(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Yamacraw, 1925"

^r::!^= 



The 1925 Yamacraw 

Copyright by 

John K. Ottley, Jr. 

Editor-in-Chief 

J. Paul Wilkes 

Business Manager 

George M. McMillan 
Art Editor 




OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY 



DEDICATION 




To 

The memory and achievements of General James 
Edward Oglethorpe, who in the pursuit of a noble 
purpose was one "who knew not how to give up," 
and in the hope that we may all be enabled, as he, 
to perceive our purpose and know not how to give 
up, 

We dedicate this 

The 1925 

YAMACRAW 




UNIVERSITY 

BOOK 1 

CLASSES 

BOOK II 

ATHLETICS 

BOOK III 

BEAUTY SECTION 

BOOK IV 

ORGANIZATIONS 

BOOK V 

MEMORIES 

BOOK VI 



F O ]R. E W O IR. D 



"Life without industry is guilt, 
Industry tvithout beauty is brutality." 

— William Morris. 



Success without the aid of a college education 
comes to many; few with or without this training 
have the power to see the beauty that is in life. We 
have the chance for both. To most a rock is a hard 
mass that one stubs his toe on; the romance of the 
rock comes with the knowledge of its millions 
of units and their activity in the rock's struggle 
against chemical decomposition. 

We have time only to swear and pass on when 
we do stub our toe — we must leave the rock to the 
specialists in beauty, the poets, and take from them 
our beauty in spare moments. 

Let us hope then for success, with beauty. If 
the letters published in Book II prove a help in 
reaching this goal, the staff will feel the 1925 
Yamacraw a success, though Joe Smith's picture 
be published above Joseph Smith's name, and 
xeropthalmia be spelled with a z. 




BOOK I 

UNIVERSITY 




Administrative Officials 




Oglethorpe University 




OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Edgar Watkins President 

J. T. LuPTON • First Vice-President 

H. P. Hermance Second Vice-President 

L. C. Mandeville • Thij-d Vice-President 

Milton W. Bell Treasurer 

Dr. J. Cheston King ■ Secretary 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Edgar Watkins Chairman 

Gordon Burnett J. R. Murphy 

John A. Copeland James R. Gray, Jr. 

Joel Hunter George E. King 

John A. Brice L. C. Mandeville 

J. Henry Porter J. Russell Porter 

Thomas H. Daniel Victor H. Kreigshaber 

James T. Anderson Sidney Holderness 

C. D. Montgomery John A. Manget 

Dr. J. Cheston King Dr. Phinizy Calhoun 

Milton W. Bell Dr. Thornwell Jacobs 






Thornwell Jacobs 

President and Professor of Cosmic History 



A.B.; A.M.; Litt.D.; Valedictorian and Medalist. Presbyterian College 
of S. C; Graduate of Princeton Theological Seminary; A.M., Princeton University; 
LL.D., Ohio Northern University; Pastor of Morganton (N. C.I Presbyterian Church 
Vice-President of Thornwell College of Orphans; .\uthor and Editor; Founder and 
Editor Westminster Magazine; Founder of the Revived Oglethorpe Unviersity; Member 
Graduate Council of the National Alumni Association of Princeton University. 





Tke Faculty 



James Freeman Sellers 

Professor of Chemistry and Dean oj Faculty 

A B and A M UmversitN of Mississippi , LL D 

sissippi College, Graduate Student LniTeisit\ <: 

ind Unuersit\ of Chicago, Te.iclunt, F 11 m 

\cisit\ of Chicago, Professoi of Chemistn Missis 



George Frederick Nicolassen 

Professor of Ancient Languages 



Fello 



and Greek, One Year; Ph.D. Johns 
Hopkins I'niversitv ; Professor of Ancient Languages 
in the S.P.U.. Clarksville. Tennessee ; Vice-Chancellor 
of the S.P.U. ; Author of Notes on Latin and Greek. 
Greek Xotes Revised, The Book of Revelations. 




Herman Julius Gaertner 

Professor of German and Education 

A.B., Indiana University; A.M., Ohio Weslej-an 
Universitv : Ped.D., Ohio Northern University; Teacher 
and Superintendent in the Common and High Schools 
of Ohio and Georgia ; Professor of Mathematics and 
in Wilmington College, Ohio ; Professor of 
G.X. & I.e., Milledgeville, Georgia ; Member 
Universitv of Georgia Summer School Faculty, Six 
Mouths : Assistant in the organization of Oglethorpe 





Ira Venson Maxwell 

Associate Professor oj Accounting and Book 
keeping 

Rheinh.irdt Colleee ; Certified rulilu Atioimtin 
(Georeia Examinins Board) ; Professoi ot Bonkkeepini 
and Shorthand (Draughton's Businesb College) . Aud 



Mark Burrows 

Associate Professor of Education 



School , 




B.S., Stanberry 
Teachers College ; City Supt. of Schools Bethany M« 
Director Department and Later Professor of Bdue.ituii 
State Teachers College. Kirksville, Mo , Associate Pi<i 
fessor of Education, University of Wyoming, Piofessi 
of Rural Education and Director of Denionstratio 
Schools, State Teachers College, Greeh Coloiado , A M 
Oglethorpe University ; Editor of the Rural Schi.i 
llessenger. The School and the Communlt^ and Authn 
of Various Educational Brochures , Jlembei of tli 
National Education Association. 



John Word West 

Assistant Professor of Physics and Mathematics 

.\.B.. North Georgia Agricultural College, Dahlon- 
gea ; A.M., Oglethorpe University ; Superintendent of 
Grounds and Buildings, Oglethorpe University. 



Oscar S. Bauhofer 

Assistant Professor of Education 

Humanistic College, Zurich, 1910-1916 ; Univer 
of Zurich. 1916-1921 ; University of Berlin ; Fel 
Union Theological Seminary, and Columbia Univeri 
1923-19i:3: Fellow, Harvard University, 1923-1924. 



Fifteen 




The Faculty 



William Louis Roney 

Professor of Modern Languages 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh; A.M., Oglethorpe 
rniverslty ; Professor of Modern Liinguages. Washing- 
ton College, Tennessee ; Professor of French. Emory 
.University (Summer School) ; Professor of Jlodern 
Languages, Marietta College, Ohio; Served in French 
.■■nd American Armies as Lieutenant of Infantry During 
ttorid War ; Member of M.L.A. ; G.E.A. 



Frank B. Anderson 

ssistant Professor of Mathematics and Athletic 
Director 

A. B.. University of Georgia ; Assistant Professor 

Mathematics and Athletic Director, University School 

r Boys ; Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Ath- 

;ie Director. Robert E. Lee Institute; Coadi. Unlver- 

of Georgia : Assistant Professor of Mathematics 




William J. Barnes 



Miss Myrta Thomas 

Librarian 



Fifteen 





Harry Robertson 

Football Coach 



Mrs. C. K. D'Arneau 

Matron 

Miss Mary Feebeck 

Registered Nurse in Charge of Infirmary 

Mrs. Frank Ashurst 

Secretary 

Miss Lottie Bell Eberhart 

Secretary 

Miss Ethel Beall 

Secretary 

Mitchell C. Bishop 

Assistant Instructor in Biology 

Thomas Camp 

Assistant Instructor in English 

Charles W. Corliss 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry 

Gibson Cornwell 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry 

Grace Mason 

Assistant Instructor in Commerce 

Robert P. Miller 

Assistant Instructor in Biology 



Robert Frank McCormack 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry 

Joseph Watkins 

Assistant Instructor in Physics 

James P. Hansard 

In Charge of Printing Office 






Yamacraw^ Staff 

OF 

1925 

John K. Ottley, Jr Editor-in-Chief 

J. Paul Wilkes Business Manager 

George M. McMillan Art Editor 

Daniel E. Conklin Assistant Editor 

William C. Morrow Athletic Editor 

Robert F. McCormack, Jr Club Editor 

Ralph F. Quarles Assistant Business Manager 

Henry I. Spencer Cartoonist 

Junior Competitors 
James P. Hansard Alton Hardin William A. Shands 




Eighteen 






'Who Is This That Cometh to Disturb My Restr 

(At The Opening Of The Vauh, October 10th, 1923, 4:30 P. M. 




Oglethorpe, awake, it is ive! 

From Georgia, thy Georgia, dost recall? 

Castell — the Anne — old Charleston — 

then the bluff 
Of densely wooded Yamacraiv — 
Savannah, drawn by thine own hand — 
Old Ebenezer — Frederica — Spanish 

guns— 
And that red day at Bloody Marsh? 
Awake, we come for Thee! 
Numbered no longer by an hundred and 

a score. 
But million-voiced, ive call! 
Come, see the travail of thy souls — 
Glynn's marshes, to sweet music their 
Lanier 

Hath taught, wave rhythmed welcome 
Tomochichi beckons, though his Creeks 
Have followed fair loskeha to the West. 
Cities by hundreds hum their grateful 

notes 
Within the land thou gavest them, 
Wherefrom great commonwealths have 

sprung : — 
Rich Birmingham is thine; Augusta 

fair; 
Electric, thine, Columbus, where the 

Chattahoochee roars. 
While at thy Georgia's farthest Western 

bounds. 
By the mighty Mississippi, Vicksburg 



Amf, lo, thy capital upon her watchful 
ridge. 



Atlanta, toils and sings and dreams of 

thee! 
Founder — Father, Oglethorpe, awake! 
Thou art no longer precious dust 
Nor group of sacred bones. 
But living once again thou hast become 
Monarch of millions! Dominant, again, 

thy tvill prevails. 
Hear this thy praise that rings through- 
out the land; 
Thine is this adulation, this vast love; 
Thine this memorial University; 
Wherein thou canst unhand thy mighty 

soul 
And teach us, as of yore, thy fairest 

dreams : 
Of friendship, militant for sad humanity 
Of conduct mailed in wise sobriety; 
Of human liberty, uncowed by slaves; 
Of Anglo-Saxon oneness; Thou first 
American and Englishman in one. 
Thou honored Chief of England's 

swords. 
Who would not fight against thy flesh 

and blood. 
Didst see, afar that Vaster Essex, 
That sisterhood of nations, Saxon womb- 

ed. 
To whose warm heart and steady will 
A world hegemony would come? 
Great Oglethorpe, awake from visioned 

sleep! 
All thou hast dreamed is true! 
At last, thy morning dawn. 
And thou dost rise, a King! 

— THORNWELL JACOBS. 



Twenty 





BOOK II 

CLASSES 




C, E. MITCHELL 

55 Wall Street 
New York 






Health, Character, Personality, Knowledge, In- 
dustry, these are the essential qualities for 
success. 

The fundamental one is Health. You may pos- 
sess all the gifts and graces known to man, but 
if they must manifest through a deficient body, 
the handicap is hard to overcome. Most of us 
start with a modicum of health. How, then, to 

keep and better it? Pood, sleep, exercise: these three 

and the key words for all of them are Moderation and Regu- 
larity, 

The next basic quality is Character and to build Charac- 
ter a man must exact from himself that unflinching Honesty 
which makes him scrupulous not alone in his dealings with 
others, but above all with himself. You may at times be 
able to "put something over'' on other people, but never be 
such a fool as to fool yourself. 

Personality is assuredly an attribute of success. Some 
claim it is God-given and beyond man's utmost striving, but 
I believe one may cultivate it greatly. Ease of manner, gra- 
ciousness, consideration for others, friendliness, democ- 
racy; care in speech, language, presence, carriage — all 
these qualities go to make up personality and all will grow 
with tending. 



Twenty-Two 





But I presume Ability is the outstanding quality essen- 
tial to gaining a high place in the competition of life. 
And Ability is Knowledge with understanding resting upon the 
basic qualities of Health, Character, Personality. 

What is the Understanding which gives us Knowledge? It is 
to know that everything one can manage to learn is closely 
related to everything one may ever want to do; this is the 
beginning of Wisdom. Do not be discouraged if as Seniors, 
you are barely catching a glimpse of this truth. The oppor- 
tunity for genuine education is boundless for those who keep 
their eyes open, observe what goes on about them and exer- 
cise the process of original thinking. 

Now, does Ability or Knowledge plus Health, Personality, 
and Character always succeed? By no means. There is a fi- 
nal sine qua non: Industry backed by determination. Every 
soul shaped for success must develop the indomitable Will to 
Win — and how. 

First eliminate the Laziness that is in you. Be unwil- 
ling to excuse yourself from work. Forget the clock drive 

yourself to Industry until it becomes your habit. 

This, then is the Chart of success: Health, Character, 
Personality, Knowledge, Industry; all yours for the demand- 
ing. But, remember, always, the greatest of these is Health. 







out it. 




IKt THE VA.i-1-EY 
HYDA.U, GEORGLA. 



A man should standardize himself early in 
life with what he considers the essential vir- 
tues of a man, and he should practice them 
until they become habits of conduct. If he 
chooses honor, energy and courage, all the 
others will be added unto him. 

In my own experience I have learned never 
to take a dare from life, but to face what- 
ever comes. It is better to be defeated in the effort to 
achieve than to retreat without making it. 

To speak the truth is a sublime privilege which fools and 
cravens never enjoy. 

It is ignoble and unprofitable to practice vengeance, 
but it is despisable to court one's enemies and produces the 
perfectly correct impression that one is treacherous or 
knows himself to be inferior and incapable of the decent in- 
difference which buries enemies. 

The man who believes in God, and so acts, dignifies him- 
self. Such faith is a form of spiritual culture and ele- 
gance which the meanly bred who deny Him never have. 

As the shadows of the years lengthen behind him this is 
what every man knows: — It is more exalting to have earned 
his own self-respect than to have many worldly honors with- 




C^>^t^c( >f oc^Jx^ 



Twenty-Fon 





The Nash Motors Company" 

.VfHi>i/iirfurnr.H o/A'tes/i Cars and Trucks 
Kl•:XOSHA,^V'I8COXSI>J 




young man, after graduating from col- 
ime to me for advice I would say to 



First, make up your mind that you are 
ing to lead an honest, industrious life. 



^^k ] ll^H Next, that the life you lead will be clean 
i^^Hk. wHi in every respect; that as you go on down life's 
^^H^^I^H pathway, you will attempt to do unto others, 
MWM^^BI as near as may be, as you would like to be 
done unto. 
Next, that you will not attempt to climb a ladder by 
starting at the top, but that you will be willing to begin 
down" at the bottom and climb the ladder step by step. 

Next, that you will practice in your living and in your 
business life, economy, having in mind at all times that 
**a dollar saved is as good as two earned.'' 

The next thing for the young man to do is to make up his 
mind about what he thinks he would like to do in a business 
or professional way through life, and then start at the bot- 
tom at that thing and not undertake to do something that he 
would not be interested in. When once he has decided upon 
his course, he should go at whatever the task may be with a 
firm desire and intention of succeeding at it and then be 
prepared to stick to it until he has mastered the task. 

Too many young men believe that all they have to do is 
receive a college education in order to be a success. What 
a great mistake this is I Men succeed through their own ef- 
forts and not on account of having enjoyed an education. 

The opportunities are as great, if not greater, than ever 
before for the young man who is willing to start at the bot- 
tom, work, and work intelligently and faithfully and not 
want to begin where the older man, who has made a success, 
leaves off. I believe that if any young chap is possessed 
of the right determination, the future is as bright as it 



ever was. 




<3. cfc" ^ ^^-^ 



Twenty-Five 







4« 

AUGUSTA, GA. 




I feel deeply honored to be asked to write 
something which would be of interest to the 
young men graduating from Oglethorpe Univer- 
sity. I also feel very incompetent to at- 
tempt such a thing, but your inspiring state- 
ment, "There are boys at Oglethorpe who have 
JLtSf^ ^^ the will to do," has helped me considerably. 
^BTia^m it seems to me that if I were going to 

^^^ — ^^"*^' deliver an address to the young men who are 
about to graduate from Oglethorpe, and enter 
upon their chosen field of endeavor, I could wish for no 
finer text than this statement, "The will to do." It is a 
theme that holds for me an irresistible appeal, for in my 
philosophy of life AMBITION is the cornerstone of success. 
A young man with an aggressive AMBITION is bound to succeed 
regardless of all draw backs. Indeed, it is my belief that 
AMBITION is a far greater asset than natural gifts. Many 
men of great natural gifts fail to apply their talent be- 
cause they haven't AMBITION, while others, far less capable, 
but possessed with that wonderful "will to do" have scaled 
the heights of success despite handicaps. 

It is not going too far to say that knowledge of natural 
ability often dulls ambition, while it is almost invariably 
true, a like appreciation of one's handicaps whets ambition 
to an edge which cuts through all obstacles. Of course, we 
sometimes see an almost ideal combination of natural talent 
and an unswerving ambition. Then you have a genius — but if 
one were forced to make a choice between the two — natural 
ability and AMBITION, you would see that the chance of suc- 
cess would be to the man with ambition. 






In every walk and phase of life handicaps actually de- 
lop latent ability. There are so many illustrations that I 
am only going to select one or two at random as they come to 
my mind. 

Take Lincoln — think of his handicaps — also obstacles 
thrown in his way. Take Roosevelt, with his lack of health 
in his formative period, and how he went about laying the 
foundation, which was his physical self, to help him toward 
his wonderful future success. Read any of your up to date 
magazines that have inspirational stories of our Captains of 
Industry and see how they had to fight to surmount the ob- 
stacles. They all had the "will to do." 

I just happen to remember a case in football — if I mis- 
take not the name of the boy in question was Daley. He had 
the terrible physical handicap of being club-footed. He 
wanted to play football and was turned down at one college 
without even a trial — he entered another and fought up into 
the ranks of "the stars" in his game. 

Take our great national pastime. Just think of the suc- 
cess of men like Meadows (a pitcher who has gained quite a 
bit of success in the National league) and Torporcer, an in- 
fielder with St. Louis. These men have the physical handi- 
cap of poor vision — they even wear glasses on the playing 
field. Think of the AMBITION that must have driven them on 
to the point where they hold their own in one of the two 
best baseball leagues in the whole conntry. Then there is 
three-fingered Brown — minus his index, and a par£ of his 
pitching hand. Just think what a star he was. 

Now when you reflect over these men doesn't it seem a 
shame that a man with all of his faculties can't go out and 
make to success in any field which he might select? 

It should be remembered that AMBITION is more than a 
longing, or mere day dreaming — that burning desire must lead 
to the necessary action and sacrifice by which one's powers 
are developed. I speak of the vaulting AMBITION that over- 
laps itself, and patient determination that overcomes all 
obstacles, and makes of them stepping-stones to higher 
achievement. 

I wish an 
fill to do." 




For each prospective graduate of Oglethorpe, 
AMBITION that will inspire him with that great " 



/Loo^ (?. ^s 



Twenty.Seven 






Appreciation 

The Senior class of 1925 wishes 
to take this opportimity to thank 
Messrs. Charles E. Mitchell, Ty- 
riis R. Cobb, Charles "W. Nash, and 
Mrs. Coi-ra Harris for their let- 
ters; Miss Mary Brent "Whiteside 
for the "Threshold"; Mr. J. D. 
Gortatowsky of the King Feature 
Syndicate, Inc., for the four class 
cartoons, and Professor W. C. 
LoAve for the Senior Graphology. 




Tiventy-Eight 






Senior Class Omcers 

' " WENDELL WHIPPLE CROWE President 

WILLIAM COSBY MORROW. JR Vice-President 

WILLIAM THOMAS PORTER Secretary and Treasurer 

Our Alma Mater 

Hail to thee, our Alma Mater 

Fair and exalted thy name shall be! 
Lo, thy sons and daughters praise thee. 

Hail, all hail to Oglethorpe! 

Children, we, of noble mothers. 

Loyal and faithful in serving thee; 
Sharers of thy fame and glory. 

Hail, all hail to Oglethorpe! 

Dear and good the days thou gavest. 

Under the Old Gold and Black with thee. 

Full of all life's deepest lessons. 
Hail, all hail to Oglethorpe! 

Thy sweet memories shall follow. 

Gently to bless us for evermore. 
In our lives thou livest ever. 

Alma Mater, Oglethorpe! 



Tiventy-Nine 




THOMAS LEE AARON 

A.B. IX EDUCATION 



"7 wish to preach not the doctrine of igno- 
ble ease, but the doctrine of the strenuous 
life." 

Entered in 1923 from Atlanta Theological Seminary. 
Thomas is a man who believes more in 
living his religion than in spending time 
in talking about it. It is a sad, but true 
fact that most preachers don't get along 
very well with college boys, when they have 
to live with them; therefore, all the more 
credit is due Aaron, whom everyone on 
the campus likes. Thomas believes that ed- 
ucation is one of the first steps toward 
Christianity, and when he gets out and 
starts preaching he expects to play a big 
part in the service of humanity. When at 
the Atlanta Theological Seminary he won 
the medal for the highest average in all 
studies for the year. He has rendered a 
great service to the students by the exam- 
ple he has set for them. 



ALFRED NEWTON ADAMS 



A.B. IX SCIENCE 



East Point, Ga. 



'Rome 



not built in one day." 



Few men with a wife and family have 
the courage to change horses in the mid- 
dle of the stream, but Alfred decided that 
he wanted to be a doctor, so after hearing 
Doctor Gaertner describe Oglethorpe he 
made up his mind that this was the place 
for him to do his pre-med work. When 
someone was asked if he had any peculiari- 
ties, they said, "Well, he is in the habit of 
emphasizing all of his jokes by pounding 
his hearers on the back." Possibly this 
makes them quicker to see the point. If 
Alfred wants something he believes in get- 
ting it no matter how long it takes him, 
whether it be a cat for biology or an A.B. 
Degree. 

Alfred has persistence, a pleasant ap- 
proach, and more than his share of cour- 
age. He will be a doctor some day, if the 
medical books aren't destroyed — if they 
were he would probably wait until some 
more were written — and with the qualities 
he has he will make good. 



JOHN WESLEY AGEE 

A.B. IN EDUCATIOX 

Cogdell, Ga. 

"To wait like a ghost that is speechless, till 
some questioning voice dissolves the spell 
of its silence." 

Cross Country Team '24. 

For several days after fall registration, 
boys rooming on the third floor were afraid 
to be alone, they said that there was a 
ghost in their midst, a ghost that some- 
times followed them to classes and always 
to the dining room. One day Dr. Nick 
called on A gee, and he spoke. 

Possibly this quality of silence is just 
a form of economy with John, because when 
he was at the University of Wyoming he 
was prominent in debating and in the Play- 
ers Club of that school. His studies have 
been his principal interest at Oglethorpe, 
and he ranks near the top of his class. 



JOHN DAVID BAXTER 



.B. IN COII.MEIICE 



ALPHA LAIIBDA TAU 

"For God's sake give me a young man with 
brains enough to make a fool of himself." 

Club ; Tech 



J. D.'s. greatest weakness is his greatest 
strength — Dorothy. A quart to him is no 
more than a pint to an ordinary man, for 
everybody is his friend. Friends may be 
expensive, but to J. D. what is worth hav- 
ing is worth paying for. Determination 
sticks out all over him; he has shown this 
quality by making his way through school, 
by working at night in the Southern Rail- 
road shops, and by his gruelling activity 
on the cross country team. He has one of 
the greatest gifts that man can have — a 
child-like simplicity, that makes everything 
from dogs to mules love him. J. D. might 
some day be the man without a country, 
but never the man without a friend. 



MITCHELL CHARLES BISHOP 

A.B. I\ SCIE.VCE 

Atlanta, Ga. 

DELTA CHI EPSTLOX 

"Silence is silver, speech is gold." 



ciety ; President '24. 

Haircuts by and of Bish brought him to 
us from North Carolina, and almost kept 
his picture out of The Yamacraw. When- 
ever there is anything to be defended or at- 
tacked, he is always more than willing to 
lend his golden tongue. If there is a dis- 
cussion in session he is there. His activity 
in forensic work, which started at North 
Carolina, was continued at Oglethorpe, 
where he was one of the mainstays of the 
debating team. There is only one person 
on the campus who can convince Bish that 
he is wrong, her name is Mary. Bish work- 
ed his way through and graduated in three 
years. He is a hard worker and if he is 
once your friend he will always be. 



SAMUEL PRESTON BOOZER 

A.B. IX C05I11EI!('E 

Hogansville, Ga. 

'The surest way to hit i 
is to take aim kneeling: 



Tea 



Hob. 



Sam's idea of a perfect world is an island 
— an island littered with fair women. He 
would like to be the only man there for 
several years, long enough to work up a 
harem of adoring young things. The dream 
would then be complete if he could have a 
few, a very few of his friends over, say 
"I've got a good looking girl I want you 
to meet;" then snap his fingers and have 
blondes and brunettes, crawl to his feet. 
But, in spite of Sam's love for women he 
is always willing to do his part whether 
it be handing someone a muffin, taking a 
hand at bridge, or building a fence around 
the athletic field. Sam's good nature al- 
ways makes a place for him by the stove 
in winter and in the shade in summer. 



m^ 



"^10^ 



JACOB BENJAMAN BLACK 

A.B. IX COjniEIiCE 

Prosperity, S. C. 
"It's an ill wind that blows no man good." 

Hoho Cluh. 

Windv believes in the above motto, and 
sees to it that there is a sufficient supply 
of wind to fan the fevered brows on the 
campus, and let the neighborhood know that 
J. B. is thereabouts. He is never a man 
to be left without a leg to stand on; if 
all else is taken, he still has his opinion. 
No one ever dislikes happy-go-lucky J. B. 
for all the heated arguments that they 
have with him. 

His favorite study is Marketing, but he 
does not expect to go into business unless 
necessity forces him to do so; his ambi- 
tion is to study pharmacy for two years 
after he leaves Oglethorpe. He hopes to 
own an up-to-date drug store some day — 
p'raps Alumni might get their prescrip- 
tions there. 



MILLEDGE HENDRIX BROWER 

A.B. IN COMMENCE 

Atlanta, Ga. 

"And my veil no mortal ever took up." 

Entered from Georgia Tec'i in 11124. 

Milledge is taking his degree in the school 
of commerce, but if he ever decides to teach, 
there is a wonderful place open to him as 
assistant in the school of journalism. When 
the cocky young reporters finish their 
course, if they are sent to interview Assist- 
ant Instructor Brower to get the story of 
his life, they will come back in a few hours 
with a blank expression and blank paper. 
If Milledge failed to like teaching, he 
would make a wonderful train caller; the 
result would be the same, with a lot less 
fuss. 

Milled.ge has worked some during the 
summer in his father's candy, business, and 
expects to make things hum when he learns 
the business, and has a chance to apply 
some of the knowledge he has acquired at 
Oglethorpe. 



PEYTON SKIPWITH COLES 



Atlanta, Ga. 

"The reward of a thing well done is to 
have done it." 

With Peyton it is the old story of the 
monuments; those who need them don't 
deserve them, and those who deserve them 
don't need them. 

He entered Oglethorpe from the Univer- 
sity School, and in spite of the handicap of 
impaired faculties of speech and hearing, 
graduated in three years and one summer 
school. He is not a genius, just like the 
rest of us, and he had to work like a dog 
to get through with this added amount of 
work. You might think Peyton would have 
had a hard time being one of the boys, but 
don't think so for a minute, if the baseball 
team had to go to Buford his care was al- 
ways forthcoming, and no one enjoyed the 
trip and game more than he. 



GIBSON KELLY CORNWELL 



I.\ SCIENCE 



DELTA CHI EPSILOX 

"In science, read, by preference the newest 

works; in literature, the oldest." 

Pl.iyers Club ; Le CoDte Club. 

Gibson is one of the last of the old school 
of real he-men who formerly inhabited the 
campus; he is a co-ed hater — possibly his 
wide experience wth cats in the Biolo^-y lab 
has caused this. It would be hard to say 
that he has specialized in any study, as hi 
has done more than the average student in 
Chemistry, Biology, and English. He spe- 
cialized in these first two sciences, but still 
had some unused time and with the help of 
A. H., wrote "Set For Midnight." which 
was one of the three plays presented at 
the Atlanta Woman's Club last spring. 
Gibson doesn't say much and he doesn't 
smile much, but in some way manages to 
create a cheerful atmosphere about him. 



WENDELL WHIPPLE CROWE 

A.B. IX COIIJIERCE 

Wrightsville, Ga. 

DELTA SIGMA PHI 

"You are a devil at everything , and there 

is no kind of thing in the 'versal world but 

what you can turn your hand to." 

President Senior Class ; Vice-President Junior Class : 
President Sophomore Class ; Football ■21-'22-'23-'24 ; 
Track '21 ; Business Manager Players Club '23-'24 ; 
ExchanRe Editor Petrel '21 ; Boars Head (Honorary 
Fraternity); Vice-President "0" Club '24-'23 ; Vice- 
President South Georgia Club '24-'25. 

Strength is written in every line of Wen- 
dell's face and body. He impresses one a^ 
having a lot of potential energy that is 
not used; he drives at the task and gets 
it done, but still there is the impression 
that, if more power were needed, he has it 
stored up. He rarely cuts loose in classes, 
but when he does, some surprising thoughts 
are brought out. 

When Wendell starts to work, and finds 
a job that requires all of his latent power, 
watch out river you may catch fire. 



WILLIAM ROBERT DURHAM 

A.B. IX SCIENCE 

Maxeys, Ga. 

DELTA SIGMA PHI 

"A book of verseR underneath the bough. 
A jug of wine, a loaf of bread and thou — " 



Pla 



Clu 



Business Manage 



Many men, like plants that wait long to 
bloom, are all the finer for the delay. Bu'l 
waited until his Senior year; before this 
time he was merely W. R. Durham, unless 
there was some sad reason for his being 
addressed as Mr. Durham. He worked as 
assistant manager of the Players Club in 
'24, and was elected manager for '25. This 
seems to have been his first real interest 
in life for he has already done about twice 
as much work as the job called for. It is 
a pleasure rare as a day in June to see 
Bull hitting his real stride and making the 
co-eds jump at rehearsals with a voice that 
carries the authority of a poll' 



Bull is a dreamer, a lover of poetry and 
a philosopher. If he likes you his other 
garter is yours; if he doesn't you'll know it, 



CHARLES ELLIOTT FERGUSON 

A B. IN COMMERCE 

Thomasville, Ga. 

DELTA SIGMA PHI 

"Our business in the field of fight is not to 
question but to prove our wight." 

Varsity Basebal; ■24-'23 ; Scrub '21-'22-'23 ; South 



Fergie, rated according to size, is the 
third member of the great triumvirate of 
baseball at Oglethorpe, which is composed 
of Parrish, Kemp, and Ferguson. This trio 
may be heard at odd moments in the lobby, 
seen on wintry afternoons in the entrance 
of the Piedmont, and heard again during 
the spring months on the diamond. After 
baseball and a blonde, cigars seem closest 
to Charley's heart. 

Charley rarely likes more than one thing 
at a time but devotes all of his energy to 
that one thing. He wanted to make the 
baseball team and did, although it took 
three years of scrubbing. As someone put 
it, Charley has a nice way about him. 



MARCELLUS EDWIN FORD, JR. 

A.B. IX LITEKATURE and JOURNALISM 

Atlanta, Ga. 

the 



"I have learned, in 
with to 






uhatsoever I 
)e content." 






Henry, according to his o\^'ti statement is 
a man \vithout a hobby, but we believe his 
hobby is to let others alone and be let 
alone. The only case where he breaks this 
precept is with his roommate Bull; to him 
he is a combination of father, confessor, 
adviser, and at times, nurse. Henry has 
the face of an angel and it seems almost a 
sacrilege for him to even smoke. His tem- 
per and temperature are the same under 
all conditions. He has put a lot of work on 
studies in the School of Commerce during 
his last year and seems to have gotten a 
lot out of them. He always has enough to 
say to make things pleasant and swears by 
Bull Durham. 



MILLER AUGUSTUS HAMRICK 

A.B. IX EUUCATIOX 

Cedartown, Ga. 

ALPHA LAMBDA TAU 

"Thus I steer my bark, and sail on even 
keel, with gentle gale." 

President Student Body '22-'23 ; Football •22-'23-'24 ; 
Manager Baseball '25 ; Boars Head (Honorary 
Fraternity); "O" Club; Secretary, and Treasurer '24- 
•25 ; Masonic Club. 

Gus seldom gets his mind set on any- 
thing, but when he does heaven, hell, and 
high water won't move him. He has feel- 
ings like the rest of us, but has learned to 
control them; if he has had a scrap with 
his roommate, and you see him five min- 
utes afterward you won't know it. His 
opinion carries great weight on the cam- 
pus as he is a logical thinker and willing 
to listen to reason. Miller has a remarka- 
ble amount of poise and feels at home 
under any circumstances. One of the things 
he has his mind set on Leila. 



HENRY MELVIN HOPE 



COMMERCE 



KAPPA ALPHA 



"Men may come, and vien may 
But I go on forever." 



Team '21; 

Although Henry is the official wit of 
the Senior Class, his wit is slow, that is, 
it takes a long time for him to get it out. 
Often a few words of explanation the morn- 
ing after a story was started vdll serve 
as a synopsis of the part which Henry told 
while his audience was sleeping away the 
night, which could have been devoted to 
listening to him. Henry gets off some 
good ones and some poor ones, however, his 
greatest accomplishment in the line of hu- 
mor is a take-off of one of the members of 
the faculty. 

Henry can talk to anyone and should he 
become "a lawyer, he will know all the judges 
and jurymen by their first names within 
a few minutes after their arrival. 



JOHN ROSS KEMP 

A.E. IX COMMERCE 

Canton, Ga. 

DELTA SIGMA PHI 

'Let no man question my comings in 
goings out." 



Ross is old enough to think for himself, 
and believes that a man should govern his 
actions by what he thinks to be right, and 
not by what the world thinks. He told 
Dr. Jacobs this in a very nice way one 
morning in chapel. Ross, besides playing 
baseball for three years, has been a prom- 
inent member of the American Legion, and 
a Knight Templar. He is specializing in 
accounting under Mr. Maxwell, and expects 
to enter the auditing department of the 
Western Union Company. Ross is the kind 
of boy that grows on you, the more you 
know him, the more you like him. 



GRACE EVELYN MASON 



IN COMMERCE 



CHI OMEGA 

"Womayi's at best a contradiction still." 

Mother of Co-Eds '34-'25 ; Players Club; Alpha Kappa 
Literary Society ; Phi Kappa Delta (Honorary Frater- 
nity) ; Petrel Staff. 

Grace has been one of the most active 
co-eds to come to Oglethorpe; besides tak- 
ing part in the activities listed above, she 
has served as assistant instructor in the 
department of Commerce during her Se- 
nior year and been one of the most promi- 
nent members of her sorority. Grace likes 
to work and takes care of a great many 
odd jobs, such as Senior invitations and 
Senior histories. In spite of all the activi- 
ties that she has participated in she has 
found time to make an average of ninety 
three for five consecutive terms and there- 
by win a Coat-of-Arms Sweater. Ambition 
is Grace's outstanding trait. 



ADRIAN HAROLD MAURER 

A.B. IN COJIMERCE 

Canton, Ohio 

DELTA SIGMA PHI 

"Thy modesty's a candle to thy merit' 



■23'21 



; Ciiptain '24 ; All S.I.A.A. '23- 
Student-Faculty Cmimittee '24- 
Head {Honorary Fraternity). 



Sparky, in our minds, will always be con- 
nected with the Mercer game of '23. On 
the kick-off Mercer ran through the en- 
tire Oglethorpe team for a touchdown. The 
Petrels started fighting and Maurer was 
called on for a gain at almost every p^ay; 
his work looked like a miracle. On one 
run he reversed his field three times; but 
as soon as the Petrels neared the Mercer 
goal, they were stopped. Adrian was so 
exhausted he could hardly walk, only a 
few minutes were left to play, the ball 
ten yards from the Mercer goal, Maurer 
staggered toward the sidelines and put his 
head in his hands; he was called on the 
next play and with strength drawn from 
somewhere — not from his limp body — car- 
ried the ball over for the winning score. 



RICHMOND LOVICK MARTIN, Jr. 

A.B. I,\ COMMEKCE 

Lawrenceville, Ga. 

ALPHA LAMBDA TAU 

le's armed without that's innocent within." 



There are few men on the campus whose 
job can stand them, and they stand their 
job for more than one year. Rich has been 
manager of football for two years and as- 
sistant for another. During this period 
of service he has developed a hard boiled 
outer crust with which he protects the 
sacred athletic supply room. He carries 
this crust about with him, and if you took 
Rich for what he attempts to appear you 
would think that he was the first man 
to eat nails and sleep with alligators. Rich 
is afraid to let the world know that there 
is poetry in his soul. How many know that 
he was the poet of his Senior Class in High 
School? 



WILLIAM COSBY MORROW, Jr. 

A.B. IX LITEKATUKE and .lOI'RXALIS.M 

Atlanta, Ga. 

KAPPA ALPHA 

"For courtesy wins woman all as well, as 
valor way." 

Vice-President Senior Class : Secretary and Treasurer 
Junior Class ; Secretary Sopohomore Class ; Secretary 
Student Body ■2S-'24; President Players Club ■24-'25 ; 
Athletic Editor Yaniacraw; Petrol Staff: Lords Club; 
J'le Club. 

Why smile a while when you can smile 
all the while, is Bill's motto. According 
to the co-eds Bill has the prettiest, pinkest 
cheeks that ever a boy at Oglethorpe had, 
however, he does not depend on his smile 
and pink cheeks for his success at the Uni- 
versity, as he has put in a lot of hard work 
on the Players Club and the sporting sec- 
tion of the Yamacraw. Bill has been the 
Constitution correspondent during his four 
years on the campus. 



He will have 
ing for all. 



le and a cheery greet- 



ROBERT FRANK McCORMACK, Jr. 

A.B. L\ SCIEXCE 

Atlanta, Ga. 

ALPHA LAJIBDA TAU 

"Seconds are -minutes, minutes are hours." 



Scientific) : Plii Kappa Delta (Honorary Fraternity.) 

Franky is like a static machine; every- 
thing about him snaps and sparkles. He 
is so full of energy, that in the rare mo- 
ments when he is idle, he can hardly sit 
still. There is no man at Oglethorpe who 
has done any more work in three years than 
Frank. He is taking a pre-med course, tha 
hardest course in school and has acted a; 
an assistant in the Biology and Chemistrv 
labs. He has crowded every minute with 
activity and mana.ged to make mark? whils 
doing it that gave him a Coat-of-Arms. In 
some way he has found time for everything 
including love, laughter and friends. 



EARNEST LELAND McCULLOUGH 

A.B, IN COIIMERCB 

Atlanta, Ga. 



"Ah, my beloved, fill the Cup that clears 
today of past regret and future fears." 

Entered From University of Georgia in '24. 

Mac seldom stops in his ceaseless round 
from school to the store and back again. 
He should have an "In Transit" sign past- 
ed on him. People might think that he 
was an endless chain, except for the fact 
that the passenger list of the Ford from 
time to time changes from blonde to bru- 
nette. When you stop Earnest in his diz- 
zy flight, you have spent time well. No 
one can be more sincere; when the question 
of student government came up he was one 
of its staunchest supporters and presented 
his views in a concise talk at chapel. Ear- 
nest we wish you had been with us from 
the first. 



HUGH DORSET McMURRAY 



.B. I.N COM.MERrE 



Lavonia, Ga. 



DELTA CHI EPSILON 



"Let us be gay while ive may and seize 
love with laughter." 

Entered From Georgia Tecli in '23. 

What is, is, and wU continue to be so, 
hence why worry about it? Hugh had only 
one worry, accounting, and traded this for 
a new and more interesting worry in the 
form of "Mabel," which incidentally did 
away with this first worry as said Mabel 
is the niece of his taskmaster. Hugh, lik3 
the Mac on the page next to him, when 
the occasion arises can take his share of 
responsibility. He has planned a large ca- 
reer for himself in the auditing department 
of a certain business house, and with this 
in view has taken an intensive course in ac- 
counting under Mr. Maxwell. 



ARCHIE McWHORTER 

A.B. IN' EDUCATION 

Hayneville, Ala. 

KAPPA ALPHA 

"The Tnusic in my heart I bore, 
Long after it was heard no more." 

Entered From University of Aliibama in '24. 

Archie went to the University of Ala- 
bama for three years, but stopped before 
he got his degree and began to teach school ; 
however, he decided that if he was going 
to make teaching his life work, he needed 
some additional work in Psychology and 
philosophy so he came to Oglethorpe. His 
hobby is music, and according to his friends 
he will play a beautiful piece for hours at 
a time. Archie is inclined to be a bit mul- 
ish about some of his opinions, but they 
are generally right. He is also very inter- 
ested in Biology and spends most of his 
spare time in Poulet Hall. Archie is al- 
ways absorbing everything possible and 
when he starts to teach again he will have 
a lot of worth while thoughts to impart 
to his students. 



ABRAM OROVITZ 

A.B^ IX COMMERCE 

Cordele, Ga. 

TAU EPSILOX PHI 

"No question is ever settled until it is set- 
tled right." 

DebatinK Team •23-'24-'2.i ; President Debating Council 
■24-'25 ; Vice-President Sigma Lambda Literarv So- 
ciety ; Soutli Georgia Club; Freshman Debating Coach 

Abe has changed a lot since he came to 
Oglethorpe; shortly after his arrival he 
made the debating team and the classes 
were few indeed in which he did not hold 
forth with all his eloquence until most 
felt like saying "as if anybody cared." It 
would be hard to pick anyone that is liked 
better than Abe now, and all the more 
credit is due him, as he had certain obsta- 
cles to overcome. He is a dreamer of dreams 
— not the ordinary kind where one is the 
principal actor, but dreams that are con- 
cerned with the betterment of the human 
race. His specialty is the suppression of 
crime by an antitoxin instead of an anti- 
dote. In his Senior year he has broadened 
and deepened wonderfully. Keep dreaming 
Abe. 



JOHN KING OTTLEY, Jr. 

3. IN LITERATURE and JOURNALISM 

Atlanta, Ga. 



"God give me seeing eyes 
For beauty where it lies!" 

Editor Yamacraw ; Business Manager Petrel '23 : Edi- 
tor '24 ; Chairman Student Facultv Committee ■24-'25 ; 
Publicity Manager Players Club '25 ; Boars Head (Hon- 



John, as business manager of The Petrel 
in 1923, was the first man to put this pa- 
per on a self-sustaining basis and keep it 
there; and later, as editor, managed to turn 
out a first class sheet. There is no doubt 
about the fact that he has turned out the 
best Yamacraw ever to be issued. He ex- 
pects to enter journalism and if he keeps 
up his good work he should arrive. .John's 
hobby is seeing beauty in everything from 
stray cats to people. 



JAMES BUGG PARTRIDGE 

A.B. IN COMMERCE 

Mountville, Ga. 

ALPHA LAMBDA TAU 

"When I'm not thanked at all, I'm thanked 
enough. I've done my duty, and I've done 
no more." 

Vice-President Student Body ■24-'25 : BisebaU '22- 
'23-'24-'25 ; Alternate Captain '25 ; Scrub Football 21 ; 
Plii Katroa Delta (Honorary Fraternitr) ; "O" Clu^j ; 
Glee Club ; All-Southern Second Baseman 24. 

But for two things Slick would make a 
perfect hero for a "Work and Win" college 
series; he is real, and you wouldn't find 
out his achievements and good qualities 
from him. He is one of two men at Ogle- 
thorpe to be one of the best athletes in a 
varsity sport and make a Coat-of-Arms 
Sweater during the same period. J's Coat- 
of-Arms was incidental; he studied hard 
before and after he got it because hs liked 
to study. He is always on the right side 
of the fence. He talks very little, but when 
the occasion arises can say what is needed 
to express his thoughts. You have to wait 
a long time to find out the things that he 
has done, but there is no delay in making 
up your mind that you like him. 



BENJAMIN FRANKLIN PICKETT, Jr. 

A.B. IX COMMERCE 

Newnan, Ga. 



'What men have done c 
shall he done today.' 



still be done and 



B. F. believes that a lot of hard work and 
determination will carry a man farther to- 
ward his goal than a spark of genius which 
is not backed up by a firm resolve to suc- 
ceed. He is a prominent member of the 
extra-curriculum courses in Cosmic His- 
tory held after the regular class adjourns, 
to settle discussions which the bell cut 
short, and is generally defending an idea 
of his against the combined forces of the 
barracks philosophers. His favorite study 
is Marketing. If B. F. puts his theory of 
hard work into practice when he enters 
business he should succeed. 



WILLIAM THOMAS PORTER 

A.B. IX CO.MMERCE 

Marbury, Ala. 

"The secret to success is the constancy to 
purpose." 

Secretar.v and Treasurer Senior Class; Football '21- 
'22-'23 ; All S.I.A.A. Guard '23 ; Assistant Coach Frosh 
Team '24: Baseball •22-'23-'24-'25 ; Boxing Team '21- 



"O" Clu 



■H--15 



Boar 



(Honora 



Frat. 



Man is the hobby of Truckhorse ; he likes 
to try to size him up, to discover his motives 
and to predict how he will react under giv- 
en conditions. Truck is serious the greater 
part of the time, but on the baseball field 
or in a crowd he often starts a bit of horse- 
play. Baseball was not mentioned as his 
hobby since Truck has already signed with 
St. Louis and nothing can be called a 
hobby when it is the star of a person's ex- 
istence. Truck is going to be a big league 
catcher or bust. He is willing to make sac- 
rifices for and work for something that he 
wants. 

Truck is the ideal friend, according to 
the definition of the ancient philosophers; 
he gives freely of himself and asks but lit- 
tle of others. 



RALPH FRANKLIN QUARLES 

A.B. IX LITERATURE AXD JOURNALISM 

Canton, Ga. 



DELTA SIGMA PHI 



"Never elated when one man's oppress' d; 
Never dejected while another's bless'd." 



Football '31-'22-'23-'24 ; Letter 
er Football '22 ; Assistant Bus 
ci-aw"; "O" Club. 



Bo maintains that he is from Canton, but 
Ross Kemp denies this, and states that Bo 
really lives in a suburb of the city known 
as Lickskillet. Among the myths about 
Bo's vast properties in North Georgia is the 
story of the interview that he had with one 
of his neighbors, during the course of 
which he told him that if he didn't keep 
those blankety blank squirrels that were 
eating up his hickory nuts off his place 

he would kill every one of 'em. During 

Bo's first three years at Oglethorpe he was 
mainly talked about, and waited until his 
Senior year to turn upon his teasers. If you 
have played football the words scrub foot- 
ball, '21-'22-'23-'24, will save a great many 
words. 



WEYMAN HAMILTON TUCKER, Jr. 

A.B. IX CLASSICS 

Conyers, Ga. 

"Thv fatal shafts unerring move, 
I bow before thine altar Love!" 

Track Team '22-'2.3-'34 ; Cantain '25; Winner Pole 
Vault and High Jump State Meet '23; Frosh Basket- 
hall '22 ; Scrub Football '24 ; Scrub Baseball '25 ; 
Players Club; "0" Club; Glee Club; Non-Frat Coun- 
cil ; Sigma Lambda Literar.v Society ; Band '21-'22. 

Tuck loves the ladies when he can and 
all he can, which isn't so much after all as 
he has so little time to spare from his 
varied activities. For some reason he gets 
little credit for the large amount of work 
he does. For example when he won the 
high jump and pole vault at the State Meet, 
it was accepted as a matter of course while 
another member of the team who won an 
event was talked about for months. Wey- 
man, we hope you will keep on working as 
hard as you have, for we know that it will 
be recognized. 



REBIE AURORA SPEARS 



EDUCATION 



Ball Ground, Ga 



"My heart is like a singing bird." 

I'layei-s Clul) ; Alplia Kappa Littnary Society. 

A co-ed says, "When you are blue and 
see nothing but dark clouds, go to Rebie 
and she will turn them inside out to show 
you the silver lining." The boys feel the 
same way, but don't wait for a blue spell 
to run to Rebie. She tried out for the 
Players Club this spring, and found her 
place immediately as Mabel, the wife, in 
"My Word." Rebie, so she tells us, pro- 
poses to be an old maid school teacher, but 
we believe the quotation "Man proposes, 
God disposes" to be apt in this case, and 
that some day she will enact in life the 
role she adopted so well on the stage. 



ERLE HOUSTON WALDROP, Jr. 

A.B. L\ COMMERCE 

Atlanta, Ga. 

DELTA CHI EPSILOX 

"Wise to resolve, and patient to perform." 

Teunls; Scrub Baseball '20. 

Erie is another member of the silent 
squad ; he goes about his business in a quiet 
and silently pleasant way. His hobby is 
music, and his favorite sport tennis. When 
the cross-word puzzle craze struck Ogle- 
thorpe he went the fans one better and be- 
gan making them not only in English, but 
in foreign languages. He has a large vo- 
cabulary and likes Commercial Law; so if 
we were an employment recommendation 
bureau we would advise a further pursuit 
of Law. While in the Commercial Law 
Class he found a great many pleasant feat- 
ures which were not in the book, amon.g 
these was a certain blonde now graduated. 
She was the only girl in the class, and Erie, 
to keep her from feeling lonely or for other 
reasons, always sat by her. If you do enter 
law, the profession will get a likeable and 



SAMUEL MAVERICK WEYMAN 



IN LITERATURE AND JOURNALISM 



"Our youth we can have hut today; 
We may ahvays find time to grow old." 



Entered from Wi 



College 



1924. 



Sam first came to Oglethorpe in 1920, 
he stayed a year and then went to the 
University of Georgia, where he joined the 
Chi Phi fraternity and became a member 
of the exclusive Senate Club; from Georgia 
he went East to school for a year at Wil- 
liams College, and returned to Oglethorpe, 
where he finished his work for a degree 
at the end of the second term. Sam loves 
his ease, and finds it pleasant to bask in 
the sun partially shaded by the top of his 
Ford, and gently grin when Ed Miles and 
Earnest McCullough chide him about some 
new love. He is conscientious and when 
he has something to do, does it. He is go- 
ing into the real estate business with his 
father. 



MRS. JOHN WORD WEST 

A.B. IN LITERATURE AND JOURNALISM 

Fairburn, Ga. 

"She looketh well to the ways of her house- 
hold, and eateth not the bread of idleness." 

Sister believes it a crime to spend a min- 
ute in anything but work or with Colonel. 
Don't you hope you get a wife that feels 
that way? If she has an examination and 
is rather doubtful about making a good 
mark in it, she would just as soon sit down 
and memorize the book. Mrs. West is busy, 
but she never gets too busy to sympathize 
with a person who needs it. She is rather 
reticent about offering sympathy, but she 
understands boys, loves them, and nothing 
pleases her more than to be able to help 
them. She spends her summers on a farm 
near Fairburn, and lavishes her affection 
on Colonel and some White Leghorns. She 
expects to leave Oglethorpe next year and 
go East for advanced work in certain stud- 
ies she is particularly interested in. 




JAMES PAUL WILKES 

A.B. IX CO.MMERCK 

Cordele, Ga. 

PHI DELTA THETA 

"Order is Heaven's first laiv." 

President Student Body '24-'35 ; Treasurer Student 
Body '23-'24 ; Business Manager Yamacraw '24-'25 ; 
Excliange Editor Petrel ■23-'24 ; Boars Head (Hon- 
orary Fraternity); Masonic Club; iManager Co-Op. 

If Paul's future father-in-law is casting 
about for a reference to make sure that h'.s 
daughter is getting the right man, he can 
easily get his information from any one 
of the nine hundred or more students who 
have attended Oglethorpe during the past 
three years, for they all know Paul, and he 
could leave his recommendation with any 
of the nine hundred and still get his bride. 
The students come in the co-op about three 
times a day and if Paul didn't have the 
goods they would have found it out by this 
time. 



LEONARD WILLIAM WILLIS 

A.B. IX COMMERCE 

East Point, Ga. 

PI KAPPA PHI 

"To him nothing is impossible who is al- 
ways dreaming of his past possibilities." 

Baseball '22-'23-'24-'25 ; Business Manager Petrel 
'22; Manager Frosli Football '22; Manager Track ■24: 
Band '22 ; Sigma Lambda Literary Society. 

Spend an hour telling Lefty that in 28 
years it would be impossible for him to be- 
come President of the United States, and 
you will be able to name one of the Presi- 
dents in 28 years or less. He has always 
been something of a miracle man, and has 
great confidence in himself. There is noth- 
ing in the way of hard work that will stop 
him if he decides he wants anything or if 
someone tells him he can't get it. He has 
a great many original ideas and expects to 
use them in the advertising business after 
he has a fling at baseball with the Pitts- 
burgh Pirates, vrith whom he has been 
signed as a pitcher. 




Senior Grapkology 



Professor W. C. Lowe, expert in Penmanship and Graphology, produced 
the remarkable analysis printed below in spite of the double handicap of having 
only signatures as specimens and no knowledge of the members of the class : 

Precision and carefulness ; always tactful ; 
thrifty, prudent and economical. Well balanced 
faculties ; make good manager, organizer, capa- 
ble clerk. 

ring, satirical, and crit- 

Pride and egotism indicated, although this is 
considered more an indication of boldness and 
aggressiveness. Self-reliant. 

An indecisive nature, lacking power for expan- 
sion, yet endowed with an open mind. 

The inclination is toward business and technical 
pursuits, with sporting proclivities. 



.(y^i^ ^K^^^<zy 







Has hard work beginning, takes courage, i 
hopeful, then completes the task. 



Much firmness and determination. Inclned to be 
obstinate ; hard to eonvice. Does own thinking. 



Ambitious for the success and welfare of those 
near and dear. Pride of family name and po 
sition. 



Denotes idealism ; 
are strongest. 



Simplicity, lack of tact, and plain tastes are in- 
dicated. Singleness of purpose for accomplish- 
ment. 



writing is calm- X/ /7^ -^ Z. 

perception. ^^ Vt'-uiyV^ / / ( ^-yxf-i^^lXV 

CU^^tjuJ ku^rC^ OJc^..^ 



ital and spiritual interests 



TAa^ S^>oo ^-yLj^^ix. Oijuk 




Nature more or less passive. Not naturally in- 
dustrious, loves peace, rest, and enjoyment. 

Denotes neatness and one who acts with pre- (~^' / 
ci-sion and carefulness. Almost alwavs tactful. -^/-^-^ 



C-t.-^ l^^^y 



ci-sion and carefulness. Almost always tactful 



This writer has a vivid power of fancy. ludi 
cates tendency to self sacrificing nature. 



May have good thinking qualities but are 
ally poor reasoners. Not always tactful. 






Fifty-On 






Finesse and an impenetrable personality are in 
dicated by the last few letters of the signature 
which dwindle. 

At bottom, decision on any question is deter 
ined by principles involved. 



Does not make up his mind hastily in matters 
of importance. Natural reasoner. 

Neat, careful of personal appearance. Combi- 
nation of dreamer and practical, but more of 
the latter. 

Denotes activity ; nervous, quick, and energetic 
disposition. Mental alertness and physical rest- 
lessness. 

High perception of beauty and form. Inclined 
to be headstrong and self-impressed with own 
importance. 

Protectiveness. The unconscious wish to shield 
oneself or others from harm. 

Usually argumentative. Inclined to ask ques- 
tions and to insist on knowing the why and 
wherefore of things. 

Denotes extravagant notions, with a certain de- 
gree of cautiousness and mistrust. 

Fond of poetry, music or whatever appeals 
the imagination along cultured lines. 

Intuitive ; indiscreet ; venturesome ; selfish. 

Thoughtful and serious turn of mind. Quiet de- 
cision, temperate nature. 

Obstinacy is nearly always shown ; will stick to 
an opinion. Strong convictions often with 
narrow prejudices. 



^J^y-ry,^^ (i^S-c-:::??^— (J^t:-^-^^ 





is aggressiveness and 



Not ea.sily excited ; inclined to be sarcastic. Not 
quick to grasp a newly presented proposition. 



Indicates caution, prudence, and guardedness. 
.A.U aggressive temperament with a reserved ex- 
terior and manner. 






FijUj-Two 





Senior Class History 




Life itself is, and always has been, a battle, and every battle must end in victory 
or defeat. Down deep in the strata of the earth, as well as upon its surface, we find 
the marks of the great conflicts that have always been waging. In measuring the ex- 
tent of our victory, the class of '25 is proud of the many individual and collective 
feats it has accomplished. 

Back in the dark ages of our Freshman year when we were enshrouded in a veil 
of ignorance, we managed to creep out and venture into the activities of our college. 
We were represented in football by Crowe, Porter, and Quarles; in baseball by 
Ferguson, Hope, Kemp, Porter, Martin and Partridge; in track by Crowe and Tucker; 
in basketlsall by Tucker, and in the Players Club by Morrow. In the spring of '22 
J. D. Baxter won the cross-country run which added another laurel to our class. 

In the Sophomore year we returned to college with the determination to make 
the class of '25 the best class in the history of Oglethorpe. How many joyous re- 
miniscences, how many bright and glowing pictures of bygone days arose in their 
shadowy review before us, as we traced our steps through our Freshman days. But 
alas — we were full-fledged Sophs! 

In our Sophomore year we contributed two more men, Maurer and Hamrick, to 
the football team. This team of '22 was coached by Russell Stein, and was the first 
Petrel team to score on the Golden Tornado of Georgia Tech which happened when 
Adrian Maurer ran 95 yards from the kick-off for a touchdown. 

Ferguson, Hope, Partridge, Kemp, Porter, and Willis were the baseball men of 
our Sophomore year; Porter represented us in boxing; Tucker and Orovitz in track; 
and Conklin, Hope, Mason, Morrow, and Tucker in the Players Club. Morrow, Conk- 
lin, and Mason played leads in the spring productions of the plays which were pre- 
sented at the Atlanta Theatre. 

In the pursuit of higher education we lost many valuable members in our Junior 
year. Scruggs, O'Neal, Gordy, Martin, Jackson, L. Pfefferkorn, R. Pfefferkorn, Mc- 
Mekin and Misses Gore, Kellam, Foster, and Broughton entered the class of '24 by 
means of work done at summer school. 

In our Junior year we were represented in football by Crowe, Hamrick, Porter, 
Maurer and Quarles; in baseball by Ferguson, Hope, Maurer, Kemp, Partridge, 
Porter, and Willis; in boxing by Porter; in track by Tucker and Orovitz. The former 
won the pole vault and high jump at the state meet. To the Players Club we gave 
six members of the class, two of whom. Morrow and Conklin, took leading parts. 

We received into our class this year Bagwell, Coles, Cornwell, McCormack, Oro- 
vitz, Willis, Agee, Brower, McWhorter, and Mrs. West. 

Last and best of all-Senior year .... "Tempus fugit." Soon we must cross 
the threshold and leave the best we got from college clays — our friends. 

Wendell Crowe, president of the Senior class, began to show his will and his 
determination to defend a principle in his Sophomore year by the stand he took on 
the ROW famous rat-court affair. Besides four years of football he was business 
manager of the Player's Club and as much in touch with student activities as any 
man on the campus. 



Fifty-Three 







We have taken our full part in college life this year as most of the leaders of 
the different activities have come from our class. Ross Kemp was captain of the 
baseball team; Dan Conklin, editor of the Petrel; John Ottley, editor of the Yama- 
craw; Paul Wilkes, president of the student body; Mitchell Bishop, president of the 
debating society, and Grace Mason, Mother of the co-eds. 

On the football team were Crowe, Hamrick, Maurer, Quarles, and Tucker; in 
the Players Club, Conklin, Crowe, Durham, Hope, Mason, Morrow, Ottley, Spears 
and Tucker. "My Word," one of the spring plays presented at the Atlanta Theatre 
was written by John Ottley. 

Camp, Cornwell, Mason, McCormack, Ottley and Partridge are wearers of the 
coat-of-arms sweater, the highest scholastic honor which our Alma Mater can award. 
Camp, Conklin, Crowe, Hamrick, Mason, Maurer, McCormack, Ottley, Partridge, 
Porter, and Wilkes are members of honorary fraternities. 

To we Seniors it seems the beginning of a new era of bright skies, sunny days 
and the lovely promise of a rich harvest in after-times. 

June! Commencement! Farewell! — but we'll always remember: 




For four long years in union sweet. 
We've often met, and kindly ever: 
Tomorrow — and again we'll meet 

And part again, but part forever 
Asunder torn, at random tossed. 

Some hopes preserved and many lost. 

for a hand aside to fling 
The veil that hides futurity; 

To shotv events that time will bring. 
To show the men that we ivill be 

The joys, the sorrows that we will have 
How spend a life, where find a game. 

However bright, however drear. 

May be lifes coming changeful weather 

The friends of youth will still be dear 
And dear the hours ive spent together 

Hope's wishes die, life's tendrils sever, 
But memory's stores are here foerver. 

So in life's course should we e'er meet. 
With those we loved when we were young. 

Whose features pictured kind and sweet. 
In memory's temple we liave hung. 

How would their face bring to view 
The scenes, the joyS'that boyhood knew." 

—GRACE MASON, 

Historian. 



Fifty-Four 






Tke TkresKold 



For The Class of 1925 

In this supremest hour, we stand at last 
Among that gallant company, for ivhom 

Life opens doors into a wider room. 

Before us passes statesman, dreamer, sage; 

The future is a challenge, and the past 
A glorious heritage. 

We may not daily do a mighty deed, 

But through the rich traditions we have brought, 
Out of these years; may hold, to meet our need, 

Daily, a mighty thought. 

There have been dreams along this sunrise way. 

Where youth has shared its raptures and its fears — 

Dreams we may shape anew each dawning day. 
Yet hold the colors of these sheltered years, 

That one more noble than the rest, may be 
At last, a wonderful reality. 

April and dawn are ours, and all the high 
And living messages those masters gave. 

Whose words were deathless, when their souls went by. 
To speak to us forever from the grave. 

Today we have the treasure of a past. 

More rich than any yester years could be 

In promise and in prophecy. 

We have known great companions; books and men, 

Whose fruitful inspiration shall outlast 

This path of youth we may not tread again. 

The datvn is ours, but shall come at last 

The noon, the tranquil starlight, and grave age. 

Nor shall all these be less than noble, with a past, 
That is a glorious heritage. 

— Mary Brent Whiteside. 



Fifty-Five 







Wko's Wko at Ogletkorpe 

Best All.Round ADRIAN MAURER 

Most Modest JAY PARTRIDGE 

Best Athlete CLAY PARRISH 

Most Accomplished SHAFFER WIMBISH 

Most Popular PAUL WILKES 

Most Literary JAMES LARWOOD 

Best Student JOE WATKINS 

Most Influential PAUL WILKES 

Best Manners WILLIAM MORROW 

Most Bashful THOMAS MOSS 

Most Sarcastic RICHMOND MARTIN 

Most Conceited DANIEL CONKLIN 

Wittiest CHARLES BARBER 

Biggest Booster GUY HOLCOMB 

Best Dressed FRANK BOSTON 

Best Dancer THOMAS CALDWELL 

Most Handsome CLAY CARROLL 

Tightest LEONARD WILLIS 

Laziest WILLIAM BROADHURST 

Most Drag MITCHELL BISHOP 

Most Ambitious EDWARD MILES 

Biggest Eater GEORGE HARDIN 

Mexican Athlete LEONARD WILLIS 

Biggest Checker KENNETH CAMPBELL 

Biggest Checker [Girl) VIRGINIA LOVELL 

Prettiest Girl LaFON DANCY 

Most Attractive Girl LEILA ELDER 

Best Athlete {Girl) MARY NICHOLS 

Most Popular Girl LEILA ELDER 

Biggest Gold Digger VIRGINIA LOVELL 








Junior Class 
OFFICERS 

PETER TWITTY MACKEY President 

BENJAMIN VINCENT Vice-President 

CHARLES W. CORLISS Secretary and Treasurer 




Fifty-Eight 





THOMAS PALMER CALDWELL 

Lake Wales, Fla. 
"Tom" 

PI IvAPPA PHI 

Fie Club; Lords Club; Golf Club; Freshman Che 
Leader '22 : Business Manager Petrel '23-'2 
'24-'25 ; Junior Annual Competitor '25. 



MRS. ESTHER COOPER 



Atlanta, Ga. 
"Ma" 



HENRY LINTON COOPER 

Commerce, Ga. 

"Coop" 

DELTA SIG5IA PHI 

lb; Football '20, '21. '24; Captain Foot- 






ball '21. 



CHARLES WARREN CORLISS 
La Grange, Ga. 

"Chuck" 
DELTA SIGMA PHI 

nte ; Plavers Club ; Sigma Lambda Literary 
•lub ; Football '22. -23. '24 ; Baseball Manager 
.\ssistant Baseball Manager '23 ; President 
nan Class '22- '23 ; President Soph 
•23-'24: Secretary Junior Class '24-'2r, 
Physics and Chemistry. 






JAMES PEYTON HANSARD 

Ashburn, Ga. 

"Pat" 

ALPHA LAMBDA TAIT 

riub ; South Georgia Club ; Sigma Lamba 
,' ; roieman Printing Office ; Sophomore Cc 
i:i : Junior Annual Competitor '24-'25. 



GUY HOLCOMB. JR. 



Atlanta, Ga. 
"Guy" 



JOHN LAMAR JACKSON 
Lawrenceville, Ga. 

"Jack" 

DELTA SIGMA PHI 

Le Conte. 



WAKEMAN LAMAR JARRARD 

Tate, Ga. 
"Jack" 

DELTA SIGMA PHI 

Players Club ; Skull and Crescent : Gordon Club 
Assistant Manager Baseball '24 : Assistant Mana 
Ker Football '24 ; Manager-Elect Football ■23. 



Sixty-Two 






CLAY PARRISH 

WatkinsviUe, Ga. 

"Clay" 
DELTA SIGMA PHI 

23, '24 ; Captain-Elect Football 
Baseball '23, '24. 



WILLIAM HEWLETT PERKERSON 

Greenville, Ga. 

"Perk" 

Football '24; Scrub Football '22, '23. 



ELIZABETH LOUISE RANSOME 

Atlanta, Ga. 

"Ebie" 

CHI OMEGA 
Girl's High Club. 



WILLIAM ASKEW SHANDS 

Union, S. C. 

"Bill" 

PI KAPPA PHI 

Cross Country Team '23, '24 ; Golf Club ; Sigma 
Lambda Literary ; Skull and Crescent ; DeMolay 
Club ; Carolina Club ; Glee Club ; Exchange Editor 
Petrel '24 ; Junior Annual Competitor. 



Sixty-Seven 





JESSE SHIELDS BREWER 

Dalton, Ga. 

''Brew" 

DELTA SIGMA PHI 

Tennis '22; Scrub Baseball '22; "0" CI 

MARY ELIZABETH WATKINS 
Atlanta, Ga. 

"Slim" 

CHI OJIEGA 

Girl's Higli Club. 



WILLIAM BENTON WILLIAMSON 
Atlanta, Ga. 



SHAFFER BURKE WIMBISH 

Five Points, Ala. 

"Shack" 

PI KAPPA PHI 




Sixty-Nine 




ALTON FRANKLIN HARDEN 
Atlanta, Ga. 
"Horseshoe" 
DELTA CHI EPSILOX 
i Club; Petrel Staff; Junior Annual Com- 
petitor. 



WINIFRED H. KENT 

Norcross, Ga. 
"Blackwell" 

DELTA CHI EPSILOX 



FOUNTAIN PITTS RANDLE 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 

"Fount" 

KAPPA ALPHA 



LEON JACKSON SISK 

Toccoa. Ga. 
"Leon" 

DELTA CHI EPSILOX 



WYETH C. STEELE, JR. 

Mount Olive. N. C. 
"Doc" 



JAMES HARLE WALL 



Clayton, Ga 
"Hade" 



Seventy 




ROBERT M. JACKSON 
Born November 20, 1904 
Died December 22. 1924 






In Loving Memory of a True Friend and 

Brother, This Page of the Yamacraw 

Is Affectionately Dedicated by the 

Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity. 

And the tear that we shed. 
Though in secret it rolls 
Shall long keep his memory 
Green in our souls. 



Seventy-On 






CARLE EARNEST SISK 
Born November 25, 1907 
Died February 25, 1925 






This Page Is Dedicated to the Beloved 

Memory of a True Friend and Dear 

Brother by the Delta Chi 

Epsilon Fraternity. 

The passing years may dull the aching pain. 
But time shall never dim his memory; 
And in our hearts he always shall remain 
Beloved, our brother in eternity. 



Seventy-Two 





Junior Class History 



Since Confucius first gathered his disciples for the distribution of knowl- 
edge, it has been the ethics of a class historian not only to stress, but to break 
as many hyperboles as possible in the glorification of his fellows. He, it is 
who goes out to do battle for the rest. Probably some unknown Yen was the 
first to acclaim the greatness of other Yens, Chows, and Fus, so that posterity 
might know beyond doubt that his was the "first" class. The advantage rested 
with him, therefore, and later historians have labored under the handicap 
ever since, for Yen's lies were not lies, which is a paradox. But so be it. 

The class of eighty that spread over the campus in September, 1922, 
was not the greatest Freshman class in history, but it was as great as any in 
its determination to battle Sophomores. And its metamorphosis of three 
years has been pleasing to say the least. For by giving to the football team 
five men, including Parrish, the captain-elect for 1925, and to the baseball 
team three, it has proven an equal to its predecessors. In addition, the busi- 
ness manager and assistant editor of the Petrel were Juniors. The high point, 
however, was the debating team of 1923, the team composed of Orovitz, 
Bishop, and Pearlstine, all members of the class, which defeated Tech and 
Emory. Two of the trio are back and it seems probable a third will be chosen 
from the same class. 

Next to the aforementioned team, the success in Dramatics will be re- 
membered. Of the three Spring plays, two were written by class members, 
"Seein God," by Gladys Hurtell, and "Set For Midnight," by Harden and 
Cornwall, while the music for the third was done by Thelma Doyal. Five 
members took major parts in the productions. 

Notable also is the predominance of class members in the Petrel's 
"Who's Who" contest. In a list of thirty "places" the Junior class is first 
with eleven, a clear indication of popularity among the students. 





As the span draws nearer its end, we see more clearly many of those 
things for which Alma Mater stands. And if some of us have not gained as 
yet the sought-for ends, the Junior Class as a body may sing with the ballad- 
singer: 

"/'// but lie down and bleed a while. 
And then I'll rise and fight again." 

— James Larwood, Histor. 



Seventy-Three 






\f: 



^^» 



1/ ^'. 







..>^ 





^' 











Sophomore Class Officers 

EDWARD MILES President 

KENNETH CAMPBELL Vice-President 

DEWEY JUSTUS Secretary and Treasurer 

CLASS ROLL 

THOMAS E. ARNOLD FRANK E. EVERETT ALBERT L. JIARTIX BSTEX B. SETTLE 

LOY P. AUSTIN' NETTIE EEAGIN FRANCES MAYER R. ('.. SLAYTON 

MARY BANKS ELMER L. GIBSON E. 0. MILES, .Ir. MARY SJIITH 

CHARLES H. BARBER C. L. GINN C. C. JIITCIiELL THOMAS J. STACEY 

DAVID BARBEE MARY GRADY EVELYN MITCHELL P. D. STEPHENS 

•lOE T. BARTON OLIVER S. GRAMLING KIMBALL MOONEY J. E. TANKSLEY 

LeROY BOONE BETTY HAMILTON ANNE MOORE HARRY P. TAYLOR 

WILLIAM T. BOOTH GEORGE W, HARDIN THOMAS H. MOSS ROYLE TERRELL 

FRANK M. BOSTON, Jr. RALPH T. HEATH GEORGE MURPHEY ROY THOMPSON 

KATHERINE BOSWORTH ALBERT HERRING CHARLES L. McRAE lONE THOMPSON 

HUGH W. BOWEN R. M. HOLLBMAN LESTER McCRARY GRADY VEACH 

WILLIAM H. BURTON GEORGE HOLLOWAY W. T. McCURDY A. M. VERNER. Jr. 

PAUL H. BUTLER ELIZABETH HOPE G. M. McMILLAN THOMAS E. WALSH 

KENNETH CAMPBELL DOROTHY HORTON D. F. JIcJULLIN HOLT E. WALTON 

CLAY CARROLL H. D. HULBURT, Jr. JULIUS P. NATIONS >V. A. WATERMAN 

GURLEY CHASTAIN McLAREN JOHNSON KEELS M NIX JAMES H. WATKINS 

W. F. CHBSTNUTT BYRON A. JONES HARRY O'KELLEY JOSEPH WATKINS 

I. W. COUSINS DEWEY JUSTUS VIRGINIA O'KELLEY HOYT WEBB 

JAMES E. CRABB STEVEN KAYLOR LUKE PETTIT THOMPSON WELLS 

J. C. CROCKETT FRANK KRAMER MARK A. PALMOUR "'. P. WHITEHEAD 

WILLIAM W. CRONIC JAMBS D. LESTER G. H. PHILIPS *■ l'- WOODBERRY 

E W. DAVIDSON JAMBS E. LINDSEY ALTON REDPEARN UOYCE WOODALL 

BERNARD S. DEKLE VIRGINIA LOVELL JOSEPH ROBERTS HTHEU D. WRIGHT 

JOSEPHINE EICHBEKG HARRY LYON J. B. ROBINSON BOWLING C. Y'ATBS 

WILLIAM S. EVANS SARAH MAGILL J. WELLS SEMON CALHOrX H. YOUNC 



Seventy-Six 














QQQm9 





Seventy-Seven 





f mr^,iw«tfiwri'ffliin~T^tir'*^ 'iTTWil 








Pi J 

I ?J» I' 



Seventy-Eight 







Sopkomore Class History 

"Here's where we may turn and go 
Down paths of memory 
Back to the land ive used to know, 
The land of used — to — be." 

My! There's such a lot we want to remember about our first two years at Ogle- 
thorpe. Can you think of anything finer than the fact that our Freshman Class, of 
'26 was the largest to enter Oglethorpe — and that 104 of the class returned as Sopho- 
mores. Not only the greatness in number of the class of '27 is notable, but its strength 
and ability represented in all college activities stands out. 

We can't go any further without a word of tribute to our president, Ed Miles. 
Not only the Sophomore Class, but the entire student body realizes his splendid ser- 
vice to Oglethorpe. "Ed Miles has the outlook, both of the student and the man of 
the Church." One vice-president has served both years, and in "Nutty" Campbell, we 
have had one of the finest possible executives. In our Freshman year, Elizabeth Hope 
was Secretary and Treasurer, and in the Sophomore year Oliver Gramling filled the 
place. Both certainly proved their ability. 

Now for athletics and the honors that the Sophomore Class can claim. In foot- 
ball, letters were made by Hardin, Redfearn, Justus, Campbell, Cousins, Carroll and 
Slaton. Representatives in baseball were: Terrell, Buchanan, Cousins, Barbee, 
Campbell, Justus and Chestnutt. Four Sophomores made it possible for Oglethorpe 
to have a boy's basketball team this past year. Redfearn, Campbell, Slaton and 
Chestnutt, as captain, formed a team and played six games, three of which they won. 
The Sophomore Co-Eds were also represented in basketball by lone Thompson, Alter- 
nate Captain; Sarah Magill, Manager and Evelyn Mitchell, guard. Brannon and 
Hardin were Sophomore members of the Golf Club. Burton, Captain; Boone and 
Wright were representatives in track. 

In both the Sigma Lambda and Alpha Kappa Literary Societies, the sophomores 
were well represented. Two of that class made the boy's debating team, Ginn and 
Yates. The Petrel staff also included four sophomores, Ed Miles, Sport Editor; W. A. 
Shands, Exchange Editor; Sarah Magill, Society Editor and Thomas Moss, Circulation 
Manager. 

Barber, Semon, Gibson and Holloway played in the Oglethorpe orchestra, and 
in the Glee Club were Justus, Hardin, Campbell, Brown, Austin, McNeil and Howell. 
The Sophomore Class can claim sixteen members of the Players Club as well as two 
authors of the Spring Plays, Josephine Eichberg and Oliver Gramling. 

"As time who steals our years away 
Shall steal our pleasures, too. 
The memory of the past will stay 
And half our joys reneiv." 

Sarah Magill, Historian. 



Seventy -Nine 





God Give Me Eyes 




God give me seeing eyes 

For Beauty, ivhere it lies! 
Let me not miss it, though its form be new, 

Nor fail to find it in a strange disguise; 
Oh let me see and knoiv that it is true — 

God give me seeing eyes 
For Beauty, where it lies! 

But let Pretense not wear 

The mask of Beauty fair. 
Nor steal my homage from her shrine away! 

Let me see clearly and the Truth declare — 
// / acclaim the false, my false pen stay! 

Oh, let Pretense not ivear 
The mask of Beauty fair! 




And, God, do not withhold 

My eyes from Beauty old! 
Let me see the Light, eternal, true! 

Let me that light still struggle to uphold. 
Nor cast aside the old lamp for the new — 

Dear God, do not withhold 
My eyes from Beauty old! 

The soul of me for Beauty ever cries — 
God give me eyes to see it where it lies! 

ROSELLE MeRCIER MONTGOMERY 





FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS 

LEWIS MOSELEY President 

HENRY SPENCER Vice-President 

DAVID BLACK Secretary and Treasurer 




AI.TOX ALLEX 
MARION B. ANDERSON 
ROBERT P. ARMSTRONG 
JAMES C. ARNALL 
HAROLD B. ASKEW 
LEONARD S. BAKER 
ELLIOT L. BAKER 
E. H. BANISTER 
FRED L. BARBER, JR. 
JAMES L, BEAN 
CHARLES H. BEUl'HLER, JR. 
DAVID G. BLACK 
HENRY W. BOOKOUT 
BRANTLEY J. BOSWELL 
FAY BOW.MAN 
WILLIAM W. BRANNON 
JOHN R. BRINSON 
WRIGHT .M. BROGDON 
FRANK G. BROWDER 
JOHN M. BROWN 
HUGH F. BUCHANAN 
DON DUANE BURT 
R. JOHN CATHCART 
SAMUEL T. CARTER 
CLEO H. CARLYLE 
ALDINE CARMICHAEL 
J. NEWTON CARJIICHAEL 
ROBERT A. CASSIL 
ROBERT L. CHASTAIN 
AMEY CHAPPELL 
HERBERT CHAPMAN 



CLASS ROLL 

ROBERT C. CHESTNUT 
H. C. CHESTNUT 
W. RODOLPH CHRISTIAN 
ANGELLO M. CLARKE 
NETTIE COLLIER 
JIARION CONE 
CLARENCE C. COOK 
MILDRED CRISLER 
LaFON DANCY 
SOPHIE DAVIS 
SHALA W. DAVIS 
W. J. S. DEAL 
JOSEPH B. DEKLE 
THURMAN K. DOBBS 
J. N. DONALDSON 
FRANK DUFFY 
W. M. ELLIOT 
REX EDMUNDSON 
G. W, FINDLEY 

E. A. GARLINGTOX 
W. S. GARVIN 
ROSE GERSHON 
FRANK GILREATK, JR. 
L. A. GINN 

F. J. GIUFFRIDA 
ILA DUDLEY GLASS 
J. F. GOLDSJIITH 
ROBERT GONZALO 
CARLOS GONZALO 

J. FRANK GORDY 



Eiffhty.Tw, 



HUBERT C. GORDON 
ARTHUR GOTTESMAX 
EVELYN GRADY 
HOMER T. GRAMLING 
5IARY GREENWOOD 
ROBERT H. GRIMES 
MAJOR GUTHRIE 
W. ROY HANCOCK 
JAMES H, HARVEY 
MILDRED HATCHER 
C. L. HENDERSON 
L. M. HOBGOOD, JR. 
EVELYN HOLLINGSWORTH 
SARA HUBERT 
JOSEPH P. HUTSON 
LILLIAN HURWITZ 
G. W. JACKSON 
JULIUS C. JOHNSON 
JAMES JONES 
FLORENCE JOSEL 
RAYMOND KING 
J. D. KIRKLAXD 
EDJIUND C. LAIRD 
PAUL E. LANDEN 
HARRIET LIBBY 
EDWIN LONG 
JANE C. LOVETTE 
HEYWARD M. LOVETT 
RICHARD A. LYON 
LOUISE MADDEN 





^# § i 









JOHN P. JIADDOX 
RALPH A. IIAHAX 
KARL MARKERT 
OTIS E. MANN 
MARION E. MANN 
GORDON MARTIN 
HARVEY T. MAYES 
B. M. McCORJIACK 
OLIN T. McCOY 
LEON R. McCRARY 
JOnN S. McCURDY 
D. P. McILVAINE 
R, B. McKISSICK 
T. A. McNEILL 
W. M. McRAE 
H. C. MINHINNETTE 
THOMAS MOFFET 
GLEN MORRIS 
A. R. MORROW 



LEWIS MOSELEY 
LEWIS MULLIS 
JAMES H. NICHOLS 
L. V. NOLAND 
JAMES L. O'KELLEY 
RUTH O'STEEN 
DORIS OSTEBN 
CARL H. O'QUINN 
CHARLES D, PAGE 
FRED PARK 
DONALD PEACOCK 
BARNARD PEARL 
W. C. PERKINS 
R. F. PITTMAN 
HELEN POTTER 
F. J. POPHAM 
C. J. RALEY 
A. W. REDDING 
MADGE REYNOLDS 



MARVIN RIVERS 
T. H. ROBERTSON 
W. P. ROBERTSON 
FLOYD S. ROGERS 
JOHN B. SANDERS 
J. B. SCOGGINS 
LOWRY A. SIMS 
PARK A. SHARP 
EARL L. SHEPHERD 
R. W. SHEPHERD 
HENRY I. SPENCER 
WYETH C. STEELE 
J. C. STEVENS 
G. C. STEWART 
NANCY' L. STRIBLING 
EARL SUMMEROUR 
REUBEN T. TAYLOR 
ROBERT B. THRASH 
EDWIN H. TILLEY 



WAYNE S. TRAER 
J. R. TUMLIN 
WILLIAM W. TYE 
W. F. UNDERWOOD 
ANNETTE VISANSKA 
CHARLES WARD 
THOMAS WATERS 
J. W. WHITAKER 
O. E. WHITE 
MARION E. WHITE 
C. A. WHITE 

C. A. WHITTLE 
CHARLES C. WILLIS 
NELSON WINGO 
LOUIS JI. WOOD 
P. J. WOODWARD 
JIARY WOOLEY 
CLARENCE WRIGHT 
EDWINA WRAY 



Eighty-Three 











9©@§®§ 
QmQQQ 






Eighty-Four 







QQQQm 




Eighty-Five 






Freskman Class History 



It must be admitted, that on September '24, when one hundred and 
eighty-three of us congregated around the lobby of the Administration Build- 
ing, we were a motley looking crowd. The only point of similarity was our 
little gold and black caps which we were forced to buy at the earliest possible 
date. However, it took us but a few minutes to redeem the ignominy of our 
looks by our prowess as a class. 

The Sophomores bothered us but little, as we outnumbered them. You 
could usually find us mi.xed up in any excitement that was ever started — 
and we started some of it ourselves. Still we can say with pride that most 
of us have survived exams, and various other pitfalls that the Profs, have 
persisted in digging for us. 

At our first meeting as an organized class, we elected Lewis Moseley, 
President; H. I. Baby Spencer, Vice-President; Roy Hancock, Secretary and 
Treasurer. 

Shortly after, the Freshman girls were formally initiated. They gave 
a Sunday afternoon tea at Nancy Stribling's home for the Sophomore girls 
and the members of the Faculty. 

The Woman's Board decided that we Freshmen should become better 
acquainted; so after the football victory over Sewanee, we were honored by 
an informal dance at the Capital City Club, with four members of our class. 
Cathcart, Underwood, Martin and Christian, contributing their part in the 
Oglethorpe Orchestra. 

The Freshman Football team was a whiz, winning six out of eight games. 
Those receiving Jerseys were: Moseley, Spencer, Grimes, Carter, Garlington, 
Dekle, Wright, Wingo, Chastain, Guthrie, Watkins, Hutson, Brinson, King, 
Gordy, Boswell, White, Goldsmith and Gilreath. Evelyn Hollingsworth, 
Evelyn Grady and Mildred Hatcher represented the Freshmen on the Co-Ed 
varsity basketball team. 

By the eighth of November the class had begun to appreciate itself so 
much, that it was decided to do something no other class had ever attempted 
— to give a dance. Giving it after the Mercer game, we invited the Mercer 
football players, and upperclassmen. The experiment was a great success. 

We have won our share of attention from everyone. We also have 
obeyed the rules of the game and if the class continues as it has begun, there 
are wonderful prospects for the class of 1928. 

—MILDRED HATCHER, Historian. 



Eighty-Six 






BOOK III 

ATHLETICS 





Letter Men 




:ball 



ADRIAN MAURER 
KENNETH CAMPBELL 
ROBERT KILGORE 
MILLER HAMRICK 
MARVIN NIX 
CLAY CARROLL 
LINTON COOPER 
WENDELL CROWE 
GEORGE HARDIN 

RICHMOND MARTIN- 



CHARLES CORLISS 
CLAY PARRISH 
ALTON REDFEARN 
DEWEY JUSTUS 
I. W. COUSINS 
HEWLETT PERKERSON 
GIFFORD SLAYTON 
RALPH QUARLES 
WILLIAM PORTER 
■Manager 



HERBERT BRYANT 
MARK HUMPHREY 
ADRIAN MAURER 
LEONARD WILLIS 
DAVE BARBEE 
LAMAR LINDSAY 
JAMES PARTRIDGE 



Baseball 



ROSS KEMP 
CLAY PARRISH 
CHARLES FERGUSON 
WILLIAM PORTER 
HARLE WALL 
JOHN MORRIS 
WILLIAM COX 



CHARLES CORLISS— /V/anager 



;k and Tt 




WEYMAN TUCKER 
JESSE BREWER 



LeROY BOONE 
WILLIAM BURTON 



Eighty-Seven 





Football Team of '24 



ADRIAN MAURER Capi 

RICHMOND MARTIN Manager 

HARRY ROBERTSON Coach 




Assistant Coaches 
HOMER CHESTiNUTT FRANK ANDERSON 

Varsity Line-Up 

PARRISH Cente 

CARROLL Left End 

COOPER Left Tackle 

CORLISS Left Guard 

HAMRICK Left Half 

CAMPBELL Quarterback 



NIX Right End 

CROWE Right Tackle 

HARDIN Right Guard 

MAURER Right Half 

KILGORE Full Back 



Substitutes 



REDFEARN Half PERKERSON Guard 

QUARLES End SLAYTON Half 

COUSINS Guard JUSTUS Tackle 




Oglethorpe 

Oglethorpe 

Oglethorpe 10 

Oglethorpe 27 

Oglethorpe 13 

Oglethorpe 7 

Oglethorpe 32 

Oglethorpe 6 

Oglethorpe 25 

Oglethorpe 20 

Total 140 



Tech 19 

Ft. Benning 20 

The Citadel ? 

Wofford 

Loyola 13 

Sewanee 

Howard 7 

St. Louis 18 

Mercer 

Chattanooga 2 

Total 



Ninety-One 





Football 

Out of a nightmare of possibly the weirdest season in the history of the 
pigskin sport, a session filled to overflow with upsets and surprises, Ogle- 
thorpe's scrappy band of gridders emerged dope champions of the world by 
comparative scores, and by actual combat, champions of the oldest Dixie or- 
ganization, the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association. True, Centre, 
also a member of the S.I. A. A. had accounted for a wonderful scoreboard, 
but the Colonels had met and defeated only one other member of the associa- 
tion, while the Stormy Petrels had backed up their claim to leadership honors 
by six decisive victories. 

The Oglethorpe '24 collegiate football accomplishments reads as a page 
from modernized Arabian Knights. There was her spectacular route of 
Mercer, dope laden to the extent of 29 points following the Bears' triumph 
over the highly tooted Florida 'Gators, the Petrels' inspired stand against the 
ferocious Sewanee Tigers, later winners over Vanderbilt, who just the week 
before had raised the Dixie flag above a conquered northern eleven. There 
were other victories that paved the way for Oglethorpe's just claim of S.I.A.A. 
leadership, otiier wins possibly just as important as those over Mercer and 
Sewanee, but the impregnable defense that the Petrels placed in the way of 
Bear and Tiger alike, the not-to-be-denied offense that cut to pieces desperate, 
fighting rival players at the same time, sent an ever loyal student body wild 
and wooly. 

To place one's finger on one, two or more heads and say "There's where 
the credit lies for Oglethorpe's most successful grid force" would be doing a 
grave injustice to others connected and associated with Oglethorpe's '24 foot- 
ball grid schedule. There was Coach Harry Robertson, succeeding his 
brother "Big Jim" at a time when dark 
iC ' clouds were hovering over the Petrel strong- 

hold, there was Captain Adrian Maurer, ad- 
mired for his ability on the gridiron and 
diamond, l^ut loved by his fellow-students 






Ninetrj-Two 







because in that enviable make-up there was no trace 

of snobbishness or the least sign of the swagger of the 

great' athlete. Then too, there was a line, a backfield 

and reserves that gave their all for the University and 

also a freshman team, a band of youngsters to whom 

no small part of the credit goes, for, afternoon after 

afternoon, hour after hour, they toiled, whipping into 

shape the varsity that was to carry so successfully the 

laurels of the Stormy Petrels. 

^ ^_ Last, far from least, was a loyal student body, a 

MX following that had backed the gridders, win or lose, 

in success and in failure. 

When the initial call for candidates for the Oglethorpe eleven was an- 
swered on September 1, eleven veterans failed to respond, graduation, busi- 
ness and marriage taking a great toll of the experienced players, but ten main- 
stays, many of them stars in '23 were in the list returning. Coaches Harry 
and Jim Robertson, with the opening game only a few 
weeks off, started to mould an eleven that was destined 
to sink into the sea of despondency at the start, but later, 
by truQ courage and dogged determination, to ascend to 
the very top of Mt. Everest. 

A relentless, terrific September sun bore down on 
die forty odd candidates from which the championship 
eleven was to be shaped, practices were held morning and corliss 

afternoon, six days out of the week. Injuries were many, the entire squad 
was bruised and battered by necessary long, hard scrimmages. Adrian 
Maurer suffered an infected foot just four days before the opening game. 
Clay Parrish was absent several days with a bad leg that would have kept the 
average gridder on the side lines in "cits" for the remainder of the year, 
otlier veterans were on the injured list, but the entire squad 
rallied bravely for 

The Tech Game — Sept. 27, at Grant Field 

A water-soaked, muddy field, one that brought back 
memories of Flander's Fields to many ex-service men in the 
large crowd that braved the wrath of the elements, greatly 
handicapped the Petrels as they battled with the formidable 
Jacket eleven. Counting upon their speed, their aerial at- 
tack, to overcome the weight handicap of the Tech players, 
the Petrels found themselves robbed by fate, disarmed by 
an over-night whim of the elements. But the little clan did 



Ninety-Three 







not falter, and when the first quarter had become his- 
tory, Oglethorpe and Tech were grappling evenly in a 
scoreless deadlock. 

A bad heave of the slippeiy pigskin, a 3-point boot 
after the Oglethorpe defense had repulsed three savage 
thrusts of Wycoff and Company, gave the Jackets a 
none too comfortable 5-point lead as the final quarter 
opened. 

With the ball in their possession in the very 
shadow of their own goal, the Oglethorpe eleven elected 
to gamble, to go down in defeat by a large score or as 

victors cross the final chalk marker at the Jacket goal line. Two iurward 
were heaved, both were completed, but as Tech players tackled the 
the slippery ball evaded their arms and Tech recovering, totaled 
14 points, the final count of 19 to favoring the Jackets. Though the Petrels 
lost, it is interesting to note that the Jackets totaled only 
six first downs against the Petrel forwards during the 
regular 60-minutes of play. 

Fort Benning — Oct. 4, at Columbus 

History failed to repeat itself as the Petrels battled 
with the Officers, a 20 to final going to the Benning 
gridders, due to the efforts of two former All-American 
players, and the valuable addition of one AU-Soutliern 
veteran. The Stormy Petrels suffered their first defeat 
in gridiron competition with the Officers, all former meet- 
ings being chalked in the Ogletliorpe won column. 



receivers. 




The Citadel — Oct. 11, at Charleston 




Under the dismal cloud of defeat. Coach Robertson, without the aid of 
his brother who had, according to former plans, returned East, sent the Pet- 
rels through a hard week of practices, gave them 
several new plays and watched them as they ac- 
counted for their 10 to 7 victory over Citadel on 
foreign soil. A forty-yard drop kick from the toe 
of little "Nutty" Campbell being the margin of 
victory. 

WoFFORD — Oct. 17, at Anderson 

An offense that had failed to function, a line 



Ninety-Four 





that had not hit its true stride, found itself against 
the Terriers, the Petrel players totaling one of their 
largest scores of the season as they ran rough shod 
over tlieir rivals, hitting the line and speeding around 
the ends to a decisive 27 to victory. Captain Maurer 
found himself in this meeting, Kilgore commenced a 
drive that was to label him one of the greatest full 
backs in the South, and Alton Redfearn, one of the 
numerous reserves, also shared the limelight. 




Loyola — Oct. 25, at New Orleans 




Outweighed sixteen pounds to the man, facing over a ton of human 
bone and sinew, the Oglethorpe eleven divided honors 
evenly in a 13-13 tie with the Loyola Wolves, the meeting 
being one of the cleanest, most sportsmanlike battles ever 
witnessed. This game in New Orleans marked the opening 
of athletic relations between the two institutions, and never 
has a Dixie delegation been more royally entertained. The 
Wolves scored in the first and third quarters, due to the 
flashy work of "Deuce" Demengeux, while the Petrel 
counters all came in the second period as Maurer, Kilgore, 
and Redfearn, by straight football devoid of all frills, car- 
ried the oval down the field, Kilgore plunging across the 
final marker for Oglethorpe's initial score. On a beauti- """' *' '" 

ful 40-yard run, Redfearn side-stepped and stiff-armed his "^ ^^" ^'^^^ 

way through practically the entire Loyola defense for the final Petrel score. 
Both teams totaled one of the two attempts for the extra point after touchdown. 



Sewanee — Nov. 1, at Ponce de Leon 

An inspired band of Oglethorpe gridders, bloody and 
exliausted, out-fought and out-scored Sewanee's powerful 
Tiger eleven by a 7 to count, the Petrel win marking the 
first of its kind in the history of athletic competition betwen 
the two universities. Linton Cooper and Charles Corliss, 
two star linesmen, who were held out of the Loyola fracus 
by Coach Robertson, were returned to the fold and aided 
materially in the greatest victory of Oglethorpe's gridiron 
history. 



Ninety-Five 







The laurels of that battle go, not to a side- 
stepping, twisting, back, but to two lines that 
grappled through 60 minutes of play, neither 
asking nor receiving ground. Sewanee with her 
backfield of fast stepping stars, Oglethorpe with 
her illustrious Adrian Maurer, were unable to 
penetrate consistently each others defense, the 
winning score coming as the result of a 20-yard 
flip from Campbell to Carroll that placed the 
pigskin on the 8-yard line. Kilgore delivering 
the needed yardage a moment later through center 



JUSTUS 



Howard — Nov. 8, at Birmingham 





Though badly bruised in their sensational win over Sewanee, who later 
in the season triumphed over Vanderbilt, con- 
querors in an intersectional tilt with Minnesota, 
the Petrels won easily over Howard's gridders, 
the larger end of a 32 to 7 score coming to Coach 
Robertson's charges. 

^^^ St. Louis — Nov. 15, at St. Louis 

PERKF.USO.X jj^ jj^g Petrel's first intersectional battle, St. 

Louis bested the Oglethorpe gridders by an 18 to 6 score. With the Mercer 
tilt coming the following week. Coach Robertson elected to save some of 
his stars as the game with the Bears, outside of the usual keen rivalry, also 
carried with it the championship of the S.LA.A. 

Bob Kilgore again tallied the Oglethorpe score, 
the Petrel's total coming in the first quarter, while St. 
Louis' scores were divided equally in the remaining 
three periods. 

Mercer — Nov. 22, at Ponce de Leon 

A dope-laden Mercer eleven, confident in its 
strength shown one week earlier by a decisive 10 to 
victory over Florida, fell before the consistent, alert at- 
tack of a rejuvenated Oglethorpe attack, the 25 to 
final being one of the greatest dope upsets in the South- 



Ninety-Six 





land. Mercer, by her victory over the 'Gators, had 
gained the dope championship of the nation, only to 
lose this honor, together with the championship of the 
S.I. A. A., to the Stormy Petrel force. 

The Petrels showed their superiority in every de- 
partment, even the Bear's celebrated aerial attack being 
used to advantage by Oglethorpe linesmen and backs 
alike. 




Chattanooga — Nov. 27, at Chattanooga 





Oglethorpe closed her most successful venture on the 
gridiron^ with a big Turkey-Day celebration at the expense 
of the Chattanooga Moccasins, the ringing down of the 
curtain exercises coming to the Petrel camp by a 20 to 2 
score. Adrian Maurer was injured in the first five minutes 
of play and was forced to retire. Without the aid of their 
captain and star, the Petrels floundered around a bit. Bob 
Kilgore rallying the oifense and leading the eleven to vic- 
tory after the Moccasins had led at the end of the first 
quarter 2 to 0. 

The Petrel's complete grid score card shows a total 
of six games won, three lost, and one tied. The Petrels quarles 

scored 140 points to the total damage done by rival elevens amounting to 
86. In S.I. A. A. competition alone the Petrels won all six of their meetings, 

i totaling 121 points to a meager total of 16 for the com- 
bined efforts of their opponents. 
To close this inadequate history of Oglethorpe's 
most successful season on the gridiron without some 
meager words of praise for coach and player alike, 
would be doing a great injustice to those who so success- 
fully carried on Oglethorpe's fight for national recogni- 
tion. 
To Coach Harry Robertson, Petrel students and 
fans owe a great debt of gratitude. The ability of Coach 
V , Robertson was realized and appreciated from the start. 

MARTIN The Petrel mentor was not a hard taskmaker, possessing 



Ninety-Seven 







those qualities of leadership that have made him more than just a grid 

director, Robertson has become literally a pal to every man in the Petrel 

camp. Through his efforts an only fair calibre of material was turned into 

a cracker] ack eleven, one 

who's just claim to S.I.A.A. 

honors has been universally 

recognized. 

There were the backs, 
Maurer, Campbell, Kilgore, 
Hamrick and Redfearn to 
whom the word "quit" was 
unknown. Nix and Carroll 
were recognized as two of 
the best end men in southern 
football, Crowe and Cooper, 

both veteran tackles, were responniblc lo a large degree for Oglethorpe's '24 
successes, and proved able mates to Hardin and Corliss, regular guards. 
Parrish, hefty center, together with Maurer and Kilgore, were picked by 
many sporting writers on the official S.I.A.A. composite line-up taken from 
all the team members of the association. 

The resei-ves often played more than the regulars, Justus, Cousins, Slay- 
ton, Perkerson, Young and Quarles giving their all and often playing on even 
terms with the varsity. The Oglethorpe '24 football session is now history — 
but a more sensational, a more satisfactory season could hardly be recorded. 




... 



;i*K 



Ninetij.Eight 





Provided' ihe old sporting adage "the freshman team of today is the varsity of tomorrow" 
holds good at the Petrel camp, then Oglethorpe is assured of having another formidable eleven 
when the baby gridders make their squalls evident next September on Hermance Field. The 
"rat" combination, under the direction of Coach Chestnutt, accounted for a very successful 
grid program, totalling seven wins out of nine meetings with some of the leading prep and 
college forces of the state. 

The younger Petrels didived two meetings with the University for Boys' eleven, and drop- 
ped to G.M.C. by a narrow 7 to count. With these two defeats marking the only reverses 
on their final scoreboard, the "rats" trampled Monroe, G.M.A., Norman Park, Locust Grove, 
and such leaders as Sheppard, Anderson, Spencer, Garlington, Guthrie, and Gilreath took 
turn about adding yardage through yawning holes opened by Chastain, Moseley, and Gold- 
smith. 





Ninety-Nine 





Uncrowned Kings 



The man who kicks the field goal 

That wins the hard-fought game, 
He kicks his way to glory. 

The thousands cheer his name. 
But what about the center 

Who passes him the ball? 
He makes or breaks the kicker, but 

He isn't cheered at all. 




The back who crashes through the line, 

For ten or maybe more. 
And makes the final touchdown 

That proves the winning score. 
He's hailed the college hero 

Amidst a wild hurray — 
But what of guard or tackle 

Who opened up the way? 




Oh, football has its heroes. 

Some of the gifted toe. 
And others who can smash a line 

And strike the winning blow. 
But as in every game on earth. 

Including that of life, 
Its greatest heroes often pass 

Unnoticed through the strife. 



One Hundred 





Baseball 1924 



HERBERT BRYANT Captain 

CHARLES CORLISS Manager 

FRANK ANDERSON Coach 




Team 

PARRISH First Base 

PARTRIDGE Second Base 

MAURER Third Base 

WALL Shortstop 

KEMP Left Field 

MORRIS Center Field 

BARBEE Right Field 

BRYANT Catcher 

PORTER Catcher 

WILLIS Pitcher 

HUMPHREY Pitcher 

COX Outfield 

FERGUSON Outfield 

LINDSAY First Base 



Ri 




Oglethorpe 7 

Oglethorpe 3 

Oglethorpe 15 

Oglethorpe 3 

Oglethorpe 2 

Oglethorpe 8 

Oglethorpe 16 

Oglethorpe 18 

Oglethorpe 5 

~ ■ ■ 11 

7 

14 



11 

6 

Oglethorpe 4 

Oglethorpe 4 

Oglethorpe 1 

Oglethorpe 5 



.170 



Dartmouth 6 

Dartmouth 9 

Furman 1 

Furman 2 

B'ham Southern 1 

B'ham Southern 4 

South Carolina 2 

Wofford 6 

Wofford 2 

Furman 10 

Furman 1 

Clemson 1 

Wofford 

Wofford 7 

Georgia 7 

Georgia 1 



Alabama 1 

Mercer 1 

Mercer 3 

Tech 

Tech 1 



Total 



Hundred and Three 





Baseball Revie\v 

Dixie Champions 

Oglethorpe grid forces may sweep the nation, her baseball nines may conquer 
in every land, but the feat of the Petrels of '24 in winning 20 out of 22 games against 
the leading diamond combinations of the country, and the Southern Championship, 
will ever be cherished by those connected with the University. Additional honors will 
come to those that bear the name of the Stormy Petrels on the athletic fields, other 
championships will follow, and Oglethorpe become an even more feared foe, but the 
joy of that initial Dixie victory, the happiness of player and student alike as Tech, 
Georgia, Alabama, and other leaders fell before the skill of Coach Anderson's 
charges will never be forgotten. 

The Petrels had, in former years, shown their strength on the diamond, had 
defeated the Tech Jackets, had tied the Georgia Bulldogs, and drubbed the Mercer 
Bears, all leaders in the hot weather pastime. But to the team of '24, led by Captain 
"Pug" Bryant, goes the laurels of the most successful endeavor of a Petrel force. 
Only two defeats were chalked against the Oglethorpe ball tossers out of twenty- 
two games, Dartmouth's Big Green dividing equally, a two game series with the ever 
fighting Petrels, and the Georgia Bulldog's defeat of the Stormy Petrels, in the first 
of a two-game series by the narrow margin of a 7 to 6 final, marking the only re- 
verse handed the Oglethorpe nine by a southern team. Though the Georgia colle- 
gians triumphed over the Petrels in their initial meeting, their historic chapel bell 
failed to toll out a Bulldog victory the following night, this usually gay college town 
being silent as the Petrels handed the Bulldogs an 8 to 1 drubbing, one of the most 
decisive defeats handed the Red and Black representatives during their "24 season. 

The Stormy Petrels opened their collegiate season with Dartmouth's formidable 
force, a nine that, up to that time, had laid waste to the Southland, and though it 
was not realized at the time, the Petrel's 7-6 win was a good omen, a victory that 
gave the confidence that was to carry them to the Dixie championship. The opening 
game with Dartmouth was probably the most sensational diamond get-to-gether ever 
witnessed on Hermance Field, the Petrels breaking a knotted count in their section of 
the eleventh inning when Clay Parrish, after being hit in the head by a pitched ball, 
crossed the counting marker when Dave Barbee tripled to deep center. 

Other victories followed in quick succession after the Big Green nine had 
evened the count in the second meeting, Furman crumbled before an attack that 
threatened to drive them back to their South Carolina haunts, Birmingham Southern 
and South Carolina fared little better, and on a week's invasion five games were 
won out of an equal number played, Wofford, Furman and Clemson dropping before 
Coach Anderson's hitting and fielding stars. 

The annual pilgrimage to the kennel of the Georgia Bulldog left the Oglethorpe 
stronghold practically vacant, and though the Petrels divided honors with the Bull- 
dogs, a satisfied student body returned to the campus ready for Alabama's powerful 
nine. 

came to Atlanta with a formidable force, one whose claim to the cham- 
pionship of the South rang true. Against the Stormy Petrels the Crimson Tide re- 
ceded in its hope for southern leadership, while the Petrels soared higher towards 
the peak of the Dixie championship by two well-earned, hard-fought victories over 
the visitors. 



One Hundred and Four 







In two games in Macon that caused brave men to tremble, the Petrels defeated 
their ancient rivals, the Mercer Bears, and with further honors returned to Atlanta 
ready for their pair of battles with Tech. 

Refusing to be shaken from their perch at the peak of the Dixie championship, 
the Stormy Petrels closed a brilliant season with two equally brilliant victories over 
the Jackets. The Petrels out-fielded and out-hit the Jackets and accounted for, along 
with the Dixie championship, leadership of the S. I. A. A., also Oglethorpe's first 
city collegiate championship. 

Fourteen players received the coveted "0" for their efforts on the diamond, 
fourteen men starred during a season filled with thrills and excitement. Willis 
pitched his mates to seven wins without a single loss being chalked against his record. 
Humphrey lost only one meeting out of nine starts, poor fielding on the part of the 
Petrel infield being responsible for this one demerit. Barbee and Morris each won 
two games in the box without a single reverse, Ferguson also showing his worth by 
adding another win in his sole attempt. Peace, after a great season in '23 failed 
to find himself and dropped the other; battle. 

The real calibre of the Petrel nine will be understood when it is noted that three 
Oglethorpe stars are slated to show their wares in the "Big Tent." Herbert Bryant 
is slated for the Pittsburgh Nationals, Thomas Porter for the St. Louis Americans and 
Leonard Willis will also report to Pittsburgh. Big league scouts followed the Petrel 
diamond athletes through many battles and there is a strong possibility that other 
members of the championship '24 Oglethorpe nine will be stepping around in the 
"Big Tent." 




Future Big Leaguers 





Golf 

Oglethorpe has tasted of leadership in football and baseball competi- 
tion and may also have the golf crown of Dixie in time. 

The Golf Club, founded on November 28, aims at a widening of the 
circle of athletic possibilities at the University. A school tournament has 
already been approved, from which a team will be selected that will possibly 
enter several of the intercollegiate meets scheduled for the spring and summer. 

The officers and members of the golf organization are as follows: 

MUGGSY SMITH President 

THOMAS WALSH Vice-President 

JOHN OTTLEY Secretary and Treasurer 




BRANNON, W. W. 
CALDWELL, T. P. 
STAGEY, T. J. 
MACKEY, P. T. 
SHANDS, W. A. 
McNEIL, T. A. 
WIMBISH, S. B. 
WATKINS, J. H. 
BLACK, D. C. 
MOSS. T. H. 
PORTER, W. T. 



WILLIS. L. W. 
EVERETT, F. C. 
CONKLIN, D. E. 
HARDIN, G. W. 
RALEY. C. J. 
YOUNG, C. Y. 
PITTMAN, R. L. 
HANSARD, J. P. 
GARLINGTON, E. 
WELLS. T. M. 
BOSWELL, B. J. 



One Himdfcd and Six 








WwWim 




Co-Ed Basketball Team 



MARY BELL NICHOLS Caplain 

SARAH MAGILL Manager 

HOMER CHESTNUTT Coach 



Line-Up 



EVELYN HOLLINGSWORTH Forward 

MILDRED HATCHER Forward 

MARY BELL NICHOLS Center 

LOUISE SMITH Guard 

EVELYN GRADY Guard 




EVELYN MITCHELL 
SARAH MAGILL 
GURLEY MAE CHASTAIN 
HELEN POTTER 
NANCY STRIBLING 



lONE THOMPSON 
FLORENCE JOSEL 
EDWINA WRAY 
LOUISE MADDEN 
HARRIET LIBBY 



One Hinidred and Eight 





BOOK IV 

BEAUTY 




^Illlllllllllillllilllilllllllillllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllilllllllllillliillillllllllllllllll^^ 




lllttlliiliitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiia 




^iiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 




illHiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin^ 




^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 




lIlliiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiii^ 




BOOK V 

ORGANIZATIONS 




PI 



ayers 



CluL 




The Oglethorpe Players Club holds a unique place among Southern 
Colleges as it is the only players organization in which the plays are 
written and acted bj' undergraduate students aloue. 



Offi 



cers 



WILLIAM MORROW President 

DANIEL CONKLIN Vice-President 

WILLIAM DURHAM Business Manager 

CHARLES CORLISS Stage Manager 

JOHN OTTLEY Publicity Manager 

LEWIS HAASE, Coach 
DR. JAMES E. ROUTH, Faculty Advisor 



Memb 



emoers 




DANIEL CONKLIN 
SAMUEL BOOZER 
VIRGINIA LOVELL 
DuPREE JORDAN 
lONE THOMPSON 
SHAFFER WIMBISH 
SARAH MAGILL 
HENRY HOPE 
LEILA ELDER 
JOHN OTTLEY 
WILLIAM DURHAM 
GRACE MASON 
LESTER McCRARY 



JOSEPHINE EICHBERG 
SAMUEL WOODBERRY 
VIRGINIA O'KELLEY 
CHARLES CORLISS 
MARY BELL NICHOLS 
WILLIAM MORROW 
GIBSON CORNWELL 
LUKE PETTIT 
EARL GAY 
GUY HOLCOMB 
WENDELL CROWE 
ALTON HARDEN 
LAMAR JARRARD 



One Hundred and Eigh 





Orchestra 




JOHN T. LEE Director 

GORDON MARTIN Assistant Director and Violin 

ROY M. LEE Business Manager 

MEMBERS 

JACK CATHCART Trumpet 

ROY M. LEE Trumpet 

ROY THOMPSON Trombone 

CHARLES H. BARBER Bass 

JAKE W. SEMON Banjo and Violin 

WILLIAM A. LEE Piano 

R. E. LEE Clarinet 

WILLIAM CHRISTIAN Drums 

GEORGE HOLLOW AY Saxophone 

DONALD W. PEACOCK " Saxophone 

ELMER L. GIBSON Saxophone 



One Hundred and Twenty 






Band 

JOHN T. LEE, Director 

MEMBERS 

W. M. DEAL Saxophone 

ELMER GIBSON ' Saxophone 

FRANK BROWDER Saxophone 

WILLIAM CHRISTIAN Drums 

DR. A. S. LIBB Y Drums 

SAM WOODBERRY Clarinet 

ROBERT PITTMAN Clarinet 

R. E. LEE Clarinet 

GORDON MARTIN Trumpet 

JACK CATHCART Trumpet 

WILLIAM UNDERWOOD Trumpet 

ROY M. LEE Trumpet 

JOHN M. BROWN Baritone 

CHARLES H. BARBER Bass 

EVERETT BAGWELL Trombone 

PAUL BUTLER Trombone 

WILLIAM LEE Alto 



Hundred and Tiventy-One 





Debating Council 



ABRAM OROVITZ President 

MITCHELL C. BISHOP Manager 

BOWLING C. YATES Secretary and Treasurer 




DEBATING TEAM 

ABRAM OROVITZ BOWLING C. YATES 

MITCHELL BISHOP DuPREE JORDAN 

LOVELACE GINN HARRY BANISTER 

DR. JAMES E. ROUTH, Coach 



One Hundred and Twenty-Tw( 





Student-Faculty Committee 

JOHN K. OTTLEY, JR Chairman 

ADRIAN MAURER Senior Meviher 

ROBERT P. MILLER Junior Member 

EDWARD 0. MILES Sophomore Member 

HARRY H. BANISTER Freshman Member 




One Hundred and Twenty-Three 






Ogletkorpe University Glee Club 

The Glee Club was organized by John Lee in the fall of 1924. 
The Club put on several performances for the student body and made 
three out-of-town trips. The Club has planned a series of trips to 
Georgia towns next year, and expects to double its membership by 
that time. 



Offic 



JOHN T. LEE Director 

SHAFFER WIMBISH President 

HARRY MYERS Manager 

GEORGE HARDIN Secretary and Treasurer 



M< 




HENRY SPENCER 
WILLIAM SHANDS 
GEORGE HARDIN 
FRANK GORDY 
SPENCER HOWELL 
LOY AUSTIN 
JAMES PARTRIDGE 
SHAFFER WIMBISH 
HARRY MYERS 
DAVID BLACK 



LESTER McCRARY 
KENNETH CAMPBELL 
DEWEY JUSTUS 
PAUL WILKES 
GUY HOLCOMB 
ADRIAN MAURER 

GEORGE McMillan 

LEON McCRARY 
HUBERT GORDON 
WILLIAM LEE 



One Hundred and Twenty-Four 





One Hundred and Twenty-Five 




Pi Kappa Pki Fraternity 

Founded at College of Charleston, 1904 

Pi Ckapter 

Established at Oglethorpe, April IS, 1918 
Colors: Gold and White. Flower: Red 

SENIORS 
LEONARD W. WILLIS 




JUNIORS 



THOMAS P. CALDWELL 
HOLMES D. JORDAN 
ROBERT N. LITTLE 



SHAFFER B. WIMBISH 
WILLIAM A. SHANDS 
CALHOUN H. YOUNG 



PETER T. MACKEY 



SOPHOMORES 



KENNETH A. CAMPBELL 
FRANK C. EVERETT, Jr. 
GEORGE W. HARDIN 
JAMES E. LINDSEY 
HARRY CLIFFORD LYON 
JULIAN S. HAVIS 



THOMAS H. MOSS 
THOMAS A. McNEIL 
THOMAS J. STACEY 
KEELS M. NIX 
JAMES H. WATKINS 
ANDREW M. VERNER, Ji 



FRESHMEN 




MARION B. ANDERSON 
THOMAS F. MOFFETT 
WILLIAM PERKINS 
ROBERT F. PITTMAN 
CHARLES J. RALEY 
HARRY O. LOUDEN 



JOHN B. SCOGGINS 
JOHN W. WHITAKER 
HAROLD B. ASKEW 
ANDERSON W. REDDING 
FREDERICK J. POPHAM 
JOHN R. BRINSON 



JOSEPH B. DEKLE 



One Hundred and Twenty-Six 





Kappa Alpka Fraternity 

Founded at Washington and Lee University, 1865 

Beta Nu Chapter 

Established at Oglethorpe, 1871 

Chapter Revived, 1918 

Colors: Crimson and Old Gold Flowers: Magnolia and Red Ro 

FRATER IN FACULTATE 

ARTHUR STEPHEN LIBBY 




SENIORS 



WILLIAM C. MORROW 
HENRY M. HOPE 



THOMAS L. CAMP 
ARCHIE T. McWHORTER 



JUNIORS 
BENJAMINE H. VINCENT FOUNTAIN P. RANDLE 



SOPHOMORES 



FRANK M. BOSTON 
HENRY BOOKOUT 



EDWARD O. MILES 
THOMAS E. ARNOLD 



ALTON REDFEARN 
FRESHMEN 




WILLIAM W. TYE 
JOHN GODLSMITH 
OLIN T. McCOY 



D. FRED McMULLIN 
WILLIAM M. McRAE 
PARKER A. YEARWOOD 



CODY LAIRD 



One Hundred and Twenty-Eight 









One Hundred and Twenty-Nine 




Alpka Lambda Tau Fraternity 

Founded at Oglethorpe Universiti/, October 8, 1916 

Alpka Chapter 

Established at Oglethorpe, March .27, 1921 

Flower: American Beauty Rose 




Colors: Old Gold and Black 



SENIORS 

JAMES B. PARTRIDGE MILLER A. HAMRICK 

L. RICHMOND MARTIN, Jr. JOHN D. BAXTER 

R. FRANK McCORMACK, Jr. 



LAMAR H. LINDSAY 
T. BRUCE LINDSAY 



JUNIORS 

MARVIN A. NIX 
JAMES. P. HANSARD 
ROBERT P. MILLER 



SOPHOMORES 



OLIVER S. GRAMLING 
R. GIFFORD SLAYTON 
L W. COUSINS 
W. PAUL WHITEHEAD 
THOMPSON M. WELLS 
LUTHER D. WRIGHT 
E. WINSLOW DAVIDSON 
LEROY J. BOONE 



HARRY F. TAYLOR 
ROYLE D. TERRELL 
L. KIMBALL MOONEY 
ROYCE E. WOODALL 
GRADY A. VEACH 
WILLIAM S. EVANS 
WILLIAM W. CRONIC 
GEORGE A. MURPHEY 




FRESHMEN 



ROBERT L. CHASTAIN 
LEWIS M. WOOD 
JASPER N. DONALDSON 



HOMER T. GRAMLING 
BRANTLEY J. BOSWELL 
ALTON E. ALLEN 



One Hundred and Thirty 





Delta Sigma Pki Fraternity 

Founded at the College of the City of New York, li 
Alplia Nu Chapter 




Estahlished at Oglethorpe, 1922 
Colors: Nile Green and White Flower: White Carnation 



SENIORS 



WENDELL W. CROWE 
JOHN ROSS KEMP 
CHARLES H. FERGUSON 



ADRIAN H. MAURER 
RALPH F. QUARLES 
WILLIAM H. DURHAM 



W. LAMAR JARRARD 
HENRY C. PARRISH 
J. LAMAR JACKSON 
HARRY W. MYERS 
ROBERT GRAHAM* 



JOHN E. TEASLEY 
EARL C. GAY 
CHARLES W. CORLISS 
JESSE S. BREWER 
EARNEST HOLLAND* 



m 



SOPHOMORES 



LOY P. AUSTIN 
R. CLAY CARROLL 
ELMER L. GIBSON 
S. LUKE PETTIT 
EARL SHEPPARD* 



LINTON H. COOPER 
STEVE G. KAYLOR 
J. WELLS SEMON 
GEORGE A. HOLLOWAY 
JOE T. BARTON 



FRESHMEN 




ROBERT H. GRIMES 
C. H. BEUCHLER 
KARL MARKERT 
JOHN B. SANDERS 
PETER WOODWARD 
HUGH BUCHANAN 
Pledges. 



H. M. LOVETT 
ROY HANCOCK 
EDWIN LONG 
GORDON MARTIN 
R. SHEPPARD 
A. YORK* 



One Hundred and Thiytij-Th 








mm 



:. P 



?>* 








0»e Hundred and Thirtij-Thi 






Delta Cki Epsilon Fraternity 

Founded at Oglethorpe University, 1923 
Color: Green and White Flower: Sweet Pea 



\vy 




SENIORS 




§ 


H. D. McMURRAY 
M. C. BISHOP 




GIBSON CORNWELL 
E. H. WALDROP 


w 




JUNIORS 




A. F. HARDEN 
W. H. KENT 




C. E. SISK * * 
LEON SISK* 



SPENCER HOWELL 

SOPHOMORES 
A. L. MARTIN J. P. NATION 

FRESHMEN 



H. S. BANISTER 
LEWIS MOSELEY 



REX EDMONDSON 
WAYNE TRAER 



Pledges 
* Deceased 




One Hundred and Thirty-Four 





CKi Omega Fraternity 

Founded at University of Arkansas, ISOS 

Sigma Gamma Chapter 

Established at Oglethorpe September S, 192i. 
Colors: Cardi)tal and Straiv Flower: White Carnation 

SENIORS 
GRACE EVELYN MASON 




LILLIAN A. McCAMMON ELIZABETH L. RANSOME 

MARY E. WATKINS 

SOPHOMORES 

NETTIE S. FEAGIN DOROTHY B. HORTON 

ELIZABETH C. HOPE 



FRESHMEN 



EVELYN P. HOLLINGSWORTH 
ILA D. GLASS 
MILDRED M. HATCHER 



LA FON DANCY 
SARA M. HUBERT 
MARY E. WRAY 



ALUJINAE 




MRS. NELLE J. GAERTNER 
LOUISE HUBBARD HART 



MARIE L. GREEN 
LOUISE E. McCAMMON 



One Hundred and Thirtu-Si. 





Founded at Oglethorpe University, April 12, 1920 
Colors: Rose and Silver Flower: Rose 



SORORA IN FACULTATE 
MRS. ARTHUR S. LIBBY 



SENIORS 
MARY BOGLE 



JUNIORS 



NANIETA ANTILOTTI 
LEILA ELDER 



NELLE MARTIN 
DIXIE McDANIEL 



SOPHOMORES 



VIRGINIA LOVELL 
VIRGINIA O'KELLEY 
SARAH MAGILL 



FRANCES MAYER 
ANNE MOORE 
lONE THOMPSON 



BILLY CRISLER 
HARRIET LIBBY 



FRESHMEN 



LOUISE MADDEN 
NANCY STRIBLING 




HONORARY MEMBERS 

MRS. FLORENCE ROBERTSON MRS. HELENA HERMANCE 

MRS. J. T. LUPTON MRS. JONES YOW 

MRS. ELEANOR CHALENOR 



One Hundred and Thirty-Eight 






Pi Delta Sorority 



Founded at Oglethorpe University December 15, 192i 
Colors: Blue and Gold Flower: Violet 

SENIORS 
REBIE AURORA SPEARS 

JUNIORS 
MARY LOUISE SMITH MARY BELL NICHOLS 

SOPHOMORES 
GURLEY MAE CHASTAIN 

FRESHMEN 
EVELYN RUTH GRADY 




One Hundred and Forty 






Pki Kappa Delta Fraternity 

(Honorary) 
Established at Oglethorpe University, 1920 

FRATBR IN FACULTATE 
ARTHUR STEPHEN LIBBY * 



THOMAS L. CAMP 

R. FRANK McCORMACK, Jr. 



GRACE MASON 
JAMES B. PARTRIDGE 



JUNIORS 
BENJAMINE H. VINCENT 



Picture unobtainable. 




One Hundred and Forty-Two 





PELTA 






Tke Boar's Head 

(Honorary) 



Established at Oglethorpe Uni 
Colors: Old Gold and Black 



rsity, 1920. 
Flower: Black Eyed Susan 



The Boar's Head was founded at Oglethorpe in January, 1920, 
and was the first honorary club to be organized. Only men who have 
been prominent and successful in academic life, and the various college 
activities, are eligible. 

The title of the organization is taken from the coat of arms of the 
University, a boar's head being a prominent feature of the escutcheon. 
The Universit3- 's armorial bearings are copied after those of the family 
of James Edward Oglethorpe, for whom our University is named. 

The 1925 members are : 



SENIORS 



MILLER A. HAMRICK 
J. PAUL WILKES 
DANIEL E. CONKLIN 

Picture unobtainable. 



ADRIAN H. MAURER 
JOHN K. OTTLEY, Jr. 
WENDELL W. CROWE 
PORTER* 




One Hundred and Forty-Four 





Tke LeConte Club 

(Honorary Scientific) 
Established at Oglethorpe University, 1920 

This organization, composed of a group of serions minded young 
men, has as its purpose the advancement of scientific study at Ogle- 
tliorpe University. The Charter Members, most of whom are con- 
tinuing their scientific studies in various institutions throughout the 
eountrv, are as follovs : 




P. D. WEEKS 

U. M. COPELAND 

J. C. IVEY 

C. E. BOYNTON 

FRED MARTINEZ 



L. N. TURK 
M. F. CALMES 
C. I. PIRKLE 
M. MOSTELLAR 
W. C. HILLHOUSE 



It is tlie aim of the club to foster individual work on the part of 
its members. It is their plan to publish some of the themes written 
1)T the members in the acquisition of the degrees awarded by the club. 

The 1925 roster is as follows: 

FRATER IN FACULTATE 
MURRAY HARDING HUNT * 

SENIORS 



R. FRANK McCORMACK, Jr. 
MITCHELL C. BISHOP 



THOMAS L. CAMP* 
GIBSON CORNWELL 



JUNIORS 




CHARLES W. CORLISS 
ROBERT P. MILLER* 



LAMAR JACKSON 
EARL C. GAY 



SOPHOMORES 



HARRY F. TAYLOR 
THOMAS H. MOSS 



HARRY C. LYON 
JOSEPH WATKINS 



Picture unobtainable. 



One Hundred and Forty-Six 





The ''O" Club 



Organized in 1919 by R. G. Nichols for the purpose of standardi::ing 
Athletics at Oglethorpe 

W. T. PORTER President 

W. W. CROWE Vice-President 

M. A. HAMRICK Secretary and Treasurer 

MEMBERS 




WENDELL CROWE 

MILLER HAMRICK 

CHARLES CORLISS 

JAMES PARTRIDGE 

WEYMAN TUCKER 

THOMAS PORTER 

ADRIAN MAURER * 

GEORGE HARDIN 

GIFFORD SLAYTON 

DEWEY JUSTUS 

* Not in picture. 



MARVIN NIX 
LEONARD WILLIS 
KENNETH CAMPBELL 
HARLE WALL* 
LINTON COOPER * 
RICHMOND MARTIN 
HOMER CHESTNUTT 
JESSE BREWER 
LEROY BOONE 
RALPH QUARLES 



CLAY PARRISH 
LAMAR LINDSAY 
WILLIAM BURTON 
CHARLES FERGUSON 
I. W. COUSINS 
ALTON REDFEARN 
CLAY CARROLL 
DAVE BARBEE * 
HEWLETT PERKERSON 
ROSS KEMP 



One Hundred and Forty-Eight 





Flower: Tuli, 




PAUL WILKES 
WILLIAM MORROW 
CLAY CARROLL 
PEYTON HANSARD 
TOM CALDWELL 
LEONARD WILLIS 



LEILA ELDER 
JOHN OTTLEY 
WILLIAM LEE 
MITCHELL BISHOP 
PETE MACKEY 
SHAFFER WIMBISH 



One Hundred and Fiftij 





Alpha Kappa Literary Society 

Founded at Oglethorpe University, 192U 

NANIETA ANTILOTTI President 

LEILA ELDER Vice-President 

JOSEPHINE EICHBERG Secretarij and Treasurer 



MEMBERS 




SARAH MAGILL 
JANE LOVETT 
NETTIE COLLIER 
NELLE MARTIN 
JOSEPHINE EICHBERG 



KATHERINE BOSWORTH 

PRANCES MAYER 

MARY BELL NICHOLS 

A^RGINIA O'KELLEY 

FAY BOWMAN 

GURLEY MAE CHASTAIN FLORENCE JOSEL 

BETTY HAMILTON EVELYN MITCHELL 

EVELYN HOLLINGSWORTH ILA DUDLEY GLASS 

EDWINA WRAY REBIE SPEARS 

MILDRED HATCHER DIXIE M 



One Hundred and Fifty-One 



VIRGINIA LOVELL 
NANCY STRIBLING 
LEILA ELDER 
NANIETA ANTILOTTI 
lONE THOMPSON 
HELEN POTTE 
SOPHIE DAVIS 
NETTIE FEAGIN 
DOROTHY HORTON 
cDANIEL 






Sigma Lambaa Literary Society 

Founded at Oghihorpe University, April 26, 192i 

MITCHELL C. BISHOP President 

THOMAS H. MOSS Vice-President 

CHARLES W. CORLISS Secretary a7id Treasurer 



^m^ 




MEMBERS 




^i^ 


R. G. SLAYTON * 




C. W. CORLISS 


vi''tJS 


B. C. YATES * 




L. M. RIVERS * 


w^r 


R. M. HOLLEMAN * 




L. W. WILLIS 


fZ^ 


THOS. H. MOSS 




M. C. BISHOP 


\ vu 


W. A. SHANDS * 




W. H. TUCKER 


\jY 


J. P. HANSARD 




0. S. GRAMLING 


rjk 


W. H. BURTON 




R. T. HEATH 


In J 


C. L. GINN 




G. A. HARDIN 


\\A 


DAN CONKLIN 




DuPREE JORDAN 



DR. JAMES E. ROUTH 
Picture unobtainable. 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

DR. ARTHUR S. LIBBY ' 




One Hundred and Fifty-Two 





§ @ 



LAMEIM 
LITEIJARY 









Lord's Club 




The Lord's Club is an honorary club organized February 19, 1924. 
This i^ the first club of a social nature to be organized at Oglethorpe. 
There are certain elements of culture and social qualities that are 
necessary for membership. The purpose of the club is to promote 
social activity of the highest order at Oglethorpe. 

OFFICERS 

PAUL WILKES President 

GEORGE HARDIN Vice-President 

FRANK BOSTON Secretary and Tn 



MEMBERS 

SENIORS 



PAUL WILKES * 
WILLIAM MORROW 



JOHN OTTLEY 
DANIEL CONKLIN 



JUNIORS 

THOMAS CALDWELL CALHOUN YOUNG 

MILTON SMITH 



SOPHOMORES 



FRANK BOSTON 
KENNETH CAMPBELL 



GEORGE HARDIN 
EDWARD MILES* 



THOMAS WALSH 



FRESHMEN 




DAVID BLACK * 
HENRY BOOKOUT 
Picture unobtainable. 



EDWARD GARLINGTON 
CHARLES RALEY 



One Hundred and Fifty-Four 





Skull and Crescent Club 



Orcjanized at Oglethorpe in 192U. 



Colors : Gold and White 



Flower: White Rose 



MEMBERS 




DuPREE JORDAN 
HARRY MYERS 
TOM ARNOLD 
LAMAR JARRAD 
WILLIAM SHANDS 
HAROLD ASKEW 



Picture unobtainable. 



WILLIAM TYE 
HARRY TAYLOR 
PARKER YEARWOOD 
ANSEL McNEIL* 
H. I. SPENCER 
FRANK GILREATH 



OiieHinidyed aud Fifty-Si. 





Tech High Club 



Motto : "Tech Hi Forever 



Purple and Gold 



MEMBERS 




EARNEST McCULLOUGH 
JASPER DONALDSON 
DURANT PAGE 
HENRY BOOKOUT 
W. R. CHRISTIAN 
FRANK EVERETT 
ROBERT PITTMAN 
ROYLE (Duke) TERRELL 
J. W. WHITAKER 
DAVID BLACK 
GEORGE HARDIN 
J. C. JOHNSON 
REX EDMONDSON 
JACK CATHCART 
I. W. COUSINS 
Not in picture. 



CHARLES RALEY 
J. D. BAXTER * 
FRANK BOSTON * 
ESTEN SETTLE * 
GEORGE HOLLOWAY* 
ALTON HARDEN * 
ED MILES * 
ROBERT MILLER * 
CHARLIE BARBER 
PAUL BUTLER 
ROBERT CASTLE 
ELMER GIBSON 
MARVIN NIX 
HUGH BUCHANAN 
EARL MANN 
RALPH HEATH 



One Hundred and Fifty-Seven 





Boy's High Club 



Motto: "Play the game fair and square' 



Colors: Purple and White 




WILLIAM MORROW 
LAMAR LINDSAY 
DuPREE JORDAN 
JOHN OTTLEY * 
LEROY BOONE 
JOHN TANKSLEY* 
FRANK EVERETT 
FRANK McCORMACK 
P. A. SHARP 
JAMES WATKINS 
SAM CARTER 
GUY HOLCOMB 
Not in picture. 



DURANT PAGE 
ED GARLINGTON 
LEONARD WILLIS 
SPENCER HOWELL 
WILLIAM CRONIC * 
ARTHUR GOTTESMAN 
WILLIAM TYE 
CLIFTON DORN 
BRUCE LINDSAY* 
ALBERT WHITTLE 
FRED STEWART * 
CLARENCE STEWART 



One Hundred and Fifty-Eight 





Gordon Club 

Motto: "There is only one prep school in Ga." 



Colors: Red aiid White 




MEMBERS 

DEWEY JUSTUS ROY LEE 

LAMAR (Jack) JARRARD DuPREE JORDAN 

LESTER McCRARY THAD BUCHANAN ■ 

LEON McCRARY HUGH BUCHANAN 

R. E. LEE ESTEN SETTLE 
JOHN BROWN 
Not in picture. 



One Hundred and Fifty-Ni 





Colors -.Gold and Black 




MEMBERS 

EVELYN MITCHELL 
EVELYN HOLLINGSWORTH 

. NANCY STRIBLING 
ILA DUDLEY GLASS 
EVELYN GRADY * 
VIRGINIA LOVELL 
JOSEPHINE EICHBERG 

Not in picture. 



GRACE MASON * 

lONE THOMPSON 

MARY GRADY* 

LEILA ELDER 

SARAH MAGILL 

ANNE MOORE * 

EDWINA WRAY 



One Hundred and Sixty 





Soutk Georgia Club 




Motto: "Get the boll weevil" Flower: Sun-floiver 

W. W. CROWE President 

ALTON REDFE ARN Vice-President 

OLIN McCOY Secretary and Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

ALTON REDFEARN PAUL WILKES 

GENE LINDSEY WENDELL CROWE 

LEROY BOONE PAT HANSARD * 

GEORGE HOLLOWAY WILLIAM BROADHURST * 

RALPH HOLLEMAN * JAMES LESTER 

CHARLIE FERGUSON * ABE OROVITZ 

THOMPSON WELLS CHARLES WARD 

HOPE WALTON * OLIN McCOY 

CLARENCE YATES EARL GAY 

FRED PARKS ANGELLA CLARKE 

J. W. AGEE JOHN BROWN 

R. L. CHASTAIN OLIVER LOUDEN 

W. M. DEAL JOE DEKLE 
* Not in picture. 



One Hundred and Sixty-One 





Carolina Llub 

Motto: Nothing sweeter than to be in Carolina. 
MEMBERS 




DR. ARTHUR S. LIBBY 
MRS. ARTHUR S. LIBBY 
JACOB BLACK 
PETE MACKEY 
WILLIAM SHANDS 
WRIGHT BROGDON 
FRANK DUFFY 
PHILIP NOLAND * 
Not in picture. 



HAROLD ASKEW 
CALHOUN YOUNG 
KEELS NIX 
ANSEL McNEIL 
SOPHIE DAVIS 
WYETH STEELE * 
DAVE BARBEE * 
ALBERT YORK * 



One Hundred and Sixty-Tivo 





Yap-Yap Club 



J. W. WHITAKER 
FRANK EVERETT 
OLIVER LOUDEN 
ANSEL McNEIL 
ROBERT LITTLE 



LEILA ELDER 
SARAH MAGILL 
CALHOUN YOUNG 
HAROLD ASKEW 
WELBORN BRANNON 



MARSHALL VERNER 




Not in picture. 



One Hundred and Sixty-Three 





Cross-Country Track Team 

LEROY BOONE Captain 

LEONARD WILLIS Manager 

MEMBERS 




LEROY BOONE 
WILLIAM BURTON 
SAM BOOZER 
J. W. AGEE 
CLARENCE COOK 



RALPH HEATH 
ROBERT LITTLE 
O. E. WHITE 
LOVELACE GINN 
LUTHER WRIGHT 



One Hundred and Sixty-Four 





BOOK VI 

MEMORIES 




former position by raising 

midday meal (Sundays 



Applesauce Academy, located in the very heart of a thriving city from which 
the students can find recreation and culture, is surrounded by a vast expanse of 
beautiful forests and lakes. Founded in the spring of 1925, the University is rich 
in the mellow traditions and customs that go so far to temper the life of a college. 



One Hundyed and Sixty-Fii 





Our faculty speaks for itself (on all occasions), as our President so aptly put 
it, "keepolotov eu opovouvta un opovelv dokelj" — "ain't they the berries." Living 
in perfect accord with each other and with their students, they make our college a 
place of brotherhood and love. 

As for our students — ah, yes, how much a part of our very being they be — not 
too much can be said (safely I, as one of our prominent faculty members so aptly 
put it, "Sultorum plena sunt omnia." "We get our freshmen from the very best 
high schools of Georgia." 









■\J tense moment in one of our Lecture courses." 
The buildings of Old Applesauce, which is often squeezed down to "Cider," as 
a loving nickname, is built of fine Buckhead Soapstone of very superior quality, 
and is well ventilated, in fact very well ventilated. We are very proud of our 
buildings, and hope some day to get another one? 







And there are our co-eds, who bring beauty and laughter to our campus — ah, 
yes, how they have taken their place in the very heart of our College, and become 
the very fabric in the fundamental foundations of our University? As one of our 
seniors so aptly put it, "/e vous aime, cherie, baisez-moi." — "They are such an in- 
spiration and incentive to us." 

We could point, but it is impolite to point, and the Applesauce boys are 
notorious for their politeness, with justifiable pride in our football and baseball 
teams, in fact we might say that we have, for the price, the best teams in thisi sec- 
tion (of the county). We almost won our baseball game last year; the score was 
98-0 in their favor when the game was called for darkness; the coach said that 
this wasn't bad, in view of the fact that we hadn't had our turn at bat. 







Will You Ever Forget 

The week-end that Dan Conklin acquired the nickname, "Mr. Hell." 
The time that Bob Grimes brought the white mice to the co-ed room 
and the girls had hysterics and almost something else. 
Bill Morrow's smile, Wendell Crowe's "Lad." 

"The following students, having accumulated five or more unexcused 
absences are requested to meet the faculty Wednesday unless a plausible 
excuse is rendered by noon of that day." 

Dr Routh in his glory. Dr. Routh: (Reading paper with no name on 
it ) "This paper lacks unity and coherence. It shows a weak vocabulary, 
poor spelling and punctuation. The grammar is also bad and he uses many 
vulgarisms." (holding up paper) "Whose paper is this? ' And then the 
still, small voice. 

The clock and its mad race for or against time. 

The night that Carlos was locked in Lupton Hall In his own words: 
"It happened some time ago that I went to the third floor of Lupton Hall 
looking for a suitable place to do a special work. I did it, and when I 
finished, I turned out the light. Absolute darkness was surrounding me as 
I began to walk carefully toward the door. A chair was right in the way 
and I stumbled against it. Then I stretched forth my hands m an for l-mj 

to grasp something and avoid falling. I grasped the door and I did not ^V^P; 

fall, but I locked the door. 

I must tell now that the lock of that door is slightly freakish Some- 
times, according to its humor, it does not work well. And that night it was 
angry in the highest degree. I try to open it, using all methods, from per- 
suasion to roughness, but I could not. 

The night was rather cold. It was about ten thirty. I looked for a 
comfortable place to sleep, but the only furniture that I found there were 
desks, chairs and a blackboard. The prospect of spending the night was 
not good enough to make me dance with joy. So I overcame my desire ot 
keeping in secret my unfortunate adventure, and I shouted for somebody to 
help me. Most of the boys were sleeping, so I was obliged to keep shout- 
ing more time that it might be convenient for my throat. At last 1 was 
heard and an expedition formed to proceed to my rescue. They were suc- 
cessful and I could realize better than ever the comfortableness ot my bed. 

The day that Mrs. Libby forgot to come to a class and the freshman 
who naively said in an English paper, "This is something that rarely happens 
so it was enjoyed by all." 

About five minutes before chapel when students begin to file in and in- 
terrupt the Economics class. 

Minus and his history. The Biology class got their hooks on the tiny 
pup and operated. Everyone thought that Minus would die, and it didn t 
seem to make any particular difference; but he lived and got. food anywhere 
he could find it. One night in the barracks Minus started howling, and 
Baby Spencer got up to throw him out. There was a fire and Minus had 



One Hundred and Sixty-Nine 






served to warn the inmates. His place was made, Soon Plus, the black 
and tan counterpart of Minus came to the campus, and because of the great 
service that Minus had rendered, Plus was adopted as a playmate for the 
scarred but loved Minus. 

How Dr. Routh looked the morning after he put kerosene on the fire, 
and it blazed up and singed his eyebrows and eyelashes. 

Football practice in the hot dusty mornings and afternoons of September, 
with the little "ring around the rosy" stunt for the backfield men. 

The time that Bully Boy went to sleep on Dr. Jacobs shoulder com- 
ing back from Anderson, S. C. 

The Saturday that some boy borrowed a flock of geese and locked 
them in Dr. Jacobs office and the Monday morning when the office was 
opened. 

The Bonfire on the night before the Mercer game of '24, and the mild 
celebration on the Saturday afternoon and night afterwards. 

Those walks up and down Peachtree road on spring nights when every- 
thing from girls to evolution were discussed. 

A boiler which was a target for rocks until there was so much racket 
that Colonel West couldn't sleep and rolled it down on the athletic field, 
and the next night the boys rolled it back up the hill, left it by Lupton Hall, 
and again disturbed the Colonel's slumbers with the resonant sound of rock 
on hollow steel. 

The kind, efforts of members of the Chemistry class to stop psychology 
by putting ammonia in the room. 

The Christy Mathewson baseball games that arrived just on the eve of 
examinations and almost broke up the usual last minute cramming. 

In the spring of '24 when the orchestra, by special arrangement, played 
a group of Hawaiian airs at a baseball game and the two teams thinking that 
it was the Alma Mater stopped the game and stood at attention with their 
caps off. 

What Leila said the first time she saw Miller. 

The last six days of work on the Yamacraw and that grand and glorious 
feeling when the last sheet was slipped into the envelope and George in- 
sured the package for $200. 

Virginia calling a member of the faculty "sticky poppa." 

The pride of the Freshman class of '28 at getting their flag up and the 
effort that was necessary to get it down. 

The night that Bull hit Father Teasley with a biscuit in the dining 
room and what Father said to Bull, and what must have passed between 
the two to make them the best of friends by 12 that night. 

Moral Victories. 

What the governor of North Carolina said to the Governor of South 
Carolina while at Oglethorpe. 

The letter that she must get, and that kind street car conductor that 
offered to mail it for you when he finished his run in Atlanta. 

That Tuesday night, May 12, 1925, A.D., in Clinton, S. C. 



One Hundred and Seventy 






Oglethorpe University 




AND THE 



City of Atlanta 

Offers the young men of the nation modern 
educational facilities in the wholesome and 
inspiring atmosphere of modern thought and 
activity. 

THE SCHOOLS 

of Liberal Arts, Science, and Journalism, 
and Commerce are open all the year and 
students may enter at the beginning of any 
one of the four terms as follows : 




September 23 

January 4 

March 16 

and June 9 

A beautiful Book of Views, illustrating 
student life at the University, will be 
sent free, with catalogue, on applica- 
tion. Address 

OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY 

Oglethorpe University, Georgia 

(Suburb of Atlanta) 



One Hundred and Seventy-Twt 





The Norlhuieslern Mulual Life losurance Gompaoy 



MILWAUKEE, W I SCO XS IN 

An Organization of Satisiied Policy Holders 

of the three hundred and seventy MIL- 
LIONS of new insurance issued in 1924, 
approximately one hundred and ninety- 
four MILLIONS, or 52.4% was upon the 
lives of members previously insured in 
the Company. 

LUTHER E. ALLEN, General Agent 
220-224 HEALY BUILDING ATLANTA, GA. 




FOR YOUR FIRST INVESTMENT 

A POLICY 



IN- 



Tlie Nortliwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company 




Insures healthy male risks only between 
the ages of sixteen and sixty living in 
the healthy portions of the United States. 



CECIL M. LEMON, Si,ecml Agent 
Healey Building Phones Walnut 1866-67 



One Hundred and Seventy-Thr 





riie Best Place in, Town for Og-lethorpe Students to Meet 




SODA, CIGARS and LUNCHES 

"We appreciate your patronage" 



jyLetro'^ohtan Theatre Lohhy 



Nell: "We made fifty miles an hour coming home in Bert's 
car last night. ' ' 

Billy: "What did you quarrel about, dear?" 



All the Avorld's a stage and all the co-eds try to be Salomes. 

— Hogans Alley. 




In the Spimg a Young Man't, Fancif 
Lightly turns to thoughs of Love" 

Just as naturally when he feels the urge of hunger his thoughts turn to 

THE BLACKBURN TEA ROOM 

43 V2 Peachtree Street. (Upstairs) 

The Most Satisfying Place To Eat In Atlanta 

Luncheons 11:30 to 3:00. Dinner 5:30 to 7 30 



One Hundred and Sevevtij-Four 






for a 

of Maxtor 

5Jot Jffounti in Any ©tl|?r 



0?ze Hundred and Seventy-Five 





PJiiKSONAL RECOMMENDATION 



It is a frequent occurrence for patients to come to us with the statement, you 
have been recommended to me as the place to go with my eye troubles — I 
put myself in your care, do what you can for me. If it were not for the many 
years of optical service rendered by us, such statements would not be made. 
Ask any of our patients how they are pleased with our pains-taking service, 
also ask any of our better oculists what they think of the Ballard optical 
service. 

WALTER BALLARD OPTICAL CO. 

105 Peachtree Street. (Clock Sign) : : Atlanta, Georgia 



I hear that Jones left everything he had to an orphan asylum. 
^Ls that so? What did he leave?" 
■ Twelve children. 



■My girl has two faults." 
' You and who else ? ' ' 




Rawlins GO TO "E\ei>thing 

Athletic Goods /^ 1 CL T-T J P i" Bci=;eball 

and O'Shea L,rumley-aharp rlardware L.o. and Football 

Sweateis ^r to 5 3 W A L T O \ STREET Equipment" 



F P COLEMAN— Hem 3856-\V R F PRATER— Hem 5783 

COLEMAN a? PRATER 

BUCKHEAD All Kmds of Cabinet Work ATLANTA, GA 



One Hundred and Seventy-Six 





Oglethorpe 




Champion in Athletics — 

A splendid University of Learning. 



Rogers 



Champion for the people — 

A splendid place for hig Values in 
High Class Pure Food Products. 




More Than 200 Stores 
in the Southern States 
at Your Service 



One Hmidred and Seventy-Seven 






FLOWERS 




Briarcliff Flow^er SKop 

Best in Flowers for All Occasions 



119 PEACHTREE ST. PHONE WALNUT 1082 



JohniiA-— "Ma, would it kill the bab.y if he fell off the bed?' 

Mama — ' ' Of course it would ! ' ' 

Johnnj' — "Naw, it wouldn't. C4o in an' see for yourself." 



Many a true word has been spoken between false teeth. 




J A. C O BS' 

Stores All Over Atlanta 

SERVING YOU AS YOU WANT TO BE SERVED 

Intelligently — Courteously 
— Promptly 



One Hundred and Seventy-Eight 






Donated by a Friend 

of 
Oglethorpe^University 



P 




i 
*«*! Refresh 








Delicious and Refreshing 

The Coca-Cola Company, Atlanta, Ga. 



One Hundred and Seventy-Nine 





QUALITY ICE CREAM AND SODAS 

CURB SERVICE 



''Red Rose Ice Cream' 

BUSSEY'S 

"The Drug Store that Never Disappoints" 



Phone Hemlock 3629 
BUCKHEAD ATLANTA 




A FABLE 

Under the swinging street car strap 

The homely co-ed stands, 

And stands, and stands, and stands, and stands. 

And stands, and stands, and stands. 

— Ames Green Gander. 



Phone Wal 2310 



For BETTER Shoe Repairing Try Us 




^^eSmsAk^//// 



Artist in Shoe Repairing, 



4-6 Auburn Ave , Atlanta, Ga 



One Hundred and Eighty 





CANDY 



COLD DRINKS 



Stc 



our otore 




GO-OP 

Books and Supplies 

RUN FOR THE STUDENTS' ACCOMMODATION 



SANDWICHES 



TOBACCO 




WHITMAN CANDY 



NORRIS CANDY 




STEPHENS ^ HAWK 

(IN CORPORA TED) 
"We will appreciate your patronage" 

TWO STORES 



WEST PEACHTREE 

At 14th St. 



PEACHTREE ROAD 

At Buckhead 



One Hundred and Eighty-One 





Catch Oglethorpe Car at — 

SELMAN'S 

"Two of Atlanta's Best Drug Stores" 



Peachtree and Houston 

Phone Walnut 4105 — Open all night. 

Ponce DeLeon ana Boulevard 

Phone Hemlock 4435 




ATLANTA 



GEORGIA 



I'LL BE DAMNED ! 

Although a judge can only say, "You be hanged," while the 
bishop can say, "You be damned," yet the fact remains that 
when a judge says you be hanged, you will be hanged. 



The height of painlessness is a splinter in a wooden lee 




Tke Soutkern Banker 

THE BANK JOURNAL OF THE SOUTH 

Atlanta, Georgia 

HAYNES McFADDEN, Pres. JOS. R. MURPHY, Sect'y-Treas. 

E. H. HINTON, Managing Editor 



One Hundred and Eighty-Two 





OPPENHEIM CIGAR COMPANY 

Distributors 

ADMIRATION 

The fdild Tam-^a Cigar 




122 Peachtree Street 



Phone Walnut 0109 




Umnge- 

CRUSH 



THE EMBLEM SHOP 

200 Metropolitan Building 



RINGS Class. Club and Fraternity PINS 

Scholastic and Athletic Emblems. Special Orders 

Solicited. Designs Furnished 

Full line of Kings. Pins. Badges, Recognition and Pledge 

Buttons. Gold and Silver .Tewelry and Novelties 

xTm Mounted with any Fraternity Crest 

ATLANTA :: GEORGIA Engraved stationery. Dance Invitations. Programs. Favors 



One Hundred and Eightij-Three 





THURSTON HATCHER 

Fine Photographs 

COLLEGE ANNUAL WORK 



A SPECIALTY 




American Bakeries Co. 
MERITA BREAD 



, ¥ ^ ¥ 
* ¥ ^(^ ^ 



NEW SOUTH BAKERY 

ATLANTA GEORGIA 



One Hundred and Eic/hty-Fom- 





Red Rock 



1) K I N K 



Long Green 

Absolutely Pure 



Ko-Nut 




THE RED ROCK COMPANY 

Leaders in pure beverages for 40 years 



TOUGHNESS 

Dentist — "So .you have broken a tooth, have j'ou?" 

Patient (tough youngster) — "Yes, sir". 

Dentist — "How did you do it?" 

Youngster — "Oh, shifting gears on a loUypop". — Exchange. 



A DISCOVERY 

Mike — "I discovered a new kind of whiskey the other day. 

Ike—' ' You did 1 What kind is it ? " 

Mike — "Chicken whiskey". 

Ike — "What do j'Ou mean?" 

Mike — "Two drinks and then vou lav". 





Reg U S Pdt Off 

IMITATION GRAPE- NOT GRAPE JUICE 

/I FLAVOR YOU CANT FORGET 



One Hundred and Eighty-Fh 






Equipped witk many years' experience 
for making pkotograpks of all sorts, 
desirable for illustrating college an- 
nuals. Best obtainable artists, work- 
manskip and tbe capacity for prompt 
and unequalled service. 





PHOTOGRAPHERS TO 

"192 5 YAMACRAW" 



Executive Office: 
1546 BROADWAY, N. Y. 



One Hundred and Eighty-Six 





E HAVE furnisked a complete 
service to tke management 
The ''Yamacraw' 1925. All 
xtra art work, the engraving 
printing and binding of tkis 
book were done in our plant. 




We are prepared to furnish a complete 
line of stock inserts, borders, panels, in- 
struction books and many other necessities 
to an annual staff. We will have a more 
complete line of samples also. 

We sincerely hope that the management 
of The 'Y amacraxu' is satisfied ■with the 
product of our efforts and that the incoming 
staff will confer with us before committing 
themselves on next year's contracts. Don't 
fail to let us know when you can see our rep- 
resentative. 




JACOBS ^ COMPANY 

COLLEGE ANNUAL SPECIALISTS 
Clinton, South Carolina 



One Hundred and Eighty-Seven 





AUTOGRAPHS 



One Hundred and Eighty-Nh, 




AUTOGRAPHS 




One Hundred and Ninety 




■'■'Hi' 



^?' 










I [ 












Wf 



l\ ",