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Full text of "Yamacraw, 1967"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

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http://www.archive.org/details/yamacraw196736ogle 



YAMACRAW 

1967 



OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 
ATLANTA • GEORGIA 





Contents 




Academics 


.. 33 


Student Life .... 


.. 49 


Athletics 


. .113 


Classes . . 


. .145 


Honors . 


..173 


Advertising . . ... 


. .183 



Some things are constant. The harmony of the 
bells, a gray silhouette through winter trees, the 
strength and grace of enduring stone — these are 
elements of Oglethorpe that are timeless. These 
form the thread that unites the past and the 
future. 





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A flower is also a timeless thing, and spring, 
although it passes quickly, has its place in the 
permanence of the seasons. At Oglethorpe, spring 
comes with the first dafi'odil, a branch of dog- 
wood, and then the glory of everything in full 
bloom. 








The changelessness of nature at Oglethorpe is 
also reflected in the stillness of Lake Pheobe. We 
see it in the woods that line its shores, the tran- 
quility of a solitary boat, and in the placid sur- 
face of the water as it mirrors an ageless sky. 











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10 





The granite buildings modeled after England's 
Oxford, are Oglethorpe's most tangible perma- 
nence. Their beauty, solidarity, and strength 
symbolize an ideal that has already lasted more 
than a century. 




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Not all permanence at Oglethorpe is tangible, 
however. Were it not for the dynamic leader- 
ship and determination of Dr. Samuel K. Tal- 
mage and Dr. Thornwell Jacobs the realization 
of Oglethorpe would never have been met. What 
we know as Oglethorpe dates from 1913, but 
Oglethorpe University actually began in 1835. 
Our past history is an ever present reminder of 
the Oglethorpe tradition and proud heritage 
that has been left to us. 



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13 



Oglethorpe has come a long way, through 
Civil War, Reconstruction, and financial hard- 
ship. Still it has retained from the past the per- 
manences of its ideal. In order to assure these 
in the future, growth must be and is one of the 
most vital permanences at Oglethorpe. Change 
is everywhere as the Oglethorpe of today 
stretches to reach the heights of tomorrow. 






14 






15 



Yes, like the city of Atlanta Oglethorpe has 
and continues to change and grow, for 

"Yesterday is but today's memory, and to- 
morrow is today's dream ..." 

Kahlil Gibran 




16 




x^\ 



Today is life and vibrancy; change is in the 
air and there is an aura of excitement. Inevi- 
tably, turmoil comes with rapid growth. But 
today Oglethorpe, as well as each individual 
student, has been given the opportunity to con- 
vert her dreams into realities. 

Yet amid this dynamic background the 
everyday things continue to be much as they 
were yesterday and as they will be tomorrow. 
Students still rush to classes, learn, argue, en- 
joy the world outside four walls, and fall in love. 









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20 





As the seasons pass, the faces of Oglethorpe 
change, each bringing a special beauty all its 
own. The bright vitality of autumn, the grey- 
ness of a winter that only occasionally sparkles 
in white, the budding green and warmth of a 
long-awaited spring . . 



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22 




As they stand in the shadows of night and 
day, our campus buildings, in their Gothic tra- 
dition of solidity and strength, are a tangible 
symbol of the Oglethorpe Ideal. As we stroll in 
these shadows, muse on these steps, or pause 
to gaze at the softly illumined tower on a misty 
night, we are part of this Ideal. 



23 




Today is people — people playing cards, chat- 
ting between classes, waiting in the cafeteria 
lines, cheering at games. These things and 
many more we will remember, and know that 
among the richest rewards of our Oglethorpe 
years were our friendships. 





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25 





26 





Today is a myriad of beginnings. Outwardly 
our year's beginnings concerned the mixed ex- 
citements and frustrations of orientation, regis- 
tration, and, for the freshmen who have more 
claim to beginnings than anyone, the rigors of 
rat week. 

Inwardly, however, are occurring more pro- 
found and significant beginnings the awaken- 
ing of minds, as each of us is "shaped, made 
aware." 





27 



As today's year progresses, beginnings grow 
to involvements, and students become ab- 
sorbed in a constant, often behind-the-scenes, 
flow of activities. Nearly everyone at Ogle- 
thorpe works hard at something, and those who 
give themselves with dedication find some of 
the most wonderful experiences Oglethorpe 
can offer. 




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30 






Perhaps most of all, today is learning: the 
long hours of study in the library, the cram- 
ming, the frustrated yet determined grappling 
for facts. To be moved by a poem, struck by 
the logic of an equation, wonder at a past era, 
discover a truth — this is w hv we came. 



31 



Reflections are glimpses into the past, each 
thought bringing the shadow of yesterday clos- 
er to the realness of today. 

Now our today is already becoming a mem- 
ory; it's realness is already becoming shadowy 
and dim. But we will remember and our mem- 
ories of Oglethorpe will enrich all our todays 
to come. 





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32 




1835 




^^^835 



ACADEMICS 









^^1835 



The future of any country which is 

dependent upon the will and wisdom of its citizens 

is damaged, and irreparably damaged, 

whenever any of its people are not educated 

to the full extent of their talents. 

— John F. Kennedy 



Reflections are glim 
thought bringing the s 
er to the realness of toda 

Now our today is a 
ory; it's realness is al 
and dim. But we will 
ories of Oglethorpe w 
to come. 







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ACADEMICS 



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Dr. Paul R. Beall at his desk. 



The college home of the President-"Cranham Hall". 




The President 

of the 

College 

Dr. Paul R. Beall 




Dr. Beall. as work begins on the new build- 
ings, lends a helping hand. 



Vice President 

for Academic Affairs 

Dr. A. Cheever 

Cressy, Jr. 



Mr. Elgin F. MacConnell, Dean of Men. 



Mrs. -an K. Sholar, 

Dean oi -len. 







34 



Dr. A. Cheever Cressy, Jr. 




Mr. Grady L. Randolph, Director of Evening Division. 




Vice President 

for Business Affairs 

James E. Findlay 




Mr. James E. Findlay 



Charles H. Cash, Jr. 

Alumni and Public Relations Director 
Assistant to the President 




Robert J. Mohan 

Director of Admissions 






Harold M. Shafron 

Director of Student Aid & Placement 





Mr. Robert I. Doyal 

Registrar 



Dr. Martin Abbott 

Assistant Dean 



35 



Mrs. Jeanne B. Cressy 

Secretary to Mr. Cash 

Miss Glenda Balowsky 

Assistant Registrar 



Mrs. Joan Barton 

Secretary to Registrar's Office 

Mrs. Thelma Evans 

Secretary to Registrar's Office 





Mr. Thomas W. Chandler, Jr. 

Librarian 

Mrs. Dorothy G. Richardson 

Assistant Librarian 



Mrs. Penelope M. Rose 

Library Assistant 

Mrs. Ruth L. Osteen 

Library Assistant 



36 




Mrs. Britta K. Palmer 

Secretary to the Dean 

.Mrs. June H. Conley 

Admissions Secretary 



Mrs. Delores Reiser 

Secretary to the Director 
of Admissions 

Mrs. Martha J. Smith 

Secretary to Mr. Findlay 



Mrs. Majorie 
MacConnell, Regis- 
trar Emeritus 

Mrs. Andrea Conner, 

Cashier 

Mrs. Wanda Bracken, 

Bookkeeper 



Miss Sandra Crohoski, 

Secretary to Mr. 
Randolph 

Mrs. Barbara Carroll 

Mrs. Kathleen H. 
Albright, Receptionist 








37 



Humanities 



Man is above all things a man. Possessing 
unique characteristics which distinguish him 
from all other creatures, he is able to enhance 
his cultural environment. Of particular import 
are his artistic, literary, and architectural tal- 
ents. The Division of Humanities emphasizes 
man's essential humanness and seeks to devel- 
ope these human qualities. Through the study of 
Art, English, Foreign Languages, Literature, 
and Philosophy, each student may fulfil his im- 
portant place among his fellow men. 





Wendell H. Brown, A.B., A.M.. Professor of Humanities 




// 



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Lucille Q. Agnew, A.B., 

A.M.. Assistant Professor 

of English 

Stuart B. Babbage, A.B , 

A.M.. Pli.D , Th.D., As- 
sociate Professor of Eng- 
lish 



Patricia Bonner, A.B., 

M. Mus.. Instructor in 

Music 

Vandall K. Brock, A B , 

A.M., M.F.A., Assistant 
Professor of English 



Elaine G. Dancy, A.B., 

M.A.. Assistant Professor 
of English 

John T. Dennis, A.B., 
A.M., Instructor in Eng- 
lish 



38 




Harry M. Oobson, Insti- 
tute of Musical Arts, As- 
sistant Professor of Music 



Robert J. Fusillo, Ph D , 

Assistant Professor of 
English 



Bruce H. Hoffman, B S , 

A.M.. Instructor in Eng- 
lish 






Lois C. Kropa, Ph.D.. 
Assistant Professor of 
English 



Maria Shafron. .A.B.. In- 
structor in An. 



39 



Languages 



In our modern age where distance no longer 
inhibits interaction between people of different 
countries, a serious problem, nevertheless, ex- 
ists: that of effective and successful communica- 
tion between people. The Language Department 
of Oglethorpe provides an excellent opportunity 
to acquaint oneself with the languages of Spain, 
France and Germany. 




William A. Strozier, 

A.B., A.M., Visiting Lec- 
turer in French 
Elizabeth Z. Sturrock, 

B.S.. A.M., Instructor in 
German 



lii 




Arthur Bieler, A B, 

A.M., Ph.D., Professor of 
Modern Languages 



Raymonde Hilley, In- 
structor in French, 




Jorge A. Marban, A.B., 
LL.D., M,Soc. Sci„ As- 
sistant Professor of Span- 
ish 




Ignacio Merino-Perez 

B.S.&A., Ph.L.D., Visit- 
ing Lecturer in Spanish 




40 




Social Studies 

The Division of Social Studies seeks to pro- 
vide every student with the essential tools for in- 
telligent and effective living in the American 
community. These tools are provided through 
the study of Business Administration, Econom- 
ics, History, and Political Studies. 






A. Cheever Cressy, A B.. 
A.M., Ph.D., Professor 
of International Relations 
Martin Abbott, ,'\.B.. 
A.M., Ph.D.. Professor 
of Historv 



Leo Bilancio, .A B , .AM.. 
Associate Professor of 
History 

William .\. Egerton, Pro- 
fessor of Business .Admin- 
istration 



Lloyd J. Elliott, B.S.. 

M.B.A., Ph.D., Associate 
Professor of Economics 
Ida L. Garrett. A.B . 

■A.M.. Instructor in His- 
torv and Government 




41 




Georgia O. Moore, 

B.B.A.. M.B.A., Instruc- 
tor in Business 




Philip F. Palmer, A B., 

A.M.. Associate Profes- 
sor of Government 
Grady L. Randolph, B S. 
in Ed., L.L.B., A.M., In- 
structor in Hisotry 



Harold M. Shafron, A B , 

A.M., Associate Profes- 
sor of Economics 
John C. Spencer, Visiting 
Lecturer in Finance, 




George C. Harris, B.A., 

M.A., Instructor in Inter- 
national Relations 



Jack Brien Key, A B, 

A.M., Ph.D., Associate 
Professor of History 



James R. Miles, A.B., 
B.S,, M.B.A., Professor 
of Business Administration 




42 



Physical and 
Biological Sciences 

"The Face of Science: rigorous, orderly, im- 
personal. Experimentation, data reduction, in- 
formation retrieval, classification, analysis, and, 
most importantly, imagination all combine 

to give Science an exciting and modern face. Im- 
personal as this face may appear, it is not with- 
out color for it is flushed with one great love, 
the love of truth itself." 






J. Kennedy Hodges. A.B.. 
A.M.. Ph.D.. Professor 
of Chemistry 
Roy N. Goslin. A B. 

.A.M.. Professor of Phys- 
ics and Mathematics 



Ronald D. Bonnell. In- 
structor in Mathematics 
Bruce H. Hauck. Instruc- 
tor in .Mathematics 



Manin R. Hawes. A.B . 

M.S.. .Assistant Professor 

of Biology 

Bemice R. Hilliard. .A B . 

M.Ed.. Instructor in 

Mathematics 



43 



i 




Patricia A. Hull, A B. 

M.S.. Instructor in Phys- 
ics and Mathematics 



Ruth E. Lewis, Instructor 
in Chemistry 




Cleon M. Mobley, Instruc- 
tor in Physics 



Skevos N. Tsoukalas, 
Ph.D.. Visiting Lecturer 
in Chemistry 




Dr. Zalkow shows student proper technique. 





44 



Sybil B. Wells, BS. 

M.A.T., Instructor in 
Mathematics 



George F. Wheeler, A.B , 

A.M., Associate Profes- 
sor of Physics 



Lois F. Williamson, A.B., 

M.Ed., Assistant Profes- 
sor of Biology 



Behavioral Sciences 



The Division of Education and Behavioral 
Sciences offers training to those students who 
wish to serve their society through working with 
people. Courses in Psychology, Sociology, Ele- 
mentary and Secondary Education provide the 
student with the qualifications necessary to ad- 
vance in his chosen field. This Division extends 
its services to the student as well as to the sur- 
rounding community. 



r i-'H 





Richard M. Reser. A B.. 

M.A.. Ph.D.. Professor 
of Sociolo2\ 




David F. Berger, Instruc- 
tor in Ps\cholo2\ 




Billy W. Carter. A B. 

.A.M.. .Assistant Profes- 
sor of Physical Education 







Johnny Guthrie. Instruc- 
tor in Ph\ sical Education 



45 



Education 



"I consider a human soul without education 
like marble in the quarry, which shows none of 
its inherent beauties till the skill of the polisher 
fetches out the colors, makes the surface shine, 
and discovers every ornamental cloud, spot and 
vein that runs through the body of it." 




Mohamed Kian, B.S., 

M.S., Assistant Professor 
of Psychology 




Pelcr N. Mayfield, A B , 
A.M., Ph.D., Visiting Lec- 
turer in Psychology 





Elgin F. MacConnell, 

A.B., A.M., Assistant 
Professor of Education 



Lorella A. McKinney, 

B.S., A.M., Ph.D., As- 
sociate Professor of Edu- 
cation. 



Edithgene B. Sparks, 

B.S.. M.Ed., Assistant 
Professor of Education 




Philosophy 



Philosophy is a human activity whose hall- 
mark is the search for generality. It differs from 
the Sciences in that it is not an attempt to de- 
scribe some specific subject area in empirically 
verifiable terms, but rather the attempt to in- 
quire into the grounds of justification of scientif- 
ic methodology in general. 



Ken Nishimura, A B., 
B.D., Assistant Professor 
of Philosophy 
Robert W. Loftin, A.B., 
A.M., Assistant Professor 
of Philosophy 



Robert M. Baird, A B, 
M.A., B.D. Assistant 
Professor of Philosophy 
John Lowry, Instructor in 
Philosophy 




4l^i 





47 





Mrs. Ruth F. Lovell, Manager of the Bookstore and Post Office. 



Mrs. Lenora Baldwin 

College Nurse 



Mrs. Barbara Wade 

Secretary, Science, Div. 




Mrs. Dorothy H. Wishon, Faculty Secretary. 



Mr. Sewell P. Edwards 

Campus Security Chief 







Mr. Donald C. Hawkins, Maintenance and Grounds Supervision. 



48 




1835 




STUDENT LIFE 





^^1835 




1835 




If a man does not keep pace with 

his companions , perhaps it 

is because he hears a different drummer. 

Let him step to 

the music he hears, however, 

measured or far away. 

— Thoreau 






Mrs. Ruth F. Lovell, Manager 






Mrs. Dorothy H. Wis ^ ^ ~ 



I. 








'• ^ 



Mr. Sewell P. Edward: 

Campus Security Chie 



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1835 




^^^835 




^1835 




1835 






STUDENT LIFE 







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ORIENTATION 

Students Participate 
in Fall Activities 

As fall comes to the Oglethorpe campus, stu- 
dents find themselves occupied with all the ac- 
tivities necessary to starting another school 
year. Excitement fills the air as one finds him- 
self running here and there, going to new classes, 
attempting to find that all-impossible parking 
place, older students befriending new ones, re- 
ceiving that first letter from home, or spend- 
ing a quiet moment of solitude or loneliness — 
All of this is part of orientation at Oglethorpe. 



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50 








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52 





RAT WEEK 

Pm an R Sir, A Sir, 
T Sir, Rat Sir, Yes Sir 

Wondering Rats, distinguished among other 
humans by rat hats and ridiculousness, await an 
entire week of "special attention"' rendered by 
upperclassmen. Rats are lowly creatures who 
answer any and all demands, from. "Tell where 
the O.C. swimming pool is to be found. "" to. 
"Hey Rat! Climb that treel" Though the rats 
seem to stand alone at the beginning of the 
week, by the end no such situation will exist. 




54 





FALL DANCES 



Informal Dances Give 
Break from Studying 

As students begin to get down to serious 
studying the social committee makes sure that 
they also get down to some serious fun at their fall 
dances on weekends. Held on campus, at the 
B & B Ranch, or the American Legion with 
bands pouring forth their favorite music, the 
students indeed find the much needed relaxa- 
tion and fun. 




GHOST STORIES 

Witches and Goblins 
Haunt O.C. Auditorium 

Ghost Story Readings are a traditional part 
of the witching season at Oglethorpe. Under 
the sponsorship of the Players, faculty and 
students are invited to participate in reading 
spooky stories on Halloween Eve. The audi- 
torium becomes the home of ghosts and goblins, 
terrorizing all who enter with their haunting 
screams and grumblings. 




56 





58 




FALL PLAYS 

Players Begin Year 
with Medieval Plays 

The Players, an integral part of the force which 
provides entertainment for the Oglethorpe cam- 
pus, started their season with two Medieval 
plays in the fall. "Everyman," a morality play, 
delighted the audiences with its sincere message 
to mankind, while "Johan, Johan,"" a bawdy 
comedy, humored them with its winning slap- 
stick. 





SPRING PLAYS 

Play and Movie Close 
the Successful Season 

The Players finished up their season with 
another play, "The Silver Cord," and one of 
their excellent movies. The play charmed the 
audiences with its peculiar situation and wit. 
The movie, using the talents of many students, 
rates as one of the finest achievements of the 
players. 




' 





60 





61 




62 




BOAR'S HEAD 

The Christmas Spirit 
Fills The O.C. Campus 

Like the first winter snow the traditional 
Boar's Head Ceremony was held at the begin- 
ning of the Christmas Season. It was the occa- 
sion for the initiation of the new members of 
the Boars Head Honorary Fraternity for 1967. 
The program included a presentation of the 
new members, carols sung by the chorus, read- 
ings of Christmas Literature, and placing the 
boar's head before the yule log. 




63 




Miss Gretchen Von Muller 
1967 Homecoming Queen 



HOMECOMING 

Pretty Girls Vie for 
a Most Queenly Title 

An intregal part of the homecoming activi- 
ties at Oglethorpe is the traditional crowning 
of the Homecoming Queen during halftime 
of the basketball game. The candidates are 
nominated by the various campus organiza- 
tions and selected by student vote. This year 
the girls represented the many-faceted person- 
ality of Oglethorpe. 



Miss Dee Denton 




64 





%*^.„ i ::,._. 



Miss Cindy Knox 



Miss Kay Alibrandi 





Miss Barbara Beggs 



Miss Sue Schmid 



65 




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LORD AND LADY 



Excitement, Honor and 
Gaiety Fill Evening 



February means the crowning of Lord and 
Lady Oglethorpe. This year the courtly sur- 
roundings of the Progressive Club and the music 
of Maurice Williams and the Zodiacs lent a 
perfect setting for the evening of festivities 
which surrounded the anticipation of the crown- 
ing of Oglethorpe's Lord and Lady of the year. 




66 









,«?v^ 







Lady Oglethorpe 
Miss Pokey Therrell 



Lord Oglethorpe 
Mr. Larry Shattles 





Court 



Miss Tina Varn 
Mr. Bill Weber 




70 



Miss Sandy Abbott 
Mr. Tim Marx 



Members 



'■'^— . 1 — -L^ 







Miss Nancy Charnley 
Mr. Floyd Ruhl 



Miss Judy Beggs 
Mr. Tom O'Conner 



71 








f^^f»% 





FINE ARTS SERIES 

Lecturers, Films, and 
Talent Are Presented 

The Fine Arts Committee brought a unique 
group of artists including Turner Cassidy, 
Van K. Brock, Lawrence Allaway, and Jonas 
Mekas to the Oglethorpe Campus this year. 
Such programs made the audiences more aware 
and appreciative of modern art forms. In ad- 
dition to these informative presentations the 
fine Arts Committee recognized Student talent 
to complete this stimulating series. 



72 



•' 







Fine Arts Awards 



Instrumental 

Jacqueline Stark 



Vocal 



Martha Ernst 



Acting 



Pamela Grossman 










74 






SPRING ENTERTAINMENT 

Lettermen, Shirelles, 
Varieties Highlight Spring 

As the Second trimester begins. Students find 
new entertainment an enjoyable break from 
studies. This year Spring Varieties proved to be 
a fine expression of the talent on campus. Con- 
certs by the Lettermen, the Tarns, and the 
Shirelles livened the spirits of all who attended 
these two pleasureable evenings. 



75 




BLACK AND WHITE 

Frosh Entertain with 
Traditional Formal 

The Black and White is sponsored annually 
by the freshman class. They have projects such 
as car washes, candy sales, and slave sales to 
make the necessary money for the dance. This 
year the students were entertained at the 
American Motor Hotel where music was sup- 
plied by Doctor Feelgood and the Interns. 




76 






77 





SPRING FORMAL 




Spring Formal Brings 
the Year to a Close 

The Spring Formal is the last dance for Ogle- 
thorpe Seniors before they graduate. This 
year they enjoyed themselves at the Marriott, 
decorated with red and black daisies, and 
music provided by Jimmy Fuller and his Or- 
chestra. The dancing and gaity of the evening 
lasted far into the night and will be a lasting 
memory to Oglethorpe's 1967 graduates. 



78 




-*PH^ 






79 




GRADUATION 1967 

Commencement — an End 
and a New Beginning 

Graduation 1967 brought to a climax a long 
and arduous struggle for those seniors in the 
graduating class. But as is oftimes stated it 
was also a Commencement. This year the 
Commencement speech was delivered by the 
new President of Oglethorpe College, Dr. Paul 
K. Vonk. 

June 4, 1967 will long stand out in the minds 
of the graduates who received their diplomas 
and capes for as they look back on their lives 
ti V will remember Oglethorpe and the alma 
ma r to which we all owe our allegiance. 





» 




81 




Dr. PaulK. Vonk 





GRADUATES HONORED 

Robert Foreman Presents 
Oglethorpe's Top Awards 

This year the awards presented at gradua- 
tion were presented by the Chairman of the 
Board of Trustees Mr. Robert Foreman. Those 
awards were The Brinker award for the out- 
standing student in philosophy and rehgion; 
The Faculty Award for Scholarship presented 
to the young man with the highest scholastic 
average over the last two or three years; The 
Sally Hull Weltner Award for Scholarship 
which is presented to the young lady with the 
highest scholastic average for the past two or 
three years; and The James Edward Ogle- 
thorpe Awards for merit. 

The winners were The Brinker Award . . . 
Dayle Janss; The Faculty Award for Scholar- 
ship . . Morris Gavin Strickland; The Sally 
Hull Weltner Award for Scholarship . . . Ma- 
jorie Hallock; The James Edward Oglethorpe 
Awards for Merit Thomas Lee Reilly, Jo- 

sephine O'Conner Therrell. 



82 



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83 



Student Council 



The five elected officers of the Student Gov- 
ernment and the four class presidents compose 
the Student Council. This governing organiza- 
tion is designed to serve as the unifying and 
coordinating body for all student activities and 
events. 

As our student body has grown larger over 
the past few years, each successive Student 
Government has found the job of providing 
activities for these students more difficult. This 
year's Student Government has lived up to the 
challenge and provided activities for all stu- 
dents' interests. 





Vice President: Steve White 



President: Larry Shiattles 




Steve White, Larry Shattles, Bonnie Tash, John Sims, Valera Bagwell 





Treasurer: John Sims 



f * 




Parliamentarian: Bonnie Tash 




Secretary: Valera Bagwell 



Student Government provided this activity? 



85 



Board of Treasurers 



All student activities are paid for out of an 
activity fee collected at the beginning of each 
trimester and and turned over to the Student 
Government for distribution to the various 
chartered organizations. The treasurer of each 
of these organizations is responsible for the 
money allocated for its use. The Board of 
Treasurers was organized to insure close co- 
ordination with the Student Government, and 
to help the treasurers keep proper and uniform 
records. 




John Sims, Bored of Treasurers? 





FRONT ROW: Frank Spearman. John Sims, Rusty Cutler, Ronald Binkney; SECOND ROW: Terrv Robinson. Dee Denton, Jerri Kuglar: THIRD 
ROW: Sandy Abbott, Kathy Starcher. Dave Copeland. 



86 



S.U.S.G.A. 



The letters S.U.S.G.A. stand for the Southern 
Universities Student Government Associations, 
which means just what it says and which pro- 
vides student governments with a common 
meeting ground at periodic meetings to com- 
pare their work and exchange ideas. 

Oglethorpe was fortunate this year to have 
had Bill Weber elected at the annual meeting 
to represent the Georgia colleges and univer- 
sities and to coordinate their work during this 
year. His fine talents have served S.U.S.G.A. 
well and given our college prestige. 

Bill Weber 











fc?* 



Tom Port and Steve White 



Student Union 

Tom Port and Ste\e White head the seldom 
heard of Student Union, which is responsible 
for maintaining our Student Union (consisting 
for the moment of the "Pit""). This year their 
efforts have been directed toward arranging for 
facilities to go into our new Student Union 
Building to be completed and opened during 
the next year. 



87 




Social Committee 

The Social Committee is a committee of the 
Student Government whose function it is to 
arrange for all social activities that come 
directly under Student Government sponsor- 
ship. 

This year's Social Committee was headed by 
Bill Weber and was very active. They arranged 
for two on campus Concerts, four formals, a 
number of small dances at the Legion Hall, 
the B & B Ranch, and the "Pit'\ and free 
movies almost every weekend. 




88 




FRONT ROW: Rusty Cutler, Tim Marx; BACK ROW: Mark Mulligan, Aubrey Whitaker, Doug Alexander 





■«• *w *«r rf * ■* ' 






Intramural Council 

The men and womens Intramural Council 
are responsible for providing intramural ath- 
letic competition for interested students and 
organizations. This was the first \ear for a 
womens council and it was extremely success- 
ful. 

SEATED: Mary Schoen, Toni Chamberlain, Terri Rosselle. Sandy Ab- 
bott, Pokey Therrell; STANDING: Salh Beall. 




le 




WM 



;*?»''jC-- 




89 



Honor Council 



The Honor Committee reviews suspected 
violations of the Honor Code presented to the 
Council and decides which of the cases has 
sufficient factual basis to warrant a trial by 
the Honor Court. The Honor Committee also 
considers amendments to the Honor Code, and 
submits the proposals it approves to the stu- 
dents and faculty for radification. This year's 
Committee was composed of Grafton Biglow, 
Ginger Anderson, Nikki McCoy, and Stuart 
Levenson. 

The Honor Court hears all cases of alleged 
violations of the Honor Code and has the au- 
thority to recommend punishment for those 
found guilty subject to the approval of the 
Dean of the College. The Court is composed 
of two elected members from each class as 
the Committee is composed of one member 
from each class, and both groups have a chair- 
man appointed by the previous chairman, 
and a faculty advisor. This year's Court was 
composed of Lee Ann Goenne, Terry Robinson, 
Tom Cone, Richard Schanen, Judy Ponturo, 
Ronald Binkney, Tom Reilly, and Bill Weber. 




Robert Johnson, Court Chairman and Mr. Palmer, Advisor. 




Mr. Palmer, Faculty Advisor and Floyd Ruhl, Committee Chairman. 



Dorm Council 



r "^ 




FRESHMAN DORM COUNCIL: Linda Hillgoth, Sharon Gleason, Noel Dalv, Carol Sareeant. June Costello. 




Each of the Women's Dorms ha\e an elected 
Dorm Council to establish and enforce dorm 
rules and regulations, and help the House 
Mothers whenever possible. They work closel_\ 
with the Dean of Women and are prob- 
ably the most hated girls on campus at the end 
of the year because of their duty to enforce the 
dorm rules even though they were elected to 
the position. 



Mrs. Sholar, Dean of Women 



91 




FRONT ROW: Bob Jackson, Joe Fitzhugh, Gretchen Von Muller, SWEETHEART, Terry Paton, Rusty Cutler: SECOND ROW: Robert Doyal, 
ADVISOR, Frank Spearman. John Wickham. John Zerby, THIRD ROW: Robert Johnson, John Sims, Stuart Levenson, Les Deadwyler, Tom ReiMy, 
Ed Daffin; BACK ROW: Ben Low, Phil Jesse, Joe Dennis, Roland Clarke. 



Alpha Phi Omega 
Fraternity 

Alpha Phi Omega is a national service 
fraternity composed of college and university 
men who are, or have been affiliated with the 
Boy Scouts of America. The purpose of the 
fraternity is to assemble college men in fellow- 
ship under the Scout Oath and Law and to pro- 
mote service to the student body, the faculty, 
the community, and the nation. The fraternity 
was probably one of the most active organiza- 
tions on campus this year sponsoring dances, 
car smashes, slave sales to raise money for the 
"Pop" Crow Scholarship Fund and participat- 
ing in the Intramural program. 




Sweetheart Janice Lymburner at Initiation. 



92 




OFFICERS: Les Deadwyler, John Wickham. Bob Jackson. Joe Filz- 
hugh. Stuart Levernson 





l^^^.i^x' 






- f 




Harris" Door gets it again. 
Some slaves are worth more than others. 




93 



Advisor Mr. Loftin selijna slaves. 







Remember the Scout Oath, Tim. 




FRONT ROW: Mrs. Robert Lofitin. Kathy McLeod. Sandy Abbott, Diane Winde, Sandra Hedge, Jennifer Thomas, Bonnie Tash, Peppie Miller, Judy 
Ponturo, Candy Kazlow; BACK ROW: Jucy Beggs, Dee Denton, Pokey Therrell, Marie McClaran, Valera Bagwell, Kalhy Starcher. 

Duchess Club 

The Duchess Club is an honor society for 
Junior and Senior women who have maintained 
an outstanding scholastic record and who have 
participated actively in campus extracurricu- 
lar activities. The club was founded in 1920 
with the ideal of integrating the ideas of aca- 
demic proficiency with service to the school. 
This year the club has worked closely with the 
Women's Club and under the guidance of Mrs. 
Robert Loftin, Sponsor, they have provided 
servers and usherettes. 



94 



Boar's Head 
Academic Excellence 



Like the Duchess Club, the Boar's Head 
Fraternity is an honor society for Junior and 
Senior men who have achieved academic 
excellence, participated in a leadership role 
in campus activities, and who wish to serve the 
campus community. 

The fraternity traditionally sponsors the 
annual Boar's Head Ceremony just prior to 
the Christmas Holidays. Mr. Robert Loftin, 
an Oglethorpe graduate and former fraternity 
member, was their sponsor this year as they 
presented the traditional ceremony. 




Mr. Robert Loftin, Faculty Sponsor 




FRONT ROW: Floyd Ruhl, Tim Marx, Robert Riclnards, Tommy O'Conner, Larry Shattles. Lee Winde. Stuart Levenson; SECOND ROW: Doug 
Alexander, John Sims, Roger Littel, Tom Reilly, Bob Jackson, Larry Pearlman; BACK ROW: Les Deadwyler, .Mr, Robert Loftin. SPONSOR, Bill 
Weber, Harry Echols, John McCook. 



95 



Le Conte 
Honorary 

Science Club 



The LeConte is an honorary science organ- 
ization for outstanding students in a 
science majors program. These students 
must maintain an average of 80 in all of 
their courses and an 85 in all of their 
science courses and have a genuine inter- 
est in the progress of science. Any student 
in a science program in his sophomore, 
junior, or senior year is eligible for mem- 
bership. 



OFFICERS: Barbara Beggs, Lila Bennett, Cheryl Baker 




FRONT ROW: Lila Bennett, Barbara Beggs. Clierl Baker; BACK ROW: 
Roger Littel, Si via Zapico, Sandra Hedge, John McCook. 





96 



Oglethorpe Players 



The Oglethorpe Chorus is composed of both 
interested students and faculty members and 
serves the college community in the dual func- 
tion of providing entertainment and musical 
accompaniment at campus functions. 

This year the Chorus was under the guidance 
of Miss Patricia Bonner, who was new to both 
the faculty and the Chorus, as they performed 
at the Boar's Head Ceremony, the Christmas 
assemblies, and the Spring Varieties. 



FRONT ROW: Paula Haver. Paula Citek. Diane Keeling. Elaine 
Reilly. Beth Jenkins, Lynn Young. Valera Bagwell. Barbara Austin. 
Bonnie Hargrove; BACK ROW: Jim Prager. David Wood. Phil Jessee. 
Rober Miller, Robert Loftin, Tom Free. 




97 



' -'iW"^ 




FRONT ROW: Arnold Rosenberg, Bob Hamrick. Dee Winde, Brenda Hamlin, Tom Romano; BACK ROW: Vickie Lewis, Nate Zahn, Pam Gross- 
man. 



Oglethorpe 
Chorus 



The Oglethorpe Players serve to promote the 
interests of students interested in the theater 
arts. It provides opportunities for all to devel- 
ope their talents and inclinations under the 
guidance a trained and experienced faculty 
member, such as Dr. Robert Fusillo, this year's 
advisor. 

The Players annually participate in several 
plays, a movie or two, and the Spring Varieties, 
and assist other groups when they need the 
Players experience. 




Nate Zahn, President 



98 




Movie Staff; Richard Schanen, Kay Alibrandi, Arnold Rosenberg. Diane Keeling, Bob Hamrick, Nikki McCoy. Nate Zahn. 






i,.>''^ •**>'," 

:^.'i 







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Officers; Bob Hamrick. Dee Winde. Nate Zahn. Pam Grossman. Arnold Rosenberg. 



99 




FRONT ROW: Ronald Binkey, Linda Newmark, Bonnie Hargrove, 
Richard Binkney; BACK ROW: Diane keeling. Bill Arey, Kay Ali- 
brandi, Elaine Reilly. 




People to People 



People to People is based on the principle 
that world peace can best be achieved by per- 
sonal understanding among people of the world. 
An example of People to People's sincerity in 
working toward their goal is the close alliance 
between them and the International Club for 
Oglethorpe's foreign students. As part of their 
efforts over the past year. People to People have 
sponsored many films and guest speakers on 
foreign topics. 




PRESIDENT: Linda NewMark 



100 




Yamacraw 
Gun Club 

The Gun Club was organized to encourage 
organized rifle and pistol shooting among mem- 
bers of the College community with the goal of 
developing broader knowledge, safer handling, 
and the proper care of firearms, and to de-el- 
ope expert marksmanship and sportsmanship. 
It might be well to add that the club is under 
the guidance of Chief Edwards. Head of 
Campus Security, who once shot himself in the 
foot. 




> <^ 



■ \-v 



■•' I 






Chief Edwards. Sponsor 




101 




Political Life 
Young Democrats 



In keeping with the Southern tradition Ogle- 
thorpe College has a Young Democrats Club 
and only a Young Democrats Club to repre- 
sent its political life. 

The Young Democrats were organized to 
participate in Democratic politics at the 
county, state, and national levels. The club also 
meets to discuss current political topics and to 
sponsor outstanding speakers. 



Dr. Key, Faculty Sponsor 




FRONT ROW: Larry Pearlman, Ronald Binkey. Bill Arey; SECOND ROW: Harry Echols, Carol Lawhorn, Frosti Croslin, Dave Copeland, Dr. 
Bri^n Key, SPONSOR: BACK ROW: Richard Binkney. Stuart Levenson, Rusty Cutley. 



102 





Dr. Nishimura 



^ Religious Life 

Baptist Student Union 



As our College Community began to grow 
several years ago and a greater percentage 
began to live on campus a\va_\- from their home 
congregations many desired local religious af- 
filiation. As a result of this need three church 
affiliated student groups have renewed their 
old charters with the Student Government. 

The Baptist Student Union was the group to 
renew its charter last year. This year both 
the Canterbury Association, for Episcopal 
students, and the Newman Club, for Roman 
Catholic students, renewed their charters. The 
next step as outlined by Dr. Nishimuri. who 
serves as the College chaplain, is the revival of 
the Interfaith Council which would try to in- 
tegrate the efforts of these groups. 



103 



r 




m.-^ '^*' 



FRONT ROW: Peppie Miller, Mrs. Agnew, SPONSOR; BACK ROW: Nancy Keenan. Dee Winde, Helen King, Jeff Mitchell, Nikki McCoy. 




Xingu 

English 

Honor Fraternity 

Xingu is an honorary fraternity for English 
majors who have achieved academic excellence 
in their chosen field of study. Their goal is to 
attract students interested in literature and the 
related arts and further their interests through 
research, discussion and creativity. They also 
annually present the Xingu Award to the fresh- 
man who has shown outstanding ability in the 
field of English. 



Mrs. Agnew, Sponsor 



104 



The Prospect 
Literary Magazine 



This magazine is the official Uterary publica- 
tion of the College and is issued semi-annually 
by a student staff. Its aim is to give students 
and alumni an opportunity to display their lit- 
erary and artistic talents in the fields of 
poetry, short-story writing, essay-writing, and 
the graphic arts. 




Frank Speraman. Susan Parker, Bonnie Tash. Jeff Mitchell 



105 







PeiTBeij 



A Collegiate Voice oj the Vigorous South 



The Stormy Petrel is the official newspaper 
of Oglethorpe College. It is an important part 
of campus life dedicated to serving the best 
interests of the student body, and providing an 
important means of expression for the students 
and faculty. 



Staff 



Managing Editor Ronald Binkney 

Business Editor Dave Copeland 

Features Editor Warren Fox 

Liberal Arts Editor Tom Cone 

Photography Editor Eric Bray 

Asst. Features Editor Trudy Abelson 

Asst. News Editor Rusty Cutler 

Advertising Bernard Bogrow 

Photography Staff Robert Crowe, Robert Burnette, 

Joel Kleiner, Joe Fitzhugh, Wayne Stephens. 
Campus Editor Anna Saibel 

Sports Editor Aubrey Whitaker 

Copy Editor Adrian Fillion 

Staff Secretaries Sally Beall, Kathy Witte 

Columnists R. L. Baron, Larry Perlman 

Copy Carol Lawhorn, Freddie Anderson 

Contributors Mike Crook, Tom Reilly. Sally Beall, 

Linda Newmark, Frank Spearman, Stuart Levenson. 

Faculty Advisor Philip Palmer 

Business Consultant Harold Shafron 

Mailing Address: 

Box 16, Oglethorpe College, Atlanta, Georgia 303 19 

Telephone: 

231-1441, Ext. 22 

The Stormy Petrel is published twice a month by the students 
of Oglethorpe College. The opinions and statements herein are 
entirely those of the Editor and his stafT, and do not necessarily 
reflect the views of the administration or faculty of the college. 

No article, advertisement, picture, or portion thereof printed 
in the Stormy Petrel may be reprinted in any form without the 
written permission of the editor-in-chief 





Editor-in-Chief, Richard Binkney 




Mr. Shafron. Business Consultant 



Mr. Palmer, Faculty Advisor 



]Q6 







Managing Editor. Ronald Binkney 




Campus Editor. Anna Saibel 



Business Editor. David Copeland 




107 



Photography 
Committee 



The Photography Committee was organized 
in order to enable the campus photographers to 
better serve the growing demans of the campus 
publications who need their talents. Their goal 
is to coordinate the photographic requirements 
of other organizations and to utilize the Col- 
lege's darkroom facilities to their fullest. 




Joel Ackerman, Joe Fitzhugh, Joel Kleiner, SEATED: Eric Bray. 




Joel Kleiner, Joe Fitzhugh, Les Deadwyler, Wayne Stephens, Bob Crowe, Jimmy Fitts. 




The Yamacraw 



The Yamacraw is the Ogleth(;rpe College 
yearbook. The editors and staff have tried to 
capture every aspect of campus life in pictures 
and words as a living record of our students' 
lives during the past year. This work is probably 
one of the most rewarding parts of college, for 
after all memories lapse, the yearbook remains 
as a lasting remembrance of our days at 
Oglethorpe. 




Co-Editors-In-Chief, Judy Ponturo and Gil Watson 



Mr. Bilancio, Faculty Advisor 




Bob Johnson, Jimmy Fitts, Dee Denton. Aubrey Whitaker, Sandy Abbott. Bob Crowe. Gil Watson. Jud\ Ponturo. Cher\l Baker. Nancy Clow. Nancv 
Charnley. (Puppy: "Bobbie"). 



109 




Co-Editors of Activities, Nancy Keenan, and Lila Bennett not pictured. 




Executive Secretary, Dee Dee Denton 



Co-Editors of Organizatic , Robert Johnson, and Tina Varn not pictured. 



no 






Co-Editors of Sports, Robert Crowe and Aubr>' Whilaker 



Business Manager, Sandy .'\bbott 



Photography Editor, Jimmy Pitts 



Co-Editors of Academics, Cheryl Baker and Nancy Charnly 








111 



And Student Life goes on and on 
and on . . . 







112 




1835 




1835 



ATHLETICS 





^^1835 




^^1835 



And Student Life goes on 
and on . . . 



Vou ask what is our aim? 

I can answer in one word. 

It is victory. 

Victory at all costs — Victory in spite 

of all terrors — victory, however long 

and hard the road may be, for without 

victory there is no survival. 



Sir Winston S. Churchill 










1835 




Wis 



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ATHLETICS 




FRONT ROW: (left to right) Daflfin, Methe, O'Conner, Ordon, Terrell, Gwilliam, Hill; SECOND ROW: Howell, Bray, Richards, Marcus, Marx, 
Pollock, Ferber, Ibsen; THIRD ROW: Kliner, Butler, Larter, Womack, Jones. 



SOCCER 



Soccer Squad Displays 
Hustle, Determination 



Dan Larter and Don Womack occupied the 
gruelling positions which are said to be the 
toughest in Soccer. At fullback, there was little 
depth, as only Rusty Jones had experience there 
prior to this season. Tim Marx who started at 
goalie four years in a row, sparkled at the net 
all year. 

Gwilliam was Mr. Excitement on the field. 
Displaying sheer speed and soccer know-how, 
"Johnny-G" easily dominated the scoring for the 
Petrels. 

Next year should be an interesting one, with 
all that experience returning. 



114 










Coach Guthrie gives pep talk. 








Seniors; FRONT ROW (left to right) Richards. Daffin. Gwilliam: 
BACK ROW, OConner and Mar.x. 



115 





O'Connergets the thumb from the ref. 



-B** 1» ^ *.» "~*^ *^ » 



Kick it, don't step on it! 




.w*» ■>, ^t . * 



Richards displays form with left-footed kick. 



116 



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Action in game with Erskine. 



Who sa> s halfbacks don't score? 




-^ 



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INTRAMURALS 

Raiders, Sigs Dominate 
O.C. Intramural Picture 

The Raiders arid Sigs each did an about face in Intra- 
murals this year with the Raiders, defending football 
champs, and the Sigs, runners-up in basketball last season 
to the now-extinct Tigers, each snatching the crown from 
the one in the favorite's role. The Junior Raiders, highly 
favored to regain the football crown which they won as 
sophomores, were upset in the first round of the play-offs 
for their first loss ever, and the powerful Sigs went on 
to cap the crown. In basketball, the Sigs got off to a 
great start; the Raiders started slow, but came on strong 
to edge the Sigs in the playoffs. 

The Studds, a Freshman team, dominated the "B" 
League in basketball, and were also outstanding in the 
football season. 

Next year should be an interesting one as the two top 
powers, the Sigs and the Raiders, battle it out again. 





Schanen looks for an open receiver as Sigs roll. 



The Parrot huffs and puffs. 




rr r — r 




Richards breaks up a Raider pass. 





FRONT ROW (left to right): Schanen. Marx. Butler. BACK ROW: Happe. Weber. Jones. Larter. Not shown: Beidleman. Womack. Den- 
nis, Guilliam. Sigs—Football Champs. 



H9 



Freeman ofTand away for another Raider touchdown! 



East All Stars 




FRONT ROW (left to right): O'Conner, Cohen, Owens, Bigelow. BACK ROW: Banner, Gower, Gurley, Whitaker, Freeman. 



West All Stars 



,.^ .w 




FRONT ROW (left to right): Jones, Inman, Arnold, Marcus. BACK ROW: Weber, Schanen, Pollock, Hagelow. 



120 





Studds overcome Bullies lo take "B" League Championship. 




Raiders— "A" League Basketball Champs, FRONT ROW (left to right) Owens. Freeman. Gower. Crowe: BACK RO\\ : Goodwin. Gurley. Whit- 
aker, and Davis. 



121 



BASKETBALL 



Petrels Post Impressive 
18 — 8 Season Credentials 



Hustle and determination were the key to this 
year's fine 18 — 8 record, compiled by a young 
Petrel squad which will return all of its number 
for next season. Coach Bill Carter and Assistant 
Coach John Guthrie did a creditable job in boss- 
ing the 1966-67 team, in Carter's first year as 
head coach. 

The Petrels were at a height disadvantage all 
year, but their desire to win was unequalled, and 
they were an exciting team to watch, as proved 



by the opening game against Shorter, the Ar- 
kansas State battle, and the Georgetown victory 
in the Christmas Tourney. 

Doug Alexander led the team in scoring with 
15 points a game, with Jim Hoggarth and Roger 
Littell not far behind. Alexander, in the last 
game of the season, set two records in pumping 
in 43 points against Chattanooga. 

The Petrels played such powers as Providence, 
with its AU-American Jim Walker, Murray 
State's Thoroughbreds, and Valdosta State's 
Rebels. 

Next year the schedule should be even tougher 
with N.Y.U. and Southern Illinois included, but 
with the entire team returning, we are looking 
forward to an even better season. 





Coaches confer as tension mounts. 





This one won't get awav! 




123 



Who says basketball is not a contact sport? 



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Doug Alexander 


Roger Littell 


Junior 


Junior 


Guard 


Forward 





Blair for two points! 



124 





1 — 2, Cha-cha-chal 





Jerry Sams 


Jim Hoasarth 


Junior 


Sophomore 


Forward 


Guard 



What do thev see that we don't? 



125 





Mike Dahl 

Sophomore 

Forward 



J. P. Bruzek 

Sophomore 
Center 




Moose gets the tap. 



Bisons buffaloed by Bruzek. 




^ 



^ 



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126 







Mike Dahl, late season starter and sparkplug, 
displays rebounding strength. 




fiJl^\ 




Doug Alexander gets free ride to the dressing room following game-winning free throw in season 
opener against Shorter. 




Al Smith 


Ear! Blair 


Doua Cole 


Sophomore 


Sophomore 


Sophomore 


Forward 


Guard 


Guard 



127 




Nobody can stop Sams under the basket! 




Kenneth Richards 


Ernie Grain 


Kenny Conner 


Freshman 


Freshman 


Freshman 


Forward 


Guard 


Forward 




128 



Hold it J. P., he's on our team! 




"Earl, get him out of there!!" 





Southpaw Sams sends another bucket. 



The fac:al expressions of a first year coach — approval, apprehension, 
encourage nt. disdain. 




Coach Carter offers some advice. 



130 



JUNIOR VARSITY 

Team Shows Promise 
for Varsity Duty 

The Junior Varsity Basketball Team, largely 
composed of two Sophomores and four Fresh- 
men, proved themselves capable of providing a 
small but good nucleus for future Petrel teams. 
Good shooting and tireless energy helped this 
year's J.V.'s bring respect for Oglethorpe teams. 






J. V. defense stymies Southern Tech. 



Richards concentrates from the foul line. 



Coach Guthrie encourages the J.V.'s. 









Barbara Beggs — Captain 



VARSITY CHEERLEADERS 

School Spirit Boosted 
at Pep Rallies, Games 

What would our team be without its cheer- 
leaders? These girls helped spark the team at 
home and on the road with their enthusiasm. 



132 














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Linda Woerner 



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Helen Epstein 




Vvjife- .W.W.. 








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Pokev Therrell 



Melanie Miller 



J.V. CHEERLEADERS 

Varsity Understudies 
Display Enthusiasm 

This group proved to be able understudies 
of their varsity counterparts. They were eager 
and wiUing to help the boys play, especially when 
they thought the refs were not treating us right. 
They should be more than able to fill the shoes 
of the varsity when their time comes. 




Toni Chamberlain — Captain 






Skip Dawson 



i 0J 

Terri Rosselle — Co-Captain 




Brenda Hamlin 




Pat Derrick 



Barbi Jacobs 




Cindy Rot)elen 




BASEBALL 

Petrels Parade New 
Coach, Young Squad 

The Stormy Petrel Baseball Team had a suc- 
cessful year in 1967, compiling a 15 — 17 regular 
season won — loss mark and 19 — 18 overall with 
a team that had no senior leadership. 

Coach Tom Norwood took over for departed 
Coach Guthrie midway through the season and 
led the Oglethorpe nine to a fine finish. At one 
time, the Petrels had amassed a seven-game 
winning streak, and ended the season winning 
seven out of the last ten games. 



Season's Results 

O.C. 7 Earlham 1 O.C. 

O.C. 2 Hillsdale O.C. 

O.C. 5 Hillsdale 8 O.C. 

O.C. William Jewel 3 O.C. 

O.C. 2 William Jewel 5 

O.C. 3 West Ga. 2 O.C. 

O.C. 6 Ga. State 5 

O.C. 3 Erskine 1 O.C. 

O.C. 2 Augusta O.C. 

O.C. 10 Ga. Sou.Wst. 3 O.C. 

O.C. 6 Erskine O.C. 

O.C. 3 Berry O.C. 

O.C. 3 Augusta O.C. 

O.C. 3 Bryan 6 O.C. 

O.C. 3 Berry 6 O.C. 

O.C. 3 Ga. State 2 O.C. 

O.C. 8 Belmont Abbey 5 

O.C. 7 Bryan 1 



3 David Lipscomb 5 

3 Valdosta 13 
2 Mercer 4 

4 William & 

Mary 5 
2 Middle Tenn. 

State 3 

2 E. Michigan 6 

West Ga. 3 

3 Parsons 7 

6 Parsons 5 

7 Mercer 1 

1 Rollins 11 
Jacksonville 6 
3 Jacksonville 4 

5 Ga. South- 

western 9 




Coach Guthrie displays fine form in batting practice. 




^^Ixl^ 







i 



136 



I 









■ ^ 



Dick Davis— P 




Steve Rudge— IF 






# 



'«*-':!* 



^ ^ 




^"iM 






Doug Cole— IF 




Mike Bagwell— OF 




John Turner — OF 



Homeground of the Petrel Nine. 



Ricky Hughs— IF 





137 Jim Hoggarth — C 

Gower displays a picture swing. 





bL<L.«,« 



Charlie Owens — P 



Randy Gurley — P 





Dick Maher — IF 








^1 



*>..iik-. 




^ 



.^WtesS»it%: 




Bagwell tries to stretch single. 



Joel Kliner— OF 




Jim Bello 




Gary Collier becomes an Umpire. 




Hero Joe 



i 



f 



^ 




'.▼•• 



ri 
— t . 



-' -J 



r 



^>lfr; 




; 



Wild Throw almost decapitates enemy runner. 



Kenny Cargile 




-<^^ 






/III ^ 



Charlie Owens whiffs another enemy batter. 









Howell Gower 





f^r^.' ■ 



% 



Larry Freeman 



139 



Maher goes safeh into third. 




TENNIS TEAM 

Big Three, Combination 
for Success 

The Oglethorpe tennis team has concluded the 
1967 season with a spanking 14 — 3 record, thanks 
to glittering play by Robbie Smith, Joe Dennie 
and Byron Walbeck. 

The Oglethorpe College Big Three combined 
to win 45 out of 51 singles matches including 
90 sets won against 18 losses. In doubles, the 
Smith-Dennis team won 15 of 16 matches and 
30 of 33 sets. Walbeck teamed with Robbie Ban- 
ner in the number two doubles for 13 out of 14 
wins including 26 of 28 sets. 

Against major college competition, Coach 
Bill Carter's team won three of four. They de- 
feated William and Mary, Vanderbilt and Fur- 
man while losing to a strong Georgia team. 

Og thorpe's first female varsity athlete, 
Sharon lleason, held her own against the male 
players s_ faced, compiling an even .500 mark. 



Coach Carter enjoys change of scenery in Spring sports — trading spilces 
for tennis shoes. 



140 






Seasons Record 








Kalamazoo 




2 


6 


L 


Appalachian 




7- 


-0 


W 


Vanderbilt 




5- 


-4 


W 


William and Mary 


8- 


1 


W 


West Georgia 




9 


-0 


W 


Georgia 




1- 


-8 


L 


Chattanooga 




9 





W 


West Georgia 




6- 


-3 


W 


Erskine 




7- 


-2 


W 


Chattanooga 




8- 


-1 


W 


Georgia State 




7- 


-2 


W 


Emory 




5- 


-4 


W 


Furman 




6- 


-3 


W 


Tennessee Wesleyan 


6- 


-3 


W 


Erskine 




^ 5- 


-4 


W 


Emory 




4- 


-5 


L 


Georgia State 




8- 


-1 


W 



Won— 14 



Lost— 3 



Dave Bonham 





Pete Butler 









Joe Dennis 



141 





i 



Byron Walbeck 



Rusty Jones 



i 





J\ 



A 



k fV 



L 




Robbie Danner 



Sharon Gleason 



142 




RIFLE AND PISTOL TEAM 

Gun Teams Take Aim on 
Another Successful Year 

The Rifle and Pistol teams experienced diffi- 
culty this year when the construction of new 
dorms interfered with the rifle range. As a re- 
sult, the teams practiced very little, and used 
the rifle range at River Bend only when they 
could. No competition was scheduled this year 
due to these difficulties, but the teams are look- 
ing forward to next year to continue their fine 
reputation in shooting matches. 




Boys Pistol Team— FRONT ROW (left to right): Joel Ackerman, John 
Zerby— BACK ROW: Frank Spearman, Chief Edwards. 





Girls Rifle Team— FRONT ROW (left to nght); Mary O'Neal. Kathy 
Starcher— BACK ROW: Valrie Williams, Naomi Vickers. 




"Reach for the sky, Sewdl." 



'What do you mean Goodman wasn't my target?" 



143 




Diane gels a ticket for 
sighting iri ihe wTong / 




The role of the actor. 



0,G. 
SPORTING LIFE 



144 




1835 




^1835 



CLASSES 






^1835 



m 




'Uhhh I 



■■■i^;;-^»v'V ''vm-j i rin iMeiissisisr3assiis^s^s_y i$fmfmim g ,.:,! ' m t «■ 




The Jets put on 



.limi^^ 




Every life is many days, day after 

day. We walk through ourselves, 

meeting robbers, ghosts, 

giants, old men, young men, wives, 

widows, brothers-in-love. But 

always meeting ourselves. 

— James Joyce 




.^^ 



spl ^.ting life 







1835 




.^^ 



^^1835 




\^835 







^^1835 






CLASSES 



Senior Class 




Floyd Ruhl, Vice President 



t 





Tom O'Connor, President 




Sandy Abbott, Treasurer. Nancy Charinley, Parliamentarian 



Tina Vam, Secretary 



145 




Sandy Abbott 

Wakefield, Mass. 



Fred Ackley 

Visulia, Calif. 





Jon Axleburg 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Irene Bailey 

Norcross, Ga. 

Cheryl Baker 

Atlanta, Ga. 



William Baker 

Norcross, Ga. 

John Ball 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Lila M. Bennett 

Smyrna, Ga. 



14<5 



\ irginia Bradley 

Atlanta. Ga. 

Thomas Browning 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Marge Burgess 

Chamblee. Ga. 



Barbara Calhoun 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Robert Campbell 

Tucker, Ga. 

Nancy Charnley 

Atlanta, Ga. 







Anna Citarella 

Atlanta, Ga. 

William Coffin 

Garden City, N.Y. 

Chris Cook 

Smyrna, Ga. 



Ed Daffin 

Panama City, Fla. 

Cheryl Davis 

Chamblee, Ga. 

Johnnie Dobbs 

Atlanta, Ga. 



148 



Martha F.ldred 

Chamblee. Ga. 

Thomas Fewellyn 

Atlanta, Ga. 

George Forman 

Yadon, Pa. 



Thomas Free 

Memphis, Tenn. 



Tanya Goodman 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Marjorie Hallock 

Atlanta, Ga. 





Pierce Hammond 

Marietta, Ga. 



Robert Hamrick 

Kno.xville, Tenn. 



149 





John Inman 

Port Chester. N.Y. 

James R. Jackson 

Chamblee, Ga. 

Arron Kassutto 

Atlanta, Ga. 



Candace Kazlovv 

Atlanta, Ga. 

George Key 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Linda King 

Marietta, Ga. 




H^^*^^ * --C--.- 



150 




Stuart Levenson 

Savannah, Ga. 



Paul Koukidis 

Atlanta, Ga. 





^f? 



1^* m^tm 11 m 



^ 



'/l 



Elizabeth Love 

McDonough, Ga. 

John McCook 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Sharon Markovitz 

Summit, N.J. 



Tim Marx 

Los Angeles. Calif, 

Priscella Miller 

Narbeth, Penn. 

Sam Mitchell 

Atlanta, Ga. 




151 




George Morris 

Stockbridge, Ga. 

Susan Mosteller 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Thomas O'Connor 

Nesponit, N. J. 



Mary O'Neal 

Decatur, Ga. 

Jerry Otting 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Nicholas Pennington 

Atlanta, Ga. 




William Plowden 

Atlanta, Ga. 



Berry Pendley 

Marietta, Ga. 




152 




Ellen Pittman 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Kenneth Powell 

Atlanta. Ga. 

Evelyn Price 

Smyrna, Ga. 



Thomas Reilly 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Floyd Ruhl 

Manheim. Ala. 

Larry Shattles 

Chamblee. Ga. 




153 



Rupertia Simon 

Smyrna, Ga. 

Wayne Stephens 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Morris Strickland 

Atlanta, Ga. 



Pokey Therrell 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Jennifer Thomas 

Waycross, Ga. 

Tina Varn 

Adel, Ga. 





Martin Zagoria 

Chamblee, Ga. 



Bill Weber 

Atlanta, Ga. 

JoAnn Wells 

Atlanta, Ga. 

James Winde 

Atlanta, Ga. 



154 



Junior 
Class 




Jay Strong, Vice President 





Gil Watson, President 



w nin^i^^j 




Kathy Starcher, Parliamentarian— Les Deadwvler. Secretary 



Dee Denton, Treasurer 



155 




.€ii4^ 



Joel Ackerman 
George D. Alexander 
Beverly Amos 
Fredica Anderson 



William Arey 
Arthur Armstrong 
Valera Bagwell 
Barbara Beggs 



Judith Beggs 
Thomas Baird 
Richard Binkney 
Ronald Binkney 



Sarah Bricker 
Mary Lee Brunt 
Gayle Burch 
Phinizy Calhoun 



George Carlisle 
Richard Davis 
Leslie Deadwyler 
Dee Denton 



Mary Emma Dieckmann 
Harry Echols 
Helen Epstein 
Tony Franeschelli 






156 




Robert Furman 
Robert Celic 
Michael Cordon 
Harold Cunnin 



Barry Gurley 
Connie Hamell 
William Happe 
Garth Hartley 



Sandra Hedge 
Joseph Heffel 
Kay Hollingsworth 
Gerald Hollister 





MJr^ 




157 



Carol Horn 
Matthew Howell 
Elizabeth Jenkins 
Ernest J essee 



Robert Johnson 
Ted Kallman 
Jane Kelley 
Allan KIrwan 



Danforth Larter 
Regina Lennox 
Roger Littell 
Janice Lymburner 





.ife4VMlt^tt^):«l«i4ll«ixt Jt^K^ 




.;.-. • „ n"* 












».«W 






158 




Nikki McCoy 
VTarie Mcflaven 
I homas \lcl,ean 
Kathleen \lcl.eod 



Jim Mann 
Martin Marcus 
Elmer Matson 
James Milford 



Larr\ Mitchell 
Samuel Mitchell 
Judith Mossman 
Robert Nash 



Linda Newmark 
Carol Norris 
James O'Rourke 
Charles Owens 



Laurence Perlman 
Charles Philo 
Judith Ponturo 
Thomas Port 



Judy Poyo 
Michael Riley 
Bonnie Roberts 
Henry Rosenbaum 



159 









Mack Sheddan 
Barry Shildneck 
John Sims 
Linda Smith 



Kathryn Starcher 
Jay Strong 
Nance Stums 
Bonnie Lynn Tash 



Naomi Vickers 
John Von Esh 
NanWald 
George G. Watson 



Charles Weathers 
Aubrey Whitaker 
Steven White 
Glenda Whitlock 



David Wood 
Diane Winde 
Hiro Yamaoka 
Silvia Zapico 



160 



Sophomore 
Class 




Doug Burkholder, Vice President 





Jeff Mitchell, President 




Gretchun von Muhler 

SecretarN 



Jerri Kugler 

Treasurer 



Barbara Austin, Parliamentarian 



161 



Mary Adkins 
Susan Alexander 
Kay Alibrandi 
Ginger Anderson 



Barbara Austin 
Robert Barnette 
Beth Barnhart 
Sallv Beall 



James Beidleman 
Jack Bishop 
Karen Boggs 
David Bonham 




1^ 




Eric Bray 
Mike Bryant 
Warde Butler 
Douglas Burkholder 



John Carney 
James Carter 
Marjorie Castimore 
Janet Chadderton 



Richard Chambers 
Paula Citek 
Gordon Clark 
Shervl Claxton 



162 




Roherl < ole 
Joseph C olion 
David C opeland 
Tom f one 



Marv Crain 
Frankie Crim 
Mary Neal Crutcher 
Russell Cutler 



Sue Dann 
Robert Danner 
Alice Davis 
Joseph Dennis 




John Dillon 
Linda Ellis 



Judy Eshner 
Cynthia Felton 



James Fitts 
Joseph Fitzhugh 



163 





Susan Goslin 
Suzanne Greer 



Pamela Grossman 
William Gusick 



James Hagelow 
Terry Haney 




Bonnie Hargrove 
Craig Hartley 
Paula Haver 
Kristin Haug 



Glenda Herd 
Jimmy Hoggarth 
Anne Houston 
Albert Hudson 



Leslie Ide 
Wanda Isbell 
Barbara Jones 
Frank Jones 




164 



Robert Jones 
INancy Keenan 
Helen Kin)> 
Cindi Knox 



Jerri Kuglar 
Elizabeth Lacava 
Cretchen von IVlullar 
Jerry Lee 



Bruce Leventhal 
Carol Leyda 
William Lipscomb 
Edward Luce 




MiMdM 




James IVIcGaha 
Jac McTighe 
Beverly Malone 
Melanie Miller 



Jeffrey Mitchell 
Molly Moseley 
Marsha Navarro 
Richard Osborne 



Caroline Pace 
Margaret Pate 
Philip Perriconc 
David Perrine 



165 



Louis Zarrilli 
James Pollock 
Snieguole Ramanauskas 
Elaine Reilly 
Barbara Rhodes 



Tony Romano 
Arnold Rosenberg 
Lome Roux 
Anne Saibel 
Richard Schanen 



Mary Schocn 
Joe Shapard 
Richard Sheffield 
Richard Sherman 
Frank Spearman 





?Sfc> 



^M^ 






Marcia Strange 
Karin Steinhaus 
Jacqueline Stark 
Jane Starnes 
William S. Taylor 



Joseph Terrell 
Donald Teti 
John Thompson 
Margaret Watkins 
Susan Whipple 



Larry White 
John Wickham 
Barry Wiesner 
Linda Woerner 
Nate Zahn 



166 



■ TT ■ - .. ra- ., .^^Kmm^. ^ ^ ^ ^ - 



Freshman 
Class 




Jane Vandever, Vice President 





Terri Rosselle. President 




Terri Robinson, Treasurer and Nancv Gelfand, Parliamentarian 



Linda Hillgoth. Secretary 



167 




Ray Applebaum 
Mike Bagwell 
Susie Beck 
Jerry Brene 
Vincent Bello 



Jeffrey Bier 
Grafton Biglow 
Barnard Bogrow 
Elizabeth Brewer 
Robert Brewer 



Barbara Burnside 
Tom Burton 
Brenda Carson 
Mary Cason 
Christine Caylor 



Toni Chamberlain 
Michael Chochoms 
Roland Clark 
Nancy Clow 
George Corbo 



June Costello 
James Creech 
Noel Daly 
Claudia Dawson 



Richard Day 
Patricia Derrick 
David Doernberg 
John Drake 




168 



Larry Embrey 
Judson Evans 
Richard h'erber 
Jim Fields 
Michael Carbee 



Richard Gaynor 
Nancy Celfand 
Sharon Cleason 
LeeAnn Goenne 
John Grady 



Randolph Graff 
Miriam Greszes 
Pamela Hague 
Brenda Hamlin 
Sonja Haney 



Kathleen Hasser 
Robert Hatch 
Jorge Herrera 
Everett Higginbotham 
Judith Howell 





Richard Hughes 
Thomas Ibsen 



Barbi Jacobs 
Wayne Jalfie 



169 




James Johnstone 
Collin Jones 
Michael Kaydouh 
Diane Keeling 



Wayne Kise 
Joel Kleiner 
JoAnn Ladouz 
Larrv Lanford 



Hugh Leavell 
Linda Leidgen 
Mark Lofgren 
Liz Leiand 



Vicki Lewis 
Benjamin Low 
David McBee 
Gail McGee 








Lawrence McKinley 
Joan Marr 
Patricia Mathis 
Susan Meek 



Myrna Mershon 
Peter Meyer 
Rodger Miller 
John Moncure 



170 




Mark Mullisan 
I.vnn Nichols 
Ptttr Nicolscjn 
Susan Farkhouse 



VVilmer Perez 
Katharyn Pierotti 
Judv Peitzman 
William Pilon 



Ellen Plutchok 
Irene Pogacnik 
James Prager 
Charles Rice 



Charlyne Rickmann 
CIndv Robelen 
Terri Robinson 
John Rogers 




Laurie Rosin 
Teresa Rosselle 



Steven Rudge 
Dean Russen 





Janet Sanders 
Carol Sargeant 
Robert Schisano 
Susan Schmid 



Cole Schreiner 
Karl Schroeder 
Fred Schuckle 
Lynn Segall 



Emma Sewell 
Robert Shaw 
Ed Siskin 
Curtissa Smith 



Nancy Stanford 
Marcia Stephenson 
Paula Stone 
William Theille 



I 

I 



Lonnie Williams 
Richard Williams 
Valerie Williams 
Carolun Young 
Jonathan Zerby 



Gloria Thompson 
Peter Tintle 
L ri Tooch 
Charles Vaast 




172 



( 



// 



I 

MM) W 




!•■■><? 



HONORS 



In Dedication . . . 



At Oglethorpe tradition is a way of life. And we are proud of 
those people who over the past years have unselfishly rendered 
a portion of themselves to the growth and development of the stu- 
dents and the perpetuation of the Oglethorpe Ideal. It is the honor of 
the 1967 Yamacraw to recognize two such individuals this year. 
Therefore we dedicate this yearbook to a living tradition — the Mac- 
Connell tradition at Oglethorpe, Mrs. Majorie M. MacConnell and 
Mr. Elgin F. MacConnell. 




174 



I 





Mrs. Majorie M. MacConnell 



Mr. Elgin F. MacConnell 



LUPTQN HALL 



ADMINISTRATIVE AND 
FACULTY OFFICEf 

PHOEBE HEARST I 



WOMEN'S DORMITOI 
FINE ARTS DIVISI' 



175 






Tom O'Conner 



S^^ 
^ 




Tom Free 




176 




Larry Shattles 



Who's Who 

Among Students in 

American Colleges 

and Universities 



Tom Reilly Bob Jackson 





Bob Hamrick 



Cheryl Baker Sandy Abbott 



i , ^ <iW^ . 



Robert Richards 




Yamacraw Awards 

Nominations for the Yamacraw Awards are 
made by each campus Organization and selec- 
tion is completed by the Yamacraw executive 
staff. These awards are presented on the basis 
of spirit, participation, academic achievement 
and fulfillment of the ideals of an Oglethorpe 
education. This year eight awards were pre- 
sented at Awards Night to Miss Bonnie Lynn 
Tash, Mr. Bob Jackson, Mr. Stuart Levenson, 
Mr. Tom O'Conner, Mr. Floyd Rhul, Mr. 
Larry Shattles, Mr. Gil Watson, and Mr. Bill 
Weber. 




Vt.. t!^^"- 



Tom O'Conner 




Larry Shattles 



Bonnie Lynn Tash 





Not Pictured: 
Bob Jackson 
Stuart Levenson 




Dr. Martin L.Abbott 



MacConnell Award 

Dr. Charles M. MacConnell was a former 
member of the Oglethorpe Faculty. Since his 
death in 1950 the Sophomore Class has estab- 
lished the tradition of annually presenting an 
award to that member of the Senior Class, who 
has done the most to further school spirit and 
create a more lively interest in student activities 
on Oglethorpe Campus and particularly one 
who has received inadequate acclaim for his 
efforts. This year the award was presented to 
Mr. Stuart Carl Levenson. 



Donald C. Agnew 
Award 

The Donald C. Agnew Award is presented 
annually by the Student Council to honor that 
person who, in their opinion, has given dis- 
tinguished service to the College. This year for 
his untiring efforts as acting dean and his ever 
determination to improve the academics of 
Oglethorpe College the Student Council has 
selected Dr. Martin L. Abbott. To all he is a 
friend, a source of guidance and exemplifica- 
tion of the Oglethorpe Ideal. 




Stuart Levenson 



179 




Harry E. Echols, Jr. 
Benjamin Parker Law Award Winner 




^'Wi^ 



Physics winners; Miss Molly Moseley 

Mr. Henry M. Spencer, Jr. 



UPPERCLASSMEN 

Law, Physics, LeConte 
Awards Given Students 

Each year at the Awards Night presentations 
are made for the Benjamin N. Parker Law 
Award, the LeConte Science Society Award, 
and the Chemical Rubber Publishing Company 
Awards. The Law Award is presented to that 
student in the Business Law classes who has 
shown the greatest development in his under- 
standing of the law. This year the winner was 
Mr. Harry E. Echols, Jr. 

The LeConte Society presents an award based 
on Scholastic achievement and contribution to 
the college and to the Science Division to the 
outstanding graduating senior in the field of 
science. Miss Cheryl Baker received the 1967 
Award. 

The Chemical Rubber Publishing Company 
Awards are presented to those students in be- 
ginning chemistry, physics and mathematics 
excelling in those classes. The Chemistry Award 
went to Mr. Steven H. Rudge. The Mathe- 
matics Award was presented to Mr. McClure 
M. Renolds, and the Physics Award was re- 
ceived by Miss Molly Moseley, and Mr. H. M. 
Stephens, Jr. 

Miss Cheryl Baker 
LeConte Science Society Award Winner 






180 





Miss Pat Mathis — Xingu Freshman 
English Award 



BOAR'S HEAD, DUCHESS, XINGU 

Outstanding Freshmen 
Honored with Awards 



Outstanding Freshmen are honored by three of the 
traditional clubs at Oglethorpe's Awards Night. These 
clubs which present awards are the Duchess Club, the 
Boar's Head Honorary Fraternity, and Xingu. 

The Duchess Club presents its award to that young 
lady in the Freshmen Class, who in the opinion of the 
membership, most fully achieves those ideals of scholar- 
ship, character and service. This year the award went to 
Miss Brenda Hamlin. 

The Boar's Head Award is a similar award presented 
to the Freshmen boy who best exemplifies the ideals of 
that organization. This year's winner was Richard Allen 
Hughes. 

Xingu, which is the local chapter of the Sigma Tau 
Delta Society, presents an award to that Freshman 
deemed to have the greatest writing promise and who has 
achieved an average of 88 in all English classes. This 
award was presented to Miss Pat Mathis. 



181 







Mr. Richard Allen Hughes — Boar's 
Head Award for Freshmen 

Freshmen Dutchess Award— Miss Brenda Hamlin 




PEOPLE TO PEOPLE 

Award Winners Advance 
Principal of World Peace 

A relatively new organization on the Ogle- 
thorpe campus People to People presented its 
awards for merit at the annual Awards Night 
Ceremony. People to People is an organization 
based on the principle that world peace can best 
be achieved by personal understanding among 
people of the world. This year the Awards 
were presented to Miss Linda Newmark. Miss 
Bonnie Hargrove, Mr. Richard Binkney, and 
Mr. Ronald Binkney. 




Miss Linda Newmark 




Richard Binlcney, Bonnie Hargrove, and Ronald Binlcney 




1835 




1835 



ADVERTISING 





1835 




1835 



From a Friend 

of 

Oglethorpe 




■~\^ '-/ 



•<<^y 
























SUB-KING 



4006 Peachtree Road 



261-6154 



Brookhaven 




Compliments 
of 

R. E. "RED" 
DOROUGH 



Support ALL our 

PATRONS 
ONE-HOUR MARTINIZING 



Cambridge Square 



(near Oglethorpe Apartments) 








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^■E^■ THE WAFFT_t HCXSC - *2TJ F-EAO^-TKi 
OPEN 3* BCK-SS A 2AT 





ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

OF 
OGLETHORPE COLLEGE 



A Message to the Class of '67 



Now you have left Oglethorpe College bearing a diploma sought by many, but received by a few. The 
memory of the campus may wane, but the warm, friendly spirit found here will remain with you always. 
We hope you will return for frequent visits to rekindle this school spirit, to keep in touch with your 
classmates. 

As an Oglethorpe graduate you have received the finest undergraduate education obtainable — for a 
purpose. You have an obligation to yourself and to society to apply your attained skills, understanding 
and ethical values to improve the lot of mankind. 

You are not alone in this task. More than five thousand alumni who have preceded you share this re- 
sponsibility for bettering the social process. They make themselves available to you if you should need them. 

We congratulate you for your academic achievement and welcome you to the swelling ranks of the 
National Alumni Association of Oglethorpe College. 



I 

I 

I 

1 



lEfl 



FRITO-LAY, INC. 



4950 Peachtree Industrial Blvd. 









Congratulations to the 

Class of 1967 

from 

THE OGLETHORPE 
BOOSTER CLUB 

We hope you will always 
be an Oglethorpe Booster — 



^ 




K 



{ V 






ct 





GASPAR-WARE 
PHOTOGRAPHERS, INC. 

876 West Peachtree. N. W. 
Atlanta 9, Georgia 

Class Photos 

in this book are 

the work of 

Caspar- Ware 



Negatives are held on file 
and may be obtained anytime 




^^A^fe^ 



World't Finest 
Sleel Die Engraved 

collegiatt 
stationery 

»nd 

fashionable 
writing papers 

MONTAO'S 

ATLANTA 
GEORGIA 



Best wishes from: L G. BALFOUR COMPANY 



OFFICE: 



3330 Peachtree Rd., N.E. 



Atlanta 5, Georgia 





PILGRIM LAUNDRY 

AND 

CLEANERS 



4110 Peachtree Rd., N.E. 



-In Brookhoven to serve you — 



DAIRY QUEEN AND BRAZIER 



Peachtree Road 



Toward Chamblee 



Seniors, 
remember 
the days 
of . . . 








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COMPANY 
INSURANCE 

90 Fairlie Street, N.W. 
Atlanta 1, Georgia 




Pecchtree Rd. 



Brookhaven 







Compliments of 



and 



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2400 Piedmont Rd., N.E. 



at Garson Drive 



Atlanta 5, Georgia 



Phone CE 7-1671 



Well Wishes 
from 

ACADEMY DESK CORP. 

338 Peachtree St., N.E. 

Atlanta 8, Georgia 

525-0524-5 




Compliments of 



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SERVICE STATION 



FREE PICK UP AND DELIVERY 



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Brookhaven 



When you are old and gray 
and full of sleep and nodding by the fire, 
Take down this book and slowly and read 
and dream of the soft look ^ 
your eyes had once and of tHfeir shadows deep 




•>^*w. 



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^?AV,'; 






II II 11 



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ALUMNI OFFICE 
'OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY