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Full text of "Yamacraw, 1963"

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yAMAGRAW 





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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/yamacraw196332ogle 



The 





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Clock moves . . . 




So move on 




Oglethorpe students 








Oglethorpe, a growing school . . . 





Atlanta, a growing city 
dwell together in unity 



Atlanta is now enjoying a phenomenal growth and 
an exciting spurt of life that moves toward a 
bright future. The buildings that reach for the 
clouds, the highways that reach toward new hori- 
zons, the people who hold on to a fabled "south- 
em hospitality" in spite of their rushed lives. 



all speak of a dynamic city with a warm heart. 
Oglethorpe shares much with her mother city; 
their spirits ale much the same. The University 
looks toward a more vital future, and her stu- 
dents are prepared to take their places in a mod- 
ern world— in cities like ATLANTA. 





''Square round 
and 
let us closer be . . . 



?? 




12 



We the staff of the 1963 YAMACRAW and the stu- 
dents of Oglethorpe University, wish to honor some- 
one whose interest stimulates our interest, whose car- 
ing inspires us to care, and whose guidance encour- 
ages our endeavor. Because she is as vital to Ogle- 
thorpe as the heart is to the body, we affectionately 
dedicate this publication to 



Bernice Hilliard 





n 





Foreword 



Oglethorpe is embarking on a new chapter in her history in this year of 1963. 
From the days of "old Oglethorpe" in Milledgeville, the University has changed to 
meet the needs of the times. Today finds a new need, and Oglethorpe is preparing 
to meet it. An expanded student body with more adequate facilities are the goals 
toward which the school is now actively working. 

In the midst of change our lives at Oglethorpe are caught in a familiar pattern of 
classes, basketball games, formals, and study. Ours is a school of many moods, and 
we are students of many faces. From the excited yell of a cheerleader to a solemn 
chorus of the Alma-Mater, our voices tell a story, changed and yet familiar. This 
year's YAMACRAW staff hopes to capture the moods and picture the faces so that 
the voices can be recalled tomorrow and in the years to come. As the cover suggests 
a movement from the familiar clock tower to the windows of the planned library, so 
the liook is intended to take you through a year which looks to the future. 



THE EDITOR 



Content: 



Introduction 
Faculty and Administration 



Section edited b\: 
GEORGE HANDLEY 



Classes 



Section edited by: 
MARY LOU ANDERSEN 



Activities 



Section edited br: 
TOMMY PHILLIPS 



Organizations 



Section edited by: 
JoANN SAGER 



Sports 



Section edited by: 
KEN BORDEN 



Ho 



nors 







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■ 9 

\„4 




Section edited by: 
CHERRY HODGES 




Ads 



/ 




FACULTY and 

ADMINISTRA TION 



16 



"This self-study group 




will now discuss the problems 



of maintenance. 




students' food, 




needed raises for the Faculty, hoiv to get money for our new library, -*^f^lt*^w^'"'*' ~" 




'^r^isSH 



the need for better dormitory facilities. 



and most important is . 





how to make better coffee. 



17 



Atlanta, (Scor^ia 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



OGLETHORPE - A GROWING SCHOOL IN A GROWING ATLANTA 



There is no doubt about Atlanta's phenomenal physical growth. 
There is also no doubt about the growth of Oglethorpe, whose stu- 
dent body has more than doubled in the last five years and whose 
student body may double again in the next ten years. But growth 
is not a matter merely of physical extension. The growth of At- 
lanta involves a growth in responsibility for h\jman values, and 
the growth of Oglethorpe implies a growth in the dedication of the 
faculty and students to the process of learning to achieve higher 
quality of educational aims. 

Atlanta is rapidly becoming a cultural center with emphasis 
not only on the sciences but on the arts. It is becoming a civi- 
lized, cosmopolitan area. That there are growing pains involved 
in this process is understandable, but in the years to come it is 
believed that Atlanta will emphasize beauty in its buildings and 
parks and landscape. It will emphasize better recreational faci- 
lities. It will emphasize improved human relations. It will em- 
phasize increased respect for law. It will emphasize political 
responsibility. 

Oglethorpe University is proud to be a part of this process 
of growth. But Oglethorpe also has its responsibilities. In the 
years ^o come, Oglethorpe and Atlanta will be even more closely 
associated. The new circumferential highway, the other express- 
ways, and the proposed rapid transit system will make Oglethorpe 
easily accessible to the whole metropolitan area. 

The growth of a college is not merely an internal growth with 
emphasis upon the learning process, but it is an extension of people 
into the community - not only into Atlanta but the communities 
throughout the United States, and to some extent in other parts of 
the world. It is important that this extension shall be a worthy 
expression of the ideals of this institution so that our gradu- 
ates may increase social responsibility, and increase the actual 
expression of humane ideals. Let us be sure that our growth is in 
keeping with the growth of Atlanta in all of these ways. We have 
confidence that this will be so. 



18 




DONALD C. AGNEW, A.B. Park College, 1929. 
M.A. Duke University, 1932, Ph.D. Duke University, 
1936, is the President of Oglethorpe University. He has 
served in this capacity since 1957. Dr. Agnew, in addi- 
tion to his many duties with the University, is a member 
of the Southern Society of Philosophy and Psychology. 



He is chairman of the Council of Presidents, University 
Center in Georgia, and also of the Board of Directors, 
Atlanta Chapter, American Association for the United Na- 
tions. He is Vice President of the Georgia Foundation for 
Independent Colleges and on the Executive Committee, 
Commission on Colleges, Southern of Colleges and Schools. 



19 



Division of 




LUCILE Q. AGNEW, A.B., Fuiman University, M.A., Duke 
University, teaches Speech and Writing, Modern Literature 
and American Literature. One of Mrs. Agnew's many inter- 
ests is organizing an active writers group on the Oglethorpe 
campus. 



ARTHUR BIELER, B.A., New York University, M.A., Mid- 
dlebury University, Docteur de TUniversite, Sorbonne, Paris, 
teaches Beginning French, Intermediate French, History of 
the French Language, Nineteenth Century French Literature, 
and Beginning German. When he is not infusing the spirit of 
language into his students, Dr. Beiler enjoys playing tennis 
and traveling in many countries of the world. 



WENDELL H. BROWN, B.S., College of Puget Sound, M.A., 
Columbia University, with studies at the University of Paris, 
teaches the Sophomore sequence in Human Understanding, 
History of the Language, Understanding Poetry, and Speech 
and Writing. He is the advisor to the Players. Mr. Brown 
enjoys growing grapes and making wine. 





\ 

RALPH L. CARNES, B.A., Emory University; M.A., Emoiy 
University, teaches Ethics, Introduction to Philosophy, Phi- 
losophy of Religion, Epistemology, History of Philosophy, 
and Humanities. Mr. Carnes is a member of the Georgia 
Philosophical Society and the Atlanta Astronomy Club. In 
addition to his skill with the Spanish guitar, he is interested 
in painting, flying, astronomy and electronics. At present Mr. 
Carnes is working on his Ph.D. at Emory University. 



20 



Human Understanding 



WILLIAM H. COHEN, B.A., University of Florida; M.A., 
University of Florida, teaches Freshman English and the 
Sophomore sequence in the Division of Human Understand- 
ing. A member of the curriculum and lihraiy Committees, 
Mr. Cohen also is advisor to the Literary Magazine. A col- 
lection of his poems has been published under the title, "A 
House In The CountiT-" 




i ^ 




ELAINE G. DANCY, A.B., The University of South Caro- 
lina; M.A., The University of South Carolina, teaches classes 
in Speech and Writing and English Literature. She is inter- 
ested in music and has directed several church choirs. Mrs. 
Dancy enjoys gardening and her garden club activities. She 
is a member of Phi Beta Kappa. 



HARRY DOBSON, Institute of Musical Arts, N.Y., Study 
Berlin, Fontainebleau, London, teaches Music Drama, 



m 



Music and Western Civilization, History of Opera, History 
of the Symphony, Music of Spain, and Wagner. 



CHARLYN B. HARPER, B.C.S., Georgia State, teaches In- 
troduction to Philosophy. She has attended New York Univer- 
sity and is now attending Emory University. In addition to 
teaching classes at Oglethorpe and going to school herself. 
Mrs. Harper finds time to read for relaxation. 




21 



Human Understanding 



DUANE E. HANSON, B.A., Macalester CoUege; M.F.A., 
Cranbrook Academy of Art, is giving a course in Art Struc- 
ture. Mr. Hanson is a sculptor who has exhibited widely in 
this country and abroad. 





CLAIRE HUBERT, A.B., Duke University; Universite d'Aix- 
Marseille; M.A., Emory University, teaches a class in Begin- 
ning French. Mrs. Hubert is a member of Phi Beta Kappa. 
She is presently preparing a disseiiation on Gerard de Nei-val 
and W. B. Yeats, a comparison of two heterodox mystics. 
She is currently candidate for the degree of Ph.D in com- 
parative literature at Emoiy University. 



INGE MANSKI LUNDEEN, University of Indiana, Curtis 
Institute and Metropolitan Opera Company, leads the Ogle- 
thorpe Chorus and teaches Voice Production. She has been 
a judge for the Metropolitan Opera Auditions and for the 
Miss Atlanta Contest. Mrs. Lundeen has directed "Amahl and 
the Night Visitors" at Oglethorpe and produced "The Old 
Maid and the Thief" at Emory University. She is a member 
of the SAL an honorary nnisic sorority. 



GEORGE C. SEWARD, A.B., Amherst; Ph.D., Tuebingen, 
is Dean of the University. Dr. Seward teaches Life and Re- 
ligion, Philosophy of Religion and Interpretation of Histoiy. 
He belongs to the Georgia Philosophy Society, the Georgia 
Mineral Society, the Kiwanis Club and the Georgia Academy 
of Science. Dr. Seward's present non-academic interests are 
mineralogy and lapidary work. 




22 



Division of Business 



WILLIAM k. EGERTON, University of North Carolina, 
University of Tennessee Law School, instructs classes in 
Business Law, Introduction to Business, and Management 
Function. He is Management Consultant. Mr. Egerton is Di- 
rector of the American Society of Training Directors. For 
pleasure and relaxation, Mr. Egerton likes to read. 




JAMES R. MILES, B.S.N., C.B.A.. University of Alabama; 
M.B.A., Ohio State University, is instructor of Accounting, 
Insurance, Finance, Marketing Principles and Business Mathe- 
matics. He is a member of the Hospitalization Committee, the 
Retirement Committee, and the Athletic Conmiittee. Mr. Miles" 
favorite outside interests are fisliing and Ijoating. 







AUSTIN C. SCHLENKER, JR., BBA, Texas College of 
Arts and Industries; M.S., Texas College of Arts and Indus- 
tries, teaches Principles of Economics, American Economic 
History, Comparative Economic Systems, Economic Fluctua- 
tions, and Government and Business. He is also Probation 
Counsellor. Mr. Schlenker plans to begin work on his docto- 
rial degree at Syracuse University and at the Federal Resei-ve 
Seminar. 




23 



Division of 



MARTIN ABBOTT. A.B., Presbyterian College; M.A., Emory 
University: Ph.D., Emory University, is a professor of West- 
ern Civilization. American History, History of the Civil War, 
and tlie American South. He spent the academic year 1960-61 
as a Fulbright lecturer and consultant at the Interpreters In- 
stitute in Germersheim. Germany. He is now the chaimian 
of the self-study group at Oglethorpe. Among other things, 
one might say his hobby is the South. 




LEO BILANCIO, A.B., Knox College; M.A., University of 
North Carolina, teaches Western Civilization, Renaissance and 
Reformation, and Europe Since 1918. Mr. Bilancio is now 
working on his Ph.D. at the University of North Carolina. 



Hi-- 



''""# 



IDA MARTIN CHIARAVIGLIO, A.B., Berea College; M.A., 
Emory University; Ph.D., Emory University, teaches Ameri- 
can Government, State and Local Government, Constitutional 
Law and Political Theory. She is a member of the Southern 
Political Science Association and the American Association 
of University Professors. In addition Dr. Chiaraviglio belongs 
to Phi Sigma Alpha and Pi Gamma Mu. She enjoys modern 
dance and swimming in her free time. 




24 



Citizenship 




A. CHEEVER CRESSY. JR.. A.B., Tufts; M.A., Fletcher 
School of Law and Diplomacy; Ph.D., Fletcher School of 
Law and Diplomacy, teaches International Relations. Com- 
parative Government, American Diplomatic History, Europe 
in the 19th Century, Far Eastern Diplomatic History and 
Nationalism in Africa and Asia. One of Dr. Cressy's many 
interests is collecting campaign material of the National 
Elections. 




GRADY L. RANDOLPH, B.S., Auburn University, M.A., 
University of Chicago; LL.B., Woodrow Wilson College of 
Law, is an instructor of Western Civilization. Mr. Randolph 
is also Vice-President of the United Nations Council in Atlan- 
ta. His hobby is collecting rare coins. 




HAROLD M. SHAFRON, B.A., University of Alabama: 
M.A., University of Alabama, joins the economics staff at 
Oglethorpe as Assistant Professor. He has taught at the Uni- 
versity of Alabama, Fairleigh Dickinson University, and at 
The College of Charleston. He served as economic aide in 
the Third Military Government Regiment during World War 
n where he worked with officials of war damaged industries 
in Germany and Austria. 



25 




Division of 



Rutgers 



ROBERT BOXER, B.S., Brooklyn College; Ph.D 
University, is an instructor of General Chemistry and Physi 
cal Chemistry. He is a member of the American Chemical 
Society. To pass the time. Dr. Boxer enjoys tennis and fishing. 



JOSEPH M. BRANHAM, B.S., Florida State University; M.S., 
Florida State University comes to Oglethorpe as Assistant 
Professor of Biology. He is a member of Phi Sigma, Ameri- 
can Institute of Biological Sciences, and The American Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of Science. His major interests 
are water sports, painting and photography. He is now work- 
ing on his Ph.D. at Florida State. 



ROY N. GOSLIN, B.A., Nebraska Wesleyan; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Wyoming, instructs classes in Advance Physics, Ad- 
vance Math and Man and the Universe. During World War 
H he served as a physicist on the Manhatten Project at Okk- 
ridge, Tennessee. Mr. Goslin has also been consultant to the 
Oakridge National Labs in 1948 and to the Southern Research 
Institute in Birmingham, Alaljama. He has been acclaimed in 
science as the discoverer of the "Goslin Effect." 




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BERNICE HILLIARD, A.B., Oglethorpe University, M.Ed., 
Oglethorpe University, teaches Algebra, Trigonometiy and 
Analytic Geometry. Most of her time is taken up with fulfill- 
ing her duties as Resident Counselor for Women, but her 
favorite pastime is walking with her two poodles. 



26 



Science 



J. KENNEDY HODGES, B.A., Wofford College, 
M.A., Duke University, Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina, is professor of General Chemistry, Organic 
Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis. At Oglethorpe 
he serves on the Building and Grounds and the Cur- 
riculum Committees. Dr. Hodges is a memher of the 
American Chemical Society. 





GEORGE F. WHEELER, B.A., Ohio State University, 
M.S., California Institute of Technology, is an instruc- 
tor of Mechanics, Electricity and Magnetism, Ad- 
vanced Mechanics, Electricity, Light, and Optics, 
Wave Motion, Modern Wave Physics and Differential 
Equations. Now in his tenth year at Oglethorpe, Mr. 
Wheeler enjoys riding around campus in his black 
convertible. 



'w 30 >!» * ' 



LOIS WILLIAMSON, B.A., Oglethorpe University, 
M.A., Oglethorpe University, teaches General Botany, 
Invertebrate Zoology, Comparative Embryology, 
Comparative Anatomy, Plant Systemics and Man and 
the Universe. She acts as an advisor to high school 
science teachers and, in addition, is active in Girl and 
Boy Scout work. 




27 




Division of 



GUNNAR H. BERG, B.S., University of Washington; M.A.; 
ED.D.; Teachers College, Columbia University, is the Resi- 
dent Administrator for the American Humanics Foundation 
on the Oglethorpe campus. He teaches Public Relations, 
Field of Social Work, Case Work Methods, Institutional Re- 
lations and Group Dynamics. He is a member of Rotary, 
past president of the Board of Education, Phi Delta Kappa 
and is listed in Who's Who in American Education. His in- 
terests are travel, public speaking and working on extinct 
languages. 



MIRRIAM JONES, B.S., Wisconsin University, M.S., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, is the 
only woman in Georgia who is a member of the American 
Educational Research Association. She is teaching Elemen- 
tary Core and supervising student teaching. 



ELGIN MacCONNELL, A.B., Allegheny College, M.A., New 
York University, teaches Introduction to Education, Curricu- 
lum, Materials, and Metliods in Secondaiy Schools, Educa- 
tional Psychology, and Elementaiy Core. He also supervises 
student teachers. Mr. MacConnell is also tlie Resident Counse- 
lor for Men. Some of his many activities include being fac- 
ulty advisor to the Student Union Committee and sei^ving on 
the Interactivity Committee. 






III' 



if li-'E U) .» I, , J 





PETER N. MAYFIELD, B.A., Emoiy University; M.A.. 
Duke University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina, is an 
instructor of Psychology. He is a member of the American 
Psychological Association, the Southeastern Psychological 
Association, and the Georgia Psychological Association. 



28 



Community Service 



GARLAND F. PINHOLSTER, B.S., North Georgia 
College; M.A., Peabody College, teaches physical edu- 
cation theoiy courses and freshman physical educa- 
tion. Coach Pinholster has written three books on 
basketball and plans to write additional books. Along 
with this busy schedule he does what he does best, 
turn out championship jjasketball with the Stomiy 
Petrels. 





RICHARD M. RESER, A.B., King; M.A.. Peabody; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina, teaches classes 
in Sociology and Anthropology. He is chairman of the 
Adult Education Program and is a member of the 
Curriculum Committee. Dr. Reser is sponsor of the 
All Faiths Fellowship. He is also Vice-Chairman of 
the Greater Atlanta Council of Human Relations. 



BARBARA S. UEHLING, A.B., University of Wichita; 
M.A., Northwestern University; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University, teaches General Psychology, Child and 
Adolescent Psychology, Social Psychology, Abnormal 
Psychology, and Experimental Psychology. She is ad- 
visor to the Debate Team, is Program Chairman of 
the Women's Club, and is a member of the League 
of Women Voters. Dr. Uehling is also a member of 
the Georgia Psychological Association and the Amer- 
ican Psychological Association. 




29 



Night Division 




PATRICIA A. HULL, B.S., Auburn 
University; M.A., Auburn University, 
is an instructor of advanced math 
courses, and Man and the Universe. 
In her free time Mrs. Hull likes to 
paint. 




JOHN J. MALLET, B.A., Oberlin Col- 
lege; Ph.D., Duke University, is a 
Visiting Lecturer in General Psychol- 
ogy. He is a member of the American 
Psychological Association and the 
American Academy of Psychothera- 
pists. Dr. Mallet enjoys the Fine Arts, 
travel, swimming, and hiking. 








LOUIS J. MALOOF, A.B., University 
of Georgia; M.A., University of Geor- 
gia; Ph.D., University of Florida, 
teaches Introductory Sociology, Social 
Problems, The Community, The Fam- 
ily, and Criminology. He is a mem- 
ber of Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Kappa 
Phi. He is also a member of Alpha 
Kappa Delta a National Honorary So- 
ciological Fraternity. 




THEODORE R. McCLURE, JR., B.A., 

Marshall University; M.A., George 
Peabody College for Teachers, is 
teaching Speech and Writing at Ogle- 
thorpe University in the newly opened 
Night School. 



IGNACIO MERINO, B.S.L., Havana 
Institute; Ph.D., Havana University, is 
a teacher of Spanish at Oglethorpe. He 
a member of the Colegio Nacional 



is 



De Doctores En Silofia Ey Letras and 
has received a Maestio Normal from 
Spain. He likes to write poems, play 
the flute, and listen to music. 



EDITHGENE B. SPARKS, B.S. in 
ED., Oglethorpe University; M.A. in 
ED., Emory University. She is an in- 
structor in Elementary Education. She 
is working on her Ph.D. at the Univer- 
sity of Georgia. She is a member of 
the National Education Association, 
Georgia Education Association and 
American Association of University 
Professors. 



30 



Administrative Staff 



Mrs. Leiioia T. Baldwin 

College Nurse 

Glenda Balowsky 

Assistant Registrar 



Joan Barton 



Assistant Registrar 



Arlene Brilliant 



Receptionist 



Billy W. Carter 



Assistant Coach 



Thomas W. Chandler, Jr. 
Librarian 



Mrs. June H. Conley 

Cf/i/i fez- 
Mrs. Jeanne B. Cressy 

Secretary to the President 



Ken Davis 



Robert Doyal 



Dorm Proctor 



Dorm Proctor 




31 




George H. Doyle, Jr. 

Director of University Relations 

H. Lynn Drury 

Dorm Proctor 



Sewell P. Edwards 

Campus Security Officer 

Mrs. Janet K. Gay 

Secretary to the Dean 



Mrs. Ruth F. Lovell 

Manager of the Post Office 
and the Bookstore 

Mrs. Marjorie M. MacConnell 
Registrar 



Mrs. Joyce B. Minors 

Alumni Secretary 

Robert J. Mohan 

Field Representative 



32 



Louis Nasi 



m 



Cafeteria Manager 



John W. Otting 



Superintendent of 
Buihlimrs and Grounds 



Jo Payne 



Receptionist 



Stanley F. Pitcher 



Business Manager 



Mrs. Caroline Pinholster 

Physical Education 
Instructor 

Mrs. Dorotliy G. Richardson 

Assistant Librarian 



Mrs. Carol G. Tucker 
Bursar 



Tom Winn 



Dorm Proctor 




33 




CLASSES 



34 



and with the dawn of July 20th began the battle of Peachtree Creek. 



On July 21st, Hood withdrew to inner fortifications 



make plans for a second attack. 




to 



Sherman began 



a wheeling movement . . . McPhersons flank was resting in mid air. 



f-r 




Hardee was to march south and then turn east to be in a position to attack 



the flank and rear troops of McPherson by day-break. 



Cheatam heard sounds of firing . . ." 





Wh 



en 



35 




seniors . . . seniors . . . seniors . . . 



36 



Senior Poem- 1963 



The dying embers of summer 

Kindled our class entree 
Alongside a multi-color Autumn. 

Scholarly attire of rodent paraphernalia 
Distinguished our naive members, 

And labeled us as one. 

Exams were our constant malady 

With nostalgia a plaguing nemesis 
But, the heat of the fire returned 

Granting a grateful leave of absence. 

The familiar ring of towered bells 

Sounded the return of our scattered ashes. 

Our attire was shield and sword 

In expectation of forthcoming battle 

But alas. Homer snuffed out his usual toll 
And the victorious few danced on 

Towards the distant warmth. 

At the death of summer 

And the conception of fall 
We found less familiar faces to recall. 

Egotism and individualism encompassed our cliche 
Week-ends, formals, ball games, etcetera 

Were cherished as if each were the last. 
\nd the divorce of summer from spring 

Signaled the beginning of the end. 

The initial tell-tale omens of fall 

Brought us together for the finale. 
And soon after caps and gowns 

Fluttered in the autumn breeze 
In anticipation of processional grandeur. 

Exams passed by the wayside 
And days turned into nights 

And back again 
And then — graduation and tomorrow. 

How rapidly the pages had been turned 

And, yet another chapter in our lives was passe. 

And with envy in our eyes 
And tears in our hearts 

We visioned a neophyte wind 
Blowing our ashes away. 

But never our memories of Oglethorpe. 

C.L.WHITE, Class of '6.3 







seniors 



seniors 



seniors 




37 



Officers for Class of '63 



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Steve McMullen 
PRESIDENT 




Ed Moore 

VICE PRESIDENT 







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Carole George 
SECRETARY 




Pete Butchait 
PARLIAMENTARIAN 




Tommy Phillips 
TREASURER 



38 



! 




BEVERLY POWERS ALEXANDER 

Bennettsville, South Carolina 

B.A. 

Transfer: St. Mary's Junior College, Raleigh, 
North Carolina. 

MARY LOU ANDERSEN 

Forest Park, Georgia 

B.A. 

Players, 1, 2, 3, 4; Social Committee, 1, 2; 
B-Team Cheerleader, 1; Yamacraw Staff, 2, 
3, 4. Organization Editor, 2, 3, Classes Editor, 
4; Secretary. Sophomore Class, 2; Bowling 
League, 2, Secretary, 2; Stormy Petrel, 2, 
Secretary, 2: Rat Court, 2, 3, High Priestess. 
3; Homecoming Queen, 3; Pep Squad, 2, 3: 
AFF, 2, 3; Sweetheart of Alpha Phi Omega. 
3; Dorm Council, 4; Senior Class Project, 
Co-Chairman; Lady Oglethorpe, 4. 



Georgia 



ARNOLD WILLIAM BAKER 
Hartwell, 
B.A. 

Humanics. 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President, 3, Presi- 
dent, 4; Libertarians, 1; Intramurals, 1, 2, 3. 
4; Lord and Lady Oglethorpe Court. 



GLENDA JEAN BALOWSKY 

Hialeah, Florida 

B.S. 
Honor Court, 2, 3, 4; Duchess Club. 3, 4, 
Vice President. 4:LeConte Society, 3, 4, Sec- 
retary, 3, Vice President, 4 ; Who's Who, 4. 




39 



MARY JANE BOWMAN 

Atlanta. Georgia 
B.A. 

Newman Club, 1. 2. 3, 4; Duchess Club, 3, 4. 

DAVID LEE BROWNING 

Avondale Estates. Georgia 
B.A. 

Intraniurals, 3, 4, (Softball and Football). 




PETER THOMAS BUTCHART 

Greensboro, North Carolina 
B.A. 

Gun Club, 1, 2: APO, 2, 3, 4; Circle K, 4. 




CAROL SUE CLINES 

Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

Transfer: Barat College, Lake Forest, Illinois 

JOSEPH ALLEN CREA 

College Park, Georgia 

B.A. 

Blue Key, 3, 4; Boar's Head, 3, 4. 



40 




SUSAN HOLLINGSHED DALTON 

Bomljay, India 

B.A. 

Social Committee, 1 ; Cheerleader, 1 : Stormy 
Petrel. 1 ; Duchess Club, 4. 

LEE BURDETTE DANIEL 

Wake Forest, North Carolina 
B.A. 

Transfer: Mars Hill College; Humanics, 3, 4. 
Vice President, 4; APO, 3, 4, Vice Presi- 
dent, 4. 



HILTON LYNN DRURY 

Columbus, Georgia 

B.S. 

Stormy Petrel Staff, 1, 3, Associate Editor, 
2; Honor Court, 1, Boar's Head Freshman 
Award; Saints, 1, 2, 3, 4; LeConte, 2, 3, 4; 
Blue Key, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer, 3; Boar's 
Head, 3, 4: Interactivity Committee, Chair- 
man, 3; APO, 4; Joint Committee, Chairman, 
4; Member of Steering Committee for Self- 
Study of Oglethorpe; Student Government 
Officer, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer, 2, Vice President, 
3, President, 4; Who's Who; Lord Oglethorpe. 



JAMES LOGAN EGERTON 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 

Libertarian Society, 1, 2, 3, 4; Players, 1, 2; 
Debate Team, 3, 4; Junior Class Treasurer, 3. 

MARY HELEN FORD 

Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

Transfer: Union University, Jackson, Tennes- 
see, Zeta Tay Alpha Sorority. 




41 



PHYLLIS FIERMAN 

Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

Transfer: University of Wisconsin. 

CAROLE PATRICIA GEORGE 

Griffin, Georgia 
B.A. 

Players, 1. 2. 3. 4: B-Team Cheerleader, 1: 
Stormy Petrel Staff. 1. 2. 3, 4; News Editor. 
3, Associate Editor, 4; Social Committee, 1. 
Public Relations Committee. 1 : Honor Com- 
mittee. 2. \amacraw. 2. Administration Edi- 
tor: Pep Squad, 2: Literary Magazine, 2: 
Bowling League. 2: Dorm Council. 3. Presi- 
dent, 3: Senior Class Secretary, 4; Homecom- 
ing Court. 3. 





SARA MAC GERMANO 

Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

Secretary of Freshman Class, 1; Players, L 
2: B-Team Cheerleader, 1; Most Outstanding 
Freshman Girl. 1 ; Lord and Lady Oglethorpe 
Page, 1 ; Student Government Officer, 2. Sec- 
retary, 2; Gun Club. 2: Junior Class Vice 
President, 3; Duchess Club. 3, 4. President, 
4; Homecoming Court, 3; Who's Who, 4. 




wm 



fW^ ^ 




BARBARA DEXTER GUPTON 

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 

B.A. 

Humanics, 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary, 3; Gun Club, 
L 2. 3, Secretary, L Treasurer. 2, President. 
3; Women's Rifle Team, L 2, 3; Intramural 
Rep., 1 : Social Committee. 4. 

JAMES CABOT GUPTON 

Raleigh, North Carolina 
Humanics. 1. 2. 3. 4, Exec. Committee. 4: 
APO. 1. 2. 3, 4. President. 2. 3. Publicity 
Chr.. 4: Delegate to APO National Conven- 
tion. 2, 4: Saints. 1. 2. 3, 4: Dorm Council. 
1: Gun Club, 1, 2, Secretary. 2: Stormy Petrel, 
1: Circle K, 4: Senior Class Project Commit- 
tee. 1: Homecoming Committee. 2. 3. 



42 




MARCIA ANN HARTRICK 

Decatur, Georgia 

B.A. 

Transfer: Pennsylvania State University; 
Swimming Club; Leadership Club. 

SUSAN ELLIN HARRIS 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 

Transfer: Goucher College: A A Dorm Coun- 
cil, Secretary, 1; WEEKly Staff, 1, 2; Play- 
ers. 3. 



TERRY A. INGERSON 

Bellerose, New York 
B.A. 

Players, 1, 2. 3, 4. Business Manager. 2, 4. 
Best Actor Award, 3: Gun Club. 1, 2; Rat 
Court. 2: Vice President of Sophomore Class; 
Stormy Petrel Staff. 2. 3. Managing Editor, 

2, Editor-in-Chief. 3: Inter-Activity Committee. 

3, Saints, 1. 2. 3. 4; Bowling League, Presi- 
dent. 3. ' 



MARTHA KAY KILPATRICK 

Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

Players. 1. 2, 3. 4: Math Club. 1, President: 
Stormy Petrel. L 2. 3. 4: Humanics, 1; Class 
Officer, 2. 3, Treasurer. 2, Secretary. 3: 
Duchess Club, 4; Lord and Lady Oglethorpe 
Court. 

STUART LLEWELLYN LYNN 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 

Libertarian Society. 1; APO, 2, 3. 4; Bowl- 
ing League, 2; Humanics, 2, 3, 4; Circle K, 4; 
Student Union, 4; Soccer Team Manager: 
Gun Club. 4. 




43 



NELLE ANNE LATIMER 

Augusta. Georgia 

B.A. 

Lord and Lady Oglethorpe Page, 1 : Social 
Committee, 1. 2. 3, 4: Chapel Committee. 1. 
2: Public Relations Committee, 1, 2; AFF, 
1, 2. 3. Secretary. 2: Players, 2; Gun Club, 
2; International Student Club. 2; Inter- Ac- 
tivity Committee, 3, 4; Chorus, 1, 2; Liber- 
tarians. 1. 2: Stormy Petrel, 2. 3: Yamacraw, 
1, 2, 3, 4, Honors Editor. 2, 3, Editor-in- 
Chief, 4: Dorm Council. 3. 4, Vice President, 
3. President, 4; Class Officer, 1. Secretary; 
Homecoming Queen. 4; Lord and Lady Ogle- 
thorpe Court. 4: Senior Banquet Chairman, 
4: Duchess Club, 4; Rat Court, 4, High 
Priestess. 4: Pep Squad. 2. President. 2: 
Cafeteria Committee. 4; Student Union Com- 
mittee. 3, 4: Who's Who, 4. 

PATRICIA ANN McMICHEN 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 

Chorus. 1. 





HERBERT STEVENS McMULLEN 

Jacksonville, Florida 

B.A. 

Humanics, 1, 2, 3. 4, Treasurer, 4; APO, 2, 
3, 4, Historian, 3, President, 4; Basketball 
Statistician, 3, 4; Rat Court, 4, High Priegt. 




CORWIN MOORE METCALF 

Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

Transfer: Georgia Tech; Dorm Council Vice 
President, 1; Lambda Chi Alpha, 1; Honor 
Committee, 2, 3, Chairman, 3; APO, 2, 3, 4; 
Players, 2, 3, 4; Stormy Petrel, 2, 3; Liter- 
ary Magazine, 2. 

MARY WILL MILES 

Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 



44 




JOAN P. MILLAR 

Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

MARTHA HEWLETT MOBLEY 

Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

Transfer: Youns; Harris College. 



CHARLES EDWARD MOORE 

Jacksonville, Florida 
B.A. 

Transfer: Jacksonville University, Band. 
Kappa Kappa Psi; Saints, 2, 3, 4; Bowling 
League. 2: Humanics, 2, 3, 4; Social Com- 
mittee, Co-Chairman, 3, 4; Yamacraw Staff, 
3; Circle K, 4, Vice President; Lord and 
Lady Oglethorpe Court, 4. 



GEORGE EDDIE MORRIS 

Alpharetta, Georgia 
B.S. 

MADGE HENSON MOSTELLER 

Roswell, Georgia 

B.A. 

Stormy Petrel, 1; Libertarians, L 2, 3, 4; 
Players. 1. 2, 3. 4, Best Actress. Single Role. 
L 




45 



WALTER EARL MUSIC 



Atlanta, 



Georgia 



B.S. 

BOBBY THOMAS NANCE 

Resaca, Georgia 

B.A. 

Basketball. 1. 2. 3. 4; Baseball, 1; Tennis 
1.2.3.4. 




YASUKO KUZUSAKA NISHIMURA 

Tokyo, Japan 

B.A. 

Transfer: Asbury College, Wilmore, Kentucky. 




THOMAS WILSON PHILLIPS 

Atlanta, Georgia 
B.S. 

Stormy Petrel, 1; APO, 1; Yamacraw Staff, 
1, 2, 3, 4, Activities Editor, 2, 3, 4; Student 
Government Officer, Treasurer, 3; LeConte, 
3, 4, President, 4; Circle K, 4, President, 4; 
Interactivity Committee, 3; Lord and Lady 
Oglethorpe Court, 4; Who's Who, 4. 

JACKIE WAYNE POWELL 

Durham, North Carolina 

B.A. 

Transfer: East Carolina College; Theta Chi 
Fraternity, 1, 2; Rifle Team of AFROTC. 



46 




BRENDA ANN ROSENTHAL 

Savannah, Georgia 

B.A. 

Transfer: University of Georgia; Yamacraw, 
3,4; AFF,3,4. 

LINDA SMITH RUTLEDGE 

Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 



ERIC MATISON SCHARFF 

Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

Class Officer, 1, 2, Parliamentarian, 1, Presi- 
dent, 2; B-Team Basketball, 1, 2; Sports 
Statistician, 1, 2, 3, 4; Interactivity Commit- 
tee, 1, 2, 3; Yamacraw Staff. Business Man- 
ager, 2, Editor-in-Chief, 3; Student Govern- 
ment Representative ; Circle K, 4. 



ROSEMARY SCRAGGS 

Hapeville, Georgia 

B.A. 

Honor Court, 3, 4; Duchess Club, 3, 4, Sec- 
retary-Treasurer, 4. 

JUDITH ELAINE SEIDENSPINNER 
Decatur, Georgia 
B.A. 
Transfer: Bryan College: Varsity Cheerlead- 
er, 1, 2; Varsity Tennis Team, 1, 2; Athletic 
Club, 2, Secretary, 2; Intramural Tennis Cham- 
pion, 4. 






47 



ROSELYN ELAINE SHIFLETT 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 
Chorus, 1, 2, 3, 4. 

JUDY MONTGOMERY SKILES 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 

Players, 1; Duchess Club, 3, 4; Lord and 
Lady Oglethorpe Court, 4. 




ELIZABETH ANN SYLVESTER 
Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

Transfer: Spring Hill College, Mobile, Ala- 
bama. 




JACK EARL TEBEAU 

Marietta, Georgia 
B.S. 

B-Team Basketball, 2; Circle K; LeConte So- 
ciety, 4. 

WILMER JACK TURPIN, JR. 
East Point, Georgia 
B.A. 
APO, 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President, 3; Humanics, 
1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer, 3; B-Team Basketball, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Sports, Soccer Team, 
3,4; AFF, L 



48 




BETTE WALL 

Doraville, Georgia 

B.A. 

THOMAS DONNELL WARTERS 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 

Rifle Club, 1 ; APO, 2, 3, 4, Officer, 3. 



CHARLES LYNN WHITE 

Hooversville, Pennsylvania 

B.A. 

APO, 1, 2. 3. 4, Secretary, 2; B-Team Bas 
ketball, 1, 2. 3; AFF, 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramurals. 
1, 2, 3, 4; Humanics, 1, 2, 3, 4; Circle K, 4; 
Author of Senior Poem. 



PETER MICHAEL WILLIAMS 

Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

Benjamin Parker Law Award, 1; Public Re- 
lations Committee, 1, 2; Hay Ride Committee, 
1; Honor Court, 2, 3, Chairman, 3; Chorus, 
3, 4; Yamacraw, 4, Business Mgr., 4. 

THOMAS L. WINN 
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 
B.S. 
Newman Club, 1. 2. 3, 4, Treasurer, 3; Sports, 
Statistician, 1, 2, 3, 4; AFF, 1, 2; B-Team 
Basketball, 1, 2, 4; Stormy Petrel, 2; Junior 
Class President; Student Council Rep., 3; 
LeConte Society, 3, 4; Dorm Proctor, 4; Stu- 
dent Government Parliamentarian, 4. 




-)^#^^ w^ <\^ 




49 





Officers for 
the Class of '64 




PRESIDENT: Bob Calvert 
VICE PRESIDENT: Steve Figler 
SECRETARY: Joan Fisher 
TREASURER: Larry Harbin 
PARLIAMENTARIAN: Jayne Archer 



juniors. . .juniors. . .juniors. . .juniors 



50 







wrs . . .juniors . . ,juni 




ors . , .ju 



51 



Phyllis Jean Abner 
William Aitken, Jr. 
Jane Albrecht 
Charles Andrews 



Jayne Archer 
Richard Aultman 
Hallie Beasley 
Carol Ann Blair 




Linda Robertson Clark 
Marsha Clifton 
Paula Coker 



52 




Larry Harbin 
William Harrison 
Faye Haver 





Ned Young 
Dan Cowart 
Sam Cunningham 
Ken Davis 



Larry Davis 

John Day 

Edward DeGross, Jr. 

Paul Roger Donald, Jr. 



Gloria Early 
Stephen Figler 
Joan Fisher 
Marti Gilreath 



Blanche Goffney 
Becky Green 
Jerilyn Hamby 
George Handley 




^ ?.zm. a& ■■■I 




Jesse Huffman 
Joseph Ivey 
Dennis Kerr 




53 



Bambi Klein 
Diane Leonard 
Irene Levy 
Jane Lincoln 



John Lipham 
Carolyn Loughborough 
Bob McMains 
Robert Manning 



Pauline Metcalf 
Richard Patrick 
Nellie Jo Payne 
Jim Pendlan 



Barry Percival 
Wayne Darrell Perry 
Elizabeth Peryam 
Jon Preu 





Glenn Painey 

Cynthia Maxine Robinson 

B. J. Rutland 



Conan Rudd 

Benjamin W. Sellers, Jr. 

Robert Sexton 



54 



Bonnie Shepard 
Leslie Shetzen 
Cebie Smith 
Charlotte Smith 



John Smith 
Elizabeth Stafford 
Gretchen Stevens 
Orlan Swennes 



Lenore Talanskv 
Jimmy Taylor 
Charles Vance 
Hoyt Wagner 




Joan Womack 
Jon Wordell 
Janet Yose 



55 




Officers for 
the Class of '66 




PRESIDENT: Tommy Crouch 
VICE PRESIDENT: Jack Grubb 
SECRETARY: Eleanor Yedvob 
TREASURER: Ben Hargrove 
PARLIAMENTARIAN: Linda Sanders 



sophomores . . . sophomores . . . sophomores 



56 










sophomores . . . sophom 




sophomore 



57 



58 




Patricia Abbott 
Larry Abner 
George Alexander 



Renee Alhadeff 
Lanier Bagwell 
Harriet Beardin 



Carlee Bell 
Steve Blake 
Arlene Brilliant 



Mary Browne 
David Max Bryant 
Vernon Caine 



James Carroll 
Joe Carter 
Juanita Casteel 



Glenda Castleberry 
Steve Cole 
Jane Lee Conner 



Jacqueline Cook 
Roy Cowart 
Tommy Crouch 



Douglas Crozier 
Sally Daily 
Marre Dansar 



Dave Davies 
Gloria Dial 
Jeanie Franco 



Sharon Friedrich 
Larry Garmon 
Jeri Gates 



Carolyn Godwin 
Vivian Gray 
Jack Grubb 



Benjamin Hargrove 
James Hartlage 
Judy Hayden 



Vincent Benjamin Hill 
Martha Cherry Hodges 
Sue Howard 



Norman Hurd 
Robert Hutchins 
William Jordan 




59 



60 




Carol King 

Jimmy Ann Langdon 

Glenda Largin 



Errol Leifer 
Edna Maleson 
Maxine Moffitt 



Cee Nolo 
William Parker 
William Mitchell Pate 



Annie Primm 
Clark Raby 
William Grady Reid 



Jimmy Rippy 
Glen Rose 
JoAnne Sager 



Linda Sanders 
Ethel Rhodes Scott 
Lynne Schaefer 



Annette Schroeder 
Kathy Shirley 
William M. Smith 



Perrin Kwan Sole 

Carol Speir 

Peter James Stelling 



Carolyn Stemples 
John Stevens 
William Stewart 



Suzy Straub 
Rona Surenko 
David F. Taylor 



Ralph Thomas 
Ray Thomas 
Gloria Thomason 



Joyce Anne Tropea 
Patricia Turner 
Jeffery Wallen 



Peggy Anne Warrell 
Earl Waters 
Lynn Watkins 



Beverly White 
Eleanor Yedvob 
Thomas Young 








61 




Officers for 
the Class of '67 




PRESIDENT: Bob Husbands 
VICE PRESIDENT: Bill Pate 
SECRETARY: Kate Mcneil 
TREASURER: Larry White 
PARLIAMENTARIAN : Elliot Schwartz 



freshmen . . .freshmen . . . freshmen . . .fresi 



bi 






en . . .freshmen . . . fre 




men , 



■fi 



ret 



63 




Carolyn Adams 
Shideh Ahmadzadeh 
James Anderson 
James Beeson 



Lisa Bishop 
Robert Blackketter 
Woody Brooks 
Glenda Broten 



Virginia Bruce 
Richard Burman 
Cheryl Lee Butterfield 
Gwyn Cannon 



William Carter 
John Cason 
Ronald Cenzalli 
Lennie Christie 



Theodore Cochron 

Edith Coleman 

Joe Couch 

Thomas W. Cowan. Ill 



64 



Robert Curry 
Ronald Darrocott 
Carl Dinerman 
Cynthia Doran 



Robert Douglas 
Kurt Dowd 
Thomas Eldridge 
Michael Esther 



Novarro Faircloth 
Beryl Odylle Folsom 
William Garrigan 
Barbara Ann Forman 



Johnny Gosdin 
Susan Goodchild 
Stanley Hall 
Joan Grice 



Jimmy Graves 
William Hartshorn 
Robert Hamrick, Jr. 
Jeffrey Hayden 




65 




Walker Heard 
Barney Howard 
Robert Hughes 
Nick Hurder 



Robert Husbands 
Rebecca Kirkland 
William Landham. HI 
Edna Lawson 



Martin Lenger 
Ronald Mattox 
Katharine McNeil 
Pat McPherson 



Michael Wing 
Carole Moore 
Suzy Mulford 
Jackie Nelson 



Rita Noesworthy 
Donald Owens 
Ronald Owens 
Peter Outhwaite 



66 



Alan Parker 
Kemal Pamir 
Jimmy Porterfield 
Marilyn Roberts 



Mary Anne Ryan 
Linda Ryner 
Roger Schlenker 
Elliott Schwartz 



Steve Sealy 
Linda Kay Shore 
Enid Siffri 
Karen Ann Smith 



Roberta Spindler 
Gary Stowers 
Joseph Strenk 
Sally Anne Tully 



Thersa Tarrant 
Larry White 
Arlene Williams 
Mary York 




67 




ACTIVITIES 



68 



The Fall days brought cries of "run. rats" 




and 



the sound of Seniors singing the Alma Mater at the Capping Ceremony. 



As the weather turned from crisp coolness to wintry breezes, the Ghost Stories. 




The Kingston Trio, the Christmas Formal, and Homecoming kept the .students bus 



Y. 




Basketball games created an excited atmosphere. 



Singing around the fire, playing cards, and the Lord and Lady Oglethorpe Ball helped 



to pass the dreary days of winter until the long awaited Spring arrived. 



Softball games on the lawn, couples strolling down dogwood covered paths marked the , 




Capping 




The Seniors line up and await their capping. The school year officially begins. 




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HI 


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Mrs. Hilliard lends a hand. 



The Faculty, too. donns the scholarly attire. 



70 



Ceremony 





The robed Faculty and Class enters. 



Lynn Drury goes to be capped for the Class. 




"We're Seniors at last!" 



71 



Rat Week 



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Welcome to RAT WEEK. 





Something fishy about this? 




Smile, Rats, smile! 




72 



Lggs, anyone: 



No, don't jump 



JiW^f-'apF' 




Ahhh ! English Leather ! 




Rat Week is as much a part 
of Oglethorpe as the granite stone 
walkways. Each year brings a new 
batch of "rats" to begin their col- 
lege careers. The common experi- 
ence of Rat Week acquaints the 
newcomers with their surroundings 
and molds them into a visible unit 
— The Freshman Class. The eggs, 
shouts, air-raids, and court sessions 
are dreaded at first but are remem- 
bered fondly. 



The Line-up 



Tired, Rats? 




73 




Don't look so sad. rat! 




Wonder where the yellow went! 





Have some . . . egg a la vaseline. 




Out of the fall-out shelter. 



74 



Need a tooth pick? 




Line up, rats ! 




Anyone for Rat Court? 



75 




With a puff of smoke the goblins appear to entertain a startled audience. 




Halloween finds weird moods. 



Mr. Cohen spins a tale of fear. 



Ghos 




76 



I 





. . . and another victim is sought. 



Bobbie Foreman sets a trick instead of a treat. 



tones 



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"Double double toil and trouble' 



The Hunchback of Oglethorpe. 



77 




The Rev. Jack Turpin assumes the role of Marrying Sam. 



Sadie 






Billy Parker as Li'l Abner 



Jane Archer 
as Daisy Mae 



Oglepatchers 



78 





5S*S?*!'*.*'3S'"'5fK»® 



Milkins? 





With this chain, I thee wed. 



Hoed 



own 



Pappy Moore 



Hawkins 




Sadie Hawkins in full swing (but the boys are not running). 



79 



Kingston Trio at 




"Hang down your head, Tom Dooley! Po' boy you're bound to die!" 





"Kinda hurts my fingers." 



John and Nick stall while Bob fixes one of his broken strings 



80 



the 0. U. Field House 




". . . and I don't like anybody very 
much!" 




The trio warm-up before the big show. 




John Stuart 



Nick Reynolds 



Bob Shane 



81 




Carole George and Woody Sellers give professional 




Larry Davis and Terry Ingerson 



^'Moniq 



ue 



r>r> 




Martha Gilreath plays an appealing role. 



82 




"Moniqiie," an en- 
tertaining murder mys- 
tery kept everyone on 
edge of their seats from 
beginning to end. 

The entire cast gave 
a splendid perform- 



ance; 



performances in THE PLAYERS' production of "Monique.' 





A moment of suspense holds the audience. 



Steve Cole as the comic gardener. 



83 



Christmas 





What's so funny, June? 




Lynn and Sandy with lots of 
Christmas spirit. 



Paradox: Black and White at the 
Christmas Formal. 




84 



Ralph Carnes mystically detached with help of Scotch friend. 



Formal 




First chance to be normal at 0. U.'s Christmas Formal. 





Let's twist again like we did last summer ! 



85 



Homecoming 
1962-63 





Last year's Queen, Miss Paula Hoffman, escorted by 
Mr. Steve Schmidt. 



Representing the Student Council, Ken Davis es- 
corts Phyllis Hynes Abner. 





Bob Calvert escorts the Junior Class representative, 
Miss Paula Coker. 



Miss Anne Latimer, the YAMACRAW nominee, is 
escorted by Pete Williams. 



86 



The annual Homecoming festivities on the Oglethorpe campus this year began with tlie lively Christmas For- 
mal where the Queen received her crown, and lasted through a weekend of activities such as the Homecoming 
Game and Dance. Two weeks before the election of the Queen and her Court, school organizations nominated 
those girls whom they felt best represented Oglethorpe in spirit of cooperation, leadership, friendliness, and neat- 
ness of appearance. From the nominees, five lucky girls were chosen by the Student Body to make up the Home- 



coming Court. 





Miss Judy Skiles representing the Senior Class is 
escorted by Steve McMullen. 



The Intramural Council's nominee. Miss Sancl\ 
Wolsey is escorted by Ken Borden. 




The Queen is crowned. 





A roval dance. 



Congratulations from a former 
Queen. 87 



Homecoming Queen 1962-63 




MISS ANNE LATIMER 



88 



The Court 




MISS PAULA COkER 



MRS. PHYLLIS HYNES ABNER 




MISS SANDY WOLSEY 



MISS JUDY SKILLS 



89 



Lord and Lady 




Social Committee members ready Peachtree Gardens for the royal Ball. 




The long awaited LORD AND 
LADY was held in a joyous atmos- 
phere at Peachtree Gardens Country 
Club. The royal Court enjoyed a fine 
band, lively dances, and a lovely cere- 
mony in which the Lord and Lady re- 
ceived their crowns. Faculty members 
and students alike welcomed the chance 
to put on their formal togs and step out 
for an evening of fun. 



90 



Bobbie Gupton decorates the tables. 



Oglethorpe Ball 




The Senior Cocktail Party precedes the dance. 





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Rosemary and Harold take a break. 





Eric Scharff and Mickey Metcalf enjoying themselves. 



The Pages: Carol Adams, Karen Smith, Marilyn Roberts, 
and Enid Siffri. 




Bambi Klein shows her enthusiasm for the twist. 



91 



Court Members 




The Ojurt Dances 




ANNE LATIMER — ED MOORE 





92 



KAY KILPATRICK — TOMMY PHILIPS 



JUDY SKILES — ARNOLD BAKER 



1 




MISS MARYLOU ANDERSEN and MR. LYNN DRURY 



93 




A 




The 

Arts 

Festival 



The Arts Festival included such 
events as a student art exhibit, a jazz 
concert, a modern dance concert, a 
lecture on art, a presentation of 
Broadway music by the Oglethorpe 
Chorus, and the Beaux Arts Ball. The 
variety of entertainment provided 
something of interest for all students. 



Virginia and Bill view the paintings. 




Flappers Steve and Sally do the Charleston at the Ball. 



% 




94 



Ken Davis sings from "West Side Story. 




The Chorus presents their version of "West Side Story." 



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A modern dance creation 





Romans Barry Percival and Joan Fisher 



95 



Visit to a Small Planet 




"You must be tired after your long trip. Sit down here, sir." 





"Whatever it is, it's real. Registers on your radar!" 



"You mean, you can talk to Rosemary?" 



96 



Weekend Activities 



This year's Student Council initiated a program in which various clubs on campus sponsored school-wide 
activities each weekend to provide more entertainment for the students. Such activities as the Student Union 
Committee sponsored Pajama Party, The Players' sponsored horror movie, and the A.F.F. sponsored trip to the 
mountains, added a great deal to the social life on the O.U. campus. Here are some pictures of one of the en- 
joyable events ... the trip to the mountains. 












Kate McNeil takes a nap ... on the side of the mountain. 



Carl Dinerman jumps a mountain str 




A lovely \ieu. 



Jo Payne has a snack. 97 



The Black . . . 




An excellent band played for the annual Freshman sponsored BLACK AND WHITE. 




The Faculty table 



98 



. . . and White 



^^ 



%,A ^ \^ I 




The Americana was the scene of this year's BLACK AND WHITE. 





Diane celebrates her birthday in the gala setting. 



Ed and Glo . . . "some enchanted evening" 99 



Spring Varieties 




Joan tisher concentrates on directing the rehearsals. 





Steve McMulIen acts as Master of Ceremonies. 




100 Bonnie Shepard . . . "Whenever I'm Depressed" 



Ann Burton displays her talenl. 



. . in Rehearsal 



A juggler, a ballerina, modern dancers, a singing group, a comic dancer, pianists, a soprano, magicians, and 
three majorettes were among those talented students who gathered on the Oglethorpe stage to organize a show. 
Tiy and try again . . . Rehearsals were strenuous and tiring, but slowly tlie rough edges were smoothed. An able 
and determined Joan Fisher insisted that eveiy perfoimer do his or her part to create an evening of enjoyable 
entertainment. 

The results of hard work were seen in a polished performance of the Student Council sponsored SPRING VA- 
RIETIES. An enthusiastic audience applauded the fine display of talent. 





^^ 



I 




Senior Morris Mitchell practices jugglino 



Lynn Drury whistles a happy tune. 



SENIORS MORRIS MITCHELL AND LYNN DRURY REVEAL HIDDEN TALENTS. 



Round 




X vr. 





102 



Camp 



us 





103 




Goodman Hall has- a ■jjuli session"! 








The Saints go marchinK in! 




The tus of war 



Snap 
Shots 



And then I said , 



104 





Mr. Schlenker and Dr. Seward at the Christmas Formal. 



"Another opening . . ." 




'Is that a real beard?' 




Eat, drink and be merrv! 





'""'tfli 



Brid 



ge, anyone ( 



Well 



105 




OR GANIZA TIONS 



106 




"Vd like to schedule a meeting of Circle K for eleven 



o'clock, Monday in the Student Lounge.'''' . . . "A.P.O. will be in charge of dec- 



orating for the Beaux Arts Ball. Members should be in the Old Gym Saturday at ten 



to paint. 




. "An Assembly is on the calendar f> 



or 



Wednesday at free period.'' 




''The Players are rehearsing 



for 'Visit to a Small Planet' and ivill need the auditorium every night this month. 




Members of the cast should be on stage promptly at 



107 



Student Council 



Members of the STUDENT COUNCIL are Lynn 
Drury, Ken Davis, Dennis Kerr, Steve McMuUen, 
Joan Fisher, Bob Husbands, Tom Winn and Tommy 
Couch. Bob Calvert is not pictured. 




VICE PRESIDENT: Ken Davis 




SECRETARY: Joan Fisher 




TREASURER: Dennis Kerr 



The STUDENT COUNCIL consists of five officers, 
elected by the student body, and the four class presi- 
dents. This goveiTiing organization is designed to sei-ve 
as the unifying and coordinating body for all student 
activities and events. 




PARLIAMEi\TARIA_\: Tom Winn 



109 



Honor Court 




Members of the HONOR COURT are Beryl Folsom. freshman; Rosemary Scraggs, senior: 
Linda Clark, junior: JoAnn Sager. sophomore: Larry Davis, junior: John Cason. freshman; 
and Hank Alexander, sophomore. Not pictured is Glenda Balowsky, senior. 



HONOR COURT judges ail cases of alleged violations of 
the Honor Code brought Ijefore it and has the power to im- 
pose punishment on those who are judged guilty of violating 
the Code. It is composed of two elected representatives from 
each class and a chairman, appointed by the previous chair- 
man with the approval of the Student Council. 

CHAIRMAN: Ken Borden 



10 




Honor Committee 




HONOR COMMITTEE members are Bill Garrigan, freshman; Charlotte Smith, junior; Patsy Turner, soph- 
omore; and Jack Tebeau, senior. 



HONOR COMMITTEE is composed of rep- 
resentatives from each class and a chairman. 
Its function is to investigate alleged violations 
of the Honor Code. 



CHAIRMAN: Barry Percival 
ADVISOR to Honor Court and Com- 
mittee: Mr. Austin Schlenker 




Interactivity Committee 




Members of the COMMITTEE are (first roiv) Diane Leonard. Cherry Hodges, Patsy Turner, Arnold Baker, Larry 
Davis and Ken Davis, chairman; (second roiv) Ed Moore, George Handley, Arlene Brilliant and Tommy Phillips; 
(third roiv) Steve McMullen. Anne Latimer, Conan Rudd, Mr. MacConnell, Advisor, Carlee Bell, and Tommy Crouch. 



The INTERACTIVITY COMMITTEE is a stand- 
ing committee of the Student Govemment set up to 
coordinate the activities of the various campus organ- 
izations. The connnittee, with the Vice president of 
the Student Council as its chairman, schedules the 
meetings and activities of the groups on campus. A 
major function of the Committee has been to promote 
more and better social activity on the weekends. 



Chairman of the INTERACTIVITY 
COMMITTEE, Ken Davis, checks the 
calendar of events for the year with 
Mr. Elgin MacConnell, Faculty Advi- 
sor, and Cherry Hodges, Secretary. 




112 



Social Committee 





"Workers" on the COMMITTEE are Glo Thomason, George Handley 
and Anne Latimer. 




The SOCIAL COMMITTEE plans and organ 
izes entertaining activities for the student body, 
faculty, alumni and others who are interested in 
Oglethorpe affairs. These social gatherings add 
sparkle to an otherwise academic life. 



SOCIAL COMMITTEE members are Arlene Brilliant, Donna 
Williams, Ed Moore and Conan Rudd, chairman. 





Student Union Committee 




Members of the COMMITTEE are Janet Yose; Conan Rudd, chairman; Jane Lin- 
coln; Anne Latimer; and George Handley. 



STUDENT UNION, a service organiza- 
tion, supports all extracurricular activities 
and has sponsored improvements in the 



gameroom. 



114 





Class representatives on the Intramural Council are (sitting) Linda 
Ryner, freshman; Ken Borden, senior; Sandy Wolsey, junior; (standing) 
Steve Figler, junior; Jeff Hayden. freshman; and Ben Hargrove, sopho- 
more. 



Intramural 
Council 



The INTRAMURAL COUNCIL, com- 
posed of representatives from each class, 
plans and coordinates athletic activities 
within the college community. 




Intramural Football Cham 



PS 



115 



All Faiths Fellowship 




ALL FAITHS FELLOWSHIP assists its members 
in understanding the religions of the world. It ac- 
quaints them with the traditions and customs of other 
religions. Social problems are dealt with in this dis- 
cussion group. 



Officers of A.F.F. are Jane Lincoln, Vice President: 
Dr. Reser, Advisor; Dave Davies, President. Not pic- 
tured are Carol King. Chaplain; and Patsy Turner, Sec- 
retary. 




A.F.F. members are Berta Spindler. Janet Yose, Dave Davies, Jo Payne, Joyce Tropea, Lynn White, 
Jane Lincoln and Dr. Richard Reser, Advisor. 



16 



Oglethorpe Chorus 




Members of the CHORUS are: (jirst row) Jan Hardin. Marti Gilreath, Carol Moore. Joyce Tropea. Elizabeth Love. B. J. Rut- 
land, Berta Spindler. Vivian Grey. Connie Boggs, Jo Payne; (second row) Gwyn Cannon. Susan Warrel, Theresa Tarrant, 
Sharon Fredericks, Sally Kerr. Gloria Early; (last row) Larry White, Bill Aitken. Pete Williams. Ed Moore. Conan Rudd, Bob 
Hamrick, Jerry Scarborough, Ken Davis, Ed DeGross and James Beeson. 



The OGLETHORPE CHORUS provides musical programs for 
assemblies and special events on campus. They also sing for 
various civic, religious and other local organizations. The Chorus 
has a broad repertoire ranging from classical to popular music. 



Vivian Grey, Secretary-Treasurer; Mrs. Lundeen; Conan Rudd. Presi- 
dent; and Mrs. Peggy Youngblood, Accompanist. 





Inge Manski Lundeen: UIKECTOR 



117 




HLMAMCS ASSOCIATIOX members are (first roiv) Patsy Turner. Jane Lincoln. Carolvn Stemples: f second row) Larrv White. 
Janet Yose, Joyce Tropea. Gloria Early: flhird roic) Lynn White. Sam Cunningham. George Handlev, Arnold Baker. Jack Turpin. 
Gloria Thomason: (fourth row) Cabot Gupton. Stuart Lynn. Bobbie Gupton. Steve McMullen, Ken Davis, Lee Daniels. John Day! 
Dave Davies, Risk Taylor, Barry Champion, Ed Moore, Dr. Berg, and Berta Spindler. 



The HUMANICS STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

sei-ves as a focal point to enlighten Humanics 
students in their profession of working with young 
people. These students will have much influence 
on many future citizens. 



18 



Humanics Association 




The weekly nieetinn; of the Executive Committee. 




An evening at Moi 




Executive officers are (seated) Dr. Gunnar Berg, Resident Administrator: 
Arnold Baker, President: (standing) Janet Yose, Secretary; Steve McMuI- 
len, Treasurer; George Handley, Second Vice President: and Lee Daniels, 
First Vice President. 



19 



Oglethorpe 
Players 



The OGLETHORPE PLAYERS produce three 
plays a year, presenting a selection of comedies, mys- 
teries and dramas. The group promotes an interest 
in the theater arts and provides those with dramatic 
inclinations an opportunity for developing their tal- 
ents. 





Officers of PLAYERS are Foxy Stafford, Secretary; Larry 
Davis, President; Terry Ingerson, Business Manager; and Conan 
Rudd, Stage Manager. 



DIRECTOR: Mrs. Charles Honce 




PLAYERS are (jirst ronj) Larry Davis, JoAnn Sager, Carole George, Sharon Friedrich; (second roiv) Woody 
Sellers, Marti Gilreath, Lou Andersen, Beryl Folsom, Mickie Tully; (third row) Dan Cowart, Joyce Tropea, Tom 
DalHnger. Kay Kilpatrick, Terry Ingerson; (last row) Conan Rudd, and Peter Stalling. 



120 



Newman Club 



The NEWMAN CLUB is the Catholic stu- 
dent organization on campus. This is a discus- 
sion group whose purpose is to gain more in- 



sight into their religion. 




Officers of the Newman Club are (standing.) Mary Anne 
Ryan, Recording Secretary; Susan Warrell. Corresponding 
Secretary; Joyce Tropea, Vice President; (seated) Ed De- 
Gross, Parliamentarian; Patsy Turner, President; and Peggy 
Warrell, Treasurer. 



Members of the club seated on the floor are Ronnie Cenzalli. Kate McNeil, and Ed DeGross. Behind them are 
Joyce Tropea, Father Felix McGrath, O.F.M., Patsy Turner, Susan Warrell, Mary Anne Ryan, and Peggy Warrell. 




Alpha Phi Omega 




FRATERNITY members are (first tow) Ed DeGross, Bill Pate, Elliott Schwartz. Ken Davis, Larry Davis, Jeff Wallen, Cabot 
Gupton. George Handley; (second row) Joe Strenk, John Stroud, Ben Vincent, John Cason, Dave Davies, Lee Daniels; (third 
row) Dennis Kerr. John Winsness, Rick Taylor, Barry Percival, Larry White; (fourth row) Jack Turpin, Larry Harbin, Lynn 
Drury. Steve McMuUen. George Alexander, and Tommy Crouch. 



ALPHA PHI OMEGA is a national service 
fraternity composed of college and university 
men who have been previously connected with 
the Boy Scouts of America. This organization, by 
volunteering to do sei-vice for Oglethoi-pe Univer- 
sity, shows respect and concern for its future. 



122 




fi^"-*^ 



A.P.O. officers are: Larry Harbin, Secretary; Cabot Gupton, Sergeant at Arms; Larry Davis, 
Historian; Dennis Kerr, Treasurer; George Handley, Second Vice President; Steve, McMul- 
len. President; Lee Daniels, First Vice President. 





A.P.O. birthday party 



SWEETHEART: Miss Jayne Archer 



A.P.O. party at the Atlanta Cabana 




123 




Ya 



macraw 



Gun Club 



The YAMACRAW GUN CLUB provides 
its members with training in the skill of shoot- 
ing rifles and pistols. Members of the Gun 
Club who are also on the rifle and pistol teams 
participate in 
colleges. 



shooting matches with other 



Officers of GUN CLUB are (kneeling) Hoyt Wagner, Vice President; Larry 
Harbin, Range Executive: (standing) Foxy Stafford, Range Executive; Dan 
Cowart, President: Cherry Hodges, Secretary; Ed DeGross. Range Executive; 
and Peggy Warrell, Treasurer. 




GUN CLUB members are (sitting) Virginia Bremer, Uiane Leonard, Foxy Stafford, Bambi Klein, Gretchen Stevens, j 
Berta Spindler; (second row) Ed DeGross, Vivian Grey. Cherry Hodges, Peggy Warrell, Patsy Turner, Larry White, ', 
Hoyt Wagner; (third row) Bill Aitken, Jack Tebeau, Ben Vincent, Dan Cowart and Larry Harbin. 



124 



Circle K 



CIRCLE K members are: (jirsi 
r o w) Tommy Phillips, Ed 
Moore, Eric Scharff, John Day : 
(second row) Wayne Perry. 
John Stroud, Dennis Kerr: 
(third row) Jack Tebeau, Orlan 
Swennes, Delmar Brinkley, Dan 
Cowart; (fourth row) Kurt 
Dowd, Pete Williams, Larrv 
Harbin, (fifth row) Bob Mc- 
Mains, Larry Davis, and Conan 
Rudd. 




CIRCLE K is a service organization sponsored by 
Kiwanis InternationaL It was revived on the Ogle- 
thorpe campus this year after an absence of several 
years. This club is part of a larger association which 
has over 6,000 members in 400 clubs in the United 
States and Canada, founded on ideals of sei^vice to 
others with the motto: "we build." 



Tug of War with A.P.O. 



Officers are: Jack Tebeau, Vice President: Tommy Phillips, 
President; Ed Moore, Secretary: John Stroud, Treasurer: 
John Day, Parliamentarian. 





Literary Magazine 




Editors of the Literary Magazine. Virginia Bremer and Linda Clark, discuss the 
magazine with Mr. Wendell, Advisor. 



The LITERARY MAGAZINE brings to light 
the hidden talents of Oglethorpe's students, 
faculty, and alumni. It exemplifies their skills 
in writing poetiy, short stories and essays. 




CO-EDITOR: Sandy Wolsey 



126 



Joint Committee 




The JOINT COMMITTEE is composed of Dr. Agnew. Dr. SeWard, Mr. Bilancio, Mr. MacConnell. Lynn Drury. Student 
Council President, Ken Davis, Student Council Vice President, and the Vice Presidents of each class. Ed Moore (senior class). 
Steve Figler (junior class). Jack Grubb (sophomore class) and Bill Pate (freshman class). 



The JOINT COMMITTEE is the only official 
organizational group with representatives from 
the administration, faculty and student body. Its 
function is to consider problems and proposals 
regarding conflicts within the three groups, keep- 
ing the best interests of the University in mind. 



127 



< 



Stormy Petrel 





\ 



EDITOR: Diane Leonard 





ASSOCIATE EDITOR: Carole George 




MANAGING EDITOR: Woody Sellers 




BUSINESS MANAGER: Barry Percival 




COLUMNISTS: Larry Davis, Carlee Bell and 
Dave Bauman. 




SPORTS STAFF: Ken Borden and Ken Davis. Also on the staff are 
Sandy Wolsey and Steve Figler. 



The STORMY PETREL, student newspaper of Oglethorpe 
University, reports and interprets campus and non-campus news. 
The PETREL provides an important means of expression for the 
students and faculty. It acts as an ever-present stimulus for thought 
and provocation. 




PHOTOGRAPHER: Blair Protzman 




Members of the staff are Arnold Baker, Judy Skiles. Es Aviles, Jacque Cook and 
Jane Lee Conner. 



129 



I 



Yamacraw 





BUSINESS MANAGER: Pete Williams 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF: Anne Latimer 




EXECUTIVE SECRETARY: Suzv Straub 



The YAMACRAW is the 
Oglethorpe University year- 
book. Like all other annuals, 
it finds its value in the future. 
In days to come when its cov- 
ers are opened, clouds of for- 
getfulness will be erased, and 
sunny events of the past will 
again shine. 




CLASSES EDITOR: Lou Andersen 





PHOTOGRAPHY COORDINATOR: Vivian Grey 



FACULTY EDITOR: George Handley 




130 



Representative from Taylor Publish- 
ing Company : Ed Jones 





SPORTS EDITOR: Ken Borden 



PHOTOGRAPHERS: George Handley and Ed DeGross 




Hi 


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ORGANIZATIONS EDITOR: Jo Ann Sager 

wHm ] 

HONORS EDITOR: Cherry Hodges 

GENERAL STAFF members are Jane Lee Conner, Judy Hayden, Larry Davis, 
and Carlee Bell. Not pictured are Bob Husbands, B. J. Rutland, Brenda Rosen- 
thal, and Arnold Baker. 





ACTIVITIES EDITOR: Tommy Phil- 
lips 




FACULTY ADVISOR: Mr. Roy N. (Doc) Gos- 
lin 



131 




SPOR TS 



132 



Athletics teaches loyalty to a goal with each participant 



giving his best for the common good. 




Athletics teaches leadership nith each person given 



equal opportunity to develop his abilities and potential. 



Even though school spirit includes much more 





than athletics, athletic competition gives 



Athletics teaches dedication to a task: players learn 



a focal point for a concrete expression of 



the valuable intangibles of spirit. 



that they get out only what they put in. 




4^^*^" -^T 



■ijdS 



133 




CHAMPIONSHIP DRIFTERS 





V" 



% 'v-^ ' 











»^iC'^. » - ■J'.^'**^ 



It,^— _9R iB»i.;«« ±^ 







.i» 







Dan Cowart administers aid to stricken Drifter, Jack Grubb. 



The Heroes and their fair Lady. 



Intramurals 



This year's version of Intramurals has provided some fine thrills and excellent athletic talents. 
Fall quarter saw Ray Thomas capture the boy's tennis trophy and Judy Seidenspinner took the girl's 
honors. The Drifters became the new football champions with a 6-0 record after unseating the de- 
fending Lions. Basketball brought the big sui-prize as the Sophomores ended the Senior win streak 
at 21 and then went on to take the crown. Girls sports proved somewhat of a disappointment when in- 
sufficient participants made a continuous program impossible. Spring brought on softball and at pres- 
ent the Sophomores seem a good bet with strong competition from the freshmen. 



134 





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■Sr. 



FOOTBALL 


STANDINGS 




Team 


Won 


Lost 


Drifters 


6 





Lions 


4 


2 


Rats 


2 


4 


Colts 





6 




■■ ^WR 



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S. 






136 



BASKETBALL 


STANDINGS 








Won 


Lost 


Sophomores 




5 


1 


Seniors 




4 


2 


Freshmen 




3 


3 


Juniors 







6 


Faculty 


Non-lea, 


»ue games 









0^ 



Soccer 









MV!i^ '■ .5tSi*i'f 




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138 








139 




'**''*''^*'*-*wn's.^^ 



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HALFBACKS 




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Injured player. Ken Borden, and Manager, 
Stuart Lynn 




■■.■■■ ■ ;*« 
FORWARDS 




■ - ■ _■*'■ 



GOALIE 



FULLBACKS 



140 







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SOCCER TEAM: Kneelins,. left to right: Benton Greenleaf. Jeff Hayden, Kwan Perrin. Errol Liefer, Ben Hargrove, 
Kim Pamir, Hoyt Wagner; Standing: Stu Lynn, Ronnie Cenzalli. Steve Figler, Tom Dallenger, Niel Erby, Lynn White, 
Lainer Bagwell, Bob Calvert, Perry Cash, Pete Outhwaite, Bill Vaughan. 







?*■ ■^ J^ 



Captain Perry Cash flips with Georgia Tech Captain. 



•.%**^ 



141 



Rifle Team 




Left to right: Bambi Klein, Vivian Gray, Diane Leonard, Foxy Stafford, Berta Spindler. 




^,:i.., 



J.-^iJ.'^^,:'.y:;-v. 



Co-Captain Foxy Stafford and Captain Diane Leonard 



The girls' rifle team extended its vic- 
tory string to three years. To date the 
Petrel's fair sex has won 33 matches. 
Top shots are Foxy Stafford, Vivian Gray, 
and Diane Leonard. 



142 




Larry and Jack take aim. 




Front to back: Larry White, Ed DeGross, Hoyt Wagner, Steve Figler, 
Larry Harbin, Dan Cowart, Ben Vincent. 




The boys' pistol team in its second 
year of competition won six of twelve 
matches. Victories were won over many 
major foes. 

Chief Sewell Edwards deserves much 
praise for his work as coach of this fine 
team. 



Captain Dan Cowart and Co-Captain Hoyt Wagner 



Pistol Team 



143 





INSTRUCTOR: Chief Sewell Edwards 




OGLETHORPE SHOT AGAINST: 

Arlington State College 

U.S. Naval Academy 

U.S. Military Academy 

Michigan State University 

Rutgers State University 

Royal Military College of Canada 

California Maritime Academy 

University of Oklahoma 

San Jose State College 

University of Illinois 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Brown University 






' '""77't " diWl 



144 



(Atlanta, deorgis 



May 2, I963 

The athletic program at Oglethorpe is of course best known in 
the field of basketball. Since the record here speaks for itself I 
woiild prefer to call attention to other aspects of our program, point- 
ing out the diversity of opportunity available to our students. 

In addition to basketball we are engaged in intercollegiate com- 
petition in baseball, soccer, tennis, and rifle ry. 

We also have intramural programs in touch football, basketball, 
Softball, and tennis. 

In intercollegiate tennis for I963 the record to date is 10 wins 
and no losses. This includes wins over Stetson University and Uni- 
versity of Kentucky. 

The riflery team has a rather spectac\ilar record having won 33 aj^<3- 
lost over a period of 3 years. 

Soccer, which is relatively new as an intercollegiate sport at 
Oglethorpe, has so far accumulated a record of 5 - 2. 

We are proud of our various athletic programs and expect to see a 

continued expansion of sports available and student participation in these 

sports . 

G. F. Wheeler, 

Chairman of the Athletic Committee 



145 



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Basketball 



146 







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BOB NANCE 



BILL GARRIGAN 




RONNIE OWENS 



1 48 



JOE CARTER 




BILL PARKER 
DONNIE OWENS 



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151 



Cheerleaders 




Left to right: Kathy Shirley. Paula Coker. Linda Sanders, Sandy Wolsey, Jacque Cook, Marsha Clif- 
ton. Jane Lincoln. 




Captam— PAULA COKER 




Co-Captain— ]m^ LINCOLN 



152 









SA.NDY WOLSEY 



LL\DA SANDERS 



153 



Saints 




Cabot gets roused up. 




Music, Man, Music 




Left to right: Cabot Gupton, Conan Rudd, John Cason, George Alexander, and Alan 
Parker. 




The Saints go Marching In. 
Ed Moore leads "Old Black Joe" 



154 




B- Team 




Coach Carter gives instructions. 




Owens has his man all the wav. 



The B team was composed entirely of 
freshmen and sophomores off the varsity. The 
future Petrel stars gained invaluable experi- 
ence in tlie highly disciplined Oglethorpe pat- 
tern. 

These boys put tlie go in the Oglethorpe 
team with their constant encouragement and 
pressure of the varsity. More regular players 
will readily admit they would rather play 
anyone than the "2p's squad." These boys 
make Oglethorpe's future look bright. 




Petrel takes finger in nose. 



155 



B- Team 





GLORIA DIAL 



ELEANOR YEDVOB 



JANE LEE CONNER 



CARLEE BELL 



156 





Cheerleaders 





JUDY HAYDEN 



BAMBI KLEIN 




KAREN SMITH 




157 










re ,f\^i r^-^Hlit 








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wmimm 



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««^J' ,, ■ » 







Statisticians: Tom Winn, Ken Broden, Steve McMullen, Eric Scharff 








Coach displays many sides in leading Petrels to 
unexcelled heights . . . 



o.u. 


Opponents 


11 


Piedmont 


45 


Murray 


66 


Carson Newman 


71 


Cumberland 


63 


Newberry 


56 


Valdosta State 


87 


Paris 


68 


St. Peters 


63 


New Hampshire 


49 


Piedmont 


60 


Ga. Southern 


56 


Centenary 



They 


O.U. 


Opponents 


42 


32 


East Carolina 


50 


47 


Chattanooga 


44 


63 


East Carolina 


56 


80 


St. Bernard 


56 


76 


Rollins 


42 


40 


Carson Newman 


37 


76 


Chattanooga 


57 


70 


Campbell 


46 


68 


Belmont Abbey 


20 


41 


Ga. Southern 


42 


80 


Athens 


67 







ley 
34 


NCAA KEGIONAL lUUKNEY 
57 Bellarmine 


49 


61 


55 Tennessee State 


51 


34 






59 






56 






49 
64 
46 


NCAA NATIONAL FINALS 
36 Phila. Textile 


34 


41 


37 Wittenburg 


46 


58 


68 Southern 111. 


64 


53 







160 




Ankles can be vital spots. 





Coach Pinholster lectures to fans as players demonstrate. 




Players relax on the Road. 



Coach Carter soes over defense for Chattanooga. 



Bobby tense before 0. U. Invitational Tournament. 





OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY ACCEPTS REGIONAL FIRST PLACE TROPHY. 





Jimbo struggles to keep victorious Coach aloft. 



162 



Captains Bob Nance and Darrell Whitford celebrate with 
Trophies and Winning nets. 




Tense moment at Louisville 




Cheerleader and students welcome home their heroes. 



NUMBER THREE TEAM IN THE NATION ARRIVES AT THE ATLANTA AIRPORT. 

If 




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V few: 



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•^ *• 



r ^ 



Baseball 



The evil eye has plagued the Petrel baseballers all this spring. Many Players got a late 
start due to basketball success and weren't ready to answer the opening bell effectively. 
Pitching and catching both have proven dark spots. Sore arms have plagued three of the 
five Petrel moundsmen and the burden fell on too few shoulders. Eligibility and injuries 
have eliminated four catchers. Inexperience in this key position has really hurt. On bright 
spot, however, was the 8-7 victory over the University of Georgia. 



164 




^k ■&■» 








r* 



'% 




^2^^' 



RONNIE OWENS 




BILL GARRIGAN 



JAMIE HYMAN 





■.»»». *«uf*'«fifc.*^\* a. 



BOBBY SEXTON 



BEN HARGROVE 



HPf 









BOB MORELAND 







J\ 



ROY COWART 



MORRIS MITCHELL 



** :.^m J&hUmSl^M 




ife 



167 




ROBERT TILLERY 




COACH BILL CARTER 



a^^ 3*. 




DARRELL WHITFORD 





1 1- 







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r .^!f".4ii. 



DONNIE OWENS 







"l^^^SS^^^^ ***^^^" 




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"- IN 



:.v 



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LARRY ABNER 



168 




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Petrels Push Runner into Scoring Position. 






Petrels Make Sacrifice to Baseball God. 



Players Look on as Teammate Takes Healthy Cut. 



Season's Results 



OPPONENTS 



VMI 

Carson 



Ne 



Carson Newman 

Georgia 

Berry 

Berry 

Wake Forest 

Mercer 

Wheaton 

Piedmont 

Shorter 

St. Bernard 

Shorter 

Georgia 

Union 

Union 

Piedmont 

Mercer 

Piedmont Mercer 



WE 

1 
3 

8 
3 
9 
3 
10 
2 
4 
1 



THEY 

4 
16 
12 

7 

2 
10 
13 

9 

4 

5 

4 



169 




Tennis Team 





Undefeated in '63 




.MUIi>i>>in«ni"» 






r 



BILL STEWART 







The tennis team under the direction of tennis great Crawford Henry has reached un- 
paralleled heights this spring. To date the Petrel netters are undefeated, numbering Stet- 
son, Kentucky and Emory among their victims. Bill Pate and Ray Thomas have been out- 
standing as the number one and two players this year. The sports staff hopes that this 
year's team is setting a new precedence. 



173 




Left to right are the members of the Tennis Team: Bill Stewart. Ray Thomas, Lynn White, Dan Cowart, Tom Dalinger, 
Bill Pate, and Coach Crawford Henry. 













.i:k«v«id 





175 




HONORS 



176 



your Senior year. Your rat cap has been traded for Mortarboard and tassle. 




The hard work and service has come to a culmination. Scholarship and participation 



will be rewarded. Those students who give so much 





are recognized. 



The Oglethorpe ideal is to create a love of learning, 



to encourage future study and to provide a background which will enable a useful life. 




The awards received at school are token symbol of the intangible reivards to be 



achieved by continuing to use what has been learned from four years at Oglethorpe. 



177 



Yamacraw Awards 




Yamacraw Awards were initiated by the 1963 
Yamacraiv staff as a new means of recognizing 
students who are thought worthy of representing 
the Oglethorpe ideals. Each club nominated one 
boy and one girl; the executive staff of the 
Yamacraw and their advisor chose by a majority 
vote the seven whom they believed were the most 
highly qualified. The qualifications that were 
used as guides by both the clubs and the staff in 
choosing these people were that they possess 
school spirit, integrity, an interest in the school, 
leadership, dependability, and that they also be 
conscientious in an academic sense. 



Conan Rudd 

Nominated by All Faiths Fellowship 

and Duchess Club 



"■ >^- "Si 








Glenda Balowsky 
Nominated by the LeConte Society 



George Handley 
Nominated by Yamacraw Gun Club 



17S 





Larry Davis 
Nominated by the LeConle Society 



Anne Latimer 

Nominated by Alpha Phi Omega and 

Boar's Head Chapter of Blue Key 





Lynn Drury 

Nominated by Alpha Phi Omega and 

Boar's Head Chapter of Blue Key 



Carole George 
Nominated by THE STORMY PETREL 



179 



Duchess Club 



The DUCHESS CLUB is an honor society for 
Junior and Senior women who have maintained 
an outstanding scholastic record and who have 
participated actively in campus extracurricular ac- 
tivities. This club was founded in 1920 to unite 
its members in a cooperative effort for assistance 
in campus activities. It was hoped that this organi- 
zation would help to integrate the ideals of aca- 
demic proficiency and seiTice. 




First row: Donna Williams, Rosemary Scraggs. Sara Mac Germano, Glenda Balowsk)'. Judy Skiles. Charlotte Smith, Carol Ann 
Blair; Second tow: Joan Fisher, Mary Jane Bowman, Betty Jane Rutland, Virginia Bremer, Key Kilpatrick, Linda Clark, Anne 
Latimer, Diane Leonard. Javne Archer, Donna Calvert. 



180 



"'.'tX-^-.-??^ 



In addition to their many re- 
ceptions. Duchess Chib spon- 
sors an Easter egg roll for the 
faculty children. 








Duchess Club Award 

Givyn Cannon 



The Duchess Club Women's Socie-. 
ty honors with this award, the Fresh- 
man girl who best exemplifies the 
ideals of the Duchess Club in scholar- 
ship and campus activities. The recip- 
ient of the Duchess Club Award has 
shown that she embodies those attri- 
butes which characterize the best in 
an Oglethorpe student. 



181 



Boar's Head Chapter 
of Blue Key 



The purpose of BOAR'S HEAD is to recognize 
those junior and senior men who have exhibited 
outstanding scholarship, leadership, and partici- 
pation in the activities of the University. By rec- 
ognizing the top students, it is the goal of Boar's 
Head to foster an attitude of scholastic achieve- 
ment and to promote the ideals of academic free- 
dom and excellence. 



Boar's Head chapter of Blue Key attempts to 
stress its ideal of academic excellence, therefore, 
setting it apart from any and all social extra- 
curricular activities. At the same time it recog- 
nizes the importance of the well rounded student 
in considering students for membership in its 
ranks. 




First row: John Lipliam. Dr. Cressy — Faculty Advisor, Ken Davis, Bob McMains; Second row: Larry Harbin, Barry Percival. 
Bobby Sexton, Ken Borden, David Bauman, Lynn Drury. 



i 



182 




Bob Calvert : 
BOAR'S HEAD PRESIDENT 



Boars Head Award 

Bill Pate 

The Boar's Head Honorary Fraternity presents 
this award to the Freshman boy whom they feel de- 
serves recognition for his scholastic achievements 
and his active participation in other school functions. 
This boy not only upholds the ideals of the Boar's 
Head Fraternity in scholastic superiority, participa- 
tion in campus activities, and leadership ability, but 
he is representative of the best in an Oglethorpe stu- 
dent as well. 




''Va.^ 



183 



LeConte Honorary Society 



The LeCONTE SOCIETY is an honorary or- 
ganization for outstanding science students who 
have a genuine interest in the progress of scien- 
tific endeavors. Any upperclassman who has at- 
tained an average of 85 in science courses and 80 
in other academic subjects is eligible for member- 
ship. Its membership is not limited to any single 
science field, but rather it includes a wide range 
of scientific pursuits. 




Members: First row: Tom Winn. 
Jayne Archer, Linda Sanders, Bob 
McMains, Larry Davis, Charlotte 
Smith, Glenda Balowsky, Renee 
Alhadeff ; Second row: Bobby Sex- 
ton, Ken Borden, Tommy Phillips. 
John Lipham, Dennis Kerr, Lynn 
Drury. 



184 



■-,:?»6vT,'*^:-?:ss5BiBBC»«"'"" 



LeCONTE OFFICERS 

Treasurer — 
John Lipham 

Secretary — 
Charlotte Smith 

Vice President — 
Glenda Balowsky 

President — 
Tommy Phillips 





LeConte Award 

Tommy Phillips 

Each year the LeConte Society chooses 
the Senior science student who has con- 
tributed the most to the field of science 
at Oglethorpe. 



185 



Players' Awards 




BEST ACTOR: Terry Ingerson 

BEST ACTRESS: Kay Kilpatrick 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR: Larry Davis 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS: Marti Gilreath 

SENIOR WHO HAS DONE THE MOST FOR PLAYERS': 

Terry Ingerson 




BROWN AWARD FOR THE PER- 
SON WHO HAS DONE THE MOST 
FOR PLAYERS': Charles Minors 



MacConnell Award 

Ed Moore 

The Charles M. MacConnell Award is given 
by the Sophomore Class to the Senior whom the 
class feels to have participated in many phases 
of campus life without having received full rec- 
ognition. With dedication to the ideals of Ogle- 
thorpe University ever in view, this Senior has 
given services without thought for the furthering 
of his personal reputation. 




186 




Ben Parker 
Law Award 

Jeff Wallen 



The Ben Parker Law Award is given yearly 
to the student who shows the most promise in 
the field of law. The recipient of this award 
is chosen by the Oglethorpe Business Division. 



Chemical Rubber Publishing 
Company Aivard 



The Chemical Rubber Pub- 
lishing Company awards are 
given to students who show 
outstanding achievement in 
freshman courses in the vari- 
ous scientific fields. 

MATHEMATICS: Frank Fort 
CHEMISTRY: Carl Dinerman, 
Jeff Hayden 
PHYSICS: Dennis Kerr 



?'f5 r 







Sally Hull Weltner 
Scholarship Award 

Sara Mac Germano 



The Sally Hull Weltner Award is presented by the 
Oglethorpe University Woman's Club to the Senior 
Woman who has achieved the highest average of any 
woman in tlie graduating class. 

The attaining of this average shows scholastic excel- 
lence to which this student aspires. 




188 




Faculty Scholarship Award 

Walter Earl Music 



The Faculty Scholarship Award is given 
each year to the Senior man who has attained 
the highest scholastic average of any man in 
the graduating class. By the awarding of this 
honor the faculty recognized the scholarly 
pursuits which it endeavors to stimulate in the 
entire student community. 



189 



Oglethorpe Cup 

H. Lynn Drury 




The James Edward Oglethorpe Award is given 
by the faculty to the Senior man who has best 
realized, the ideals of an Oglethorpe education. 
This senior has shown his ability in all phases of 
campus life. 



190 



Oglethorpe Cup 

Sara Mac Germano 



The James Edward Oglethorpe Cup is given 
to the Senior Woman who, in the opinion of the 
Oglethorpe Faculty, has best realized the ideals 
of an Oglethorpe education. This award is given 
annually to the woman who has participated ac- 
tively in the life and growth of the University. 




191 



Who's Who 
in American Colleges and Universities 



This honor recognizes those members of the Senior 
class who are officially recommended by the Student 
Government and the Faculty Council and who meet the 
requirements of the National publication, Who's Who in 
American Colleges and Universities. 

These students are those who are felt to have realized 
the highest standards of an Oglethorpe education and 
who have shown outstanding participation in all school 
activities, as well as holding positions of leadership and 
responsibility. 





GLENDA BALOWSKY 



KEN BORDEN 



192 





I'-'^^sf^u-vki^sdiKMimmtmsJiai^^^ii^ 



LYNN DRURY 



SARA MAC GERMANO 





ANNE LATIMER 



TOMMY PHILLIPS 



193 




David Hess Award 

Boh Nance 

The David Hess Award is presented 
to a Senior who has won a letter in an 
intercollegiate sport in the year in which 
the award is given and who has shown 
the ability to face failure and success 
with the same gracious attitude. The re- 
cipient also must show support of the 
athletic ideals of Oglethorpe through par- 
ticipation and assistance in the overall ath- 
letic program. 



art ?? /^ 

rop Lrow 
Humanics Aivard 

Arnold Baker 



The Humanics Award is given to the student 
who possesses a firm commitment and great 
promise in the field of youth work. This student 
must exemplify the four avenues of preparation 
and service as indicated on the Humanics Em- 
blem by the Torch, the Book, the Lamp, and the 
Helping Hand. He must also be conscientious 
in academic endeavors. 

The recipient of this award was voted on by 
the Oglethorpe Humanics students and recom- 
mended by the Local Humanics Organization and 
the Administration of Oglethorpe. His selection 
was also confirmed by the National Humanics 
Administration. 




194 






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YAM A CROW 



195 




THE THEME 





DEDICATION: Pierre L'Agneau 




BUSINESS MANAGER: Stanlet Scrooge 



EDITOR:0. U. Phinque 




FACULTY ADVISOR: Phil. Morals 




STAFF OFFICE 



196 




Burma Road paved at last. 




"Don't trade a headache for an upset stomach." 




"The radiation count just went down half a point!" 




Mother, please, I'd rather do it myself. 



197 




'"This warm response overwhelms me.' 




^ 



"Just think, me assisting Ben Casey. 




"And then he stabbed me." 




FAST, FAST, F-A-S-T RELIEF 




■'According to the latest Kinsey Report . . .' 



198 





,</ 



J 



^/ 



Shoplifting? 














■'Will the student body meeting please come to order?" 





Always late to class. 




'•But Dr. Abbott said that the South won 
the War!" 



'Now you two cut that out!" 



199 



PREPARATIOxN, GROWTH, ACHIEVEMENT— these are the processes 
which will enhance individual adaption to the world in which one finds 
himself. 

We the members of the BOOSTER CLUB, congratulate the class of 1963 
in the progress you have made in your college career. It is hoped that we 
have contributed in some way to your education by supporting and em- 
phasizing the physical as mental aspects of growth. 

We welcome you into our organization and look fonvard to your support of 
Oglethorpe's activities and the upholding of her ideals. 







gk % 





CARTER 

THEATERS 

BUCKHEAD THEATER 

3110 Roswell Rd. 

Nor+hside Home of all first 
run hits 




2835 Peachfree Rd. 



What is Success? 

It's struggling on with the will 
to win, but taking loss with a 
cheerful grin; it's sharing 
sorrow and work and mirth, 
and making better this good 
old earth; it's serving, striving 
through strain and stresses; it's 
doing your noblest. 

That's success. 



Best Wishes from 

L G. BALFOUR 
COMPANY 



Office: 

3330 Peachtree Rd., N.E. 

Atlanta 5, Georgia 

Representative — Mollis Britt 




GAY'S 
SERVICE STATION 



Compliments of 

and 
Best Wishes from 



American Oil Company 

Atlas Tires, Batteries and 
Accessories 



LOVABLE BRASSIERE 
COMPANY 



4045 Peachtree Rd., N.E. 
CE 3-9221, CE 7-5255 



2400 Piedmont Road, N.E. 

at Garson Drive 

Atlanta 5, Georgia 

PHONE: CE 7-1671 



202 



DEKALB SPORTING 


Compliments of 




GOODS 


«. 


TOM COLLINS 


1237 Clairmont Road 
DR 8-7588 


BROOKHAVEN 
PHARMACY 

4005 Peachtree Road 


TOWN & 
COUNTRY 


Sporting Goods and Equipment 




CLEANERS 


of All Types Is Our Specialty 






— PETREL UNIFORM DESIGNERS — 


Serving all North Atlanta 

with 

Excellent Service 




Call on us for your sporting goods needs. 


and Fine Goods 




Let us serve you as we serve Oglethorpe. 












Compliments of 


Compliments of 


/^S% 


UNDERWOOD'S 


PEACHTREE 


^Jz^^^ /i/llllr 


TEXACO 


ROAD 


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SERVICE 


PHARMACY 


V^^^^^^^^^^^K^T^^^^^^^^^B^^^fiSfiSSSflnr^ 


W06 Peachtree Road, N.E. 
Atlanta 19, Georgia 


Prescription Druggists 
4062 Peachtree Road, N.E. 




CE 3-665! 


N. Atlanta 19, Ga. 


BOTTLING COMPANY OF ATLANTA 


MAX UNDERWOOD 


CE 7-6466 










203 



OSCAR BALL 
PRINTING CO. 




WING'S 

FAST 

PHOTO 




BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY BY 
THE ATLANTA COCA-COLA BOHLING COMPANY 

864 SPRING STREET, N.W., ATLANTA 8, GEORGIA 



204 



VAN'S 

Cleaners — Laundry 



247 Buckhead Ave. 



1954 Howell Mill Rd. 



3625 Peachtree Rd. 



Brlarcliff-Lavista 



4208 Peachtree Rd. 



CE 3-2133 
TR 4-7224 
CE 7-3882 
ME 4-7515 
CE 7-6636 



FOREMOST 
DAIRIES, INC. 



MILK 



ICE CREAM 



2711 Piedmont Road. N.E. 
CEdar 3-9431 



CONGRATULATIONS TO STUDENTS 

OF OGLETHORPE ON YOUR 1963 YAMACRAW 

We were proud to be a part of it. 



CLIFF AND EBBA JUNE HARDEN 




HARDEN HOUSE OF PHOTOGRAPHY 

1769 Cheshire Bridge Rd., N.E. 

Atlanta, Georgia 

(Negatives of all class pictures will be kept 
on file for future re-orders) 



FRITO-LAY, 
INC. 



4950 Peachtree 
Industrial Boulevard 
CHAMBLEE, GEORGIA 




MONTAG 
PAPER 

for all occasions 



^\fP(J^'/^ 



writing papers 
that create an impression 

MONTAG'S 

Atlanta, Georgia 



205 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



of 



OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY 

A Message to the Class of '63 



Soon you will leave Oglethorpe University bearing a diplonna sought by many, but received by a few. The 
memory of the campus may wane, but the warm, friendly spirit found here will remain with you always. We 
hope you will return for frequent visits to rekindle this school spirit, to keep in touch with your classmates. 

As an Oglethorpe graduate you will have received the finest undergraduate education obtainable — for a 
purpose. You have an obligation to yourself and to society to apply your attained skills, understanding and 
ethical values to improve the lot of mankind. 

You are not alone in this task. More than five thousand alumni who have preceded you share this responsi- 
bility for bettering the social process. They make themselves available to you should you need them. 

We congratulate you for your academic achievement and welcome you to the swelling ranks of the National 
Alumni Association of Oglethorpe University. 



1% t|d|r _^«^4f 




206 



ORKIN 





WORLD'S LARGEST 


COMPLIMENTS 


PEST CONTROL 


of 


COMPANY 


ALEX 
HAIR 


SCIENTIFIC 
PEST 


STYLES 


CONTROL 




SURETY BONDED 
TERMITE CONTROL 




OGLETHORPE 
PHARMACY 



'For all your medical and 

drug supplies ..." 
Serving North Atlanta with 



EXPERT 

PRESCRIPTION 

SERVICE 

AND 

FREE DELIVERY 



Open Daily From 
8:30 A.M. Until 10:30 P.M. 

2150 Johnson Ferry Road 
GL 7-4436 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



A FRIEND 



207 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



A FRIEND 



208 



In Appreciation 




Unknown to our Editor, we the staff have resei-ved this space in order 
to express our sincere appreciation to our editor — Anne Latimer. 

From working long hours in the dark room to drawing up layouts, Anne 
has contributed far more than her share to the publication of this book. 



209 




. rop Crow • 



210 



In Memoriam 



He will be lastingly remembered for his sincere interest 
in and concern for the students of Oglethorpe. He taught 
by the example of his own life the principles of human 
kindness. No words can say what the heart feels, but the 
lives of those who knew him can pay him tribute in fol- 
lowing his lead. 



211 



TAYLOR PUBLISHING COMPANY 

"The World's Best Yearbooks Are Taylor-made" 



Yf AR600KS /