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Full text of "Yamacraw, 1929"


Copyright 
1929 

HAYTI THOMPSON 

Editor-in-Chief 

LOUIS GILLMAN 

Business Manager 

5. G. PFEFFERKORN 

Business Manager 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/yamacraw192907ogle 



aiie 



1Q20 




THE ANNUAL PUBLICATION 

OF 

THE STUDENTS 

OF 

OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY 




To 

Dr. James Freeman 

Sellers 

Dean 



faithful friend, advisor and 
counselor to all true stu- 
dents, who for the last 
twelve years has so faith- 
fully and efficiently served 
the University ; one who 
has toiled through tireless 
days of constructive work 





ontcnts\ 


I. 


UNIVERSITY. 


II. 


CLASSiiS. 


Ill 


ATHLETICS. 


IV 


SPONSORS. 


V. 


ORGANIZATIONS. 


VI 


ACTIVITIES. 




ubmit this vol- 

of the Yam- 

to record in 

enduring form t h e 

achievements of the 

student body, hopeful 

of instilling into the 

hearts of the sons 

and daughters of 

Oglethorpe a greater 

love for their Alma 

Mater; we submit it 

as an inspiration to 

future students that 

they may continue to 

make the project a 

reality. 




We submit this vol- 
the Yam- 

acraw to record in 
enduring form the 
achievements of the 
student body, hopeful 
of instilling into the 
hearts of the sons 
and daughters of 
Oglethorpe a greater 
love for their Alma 
Mater; we submit it 
as an inspiration to 
future students that 
they may continue to 
make the project a 
reality. 




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Our cyllma cTWater 

A search is the thing He hath taught you 
For Height and for Depth and for Wideness. 

WITHIN the thought of these two striking- lines, inscribed over the 
entrance of our first building, may be discerned the key to the 
resurrection of Old Oglethorpe College which, with its Doric col- 
umns, stood on Midway Hill in Milledgeville, then the capital of Georgia, 
in the early nineteenth century as a tribute to education in the South. 
And, too, the thought of these lines may be described as the palpitating 
note in the heart of that modern philanthropist. Dr. Thornwell Jacobs, 
our founder and president, as he went about indefatigably in his effort to 
bring the old institution to life. 

These almost living structures of blue granite which surround us 
today are not "new" in the sense of appliance to the University. The dig- 
nity, honesty, reliability, reverence and beauty expressed in them reflect 
over a span of more than a century when a gi'oup of men organized the 
Georgia Educational Society with the avowed purpose of giving an educa- 
tion to every youth in the Southland. From their earnest endeavors grew 
Old Oglethorpe. 

And from Old Oglethorpe comes the 
ideas and ideals of our University today! 

Let us take a retrospective view of 
the historical genesis of our Alma Mater. 
We find that the educational society spok- 
en of in the above paragraph as early as 
1809 began a movement which culminat- 
ed in the astablishment of a Theological 
Seminary for the southeast. Before they 
had finished, three great institutions 
sprang up, blazing the trail for similar 
ones throughout the South afterwards. 

The first of these, an institution of 
power which was graduating the manhood 
of the southeast into careers of useful- 
ness, was Old Oglethorpe. In the decade 
of the fifties we learn that the school had 
prospered and become the one great in- 
Lupton Hall Tower stitution of the South, 



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Chapel Exit 



Among its foremost professors and 
graduates we find the name of the im- 
mortal Sidney Lanier, who finished his 
work in three years and then became a 
tutor within the walls of the college un- 
til its sons marched to battle. We read 
of James Woodrow, uncle of the twenty- 
eighth president of the United States, 
who was admired for his scientific at- 
tainments. There was Joseph LeGonte 
who ranks as one of the greatest geol- 
ogists America has ever produced. 
Among her alumni we read the names 
of governors, statesmen, discoverers, 
moderators, all true Christian gentlemen 
of integrity. 

But, as President Jacobs so ably ex- 
pressed it in his owm story of Oglethorpe, 
the college "died at Gettysburg." At 
the outbreak of the Civil War, the sons 
of the Old College marched to the ranks, the trustees invested the en- 
dowment in Confederate bonds, the buildings were converted into hospitals 
and later destroyed. Thus, Old Oglethorpe died. 

From the smoldering ashes came the ideas and ideals and a few good 
souls, despite the evils of Reconstruction days, made an attempt to res- 
urrect the Old College in 1870 with Atlanta as the site. The financial 
disaster at the time made the task utterly impossible and so the doors 
were closed for a second time after a little less than three years of exis- 
tence. 

A little more than a half century later we find New Oglethorpe located 
in the capital of the state which was founded by that great English phil- 
anthropist for whom the school was named. And it is championing the 
ideas and ideals so deeply rooted in the Old College. 

It was Dr. Thornwell Jacobs, who, sixteen years ago, accepted the 
almost impossible task of resurrecting Old Oglethorpe. The story is a 
romance within itself. It began in the youth of the president when he 
listened to the tales of his grandfather who was a professor at the insti- 
tution in Milledgeville. It was then that a love for the old school began 
to kindle in the heart of Dr. Jacobs. 



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Being reared in a tiny South Carolina village, a population of 1500, 
he was sent to Princeton University, a Presbyterian institution, and one 
of the most beautiful universities in the world. There he dreamed of the 
establishment of similar institutions in his native section amid the praise 
of other great universities by his fellow classmates who came from all sec- 
tions of the country. 

And so it came to pass that "without invitation save from within, and 
without authorization save from above," Dr. Jacobs came to Atlanta on 
September 13, 1909, to refound the school of his dreams. And there be- 
gins that romantic story which ends in these beautiful buildings of ours, 
those sound educational principles, after sixteen years of effort. 

The president, with his corps of assistants, appealed to the good- 
hearted people of the Southland and dollar by dollar was added. A cam- 
paign of four years was conducted, the storay told to people in cities, 
towns and villages from Galveston, Texas, to Charlottesville, Virginia, 
and from Marshallville, Missouri, to Bradenton, Florida. The city of 
Atlanta did its share, more than seventy men subscribing not less than 
$1,000 each to the campaign. 

Despite conditions of turmoil and financial disaster more than five 
thousand people have contributed to the cause, the assets and subscrip- 
tion pledges having passed the sum of 
one and a half million dollars. And 
so the corner stone of the University 
was laid on January 21, 1915 with the 
.--rf ^-^^^^^^V^a motto "Manu Dei Resurrexit" (By the 
^^^^^W 4'4%1^SmKl^m^ hand of God she has risen from the 
WlmLp Isjyt:^^^^^ dead) engraved upon it. 






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Iding 



After more than a half century of 
rest, Oglethorpe once again opened its 
doors. With only one building, now the 
Administration Building, classes began 
in the Fall of 1916. Today we find three 
magnificent buildings, plans underway 
for a wonderful stadium and the Univer- 
sity steadily improving in greatness as 
well as bigness. 

We, the members of the Senior 
class, upon leaving the campus of our 
Alma Mater as graduates, trace over the 



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past lour years and see a vast improve- 
ment in the University. As Freshmen 
we found only the Administration Build- 
ing and the executive offices of Lupton 
Hall standing. As we leave we see three 
magnificent structures and plans in the 
making for more strides forward. 

To read the history of our Alma 
Mater, to stare in the faces of these 
buildings, to adhere to the teachings of 
our president and faculty, is indeed a 
stirring inspiration and we are justly 
proud of such an institution as our Alma 
Mater. We shall contribute our efforts 
to its growth and prosperity. 

As we go forth may these words 
forever remain in our hearts: 




We have finished, we 
We go, noble sons. 
But from within 'tis i< 
Our work yet iindone. 



Loivrij Hall Etitranci. 




Campus fniiii L'cachti-ti Rniid 



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ADMINISTRATIOIM 




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OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Edgar Watkins President 

J. T. LUPTON First Vice-President 

H. P. Hermance Second Vice-President 

Harold R. Berry Third Vice-President 

Joseph R. Murphy Secretary 

Milton W. Bell Treasurer 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Edgar Watkins, Chairman 



E. P. McBurney 
Jas. T. Anderson 
J. H. Porter 
G. H. Brandon 
Joel Hunter 
J. R. Bachman 



Thos. H. Daniel 
J. R. Porter 
J. T. Edwards 
Thornwell Jacobs 
B. M. Good 
Robert H. Jones, Jr. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Edgar Watkins 
H. P. Hermance 
E. P. McBurney 



Carter Lupton 
W. O. Steele 
Archibald Smith 



Thornwell Jacobs 



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DR. THORNWELL JACOBS 

A.B., A.M., LL.D., Litt.D. 

President of Oglethorpe University 






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THORNWELL JACOBS 
President ayicl Professor of Cosmic History 

A.B., Presbyterian College of South Carolina. Valedictorian and Medalist : A.M., P. C, of S. C. ; Grad- 
uate of Princeton Theological Seminary; A.M., Princeton TIniveraity : I.T,.D., Ohio Northern University; 
Litt.D., Presbyterian College of South Carolina: Pastor of Morganton, IN. C.) Presbyterian Church; 
Vice-President of Thornwell College for Orphans : Author and Editor ; Founder and Editor Westminster 
Magazine; Engaged in the organization of Oglethorpe University; Author of The Law of The White 
Circle, (novel) : The Midnight Mummer (poems) ; Sinful Saddy (story for children) ; Life of William 
Plumer Jacobs ; The New Science and the Old Religion : Member Graduate Council of the National Alum- 



JAMES FREEMAN SELLERS 
Dean of University and Dean of The School of Science 



A.B., and A.M., University of Missi 
Virginia and University of Chicago 
Mississippi College and Mercer Un" 
A. E. F., University, Beau 



ippi : LL.D., Mississippi College ; Graduate Student, University of 

Teaching Fellow, University of Chicago ; Professor of Chemistry, 

sity : Dean of Faculty, Mercer University ; Professor of Chemistry, 

France ; Y. M. C. A. Educational Secretary, England ; Fellow American 



the Advancement of Science ; Presidi 
Author Treatise on Analytical Chemistry; Contributor 
School of Science and Dean of Oglethorpe University. 



GEORGE FREDERICK NICOLASSEN 
Dean of School of Liberal Arts and Professor of Ancient Languages 

A.B., University of Virginia; A.M., University of Virginia; Fellow in Greek, Johns Hopkins 
Iv/Q years ; Assistant Instructor in Latin and Greek in Johns Hopkins Univers 
Ancient Languages in the Southwestern Presbyterian University, Clarksville. Tenn. : Ph.D., Johns Hop- 
kins University; Vice-Chancellor of the Southwestern Presbyterian University: Member Classical As- 
sociation of the Middle West and South ; Author of Notes on Latin and Greek ; Greek Notes Revised ; 
The Book of Revelation. 



HERMAN JULIUS GAERTNER 
Dean of School of Education and Professor of German and Education 

ndiana University ; A.M. 



and Superintendent in the commo 
ematics and Astronomy, Wilmingti 
College, Milledgeville, Ga. ; Membi 
six summers: Pi Gamma !V 



) Wesleyan University ; Ped.D., Ohio Northern University ; Teacher 
schools and high schools of Ohio and Georgia : Professor of Math- 
College. Ohio ; Professor of History, Georgia Normal and Industrial 
of the University Summer School Faculty, University of Georgia, 
the organization of Oglethorpe University. 



JAMES E. ROUTH 
Dean of School of Literature and Journalism and Profe 



of English 



A.B., and Ph.D., Johns Hopkim 
Century Magazine Essay Prize 
Century Dictionary Supplement, 
sity ; Acting Assistant Professo 
University ; Professor of Engli 



3 University; Tocqueville Medalist, Johns Hopkins University; winner 
for American College Graduate of 1900; Phi Beta Kappa; Sub-editor. 
N. Y., 1905; Instructor University of Texas and Washington Univer- 
r. University of Virginia : Assistant and Associate Professor, Tulana 
h, .lohns Hopkins University Summer School. 1921, 1922. 1925, 1926 : 



Modern Language Association : National Council of Teachers of English and American Dialect 
Society ; Author, Two Studies on the Ballad Theory of the Beowulf, the Rise of Classical English, 
Criticism, Contributor to Modern Language Notes ; Publications of Modern Language Association, Journal 
of English and Germanic Philology, Modern Philology, Englische Studien, South Atlantic Quarterly, etc. 






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ARTHUR STEPHEN LIBBY 
Dean of School of Commerce and Finance and Professor of International 



Ph.B.. Eowdoin Colle?:e ; A.F 
lirown University: Ph.D., A 
Law School and Columbia U 
tor in Modern Languages, B 
Profes.sor of History, Politic 
torical Association ; America 



versity of Maine; A.M.. Sorbonne, Paris, (Diplome Inferieure) ; A.M.. 
Francaise, Paris, (Diplome Superieure) ; Student University of Maine 
ity Law School; Principal of various High Schools in Maine; Instruc- 
Univer-sity : Professor of Modern Languages, Converse College ; Acting 
mce and International Law, WofFord College; Member American His- 
!:raphic Society; Phi Kappa Delta (honorary.) 



HARDING HUNT 
Professor of Biology 



York City : Reynolds Professor of Biology, Davidson College ; Professor of Biology. Southern College. 



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Assistant Profe 



CORA STEELE LIBBY 
ssor in School of Business Administrati 



MARK BURROWS 
Head of the De^mrtment of Secretarial Preparation 

B.S.. Stanberry Normal School : A.B., State Teachers' College. Kirksville, Missouri : A.M.. Oglethorpe 
University : Teacher and Superintendent in the Public and High Schools of Missouri : Director Depart- 
ment of Commerce State Teachers' College. Kirksville. Mo. ; Professor of Rural Education in University 
of Wyoming and in State Teachers' Colleges at Kirksville. and Greely. Colorado ; Editor, Rural School 
Messenger and The School and The Community, and Author of Tractates on Education : Member of Na- 
tional Educational Association and of National Geographic Society and National Academy of Visual Edu- 



WILLIAM LOUIS RONEY 

Assistant Professor in Romance Languages 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh ; A.M., Oglethorpe University : LL 
Professor Modern Languages, Emory University : Professor Mode 
Tenn. : Professor Modern Languages. Marietta College, Ohio. 



JOHN A. ALDRICH 

Professor of Physics and Astrono), 



A.B.. Albion 


College; M. 


3., Univer 


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Olivet College ; Professor 


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EARL A. GERHARDT 

Professoi' of Accounting 



Mexico; M.R.A., 1 
Roy, New Mexic( 
Jabama Polytechn 



B., University of Georgi: 
chool for Boys ; Assistant 
stant Professor of Mathen 
ia ; Assistant Professor of : 



Graduate Carnegi( 



FRANK B. ANDERSON 
Athletic Director 

Methematics and Athletic Director. University 
and Athletic Director. R. E. Lee Institute : As- 
thletic Director. Gordon Institute; Coach, University of Geor- 
and Athletic Director, River.side Military Academy. 



MYRTA BELLE THOMAS 
L ib ra ria n 

School of Atlanta. Ga. ; Librarian Mitchell College, Statesvi 






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School of Science 

m/K^ The School of Science offers the degree of A.B., in 

'pP^B Science by three approaches: those of General Science, 

-Ww Special Science and Mathematical Science. These give 

J ^M to students a varied selection to equip them specifically 

^H^ 'J^^^^ for scientific research and for general culture. In each 
I^Bk'i^^H ^^'°"P one-half the requirements for graduation include 
^^^B^H^H the humanities of language, history, etc., to insure 
^^^^m^^KM breadth of culture and knowledge. 

Of the large number preparing for their professions several have ex- 
celled at Columbia, Harvard, Hopkins, Tulane and other institutions. And 
of these, three have received their doctorates and others are research fel- 
lows in their respective branches. Others, still, are teachers of science 
and practitioners of their professions. Within the short life of the Uni- 
versity, graduates from the School have reflected credit on the institution 
and have become useful and cultured citizens. 



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School of Commerce 



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This School consists of a full four years' course in 
studies relating to practical business administration and 
industrial life. Upon its successful completion the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Commerce is conferred. It is the 
f^- A^ only professional school at the University. It was or- 

f^^^^^^ ganized in the Fall of 1919 by Dr. Arthur S. Libby, who 
^^^^H| then took the office of Dean of the School of Commerce 
f^^^^^^ and Business Administration. Mrs. Cora Steele Libby 
is associate professor. 

The School with its allied departments has as its central idea the pre- 
senting of a course of study designed to give an adequate and thorough 
preparation for an executive business career. Among the outstanding 
graduates are: William Nunn, professor of Economics at University of 
Pittsburgh and Joseph Wilson, professor of Economics at University of 
Florida. ; ' " 



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School Of Literature And Journalism 



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The Department of Literature and Journalism is 
planned for three ends: to provide a liberal education as 
a preparation for life, to provide a groundwork for stu- 
dents who wish later to pursue higher work in post- 
graduate schools, and to provide a career and means of 
livelihood for such students as are able to make the 
grade in any literary activity. 

The chief method of the department is to encour- 
age constructive work, in the belief that a student is a growing organism 
that grows by original work, not a sort of tank to be filled up with know- 
ledge. Hitherto dramatic training and newspaper practice have engaged 
most attention but not to the neglect of other literary forms. 

Among outstanding graduates of the school are: James Larwood, 
publicity agent for airship corporation in New York; Oliver Gramling, 
with Associated Press in New York; Fred Stewart, stage manager of 
Stuart-Walker Company in Virginia; James Burns, make-up and sports 
editor of Atlanta Georgian; John Ottley, Jr., officer of Pitcairn Airship 
corporation ; Bernard Dekle, officer of National City Bank of New York. 



School Of Liberal Arts 

The School of Liberal Arts has always been small. 
When the institution was opened in 1916, it was recog- 
nized that the commercial spirit in Atlanta was strong 
and that it would be useless to attempt to force all stu- 
dents to take Latin or Greek. So the studies of this 
School were made elective. The department has always 
had some fine students. In the first year we had the 
largest Latin class in our history — Powell, Moye, War- 
Martin, Mattox, Stokeley, Northcutt, States Jacobs and a 
The Greek classes have been still smaller. 

Among the most brilliant students were the Parish twins, who took 
the third and fourth years of the Greek course simultaneously. An at- 
tempt is now being made to popularize the School by allowing a wider 
range of selection so as to include the modern languages as well as the 
ancient, and by offering classes for beginners in Latin. 




ren, Maddox, 
few others. 



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School of Education 



The School of Education from a vocational viewpoint 
meets the needs of those expecting to teach. From a 
cultural viewpoint it presents the needs of those desiring 
a deeper understanding of the mysteries of the mind and 
heart especially as it relates to all forms of human con- 
tact problems. 



& 

^^^^^^^^H The first graduate in the school was Miss America 

^^^^^^^^^ Woodberry in the class of 1921. Since then a large num- 
ber of the Atlanta teachers have received either the A.B., or the A.M., 
degree and about one hundred Atlanta teachers at present are enrolled 
in the department. 

The new curriculum is arranged so that the required professional 
courses are offered and the other subjects are so arranged that the stu- 
dent may concentrate in either one or two lines, thus fitting him or her 
especially for good teaching in high schools. 






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School of Secretarial Preparation 

\ The department was organized last year for the ben- 

efit of the following students: Those who wish to en- 
ter the business world in the capacity of skilled assist- 
ants to those in the executive positions; for ofRce man- 
agement and the like; for those preparing to teach the 
commerical subjects in the high schools and colleges; 
for young ladies who are preparing for work of a literary 
nature, or as social secretaries; and as an aid to those 
majoring in journalism. The full course comprises four years of work 
in which languages and other subjects with a cultural trend are stressed 
as well as the skilled subjects expected in such a course. At the close of 
the first two years of work, provided a record has been established for 
scholarship, character and reliability, on request, a Certificate of Profic- 
iency will be granted. This is not to encourage a premature capitalization 
of acquired skills but more as an incentive to complete the four years of 
work for the diploma and the degree. 





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Officers and Instructors 



George Murphy 
Miss Virginia O'Kelley 
Miss Mary Feebeck 
Mrs. Sallie Poole 



STUDENT INSTRUCTORS 
Biology Department 



. Bursar 

Secretary 

Registered Nurse 

. School Mother 



G. H. O'Kelley 
Zelan Wills 
Robert O'Kelley 
Gertrude Murray 

Stanley Pfefferkorn 

Assistant Instructor in Physics 

Leonard Hill 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistr 

George Nowell 

Assistant Instructor in Accountin 

Earl Blackwell 

Assistant Instructor in English 



Annie B. Wills 
Edward O'Kelley 
Hale Kellogg 
Morris Jackson 

W. W. Hill 

Assistant Instructor in Chemistry 

Antoinette Brown 

Assistant Instructor in Typing 

E. B. Hill 

Aysistant Instructor in Business Cor. 

Louise Madden 

Assistant Instructor in French 



Assisl 



William Powell 
Instructor in Mathematics 



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CLASS 
HISTORY 



By Evelyn Silverman 

^^^^ On a September morning four short years ago, some 

^Unk one hundred and twenty Mothers and Dads smiled brave- 
^*^H ly as they bade fond farewell to their sons and daughters, 

Y" ▼ off to college — to Oglethorpe! Sons and daughters from 
^^pC ^^^ modest farmhouses, pretentious country homes and fash- 
^^^^^^^^ ionable city residences — all mingling together, determined 
^^^Hj^HH to seek knowledge — and the truth. 

^^^^^^^^ With the enthusiastic aid of the Sophomores, the 

class of '29 was whipped into shape, as it were. And ever since it has 
displayed an indominable fighting spirit that makes for success. Hayward 
Thompson, at the first class meeting, was elected president of the "rats." 
Haywood Clement led the class in its second year; Thompson again the 
third year, and Stanley Pfefferkorn guided its destinies during the senior 
year. 

On the athletic field, the men of the class of '29 distinguished them- 
selves. Many of them held varsity berths the memorable year that Ogle- 
thorpe defeated Georgia Tech on Grant Field. Among the wearers of 
the "0" in this class are Haywood Clement, Jimmie Sims, Lindsey Vaugh- 
an and Jake Malsby. 

On the baseball diamond we were represented by Captain Erskine 
Thompson, Howard Lawson, Jimmie Sims, Marion Anderson, Lindsey 
Vaughan and Manager John Crouch. Clement, the athlete, and Gillman, 
the manager, upheld the class reputation on the basketball court. 

Mary X. Gunter was Captain of the Co-ed squad for two consecutive 
years. 

The class of '29 did much to contribute to dramatic art. Earl Black- 
well, an officer in the Player's Club for three years, originated the Petrel 
Follies and wrote "The Temporary Vamp" which was produced at the 
Erlanger Theater on the annual spring production bill. Jake Sutton and 
Paul Madden are two of the most accomplished actors of this class. 

In campus literary activities, Hayti Thompson is an outstanding fig- 
ure. In his freshman year he was elected to the board of editors on the 



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stormy Petrel, and continued to be a contributor to tlie paper for three 
years. He was elected Editor-in-chief of this weekly paper in his junior 
year, and gave the college a season of fearless journalism which was in- 
strumental in bringing about several commendable movements. As edi- 
tor of the Yamacraw, Hayti has shown that he's a fighting Irishman with 
the will to win. 

Homer Gramling, Leonard Hill, James Howe, Clarence Wells and 
Evelyn Silverman saw service on the Petrel staff as reporters and assist- 
ant editors. Ray Todd has been both writer and printer for the paper, 
having worked in the Printing Office during his entire college career. 
Louis Gillman acted as business manager of the Stormy Petrel for two 
years; Stanley Pfefferkorn assisted him as business manager of the Yam- 
acraw. 

Beverly Irwin, veteran debator, with Hayti Thompson, James Howe 
and Allan Watkins, represented the class on the Debate Council. Their 
keen young analytical minds and commanding deliveries have won for 
Oglethorpe several intercollegiate debates. 

The highest award for scholastic attainment that the university can 
offer — the coat-of-arms sweater — was won by Stanley Pfefferkorn, Charles 
Pittard, Thyrza Perry and Bob Shaw, who is also a member of the Phi 
Kappa Delta honorary scholastic fraternity. 

In the campus musical activities, Bob Shaw takes the center of the 
stage as the gifted director of the Oglethorpe Orchestra. And Homer 
Gramling, Beverly Irwin and Jack Murphy have made music these past 
years that some musically inclined co-eds will never forget. LeRoy Tebo 
capably managed the Glee Club. 

The "High Victory" was an outstanding achievement of the past year. 
The seniors of the Commerce Department played an important part in the 
management of the J. M. High Company on that red-letter day in Decem- 
ber when the Petrels again defeated the Yellow Jackets, this time in the 
field of business administration. 

The members of the class of '29 who acted as student instructors in 
various departments were: Stanley Pfefferkorn, Leonard Hill, Hilary 
Bryson, Earl Blackwell, Hale Kellogg, Annie Belle Wills, W. W. Hill, E. B. 
Hill, Nellie Kate Noel, George Nowell and Antionette Brown. 

Looking back over this record of the Class of '29, we see always the 
names of its leaders. But we must not forget those names that do not 
appear ; those men and women who have worked for their class and Alma 
Mater earnestly, honestly and conscientiously, preferring to be a part of 
the harmonious background of the glorious panorama of the college ca- 
reers of American Youth. 

"We have fought a good fight, 
We have finished our course, 
We have kept the faith." 



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Our Toast 

By Eaton B. Hill 

Come, men, let us drink a toast today 

In water sparkling clear, 

From the old red hills of Georgia 

That Oglethorpe held dear; 

Let us clink our glasses and hold them high, 

Let IIS smile, no need for tears, — 

We must bid each other o glad goodbye 

As we go forth to meet the years. 

Let us pledge our toast to Oglethorpe, 

Our Alma Mater's name; 

Let us pledge our best to Oglethorpe 

The man who sought no fame. 

But left a glorious heritage 

And wealth beyond the sea. 

To find a home in an untried land 

For those less blest than he. 

We shall drink to his nobility, 

His justice and love of truth, 

A7id to those who follow after him, — 

Jacobs, Libby, Routh; 

Men who live for others, — 

Not for themselves alone, — 

Whose lives will stand the test of time. 

And the light of the judgment throne. 

And then in lighter vein,_ we'll toast 

Our co-eds sweet and fair. 

In the light of whose smiles full nuiny a may 

Has called a triangle a square, 

'Fore teachers, stern and critical, 

Im,mune to charms like these; 

But were they really? — We have doubts 

But just forget it, — please. 

Come closer lads, let us drink today 

To the class of '29; 

Who can tell what the future holds? 

Or the gift of fate divine? 

Whatever may be, we will stand like men, 

Our goal shall be high and true. 

Let us drink to the class of '29 — 

Those who shall dare and do. 



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Senior Class Officers 

Stanley Pfefferkorn President 

Louis Gillman Vice-Presidejit 

Luther M. Davenport .... Secretary-Treasurer 

Evelyn Silverman Historian 

Eaton B. Hill Class Poet 



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FLOYD CHILDS COOPER, Jr. 

"Coop" 

e K X 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. COMMERCE 

Blue Key fraternity; Literary society (1, 
2); Players Club; Debate Council (1, 2, 
3); President of Debate Council (3); In- 
tercollegiate debates (2, 3) ; Honor Roll (1, 
2, 3) ; Awarded Theta Kappa Nu scholar- 
ship key and activity key (4). 



RUTH BROOKE 

"Brooksie" 

X P. 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. EDUCATION 

Member of Players Club; Duchess Club. 



HILERY E. BRYSON 

"Slee]}y" 
Hamlet, North Carolina. 

A. B. COMMERCE 

Secretary and Treasurer of Carolina Club; 
Assistant Instructor in Accounting. 



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JAMES BENNETT COWDIN HOWE 

•'General" 

A 2 * 

Washington, D. C. 

A. B. Literature and Journalism 

Debate Council (4) ; Assistant Editor of 
Stormy Petrel (4) ; Assistant Editor of 
Yamacraw (4) ; Le Conte scientific fra- 
ternity; Freshman football; Football squad 
(,4) ; Attended Notre Dame and Mount 
Saint Mary's College. 



ELIZABETH RILEY 
Butler, Georgia. 
A. B. Education 



ALLAN WATKINS 

"Hot Shof 

U K <l. 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. Literature and Journalism 

Vice-President of Inter-Fraternity Coun- 
cil (4); Freshman football; Lord's Club; 
Round Table; Players Club (2, 3, 4); De- 
bate Council (4) ; Boar's Head; Boy's High 
Club. 






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HAYWOOD MONK CLEMENT 

"Apollo" 

e K N 

Greensboro, North Carolina. 

A. B. Commerce 

President of class (2) ; Freshman Foot- 
Student Council representative (1) ; 
Secretary and treasurer of "O" Club; 
Freshman basketball; Freshman baseball; 
Varsity football (3, 4) ; Varsity basketball 
captain (3) ; Varsity track team (3, 4) 
President of Blue Key Fraternity (3) 
Exchange Editor of Stormy Petrel (3) 
Carolina Club; DeMolay Club; Best all- 
round athlete (4). 



ANNIE BELL WILLS 

"Aiiubaena" 

Smyrna, Georgia. 

A. B. Literature and Journalism 



Assistant in Biology Laboratory. 



DONALD WINFRED WILSON, Ji 

"Don" 

Duluth, Georgia. 

A. B. Com:merce 

Member of Bell Club. 



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HALE KELLOGG 

Chamblee, Georgia. 

A. B. Science 

Le Conte Scientific fraternity. 



MARY X. GUNTER 

"X" 

Z T 
Atlanta, Georgia. 
Treasurer Zeta Tau Sorority (1, 2, 3, 4); 
President Inter-Sorority Council (3) ; 
Players Club; Petrel Follies (2, 3); Bas- 
ketball (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Captain and Manager 
(2, 3, 4); Alpha Kappa Literary Society; 
Left Hand Club. 



JOHN W. ROGERS 

"J. W." 
Chamblee, Georgia. 
A. B. Education 



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JOSEPH HOWARD LAWSON 
"Frievd" 
K A 
Atlanta, Georgia. 
A. B. Commerce 
President of "O" Club (4) ; Tech High 
Club; Lord's Club; Secretary and treas- 
urer of student body (4) ; Football man- 
ager (4) ; Freshman baseball; Varsity 
baseball (2, 3, 4); Player's Club; Petrel 
Follies. 



WALTER CLARENCE WELLS 

A :s 'I> 

Plant City, Florida. 

A. B. Literature and Journalism 



Le ROY PATTERSON TEBO 

"Teabone" 

e K N 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. Commerce 

Manager and Member of Glee Club (4) ; 

Assistant Business Manager of Stormy 

Petrel (4) ; Club Editor of Yamacraw 

(4); Player's Club; Alpha Delta Sigma 

Professional fraternity; Honor Roll (4). 



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MORRIS KEMSLER JACKSON 

"Jack" 

AS* 

Lawrenceville, Georgia. 

A. B. Science 

Member of Le Conte scientific fraternity; 

Biology Instructor (3, 4) ; Member of Bell 

Club. 



CAROL THOMPSON 
"C" 

Z T 
Atlanta, Georgia. 
A. B. Literature and Journalism 
Member of Inter-Sorority council; Petrel 
Follies (3, 4); Round Table; Players 
Club; Girls' High Club; Girls' Glee Club 
(4). 



DAVID MEADE BLAKE 
"Dave" 



Atlanta, Georgia. 
A. B. Commerce 




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HENRY CLAYTON WHITESELL 

"Mule" 

e K N 

Clearwater, Florida. 
A. B. Commerce 

President of Blue Key Fraternity (4) ; 
Member of Glee Club; "0" Club; Member 
of band. 



LYNTON B. KNIGHTON 

"Skeet" 

A A T 

Bluffton, Georgia. 

A. B. Education 

Member of Blue Key Fraternity. 



EDWARD ELLWOOD O'KELLEY 

"Ed" 

A A T 

Greensboro, Georgia. 

A. B. Education 

Le Conte scientific fraternity; Assistant 

instructor in Biology. 



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ROBERT WILSON EMERY 

"Bob" 

Hoboken, New Jersey. 

A. B. Science 

Vice-President of student body (4) ; Le 

Conte scientific fraternity; Players Club; 

Martin Hoyt Publishing Company prize 

essayist (2) ; Alchemist Club. 



MARY DORIS TAYLOR 

"Dee" 

Z T 

Buford, Georgia. 

A. B. Education 

Players Club (3, 4); Girls' Glee Club; 

Bell Club. 



ERSKINE THOMPSON 
"Wild Boy" 
A A T 
Atlanta, Georgia. 
A. B. Commerce 
"O" Club; Blue Key fraternity; 
man baseball; Varsity baseball (2, 
Captain of baseball team (4). 



Fresh- 
3, 4); 



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WILLIAM WILSON HILL 

"B^mker" 

Bowdon, Georgia. 

A. B. Education 

Le Conte Scientific fraternity; Assistant 

Instructor in Chemistry (4) ; Secretary 

and member of Glee Club (4) ; Freshman 

football; Postmaster of University, (3, 4). 



CHARLES C. PITTAED 

"Charlie" 

Duluth, Georgia. 

A. B. Commerce 

Member of Bell Club (4) ; Winner of coat- 
of-arms sweater (4). 



STANLEY G. PFEFFERKORN 
"Pfeffij" 
AS* 
Gainesville, Georgia. 
A. B. Literature and Journalism 
President of Le Conte scientific fraternity 
(4) ; Winner of coat-of-arms sweater; 
Fencing team (1, 2) ; Captain of Fencing 
team (2) ; Member of Glee Club (1, 3, 4) ; 
Debate Council (1) ; Blue Key fraternity; 
President of Senior class; Business Man- 
ager of Yamacraw; Physics Laboratory 
Instructor (2, 3, 4). 



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LOUIS GILLMAN 
'■Gillie'' 
A i; II 
Columbus, Georgia. 
A. B. Commerce 
Stray Greek Club; Blue Key Fraternity; 
Vice-President of class (4) ; Business Man- 
ager of Yamacraw; Business Manager of 
Stormy Petrel (3, 4) ; Freshman football; 
Freshman baseball; Manager of Freshman 
basketball team (3) ; Manager of Varsity 
basketball team (4) ; Circulation Manager 
of Stormy Petrel (2); Boar's Head; Ma- 
sonic Club; "O" Club. 



ANTIONETTE BROWN 

"Toiiu" 

* K 11 

Sumter, South Carolina. 

A. B. Education 

Student Instructor in typewriting (4) ; 
Member of Inter-Sorority Council (4). 



CHARLES BRANON LINDSAY 

"Charlie" 

A A T 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. Commerce 

Stormy Petrel Staff (). 



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EARL BLACKWELL, Jr. 
n K "t 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. Commerce 
President of student body (4) ; Boar's 
Head; Blue Key Fraternity; Lord's Club; 
Round Table; Players Club (1, 2, 3); Bus- 
iness Manager of Players Club (1) ; Vice- 
President of Players Club (4) ; Inter-Fra- 
ternity Council; Cotillion Club; Assistant 
Instructor in English (4) ; Devisor and 
producer of the Petrel Follies; Originator 
of First Little Commencement. 



DOROTHY POMEROY 
Atlanta, Georgia. 
A. B. Education 

Teacher in Atlanta Public school sys- 
tem; Life membership to Hermance Sta- 
dium. 



VIRGIL WINPRED MILTON 
"Vii-g" 
\ A T 
Waycross, Georgia. 
A. B. Literature and Journalism 
Lord's Club; Players Club (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Petrel Follies (3, 4) ; President of Inter- 
Fraternity Council (4) ; Freshman foot- 
ball; Varsity football squad (2, 3, 4); 
Boar's Head fraternity. 



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HAYWARD MARTIN THOMPSON 
•'Hauti" 

e K N 

Columbus, Georgia. 
A. B. Literature and Journalism 
President of Freshman class; Historian of 
Sophomore class; President of Junior 
class; Petrel staff (1, 2); Editor of the 
Stormy Petrel (3) ; Vice-President of Blue 
Key (4) ; Founder of Chi Delta Epsilon 
(honorary journalistic); Round Table; 
Secretary of Inter-fraternity council (4) ; 
Boar's Head fraternity; Phi Kappa Delta; 
Sigma Lambda Literary Society (1, 2) ; 
Petrel Follies (3, 4) ; Assistant Librarian 
(2, 3, 4); Left-Handed Club; DeMolay 
Club; Smith-Hoover Debate (4); Honor 
Roll (1) ; Most Accomplished in Who's 
Who contest (3, 4) ; Atlanta Journal cor- 
respondent (3, 4). 



EVELYN CECILIA SILVERMAN 

'•Evi/' 

Fort McPherson, Georgia. 

A. B. Literature and Journalism 
Debate Council (1); Secretary and treas- 
urer of Alpha Kappa Literary Society (1) ; 
Girls' High Club; Publicity manager of 
Petrel Follies (3, 4) ; Petrel staff {1, 2, 
3, 4) ; Senior representative to Co-ed Coun- 
cil; Chi Delta Epsilon fraternity; Co-ed 
Editor of Yamacraw; Phi Kappa Delta. 



HOMER THOMAS GRAMLING 

A A T 

Tallahassee, Florida. 

A. B. Commerce 

Member of orchestra and band (1, 2, 3, 

4); Editor of Petrel (1); Inter-Fraternity 

council (4) . 





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EATON BASS HILL 
"E. B." 



Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. Commerce 
Honor Roll (3) ; Senior Class Poet; Boys' 
High Club; Assistant Instructor in Bus- 
iness Correspondence; Winner of Theta 
Kappa Nu scholarship key. 



ELIZABETH COWLES WERNER 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. Classics 

Alpha Kappa Literary Society (1, 2) ; 

Girls' High Club; Girls' Glee Club (4). 



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JOHN WILL CROUCH 

"Jawn" 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. Commerce 

Manager of baseball (4) ; Member of "O" 

Club; Assistant to the Dean. 



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LUTHER MARCHANT DAVENPORT 

'■Pete" 

A i; -I- 

Coral Gables, Florida. 

A. B. COM.MEKCE 

Secretary and Treasurer of Senior class; 
Carolina Club; Round Table; Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Inter-Fraternity Council (4). 



A. B. 



ANGEL ALLEN 



Atlanta, Georgia. 
Literature and Journalism 



Co-ed basketball varsity team (4) ; Cotil- 
lion Club; Players Club (3, 4); Duchess 
Club; Girls' High Club; Fouress Club; 
Petrel Follies (3, 4). 



JOHN FRANCIS MURPHY 

"Jack" 

B K X 

New York City, N. Y. 

A. B. Commerce 

Member of Orchestra and Band ( 

Glee Club (4). 



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JOHN ROBERT SHAW 
"Bob" 
A 2 * 
Atlanta, Georgia. 
A. B. Commerce 
Chairman of Student-Faculty Council (4) ; 
Honor Roll (3); Blue Key Fraternity; Phi 
Kappa Delta fraternity; Boar's Head; 
Director of Orchestra and Band (4) ; Or- 
chestra and Band (1, 2, 3, 4). 



RAY UPSHAW TODD 

"Red" 

A. B. Literature and Journalism 

Le Conte scientific fraternity; Chi Delta 
Epsilon Journalistic fraternity; Exchange 
Editor of Petrel (4). 



LEONARD WITHINGTON HILL 

"Leo" 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. Science 

Le Conte scientific fraternity; Chi Delta 
Epsilon Journalistic fraternity; Art Edi- 
tor of Yamacraw; Assistant Editor of 
Stormy Petrel (4) ; Assistant Instructor 
in Chemistry. 



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MRS. ADELE JOHNSON BUSSEY 

A A <t 

Waynesboro, Georgia. 

A. B. Literature and Journalism 

M. A. Literature and Journalism 

Member of Players Club; Girls' Glee Club 

Stray Greek. 



JAMES HERBERT SIMS 
"Jim" 

e K X 

Grantville, Georgia. 
A. B. Commerce 



I'^otball (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Co-Captain of var- 
sity football team (4); Baseball (1, 2)_: 
Blue Key Fraternity; "0" Club; All-S 
A. A. football tackle (4). 



CAMMIE LEE STOW 

A. B. Commerce 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

Member of Girls' Glee Club (4) 




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WILLIAM MARSHALL JONES 

"BUI" 

Duluth, Georgia. 

A. B. Commerce 

Member of Bell Club. 



HENRY JOHNSON REYNOLDS, Jr. 

"Johnny" 

<!> 2 K 

Norcross, Georgia. 

A. B. Commerce 

Stray Greek Club; "O" Club; Varsity 
baseball (3, 4); Bell Club; Glee Club (4); 
Tech High Club. 



JAMES REID CALDWELL 

"Ox" 

Spring City, Tennessee. 

A. B. Commerce 



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LINDSEY C. VAUGHN 

"Iron Head" 

A A T 

Union, South Carolina. 

A. B. CoMiMERCE 

Freshman football (1); Varsity football 

(2, 3, 4); Freshman baseball (1); Varsity 

baseball (2, 3, 4). 



ELIZABETH COLLIER DODD 

"Libbs" 

X P. 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. Literature and Journalism 

Players Club; Duchess Club; Cotillion 

Club; Round Table; Petrel Follies (3, 4). 



ROBERT BEVERLY IRWIN 
"Bev" 
K A 
Buford, Georgia. 
A. B. Commerce 
Student Council representative (2 ,3, 4) ; 
President of Debate Council (4) ; Member 
of Debate Council (1, 2, 3, 4); Represen- 
tative National Oratorical Contest (1, 2, 
3, 4) ; Orchestra and Band (1, 2, 3, 4) ; 
Assistant Director of Orchestra and Band 
(4) ; Blue Key Fraternity; Honor Roll (3). 





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MARION BROWN ANDERSON 
"Marne" 

n K * 

Decatur, Georgia. 

A. B. Education 
Member of "0" Club; Freshman football; 
Varsity baseball (1, 2, 4) ; Le Conte scien- 
tific fraternity. 



THYRZA PERRY 

"T" 

X n 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. Literature and Journalism 

Member of Girls' Glee Club (4) ; Member 

of Inter-Fraternity Council; Phi Kappa 

Delta. 



PAUL THOMAS MADDEN 

K A 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. Commerce 

Players Club (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Lord's Club; 

Inter-fraternity Council. 



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JOHNSON WARDE SUTTON 
•'Jake" 



Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. Commerce 
Member of "O" Club; Lord's Club; Players 
Club; Business Manager of Players Club 
(3, 4); Ten Club; President Ten Club (3, 
4); Cotillion Club; Tech High Club; Man- 
ager of Football team (4). 



JANE CALLAHAN REES 

East Point, Georgia. 

A. B. Education 



EMORY S. LUNSPORD 
Darien, Georgia. 
A. B. Commerce 
The Bell Club. 



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NELLIE KATE NOEL 
Atlanta, Georgia. 
A. B. Commerce 
Phi Kappa Delta. 



MARY BELLE LANEY 

Locust Grove, Georgia. 

A. B. Education 



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The Good Fight 

By Jean Nutting 

The spirit of mortal can justly be proud, 

It has climbed from the depths; it has challenged the cloud. 
With vision and courage, man's strength has essayed 

To wage the good fight, soul-free, unafraid. 

The body will falter, the life-spark will wane 

But accomplishment lives; man dies not in vain. 

The work he has built, the good he has done. 

Lives on though the body has withered and gone. 

Oh, why should the spectre of death sear his soul? 

God's still in his heaven; God's throne is his goal. 
From the plain to the mountain, man's footsteps have trod. 

From the slough of despair to the heights, which is God. 




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Junior Class Officers 

Bryant Arnold President 

Robert Benson ...... Vice-President 

Charles MacLaughlin . . . . Secretary-Treasurer 

James .Jackson Class Poet 



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JOHN COLUMBUS BELL 
"€!/'• 
A A T 
Gainesville, Georgia. 
A. B. Education 
Member of "0" Club; Manager baseball 
(2) ; Freshman football; Freshman basket- 
ball; Varsity football (2, 3) ; Varsity bas- 
ketball (2, 3). 



JOHN BURNS JONES 

"Stiag" 

IT K <I. 

Branchville, S. C. 

B. Literature and Journalism 



ANNA BAUM 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. Literature and Journalism 



CHARLES ALDRIDGE 
"Churlie" 
A A T 
Carrollton, Georgia. 
A. B. Commerce 
President of class (1) ; Freshman foot- 
ball; Varsity football (3). 

LYMAN B. POX 



Sikeston, Mi 
A. B. Education 
Lord's Club; Round Table; Freshman foot- 
ball; Freshman basketball; Varsity foot- 
ball (2, 3) ; Track (2, 3) ; "0" Club; Play- 
ers Club; Secretary - Treasurer of Lord's 
Club. 





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WILLIAM MOORE POWELL 

"BUI" 

A A T 

Greensboro, Georgia. 

A. B. Education 

Le Conte scientific fraternity; Student 

council; Debate council; Winner of Coat- 

of-Arms sweater; Assistant Instructor in 

Mathematics; Phi Kappa Delta. 



MARY LAURA DAVIS 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. Literature and Journalism 

Chi Delta Epsilon journalistic fraternity; 

Reporter on Stormy Petrel (2). 



ELIZABETH HAMILTON 
Decatur, Georgia. 
A. B. Education 



MARY LEE PRICE 

Abbeville, South Carolina. 

A. B. Science 



SADAJIRO YOSHINUMA 
Yokohama, Japan. 
A. B. Commerce 



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JOSEPH TERRY 

"Joe" 

O K \ 

Beaumont, Texas. 



ROBERT M. BENSON 
"Bobby" 
A A T 
Statesboro, Georgia. 
A. B. Science 
Le Conte scientific fraternity; Vice-Presi- 
dent of class (3) ; Class historian (3) ; 
Alchemist Club. 



CATHERINE FISCHER CARLTON 

X 9. 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. Education 



AMOS MARTIN, Jr. 
"Mouse" 

n K <{. 

Norcross, Georgia. 
A. B. Commerce 
Lord's Club; Freshman football; Fresh- 
man baseball; Varsity football (2, 3); 
Varsity baseball (2, 3) ; "O" Club. 



HOKE SMITH BELL 

A 2 'l> 

Carrollton, Georgia. 

A. B. Commerce 

Freshman football; Varsity football (2, 

3) ; "0" Club. 





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FRED R. SNOOK 

A i: >I' 
Atlanta, Georgia. 
A. B. Education 
(1, 2); Advertising Manager of 



Track 

Stormy Petrel (2) 



ELOISE CHABLE TANKSLEY 



Atlanta, Georgia. 
A. B. Commerce 
Girls' High Club. 



HARRY FEINBERG 
'■Irish" 

X ^ n 

Columbus, Georgia. 

A. B. Commerce 

Stray Greek Club; Varsity football (2, 

3) ; Varsity basketball (2, 3) ; Freshman 

football and basketball; "O" Club. 



ASA WALL 

"Ace" 

Pulaski, Georgia. 

A. B. Education 

"O" Club; Varsity football and baseball 

(2, 3) ; Freshman football and * 



WADE BRYANT ARNOLD 



Spartanburg, South Carolina. 

A. B. LlTER-A-TURE AND JOURNALISM 

Debate Council (1, 2, 3) ; Business Man- 
ager Debate Council (1, 2) ; Assistant 
Librarian (1, 2); Proctor (1, 2); Presi- 
dent of Junior Class; President of South 
Carolina club; Alchemist Club; Le Conte 
scientific fraternity; Chi Delta Epsilon; 
Editor of Stormy Petrel (3) ; Coat-of- 
arms sweater; Honor Roll. 



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VIVIAN McGOWAN 

"Mac" 

Cartersville, Georgia. 

A. B. Commerce 

Orchestra (3) ; Stray Greek Club. 



MILDRED BRADLEY 

/. T 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. Literature and Journalism 

Duchess club; Co-ed basketball team. 



VIRGIL WINFRED MILTON 

"Viig" 

A A T 

Waycross, Georgia. 

A. B. Literature and Journalism 



MARY EUGENIA TUCKER 

* K n 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. Education 



GEORGE LEWIS NOWELL 

e K X 

Colquitt, Georgia. 

A. B. Commerce 

Assistant Instructor in Accounting (3). 




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CHARLES P. MacLAUGHLIN, Jr. 

"Mac" 

A 2 * 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. Science 

Football (1, 2, 3); Basketball (1, 2, 3); 

Secretary of Junior Class; Captain-elect 

of football team. 



JAMES PAUNTLEROY JACKSON 

"Jimmy" 

n K * 

Cairo, Georgia. 

Special Student 

Glee Club. 



MARGARET MARY NEUHOFF 

Z T 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

A. B. Education 




MARY C. DODD 

X o 
Atlanta, Georgia. 
Literature and Journalism 
Round Table; Duchess Club; Players Club. 



EDWARD D. EMERSON 

"Ed" 

A 2 <I' 

Birmingham, Alabama. 

A. B. Commerce 

Freshman baseball; Proctor. 



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Class History" 



By Robert M. Benson 



^t^ Of one hundred and twenty-three freshmen who en- 

bIt \ tered in 1926, only thirty-two remain. As Hannibal's men 

^^^ fell by the wayside in crossing the Alps, so members of 

Sjpr our class have fallen in the struggle of three years of col- 

,^^% ^ lege. We, who have survived the struggle, are proud as 

^^^^t^^k we are a chosen few and so, with our heads held high, 

^^^^H^^A we are marching onward toward our goal. Spiritually, 

^^^^^^^* mentally, and physically, we have progi-essed since we 

iirst entered Oglethorpe — now we are Juniors. 

Let us stop and take a retrospective view of our achievements since 
we first came. As a class we have always taken the initiative and as Soph- 
omores we abolished the time-worn tradition of cutting hair. 

In athletics we played a leading role. On the 1928 football squad we 
were represented by Amos Martin, Harold Coffee, Charles MacLaughlin, 
Asa Wall, Harry Feinberg, Curry Burford, Hoke Bell; Lyman Fox, "Cy" 
Bell and Charles Aldridge. In 1927 we produced eight letter men and 
in 1926 nineteen of our men made numerals. For the past two years we 
have had three men on the track team, Blanford Eubanks, Fred Snook 
and Lyman Fox. On the basketball team we have Charles MacLaughlin, 
Harry Feinberg, "Cy" Bell and Blanford Eubanks, while in baseball we are 
represented by Asa Wall and Amos Martin. 

As individuals make the history of a class it is only fair that a few 
outstanding members be named here. First on the roll is Bryant Arnold, 
master debater, editor-in-chief of the Stormy Petrel and president of the 
class. Next is "Banty" Eubanks, our song-bird, who has gone down in 
Petrel History as one of the most versatile track devotees in the history 
of the school. Then there is Vivian McGowan, representative in the or- 
chestra; Fred Snook, advertising manager of the school publication, and 
"Cy" Bell, noted football star. Those foremost in scholarship and win- 
ners of the coat-of-arms sweater are Harold Coffee, Eolise Tanksley and 
William Powell. 

Now, as we are approaching our Senior year, we can only say that if 
the past is a key to the future then great things may be expected of the 
class of 1930. 



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^ 



Class Poem 

By James Jackson 

The goal is in sight. 

All the best in us has been used 

To make our future bright. 

Some times we thought the traveling bad, 

The mountains high; Sharp stones bruised 

Our pride, 'till never was as sad 

A plight as some who lost the way 

And wandered through the night. 

Now we stand on level ground; See 

Our stock rise with the sun? 'Tween you and me' 

For three long years we've stood the test, 

I think we've done our level best. 




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Class Roll 



ALDRIDGE, CHARLES 
ARNOLD, BRYANT 
BAUM, ANNA 
BELL, H. S. 
BELL, J. C. 
BENSON, ROBERT 
BRADLEY, MILDRED 
BURFORD, CURRY 
CARLTON, CATHERINE 
COFFEE, HAROLD 
DAVIS, MARY 
DODD, MARY 
EMERSON, EDWARD 
FEINBERG, HARRY 
FOX, LYMAN 
HAMILTON, ELIZABETH 
JACKSON, JAMES 
JONES, R. W. 



JONES, J. B. 

MacLAUGHLIN, CHARLES 
MARTIN, AMOS 
MEGAHEE, EVELYN 
McGOWAN, VIVIAN 
NEUHOPF, MARGARET 
NIXON, R. J. 
NOWELL, GEORGE 
POWELL, WILLIAM 
PRICE, MARY 
ROGERS, O. P. 
SNOOK, FRED 
STRIBLING, BETTY 
TANKSLEY, ELOISE 
TERRY, JOE 
TUCKER, MARY 
WALL, ASA 
YOSHINUMA, SADAJIRO 




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Junior Autographs 




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Sophomore Class Officers 

Glen Bridges President 

Robert Beasley Vice-President 

Claud Herrin Secretary-Treasurer 

John Turk Historian 



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Class History" 

By John Turk 

As the fleeting years ripple by there comes, to every 
striving, wide-awake institution, changes of numerous 
and various sorts. So to what justification have we for 
the sweeping assertion that Oglethorpe in all its forms — 
be it mental, moral or spiritual — is constantly changing, 
shaping and mounting to a higher peak of success. 



Retrogarding into the clear and unforgotten pass, 
we see ourselves as Freshmen — dumb, humble and unsophisticated. But, 
regardless, that year was a lesson to all of us and it will never be foi-got- 
ten. One hundred and eighty-two strong, hailing from the wide open 
spaces, we came to drink of the fountain of knowledge, many drank, 
others sipped, few inhaled, and those who refused were disposed of. Un- 
fortunately about sixty-seven of our Freshman brothers and sisters failed 
to return — this gap was somewhat filled by the appearance of about fifteen 
new Sophomores. Among them were Byrd, Dennis, Jackson, Whitaker, 
Hawley and others. 

In the field of athletics our class has indeed, furnished many valu- 
able men, namely: Herrin, Fulton, Riddle, Therrell, Holcomb, Kimbrell, 
Golden, Rabon, Church, Adams, Woodward, Brooks, Everett, Emerson, 
and a score of others. 

Looking here and there we find that the Sophomores prove to be an 
important factor in every branch of activities offered at Oglethorpe. Thus 
in this class we find much talent and a glorious future. 

By means of a talk given to the class by Dr. J. F. Sellers, whom all of 
us admire, the class held a meeting, headed by President Bridges, and 
concluded that hazing and the cutting of hair should be abolished — thus 
another step was taken in the making of a greater and nobler institution, 
by the abolition of the fear and distractions of hazing. 




^ 



Terminating towards the golden fleece we struggle and look forward 
to the time when we shall be initiated into a new era of life. The wolf 
stands at the gate awaiting our arrival, the time is two years. 



<izaamcBaM> 





CHARLES McKISSICK 

"Mac" 

A A T 

Carrabelle, Florida. 

JEROME DERMONT TRIPLETTE 

"Doc" 

A 2 * 

Lenoir, North Carolina. 

JAMES SULLIVAN 

"Jim" 

II K * 

Gainesville, Georgia. 

FRANK M. INMAN, Jr. 

K A 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

MARIA LUISA BENTEEN 
Atlanta, Georgia. 

THELMA MARGARET BROGDON 
Buford, Georgia. 

VIRGINIA BLACK 
Savannah, Georgia. 

HELEN MARY BOARDMAN 

Z T 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

HOWARD KENDALL 

K A 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

ROBERT BEASLEY 

"Bob" 

e K X 

Lavonia, Georgia. 



■ l iimnRG^tMTu% 



JAMES CORNELIUS BOWMAN 

"Bo" 

Wadesboro, Georgia. 

FRANK JOSEPH MEYER 

"Biibber" 

e K N 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

HAROLD ADAMS 

"Muddy" 

e K N 

Lavonia, Georgia. 

PRESTON SIDNEY BROOKS 
Atlanta, Georgia. 

GERTRUDE JANE MURRAY 

Z T 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

ELIZABETH ANNIE McCLUNG 

'•Betty'' 

<!> K II 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

HORACE MANN BYRD 
"Lefty" 

e K \ 

Enterprise, Alabama. 

FRANK MARTIN McSHERRY 

"Mac" 

n K * 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

JOHN P. TURK 

A A T 
Nelson, Georgia. 

JENNINGS HENRY DENNIS 
Lyons, Georgia. 





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OLIVER HENRY BEALL, Jr. 

K A 

Louisville, Georgia. 

GEORGE MELVIN McDONALD 

A A T 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

JAMES WILLIAM ANDERSON, Jr 

"Jimmie" 

Griffin, Georgia. 

ZELAN T. WILLS 
Smyrna, Georgia. 

CLYDE EDWARD DUDLEY 
Atlanta, Georgia. 

DAVE THERRELL 
Atlanta, Georgia. 

THOMAS HENRY DANIEL, Jr. 

■Tom" 

K A 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

GEORGE HOPE SCUDDER 

"Skippij" 
Carrollton, Georgia. 

ALBERT H. CHURCH, Jr. 

'■AV 
A i: * 

Orlando, Florida. 



RALPH MINCEY 

'■Rudif 
Gainesville, Georgia. 



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THEO WALTER FULTON 

"Cnrleii" 

A ^ 'I' 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

HUBERT ALLISON TUCKER 

"Tuck" 

A A T 

Royston, Georgia. 

GEORGE MCMILLAN 

A i; <i> 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

ROBERT WILLIAM O'KELLEY 

"Bob" 

\ A '1' 

Greensboro, Georgia. 

MARTHA JEAN OSBORNE 

Z T 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

MARIE ELIZABETH ODUM 

<I> K II 
Bennettsville, South Carolina. 

DOROTHY LINCOLN BARNES 

X i> 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

ZADIE ELIZABETH IVEY 
Atlanta, Georgia. 

GEORGE DANIEL BYRD 

"Red" 

e K X 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

DENNIS RIDDLE 
"Mutt" 

e K X 
Oglethorpe, Georgia. 




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MILTON PRANK DAVENPORT 

"Speechj" 

Anniston, Alabama. 



PAUL BACON 

A i * 
Atlanta, Georgia. 



CLAUD HERRIN 

n K <!> 
Winder, Georgia. 



GEORGE EVERETT 



Valdosta, Georgia. 



MILTON WOOD 

"Milt" 

K A 

Atlanta, Georgia. 



GLEN BRIDGES 
"Red" 

e K X 

Atlanta, Georgia. 



WILLIARD HITCHCOCK BACKUS 
Cartersville, Georgia. 



WILLIAM MONROE BUTLER 
O K X 



Atlanta, Georgia. 



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<iiRm^Gisj5m> 



Class Roll 






ADAMS, HAROLD 
BACKUS, W. H. 
ANDERSON, J. W. 
BACON, PAUL 
BARNES, DOROTHYE 
BASKIN, SEAMAN 
BEALL, OLIVER 
BEASLEY, ROBERT 
BENTEEN, MARY LOUISE 
BLACK, VIRGINIA 
BOARDMAN, HELEN 
BOWMAN, J. C. 
BOYNTON, FRED 
BROGDEN, THELMA 
BROOKS, PRESTON 
BRIDGES, GLEN 
BUTLER, WILLIAM 
BYRD, GEORGE 
BYRD, HORACE 
CHURCH, A. H. 
COLEMAN, H. G. 
DANIEL, THOMAS 
DAVENPORT, FRANK 
DENNIS, JENNINGS 
DUDLEY, CLYDE 
ENGLISH, RALPH 
EVERETT, GEORGE 
FULTON, T. W. 
FURSE, MARION 
GOLDEN, ERNEST 
HERRIN, CLAUD 
HOLCOMB, HUBERT 
INMAN, FRANK 
IVEY, ZAIDEE 



KENDALL, HOWARD 
KIMBRELL, ALBERT 
KRATZ, LYLE 
LINDSEY, VERA E. 
MEYER, FRANK 
MINCEY, RALPH 
MORGAN, ARCHIE 
MONTGOMERY, JAMES 
MURRAY, GERTRUDE 
McCLUNG, ELIZABETH 

Mcdonald, george 

McKISSICK, CHARLES 

Mclaughlin, keitii 
mcmillan, george 

McSHERRY, FRANK 

odum, marie 
o'kelley, robert 
osborne, martha 
rabon, melton 
redmond, a. w. 
respess, richard 
riddle, dennis 
scudder, george 
snyder, j. l. 
strickland, celia 
strickland, e. 
sullivan, james 
therrell, david 
tripelette, jerome 
turk, john 
tucker, hubert 
wade, emily 
wills, zelan 
wood, milton 
woodward, irwin 



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Sophomore c^utographs 



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Freshman Class Officers 

Harry Emanuel President 

Charles Gardner Vice-President 

Jeff McMillan Secreturii-Trcasurer 

Ollie Nall Hisforicni 

Reavis O'Neal Class Poet 



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Class History 



§ 



^ 

A 



By Ollie Nall 

"Freshman, grab your ankles!" 
"Freshmen will remain in dining hall!" 



Such were the stern commands heard by one hundred 
and eighty-two bewildered freshmen on the morning of 
September 23. Like all freshmen have been and always 
will be, we resented the lower station in life because it was 
a tremendous setback — from a lorded Senior in high school, 
accustomed to an upper-hand, to a lowly freshman who 
must serve superiors! However, the resentment was short-lived. 

We soon realized our importance for our big brothers had gone to the 
trouble to map out a definite program. First, traditions were impressed 
such as the learning of songs and yells, smoking of corn pipes, last, but 
not least, forbidden to "check" with the fair Co-eds. This restriction was 
immediately neglected. But the violation did not help our standing with 
the Sophs, or for that matter, the other side of our laps, either. 

Our first class meeting was held in the auditorium and the following 
ofiicers were elected : President, Harry Emanuel ; Vice-President, Charles 
Gardner; Secretary and Treasurer, Jeff McMillan; Student Council Repre- 
sentative, Edward Durst. 

And then came the Freshman minstrel ! The black faces amused the 
student body for more than an hour and in fine fashion, too. Julian 
Stoval acted as interlocutor while Whiteside, Luther, Mincey and Taylor 
carried away honors as end men. 

The class was well represented in the orchestra with three mem- 
bers, namely: Charles Bourne and Jeff McMillan, saxophones and Ollie 
Nail, trumpet. 

In athletics we made a good showing. The teams of the three major 
sports should furnish excellent material to the varsity squads of the com- 
ing school year. The freshman teams certainly stepped about and carried 
away many victories. 

We are proud of Oglethorpe and expect to help in making it the great- 
est college in the South, yea, even in the whole wide world, and we are 
going to drive into the "rats" of next year that grand old Petrel spirit so 
that they, too, will help to carry on this institution. But let us add these 
few words of warning to the Class of '33: 

"Beware, you freshmen, for revenge is sweet!" 



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class roll 



SM> 



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alison, 


eeorsia 


anderson, frank 


appling 


luke 


arnold, 


elizabeth 


baKwell 


h. 


bailey, 


victor 


barnes. 


w. j. 


baynes. 




bennett 


dumont 


bishoD, 


Joseph 


black, anita 


boone. 




bourne. 


Charles 


brooks. 


c. b. 



bryant, p. 
buKir. pansy 

clancy. Ionic 

dial, edward 
dodd, hugh 
driver, morrell 
durst, edward 
emanuel, harry 
farabee, jack 
fowler, athalena 
freeman, joe 
frost, ruth 
gardner, charles 
gardner, glen 
goldsmith, pauI 
gowen, Jesse s. 
gulley, elmer 

hamrick, richard 
harney, robert 
hedges, burke 
heeley, harper 
hight, lawrence 



utchii 



viUU 



huddleson, emma 
Johnson, martha 
Johnson, allan 

Jordan, kendal 
kadel, hubert 

key, robert 
last, harry 
leithe, carl 



lindsay, wylie 
luther, gcorge 
macgregor. gordo 
magill, rosetta 
mahoney, jack 



nail, ollie 
nutting, jean 
oliphant. charles 
o'neal, reavis 
parham, Icslie 
Patterson, eugeni 
patton, w. d. 
perkerson. marth; 
renfroe, John 
riddick, martha 
roberts, eldridge 
rogers, charles 
Sanders, robert 

sewell, roy 

shoesmith, james 
silsby. valentine 



smith, b. d. 
spencer, richard 
stoval, Julian 
sullivan, myrtle 
swaggert, taft 
sypert, caly 
taylor, charles 
templeman. virgii 
thomas, helen 



todd, c. 

vardaman. margaret 
wade, harden 
walker, murdoch 



warren, selma 
whaley, marion 
whitaker, j. p. 
whitesides, John 
Williamson, mary 
Williamson, louise 
Wilson, gertrude 
woodall, Willie 
yeomans, raymond 
Wright, harold b. 



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Class Poem 



By Reavis C. O'Neal 

On dances now our boat of life to sunset, 
A-gliding down the sparkling sea of learning. 
Full nine months past, our sea . . .a rivulet, 
And we midshipmen, eager, young, and yearning. 

But blazoned now on each one's shield a token 
Of time and hours passed in servitude. 
Of tight sealed lips, no single word outspoken 
To break the enforced calm of solitude. 

What lies around yon greening bend, sweet comrades? 
Who knows what distant fate God holds in store? 
Make each wave from the prow of our frail vessel 
Twicefold do good before it strikes the shore. 

Henceforth, with chains of slavery cast aside. 
We walk upright in brightness of the sun, 
That safe in harbor we may point with pride 
To tasks complete and know they were well done. 

Again, what lies beyond the nearing bend, my fellows? 
Bring forth red wine and freely let it run. 
Who knows what brings today or holds tomorrow. 
As arrow-like we sail to rays of sinking sun? 



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cAtlanta Theological Seminar}^' 

FACULTY 

Lewis H. Keller, B.D., D.D President 

G. Floyd Zimmekmann, A.M., S.T.B., M.R.E., . . Dean 

George A. Ehrgood, A.B., LL.B., 

Insti-nctor in Church Historii and Greek 

M. Luther Stimson, A.B., B.D., 
Professor of New Testament Literature and Missions 

Mrs. Florence Venn Zimmermann 
Professor of Hymnology and Public Sjjeaking 



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STUDENTS 



CANOY, JEFFERSON McKENZIE 
CRAFT, LUTHER BLAKE 
KREBS, CLARENCE WILLIAM 
NAGEL, HERBERT JOHN 
TREESE, GEORGE WINFIELD 
SLATER, ARNOLD 



SWARTZ, ARTHUR GEORGE 
DAVIES, SIDNEY HARRY 
WESSLING, GEORGE ALFRED 
HALL, CHARLES 
BARRETT, J. HILL 
IVEY, OTTO 



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Anent The Seminary^ 

AT the beginning of the school year of 1928 the Atlanta Theological 
Seminary group came to the campus of the University to continue its 
work during the transition of the school to Elon College with which 
institution it will affiliate in 1929. 

The Seminary was organized in 1901 with a small body of students. 
Its home was a farm house on the site purchased for the campus, 1032 
Stewart Avenue, Atlanta. The student body continued to grow until the 
war called young men from all seminaries and colleges. The program 
has so enlarged in present years that it was necessary to affiliate with a 
college in order to carry on in a more efficient manner. 

It is Congregational in denomination but is non-sectarian in its teach- 
ing and has always opened its doors to students of all denominations. Dur- 
ing its existence, the Seminary has sent men to the pulpits of Methodist, 
Baptist, Presbyterian, Evangelical, Christian and Holiness churches as 
well as its own Congregational churches. 

As the course of study will suggest, it is the aim of the Seminary to 
meet the widest possible needs of men and women preparing for the min- 
istry and other forms of Christian service. The Seminary recognizes the 
new day that calls for trained religious leadership of many kinds. By 
its charter and its purpose it is free to meet changing conditions in the life 
about it. 

The student body of Oglethorpe has made many friends among the 
young theologians and it is with regret that we see the Seminary move 
lo Elon College. 



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Extension Classes 

THROUGH the untiring efforts of Dr. Herman J. Gaertner, who ably 
assisted in the resurrection of Oglethorpe, the extension classes of 
the University became a reality three years ago and since the organi- 
zation has been on a rapid increase. 

For the school year of 1928 more than seventy-five enrolled for the 
extension work leading to degrees of Master of Arts, Bachelor of Arts or 
work in the School of education. 

In order to make it more convenient for the students, a number of 
whom are teachers in the Atlanta Public School system, a majority of the 
classes are held in Atlanta. Classes in French, Biology, Chemistry and 
English are held on the campus on Saturdays. 

The overwhelming success and the encouraging results of the exten- 
sion classes in the past has become an incentive and officials are centering 
their attention to that phase of work. 



tHRdmc^^M^ 



Roll of Extension Students 



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BAIRD, AURA 
BARKSDALE, WILLIAM 
BENNETT, PEARL 
BRENNER, AUGUSTA 
BRINGHURST, MARY 
BROWN, IDA LEE 
CLAPP, HELEN 
CLEMENTS, WILLIE 
COOPER, MRS. ETHEL 
DANIEL, BEULAH 
EARNEST, MRS. VERA 
EDWARDS, THELMA 
EDWARDS, THERESA 
ENGLAND, ANNA 
FAVER, KATE 
FROST, MRS. LEOLA 
FULLER, ANNIE MARY 
HARDEE, MRS. W. T. 
HEAD, LUTIE POPE 
HICKS, CLEOPHAS 
HILL, MRS. LUDOWICK J. 
HOUK, LAURA 
HUTCHINS, MRS. ETHEL 
JAMERSON, MRS. L. G. 
JOHNSON, MRS. ANNIE S. 
KENDRICK, MARGARET 
KING, ROSA MAY 
KING, MRS. ETHEL 
KINNARD, RUTH 
LANEY, BELLE 
LANKFORD, RUBY 
LEONARD, ELLA 
LINCH, EVELYN 
LINDSEY, EDNA 
LUMPKIN, MARY 



LOPIN, ABRAHAM 
MACKIE, MARGARET 
MADDEN, LOUISE 
MADDOX, WARREN 
MAXWELL, JULIA 
McDAVID, NEOLA 
McELHENY, MRS. C. J. 
McLENDON, DOLLIE 
MEADOW, STELLA 
MITCHELL, MRS. R. M. 
MORROW, MABEL 
NORMAN, INA 
NOWELL, MARY HATTON 
PAULK, MAUDIE 
PIRKLE, LOUISE K. 
POWELL, RALPH 
PRICHARD, EMMA 
RAMPHY, WOODFIN 
REED, MRS. VIOLA 
SCHORB, ANNE CHERRY 
SOLOMON, JANIE 
SOLOMON, MAGGIE 
SUMMER, CARROLL 
TAYLOR, FRANK 
TEMPLE, FRANCES 
WALKER, MAY 
WATERS, MRS. IRENE 
WEST, ADA 

WHITWORTH, MRS. ROSE 
WILLIAMS, MANGE 
WINSLOW, VIRGINIA 
WILSON, HANNAH 
WILSON, VIOLA BELLE 
WOODBERRY, FRANCES 
YOUNG, MARY ELISE 



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AtljUlirs 



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FRANK [i. ANDERSON, Athletic Director 

"The Daddy of Oglethorpe Athletics!" Thai's the sobriquet 
he earned seven years ago and it still breathes. He has seen Ogle- 
thorpe athletics at its worst and at its best and there cannot be too 
much praise for his conscientious endeavors. 



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luRdmcB^m^ 




WEARERS OF 

"O" 



FOOTBALL 



CHARLES ALDRIDGE 
LYLE KRATZ 
JOHN C. BELL 
HOKE BELL 
CURRY BURFORD 
PRESTON BROOKS 
HAROLD COFFEE 
HAYWOOD CLEMENT 
ALBERT CHURCH 
JOHN CROUCH 
THEODORE FULTON 
JAKE SUTTON, Mgr. 



HARRY FEINBERG 
CLAUD HERRIN 
LYMAN FOX 
AMOS MARTIN 
JAKE MALSBY 
CHARLES McKISSICK 
CHARLES MacLAUGHLIN 
JAMES SIMS 
LINDSEY VAUGHN 
IRWIN WOODWARD 
ASA WALL 
HOWARD LAWSON. Msr. 



HENRY WHITESELL, Cheerleader. 

BASKETBALL 

JOHN C. BELL ERNEST GOLDIN 

HAYWOOD CLEMENT CLAUD HERRIN 

HARRY FEINBERG DENNIS RIDDLE 

DAVE THERRELL LOUIS GILLMAN, Mgr 




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BASEBALL 



BRANTLEY BOSWELL 
CLARKE TALIAFERRO 
ED MIMS 

HOWARD LAWSON 
ASA WALL 
DUKE TURNER 
ERSKINE THOMPSON 



AMOS MARTIN 

JOE HUTSON 

LINDSEY VAUGHN 

JOHN REYNOLDS 

CODY LAIRD 

AL YORK 

BUDDY THRASH. M.ffr. 




TRACK 

HAYWOOD CLEMENT BLANFORD EUBANKS 

JOE DEKLE. Mana.tjer 



timcnRG^^M% 



^ 



[P 




ALDRIDGE 

(•28) 

BARTENFELD 

('20-21-22-231 

BASS 



BRINSON 



BOSWELL, C. 



CAMP 

CIS) 

CAMPBELL. C. 

('22-231 

CAMPBELL, K. 

("23-24-25-261 

CARLYLE 

('20-21) 

CARROLL 

('23-24-25-2S) 

CHESTNUT. C. 

('18-19) 

CHESTNUT, W. 1 

CHURCH 

('28) 
CLEMENT 

(■27-28) 
COFFEE 

(•27-28) 
COOPER 
(■19-20-24) 
COUSINS 

(■24-25) 
CROUCH 



FOOTBALL 



CROWE 
(■22-23-24) 
DUFFY 

(■18) 

DeJARNETT 

(•17) 

DAVID 

(•20-21-22-23) 

DAVENPORT 

(■18-19) 

FOX 

(■27-28) 

FRAMBOUGH 

(■18) 

FULTON 



GORDY, W. 

(■22-23) 
GORDY. F. 
(•25-26-27) 
GUTHRIE 

GARLINGTON 

(■25-26-27) 

GOLDSMITH, J. 

(■25-26-27) 

GASTON 

(•18-19) 
HUTSON 

(■26-27) 
HAFELEE 

(■21-22) 

HANCOCK 

( '26-27 ) 

HERRIN. A. 

HERRIN. C. 

("28) 
HAMRICK. M. 

(•23-24) 

HAMRICK. N. 

(■21-22) 

HAWKINS 



■17) 



JUSTUS 

(•23-24-25) 

JOHNSON. 1 



JONES. E. 

KNOX 

(•18-19-20) 

KILGORE 

(•22-23-24-25) 

KRATZ 

LEMON 



LANE 

(•17-lS) 

LAIRD. R 

(•17) 

MORRIS. J 

(•21-22-23) 

MASON 



MORRIS. H. 

(•19-20) 
MOORE. E. 
(•17-18-20) 
MOSELEY 

(•25) 

MALSBY 

(•27-28) 

MORRISON 

(•20) 
McKISSICK 



MacLAUGHLIN. L. 

(•26) 
MacLAUGHLIN, C. 



McGARRITY 



NIX 
•22-23-24-25) 
PORTER 



ROBERTS 

(■21-23) 

REYNOLDS, ( 



SHEPPARD. B. 

SIMS, J. 

(■26-27-2S) 

STEPHENS, M. 

(■20-21-22-23) 

SMITH 



TURNER, H. 

(■18-19-20-21) 

THOMPSON. F. 

(■17) 

TURK 

(■18-19) 

TALIAFERRO 



VAUGHN 

(•26-27-28) 

WALSH 

(•25) 

WALLACE 

(•23) 

WALTON. O. 

(•18-19-20) 

WALL. A, 

(•27-28) 

WHITEHEAD 

(•20-21-22) 

WHITE 



(•25-26-27) 
WYATT 



WILLIAMSON 



WOODWARD 



^imcrmG^oim% 



BASEBALL 



ADAMS, W. 

('21) 

ANDERSON. M. 

(•2G-27) 

BRYANT 

(•22-23-24) 

BARBEE 

('24-25-20) 

BARTON 

('25) 

BUCHANAN. T. 

('24-25-26) 

BUCHANAN. H. 

('26) 

BOSWELL, B. 

(•26-27-28) 
BOSWELL, C. 

COUSINS 

('25-26-27) 

CHESTNUT, W. F. 

(•26-27) 

CHESTNUT. C. 

('20) 

COOPER 

('21) 

CARLYLE 

('20) 

COX, w. 

('22-23-24) 
COLLIER 
(•221 
DAVID 
('21-221 
DAVENPORT 

('19-201 

DeJARNETT 

(•17-18-19) 

DURHAM 

(•18) 



CHESTNUT. W. F. 

(•26-27) 

CLEMENT 

(•27-28-29) 



dA& 



FERGUSON 




MASSEY 


(•22-24-251 




(■27) 






MAURER 


(•26) 




(•23-24-25) 


HOLBROOKE 




MIMS 


•19) 






HOPE 




MINHINETT 


(•17-18-20-21) 




(•26) 


HUMPHRIES 




McNEIL 


(•22-23-24) 






HUTSON 




NICHOLS 


(•27-28) 




('17-18-19-20) 






PORTER 


(■21-23) 




(•23-24-25) 


JUSTUS 




PARRISH 


(•26-27) 




(•23-24-25) 






PEACE 








JONES, T. 




PARTRIDGE, H 


(•21) 




('22) 






PARTRIDGE, J. 


(•26) 




('22-23-24-25) 






PRICE, J. 


(•22-23-24-25) 




(•21-22) 


KNOX 




POLLOCK 


(•19-20-21) 










REYNOLDS, G 


(•19-20) 






LINDSEY, L. 




REYNOLDS, J. 


(•24-25-26) 




('28) 


LITTLE 




RICKS 


(•20-21-22) 




(■17) 


LAWSON 




REED, J. 


(•27-28) 




(•19) 


LAIRD. C. 




SIMPSON 


(•28) 




(•21-22) 


MORRIS, J. 




SHEPHERD, E 


(•21-22-23-24) 




(•26-27) 


MASON 




SELMAN 


(•17-18-19) 


YORK 

(•26-27-28 


(•23) 


BASKETBALL 


COUSINS 




GOULD 


(>26-27) 




('28) 


FEINBERG 




HERRIN. C. 


(•28-29) 




(•29) 


GARLINGTON 




MASSEY 


(•26-27) 




('27-28) 


GOLDIN 




NIX 


(•29) 




(•26) 




TRACK 


DeJARNETT 




IVEY 






(•22-23) 


EUBANKS 




LIBBY 


(■28-29) 




(•26) 



SIMS 
•19-20-21-22) 
SIMS, C. 



TURK 

(•19-20-21) 
TALIAFERRO 

(•27-28) 
TUCKER, Q. 



TURNER, D. 

(•28) 

TERRELL 

(•25-26) 

THOMPSON, E. 

(•27-28) 

VERNER 

(•17) 

VAUGHN 

(•27-28) 

WILLIS 

(•20-23-24-25) 

WALTON, H. 

(■27) 

WALLACE 

(•23) 

WALTON, O. 

(•19-20-21) 

WALL, A. 



WALL, H. 

(•23-24-25-261 
WARWICK 



WALSH 

(•26) 

WILSON, J. 

('28) 



ROBERTS 

('22-23) 
SNEAD 



iP 



TENNIS 



fT? 



CAMPBELL, C. 



DUCKWORTH 



GORDY. W. 



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li 

'a-^ 

^ 



WOLFP ACK, PETRELS TO BATTLE ' ^'l^l^o 
^iSWws PETRELS ROUT MAURER'S AGGIES 



BY INJURIES,. 
Petrels' Hones Rest on This Lii 



JACKETS MEET 
OGLETHORPE IN 
ANNUAL AFFR« 



Jt Will Try to Halt Tcfh ' 

Robertson's Praise of Tech fox Scores Touchdown to " 
r.'"'L,uZu7h.,^^.Z'^'""'°' To Tie It tn 2nd Period 

PETRE LS GET 6^6 TIE WIT H MARYVILLE- 

Petrels Point for Tech Tilt 



Petrels Score 
On First Play 
Of Hard Game 




«» 



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ITC0V4LS /^- xv^\ 
-«TTEDOUT ^/y- y^^.^ 
IIFRMANCL V > ^^ 

''varsity leaves for cincinnatip 



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NORTH GEORGIA AGGIE GAME 

Thanksgiving marked the end of a rather hectic and rather unsuccessful grid- 
iron campaign for the Petrels of 1928. The only high spot in the entire season was 
the licking handed our ancient and time-honored rivals, — the Mercer Bears in Macon. 

Coach Robertson's lads flashed a most brilliant offense in whipping the North 
Georgia Aggies in the curtain-raiser on the campus 
70 to 0. 

Those who knew and a great number of those who 
did not know, predicted a great season for Oglethorpe 
right at the start on the strength of the showing made 
against Adrian Maurer's out-fit. 

Coach Robertson started his second stringers 
against the boys from Dahlonega and although they 
were only scrubs they accounted for four touchdowns 
ere the regulars relieved them at the close of the first 
period. The remainder of the game was nothing short 
of a track meet with the two scions of speed, "Cy" 
Bell and Lyman Fox, running wild. These two aces 
were ably assisted, however, in the ball toting de- 
partment by Amos Martin and Clau^ Herrin. 
nd Malsbi) 




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HIGH POINT COLLEGE 

The following Saturday the Petrels experienced no real difficulty in subduing the 
purple-clad warriors of High Point College 33 to in Asheville, North Carolina. 

Once again the Oglethorpe offense was unstopped and, except for two or three 
costly fumbles when touchdowns were inevitable, the score would have been much 
larger. Claud Herrin broke into the limelight during this game when he replaced 
"Cy" Bell in the second half and immediately proceeded to gallop for a touchdown. 

Lyman Fox and "Cy" Bell were once more shining lights in the offensive play 
while a sophomore by the name of McKissick was a tower of strength on the defense, 
backing up the line in a most satisfactory manner. 




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LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 

The Loyola Wolfpack, fresh from a near-victory over the famous Notre Dame 
"Irishmen," blew into Atlanta with one of the most powerful offenses ever seen at 
Spiller Field. When the smoke of battle had cleared Oglethorpe was found to be 
on the short end of a 33 to 6 score. The "Dixie Flyer," who in private life is known 
as "Bucky" More, was the ace in the hole for the lads from New Orleans. This in- 
dividual had scored two touchdowns before the game was ten minutes old. 

After the devastating first quarter things began to look a little more encouraging 
for Coach Robertson's men. Herrin scored Oglethorpe's lone touchdown after a nice 
gallop of some 30 or more yards late in the third period. The work of Fox, Bell, 
Herrin and McKissick stood out in the back-field while Sims, Fulton and Clement 
were potent factors in the showing of the line. 




timcimG^t^W% 




ST. XAVIER COLLEGE 

Saturday, October 20, found the Petrels doing battle with the St. Xavier Musket- 
eers in Cincinnati, Ohio. Fumbles on the part of Oglethorpe proved fatal and the 
Birds were forced to bow to the enemy 9 to 6. 

Successive fumbles in the backfield stopped two nice Oglethorpe drives goalward 
in the first period. The first quarter was rather dull and uneventful save for the 
exhibition of fumbling that was put on by the Petrel backs. The second quarter, 
however, opened with a bang when St. Xavier recovered another Oglethorpe fumble 
in mid-field and on two plays were on the Birds' 5 yard line. On the next play the 
Ohio lads took the lead 7 to 0. Oglethorpe, undaunted by this twist of fate, pro- 
ceeded to work the ball down the field when Fox returned a punt 30 yards before 
being brought to earth. On a pretty 25-yard pass flipped by Herrin to Fox the lat- 
ter raced the remaining 35 yards for a touchdown. A beautiful rally in the closing 
minutes of the last period brought the fans to their feet. This drive started from 
Oglethorpe's own 20-yard line when "Cy" Bell passed to Herrin for 12 yards follow- 
ed by two nice passes from the hands of Herrin, one an 8-yard heave to "Cy" Bell, 
and the other a 15-yard toss to Wall. 





By grabbing a punt and dashing 64 yards through the entire Maryville team with 
but one minute left to play, "Cy" Bell saved his mates from defeat, the game ending 
to 6 tie. 

Just why Oglethorpe couldn't hand a decisive licking to the Maryville High- 
landers is not known unless, perhaps, the game with Georgia Tech slated for the 
next Saturday was uppermost in their minds. Anyway it was the great work of 
"Cy" Bell that saved the day. The Petrels seemed to be able to gain at will until 
a certain point had been reached near the Maryville goal line and there the advance 
usually stopped. Claud Herrin and Amos Martin romped up and down the field 
like a pair of young colts while Jenny Woodward was a regular wheelhorse. "Cy" 
Bell of course accounted for his usual number of good runs even had he not returned 
that punt for 60 odd yards. Burford, Clement, Sims, Fulton and Coffee were out- 
standing in the line. 




KizaamcB^M^ 



f? 




GEORGIA TECH 

The Oglethorpe-Tech game ran true to form with the Petrels holding the nation- 
al champions to two lone touchdowns for three long quarters only to have Tech's su- 
perior reserve material run rough-shod over them during the last period to win, 33-7. 

The Petrels, as has been the case for the past three years, were leading the Yel- 
low Jackets at the half, 7 to 6 and it was not until late in the third quarter that Tech 
was able to take the lead 13 to 7. Coach Robertson's lads have the distinction of be- 
ing the first team to actually earn a touchdown against the Golden Tornado last year. 
Oglethorpe's score came in the latter part of the second period when several wall 
directed plays and two forward passes turned the trick. The touchdown was made 
on a line-buck right through Tech's million dollar line for three yards with Herrin 
carrying the ball. It was "Cy" Bell, however, who carried the ball to the three 
yard marker on a pretty pass thrown by Herrin. 

Jake Malsby at center played the best game of his career stopping Tech plays 
time and again before they started. Jimmie Sims played his usual good game at 
tackle as did "Curley" Fulton at guard. "Monk" Clement proved himself to be a 
really great end by stopping the famous end runs of Tech's Ail-American half-back, 
Mizell. In the back-field the work of Fox, Herrin, Woodward and Bell was outstand- 
ing. 




^immjiG^cnm^ 




MERCER UNIVERSITY 

The one bright spot during an otherwise gloomy season was the way Oglethorpe 
spanked Mercer down in Macon on Armistice Day 15 to 0. The score does not indi- 
cate the complete whipping that the Bears were forced to take at the hands of their 
bitterest rivals. 

Oglethorpe jumped into the lead in the first few minutes of play when Mercer 
fumbled on their own 40 yard line and Asa Wall broke through, scooped up the ball 
and lumbered down the field for a touchdown. Burford, Coffee, Clement, Sims and 
Malsby played exceptionally fine football in the line while the old faithful trio of ball- 
toters, Bell, Herrin and Martin were the offensive heroes. Martin particularly was 
right and it was through his efforts that much of the yardage was gained. His 
kicking, too, was far above the average. Charlie McKissick was a terror to the 
Bears when on defense backing up the line like a veteran rather than a green sopho- 
more. 




t'iimxmGimm^ 




PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE 

Oglethorpe, in an attempt to play two games in one week, suflfered from the ef- 
fects of over-work and dropped a hard fought game to Presbyterian College 7 to 6, 
on Friday, November 16. The victory over Mercer the preceding Monday seemed 
to have sapped the strength of the Petrels to such an extent that they were not able 
to make any marked headway against the stubborn defense that Presbyterian present- 
ed that day. 

Oglethorpe's score came early in the first period when Jake Malsby intercepted 
an enemy pass and raced 45 yards to a touchdown. The failure to kick the goal cost 
Oglethorpe the game. The Petrels, however, maintained this six point lead until the 
final period when a sustained attack netted the Presbyterians a touchdown, the extra 
point giving them the struggle. 




:< :iiaamcBaM> 




CHATTANOOGA UNIVERSITY 

The Petrels once more figured in one of the most heart breaking losses on record 
when they were forced to take the count up in Chattanooga on Thanksgiving 34 to 19. 
Oglethorpe started off with a rush when on line plays and end runs they placed the 
ball on 'Nooga's two yard line right after the kick-off only to have the chance to score 
again taken away by a fumble. And so the ball see-sawed back and forth during 
the entire first period and most of the second. It wasn't until late in the second 
quarter that the Birds were able to push a touchdown across when Jenny Woodward, 
after a series of bull-like rushes at the line, crossed the final white line to tie the 
score 7 to 7. With a scant 45 seconds left in the first half, Chattanooga heaved a long 
pass that was good for a touchdown. 

Oglethorpe came back in the second half and scored two touchdowns before the 
lialf was eight minutes old. Oglethorpe held this advantage up until the last ten min- 
utes of the game when an intercepted pass thrown by Herrin started the Moccasins 
on a scoring spree that put the game on ice for Chattanooga. 

The playing of Sims in this game earned for him a place on the All-S. I. A. A. 
aggregation. Once more Jeff Burford stood out in the line as a guard of no mean 
ability. Woodward, Herrin and "Cy" Bell did most of the ball carrying for the Birds 
and did it well. Had Herrin not been hurt in the first half things might have been 
different at the end. 



9^ 




^ 



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tnnduiGB^m^ 



1928 Season Results 



September 28— Petrels 70; 

October 6— Petrels 33; 

October 13— Petrels 6 ; 

October 20— Petrels 6 ; 

October 27— Petrels 6 ; 

November 3 — Petrels 7 ; 

November 12 — Petrels 15; 

November 16 — Petrels 6 

November 29 — Petrels 19 



North Georgia Aggies — Campus. 

High Point College 0— Asheville, N. C. 

Loyola University 33 — Atlanta, Georgia. 

St. Xavier College 9 — Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Maryville College 6 — Atlanta, Georgia. 
; Georgia Tech 33 — Atlanta, Georgia. 
; Mercer University — Macon, Georgia. 
; Presbyterian College 7 — Clinton, S. C. 
; University of Chattanooga 33 — Chattanooga. 



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rOX PLACE KICKS FOR POINT G] (Pi 



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1928 Roster 





OFFICERS 
















Homer C. Chestnut 




. Freshman Coach 


James Sims 




Captaw 






. Captah 






. Manager 


Jake Sutton 




Manager 




LINEUPS 




FIRST 


TEAM SECOND 


TEAM 


Clement 


LE 


. Aldridge 


Coffee 


LT 


Church 




lg 


Fulton 




. . . . c 


. . Vaughn 




rG 






. . . RT 




Wall 


rE 


GiFFORD 


C. Bell . 


QB 


. MacLaughlin 


Fox 


. RH 




Herein 


. . . . LH 


Woodward 


McKissiCK 


. . . . FB 


Brooks 




SUBSTITUTES 




Milton . . . 


. . FiiUback Golden . . . 


. . . Tackle 


Therrell 


. . Halfback Adams . . . 


. . . Gnard 


Crouch 


. . Halfback McSherry . 


. End 



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PETRELS LOSE 
STERN GAME 
TO BEARS 41 30 



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FORSimNK 

OPT 


PETRELS PLAY 
N. GEORGIA'S 
AGGIESFRIDAY 

rw > , Fob. 


PETRELS PUY IN • 

MACON TUESDAY 

Basket Games 
With A. A. C. 


Oglethorpe and Mercer 
Clash m Atlanta Tonight 

- L W R. ir rBciriwHom, Court 



4 ^>; 



PAT STEPHENS 
FINDS STRIDE 
A A C RQMPS 



BEARS UCK 
PETRELS IN 
EXTRA PERIOD 







PETRELS PLAY 
J. P. C. CLUB AT 
8:3«TONIGHTi 



\ti ^ .^ Moccasins 

/^ ,^ *'>-^ Saturday 

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PETRELS A^D \W ^A^ ^Cj 

BEARS RENEW v*^ v^ ^ ho, G.,;rT;^.=a J 

OLD RIVALRY ^vV^x ><" ^y<> ^ two Mh... j^ j 

B«k«l Ban Qui„icl» MmI VT^ ~ ^*« "^^ '=-"■ f»'^.» >» Bt »«, 

on Mdcon Court Tonight . ^ v ' ^*\ '" C*^.,*^^ "^ "'"^ ^^ °* 

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Progressive Club Beats 
Petrel Quint. 55 To 39 



Hign Giin. 

Mercer Turns Back Oglethorpe 
In Hard-Fought Basketball Game 



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Basketball 1929 

r-|-rHE basketball season of 1929 could not be termed successful by even the most 
I enthusiastic Petrel supporters. Only twelve games were played by Coach Rob- 
^ ertson's men and of that number the Birds were able to win only three. 

Shortly after the Christmas holidays, with only five practices under their belts, 
Oglethorpe trotted down to the Atlanta Athletic Club to engage those individuals on 
the hardwood. During the first half the A. A. C. lads were given the scare of their 
young lives when Harry Feinberg and Claud Herrin rained in shots from all angles 
of the floor. The guarding of Clement and Bell held the Clubbers mighty close, too, 
making scoring almost impossible. The score at half time found the A. A. C. just 
two points ahead — 17 to 1.5. Pat Stephens and Company, however, came back with 
a vengeance during the second half snowing the Petrels under, the final score being 
58-30. Harry Feinberg was high point man for Oglethorpe. 

Oglethorpe had a little better luck in the next game with Joe Hutson's North 
Georgia Aggies in Dahlonega when Claud Herrin found himself and looped the ball 
through the basket for a total of 27 points. The game was hard fought most of the 
way and it wasn't until the closing minutes of play that the Birds were able to pile 
up a lead that assured victory. "Kid" Golden, substituting for Feinberg, was second 
high point man for the day with 10 points. 

The following week our Petrels invaded the lair of the Mercer Bears and came 
out on the short end of a 41 to 33 score. This game between these two bitter riv- 
als was a battle royal from start to finish and it was not until the final whistle that 
Coach Robertson's boys were forced to bow in humble submission. Herrin was once 



^ 



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[? 




MONK CLEMEWT 

Cen i:er 




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again the high scorer for the night with 17 points 
to his credit. The defensive play of Clement, Bell 
and Therrel kept Mercer from piling the score. 

Oglethorpe dropped two more games in as many 
nights on a trip to the southwestern part of the 
state. Columbus "Y" headed by Jack Massey, 
barely nosed the Birds out 47 to 45 in the first 
of the series and the soldiers of Ft. Benning won 
the second 35 to 26. The loss of Clement may 
have had something to do with the reversals. 
Ilerrin far outdistanced the field in the first of 
these games 
when he turned 
in 22 points for 
his share of the 
evening's work. 
Riddle was sec- 
ond to Herrin 
with 8 points 
while Goldin was 
third with 7 
points to his 
credit. In the 
game with Uncle 
Sam's guardians, 
Herrin garnered 
16 points to step 
out in front once 
more. Therrell's 
guarding was an 
added feature of 
this scrap, hold- 
ing the soldier 
star All-Anieri- 
c a n forward, 
Johnny Re 
to 6 points. 




HARRY PEINBERG 
Forward 



Oglethorpe broke the losing streak by nosing 
out the fast Jewish Progressive Club quintet ir. 
Atlanta 28 to 25 in one of the fastest games the 
Birds engaged in all year. "Monk" Clement car- 
ried off the scoring honors in this game with 9 
points while Feinberg was a close second with 
7 markers. Bell played a beautiful floor game, 
taking the ball up the floor on numerous occasions 
from under his own basket to put it in a scoring 
position. 






tiimDRGi3jim> 



E 



The next game was dropped to Chattanooga 
after the Petrels had held a substantial lead 
throughout most of the first half. The 'Noogans 
put on a second half rally that quickly erased the 
lead held by Oglethorpe. The final score was 
3.3 to 20. 

It required an extra five minute period for Mer- 
cer to win their return game in Atlanta the score 
being dead-locked 30 to 30 at the end of the regular 
playing time. During the extra period Mercer 
sank three long shots while the best the Petrels 
could do was to 
get one and so 
once more Mer- 
cer forced the 
Birds into sub- 
mission. Her- 
rin with 14 
points and Fein- 
berg with 8 led 
the attack for 
Oglethorpe. 

The return 
game with J. P. 
C. was a rough 
and tumble af- 
fair with the 
clubbers getting 
revenge for the 
licking handed 
them earlier in 
the season. The 
Birds were ten 
points behind at 
half time and 
from then on 
they dropped 
farther and farther back, the final score being 55 
to 39. Herrin, who had been badly off form in 
the last few games, seemed to come to life and drop- 
ped a total of 20 points through the mesh. Once 
again the floor work of "Cy" Bell was outstanding. 

The North Georgia Aggies were again conquer- 
ed this time by a much smaller score than the first. 
Herrin and Bell were the big guns in the 44 to 40 
win, the former getting 16 points while the latter 
amassed a total of 12. 





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'MUTT" RIDDLE 
Forward 





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^*^':- 



CHARLES MSLAUGHLIN 
Guard. 




t'^RiimGHM.ad^ 



Chattanooga came to Oglethorpe all set to make 
it two in a row over the Petrels and after a decid- 
edly close game they succeeded in accomplishing 
their purpose. The score was 27 to 22. 

In the grand finale Coach Joe Bean's A. A. C. 
wonder boys handed Oglethorpe a neat lacing, 51 
to 16. There wasn't anything outstanding in this 
game unless it was the regularity with which 
Herrin and Feinberg missed shot after shot at the 
basket. Bell, Therrell and Clement played their 
usual good defensive game although the score 
wouldn't indicate 
that the Petrels 
even had any 
guards in the 
game. 

Basket ball at 
Oglethorpe has 
never been a 
howling success 
from the very 
first year which 
was in 1926 up 
until now. Al- 
though the Pet- 
rels have played 
some mighty 
fine games on 
the court at 
times they have 
never approach- 
ed the records 
made in t h e 
other sports on 
the campus. 




LYLE KRATZ 
Guard 



The Fresh- 
man team of 1926 whipped everything in this part 
of the south and were counted upon heavily to 
make basketball history before their life at Ogle- 
thorpe was ended. "Monk" Clement and "Cy" 
Bell were the only ones of that Frosh squad to play 
three years of varsity basketball, the rest having 
dropped out of school one by one as the years roll- 
ed by. The prospects for next year's team are 
the best that they have been since 1926 and it is 
hoped that the jinx which has followed the Petrels 
se doggedly for the past four years can be shaken 



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^1171CDMGWSm% 



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Claud Herrin, the star of this year's quint, 
still has two more years to go and should this 
blonde gentleman show as much form in 1930 as he 
did this past year he will rank with the best basket 
bailers in the south. The task of filling the shoes 
of "Monk" Clement next year is not going to be an 
easy task for Clem has been an outstanding per- 
former for the past three years, captaining the 
team in his sophomore year. Harry Feinberg did 
not have as successful a year on the hardwood in 
1929 as he did the year before but at that he made 
a very capable 
running mate 
for Herrin at 
forward. "Irish" 
turned in some 
pretty nice 
games during 
the early part of 
the year, espec- 
ially in the sea- 
sons' opener with 
the A. A. C. out- 
fit. "Mutt" Rid- 
dle played the 
role of chief sub- 
stitute to both 
Herrin and Fein- 
berg and played 
it in a most 
satisfactory and 
pleasing man- 
ner. More will 
be heard from 
this individ- 
ual ere his days 
as a Petrel are 
over. "Cy" Bell played better basket ball this 
year than at any other time during his career. His 
floor work was of the highest order and it was 
through his efforts principally that the rest of the 
club were able to score for "Cy" had a knack of 
taking the ball off the enemies' backboard and 
working it up the floor. 

This past year was perhaps the most disastrous 
season that Oglethorpe has had since the begin- 
ning of this sport, winning only three games out 
of fourteen played. 




porward 





[? 




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1929 Roster 



OFFICERS 

Harold J. Robertson Head Coach 

Kenneth Campbell Assintant Coach 

Louis Gillman Manager 

Harry Feinberg Captain 

Cy Bell Captain 

LINEUPS 

FIRST TEAM SECOND TEAM 

Hekrin F Riddle 

Feinberg F Eubanks 

Clement C Golden' 

Therrell G Kratz 

C. Bell G MacLaughlin 



RESULTS OF SEASON 



Oglethorpe 30; 
Oglethoi-pe 51; 
Oglethorpe 33; 
Oglethorpe 45; 
Oglethorpe 26; 
Oglethorpe 28; 
Oglethorpe 20; 
Oglethorpe 32; 
Oglethorpe 39; 
Oglethorpe 44; 
Oglethorpe 22; 
Oglethorpe 16; 



Atlanta Athletic Club 58. 
North Georgia Aggies 42. 
Mercer University 41. 
Columbus "Y" 47. 
Fort Benning 35. 
Jewish Progressive Club 25. 
University of Chattanooga 33. 
Mercer University 36. 
Jewish Progressive Club 55. 
North Georgia Aggies 40. 
University of Chattanooga 27. 
Atlanta Athletic Club 51. 



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PETREL NINE MEETS NOTRE DAME 




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1928 ROSTER 
MADE PI B1,!C 



PETRELS MEET BRUINS THURSDAY 

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TOBESCENE A.enfucRj' Wildcats Are lamed 



PETRELS LOSE SERIES TO TECH 



LETS WIN 



I SPORTS I THOMPSON IS 1929 DIAMOND LEADER ^TH GAMES 



TiiilEE STARS 
LOSS TO TEAM 



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PETRELS MEET BRUINS TUESDAY 



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PETRELS PLAX^xV-^ORGlA/ ''^MAY ' ^^fVpiiiER 



MEET AGAIN ,«xf ; 

ON DIAMOND '«'^ ^^ 



Oglethorpe Begins Grind 
for Mercer Tilt Saturday 




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BASEBALL at Oglethorpe during the 
Spring of 1928 was considered very suc- 
cessful by Virtue of vv'inning more col- 
lege games than lost. The Stormy Petrels 
played a twenty-two game schedule, eigh- 
teen of which were with college teams while 
the other four were with professional teams 
of high standing. The Birds got off to a 
bad start when they dropped two games to 
the Atlanta Crackers and a pair to the Co- 
lumbus "Foxes" within five days. 

In the first college tilt Oglethorpe was 
forced to bow to its bitter rival, Georgia 
Tech, on two occasions. Coach Anderson's 
lads started scoring early in the first game 
holding a three run lead up until the eighth 
inning when Tech came from behind win- 
ning by one lone run, 5 to 4. Asa Wall hit 




Coach Anderson 
and Managtr Thrash. 




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one over the right field fence with 
two on to give the Birds three runs 
in the second inning. Lawson pitch- 
ed nice ball all the way. In the sec- 
ond game, with the Techites the 
same situation was in vogue with the 
Petrels holding what looked like a 
comfortable lead only to have it wip- 
ed out late in the game with Tech 
once more winning by one run, 11 
to 12. Vaughn was right but no 
amount of masterly pitching could 
have won the game it seems. It 
just wasn't in the books for Ogle- 
thorpe to win. 

The next two games on the base- 
ball menu were with the University 
of Kentucky, Oglethorpe winning 
one and tying the other. In the first 
game the Birds won handily 7 to 5 
and were in a fair way to win the 
second with a two run lead up until 
the first of the ninth when Kentucky 
tied it up. The boys from the Blue- 
grass state had to leave to catch a 
train with the score still knotted at 
4 to 4. 

Things began to look bad for 
Oglethorpe once again when on a 
week's trip they lost four straight, 
two to Furman in Greenville, S. C, 
and two to Davidson College in Con- 
cord, N. C. But by winning the last 
game of the trip from Wofford in 
Spartanburg, the Petrels started a 
winning streak which carried them 
through eight games before they 
were again toppled. During these 
eight wins the Birds amassed a total 



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of 88 runs for an average of eleven 
runs per game. Not so bad! 

The Mercer Bears were taken in- 
to camp on three occasions during 
this winning reign of the Peachtree 
Road collegians by the scores of 11 
to 2, 14 to 8 and 7 to 6. These 
wins alone would have given Ogle- 
thorpe a successful season in view 
of the intense spirit that exists be- 
tween these two institutions. In 
the second game the Birds hit safe- 
ly exactly sixteen times. 

Tennessee was the Anderson- 
men's next victim, falling 11 to 5 
and 21 to 8. Vaughn pitched steady 
ball in the first game giving up a 
total of ten hits but keeping them 
so scattered that only five runs 
could be scored. Taliaferro furnish- 
ed the big thrill of the afternoon 
when he smacked one out of the lot 
in the first inning. Turner and 
Laird with a pair of hits apiece were 
the heavy stickers for the Petrels. 
The second game, with big Asa Wall 
on the mound at the start, looked 
like a track meet for Oglethorpe, the 
final score being 21 to 8. A total 
of 18 errors were made by both 
teams, Tennessee holding a slight 
edge with 10 mistakes to their credit. 
In the eighth inning Taliaferro and 
Joe Hutson got two hits apiece in 
one inning, which was a rather uni- 
que occurrence. Martin, Laird and 
Thompson were the big guns in the 
Petrel attack. 

Oglethorpe jumped on three 





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Howard pitchers in the first of a two 
game series for a grand total of 13 
hits and 11 runs while the Howard 
Bulldogs had to be content with 7 
hits and 4 runs. Vaughn and Hut- 
son did the pitching for the Birds, 
going 5 and 4 innings respectively. 
Besides pitching nice ball Vaughn 
also added his share in a hitting way 
by getting a triple and a double out 
of four trips to the plate. Brant 
Boswell also had a good day at the 
bat hammering out three safe hits 
out of five times at bat. The sec- 
ond game was not so easy for the 
Petrels to tuck away and it was not 
until the eighth that Oglethorpe got 
a one run lead, finally winning 5 to 
4. Lawson did the twirling, pitch- 
ing almost air-tight ball except for 
one bad inning. 

In the last two games of the sea- 
son with Georgia down in Athens 
the Birds ran into a lot of grief. 
Vaughn pitched the first game and 
was going good until the umpire 
took a dislike to him and from then 
on they had to be right down the 
middle before said Mr. Umpire would 
call a strike. Just as soon as Lind- 
sey shoved his slants down the 
groove the Georgia Bulldogs prompt- 
ly smacked them out of the ball park 
or almost out of the park. Anyway 
Bill White's lads had plenty of trou- 
ble winning those two games despite 
the handicap under which the Pet- 
rels were laboring. The first one 
was lost by a one run margin while 
the second went down on the records 



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10 to 7. Lawson pitched the sec- 
ond game and ran into almost as 
much trouble with decisions as did 
his teammate on the preceeding day. 

Coach Anderson made a pretty 
smart set of ball players out of the 
1928 aggregation after all. The 
pitching staff, composed of Howard 
Lawson, Lindsey Vaughn and Joe 
Hutson, with Asa Wall pitching a 
few nice games on the side, was 
mighty effective. The infield with 
Turner on first, Boswell on second, 
Taliaferro at short and Martin on 
third was all that could be asked for. 
Laird, York and Wall did their share 
in the outfield. 

There never has been a time, 
since the founding of Oglethorpe 
University, that Coach Frank Ander- 
son has not had an exceptionally fine 
baseball aggregation. Present indi- 
cations are that the season of 1929 
will be no exception to the prece- 
dent as set by the Petrels in years 
gone by. 

As we go to press Coach Ander- 
son's clan have participated in four 
baseball games, two with the Atlanta 
Crackers and two with our ancient 
and honorable rivals — Georgia Tech. 
In the series with Atlanta's entry in 
the Southern League, the Petrels 
were forced to bow to their superior 
and more experienced professional 
rivals in the first game but came 
back the next afternoon with a ven- 
geance, defeating the pros 8 to 4. 
Friday and Saturday of the same 





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week Oglethorpe and Georgia Tech 
played, the first game resulting in 
an 8 to 8 tie, play being called at the 
end of the ninth inning because of 
darkness. Saturday afternoon the 
Petrels played brilliant ball to defeat 
their opponents from North Avenue, 
5 to 4. This victory over Tech help- 
ed to salve the wounds so often in- 
flicted on Oglethorpe on the gridiron. 

In the first game with the Crack- 
ers, Oglethorpe stayed in the lead for 
the greater part of the game and it 
was only a belated rally in the eighth 
inning that gave the pros the win- 
ning runs. Lindsey Vaughn pitched 
mighty good ball all the way and had 
it not been for that one bad inning, 
the eighth, the chances are that the 
Birds would have made it two over 
Atlanta. Howard Lawson did the 
twirling in the second game display- 
ing the same brand of baseball that 
Vaughn did the preceeding day. 
Oglethorpe collected a total of 28 
hits in the two games with Mr. Spil- 
ler's men, 17 of which were gotten 
in the second game. 

Once more Vaughn did mound 
duty in the first Tech game holding 
the hard hitting Jackets to 8 bingles 
while his mates were collecting 10 off 
the deliveries of three Tech hurlers. 
Marion Anderson was the outstand- 
ing hero of this first game when he 
hit a home run with a man on first 
base. This circuit drive of Ander- 
son's drove in the tying run, his own 
run giving the Petrels a one run ad- 



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vantage. Asa Wall also got a four 
sacker in the fourth inning which 
helped very materially to overcome 
the four run lead that Tech got in the 
second inning. 

The second game was perhaps the 
more spectacular of the two for it 
was not until the first of the ninth 
that Oglethorpe gained a one run ad- 
vantage over the Jackets which prov- 
ed to be the margin of victory. Once 
again it was Marion Anderson that 
drove in the winning run. Howard 
Lawson did the pitching in this game 
holding the Techites' hits so scatter- 
ed that little damage was done until 
the seventh inning when three men 
scored on two hits and two errors. 
Vaughn relieved Lawson in the ninth 
and it was through his own efforts 
that the Petrels were able to win. 
With one out and a man on second 
and third Vaughn raced clear over 
to the third base line to spear a pop 
fly which looked like a sure hit doub- 
ling the man on third base to end the 
game. 

Oglethorpe's infield has received 
a great deal of favorable comment 
from the sport writers of Atlanta 
during these early season games, 
most of them going so far as to say 
that it is the best college infield in 
the south. The infield composed of 
Holcomb on first; Anderson on sec- 
ond; Martin at short and Herrin on 
third, functions in big league style. 
Coach Anderson has a wealth of 
pitching talent in Vaughn, Lawson, 





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Byrd, Rabon, Golden, Holcomb and 
Wall. The outfield has been chang- 
ed so many times that it is hard to 
say just who are the regulars. Wall, 
Kimbrel, Reynolds, Riddle, Holcomb 
and McLaughlin have been doing the 
bulk of the work in the outer garden 
so far, and doing it well. George 
Everett has been alternating with 
Holcomb on first base and it is a toss 
up as to which one will get the call 
legularly. Behind the bat we find 
captain "Wild boy" Thompson, one 
of the finest college catchers in the 
south. "Tommy" has been showing 
a world of stuff so far this year and 
he is expected to go even better as 
the season advances. 

The Petrels dropped their first 
college game of 1929 to the Univer- 
sity of Tennessee on Hermance Field 
9 to 7 after leading the Volunteers 
for seven innings. It was'nt until 
the tenth frame that Tennessee was 
able to break the 7-7 dead-lock es- 
tablished in the eighth. Vaughn, on 
the mound for the Petrels, gave up 
14 hits while his mates were only 
able to collect 9 safe bingles off the 
delivery of Bridges. Martin, An- 
derson and Holcomb, with two hits 
apiece were the heavy stick-wielders 
for Oglethorpe. Herrin's home run 
in the sixth was one of the high spots 
of the days activities. 

The following afternoon Coach 
Anderson's proteges evened things 
up with Tennessee by taking the 
second game 12 to 7. 



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The 1928 Team 

COACH Frank B. Anderson, the dean of Southern baseball coaches, 
faced a difficult and puzzling problem m early March of 1928 when 
he began organizing another one of his famous ball clubs from a 
group of candidates who lacked the polish and gusto of usual Oglethorpe 
diamond turnouts. 

Nevertheless, the sage skipper scratched his chin and busied him- 
self. As a result he produced one of the fastest infields in Oglethorpe 
baseball history and, too, introduced several outstanding players who are 
destined to arouse baseball critics before their college careers end. 

Kid Jinx was the stumbling block throughout the season. Honestly, 
he blocked the path of the Petrels at nearly every turn. Just recall the 
two games with Tech and the University of Georgia series and you'll cer- 
tainly place that sickening mug of the Kid ! 

Fourteen letters were awarded to : Thompson, catcher ; Turner, first 
base; Martin, second base; Taliaferro, shortstop; Reynolds, third base; 
Wall, right field ; Laird, left field ; Boswell, centerfield ; Mims, utility man ; 
Lawson, York, Vaughn, Hutson, pitchers and Buddy Thrash, manager. 



i 



- And The 1929 Team 



AS the Yamacraw goes to press. Coach Anderson is again busy with 
his young, hustling ball players. In addition to the veterans of 
1928 — ■ Thompson, Martin, Reynolds, Wall, Lawson, Vaughn — the 
skipper has a bunch of recruits from the Freshman team ready to fill the 
vacancies and another rosy season is ahead! 

Al Kimbrell, a backstop of ability ; Mutt Riddle, a pony in the outfield ; 
Hubert Holcomb, first baseman; Horace Byrd, portside pitcher; Melton 
Rabon, pitcher; Ed Emerson, infielder; George Everett, pitcher; Keith 
McLaughlin, outfielder; Marion Anderson, second baseman and a chip off 
the old block; Harry Adams, backstop; Ernest Golden and Jenny Wood- 
ward, outfielders and Claud Herrin, third baseman, are the new candidates. 



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1928 Season Scores 

Atlanta Crackers 9. 
Atlanta Crackers 19. 
Columbus Foxes 14. 
Columbus Foxes 8. 
Georgia Tech 5. 
Georgia Tech 12. 
University of Kentucky 5. 
University of Kentucky 4 (tie.) 
Furman University 8. 
Furman University 4. 
Davidson College 7. 
Davidson College 10. 
Wofford College 4. 
Mercer University 2. 
Mercer University 8. 
Mercer University 6. 
University of Tennessee 2. 
University of Tennessee 8. 
Howard College 3. 
Howard College 4. 
; University of Georgia 9. 
University of Georgia 10. 

Batting Averages 

ab. r. h. Pet. 

Hutson 15 4 9 .600 

Thompson 79 14 28 .345 

Martin . 66 12 22 .333 

Wall 90 15 27 .300 

York 50 7 14 .280 

Turner 89 18 24 .270 

Vaughn 48 11 13 .270 

Bass 19 4 5 .268 

Laird 61 11 18 .265 

Lawson 23 3 6 .260 

Taliaferro 96 18 24 .250 

Boswell 74 28 18 .243 

Mims 8 3 2 .250 

Reynolds 42 2 7 .167 



Petrels 


1; 


Petrels 


4; 


Petrels 


3; 


Petrels 


4; 


Petrels 


4; 


Petrels 


11; 


Petrels 


7; 


Petrels 


4; 


Petrels 


7; 


Petrels 


2; 


Petrels 


6; 


Petrels 


2; 


Petrels 


8; 


Petrels 


11; 


Petrels 


14; 


Petrels 


7; 


Petrels 


11; 


Petrels 


21; 


Petrels 


11; 


Petrels 


5; 


Petrels 


8; 


Petrels 


7; 



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EUBANKS SMASHES TW^ RECORDS^ 

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Track 

TRACK at Oglethorpe has been more or less a one man affair for the 
past two years with a slim, frail looking lad by the name of Blan- 

ford Eubanks playing the part of the Lone Wolf. While the Petrels 
have had a pretty respectable number of men out for track at one time 
or another through the seasons of 1927 and 1928 only two of these men 
have been able to place in a major meet. Hey wood Clement is the only 
other letterman in school besides Eubanks. 

As a freshman, Eubanks began breaking records when he cleared the 
bar in the high jump at the Southern Relays at 5 feet 10 7-8 inches and 
has been at it ever since. At the Southern Relays last spring "Banty" 
broke his own record in the high jump by getting over 5 feet 11 5-8 inches. 
A little later on he journeyed out to Lafayette, Louisiana, where he start- 
led the natives of that section by breaking two S. I. A. A. records and 
equaling a third, all in one day. Oglethorpe's track wizard clipped two- 
tenths of a second off the 120-yard high hurdle record stepping over the 
barriers in 15 seconds flat. His next feat was to clip four-tenths of a sec- 
ond from the 220-yard low hurdle record which had stood since 1923 when 
he ran this event in 24 4-10 seconds. In equaling the S. L A. A. high 
jump record of 5 feet 11 1-2 inches Eubanks jumped higher than the rec- 
ord he holds in the Southern relays. Then too he held the world's record 
for the 400 meters hurdles for ten minutes last summer while trying out 
for the Olympic team up in Boston, but alas some one came along and 
lowered the record for this event still more. 



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Heywood Monk Clement, who acquired the sobriquet "Apollo" be- 
cause of his grace in handling the javelin and discuss, stepped from be- 
hind the scenes in 1928 and placed in the Georgia State meet, held at 
Emory, with javelin and discuss throws. He won third standing in both 
events. Georgia Tech, Emory, University of Georgia and Oglethorpe par- 
ticipated. 

During the track season the squad participated in several meets of 
this section. In a dual meet with the Federal Prison aggregation, the 
Birds walked away with the bunting. 

Those on the track squad were: Cy Bell, Claud Herrin, Dave Ther- 
rell, Jenny Woodward, Charles McKissick, Seaman Baskin, Fred Snook, 
Dekle Kirkland, Banty Eubanks, Hoke Bell, Lyman Fox, Monk Clement 
and Joe Dekle, manager. 




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Winners Of Numeral 



FOOTBALL 



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Luke Appling 
Frank Anderson, Jr. 
Dan Boone 
Tom Brown 
Parker Bryant 
Hugh Dodd 
Charles Gardner 
Harry Emanuel 
Richard Hamrick 
George Luther 
Carl Lett he 
Kenneth Myers 



Leslie Parham 
Charles Rogers 
Clay Sypert 
Julian Stoval 
Joe Simon 
Cecil Todd 
Charles Taylor 
Frank Whaley 
John Whiteside 
Harmon Wade 
Raymon Yeomans 
Charles Oliphant 



BASKETBALL 



Luke Appling 
Frank Anderson, Jr. 
Parker Bryant 
Dumont Bennett 
Hubert Kadel 



Marvin Keener 
Carl Leithe 
Jeff McMillan 
Charles Mitchell 
Cecil Todd 



BASEBALL 



Harry Adams 
Edward Emerson 
George Everett 
Dennis Riddle 
Ernest Golden 
Claud Herrin 



Hubert Holcomb 
Melton Rabon 
William Hill 
Albert Kimbrel 
Keith McLaughlin 
James Sullivan 



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Freshman Football 



COACH Homer Chestnut guided his battle-scarred Freshmen— such 
they were, after facing the varsity in the first few scrimmages- 
through a successful season of it despite the many reverses in the 
way of injury, etc. The "rats" came through with five victories in eight 
contests. Not so bad, huh? 

The trio of losses were suffered in the enemy's backyard — one to a 
college freshman eleven and the remaining couple of prep school aggre- 
gations. The University of Chattanooga "rats", tutored by "Scrappy" 
Moore, former Georgia luminary, inflicted the most stinging defeat of the 
season— a 25 to 12 victory in the Tennessee city on November 10. 

The Frosh ushered in the season along with the varsity on September 
29, dishing out a sound lacing to the North Georgia Aggie reserves dur- 
ing the rest periods of the Varsity-Aggie game. The final audit of the 
freshman affair was 32 to 0. Dapper Myers and Lefty Sypert were the 
race horses of the day. 

The " rats" suffered their first defeat the following week-end in 
Rome, Georgia, bowing to the Darlington School machine by the score of 
7 to 0. And the following week the Greenhorns were still laboring un- 



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der the strain because they were humbled in a like manner by the River- 
side Cadets in Gainesville — this time by a 6 to score. 

But the good times started again the following week when the Mad- 
ison A. & M. team was smothered 70 to on Hermance field. The boys, 
not satisfied with the trimming handed the North Georgia Aggies, jour- 
neyed to Dahlonega and inflicted another defeat, 36 to 0. Carrollton A. 
& M. was humbled in Carrollton on November 3 by a 26 to score. 

Then came the third defeat of the season at the hands of the Uni- 
versity of Chattanooga freshmen. It was a rough battle, believe us, and 
the crisis was not reached until late in the final half. But the "rats" 
redeemed themselves for the three reverses by manhandling the Mercer 
Freshmen in Hawkinsville on November 29 by the decisive score of 25 
to 0. 

Coach Chestnut presented an exceptional Freshman team and from it 
are expected to be graduated several outstanding linemen ball toters to 
the varsity. 



The scores: 

September 29— Freshmen 32; 

October 6 — Freshmen ; 

October 13 — Freshmen 0; 

October 20— Freshmen 70; 

October 26— Freshmen 36; 

November 3 — Freshmen 26; 

November 10 — Freshmen 12; 

November 29 — Freshmen 25; 



North Georgia Aggie Reserves 0. 
Darlington 7. 

Riverside Military Academy 6. 
Madison A. & M. 0. 
North Georgia Aggies 0. 
Carrollton A. & M. 0. 
Chattanooga Freshmen 25. 
Mercer University Freshmen 0. 




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THE Freshmen of 1928-29 presented a most colorful array of basket- 
ball talent, which, besides furnishing the varsity formidable opposi- 
tion in practicing rounds, proceeded to humble quite a few of the 
prep, high school and freshman quintets in and about this neck o' the 
woods. 

At least, the "rats" accomplished something that freshman teams in 
the past have utterly failed to do. And that was a victory over the Jew- 
ish Progressive Club "Reds." The score was 27 to 25. But the "Reds" 
eased their feelings by administering defeats in a couple of return games. 
In Hubei't Kadel and Cecil Todd, the latter of Savannah High, Coach 
Campbell had a pair of remarkable scorers and, too, flashy and capable 
as floor workers. They topped the "rat" crew in performing throughout 
the season. 

All in all, the Frosh commanded situations in a half dozen of the ten 
games played during the season. Two defeats by the Atlanta Athletic 
Club "Reds", one by the Jewish Progressive "Reds" and one by the Dai-- 
lington School, of Rome, constituted all of the bad sailing for the Baby 
Birds. Two of these defeats — by Darlington and J. P. C. "Reds" — were 
avenged. 




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The Freshmen had their biggest froHcs at the expense of the North 
Georgia Agricultural College Freshmen — once on the Dahlonega floor and 
a second time in the University gym. In the first encounter the Babies 
came out in front by a 63-25 score. They later enticed the Aggies to the 
campus and thereupon romped easily to victory by the overwhelming 
score of 70 to 11. 

The guarding of Frank Anderson, Jr., hailing from Darlington School 
in Rome, and Luke Appling, an Atlanta prep star, attracted quite a bit 
of attention and they are expected to add to the strength of the varsity 
in 1929-30. 

There was an unusual supply of forwards on the "frosh" team and 
Coach Campbell had very little trouble in finding men who could drop the 
ball through the mesh. They were: Keener, Bennett, Sypert, McMillan 
and Leithe. With the addition of several of the Freshman stars to the 
varsity line-up next year, Coach Roby should place a winner in the field. 



The scort 



Freshmen 26; A. A. C. "Reds" 31. 
Freshmen 63; North Georgia Aggies 25. 
Freshmen 44; University School 19. 
Freshmen 33; J. P. C. "Reds" 36. 
Freshmen 87; Rome "Y" 30. 
Freshmen 31; Darlington School 35. 
Freshmen 70; North Georgia Aggies 11. 
Freshmen 32; Darlington School 15. 
Freshmen 27; J. P. C. "Reds" 25. 
Freshmen 35; A. A. C. "Reds" 38. 



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Baseball 

A LTHOUGH "rat" teams in the other two major sports fared very 
l\ satisfactorily, the real glory of the year was left behind for the hust- 
ling lot of young baseball scalawags who were tutored by none other than 
genial Coach Harry Robertson, a baseball devotee of some ability himself. 
To tell the interesting feature first — the Frosh, limited to a small 
number of games, buckled down to brass tacks, as it were, and routed the 
opposition in regular order without once erring in the course of events. 
They nicked their willows five times for as many victories. 

To tell still another interesting feature — the Frosh humbled the first 
year nine of the University of Georgia and Georgia School of Technology 
in decisive fashion! 

To tell yet another feature — the Frosh, at this writing, have placed 
seven members of the clan on the 1929 varsity squad. They are: Herrin, 
third base; Kimbrell, catcher; Riddle, outfield; Holcomb and Everett, first 
base ; McLaughlin, outfield and Rabon, pitcher. 



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One of the most promising lot of balltossers ever gathered at the 
University, the critics have said. They corroborated the statement in 
Freshman activity and those select few are making headway on the var- 
sity squad. 

The "rats" ushered in the season with a landslide victory over the 
Fulton High aggregation, coached by a former Oglethorpe performer, by 
the score of 12 to 2. The opening triumph was followed a week later by 
a 9 to 5 win over the Georgia Tech Baby Jackets. 

The "rats" invaded Athens, Georgia, later and applied the paint to 
the University of Georgia Bullpups. The score, 5 to 3. The Norcross, 
Georgia, High School (home of several big league players) was added to 
the list, 9 to 7. The "rats" closed the season with a shutout win over 
Fulton High in their second encounter. The audit was 8 to 0. 

The hurling duties were handled mostly by Rabon, Holcomb and Sul- 
livan. To say the least, these inexperienced Freshmen certainly did well. 

1928 SCHEDULE 

Freshmen 12; Fulton High 2. 

Freshmen 9; Tech Frosh 5. 

Freshmen 5; Georgia Frosh 3. 

Freshmen 9; Norcross High 7. 

Freshmen 8 ; Fulton High 0. 





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INTIIURUIRMH 



ALPHA LAMBDAS '"-- - ■ '" *' "" '" 
,«..««« LEAD BASKETEERS 

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ALPHA LAMBDA TAU WINS, 35-21 

FLOOR TOURNEY BEGINS MONDAY 




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The Two Leagues 



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DID the basketball folk have fun ? Well, Boy Howdy ! 
When our spirited fraternity brothers and loyal sorority sisters, this 
time arrayed in battle formations of basketball aggregations, rubbed el- 
bows in the University gymnasium, the more scholarly boys and girls 
readily recalled the legendry tale of the ten years' war by the Greeks, 
under Agamemnon, against the Trojans. 

For sometime in the past there has been a laxity in student athletic 
activity but the good work rerhained for the newly organized Inter-fra- 
ternity council, sponsor of both the Inter-fraternity and Inter-sorority 
basketball leagues. It was through the efforts of this organization that 
the two events were carried through so successfully. 

Through a period of more than two weeks the basketball fives of the 
five national fraternities and the three sororities waged mortal combat 
only to see the Alpha Lambda Taus and the Phi Kappa .Etas wobble 
through the thick of it all to capture the bunting. 

It was great fun, believe us, and the scarred belligerents as well as 
the excited spectators cried for more when festivities had reached the 
official close. All of which means that the 1928-29 league movement is a 
precedent which will be followed in the future by Oglethorpe students. 

The Inter-fraternity Council placed in competition two handsome lov- 
ing cups as a move to continue the activity in the future. One of the 
cups was donated by Dodson and Daniels, Atlanta jewelers, and the other 
purchased by the organization. Any team winning the league champion- 
ship twice will win permanent possession of the trophy. 

It will be remembered that in 1927-28 a similar movement was inau- 
gurated but toward the climax the league fell through with the Theta 
Kappa Nus topping the situation without suffering defeat. 

Let us repeat that the two leagues certainly aroused the spirit of the 
student body but what manner of man shall he be who sits and ponders 
during the procession of an inter-fraternity or inter-sorority basketball 
game ? • 



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cAlpha Lambda Tau 



CHAMPIONS OF INTER-FRATERNITY LEAGUE 

DISPLAYING a superior brand of basketball throughout the league, 
the young Herculean fellows grouped above wended through the 
grind without suffering defeat, gaining possession of the trophy, offered 
by the Inter-fraternity Council, for the year. 

The declaration of victory came on the night of February 20, in the 
gymnasium when the Pi Kappa Phi quintet, runner-up, was humbled be- 
fore a packed house. The score was 35 to 21. It was a rugged game 
and the champions did not gain headway until the latter stages of the 
game when the vanquished weakened considerably. 

The personnel of the championship team: Turk and Farrabee, for- 
wards; Holcomb, center; Kimbrell and Baskin, guards; Brooks, Tucker, 
Vaughn and Burford, substitutes. 



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Phi Kappa Eta 

CHAMPIONS OF INTER-SORORITY LEAGUE 

THESE young ladies, by virtue of a decisive victory over the Zeta 
Tau team, runner-up, became champions of the first Inter-sorority 
basketball league at the University. 

The bunting, a silver loving cup, was the goal of three sororities at 
the outset — Phi Kappa Eta, Zeta Tau and Chi Omega. The last men- 
tioned failed to score a victory and the championship tussle remained be- 
tween the first two. 

In their meeting, the Zeta Taus nosed out the Phi Kappa Etas by a 
close score but in the return engagement the champions uncorked a sur- 
prising brand of basketball and swept the opposition off its feet to win 
15 to 4. Ruth Frost, captain, led the victors with thirteen of the total 
number of points registered. 

The members of the squad : Frost and Black, forwards ; Vardaman, 
center ; Fowler and Alison, guards ; Brown, McClung, Woodall, Williamson 
and Martin, substitutes. 



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oAll-Star Team 



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FOLLOWING the championship game of February 20, between Alpha 
Lambda Tau and Pi Kappa Phi, the Stormy Petrel, school publication, 
selected an All-Star team with the aid of the coaches of the various teams. 
But allow the publication to tell the story: 

"The Stormy Petrel, after carefully considering every man who par- 
ticipated in the Inter-fraternity basketball competition, makes these se- 
lections for the mythical all-star team. 



"First, John Turk, Alpha Lambda Tau, won unanimously one forward 
berth. No explanation for this selection is needed for those who saw the 
final game. His work in that game placed him head and shoulders above 
the other forwards. 

"Hutchinson, Theta Kappa Nu, because of his accuracy in scoring and 
general all-round style on the court, was awarded the second forward 
position. He was perhaps the most valuable man to his fraternity team. 

"For center. Jack Mahoney, Kappa Alpha, was deemed sufficiently 
worthy. It was quite difficult to decide between him and Holcomb, A. L. 
T., who was given honorable mention for center. However, Mahoney 
succeeded in getting almost every tipoff in addition to scintillating de- 
fensive and offensive tactics. 

"Kimball, A. L. T., and McSherry, Pi Kappa Phi, were versatile 
enough in all departments of the game to be awarded the guard places. 



"Honorable mention as forward goes to Farabee, A. L. T., while 
Dodd, Delta Sigma Phi exhibited enough ability to tnerit mention as a 
guard." 



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COLUMBUS, GEORGIA 

SPO-NSOR OF YAMACRANW 




DQiss QQary S. Guatcr 

ATLANTA.. GEORGIA 
bPONbCTl OF BUSINESS STAFF OF YAMACRAW 




ATLANTA , GEORGIA 

SPONSOR OF INTER-FRATERT^ITY COUNCIL 



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DQiss £D,argarLt(L JB-udcrsorv 

ATLANTA. GEORGIA 

SPONSOR OF KAPPA ALPHA FRATERNITY 




£0.155 cJcarv Tlatt'irvg 

ATLANTA. GEORGm 

SPONSOR OF ALPHA LAMBDA TAU 




jQQiss DorotKy Barrvc^s 

ATLANTA. GEORGIA 
SPONSOR OF DELTA SIGMA PHI 




DQi55 Pcai\c<L5 Barawcll 

ATLANTA, GEORGIA. 

SPONSOR or THETA KAPPA NU 



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ATLA"NTA, GEORGIA 

SPONSOR OF PI KAPPA PHI 





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GREENVILLE. SOUTH CAROLINA 
SPONSOR, OF EDITORIAL STAFF OF STORMY PETREL 







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COIUMBUS, GEORGIA 

'ONSOR OF BUSINESS STAFF OF STORMV PETREL 




£0.155 cJo BctK ^ppcrsoa 

ATLANTA. QEORQtA 
SPONSOR OF BLUE KEY FRATERNITY 




ATLANTA. GEORGIA 

SPONSOR OF LORD'S CLUB 




n}i55 cJar\G/ Kit\g 

ATLANTA. GEOUaiA 
SPONSOR OF LORD'S CLUB 




£0.155 DalpKitKd Pfaff(Lrkortx 

GAlNESVILLi: , OEOKalA 

5P0NS0TI OF LeCONTE SCIENTIFIC CLUB 




DQi65 Gartrada, Ularcay 

ATLANTA. GEORGIA 
SPONSOR OF ALCHEMI5T CLUB 



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ATLANTA, GBORGIA 
SPONSOR OF OGLETHORPE ORCHESTRA 




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Inter-Fraternity Council 



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SHORTLY after the opening of the University for the new school year, 
active members of the five national fraternities on the campus — those 
interested in the development of closer relationship — gathered and form- 
ulated plans for Oglethorpe's first Inter-Fraternity Council. 

The purpose of the Council, as stated in the constitution, leads to the 
creation of harmony and co-operation among the fraternities on the Uni- 
versity campus. 

It was stipulated in the constitution that should the organization be 
a failure or meet disapproval of any of the fraternities after one year of 
trial, then it shall be disbanded at the request of the dissatisfied fraternity 
without any financial loss. But if it proves successful and is allowed to 
exist more than one year, then it shall be considered a permanent organi- 
zation changeable only through the unanimous consent of the members 
of the Council. 



OFFICERS 



Virgil Milton 
Allan Watkins 
LuTHEK Davenport 
Hayti Thompson 
Frank Inman 



. President 

First Vice-President 

Second Vice-President 

. Secretary 

. Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



Paul Madden Kappa Alpha 

James Howe Delta Sigma Phi . 

Robert Beasley Theta Kappa Nu . 

Virgil Milton Alpha Lambda Tau 

Allan Watkins Pi Kappa Phi 



. Frank Inman 
Luther Davenport 
. Hayti Thompson 
. Homer Gramling 
. Earl Blackwell 



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Delta Sigma Phi 



Founded at the College of the City of New York, 1899 

ALPHA NU CHAPTER 

Established 1922 

Colors— A'i7e Green ami White Flower— T17nYe Carnuti 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 



L. M. Davenport 
Morris Jackson 
Robert Shaw 
Bryant Arnold 
Fred Snook 
Charles MacLaughlin 
Albert Church 
Lyle Kratz 
James Montgomery 
Ernest Golden 
Jeff McMillan 
Kenneth Myers 
Gordon MacGregor 
Doris Selman 
Cecil Todd 
Reavis O'Neal 



James B. C. Howe 
Stanley Pfefferkorn 
Clarence Wells 
Edward Emerson 
Hoke Bell 
Paul Bacon 
T. W. Fulton, Jr. 
Jerome Triplette 
Hubert Coleman 
Burke Hedges 
Leslie Parham 
Charles Bourne 
Charles Gardner 
Carl Leithe 
Hugh Dodd 
Eldridge Roberts 



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Pi Kappa Phi 



Founded at College of Charleston, 1904 

PI CHAPTER 

Established April 18, 1918 

Colors — Gold and White Flower — Red Ros 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 



Earl Blackwell 
J. W. Sutton 
William Perkins 
Blanford Eubanks 
Lyman Pox 
Fred Boynton 
Frank McSherry 
Ralph English 
Kendall Jordan 
Hubert Kadel 
Park Brinson 
John Whiteside 
Frank Anderson, Jr. 



Marion Anderson 
Allan Watkins 
J. C. Malsby 
James Jackson 
Amos Martin 
Claud Herri n 
James Sullivan 
Joseph Freeman 
Burns Jones 
Julian Stoval 
Robert Jones 
John Renfroe 
E. R. Boone 



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Theta Kappa Nu 



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Founded at Springfield, Missouri, 1924 

GEORGIA ALPHA CHAPTER 

Established October 5, 1925 

Colors — Crivjson, Argent, Sable Flower — American Beauty Hose 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 



George L. Nowell 
Hayti Thompson 
James Sims 
Frank Meyer 
Henry Whitesell 
Robert Beasley 
LeRoy Tebo 
Hardon Wade 
Dennis Riddle 
Lucius Appling 
Charles Rogers 
Joe Terry 

William Hutchinson 
Harper Heeley 
Edward Durst 



Floyd C. Cooper 
Haywood Clement 
John Murphy 
George Byrd 
Eaton B. Hill 
Glen Bridges 
Ollie Nall 
Harold Adams 
Harry Emanuel 
Robert Key 
Horace Byrd 
Harry McGinnis 
Monroe Butler 
William Higgins 
Raymond Yeomans 



Jimmy Shoesmith 



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c^lpha Lambda Tau 



Founded at Oglethorpe University, 1916 

ALPHA CHAPTER 

Established March 27, 1921 



Colors— Old Gold ami Black 



Flower — American Beauty Rose 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 



Virgil Milton 
Robert M. Benson 
LiNDSEY Vaughn 
George McDonald 
Charles McKissick 
John P. Turk 
William R. O'Kelley, Jr. 
Lynton B. Knighton 
Charles Lindsay 
Erskine Thompson 
Seaman Baskin 
Jack Lee Farabee 
Parker Bryant 

Marion Whaley 



Earl Benson Brooks 
John C. Bell 
David M. Blake 
Charles Aldridge 
Edward O'Kelley 
Curry Burford 
Homer Gramling 
Dennis Mincey 
Hubert Holcomb 
William Powell 
Albert Kimbrell 
Robert Sanders 
Asa Wall 






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Kappa Alpha 



Founded at Washington and Lee University, 1865 

BETA NU CHAPTER 

Chapter Revived, 1918 

Cdlors — Crimson and Old Gold Flower — Magnolia and Red Rose 

FRATER IN FACULTATE 

Arthur Stephen Libby 

FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 



Howard Lawson 
Paul Madden 
Thomas Daniels 
Milton Wood 
Burns McCubbin 
Harmon Sned 
Joe Barnes 
Willis Timmons 



Beverly Irwin 
Frank Inman 
Oliver Be all 
Howard Kendall 
David Smith 
Paul Goldsmith 
William Moran 
Lawrence Height 



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History of Fraternities 



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THE histoi-ical genesis of fraternities, both national and honorary, at 
the University carries us through a span of three periods dating as 
far back as the year of 1859 and, too, presents a kaleidoscopic picture 
in which is revealed the birth of one national organization as well as 
several honorary fraternities that are functioning in our midst today. 

The establishment of fraternities came with the birth of Oglethorpe 
in ante bellum days at Milledgeville, Georgia, then the capital of Georgia. 
In the year of 1859 chapters were established by Beta Theta Pi and Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon. But the movement was short lived when in 1861 the 
sons of the University marched to defend colors in the Civil War. 

Later, Oglethorpe was re-established, locating in Atlanta. Georgia. 
The resurrection was brief — 1870 to 1873 — due to the wave of financial 
disaster following the War. But a fraternity spirit was active and three 
chapters were installed. Kappa Aplha, Chi Phi and Phi Delta Theta in 
the order mentioned. 

The third period of the fraternity history began on May 17, 1918 
when Pi Kappa Phi installed a chapter at the new University, located in 
Atlanta. Since that time, four other nationals, Kappa Alpha, Delta Sigma 
Phi, Alpha Lambda Tau and Theta Kappa Nu have come to the campus. 

The national fraternity which was founded on the campus of the Uni- 
versity is Alpha Lambda Tau. It entered the national fraternity field in 
1920. A charter was granted on March 27, 1921. From 1916 to the 
time of the big adventure, the organization was known as the Alpha 
Lambda Club on the campus. 

Following the installation of Pi Kappa Phi on May 17, 1918, the Kap- 
pa Alpha chapter, established during the period from 1870-73, was revived. 
In 1920 Zeta Tau was founded to become the first sorority. Then the 
Alpha Lambda Tau Club was nationalized on March 27, 1921. In 1922 
the Alpha Omega, a local club, was granted a charter by the Delta Sigma 
Phi. Chi Omega, second sorority, was established on September 8, 1924. 
Theta Kappa Nu was the next fraternity, coming to the campus in 1925. 
Phi Kappa Eta, a local sorority, is the latest, being founded in the year 
of 1927. 



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Inter-Sorority Council 

OFFICERS 

Elizabeth McClung President 

Thyrza Perry Secretarii-Ti-easurcy 

MEMBERS 

Margaret Neuhoff Zeta Tau .... Carroll Thompson 

Dorothy Barnes Chi Omega Thyrza Perry 

Elizaeeth McClung . . . Phi Kappa Eta . . . Antoinette Brown 



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History of Sororities 



SORORITIES did not come to the campus of the University until 1920, 
only a few years after co-education became a part of the program of 
the University. 



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It was in 1920 that a group of girls banned themselves together under 
the name of Zeta Tau sorority, leading the way to the founding of two 
other such organizations up to the present time. 

Two years later another female organization, Sigma Alpha sorority, 
was established. And another two years after its organization, it became 
the Sigma Gamma Chapter of the national sorority, Chi Omega. The 
chapter was installed on September 8, 1924. 

The third and latest sorority is Phi Kappa Eta, a local, which was 
organized in 1927. 

One of the most harmonious movements of the three sororities took 
place when an Inter-Sorority Council was organized for the promotion of 
closer relationship. The Council has been very active this year. 



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Chi Omega 



Founded at University of Arkansas, 1895 
SIGMA GAMMA CHAPTER 
Established September 8, 1924 



Colors— Cfn-d/»f(/ and Sir 



Flower— TI7i(7f Cn) 



SORORES IN COIJ.EGIO 



Thyeza Perry 
Elizabeth Dodd 
Ancel Allen 
Dorothy Barnes 
KufiENiA Patterson 
Murdoch Walker 



Ruth Brooke 
Mary Dodd 
Eloise Tanksley 
Helen Thomas 
Mary Nell Mathis 
Catherine Carlton 



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Zeta Tau 



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Founded at Oglethorpe University, 1920 
Colors — Rose and Silver Flower — Rose 

SOROR IN FACULTATE 

Mks. Arthur S. Libby 

SORORES IN COLLEGIO 



Louise Madden 
Carroll Thompson 
Margaret Neuhoff 
Helen Boardman 
Mildred Bradley 
Berma Warren 
Martha Johnson 
Mary Manning 



Mary X. Gunter 
Doris Taylor 
Gertrude Murray 
Martha Jean Osborne 
Jean Nutting 
Evelyn Moore 
Rosetta Magill 
Marion Attridge 



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Phi Kappa Eta 



Founded at Oglethorpe University, 1927 
Colors— Green and White Flower— II7u>c Sweet Pea 



FACULTY ADVISOR 

Mrs. John A. Aldrich 



HONORARY MEMBER 

Miss Myrta Thomas 



SORORES IN COLLEGIO 



Antoinette Brown 
Anna Baum 
Willie Woodall 
Athalena Fowler 
Sara James 
Virginia Crusselle 
Georgia Alison 
Gertrude Wilson 



Mary Tucker 
Elizabeth McClung 
Ruth Frost 
Anita Black 
Margaret Vardaman 
Sara Martin 
Louise Williamson 
Mary Williamson 



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Le Conte 

Established in 1920 

This organization, composed of a group of serious minded students, 
was organized in the Fall of 1920 for the purpose of advancing scientific 
study at the University. It is the aim of the organization also to foster 
individual work on the part of the members. 

The charter members of the fraternity are: Professor E. S. Heath, 
L. N. Turk, M. F. Calmes, C. I. Pirkle, M. Hosteller, W. C. Hillhouse, P. 
D .Weeks, M. M. Copeland, J. C. Ivey, C. E. Boynton. 

FRATERS IN FACULTATE 

Dr. James F. Sellers 

Dr. John A. Aldrich 

Professor Harding H. Hunt 



Stanley PFEFfERKORN 
Robert Emery 
William Powell 



OFFICERS 



President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



Robert Emery 
Morris Jackson 
Glen Bridges 
William Hill 
Edward O'Kelley 
James B. C. Howe 
John Turk 
Bryant Arnold 



William Powell 
Stanley Pfefferkorn 
Ray U. Todd 
Leonard Hill 
PlALE Kellogg 
Robert Benson 
Fred Boynton 
Charles McKissick 



Marion Anderson 



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Phi Kappa Delta 



Established in 1920 



The Phi Kappa Delta fraternity was established for the purpose of 
having in the University an honorary organization which selected its 
members for their scholastic attainments. 



FRATER IN FACULTATE 

Dr. Arthur S. Libby 



SOROR IN FACULTATE 

Mrs. Arthur S. Libby 



MEMBERS 



Harold Coffee 
Bryant Arnold 
Charles Pittard 
Nellie Kate Noel 
Thyrza Perry 



Robert Shaw 
William Powell 
Hayti Thompson 
Eloise Tanksley 
Evelyn Silverman 






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Boar's Head 



Colors— Old Gold and Bluck 



Flower — Black-eijed Susan 



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Established in 1920 

The Boai-'s Head, first honorary club to be organized at the Univer- 
sity, was founded in January 1920. Eligibility to membership is limited 
to members of the student body who have not only been prominent and 
successful in academic life but who have also distinguished themselves in 
various other activities of the college. 



The title of the organization is taken from the coat-of-arms of the 
University, a boar's head being a prominent figure of the escutcheon. The 
University's armorial bearings are copied after those of the family of 
James Edward Oglethoi-pe for whom our University is named. 



OFFICERS 

George Murphy President 

Earl Blackwell Vice-President 

Blanforu Eubanks . . . Secretary-Treasiirer 

Virgil Milton Hayti Thompson 

George Murphy Louis Gillman 

Earl Blackwell Robert Shaw 

Allan Watkins Blanford Eubanks 



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Established in 1926 

The local chapter of this organization was installed in the year of 
1926. It has as its purpose the promotion of activities among the stu- 
dents. 

OFFICERS 

Henry Whitesell President 

Hayti Thompson Vice-Pyesident 

Floyd Cooper ... Secretary-Treasurer 

Erskine Thompson Sergeant-at-arms 

Robert Shaw Henry Whitesell 

Lynton Knighton Haywood Clement 

Louis Gillman Beverly Irwin 

Hayti Thompson Stanley Pfefferkorn 

James Sims Floyd Cooper 

Erskine Thompson Earl Blackwell 
Blanford Eubanks 



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Chi Delta Epsilon 

This honorary fraternity was founded for the purpose of promulgat- 
ing and promoting a better spirit in the Oglethorpe journalistic field. 
Membership is dependent upon two years' work on school publications or 
the equivalent in actual newspaper work. Only Juniors and Seniors ad- 
mitted. 





MEMBERS 




RD Hill 




Evelyn Silverman 


Thompson 




Ray U. Todd 


Davis 




Bryant Arnold 



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Motto — Duin Spiro Spero 



Carolina Club 



OFFICERS 



Flower — Magnolia 



BryaiNT Arnold 
HiLERY Bryson 



P>eside7ii 
Secretary-Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



L. M. Davenport 
HiLERY Bryson 
Jefferson Canoy 
Jerome Triplette 
Antoinette Brown 
Mrs. a. S. Libby 



Bryant Arnold 
James Bowman 
Burns Jones 
Marie Odum 
Mary Lee Price 
Haywood Clement 



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Lindsey Vaughn 



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Girls'lHigh Club 



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Colors— S;«c/v and Gold 




Flower — Poppy 


Motto— "i?e not s 


'mplii fjood; be good for something." 




OFFICERS 




Eloise Tanksley 




President 






. Vice-President 










MEMBERS 




Elizabeth Werner 




Louise Madden 


Ruth Frost 




Evelyn Silverman 


Evelyn Megahee 




Evelyn Moore 


Ruth Brooke 




Catherine Carlton 


Mary Elizabeth Smith 




Mary Dodd 


Elizabeth Dodd 




Thyrza Perry 


Carroll Thompson 




Angel Allen 


Willie Woodall 




Virginia Templbman 


Sara Martin 




Emily Wade 


Nellie Kate Noel 




Dorothy Pomeroy 


Zadie Ivey 


Eloise Tanksley 


Mary Davis 




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Bell Club 

This club was founded by those students who journey to the Univer- 
sity daily on the Southern Air-line Railway for the purpose of promoting- 
a closer friendship among the day students residing in communities north 
of the University. 

OFFICERS 

John Reynolds President 

Charles Pittard Vice-President 

William Jones Secretary 

Donald Wilson Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



DuMONT Bennett 
Thelma Brogdon 
Morris Jackson 
Allen Johnson 
John Reynolds 
William Jones 



Victor Bailey 
Athalena Fowler 
James Johnson 
Doris Taylor 
Donald Wilson 
Harold Wright 



Charles Pittard 



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Left-Handed Club 

This club was organized with the purpose of defending the left-hand- 
ed individuals on the campus and, too, to further the progress made by 
this particular group. 

MEMBERS 



Dr. J. F. Sellers 
Mary X. Gunter 
Hayti Thompson 
Roy Warren 
Ollie Nall 
Clay Sypert 



Edward O'Kelley 
Thelma Brogdon 
Lee McKoon 
Emery Lunsford 
Horace Byrd 
Raymond Yeomans 



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Alchemist Club 

Motto — "To Make the Best of the Worst" Colors — Gold and White 

OFFICERS 

Robert Emery President 

John P. Turk Vice-President 

Robert Benson ■ Treasurer 

Frank Davenport Secretary 

MEMBERS 

Bryant Arnold Gertrude Murray 

Robert Emery Frank Davenport 

Robert Benson John P. Turk 

Ernest Golden 



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Lord's Club 

The club was founded on February 19, 1924. It was the first hon- 
orary club of a social nature to be organized at the university. There 
are certain elements of culture and social qualities necessary for mem- 
bership. The purpose of the club is to promote social activity of the 
highest order. 

OFFICERS 

Frank Inman President 

Earl Blackwell Vice-President 

Paul Madden Secretary-Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Paul Goldsmith Julian Stovall 

Blanford Eubanks David Smith 

Virgil Milton Howard Lawson 

Lyman Fox Thomas Daniel 

Frank McSherry Amos Martin 

Fred Boynton Allan Watkins 
Jake Sutton 



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Duchess Club 

The club was founded in the fall of 1927 to promote social activity 
among the female students of the University. 

Elizabeth Dodd Chairman 



MEMBERS 



Dorothy Barnes 
Mary Dodd 
Jane Sharp 
Ruth Brooke 
Gertrude Murray 
Mildred Bradley 



Angel Allen 
Louise Madden 
Helen Thomas 
Martha Johnson 
Margaret Neuhofp 
Mary Nell Mathis 



Mrs. Kate Thompson Schippi 



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Stray Greek Club 

The club is composed of fraternity men of other schools organized 
for the purpose of promoting a spirit of friendship among those students 
transferring from other institutions. 

OFFICERS 

Louis Gillman President 

John Reynolds Vice-President 

Vivian McGowan Treasurer 

Harry Feinberg Secretary 

MEMBERS 

George McMillan Pi Kappa Alpha 

John Reynolds Phi Sigma Kappa 

James Anderson ' Sigma Nu 

Louis Gillman Alpha Epsilon Pi 

Dave Therrell Sigma Chi 

Clyde Dudley Sigma Chi 

Harry Feinberg Alpha Epsilon Pi 

William Backus Pi Kappa Alpha 

J. L. Snyder Phi Kappa Sigma 

D. D. Frary Phi Kappa Sigma 

ROBERT Nixon Phi Kappa Sigma 



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cTVIasonic Club 



FOUNDED 1920 



GEORGE MURPHY, Atlanta Ga., Palestine Lodge No. 486 F. & A. M. 
HERBERT NAGEL, Cincinnati, Ohio, Ft. Carson Lodge No. 598 F. & A. M. 
DR. M. HARDING HUNT, Seneca, Conn., Seneca Lodge No. 55 F. & A. M. 
E. H. GERHARDT, Tucumcari, N. M., Tumucari Lodge No. 27 A. F. & A. M. 
J. P. HANSARD, Chamblee, Ga., Chamblee Lodge No. 444 F. & A. M. 
R. W. HANCOCK, Chamblee, Ga., Chamblee Lodge No. 444 F. & A. M. 
A. S. LIBBY, Mooresville, N. C, Mooresville Lodge No. 196 A. F. & A. M. 
WILLIAM W. HILL, Bowden, Ga.. Tyus Lodge No. 671 A. F. & A. M. 
GEORGE McMillan, Atlanta, Ga., Atlanta Lodge No. 59 F. & A. M. 
LOUIS GILLMAN, Columbus, Ga., Mt. Hermon Lodge No. 304 F. & A. M. 






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cTVIanagers' Club 

HOWARD LAWSON ^'"'*''^'" 

JAKE SUTTON ^«<'*''"" 

LOUIS GiLLMAN Basketball 

JohnCuouch ^««^''«" 

FredBoynton stage Mavager 

Stanley Pfefferkorn Yamacmw 

Burke HEDGES Stormy Petrel 

BRYANT ARNOLD Debate Council 

MARY X. GUNTER ^o-ed Basketball 

LEROYTEBO G'-^'"^ 

BEVERLY IRWIN Orchestra 

ASA WALL Freshvum Basketball 




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Booster Club 

This club, organized a number of years ago by spirited students, has 
been revived with the purpose of carrying forward the spirit of the Uni- 
versity as alumni as well as promoting such on the campus. The presi- 
dent of the student body and presidents of each class become members 
and four members are elected from each class. 

MEMBERS 



Earl Blackwell 
Glen Bridges 
Stanley Pfefferkorn 
Robert Shaw 
LeRoy Tebo 
Jeff McMillan 
Murdoch Walker 
Gertrude Murray 
Robert Beasley 
Robert Benson 



Harry Emanuel 
Bryant Arnold 
Louis Gillman 
Hayti Thompson 
Ollie Nall 
Frank Anderson, Jr. 
Frank Inman 
John Turk 
George No well 
Harold Coffee 



Mildred Bradley 



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Student-Faculty Council 

Robert Shaw Student Bodij Represen 

Beverly Irwin Senioi- Repi-esen 

William Powell Junior Repvesen 

John P. Turk Sophomore Represen, 

Edward Durst Freshman Represen. 



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Debate Council 

Under the direction of Dr. James E. Routh, dean of the School of 
Literature and Journalism, the Oglethorpe University Debate Council 
functioned most successfully during the school year. 

Beverly Irwin and Bryant Arnold, president and business manager, 
respectively, arranged two outstanding debates for the spring of 1929 
with Louisiana State University and Princeton University. Allan Wat- 
kins and Bryant Arnold won a unanimous decision over L. S. U., on Feb- 
ruary 12 at Oglethorpe and James B. C. Howe and Watkins defeated 
Princeton by a unanimous decision in the most excellent debate ever stag- 
ed here. 

For the first time in the history of the present council, women of the 
university were admitted. Misses Gertrude Murray and Helen Board- 
man were elected to the council. They did not take part in an actual 
debate but gained much valuable experience that will aid in their work 
next year. 

Just before the National election of the fall, Hayti Thompson and 
Beverly Irwin defeated Clarence Krebs and L. Blake Craft in a debate on 
the question: Resolved, that Alfred E. Smith should be elected president 
of the United States in preference to Herbert Hoover. Mr. Irwin and 
Mr. Thompson, defending the affirmative, won the decision by 2 to 1. . 




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Smith-Hoover Debate 



Not since the heydey of Mitchell Bishop and Abe Orowitz, two Petrel 
debaters of whom we have heard much praise, has the student body wit- 
nessed such dramatic, not to say stirring, debating as was the exhibition 
presented by the Smith-Hoover orators in the auditorium on November 2. 

Words flew hot and fast in one of the best debates witnessed on the 
campus in years. The forensic artists were fired with a great enthusiasm 
for their respective candidates and, secondly, with a genuine dislike for 
the opposing candidate. 

The Al Smith defenders, Beverly Irwin and Hayti Thompson, came 
through with flying colors, winning a two to one decision. Mr. Herbert 
Hoover, president despite the loss on the campus, was ably defended by 
Blake Craft and Clarence Krebs, of the Atlanta Theological Seminary. 

Following the debate, students produced the red pencil and cast a bal- 
lot for one of the two candidates. Congenial Al Smith was the victor the 
second time within the hour, receiving 156 votes against 69 for Herbert 
Hoover. 



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The Stormy Petrel 

The publication, as a property, is owned by the student body. It is 
dedicated to the service of the University and aims to contribute to its 
progress and development. 

W. Bryant Arnold Editor-in-Chief 

Louis Gillman Business Manager 

BOARD OF EDITORS 

Evelyn Silverman Associate Editor 

Leonard Hill Assistant Editor 

James B. C. Hovs^e Assistant Editor 

Reavis O'Neal, Jr., News Editor 

Ray U. Todd Exchange Editor 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Burke Hedges Advertising Manager 

Milton Wood Circulation Manager 

Jennings Dennis Assistaiit Circulation Manager 



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THE 



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Westminster Magazine 

IT WAS founded in December, 1911, for the expressed purpose of found- 
ing Oglethorpe University and in its first issue an editorial was printed 
caUing for the re-establishment of OglethorjDe and from that day to this 
it has presented to its readers the news and progress of the institution. 

Its subscribers were first secured by personal solocitation in Atlanta 
and the state of Georgia. In addition to news about Oglethorpe, the 
magazine carries literary, historical and sociological articles customarily 
found in publications of that sort. 

The magazine was founded, edited and managed by Dr. Thornwell 
Jacobs, assisted at various times by a capable corps of writers, among 
others Dr. James E. Routh, dean of the School of Literature and Journal- 
ism at the University; Dr. Mary Brent Whiteside, poet and critic; Mr. 
Harry Harmon, poet and essayist and Virginia Stait (Winifred Russell), 
poet. 



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MAGAZ^INE 




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University Press 



With two cases of type and as many job presses in addition, of course, 
to a corps of inspired collegiate printers, the Oglethorpe University Press 
got its start in the year of 1917. Through the generosity of J. Dillard 
Jacobs, of Atlanta, Ga., the necessary material and equipment was fur- 
nished for the beginning. 

There were two ends in the establishment of the University print 
shop: one was to supply the institution with stationery, etc., publish 
bulletins, and the other to make possible a means of earning a scholarship 
to students less fortunate. 

The print shop continued on the increase and its output more than 
doubled in less than ten years of existence. As a result, in 1926 a lino- 
type machine, cylinder press, and other modern mechanism were installed. 
It was the gift of Dr. Dillard Jacobs, of Atlanta. Shortly afterwards, the 
publication of the Petrel was transferred to the campus. 

Today the shop is just twelve years old and is producing periodicals, 
campus publications, stationery, and, lately, books, winning the distinction 
of being the only college press in the South to print its own text books. 

J. P. Hansard, member of the Class of 1926, is in charge of the Uni- 
versity Press and is ably assisted by Ray Todd, Morrell Driver and Jen- 
nings Dennis, students. 



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Boys' Glee Club 



OFFICERS 

Henry Whitesell President 

LeRoy Tebo Manager 

William Hill Sccrclury 

George Wessling Treu^nrer 

MEMBERS 



Herbert Nagel 
William Hill 
Arthur Swart/, 
Dennis Mincey 
Henry Whitesell 
Joe Terry 
Harry Davies 
LeRoy Tebo 



John Reynolds 
George McMillan 
Joseph Freeman 
Clyde Dudley 
George Wessling 
George Scudder 
Arnold Slater 
James Jackson 



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Girls' Glee Club 



OFFICERS 

Eugenia Buchanan President 

Thyeza Perry Secretary 

Gertrude Murray Manager 

Mrs. Floyd Zimmermann Director 

MEMBERS 



Elizabeth Werner 
Sarah James 
Margaret Vardaman 
Gertrude Murray 
Jean Nutting 
Cammie Lee Stow 



Adele Bussey 
Ruth Frost 
Thelma Brogdon 
Eugenia Patterson 
Thyrza Perry 
Louise Madden 



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Players' Club 

The club became a part of the University in its early history and 
since its organization has contributed largely to dramatics on the campus. 
Each year the club presents several plays to the student body in addition 
to taking part in the annual production of Spring Plays. 

OFFICERS 

Paul Madden President 

Earl Blackwell Vice-President 

Fred Boynton Stage Manager 

Jake Sutton Business Manager 

MEMBERS 

Louise Madden Elizabeth Dodd Martha Riddick 

Paul Madden Robert Emery Fred Boynton 

Carroll Thompson David Smith Eugenia Patterson 

Myrtle Sullivan Frank McSherry Floyd Cooper 

Earl Blackwell Julian Stoval Jennings Dennis 

Rosetta Magiill Mildred Bradley Mary Dodd 

Virgil Milton Frank Inman Lyman Fox 

Angel Allen Allan Watkins Gertrude Murray 

Adele Bussey Robert Key Eugenia Buchanan 

Jake Sutton Kendal Jordan Henry Whitesell 
Ben Simpson 



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The Follies Of 1929 

Earl Blackwell Director 

Robert Shaw Musical Director 

Paul Madden Advertising Manager 

Frank Inman Assistant Advertising Manager 

Fred Boynton Business Manager 

David Smith Assistant Business Manager 

Evelyn Silverman . . . . Publicitij Manager 



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What! When! Why! 




The Petrel Follies ! 

It's becoming to be a pet expression these days 
among the theatre folk of Atlanta as well as the stu- 
dents of the University. Those performances of the 
past two years at local theatre houses convinced thou- 
sands of theatre folk that the University has in its midst 
a group of talented students — and, too, a talented direc- 
tor. 

F^ Two years ago Earl Blackwell, now president of the 

student body, conceived of the idea. He tackled the job single-handed 
and in the end put over to the satisfaction of theatre-goers for two nights 
a splendid production. In fact, it was so successful, there was a demand 
for another performance. Earl did not hesitate. 

And again in 1929 Earl was on the job bright and early. As a result 
he devised and produced another Follies equally as good if not a wee bit 
better than the 1928 show. 

All of which means that the Petrel Follies has become a permanent 
thing. Just who will take over the burden of producer and director when 
Earl leaves is the one big question. 

For a number of years the dramatic students of the University have 
written and produced their own plays, being the only group to do so until 
a few years ago. And now the students have gone one better by produc- 
ing their own Follies! 

Aesthetic dancing, toe dancing, jazz singing, comedians, choruses to 
rival the best, trained musicians — they're just a few of the things Earl 
presented to the public. It was an array of talented entertainers capable ^ 
of even causing Flo Zeigfield to wriggle in his seat. ^ 



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c/4 Criticism 



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THE Oglethorpe Players Club, with the able assistance of the Oglethorpe orches- 
tra, December 6th and 7th presented their 1928 contribution to the gaiety of the 
community. They presented the "Petrel Follies," an entertainment, friends, 
worth much more than the price of admission, whether Oglethorpe be your collegiate 
weakness or not. 

It is invidious to make comparisons, at any time and in any manner. It is still 
more invidious to attempt to compare an amateur performance with the work of 
stage professionals. For it is fair to neither. They are two entirely distinct specii. 

Professionals may have more training, greater mechanical perfection and more 
aplomb before the hundred-eyed monster, the audience. But amateurs have, to ofl'- 
set this, an enthusiasm, a freshness and a charm that professionals can never hope to 
duplicate. 

Last night the "Petrel Follies" gave us a program that sparkled with the fresh- 
ness and enthusiasm of the amateur and added to it a perfection of production that 
can only be described as professional amateurism. So let it go at that. 

It is impossible to name all the incidents and acts of the program. It is one of 
those revues where one item follows another so fast that you lose count and memory 
cannot hope to list them later in orderly progress. Sufficient to know that you enjoy 
each one so much you wonder how come you thought those that had gone before could 
be the best of the night. 

From the opening numbers by the orchestra — by the way, professional or other- 
wise, there isn't a theatre in Atlanta with an orchestra that plays as zippily as the 
Oglethorpians — to the last finale it was amusing, clever, modern and zestful. 

Likewise, it is impossible to name the performers. There were too many. But 
recollection picks out as high lights, say Sara Sharp and her tap dancing. Louise 
Madden and her songs, Hayti Thompson, Jimmy Anderson, Dwight Horton and Jake 
Sutton and their comedy. Eugenia Buchanan and her splendid voice, Robert Jester 
Harbour and her gorgeous "Peacock" act, George McMillan, Joe Freeman, Blanford 
Eubanks and their vocalising. 

And, if Texas Guinan were only half as attractive as her copy last night, she'd 
be too good for New York. Also, Marian Attridge can "put over" a song, emphat- 
ically. 

Then don't forget Frank Inman, Paul Madden, Theodosia Hunnicutt and all the 
rest of the gang, particularly Earl Blaekwell, the director, and Bob Shaw, musical 
director. Anyway who knows how hard they must have worked to achieve such a 
resiflt. 

All in all, the "Petrel Follies" is a distinctly snappy item of the season, and if 
you are so forgetful as to overlook it tonight let your folly be on your own head. 
Incidentally, the co-eds, fair and brunette, usher all comers to their seats with a de- 
licious touch of welcome that is balm to a tired newspaper scribbler's heart. — Ralph 
T. Jones in the Atlanta Constitution. 






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Co-ed Council 

Louise Madden President 

Evelyn Silverman Senior Representative 

Mary Dodd Junior Rei)rescntativc 

Gertrude Murray Sophomore Representative 

Jean Nutting Freshman Representative 



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Co-ed History 



1 snow storm in the desert ! Roses blooming in Iceland ! 

■^^ Even a sophisticated, cynical world would be sent into pandemonium 
should such a thing come to pass. But never will the world see a more 
frenzied group of young men than the Oglethorpe students of the class of 
1919 when they realized that a co-ed had succeeded in crashing the gates 
of the Petrel Institution of Learning! 

Miss Martha Shover — pioneer of Lindberghian courage, was the bit 
of femininity that startled the heretofore secure male existence of the 
Petrels. And from the very beginning she gave these men to understand 
that co-eds were not content to be mere figureheads. 

So the Petrel files of November, 1919, relate that "to Miss Martha 
Shover goes the honor of being the first woman to hold office among stu- 
dent activities at Oglethorpe." She was elected secretary and treasurer 
of the freshman class. 

"Boys! Sharpen Your Razors— Fifty Co-eds On Their Way!" So 
read the glaring headline in the Petrel for September 1921. And then 

"An incentive for every Oglethorpe man adopting a slogan of 'a shave 

a day' and the return of the lost art of sporting collars and ties is offered 
in the announcement that forty young ladies of Atlanta have registered 
at the university for the coming year." 

The outstanding achievement in 1921 seemed to be the fact that 
thirty-seven per cent of the co-eds were red-haired, so the Petrel files tell 
us. But storm clouds were already gathering. The winter of 1922 the 
Co-eds broke into print. The disturbing crash of thunder came when 
Mariana Goldsmith wrote, "If the girls can vote, why can't they also be 
voted for?" 

Meanwhile these brave, courageous pioneers were struggling to instill 
a feminine atmosphere; they started with the Co-ed Room. "Some want 
a couch, others want a table. But all are in favor of a mirror." 



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In the fall of 1923, thirty-five "young and innocent males" banded 
together for protection against the winning ways of co-ed flappers, and 
called their organization the Anti-Co-ed Club! But this did not inter- 
fere with the co-eds' activities. They played basketball, went out for 
debating, acted superbly in the Players Club, wrote for the campus pub- 
lications, competed with the men students in almost everything and still 
maintained their "winning ways." 

And now, in the grand old year of 1929, we discover the fact that the 
female students are taking a very active part in various activities, viz. 
Stormy Petrel, Yamacraw, basketball, tennis, Follies, Players' Club, de- 
bating. There is quite a contrast between the years 1919 and 1929 — 
just ten years difference — regarding the fair student! 

Probably one Co-ed whose name will live through the ages of Co-ed 
history is Evelyn Silverman, a talented writer, a wise student and a sa- 
gacious individual. During the past two years she captured the literati 
with her "Brewing" column in the Stormy Petrel. She has had several 
short stories accepted. She played a prominent part in the victory at 
High's department store. She has made good as a student of literature 
and journalism and a brilliant career is ahead. 

Martha Shover, who was elected secretary and treasurer of the 
Freshman class in 1919, no longer can be labeled the only Co-ed to capture 
votes. In 1928, Evelyn Hollingsworth was chosen vice-president of the 
Senior class. And this year Mildred Bradley was elected advertising man- 
ager of the Yamacraw for 1930. Not so bad for the girls ! 

The past year has been a progressive one for the Daughters of Ogle- 
thorpe. They have installed with notable success a Co-ed Council, and 
have drawn up the first Co-ed Constitution that the college has ever had. 
But sure proof of their growth and progress is presented with the fact 
•L that where one mirror hung before, three now hang! 



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Co-ed Basketball Team 

SINCE the year of 1923 the Co-eds have entered a team in the basket- 
ball field despite the many handicaps and disheartening reverses. Dur- 
ing the recent season they failed to break through for a victory but 
still there is spirit and anticipation for a better round of it in 1930. 

The Co-eds did not participate but in three games in 1929 due to the 
Inter-Sorority league, sponsored by the Inter-Fraternity Council, which 
occupied the most of their afternoons. Two games were lost to Piedmont 
College and a third to North Georgia Agricultural College. 

Several outstanding players did not join the Co-ed squad until the 
Inter-sorority league was concluded and thus a reason for the erratic 
playing in the early games. 

The members of the squad were: Myrtle Sullivan, Jean Nutting, 
Doris Taylor, Louise Madden, Ruth Frost, Margaret Vardaman, Mary X. 
Gunter, Pansy Bugg, Martha Riddick, Gertrude Murray, Mildred Bradley, 
Helen Boardman and Rosetta Magill. 



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Most Popular Boy . 
Most Popular Girl . 
Most Intellectual Boy 
Most Intellectual Girl 
Most Dignified . 
Most Timid Girl . . 
Most Timid Boy . . 
Most Accomplished . 

Laziest 

Best Athlete . . . 
Biggest Grafter . . 

Luckiest 

Most Modest . . . 
Prettiest Girl . . . 

Cutest 

Biggest Eater 
Greenest 



Earl Blackwell .... Hiujt! Thompson 

Mary X. Gunter .... Angel Allen 

John Turk L. Hill, Arnold 

Evelyn Silverinun . . . Emily Wade 

Pete Davenport .... Bryant Arnold 

Mary Williamson .... Eugenia Patterson 

Zelan Wilts . . . Robert Shaiv 

Hayti Thompson .... Robert Shaw 

Cy Bell Jim Sims 

Monk Clement Claud Herrin 

Julian Stoval Clay Sypert 

Jim Sims Lindsey Vaughn 

Robert Shaw Earl Blackwell 

Martha Johnson .... Mary Nell Mathia 

Carroll Thompson . . . Evelyn Moore 

Morrelt Driver .... Stanley Pfefferkorn 

Luke Appling .... Charles Taylor 



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AN ESSAY ON SILENCE 
Bv Zelan Wills 



ALL IN 



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Editor (to Beall and Brinson) : Know 
any jokes we can use in the annual? 

Answer: Naw, but we know a great 
Big Joker. 

Editor: Whoosit? 

Chorus: John Renfroe. 

FAMOUS FOLK 

Many famous men, or rather little men 
with big names, have been seen around the 
campus, such as: Wilson, Morgan, Gordon, 
Bryant, Hancock, Adams, Jackson, Virgil 
Cooper, Hamilton, Brown, Buchanan, Em- 
erson, Goldsmith, Johnson, Marie, Riley, 
Simpson, Taylor and Smith. 

Jack Murphy tells us that he saw a 
Scotchman down town the other day throw- 
ing rocks at the newsboys in hopes they'd 
hurl a paper at him. 



The BMiop and the ShoeHinith, one was 
English and the other a Turk, were stand- 
ing on the edge of the Brooke arguing as 
to who was Wright in regard to a Wade 
in the water. "Shaw," said the Bishop, 
"you be the fiirse one to enter!" But a 
couple of bgrds appeared from the ivoods 
and attracted him. As the Bishop watched 
the Height of their flight, he fell in the 
Poole and shouted that he was a Coleman. 
The Shoesmith faced a Riddle in pulling 
his Pal from the Poole but he succeeded 
and they continued in the Woods, ap- 
proaching two Bridges. A few feet be- 
yond was seen a Wall which was very 
Long. They scaled the Wall and saw a 
Broirn Church over the Hill. 

"Hoice can I dry my clothes?" said the 
Bishop. A Gran Fox appeared and the 
two ran to the Church. They rang the 
Bell of the parsonage but no one answered 
so they found the Key and entered. The 
drenched Bishop sat on the Davenport 
■while the Shoesmifli went in the kitchen 
and found some Coffee and Bacon. The 
wet Bishop reached in his pocket and 
found a Hevrin that, evidently, secreted its- 
elf when the victim fell in the Brooke. 
"Am I crazy?" he shouted. "Fll be going 
Nutting soon." 

Before he had hardly finished, the But- 
lev entered. He listened to the Bishop's 
story and informed him that the pastor 
was in Montgomery and would later visit 
in Hamilton. "It is all Wright for you to 
stay," he said kindly. The Bishop want- 
ed to know his Price for the trouble and 
the answer was in the negative. 

The intruder suffered chills so he plac- 
ed himself in a Crouch. The Butler put 
a Black blanket around his body. The 
Shoesmith brought the Bacon and Herrin 
and Coffee and they dined. 

"We wish you Moore luck than the gods 
can give," they said and then departed. 

Don't be too hard on the Co-eds; they're (7 
hard enough! 



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F£ACHTREE ROAD VIEW 



LUPTON HALL 



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Dr. Jacobs: What do you think of this 
Evolution? 

Nowell: Well, it's a good idea — but 
can they enforce it? 

WHAT, HO! 

Hickory, dickory, dock, 
My girl has bought a clock; 
I'm afraid to squeeze her, 
Yes, even to tease her. 
For fear she'll gimme a sock. 

A GENIUS 
The dignified Senior was filling out an 
application. What is your father's occu- 
pation?" read the question. The answer 
was '"Nothing." The next question was: 
"What do you intend to do?" and the ans- 
wer was: "Do the same as my pappy." 

Little Boy : Say, Mister, will that man 
there (pointing to Vaughn) go to heaven? 

Wild Boy: Sure, lad. 

Little Boy: But, Mister, angels don't 
have whiskers. 

Wild Boy: Quite right but he'll get in 
heaven with a close shave. 

Dame No. 1: Say, Susie, I had a date 
with an Oglethorpe boy last night. 

Dame No. 2: What'd you do? 

Dame No. 1 : Honey, ain't you ever been 
out with an Oglethorpe boy? 

Prof. Burrows: . . . and the Britons 
still wore the same clothes that their an- 
cestors did. 

Bob Shaw: Why, the dirty things! 

Nixon: What business are you going 
in next year? 

Sims: The food business, my comrade. 
Nixon: Yeah? Well, what part? 
Sims: Why, the eating part. 

Neuhoff: Why did you run away from 
Hot? 

Carroll: I just Wanted to be chased. 



Clem: Say, that girl over there (Mar- 
tha) is a man hater. 
Asa: Yeah? 
Clem: Yep, hates to be without 'em! 

Prof. Hunt: Now, Brother Bridges, 
what is an artery? 

Innocent Red : Why, that's a place where 
folks go to look at pictures. 

She: If you kiss me again I will scream. 
Then there is silence. 
Henry: Well, c'mon an' say somethin'. 
She: Don't bother me. I'm screaming. 

Dave: Did you hear 'bout the big wreck? 

Charlie: Naw, whut? 

Dave: Two taxicabs collided down town. 

Charlie: Anybody hurt? 

Dave: Yea, seventeen Scotchmen. 

Fulton : I have an athletic heart, I 
think. 

Hedges: That ain't nothin'. I've got 
athletic underwear. 

Gillman: Well, sir, I am here to see 
about a job. 

Business Man: Sorry, but I do all the 
work myself. 

Gillman: Perfect, sir, when can I start? 

HUMAN NATURE 
Humanity is a great mystery. Y'ou can 
do and do, serve and serve, put yourself 
out time after time, then fail in one single 
instance and all the good you ever did is 
forgotten in the storm of hate and scorn 
hurled in your direction. Too bad we are 
so forgetful. 

— Cartersville Tribune-News. 

COCOANUT BLUES 
Under the spreading cocoanut tree, 
I counted my golden treasure; 
A monkey looked down, 
Dropped a nut on my crown. 
And I looked elsewhere for my pleasure. 
— H. M. T. 




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ON THE WAY TO LIBBY CA5TLE 



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THE STRANGER 
"Well, boys' I've come to town, 

The call of the bar was strong — 
Stop all of your games, and drink to the 
health 
Of a man who is always wrong." 

'Twas in a way as this — 

On a cold November eve 
That we saw first 
He who had just come in 

He told us to call him Steve. 

He had the face of an eight day clock 
The walk of the mountaineer's stride 

The look of an Indian, 

The voice of a bell. 

And we thought he was here to hide. 

He'd been through heaps and gobs of pain, 

'Twas written in his face, 
This mystery man whom none had seen 

Other than at this place. 

But, true to the style and customs 
Of our Northwest, bless the ham. 

He asked no questions. 

Got no answers, 

And didn't give a damn! 

Thus we sized the stranger up 

And though we eyed him still — 

As time flew by, 

And nothing came 

We let him alone to fill. 

For he loved his whiskey, clear he said, 
And though he was always drunk, 

He kept his mouth shut all the time 
And we classed him as a skunk. 

Now as is our custom to make one talk 
In our far Northwest town, 
Q,^ We called in one "Mary Ann" — 
^-^ To open the mouth of this clown. 



Now Mary Ann is the flower of the wilds- 
The lil' of the Valley— the sun— 

And though she took to none of us 

*^ (p She fell right for this bum. 



So we gave her a week to open his mouth 

To find out his business and trade — 
But they fell for each other like a ton of 
brick 
And he drank naught but sweet lemon- 
ade. 

Two more weeks and we found a note 
That drowned us in all despair — 
The note said she, "Mary Ann," 
Has for him, gone to care. 

She also found out who he was — 

A reporter her note had said. 
Come to the North to confirm the report 

That Dan McGrew was dead. 

— F. Mc. S. 

Hezekiah McGoof ski, brilliant young shoe 
mender of Gilopi, progressive city located 
about three whoops and two hollows north 
of Geek, submitted the following with the 
question attached: "When do we work?" 
Days 

Every year has 365 

If you sleep 8 hours it equals.., 122 

This leaves 243 

If you rest 8 hours it equals 122 

This leaves .....121 

There are 52 Sundays... 52 

This leaves 69 

If you have half holiday on Saturday... .26 

This leaves 43 

If you have V2 hour for lunch 28 

This leaves 15 

Two weeks vacation 14 

This leaves 1 

Labor Day 1 

Working Days ..0 

TWEET! TWEET! 

Sweet 

Love 

Feet 

Move 

Too 

Slow 




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JAe PROBE OGLETHORPE BIAZE; 
BARRACKS S2 YOUTHS ESCAPE DEATH 





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I hate to say good bye 
But 'tis time for me to fly. 



I hear the angels singing 
And silver bells a-ringing. 



Give me a kiss, my dear, 
And do not shed a tear. 



Your life on earth is sublime 

But mine 'twill be sweeter than thine. 



My darling, do not brood. 
For I'm in a joyful mood. 



AVIATOR'S SONNET 
I 

Through 
Blue 
Skies 
Fly 
To 
You 
Why 



THOROUGHBREDS 
We come in this world 

All naked and bare — 
We go through this world 
With trouble and care. 
We die! We go! 
We know not where. 
If we're thoroughbreds here — 
We'll be thoroughbreds there. 

— Anonymous 

A NEW LIFE 

Bending, moping, flowers sway, 
And lift their heavy heads; 
Waked to life by a glistening ray, 
They rise from their frosty beds; 
Murmuring brooklets and birds that sing 
Announce the advent of Patient Spring. 
— H. M. T. 



JUST WISHING 
! Would there were 

Some kind of power 
To make me dream 

From hour to hour — 

I'd dream of Love 

From day to day, 

And always live 
In ecstasy. 



FAMOUS PAIRS 
Mutt and Jeff 

M. Thomas and Va. O'Kelley. 
Ham and Eggs. 
A. Watkins and C. Thompson. 
Haig and Haig. 
Seven and Eleven. 
Nutting and Milton. 
Martha and Rosetta. 

BALL GAME EPISODE 
The batter stood at the plate, 

The count was three-and-two, 
His face bore signs of hate 

And vengeance through and through. 

The pitcher breezed one by — 

It split the center o' the pan — 

The batter socked 'im in the eye 
And ran and ran and ran. 

— H. M. T. 

TEE! HEE! 
Here are the remains of Art McDuff', 

The rest is sad to mention; 
He toasted the health of H. L. Mencken 

At a Rotary Club convention. 

Scene: Oglethorpe-Tennessee baseball 
game. 

Kimbrell — (pinching hitting) : Say, Mr. 
Umpire, Kimbrell hittin' for er-er-er-?!$fl? 
ffl?!ffia;oe&?! 

Umpire Walton — (addressing stands) : 
Ladies and Gentlemen, Kimbrell is hitting 
for Mr. Damfino. 



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TINY "AND HIS TROUBLES 



CHAPEL 15 OVFK- 



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BETWEEN CLASSES 


THE SHORT-CLTT 



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The following' writing was found beside 
the dead body of its author in the middle 
of the Arizona desert. It is an attempt 
of a dying man to put into verse the ac- 
count of the only good deed in his life. 
It is reprinted here as it was found except 
for a short paragraph that was too blood- 
stained to read, but which started: "To 
Whom It May Concern.". The rest was 
as follows: 

I was knowed by seven names 

From Haiti to Nome and back, 

A cut-throat, grim-ridden son-of-a-gun, 
Kept alive wid a blade, and tact. 

Yes, I've kilt, for revenge, for money, 

For fun, and laughed as I slit a gut, 

Half drunk for months at a time, 
A fight-lovin' fool, a slut. 

I knowed what I'se doin', yes, 

Jest in me to do it, I guess, 
But there's one white trick I pulled in my 
life, 

Though I'm payin' for it wid my best. 

Yep! I'm dyin' and oh! Hell, 

What a way to die, 
Wid bullet holes all through me 

And the lid torn off'n my eye. 

But strange to me, it seems, I'm happy, 
Yeh, happy By God! and why? 

It's cause of that trick I jest now pulled 
And though it's causin' me to die. 

I shake my own damn hand on it 

And I'll shake it again if I live, 

I"l tell you about it if I can hold out 

And forget about being like a sieve. 

Been about two years ago that I wuz 
riding through 
A pasture right off'n th' road. 
Fell off my horse, couldn't hold 'im no 
more 
Cause I'se totin' a load. 



Yeh! A load of lead pumped into me 
By a snake I took for a friend, 

When a farmer picks me up and says 
"You're mighty nigh your end". 

But he took me to his farmhouse 

And lay me down on a bed 
Jes' like he'd done for any man — 

If it wasn't for him I'd been dead. 

Well, he dressed my wounds and fixed me 
up 

And saw that I eat and drink, 
And he's th' man that saved my life 

And pulled me from death's brink. 

He had a little baby gal. 

Oh! She was a purty little tot 

And it was a hell of a combination — 
Them two and me — a sot. 

Well, I learnt to love the little gal. 
She was about six and a half. 

And while her pappy wuz off'n to work 
She'd talk to me and laugh. 

I couldn't move, even my arm 
For six weeks, maybe seven. 

And I'll never forget them days wid her, 
It's as close as I'll come to heaven. 

She cared for me like she was used to it 
And saw that I got along fine, 

It took me back to the long gone days 
When I'se about eight or nine. 

One night when I was well enough to leave 
And I bid 'em both goodbye. 

The old man shook my hand and said 
He guessed the little gal'd die. 

But the law was a-comin' and a-eomin' 
fast, 

Hot again on my trail, 
So I had to git, as my kind does. 

To stay outta sight and jail. 

That was a little over a year ago, 

I'd been pinin' for my little pal. 
While the sheriffs was keepin' me up in 



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. RATHr:F DlFHCULTjrODO THhTi MUSfl'lFFR FAJlYf 



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th' hills 
And away from that baby gal. 

But I made up my mind to sec her, 

Sn one night when there wasn't no 
moon, 

I steps outta the hills and starts ridin' 
Wid half a shant-e of a loon. 

And when I start ridin' I'm shootin' 
So five of 'em bit the dust. 

The other man I aimed at lives 

Cause the other bullet was rust. 

But there was plenty more, I knew, 

Ilidin' round every hill. 
And they had but one thing in mind — 

To see me in jail, or to kill. 

I rode out two horses' tongues that night 
Trying to outrun the pack, 

I wanted to fix my leg they got to— 
The blood was all turnin' black. 

Early the next morning I lands in the 
yard 

Of the farmer that once picked me up. 
But there was.nt no sign of life there 

Save for a little mangy pup. 

So I ditched my horse and limped towards 

A barn half full of hay. 
Slammed the door and heard the yells 

Of the posse a mile away. 

Had plenty of shot and felt purty sound. 

Wasn't caring a bit, 
I could shoot 'em all up, on the ground 

While they could tell when I hit. 

Well, the posse arrives twenty men strong. 

Blood thirsty and rarin' to shoot, 
"Well, I'll give 'em that," I thought to my- 
self. 

With a little more to boot. 
So I start things off, the pup gets pran- 
cing, 

And lights out to where I lay, 
I cusses to myself to have let him live 

To come and give me away. 



But I draws back my gat and get 

get ready to work, 
Smilin' and frownin' in time. 
When somethin' back o' me causes me to 

jerk 
And forget all other worries o' mine. 

Then wid shaking hands and a lead of a 
bullet 
I wrote a note on tlie door. 
And with tears in my eyes I limped to 
my horse 
Playin' target like a boar. 

Shooting to all sides o' me 

And gettin' shot in return, 

Tryin' to live just long enough 

To do what I thought I had earn. 

And so here I am a bleedin' fool 
Wid a lid torn off'n my eye. 

With white ants crawling all over me 
A-helpin' me to die. 

But I'm thankful for livin' long enough 
To write all this and — well, 

But I've gotta hurry and finish this thing 
Before I go off to Hell. 

When the sheriff wonders why I left th' 
barn 

To get shot at by his men. 
He'll go in the barn and look around 

And find my note then. 

That I was a-goin' to face his guns 

I put in the note just why 
Kniiwin' damn well I'd git shot all up 

And had nothin' to do but die. 

This is what I wrote the sheriff'. 

You kin understand it too, 
"Dear Sheriff, my reason for not shooting 
from here 

Is in the wood box, best wishes to you." 

And when he opens the wood box up 
Wid a gun drawn in his hand, 

He'll see a blue eyed baby gal 
And then he'll understand. 

— F. Mc. S. 



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THE BOK CARILLON 

(or Singing Tower) 
Mountain Lake, Florida 



c — VanNatta Studios 



Erected of Georgia Marble and native Coquina 
Stone from plans of Milton B. Meadry, Architect 



iWOUJ 







(?0- 
GRErHCUND 
TELLOWAy 

Today you can go to every vacation- 
country at lowest costs in travel his- 
tory. One great motor bus system 
reaches Yellowstone, Yosemite, Rocky 
Mountain and Crater Lake National 
Parks — takes you to Niagara, the 
Gettysburg Battlefields, New York 
East — the Michigan 



Florida 
tly or 



California, 



bus system. Travel the senic high- 
ways. Check the remarkably low- 
fares a* your local depot or write 
Motor Transit Management Company. 
Chicago, for interesting book, "Circle 
Trip Suggestions." 



DEPOTS 



—Union Bus Terminal— 
Wilmont Hotel 

The Petrel Shop, Peachtree Road. 
Greyhound Depot, US Peachtree St„ 

Phone Walnut 6300 

Hotel— Phone Ivy 0600 
Ansley Hotel — Phone Ivy 1100 
Robert Fulton Cigar Station— Phone 

Ivy 2501 
Greyhound Depot, 17-B N. Forsyth 

St.— Phone Walnut 3351. 



^"^mMYM^^e^Y 



Our 15 years of Experience on Furniture Rebuilding 

SHOULD MEAN MUCH TO YOU 

Years of comfort and service will be added to your club and house furniture 
by having it Repaired, Refinished and Upholstered by The Trinity Shops, 

We will enjoy having you visit our shops and studios, the South's largest and 
best equipped Furniture Repair Shops. Call for estimate, without obligation, 

TRINITY QUALITY SHOP Lc 

Call WALnut 5828-9 
363 Boulevard, N. E., Atlanta, Georgia. 



ruG 



LA 

IS 



Collegiate 
Headquarters 



laIe 

STQRES 



Meet Your Friends at 

LANE'S DRUG STORES 



Quality 

Courtesy 

Reliability 

Right Prices 



Atlanta 

Knoxville 

Jacksonville 





BALLARD'S 



Two Optical Stores 

It is essential that your optician is competent to 
fill your oculist prescription correctly. 

Your oculist knows 
you will get what he orders here. 



WalterBallard OpticalC? 




Carolina Sandwiches 

Good Sandwiches — Good Service 

Phone Walnut 7699 

Party Orders — Sandwiches for all 
Occasions. 



Frances 
Tea 


Virginia 
Room 


63% POPLAR STREET, N. W. 
(Diagonally across from Post Office) 


Luncheon 11:30-2: 


30— Dinner 5:00-8:00 


Reservations Made For Tea and 
Bridge Parties 


Phone Wal. 4433 


Open week days only 




Truly 
The Best Taste in Gifts 





ANY NUNNALLY DEALER OR STORE WILL GUARANTEE SAFE DELIVERY 



Still Available 

Even After You Have Left Atlanta Jacob's 
Prices and Service are Yours — 
OUR MAIL ORDER SERVICE EXCELS 

You do not have to live in Atlanta to take advantage of 
the saving afforded by the cut prices of Atlanta's own, and 
oriignal, cut price Drug Store, Jacobs. When, after grad- 
uation, you go out to carve your niche in the world, remem- 
ber that saving is one of the greatest incentives to success 
and you can continue to save on drugs and toilet articles 
by using Jacobs' Mail Order Service. 

Jacobs 

Stores all over Atlanta 



The Sun Lite Assurance Company o! Canada 

Presperous and Progressive 

Insurance in Force December 31st 1928 $1,896,915,934 

New Insurance Paid for in 1928 441,244,390 

Gain in Insurance in Force in 1928 408,925,000 

Total Income in 1928 144,747,000 

Asset at December 31st 1928 488,958,706 

Reserve for Unforseen Contingencies $12,500,000 

54,438,862 

Surplus 66,938.862 

Payment to Policyholders in - 1928 49,920,000 

Total Payment to Policyholders since Organization 350,000,000 

The Company operates in 41 States of the United States 

The Atlanta Division 

1308-1315 Citizen and Southern Bank Buildinj^ 

J. T. WILSON, Division Manager 



Wholesome 

refreshment 

Pure as sunHght 



Drink 




Delicious and Refreshing 



The drink that's a blend 
of pure products from 
nature .— and nature's 
finest flavors, gathered 
from nine different 
climes. Nothing syn- 
thetic or artificial is used. 

The proof of the purity 
is in the testing. Twenty- 
two scientific tests, cov- 
ering every step in its 
preparation, assure it. 

It's wholesome refresh- 
ment^ just the thing 
for a minute's pause to 
relax and refresh your- 
self. Such a little min- 
ute is long enough for 
a big rest. 

The Coca-Cola Co., Atlanta, Ga. 






8 million^ 
a day 



GOOD TO GET WHERE IT IS 



No wonder COLDS 
yield so quickly 



Vicks attacks them 
2 ivays at once 

Just rubbed on throat and 
chest, Vicks relieves colds 
two ways at once: 

(1) It acts through the 
skin like a poultice and 
"draws out" tightness and 
soreness. 

(2) Its healing vapors, 
released by the b o d y- 
warmth, are inhaled direct 
to the inflamed air-pass- 
aees. Most colds usually 
vield oveTijqrbt. 





EMPIRE COAL COMPANY 




DEALERS IN HIGH GRADE 






DOMESTIC AND STEAM 






GOAL 




Hem. 5086 


:-: North Boulevard at Tenth Street :-: 


Hem. 5087 



ZAGHRY 


S7 Peachtree Street 


HART SCHAFFNER & MARX 


CLOTHES 



W I LLN ER'S 

The Sijmbol of Safety in Furs 

The Most Exclusive Fur House in 

the South 

Expert Remodeling and Storage 

234 Peachtree Walnut 8918 



COMPLIMENTS 

Quick Tire Service, Inc. 

344 W. Peachtree St. 

Distributors 

InttrJi BUUb (SxvtB 

Gas and Oil — — Road Service 
Expert Vulcanizing 

Ivy 0065 

OPEN EVERY HOUR IN THE YEAR 




DRINK 



jiHIi 



In sixteen delicious flavors. 

Sold by NuGrape Bottlers 

everywhere. 



COMPANY OF AMERICA 

ATLANTA, GA. 




BRO S. & CO.^^ 

E ST AB Ll S HED 1358 

36 BROAD ST., S. W. 

Corner Broad and Alabama Streets 

Entrance on the Corner 



CONGRATULATIONS! 



We wish you the best of luck and success in life ! 

To be successful you must look successful. Let 
us help you — we have a wide range of choice for you in 
our large assortment of costume accessories, so essential 
to the well dressed man or woman. You'll be interested 
in our Diamond jewelry, wrist watches, pocket watches, 
imported French bags, attractive compacts, etc., which are 
appropriate for all occasions. 

Come in today and see our beautiful display — we 
want to become acquainted with you and all members of 
your family. 



Terms to Suit Your Convenience- 



Open daily till 6:30 p. m. 
Saturdays till 9:30 p. m. 



Call or Write for Cata- 
logue. Phone Wal. 3737 









i 


1 


HEADQUARTERS FOR 

KODAKS and SUPPLIES 








1 


m 


Bring Us Your Films for Development 
Correct Developing Means Better Pictures 






m. 


l^w — ~~' 


Eastman Kcdak Stores, Inc. 






i 


^ 


"The Large Kodak Store" 

183 PEACHTREE ST. 



It's the Smart Co - Ed 
that Knows Her 

Allen's 



Allen's stands back of the 
Oglethorpe Co-Ed with a 
variety of shops supply- 
ing sport or dress frocks, 
always new, smart and 
individual styles. Clothes 
that satisfy the smart Co- 
Ed are always found at 
Aliens and are enough 
to make her shine on any 
campus. It is the smart 
co-ed who will enjoy col- 
lege life. And if she is 
smart she knows her Al- 
iens! 

J, P, Allen & Co. 

"The Store All Women Know" 



Photographers For 
The 1929 Yamacraw 



ELLIOTTS' 

Peachtree Studio 

"BETTER PHOTOGRAPHS" 



Howard Theatre 
Atlanta 



TUBBY WALTON'S FILUNG STATION 

We Appreciate the Patronage of Oglethorpe Students 

Our One Aim is to Please our Customers 
REAL HOME COOKED FOOD 





when you 
need 



alotabs 



One tablet at 'bedtim? 

with a swallow of water, 

that's all. Next morning 

you are feeling fine with a hearty appetite 

for breakfast. Eat what you wish, — no danger. 



in the ring it's 

PUNCH/ 

m 



n 




arette its 



TASTE/ 



TASTE above everything 



Why 



MILD and ye( 
THEY SATISFY 



CtVe Chesterfield tobaccos "cross- 
hlended?" Why are they so thoroughly ajefl'.' Why 
do our leaf buyers watch quality so closely? Why 
is the Chesterfield blend so accurate? 

You get the answer when you light up; you 
get out of your Chesterfields exactly what we put 
above everything.' 



Cin — "taste . . . above everything." 
hesterfield 
FINE TURKISH and DOMESTIC tobaccos, not only BLENDED but CROSS-BLENDED 



The new NASH "400" 

PRICED FROM $885 to $2190 

F. O. B. Factory 



KNOWLES NASH CO. 

PEACHTREE AT NORTH AVENUE 



Lincoln 


Hemlock 2955 


Sales 


Ford 


GRANT - HARRIS ■ RIPPEY CO. 

Temporarii Location— 505 West Peachtree St. 

ATLANTA, - GEORGIA 

"NOW BUILDING OPPOSITE BILTMORE HOTEL" 


Service 



Compliments Of 

RED ROCK COMPANY 

NU-GRAPE BOTTLING COMPANY 

ORANGE CRUSH BOTTLING COMPANY 



o — Kark! ^e Daughters of E-^e — ^ 



I y 



Oh for the life of a Popular 
co-ed! 



The college prom . . rainbow 
hued, serpentine confetti . . 

Intriguing treasure hunts . 
burnt orange forests . . pep 
meetings around a bon-fire . 

Fraternity masque balls . . in 
viting glances, bewitching and 
mysterious . . . 

The Senior Follies . . check- 
er-board costumes . . . Doin' 
the Racoon . . . 

The classroom — chamber of 
Challenge 

And never the hackneyed — 



I HAVEN'T A THING TO 
WEAR. 

The Modern Co-Ed knows in- /, 
stinctively — the HIGH ■ road 
to Popularity — and Economy — 



I J. M. High Co. 

O 46 Yeays of Faithful Service and Value Giviiii/ 




Official 
Ogletnorpe Senior Rings 

By 

•^aiieir Man/- ajtf/ P/jM/fd 'ioo' 
of Philadelphia 

Represented by Metropolitan Theatre Bldg. 

THE EMBLEM SHOP, Inc. Atlanta, Ga. 



THE DRIVE-IN 

Sandwiches of all Kinds 

AT BUCK HEAD 



C. E. FREEMAN 

Boulevard and Highland Avenue 
ATLANTA 



REAL 
HOME — COOKING 



— We cater to students 
of Oglethorpe Univer- 
sity; make you feel at 
home by furnishing 
home - cooked food ; 
and at reasonable 
prices! — 



Plate Lunches 
Cigarettes 



Barbecue 
Candies 



Cold Drinks 

— Sandiviches of all kinds — 
Home-Cooked Pies and Cakes 

Mrs. F. D. Streckfuss 
Cafe 

Brookhaven 

"Real Home - Cooking" 



The Pclrcl Shop, Inc. 

"The Petrels' Roosting Ground" 



BOOKS AND SCHOOL 
SUPPLIES 



At Your Service 



COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND 











'^ GARDEN W 

■ftj^ 172/2 PeachtroeSt. 













•-^>^7< 



In announcing that '2^:^^^,i by us. «. 
engraW"S-"f;^";i:derivedlntheacco.- 
,,e conscious of tl.epeasn^.^^pp„^„,y 

of diankmg the eu 

^etedV^-^S*^'''! ,^oie, aM ouv cou- 
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