeleather, J. G. 
Stokes, J. W. 
Straum, J. R, 
Strickland, M. E. 
Striegel, J. F. 
Stumpf, W, W. 
Stutts, C, L. 
Sullivan, H. S. 
Sullivan, L. G. 
Swann, W. K. 
Sykes, B. W. 
Sykes, M, p. 
Taff, M. a. 
Talkowsky', a. 
Talley, H. a. 
Tart, R. G. 
Tate, D. 
Tatum, J. M. 
Taylor, D. B, 
Taylor, H, C. 
Taylor, M. F. 
Teague, J, J. 
Teal, F. T. 
Teele, L. B. 
Temple, J. P. 
Templeton, C. S. 
Tennant, W. D. 
Tharpe, O. D. 



Thomas. B. G. 
Thomp.son, a. W. 
Thompson. H, S. 
Thompson, J, ]'-. 
Thompson, J. M. 
Thompson, I^. O. 
Thompson, L. K. 
Thompson, M. W. 
Thompson, W. A. 
Thornberg, W. M. 
Tillery, J. G. 
TiSH, A. K. 
TOBIN, J. M. 
townsend, m. a. 
Trachtenberg, W. 
Trakas, v. a. 
Tranthen, R. R. 
Travis, W. B, 
Trotter, J. 
Tucker, I. B. 
Turner, S. L. 
Tyree, L. p. 
Umana, H. J. 
Usry, S. H. 
VanSant, F. R, 
Veasey, J. A. 
Vernon, R. L. 
Vitz, H. E. 
Wads WORTH, J. E. 
Wagner, W. H. 
Waldo, R. H. 
Walens, S. D. 
Wall, G. L. 
Wall, J. R, 
Ward, C. M. 
Ward, D. B. 
Ward, J, B. 
Ward. J. W. 
Ward, R. Q. 
Warriner, W. B. 
Waters, H. L. 
Watson, L. W. 
Way, J. E. 
Weathers, R. E. 
Weathers, V. S. 
Webb, A, 
Webb, T, 
Webster, W. O. 
Weinberg, A. H. 
Weiner, D. 
Weisker, a. 



Welch. J. T. 
Wells, R. R. 
Westbrook. a. L. 
Wharton, A. C. 
Wheeler, E. E. 
Wheeless, G. V. 
White, H. V. 
Whitener, H. K. 
Whitley, A. L. 
Whitley, T. H. 
Whitney, G. H. 
Whitton, J. W. 
Whiggs, J. H. 
Wilkinson, L, C. 
Willard, p. C. 

WiLLEY, H. S. 

Williams, A. S, 
Williams, B. L. 
Williams, J. L. 
Williams, L. 
Williams, R. T. 
Williams, Z, V. 
Williamson, A. C. 

WiLMER, F. H. 

Wilson, G. D. 
Wilson, G. N. 
Wilson, R. E, 
Wilson, W. V. 
WiNSLOW, R. L. 
Winston, K. 

WlS?INEFSKY, E. 

Withers, W. B. 

WiTHROW, C, K. 
WiTTEN, M. A. 
WOERNER, W. R. 

Wolfe, J. 
WOLKE, G. F. 
Wood, W. R. 
woodley, j. l. 
Woolen, C. T. 
Wray, R. T. 
Wrenn, W. a. 
Wright, C, A. 
Wyrick, S, T, 
Yerton, L. E. 

YOUNT, L, C. 

Zerbst, W. R, 
Zimmerman, H. W. 
Zimmerman, J. O. 



[183 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




[184: 




PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




[186; 



PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS 



Law School Association 

James A. Williams President 

Paul J. Story I 'ice-President 

^^'ILLIAM L. Marshall Secretary-Treasurer 



Peyton B. Abbott. Jr. 
Mills S. Benton 
Walter M. Bryson 
James H. Chadbourn 
George, L. Cole 
Edmund L. Curlee 
RoDOLPH Duffy 
Jajies G. Edwards 
Seon Felshin 
Lawrence J. Giles 



THIRD YEAR CLASS 

Martin Kellogg. President 
Earle a. Humphrey 
William S. Jenkins 
Martin Kellogg 
Howard L. Lackey 
James B. Linn 
James E. Magner 
Wex S. Malone 
Charles S. Mangum 
Henry B. Parker 
Claude E. Reitzel. Jr. 



Henry Roane 
Edward Scheidt 
Gregory A. Smith 
Thomas C. Smith 
Paul J. Story 
Kenneth W. Swartz 
Thomas A. LTzzell. Jr. 
James A. Williams 
[osEPH M. Wright 



Junius G. Adams 
Marion R. Alexander 
Naomi Alexander 
George P. Boucher 
Travis T. Brown 
Hugh B. Campbell 
Clarence C. Gates 
\^'ILLIAM T. Covington. 
David J. Craig. Jr. 
Daniel A. Currie 



SECOND YEAR CLASS 
Robert McDonald Gray. President 



George T. Davis 
Thomas J. Gold. Jr. 
Calvin Graves 
Robert McDonald Gray 
Fred D. Hamrick 
Joseph E. Jaffee 
William \\ . Johnson 
Jr. Howard M. Kluttz 
Allen W . Langston 
Hugh H. Lobdell 
George A. Long 



Dallas McLennan 
William L. Marshall. Jr. 
Wade B. Matheny 
Robert A. Merritt 
Edwin M. Perkins 
Charles J. Shannon 
Odell M. Smith 
William A. Stringfello\\' 
Allston J. Stubbs 
Horatio N. Woodson 



\\'iLLiAM J. Adams. Jr. 
Arch T. Allen 
James M. Baley 
Fred B. Bunch 
Edwin E. Butler 
Joseph A. Cannon- 
Stanley M. Carpenter 
Frederick L. Carr 
rufus t. coburn 
Thomas W\ Davis 
Robert F. Dewey 
\\'iLLiAM Dunn. Jr. 
Richard M. Chamberlain- 
Ernest W. Ewbank 
Ray S. Farris 
Sideny B. Gambill 
.\lbert E. Garrett 
Iohn ^^^ Graham 



FIRST YEAR CLASS 

Arch T. Allen, President 
Ralph C. Greene 
James O. Griffin 
Lawrence T. Hammond 
George L. Harris 
\\'illiam L. Higdon. Jr. 
Robert A. Hovis 
John F. Huskins 
Julian P. Kitchin 
Edwin S. Lanier 
John P. Lippincott 
James W. Little 
Homer L. Lyon 
Dewitt C. McCotter 
Earnest C. McInnis 
.A^lbert H. Martin- 
William C. Medford 
Herman S. Merrell 
^^'ILLIAM D. Merritt 



James O. Moore 
Roscoe H. Morgan 
Richard H. Moser 
\\'iLLiAM C. Parker 
Forrest A. Pollard 
Cornelius P. Randolph 
Thomas B. Rector 
James P. Rowe 
John H. Sembower 
William W. Speight 
Frank P. Spruill 

\^'ILLIAM A. StARBUCK 

Joseph B. Stein 
Solomon B. Sternberger 
Huker T. Taylor 
David J. Ward 
Charles H. Whedbee 



187 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




[188] 



PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS 




Johnson 



Wall 



Earnhardt 



MEDICAL SCHOOL 

SECOND YEAR MEDICAL CLASS 

Amos Johnson President 

William Stanley Wall Vice-President 

A. E. Earnhardt Secretary-Treasurer 



J. AI. Alexander 

Louis Appel 

L. G. Brown 

Elizabeth Irving Christian 

Morris Dworin 

Everett Yates Ellin wood 

William H. Flvthe 

William O' Kelly Fowler 

Haskel Wright Fox 

William A. Fritz 

Ralph B. Garrison 

Chas. H. Gay 

James D. Hall 

Henry C. Harrill 

Charles N. Kendrick 

Jesse Walton Kitchin 



Jean C. McAlister 
Lewis M. McKee 
Ernest Vick Moore 
E. M. Northrop 
Robert M. Oliver 
James T. Ramsaur 
Asa M. Scarboro 
G. C. Shinn 
Robert E. Stone 
Harry E. Talmadge 
Shelby Williams \'ance 
W. \Y. \'aughn 
\\'iLLiAM Roy Wandeck 
Samuel E. Way 
Paul Gregory \\'eil 
Robert W. Wilkins 



E. L. ^^'OODARD 

[1S9] 



YACKETY YACK 




[190 



PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS 




MEDICAL SCHOOL 

FIRST YEAR MEDICAL CLASS 
Frank M. Adams President 

E. BuRTis AvcocK I 'ice-President 

Sterling A. Barrett Secretary -Treasurer 



F. M. Adams 

D. L. AVNER 

E. B. AvcocK 
S. A. Barrett 

G. R. Benton 
C. R. Brown 
E. E. Brown 
J. A. Brown 
H. T. Browne 
R. D. Bonn 

L. E. Calhoun 
Jeff Davis 
j. h. doltgherty 
J. \V. Eaton 



RoscoE Farabee 
H. W". Glascock 
C. W. Goodwin 

A. V. Hammond 

B. H. Harding 
F. T. Harper 

W. C. HuNSrCKER 
T. T. Kerr 
W. R. Kersey 
R. L. Kesler 
A. E. Knoefel. Jr. 
F. R. Lawther 
H. Q. L. Little 
Dermot Lohr 
[191] 



M. M. McLeod 

F. C. O'Neil 
D. L. Potter 
J. \V. Rea 

G. p. Rosemond 
F. D. Sain 

W. E. Selby 
C. G. Southard 
P. R. Sparks 
R. L. Sugg 
T. J. Taylor 
John Thornton 
R. A. Way 
R. H. VVhitaker 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 



T i u,>:Mi: 




LtU-l 



V_l H H Irl Hi M iiJ>UMjjJjJjiJ.J-L.. 



[192] 



PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS 




Gordon 



S. \V. Arenson 



Hartis 



Pharmacy School 

SPECLAL STUDENTS 
B. D. Arnold D. W. Bell 

THIRD YEAR PHARMACY CLASS 



K, W, Huss 



T. W. Gordon President 

Marie Rogers Secretary 



R. L. Alphin 
L. G. Barefoot 
R. B. Bolton 
B. C. Brown 
E. P. Cahoon 
\\'. W. Carroll 



R. E. Clark 

C. L. Clodfelter 

G. T. Corn WELL 

R. P. Craig 

G. M. Culbreth 

H. M, Dellinger 



sid 
ret 


eut 
arv 


R. P. 
C. L. 


B. 


B. 


Forrest 


T. 


W 


. Gordon 


T. 


B. 


Johnson 


R. 


G. 


Kale 


B. 


H. 


Kent 


M 


. R. 


. Kewis 



Craig Vice-President 

Codfelter Treasurer 



L. M. McCoMBS 
T. L. WcLal'ghlin 
L. F. Parrish 
M. Rogers 
L. E. Scoggin. Jr. 
R. H. Temple 



P. L. Thomas 
B. R. Ward 
J. A. Weaver 



SECOND YEAR PHARAL\CY CLASS 

G. C. Hartis President F. Ray 

S. B. Clark Secretary AL T. Upchurch 

E. W. Buchanan A. L. Cochrane, Jk A. M. Hicks W. N. Moore 

R. a. Buchanan W. S. Crouch W. W. Johnson F. M. Moss 

E. B. Clapp a. T. Griffin Miss R. Lazarus J. E. Phillips 

C. B. Clark F. B. Ham R. C. Maness F. Ray 

M. L. Cline G. C. Hartis W. W. Massengill C. R. Rhodes 

J. C. Coble 

FIRST YEAR PHARMACY CLASS 

G. H. Brown President M. M. Brame 

H. M. Cooke Secretary H. F. McArver 

R. W. Baker H. M. Cooke S. C. Hall P. A. Klieger 

M. M. Brame S. D. Cranford F. M. Holloway R. L. Lineberry 



Vice-President 

Treasurer 

C. Robinson 
L. L. Rouse 
C. B. Strickland 
C. P. Thompson 
M. T. Upchurch 



.Vice-President 
Treasurer 



G. 


H 


. Brown 


L. 


R. Creech 




F. 


A, 


Holt 


H. 


F. McArver 


A, 


. F. 


Caudle 


W 


. L. Dunn 




C. 


C. 


Hutton 


S. 


P. McDaniel 


T. 


K. 


Chapman 


A. 


M. Evans 




F. 


M 


. Hyman 


W 


. B. Matthews 


S. 


G. 


Clark 


A. 


A. Gwynn 




T. 


W. 


Jones 


u. 


S. Puckett 


J- 


R. 


Cole 


F. 


L. Haislip, 


Jr. 


D. 


K. 


Kiel 
[193] 


L. 


L. Ramseur 



J. S. RuDisiLL, Jr. 
P. F. Sanderson 
W. M. Sandlin 
F. W. Sheffield 
N. T. Taylor 
J. L. Womble, Jr. 
j. V. Woodard 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Law Library 




Pharmacy Laboratory 



194 




'IsiMlu*, ^ 'TDaO>J--»^ 



THE CHAPEL OF THE CROSS 



Organizations 



ORGANIZATIONS 




Greene Albright L'zzell Barnes 




Benton \\'hitaker Barefoot Patterson 



I 



^tubent Council 

Ralph Greene President Student Body 

Mayne Albright Secretary Student Council 

William Uzzell Junior Representative 

Harper Barnes Sophomore Representative 

Scott Benton Laxv School Representative 

Allen Whitaker Medical School Representative 

Lexie Barefoot Pharmacy School Representative 

H. N. Patterson _ i^jg-ig^o Council Representative 



[197] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Coffin- 




Davis 



Ramsay 



publications; ^nion Poarb 

K. C. Ramsay, F^rcsident 
E. C. Damel, Jr., Secretary 
J. M. Lear, Treasurer 
O. J. Coffin 
(. Holmes Davis, Ir. 



[198] 



O R G A N I Z A T 1 n N S 



9 


U 


^ 


m 



Williams Patterso.v Rector Worth 




Jones Crook Buie Gurganus 





Whearv Wardlaw Moore Barrett 




Carolina ilaga^inc 

Bi-JJ'cckly Supplement of tlie Daily Tar Heel 

J. C. Williams Eciitor-iu-Chief 

H. N. Patterson Business Manager 

Beatty Rector Exchange Editor 

H. V. Worth Circulation Manager 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Joe Jones James Dawson 

Beverly Moore 

ASSISTANT EDITORS 
Vernon Crook Philip Liskin 

Kermit Wheary Mary Buie 

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 

S. S. RosENBLUM John Wardlaw Carlton Wilder Wilbur Dorsett 

W. M. Hayes Stanley Stevens Frank Manheim J. T. Ginn 

D. C. McClure Philipp K. Kauffman Shirley Carter J. ^^". Long 

Philip Milhous Fxeanor Kincaid Evelyn Terry 

Robert Barnett Aubrey Gurganus Herbert Silverman 

[199] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Drx\ Hamer Albright Moore Kixcaid 



^uyii 



,^^MA ^ ^< 



Davts Tavlor Axderson Kidd Conrad 




Hoffman Parslev Preston Allison Wright 




gacfeetp gack 

I ^iin'crsity Annual 

W. Clyde Dl^nn Editor-in-Chief 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

A. D. KiNCAiD E. R. Hamer 

R. J\I. Albright 



ASSISTANT EDITORS 



J. H. Davis. Jr. 
H. L. Anderson 



H. H. Taylor. Jr. 
E. B. Kidd 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



B. C. Moore 
E. V. Conrad 
H. N. Parsley 
W. R. Hoffman 



I. A. Preston F. G. Harper 

T. H. Wright P. W. Tyree 

C. W. Allison. Jr. W. W. Farmer 

A. A. Oettinger p. Sasser 

[ 200 ] 



D. C. Shoemaker 
J. Bessen 
p. K. Alston 



ORGANIZATIONS 




Bruwx Sii.verstf.in' Marsh 




Margulies Entwistle Broughton Feeedland 




§atkttp Jack 

Unk'crsily Annual 

Travis T. Brown Business Managei 

Sam Silverstein Advertising Manager 

S. P. Marsh Collection Manager 

R. H. Staton Appointment Manager 

BUSINESS STAFF 

J. Freedland T. H. Broughton F. \\'. Sheffield 

J. W. C. Entwistle E. M. Wily J. H. Meyer 

W. \V. Walker \\'. R. Jones I. M. Margulies 

H. B. Stein H. L. Silverman R. O. Stein 



[201 ] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




W.YARBOROrCH DUNGAN PATTERSON Worth 




Moore Kamsav Rose Maxmxg French 



t ^ f v^ 



McKee Hammer Sitterson Olm stead E. Yarborough 



9i 



Uniz'crsity A'czvspapcr 

W. H. Yarborough, Jr Editor H. N. Patterson .Business Manager 

Jack Dungan ,., Managing Editor H. V. Worth, Jr Cireulation Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Beverly Moore Chairman 

Virginia Douglas Oscar W. Dresslar W. M. Bryso> Robert Hodges E. F. Yarborough 
Harper Barnes J. C. Sitterson Wex Malone Phil Liskin 

NEWS EDITOR 
Charles G. Rose 



CITY EDITORS 
George Wilson G. E. French Billy McKee 

E. C. Daniel Peter Hairston W, A. Shulenberger 

SPORTS EDITOR 
K. C. Ramsay 
ASSISTANTS LIBRARIAN 

Don Shoemaker Jack Bessen Sam Silverstein 

[202] 



J. M. Little 



ORG A N I Z A T I O N S 




Broughton Beyson Douglas Barnes Malonb 



Mary Buie 
Otto Steinreich 
E. M. Spruill 
Frank Hawley 
E. E. Ericson 



f 



Bailp l^ar ©eel 

i'liiz'crsity Xcicspaf'cr 
NEWS STAFF 



Charles Poe 

W. R. Woerner 

Bob Betts 

R. McB. Fleming-Jones 

\\'. E. Davis 



Alex Andrews 
T. H. Broughton 
Dan Kelly 
T. W. Blackwell 



Phil Alston 
L. L. Pegram 
Jack Riley 
F. W. Ashley 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Harland J AyiEso's ..Assistant Business Manager John Manning Assistant Business Manager 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 

Al L. Olmstead -Idvcrtising Manager Bernard Solomon Assistant Advertising Manager 

Pendleton Gray' Advertising Manager R. D. McMillan, ]■&. Assistant Advertising Manager 

James N. Nowell H. A. Clark 

COLLECTION DEPARTMENT 

Jack Hammer _ Collection Manager 

John Barrow Robert Bernhardt Frank S. Dale James M. Ledbetter Carol Spencer 

Correspondence Department 

Ed Michaels, Jr Correspondence Manager 

Wyn Hamm Assistant Correspondence Manager 

W. M. Bliss Assistant Correspondence Manager 

[203 J 



Y A C K E T Y ^' A C K 




Tyson 



Betts 



Fox Williams 




Carolina puctaneer 

['iiii'crsily Moiilhly Hiiinor Mayazinc 

KERiriT Wheary.. Editor 

Bobbie Mason Art Editor 

Walter Mason Exchange Editor 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
Pete Gilchrist James Tyson Bob Betts 

ASSISTANT EDITORS 
J. C. Williams Joe Fox Doc Foster 

EDITORAL STAFF 
Ronald Brooks Maddrey Cook Robert Hodges 

Tom Worrall Lewis Slung 

ART STAFF 
Ned Wheeler Kent Creuser Carl Spencer 

John McCoy Karl Sprinkle M. P. Hiller 

Jack Sherrill 

[ -^04 ] 



ORGANIZATIONS 




SlLVERSTElN 




Sims 




Carolina Puccaneer 

Unh'i'rsity Moiitlily Hiiiiior Mat/a::iiie 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

James C. Harris Business Manager 

Steve Marsh -issistant Business Manager 

Sam Silverstein Advertising Manager 

W. M. Thompson Assistant Advertising Manager 

J. W. Davis - Circulation Manager 

James M. Bobbit Collection Manager 

Lester Martin Assistant Circulation Manager 



W. A. Wren 
Howard Beebe 
C. P. Sims 
M. M. Heber 



Edgar Hazelwood 
James B. Spell 
Peter Hairston 
J. P. Griffin 



[205] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 





KJT 




Moore 



Graham 



McAnallv 



Daniel 



Women's Association 



Reeme Moore 

Kate C. Graham Vice-President 

Adelaide McAnally Secretary 



President 

Harriet Daniel Treasurer 

Kate Kitchin — House President 



Naomi Alexander 
LiLLER May Antley 
LoRETTA Carroll Bailey 
Alice Caroline Ballenger 
Eloise Barwick 
Sybille Berw anger 
LuLA Belle Black 
Nettie Marie Black 
Hazel Judith Bowers 
Evelyn Ruth Brickman 
Janet Murray Browne 
Ruby Delight Buck 
Mary Black Buie 
Mary Burroughs 
Seny Bynum 
Alice Alexander Carr 
Mary Anderson Carter 
Ruth Madeline Catlin 
Elizabeth Irving Christian 
Kate Drucilla Collins 
Anne Jeanette Comer 
Mary Lillian Correll 
Elsa Snowden Craig 
Orville Park Culpepper 
Ida Withers Currie 
Harriet Law Daniel 
Rebecca Gibson Daniel 
Martha McGill DeLaney 
Ruth Elizabeth Dillon 
Virginia Adams Douglas 
Inex Sparrow Dudley 
Clyde Mason Duncan 
Mary Evelyn Duncan- 
Mary Marshall Dunlap 
Georgia May Elgar 
Mary Aileen Ewart 



UNDERGRADUATES 

Kathleen Ellen Fennell 
Mary Virginia Ferguson 
Lucy T. Fletcher 
Edna Lee Fussell 
Edna Elizabeth Garlick 
Marjorie Good 
Margaret Alice Goodson 
Helen Edna Gores - 
Kate Chestney Graham 
Elizabeth McMillan Grant 
Elizabeth Fuller Green 
Mary Irene Griffith 
Bessie Tysinger Grubbs 
Marie Elizabeth Hamrick 
Blanche Baker Hanff 
Charlotte Hayes 
Ruth Dixon Hinley 
Mary Trask Hensley 
Elizabeth Divine Horne 
Lillian Maye Hottenstein 
Annie Laurie Hudson 
Eleanor Gwyn Hunt 
LiLLiE Williams Jackson 
Annette Chadwick Jeffers 
Clyde Johnson 
Betty Jones 

Pattie Mathews Jordan 
Kate Parks Kitchin 
Helen Frances Lance 
Jean McIver Lane 
Rose Lazarus 
Martha Battle Lewis 
Marian Sltmpter Love 
Virginia Dabney Lumpkin 
Myra Peyton Lynch 
Jean Calvin McAlister 



Adelaide McAnnaly 
Gabrielle Palmer McCall 
Mary Margaret McLeod 
Mary Louise McWhirter 
Edith Hooper Mangum 
Reeme Moore 
Mary Wadley Morris 
Edna Eloise Morissette 
Ruth Toms Newby 
Jo White Norwood 
Elizabeth Nicholls Nunn 
Josephine Patton Parker 
Closs Courtney Peace 
Betsy Marshall Perrow 
Florence Lorraine Phillips 
Margaret Powell 
Mary Watkins Price 
Elizabeth Gatewood Reed 
Mary Adelaide Reed 
Marjorie Isobel Reeves 
Emma Elizabeth Rennie 
Elise Williams Robert 
Marie Rogers 
Jean Evans Rose 
Serah Elizabeth Rushing 
Doretta Russell 
Irma Shaw 

Eleanor Cunningham Smith 
Charlotte Anne O'Mara Stew 
Frances Ellen Stewart 
Marion Colyene Tatum 
Margaret Louise Troutman 
Mariodsie Turner 
Virginia Robinson Tlrner 
Ruth Underwood 
Mary Frances Wagstaf 



206 ] 



ORGANIZATIONS 



Mary Louise Wall 
.Sarah Elizabeth Ward 
Ertie Bovd Warren 
Elizabeth Dran'e Webb 
Katherin Dale Wheaton 
Ruth Elaine Wheaton 
JocELYN Elizabeth Whedbee 



Catherine Thomas Wilds 
Ruth Ellen Williams 
Bess Jones Winburn 
Eva Antoinette Wiseman 
Mary Laurens Withers 
Sylvia Wolk 
Florence Carson Yancey 



GRADUATES 



Charlotte Garth Adams 

Mattie Mac Addison 

Geneva Anderson 

Lucy Austin 

Carolyn Rose Banner 

Ethel Irene Baugh 

^Iartha Bell 

Inex Chump Boney 

Annie Wxchart Braddy 

Hope Buck 

Elizabeth Caldwell 

Kate J. Carmichael 

Olivia Hart Chamberlain 

Rachael Crook 

Helen Jameson Crossen 

Bernice Spear Darden 

Virginia Lyn Denton 

Laura-Belle Dietrick 

Elizabeth Martha Edwards 

Louise Aiken Egleston 

Mary Howell Eliason 

Grace Genevieve Frazier 

Selma McComas Fuller 

Victoria T. Geiger 

Lou Frances Hampton 

Larrine Haynes 

Nell Quinby Henry 

Margaret Ellen Hight 

Elizabeth Irish 

Sadie Franklin Jenkins 

Alice Freeman Jones 

Edith Gertrude Jones 

Lois Justice 

Edna Coates King 

Louise Lanham 

Ruth Lindquist 

Virginia May Love 

Elizabeth Gregory McPherson 

Katharine Martin 

Margaret Beaufort Miller 

Mrs. Charles C. Neal, Jr. 

Martha Elizabeth Norburn 

Mathilde AIayer Parlette 

Louise Sublette Perry 

Emmie Frances Polhill 

Clara Belle Reinecke 

Casa Elizabeth Reynolds 



Elizabeth Roonee 
Mildred Jeanette Ruskin 
Clara Paulk Sartin 
Alma Smith 
Emily White Stevens 
Mrs. Stanley S. Stevens 
Carrie May Stockton 
Margaret Anna Tufts 
Kathleen Tyer 
Ora Emily Upshaw 
Mrs. Rupert B. Vance 
Mary Lucille Vest 
Mary Vatters 
Evelyn Lee ^^'AY 
Edith Webb 
Lena May Williams 
Mary Ruth Williams 
Flora Prevatte Wilson 
Myra Lois Yancey 
Mary Wiatt Yarborough 









w^^m 


mt^w 


?:r'^.<j^-;;,: ■• 


fer'li^'' 


pg 


ml 









Spencer Hall 



[ 207 ] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 





(§lee Clut) 

Har(ii.i> Shki.ton Dyer Director 

OFFICERS 

Stephen A. Lynch, Jr President 

John E. ALller _ I'ice-President 

Charles E. Dufty Secretary 

Charles B. Overman Treasurer 

James C. Pfohl Assistant Business Manager 

Alden J. Stahr Librarian 



[208] 





ORGANIZATIONS 






PERSONNEL 






First Tenors 




Charles Aiken 
J. H. Clifford 
C. C. Duffy 

S. C. ISLEY 


S. A. Lynch, Jr. 
E. L. Midgett 
J. D. AIoxaghan 

Set-o)ul Tenors 


L. I-".. Rackley 

I. R. Raper 

"W. T. VVhitsett, Jr. 

CiEorce W'in.ston 


Wm. Barfield 
W. R. Bateman 
J. C. Connolly 
J. D. Croom 


L. B. Mann, Jr. 
R. J. NoviNs 
H. N. Parsley 

Baritones 


C. M. Sawyer 
Jess Slaughter 
J. H. Stewart 
H. C. Triplett 


W. G. Barnett 

C. Boone 

T. Bremar 

E. V. Conrad 

A. H. Fleming, Jr. 

W. F. Humphries 


W. W. Hunt 

E. M. Jess 

\V. H. McAlister 

W. C. McCanless 

C. B. Overman 

J. C. Pfohl 

C. A. Pratt 

Basses 


W. W. Stumpf 
M. A. Taff. Jr. 
C. S. Templetox 
G. L Trull 
G. V. Wheeless 
T. C. Worth 


R. At WOOD 
W. M. Cook. Jr. 
A. R. Davis 
O. Duncan 


D. a. Harrell 
J. D. Linker 
J. E. Miller 

Accompanist 
Harry Lee Knox 


F. M. Prouty 
A. J. Stahr 

G. \^^ Stamper 

K. WiLSOX 






^^f^ sses^^i 



,^. EL 




[209] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




American Snsititute of electrical engineers 

G. D. Thompson President 

C. P. Hayes Secretary R. E. Hubbard Treasurer 



D. Avery 

C. G. Balyo 
W. W. Brodie 
J. A. Brooks 
J. B. Brown 
R. F. Colyer 

D. W. Craig 
W. E. Davis 

H. W. Ehrhardt 

D. H. EZZELL 



C. G. Fields 
R. W. Foster 
R. V. Frazier 



C. M. Garrison 
H. A. Geddie 
G, L. George 
E. L. Glenn 
K. J. Hilliard 
J. P. Erwin 
N. A. Jennings 



FRESHMEN 

M. M. Jones 
R. L. Jones 
E. W. Kerr 
G. Koch 
H. M. Lee 
G. C. Lester 
H. McBriar 
W. H. McGee 
W. L. McKeithan 
R. H. McKenny 



C. M. McNair 
H. L. Miller 
R. D. Morton 
F. J. Murdoch 
C. C. Oates 
R. M. O'Neal 
R. M. Query 
J. W. Register 
T. J. Robinson 

T. H, RoTHROCK 



H. M. Stein 
H. F. Stewart 
D. Tate 
B. G. Thomas 
J. E. Thompson 
W. M. Thornburg 

S. H. USRY 

J. A. Veasey 
B. L. Williams 
A. C. Williamson 



H. M. Allen 
F. G. Bellinger 
F. S. Black 
C. L. Bradley 
J. K. Bridges 
F. M. Carlisle 



G. H. Alford 



T. L. Cordle 
C. F. Crum 
T. C. Evans 
J. L. Fischer 

H. S. FuLCHER 

J. K. Galloway 



SOPHOMORES 
F. M. Glover 
W. H. Griffin 
J. T. Healey 
J. E. Hunter 
I". M. Laxton 



JUNIORS 



J. R. Marvin 
W. G. Miller 
W. J. O'Brian 
E. L. Peterson 
B. C. Protor 
J. E. Slater 



J. F. Strickland 

A. W. TiLLEV 

T. H. Walker 

G. C. WORSELY 

G. M. Young 
H. N. Zelley 



T. A. Baroody R. C. Cadmus 



W. F. Jones 



E. L. Swain D. J. Thurston 



J. T. BOYSWORTH 

p. Choate 

W. S. Crawford 



E. L. Davis 
C. P. Hayes 
E. G. Hoefer 



SENIORS 

G. F. HoRNEV 

R. E. Hubbard 
F. A. Jacocks 



P. G. Johnson W. R. Mills G. D. Thompson 

J. D. McConnell a. M. Perez R. V. Whitener 
W. P. McPherson a. C. Robertson 



[210] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 





American ^ocietp of Cibil engineers; 



R. J. White. 
G. J. OUINN- 



WILLIAM CAIN CHAPTER 

President C. P. Erickson Treasurer 

.rice-President F. Cain Secretary 



]. L. Brown, Jr. 
N. L. Brv.ax, Jr. 
M. R. CowpER, Jr. 
C. S. Dickie 
f. g. doggett 

John Andrews 
C. H. Atkins 
Wm. Atkinson 

F. C. Cain 

N. C. C-^MERON 

F. D. Clawson 

S. J. DUN.WANT 

W. B. Baldwin 
.'\. J. Cowan 
I. M. Craig, Jr. 
J. L. Crutchfield 



J. W. DOUGHTIE 

C. P. Erickson 

H. T. Ervin 

J. L. Ferebee, Jr. 



E. G. RoBBINS 

C. H. Boyd 



R. E. Fkonebercer 
J. F. Geiger 
J. M. Goodson 



F. E. Culvern 
R. M. Culvern 
R. M. Dailey 
A. J. DeRose 



SENIORS 
P. L. Gilbert 
B. B. Lane, Jr. 
E. G. LoxNG, Jr. 
R. H. Moore 

JUNIORS 
R. VV. Goebel 
Fked Knoop 



H. A. Nelson 

J. L. NoRRIS 

G. J. QuiNN, Jr. 
A. E. Reynolds, Jr. 



T. M. RiDiucK 
O. D. Stinson 
J. G. Wadsworth 
R. J. White 
G. T. Winston 



H. P. TsuMAs H. S. McIver 

O. W. Kochtitzky, Jr. G. W. Pearson 



SOPHOMORES 

I. .-X. GrOOME J. M. ISLEY 

Jack Herman J. T. Peacock 

I. R. Hubbard S. S. Scarboro 



FRESHMEN 
S. Franklin 
C. C. Glover 
C. F. Hargrett 
J. B. Klein 



S. Krock 
C. M. Lamb 
J. H, Lynch 
S. S. Meyers 



M. M. TiMMONS 

p. L. Verberg 
G. M. Winecoff 
A. H. Yoemans 

R. W. Oakley 
G. M. Pope 
J. W. Whitton 
G. N. Wilson 



[211] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




American ^ocietp of jMecJjanical Cngineersi 



R. C. Plummer P reside lit 

Fredrick Knoop, Jr I'icc-Pres'uleiit 



R. A. Parsley Treasurer 

D. A. Harrei.l Secretarv 



FACULTY MEMBERS 
E. G. HoEFER. Honorary Chairman 



N. P. Bailey 



J. S. Newsom 



SENIORS 
R. A, Parsley 



R. C. Plummer 



B. Kendall 
V. L. Kenyon 



E. L. MlDfiETTE 

C. C. Cornwall 



JUXIORS 



A. W. Dunbar 
Kkedkh K Knuup, Jr. 



A. E. Bevacqua 
C. F. Bullarl 



J. S. Adams 
R. K. Cow H If, 

A. C. FURCHGOTT 



G. W. GoRHAM. Jr. 
D. A. Harrell 

S. W. HlNSON 



SOPHOMORES 

W W. Hewitt 

L'. D. Kellenberger. Jr. 

J. A. McLean 



J. IL IVL\RGOLIS 

k. E. Orbaugh 

\\. M. RoBEV 



J. H. Smith 



C. W. BlSSEI.L 

Caesar Boone 
C. E. Cahoox 
H. R. Clapp 
A A. Cohen 

J. E. CUTHRELL 

J. R. Felts 

J. S. GOODKOWITZ 



Mac Gitlin 
j. b. hornev 
J. L. Hammer 
P. R. Haves 
J. D. Henley 
R. P. Howell, Ir. 
P. L. Hudson 
E. C. Johnson 



FRESHMEX 

1". B. Johnson 
\V. D. Johnston 
C. M. Jones 
Charles Lasko 
F. R. LeGore 
S. P. Lock hart, Jr. 
W. C. McCanless 
J. .A. McGlinn, Jr. 



D. B. Morgan 
P. A. Nicholson 
T. F. O'Hara 
\V. T. Old, Jr. 
M. F. P.\ge 
S. H. Pitkins 
J. M. Rennie 
J. N. Ross 



W. D. Royster 
H. S. Sasscer 
J. C. Shuford, Jr. 
M. F. Taylor 
L. C. You NT 
J. O. Zimmebman 
A. C. Wharton, Jr 
S. S. Meyers 



[ 212 ] 




w 



American ins^titute of Cftemical engineers 

R- JR'^^LE President 

E.F.Thomas lice-President 

T. R. Taylor Secretary 

Adam Fisher Treasurer 

F.\CULTY 

Dr. a. M. White Dr. F. K. Camero.v 

SEXIOR CLASS 

H. F. Chrisco G. H. McCormick R. T. Ruble \ W Dockery 

Adam Fisher C. B. Overman E. "F. Thomas R. L. Poplin 

JUNIOR CLASS 
E. O. Bryant P. S. Gilchrist J. .A. Preston M. M. Matthews 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 
D. E. Askew E. Brexxer M. S. Merrison C. M. Sawyer T R T\ylor 

R. E. Baldwin- J. E. Gant G. A. Phillips L. C. Sirpren.^nt W. C Walliv 

A. G. Biggs B. E. Lukens R. G. Rand 

FRESHMAX CLASS 

W. R. Bateman H. .\. Feldman B. Hollidav p. A. Xef.^l C A Rouiller 

p. A. Blue E. A. Gaskill J. W. Kirby Albert Xew L. K. Thompson 

J. M. Bobbitt X. J. Heywari. F. H. Lentz I. L Pittman G. D. Wilson 

J. B. Crutchfield C. F. Habtman D. B. McIntyre John Ritter T I Wolfe 

C. B. Dvans F. D. Hicby G. P. Mill.\r 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




All Intcniatioiiul Society to Promote tin- Sciiiuc and the .Irt of .hliiiiiiistratioii and of 

Managciiiciit ■ 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA STUDENT BRANCH ORGANIZED IN 1928 

B. A. SiEDER President 

Adam Fisher, Jr _ Vice-President 

W. P. McPherson Secretary 

A. A. Mount Treasurer 

Prof. G. T. Schwenning •. ....Faculty Sponsor 

STUDENT ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 

H. G. Brainard a. a. Mount R. C. Plummer Lee Richardson 

J. M. Graham J. S. Newsom R. J. Ruble B. A. Sieder 

P. G. Johnson, Jr. Herman Vinson 

STUDENT MEMBERS 

C. M. Austin R. W. Davis R. E. Hubbard .\. C. Robertson 
Julian Booker C. S. Dickie B. B. Lane, Jr. A. L. Shuford 
J. L. Brown, Jr. J. W. Doughtie E. G. Long, Jr. Boris Siniavsky 
N. E. Bryan O. W. Dresslar S. A. Lynch, Jr. J. K. Smith 

N. L. Bryan, Jr. L. T. Felton W. P. McPhereon J. W. Stallings, Jr. 

R. T. Burnett Adam Fisher, Jr. W. R. Mills, Jr. O. D. Stinson 

G. D. Caraway Thomas Follix R. H. Moore J. Y. Taylor 

F. M. Carlisle B. G. Gentry J. S. Morrison G. D. Thompson, Jr. 

J. W. Clinard, Jr. P. L. Gilbert R. A. Parsley \V. A. Triess 

Raymond Cohen W. F. Haywood J. A. Preston C. M. Tucker, Jr. 

E. V. Conrad A. C. Hitchcock A. E. Reynolds. Jr. E. C Wall 

M. R. Cowper E. G. Koefer, Jr. G. H. Roach R. V. Whitener 

E. L. Davis G. T. Winston 




ORGANIZATIONS 

Speight Fleming-Joxes Rector Hobgood 

Betiate Council 

STUDENT MEMBERS 

W. W. Speight _ President 

MacBride Fleming-Joxes Representative of Dialectic Senate 

Hamilton Hobgood Representative of Philanthropic Asscmblv 

Beatty Rector Mcmbcr-at-Large 

FACULTY ADVISERS 

G. M. AIcKiE Executive Secretary 

E. J. WooDHousE W. A. Olsex 

'^ JKM 




[215] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 





Fleming-Jones 



UZZELL 



SntercoUegiatE Betjateg 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
Chapel Hill, April i, 1930 
On Disarmametit 
Affirmative: G. P. Carr, '30, Iohn Wilkinson, 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Chapel Hill, April 15, 1930 

On the Chain Store 

native: W. E. Uzzell. '32, John Wilkinso> 



BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Chapel Hill, April 18, 1930 

On Disarmament 

Affirmative: J. M. Baley. '31, G. P. Carr, '3. 

John Wilkinson. '32 



UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Raleigh, April 25, 1930 

On the Thirteen-Month Calendar 

tive: W. W. Speight, '30, A. V. Lowenste 

H. H. HOBGOOD, ' ^2 



UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

Lowell, Mass., May 5, 1930 

On Disarmament 

Affirmative: J. M. Bailey, '31, G. P. Carr. '3 

J. C. Williams. '30, .Tohn Wilkinson. '32 




H.-WWOOD 



r\l\ERSITY OF THE SOUTH 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Chapel Hill. May 8, 1930 

0)1 the Chain Store 

Negative: W. W. Speight, M. B. Fleming-Jox 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
Chapel Hill, Novemher 25, 1930 
On Free Trade 
Negative: C. A. Shreve, '32, J. C. Williams, 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 
Raleigh, December 2, 1930 
On Free Trade 
Affirmative: D. M. Lacy, ■34. R- A. Merritt. 



CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Chapel Hill, December 13. 1930 

Oil the Emergenee of Women from the Home 

Split Teams — Carolina's Representatives: 

J. C. Williams. M. Fleming-Jones 



UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 



UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
Chapel Hill, March 3. 1931 




Carr 



[ -i& J 



ORGANIZATIONS 





Wilkinson 



Shreve 



ASBURY COLLEGE 

versus 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Chapel Hill, March lo. 1931 

Oh Free Trade 

Affirmative: R. A. Merritt, '33, B. Rector, '31 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY 

Atlanta, Ga.. March 16, 1931 

On Compulsory Unemployment Insurance 

Negative: E. E. Ericson, 'jz, J. M. Baley, '31 



UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

BOSTON VnIVERSITY 

Boston, Mass., March 16, 1931 

On Compulsory Unemployment Insurance 

Negative: M. Flemixg-Jones, '32, W. VV. Speight, '30 



UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE 
Knoxville, Tenn., March 21, 1931 
On Free Trade 
irniative: E. E. Ericson, '32, J. M. Balev, '31 



EMORY UNIVERSITY 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Chapel Hill, March 27, 193 1 

On Free Trade 

Negative: C. D. Wardlaw, '32, E. E. Ericson, '32 



UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Chapel Hill, March 31, 1931 

On Free Trade 

Negative: D. M. Lacv, '34, C. A. Shreve, '32 



UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY 



UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS 
Austin, Texas, March 19, 1931 
Oil Free Trade 
Negative: E. E. Ericson, '32, J. M. Baley 



UNIVERSITY' OF NORTH CAROLINA 



UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Chapel Hill, April 2, 1931 

Oil Compulsory Unemployment Insurance 

Negative: J. W. Slaughter, '32, M. Fleming-Jones, '32 

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



NEW YORK UNIVERSITY 
New York, N. Y., March 19, 1931 
Oil rniii/'i(/:toi-v Unemplo\ment Insurance 
Affirmative: M. Fleming-Jones, •32, W. W. Speight. 



UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Chapel Hill, April 6, 1931 

Oil Free Trade 

Negative: J. W. Slaughter, '32, E. L. Haywood, '32 





Balev 



[217] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 







tlTfje Bialetic Senate 



Ramsay 



\Y. C. Medford - President, Fall Term 

J. M. Little President. Winter Term 

K. C. Ramsay President, Spring Term 



[218J 



ORGANIZATIONS 



SENATORS 



Abelsen S. B. 
Baucom. C. R. 
Blount, W.L. 
Butler, E. E. 
Cocke. G. D. 
Cromartie. a. S. 
Crum, C. F. 
Crum, p. S.. Jr. 
Dautridge. U. 
D'Alemberte, J. H. 
Deitz. C. J. 
Dorsett, F. W. 
Duncan, J. E. 
durand. r. y. 
durand. j. d. 
Feldman, H. a. 
Fleming-Jones, McBride 
French, G. E. 
Gault, C. B. 
Gentry. B. G. 
Ham. W. W. 
Herdimer. B. J. 
Heywood. H. 
HiGDON. \\'. L.. Jr. 

Ho\VELL, R. P. 

Johnson. E. C. 
Johnson, T. B. 



Kitchen. J. P. 
Lamb, C. M. 
Little, J. ^L 
Lyons, H. T. 
MacNeill. J. C. 
M alone. G. H. 
McKee, W. \\\ 
McIvER. C. R 
McMichael, J. 
Medford. \\'. C. 
Moore, J. O. 
Olive. D. J. 
O'Neil. J.T. 

PiTTMAN. J. L. 

Queen. J. S. 
Ramsay, K. C. 
Rector, T. B. 
Reynolds. R. R. 
Roberts. C. M. 
Rose, C. G. 
Rutledge. J. C. 
Shreve. C. a. 
Silverstein. S. 
Thompson. ^I. \\' 
Weeks. O. H. 
\\'hitaker. S. C. 




[219] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 






Albright 



Whittenton 




Mayne Albright Speaker, Fall Term 

W. Ranson Whittenton Speaker, Winter Tenn 

Egbert L. Haywood Speaker, Spring Term 



[ 220] 



ORGANIZATIONS 



Adams, Wm. 
ACEE, J. M. 
Atwood, R. C. 
Brickell, H. O. 
Brown, M. J. 
Brown, V. L. 
Best, M. J. 
BiMS, C. 
Bynum, M. 
Barnhill, M. V. 
Campen, T. B. 
Cobb, D. L. 
culbreth, o. c. 
Carmichael, C. K. 
cutchin, j. m. 
Crutch FIELD, W. J. 
Carroll, T. S. 
Castner, B. p. 
Douglas. Miss V. A. 
Dawes, W. R. 
Dunn, M. H. 
Dixon, J. G. 
Evans, C. B. 
Fountain, L. H. 
Fisher, R. B. 
Ferguson, E. B. 
Godwin, J. L. 
Greer, L. J. 
Gavin, H. W. 
Griffin, W. C. 
Gray, T. B. 



REPRESENTATIVES 

Haywood, E. L. 
hobgood, h. h. 
Heavner, R. W. 
Holt, R. L. 
Hall, M. L. 
Jackson, C. C. 
James, F. M. 
Johnson, J. M. 
Johnson, R. D. 
Johnson, W. R. 
Jess, E. M. 
Kelly, D. A. 
Langdon, B. B. 
Lacy, D. M. 
London, G. E. 
McLean, A. W. 
McWhirter, Miss M. L. 
McDuffie, D. C. 
McMillan, R. D. 
McMillan, R. M. 
Millar, G. P. 
Mulieri, B. C. 
Matheson, J. D. 
Moss. J. B. 
monaghan, j. m. 
Neville, B. H. 
O'Hara, T. F. 
Olmstead, W. F. 
Patterson, J. H. 
Pratt. J. H. 

PiTTARD, L. L. 
PiTTMAN, J. J. 



Powell, E. C. 
Randel, O. M. 
Riddle, B. B. 
Ratcliff, J. L. 
Speight, W. W. 
SisK, W. N. 
Stallings. J. O. 
Steinhauser, J. A. 
Stutts, C. L. 
Simons, M. A. 
Shuford, J. A. 
Sherill, J. A. 
Strickland, M. E. 
Sasser, p. 
Sloan, W. W. 

TOBIN, J. M. 

Thompson, H. S. 
Taff, M. a. 
Trachtenberg, W. 
Tennener, J. O. 
Temple, J. P. 
Thorpe, O. 
UZZELL, W. E. 
Ward, C. M. 
Worth, T. C. 
Wilkinson, J. A. 
\\'heeless, G. W. 
Wright, G. W. 
Weaver, G. B. 
Williams, Miss R. E 
Whittenton, W. R. 




I 221 J 



YACKETY YACK 




Hamer 



Mayne Albright 
Ed Conrad 
Ellis Crewe 
Adrian Daniels 
Jack Duncan 
Clyde Dunn 
Bill Draper 
Jack Farris 

Joe Adams 
W. E. Adams 

Harper Barnes 
Bob Barnett 
V. L. Brown 
H. G. Connor 
Walter Cook 
Archie Davis 
Bob Davis 
Bub Drane 
Bim Ferguson 
Belmont Freeman 



R. J. Adderton 
Alex Andrews 
G. T. Barclay 
Grady Bell 
W. B. Bennett 
William Bynum 
R. B. Chapin 
W. B. Chapin 
J. R. Dunn 
W. A. Enloe, Jr. 
J. D, Garland 
P. Hairston 
W. W. Ham 




i. iR. €, ^. 



JUXIOR-SEXIOR CABINET 

Harry Finch John Idol 

McBride Fleming-Jones F. M. James 

Adam Fisher Doug Kincaid 

Ed French Wilbur Kochtitskv 

Sam Gorham John Lang 

Red Greene Fred Lewis 

Jim Harris Ike Manning 



SOPHOMORE 
L. J. Greer 
Frank Hawley 
Bob Hubbard 
Jim Hubbard 
T. B. Johnson 
Jim Kenan 
J. G. Kerfees 
Jim Ledbetter 
Joe Lineberger 
George London 
John McCampbell 
Billy McKee 



CABINET 

John Manning 
Ted Newland 
Nutt Parsley 
Fred Patterson 
Cabell Philpott 
Ed Ratcliffe 
G. J. Renegar 
Charles Rose 
L. O. Rowland 
J. A. Shuford 
W. H. Spradlin 
E. W. Staples 



FRESHMAN FRIENDSHIP COUNCIL 



M. S. Hamer 
Jack Hammer 
Buck Harris 
T. A. Henson 
W. T. Hussey 
W. R. Johnson 
Walter Jones 
Edwin Kerr 
Donald Kinney 
Champ Land 
J. D. Leak 
George Little 
Bill McAllister 
W 



W. G. McBryde 
Graham McLeod 
G. H. Malone 
L. C. Martin 
J. D. Matheson 
Ike Minor 
R. M. Moore 
Rot Oakley 
W. T. Old, Jr. 
J. G. Pace, Jr. 
Albert Park 
Bob Reynolds 
H. C. Richardson 
R. Woener 

[ 222 ] 



James 



Beverly Moore 
K. C. Ramsay 
J. B, Spell 
Herbert Taylor 
O. H. Weeks 
W. R. Whittenton 
Willis Henderson 
J. H. Vokley 

Jim Steer 
G. L. Thomason 
G. D. Vick 
Tom Watkins 
G. B. Weaver 
Alec Webb 
Vance Wertz 
Tom White 
Hugh Wilson 
J. D. Winste.\d 
Tom Worth 
Lenoir Wright 



C. A. RoUILLER 

Hugh Sawyer 
J. E. Shearin 
C. P. Sims 
Don Shoemaker 
C. M. Spencer 
E. M. Spruill 
Walker Stamps 
J. W. Stokes 
H. S. Thompson 
Irwin Tucker 
J. E. Wadsworth 
Johnnie Way 



ORGANIZATIONS 




Jlmuk-Senior Cabinet 




jiiinMuut. Cabinet 




Freshmen Friendship Council 
[223] 



YACKETY Y ACK 




Win\\}tv^itV i. M^ C, ^, 



About 1900, a group of students and faculty-members seriously 

discussing the need for a student center on the campus. Inasmuch 

as the Young Men's Christian Association was the pioneering 

organization in providing activity buildngs partcularly on the campi 

of State schools, the thoughts of this group turned immediately to 

the idea of a Y. M. C. A. Building. A year later the idea crystalized 

into a definitely organized campaign for building funds. At the 

opening of the campaign, Dr. Francis P. Venable, then President 

of the University, secured from a friend an initial gift of $10,000; 

and the student, faculty, and alumni campaign raised an equal sum, 

H. F. Comer {qj- (j^g purpose of erecting a Y. M. C. A. building in the center of the 

campus. In 1904 the above structure was erected: and until this day has been the hub around 

which campus activities have revolved, for it has been the common meeting place of them all. 

— H. F. Comer. 
[224] 





e|jlf».,...^-£-ttnlMJt 



KENAN MEMORIAL STADIUM 



Athletics 



ORGANIZATIONS 




Woollen I'etzer 





RoBERSON 



Cone 



Spruill 




House 



Athletic Council 



C. T. W'OOLLEX 

Graduate Manager of Athletics 

FACULTY REPRESENTATIVES 
A. W. HoBBS R. D. W. Connor 

H. G. Baity 



R. A. Fktzer 
Director of Athletics 

ALUMNI REPRESENTATIVES 

FOY RoBERSON BeN CoNE 

F. S. Spruill, Jr. 



STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES 

R. C. Green J. E. Magner H. C. House 

[227] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

^S far back as 1876 we find records of the student body at the University organizing an 
/-\ Atliletic Association and taxing themselves to provide equipment and trainers. The 
sequel to that action was the decision on the part of the students themselves to include 
with the matriculation fees a charge upon each student for the further expansion of an ath- 
letic program. The students for a large number of years perpetuated the Athletic Associa- 
tion through their own efforts, with no help from the University or faculty. 

During its infancv the Athletic .Association sponsored baseball and occasional track 
meets. There were no intercollegiate contests of any kind. As the student body grew larger, 
the athletic program expanded. Throughout the period of growth the students played a 
leading role. Student sentiment has been a large factor in the rapid progress which athletics 
has made at the University. In 1926, when a committee was appointed to make recommenda- 
tions for the control of athletics, recognition was given to the part students had played by 
giving them equal representation with the faculty and alumni on the proposed Athletic Council. 

The Athletic Council has control over all matters pertaining to athletics at the University. 
Its membership is composed of three faculty members appointed by the President ; three 
alumni members elected by the alumni ; three student members — the President of the General 
Athletic Association, the President of the Student Body, and a delegate elected from the 
Monogram Club; the Graduate Manager of Athletics; and the Director of .Athletics. 

The athletic policy of the present Athletic Council is to provide such a broad athletic 
program that every student in the University will find some sport which commands his 
interest. In an effort to carry out this jwlicy the Athletic Association maintains varsity and 
freshman schedules in football, basketball, baseball, track, boxing, wrestling, cross-country, 
tennis, and golf. The .Athletic Association also maintains one of the largest coaching staff's 
in the South to assure individual attention to every student trying out for the various squads. 
In addition, there is a Department of Intramural .Athletics which sponsors a diversified ath- 
letic program for all students who do not have the time or ability for varsity and freshman 
competition. The goal is acti\e participation by e\ery student in some form of athletics. 

To one man, Mr. Charles T. Woollen, goes the major portion of credit for the rapid 
advancement towards this goal. Mr. Woollen became Graduate Manager of Athletics in 1913 
and has served in this capacity since that date. When he came into ofiice, the Athletic Asso- 
ciation was barely able to support four intercollegiate sports. Under Mr. Woollen's guidance 
the Athletic Association has added five sports to its intercollegiate schedules, has increased its 
physical plant to the point where it compares favorably with any in the South, and has estab- 
lished itself on a firm financial basis. 

The preeminence that the University enjoys in a well-rounded athletic program, and the 
splendid athletic plant which the University maintains, is a monument to Mr. Woollen's able 
and devoted service as Graduate Manager of Athletics. 



[228] 



_ r^>t 


■A -J.- ..•■luii 


'■. v^iii""*' ■' 




^*^\^^M 


Hi 


o,"-! ^Vr*'*" .V'VJ., .;•' 't:''^'\.^'' ■■■' 


Si 






"l^^^n^^udtaBHlHHH^flHBfl 




"^ 


. ^^<=^"ir 


^ 


^^^n8 


^ y-. - - 


<^!]f^^"; • 





FOOTBALL 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




[230] 



ATHLETICS 




Ql'inlax 



STAFF 



Head Coach C. C. Collins 

Assistant Coach \V. J. Cerney 

Assistant Coach R. A. Fetzer 

Freshman Coach R. E. Enricht 

Freshman Coach '. C. O. Sapp 

Freshman Coach R. S. Farris 

Frainer P. H. Qutnlan 

Captain:. E. S. Nash 

Managers ■„ r> r> 

■^ ( P. B. RuFFIN 



SCHEDULE 



Sept. 27 — Wake Forest.... 

Oct. 4— V. P. I 

Oct. II — Mao'land 

Oct. 18 — Georgia 

Oct. 25 — Tennessee 

Nov. I — Georgia Tech.. 

Nov. 7— N'- C. State 

Nov. 15 — Davidson 

Nov. 27 — \"irginia 

Dec. 6 — Duke 



.. 7; Canilina 
..21 : Carolina 
..21 ; Carolina 
..26: Carolina 
.. 9: Carolina 
.. 6 : Carolina 
.. 6 : Carolina 
.. 7 ; Carolina 
.. 0; Carolina 
.. ; Carolina 



SUMM.VRY 

Games Won. 5; Games Lost, 3; Games Tied. 2 
Total Points: Carolina, 153; Opponents. 103 




Farris 



Rui-Fi.\ 



[231] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




CAPTAIN NASH 

Culminating with the captaincy of this year's team, the 
football career of Strud Nash has been an ideal one. A star of 
a fine set of backs, he was a mainstay of his Freshman team, 
was selected for All-State as early as his Sophomore year, and 
was later honorably mentioned for All-Southern. 

As captain this of a powerful but erratic team, Strud had 
his hands full. Nevertheless he played his usual brilliant game, 
especially in the unparalled 41-0 victory over Virginia, and 
remains as a shining light in Carolina football history. 



Captain Nash 
Halfback 



THE SEASON 



CHAMPIONSHIP football teams are built around good lines, lines that 
have had experience. In reviewing the successes of the 1930 Carolina 
gridiron team this fact is clearly distinguishable. With a bevy of stellar 
backs and the mere remnants of the great line of the year before, prospects 
were dark at the outset of the season. The Tar Heels hung up a record of five 
victories, three defeats, and two ties. Wake Forest, V. P. I., Maryland, N. 
C. State, and Virginia all fell before the onslaught of the Tar Heel forces, 
while Georgia, Tennessee, and Davidson turned the table for victory. The 
latter two defeats were only by a two and one point margin respectively. Duke 
and Georgia Tech battles Carolina to ties, the Devils to a scoreless count, and 
the "Ramblin' Wreck" to a 6-6 deadlock. 

As the season progressed, the forward wall, composed of a host of rookies 
and an occasional veteran took on shape and rose near the end of the season to 
pave the way for a 41-0 slaughter over Virginia. 

There were few individual stars, for the 1930 Tar Heels provided no such 
score-at-random ball carriers as did the memorable "346 point team" of the 
year before. New strength was tested and raw material trained in a process 
of constructing great teams for succeeding years. 

Anticipating a whitewashing such as that in 1929 when the Tar Heels 
downed the Deacons 48-0, eight thousand fans sat under a hot September sun 






[232] 



A T H L E T I C S 




WVRICK 

Ouarterback 



House 

FuUhack 



and watched Carolina barely eke out a 13-7 victory over the stocky Wake Forest 
eleven. It was the first game of the season and Carolina's comparatively 
green line found difficulty in opening up holes through the heavy Wake Foi'est 
forward wall. 

Toughened by their experience of the preceding Saturday, Carolina's line 
opened up hole after hole in a staunch V. P. I. line and ball-carriers Branch, 
Magner, and Nash galloped through for six touchdowns to the Gobbler's three. 
The final count gave the Blue and White the long end of a 39-21 score. 

Resorting to the air for repeated gains, the Tar Heels matched Maryland 
touchdown for touchdown in a thriller at Kenan stadium and Johnny Branch 
raced through the whole Maryland team for ninety-six yards and a touchdown 
in the final quarter to give Carolina the edge, 28-21. It was the longest punt 
return in the country on record this year. 

Elusive off-tackle plays and tricky reverses, aided and abetted chiefly by 
"Jack the Ripper" Roberts, spelled defeat for the Tar Heel grid legions as 
Georgia took a one-sided contest, 26-0. Carolina's line looked good in the first 
half, but ceaseless battering in the third quarter told, and the Georgians had 
everything their way from then on. 

A blocked kick, resulting in a safety, and a trick pass for a touchdown was 
all that separated Carolina from a well earned victory over Tennessee. The 
Vols handed the Tar Heels their second drubbing of the year by 9-7 count, but 





Kick-off 



Slusser Gains Through the Line 



[233I 




the score fails to hint how the Blue and White carried the ball within the 
shadow of the Tennesseans' goal on five occasions. 

Pap Hart for Georgia Tech and Rip Slusser for Carolina each gained 
more than seventy yards, but neither could bunch his gains at the opportune 
moment to break a 6-6 tie as the "Ramblin' Wreck" and the Tar Heels battled 
on each other's goal lines for four quarters of hectic football. Though Tech 
went down to overwhelming defeat as the season neared its close, experts stated 
that the White and Gold had as fine a team on the field as the memorable 1928 
eleven which achieved national fame. 

Captain Strud Nash came into his own and crashed through State Col- 
lege's line nineteen times for seventy-six yards and received three passes for 
seventy yards more as the Tar Heels downed the Wolfpack by a 13-6 count. 
The battle, listless at times, was pepped up in the second quarter when Sam 
Gurneau put the game in danger by intercepting Magner's pass and racing 
seventy-six yards for a touchdown. 

Beaten and broken in the first quarter by a hard driving Carolina line, the 
fighting Wildcats of Davidson rose to mighty heights and provided the sensa- 
tion of the season by downing the Tar Heels 7-6. Failure to make the point 





House Goes 0\'er Virginia's Center 



Macner Plows Down Lambeth Field 



[^34. 



A T H I. E T I C S 




Tackle 



ical mar^fn Zw^^ f°' the defeat, but despite the slight numer- 

n^ n^f ^' ' the Wildcats decisively outplayed the Carolinians. Tom Brock 
t^ man ToVZ S^ guard kept the pigskin well out of reach of Carolina's sS 
1930 foe ^ ' ^ ^"^ ^'""^ ''^^'''■"' "^^^^ th^ bugbear of every 

A Tar Heel team of old, smacking of the famous "346 point team" of 1929 

cTa"ssicT^ChXV^^l''' ''/' I'^^T^ ^'^ '' °ff^^ i" the Innual Turkey Day 
class c m Charlottesville and when the smoke cleared away Carolina had a 
41-0 victory mthebag. It was the worst drubbing ever handed a Virginia 
M^y ^Tm"1^" thirty-five years of gridiron relations between the^two 

o-,-r.,-o^'^!i ^^o.^V^^^?.f appropriately by the spirited Tar Heel victory over Vir- 

mZu^t^fff.^nf^^^^^^^^ '°^k^^ horns fn the me- 

morable battle of Lake Kenan." Drenched by two days of rain Kenan sta- 

fiddTdo' battfe "'r\'' l^l' ""'Tu ^^^U^ ^"^ '^^ T- ^eels trotted upon the 
fteld to do battle. In a short time the mud made players indistinguishable and 
while spectators sought protection from the driVing rain under^ coverings of 




Rain 



[ -^35 ] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




m 



II 



Blackwood 
Guard 

every description, the two ancient rivals battled to a spiritless 0-0 tie. Both 
teams fumbled frequently, the ball passing mid-field on but several occasions. 
The tie clinched the state title for the Devils and gave them fourth place in 
conference ranking. 

THE FRESHMAN SEASON 

Freshman football, dubbed the "Gridiron laboratory," experienced only a 
fair season in record of games won and lost, but its purpose of developing 
future varsity material was fulfilled to the utmost. Four out of five games 
played were dropped, three by close scores, but several dozen stellar linemen 
and backfield aces received their first tutelage and will doubtless see service 
with the varsity next year. 

Maryland was the first to taste the fruits of victory from the Yearlings, 
downing them 13-12. On the one long trip of the season, Princeton's Tiger 
Clubs shut out the Tar Babies, 20-0, and in the second home engagement N. C. 
State College Frosh turned back the first year men by 12-7. Duke's Blue Imps 
swelled the lists of defeat to four, gaining a 14-7 victory, while Virginia bowed 
in the final contest by 45-0. The latter game saw the Tar Babies functioning as 
a well organized machine, blocking and tackling to perfection. 




Lernev 
Assistant Coach 



SLUa.-.l-.l; 

Halfback 



Maus 
Halfback 



E.NRK.HT 

I'rcshman Coach 



[-'36 




BASKET-BALL 



Y A C K K T Y Y A C K 




K< 



[238] 



ATHLETICS 






KOVSTER ASHMORE MaKPKT 

STAFF 
Coach - - Jim Ash more 

Captain - Artie }^Iarpet 

Manager Chauncey Rovster 



SCHEDULE 

January 9 — Guilford 13 

January 10 — Randol])h-]\Iacon 13 

January 11 — Davidson -.. 18 

January 12 — Furnian 16 

January 13 — South Carolina 8 

January jo — \\'ake Forest 13 

Januar\- 23 — V. P. 1 31 

Januar\- 2/ — X. C. State 18 

January 31 — Duke 30 

February 3 — X. C. State 2^ 

February 5 — V. I\ 1 24 

February 6 — V. AL 1 13 

February 7 — Vir^i(inia 24 

February S — \\'ashin^ton & Lee 39 

February 9 — Maryland 33 

February 12 — Davidson 30 

February 14 — Duke 34 

February 11^ — Wake Forest 2^ 

February 21 — V. M. 1 21 

February 24 — Sewanee 28 

Februarv 



Carolina 33 

Carolina 34 

Carolina 17 

Carolina 23 

Carolina 38 

Carolina 30 

Carolina 28 

Carolina 22 

Carolina 18 

Carolina 20 

Carolina 30 

Carolina 42 

Carolina 28 

Carolina 31 

Carolina 31 

Carolina 28 

Carolina 23 

Carolina 45 

Carolina 30 

Carolina ^y 



-S. I. C. Tournament: Vanderbilt 21. Carolina 23 : Maryland ig. Carolina 17. 

SUMMARY 

Games \\'on. 13; Games Lost. 9 

[ -'39 ] 



^^ACKETY YACK 




Captain Marpet, Guard 



The Season 

^N impenetrable defense coupled with a lightening offense gave the Tar Heel cagers their 
/-\ first vviti of the season in intercollegiate competition, bowling over the (iuilford 
^ -^ Quakers by a 33-13 score. Randolph-Macon proved to be an easy foe in the second 
game of the year, falling by a 34-13 score as the Carolina forwards and center got the shooting 
range. Davidson, encountered in Charlotte, proved to be too stern a foe as the Tar Heels were 
forced to take the short end of a 29-28 score. Inirman was the next Tar Heel victim, drop- 
ping a close contest, featured by adept freezing of the ball, by a score of 23-16. A 38-8 win 
over South Carolina brought the hectic "suicide period" to a close with a net of five victories 
and one defeat. Raleigh "Y" fell before the Tar Heel onslaught in a pre-season warm up. 

.\fter a brief respite, the Deacons of Wake Forest invaded the Tin Can and were sent 
home with a stinging 30-13 drubbing. Risking a spotless conference record at the mercies of 
V. P. 1., the White Phantoms received their first S. I. C. setback of the year by the narrow 
margin of three points. The Goliblers amassed a sizable lead and proceeded to freeze the 
ball, permitting the Carolinians a few scattered shots ; the final count stood 3 1 -28. 

N. C. State was the next prey for the Phantoms as the latter loped oft" the Techmen by a 
22-18 score. In their first meet of the season, Duke and Carolina tangled in Durham and 
Devils came out with a 30-18 victory after gaining a 11-3 lead which was never topped. Set- 
tling a score but a few weeks old. the Red Terrors of N. C. State gave the Tar Heels a 
drubbing in Raleigh to the tune of 23-20. .\ northern invasion with games with V. P. I., V. 
M. I., Virginia, Washington and Lee, and Maryland netted the Tar Heels three victories and 







Muukh 
Forward 




240 



ATHLETICS 





two defeats, W. and L. and Maryland ekeing out close wins. In a return contest with David- 
son, Goodson, Wildcat captain cut loose in the last half to score five difticult field goals, just 
enough to give his quintet a 30-28 win o\er Carolina. Termed as an "epic contest" the return 
Duke-Carolina engagement in the Tin Can drew fans from all corners of the state. It pro\'ed 
to be the same old story and the White Phantoms were snowed under to the tune of 34 to 2^, 
clearing the way for Duke to a state title. Holding a 24-14 margin at the half, Coach Ash- 
more's men reversed their form of the week before and administered Wake Forest a severe 
drubbing, 45-25. Captain Marpet and the elongated center, Sandy Dameron again topped the 
scoring lists with a dozen points each. V. M. I.'s Flying Cadet basketeers journeyed southward 
and were vanquished by the ever-changeable Tar Heel quint by a score of 30-21, while Sewa- 
nee, final foe of the regular season tasted bitter defeat as they were snowed under an avalanche 
of baskets, 37-28. 

The season over, the White Phantoms concentrated on the conference tourney at Atlanta. 
Conceded little chance to go far in the tournament, the Tar Pleels drew attention at the outset 
by eliminating Vanderbilt, 23-21. .\way to an early lead by virtue of a 13-1 walk-away in the 
opening quarter, the Tar Heels apparently had their second tourney encounter with Maryland 
on ice, but a cog slipped in the Carolina machine and the ultimate winners of the conference 
title piled up the points in the final minutes to emerge victorious, 19-17. With but a minute 
to go, the Old Liners' great guard, Berger, dribbled through the Tar Heel defense for a crip 
shot that pro\'ed the margin of x'ictory, and the elimination of Carolina from further compe- 
tition. 






[241] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 






i()3i I'UKSH.MAN Basketball SyiAn 

Freshman Basketball 

STAFF 
Coach G. E. Shepard 

Manager J. C. Eagles 

Captain D. D. McCachren 

THE SEASON 

With a record of eleven victories and three defeat^, Carohna's Tar Baby basketeers wound up 
their season by administering a 21-20 beating to Wake Forest's Baby Deacon quintet and annexing 
the state freshman title. A foul throw sunk in the last split second of play by Fisher gave the Year- 
lings their margin of victory. Scoring victories over the best first year college teams that the south 
has to offer, the Tar Babies might well lay claim to sectional honors. The playing of Weather, 
Fisher, and McCachern was especially commendable, and around these three the frosh quintet was 
built. Accompanying the varsity on a northern trip, the Tar Babies turned in a spotless record 
with wins over Woodberry Forest, V. M. I. freshmen, and Augusta Military Academy. 





Eagles 



[242] 




BOXING 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




[244] 



ATHLETIC S 





STAFF 
Coach Crayton Rowe 

Assistant Coach Archie Allen 

Manager Clarence Weeks 

Captain Noah Goodridge 



SCHEDULE 

January i6 — South Carolina j ; 

January 24 — V. M. I I ; 

January 31 — V. P. I i ; 

February 7 — Virginia 3 '; 

February 17 — Duke 3 ; 

February 21 — Penn State 4^ ; 

February 27-28 — Southern Conference Tournament 
third ; Louisiana State, fourth. 



Carolina 5 

Carolina 6 

Carolina 6 

Carolina 4 

Carolina 4 

Carolina 2J/2 

Virginia, first; Tulane, second; Carolina, 



SUMMARY 
Meets Won, 5 ; Meets Lost, i 





Weeks 



Goodridge 



245] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 








iA 








Levinson 
Feather-weight 

THE SEASON 

LED by Captain Noah (iondridge. tlie Tar Heel boxers completed another successful season, winning the 
State title, gaining third in the Southern Conference tournament, and losing only one dual meet, that to 
Penn State 4''2-2j^. Goodridge, undefeated in nine bouts won the Conference lightweight title while War- 
ren, heavyweight, was undefeated in seven bouts before losing in the Conference finals. 

The season opened January i6, with a 5-2 win over South Carolina. Levinson, Goodridge, Jackson, and 
Davis won decisions and the heavyw-eight was forfeited to Warren. Goodridge, Warren, Davis, Levinson, 
Holderness, and Wilson turned in two victories each as V. M. L and V. P. L went down 6-1 on successive 
Saturdays. 

On February 7 Warren's victory nver Bryant enabled Carolina to defeat \'irginia 4-3 liefore approximately 
4,000 people. Davis and Levinson scored knockouts, and Captain Goodridge a decision to account for the other 
Carolina points. 

Duke was defeated February 17 to clinch the State title with Warren again scoring the deciding point. 
Goodridge, Landis, and Levinson won decisions for Carolina's other points. 

The Tar Heels closed their dual meet season the following Saturday, losing to Penn State. Goodridge won 
a decision from McKndrew-s and Warren knocked out Skoberne. Parsons, middleweight, fought a draw with Babb, 

Virginia won the Conference tournament with Tulane second and Carolina third. Every Carolina fighter, 
except Young, won at least one bout, with Goodridge and Warren going to the finals. 

Of the six men awarded monograms, four will be lost 6y graduation. Goodridge, Warren, Davis, and Hol- 
derness completed their careers while Landis and Levinson will be juniors next winter. 

THE FRESHMAN SEASON 

The freshmen went through their six-meet schedule unbeaten, winning the .'^tate and Southern champion- 
ships. Brown and Raymer won all si.x of their bouts. Brown with six knockouts and Raymer with three knock- 
outs and three decisions. Numerals were awarded to Cliff Glover, Jimmie ^\"illiams, Furches Raymer. Bruce 
Langdon, \\'illiam .\llsbrook, Paul Hudson, John Nicholson, Vernon Guthrie, James Wadsworth, Peyton Brown, 
and Lacev Pace. 





Davis 
Middle-weight 



Landis 
Light heaz'y-ii'eighl 

[246] 





TRACK 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




[248] 



ATHLETICS 






I'ETZER 



Alexander 



STAFF 
Coach Bob Fetzer 

Coach Dale Ranson 

Manager : a Johnston Alexander 



193 1 SCHEDULE 

March 28 — Presbyterian College of South Carolina at Chapel Hill 

April 4 — North Carolina State College at Chapel Hill 

April 1 1 — Georgia School of Technology at Atlanta, Ga. 

April 18 — Virginia Polytechnic Institute at Chapel Hill 

April 22 — Duke Lhiiversity at Chapel Hill 

April 23 — Penn Relays at Philadelphia. Pa. 

.\pril 2/ — Washington and Lee Cniversiitv at Le.xington, Ya. 

May 2 — North Carolina State Championship Meet at Greensboro 

May 9 — Pennsylvania State College at State College. Pa. 

May 15-16 — Southern Conference Meet at Birmingham. Ala. 



[249] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




THE 1930 SEASON 



LAST vear the Mvinj; Tar Heels a^^ain swept the Sduth, eapturins the Dixie title by a large 
margin, the state title, and sweeping all Init one of the dual meets. 
Ele\en lettermen formed the nucleus of Coaches Fetzer and Ranson's squad, and 
these were supported by several star freshmen. The veterans were: Ken Gay, sprinter, Johnny 
Stafford and Bill Perry, hurdles. Captain Dave Nims and Dick Garrett, quarter milers, Minor 
Rarkle>- and Cliff Baucom, distance men, Dave Neiman, George Bagby. Pot Adkins, and Sandy 
Dameron, held events. Among the new men were : Ray Ruble, Charlie Farmer, Rip Slusser, 
Brodie Arnold, and Theoren Brown. 

After winning an unofficial meet from State. Carolina took on the highl\- touted (ieorgia 
Tech team and won an overwhelming 104-27 victor)', getting thirteen out of fifteen first 
places. Farmer and Barkley of Carolina and Ed Hamm and Doug Graydon of Georgia Tech 
featured. 

Duke, next on the schedule, also fell an easy victim to the South's best team, the score 
being 96-29. 

Then came the thrill of the year — the meet with Penn State, one of the leading cinder 
teams in the country. In this battle of champions. Carolina kept her eight year old clean slate 
for dual meets unmarred, the Xittany Lions falling 70'/-55'/'. 

\'. P. I. was defeatetl by an 88-38 score. 

In one of the most important meets of the season, Carolina trounced Washington and Lee, 
southern indoor champions, 78j/-47'/j. It was a record-breaking day. Charlie Farmer con- 




Phoenix 
Dislaiu'cs 



Baucom and Wrenn 
Distances 



Sm'sser 
S/'iiitls and Hurdles 



[ -^50 ] 



A THLF'.TICS 



WBSBk 



Reid 
Hurdles 




,\ I- I \l A \ 

Pole ] \udt and H road .hunt 



Perrv 
Hurdles 



tinned his sensational work in tiie sjjrints, rnnning the century in i).8 and the 220 in 21.2. both 
marks tying tiie Southern records. 

.\ number of other feature performances were turned in. Rrodie Arnold, Tar Heel \aul- 
ter. moved his own University record to thirteen feet. 

Dave Neiman also increased his University record in the broad jump with a leap of 22 feet 
3)4 inches. In a great linish Ken Gay bettered the State record in the quarter mile, running the 
distance in 50.6. 

After having- won the state championship, Carolina sufTered her first defeat in a dual meet 
in eight years at the hands of Princeton, the score being 80^-453/3. 

The climax to one of the most successful .seasons e\er enjoyed l)y a Carolina track team 
was the annexation of the Dixie title at Birmingham, Ala. The Tar Heels rolled up 40^/2 
points, while Georgia was second with 28 '/4 and Mississippi Aggies were third with 25;/? 
points. 

In total points for tiie season, Charlie Farmer, so])honiore, led with 100 [)oints. Another 
sophomore, Theoren Brown was second with 85 markers. Minor Barkle}', senior, was third 
with sixty-five. 

Twenty-six letters were awarded to the following : Capt. Dave Nims, F. A. Adkins, B. 
D. .\rnold, G. L. Bagby, Minor Barkley, C. R. Baucom, T. R. Brown, E. P. Dameron. A\'. H. 
Dry, C. M. Farmer, H. R. Garrett, K. .A. Ga\-, G. W. Hamcr, W. j. Horney. L. B. Johnson, 
W'.G. Lowry, Dave Neiman, W. A. Perry, C. B. Phoenix, \\'. G.'Rcid, R.' J. Ruble, F. W. 
Slusser, J. S. Stafford, L. S. Weil, Creighton W'renn, and Manager J. J. Alexander. 




LoWRV 

Distances 



Garrett 
Middle Distances 



St.vfford 
Hurdles 



[ -51 ] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Southern Intercollegiate Conference Indoor Meet 

IN two years of existence the Indoor Meet lias become one of the biggest events on the ath- 
letic calendar. Tlie k;^! games were particularly successful, l:)eing attended by a crowd 
of three thousand which jiacked the Tin Can. 

The Tar Heels swept through to take the indoor cham])ionshi]) by a wide margin, rolling 
up ■x^y.z points to their nearest rival's 18.7. First places were won by Cieorge Bagby. high 
jump; Ray Ruble, pole x'ault: Clarence Jensen, mile: Lionel \\'eil. 440 dash: and the relay 
team, composed of Jensen, Marland, Weil, and Drane. 

Carolina's victory was somewhat clouded by a leg injury suffered by Charlie Farmer, last 
year's sprint champion, which kept him out of most of the outdoor season. 





Weil and Xims 
Middle Distances 





I^SI 




BASEBALL 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 







o S * <■ 



w^:4 



[254: 



ATHLETICS 





Sickles 



STAFF 

Coach J- N. Ash MORE 

Manager ^xt Sickles 

Captain - ; Jimmy Macs 

193 1 SCHEDULE 
March 30 — Cornell L'ni\ersity at Chaiiel Hill 
March 31 — Cornell University at Chapel Hill 
April I — L^niversity of PennsyUania at l'hai)cl Hill 
April 2 — Unixersity of Pennsylvania at Chapel Hill 
April 3 — Washington and Lee L^niversity at Chap'el Hill 
April 4 — University of Maryland at Chapel Hill 
April 6 — Davidson College at Winston-Salem, N. C. 
April 7 — Princeton University at Chapel Hill 
April 8 — Princeton Universitx' at Chapel Hill 
April 10 — University of Maryland at College Park, Md. 
April II — University of Virginia at Charlottesville, \'a. 
April 13 — Washington and Lee University at Lexingtcm, \'a. 
April 14 — Virginia Military Institute at Lexington, Va. 
April 15 — Virginia Polytechnic Institute at Blacksburg, \'a 
April 16 — \'irginia Polytechnic Institute at Blacksburg, \'a. 
April 21 — Wake Forest College at Chai)el Hill 
April 25 — X'irginia Military Institute at Chapel Hill 
May 2 — Duke University at Durham, X. C. 
May 5 — North Carolina State College at Chai)el Hill 
Alay 8 — Uni\'ersity of Virginia at Chapel Hill 
Ma\' 9 — University of \'irginia at Greensboro, N. C. 
May 12 — L^niversit)- of Maryland at Chajjel Hill 
May 16 — Duke University at Chapel Hill 
May 20 — North Carolina State College at Raleigh, N. C. 

[-^55] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Lapiain Mal's 
Cati-her 



The 1930 Season 



ALTHOUGH the record of twelve lost for thirteen won is not impressive, there were sev- 
eral high lights to last year's baseball campaign. For one. the Tar Heels again swept 
the Virginia series, beating the Cavaliers by the scores of 8-5, and 12-1. In addition 
the Tar Heel nine rated second to Duke in the Big Fi\e race. 

As has been the trouble in past years, the main handicap to the team was the dearth of 
pitchers, Coach Ashmore being forced to build his mound staff around three sophomores, Cecil 
Longest, Paul Edwards, and J. D. Shields. There was plently of power in the Tar Heel bats 
but they were helpless without any support from the hurlers. 

The season opened rather auspiciously with an 18-7 win over the Springfield, Mass. Col- 
lege. In this game Coach Ashmore used twenty-one men. The batters, led by Captain Jimmy 
Maus and Map Lufty, fell on the northern hurler for fifteen runs in tlie first three innings. 

Carolina continued her winning ways, this time beating Cornell ^-2 in a pitcher's battle. 
Frank Fleming bested the Cornell ace, Boies, allowing six scattered bingles. Burgess White- 
head, Frank Fleming and Phil Jackson featured the play. 

In the second game of the Cornell series, the Tar Heels suffered their initial defeat, los- 
ing a free hitting game 10-8. Auburn Wright, after his second victory, pitched good ball, but 
five errors on the part of his mates lost the ball game. La France, the visiting first baseman led 






[256: 



ATHLETICS 






the attack with tour hits, inchiding- three doubles. The batting of Wright and Whitehead were 
the bright lights in the Carolina defeat. 

The Tar Heels then went down to Athens, Ca., for a two game series with the Bulldogs. 
Georgiacapturedtheopener, 9-1, Fleming, Hinton and Longe.st being hit hard. The tables 
were turned in the second game, Carolina coming out on the long end of a 6-4 game, which 
was called in the sixth on account of rain. Wright hurled for the victors. 

Defending her Tri-State title in the opening league game with Marxdand, the Tar Heels 
agam emerged victorious, 7-2. Frank Fleming started on the mound and pitched steady ball, 
allowmg the Old Liners one run and three hits in the seven innings that he hurled. Shields 
who relieved hleming, allowed the other run, yielding three hits. Nap Luftv was the big star 
m the victory. Nap fielded like a major leaguer and had four hits at bat,' a single, double, 
triple, and home run. 

Opening a six-day northern trip against the Terrapins at College Park, the Tar Heels col- 
lapsed, being snowed under by Maryland, 14- 1. This game started the Tar Heels ott on one 
of the most disastrous trips in years, losing live out of six Conference games. The only re- 
deemmg feature of the trip was an 8-5 victory over the Cavaliers. The pitchers fell dowii, the 
batter couldn't hit : in general the Tar Heels played the worst ball of the season. 

Georgia returned the Tar Heel visit, coming to Chapel Hill for a two game series. As was 
the case in the early series, each team won a game, the Crackers capturing the first, 7-0, and 
losing the final, j-t^. 






PAXTON 

Outfielder 



[257] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




WklGHT 

Pitcher 





I'LtMlNG 

I'ltchcr 



In the first encounter C'liandler, l'ootl)all ace for the \isit(irs. hlanked the 'l"ar Heels with 
only three hits, while his mates were jxiunditii; I'ark, Shielils, and l-Alwards. for eleven hits, 
including' two triples, and a douhle. 

I. (ingest i)itched hitless hall for se\en innings, easing duwii in the final two innings to 
hree/e through with a 7-3 win. The all aroinul play of Carolina's hig three, W'hiteheatl, 
Alaus, and Lufty featured. 

\'. P. I. repeated her earlier victory, this time walking off with a 9-4 score. As has 
heen the case in most of the losing games, the pitcher, Wright, hurled good hall hut received 
no suj)port at the jjlate or in the held. 

Duke, state champions, took the season's two games, each hy large scores. There was no 
doubting the supremacy of the Blue Devils, who h.ad cjne of the best collegiate clubs in the na- 
tion. The score of the first game was 14-5, and the second, i 5-2. Lefty Jenkins, Duke South- 
paw, won his sixth game over the Tar Heels in three years. 

The second game of the Virginia series was rained out, l)ut the Tar Heels took the 
Greensboro classic by the large score, 12-1, thus giving the Tar Heels a clean sweep for the 
season. I-'leming and Maus was the winning" battery. 

In a game on which depended second place in the state race, the Tar Heels defeated 
State, 3-3 at Emerson Field. This game rolled down the curtain on the 1930 season. 

Burgess Whitehead was electetl captain for 193 1 after the State game, but will be inelig- 
ible to play college ball as he signed a professional contract, and "Piggy" Potter was elected 
to replace Whitehead. 





Hit! 



Run! 



25S 




MINOR SPORTS 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Watkixs, Ll'mi'kin, Fettv. Pratt, Crane, Zellv, Coach Kansox 

Farris, Hlbbakd, Jensen, Captain Baucom, Jones, Cordel 

iy3i CROSS COUXTKV SQUAD 

Cross Country 

STAFF 

Coach - - Dale Ranson 

Manager - George Newman 

Captain Cliff Baucom 

SCHEDULE 

October _'i — Virginia Polytechnic Institute 29; Carolina 27 

November 8 — Duke University 37; Carolina 18 

November22 — Southern Conference Meet : Virginia Military Institute, 40; Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute, 56; University of Florida, 84; Carolina, 105: University of Georgia, 131 ; 
Washington and Lee University, 14J: University of Tennessee, 156; Duke Univer- 
sitv, 161. 

THE SEASON 

For the first time in five years the Carolina Cross Country team failed to win the Southern Con- 
ference championship; but the team turned in victories in both of its dual meets, took the State title, 
and placed fourth in the Conference run. Captain Cliiif Baucom and Clarence Jensen led the team 
to victories against V. P. I, and Duke, while Jensen was the first Tar Heel to cross the finish line 
in the Conference run. Baucom ran most of this race with a foot injury, but placed twenty-first. 
With the exception of Baucom, a senior, all the monogram winners were sophomores. Clarence 
Jensen was elected captain of the 1931 team. Monograms were awarded to Captain Baucom, Jensen, 
Cordle, Farris, Hubbard, Pratt, and Jones. 






Newman 
[260] 



ATHLETICS 












CuACH QUINLAN, MANAGER CasE 

Park, Lkarv, Cowper, Hampton, Ferguson, Auman, Margous 

Idol, Captain-elect Tsumas, Captain Stallings, Albright, Ushe 

1931 WRESTLING SQUAD 



Wrestling 



January 

January 

January 

February 

February 



Carolina 16 

Carolina 12^ 

; Carolina 19 

; Carolina 29 

; Carolina _. 2"/ 

: Carolina zy 

; Carolina 12 



STAFF 

Coach P. H. OuiNLAN Manager Wallace Case 

Captain Fred Stallings 

SCHEDULE 

10 — ['rinceton L'niversity 14 

17 — United States Naval Academy 191^ 

31 — Virginia Polytechnic Institute 13 

17 — North Carolina State College 3 

21 — Davidson College 5 

February 23 — Duke University 3 

February 28 — Virginia Military Institute 12 

THE SEASON 
Carolina's wrestling team, with Stallings, Conklin. Tsumas. and Cowper doing outstanding 
work, won the State title and were unbeaten in the South. Conklin won all si.x of his bouts while 
Tsumas lost only to Navy. Navy was the only team to win over the Tar Heels, and everv team in 
the state was defeated by an overwhelming margin. Every regular except Usher won state cham- 
pionships. 

Four letter men. Harry Tsumas. Don Conklin. Percy Idol, and Pete Usher, will return next 
year with Tsumas as captain. Captain Fred Stallings. Alaync Albright. Fred Ferguson. Marion 
Cowper. and Ken Hampton closed their careers by carrying Carolina through one of its most suc- 
cessful wrestling seasons. 

Monograms were awarded to Captain Stallings. Tsumas. Albright. Usher, Conklin, Cowper, 
Ferguson, Idol, and Hampton. 




Quinlan 





Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




LisKiN, Abu s, Hines. Hendi.in, Vf.omens 

Gk\m, CoM-H F<t\Fl^LD. Captain Graham, Wright 

1931 TENNIS SQUAD 



Coach John I" 



Tennis 

STAFF 
Kenfiei-d Caftoiii- 



-Edwarp K. Graham 



I'orcst, 



March 30 — Clenison College at Cliapcl Hill, 

April Q — Wake Forest College at Wak 

\. C. 

April II — Davis Cup Team at Pinehurst. X. C. 

April 20 — Duke University at Chapel Hill. 

-\pril 21 — Wake Forest College at Chapel Hill. 

April 22 — Davidson College at Chapel Hill. 

April 23 — State Tournament at Chapel Hill. 

April 24 — State Tournament at Chapel Hill. 

.•\pril 25 — State Tournament at Chapel Hill. 

."Xpril 27 — Sewanee College at Chapel Hill, 

May 2 — Georgetown University at Washington. D. C 

May 4 — Princeton University at Princeton. X. J. 

May 5— New York University at New York. X."Y. 



1931 SCHEDULE 

Mav 6— United States Military Academv at West 
Point. X. Y. 
- — Yale University at New Haven, Conn. 
8 — Brown University at Providence, R. I. 
9 — Harvard University at Cambridge. Mass. 
13 — Southern Conference ~ 
Orleans, La. 
Southern Conference 
Orleans. La. 
15 — Southern Conferenc 

Orleans, La. 
ifi — Southern Conference Tournament at New 

Orleans, La. 
18 — Duke University at Durham, X. C. 



May 
May 
Mav 
May- 
May 
May 
Mav 



14- 



Tournament at 
Tournament at 
Tournament at 



New 
Xew 

Xew 



Max 



LAs this book goes to press, it is generallv conceded that the University's 1931 tennis team has established 
just claim to the title of National Intercollegiate Champions. The season shows an unmarred record of victories 
over the strongest teams in the South and East. — Ed. Note] 

THE 1930 SEASON 

Coach Kenfield's 1930 tennis team swept 
through its eleven-match schedule with ten wins 
and one tie to win the State championship and 
,:laim Southern honors. Tulane tied the Tar Heels 
3-3 in the hnal match of the season, but Carolina 
uoii the remaining meets easily, winning over 
!;ome of the most prominent teams in the South. 

Carolina won the State championship with 
Hinkey Hendlin winning the singles title and pair- 
ing with Phil Liskin to take the doubles crown, 
h'our Carolina men fought it out in the quarter- 
linals. Liskin and Hendlin went to the finals of 
the Southern tournament but were eliminated. 
Captain Bill Merritt was the only man lost by 
graduation. 

Monograms were awarded to Captain Merritt. 
Graham, Baggs. Hendlin, Brown, Liskin, and 
Palniore. 

f 262 1 





Graham 



A T II L h'.'l' I CS 




O'Brien, Goodes, Carter, Brooks. Mason, Willis, Brow: 
1931 GOLF SQUAD 



Laxton, Adams 



Golf 



STAFF 
Coach John F. Kenfield Captain Meade Willis 

1931 schf:dulr 

4 — Georgetown Universit\' at Chapel Hill. 

7 — Boston College at Chapel Hill. 
II — Washington and Lee University at Chapel Hill. 
15 — Duke University at Chapel Hill. 
18 — Georgia School of Technology at Chapel Hill. 
24 — Davidson College at Greenshoro, N. C. 
25 — State Tourney at Greensboro, N. C. 
30 — Southern Conference Tournament at Athens. Ga. 

I — Southern Conference Tournament at Athens, Cja. 

2 — Southern Conference Tournament at Athens, Ga, 

9 — Duke University at Durham, N. C. 
15 — University of Virginia at Charlottesville, Va. 
16 — William and Mary College at Williamsburg, Va. 



April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April , 

May 

Ma'v 

Mav 

Mav 

Mav 



THE 1930 SEASON 
Golf was added to the list of minor sports at Carolina during the 1930 season and the team 
responded by winning seven of its nine dual matches, taking the State championship for the third 
straight year, and placing fourth in the Southern Intercollegiate tournament. Captain Charley 
Chatham led the team in its seven victories, and received alile sup])ort from the remaining members 
of the squad. Duke and Georgia Tech defeated the Tar Heels by close scores for the only los.ses 
of the year, while decisive victories were turned in against Wake Forest, Duke, N. C. State. David- 
son, \'irginia. William and Mar\-. and Vanderbilt. 



Alonogram 




Captain Chatham, Willis, Stewart 




and T. Adams, 



Willis 



[^63 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




G. E. Shepard 
Director of Intraniura! Athletics 



Intramural Athletics 

THE purpose of Intramural athletics is to provide an atliletic program for those students 
who ha\-e neither the time nor ability to compete on varsity or freshman squads. The 
Intramural Department provides a diversified athletic program, in order to have a wider 
appeal to the student body. Additional events have continually been added, until at the pres- 
ent time competitixe leagues exist in almost every branch of sport. The enthusiasm of the 
student body for participation in the intramural program has grown until jiractically every 
student now competes in at least one of the sjjorts conducted 1)_\' this department. 

Director Shepard. assisted by "Mac" Gray and ^\'allace Shelton. ha\e worked with the 
purpose of providing" some form of sport for all members of the student Ixxly at all times 
during the year, and their efforts have resulted in the most successful year that the department 
has ever had. 



[ -^64 ] 



ATHLETICS 





RUFFIN DORMTTORV TeAM 

Taq Football Clianif^ioiis, igju 



Qliestion Maki^o 
3ashclball Champions, I9,V 



Intramural Champions 

Football, 1930: Ruffin, Dormitory Champions 

Beta Theta Pi, Fraternity Champions 
Ruffin Dormitory, Campus Champions 

Basketball, 1931 : (Question Marks, Dormitory Champions 
Kappa Alpha, Fraternity Champions 
Question Marks. Campus Champions 

Baseball, 1930: New Dorms. Dormitory Champions 

Lambda Chi Alpha, Fraternity Champions 
New Dorms. Campus Champions 

Tennis, 1930: New Dorms. Dormitory Champions 

Beta Theta Pi, Fraternity Champions 
Beta Theta Pi, Campus Champions 

Boxing, 1931 : Best House, Dormitory Champions 

Delta Kappa Epsilon, Fraternity Champions 

Wrestling. 1930: New Dorms, Campus Champions 

Cross-Country 

(Cake Race) : Tar Heel Club, Team Winner 

Fencing. 1931 : Phi Gamma Delta, Campus Champions 






Phi Gamma Delta 

Fencing Champions 

1931 



Tar Heel Ctun 

Cross Country Champions 

1930 



Varsity Fencing Team 

Southern Intercollegiate 

Champions, 1931 



[265] 



^'ACKETY V,\("K 






Mo., RE, Jexsen. Wyrick. Lips 


COMB. FaRRIS. A«X", I;: 


■•,r ,„>. Kl-BLE. TSI 


Weil. Ferguson, Garre 


TT. Tabb. Crew. Erukson. 


I'ARSLEY. Brown 


Farmer, Pratt, Shields, 


Willis, Chandler, Cho.^te, 


Marpet. Cleland 


Blythe, Snyder, Slus- 


ER, Walker, Gilbreath, Co\ 


vper, Thompson 


Jones, Corple, Newcomb, Da 


is, Baucom, Paxton, Goodr 


DGE, Albright, U 



1930 MOXOGR.AM CLUB 

Monogram Club 



J. G. Adams. Jr. 
R. M. Albright, ] 
T. W. Alexander 

A. T. Allen 

B. D. Arnold 
G. L. Bagby 
H. M. Baggs 
R. C. Baucom 

C. E. Blythe 
J. D. Branch 
T. R. Brown 
H. T. Browne 
T. W. Case 

S. M. Chandler 
Page Choate 
T. M. Cleland 

D. R. CONKLIN 

F. L. Cordell 



M. R. Cow PER 
R. D. G. Craig, Jr. 
S. E. Crew 
G. O. Davis 
J. P. Edwards 
C. P. Erickson 
C. M. Farmer 
J. B. Farris 
R. S. Farris 
F". G. Ferguson 
E. D. Fysal 
H. R. Garrett 
J. U. Gilbreath 
Ben Goodes 
Noah Goodridge 
E. K. Graham 
R. M. Gray, Jr. 
K. D. Hampton 
H. H. Hendlin 



\V. M. HiNES 

H. M. Hodges 
Dail Holderness 
H. C. House 
R. D. Hubbard 
P. C. Idol 
C. A. Jensen 
M. M. Jones 
P. W. Landis 
Martin Levinson 
J. V. Lindley 
E. R. Lipscomb 
Phillip Liskin 
E. C. Longest 
R. A. McDade 
H. S. McIvER 
J. E. AIagner 
A. R. Marpet 
J. R. Maus 

[266] 



W". C. Medford 
\N'. E. Merritt 
]. E. Moore 
R. H. Moore 

E. S. Nash 
H. A. Nelson 

J. E. Newcombe 
G. F. Newman 
D. A. Nims 
R. A. Parsley 

B. E. Paxtox 
W. H. Potter 
W. H. Pratt 
R.J. Ruble 
P. B. Ruffin 

C. O. Sapp 

H. J. Sheffield 
J. D. Shields 

F. W. Slusser 



Jr. 



W. \V. Smith 

D. M. Snyder 
L. F. Stallings 
L. C. Stewart 
W. S. Tabb 

G. D. Thompson 
Harry Tsumas 
N. A. LTnderwood 
R. C. Lusher 
Evan Vaughan 

E. G. Walker 
John \^'ARREN 
Clarence \\'eeks 
L. S. \\'eil 

AL H. Willis 

W. O. ^^'OODARD 

C. L. Wyrick 
E. D. Yeomans 




GIMGHOUL CASTLE 



Fraternities 

SOCIAL AND HONORARY ORDERS 



^S^El^ 



W'aud. President Coo?er, Sec. -Treas. Holdekness Hubbard 

KA 2N AKE ■t-TA 



Uresslar 
Ben 



Faulkner 

A A T 



Vaughan 



Andrews 
* 2 K 



Gump 

Z B T 



Lea 




Austin Silverstein 



INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




[ 2-0 ] 



F R A T E R N IIM E S 




Mtlta i^appa Cpsiilou 



rounded al Yale I'liircrsily h\'_(_f 



Colurs: Crimson. Blue and Gold 



Piiblicatioii: D. K. E. Oiiarterh 



Ur. W. M. Dev 



William Duxx, ]k 

JllHX \'. LlXDLEv' 



BETA CHAPTER 

Established iSji 
Fratres in Facultate 

Fratres IX Universitate 
C lass of jo^i 

Meade H. Willis, Jr. 
Class of IQ^2 



Thomas W. Alexander, Jr. 
Thomas L. Parsons 



.Aubrey L. Brooks. Jr. 
Raymond H. Chatham 
Joseph W. Lineberger 
Elliott H. Newcomb 
William V. Shepherd 

David J. Craig, Jr. 



Class of IQ^^ 



Lazv 



Pledges 



Dr. F. p. \"enable 



.Archibald D. Kixcmd 
Alstox Watkixs 



John A. Preston 
Mandeville a. Webb 



Robert H. Carmichael 
-Archibald K. Davis 
JoHx Hane.'-' Lassiter 
Robert J. Mebaxe, Jr. 
Erwix G. \\alker 

Horatio X. Woodsox 



JoHx .Armistead. Jr. Robert W. Gold 

B. liivix HovLE Basil W. Hall _, ^ 

Thorxtox W. Bro(]Ks Romavxe S. Howard Brodie C.'Xalle, Jr 



WooLsEY W. Hunt William M Parsons 

JoHX .A^ McGlixx, Jr. Charles T. Woollex! Jr. 




[ -TI ] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




SOtn 
tn S 5 



So - 



.2U 
Is 



d^ S 






[272] 



FRATERNITIES 




^f)i #amma Belta 

Foiiiulcil at iras/iiiu/lon and JL\fferson College. 1(^48 

Color: Royal Purple Fhra'er: Purple Clematis 

Pitblicdtiuii: The Phi Ganmia Delta 

EPSILON CHAPTER 

Esfablislied j6'^i 



Fratres in Facultate 



Ernest L. Mackie, Ph.D. 



Sterling A. Stoudemire, Ph.D. 
Fratres in Urbe 



J.\mes B. Bullitt, M.D. 



Luther J. Phipps C. D. Kittredge 

Fratres in Universitate 



Class of i(y>^i 



S. Ellis Crew 
Kent Creuskr 



Berry G. French 
Robert E. Hubb.ard 



Henry N. Patterson Ch.^lmers L. White 

.Arthur E. Reynolds 



Class of IQ^2 
W'lLLUM M. Blis.-; Stu.^rt L. Cl.\rk .Arthur H. Fleming, Jr. Ch.\rles \V T.\ylor 

WiLLi-\M D. Br\an. Jr. Donalu P. Cooke John L. Sehon Herbert H. Taylor, Jr 

John W. Clinard, Jr. Frank P. Davis, Jr. Charles E. Taylor '" ~ ' " 



Class nf ip^j 



Robert B. Brock 
Robert F. Davis 



P. Paul Boucher 



John S. Dozier 
William .A. Howard 



Travis T. Brow: 



James R. Hubbard 
Jack C. Morisev 

Lazu 

Robert F. Dewey 
Pledges 

Edwin \V. Kerr 



\\'ii.li.\m T. Whitsett, Jr. 



Gilbert F. Oberfell 
G. Mather.son Young 



DeWitt C. McCotter, Jr. 
Evan G. McIver 



R. Stokes Adderton Espie B. Grady _ ^ 

George T. Barclay William T. Hussey. Jr. Ja.mes McQ. Ledbetter Stephen H Pitkin 

Robert L. Bernhart Walter R. Jones Edwin B. Lyons Tack W. Stokes 




Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




to d 



«=^ 



i .& 






:SS 



[ -^74 



ADM I XI ST RAT ID X 



f 

^ 



Colors: Pink and Blue 



peta i:j)eta l^i 

Founded at Miami I 'nii'crsity. uS:;g 
Piddicatiou: The Beta Theta Pi 

ETA CHAPTER 

Established iS^^j 

Fratres in Facultate 
Alvix S. Wheeler Kent J. Brown 

Fratres in Universitate 

Class of IQU 
George D. Moody 



Flozcer: Rose 



Henry L. Anderson 
William F. Draper 
Oscar W. Dresslar 



Robert VV. Barxett 
Fisher S. Black 
Andrew Hargreave 



Class of iQ-;:^ 

Thomas B. Follin Frank L. Sample. Jr. Donald B. Waugh 

Richard M. Fenker Charles D. Wardlaw, Jr. Joseph T. Wilson. Jr. 

Peter W. Glidewell Fredrick C. Wardlaw 

Class of TQ^^ 
Joseph J. McGavley William G. Roberts 

C. Ashby Penn, Jr. George B. Stone 

J. Russell Williams, Jr. Homes Bryson, Jr. 

Charles G. Rose, Jr. 

Latv 

Thomas -\. Uzzell. Jr. 

Medicine 



Lawre.vce Flinn 
James M. Lynch 
Garrison Reid 



Herbert T. Brown 

Charles Bartholomew Alva Cromartie 
Harmon Chamberlain Dilworth Cocke 
Clalde Council Otto Prochazka 



Pledges 



Douglas L. Potter 



Walter Ridenhour 
Marshall Thompson 
Robert R. Reynolds. Jr. 



Henry L. Gibes 
Allen Heath 




[-T5] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




[276: 



!■• R A T K K N ri' 1 E S 




Belta J^sii 



Branche E. Paxton 



Paul S, Carter 
Richard U. Wood 



John C. Borroughs 



John R. Dii.lard 
Howell Cobb 
Harrison P. Doty 
F. Pendelton Gray 



Fuiindcd III Colninhia ihik'crsily, 1S4J 

XI CHAPTER 

Established iSfi4 

Fratkes in Universitate 

Class of I PS I 

Adam Fisher, Jr. 

Class oj I PS- 
Class of ipss 
Carroll P, R(x:ers, Jr. 

Graduate Student 
Herman W. Schnell 

Medical Student 
R. Lincoln Kestler 

Pledges 

John T. Ham mer, Jr. 
William F. Blount, Jr. 



John C. Grainger 



Wallace T. Cask 
Sydney L. W. Lea 



Harold .A. Haines, Jr. 



Stanley H. Heist, Jr. 
Neil Jennings 
Willis V. Nash 
William R. Rockhill 




[277] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 







[278] 



1'" \< A T E R \ I '1' I E S 




Colors: Purple and Gold 



W. C. COKER 
R. E. CoKER 



C. G. CoLEV 



Cf)i S^i 



Founded at Union CoUcijc, 1841 

Publication : The Purple and Ciold 

ALPHA SIGMA CHAPTER 

Established i6'j^ 



Fratres in Facultate 
W. D. Toy 

Fratres in Universitate 
Class of ig^i 



G. C. Taylor 

A. R. HOLLETT 



Robert Reeves 



Class of ig^^ 



Robert H. Avery 
Whitner N. Bissell 



R. E. CoKER 

Franklin Gray 



M. M. TiMMONS 

John S. White 



Thomas Badger, III 
T. G. Pearson 



Charles W. Allison 
Robert C. Atwood 



Class of ig^s 



Robert K. Cowhig 
Ellis Dudley 



W. Marvin Robey 
William C. Mitcham, Jr. 



J. Banks Young 



Laiv 



W. S. Malone 



R. A. Hovis 



Medicine 
H. W. Glascock, II 



H. W. Beebe 
H. A. Clark 
S. B. Glascock 



L. T. GuioN 
M. M. Heber 



Pledges 



William Harris 
D. B. McIntyre 




[279 J 



V. B. Phillips, Jr. 
R. S. Reynolds 
Boris Siniavsky 



YACKETY YACK 




[280] 



I'" R A 'I" I-: K X I T I E S 




^f)i Eappa ^igma 



Founded at the I'nivcrsity of /'ciiiisvl:ania. i8=iO 
Colors: Old Clold and Black Publicotiitii: Phi Kappa Sigma Xews Letter 

LAMBDA CHAPTER 

Established iSj6 

Fratres in Factltate 

Isaac H. Ma.nmnc. M.D. Gregorv L. Paine, Ph.D. English Bagbv. Ph.D. Robert H. Sherrill, M..\. 
Hen-ry H. Wii.liajis. Ph.D. Ralph Westermax. M.A. J. Merritt Lear. M..\. Samuel Seldex, B.A. 

Fratres in Univer.-^itate 

Chiss of iQ^i 

William L. Hvxt James S. Gorha.m, Jr. Issac H. Maxxixg. Jr. Johx W. W ardlaw 

Johx J. KiRKPATRicK E. George Hoefer, Jr. George T. Wixstox 



W. Gilles Beowx 



Llass of /y.i-' 
.Arthur W. Kauf.maxx 

Chiss of iq;^ 



Frederick M. Prouty 



Robert W" Dr.^xe 
Johx T. Maxxixg 



William S. Markham, Jr. Ja.mes B. Thompsox George W. Wilsox. Jr. 

James E. Steere. Jr. Thomas H. Walker Hugh Wilson 



W ILLIAM J. .\d.\ms. Jr. 

Elias H. Phillips 



Law 
^\'ILLIAM D. Merritt. Jr. 

Graduates 
Pledc/es 



Fraxk P. Spruill. Jr. 



Theodore F. Hermax 



Maurice A". Barxhill, Jr. James M. Cutchix. Jr. Hexdersux Heyward Johx W. Whittox 

John Bullock Edward M. Spruill Eugene P. Odum James B. Farr 

Myrl Carsox Robert A. Reid James \. Ross Francis H. Wilmer 




Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




[282 



I<" R A T E R N I T I R S 




^igma ^lpf)a €p^ilon 

rounded at the University uf Alabama. i(S'f)6 

Colors: Old Gold and Pur])le Flozver: Violet 

Publications: The Record, and Phi Alpha (Secret ) 

XI CHAPTER 

Established iSfi/ 

Fratres in Facultate 

Edward V. Howell. Ph.G. 
W. W. PiERsoN. Jr., Ph.D. 

Fratres in Universitate 



Robert D. W. Connor, Ph.B. 
.Almonte C. Howell, Ph.D. 
George F. Horner, A.M. 



James N. Ashmore 

Charles Morris 

Robert H. Wettach, S.J.D. 



Noah Goodridge 

W. W. Heffelfinger, Ju 

W. B. Huger 

John S. Jemison 

William M. Atkinson 
Royall R. Brown 



Joel B. .Adams 
E. G. Ballenger 
H. G. Connor, IH 
R. L. Covington 



Class of ip^i 

John H. London R, A. Parsley, Jr. 

Lawrence F. London Albert M. Rhett 

E. S. Nash, Jr. Peter B. Ruffin 



Class of IQJ-^ 



J. Holmes Davis, Jr. 
S. Jackson Dunavant 



Lawrence R. Harris 
George Waterhouse 



Bryan Grant 
John Holbrook 
L W. Hughes 
James G. Kenan- 



William C. Thompson 
Edward J. Wood 
Harold V. Worth, Jr. 
W. H. Yarborough, Jr. 

E. F. Yarborough 



Alexander Webb, Jr. 

T. C. Worth 

K. P. Yarborough 



Junius G. Ada.ms 



Alex Andrews. Jr. 
Martin Cannon. Jr. 
Claiborn Carr, Jr. 
.Ansley Cope 



GwYN Harper, Jr. 
W. C. Harris, Jr. 
John Lipscomb 



Class of ip^3 

Theodore Mavbank 
W. J. O'Brien, Jr. 
H. X. Parsley 
F. G. Patterson 

Lazv 

C. J. Shannon, IV 
Pledges 

.\ydelett Minor Harley Shuford 

David Morgan James C. Shuford, Jr. 

Charles Poe J. R. Wall 

Eugene Wily 




[-^83] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




[284] 



R A T !■: R X I T I !■: S 



Color: White 




Heta J^gi 



l-oiiudcd at \c-a' York I 'iikt rsity. 1S46 



Flozver: White Carnation 



Piiblicafioii : 'ilie Circle 



EiiwARD T. Bkowx 
C;eorce Hiiwe 



Louis Graves 



Mavne Albright, Jr. 
Williams Cooper 
Marion K. Cowper 



Woodward L. Bovnton 
Peter S. Gilchrist, Jr. 



.-\sHBY L. Baker 
JiLiAN" T. Baker 



John- W. Graham 



Marcellus J. Best 

T. WiNFIELIi BlaCKWELL. 



UPSILON CHAPTER 

Established: n\\=,8 

I-'r.\tres in Facl'Lt.ate 

Henry Johnston 
Charles S. Mancum 

Fratre.-s in Urbe 
Calvert Toy F-toBERT W. Winston 

Fr.atres IX Universit.ate 

C7(;,s\s- of IQU 

Frank A. Jacocks 
William P. McPherson 
Thomas M. Riddick 

C/(7,s\V of ig^2 

Edward K. Graham John G. Smith 

H. Haywood O'Donnell Paul .A. Tillery 

Class of 19 ^^ 
Milton .-\. Barbar Joseph H. Pratt 

Frederick P. Laxtox .Arthur deT. X'ai.k 



Low 



Charles S. Manc 



^\■Il.LIAM B. Bean 
Pledges 
George W. Capehart Phillip Sasser 

Jr. P. Havward Daggett Frank W. Elliott 



Robert Meade 
Thomas J. Wilson. Jr. 



Walter Wilson 



William B. Snow 
George D. Thompson 
Burgess U. Whitehead 



T. \'oRFLETT Webb, Jr. 
Lynn Wilder 



Louis Whitehead 

Homer LeGraxd Lvox. Jr. 
M. WooDARD Glen.v 




Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




g^l 



[286] 



F R A T l<: R N ri" I I', s 




Ci)i mi 



Founded at Princeton L'nk'crsity, 1S24 



Colors: Scarlet and Blue 



Publication: The Chakett 



ALPHA ALPHA CHAPTER 

Established iSf^S 

Fratres in Urbe 
James Arthur Branch John- McIver Foushee Nathaniel James Hevward Joseph Marion Saunders 

Fratres in Facultate 
George Frank Sensabaugh Thomas Jackson Woofter, Jr. 

• ■ Fratres in Universitate 

Class of ipji 
Robert Farrell Edgar Adams Neely, Jr. John Alexander Currie Luther Corwin Steward 

Egbert Lynch Haywood Arthur Gregory Peeler James Grimes Walter Gregg Sutton 

Class of ipjs 
Henry Bell Benoit Ernest Walter King. Jr. Louis Sherfessee, Jr. Sage Hardin Upshaw 

John Dunn Branch James Hodge Krider Frank Willard Slusser John Archibald Wilkinson 

James Anderson Hudson Willard Lee Parrish Amos Hill Taylor William Alphonso Withers 

Class of ipjj 
Lucas Abels Phillip Nathaniel Peacock Lee G. Richardson .\bie Carr Skinner 

Lazv Medicine 

Edward Scheidt Paul Gregg Weil 

Pledges 

Harry Buford Charles Baisden Evans Arthur L. Mortenson William Weimar Sloan 

Noah Webster Collett George Watts Harris John L. Radcliff William A. Thompson 

Vance Hampton Crane Everett B. Jess Ja.mes R. Renshaw 




Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




g -^ 



[ 288 ] 



F R A T E R N T T T K S 




^Ipfja Wan (Iomega 

h'oundcd tit J'iri/iiiia Military Institute. l,\'6i 



Colors: Old Ccil.l and Skv Blue 



Flozi'cr: White Tea Rose 



Piiblicntioii: The Palm 



Thomas J. Wilson, Ph.D. 
Eugene C. Branson, A.M. 
Harry F. Comer 
William D. MacMillan, Ph.D. 
Howard R. Huse 

Class of rg;/ 

Herbert A. Nelson 
Charles P. Erickeox 
Paul L. Gilbert 
George J. Quinn 
Byron A. Sieder 
Hugh T. Erwin 



ALPHA DELTA CHAPTER 

Established i8jQ 

Fratres in Facultate 

Fletcher McL. Greene, Ph.D. 
Atwell C. McIntosh, LL.D. 
Geralii R. McCarthy, A.M. 



Laii 



T. C. Smith. Jr. 



Alan A. Smith 
Bernard Menge 
Tom Webb 
Robert Colyer 



C7(7.v.s- of rg^s 
\V. Goriion Boger 

LOKTIN p. BROOKER 

Kennith Marlaxd 
Barron K. Grier 
H. Fred Jones 

W. .A. KiNDEL 

George L. Jones 



Thomas S. McCorckle 
William R. .Abbott. .\.M. 
Keener C. Eraser, Ph.D. 
J. Gilbert Evans, M..-\. 
John Watson. B.S. 

Class of Toj;j; 

Donald M. Jenkins 
Peter Garland 
Joe E. Gant 
John D. Sloop 
Harry Hodges 



.Alston Stubbs 



Pledge 



Jones Pollard 
.Ale.x G. Mackadyen 
Edgar Penn 



Gradiiales 



Elroy Dl! Puis 



Robert McLaughli.n 
Francis Johnson 
Du Bose Avery 



Harry H. Lovelace 



Melvin Thompson 
Robert Wilson 
George Wilson 
Stephen White 




[289] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 










^51 



J53 



= So 



[290] 



F R A T !•: R X I T I K S 




Eappa ^Ipfja 



Founded at U'asliinyton and Lcc i'nii'crsity, iS6j 

Colors: Crimson and Gold Flozvcrs: Red Rose and Magnolia 

Publications: Kappa Alpha Journal and Special Messenger (Secret) 



UPSILON CHAPTER 

Established 1881 

Fratres in Facultate 
J. G. R. Hamilton Edgar W. Knight 

Frater in Uube 
John B. Boyd 



Class of ipji 

Robert S. Cromartie, Jr. 
Richard H. Garrett 
Joseph heR. Hamilton. Jr. 
Henry C. House 
William S. Linsay 
Stephen H. Millender 
William B. Oliver 
Eugene E. Wells 

Law 
David J. Ward Hugh L. Lobdell 



Frater in Universitate 

Class of 19^2 
Frank A. Cole, Jr. 

EdMOND S. M.ANN 

James S. Morrison- 
Samuel T. Peace 
Thomas H. Redding 



Class of /pj?j? 

George S. Adams 
Burwell .\. Allen 
John W. Daniel 
.\lfred T, Hamilton- 
William L. Trotter 
RoLFE E. Hughes 
Thomas H. Watkins 



Medicine 
Harry E. Talmadge 



Pledges 



George G. Bethune 
James W. Blackhurst 
George F. Brandt 
Kenneth V. Fisher 
Clifford C. Grover 



D. .Allen Green 
Charles F. Hargrett 
John D. McNeil 
Plummer a. Nicholson 
James W. Patton 



James B. Person 
Harry L. Phipps 
John M. Phipps 
J. Frank Plummer, Jr. 
Gordon C. Priest 



.Alex L. Snead 
John G. Tillery 
William O. Webster 
John H. Wiggs 




Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




;=S 



HJ& < 



[292] 



FK A TERN ITI ES 




^f)i Belta ^fjeta 

Founded at Miami L 'iiiz'crsitw iiS_iS 

Colors: Argent and Aznre Flourr: White Carnation 

Publications: Tiie Scroll and The Palladium 



William S. Bernard 



\\". A. Dalev 



D. C. 



J. P. BUNN 

I. C. Brovver 

I. C. Griffin, Jr. 



BETA CHAPTER 

Established 1S83 

Fratres in Facultate 

C. T. McCoRMicK Thomas F. Hickerson William F. Proutv Patrick H. Wixstox 

Fratres in Universitate 

Class of iq;[ 

DeWolfe. Jr. T. M. Clelaxd L. E. Scoggix. Jr. W. R. Mills P. L. Thomas 

Class of iQ^s 



W. P. Freeze 

E. M. Fo.VVlEI.LE 



T. McLaughlix 
G. W. Hlguely 



J. K. Taylor. 
W. H. Griffi 
H. Moore 



Jr. 



Class of ip^^j 

E. C. Daxiel, Jr. 
J. T. Peacock 
J. G. Peacock 



J. R. Holmes 
T. E. Marshall 
\V. H. Young 



P. J. Storey 

E. W. 



John .\cee 
John K. Barrow, Jr. 
Eugene Carlaxd 
S. D. Craxford 

W. A. ExLOE 



Laxc 

J. .A. WiLLIA.MS 

EwBAxK. Jr. 



M. .\. Grikfix 
W. A. Mack. Jr. 
R. McDowell 

H. .A. MOFFIT 



Pledge 



K. T. White 
C C. Daley, Jr. 

H. T. Xewla.vd 

Medicine 

J. A. WlTAKER 

George R. Benton 



E. B. PE.\CnCK 

S. W. Scoggix 
M. E. Stricklaxd 
B. J. Shore 



H. SrLLivAX 

L. SuLLIVAX 

W. K. SwAx 
B. G. Thomas 
I. B. Tucker 




[293] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 



■|i|i|ii;tiiM:'i^ " 




i!i!iiit. 

i|>isif|s|i 

N»Piil" 

ikkk 

HHlFil 

liillil 









"J 



[294] 



R A T K R X I T I I-: S 




tiorl-asi 



>igma iSu 



Founded at I'injiiiia Military Institute. 1868 
Colors: White, Black and Gold 

Publication: The Delta of Siifma Xu 



Flatter: White Rose 



PSI CHAPTER 

Established 18SS 



Fratres in Facultate 

William D. McXider. M.D. Earle A. Peacock. A.M. C. C. Peacock, A.M. 

S. M. Breckexbridge, Ph.B. .A. Henderson. Ph.D., LL.D. J. B. Wooslev. A.M. 

Fratres in Uxiversitate 



Class of /QU 



E. P. Dameron 
E. R. Hamer 



T P. Cooper 



W. I. Henderson 
E. C. Person 



K. C. Ramsey 

C. C. SiKES 



J. H. BUNN 

E. B. Ferguson 
J. T. Griffith 



A. T. Allen 



W. BVNUM 

P. W. Hairston 



E. L. Carr 



M. S. Hamer 
J. D. Leak 



Class of IQ^2 

W. M. Crouch 
J. A. Park 

Class of ipS3 
\\. A. Lane 
B. C. Prince 
L. C. Skinner 

Law 

E. E. Butler 

Graduate 
Walter Creech 



Pledges 

G. H. Malcane 
E. M. McNair 



J. C. Lyons. Ph.D. 



G. Wadswurth 



L. L. Miller 



.-\. H. Snider 
L. C. Wright 
T. H. Wright 



W. L. Marshall 



W. T. Old 
J. T. O'Xeil 



E. H. Whedbee 



h G. Pace 
A. P. Park 




[295] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




296 J 



FRATERNITIES 




Colors: Blue and Gold 



^igma Cfji 

!■ minded lit Miami Ciiii-crsity, rSSf; 
Publication: The Magazine of Sigma Chi 

ALPHA TAU CHAPTER 

Established iSSp 
Fratres in Facultate 



Floiver: White Rose 



Herman G. Baity 
Frederick H. Koch 



Nicholas West Dockery 
Francis Gilliam Jacocks 



Thomas Allison Henry 
Steven Andrew Lynch 



James Jerry Slade 
R. P. McClamrock 



Wesley C. George 
John W. Lasley 



Frederick B. McCall 



Frater in Urbe 
William D. Scott 

Fratres in Universitate 
Class of 19 3 1 
Augustus Henry Jarratt, Jr. Chauncy Lake Royster Arthur deLoss Sickles 
Edwin Russel Lipscomb Bonner Mills 



Class of ips2 

William Turrelius Myers 
Walter Thomas Rose 



Thomas M. Shelton, Jr. 
Edwin Craig Wall 



John Sneed Adams 
Trogler F. Adkins 
Turner B. Bunn 
Arlindo S. Cate 



Class of ip33 

Stuart W. Chandler James W. Peacock James G. Stikeleather 

David P. Henry 
Wilmer M. Hines 
Henry Wood, IH 

liledicine 



Amos N. Johnson 



Clyde F. Adams 
Charles W. Bissell 
James P. Bunn 
Frank W. Crowell 
John C. Dockery 
Alfred S. Dockery 
John C. W. Entwistle 
Win W. Ham 



John A. Hardin 





William H. Karle William L. 
Jacob H. Shuford W. Howard 
A. Harold Staton 

Graduates 


White 
Wilson 


Pledg 


J. D. E 

es 
Frederick 


ULLOCK, Jr. 
A. M. 

E. Harlee 


W. D. 
Mitchell 

Angus 


Harris 
W. McLea 



J« 


4- 


™ 


B 


' 


■^-^ 



Edward C. Michaels 
James C. Pfohl 
R. Lee Ritchie 
James M. Tatum 
John E. Way 
Barron W. Withers 
William R. Wood 



[297 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 







S 3 .-: 
en < K : 



.a a. 



MO g 



[298] 



I- R A T E R N I T I I-: S 




i^appa ^igma 



John Grover Beard, Ph.D. 
GfsT.WE M. BR.^UNE, B.S.. C.E. 
Robert .\. Fetzer, B.S., il.A. 



Foutidcd at the ['iiizrrsity of Bolocjtia. 1400 

Established in Jiiieriea at tlie i'liiz'ersity of I'irgiuia, i86j 

Colors: Scarlet, ^^'hite and Emerald Green Flower: Lily of the Valley 

Publications: Caducens, and Star and Crescent (Secret) 

ALPHA MU CHAPTER 

Established iSp; 

Fratres in Facultate 

Elmer G. Hoefer, B.S., M.E. 
Sturgis E. Leavitt, Ph.D. 

Frater in Urbe 
George Edward Shepard 

Fratres in Universitate 

Class of lo^U 
George Lewis Bagby William Clyde Dunn 

John Leonard Brown, Jr. 

Class of ig^2 

William .\shly Bridgers Harry Clinton Finch George Phiker Houston 
Sydnor Moye Cozart Robert Walker Geitner John Augustu'; Kleemeier 

Class of 19^ ^ 
William Rhyne Hoffman Paul Phillip Pelton 

Platt Walker Landis Benjamin Cabell Philpott 

Roy Arnold McDade Everard Baxter Shemvvell 

Robert McDonald Gray, Jr. 



Marcus C. S. Xoble, Ph.D. 
Charles Thomas Woollen 
E. J. WOODHOUSE, .A.B., LL.B. 



Joseph Colin Eagles 
Peter Leland Henderson 



William Robert Satterfield 



Thomas Sheffield Bennett 
Barrie Bascom Black welder 
Harley Gaskill Brookeshire 
John Bass Brown 
McCorkle Caldwell 



Ernest Williamson Staples. Jr. 
Eugene Lee Webb, Jr. 
Thomas Skinner White, Jr. 

Medicine 
Robert Mitchell Oliver George Parrott Rosemond 
Pledges 



Traver Harwood Farmer 
William Woodard Farmer 
Archer Bennett Glenn 
Milo Johnson Hoffman 
Oscar Lee Mullis 



Francis Johnstone Murdoch 
James Malcolm Rennie 
Xewman a. Townsend 
Lemuel Preston Tyree 
Weaver Wilson 




YACKETY YACK 











t,>#fc 



Wr \ 






pHii 












.Ji±.'l..-«ll 



[300: 



FRATERNITIES 



^ 



tf/: 



3^i i^appa ^Iplja 



Founded at the University of I'irginia, iS68 

Colors: Garnet and Old Gold Flower: Lily of the Valley 

Publications: Shield and Diamond, Dagger and Key 

TAU CHAPTER 

Established iSg^ 

Fratres in Facultate 
GusTAVE Adolphus Harrer John Erwin Carroll George McFarland McKie George Glenn Killincer 

Fratres in Universitate 



John Bulls Ashcraft 



George Edward French, Jr. 
Horace Hines 



Edgar Allan Bisanar 
Claude Baxter Clarke, Jr. 



Henry Roane 



John Angier Blue 
Harry Halleck Cassada 
James Henderson Clifford 
George Roscoe Little, Jr. 



Class of ipj/ 
Andrew Tyer Sawyer 

Cla^s of ips^ 
Adrian Lafayette Shuford, Jr. 

Class of I9S3 

John Shelton Gorrell 
Frank Morton Hawley, Jr. 



Harry Linden Shaner, Jr. 



George Ward Thompson 
Tom White Weeks 



Clarence Latimer McCoy, Jr. 
John Watkins Williams, Jr. 



Law 
Pledges 



Howard Lester Lackey 



Roscoe Drake McMillan, Jr. 

Hugh Sawyer 

Donald Cleavenger Shoemaker 



Carroll Mann Spencer 

Walker Stamps 

Jack Trotter 

William Robert Woerner 




Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




-Sffi 






> ^ 

< ^" u 
QoZ 






em 



[ 302 ] 



F R A T E R N n' I R S 




m laappa mi 



Founded at the College of Charleston, 1904 

Colors: Gold and White Flower: Red Rose 

Publications: Star and Lamp of Pi Kajijia Plii. Fokromix ( Esoteric) 

KAPPA CHAPTER 

Established 1914 
Fratres in Facultate 

CORYDON P. SpRUILL, B.LiTT. 

Fratres in Universitate 
Class of ip^i 



Dudley D. Carroll, A.M 
Jefferson Bynum, A.M. 



WiLLLAM OlsEN, .\.M. 
WiLLI.AM Gr.'\DY PrITCH.ARD 



Thomas C. Bowie, Jr. 
Ollen D. McLeod 



Beverly Cooper Moore 

George Franklin Newman, Jr. 



Clifton Edward Pleasants 
John Gary Slater 



Class of I9S-- 
Theron Renfry Brown Thomas Pittman Davis Charles Farmer John McIver Gillespie 

Adrian Nathan Daniel James Baxter Dawson John Ulpin Gilbreath Edward Stephen Grady 

Oscar Wilbur Kochtizky, Jr. 

Cla^s of /p5j 

Harper Barnes William Nelson Dixon, Jr. James Gordon Kurfees James Harold Smith 

Henry Armistead Boyd Bernice D. Farmer. Jr. George A. Phillips William Woodard Walker 

Charles H. Brawley Moody Z. Gaither, Jr, Joseph Elvy Slater, Jr. Barker Buxton Williams 

Lazv 

Walter Moore Bryson Calvin Graves. Jr. Ernest C. McInnis A. Hugh Martin 

Medicine 
William O'Kellev Fowler James Brownlee Hall, Jr. Robert Wallace Wilkins Frank Church O'Xeil 

Graduate 
Charles W. Banner, Jr. 

Pledges 

James M. Bobbitt Paul Lasley Hudson Robert McWilliams Edward Vann 

James R. Felts William H. McAllister, Jr. Joseph B. Muse William C. Wallin 

James B. Hockaday Graham McLeod Thomas B. Spencer J. Hale Yokley 




YACKETY YACK 




St-. 



ffi >Q 






[304] 



FRATERNITIES 




Belta ^igma ^fji 



Founded at the Collcijc of the City of Xeiv York. iSqq 

Colors: White, Nile Green and White Flozi'er: White Carnation 

Publieatioiix: The Carnation ( Exoteric ), Tlie Spliinx ( Esoteric) 



ALPHA DELTA CHAPTER 

Established 1920 

Frater in Facultate 
Maurice Taylor Van Hecke. J.D. 

Fratres in Urbe 
Douglas McIntosh Fambrough Carl Vernon Farriss 

I^'ratres in Universitate 
Class of ipji 



Charles Chapman Dufkv 
Pedro Pablo Kjellesvig 
George Martin Koehl 



William Richard Battley 
Richard Mitchell Chamberlain 



Charles Walton Carlton 
Harry Glenn F'rasier 



Randolph Duffy 



WrLLiAM Mangum Bacon. Jr. 
David Boyd Davis 
John Huit Dellinger 
Arthur Mifflin Jenkins 



.\lan Ashworth Marshall 

WiNSLOW WiLKINS SmITH 

Class of 1932 
Charles Castner Cornwall 

Class of 1933 
Clarence E\"erette Johnson 

Lazv 

Pledges 

Erik Xor.man Kjellesvig 
Fred Henry Lenz 
Lynn McIver, Jr. 
Joseph K. Peri^y 



\Villiam Agurs Starbuck 
William Archie Sugg 
Fred Amick Thomas 



Kolbein LuDVk-iG Kjellesvig 
Dewey Little Raymer 



Joseph Alfred Morris 
\\'iLLiAM Lowe Roth 



Claude Everett Reitzel 



Richard Gilbert Rand, Jr. 
Furches Barker Raymer 
Duncan Murchinson St. Clair 
Joseph Sharpe Williams 



[305] 



YACKETY YACK 




:-i ^ 



" J M ; 
. < -J * 












[306: 



F R A T R K X I T I E S 




founded at Xorzcich I 'nix'crsity. 18^6 

Colors: Military Red and White FUra'cr: Red Carnation 

Publication: The Rattle 

ALPHA ETA CHAPTER 

Established iqjo 



]. C. Goodwin 
E. F. Thomas 



Harlan" Jameson 
J. L. Sherrill 
O. H. Weeks 



J. K. Ray 

VV. H. Maxwell 



Frater IX Faccltate 
Samuel Huntington Hobbs 

Fratres in Universitate 

Class of ip^i 
E 

J 

Class of !()•;. 



B. Lane, Jr. 
R. Ingram, Jr. 



J. C. Peele 

D. R. Foster, Jr. 



Frederick Knoop, Jr. 
\'ernon Idol 



T. E. R.^tcliffe. Jr. 
R. E. Brooks 
O. C. Oxen, Jr. 



Class of /pjj; 

G. S. MuRPHV 

M. F. Stone 
B. P. Collins 



J. G. Branch 
I. M. Craig, Jr. 
R. F. Foster 
B. C. Goodwin, Jr. 
R. C. Holt 



Pledges 



W. H. Hussey 
Champ Land 
T. I. McLean 
J. E. Ramsey 
J. O. Zimmerman 



J. K. Bridges 

T. A. Glascock, Jr. 

H. K. Whitener 

J. X. XOWELL 

R. M. Foster 



J. F. Parrott, Jr. 
W. B. Napier 



T. L. Lov 

C. H. Boyd. Jr 

H. S. McIVER 



R. B. Hubbard 
C. H. .\ike.\ 

C. L. WiLPAN 



Alexander Weisker 
Jack M.\cKay 
G. L. Harris 
\\". S. Haves 




[ 307 ] 



FRATERNITIES 







.a 



[308: 




Belta ^m Belta 



I^'oiiinlcd at Bethany Collajc, /tV^o 
Colors: Purple, White and Gold 

Publication: The Rainbow 



Flower. Pansv 



GAMMA OMEGA CHAPTER 

Established igsi 



Charles Dale Beeks 



J. W. Doughtie 
J. L. Ferebee 



F. E. Atiyeh 
C. H. Kapp 



C. B. Gault 



J. O. Moore 



Maddrey Cooke 
William Davis 
Carl Hartman 



Fratres in Facultate 



Class of ip^T 

J. P. Fox 

W. B. Scales 



Harold D. Meyer 



Class of ip^^ 



]. M. Miller 
C. G. Mock 



F. N. Owens 
R. C. Pond 



Class of ipS3 
R. L. Miller H. R. Small 

Law 

J. H. Chadbourn 

Pledges 

William Johnston 
Lester Martin 
James Matheson 



E. N. Shaffner 
K. Wheary 



C. D. Rollins 



K. O. Wright 



George Cole 



Herbert Mosely 
Charles Roullier 
Chaille Sims 




[309] 



YACKETY YACK 







' si S ,-< 



C/} g o ^ 
< -SO 

^?s ■ 






310] 



FRATERNITIES 




^^fei?.^ 



Founded at the Uiik'ersity of Rielnnoud, iQoi 



Colors: Purple and Red 



FUnvers: American Beauties and Violets 



Publication: Sigma Phi I-'psilon Journal 



NORTH CAROLINA DELTA CHAPTER 



Clarance Odell Sapp 



B. B. Forrest 
June U. Gunter 



Maurice Eighme 



Frederick C. Cain 
Allen T. Caldwell 



Lawrence T. Hammond 
Marion R. Alexander 



Jack H. Boyd 
Milton S. Brown, III 
Donald Campbell 
Warren T. Davis, Jr. 
Paul S. Cooper 



Established igsi 
Fratres in Urge 



William Abernethy, M.D. 



Prater in Facultate 
J. P. McDowell 

Class of /pj I 

Thurman R. Karriker 
Henry Temple 

Class of iQ^2 

Class of iQ^^; 

Donald Seawell 
William T. Lasley 

Laiv 
James E. Magner 



Ashley F. Seawell, Jr. 
Malcolm B. Seawell 



Sam M. Yancey 



John Henriques 
Roger Harper 
Carl Hitchcock 
James B. Little 



Pledges 

Cicero A. Frazier 
Norman McCaskill 
Dan a. Powell 
John Durand 



Jesse R. Johnston 
Thomas S. Redding 



Herman S. Merrill 
James B. Linn 

Warren W. Stumph 
Melville Taff 
William A. Wrenn 
Robert H. Waldo 
Thomas L. Johnson, Jr. 




[311] 



FRATERNITIES 










[312] 



I' R A T 1". R X I T I !■: S 




2.amtiba Cfti ^lpl)a 



I'ttinnlcd at Boston Collcijc. igov 

Colors: Purple, Green and (iold Fhnvcr: \'ioIet 

Publications: Purple, (ireen and (Iold Cmss and ('rescent 

GAMMA-NU ZETA CHAPTER 

Established lO-- 

Fratres in Facultate 

K.AEL H. FussLER A. K. King 

Fratres in Universitate 

Class of igj;T 

Frank Johnston Houschodder, Jr. Edwin Godwin Long. Jr. 

Henry Hanes Jenkins John Aaron Prevost 

Whitener Harris Prevost 

Class of IQ^2 

Howard Graham Bowman Benjamin Palmer King John Edward Miller James Bryson Spell 

John Calhoun Connolly Hubert William Miller Charles William Reavis 

Class of rgj;; 
Ralph Gibson Flemming 

Pledges 

Archie B. Joyner 
William J. Lodge 
Harvey F. McCracken 



Alan P. Carey 
Benjamin C. D.avis 
Frank L. Haislip 



Jones S. Rudisili, 
Hugh J. Sloan^ Jr. 
Wade Stanley 




[313] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




.0 



[314] 



F R .\ T F. R NM T I E S 




Cl)i #mega 

Founded at the i'iik'tvsit\ of .Arkansas. f8o3 
Colors: Cardinal and Straw Flozvcr: White Carnation 

Publication: Eleusis 

EPSILON BETA CHAPTER 

Established rO-^^ 



Mrs. Donald Coney 
VIrs. R W. D. Connor 
vIrs. William T. Couch 



SORORES IN UrBE 



Miss Xellie Graves 
Mrs. Guv Johnson 
Miss Estelle Lawson 



Mrs. J. C. Lyons 
Mrs. E. L. Mackie 
Mrs. H. D. Meyer 



Mrs. W. \\". Pierson 

Miss Margaret Pritchard 

Mrs. Wallace Smith 



KuBY Buck 
Mary Bl'rroughs 
Mary .\nderson Carter 



OrVILLE CL'LPEPPER 

Rebecca Daniel 



SORORE.-? IN UnIVERSITATE 

Class of 19 V 



Ida Withers Currie 
Harriett Lane Daniel 



Kate Parks Kitchin 
Elizabeth Horne 



Class of 19^2 

Martha Delanev 
Jo White Norwood 



Edna Morrisette 
Mary Watkins Price 
Mary Louise Wolf 



DoRETHEA RuSSEL 

Charlotte O'Mara Steward 



Graduate 
Hope Buck 




[315 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




[316] 



FRATERNITIES 




m Peta mi 

Pounded at Moiiiuouth Collcijc, iS6y 
Colors: Wine aiitl Silver Blue I'lowcr: White Carnation 

Publication: The Arrow 

NORTH CAROLINA ALPHA CHAPTER 

Established iQs:; 



SORORES IX UrBE 



Elizabeth Branson 
Mrs. Edward Brown 
Margaret Bullitt 
Mrs. W. E. Caldwell 



Alice Carr 
Clyde Duncan 
Kate Graham 



Eloise Barwick 
Blanche Baker Hanff 
Gabrielle McColl 



Mrs. H. F, Comer 
Grace Duncan 
Mrs. Hugo Giddie 



Mrs. a. S. Lawrence 
Mrs. Douglas MacMillan 
Katharine Martin 



Mrs. Fred McCall 
Mrs. Harry Russell 
Mrs. J. Mario.n Saunders 
Rosalie Thrall 



SORORES IN UnIVERSITATE 

Class of I PS I 



LiLLiE W. Jackson 
Edith Mangum 



Adelaide McAnally 
Adelaide Reed 



Class of 19 ^^ 

Ruth Newby Closs Peace 

Elizabeth Nunn Margaret Powell 

Katherine Wheaton Jean Rose 

Class of 19s 3 
Mary Lillian Correll 



Emmie Frances Polhill 

Lazv 
Naomi .Alexander 



Jeannette Comer 
ELIZABETH Green 
Frances Hampton 



Graduates 
Evelyn Way 



Pledges 

Betty Jones 
Patty Lewis 
Myra Lynch 



Virginia Turner 
Elaine Wheaton 
Mary Laurens Withers 

Frances Wagstaff 
Elizabeth Webb 
Virginia Ferguson 



Mary Wiatt Yarborough 
Medicine 
Jean McAlister 



Josephine Parker 
Joselyn Whedbee 
Anne Edmunds 




Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




[318: 



F R A T E R N T T T K S 




^m Cpsiilon Pi)i 

Founded at Culiiiiibiti i/nivcrsity, iqoq 
Colors: Lavender and White Fhwrrs: Lily of the \'alley and \' inlets 

Piihlicatiou: The Plume 

OMEGA CHAPTER 

Established iQJ-j 



Fratres in L^niversitate 
Class of iQp 



Arthur Randolph Marpet 



George Richard Sulkin 



Samuel J. Breen 
Sidney Brownstein 



George Brown 
Norman Coates 



Sidney Ashkenas 
Bernard Elliseurg 
Jack Freedland 



Class of 19: 



Raymond Cohen 
Sidney L. Hirsch 



Joseph Shachtman 
Laurence Spitzer 



Class of TQ^S 
Leonard Eisenberc Henry Fine 

Joseph Eisener Theodore Levy 

Pled(/cs 
Herbert Feldman Erwin Jaffe 

Arnold Friedman Joseph Patterson 

Israel Jacobson Spencer Rosenthal 



Samuel E. Washauer 



Irving Peres 



Herbert Silverman 
Jerome Simons 
Jerome Wolfe 




319 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 







zm _ 

z s s 

w so 



[320] 



FRATERNITIES 




^fjeta ^appa i8u 



Founded at Dntry CoUcije, iO-'4 
Colors: Argent, Crimson and Sable 

Piibliiation: Hieta News 



Floiver: White Rose 



NORTH CAROLINA GAMMA CHAPTER 

Established iO-4 

Frater in Facultate 

Dk. Lee M. Bruuks 



Fratres in Universitate 
Class of ig^i 

Meritt Clarence Baker Fred Odell Johnston James R. Maus 



Howard Henry 



HiLLARD BaXLEY WiLSON 

Napoleon B. Luftv John Southgate Vaughn Charles Lloyd Wyrick 



Cecil Longest 



WiLLL\M Joseph Arthur 



Billy Barett 
Jerry M. Brown 
Henry Lee Buck, Jr. 



Class of 19 S- 

Class of i()S3 
Alexander Grahm Biggs 

Pledges 

George VV, Chandler, Jr. 
James Rufus Creech, Jr. 
Thomas Morgan Daniels 



LORIMER \\'iLLARD MIDGETT 



Erwin M. Culpepper 



Joseph Wheeler Hurteau 
Porter P. Lamm 
Richard L. Winslow 




[ 321 ] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




a 2 






g^i 



[322] 



FRATERNITIES 




llpfia lambba ^au 



Founded Oglethorpe V iiiversity. igio 
Colors: Black and Gold F longer: American Beanty Rose 

Publication: The Rose Leaf 

EPSILON CHAPTER 

Established IQS^ 

Frater in Facultate 
E. K. Plvler, Ph.D. 

Fratres in Universitate 

Class of igu 

Joseph G. Faulkner 
Hakrv M. Gilbert 

Class of 1 9^2 
Carl H. Fisher Donald J. Rltlfs 



Howard H, Crisco 
Colbert ¥. Crutchfield 



Armando M, Parez 
Philip K. Sowers 



RoscoE B. Fisher 



Wallace A. Sheltox 



Class of 1033 



Hampton W. Boring 



George M. Winecoff 



Pledges 

Edward L. Clayton Max W, Holland Ernest W. Hunt Gordon D. Wilson 

Charles F. Crews James T. Hagans William B. Warriner Samuel T. Wvrick 




[ 3-^3 J 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




-,. I t^^H 






t/iQ 



[324] 



1- R A T 1<: R N I T I !■: S 




Founded at ['iik'crsify of I'ciinsylTVuia. /yo.V 



Colors: White and Gold 



Alfred Alexander Mount 



Floivcrs: Daffodils and Lily of the Valley 
Fubliaition: The Nomad 

XI CHAPTER 

Established iqj6 

Frater in Facultate 

Otto Stuhlman, Jr., Ph.D 

Frater in Urbe 

William Carbine, Jr. 

Fkatres in Universitate 

Class of ip^i 
William Gordon Dike Evan James Vaughn 

Class of iQj; 



Calvin Greer Todd George Louis VanEchop, Jr. 
Calvin Luther Todd 



Vernon Lewis Kriggs Jack Brodie 1"'arris 

Edward Benedict Kidu, Jr. Lewis Joseph Loveland 

Class of ipss 
John Frank Geiger Daniel Elmore Gray, Jr. Joseph Hinds Charles L Loftin 

Law 
Ray Simpson Farris 
Graduates 
Milton Clapp, Jr. Henry Harmon zur Burg 

Pledges 
James H. D' Alemberte, Jr. Edgar H. Hazelwood, H Ronald Kochendorfer Ethan ^A._ Sheeder 
Robert Garrett Caldwell John Alfred Jackson Joseph J. McShain 

Lynn R. Davis 



John McCullen Warren 
\'ance G. Wertz 




Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




[326] 



V R .\ T E R N I T I E S 



h^^^Kv 



^!)i ^igma i^appa 

FouiiJcti at M(is.Siuliiisi-l/s A(jricultuyal Collcijc. Amiicrst. iSj; 

Colors: Magenta and Silver flozccr: Red C'arnation 

Fiiblicatioii: The Signet 

UPSILON DEUTERON CHAPTER 

Established iqjO 



R. B. Lawsox, M.D. 



Edwin M. Fowler 



Fratres in Facultate 
C. J. McHale, A.B., A.M. 

Fratres ix Urbe 
Fratres in Universitate 



A. M. White. Ph.D. 



John L. Holshouser 



Elbert H. Denning 
Robert H.\N£Come 



Harold J. Dillehay 



Henry F. Click 
Thomas C. Evans. Jr. 



Donald L. Wood 
Herbert W. Jones 



Class of ipU 

WiLEV H. McGlamery. Jr. Fred C. Thomas 
Robert H. Procter C. Hasford White, Jr. 

Class of ig^^-^ 

Clyde M. .Andrews William C. Fitzgekald. Jr. Edward H. Gibson. Ill Robert T. Sartwell 

Graham C. Cochrane Brittain E. Lukens, Jr. Raymond T. Jenkins James C. Teachev 

Robert J. Whittixgton. Jr. 

Class of iq:;:; 

J. Fred Merritt W. Ward Peetz 

Wiley E. Mitchelle George D. \'ick 

Lazi' 

Ed.mund L. Curlee 

Pledges 

Millard H. Bennett Theodore \\". Bremer Thomas S. Jenrette F. Gerard Wolke 

Iames D. Bivens Rov B. Chapin Linwood C. Wilkinson. Jr. 




[ 327 ] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 







50 



[328] 



F R A T K RNITIES 




Heta Jleta Cau 



Founded at the CoUeyc of the City of Ncic York. i8q8 
Colors: Gold, Blue and White Publications: Zeta Beta Tan Quarterly and Monthly 

ALPHA TAU CHAPTER 



Harry Gump 



Harold S. Cone 



John F. Alexander 
JuLiEN Frankel 



Established iQJ/ 

Class of ip^i 
D. J. Pachman 

Class of ig}2 

Geouce Dannenbaum 
Class of /pjj 

JUL[AN SpIGEL 

Pledges 

John Lindeman 
Albert Oettincer 

Law 
Solomon B. Sternberger 

Medicine 
David L. Avner 



Lionel S. Weil 



Seymour Abrams 



Elmer Oettincer 
JuLiEN Meyer 




[ 3-'9 ] 



YACKETY YACK 







1^' W: 



/ 

f 





'^0m^ 



T&^ 



m>- 



0> 






-gs^ 



\ 4 



P^ P 



^l 



w 5 . 



SOS 
*^ r z 

Qj z 
Ȥ5 



[33°: 



F R A T K R N T 'I" I E S 




^igma Heta 



Founded at the I'lihTrsity nf Michif/aii. IQ24 



Colors: Black and Gold 



Flozver: Pansy 



Publitati 



lie Torch nf Sisma Zeta 



XoR.MAN Luther Bryan, 
Gus Obie Davis 
Canfield Smith Dickie 



Casper Marion Austin 
XoRwooD Easox Bryan 



Romulus Hoke Flynt 
Benjamin Barber Frazer 



Fred Brenning Bunch 



C. G. Blackwood 
XoRMAN Bonner 
Thomas H. Broughton 
\\' alter M. Cooke 



GAMMA CHAPTER 

Established IQ2S 

Prater in Pacultate 

Rupert Bayliss \'ance. Ph.D. 

Prater in Urbe 
Joseph Herman Brisson 

pRATRES IN UnIVERSITATE 

Class of ig^r 

Mebane Thomas Lea Henkle Moser Price Leo Brown Skeen 

Walter F. Owen James Clayton Purser Howard Prestin Whisnant 

Milton Purcell Park James Howard Sheffield Rankin Jones White 



Class of /<??- 



Edward Victor C onrad 
Joseph Elmo Huffman 



.Alden Joseph Stahr 
Carl Milton Tucker. Jr. 



Steve Parker Marsh 



Class of 19 ^^ 
JosEY Key Galloway 
Clarence Arthur Jensen 

Lazi' 
Ralph Cordell Greene 



John Caldwell McCampbell 
Harold Raymond Ritchie 



Henry Bryce Parker 



Pledges 



Theodore ^L Crawford 
Ralph G. Edwards 
David M. Feit 
John Sparks Griffin 



Charles C. Keener 
R. G. McFarlane 
Joe Purchess 
Vernon H. Scarborough 



Frank Sheffield 
Grahm H. Tart 
Joe M. Tobin 
.Asa L. Whitley 




j....--?i~ ^ 



33^ 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




S 3," 
J z 2 



[332] 



I< R A T K R N I 'I' I K R 




^f)i ^Ipfja 



Founded at Gcoryc Washington University, IQ14 

Colors: Maroon and Blue Floiver: Rose 

Publications: Plii Alpha Quarterly, Phi Alpha Bulletin (Esoteric) 



Milton Cohen 



Stanley B. Abelson 



Jack Bessen 



Jack Abramson 
Joseph Dinstman 
George Dorfman 
Milton Fleishman 



OMEGA CHAPTER 

Established iQsS 

Fratres in Universitate 
Class of igj!i 



Class of 19,^- 
Class of /pjj 

Pledges 

Samuel Greenberg 
Edwin Kahn 
Seymour Lorberbaum 
Henry Lubetkin 



Sam Silverstein 

Morris Krasnv 

I. H. L. Shlefstein 



Jack Margolis 
Irving Margulies 
Harry Siegel 
Morris Witten 




Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 







334 



F R A T E R N IT I R S 



M 



^igma Belta 



Founded at the Vnk'ersity of North Carolina, 1024 
Colors: Brown and Wliite Flou'er: Cape Jasmine 



James O. Bailey 
Dr. K. G. Henrv 



Fratres in Facultate 

William T. Couch Murphy D. Ransom M. S. Heath 

Henry M. DeWick Harry G. Brainard 



John H. Croom 



Fratres in Universitate 

Class of /p_?/ 
Matthew G. Henry James G. Poole Benjamin B. Kendrick, Jr. 



Class of 193- 

VV. Eugene Connallv, Jr. James L. Thomas Carlton E. Wilder Morris S. Clary 

F. O. Carver, Jr. Samuel Byrd Winstead J. Sherman Shore 



Henry Wieland, Jr. 



Blair Holliday 
William E. Riley 



Class of I OS 3 

Fledges 

Benjamin Napier 



Alfred Encstrom 



William V. Covington 
Raleigh Baker 




[335] 



YACKETY YACK 




I » 2 









[336] 



V R A T E R N I T 1 !•. S 




^igma €ps!ilon 



Founded at lUiivcrsity of North Carohiia. 19-4 

Colors: Purple, Cerise and (jray Floxvcr: White Rose 

Publication: Sigma Epsilon Scroll 

I'^RATRES IN FaCULTATE 



J. Willis Posey 
J. X. Callahan 



C. VV. Blackwood 



L. M. Allen 



\Y. W. Hewitt 



C. W. Goodwin 



D. Clifton 

L. L. Hutchinson 



Fratres in Urbe 

Fratres in Universitate 

Class of 1 9^1 
J. C. Blackwood 

Class of 193^ 
S. W. Fleming W. E. Uzzell 

Class of 1933 
Medicine 

D. LoHR 

Lazv 
O. M. Smith 



J. Leroy Smith 
H. E. Thompson 



D. P. Whitley 



N'. E. Wiggins 



K. W. Lumpkin 



Pledges 



L. B. Mann 
J. P. Truim 



L. R. Rankin 
J. W. Ward 



P. R. Sperks 



Eugene Fallon 




Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




[338; 



F R A 'I" V. K N T T T E S 




i;f)eta Mi 



Founded at the Uni-versity of Xortli CayolUia, iqs6 

Colors: Orange and Blue Flower: Sweet Pea 

Fratres IX Faci'Ltate 
John E. Lear, E.E. Ralph M. Trimble, C.E,, M.S. 

Fratres in Universitate 

Class of igu 

Edgar Lee Davis Fred Jovner Moore Robert Cronly Plummer 

Gaston Lee Deese Jesse Strickland Newsom Raymon John Ruble 

JoH.N- Daniel McConnell Charles Beatty Overman Robert Festus Welch 



Cla^s of /y •?-" 



Callis Harvv .\tkixs 
Robert Trafford Burnett 



William Tho.mas Crutchfield 

IVEY .-\dDISON GrOOME 



Pledges 



William Emerson Davis Earnest Woodrow Fisher 

Flay Grigc Dellinger John Wesley Kirby 

William ALartin Sloop 




339 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 










5^ > 

s 



[340: 



F R A T ]-: R N I T I I-: S 




mi CJ)i 



Founded at LouisviUc Medical School. iSq^ 



Colors: Green and White 



Flower: Lilv of the Vallev 



Publication: Phi Chi Ouarteiiv 



SIGMA THETA CHAPTER 

Established ign~, 
Fratres in Facultate 



James B. Bullitt 
William deB. MacNiuer 



Wesley C. George 
William Abernethy 



William O'Kelly Fowler 
James Brownlee Hall, Jr. 



Fratres in Universitate 

Second Year Medical Class 

Robert Mitchel Oliver 
William Stanley Wall 
James Allen Whitaker 



Samuel Eason Way 
Robert Wallace Wilkins 



Herbert Thompson Browne 
Robert Dean Bunn 
Frank Church O'Neil 



First Year Medical Class 

John Thornton 
Richard Harper Whitaker 
Douglas Laten Potter 
William Elledce Selby 



George Parrot Rosemand 
George Ruffin Benton 
Weddle Walter Vaughn 



Pledge 
Francis Rivers Lawther 



[341] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




[ 342 ] 



P' R A T E R N 1 T I E S 

^Ipfja Ci)i ^igma 

Founded at the i'nk'crsity of irisconsiu. iqoj 
Colors: Prussian Blue and Crome Yellow Floivcr: Red Carnation 

Publication: The Hexagon 

RHO CHAPTER 

Established iqij 



Dr. F. p. Venable 
Dr. J. M. Bell 
Dr. a. S. Wheeler 



Fratres in Facultate 

Dr. F. C. Vilbrandt 
Dr. J. T. Dobbin's 
Dr. H. D. Crockford 



Dr. F. K. Cameron 
Dr. F. H. Edmister 
Dr. R. W. Bost 



A. L. Alexander 
W. A. Biggs, Jr. 

N. W. DOCKERY 



Fratres in Universitate 
Class of ipu 



M. G. Henry 

G. H. McCarmick 



R. H. Munch 
R. L. Poplin, Jr. 



F. Thomas 
H. C. Thomas 

E. H. Wycke 



Class of IQ^2 
E. O. Bryant P. S. Gilchrist B. E. Lukens, Jr. M. M. Mathews M. A. Suther P. C. Usher 



R. C. Pond 



Class of IQ^^ 
E. C. Powell. Jr. X. L. Simmons, Jr. 



H. J. Wieland 



G. G. Albrittan 
R. H. Belcher 
R. M. Byrd 



M. W. Conn 

E. W. Constable 

G. H. Fleming 



Graduates 
E. S. Gilreath 

G. C. HOLROYD 

A. E. Hughes 



T. L. King 

J. N. Le Comte 

H. .\. LjUNG 



W. J. Mattox 
J. H. Sanders 
J. O. Turner 




[343] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




[344] 



1- R \ T I-: R X 1 T I !•: s 




4m 



i:f)eta Eappa ^^i 



Founded at the Medical LoUctjc of I 'injiiiia. iSjQ 
Colors: Nile Green and Olil ( iuld Flo-arr: Red Rose 

['uhlicatioii: The Messenger 

UPSILON CHAPTER 

Established loi t 



Albert Earl Barxhaedt 
\ViLLL\M Henry Flvthe 



■ F"RATRE.S IX UXIVERSITATE 

Class of ig;[ 

Haskell Wright Fox Charles Houston Gay 

\ViLLiAM Abel Fritz Jessie Walton Kitchen 



Ernest Vic Moore 



Edwin Buetis Aycock 
Joe Withington Eaton 



Sterling Archie Barrett 
Henry Clay Harrill 



Class of IQ^J 

Walter Robert Kersey 
Fletcher Dover Sain 



Pledges 
Alfred Franklin Ha.mmond, Jr. 



Curtis Glenn Southard 
Richard Lewis Sugg 



Wileer Curtis Hunsucker 
Howard Q. L. Little 




[345 



YACKETY YACK 







[346: 



F R A T K R N I T I E S 




Eappa JPsii 



Founded at the Medical College of Virginia, 18/Q 

Colors: Scarlet and Gray Flozuer: Red Carnation 

Publications: The ^lask (Exoteric), The Agoa (Esoteric) 



E. \'. Howell 
M. L. Jacobs 



BETA XI CHAPTER 

Established 1913 
Fratres in Facultate 

Fratres in Universitate 



J. G. Beard 
R. W. BosT 



Class of 1 93 1 

B. D. Arnold M. R. Lewis L. G. Barefoot 

R. E. Clark B. R. Ward B. H. Bent 



B. C. Brown 



A. T. Cochrane 
F. B. Ham 



Class of 1932 
J. C. Coble M. L. Cline A. T. Griffin 

M. T. Upchurch Fred Ray, Jr. 



W. W. Johnson 



F. A. Holt 



Class of ip33 

Pledges 
M. M. Brame 



H. G. Brown 



S. McDaniels 




[347] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




-<H 



:348: 



I- R A T !•: R N I T I I-: S 




^Ipfja i^appa Eappa 



Foumlcd at Parliiioiitli Ci'llc(/c. iSS() 
Culurs: Dartniuuth Green and White 

BETA IOTA CHAPTER 

Established ^0-^^ 



Piiblicaliun : Centaur 



I. H. Manning 



J. M. Alexander 
L. G. Brown 
R. B. Garrison 
L. M. McKee 



F. M. Adams 
C. R. Brown 
J. Davis 
C. R. Farabee 



Fratres in Facultate 
G. W. Carrington 

Fratres in Universitate 

Second i'car Alcdical Class 

T. M. Northrop 

A. M. Scaraborough 

H. E. Talmadge 

First ]'car Medical Class 

C. W. Goodwin 
F. T. Harper 



E. A. Abernathv 



\\". R. Wandeck 

B. L. WoODARD 

C. M. Kendrick 
J. T. Ramsaur 



A. E. Knoefel 
D. LOHK 
T. R. Sparks 
T. J. Taylor 



A. N. Johnson 



Pledges 




349 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




[350]. 



F R A T R R N I T I R S 




Founded at Nczv York Unizrrsify, 1904 

Colors: Blue and Gold Alpha Kappa Psi Diary 

ALPHA TAU CHAPTER 

Established ip^j 



D. D. Carrol 

C. T. MURCHISON 



E. G. HiNES 
R. Farrell 

J. S. GORHAM 



A. B. Carr 
J. p. Cooper 
W. M. Crouch 



B. C. Idol 
J. M. Catling 
McB. Fleming Jones 
R. W. Drane, Jr. 
J. W. Peacock 



Fratres in Facultate 



Fratres in Universitate 

Class of ip3i 

W. I. Henderson 

B. S. Mills, Jr. 

C. E. Pleasants 

Class of 1932 
C. W. Dresslar 
H. Jameson 
S. A. Lynch, Jr. 

Graduate 
C. W. Banner 

Law 
D. C. McCoTTER, Jr. 



Pledges 



I. J. Strikeleather 
O. C. Owen, Jr. 
W. A. Lane 
S. Upshaw 



E. E. Peacock 
R. H. Sherril 



H. N. Patterson 
A. S. Watkins 
E. M. Waddil 



T. M. Shelton, Jr. 
A. D. Sickles 
J. W. Clinard 



T. J. Campbell 
R. Hanscome 
R. Foster 
J. G. Slater 
J. B. Thompson 



351 



\' A C K ]•: T Y Y A C K 




Uli 









I 35-' ] 



V R A T E R N I T I !•: S 



Belta ^igma ^i 



Founded at Xczv York I'nk'crsity, igoj 
Colors: Old GoUl and Royal Purple 

Publication: The Delta Siema 



Flozucr: Red Rose 



ALPHA LAMBDA CHAPTER 

Established i9-3 



C. Heer 

J. G. Evans 



Fratres in Facultate 



G. T. SCHWENNING 

H. D. Wolf 



M. D. Taylor 

E. \V. Zimmerman 



M. S. Heath 



Frater in Urbe 

Thera E. Hinson 



S. R. Blair 
VV. J. Chandler 
J. F. Parrot 



Fratres in Universitate 

Class of /p-?/ 

W. H. Prevost B. B. Kendrick 

G. H. Roach G. P. Bourdelot 

W. A. Sherrill E. J. Fergurson 

W. C. Thompson 



A. A. Mount 
J. K. Smith 

B. K. Stewart 



J. P. Sherrill, Jr. 
J. M. BuiE 



H. G. Brainard 
D. F. Martin 



B. L. Credle 



Class of ig^2 
J. \V. Gordon 

Graduates 

Pledges 
J. S. Stallings 



E. D. Um stead 
B. E. Strickland 



W. L. Higdon, Jr. 
H. I. Arox 



W. R. Curtis 




[ 353 ] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Founded at the College of U'illiain and Mary, I//6 

ALPHA CHAPTER OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Joseph Colin Eagles _ President 

Thomas Hays Barker, Jr Vice-President 

Beverly Cooper Moore _ Secretary 

Thomas James Wilson, Jr Corresponding Secretary and Treasurer 



Student Members 



Frank Marvin Adams 
William Jackson Adams, Jr. 
Robert Mayne Albright, Jr. 
Marion Romaine Alexander 
Charles Whitlock Banner, Jr. 
Thomas Hays Barker, Jr. 
Sherman Bisbee Barnes 
Sterling Archie Barrett 
Clay Covington Bell 
Travis Taylor Brown 
Edvi'ard Alexander Cameron 
Clarence Coleman Cates 
Ralph Stokes Collins 
William Rodolph Curtis 
Robert Foster Dewey 
Thomas Basil Douglas 
William Dunn, Jr. 
William Clyde Dunn 
Joseph Colin Eagles 
Monroe Taylor Gilmour 
Esmarch Senn Gilreath 
John Cameron Grainger 
Robert McDonald Gray 
Ralph Cordell Greene 
June Uriah Gunter, Jr. 
Charles Patton Hays, Jr. 
Francis Clement Hayes 
Matthew George Henry 
George Clinton Holroyd 



Robert Alexander Hovis 
El wood Cartel you Hunter 
Wallace Hamilton Kuralt 
John Albert Lang 
John Van Lindlev 
Julius Dodd Linker 
James Millard Little, Jr. 
Lawrence Foushee London 
George Atmore Long 
William Leak Marshall, Jr. 
Rudolph Samuel Matthews 
William Hampton Maxwell 
Beverly Cooper Moore 
Jesse Strickland Newsom 
Frank Church O'Neil 
William Carey Parker 
Robert Aubrey Parsley, Jr. 
Kerr Craige Ramsay 
John Gary Slater 
Bud Elmon Smith 
Thomas Carlisle Smith, Jr. 
William Boylan Snow, Jr. 
Frank Parker Spruill, Jr. 
Albert Irving Suskin 
Henry Garrison Thomas 
George Dewey Thompson 
John Dargan Watson 
Burgess Urquhart Whitehead 
Flora Prevatte Wilson 



Mary Wiatt Varborough 



354] 



F R A T E K N I T I F. S 



Eleanor Elliott Carroll 

Columbia 
May Louisa Cobb 

North Carolina 
Louis Graves 

North Carolina 
Barbara Henderson 

North Carolina 
Alma Holland 

North Carolina 
Katharine Jocher 

Goucher 

\. B. Adams, Ph.D. 

Washington and Lee 
H. G. Baity, Sc.D. 

North Carolina 
R. S. BoGGS, Ph.D. 

Chicago 
R. P. Bond, Ph.D. 

Vanderbilt 

F. F. Bradshavv, Ph.D. 
North Carolina 

G. M. Braune, C.E. 
Washington and Lee 

K. J. Brown, Ph.D. 

Dickinson 
R. M. Brown, Ph.D. 

North Carolina 

E. T. Browne, Ph.D. 
Virginia 

J. B. Bullitt, A.M., M.D. 

Washington and Lee 
W. E. Caldwell, Ph.D. 

Cornell 
G. R. Coffman, Ph.D. 

Drake 
R. E. Coker, Ph.D. 

North Carolina 
W. C. Coker, Ph.D. 

Johns Hopkins 
H. W. Crane, Ph.D. 

Michigan 
W. M. Dey, Ph.D. 

Virginia 
S. A. Emery, Ph.D. 

Cornell 

F. P. Graham, M.A. 
North Carolina 

F. M. Greene, Ph.D. 

North Carolina 
Paul Green, A.B. 

North Carolina 



Members in the City 

GuioN Griffis Johnson 

North Carolina 
Estelle Edith Lawson 

North Carolina 
Adeline Denham McCai.l 

North Carolina 
Romana Galloway Mackie 

North Carolina 
Eleanor Schmidt Mosher 

North Carolina 



Members in the Faculty 

E. R. Groves, A.B., B.D. 

Dartmouth 
J. M. Gwynn, A.m. 

North Carolina 
J. G. deR. Hamilton, Ph.D. 

William and Mary 
J. P. Harlan, Ph.D. 

Princeton 
G. a. Harrer, Ph.D. 

Princeton 
Clarence Heer, Ph.D. 

Rochester 
A. Henderson, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L. 

North Carolina 
U. T. Holmes, Ph.D. 

Pennsylvania 
R. B. House, A.M. 

North Carolina 
George Howe, Ph.D. 

Princeton 
A. C. Howell, Ph.D. 

North Carolina 
V. A. Hoyle, Ph.D. 

North Carolina 
A. P. Hudson, Ph.D. 

North Carolina 
A. K. King, A.M. 

North Carolina 
E. W. Knight, Ph.D. 

Duke 
J. W. Lasley, Jr., Ph.D. 

North Carolina 
J. B. Linker, Ph.D. 

North Carolina 
J. C. Lyons, Ph.D. 

William and Mary 
G. R. MacCarthy, Ph.D. 

North Carolina 



Luthur Ja.mes Piiipps 

North Carolina 
Charles Edwin Ray, Jr. 

North Carolina 
Rosalie Thrall 

North Carolina 
Calvert Rogers Toy 

North Carolina 
Hazel Terry Trimble 

North Carolina 
Louise Manning Venable 

North Carolina 

A. C. McIntosh, A.m., LL.D. 

Davidson 
L. C. McKinney, Ph.D. 

Lawrence 

E. L. Mackie, Ph.D. 
North Carolina 

H. W. Odum, Ph.D. 

Emory 
W. W. PiEHsoN, Jr., Ph.D. 

Alabama 
W. F. Prouty, Ph.D. 

Johns Hopkins 
Thorndike Saville, C.E., M.S. 

Dartmouth 

C. P. Spruill, 

A.B., B.Litt. (Oxon.) 

North Carolina 
G. C. Taylor, Ph.D. 

South Carolina 
M. R. Trabue, Ph.D. 

Northwestern 
R. B. Vance, Ph.D. 

North Carolina 

F. P. Venable, Ph.D. 
North Carolina 

P. W. Wager, Ph.D. 

Hobart 
H. M. Wagstaff, Ph.D. 

Johns Hopkins 
N. W. Walker, A.B., Ed.M. 

North Carolina 
A. S. Wheeler, Ph.D. 

Beloit 
L. R. Wilson, Ph.D. 

North Carolina 
T. J. Wilson, Jr., Ph.D. 

North Carolina 
E. J. Woodhouse, B.A., LL.B. 

Randolph-Macon 
L. B. Wright, Ph.D. 

North Carolina 



[355 



^' A C K R T Y ^' A C K 





John E. Lear 
Elmer G. Hoefer 



George D. Thompson' 
Giles F. Horney 
Robert E. HuBnARD 



JPfji Heta Mn 

Established in iQig 
Colors: Red and Cireen 
Fratres in Facultate 

Enwix \V. Winkler 
Fratres in Universitate 

[ 356 ] 



George Wallace Smith 
Raymond F. Stainback 



PiNKNEV G. JoHNtON 

D. Jones Thurston 
J. Sydney Kirk 



I'' R A 'I' I'. 1^ N I T r ]•: s 




Ruble, Haves, C, P., Uuinn, Thompson, Bryan, Hubbard 
White, Horney, Noe, Parsley, Smith, Pittana 
Winkler, Hayes, N., Baity, Hoeffer, Trimble 




Colors: Brown and White 



Founded at Lchigli l 'nivcrsity, iSS^, 



Publication: The Bent 



BETA CHAPTER OF NORTH CAROLINA 



George Joseph Quinx, Jr President 

Charles Patrick Haves, Jr.. ..Recording Secretary 



Norman Luther Bryan, Jr. Corresfondt 
Georle Dewey Thompson 



iig Secretary 
Treasurer 



Student Members 



Howard Fentress Chrisco 
Giles Foushee Horney 



Robert Aubry Parsley, Jr. 
Raymond John Ruble 



Doc Jones Thurston, Jr. 
Rankin Jones White 



R. E. Hubbard 



Graduate Member 
John Baptist Pittaxa 

Faculty Members 



Dean G. M. Braune 


T. F. Mickerson 


G. W. Smith 


N. P. Bailey 


(Deceased) 


R. M. Trimble 


T. P. Noe 


N. P. Hays 


H. G. Baity 


E. G. HoEFER 


E. W. Winkler 





[357 



FRATERNITIES 




i:j)e Coop 

OFFICERS 
John Jemison - President 

John A. Park, Jr Manager 

Jack Kirkpatrick Secretary 

MEMBERS 

Joe Adams Jerry Doughtie Jack Kirkpatrick Boots Rhett 

June Adams Adam Fisher Sid Lea Peter B. Ruffin 

Bill Adams James Ferebee George London Charles Rollins 

Fred Atiyeh Sam Gorham Theodore Maybank Bob Reid 

Alex Andrews, Jr. John Gorrell Bill Merritt Wallace Scales 

Kenneth Byerly Carl Hartman Strud Nash Harrold Smith 

Henry Benoit Slow Henderson Bill O'Brian Archie Suggs 

Doc Ballinger Gene Hines H. N. Parsley Tom Wright 

Johnny Blue Pete Haines R. T. Parsley Alex Webb 

Branch Carr W. B. Huger Charlie Poe Jack Ward 

Paul Carter Bert Heywood Jim Pace Dick Wood 

Lee Covington Frank Hawley R. C. Pond Hal Worth 

Pinkey Connor John Jemison Albert Park Francis Wilmer 

Fred Carr N. A. Jennings John Park Tom Weeks 

C. B. Clark C. H. Kapp Carrol Rogers John Williams 

Chink Davis Jim Kenan Chief Ramsey Ed Yarborough 

[358] 



FRATERNITIES 




VLf)t Cabin 

OFFICERS 



Cooper Person. 
John London-. 



.President 
..Manager 



MEMBERS 



Gil Brown 
Bill Blount 
John Cooper 
W. M. Crouch 
Bob Drane 
High Doty 
John JDillard 
Andy Douglas 
Charley Duffy 
Jack Dunnavant 
Ed French 
Monroe Gilmore 



Matthew Gilmore 
Noah Goodridge 
Lawrence Harris 
Stanley Hist 
Jack Hamer 
Ike Hughes 
Link Kessler 
E. B. Furgeson 
Charles Gault 
LoNNiE London 
George Little 
W. S. Markham 



Lawrence Miller 
Bill Nash 
F. N. Owens 
J. T. O'Neill 
Branch Paxton 
Cliff Prince 
Lee Richardson 
James Ross 
Billy Rockhill 
Emil Shaffner 
C. C. Sikes 
Arnold Snider 



F. P. Spruill 
E. M. Spruill 
J. E. Steere 
Carroll Spencer 
Hugh Sawyer 
Bill Thompson 
Red Waddell 
Ed Wood 
George Weeks 
Bob Wall 
Lenoir Wright 
C. J. Shannon 



[359] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 

0thtv of ilinotaurg 

Thomas Willis Alexander, Jr. M. W. H. 

\\'lLLIAM Tl'RELIUS MvERS M. W. I'. 

George W'aterhouse B. T. 

Lynn \\'ilder, Jr H. D. K. D. 



Thomas Barber Follin 
John Alsev Park 
Mandeville Alexander Webb 
SvDNOR Move Cozart 
Henry Groves Connor, III 
Louis Cherry Skinner 
Thomas Hasell W'right 
Archibald Kimbrough Da\'is 




Elliot Hill New combe 
Jacob H. Shuford 
William Rhvne Hoffman 
Thomas Skinner White 
]\JiLTON A, Barber 
Robert W. Barnett 
Frank Hughes Dunn 



HUTS 



Allen 
Craig 
Marshall 
Person 
Dunn, W. 



Willis 

Nash 

Thompson 

Lipscombe 

Hamer 



Bagby 



360; 



FRATERNITIES 




0vhtv of tJje ^\)tik^ 

Harry C. Finch S. 

J . H( )LM Es Ua\-is, J R ^^- S. 

Peter Gilchrist '*^- 



Joe Eagles 
Peter B. Ruffin 
McDonald Gray 
Nelson Woodson . 
Junius G. Adams 
Dail Holderness 
Eugene Wells 
R. Mayne Albright 
John Van Lindley 
George P. Moody 

\\'lLLIAM H. YaRBOROUGH, Jr. 

Henry B. Webb 
Henry C. House 
Thomas L. Parsons 
Edward F. Varborough 
George L. Jones 
Henry L. Anderson 



Hubert H. O'Donnell 

\\'lLLIAM R. SatTERFIELD 

Frank A. Cole. Jr. 
Fred M. Laxton, Jr. 
Julian T. Baker 
Platt Landis 
Eugene L. \\'ebb 
Irwin Walker 
Robert Mebane 
\\'alker Geitner 
Thomas Watkins 
Kemp Varborough 
William Barnes 
James Lynch 
Charles Rose. Jr. 
Peter Garland 
Loften Brooker 



'The uwviinj finger ivrites: and lun'iny -a'rit 
Moves on: nor all your piety nor ivif 
Shall lure it back to cancel half a line, 
Nor all your tears zvash out a word of it." 

■ OMAR KHAYYAM. 




S^^is^" 



361 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 



Bert Haywood 
Ted Newland 

Henry Wood 
Chauncy Lake Royster 
Thomas M. Shei.ton, Jr. 
Thomas A. Uzzell. Jr. 
Williams G. Roberts 
William F. Draper 
Herman Schnell 
John Grainger 
Pete Haines 
Sydney L. W. Lea 
Kenneth A. Gay 
H. N. Parsley 
Joseph H. Pratt 
Edward K. Graham 
Egbert L. Haywood 
Phillip Peacock 
John D. Branch 
John Sloop 
Barron K. Grier 
Ralph E. Hughes 
Samuel T. Peace, Jr. 
Henry House 
Tad L. McLaughlin 
H. Theodore Newland 
Lenoir C. Wright 
A. Branch Carr 

Willis Henderson 

Fredric L. Carr 

John A. Blue 

Harry L. Shaner, Jr. 

Ward Thompson 

Dick Hiller 

Charles D. Rollins 

Emil N. Shaffner 

Edmund L. Waddill 



President 
Secretary-Treasurer 




Chi Phi 

Phi Delta Theta 

Sigma Chi 

Sigma Chi 

Sigma Chi 

Beta Theta Pi 

Beta Theta Pi 

Beta Theta Pi 

Delta Psi 

Delta Psi 

Delta Psi 

Delta Psi 

Delta Psi 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Zeta Psi 

Zeta Psi 

Chi Phi 

Chi Phi 

Chi Phi 

Alpha Tau Omega 
.\lpha Tau OMEt;A 
Kappa Alpha 
Kappa Alpha 
Kappa Alpha 
Phi Delta Theta 
Phi Delta Theta 
Sigma Nu 
Sigma Nu 
Sigma Nu 
Sigma Nu 
Pi Kappa Alpha 
Pi Kappa Alpha 
Pi Kappa Alpha 
Delta Tau Delta 
Delta Tau Delta 
Delta Tau Delta 
Delta Tau Delta 



[362] 



F R A T E K N I 'I' I H S 





Sgusnty Vos Polpasaaul 

Zvej Vos Phrthqgei 

Valmar XLllI 



45-' 
460 

456 
454 
457 



170 

174 
180 

193 
241 
244 
245 

255 
272 
319 
328 

331 
342 
369 
373 
375 
385 
399 
405 
417 
431 



RULERS 

William Bef.kman Huger REX 

George Dewey Thompson K. D. S. 

William Dunn, Jr W. S. S. 

Peter Browne Ruffin K. M. K. 

Robert Aubrey Parsley N. G, P. 

SUBJECTS 

Charles Staples Mangum 439 James Penrose Harland 

Archibald Henderson 442 Robert Burton House 

Edward Vernon Howell 446 William Leake Marshall 

William Stanley Bernard 447 Horatio Nelson Woodson 

Gregoire deRoulac Hamilton 452 William Beekman Huger 

George Howe 453 Herman Glenn Baity 

Joseph Hyde Pratt 454 Peter Browne Ruffin 

Frank Porter Graham 455 Iidmund Strudwick Nash, Jr. 

Patrick Henry Winston 456 William Dunn. Jr. 

William Watlet Pierson 457 Robert Aubrey Parsley 

Francis Foster Bradshaw 458 John Van Lindley 

Thomas Fellx Hickerson 460 George Dewey Thompson 

Dudely DeWitt Carroll 461 George Lewis Bagby 

William Frederick Prouty 462 Kenneth Alexander Gay 

Allen Wilson Hobbs 463 George Waterhouse 

Robert Hasley Wettach 464 Alexander MacLeod Brown 

Robert Edwin Coker 463 Thomas Willis Alexander, Jr. 

Henry Johnston, Jr. 466 William Robert Satterfield. Jr. 

Charles Staples Mangum, Jr. 467 Harry Clinton Finch 

George Coffin Taylor 468 Herman Walker Schnell 

John Dargan Watson 469 Mandeville Alexander Webb 
470 Archibald Kimbrough Davis 

[363] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 



#orson*s;]^eab 




Junius Greene Adams, 
John David Bullock, Jr. 
Thomas Carlyle Smith, Jr 
Archie Turner Allen 
David Jenkins Craig, Jr. 
Isaac Hall Manning 
Edgar Cooper Person 
Chauncey Lake Rovster 
Haywood Dail Holderness 
Frederick Carr 
Joseph Colin Eagles 
Henry Charles House 
Willis Irwin Henderson 
William S. Lindsay 
William Boylan Snow, Jr. 
Albert Moore Rhett 
William Ashley Bridgers 
Edward Kidder Graham 
J. Holmes Davis, Jr. 



John A. Parke, Jr. 
Samuel Thomas Peace 
Robert Diggs Wimberly Connor 
Charles Thomas Woollen 
John Manning Booker 
William Morton Dey 
James Bell Bullit 
William de Bernier INIcNider 
Clarence Addison Hibbard 
Claudius Temple Murchison 
William Douglas MacMillian 
Kenner Chapman Eraser 
LTrban Tigner Holmes 
Nicholas Barney Adams 
Charles Tilford McCormick 
William Richardson Abbot 
Louis Graves 



[364 



F R A T E R N I T I E S 




l^igue anb Jlasique 

Wex Maloxe President 

Arthur Sickles J'ice-President 

Jack White Secretary 

Block Bryson Treasurer 



I. T. Holmes 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

T. S. McCORKLE 



Otto Stuhlman 



STUDENT MEMBERS 



Dave Avner 
Theron Brown 
Fransic Jacocks 
Cliff Kiem 
Jack Kirkpatrick 



Dan ]\IcConnell 
Dick Fenker 
Craig Shelton 
Thomas Uzzell 
Don Wood 



[365 



Richard M. Fenker 
Herbert Hechenbleiknek 
J. G. deRoulac Hamilton, Jr. 
William Merlin Bliss 
Henry Newton Patterson 
William Ashley Bridgers 
Beverly Cooper Moore 
William Boylan Snow 
Lynn Wilder, Jr. 
Arthur deTalma Valk 
Donald Parkhurst Cooke 
Bennett Harper Barnes 
William Rhyne Hoffman 
William Egbert Uzzell 
Frank Joseph Manheim 



J. G. deRoulac Hamilton 
Francis Foster Bradshaw 
William Terry Couch 
Ernest Lloyd Mackie 
John Maryon Saunders 
William Jackson Adams, Jr. 
Travis Taylor Brown 
Glenn Parran Holder 
Joe Jones 

Douglas Laten Potter 
J.\MES Jerry Sl.\de 
Mayne Albright 
Herbert T. Brown 
Stanley Ellis Crew 
Joseph Colin Eagles 
Oscar W. Dresslar 
Harry Clinton Finch 





Stk^uum 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

Frank Porter Graham 
Francis Foster Bradshaw 
Albert Coates 
J. Minor Gwynn 
A. C. Howell 
W. M. Saunders 
Edward A. Cameron 

STUDENTS 

Beverly Moore 
iu) Hamer 

l.YLE SiTTERSON 

A(;gie Thomas 
Mac Gray 
I'^rancis Zappa 
Tita Pittano 
DoLc; Potter 
Travis Brown 

)HN Lang 
Beatty Rector 
Calvin Graves 



Charles Banner 
Bill Speight 
Clyde Dunn 
K. C. Ramsey 
Ellis Fysal 
Pedro Kjellesvig 
KoLVEiN Kjellesvig 
Armando Perez 
Alfredo Nazareno 
Attilis Bevacqua 
J. C. Williams 
Mayne Albright 
Ike Manning 
Jimmy Harris 
Ellis Crew 
Bob Karriker 
Ted Baroody 
Billy McKee 



Larry Spitzer 
Ed F'rench 
Bill Draper 
Harry Gump 
Adrian Daniels 
Heywood Weeks 
Bruno Mulieri 
P'dward Jaramillo 
Umberto Umano 
Randolph Orbaugh 
Bill Bliss 
Ralph Crum 
Charles Crum 
K. V. Conrad 
John Wilkinson 
McBride Fleming-Jones 
Hamilton Hobgood 
Bob Barnett 




QRDGRtif^GRflnc 



John Gary Slater Del. 

Haywood Wekks Sc. 

Robert Mayne Albright, Jr Ex. 

John Wilson Clinard, Jr Asst. Ex. 

FACULTY MEMBERS 
Horace Williams William S. Bernard 



MEM 
Robert Mayne Albri(;ht, Jr. 
John H. Anderson 
William A. Bridgers 
Theron R. Brown 
Travis T. Brown 
John Wilson Clinard 
W alter D. Creech 
Oscar Welborne Dresslar 
Joseph Colin Eagles 
Ray Simpson Farris 
Fred J. Ferguson 
Xoah Goodridge 
Robert McDonald Gray 
Ralph C. Green 
Edward k. Hamer 
Ham ii.Tiix H. Hobgood 

Burgess V. 



BERS 

Henry C. House 

John Desmond Idol 

Joseph Piper Jones 

Henry Johnston, Jr. 

Isaac H. Manning, Jr. 

Steve P. Marsh 

Robert Aubrey Parsley 

Henry N. Patterson 

Douglas M. Potter 

Kerr Craig Ramsey 

Joseph Carlyle Sitterson 

John Gary Slater 

Eugene David Um stead, Jr. 

Clarence J. Weeks 

Haywood Weeks 

James Allen Williams 
Whitehead 





14 CHARLES^XweM'AS WjOOLLEN 
40 pR.OaC^OlffES-^RAHA.M 

90 Edgar Ralph Rankin 
99 Francis Foster Bradshaw 
102 Robert Burton House 
109 Herman Glenn Baity 

111 F.RNKST Ll.OVD MaCKIE 



119 Albert McKiNLEY Coates 
121 Joseph Burton Linker 
131 Jefferson Carney Bynum 
141 Corvdon Perry Spruill 
186 Joseph Maryon Saunders 
193 William Terry Couch 
JOt) Edward Alexander Camf.ron 



GRADUATE ARGONAUTS 



.'11 Robert Wallace Wilkins 
>i8 Robert McDonald Gray 
^30 Ray Simpson Farris 



-'35 Ralph Cordell Greene 

-i7 James Maus 

239 Glenn Parr an Holder 



ACTIVE ARGONAUTS 



.'34 Travis Taylor Brow n 
.'36 Junius Greene Adams, Jr. 
-'40 Edward Ryan Hamer 
241 Joseph Colin Eagles, Jr. 
-'43 William Clyde Dunn 



244 Henry Newton Patterson 

245 Noah Goodridge 

246 Marion Romaine .Alexander 

247 Archie Turner Allen 

248 William Henry Yarborougii. 



369; 




Cameron 

CoUKT 




^OjA-tt>>*\ 



"^SliA-Ov 1 



THE ARBORETUM 



Dances 



DANCES 




John Bulluck 



Marion Cowper 
Chairman 



Will Varborough 




Buck Snow 



John Park 



Aubrey Parsley 




Henry House 



Steve Lynch 



George Newman 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE GERMAN CLUB 

[373 J 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Will Yarborough 
Sccri'tarv-Trcasiircr 



Miss Ieaxie Boatwright 



GERMAN CLUB 

[374 J 



DANCES 




Edward Wood 
Assistant Leader 



Henry Anderson 
Assistant Leader 



Miss Ruth Davis 




Miss Margaret Powell 



FALL GERMAN 

[375] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




BOBBV Carmichael 
Leader 



Miss Rosemary Ward 




Arlindo Gate 
Assistant Leader 



Miss Electra Wagner 




Elliott Xewcombe 
Assistant Leader 



Ml^- In.WhUK .\Il.\iiEN 



SOPHOMORE GERMAN 

[ 3/6 J 



D A X C F. S 




George Bacby 
Assistant Leader 



Miss Louisiana Wood 



MID-WINTER GERMAN 

[ 377 J 



YACKETY YACK 




Bill Bridcers 
Leader 



Walter Crouch 
Assistant Leader 



Steve Lynch 
Assistant Leader 



Miss Molly Allen 




Miss Frances Fletcher 




Miss Dorothy Battle 



JUNIOR GERMAN 



D A N ( : K S 




Sparks Griffin 

.Issistanl Leader 



Miss Lois Meacham 




Ben Campe> 



Assistant Lender 

SOPHOMORE HOP 



Miss Marguerite James 



[379 J 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Theron Brown 

Leader 



Miss Alice Caldwell 




John Phil Cooper 
Assistant Leader 



Miss Grace Boren 




John Stallings 
Assistant Leader 



Miss Lola Colli x^^ 



JUNIOR PROM 



[380] 



DANCES 




Pat Patterson Miss Madeline Thompson 

Leader 




Chuck Eeickson 
Assistant Leader 



Miss Rita Quinn 




Beverly Moore 
Assistant Leader 



Miss Sara Scott Moore 



SENIOR BALL 



3S1 



^' A C K E T Y Y A C K 




PI KAPPA PHI 




Barron Grier Julia Or 



Pitt Davis Habrjet Da 




PHI GAMMA DELTA 




Bill Bliss Barbara Ke 



Arthur Fleming Kittie Boddii 





PHI DELTA THETA 





Moselev Fonville Frances Stowe 



Tad McLaughlin Lillian Pa 




ALPHA TAU OMLGA 






PI KAPPA ALPHA 




Edward French Alice Al 



SPRING FESTIVAL 



Tver Sawver Do 



D A N C K S 



Spring Festival, 1931 

April I nth 1111(1 I ftli 



New Moon Ball 

Frioav, 9:00 p. ^r.-I :oo a. m. 



Sunset Dansant 

Satukkav, 4:00 p. M.-y.oo p. m. 



Dance of the Shadows 

Saturday, 9:00 p. m. -12:00 midnight 



Sponsors 

Phi Gamma Delta Pi Kappa Phi Phi Delta Theta 

Alpha Tau Omega Pi Kappa Alpha 



[383 



YACKETY YACK 





4. 



Arthur Sickles, i: X Elizabeth Barber 





Buck Snow, Z + Ruth Stikeleath 
Secretary-Treasurer 









Henry Anderson, BO n Em Gre 

Asst. Secy.-Treas. 





Clvde Dunn, K r Chiki: Ha 



John jEMisoN, - AE Jane Ro 



MAY FROLIC 



384 



DANCES 





Cooper Pkrson Miss Fkances Person 



flEORCE Thompson Miss M. Yur 




Joe Eagles Miss C. E 





^ 



K. C. Ramsev Miss Jane Kl 




Alston Watkins Miss I. VV 





\f 1 

Arthur Sickles Miss E. Barbe 




George Moody Miss C. Bu 



COMMENCEMENT BALL MANAGERS 



[385 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




Tom Alexander 



Holmes Davis 
Chief 



Billy Satterfielii 




Ed Yarborough 



Bkaxc H Carr 




iiLL Draper Xorfleet Webb Tom Sheltox 

COMMENCEMENT MARSHALS 

[ 386 ] 




PLAYMAKER THEATRE 



Kaleidoscope 



K A T. F. T D O S r n P I'. 




Bingham Hall Eneketi Dormiior 

REFINEMENTS OF THE QUADRENNIUM 1927-1931 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




GlMGHULL M 



1 )avie Poplak 



Plavmakek Theatre 




The Arboretum Uld West Dormitory X'ance-Pettighew Dormitory Senior Walk 




Baptist Church Methodist Church Presbyterian Church Episcopal Church 



THE UNIVERSITY— MATERIAL AND SPIRITUAL 
[390] 



K A I. ]•: I D O S C O P 





Intersection 



Main Street 



Post Office 




Confectionery 



Talkies 



Haberdashery 




Home 



Mansion 




Estate Cottage 

CHAPEL HILL-BUSINESS AND RESIDENTIAL 

[391] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 




"LEST AULD ACQUAINTANCE BE FORGOT 




VILLAGE GOSSIP 



[392] 



K A L E I D O S C O P l-: 





liiiVj4^i^« 




Pritchett and Henderson Arnold and Ruin k 

Tzsjo-Mile Run Polc-J'aiilt 



McPherson 

ino-]'ani Dash 




Neiman, '30 
Broad-Jump 



UXIVERSITV RECORD HOLDERS 
[393] 



Y A C K E T Y Y A C K 



There is something distinctive 
about the culture that is CaroUna's. 
This atmosphere of enhghtenment 
and refinement is the product of 
one hundred and thirty-six years' 
progress, material and spiritual, 
which development has seen con- 
stant enrichment of life in Chapel 
Hill. 

Certain old landmarks have stood 
for decades as symbols of the Uni- 
versity's finer feelings. Exemplary 
of these is Smith Hall, located 
within a stone's throw of the Old 
Well. This building was erected 
in 1849, and financed by funds ac- 
cruing from a land grant in Ten- 
nessee left the University by Ben- 
jamin Smith shortly before the turn 
of the eighteenth century. Benja- 
min Smith was one of the coun- 
try's earliest large educational ben- 
efactors, and a constant debt of 
gratitude is paid him in the mem- 
ory of Carolina men. 

Smith Hall is a practically per- 
fect example of Roman variations 




Ni 










"**^.^-.l . j'^"** 



on the Greek temple. Pleasing pro- 
portions, majestic columns, cul- 
tured dignity — these elements enter 
to make the edifice an object of 
architectural appreciation. Just as 
the Egyptians and the Greeks re- 
vealed their objects of admiration 
in their architecture by moulding 
the effects of the lotus leaf and the 
canthus leaf into their capitals, 
just so has the designer of Smith 
Hall portrayed our most highly 
valued land yields in the capitals 
of the columns here using t le 
forms of corn and wheat. It is 
generally understood that this is 
the only local adaptation of the 
Corinthian column in modern 
times. 

The architect for the building 
was .\. J. Davis, of New York 
City ; the builder. Captain John 
Berry, "a very substantial citizen 
of Orange County." 

Smith Hall has served a variety 
of uses. Built as an assembly hall 
for alumni, it was later converted 
into a dance hall, then a gymnasi- 
um, then a library, then a law 
building, and finally into a theatre, 
in which form it now adds so ma- 
terially to the effectiveness of the 
nationally-known Carolina Play- 
makers. 

Smith Hall symbolizes in itself 
beauty that can well become tl e 
objective of private funds in 1931 
in beautifying and enriching the 
University, physically and in every 
other respect. — The Editor. 



Room 




AND Tuition 



I 394] 



A dvertisem en ts 




WOOTTEN' 
MOULTON 

Photographers 




PORTRAITS 

COLLEGE ANNUALS 

COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHS 



CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 
NEW BERN, N. C. 



WHEN IN NEED OF 

ANYTHING 

ELECTRICAL 

SEE US 
WE HAVE IT 



U. C. S. P. 

Electric & Water Division 



Protection 

A million dollars worth of 

protection stands back of 

every deposit made m The 

Fidelity Bank 

Complete facilities for modern 
financial needs 



The Fidelity Bank 

DURHAM, N. C. 



'Crowing Larger b\) Serving Better" 



EAT 
WAVERLY ICE CREAM 

'Made Its Way hy the Way It's Made' 
For Sale fop 

Eubanks Drug Co. 

Manufactured by 

Waverly Ice Cream 
Co., Inc. 

DURHAM, N. C. 



I 



T is a pleasure for SxETSON 
"D" to style and tailor your 
clothes. Most of you are now 
planning to enter business. 
You are styling your life to 
your own taste — let us con- 
tinue to tailor your clothes 
according to your style and 
taste. 

-4>~ 



"NATS" 
Agent for 




We want to say—THAHKS ! 

Our hope is that those who have earned their sheep-skins and are about to enter 
that unHmited number in the 

FRESHMAN CLASS OF PROFESSIONAL 
AND BUSINESS LIFE 

Will add to their memory of "Carolina" and the "Hill" just a thought of a 
service this department has tried to give. 

GOOD LUCK to those that depart— we WELCOME those that return and 
to those that are to COME we assure a LAUNDRY SERVICE that 
Satisfies. High Quality of Work as well as the lowest possible price con- 
sistent with good work, is our motto. 

For a ''Clean Came" Always 

LAUNDRY DEPARTMENT 

University Consolidated Service Plants 



Financing Chapel Hill 
Business 

It may be the home, the business institution, 
the University, or your own personal account, 
but you will find that the Bank of Chapel 
Hill plays an important part in financing the 
business of Chapel Hill. Safety, convenience, 
and service, all make this bank the place for 
your funds. 

The 

Bank of Chapel Hill 

Oldest and Strongest Banl( in Orange County 

M. C. S. Noble, Praidenl 

R. L. StrOWD, Vicc-PresiJent 

M. E. HOCAN, Cashier 



FANCY ICES 



SHERBETS 



-4>- 



Durham Ice Cream 
Co., Inc. 

"Blue Ribbon" 

ICE CREAM 

DURHAM. N. C. 
"IV on its Favor b\; its Flavor" 



BLOCKS 



PUNCH 




WE THANK YOU AND WISH 
YOU GOOD LUCK 

Strowd Motor Co. 

FORD PRODUCTS SINCE 1914 



Congralulaiions and best ivishes for a 
success. 

Cavalier Cafeteria 

Where the best is less 

SINCE 1885 

This Company has been serving a vast clienlele 
in North Carolina, and this ripe experience, coupled 
with a complete modern equipment, is at your 
command. 

Correspondence Invited 

The Seaman Printery 

INCORPORATED 

DURHAM, N. C. 



6£|yE WISH TO THANK the entire 
Student Body for its patronage. ((We 
hope that we have contributed to 
your school year with our Good Food 
and Friendly Service 

''Every hieal A Pleasant Memory"' 

Friendly Cafeterias 

CHAPEL HILL HIGH POINT GREENSBORO 
WINSTON-SALEM 



Durham 
Dairy- 
Products 

INCORPORATED 

"'Better Because Its Pasteurized" 
DURHAM CHAPEL HILL 



Patronize Our 
Advertisers 




' Uinusual COxcelU 



nusuai y^xceuence 

••NEVER RESULTS RY CHANCE 



J.n producing school publications we 
endeavor to render a helpful and con- 
structive service directed toward enabl- 
ing a student staff to issue a represent- 
ative and distinctive publication. 



The Queex City Printing Company^ 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 

A Complete Service for School Publications 




m 



Wlllll 

# 

Kll * 

i 

*)ii 

■ 
^1 



•III 

i 




15he 
CAROLINA THEATRE 

APPRECIATES YOUR PATRONAGE 

and 

INVITES YOU TO VISIT OUR OTHER THEATRES 
THROUGHOUT THE STATE 

One of the Puhlix ^ Saengers Tjheatres 




o 



DREAMS COME TRUE 



o 



\^A l J. ' Al^ l ^ ' ^ ■ ^|^ ' A ' ^ | >'^'^ ' ^'^!^ ' <.'>. ' A ' X l la ' A l X ' )L'^■lJ^i»4UHl^uuv^^^'^^'l'^u^r^'rr^^'J^^ : ^ J L^'JJAy^ 



f a raan cau torite a better 

booK • paint aktter picttirc 

btiUd a better moujretrap than 

hj;8riiei|*ihor- xhB taorld toill 

mkt a beaten Ratli to My door." 



DESIGNERS AND ENGRAVERS OF BETTER ANNUALS 





STOP 



rannuixj around in circles 
wizen planning an Cfnnual I 

. . . place your book m the 
hands of an organization 
with ample facilities and 
personnel experienced to 
produce an Annual in 
keeping with the ideals 
and traditions of your 
Alma Mater .... 





Such An Organization is 

^. J . JjeLL Gompani/ 

"In Lynchburg, Virginia, for nearly three-quarters 
of a century" 



o