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Full text of "Yamacraw, 1932"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/yamacraw193210ogle 




Tinouncmn 



REAVIS 0'NE\L JR. 




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YAMACRAW 



I 9 32 



ANNIVERSARY 

AND 

RADIO 
E D I T I ON 





To 

WILLIAM 
RANDOLPH 

HEARST 

By Arthur Brisbane 



The students of Oglethorpe Uni- 
versity, desiring to express their ap- 
preciation of your generous interest 
in Oglethorpe, and more especially to 
recognize your services to the coun- 
try as a whole, dedicate to you this 
college annvxil. 

Our radio division, WJTL, being 
the pioneer radio university of the 
u-orld, it seems to us appropriate 
that this annual should he dedicated 
to you, who, through numerous pub- 
lications, have done so many things 
that have never been done before, so 
much to enlighten and encourage mil- 
lions of Americans, so much to stim- 
ulate progress and patriotism. 




d)edLccdj&cC tcr 

WILLIAM RANDOLPH 

• HEARST- 



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FOREWORD 



Within recent years every liviiiy, vital 
art has gone through an inner bath of fire, 
and each has come out bettered. A few 
years back and we were chuckling at the 
eccentric joiirnalism advocated by William 
Randolph Hearst. X no longer marks the 
spot where the body was found, but indi- 
cates the birthplace of a newer and finer 
journalism. William Randolph Hearst has 
shown himself the apostle of progress with 
a text taken from human life. 

To William Randolph Hearst The Yam- 
acraw of 1932 is dedicated by a staff im- 
bued with his tenets of patriotism and 
progress. As joumalism has advanced 
through his efforts from cloying dullness 
to virility, so we believe that the cause of 
education ivill be bettered by the university 
of the air. Through the radio diision of 
Oglethorpe University 'knowledge is given 
to the many, just as through the Hearst 
newspapers wisdom has been given the 
masses. 

The university of the air and William 
Randolph Hearst are actuated by the same 
progressive motives, striving to do that 
which has not been done before. 

In this analogy the staff of The Yani- 
acraw of 1932 have striven to present that 
which has hitherto been unseen. With 
William Randolph Hearst as a central fig- 
ure and WJTL, the university of the air, 
as a central theme, we offer new recollec- 
tions of old memories in a strange and finer 
guise. 




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Contents 



1. University 

2. Classes 

3. Radio 

4. Athletics 

5. Features 

6. Fraternities 

7. Publications and Activities 

8. Comic and Advertisements 



Remembrance 



I cannot think of things that I have loved 
Without a bitter longing and regret! 
A wild plum tree, all tremulous and white, 
(Last spring it was) and I cannot forget. 

And once there was a boy with tawny hair, 
The color of a field of waving grain ; 
Two mystic pools of blue that were his eyes — 
My heart remembers with a knife-like pain. 

One day I came upon a waterfall. 
Close-hidden in a shadowy green wood ; 
A foaming spray dashed on the rocks below. 
(I think I'd not forget this if I could.) 

I cannot think of things that I have loved 

Without a bitter longing and regret. 

I would exile these things from memory. 

But it's my heart, my heart that won't forget! 



NiSBET LeConte, '35. 




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Ten Years of Radio 



Bu 



William Randolj-h Heakst 



Ten years ago the radio was introduced to our daily lives. 
Think of what the radio has attained to in these ten short 
years. 

The radio then was a strange, uncanny intruder into our 
lives, a disturber of our habits and customs. It has now be- 
come the friend of every household in the land. 

It has taken its place with the automobile, the moving 
picture and the press as one of the four cornerstones of our 
modern civilization. 

It entertains us. 

It enlivens dull hours. 

It brightens our lives and it does more. 

It performs fundamentally useful functions. 

It spreads education, widens our experience, increases our 
knowledge, refines our tastes, enlarges our vision, gives us 
that competence and culture which come from contact with 
the best and most informative things which the world has 
to offer. 

We often wonder how we could ever get along without 
the four supports of our modeni civilization. 

Oglethorpe University's "University of the Air," a result 
of the kindness and generosity of Dr. and Mrs. John Thomas 
Lupton, is another example of the entrenchment of the radio 
in our modern civilization. 

I wish it well, for it is a pioneer in an unexplored field. 




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THORNWELL JACOBS, A.B., M.A., LL.D., LITT.D. 

President of Oglethorpe University 



.-iSB=^*^.. 




JAMES FREEMAN SELLERS, A.B., M.A., LL.D. 
Dean of the University and Dean of the School of Science 



Herman J. Gaertner, A.B., A.M., Ped.D. 

Dean of School of Education 

Director of Extension Department 

George F. Nicolassen, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 
Dean of School of Liberal Arts 

James Edward Routh, A.B., Ph.D. 
Dean of Literature and Journalism 

*Mark Burrows, A.B., A.M., Ped.D. 
Dean of Secretarial Preparation 

John A. Aldrich, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. 
Professor of Physics and Astronomy 

W. M. Cunningham, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 
Dean of School of Commerce 

D. H. Overton, A.B. 

Dean of Physical Education 

Director of Intramural Sports 

*Frank Anderson, Sr., A.B. 
Registrar 

Witherspoon Dodge, A.B., M.A., D.D. 
Professor of Philosophy 

Harding Hunt, B.S., M.S. 
Professor of Biology 

Fritz Paul Zimmer, A.B. 
Professor of Fine and Applied Arts 

Earl L. Shepherd, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Science 

Mrs. Marie P.\telli, A.B. 

Professor of Italian 

Francisco Perez, A.B., M.A. 

Professor of Romance Languages 

Pierre S. Porohovshikov, A.B., M.A. 

Asst. Professor of Romance Languages 

B. E. Alward, A.B. 

Assistant Professor of Commerce 

H. E. Bannister, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Commerce 

Frank Davenport, A.B. 

Instructor in Science 

*WlLLIAM HiGGINS 

Physics Laboratory Assistant 

Margaret Vardaman, A.B. 

Assistant Instructor in Mathematics 

John Wigington 

Assistant in Art 

*Not in 



Myrta B. Thomas 

Librarian 

Graduate Library School, Emory Univ. 

* Robert Leseur Jones 

Asst. Editor Westminster Magazine and 

Bozart 

James P. Hansard, A.B., LL.B. 

Supt. of Oglethorpe University Press 

Harold J. Robertson, A.B. 

Football Coach 

T. Peden Anderson 

Bursar of the University 

*Sam Miller 

Dramatic Director 

* Lewis Haase 

Advisor In Dramatics 

Zaidee Ivy, A.B. 

Assistant to the Registrar 

*John Artley, Jr. 

Assistant Librarian 

*Thornwell Jacobs, Jr. 

Assistant Librarian 

*William Dalton Hays, Jr. 

Assistant Librarian 

* Russell Stovall 

Secretary to Radio Department 

* Margaret Stovall 

Secretary to President 

*Mrs. Bessie Mills 

Bookkeeper 

*Mrs. T. Peden Anderson 

Secretary to Bursar 

*Mary Hubner 

Secretary to Registrar 

Lynne Brannen 

WJTL Staff Director 

*David Brinkmoeller 

General Manager, WJTL 

Rex Dantzler 
WJTL Commercial Agent 

Robert McConnell 

WJTL Program Director 

Frank Parkins 

WJTL Technician 

Mrs. Annie L. Crum 
Dietician 
Picture 



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Officers of Class of 1932 

Ray Sewell ., President 

Frank Anderson, Jr Vice-president 

Mary Williamson Secretary-Treasurer 

Reavis O'Neal, Jr Class Poet 

COMMENCEMENT SPEAKERS 

Mary Williamson Valedictorian 

Reavis O'Neal, Jr Salutatoriaii 



FRANK ANDERSON, JR. 

Decatur, Ga. 

II K* 

Student-Faculty Council, 1; Sophomore 

Class President; Vice-president Senior 

Class; Blue Key; "O" Club; Football, 1, 2, 

3, 4; Basketball, 1; Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



HEWLETT BAGWELL 
Duluth, Ga. 

AS* 



EVELYN BAUGH 
East Orange, N. J. 
KA 
Matriculated from Upsala College, 1930; j 
Glee Club, 2; Petrel Follies, 3. 




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CHRISTINE BOST 

Atlanta 

KA 

Matriculated from Queen's College, 

1929; Players Club, 3, 4; Basketball, 2; 

Petrel Follies, 3. 




CHARLES BOURN 
Atlanta 

Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; Band, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



G. PARK BRINSON 
Millen, Ga. 
UK* 
Blue Key; Boar's Head; "O" Club; 
Track, 2; President Student-Faculty Coun- 
cil, 4; Petrel Club; Post Office manager, 2, 
3, 4; Infirmary assistant, 1; Leader Intra- 
murals, 3. 



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1 I. 



EARL B. BROOKS 

Marietta, Ga. 

Olympic Club 

Freshman football trainer, 4; Infirmary 

assistant, 2, 3, 4; Football, 1; Assistant 

manager Intramurals, 3. 



PARKER LEWIS BRYANT 

Summit, Ga. 

ALT 

Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; Football Captain, 4; 

Honorable mention for All-American end, 

3; Basketball, 1; Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4. 




A. G. CARTER, JR. 
Decatur, Ala. 
XAe 
Matriculated from Jones College, Fla.. 
2; Freshman baseball. 





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RICHARD CLARK 
Tuckahoe, N. Y. 
2AE 
Transferred from St. Lawrence Uni- 
versity, 4; Pipe Club. 



BETTY CRANDALL 

Atlanta 
KA 
Associate Editor Yamacraw; Debate 
Council, 3; Petrel Follies, 2, 3; Glee Club; 
German Club; Duchess Club; Co-Ed Lead- 
er, 4; Pan-Hellenic Council; Petrel Club. 



PAUL GOLDSMITH 
Atlanta 
KA 
Football, 2, 3, 4; Freshman football; "0" 
Club; Players Club. 



CHARLES THOMAS GARDNER 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

Blue Key; Boar's Head; DeMolay Club; 
Football, 1, 2, 3; President Sophomore 
Class; Vice-president Freshman Class; 
President Student Body; Assistant in Ac- 
counting. 




JOHN F. HALLMAN, JR. 
Atlanta 
K\ 
Vice-president Student Body; Vice-presi- 
dent Junior Class; Lords Club; Intramural 
"O", 3; All-Intramural Basketball, 3; Blue 
Key; Boar's Head. 




BURKE OSBOURNE HEDGES 
Havana, Cuba 

Players Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Debate Coun- 
cil; President Junior Class; Cheer Leader; 
Advertising Manager Stormy Petrel, 1 ; 
Blue Key; Pipe Club; "0" Club. 



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EDWARD L. HARNEY 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

eKX 





WILLIAM W. HIGGINS 
Atlanta 
eKX 
Transferred from North Georgia Agri- 
cultural College, 1; LeConte Society; De- 
bate Council, 3, 4; Assistant in Botany 
Laboratory, 2, 3; Assistant in Chemistry 
Laboratory, 3. 



LAWRENCE HIGHT 

Atlanta 

KA 

Lords Club; Intramural athletics. 




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ABNER JOHNSON 

Atlanta 

ATO 

Transferred from Sewanee, 3. 




ALLEN M. JOHNSON 

Norcross, Ga. 

OKX 

Commerce 








LYLE A. KRATZ 

Wheeling, W. Va. 

^2* 





ASHER LEE 
Atlanta 

eKx 

Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Arranger for studio orchestra WJTL. 




HALLET A. MacKNIGHT 
Columbiana, Ala. 
Olympic Club 
Transferred from Berry Junior College, 
3; Debate Council, 3; Editor Stormy Pet- 
rel, 4; Correspondent for Atlanta Geor- 
gian, 4. 



EDITH BAILEY MARSHALL 

Atlanta 

KA 

Transferred from Sweetbriar College, 2; 

Duchess Club; Players Club; Petrel Staff, 

3, 4. 



CHARLES MITCHELL 
Yatesville, Ga. 

Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball Captain, 4; 
Basketball, 1; "O" Club, Secretary. 




REAVIS CARLTON O'NEAL, JR. 
Atlanta 

Editor-in-chief Yamacraw of 1932; Edi- 
itor-in-chief Stormy Petrel, 2, 3; Debate 
Council, 2, 3, 4; Blue Key, 2, 3, 4; Coat-of- 
Arms, 4; Class Poet, 1, 2, 4; Assistant Li- 
brarian, 1, 2, 3; Class Historian, 2; Play- 
ers Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Petrel Club; Who's 
Who. 



EUGENIA GASTON PATTERSON 

Atlanta 

xn 

Players Club; Intramurals, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Vice-president Sophomore Class; Phi Kap- 
pa Delta; President of Pan-Hellenic Coun- 
cil; Historian of Junior Class; Secretary 
of Student Body. 



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GERALDINE REEVES 

Atlanta 

B<}>A 

Transferred from Judson College, 3; In- 

tramurals, 3, 4; Who's Who, 3; Players 

Club; Honor Roll, 3. 




RAY S. SEWELL 
Newnan, Ga. 
eKX 
Blue Key; President Senior Class; As- 
sistant in Accounting Laboratory, 3, 4. 




MARIE SHAW 
Atlanta 
B*A 
Phi Kappa Delta; Coat-of-Arms; Play- 
ers Club, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club; Yamacraw 
Staff, 3; Intramurals, 3; Junior represen- 
tative Co-Ed Council, 3; Petrel Club; Pan- 
Hellenic Council. 



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BESSIE SILVERBOARD 

Atlanta 

Honor Roll, 3; Coat-of-Arms, 4. 



JULIAN STOVALL 
Valdosta, Ga. 
UK* 
Lords Club; Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; Players 
Club; "O" Club. 





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VIRGINIA DeWOLF TEMPLEMAN 

Atlanta 
Players Club, 1, 4; Petrel Follies, 1, 2; 
Girl's High Club. 





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GORDON WHITE 
Atlanta 
ALT 
Business Manager Yamaeraw of 1932; 
Blue Key; Zeta Upsilon; Petrel Club; Stu- 
dent-Faculty Council, 4. 



EDNA WHITEHEAD 
Atlanta 

Transferred from University of Geor- 
gia; Glee Club. 



MARY KATHLEEN WILLIAMSON 
Atlanta 
B-i-A 
N.A.P.S. Club; Pan-Hellenic Council; 
Coat-of-Arms; Phi Kappa Delta; Most In- 
tellectual, 2, 3; Secretary and treasurer 
Senior Class. 



ROY WARREN 
Millen, Ga. 
Olympic Club 
Winner American Bankers Scholarship, 
1930; Assistant manager Baseball, 3; man- 
ager baseball, 4. 




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MRS. AMY SILKS KNIGHT 
Atlanta 




^ 



GLADYS BRIDGES 
Atlanta 
B<I>A 
Players Club; Intramural Basketball 
team; Assistant to Dean of School of Sec- 
retarial Preparation. 



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\ \ \ 



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GEORGE NICHOLSON 
Augusta, Ga. 

eKN 

Class historian 2, 3; Petrel Staff, Adver- 
tising manager, 2, Business Manager 3; 
Intramural athletics. 



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TAI-HO WOOH 
Pyeng-Yang, Korea 
Union Christian College, Korea, Pasa- 
dena College A.B., 1930; Graduate study 
Rutgers University, Graduate study Ogle- 
thorpe University. 



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Senior History 



By Betty Crandall 



Scene: In Dr. Jacobs' office at Oglethorpe University, Ga. All the professors are 
seated around a large table in the middle of the room. Dr. Jacobs is at the head 
of the table. 

Time: May 29, 1932. Sunday Morning. 

Dr. Jacobs: This meeting has been called in order that we may have a round-table 
discussion of the class that is to be graduated tonight. Dr. Sellers, what is 
your earliest recollection of these boys and girls? 

Dr. Sellers: Let me see, mine is a greased pig contest held when they were freshmen. 

Dr. Gaertner: It was held during the half at the Loyola game, wasn't it? It seems 
to me the freshmen won. 

Dr. Aldrich: They did and do you remember that freshman football game with Chatta- 
nooga, when Dapper Myers made those two long runs for a touchdown? 

Coach Robertson: (reclining in his chair and putting his thumbs in his vest) Well, 
don't ever forget Paul Goldsmith's playing in that Georgia game, when we beat 
'em 13 to 7. 

Dr. Roiith: This class has done other things besides football; Reavis O'Neal was Edi- 
tor of The Stormy Petrel in '29 and he was Secretary and Treasurer of the 
Petrel Bible Class. Betty Crandall played in "Framed" and with Marie Shaw 
in "Innocent Child" in '29. 

Dr. Burrows: Don't forget Eugenia Patterson was Vice-President of the Sophomore 
Class in '29 and President of the Pan-Hellenic Council in '30. 

Dr. Sellers: It seems to me it was in '29 that the football team was entertained by 
a movie star when they went to Charleston, am I right? 

Dr. Gaertner: You are; the star was Jack Hoxie a cowboy star and the guests were: 
Frank Anderson Jr., Clay Sypert, Parker Bryant, and Paul Goldsmith. 

Mr. Anderson: And now just listen to the list of baseball players this class has pro- 
duced: Sypert, Bryant, Anderson, and Mitchell, not to forget Luke Appling, 
wish he'd stayed with us, but he was quite an asset to the Crackers in '30 and 
also the White Sox in '31. 



Dr. Htini: Now, brother, it seems to me we defeated Georgia in '30 in baseball, um huh! 

Mr. Anderson: Yes Sir! Two games 7-0 and 10-3 with Mitchell in both games. 

Mr. Perez: Say, let's talk about the girls. 

Coach Overton : They did well in athletics. The year before I came they had an all- 
slar team and Christine Bost and Eugenia Patterson were named for that. 

Coach Robertson : But to talk of really interesting things, I can still see "Tanky" 
Anderson sending that 32-yard pass to "Lefty" Sypert in the Furman game 
in '30. 

Dr. Jacobs: It was beautiful! Do you know there were six of this year's class on 
the honor roll of 1930. Mary WilliamLon, Marie Shaw, Harold Coffee, Eugenia 
Patterson, Edith Marshall, and Ray Sewell. 

Dr. Burrows: They've kept up their high standard until the last, too; why this year 
there were nine Seniors on the honor roll; Evelyn Baugh, Mary Williamson, 
Rcavis O'Neal, Edith Marshall, Bessie Silverboard, Ray Sewell, Marie Shaw, 
Eugenia Patterson, and Edna Whitehead. 

Dr. Aldrich: Ray Sewell, Roy Warren, Jerry Reeves, Lawrence Hight and Reavis 
O'Neal were also elected to Phi Kappa Delta. 

Dr. N^colasscn: Marie Shaw and Reavis O'Neal were awarded the Oglethorpe Coat- 
cf-Arms for making an average of 93 for five consecutive terms. 

Dr. Sellers: What about the Debating team? Reavis O'Neal and William Higgins 
were on that, were they not? 

Dr. Roitth: Yes they were and Reavis O'Neal is the Editor of this year's Yamacraw, 
too, with Gordon White his Business Manager. 
(A knock is heard on the door.) 

Dr. Jacobs: Come in. 

Miss Maigarct Stovall: Excuse me. Doctor, but it's getting late and you are supposed 
to meet the Seniors to rehearse graduation. 

Dr. Jacobs: Thank you. Miss Stovall — I did not realize it was getting so late. 
(She exits.) 

And now I must hurry, will see you all down at the Church tonight, be sure 
and be there about 7 o'clock. (He exits). 
(All the other proIeLsors walk out, talking as they go.) 



Diploma — and- 



Now we must part to walk the fated ways 

That lead us irrevokably apart; 

But I shall woo the dreams of yesterdays 

When we were young and life was at its start. 

How vain to say that I shall soon forget 

The far-flown hours of the tender past, 

For I shall tread remembered ways and let 

Death bring me glad forgetfulness at last. 

And on some crowded street, caught in a throng 
Of strangers, I shall hear a whistled note. 
Refrain we knew of some old cherished song. 
Then I shall feel the fog within my throat. 
And in the lilting of that old refrain 
I'll know forgetful years were spent in vain. 

— Reavis O'Neal, Jr. 




unic/M. 




Junior Class Officers 

George Gaillakd President 

Reed Craven Vice-President 

Lee Bennett Secretary-Treasurer 



WILLARD ALLISON 

Atlanta 

Instructor in Biology Laboratory. 



JOHN ARTLEY 

ALT 

LaGrange, Ga. 

LeConte Society; Asst. Librarian 1, 2, 3. 



LEE BENNETT 

Atlanta 
Basketball 1; Student Council 2; Glee 
Club 2; Class Secretary 2. 





JOHN BITTING 

Decatur, Ala. 
Football 1, 2, 3; Players Club 1, 2, 8; 
Petrel Follies 2. 



LUISE BODE 
xn 
Atlanta 
Transferred from University of Geor- 
gia; Intramural Letter, 2; Follies, 2. 




GLADYS BRIDGES 

Atlanta 
Basketball 1; Glee Club 2; Intramural 
Letter 2; Commerce Assistant 3. 




GEORGIA BROWN 

B*A 

Atlanta 

Basketball 1; Delta Sigma Phi sponsor, 3. 



JOSEPH CLEMENTS 

Atlanta 

Transferred from Georgia Tech. 



REED CRAVEN 

ALT 

Atlanta 

Baseball; Vice-President Class of 1933; 

Manager of intramural athletics; "0" 

Club; Knights of the Pipe; Co-Editor of 

Stormy Petrel 3. 




DANIEL DUKE 

ALT 
Fairburn, Ga. 
Chairman Debate Council 3; 
chief Stormy Petrel 2. 



Editor-in- 




/_ /_ 



WILLIAM FREEDMAN 

eK\ 

Elizabeth, N. J. 

Freshman football; basketball manager; 

Debate Council; Asst. football manager; 

Circulation manager Petrel; Cheerleader; 

Players Club. 






GEORGE GAILLARD 

UKl' 

Savannah, Ga. 

Football 1, 2, 3; "0" Club; Blue Key; 

Lords Club; Class President 3; Petrel Fol- 

1 03 ; Players Club. 




CLINTON HOLBROOK 
AS* 
Atlanta 
Knights of the Pipe; LeConte Honorary 
Scientific. 



GEORGE HURT 

ALT 

Atlanta 

Trasferred from Georgia Tech. 




DANIEL KENZIE 

Chicago, 111. 

Football 1, 2, 3: "0" Club; Basketball 1. 



HOUSTON LUNDY 
ALT 
Milton, Fla. 
Transferred from Berry College; 
Knights of the Pipe; Print Shop 2, 3. 




HOWARD MARTIN 

KA 

Atlanta 

Lords Club; Petrel Staff 1; Players 

Club; Football manager 3; Stage manager 

Players Club 2, 3. 








W. R. MASSENGALE, JR. 
KA 
Atlanta 
Lords Club; Players Club; Debate Coun- 
cil; Student-Faculty Council 2; Advertis- 
ing Mgr. Yamacraw 2, 



MARIE MAULDIN 
KA 
Bolton, Ga. 
Transferred LaGrange College; Duchess 
Club; Glee Club. 



V 




JOHN F. OAKEY 
ALT 

Forest, Miss. 
LeConte Society; Knights of the Pipe; 
Debate Council. 




JOHN PATRICK 
Olympic Club 
Chicago, HI. 
Football captain, 4; football 1, 2, 3; "O" 
Club; Class Poet 2. 




,#»: 



JOHN MICHAEL PUTNO 

Olympic Club 

East Chicago, Ind. 

Football 1, 2, 3; President "O" Club; 

Basketball 1; Treasurer Student Body 3. 




EDWARD REDER 
KA 

Babylon, L. I., New York 
Orchestra 1 ; Lords Club. 



VIRGINIA RIGGS 

Atlanta 
Transferred from Peabody College. 



CATHERINE IDA SHAW 
Atlanta 
Transferred from St. Petersbui-g Junior 
College. 




MABEL STANTON 
Decatur, Ga. 



JOHN STATHAM 

ALT 

Covington, Ga. 

Transferred from Emory Junior College. 





MARY ROBERTA STEADWELL 
AAA 
Atlanta 
Student at Vanderbilt and Peabody Col- 
lege. 




SAMUEL TARANTINO 
Olympic Club 
Savannah, Ga. 
Football 1, 2, 3; Debate Council; In- 
tramural letter 2. 




CHARLES SPENCER WORTHY 

KA 

Columbus, Ga. 

LeConte Society. 



Junior History 



When seniors get their diplomas and leave the campus, someone 
always wonders who is going to fill the gap left by their departure. 
The answer is always found in the Junior Class. 

The Class of 1933 is well represented in all lines of college ac- 
tivities. On the Debate Council is Dan Duke as chairman. Duke is 
also president-elect of the student body and is a member of Blue Key. 
Captain of the 1932 football team is John Patrick and under him several 
juniors disport themselves: to wit, Gaillaril, Kenzie, Patrick, Putno, 
and others. 

Robert Leseur Jones, the most outstanding college poet in this 
rection, is a junior and will edit The Yamacraw next year in addition 
to the Westminster Magazine and Bozart. His business manager is 
W. R. Massengale. 

Football Manager Howard Martin, Catcher Reed Craven, who also 
co-edits The Petrel, are included in the roster. 

Various other luminaries dot the pages of the class roll and include 
Wearer of the Coat-of-Arms Clinton Holbrook, talented Almon Raines, 
Instructor Willard Allison, Librarian John Artley, Scientist Spencer 
Worthy, Debutante Peggy Underwood, and a host of others distinguished 
in their several fields. 



Query of Escape 

By Robert Leseur Jones 



Since we must lose our earthliness at last, 

Where shall we find a secret halidom 

Beyond the battle din of deities 

Who seek the golden throne of Kingdom Come? 

There is no peace among the thousand gods, 
No truce to quiet Buddha or Messiah, 
When each Osiris is Beelzebub 
And any prophet metaphysic liar. 

Along the windy corridors of sky 

Divine encounters multiply like thunder, 

As elfish juggernauths are beaten back 

And Brobdingnags assume the sacred plunder. 

The rabid clamor permeates the earth: 
A hundred foes refuse a sacrament; 
The altar is a place for demigods 
To mouth old malices in discontent. 

Incredulence and credulence abound; 

No warring deity has counterpart. 

In bitter, cataclysmic skirmishing 

Each god has sacked the sanctum of a heart. 

Therefore, I ask, how may we pass among 
These bastioned divinities who wait 
Behind a snare of mythologic words, 
To seek the hidden Golden Fleece of Fate? 

Where may we go beyond belligerents 
Who barricade themselves behind a creed. 
To see a secret urge uncurl the fern. 
To feel beneficence inspire the seed? 

There is no password to apocalypse. 
There is no certain earthly shibboleth 
To covert regions of oblivion. 
As near or far as we surmise, save death. 



Ml 




Sophxjmur^^ 






Officers of Sophomore Class 



Philip Hildreth ; President 

Frances Smith Vice-president 

Aline Fraser „. Secretai-y-Trcasui-ey 

Martha Keys Historian 



DONALD ADERHOLD 
Atlanta 



WOODROW BROOKS 
High Point, N. C. 



FLORENCE BRYAN 
Atlanta 



MARY BRYAN 
Atlanta 



EMORY CHANDLER 
Milledgeville, Ga. 



MARGARET CUMMINS 
Atlanta 





VIRGINIA CLEVELANJ) 
Atlanta 



PERCY DIXON 
Waycross, Ga. 



G-'DNEY FLYNT 
Decatur, Ga. 



ALINE ERASER 
Atlanta 



MARY FRANCES GAV 
Atlanta 



DOUGLAS HANSARD 
Ashburn, Ga. 



MARTHA KEYS 
Atlanta 



SIDNEY KILPATRICK 

Montgomery, Ala. 



HERMAN LANGE 
Savannah, Ga. 



JEANETTE LINCH 
Atlanta 



MARCELLA LUCKEISH 
Atlanta 



VIOLA MARTIN 
Atlanta 




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CHESTER PARHAM 
Atlanta 



WAYNE PICKARD 
Cartersville, Ga. 



SARAH SHARP 
Atlanta 



FRANCES SMITH 
Atlanta 



HELEN STEVENS 
Atlanta 



EVELYN TERRELL 
Atlanta 



I ^ 



HELEN VAUGHN 
Atlanta 



JOHN WIGINGTON 
Atlanta 



SARAH WILKERSON 
Atlanta 



HARRY WRENS 
Wrens, Ga. 




MILDRED EAVES 
Atlanta 




The Riddle 



By Merle M. Elsworth 

Who loves a lake, loves water, fickle stuff; 

Who loves a tree, loves wood, to ax foredoomed; 
Who loves a city, has rebuke enough; 

Who loves a body, loves the swift-entombed. 
This being so, what solace shall he find, 

What standard shall he raise against despair, 
Who dares to set his love upon a mind — 

The most impermanent of all things fair? 
If mind be fair in flesh we apprehend it; 

If mind wage war, through flesh its cause is fought; 
If mind have power, a stroke of time can end it — 

Dead Caesar's dust holds not dead Caesar's thought. 
Mind is not palpable for moment's pleasure; 

Yet for all time your mind is my mind's treasure. 




i^^^^smni^ 



iL^ 






Officers of Class of 1935 



Thomas Cooper President 

Suzanne Memminger Vice-president 

Thorn WELL Jacobs, Jr Secretary-Treasurer 

Barclay Jackson ...Poet 

Virginia Stitt - Historian 



ll 



JAMES ANDERSON 
Oglethorpe University, Ga. 



VERNON ANDERSON 
Shreveport, La. 



DOROTHY WYATT 
Atlanta 




AILEEN BROWN 
Atlanta 



MARVIN BENTLEY 
Savannah, Ga. 



OSCAR BRADEN 
Rome, Ga. 



JEAN BROWN 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



HENRY H. BUCHANAN 
Blakely, Ga. 



^^^f^.^'^ktA 




EVELYN BURNS 
Atlanta 



AVERY COFFIN 

Atlanta 



CAROLYN COGBURN 

Atlanta 



JANE CRENSHAW 
Atlanta 



VIRGINIA COMBS 
Wrens, Ga. 



THOMAS COOPER 
Miami, Fla. 



De ALVA CUMMINS 
Atlanta 



IRA STEWART 
Miami, Fla. 




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LAURA CAUSEY 
Atlanta 



IDABELLE DuPREE 
Atlanta 



DARRELL FUNDERBURKE 
Atlanta 



D. W. GENTRY 
Palmetto, Ga. 



NELLE JANE GAERTNER 
Atlanta 



JACQUELINE GORDY 
Atlanta 



FLOYD GAITHER, JR. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 



EMILY HARVEY 
Decatur, Ga. 




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MARY HUBNER 
Atlanta 



ELEANOR HARRISON 
Atlanta 



BENJAMIN HARGROVE 
Atlanta 



JULIA HENDERSON 
Atlanta 



FRANCES HURLEY 
Atlanta 



THORNWELL JACOBS, JR. 
Atlanta 



BARCLAY JACKSON 
Atlanta 



MARTHA KNAPP 
Atlanta 



VIRGINIA LEE 
Atlanta 



CATHERINE LITTLETON 
Atlanta 



JULIA LOVVORN 
Columbia, S. C. 



FRANCES MacDONALD 
Bolton, Ga. 



LEONTES Mcduffie 

Atlanta 



THEODOSIA McKELLAR 
Atlanta 



SARAH MITCHELL 
Bolton, Ga. 



ELSIE MORTON 

Atlanta 






* t 



i 





^ 




A »■ 




CHARLES MURPHY 
Morrow, Ga. 



VAUGHN OZMER 
Decatur, Ga. 



EVERETT PEED 
Atlanta 



JOSEPH J. PERRY, JR. 

Atlanta 



IRENE SEAY 
Duluth, Ga. 




PAUL PRATHER 
Atlanta 



MRS. D. CATHELL 
Atlanta 



JOSEPH SINGLETARY 
Atlanta 



KATHLEEN SIMMONS 
Atlanta 



JOSEPH SLATON 
Atlanta 



ARTHUR SMITHA 
Tuscaloosa, Ala. 



AUBREY SMITH 
Atlanta 



WILLIAM SMITH 
Gallatin, Tenn. 



MARJORIE SPRATT 
Atlanta 



LILYAN STARR 
Atlanta 



FRANCES STARBUCK 
Atlanta 








EARL CHRISTIANSON 
Miami, Fla. 



AMOS TEASLEY 
Hartwell, Ga. 



lONE UPSHAW 
Atlanta 



RUTH WARD 
Atlanta 



MARY WIGHT 
Atlanta 




HERBERT WILLIAMS 
Key City, Fla. 



History of the Freshman Class 

By Virginia Stitt 



It was a hot, a very hot day in September, 1931, when we, a throng 
of high school veterans entered upon a new conquest — that of over- 
powering the arts of Freshman college. But the heat had not lessened 
our courage, nor curbed our anticipation to discover what was in readi- 
ness for us. After meeting our classmates we felt confident that we 
could accomplish great things during our first year together. 

The election of class oflicers was an event of great importance, 
and at our organization meeting we elected Thomas Cooper as Presi- 
dent, Susanne Memminger, Vice President; and Thornwell Jacobs Jr. 
Secretary and Treasurer. 

The class of '35 is proud of its many accomplishments. We ranked 
high in scholarship, and many of us made the honor roll, Louis Evans 
leading with the average of 95.5. The boys were in their prime during 
the eventful season of football, the topnotch of college sports. Those 
who were honored with numerals are Metrick, Cobb, Harper, Smith, 
Martin, Chandler, George, Teasley, Beasely, Tranhart, Wright, Larkin, 
Robinson, Bentley, Stewart, Christiansen and Bearden. We are proud 
of these boys, and confident they will be a great addition to the varsity. 
Basketball was an exciting season. Jacqueline Gordy captured the 
honor of high score over both the boys and girls. 

We contributed much to the betterment of the Stormy Petrel and 
added our talent to the Players Club, the Glee Club and the orchestra. 
Many of our versatile freshmen took prominent parts in the programs 
over our own radio station WJTL located in Lupton Hall. The frosh 
decidedly featured in the weekly vaudeville skits sponsored by the 
Players Club at the Buckhead theater. 

All in all, the class of '35 performed greatly as Freshman, and we 
only hope that we will keep up the good standard set in 1931-32. 



Autumnal 

By Israel Newman 



Ours is no vivid flush of summers dying — 
The brightening of a glory that is brief — 
No aftermath which crowds beyond denying 
A summer's sunsets in each elm or oak; 
A summer's sunshine in each ripening leaf, 
Such fevers are not theirs whose slow existence 
Seems but a pointing-in of threads that broke; 
To see these they must hold them at a distance. 

For ours, unlike the maples and their kin. 

Is not one hectic season edged with frost. 

With life's first April does life's fall begin; 

Dream after dream grows golden and is lost 

Until we too are like those trees gone dry, 

Whose limbs look more like roots against the sky. 




adkf 




University of the Air 

(Written in collaboration bii the members of the class 
in Poetics at Oglethorpe Universiti/.) 

A message on electric threads of fire; 

A renaissance from heaven's endless space, 
With all the wonderment of Circe's lyre, 

Shall bring free wisdom to uplift the race. 
New lore and old, on slender, gilded wings 

Shall reach the seeker in remotest spheres; 
Enrich the humblest with the priceless things 

That sages give their lives for through the years. 

This stately college of the air decrees 

There shall be none too poor, too far away 

To touch the ancient Greece of Pericles, 
Or learn the latest science of today. 

So Oglethorpe shall spread what she has brought 

Of golden treasure from the mints of thought. 



Radio History 

Bi/ Vernon Anderson 

June 6, 1931 marked the beginning of a 
new era in the history of education. It 
was the birthday of Radio Station WJTL, 
the Radio Division of Oglethorpe Univer- 
sity. 

Early in the spring of 1931 Oglethorpe 
received the permission of the Federal 
Radio Commission to erect and operate a 
radio station. The generosity of Mr. and 
Mrs. John Thomas Lupton, donors of Lup- 
ton Hall, made possible the installation of 
one of the most completely equipped re- 
gional channel stations in America, whose 
call letters were formed from the initials 
of our gracious friends. 

At first the entire station was located in 
Lupton Hall, on the campus of the Uni- 
versity. The entire Biology Department 
was moved from Lupton Hall to Lowry 
Hall to make room for the new Radio Di- 
vision. Two large studios were constructed 
and elaborately equipped and a small room 
was turned into a transmitting and control 
room. 

Thus on June 6, with the beginning of regular lectures, Oglethorpe University be- 
came the possessor of the first standard Radio College in the history of the world. 
There have been many educational programs presented over many broadcasting sta- 
tions, but never before, so far as we have been able to learn, in the history of this 




I I f 



-i^iil 




or any other country, has a complete college 
ccurse been broadcast by a complete faculty in 
the same manner as when offered on the campus. 
The equipment of WJTL is of the latest type 
available The transmitter is an RCA 100-W, 
employing direct crystal control and 100 percent 
modulation. RCA microphones and amplifiers 
are used in the studios. In addition, a new 
RCA frequency monitor has recently been pur- 
chased to enable the station to comply with the 
new government regulations concerning fre- 
quency deviation and frequency checking. 

After a few months of operation in Lupton 
Hall, officials of the University decided that 
greater Atlanta could be better served by moving 
the transmitter nearer the center of the city. 
Accordingly, therefore, the Yaarab Shrine 
Mosque, one of the most beautiful buildings in 
the South, was picked as the new site for the 
transmitter. At the same time it was decided 
to erect a new type of antenna which would also 
add to the efficiency of the station. This new an- 
tenna, which is a seven ton, 135 foot, base-insulated steel tower, is the first quarter- 
wave vertical radiator in the world. It represents an achievement resulting from 
years of study and research directed toward the production of a system giving maxi- 
mum radiation of the power supplied to it. Engineers have pronounced it the ultimate 
in antenna construction. The tower was erected atop the Mosque and directly under 
it a transmitting room and a small studio were built. The large studios at Ogje- 
thorpe were retained, having been connected with the new transmitter location by 
special telephone lines. About the middle of November the work was completed and 
one Sunday afternoon WJTL broadcast her first program from the Yaarab Shrine 
Mosque. Reports soon showed that the expectations of the officials were justified. 

A glance at a day's schedule will give some idea of the scope of the work carried on 
by the Radio Division. Each morning the station is opened with a devotional program 
from 6:45 to 7:00. This is followed by an hour of variety musical programs. At 
eight o'clock Dr. H. J. Gaertner lectures on beginners' German. A lecture is of 





fifty minutes duration and is followed 
by s. ten minute recess, during which 
music is offered. At nine o'clock Dr. 
James E. Routh Isctures on English, 
Idioms and Good Usage. A lecture on 
an Introduction to Economics is pre- 
sented by Dr. Wallace McCook Cun- 
ningham at ten o'clock, and at eleven 
Dr. James E. Routh lectures on Types 
ci' literature. Prof. Francisco Perez 
offers a course in Beginners' Spanish 
at twelve o'clock. Luncheon hour lasts 
from, twelve-fifty until two o'clock. Dur- 
ing this time a varied musical program 
is presented over the station. At two 
o'clock Dr. Witherspoon Dodge resumes 
the educational program with a lecture 
on Contemporary Civilization. At three 
o'clock Dr. Wallace McCook Cunning- 
ham lectures on Business Problems. At 
four Dr. Witherspoon Dodge returns to 
the air to lecture on an Introduction to 
Philosophy. At five o'clock Dr. Mark 
Burrows concludes the day's educational 
activity with a lecture on the Biography 
of Musicians, magnificently illustrated 
with recordings of their respective 
works. From five-fifty until twelve, 
midnight, various commercial and sus- 
taining programs are presented. 
Announcement has ju3t been made that Oglethorpe University will institute a com- 
plete four year course in radio broadcasting. This course will begin with the open- 
ing of the fall term in September of this year Every phase of radio work, including 
the commercial, managerial and technical aspects, will be taught, together with courses 
in announcing, studio direction and program formulation. Completion of the required 





four year course entitles a student to a degree 
of Bachelor of arts in the School of Radio 
Broadcasting. Oglethorpe thus becomes the 
first standard university in the world to offer a 
full four-year course in radio learing to an 
accredited college degree. The regular faculty 
of the new radio college will be headed by Dr. 
James E. Routh as dean, and others of the 
Oglethorpe faculty, as follows: Dr. John A. 
Aldrich, physics; Dean J. F. Sellers, chemistry; 
Dean W. McCook Cunningham, business adminis- 
tration; Dr. Mark Burrows, music; Dr. Thorn- 
well Jacobs, history of earth and its inhabitants; 
Professor Porohoushikoff, Professor Perez and 
Professor Pattelli. modern languages; Dr. Gaert- 
ner, psychology; Dr. D. Witherspoon Dodge, ra- 
dio ethics. 

Instructors in professional courses will be 
headed by David Brinkmoeller, director of Sta- 
tion WJTL of the university, who will lecture 
on studio management and studio direction, and / 

Vernon Anderson and Frank Parkins, of the / 

studio staff, on radio theory. 

The personnel of radio station WJTL has been drawn from every branch of the 
radio field, and from the student body of the university. The staff is as follows: 

David Brinkmoeller, formerly manager of WGST, is now director of WJTL. 

Frank Parkins, formerly chief engineer of WRBI is the chief engineer in charge 
of WJTL's technical department. 

The program management is under Jeff MacMillan. 

Joe Paget, Barclay Jackson, Spencer Worthy and Al Herrick are announcers and 
control operators. 

George Moore and Maurice Coleman are commercial representatives. 

Al Riley, Frank Whitmore and Vernon Anderson are engineers. 

Because the activities of the Radio Division are not confined solely to the edu- 
cational field, its history is not complete without some mention of its entertainment 
facilities. It has put on the air some of the foremost musical talent of the South. 





The Oglethorpe orchestra under the direc- 
tion of Jeff MacMillan became the WJTL 
studio orchestrp. and endeared itself to the 
hearts of all who listened. Oglethorpe 
football games have been and will be 
broadcast. Sunday devotional programs 
are a regular feature. 

Clo.^ely linked with its educational work, 
arc the dramatic features presented by 
WJTL. Sponsored by the Oglethorpe 
Players' Club, a series of plays were broad- 
cast and received favorable response. A 
class in radio drama was begun and pro- 
duced some plays of notable quality. This 
phase of work is largely under the direc- 
tion of Dr. James E. Routh. The pioneer 
work begun by the students under his di- 
rection and guidance will be continued and 
enlarged upon. It is rapidly becoming one 
of the most important features of the 
Radio Division. 

The introduction of the Radio Division 
to Oglethorpe University also opened up 
many new opportunities to members of the 
student body who wished to work for a 
part of their college expenses. A large 
number of these students are employed by 
WJTL. The studio orchestra is made up 
entirely of students, and several regular 
members of the staff of entertainers were drawn from the student body. 

A large part of the personnel of WJTL is composed of students. Some who had 
the required characteristics were trained as announcers and those with technical 
training were employed as engineers. As entertainers, Oglethorpe students have 
proved highly versatile and some artists of real merit have been found. 






/ 



^^^hvthalL^ 




HAROLD J. ROBERTSON 
Head Football Coach 



ALBERT CHURCH 
Trainer 

HOWARD MARTIN 
Manager 





Football Scores, 1931 

Oglethorpe Opponents 

7 Chattanooga 12 

Duquesne 6 

Manhattan 13 

7 Loyola 12 

3 Furman 

12 Clemson 

37 Wake Forest 

6 Haskell 31 

Mercer 20 



72 



94 



Football Schedule, 1932 

Sept. 24 Howard College 

Oct. 1 _ Open 

Oct. 7 St. Xavier 

Oct. 14 Duquesne 

Oct. 22 _. Open 

Oct. 29 Manhattan 

Nov. 5 __. Syracuse 

Nov. 12 Loyola 

Nov. 24 __ - Mercer 

First and last games at home. 




History of 1932 Team 



By Philip Hildreth 



If one judges the success or failure of a football season by the number of games 
won or lost, then Oglethorpe was not successful during 1931. On the other hand, 
such an attitude is contrary to the fundamental idea of competitive athletics. The 
champions of such antagonistic attitudes will, unless suppressed, finally cause the 
downfall of college football. 

Football is played at Oglethorpe University by a squad of husky, healthy boys who 
love the game, who are learning things and developing qualities which will make them 
better men. Friendships are made on the Hermance Field gridiron which will last 
for many years. 

After a very successful four weeks' training period, the Stormy Petrels, captained 
by Parker Bryant, came to their first game with Chattanooga University. During the 
pre-seaseon period the individual material at Oglethorpe was conceded to be, as a 
whole, on a par with the best in the South. On the eve of the Moccasin game, Ed Miles 
remarked in the Atlanta Journal, "Oglethorpe's battle with Chattanooga should pro- 
vide Atlanta fans with one of the finest games of the local season. The teams are 
old rivals and Oglethorpe has not defeated the Moccasins in five years. They hope to 
break that unlucky string Saturday, having as they do one of the best teams in the 
history of their school and with Chattanooga not much stronger than they were last 







year." Nutty Campbell proved a sage when he predicted that the Moccasins would 
win the new Dixie Conference championship. 

This initial game with the University of Chattanooga was the first loss ever 
sustained by the Petrels on Hermance Field. Chattanooga put on a spirited last 
quarter drive and scored the winning points with but a few minutes to play. One 
will not forget quickly the beautiful run of Dapper Myers which put the Petrels 
ahead for the better part of the game. After the game, Jimmy Burns, of the At- 
lanta Georgian, said, "Myers and Anderson were heroes, even in defeat, but if vic- 
tory had been the Petrels' lot they would have been given more credit .... Chat- 
tanooga has a great line and a great center in Koeninger." The final score was 
12-7. As a bit of consolation Oglethorpe outgained Chattanooga from scrimmage 
155 to 92 yards. After this game the versatile Paul Goldsmith was shifted to end, 
being replaced at running guard by Marion Whaley, a reliable wheelhorse in the 
line. To Goldsmith's ability Coach Harry Robertson paid a glowing tribute after 
the season's end. Said sedate Coach Harry, "Goldsmith is the greatest player I 
have ever coached." 

Duquesne University was met in a nocturnal affair at Pittsburgh in the next 
game, played under a golden harvest moon. Some of the Petrels no doubt became 
moonstruck, and another loss was recorded. The Dukes outfought the Birds for three 
quarters, the last minute rally of the Petrels being stopped by a referee's whistle 
four yards short of the final stripe. The Pltlshiu gh Ledger commented, "Harry 









Robertson'E Petrels were outplayed during the first half, but in the second stanza 
they were several times dangerous. A bad decision just before the end of the game 
halted a rally that looked good for a touchdown, which would have meant either a 
tie game or a victory for Oglethorpe." Dan Kenzie's absence hurt the Petrels. A 
bright spot was Goldsmith's aggressiveness despite a painful broken finger. 

Manhattan College was ne.xt met, after three day's practice for the Petrels, under 
the arc lights at the Polo Grounds in Peter Stuyvesant's old hangout. Manhattan 
and Oglethorpe had the distinction in 1930 of playing the first night football game 
ever played in New York City. Manhattan lost that year 19-0, but in 1931 deserved 
their 12-0 victory under the capable tutelage of John Law, former Notre Dame star. 
The rhetorical New York Times sophisticatedly chirped, "Well -drilled in the for- 
mations that Knute Rockne taught Law at Notre Dame, the Jaspers bewildered the 
Georgians with a quick succession of reverses, cross bucks, spinners, double and 
triple passes, and had the Southerners well on the run for three of the four periods. 
In the third period Oglethorpe was at its best. Generating plays from the Chick 
Meehan military huddle, the Peirels slammed down the field for seven first downs in 
this period alone. A big 19.5-pound back, Putno, was the spearhead in that attack 
which overlapped slightly into the final quarter when the Black and Gold advanced 
to the Jasper 15-yard line." 

At this juncture came Ed Miles crying in the Atlanta Journal, "The vaunted 
Oglethorpe oft'ense has so far failed to put over the scoring punch. With two triple 









threat men in Frank Anderson, Jr., and Ray Walker there is no excuse for the team's 
not scoring, no matter whom they go up against. Harry Robertson has a fine football 
team out Peachtree way, but so far the boys have not started clicking. They have 
the ability, but timing and co-ordination are not there." 

In spite of the defeat the trip was most enjoyable to the team. At the Hotel 
Pennsylvania Jack Randolph Hearst, former Oglethorpe student, feted the team with 
a banquet at which Chick Meehan, then N.Y.U. coach and now Manhattan mentor 
and life-long friend of Coach Harry Robertson, spoke briefly. 

The Loyola game, played in New Orleans, was another night-prowling expedition, 
and the defeat suffered there was the biggest disappointment of the entire season. 
Loyola was pointing for Oglethorpe because of the blemish put on the Wolf slate, 
otherwise clean, in 1930. They made good their threats by putting up a powerful 
defense in the crises of the game. Score 12-7. Three times within the last ten min- 
utes of play the Petrels were inside the Loyola five-yard line with four downs to 
make a score. The New Orleans sports scribes politely stated, "Oglethorpe has 
evidently done something to peeve old Dame Fortune for she refused to smile upon 
the hard-fighting Petrels. The figures show that Oglethorpe outplayed the victors. 
Coach Robertson's combinations gained a total of 279 yards by rushing to 148 for 
Loyola and were credited with 17 first-downs to Loyola's 10." 

Following four consecutive losses, there was a bit of downheartedness, but no 
quitting. Coach Alexander, of Georgia Tech, suggested that Coach Harry, a fine 







> « «v 








baritone singer, sing to the boys between halves instead of pep-talking. Campus 
spirit hit a new high for the season with placards urging the team against the next 
foe, Furman University. The Peti-el Sliop and campus buildings blazed with signs, 
colors and pointed adjurations about a fifth loss. The student body armed with 
flowing streamers swarmed upon the field before the game and supported the team 
in a manner unexcelled in Petrel history. Sweeping down from the hills of Carolina 
came the undefeated Purple Hurricane. They, too, were pointing, for Oglethorpe 
had spoiled a perfect season for them in 1930. In the midst of the Furman fol- 
lowers blared a triumphant siren stirring the Amismen to action. Up and down 
the field tore the teams in the most heated battle seen in Atlanta in many a day. 
In the final stanza Clay Sypert booted a left-footed goal for Oglehorpe to put the 
game into the fabled larder. 0. B. Keeler in the Jounuil said, "It was a real win, 
no fluke to it. The Birds turned in a really heroic job in beating the undefeated 
Furman team." 

Into the Southern Conference sped the Petrels after their first victory over Fur- 
man, with Clemson as opponents. Said Ed Danforth in the Atlanta Constitution, 
"Oglethorpe's Stormy Petrels continued their recently launched victory march with 
a 12-0 conquest of the Clemson Tigers. Dapper Myers, flashy Petrel fullback, pro- 
vided the sensation of the day when he broke through the Tiger line in the first 
quarter and dashed 62 yards for the first touchdown." And in the Greenville (S. C.) 
Record, "The Clemson game was an easy victory for Oglethorpe, and the 12-0 score 













does not represent the margin of victory. The Petrels gained 231 yards from scrim- 
mage to 72 for Clemson." 

After a week's lay-olf, the Petrels crossed fingers and went up against Wake 
Forest College on Friday, November 13th. Declared Jack Kytle of the AiUinta 
Georgian, "The Petrels ripped a giant Wake Forest team to pieces on Hermance 
Field, burying the Deacons under a 37-0 score." Continued Ed Miles in the Jonr- 
nul, "Never has an Oglethorpe team played a more powerful brand of football than 
they showed against the gigantic Wake Forest team. Never have linesmen charged 
with more overwhelming power than that showed by Parker Bryant, Paul Gold- 
smith, Dan Kenzie, Dave Barrow, John Patrick, Andy Morrow, and Julian Stovall, 
the starters, and by Pickard, Whaley, Shouse, and others who went in later. Ogle- 
thorpe's backfield stars were numerous. Anderson, Herrin, Myers, Walker, Sypert, 
Harrison, and Raines were scintillant on defense and powerful beyond words on 
offense." 

Came the disaster. For charity Oglethorpe met the Haskell Institute Indians 
on Soldiers' Field in Chicago. The game was not a regularly scheduled affair, 
being added after the start of the season. Oglethorpe was entirely outclassed and 
lost, 31-6. The Indians had not scouted and their tricky offense completely baf- 
fled Oglethorpe at times. It was a fine sight to see Oglethorpe come back in the last 
quarter to score their lone marker. The Chicago Herald grunted, "Oglethorpe was 
the victim of some very bad medicine yesterday, stirred up by the Haskell Indians 




JLrA 





who defeated the Southerners 31-3. Oglethorpe made a nice come-back in the last 
quarter and Raines scored on a beautiful pass from Walker. The score would in- 
dicate a rout, but Oglethorpe played a bang-up game of ball. The defensive work 
of Raines, Herrin, and Pickard was the only Petrel spark in a war-dance of flying 
redmen." 

With the sick and crippled huddled disconsolately on the sidelines five days later, 
the Petrels, almost stormless, were hosts to the arch rival, Mercer University, in 
the annual Thanksgiving embroglio. The Oglethorpe team played on spirit alone, 
and Mercer was riding the crest of a successful season. The outcome was never 
in doubt. As Jimmy Burns' post-mortem ran, "Out of the half-dozen or more heroic 
figures in the thrill-punctuated game at Hermance Stadium yesterday, only one wore 
the Gold and Black of Oglethorpe. He was Dan Kenzie, the Petrel's right tackle, 
who fought his heart out in the vain, yet gallant, attempt to stave off Mercer's 
20-0 victory." 

Jack Troy's say-so in the Atlanta Constitution was appropriate. "And so they 
ended their season with a defeat, did the Petrels, ended as they had begun, losing 
but fighting. Since there is more to football games than bare results, the Oglethorpe 
squad has nothing to feel badly over. Never once has their fighting spirit lagged." 








D. H. OVERTON 
Freshman Football Coach 



LYLE KRATZ 
Assistant Freshman Football Coach 









<e 




FRANK B. ANDERSON 
Baseball Coach 



Baseball Scores, 1932 

Oglethorpe Opponents 

2 University of Florida 6 

4 University of Florida 6 

8 Georgia Tech 

3 Georgia Tech 5 

7 Georgia Tech 1 

17 Georgia Tech 1 

13 - University of Georgia 4 

8 University of Geeorgia 7 

13 University of Georgia — 

5 Auburn 6 

4 Auburn 11 

1 Auburn 3 

5 Auburn 12 



90 



62 








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Baseball, 1932 



With the selection of Charlie George, stellar Petrel outfielder on the College Humor 
Ail-American Baseball Team, Coach Frank Anderson closed another season of base- 
ball at Oglethorpe. His team had won the city championship by virtue of three 
victories over perennial rivals, Georgia Tech; had triumphed over University of 
Georgia player, he has acquired the reputation of being able to watch a prospect 

Auburn, by virtue of brilliant play at bat in the field, repeated her flag winning 
performance of 1931 and easily coasted into first place. 

Baseball at Oglethorpe is a monument to Frank Anderson. Himself a former 
Georgia player, he has acquired the reputation of being able to watch a prospect 
plow a field and tell whether or not there is baseball in his bones. 

Captain Charles Mitchell, after four years of Andersonian tutelage, was one of 
the leading moundsmen of the Dixie League. The tall, lanky product of Yeatsville 
nonchalantly twirled winning baseball in such fashion as to merit the praise given 
him by southern newspapers. 

Frank Anderson, Jr., one of three Andersons who have represented Oglethorpe 
on the diamond, concluded his career in a burst of glory. 

Marion Whaley and Reed Craven handled the fast slants of the Petrel twirlers 
superlatively. 

Big Parker Bryant at first base will be missed next year. His fielding was a 
wonder to behold. 






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Percy Dixon and Happy Vance, a duo who played together through prep days, 
formed a battery greatly feared by all opponents. 

Deserving of most praise for the 1932 season is Email Harold Martin, capable 
shortstop. Although he tipped the scales at the Lilliputian figure of 120 pounds, he 
tripled his weight at the bat and bids fair to be one of the most versatile players ever 
coached by Anderson. 

Jack Moore, B. Clark, Truman Riggins, Emerson Evans, Eddie Anderson, Currie 
Martin, Harold Blackwell, Sam Baker, Monford Whitley, and the twins, Burkhalter 
and Wall, will give Frank Anderson a nucleus about which to build a formidable 
machine for 1933. 

The passing of the Dixie League is to be regretted Fathered by Anderson, of 
Oglethorpe, and White, of Georgia, it brought college baseball in the South back to 
a position of prominence. 

Efforts will be made to form another loop with perhaps Oglethorpe, Auburn, 
Clemson, Alabama, Chattanooga, and one other nearby college. 

Major league scouts were in abundance during the past season and several Dixie 
League players will perform in the big tent as a result. 



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THE OGLETHORPE "0" CLUB 



Intramural Sports 

B]i D. H. Overton, Director 

In order to extend the benefits of organized athletic compe- 
tition to all students of Oglethorpe University, instead of only 
to those who take part in intercollegiate competition, the De- 
partment of Physical Education sponsors the program of In- 
tramural Athletics. 

The purpose of the intramural department is to encourage 
every student to participate in some or all intramural sports, 
to provide facilities for this participation, to organize and pro- 
mote intramural competition and to stand for fair play and true 
Eljortsmanship. 

This program includes competitive sports for every student 
on the campus. Students thus benefit from the wholesome ef- 
fect of organized sports, and from the physical development 
which naturally follows. 

Intramural competitors, strangers at first but later friends, 
learn courage, determination, and self control. Qualities of 
loyalty, self-sacrifice and team play are also thoroughly in- 
grained in each individual through this program. 

The fact that the intramural program provides continuous 
competition in some sport throughout the school year assures 
each participating student of physical exercise every day of 
the school year. 




The First Intramural Program 



For the first time in the history a full powered program 
of intramural athletics was launched in 1931-2 by Coach Jack 
Overton. The stocky director from Gatorland directed the 
program with great ability and brought it to a highly suc- 
cessful conclusion. 

The range of sports was wide, including football, baseball, 
basketball, tennis, track and cross country, swimming, and 
golf. 

In football, organized on the fraternity and club idea, 
Pi Kappa Phi romped to an easy victory, concluding with no 
defeats. Stellar playing by Park Brinson and B. Clark in the 
backfield and a sturdy line helped them on. 

Not content with this first crash into the ranks of winners. 
Pi Kappa Phi repeated in the fraternity tourney, wrestling a 
close one from Kappa Alpha to win the cup 

Free throwing aroused much interest and after tedious 
tryouts, Monford Whitley and Helen Stevens succeeded in looping more balls through 
the hoops than any others. 

Tennis found Charles Bourn and Benjamin Hargrove battling for supremacy. 
Hargrove, a first year man, defeated Bourn, former title holder, in a gruelling and 
tense match. 

In the feminine sports. Beta Phi Alpha ruled supreme. 
Combining doughty hearts with pulchritude, the sorority girls 
smeared their Chi Omega and Kappa Delta opponents all over 
the lot to win the all-around pennant. 

Perhaps the most favorable feature of the whole sports 
program was the welding of fast friendships. The Olympic 
Club, newest local on the campus, found its birth in the ath- 
letic competition, as did the All-Americans and other hitherto 
unorganized groups. 









March 31st, 1932 



Miss Betty Crandall 

Ass 't. Editor of Yamacraw 

Oglethorpe University, Ga. 



My dear Miss Crandall: 



I am returning the photographs 
you sent me together with my selections as you re- 
quested. This marks my first experience in this 
capacity and I am naturally a little doubtful as to 
my qualifications to judge impartially and well. 

All the younp; ladies looked 
attractive to me, so picking winners was a tough 
task indeed. However, I have done my best and only 
trust the selections are reasonably accurate. 

With all good wishes to the 
folks, down that way, I am. 



Sincer^y yours. 





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Delta Sigma Phi 

Founded at College of City of New York, 1899 

Alpha Nu Chapter established, 1922, from Alpha Omega local 

with twenty members 



'I 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
Dr. John A. Aldrich Earl L. Shepherd 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 



Burke Hedges 
J. Clinton Holbrook 
Reavis O'Neal, Jr. 
Charles Mitchell 
Joseph Perry 
Charles Bourn 
Daniel Kenzie 
Chester Parham 
Gilbert Wood 
Vaughan Ozmer 
John Griffin 



Lyle Kratz 
Hewlett Bagwell 
Joseph Slaton 
Charles Gardner 
William Smith 
Benjamin Hargrove 
Floyd Gaither, Jr. 
Darrell Funderburke 
Henry Buchanan 
Arthur Smitha 
Emory Chandler 



Alpha Lambda Tau 

Founded at Oglethorpe University, 1921 

Alpha Chapter Established 1921, from Alpha Lambda Club 

with seven members 




FRATRE3 IN FACULTATE 
Peyton Hansard Frank Davenport 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 



Reed Craven 
Daniel Duke 
John Oakey 
Houston Lundy 
John Artley 
Gordon White 
Daniel W. Gentry 
Herman Lange 
John Statham 



Aubrey Smith 
Paul Prat her 
George Hurt 
Douglas Hansard 
Thomas Cooper 
Roeert Mays 
Parker Bryant 
Charles Murphy 
Amos Teasley 



Percy Dixon 



Kappa Alpha Order 

Founded at Washington and Lee University, 1865 

Beta Nu Ciiapter Established, 1918, from revived Theta 

Chapter with eight members 




FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 



W. R. Massengale, Jr. 
John Hallman 
Paul Goldsmith 
Edward Reder 
Lawrence Hight 
Spencer Worthy 
Thornwell Jacobs, Jr. 
John Allison 



Howard Martin 
Sidney Kilpatrick 
Truman Riggins 
Luther Watson 
Peter Bearden 
John Harrison 
John Carter 
Sidney Flynt 



Pi Kappa Phi 

Founded at College of Charleston, 1904 
Pi Chapter established in 1918 from local with seven members 




FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 



Park Brinson 
John Bitting 
Buster Carter 
Everett Peed 
WooDROw Brooks 
Frank Anderson, Jr. 
Marvin Bentley 
Julian Stovall 
James Anderson 
James Wilson 



George Gaillard 
Almon Raines 
Kelley Byars 
Julian Heriot 
John Renfroe 
Lloyd Davis 
Phillip Hildreth 
Rudolph Shouse 
Chris Wooten 
Claude Herrin 



Theta Kappa Nu 

P'ounded at Springfield, Mo., 1924 

Georgia Alpha Chapter established, 1925, from Delta Chi 

Epsilon local with thirteen members 




FRATER IN FACULTATE 
Harry Bannister 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

George Nicholson William Friedman 

Vernon Anderson John Ruble 

AsHER Lee Emory Hammack 

William Higgins Frank Wall 

Joseph Singletary Herbert Varn 

Edward Harney Ray Sewell 

Edward Burkhalter Allen Johnson 



Olympic Club 



Founded at Oglethorpe University, 1931 




FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 



Samuel Tarantino 
Donald Aderhold 
Earl Brooks 
Hallet MacKnight 
Wayne Pickard 
Roy Warren 
Harry Wrens 
John Putno 
Henry Taylor 



Ray Walker 
Carl Coffee 
Robin Thurmond 
Curry Martin 
Samuel Baker 
MuNFORD Whitley 
Marion Whaley 
Jack Moore 
John Patrick 



Charles Vance 




Stray Greeks 



Dr. Thornwell Jacobs Pi Kappa Alpha 

Richard Clark.- -— Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Frank Anderson, Sr Sigma Chi 

Ace Carter . Chi Delta Thefa 

T. Peden Anderson Pi Kajipa Alpha 

Dr. Wallace Cunningham Phi Gamma Delta 

Dr. James Routh Phi Kappa Psi 

Dr. George Nicolassen Chi Phi 

J. F. Glenn Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Edward Miller .- Theta Chi 

Albert Reilley Sigma Chi 

Dr. Herman Gaertner Sigma Nu 

Dr. J. F. Sellers Delta UpsUon 

Harry Robertson Delta Kappa Epsilon 

D. H. Overton -Pi Phi Pi 

Dr. Witherspoon Dodge Pi Kappa Alpha 

Dr. Wightman Melton Kappa Alpha 




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Beta Phi Alpha 

Founded at University of Southern California, 1909 

Chi Chapter established in 1930 ftom Phi Kappa Eta local 

with sixteen members 




SOROR IN FACULTATE 
Margaret Vardaman 



50R0RES IN UNIVERSITATE 



Frances Hurley 
Ruth Ward 
Mrs. Burke Hedges 
Mrs. Paul Prather 
Mildred Eaves 
Gladys Bridges 
Jacqueline Gordy 



Marie Shaw 
Mary Williamson 
Viola Martin 
Geraldine Reeves 
Frances Smith 
Kathleen Simmons 
Catherine Littleton 



Kappa Delta 

Founded at State Normal College, Faimville, Virginia, 1897. 
Alpha Tau Chapter Established, 1930, from Zeta Tau Local 

with eighteen members. 




SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 



Marcella Luckeish 
Betty Crandall 
Edith Marshall 
Marie Mauldin 
Christine Bost 
Evelyn Baugh 
Helen Stevens 
Evelyn Burns 



Genevieve Neuhoff 
Martha Knapp 
Mabel Stanton 
Lee Bennett 
Helen Vaughan 
Frances MacDonald 
Mary E. Workman 
Edna Whitehead 
Sara Wilkerson 



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Chi Omega 

Founded at University of Arkansas, 1895 

Sigma Gamma Chapter Established, 1924 from Sigma Alpha 

local with five members. 




SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 



Eugenia Patterson 
Martha Keys 
Aline Eraser 
Louise Bode 
Martha Carmichael 
Aline Brown 
Mary Bryan 
Florence Bryan 
Jean Brown 
Virginia Stitt 
T.aura Causey 



Mary F. Gay 
Margaret Cummins 
Emily Harvey 
Jane Crenshaw 
Peggy Underwood 
LiLYAN Starr 
Julia Henderson 
Susanne Memminger 
Belle Scott Meador 
Nellie Gaertner 
Frances Starbuck 



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/ / / 





Inter-Sorority Council 

Betty Craxdall Kappa Delta Lee Bennett 

Marie Shaw Beta Phi Alpha Mary Williamson 

Eugenia Patterson Chi Omega Martha Keys 




Blue Key Fraternity 

Founded at University of Florida in 1920 
03lethorpe Chapter Established in 1926 




Reavis O'Neal, Jr. 
Park Brinson 
Almon Raines 
Ray Sewell 
John Halman 



W. R. Massengale 
Gordon White 
Burke Hedges 
Charles Gardner 
Lyle Kratz 




LeConte Honorary Scientific Fraternity 



Organized at Oglethorpe University in 1920 






Dr. J. F. Sellers 
Dr. John A. Aldrich 
Dr. M. Harding Hunt 
Prof. Earl Shepherd 
Clinton Holbrook 
Spencer Worthy 



William Higgins 
Herman Lange 
John Oakey 
John Artley 
AsHER Lee 
Frank Davenport 




PHI KAPPA DELTA HONORARY SCHOLASTIC FRATERNITY 



Knights of the Pipe 

Alpha Chapter founded 
in 1930 





De. John A. Aldrich 

Prof. Earl Shepherd 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Prof. Francisco Perez 
Prof. Frank Davenport 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Sir Clinton Holbrook Sir Burke Hedges Sir John Hallman 

Sir Spencer Worthy Sir Richard Clark Sir Thomas Cooper 

Sir Frank Gaither Sir John Oakey Sir Houston Lundy 





Zeta Upsilon 

Founded at University of Alabama 
Oglethorpe Chapter Organized 1930 



Thornwell Jacobs, Jr. 
Sidney Kilpatrick 
Reed Craven 



Flo\d Gaither 
Tom Cooper 
Gordon White 



\ \ 



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Duchess Club 

Founded in 1927 to promote social good will among outstand- 
ing women students. 



Betty Crandall 
Peggy Selman Cathell 
Helen Stevens 
Martha Keys 



Edith Marshall 
Margaret Underwood 
Nisbet LeConte 
Marcella Luckeish 




'TTiii-M 



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WINNERS OF THE OGLETHORPE COAT-OF-ARMS 



Imaginary Situation 

By Sara Henderson Hay 

When Ti-ojan Helen closed her perilous eyes, 
And laid her light limbs down, God sighed ,"Ah well- 
Give her admission into Paradise; 
She would be sadly out of place, in Hell." 

Curious, His failure to foresee the day 
When all of Heaven would tingle to the story 
Of how that shameless ghost had led astray 
The comeliest Seraph in the Realms of Glory. 




OifZJL 



Apoloj^y 

Bii Carl John Bostelman 

Great song is sublimation of great sorrow; 
Man's anguish gives him music. Free from care, 
I can not lose my laughter, so I borrow 
My lyric moment from a lost despair. 

When sudden rapture wakens and is muted — 
A sound at once become magnificence — 
One strain of song, and silence is refuted 
And mood become immortal eloquence. 

So I must celebrate, though none may hear it. 
And lift up empty hands that might have hurled 
The pregnant message of a fevered spirit. 
To shout one song against a grieving world. 

Because I sing, who have not any sorrow. 
With laughter challenging all ancient wrong, 
The answer of an infinite tomorrow 
Must be eternal echo to my song. 

— From Bozart. 



Oglethorpe University Press 

and 

B OS art Press 

Through the generosity of friends of Oglethorpe, the University 
i? the possessor of a complete printing shop equipped with linotype, 
job presses, and a modern cylinder press. Under the direction of J. P. 
Hansard, himself an Oglethorpe graduate, a staff of printers made up 
Oi self-help students have printed outstanding books and nationally 
known periodicals, as well as all student publications. 

Under the editorial guidance of Dr. Thornwell Jacobs, Dr. James E. 
Routh, Dr. Nathan Haskell Dole, and Robert Leseur Jones, books rang- 
ing in subject matter from cosmic history to humorous essays have 
been published. 

Bozart and Contemporary Verse, founded by Ernest Hartsock, 
became the property of Oglethorpe University through the beneficence 
01' the deceased poet's family and has continued its progress under 
the management of Robert Leseur Jones. Bozart has the second largest 
circulation of any poetry magazine in the United States and includes 
contributions of the world's leading poets. 

Westminster, founded by Dr. Thornwell Jacobs in 1911, has be- 
come a periodical of the university review type and is rapidly attaining 
fame in its chosen realm. 

The Stormy Petrel, student weekly, and The Yamacraw are pro- 
ducts of the Oglethorpe University Press. 




The Yamacraw of 1932 

REAVIS O'NEAL, JR. 
Editor-in-Chief 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Betty Crandall Assistant Editor 

Martha Keys Associate Editor 

Phillip Hildreatii Sports Ed'.tor 

Robert Clark Photograph Editor 

Park Brij:so.n Photograph Ed'.tor 

Aline Eraser .,. Histories 

Vernon Anderson.... Radio Editor 

Marvin Bentley Assistajit Sports Editor 




The Yamacraw of 1932 

GORDON N. WHITE 
Business Manager 




BUSINESS STAFF 

Richard Clarke Advertising Manager 

W. R. Massengale, Jr. Assistant Advertising Manager 

George Nicholson Assistant Advertising Manager 





The Petrel 

MARTHA KEYS, REED CRAVEN 

Co-Editors 

GEORGE NICHOLSON 

Business Manager 

Hallet MacKnight Features 

Dan Duke _. Assistant Editor 

William Freedman ..Assistant Bushiess Manager 

Reavis O'Neal, Jr Columnist 

Edith Marshall Columnist 

Marvin Benltey Sports Editor 

Eugenia Patterson Cojjy Editor 





ed and published by the students of Oglethorpe 
ersity, Oglethorpe University, Georgia, 
ished each Friday of scholastic year. 
glethorpe University Press. 



Printed 




Reed Craven 
Bill Hays 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



B Editor 

rty Editor 

stant Sports Editor 

' Editor 

' Editor 

iane:c Editor 

mnist 

mnist 

mnist 

mnist 



St 



, Park Brinson 

Martha Keys 

. Marvin Bentley 

Aline Eraser 

Elcenia Patterson 

, Herman Lange 

. Reavis C. O'Neal 

Sam Miller 

Thornwell Jacobs. Jr. 

. Dan Kenzie 

AiLEEN Brown 



ff^t^- 



OGLETHORPE 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 






[less Manager 
jrlising M.m.iiier 
illation Manager 



George Nicholso 

TYt'S Bl 
. Woody '" 






When tlie Association of 
irgia Colleges dropped Ogl 
rpe University from 
nbership on Saturda' 
y 30, 1932." our ' 
I recently, "the^' ^ ^^ 
ip. They calle " ^,X9 -'on 
he people <-• a^i^-nd we 
it of th l^t "■<>". to 



%^% 



of 



enc."%^ ^C/ 
ch t 

large 

process of i 



^ 



abuses in 



cred.tcc A.;^,/<SS. 



The fight for 
Georgia and the^. 
the fine privik 

By thei 
of educati' t.' 



THEATRE GUILD ^„,^,ftr- '. <■, 

,'" ACTRESS INTERVIEW ED«> ^^X'- „ 

Obh %. v^**.^ 



!s by a hand-picked commit- 

of college politicians behind 

led doors in star chambet-i 

ecdings." 

t is well llQ»'"^^.^\lU^^,,^\ 



S^S?Ji:«>->* 



'«%licS>"' 



hould be done 
tU^-sTate and not by m-i'-' , 
litutions '^' . »i„„^aUGS 





HALL1VL\N NEW 
PRESIDENT TO 
SUCCEED 'CHICK' 



Owned and i'ublisr.ed 
the students of Og 
thorpe University. 



FEBRUARY 12, 



ORPE 

^W Wins Debate ^ ^ 
-i^m ^uke. Jack 



hSNYih 



EvfA^.1"LEADINi 
TO THE ' OllSTE 

E PICTURE TAKEN ETHOF 



FOR YAiMACRAW TODAY! 



■*' in education has begun in 

JYpii, y ^ '>thorpe University 

'^n 'J IL Second 

4'hich brougfft'! been he "/•'"''obs 

^ a committee V se(on(("^j '" 
j'g made by an impai early " 



tension r'" 




rival.^oVi 
and \\' 
"indign 
"to drop 
To s 
educati\ 
■^ ^scendeil. 
Fortunat 



l-or ^^^\^^laI vears prio 
May 31st, 1927 Oglethor— 
versify had been "- ,\.t i»'^ 

W^'^'^V^"'^ ■•-- of the 
A-ew ""W so};5ib\>: ^^ .^le to Dr. H. J. G 
The ; '".'''=>■ to b\ „_ .■director of the Extei 

a,h„p„/made crac^^ "'/"d ,v/,, 

Je clear when the \ery men proposing Tatedji — ■ — ""'' 

ethorpe and they were also the very men wi. // 
«"st Oglethorpe, assassins not inspectors, 
^ .^-'ine to allow a comrpittee of jealous 



''^rection of the State Depart at 



^'^'^fFeatht 



"f oi'posing t* 



machine 
titor. 



'VKTH. 



-> Kevs 



'A 



^Tlethorpe U. 
'■■' J<nown 
* ret 



»gnCoWm" , ^f 

ach VJ»**' *ion, 

I inoividuals 

will recoj.'" 
which the 
y assumt^ 

judgm*" 
IS. Olh 
sions . 
Jecting 

c of criticism ^ ^ 
LIS when one is cali^. 
der decisions in a ma 
ich \}e could possibly- ha. 
' perso^ ^ *^ -'^- In every ^ 
iness '"ERE /S ONE IVIAN'^ ^ 

then THANKSGIVING DINNER im. ^ 
pract THiTn... *"" >"- '- 

ist th„. ....... THATCAME BASYP on Do., 

disinterested persons, i ll^- Tech S 

"■ jsiimption is thati''''>'' February 6, 



^* \\CiV* AQI^V^s and subs, *<0>y '^^i -ar. I am st'" 



V/*^ r^W^ VrCW^"' 'V'^ - ^^^ accrediting situation ai,.- -V«_ y 



'^VN* 



college politics which Woodrow 
orld" will be shorn of their power 



fortunat. ^1*^ ^^r *-f^'' 3V^ 

it is to be hopv^^ ,x!C?^C V^v'\^ ^' 

Wilson cjiaraciy ^\^ P V^ ^l*" •" ^^'^ "' 

•o injure institulOv^V.K^^-'S .1 „ ., ^^ ,. 

Boys More Studioiis,;pv 
Co-Eds Lead In 
Intelligence 



NV^' ^ ^vn sui 
-lie result ol 
neen legally ac^ 
whole world now knt 
-'ose henceforth t< 



=>Sv 



kX.^", 



A'f>. 



pt - 



109 FROSH TAKE TEST 



d little t%''>'' 
the worlo r.v, 



''tout hh 

I for the g: 

taken in 

or qui 

/eacher 

/r mast 

(state ( 

taking 

o me in 

s of the 

whom t 

ing the i 

lat the si 

come f; 

vices will be of gi 

6Jt>/ , .fe in the Atlanta : 

^Of ecember 9th, 1928, 
Hi., c wrote to Mr. J. H. Si 
principal of the Bass Ji 
High School, who had inqi 
concerning Oglethorpe's cr 
and their .standing with the 
Board of Education as folio 
"Our office has gone : 
:^^^this matter very caref 
^•$>ith Oglethorpe Unive*' 



1932.) 
The most astounding instan^,^ 
of this oustii 




--^S^fo°r""^ 



\-l-j'>- 'he State Departrr 
Vv^^Vj-ation and we '^j^S 
\ f'^O ncy in sayir . >\jt^ 



fcXt. .sion 
caN led 



SOl.J^ 

issue, 

ept a juror to s 
a relative, or of a cone 
cm he was employe*' 
(ipetitor. No judf» 
side at a trial of a c* 
any way concerne* 
lal interests, Inv* 
de on behalf of G* 
1 Corporations mi* 
impartial e.xpert * 
ts are acceptable 
lies. 




y 



''a(ft, 



"^'t/^ 



""'^^ By 

St 



OlKi 



gal au^ 

ate. But 

*,ion of indi- 

♦ together, es- 

Jparate stand- 

*o those of the 

tf' organizes an- 

wi'Awincr 



anything that 
adversely against .- 
But the public ■\^■ii 
>k why they were so tho^ 
Oglethorpe and what bust/.. 

theirs to discuss Dr. Sati- 

h the Judge ivho 

cut piissmg 

-<k wheth- 



^^ "^ ' of the ..„.:^ ^ '^iiKE --^ ^-^^ ' ■ ""- 

p 



^IIKE 

Sanford, Inspec- 

'^epartment of 

■' made a 

id on 




>o, however high the motives Start- 

^^RJ>BOlLED ACTRESS SAYS ""'"'^ ^J^'-^' .-; n> ^ 

CaiLtGE PLA YS PROBABLY SLOPPY' c^•#,.:r'^ ^J? 

lUl Block Referees why Because Ogleth; ^; 

Rogers' Argument I'l'-man^l'^d m the vineyard .- _S 



:«S?J^ 



.<^ 



ucation the fruit of fr JV> X.-- /""rpe 

With Dr. Jacobs'™'*'';'*''*il<^°."'.T''"'' s^ .<?'/.i" ^W , 

■^^^y I where • 



\ es^iv L 1 I L 



Irespect. It said to 
""J" [elation of Georgia Co., 




"ork,v'?,'^ , 

i'^^^ Ah 

pe I 

credit 

ere 

,^vj .cr instituti 

of K^ ,mg. I have 1: 

makin^ .n investigation 

the coihrses which Iiave t 

given; the reports are 

formly good." 

"^i September first, 192S 

superintendent 

''» High Schoo 

■'a wrote ti 

'■ the 

~feo 

, th( 

,ns as 

isider ( 

.liting ai 

this na( 

erred to 

.lent. If 

^-nt acc) 

;?ita 



For many months folio 
this letter credits of Or'"'' 






Contemporary Verse 

Combining Japm and The Oracle 

Founded by ERNEST HARTSOCK 






Thornwell Jacobs, James E. 
Robert Leseur Jones 
Editors 



ROUTH 



Nathan Haskell Dole, Benjamin Musser 
Associate Editors 



OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY, GEORGIA 
12.00 a Year, 40c a Copy 



^^*'^^*^^^*'*'-**^^*^^*****^***^^*-^^AAAAAAAAAAAAAA^^*.^^^jj,^^^ 




M^A^^zint 



PUBLISHED QUABTERLY AT OGLETHORPE DNIVERSITY, GEORGIA 



•jjfl 



Thornwel Jacobs, James E. Routh 
Editors 

RODERT LESEUR JoNES 

Assistant Editor 

Nathan Haskell Dole, Virginia Stait, Joseph Upper 
Associate Editors 








DECEMBER -- 


- 19 3 1 





Players' Club 



The work of the Players' Club has been spasmodic this year, but, 
as p. whole, satisfactory. 

Our first activity was the presentation, first at school, later at 
the Atlanta Woman's Club, of three one-act plays. The casts ar,? listed 
herewith. 

THE PINK LOLLYPOP, by Sam Miller 

Mrs. Brown Christine Bost 

Mr. Brown Park Brinson 

Marge Betty Crandall 

Billy John Bitting 

The Grocer's Boy Woody Brooks 

Billy's Sweetheart Sara Sharpe 

SUCH GALL, bu Harvey Smith 

Mrs. Stonehenge - Sam Miller 

Marge, the grand-daughter Aileen Brown 

Cyrus Branbury, Sr _ Burke Hedges 

Cyrus Branbury, Jr. Frank Gaither 

The Maid Belle Scott Meador 

EXTRA!!, by Betty Crandall 

Granny Aline Fraser 

Sonny, the newsboy BETTY Crandall 

Snifty - Pop Freidman 

Business Man Thornwell Jacobs, Jr. 

Business Woman _ Martha Knapp 

Street Woman — .. Marie Shaw 

Street Kids _ Tyus Butler, Frances Gay, Bob Caldwell 

Jailer Jack Oakey 

Woman Prisoner Edith Marshall 

To criticize these plays is to get into more complications than their 
importance justifies. That they were typical college plays, presented 
in typical college style, cannot be denied. And then there was the 
audience — 

The experiments with Radio Drama promise to be the nuclei for 
better work. They were truly experimental, but have marked the be- 
ginning of worthwhile work. 

The Spring Play deserves all the praise space will permit. The 
selection of the Players' Club and the English Department was Henrik 
Ibsen's "A Doll's House." 

As to the more or le3s minor details, John Wigington deserves 



praise for the stage set. 
nc'; impressionistir. 



It was quite appropriately uncommon, though 



The cast, selected by try-outs, was: 

Nora Helmer Betty Crandall 

Torvald Helmer Frank Gaither 

Nil-, Krogstad Howard Martin 

Christina Linden Aline Fraser 

Dr. Rank Barclay Jackson 

Ellen, the maid .Ruth Ward 

Anna, the nurse Frances Hurley 

The Helmers' Three Children Donald Coffin, 

Lucy Jones Crane, Edward Duff Crane III 

The production was minutely perfected in all details. To Betty 
Crandall. goes credit for a splendid performance as well as for the able 
assistance she gave in interpretation at rehearsals. If it was her 
Oglethorpe Players' Club Swan Song, she has sung well. The other 
members of the cast supported her well, and it is the general consensus 
of opinion that this performance was the best ever presented by the 
Club. 

By request "A Doll's House" was repeated as a feature of Com- 
mencement Week, at a special performance for our visiting recipients 
of degrees. 

Sam Miller was director of the Players' Club this year. 




Debate Council 



Daniel Duke 
Chairman 



W. R. Massengale, Jr. 
Burke Hedges 
Aline Fraser 



Hallet MacKnight 
William Higgins 
Vernon Anderson 



Reed Craven 

The Oglethorpe Debate Council held its annual tryout last October 
in the school auditorium before the student body. Four varsity de- 
baters and three freshmen debaters were chosen. 

The first debate was at Mercer University in Macon; at that debate 
Oglethorpe met defeat. The next debate was with Bucknell in Ogle- 
thorpe's auditorium; in this evenly contested debate Bucknell Univer- 
sity was given a 2 to 1 decision over Oglethorpe. Vernon Anderson 
and Dan Duke defended Oglethorpe. Then the Mercer freshmen came 
to Oglethorpe and the Oglethorpe freshmen gained a decided victory 
over them. 

Dan Duke was reelected Chairman of the Debate Council and 
Aline Fraser was elected Secretary. 








TH*S 



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Resigned 

Bii NiSBET LeConte, '35 

The grey November day turns to depart; 
This is the end. Let now no word be spoken 
To quicken anguish of a breaking heart. 
Let deafening silence reign supreme, unbroken. 

I have no need to rake the dying embers 
Of love that once leaped high in joyous flame; 
There is enough of grief that one remembers, 
And love, once crushed, can never be the same. 

The coins that you have laid upon love's eyes, 
Growrn suddenly old and colorless in death. 
Shall not be moved; the dead will not arise 
To haunt you, you who killed love in a breath. 

The grey November day turns to depart, 
And winter now has come upon my heart! 



Your tongue 
tells when you 
need 




aiotabs 



Coated tongue, dry mouth, 
bad breath, muddy skin, 
groggy nerves and sour 
stomach suggest its use. 



€k.^ a 




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When the Fighting Petrels 
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For their Laundry Work 

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Oglethorpe University 



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