(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Yamacraw, 1941"

-X 



n" 



V 



.^. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/yamacraw194114ogle 



YAMACRAW 




IMeme 



As I thumbed through a book one day 
A picture stared out at me; 

I saiv a youngster hard at play — 
Funny, he looked like me! 



The editors of most college yearbooks often make attempts 
at formal pictorial and literary composition — something that 
will come up to the standards of their college training. But 
in doing this they have destroyed genial contact with the 
students and missed the purpose of the book entirely. The 
Yamacraw staff has prepared your annual with no regard 
for national or local boards of critics — in short, we have pub- 
lished your annual for you and about you by dropping for- 
mality and emphasizing 

SCHOOL ACTIVITIES 



COITEITS 



THE (COLLEGE 



AfTlflTIES 



ATHLETIfS 



nan 



Wje> ^jeJUcaie 6a4A. lixxJi 



, because of our frank admi- 
ration for able leadership, impartial 
decision, unimposing good natui'e, 
effective instruction, and spontan- 
eous sympathy, 



John W. Patrick 

A.B., and M.A., Oglethorpe Univer- 
sity; Dean of Oglethorpe University 
Assistant Football Coach in 1933 
Head Football Coach since 1933 
Dean of the School of Health and 
Physical Education; Director of In- 
tramural Sports; Professor in the 
School of Physical Education; Mem- 
ber Alpha Lambda Tau ; Who's Who 
in Georgia; Advisory Board of Sou- 
thern Coaches and Athletes; Ameri- 
can Football Coaches' Association. 




'41 M 



umcicrciw 




to- 



JOHNW. PmiCR 




Of all the beauty in this world, 
Of all the things there are to see, 
I will always love this place the most: 
It will ahvays mean the most to me. 

Heie the sun is so friendly and ivarm 

And the sky so clear and bright. 

Where the stars watch over the tall proud 

trees 
With their soft, kind blanket of night. 

— Martin Kelly, U 



Gxi4^nic eMyUto^ . . . Xi4iJt 



Since Dr. Jacobs reestablished Oglethorpe University in 1913, he has taught a course 
called Cosmic History which is, at present, required of all seniors, and is so designed 
to better associate the student with the problems that he will face when he leaves the 
University. Dr. Jacobs believes that the only way people can rid the world of con- 
flict is by a clear understanding of present-day problems in terms of the past so that 
we, as individuals, may be able to solve these problems by past experience and a 
clearly developed foresight. To develop this power of introspection in the college 
student, Dr. Jacobs has impressed upon him that one must realize the complexity of 
the elements which have gone into the making of Man and his environment. 

Throughout the past ages, Man has undergone a series of changes in adjusting him- 
self to the increasing complexity of his surroundings, and through a process of steady 
development and acclimation ; he has become an ever-developing Knower in an ever- 
developing Known, waxing more and more complex and specialized as he meets the 
new obstacles with which he is faced. This summarizes Man's situation as it is seen 
today: a highly specialized creature 
beset upon all sides by a maze of 
primitive emotions. Dr. Jacobs holds 
to the theory that Man will ever con- 
tinue to progress and will never be- 
come an element in the process of re- 
tardation. 

The text used for the study of Cos- 
mic History was written by Dr. Ja- 
cobs in which he presents the growth 
of Man through the composite eye 
of all the natural sciences. Through 
this procedure not one aspect of hu- 
man life and its associations is omit- 
ted ; a clear picture of the Universe 
as a whole is considered. 

Once a week Dr. Jacobs conducts a 
lecture for his class, bringing into 
the lecture many interesting obser- 
vations of his own along with the 
textual material. At the close of the 
year, the members of the class meet 
before a board of examiners and are 
required to pass an oral examination 
before they receive credit for the 
course. 





2>^, ^MoAAiAJUieU ^xicaLi 



A.B., Presbyterian College of South Carolina, Valedictorian and Medalist; A.M., 
P C. of S. C; Graduate of Princeton Theological Seminary; A.M., Princeton 
University; LL.D., Ohio Northern University; Litt.D., Presbyterian College of 
South Carolina; Pastor of Morganton (N. C.) Presbyterian Church; Vice-Presi- 
dent of Thornwell College for Orphans ; Author and Editor ; Founder and Editor 
of Westminster Magazine; Author of The Laic of the White Circle (novel) ; The 
Midnight Mummer (poems) ; Sinful Sadday (story for children) ; Life of Wdham 
Plumer Jacobs; The New Science and the Old Religion; Not Knowing Whither 
He Went; Islands of the Blest; Red Lanterns on St. Michael's. Editor of The 
Oglethorpe Book of Georgia Verse; Member Graduate Council of the National 
Alumni Association of Princeton University; President of the University. 




LIBERU 



ARTS 



POROHOVSHIKOV, NiCOLASSEN, AVILES PeREZ 



THE SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS could well be named 
the Cosmopolitan School because the course of study is in- 
tended to encourage especially the study of languages, an- 
cient and modern. Doctor George F. Nicolassen, dean of the 
school and one of the oldest members of the university fa- 
culty, has long been endeared to all students as "Doctor 
Nick." Doctor Nicolassen, professor of ancient languages, di- 
rects his staff of language professors consisting of Profes- 
sor Pierre S. Porohovshikov, professor of French and Ger- 
man; Doctor Herman Gaertner, professor of German; and 
Doctor Luis Aviles Perez, professor of Spanish and Italian. 
Because of language requirements in other schools, all stu- 
dents of the university at one time or another come under 
the influence of this department. 



EDllfATIfli 




DR. HERMAN J. GAERTNER is dean of 
the School of Education which is both an 
undergraduate and a graduate school. A 
number of graduates from this school in 
Oglethorpe University as well as other 
colleges have entered the teaching profes- 
sion. Since much of the work is psycho- 
logical and humanistic, the dicipline of 
this school is a preparation for dealing 
with all forms of human contact sides of 
life work, as well as for the teaching pro- 
fession. Dr. Gaertner is professor of 
general psychology ; Dr. Thomas B. Mea- 
dows, educational psychology; Professor 
Hugh A. Woodward, orientation in edu- 
cation, secondary education and school and 
social order; Professor Morris J. Hard- 
wick, teaches in the extension school. 



Hardwick, Gaertner, Woodward 




Wallace, Mosteller 

LITERATURE kU JflllRyLISM 

THE WORK in the School of Literature and Journalism is based upon two groups of courses, English major 
and Journalism major. The group of courses which centers in the study of English has the two-fold purpose 
of giving students command over the use of their own tongue in both speaking and writing, and of familiar- 
izing them with those aspects of English literature which are usually treated in undergraduate courses. Dean 
Leonard DeLong Wallace, Professor Pierre S. Porohovshikov, and Professor J. D. Mosteller teach the subjects 
in this group. The journalism group has been designed as a professional course for students of journalism 
who are expected to follow basic courses in literature, history, economics, political science, and sociology. Mr. 
Hines, of the Atlanta Constitutio>i editorial staff, is the instructor in the Technique of Journalism. At- 
tached to the School of Literature and Journalism are courses in Bible and Mythology, taught by Dr. Nic- 
olassen; public speaking by Professor Mosteller, and radio and stage production by Professor Paul Carpenter, Jr. 



SflEiCE 



THE SCHOOL OF SCIENCE, under the 
direction of Dean J. A. Aldrich, is organ- 
ized to build a solid foundation for future 
work in such professions as agriculture, 
engineering, medicine and dentistry, and to 
prepare for industrial occupations not yet 
organized into professional groups. Besides 
giving their students practical work in the 
natural sciences, the professors of this 
school have done much to build a true pros- 
pective and its corollary, a sane judge- 
ment of relative values — attainments which 
are basic in any liberal culture. Dean Aid- 
rich is the professor of astronomy, mathe- 
matics, and physics; Professors Harding 
Hunt and David W. Davis, of biology; and 
Professor Harold L. Jones, of chemistry 
and geology. 




Hunt, Jones, Aldrich 




Davis 



Anderson 



Leskosky, Hunt, Patrick 



PHISICU EDUCATION 

THE TASK of the School of Physical Education, under Dean John William Patrick, is the training 
of the students enrolled in this school for positions as physical directors and coaches in other schools, 
colleges and universities, in Y. M. C. A's, and the Army; and the development of the bodies of all stu- 
dents of the University. With his associates, Professors Harding Hunt, David W. Davis, and Louis 
Leskosky, Dean Patrick directs his students through three groups of studies : exhaustive anatomical re- 
search and investigation, teaching methods, and the theory and practice of athletic games. In order to 
extend the benefits of organized athletic competition to all students of Oglethorpe University, instead 
of only to those who take part in intercollegiate competition, the Department of Physical Education 
sponsors the program of Intramural Athletics. The purpose of the intramural department is to encour- 
age every student to participate in some or all intramural sports, to provide facilities for this partici- 
pation, to organize and promote intramural competition, and to stand for fair play and true sports- 
manship. This program includes competive sports for every student on the campus — volleyball, 
basketball, baseball, badminton, tennis, fencing, shuffleboard, and archery. 




FIO UTS 



THE RESPONSIBILITY for the entire Art Department rests upon 
Professor James M. Springer, acting dean. The curriculum of 
the department has been divided into two classifications. One of 
these is designed to train students who intend to follow Commer- 
cial Art, and the other to give instructions in the fundamentals of 
the various fields of arts with an ultimate specialization in one 
particular field. Professor Springer, a graduate of the LTniversity 
of Tennessee and the Art Institute of Pittsburgh, is widely known 
throughout Atlanta in art circles, and is President of the Artist 
Guild of Atlanta. 



Springer 




Mrs. SAN'DiiRs, Anderson, Eason 



COMMERCE 



THE COMMERCE department 
of Oglethorpe University em- 
braces two schools, the School of 
Banking and Commerce and the 
School of Secretarial Prepara- 
tion. Dr. Mark Burrows is the 
dean of both schools. 
The Lowry School of Banking 
and Commerce furnishes the 
student with a general basis of 
business facts, standards and 
theory and stresses particularly 
accounting, finance, economics, 
and business law. 
The secretarial course has been 
designed for those persons who 




wish to enter the business 
world in the capacity of skilled 
assistants to tnose in execu- 
tive positions, teachers of com- 
mercial subjects in schools, of- 
fice managers, and those per- 
sons who desire positions as 
social secretaries. 
Members of the faculty includ- 
ed within these schools arc 
Professors Mark Burrows, S. 
B. Fenster, Charles M. Ander- 
son, W. N. Eason, Hugh A. 
Woodward, and Mrs. Ruth 
Wells Sanders. 



Burrows 




Mrs. Carper 



LIB RARY 



The Oglethorpe Library, under the supei-vision of Mrs. Myr- 
ta Thomas Carper, librarian, is a popular retreat for both 
the studious and those seeking entertainment in books. Its 
60,000 volumes include many rare books, Scuch as the "Book 
of the Dead," book autographed by well-known persons, and 
foreign books, as well as those for research and general 
reading. The Family Tree of Man, prepared by the Ameri- 
can Museum of Natural History, is the only one of its kind 
in the South and one of several in the United States. It is 
a tree of skulls giving a picture of the whole story of the 
evolution of man. On the walls are original oil paintings of 
General and Oglethorpe, Sidney Lanier, John Thomas Lup- 
ton, and many others. 



(JRIDUITE 




Louis Edward Leskosky : : East Chicago, Indiana 

M. A. Science 

A. B. Science, '40; Delta Sigma Phi Chaplain; Assistant Football Coach: 
Professor of Directed Teaching; Assistant Director of Intra-Mural 
Sports; Blue Key; Le Conte; "0" Club; Ugly Club; Who's Who; Intra- 
mural Sports; Football '38, '39, '40; Honor Roll '37, '38, '39, '40, '41; 
Coat of Arms; K D cup — 1940. 



'41 U 



umcicrciw 



S T O O T S 



J. D. MOSTELLER 



Mount Dora, Florida 



M . A. Literature and Journalism 

Freshman Football '34; Fre^hmrn Bareba'l '04; Foa'bpll 'Z7: Cnat 
of Arms; Who's Who; President Baptist Student Union; Library As- 
sistant; Phi Kappa Delta; Assistant Jn-t'-'if+^o'-, FnHj b D"'^-'''tmcpt : 
Professor of English; Director of Debating; A. B., Liberal Arts'40. 









Mary Bishop 



Mildred McKay 



Robert O'Dell 



'41 U 



amacruw 




^Ji^ QjoUe^^ 



Bje^^AJOAA. 



Philip Scales 



L. T. Lawson 



CLASS 
OFFICERS 




President 



Anna McConneghy 



Vice President 
Secretai-y and Treasurer 




THE cms 




Milton Chauncey Austin : : Erie, Pennsylvania 

A. B. Science 

Glee Club; Orchestra; Fencing; Le Conte; Vice President, 4 P Club; 
Chemistry Laboratory Instructor. 



'41 U 



ctmcicrctw 



OF 1941 



Herbert Philip Beckett : Providence, Rhode Island 

(4. B. Physical Education 

Manag-ing- Editor, '39, Editor-in-Cliief, '40, '41, Stormy Petrel; Secre- 
tary, Pledge Ckib, Pi Kappa Phi; Blue Key; Who's Who 1940. 




THE CLin 




Betty Virginia Benefield : : Atlanta, Georgia 

A. B. Literature and Journalism 

President, Beta Phi Alpha; Treasurer, Duchess Club; Basketball; Secre- 
tary, Pan Hellenic; Glee Club; Intramural Sports; Sponsor, Home- 
coming, 1940. 



'41 U 



amucraw 



OF 19 41 



Frank Frodolfo Castelluccio : Newark, New Jerssy 

A. B. Education 

4 F Club; Baseball, '41; Intramural Basketball; Transfer from Univer- 
sity of IMinriesota. 




THE (]LAn 




John Mark Cown : : : Fairburn, Georgia 

A. B. Science 

President, 4 F Club. 



•4/ U 



umucrctw 



OF 1941 



Martha DeFreese : : : Atlanta, Georgia 

A. B. Fine Arts 

Kappa Delta; Duchess Club; Glee Club; Basketball; Fencing; Treble 
Clef Club. 




THE CLUS 




Harriette Deas Hamilton : : Atlanta, Georgia 

A. B. Literature unci Journalism 

Chapter Correspondent, Chi Omega; Petrel Staff; Radio Play Produc- 
tion Group. 



'41 Vc 



cimcici^ctw 



OF 1941 



Luther Harben : : : Stone Mountain, Georgia 

A. B. Science 
4 F Club; Blue Key; President, LeConte. 




THE CLin 




Miriam Highnote 



Columbus, Georgia 



A. B. Liberal Arts 



Pledge, Beta Phi Alpha; Transfer from Shorter College (2 years), Ala- 
bama Polytechnic Institute (1 year). 



'41 U 



cimcicrcuv 



OF 1941 



George Hopkins 



Norcross, Georgia 



A. B. Commerce 
Fledge, Pi Kappa Phi; Honor Scholarship Student, '39, '40. 




THE fLlSN 




Martin Lawrence Kelly : : Atlanta, Georgia 

A. B. Education 

Football, '37, '38, '39, '40; Intramural Basketball; Broad Jump Record; 
Yamacraw Staff; Alpha Lambda Tau; Ugly Club; "O" Club; Glee 
Club. 



'4iU 



amacraw 



I) r 1 9 1 1 



LONNIE Thompson Lawson : Clinton, South Carolina 

A. B. Commerce 

Literary Society; Football, '39; Pi Kappa Phi Pledge; Coach, Fresh- 
man Football, '40; Transfer from University of South Carolina. 




THE CLin 




Patsy Charles Locascio : East Chicago, Indiana 

A. B. Physical Education 

Football, '37, '38, '39, '40; Intramural Sports; Vice President, Delta 
Sigma Phi; Play Production. 



'41 U 



ctmucruw 



(IF 19 41 



Anna Catherine McConneghey : Atlanta, Georgia 

A. B. Literature and Journalism 

President, Chi Omega; President, Duchess Club; Phi Kappa Delta; Pan 
Hellenic Council; Secretary, Senior Class; Basketball; Petrel Staff; 
Sponsor, Homecoming, '40. 




THE CLUS 




Mildred Evelyn McKay 



Atlanta, Georgia 



A. B. Literature and Journalism 

Secretary, Kappa Delta; Duchess Club; Phi Kappa Delta; Glee Club; 
Secretary-Treasurer, Spanish Club; Basketball; Intramural Sports Dir- 
ector; Yamacraw; Secretary-Treasurer, Student Council; Baptist 
Union. 



'41 U 



umucruw 



OF 1941 



Frances Anderson Maloney : Atlanta, Georgia 

A. B. Literature and Journalisrn. 
Transfer from University of Georgia. 




THE run 




Reva Murphy 



: : Mount Sterling, Kentucky 

A. B. Fine Arts 



Treasurer, Kappa Delta Pledge Club; Glee Club; Intramural Sports; 
Transfer M. S. T. C. 



'41 U 



amacraw 



F 1 9 4 1 



Gene North 



Atlanta, Georgia 



A. B. Secretarial Prepcirafion 



Treasurer, Beta Phi Alpha; Intramural Sports; Petrel Staff; Treasurer, 
Senior Class; Duchess Club; President, Baptist Student Union. 




THE CLin 



I 




Robert O'Dell : : : Keeseville, New York 

A. B. Literature and Journalism 

Delta Sigma Phi Pledge; Student Advisor; Associate Editor, Stormy 
Petrel; Director of Publicity; Fencing Instructor; Yamacraw Staff; 
Student Council; Transfer from Green Mountain Junior College. 



'4tU 



amactaw 



OF 19 4 1 



Jacqueline Partain : : : Atlanta, Georgia 

A. B. Literature and Journalism 
Secretary, Chi Omega; Glee Club; Basketball; Intramural Sports. 




THE CLUS 




James Henry Pope 



Villa Rica, Georgia 



A. B. Commerce 



Freshman Football; Secretary-Treasurer, Ugly Club; Head Manager, 
Football; "0" Club; Delta Sigma Phi; Blue Key; Who's Who; Business 
Manager, Football Program; Proctor Lowry Hall. 



'41 U 



umucrciw 



OF 1941 



Harold White Powers : Gibbstown, New Jersey 

A. B. Science 

Freshman Football; Freshman Football Trainer; Delta Sigma Phi 
Pledge; Ugly Club; Transfer from Gettysburg. 




THE iLiSS 




Charles Philip Scales 



Griffin, Georgia 



A. B. Literature and JoiirnaUsm 

Secretary, Kappa Alpha; Vice President, Kappa Alpha; Business Man- 
ager, Stormy Petrel; Football Manager; Glee Club; Campus Correspon- 
dent, Atlanta Papers; Secretary, Blue Key; President Blue Key; Presi- 
dent, Senior Class; Who's Who; Ugly Club; Intramural Sports; Stu- 
dent Representative. 



'41 U 



umucrciiu 



OF 19 41 



Ernest O. Sheffield : : Fort Pierce, Florida 

A. B. Physical Education 

Football, '38, '39, '40; Captain, '40; Intramural Sports; President, Delta 
Sigma Phi; President, "O" Club; President, Student Body; Executioner, 
Ugly Club; Blue Key; Who's Who. 




THE fLUS 




Albert Sprouse : : : : Atlanta, Georgia 

A. B. Commerce 

Freshman Football; Freshman Baseball, '38; Varsity Baseball, '39, '40, 
'41; "0" Club. 



'41 U 



umucruw 



OF 1941 



Jackson Stephens : : : Newnan, Georgia 

A. B. Commerce 

President, Pi Kappa Phi; Transfer from Georgia Junior College, Georgia 
Evening College. 




THE uin 




Marcus H. Wilson : : : Villa Rica, Georgia 

A. B. Science 

Freshman Football; Manager, Football; Ugly Club; Assistant Instruct 
tor, Physics Laboratory; President, Alpha Lambda Tau; Intramural 
Basketball. 



'41 U 



umucrcuv 



OF IHl 



Sam Worthington : : : Lumpkin, Georgia 

A. B. Physical Education 
"O" Club; Ugly Club; Baseball; Alpha Lambda Tau. 




THE CLUS 




Ross Wyrosdick : : : : Ellaville, Georgia 

A. B. Literature and JoHiiialiiiin 

Football, '37, '38, '39, '40; Intramural Sports; Sports Editor, Stormy 
Petrel; Sports Editor, Yamacraw; Radio Play Production. Group; Grand 
Wiser, Ugly Club; "O" Club. 



'41 U 



amacrciw 



OF 19 4 



Anthony Stephen Zelencik : East Chicago, Indiana 

A. B. Science 

Editor-in-Chief, Yamaciaw; Pledge, Le Conte; Blue Key; Pledge Presi- 
dent, Alpha Lambda Tau; Ugly Club; "O" Club; Football, '38, '39, '40; 
Intramural Sports; School Discus Record; Student Council; Transfer 
from St. Viator College. 




TRIP 





The Triple-E boys, the members of the Ex- 
ceptional Educational Experiment, constitute a 
separate class at Oglethorpe. Doctor Jacobs 
founded the Experiment in 1939 to demonstrate 
two of his main ideas concerning education — that 
the nation needs for its leaders men with broad 
general education rather than a technical grain- 
ing in only one field, and that under the present 
educational set-up about half of the student's 
ability is wasted. 



Marshall Asher 



Athens, Texas 



Spanish Club 



Frederick Goss : : : Proctor, Vt. 

"Guiding Don" of Triple-E's. Le Conte, "Who's Who in 
American Colleges and Universities," Plii Kappa Delta. 





John Goldthwait : Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Spanish Club, Yamacraw Staff 



'4/ M 



cimcicrciw 



IE E'S 



The Triple-E's have already finished four 
years' college work in less than two, but they will 
continue studies at Oglethorpe for another four 
years. They will take every course the University 
offers, and after six years here will receive a 
specially-created degree, Doctor of Arts and 
Sciences. They will have maintained averages 
above ninety in their classwork, but the real test 
of the efficiency of their education will be to teach 
successfully every subject they have taken. They 
will begin teaching next fall. 




Keith Lane 




: Mountainair, N. M. 

Spanish Club 



Edgar Vallette 



Dallas, Texas 




John Meacham 



Scooba, Miss. 




^A44t4J0^ 




*,■*» H*"^^ 



▲ 





diss mvm, 



President 

I'ice Pre side lit 

Secreta)'i/-T reasuyer 



Pete Maman 

Nick Popa 

Mary Bishop 




CLss of 1942 



Jane Aldrich : : : Oglethorpe University 
Science 



Mary Emma Bishop : : : Atlanta, Georgia 

Science 



1 <-^^ n^* 



Edward Black :::::: Lee, Florida 

Commerce 



John G. Brackett : : East Point, Georgia 

Science 




Victor Rudolph Cegoy : : Gary, Indiana 

Literature and Journalism 



WiLHELMiNA DURHAM : Avondale Estates, Ga. 

Literature and Journalism 



Robert Arthur Elliott : Lakeworth, Florida 

Commerce 

Gus Hendry : : : : : Arcadia, Florida 

Science 



C. Rudy Horne : : : : Griffin, Georgia 

Literature and Jour)ialism 

Thomas John House : : : Omaha, Geoi-gia 

Physical Education 




Aunt 



unions 



LoRAiNE Jackson : : : Decatur, Georgia 

-* ■*•■. Education 



Hazel Josey : : : : : Atlanta, Georgia 

Ediicatiun 



Evelyn Lowry 



Atlanta, Georgia 



Education 



James W. McGrory, Jr. : Lansdowne, Penn. 

Education 



Peter Pierpont Maman : Hammond, Indiana 

Physical Education 

John William Mockabee : Dade City, Florida 

Physical Education 



Charles Monsour 



Atlanta, Georgia 



Physical Education 

Charles E. Newton : East Chicago, Indiana 

Commerce 



Edward Norvell : : : Augusta, Georgia 

Commerce 



Antonio Michael Palma : 

Education 



Milford, Mass. 




Ciasi of 1942 



Nick Claude Popa : East Chicago, Indiana 

Commerce 



Robert E. Rivenbark : : Savannah, Georgia 

Litetature and Journalism 



Ernest William Roberti : : Milford, Mass. 

Education 



Jean Rogers : : : : : Decatur, Georgia 

Literature and Jourvalism 



John Wilson Smith : : Gumming, Georgia 

Education 



James L. Timberlake : : Atlanta, Georgia 

Physical Education 



Joseph Nicholas Tosches : Milford, Mass. 

Science 



Charles Fletcher Waller : Griffin, Georgia 

Physical Education 



Paul Whaley, Jr. : : : Augusta, Georgia 

Science 

Margaret Young : ; : : Atlanta, Georgia 

Secretarial Preparation 



Aunl 



uniOP:S 




Clifton McClanahan 



Hartsville, Tenn. 



Joseph Drake : : : : Atlanta, Georgia 
Angelo Ferrario : : : : Milford, Mass. 



'4/ yic 



umucruw 



Bo4X*tomjo^te4, 






CLISS OFFICERS 






President 



TfV'f President 



Secretary 



Treasurer 



Thomas Hunter 

George Talbott 

Audrey Moore 

David Eavenson 




'41 U 



umcicruw 









life 




Robert Booth : : : : Atlanta, Georgia 

Fine Arts 

Ray Davis : : : : : Mansfield, Georgia 

Education 



Roy Davis : : : : : Mansfield, Georgia 

Kducatioii 

Robert Dillard : : : : Cornelia, Georgia 

Science 



Larry Dodd : : : : East Point, Georgia 

Physical Education 

David Eavenson : : : : Kingston, Penn. 

Physical Education 



Bill Fleury : : : Upper Falls, Maryland 

Science 

Hugh Floyd : : Kershaw, South Carolina 

Physical Education 



John Gasaway : : : : Decatur, Georgia 

Banking and Commerce 

Max Gaston : : : : : Lindale, Georgia 

Banking and Commerce 



Marian Gillooley : : : Atlanta, Georgia 

Fine Arts 

Gene Harris : : : : East Point, Georgia 

Banking and Commerce 




'43 






Beula Mae Hightower : Atlanta, Georgia 

Commerce 

Thomas M. Hunter : : Oak Park, Illinois 

Literature and Journalism 



Max Ivey :::::: Atlanta, Georgia 

Physical Education 

Claudie Johnson : : : Atlanta, Georgia 

Commei'ce 



Joe JuLiANA : : : Moorestown, New Jersey 

Physical Education 

George Koi,owich : : Grosse Point, Mich. 

Co7nmerce 





Edward Link : : : : Chicago, Illinois 

Literature and Jourr.alisin 

George Liptak : : Bridgeport, Connecticut 

Eaivhcing and Comme)'ce 



Elizabeth Longworth : : Decatur, Georgia 

Commerce 

Verna Lee Miller : : : Atlanta, Georgia 

Secretarial Preparation 



Audrey Moore : : : : Atlanta, Georgia 

Fine Arts 

Beatrice Nix : : : : : Atlanta, Georgia 

Secretarial Preparation 



^opnomored ^^ f 

1^ ^ ^ — ^1 

Rhett Pinson Atlanta, Georgia ^^ <^W ■> ^ ,V 

Robert Powell Columbia, South Carolina ^^m M ^^^| 

JMera^ lire and .JoiinniUsni ^^H ^Ki ^^^^^1 

Bettye Ray : : : : : Atlanta, Georgia y^ /■ 

Walter Ross Rome, Georgia ^\ ' / ^^^^K^^l 

Yancey Shaver : : : : Atlanta, Georgia ^^ '^^ ? *> «£" 

Liberal Arts -<•* 

Roland Sheets Valparaiso, Ind. ^^^d^^^^fcaBBt '^ ^^^ 

William Sigman : : : : Atlanta, Georgia > .j*> ,#- ' ^ ^ •- » 

Fine Arta - _ ». 

Frank Singer Lumpkin, Georgia ^^^"^m^^ .^^^*'^'^^. 

Milliard Steele : : : East Point, Georgia '-, >!r F, 

Banking and Loiiunei ck 

I.UCY SUTTLES Atlanta, Georgia ^^^^"^ ^^^^^ 

Commerce ^^^^^^ A ^^^B 

Fred Vihlen : : : : Homestead, Florida If ;» «; n 

Physical Education ^MLk *^ ' 

George Talbott Portsmouth, Virginia ^K^ - ^^T''^ ^^ 

Literature and Journalism H^If^ ^^BA .^^^^B 






'43 



Jimmy Vocalis : : : : Atlanta, Georgia 

Bankiny and Commerce 



William Whitaker : : Tuskeegee, Alabama 

Physical Education 



Otis White : : : : : Atlanta, Georgia 

Literature and Journalism 



'4/ % 



cimctcruw 




^JveAiune^ 




CLASS OFFICERS 




Bruno Blash 
President 



Arvel Brouse 
Vice President 



Gloria Warren 
Secretary-Treasurer 



^ '4/ U 



cimctcraiv 



Jane Addams 
C. L. Allen : 
James Alien 



Jane Anderson 
Richard Arnold : 
Emma Jean Baldwin 



: : Atlanta, Ga. 
: LaGrange, Ga. 
Atlanta, Georgia 



Oglethorpe U., Ga. 

: Groveland, Fla. 

Atlanta, Ga. 



Eruno Elash 
Arvel Brouse 
Ann Bray : 



Nan Brogdon : : 
Harold Campbell 
Thomas Cantrell 



Chloe Cochran 
Rodney Cone 
Mary Cooke : 



William Cfowell 
Eudora Doan : 
Daniel Douglass 



Eugene Doyal : : 
Henry Farris : : 
Katherine Gillooley 



: Gary, Ind. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Columbus, Ga. 



Lawrenceville, Ga. 

: Lavonia, Ga. 

: : Penfield, Ga. 



: Decatur, Ga. 
Thomasville, Ga. 



Atlanta, Ga. 



Portendale, Ga. 
: Covington, Ga. 
Jefferson, S. C. 



Villa Rica, Ga. 

Augusta, Ga. 

Atlanta, Ga. 




fi; 



ii^^iP 




^pesh 



men 



Ellen Gottenstrater : Atlanta, Ga. 
James Green : : : : Dublin, Ga. 
William Hill : : Zonesville, Ohio 



Joseph Hooks 
Jack Horner 

William Jones 



Robert Lawrence 
Charles Lorens 
Frances Loyd : 



Juanita Mailey : 
Shirley Massell : 
Eleanor Matthews 



Lake Worth, Fla. 
: Lowell, Ind. 
: Augusta, Ga. 



: Decatur, Ga. 

Vero Beach, Fla. 

: Atlanta, Ga. 



Atlanta, Ga. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Atlanta, Ga. 



Earl Moore : 
William Nieman 
Barbara Perrin 



: : Winder, Ga. 

Cliff Side Park, N. J. 

: : Atlanta, Ga. 



Marian Rosenberg 
Mary Lou Schick 
Robert Schoales 



Jerome Silverman : St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Charlotte Simmons : Atlanta, Ga. 
Charles Smith : Brookhaven, Ga. 




(!5 O 




f?5 f?| 




: Atlanta, Ga. 
: Fort Knox, Ky. ^ 
Fitchburg, Mass. 





p^l 



i 
1 


O 

■ \ 




f^ 


,j 


i^ 




(T^ 










iii; 




^re6n 



Margaret Stewart 
Mary Sturdevant 
Lydia Vihlen : : 



Alice Walker 
Anne Wallace 
Sherman Ward 



Gloria Warren : 
Charlie Williams 
Harris Wilson : 



men 



: Atlanta, Ga. 
: Atlanta, Ga. 
Homestead, Fla. 



Atlanta, Ga. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Lorain, Ohio 



: Atlanta, Ga. 
Thomasville, Ga. 
: Villa Rica, Ga. 



Ferol Wing : : : : Decatur, Ga. 
Norman Wood : Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Doris Yarbrough : : Atlanta, Ga. 



'41 U 



ctmctcruw 




Ajcil(Miie4. 



•4/ U 



umacraw 




The Glee Club, under the direction of Professor David W. Davis includes Doris 
Yarbrough, Cloe Cochran, Charlotte Simmons, Reva Murphy, Ferol Wing, Mary 
Lou Sturdivant, Evelyn Cook, Marian Rosenberg, Bettye Ray, Hazel Josey, Bee 
Nix, Mary Glenn Spears, Shirley Davis, Audrey Moore, Eudora Doan, Eleanor Mat- 
thews, Mildred McKay, Gloria Warren, Jane Aldrich, Mary Lou Schick, Martha De- 
Freese, Jacqueline Partain, Betty Benefield, Alice Walker, Herbert Beckett, Sher- 
man Ward, Yancey Shaver, William Neiman, Pete Cunningham, Robert Booth, Ed- 
ward Black, George Liptak, and Charles Newton. 




TREBLE flEF 



The Treble Clef Group is com- 
posed of seven singers and the 
pianist and has contributed 
color and variety to the Glee 
Club concerts and programs. 
The members are Eudora Doan, 
Ferol Wing, Mary Lcvu Sturdi- 
vant, Mary Lou Schick, Martha 
DeFreese, Gloria Warren, Bee 
Nix and Alice Walker, pianist. 



DELTA 

SIGMA 

PHI 

OFFICERS 

Ernest Sheffield 

President 

Patsy LoCascio 

Vice President 

Robert Elliott 

Secretary 

George Kolowich 

Treasurtr 

Louis Leskosky 

Chaplain 






Founded at College of the City of New York, 1899 
Alpha Nu Chapter 1922 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

Ernest Sheffield James McGrory 

Patsy LoCascio Charles Newton 

Robert Elliott Jack Horner 

George Kolowich James Pressley 

Louis Leskosky Gene Harris 



Nick Popa 
Peter Maman 
Norman Wood 
Arvel Brouse 
Robert Schoales 
C. L. Allen 



PLEDGES 

Francis Adams 
Hugh Kolowich 
William Crowell 
James Pope 
Jack Mockabee 
Robert O'Dell 



K A PPl DELTA 



OFFICERS 

Mary Eishup 

President 

Marian Gillooley 

Vice President 

Mildred McKay 

Secretai-y 

Jane Aldrich 

Treasurer 

Martha DbFreese 

Pa rl ia m enta i-ia n 




Founded at Virginia State Normal 1897 
Alpha Tau Chapter 1930 

Colors 
Green and White 

Flowers 
White Rose 



MEMBERS 
Mary Bishop Jane Aldrich 

Mabi\n Gillooley Mildred McKay 

Martha DeFreese 




FLEDGES 
Chloe Cochran Evelyn Lowry 

Ellen Gotten strater 
Mary Lou Schick 
Margaret Stewart 
Frances Loyd 

JUANITA MAILEY 




ALPHA 

LAMBDA 

TAU 

MEMBERS 
Marcus Wilson 

President 
Sam Worthington 

Vice President 
Clifton McClanahan 
Sec-Treas2irer 
David Eavenson 
Max Ivey 
John W. Patrick 
Henry Farris 
William Nieman 
Edward Black 



Alpha Lambda Tau was founded by a group of men who first organized as the Alpha Lambda Tau 
Club, the first fraternal organization at Oglethorpe University. After its reorganization in 1916, the 
fraternity soon became a power on the campus and numbered on its rolls some of the most influential 
of the students. Its purpose had been to maintain good fellowship and understanding among the club 
groups at Oglethorpe; but with T. V. Morrison. C. C. Mason, Marion Gaertner (the first freshman 
to enter the University), O. M. Cobb, William Nunn, H. F. Whitehead, and Carl Stokes as officers 
and through the efforts of Doctor H. J. Gaertner, it was decided that the organization should become 
a national order. Consequently the fraternity was incorporated under the laws of the State of Georgia; 
the name was registered as Alpha Lambda Tau ; and the members determined that the new national 
should grow with the new Oglethorpe. It was once thought that the fraternity would never go north of 
the Mason-Dixon Line, but today it has twenty-ona chapters. 

Two official songs have been adopted: '"The Sweetheart of A. L. T." by Tom Ellis of Eta Chapter and 
"The Dream Girl of A. L. T." by Paul Crumbaugh of Omicron Chapter. The colors of the fraternity are 
old gold and black. The flower is the American Beauty Rose. 

Prominent Alumni include: Dr. William Lee Nunn, an Oglethorpe graduate, editor of several text 
books on economic sociology and professor at Dana College; Dr. Marc C. Leager, professor of 
economics at North Carolina State College; John Randolph Hearst, graduate of Oglethorpe, editor of 
Harper's Bazaar, vice president of Cosmopolitan and Good Housekeeping magazines; and Dr. M. D. 
Collins, Oglethorpe graduate and State Superintendsnt of Education of Georgia. 





PLEDGE 

CL^B 
OFFICERS 



Anthony Zelencik. 

Prcside}it 
Hugh Floyd 

Secrefayy 
Thomas Hunted 

Treasurer 




ALT PLEDGES 



Joseph Juliana, Robert Dillard, Winton Laslie, Ben Lorenz, John O'Brien, Daniel Douglas, Edward 
Link, Thomas House, Thomas Smith, Fred Vihlen, Charles Waller, Joseph Hooks, Edward Norvell, 
Alfred Langford. Roland Sheets, Roy Carter, John IVTouchet, William Fletcher, Paul Whaley, Hugh 
Floyd, Thomas M. Hunter, Anthony Zelencik, Larry Dodd, and William Fleury. 





PI KAPPA PHI 



Jackson Stephens 
Yancey L. Shaver 
Jerry Hastings 
Robert Booth 
Gus Hendry 
Bill Sigman 



Pi Kappa Phi Fratei-nity was founded on December 
10, 1904, in Charleston, South Carolina, to perpet- 
uate the ideals of Andrew Alexander Kroeg, Jr., 
Anthony Wagner, Lawrence Mixon, and James 
Fogarty. 

This young fraternity was incorporated as a nation- 
al college fraternity on December 23, 1907, under the 
laws of the State of South Carolina. 

At the ninth supreme convention in 1916, Oglethorpe 
University was granted a charter and designated 
as Pi Chapter. 

The fraternity has grown from a small club to one 
of 8,300 members embracing 40 chapters in colleges 
and universities throughout the country. 

The red rose is the fraternity flower, and the colors 
are gold and white. 

The officers of the Pi Chapter are : Y'ancey L. Sha- 
ver, President; Robert Booth, Secretary; Jack Ste- 
phens, Treasurer; Jerry Hastings, Historian; and 
Augustus Hendry,- Warden. 



'4/ U 



cimucrciw 




PLEDGES AO U! T H E S 

Front Row. Jerry Hastings. David McCormack, William Sigmcn, James Allen, and Jack Stephens. 

Second Row. Robert Booth, Pliillip Simmons, and George Liptak. 

Third Row. Walter Erikson, Robert Monroe, Herbert Beckett, and Yancy Shaver. 





Founded at the University of Southern California 1909 
Chi Chapter 1930 

Colors 
Kelly Green 

Floiver 
Tea Rose 

MEMBERS 



BETA PHI ALPHA 

OFFICERS 

Betty Benefield .... President 

Beatrice Nix . . . Vice President 

LoRAiNE Jackson .... Secretary 

Beatrice Nix Treasurer 



Betty Benefield 
Beatrice Nix 
LoRAiNE Jackson 
Gene North 
Rhett Pinson 
Anne Wallace 
Doris Yarbrough 
Jane Adams 
Miriam Highnote 





I 

4 
I 



(HI OMeu 

OFFICERS 

Anna McConneghey . . President 
Beula Hightower . . Vice President 
Jacqueline Partain . . Secretary 
Audrey Moore .... Treasurer 

Pounded at the University of Ai-l^ansas 
1895 

Sigma Gamma Chapter 1924 

Colors 
Cardinal and Straw 

Flower 
White Carnation 



MEMBERS 



Anna McConneghey 
Beaula Hightower 
Jacqueline Partain 
Audrey Moore 
Deas Hamilton 



Betty Longworth 
Eleanor Matthews 
Shirley Davis 
Claudie Johnson 



Verna Miller 
Emma Baldwin 



PLEDGES 

Wilhelmina Durham 




r"' ■ 








HH 






H 




HHI 




■1 










I^^^^^^^^BI^^H 






IHIhIH 




uHinliJ^^^^^^I 




^H^^^^^^H 


^^^^d 


R'^i 


1^ 










1 


^H>,~ ' 


H^Bt ▼ 


' la 


'^ ^^^^H 










ft 


m 


1 


1 




^^^^^^fc v^'.^itf 




1 










■ "--^^^ 






I3S 


-"iaB 


Hm^^ 




^^Hj 










n 




1 


1 




1 




1 



PHI RAPPA DELTA 



Phi Kappa Delta is Oglethorpe's only national honorary society for both men and women. It was or- 
ganized to encourage high scholarship among students and participation of the individual in campus 
activities. 

Members of the Oglethorpe Chapter are chosen in the Spring of each year. Only those members of the 
Junior and Senior Classes who have a scholastic average of 90 or above and who are active in club 
groups are eligible. 

Active members on the campus this year are: J. D. Hosteller, Regent; Fred Goss, Vice Regent; Mil- 
dred McKay, Scribe; Anna McConneghey, Historian, and John Brackett, Sergeant-at-arms. 





LE COiTE 



The aim of the Le Conte Honorary Society is the advancement of scientific study and research at the 
University and the encouragement of individual work among the students. The Society was organized 
at Oglethorpe in 1920. • -^ 

Faculty members are Dr. John A. Aldrich, Dr. M. H. Hunt, and Professor Harold L. Jones. 
Student members are Luther Harben, president; John Brackett, vice president; Paul Whaley, secre- 
tary-treasurer; Gus Hendry, sergeant-at-ai^gs ; Louis LeskggJu, Milton C. Austin, and Frederick Goss; 
and Anthony Zelencik, pledge. 





BLUE KEY 



Anthony Zelencik 



Philip Scales . 

Vice President 
Herbert Beckett 



President 

Charles Newton 
Corresponding-Secretari- 



Secretary-Treasurer 



The local chapter of the Blue Key, national honorary fraternity, was installed at Oglethorpe in 1926. 
The men who are selected for membership must have a high scholastic average, interest in campus ac- 
tivities, qualities of leadership and a desire to render service to the student body as a whole. The organ- 
ization conducts the Orientation Program lat the beginning of each year, sends telegrams to the foot- 
ball team at games away from home, and makes the Homecoming Day award to the best player of the 
day. 

Paul Whaley, Luther Harben, Louis Leskosky, Philip Scales, John Brackett, Herbert Beckett. Joseph 
Tosches, Charles Newton, Anthony Zelencik, James McGrory, and Jeter Maman are members of the 
group. 



T 




Sitting. Patsy LoCascio, Paul Whaley, Coach John Patrick, Ernest Roberti, Sam Worthington, Augus- 
tus Hendry, Louis Leskosky, Charles Monsour. 

Standing. Clifton McClanahan, John Brackett, John Smith, Anthony Zelencik, Peter Manian, Thomas 
House, James Pope, Ross Wyrosdick, Ernest Sheffield, Joseph Tosches, Alfred Sprouse. 



i 4 



fl" flUB 



Sam Worthington 



Ernest Sheffield President 

Anthony Zelencik Vice Pi-esident 

. Treasurer Clifton McClanahan 



Secretary 



The "O" Club was founded on Februaryj 
men who have made the varsity "0" in 
eligible for membership in the club 




1920, through the efforts of Mr. Frank B. Anderson. Only 
[:form of athMtics, recognized by the athletic council, are 



The club is especially noted for its dance which follows the Homecoming Football Game every year. 




FOUR F'S CLUB 



The Four F Club was founded on October 15, 1940, and it is already active as a member of campus or- 
ganizations. The name stands for Four Fine Friendly Fellows and as the name indicates, the club was 
founded by four men from the student body. The club motto is Bono Vince Malum (Overcome Evil with 
Good). The organization is founded on the principles of chivalry and its aim is to promote honesty, 
courtesy, and friendship in the University. The four charter members were John Cown, President; 
Milton Austin, vice president; William Hill, secretary-treasurer; and Alvaro Gonzalez, chief justice. 
Ed Black was elected second justice; and Paul Meadows, third jiustice. Other members are R. E. 
Arnold, Frank Castelluccio, Rodney Cone, Daniel Douglas, James Greene, Luther Harbin, R. C. Law- 
rence, Clifton McClanahan, William Nieman, Ed Norvell, Jerome Silverman, Paul Whaley, and Charles 
Williams. 




SPAilSH CLIB 



The Circulo Simon Bolivar, generally known as the 
Spanish Club, was founded in the fall of 1940 for 
students who are interested in the language and 
customs of the Latin-American countries. The group 
is a member of the Atlanta chapter of the Pan- 
American Forum, and its ultimate aim is member- 
ship in the national honorary Spanish fraternity, 
Sigma Delta Pi. 

Alvaro Gonzales, of Bogota, Columbia, is president; 
Mildred McKay, secretary-treasurer; and Mary 
Bishop, corresponding secretary. Members include 
Marian Rosenberg, Keith Lane, Betty Longworth, 
Beula Mae Hightower, Tom Hunter, Evelyn Cooke, 
Margaret Morris, Marshhall Asher, Robert Pitts, 
John Gold'thwait, William Nieman, Mrs. John W. 
Patrick, Daniel Douglas, Jack Mockabee, Margaret 
Stewart, Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Anderson, Bruno 
Blash, Robert Elliott, Marian Gillooley, Martin 
Kelly, Walter Ross, and James Vocalis. Honorary 
members of the club are Dr. Thornwell Jacobs, Mr. 
George T. Bush, and Mr. Edward Austin, of At- 
lanta. Dr. Luis Aviles Perez is the faculty advisor. 





DUCHESS CLUB 



The Duchess Club was organized at Oglethorpe to encourage a spirit of friendship and co-operation 
among the campus clubs and sororities and to promote social, scholastic, and extra-curricular activity. 
Bids for membership are issued each fall to sixteen girls, four to each sorority and four to non-sor- 
ority girls. 

It awards two trophies annually — one for the best- all-round girl, and another for the best play pre- 
sented by a sorority in an annual contest. 

Members are: Anna McConneghey, president; Mary Bishop, vice president; Jean Rogers, secretary; 
Betty Benefield, treasurer; Gene North, Jane Aldrich, Mildred McKay, Marian Gillooley, Beula Mae 
Hightower, Betty Longworth, Hazel Josey, Jane Anderson, Lydia Vihlen, Verna Miller, Martha De- 
Preese, Bettye Ray, Chloe Cochran, Ferol Wing, Audrey Moore, Eleanor Matthews, Claudie Johnson, 
Rhett Pinson, Ann Wallace, and Jane Adams. 




UGLY CLUB 



An exclusive male organization, the Ugly Club was organized on the Oglethorpe campus in 1933 by a 
group of men who were interested in promoting and sponsoring student activity. 

The club has a membership of twenty students, carefully selected from the student body. Membership 
can be attained only by a unanimous vote of invitation by active members. Each year, the club spon- 
sors chapel programs of special interest to the students. 

The officers are: Harold Powers, President and Grand Wiser; Rudolph Home, Vice President; and 
James Pope, Secretary-Treasurer. The Active roll also includes Frank Singer, E. O. Sheffield, Larry 
Dodd, Nick Popa, James McGrory, Louis Leskosky, Marcus Wilson, Joseph Tosches, Peter Maman, 
Samuel Worthington, Anthony Zelencik, David Eavenson, Ross Wyrosdick, Philip Scales, James Tim- 
berlake, Martin Kelly, and Wayne Melton. 



THE STO RM Y 
PETREL 



HERBERT BECKETT EDITOR-IN-CHIEF PHILIP SCALES . . BUSINESS MANAGER 

GEORGE TALBOTT . . MANAGING EDITOR ROBERT O'DELL . . ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

LOUIS LESKOSKY . . ASSOCIATE EDITOR D'ARMON ALLEN . . ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

ROSS WYROSDICK SPORTS EDITOR 

THOMAS M. HUNTER SPORTS EDITOR 

GEORGE LIPTAK CIRCULATION MANAGER 




Reporters Anna McConneghey, Jean Rogers, Hazel Josey, Jean North, Marian Gillooley, Charles New- 
ton, James McGrory, Gloria Warren, Marian Rose nberg, Jack Horner, Victor Cagoy, and Robert Riv- 
enbark. 




^ 


^M^B^H^I 


~ ^^ 


^^■^^^^■L^^^l 


■ i^l 


I^SBS^K 


fi^J 




Jml 


I^^^^^Ml^^ ^'^.^gJT'v^'^^^B^Bi 


-C^ 


,^^/p^^ -N^m^^^nn 



1lG4n<A<:A<4/UA Stojilf 




ANTHONY ZELENCIK 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF _„ 

1 

RUDY HORNE 

BUSINESS MANAGER -*" 

GEORGE TALBOTT |gj|||k^%i^^^ 

MANAGING EDITOR |^|hL jk Bhj 

MR. J. D. HOSTELLER FACULTY ADVISCR 

BILL SIGMAN ART EDITOR 

ROBERT O'DELL ....... MAKEUP EDITOR 

THOMAS M. HUNTER SPORTS EDITOR 

JOHN GOLDTHWAIT PHOTOGRAPHER 

JOSEPH JULIANA . . . . . ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

MARIAN ROSENBERG ASSOCIATE EDITOR 







•4/ U 



umucruw 




AMdeticA. 



^ootLaU 




Front Row. Pope, Manager; LoCascio, Roberti, Hendry, Abney, Home, Peppy Patrick, Mascot; Timber- 
lake, Pressley, Thomason, Coach Patrick. 

Second Row. Whitaker, Sheets, Leatherwood, Waller, Floyd, Wyrosdick, Captain Sheffield, Mockabee, 
Monsour, Tosches, Ferrario. 

Back Row. Leskosky, Asst. Coach; Dodd, Hunter, Lawson, Zelencik, Kelly, House, Eavenson, Reid, Cegoy, 
Link. 



1940 nnn results 



OGLETHORPE 





GEORGIA 


53 


OGLETHORPE 


14 


WOFFORD 


26 


OGLETHORPE 


20 


TROY TEACHERS 


7 


OGLETHORPE 





CITADEL 


25 


OGLETHORPE 


7 


NEWBERRY 


28 


OGLETHORPE 





TAMPA 


52 


OGLETHORPE 


28 


ERSKINE 





OGLETHORPE 


6 


PRESBYTERIAN 


20 



In the sweltering heat of the first week in September, Coach John Patrick 
faced the job of developing a starting eleven from the thirty-five candi- 
dates who reported for the first day of practice. 

With veterans Captain Ernie Sheffield, a guard, Tony Zelencik, a tackle, 
Martin Kelly, a back, a number of seasoned reserves augmented by a few 
promising sophomores, the task of shaping up a team to face Georgia's Bull- 
dogs on September 27, at Ponce de Leon ball park, was not a too pessimistic- 
looking one. 

The early workouts progressed smoothly, if slowly, never seriously impeded 
by injuries. Pounds rolled off as the Stormy Petrels sweated themselves in- 
to condition. The coaching staff decided to taper off during the last week, 
after a workout under the lights at the North Fulton High School field, 
everything was in readiness for the big test. 

The biggest Oglethorpe team in several seasons was conceded at least a 
fighting chance to stop the 1940 edition of the "flaming sophomores" of 
Georgia. 



ASSISTANT COACH LOU LESKOSKY 
PEPPY PATRICK 
HEAD COACH JOHN PATRICK 




'4/ U 



umacruw 



GEORGIA 53 



OGLETHORPE 



Urder the arc lights of Ponce de Leon park, 25,000 spectators were amazed as they watched a highly- 
touted Oglethorpe team absorb the decisive defeat at the hands of the Bulldogs. In bitter disappoint- 
ment the Stormy Petrel bowed down to a much greater machine which lacked nothing. The Petrels' 
uppermost thought was to give Georgia a good game, this they did as far as their limits allowed. Ogle- 
thorpe believed that they could give the Bulldogs a fight as long as the "big team" held out, but a 
lack of reserves proved to be the weakest spot in the Oglethorpe armor. Georgia, on the other hand, 
showed speed, power, stamina, running, and kicking, and passing with the greatest precision. 
Coach Patrick had started one of the biggest Oglethorpe lines in history, with Ernie Roberti, James 
T'mberlake rt ends. Tonv Zeicncik. Vic Ceuoy at tpckles, Captain Ernie Sheffield, Dave Eavanson at 
guards, Joe Reid at center. The line averaged 205 pounds, with 170 pound Ernie Roberti the smallest 
man, 225 pound Joe Reid the biggest. In the starting backfield were Pete Maman, 175 pound tailback. 
Trig Thomason, 175 pound fullback, Charlie Monrour, 165 pound former Commercial High star, 180 
pound Joe Tosches at the wing back posts. 

A bad break of the Petrels came in the first quarter when Georgia intercepted a shovel pass on the 
Birds' own 15 yard line, carried the b^ll over from that point in the first five minutes of play. From 
Ihat point on the game was all Georgia. Sophomores Lamar Davis, Frank Sinkwich spurred their 
team-mates on to great efforts as they tore gaping holes in the fighting Petrel line. Davis' 65 yard re- 
turn of a punt at the start of the third period was the longest run of the evening, however, and it was 
necessary for the Bulldogs to capitalize on breaks, long sustained drives to run up their score. 
Ernie Sheffield, the only man on either team 

to go the route, never once lacked the fight - ~ - - - - -. 

and drive which characterized his rlav ?11 
through his career at Oglethorpe. Big tickle 

Tony Zelencik was all in the iron man class s. ■ ,:■ »^ , , 

until a t'"isted knee in the fourth nuarter 
removed him from the game. Center Joe Reid 
and end Jamie Timberlake gave the last ounce 
of their strength to st'm the 1ide. and bac'-s 
Maman, Tosches, and Kelly gave the only 
Oglethorpe offensive spark, but their efforts 
were in vain. Sophomores Dave Eavenson. Ed 
Link, Tom Hunter, Charlie Waller, Bill Whit- 
aker got their first taste of varsity competi- 
tion, gave good accounts of themselves. 




mes Pressley Ross Wyrosdick Rudy Home Angelo Ferrar Dave Eavenson Ernie Sheffield, (c) Charles Wallerl 




JV^j 




Hugh Floyd Jamie Timberlake Harry Leatherwood Jack Mockabee Ross Abney L. T. Lawsun Lurry Do 



idd 



WOFFORD 26 



OGLETHORPE 14 




S£.> 



TOP — Joe Tosches and Pete Maman 
BOTTOM— Joe Juliana 



Oglethorpe's Stormy Petrels opened their confer- 
ence season at home, October 4, against a Wofford 
College team which came from behind to outscore 
the Birds in a nip and tuck see-saw battle. The Ter- 
riers came to Hermance Field with Jack Taggart, 
one of the surest passers in the conference, and 
James Hilton a pint-sized scatback, both the envy 
of enemy coaches. It was these two Woffordites who 
just about spelled the difference of victory for the 
Terriers. 

OGLETHORPE 20 ALABAMA STATE TEACH. 7 

Oglethorpe's Stormy Petrels flew wild as they 
spoiled the annual homecoming for the Alabama 
Teachers, 20-7. This was the first win of the season 
for the Birds. 

In the final minutes of play the Teachers hanging 
on in a defensive game. Shifty Little Charlie Mon- 
sour brought the crowd to its feet with a spectac- 
ular run of 65 yards behind some beautiful block- 
ing to score the climactic goal. Sheffield's success- 
ful conversion capped the evening. 



CITADEL 25 



OGLETHORPE 



Injuries to key Petrels and a host of fast-stepping 
Citadel backs spelled defeat to the Petrel's inva- 
sion attempt on the Charleston, S. C. stronghold on 
October 25. Fullback Bolduc and tailback Hank Fos- 
ter were the thorns in the Bird's sides throughout 
the day. 

It was Parents' Day at the Battery School, and 
the Bulldogs were out to impress their guests. A 
second period 52 yard march, a 48 yard punt return 
by Foster in the third quarter, another Bolduc-Fos- 
ter sustained drive in the third, and finally a 34- 
yar'i march following a blocked kick recovery by 
Ben Suitt, Citadel flankman. 



1« .>4i„. /!^^ 




^ '^# ,;««i»«».^ ft 



'^--ttogrj 



' ^ a igi»»^ 




Ed Link Martin Kelly Vic Cegoy Bill Whitaker Pat LoCasdo Tony Zelencik Charles Monsour 



i^aseio Tony zele 

•4/ M 



ctmucruw 



UIllROWiED KliliS 



The man who kicks the field goal 
That wins the hard fought game, 

He kicks his way to glory, 

The thousands cheer his name. 

But what about the center 
Who passes him the ball? 

He makes or breaks the kicker, but 
He isn't cheered at all. 

The back who crashes through the line, 

For ten or maybe more. 
And makes the final touchdown 

That proves the winning score, 



He's hailed the college hero 

Amidst a wild hurray — 
But what of guard or tackle 

Who opened up the way? 

Oh, football has its heroes. 

Some of the gifted toe, 
And others who can smash a line 

And strike the winning blow. 
But as in every game on earth. 

Including that of life. 
Its greatest heroes often pass 

Unnoticed through the strife. 

— Anonymous 




Randy Sheets Gus Hendry 



Joe Reid 



Ernie Robert! 



Tom Hunter Tom House 




Coach and "E. 0.' 



Walter Ross 




NEWBERRY 28 OGLETHORPE 7 

It was a case of a "jinx" working against the Pe- 
trels as they took the field on November 2, in the 
thirteenth Homecoming tilt, and lost to the New- 
berry Indians, the first time in history that an 
Oglethorpe team had ever dropped a Homecoming 
game. It was the fourth period onslaught of Little- 
All-American Dominick Collangelo that spelled the 
difference between victory and defeat. 

After the Indians had made their first seven points 
the Petrels took over, for a period and a half. They 
got their scoring chance when Jack Mockabee, who 
played a whale of a game at centter, subbing for 
the injured Joe Reid, intercepted one of Dominick's 



passes on the Newberry 20 and went to the 15. The 
Birds fritted away three downs, but on the fourth 
try Joe Tosches dropped back and passed beauti- 
fully to Charlie Monsour at the goal line, 11 yards 
away. 

Joe Tosches gained about as much ground as did 
Collangelo, and it was his sweeps of the Newberry 
flanks that cheered Oglethorpe supporters midway 
in the game. Ernie Sheffield stayed for 60 minutes 
of ball, later was awarded the Blue Key medal as 
the outstanding Homecoming player, by a vote of 
the press box. Tosches' great game led the Blue 
Key officers to duplicate the award to Sheffield, 
an unprecedented move. 





Front Row. Fletcher, Shelby, Erickson, Schoales, Langford, O'Brien, Doyle, Douglass, Ragsdale, Blash. 
Back Row. Smith, Najour, Coach Palma, Brouse, Hooks, Trainer Powers. 



TAMPA 52 OGLETHORPE 

One of the greatest disasters ever to strike an 
Oglethorpe team came in mid-season when discipli- 
nary action brought the dismissal of five members 
of the varsity, three of them slated to start against 
Tampa on November 8. Two of the five were rein- 
statetd, but big center Joe Reid, guard Gus Hen- 
dry, fullback Trig Thomason were lost. 

In the line there was a good deal of 60 minute ball, 
but the 45 minutes played by RanJy Sheets in place 
of Jamie Timberlake, who had gone out with a 
sprained ankle earlier, were the mos*. courageous 
minutes demonstrated by the Petrels all season. 
When it was over. Sheets had a badly sprained 
ankle, was through for the rest of the season. 

The game itself was merely a case of Williams, 
Williams, Williams and more Williams, as big, 
hard-running Chamo Williams completely over- 
whelmed the Black and Gold warriors, scoring ir 
almost every conceivable way. 



OGLETHORPE 28 ERSKINE 

Oglethorpe's Petrels whitewashed the Erskine Se- 
ceders November 22 before a Thanksgiving Day 
crowd of 5,000. The Petrels tallied once in the first- 
twice in the second, and again in the fourth quar- 
ter. Erskine threatened only once, driving to the 
one-yard line in the fourth, only to lose the ball on 
downs. 

PRESBYTERIAN 20 OGLETHORPE 

Although limited to one first down and to only 66 
yards by rushing by a battling Oglethorpe defense, 
Presbyterian's Blue Hose capitalized on the breaks 
to give the Petrels a beating at Hermance Field in 
the season's finale for both teams. 

Presbyterian scored early on a pass intercepted by 
center Raterse in the first quarter, and again in 
the closing minutes of the second period. The Birds 
scored in the third quarter when Ed Link recovered 
a fumbled punt on the P. C. 26, and Pete Maman 
passed on fourth down to Joe Tosches. The final 
P. C. score came when Church intercepted a pass 
from Farrar and went 22 yards to score. 



BoAjeJujiil 




Front Row. Manager Singer, Melton, Smith, Waller, Sprouse. 

Second Row. Palma, Whaley, Worthington, Ferrario, Dodd, Whitaker, Coach Anderson 

Back Row. Wilson, Monsour, Gassaway, Brackett, Taylor, Maman 





SEASON 


RECORD 




Oglethorpe 


3 


Auburn 


2 


Oglethorpe 


1 


Auburn 


1 


Oglethorpe 


1 


Auburn 


6 


Oglethorpe 


3 


Auburn 


8 


Oglethorpe 


1 


Presbyterian College 


15 


Oglethorpe 


2 


Presbyterian College 


4 


Oglethorpe 


9 


Fort Benning 


6 


Oglethorpe 


2 


Fort Benning 




Oglethorpe 


1 


University of Georgia 


10 


Oglethorpe 


5 


University of Georgia 


4 


Oglethorpe 


4 


University of Georgia 


11 


Oblethorpe 





Newberry 


s 


Oglethorpe 


3 


Newberry 


2 


Ogletharpe 


3 


Piedmont College 


9 


Oglethorpe 


9 


Piedmont College 


8 


Oglethorpe 


12 


Piedmont College 


2 


Oglethorpe 


2 


Piedmont College 


10 


■■\ll ni.ll. '-WC-y 









^^JU,«rfr«» 



THE REGULAR LINE-UP 



SUBS 



Monsour, If Maman Gaston 

Sprouse, rf, c Smith, J. Vihlen 

Whitaker, c Tosches 

McClanahan, p 
Worthington, p 
Whaley, p 

^umucruw 



Worthington, p 
Whaley, V /~k t 




ctmctcrctw 




Nub Floyd 



Charles Waller 



Joe Juliana 



Rudy Home 



Hugh "Nub" Floyd, featherweight, Golden Gloves, 1940, went to quarterfinals where he lost a close 
decision. He won his first fight on a 3rd round knockout. 

Charles Waller, lightweight. Golden Gloves, 1940, advanced to finals, lost a split decision. 
Rudy Home, light heavyweight. Golden Gloves, 1940, won the novice championship of his division. 
Knocked out his first opponent. 

Joe Juliana, middleweight. Golden Gloves, 1940, won first fight by 1st round knockout. Lost in quar- 
ter finals on a split decision. Golden Gloves, 1941, vi^on first fight by a decision, but lost in quarterfinals 
to a previous Golden Gloves champion. Azalea Festival, Charleston, S. C. 





Josey 
O'Dell 



Tony Zelencik 
WRESTLING 

Heavyweight Southeastern Y. M. C. A. 
champion in 1940 and 1941. In 1940 he 
placed third in the National Y. M. C. A. 
tournament held in Detroit, Mich. Won 
City of Atlanta championship in 1940 and 
1941. 

Tony has never lost a match in which he 
wrestled below the Mason-Dixon line. 



Schick 
Talbott 



DeFreese 
Hunter 



Talbott O'Dell Shaver 



FENCING 



The Fencing Club is one of the organizations which were 
begun this year. It was founded by a group of students 
who saw that they must organize in order to make pos- 
sible the enjoyment of this sport. Among them are, 
George Talbott, coach; Mary Lou Schick, women's in- 
structor; Bob O'Dell, men's instructor; Hazel Josey, 
Jane Anderson, Martha DeFreese, Margaret Stewart, 
Keith Lane, Yancey Shaver, Bruno Blash, Nick Popa, 
d'Armon Allen, and George Kolowich. 




ctmacruw 




£, 



4Ul 



Ui 





RADIO PLAY PRODUCTION 

Our Radio Play Production class, directed 
by Paul Carpenter, Jr., provided a new 
scope of school activity. Here is a picturi- 
zation of a radio drama in the making. 
Top left, Nick Popa at the control board. 
Top right, the silhouetted hand of Paul 
Carpenter gives the signal for a mystery 
play to start. At left, Jane Adams at the 
"mike" with Catherine Gillooley. Bottom 
left Jimmy Vocalis and "Newscaster" Ross 
Wyrosdick at a sound effects table. Below 
right, Marion Gillooley, Ed Link, and Deas 
Hamilton, in a "DRAMA." 




umucruw 



^^mr'-^-^fis:^.! 





DEBATE CLUB 




BLASH TRIAL 

Biggest hoi'seplay of the year was "the 
case of the people of Lupton City vs. 
Bruno V. Blash," a trial for "vagrancy." 
Court convened Tuesday evening, Febru- 
ary 11, with Judge Zelencik on the bench. 
After a dignified ceremony and much wise- 
cracking, the jury retired for one minute 
and twenty seconds to bring in a verdict 
of "guilty." An appeal was granted and a 
retrial took place the following Thursday 
in student chapel. 



1. Court officials make last-minute preparations. 




4. "Do vou swear?" "Yeh! I swear. 



5. Sheriff Eavenson wishes luck to Prosecutor 
McGrory. 



8. The witness charges, "You're too 
broadminded!" 

. Coach Pat gets a kick out of the pro- 
ceedings. 





2. Bailiff Hendry is unaffected by the 
drama. 



3. The jury gravely weighs the evidence. 




6. McGrory demands, "Tell me what 'ex- 
post facto' means!" 



7. The witness replies, "There are two answers to that ques- 
tion!" 




10. Defense attorney Niemann takes the wit- 
ness. 



11. Judge Zelencik sentences Blash to banishment from 
Lupton City. 



THE PAUSE THAT REFRESHES 






COMPLIMENTS OF 



l\ 



SOOA CO. 




GARAGE INC. 



Automotive Specialist 

TEL. HE. 4665 
588 SPRING ST., N. W. 



COMPLIMENTS Of 

BUCKHEAD 

BARBER 

SHOP 

G.V.NixJgr. 



Jnhniiie Scarrett 

GARAGE 

Special Rates To Student Body 

COMPLETE 

SERVICE 
24 Baker St., N. E. Tel. Wa. 6243 



GARMENT CLEANERS 

CLEANING 
PRESSING 

REPAIRING 
DYEING 

"Where the Charm of Newness is 
Restored" 

LAUNDRY SERVICE 

PLANT AND OFFICE (BUCKHEAD) 
! 3112 PEACHTREE RD.Phone Ch. 2187 



DID \0^ K^flW? 



Did you know that Oglethorpe is a $2,000,- 
000 plant with a six hundred acre cam- 
pus ? 

Did you know that Lowry Hall is a replica 
of Corpus Christi, the alma mater of Gen- 
eral Oglethorpe at Oxford, England? 

Did you know that President Jacobs, single- 
handed, raises the annual deficit of the 
college each year which amounts to $40,- 
000? 

Did you know that Oglethorpe has gradu- 
ated one-fourth of the teachers in the At- 
lanta Public School System and that one- 
third of all of them have either attended 
or been graduated by Oglethorpe? 

Did you know that Oglethorpe is the only 
college in America that has preserved for 
posterity in its famous Crypt a complete 
picture of modern civilization? 

Did you know that Oglethorpe is the first 
University to demonstrate that the aver- 
age college student is doing just one-half 
of the work he could take without excess 
strain on his physical and mental facul- 
ties? 

Did you know that Oglethorpe has one of the 
few University presses in the country on 
which are printed text books, stationery, 
catalogues and other literature? 

Did you know that THE WESTMINSTER, 
one of the oldest and most internationally 
known poetry and prose journals is print- 
ed by the University Press? 

Did you know that Oglethorpe numbers 
among its honorary alumni a hundred or 
more of America's most illustrious citi- 
zens? 

Did you know that during the depression not 
one of the members of Oglethorpe's facul- 
ty was discharged? 



Did you know that Oglethorpe possesses the 
only authenticated portrait of General 
James Edward Oglethorpe as a mature 
man? 

Did you know that Oglethorpe has in its li- 
brary over 60,000 volumes? 

Did you know that Oglethorpe is one of the 
few universities in the South having a 
complete carrillon of chimes played daily? 

Did you know that the professor of Journal- 
ism at Oglethorpe is one of the finest 
newspaper men in the country and is city 
editor of the Atlanta Constitution? 

Did you know that Oglethorpe is one of the 
very few universities in America today 
that requires all Freshmen to take Bible 
courses for a degree in the School of Lib- 
eral Arts? 

Did you know that Oglethorpe's buildings 
are as fire proof as human skill can make 
them? 

Did you know that 1941 was the Silver Ani- 
versary of the opening of Oglethorpe? 

Did you know that President Jacobs is the 
author of THE NEW SCIENCE AND 
THE OLD RELIGION, ISLANDS OF 
THE BLEST, THE OGLETHORPE BOOK 
OF GEORGIA VERSE, DIARY OF 
WILLIAM PLUMER JACOBS, LIFE OF 
WILLIAM PLUMER JACOBS, SINFUL 
SADDAY, AND RED LANTERNS ON 
ST. MICHAEL'S the latter published by 
E. P. Dutton and Co., of New York now in 
its sixth printing? 

Did you know that Oglethorpe has a W. E. 
Hopper Memorial and that in this me- 
morial there is one of the finest flag col- 
lections to be found in the South? 

Did you know that every flower bulb in the 
Oglethorpe rock garden was donated by 
an internationally known florist? 



ALL PORTRAITS 

n 

BY 
THE WHITEHALL STUDIOS 



86 WHITEHALL STREET 
ATLANTA 



Your tongue 
tells when you 
need 




alotabs 



Coated tongue, dry mouth, 
bad breath, muddy skin 
groggy nerves and sour 
stomach suggest its use. 



A Product of Unusual Merit 
Consistently Advertised 



\,mm MPANY, k 



Sibile, Si Ergo, 
Fortibns Mm M 
M\k, Themis Trnx. 
Votis Enini, (mm Dux. 



•fi. llbitezy 



Ajaio<yiG/pivi