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Full text of "Yamacraw, 1965"

3^ 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/yamacraw196534ogle 




Editor — Suzy Straub 

Business Manager — Ed Garrett 

Photographers — Jim Brown 
(Color Photography) 

— Fred Ackley 

Faculty- Advisor — 
Prof. Harold M. Shafron 



YAMACRAW 



1965 




Oglethorpe University 
Atlanta, Georgia 



CHANGE AND GROWTH 

. . . have characterized the pattern of life at 
Oglethorpe this year. Welcoming a new presi- 
dent was the first big step. 

Yet there are some things that do not 

change . . . 









CHANGES ARE EVIDENT 

/// cdDipus unproirDients and repdirs. Expansion and a building pro- 
gram are parts of a dejinte jiitiire. Equally important is the change in 
the name of the school. Henceforth the school will be known as Ogle- 
thorpe College, a name more in keeping with the nature and purpose 
of the Oglethorpe ideal. Change has come rapidly this year, but tnuch 
that is essential to life and study at Oglethorpe remains and forms the 
building stone for future progress. Many of the routine aspects of life 



at Oglethorpe go unchanged, too 









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The companionship of Great Hall, friendly and earnesl discus- 
sion over ii cup of coffee, concentration on a Lihoratory assignment, 
these things stay a part of the memory and life of Oglethorpe. 





THE ACADEMIC SPIRIT CONTINUES 




10 



This is the way Oglethorpe students Ih'e and play and study. Faces 
will change, the school will progress and grow, but every Ogle- 
thrope student will retain his own special mernory of the time he 
spent here and more will come to make their ou'n tnemories about 
life and study at Oglethorpe. 




^yb^■^^^N^^^■*^y« -"^^ v-'*«ewf>f 





II 





// is this record of student life and the beauty 
of our campus, caught in the midst of transition, 
yet continuing on in much the same way as ever 
in taken-for-granted things that we often overlook 
and fail to appreciate, that the 1963 YAMA- 
CRAW-^ has sought to capture. 








12 




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W^e, the slaff of the 1963 YAMACRAW and 
the students of Oglethorpe, wish to dedicate this 
record of student life and of our school to some- 
one who is a vital part of that life and that school. 
His willingtiess and ability to listen, understand, 
encourage, and help have inspired our confidence 
both in him and ourselves. He has helped us to 
grow academically and in self-understanding. 

Because one of the avowed purposes of a small 
school is to close the distance between students and 
faculty and he has done so much to bridge that 
gap, we dedicate this book to 

ROY N. GOSLIN 



14 








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16 





FACULTY 




17 



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Looking Forward 
to a Progressive 
Tomorrow, Oglethorpe 
Inaugurates a 
New President . . . 



DR. PAUL R. BEALL 



June 1965 



Greetings to all Oglethorpians! 

This is my first year with you, and since I am writing this greeting in February 
(for ail that the page is dated June), my first and strongest feeling is to thank ail 
of you again for the cordial welcome you have given me. I find that every prospect 
pleases. I like the cut of our students, the skill of our faculty, the dedication of 
our trustees, and the opportunity that is Atlanta in 1965. 

I know a high school sophomore, a person very dear to me, who told me the other 
day that one of her high school teachers had said, "Understand that you do not 
come to high school for an education, but only to prepare so that you can get 
into college. There you will receive your education." 

Contrary to this, we think that education begins on Day One and continues, for 
those who truly live, to Day Last. 

What is the point of all of this? I speak of the importance of NOW. 

Boss Kettering said wisely, "We are interested in the future because that is where 
we will spend the rest of our lives." Note, though, that the only reality of "future" 
is that instant we call NOW. To quote from ancient Sanskrit, 

"For yesterday is but a Dream 

And tomorrow only a Vision. 

But today well lived makes 

Every yesterday a Dream of Happiness, 

And every tomorrow a Vision of Hope. 

Look well therefore to this Day!" 

I think we live in a great day — a day of good living and a day of wholesome growing 
for Oglethorpe College. It is a pleasure to be with you. 

Sincerely, 
PAUL R. BEALL 
PRESIDENT 



18 




DR. PAUL R. BEALL, President 



19 




GEORGE C. SEWARD 

B.A., Ph.D. 

Dean of Admissions 




MRS. JOAN F. BARTON 

Assistant Registrar 







MRS. BETTY J. 
HUDDLESTON 

Admissions Secretary 




MRS. JUNE H. CONLEY j f 

Cashier *-' 





THOMAS W. CHANDLER 

Librarian 



MRS. JEANNE B. CRESSY 

Secretary to the President 




SEWELL P. 
EDWARDS 

Campus Security 
Officer 




MRS. LOIS ALBRIGHT 

Receptionist 



20 





MRS. IRIS MAGID 

Alumni Secretary 



MRS. DOROTHY G. 
RICHARDSON 

Assistant Librarian 




MRS. MILDRED M. JACOB 

Bookkeeper 



MISS GLENDA J. BALOWSKY 
Assistant Registrar 





MRS. JOYCE B. MINORS 
Alumni Director 




ROBERT J. MOHAN 

Field Representative 




The 

Administrative 

Staff Keeps 

a Close 

Check on 

Campus Affairs. 



1 




R 



MRS. CAROL G. TUCKER 

Bursar 




MRS. MARJORIE M. .\facCOXXELL 
Registrar 



MRS. RUTH F. LOVELL 

Manager of Book Store 
and Post Office 



itf^fcjij 



MRS. TRIGG 

Science Secretar>' 



MRS. LENORE WATKINS 

Visiting Nurse 




A Weil-Rounded Education Includes 

Knowledge of the Elements of 

History, Government, and 

Citizenship 





A. CHEEVER CRESSY 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Political Science 

Professor of International Relations 



MARTIN ABBOTT 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
American History 
Professor of History, Assistant Dean 



LEO BILANCIO 

B.A., M.A., 
Associate Professor of History 






H. RANDALL DOSHER 

B.A., MA. 
Assistant Professor of History 






11 




PHILIP F. PALMER 
B.A , MA. 

Government 
Associate Professor of Government 



The Division of Citizenship seeks to develop among 
all students of Oglethorpe an awareness in breadth 
and in depth of the political, social, cultural, and eco- 
nomic forces that have shaped the past and the present 
and will influence the future. To this end, the depart- 
ment pivots around a common core program which ex- 
tends over a four year period. This program concen- 
trates on providing students with a broad background 
in the specific areas of world history, principles and 
practices of economics and government, and culminates 
with a course in international relations that integrates 
the three fields already mentioned into a meaningful 
synthesis. The department feels that it is only through 
an intelligent awareness of these factors that a person 
can fully understand the manner in which modern-day 
America relates to the world community and thus un- 
derstand the privileges and responsibilities of citizens not 
only of the United States but of the world community. 




MRS. BEVERLY K. SCHAFFER 

B.A. 

Economics 

Assistant Professor of Economics 



HAROLD M. SHAFROX 

B.A., MA. 

Economics 

Associate Professor of Economics 





RICHARD M. RESER 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Sociology 

Professor of Sociology 



PETER N. MAYFIELD 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Psychology 

Instructor in Psychology 






GUNNAR H. BERG 

B.S. in Ed., M.A., Ed.D. 

Humanics 



The Division of Community Service offers a broad curriculum to 
those who are planning to spend their future working with people. 
This program is aimed at enhancing the depth, breadth, and precision 
of our knowledge about human conduct. Through an extensive 
survey of the Lynwood section of DeKalb County directed by Dr. 
Richard M. Reser, head of the division, during the year, many prob- 
lems were explored and discussed and solutions were suggested to 
the county officials. Through projects such as this, through student 
teaching, through an active intercollegiate sports schedule, and through 
the training of public servants in the humanities, the division of com- 
munity ser\'ice promotes Oglethorpe's future — not only as an institution 
of higher learning, but as a public servant to the surrounding com- 
munity. 



24 



MRS. EDITHGENE SPARKS 

B.A. in Ed., M.Ed. 

Teacher Education 

Assistant Professor of Education 



Psychology, Teacher 

Education, Humanics, 

Sports . . . 

All These Help to 

Promote 

Oglethorpe's 

Future as It 

Serves the 

Community. 






BILLY W. CARTER 

B.A., M.A. 

Assistant Ojach 

Director of Phrsical Education 



ELGIN F. MacCONNELL 

B.A.. MA. 

Teacher Education 

Assistant Professor of Education 



#■ 




GARLAND F. 
PINHOLSTER 

B.S.. AtA. 

Head Coach 

Associate Professor of Physical 

Education 

Director of Development and 

Assistant to the President 



Classes are small and personal 




An Essential 
Part of an 
Oglethorpe 
Education Is 
Learning to 
Understand the 
True Nature 
of Man 



VANDALL K. BROCK 

B.A., M.A., M.F.A. 

Literature 

Assistant Professor of English 





WENDELL H. BROWN 

B.S., M.A. 

Humanities Sequence 

Professor of Humanities 




MRS. LUCILE Q. AGNEW 

B.A., M.A. 

English 

Assistant Professor of English 



THOMAS L. ERSKINE 

B.A., M.A. 

English 

Instructor in English 




ARTHUR BIELER 

B.A., M.A,, Docteur de I'Universite 

Languages 

Professor of Modern Languages 



HARRY M. DOBSON 

Institute of Musical Arts 

Study in Berlin, 

Fountainbleu, London. 

Music 

Assistant Professor of Music 






MRS. 



ELAINE G. DANCY 
B.A., M.A. 
English 
Assistant Professor of English 




DU.\NE E. HANSON 

B.A.. M.FJi. 

Art 

Instructor in Art 



27 




MRS. RAYMONDE HILLEY 

LL.B., M.Ph. 

French 

Instructor in French 




KEN NISHIMURA 
B.A., B.D. 

Philosophy 
Instructor in Philosophy 



ROBERT W. LOFTIN 

B.A., M.A. 
Philosophy 
Assistant Professor in Philosophy 



i 




28 



GEORGE C. SEWARD 

B.A , Ph.D. 

Philosophy 

Professor of Philosophy 

Dean of the College 



1 





MRS. INGE MANSKI LUNDEEX 

Curtis Institute and 

Metropolitan Opera Company 

Chorus 

Instructor in Voice 



MOHAMED KIAN 

B.S., M.S. 

Psychology 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 



The Division of Human Understanding, headed by 
Wendell H. Brown, has as its major theme the develop- 
ment and advancement of man's essential humanness. 

Through an extensive study of the nature of the western 
world, the student observes change and pattern in history. 
By examining the past, he learns of man's nature, and 
equipped with this knowledge, he is able to live a good 
life as well as earn a good living. 

Language, art, music, and philosophy all combine 
to give the student an overall understanding of the ad- 
vancement of man and his society. 





MARIA de NORONHA SHAFROX— F.R.S.A. 

B.A.: Art Students League 

Instructor in Art 



29 



Through Scientific 

Study and 

Research Our 

Future Is Insured 




LOIS F. WILLIAMSON 

B.A., M.Ed. 

Biology 

Assistant Professor in Biology 



J. KENNEDY HODGES 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Chemistry 
Professor in Chemistry 



MISS E. VIRGINIA BOWERS 
B.A., M.S. 
Biology 
Instructor in Biology 



MRS. PATRICIA A. HULL 

B.S., M.S. 

Physics 

Instructor in Physics and Mathematics 






'^ 



The Division of Science seeks to train the stu- 
dent in such a manner that he is able to recognize 
and explore the interaction between science and 
human affairs. Although the sciences are divided 
into a great number of specialties, there is a funda- 
mental background to all. At Oglethorpe science 
courses are designed to provide this needed back- 
ground in preparation for future study. Through the 
stimulation of scientific inquiry, members of the 
science division encourage the student to search 
for development of new products and discoveries 
in a world which is putting more and more emphasis 
on scientific advancement. 



\ 


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la 


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JOSEPH 
B.S. 


M. BRANHAM 
, M.S., Ph.D. 


Biology 
Associate Professor of Biology 





SAML'EL STERXBERG 

B.Ch.E.. M.S. 

Chemistry 

Instructor in Chemistry 



GEORGE F. WHEELER 

B.A., M.A. 

Physics 

Associate Professor of Physics 






WILLIAM A. EGERTON 

Studies at University of 

Tennessee Law School 

Business Law 

Professor of Business Administration 



Tricks of 

Business 

Administration 

Are Sometimes 

Hard to Learn 




JAMES R. MILES 

B.A., B.S., M.B.A. 

Business Math, Accounting 

Professor in Business Administration 



The purpose of the Division of Business is to equip the prospective businessman 
with the knowledge and aptitudes essential for solving situations in critical areas 
of business operation. Business math, Business Law, and Accounting are part of the 
program designed to prepare business majors for a successful future in their chosen 
professions. Machines of the type that may be used in the business world are available 
for the student's use. Upon completing these courses a student should be prepared to 
meet any professional situation that may be presented to him. 



32 




THEODORE R. McCLURE, 
B.A., M.A. 
English 
Instructor in English 



JR. 




ROBERT A. ERMENTROUT 

A.B., M.A. 

History 

Instructor in History and Government 




The Oglethorpe program is extended to 
an Evening Division where one is able to 
receive the benefit of full-time college 
training as a part-time student. 



MRS. FRANCES D. DOUGLAS 

A.B., M.Ed. 

Teacher Education 

Instructor of Teacher-Education 



Oglethorpe's 

Program Is 

Also Extended 

to an 

Evening Division 




GRADY L. RANDOLPH 

B.S. in Ed., LL.B., M.A. 

History 

Instructor of History 






IGNACIO JStERINO 

B.A.&S., Ph.L.D. 

Spanish 

Instructor in Spanish 



MRS. GEORGIA O. MOORE 

B.B.A. 

Accounting 

Instructor in Business 



GEORGE O. KUNKLE 

B.A. 

Philosophy 

Instructor in Philoscphy 



33 






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CLASSES 




35 



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Seniors . . 



36 







Class officers are Pat Abbott, Parliamentarian; Hank Alexander, Vice-President; Jack Grubb. President; and Billy Parker, 
Treasurer. Not pictured is Carolyn Adams, Secretary. 



Swing Into Their Last Year 



37 



Senior Poem — 1965 



A beginning — the Fall, when mornings are chilly 

And afternoons bright. The brisk season of our lives. 

Leaves furl expectantly from their sources 

Meeting the chill of an inevitable winter. 

Before the frost are days of the unexpected — 

Sensations that resemble exaltation and depression. 

Orientation to the long-awaited experience 

That is to temper our thoughts, feelings, and actions. 

For those who become involved it is a dynamic 

Process — of give and take — and infinite meaning. 

The dominant character of our new era is discovered. 

The Medium to seek greater wisdom shrouded 

In deep, secretive days that can never 

Be held close enough again. 

The sting of winter, a quiet, grey January, and with it 

The classroom, the group related through thought 

And experience. Study, some is required, 

But only earnestly pursued by a few. 

The inspiring principles that we hope will 

Pervade even the roughest weather. 

The gradual sense of membership, 

The closeness of a time in-between — 

In the gameroom — coffee — a chat — 

The fervor of basketball season — another 

Part of learning the "game." 

It happens too fast to think and can 

Never be replayed. 

Then — no more time. 

The visible joy of spring — the comfort of electric days and warm, 

clinging nights. 
The growing need to taste and touch 
All of earth's progeny. 
The passion for times lived and the 
Laurel that fits any head. 
The vernal span that provokes 
An effortless energy and at times 
A solemnity, an awareness, and a 
Realization. 

Summer, like a senior year, comes too quickly, without transition. 
Bringing gratification and a last 
Grasp for the illusive spirit of 
An institution for higher learning. 
The baccalaureate has been given 
The graduation programs are swept away 
Life here is not over. It only 
Enters the new dimension of memory. 
And another beginning. 
Whatever we remember — however 
Often we recall "the thing we did 
In College" — these will all be united 
Into one common denominator — 
Oglethorpe. 

CARLEE BELL 




Pat Abbott 



38 



Larry S. Abner 



Carolyn Adams 




George D. Alexander 



William H. Alexander 




Renee Alhadeff 



Joyce T. Bacon 




Peter D. Bacon 



Lanier Baowell 



39 




Jimmy D. Bass 



S. Carlee Bell 




Shawn M. Boles 



Patricia J. Bowden 



Donald J. Brady 




Alice A. Briscoe 



Ann M. Brown 



40 




Connie Brown 



James Brown 




Mary L. Browne 



Brenda A. Buice 



James E. Carroll 




R. Joe Carter 



Barry F. Champion 



41 




James D. Connelly 



Jane Lee Conner 




Kathy S. Cowart 



Roy Cowart 



J. Thomas Crouch 




Sam L. Cunningham 



Dave S. Davies 



42 




Elizabeth A. Davis 



Pamela J. Duffey 




Valerie Duncan 



Matthew L. Gardner 



Edward Garrett 




Vivian R. Gray 



Jackson Grubb 



43 




Gloria D. Haug 



Judith A. Hayden 




Ben T. Hargrove 



James V. Hartlage 



James P. Henson 




Sharon Friedrich 



Carol F. King 



44 




Roger H. Kitchens 



Betty M. Klaudt 




Ethel C. Lambert 



Elaine T. Law 



Franklin E. Mahaffev 




Edna Maleson 



Diana C. McClurkin 



45 




Penelope A. McCulloch 



Grant McDonald 




Michael L. McQueen 



Nancy H. Northcutt 



Connie B. Olson 




William H. Parker 



Jon L. Preu 



46 




Clark D. Raby 



Glenn W. Rainey 




Glen C. Rose 



Linda G. Roy 



Linda L. Sanders 




S. Lynne Schaefer 



Mary A. Schroeder 



47 




Rosalie B. Seidel 



James Alton Sexton 




Harvey J. Shaffer 



Dorothy S. Sharp 



L. Barrett Smith 




Phyllis L. Smith 



Barbara Southard 



48 




John C. Stevens 



Elizabeth R. Ste\'enson 




Suzy Straub 



Ray M. Thomas 



Benjamin H. Vincent 




Margaret A. Warrell 



Ha>'\\'ood E. Waters 



49 






Juniors . . . 



50 




i 

Class officers are Sally Kerr, President; Kate McNeil, Treasurer; Steve Anderson, Parliamentaiian; Carole Moore, Secretary; and 
Frank Hughes, Vice-President. 



Jump Into Campus 
Life 






Warren Q. Adams 
James S. Anderson 




Feltpn Bohannon 
Cheryl Butterfield 
Gwyn Cannon 
John L. Cason 



William Cason 
Lennie Christie 
Curtis C. Cook 
Ronald Darracott 



52 




Carl E. Dinerman 
Wallace Douglass 



Nancy Fields 
Bill Garrigan 
Edward Gerson 
Susan Goodchild 



Walker Heard 
Jeff Hayden 
Frank Hughes 
Norman Hurd 




Mimi Elrod 
James R. Essam 
Melanie Everitt 



53 



Tomoko Ida 
Ted Johnson 





Rebecca E. Kirkland 
Philip Leftwich 
Stuart Levenson 



Jerry Meaders 
Kate McNeil 
Carole Moore 
John Nevin 






spruce Newman 
James Nissley 
Pete Outhwaite 
Yahya Pamir 



54 




Ellintt Schwartz 
Craig O. Smith 
Gar)' L. Stowers 
Michael Streicker 



Joseph J. Strenk 
Theresa M. Tarrant 
Larry White 
Jon Wordell 



55 






Sophomores . 



56 




Class officers are Caroline Kelly, treasurer; Robert Richards, President; Pokey Therrell Vice-President; Kenny Smith, Parliamentarian; and Tina- 
Varn, Secretary. 



Hit the Slump 



57 








Sandy J. Abbott 
Frederic Ackley 
Penny H. Alexander 



Arthur Armstrong 
Thomas M. Baird 
Cheryl J. Baker 



Eddie H. Bennett 
Dana Climer 



Joe C. Bentley 
Edear C. Daffin 



Ana G. Citarella 
Johnnie A. Dobbs 



Nancy L. Charnley 
Adrian S. Elson 




58 



Mary Alice Etheridge 
George Fannon 
Thomas B. Free 



George W. Greer 
Babs E. Halstead 
June K. Harris 




Thomas W. Hassert 
Caroline Kelly 



Andrew I. Holland 
George M. Key 



James Jackson 
William Lozier 



Jacquelyn Jones 
Tim Marx 




59 




Rhonda L. Maxey 
Nicholas I. Pennington 



Lila K. McGahee 
Nancy PhiUips 



Susan Mosteller 
Thomas L. Reilly 



Dianne Ottowitz 
Robert Richards 



Ilene L. Roos 
John R. Singletary 



Floyd D. Ruhl 
Kenny Smith 



Larry C. Shattles 
Susan Snowden 



Anne M. Sherwood 
Charles Stepp 




60 




Sophomores spend long hours in lab. 



Marilyn D. Tatum 
F. Len Willis 



Pokey Therrell 
M. Emily Wright 



Tina Varn 
Barbara Youmans 



Ellen T. Verdel 
Louis F. Young 





i^/'f •''■}« --V — ■'' '':■'■ 



61 





I 




Freshmen . . . 



62 




Class Officers are Jay Strong, Parliamentarian; Doug Alexander, President; Bob Johnson, Vice-President; Anita Sloane. Treasurer; and 
Yetty Levenson, Secretary. 



Survive First Year. 



63 



Anne M. Alexander 
Doug Alexander 
Susan Alexander 
Beverly Jo Amos 



Donna L. Anderson 
Marie B. Anderson 
James K. Andrews 




Judy Ball 
Charlene Barlow 



Charles Astin 
Valera Bagwell 




Richard Binkney 



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Sarah Bricker 
Ellen Brown 
Elsa Buenaventura 
Nancy A. Byron 



64 



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William P. Carson 
Joy B. Conklin 
Dick E. Davis 
John Davis 




Kenneth W. Henritze 
Kathy Hess 
Gerald Holhster 
Robert E. Johnson 



65 



Frank Kamor 
Susan J. Kellogg 
Sandra A. Kent 
Linda D. King 



Evan G. Lea 
Yetty T. Levenson 
Roger A. Littell 



Marcia Lloyd 
Janice Lymburner 





John McCook 
Caria E. McDaniel 



Nancy L. Mitchell 
Robert J. Nash 
Russell W. Ogle 



dVM^^ 



\ 




Andy Oschack 
David Phillips 
Carolee Piatt 
Paul G. Rechtman 



66 



William M. Sheddan 
Suzanne E. Shirley 
John S. Sims 




Bonnie Roberts 
Harold Rountree 
Jerry W. Sams 
Joe E. Shapard 



Anita M. Sloane 
Courtenay H. Smith 



John W. Sognier '^'■l'-'^ 



Mary S. Spahr 




Redden K. Timmons 
George G. Watson 
Aubrey Whitaker 
Jimmy Wilson 




Bonnie Tash 
Jennifer Thomas 
Naomi E. Thomas 



67 




68 





ACTIVITIES 





Out in the Snow 



Sandy — the snow girl. 



^?^'^1.^^<^LW^1 




Snow covered the campus and transformed it into a wintry 
wonderland. Snowball fights and snowmen sprang up all 
over the campus as students braved the cold to enjoy the white 
stuff. 




Better not turn around, Floyd. 



Next game on ice skates. 




70 




This fond is ahhhhhiihlihlih! 




Meanwhile, down in the Game Room 




"No, it's not a bill 



In From the Snow 



— back to normal. Campus life settles down into its 

usual routine. 




Love is (sprendid). 





Sandy Abbott 




Ed Daf fin 




Rat Court plans dim- work 




Cheryl Baker 



HIGH PRIEST 
Hank Alexander 



The 



R 

A 
T 




Tim Marx 




72 




c 

o 

u 

R 
T 






HIGH PRIESTESS 
Jane Lee Conner 



welcomes 
Rats' 



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Pokey Therrell 





Diane Ottowitz 




Robert Richards 









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Anyone for vaseline sandwiches? 



Len Willis 



73 




and to bind the Freshman class info a single unit. 



74 



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Rat Week may be rather strenuous at times 




as upperclassmen trj- to subdue rebellious Rats, 




but in the end, it's all worth it 



and Miss Rat, Sally Bricker, and ^^r. Rat, 
Jerry Sams, are chosen. 




Seniors receive their caps! 





The Duchess Club serves at the President's Reception after the Capping Ceremony. 



Psst ... fix your robe. 




Old friends chat about the coming year. 



76 




Seniors listen to a message for the future. 





Mr. Goodwin gives the address. 




George is capped for his class. 



77 




Faculty and students find time 

at the 



Jimmy and Beth enjoy the evening. 




National Civit Cat Day??? 



73 




for fun 
Fall Formal 




Has anyone ever told you that 




The Bealls meet Oglethorpe snidenis. 




Well, I can even play Chopsticks with my hands crossed. 



79 




The Great Pumpkin visits Great Hall. 




The bloodchilling Mr. Loftin prepares to put 
a hex on his audience. 






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Home . 



80 



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Students 
take part 
in Halloween 
traditions at 
Ghost Story 
Readings 




Readings are held in Great Hall. 




of the bats???? 



Ghost Story Readings are a traditional part of the 
witching season at Oglethorpe. Under the sponsorship of 
the Players, faculty and students are invited to participate 
in reading spooky stories on Halloween Eve. 



-C-' 




SADIE HAWKINS is the 

one day in the year when 
every girl gets her man . . . 




. one way or the other! 







"slippin' and slidin' " 




Marryin' Sam ! 



82 



Boar's Head Ceremony Marks 
Beginning of Christmas Season 




y^- 



Christmas joy revealed in eyes of children. 




Everyone joins in singing carols. 





Jon and Ray lead fraternity into ceremony. 




Refreshments follow ceremonv. 



83 



p;r 



Welcome Alumni — to 1965 
Homecoming! 




Freshman boys take the trophy with this display under the direction of Gil Watson! 




"Petrel Train" 
Freshman and Sophomore girls 



84 



"Profiles in Courage" 
Junior and Senior girls 





Last year's Queen, Mrs. Jane Lincoln Bundy escorted by Dr. Paul Beall and Mr. Ottis 
J Jackson. 



Excitement begins . . . Freshmen recei%'e trophy 




Tense moments ahead as everj'one awaits the announcement of 1965 homecoming Queen 



^' 



Congratulations, Jane Lee! 



85 



Homecoming Queen 1965 . . . 




Miss Jane Lee Conner 



86 



. . . And Court 




SALLY KERR 

Sponsored by the 
Junior Class 



POKEY THERRELL 

Sponsored by Boar's Head 
Honorary Fraternity 




^V 



MARIE ANDERSON 
Sponsored by the Freshman Class 




JUDITH ANN HAYDEN 

Sponsored by Le Conte Honorary 

Science Society 




Students Have 
Ball to Announce 
Lord and Lady 
Oglethorpe 






Pat Abbott and Jimbo Hartlage 



Jane Lee Conner and Tommy Crouch 



Court Members 





i^^a^^-TT:- -^ 



Linda Sanders and Jack Grubb 



Suzv Straub and Shawn Boles 



89 





LORD OGLETHORPE - GEORGE ALEXANDER 




90 



Lord Oglethorpe receives his crown 





Lady Oglethorpe receives her crown. 




LADY OGLETHORPE - JUDITH HAYDEN 





Student Weekend Brings Company to the Campus 




Who wore that ten gallon pocketbook in here? 





The magic genie will pop out of the bottle and , 



Caroline, don't laugh so loud. 




92 



Let's, all join in and sing. 




Did you hear that Two-gun Pete is back in town? 




93 



Dramatic Abilities Revealed . . . 





Audience awaits opening. 







Escapees . 



from a French play. 



In a Series of Plays 



The Oglethorpe Players, under the direction of Ed Danus, switched from the tragic 
to the comic farce in the plays they presented this year. The first quarter's production 
of the Greek tragedy "The Trojan Women" highlighted the dramatic abilities of the 
Players in the story of the aftermath of the fall of Troy. 

Winter quarter they presented a series of three French plays. "The Painting" by 
Eugene loneso, "En Gggarrde" by Rene Daumal, and "The Wedding on the Eiffel 
Tower" by Jean Cocteau. 



/' 



\ 



95 




The lion attacks 



Take a Wild Cast 



of characters, crazy costumes, ingenious sets, and stir in 
the Oglethorpe Players and what have you got? — Just 
take a look . . . 





The wedding ...??? 



96 




Unreal 




Bathing beauties 




and charming usherettes. 





A Day in Autumn. 



At first glance the campus seems deserted and quiet. 
But very slowly the stillness of the quadrangle is disturbed. 
A car comes up the thermometer. Soon two coeds, dressed 
in the latest campus styles, leave Lupton Hall. 

Autumn days are filled with a flurry of activity — 
orientation, Rat Week, buying books, getting to know 
people, the hayride, weekend socials, and listening to 
introductory lectures . . . 




1 ... 
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98 




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But Then Fall Turns 



into winter and with the holidays over a grayness sets 
in — class after class, lab after lab and term paper after 
term paper. 





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. . . the companionship of a goof-off session in the dorm, 



and finally us home — or elsewhere — for spring holidays. 



YET even these gray days are relieved by 
happier times — the excitement of a formal, 
the work on a play, the satisfaction that 
comes from grasping a difficult bit of knowl- 
edge. 




iOO 





spring Brings With It 



brighter, lighter days: Days which arc doubly tinged with 
excitement over the progress and plans going on all around 
us. But the days are long and there's still time for a leisurely 
cigarette smoked in plc-ased contemplation of a finished art 
project or time to sit down on the grass and try to untangle 
that kite string. There are still labs to be done and classes to 
get to on time, but the spring air sec-ms to have breathed 
new life into all. 



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All of This 
Is Oglethorpe 



101 




He e. lino 
^ T hui%dftij^ II 00 



Smde Look 
<H lense 



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oeace' 

r.oros 



102 





ORGANIZATIONS 







103 




EDITOR-IN-CHIEF: Suzy Straub 




EXECUTIVE SECRETARY: 

Sandy Abbott 






FACULTY EDITOR: Theresa Tarrant 



Executive Stiff discusses Annual plans 
in an informal atmosphere. 



The YAMACRAW 

represents people— 



r.--::'^' 




BUSINESS MANAGER: Ed Garrett 




CLASSES EDITOR: 
Lila McGahee 



FACULTi' ADVISOR 
Harold M. Shafron 



104 




their moods in study, work, and play. 




GENERAL STAFF- Standhn!, left to right: Kenny Smith, Suzy Straub, Linda Sanders, Jane Lee Conner, Pat Abbott, Sandy Abbott. Nancy _Mitchell,_ Anita 
SloaneUk IkGahee JanKeLynburner, Connie HameU; ^ Furman, Andy Oschack, Jeff Hayden, Gil Watson, Richard Bmkney. 

Not pictured: Carolee Piatt, Tom Reilly, and Nancy Byron. 




ORGANIZATIONS EDITOR: 
Susan Goodchild 




HONORS EDITOR: 

Cirolvn Adams 



105 






The YEARBOOK STAFF works hard behind 

the scene. 




ACTIVITIES EDITOR: 

Janet Lee Conner 




PHOTOGRAPHY COORDINATOR: 

Kenny Smith 



^^f&Zf' ,<» 




SPORTS EDITOR: 

Joe Carter 




PHOTOGRAPHERS: Jim Brown, Fred Ackley. Not piclured: Jeff 
Hayden 



106 



The INTERACTIVITY COMMITTEE co-ordinates 
organizations' meeting schedules 




INTERACTIVITY COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN; 
Shawn Boles 



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Ujt to right, first row, Joe Strenk, Phil Leftwich, John Nevin; second row, Glen Rose, Suzy Stxaub, Lila McGahee; ti::rd row, Linda Sanders. Bob 
Johnson; jourth row, Judy Hayden, Jane Lee Conner, Mr. McConnell; fifth row, Pat Abbott and Dave Davies. 



107 



The HUMANICS' field-trips, retreats, 
and seminars help to broaden the knowledge 




HUMANICS OFFICERS are: Lejt to right, Dave Davies, President; Barrett Smith, First Vice-President; Sandy Abbott, Secretary; Jack Grubb, 
Treasurer; Dr. Berg, Advisor; and Gwyn Cannon, Second Vice-President. 



Oglethorpe has been unique in hav ing one of the three American Humanics Foundation 
programs in the United States. This program serves to train interested students in 
the fields of youth work, and other areas of social work. The Humanics Club is an 
integral part of this program of study, as well as being a leading organization on 
campus, sponsoring parties, dances, and service projects. 



108 



of those students interested in the 
field of social work. 








Sealed: left to right, Tomoka Ida, John Sims, Don Otwell, Barrett Smith, Craig Smith, Hari-ey Shaffer, Andy Holland, Larry Vhite, Gwyn 
Cannon. Standing: left to right, Dave Davies, Carole Moore, Sandy Abbott, Marie Anderson, Joyce Bacon, Ethel Lambert, Nancy Chamley. 
Berfa Spindler, Ben Hargrove, Jack Grubb, Frankie Mahaffey, Dr. Berg, Barry Champion. 



109 



The latest news of interest is brought 

THE 
STORMY 




Left to right: Carol King, Associate Editor; Dr. Cressy, Faculty advisor; Tommy Crouch, Editor-in-Chief; 
Craig Smith, Business Manager; John Nevin, Managing Editor. 




SPORTS STAFF: Lejt to right; Ben Hargrove, Aubrey Whitaker, Jane Stroud, Jerry Hollister; not 
pictured, Glen Rose, Editor. 




LIBERAL ARTS STAFF: Lejt to right: Beryl Folsom, Editor; Ed Gerson, plana McClurkin. 



110 



to the students through the efforts of 

PETREL ~" ' 

STAFF 




FEATURES STAFF: Left to right: Linda Sanders, Editor; Theresa Tarrant; Jay Strong; Pat Abbott; Sandy Abbott; 
and Carole Moore. 




NEWS STAFF: lejt to right: Ronald Binkney; Betsy Primm; R ichard Binkney; Bonnie Tash. Editor; John Sims; and Suzj' Straub. 



Ill 



PETREL press rolls twice a month. 




COPY STAFF: left to right: Richard Binkney; Bonnie Roberts; Valerie Duncan, Editor; and Ronald Binkney. 





PHOTOGRAPHERS: Michael Streicher and Jon Preu 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF: 

Tommy Crouch 



112 



SOCIAL COMMITTEE works and plans 
to make formals a success . . . 




Left to right: Linda Sanders, Chairman; Jane Lee Conner; Theresa Tarrant; and Suzy Straub. 



The Social Committee takes charge 
of three major social events during 
the year — the Fall Formal, The Lord 
and Lady Oglethorpe Ball, and The 
Senior Banquet and Spring Formal. 
The Social Committee is responsible 
for these events all the way from 
the first planning of the events to 
the last minute job of decorating the 
ballroom. 



The students all enjoyed the Lord and 
Lady Oglethorpe Ball sponsored by the 
Social Committee. 




113 



Intramural Sports offer 

school athletes a chance to 

participate under the guidance of 




Left to right: Joe Strenk, Charlie Stepp, Aubury Whitaker, Glen Rose, Jeff Hayden, Ben Hargrove, President. 




The 

INTRAMURAL 

COUNCIL 



Coach Carter, SPONSOR 



114 



ALPHA PHI OMEGA, the national 

service fraternity, extends its services 

to the student body. 




Bottom to top of stairs, left to right: Dave Davies, Wayne Henritze, John Sims, Gil Watson, Rick Reser, Barrett Smith. George Reid; hsck rou: 
Dr. Berg, sponsor; Joe Strenk, John Cason, president; and Bob Brady. 



APO is composed of college men 
who are or have been previously affiliated 
with the Boy Scouts of America. The 
purpose of the fraternity is to assemble 
college men in fellowship under the 
Scout Oath and Law and to promote 
service to the student body, the faculty, 
the community, and the nation. 




APO has a workday. 



115 



Long hours of practice result in 

outstanding performances presented 

by the PLAYERS 




PLAYERS: Front row, left to right: Mr. Brown, sponsor; Susan Mostellar, Nancy Fields, Beryl Folsom, Chris Cook, Carole Moore; back row, 
left to right; Frank Hughes, Alan Parker, Berta Spindler, Malin Riben, Joyce Bacon, Cheryl Butterfield, and Phil Leftwich. 




The Oglethorpe Players present 
one play or a series of plays each 
quarter. Members of the Players 
not only act, but work behind the 
scenes in all phases of the produc- 
tion. Work begins on a play at 
the beginning of each quarter or 
sometimes earlier with the selection 
of that quarter's production. Casting 
is the next step and after that all 
who are involved are increasingly 
busy up until the date of the 
presentation. Rehearsals grow in 
length and frequency while the stage 
managers slave away at producing a 
set. This year, under the direction of 
Ed Danus, the Players brought "The 
Trojan Women," a Greek tragedy, 
a series of three one-act French 
plays, and another series of two 
one-act plays by Moliere to the 
Oglethorpe stage. 



SPONSOR: 
Wendell Brown 



116 




Play Practice in action . . . 



Give me liberty, or give me death! 




Who says it's bad luck to walk under a ladder? 




Let me down, right now! 









PLAYER OFFICERS: Lefl to right. Phil Leftwich, president; Berj-I Folsoni. Secretary, Fr.ink Hughes, stage manager; Joyce Bacon, business man- 
ager; Carole Moore, vice-president. 



117 



STUDENT COUNCIL supervises 




front row, left to right: Robert Richards. Sally Kerr, Elaine Law, Shawn Boles, Jane Lee Conner; back row: Jack Grubb, George Alexander, Doug 
Alexander. 




PRESIDENT: 
George David Alexander 



118 



campus affairs . . . 




A get-acquainted Hawaiian Luau was sponsored by the Student Council. 





SECRETARY: Elaine Law 




PARLIAMENTARIAN: Tane Lee Conner 



TREASURER: Ray Thomas 



119 



HONOR COURT and COMMITTEE rule on 




Left to right: Aubrey Whitaker, Gil Watson, Marilyn Roberts, Jimbo Hartlage; b.ick row: Barrett Smith, and Tom Reiley. 



The Honor Court, composed of representatives from each class, judges all cases 
of alleged violations of the Honor Code brought before it. The Honor Committee 
investigates all alleged violations within a calendar week after the cases are laid before 
it. The Committee Chairman is responsible for summoning all witnesses to appear 
before the Court. All investigations of violations are kept secret unless the actused 
is judged guilty by the Honor Court. 



120 



Code Infractions 




CHAIRMAN OF THE HONOR COURT: 
James V. Hartlage 



CHAIRMAN OF THE HONOR COMMITTEE: 
Sharon Friedrich 




121 



The O.U. CHORUS provides a 
musical note to campus affairs 




CHORUS MEMBERS: Left to right: Tom Free, Kerby Timmons, Miguel Rivarola, Malin Riben, Berta Spindler, Carole Moore, Diane Donnelly, 
Kenny Smith, Gwyn Cannon; pianist: Peggy Youngblood. 




DIRECTOR 

Inge Manski Lundeen 



The chorus, under the direction of Mrs. 
Lundeen, presented a program of traditional 
Christmas music for the annual Boar's Head 
Ceremony. This year the Ceremony was televised 
and the music of the chorus was a major part 
of the televised program. 



122 



The YOUNG DEMOCRATS were thrilled 
with the 1964 Presidential election 

of Johnson. 




Back row. left to right: Roger Kitchens, John Cason, John Sims, Steve Anderson, Michael Streicher, Bill Garrigan, Lynne Schaefer, Susan _ Jane 
Kellogg; front roiv, left to right: Beryl Folsom, Berta Spindler, Valerie Duncan, Diana McClurkin, Mr. Palmer, sponsor; Carl Bergman, president: 
and Ed Gerson. 




Johnson wins mock election poll held on Oglethorpe campus. 



1964-65 was the chaner year for the Ogle- 
thorpe chapter of the Young Democrats. They 
began the year as "Young Citizens for Johnson" 
and after the Presidential election secured a new 
charter as part of the national and state organi- 
zation of Young Democrats. The group does 
volunteer work for the Democratic party and 
encourages the active participation of young 
citizens in pohtics. 



123 



Good sportsmanship and marksmanship are 
the aim of the O.U. GUN CLUB 




first row. left to right: Chief Sewell Edwards, Chris Cook, Jane Stroud, Naomi Thomas, Ben Vincent, Frank Hughes; second row, left to right: 
Mark Gray, Kathy Starcher, Peggy Warrell, Shawn Boles, Caroline Kelly, Judy Ponturo, and Anne Alexander. Not pictured: Fred Ackley. 



Ready, Aim, 
FIRE! 




124 



The Episcopal students are enlightened 

by challenging speakers and discussions 

throughout the year in the CANTERBURY CLUB 




Lef/ to right: Valerie Duncan, Rev. Milton Cowert, Ber)-1 Folsom. Carol King, and Michael Streicher. 




The Canterbury Club is the organization for 
Episcopal students on campus. Canterbun- 
serves as a challenging outlet for student 
opinion. Discussion focuses on current events, 
social problems, and issues and developments 
within the church. 

As part of its program for this year Canterbury 
sponsored a campus-wide Speakers' Series. 
Such noted speakers as Eugene Patterson, editor 
of the Atlanta Constitution, and James Townsend 
spoke at the invitation of the Canterburj" Club. 



James Townsend speaks ar one of 
Canterbury's Lecture series. 



125 



The creativity of XINGU is 
enjoyed throughout the school 










Left to right: Pauline Metcalf, treasurer; Diana McClurkin, president; Beryl Folsom; Carlee Bell; Mrs. Agnew, Peter Bacon, vice president; Phil 
Leftwich; not pictured: Sharon Friedrich, secretary. 



Xingu is an honoraiy organization for English majors and majors in related fields. 
This group of students study literature and in their meetings learn to enjoy it more 
fully through research and discussion. The emphasis is put on creativity in work done 
by the members themselves. Xingu serves to recognize those students who have shown 
outstanding interest and ability in the field of literature. It also serves the school in 
a larger sense through the contributions of its members to the Literary Magazine. 



126 



Recreational facilities for O.U. are improved by 

the willing work of the 
STUDENT UNION 










■'" J^^^ 




Left to right: Judy Hayjen, Jane Lee'Conner, Susan Goodchild, Suzy Straub, Carolee Piatt, and Mary Lee Brunt. 




The Student Union works hard 
on improvements of Game- 
Room facilities. One of their 
projects this year was a new set 
of lighting fixtures for the 
Game-Room. 



This Game-Room mood is that of leisure. 



127 





128 





*<s***Wi''^^Pi^ 





SPORTS 




129 




Using your head 



o.u. 

Soccer 




Ben's down 




Stiff opposition precedes another goal 




Carter coaches from the sidelines 



Soccer Team Shows Determined 
Spirit in Face of Tough Opposition 





130 



Fighting for possession 



Joe moves in for the ball 




and fighting ! 




Tension on the bench as well as on the playing field. 




The 1964 soccer team. 



Action on the field. 




Determination 




SOCCER on the Oglethorpe scene is now four years old. Although the soccer 
team did not turn in an impressive record this year, they were unmatched in team 
spirit and determination. All the boys worked long and hard under the watchful 
eye of Coach Carter. Even when the score was overwhelmingly in the opposition's 
favor, the Petrels refused to quit. 

At the annual soccer banquet special awards were presented to the outstanding 
players. The recipients of these awards were the following: Joe Strenk, Most Im- 
proved During the Season; Ben Hargrove, Best Effort and Best Offense; Jack 
Grubb and Tim Marx, Best Defensive; and Roy Cowart, Appreciation Trophy. 



Sprinting for the ball. 




Endurance 



132 




Heading for the goal. 



TEAM members were Ben Hargrove, Glen Rose, 
Charles Sanders, Michael Streicher, Marvin Zagora, Roy 
Cowart, Jay Strong, Andy Holland, Jack Grubb, Joe 
Strenk, Jeff Hayden, John Sims, Tommy O'Connor, Rus- 
sell Ogle, Bob Furman, Pete Outhwaite, Frank Shipton, 
Tim Marx, and Jim Hampton. 




Exhaustion, and only a minute to relax. 




and team spirit have made Oglethorpe's soccer team a by-word for good sportsmanship. 



133 





Where did it go? 






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The Greenbacks go up for t-wo points. 



The Intramural Games 



were dominated by the ever-successful Drifters, as they took top 
place in football and basketball. Although the Drifters, ending a 
fabled six-year career at Oglethorpe, won the title of champs, they 
faced a determined group of opposition. Spirit ran high in all the 
intramurals as the teams sported uniforms bearing their team names — 
"the 68ers", "the Greenbacks", "the Deals", and "the Drifters." 
In the tennis tournament Clark Raby captured Class A honors and 
Jerry "B.A." Hollister claimed the Class B title. 



134 



Pistol and Rifle Teams 
have another winning season 




■^^S jMW^at<6r'* ■ ' '■-*... .-f«v,».- ,i,-v, ,'■— i-y-.. 



r^mn^^^sMMi. 







Ready on the firing line 




"Check your sights . . . 
Don't jerk your trigger finger . 
check your sights . . ." 




The Rifle Team in the new indoor range. 




The Pistol Team. 



Under the expert guidance of "Chief" Sewell Edwards the pistol 
and rifle teams presented Oglethorpe with a record that ranks her 
in the top in these intercollegiate sports. The Gun Qub belongs to 
the National Rifle Association as well as being in the National Inter- 
collegiate Pistol League. 

Rifle team members are Naomi Thomas. Kathy Searcher. Peggy 
Warrell, Judy Ponturo, Anne Alexander, Caroline Kelly, and Jane 
Stroud. The boys' pistol team is made up of Frank Hughes, Cris 
Cook, Mark Gray, Shawn Boles, Ben Vincent, and Fred Ackley. 



135 



Basketball 




136 



J»« 







Fighting for that rebound , 





a high-stepping lay-up and two more points for the Petrels. 



and on the sidelines the scorekeepers take note of , 






time out before the game begins again. 



' f - - • " • - ^ ' 






Billy makes a quick pass to his left but it's . 





Tough Luck and Close Games 



characterized the '64-'65 basketball season for Oglethorpe's Stormy Petrels. This season's 
schedule was one of the toughest in the school's history, and O.U. basketball had its 
first losing season in current history. The Petrels played such strong teams at Chatta- 
nooga, Bellarmine, Northwestern State, Centenary, Murray and Georgia Southern. 

The fans were promised a lot of fast action and they got it. The Petrels tried the 
fast break and only occasionally reverted to the "wheel" — a deliberate pattern of play. 
Injuries and illness plagued the team and more than ever before the freshmen were 
counted on. They were among the brightest spots of the season. The junior varsity team 
turned in a perfect record, not losing a single game. "We are two years away from a 
great team," said Coach Pinholster. 





138 




Time out and an earnest coach talks to his players before sending them back in 




and score again! 



139 





Jimmy Tumlin 



140 





Ray Thomas 





ifD 



Wayne Johnson 




Bill Garrigan 




(••«■» » 





Jimbo Hartlage 




Walker Heard 




Billy Parker 



141 




The Varsity Cheerleaders 

keep us cheering even when the going gets rough. Always ready to lead a cheer or travel to an away game, this energetic 
group of six girls was supplemented this year by the addition of two boy varsity cheerleaders. 





Judy Hayden 



Linda Sanders 



142 




Barbara Youmans 



Down the Court 
and on to Victory! 





Bob Johnson and Steve White 



Pokev Therrell 



143 




The Baby Petrels 



ended the season with a clean record of all wins and no defeats. 
The inspired scoring of Roger Littell, Doug Alexander, Bill 
Carson, Jimmy Fain, and Jerry Sams downed such foes as the 
Covenant College Freshmen, G.M.C. and the North Georgia 
Trade School for their perfect record. 



J.V. Cheerleaders 
Cheer Freshman 
Team on to 
Undefeated Season 



144 





Theresa Tarrant 





Suzanne Shirley 



YetU" Le\enson 



Barbara Beggs 





Sally Bricker 



W' 




Dona Qimer 



145 



Tennis 



at Oglethorpe is more than just a sport, but is a pastime which 
a student may carry with him beyond his college years. 
Just as his education never leaves him, the Oglethorpe student 
who once learns the art of sending a ball at the right angle and 
at the right time across the net to score against an opponent 
never quite loses his skill. Tennis by its very nature teaches 
the rewards of maintaining good physical co-ordination, of 
perseverance, of the victory well earned or the loss well 
borne. Those who learn the game and play it know these re- 
wards, and receive the benefits that come from knowing their 
value. 




Clark Raby won the Intramural "Class A" championship. 




Jeff waits for the return. 



Hank ambles across the court. 



146 




Clark and Hank get in some practice. 




Tennis demands the same amount of pzXience, en- 
durance, skill and strength required of any participant in 
any major competitive sport. Although Oglc-thorpe did not 
have a tennis team this year, the courts were nearly al- 
ways filled and a large number participated in the intra- 
mural tennis matches. 




Jerr>' HolHster demonstrates the form that captured the Intra- 
mural "Class B" championship for him. 




Carl Dinerman at the net! 



147 



Experienced Players Spark 



Baseball at Oglethorpe for 1965 gave promise of a better team 
than ever. Transfers, Jerry Brown and Jimmy Tumlin, along with 
fourth year regulars, Larry Abner, Ben Hargrove, Roy Cowart, and 
Bob Moreland formed the core of an experienced group of athletes. 

The Petrels had on their schedule such schools as William Jewell, 
Valdosta State, Auburn, St. Bernard, Mercer, and Piedmont. 

The beginning of the season saw the addition of Jimmy Tumlin 
and Dick Davis to the already experienced pitching staff of Roy 
Cowart and Ben Hargrove. The catching position has been a large 
problem for Coach Billy Carter for the last three years at Oglethorpe, 
but this year the catching ability of Larry Freeman, Roger Littel, and 
Tommy O'Conner made it easier for Coach Carter to concentrate on 
other problems. 

Outfield returnees Bob Moreland, Larry Abner, and Charlie Stepp 
more than adequately filled the "big country" positions, but when 
help was needed, Aubrey Whitaker, Wayne Johnson, and Dick Davis 
were there for the tough job of backing up. 





THE BASEBALL TEAM was: Left to right, (back row) Jerry Brown, Larr)' Abner, Bill Smith, Jimmy Tumlin. Bob Moreland, Dick Davis, 
(front row) Wayne Johnson, Charhe Stepp, Ben Hargrove, Larry Shattles, Roy Cowart, Tonrimy O'Conner, Larry Freeman, and Aubrey Whitaker. 



148 



Baseball Season 




Pitchers were Jimmy Tumlin, Roy Cowart, Ben Hargrove, and Dick Davis. 








Outfielders were Dick Davis, Aubrey Whitaker. Bob Moreland, Wayne Johnson. Chajlie 
Stepp, Roy Cowart, and Larry Abner. 



Catchers were Lirr.' Freeman and Tommy O'Conner. 

149 



THE INFIELD at the opening of the season appeared to be sound 
with two good first basemen vying for the starting position. With 
Tumlin or Bill Smith on first, second was held down by Larry 
Shattles, a returning letterman. Jerry Brown batted clean-up as well 
as playing shortstop. The rare combination appeared to be well suited 
for Jerry. Third base was shared by Ben Hargrove and Roy Cowart, 
with one playing it while the other was pitching. The two have alter- 
nated in this manner for the past three years in other similar positions. 








Infield positions were played by Ben Hargrove, Bill Smith, Jimmy Tumlin, and Larry Shattles. 




150 





Petrels execute old one-two. 





Heading into home!! 




The Sportin' Life 



is always "in" at Oglethorpe. Aside from the organi2ed 
intercollegiate and intramural sports that most Oglethorpe 
students participate in, either as a player or as a spectator, 
life on campus is filled wich fun and games. In the spring- 
time, especially, self-devised forms of entertainment are seen 
all over campus, from the frisbee game in front of Goodman 
to the embrace of the couple on the stairs in Phoebe Hearst. 
The tennis courts are filled from dawn to dusk and in the 
evenings after supper energetic groups of freshmen, soon 
joined by upperclassmen, happily play hopscotch or the "shoe 
game". Skateboarding takes some skill, but kite-flying takes 
nothing but a sunny, warm afternoon with a little bit of bree2e 
— and a little bit of luck. 









"See the bird?" "Where?" "There!" and they all fall down. 





152 







Tennis is always an old favorite — no matter just how you 
play the game. Kite-flying is a newer fad around campus 
and it's a real challenge to keep one of those trees from 
catching your kite. 






"Shall I go for a ride down Burma Road now or wait till ever>'one else is in class??" 



153 




It might be nice to go for a little drive this evening 





Frisbee has been on the O.U. scene for a few years 



or maybe play the "shoe game" 






as has modern dance 



like fun. 



154 



._.^?^..,. 
<^^.^ 



.T^ 



*: --rx' 




Some try niany different sports , 




while many are good spectators . 




and others eagerly participate in the sport they enjoy the most. 



155 




156 




■■'■■' '/„ ^ . 




HONORS 




j^""/ 




157 



Yamacraw Awards 
Presented to Outstanding Students 



The Yamacraw Awards were initiated as a means of recognizing those students who 
are outstanding members of the Oglethorpe community. Each club nominated one 
boy and one girl; the executive staff of the YAMACRAW and their advisor chose 
by a majority vote the eight whom they believed were the most qualified. The awards 
are made on the basis of spirit, participation, academic achievement, and an intangible 
fulfillment of the ideals of an Oglethorpe education. 





Jane Lee Conner 



Tommy Crouch 








Dave Davies 



Betsy Primm 



158 



V 





Glen Rose 



Linda Sanders 





Barrett Smith 



Suzy Straub 



159 



Nine Seniors 

Named to Who's Who 

in American Colleges and Universities 



This honor is given in recognition of the merit and accomphshment of the student who 
is officially recommended by the Student Government and the Faculty Council, and 
who meets the requirements of the National publication, WHO'S WHO IN AMER- 
ICAN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES. 





George Alexander 



Shawn Boles 



Tommy Crouch 





J 60 





Judy Hayden 



Billy Parker 




Linda Sanders 



Suzy Straub 



Ray Thomas 







4^ 





161 



DUCHESS CLUB 



The DUCHESS CLUB is an honor society for Junior 
and Senior women who have maintained an outstanding 
scholastic record and who have participated actively in 
campus extracurricular activities. This club was founded 
in 1920 to unite its members in a cooperative effort 
for assistance in campus activities. It was hoped that 
this organization would help to integrate the ideals of 
academic proficiency and service. 




OFFICERS: Mrs. Bieler, advisor, Suzy Straub, secretary, Mrs. 
Brown, advisor, Sharon Friedrich, vice president, Linda 
Sanders, parliamentarian, Betsy Primm, president. 




Standing, left to right: Sharon Friedrich, Betsy Primm, Suzy Straub, Linda Sanders, Theresa Tarrant. Sealed: 
Gwyn Cannon, Gloria Haug, Judy Hayden. Not pictured: Linda Roy, Carolyn Adams, Carol King. 



162 




Duchess Club Award 
goes to Bonnie Tash 



The Duchess Club Women's Society honors with this 
award, the Freshman girl who best exemph'fies the 
ideals of the Duchess Club in scholarship and campus 
activities. The recipient of the Duchess Club Award has 
shown that she embodies those attributes which charac- 
terize the best in an Oglethorpe student. 



The Duchess Club sponsors many activities during the school year, among them is 
the annual Sadie Hawkins Day. Members of the Duchess Club also act as hostesses for 
numerous activities during the year. 





163 



Boar's Head — Chapter 
of Blue Key 



The purpose of Boar's Head is to recognize those 
junior and senior men who have exhibited outstand- 
ing scholarship, leadership, and participation in the 
activities of the University. By recognizing the top 
students, it is the goal of Boar's Head to foster an 
attitude of scholastic achievement and to promote the 
ideals of academic freedom and excellence. 




OFFICERS: Ray Thomas, vice-president and Jon Preu, 
president. 




Left to right: Jon Preu, Ed Garrett, Barrett Smith, Shawn Boles, Carl Dinerman, Doug McGinty, Tommy Crouch, George 
Alexander, Ray Thomas, Billy Parker. 



164 



Each year among Boar's Head activities is 
the annual Boar's Head Christinas Cere- 
mony. This ceremony has been a tradition 
at Oglethorpe for over twenty years. It is 
based upon a similar activity from Christ 
College of Oxford University in England. 





Duchess Club members are hostess at the recep- 
tion which follows the ceremony. 



165 



LeConte Honorary Society 



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The LeConte Society is an honorary organization 
for outstanding science students who have a genuine 
interest in the progress of scientific endeavors. Any 
upperclassman who has attained an average of 85 
in science courses and 80 in other academic subjects 
is eligible for membership. 



OFFICERS: Linda Sanders— President, Pat Abbott- 
secretary, Theresa Tarrant — vice-president, Carl Diner- 
man — treasurer. 



■ I'-'l^id 




— 1 flVI^K 






11 






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F/W/ roa'.- Jane Lee Conner, Pat Abbott, Ana Citeralla, Carolyn Adams Second row: Theresa Tarrant, Carl Dinerman, Linda 
Sanders, George Alexander, Judy Hayden 



166 



Linda Sanders 
Receives LeConte Award 



This award is given to the outstanding 
graduating senior in the field of science on 
the basis of his scholastic achievement and 
his contribution to the University and the 
Science Division. 





This year the Georgia Academy of Science held its annual 
meeting at Oglethorpe. Members of LeConte helped with 
registration and other activities during the day. 




167 



Suzanne Straub as 

Outstanding Senior Girl Receives 

Oglethorpe Cup 




One of Suzy's many activities is the Yamacraw 
which she is editor of this year. 



The James Edward Oglethorpe Cup is 
given to the Senior Woman who, in the 
opinion of the Oglethorpe Faculty, has best 
realized the ideals of an Oglethorpe educa- 
tion. This award is given annually to the 
woman who has participated actively in the 
life and growth of the University. 




168 



Thomas Crouch Receives 

Oglethorpe Cup 
as Outstanding Senior Boy 



The James Edward Oglethorpe Award is 
given by the Oglethorpe Facult}' to the Sen- 
ior Man who has best realized the ideals of 
an Oglethorpe education. 





Tommy has participated in many phaies of cam- 
pus life while at Oglethorpe. One of his main 
interests this rear has been the Stormv Petrel. 



169 



Faculty Scholarship Award 
goes to Lanier Bagwell 




The Faculty Scholarship Award is given each 
year to the Senior man with the highest scho- 
lastic record during his junior and senior years. 
By the awarding of this honor the faculty 
recognized the scholarly pursuits which it en- 
deavors to stimulate in the entire student body. 




170 



Patricia Bowden Receives 
the Sally Hull Weltner Award 



The Sally Hull Weltner Award is presented 
each year by the Oglethorpe University Woman's 
Club to the Senior woman who has achieved the 
highest average of any woman during her junior 
and senior years. 







'^ 




171 




Jerry Wayne Brown 

Receives the 

Ben Parker Law Award 



The Ben Parker Law Award is given each 
year to a member of the Business Law class 
who shows the most promise in the field 
of law. The recipient of this award is 
chosen by the Oglethorpe Business Division. 



Brinker Award was 
presented to Patricia Bowden 



The Brinker Award is presented annually 
to the student having the highest achieve- 
ment in the philosophy and religion courses. 




172 



Dave Davies Receives 
the MacConnell Award 



The Charles M. MacConnell Memorial 
Award is presented by the Sophomore class 
to the Senior who the class feels has par- 
ticipated in many phases of campus life 
without having received full recognition. 
This senior has worked in many activities 
without thought for personal gain. 





Three Receive 
Sidney Lanier 
Poetry Awards 

The Sidney Lanier Poetry- Awards ore 
given each year to the students who 
sho-w- outstanding abilits' in the area 
of poetry-. This yeax First Place w-as 
Ben Mathews: Second Place was Val- 
erie Duncan; and Third Place was Beryl 
Folsom. 



173 



Outstanding Freshman Science Students 

are recognized by the 
Chemical Rubber PubHshing Company 




The Chemical Rubber Publishing Company awards 
are given each year to students who demonstrate 
outstanding achievement in the various freshman 
science courses. This year the awards go to: 

PHYSICS— Ana Citeralla 
CHEMISTRY— Sandra Hedge 
MATHEMATICS— Roger Littell 



Ana Citeralla 



Sandra Hedge 



Roger Littell 





174 



Barrett Smith was 

presented the 
Humanics Award 



The Humanics Award is given to the student who 
possesses a firm commitment and great promise in 
the field of youth work. This student must exemplify 
the four avenues of preparation and service as in- 
dicated on the Humanics Emblem by the Torch, the 
Book, the Lamp, and the Helping Hand. He must 
also be conscientious in academic endeavors. 

The recipient of this award is chosen by the Ogle- 
thorpe Humanics students, administrator, and Ameri- 
can Humanics Foundation. 




This year the 

David Hess Award 

goes to Ben Hargrove 

The David Hess Award is presented to a Senior 
who has won a letter in an intercollegiate sport in 
the year in which the award is given. The recipient 
must also have supported and contributed to the 
total athletic program of Oglethorpe during his four 
years here. 





175 



Players' Awards 




Senior Award: 

Phil Leftwich 
Best Actor: 

Shawn Boles 
Best Actress: 

Malin Riben 
Best Supporting Actor: 

Ben Matthews 
Best Supporting Actress: 

Carole Moore 



Left to right: Phil Leftwich, Carole Moore, Malin Riben, Shawn Boles 




Ed Danus 



The Brown Award this year goes to Ed 
Danus. This award is to the person who 
has done the most for players during this 
year. 




176 



Dr. Paul Beall Receives the 

Donald C. Agnew Award for 

Distinguished Service to the University 



The Donald C. Agnew Award is pre- 
sented each year by the Student Council 
to a member of the Faculty or Administra- 
tion whom they feel has contributed a 
great deal to Oglethorpe during the year. 
Since Dr. Beall has been at Oglethorpe, 
he has worked diligently to develop and 
improve Oglethorpe. 




— -_ J 




177 




178 





ADS 'N' ENDS 




179 




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writing papers 

MONTAO'S 

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GASPAR-WARE 
PHOTOGRAPHERS, INC. 

876 West Peachtree, N.W. 
Atlanta 9, Georgia 



Class Photos 

in this book are 

the work of 

Gaspar-Ware 




VAN'S 

Cleaners — Laundry 



274 Buckhead Ave. CE 3-2133 

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From a Friend of Oglethorpe 





School Fraternity 
Automobile Togs 




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UNIVERSITY 



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ATLANTA, GA 




181 






L. G. BALFOUR 
COMPANY 

Office: 
3330 Peachtree Rd., N.E. 

Atlanta 5, Georgia 
Representative— MOLLIS BRITT 







CLASS OF 1966 



The Junior Class sponsored several projects dur- 
ing the year. One of these was a supper In Good- 
nnan Lounge. 




182 







Compliments 
of 

R. E. 'RED" DOROUGH 





REG. U. S. PAT. Off. 






CHEROKEE THEATER 

Cherokee Plaza 

Peachtree Road 

Atlanta, Georgia 





LIPSCOMB-ELLIS COMPANY 

insurance — Rentals — Real Estate 



90 Falrlie Street 

Atlanta I , Georgia 

JA 1-2162-68 



KINSLAND'S FLORISTS 

4069 Peachtree Road 

Atlanta, Georgia 

— n Brookhaven — 



!84 








^■K^^BBjHj^^wB 


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y 1 li^r*^ 






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w 













Oglethorpe — 

Not a place, but a purpose . . 

Not an institution, but an ideal 

Not numbers, but people. 

Our people. 

Our Ideal. 



'ur purpose. 



CLASS OF 1965 







Compliments 
of 

CROWN 400, INC. 

R. B. Greenleaf — Insurance 

1228 Candler Building 

Atlanta, Georgia 30303 




PILGRIM LAUNDRY 
AND CLEANERS 



-In Brookhaven to 
Serve You! 



i86 




SCOTT HUDGENS REALTY 
COMPANY 




Sophomores conduct Rat Week in usual dignified fashion. 






Sophomores 



for sale! 




CLASS 



OF 



1967 



IS there anything worse than a Greek final??? 



187 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



of 



OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY 

A Message to the Class of '65 



Now you have left Oglethorpe University bearing a diploma sought by many, but received by a few. The 
nnemory of the cannpus may wane, but the warm, friendly spirit found here will remain with you always. We 
hope you will return for frequent visits to rekindle this school spirit, to keep in touch with your classmates. 

As an Oglethorpe graduate you have received the finest undergraduate education obtainable — for a pur- 
pose. You have an obligation to yourself and to society to apply your attained skills, understanding and ethical 
values to improve the lot of mankind. 

You are not alone In this task. More than five thousand alumni who have preceded you share this responsi- 
bility for bettering the social process. They make themselves available to you should you need them. 

We congratulate you for your academic achievement and welcome you to the swelling ranks of the 
National Alumni Association of Oglethorpe University. 







188 



■.-:*oi'V 't • IT., .—••f^'v*-. 





BOB MOHAN— Representative 



OGLETHORPE 
PLACEMENT SERVICE 




My Sincere Congratulations 

Are Extended to the 
Graduating Class of 1965 

CHARLES L WELTNER 

Member United States Congress 
Fifth District, Georgia 




FRITO-LAY, INC. 

4950 Peachtree 
Industrial Boulevard 




189 



Senior Directory 



PATRICIA SARA ABBOTT 
Bridgeport, Connecticut 
B.S. 

LeConte, 3, 4, V.P., 4; Stormy Petrel, 4; Yama- 
craw, 4; Parliamentarian of Senior Class, 4; Inter- 
activity Committee, 4, Sec, 4; Who's Who, 4; Lord 
and Lady Oglethorpe Court, 4. 

LARRY SCOTT ABNER 

Smyrna, Georgia 

B.A. 

Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramurals, 1, 2, 3, 4; Rat 

Court, 2; Statistician, 4. 

CAROLYN SUE ADAMS 

Lexington, Kentucky 

B.A. 

Dorm Council, 1; Lord and Lady Page, 1; Yama- 

craw, 3, 4, Classes Editor, 3, Honor's Editor, 4; 

LeConte, 3, 4; Social Committee, 4; Duchess Club,' 

4; Secretar)' of Senior Class, 4; Exchange Student 

to Barnard College, 4. 



GEORGE D. ALEXANDER 

Columbus, Georgia 
B.S. 

Alpha Phi Omega, 1, 2, 3, Treasurer, 3; Saints, 
1, 2, 3, 4; President of Junior Class, 3; LeConte, 
3, 4, V.P., 3; Boar's Head, 3, 4; Stormy Petrel, 
3; President of Student Council, 4; Who's Who, 4; 
Lord Oglethorpe, 4. 
WILLIAM HENRY ALEXANDER 
Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

Tennis, 3; Rat Court, 2, 4, High Priest, 4; Vice 
President of Senior Class, 4. 
RENEE ALHADEFF 
Atlanta, Georgia 
B.S. 

LeConte, 3, 4. 
JOYCE TROPEA BACON 
Pennsauken, New Jersey 
B.A. 

Transfer, College of Steubenville; Chorus, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Treasurer of Freshman Class, 1; Dorm Proctor, 
1; Players, 2, 3, 4, Sec, 3, Business Manager, 4; 
Humanics, 2, 3, 4; A.F.F., 2; Dance Club, 2; New- 
man Club, 2, 3, National Sec, 3, V.P., 2; Stormy 
Petrel, 2, 3; Ghost Storj' Reading, 3, 4; Treasurer 
of Student Council, 3. 

PETER DAVID BACON 

Lexington, Massachusetts 

B.A. 

Libertarian, 1; Players, 1, 2; Bowling, 2; Xingu. 

3, 4; V.P., 4; Stormy Petrel, 3. 

LANIER CHARLES BAG'WELL 

Gumming, Georgia 

B.A. 

Soccer, 1, 2. 

JIMMY DEAN BASS, JR. 

Clinton, South Carolina 

B.A. 

Transfer, Massey Junior College; Student Council, 

1, 2; Judicial Board, 2; Dorm Proctor, 4. 

SUSAN CARLEE BELL 

Cartersville, Georgia 

B.A. 

Yamacraw, 1, 2, 3; Stormy Petrel, 1, 2; B-Team 

Cheerleader, 1, 2; Literary Magazine, 2, 3, 4; 

Student Public Relations Committee, 2, 3; Young 

Conser\'atives, 3, 4, Sec, 4; Spring Varieties, 3; 

Xingu, 4. 



SHAWN MICHAEL BOLES 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 

Transfer, Georgia Tech; Kappa Alpha Order, 1, 2, 

Sgt. at Arms, 2; Georgia Tech Blue Print, 1, 2, 

Organizations Editor, 1, Managing Editor, 2; 

R.O.T.C, 1, 2; Players, 3, 4; Circle K, 3; Vice 

President of Student Council, 4; Interactivity 

Committee, 4, Chairman, 4; Gun Club, 4; Boar's 

Head, 4; Stormy Petrel, 4; Who's Who, 4; Lord 

and Lady Oglethorpe Court, 4, 

PATRICIA BOWDEN 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 

ALICE ANN BRISCOE 

Pine Lake, Georgia 

B.A. 

Transfer, Carson-Newman. 

ANNE MEINERT BROWN 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 




Pep Club, 1; Stunt Night, 1. 

EVELYN CORNELIA BROWN 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 

Transfer, Universit)' of Georgia; Kappa Kappa 

Gamma. 

JAMES H. BRO"WN 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.S. 




Transfer, Southern Tech; I.R.E., 2; Epsilon Pi 

Chi, 2; Young Conservatives, 3, 4; Yamacraw, 4, 

Photographer, 4. 

MARY LOUISE BROWNE 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 

Transfer, North Georgia; Newman Club, 1, 2; 

B-Team Cheerleader, 1; Stormy Petrel, 2. 

BRENDA A. BUICE 

Tucker, Georgia 

B.A. 

Transfer, Truett-McConnell; B.S.U., 1, 2 4 

LOUISE EUENSON CAIN 

Los Angeles, California 

B.A. 

RICHARD JOSEPH CARTER 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 

Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Parliamentarian of Junior 

Class, 3; Yamacraw, 4, Sports Editor, 4. 

CHERRY HODGES CASEY 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 

Gun Club, 1, 2, 3, Sec, 2; Yamacraw, 1, 2, 3, 

Honors Editor, 2, 3; Players, 1, 2, 3; Interactivit)' 

Committee, 2, 3, Sec, 2; Lord and Lady Page, 1. 




BARRY CHAMPION 
Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

PATRICIA MORRIS COHN 
Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

JAMES CONNELLY 
Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

Transfer, Reinhart; Circle K, 1, 2; Literary So- 
ciety, 1, 2. 

JANE LEE CONNER 
Atlanta, Georgia 
B.S. 

Gun Club, 1; Yamacraw, 1, 2, 3, 4, Activities 
Editor, 3, 4;, Stormy Petrel, 2; Rat Court, 2, 4, 
High Priestess, 4; Social Committee, 3, 4; Student 
Union, 3, 4, Chairman, 4; Junior Varsity Cheer- 
leader, 1, 2, Co-Captain, 2; Varsity Cheerleader, 
3; LeConte, 3, 4; Spring Varieties, 2, 3; Par- 
liamentarian of Student Council, 4; Petrel Girl 
of the Week, 2; Honor Court, 3; Homecoming 
Court, 4, Queen, 4; Lord and Lady Oglethorpe 
Court, 4; Interactivity Committee, 4. 
GLENDA CASTLEBERRY COOK 
Marietta, Georgia 
B.A. 

KATHY SHIRLEY COWART 
Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

B-Team Cheerleader, 1; Varsity Cheerleader, 2; 
Receptionist, 1, 2, 3, 4; Stormy Petrel, 4. 
ROY JAMES COWART 
Ball Ground, Georgia 
B.A. 

Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramurals, 1, 2, 3, 4; B- 
Team Basketball, 2; Soccer, 3, 4. 
JOHN THOMAS CROUCH 
Albany, Georgia 
B.A. 

President of Freshman Class, 1; Student Council, 
1, 2; Interactivity Council, 1, 2; Stormy Petrel', 
1, 2, 3, 4, Copy Editor, 2, Managing Editor, 3, 
Editor-in-Chief, 4; Alpha Phi Omega, 1, 2; Boar's 
Head Freshman Award, 1; President of Sopho- 
more Class, 2; Honor Court, 2,' 4, Chairman, 4; 
"O" Book Editor, 2; Boar's Head, 3, 4; Lord and 
Lady Oglethorpe Court, 4; Who's Who 4 
DOUGLAS CROZIER 
Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

SAMUEL CUNNINGHAM 
Columbus, Georgia 
B.A. 
DAVID STEWART DA VIES 




1-ort Bragg, North Carolina 

B.A. 

Humanics, 1, 2, 3, 4, President, 4; Honor Court, 

1; A.F.F., 1, 2, 3, President, 2; Newman Club, 

1, 2, 3; Pep Club, 1; Alpha Phi Omega, 1, 2, 3, 

4; Intramurals, 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball Manager, 4. 

ELIZABETH A. DAVIS 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 

B.A. 

PATRICIA HALE DeVANEY 

Augusta, Georgia 

B.A. 



Security is being an Ed. Major 



PAMELA DUFFEY 

Rome, Georgia 

B.A. 

VALERIE DUNCAN 

Jacksonville, Florida 

B.A. 

Transfer, Young Harris; Susan B. Harris Literary 

Society, 1, 2; Enotah Echoes, 2, Literary Editor; 

Enotah, 2; Stormy Petrel, 3, 4, Copy Editor, 4; 

Canterbury Club, 3, 4; Young Democrats, 4, Sec- 

Treas., 4. 

SHARON DIANE FRIEDRICH 

Decatur, Georgia 

B.A. 

Chorus, 1, 2; Players, 1, 2; Duchess Club, 3, 4, 

V.P., 4; Xingu, 3, 4, Sec.-Treas., 4; Honor 

Committee, 3, 4, Chairman, 4; Stormy Petrel, 

3, 4, Executive Secretary, 4. 




MATTHEW GARDNER 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 

EDWARD M. GARRETT 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 

Transfer, University of Georgia; Chorus, 3, 4; 

Yamacraw, 4, Business Manager, 4; Boar's Head, 

4; Young Democrats, 4; Woodrow Wilson 

Fellowship, 4. 

VIVIAN ROBERTA GRAY 

Rossville, Georgia 

B.A. 

Gun Club, 1, 2, 3, 4, 

1, 2, 3; Yamacraw, 2, 3, 

2, 3; Chorus, 2, Sec, 2; 
pion, 2; Stormy Petrel, 3. 
JACKSON R. GRUBB 
Thomaston, Georgia 
B.A. 

Humanics, 1, 2, 3, 4; A.P.O. 1, 2; B-Team Bas- 
ketball, 1; Intramurals, 1, 2, 3, 4; A.F.F., 1, 3; 
Soccer, 2, 3, 4; Vice President of Sophornore 
Class, 2; Rat Court, 2; Boar's Head, 4; Presidenr 



Pari., 4; Rifle Team, 
4, Photo. Co-ordinator, 
Gun Club Rifle Cham- 



of Senior Class, 4; Student Council, 4; Basketball 

Manager, 4. 

BENJAMIN THOMAS HARGROVE, JR. 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 

Intramurals, 1, 2, 3; Soccer, 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain, 

4; Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Treasurer of Sophomore 

Class, 2; Rat Court Helper, 2; Humanics, 2, 3, 4; 

Student Intramural Director, 4. 

JAMES VICTOR HARTLAGE 

Elizabethtown, Kentucky 

B.S. 




Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball, 1, 2; 

Helper, 2; Tennis, 3; Honor Court, 3 

man, 4; Lord and Lady Oglethorpe 

LeConte, 4. 

GLORIA DIAL HAUG 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 

B-Team Cheerleader,. 1, 2; Dorm Counci 

Sec, 1, Pres., 3; Homecoming Rep., 2; 

Club, 3, 4, Projects Chairman, 4. 

JUDITH ANN HAYDEN 

Avgndale Estates, Georgia 

B.S. 

Newman Club, 1; Yamacraw, 1 

Council, 1; Homecoming Court, 

Cheerleader, 2, 3, Co-Captain, 

servatives, 3; Duchess Club, 3, 4 

Student Union, 4; Interactivity 



Rat Court 
4, Chair- 
Court, 4; 



, 1, 2, 3, 
Duchess 



2; Intramural 
, 3, 4; B-Team 
; Young Con- 
LeConte, 3, 4; 
Committee, 4: 



Young Democrats, 4; Who's Who, 4; Lady Ogle- 
thorpe, 4; Varsity Cheerleader, 4, Captain, 4. 
JAMES HENSON 
Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

MARGARET L. JONES 
Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

HALLIE BEASLEY KIMMELL 
Conyers, Georgia 
B.A. 

Transfer, Emory-at-Oxford. 
ROGER KITCHENS 
Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

Young Democrats, 4. 
BETIY' MARIE KLAUDT 
Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 




Harris; Sigma Beta Sigma, 
1, 2; Corresponding Sec^ 2; 



ELAIN'E LAW 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 

ROBERT FRANKLIN LIN"DLEY 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 

FRANKLIN EDWARD .\LAHAFFEY 

Duncan. South Carolina 

B.A. 

Alpha Phi Omega, 1, 2, 3, 4; Dorm Council, 1, 

Pres. 1; Mr. Rat. 1; Saints, 1, 2, 3, 4; Rat Court, 

2; Humanics. 1, 2, 3, 4, Chaimian of Public 

Relations, 4; Intramurals, 1, 2; Studait Field 

Rep., 3. 4. 

PENELOPE ANN AfcCULLOCH 

Chamblee. Georgia 

B,A. 

Transfer. Young 

1, 2; Cheerleader. 

Dorcas, 2, V.P.. 2. 

GRANT McDonald 

Zurich. Switzerland 
B.A. 

DOUGLAS T. McGLXri' 
Tallahassee, Florida 
B.A. 

Transfer, Emon--at-Oxford; Sigma Tan Sigma, 
1, 2, Treas., 2; Christian Service Fellowship, 1. 2, 
Pres., 1; Eta Sigma Psi, 1, 2, Sec.-Treas.. 2; Re- 
ligious Activities Council, 1, 2; Student Judiciary 
Council. 2: Dorm CoundJ. 2; Humanics ^- Circle 
K. 3; Boar's Head. 4. 
MICHAEL LEO McQUEEN 
Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

Newman Club. 5. 
PAULINE F. JIETCALF 
Atlanta. Georgia 
B.A. 

Players, 1. 2; Xingu. 4. 
FRANCES ^LAXI^"E MOFFITT 
Maricita, Georgia 
B.A. 
Humanics, 2, 5. 4. 



^•^i^^ 




«S*c^<«^3b^-. 



The New President s Home 



ETHEL CLARK LAMBERT 

College Park Georgia 

B.A. 

Transfer, G.S.C.W.; B.S.U., 3, 4. 



ROBERT FRANCES MOREL.\XD 

Malibu West. California 

B.A. 

B-Team basketball. 1; Intramurals. 



S 4; BiSft 



Wi 



ball, 1, 2, 3; Young Conservatives, 3; Tennis, 4; 
Play, 4; Tennis Tournament Winner, 2. 
GARY MIILLINS 
Atlanta. Georgia 
B.A. 

CASPER NOTO 
North Bergen, New Jersey 
B.A. 

CONNIE BARR OLSON 
Elbert Lea. Minnesota 
B.A. 

DONALD EDWIN OTWELL 
College Park. Georgia 
B.A. ' 

Transfer, Truett-McConnell. Ministerial Associa- 
tion, 1, 2; Torch Bearers, 1, 2; B.S.LT.. 1, 2, 4; 
Student Gov't. Rep., 2; Devotional Chairman, 4; 
Pres. of Student Gov't., 2; Humanics, 3, 4. 
WILLIAM H. PARKER 
Newnan, Georgia 
B.A. 

Basketball. 1, 2, 3, 4; Boar's Head, 3. 4; Treas- 
urer of Senior Class, 4; Who's Who, 4. 
DAVID L. PEARL III 
Tryon. North Carolina 
B.A. 

Transfer. Georgia Tech; Blue Print, 1. 
JON LESTER PREU 
Miami, Florida 
B.A. 

Alpha Phi Omega. I, 2; Vice President of Fresh- 
man Class, 1; Joint Committee, 1; Honor Court, 

2, 3, 4; Stormy Petrel. 3, 4, Photography Editor, 

3. 4; Yamacraw. 3. 4; Photographer, 3, 4; Boar's 



President, 4; Teimis, 
4; B.S.U.. 4. V.P., 



Head, i. President, 4; Interactivity Committee, 4; 
Youns; Citizens for Johnson, 4. 
ANNIE ELIZABETH PRIMM 
Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A. 

Transfer. Emorj-, Student Public Relations Com- 
mittee, 2; Duchess Cluh. 3, 4, Pres., 4; Literarj' 
ftfagazine, 3; Stormy Petrel, 4; Homecoming 
Display, 4. Chairman. 4. 
CLARK DEMPSY RABY 
Atlant.i. Georeia 
B.A. 

Circle K, 3, 4, Treasurer, 3, 
3; Basketball Statistician, 3, 
4. 

GLENN W. RAINEY. JR. 
Atlanta, Georgia . 

B.A. 

GAIL ROBINSON 
Savannah, Georcia 
B.S. 

GLEN CLIFTON ROSE 
Atlanta. Georgia 
B.A. 

Soccer. 1, 3. 4; Man.iger of Baseball, 1; Saints. 
1; Stormy Petrel, 1, 2, 3, 4, Sports Editor, '4; 
Intramurals, 1, 2, 3, 4; Circle K, 2, 3, 4, Treas.. 
4; Treasurer of Junior Class, 3: Intramural Council. 
4: Class Propheo' Co-Author, 4. 
LINDA GRAY ROY 
Atlanta. Georaia 
B.A. 
Young Conservatives, 4; Duchess Club. 4. 



LINDA LEE SANDERS 
Marietta, Georgia 
B.S. 

Parliamentarian of 
2, 3, 4, Pres., 4; 
Editor, 4; Varsity 



Sophomore Class, 2; LeConte, 
Stormy Petrel, 2, 4, Features 
Cheerleader, 2, 4, Co-Captain, 



4; Social Committee, 2, 3, 4, Chairman, 4; Duchess 



Club, 3, 4, Pari., 4; B-Team Cheerleader, 3, 
Captain, 3; Yamacraw, 3, 4; Who's Who, 4; Lord 
and Lady Oglethorpe Court, 4; Interactivity Com- 
mittee, 4. 

LYNNE SCHAEFER 

Atlanta, Georgia j>^ ';.'■-■ 

B.S. 

ETHEL RHODES SCOTT 
Marietta, Georgia 
B.A. 




% 



ROSALIE SEIDEL 

Atlanta, Georgia » 

B.A. 

MILDRED L. SEYMANN 

Atlanta. Georgia 

B.A. 

HARVEY JAY SHAFFER 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 

Transfer. L'niversity of Georgia. Alpha Epsilon 

Phi, 1, 2, Pledge Class, 1, Pres., 2; Humanics. 

3, 4. 

DOROTHY SHARP 

Atlant.i. Georgia 

B.A. 

LOY BARRETT SxMITH 

Lavonia. Georgia 

B.A. 

Transfer, Emor\-; Humanics, 3, 4, V.P., 4; Alpha 

Phi Omega, 3, 4, V.P., 4; Boar's Head, 4; Chorus. 

4. 

PHYLLIS LOUISE SMITH 
ftfcHenr)-, Illinois 
B.A. 

Transfer. Agnes Scott; French Club, 1, 3; Human- 
ities Secretary, 4; Xingu, 4. 
BARBARA SOUTHARD 
Lawrenceville, Georgia 
B.A. 

JOHN CHENOWETH STEVENS 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 



Transfer, Antioch; Advertising Manager of Radio 

Station, 1; Executive Sec. of Young Republicans, 

1; Players, 3, 4; Young Conservatives, 3, 4, Pres., 

4. 

ELIZABETH STEVENSON 

Decatur, Georgia 

B.A. 




SUZY STRAUB 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. » 

Yamacraw, 1, 2, 3, 4, Executive Secretary, 2, 3, 

Editor-in-Chief, 4; Treasurer of Freshman Class, 

1; Stormy Petrel, 3, 4; Duchess Club, 3, 4, Sec, 

4; Social Committee, 3, 4; Secretary of Junior 

Class, 3; Interactivity Committee, 3, 4, Sec, 3; 

Student Union, 4, Sec-Treas., 4; Whos' Who, 4; 

Lord and Lady Oglethorpe Court, 4. 

RAY M. THOMAS 

Cedartown, Georgia 

B.A. 

Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Captain, 3; Tennis, 

1, 2, 3, Captain, 3; Vice President of Junior Class, 

3; Boar's Head, 4, V.P., 4; Treasurer of Student 

Council, 4; Who's Who, 4. 

BENJAMIN VINCENT 

Atlanta, Georgia 

B.A. 

GEORGE HOYT WAGNER 

Briarcliff Manor. New York 

B.A. 

Parliamentarian of Freshman Class, 1; Gun Club, 

1, 2, 3, 4, V.P., 3, Pres., 4; Soccer, 1. 
MARGARET ANNE WARRELL 
Atlanta. Georgia 

B.A. 

Transfer, Old Dominion; Dramatics Society, 1; 

Tennis 2; Rifle, 2, 3, 4, Captain, 4; Gun Club, 

2, 3, 4, Treas., 2, 3; Newman Club, 2, 3, Treas. 

2, 3; Stormy Petrel, 3 ,4. 
HAYGOOD EARL WATERS 
Atlanta. Georgia 

B.S. 

ESMERALDA AVILES WELLS 
Atlanta. Georgia 
B.A. 

Transfer, Wesleyan; B-Team Cheerleader, 2; Var- 
sity Cheerleader, 3; Stormy Petrel, 2; Spring 
Varieties, 2, 3; Social Committee, 3; Jr. Class 
Intramural Rep., 3; Student LTnion, 3; Yamacraw, 

3, Organizations Co-Editor. 




192