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Full text of "Yamacraw, 1931"

d 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/yamacraw193109ogle 




Helen Mary Boardman 
Editor-in-Chief 



Frank M. Inman, Jr. 
Business Manager 



.^amacmm. 

mil 



Published Annually 

BY THE 

SENIOR CLASS 

Oglethorpe University 

Oglethorpe University, Georgia 



ft-j 





'" ^. 











£\€M.m 



April Sadness 

by 
Ernest Hartsock 

How sweet it shall be soon 
To lie beneath moist grass 

Under a white-flowered moon 
Where no men pass. 

Then place no carven stone 
To watch my eternal bed, 

I long to lie alone 
When I am dead. 

When I have had my day 
Of mortal loves and care, 

The rose from my decay 
May blossom there. 

Then I shall give the sod 

Return for life's pale star — 

A rose is closer God 

Than angels are 

[Editor's Note — This poem, written by Mr. Hurtsock, is 
strangely prophetic of the author's sudden untimely death] 




EKNEST HARTSOCK 



May 5, 1903 



■^# 



Dedication 

A modern poet sings of one who 

cannot die, for loveliness 

Is an eternal thing. 

So shall the two friends of Oglethorpe Univer- 
sity, to whom this issue of the Yamacraw is grate- 
fully and affectionately dedicated, Dr. and Mrs. 
J. T. Lupton of Chattanooga, survive the centuries 
because of the beauty which they have created and 
have bestowed upon future generations to be their 
inheritance forever. 

Because of these two beloved and honored 
friends, an Institution of learning, built upon the 
lofty ideals of the great leader who founded the 
Commonwealth of Georgia, is enabled to extend its 
sphere of usefulness, and to look forward to a fu- 
ture of increased service and achievement. 

So always shall the achievements of Oglethorpe's 
mcst illustrious alumni embody something of the 
great vision that abides in these two revered and 
beneficient friends, from whom the Lupton School 
of Liberal Arts derives its name. 



■^ 



Foreword 



Throughout all ages there has been some one 
person or group of persons who, possesced of a 
greater spirit of initiative than the rest, has gone 
ahead to hew out the path which his followers must 
take. On these valient ones, who have given un- 
stintedly of their all, we have bestowed the name 
of pioneers. 

Nowhere among the annals of this University 
can there be found the name of any two persons 
who have so typified the pioneer spirit as Dr. and 
Mrs. J. T. Lupton, to whom this book is dedicated. 
Through their unselfishness Oglethorpe was given 
its start. 

Having this idea ever before us, we have chosen 
this theme of pioneers and have used the various 
pioneers to be found in American history as motifs 
for the division pages. 



Table of Contents 

I. University 
II. Classes 

III. Athletics 

IV. Organizations 
V. Beauty 

VI. Features 




l':!;:.dSM^*ai,«: 




Facult^ 




DR. THORNWELL JACOBS, A.B., A.M.. LL.D., Litt.D, 
President Oglethorpe University 



OGLETHOF 




DR. JAMES FREEMAN SELLERS, A.B., A.M., LL.D.. 
Dean Oglethorpe University 




JAMES FREEMAN SELLERS 

Dean of University and Dean of 
School of Science 

A.B. and A.M. University of Mis- 
sissippi, LL.D. Missippi College, Grad- 
uate University of Virginia and Uni- 
versity of Chicago, Teaching Fellow 
University of Chicago, Professor of 
Chemistry, Mississippi College and 
Mercer University, Professor of 
Chemistry, A. E. F. University, 
Beaune, France, Y. M. C. A. secre- 
tary of education, England, Fellow 
American Association for the Advancement of Science, President Georgia 
Section American Chemical Society, Author Treatise on Analytical Chem- 
istry, Contributor to Scientiiic and Religious Journals. 



EARL SHEPHERD 

Professor of Biology 

B.S. Oglethorpe University, Mem- 
ber Blue Key, honorary fraternity. 
Boar's Head, President of Student 
Body, Winner of Coat of Arms, Le 
Conte honorary scientific society. Ed- 
itor of Yamacraw, founder of the 
Oglethorpe chapter of the Order of 
Pipers and member of Delta Sigma 
Phi fraternity. 




uuri 



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Ir^^n 



HERMAN JULIUS GAERTNER 



Dean of the School of Education and 
Professor of German and Education 



IT 

^^^H^K 49WHHL '^''^' I'^di^'^^ University, A.M. Ohio 

^^■K^ ^^P^»^ Wesleyan University; Ped.D., Ohio 

^^^^n ^^n^ Northern University; Teacher and 

PH^^ *«-««»«■ Superintendent in the Common 

*■ '-'- Schools of Ohio and Georgia ; Pro- 

^, ^ vti^^ k fessor of Mathematics and Astron- 

H^b- ^B^^ ^^L omy, Wilmington, Ohio; Professor of 

^H^^gtfH '^P^ ^^^B^ History, Georgia Normal and Indus- 

^^^^^^p/jl^ ^^^^^H trial College, Milledgeville, Georgia, 

'"^^^^^^ Member of the University Summer 

School Faculty, University of Geor-gia, six summers; Pi Gamma Mu; 

Assistant in organization of Oglethorpe University. 



WILLIAM PEW BRANDON 

Professor in School of Commerce 

B.Ph. Emory University, M.A. Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, Professor 
of History and Economics Southern 
College 1925-26, Instructor in His- 
tory University of North Carolina 
1927-29; Associate Professor of His- 
tory College of the City of Asheville 
North Carolina 1929-30, Member 
American Historical Association, Na- 
tional Geographic Society, Phi Delta 
Theta Fraternity and Captain Of- 
ficers Reserve. 




!^ 



^ 




JOHN A. ALDRICH 

Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

A.B. Albion College; M.S. Univer- 
sity of Michigan ; Ph.D. University of 
Michigan; Member of Sigma Xi, of 
American Astronomical Society, of 
American Association of University 
Professors; Fellow of American As- 
sociation for the Advancement of 
Science; Professor of Physics and 
Astronomy, Olivet College; Profes- 
sor of Physics and Astronomy, 
Washburn College. 



JAMES A. ROUTH 

Dean of the School of Literature and 
Journalism and Professor of English 

A.B. and Ph.D. Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity; Tocqueville Medallist, Johns 
Hopkins University; Winner Century 
Magazine Essay Prize for American 
College Graduate of 1900; Phi Beta 
Kappa; Sub-Editor Century Diction- 
ary Supplement, N. Y. 1905; Profes- 
sor University of Texas and Wash- 
ington University, Acting Assistant 
Professor Tulane University; Pro- 
fessor of English Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity Summer School 1921-22, 25-26; Member Modern Language As- 
sociation, National Council of Teachers of English and American Dialect 
Society, Author Two Studies on the Ballad Theory of Beowulf, The Rise 
of Classical English, etc. 




r 



CxEORGE FREDERICK 
NICOLASSEN 

9, Dean of the School of Liberal Arts 

, ^.1 and Professor of Ancient Languages 

^^*i^PW\^^ A.B. University of Virginia; A.M. 

'*? University of Virginia; Fellow in 

^ ■* . Greek, Johns Hopkins University, 

..-w-aj^^^jf- two years; Assistant Instructor in 

"^-^^Hp ^ Latin and Greek in Johns Hopkins 

^ T^HajHIP^ ^ ^m University one year ; Professor in 

JHHHH ^Pl^^ ^B^^ Ancient Languages in the Southwes- 

^^^^^V ^jt ,^fl^H| ^^^^ Presbyterian University, Clarks- 

^^^^^B ^^9*^ J^^^^^M Tenn; Ph.D. Johns Hopkins 

University ; Vice Chancellor of the 

Southwestern Presbyterian University; Member Classical Association of 

the Middle West and South; Author of Notes on Latin and Greek, Greek 

Notes Revised, The Book of Revelation. 



HILERY E. BRYSON 

Professor of Accounting and Book- 
keeping 

A.B. Oglethorpe University; In- 
structor in Accounting, Oglethorpe 
University, two years. 






^OC 



^-^ 



MARK BURROWS 

Dean of the School of Commerce and 
Department of Secretarial Prepar- 
ation 

B.S. Stanberry Normal School; 
A.B. State Teachers College, Kirks- 
ville, Missouri; A.M. Oglethorpe Uni- 
versity; Teacher and Superintendent 
in the Public and High Schools in 
Missouri; Director Department of 
Commerce State Teachers' College, 
Kirksville; Professor of Rural Edu- 
cation in University of Wyoming and 
in State Teachers' Colleges at Kirksville and Greely, Colorado; Editor, 
School Messenger and the Community, and Author Tractates on Educa- 
tion; Member of National Geographic Society and National Academy of 
Visual Education; Ped.D., Oglethorpe University. 




FRANCISCO R. PEREZ 

Professor Modern Languages 

A.M. University of Havana; Book- 
keeper Degree, London Metropolitan 
School. 




^ 




MYRTA THOMAS 

Librarian 

Graduate Carnegie Library School 
of Atlanta, Georgia ; Librarian 
Mitchell College, Statesville, North 
Carolina. 



CHARLES G. REEVES 

Professor of Business Administra- 
tion School of Commerce 

A.B. University of North Carolina, 
A.M. University of North Carolina, 
Teaching Fellow in Economics, Okla- 
homa A and M ; Fellow in Economics, 
Professor in Economics Georgetown 
University. 




'^ 




ERNEST HARTSOCK 

Professor of Poetics 

A.B. and A.M. Emory University ; 
Fellow in English Emory University ; 
Instructor in Latin Emory Univer- 
sity; Instructor in English Georgia 
School of Technology; Editor of Bo- 
zart and Contemporary Verse, Vice- 
President Empire Poetry League of 
Great Britain, Member Poetry So- 
ciety of Georgia; Honorary Member 
of Poetry Society of Alabama; and 
Winner of Annual Award, Poetry So- 
ciety of America 1929. 



FRITZ PAUL ZIMMER 

Professor of Fine Arts 

A.B. Royal Academy of Commer- 
cial Art, Stuttgart, Wittenburg, Ger- 
many, Assistant Professor Art Insti- 
tute, Stuttgart, Instructor in Urania 
Art School for Commercial Art, Zur- 
ich, Switzerland; Studied Architec- 
ture in Rome, Florence and Ravena, 
and member of Secession Artes, club 
which all the famous artists of 
Europe are invited to join. 




^-^O 




MARY BRENT WHITESIDE 

Successor to Ernest Hartsock, Pro- 
fessor of Poetics 

Lucy Cobb Institute, Athens, Ga., 
Graduate work in English at Colum- 
bia University, HonoraiT Litt. De- 
gree Oglethorpe University, Editor 
Southern Literary Magazine, 1923-24, 
Member Editorial Staff The Step 
Ladder, Chicago, Ballad Prize by 
London Poetry Review, 1925, Prize 
of Poetry Society of Virginia, 1927, 
Sterling Memorial Prize, 1928, Inter- 
national Prize, Editor Bozart, Contemporary Verse, Stepladder, official or- 
gan of International Order of Bookfellows, and Westminster, Book Editor 
of Oglethorpe University. 



FRANK B. ANDERSON 

Athletic Director of University 

A.B. University of Georgia, Assis- 
tant Professor of Mathematics and 
Athletic Director, University School 
for Boys, Assistant Professor of 
Mathematics and Athletic Director, 
R. E. Lee Institute, Assistant pro- 
fessor of Mathematics and Athletic 
Director Gordon Institute and River- 
side and Coach, University of Geor- 
gia. 




^ 




EARL BLACKVVELL 

Director of Dramatics 

A.B. Oglethorpe University, Dra- 
matic course at Columbia University, 
devisor and producer of the Petrel 
Follies. 



R. E. WALKER 
Bursar 





I f^ pi e% 

STUDENT INSTRUCTORS 

Top Row — Wills, Biology; Boardman, Biology; and Murray, Chemistry. 

Second Row — Woodall, Typing; Higgins, Botany; and Brogdon, Typing. 

Third Row — Simpson, Physics; Zaidee Ivy, secretary to Bursar; and Merritt, Sten- 
ographic. 

Fourth Row — Davenport, Chemistry; Sewell, Accounting; and Osborne, Secretary to 
Dr. Burrows. 



THE PRAYER OF OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY 

Father of Wisdom, Master of the Schools of Men, of 
Thine all-knowledge grant me this my Prayer; that 

I MAY BE wise IN THEE. SiNK THOU MY FOUNDATIONS 
DOWN DEEP INTO THY BOSOM UNTIL THEY REST UPON THE 
VAST ROCK OF THY COUNSEL. LiFT THOU MY WALLS INTO 
THE CLEAR EMPYREAN OF THY TRUTH. CoVER ME WITH THE 
WINGS THAT SHADOW FROM ALL HARM. LAY MY THRESHOLD 
IN HONOR AND MY LINTELS IN LOVE. SET ThOU MY FLOORS 
IN THE CEMENT OF UNBREAKABLE FRIENDSHIP AND MAY MY 
WINDOWS BE TRANSPARENT WITH HONESTY. LEAD THOU UN- 
TO ME, Lord God, those whom Thou hast appointed to 

BE MY CHILDREN, AND WHEN THEY SHALL COME WHO WOULD 
LEARN OF ME THE WISDOM OF THE YEARS, LET THE CRIMSON 
OF MY WINDOWS GLOW WITH THE LIGHT OF THE WORLD. LET 
THEM SEE, O MY LOED, HiM WHOM THOU HAST SHOWN ME; 
LET THEM HEAR HiM WHOSE VOICE HAS WHISPERED TO ME 
AND LET THEM REACH OUT THEIR HANDS AND TOUCH HiM 
Who HAS GENTLY LED ME UNTO THIS GOOD DAY. ROCK-RIB- 
BED MAY I STAND FOR ThY TrUTH. LeT THE STORMS OF 
EVIL BEAT ABOUT ME IN VAIN. MAY I SAFELY SHELTER THOSE 
WHO COME UNTO ME FROM THE WINDS O? ERROR. LET THE 
LIGHTNING THAT LIES IN THE CLOUD OF IGNORANCE BREAK 
UPON MY HEAD IN DESPAIR. MAY THE YOUNG AND THE PURE 
AND THE CLEAN-HEARTED PUT THEIR TRUST SECURELY IN ME 
NOR MAY ANY THAT EVER COME TO MY HALLS FOR GUIDANCE 
BE SENT ASTRAY. LET THE BLUE ASHLARS OF MY BREAST 
THRILL TO THE HAPPY SONGS OF THE TRUE-HEARTED AND MAY 
THE VERY HEART OF MY CAMPUS SHOUT FOR JOY AS IT FEELS 
THE TREAD OF THOSE WHO MARCH FOR GOD. ALL THIS I PrAY 

Thee; and yet this more: That there may be no stain 
UPON MY stones, forever. Amen. 



lor 




M' 



Officers Of The Senior Class 



John Turk President 

Gertrude Muruay Vice-President 

Alan Ritz Secretary and Treasurer 

SPEAKERS AT COMMENCEMENT 

Paul Bacon Salutatorian 

Zaidee Ivy Valedictorian 



PRANK M. INMAN, JR. 

K A 

Atlanta 

COMMERCE 

Lords Club; Blue Key; Boars Head; Players Club 
'Z, 3, 4; Student Faculty Council 3; Business Mgr. 
Yamacraw 4; Freshman Football Squad; Petrel 
Follies 1, 2, 3. 



JAMES W. ANDERSON, JR. 

"Jimmie" 

Griffiin, Ga. 

i: \ 

COMMERCE 

Matriculated from Dahlonega 1928; Lords Club; 
Boar's Head; Asst. Editor of Yamacraw 4; Players 
Club 3, 4; Petrel Follies 2; Stray Greek Club 2, 3, 
4; Glee Club 2. 

HELEN MARY PERKINS BOARDMAN 

"Dr. Helen" 

Atlanta, Ga. 

K A 

LITERATURE AND JOURNALISM 

Sec. and Treas. of Junioi Cass; Co-ed Representa- 
tive 3; Class Vice-Pres. 1; Petrel Follies 2, 3; Play- 
ers Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Vice-Pres. Players Club 3, 4; 
Debate Council 2, 3, 4; Biology Lab. Instructor 3, 
4; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Reporter for Stormy Petrel 
1, 2; Assistant Editor 3; Society Reporter 4; Editor 
in Chief of Yamacraw 4; Honor Roll 1, 2, 3, 4. 

ALAN S. RITZ 

"Al" 

Kendall, New York 

n K * 

EDUCATION 

Matriculated from Cornell Jan., 1930; Asst. Base- 
ball Mgr. 3; Baseball Mgr. 4; Boars Head; Pres- 
ident of Student Faculty Council 4; Asst. Business 
Mgr. of Yamacraw 4; Secretary and Treas. of 
Senior Class; Boxing 4; Zeta Upsilon. 






.^f^ 



CHARLES LL. McKISSICK 

"Mac" 

Carrabelle, Fla. 

ALT 

SCIENCE 

Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Captain 4; Track 2, 3; President 
01 the "O'' Club 4; Lab. Instructor in Physics 4; 
LeConte. 



ZAIDEE IVEY 
Atlanta, Ga. 

COMMERCE 

Players Club 1; Honor Roll 2, 3, 4; Coat of Arms 
3. 4; Asst. tc Bursar and Registrar 3, 4; Phi Kappa 
Delta. 



HAROLD ADAMS 

"Muddy" 

Lavonia, Ga. 

e K N 

COMMERCE 

Freshman Football; Varsity Football Squad 2, 3, 4; 
Freshman Baseball; Varsity Baseball Squad 2, 3, 
4; "O" Club; Knights of the Pipe. 



JOHN P. TURK 

"Seiuor" 

Nelson, Ga. 

ALT 

SCIENCE 

President of Senior Class; President of Junior 
Class; Student-Faculty Council 2; Freshman Bas- 
ketball; LeConte; Pres. 3; Phi Kappa Delta; 
Knights of the Pipe; Blue Key; Alchemist Club. 



.^ 




ELIZABETH H. ARNOLD 

"Bettie" 

Decatur, Ga. 

LITERATURE AND JOURNALISM 

Players Club 2, 3, 4. 



ZELAN T. WILLS 

"Zeke" 

Smyrna, Ga. 

LITERATURE AND JOURNALISM 

Biology Lab. Instructor 2, 3, 4; LeConte. 



RUTH FROST ^^°^^^-= ^"S3r ->- 

"Jack" 
Atlanta, Georgia 

EDUCATION 

Basketball 1; Captain 2; Champion Intramural 
Debating 1, 2; Most Athletic Coed 4. 



ABRAHAM GERMAINE 

Russia 

EDUCATION 






MARTHA JEAN OSBORNE 
"Jean" 
Atlanta 



Ji 



Duchesn Club; Petrel Follies 3; Basketball; Asst. 
Instructor in Secretarial Preparation. 



THEODORE FULTON, JR. 

"Curly" 

A 2 ■]' 

Atlanta, Ga. 

COMMERCE 

Freshman Baseball Mgr. 2; Varsity Baseball Mgr. 
3; Freshman Football Squad; Varsity Football 2, 
3, 4; Sec. and Treas. Junior Class; "O" Club. 



TOM DANIEL, JR. 

"Tom" 

Atlanta 

K .\ 

COMMERCE 

Lordfi Club; Players Club; Petrel Follies. 



PAUL BACON 
A :: 'I. 

COMMERCE 

Vice President Sophomore Class; Student Faculty 
Council 2; Pres. of Student Body 4; Boars Head 4; 
Business Mgr. of Stormy Petrel 3, 4; Yamacraw 
Staff 3, 4; Chairman of Debate Council; Zeta Up- 
silon. 



dm^i^- 




JAMES CHU 
New York City 

EDUCATION 

Matriculated from Columbia University 19o0. 



MARGARET VARDAMAN 

"Vardy" 

Atlanta, Ga. 

1! * A 

EDUCATION 

Glee Club 1, 2, 4; Co-ed Basketball 1, 2; Players 
Club 1, 2, 4; Asst. in Mathematics 2, 4. 



LESTER L. ELSBERRY ^ 
"Les" 
Wimauma, Fla. 

COMMERCE 

Matriculated from Stetson University '29. 



WILLIAM J. DEAL 

"Oodc" 

Statesboro, Ga. 

e K X 

Orchestre, 2, 3, 4; Band 2, 3, 4; Debate Council 3, 4; 

Glee Club 2., 4; Players Club 3. 






CLAUDE HERRIN 

"Claudie" 

Winder, Ga. 

n K * 






COMMERCE 

Freshman Baseball; Varsity Football 2, 3, 4; Capt. 
4; Freshman Baseball; Varsity Baseball 2, 3, 4; 
Freshman Track; Vice-Pres. of "0" Club; Treas. 
oi' Freshman and Sophomore Class; Zeta Upsilon. 



BETTY WHITTAKER 

Fayetteville, Tenn. 

EDUCATION 

Matriculated from Middle Tennessee State Teach- 
err.' College, Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Also at- 
tended Bryson College, Fayeteville, Tennessee. 



ARCHIE MORGAN 

i^g', , "Archie" 

Fair Mount, Ga. 

EDUCATION 

Knights of the Pipe; Junior Class Historian; Play- 
ers Club 3, Glee Club 2. 



ELIZABETH MERRITT 
"L. B." 
Atlanta, Ga. 
A Z 

EDUCATION 

Duchess Club 4; Petrel Follies 4; Co-Ed Council 4; 
Intramural Basketball 4. 



.^•l 




NATHAN MANN 

"Geo)'gia" 

Atlanta, Georgia 

M.A. BIOLOGY 

E.S. from C. C. N. Y. ; Bio-Chemistry Club; Canoe- 
ing Club; Intra-Mural Swimming; Wrestling; 
Track; Debate Club. 



FRANK DAVENPORT 

"Speedy" 

Anniston, Ga. 

ALT 

SCIENCE 

LeConte; Alchemist Club; Knights of the Pipe; As- 
sistan': Lib.; Asst. Instructor in Biology; Asst. 
Chemistry Instructor. 



WILLIE WOODALL 
'■Willie" 
Atlanta 
]? <I> A 



COMMERCE 



Glee Club 1, 2; Debate Council 2, 3; Asst. Instructor 
oi Secretarial Dept. 2, 3; Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3; 
Treas. Inter-Sorority Council 3. 



EDWARD EMERSON 

"Ed" 

Birmingham, Ala. 

A 2 ^t 

Freshman Baseball; Succeeding Editor of Yam- 

acraw 3; Oglethorpe Representative of Georgia 

Placement; Board of Colleges; Alabama Club; "Head 

Hash Hiker." 







m^ 



BEN I. SIMPSON JR. 



Atlanta 
H K X 

LITERATURE AND JOURNALISM 

Blut Kev; Editor ot Stormy Petrel 4; Physics In- 
structor 4; Players Club 2, 3, 4. 

GERTRUDE MURRAY 
"Gertie" 

K -i 
Atlanta 

SCIENCE 

Vice President of Student Body 4; Vice President 
01 Senior Class; Historian of Senior Class; Sec. of 
Pan Hellenic Council 4; Co-ed Mother 3, 4; Co-ed 
Representative 1, 2; Debate Council 2, 3, 4; Duchess 
Club 2, 3, 4; Players Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Alchemist Club 
i:, 3, 4; Co-ed Council 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Faculty 
Council 3. 4; Asst. Biology Instructor 2; Asst. 
Chemistry Instructor 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3. 

ALBERT CHURCH 

"AV 

Orlando, Florida 

A i; * 

COMMERCE 

Freshman minstrels; Petrel Follies 1, 2; Freshman 
Football; Varsity Football 2, 3, 4; Zeta Upsilon; 
Rebels Club. 



ERNEST H. GOLDEN 

"Kid" 

Rockmart, Ga. 

A 2 $ 

COMMERCE 

Alcemist Club; Club; Fresman Baseball; Var- 
sity Baseball 2, 3, 4; Alternate Capt. Baseball 4; 
Freshman Basketball; Varsity Basketball 2, 3; Var- 
sity Football 4. 




THELMA BROGDON 

■T" 

Buford, Ga. 

EDUCATION 

Matriculated from LaGrange College '28; Glee Club 
i;, 3, 4; Secretarial Instructor 4. 



DAVID THERRELL 

"Dave" 
Atlanta, Ga. 
i: X 
Varsity Football 2, 3, 4; Varsity Basketball 2, 
Stray Greek Club 2, 3^ 4. 



HARRY LAST 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SCIENCE 

Lab. Instructor in Organic Chemistry 3; Librarian 
3; Inorganic Lab. Instructor 4; Lab. Instructor in 
Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis 4; LeConte. 



FRANK MACKEY 

"Mac" 

Camden, South Carolina 



Rebel Club; Palmetto Club. 





,0^ A 




ELLIECE JOHNSON 

A.M. EDUCATION 

Atlanta, Georgia 




MRS. HAZEL SEAVY 

A.B. EDUCATION 

Atlanta, Georgia 



T. C. SWEETS 

A.B. EDUCATION 

Atlanta, Ga. 



MARY CLARY 

A.B. EDUCATION 

Atlanta, Georgia 



ii r~- 




K-' 



MARY CORLEY 

A.B. EDUCATION 

Atlanta, Georgia 



MRS. C. J. McELHENEY 

A.B. EDUCATION 

Atlanta, Georgia 



ROBERT E. CARROL 

A.B. EDUCATION 

Atlanta, Georgia 



PEGGY GREENWOOD 

A.B. EDUCATION 

Atlanta, Georgia 




-^li 





MIRIAM S. LEVY 

A.B. EDUCATION 

Atlanta, Georgia 



WU. 



ANNIE MARY FULLER 

A.B. EDUCATION 

Atlanta, Georgia 



tm 




^ 



X 



fih 



A Chemical Analysis 

or (A Chemistry Laboratory Report) 

Name — Gertrude Murray Date— May 24, 1931 

Class — Senior Section — 1-4 

Experiment No. — 1 1 

Title— Class of '31 

Object of experiment: To study the properties and activities of the class of '31. 

Apparatus and material: 182 boys and girls registered at Oglethorpe University, 
Georgia, September 1927. 

Method and observation: Some 182 freshmen were put into solution. The actions and 
reactions of this human mass of chemical composition are recorded under (a), (b), 
(c), and (d). 

(a) A meeting of the class was held after breaking away from the superior soph- 
omores, temporarily. They quietly and sanely elected Clifford Pryor leader; Charles 
Tatum, Vice-President; Curley Fulton, Secretary and Claude Herrin, Treasurer. 

They began working vigorously, first with the traditional "Freshman Minstrel" and 
the Coed Tea. Then came football, baseball, basketball, the names: Al Church, Cur- 
ley Fulton, "Kid" Golden, Charlie McKissick, Clifford Pryor and Charles Tatum gave 
promise to be bright objects in the future. 

(b) The second year was quite active. The molecules were less in number, some 
had been precipitated out by the faculty and other agents. Glenn Bridges was elected 
leader; Robert Beasley, Vice-President; Claude Herrin, Secretary and Treasurer. 

The class contributed splendid material to the field of athletics. Herrin, Fulton, 
Riddle, Therrell, Holcombe, Kimbrell, Golden, Rabon, Church, Adams, Woodward, 
Brooks, Everett, and many others. 

The names of many of the class appeared on the rolls of the Glee Club, Petrel Fol- 
lies, Players Club and Orchestra. 

At this early age the importance of the class was beginning to be realized in that 
the names of Turk, McKissick, Bridges were found on the LeConte; Murray, Daven- 
port, Turk and Golden on the Alchemist rolls. On the Petrel staffs Hedges and Wood. 
The first women to be admitted to the debate council, Boardman and Murray. 

(cj Noted action continued in the third year of the experiment. The leader for this 
year was John Turk; Curley Fulton, Vice-President; Helen Boardman, Secretary and 
Treasurer. 

In athletics, football, Fulton, McKissick, Herrin, Woodward, Kratz, Golden, Adams; 
basketball, Herrin, Golden; baseball, Kimbrell, Holcombe, Rabon, Adams, Herrin; 
track, McKissick and Woodward; coed basketball, Murray, Boardman, Frost and Wyle. 

Gertrude Murray was the first coed to be elected Coed Mother in her Junior year. 

(d) The last part of this experiment which is nearing completion was started by 
electing John Turk, leader; Gertrude Murray, Vice-President; Allen Ritz, Secretary 
and Treasurer. The class has been filtered down to 37. Although a group small in 
number every particle is active. Charlie McKissick, captained the Stormy Petrels of 
1930 to many victories. Herrin captained the baseball. 

This class is most distinguished in having Helen Boardman the first coed to edit the 
Yamacraw and the first coed editor of the South; Zaidee Ivey, the first coed to be 
valedictorian; D. H. Overton, head of intramural athletics, Paul Bacon, President of 
the Student Body and Salutatorian; Gertrude Murray, Coed Mother; Allan Ritz, Pres- 
ident of the Student Faculty Council; Elizabeth Merritt, President of the Coed Faculty 
Council; Claude Herrin, a three letter man. 



OG 




Zaidee Ivey, wearer of the Coat-of-Arms sweater, and John Turk are members of 
Phi Kappa Delta honorary scholastic fraternity. 

IVIembers of the class who held positions as instructors are: Helen Boardman, Harry 
Last, Thelma Brogdon, Charles McKissick, Martha Jean Osborne, Margaret Vardeman, 
Zelan Wills, Gertrude Murray, Frank Davenport and Willie Woodall. 

Wearers of the "O": Harold Adams, Al Church, Curley Fulton, Ernest Golden, 
Claude Herrin, Charles McKissick and Hoke Bell. 

Wearers of the "O. U." are: Ruth Frost, Helen Boardman, Gertrude Murray. 

On the LeConte Roll this year Frank Davenport, President; Turk, Harry Last, Ze- 
lan Wills. 

Discussion and conclusion: The class of '31 contains many priceless properties in 
its members whom this experiment proved have worked honestly, courageously, and 
conscientiously for their class in college. 

Active from the beginning, it was noticed that the action increased steadily as time 
went on. 

Although the class was a most successful experiment, only the high points have been 
recorded. It unquestionably proved the class of '31 to be a well balanced equation, 
bringing credit and honor to themselves, their class, faculty, and their Alma Mater. 



lORPE J 



u u nj o 




f> 



AW^ 



w 




Ji-u 



OGLETHORPE 



J 



History of the Junior Glass 

By Eugenia Patterson 

From 98 in 1929-30 to 49 in 1930-31 is, no doubt, another result of the well-known 
depression. At any rate, this is tne number to which the class of 1932 has shrunk. 

But of those who remain, we have many who have been outstanding during the whole 
of the history of this class. 

Ever since Freshman days, Parker Bryant, newly-elected captain of the Stormy 
Petrels of 1931, "Dapper" Myers, alternate captain, Frank Anderson, Jr., Chick Gard- 
ner, Paul Goldsmith and Lefty Sypert, have been shining on the gridiron. 

In Baseball, thanks to no efforts of its own, the class of 1932 has lasting distinction, 
for wherever the prowess of Luke Appling, Crackers 1930, White Sox 1931, is known 
every member of this class will remember that he once represented us on our 5's, 9's, 
and ll's, Oglethorpe's three major sports. 

But the class of '32 still has representation on the Petrel nine in Charlie Mitchell, 
first-string pitcher, Frank Anderson, Jr., regular second-baseman, Lefty Sypert, the 
Birds' only southpaw, and Parker Bryant, who holds down first base. 

Due to a change in the plan of intercollegiate athletics at Oglethorpe, the usual 
season of basket ball was replaced by a series of inter-fraternity contests. But here 
again the class of '32 had its place in the limelight, with John Hallman and JeiT 
McMillan being selected by the officials for the all-star team. Among the co-eds, Mar- 
garet Vardaman, Christine Bost, and Eugenia Patterson were judged worthy of a 
place on the Co-ed five. 

Betty Crandall and Ben Simpson appeared in the first Players Club production of 
the season, "The Coming of Peg," and both are now helping to make the Petrel Follies 
of 1931 the usual hit. Other Juniors appearing in the Follies are Jane Kops, Betty 
Greaves, Edith Marshall, Marie Shaw, who assists Ben Simpson as manager, and 
Eugenia Patterson. 

On the Debate Council we have Reavis O'Neal and William Higgins. The members 
of the Junior Class who have been pledged to Phi Kappa Delta are Mary Williamson, 
Marie Shaw, and Eugenia Patterson. 

In the recent Who's Who contest held on the campus, Betty Crandall was elected 
the most popular girl, and Mary Williamson, the most intellectual girl. 

Jeff McMillan is the leader of Oglethorpe's orchestra; other Juniors thus musically 
inclined are Ollie Nail, and Charlie Bourne. 

Reavis O'Neal, Park Brinson, and Kendall Jordan have been honored by election to 
Blue Key, Honorary Activity Fraternity. 

Other honors besides these have come to the members of this, our class of 1932, all 
of which we will try to deserve during our last year at Oglethorpe, and in going away 
we hope to leave our beloved Alma Mater a littls better for our having been a part of 
her, for we will take away with us the association and influences of her indomitable 
spirit. 



tOGLE THORI 




FRANK ANDERSON, JR. 
, Decatur, Ga. 

^' "I 11 K * 

EVELYN BAUGH 
Atlanta, Ga. 
K A --^- 




CHRISTINE BOST 
Atlanta, Ga. 



CHARLES BOURNE 



PARK BRINSON 
Millen, Ga. 
11 K 






JACK FAIN 
Atlanta, Ga. 

ALT 

CPIARLES GARDNER 
Atlanta, Ga. 



PAUL GOLDSMITH 

Atlanta, Ga. 

K .V 

HARRISON GRIFFIN 
Decatur, Ga. 



* ^\ 



LAWRENCE HEIGHT 

Atlanta, Ga. 

K A 

J. C. HOLBROOK 

Atlanta, Ga. 

A :;; ■!. 






JANE KOPS 

Atlanta, Ga. 

K A 

MRS. RITA LOWNSBERRY 
Atlanta, Ga. 



EDITH MARSHALL 

Atlanta, Ga. 

K A 

SARA MARTIN 

Atlanta, Ga. 

B * A 



JEFF MacMILLAN 



CHARLES MITCHELL 
Yatesville, Georgia 



^ ^ 



PRANK MEYERS 

Atlanta, Ga. 

O K X 



'I OLLIE NALL 

(i Jacksonville, Florida \)[ 






REAVIS O'NEAL, JR. 
Savannah, Ga. 



EUGENIA PATTERSON 

Atlanta, Ga. 

X 12 



GERALDINE REEVES 
Atlanta, Ga. 



MARIE SHAW 

Atlanta, Ga. 

B * A 



RICHARD STONE 

Birmingham, Ala. 

ri K <I' 

RAY SEWELL 

Atlanta, Ga. 

e K N 






VIRGINIA TEMPLEMAN 
Atlanta, Ga. 

MIRIAM VARNER 

Atlanta, Ga. 

K A 





JOHN HALLMAN 

Atlanta, Ga. 

K A 

/4'U ■ EDWIN HARNEY 

iSi}^ Atlanta, Ga. 

fi-/ , e K X 



BURKE HEDGES 
Havana, Cuba 



BILL HIGGINS 

Atlanta, Ga. 

K X 



If 



GORDON WHITE 
Atlanta, Ga. 



MURDOCH WALKER 
Atlanta, Ga. 



ALLAN WHEELOCK 
Macon, Ga. 

A I, T 

EDNA WHITEHEAD 

Atlanta, Ga. 

K A 




X 



T^K 




Officers of the Sophomore Glass 



Alman Raines 
Reed Craven 
Lee Bennett 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 



V . ..^. nORPE 



■S 



Sophomore Glass History 



The Sophomore Class history indirectly dates back to September nineteen hundred 
and twenty nine, the days when freshmen were commanded to stoop to conquer, grasp 
their shoe laces, assume the freshman angle to receive licks and many other unpleasant 
things, in order to reimburse the upper classmen who had to undergo these hardships 
when they were freshmen. Directly, the record of the Sophomore class begins with 
the opening of the Fall term, in September, nineteen hundred and thirty. 

It was then the class of '33 reassembled at Oglethorpe as Sophomores to continue 
upon their journey, the main object in view to exemplify the Oglethorpe spirit in 
obtaining still higher honors, better ideals and having a degree at the point of des- 
tination to end our college career at Oglethorpe. Beginning the first day from then 
on, the freshmen were not hazed in any form whatsoever. 

This bestows two honors upon us, the first being, the last class to receive unneces- 
sary hazing during their freshman year at Oglethorpe, and the second being the first 
Sophomore class not to apply unnecessary hazing to freshmen, all of which we are 
proud to have bestowed upon us. 

We are also proud to have the following to represent us in ditferent branches of ac- 
tivities of the school. Nammie Raines, our beloved president, was selected by the 
student body as being the most talented student at Oglethorpe University. Howard 
Martin and Jimmie Stringer were selected Beau Brummels from a large group of 
well dressed men. Last but not least, the Sophomore Class is proud of Robert L. 
Jones, who is editor-in-chief of the school paper. The Stormy Petrel. 

In various fields of athletics we have the following representatives. In football we 
have Walker, Kenzie, Patrick, Putno, Raines, Gaillard, Baker and Morrow to make the 
"O" Club. In baseball the following have distinguished themselves: Riggins, Salmon, 
Baker, Walker, Moore, Whitley, Blackwell, Evans and Craven. We are also fortunate 
in have Pop Freedman acquire the position of Athletic Manager for Football, Basket- 
ball and Track. 

All in all the Class of '33 performed greatly as Sophomores and we are determined 
to surpass all other classes in attaining better achievements and exemplifying Ogle- 
thorpe spirit as we continue our journey to reach the top of the ladder. 

GEORGE NICHOLSON, Class Historian. 



K 



*-5 s- ir-- rr^ T r J"*, in n T? 




ARLENE ALEXANDER 
JOHN ALLISON 



LEE BENNETT 
JOHN BITTING 



LOUISE BODE 
KATHERINE BODENHEIMER 



GLADYS BRIDGES 
DAVID CLARK 



REED CRAVEN 
RALPH DOAK 



LINA DONAHUE 
JOHN DREWRY 



WILLIAM FREEDMAN 
GEORGE GAILLARD 



NEAL HAMMOND 
HOUSTON LUNDY 



HOWARD MARTIN 
W. R. MASSENGALE 



MARIE MAULDIN 
GEORGE NICHOLSON 



JUSTIN NIX 
JOHN OAKEY 



'h 



ALMON RAINES 
EDWARD REEDER 





JUDE SALMON 



MABEL STANTON 



ISABEL TONKS 



JIMMIE STRINGER 



M'1^- 



CECIL WILLIAMSON 



JOHN WIGINGTON 
SPENCER WORTHY 



i 1 



^AW 




Officers of the Freshman Glass 



Philip Hildreth 



Sec)etayy-Ti-easin-e7- 



OGLETHORPE 



joe alien 

edward anderson 
gertrude askew 



carlton baggs 
betty ballentyne 
bertha banks 



love joy boyer 
woodrow brooks 
mary conway 




alphonso goforth 
Josephine garmon 

Chester graham 
ward hardin 
emily harrell 




georgia mcdaniel 
martha mcdaniel 
sara mcdaniel 



l)hilip hildreth 
margaret morgan 
like moss 




James wilson 
elizabeth whitten 
byran walker 



Roll of the Freshman Glass 



aderholt, donald 
allan, joe 
anderson, edwin 
askew, gertrude 
ball, katherine 
ballentyne, betty 
barber, olin 
barrow, dave 
bell, robert 
bethune, sam 
bolden, jeflF 
bolen, William 
boyer, lovejoy 
brooks, woodrow 
brown, mary 
buchanan, claude 
burkhalter, e. h. 
calhoun, sam 
Carroll, frank 
conway, mary 
coster, doris 
coursey, John 
Crawford, j. o. 
curran, h. f. 
cummings, margaret 
darnell, clinton 
davis, lloyd 
dixon, percy 
doster, byron 
duke, dan 
eaves, frank 
eberhardt, John 
emery, isabelle 
farmer, mary 
flannagan, John 
flemming, margaret 
flynt, Sidney 
frazier, allene 
fulton, doris 
furney, clyde 
garmaon, Josephine 
george, charles 



goforth, alphonso 
graham, Chester 
hamilton, gordon 
hansard, douglas 
hardy, edward 
harden, warren 
barrel, emily 
harrison, jack 
hood, lewis 
heard, mildred 
herriott, Julian 
hildreth, philip 
holbrook, j. c. 
humphries, jack 
Johnston, hugo 
Johnston, jack 
Johnston, macferrin 
Johnson, thomas 
Jones, Christine 
johansen, thor 
Jones, estelle 
keen, paul 
keenan, eleanor 
kemp, lamar 
keys, martha 
lang, herman 
langenbacker, irwin 
langley, raymond 
lewis, jane 
linch, jeanette 
marshall, serena 
martin, harold 
martin, viola 
maloney, leone 
mcdaniel, georgia 
mcdaniel, martha 
mcdaniel, sara 
miller, mary 
mobley, charles 
morgan, margaret 
moss, luke 
muhleman, mary lou 



nance, mildred 
neuhoff, genevieve 
o'neal, howard 
parris, charles 
Patterson, macl^ey 
petty, edward 
pickard, wayne 
redfern, gordon 
revel, silas 
richards, frank 
rogers, mitchell 
savage, elizabeth 
scheck, Constance 
sharpe, sara 
shouse, 1. r. 
smith, frances 
Stevens, helen 
stokes, fred 
terrell, evelyn 
thomas, ida 
thurmond, r. 
troy, jack 
vance, charles 
veltre, robert 
walker, byron 
wall, frank 
warren, roy 
welch, frank 
whitley, clarence 
wilson, James 
wilson, Cornelia 
wilson, louise 
wilson, nannie 
wood, gilbert 
wrenn, harry 
wright, Christine 
young, george 
whitten, elizabeth 
reeves, geraldine 
banks, bertha 
dunn, blackman 



History of the Freshman Glass 

By Martha Keys 

Oh! What a welcomed event that Freshman dance was. For the first time since 
Registration Day all students srathered in the gym for introductions to their school- 
mates. How happy we were to become part of the college circle instead of lonesome 
left-out freshmen. 

At an organization meeting we elected Phil Hildreth. President; Alfonso Goforth, 
Vice-president; and Sara Sharpe, Secretary and Treasurer. 

This class of '34 held the top places in three fields. First, in scholarship, we led 
the other classes with the average of 80.9, and Mildred Nance with an average of 97.5 
surpassed all other student marks. On the honor roll, 20 out of the 32 members were 
freshmen. The second field was the gridiron. Not enough praise can be given our 
boys. Those who have received numerals are: Hardy, Heriot, Johnston, Wren, Jo- 
hansen, Hildreth, Goforth, Shouse, Bolden, Young, Curran, Aderhold, Flynt, Welch, 
Mitchell, George, Barrow, Moss, Pickard and Harrison. These boys worked hard in 
games and in practice and their striving was not in vain for — our team was UN- 
DEFEATED! Coach Robertson is anticipating great things from these new candi- 
dates of the Varsity. The above athletes should also be commended for their work 
during the year in the dining hall. Not all honors could go to the boys, for the three 
high-point co-eds in the Intramural sports are of the 1934 class. They, too will wear 
school sweaters. 

In the third field, student activities, we contributed to the Petrel Follies, the Glee 
Club, the orchestra, and the debating teams. Dan Duke and Charles Parris brought 
us more distinction with their work as co-editors of the Stormi/ Petrel. 

We have won our share of respect from everyone, and have always played the game 
according to rule. We only hope that in the next three years to come we will live 
up to the standard set in 1930-31. 



Math Prof 

by 

Robert Leseur Jones, '33 

His bald head waggles like a marionette's 

While he erupts symbolic meteorites; 

His vast umbrageous iiguring begets 

A nauseous admiration from his neophytes, 

Who sit in silent, sympathetic glee 

And hear his discordant numbers ctash like g 

Hear him derive a lunar apogee; 

See him imagine molecules for grass. 

If figures never lie, he's atheist, 

And marshals wierd enigmas for his proof. 

Impeccable as ice, lucent as mist, — 

So goes this fusty Pan on cloven hoof. 

And when he dies, he'll ride a geometric rail 

Straight to the sacred heaven's Holy Grail. 










£.S/-V/,eE 



Footbal 




McKISSACK 
Captain 




September first brought with it prospects 
of the most successful crusades in the his- 
tory of the Peachtree Road school. Seventy- 
five stalwart football men reported to Coach 
Harry Robertson and hard work was begun 
to prepare for the list of hard foes as they 
would come during the season. 

Despite the set-back in the opening game 
with the University of Georgia, it looked like 
the Petrels would turn in a good account of 
themselves before the season came to a close. 
But this world isn't composed of nothing but 
beds of roses. Bad luck sometimes visits 
the camps of the best clubs and so it did with 
the Petrels at the half way mark. 

And so after winning four games in a row, 
the Petrels were made to feel the thorn in 
the side thrust there by Mr. Jinx. 

Traveling to the Bull Dog camp at Athens 
the Petrels faced a revengeful foe in the Uni- 



ANDERSON 




versity of Georgia. They were out for blood 
because of the 13-7 defeat at the hands of 
the Birdmen in 1929. 

Slashing, ripping, passing and running 
around ends the Bull Dogs ran up a 30-0 
score in the first half. Bewildered and half 
dead the birdmen looked on. But after a 
pep talk during the half the Birds came back 
in the second half and held the Bull Dogs 
scoreless and Ray Walker carried the pig- 
skin across for six points and then kicked 
the extra point. 

At this point of the game all the efforts 
seemed futile to defeat the Red and Black 
Warriors and so with the final whistle the 
Birdmen accepted a 30-7 defeat. They were 
ready to forget and start after the rest to 
come. 

In the second game the Birdmen killed two 
birds with one stone. They inaugurated the 




BRYANT 




MYERS 



''AM^'^mMfi 



mim 



h^^ 




WALKER 




night game under the bright arc lights in 
New York City. The game was played in 
the Polo Grounds. 

At the end of the sixty minutes of play 
the Petrels had turned in a 19-0 victory and 
Ray Walker proved the most outstanding 
man on the field. He acquired for himself 
a new nick name, "Dixie." He ran, passed 
and kicked the ball around the field so that 
it bewildered the Manhattan players. 

The whole team functioned like clock 
work, clicking off five, ten or fifteen yards 
at will. 

The play of the forward wall was some- 
thing to remember. They blocked and 
slashed the Manhattan forwards throwing 
the ball carrier for losses at will. Under 
punts they always had the ball carrier cov- 
ered for only small gains. 

In the third start the Petrels faced the 



KENZIE 




Dayton Flyers who in 1929 helped so nobly 
to dedicate the Petrel stadium with a 20-12 
defeat. Like the second game this too was 
played under the moon, stars and artificial 
light. 

Like a cyclone out of the south the Petrels 
swept down upon the Flyers, ripping, slash- 
ing and tossing them aside for sixty min- 
utes and when the storm subsided the 
Petrels were on top 6-0. At three different 
times during the game the Bird backs car- 
ried the ball over for markers but twice they 
were called back and penalized. But constant 
playing kept them on top and at no time dur- 
ing the game was their goal stripe in danger. 

Until removed from the game with an in- 
jured arm Dixie Walker assisted by Dapper 
Myers were the two m.ain worries the Flyers 
had. Others who stared were Bryant, Mor- 
row, Kenzie and Goldsmith. 




BAKER 




FULTON 





WOODWARD 




Starting the fourth game as the under- 
dogs and playing on foreign soil at the home 
of the Wolf Pack of Loyola of the South 
the Petrels began working. 

Fighting harder than usual to offset the 
revengeful attitude of the Wolf Pack it 
wasn't long before the Birds had the ball 
nesting in the Pack Den over the line. Main- 
taining this fighting spirit the Petrels 
pushed the ball over the Host's line twice 
more. 

On the defense the Peachtree Road lads 
fought just as hard. Moore, Lopez and the 
rest of the Wolf Pack found going harder 
than usual and were finally forced to accept 
defeat to the tune of 19-0. 

Dapper Myers was the outstanding per- 
foimer in this contest. He scored twice, and 
made possible by his brilliant blocking and 
interfering, many other profitable gains. In 



MORROW 




the line Kenzie received wild appraise from 
the stands for a brilliant performance as 
tackle. He was assisted by Bryant, Fulton, 
Goldsmith and Captain McKissack. 

During the weeks practice that followed 
at the Petrel Camp, Dapper Myers received 
a broken foot and was removed from the 
team roster for the remainder of the season. 

This was the first real streak of bad luck 
the club tasted so far. But it wasn't for long 
for John Putno, who replaced Myers in the 
next game received the same kind of an in- 
jury thus eliminating him from competition 
until next year. 

From this date Mr. Jinx accompanied the 
Birdmen until the end of the year. 

Furman's Purple Hurricane invaded the 
Petrel camp for the initial home game at 
Hermance Stadium. 

Just back from Florida with a Gator scalp 





KRATZ 





GOLDSMITH 




hanging on the belt the Hurricane began 
work to bag another victory. But the Pet- 
rels, known to weather the strongest of 
winds, rode the gale until it gradually weak- 
ened to a mere breeze. 

It was a hard game with the backs run- 
ning ends, hitting the line and passing for 
only sm.all gains. Until Sam Baker grabbed 
hold of the famous submarine pass from An- 
derson and trekked eighteen yards and over 
the goal line. 

Not to be outdone, the Hurricane came 
back and shot a bullet-like pass to a back 
who had slipped through the secondary de- 
fense, had the ball and was away for six 
points. 

Late in the third quarter Putno, who re- 
placed Myers, slipped through the weak side 
of the line for a second marker making the 
score 12-6. The fourth quarter was an even 
fight waged in the center of the gridiron. 



GAILLARD 




Outstanding" performers of the game were 
Bryant, Putno, Baker, Sypert, Kenzie, Gold- 
smith and Morrow. 

Furm.an had several outstanding perfor- 
mers but all their efforts were in vain when 
they attempted to crash the Gold and Black 
forward wall. 

Taking to the road again the Petrels trav- 
eled to the Quaker City to face the Main 
Liners of Villanova. The game was played 
in the Philadelphia Municipal Stadium. 

On the fourth play of the game the Main 
Liners received a break that decided the 
game. Dropping an end back to kick out of 
danger on a muddy field they were unable to 
do so when he fumbled. But picking the ball 
up and running, he skirted the end and was 
away behind a wall of interference that 
made it impossible for a tackier to get 
through. So before the game was five min- 




WHALEY 




PATRICK 





JAMES 




utes old the score was 6-0 Villanova. 

Fighting desperately to score the Petrels 
did so in the latter part of the game. But 
in the fourth quarter the Main Liners 
pushed the ball over for a second score and 
the game ended 12-6 Villanova. 

The Petrels next journeyed to Springfield, 
Ohio, where they faced the Wittenburg 
eleven in the Homecoming event of the year. 

Playing hard but just unable to go any- 
place when they got within the five yard ter- 
ritory, the Petrels had to be satisfied with 
a 0-0 game and so the home club was glad 
for the old timers did not have to see the 
colors trampled in the dirt. 

Four or five times the Birds were within 
the five yard stripe, but the stubborn defense 
of the Ohioians would not yield to a score. 
The entire first half of the game was played 
in their territory but to no avail. 



THERREL 







In the closing minutes of the game the 
Birdmen were lucky when Sypert caught the 
ball carrier from behind after all the other 
tacklers had let him sift through. 

Facing an old rival in the Bears of Mercer, 
the Oglethorpe jinx, Waldon and Matt, Mer- 
cer backs began work and in the opening 
minutes of the game had the ball on the Pet- 
rel goal line. The Birds stemmed the rush 
and for the remainder of the half the game 
was waged in mid field. 

In the third quarter it looked like Ogle- 
thorpe would score when Gaillard made a 
gain of forty yards, being forced out of 
bounds on the one yard line. With a chance 
to score but overly anxious, Gaillard fumbled 
and lost the ball. The Birdmen were unable 
to come within striking distance again. 

Fighting hard to regain what they had 




GOLDEN 




ADAMS 



f^- 








COFFEE 




lost in the third quarter the Birdmen began 
passing but to no avail. Everywhere there 
seemed to be too many Mercer Bears. 

A blocked kick in the latter part of the 
fourth period cost the Petrels a ball game 
by the score of 2-0. 

Outstanding performers for the Birdmen 
were Goldsmith. He figured in every play, 
always reaching out grabbing legs. He was 
assisted by Kenzie who played the best game 
of the season. Morrow and Bryant both 
turned in a good game. 

In the backfield Gaillard, Anderson and 
Raines played good games. 

Thanksgiving day found the Birdmen in 
Chattanooga to do battle with the Moccasins 
Oi the University of Chattanooga with four 
victories, one tie and three defeats on their 
books. 



JONES 




Opening the game with a rush, only to be 
stopped by a penalty, the turning point of 
the game, the Petrels had an uphill fight on 
their hands. 

During the second quarter the Moccasin 
backs ran at will, scoring two touchdowns. 
Trail, the fleet back, gave a wonderful ac- 
count of himself to close his career as a col- 
lege football player, scoring two of his 
team's three markers. 

The Petrels' score did not come until late 
in the fourth period, when Anderson flipped 
a long pass down the field to Bryant, who 

was just crossing the goal line. 

Myers, the fighting little Petrel fullback 
who was removed from the team roster 
earlier in the season with a broken foot, was 
put into the game and at that point the team 
spirit picked up, but it was too late for the 
Moccasins had a twelve point lead and the 
Moccasins went home to a turkey dinner 
thankful for many things, mainly a victory 
over Oglethorpe, a long time rival. 

Thus the curtain rolled down on another 
Petrel football setting with the Petrels just 
over the half way margin. 




RAINWATER 




GARDNER 



,,«*«>.■ 



CHURCH 



.GRAW 



9 




COACH ROBERTSON 

Harry Robertson has held the coaching reins of the Stormy Petrels since 1923 when 
he replaced his brother, Jim Robertson, Dartmouth star and All-American halfback. 

It was a great break for Oglethorpe for in Robby they have one of the best all around 
football coaches in the south. He has turned out good teams with the material avail- 
able, and somehow, managed to pull through the season with a larger percentage of 
victories than losses. 

Robby is a product of Syracuse under the tutelage of Chick Meehan. He played the 
pivot position for two years 1917-19 and the end position in 1920. He was named 
on the coaches All-American team as end in 1920. Before coming south he was line 
coach at Syracuse under Meehan during the 1921-22 seasons. 



OGLETHORPE T 



J- 



VAM/^^ 





JACK OVERTON 
Director Intramural Sports 



HOKE BELL 
Freshman Coach j 




KENNETH CAMPBELL 

Assistant Coach 



^ 



u 




CAPTAIN HERRIN 



Claude Herrin, elected to lead the Stormy Petrels through the 1930 campaign, was 
forced to hang his football togs on the hook for the season when he was injured in 
pre-season training. He spent three weeks in the hospital at Winder, Ga. 

Unable to return to the squad he called it a year. Coach Harry Robertson will have 
the services of the flashy quarterback during the 1931 season and is expecting the 
tow-headed lad to have his greatest year of college football. 




^OGLETHORPE 



p%> 








rl\ 


■ -.^ . 


^"^??' ^. 




IUPW^SH 


^ 


•-#_^ 'J 




■■—-■-— 


"— 


_..._.._„___ 


— 






SEASONS RESULTS 








Oglethorpe 
Oglethorpe 
Oglethorpe 
Oglethorpe 
Oglethorpe 
Oglethorpe 
Oglethorpe 
Oglethorpe 
Oglethorpe 


6; 
19; 

6; 
19; 
12; 

0; 
0; 
6; 


University of Georgia 
Manhattan 
University of Dayton 
Loyola 
Furman 6 
Villanova 12 
Wittenburg 
Mercer 2 
Chattanooga 20 


31 





^^O^^ Club 



T. W. Fulton 
A. H. Church 
L. A. Kratz 
Harold Adams 
Frank Anderson, Jr. 
Sam Baker 
Park Brinson 
Parkep. Bryant 
George Gaillard 
Ernest Golden 
Paul Goldsmith 
Claude Herrin 
Dan Krnzie 



Kenneth Myers 
Andrew Morrow 
Charles Mitchell 
John Patrick 
John Putno 
Almon Raines 
Clay Sypert 
Dave Therrell 
Ray Walker 
Marion Whaley 
Irwin Woodward 
Charles McKissack 
Hubert Holcomb 



i Ol^Jr 




9 

5 



HEYWOOD CLEMENT 
Trainer 




HUBERT HOLCOMB 
Manager 



OGLETllUKri^ 




Under the tutelage of Hoke Bell, former Petrel grid star, the Baby 
Petrels marked up a very creditable score for the season. Not one minus 
sign of defeat was marked up against them for the entire season of fcot- 
ball. 



Outstanding players of the club are : Bolden, Shouse, George. 



4 




FRANK ANDERSON 
'The Daddy of Baseball at Oglethorpe" 



i^n^i nuKm^ 




J € * # t 



Despite the loss of four of the hardest hitters from the 1930 Oglethorpe 
baseball team which won seventeen straight games, the old master, Frank 
Anderson, put out a club which made a very creditable showing for itself 
during the 1931 season. 

Only three veterans were back from last year. They were: Captain 
Claude Herrin, infielder; Whaley, catcher; Mitchell, pitcher; and Ernest 
Golden, reserve outfielder on the last year's squad, who was elected 
alternate captain. Goldin was kept out of the regular lineup last year 
only by an outfield trio that was far above the average so far as college 
baseball goes. 

Frank Anderson, Jr., reserve second baseman last spring, played a good 
year at the keystone and gave every indication that before he finishes his 
college career he will have seized a fair portion of the fame that his 
brother, Marion, who was one of the best second basemen that ever played 
with the Petrel Club. 

The pitching staff composed of Mitchell, Walker, Carter, Evans, Black- 
well, and Sypert stepped on the firing line and proved themselves more 




than capable of meeting the competition offered them by the tough sched- 
ule placed before them. 

Jack Moore, second baseman on the Baby Petrel outfit of 1930, proved 
a most consistent hitter and his bat helped the Petrel cause no little. 

In the opening game with the Georgia Bulldogs played at Hermance Sta- 
dium, the Petrels came from behind twice to outscore the Bulldogs with 
thirteen base hits and twelve runs. The final score being 12-9. Parker 
Bryant was the hero of the day with three bingles, which included a three 
base hit to the far corners of Hermance Field. 

Oglethorpe defeated Georgia in the second game of the series and tied 
with Auburn for top place in the Dixie Collegiate League, each having won 
two games. Ray Walker, tho' far from invulnerable, maintained excellent 
poise throughout the entire game. Even when under the most severe fire, 
he remained cool and controlled. 

The Petrel club suffered a two game defeat at the hands of the Auburn 
Tigers when the two undefeated teams met on Hermance Field. However, 
the Petrel luck seemed to have taken a change for the better when the 
Oglethorpe Club handed the Plainsmen a 8-3 defeat on the first return 




game. The next game, however, with a 12-0 score was won by the Tigers 
to give them the lead with a line of three out of four games tucked away in 
their pocket. 

The opening game with Mercer gave every prospect of being a taut game 
but in the fourth inning it dropped a stitch, unravelled, and then went to 
all sorts of loose ends as the Bears took the game with a 12-2 score. 
However, whatever was lacking on the opening game came back in full 
sway for the second game when the Birdmen took a revengeful victory 
of 11-3. The hitting, which had been lacking during the season, was re- 
vealed in great fashion with the Petrels securing 17 hits, including nve 
doubles. Sypert came thru in fine style and proved to those who had been 
doubtful of his ability, his merit as a left-hander when the Petrels won the 
third game with a 4-1 score. The fourth game of the series was called 
on account of rain. 

In the series of games with the Florida 'Gators the Petrels emerged with 
three victories; the games being marked by the stellar playing of Herrin 
and Mitchell. 

The Yellow Jackets took the scalp of the Petrel club to the tune of a 8-7 




victory in the opening game at the Rose Bowl Field. In the second game 
which saw a better brand of ball played by both teams and which revealed 
none of the usual collegiate baseball erratics, the Oglethorpe Petrels won 
with a 6-4 score to even up the series at one all ; Parker Bryant made a 
very good display of his ability with a triple which aided considerably in 
the achievement of the victory. With a bunting attack that left the 
Jackets sick, the Petrels won the third game of the series with a 8-5 score. 
The year's schedule which is one of the toughest that the Birdmen have 
had to face is as follows : 

April 16-17 Georgia at Hermance Field 

April 10-11; Auburn at Hermance Field 

April 17-18; Auburn at Auburn 

April 22-23; Mercer at Hei-mance Field 

April 24-25; Florida at Hermance Field 

May 1-2; Mercer at Macon 

May 4-5; Florida at Gainesville, Florida 

May 8-9 ; Tech at Hermance Field 

May 11-12; Georgia at Athens 



• Intramural Athletics • 




©asHetbaU 



Oglethorpe University did not participate in Inter-collegiate basketball 
ccmpstition during the season of 1930-31 although they had prospects xor 
the best court team in the history of the school. 

The Athletic Governing Board, headed by Dr. Thornwell Jacobs, pres- 
ident of the school, decided that the students of Oglethorpe were not reap- 
ing any benefits from the athletic department due to the fact that only a 
limited number of the students derived benefit under this plan. They de- 
cided on Intramural sports because under this plan approximately three 
fourths of the student body received instructions in physical education. 

Heretofore a certain group of athletes participated in all the sports at 
the university while the rest who were not adapted in football, basketball 
or baseball, received no instruction in physical education at all. So in an 
effort for them to participate, intramural basketball was introduced and 
the program proved very successful. Now approximately three fourths 
of the students are taking part in the basketball, indoor baseball, basket- 
ball, free throw, tennis, golf, track and many other sports. 

Football and baseball programs will be sponsored as in the past for both 
freshmen and varsity. 

With such men like Putno, Herrin, Moore, Walker, Whitley, Mitchell, 
Golden and Hallman to represent the Gold and Black on the court it was 
a blow to the students and coaches to see what pointed to be the best season 
on the court go to the wind. But as intramural sports would benefit the 
majority, the board figured that the best plan. Whether Oglethorpe will 
take part in intercollegiate basketball next year remains with the Athletic 
Board. 



n. 



Girls Intramural Basketball Tournament 



Led by Ruth "Jack" Frost, the Fighting Ramblers, composed of the non- 
sorority girls of the campus copped the girls' intramural basketball tour- 
nament in the campus gym. 

They had very little competition and were never threatened at any time 
during the course of the tourney. In the opening game they defeated the 
Beta Phi Alphas to the tune of 17-4. While not the leading scorer. Miss 
Frost was the most outstanding player on the court. Josephine Garmon 
was high point getter in the opening game, counting four times from the 
floor. Gladys Bridges was the outstanding performer for the opponents. 

Miss Frost being unable to play in the second game. Little Joe Garmon 
led the Ramblers to a brilliant victory of 20-8. She scored sixteen of her 
team's twenty points. Lee Bennett was the only member of the Kappa 
Delta team to score. She counted with four double deckers. 

In the third game the Ramblers sent the Chi Omega girls to the turkish 
baths suffering under a 13-3 defeat. This gave the Rablers the undisputed 
claim of championship and the cup. 

Miss Garman led the field of leading scorers by a margin of one point. 
She totaled twelve double deckers for a total of twenty-four points. Second 
place was held by Miss Louise Bodie, C. 0. and Francis Smith, B. P. A., 
both with a total of twenty-three points. Third place was taken by Gladys 
Bridges, B. P. A., with a total of seventeen points. 



flT 
llj 



^VAMACRAW 



Boys Intramural Basketball Tournament 



Winning five consecutive victories, the Delta Sigma Phi fraternity won 
the first Annual Intramural Baslvetball Tournament sponsored by the Ath- 
letic Department of Oglethorpe Univer_sity. 

The tournament was held in the university gym with approximately 
fifty to seventy-five men not competing in varsity or freshman basketball 
taking part. The tournament was held in order that those not out for the 
athletic teams of the university would receive some instructions in ath- 
letics by trained instructors. 

Each fraternity placed a team in the tournament. The non-fraternity 
men of the campus banded together and a team was picked from the can- 
didates. 

Second honors were captured by the Alpha Lambda Tau Fraternity. 
They only dropped one game that being to the tournament winners. Third 
place was held by the All-Am.ericans composed of the non-fraternity men 
of the campus. 

The Delta Sig aggregation v/as composed of a group of sharp shooters. 
They turned in a total of 167 points for the five games. Four members of 
the team placed in the high score out of five places. MacMillan led with 
42 points. Calhoun and Moss of Pi Kappa Phi fraternity were tied for sec- 
ond place with 40 points. Hood totaled 39 points while Mitchell totaled 
38 points. 

The cup won two consecutive years by the Alpha Lambda Tau Fraternity 
in the Inter-fraternity Council tournament was presented to the Delta Sig- 
ma Phi Fraternity. And thus all is quiet on the basketball frontier until 
the coming of the next season. 



^^. 



^K^juETHORPE 



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ii 



KAPPA ALPHA 

Founded at Washington and Lee, 1^ 
Beta Nu Chapter revived 1918 



COLORS: SI JfJ^lm, FLOWER: 

Crimson and Old Gold jZ/ ^^^1''W|^ Magnolia and Red Rose 




FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

Frank Inman Sydney Flynt 

Tom Daniel Paul Goldsmith 

James Stringe?. John Hallman 

Howard Martin Lawrence Height 

Edward Reeder John Drewry 

W. R. Massengale John Allison 

Paul Keen Spencer Worthy 



VAMAC 




OGLETHORPE i=L 



VAA^ACRAW^ 



^^: 



PI KAPPA PHI 

Founded at the College of Charleston, 1904 
Pi Chapter Established 1918 



COLORS: 

Gold and White 




FLOWER: 
Red Rose 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 



Frank Mackey 
Ward Hardin 
Lamar Kemp 
Alan Ritz 
Frank Richards 
Park Brinson 
Andrew Morrow 
Blackman Dunn 
Howard Carey 
George Gaillard 
John Bitting 
Richard Stone 
Rudy Shouse 
Luke Moss 
Claude Herrin 



Eddie Anderson 
Lovejoy Boyer 
Hubert Kadel 
Byron Walker 
Jack Johnson 
Earl Blackwell 
Nammie Raines 
Harold Martin 
Sam Jones 
Billy James 
Kendall Jordan 
Frank Anderson 
John Coursey 
Philip Hildreath 
Claude Buchanan 



OGLETHORPE 



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DELTA SIGMA PHI 

Founded at College of the City of New York, 1899 
Alpha Nu Chapter 1922 



Nile Green and White 



mWk. 



AL<i>) 



White Carnation 



FRATER IN FACULTATE 

Earl L. Shepherd 



FRATRES 

Theodore Pulton 
^Albert Church 
^2 Paul Bacon 
y. Edward Emerson 
'^ Ernest Golden 
^ Lyle Kratz 
n Jefi' MacMillan 
ig, Burke Hedges 
■ Charles Gardner 
rCREAVis O'Neal 
Charles Bourne 
Kenneth Myers 



IN COLLEGIO 



Clinton Holbrook 
Dan Kenzie 
Charles Mitchell 
Cecil Williamson 
Ray Walker 
John Patrick 
Billy Salmon 
Hewlett Bagwell 
Jack Troy 
Sam Calhoun 
Lewis Hood 
James Wilson 



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ALPHA LAMBDA TAU 



Alpha Chapter 

Founded at Oglethorpe University, 1916 
Established 1921 



COLORS: 

Old Gold and Black 




FLO WE R.- 
American Beauty Rose 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 



Charles McKissack 
John Oakey 
Frank Davenport 
John Turk 
John Artley 
Reed Craven 
Gordon White 
Howard O'Neal 
Allen Wheelock 
Jack Fain 
Parker Bryant 
Douglas Hansard 
. Dan Duke 
Percy Dixon 



Houston Lundy 
Robert Mayes 
M. D. Collins 
Jack Humphries 
Justin Nix 
John Patterson 
Marion Whaley 
MuNSFORD Whitley 
Reginald Baker 
Dal Mobley 
Charles Vance 
Henry Currand 
Alfonso Goforth 
Herman Lange 



OGLETHORPE 




Ill 



OGLETHORPE, 



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THETA KAPPA NU 

Founded at Springfield, Missouri, 1924 
Georgia Alpha Chapter Established Oct. 5, 1925 



COLORS: 

CrimHon, Argent, Sable 




FLOWER: 
Ameyican Beaut u Rose 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 



i' Frank Meyers 
William Higgins 
William Freedman 
David Clark 
Chester Graham 
Frank Eaves 
Byron Doster 
George Nicholson 
William J. S. Deal 
Ben Simpson 
Ray Sevi^ell 



Edward Harney 
Ollie Nall 
Harry McGinnis 
Joe Hardy 
O. K. Barber 
Franklin Wall 
Edward Burkhalter 
Bo Johnson 
Harry Wrens 
Jack Harrison 
Warren Turner 



^ 



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'OGLETHOjlPE 



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Stray Greek Glut) 



Garnet Butts, Sig)ii(i Nii 5" Dr. H. J. Gaertner, Sigma Xii ' 

William Brandon, Phi Delta Thcfa £. Dr. James Routh, Phi Beta Kappa 



A 



(A. David Therrel, Sigma Ch 

^ Harrison Griffin, Chi Phi '< 

, Frank AndersiJn, Sit/ma Ch 



( -James Anderson. Sigma Nii 
•^ Ralph Doak, Chi Px; 



^^LjJC^i rLKj^rnj jz 




Sororities 



KAPPA DELTA 



October 23, 1897 



Alpha Tail Chapter, April 3-5, 1930 



COLORS: 

Gvppv avd White 




FLOWER: 
White Rose 



SORORES IN COLLEGIO 



17 



Gertrude Murray 
Helen Boardman 
Martha Jean Osborne 
Betty Crandall 
Miriam Varner 
Edna Whitehead 
Christine Bost 
Bertha Banks 



Jane Kops 
Genevieve Neuhoff 
Isabel Tonks 
Evelyn Baugh 
Elizabeth Savage 
Marie Madldin 
Mabel Stanton 
Edith Marshall 



Lee Bennett 






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CHI OMEGA 



Founded in 1895 



Sigma Gamma Chapter, 1924 



COLORS: 
Curdinal and Strau- 




FLOWER: 

Vhitc Carnation 



SORORES IN COLLEGIO 



Eugenia Patterson 
Murdoch Walker 
Eleanor Memminger 
Mary Lou Muhleman 



Martha Keys 
Louise Bode 
Elizabeth Stitt 
Margaret Cummings 



Aline Frazier 



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s, 



BETA PHI ALPHA 

May 9, 1909 
Chi Chapter, 1930 



COLORS: 

■een and Gold 




FLOWER: 

Yellow Tea h 



SORORES IN COLLEGIO 



( Virginia Turner 

•7 Mary Williamson 
O Willie Woodall 
ji- Marie Shaw 

I^Sara Sharpe 
Frances Smith 

/ Gladys Bridges 



^ Geraldine Reeves 

10 LlNA DONAHEW 

jf Arlene Alexander 
Georgia Brown 

^ Gertrude Askew 
Margaret Vardamen 
QMary Farmer 



JiT^Sara Martin 



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Honorary Fraternities 



-f^' 



1 



BOAR'S HEAD 

Colors — Old Gold and Black Flower — Black Eyed Susan 

Established 1920 



The Boar's Head, first honorary club to be organized on the campus of 
Oglethorpe University, was founded in January, 1920. Eligibility to mem- 
bership is limited to members of the student body who have not only been 
prominent and successful in academic life but who have also distinguished 
themselves in various other activities of the University. 

The title of the organization is taken from the coat-of-arms of the Uni- 
versity, a boar's head being a central part of the escutcheon. The Uni- 
versity's armorial bearing's are copied from those of the family of James 
Edward Oglethorpe for whom our University is named. 



OFFICERS 

Earl Blackwell 



MEMBERS 

JiMMiE Anderson Frank Iniia> 

Paul Bacon Alan Ritz 

Earl Blackwell 



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JUHj A 11^^ JC^JT J-^ 




^EEKOr 




PHI KAPPA DELTA 



This fraternity was established in 1920 for the purpose of having in the 
University an honorary organization, which elected its members for their 
scholastic achievements. Before being elected as a member of the frater- 
nity a student must have attained a high scholastic record and must be a 
person of high integrity. 



M E M B E K S 



■> 



Marie Shaw 



^^ Eugenia Patterson 
Mary Williamson 



^ 




* % OGLETl 



RAV^ 




LE CONTE 

This organization, composed of a group of serious students, was organ- 
ized in tlie Fall of 1920 for the purpose of advancing scientific study at the 
University. It is the aim of the organization also to foster individual work 
on the part of the members. 

The chai'ter members of the organization are: Professor E. S. Heath, 
L. N. Turk, M. F. Calmes, C. I. Pirkle, M. Monsteller, W. C. Hillhouse, 
P. D. Weeks, M. M. Copeland, J. C. Ivey and C. E. Boynton. 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

'i Dr. James F. Sellers Dr. John A. Aldrich 

Professor M. H. Hunt 

MEMBERS 



J) Howard Carey 
"^ Frank Davenport 
Harry Last 
Harry McGinnis 
l^JoHN Turk 
Zelan Wills 



John Artley 
William Higgins 
Paul Keen 
Herman Lange 
John Oakey 
Spencer Worthy 



aAW 




BLUE KEY 

Established in 1920 



The local chapter of this organization was installed in the year of 1926. 
It has as its purpose the promotion of activities among the students. 



MEMBERS 



John Turk 
Earl Blackwell 
Kendall Jordan 
Frank Inman 



Reavis O'Neal 
Almon Raines 
Ben Simpson 
Park Brinson 



^ 



^ 




V^-^S^:I^EM-*-!J*lf ■i^v 



OGLE 



Glorifying The Oglethorpe Go-ed 



America's most famous connoisseur of beauty, Florenz Ziegfield, whose 
productions are said to assemble more beautiful women under one roof 
than any other place in America, was asked by the 1931 Yamacraw staff 
to choose the five most beautiful Oglethorpe girls from a large group of 
individual photographs. 

On the following pages are five Oglethorpe co-eds whose beauty has 
been glorified by the country's most eminent genius of the stage. 

They are: 

MISS MARTHA JEAN OSBORNE, Atlanta, Georgia. 

MISS HELEN BIVINGS, Atlanta, Georgia. 

MISS GRACE WOOLFORD, Atlanta, Georgia. 

MISS EDITH MARSHALL, Atlanta, Georgia. 

MISS KATHRYN BODENHEIMER, Atlanta, Georgia. 




MISS MARTHA JEAN OSBORNE 
Atlanta, Georgia 




MISS HELEN BIVINGS 
Atlanta, Georgia 




MISS GRACE WOOLFORD 
Atlanta, Georgia 




MISS BERTHA BANKS 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Sponsor Alpha Lambda Tau Fraternity 







MISS EUGENIA PATTERSON 

Aihiutu, Ganyia 

Sponsor Delta Sigma Phi Fratcniiiy 



MRS. J. S. BOARDMAN 
Atlanta, Georgia 
Sponsor Editorial Staff of Yamc 




MISS LAURA WHITNER 

Ailanta, GeorgUi 

Sponsor LorcVs Club 




MISS EDITH MARSHALL 
Atlanta, Georgia 




1//SS KATHRYN BODENHELMER 
Atlanta, Georgia 




LILLIAN SMITH 
Atlanta, Georgia 
Sponsor Theta Kappa Nil Frater 




MISS MARY BLACKWELL 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Sponsor Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity 



k_ 




Club 



OGLETHORPE 



w 



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*1 

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O 



KNIGHTS OF THE PIPE 



Oglethorpe University Chapter 



Sir Eakl L. Shepherd 
Sir John Aldrich 
Sir J. C. HoLBRooK 




SiE Frank Perez 
Sir Archie Morgan 
Sip. Clinton Darnell 
Sir Houston Lundy 
Sir John Turk 



President 

Vice-President 
Secret aril and Treasurer 

Sir Burke HedgeS 
Sip John Oakey 
Sir Frank Davenport 
Sir J. H. Abbott, Jr. 
Sir Reid Craven 



L'j J: 11 ^^ Jr^JTJL^ 



ZZTT 



^ij 




OGLETHORPE 





aAW 



LORDS CLUB 



The club was founded on February 19, 1924. It was the first honorary 
club of a social nature to be organized at the university. There are certain 
elements of culture and social qualities necessary for membership. The 
purpose of the club is to promote social activity of the highest order. 



MEMBERS 



Andrew Morrow 
Tom Daniel 
Almon Raines 
George Gaillard 
Philip Hildreth 
W. R. Massengalb 
Neal Hammond 



Edward Reeder 



John Hallman 
Hubert Kadel 
Lawrence Height 
Frank Inman 
James Anderson 
Paul Goldsmith 
Earl Blackwell 



/^ 



OGi^i^i £iKJt<PE 









^=:COGLE THORPE^, 




.ACRAW> 



DUCHESS CLUB 



The club was founded in the fall of 1927 to promote social activity anions 
the female students of the University. 



MEMBERS 



I Gertrude Murray 
<Q. Betty Crandall 
■'7, Elizabeth Stitt 
Helen Stevens 



Jy Martha Jean Osborne 
d. Edith Marshall 
^ Bertha Banks 
Grace Woolford 



Helen Bivings 



7 



?^ 



OGLETHOKPE 



■iti 




~^. 



OGLETHORPE 




f VAMACRAW 



I / 



ZETA UPSILON 



Founded at University of Alabama 



This club, of a purely social nature, was organized on the campus of 
Oglethorpe University in 1930. It has as its purpose the promotion of 
greater fellowship between fraternal rgoup members. 



MEMBERS 



/ Claude Hekrin 
^^ Albert Church 
<l James Stringer 

i i Allan Wheelock 



^ Howard Carey 
(^ John Allison 
h Paul Bacon 
<7Jack Fain 



OGLETHOP 



^ 




OGLETHORPE 



RAW 



S^^^^^v 




ALCHEMIST CLUB 



Motto — To make the best of the worst 



Colors — White and Gold 



This club, composed of students who were taking analytical chemistry, 
was organized in 1928 by the members of that class taught by Dr. J. F. 
_Sellej:s.. No one except the original members, seven, will ever be Alchem- 
ists at Oglethorpe. Since three of the members have gone, the club will 
automatically expire this year with the graduation of the remaining four 
members. 



MEMBERS 



p. Gertrude Murray 



I John P. Turk 



w Ernest Golden 



- ^o^ 



..^M^. 




Government 




Officers of the Student Body 



Paul Bacon 
Gertrude Murray 
Frank Meyers 



President 

Vice-President 

Sccretar]! and Treasurer 



-h ,1^ T 17 ^T" ic_r /^ r) 7 > ir 



A 



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Student Faculty Council 

The Student Faculty Council meets with the faculty as a representation 
from the entire student body in an effort to promote a better spirit of co- 
operation between the faculty and the students in the projects undertaken 
by the University. 

Alan Ritz President 

REPRESENTATIVES 

Reavis O'Neal Junior 

W. R. Massengale Sophomore 

Sidney Flynt ■ • Freshman 

Gertrude Murray Co-Ed Motner 

Elizabeth Merritt Senior Co-Ed 

Marie Shaw Junior Co-Ed 

Lee Bennett Sophomore Co-Ed 

Bertha Banks Freshman Co-Ed 



OGLE THORPE ^ 



"^ 




ill- 



Mrs. R. F. Poole (Aunt Sallie) 
Mrs. Annie L. Crum 



Housekeeper 
Matron 



We feel that Aunt Sallie and Mrs. Crum must of a necessity be placed in 
this government section whereas one governs the conditions that make 
the dormitories a pleasant place not only to hang your hat but to linger 
a while, and the other controls that vital necessity — food, that governs ( ?) 
the mere man. 




C/'U'Xvz:-^ 



THORPE 




1 \ \ \ \ 

OGLETHORPE 
PRESS 




PUBLICATIONS 



RAW 



The Stormy Petrel 



The publication, owned as a property by the student body of Oglethorpe 
University, is dedicated to the service of the University and aims to con- 
tribute its share to the betterment of that institution. 



' Ben Simpson 
Paul Bacon 



O 



Editor-in-Chief 
business Manager 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

-^ Reavis O'Neal, Jr Assistant Editor 

■Jr Helen Boardman Society Editor 

Jack Troy Sports Editor 

BUSINESS STAFF 

X^ George Nicholson Advertising Manager 

A William Freedman Circnlation Manager 



^ 




Ui 



OGLE THORPE g ^ 



Yamacraw Staff 



II Helen Mary Boardman Editor-in-Chief 

•1 Frank Inman ....... Business Manager 



BOARD OF EDITORS 




James Anderson Associat 


e Editor 


Lyle Kratz SjMrl 


s Editor 


Aline Frazier Co-Ed Editor 


Earl Blackwell Puhlicit 


y Editor 


Elizabeth Savage . Ai 


t Editor 


John Wigington Art Editor 


Marie Shaw Snap^ Editor 


BUSINESS STAFF 


Alan Ritz Assistant Bitsijiess Manager 


Paul Bacon Advertising Manager 


W. R. Massengale . . Assistant Advertisng Manager 



\r>r> / 



O' 




ri 




i 






ORPE 



VAmACRAW.. ^ X 






Oglethorpe University Publications 



Westminster Magazine which was founded in December 1911, had as its 
objective the re-founding of the University. It presents to its readers the 
news and progress of Oglethorpe, together with literary, historical and 
sociological articles. Dr. Thornwell Jacobs, founder and editor is assisted 
by Dr. James Routh and Mary Brent Whiteside. 

Bozart, the magazine which was edited and owned by Ernest Hartsock, 
until his death in December, was taken over by the University and com- 
bines Contemporary Verse with it. Dr. Mary Brent Whiteside is managing 
editor. 

The Oglethorpe Book of Georgia Verse, a collection of the best works of 
Georgia authors, compiled by Dr. Jacobs, Dr. Whiteside and Dr. Routh, is 
an outstanding publication of the Oglethorpe University Press. 



OGLETHORPE 



^ 




SOFT 



CAMPUS ACTIVITIES 



MACRAW 



&, 



The Players Club 



The club became a part of the University early in Oglethorpe's history 
and since its organization has contributed largely to the furtherance of 
drama on the campus. Several plays are presented during the year to the 
student body with the Spring Plays as the culmination of the year's work. 
In addition the Petrel Follies are produced under supervision of the club. 



OFFICERS 

/ Earl Blackwell President 

'^ Helen Boardman Vice-President 

-n Ben Simpson Business Manager 



MEMBERS 



1|-Reavis O'Neal 

^ Marie Shaw 

^John Drewry 
■-7 Almon Raines 

^ Burke Hedges 
Ci James Anderson 
j^. W. R. Massengale 
f( Bettib Arnold 



/3. Kendall Jordan 
j 2 Frank Inman 

Betty Crandall 
j U- Gertrude Murray 

Paul Bacon 

Martha Jean Osborne 

Jane Kops 

Howard Martin 



M/\Rji-C'V MvH^'^^^^^ 



VCRA't^^ 







Debate Council 



Paul Bacon 

Dr. James Routh 



Chairman 
Faculty Advisnr 



' Willie Woodall 
Ruth Frost 
Paul Bacon 
Burke Hedges 
Reavis O'Neal, Je. 
William Freedman 



John Oakey 
Helen Boardman 
William Deal 
Aline Fraser 
W. R. Massengale 
Gertrude Murray 



ORPE 




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MAC RAW V ^ 



Villanelle of the Glass of '33 



by 
John Patrick 



': We are like a ship that's reached mid sea, 

; . With careful navigation; 

: ; We are the class of '33. 

j j ; Our aim's the port of high degree, — 

! I Ambitious destination; 

I We are like a ship that's in mid sea. 

I By God's hand, and the Faculty, 

We're led in depuration — 
We are the class of '33. 

j Though storms confront us mightily, 

I j We feel no trepidation, — 

' ' We are like a ship that's in mid sea. 

! To face whatever tasks may be, 

We go with exultation — 
We are the class of '33- 



:zz:7'' jThf^rtr 



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The Co. 




E. SAVAGE. 



ACRAW 



X 




Go-Ed Council 



This council serves as a governing board for the co-ed students of the 
university. One representative from the four classes comprise the member- 
ship of the organization together with the "co-ed mother" selected from 
either the junior or senior classes by the co-eds at large. 



Gertrude Murray Co-ed Mother 

Elizabeth Merritt Senior 

Mary Williamson Junior 

Lee Bennett SoiJhomore 

Bertha Banks Freshman 

1 , 



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OGLETHORPE 



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4 

4 
Inter-Sorority Council 

Eugenia Patterson President, Chi Omega 

Willie Woodall . . . Vice-President, Beta Phi Alpha 

Gertrude Murray . . Secretary-Treasurer, Kappa Delta 

REPRESENTATIVES 

Elizabeth Stitt Chi Omega 

Marie Shaw Beta Phi Alpha 

Betty Crandall Kappa Delta 

This organization, Panhellenic in nature, is the governing board for 
sorority activity on the campus of the University. Its membership is 
composed of two representatives from each of the three sororities. 



OGLE THORPW^ ^ 



mMACRAW 



History of the Go-Eds 



The last decade has witnessed woman gradually taking a more important place in 
the political, business, and educational life of the world. In approximately that same 
amount of time the co-eds of Oglethorpe have entered in full swing into the prominence 
of responsible posts and campus activities. 

The year 1917 (?) found an ambitious young woman, Martha Shover, applying for 
the position of secretary to Dr. Jacobs, and also desiring to take a few courses in the 
University. She was given the position and admitted to classes as Oglethorpe's first 
co-ed. The following year, she was joined by her sister Elise. Eight or ten 
co-eds voluntarily enrolled in the University during the next two years. By this 
time it was noted by the faculty that the presence of these young women made the boys 
more careful in their general appearance and behavior. So the President gave the 
Eclicitors directions to be on the lookout for prospective women students. The num- 
ber of co-eds has steadily increased, there now being approximately 90 in the Univer- 
sity and 200, mostly public school teachers, in the Extension School. 

From the very beginning the co-eds entered into campus activities with enthusiastic 
interest and sought to attain the highest degree of scholarship, meriting membership 
in Phi Delta Kappa honorary society, and the right to be a wearer of the coat-of-arms. 
As we examine early editions of the Yamacraw we see co-eds holding positions as 
class officers, student council members, staff members, participants in the Player's 
Club, and student assistants in various academic departments. Later editions reveal 
the organizing of a girl's basketball team and three local social clubs; Zeta Tau, Sigma 
Alpha, and Phi Kappa Eta, now respectively Kappa Delta, Chi Omega, and Beta Phi 
Alpha, national fraternities. 

It was 14 years ago that the first co-ed entered Oglethorpe. Today a co-ed holds a po- 
sition, and that a prominent one, in every important phase of campus life. For the 
first time in the history of the school a girl is editor-in-chief of the Yamacraw. She 
is assisted by a staff' of as many girls as boys. Several girls also hold responsible 
posts on the Petrel staff. The first girl's intercollegiate debating team was organized 
by the influence of the two co-eds who were admitted to the debating council last year. 
By the installation of a system of intramural athletics, the co-eds were given an equal 
opportunity for physical education. 

Back in the days when that first lone co-ed entered Oglethorpe, who dreampt that in 
less than fifteen years the number of co-eds would increase to such an extent as to 
necessitate a "co-ed mother"? This has become necessary and the position is ably 
filled by a co-ed, Gertrude Murray. 

So we feel that it is not with too much "braggadocia" that we quote the words of 
Bernard de Vota, "The Co-eds: God bless them." 



l^^l^ _ /^' 



OGLETHORPE ^ 



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MAr.RAUJ 




Oglethorpe University Band 



Jeff MacMillan 



Band Master 



^- 



ORPE 




Under the direction of Jeff MacMillan, the orchestra has furnished many 
enjoyable programs of music for the assembly hours and for such student 
productions as the "Petrel Follies." 



O. K. Barber 
Chester Parham 
AsHER Lee 
Bill Manly 
William Deal 
Edward Reder 



Jack Lanum 
Stanley Haseltine 
George MacMillan 
James Wilson 
Ollie Nall 
Frank Meyers 



Charles Bourne 



i OGLETHORPE 



VAMACRAW^ 



^ 



Glee Club 



Mr. William Webster, lately of the Broadway production, "Blossom 
Time," was secured by the University as director of the Glee Club with his 
wife, Dorothy Remington Webster, as accompanist. Altho' the club did 
not give any public performances, other than the weekly assembly hours, 
notable progress was made and the club gives promise of outstanding work 
for the coming year. 



MEMBERS 



Helen Stevens 
Gertrude Murray 
Betty Ceandall 
Marie Shaw 
Margarev Vardaman 
Sidney Flynt 



William Deal 
Thelma Brogdon 
Christine Host 
Edna Whitehead 
Marie Mauldin 
Joe Padgett 



OGLETHORPE 



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^ OGLETHORPE 




ACEIAW 



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9 

,1 



Homage to the "nice date" 
Satan get thee hence 
No lipstick on the collar 
Bu', no experience. 



Let her chatter keep you warm 
Even in December 
Then say goodby and go your way 
With nothing to remember. 

Entwine in conversation 
See love's light in her look 
But for your education — 
Stay home and read a book. 



Last night I held a little hand 

So dainty, and so neat! 

Methcught my haert would burst with joy, 

So wildly did it beat! 

No other hand into my heart 

Could greater solace bring, 

Than that dear hand I held last night, 

Four aces and a king. 



Black is white you used to say; 
My foolish head would nod. 
That, my dear, was yesterday 
Now black is black, by god. 

BOZART. 



Here lies Ann Mann, she lived an 
Old maid and died an old Mann. 



And thei-e was the absent-minded gangster who lit a bomb and threw away 
a match. 



Pity the Scotchman who can't take a drink — the bottle has to be tipped. 



The Seniors may be interested in this age old advice — "All work and no 
play makes Jack" — and plenty of it. 



-By J. W. A. 



?i\ 



LETHORPi 




Your good deed 
for today 




H 






/^. 




9 



MILLION 

a day 



the Pgg^g^ 

that refreshes 

No matter how busy you are — ho^v hard you 
work or play — don't forget you owe your- 
self that refreshing pause with Coca-Cola. 
You can always find a minute, here and 
there, and you don't have to look far or 
wait long for Coca-Cola. A pure drink of 
natural flavors — always ready for you — 
ice-cold — around the corner from any- 
where. Along with millions of people every 
day, you'll find in Coca-Cola's >>fholesome 
refreshment a delightful way to ^veil-being. 



WHERE 



CW.6 

I S 



cTl^cNEEL 
Marble Co. 

— MONUMENTS — 
Marble and Granite 

Largest Manufacturers 
In America 

MARIETTA, GEORGIA 



Compliments of 


Sugarman-Hirsch Go. 


157 Alabama St., S. W. 


Wholesale Candy — Drug Sundries 


Distribiitoys 


Famous Schrafft Chocolates 



L O U I S' 

"IS DIFFERENT" 
Ninety Five Luckie Street 



Fellows . 






Don't forge 


we are all using 


BLAGK 


AND 

and 


WHITE 


YELLOW 


GABS 


Wa. 0200 




Wa. 3161 


Five Ride 2 Mil 


es for 30c 


DIVIDE 


THE COST 



Fifth Street Pharmacy 

PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST 

368 5th St. Bet. N. Jackson & Argonne Ave. 
MAIN 8108 

Service in a Moment 



Wal, 479'' Mrs. J. E. McRee 

The Dafiiodil Tea Room 

A Charming and Delightful Place 
To Dine 

Private Dining Room for Parties 

And Banquets 
81 Pryor St., N. E. Atlanta, Ga. 



ROAD SERVICE 


VULCANIZING 


GORDY TIRE & SERVICE STATION 


Peachtree a 


t 12th Svreet Phone He. 9152 




Atlanta, Georgia 




HENRY GRADY 
HOTEL 

Peachtree at Cain, Atlanta, Ga. 

550 rooms of comfort and convenience. 
Each room has ceiling fan, circulating 
ice water, radio and either shower or 
tub bath; corner rooms have both. 
Open dining Terrace and Coffee Shop. 

Rooms from $2.50 

J. F. deJaenett, Vice-Pves. & Mgi: 



EVBANhSf-BlDi), 



je* 



^lers Silversmiths Sta, 



'None,, 



% 



ESTABLISHED 1832 

PHILADELPHIA 

SCHOOL RINGS. EMBLEMS, 
CHARMS AND TROPHIES 

Of the Better Kind 

The Gift Suggestion Book 

Mailed upon request 

Illustrates and Prices 

Jewels, Watches, Clocks, Silver, 
China, Glass, Leather, Novelties 

from which may be selected 

distinctive Wedding, Birthday, Graduation 

and other Gifts. 



Bell Phone Ivy 9489 Pay Station Ivy 9595 



^ The Rex & Recreation, Inc. 

l^M BILLIARDS, SOFT DRINKS AND LUNCHES 






The Rex 

105-109 Pryor St., N. 



The Recreation 

89 Pryor St., N. E. 



105-109 Pryor Street, N. E. 







At TKe 

Atlanta Biltmore 

EVERY facility required by members of either 
Sororities, Fraternities and all other Student 
^ Societies is extended to assure the success of 

tit' Q i^' ^ " \ ^^^ occasion. The Georgian Ball Room, Pom- 

"^li^ r » ® / J peian Room, Silver Room and Private dining 
1 (4 <^ rooms are at your command. The environment 

\ / "^-Cl^"^ 1 -— is ideal and the service courteous and efficient. 
f^ V^^y ^"^ We invite inquiries and will be glad to furnish in- 
A \ L-.'^ formation relative to arrangements for any occasion. 
^ Ijji'i — OGLETHORPE CARS PASS RIGHT BY THE DOOR — 

3HT|U' ROOMS — Single, $3, $4, $5; Double, $5, $6, $7, $8 

ATLANTA BILTMORE 

The South's Supreme Hotel 



Compliments Of 

CAROLINA PORTLAND 
CEMENT COMPANY 



To abort a cold 
and prevent com- 
plications take 




The purified and refined 
calomel tablets that are 
nausealess, safe and sure. 

Vest pocket size 10c; 
large family package, 
35c. Beware of imita- 
tions. 



Headquarters for 

Kodaks and Supplies 

Ering Us Yoor Films for Development 
Correct Developing Means Better Pictures 

Eastman Kodak Stores, Inc. 

"THE LARGE KODAK STORE' 

183 Peachtree St. 



Best Taste in Gifts — 




WENDER & ROBERTS 

Buckhead's Leading Drug Store 

Phone Cherokee 2416-2417 
Buckhead Atlanta, Ga. 



Compliments 

of a 

Friend 



When the Fighting Petrels Don Cits 
They Use 

TRIO 

For Their Laundry Work 

Call IVy 1600 

Agency at Petrel Shop, Oglethorpe Univer 

Agency at the Petrel Shop, 

Oglethorpe University 



VANITY 


FAIR 


TEA ROOM 


Invites 


5 


Oglethorpe 


Teas, 


Bridge Parties, 


Banquets 



LATHAM 




, At Your Service Oglethorpe Students- 


and 




Special courtesies extended 




Wide selection for graduation gifts 


ATKINSON, 


Inc. 


$6 allowance on any old watch 


Jewelers 




185 Peachtree Street 



Compliments of 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford M. Stodghill 
BucKHEAD Cleaners 
BucKHEAD Barber Shop 
North Side Gift Shop 
Mr. Jeff M. Wigington 
Mr. Wyley Stephenson 
Kay and Lee Barber Shop 



Compilments 

of a 

Friend 



The cover on this book 
IS :he product of an organization 
of specialists whose sole work is 
the creation of unusual covers for 
School Annuals, Set Books, Histories, 
Catalogues, Sales Manuals and 
other Commercial Publications 

THE DAVID ]. MOLLOY CO 

j8j7 Nonl, Ty«K™ Avmu, 



Upholstering a Specialty 
Telephones Walnut 5828-5829 

CRAFTSMEN OF PERIOD FURNITURE 
RebuHders of Antique and Modern Pieces 

3S3 Boulevard, N. E., Atlanta, Ga. 
Trinity Studios, Decorating Department 
Interior Decorating, Consulting Decorating 



PARADIES & RICH 
Wholesale Fancy Grocers 

Distributors 
GOLD METAL FLOUR 

66 Magnum St., N. W., Atlanta, Ga. 



Compliments 

of a 

Friend 



GOLDBERG' S 


TAILORING & 


HABERDASHERY 


Phone Wa. 5974 


100 Forsyth Street 
Hotel Ansley 



TRAVEL VIA BUS 



Whether going- on a business or a pleasure trip — you wiU find it is the 

safest, fastest and most economical way to travel. 

The Colonial Stages System covers practically the entire United States. 




Colonial Stages South, Inc. 

Luckie & Cone Sts., Atlanta, Ga. 



JA. 4030 



JEWELERS 

Silversmiths 
Stationers 

Maier and Berkele" 
Gorham, Inc. 



Ill PEACHTREE STREET 

Atlanta, Ga. 



The 
Oglethorpe Sandwich Shop 

"The Petrel's Roosting Ground" 

Books and 
School Supplies 



At Your Service 

Bill and Henry Taylor, Managers 



y^'S^WW^ 





^^^M 



ATLANTA, GA.