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Full text of "Yamacraw, 1930"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/yamacraw193008ogle 



ICtbria 



193n 



W. Bryant Arnold 
Editor 

Fred R. Snook 
Business Manager 

Mildred Bradley 
Advertising Manager 



®If^ famarram 

nf 1930 




PubliBljFJi Atinuallg bp lljp 

Oglethorpe University 
Oglethorpe University, Ga. 



ifiitrattnn 

(Ho ®ur UnllyprB 

Monuments, through books, 
the most precious of all 
mediums, have been erected 
to men and women by au- 
thors from the time of the 
Unknown Author to that of 
our own Rupert Brooke, but 
no one was born a more 
noble idea than that which • 
places these pages as an 
everlasting memorial to the 
Mothers of the members of 
the 1930 Class. On bended 
knee, we give this book into 
the hands of those who gave 
us that beauty of soul upon 
which is built all other 
things beautiful in Life. 



iFnrruJ0rh 

How beautiful were those 
days at Oglethorpe! How 
crowded with happiness yet 
mingled with a little sad- 
ness. With the gold, we 
found the dross, making 
more precious our rewards. 
Truly, the philosopher's 
stone is worth while, for i1 
turned into precious metal 
the mind's food from which 
we have coined the ever 
stable riches of our intellec- 
tual banks. 

In submitting this book, we 
hope we have gleaned a part 
of the beauty surrounding 
our lives as Oglethorpians. 
Treat our efforts not harsh- 
ly for 

"Each picture is painted 

with the blood of oiir 

lives; 
Each word is written by 

the hand of our 

hearts." 



So many half-lit worlds to see, 

So many muffled voices hear, 

Such countless forms of things to feel. 

Such breaths, breast-warmed of heaven's draught. 

Such untried sweets to taste of, but 

Only a momentary glance. 

Through five, tiny, blurred panes of glass! 

Yet, so beautiful! 

The odor of them is a universe! 

So fair their favors, so entrancing sweet they seem. 

So pleasing is their voice, so good the touch of all 

I crave one pane the more. 

One crystal pane and then — 

O Worlds, O Infinite, God! 

— Thornwell Jacobs. 



InM 



emorium 




Wade Bryant Arnold 

Nov. 28, 1908 — Feb. 23, 1930 



dnntptita 

I. University 

II. Classes 

III. Sponsors 

IV. Athletics 
VI. Features 

V. Organizations 




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Lupton Hal 




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Administration Building 



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a m a c r a to 





DR. THORNWELL JACOBS, A.B.. A.M., LL.D., Litt.D. 
President Oglethorpe University 



B a \ 




DR. JAMES FREEMAN SELLERS. A.B., A.M., LL.D. 
Dean Oglethorpe University 



'^Ci^S^X y^^^^^l^^r^'^. 



i| a m a c r a 




THORNWELL JACOBS 
President and Professor of Cosmic History 

A.B., Presbyterian College of South Carolina, Valedictorian and Medalist; 
A.M., P. C. of S. C; Graduate of Princeton Theological Seminary; A.M., 
Princeton University; LL.D., Ohio Northern University; Litt.D., Pres- 
byterian College of South Carolina; Pastor of Morganton, (N. C.) Pres- 
byterian Church; Vice-President Thornwell Orphanage; Author and Edi- 
tor; Founder and Editor of Westminster Magazine; Engaged in the or- 
ganization of Oglethorpe University; Author of The Law of the White 
Circle, The Midnight Mummer, Sinful Sadday, Life of William Plumer 
Jacobs, The New Science and the Old Religion ; Member of Graduate Coun- 
cil of the National Alumni Association of Princeton University. 

JAMES FREEMAN SELLERS 
Dean of University and Dean of the School of Science 
A.B., and A.M., University of Mississippi; LL.D., Mississippi College; 
Graduate Student, University of Virginia and University of Chicago; 
Teaching Fellow, University of Chicago; Professor of Chemistry, Miss- 
issippi College and Mercer University; Dean of Faculty, Mercer Univer- 
sity; Professor of Chemistry, A. E. F., University, Beaune, France; Y. 
M. C. A., Educational Secretary, England; Fellow American Association 
for the Advancement of Science; President, Georgia Section American 
Chemical Society; Author Treatise on Analytical Chemistry; Contributor 
to Scientific and Religious Journals. 




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GEORGE FREDERICK NICOLASSEN 
Dean of School of Liberal Arts and Professor of Ancient Languages 
A.B., University of Virginia; A.M., University of Virginia; Fellow in 
Greek, Johns Hopkins University, two years; Assistant Instructor in 
Latin and Greek in Johns Hopkins University, one year; Professor of An- 
cient Languages in the Southwestern Presbyterian University, Clarks- 
ville, Tenn. ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University; Vice-Chancellor of the 
Southwestern Presbyterian University; Member Classical Association of 
the Middle West and South; Author of Notes on Latin and Greek, Greek 
Notes Revised, The Book of Revelation. 

HERMAN JULIUS GAERTNER 
Dean of School of Education and Professor of German and Education 

A.B., Indiana University; A.M., Ohio Wesleyan University; Ped.D., Ohio 
Northern University ; Teacher and Superintendent in the Common Schools 
and High Schools of Ohio and Georgia; Professor of Mathematics and 
Astronomy, Wilmington, Ohio; Professor of History, Georgia Normal and 
Industrial College, Milledgeville, Georgia; Member of the University Sum- 
mer School Faculty, University of Georgia, six summers; Pi Gamma Mu; 
Assistant in organization of Oglethorpe University. 

JAMES E. ROUTH 

Dean of School of Literature and Journalism and Professor of English 

A.B., and Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University ; Tocqueville Medalist, Johns 

Hopkins University; Winner Century Magazine Essay Prize for Ameri- 




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can College Graduate of 1900; Phi Beta Kappa; Sub-editor, Century Dic- 
tionary Supplement, N. Y., 1905; Professor University of Texas and 
Washington University; Acting Assistant Professor, University of Vir- 
ginia; Assistant and Associate Professor, Tulane University; Professor 
of English, Johns Hopkins University Summer School, 1921, 1922, 1925, 
1926 ; Member, Modern Language Association ; National Council of Teach- 
ers of English and American Dialect Society ; Author, Two Studies on the 
Ballad Theory of the Beowulf, The Rise of Classical English, Criticism, 
Contributor to Modern Language Notes ; Publications of Modern Language 
Association, Journal of English and Germanic Philology, Englische Stu- 
dien. South Atlantic Quarterly, etc. 

ARTHUR STEPHEN LIBBY 

Dean of School of Commerce and Finance and Professor of 

International Law 

Ph.D., Bowdoin College; A.B., University of Maine; A.M., Sorbonne, Paris, 
(Diplome Inferieure) ; A.M., Brown University; Ph.D., Alliance Francaise, 
Paris, (Diplome Superieure) ; Student University of Maine Law School 
and Columbia University Law School ; Principal various High Schools in 
Maine; Instructor in Modern Languages, Brown University; Professor of 
Modern Languages, Converse College; Acting Professor of History, Polit- 
ical Science and International Law, Wofford College; Member American 
Historical Association; American Geographic Society; Phi Kappa Delta, 
Honorary Fraternity. 




HARDING HUNT 
Professor of Biology 
B.S., Tufts College; Harvard University; Danbury Normal School; Mas- 
ter in Science, Freyburg Institute; Principal Torrington High School; 
Superintendent of Schools, New Hartford ; Private Tutor, New York City ; 
Reynolds Professor of Biology, Davidson College; Professor of Biology, 
Southern College. 

CORA STEELE LIBBY 
Assistant Professor in School of Business Administration 
A.B., Converse College; Student New York University and Columbia Uni- 
versity ; Head of the Department of Mathematics, Converse College, Spar- 
tanburg, S. C. ; Acting Dean of Converse College. 

MARK BURROWS 
Head of the Department of Secretarial Preparation 

B.S., Stanberry Normal School; A.B., State Teachers' College, Kirksville, 
Missouri; A.M., Oglethorpe University; Teacher and Superintendent in 
the Public and High Schools in Missouri; Director Department of Com- 
merce State Teachers' College, Kirksville; Professor of Rural Education 
m University of Wyoming and in State Teachers' Colleges at Kirksville 
and Greely, Colorado; Editor, Rural School Messenger and The School 
and The Community, and Author Tractates on Education; Member of 
National Education Association and National Geographic Society and Na- 
tional Academy of Visual Education ; Ped.D., Oglethorpe University. 




mw#^ 



lu a c I a 




WILLIAM LOUIS RONEY 
Assistant Professor in Romance Languages 

A.B., University of Pittsburg; A.M., Oglethorpe University; LL.B., At- 
lanta Law School; Assistant Professor Modern Languages, Emory Uni- 
versity; Professor Modern Languages, Washington College, Tennessee; 
Professor Modern Languages, Marietta College, Ohio. 

JOHN A. ALDRICH 
Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

A.B., Albion College; M.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of 
Michigan; Member of Society of Sigma Xi, of American Astronomical 
Society, of American Association of University Professors; Fellow of 
American Association for the Advancement of Science; Professor of 
Physics and Astronomy, Olivet College; Professor of Physics and Astron- 
omy, Washburn College. 

FRANK B. ANDERSON 
Registrar and Athletic Director 

A.B., University of Georgia; Assistant Professor of Mathematics and 
Athletic Director, University School for Boys; Assistant Professor of 
Mathematics and Athletic Director, R. E. Lee Institute; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics and Athletic Director, Gordon Institute; Coach, 
University of Georgia; Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Athletic 
Director, Riverside Military Academy. 

HILERY E. BRYSON 
Professor of Accounting and Book-keeping 

A.B., Oglethorpe University; Instructor in Accounting, Oglethorpe Uni- 
versity, two years. 

ROBERT SHAW 
Director of Music 

A.B., Oglethorpe University; Phi Kappa Delta Fraternity (Honorary.) 
CLARENCE W. WELLS 
Assistant to the President 

A.B., Oglethorpe University, 1929. 

MYRTA THOMAS 
Librarian 

Graduate Carnegie Library School of Atlanta, Georgia ; Librarian Mitchell 
College, Statesville, North Carolina, 




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The Years in Retrospect 

In the following Senior Class section of this book, the reader will 
find pictures of sixteen Seniors who matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1926 
along with a hundred and seven other freshmen. The remaining Seniors 
joined us as we proceeded along the way to graduation and happy are we 
in having them; they are a part of us, helping us to make the whole. 
Many, therefore, enter into the gates of college education, but few emerge 
from the fertile pasture wherein are fed hungry minds into the open fields 
beyond. We are fortunate in realizing the goal of our endeavors, but un- 
fortunate in not being accompanied to the heights by our classmates. To 
our absent men and women we send this message, and hope, by some means 
of mental telepathy, that it reaches them : the spirit you helped to found 
as freshmen, sophomores and juniors remains with us yet, and as we get 
our diplomas, we get them not as individuals, but as a group for all of 
us, for you, the departed, as much as for us, the graduates. 

The most prized of all the many gifts of Oglethorpe: freedom of 
thought, word and deed. We entered with the knowledge that we could 
think "as we pleased." But, coming from many sections of the country 
where academic freedom is hardly tolerated, we did not take much stock 
in it until we sat at the feet of our professors and learned from them the 
truths of life without the limitations of the sectarian college or univer- 
sity. As a result, our minds have been broadened and enriched by the 
true philosophy of our being. We have not had to check the reins; we 
have not had to cut and injure our minds; we have given our minds with 
their thoughts the proper outlets; investigations. Yet, the most of us 
reach the same conclusion as that of our fellow-graduates from the sec- 
tarian schools, although we have trod a different and harder path. We 
know why we return to the faiths of our fathers yet we cannot say how 
our minds made the journey. But they were guided aright by some Pow- 
er. We began a journey to we knew not where, but like the world-voy- 
ager, returned to the home-port, happier for the beauties seen in the far- 
off crevices of human knowledge. Perhaps all of us can echo the words 
of Omar Khayyam, the friend of Nizam ul Mulk and of Hasan Ben Sabbah : 

"Myself when young did eagerly frequent 
Doctor and Saint, and heard great argument 
About it and about; but evermore 
Came out bi/ the same Door where in I went." 



Bam 



\./ 



This book is an historical account of the years spent here. We were 
particularly active in athletics, scholarship and debating. We were repre- 
sented in football by such notables as Cy Bell, Firpo Coffee, Amos Martin, 
Asa Wall, Lindsey Vaughn, Hoke Bell, Curry Burford and Monk Clements. 
In basketball, we had Cy Bell, Lindsey Vaughn, Banty Eubanks and Monk 
Clements. In baseball, the standards were carried by Martin, Wall and 
Vaughn. For two years, Banty Eubanks, the most famous one-man track 
team in the South, represented Oglethorpe on the track and in the tield. 
Harold Coffee, Eloise Tanksley and Bryant Arnold were given the Coat- 
of-Arms and elected to Phi Kappa Delta for high scholastic attainments. 
We had our share of members in Boar's Head, Le Conte and Blue Key. 
During our senior year, more intercollegiate debates were held than in 
any year since 1924. The Orchestra, Players' Club and the Follies claimed 
a number of our classmates. 

We sincerely hope our Oglethorpe has benefitted as a result of our 
labors in these and many other activities. We hope it has grown and 
prospered with honor to itself and glory to its founders. We hope we 
have been able to perpetuate the heritage of those who breathed the breath 
of life into the old Oglethorpe and the new. The spirits of Woodrow, Le 
Conte and Talmadge, coupled with that great emancipator, Oglethorpe, 
have led us ever forward to the goal which will be attained by our progeny 
— to the goal which will make of our University the Princeton of the 
South and the pride of the nation. 

The companionship of our fellows, the helping hands of our profes- 
sors gave us four happy years. We, at least, go so far as to say that the 
comraderie of our campus proved that Oglethorpe is the second best col- 
lege or university in the world. So many colleges claim first place until 
we hesitate to enter the fight for the right to control that throne and be 
the monarch of all we survey; we take the rostrum of the second place, 
secure in our opinion that we belong there, and rightfully. A number of 
us returned to school each succeeding September for one reason: com- 
radeship such as cannot be found elsewhere. 

So, as we leave our school, the school into whose rock and granite 
we've blended heart's blood and the soul's hope, we repeat the words writ- 
ten by Dr. Jacobs for the marble slab at the railway station: 

"Coming, I go, and yet I know that I remain. 
Going, I come, to whatso home with loss or gain. 
Meeting, I part, yet in my heart I take with me 
All that befell, or ill or well, eternalhj." 

HISTORIAN. 



\_, 



lam a c r a to 





Officers of the Glass of 1930 

W. Bryant Arnold Pyesideul 

Amos Martin Vice-President 

Robert M. Benson Secietatu-Treafnu-er 

REPRESENTATIVES AT COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 

W. Bryant Arnold Valedictorian 

Fred R. Snook Salntatorian 



1 a m a c r 





MARY LEE PRICE 
MRS. JOHN B. PRICE 
Abbeville, South Carolina. 

A.B. SCIENCE 

"Jehovah, God of Sabaoth, to thee 
I dedicate the labor of .my hands. 
I, one of many millions of all lands, 
Pray, bending, Holy Father, at Thy 
knee." 

Matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1927 
from Anderson College. 



ROBERT WILSON JONES 

MRS. DAISY PRISCILLA JONES 

U K <I> 

Pelham, Georgia 

A.B. LITERATURE and JOURNALISM 

"One of Thy masons lays his chisel 

by 
And searches for a Master's kindly 

smile. 
From Him whose guiding hand had 

all the while 
Struck every blow this newest tool 

woidd try." 



Matriculated at Oglethorpe in Jan- 
uary 1927 from Young Harris. Ac- 
tivities: Players' Club, 3, 4; Stage 
Manager, Players' Club, 3, 4; Adver- 
tising Manager, Stormy Petrel, 3, 4; 
Petrel Follies, 4. 





JOHN COLUMBUS BELL 
MRS. C. H. BELL 

ALT 

Gainesville, Georgia 

A.B. LITERATURE and JOURNALISM 

"This line I grave, that all who read 

may know: 
Wherein I struck for that whereof 

I dreamed, 
Thou knowest, Lord, hoiv light the 

struggle seemed. 
Aye Thou, whose hand alnne did 

strike the blow." 



WILLIAM HAROLD COFFEE 

MRS. LAURA BELL COFFEE 

Cornelia, Georgia 

A.B. COMMERCE 



"Of some I heard, 'I will not!' Some, 

■ 7 fear!' 
And some held back till victory was 

said. 
And some most wisely doubled how 

the dead 
Cojdd ever rise forth from her sable 

bier." 



Matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1925 
from Gainesville High School. Ac- 
tivities: Freshman football; Basket- 
ball; Varsity football, 2, 3, 4; Var- 
sity basketball, 2, 3, 4,; Manager of 
freshman baseball, 2. 



Matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1926. 
Activities: Fresman football; Var- 
sity football, 2, 3, 4; O Club; Coat- 
of-Arms; Phi Kappa Delta; Proctor, 
3, 4; Chairman of Proctors, 4. 



a m a c r a t» 



m/w 




ASA PATRICK WAL 
MRS. S. M. WAIA, 

ALT 

Pulaski, Georgia 

A.B. EDUCATION 



AMOS AGUSTUS MARTIN 

MRS. SAMUEL AMOS MARTIN 

n K <i> 

Norcross, Georgia 

A.B. COMMERCE 



"So out of all mil love for all her 

past, 
Out of my deep desire for what 

should be, 
There came this ivondrnas Ihiiiy, 

that I coidd see 
Yet follow Mind the die that I had 

cast." 



Matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1926. 
Activities: Freshman football; Var- 
sity football, 2, 3, 4; Varsity base- 
ball, 2, .3, 4; Freshman baseball; 
Manager of freshman basketball, 3. 



"But surely there n 

the sand. 
Ami everywhere I f( 

pared 
Bil Him. through whose wise - 

/ had dared 
To hold the tool he fitted 

hand." 



>-e footprints on 
lid the way pre- 

my 



Matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1926, 
Activities: Freshman baseball and 
football; Varsity football, 2, 3, 4 
Varsity baseball, 2, 3, 4; Lord's 
Club, Club, Blue Key, Boar's Head 
Captain of baseball, 4; Vice-Presi 
dent of Senior Class. 



laamacratD 





ROBERT MOORE BENSON 
MRS. MAUDE MOORE BENSON 

ALT 

Statesboro, Georgia 

A.B. SCIENCE 



MARY EUGENIA TUCKER 
MRS. LURIE McLENDON TUCKER 



Atlanta, Georgia 



EDUCATION 



"Ah, Lord, how Utile do ive men be- 
low 

Yet understand from whence thy 
footsteps tread? 

Of all the millioned words that men 
have said 

What one reveals the whither Thou 
dost go?" 

Matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1926. 
Activities: Vice - President Soph- 
omore class; Le Conte; Alchemist 
Club; Blue Key; Class Historian, 3; 
Secretary Senior class; Chairman of 
Student-Faculty Council; Assistant 
to Dean; Yamacraw staff, 4; Boar's 
Head; Hobo Club; South Georgia 
Club. 



•'How often. Lord, I cried to Th 
aid, 

Unrter o, 



? for 
Thy 



Who knowingly didn 

way. 
Yet ever would Thy sun prolong his 

day. 
Thy moon o'er shadowed Ajalon be 

stayed." 



Matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1927 
from Bessie Tift College. 



Iv 




l| a m 



V 




ANNIE ELIZABETH McCLUNG 

MRS. PERCY S. McCLUNG 

<I' K n 

Florala, Alabama 

A.B. EDUCATION . 



WADE BRYANT ARNOLD 

MRS. MITTIE BRYANT ARNOLD 

A 2 * 

Spartanburg, South Carolina 

A.B. LITERATURE and JOURNALISM 



'■Till this I learned that he who huild- 

eth well 
Is greater than the structure that he 

rears, 
And wiser he who learns that heaven 

hears 
Than all the ivordy wisdoms letters 

spell." 



Matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1927 
from N. A. P. S. Activities: Pres- 
ident Inter-Sorority Council, 2, 3; 
President of Co-ed Council, 4; Vice- 
president of Student body, 4; Duchess 
Club; Senior representative to the 
Co-ed Council. 



"For once I helpless hung upon His 

ivill, 
And tivice I waited hopeless for His 

word." 

Matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1926. 
Activities: Debate Council, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Business Manager Debates, 1, 2, 
3, 4; Assistant Librarian, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Proctor, 2, 3; Honor Roll, 2, 3; Pres- 
ident Debate Council, 3, 4; Junior 
Class President; President of South 
Carolina Club, 3; Alchemist Club; 
Le Conte; Blue Key, Boar's Head; 
Phi Kappa Delta; Editor Stormy 
Petrel, 3; Coat-of-Arms ; Chi Delta 
Epsilon; Players' Club; Contestant 
for Rhodes Scholarship; President of 
Student body, 4; President Senior 
class; President of Le Conte, 4; Pres- 
ident Petrel Bible Class, 4; Editor of 
Yamacraw; Valedictorian. 




lamacratu 





M.LDRKI) FRANCES BRADLKV 

MRS. CORA IS. liRAULEY 

K A 

Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. LITERATURE and JOURNALISM 



LINDSEY C. VAUGHN 
MRS. LUCY VAUGHN 

A -L T 

Union, South Carolina 

A.B. COMMERCE 



"TUI lo, the wise mulherry leaves 
wire stirred 

What time he planned His promise 
to fulfill. 

My Mantle for my God, mi/ Ogle- 
thorpe, 

If I did tveave Thee with a tremb- 
ling hand, 

The virtue of Jehovah's magic wand. 

Lo, this the shuttle and the woof and 
warp." 

Matriculated in 1928 from Lucy 
Cobb. Activities: Duchess Club; 
Players' Club, 3, 4; Booster's Club; 
Varsity Basketball; Advertising 
Manager Yamacraw, 4; Petrel Fol- 
lies; Sponsor Delta Sigma Phi. 



"Hoiv like to Him, forth s^onmonct 

a;, he bent 
Beneath His fig tree, musing on Hi 

deed; 
To inarrvl irhcn He learned whcrci, 

irniihl Irad 
The path that followed where hif 



Matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1925. 
Activities: Freshman football and 
baseball; Varsity football, 2, 3, 4; 
Varsity baseball," 2, 3, 4. 




1 a ni a c r a tp / 




MARY ELIZABETH HAMILTON 

MRS. MARY H. HAMILTON 

Decatur, Georgia 

A.B. EDUCATION 

"And like to her who ventured to the 
door 

Of Persian palace, driven a n d 
afraid ; 

Not knowing how she for the times 
was made 

To wield the sceptre that she trem- 
bled o'er. 

Like him, asleep neath southern skies, 
I lay 

Adream of Heaven's opened gates; 



FRED RICHARD SNOOK 

MRS. CHARLOTTE C. SNOOK 

A 2 * 

Decatur, Georgia 



^.B. EDUCATION 



"My 



saw, 



I made, ing upright ladder 



And met his angels going on my -way. 
Like him of trembling heart tvho 

fain tvould try 
To tread the waters of a stormy sea; 
Amazed that waves a ivilling path 

coidd be 
For those who hear the whisper: It 

is I. 



Matriculated in 1926. 



Matriculated in 1926. Activities: 
Track, 1, 2, 3, 4; Advertising Man- 
ager Stormy Petrel, 1, 2; Business 
Manager Yamacraw, 4. 



n n 





CLARENCE WILLIAM KREBS 

MRS. CATHERINE E. KREBS 

Cold Spring, Kentucky 

A.B. EDUCATION 

"Aye, like to him who tyiisting, cast 
his net, 

As one commanded, forth into the 
deep. 

Wherein the master loves and yearn- 
ings sleep. 

Wherewith the lines that lift the 
world are wet!" 



Matriculated in June 1929 with de- 
gree from Atlanta Theological Sem- 
inary. Activities: Debate Council, 
4; Assistant History professor; As- 
sistant Librarian; Teacher of Petrel 
Bible Class; Associate Editor of the 
Stormy Petrel. 



HOKE SMITH BELL 

MRS. MOLLISSA BELL 

A 'i; '!> 

Carrollton, Georgia 

A.B. COMMERCE 



"Like him denying, thrice denial 
heard, 

Gn whom one turning, looked; re- 
penting sore, 

And wistful, went to toil forever 



That he might 
broken ivord. 



redeem his 



Matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1926. 
Activities: Freshman football and 
basketball; Track, 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity 
football, 2, 3, 4; Blue Key Frater- 
nity; Trainer, Spring Football, 4. 




lamacr atn 



i^W lA I 



/ 




JOHNSON WARDE SUTTON 

MRS. MARIE WARDE SUTTON 

II K <I> 

Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. COMMERCE 



MARY COLLIER DODD 

MRS. ELIZABETH C. DODD 

X n 

Atlanta, Georgia 

\.B. LITERATURE and JOURNALISM 



"And like, though most unlike, to 
Him who died 

For that He tvoiild attain love pass- 
ing fair; 

Nor fainted in his jiain, but seeing 
there 

The travail of his soul, was satis- 
fied." 

Matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1925. 
Activities: Players' Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Lord's Club; Glee Club, 1; Varsity 
football manager, 4, 5; Skull and 
Key; O Club; Manager of Track, 1, 
2, 3; Manager basketball, 4. 



"For surely, Lord, I know that all 

is thine. 
And thine the part, the little part I 

played; 
So deeds 'made answer to the words I 

prayed 
That they might join their witness 

to thy sign." 

Matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1926. 
Activities: Players' Club, 2, 3, 4; 
Duchess Club; Petrel Follies, 2, 3, 
4 ; Inter-Sorority Council. 




a m n ■- 





MARGARET MARY NEUHOFF 

MRS. LORENZ NEUHOFF, SR. 

K A 

Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. EDUCATION 



EDWARD DUNCAN EMERSON 
MRS. LERAH LILLY EMERSON 



Birmingham, Alabama 

A.B. COMMERCE 



"Thus silent I have heard the voice- 
less speak; 

The Formless I have seen walk by 
my side; 

And I have touched the hand of One, 
my guide, 

Whom all the world could find if it 
ioould seek." 



Matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1927 
from Peabody. Acl ivities : Duchess 
Club; Vice-President, Inter-Sorority 
Council; Secretary, Inter-Sorority 
Council, 4; Sponsor, Pi Kappa Phi, 
4. 



"There is a voice that calls Dtc on 

and 071 ; 
There is an urge compelling me to 

go; 
There is « hand that becko)is mc, 

alone; 
To ivhispered secret which I fain 

woidd knoiv." 



Matriculated in 1928 from Georgia 
School of Technology. Activities: 
"Head Hash Hiker"; Photographic 
Editor of Yamacraw; Succeeding Ed- 
itor of Yamacraw; Oglethorpe rep- 
resentative of Georgia College Place- 
ment Board; Freshman 
Alabamp, Club. 





MARK BLANFORD EUBANKS, JR. 

MRS. LILLIAN KATE EUBANKS 

n K <I> 

Rome, Georgia 

A.B. LITERATURE and JOURNALISM 



"There is a place for her who pass- 
There is a seat beside the throne of 

God 
For those ivhose robes have known 

such molten sea 
As that through which thou comrade- 
less, hast trod. 
Such death — though every human 

eye neglects it. 
Must live, for Manu Dei Rcsur- 
rexit." 



Matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1920. 
Activities: Boar's Head; Blue Key; 
Cheer leader, 3, 4; Track, 1, 2, 3; 
Basketball, 2, 3; Class Vice-President 
1, 2; Lord's Club; Assistant manager 
football, 1, 2; Follies, 2, 3, 4; Play- 
ers' Club. 



MARY LAURA DAVIS 

MRS. ELIZABETH M. DAVIS 

Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. LITERATURE and JOURNALISM 



"My quartz has met me from her age 

of fire. 
My feldspar, blackened with the 

smoke of hell, 
My clear-eyed mica, lucent with de- 



sirt 



Engrav 

tell 
In clay and flame — 

strength reflects it! 
Tis granite! Manu Dei Resurrexit!" 



the story they would 
- their very 



Matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1926. 
Activities: Stormy Petrel reporter, 
2; Stormy Petrel, Assistant Editor, 




i^ a m a t r am 





ELOISE CHABLE TANKSLEY 

MRS. J. E. TANKSLEY 

X o 

Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. COMMERCE 



FRANK MEYERS 

MRS. PHEMIE MEYERS 

e K N 

Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. COMMERCE 



"So dost thou come from out thy 
molten tomb, 

My Oglethorpe, as one whose heart 
is tried 

And fused and fixed for what thou 
wouldst assume; 

My ashlar, born of that wherein she 
died! 

Lost stone, — a dying nation's life- 
blood flecks it, — 

Rise empire! Manu Dei Resiirrcxit!" 

Matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1926. 
Activities: Girls' High Club; Wear- 
er of Coat-of-Arms, 3, 4; Phi Kappa 
Delta. 



"Take thou thy place beside thy 
friends who went 

With thee unto the wars and thence 
returned 

In safety home, and left thee bleed- 
ing, spent. 

Alone ivhere immortality is earned." 



Activities : 
1. 2, 3, 4. 



Petrel Follies; Orchestra 



l|a m a c r 




CATHERINE FISCHER CARLTON 

MRS. JAMES E. CARLTON 

X n 

Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. EDUCATION 



LYMAN BERNARD FOX 

MRS. JOHN T. FOX 

n K * 

Sikeston, Missouri 

A.B. EDUCATION 



"And yet I know — cnid thou art 
witness, too — 

There was an Eye that kept my vis- 
ion clear; 

There was a step that kept my path- 
way true; 

There was a pulse that kept my 
heart from fear." 



Matriculated in 1928 from Shorter 
College. Activities: Basketball; Glee 
Club; Girls' High Club; Four Devils 
Club. 



"/ heard thy blood keep calling from 
the ground; 

I did what thou commandedst me to 
do; 

1 scattered century's sands that gath- 
ered round 

Thy head, and lo, a Hon sprang to 



Matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1926. 
Actii'ities: Freshman basketball and 
football; Varsity football, 2, 3, 4; 
Track, 2, 3; Lord's Club; Players' 
Club; Petrel Follies, 2; Club. 






a m a c r a w 





CLYDE COURTNEY LUNSFORD 

MRS. LEILA VIOLA LUNSFORD 

Cleveland, Georgia 

A.B. EDUCATION 

"Oh God of Dreamers, thine the tug 

that draws 
Our faltering footsteps toward the 

purple hills, 
Till all that we have sought we find, 

because 
We dared not disobey the will of 

wills." 

Matriculated in 1929 from North 
Georgia Agricultural College. 



SADAJIRO YOSHINUMA 

MRS. TOMt-KO YOSHINUMA 

Yokohama, Japan 

A.B. COMMERCE 



"From school of molten lava thou 

art come; 
Now to the time's strange wi)ids dost 

bare thy breast. 
The self-opinioned rain, the frost's 

white tome 
Will test thy temper toivard that 

which is best. 



^' 



d n m n i 





HAYWOOD MONK CLEMENT 
MRS. MARY OTELIA CLEMENT 



Greensboro, North Carol 

A.B. COMMERCE 



CURRY JEFF BURPORD 
MRS. J. D. BURFORD 

ALT 

Jackson, Georgia 

A.B. COMMERCE 



"To all thy past of pain arid toil, 
Thy future's brilliant goal 
We promisee loyalty and love; 
We pledge thee heart and soul. 

Matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1925. 
Activities: Member of Student coun- 
cil; Freshman football; Freshman 
basketball ; Freshman baseball ; Var- 
sity basketball, 2, 3, 4; Varsity foot- 
ball, 2, 3, 4; Track, 2, 3, 4; Exchange 
Editor, Stormy Petrel; Secretary De 
Molay Club; Member, Carolina Club; 
President, Blue Key; Voted Best Ali- 
Round Athlete, 1928; President Soph- 
omore class. 



"And as the times pass o'er 

heads 
In this we shall rejoice: 
That we may never drift beyond 
The memory of thy voice." 



Matriculated at Oglethorpe in 1926. 
Activities : Freshman football; base- 
ball and basketball; Varsity football, 
2, 3, 4; Captain, football '29; All-S. 
L A. A. '29. 



i|£i m a 




Gl 



ass 



Po. 



OUR HERITAGE 

Years of love, net hciii-k ton short 
In cold contract to heovciilii stiife, 
Hai'e seev our sonh in battle 
For the trent.iired heiiiitics of life. 

English, history, chemistry, math, 
O, the days in awe we sat at thy feet! 
We learned thy secrets, we trod thy path. 
Sweeping forever the bitter from sweet. 

Truth we found in reality 
Freely given by your loving, tender hands. 
Our Oglethorpe, thou revered home of man 
So we take it, honored into manit lands. 



When we've groivn old. and our hair's turned gray. 

We'll turn to thee as we go our way. 

And raise our heads to the stars above 

To utter a prayer for thy hlessijigs of love. 

— Anonymous. 




3luni0r OUaBs 




la m a c r a ttJ 





lam 



to 



J J 









LYLE KRATZ 

A 2; * 

Wheeling, West Virginia 


NATALIE DE GOLIAN 


X f i 
Atlanta, Georgia 


A.B. COMMERCE 

Activities: Freshman basl<etball; 
Varsity football, 2, 3; Sports editor 
of Stormp Petrel and Yamacraw; 
Blue Key Fraternity. 


A.B. LITERATURE and JOURNALISM 

WILLIAM BACKUS 

n K A 
Cartersville, Georgia 


THELMA BROGDON 


A.B. COMMERCE 


Buford, Georgia 

A.B. EDUCATION 


GERTRUDE MURRAY 
K A 


JUNE BARKER 

A 2 * 

Boston, Massachusetts 

A.B. LITERATURE and JOURNALISM 

Activities: Players' Club. 

JAMES ANDERSON 


Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. SCIENCE 

Activities: Players' Club; Petrel 
Follies; Sacred Heart Club; Instruc- 
tor in Chemistry; Manager of Co-ed 
basketball; Inter-Sorority Council; 
Alchemist Club; Co-ed Council. 


Griffin, Georgia 


TOM DANIEL 
K A 


FRANK MACKEY 


Atlanta, Georgia 


n K * 
Camden, South Carolina 

A.B. COMMERCE 


A.B. COMMERCE 

Activities: Petrel Follies; Lord's 
Club. 



■<^^^-2'<><-:^.^ 




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MARTHA OSBORNE 

K A 

Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. EDUCATION 

FRANK DAVENPORT 

ALT 

Anniston, Alabama 

A.B. SCIENCE 

Activities: Le Conte, Honorary 
Scientific Fraternity; Instructor in 
Chemistry. 

ELEANOR WYLE 
Atlanta, Georgia 

DAVE THERRELL 

i; X 

Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. COMMERCE 

Activities: Freshman football; Var- 
sity football, 2, 3; Freshman basket- 
ball; Varsity basketball, 2, 3; Tech 
High Club. 

BURNS McCUBBIN 

K A 

Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. COMMERCE 



HELEN BOARDMAN 

K A 

Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. LITERATURE and JOURNALISM 

Activities: Debate Council; Players' 
Club; Secretary and treasurer of 
Junior class; Petrel staff; Co-ed 
basketball, 2, 3. 

THEODORE FULTON 

A :: <i> 

Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. COMMERCE 

Activities : Freshman football and 
Manager of freshman baseball team; 
Varsity football, 2, 3; Varsity base- 
ball manager. 

ZAIDEE IVY 
Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. COMMERCE 

PRANK INMAN 

K A 
Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. COMMERCE 

Activities: Petrel Follies; Student 
Faculty Council; Lord's Club; Blue 
Key Fraternity; Players' Club. 



"^^yC/J 




i^MP 



BISH FOREMAN 

-i i; <I> 
Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. COMMERCE 

A ct iv it ies : Orchestra. 

JESSIE GUERRY 

X u 

Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. EDUCATION 

Activities: Petrel Follies. 

FRANK McSHERRY 

II K * 

Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. LITERATURE and JOURNALISM 

Activities: Freshman football; Var- 
sity football squad, 2, 3; Orchestra; 
Lord's Club; Bule Key Fraternity. 

PAUL BACON 

AS* 
Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. LITERATURE and JOURNALISM 

Activities: Debate Council; Business 
Manager Stormy Petrel. 



HAROLD ADAMS 

e K X 

Lavonia, Georgia 

A.B. COMMERCE 

Activities: Freshman football and 
baseball; Varsity football squad, 2, 3. 

SEAMAN BASKIN 

n K <!> 
Carrollton, Georgia 

A.B. COMMERCE 

ALBERT CHURCH 

A 2 * 

Orlando, Florida 

A.B. COMMERCE 

Activities : Freshman football; Var- 
sity football, 2, 3. 

ZELAN WILLS 
Smyrna, Georgia 

A.B. SCIENCE 

Activities : Le Conte Honorary 
Scientific Fraternity; Assistant In- 
structor in Biology. 

MARY BENTEEN 
Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. COMMERCE 




la m a c r a to 




WILLIAM DEAL 

e K X 
Statesboro, Georgia 

A.B. COMMERCE 
Activities : Orchestra, 2, 3. 
JOHN TURK 

ALT 

Nelson, Georgia 

A.B. SCIENCE 

Activities: Le Conte Honorary 
Scientific Fraternity; Alchemist Club. 

MRS. JOHN P. ECHOLS 

SPECIAL STUDENT 

Atlanta, Georgia 
CHARLES McKISSICK 

ALT 

Carrabelle, Florida 

A.B. SCIENCE 

Activities: Freshman football; Var- 
sity football, 2, 3 ; Alternate Captain- 
elect 4; Track 2; Le Conte Honorary 
Scientific Fraternity; Historian Jun- 
ior class. 

ALLEN RITZ 

ri K -l' 

Jamestown, New York 

A.B. LITERATURE and JOURNALISM 

Activities: Assistant Manager base- 



G. H. POWELL 
Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. SCIENCE 

MILTON WOOD 

K A 
Atlanta, Georgia 

A.B. SCIENCE 

BETTY ARNOLD 
Decatur, Georgia 

A.B. LITERATURE and JOURNALISM 

Activities: Stormy Petrel staff. 

CLAUDE HERRIN 

n K * 

Winder, Georgia 

A.B. COMMERCE 

Activities: Freshman football, base- 
ball and basketball; Varsity baseball, 
2, 3; Varsity basketball, 2; Captain 
basketball, 3; Varsity football 2, 3; 
Captain football-elect, 4. 

ERNEST GOLDEN 

A 2 * 
Rockmart, Georgia 

A.B. SCIENCE 
Activities: Freshman football, base- 
ball and basketball; Varsity football 
squad, 2, 3; Basketball, 2, 3. 



■«#v. 



-^ 



Junior Glass History 

By Archie Morgan 

The group of talented boys and girls that gathered here in September 
1927, have used the past three years as "stepping stones" to greater 
things, and in doing so, have accomplished much in every field of endeavor 
at Oglethorpe. The tares have sprung up and have been plucked out; 
others have attained high places; so it has been the chosen few who have 
constantly pressed forward. 

First, let us pay a word of tribute to the faculty that has been ever 
ready to lend us a helping hand, and to the class officers that have been 
chosen to guide the class through many trying experiences. 

This year John Turk was elected president of the class and Curley 
Fulton vice-president. Helen Boardman was elected secretary-treasurer 
and Frank Inman representative on the Student Faculty Advisory Coun- 
cil. 

The class plays an important role in athletics at Oglethorpe. Its 
members on the varsity football squad are: Fulton, McKissick, Herrin, 
Woodward, Kratz, Golden and Adams. The class is represented on the 
basketball team by Herrin and Golden. In baseball we have Kimbrell, Hol- 
combe, Rabon, Adams and Herrin, in track McKissick and Woodward. 

Notable is the large number of the class that have helped in making 
the Players' Club and the Orchestra a success. Many have won honors 
in the "Who's Who" contest from year to year. 

Lyle Kratz is Sports Editor of the Stormy Petrel and Yamacraw. 
Helen Boardman is Associate Editor of the Stormy Petrel; Paul Bacon 
is business manager; Betty Arnold and Eleanor Wyle are others on the 
Petrel stafl^. 

In the field of athletics the Co-eds have contributed much. The class 
is represented in basketball by Gertrude Murray, Helen Boardman and 
Eleanor Wyle. Gertrude also has the distinction of being the first "Co-ed 
Mother," elected from the Junior class. She is also a chemist of no mean 
repute. 

Whether or not every one has won a position of honor, each has con- 
tributed his part to the making of a better Oglethorpe. And as we pass 
on the last great "stepping stone," the senior year, let us remember: 

The light thou hast was given thee, 
To guide thy life that thou might sec. 
To live a life of usefulness. 
To share with those that are less blest. 






.-•^^^ 



la m 



a ». I a 




Gl 



ass 



Po 



em 



Green before us lie the meadows. 
Meadows which are still uncompassed 
By the throngs gone on before. 
Ours to pierce the gloomy thickets, 
Slay the dragons therein hidden. 
Driving toivard an unknown shore. 

Some will 2)eHsh in the meadows, 
Weaklings they, in strife unproven. 
Fallen on the dewy grass. 
Heed them not, press forward, comrades 
Strike the dying from your memory 
Greater barriers yet to jxtss. 

Ours the god of great achievements, 
To excel the ancient records. 
Handed down from former day. 
Through the meadow runs the pathway; 
Bright through bars of leafy branches 
Runs the untraversed way. 

— Anonymous. 




§npl|omorp dlasB 



la, g iu g c I 





Officers of the Glass of 1932 

Frank AiVDERSON, Jr. . . Presidenf 

Eugenia Patterson Vice-President 

Jack Faeabee Secretary-Treasurer 

Reavis O'Neal Historian-Poet 



W n m 



KT 







BEN I. SIMPSON, JR. 


JEAN NUTTING 


e K X 
Atlanta, Georgia 


K A 
Atlanta, Georgia 


ALLEN JOHNSON 
Norcross, Georgia 

JACK FARABEE 


ADRIENNE ROBERTS 

K A 

Atlanta, Georgia 


ALT 

Commerce, Georgia 


RAY SEWELL 
e K X 


VIRGINIA TEMPLEMAN 


Atlanta, Georgia 


Atlanta, Georgia 
SARAH MARTIN 


RUTH STARK 
K A 


* K II 
Atlanta, Georgia 


Atlanta, Georgia 


FELIX Mcdonald 

Century, Florida 


PANSY BUGG 
East Point, Georgia 


MARGARET VARDEMAN 

* K II 

Atlanta, Georgia 


MARIE SHAW 

<I> K II 
Atlanta, Georgia 


EVELYN MOORE 


ASHER LEE 


K A 
Atlanta, Georgia 


e K X 
Atlanta, Georgia 



J^/i^^^ 



laamacrato 




ALICE LANE 


LAWRENCE HEIGHT 


Atlanta, Georgia 

MURDOCH WALKER 

X S! 

Atlanta, Georgia 


K A 
Atlanta, Georgia 

RAYMOND BOONE 

II K * 

Valdosta, Georgia 


OLLIE NALL 


CECIL TODD 


e K N 
Jacksonville, Florida 


Savannah, Georgia 
GORDON MacGREGOR 


GEORGIA ALLIffON 
* K II 


A 2 >I' 
Brunswick, Georgia 


Atlanta, Georgia 


EDWIN HARNEY 


DORIS SELMAN 

A 2 * 

Douglasville, Georgia 


e K X 
Atlanta, Georgia 

BURKE HEDGES 

A 2 <1> 

Havana, Cuba 


MORRELL DRIVER 


Carrollton, Georgia 


HARY EMANUEL 


JOHN HALLMAN 

K A 

Atlanta, Georgia 


Brunswick, Georgia 

JOSEPH FREEMAN 
Greenville, Georgia 



1 am 



/K/ 



S 



JOSEPH BISHOP 


MARY WILLIAMSON 


Atlanta, Georgia 


<1. K 11 
Atlanta, Georgia 


JOHN PAYNE 


RALPH MINCEY 


ALT 

Greenwood, South Carolina 


Gainesville, Georgia 


BETTY CRANDALL 


KENNETH MYERS 
^ 2 <1. 


K A 
Atlanta, Georgia 


Norcross, Georgia 
CHARLES GARDNER 


CARL LEITHE 
A i; * 


A 2 * 
Louisville, Kentucky 


Wheeling, West Virginia 


JEFF MacMILLAN 


JULIAN STOVALL 

n K <!> 

Valdosta, Georgia 


A 2 <!' 
Atlanta, Georgia 

LESLIE PARHAM 

A i; <i> 

Orlando, Florida 


KENDALL JORDAN 


n K * 
Atlanta, Georgia 


ROBERT SANDERS 

ALT 


DUMONT BENNETT 
e K N 


Commerce, Georgia 
RUTH FROST 


Duluth, Georgia 


Atlanta, Georgia 



\m 



n a c r a B) 



^S~ 





HUBERT COLEMAN 

e K \ 

Austell, Georgia 

LOUISE WILLIAMSON 

<I> K n 

Atlanta, Georgia 

MARTHA PERKERSON 
Austell, Georgia 

CHARLIE BOURN 

A 2 * 

Atlanta, Georgia 

GLADYS SEGUIN 

New York City 

KATHRYN GARMON 

Duluth, Georgia 

WILLIAM HIGGINS 

e K X 

Atlanta, Georgia 

OLIVER BEALL 

K A 
Louisville, Georgia 



REAVIS O'NEAL 

A i: >1> 
Savannah, Georgia 

MIRIAM VARNER 

K A 

Atlanta, Georgia 

FRANK ANDERSON, Jr. 

II K * 

Decatur, Georgia 

ANITA BLACK 

* K II 
Atlanta, Georgia 

HARRY McGINNIS 

e K X 

Summerville, Georgia 

ROY WARREN 
Millen, Georgia 

CHARLES ROGERS 

e K X 

Hartwell, Georgia 



^' 



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CHARLIE MITCHELL 


LUCIUS APPLING 


A 2 <!> 
Yatesville, Georgia 


A 2 * 
Atlanta, Georgia 


PARKER BRYANT 


PARK BRINSON 


ALT 

Summitt, Georgia 


n K <!• 
Millen, Georgia 


OTIS LTLE 


VIRGINIA HASTINGS 


Atlanta, Georgia 

HELEN THOMAS 
X !• 


K A 
Atlanta, Georgia 

EDWARD DURST 


Atlanta, Georgia 

HOWARD GARY 
n K * 


K X 
Commerce Georgia 

ROWENA WYCHE 


Sparta, Georgia 

3UGENIA PATTERSON 
X Si 


ATP 
Atlanta, Georgia 

DOROTHEA YORK 


Atlanta, Georgia 


Atlanta, Georgia 


RATLIFFE MURPHY 


JULIAN TROWBRIDGE 


Duluth, Georgia 


College Park, Georgia 




lama cratp 

Sophomore Glass History 

By Reavis O'Neal 

"Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore, 

So do our minutes hasten to their end, 

Each changing place with that which goes before." — Shakespeare. 

The beginning of the sophomore year at college is always tinged with 
sorrow and gladness. Fervid and joyful are the greetings exchanged by 
old friends meeting again, but sorrowful are those who search amid the 
throng for old remembered faces and find them not. So was it with the 
class of 1932. 

Ninety-eight sophic morons, swelled with knowledge and savoir faire 
gleaned during the initial year at Oglethorpe, returned to academic haunts. 
Among those who dropped from the ranks was the president of the class, 
Charles Gardner. Frank Anderson, Jr., was selected to take his place. 

The year has been an eventful one, replete with the unexpected. The 
grim glee with which the class welcomed the new men who came to make 
their vacant seats was turned into hasty withdrawal when half of the 
I^'reshman class was found to be composed of Titans who refused to sub- 
mit to discipline, and the other half of gibbering babes who obeyed the 
slightest behest, not comprehending in their diminutiveness of mind the 
rerum causas of college life. 

In athletics we have been very vigorous, contributing to the regular 
football team Kenneth Myers, Clay Sypert, Parker Bryant, Luke Appling 
and other lesser luminaries. On the basketball court were found Cecil 
Todd, Clay Sypert and Parker Bryant. Coach Frank Anderson has not 
as yet selected his first baseball team, but at least five sophomores are sure 
to find berths on the starting nine. 

In cultural fields the class of 1932 has also shown much versatility. 
Betty Crandall and Atwood Whittington carried on capable shoulders the 
histrionic burden, while several others are well on the way toward obtain- 
ing the much coveted coat-of-arms award for scholastic supremacy. Reavis 
O'Neal is editor of The Stormy Petrel, student newspaper, and is also a 
member of the Players' Club and the Debate Council. Frank Anderson, Jr., 
is representative on the Student-Faculty Council. In the orchestra Ollie 
Nail displays marked ability with the trumpet. 



Glass Poem 

By Reavis O'Neal 

The shield-embroidered Viking ship we boarded moons ago 
Has slackened in its wind-blown speed and now proceedeth sloiv. 

The loaves of Life encircle iis with ever-loftier height, 
And dark before us looms the shade of everlasting night. 

But cast lip high on towering crest we see across the dark 
An islet with a shining bay of refuge for our bark. 



Turn not aside, is Norseman's cry, to seek the safer place; 
Before lis lie iinconquered depths whose terrors we must face. 



The look-out stands upon the prow with hand above his eyes. 
Who knows what mysteries he sees, what future he descries? 



^KFf( 



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a m a c r a t» 




Who's Who at Oglethorpe 



Girls 

Most Beautiful 

BETTY McCLUNG 

Most Popular 

BETTY McCLUNG 

Best All Round 

GERTRUDE MURRAY' 

Most Intellectual 

MARY WILLIAMSON 

Wittiest 

GEORGIA ALLISON 

Most Conceited 

HELEN BOARDMAN 

Biggest Gold Digger 

JEAN NUTTING 

Biggest Shine 

RUTH FROST 

Biggest Checker 

JEAN NUTTING 

Cutest 

WILLIE WOODALL 

Biggest Eater 

LOUISE WILLIAMSON 

Most Talented 

BETTY CRANDALL 



Boys 



Most Handsome 

LYMAN FOX 

Most Popular 

ALMON RAINES 
REAVIS O'NEAL 

Best All Round 

CLAUDE HERRIN 

Most Intellectual 

HAROLD COFFEE 

Wittiest 

JIMMY ANDERSON 
DAN KENZIE 
FRED SNOOK 

Most Conceited 

TOM DANIEL 

Biggest Gold Digger 

BILLY JAMES 

Biggest Shine 

CECIL TODD 

Biggest Checker 

BURNS McCUBBIN 

Cutest 

SAM BAKER 

Biggest Eater 

WILLIE BELL ROBINSON 

Most Talented 

ALMON RAINES 

Biggest Sleeper 

DAN KENZIE 




JFrFHliman (ElaHB 



\^ t| a m a c r a to 




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■HflHIk !«■» .^1 

Officers of the Glass of 1933 

Almon Raines President 

William James Vice-President 

Marie McAfee Secretary-Treasurer 

Virginia Turner Historian 




^\Vf 



■^l/J 




tyrus andrews 
wilburn legree 
w. r. massengale 
William maner 
gladys bridges 
guthrie ellis 
lee bennett 
rufus hughes 



robert mcgrath 
zelda webb 
John Patrick 
andrew morrow 
alice keiley 
sam tarantino 
georgia brown 
huston lundy 



george gaillard 
sam Jones 
anne harris 
James loekett 
frances mckirgan 
claire jones 
marie mcafee 
James weldon 




a m a c r a t» 





"^MB 




fred Cunningham 
a. 1. carter 
ida nevin 
Otis lyle 

katherine bodenheimer 
a. d. barfield 
dorothy coleman 
Joseph Cornwall 



Christine host 
almon raines 
truman riggins 
Virginia cooledge 
herman martin 
claire mcdonough 
Virginia turner 
elizabeth merritt 



david clarke 
louise butler 
Charles gurr 
dora dean ambrose 
James hedges 
edwina connally 
Catherine maugham 
William james 





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John bitting 
William ayers 
henry Jenkins 
marion collier 
sam miller 



louise goslin 
roy raines 
g. g. king 
charlotte collier 
paul goldman 
bill allison 



William freedmen 
John artley 
Winifred niall 
ray walker 
helen carr 




I a m a c r a tt 



Freshman Glass History 

By Virginia Turner 

September the twenty-fifth, nineteen twenty-nine, found a large group 
of frightened Freshmen huddled in the far corner of Oglethorpe,' s ex- 
tremely large Assembly Hall, deeply interested in each other and the up- 
per-classmen. 

Soon the Frosh co-eds donned baby caps and black stockings imposed 
upon them by the Sophomores, thus beginning initiation. The girls en- 
dured many hard knocks, but all survived with a cheerful smile — for, 
were not happy days ahead? 

The election of class officers was an event of great importance. Almon 
Raines, of Savannah, became our distinguished president ; William James, 
vice-president; Marie McAfee, secretary and treasurer; Virginia Turner, 
the class Historian. 

Then for weeks the Frosh walked the campus with thougthful faces. 
You have guessed the reason? Yes, the Minstrels, the production that 
brings joy to the heart of every Freshman. It was one of the most out- 
standing accomplishments of the class during the entire year. 

Crisp Autumn days, golden leaves falling, and cheering throngs sway- 
ing before a figure in white. Football! The topnotch of college sports. 
Kenzie, Patrick, Walker, James, Jones, Nix, Rainwater, Raines and Lock- 
ett were outstanding among those who represented the class of 1933 on 
the gridiron. 

Lon Chaney on the campus? No, only a Frosh trying to master the 
eccentric tap dance for the Petrel Follies. This was none other than Nam- 
mie Raines who teamed with Nonnie Maugham in a comedy skit to bring 
much applause from the audience and honor ot the Freshman class. 

How the time flies — Commencement — with exams and many heart- 
breaks, soon to be forgotten in the gayety upperclassmen inspire within 
us. 

And now we bid farewell to a year of accomplishment and fun. We are 
not as happy as we thought we would be with this year behind us; those 
who do not come back will never forget Oglethorpe. A big part of our 
hearts will always remain on the beloved campus. 




RAYMOND MAXWELL McEOWEN 

JUNE 27, 1908 — OCTOBER 25, 1929 



a m a c r a t» 




Gl 



ass 



oem 



The shadow of the goal for which we strive 
Now casts its outer shade upon our lives, 
Changing our opinions, tastes, and views 
Into a thing of myriad-colored hues. 

Pure Reason takes her seat upon our broivs 
To make us comprehend the whats and hows 
Of daily life amid a world of song, 
A universe of Art in motley throng. 

We are the New, whose eager hands do grasp 
Forth for the fleeting idea, to clasp 
It close unto our hearts, that we may give 
The world a neiv and better way to live. 



The task is ours to feed the glowing fire 
Whose ever-higher tongues from Learning's pyre 
Lick forth for neiv discoveries, whose seed 
It first consumes, the^i stores for future need. 



-Anonymous. 




S'pnnsnrB 




MRS. J. G. ARNOLD 

SPARTANBURG, S. C. 
Sponsor Editorial Staff of Yamacraiv 




MISS ELIZABETH HAMILTON 

DECATUR, GA. 
Sponsor Bi(viHei<s Stuff of Yd iiiacni ir 




MISS MILDRED BRADLEY 

ATLANTA, GA. 

Sponsor Delta Sigma Phi Frateniii 




MISS DIXIE WAMSLEY 

SAVANNAH, GA. 

SiJonsor Editorial Staff of Stormy Petrel 




MISS VIRGINIA COOLEDGE 

ATLANTA, GA. 

SiMHSor Football 




MISS ELIZABETH STITT 

ATLANTA, GA. 

Sponsoi- Kappa Alpha Fratenuty 




MISS LILLIAN SMITH 

ATLANTA, GA. 
SiJonsor Theta Kappa Nu Fraternity 




MISS EMILY BACON 

ATLANTA, GA. 

Siionsor Business Staff of Stormi/ Petrel 




MISS MARGARET NEUHOFF 

ATLANTA, GA. 

Sponsoi- Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity 




MISS MARY BLACKWELL 

ATLANTA, GA. 

Sponsor Blue Key Fraternity 




MISS HELEN CARR 

ATLANTA, GA. 

Sjionsor Alpha Lambda Tan Fmieniitij 




MISS GERTRUDE MURRAY 

ATLANTA, GA. 

Sponsor Le Conte Scientific Fraternity 




Atlilrttrs 




JFonlball 



i|a m a c r a m 



"Muddy" Adams 

E'or your pleasure, we present this reserve lineman 
who bids fair to land a regular berth as that smash- 
ing guard who leads the interference around end 
on Coach Harry's team. 



"Curly" Fulton 

Exactly half that guard combination of Fulton and 
Bell. Curly was one of the best guards who ever 
played at Oglethorpe. He gained fame on grid- 
irons all over the country. 



Hoke Bell 

Another guard, and the same fellow as the one 
mentioned above. He was, perhaps, the best guard 
Coach Harry Robertson ever had in clearing the 
field of opposition for the march of the backs. 



"Luke" Appling 

Luke finished his first season of varsity play in 
1929. He played first string, too, and proved to be 
one of the squad's most versatile backs. 



"Cy" Bell 

His name will live in the halls of Oglethorpe fame 
for many years as a result of his part in defeat- 
ing Tech in 1926 and Georgia in 1929. He had a 
most brilliant 



fc 



Frank McSherry 

A Junior who has played two seasons of reser\e 
ball, who has plenty to look forward to next year 
in the way of pigskin success. 



Paul Goldsmith 

Another of those Sophomores who gave the old 
fellows a run for their lives. Paul played a jam- 
up season at end and was a star in a number 
of games, notably, the Georgia fracas. 



"Kid" Golden 

A tackle with plenty of weight and drive who play- 
ed his second year of reserve football in 1929. He 
will bear watching next year. 



"Fatty" Pierce 

A big end who had a rather tough time of it. He 
was out during the 1928 season and returned in 
1929 after entering the holy bonds of matrimony. 
A good man. 



"Firpo" Coffee 

Quiet on the sidelines, but a regular demon once 
he takes his place at a tackle or guard. He made 
his letter for three years and starred in most of 
the games. 





laa m a c r a tp 





"Spud" Kratz 

Diminutive center who will fill Captain Burford's 
place in the line next year. He played regular 
ball for most of the last season and has already 
made two football letters. 



Lyman Fox 

The Sikeston Terror! Lyman was good. The thrill 
of a Petrel's life came when he stepped oft' sixty or 
seventy yards against Mercer for a touchdown on 
a muddy field. 



"Cy" Todd 

Fast as lightning and a hard driver who played 
an end on the reserve team. After taking on a 
little weight, this boy should make the Petrels a 
good man. 



Charlie Rogers 

Hailing from the regions whence Oglethorpe drew 
one of its best players, Andrews, Charlie made the 
squad his first year out for the team. 



"Booster" Church 

Corning up from Orlando High in 1927, Al or 
Booster, as you will, has been in the limelight as 
a football luminary for three years as a star at 
tackle. Tall and rangy, he has been a mainstay 
of the varsity for two years. 



IB an 



Dorris Selman 

A graduate of Coach Chesnutt's 1928 Freshman 
team, Dorris played in the backfield on the reserve 
squad in 1929. A big man with lots of push, who 
needs only experience. 



"Kid" Leithe 

Product of Wheeling, West Virginia and another 
sophomore, played end for Coach Harry's aggre- 
gation on the reserve' team. He will be back next 
year with plenty of fight and pepper. 



Leslie Parham 

A 1928 freshman tackle step-up who should be a 
good man in a year or so. He is rather small for 
a tackle and his progress has been retarded by 
weak ankles. He'll be there in a year. 



Frank Anderson, Jr. 

"Tanky," the son of Coach Frank Anderson, athletic 
director, played most of the .season as a regular 
quarter and he directed the team in an excellent 
manner. He was particularly good in the Georgia 
game. 



"Chick" Gardner 

A light halfback and a sophomore, who was unal)le 
to get going. He gave up football when he with- 
drew from school just before Christmas. 





lam 





Charles McLaughlin 

Charlie was captain for the first of the season, but 
had to withdraw from school because of family 
obligations, thus cutting short a prosperous foot- 
ball career. 



Dave Therrell 

One of the few Junior backs on the squad. He was 
exceptionally light but a good kicker and a good 
man to have around when some hard hitting was 
needed. 



"Dapper" Myers 

Still another sophomore who won his spurs and 
the right to wear the block O in his first year of 
varsity competition. He played a whale of a game 
at half on the regular team. 



Harry Emanuel 

And still they come, these sophs. Harry, an end 
who was great in prep school but who hasn't found 
his way about in varsity play yet. Give him time, 
though and he'll come through everything but his 
shirt. 



Parker Bryant 

What a whale of an end this guy played against 
Chattanooga ! A couple o' hundred pounds of con- 
centrated nitric acid. He will be back for one of 
the greatest years an end ever had. 




"Lefty" Sypert 

That left-handed guy who could catch more Ap- 
pling heaves than any man on the squad. Many 
times he gained on forward passes. A sophomore 
who was plenty good. 



Alternate Captain-Elect McKissick 

Charlie, the bull of Florida and a fine specimen of 
human flesh played a beautiful game at end this 
last year. He will help lead his mates in the most 
successful season on record, and he deserves it. 



Charlie Taylor 

Big Ch'.rlie, one of the most popular fellows on the 
squad who was, however, unable to find himself in 
the first year of varsity play. With a little more 
experience Charlie should be a good lineman. 



Amos Martin 

After playing two years as the regular Petrel gen- 
eral, Amos leaves to take a job as coach at Nor- 
man Park. Just let him instill into his players 
there what he evidenced on the Oglethorpe field 
and he will be successful again. 



"Chief" Whaley 

Another candidate for that running guard position 
of Hoke Bell's who is looking good at this writing 
during spring training. He will probably come 
through with flying colors. 



I 



fT 
^ 




''"■^^J^Kii 



a m a c r a tn 




"Bill" Liggin 

Substitute center from the 1928 freshman team 
who, in spite of his huge frame, was unable to 
land a berth during his first year of varsity play. 
He will be in there next year fighting with the 
rest of them. 

Captain-Elect Herrin 

Claude, that blond phantom of speed, who will lead 
Oglethorpe against Villanova, Wittenberg and 
other schools next year was extraordinarily good 
in his Junior year. 

Dan Boone 

A first-year back with plenty of speed and drive. 

"Hot" Holcombe 

As Junior Manager of the 1929 team, he was so 
good that his mates elected him as manager for 
1930. Being jolly in spirit and an excellent com- 
panion, he will be successful. 

"Jake" Sutton 

He served his second year as manager in 1929. Of 
all the managers of the last four years, he is the 
most out-standing. 



Willard 

Findley 

H. Bell 

Burford 

Oglesby 

Battle 

Mallard 

Spicer 

Strong 

Cy Bell 

Ward 



ALL S. L A. A. 

LE 
LT 
LG 

C 

RG 
RT 
RE 

Q 

LH 
RH 

F 



Citadel 

Chattanooga 

Oglethorpe 

Oglethorpe 

Citadel 

'ham-Southern 

Mercer 

Howard 

Chattanooga 

Oglethorpe 

Chattanooga 



K^ 



IB n ■> 



n/lAj' 




^TJinnnr i:nun 




Top— First Varsity; Center— Varsity Squad; Bottom— Second Varsity. 



a nt a c r a to 





Coaches of the 1929 Stormy Petrels 



Harry Robertson 

Kenneth "Nutty" Campbell 
Homer Chesnutt 



. Head Coach 
Asfiistant Coach 
Freshman Coach 







"^^^^'^ss^'J^'dib^^^^L.^i^ 



?i m a c r a to 



Personnel 

Hakry Robertson Head Coach 

Kenneth Campbell Assistant Coach 

Homer Chesnutt Freshman Coach 

CUKRY BuRFORD Captain 

Jake Sutton Manager 

Hubert Holcombe Assistant Manager 

Haywood Clement Trianer 



.inemen 



PARKER BRYANT 
ERNEST GOLDEN 
CARL LEITHE 
T. W. FULTON 
CHARLES TAYLOR 
PRANK McSHERRY 
HARRY EMANUEL 
ALBERT CHURCH 
CY TODD 
HAROLD COFFEE 



ASA WALL 
LYLE KRATZ 
HARRY ADAMS 
HOKE BELL 
CURRY BURFORD 
CHARLES McKISSICK 
PAUL GOLDSMITH 
JULIAN STOVALL 
FRED PIERCE 
"CHIEF" WHALEY 



CLAUD HERRIN 
DAVE THERRELL 
IRWIN WOODWARD 
CLAY SYPERT 
LUKE APPLING 
"DAPPER" MYERS 



Backj 



LYMAN FOX 
AMOS MARTIN 
"CY" BELL 
DORRIS SELMAN 
CHARLES MCLAUGHLIN 
CHARLES GARDNER 



FRANK ANDERSON, JR. 



Resultj 



September 28, 1929 .... Oglethorpe 

October 5, 1929 Oglethorpe 

October 12, 1929 Oglethorpe 

October 19, 1929 Oglethorpe 

October 26, 1929 - - - 

November 2, 1929 



3; University of Georgia . . 7 

0; Citadel 19 

0; Loyola 

0; St. Louis 6 

Oglethorpe 20; Dayton 12 

. Oglethorpe 7; Villanova 17 



November 9, 1929 .... Oglethorpe 14; Manhattan 

November 16, 1929 .... Oglethorpe 7; St. Xavier 

November 23, 1929 .... Oglethorpe 26; Mercer 

November 28, 1929 .... Oglethorpe 6; Chattanooga 



Totals Oglethorpe 96 



Opponents 



,3§S3^^i?^:^^ 



}L^^^ 




laspball 




la a m a t. r a 




FRANK ANDERSON — Coach Anderson has 
quite a number of former pupils now occupying 
berths with big league clubs. The reason for 
this fact is that he is one of the three best base- 
ball coaches in the south. 



CAPTAIN AMOS MARTIN — "Mouse" is a 
natural born ball player. Plays the keystone 
bag, second base, and hits the ball like nobody's 
business. When you find them any better they'll 
be from Norcross. 



LUCIUS APPLING — "Luke" is hailed by many 
sports writers as the greatest college shortstop 
m the south. He is a consistent long distance 
hitter. 



CHARLIE MITCHELL — Second on the pitch- 
ing staff. "Bo" throws a mean ball. He is 
filling the vacancy left by Vaughn in fine fash- 
ion. 



i| a m a 



W.. ^J±J1! 



)^ 



CLAUD HERRIN — Petrel third baseman 
one of the best ball players in school. Who 
not playing or talking baseball you will find hii 
with a ball in his hand, a hobby it must be. 



GLENN GARDNER — Plays a good brand of 
ball in left field. It takes a good man to knock 
the ball out of the reach of this lad. 



CLAY SYPERT — "Lefty" is the only man on 
the club who throws with the wrong arm. lii 
is counted upon to do some good box work for 
the Petrels before leaving Oglethorpe. 



ASA WALL — "Casey" takes- great pleasure in 
elevating and propelling the horse hide into dis- 
tant regions. He is a good keeper of the outer 
gardens and an excellent pitcher when called 
upon to do so. 



FRANK ANDERSON, JR. — "Tanky" plays tlic 
role of utility infielder but plays it well. He is 
only a sophomore and has two more years in 
which to equal and surpass the splendid record 
made by his brother. 




\g a in g t I a 





PARKER BRYANT — "Big boy" possesses all 
the strength and speed necessary to make a 
good ball player. He is counted on to deliver in 
great style as a first baseman. 



DUMONT BENNETT — "Gyp" is an ideal lead 

^ off man, small of stature, possesses a good eye 

*<il\ and swings from the side of the plate nearest 

first base. His speed enables him to haul down 

many would be hits, and run the bases well 



HUBERT HOLCOMB — A hitting pitcher. 
"Hot" chunks the ball over the plate so fast 
they seldom see it. Just finishing his second 
year on the mound the Petrels are looking for- 
ward to his great work next spring. 



CECIL TODD — "Cy" is the initial base man. 
He plays a fine brand of ball, getting his bingles 
to do his bit of scoring. 'Ole "Cy" talks a great 
game, too. 



ALBERT KIMBREL — "Al" is the best receiv- 
er since the days of Bryant. He just finished 
a great season. His hobby is throwing men out 
at second. He is a good hitter so be watching 
for him in the majors. 



HAROLD ADAMS — "Muddy" is the most pep- 
pery man on the club. Whether behind the bat 
or on the coaching line he is always whooping 
things up and playing the game. 



MELTON RABON — Another hurler that zips 
them past before they have a chance to see it. 
He has one season left to play for the Gold and 
Black. 



IRVIN WOODWARD — "Jenny" is a hustling 
ball player who has the speed and power neces- 
sary to pitch the Gold and Black to many vic- 
tories. He has one more year to devote to the 
cause of the Petrels. 



MARION WHALEY — Another relief catcher 
and one who can be depended upon to throw 
them out at second. He, too, has another year. 



ERNEST GOLDEN — "The Kid" is a good 
utility man who can play the field or pitch with 
good results. His services will be available 
again next year. 




^^^§>. 



mat 



w 



1930 Baseball Season 



The 1930 baseball season saw Oglethorpe with one of the best diamond 
nines in the history of the school. To the old grads who sat in the bleach- 
ers as spectators it brought back the by-gone days of 1924 when the 
Petrels hung up the Southern Inter-Collegiate Championship. 

The Petrels as a team are much better this season than the champion- 
ship team. It was composed of a few stars who later went to the big 
leagues. But from the 1930 club it would be hard to pick the most out- 
standing player. 

Sports writers of Atlanta gave the Petrels credit for having the best 
inlield and outfield in the south, also, as being a team that could hit and 
hit plenty. That is the reason for so many wins to date. 

In the opening games with Clemison the Petrels came out on top with 
two victories. These were followed by two games from Fort Benning in 
Columbus. 

The three game series with Georgia Tech was captured by the Petrels 
with three victories in a row. At no time were the Birdmen in danger. 
Then they took one from Lindale in the Georgia Alabama League and 
dropped one, the first of the season. 

Playing again in their own back yard they took a two game series from 
the Panthers of Birmingham Southern. 



Summaries of the season to date follow: 



Oglethorpe 5 
Oglethorpe 5 
Oglethorpe 12 
Oglethorpe 10 
Oglethorpe 5 
Oglethorpe 5 
Oglethorpe 14 
Oglethorpe 8 
Oglethorpe 16 
Oglethorpe 15 
Oglethorpe 11 



Clemson 3. 

Clemson 4. 

Ft. Benning 4. 

Ft. Benning 2, (rained out.) 

Georgia Tech 4. 

Georgia Tech 3. 

Georgia Tech 2. 

Lindale 9. 

Lindale 4. 

Birmingham Southern 3. 

Birmingham Southern 5. 




laakftball 



I m a c r a to 





TODD 
Forward 



SYPERT 
Guard 



Petrel Quintet 



HERRIN, Cap't. 
Forward 



GOLDEN 
Center 



THERRELL 
Guard 



(ummaries 



Oglethorpe 
Oglethorpe 
Oglethorpe 
Oglethorpe 
Oglethorpe 
Oglethorpe 
Oglethorpe 
Oglethorpe 



U. of Georgia 
U. of Georgia 
Atlanta Athletic Club 
Y. M. C. A. . . . 

J. P. C 

Y. M. C. A. . . . 
Mercer . . . . 
Mercer . . . . 



Total 




Petrel Basketball Squad 

Front row — Todd, Sypert, Bryant, Golden, Herrin, Thei-rel 
Back row — McMillan, Clement, trainer; Kadel. 



:^>". 



a m a c r a tn 





CAPTAIN CLAUD HERRIN 



i.^^=<r^^ 



\n 



u.^ 



Basketball 

The Petrel basketball team experienced the worst season in the history 
of Oglethorpe basketball teams. They lost every contest of the season. 

One reason for this was the fast company the Birds were playing in. 
But only those who witnessed the games can appreciate the effort put 
forth by the team, which on several occasions, was only beaten by a one 
point margin. Although some of the scores appear that the Birds were 
out played they were always fighting and gave a good account of them- 
selves. The opponent always knew that they had been through a real 
battle when the final whistle sounded. 

The most outstanding showings of the Petrel quintet were those with 
the Atlanta Y. M. C. A. Both times the Y was pushed to the limit, only 
to top the Bird cagemen by a one point margin. In the second game with 
the IMercer Bears it was either teams game until just a few minutes be- 
fore the game ended, when Matt, stellar Bear guard, dropped three double 
deckers to win the game by a six point margin. 

The outstanding performers for the Petrels for the season were Captain 
Claud Herrin, Cecil Todd, Luke Appling and David Therrell. 

Captain Herrin, playing a forward position, was here, there and every- 
where on the court ringing baskets from every angle. He was the best 
floor man the Petrel's had. 

As a running mate for Herrin, Coach Robertson had Cecil Todd, former 
product of Savannah. When playing in prep school circles, Todd was an 
All G. I. A. A. forward. His best game of the season was against the Mer- 
cer Bears when he scored twenty-two of his team's forty-seven points. 
He always turned in a good floor game. 

Luke Appling and Dave Therrell were always seen in the role of guards. 
Both these lads played a consistent brand of ball all season. As well as 
being good guards they were accurate when it came to dropping the ball 
through the basket for points. 



-s^m. 



^?^>A\ ~FZ~' 



\:t\x\ l|amacrat» 




Inter-Fraternity Basketball 

The Alpha Lambda Tau Fraternity defeated the Pi Kappa Phis by a 
28-16 count to win the annual Inter-Fraternity Basketball tournament for 
the second consecutive year. This is the second time the Pi Kappa Phis 
and Alpha Lambda Taus have battled, in as many years, for the court 
honors among- the fraternities on the campus. 

With this win the Alpha Lambda Taus have two tournament wins to- 
ward the receiving of the cup offered by the Inter-Fraternity Council for 
permanent possession. It has to be won three consecutive times. 

•Summaries of the tourney follow: 

Pi Kappa Phi, 24— Delta Sigma Phi, 15; Theta Kappa Nu, 20— Kappa 
Alpha, 6; Alpha Lambda Tau, 42 — Theta Kappa Nu, 7; Alpha Lambda 
Tau, 28— Pi Kappa Phi, 16. 

All-Fraternity Team 

First Second 



Raines— P K P . . . 


. Ponvard 


. . . Kimbrel— A L T 


Nix— A L T . . . . 


. Forward 


, . . . James— P K P 


Mitchell— D S P . . 


. . . Center . . . 


. Holcomb — A L T 


Farabee— A L T . . 


. Guard . . . 


. . . . Wall— A L T 


Anderson— P K P . . 


. . Guard . 


. . . Morrow— P K P 



Best all round player — NIX, A L T 
Most valuable player to team — RAINES, P K P 



.<??f:^-,:-^i«'.-r-=?-- 




Go-'Ed Basketball Team 

Front row — Gorman, Bennett, Webb, Butler, Bridges. 

Back row — Varner, Murray, manager; Wyle. 

Not in picture — Boardman, Nutting, Frost, Morris, Ambrose. 



First Team 



Second Team 



Gorman 

Bennett 

Bridges 

Boardma 

Webb 



Varner 

Ambrose 

. Butler 

. Frost 

Morris 



SUMMARIES 



Co-Eds 
Co-Eds 
Co-Eds 
Co-Eds 
Co-Eds 
Co-Eds 
Co-Eds 
Co-Eds 



3 Dahlonega 48 

19 Duluth 13 

9 Pattillo 17 

11 Decatur 9 

14 Chamblee 25 

16 Lutheran 10 

7 Dahlonega . . . . . 25 

8 Duluth 17 



»'--Cfc7'-*-ctii.j^: 



la mac r a to 



1, 



Inter-Sorority Basketbal 



The Phi Kappa Eta Sorority won the second annual Inter-Sorority bas- 
ketball tournament March 6, 1930 when they took the final game of the 
tournament on a 2-0 forfeit from the Kappa Delta quintet. 

At the end of the regular playing time the score ended 11-11. An extra 
period was played but neither team scored. During the extra period two 
(): the Kappa Delta players were unable to continue, thus dropping the 
game by forfeit. 



Summaries of final game: 
Kappa Delta 



Nutting (1) 
Bennett (8) 
Murray 
Boardman 
Varner (2) 



Phi Kappa Eta 

F . . . . . McClung(4) 

F Brown 

C Bridges (7) 

G Black 

G Butler 



Summai'ies of tournament play: 

C;hi Omega, 5— Kappa Delta, 17; Chi Omega, 6— Phi Kappa Eta, 30; 
J*hi Kappa Eta, 2 — Kappa Delta, 0. 

ALL-SORORITY TEAM 
First Team Second Team 



Nutting— K. D. 


. . F . . 


. . Ambrose— C. 0. 


Bennett— K. D. . . 


. . F . . 


. . McClung— P. K. E 


Bridges— P. K. E. . 


. . C . . 


. . . Murray— K. D. 


Carlton— C. 0. . . 


. G . 


. . . Black— P. K. E 




. . G . . 


. . . Butler— P. K. E 




IFrpaliman Atlilrttra 



3o 



a m a c r a to 



Freshman Football 




The Petrel Greenies made their debut on the gridiron October 12 and 
after the excitement of the battle was over they had hung a 14-0 score on 
Father Time's Sport rack at the cost of the fast Monroe A. & M. eleven. 

Undaunted and ready for their next foe the Green Wave encountered 
the Soldiers of Georgia Military College. They sent the soldiers back to 
Milledgeville smarting under a 13-6 defeat. 

Next came the Freshman of the University of Chattanooga. They de- 
feated the Volunteers 20-0. Revenge was sweet for in 1928 the Vols de- 
feated the Greenies by a two touchdown margin. 

The next foe proved a Waterloo for the young Peti-els. Mercer fresh- 
men defeated the locals 7-0 on their home field. The game was played in 
a sea of mud and although Petrels can weather any kind of a storm they 
found going tough trying to wade through the mud plus the Cubs of Mer- 
cer. 

The outstanding men for the entire season were: Kenzie, the giant 
lineman; Jones at end; Morrow at center and Raines and Walker in the 
backfield. 











m a 



Petrel Greenies 



First Team 



Second Team 



Jones . 

Kenzie 

Lockett 

Morrow 

Rainwater 

Patrick 

Higdon 

James . 

Baker 

Walker . 

Raines 



RG 
RT 
RE 
Q . 
LH 
RH 



Whitley 

Robinson 

. Coffee 

Martin 

. Nix 

. Clark 

. Britt 

■ King 

Bitting 

. Moore 

McGrath 



Results 



Freshmen 14; Monroe A. & M. 0. 
Freshmen 13; G. M. C. 6. 
Freshmen 20; University of Chattanooga 0. 
Freshmen 0; Mercer University 7. 





a m a c r a t» 





Freshman Basketball Squad 

Front row — Martin, Baker, Moore, captain; Walker, Legree 

Second row — Putno, Blackwell, Whitley, Higdon. 
Third row — Manager Freedman, Garrison, Clement, Coach, 





First Team 


Second Team 


Martin 
Whitley 
Moore 
Walker 






. . F Legree 

. . F Blackwell 

. . C Higdoii 








a Raker 






SEASON RESULTS 




Freshmen 


19 


U. S. B. 8. 




Freshmen 


51 


Grace Methodist Church 15. 




Freshmen 


34 


■ Triple E 18. 




Freshmen 


73 


Rome Y. M. C. A. 21. 




Freshmen 


35 


J. P. C. 26. 




Freshmen 


46 


Darlington 25. 




Freshmen 


75 


Bartow High 15. 




Freshmen 


88 


Bowie Bible Class 20. 




Freshman Baseball Squad 

Front row — Garrison, Salmon, James, Riggin, Legree, Craven. 
Back row — Cunningham, Wliitley, Moore, Walker, Baker, Carter, Britt. 



Under the careful tutelage of Coach Monk Clement, the baby Petrels 
are fast rounding into one of the smoothest frosh diamond machines to 
function on Hermance field. 

At the present writing they have won two and lost one contest. Gor- 
don, by virtue of some exceptionally good work on the part of their pitch- 
er, was able to hang the heavy end of a three to two score in their column 
of the score-board. Bowdon College was easily disposed of by the junior 
Petrels to the tune of 12-2 and 5-2. 

Several of these lads will see service with the varsity next year. Espec- 
ially promising is the work of Craven behind the bat ; Whitley at first base ; 
Moore at second and Walker, Carter, Evans and Legree in the box. 



lama c r a to 



"1933" Club 

With the high school football and basketball days and "letter" some- 
thing of the past a group of young stalwarts came to the Oglethorpe cam- 
pus last fall in quest of newer and greater honors. More and more honors 
on the gridiron and basketball court were theirs for the getting. The 
idea of stepping into the class of higher and more mature athletics, as 
played in the Inter-collegiate circles inspired them to work hard. 

They had something else to look forward to, a numeral, the key to the 
varsity football team and a varsity letter. It seems bigger to make the 
freshman insignia than it did his letter in his last year of prep school 
sports. In fact, it often means more to him than does his varsity letter. 

All the men who make their numerals are closely associated because of 
Iheir playing side by side, one for all, and all for one. And each year at 
the close of football season they organize with the number of their num- 
eral as the name of their club. 

This year we have the "19.33" club to offer for your inspection. It is 
composed of the following men who made their numerals in either football 
or basketball. 





FOOTBALL 




JAMES 


MARTIN 


HIGDON 


ROBINSON 


LOCKETT 


NIX 


RAINWATER 


BITTING 


COFFEE 


WALKER 


KENZIE 


BAKER 


MORROW 


JONES 


PATRICK 


RAINES 


BASKETBALL 


WHITLEY 


BLACKWELL 


PUTNO 


HIGDON 


MARTIN 


LEGREE 


WALKER 


MOORE 


WHITLEY 
BAKER 


GARRISON 



^^:^S.^^^^^0'-: 




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lama c r a to 



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Alpha Nu Chapter 



Founded at the College of the City of New York, 1899, 
at Oglethorpe University in 1922 



^hUc Carnaliuh 



MEMBERS 



T. W. Fulton 
Fred Snook 
Burke Hedges 
Reavis O'Neal 
Edward Emerson 
Hoke Bell 
Albert Church 
Kenneth Myers 
Robert Shaw 
Clarence Wells 
Wilbur Nall 
Henry Jenkins 
RuFus Brown 
Carl Leithe 
Fred Cunningham 
June Barker 



DORRIS Selman 
Bryant Arnold 
Paul Bacon 
Charles Bourne 
Jeff MacMillan 
Gordon MacGregor 
Leslie Parham 
Charles Gurr 
Robert McGrath 
Daniel Kenzie 
FoLSON Rainwater 
Ray Walker 
Charlie Mitchell 
Jack Moore 
Lyle Kratz 
Lucius Appling 



Ernest Golden 



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a m a c r a 




nf Kcinna 0T 

Pi Chapter 

Founded at College of Charleston in 1904, 
and at Oglethorpe in 1918 



Colois — Gold and White 



MEMBERS 



Fkank Anderson, Jr. 
Frank Mackey 
Almon Raines 
John BrrriNc 
Grantlani) King 
Seaman Baskin 
Bill Maner 
Billy James 
Sam Jones 
James Lockett 
Julian Stovall 
George Gaillard 
Tyrus Andrews 



Earl Blackwell 
Blanford Eubanks 
Joseph Freeman 
Lyman Fox 
Amos Martin 
Claud Herrin 
Robert Jones 
Kendall Jordan 
Frank McSherry 
Raymond Boone 
Park Brinson 
Jake Sutton 
Andrew Morrow 



Allan Ritz 



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a\0a Xaul5da rav 



Alpha Chapter 



Founded at Oglethorpe University in 1916 
and established in 1921 



Old Gold avd Black 



Americiin Beauty Rose 



MEMBERS 



Jack Farauke 
Marion Whaley 
R. W. Oakey 

WiLBURN LEGREE 

Asa Wall 
Parker Bryant 
Justin Nix 
Huston Lundy 
Frank Davenport 
McKay Patterson 



ViRciL Milton 
Robert Benson 
John Bell 
John Turk 
Charles McKissick 

LiNDSEY VaUCHN 

Curry Burford 
Hubert Holcomb 
Homer Gramlinc 
R. W. Hughs 



John Artley 



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la m a c r a tt 



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mnna aX0a 



Beta Nu Chapter 

Founded at Washington and Lee University in 1865 

and at Ogletliorpe University in 1918 

when chapter was revived 



Crimson and Old GoU 



Floiver — Magnolia and Red Rose 



MEMBERS 



Paul Goldsmith 
John Hallman 
Oliver Beall 
Truman Riggins 
Herman Martin 



Frank Inman 
M. H. Wood 
Burns McCubbin 
Lawrence Hight 
Atwood Whittington 



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l|a m a c r a 




QfjTa minra Vd 



Georgia Alpha Chapter 



Founded at Springfield, Missouri in 1924 
and at Oglethorpe in 1925 



Colors — Crimson, Argent, Sable 



Floiver — American Beauty Rose 



David Clark 
Guthrie Ellis 
James Weldon 
Roy Raines 
A. D. Barfield 
Martin Arnold 
Sam Miller 
A. L. Caeter 
MoNFORD Whitley 
DuMONT Bennett 
Edward Durst 
Haywood Clement 
John Patrick 



MEMBERS 

Harry Adams 
Harry Emanuel 
William Higgins 
William Hutchinson 
Ollie Nall 
William Deal 
Frank Myers 
Harry McInnis 
Asher Lee 
Ray Sewell 
Edward Harney 
Ben Simpson 
Hubert Coleman 
William Freedman 



v-^^. 



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I 

















History of Fraternities at Oglethorpe 

Theta chapter of the Kappa Alpha Order was installed at old Oglethorpe 
College, January 31, 1871. On December 1, 1918 the original charter of 
the Theta chapter was reissued to Beta Nu chapter at the new Oglethorpe 
University. The charter members were as follows: W. R. Carlisle, D. S. 
Harrison, E. C. James, Jr., J. H. Goff, B. H. Wyly, H. W. Bagley, Hugh I. 
Turner, S. D. Smith, Jr. 

The Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity was established on the present Oglethorpe 
campus May 16, 1918. The following members of the Pi chapter of the 
Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity claim the distinction of being the first to wear 
the pin of a national fraternity at the new Oglethorpe University: G. 
M. McNeill, Jr., S. H. Gilkerson, A. F. Laird, D. C. McNeill, J. P. Wilson, 
L. M. McClung, H. Metcalf. 

On February 4, 1922 the Alpha Omega Club became the Alpha Nu chap- 
ter oi Delta Sigma Phi. The charter members were: W. C. Maddox, M. 
F. Calmes, J. J. Trimble, S. Holderness, Jr., D. B. Johnson, J. M. Staf- 
ford, Jr., J. R. Smith, G. E. Talley, P. C. Gaertner, C. J. Hollingsworth, 
J. E. Johnson, H. L. Cooper, C. J. Maddox, W. W. Crowe, S. G. Kaylor, 
L. G. Pfefferkorn, A. L. Shelton, D. 0. Trimble, J. R. Kemp, M. Humphrey. 

The Alpha Lambda Tau Fraternity has the distinction of being the first 
and only national fraternity to be founded on the Oglethorpe University 
campus. Prior to its being incorporated in 1921, it was known as the 
Alpha Lambda Club. The members whose names appear on the charter 
are: 0. M. Cobb, J. H. Hamilton, T. V. Morrison, A. M. Hollingsworth, 
W. L. Nunn, J. C. Ivey, H. C. Trimble. 

The Georgia Alpha chapter of Theta Kappa Nu, which was establish- 
ed at Oglethorpe December 5, 1925, was previously known as Delta Chi 
Epsilon. Following is a list of the charter members: J. P. Nation, Harry 
Banister, Albert Martin, Lewis Moseley, Alton Harden, Spencer Howell, 
Wayne Traer, Gibson Cornwell, Walter Ingram, Mitchell Bishop, Leslie 
Hammock, Winfred Kent, Leon Sisk. 




^nrortli^B 




mmaSeXia 



Alpha Tau Chapter 

Founded at Virginia State Normal, Farmville, Virginia, October 23, 1897. 
Established at Oglethorpe University April 5, 1930. 



Faculty Member 

Mrs. Arthur S. Libby 

MEMBERS 



Virginia Hastings 
Sophie Lou Meakin 
Frances MacKirgan 
Adrienne Roberts 
Catherine Maugham 
Lee Bennett 
Christine Bost 
Ruth Starke 
Betty Orandall 



Margaret Neuhoff 
Gertrude Murray 
Mildred Bradley 
Helen Boardman 
Jean Nutting 
Evelyn Moore 
Miriam Varner 
Virginia Cooledge 
Martha Jean Osborne 



^^^I^^S^^^^^^-^' 



a m a c r a t» 



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Sigma Gamma Chapter 



Founded at University of Arkansas in 1895 and at 
Oglethorpe University in 1924. 



Cardinal and Straw 



White Carnath 



MEMBERS 



Murdoch Walker 
Eugenia Patterson 
Charlotte Collier 
Jessie Guerry 
Marie McAfee 
Ida Nevin 
Edwina Connolly 
Clare Jones 
Helen Carr 
Eloise Tanksley 



Mary Dodd 
Helen Thomas 
Ann Harris 
Marion Collier 
Rose Wainwright 
Natalie de Golian 
Clare McDonough 
Alys Keiley 
Elizabeth Stitt 
Virginia Fortson 



W a m a c r a to 



W 



A/V^ 



uji Kama fjra 



Founded at Oglethorpe University in 1927 



Flower — White Sweet Peas 



Faculty Advisor 

Mrs. John A. Aldrich 



MEMBERS 



Sara Martin 
Anita Black 
Georgia Alison 
Mary Williamson 
Louise Williamson 
Virginia Turner 
Gladys Bridges 
Georgia Brown 



Elizabeth McClung 
Myrta Thomas, hoiiovary 
Mary Tucker 
Margaret Vardaman 
Willie Woodall 
Louise Butler 
Marie Shaw 
Ruth McLaughlin 



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n a c r a ui _/^^'^/ 

Inter-Sorority Council 

OFFICERS 

ELizABE*rH McCluno, Phi Kappa Eta President 

Margaket NeUHOFF, Kappa Delta Secretary 

Helen Thomas, Chi Omega Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Georgia Allison Phi Kappa Eta 

Gertrude IVIurray Kappa Delta 

Mary Dodd Chi Omega 

m Mm M 'K . 1^ 






I^nnnr ^nrntira 



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t a mac r a 




Bo 



ar s 



Head 



Established at Oglethorpe in 1920 

Colors — Old Gold and Black Flower — Black-Eyed Susan 

The Boar's Head, first honorary club to be organized at the University, 
was founded in January 1920. Eligibility to membership is limited to 
members of the student body who have not only been prominent in aca- 
demic life but who have also distinguished themselves in various other 
activities of the college. 

MEMBERS 



Earl Blackwell 
Blanford Eubanks 

Bryant Arnold 



Preaidevt 

. Secretary-Treasurer 
Amos Martin 



Robert Benson 



t^v, Ca ni a c r a tt 




!| a m a c 



Phi Kappa Delta 

Established on the campus of Oglethorpe University in 1920. 

The Phi Kappa Delta Fraternity was established for the purpose of having 

in the university an honorary organization which selects its members for 

their scholastic attainments. 

MEMBERS 

Mrs. Arthur S. Libby Dr. Arthur S. Libby 

Wade Bryant Arnold John Robert Shaw 

William Howard Coffee Eloise Chable Tanksley 



■KM 



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a m a c r a to 




Le Gonte Honorary Scientific Fraternity 

Established on the campus of Oglethorpe University in 1920. 

Not much is known of the activities of Le Conte on the campus. It func- 
tions as an organization within itself in advancing the cultural relations 
of the various sciences among its members who are chosen from the most 
outstanding students in the University. Through its members, it advances 
scientific study in the college. 

MEMBERS 



Harry Last 
Harry McInnis 
Dr. J. F. Sellers 
Dr. John A. Aldrich 
H. Hunt 



Robert Benson 
Bryant Arnold 
John Turk 
Charles McKissick 
Zelan Wills 



Frank Davenport 



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( m a c r a tv 



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Blue Key 

Established on the campus of Oglethorpe University in 1926. 

Blue Key has as its purpose the promotion of activities among the students 

and the advancement of the University's cause. Membership is given to 

those who contribute to the progress of our Alma Mater. 

MEMBERS 



Earl Blackwell 
Blanford Eubanks 

Amos Martin 
Bryant Arnold 
Frank Inman 



Robert Benson 
John Turk 
Hoke Bell 
Lyle Kratz 
Frank McSherry 



m' 




r a v> 



The Honor Man 

When one goes on a long journey he is delighted to bring 
back some souvenir in memory of the paths he trod, of the 
difficulties he encountered and overcame. Likewise, when 
one goes on a literary career or scholastic journey, not only 
bringing honor to himself but fame to his Alma Mater, it 
is but natural for his fellow men to want to show their ap- 
preciation of his efforts. This they do by electing him to 
membership in a society whose members have already trod 
the paths and surmounted the difficulties thereon. 

A very fitting and appropriate description of the honor- 
ary fraternities on the Oglethorpe campus and the char- 
acteristics which they try to impart may be had from one 
man. Namely, Bryant Arnold. In him we believe was por- 
trayed as nearly as possible just what these fraternities can 
mean to the individual and to the school. He was a mem- 
ber of every honorary fraternity on the campus, and all 
of these are glad to hold him as an example of their ideals. 

In summing up an honorary fraternity man and calling 
Bryant, as he really was, The Honor Man, let us quote 
from Shakespeare: 

"His life was gentle; and the elements 

So mix'd in him, that Nature might stand up, 

And sail to all the ivoiid. This was a Man! 



<jP'- 



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CElubB 



ij amacrata 

Duchess Club 



The Club was founded at the University in the Fall of 1927 to promote 
social activities among the female students of the University. 






MEMBERS 



Betty Crandall 
Betty McClung 
Clare Jones 
Catherine Maugham 
Virginia Cooledge 
Alys Keiley 



Mary Dodd 
Mildred Bradley 
Margaret Neuhoff 
Helen Thomas 
Gertrude Murray 
Elizabeth Stitt 



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Yankee Club 

This Club is composed of those who live in the states North of the Mason 
and Dixon Line, and who have for Oglethorpe a great love and esteem. 

MEMBERS 



Eleanor Wyle 
Edwina Connolly 
Betty Crandall 

WiLBURN LeGREE 

William Freedman 
Edward Harney 
Dan Kenzie 
Robert McGrath 
Burke Hedges 



Jack Barker 
Gladys Sequin 
Marion Brown 
Virginia Hastings 
Everett Nelson 
John Patrick 
Alan Ritz 
Ray Walker 
Clarence Krebs 



t| a m a c r a to 



OMU 






Stray Greek Club 



The membership of this ckib is composed of those students who belong- 
to Greek-Letter fraternities other than those on the Oglethorpe campus. 

MEMBERS 

Dave Therrell Sigma Chi 

James Anderson Sigina Nu 

Billy Backus Pi Kappa Alpha 

James Hogdes Sigma Chi 

Charles Trout Sigma Chi 

W. R. Massengale .... Chi Phi 

Frank Anderson, Sr Sigma Chi 

Dr. H. J. Gaertner Sigma Nu 

Harry Robertson Delta Kappa Epsilon 

Dr. James E. Routh Phi Kappa Psi 






Alchemist Club 

Co/ocs — Gold and White Motto — To Make the best of the Worst 

This Club was organized in 1928 by the members of Dr. J. F. Sellers' ana- 
lytical chemistry class. It will automatically expire when the last mem- 
bers have been graduated. No one except the original members, seven, 
in number will ever be Alchemists at Oglethorpe. We were seven, now 
we are six since Robert Emery has left us. 

OFFICERS 

Robert Emery* President 

John P. Turk Vice-President 

Robert Benson Treasurer 

Frank Davenport Secretary 

MEMBERS 

Robert Emery Bryant Arnold 

Gertrude Murray Robert Benson 

Frank Davenport John P. Turk 

Ernest Golden 



\K 





l ama c r a to 

Lord's Club 

This Club was founded on February 19, 1924. It was the first honorary 
club of a social nature to be organized at the University. There are cer- 
tain elements of culture and social qualities necessary for membership. 
The purpose of this club is to promote social activity of the highest order. 

OFFICERS 

Earl Blackwell President 

Jake Sutton Vice-President 

Frank Inman Secretary-Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Almon Raines Earl Blackwell 

Jake Sutton Frank Inman 

Lyman Fox Tom Daniel 

Frank McSherry Amos Martin 

John Hallman George Gaillard 

Hubert Kadel Lawrence Hight 

Atwood Whittington Paul Goldsmith 




Girls High Glub 



This Club is composed of Oglethorpe Co-eds who received their College 
preparation at Girls High School, Atlanta, Georgia. 



MEMBERS 



Dora Deane Ambrose 
Bessie Silverman 
Willie Woodall 
Elizabeth Merritt 
Ruth Frost 
Ruth McLaughlin 
Alys Keiley 



Catherine Maugham 
Virginia Templeman 
Rowena Wyche 
Sarah Martin 
Gladys Bridges 
Zelda Webb 
Mary Davis 



Eloise Tanksley 



^0^5^?^-?^^=:^ 




l a m a c r a tjj 




O" Club 



Haywood Clement 
Amos Martin 
Lyman Fox 
CuRLEY Fulton 
Lyle Kratz 
Irwin Woodward 
Hoke Bell 
John Bell 
Ernest Golden 
Jake Sutton 
Clay Sypert 
Hubert Holcomb 
Albert Kimbrel 



Lindsey Vaughn 
Harold Coffee 
Charles McKissick 
Asa Wall 
Curry Burford 
Albert Church 
Claud Herein 
David Therrell 
Lucius Applinc- 
Kenneth MY'ERS 
Frank Anderson, Jr. 
Cecil Todd 
Paul Goldsmith 



Parker Bryant 



l|a m a c r a ti 




Washington Seminary Glub 

Membership made up of those who i^eceived theii' college preparation at 
Washington Seminary, Atlanta, Georgia. 



MEMBERS 



Virginia Cooledge 
Marie McAfee 
Edith Marshall 
Murdoch Walker 
Helen Thomas 
Mildred Bradley 
Dorothea York 
Ruth Starke 
Lawrence Hight, spojiso?- 



Jean Nutting 
Clare Jones 
Miriam Varner 
Lee Bennett 
Winifred Niall 
Marion Collier 
Natalie de Golian 
Marion Brown 
Virginia Fortson 



Charlotte Collier 




Boys High-Tech High Club 

Members of this Club are those who received their college preparation at 
Boys High and Tech High Schools, Atlanta, Georgia. 

MEMBERS 



CuRLEY Fulton 
Dave Therrell 
Claud Herrin 
John Hallman 
Kendall Jordan 
Otis Lyle 



Fred Snook 
W. R. Massengale 
Paul Goldman 
AsHER Lee 
Allen Johnson 
Jeff McMillan 






a m a c r a to 





Sacred Heart Glub 



The Co-eds who constitute this group received their preparatory educa- 
tion at Sacred Heart School, Atlanta, Georgia. 



MEMBERS 



Claire McDonough Gertrude Murray 

Louise Goslin Katherine Bodenheimer 

Helen Carr 



.0^ 




U. S- B. Glub 



Members of this club are those who received their college preparation at 
University School for Boys, Atlanta, Georgia. 

MEMBERS 



Justin Nix 

Ben I. Simpson, Jr. 

DuMONT Bennett 

Amos Martin 



James L. Hight 
Atwood Whittington 
Howard Martin 
Ernest Poole 



I c r a ti 




South Georgia Club 



This Club is composed of students, who previous to entering Oglethorpe, 

grew water-melons and kicked foot-balls about over the southern section 

of the State of Georgia. 

MEMBERS 



Parker Bryant 
Harry Britt 
Melton Rabon 
Willie Belle Robison 
David Clarke 
Reavis O'Neal 
George Gaillard 
Roy Raines 
Albert Kimbrel 
Fred Cunningham 
Cecil Todd 



Herman Martin 
Gordon MacGregor 
Sam Baker 
Raymond Boone 
Robert Benson 
Harry Emanuel 
Roy Warren 
Park Brinson 
Charles Gurr 
Truman Riggin 
Folson Rainwater 



^^^s^"^ 



■^=^ 




Alabama Glub 

This Club is composed of students who hail from the State of Aalbama. 
MEMBERS 



Edward Emerson 
Frank Davenport 
Charlie Mitchell 
John Bitting 



Virginia Templeman 
ROWENA Wyche 
Louise Goslin 
Betty McCluno 



la m a c r a t» 



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>arolina 



Club 



Membership composed of those attending Oglethorpe University and liv- 
ing in North and South Carolina. 

MEMBERS 



LiNDSEY Vaughn 
Frank Mackey 
HiLERY Bryson 
Bryant Arnold 
George Nicholson 



Jack Farabee 
Johnny Payne 
Mary Price 
Myrta Thomas 
Haywood Clement 



l^- 



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^ 




Florida Club 

This Club is composed of those who live m the State of Florida and who 
attend Oglethorpe University. 

MEMBERS 



Lester Elsberry 
Guthrie Ellis 
Houston Lundy 
Leslie Parham 



Ollie B. Nall 
Albert Church 
Charles McKissick 
Clay Sypert 



James Hodges 



1 m a c r a t5 




Hobo Club 



The Hobo Club is our prized exclusive organization. In fact, its members 

have been excluded from the bigger and better places all over the country 

at some time or another. 



Paul Goldman 
Louise Williamson 
Betty McClung 
Herman Kristman 
Bill Higgins 
Johnny Payne 
Burke Hedges 
Edwin Harney 
Charles McKissick 
Bryant Arnold 
JiMMiE Anderson 
AsHUR Lee 
Oozie Deal 
Al Ritz 

Hubert Coleman 
Lawrence Hight 
Atwood Whittington 



MEMBERS 

Herman Martin 
Leslie Parham 
Hubert Holcombe 
Virginia Templeman 
John Bitting 
Seaman Baskin 
FoLSON Rainwater 
Charlie Mitchell 
Charles Taylor 
Bill Salmon 
Curley Fulton 
DuMONT Bennett 
George Gaillard 
Jack Barker 
Kenneth Myers 
MuNFORD Whitley ' 
Melton Rabon 



Raymond Boone 
Albert Kimbrel 
Willie Belle Robison 
MoRRELL Driver 
Parker Bryant 
Sam Baker 
A. L. Carter 
Robert Benson 
John Patrick 
Amos Martin 
Harry Emanuel 
Fred Cunningham 
Park Brinson 
Wilburn Legree 
Clay Sypert 
George Nicholson 
Dan Kenzie 




^nuprnmpnt 



a m a c r a tp J^] 



Government 



No one is as near the student body as a student, no faculty member can 
feel the pulse beats of the students and understand them as they are un- 
derstood by their fellow men. It was in view of these facts that the Stu- 
dent-Faculty Council was organized in 1927. 

The chairman of this council is a senior, chosen annually by the student 
body. The president and four other students, one from each of the classes, 
constitute the membership of the council. Their duty is to work with the 
Dean of the University, assisting and advising him in regard to questions 
of conduct of the students who may be brought before them. 

The Co-ed Council is a similar organization whose members are chosen 
from the Co-eds of the various classes. The cases brought before this 
body are relative to the women of the University. In addition to the rep- 
resentatives of the four classes is the "Co-ed Mother," appointed by the 
Dean. 

On each floor of the dormitories there is a proctor whose duty it is to 
report to the head proctor the conduct in his hall from week to week. The 
head proctor in turn reports to the Dean. 

By careful selection of the officers and members of these organizations 
and sincere co-operation with them, we can have a better Oglethorpe. 




Officers of the Oglethorpe University 
Student Body 1929^30 

W. Bryant Arnold President 

Elizabeth McClung Vice-President 

Frank Myers Secretary-Treasurer 



f^\ la m a c r a to 





Student^Faculty Council 

Robert Benson Chamnan 

Hoke Bell Sevior Representative 

Prank Inman Junior Representative 

Frank Anderson, Jr Sophomore Representative 

Andrew Morrow Freshman Represntative 

Dean James F. Sellers FaeuUij Advisor 




Go-Ed Council 

Elizabeth McClung President 

Helen Boardman Junior Rejjresentfitivc 

Sara Martin Sophoomre Representative 

Clare Jones Freshman Representative 

Gertrude Murray Co-Ed Mother 




I| a m a c r a to 




m^ 



Oglethorpe Debate Council 

Dr. James E. Routh Faculty Advisor 

W. Bryant Arnold Chairman of Debates 



i 






MEMBERS 



WiLBURN LEGREE 

Reavis O'Neal 
Burke Hedges 
William Deal 
Paul Goldman 
Clarence Krebs 



Gertrude Murray 
Paul Bacon 
Pansy Bugg 
Dr. James E. Routh 
W. R. Massengale 
Helen Boardman 




Reavis O'Neal 



Clarence Krebs 



Oglethorpe - Furman 



Subject. Resolved: That the merging of banks and stores into chain 
systems is detrimental to the moral and economic welfare of the Ameri- 
can people. 

Reavis O'Neal and Clarence Krebs, negative, represented Oglethorpe. 




Paul Goldman 



WiLBUBN LEGEEE 



^«^v 



ta m a c r a to 





WiLBURN LEGREE 



Oglethorpe - Pittsburgh 



Subject. Resolved: That Modern Advertising is more detrimental than 
beneficial to society. 

Paul Goldman and Wilburn Legree, representing Oglethorpe, upheld the 
negative. 



Mercer - Oglethorpe 



Subject. Resolved: That the merging of banks and stores into chain 
systems is detrimental to the moral and economic welfare of the Ameri- 
can people. 

Reavis O'Neal and Wilburn Legree, affirm.ative, represented Oglethorpe. 




Publiratinna 



l| a m a c r a to 





Y, 



amacraw 



StafF 



Bryant Arnold 
Edward Emerson 
Burke Hedges 
Robert Benson 
Lyle Kratz 
Paul Bacon 
Fred Snook 
Mildred Bradley 
W. R. Massengale 



Editor 

Photographic and Succeeding Editoi 

Assistant Editor 

Assistant Edito> 

Sports Editor 

Fruternitji Editor 

Easiness Manage) 

. Adi'ertisiitg Manager 
. Assistant Adv., Manager 



&^SS^?^:: 



K^^^^s^^b^. 



'<=?=CZ?ce'<:^, 



lama 



IKlJa 



The Stormy Petrel 



Reavis O'Neal, Jr. 
Bryant Arnold 
Helen Boardman 
Lyle Kratz 
Gordon MacGregor 



. . Editor 
Associate Editor 
Associate Editor 
. Sports Editor 
Exchange Editor 



Almon Raines Art Editor 

Ben I. Simpson, Jr Reporter 

Betty Arnold Reporter 

Adrienne Roberts Reporter 

Otis Lyle Reporter 

Robert McGrath Reporter 



Reporter 



James Hodges 

Paul Bacon Business Manager 

Robert Jones Advertising Manager 

Howard Martin Assistant Adv., Manager 



\\\ 



1 c r a u) 




S*etrels Pl ay S, L C. Team s jn 1930 
?:*5lcSS'*''to; St?S Maje^0n,ic And Meatatorial Observations "~T77^^7^i^''ra,l,„^ ' 



?? 



^-'•'^^i^-< : ... 

Walker, New Bursal,. '""'''■'■'•.' 'J' '•"' o 

Ex-Aero Offiriil English Educator Begs g .iss Maughm Robbed 

„, , , „- - Anglo - U. S. Amity |. Of Five New Dresses 



,tets Straus' 



-^Og/erho, 



^1 lists 










On Athens Train [ 




Oglethorpe Coeds 
. In Debutante Club 
Poetry 


Raymond 
Maxwell 
McEowen 



2% 



^-o On European Tom 



Mighty Bulldogs Taken Into Camp 

By Well-Coached Oglethorpe Team ! =-K 

' 3 'iJ' 

Parrish Twins Made Georgia Bows To i = S 
Theatrical Editors! Superior Petrels', 9 










v%^'^' 



-Vamacraw Pictures 
To Be Made Monday 



\ -5^ f ^^^^ . V |.reshman Gridsters 
•-(i'V^ \^ N'earing Top Shapcl 



lOs/ethoi 



Schedu/i 



"■PP Debate 



sJBEAT 



■"'nounrorf 



Shakespeare Used 1j 
~;ordsThan.\merici 



I ■f /,'''•■< ■„ ^.Ji'versity Faculty I 
,'. ' % "■' P° %■% Enlarged For' 1 930 

%,• \ "'>)■'- - 

.^ • ■« 7- "T" /^ Kl'^' >'^' . ^ .laik Hears! Is 

n A-Y T O IN i -'^ ? == Mas,./,,,.. iMlitor 



T)tama 






petrols Ral^ To|' 
Defeat .lavpcrv I 



PETRELS EO'A 
TO ST. LOUIS 



I' OKlcIhorpe; 



'^ , . -; ;;;;§ 1930 Grid Schedule 
"^"^ Birds n ' ° bearing Completion 
o'^Ji By?'' '^"'"ts , ,,. v,„,H, 






rheta Kaps Elect 1/% 
^''s.^ Lillian Smit^ ■Z"^ 



Kartsock Gives 

Poetry ("nurse i 



Birds Battle Be,irs 
-jjor Championship 



Dr. H. F. Osborn's Dis-'T^T^ ;,. . ,. .^a. 

co^erv Does Not ^'" ^""^Sas Give •;, '" ""„ ^ 

Affect Chart Benefit Bridge """ay Sponsors 



5^00 PETREl^ WANTED IN 1™^^^^ 1 




Art 



ia m a c r a 




The Orchestra 



The Oglethorpe University Orchestra under the leadership of Jeff 
iVIcMillan, sophomore saxophonist, has made it possible for the students 
to enjoy many delightful dances in the gymnasium, as well as furnish en- 
tertainment for the chapel hour. 

Following is a list of those who compose this harmonious group: Robert 
Shaw, former director and banjo player; Martin Arnold, bass; Asher Lee, 
trumpet; Vivian McGowan, piano; Jeff McMillan, saxophone; Ollie Nail, 
trumpet; William Deal, violin; Homer Gramling, drums; Charles Bourn, 
saxophone; Frank McSherry, trombone and Ralph Mincey, saxophone. 




lamacrato 



Plays and Players of 1929-30 

With the installation of a Dramatic Laboratory course this year dealing 
with stage technique and settings under the direction of Samuel Earl 
Blackwell, Oglethorpe University graduate and originator of the annual 
Petrel Follies, legitimate stage productions, have been given a steady 
incentive to progress. 

The first production of the year was presented in chapel in early No- 
vember. It was a play written by Charles Willis, a former Oglethorpe 
student, entitled "Roslynne." The second production was an adaptation 
of Bernard Veiller's "Within the Law," which was produced at Oglethorpe 
under the title "Framed." 

Several notable additions to Oglethorpe's histrionic roll of honor were 
made after the presentation of these two productions. Notable among 
these are Elizabeth Crandall, of Indiana, who played leading roles in both 
plays and also in the Petrel Follies. Catherine Maugham also took honors 
in both presentations, as did Jack Barker, Marie Shaw, Howard Martin, 
Marion Gertman, who proved to be an exceptional tragedienne; Atwood 
Whittington, Mildred Bradley, Natalie de Golian, Ida Nevin, William 
Maner and Paul Goldman. 

The excellence of the plays was made possible by the dilligence of Sam 
Miller, who worked day and night on the actual manufacture of the set- 
tings used in both plays. His artistry is at times professional in technique. 

Extensive plans are being made for the enlargement of the stage pro- 
gram next year. 



^ 



The Players' Club 



The club became a part of the University early in its history and since 
organization has contributed largely to the progress of the drama on the 
campus. Each year the club presents several plays to the student body in 
addition to taking part in the annual production of Spring plays. 



MEMBERS 



Earl Blackwell 
Helen Boardman 
Jake Sutton 
Robert Jones 
Frank McSherry 
Mildred Bradley 
Frank Inman 



Ben I. Simpson, Jr. 
Eugenia Patterson 
Mary Dodd 
Lyman Fox 
Gertrude Murray 
Betty Crandall 
William Maner 



Kendall Jordan 






m"^ 



The Players' Club 



Earl Blackwell President 

Helen Boardman Vice-President 

Jake Sutton Business Manager 

Robert Jones Stage Manager 

MEMBERS 

Jack Barker Natalie de Golian 

Burke Hedges Evelyn Moore 

Bryant Arnold Jean Nutting 

Marie Shaw Reavis O'Neal 

Paul Goldman Catherine Maugham 

Ida Nevin Adrienne Roberts 

Sam Miller W. R. Massengale 

Bettie Arnold Helen Boardman 



p^<:^^ 



Sti 



lamacr ato 





am a c r a to 



..1j2- 



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The Petrel Follies 

OVERTURE — The Oglethorpe Orchestra under direction of Jeff McMillan. 

Scene 1— HAPPY DAYS. 

Nonnie Maugham, Jean Nutting, Alys Keiley, Clare Jones, Jessie Guer- 
ry, Peggy Smith, Lawson McAfee, Helen Carr, Elizabeth Stitt, Frances 
MacKirgan, Mary X. Gunter, Helen Boardman, Betty Crandall, Ruth 
Brooke. 

2_WHAT HAVE YOU. 

Paul Madden and Mary Buchanan. 

3_L0VE PARADE. 

Blanford Eubanks and Betty Crandall. 

Alice Blue Gown A.\kc Keiley 

Marie Marie McAfee 

K. K. Katv ' Kate Jenkins 

Jeanne ■/''"" Nutting 

Mary M<irii Black well 

4— MY MAN ON THE MAKE. 

Flossie Hill and Frank Inman, George Forrester, Almon Raines, George 
Gaillard, Billy James, Howard Martin, W. R. Massengale, Lorenzo Mas- 
sengale, Stuart Morris, Atwood Whittington, John Bitting, Buster 
Adams, Tom Daniel and Paul Madden. 

5_FL0RA DORA SEXTETTE. 

Martha Buchanan, Mildred Bradley, Gertrude Murray, Flossie Hill, 
Mary Blackwell, Betty Stribling, W. R. Massengale, Howard Martin, 
Paul Madden, George Forrester and Atwood Whittington. 

6_WHY? 

Comedy skit. 
7— IN OLD HOLLAND. 

Dutch chorus: Jean Nutting, Betty Crandall, Nonnie Maugham, Alys 
Keiley, Clare Jones, Billy James, George Gaillard, John Bitting, 
Howard Martin and Atwood Whittington. 

Tulip Time: Elizabeth Stitt and girl chorus. Flossie Hill, Mary Black- 
well, Kate Jenkins, Constance Adams, Peggy Smith, Lawson Mc- 
Afee, Helen Boardman, Martha Osborne, Frances McKirgan, Jes- 
sie Guerry, Betty Stribling and Helen Carr. 

Dutch Dance: Ruth Brooke and Frank Inman. 

8— WHEN A WOMAN LOVES A MAN. 

Eugenia Buchanan. 
9— THE BOWERY. 

Nonnie Maugham and Almon "Nammie" Raines. 

10_LOVE SET. 

Girls: Clare Jones, Elizabeth Stitt, Alys Keiley, Betty Crandall, Jessie 
Guerry, Jean Nutting, Frances MacKirgan, Helen Carr, Lawson 
McAfee. 

Boys: George Gewinner, Buster Adams, George Gaillard, Howard Mar- 
tin, Atwood Whittington, George Forrester, Lorenzo Massengale, 
John Bitting and Billy James. 




K^,, I a m a c r a tP 



11— MEASLES. 

Betty Crandall, Frank Inman, Paul Madden and Howard Martin. 
12— A STUDY IN GOLD AND BLACK. 

Miss Ruth Brooke and girl chorus; Flossie Hill, Helen Boardman, Kate 
Jenkins, Mary Blaekwell, Constance Adams, Peggy Smith, Lawson 
McAfee, Mildred Bradley, Betty Stribling, Martha Osborne, Mary X. 
Gunter. 

13— A BIT OF IRELAND. 
Almon "Nammie" Raines. 

14— LADIES FASHION PARADE. 

Clothes through the courtesy of J. P. Allen Co. 

15— MEN'S STYLE REVUE. 

Clothes through the courtesy of George Muse Clothing Co. 

16— FINALE OF FIRST ACT. 

Buster Adams and girl and boy chorus. 

INTERMISSION OF TEN MINUTES 

17— TEXAS GUINAN, GOTHAM NIGHT CLUB. 

Oglethorpe Orchestra on stage. 

Texas Guinan Mary Buchanan 

Head Waiter Frank Inman 

Assistant Waiter Paul Madden 

Check Room Girl Flossie Hill 

Another Check Girl Mary Blackivell 

Elmer Almoit "Nummie" Raines 

Elmira Nonnie Maugham 

And members from the Debutante Club. 

18— ALBANY BOUND. 

Porter Corn well Smith 

Old Lady ■ . ■ . ■ Jfl"'n""i"fi 

Bride ■S«'"y Crandall 

Groom -P""' Madden 

19_D0WN ON THE FARM. 

Blanford Eubanks and Kate Jenkins and girl and boy chorus. 

20— WELL! HEY! 

Comedy skit. 
21— ON BOARD THE S. S. STORMY PETREL. 

Doin' the Boom Boom — Earl Blaekwell and sailor chorus. 
Sailors' Sweetheart — girl and boy chorus. 
Yamacraw Stomp — Almon "Nammie" Raines. 

22— FINALE OF SHOW. 

With entire cast. 




]fmtnvtB 



i::-H*tri^_ 



'rff4#iV\ 




The Tower's Top 



Mrs. Crum: "Aren't you the same boy I gave a special piece of pie to 
the other day?" 

Jimmie Anderson: "No, mam, and the doctor says I never will be 



My brother is working with 5,000 men under him. 

Where? 

Mowing lawns in a cemetery. 

"Do you like music?" 

"I love music." 

"Do you like operettas?" 

"Some of them." 

"What kind of operettas do you like best?" 

"Telephone operettas." 

Gash — "You mean to say you don't care for expenses?" 
Carry — "No, thanks, I have plenty." 




Left — Mrs. Annie L. Crum, Matron. 

If you doubt her ability to prepare 

good foods just ask Dr. Jacobs or ^^ » 

Dan Kenzie. 

Right — Mrs. F. R. Poole. Besides 
being the house keeper, Aunt Sallie 
is a friend of all the boys and believes 
they are always in the right. 




r\ IB a m a c r a to 





Loitering 



The Sanctum 



Quart-ette 



THAT SOMETHING UNATTAINABLE 

Though I should be King of a thousand worlds 
Have all God has given to make life glad, 
Though I should have the love of a thousand girls 
Life for me must always be sad. 

It sometimes seems odd, the tricks nature plays. 
In limiting one's love to just one. 
And making that one love, the love that stays. 
Making or breaking a life just begun. 

To my heart it spelled break, in the highest degree, 
Brought misery no words can e'er tell. 
It took all the ideals in life from me 
And left it just one big HELL. 

Why not love another, someone may think. 
There's always another on down the line. 
Such thoughts only make my heart deeper sink. 
Knowing still better, she can never be mine. 




Words haven't been made that could 

half describe her ( i 

Nor music so sweet as her voice. 

Venus looks bad when standing beside 
her. 

She could be anyones choice. 




"ۥ 




B. V. D/ed 



Anemics 



The Chariot (campus.) 



She was the queen of a thousand dreams, 
The golden haired maiden you see. 
But in the soft gleam of the pale moon beams 
She turned to another — and away from me. 

It is just this that makes me pine 
And stop those dreams that were vain, 
Leaving nothing in life that I can call mine. 
Nothing to strive for, nothing to gain. 

Oh ! if I could but only forget, 
The days when I thought her so true 
There'd be nothing more for me to regret. 
Nothing in life to make it so blue. 

But why should I go to the trouble to tell 
Of the thing that is racking my brain 
Making me feel like a ghost of Hell, 
Driving me slowly, but surely insane. 




It is just to warn you of the aches in 

my heart 
Before the same happens to you. 
To let you know before I depart, 
1^ That a Maidens love is all TABOO. 

— Anonymous. 




Wn m a c r a t» 





era tt 



;.v-«^V 




^^>^.ys^^-m^^^' 




Silence 



Making what? T. N. T.! 



Silence and a reason. 



EXTRA-CURRICULUM 

In April far from pallid, bookish toils, 

Drifting with breezes in a pine bateau, 

And lulled by riplets whose vibrating coils 

Spanked the boat's flanks in rapid tremolo; 

My half-closed eyes, surveying the array. 

Looked up with recognition at the slopes, 

Whose mottled blossoms were whitecaps, which lay 

Around the turtles' heads, like periscopes; 

At torpid tadpoles, wriggling to be frogs. 

And in night's myriad chorus croak their woes, 

And goggle at the stars from miry bogs. 

A dragon fly sat sunning on my toes. 

Far off, I faintly heard, unreconciled. 

Chimes peal the hour for Bible class — and smiled. 

— Jim Hodges. 



9. 



1^ 



Reavis O'Neal: "What are you going 
to do with that fly paper?" 

Gordon "Scotty" MacGregor: "I'm 
going to take it to the print shop and 
have the Petrels printed on it so I can 
send the exchanges by air mail. 




-^^^:5^«:::<S5 



Lupton Hall 



Lowry Hall 



Administration Building 



SNOW 

Nature in her pious mood, 

An ivory rosary around her neck, 

Carpets the cloistered aisles of earth 

With evanescent velvet — 

Like moonlight 

Or pallid Damson petal rugs — 

Immaculate — 

Too pure, 

Too saintly and silvery sad 

For virgins feet — 

I think that God comes here to walk 

In the hushed silence after snow! 

—Otis DeWitt Lyle. 




Can you imagine Nonnie Maugham 
and "Scotty' 'MacGregor standing on a 
street corner with two slices of bread 
in each hand waiting for the traffic 
jam? 




I m a c r a to 





'Pcpsy's Pet' 



'Dreams Come True" 



Diligence 



Offisher, you'd better lock me up, just hit my wife over the head with 
a club. 

Did you kill her? 

Don't think sho. Thash why I want to be locked up. 
* * * * * 

Upon hearing the report that alcohol was in the air, the dean immediate- 
ly drew a long deep breath, and the exhalation of this tremendous gust of 
intoxicated ozone blew from the roll books the name of one of our football 
heroes. 

Co-ed: "Let's drive in the park." 

Joe College: "Naw, lets park in the drive." 

***** 
Miss Sallie: (Speaking to one of her boys,) "He has his mother's eyes." 
Mrs. Crum: "And his father's mouth." 
The boy's room-mate: "And his rcmmie's trousers." 



The guy who dubbed woman the weaker sex, must have been a sports 
writer. 





The H. N. Club 



The Petrel Roost 



t a m a c r a t» 








Libby Castle 



Armed for Action 



Di'. Jacobs: "Tom, my boy, what is your opinion of evolution?' 
Tcm Daniels: "It's a great idea, but can it be enforced?" 



For tlie fellow who would like to be cut off entirely from the outside 
world, we suggest that he try the Petrel Shop telephone booth. 



Bryson: "Does your girl know much about automobiles?" 
Bacon: "Heavens, no; she asked if I cooled my car by stripping the 
gears.'" 



Co-ed: "Why do they caU Patrick's feet camels?" 

Ed: "Because he lets them travel for days and days without water. 



And how about the Scotchman who left everything he had to the 
Orphan's home? 
What was that? 
Thirteen kids. 



Kl 




Ah! Grits! 



Don't Staht Nothin' 



:i5^ftf\ 



l| a m a c r a t» 





AiiuFrtiBpmpntB 



r^ 



^§0^^ 



^^^ 






V 






.1 




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lllpl 



c — VanNatta Studios 

THE BOK CARILLON 

(or Singing Tower) 
Mountain Lake, Florida 

Erected of Georgia Marlde and native Coquina 
Stone from /j/foi.s of Milton B. Meadry, Architect 




AtTKe 

Atlanta Biltmore 







VERY facility required by members of either 
Sororities, Fraternities and all other Student 
Societies is extended to assure the success of 
any occasion. The Georgian Ball Room, Pom- 
peian Room, Silver Room and Private dining 
i\ •^} — ^^^^ rooms are at your command. The environment 
^^^J IS ideal and the service courteous and efficient. We invite 
inquiries and will be glad to furnish information relative to ar- 
rangements for any occasion. 

OGLETHORPE CARS PASS RIGHT BY THE DOOR 

ATLANTA BILTMORE 

The South's Supreme Hotel 



9 



MILLION 

a day 




The pause that 
gives poise 



TO BE GOOD 



"'*' Pause 

that refreshes 

The Coca-Cola Co.. Atlanta. Ga. 
TO GET WHERE IT 









Your tongue 
tells when you 
need 

falotaDs 

^k TRADE MARK REG. -■ 

Coated tongue, dry mouth, 
bad breath, muddy skin, 
groggy nerves and sour 
stomach suggest its use. 











— 


JACOBS 

DRUG STORES ALL OVER ATLANTA 


-r 



USED GARS 

All makes, types, and 
prices 



WAlnut 1629 



R. H. Martin, Inc. 

270 Peachtree 



The Petrel Shop, Inc. 

'The Petrels' Roosting Ground' 



BOOKS AND SCHOOL 
SUPPLIES 



A t Your Serv 



ESTABLISHED 1832 

PHILADELPHIA 



SCHOOL PJNGS, EMBLEMS 
CHARMS AND TROPHIES 

Of The Better Kind 

The Gift Suggestion Book 

Mailed upon request. 

Illustycitions and Prices. 

Jewels, Watches, Clocks, Silver, 

China, Glass, Leather and 

Novelties 

from which may be selected distinctive 

Wedding, Birthday, Graduation and 

other gifts. 



MODERN 
AS YOUTH 
ITSELF! 




# Within the space of a score of yearS/ the scope of Southwestern Engraving 
Company has increased from the parent plant in Fort Worth to an organiza- 
tion of nine plants. 

Pioneering the field in the introduction of modernistic art, a personal service 
bureau composed of former college annual editors and managers, the budget 
and dummy system, and field service men, the name Southwestern has be- 
come synonymous with art motifs that arc distinctive, an understanding, helpful 
service, and printing plates that print right. 



THE SOUTHWESTERN ENGRAVING COMPANY 

FORT WORTH TULSA ATLANTA DALLAS HOUSTON SAN ANTONIO BEAUMONT AMARILLO WICHITA FALLS 



'.Vi-^^^' Many new staffs turn each year to SWECO S 
|t«.^^*( corps oP artists, personalized service, and en- 



^^lii<^ graving technicians for fresh ideas, newer layouts, 
Mi.»!i<^^i!,il and modern methods in year book production. 



NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE 
INSURANCE COMPANY 

212-33 Candler Bldg. 




R. 1 QUINN 

General Agent 

FRED R. SNOOK 

special Representative 



Chartered in 18 35 



Almost a century of fair dealing 
and faithful performance 



TUBBY WALTON'S FILLING STATION 

Our One Aim is to Please our Customers 

We Appreciate the Patronage of Oglethorpe Students 

REAL HOME COOKED FOOD 



Carolina Sandwiches 

Good Sandwiches — Good Service 



Phone Jackson 1959 



PARTY ORDERS — SANDWICHES FOR 
ALL OCCASIONS. 



D. E. PiNKARD 
GARMENT CLEANERS 

Valetor — Pressing — Repairing 

Office and Plant School Representative 

3112 Peachtree Rd. dan kenzie 

Telephone Cherokee 1587 & 1588 



Headquarters For 

KODAKS and SUPPLIES 

Bring U.: Your Films for Development 
Correct developing mean3 belter Pictures 

Eastman Kodak Stores, Inc. 

"The Large Kodak Store" 

1S3 PEACHTREE ST. 








Compliments Of 




=^^ ^1 




LYON 


-STARBIRD, 


INC. 






Radios — 


Phonographs — 


Records 




157 


Peachtree St., N. E. 


Walnut 2172 


Next to Loew'g 


Grand 





Photographers For 
The 1930 Yamacraw 



E LLIO TT S' 

Peachtree Studio 

'Better Photographs' 



Paramount Theatre Bldg. 
Atlanta 



Earnest G. Beaudry 



£^^ 



Established 1916 

CARS SERVICE PARTS 



EXCLUSIVE 
TWENTY-FOUR HOUR SERVICE 



IVy 0446 



Service Entrance Sales Entrance 

168 Wultov Street leg Marietta Street 



Geo. a. Clayton Co. 

ENGINEERS AND CONTACTORS 

Bona Allen Bldg. 

ATLANTA, GEORGIA. 



"Builders of He 



Stadi 



THE DRIV&INN 

Sandwiches of all Kinds 

AT BUCKHEAD 



COMPLIMENTS OF 


GEORGE T. BRADLEY 


JOHN H. BRADLEY, JR. ' 


DAN A. HINSON 


JAMES D'ARCY 


BURDETT REALTY CO. 


CARL V. HANCOCK 


MRS. EULALIA WARREN 


BALDWIN MARKET 


HART'S TEA AND CAKE SHOP 


MR. ROBERT J. GUINN 


BRADSHAW FISH CO. 


MR. & MRS. W. H. S. HAMILTON 


VANITY FAIR TEA ROOM 


MR. & MRS. J. W. SNOOK 


OBY BREWER (Muse's) 


LA GRANDE JEWELRY CO. 


JULIA CLENDENIN (Balfour's) 


CANDLER BLDG., SODA CO. 


ORIGINAL SANDWICH SHOP 


BAMES, INC. 


THE LELAND-GRANT CO. 


A. L. ZACHRY 


CAROLINE'S 


COMMUNITY SHOPPE 



City Ice 

Delivery Company 

267 Peachtree —'^'^ WAlnut 1287 



Gompliments of 



Oglethorpe University Press 

Oglethorpe University, Georgia