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Full text of "Yamacraw, 1989"






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Where It's At 




6 



Student Life 



Student Life 





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9 



Where It's At 




Oglethorpe Day in 1989. 

O . U . Day is a day of celebration and recognition . It is a time for everyone to take a break 
from the routine. O.U. Day is also a time to honor an individual who has served the institu- 
tion well. The person honored this year is a person who deserves to be honored every year. 
He has served as a professor of history for more than thirty years. Mr. Leo Bilancio is a 
professor to all, a colleague to many, and a friend to anyone who would have him. 

Mr. Bilancio's courses on Europe, Russia, and Western Civilization were always the first 
to be filled. The students like him because of his great ability to make history not only easy 
to learn but enjoyable. One particular fame to his teaching style was the in-class debates. No 
matter what the topic the class was in for a good argument. 

Mr. Bilancio has served on many committees and is well respected by all of the faculty, 
administration and staff. His devotion and service to this institution go unparalleled. It was 
only fitting that Oglethrope University should chose to honor him on this day, 1989. 





10 



'A here ll' , A! 




Oglethrope Day 1989. 

O.U. Day is also that time for fun. 
Everyone takes a break from the class- 
room or the office. It is a day for good 
food and a little entertainment. If you 
were lucky maybe both at the same 
time. 

As one can see by the pictures, the 
road to commencement is not as easy as 
one may have thought. 





11 




13 



Where It's At 



SPRING BASH 

Spring Bash is an Oglethorpe tradition that is organized by the 
Dorm Council. Students go to Traer Quad for an outdoor brunch 
followed by games that continue until dinner is served. Games in- 
clude balloon tosses and tug of wars. Since it was such a sunny day 
this year. Traer residents and other students took the opportunity to 
sun worship. 







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Where It's At.. 



Summer Pow-wow 

Kerensa Shoemake and fellow 
camp counselors patiently await 
the chiefs "okay" to begin the 
evening's festivities. 









Club Paradise 

Junior Beth Eckard, and Seniors 
Cindy Clauson, Kim Whyte, Scott 
Haight and Gary Hand gather to- 
gether to capture a moment for 
their vacation scrapbook. This 
group ventured to Hilton Head, 
North Carolina in July for a mid- 
summer celebration. 




Summer Vacation 



Summ-are 





Mr^jj;., 





The beginning of sum- 
mer was always an 
incredible relief af- 
ter an excruciating week 
of final exam inflicted 
pain. Summer was a time 
to relax, forget about pa- 
pers, spend quality time 
with family, and get re- 
aquainted with ones high 
school pals. 

After nine months of rig- 
orous acadennics, Ogle- 
thorpians evacuated the 
campus in the blink of an 
eye. Some headed home, 
some traveled, and most of 
them worked. Junior An- 
drea Arnold spent her va- 
cation helping the home- 
less as a Project Developer 
for a real estate develop- 
ment firm in Naples, 
Florida. Senior Jon Reilly 



held one of the more inter- 
esting summer jobs. He 
drove a mosquito truck for 
the Ocean County Mos- 
quito Commission in Jack- 
son, New Jersey. Jon says, 
"It gives me a warm feel- 
ing inside when I realize 
that I'm making the out- 
doors safe from pesky in- 
sects." Senior James 
Smith spent his summer 
working and taking 
classes. While going to 
school he also worked at 
the Ritz Carlton fitness 
center as physical trainer 
to the rich and famous. 
For some students like 
Debbie Schoor and Jenni- 
fer O'Brien, two puny se- 
mesters were not enough 
to quench a voracious ap- 
petite for knowledge. 



Lucky for them summer 
sessions are offered. Actu- 
ally, many students re- 
turned for the summer, be 
it to make up for dropped 
classes, to graduate early, 
or to just fight boredom. 

It didn't take a cruise 
down the Nile or a surf trip 
to Hawaii to keep the aver- 
age student happy. Most 
were content with basking 
in the sun by the pool dur- 
ing the day, and hanging 
out or dancing at their 
hometown clubs in the 
evening. Getting back into 
the groove of studjing and 
test taking proved to be 
very difficult once Sep- 
tember rolled around. 
RH.lm 



Poorboys in Paradise 



Soccer players Michael Tolniich and Rob Frazier cleaned and cooked 
fish in a seafood restaurant in Cape Cod this summer. John Kratt also 
joined this group who headed up north to work, once spring semester 
was over. The guys had to put in long hours, but they did manage to 
find time to spend on the beach and check out the bikini-clad female 
tourists. 



Cool Shades 

Wendy Smith and her brother 
Randy find a spot out of the sun to 
relax from their busy day at Walt 
Disney World's Epeot Center 
which thev visited this summer. 



19 



Where It's At... 



Hercules 

Sophomore Chip Baldwin decided 
against moving the couch into his 
room after reahzing the difficulty 
of fitting it through the door. 
Throughout the semester the 
couch served many purposes out- 
side of Trustees 13. 



On 



the 



Move 



For some, it was the 
first time. For 
others, the routine 
was second nature. With 
boxes and crates filled to 
overflowing, students in- 
vaded the residence halls 
after summer break. "I 
need a muscular male to 
carry this refrigerator!" 
screamed Junior Beth 
Eckard from the third 
floor of Traer. 

Chivalrous and lech- 
erous men, both young and 
old, offered to help ladies 
with their too many suitc- 
ases. Freshmen Rush star- 
ted early in the men's resi- 
dence halls through the 




honed moving techniques 
of the fraternity men. 

For returning students, 
it was a time to renew 
friendships lost over three 
months. It was also a time 
to begin dreading class 
loads. For the new 
students, it was a time of 
anxiety and anticipation. 
For all, it was a time of ac- 
tivity and learning. 

After the rooms were 
decorated, boxes un- 
packed, and the men 
learned not to mix brights 
and whites (with a few ex- 
ception of pink under- 
wear), the students were 
ready to face everyday col- 



The Last Haul 

With a sigh of relief, Tracy John- 
son stops at the stairwell for a 
breather vnth her last load from 
the car. 

lege life. But were they 
ready to brave the foreign 
and bizarre terrain of the 
cafeteria. 
BE.tb 



20 




Movinjc On Campus 




The Happy Couple 

Junior Kami Everette receives 
help from her boyfriend Senior 
Clayton Cornell moving in to the 
dorms. Many women found it a 
big advantage to have a boy- 
friend on moving days, especially 
when living on the third floor 
Traer. 



Togetherness 

Heidi Dawson and Stephanie and 
Christine Merman help each 
other take their belongings to 
their third floor Traer room. 
Although living on the third floor 
has its advantages, many girls re- 
fuse to live there because of the 
hassle of moving in. 





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Where It's At... 



Socializing 

President and Mrs. Stanton, Dr. 
William Shropshire, and Dr. John 
Knott enjoy some refreshments 
at the farewell reception for the 
parents at the president's house 
on Sunday. 

Chit-Chatting 

Dr. Nancv Kerr, Professor of Psy- 
chology, "talks to Jerrie James 
about the many different activi- 
ties Mrs. James participated in 
during the weekend 





From registration to class lectures, parents were 

Trading Places 



The Community Life 
office, with the help 
of other vai'ious ad- 
ministrators, developed 
the first annual parents 
weekend which occurred 
the first weekend in 
October. Parents came 
from miles away to experi- 
ence "a day in the life of a 
college student." 

Parents attended 
classes, in which certain 
members of the faculty lec- 
tured for ten minutes and 
then answered questions 
for an additional ten min- 
utes. From these various 
short classes, parents 
were exposed to the dif- 
ferent styles of teaching 
offered. "I liked Prof. 
James Bohart's approach 
to teaching Music Appreci- 



ation. I especially enjoyed 
his idea of encouraging 
students to investigate all 
forms of music. His re- 
quirements for an out-of- 
class live listening report 
also impressed me as an 
important contribution to 
a well rounded education 
and a person's apprecia- 
tion of music," commented 
Cleone Sutleif, mother of 
Stormy Petrel Editor 
Charles Sutleif. 

Parents were also given 
the chance to experiment 
in extra-curricular ac- 
tivities. Some parents, like 
Tom and Jerrie James (Len 
and Jill's mom and dad), 
went to the SAE house for a 
greek mixer where they 
had the opportunity to 
learn greek songs and 



cheers, as well as mem- 
orizing the Greek Al- 
phabet. Others spent the 
afternoon in Lupton 
auditorium working on a 
skit with the Players, 
while still others worked 
with the University 
Singers or the Stormy 
Petrel (or Parent Petrel) 
Newspaper staff. The par- 
ents displayed their newly 
acquired skills later that 
evening. 

Through these various 
activities, parents were 
supposed to get a taste of 
what it is like for their 
children attending the un- 
iversity. The only problem 
was that it may not have 
been a true simulation of 
"real" campus life. Junior 
Sherry Wilson, a staff wri- 



ter for the Stormy Petrel, 
wrote that the parents 
may have had a distorted 
view of campus life in that 
the cafeteria food was 
spruced up and the soccer 
game had a very high 
attendence due to its being 
planned as an activity for 
the parents to do. But even 
if the Parents Weekend 
was not a precise depiction 
of the life of a college stu- 
dent, parents got some 
idea of what it took to 
"make the grade," and 
were able to spend an en- 
joyable weekend with 
their favorite college stu- 
dent, as their peers and 
not their parents. 
LM.jw 



Parent's Weekend 




Dan Eichorst and his parents 
talk to Dean Carlisle at President 
Stanton's open house about dif- 
ferent school policies while enjoy- 
ing some refreshments. Dean 
Carlisle is also a Professor of 
Computer Science. 

What's in a Name 

Judy Knott and Adrina Richard 
help former University President 
Manning Pattillo and his wife 
Martha put on their nametags for 
the farewell party during 
Parent's Weekend. 



23 



Where lt"s At 









24 



Intramurals 




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Where It's At 







26 



IniramuraK 





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27 



Where It's At... 



A full moon eerily 
shimmered over 
the still campus; 
in the distance a mys- 
terious howling could be 
heard. Was this the mak- 
ings of a gory horror 
movie? No, this was just 
the beginning of Hallo- 
ween weekend, eagerly 
awaited by students as 
an after mid-term break. 
The festivities started 
with Tri Sigma's annual 
Hallo-weenie Roast, in 
which the girls brought 
their favorite "wolf- 
man", roasted hot dogs, 
and ate caramel apples. 
Later, students rode 
their brooms to the Chi 
Phi house to socialize 
and do the "Monster 
Mash" on their newly in- 
stalled dance floor. 

On Saturday, the 2nd 
floor lounge was trans- 
formed into a Haunted 
House, designed by 
Missy Sauer, where Dr. 
Malcom Amerson and 
the pledges of Chi 
Omega and SAE did 
their "ghoulish" best to 
frighten the brave 
students who wandered 
in. Those who did make it 
out alive, donned their 
best Halloween garb and 
headed over to the stu- 
dent center for the 
Halloween Dance. Fin- 
ally, the Halloween fes- 
tivities winded down on 
Monday, with the fourth 
annual Trick-or-Treat in 
Traer. Children from 
nearby elementary 
schools, dressed from 
bunnies to devils to baby 
elephants, roamed the 
floors of Traer and Good- 
man dorms for goodies 
provided by Rotaract. 
Not even rain could stop 
these little candy hunt- 
ers, who were safely es- 
corted by fraternity 
pledges. LM.jw 



Suddenly, out of nowhere... 



BOO! 





Monster Mash 

SAE little sister Christy Baird 
and boyfriend Sam McKniRht, a 
Brother in SAE, enjoy the music 
played at the Halloween dance 
which was sponsored by the Chi 
Omega pledge class and the 
Oglethorpe Student Association. 
Although not a student at 
Oglethorpe, Christy enjoyed all of 
the benefits of an Oglethorpian's 
life through her relationship with 
Sam. Christy studied at Berry 
College before transferring to 
Georgia State University to 
study physical therapy, while 
Sam studied economics at Ogleth- 
orpe. 

Babes In Arms 

SAE pledge Kelvin F'ord helps a 
little bunny down the stairs dur- 
ing Trick or Treat in Traer on 
Halloween afternoon. Extra cau- 
tion had to be taken because the 
rain that day made the staircases 
in Traer that much more dan- 
gerous for the children to go up 
and down, so volunteers from 
Rotaract, the SAE and Chi Phi 
pledge classes escorted the little 
"monsters " from floor to floor. 









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Hallov/f-en Wfifikftnd 



Here ('omes the IJride 

Michelle Fleming gives a 
trick-or-treater some candy 
(iurinK the invasion. 

Munchkinland 

"I don't think we're in Kansas 
anymore, Ted." Jerry Renoe and 
Ted Marks lead the kids around. 




S^t^ 





Trick or Treat 



Lee Ann Flemming and Chris 
Coffin offer some candy to two 
trick-or-treaters who weathered 
the storm and made their way to 
the third floor of Traer. 

Mad Scientist 

Dr. Malcom Amerson rehearses 
his act for the Haunted House in 
Traer. Those who entered the 
dark pit found themselves chased 
by the blood stained "lab assis- 
tant gone mad." trying to get 
someone to taste the unidentitl- 
able pile of slimy material that he 
held in his hand. 



29 



Where It's At... 




Nij^ht of the Arts 



Pot-Pourri 



Of Talent 



Rehearsing 

Nacho Arrizablaga finds some 
time alone to practice "The Color- 
ing: Song" on his recorder. 

First Billing 

Jim Peterson, the special guest 
read from his published works. 




The Great Hall was 
filled with an eager 
audience anticipat- 
ing Dr. Linda Taylor's 
discoveries from search- 
ing every nook and 
cranny of the campus to 
find the finest of talents 
for the Night of the Arts. 
From drama to music, 
the evening touched on 
every point in the artistic 
spectrum. 

For the literature 
lovers, Stephanie Phil- 
lips and Troy DeGroff 
offered original poems, 
while Rachel Williams 



and Liz Miello enter- 
tained the audience with 
their dramatic (and at 
times quite humorous) 
prose pieces. 

For the music lovers, 
DeShawn Jenkins sang 
"The Greatest Love of 
All," Kevin Rapier played 
"Sarabande" on the 
trumpet, Ignacio Arriza- 
blaga played "The Color- 
ing Song," on the re- 
corder, and Jackie Pearse 
played a rendition of Vi- 
valdi's "Concerto in A 
Minor." on the violine. 
Finally, Soren Ryland 



played original songs on 

the guitar. 

During intermission, 
art lovers were invited to 
Hearst 100 where stu- 
dent's works were dis- 
played. 

Even the faculty got in 
on the action. Dr. Madel- 
ine Picciotto translated 
poetry from Brazil and 
Argentina. 

Finally, the main at- 
traction of the evening 
was poet Jim Peterson, 
entertaining the audi- 
ence with selected poems 
from his collection. LM.jw 





Ant Lion 

"Fetch me the ant killer!" Rachel 
Williams reads from an original 
dramatic piece. "The Ant Lion." 

Lonesome Road 

Dr. John Cramer, Dr. Victoria 
Weiss and Dr. Jeff Arnett (not pic- 
tured) sing James Taylor's mel- 
low single. An unexpected added 
attraction to the evening was 
when Dr. .A.rnett sang Dr. Weiss" 
solo in the song — she was unable 
to because of a sore throat; it was 
a very interesting moment con- 
sidering it was a little high in Dr. 
.•\rnett's range. 



31 



Where It's At... 



Glamour 



Glitz and Gowns 



Blondes in Black 

Allison Wethington and Jay 
Shirey were one of the first cou- 
ples out on the dance floor — un- 
like past formals, the women 
seemed to be wearing more black 
than the men. 





Young Entrepreneurs 

SAE Brothers Scott Beaver and 
Jim Marotta provide music for 
the Formal. Scott and Jim formed 
their own company, Sound Audio 
Evolution, during their Sopho- 
more year and became inundated 
with various bookings through- 
out the year, keeping the two 
Juniors' nonacademic life pretty 
busy. 



Checking Tickets 

OSA Vice President Beth Eckard 
and Junior Class President Ni- 
cole Caucci trade Heidi Dawson 
and date Scott Peil "Formal '88" 
shot glasses for the couple's 
tickets at the entrance of the 
Medical Center. It was Formal co- 
organizer Nicole (along with 
Senior Class President Jennifer 
O'Brien) who wanted to have the 
function in the fall rather than 
the spring in order to cut back on 
the number of major events oc- 
curring so close to the end of the 
school year. 




The Autumn Formal 




Screams of "What a 
{gorgeous dress!" 
and the faces of 
impatient tuxedo-c)ad 
dates filled Traer dorm 
early in the November 
evening as the anx- 
iously awaited Fall 
Formal drew near. 
Some dined intimately 
at the Peachtree Cafe 
beforehand, while 
others did the cocktail 
party thing a la Traer. 
The destination, 
though, was a common 
one — midtown, at The 
Academy of Medicine. 
Entering the Academy, 
one found either Beth 
Eckard, Jennifer 
O'Brien, or Nicole Caucci 
— formal organizers 
and OSA members — at 
the door asking "Can I 
have your ticket, 
please?", while Service 
America staff members 
rushed hurriedly about 
touching up the hors 
d'ouevors and refilling 
the punch to create a 
feast fit for a king. 

The formal had the 
largest turnout in 
years: 175 people pur- 
chased tickets from en- 
thusiastic OSA mem- 
bers. And what a mem- 
orable night it was. 

Couples ate and drank 
in the foyer and then 
ventured on into the 
ballroom to dance the 
night away on the black 
and white checkered 
floor. All good things 
must come to an end. 
however, and soon the 
music ceased and the 
lights dimmed, lea\ing 
our par tiers in the 
hands of the Atlanta 
nightlife. LM.jw. 

A Tender Moment 

Sophomores Keith Boan and 
Kris Reeder take a moment to 
themselves while dancing. 



33 



Where It's At 



ACTIVITY DAY 

Activity Day, held in the Spring, 
shows the good relations between 
the school and the students. Students 
in all fraternities, sororities, clubs 
and organizations participate in an 
effort to clean up the school. The 
jobs include picking up trash, clean- 
ing the pool, repainting trim work, 
raking leaves and planting flowers. 
After this year's Activity Day, 
students were treated to an outdoor 
band concert. 






34 



Aclivity Day 






35 



Where It's At 






36 






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37 



Where It's At 



CAFETERIA STORY 

While the food in the cafeteria may not always be up to the students" exacting standards, students are unfailingly greeted 
with the smiling faces of cafeteria workers Sarah "Baby" Smith and Frank Reid. Both are continually gracious to all students 
and are universal favorites on campus. Sarah offers sage advice to one and all while admitting people to the cafeteria. Frank 
cooks great omlettes and pancakes, as more than one student can attest. Students, such as Clayton Cornell and Doreen Hart 
(pictured below) don't even mind standing in line if Frank is at the grill to prepare one of his mouth-watering creations. Heruy 
Broitman always enjoys seeing Frank and Sarah in the cafeteria, "They're like the momma and poppa at mealtimes," a 
statement which sums up the affection of all the students. 



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38 



Cafeteria Storv 




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39 



Where It's At 



SPRINGFEST 

Springfest is organized by the Admissions 
Office and VISTA to welcome prospective 
students to campus. Activities are organized 
for prospectives to fill their time between 
classes and tests and to show how much fun 
Oglethorpe can be. After playing such games 
as "childhood revisited" in which one tries to 
survive an obstacle course of tricycles and 
baby bonnets, how can one not be absolutely 
convinced to choose Oglethrorpe as their col- 
lege of choice? The entire school enjoys the 
picnic dinner served in the stadium and the 
competitive games held during and after. 






40 



SpringfeM 





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41 



Where It's At 




42 



Campus 






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Where It's At 






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Where It's At 




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Career Dressing 






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Where It's At 



Greek Week 








48 



Greek Week 



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Where It's At 



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Greek Week Athletes 




50 



Greek Week 





51 



Greek Week 




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Where lt\ Ai 



Greek Week Skit 




53 



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TRI SIGMA HALLOWEEN ROAST 



Ever since Tri Sigma came aboard campus, they've held an annual fete that is enjoyed by sisters and guests. It is the 
Sigma Halloween Roast which is organized by the Fall pledges for the sisters. Costumes are worn by those with the 
imagination, but it is more popular to simply come as a "student."" In the backyard there is a firepit that is used to roast 
hotdogs and make those campfire delicacies, s" mores. 




54 



Hailov.een 





/ 



55 



Where It's At 






|. .1 







56 







^- r.' 



^A-l, * I ^ 



-•- - - *-i?!r"*. *^?^ "^iT 5^-U 



^ 










57 



Where It's At 




58 



'Jg\cih<)Tpc 



Administration, Faculty, and Staff 




59 



Oglethorpe 




\ 



Jeffrey Amett 

Asst. Prof, of 

Psychology 



i 




Bonnie Bertolini 

Admission's Office 

Receptionist 




^.a4.. 



Ananias Birden 
Staff 






James Bohart 
Asst. Prof, of Music 



Patsy Bradley 
University Nurse 




William Brightman 
Professor of English 



60 



'^Jglethorp; 




Linda Bucki 
Asst. Dean for 
Administration 




Mark Burgess 
Men's Resident Director 




John Cramer 
Assoc. Prof, of Piiysics 





Perry Dement 
Director of Alumni 
Clubs and Research 




Patsy H. Dickey 

Director of Public 

Relations 




n 



\ 



Carol Duff}' 
Office Manager 



61 



Oglethorpe 




Katherine Eubanks 

Director of Career 

Plannins and Placement 




Janice Gilmore 

Director of Business 

Office 




Cle Hall 

Secretary to V.P. and 

Asst. Dean 








FRftNV 



A ^' 



Frank Hammond 
Staff 




Bruce Hetherington 

Assoc. Prof, of 

Economics 




JOSS- 



Joseph Jackson 
Staff 



62 



Oglethorpe 




Nancy H. Kerr 

Assoc. Prof, of 

Psychology 




* r,0<«'' 



t!,«« 



t 



Contesser Lowe 
Staff 




Donna Loveladv 

Secretary to V.P. 

Development 




V 




Jay Lutz 
Asst. Prof, of French 




' 1 



Janet Maddox 
Staff 




\ 



:^^j 



jiXMORl 



\ 




Seymore Masee 
Staff 



63 



Oglethorpe 







Lester March 
Staff 





Debby Marsh 
Staff 



Marilyn Merrifield 
Payroll Supervisor 





t 



m. 



1.. 



it;;^^ 



nT: 






Mary Middleton 

Assoc. Prof. 

of Accounting 



Il\ 




Sheryl Murphy 
Asst. Mgr. Bookstore 







Anders Nilsen 
Dir. of Financial Aid 



64 



Oglethorpe 




Ken Nishimura 
Prof, of Philosophy 




Sue Palmer 

Asst. Dir. of Financial 

Aid 




Howard Parker 
Supervisor of 
Housekeeping 




et «* 



1 



k 



J 



Ginger Pate 
Faculty Secretary 




CBft'l-'^ 



Charles Pendley 
Maintenance 




Carl Pirkle 

Assoc. Dean of Continuing 

Education 



65 



Oglethorpe 




) 



Sandra Ranger 
Staff 




W. Irwin Ray 
Dir. of Choral Activities 




Rick Robbins 
Asst. V.P. of 
Development 





Daniel Schadler 
Prof, of Biology 





I 



William Shropshire 
Prof, of Economics 




Ann Sincere 
Sec. Alumni Office 



66 



'j'dl':'i.'ir!/: 




k-V _._ ..A. 




"•sr ^l- 




ry Smith 


T. Randolph Smith 


John Stevens 


Staff 


Assoc. Dir. of 
Admissions 


Prof, of Education 





> 



George Stewart 
Asst. Librarian 



Louise Valine 
Prof, of Education 




Martha Vardeman 
Prof, of Sociology 



67 



Oglethorpe 




Mary Warrick 
Secretary of 
Development 





Betty Weiland 

Administrative Asst. to 

President 




Gregory Weiss 

Visiting Asst. Prof, of 

Philosophy 




Chuck Wingo 

Director of the 

Bookstore 




Dean Tucker 

Assoc. Prof, of Business 

Admin. 




68 



Sorry for the Delay . . . 



We would like to apologize for the long delay in receiving the 1989 Yamacraw. There were several causes for the delay. 
However, the completion of the Yamacraw was always the first priority. 

In completing the 58th edition of the Yamacraw some materials were readily available, however, some materials were 
missing. We apologize to any individual or organization that is not pictured or mentioned. One such area was the athletic 
section. Regretfully, no pictures were available for the Cross Country, Tennis or Volleyball teams. In other areas such as the 
Faculty and administration we tried to list those not pictured. 

Although this edition will not be award winning, the staff of 1989 still deserves a word of thanks. Thank-you to ail of you 
who put your time and effort into the completion of this book (you know who you are). The materials and time that you 
provided were critical elements in being able to produce this edition. 

In our efforts to capture the essential events of 1989, which were numerous (O.U. Day, the Inauguration. Graduation, etc. ) 
we may have left some other event out. We apologize. 

Finally, the book was originally supposed to be delivered in September of 1989. Each Yamacraw after this will come in 
September, so that seniors will have their own Graduation picture and a complete history of their year. For the Graduates of 
1989 and the others who bought an annual, we want to thank you for being so patient. It is our hope that you enjoy this, the 
58th edition of the Yamacraw. 

Sincerely. 

Krissy Grods 
James D. Marotta Jr. 



69 



Where It's At 



^'•- 




Dr. Donald S. Stanton 
President 




John B. Knott 
Executive Vice President 



70 



AdrnJriislralior. 




Donald Moore 

Dean of Community Life 




Ronald Carlisle 

Interim Dean of the Faculty 



71 



Where It's At 




John A. Thames 

Dean of Continuing Education 





Sorry . . . Not Pictured 

The following people were not pictured 



Paul L. DilHngham 
Vice President for Development 



72 



Where ll ••. Al 






i 



\ 




Marshall Nason 


Leigh Anne Leist 


Paul Hudson 


Assoc. Dean of 


Asst. Dean/Director of 


Registrar 


Community Life 


Housing 





Sorry . . . Not Pictured 

The following people were not pictured 



John A. Ryland 
Jonathan Jay 
Dennis Mathews 
Jack M. Berkshire 
Adrina Richard 



Librarian 

Director of Admissions 

Assoc. Dir. of Admissions 

Director of Athletics 

Director of Auxiliary Services 



We apologize for any omissions 



73 



Where It's At 



^'■•" 



INAUGURATION OF DR. DONALD STANTON 

President Manning Pattillo stepped down on August 15, 1988. Dr. Pattillo had served 
as President of Oglethorpe University for 13 years. As President he directly concerned 
his efforts on improving the university's overall academic standards. In those years he 
brought Oglethorpe to new highs in all the collegiate guides. In fact Oglethorpe was 
being titled as one of the best liberal arts schools in the South, Dr. Pattillo was named 
Honorary Chancellor by the Board of Trustees in reward for his fine accomplishments. 

Dr. Donald Stanton received the gavel at half past two in the afternoon on November 
3rd, 1988 with the full understanding of the job before him. President Stanton gave an 
eloquent inaugural speech in which he frequently compared the history of Oglethorpe to 
the Stormy Petrel. In short. Dr. Stanton outlined plans to increase enrollment without 
sacrificing quality, and to launch a new endowment campaign to improve the school's 
facilities and expand the faculty. President Stanton has many other great plans which are 
sure to benefit the university as well. 




74 



Iriauguraljon 




75 



Where It's At 



BOAR'S 

HEAD 

CEREMONY 

All students look forward to the school 
tradition of the Boar's Head ceremony. This 
signals to the students that the Christmas sea- 
son is beginning. Boar's Head is based on an 
English ceremony at Corpus Christi college, 
Oxford that James Oglethorpe brought over to 
us. In addition to ushering in the season, this 
ceremony serves as a time to honor the new 
ODK initiates, as they are allowed to carry in 
the actual head of the boar. After the proces- 
sion of the boar's head, a concert is given by 
the O.U. Singers. Directly following the 
ceremony, everybody gathers outside to 
watch the lighting of the Christmas tree on the 
top of Lupton's bell tower. 







76 




77 



Where It's At... 



Who's Who Among Students 









Wio'.s WYio 



DGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY 






Ben Bagwell AS^, Alberto 
Barragan SAE, Fran Ben- 
nett XCl, Robert Bowen, 
Nicole Caucci XO, Jennifer 
Dubose, Beth Eckard XH, 
Brent Evitt iAE, Merri 
Griffis 2SS, Scott Haight, 
Gary Hand X<t>, Carol Mor- 
gan Xn, Jennifer O'Brien 
111, Randy Padgett, 
Michelle Rosen 11^, Ava 
Salerno m, Marcy 
Smith, Orby Sondervan 
2AE, Charles Sutlief, Keri 
Wells and Sherry Wilson. 
Not pictured: Jeff Amon, 
Andy Geeter, Julie Hunt, 
Greg Ray, Vicki Smith and 
Ana Walraven. 



Who's W h o A m o n g 
Students in American Col- 
leges and Universities ivas 
a prestigious aivard given 
each year to a select yium- 
ber of students across the 
country. Our twenty-nine 
honorees were recommen- 
ded by a nominating com- 
mittee of Oglethorpe fac- 
ulty, students and admini- 
strators. The committee 
based their recommenda- 
tions of these upperclass- 
men on academic achieve- 
ment, leadership and par- 
ticipation in e.ctra-cur- 
ricular activities, service 
to the campus com)7iunity. 
and good citizenship. 

The studeyits selected 
represent a very icide 
range of fraternities, sor- 
Oi-ities and other organiza- 
tions. Some were selected 
because of their very high 
grade point average, others 
for their outstanding lead- 
ership contributions to the 
commutiity and some for 
their ability to be super- 
latively good in both areas. 



79 



Where It's At 



^'•'_ 




80 



Senj'/rs 



SENIORS OF 1989 




.L-lC-ri; ^ji 



81 



■ ^yj^" "-* ^^^"^Tir^ 



Where Ifs At 




Gabriel Arango 

Ben Bagwell 

Teresa Bamhill 

Carrie Bartenfeld 

Hoist Beall III 



82 



Senir/rs 





Alberto Barragan 
Ladonna Barros 
Carole Bengston 
Cynthia Clauson 
Peter Conrady 



83 



Where It's At 




Clayton Cornell 
Heidi Dawson 

Dawn Ellis 
Stephanie Ervin 

Brent Evitt 



1 




[ 


1 

1 

i 


m 

i 


' 



84 





S<mK«-% 




w 







Toni Downs 
Stephanie Dungan 
Wendy Eleswich 
Michele Fleming 
Chris Fhnt 



85 



Where It's Al 




Lea Franco 

Harry Frazer 

Kelly Galberaith 

Jacque Gentry 

Scott Haight 



86 




Jennifer Gamblin 
Andy Geeter 
Brian Hawkins 
Kurt Hansen 
Donna Hook 




87 



Where It's At 




88 



Seniw. 





Michael Jones 
Yoonsok Kim 
Katrina Latinen 
Denise Mont 
Carol Morsan 



89 



Where It's At 




Pamela Nunez 

Jennifer O'Brien 

Darien Ogbum 

Wendy Pearson 

Dorothea Pickett 



90 





k^ 



Photo Missing 



Photo Missing 



Melissa Sauer 
Cliff Robinson 
Jonathan Reilly 
Randy Padget 
Hemendo Osso 



Photo Missing 



Photo Missing 



Photo Missing 



91 



Where It's At 




92 



Senior* 





Todd Shapiro 
Thomas Sheridan 
Lynn Slaughter 
Jay Tate 
William Teto 



93 



•"•'.'_ 



Where It's At 



Seniors 




Hisako Tsumagari 

Trisha Voiles 

Teri Wall 

Ana Walraven 

Elaine Wood 



94 



Senior', 





95 




96 




GRADUATION 

One of the greatest milestones 
a person passes in one's lifetime 
is college graduation. Tlie gradu- 
ation marks the end of an era for 
most college seniors at the same 
time it marks the beginning of an- 
other . . . Real Life. 

Donald S. Stanton welcomed 
parents, students, faculty, and 
guests to Oglethorpe's 1 1 6th 
commencement on May 14, 
1989. Eighty-nine Stormy Pet- 
rels received Bachelor of Arts de- 
grees and eleven received Bach- 
elor of Science degrees. There 
were twenty-seven Bachelor of 
Business Administration degrees 
awarded and six Masters of Arts 
degrees. 

Special recognition was 
granted to deserving seniors. 
Karen Barrow received the Sally 
Hull Weltner award for scholar- 
ship, and Lene Jensen was 
honored with the faculty award 
for scholarship. The prestigious 
James Edward Oglethorpe 
Awards presented to the man and 
woman, who best epitomize the 
Oglethorpe ideal of academic 
achievement were earned by 
Vicki Smith and Jonathan John- 
son. The Phi Beta Kappa .^ward 
was earned by two individuals. 
Lene Jensen and Karen Barrow, 
for their outstanding academic 
achievements. The Presidents 
Leadership Prize, which was the 
final award was presented to 
Gar\' Hand for his superior lead- 
ership and involvement in a mul- 
titude of organizations. 

Following the awards cere- 
mony. Jennifer O'Brien. Pres- 
ident of the class of 1989. an- 
nounced the senior class gift. .A 
benediction given by Dr. Ken 
Nishimura followed the presenta- 
tion and marked the end of the 
ceremony. The new alumni ex- 
ited the auditorium and became 
members of "the real world." 



97 



Where It's At . . . 




98 



CjT'^fhi^iU'jri 




99 



Where It's At 




100 



Graduali'm 




101 



Where It's At 



^,U 




102 



Undergraduates of 1989 



Oglethorpe 




103 



Where It's At 




Jennifer Amerson 

Ignacio Arrazabalaga 

Deborah Atwell 



104 



OgJethorpe 





^^'V 



\ 




} 



I 




Amy Baggett 
Beth Bailey 
John Baker 



William Baldwin 
Debbv Balmes 
Billv Bam- 



105 



Where It's At.. 



Hr 



Brainchild of Lane Anderson and Richard Garner, 
the Georgia Shakespeare Festival recently fin- 
ished its third year of 
production and once 
again enjoyed a success. 
Performances are held 
nightly in a 90 foot 
circus tent located in 
Hermance Stadium. 
People came from all 
over Georgia to see the 
plays. Hermance Sta- 
dium transformed from 
its barren green grass 
and into a spectacular 
array of Shakespeare 
lovers. 

Pre-performance 
shows were also pre- 
sented on the lawn by a 
seventeen member ap- 
prentice acting troupe 
comprised 
of theatre 
students 
from col- 
leges and 
universities 
from 



Putting on an Act 

Dramatic actor Levi Lee plays 
the part of Bottom/Pyramus in A 
Midsummer Night's Dream. 




Play 




Femme Fatale 

Jodi Kahn plays Hippolyta. 



around the Southeast. These shows usually began 
in the afternoon, so many families made a whole 
day out of the festival. The act- 
ing was stupendous, bringing 
each person in the audience 
back to the seventeenth cen- 
tury to witness the plays. 

During the 1988 season, the 
Festival booked A Mid-Summer- 
Night's Dream and The Winter's 
Tale. The first production was 
directed by Santa Barbara star 
Lane Davies (Mason Capwell), 
^^^^ who also starred in the 1987 
i^f^ ^^^ production of Much Ado About 
f 1^^^ Nothing. The Winter's Tale was 

directed by Sabien Epstein 
from San Francisco's American 
Conservatory Theatre. 

During the month and a half 
1988 production run, Georgia Shakespeare Festival 
representative Kathleen Williams stated that over 
10,000 visitors came to Hermance Stadium to see 
the performances. The 1988 Georgia Shakespeare 
Festival season was definitely a huge success and 
Shakespeare fans are eagerly awaiting the 1989 
season which will feature Twelfth Night and A 
Comedy of Errors. 



Midsummer 




OgJethorpe 




Troy Bartlett 
Matt Battle 
Laurel Batty 



James Beall 
D. Scott Beaver 
Kathy Bedell 



Amy Bell 

Fran Bennett 
Ronald Bennett Jr. 



1 



107 



Where It's At . . . 




Robin Benson 
Melanie Beiman 
Carmen Bernard 



Jennifer Berry 

Michelle Blalock 

Oren Blalock 




108 



OgJethotpe 






f I f 



n 



i 




Todd Blanchard 
Thomas Boan 
Richard Bo22s 



Son\ a Bohon 

William Bolton 
John Bono 



109 



Where It's At 




Vanessa Bozman 

Tim Brady 

Bryan Blake 



110 



Otflettwffpe 







Rodney Drinkard 
Marsha Brittain 
Henr} Broitman 



Wayne Brooks 

Elizabeth Brown 
Clav Buck 



111 



Where It's At . 



Susan Bums 

Joselyn Butler 

Lynn Calloway 



Craig Campbell 

Robert Canavan 

Erin Canney 



Charles Carter Jr. 

Trina Cavender 

A.J. Chabna 




112 



Freshman Spotlight 



Fresh 



What?! 

Gloria Reynolds 
laughs along with 
Katie Garrigan 
while she tries to 
ignore the chides 
directed towards 
her for spilling 
her fruit loops. 



After being a "quiet observer" during her high 
school years, Freshman Gloria Reynolds decided it 
was time for a change. The freshman from Dalton, 
Georgia decided the key to this change was involve- 
ment. And her first step was running for and being 
elected class president. 

Gloria centered 
her campaign on a 
personal level, 
making it a point to 
meet every 

Ideas member of 
the fresh- 
man class twice and typing up a fact sheet present- 
ing her views on current school issues. After being 
elected, she got to work immediately, meeting with 
the four freshman senators. The group discussed 
issues such as "prep" days, campus security, and a 
judicial honor code system, as well as drafting a 
freshman newsletter. 

However, Gloria's involve- 
ment in school activities did 
not end there. During her se- 
nior year at Dalton High 
School, she was very active 
as a member of the Debate 
Team. Gloria's talent for or- 
ganization led her to initiate 
proceedings to start a Debate 
Club. "After I joined in high 
school, I got very excited 
about it and I would love to 
be involved in it again," she 
commented. 

Her other goals included 
obtaining a double major in English and Biology - 
two of the most difficult and demanding majors 

offerred. Laughingly, 
she stated, "I'm going to 
have to take 17-18 hours 
each semester for the 
rest of my life!" Her 
plans for a career also 
entail graduate work in 
Creative Writing and 
Entomology, to be even- 
tually used for research 
and publishing on in- 
sects. 
Gloria's other hobbies 
included ballet and rock-climbing. She studied bal- 
let for thirteen years and performed for five years 
with the Dalton Ballet Theatre. "I love being on 
stage performing. Ballet is a creative outlet for 
me." As for rock clinlbing, "It was totally isolated, 
no creeks or other water sources anywhere, we 
couldn't shower the entire time. It was great!" 





Catching Up 

Gloria prepares to spend an 
afternoon catching up on 
her studies after a major 
midterm earlier in the day. 
Gloria's favorite place to 
study was the "big couch" 
in her and Mabel Lastre's 
suite, but she admits that 
she sometimes got too com- 
fortable. 



113 



Where It's At 



* '4 








Michiyo Chiba 

Lisa Chkoreff 

Sinae Choi 



Andrew Christensen 

Angie Clem 

Christine Coffin 



114 



Oglethorpe 





Sandy Cofield 
Michelle Coker 
Shannon Collinson 



Tammy Cooper 
Cheryl Coore Campell 
Candice Corbitt 



115 



Where It's At 



Don Corleone 

Mary Cravey 

Tina Crawford 



Lisa Cross 

Jennifer Crouse 

Mary Daniels 



Dennis Davis 

Glen Davis 

Heather Davis 




116 



Aft,<-f ''/radijatjori 



Entering 

The 





Finally... 



Tom James and his proud family 
— sister Jill, father Tom and 
mother Jerrie — take a moment 
from the busy graduation day to 
capture a beautiful moment 
together for their family album. 



Real World 

What did the usual graduate do once handed the 
diploma, symbolizing the completion of four years 
of grueling struggle and strain. 

Graduates were most successful in getting into 
the respectable graduate schools. David Turner 
and Brad Baldwin, both excellent ex- 
amples of a successful college graduate; 
with David's attendance at Emory Uni- 
versity's Medical School and Brad Bald- 
win's full scholarship to the University of 
Georgia's Law School. Kathy King, a 
former psychology major, was also accep- 
ted into UGA's graduate program and 
worked towards her MBA in psychology. 
King stated that "the academic program 
at Oglethorpe prepared her very well for 
her graduate work." 

Other graduates decided to take a 
break between graduate school and col- 
lege, for financial and other reasons. Tom 
James was employed at Oglethorpe just 
six months after graduating, and planned on enter- 
ing law school later on. Having graduated college 
with a high GPA, Tom wanted to get out in the work 
force and learn practical knowledge. 

"There are some things that Oglethorpe just 
can't teach from a book," commented fellow grad- 
uate Johnny White. 
Tom said that his break really helped him to see 

what he wanted to do and 

strengthened his desire to 

pursue his goals with further 

education. 

Kathleen McDermott was an- 
other 1988 graduate who took a 

year off between college and 

law school. She agreed with 

Tom's desire to get into the 

work force, and also added that 

she enjoyed the work more 
d - ^ knowing that she had four 

years of college behind her. Her 
goals of going to law school were set, but she de- 
cided that she wanted to have the experience of ac- 
tually working in a law firm, so that when she did 
finally go to law school, she could apply the hands- 
on experience and new knowledge she had gained 
to have a fuller understanding of her law studies. 
KG.jw 






Working 9 to 5 

Kathleen McDermott visits 
with friends Ron Bennett and 
Kelly Galberaith during her 
lunch break from the law firm 
where she's employed. 



117 



Where It's At... 



Movie 






Madness 



Cut! 

Lanier Road was 
blocked off in order to 
film driving scenes. 



Standing 
By 

Lee Ann Flem- 
ming, Katrina 
Lahtinen, Dor- 
een Hart, and 
Amy Bagget, 
talk to casting 
director Carlos 
Williams in be- 
tween takes 
outside Lowry 
Hall. 




In recent years, the campus, with its gothic build- 
ings and beautiful lawns, has served as a setting for 

location shots for 
various movies — 
including The Lea- 
der of the Band and 
Made in Heaven, 
neither of which 
did very well at the 
box office. Another film endeavor shot at the 
campus, though, has a much better chance at hav- 
ing a successful run in Atlanta theatres; for it's dir- 
ectors used Oglethorpians as extras throughout 

much of the film — 

including the shots 
made at a studio 
downtown. For 
three glorious days, 
students left their 
studies to be able to 
participate in this 
event. "As most 
students tried, I 
took my book bag so 
I could study in be- 
tween shots, but I 
got so involved in 
the film making 
process that I just 
used my books as a 
prop when filming took place," told Sophomore Lisa 
Frambache. And many students paid the price for 
their small shot at fame, being that filming took 
place just a week before midterms. 

Although filming took place throughout the 
month of October, Oglethorpians had to wait until 
the Spring to see if they had been one of the few for- 
tunate extras not edited out of 
the film. One shot, which was 
approximately a ten second 
flash on the screen, took over an 
hour and a half to film. As the 
star of the show, Clark 
Brandon, walked into 
Lowry Hall, students 
were directed to go in 
and out at certain times. 
The crew rehearsed it 
several times with var- 
ious light settings and applied make-up to 
the star and the extras. Most every scene 
filmed on campus needed a lot of extras in 
the background: walking to class, leaving 
Lupton Hall, playing frisbee in the acad- 
emic quad, or riding a mo-ped in the 
"thermometer". On the first day of shoot- 
ing, filming took place from two in the afternoon 
until paslreleven in the evening, continued on page 121 




The Chat 

Yamacraw staff 
member Ladonna 
Barros interviews 
the producer of 
Fast Food. 





Kimberly Davis 
Lisa Deason 
Troy DeGroff 



Carolyn Delieto 
Lisanne Depriest 
Samson Desta 



Lisa Dinapoli 
Ursula Dinkins 
David Divita 



119 



Where It's At . . . 


m \, 




■ 


Elizabeth Dressier 

Jennifer Dubose 

Nathaniel Duff 






i 



Brett Duncan 
Fatima Durrani 
Smythe DuVal 



Lisa Eady 

Beth Eckard 

Daniel Eichorst 



Suzianne Ellington 

Annette Ermert 

Kami Everette 




120 



Madness 




Look Natural 

Passerby students pose with the 
stars of the movie during a break. 




Star Struck 

Juniors Amy Baggett 
and Doreen Hart find 
out the real story on 
what it's like to be 
famous from Fast Food 
star Clark Brandon. 



The campus was chosen over Emory, Georjcia 
Tech, and the University of Georjfia. In the movie it 
vi'ill be called Hopkins University, which caused a 
lot more trouble 
than one might 
think at first. 
Every sign in 
front of any 
building that 
would show up 

on the screen had to have "Oglethorpe" covered 
with "Hopkins". Even the sign in front of the Uni- 
versity on Peachtree Road was covered with a red 
cardboard Hopkins sign. A few 
people called the school, wor- 
ried that the name had been 
changed or that another Uni- 
versity had bought the prop- 
erty and moved in — really! 

Fast Food stars Clark 
Brandon who played Jo's boy- 
friend on The Facts of Life, had 
a supporting role in My Tutor, 
and played on a television 
llC^BfiB^- series called Mr. Merlin. Also 
>^ ij i^^ - starring in the film are Jim Var- 

ney, Ernest Goes to Camp, 
Michael J. Pollard, Bonnie and Clyde, Tracey 
Griffith, Melanie Griffith's sister, and Kevin Mc- 
Carthy from Inner Space. 
The story of the film is about a few perpetual col- 
lege students (running on the CD eight year 
plan) who are finally kicked out of college be- 
cause of their crazy antics, they are forced to 
graduate. They open up their own fast food 
chain and steal some kind of secret formula 
that makes people love the taste of their bur- 
gers; therefore becoming very successful. 
Their final antic, operating a casino in the 
basement of their fraternity house, was the 
cause of their demise at school. It was also a 
major day of filming for three Oglethorpians 
— Lisa Frambach, Jay Shirey, and recent 
graduate Johnny 
White. They spent 
hours at the Lake- 
wood Fairgrounds 
serving as college stu- 
dent gamblers during 
the Dean's raid. The 
plot doesn't seem too 
complicated, and the film 
may not be up for many 
critical awards, but to 
many Oglethorpians Fast 
Food will be one of the 
most exciting films to watch throughout the 1989 
film season. 



Continues 



Quiet on the Set! 

The camera crew makes its last 
minute adjustments on the set at 
Faith Hall before shooting a par- 
ticular scene for the fifth time. 
Everything had to be done per- 
fectly, no matter how many 
"takes" it took, in fact, some two 
minute scenes took two hours to 
shoot. 




121 






Where It's At... 



Christine Franklin was a contradiction; her 
friends described her as easy-going yet intense. 
She was easy-going in that she was always avail- 
able to the people she loved. However, Christine 
was intensly driven to succeed. A pre-med 
. , major, Chris was very serious about her school 

Not J USt anOt ler work. Her intensity could be seen in her dedi- 

Sopfiomore 

cation to her academics as well as tennis. 

In her freshman year, she won the singles All- 
Conference which includes tennis teams from all 
over Georgia. This was the first time a woman ten- 
nis player got so far at Oglethorpe. Also, her win 
was unusual in that she was one of the few fresh- 
men to win the All-Conference. Also, Christine had 
just been injured the previous day in a doubles 
match, in which she and her partner were first 
runner up. 

A native of 
Palm Beach, 
Florida, Chris- 
tine chose O.U. 
because of the 
excellent pre- 
med program 
and the intimacy 
of a small cam- 
pus. She was a 
member of the 
International 
Club, Circle K 
and Vista this 
year, but said 
she was even 

more involved last year! To help her get through 
her pre-med major and other activities, 
Christine said she was glad she had her 
friends to "lean on". 





Oglethfjrpe 




Ashley Everhart 
Kerry Evert 
Jean Faasse 



Brad Fairchild 
Jennifer Fairchild 
Mike Fish 



Debbie Fitzgerald 
William Flammer 
Patricia Flanagan 



Lee Ann Fleming 
Tonya Folsom 
Elisabeth Frambach 



123 



Where It's At . . 




Katie Garrigan 

Stacey Gibson 

Wendy Goldberg 



124 



OgletlvrtT>e 





Isabel Gomez 
Elizabeth Gonzales 
Jamie Gramlina 



Charles Gray 
Steven Green 
Randv Greer 



125 



Where It's At . . . 




Merrill Griffis 

Amanda Griffin 

Krissy Grods 



Megan Grogan 
Birthe Grotle 
Jon Gundlach 




126 



Ogleth'jrpe 




Alexandra Hand 
Shane Haney 
Christina Hans 



127 



i« 



Where It's At 




C. Kim Henderson 

Steve Hoard 

Coleen Hodgson 



128 



Og\tth(jrpt 





Dara Holleman 
Leo Hopewell 
Shane Hombuckle 



Tracy Howard 
Tammy Hunsucker 
Daniel Hunt 



129 



Where It's At ^ . 




Julie Hunt 
Robert Irving 
Lissa Jackson 



Joy Jackson 

Lois Jacobs 

Julie Jacques 




130 



Oglethorpe 




Michael Johnson 
Tracey Johnson 
Jackeline Kafati 



131 



Where It's At 




Charles Killam 

Natalie Knowles 

Karen Kopp 



132 



Oglethorpe 





Danielle Krankel 
John Kratt 
Wendy Kurant 



Kimberly Lambert 
Stephanie Land 
Tracy Larson 



133 



Where It's At 





Billy Lee 

Lance Leitzel 

Christophe Lenz 



134 



OgJethorpe 





Jennifer Lewis 
Tomekia Lindley 
Julie Llorente 



Donald Lomhardi 
Claudia Lojjez 
Rob Luxton 



135 



Where It's At 




Nancy Mallis 

Becky Marasia 

Jennifer Marine 



136 



Oglethorpe 





Edward Marks 
Ann Markwalter 
Yuki Matsuda 



Kristi McCowan 
Stephani McCran' 
Joe McCurdv 



137 



Where It's At 





William Meriwether 

Stephanie Merman 

Kinis Meyer 



138 



Oglethfwpe 





Donna Miller 
Byron Millican 
Karen Mitchell 



Sergio Moncada 

Jeannette Montgomery 
Jennifer Montgomery 



139 



Where Ifs At 



^'.'w 




Lance Moonshower 

Candice Moreno 

Zac Moretz 



Beth Morrison 

Angela Moss 

Camila Mrochek 




140 



OgletfKjrpe 





Vince Mull 

Ann Murray 
Kiersten Murray 



Cynthia Nicholson 

Volkmar Nitz 
Cecelia Oflinn 



141 



Where It's At . 




Lori Pacpaco 

Amanda Paetz 

Elizabeth Parks 



142 



Oglethorpe 





Hina Patel 
Shital Patel 
Archella Pavlisko 



Oregon Patterson 
Carol Payne 
Jacki Pearse 



143 



Where It's At . . 





Jon Perry 

Christophe Petty 

Jonathan Peyer 



144 



OglettKjrpe 



'-ifrlV.: 













Greg Pitera 
Margie Plagwitz 
Colleen Plata 



Melissa Podriznik 
Michael Poley 
Frances Pollard 



145 



Where It's At 




Greg Ramsby 

Kevin Rapier 

Kristen Rapps 



146 



Oglethorpe 




'^W» 




Jern' Reed 
Kristin Reeder 
Debra Reimels 



Daniela Reyes 
Gloria Reynolds 
Timothv Richardson 



\ 



147 



Where It's At 




Julian Robichaux 

Christine Rohling 

Michelle Rosen 



148 



OgJethorpe 




Photo Missing 




% / ^ 



\] 




Clint Ross 
Hal Rover 

Soren Rvland 



Ava Salemo 
Amanda Sands 
Levie Satisfield 



149 



Where Ifs At 




Sanjeev Saxena 
Denice Sayers 
John Schaefer 



Eric Schmidtt 

Delores Schweitzer 

Christian Scott 




150 



'■jglethoqx; 





Tina Seaer 
Robb Sellards 
Joseph Shelton 



Hisahiro Shimizu 
Jameson Shirey 
Kerensa Shoemake 



151 



Where It's At 




Debbie Shreve 

Michelle Sidler 

Kimberly Skinner 



Aleah Smith 

Hope Smith 

Marcy Smith 




152 



Oglethorpe 





Wendy Smith 
Rob Smith 
Delana Snyder 



Bryan Sowell 
Valorie Spence 
Geoffrey Spiess 



153 



Where It's At 




Duane Stanford 

Dana Stanley 

Stephanie Stanley 



Matthew Steinmetz 
Bonnie Stevenson 
Jennifer Straeffer 




154 



OgJethorpe 





Mar\' Stuart 
Charles Sutlief 
Stephen Summerow 



Tiffan>- Taft 
Alan Taylor 
Kasva Tavlor 



155 



Where It's At 



/>W" 




Rob Thielemann 

Cheryl Thomas 

Mark Thompson 



Sonja Thomas 

Beth Toole 

Dana Tooley 




156 



O-AtiffXTK 





Heinz Treiber 
Dana Trotsky 
Arthur Tsiropoulos 



Christen Tubesing 
Julie Turner 
Sharon Tyndall 



1^ ^ 
O ( 



Where It's At 




•J»' v«^v■«-»' S*»'.".-7'«*^vti,.i_«.....i-iR-:» — ^'i* ^^JS-._if 



Nessa Vasconez 

Tracy Walden 

Charlton Walker 



Naomi Walker 

Linda Wallace 

Kaoruko Watanabe 




158 



Oglerh'jrpe 





fc^ •■A""vjrt 



Angela Watson 
Howard Wolfson 
Jeanie Waddell 



Allison W'eathington 
Donna Welch 
Ken Weils 



159 



Where It's At 



Nichole Wells 
Siri Werner 
Nancy West 



Rachel Williams 
William Williams 
Tracy Williamson 




Edna Wilson 

Sherry Wilson 

Dan Worley 



> , '-^^^S^ 



A^ \ 




160 



Oglethf^pe 




Craige Wrenn 
Julia Wynn 
Samson Wong 



Jainzhong Wu 
John Wuichet 
Melissa Yahn 



Carlos Yondays 
Lisa Zawacki 



161 



>*-- 



Where It's At... 



Intimate 




Small Schools 



Relations 



Helping Hand 

Dr. Linda Taylor helps sopho- 
more Derek Gilbert after class, to 
decide which story he should use 
in his final Creative Writing port- 
folio. 



"I know it is last minute, 
but could you please look 
over this rough draft for 
me?" 

"Sure, bring it by my of- 




[II II 





fice later today." 

How many times has 
this scene and similar ones 
been heard and said at 
Oglethorpe? This kind of 
situation would rarely 
happen at a larger school 
where each member of the 
student body is known by a 
number, and not by their 
name. 

Due to the fact of the 
small student/faculty 
ratio, students gain the 

In the Dark 

Photograpy instructor Frank 
Hunter and Chris Henderson 
look up in surprise at the sudden 
flash from Yearbook Editor Liz 
Miello's camera, as she tries to 
focus in the dimly lit darkroom. 



advantage of a personal- 
ized relationship with the 
instructor. 

Often, this relationship 
leads to a higher degree of 
motivation and knowledge 
in general, as the students 
will work harder knowing 
there is someone watching 
their progress — a profes- 
sor that cares. The in- 
structors at Oglethorpe 
are usually ready and wil- 
ling to help the students to 
reach their highest poten- 
tial. The professors are 
also able to evaluate tal- 
ents and encourage the 
students, due to the one- 
on-one type atmosphere. 
BE.lm 



^C^ 




Giving Advice 

English Professor Barbara Clark 
helps Senior Ellen Sanders de- 
cide which classes she will select 
for the next semester. Although 
pre-registration week can be very 
hectic for both students and pro- 
fessors, most students found that 
their advisors were able to make 
time for them, and proved to be 
very helpful in selecting classes 
working towards their major. 



Off the Record 

On their way to lunch. Dr. Jeffrey 
Arnett tells Kimberly Davis. Lisa 
Zawacki. Randy Greer and Rob 
Thielman his thoughts on 
something they discussed in his 
Introduction to Psychologj- class 
earlier. This was not an unfamil- 
iar sight in the Academic Quad, 
as most professors took that ex- 
tra step to develop friendly re- 
lationships with each of their 
students. 



163 



Where It's At.. 



lii 



The Study Pit 

Brian Slater and Angle Clem go over then- 
notes in the "Study Pit" (two couches put 
together) — a popular hang-out for all night 
studiers who frequent the 3rd floor lounge. 
But during intense cramming sessions, couch 
cushions provide almost too much comfort to 
resist falling asleep. 



100 Pages To Go 

Senior Heidi Dawson realizes it's going to be a 
longer night than she e.xpected, when study 
partners Thad Hall and Brenda Guthrie de- 
cide to give up on their studies. Study groups 
were as controversial as cramming itself, 
many felt more talking occurred than study- 
ing during these friendly gatherings. 




Doing It 



All Night 



The residents of Traer 322 posted 
an official list of "hates." Number 15 
on this list read, "I hate all-night- 
ers", those infamous early hours 
spent cramming for the "killer" 
exam or writing the "impossible" pa- 
per that were as much a part of col- 
lege life as are the exams or papers 
themselves. 

But why did people choose to 
spend the hours between 1 a.m. and 8 
a.m. studying or writing? "Procrasti- 
nation and' unforseen emergencies 
prevented me from doing my work 
earlier," reasoned Junior English 
major Lisa Chkoreff. 

Sophomore Kym Ford explained 
that the reason she had to end up 
cramming all night was because "my 
professors think their classes are 
the only ones I have homework in." 

Students found in the infamous 
"all-nighter" lounge of 3rd floor 
Traer studied there not to get any 
work done, but more to socialize. "We 
don't get any work done," laughed 
Junior Fran Bennett, "but we sure 



have a lot of fun." 

For whatever reasons, students 
continued pulling "all-nighters" to 
improve grades. But do "all-night- 
ers" really help? Senior Paula Carr 
feels that "you actually do worse on 
an exam after you stay up all night 
because your recall is worse than if 
you had gotten some sleep." Senior 
Richard Wayne disagreed with 
Paula stating that studying all night 
gave him more confidence going into 
his exam. 

Whether or not pulling "all-night- 
ers" were beneficial, students could 
always be found in the early morn- 
ing hours trying their hardest to 
gain those extra pieces of knowl- 
edge. LL.Im 

Getting Comfortable 

Chris Henderson and beau Joe McCurdy 
settle in at a table in the 3rd floor lounge of 
Traer where they will spend the remainder of 
the evening (and early morning) cramming 
for mid-term exams. Men were not allowed in 
the women's dorms past midnight on week 
nights and two a.m. on weekends, but were 
allowed in the lounges to study. 




<" .' r a rn rn i n j/- S <•:-:- i o n -: 




I^ounginj^ Around 

HelpiriK each other prepare for a I'syeholotcy 
test, Debbie FitzKerald, C)ren Blaiock and 
Sonya I>ohan spend the eveninK in the first 
floor lounge. 



165 



Where It's At 



l«l 




166 



Ogtethwpe 



Organizations 




167 



Where It's At 



ALPHA PSI OMEGA 





% 



OMICRON DELTA KAPPA 







168 



<'yT%}in\7ja\rm% 




PHI ALPHA THETA 



PHI ETA SIGMA 



PSI CHI 



169 



Where It's At 






SIGMA TAU DELTA 



i«i 



SIGMA ZETA 



ALPHA PHI OMEGA 



170 




Organization-. 




CIRCLE K 



STORMY PETREL 



THE TOWER 



171 



Where It's At 



YAMACRAW 



iii 




ACCOUNTING CLUB 




172 



^^Ti^aTiiZiitifiris 



ENGLISH CLUB 




CHIAROSCURO 




173 



Where It's At 



FRENCH CLUB 



% 



O.U. PLAYERS 



P.P.L.A. 



174 




<y!w:'7:'.'- 




PUBLIC AFFAIRS FORUM 



THALIAN SOCIETY 



O.U. SINGERS 



175 



Where It's At 



:^'. 



BLACK STUDENT COUNCIL 



4 




A 



COLLEGE DEMOCRATS 




176 



OrzanizaJions 



COLLEGE REPUBLICANS 




GINUS 




177 



Where It's At 



'>'.- 



INTERNATIONAL CLUB 



i« 



CYCLING CLUB 




178 



Organizatirnis 




VISTA 



OGLETHORPE CHRISTIAN 
FELLOWSHIP 



O.S.A. EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 



179 



Where It's At 



CHI OMEGA 



Chi-O Formal 



i 



Twin Chi-O's Fraternize 




Chi-O Fun 



180 



Chi fJrnsgi) 





181 



Where It's At 



TRI 
SIGMA 



Sigma Balloon Ascension 



H 



A Successful Rush 




Sigma Formal 



182 



Tri Sigma 





183 



Where It's At 



DELTA 

SIGMA 

PHI 



I* 




Fun at the Formal 



184 



UtiLTA SIGMA PHI 





185 



Where It's At 



KAPPA 
ALPHA 






:'Ji 






-#f^j.*fXP; 



I 



■i-W' \ij 



^f\«;^« 



.' ■ 



^^ X 



'/"tVi^.. ;^; 



'^ ?--0j^W 







186 



Kapr/S Alpha 




KA Dresses up for Old South 




KA Dates Relax 



187 



Where It's At 



SIGMA 

ALPHA 

EPSILON 





188 



SAE 



^^ 





189 



Where It's At 



CHI 
PHI 





190 



Chi Phi 




^ 




191 



Where It's At 








192 



Men'-, S'Kisit^ 



MEN'S SOCCER 




*s& 




193 



Where It's At 














II 

li 



!■■■ 




^ 7« 8 

i: gji! 








j^ 



194 



Men'v Soccc-r 



MEN'S SOCCER 




"^H 



c^'o^T 



m^ 



imm^.'lfsm 


m; 







195 



Where It's At 




Men'-i SotctT 



MEN'S SOCCER 



School 

University of South 

Wofford 

use — Aiker 

Presbyterian 

Florida Atlantic 

La Grange 

Central Wesleyan 

Savannah College of Art & Design 

Bellhaven 

Milsaps College 

Maryville University 

Berry College 

North Georgia 

Covenant 

Overall 



BOARD . . . 


Score 


3-0 


L 


0-0 


T 


4-5 


W 


3-2 


L 


2-4 


W 


1-3 


W 


0-8 


W 


0-14 


W 


3-2 


L 


3-1 


L 


5-1 


L 


3-1 


L 


0-4 


\\ 


2-4 


L 




6-6-1 




I 



197 



Women's Soccer 



School 

Clemson 

La Grange 

Wesleyan 

Tennessee 

Charleston 

Wesleyan 

Agnes Scott 

Emory 

La Grange 

Georgia State 

Wesleyan 

Georgia State 

Clemson 

Overall 



WOMEN'S SOCCER 



SCOREBOARD 

4-2 
1-5 
1-1 
1-0 
1-3 

0-7 
1-0 



Score 

L 

W 

T 

L 

W 

Canceled 

W 

L 

Forfeit 



1-2 


W 


0-4 


W 


1-2 


W 


3-2 


L 




6-4-1 





198 



Women"', Vx.cer 






t^^jOmf-* 



199 



Basketball 



J.- 









SCOREBOARD . . . 




o.u. 


School 




76 


Warren Wilson 


43 


71 


Monmouth 


75 


91 


Toccoa Falls 


67 


67 


Christopher Newport 


49 


80 


Apprentice 


57 


75 


Berry 


64 


56 


Shorter 


51 


79 


Sewanee 


80 


92 


Warren Wilson 


65 


74 


Maryville 


66 


90 


Trinity 


54 


89 


Webster 


57 


80 


Stillman 


82 


64 


Berry 


67 


95 


Toccoa Falls 


65 


62 


Thomas More 


73 


110 


Warren Wilson 


63 


70 


Emory 


72 


87 


Warren Wilson 


75 


64 


La Grange 


62 


62 


Maryville 


65 


63 


La Grange 


68 


88 


Sewanee 


65 


100 


Emory 


82 


59 


Shorter 


48 


Overall 




17-8 



,-«#'■,*-■->*" """<» 







200 



Biskctball 



J 




1988-1989 VARSITY BASKETBALL TEAM 



201 



Where It's At 



CHEERLEADERS 

This is the first year that the cheerleading 
team has had male cheerleaders. Everybody 
seemed to have a good time with the addition 
of the guys and it enabled the girls to perform 
more stunts since the guys were strong 
enough to support them. Team captain Chris 
Henderson stated that the team was really 
working great together and that they would 
continue to use guys on the team. Many 
students claimed that they went to the games 
to watch the cheerleading stunts now. Work- 
ing in pairs, the team added a lot of spirit to 
the basketball games. 






202 



Ct'x;';rl'ra-4w. 





_^Jy >^ tin 1_ 



'. Lr^r 




203 



Where It's At 



MOVING OUT 

Just when it seems as if you've moved 
everything in, the year is over and it is time to 
move out. Usually, it is with the help of 
family and friends that make the moving pro- 
cess a little easier. One never realizes how 
much accumulates during the year until it is 
time to pack up. "Sorry, mom and dad, forget 
the truck — go get a U-Haul." Everybody 
scrambles for boxes in which to pack. For 
students who live far away they don' t have the 
option to stuff everything in a car but have to 
choose between storage or freight mail. And 
just think — once everything is packed you' 11 
have to unpack it again at home the next day. 





204 



Moving Out 








:JW 





205 



Where It's At 



SAYING GOODBYE 

While everybody breathes a collective sigh of relief that 
studies are over for the year, it is always sad to leave your 
friends. Many students have get-togethers to say goodbye to 
each other. For seniors the parting is more or less permanent and 
it is a sad farewell. One advantage of saying good-bye for the 
summer is that it makes getting back together in the fall all the 
better! 





206 



Saving O'yxlbve 






207 



Dean of Community Life 




4484 Peachtree Road, N.E. 
Atlanta, Georgia 30319 
404-261-1444 



Spring 1990 



To The Subscribers of the 1989 Yamacraw: 



\ 



The 1989 Yamacraw was scheduled to be published last summer and distributed 
to subscribers at the beginning of this past fall semester. Because the 
book was not finished on time and a substantial portion of the materials 
needed to complete it were not available to us until January of 1990, 
the Yamacraw could not be published until now. 



I very much regret the delay in getting last year's yearbook out. The 
absence of any color photography, the limited text, and incomplete coverage 
of some areas were necessary to expedite the process and avoid additional 
expense. It is gratifying, however, that we are now able to publish the 
1989 Yamacraw and capture the record of the significant events of this 
last school year. 

There are three individuals who were instrumental in completing the yearbook 
for publication. Krissy Grods and Jim Marotta, Co-Editors of the 1990 
Yamacraw , devoted their time and talents to that task. Our yearbook 
representative, Mary Kay Kimmitt, provided technical assistance and 
professional advice to facilitate the process. On behalf of the University, 
the 1989 graduating class, and the subscribers of last year's Yamacraw , 
I express our appreciation and commendation for a job well done to Jim, 
Krissy, and Mary Kay. 



cerely , 





*-T--v-4_/<--\ 



Donald R. Moore 

Dean of Community Life 



208 




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