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Full text of "Yamacraw, 1985"

a step forward 



a step backward 



YAMACRAW 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/yamacraw198554ogle 



YAMACRAW 

OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY 
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 




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Oglethorpe University began in 1838 in 
Midway, GA, (near Milledgeville). The 
main buildings on the campus were 
Thalian Hall, Central Hall, and the twelve 
dorm buildings. Central Hall was completed 
in 1840 by Joseph Lane, Sr. at a cost of 
$38,000.00. Thalian Hall was completed in 
1860 by Joseph Lane, Jr. as a dormitory and 
meeting hall for the Thalian Society. The So- 
ciety began in 1839 to promote "oratory, dec- 
lamations, debating and other literary pur- 
suits." It is one of the two remaining buildings 
at Midway now. The Midway campus flour- 
ished until the early 1860's when it had to 
close down due to the Civil War. Oglethorpe 
University attempted to reopen at Midway in 
1 866 but it could not maintain at that time and 
so closed its doors once again. Then in 1871 it 
was decided that it would be advantageous to 
relocate Oglethorpe in Atlanta, the new cap- 



itol, since Milledgeville was no longer going to 
be the hub of Georgia. During its relocation in 
Atlanta in 1871 Olgethorpe stayed in the pre- 
sent day Atlanta City Hall building. This re- 
vival attempt unfortunately also did not last. 
Finally the school was moved to Atlanta in 
1915. 

The first building erected was Hearst Hall. 
Hearst Hall has served in many capacities. Its 
third floor was once dormitories. Its basement, 
where the present day Bookstore is, was the old 
cafeteria. Lupton Hall also served as many 
different things. It had an indoor pool which 
spanned the length of the present day pit and 
the business office. Its third floor also served 
as dormitories for awhile. Lowry Hall was 
probably the most diverse in range of uses. It 
served as both boys' and girls' dorm rooms, at 
different times, and its top floor served as an 
apartment for the Men's Housing director 




Thalian Society Hall is one of the two re- 
maining buildings of the old campus at 
Midway. This building served as a dormi- 
tory during the years Sidney Lanier attend- 
ed Oglethorpe. 

The third floor of the Thalian Hall was used 
by the Society for its meetings and social 
affairs. The plaster medallion on the ceiling 
from which a candle chandelier was hung 
dales back to the building's completion in 
1860. 




2 HISTORY OF BUILDINGS 



Something Old, Something New 

And 

Something From the Future? 



This memorial marking the site of old Og- 
lethorpe University was erected in 1931. 
The stones used in the base of the marker 
were foundation stones from the old univer- 
sity. 




Central Hall was the main campus building at 
Midway. It contained a large Chapel which 
was surrounded by faculty offices, classrooms 
and a library. It also contained a museum in its 
basement. 

A far cry from present day Oglethorpe dorms, 
this is the only remaining one of the original 
twelve two-room dorms at Midway. Formerly 
there was no door in the center. Each room 
measured 18 feet by 18 feet. There were six of 
these dormitories in a row on either side of the 
campus, in front of Central Hall. 



HISTORY OF BUILDINGS 3 



The future Ogelthorpc? No. but it could 
have been as of the plans drawn in 1913 for 
the expansion of the campus. Lupton, 
Hearst. Lowry and part of Faith were built 
before these plans were abandoned. 




Married student bousing? A natatorium? 
Community Faculty housing? This 
couldn't be Oglethorpe, could it? These 
were the plans for expansion drawn up in 
the 1940's. 

Realizing that Milledgeville was no longer 
going to be the hub of Georgia, the present 
administrators tried unsuccessfully to relo- 
cate Oglethorpe into Atlanta in 1871. It 
was eventually moved successfully to At- 
lanta in 1915. 



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MASTER PLAN 0(i 

SnEETZANPHHAOFIEI-n -U^MK 
EDWABt) I- OAfOHLRTY 
TRAfKrC PLAWNINQ ASSOCIA-ii- 



1^ - ATUNTA^ .rOlT Y . HALL , . . 
■Site of^>)HO¥E of johN- KIAl^ 
:'. ^. 1859 - 1B64 
-—^HEADQUARTERS OF 

■GENERAL WILLIAM •T SHERMAN 
SEPT 8, OCT 3, NOV 14-16 1864. 
HOUSEt> 0GLETH0R|''E UI^IVERSITY 
1871 - 1872 
ATLANTA BOYS' HIGH SCHOOL ia?6^92 
ATLANTA GIRLS' HIGrf SCHOOL I87J-t^i7 
^ MADE BY o ' ^^' 

'"W P. A. GEORGIA SCHOOL 6f TECHNOLOfiT 1936 



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4 HISTORY OF BUILDINGS 





Ever wondered why you have to go outside 
to get from the financial office to the Ca- 
reer department? When James Lupton 
gave money in 1920 for the building he had 
it erected in three parts. The part with the 
bell tower was to be in memory of his moth- 
er, the middle part was in honor of his wife 
and the third part was to be an inspiration 
to his son. 

The main campus as it stood in 1963 with 
the temporary science building and no 
Traer. 



who also happened to be a faculty member. Its 
basement was used for the Medical School at 
Oglethorpe and was later used for the science 
facility until the temporary wooden structure 
was erected for the science department. The 
addition of the buildings was completed with 
Goslin Science building in 1971. There have 
been many plans to expand the present cam- 
pus but as it stands now the campus will prob- 
ably remain the same forever. 



Something Old, Something 
New And Something From 
the Future? 



HISTORY OF BUILDINGS 5 



The Rich and Famous 



William Randolph Hearst made sev- 
eral donations which totaled to be 
more than $330,000.00 to Ogle- 
thorpe over a thirty-four year span. During 
Hearst's last trip to Atlanta Dr. Thornwell 
Jacobs presented him with the honorary de- 
gree of Doctor of Laws on May 22, 1927. 
On this same day Hearst delivered the Bac- 
calaureate address which dealt with "the 
great discoveries and inventions of the nine- 
teenth century." One of Hearst's sons, John 
Randolph, attended Oglethorpe in 1927, 
and 1928. Dr. Jacobs went to see Hearst in 
California to ask for assistance in the pur- 
chase of the Silver Lake property. Hearst's 
response was, "Certainly, I shall take plea- 
sure in giving it to you." Silver Lake was 
renamed Lake Phoebe in honor of Hearst's 
mother. 



A native of Cuba, New York, Harry Put- 
man Hermance came to Atlanta in 
1916, as an executive in the F.W. 
Woolworth Company. Hermance was elected 
as a trustee of Oglethorpe in 1917. One day 
several members of the football team ap- 
proached Harry Hermance to ask for his assis- 
tance in developing the athletic program at 
Oglethorpe. Mr. Hermance's response was, 
"Boys, I don't know how much I'll be able to 
help but I'll sure do my damndest." Mr. Her- 
mance told a group at a meeting on December 
4, 1919, that he "had found a family" which 
would contribute $5,000.00 a year for the next 
ten years for the building of a stadium. Harry 
Hermance was referring to his family. In 
1926, Dr. Jacobs presented Harry Hermance 
with an honorary degree of Doctor of Com- 
mercial Science. 



Following his mother's advice, Sidney 
Clopton Lanier began his studies at Og- 
lethorpe at the age of 15. In 1860, he 
graduated from Oglethorpe and was valedic- 
torian of his class. After graduation, Lanier 
worked as a tutor in ancient languages at Og- 
lethorpe from 1860-61. While tutoring at Og- 
lethorpe Lanier began to make plans to study 
in Germany like his professor, James Wood- 
row. The Civil War changed these plans. In 
1861, he joined the Macon Volunteers. After 
returning home from the Civil War Lanier 
worked as a tutor, a hotel clerk and in 1868 he 
returned to Macon, Georgia, to read law in his 
father's office. In 1873, Sidney Lanier moved 
to Baltimore, Maryland. After moving to Bal- 
timore Lanier played the flute in the Peabody 
Symphony Orchestra and served as a lecturer 
at Johns Hopkins University. While living in 
Baltimore, Lanier also spent time writing. 
Some of his most famous poems were written 
during this time. They were "Song of the 
Chattahoochee" and "The Marshes of 
Glynn," which were about his home state of 
Georgia. 






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tr^^^ i 



Mr. George Stewart photographed this 
bronze bust of Sidney Lanier at the Milton 
S. Eisenhower Library, Johns Hopkins 
University. The bust was modeled by 
Ephraim Keyser. 



6 FAMOUS MEN 





When Ernest Hartsock came to Ogleth- 
orpe in 1928, from Georgia Tech he 
brought with him the Bozart Press. 
Hartsock was the editor of the Bozart Contem- 
pary Verse, which was published bimonthly. 
This literary magazine had a wide circulation 
which included more thirty states, England, 
France and Canada. Hartsock was made pro- 
fessor of poetics at Oglethorpe. This distinc- 
tion had never been used previously anywhere 
in the United States. Referring to Ernest 
Hartsock, Thornwell Jacobs said, "He had the 
heart and instinct of a true poet, and his love 
for poetry had completely mastered his life." 

John Thomas Lupton was one of the early 
benefactors of the Oglethorpe established 
in Atlanta. Dr. Thornwell Jacobs spoke at 
the First Presbyterian Church in Chattan- 
ooga, Tennessee, on November 1, 1914. He 
told the congregation about his efforts to rees- 
tablish Oglethorpe University. After the ser- 
vice a man came up to Jacobs and offered to 
pledge $10,000.00 to the resurrection of Og- 
lethorpe. This man's name was John T. Lup- 
ton. Mr. Lupton practiced law, served as the 
president of the First National Bank of Chat- 
tanooga and was the vice president and trea- 
surer of the Coca Cola Bottling Co. Dr. Jacobs 
presented Mr. Lupton with the honorary de- 
gree of Doctor of Laws. John T. Lupton gave a 
total of $1,018,000.00 to Oglethorpe. 



Joseph Mackey Brown was a member of the 
last graduating class from old Oglethorpe. 
After graduation in 1872, Brown spent 
several years associated with the Western and 
Atlantic Railroad. In 1909 he became gover- 
nor of Georgia. He served a second term as 
governor from January 25, 1912, to June 28, 
1913. After his career in politics Brown spent 
the rest of his life writing "cards" on such 
things as the Leo Frank case. World War I 
and the draft, women's suffrage, mob law, 
Bolshevism, religious matters and American- 
ism. 



Joseph LeConte, who received internation- 
al fame for his published works on evolu- 
tion and religion, physiological optics and 
geology, served as a professor at old Ogleth- 
orpe for one year beginning in January 1852. 
He was responsible for teaching a wide variety 
of classes. Among some of these were mechan- 
ics, physics, chemistry, geology and botany. In 
his teaching LeConte used scientific methods 
that were considered modern for his day. Al- 
though LeConte only stayed at Oglethorpe a 
short time, he said that his variety of teaching 
responsibilities gave him "excellent training" 
which increased his "interest in all depart- 
ments of science." 




James Woodrow was appointed as profes- 
sor of natural science at old Oglethorpe in 
1 853. After earning a Ph.D. at the Univer- 
sity of Heidelberg he returned to Oglethorpe. 
With this degree Woodrow became the first 
teacher in the history of the state of Georgia to 
hold a Ph.D. While at Oglethorpe he gained a 
reputation as an inspiring teacher. In 1861, he 
left Oglethorpe to chair a position at Columbia 
Theological Seminary. James Woodrow be- 
came interested in evolution and finally con- 
cluded that it was probably true; although, he 
continued to believe in divine inspiration. 



Frank B. Anderson, a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Georgia, came to Oglethorpe in 
1917. While at Oglethorpe he served as 
an assistant professor of mathematics and as 
Athletic Director. In 1941, he was made Dean 
of Men. Frank Anderson left Oglethorpe in 
1942, after several successful years as a win- 
ning coach and a professor. 



Colonel Robert James Lowry came to At- 
lanta from South Carolina about the 
time of the Civil War. He and his father 
established the banking house of W.M. and 
R.J. Lowry. After the death of his father in 
1887, Robert Lowry founded the Lowry Bank- 
ing Company. Col. Lowry left his fortune to 
his wife, Mrs. Emma M. Lowry, to be convert- 
ed to a memorial fund. Mrs. Lowry died in 
1923, leaving $275,000.00 to Oglethorpe to 
found the Robert James and Emma Markman 
Lowry School of Banking and Commerce. 



FAMOUS MEN 7 



Governor Roosevelt of New York was 
awarded an honorary degree by Oglethorpe 
University in May of 1932, before he deliv- 
ered the commencement address. 



Mayor of Atlanta, Ivan Allen received his 
honorary degree from Oglethorpe Presi- 
dent Thornwell Jacobs. 





Oglethorpe's Honorary Degrees went ex- 
clusively to women during the 1935 com- 
mencement. Among this group are Martha 
Berry, founder of Berry Schools, Caroline 
Miller, author of Pulitzer winning novel, 
"Lamp In His Bosom," Mrs. Sidney La- 
nier, and Mrs. Amelia Earhart Putnam. 




This fall Sir Kenneth Dover of Corpus 
Christi College in Oxford, England spoke 
at Oglethorpe's convocation and received 
an honorary degree. 



8 HONORARY DEGREES 




"lA^^ 



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i.:s--f.mt etf f f^ssie: 



Samuel K. Talmage 
1841-1865 



Thornwell Jacobs 
1913-1943 



Philip Weltner 
1944-1953 




1^^ 




Donald Wilson 
1956-1957 



Paul R. Beall 
1965-1967 



Paul K. Vonk 
1967-1975 




President J. Whitney Bunting (1953-1955) 
and George Seward (acting President in 
1956 and 1964) greet friends of Oglethorpe 
at a reception. 

Carlyle Pollock Beman, 1836-1840 
Samuel Kennedy Talmage, 1841-1865 
William M. Cunningham, 1869-1870 
David Wills, 1870-1872 
Thornwell Jacobs, 1913-1943 
Philip Weltner, 1944-1953 
James Whitney Bunting, 1953-1955 
Donald Wilson, 1956-1957 
Donald Charles Agnew, 1958-1964 
George Seward, Acting, 1964-1965 
Paul Rensselaer Beall, 1965-1967 
Paul Kenneth Vonk, 1967-1975 
Manning Mason Pattillo, Jr., 1975- 



PAST PRESIDENTS 9 



Oh What 
They Wore! 

Dress styles have changed a great deal 
through Oglethorpe's history. With 
an all male student body at the 
school's opening in 1 835, the dress was typi- 
cal of the period with dark suits, top hats 
and capes. From this point onward, Ogleth- 
orpe's dress styles basically followed trends 
in the country's fashion. We had flappers in 
the Roaring Twenties, "Sweater Girls" in 
the Fifties, bell-bottomed jeans, mini- 
skirts, peasant dresses and long hair 
through the Sixties and the Seventies. Og- 
lethorpe has seen changes in style, an evolu- 
tion that has brought us to dress as we do 
now. 



Men in the 1800'$ dress in dark suits, often 
with striped pants. Accessories include 
capes and top hats. 



Women's dress in the early 1920's is char- 
acterized by large hats, calf-length skirts 
and wraps made of fox — the entire fox! 




The 1930's bring in feminine flower-print 
dresses with drooping skirts, tilted hats 
worn over carefully curled hair, and gloves. 

Later in the 1920's women's hemlines rise 
higher, revealing rolled stockings. Hair is 
cut short and is shingled. 




10 FASHIONS 





Knit sweaters and narrow skirts become the 
rage in the 1950's for girls who admire 
Lana Turner, the "Sweater Girl." 

Conservative, double-breasted suits and 
neat, creased trousers characterize the 
men's style of the 1950's. 

Ankle strap shoes make their first showing 
in the 1940's. 



FASHIONS 1 1 




12 FASHIONS 



The Rolling Stones are models of men's 
fashion in the 1960's, including tight pants, 
worn low on the hips, brightly colored shirts 
and shoulder-length hair. 







Fashion becomes unisex with the popularity 
of denim shown here in bell-bottomed jeans 
and bush shirts. 




"^/'JL Some clothes are an ethnic medley — pat- 
''' terned after combinations of Indian, Asian, 
Mexican and Eastern styles of dress, ac- 
' companied by jewelry. 

Love for simplicity and nature in the 1960's 
and 1 970's increases the popularity of peas- 
ant dresses like those made by Laura Ash- 
ley. 

Patterned pants, knee-high boots, culottes, 
t-shirts, felt hats and fringed leather purses 
are all fashionable in the 1 960's and 1 970's. 



FASHIONS 13 



Did You Know? 



Oglethorpe Odd Facts 



*In the early 1930's, Oglethorpe had a radio 
station, WJTL, which was the first campus 
radio station in the United States and the first 
to conduct classes over the air. 
*Hermance Stadium was originally supposed 
to be a coliseum but is incomplete because its 
financeer, Harry Hermance, lost his money in 
the Stock Market Crash. 
*The original library was located in Lupton 
Hall and consisted entirely of the registrar 
area, the admissions offices and the Dean's 
offices and was not relocated until 1972. 
*The Crypt of Civilization located in Hearst 
Hall contains a Donald Duck doll. 
*The Crypt will be opened in the year 8113. 
♦General David Sarnoff, who spoke at the 
closing of the Crypt, is the founder of RCA. 
*Thornwell Jacobs wanted to be buried under 
Lupton Hall according to his poem, "My Last 
Request". 



*Oglethorpe had its own printing press during 
the 1930's and the 1940's. 
*John Thomas Lupton bottled Coca-cola in 
Chattanooga. 

*The lower part of Hearst Hall was known as 
the "Passion Pit" when it was a dormitory. 
♦There's a sun dial on Hearst Hall. 
♦Sailing class was taught in the "pit" of Lup- 
ton Hall. 

♦Thornwell Jacobs went to England to find 
General Oglethorpe's body and bring it back 
to the Oglethorpe campus but dropped the 
idea because of a controversy between Jacobs 
and the people of Savannah, who wanted the 
body buried in Savannah. 
♦Original entrance requirements for freshman 
included examinations in Caesar, Cicero's Se- 
lect Orations, Greek Testament and the ability 
to speak Latin and Greek fluently. 
♦Oglethorpe once had a rule that specifically 




»-'^* 

i*"' 




( 



> 






stated: that no person or persons would be al- 
lowed on the roof for any reason. 
*There was once a rule that expressed that 
during hours of relaxation, no student had per- 
mission to go more than one mile from the 
college without permission. 
*In the early 1940's the circus came to town 
and its elephant got sick and died. Medical 
students at Oglethorpe asked for its body and 
it was brought to the campus by Dr. John 
Barnard. The body is buried somewhere be- 
tween Lowry and the Emerson student center. 
*Dr. Harry Dobson, noted music professor 
during the 1950's, lived in the top floor of 
Lowry when it was a men's dorm and owned 
35 cats at the time of his death. It is rumored 
that you can still smell a cat litter odor in the 
library (Mr. Stewart). 

*That Dean Mac's mother played "I Love 
You Truly" on the bells when two students 
became engaged on the traditional Senior 
bench one evening. She also used to play Og- 
lethorpe favorites every Saturday after bas- 
ketball games at Coach Pinholster's request. 



ODD FACTS 15 



Oglethorpe University is named in honor of 
General James Edward Oglethorpe, founder 
of Georgia, and modeled after Corpus Christi 
College in Oxford England which Oglethorpe 
attended. 
When General Oglethorpe first came to 
eorgia, he landed on Yamacraw Bluff near 
nah, hence the name of the yearbook. 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 



L 



V 



18 



Student Life 



38 



Organizations 



Classes 



84 



Faculty 



122 



Sports 



154 



Advertisements 



180 



Index 



190 



196 



Closing 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 17 



The Black and White Formal was the 

first event of tfie spring quarter in 1961- 
The freshman rats of 1970 had to 
dress up as the opposite sex. 




18 STUDENT LIFE 



Student Life 



TABLE OF 




CONTENTS 




Rush 


20 


Getting Settled 


22 


O.U. Life 


24 


Traditions 


26 


Fashion 


28 


Atlanta 


30 


Weekends 


32 


Fall Semester Activities 


34 


Homecoming 


36 



\ 





STUDENT LIFE 19 



Wearing matching Hawaiian shirts to 

the Delta Sig Beach Party are Harry Frazier 
and his friend, Michon Hall. 
Rush week began with a coat and tie din- 
ner at Dr. Pattillo's house. Kurt Alexander 
and Andrew Nash discuss Kappa Alpha Fra- 
ternity with a prospective pledge. 
Chi Phi Guy Scott Einbinder enjoys the mu- 
sic of the Swinging Richards at their open 
party during rush week. 
Chi Omega and Sigma Alpha Epsilon have 
various joint activities during the year. Ray 
Lucas, Marlene Rudy, Naomi Hamby, Bob 
Balkcom, Sue Bamford, and Ralph Beard get 
together during rush week. 
SAE Little sister Catherine Gay tells a pro- 
spective pledge about the advantages of fra- 
ternity life. 




I 



20 RUSH 



Rush Week Highlights 




The fall rush of 1984 was a great time for all 
involved. Chi Omega and Delta Zeta had a 
week full of rush activities the week before 
the men's rush. All four of the fraternities had 
successful dinners and parties, and gained many 
new pledges. The parties, of course, were unfor- 
gettable. Sigma Alpha Epsilon treated the stu- 
dents to a "Fallout Party," continuing in their 
tradition of great themes. Delta Sigma Phi had a 
beach party, while Chi Phi and Kappa Alpha 
sponsored their own diverse, yet fun activities. 
All things considered. Rush 1984 was a great 
success. 





Dan Duncanson was one of the charter 
members who helped reactivate Delta Sigma 
Phi this year. 

End of the world survivors Amy Glover. 
Tom Johnson, and Rhonda Hickman dress 
up for an SAE rush party- 
Summer attire worn by Mick Rathjens and 
Annette Hansen were right in style at the 
Delta Sig Beach Party. 
Greeting students at the first Delta Sig 
party were Jennifer Perry. Hank Bunnell. 
Courtney Joye. and Mark Knautz. 



f;p^^n^ 



RUSH 21 



Larry Frank. Stewart Keller and Reggie 
Frye hurry to the Student Center to check 
their mail and eat lunch after a morning of 
science classes. 



Alonso Borrero and Connie Duque enjoy 
dancing to the music at the Welcome Back 
Dance. 




Freshmen gather in Lupton Auditorium for 
Freshman Seminar, a class deisgned to orient 
students to college life. 



Kathleen McDermott poses for her year 
book picture, one of the many steps a student 
must go through to register. 



22 GETTING SETTLED 



Getting Settled Into Student Life 




Laura Brian and Pam Galamek find time to 
compare their class schedules during Regis- 
tration. 

The first week at Oglethorpe each year 
proves to be a busy and interesting one for 
both new and returning students. Dorms 
were opened to resident students on Sunday, 
September 2, 1984. The freshmen and their 
parents enjoyed lunch in the cafeteria before 
attending afternoon meetings. The new students 
learned about the clubs and organizations at the 
Activities Fair. The clubs and organizations 
were represented by a speaker and a display 
table. On Sunday evening Dr. and Mrs. Pattillo 
gave a reception for the freshmen and their par- 
ents. The upperclassmen spent their Labor Day 
in a leisurely manor while the freshmen took 
placement tests. Registration was done differ- 
ently this year as the freshmen registered on 
Tuesday before the upperclassmen. Classes be- 
gan on Thursday. The first week of school came 
to a close with the Welcome Back Dance on 
Friday night. 



Tim Bates and Wendy Bal<er help out 
with the registration process. 

At the President's Reception Dr Pattillo 
greets students and parents. 



Having dinner outside of the cafeteria 
gives Dean De Cencio, Deda Walker, llene 
Baylin and Brett Sleight a chance to visit. 



GETTING SETTLED 23 



Life After Class 



Girls at OU just wanna have fun as seen by 
Donna Baker and her "Z-Style." 
On the borderline of insanity, third year 
science majors Marty Eastlack and Ray Lu- 
cas approach the edge. 




An everyday end to an O.U. day, Michelle 
Gazes, Shelley Alford, and Cathy Roberts 
wind down in their own way. 



24 O.U. LIFE 




Silence is rare in the men's dorms, yet 
Doug Dubay manages to utilize one such mo- 
ment. 

Tom and Chris learn what it takes to sur- 
vive O.U. dorm life in Weltner. 





An old hand on campus John Schattenfield 
shows Anne Mills and David Frost one way to 
spend their leisure time. 
Casey Chosewood breathes a sigh of relief 
after a Doc A. Quant lecture. 



O.U. LIFE 25 



Traditions of the Past 



Many traditions have come and gone or 
undergone change on the Oglethorpe 
campus. Some of the more well known 
traditional events that are no longer a part of 
Oglethorpe are Rat Week, The Black and White 
Ball, The Senior Capping, Ghost Readings and 
The Masquerade Ball. 

The underlying purpose behind Rat Week 
was to, "bind the members of the Freshmen 
Class in a spirit of comradeship and unity." It 
also gave the freshmen a chance to become 
better acquainted with their peers. All freshmen 
were regarded as rats from the first day they 
arrived on campus until the Black and White 
Formal. A rat was required to wear their rat cap 
everywhere during Rat Week. They were also 
required to wear an identification badge with 
their first and last names, hometown and major. 
The Rats of 1968 were required to know 1) How 
to sing the Alma Mater, 2) The "O" Book from 
cover to cover, 3) The Petrel Fight Song, 4) The 
History of Oglethorpe, 5) The Rat Code, 6) Say- 
ing over doorways, 7) Facts about tunnel, sun 
dial, crypt, bells, swimming pool, old gym etc. 
Ron Few, Library Assistant, was a freshmen rat 
in 1971, the last year that Rat Week was held. 
He remembered Rat Week as being, "A way of 
breaking the ice." 

The Black and White Ball was a dance spon- 
sored by the freshmen class. At the Black and 
White the Rat Court, which was composed of 
upperclassmen, announced King and Queen 
Rat. 

The Senior Capping Ceremony marked the 
beginning of the academic year. The president 
of the senior class recieved his mortar board 
symbolically for his class from the Dean. 

During the Halloween season the Lupton 
Auditorium became the home of ghosts, haunts 
and gobblins. The Oglethorpe Player sponsored 
a reading of spooky stories for students and 
faculty. 

At one time the title of Lord and Lady Ogleth- 
orpe was limited to seniors. The winners were 
the male and female senior who best exempli- 
fied the Oglethorpe spirit. 

Costumes worn at Masquerade Party 

1957 

Lord and Lady Oglethorpe with their Royal 

Court in 1961 




26 TRADITIONS 




Enthusiastic Rat of 1970 
Senior Capping Ceremony 1965 



TRADITIONS 27 



Rebecca Green and Yvonne Hamby find that brightly col- 
While at a party. Selena Scott shows that hats are back ored T-shirts and sweatshirts are fun. comfortable and per- 
and black and white are big in fashion feet for parties. 




Forever in style are comfortable, well-worn Topsiders 
such as Ross Lipman's which are held together by tape. 

Cropped pants, spiked heels, big vests and blouses, leath- 
er, and velvet are at the top of the fashion scale for Pauline 
Robinson and Michelle Payne. 

Sitting pretty in pink and comfortable in sweats are fresh- 
men Kelly Moran and Wendy McKelvey. 




28 FASHION 



Purchases for the fashion conscious can be made at 
Lenox Square, one of Atlanta's many shopping malls. 




What's in 
style? 

Isn't that dress a little old? 
— Not old; classic baby! Vintage clothing! 
— You mean other people wore those?! 
Yucko! 

— Hey, did her pants shrink? 

— Shrink?! No, they're cropped. They're sup- 
posed to be short. 

— And her shoes! My mother wore heels like 
that when she was our age! 

— Pumps are in — especially spiked heels and 
bright colors. 

— You want colors? Check out that psychedelic 
plaid! 

— Don't you love it?! Flourescent pink, yellow 
and green! 

— That guy's dark jacket and narrow tie are 
great! 

— Yeah, but 1 prefer the casual look — jeans, 
button down shirts, sweaters and Topsiders. Es- 
pecially the sweater because I can wear it! 

— A girl wearing a guy's sweater? Strange. 

— No, comfortable! Like these sweats — I live in 
'em! 

— Well, everyone's dressed so differently, how 
do I know what's in style? 

— It all is! Just wear what you like and make it 
your own style! 

Fading into the background bushes, Mark Feiring and 
Kathy King display the use of camouflage in clothing. 

Rainy days don't get Kathleen McDermott down as she 
donns her hot pink raincoat to brave the wet weather. 

Summer McNair's argyle and loafers prove that preppies 
are still present at Oglethorpe. 



FASHION 29 



ATLANTA . . . PAST 





Above: Reconstruction after the Civil War, 1870 Nearing the turn of the century, 1890 



30 ATLANTA 



AND PRESENT 



Atlanta . . . she has survived the tragedy of 
war, the drama of everyday life, and the 
horror of depression, but still she emerges 
as a beautiful and respected city. Gone are the 
days of reconstructing a burned ruin, but still the 
city constantly changes her architecture, which 
includes an exciting new skyline. Atlanta should 
be proud of her accomplishments. 




ATLANTA 31 



Weekends 

are made 

for. . . 

It's Friday, the bell tower signals that it is eight 
o'clock. The students here at Oglethorpe 
have forty-eight hours to recover from the 
past week and prepare for future ones. How can 
forty-eight hours make up for one hundred and 
twenty hours of frustration? Different people 
have different ideas to answer that question. 
The conservative student spends his weekend 
doing laundry and typing his English paper. The 
moderate student goes to see a movie and reads 
a good book. The other 99.5% of the students 
do only one thing — PARTY! 



Mick Rathjens and Rich Fischer share in a 
conversation while socializing at one of the 
numerous fall parties. 

Silver Lake has provided a place for enter- 
tainment at O.U since the campus moved to 
Atlanta 

Robert Miller from Florida takes advantage 
of the lower weekend rates to call home. 
Spectators at a soccer game argue over a 
controversial call. 




32 WEEKENDS 



Nathaniel "Dingo" Lowe spends another 
exciting weekend doing his laundry. 

The Limelight is a popular hangout for the 
more adventuresome O.U. student. 




tick checks out a listing of local activities 
round Atlanta. 



WEEKENDS 33 



1 1 



e 
s 
t 
1 

V 

1 
t 
1 

e 
s 



The International Dinner provided a won- 
derful night of entertainment for all who at- 
tended. Members of the International Club 
contributed to the various food dishes that 
were served. Elise Witt and the Small Family 
Orchestra performed folk music and selec- 
tions written by members of the orchestra. 

What is your roommate's worst habit? 
Who does your roommate invite over often 
that you do not like? These are questions 
similar to those asked of contestants in the 
Roommate Game. Based on the television 
show "The Newlywed Game," the questions 
test the knowledge roommates have of one 
another. The event, sponsored by OSA, gave 
students a comic relief during the semester. 



Kathy Messina, Jon Van't Riet, Jennifer Sier- 
ra, and Eyo Eyo enjoyed the food and enter- 
tainment at the International Dinner, which 
was held on November 10, 1984, in the cafe- 
teria. 

Mike Cheek captivates polo players, Deda 
Walker and Jill Rossen. with his officer and a 
gentleman charms. 

Scott Soloway, emcee for the Roommate 
Game, is applauding for one of the many 
interesting responses given by one of the con- 
testants. 



The Halloween Dance, sponsored by the 
OSA and APO, was an opportunity for every- 
one to take a mid-semester break. Among all of 
those research papers, tests, lab experiments, 
and all night study sessions, students could put 
on their most outrageous costumes and dance 
the night away. Creativity and originality of cos- 
tumes made an interesting topic of conversation 
for meeting exciting and interesting people. The 
music was provided by the Swinging Diamonds. 



This group never clowns around. Enjoying 
the conversation are Beatriz Lopez, Fred De 
Loach, Cile Hardwick, and Randy Wade. 




34 FALL FESTIVITIES 



And The 
Winner Is 




Appearing jubilant and excited, Bonnie 
O'Harrow receives a hug from Mary Howard 
after hearing her name announced as the 
1985 Miss Yamacraw. 

And the winner is . . . These are the words 
that proceeded Miss Bonnie O'Harrow's name 
at the Miss Yamacraw pageant, which was held 
on December 6, 1984. Excitement mounted 
throughout the pageant as the girls were judged 
on interviews, talent, and fashion. The talent 
ranged from dancing to singing to fashion de- 
sign. In the end, the results were tabulated and 
the winners were as follows: Second runner 
up — Misty Reid, First runner up — Marsha 
McGuigan, and the 1985 MISS YAMA- 
CRAW— BONNIE O'HARROW. 

Misty Reid, who was sponsored by the Chi 
Phi Fraternity, did a jazz dance to "Body 
Rocl<," a popular song from the movie of the 
same name. 

The Student Education Club sponsored Mar- 
cia McGuigan, who played Albumblatt OP. 
117. on the piano which helped her to be 
selected as the First runner up. 



Entertaining the audience while the curtain 
was closed, Mick Rathjens and Dan Duncan- 
son served as emcees for the pageant. 



YAMACRAW PAGEANT 35 



At one time Lord and Lady Oglethorpe was a 
more significant event involving crown bear- 
ers and a royal court. 




36 HOMECOMING 



A Gala Event 




Hat night at the basketball game Monday, 
January 28, started off Homecoming Week. 
Sunglasses, buttons, and bandanas could be 
seen on the more spirited students during the 
week. The cold damp weather on Friday forced 
the bonfire to be moved into Goodman lounge 
fireplace and students to coverup their black 
and gold outfits. But nothing could dampen the 
spirits of the students, faculty, and alumni on 
Saturday night. During halftime at the basket- 
ball game the cheerleaders performed a pom- 
pom routine to a song from Prince's "Purple 
Rain" album. 

Dan Duncanson then introduced the Home- 
coming Court and the three final couples who 
were Frank Russo-Alesi and Terri Abernathy 
sponsored by Delta Sigma Phi, Chris Erckert 
and Sue McCue sponsored by Sigma Alpha Ep- 
silon, and Ken Jackson and Stacy Gates spon- 
sored by Alpha Phi Omega. Kappa Alpha won 
the banner contest. Delta Sigma Phi won the 
attendance contest and O.U. won the basketball 
game over Shorter. 

After the students had a chance to enjoy 
some music at the dance Frank and Terri were 
named Lord and Lady Oglethorpe. 



HOMECOMING 37 



HMJ M *^^ 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



OSA 


42 


Dorm Council 


48 


Athletics 


49 


Clubs 


50 


APO/RUDD 


54 


Greeks 


56 


Honoraries 


64 


Career Clubs 


71 


Religious Clubs 


75 


Entertainment 


76 


Publications 


79 



ORGANIZATIONS 





38 ORGANIZATIONS 




ORGANIZATIONS 39 



CANDIDS 






40 CANDIDS 



"f$ 





CANDIDS 41 



I, ■ rJ ^ M im^^'^^^^imm 



OGLETHORPE 

STUDENT 
ASSOCIATION 




Ray Lucas— Vice President, Tim Bates— Parliamentarian, Rusty Mabrey— Sophomore Class President, Chris Erckert— Treasur- 
er, Sue McCue— Secretary, Dan Duncanson— President, Becky Gess— Junior Class President, Bill Fair— Freshman Class 
President, Barb Bessmer — Senior Class President 



42 OSA 



SENATE 







'hil Deal, Jay Floyd, Larry Frank, Harry Frazer, Bret Sleight, Doug Schmitt, Ray Lucas, Rod Johnson, Marlene Rudy, Janice 
/[arshall, Jessica Bagley, Marty Eastlack, Rise Nachman, Dee Pickett. 



OSA 43 



n j»j > ■ i w>^wwr.f»»v<i^— g^- 



ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 




John White, Maureen Rowe, Carolyn Nowell, Jay Floyd, Barbara Shadomy, Bonnie Boles, Jessica Bagley, Dan Noble, Harry 
Frazer, Sharon Petty, Chris Erckert 



FOOD COMMITTEE 




i 



Chris Erckert, Bill Fair, Jennifer Perry, Mike Rathjens, Ruth Ryan, Dan Duncanson, Barb Bessmer, 
Jackie Liberman, Sean LaPides, Stacey Bronstein, Naomi Hamby, Daine Dubay, John White 



44 COMMITTEES 



COUNCIL OF CONCERNED STUDENTS 




Doak Patton, J.C. McElroy, Rod Johnson, Cindy 
Bjurmark, Susan Street, Amy Young, Laura Rankin 



3AMPUS LIFE COMMITTEE 




me McCue, Dr. Brad Stone, Barb Bessmer, Dean Edd Wheeler, Marcia McGuigan, 
Jich Fischer, Marty Eastlack, Dr. Robert Moffie, Larry Frank, Marshall Nason 



COMMITTEES 45 



EXECUTIVE 

ROUND 

TABLE 




Bob Balkcom, Phil Deal, Stewart Keller, Dan Duncanson, Doug Schmitt, Laura Rankin, Brett Sleight, Penni Reid, Larry Rollins, 
Doug Dubay, Rich Fischer, Ralph Beard, Larry Frank, Eric Dnck, Scott Soloway, Jackie Woodard, Kathy Messina, Sue McCue, 
Marlene Rudy, Reggie Frye, Sue Bamford, Julie Quickmire, Naomi Hamby, Mike Rathjens, Dee Pickett, Rise Nachman, Kim 
Hudgens, Bonnie O'Harrow, Rod Johnson, Jackie Liberman, Maureen Rowe, Helen Bourne, Stacey Bronstein, Diane Dubay, 
Lise Shade, Barb Bessmer, Charlotte Christian 



46 EXECUTIVE ROUND TABLE 




Mark Stephens — Sunkist, Dr. Philip Zmsmeister, James M. Christain — Ciba-Geigy, Lew Jachob, Wayne Stahn — OEI Busi- 
ness Forms, James E. Copeland — DHS, Dr. Philip Neujar, Dr. Mike Rulison, Fred Carter, Edward O'Harn, Steven Brown — 
The Fortune Group, Trippe Blade, Lloyd Nick, Dr. Manning Pattillo 



EXECUTIVE ROUND TABLE 47 



Womens 



DORM COUNCIL 




Anjie Rupe, Becky Gess, Mary Howard, Stacey Bronstein, Cathy Gay, Guynelle Brown, Penni Reid, Naomi 
Hamby, Kelly Moran 



Mens 




Chip Wuerz, Mark Knautz, John Winecker, Doug Schmitt, John Mastroianni 



48 DORM COUNCILS 



OFF CAMPUS COMMITTEE 




Barb Bessmer, Marcia McGuigan, Veronica Maldonado, Mirvat ]rab, Joseph Parson, Maureen Whalen, Laura 
Laframboise, Betti Scott, Mark Blankenship, Marc Cash, Deidre Parker, Kim Raid, Charlie Woodford, Eric 
Mehnert, Vicki Vietor, Cindy Downey, Manolis Platanis 



YOUNG REPUBLICANS 




Joanne Jarosz, Barbara Shadomy, Michelle Harrison, Bonnie Boles, Beatriz Lopez, Brad Baldwin, 
Dee Pickett, Ross Lipman, Jessica Bagley, Chris Erckert, Rusty Mabrey, Kevin Southern, Robert de 
Matheu 



CLUBS 49 



INTERNATIONAL CLUB 




Connie Duque, Suzy Komin, Jennifer Sierra, Marshall Nason, Kazuhiko Okubo, Alfian Tansil, Amy Mcllveen, 
Mauricio Amaya, Eyo Eyo, Yoshiaki Kurokawa, Aripin Tansil, Armando Kohn. 



"Rosa Virgmia Peletier" orphanage 
Ilopango, El SALVADOR 




50 INTERNATIONAL CLUB 



BLACK STUDENT CAUCUS 




Fran Flowers, Kim Reid, Lisa Barnes, Kecia McGlothan, Paula Cornish, Christine Gilmore, D. Tolbert, Sharen 
Wilcox, Willie Lawton 




Rod, Marshall, and Mauricio 
with some of the things collect- 
ed tor the Salvadorian orphans 



BLACK STUDENT CAUCUS 51 



52 OUTDOORS 



OUTDOORS CLUB 



Michelle Harrison, Dawn Skelton, Jim Tuten, Marty Eastlack, Guynelle Brown, Suzy Schobert, 
Doug Dubay, Harry Frazer, Ruth Ryan, Dee Pickett, Jennifer Perry, Rusty Mabrey 



KARATE CLUB 




David Robertson, Brian Buzzeo, Gary Ford, Mac Van't Riet, Guynelle Brown, Frank Lawton, Suzy 
Schobert, John White 



KARATE 53 



ALPHA PHI OMEGA 




John Green, Tnna Crowder, John Jarrard, Denise Enneking, Ken Jackson, Mary Howard, Phil Deal, Stacey Gates, Joe 
Helwig, Brenda Mullis, Casey Chosewood, Terry Brooks, Maureen Whalen, Karen Poe, Janice Marshall, Rhonda Hick- 
man, Biya Kahn, Diane Dubay, Dee Pickett, Susan Butler, Maureen Rowe, Maria Jordan, Emily Yen, Theresa Ryan, Doug 
Dubay, Cindy Bjurmark, Cyndi Crawford, Irene La Vita, Joanne Jarosz, Elena Franco, Anne Kohl, Mark Bryant, Larry 
Rollins 




54 APO 



RUDD 




Terry Brooks, Larry Frank, Bruce Benton, Dave Holcomb, Reggie Frye, Stewart Keller, Anjie Rupe, Becky Gess, 
Renee Byland, Margaret Meyer, Paul Sykes 




RUDD 55 



INTRAFRATERNITY 
COUNCIL 



Bud Granger, Mike Rathjens, 
Mark Feiring, Jonathan 
McLeod, Ross Lippman, Mike 
Wywra, Scott Soloway 




PANHELLENIC COUNCIL 



Jackie Liberman, Naomi 
Hamby, Kelli Heitt, Ai- 
leen Pratt, Margaret Tur- 
cotte, Courtney Joy, 
Shelly Alford, Dr. Ann 
Wheeler. Pictured: Jack- 
ie Liberman, Margaret 
Turcotte, Courtney Joy 




56 GREEKS 





In the 1 50 year history of 
Oglethorpe the Greeks have 
under gone a great number 
of changes. In the late thirties 
and early forties, the number 
of Greek organizations 
numbered around fifteen. Of 
these there were eight 
Fraternities and Sororities. 
Then a period came in which 
these Greeks were asked to 
leave the campus. For a long 
time the school had no active 
Fraternal organizations. It was 
not until the late sixties that 
the Greek system was allowed 
to resume on OU's campus. 
From then on the Fraternities 
have continued to grow and 
improve. The latest of these 
improvements was the return 
of Delta Sigma Phi after a 
forty year absence. This trend 
will hopefully continue and 
cause the Greek system to be 
as strong as it once was. On 
the Sorority side of this all, 
things have not been going as 
well. The outlook, however, 
seems to bring a brighter side 
to the future of the sororities 
here at Oglethorpe. 



GREEKS 57 



DELTA ZETA 




Cathy Preiser, Jill Ashton, Michelle Anderson, Cathy Steiner, Shelly Alford, Aileen Pratt, Helen Peterson, Jackie Liberman, 
Kathy Roberts, Hassana Adamson. 



58 GREEKS 



CHI OMEGA 




Margaret Turcotte, Charlotte Christian, Renee Byland, Kelli Heitt, Kim Hudgens, Traci Bell, Dorothy Saltmer, Michelle Harrison, 
Maria Paterson, Jacqueline Hernandez, Sherry Sing, Susan Street, Naomi Hamby, Lise Shade, Julie Quickmire, Martha 
McCardel, Courtney Joy, Leslie Martin. 



GREEKS 59 



SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON 




Bob Balkcom, Sean LaPides, Greg Steele, Ross Lipman, Joe Del Rocini, Mark Feiring, Scott 
Soloway, Thair Hanaway, Ray Lucas, Ralph Beard, Guy Samuels, Harris Targovnik, Dave Turner, 
Ron Kraynik, Gary Ford, Mac Van't Reit, Jill Ashton, Chris Erckert, Tom James, Jennifer Francik, 
Maureen Murphy, Beatriz Lopez, Cathy Gay, Gale Gallager, Sue McCue 




60 GREEKS 



DELTA SIGMA PHI 




Richard Briggs, Stewart Keller, Reg Frye, Frank Russo-Alesi, Mark Knautz, Bill Sharpe, Bret Sleight, Greg Hightower, Brad Baldwin, 
Frank Lawton, Brian Buzzeo, Fred Long, John Greene, Casey Chosewood, Dave McCollam, David Tucker, Sandra Sasson, Mike 
Rathjens, Dan Duncanson, Steve Kim, Rusty Mabrey, Hank Bunnell, Jeanne Carolan, Terri Wall, Ruth Ryan, Theresa Ryan, Harry 
Frazer, Doug Dubay, Michon Hall, Jennifer Perry, Annette Hansen, Sharon Petti 




GREEKS 61 



KAPPA ALPHA 




Kurt Alexander, Cathy Preiser, Eric Drick, Samantha Woods, Jerry Garcia, JC McElroy, Selena Scott, Victor Guisto, 
Sherry Rosen, Andrew Nash, Alicia BuUard, Glen Dubrowsky, Sarah Hunter, Cheryl Lerner, Viana Falune, Marc Naef, 
Mike Wyrwa, Neil Seiwell 




62 GREEKS 



CHI PHI 




Bill Cottone, Jim Kuchinski, Rich Wallace, Jon Rawls, Tim Ray, Bud Granger, Carlos Duque-Estrada, Scott Einbinder, 
Andy Weiller, Mike Gates, Keith Nabb, Jeff Petree, Kenny Hines, Tommy Johnson, Ron Vaughn, James Leggat, Robin 
Porter, Becky Gess, Lil Klien, Jackie Liberman, Anjie Rupe, Theresa Norton, Cece Mullings, Lenni Bunin, llene Baylin, 
Cathy Shattenficld, Naomi Hamby, Michelle Gazes 




GREEKS 63 





,iftl.,.>._i ., k;.- J,.J^:^*I 



Guynelle Brown 



WHO'S 




Jessica Bagley 



Casey Chosewood 



Douglas Dubay 

Daniel Duncanson 

Marty Eastlack 



Barbara Bessmer 




Diane Dubay 




64 WHO'S WHO 




Brad Gadberry 



WHO 



Jay Floyd 




Ellen Gadberry 





' — --'■'**.'*>^\ 



Gabriel Grasso 



Ray Lucas 



Janice Marshall 




Frank Russo-Alesi 
Lise Shade 
Paul Sykes 



WHO'S WHO 65 



OMICROM DELTA KAPPA 




Ellen Gadberry, Brad Gadberry, Kenton Baggs, Richard Williams, Dr. Key, Casey Chosewood, Dean Waldner, 
Paul Sykes, Ray Lucas, Sue McCue, Lise Shade, Marshall Nason, Guynelle Brown, Diane Dubay, Dan Duncanson, 
Janice Marshall, Jay Floyd 



66 HONORARIES 




BOAR'S HEAD CEREMONY 





HONORARIES 67 



PHI ALPHA THETA 




Becky Gess, Juliette Johnson, Tony Petty, Eileen Murphy, Dr. Key, Scott Solway, Richard Scott, Shari Booth 



POLITICS— PRELAW 



Dee Pickett, Kevin Southern, Dr. 
Neujar, Brad Baldwin, Gabriel 
Grasso, Chris Erckert, Jessica 
Bagley, Robert De Matheu 



n f^ 



m 




68 HONORARIES & CLUBS 



BETA OMICRON SIGMA 




Dr. Bill Shropshire, Dr. Carl- 
ton Jones, Dr. Bruce Hether- 
ington, Jill Shimmack, 
Dominic DeSantis 




A speaker sponsored by Phi 
Beta Lambda 



HONORARIES & CLUBS 69 



ALPHA CHI 




Frank Russo-Alesi, Jill Schimmack, Rhett Laurens, Nina Ha- 
mond, Marie Wesley, John Green, Evelyn Bowyer, Sally 
Shin, Richard Scott, Jay Floyd, Dr. Mike Rulison, Kenton 
Baggs, Henry Hartje, Robert Strozier, Rhoda Williams, Dr. 
Barbara Clark, Guynelle Brown, Diane Dubay, Tammy 
Chaffin 



SIGMA 
ZETA 



Jennifer Perry, Guynelle Brown, Lise Shade, Bonnie Boles, 
Jay Floyd, Dan Duncanson, Casey Chosewood, Dr. Mal- 
colm Amerson, Dr. John Cramer, Dr. Philip Zinsmeister, 
Paul Sykes, Tammy Chaffin, Bret Sleight, Dr. Keith Aufder- 
heide. Dr. Mike Rulison, Dr. Monte Wolf, Mauricio Amaya 




70 HONORARIES 



ENGLISH CLUB 




Pat Maerker, Jerri Newman, Jetfrey Portnoy, Dr. Linda Taylor, Mary Carol Geddis, Penni Reid, Dr. Barbara Clark, 
Hank Bunnell, Brad Gadberry, Ellen Gadberry, Dr. William Brightman 



STUDENT EDUCATION 
ASSOCIATION 




Dr. Ann Wheeler, Kath- 
erine Conrad, Angela 
Wilson, Marcia McGui- 
gan, Martha McCardel, 
Jeannie Carolan, Gwen 
Kendrick, Sonja Hol- 
combe. Donna Rothstein, 
Alice Hilger 



CLUBS 71 



ACCOUNTING CLUB 



Dr. Keith Baker, Jill 
Schimmack, Domi- 
nic DeSantis, Ken 
Jackson, Irish Shel- 
ton, Juhette John- 
son 



^ 














§^mm 




II 1 




1 ~"-^^S^V \W 


ijjHP.i 






PHI BETA LAMBDA 




I 



Carol Johnston, Michelle Harrison, Helen Bourne, Barbara Shadomy, Diane Dubay, Janice Marshall, Lisa 
Barnes, Charlotte Christian, Irish Shelton, Luann Sands, Eileen Murphy, Ken Jackson, Bonnie Patterson, 
Kecia McGlothan 



i 



72 CLUBS 



PSYCHOLOGY/ 
SOCIOLOGY CLUB 




Kenny Gould, Laura 
Rankin, Laura Trittin, 
Kevin HaU, Jerrie 
Thompson, Mike Rath- 
jens, Nina Hamond, 
Margaret Meyer, Rob- 
ert Strozier, Cheryl 
Lerner, Rod Johnson, 
Dr. Robert Moffie, Dr. 
Nancy Kerr, Dr. Brad 
Stone 



AMERICAN 
CHEMICAL SOCIETY 




Paul Sykes, Larry Frank, Dave Holcomb, Dr. Monte Wolf, Bret Sleight, Pat Capes, Stewart Keller, Reg Frye, 
Frank Russo-Alesi, Denise Enneking, Irene La Vita, Kan Spangler, Deda Walker, Eric Mehnert, Ruth Ryan, 
Lisa Quinn, Kim Rouleau, Bonnie Boles, Mark Wilson, Joey Masdon, Rich Fischer, Guynelle Brown, Debney 
Moore, Mark Knautz 



CLUBS 73 



ATHLETIC COUNCIL 



Coach Berkshire, Doug 
Schmitt, Scott Smith, Diane Du- 
bay, Renee Byland, Veronica 
Malnado 




POOR BOYS 



John Winecker, Mike Cheek, 
Dean DeCencio, Doug 
Schmitt, Eric Garvey, John Sa- 
lamone, Tony Lentini, Bruce 
Cram, Mike Harrison, Kevin 
Southern 




74 SPORTS 



OGLETHORPE 
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 



rt^^.ft'^ 





Bob Pickney, Dr. Monte Wolf, Sa- 
brina Williams, Ken Jackson, Rob- 
in Bishop, Cathy Messina, Kenton 
Baggs, Ruth Ritch, John Win- 
ecker, Maureen Rowe, Diane Du- 
bay, Debney Moore, Joe Helwig, 
Ralph Gunn, Mary Hauk, Jay 
Floyd, Gary Pearson, Casey 
Chose wood, Tony Petty, Stacey 
Gates, Penni Reid, Richard Wil- 
liams and Katharine, Aripin Tansil 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
STUDENT ASSOCIATION 




Frank Lawton, Tomas Hernandez, Bill 
Sharpe, Rich Fischer, Frank Russo-Alesi, 
Mark Knautz, Brian Buzzeo, Theresa Ryan, 
Mary Howard, Jessica Bagley, Ruth Ryan, 
Cindy Bjurmark, Jeannie Cardan, Mi- 
chelle Waschak, Carolyn Nowell 



RELIGION 75 



SINGERS 



Larry Rollins, Trina Crowder, Casey Chosewood, Lizabeth Harkey, Mark Bryant, Helen Maddox, Bill Fair, Maureen Rowe, Doug 
Dubay, Diane Dubay, John Jarrard, Charis Andrews, Joe Helwig, Cindy Crawford, Ken Jackson, Bill Porter, Donna Adair, Elena 
Franco, Rob Boggus, Helen Bourne, Janice Marshall, Ralph Gunn, Yvonne Hamby 



76 CHORALE 





\ 



Brad Gadberry — Editor-in-chief 



/ 


X 


■ 


■ 



TOWER 



Dr. Linda Taylor — Advisor 




Jessica Bagley— Publicity, Hank Bunnell— Assistant editor 



PUBLICATIONS 77 



PLAYERS 



Jessica Bagley, John White, Darryl 
Wade, Lane Anderson, Harry 
Frazer, Bonnie O' Harrow, Mark 
Wilson, Mike Rathjens, Joey Mas- 
don, Kelly Moran, Chris Erckert, 
Peg O'Neil, Veronique Cauquil, 
Michelle Waschak, Sharon Petti, 
Deidre Parker, Lisa Quinn, 
Rhonda Hickman, Rise Nachman, 
Ann Groover, Kim Rouleau, Rob- 
in Rose, Leslie Taylor 







TONIGHT 

8-OOPM 




78 ENTERTAINMENT 



STORMY PETREL 



M>t(nin 




Mike McCracken, Larry Rollins, Jessica Bagley, Terry Brooks, David Tucker, Gabriel Grasso, 
Diane Dubay, Kaylen Biggins, Gary Pearson, Robin Bishop, Margaret Meyer, Helen Bourne, 
Ryan McMuUun 



PUBLICATIONS 79 



YAMACRAW 




John White — layouts, John Jarrad, Ken Jackson, Kevin Bradley, Jessica Bagley, Jackie Woodard — Co-Editor of 
Student Life, Darien Ogburn — Editor of Sports, Laura Lafromboise — Editor of Classes, Bonnie Paterson, Diane 
Dubay — Editor-in-chief, Marty Eastlack — Assistant editor-in-chief, Barbara Shadomy, Joanne Jarosz — Editor of 
Faculty, Laura Brian, Stacey Bronstein — Editor of Organizations, Angela Wilson — Editor of Student Life 



80 PUBLICATIONS 



CANDIDS 






CANDIDS 81 



Cathy Schattenfield, Linda and 
Kenneth are having some fun 
during the OSA's service pro- 
ject. 





APO's pledge class's slumber party. 



Some of the food present at the 
International Club dinner. 




82 CANDIDS 




Casey Chosewood shows 
how much fun he is hav- 
ing during some games. 




%.;;, Here some of the peopfe present 
j at Night of the Arts sampfe the 
food which was put out for inter- 
mission. 




Some OU students show what they are 
tt reafly like during the fialloween Dance 



here at school. 



CANDIDS 83 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Seniors 
Underclassmen 



GLASSES 




84 CLASSES 



<v. 




CLASSES 85 



SENIORS 



Pam Adams 
Decatur, Ga. 
Education — early 

Nancy Arnold 
East Point, Ga. 
Medical Tech. 

Kenton Baggs 
Jasper, Ga. 
Education — secondary 



Tim Bates, 
Islip, NY. 
Political Studies 

Ralph Beard 
Nashville, Tn. 
Business /Economics 

Barb Bessmer 
Dunedin, Fl. 
Economics 

Rob Boggus 

Conyers, Ga. 

Business and Behavioral Sciences 




In 40 years, a lot of things tiave changed. 
One of the more noticeable, has been stu- 
dents' appearances. 



86 ADAMS-BOGGUS 








Maxeen Brown 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Sociology 

Sheryl Brown 
Atlanta, Ga. 
History 

Mark Bryant 
Marietta, Ga. 
Business Administration 

Tammy Chaffin 
Hampton, Ga. 
Mathematics 

Charlotte Christian 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Business Administration 

Marohn Callins 
Cedartown, Ga. 
Business Administration 



Joey Damiano 
Marietta, Ga. 
History 



This 1948 graduate, is typical of the 
style of that era. 



BROWN-DAMIANO 87 



Phil Deal 

Chickamauga, Ga. 
Biology 

George Dippel 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Business Administration 

Eric Drick 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Business Administration 

Doug Dubay 

Norcross, Ga. 

Business and Behavioral Sciences 

Dan Duncanson 
Hollywood, Fl. 
Biology 

Alan Fann 
Decatur, Ga. 
Psychology 



Seniors Sherry Rosen and Bonnie O'Har- 
row toast to their success at thie Ctirist- 
mas mixer, honoring the December 
graduates. 




88 DEAL-FANN 





hiiiniii'^iir 



/ 



A rare warm day in December finds Sen- 
ior Robin Rose outside studying for her 
management final. 



Jay Floyd 
Baltimore, Md. 
Biology 

Ellen Gadberry 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Education — secondary 

Howard Gelb 
Coral Springs, Fl. 
Individually Planned Major 

Christine Gilmore 
Baltimore, Md. 
Accounting 

Kenny Gould 
Rockville, Md. 
Psychology 

Charles Granger 
Miami Beach, Fl. 
Business Administration 



FLOYD-GRANGER 89 



Ann Groover 
Dalton, Ga. 
Biology 

Ralph Gunn 
Marietta, Ga. 
Business Administration 

Kevin Hall 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Psychology 

Nina Hamond 
Norcross, Ga. 
Psychology 

Michael Hays 
Atlanta, Ga. 
History 

Greg Hightower 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Chemistry 

Kelly Hodges 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Business Administration 

Sonja Holcombe 
Alpharetta, Ga. 
Education — early 

David Hwang 

Kuching, Sarawak; Malaysia 

Mathematics — dual major 




90 GROOVER-HWANG 




Juliette Jotinson 
Atlanta, Ga. 
International Studies 

Rod Johnson 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Sociology 

Anne Kohl 

Roswell, Ga. 

Business and Behavioral Sciences 



Rhett Lawrens 
Lithonia, Ga. 
Accounting 

Cheryl Lerner 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Psychology 

Hsiao-Yun Liu 

Taiwan, Republic of China 

Accounting 

Senior Class President Barb Bessmer 
enjoys the Christmas Student/Faculty 
mixer along with MIchon Hall and Naomi 
Hamby. Barb arranged the mixer to honor 
the December graduates. 



JOHNSON-LIU 91 



The Boar's Head Ceremony, one of Og- 
lethorpe's annual events gives Senior 
members of ODK such as Paul Sykes, a 
chance to carry the actual boar's head. 



Nan Loftis 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Individually Planned 

Jeff Lowman 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Business Administration 

Janice Marshall 

Lilburn, Ga. 

Business Administration 

Karen McAmis 
Norcross, Ga. 
Political Studies 

Martha McCardel 
Albany, Ga. 
Education 

Mike McCracken 
Dunwoody, Ga. 
Political Studies 




92 LOFTIS-McCRACKEN 




Ann McGuffey 
Riverdale, Ga. 
Political Studies 

Greg Meyer 

West Palm Beach, Fl. 

International Studies 

Margaret Meyer 

Ctievy Ctiase, Md. 

Business and Behavioral Sciences 

Chris Moore 
Marietta, Ga. 
Accounting 

Eileen Murphy 
Tampa, Fl. 
International Studies 

Maureen Murphy 
Savannah, Ga. 
Political Studies 

Carolyn Nowell 
Mauldin, SC. 
Math 

Bonnie O'Harrow/ 

Stone Mountain, Ga. 

Business and Behavioral Sciences 

Sharon Petti 
Bridgeport, Ct. 
Biology 



McGUFFEY-PETTI 93 



Luis Prado 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Business Administration 

Aileen Pratt 
Edison, NJ. 
Economics 

Ellis Ragland 
Dunwoody, Ga. 
Individually Planned Major 

Michael Rathjens 
Miami, Fl. 
Psychology 

Cheryl Bella 
Norcross, Ga. 
Accounting 

Robin Rose 

Cranford, NJ. 

Business and Behavioral Sciences 

Donna Rothstein 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Education — early 

John Schattenfield 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Business Administration 

Richard Schwartz 

Hillside, NJ. 

Individually Planned major 




t 



94 PRADO-SCHWARTZ 



SENIORS 




Jonathan Spanier 

Marietta, Ga. 

Business & Behavioral Sciences 

Cathy Steiner 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Business & Behavioral Sciences 

Yvonne Turner 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Business Administration 



Richard Williams 
Orange Park, Fl. 
English 

John Winecker 

Clinton, NJ and Fl. 

Business & Behavioral Sciences 

Chip Wuerz 

Winterpark, Fl. 

Dual Degree/Engineering. 




Happy to be graduating but sorry to be 
leaving tier friend Bonnie Patterson be- 
tiind, Senior Eileen Murphy relisties a rare 
moment with her roomie. 



SPANIER-WUERZ 95 



UNDERCLASSMEN 



Donna Adair 
Kevin Adams 
Robin Adams 
Slieiiy Alford 



Mauricio Amaya 
Sonya Anderson 
Charls Andrews 
Asdrubal Arvelo 



Jill Ashton 

Omid Atlassi 

Vicki Autrey 

Jessica Bagley 



John Bailey 

Donna Baker 

Wendy Baker 

Scott Baldwin 



Sue Bamford 

Colin Bannerman 

Lisa Barnes 

Suzanne Bartholomae 




96 ADAIR-BARTHOLOMAE 




Karen Bates 
Frank Beaty 
Traci Bell 
Babette Bennett 



Brent Bishop 
Lauren Bishop 
Robin Bishop 
Lisa Bitoun 



Cindy Bjurmark 
Mark Blankenship 
David Boisvert 
Chris Bolden 



Taking advantage of the last bit of warm 
weather, Christine Green, Amy Glover 
and Joe Helwig do some necessary 
studying. 



BATES-BOLDEN 97 



Any day is Tie day when the basketball 
team has a game for players Rich Fischer 
and Bill Sherwood. 

Another day, another storm. Trying not 
to be late to class, Sue Bamford tra- 
verses one of Oglethorpe's reoccuring 
rivers. 




Scott Boynton 

Timothy Bracy 

Kevin Bradley 

Laura Brian 



Richard Briggs 

Stacey Bronstein 

Marcie Brooks 

Terry Brooks 



98 BOLES-BROOKS 




Carolyn Brown 
Guynelle Brown 
Bobbin Brown 
Martin Bucci 



Hank Bunnell 
Chitrada Burapachaisri 
Susan Butler 
Brian Buzzeo 



Renee Byland 
Felix Cabrera 
Pat Capes 
Jeanne Carolan 



Chris Carter 
Veronique Cauquil 
Mike Cheek 
Karen Cheole 



Margaret Chin 
Casey Chosewood 
Michael Clance 
Tom Clements 



BROWN-CLEMENTS 99 



Cindy Cobbaert 

Paula Cornish 

Bill Cottone 

Bruce Crain 



Cindy Crawford 

Trina Crowder 

Ann Crump 

Steven Cumbee 



Thomas Danisi 

Rhonda Davie 

Guinan Dawson 

Dean De Cencio 




Making use of the Traer lounges, Jackie 
Leiberman and Lil Klein study for their 
midterms. 




too COBBAERT-DE CENCIO 




Robert de Mattheu 
Dominic De Santis 
Joe Del Rocini 
Mara Delaney 



Chrissy Dl Benedetto 
Cindy Downey 
Glen Dubrowsky 
Diane Dubay 



Matt Duggan 
Terria Duncan 
Wayne Duncan 
Richard Dunn 



Eduardo Duque-Estrada 
Marty Eastlack 
Shawn Edwards 
Chris Eidson 



Sheri Eleswich 
Uta Eltester 
Denlse Enneking 
Jane Ensor 



DE MATTEU-ENSOR 101 



Young Eom 

Chris Erckert 

Angela Espejo 

Mollis Ewing 



Eyo Eyo 

Bill Fair 

Mark Feiring 

Sheri Fields 



Richard Fischer 

Penny Fisher 

Gary Ford 

Alan Fountain 



John Fox 

Elena Franco 

Larry Frank 

Harry Frazer 



Betsey Freiburger 

Charlotta Friday 

David Frost 

Reggie Frye 




102 EOM-FRYE 





Anne Foster 



( i\<Hi,\ ll.iv\y 



Ursula B. Bailey 




Time changes and so do fashions as can 
be seen by these O U. students of the 
50's-70's. 

Leticia Galan 
Pam Galanek 
Don Galbraith 
Mia Gallagher 



Mike Galyean 
Christine Garrido 
Stacy Gates 
Catherine Gay 



Michelle Gazes 
Andy Geeter 
Becky Gess 
Victor Giusto 



GALAN-GIUSTO 103 



David Goldberg 

Tracy Goldman 

Eileen Gomez 

Christine Graf 



Antonella Grandi 

Sandee Gray 

Christine Green 

John Green 



Rebecca Green 

Wayne Gregory 

Jay Cee Groce 

Walter Gunn 




Clarifying some lecture notes, Mike 
McCracken and Gabe Grasso stay after 
class to talk to Dr. Neujahr. 
The campus affords many places to get 
away, Jon Spanier chooses to use one of 
them to catch up on his reading. 



104 GOLDBERG-GUNN 




Beth Guntner 
Michon Hall 
George Hall 
Naomi Hamby 



Thair Hanaway 
Richard Hans 
Annette Hansen 
Gile Hardwick 



Marie Harkey 
Darryl Harper 
Richard Harris 
Terri Harris 



Ginny Harrison 
Michelle Harrison 
Joe Helwig 
Christy Hendrix 



Sonja Henry 
Karen Herfurth 
Jacqueline Hernandez 
Rhonda Hickman 



GUNTNER-HICKMAN 105 



Jo Dee Hicks 

Tomonari Himeno 

Ralph Hodge 

Amy Hoffland 



David Holcomb 

Khalil Hourani 

Mary Howard 

John Huber 



Kim Hudgens 

Michelle Hughes 

Eiji Igarashi 

Islamiat Ipaye 



Brad Isaacson 

Humberto Itriago 

Maria Itriago 

Ken Jackson 



Tom James 

Joanne Jarosz 

John Jarrard 

Cecilia Jenkins 




106 HICKS-JENKINS 



Overflow from the Snack Shop, these in- 
ternational students Eduardo Duque-Es- 
trada and Nicolas Vasconez spend their 
free time out in the hall in the basement of 
Lupton Hall. 




As the off campus student's refuge, the 
Snack Shop offers a place for Kazuhiko 
Okubo and Eiji Igorashi in between 
classes. 




Greg Johnson 
Thomas Johnson 
Maria Jordan 
Mirvat Jrab 



Jill Kaminski 
Stewart Keller 
Gwen Kendrick 
Awilda Kennedy 



Biya Khan 
Stephen Kim 
Kathy King 
Elizabeth Klein 



JOHNSON-KLEIN 107 



After Organic lab, Bruce Heissler walks 
Sunny White back to the dorms. 



Mark Knautz 

Ray Koepsell 

George Koether 

Susan Komin 



Georgianna Krause 

Ronald Kraynick 

Marianne Krill 

Ritesh Kuvadia 



Onikepo Kuye 

Laura LaFramboise 

Andrew Lampros 

Todd Lane 




108 KNAUTZ-LANE 




Carol Lanier 
Kim Laurel 
Irene Lavita 
Reid Lawson 



Frank Lawton 
Willie Lawton 
Gina Leathers 
Seoung Geun Lee 



Sung Suk Lee 
Tony Lentini 
Liliem Levy 
Tammy Locklear 



Fred Long 
Beatriz Lopez 
Rusty Mabrey 
Helen Maddox 



Veronica Maldonado 
Natalia Martin-Leyes 
Lonnie Masdon 
Jeff Masso 



LANIER-MASSO 109 



John Mastroianni 

Gwen Mathews 

David McCollam 

Sue McCue 



Kathleen McDermott 

J.C. McElroy 

James McFarland 

Meg McGinness 



Kecia McGlothan 

Amy McGowan 

Marcia McGuigan 

Amy Mcllveen 



Wendy McKelvey 

Jonathan McLeod 

Ryan McMullen 

Summer McNair 



Eric Mehnert 

Hassan Mehsen 

David Methven 

Lisa Millman 




110 MASTROIANNI-MILLMAN 




Anne Mills 
Judy Mitcham 
Kathy Mitchell 
Stephanie Mitchell 



El-Hosin Mohamed 
Debney Moore 
Kelly Moran 
Angle Morrison 



Cecilia Mullings 
Brenda Mullis 
David Murdico 
Maureen Murray 



The new Psych lab provides a place for 
senior Nina Hammond to conduct her Hon- 
ors program experiment. 



MILLS-MURRAY 111 



Timothy Murray 

Keith Nabb 

Rise Nachman 

Marc Naet 



Chris Neild 

Tom Nesbitt 

Susan Nicholas 

Dan Noble 



Tim Noto 

Andy Nye 

Jimmy Nye 

Peg O'Neal 





DORMITORIES 
STUDENT 
CENTER 

■ ir- IBCT UAI I 



Signs help the unfamiliar summer stu- 
dents find their way around Oglethorpe. 
Freshmen gather at the beginning of the 
year to take their placement tests in Lup- 
ton Auditorium. 



112 I^URRAY-O'NEAL 




Darien Ogburn 
Charles Okoh 
Kazuhiko Okubo 
Agustin Olmos 



Janice Ott 
Lance Owen 
Carmen Papp 
Deirdre Parker 



Linda Parkinson 
Joe Parsons 
Bill Patton 
Gary Pearson 



Tony Petty 
Dorothea Pickett 
Kerstin Pierce 
Bob Pinkney 



Manolis Platanis 
Karen Poe 
Bill Porter 
Cathy Preiser 



OGBURN-PREISER 113 



Jeff Provissiero 

Andrew Provost 

Phil Qualter 

Julie Quickmire 



Lisa Quinn 

Laura Rankin 

Jon Rawls 

Tim Ray 



Kimberly Reid 

Penni Reid 

Sandra Reyes 

Keith Rieders 



Elaine Riordan 

Ruth Ritch 

Amy Ritchason 

Wade Roach 



Donald Roberson 

Kathie Roberts 

Jon Robinson 

Pauline Robinson 




114 PROVISSIERO-ROBINSON 




Martine Rochat 
Doris Rojas 
Larry Rollins 
Jill Rossen 



Tracy Roth 
Kim Rouleau 
Maureen Rowe 
Alan Royalty 



Marlene Rudy 
Frank Russo-Alesi 
Rutti Ryan 
Theresa Ryan 



John Salamone 



A late night or early morning for Rusty 
Mabrey as he once more cranks out an- 
other print out of his program to see if it is 
finally debugged. 



ROCHAT-SALAMONE 115 



Dorothy Saltmer 

Guy Samuel 

Jane Samuel 

Audrey Sanchez-Salazar 



Luann Sands 

Robert Sasovetz 

Levie Satisfield III 

Melissa Sauer 



Cathy Schattenfield 

Gretchen Schmidt 

Doug Schmitt 

Susan Schobert 



Kimberly Scott 
Laura Scott 

Judy Seamens 
Neil Seiwell 



Lise Shade 

Barbara Shadomy 

Bill Sharpe 

Irish Shelton 




116 SALTMER-SHELTON 



Giving a little boost in freshman English, Using those last minutes before class, 

Dr. Fusillo stays after class to help a stu- Judy Mitcham jots down some notes to 

dent collect his thoughts before his next get prepared for class discussion, 
paper. 




Burdette Sleight 
Andy Smith 
David Smith 
Faith Smith 



SHERWOOD-SMITH 117 



Sharing her thoughts about the subject 
at hand, Laura Tritten helps Jerrie 
Thompson think of all the possibilities be- 
fore she starts writing her paper. 



Lizabeth Smith 

Scott Smith 

Scott Soloway 

Jennie Soria 



Kevin Southern 

Kari Spangler 

Scott Spooner 

David Stallings 



Victoria Stevens 

Lisa Striano 

Wally Strom 

Robert Strozier 




118 SMITH-STROZIER 




Steven Sugg 
Polsak Sukying 
Bob Swanson 
Mike Szalkowski 



Alfian Tansil 
Aripin Tansil 
Harris Targovnik 
Leslie Taylor 



Ernie Thomason 
Walter Thomason 
David Thompson 
Jerrie Thompson 



Dale Tobias 
Deidre Tolbert 
Ricky Traylor 
D.J. Trees 



Laura Trittin 
David Turner 
Jim Tuten 
Jeff Tuttle 



SUGG-TUTTLE 119 



Katie Tyndell 

Steve Underwood 

Osagie Uzzi 

Mack Van't Riet 



Nicolas Vasconez 

Ron Vaughn 

Vicl<i Vietor 

Darryl Wade 



Randy Wade 

Rodney Wade 

Deda Walker 

Teh Wall 



George Walters 

Michelle Ward 

Michelle Waschak 

Andrew Weiller 



Maureen Whalen 

Johnny White 

Sunny White 

Tina White 




120 TYNDELL-WHITE 



UNDERCLASSMEN 




Sharen Wilcox 
Byron Wilde 
Cindy Williams 
Todd Williams 



Angela Wilson 
Hope Wilson 
Julie Wilson 
Mark Wilson 



Jackie Woodard 
Samantha Woods 
Todd Wucik 
Emily Yen 



William Yorks 
Gina Yuille 



WILCOX-YUILLE 121 



TABLE OF 
CONTENTS 



Administration 


124 


Staff 


126 


Instructors 


142 



FACULTY 




122 FACULTY 



v^ 








^ 




FACULTY 123 




Manning M. Pattillo 
President of the University 




Paul Dillingham 
Acting Vice President of Development 



John Knott 
Vice President for Administration 



124 ADMINISTRATION 




J. Bradford Sargent 
Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid 



John Thames 
Dean of Continuing Education 




George Waldner 
Dean of the Faculty 



Edd Wheeler 
Dean of Community Life 



ADMINISTRATION 125 



Betty Amerson 
Controller 

Karen Bender 

Assistant Supervisor of the Bookstore 





!S!5.f4,W',-'W5 



Jack Berkshire 
Director of Athletics 

Bonnie Bertolini 
Admissions Receptionist 



Patsy Bradley 
University Nurse 

Linda Bucki 

Assistant Dean of Administration 




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126 AMERSON-BUCKI 



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Claire Carroll 

Continuing Education Administrative 

Assistant 



Fred Carter 
Director of Financial Aid 



Julie Chapin 
Admissions Counselor 




Tom Chandler, long-time li- 
brarian of the University, an- 
nounced his intention to retire 
at the end of this year. At this 
time, he will have been at Og- 
lethorpe for 24 years. Mr. Chan- 
dler came to Oglethorpe in 1961 
after receiving a Master of Li- 
brarianship degree at Emory 
and heading the Acquisitions 
department at Georgia State 
University. Tom Chandler has 
been an asset in strenghtening 
our library system here at Og- 
lethorpe. 



CARROLL-CHANDLER 127 



Carol Duffy 

Community Life Office Manager 

William Erickson 
University Doctor 



Jack Ferrey 
Data Processing 

Fran Flowers 
Assistant Librarian 




128 COBB-FLOWERS 




Kathleen Ganey 

Director of Women's Housing, 

Volleyball Coach 




William Gates 

Assistant Dean of Continuing 

Education 

Janice Gilmore 
Payroll Supervisor 





Prudy Hughes takes a break from 
her work to visit with Cheryl King in the 
Faculty Secretary's office. 



GANEY-GILMORE 129 




Carol Duffy displays her talent at the Night of the Arts. 




Marlene Howard 

Associate Dean of Continuing 

Education 



Nest Hovey 
Secretary for Development 



Cle Hall 
Associate Registrar 



130 HALL-HOWARD 




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Prudy Hughes 
Faculty Secretary 

Jonathan Jay 
Director of Admissions 



Carol Johnston 
Director of Placement 

Michelle Lent 

Assistant Manager of Epicure 



Sheryl Manley 

Director of Annual Support 

Carolyn Matthews 

Secretary for Continuing Education 



HUGHES-MATTHEWS 131 






Dennis Matthews 
Admissions Counselor 



Anne McGinn 
Director of Public Relations 



Marilyn Merrifield 
Admissions Assistant 



Elgin F. MacConnell, former Dean 
of Services, took the Director of Security 
position after semi-retiring in August. 
He has been on the staff or faculty at 
Oglethorpe for 25 years. Only Mr. Hood 
has been here longer. "He has become an 
institution to generations of students 
and colleagues." Stated Dr. Patillo in a 
recent memo to the faculty and staff. His 
responsibilities over the years have in- 
cluded Associate Professor of Education, 
Dean of Students, Director of Libraries, 
and Chairmen of the Community Ser- 
vice Division. However, he is most com- 
monly and affectionately known to the 
students as "Dean Mac". 




132 MATTHEWS-MERRIFIELD 




1 





Anders Nilsen 

Associate Director of Financial Aid 










Gloria Moore 
Receptionist 

Marshall Nason 

Associate Dean of Community Life 



Jim Owen 

Director of Men's Housing 

Bud Payne 

Superintendent of Buildings and 

Grounds 



MOORE-PAYNE 133 



Byrd Perkerson 

Director of Non-Credit Courses 

Mary Ellen Perkins 

Graduate Admissions Counselor 



Polly Perry 
Alumni Director 

Michael Petty 
Library Assistant 




Bucky Reynolds 

Assistant to Director of Admissions 



134 PERKERSON-REYNOLDS 




Marshall Nason and Greg Hightower are enjoying conversation during a Men's Rush party at President 
Pattillo's home. 




Adrina Richard 
Bookstore Manager, Purchasing 




Phil Ritchie 
Tennis Coach 



i 



Penny Rose 
Library Assistant 



RICHARD-ROSE 135 








,'• ^ 



Tom Seitz 
Assistant Basketball Coach 






Carolyn Simpson 
Secretary to the President 




Ann Sincere 

Secretary for Alumni-Public 

Relations 




Marshall Nason and Senior ODK member Paul Sykes decorate the entrance to Hearst Hall in preparation for the Boar's 
Head Ceremony. 



136 SEITZ-SINCERE 




Alan Sloan 
Epicure Manager 





kL'^ 



I 



Pamela Tubesing poses with her Christmas 
friend. 



Linda Sloan 
Epicure Bookkeeper 



SLOAN 137 



Randy Smith 

Associate Director of Admissions 



George Stewart 
Assistant Librarian 

Pam Tubesing 

Secretary to Dean Waldner 




Mary Ellen Warrick 
Secretary to Vice President of 
Development 



138 SMITH-WARRICK 




Betty Weiland 
Secretary to Dr. Knott 







Julie Weyer 

Financial Aid Office Manager 

Chuck Wingo 

Assistant Manager of the Bookstore 



Anders Nilsen keeps busy making direction 
signs for the campus. 



WEILAND-WINGO 139 




Maintenance and 
Grounds 

Mr. John Hood, the most senior employee of the University, retired on 

December 18, 1984. Mr. Hood came to Oglethorpe in 1934 and was a 

member of the staff for fifty years, leaving only for military service in 

World War II. In recent years Mr. Hood was the custodian of Goslin 

Hall. Mr. Hood was here when the infamous elephant died and was in 

charge of burying it behind Lowry Hall. Mr. Hood spoke kindly of 

Oglethorpe and the staff. He also said that "Oglethorpe has treated me 

fine." 




140 MAINTENANCE AND GROUNDS 





Harold Johnson 
Security Guard 



Epicure Food 
Service 



Mike Robinson 
Security Guard 




EPICURE AND SECURITY 141 



Rhoda Allen (1984) 

Instructor of Computer Science 
M.B.A.— Georgia State University 
B.B.A.— Georgia State University 
Assoc. — Floyd Junior College 

Dr. G. Malcolm Amerson (1968) 

Professor of Biology 

B.S.— Berry College 

M.S., Ph.D.— Clemson University 





Lane Anderson (1983) 

Drama Director 

B.A. — Berry College 

Graduate work: National Shakespeare 

Conservatory 

Daniel Anglin (1979) 

Instructor of Business Administration 
B.A.— Oglethorpe University 
J.D. — Emory University School of Law 




Since his arrival on the Oglethorpe campus in 
1958, Mr. Leo Bilancio has been admired and well- 
liked by both faculty and students. The picture to 
the right was taken three years after his arrival. Mr. 
Bilancio has continued teaching and 23 years later 
is still teaching History, as can be seen in the pic- 
ture below. 




142 ALLEN-ANGLIN 




% 



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Dr. Keith H. Aufderheide (1980) 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.S. — Wilmington College 
Ph.D. — Miami University 

Keith E. Baker (1983) 

Director of Accounting Studies 
B.S. — Youngstown State University 
M.A. — University of Florida 





Patrick Berry (1983) 

Assistant Professor of Accounting 
M.B.A. — Rutgers University 
B.S. — East Carolina University 

Leo Bilancio (1958) 

Professor of History 

B.A. — Knox College 

M.A. — University of North Carolina 



Throughout the years, Oglethorpe has seen many changes, from 
a change in location of the campus and new buildings, to 
changing presidents and hiring new professors, but it seems that 

Some Faces Never Change 



"Oglethorpe is not the same univer- 
sity anymore, but the situation 
changed for the better. The education 
has always been top quality, but the 
admission standards have been up- 
grading for the past ten years," told 
Dr. George Wheeler, the longest em- 
ployed professor on campus. 

"I am the survivor," added Wheel- 
er, "When I came here there were only 



165 students enrolled here. The build- 
ings were all different too. Lowry had 
dorms on the top floor along with the 
science rooms on the second and first. 
Chemistry was the only science class 
taught out of Lowry Lowry. They set 
up a ram-shackle wooden building for 
all chemistry classes." 

When asked to recall an event that 
really stood out in his mind he said 



"When Paul Vonk was president, the 
university almost became Baptist af- 
filiated. The faculty and others ob- 
jected, and the school made the deci- 
sion to stay secular." 

Mr. Leo Bilancio, a professor of his- 
tory since 1958, feels that the school 
has gone through many changes 
"When I first began teaching at O.U., 
(continued on next page) 



AUFDERHEIDE-BILANCIO 143 



James Bohart (1972) 

Assistant Professor of Music 
B.S. — Northern Illinois University 
M.M. — Northern Illinois Universi- 
ty 

Dr. F. Eugene Brasher (1982) 

Director of the University Singers 

B.M. — Stetson University 

M.S.M.— New Orleans Baptist 

Seminary 

Ph.D. — Florida State University 




^ 




Dr. William L. Brightman (1975) 

Associate Professor of English 
A.B. — University of Washington 
Ph.D. — University of Washington 

Dr. Barbara R. Clark (1971) 

Professor of English 
B.A. — Georgia State University 
M.A. — University of Kansas 
M.P.A. — Georgia State University 
Ph.D. — University of Georgia 





Some Faces Never Change cont'd 



the atmosphere was that of a closely 
knit family. There were only 186 stu- 
dents when I started here and it 
seemed as if everyone knew everyone 
else. Now there isn't that family feel- 
ing as before; the population of the 
university and the time period has 
changed that." 

"Another drastic change," he add- 
ed, "in the past 25 years has been in 
the constructive organization. Lupton 
housed the library, a swimming pool, a 
gymnasium, auditorium, faculty of- 
fices, student dorms, and a number of 



classrooms. Phoebe Hearst Hall was 
the girl's dormitory with the cafeteria 
located in the basement. At one point, 
faculty members lived in the second 
floor. 

"The best change of the system 
which I can find is that the students 
seem to be more serious about their 
education, and though student/ 
teacher relations are more formal now 
than ever. Oglethorpe still holds a 
close, friendly, small college atmo- 
sphere." 



144 BOHART-CLARK 




Dr. John Cramer (1980) 

Associate Professor of Physics 
B.S.— Wheaton College 
M.A. — Ohio University 
Ph.D.— Texas A&M University 

Nell D. Crowe (1978) 

Lecturer in English 
B.A. — Georgia State University 
M.A. — Emory University 



Dr. Joseph N. Fadyn (1981) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.A. — Lehigh University 
M.A., Ph.D.— Lehigh University 

Dr. Robert J. Fusillo (1966) 

Professor of English 

A.B., M.S.— Fort Hays Kansas State 

College 

Ph.D. — The Shakespeare Institute 

(Stratford-upon-Avon), University of 

Birmingham, England 




"I think I'm the soul survivor." No one can 
disagree that after 31 years of teaching at Og- 
lethorpe University, Mr. George Wheeler has 
indeed survived all of the changes throughout 
the years. A contrast between the George 
Wheeler of 1956 and that of 1984 is pictured. 



CRAMER-FUSILLO 145 



Old Habits are Hard to Break 

for some Oglethorpe students, so after graduation they return 
to Oglethorpe University with their newly found talents to 
contribute to the campus as a whole . . . 



Hippies, hitchhikers, flower chil- 
dren, anti-war demonstrations and 
Vietnam enter the mind when one 
thinks of the late 60s and early 70s. It 
seems almost impossible to imagine 
Oglethorpe during that time period. 
But to Paul Hudson, Ronald Few and 
Dan Anglin, that period was Ogleth- 
orpe as they knew it as students. 

"During the age of the Hippies you 
either joined college or you were 
drafted — needless to say the universi- 



Dr. Bruce W. Hetherington (1980) 

Associate Professor of Economics 

B.B.A.— Madison College 

M.A., Ph.D. — Virginia Polytechnic 

Institute 

C. Norman Hollingsworth (1981) 
Lecturer in Economics 
B.S. — University of South Carolina 
M.B.A. — Georgia State University 



Paul Hudson (1982) 

Lecturer of History 
B.A. — Oglethorpe University 
M.A. — University of Georgia 

Walter S. Jenkins (1984) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
B.A. — Emory University 
M.A. — Emory University 



ty's enrollment increased very rapid- 
ly," told Paul Hudson. "O.U. wasn't 
as radical as many schools. We held 
demonstrations at Piedmont Park, 
but for the majority, students didn't 
protest much," Hudson added. 

Hudson, now the Assistant Regis- 
trar, attended Oglethorpe from 1968 
to 1972. While here, Hudson had 
many unique experiences; "In 1969 we 
saw the original Fleetwood Mac in 
concert at the Fieldhouse." 



Dan Anglin, Professor of Business 
Law, also attended Oglethorpe. "If I 
had to do it again, I would definitely 
come back. Oglethorpe is doing some- 
thing right! Students can come here 
and compete with students at the Ivy 
League Schools. Oglethorpe has 
changed and so has its students; both 
have increased in quality and in stan- 
dards." 




fc5Ciil£;;.;Sii'i^'''if*'''*'^;; 




146 HETHERINGTON-JENKINS 




Mr. Paul Hudson, graduate of the 
1972 class of Oglethorpe University, 
has since returned to his alma mater 
to once again become involved with 
the Oglethorpe community. When not 
playing tennis, Mr. Hudson works in 
the registrar's office and teaches his- 
tory. 



z^mi . 




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Mr. Ron Few, another alumni of 
Oglethorpe University (class of 1975), 
has also returned to campus and is 
working as the assistant librarian, as 
well as taking a few classes. 



Dr. Charlton H. Jones (1974) 

Professor of Business Administration 
B.S. — University of IlHnois 
M.B.A., Ph.D.— University of Michi- 
gan 

Dr. Nancy H. Kerr (1983) 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A. — Stanford University 
Ph.D. — Cornell University 



Dr. J. Brien Key (1965) 

Professor of History 
A.B. — Birmingham-Southern College 
M.A. — Vanderbilt University 
Ph.D. — The John Hopkins Universi- 
ty 

Dr. Robert Moffie (1979) 

Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A. — University of California 
M.A., Ph.D.— University of Notre 
Dame 



JONES-MOFFIE 147 



^-^^ 



.vy 



Dr. David K. Mosher (1972) 

Professor of Mathematics 

B.A. — Harvard University 

B.S.A., Ph.D.— Georgia Institute of 

Technology 

Dr. Phillip J. Neujahr (1973) 

Professor of Philosophy 
B.A. — Stanford University 
M.Phil., Ph.D.— Yale University 



Lloyd Nick (1983) 

Lecturer in Art 

B.F. A.— Hunter College of the City of 

New York 

M.A. — University of Pennsylvania 

Dr. Ken Nishimura (1964) 

Professor of Philosophy 
A.B. — Pasadena College 
M.Div. — Asbury Theological Semi- 
nary 
Ph.D. — Emory University 








i 


1 


^S 



148 MOSHER-NISHIMURA 





The reestablishment of the Art Gallery not 
only enhanced the idea of a Liberal Arts 
Education but also gave the Oglethorpe 
C Community 

A Touch of Class 




Striving to enhance the cultural en- 
vironment of the Oglethorpe student 
and community, Oglethorpe Univer- 
sity advanced the articular setting of 
the Art Gallery, located in Lowry 
Hall. By promoting exhibits in malls, 
Mr. Lloyd Nick managed to provoke 
the curiosity of many people in the 
Atlanta area. The interest of the At- 
lanta community was necessary to ex- 
pand the gallery program. The terrific 
response received, along with the in- 
creased interest and support, had 
been very encouraging. 



Nick stated that the main goals of 
the gallery were to not only bring in 
art that had not been shown previous- 
ly in Atlanta, but also to present abso- 
lutely original exhibits never shown 
before. He hoped the Oglethorpe gal- 
lery would be the originating site of 
many future traveling exhibits that 
would go on tour to other universities 
across the nation. No one can argue 
the fact that the gallery at Oglethorpe 
has "definitely added a different di- 
mension to the university." 




Dr. John Orme (1983) 

Assistant Professor of Political Stud- 
ies 

B.A. — University of Oregon 
M.A., Ph.D. — Harvard University 

Philip F. Palmer (1964) 

Professor of Political Studies 
A.B. — University of New Hampshire 
M.A. — University of New Hampshire 



Dr. Luis Pena (1983) 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 
B.A. — Universidad de Monterrey 
M.A. — Arizona State University 

Jeffrey Portnoy (1983) 

Instructor of English 
B.A. — The State University of Iowa 
M.A. — Emory University 



ORME-PORTNOY 149 



Tad D. Ransopher (1981) 

Lecturer in Business Administration 
B.A. — Indiana Central University 
M.B.A. — Stetson University 
J.D. — Woodrow Wilson College of Law 

Dr. Michael K. Rulison (1982) 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S. — University of Illinois 

M.S., Ph.D. — University of Georgia 



Dr. Daniel L. Schadler 
Professor of Biology 
A.B. — Thomas Moore College 
M.S., Ph.D.— Cornell University 



(1975) 



(1979) 



Dr. William 0. Shropshire 
Professor of Economics 
B.A. — Washington & Lee University 
Ph.D. — Duke University 



Dr. John C. Stevens (1975) 

Professor of Education 

A.B. — University of Denver 

M.Ed., Ed.D. — University of Georgia 

Dr. Brad L. Stone (1982) 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.S., M.S. — Brigham Young University 
Ph.D. — University of Illinois 



William Straley (1982) 

Lecturer in Business Administration 
B.S., M.S.— Georgia State University 
Ph.D. — Auburn University 



Dr. T. Lavon Talley 
Professor of Education 
B.S., M.S. — Auburn University 
Ed.D. — Auburn University 



(1968) 




150 RANSOPHER-TALLEY 




Dr. Amerson, Dr. Thomas and Dean Knott 
taking a coffee break in the administrative 
lounge in the basement of Lupton Hall. 

Demonstrating that he is as proficient at 
microwave cookery as he is with evaluating eco- 
nomic theories, Dr. Bruce Hetherington pa- 
tiently waits for his lunch to be cooked in the 
faculty lounge. 




Dr. Linda J. Taylor 
Professor of English 
A.B. — Cornell University 
Ph.D. — Brown University 



(1975) 



(1968) 



Dr. David N. Thomas 
Professor of History 
A.B.— Coker College 
M.A., Ph.D.— University of North Caro- 
lina 



Dr. John E. Tully (1981) 

Professor of Business Administration 
A.B. — Harvard University 
M.B.A. — Emory University 
D.B.A. — Georgia State University 



Dr. Louise M. Valine 
Professor of Education 
B.S. — University of Houston 
M.Ed. — University of Georgia 
Ed.D. — Auburn University 



(1978) 



TAYLOR-VALINE 151 



(1966) 



Dr. Martha H. Vardeman 
Professor of Sociology 
B.S., M.S. — Auburn University 
Ph.D. — University of Alabama 



Dr. Victoria L. Weiss (1977) 

Associate Professor of English 
B.A.— St. Norbert College 
M.A., Ph.D. — Lehigh University 



Dr. Ann M. Wheeler (1979) 

Associate Professor of English 
B.S. — University of Nebraska 
M.S., Ph.D.— Florida State Universi- 
ty 

Dr. George Wheeler (1953) 

Professor Emeritus of Physics 
A.B. — Ohio State University 
M.A. — California Institute of Tech- 
nology 




Dr. Schadler recruiting help from the orga 
nizations on campus to assist him with the flow- 
er show that he is involved with. 



152 VARDEMAN-WHEELER 





William Whitten (1984) 

Instructor of Business Administration 
M.P.A. — Georgia State University 
M.B.A. — Southern Mississippi Univer- 
sity 
B.S. — Auburn University 

Paul Wiebe (1983) 

Instructor of English 
B.A. — Texas Christian University 
M.A. — Emory University 



Dr. Monte Wolf (1978) 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.S.— University of California 
Ph.D.— University of Southern Califor- 
nia 

Dr. Philip Zinsmeister (1973) 

Professor of Biology 

B.S. — Wittenburg University 

M.S., Ph.D.— University of Illinois 



Not only is Dr. Bruce Hetherington showing his 
Halloween spirit and youthfulness, but he is also 
demonstrating yet another way of making econom- 
ics interesting by masquerading as the Democratic 
Party of 1984 (Mondale/Ferraro). 



Picture not available for; Dominique Bennett, Robert 
E. Bergman, Marjorie Blum, Ronald L. Carlisle, Claire 
Coles, George Dupuy, Jane K. Hayes, Richard Kustin, 
Keith Leggett, .Janie J. Little, Martha Loring, Daniel Mc- 
Clure, Edward Metcalf, Vanya Nick, and Deborah Sitter, 



WHITTEN-ZINSMEISTER 153 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Soccer 

Volleyball 

Tennis 

Cheerleaders 

Basketball 

Intramurals 

Cross Country 



SPORTS 




154 SPORTS 





SPORTS 1 55 





Front Kevin Southern Chris Carter, Tony Murphv. Andv Geeter. Mike Galyean. Rob Boggus, Omid Atlassi. Second; Hassan Mehsen, AuguStin Olmos, Matt Duggan, 
Walter Gunn, Harry Frazer, Bruce Cram, Jon Van't Riet. Back: Mack Van'I Riel. Mauricio Amaya, Mark Knautz, Doug SchmJtl, Bucky Reynolds. Rich Hans, John 
Satamone. Mike Cheek, Dean DeCencic, Eric Garvey, 




156 SOCCER 





ou 


2 


Greensboro 





ou 





Eckerd 


1 


ou 


2 


High Point 


5 


ou 





Withrop 


7 


ou 


I 


Maryville 


2 


ou 


2 


Mercer-Macon 


5 


ou 


2 


Tenn, Wesleyan 





ou 


2 


Lander 


3 


ou 


3 


Birmingham 


1 


ou 


1 


Berry 


5 


ou 





Emory 


6 


ou 


1 


Ga College 





ou 


2 


Kennesaw 


1 


ou 


2 


U Of South 


3 


ou 


5 


Limestone 


5 


ou 


2 


N Georgia 


1 


ou 





Presbyterian 


4 



SOCCER 157 



■♦,■ 




I 




158 SOCCER 




With Young players and 
very intense competition 
the soccer team still 
managed to have their 
100th win. 

One Oglethorpe tradition since 
1961 has been a soccer team. 
The 1984-1985 school year 
brought about a new tradition. For 
the first time In Oglethorpe's his- 
tory there was a junior varsity soc- 
cer team. The varsity team was 
relatively young, with only two 
seniors out of twenty-two play- 
ers. 

The team faced one of It's 
toughest schedules, Coach Bucky 
Reynolds said, "It's the toughest 
they've had since I've been here." 
The team's record was 6-11-1. 
Coach Reynolds said, "The big- 
gest problem on O.U.'s part was 
our lack of scoring." He expects 
next year's team to be more ex- 
perienced. Although Oglethorpe's 
team was young, they had several 
outstanding accomplishments. 
Some players received awards of 
high recognition and this season, 
the team won their 100th game. 
"John Salamone," Reynolds said, 
"was all district and a good con- 
tender for all southern." Two oth- 
er players received honorable 
mention for all district; Doug 
Schmitt and Eric Garvey. This 
year's captain was Rob Boggus 
and the co-captalns were Mike 
Cheek and Eric Garvey. 



SOCCER 159 



Volleyball 




160 VOLLEYBALL 




The 1984 Lady Petrels was THE Team 
that clinched the District 25 
championship. With six returning players 
and four newcomers, the team worked 
hard to set-up a reliable, synchronized 
bump, set, spike offense. Kathleen 
Ganey, in her first year of coaching, 
worked hard to train everyone to work 
together as a team and to build skill and 
confidence among the players. As 
demonstrated by their 9-0 record in 
Division Three play, the OU volleyball 
team showed that cooperation and hard 
work can pay off. The. weaker 
competition in the first half of the season 
put the Petrels at a disadvantage when 
faced with Division One teams. The lack 
of team morale, and tension on the court 
near the end of the season kept the team 
from playing up to their potential. 

The team had planned to play in the 
NAIA Conference playoffs, but the players 
were disappointed when they were 
disqualified due to a technical error. 

With the majority of the team returning 
next year, they are looking forward to an 
even stronger finish. 



VOLLEYBALL 1 6 1 




Coach Phil Ritchie, Tom Clements, Andy Provost, Bill Fair, Walter Thompson, Jon Van't Riet, Scott Smith. 




Tennis 



162 TENNIS 




Tennis has been a longstanding tradition at Oglethrope. It is one of the 
few sports to survive the decline in the sports program. 





The men's and women's tennis teams put in 
a lot of time and hardwork preparing for a busy 
spring schedule under Coach Philip Ritchie. The 
^^ r~-,m^^^mi nice weather made it possible for the team to 

'#'. .yHfliiH^^HI practice quite extensively during the fall 
^^^^^^ semester. 
^yi^^^^^H Despite the cold weather, the team began 

/^J^^^^^^^l practicing at the start of spring semester to 
prepare for a full schedule of 29 matches for 
the men and 22 matches for the women. 
PV' "'■'■'/'■'■'■'■'-■'■ Senior player Kenny Gould had been plagued 

with injuries in past years. With treatment, his 
hamstring has become 80% stronger in just 
one semester. Coach Ritchie believes his team 
iiiiiiiiMiaiiiUM will do quite well this spring if they stay 
■*•■ healthy. He is hoping several might qualify for 

NCAA nationals. 



Coach Phil Ritchie, Sharon Wilcox. Summer McNair, Lil Klein, Tracy Goldman. Jennifer Perry, Veronica 
Maldonado. 



TENNIS 163 




164 CHEERLEADERS 




Cheerleaders 



The 1984-85 basketball season was one of 
dedication and hard work for the cheerleaders. The 
long hours began in late September with tryouts. 
The cheerleaders practiced for several weeks 
before the first game. Captain Renee Byland said 
that for the Homecoming game's routine, the 
squad practiced six days a week for two weeks. 

This year's squad saw four new faces as well as 
four returning cheerleaders. This combination gave 
the squad a productive balance of experience and 
fresh ideas. First year cheerleader Traci Bell stated, 
"I couldn't have done it without the experienced 
girls to help me. They treated me as an equal and 
were always asking for new ideas. " 

The cheerleaders' busy season included cheering 
at all the home games, some away games, making 
signs, decorating the locker room and planning 
Homecoming activities, such as spirit week and 
the bonfire. Renee Byland summed up the season, 
saying, "All the cheerleaders are great! This is the 
most spirited squad we've had in the three years 
that I've been here. We've done a lot for the 
school." 



CHEERLEADERS 165 




Oonn. Roberson, Alan Royalty, Wil„e La„,on, Ken 0.msn., Sco„ Boyn.on, Tony Len„n,, Dav.d S,a,„ngs, B,ll Snerwocd, R.cky Tray.or, Jo, Grange,. Wayne Duncan, K,„ S.eppe, Larry Frank, Tom Se,U, Jim Owen, Dav.d Bolaver., 
Bruce Benton. Rich Fischer, Rich Williams and Coach Berkshire. 



166 BASKETBALL 




r.nl I 



A glimpse of the past petrels who were as hard as opponents then as we are now. 



BASKETBALL 167 



Basketball 

After Christmas break Oglethorpe's basketball 

team basically started over with a new team. 

Transfers Kitt Steppe and Joe Granger became 

eligible to play during the winter break, O.U.'s 

team won six of its first seven games during 

second semester. Both players became strong 

rebounders. Freshmen — Alan Royalty moved into 

the starting line up second semester and has made 

important contributions to the team according to 

Coach Jack Berkshire. 

The team has changed a lot but Coach Berkshire 
believes they are playing better. 

Willie Lawton has been playing well and moved 
up to be the leading scorer during the second half 
of the season. 

The other Senior player, Bruce Benton, was 

bothered by a thumb injury and missed a week 

due to a flu late in January. Bill Sherwood moved 

into the starting position and did quite well 

according to Coach Berkshire. 

"Bruce will be important to us down the 

streach," added Berkshire. Although he didn't 

start for a while, he will be playing a great deal. 

Reserve guards Ken Ozment and Scott Boynton 

were both very important to the team, especially 

in the first part of February. 

O.U. was looking to finish in the top four teams 

in the district. A crucial game came late in the 

season against Georgia Southwestern on the road. 








-''#J-^ 






168 BASKETBALL 




BASKETBALL 169 




Chi Omega 
Guynelle Brown, Naomi Hamby, Suzie Schobert, Doug Schmitt, Kelli Hiett, Marlene Rudy, Michon Hall; Renee Byland, 
Sherry Sing, Julie Quickmire, Lise Shade. 





Raiders 
Kenton Baggs, Murray Brinson, Tomas Hernandez, Chris Bolden, Jeff Provissiero, Bob Brown, Jason 
Freeman, Frank Russo-Alesi, Jim Owen. 



170 INTRAMURALS 




Independents 
Jill Kaminski, Joann Bertone, Leticia Galan, Juliet Jotinson, Wendy McKelvey, Becky 
Gess, Anjie Rupe, Cathy Schattenfield, Jenny Soria, Lauren Bishop, Tomas Hernandez. 




Poor Girls 
Anne Johnson, Kathy Messina, Lil Klein, Hope Wilson, Kari Spangler, Deda Walker, Sharon Wilcox, 
Cec Mullings, Jill Rosen. 



Football 






Mens 








W 


L 


1 Raiders 


8 





2 


Chi Phi 


6 


2 


3 


Poor Boys 


6 


3 


4 


Delta Sigma Phi 


3 


5 


5 


Kappa Alpha 


3 


4 


6 


Rudd 


1 


6 


7 


Sigma Alpha Epsilon 





7 


Women's 








w 


L 


1 Poor Girls 


5 





2 Independents 


3 


2 


3 Chi Omega 


1 


3 


4 Delta Zeta 





4 




Chi Phi 
Carlos Duque-Estrada, Scott Einbinder, Brad Isaacson, Rich Hans, George Dippel, Tim Ray, Rich Wallace, Dave Murdico, 
Marty Bucci, Keith Nabb, Andy Weiller, Tony Murphy, Kenny Hines. 



INTRAMURALS 171 





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Trallblazers 
Coach Philip Ritchie, Julie Quickmire, Anjie Rupe, Jeff Portnoy, Jim Owen, Chris Eidson. 




i — 







Poor Boys 
John Winecker, Eric Garvey, Dean DeCencio, Doug Schmitt, Mike 
Cheek, John Salamone. 















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International 
Armagan Ozgorkey, Asdrubal Arvelo, Yunasao Murata, Marty Bucci, l^aria 
Tovar, Lil Klein, Leticia Galan. 





172 INTRAMURALS 




Raiders 
Bob Brown, Mike Szalkowski, Steve Underwood, Gary Pearson, Scott 
Spooner, Murray Brinson, Tomas Hernandez, Chris Bolden. 








' r 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
Mack Van't Riet, Ray Lucas, Joe Del Rocini, Thair Hanaway, Guy Samuels, Ron Kraynik, David Turner, Harris 
Targovnik, Tom James, Ross Lippman. 




INTRAMURALS 173 




Rudd 
Chris Carter, David Holcomb, Paul Sykes, Larry Frank, Stewart Keller, Reggie Frye, Kevin Bradley. 





J-Gang 
Bret Johnson, Darryl Wade, Bill Fair, Gus Almos, Scott Smith, Jon Van't Reit, Johnny 
White. 



174 INTRAMURALS 




Kappa Alpha 
Jon McLeod, Victor Guisto, Kurt Alexander, Cheryl Lerner, Sarah Hunter. 




A-Team 
Harry Frazer, Steve Kim, Dan Duncanson, Seoung Guem-Li, Bill Sharpe, Mark Knautz, 
Frank Russo-Alesi. 



Volleyball 






Men s 








W 


L 


1 . Trailblazers 


8 





2. Poof Boys 


8 


2 


3 Delia Sigma lA) 


9 


1 


4. Raiders 


5 


2 


5, International 


4 


4 


6. J-Gang 


4 


3 


7. Chi Phi 


2 


4 


a. Sigma Alpha Epsilon 


3 


6 


9- Rudd 


1 


4 


10 Delta Sigma (Bl 





5 


11 Kappa Alpha 





4 


12 Alpha Phi Omega 





6 


Women s 








w 


L 


1 Independents 


7 





2 Chi Omega 


4 


3 


3 Alpha Phi Omega Women 


2 


2 


4, Delta Sig Little Sisters 





4 


5 Delta Zeta 





2 


6 Poor Girls 





2 




Alpha Phi Omega 

John Green, Diane Dubay, Ken Jackson, 

Casey Chosewood, Doug Dubay, Kenton 

Baggs. 



INTRAMURALS 175 





Chi Phi 
Tim Ray, Brad Isaacson, Kenny Hines, Scott Einbinder, Rich Wallace, Rich Hans. 




176 INTRAMURALS 




B-Team 
Fred Long, Jay Cee Groce, Bret Sleight, David McCollum, Frank Lawton, Rusty 
Mabrey. 




Trojans 
Scott Spooner, Adam Petty, Doak Patton, Mike Szalkowski, Steve Underwood, 
Gary Pearson, Kevin Bradley, Paul Sykes. 




INTRAMURALS 177 





Alpha Phi Omega Women 
Emily Yen, Diane Dubay, Trina Crowder, Cyndi Crawford. 




Kappa Alpha 
Neil Seiwell, Mark Neff, Eric Drick, Andy Applebaum, Kurt Alexander, J.C. McElroy, Victor Guisto. 



178 INTRAMURALS 




B-Team 
David McCollum, Hank Bunnell, John Green, Brian Buzzeo, Seoung Guem-Li, Frank Lawton. 




Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
David Turner, Harris Targovnik, Ron Kraynik, Greg Steele, Thair 
Hanaway. 




|2^JiV^'>9^ 



INTRAMURALS 179 




Past 
Petrels 



O.U.s diversified past included such sports as the 
rifle team, pistol team and baseball. None of these 
sports made it past the Seventy's, but the memo- 
ries of these past athletes linger on. 






Cross 
Country 



A^ ^ 



Wally Strom, Phil Qualter, Glen Dubrowsky, Eric Drick, Greg Hightower, Richard Briggs, Ron Vaughn, 
Marshall Nason 



This year's cross country team was a team that 
was comprised of many hard workers. Marshall 
Nason, Cross Country Coach, said of the team, 
"They were a good bunch." 

The O.U. team had only two Seniors this year 
and were relatively inexperienced. One team 
member. Freshman Richard Briggs, went to NAIA 
nationals. Nationals were held in Kenosha, Wis- 
consin, on November 17. The team's best times 
were at NAIA district 25 championships. The 
team showed their best effort, according to Na- 
son, at the O.U. invitational. 



4i0 




CROSSCOUNTRY 181 



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plans; plus, a number of other services. Ask 
your Fulton Federal Savings Counselor about 
the Fiscal Fitness Package. 

Mam Office 

21 Edgewood Ave , NE 

586-7283 



V 
^ 



N 



ROYOl . ^^^ 



OLDSMOBILE ROLLS ROYCE 



ISUZU 



One Dealership brings together 
the best of three countries 



AMERICA 



ENGLAND 



JAPAN 



Mitchell Motors Inc, 

•SALES -SERVICE -LEASING 

We lease all makes & models 

5675 Peachtree Industrial Blvd. 

Chamblee, Georgia 30341 

458-51 H 



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ADS 185 



For the seafood lover in you. 

Setijml linxn (nil: 

CHAMBLEE 

458-3176 
5347 Peachtree 
Industrial Dr. 
Most Major Credit Cards Accepted 



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4276 PEACHTREE ROAD, N,E. 

ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30319 

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(404) 266-8800 



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^ 



^ 
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Oglethorpe Bookstore 



CAt\«HJS WEAR 




186 ADS 



Good Luck To 
O.U. from 

Bob and Ray 

Brookhaven Liquor Store 
4200 Peachtree Road 
1 mile south of campus 



^ 
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Wc dclhvt nn ihanjuMJiar 




SPREEN 
TOYOTA 

'Old- st Toyota Dealer in Georgia" 

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4001 Peachtree Rd 

Atlanta, Georgia 

233-6701 



ADS 187 



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GENERAL HARDWARE 

4218 PEACHTREE ROAD 

ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30319 

404 237 5209 

BROOKHAVEN 
OGLETHORPE 

ANYTHING IN HARDWARE" 



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tmmanA^ 



Professional Color and Make Up Consultant 

(404)-953-2254 

659 Fern Street Marietta. Georgia 30067 



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Congratulations 
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GEORGIA ARMY NATIONAL GUARD SALUTES 
THE STUDENTS OF OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY 



We have challenging, good paying part-time jobs for qualified men and women. You 
may also qualify for generous financial assistance and many other benefits to help you 
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state and nation while helping yourself. Call 656-6254 in Atlanta. 



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188 ADS 



Let It Snow! 




«•*• 




SNOW DAY 189 



Aa 



Terri Abernathy 36 

Donna Adair 76, 78, 96 

Kevin Adams 96 

Pam Adams 86 

Hassana Adamson 58 

Robin Adams 

Kurt Alexander 20, 62, 175, 178 

Shelly Alford 24, 56, 58, 96 

Rhoda Allen 142 

Gus Almos 174 

Mauricio Amaya 50, 70, 96, 151 

Betty Amerson 126, 151 

G. Malcolm Amerson 70, 142 

Michelle Anderson 58 

Lane Anderson 142 

Sonya Anderson 96 

Charis Andrews 78, 96, 164 

Daniel K. Anglin 142 

Andy Applebaum 178 

Nancy Arnold 86 

Asdrubal Arvelo 96 

Jill Ashton 58, 60, 96 

Omid Atlassi 96 

Keith Aufderheide 70, 143 

Vicky Autrey 96 



Bb 



Kenton Baggs 64, 66, 70, 86, 170, 175 
Jessica Bagley 43, 44, 49, 64, 66, 68, 

76, 78, 80, 96 
John Bailey 96 
Donna Baker 24, 96 
Keith E. Baker 72, 143 
Wendy Baker 23, 96 
Brad Baldwin 49, 61, 68 
Scott Baldwin 96 
Bob Balkam 20, 46, 60 
Sue Bamford 20, 46, 96, 98 
Colin Bannerman 96 
Lisa Barnes 51, 72, 96 
Sue Bartholomae 96 
Karen Bates 97 
Timothy Bates 23, 42, 86 
Ilene Baylin 23, 63 
Ralph Beard 19, 20, 46, 60, 86 
Frank Beaty 97 
Traci Bell 59, 97, 164 
Babette Bennett 97 
Bruce Benton 55, 166, 168 
Barb Bessmer 42, 44, 45, 46, 49, 64, 

86,91 
Karen Bender 126 
Patrick Berry 143 
Jack Berkshire 126, 166, 168 
Bonnie Bertolini 126 
Joann Bertone 171 



Brent Bishop 97 

Lauren Bishop 97, 171 

Leo Bilancio 142, 143 

Lisa Bitoun 97 

Cindy Bjurmark 44, 54, 97 

Mark Blankenship 49, 97 

David Boisvert 97, 166 

Chris Bolden 97, 170 

Rob Boggus 76, 78, 86, 159 

James Bohart 144 

Alonso Bohart 144 

Bonnie Boles 44, 49, 70, 73, 98 

Annette Boling 98 

Shari Booth 98 

Helen Bourne 46, 72, 76, 78, 98 

Eve Bower 70 

Scott Boynton 166, 168 

Timothy Bracy 98 

Eugene Brasher 144 

Kevin Bradley 80, 174 

Patsy Bradley 126 

Laura Brian 80 

Richard Briggs 61, 181 

William Brightman 71, 144 

Murray Brinson 170 

Stacey Bronstein 45, 46, 48, 80, 98 

Marci Brooks 98 

Terry Brooks 54, 55, 98 

Bob Brown 170 

Carolyn Brown 98 

Guynelle Brown 48, 52, 53, 66, 70, 73, 

99, 160, 170 
Maxeen Brown 87 
Robbin Brown 99 
Sheryl Brown 87 
Mark Bryant 54, 76, 79, 87 
Martin Bucci 99, 171 
Linda Bucki 126 
Hank Bunnell 21, 61, 71, 79, 99, 179 
Alecia Bullard 62 
Chitrada Burapachaisri 99 
Leni Bunin 63 
Susan Butler 54, 99 
Brian Buzzeo 53, 61, 179 
Renee Byland 55, 59, 99, 164, 170 




Cc 



Felix Cabrera 99 

Marohn Callins 87, 100 

Marc Cash 49 

Pat Capes 73, 99 

Ronald Carlisle 

Jeanne Carolan 61, 71, 99 

Claire Carroll 127 

Chris Carter 99, 174 

Fred Carter 47, 126 

Veronique Cauquil 99 

Tammy Chaffin 70, 87 

Thomas Chandler 127, 195, 197 

Julie Chapinn 



Mike Cheek 34, 99, 159 

Karen Cheole 99 

Margaret Chin 99 

Casey Chosewood 25, 54, 61, 64, 66, 

76, 78, 83, 99, 175 
Charlotte Christian 46, 59, 72, 87 
Michael Clance 99 
Barbara R. Clark 70, 71, 144 
Tom Clements 99, 162 
Cindy Cobbaert 100 
Claire Coles 100 
Katherine Conrad 7 1 
Paula Cornish 51, 100 
Terri Cobb 128 
Bill Cottone 63, 100 
Bruce Grain 100 
John Cramer 70, 145 
Cindy Crawford 54, 56, 76, 78, 100, 

178 
Trina Crowder 54, 76, 78, 100, 178 
Nell D. Crowe 145 
Ann Crump 100 
Steven Cumbee 100 



Dd 



Antonio Dahl 19 

Joe Damiano 87 

Thomas Danisi 100 

Rhonda Davie 100 

Guinan Dawson 100 

Phil Deal 43, 46, 54, 88 

Dean De Cencio 23, 100 

Joe De Franks 

Robert De Mattheu 49, 68, 101] 

Mara Delaney 101 

Fred DeLoach 35 

Joe Del Rocini 60, 72, 101 

Dominic Desantis 69, 101 

Chrissy Di Benedetto 101 

Paul Dillingham 124 

George Dippel 88, 171 

Cindy Downey 49, 101 

Eric Drick 46, 62, 179, 178 

Diane Dubay 44, 46, 54, 64, 66, 70, 

72,78,80, 101, 160, 175, 178 
Doug Dubay 25, 46, 53, 54, 62, 64, 76, 

78, 88, 175 
Glen Dubrowsky 62, 101, 181 
Carol Duffy 128, 130 
Matt Duggan 101 
Terria Duncan 101 
Wayne Duncan 101, 166 
Dan Duncanson 21, 22, 34, 35, 37, 42, 

44, 46, 61, 64, 66, 70, 88, 175 
Richard Dunn 101 
Carlos Duque-Estrada 63, 171 
George Dupuy 153 
Connie Duque 19, 22, 50 
Eduardo Duque-Estrada 101 



190 INDEX 



Ee 



Marty Eastlack 24, 36, 43, 45, 52, 64, 

66,80 
Shawn Edwards 101 
Chris Eidson 101 
Scott Einbinder 20, 63, 171 
Sheri Eleswich 101 
Uta Eltester 101 
Denise Enneking 54, 73, 101 
Jane Ensor 101 
Young Eom 102 
Chris Erckert 36, 37, 42, 44, 49, 60, 

68, 102 
William Erickson 128 
Angelo Espejo 102 
Hollis Ewing 102 
Eyo Eye 34, 50, 102 



Ff 



Joseph N. Fadyn 145 

Viana Faline 63 

Bill Fair 36, 42, 44, 76, 78, 102, 162, 

174 
Alan Fann 88 
Ron Few 147 

Mark Feiring 29, 56, 60, 102 
Jack Ferrey 128 
Rich Fischer 32, 45, 46, 73, 98, 102, 

166 
Penny Fisher 102 
Fran Flowers 51, 128 
Jay Floyd 43, 44, 65, 70 
Gary Ford 53, 60, 102 
Alan Fountain 102 
John Fox 102 
Elena Franco 54, 78, 102 
Jennifer Francik 60 
Larry Frank 22, 43, 45, 46, 55, 73, 

102, 166, 174 
Harry Frazer 20, 43, 44, 53, 61, 102, 

171, 175 
Jason Freeman 170 
Betsey Freiburger 102 
Charlotta Friday 102 
David Frost 25, 102 
Reggie Frye 22, 46, 55, 61, 73, 162 
Robert J. Fusillo 145 



Gg 



Brad Gadberry 63, 65, 71, 76, 79 
Ellen Gadberry 63, 65, 71, 89 
Leticia Galan 103, 160, 171 
Pam Galanek 23, 103 
Don Galbraith 103 



Mia Gallagher 60, 103 

Jerry Garcia 

Mike Galyean 103 

Kathleen Ganey 129, 160 

Christine Garrido 103 

Eric Garvey 159 

Stacy Gates 36, 37, 103, 154 

William Gates 63, 129 

Catherine Gay 20, 60, 48, 103 

Michelle Gazes 24, 63, 103 

Mary Carol Geddis 71 

Andy Geeter 103 

Howard Gelb 89 

Becky Gess 42, 48, 55, 63, 68, 103, 

171 
Christine Gilmore 51, 89 
Janice Gilmore 129 
Victor Giusto 62, 103, 175, 178 
Amy Glover 19, 21 
David Goldberg 104 
Tracy Goldman 104, 163 
Eileen Gomez 104 
Kenny Gould 73, 89, 163 
Christine Graf 104 
Antonella Grandi 104 
Joe Granger 166, 168 
Charles Granger 56, 63, 89 
Gabriel Grasso 65, 68, 104 
Sandee Gray 104 
Christine Green 104 
John Green 54, 70, 104, 175, 179 
Rebecca Green 28, 61, 104 
Wayne Gregory 104 
Jay Cee Groce 104 
Ann Groover 90 
Seong Guem-Li 175, 179 
Ralph Gunn 76, 78, 90 
Walter Gunn 104 
Beth Guntner 105 



Hh 



CleHall 130 

Michon Hall 61, 91, 105, 170 

George Hall 105 

Kevin Hall 73, 90 

Naomi Hamby 20, 44, 46, 48, 56, 59, 

63,76,91, 105, 170 
Yvonne Hamby 28, 78 
Nina Hamond 70, 73, 90, 111 
Thair Hanaway 60, 105, 179 
Richard Hans 36, 105, 171 
Annette Hansen 21, 61, 105 
Cile Hardwick 35, 105 
Marie Harkey 76, 79, 105 
Darryl Harper 105 
Richard Harris 105 
Terri Harris 105 
Ginny Harrison 105 
Henry Hartje 70 
Michelle Harrison 49, 52, 59, 72, 105 



Jane K. Hayes 146 ... _,, .^ 

Michael Hays 90 

Joe Helwig 54, 79, 105 

Bruce Heissler 109 

Christ! Hendrix 105 

Sonja Henry 105 

Karen Herfurth 105 

Jacqueline Hernandez 59, 105 

Tomas Hernandez 170, 171 

Bruce W. Hetherington 69, 146, 151, 

153 
Rhonda Hickman 21, 54, 105 
Jo Dee Hicks 106 
Kelli Hiett 56, 59, 170 
Greg Hightower 61, 90, 135, 181 
Alice Hilger 71 
Tomonari Himeno 106 
Kenny Hines 33, 63, 171 
Ralph Hodge 106 
Kelly Hodges 90 
Amy Hoffland 106 
David Holcomb 106, 73, 55, 174 
Sonja Holcombe 90, 71 
C. Norman HoUingsworth 146 
John Hood 140 
Khali! Hourani 106 
Nest Hover 130 
Mary Howard 48, 54, 106 
Marlene Howard 35, 130 
John Huber 106 
Sarah Hunter 62, 175 
Kim Hudgens 46, 59, 106 
Paul Hudson 146, 147 
Michelle Hughes 106 
Prudy Hughes 131 
David Hwang 90 



li 



Fiji Igarashi 106, 107 
Islamiat Ipaye 106 
Brad Isaacson 106, 171 
Humberto Itriago 106 
Maria Itriago 106 



Jj 



Jonathan Jay 1 3 1 

Ken Jackson 36, 37, 54, 72, 78, 80, 

106, 175 
Tom James 60, 106 
Joanne Jarosz 49, 54, 81, 106 
John Jarrard 54, 78, 80, 106 
Cecelia Jenkins 106 
Walter Jenkins 146 
Anne Johnson 171 
Bret Johnson 174 



INDEX 191 



■t^%^»i«i:«'.tsiiK;S->Si>»^ 



>m 



Greg Johnson 107 
Harold Johnson 141 
Juliette Johnson 68, 72, 91, 171 
Rod Johnson 43, 45, 46, 51, 73, 91 
Thomas Johnson 21, 63, 107 
Carol Johnston 72, 131 
Charlton Jones 69, 147 
Maria Jordan 54, 107 
Courtney Joye 21, 56, 59 
Mirvat Jrab 49, 107 



Kk 



Okubo Kazuhiko 107 

Jill Kaminski 107, 171 

Stewart Keller 22, 46, 55, 61, 73, 107, 

174 
Gwen Kendrick 107 
Awilda Kennedy 107 
Nancy H. Kerr 73, 147 
J. Brien Key 68, 136, 7 
Biya Khan 54, 107 
Stephen Kim 61, 107, 175 
Kathy King 29, 107 
Elizabeth Klein 63, 101, 107, 160, 163, 

171 
Mark Knautz 21, 48, 61, 73, 108, 175 
John Knot 124, 151 
Ray Koepsell 108 
George Koether 108 
Ann Kohl 54, 91 
Susan Komin 50, 108 
Georgiana Krause 108 
Ronald Kraynick 60, 108, 179 
Marianne Krill 108 
Jim Kuchinski 63 
Richard Kustin 
Yoshiaki Kurokawn 50 
Ritesh Kuvadia 108 
Onikepo Abi Kuye 108 



LI 



Laura Laframboise 49, 80, 108 
Andrew Lampros 108 
Todd Lane 108 
Carol Lanier 109 
Sean Lapides 44, 60 
Kim Laurel 109 
Rhett Laurens 70, 91 
Irene Lavita 54, 73, 109 
Reid Lawson 109 
Frank Lawton 55, 61, 109, 179 
Willie Lawton 51, 109, 166, 168 
Gina Leathers 109 
Seong Lee 109 

Jackie Liberman 44, 46, 56, 58, 63, 
101 



192 INDEX 



Sung Lee 109 

Michelle Lent 131 

Tony Lentini 109, 166 

James Leggat 63 

Cheryl Lerner 63, 73, 91, 175 

Liliem Levy 109 

Ross Lipman 28, 49, 56, 60 

Janie J. Little 154 

Hsiao- Yun Liu 91 

Tammy Locklear 109 

Nanette Loftis 92 

Fred Long 61, 109 

Beatriz Lopez 34, 49, 53, 60, 109 

Martha Loring 

Nathaniel Lowe 33 

Jeff Lowman 92 

Ray Lucas 20, 24, 42, 43, 60, 65 



Mm 



Rusty Mabrey 42, 45, 49, 52, 61, 109, 

114 
Helen Maddox 78, 109 
Patt Maerker 71 

Veronica Maldonado 19, 49, 109, 163 
Sheryl Manley 131 
Janice Marshall 43, 54, 65, 66, 72, 76, 

78,92 
Leslie Martin 59 
Natalia Martin-Leyes 109 
Lonnie Masdon 73, 109 
Jeff Masso 109 
John Mastroianni 48, 110 
Carolyn Mathews 131 
Gwen Mathews 110 
Dennis Mathews 132 
Daniel McClure 
Marcia McGuigan 71, 110, 34, 35, 45, 

49 
Ann McGinn 132 
Karen McAmis 92 
Martha McCardel 59, 71, 92 
David McCollam61, 110, 179 
Mike McCracken 104 
Sue McCue 36, 37, 42, 45, 46, 60, 66, 

110 
Kathleen McDermott 22, 29, 110, 164 
J.C. McElroy 36, 45, 62, 110, 178 
James McFarland 110 
Kecia McGlothan 51, 72, 110 
Amy McGown 110 
Anna McGuffey 93 
Amy Mcllveen 50, 110 
Wendy McKelvey 28, 160, 171 
Jonathan McLeod 56, 110, 175 
Ryan McMullen 110 
Summer McNair 29, 110, 163 
Eric Mehnert 73,49, 110 
Hassan Mehsen 110 
Kathy Messina 34, 46, 160, 171 
Edward Metcalf 



David Methven 1 10 
Greg Meyer 93 
Margaret Meyer 55, 73, 93 
Robert Miller 32 
Lisa Millman 1 10 
Anne Mills 25, 1 1 1 
Judy Mitcham 1 1 1 
Kathi Mitchell 1 1 1 
Stephanie Mitchell 1 1 1 
Robert Moffie 45, 73, 147 
El-Hosin Mohamed 1 1 1 
Debney Moore 73, 111 
Gloria Moore 133 
Chip Moore 93 
Chris Moore 93 
Kelly Moran 28, 48, 111 
Angle Morrison 111 
David K. Mosher 148 
Cecilia Mullings HI, 171 
Brenda Mullis 54, 1 1 1 
David Muridico 111, 171 
Eileen Murphy 66, 68, 72, 93 
Maureen Murphy 93 
Tony Murphy 171 
Maureen Murray 111 
Timothy Murray 112 




Keith Nabb 63, 112, 171 
Rise Nachman 36, 46, 112 
MarcNaef 62, 112, 178 
Andrew Nash 20, 62 
Marshall Nason 45, 50, 66, 133, 

179, 181 
Chris Neild 112 
Tom Nesbitt 112 
Phillip J. Neujahr 47, 68, 148, 1 
Jerri Newman 71 
Susan Nicholas 112 
Lloyd Nick 47, 148, 197 
Vanya Nick 153 
Anders Nilsen 133, 139 
Ken Nishimura 148 
Dan Noble 19, 44, 112 
Theresa Norton 63 
Tim Noto 112 
Carolyn Nowell 44, 93 
Andy Nye 112 
Jimmy Nye 1 12 



135, 



52 



Oo 



Bonnie O'Harrow 34, 35, 46, 
Peg O'Neal 112 
Darien Ogburn 1 1 3 
Charles Okoh 113 
Kazuhiko Okubo 50, 113 
Agustin Olmos 1 1 3 



5,93 




JohnD. Orme 129, 149 
Janice Ott 113 
Jim Owen 133, 166, 170 
Lance Owen 1 1 3 
Ken Ozment 166, 168 



Pp 



Phillip F. Palmer 149 

Carmen Papp 1 1 3 

Deirdre Parker 49, 113 ;sf 

Linda Parkinson 1 13 

Joe Parsons 49, 113 

Maria Paterson 59 

Bonnie Patterson 72, 80, 95 

Manning M. Pattillo 7, 47, 124 

BillPatton 113 

Doak Patton 45 

Bud Payne 133 .„^, 

Michelle Payne 28 

Gary Pearson 1 1 3 

Luis Pena 149 

Byrd Perkerson 134 

Mary Ellen Perkins 134 

Jennifer Perry 21, 44, 52, 53, 60, 70, 

163 
Polly Perry 134 
Helen Peterson 58 
JeffPetree63 
Sharon Petti 44, 60, 93 
Michael Petty 134 
Tony Petty 68, 113 

Dee Pickett 43, 46, 49, 52, 54, 68, 113 
Kerstin Pierce 113 
BobPinkney 113 
Manolis Platanis 49, 113 
Karen Poe 19, 54, 113 
Bill Porter 76, 78, 113 
Robin Porter 63 
Jeffrey Portnoy 71, 149 
Luis Prado 94 o 

Aileen Pratt 56, 58, 94 
Cathy Preiser 58, 62, 113 
Jeff Provissiero 114, 170 
Andrew Provost 114, 162 



Qq 



PhilQualter 114, 179, 181 

Julia Quickmire 46, 59, 114, 160, 170 

Lisa Quinn 73, 114 



Rr 



Mick Rathjens 21, 22, 32, 35, 44, 46, 

56, 60, 73, 94 
Jon Rawls 63, 1 14 
Tim Ray 64, 114, 171 
Kimberly Reid 49, 51, 71, 114 
Misty Reid 34, 35, 164 
Penni Reid 46, 48, 71, 114 
Cheryl Rella 94 
Sandra Reyes 1 14 
Bucky Reynolds 134, 158, 159 
Adrina Richard 135 
Keith Rieders 114 "* 
Elaine Riordan 1 14 ^ww>» 

Ruth Pitch 114 ^^ 

Philip Ritchie 135, 162, 163 
Amy Ritchason 114 
Wade Roach 114 a ' 

Donald Roberson 114, 166 M 
Cathie Roberts 24, 58, 1 14 M 
Jon Robinson 114 | -^ ^ 
Mike Robinson 141 
Pauline Robinson 28, 114 
Martine Rochat 115 
Doris Rojas 1 1 5 

Larry Rollins 46, 54, 76, 78, 115 
Penny Rose 135 
Robin Rose 89, 94 
Sherry Rosen 62, 171 
Jill Rossen 34, 88, 115 
Tracy Roth 115 , 

Donna Rothstein 71, 94 
Kim Rouleau 73, 114 
Maureen Rowe 44, 46, 54, 76, 78, 1 15 
Alan Royalty 115, 166, 168 
Marlene Rudy 20, 43, 46, 115, 170 
Michael K. Rulison 47, 70, 151 
Angle Rupe48, 55, 63, 160, 171 
Frank Russo-Alesi 36, 60, 65, 70, 73, 

115, 170, 175 
Ruth Ryan 44, 52, 60, 115 



Ss 



Ellis Ragland 94 

Laura Rankin 45, 46, 73, 114 

Tad D. Ransopher 1 50 



John Salamone 115, 159 
Dorothy Saltmer 59, 116 
Guy Samuel 60, 116 
Jane Samuel 1 16 
Audrey Sanchez-Salazar 116 
Luann Sands 72, 116 
J. Bradford Sargent 125 
Robert Sasovetz 1 1 6 
Sandra Sasson 60 
Levie Satisfieid III 116 
Missy Sauer 116, 164 
Daniel L. Schadler 151, 152 
Cathy Schattemfield 63, 82, 116, 171 
John Schattenfield 25, 94 
Jill Schimmack 69, 70, 72 
Gretchen Schmidt 116 
Doug Schmitt 43, 46, 48, 116, 159, 
170 



Suzi Schobert 52, 53, 116, 170 

Richard Schwartz 70, 94 

Kimberly Scott 28, 116 

Laura Scott 49, 116 

Richard Scott 70 

Selena Scott 62 

Judy Seamens 116 

TomSeitz 136, 166 

NeilSeiwell 62, 116, 178 

Lise Shade 46, 59, 65, 66, 70, 1 16, 

164, 170 
Barbara Shadomy 49, 72, 80, 116 
Bill Sharpe60, 116, 175 
TrishShelton 72, 116 
Sally Shin 70 

Bill Sherwood 98, 116, 166, 168 
William O. Shropshire 69, 151 
John Shuttieworth 117 
Jennifer Sierra 34, 50, 51, 117 
MarkSikorski 117 
Scott Silvis 117 
Carolyn Simpson 136 
Ann Sincere 136 
Sherry Sing 59, 117, 170 
Katherine Sjoblom 117 
DawnSkelton 52, 117 
Bret Sleight 23, 43, 46, 60, 70, 73, 1 17 
Alan Sloan 137 »s !# 

Linda Sloan 137 
Andy Smith 117 -^^ 
Randy Smith 138 "*"^ 
David Smith 117 

Faith Smith 117 = g, 

Elizabeth Smith 118 * M 

Scott Smith 118, 162, 174 f 

Jennie Soria 118, 160, 171 
Kevin Southern 49, 68, 118 
Kari Spangler 73, 118, 171 
Jonathan Spanier 95, 104 
Scott Spooner 1 1 8 I 

David Stallings 118, 166 
Greg Steele 60, 179 
Cathy Steiner 58, 95 
Mark Stephens 47 
Kitt Steppe 166, 168 
John C. Stevens 150 
Victoria Stevens 150 
George Stewart 6, 138, 195 
Brad L. Stone 45, 73, 150 
William Straley 150 
Susan Street 36, 44, 59 
Robert Strozier 70, 73, 118 
Steven Sugg 119 
Polsak Sukying 1 19 
Bob Swanson 1 19 

Paul Sykes 55, 65, 66, 70, 73, 92, 121 
Mike Szalkowski 119 



Tt 



T. Lavon Talley 150 



INDEX 193 



Alfian Tansil 119 

Aripin Tansil 50, 119 

Harris Targovnik 60, 1 19, 179 

Leslie Taylor 1 19 

Linda Taylor 71, 77, 79, 151 

John Thames 125 

David N. Thomas 119, 151 

Walter Thompson 119, 162 

David Thompson 119 

Jerrie Thompson 73, 118, 119 

Dale Tobias 119 

Deidre Tolbert 51, 119 

Maria Tovar 160 

Ricky Traylor 119, 166 

D.J. Treas 119 

Laura Trittin 73, 118, 119 

Pamela Tubesing 137, 138 

Dave Tucker 60, 80 

JohnE. Tully 151 

Margaret Turcotte 56, 59 

Dave Turner 60, 179 

Yvonne Turner 95 

JimTuten 52, 119 

Jeff Tuttle 119 

Katie Tyndell 120 



Uu 



Steve Underwood 120 
Osagie Uzzi 120 



Vv 



!#!* 



Louise M. Valine 151 
Mack Van'T Riet 53, 60, 120, 174 
Jon Van'T Riet 34, 162 
Martha H. Vardeman 152 
Nicholas Vasconez 107, 120 
Ron Vaughn 63, 120, 179, U 
Vicki Victor 49, 120 



!1 



Ww 



Darryl Wade 36, 120, 174 

Randy Wade 34, 120 

Rodney Wade 120 

George Waldner 66, 125, 129, 136 

Deda Walker 19, 23, 34, 73, 120, 164, 

171 
Teri Wall 60, 120 
Rich Wallace 63, 171 
George Walters 120 
Michelle Ward 120 
Mary Ellen Warrick 138 
Michelle Waschak 120 
Betty Weiland 139 
Andrew Weiller 62, 120, 171 
Victoria Weiss 153 
Marie Wesley 70 
Julie Weyer 139 
Andy Weyller 63 
Maureen Whalen 49, 54, 120 
Ann Wheeler 56, 71, 152 
Edd Wheeler 45, 125 
George Wheeler 145, 152 
Johnny White 44, 53, 80, 120, 174 
Sunny White 109, 120 
William Whitten 153 
Tina White 120 
Paul Wiebe 153 

Sharon Wilcox 51, 121, 163, 171 
Byron Wilde 121 
Richard Williams 66, 95, 166 
Rhoda Williams 70 
Cindy Williams 121 
Todd Williams 121 
Angela Wilson 71, 80, 121 
Hope Wilson 121, 160, 171 
Julie Wilson 121 1:; 

Mark Wilson 73, 121 
John Winecker 48, 95 
Chuck Wingo 139 
Monte Wolf 70, 73, 153 
Jacqueline Woodard 46, 80, 121 



Charles Woodford 49 
Samantha Woods 62, 121 
Todd Wucik 121 
Chip Wuerz 48, 95 
Mike Wywra 56, 62 



Yy 



Emily Yen 54, 121, 178 
William Yorks 121 
Amy Young 45 
Gina Yuille 121 




Philip Zinsmeister 47, 70, 121, 153 



i 



A Special Thanks goes to: 

Marty, who was more like a co-editor than an 
assistant editor. Without her hard work and 
dedication, this book would not have been possi- 
ble. 

Angela, for putting together the new Student 
Life section with Jackie, for drawing the ad sec- 
tion layouts, and especially for doing so much to 
improve the quality of the Miss Yamacraw Pag- 



Stacey, for putting together the Organizations 
section for the second year in a row almost single 
handedly. 

Joanne, for doing an excellent job with the in- 
structors layouts and helping with the index. 
Johnny, for his willingness to help in everyway 
he could. 
Terry and Kaylen, for taking pictures. 



John, for taking care of the survival kits. 
Sue and Jackie, for their help with the Miss 
Yamacraw Pageant. 

Art Williams our Herff Jones Yearbook Repre- 
sentative. 

My Mother and Father for their help and sup- 
port. 

Diane Dubay — Editor 



194 INDEX 



Dedication 




Mr. Chandler with his Rolls Royce. 




This yearbook is dedicated to our li- 
brarians, Mr. Chandler and Mr. Stew- 
art. The Yamacraw staff greatly appre- 
ciates all the assistance that these men 
gave us when we were preparing the his- 
torical sections of this yearbook. We are 
indebted to them for the time and effort 
they spent locating books, information, 
and pictures for us. We also thank them 
for their cooperation and understanding 
ways. 



Mr. Stewart at the library. 



Dedication 195 



150 years of 

excellence 

celebrated with style 




196 CLOSING 




Oglethorpe University proudly celebrated 150 years 
of excellence on February 1 3. The activities had origin- 
ally been scheduled for February 1 2, but an unexpected 
snow storm forced the event to be rescheduled. 

Although some of the distinguished guests were not 
able to be present on the thirteenth, the O.U. players 
performed The Oglethorpe Story to a near capacity 
crowd. After the play, the cast and crew, as well as 
many distinguished and honored guests gathered in 
Emerson Student Center for a luncheon, where they 
were entertained by the University Singers. 

Lloyd Nick and Mr. Chandler seemed pleased as 
many guests, students and faculty members proceeded 
to Lowry Hall for the opening of an art exhibit depict- 
ing the history of old and new Oglethorpe. 



OGLETHORPE DAY 197 




198 CLOSING 




OGLETHORPE DAY 199 




200 CLOSING 



a