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Full text of "Yamacraw, 1942"

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YAMACRAW 




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COITMTS 

FOREWORD 

DEOKMTIOi 

THE UNIVERSITY 

SENIORS 

MEDICOS 

ODERIiRIDlUTES 

SOCHI GROUPS 

ACTIVITIES 

SPORTS 

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This is a little book — it was gathered together and published 
by little people from little places — and it is representative of a 
little school. But it is meant to stand as a graphic representation 
of one year in the lives of some of the future great men and 
women of America. On these pages have been recorded some 
of the things you have done during 1941-42. It has been the 
dssire of the YAMACRAW staff to present the record with 
completeness and accuracy. 



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Everyone who has known Doctor Hording Hunt for any length 
of time has come to coll him by his self-chosen title, "Popsie." 
His "yes, yes, you know," his incomparable sense of humor, 
his expert knowledge and ability have made his courses treas- 
ures among the components of ojr curriculum. We dedicate 
this bock to a man who has made brief moments of all our lives 
so livable — a man no Cglethorpe student would hesitate to love 
and admire — a man who knows how to live and like it: 
POPSIE HUNT. 





HilRDING HlIiT 

Tufts College, B.S., Harvard University; Danbury Normal School; Master in 
Science, Freyburg Institute; Principal Torrington High School; Superintendent 
of Schools, New Hartford; Private Tutor, New York City; Reynolds Professor 
of Biology, Davidson College; Professor of Biology, Southern College; Pro- 
fessor of Biology, Oglethorpe University. 



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FRANK ANDERSON, Registrar 

MARY FEEBECK, R. N., Dean of Women 

MARGARET STOVALL, Secretary to the President 

RUSSELL STOVALL, Cashier 

A. G. MARSHALL, Bursar 

MRS. BERNICE DAVIS, Dietitian 

B. S. ALWARD, Supt. of Buildings 




FRANK B. ANDERSON 

Registrar J 

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FRANK ESKRIDGE, M.D., Dean 



September, 1941, will be recalled as a great epoch in the history of Oglethorpe, for in that month 
dream of Thornwell Jacobs was realized, the founding of a school of medicine. The impetus of 
the need for more doctors to meet the defense programs increased requirements, and the necessity 
for more facilities in the South urged Doctor Jacobs to embark on the program without further 
delay. Preparations were made throughout the summer to receive the first class, and by September 
arrangements had been made to care for the class of 70 who became Oglethorpe's first class in 
graduate medicine. 

The securing of a faculty was one of the major problems facing the administration. Dr. John Jacobs, 
son of the president, and a professor at Tufts College, in Massachusetts, was mode Vice-President. 
Then Dr. Frank Eskridge, Chief of Staff in Obstetrics of Henry Grady Hospital, Atlanta, and one of 
the great names in southern medicine was made dean of the school. For the completion of the 
staff for the first year's work, John W. Barnard, Ph.D. from Michigan, and a professor at George- 
town University, was engaged to handle anatomy; Alfred Leimdorfer, M.D., for physiology, and Dr. 
Herman Jones, of Auburn Polytech, for Bio-Chemistry. 




HERMAN JONES Ph.D ALFRED LEIMDORFER, M.D. JOHN W. BARNARD, Ph.D. 



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DR. NICOLLASSEN 

GEORGE F. NICOLLASSEN, Ph.D., Dean 

The School of Liberal Arts pursues the education of the student with the accent on the well-rounded 
program, which is made to include the classics. Heavy stress is laid on language, and Dean 
Nicollassen, a Greek scholar, assisted by Triple E John Meacham, teaches that language and Latin. 
Judge Pierre Porohovshikov, a former member of the Russian Imperial Supreme Court, teaches 
advanced French and German, and Senor N. J. Castellanos handles Spanish. 





JUDGE POROHOVSHIKOV 



PROF. COSTELLANOS 



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J. D. MOSTELLER 



J. D. MOSTELLER, M.A., Dean 

English majors in this department of the University spend their time studying the classics of English 
and American literature. In addition, students in this field are offered a program in other branches 
that will give them a well-founded education designed to prepare them for a life in contact with 
English, yet possessed of practical knowledge in other fields. 

In addition to the English major, a course in journalism is offered under the city editor of the At/onto 
Constitution, Lee Rogers. Actual experience is gained by work in the offices of the paper, and by 
editing the Stormy Petrel at times during the year. 

Under Paul Carpenter, Jr., a course in Radio Dramatics and another in Play Production is offered 
to persons interested in studying drama. Actual radio broadcasts are given to the student body 
from time to time, and several plays are produced. 





LEE ROGERS 



PAUL CARPENTER 



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DR. ALDRICH 



JOHN A. ALDRICH, Ph.D., Dean 



Offering a diversified program \^hich gives special training in all of the sciences, the School of 
Science prepares the student for work in industries which require special skills in chemistry and 
physics, and offers courses in pre-med and pre-dental for students who wish to specialize in one of 
these fields. 

Heading the Department, Dr. Aldrich is professor of physics and astronomy, and is assisted by 
Professor Harold Jones, who has charge of chemistry, and Professor D. W. Davis, who teaches 
botany and biology. Triple E Keith Lone is an assistant in the chemistry department. 




PROFESSOR JONES 







DR. BURROWS 



MARK D. BURROWS, Ped.D., Dean 



Training in this field is centered around accounting as a major and other related courses in advertis- 
ing and accounting as subordinates. The program is designed to prepare the student for work in 
the business world, and give basic training to those who wish to moke a career as a C. P. A. Other 
courses are built around the business program to give the student a cultural background to his 
practical work. 

Doctor Burrows heads the American History, Political Science, Sociology departments, and Professor 
Charles Anderson handles the accounting work. Professor H. A. Woodward teaches courses in 
banking and insurance. 




PROF. ANDERSON 



PJidfUcal ZAucaiixut 




J. W. PATRICK 



JOHN W. PATRICK, M.A., Dean 



As well as being the head football coach of the Stormy Petrels, John Patrick is also head of the 
department of Physical education. The training if men and women for work as coaches and physical 
instructors is the primary task of Coach Patrick and his staff. The work is mode as much as possible 
actual experience in the sports in which the individual desires to later work. 

An important specialized branch of physical education has been uncovered recently in the demand of 
the Army and Navy for trained men and women to conduct programs of physical training in army 
camps and in civilian work in the nation. Already 18 former Petrels are enrolled in the Services 
as Physical instructors. 

Dean Patrick is assisted in his department by Professor Davis, Dr. Meadows, o.id Martin Kelly. 





DR. MEADOWS 



PROF. DAVIS 







DR. BURROWS 



MARK D. BURROWS, Ped.D., Dean 



The School of Secretarial Preparation, which is associated with the school of Commerce, but inde- 
pendent of it, was established to offer a course which would prepare the students, particubrly girls, 
for work in offices. The curriculum covers the ordinary territory of a business course, but places 
special emphasis on typing, shorthand, and office practice. 

Under the direction of Mrs. Ruth Wells Sanders, an Oglethorpe graduate, few of the girls who 
enroll in the school as freshmen go on to get their degrees, for the reason that the demand for train- 
ed office workers is so great that the average girl is working at the end of her second year. 

Assisting Miss Sanders in the instruction in typing and shorthand are a number of student assist- 
ants, chief of whom this year is Hazel Josey, a senior in the school of Secretarial Preparation. 




MRS. SANDERS 



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DR. GAERTNER 



HERMAN J. GAERTNER, Ped.D., Dean 



Work in the school of education is designed to prepare students for a career in the teaching profes- 
sion. Consequently the program is intended to give the student a grounding in teaching practice 
and various phases of the psychology of teaching. Dean Gaarrner himself teaches psychology, and is 
assisted by T. B. Meadows, Ph.D. Professor Woodward and Professor Davis also are members of 
the faculty of this department. 

One of the important branches of the school of education is the adult education department, which 
offers practicing teachers in Georgia schools an opportunity through Saturday class work on the 
campus or in field centers to work for higher degrees. The number enrolled in this work yearly 
is around 400 students. Professor Morris Hardwick assists Dr. Gaertner in the organization of class- 
es, and in teaching in the field. 



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HARDWICK GAERTNER WOODWARD 




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PROF. MORRIS 



GEORGE N. MORRIS, A.B., Dean 



The curriculum of the department of Fine Arts is designed primarily for students with definite abili- 
ties in an artistic nature. Specializing in various branches, such as portraiture, cartooning, commercial 
drawing is possible for students, but all are given a general cultural program based on an apprecia- 
tion of classical and modern art. 

Professor Morris handles the bulk of the work in his department, but is assisted by student instructor 
Bill Sigman in commercial art, and advertising art layout. 




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MRS. MYRTA CARPER, Librarian 




WILLIAM JONES, Superintendent 



SMITH 



DRINKARD 



WATSON 



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Mockabee 
Vice-President 






Whaley 
President 



ODERGRADllilTES 



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Rivenbark 
Student Advisor 




Mockabee Smoljan Whaley 



Doyal 



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President 



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Goldin 
Secretary 



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Hickock 
Treas. 



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Sherman 
Vice-Pres. 




Counts Sherman Smith Davis Fisher Hickok Lyon Coldin Lcovel 



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FRANK GREENE, B. S., 1941 
Wabash College 




JACK ESKRIDGE, B. A., 1942 
Oglethorpe University 






Frederick Goss 



Proctor, Vermont 



"Guiding Don" of Exceptional Educational Experiment; vice-regent of Phi Kap- 
pa Delta; Leconte; Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities 




John Goldthwait New Orleans, La. 

Corresponding secretary, Circulo Si- 
mon Bolivar 




Keith Lane Mountainair, N. M. 

President, Circulo Simon Bolivar 






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John Meacham Scooba, Miss. 

Vice President, Circulo Simon Bolivar 



A-^h 



Edgar Vallette Dallas, Texas 



Before they had completed their work toward becoming masters of arts, the students shown on these 
pages had begun their final examinations for doctors' degrees. They are the members of the 
Exceptional Educational Experiment, who are taking every subject the college offers. The test of 
their successful completion of these courses is that they should be able to teach them to University 
classes. 

The Triple-E's have just finished their first year of teaching. The subjects handled were chemistry, 
Latin, English and Public Speaking. 

The experiment, begun by Dr. Thornwell Jacobs in the fail of 1939, operates on the belief that college 
men waste at least half of their time. The Triple-E's had enough hours for bachelors' degrees at 
the end of two years and one summer, and enough for their masters' before the end of the winter 
term of this year. They will spend the rest of their time at Oglethorpe, another three years, in ac- 
cumulating enough hours to earn the rank of Doctor of Arts and Sciences, a degree especially 
created for the experiment and sanctioned by the state board of education. 



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My Oglethorpe 



Oglethorpe, Oglethorpe! That place 

among the pines 
Where angels bring to earth many 

heavenly signs. 
Throughout your campus wide happiness 

fills the air, 
Joyous smiles ring like bells and 

prevail everywhere; 
Within your boundaries by God's hand 

sweetly blest, 
I find in each respect you are the 

very best; 
Along the flowing paths over this 

spot of sod 
Ever walks our Master, the divine 

living God; 
Those high towering walls standing 

against the sky 
Give knowledge old and great as the 

new years go by; 
At those majestic feet, in your 

protecting arm, 
I realize I stand sheltered from 

every harm. 
Minds and souls know the truth you 

so proudly possess; 
The road you pave for men leads only 

to success. 



Earle J. Moore '44 



SEIIORS 



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fLASS OFFICERS 




THE mn 







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JANE CARRIER ALDRICH Oglethorpe University, Georgia 

A. B. Science 



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President, Kappa Delta '42; Senior Class Trea- 
surer; Secretary, Pan-Hellenic Council; Glee Club; 
Treble Cleff; Twice listed in Who's Who Among 
Students in American Colleges and Universities; 
BSU Council; Vice President KD, '40, Treasurer, 
'41; Duchess Club; winner of KD pledge ring for 
Best all around Pledge; winner of KD cup for most 
valuable Active; 1942 Hall of Fame; Honor Roll 
'39, '41; Petrel Popularity Poll '42, "Best AH Around 
Girl". 




OF 1942 





WILLIAM EDWARD BLACK 

A. B. Commerce 



Lee, Florida 




Transfer, Stetson University; Glee Club '41, 42; 
Treasurer, Glee Club; President Alpha Lambda 
Tau '42; President, Order cf the Lionz Head; Man- 
aging Editor, Sformy Petrel '42; Yamacraw Staff; 
BSD Council; Spanish Club. 



THE fLASS 




JOHN G. BRACKETT 



East Point, Georgia 



A. B. Science 



Alpha Lambda Tau Pledge; "0" Club; Secretary, 
Blue Key; 1942 Hall of Fame; Petrel Popularit/ 
Poll '42; Secretary, Phi Kappa Delta; Secretary, 
LeConte; Baseball; Assistant in Chemistry; In- 
structor, Zoology Lab.; Yamacrow Staff. 




OF 1942 




JOSEPH PERRY DRAKE Atlanta, Georgia 

A. B. Commerce 




Yamocraw Staff '41, '42. 



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ROBERT A. ELLIOTT Lake Worth, Florida 

A. B. Commerce 



Delta Sigma Phi, Secretary '39, Treasurer '40, 
'41; Petrel Popularity Poll 3 years "Best Dancer; 
Football Trainer, '39, '42. 




OF 1942 



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JERRY HASTINGS 



Atlanta, Georgia 



A. B. Education 




Transfer, Atlanta Junior College; Business Staff, 
Stormy Petrel '41; Baseball; Pi Kappa Phi President, 
'42, Secretary, '41; Intramural Sports, '41. 



THE CLASS 



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DOUGLAS HINTON Atlanta, Georgia 

A. B. Commerce 




OF 1942 




HAZEL JOSEY 



Atlanta, Georgi( 



A. B. Education 




Secretary, Senior Class; Vice President, Delta 
Zeta; Pan-Hellenic Council, Duchess Club; Stu- 
dent Council; Glee Club; Petrel Staff; BSU Council- 
intramural Sports; Typing Instructor; President 
Delta Zeta Pledge Club. 



THE n\n 




PETER MAMAN 



Hammond, Indiana 



A. B. Physical Education 




Captain, Freshman Football; Varsity Football, 
'40 '42; Baseball, '40 '42; Petrel Popularity Poll 
"Best All Around Boy"; Delta Sigma Phi Active; 
Vice President, "O" Club; Ugly Club; Blue Key; 
President Junior Class. 




OF 1942 




JAMES W. McGRORY, Jr. Haverford, Pennsylvania 

A. B. Education 



v — * 



President, Delta Sigma Phi; Secretary, Blue Key; 
Business Manager, '41 Yamacraw; Sports Editor, 
Stormy Petrel; Freshman Baseball Coach; Foot- 
ball; Ugly Club; Treasurer, Inter-Fraternity Council; 
Petrel Popularity Poll "Best Dressed Boy" '40, '41. 



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THE CLASS 




JACK MOCKABEE Dade City, Florida 

A. B. Physical Education 




Freshman Football; Varsity Football 3 years; 
Captain, Football Team '41; Delta Sigma Phi; Vice 
President, Senior Class; 1942 Hall of Fame; Presi- 
dent, "O" Club; Who's Who Among American 
Colleges and Universities; Basketball Coach. 




OF 1942 




CHARLES MONSOUR Atlanta, Georgia 

A. B. Education 




Baseball; Varsity Football; "O" Club; Ugly Club; 
Delta Sigma Phi Pledge; Debate Club; Radio Work. 



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THE CLASS 



11 




CHARLES NEWTON 



East Chicago, Indiana 



A. B. Commerce 
(Called to the Colors) 



Secretary, Delta Sigma Phi; Blue Key; Intramu- 
rals; Stormy Petrel; "Local Adonis", Petrel Pop- 
ularity Poll '41; Glee Club; Football Manager; Presi- 
dent, Sophomore Class '39; Who's Who Among 
Students in American Colleges and Universities, 




OF 1942 




THOMAS EDWIN NORVELL 

A. B. Commerce 



Augusta, Georgia 




Transfer, Augusta Junior College; Alpha Lambda 
Tau; Four F's; Baseball; Order of the Lionz Head. 



ANTONIO PALMA 



THE fLiSS 




Milford, Massachusetts 



A. B. Education 



Freshman Football; Freshman Baseball; Cross 
Country; Varsity Baseball '40, '41; Intramurals; 
"0" Club; Freshman Football Coach. 




OF 1942 





NICK POPA 



East Chicago, Indiana 



A. B. Commerce 
(Called to the Colors) 



Transfer, UCLA; Football Manager; Business 
Manager, Stormy Petrel '41; Delta Sigma Phi; 
Yamacraw Staff; Ugly Club. 



THE CLASS 




ROBERT EARL RIVENBARK 



Savannah, Georgia 



A. B. Literature and Journalism 



Pi Kappa Phi; Scribe, Phi Kappa Delta; Spanish 
Club; Yamacraw, '42; Petrel Staff: Reporter '39, 
Business Staff '40, Managing Editor '41, Editor- 
in-Chief, '42; Petrel Popularity Poll '42, "Most 
Likely to Succeed"; Debate Club, Business Man- 
ager, President '42; Honor Roll '37 — '42; Campus 
Correspondent, Atlanta Journal; 1942 Hall of 
Fame; Special Assistant, Crypt of Civilization 
'38— '40. 



The Stormy Petre 

^ 'Seniors To Hall Of Fan 



OF 1942 





ERNEST WILLIAM ROBERTI Milford, Massachusetts 

A. B. Physical Education 




Delta Sigma Phi; Freshman Football; "0" Club; 
Baseball; Varsity Football '40 — '42; Basketball, 
'39 — '42; Cross Country Run; Vice President, Soph- 
omore Class; Award, Best Linesman. 



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THE (LASS 




JAMES TIMBERLAKE Atlanta, Georgia 

A. B. Physical Education 



Transfer from Auburn; Football, '41, '42; "0" 
Club; Ugly Club; President, Pledge Club Delta 
Sigma Phi; Basketball. 




-^K 



OF 1942 




JOSEPH N. TOSCHES Milford, Massachusetts 

A. B. Science 







Football 3 years; Baseball 2 years; Basketball 
2 years; Blue Key; "O" Club; Ugly Club; Track; 
Winner of Best Back Award; LeConte Scientific 
Fraternity. 



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THE CLASS 




CHARLES F. WALLER 

A. B. Physical Education 



Griffin, Georgia 



Transfer, Middle Georgia College; Football '40, 
'41, '42; Baseball 2 years; Basketball 3 years; "0" 
Club; Ugly Club; Winner of Best Blocker Award; 
Golden Gloves Champ '40; Delta Sigma Phi Pledge. 




OF 1942 





Alpha Lambda Tau; "0" Club; LeConte, Sec- 
retary, '41, Treasurer, '42; Blue Key, Vice Presi- 
dent, '41, President, '42; Who's Who Among Stu- 
dents in American Colleges end Universities, '41, 
'42; Business Manager, '42 Yamacrow; Baseball 
'39 — '42; President, Student Body '42; President 
of Student Council '42; Order of the Lionz Head; 
1942 Hall of Fame. 



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THE CLASS 




LILLIAN WILLOUGHBY Atlanta, Georgia 

A. B. Fine Arts 



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Transfer, Atlanta Junior College; Treasurer, 
Chi Omega Pledge Club. 




OF 1942 










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Sherman 
Vice-President 




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Goldin 
Secretary 




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George Anderson Bollston Spa, N. Y. 

B. A. Centre College 1941 

Albert Beckmon Lynbrook, N. Y. 

M. A. Univ. of North Carolina 



Belen Bernabe Son Juan, Puerto Rico 

B. A., M. A. William & Mary 1941 



Robert Brown Jr. Locust Grove, Go. 

Emory 1940 



Bill Corns Delta Sig Lancaster, S. C. 

A. B. Wofford 1940 

Charles Corraway S. A. E. Birmingham, Ala. 

B. S. Alabama 1941 



Irving Chase Everett, Mass. 

A. B. Clark Univ. 1941 

Aurelio Christoin Moyaguez, Puerto Rico 

A. B. Polytechnic Institute 1941 



Joseph Connelly S. A. E. Albany, N. Y. 

B. S. Vermont 1938 

Robert Cowden S. A. E. Mobile, Ala. 

A. B. Alabama University 



Hugh Cregg Methuen, Mass. 

Duke University 

Joe Davis Chi Phi Gordo, Ala. 

Birmingham-Southern 



Gabriel Fagot Ponce, Puerto Rico 

B. S. Univ. of Virginia 1941 

Mabry Garner Benton, Ala. 

Univ. of Tennessee 



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Robert Glenn 
A. B. 


K. S. Gastonia, N. C. 
Davidson 1927 


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Harold Goldin 


Rockmart, Ga. 
Vanderbilt 




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Nelson Hickok 
A. B. 


D Psi D Salem, Oregon 
Linfield College 1940 


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Selig Hoddes 
M. S. 


S. X. New York, N. Y. 
Purdue Univ. 1941 


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C. H. Houston 
B. S. 


S. A. E. Sylvester, Ga. 
Univ. of Georgia 1941 


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Herschel Hughe; 
B. S. 


South Pittsburg, Tenn. 
Chattanooga 


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Thomas Izzo 
B. S. 


White Plains, N. Y. 
Fordhom 1941 


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Gene Jones 

Uni 

Bernard Kaplan 
B. S. 


Pi Kap Lakewood, Ohio 
V. of South Carolina 


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Phi Sig Hartford, Conn. 
Muhlenberg 1941 


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John Kessler 
B. S. 


Peekskill, N. Y. 
Fordham 1941 


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Paul Langston 
B. S. 


Newhebron, Miss. 
Miss. State 1940 


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Boude Leavel 
B. S. 


Greensboro, N. C. 
Guilford 1941 



J. V. Lavecchia Vicksburg, Miss. 

B. S. Spring Hill 1941 

Francis Logalbo Buffalo, N. Y. 

University of Buffalo 



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Elbert F. MacFadden Kingston, N. Y. 

A. B. Middlebury College 1941 

Herbert Morrow Bloirsville, Penn. 

University of Pittsburgh 1941 



Marie Mueller Z. T. Buffalo, N. Y. 

A. B. University of Buffalo 1940 

James Nickles Hodges, S. C. 

A. B. Erskine 1935 



Benjamin Nicotri Nev\^ York, N. Y. 

B, S. Fordham 1941 

Rafael Pagan Barranquitas, Puerto Rico 

B. S. Univ. of Puerto Rico 1941 



Jerry Perry Chesterfield, S. C. 

B. S. Wake Forest 1939 

LeRoy Plank Milwaukee, Wis. 

Marquette 



Edward Pressley Sparta, Illinois 

B. S. Univ. of Illinois 1940 

Charles Ramey McCalla, Ala. 

B. S. Univ. of Alabama 1939 



Arnold Remer Ansonia, Conn. 

A. B. Yale University 1941 

Daniel Rentz S. A. E. Miami, Fla. 

B. S. Univ. of Georgia 1941 



Anthony Santamorena New York, N. Y. 

A. B. Alabama 1941 



Paul Santoro LXA Schenectady, N. Y. 

A. B. Union University 1941 



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Louis Scinta 
A. B. 


Rochester, N. Y. 
Princeton 1937 


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Charles Sherman 
B. S. 


Montgomery, Ala. 
Davidson 1940 


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Henry Smith 
B. S. 


Swainsboro, Go. 
Georgia 


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Rhett Smith 


Troy, Alabama 
Stetson Univ. 


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Basil Sollitto 
B. S. 


K. S. Newbrunswick, N. J. 
Rutgers 1941 


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Harry Truly Shreveport, La. 
B. S. Louisiana Polytechnic Institute 1939 


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Max Weinshel 
A. B. 


Salem, Mass. 
Bowdoin 1941 


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P. L. Williams 
B. S. 


S. N. Cordele, Go. 
Georgia 1941 





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UIDERIiyDllATES 



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Hunter 
President 



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dm. 





Ivey Stewart Ferrario 

Vice President Secretary Treasurer 



Catherine Benefield K. D. Atlanta, Ga. 

Physical Education 

Frances Carr Chi Omega Emory Univ., Ga. 

Physical Education 



Robert Dillord 


A. L. T. 

Science 


Cornelia, Ga. 


Angelo Ferrario 


Delta Sig 
Education 


Milford, Mass. 



Hugh Floyd A. L. T. Kershaw, S. C. 

Physical Education 

John Gasawoy A. L. T. Decatur, Ga, 

Banking & Commerce 



Max Gaston A. L. T. Lindale, Ga. 

Banking & Commerce 



Marian Gilooley K. D. 

Fine Arts 



Atlanta, Ga. 



Dorothy Greene K. D. Geneva, Ga. 

Literature & Journalism 

Gene Harris Delta Sig East Point, Ga. 

Commerce 



Thomas M. Hunter A. L. T. Oak Park, III. 

Commerce 

Max Ivey A. L. T. Colquitt, Ga. 

Physical Education 



Claudia Johnson Chi Omega Atlanta, Ga. 

Commerce 

Edward J. Link A. L. T. Chicago, III. 

Literature & Journalism 





George Liptak Delta Sig Bridgeport, Conn. 

Banking & Commerce 

Beatrice Nix Delta Zeta Atlanta, Ga. 

Secretarial Preparation 



n 



Betty Prescott Delta Zeta Atlanta, Ga. 

Physical Education 




- 


Cliff Ray 


Delta Sig 


Baxley, 


Ga 






Science 






a 


Elizabeth Rollison 
William Sigman 


K. D. 

Education 

Pi Kap 
Fine Arts 


Waycross, 
Atlanta, 


Ga 
Ga 




Milliard Steele Pi Kap East Point, Ga. 

Banking & Commerce 

Margaret Stewart K. D. Atlanta, Ga. 

Physical Education 





Lucy Suttles 



Atlanta, Ga. 



Helen Vance Phi Mu Buford, Ga. 

Commerce 




Fred Vihien A. L. T. Homestead, Fla. 

Science 

Adeline Weatherly Royston, Ga. 

Literature & Journalism 



Otis White 



Pi Kap Brookhoven, Ga. 

Commerce 



r ■ - - - ■ -- ■ ■ ■■■- ^ ■ ■ 


i 


ft, 




is 

j 


Doyal 
President 




iiii 




Blash Shepard Davis 
Vice President Secretary Treasurer 

\ 

1 











f? A 




Jane Anderson K. D, Oglethorpe Univ., Ga. 

Literature & Journalism 

Richard Arnold A. L. T. Grovelcnd, Flo. 

Fine Arts 



Emma Jean Baldwin Chi Omega Atlanta, Ga. 
Secretarial Preparation 

Bruno V. Blash Delta Sig Gary, Ind. 

Commerce 



Jane Cannon K. D. Atlanta, Go. 

Literature & Journalism 

^^. Bette Clark Chi Omega Atlanta, Go. 

^ Fine Arts 



Rodney Cone A. L. T. Thomasville, Ga. 

Banking & Commerce 

Peter Cunningham Pi Kap Williamstown, Mass. 
Physical Education 



Shirley Davis Chi Omega Atlanta, Ga. 

Literature & Journalism 

Daniel Douglas A. L. T. Jefferson, S. C. 

Commerce 



Eugene Doyal A. L. T. Villa Rica, Ga. 

Banking & Commerce 

Henry Farris A. L. T. Augusta, Ga. 

Physical Education 



Catherine Gilooley K. D. Atlanta, Ga. 

Commerce 

William Hill Zanesville, Ohio 

Science 



Joseph Hooks Lake Worth, Flo. 

Physical Education 

William Jones Augusta, Ga. 

Fine Arts 



Louis Lyda A. L. T. Porterdale, Go. 

Physical Education 

Elanore Mathews Chi Omega Atlanta, Ga. 

Liberal Arts 



Jik 


n 


Earle Moore Winder, Go 
Physical Education 

Margaret Morris Atlanta, Go 
Fine Arts 


PI 


a 


Iris Mosteller Augusta, Go 
Literature & Journalism 

William Gates Lambda Chi Alpha Easiey, S. C 
Commerce 




.<?> r> 




Bette Ray K. D. Atlanta, Ga. 

Literature & Journalism 

Bette Shepard Griffin, Go. 

Literature & Journalism 



Jerome Silverman St. Petersburg, Flo. 

Physical Education 

Charles Smith Pi Kap Brookhaven, Go. 

Science 



Dewey Stevens A. L. T. Rome, Go. 

Commerce 

Anne Wallace Delta Zeta Atlanta, Ga. 

Secretarial Preparation 




Sherman Ward 



Lorain, Ohio 



Science 



Gloria Warren K. D. Atlanta, Go. 

Literature & Journalism 



Dorothy Weather!/ Royston, Ga. 

Literature & Journalism 

Marion Williamson Chi Omega Atlanta, Ga. 
Literature & Journalism 



Norman Wood Delta Sig Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Physical Education 

Catherine Wright Chi Omega Atlanta, Ga. 

Fine Arts 




^Ae4Ji4iie^ 






Smoljan 
President 




Cowles Saenz Calmes 

Vice President Secretary Treasurer 



1 




Raymond Adamson 



Science 



Jeanette Anderson 



Atlanta, Ga. 
Atlanta, Ga. 



Commerce 



J ^^ 



Frank Bagley A. L. T. Glennville, Ga. 

Physical Education 

Herman Blackman Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Literature & Journalism 





Mary Lou Bollinger Chi Omega Atlanta, Ga 
Liberal Arts 



Barbara Boze 



Atlanta, Ga 



Fine Arts 





Jane Colmes K. D. Territory of Hawai 

Science 



Ann Cannon K. D. 

Liberal Arts 



Atlanta, Ga. 



Wilton Chapman A. L. T. Mountain City, Ga. 
Commerce 





Elizabeth Cowles K. D. Decatur, Ga. 

Literature & Journalism 



William Crisp Pi Kap Candler, N. C. 

Literature & Journalism 

Evelyn Ergle Delta Zeta Fort Pierce, Fla. 

Commerce 




Jean Johnson Chi Omega Atlanta, Ga. 

Science 

June Johnson K. D. Atlanta, Ga. 

Liberal Arts 






John J. Kelley 



Boston, Mass. 



Science 



James Kolbas Delta Sig Indiana Harbor, Ind. 
Physical Education 




William Mays 



Atlanta, Go. 



Science 






Tommye Mueller Delta Zeta Decatur, Go. 

Fine Arts 



James Nations Pi Kap Smyrna, Ga. 

Physical Education 

Millard Patrick Delta Sig Fort Pierce, Fla. 

Physical Education 



Milton Patrick Delta Sig Fort Pierce, Fla. 

Physical Education 

Elizabeth Pinkard K. D Atlanta, Ga. 

Literature & Journalism 



Joyce Pratt K. D. Covington, Go. 

Commerce 

Louis Ptacek Pi Kap Fort Pierce, Flo. 

Science 




Edward Queen A. L. T. 

Commerce 



Decatur, Ga. 



Ruth Reid Delta Zeta Villa Rico, Go. 

Commerce 



Jo Anne Saenz Atlanta, Ga. 

Literature & Journalism 



Frances Sheffield Delta Zeta Fort Pierce, Flo. 
Secretarial Preparation 






J ... IS 







Victor Smith Highlands, N. C. 

Fine Arts 

Charles Smoljan Delta Sig Indiana Harbor, Ind. 
Commerce 



Clifton Stubbs Glennville, Ga. 

Commerce 



Virginia Templin Chi Omega Atlanta, Ga. 

''JK'^' Liberal Arts 




Robyn Wall K. D. Atlanta, Ga. 

Commerce 

Donald Ward Lorain, Ohio 

Science 



John J. A. Watson Atlanta, Ga. 

Literature & Journalism 

Quentin Welbaum A. L. T. Miami, Fla. 

Physical Education 



Lois Wright Delta Zeta Atlanta, Ga. 

Literature & Journalism 



^jo^iidf-idjua 










^k 



SO(]IilL CROUPS 




I^Uu 





a 



McGrory 

Treasurer 



^ 



Ke4f 



AM 


. 


^ 






1^ 



The national honorary frat-ernity, Blue Key, installed a chapter at- Oglethorpe in 1926, and ever 
since the organization has been recognized as the leading social-scholastic group on the campus, 
and its members noted among the campus leaders in all activities. Each year the group gives 
awards to outstanding performers in the Homecoming Game, and conducts an Orientation program 
for new students. 

Members of the group ore Paul Whaley, John Brackett, James McGrory, Luther Harbin, Angelo 
Ferrar, Hugh Floyd, Pete Maman, JoeTosches, Bob Dillard, Max Ivey, Fred Vihien, and T. M. Hunt- 



-d 



piu Ko/p. 




Regent 







Rivenbark 
Scribe 



Goss 
Vice Regent 



Brackett 
Historian 



na 



:bdta 




Phi Kappa Delta, Oglethorpa's only naHonal honorary society for both men and women was refound- 
ed last year after a dormant period of three years. Members of the Oglethorpe chapter are chosen 
in the spring from members of the junior and senior classes who have a scholastic average of above 
93, and who are active in campus groups. 



Members this year are: Regent, J. D. Mosteller, Dean of the School of Literature and Journalism; 
Vice-Regent, Frederick Goss; Scribe, Robert Rivenbark; Historian, John Brackett; James Vocalis and 
Dot Greene, Pledges. 







A 


I; 

k 

'i 


Whaley 
President 






«,^ 





Goss 
Treasurer 



Brackett 
Secretary 



Q04^ 




Organized at Oglethorpe in 1920, the aim of Le Conte is the advancement of scientific study and re- 
search at the University, and the encouragement of individual work among the students. 

Faculty members are Dr. John A. Aldrich, Dr. M. H. Hunt, and Professor Harold L. Jones. 

Student members are: Paul Whaley, president; John Brackett, secretary; and Frederick Goss, Luther 
Harbin, Robert Dillard and Fred Vihien, pledges. 




Johnson 
President 



eiu 




Davis 
Vice President 






— ■ n 



Ojmcfa 




Founded at the University of Arkansas in 1895, and the Sigma Gamma chapter installed at Ogle- 
thorpe in 1924, the Chi Omegas have been among the leaders of campus activity during all of the 
years. 

Representing one of the largest girls social organizations in the United States, the Chi Omegas of 
Oglethorpe hove taken an active part in social affairs, and in intramural activities, finishing high in 
the scholastic standings as well. 

Members are: Claudia Johnson, Shirley Davis, Jean Baldwin, Eleanor Mathews, Virginia Templin, 
Marion Williamson, Lillian Willoughly, Mary Lou Bollinger, Frances Carr, and Betty Clark actives; 
and Barbara Keeler, Dell Smith, Madeline and Barbara Waite, pledges. 



/llpJul Jlcuftt 




iii 



Black 
President 



iii '^ 



• 






Farris 
Vice President 





Ivey 
Secretary 



The first fraternity founded on the Oglethorpe campus was Alpha Lambda Tau, which in 1916 
through the efforts of Dr. Gaertner, one of the original five who founded the Sigma Nu fraternity, 
was organized with seven undergraduates as the charter members. Since its beginning the ALT's 
hove been leaders in both scholarship and athletics. It has consistently been one of the largest cam- 
pus groups. 

Prominent among the alumni are: Dr. M. D. Collins, State Superintendent of Education in Geor- 
gia; Coach Patrick, and John Randolph Hearst. 

Members ore: Ed Black, Henry Farris, Hugh Floyd, Max Ivey, Ed Norvell, Bob Dillord, Gene Doyal, 
Dewey Stevens and Tom Hunter. Pledges ore; Max Gaston, Pledge Club President; Dick Arnold, 
vice-president; Frank Bagley, treasurer; Rodney Cone, Clyde Chapman, Quentin Wellbaum, Wilton 
Chapman, John Gasaway, Ed Link, Don Douglas, Fred Vihien and Ed Queen. 



Ua^i 



OH 





:belta 




^if\ 



McGrory 
President 






Elliott 
Treasurer 




Mockabee 
Secretary 



Delta Sigma Phi was founded at the College of the City of New York in 1899, and came to Ogle- 
thorpe when the Alpha Nu chapter was organized in 1922. 

On the campus the Delta Sigs have been outstanding in scholastics and in athletics, numbering 
many of the prominent Oglethorpe athletes among their actives at present, and alumni. This year 
they were conspicuous for leading the other fraternities in scholarship throughout the year. 

Active Ernie Roberts received the "O" Club award for the best line performance in the homecoming 
game last season, and pledge Charlie Waller received a similar award, sponsored by the Delta Sigs, 
for the best blocking job in that game. 

Actives are: Jim McGrory, Bob Elliott, Jack Mockabee, Gene Harris, George Liptak, Ernie Roberts, 
and Pete Maman. Pledges are: Jamie Timberlake, President of the pledge club; Bruno Blash, vice- 
president; Norman Wood, secretary-treasurer; Jim Kolbas, Milton Patrick, Charles Smoljon, Charles 
Waller and Charlie Monsour. 



ifUS, 



Plu 




-J 





Stewart 

Treasurer 



/:. 




ap/pxi 




Gillooley 
Vice President 




Raye 
Secretary 




.Lg 



^eUa 




One of the leading girls groups since its beginning on the Oglethorpe campus in 1930 has been the 
Alpha Tau chapter of Kappa Delta sorority. Scholastically and athletically, this group has shown 
the way consistently, and this year for the second year in a row, was the leading scholastic social 
organization on the campus. This year the KDs were winners of the girls intramural basketball 
title. 




^eUa 




Nix 
President 



Josey 
Secretary 





Prescott 
Treasurer 



^eia 



Formerly the Beta Phi Alpha Sorority, which was founded at the University of Southern California in 
1909, and organized as the Chi chapter at Oglethorpe in 1930, the group became merged with the 
Delta Zetc Sorority in the summer of 1941. 

The group has been active in all phases of campus life, and has mode an excellent showing in girls 
intromurals, as well as maintaining a high scolahstic rating throughout the year. 

Members are: Bea Nix, Hazel Josey, Betty Prescott, Lois Wright, Ruth Reid, Jean Johnson, Frances 
Sheffield, Tommye Mueller and Evelyn Ergle. 




1 



Pi Ko/fx 



^^\ 



WSmif. 



Hastings 
President 




pxi 



pUi 



Founded at the Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina, on December 10, 1904, the organization was 
incorporated as a notional social fraternity in 1907, and at its ninth annual conference in 1916, a 
charter was granted for a chapter at Oglethorpe. 

The fraternity flower is the red rose, and its colors are gold and white. 

Active members are: Jerry Hastings, President; Otis White, vice-president; Bill Sigmon, secretary; 
Louis Ptacek, historian; Bob Rivenbark, chaplain. 

Pledges are: Bill Crisp, Herman Blackman, James Nations, Pete Cunningham, Charles Smith and 
Hilliard Steele. 




^elta CfiA4lo*t Mu 



O 
M 



Remer 
Treasurer 






Sherman 
President 



Sollita 
Secretary 

Fraternities among the medical men began early in the year, with the idea of fostering activity to 
relieve the strain of the heavy scholastic load carried by the students, and to aid as much as possible 
in acclimating the men to their chosen profession. 

Plans of the Delta Epsilon Mu group are to be incorporared into the Alpha Kappa Kappa national 
medical fraternity as early as possible. 

Members are: Rhett Smith, Charles Priles, Charles Sherman, Basil Sollita, Ben Nicotri, Al Khoury, 
Tom Izzo, Harry Wortmann, Paul Langston, Frank Logalbo, Harry Truly, Bob West, Aurelio Christ- 
ian, LeRoy Plank, Arnold Remer, Mabry Garner, Gabriel Fagot, George Anderson, John Kessler, Joe 
Levecchio, Herb Morrow, Rafael Pagan and Tony Sontomorena. 




^^^ 



Omeaa Qam4na 



Brown Goldin 

Vice President Secretary 



Cowden 
President 



Organized on October 15, 1941, the Orrn 
the idea of doing as much as possible 
limited in the curriculum of a doctor, but 
with a banquet given in honor of the pr 

Members are: Bob Brown, Charles Carra 
Bob Glenn, Harold Goldin, John Griffin, 
Leovel, Joe Moggio, Jerry Perry, Charles RameyV 
Smith, Lee Williams and John Nickles, 




rank 



Rentz Ramy 

Treasurer Cor. Sec. 

I fraternity program was predicated on 
^rs who composed it. Social activity was 
several small affairs, and copped them 
icol faculty. 

, Bob Cowden, Joe Davis, George Fisher, 

Hershel Hughes, Jack Johnson, Boude 

Rentz, Louis Scinta, Warren Smith, Wilder 



^^?^ 


m 


Mm 


Q&M 


Bf - 


1 . 1 ^ 


t 




- 





Pan <Jleile4n4x:. 



The Pan Hellenic Council is composed of the president and vice-president of the three notional so- 
rorities. It acts as a medium through which the sororities, by common agreement and cooperation 
can promote a better working understanding between themselves and the University. 

The officers are: President, Bea Nix, Delta Zeta; Secretary, Jane Aldrich, Kappa Delta; Treasurer 
Audrey Moore, Chi Omega. 

The members are: Bea Nix and Hazel Josey, Delta Zeta; Audrey Moore and Shirley Davis, Chi 
Omega; Jane Aldrich and Betty Ray, Kappa Delta. 




lU 



U4 



^ucUveAA. QUiA 




A Club organized at Oglethorpe in which the leading girls of all the sororities and the non-sorority 
girls are enrolled on the basis of their qualities of leadership in campus activities, scholarship and 
friendly spirit. 

Four girls are enrolled from each sorority; fo'jr from the non-sorority group. Two trophies ore award- 
ed annually, one for the best-all-round girl and one for the winner of a play contest, in which all of 
the groups participate. 



Members this 


year are: Claudia 


Johnson, 


Eleanor MatI 


news. 


Marion Gillooley, 


Bea Ni 


ix, Lillian Wi',- 


loughly, 


Hazel 


Josey, 


Jeannie 


Bald^ 


//in, Frances Sheffield, 


Tommye Mueller, Jo 


Anne 


Saenz, 


Kath- 


erine Gi 


llooley, 


, Gloria Kelly, 


Jane 


Aldrich, 


Bettye 


Raye, 


Eve 


lyn Ergle, Margaret Morris and 


Helen 


Vance. 
























! 

! 

i 


I 



























Qlee^ QUM 



Directed by Professor D. V/. Davis, the Glee Club is the outstanding musical organization on the 
campus. Several concerts are given each year, and the group participates in various programs on 
the campus throughout the year. 

A leading feature of the Glee Club is its subsidiary, the Treble Clef Club, composed of six girls, who 
do number of specialty songs. 

Members of the Glee Club are: Gloria Kelly, Virginia Templin, Katherine Gillooley, Bea Nix, Shirley 
Davis, Mary Lou Bollinger, Tommye Mueller, Jean Johnson, Jane Aldrich, Bettye Raye, Eleanor 
Mathews, Lillian Willoughby, Sherman Ward, Gene Harris and Ed Black. 

Members of the Treble Clef are: Gloria Kelly, Katherine Gillooley, Bea Nix, Virginia Templin, Mary 
Lou Bollinger and Shirley Davis. 




""^0" euA 






h * \\ 



Founded on February 6, 1920, by Coach Frank B. Anderson, the "O" Club is composed only of 
men on the campus who have earned their varsity letters in athletics, recognized by the athletic 
board. 

The principal annual activity of the "0" Club is the Homecoming Dance, which is the biggest event 
of the fall season. This year over a hundred couples attended the dance, at which Harry Hearn 
provided the music, inaugurated this year was the "0" Club award for the best line performance 
in the Homecoming Game, the first winner being Ernie Roberts, a three year letter man in foot- 
ball. 




Members are: Jack Mockabee, president; Pete Maman, vice-president; Ed Link, secretary; Tom 
Hunter, treasurer; Pat Locascio, assistant treasurer; Ernie Roberts, Jamie Timberlake, Charlie Wal- 
ler, Ang Ferrar, Bruno Blosh, Charles Monsour, Fred Vihien, Bob Dillard, Hugh Floyd, Joe Tosches, 
Max Gaston, Hilliard Steele, John Brackett, Paul Whaley, Max Ivey, James D. Kolbas, Charles 
Smoljan, Tony Palme, Coach Patrick and Coach Anderson, faculty members. 



F 



^eJmte Qo444^x>ii 



The Debate Club reorganized lost year under Professor J. D. Mosteller has assumed an enviable spot 
in campus life. With the loss of only one member from lost year, and a group of new members to 
carry on, the teams have engaged in several matches of note this year. Outstanding among their 
opponents have been Muhlenburg College, of Pennsylvania; Berry College of Rome; Shorter College 
of Rome; G. S. C. W., of Miiledgeville; the University of Florida, Amherst, Johns Hopkins and New 
York University. 

Members of the club are: J. D. Mosteller, faculty adviser; Robert Rivenbark, President; Thomas M. 
Hunter, vice-president; James Nations, business manager; Dorothy Greene, secretary; Ellen Gotten- 
stratter, treasurer; Richard Arnold, Bill Crisp, Jane Calmes and Gloria Warren. 




I 



"iM 



J[!.io4^ QluL 




The Order of the Lionz Head was founded on October 15, 1940, and is active among the organiza- 
tions of the campus. The motto is Bono yince hAalum (overcome evil with good). The club was 
founded on the principles of chivalry and its aim is to promote honestry, courtesy, and friendship 
among the students of Oglethorpe. 

This organization sponsors trips for its members to various cities of interest for educational purposes. 
We believe that the principles upheld by our members will stimulate their judgement of character 
and evaluation of ideals. 

The officers and other members are: Edward Block, President; Rodney Cone, Vice-Pres.; Paul 
Whaley, Secretary-Treasurer; Richard Arnold, Chief Justice; Luther Harbin, Second Justice; Max 
Gaston, Third Justice; William Hill, Publicity Manager; Ed Ncrvell, Daniel Douglas, Jerome Silver- 
man, Henry Farris, Hugh Floyd, Dewey Stevens, Robert Diilcrd, Quentin Welibcum and Max Ivey. 



SpxAAnAMt QUuL 

The Spanish Club or El Circulo de Simon Bolivar, was named in honor of the South American liber- 
ator. Its purpose is to encourage friendship with the South American countries and to better the 
student's use of the language. 

The group was founded September, 1940, and became a member of the Atlanta chapter of the Pan- 
American Forum. 

Senor N. J. Castellanos is the faculty advisor and the officers include: Keith Lane, president; John 
Meacham, vice-president; Elizabeth Cowles, recording secretary; John Goldthwait, corresponding 
secretary; Margaret Morris, treasurer and Bob Rivenbark, publicity manager. 

Members of the club are: Edward Black, Richard Arnold, Joanne Saenz, Max Gaston, Tommy Muel- 
ler, Barbara Boze, Jane Cannon, Betty Clark and Daniel Douglas. 





SPORTS 



r 



^jooilcU 




The Petrels Head Coach 

JOHN W, PATRICK 

"Coach Pat" to the team 

A member of the class of 1933, he was an assistant to Coach 
Harry Robertson for a year, and then took over the reins and 
has held them successfully for the past eight years. 



1 


-i-^iiilL ik J-^ .^3* » 


i 


3D H3 l.-:8 1 -.l, fa -^w _ ,/ . 


r 

1 


'' . .Jmm^^ ■■ Twm, - -^-^ i. 





Football came back to Oglethorpe lost fall, and brought with 
it some pretty dismal prospects. As Coach Patrick met the 
squad for the first workout on September 8, he found several 
faces absent on whom he had counted for some heavy duty. 
Notable among the absentees were big Dave Eavenson, a tackle; 
Randy Sheets, an end; another end, Rudy Home; Gus Hendry, 
a guard, and Vic Cegoy, a tackle. 

But to some extent these losses were balanced by the return 
of almost all of the previous year's team. Biggest job in the 
line was to replace Captain Ernie Sheffield at the running guard 
post, and Coach Pat busied himself with this job, olternaHng 
several men at the position, until midway in the season, he 
converted wingback Charlie Waller into o guard who plenty 
well filled Sheffield's shoes. 



Maman 
Back 




Locascio 
Back 



At center veteran Jack Mockabee was back for his last cam- 
paign, and handled the pivot post throughout the season. Along 
side him at the weak side guard post was Joe Juliana who had 
handled the position in the latter half of the 1940 season. At 
the tackle slots there were another job to replace big Tony 
Zelencik, a three year letterman, but the problem was met by 
shifting 205 pound Jamie Timberlake from end. At the op- 
poite side of the line junior Tom Hunter, another mid season 
veteran from the preceding year, was holding down the other 
tackle job. At the ends were Ernie Roberts, who had played 
the full time the previous year, and Ed Link, fleet-footed junior, 
who with Juliana and Hunter, had moved into regular slots in 
the middle of the season before. 



Mockabee 
Center 



In the backfield, Joe Tosches was set in his wingback post, and 
he teamed with Charlie Monsour, to give the Petrels a strong 
running threat. Tosches' broken ankle slowed him down in 
the early part of the season, but as time went on he overcame 
this difficulty. Pete Maman and Max Ivey battled it out 
throughout the season for the starting tailback post, with the 
former's experience giving him the call in the opening game. 
At fullback. Coach Patrick had a strong pair of hard-running, 
hard-tackling men in Ang Ferrario and Tom House. 

With very few reserve: — only Bob Dil'ard and Hilliard Steele in 
the line, and Nub Floyd and Pat Locascio in the backfield with 
any game experience from the previous year — Coach Patrick 
prepared to meet the strongest opening game foe in recent 
Pe*-r3l history — the Blue Stockings of Presbyterian College. 



Tosches 
Back 



Monsour 
Back 




Smoljan 
End 



PRESBYTERIAN 34— OGLETHORPE 14 

Few people who came to the game on Saturday, September 27, 
had any idea of seeing the great exhibition that took place on 
Hermance Field. For Presbyterian came to Atlanta odds-on 
favorites to take the Petrels with little or no trouble. The final 
34-14 score gives no indication of the battle which raged for 
the full 60 minutes. 






The opening minutes found both teams sparring for an open- 
ing, and neither doing any serious threatening. However, it 
wasn't long before a fumble on the Petrel 40 gave the Blue Hose 
an opening. McCommons went for 16, and then for 11. A 
penalty set the Hose back momentarily but McCommons again 
came through, this time lugging the ball to the eight, and then 

Shelby Rock Mitchell hit Evans in the end zone for the score, but the 

Tackle extra point was wide. 



The Petrels came back in the second period when Joe Tosches 
recovered a P. C, fumble around midfield. Tosches then slam- 
banged to the 29, passed to Link at the 10, and then en fourth 
down the Petrels had to give up the ball on the two. However, 
with the ball back on their own 30, the Birds started up the 
field again, with Maman and House pounding the middle and 
Tosches sweeping the ends. With the drive apparently bogging 
down at the Hose 20, Tosches dropped back on third down and 
passed to Charlie Waller, who took it on the eight and made it 
across the goal line unscathed. Tom Hunter then stepped back 
and kicked the extra point to give the Petrels a 7-6 half-time 
lead. 

Neither team scored in the third period, but immediately at the 
start of the fourth quarter the fireworks began. Mitchell haul- 
ed a Petrel punt back to the Oglethorpe 40, and on the very 
next play Rollins hit center, cut back to the right and went 
all the way to score, following up with a placement to give the 
Hose a 13-7 lead. 

Then came the ploy that caused the Petrel supporters to raise 
the sky. On the following kickoff. Max Ivey gathered the ball 
in on his own two yard line, started up the center, and with the 
exhaused Petrels giving him their last bit of effort, he crossed 
to the right sideline at the 40, and streaked for the goal line 
which he made without another Presbyterian hand touching 
him. Hunter stepped back and again converted to give the 
Birds a 14-13 lead with only 9 minutes and 35 seconds remain- 
ing. 



Hunter 
Tackle 



Kolbas 
Tackle 



The rest was a nightmare. The completely exhausted Petrels 

were unable to stem the tide of fresh P. C, reserves. Not a 

Timberlake man on the Petrel line had played less than 55 minutes, and 

Tackle the well rested Presbyterian backs were able to push over three 

more touchdowns before the final whistle ended the game. 



|jp>»rr-'^*W«? 



Dodd 
Back 



TROY TEACHERS 3— OGLETHORPE 

Two weeks later, on October 10, it was an altogether different 
story. Against probably the weakest opposition they were to 
face all season, the Troy State Teachers, the Petrels were un- 
able to get started. An important factor was the absence of 
Joe Tosches, whose magnificent display against P. C, had ag- 
gravated his injured ankle, and allowed him to go into the 
Troy game for only about five minutes. 

With about four minutes of play remaining in the fourth per- 
iod, the Teachers had the ball on the Oglethorpe four, but 
three downs later they were back to the Birds' eight. Then 
Teacher halfback Dave Gafford dropped bock and placekicked 
a field goal for the only score of the gome. 



Juliana 
Guard 



Crowe 1 1 
Guard 



NEWBERRY 13— OGLETHORPE 

Injuries continued to plague the Birds as they headed for South 
Carolina and an October 30 date with Newberry. Monsour 
was ready to go part of the distance, but as the team departed 
for the game, Coach Patrick announced that it was unlikely 
that Tosches would be able to go more than a quarter. 

The Coach's prediclion was borne out, and with Tosches inac- 
tive the Bird offense only clicked hap-hazardly. The Indians 
were able to push over two touchdowns and came away with 
a 13-0 victory, and added the third defeat to the Petrels rec- 
ord for the season. 



Ferrario 
Bock 



Floyd 
Back 




Waller 
Back 







Link 

End 




Dillard 
Center 




Roberts 
End 



OGLETHORPE 53— GEORGIA TEACHERS 

Apparently all eleven of the Petrels decided at the same time 
that something should be done about those losses. Nobody 
had any idea as the team headed for Statesboro and the Geor- 
gia State Teachers College that any records would be broken. 
But so it happened — the Birds came back with a 53-0 score, 
the largest made by any Oglethorpe team. 

Right off the bat the Birds started and with Tosches running 
like a piledriver, behind the accurate blocking of Charlie Waller 
who made his debut at running guard, the team scored in the 
first minutes of the game when Maman went over from the 
eight. Two more scores were added, and at the half the score 
was 19-0. 

In the second half the fireworks really broke. Almost every 
one scored, with Tosches getting two and Tom Hunter adding 
six extra points. Charlie Waller speared a Teacher pass from 
his defensive guard slot, and went bock 25 yards to score. 
House, Monsour, Roberti, Maman, and Link each got the other 
scores. 



OGLETHORPE 60— LIVINGSTON 

As if 53 points weren't enough the Birds came back to Her- 
mance Field for Homecoming, November 22. Against Living- 
ston College they went on a rampage, beginning when Joe 
Tosches took the opening kickoff and returned it 95 yards to 
score. When the final tabulations were over the score was 
60-0, and a new record had been set by the Petrels. There is 
little to recount of this game except who scored. Tosches 
again counted twice, and Maman, Ivey, House, Floyd. Locoscio, 
Waller, Monsour, added one each. Hunter added six extra 
points. Outstanding among the scorers was Pat Locascio, who 
after three varsity seasons at Oglethorpe, finally carried the ball 
over for a touchdown. 



Ill 



^f^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



mash 
Guard 



OGLETHORPE 21— TROY TEACHERS 

A highly confident band of Petrels hit the trail for Dothan, 
Alabama, where they met the Troy Teachers in a return gome. 
This time the issue was never in doubt, as the Birds pounded 
through the Teachers for an early score and continually stop- 
ped the thrusts of the Red Wave. There was a real grudge 
behind this game, and the Petrels were able to take all that 
the Teachers could hand out. Tosches again spearheaded the 
attack, and with some great pass-catching by Ed Link, the 
Petrels left the field with a 21-0 victory, on touchdowns by 
Tosches, Link and Monsour, and three conversions by Tom 
Hunter. 



Ivey 

Back 



Steele 
Guard 



House 
Back 





91 SE SB H 




fixuijeJpCuU 





On paper the Petrels were headed for a poor season. The loss of practically the whole pitching 
staff, and the failure of freshman prospects to return, and the gradual dissipation of a number of 
the squad through the Army all totaled up to an unimpressive season — before it started. 

Contrary to expectations, the old master. Coach Anderson, pulled one of his finest teams of recent 
years from the hat. The unheralded ability of left bonder. Lefty Wellbaum, was responsible for a 
good share of the success, and the starting ability of Earle Moore, and Jim Chastain was a major 
factor in the Petrels splitting four games with the powerful Auburn nine, and putting on one of the 
greatest series in history with the U. of Go., before dropping the count to the Bulldogs, four games 
to three. 





.,,^^WP^^ 




^ ^^-^ 





-1942- 




Oglethorpa 4 — Auburn 5 




Oglethorpe 11 — Middle Georgia College 5 


Oglethorpe 7 — Auburn 5 




Oglethorpe 5 — Georgia 13 


Oglethorpe 10 — Piedmont 4 




Oglethorpe 15 — Georgia 7 


Oglethorpe 11 — Georgia 13 




Oglethorpa 9 — Fort Benning 2 


Oglethorpe 3 — Georgia 10 




Oglethorpe 1 — Fort Benning 2 


Oglethorpe 3 — Middle Georgia 


College 2 






9 Aii^lCi4114/lA<4ii 



When the long winter evenings come, the attention of the male element on the campus, through 
the fraternities, is turned to intramural basketball. This year the competition was the hottest in the 
last several years, with five teams entered in the league. 

For the past five years the Alpha Lambda Taus have dominated the play, but this year their suprem- 
acy, was seriously challenged by the Delta Sigs, lead by long range artist Jim McGrory. However, 
in the first game the defending champs managed to take the measure of the challengers by a 56-42 
count. However, in the second match between the teams a Delta Sig team which could not be 
denied swept the game, demonating for the whole four quarters as they managed to tie down the 
ALT star, freshman Frank Bagley, and the wheelhorse. Red Ivey. The final score was 51-32. 




Coach Patrick 
Intramural Director 



Entered in the league were "A" and "B" team of both the ALT's and the Delta Sigs, and a team 
from the All-Americans. Jim McGrory was the leading scorer, notching 1 07 points for the season, 
while Bagley was second with 102. Ang Ferrario, of the Delta Sigs, was third in the scoring, closely 
followed by Ivey of the ALT's. 

The climax of the season came in February when a team of All-Stars from the "B" teams of the 
fraternities and the All-Americans met a picked group from the Medical School, led by Ex-Georgia 
star Frank Rentz, the decision going to the Meds, 33-24. In the finale of the evening, the two 
fraternity "A" teams met for the championship, and after a terrific tussle, during which the lead 
changed hands several times, the ALT's emerged with the victory and the championship, the score 
being 36-30. 

Following the games was a dance, and at intermission Coach Patrick awarded trophies to the win- 
ning teams of the girls and boys divisions, a sportsmanship trophy to Don Douglas, ALT. 




A. L. T. Basketball Team 



. ■ * 



CjMui 



While the boys boot the old pigskin and bat the old apple, the girls have a way of entertaining them- 
selves. They pass the time away with intramural sports. The three groups of girls — Kappa Deltas, 
Chi Omegas, Delta Zetas, and All Americans — compete among themselves in the various games 
played. 

The girls' sports were headed by Betty Prescott this year with Evelyn Ergle and Frances Sheffield 
assisting her. These three girls were in the gym at all times that it was open to the girls. They 
provided the girls with equipment, arranged for games, and kept general care of everything. They 
did their work well as deserve credit for a job well done. 

Undoubtedly the biggest attraction of the girls intramural league was the basketball tourney. This 
year, as for the last three, the KD's walked off with the honors, but not without a fight from the 
other sororities. Throughout the season, the KD's went undefeated. However, the individual per- 
formances of Betty Prescott of the Delta Zetas, and Claudia Johnson, of the Chi O's gained the 
notice of the spectators at every game. 

On Intramural Night, the KD's met a picked team from the other girls, won an easy victory. Mar- 
ion Gillooley, president of the sorority, received the trophy from Coach Patrick at the ceremonies a 
little later. 




Coach Patrick awards girls trophy to Kappa Delta President 
Marion Gillooley Intramural Night. 



9 yntflCumd^^Uiii 



Deck tennis was the sport with which the girls began their season. Their patiences were taxed a 
little with having to learn a game with which most of them were completely unfamiliar. But when 
the rules and ploys became familiar and natural, deck tennis became one of the favorite past-times 
of the coeds. A tournament was held between the groups of girls and the Delta Zeta team come out 
victorious. Ruth Reid of the winning team showed, along with her skilled playing, an excellent 
spirit of sportsmanship. Jane Anderson of the Kappa Delta team shot many a fast one over the 
net for a point. All teams feared the arm of Claudie Johnson when that Chi Omega come up to 
serve. 

After this tournament the girls found interest in the game of shuffle board. There were several 
skinned shins before the girls learned that the place not to stand was in the line of serve. Old timer 
Jane Cannon was a good example to many in how to play correctly. 

The interest in shuffle board died down a bit when the badminton set was brought out. Badminton 
was familiar sport to all the girls so they all wanted to porHcipate. Marion Gillooley, on old 
hand at the game seemed to know just where to send that birdie. The blond Corr girl showed that 
she was not exactly a novice at the game either. 

The girls had a fine year of it. They learned to know each o'her better. The program of intro- 
murals helped to better relations in the group of girls. And besides, all of them had a good time. 




4 



Although time was "what they didn't have a lot of" the medical students nevertheless managed to 
get their exercise, using softbnil as the main form. 

There was no league among the boys, but they daily chose up, and several gomes went on at once. 
The main attractions, however, were the occasions when the Med boys vied against the Med faculty, 
and these tilts always provided plenty of excitement. Led by Drs. Barnard and John Jacobs, the 
faculty, augmented by Coach Patrick was a good match for the stduents. 

The program of exercise was supervised by Coach Patrick and members of his Physical Ed school 
in the fall, during which calisthenics were given to the Meds three afternoons a week. In the 
spring the program was devoted exclusively to Softball gomes, in which both faculty and students 
merely mixed and chose. 





J 



StoAAHdf^ 



^ 



i 




Robert Rivenbark 
Editor 



Jane E. Calmes 
Business Manager 




Pjehd 




iii 



Black 
Man. Ed. 






Gaston 
Sports Ed. 





REPORTERS 
Frank Greene, Jeannie Bald- 
win, Gloria Warren, Johnny 
Saenz, Jane Anderson, Shirley 
Davis. 




r^ 



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George M. Talbott 
Editor 



V 



Xi4ft 







Thomas M. Hunter 
Acting Editor 





Paul Whole/, Jr. 
Business Manager 






Drake 
Man. Editor 







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^ 


Rivenbark 


Greene 


Link 


Baldwin 


Senior Editor 


Med. Stu. 


Undergrad. 


Secretary 




^^ 





Arnold D. Greene Jones 

Art Editor Intramural jech. Advisor 

Editor 




3^A<i4fta 



Under the direction of Paul Corpenter, Jr., the Drama Department revived the ancient classic of 
Oglethorpe, the Petrel Follies, and renamed Campus Capers, visited local army camps, and the Vet- 
erans Hospital in Brookhaven. 

The first Campus Capers was in the nature of a radio show broadcast by television with Mr. Carpen- 
ter directing in person, all of the cast in view. It was featured by several dances by the Weatherly 

sisters, glamourous team of Miami and New York night 
club fame, and by Bette Shepherd, Miss Georgia of 1941. 
In addition there was a radio play featuring Marion Gill- 
ooley and Ed Link. A number of songs by Chuck Newton, 
and several other songs by the entire ensemble were the 
backbone of the show. The show went to the Veterans 
Hospital 48, and twice to Fort McPherson. 




^ jeftxi^tmeHt 




With the war, several of the members of the original cast were unable to return, the biggest loss 
being that of Chuck Newton. However, it was determined by Mr. Carpenter to go ahead, revise 
the show, — put it on as the main feature of the Commencement program in June. 

Long hours of rehearsal followed, and the show began to take shape, patterned after the original 
Hellzapoppin. Everything was on the crazy side, with spontaneous entrances from the audience, 
dancing, singing and various acts with a note of sobriety. 

Fort McPherson was again visited, this time one of its au- 
dience being the Commanding General of the Fourth Corps 
Area. The Veterans Hospital No. 48 also saw the new 
version, and one of the most spontaneous bursts of ap- 
plause greeted the end of the show. 

The Commencement audience was the first campus au- 
dience to view the production and be wowed by the antics 
of the cast. There were no individual stars in the show, 
but everyone in the cast had heavy ports. 





THE liiER SAIfTllM 







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Homecoming Dance 





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President's Birthday Ball 



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The Superlatives 



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Most popular perennial Petrel feature is the selection in March of the campus superlatives. This 
year the rivalry was keen and the voting was heavy. 

Repeating for the third straight year, junior M.arion Gillooley copped the "Most Glamorous" title. 
Ed Link, another junior, succeeded to the title of "Local Adonis. 



The other selections are 

June Johnson 

Ctis White 


as follows: 

Best Dressed Girl 

Best Dressed Boy 


Pete Maman 


Best All-Round Boy 


Bob Rivenbark 




Jane Calmes 

Dot Weatherly 

Bob Elliott 


Most Interesting 

Best Girl Dancer 

Best Boy Dancer 


Jane Cannon 

Frances Sheffield .. 
Sherman Ward 
Margaret Morris 
Jane Anderson 
Joe Tosches 


Most Original 

Most in Love 


Jane Aldrich 

John Brockett 


Biggest Girl Grind 


Dizziest 


Dot Greene 


Best All-Round Girl 


Best Boy Athlete 








SIW AT 
OGLETHORPE 



^xUtk 




Probably the outstanding single event at Oglethorpe in the last 
ten years took place one day in February. Doctor Thornwell 
Jacobs announced to the student body that a new building was 
to be erected on the campus to house the expanding medical 
school. 

Leaving the chapel, the student body went out on the campus 
between Lupton and Lowry Halls, and there Mrs. Boncker, pres- 
ident of the Oglethorpe Woman's Board, broke the ground for 
the building. Dr. Nicolassen gave the blessing, and J. D. Mos- 
teller gave the benediction. Mrs. Boncker made a short speech, 
as did Judge Wotkins, president of the board of Oglethorpe, 
and Doctor Jacobs. 




Jlxdl 



The new building is to bs named Faith 
Hall in honor of those, students and 
friends, who hove pledged their pray- 
ers to the building of the plant, a job 
which few have had the courage to 
go forward with in the face of the 






difficulties which make such things 
subordinate to our war effort. 

On these pages are pictures of the ded- 
ication of the building, and the pro- 
gress of the work as it moves toward 
completion by September, 1 942. 




The Liike 



imi 




-^ 




Medical Life 






BAeeU 



Biggest bit of undergraduate horseplay was the trial of one Hilliard Steele, charged with everything 
from vagrancy to illegally belonging to the Y, M. H. A. 

Brought to trial before Judge Nick Popa in the Lupton City Court, he was opposed by the powerful 
District Attorney, of Lupton, Jim McGrory, who lost year was responsible for the conviction of Bruno 
Blash, a decision which was upheld in the Supreme Court later. 

Defending the accused was W. T. (Wattoman) Crisp, youthful criminal attorney, whose small ex- 
perience was no match for the brilliant prosecutor, and the slightly biased jury. 

The trial opened with McGrory presenting evidence and witnesses which proved that Steele hod been 
known to be a resident of The Marine Room of the Hotel Lupton, but had spent weekends at home, 
sleeping in the daytime in the Room, in violation of all precedent in that honored establishment. 




*lA4<d 




It was further brought out by witnesses that Steele had been seen entering a Y. M. H. A., in spite of 
the fact he had no right there, and then McGrory gave the coup de grace when he showed that 
Steele had become a member of Pi Kappa Phi, testimony that caused the foreman of the jury to 
jump up and declare: "Your Honer, we have reached a verdict, — we find the accused guilty as 
charged." However, that worthy was silenced by Judge Popa, v\ho admonished him to give a ver- 
dict on the basis of the evidence and not on any personal whim. 

The defense had few witnesses with courage enough to testify in behalf of the defendant, and Crisp 
was forced to merely cross-examine the prosecution's witnesses. 

The Jury retired at 9:45 and returned with a verdict, and three block eyes, at 9:50. Steele was 
found guilty and sentenced to banishment from Lupton City forever — and the decision was ren- 
dered without right of appeal. 





Miss Brown and Three 
Chicago Gangsters 




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