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CATALOGUE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



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OCT 



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AN Institution of the Reformed Church in America, G 

FOUNDED IN 1 86 1 . G 

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HOPE COLLEGE, 

HOLLAND, MICHIE-ilN, 

1888'-89. 



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Incorporated as Hope College, 1866. 



Year book 



Hope College 



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CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



OF 



HOPE COLLEGE 



AT 



HOLLAND, OTTAWA COUNTY, 
1881-82. 



Of the Reformed Church in America, founded in 1851, and 

Incorporated as Hope College, under the 

Laws of Michigan, in 1866. 



HOLLAND, MICHIGAN: 

PBINTSD AT THB " HOLLAKD CITY KBWB " BOOK AHD JOB OFFIOB. 

1882. 

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NOTE. 

Three years have passed since the last Catalogue was issued. The 
one now published will fill up the interval, and also connect, in the list 
of Alumni, with the full Catalogue of 1876. We wish t)iis to be a circu- 
lar of ^infomi&tion to sister institutions of learning, and to sueh as are 
inquiring for a suitable place of education. One special object is to have 
it distinctly understood what the course of instruction is at Hope 
College, and what te^books are required. We can commend the 
School to favorable notice, and trust it may thus be the means of fitting 
many imto a life of useful work for God and man. 

During the past year, the buidens(»ne debt of |25,000 has been re- 
moved, and over $12,000 have been added to the Endowment funds. 
With increasing means and facilities, the future of the Institution be- 
comes brighter and more promising. May the generous support of the 
public cause these hopes to be more than fulfilled. 



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REMARKS. 



Hope College ia situated in the city of Holland, on the 
Chicago and West Michigan Railway, ninety miles north of 
New Buffalo, twenty-five miles southwest of Grand Rapids, 
and midway between Grand Haven and Allegan. It is the 
only institution of the kind in Western Michigan, north of 
Kalamazoo, and being central to a population of over 300,000, 
with close and rapid communications by land and water, it 
offers educational facilities of a high order. The school is 
resorted to by students from Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa and 
New Tork, as well as from Michigan. 

Holland itself is a quiet, orderly and moral city. Its six 
churches are well attended and well supported. Many of the 
usual temptations of college towns are in a great degree 
absent. The health of the place is good, and the surround- 
ings of lake, and farm, and orchard, and village, have con- 
stantly growing attractions. 

Ab will be seen in our Catalogue, the Departments of In- 
stnietion are for the present two: 

I. The Academic. (College proper.) 
II. The Pbepaeatobt. (Grammar School.) 

Until 1877, a Theological Department was carried on, but 
in. that year it was temporarily suspended by the General 
Synod. 

It will also be seen that the eourse of instruction is as full 
and complete as can be obtained in most of the colleges of 
the West, fitting the student for the learned professions, for 
teaching, or for the business occupations of life. It is not 
claimed that all the appliances of older or better endowed 
schools can be furnished, but the teachers have experience, 
and skill, and devotion to their work; and the classes have 
ever shown a corresponding spirit of fidelity to their duties, 
and to the honor of the Institution. 

&^ 



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^ 4 CATALOGUE OF J|> 



Most of the students seek what is called 
classical education," but a " paitial " or " elective " course is 
offered to all who so desire, and.facilitiefi furnished through 
the regular instructors. German and French can be studied 
at any time, as also the branches generally called ^^scientific." 

In 1878, the Institution was opened to women, and at once 
9everal young ladies availed themselves of the privilege. 
The number has been increased from year to year. They 
enter the regular classes, and attend the same lectures and 
recitations as the young men. Their home will be with ap- 
proved families in the city. 

Although Hope College is denominational^ and is under 
the patronage and support of the Reformed Church in 
America, yet, by the law of its incorporation, it can have no 
'* religious test." The doors are open, and welcome is given 
to all who submit to its scholastic regulations. As a Christian 
school, however, it inculcates gospel truths, and demands a 
consistent moral character and deportment. 

In connection with the above may be made a statement of 

EXPENSES. 

Holland is surrounded by a rich agricultural region, and 
thle bost of living<is comparatively cheap. Good board may 
be had in families of the city, for from two dollar^ to three 
dollars per week; and withcnU furnished rooms at correspond- 
ing rates. . 

Theie are some rooms in the College building; in the selec- 
tion of which students fot the ministry have the preference. 
These are are furnished in part, and bear a charge of five 
dollars a year. 

Toung ladiee board and room in private families. 

As yet, no Tuition fees have been charged, but every 
student must pay to the Treasurer, in advance, an Incidental 
fee of five dollars per terfn. 

The Graduation fee is five dollars, and the cost of the 
diploma.. No other charges are made. 

For books, clothing, washing, fuel, light, travel, etc., those 
interested can best make the estimates. The 6n^t>« expenses 
need not exceed $200 per annum. ^ 

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BOPS COLLSeB. 



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THE COUNCIL. 



EX-OFFICIO. 

Rkv. Chables Scott, D. D., . President of the Collega 

ELlfiCTED MEMBERS. 



Hon. HonATio P. Allen, New York City, General Synod, 
RbV. E. p. Livingston, D. D. Pekin, HI. " '* 

Ret. Nicholas M. Steffens, Zeeland, Mich., " " 

James C. Knight, Esq.,* Farmer Village, N. Y," •' 

J. C. Benham. M D., Hudson, N. Y., 



1883. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1888. 



Rev. Johh W . ^eardslsb, Constantine, Mioh. , ClaBsis of Michigan. 1883. 

Rev. N. Dubois Williamson, South Bend,Ind. ** •• 1883. 

Rev. Jacob Van Der Meulen, Muskegon, Mich. *• Gd. River. 1883. 

Rev. Nicholas H. Dosker, Grand Rapids, '» ** 1883. 

Rev. Peter Lepeltak, Overisel, Mich., *' Holland. 1884* 

Rev. Dirk Broek, Holland, Mich., '* '* 1884. 

Rev. John H. Joralmon, Fairview, HI.. " Illinois. 1885. 

Rev. Egbert Winter, Pell a, Iowa. '* ** 1885. 

Rev. John H. Karsten, Waupun, Wis. ** Wisconsin. 1886. 

Rev. William Moerdijk, Milwaukee, Wis. *' " 1886. 
* Deceased within the year. 



OFFICERS OF THE COUNCIL. 



Rev. John H. Karsten, 
Rev. N. Du Bois Williamson, 
Rev. Peter Lepeltak, 
Prof. Cornelis Doesburg, 



President, 

Adsessor, 

Secretary, 

Treasurer, 



. Rev. G. H. Mandeville, D. D., New York, Mnancial Agent, 

iso — '■ e^ 



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6 CATALOGUE OF % 



TCin8 (mTiVK COMMITTEB. 
Bbv. Chablbs Scott, Chairman, 
Rey. Dibk Bbobk, Secretary^ 
Rey. Peteb LbpbltaK) 
Rby. Nicholas M. Steffbns, 
Rby. Jacob Van Dbb Mbulbn. 

INVESTMENT COMMITTEE. 

Isaac Mabsiljb, Esq., 
Isaac Cappon, Esq., 
Rev. J. W. Bbabdslbe, 

In charge of the loaning of the funds of the Council. 

HOPE FARM COMMITTEK 

Pl-est. Chablbs Scott, 
Abbnd Yisscheb, Esq., 
Tbunis Keppbl, Elsq., 

In charge of a tract of land, at Point Superior, on Black 
Lake, containing 837 acres. 

Pbop. Gbbbit J. KoLL3ffiN, . Manager of " De Hope.^ 

Pbop. Cobnblis Doesbubg, 1 

Rev. Nicholas M. Steppens, I EdUor% of " Be Hope.^^ 

Rev. Dibk Bboek. 



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\ ) JffOPB COLLBQB. *J \ ) 



CORPS O F INSTR UCTION, 

I. 

A GADEMIC FACULTY. 
Rev. Chables Scott, D. D., President^ ex-officio. 

Profeetor in Chemistry and N«titT»l Hiatory. In charge of Mental and Moral 
Phlloeophy, Hlitory, Conatltntional Law and BTidenceB of Christlanltj. 

Rev. T. Rombtn Beck, D. D., SeoreUiry. 

Professor of Q;-eek and l4Stin Languages and Literature. In chaige of 
Logic and Sacred Literature. , 

COBNELIS DOESBUBa, A. M., 

Professor of Modem Languages and Literatnre. 

William A. Shields, A. M., 

' Professor of Enffllsh Lansua^ and Literature, and Bhetorlc. In charge of 
Latin with the Freshman Glass. 

Gebsit J. EoiXBur, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics, Katural Philosophy and Astronomy. In charge of 
Oidactles, Potttkal Bconomy, and Onil Goremment, 

n. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL FACULTY. 

Prof. Chakles Scott, Presidenty ex-officio. 
Prof. T. RoMETN Beck, 

Prof. COBNELIS DOESBUBG, 

Prof. William A. Shields, Secretary, 

Prof. GeBEIT J. EOLLEN. 

(The Academic Professors all assist in giving instruction 
in the Preparatory Department. Thus the classes, from the 
lowest, are under the care of experienced teachers.) 
Henbt Bobbs, a. M., 

Teacher of Latin, Arithmetic, Hlstor;^, etc 

John ft. Eleinheksel, Jr., A M., 

. Teaoher of Qteek, English Grammar, Algebra, etc. 

■ (Rev. Daniel Van Pelt, 1879-81.) 

In charge of Beligions Instmcdon. 

-t 



In chaige of Vocal Music ' 

f Temporarily filled by T. John Kommers, A. B., J. 
George Van Hees, Jr., A. B. and John H. Kleinheksel, Jr. A. M. 



Prof. Q'eebit J. KoLLEN, Librarian. 

Albebt Oltmans, Assistant Librarian. 

PiETEB Ihbmak, Chorister. 

Saeah G. Alcott, Organist. .1 

LOUTS DE WIT, JcmUor. m 
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CAl^AhOQVB OF 



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THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



In 1866, the Gteneral Synod anthorized the introduction of 
Theologioal Instruction at Hope College. TheSynod of 1867 
elected Rev. Cornelius E. Crispell, D. D. Professor of 
Didactic and Polemic Theology, and appointed Profs. Phelps, 
Oggel, Beck, and Scott, as Theological Lectors. In 1869, the 
Theological Department was constitutionally or^nized by 
the Synod, as the Western Seminary of the Reformed Church, 
for the training of her ministry. In 1875, Prof. Beck and 
Scott received more formal appointments, and the payment of 
the salaries of the theologici^l teachers waa assumed by the 
General Synod. Sufficient means, however, were not fur- 
nished, and in 1877, because of finanoial difficulties, the 
School was suspended, to await a mqre liberal and secure en- 
dowment. The list of Theological Graduates has beeo givem 
up to 1875. 

Frederic Bakker, Pastor, Rural, Wis. 

Josias Meulendyk, Pastor, Datiforth^ 111. 

Helenus Elizaus Nies, Pastor, Patterson, N. J. 

Barend Weenink,<Bi0eUTe ooan9)Farmer, Kalamazoo. 

ISTT. 

Harm Van der Ploeg, Pastor, .Greenleaf ton,. Minn. 

Coraelis Wabeke/ Deceased. 

' Graduates (H569-77,) 30. ' ' 

Besides the above graduates, the followii^g were in tl^s 
Department during a part of the course: i 



* Key. Mr. Wabeke, was pastor at Marlon, K. Y. Hie health faf)ing', he resigned 
*' his charge, and died at his home, New Holland, Mleb., F^bntairy SB, 1880. 



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HOPS OOLLBQE. 



NAXK. OOOUPATIOir. BBSIDKNCS* 

Arend Visscher, 1872-73, Lawyer, Holland City. 

Howard H. Van Vranken,l872-74Pa8tor, Irving Park, III. 

Lawrence Dykstra, 1876-77, Pastor, Cleveland, Ohio. 
John Hoekje, 1875-77, Pastor, Gawker City, Kan.^ 

Henry E. Dosker, 1876-77, Pastor, Grand Haven* 

Albert A. Pfanstiehl, 1876-77, Pastor, Raritan, Ilf. 

Cornelius Van Oostenbrugge, " Pastor, Stevens Point, Wis. 
John Visscher, 1876-77, Pastor, . Sioux Falls, Da. 

Hence the total number who have studied Theology att 
Hope College is 38, of whom 31 are now in the active service 
of the Master a« pastors of churches. Rev Enne J. Heeren, 
of the class of 1870, (a returned missionary from India,) died, 
at Puablo, Colorado, on the 16th of October, 1879. 

The following is the latest deliverance of General Synod 
upon the subject of the revival of the Theological Depart- 
ment: — See Minutes of General Synod, 1879, pages 363-4, 
Resolutions 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Resolved^ That General Synod desires to express its 
grateful and hearty recognition and appreciation of the efforts 
of the Western Brethren, from the first day until now, to 
secure sound Theological instruction among them. 

Resolvedy That the General Synod desires to reiterate 
that Hope College was established, and exists, for the purpose 
of providing a course of Collegiate study, " in connection 
with sound evangelical religious instruction; " that to the suc- 
cess of such an institution sound Theological teaching is in- 
dispensable; and that the Synod heartily prays for the com- 
ing of the time, when it will be possible to have there a fully 
equipped Theological School. 

Resolvedy That General Synod exceedingly regrets that, 
for financial reasons, it seems impracticable to institute such 
a Theological department at present; but most earnestly 
desires to do this at the earliest practicable moment, believing 
that the true interests of our Reformed Church imperatively 
require an educational centre at the West, and that the same 
is essential to the growth of our Church as a whole, and to 
its very life in the West. 



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I i 10 OATALeBUB OF ( \ 



M^ohf^^ That the Synod repeats the expresdon of its 
opinion, in the terms nse^ a year ago, that ^*if the Western 
Chnrches and Classes should at any time come to Synod with 
the announcement that they have taised a fund to endow a 
Professorship of Theology, to be coupled with the name of 
Albertus C. Van Raalte, it would go far to remove the present 
obstacles to the restoration of Theological instruction in the 
West;" and that all funds and securities received for this 
purpose should be ^^put into the hands of the Board of Direc- 
tion." 



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BOPS OOLLMBS. 



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STUDENTS. 



After each class is apppended a list of such as have been 
connected with it since the last Catalogue was printed. 

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT. 

8BNIOR CLAB8. 



BOOM. 

At home. 

No. 20. 

No. £0. 
NAbeUnk. 
At Home. 
Nibbelink. 
At Home. 
At Home. 
At tiome. 



JoHK William Bosmait, Holland, Cityy 
OsEBHARD De Jonok» Zealand, 

PiBTBB Ihrmak, Kalamazoo. 

JoHAiTN^is Ebnkst Matzkb, Silver Creek, HI., Mrs. 
Philip Phelps, Jr., Holland City, 

Jacob Poppen, Drenthe, 

Chas. Thsodobe SxEFFKKSjZeeland, 
Sabab Gbbtbude Alcott, Holland City, 
Fbakces F. C. Phelps, Holland City, 



Mrs. 



Tennis Boot, Holland City, 

Johannis H. Brockmeier, Bailey ville, 111., 
Henry McDonald Joralm6n, Fairview, III, 



John Kuiper (partial,) 
Benjamin Pyl, 
Francis Rykenboer, 
Gerrit Wikkerink, 



Graafschaap, 
Kalamazoo, 
Rochester, N. Y<, 
.Cherry Grove, Minn., 

JUNIOR CLASS. 



18V8-S0. 



1879-80. 



11378-80, 

1878-81. 



EvEBT John Blbkkink, Oostburg, Wis. No. 7. 

Jacob Dyk, Grandville, J. Van den Berge, Sf. 

Henby Hulst, iGrrand Rapids, Mrs. Nibbelink. 

Tametsne Matsda, Kagoschimaken, Japan, Mrs. Van Olinda. 
Albebt 0LTMAN8. Grand Rapids, No. 2. 

JoH JT Abbaham Otte, " J. Van Den Befge, Sr. 



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CATALOGUE OF 



HKSIDBMOI. 



DiBK ScHOLTEN, Orange City, la. H. Toren. 

E. William Stapelkamp, Greenleafton, Minn., No. 3. 

Sybrant Wesselius, Graod Rapids, Dr. Annis. 



1879-80. 



Gerrit John Koning, Overisel, 

William Henry Rawerdink, Rochester, N. Y., 

Otto Stuit, Fulton, IlL,. " 

Nicholas Van den Belt, Holland, ^' 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Gerrit Henry Hospebs, Orange City, la. A. Vennema. 

John Bernard Nykbrk, Overisel, Mrs. Nibbelink. 

Anna H. Becker, (partial) Holland City, At Home. 



1880-81. 



Mary Eliza Alcott, (partial) Holland City, 
GreorglB Heneveld; Graafschap, 

JEliza Phelps, Holland City, 

Klaas Poppen, Drentbe, 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 
Ralph Bloemendaal Cedar Grove, Wis., 

John H. Doesburg,* 
Gerrit John Hekhuis, 
Albert Van Den Bero, 
Peter Wayenberg, 

* Scientiflc. 

UNCLASSIFIED. 
Simon Hogenboom, (partial) Clymer,N. Y., J.VauDeaBerge. 

1879-81. 



Holland City, 

Holland, 

South Holland, III, 

Orange City, la.. 



No. 16. 
At Home. 
At Homa 

No. 16. 
Mrs. Bolhuis. 



Henry W. Cross, (partial) Grand Haven, 
John R. Strabbing, (partial) Graafschap, 

SUMMARY. 

Seniors, .... 

Juniors, ...... 

Sophomores, . 

Freshmen, .... 

Unclassified, 

Previously connected with these Classes, 
Total, .... 



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1879-80. 



9 
6 
3 
5 
1 



27 
17 

44 



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MOPE COLLEGE. 



•OC72 



13 



GRADUATES SINCE 1875. 



Note.— The Catalogue of 1876 gave a list of the Ahmm up to and 
including 1875 ; a total of 08. The list is continued. 



haxb. 
Henry Elias Dosker, 
Frank Alanson Force, 
Albert A. Pfanstiehl, 



1876. 

PBXtBHT BStlDSNCX. 

Grand Haven, 
Woodstock, N. Y., 
Raritan, HI., 



OOOUPATIOM. 

C'lergyman. 

u 



Cornells Van Oostenbrugge, Stevens Point, Wis,, 



Douwe Yntema, 

John Cornells Groeneveld, 
Lambertus Hekhuis, 
Matthew Koleyn, 
Johannls Vlsscher, 



Teacher. 



St. Johns, 
1811. 

East Saugatuck, Clergyman. 
Madanapelly, India, Missionary. 



Henry Boers, 
John Gabriel G^bhard, 
Stephen John Harmeling, 
John Henry Kleinheksel, Jr. Holland, City, 

1819. 



Marlon, N. Y., 
Holland, 
1818. 

Holland City, 
Hudson, N. Y., 
Spotswood, N. J., 



Clergyman. 
Teacher. 

Teacheir. 

Jilcentiate. 

Clergyman. 

Teacher. 



Dirk John De Bey, 
Elias De Spelder, 
Knmaje Kimura, 
George Nlemeyer, 
Motoltero Ohglmi, 
Ame Yennema, 

William G. Baas, 
Jacob Peter De Jong, 
Bernard John De Vrles, 
Peter Mannas Elsenins.* 
Abel Henry Huizinga, 
Abraham Stegeman, 
Albert H. Strabbing, 
Jacob John Van Zanten, 



Chicago, 111., Licentiate. 

Holland City, M. D.,(I7. of Mich.) 
N. Brunswick, N. J., Licentiate. 
Grand Haven, " 

K Brunswick, N. J., " 

Holland, City, « 

1880. 

Holland, Theological Student. 
Boseland, 111., « 

Holland City, Dentist. 

Zeeland, Theological Student. 
New Groningen, " 

Jamestown, Teacher. 

Orange City, la., * 



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CATALOaUS OF 



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HAMB. PBBsmr BniDncs. ooodpatiov. 

Frederic James Zwemar, RoseUnd, lU.^ Teacher. 

Ebemezer Van den iBerge,f Holland City, " 

* Peceased, at Patterson, 19. J., June 90, 18B1. 

IMl. 

Gerrit John Diekema, Holland City, Law Student. 

Charles Selwjm Dutton, ** Theological Student. 

John Gerardus Fagg, Madison, Wis., Teacher. 

Reuse Hendrik Joldersmai Chicago, HI., Theolegieal Student 
Tinis John Kommers, N. Brunswick, N. J., " 

John Riemersma» New Groningen, " 

Bastian Smits, Holland City, ^ 

John George Van Hees,Jr., St. Joseph, Telegrapher. 

John W. Cross,* Grand Haven. 

* R«eciTingaF»»tbaCiMir$6 0irtUtaiiv 

Total Alumni (1866-1861.) 01. 



The following have been connected with the Academic 
Department, in the above Classes, but did not graduate: 

Close of 1876. ' 
Frederic Bakker, Holland City, 

Albeit Broek,* Holland, 

John Kerkhoff, Holland City, 

Herman Kicholas Dosker, Graiid Rapids^ 

Class of 1878. 
Albert Van Zoeren, Vriesland, 

Class of 1880. 
Charles Buchanan Scott^ Holland City, 
James Arie Van de Luister, Chicago, 111., 

Class of 1881. 
Cornells Lepeltak, Holland City, 

Witlism John Lucasse, Kalamazoo, 
Benjamin Pyl, " 

John Van der Laan, Muskegon, 

• Deceased at Holland. Janviry, idTT. 



1872-.78. 



18^8-76. 



1874-75. 



1876-78. 



1^77-7&. 
1877-79. 
1877-78. 



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B9Pm GOLiaSBE, 



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PREPARATOR T DEPARTMM2fI\ 



Hbnbixtta Boonb, 
Anna Bbbyman, 
Ida Ellen, 

SmCA EOLLEN, 

Dbna Van Dbn Bbbg, 
Anna H. Van RAALt% 
Sbnib V188CHBB, 
Anna J. Wibbsbma, 
Hbnbibtta Zwembb, 
WiLLiAiff John DumsB, 
William Foetuin, 
Henet Hbnetbld, 
Pbtbb Holleman, 
Jbbbmias Ebuidbnibb, 
William Lammbbs, 

JOH^r ROZEMA, 

Ralph Bchepbes, 

John William Visschbb. 

Wietge Foppe Douma, 
John Den Herder, 
Lawrenoe Hof ma, 
Hovert Hoogenstein, 
Albert Berend Kleis, 
Henry Konig8ber>^e, 
Jacob Nauta, 
Theodore Seth Phelps, 
Leonard Reuse, 
Alexander Wier Scott, 
Dirk John Te Roller, 
Hermati Augustus Toren, 
William Vaarwerk, 
Nicholas Vyn, 
Berend B. Werkman, 
Linus John Wolters, 



•A" CLASS. 




New Groningen, 


6. J. Haverkate. 


Holland City, 


At Home. 


Holland, 


a 


Orerisel, 


Prof. KoUen. 


Holland City, 


At Home. 


Holland, 


a 


Holland, 


XI 


Holland City, 


« 


GVaafschap, 


Mrs. Le Fbbbb. 


Grand Haven^ 


H. Toren. 


Vriesland, 


No. 18. 


Graafscbap, 


At Home. 


Drenthe, 


No. 19. 


Holland City, 


At Home. 


Cedar Grove, Wis., No. 14. 


Drenthe, 


No. 16. 


Holland, 


At Home. 


B. Holland, 


At Home. 


New Holland, 


1878-81. 


Vriesland, 


1878-80. 


Drenthe, 


1878-81. 


Holland, 


1878-79. 


Nunica, 


1878-80. 


Holland City, 


1878-79. 


Holland, 


u 


Holland City, 


1878-80. 


New Holland, 


1878-80. 


Holland City, 


1878-79. 


(( 


1878-80. 


[I, Grand Rapids, 


1878-70. 


Holland City, 


(( 


Zeeland, 


1870-81. 


Danforth, 111., 


187»-SO. 


Franklin, Wis. 


1870-81. 



e^ 



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18 



CATALOGUE OF 



! 



Urana Harrington, 
Jennie H. Pfanstiehl, 
Lilian J. Rose, 



Holland, 
Holland aty, 



'B" CLASS. 



1878-SO. 
1879- . 
1879-81. 



KAMB. 


BaVDXlfCB. 


BOOJf. 


M^T E. Ankis, 


HoJland City, 


• At Home. 


COBNBXIA CaPPON, 


iC 


cc 


Della Duiker, 


Grand Haven» 


fl. Toren* 


jEimiB Kanters, 


Holland City, 


At HoQie. 


Henrietta Te Roller, 


(( 


a 


Katie yAUPRi^L, 


. « 


iC 


Henrt John Cook, 


Ea«tmanville, 


B. Kruidenier. 


Paul Raphael Coster, 


Holland, 


At Home. 


AXf^UWW PlETERS, 


Holland City, 


(( 


ADRii;N John Pieters, 


u 


« 


William /Reepman, 


Overisel, 


. No. 12. 


Theodore M. Sntder, 


Hamilton, 


Mrs, Davis. 


John Peter Ten Haap, 


FUlmore, 


At Home. 


JoHN: Trompen, 


Vriesland, 


B. Kuidenier. 


A. Van ^waluwenburg, 


Drenthe, 


Dr. Kremers. 


Samuel M. Zwemer, 
Martha Diekema, 


Graafschap, 


B. Kruidenier. 

1880-81J 


Holland, 


Jennie Eastman, 


Robinson, 


187-9-80. 


Christina Herold, 


Holland City, 


1880-81. 


Saddle Howard, 


Holland, 


1879-81. 


Laura Meengs, 


Holland City. 


1879-80. 


Etnma Milliraan, 


u 


u 


Ella Nash, 


/ u 


1 880-8 li 


Christina Oggel, ' ' ' 


' ' (( 


1879-81. 


Dana Davis Dutton, 


Holland, 


" . • : 


Jacob Lbkker, ' • • ' 


Graafschap, 


1879- . 


Daniel Matzke, 


Silver Creek, III. 


, 1879-80. 


Herman Scholten, 


Ov'erisel, 


' l880-8r 


PaufTanis, 


i>renthe, 


1870-81'! 


l!(^ert Li Visser, '' ■•• 


rtbllaiid City, 


1879-801 . 


Le 




^&^ 



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^! 



HOPS 


COLLEGE. 


17 ^ 


"C 


" CLASa 




XAIIB. 


BBSIDBNOB. 


BOOM. 


Elsie Davis, 


Holland City, 


At Home. 


Anote Dokteb, 


Holland, 


(( 


Oebabd Bbandt, 


Forest Grove, 


Mrs. Bolbuis. 


Hebmaitus C. Brobk, 


Holland Gty, 


At Home. 


HSNBT ROBEBT DoESBUBO, 


a 


it 


Dana Davis Dutton, 


Holland, ' 


u 


Heitby R. Geeblings, 


Holland City, 


u 


Gbbbit Henevbld, 


Graafscbap, 


« 


Adbian C. Eabstbn, 


Waupun, Wis., 


B. Kruidenier. 


FoppE Kloostbb, . 


Jamestown, 


Mrs. Bolbuis. 


Meikardus 6. Mantingh, 


Graafscbap, 


At Home. 


Walteb Ten Haaf, 


Fillmore, 


u 


Abie Van Woebkom, 


Grand Haven, 


H. Toren. 


Peteb John Zwemeb, 


Graafsobap, 


B. Kruidenier. 
1880-81. 


George Almond, 


Allegan, 


Pieter Braam, 


Holland City, 


it 


Maggie Meidema, 


Holland, 


1880- . 


Luke Nyssen, 


Grand Haven, 


1880-81. 


B. Van den Boomgaard, 


it 


u 


"D 


" CLASS. 




OscAB Baebt, 


Zeeland, 


At Home. 


Henby E. Giebink, 


Waupun, Wis,, 


A. Vennema. 


Henby Habbington, 


Holland, 


At Home. 


Hebbebt G. Keppel, 


Zeeland, 


ti 


Josephine J. Kiekintveldt, Holland City, 


it 


Stephen Lukas, 


Graafscbap, 


it 


Ettie Plummeb, 


Peotone, 111., 


Mrs. Nieuwbolt. 


CoBNELius M. Steepens, 


Zeeland, 


At Home. 


William Stegeman, 


NewGroningen, Mrs. Nibbelink. 


Benjamin Stegink, 


Graafsobap, 


a 


Abbaham Isbael Thompson 


r, Holland City, 


At Home. 


Johanna Tien, 


Graafscbap, 


Mrs. Nieuwbolt. 


Anthony M. Van Duine, 


Zeeland, 


Mrs. Bolbuis. 


Ellenus H. Van Eye, 


New Groninget 


1, At Home. 


DiBE. John Webkman, 


Patter8onville,Ia. R. Werkman. a 


5^. 




o^ 



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ip 

18 


CATALOGUE OF 


^ 




UNCLASSIFIED 




Gerardus Kanteks, 


Holland City, 


At Home. 


SUMMARY. 


f' A "Class 


• • • • 


18 


"B** Class 


• ■ • 


16 


"C" Class . • 


.... 


14 


"D" Class . 


• . • 


15 


Unclassified, 


. 


1 
64 


Have been connected wUh tbe* above classes: 




"A" Class 


• • • . 


. 20 


"B" Class . 


- . . 


14 


"C" Class 


. 


4 






38 


Total, 

In the Academic Depa 
in the Preparatory De 


• . • 


102 
27 


rtment, 


partment, 


64 


Total, . 


. 


91 


Previously connected, 




55 
146 



C*0. 






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r 



HOPE COLLEGE. 



ALUMNI SINCE 1875. 



MAMB. rBBBVUT BBHDIHOB. OCOUPATIOH. 

William G. Baas, A. B. Holland, Theological Student. 
Jacob Peter De Jong, A. B. Roseland, HI., *' 

Bernard J* De Vries, A. B. Holland City, Dentist. 

Jacob M. Doesbnrg, " Engineer. 

Charles S. Dutton, A. B. Holland, Theological Student. 
Peter Marinus Elsenius, deceased, June 20, 1880. 



Abel Hildebrand Klooster, Chicago, 
Albert J. Kroes, MilWaukee, 

Albert Lahuis, 
William John Lucasse, 
Jacob Poppen, A. B. 
John Riemersma, A. B. 



Medic. Student. 
Merchant Clerk. 
Teacher. 
Mechanic. 
Bade. Student. 



Zeeland, 

Kalamazoo, 

Drenthe, 

New Groningen, Theol. Student. 
Charles Buchanan Scott, A.B.Philadelphia, Pa., Geol. Survey. 
Abraham Stegeman, A. B. New Groningen, Theol. Student. 
Albert Strabbing, A. B. Jamestown, Teacher. 

James Arie Van de Lulster, Vriesland, Farmer. 

Jacob Van Zanten, Jr., A. B. Orange City, la., Teacher. 

John Vinkemulder, Jr., New Holland, — '• 

Frederic James Zwemer,A.B.Roseland, HI., Teacher. 

1811. 
Gerrit John Diekema, A. B. Holland, Law Student. 

John Gerardus Fagg, A. B. Madison, Wis., Teacher. 

Rense H. Joldersma, A. B. Chicago, 111., Theol. Student. 
Tinis John Kommers, A. B. Holland City, " 

Cornelis Lepeltak, Overisel, 

Benjamin Pyl, Kalamazoo, 

Bastian Smits, A. B. 

Marinus Van Doom, Clymer, N. Y., 

John Van der Laan, Muskegon, 

John G. Van Hees, Jr., A. B. St. Joseph, 

1878. 
Sarah Gertrude Alcott, 
Frances F. C. Phelps, 
John William Bosman, 
;^e— 



Teacher. 
Medic. Student. 
N;Brun8wick,N.J.,Theol.Student. 
Clergyman. 
Physician, 
Telegrapher. 



Holland City, ' Bacc. Student. 



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20 



CATALOaUE OF 



•^1 



HAMX. 

John Henry Brockmeier, 
Cornelias Damstra, 
Geerhard De Jonge, 
Pieter Ihrman, 
Anthony Pauels, 
Philip Phelps, Jr., 
Frank Rykenboer, 
Charles T. Steffens, 
Gerrit Wikkerink, 
Adrian Peter Zwemer, 
Tennis Boot, 

Evert John Blekkink, 
Jacob Dyk, 
Greorge Heneveld, 
Henry John Heusinkveld^ 
Henry Hulst, 
Lambertus Kolvoord, 
Gerrit John Koning, 
Tametsne Matsda, 
Albert Oltmans, 
John Abraham Otte, 
William H. Rauwerdink, 
Evert William Stapelkanip, 
Otto Stuit, 
Albert Tillema, 
John Van Dellen, 
Nicholas Van den Beldt, 
Peter Venhuizen, 
Sy brant Wesselius, 

Mary Eliza Alcott, 
Anna Helena Becker, 
Christina Pfanstiehl, 
Eliza Phelps, 
Peter H. Benjaminse, 
John Bernard Nykerk, 
. Klaas Poppen, 



OOOUFATIOV. 

Siver Creek, 111., Medic. Student. 
Drenthe, Parmer. 

Zeeland, Baco. Student. 

Kalamazoo, *' 

Grand Rapids, Merchant Clerk. 
Holland City, Bacc. Student. 

Rochester, N.Y.^Merchant Clerk. 
Zeeland, Bacc. Student. 

Greenleafton, Minn., Teacher. 
New Holland, Merchant. 

Grand Haven, Co. Reg. Office. 
1819. 

Oostburg, Wis., Bacc. Student. 
Grandville, " 

Graafschap, Farmer. 

Cherry Grove,Miiin.Med.Student. 
Grand Rapids, Bacc. Student. 
Overisel, Teacher. 

" Farmer. 

Satsma, Japan, Bacc. Student. 
Grand Rapids, ^^ 

Rochester, N. Y., Farmer. 

GreenIpafton,Minn.Bacc.Student. 

Fulton, III., Teacher, 

" Farmer, 



Holland, 


Pharmacist. 


u 


Manufacturer. 


Grand Rapids, 


Bacc. Student. 


1880. 




Holland City, 




Student. 


u 


Teacher. 


4( 




TlAuUn/l 





Overisel, 
Drenthe, 



Student. 
Teacher. 

o^ 



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BOPB COLLBQB. 



21 



OOOUPATIOH. 



John L. Rademaker, Milwaukee, Wis., 

Jacob G. Van Zoeren, Vriesland, 

ComeliusVanZwalQwenberg, Drenthe, 

1881. 



Bookkeeper. 



Teacher. 



Frances M. Westveer, 


Holland City, 


Teacher 


Annie Winter, 


u 


ii 


Nellie Zwemer, 


Graafschap, 


it 


Ralph Bloemendaal, 


Cedar Grove, Wis., 


Student. 


John De Bruin 


Rochester, N. Y., 


Teacher. 


John Henry Doesburg, 


Holland City, 


Student. 


Austin Harrington, 


Fillmore, 


Farmer. 


Gerrit John Hekhuis, 


Holland, 


Student. 


Edward Hofma, 


Vriesland, Medic 


. Student. 


Simon Hogenboom, 


Clymer, N. T., 


Student. 


John Lamer, 


Jenisonville, 


Teacher. 


Albert Van den Berg, 


South Holland, 111., 


Student. 


Henry Vennema, 


Holland City, Merchant Clerk, 


Peter Wayenberg, 


Orange City, Iowa, 


Student. 


ADMISSION. 





For admission into the ''D'^ Class, a common school 
education is required, up to the branches pursued in that year. 
The better their previous training, the more easily and profit- 
ably can pupils enter upon the Grammar School Course. 

For admission into the Freshman Class, a full certificate 
of graduation from the Preparatory Department is required; 
or an examination in the studies pursued in that Department, 
or in what the Faculty shall deem an equivalent. 

For admission into any advanced class of the Institution, 
it will be necessary for the applicant to pass an examination 
in the studies previously pursued by that class. If received 
OD conditions, the conditions must be fulfilled before 

matriculation. 

PROBATION. 
New students, in either Department, remain on probation 
for one term, at the expiration of which, if their course prove 
satisfactory, they are admitted to matriculation in the usual 
manner. 






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20 



cATALOGxm or 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



PREPAJRATORT. 

FIRST YEAR ''D" CLASS. 

Reaping^ j^tc, — ^National Fourth Reader; Penmanship; 
Harrington's Graded Spelling Book, Part 2. 

Geography. — Harper's Sphool Geography, Michigan 
edition. 

Mathematics. — Davies' Intellectual Arithmetic; Olney's 
Practical Arithmetic. 
Language, — 

English. — Reed and Rellog's Graded Lessons in English. 

Latin. — Bullions and Morris' Latin Lessons. 

Rhetoric. — Written Essays through the year; Declama- 
tion of selected pieces. 

History. — ^Anderson's United States. 

SECOND TEAR "C" CLASS. 

READiJfG, etc. — National Fifth Reader; Penmanship; 
Westlake's 8,000 Words; Dictation Exercises. 

Mathematics. — Davies' Intellectual Arithmetic (con- 
tinued) : Olneys Science of Arithmetic. 
Language. — 

English. — Reed and Kellog's Higher Lessons in English. 

Latin. — Bullions and Morris' Latin Lessons, (continued). 

Greek. — Crosby's Greek Grammar; Crosby's Greek Lessons. 

Moderyi. — Van Dalen's Dutch Grammar; Van Dalen's 
Dutch Exercises. 

Rhetoric. — Essays and Declamations, (continued). . 

^e — &A 



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BOPS COLLBQB, ^8 



History. — Smith's Bnglisfa History. 

iSpeeial — 'As soon as practicable, French and German will 
be introduced into the ** C " year, in the pUce of Latin and 
Gh*eek, if desired by the pnpil. 

THIRD YEAR " B " 0LA88. 

Reading^ <fca — Selections; Penmanship* 

Jf-4rjJiJiMT/c&-*-01ney'8 First Principles of Algebra; 
Mattison's High School Astronomy, with use of the Globes 
ItAirauAQB. — 

JEn^/wA.— Kellog's Text Book of Rhetoric. 

Xa^m.— Bullions and Morris' Latin Grammar; Harkness' 
First Latin Book; Caesar's Gallic War, (Bullions). 

Greek. — Crosby's Grammar, and Lessons, (continued). 

Modem. — Van Dalen's Dutch Grammar and Exercises, 
(continued). 

Rhetoric. — Essays and Declamations, (continued). 

jE&5froi?r— Smith's Greek History, (abridged). 

Special. — Duffet's French Grammar, 1st Part; Worman's 
German Grammar; Worman's German Reader. 

FOURTH YEAR "A" CLASS. . 

Penman$hip and Dratoing.-^ 

Mathematics. — Olney's complete Algebra; Olney's 
Geometry (in part) ; Peck's Ganot's Natural Philosophy. 
Language. — 

EngUeh, — Parsing Milton's Paradise Lost, (Sprague). 

IfCUin. — Harkness' First Latin Book (continued) ; Arnold's 
Latin Prose Composition, (begtm); Anthon's Virgil's ^Eneid. 

6?re€A.— Arnold's Greek Prose Composition; Anthon's 
Xenophon's Anabasis; Seeman's Mythology. 

Modem. — Mulder's Syntaxis, (Dutch). 

Rhetoric. — Hart's Rhetoric; Essays; Declamations (often 
original); "The Excelsiora" published by the Class. 

History^ cfcr. — Smith's Roman History, (abridged); I 
Young's Government Class Book. ■ 

^J30 



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e^ 

24 CATALOGUE Of 

Didactics. — ^Lectures on the Art of Teaching. 

Special. — Doffet's French Grammar^ 2nd Part; Wor- 
man's German Grammar and Reader, (continued). 

NoTB. — Special attention is given, daring the whole of 
the Prepartory coarse, to the grammars of the languages 
studied. For those who pursoe only English studies, or who 
design stopping at the end of the ^^A" year, the Faculty 
provide such additional branches as seem most expedient and 
profitable. Among them may be named Physiology, Botany, 
Zoology, Chemistry and Geology. Those generally make 
better progress whose time is fully occupied in the work of 
the School. 



feo 



n. 

ACADEMIC. 
FRESHMAN CLAS8. 

Mathematics. — Olney's Geometry and Trigonometry. 
Language and Literature. — 

English. — Shoemaker's Practical Elocution; Swinton's 
Studies in English Literature. 

Latin. — ^Anthon's Cicero de Amicitia; Arnold's Latin 
Prose Composition. 

Greek. — Owen's Xenophon's Cyropfidia; Arnold's Greek 
Prose Composition. 

Modem. — Mulder's History of Dutch Literature; Jager's 
Derivation of Dutch Words. 

Rhetoric. — Essays and Declamations. 

History. — Anderson's New General History, First Part; 
An Atlas of Classical and Mediaeval Geography. 

Natural Science. — Hooker's New Physiology. 

SOPH MORE YEAR 



MATHEMATiC8.-^0\nQf% General Gkometry and Calculus; 
Davies' New Surveying. 



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^^ 

HOPS COLLM0B. 26 \) 



Language AND Literaturb,— . » 

Ikiglish.'-^9LW*% New History of English Literature. 

LcUin. — ^TylerV Germania and Agrioola (Taoitas); Latin- 
Prose Composition {continued); Roman Antiqnities. 

• ffreeA^— Johnson's Herodotus; Qreek Prose Composition, 
(Continued); Greek Antiquities. 

Modern. — Puff^t's French Grammar, Ist part; Worman's 
German Grammar; German Reader, 1st part. . . . , 

Rhbtohic, — Essays, Speecl^es, and Deplan^ations. ^ 

History. — Apderson's New Gtf^eral His^ry;, Special 
Studies in History. . 

Natural Science. — Elliot ao4 Stoner's. Manual of 
Chemistry, (the Abridgment by Nicliols) . 

Sacred Literature, — Robinson's Ha^ony of the 
Gospels. 

JUNIOR TEAR 

Mathematics ApPLiBD.-^\m9XeA^% Natural Philosophy. 

LaNGUAGB AND LrrBHATUME.— 

Latin. — ^Antbon's Horace; Lectnres on Roman Literature. 

Greek. — Tyler's Plato's Apology and Crito; Lectures on 
Greek Literature.^ 

Modem. — Duffet's French. Grammar, 2nd part; Duffet's 
Extracts from Frenc)i Literature; Wonnan's German Grammar, 
(continued); German Reader, 2nd part 

Rhetoric. — Bascom's Philosophy of Rhetoric; Essays, 
and Discussion; Delivery of Original Speeches. 

J9>fT0i{r.-— Anderson's Kew General History; Lectures 
on the Constitution of the United States, (Part Second). 

Natural Science. — Chemistry, (Analysis, etc.) one term; 
Woods's Botany, two terms. 

Metaphysics. — XTpham's Mental Philosophy. 

Sacred Literature. — Introduction to the Sacred .Scrip- 
tures. 



Lo 



.aBin,ORY£AB. 
J!fJiTJ?*iMi7<7«.^— Olmsted's Astrouolny. 



-o^ 



f; 



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CATALOeUB ,0F 



■^^ 



I 



[LaNGUAQB and LITSBATUBS.-T- 

&ir^,i— Plato's PhflKla; Ltetures oi» Qreek Pkflo- 

I Modem.'^TehmAqvie; Orosemann's' Reader. (German); 
jLeotnres on German' LiieratariB; Compositions in Prenoli aAd 
•German. 

I Rhetoric, — ^Bascom's Aesthetios, with Essays; Delivery 
of Original Speeches. , 

Logic. — Jevons' Lessons in Logic. 

JE!r07a&-^WayIand's Moral Sciwce. 

History. — Guizot's History of Civilisation. 

Natural Science.— Daw\ Class Book of (Geology. 

Political Science. — Wayjand's Political Economy; 
kjectnres on Civil Grovernment. 
I Sacred Literature. — ^Lectures on the Evidence of 

Christianity. 

I 

t ... 

•N'6'rK. — ^Iri the Preparatory Department it is customary 
for the Council or the Execntive Committee to arrange for 
the Religious Instmction of the classes and for regular lessons 
inmusio. 

In the Academic Department, there is a partialy rather 
than a special course. Studies may b^ omitted, but as yet 
others have hot been substituted in their place, and such a 
partial courHC entitles only to a certificate, not to a Diploma. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATIOfJ. 



The Scholastic Year of forty weeks begins on the third 
Wednesday in September, and ends witk the General Com- 
mencement on the fourth Wednesday in June. 

The WiTiter and Spring vacations are fixed by the Gener- 
al Faculty. (See the Calendar). 

The Yearly MsamincUions, before the Council or its Com- 
mittees, begin on the third Wednesday in June. At other ^ 

a4 



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r 



HOPS COLLSGB. 



times, /^peeio/ examinations may be held, and passed upon by 
the respeetive Faculties. 

The Rtilea of Order are few and simple. In general, if 
the students do not improve their time and opportunities, or 
do not conduct themselves in a respectful and orderly manner, 
their connection with the Institution will be suspended. 

RJBLIG10U8 SERViCEB. 

The exercises of each day begin with prayer in the Col- 
lege Chapel, at 8 oMcMik a. x. 

On the Sabbath, the students are expected to worship reg- 
ularly with one of the churches in the city or vicinity, un- 
less excused by the President. • 

One of the Pastors of the Reformed Churches in Holland 
or vicinity, by appointment of the Council gives religious 
instruction to the Grammar School classes. 

LIBRARY* ETC., 

A Library of over 5,000 volumes, and a Reading Jtoom^ 
are free for the use of the students. Books and papers are 
being constantly Added. About 700 bound volumes have 
been received during the past year. 

The Laboratory and Cabinet are, as yet, only adapted to 
the uses of the lecture room. The same may be said 9f the 
Philosophical Apparahis. It is to be hoped that Maps, 
Charts, Instruments and Specimens of Natural History, as 
well as books, will be donated by the graduates and friends 
of the Institution. 

The Literary SocietieSy viz., the Meliphon and the Frater* 
nal, offer decided advantages to their respective members; 
and materially aid in the attainment of that culture which 
it is the object of this school to promote. 

A Course of Lectures^ by the Professors or others, is of 
almost yearly occurrence. In the winter of 1881-82, an able 
course of six lectures was provided by the Council. 

Vocal Music is usually provided for. No charge is made 
for this; but lessons in Instrumental Music are at the expense 
of the pupil. 






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28 



CATALOOUS QF 



THE CAMPUS, BTC. 

The CoUege Buildings are eight in number, on a caropVB 
of 18 acres. The grouods are beauiifully locate^, are well 
shaded with native trees, and annoalljf improved in appear- 
ance. 

The *^De Hope" printing office will eventually become an 
important auxiliary to the Institution. The paper has quite 
a large circulation. The Manager anfd the Editorial Com- 
mittee are appointed by Council. 

THE C0MMUNTCATI0N91. 

Morning and evening trains arrive uid leave in every di- 
rection. At Grand Haven, they connect with steamers 
departing daily for Chici^o and other ports on Lake Michi- 
gan, Hence there is no delay in the mails^ and the students 
can easily go to, or be reached from their homes, however 
distant. Holland City is the central point on the Chicago A 
West Michigan Railway. Black Lake on which it is situated 
is an attractive sheet of water extending six miles to Lake 
Michigi^n. 

DEBT AND ENDOWMENT. 

In 1878, the actual debt of the Council was, in round 
numbers, 128,000, on which interest has since been paid to 
the amount of 15,762,94, with the exception of $1,000 to the 
Board of Benevolence, this whole amount of over $33,000 
has since been paid. To this end, the Financial Agent, Rev. 
6. H. Mandeville, D. D., of New York City, has labored 
most successfully for four years. An unknown lady of 
Philadelphia, donated $1 0,000 for the purpose, in one sum; 
and Mr. Gerrit Cowenhoven, gave $3,000. Meantime the 
churches took collections for the support of the Institution, 
and the current expenses have been fully met. The Board 
of Eldueation of the Refoi^raed Church has continued to give 
aid to the extent of its ability. 

In addition to the above the General Synod, in 1878, 
owed $4,127 for arrears of salary to the Theological Teachers. 
This amount with its interest was fully liquidated in 1880. 
.^ On the Ist of April, 1882, the amount of Funds actually a 

.fee ^ 



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29 



invosted for the benefit of Hope College wae as reportdd, 
ta7yd27«24. Bndowment notes and Loans to the Priiitiiig 
Office amounted to $18,271 additional, but the last sum pays 
a small and uncertain' intemst, and n&ay Mly in part be col- 
lected or returned to the, Treasury. 

An ** Ebenezer Fund " of $36,000 has bQQn subscribed or 
pledged in the Holland Churches, for the support of.th^ 
Grammar School; but, as with the Endowment Notes, the in- 
terest is of doubtfif 1 amount,^ and the principal may not all be 
secured. The management of the Sbeoezer Fund i^ not 
vested in the Council. , 

Since April lasi^, $12,p<)0 has been added to the Endow- 
ment, of which $10,000 was. doniuted by. Mr. Gkrrft Oowen- 
hoven, of Newtown, L. L It is much to be desired that 
other liberal gifts frpm East and West may s^ell the FH^di^ 
to at least $100,000. 

The General Synod holds over $6,000 for a '^Professor- 
ship of Polemic and Didactic Thpology at Hope College,'' 
also a Legacy for $2,000 left by Rev. A, J. Switz, of Schenec- 
tady, N. Y., for th* "Theological Seminary " at Hope College. 
Here is a basis for hope and labor in endowing and restoring 
the Theological Department. 

As the West has the special benefit of Hope College, the 
West should from year to year continue special efforts to 
make the Institution an efficient School to the glory of God, 
and the advancement of His Kingdom. 

E8TIMATS8. 

The smallest amount required for the efficient operation of 

Hope College is $9,000 per annum. What means are to be 

relied upon for making up thi^ amouift? 

Invested J'uDdfl,, Interest $3,000-3,800 

Printing Offlc^ and Notes, $18,271 * ' 400- 500 

Ebenezer Futfd, $36,000 " 800- $00 

Student Fees....- 1.000-.1,800 

Donations and Collections 800-1,000 

Boani of Edn6ation . . ...,'. 1.600-2,400 



$7,000-0,600 

Thus it is seen .that $2,000 is njore or less uncertain, and 
also that the Board of Education in not, but ought to be re- 



&^ 



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(9^ 

CATAlAi€iKB OF KO^JB COLLEGE. 



Ueyedfrom its annual OQtlaj. Will aot some friend, endow 
the PreBidenoy om iP^ofesftonhip? This would go very far 
in givjb^igithe relief. 

8T\iiTB BO^RD OF YI8ITOII8. 

The Saperintendent of Public Instraction, annually ap- 
points a State ''Board of Visitors/' whose dnty it is to attend 
Examinations and to make such other inquiries as shall satis- 
fy said Superintendent that the standard of instruction, etc., 
are acoording to the law. Said Board at present consists of 
the following gentlemen: 

Hon. Qsobqs A. Fabb, Grand Haven. 
Rbv. Sakubl Obatbs, D. D., Grand Rapids. 
Wic L. Eaton, Esq., Kalamazoo. 

All eommunications relating to the Treasury should be 
addressed to Prof. C. Doesburg, and communications con- 
cerning the College in general, or applications for catalogues, 
or information, to the President. 

CALENDAR, 188d-88. 
Commencement, June 28, 1882. 
First Term begins September 20, 1882. 

" " ends December 22, 1882. 
Second Term begins January 8, 1883. 

" " ends March 30, 1883. 

Third Term begins April 16, 1883. 
Meeting of the Council April 25, 1883. 
Examination of Senior Class April 26, 1883. 
Examination begins June 20, 1888. 
Meeting of Council June 26, 1883. 
Commencement June 27, 1883. 

FORM OF BSQU£ST. 
*'I give and bequeath unto the Council of Hope College, 
(at present located in Holland, Michigan,) dollars, 

to be applied to, etc. -. -(or to be held in 

trust for, €|tc. ) aDd they are safely to invest the 

principal, and apply only the income to the said purpose." 

NoT^.— Isaac Cappon, Esq., of Holland City, has been appoinU^ 
to the i:ouncil, by tiie last General Synod, in the place of James C. 
Kn^pbt, Deceased. 



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I^^i^i^f^0^i^i^i^i^f^i^i^0^r^i^r^i^i^i^f^i^r^i^i^0^i^i^f^f^0^^0^i^'^i^i^0^i^i^r^i^m 



GATALOQJJE 



--OF TJiE- 



OFFICEI^JS AND jSTUDENTjS 



—OF— 



flOPE COLLEGE, 



MOLLMD, MICH' 



1882--'83. 



--VSSSr 




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CATALOGUE 



—OF TflE— 



OFFICEI^JS AND jSTUDENfjS 



—OF- 



flOPE COLLEQE, 

/{QLL/m MICH. 

1882-'83. 



;4N m^TITUTION OF TfiE REFORMED GfiURGfi m ;iMERlCA, 

FOUNDED IN 185i, 

mCORPOR^'PED ;>i^ POPE COLLEQE, 1866. 



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CALENDM- 



1883. June 27, 
/^ Sept. ^, 

Dec. 21, 

1884. Jan. 7, 

March 28, 
April 14, 
April 30, 
May 1, 
June 18, 
June 24, 
June 25, 



Commencement. 

First Term begins. 

First Term ends. 

Second Term bejjins. 

Second Term ends. 

Third Term begins. 

Meeting of the Council. 

Senior Examinations. 

Undergraduate Examinations. 

Meeting of the Council. 

Commencement. 



kC 



nnolp 



THE COUNCIL 



-^vfiK-^— V-- 



EX-OFFICIO. 
Rev. Charles Scott, D. D., President of the College. 

ELECTED MEMBERS. 
From Qeneral Synod. 



BX&IDKNOB. 

Pekin, 111., 
Holland, Mioh., 
HollBnd, Mioh., 
Hudflou, N. Y., 
Grand Haven, Mioh., 



BXY. EOIVABD P. LirnfOBTON, 

BxY. NiCHoi«A8 M. Stxfvbns, 

ISAAO GaPPON, 

J. G. Bkmham, M. D., 
KjLAfls Bbouwib, 

From Ciaaaia of Grand River, 

Bkt. Jacob Van dbb Mbuurv. Muskegon, Mioh., 

Bbt. NiohoijAB H. Dobkkb, Qrand Bapids, Mioh., 

. From C/aaaia of Hoi/and. 

Bby. Petbb Lbpkltak, Overyssel, Mioh., 

Bby. Bibx Bbobk, Holland, Mioh., 

From Ciaaaia of lllinoia. 

Bbt. John H. JoBAZiMON, Fairview, 111., 

Kbt. Eobbbt Wimtxb, Pella, Iowa, 

From Ciaaaia of Wiaconain. 

Bbt. John H. Kabstxn, Ooetbnrg, Wis., 

Bbt. WnjJAM Mobbdtx, Milwaakee, Wig., 

From C/aaaia of Michigan. 

Bbt. Pbtbb Mobbdtxb, Qrand Bapids, Mioh., 

Bbt. John W. Beabdblbb, Constantino, Mioh., 



OFFICER^. 



1888. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 

1888. 
1888. 

1884. 
1884. 

1885. 
1885. 

1886. 
1886. 

1887. 
1887. 



Rev. Nicholas M. Steffens, 
Rev. John W. Bbardslee, 
Rev. Peter Moerdvke, 
Isaac Cappon, 



President. 

Vice President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

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FACULTY. 



ACADEMIC. 

REV. CHARLES SCOTT, D. D., President, ex-officio. 

Professor of Chemistry and Nataral History. In charge of Mental and Moral Philosophy, 

History, Constitutional Law and Evidences of Christianity. 

REV. T. ROMEYN BECK, D. D., Secretary. 
Professor of Greek and Latin Languages and Llteratare. In charge of Logic and 

Sacred Literature. 

CORNELIS DOESBURG, A. M., 
Professor of Modem Langnages and Lttciratare, and of Art. 

WILLIAM A. SHIELDS, A. M., 
Professor of English Language and Literature, and Rhetoric In charge of Latin In the 

Freshman Class. 

GERRIT J. KOLLEN, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics, Natural PhUoaophy and Astronomy. In chaige of Didactics. 

Political Economy and Civil Government. 



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FACULTY. 
QUAMMAK SCHOOL. 

The ▲oademle Fa4niltr ftll teach In this department, thas glilnff pupOa from the 
betlnnlng the adyantaee of experlenoed teaeheia. 



Prof. CHARLES SCOTT, President, ex^ffido. 

Prof. T. ROMEYN BECK. 

Prof. CORNELIS DOESBERG. 

Prof. WILLIAM A. SHIELDS, Secretary. 

Prof. GERRIT J. KOLLEN. 

HENRY BOERS, A. M., 

▲witftant Prof easor of Latin, ArtthmeUe, Hlatoiy. Ae. 

JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, Jr., A. M., 

AaalatantPiofeaaorof GreeK, Bngilah Gnunmar, llcelna, Ac. 

Rev. NICHOLAS M. STEFFENS, A. M., 

In eharse of Bellgloas Inatnutlon. 

JOHN GILMORE, 

Inchaige of Vooal Mnslo. 

Professor GERRIT J. KOLLEN, Librarian. 

RALPH BLOEMENDAAL,^j«j/aif/ Librarian. 

GERRIT J. HEKHUIS, Chorister. 

G. TE LINDE, Organist 

LOUIS DE WITT, Janitor 



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JSTUDEMTJS. 


1 


AO) 


4DEMIC DEPpi^TMK 


MT. 


Senior Class. 


MAMB. 


BUmSNOB. 


BOOMB. 


Even John Blekkink, 


Ouattnvg, Wis., 


No. 7. i 


Jacob U>k, 


GrandTille, ICioh., 


J. Van den Berge, 8r. 


Henry Hulst, 


Grand Bapida, Mioh., 


Mrs. Nibbelink. 


TametBne Matoda, 


Ea^^oschimakin, Japan, Mra. VanOlinda. 


Albert Oltmans, 


Grand Eapida, Mich., 


No. 2. . 


John Abraham Otte, 


Grand Bapida, Mich., 


J. Van den Bexge, Sr. 


Dirk Scholten, 


Orange City, Iowa, 


H. Toren. 


E. WiUiam Stapelkamp, 


Qreanleafton, Minn., 

Junior Class. 


No. 3. : 


Simon Hogeboom, 


Clymer, N. Y., 


No. 2. : 


Gerrit Henry Hoapers, 


Orange City, Iowa, 

Sophomore Class. 


H. Toren. ' 


Kalph Bloemendaal, 


Cedar Grove, WiB., 


No. 15. 


Oerrit John Hekhnis, 


Holland, Mioh., 


At Home. 


Albert Van den Berg, 


Sonth Holland, lU., 


No. 11. 


Peter Wayenberg, 


Orange City, Iowa, 

Freshman Class. 


MrB.BolhinB. 




Gnmd ^ven, Mich., 


B. Eroidenier. 


Peter Holleman, 


Drenthe, Mich., 


No. 16. 


Jer^miaa Emidenier, 


Holland, Mich., 


At Home. 




Cedar Grove, 


No. 19. 


Ralph Schepers, 


Holland, Mich., 


At Home. 


Herbert G. Sharpley, 


Bn8hnell,T1l., 


No. 14. 


John WiUam Viaeoher, 


Holland, Mich., 


At Home. 




c 


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PJiEPAKA'POTiY. DEPMi'MENi'- 


"A" Class. 






USIDBNGX. 


BOOMS. 


. Mary E. Annis, 


Holland City, 


At Home. 


Cornelia Cappon, 


i( u 


u a 


Teennie Kanters, 


fti u 


ift u 


Katie £. Vaupell, 


(( u 


C( u 


William A. Beardslee, 


Constantine, 


Dn Scott's. 


Henry J. Cook, 


Eastmanville, 


B. Kruidenier's. 


Paul R. Coster, 


Holland, 


At Home. 


Harman V. S. Peeke, 


Centreville, 


Dr. Scott's. 


Albertus Pielers, 


Holland City, 


At Home. 


William Reefman, 


Ovcryssel, 


No. 12. 


John P. Ten Haaf, 


Fillmore, 


At Home. 


Charles N. Thew, 


Allegan, 


Mr. Toren's. 


Hobart K. Whitaker, 


Leverett, Mass., 


Dr. Beck's. 


A. Van Zwaluwenburg, 


Drenthe, 


Dr. Kremer's. 


Samuel M. Zwemer, 


Graafschap, 


Mrs. Boot's. 


tc 


B" CLASS. 




Frances C. Post, 


Holland, 


At Home. 


Johanna Schravesande, 


Holland City, 


At Home. 


Johanna Van Ark, 


Holland, 


At Home. 


Gerard Bnindt, 


Forest Grove, 


Mrs. Bolhuis's. 


Hermanus C. Broek, 


Holland City, 


At Home. 


Henry R. Doesburg, 


Holland City, 


At Home. 


Henry R. Geerlings, 


Holland City, 


At Home. 


Henry Harmeling, 


Oostburg, Wis., 


Mrs. Nebbelink's. 


Gerrit Heneveld, 


Graafschap, 


At Home. 


Adrian C. Karsten, 


Waupun, Wis., 


^ 


Toppe Klooster, 


Jamestown, 


Mrs. Bolhuis's. 


Meinardus G. Mantingh, 


Graafschap, 


At Home. 


Aru Van Woerkom, 


Grand Haven, 


H. Toren's. 


John Van Westenbrugge 


> Grand Rapids, 


Mrs. Schole's. 


Peter J. Zwemer, 


Graafschap, 


Mrs. Boot's. 

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8 


CATALOGUE OF 








"C" Class. 






NAm. 


Bsammcx. 




BOOMS. 


Josephine Kiekintveldt, 


Holland City, 


At Home, j 


Jennie Kreiners, 


Holland City, 






Christina Oggel, 


Holland City, 


At Home. 


Johanna Tien, 


Graafschap, Mrs, Nienwholt's. 


William Bertsch, 


Holland City, 


At Home. 


James E. Fagg, 


Madison, Wis., 


Mrs. Le Febre*s. 


Henry K. Giebink, 


Wiiupun, Wis,, 


C. Landaal's. 


Herbert G. Keppel, 


Zeeland, 


J. 


Cats's. 


Henry Kleyn, 


Holland City, 


At Home. 


Albert Knooihuizen, 


North Holland, ] 


^. Knooihutzen's. 


Germel Kuyper, 


Graafschap, Mich. 


, B. Kruidenier's. 


Abraham Leenhouts, 


Zeeland, 


A. Benjaminse's. 


Marinus Ossewarde, 


Holland City, 


At Home. 


Martinus Rozema, 


Drenthe, 


B. Kniidenier^s. 


Cornelius M. Steffens, 


Holland City, 


At Home. 


William Stegeman, 


New Groningen, 


Mrs.Nebbelink's. 


Gerrit Te Linde, 


Brandon, Wis., 


C. Landaal's. 


Abraham Thompson, 


Holland City, 


At Home. 


Anthony M. Van Duin, 


Zeeland, 


Mrs. Bolhuis's. 


Elenus H. Van Eyk, 


New Groningen, 


At Home. 


Dirk J. Werkraan, 


Pattersonville, la 


,, R. Werkman's. 




"D" CLASS. 






Christina Boone, 


New Groningen, 


At Home. 


Rike Boone, 


Holland City, 


(4 


44 


Katie Herold, 


U i( 


44 


44 


Ella Hunt, 


4( U 


(4 


44 


Anna Kruidenicr, 


U (( 


44 


44 


Martha Nyland, 


U U 


44 


44 


Ida Nies, 


(4 (t 


44 


44 


Lizzie Otte, 


(( U 


44 


44 


Mary Schepers, . 


Holland, 


44 


44 


Mary Steffens, 


Holland City, 


44 


44 


Henrietta Teleman, 


ft( cc 


44 


44 


Maggie Van Putten, 


U M 


44 


44 


Oscar Baert, 


Zeeland, 


44 


44 


Thomas Boone, 


New Groningen 


, 


44 


John Bode, 


Holland, 


44 


44 




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HOPE COLLEGB. 




9 


NAMB. 


lOBnnNox. 




BOOMS. 


Wm. H. Bruins, 


Brandon, Wis., 




C. Landaal's. 


David G. Cook, 


Overyssel, 


B. 


Kruidenier's. 


Wesley Cronkright, 


Holland, 




At Home. 


Albert De Vrics, 


Holland City, 




(( ti 


Jacob De Vries, Jr., 


Vriesland, 




H. Toren's. 


Henry J. De Vries, 


Holland City, 




At Home. 


Henry Harrington, 


Holland, 




(( M 


Tohn Huizinga, 


Holland City, 




a (( 


Herman Juistema, 


Grand Haven, 


Mrs. Geerling's 


Harry Kremers, 


Holland City, 




At Home. 


John Kroodsma, 


Vriesland, 






Bernard J. Landaal, 


Alto, Wis., 




C. Landaal^s. 


Albert Rooks, 


Holland, 




At Home. 


Peter Rooks, 


(t 




it ti 


Peter Schraversande, 


Holland City, 




ti it 


♦Wm. D. Van Loo, 


Zeeland, 




it it 


Wm. Van Der Haar, 


Holland City, 




it ti 


♦Ralph Ter Beek, 


i( u 




tt ti 


♦Gerrit Tubergen, 


Holland, 




it it 


Aart Van Westrenen, 


Grand Haven. 


M 


rs. Geerling's. 


Henry Wolcotte, 


Drenthe, 




At Home. 


George W. Willebrands, Detroit, 


Mrs 


. NebbelinkV 


Jacob Wyngaarden, 


Vriesland, 

Unclassified. 






Klaas Knoorhuizen, 


Holland City. 




At Home. 


Azro Dutton, 


Holland, 




tt tt 



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lO 



CATALOGUE OF 



ACADEMIC. 



Seniors, 
Juniors, 
Sophomores, 
Freshmen, 



"A" Class, 
"B" Class, 
"C" Class, 
"D" Class, 
Unclassified, 



PREPARATORY. 



Total, 



8 

2 

4 

7 

i6 

21 

38 



"3 



For admission into the " D " Class, a common school educa- 
tion is required, upon the branches pursued in that year. The 
better their previous training, the more easily and profitably 
can pupils enter upon the Grammar School Course. 

For admission into the Freshman Class, a full certificate of 
graduation from the Preparatory Department is required ; or an 
examination in the studies pursued in that Department, or in 
what the Faculty shall deem an equivalent. 

For admission into any advanced class of the Institution, it will 
be necessary for the applicant to pass an examination in the studies 
previously pursued by the class. If received on conditions, the 
conditions must be fulfilled before matriculation. 



PI^OBATION. 

New students in either Department, remain on probation for 
one term, at the expiration of which, if their course prove satis- 
factory, they are admitted to matriculation in the usual manner. 



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GOUK^E OF JSTUDY. 
1. 

FIRST YEAR "D" CLA88. 

Beading^ etc. — National Fourth Reader; Penmanship; Har- 
rington's Graded Spelling Book, Part 2. 

Geography. — Harper's School Geography, Michigan edition. 

McUhematics. — Davies' Intellectual Arithmetic; Olney's Prac- 
tical Arithmetic. 
Language. — 

English. — Reed and Kellogg's Graded Lessons in English. 

Latin. — Bullion's and Morris' Latin Lessons. 

Ithstoric, — Written Essays through the year; Declamation of 
selected pieces. 

History. — Anderson's United States. 

SECOND YEAR "C" CLASS. 

Heading^ etc. — National Fifth Reader; Penmanship; West- 
lake's 3,ocx) Words; Dictation Exercises. 

Mathematics. — Davies' Intellectual Arithmetic (continued) ; 
Olney's Science of Arithmetic. 
Language. — 

English. — Reed and Kellogg's Higher Lessons in English. 

Latin. — Bullion's and Morris' Latin Lessons, (continued). 

Cheek. — Crosby's Greek Grammar; Crosby's Greek Lessons. 

Modem. — Van Dalen's Dutch Grammar; Van Dalen's Dutch 
Exercises. 

Mhetoric. — Essays and Declamations, (continued). 

History. — Smith's English History. 

Special. — As soon as practicable, French and German will be 
introduced into the " C " year, in the place of Latin and Greek, 
if desired by the pupil. 

THIRD YEAR "B" CLASS. 

Heading^ etc. — Selections; Penmanship. 

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12 CATALOGUE OF 



Mcahematica. — Olney's First Principles of Algebra; Matti- 
son's High School Astronomy, with the use of the Globes 
Language. — 

^n^/wA.— Kellogg's Text Book of Rhetoric. 

Latin. — Allen and Greenough's Latin Grammar; Harkness' 
First Latin Book; Caesar's Gallic War. 

Oreek. — Crosby's Grammar and Lessons, (continued). 

Modem. — Van Dalen's Dutch Grammar and Exercises (con- 
tinued). 

Bhetoric. — Essays and Declamations, (continued). 

History, — Smith's Greek History, (abridged). 

Special. — Duffet's French Grammar, ist Part; Worman's Ger- 
man Grammar; Worman's German Reader. 
FOURTH YEAR "A " CLA88. 
Penmanship and Drawing. — 

Mathematics. — Olney's complete Algebra; Olney's Geometry 
(in part);' Page's Natural Philosophy. 
Language. — 

£j7iglish. — Parsing Milton's Paradise Lost, (Sprague). ' 

Latin, — Harkness' First Latin Book (continued); Arnold's 
Latin Prose Composition (begun); Greenough's Virgil's ^neid. 

Greek, — Arnold's Greek Prose Composition; Crosby's Xeno- 
phon's Anabasis; Seeman's Mythology. 

Modem. — Mulder's Syntaxis, (Dutch). 

Rhetoric, — Hart's Rhetoric; Essays; Declamations (often orig- 
inal); "The Excelsiora" published by the Class. 

History^ etc, — Smith's Roman History, (abridged); Young's 
Government Class Book. 

Didactics. — Lectures on the Art of Teaching. 

Special, — Duffet's French (yrammar, 2nd Part; Worman's 
German Grammar and Reader, (continued). 

Note. — Special attention is given, during the whole of the 
Preparatory Course, to the grammars of the languages studied. 
For those who pursue only Englit^h studies, or who design stop- 
ping at the end of the " A " year, the Faculty provide such ad- 
ditional branches as seem most expedient and profitable. Among 
them may be named Physiology, Botany, Zoology, Chemistry 
and Geology. Those generally make better progress whose 
is fully occupied in the work of the Sthool. 

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HOPE COLLEGE I 3 



11. 

ACADEMIC. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

MaihematicB, — 01ney*s Geometry and Trigonometry. 
Language and Literature. — 

English. — Shoemaker's Practical Elocution ; Swinton's Studies 
in English Literature. 

Latin. — Anthonys Cicero de Amicitia; Arnold's Latin Prose 
Composition. 

Cheek. — Owen's Xenophon's Cy ropaedia; Arnold's Greek 
Pr*se Composition. 

Modem. — Mulder's History of Dutch Literature; Jager's De- 
rivation of Dutch Words. 

Itheioric. — Essays and Declamations. 

History. — Anderson's New General History, First Part; An 
Atlas of Classical and Mediaeval Geography. 

Natural Science. — Hooker's New Physiology. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Mathematics.— Olney^s General Geometry and Calculus; Da- 
vies' New Surveying. 
Language and Literature. — 

English. — Kellogg's New History of English Literature. 

Latin. — Tyler's Gennnnia and Agricol a (Tacitus); Latin Prose 
Composition (continued); Roman Antiquities. 

Cheek, — Johnson's Herodotus; Greek Prose Composition, (con- 
tinued); Greek Antiquities. 

Modem. — Duffet's French Grammar, ist part; Worman's 
German Grammar; German Reader, ist part. 

JRhetgric. — Essays, Speeches, and Declamations. 

History. — Anderson's New General History; Special Studies 
in History. 

Natural Science. — Elliott and Stoner's Manuel of Chemistry, 
(the Abridgement by Nichols). 

Sacred Literature. — Robinson's Harmony of the Gospels. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
McUhematics Applied. — Olmsted's Natural Philosophy. 
Language and Literature. — 
Latin. — Anthon's Horace; Lectures on Roman Literature. , 

....... ., L-ooole 



14 CATALOGUE OF 



Cheek. — Tyler's Plato's Apology and Crito; Lectures on 
Greek Literature. 

Modem, — Duffet's Frehch Grammar, 2d part; Duffet's Ex- 
tracts from French Literature; Worman's German Grammar, 
(continued); German Reader, 2d part. 

Rhetoric. — Bascom's Philosophy of Rhetoric; Essays, and 
Discussion ; Delivery of Original Speeches. 

History, — Anderson's New General History ; Lectures on the 
Constitution of the United vStatcs, (p^rt second). 

Natural Science. — Chemistry, (Analysis, etc.) one term; 
Woods's Botany, two terms. 

Metaphysics. — Porter's Mental Philosophy. 

Sacred Literature. — Introduction to the Sacretl Scriptures. 
SENIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics. — Olmsted's Astronomy. 
Literature and Language. — 

(?reeA:.-^Plato's Phsedo; Lectures on Greek Philosophy. 

Modern. — Telemaque; Gro^zmann's Reader (German); Lec- 
tures on German Literature; Compositions in French and Ger- 
man. 

Ithetoric. — Bascom's Aesthetics, with Essays; Delivery of 
Original Speeches. 

Logic. — Hill's Jevons' Lessons in Logic. 

Ethics. — Waylaml's Moral Science. 

History. — Guizot's History of Civilization. 

Natwral Science. — Dana's Class Book of Geology. 

Political Science. — Way land's Political Economy; Lectures 
on Civil Government. 

Sacred Literature. — Lectures on the Evidence of Christianity. 

MIjSCfELLMEOVjS WOKMA^IOH. 

Tn the Preparatory Department it is customary for the Council 
or the Executive Committee to arrange for the Religious In- 
struction t>f the classes and for regular lessons in music. 

In the Academic Department, there is a partial^ rather than a 
special course. Studies may be omitted, but as yet others have 
not been substituted in their place, and such a partial course enti- 
tles only to a certificate, not to a diploma. 

Most of the students seek what is called "a liberal or^claesical 

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HOPS COLLEGC. 1 5 



education," but a "partiaP or **elective" course is offered to all 
who so desire, and facilities furnished through the regular in- 
structors. German and French can be studied at any time, as 
also the branches generally called "scientific." 

In 1878, the Institution was opened lo women, sad at once sev- 
eral young ladies availed themselves of the privilege. The num- 
ber has been increased from year to year. They enter the regu- 
lar clashes, and attend the same lectures and recitations as the 
young men. Their home will be with approved families in the city 

Although Hope College is dt-nomi national, and is tmder the 
patronage and support of the Reformed Church in America, yet, 
by the law of its incorporation, it can have no "religious test." 
The doors are open, and welcome is given to all who submit to 
its scholastic regulations. As a Chnstian school, however, it in- 
culcates gospel truths, and demands a consistent moral character 
and deportment. 

The Scholastic Year of forty weeks, begins on the third Wed- 
nes<lny in September, and cn<is with the General Commence- 
ment on the fourth Wednesday in June. 

The Winter and Spring vacations are fixed by the General 
Faculty. (See the Calendar). 

The Yearly/ JExaminations^ before the Council or its Commit- 
tees, begin on the third Wednesday in June, At other times, 
Special examinations may be held, and passed upon by the re- 
spective Faculties. 

The Rules of Order are few and simple. In general, if the 
students do not improve their time and opportunities^, or do not 
conduct themselves in a respectful and orderly manner, their con- 
nection with the Institution will be suspended. 

RELIQI0U8 SERVICES. 

The exercises of each dny begin with prayer in the College 
Chapel, at 8 o'clock a. m. 

On .he Sabbath, the stu lents arc expectc.I to worship regular- 
ly with one of the churches in the city or vicinity, unless excused 
by the President. ♦ 

One of tlic Pttstors of the Reformed CliurcheR in Holland or 
vicinity, by appointment of the Council gives religious instruction 
in the Grammar School classes. ^^ , 

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1 6 CATALOGUE OP 



LIBRARY, ETC. 

A Library of over 5,000 volumes, and a Reading JRoomy are 
free for the use of the students. Books and papers are being con- 
stantly added. 

The Lahoraiory and Cabinet are, as yet, only adapted to the 
uses of the lecture room. The same may be said of the Phil<h 
Bophical Apparahu. It is to be hoped that Maps, Charts, In- 
struments and Specimens of Natural History, as well as books, 
will be donated by the graduates and friends of the Institution. 

The Xfiterary Societies^ viz,, the Meliphon and the Fraternal, 
offer decided advantages to their respective members; and mate- 
rially aid in the attainment of that culture which it is the object 
of this school to promote. 

A Course of Leaburee^ by the Professors or othera, is of almost 
yearly occurrence. 

Yocal Music is usually provided for. No charge is made for 
this; but lessons in Instrumental Music are at the expense of the 
pupil. 

The "De Hope" printing office will eventually become an im- 
portant auxiliary to the Institution. The paper has quite a large 
circulation. The Manager and the Editorial Committee arc ap- 
pointed by Council. 

EXPENSES, 

Holland is surrounded by a rich agricultural region, and the 
cost of livinp is comparatively cheap. Good board may be had 
in families of the city, for from two dollars to three dollars per 
week ; and without furnished rooms at corr^jsponding rates. 

There are some rooms in the College building, in the selection 
of which students for the ministry have the preference. These 
are furnished in part, and bear a charge of ^ve dollars a year. 

Young ladies board and room in private families. 

As yet no tuition fees have been charged, but every student 
must pay to the Treasurer, in advance, an incidental fee of 
five dollars per term. 

The Graduation fee is five dollars, and the cost of the diploma. 
No other charges are made. • 

For books, clothing, washmg, fuel, lights, travel, etc., those 
interested can best make the estimates. The entire expenses 
need not exceed $200 per annum. 

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HOPE COLLEGE. , 1 7 



Much progress has been made toward a suitable endowment, 
but much remains yet to be done. The income from invested 
funds will not support the Institution, much less open the way 
for the many and much needed improvements demanded. Our 
buildings are inadequate, our apparatus limited, our teachers 
overtaxed. To relieve such pressure an endowment is necessarv, 
such an endowment as will make Hope Colleire equal to other 
Institutions of its character. Where is the man, or woman, or 
church that will help forward this work of endowment.? 

It will be seen that we have at present two Departments in 
operation. A third embracing Theology is essential to the at- 
tainment of the end for which the College was organized. Steps 
are now being taken. General Synod having recommended it, 
and the Council having appointed a strong committee with Rev. 
E. Winter, of Pella, as chairman, to secure funds for the proper 
endowment of this Theological Department. With that secured, 
the way will be open for the completion of our course of study, 
and the thorough training of a suitable ministry for our Western 
Church. May we not hope there will be such a willing and 
ready response that this step may soon be safely taken? 

Our Library is rapidly increasing in the number of volumes 
and m value. It has already outgrown the rooms assigned it, and 
we have none suitable for its use. At present we rannot prepare 
a catalogue, nor place the books where they can be most useful 
to the students. A Library building is one of our pressing ne- 
cessities. With a spacious, fire-proofroom, the collection would 
be safe and serviceable. Additions are being made every year of 
valuable works, which would be difficult and expensive to re- 
place. Who will see that they have awaiting them a safe and 
cheerful room, where they can be consulted, and their precious 
treasures made useful to our students? 



LOC;iTION, ETC. 

Holland City is a central point on the Chicago and West Mich- 
igan Railway, ninety miles north of New Buffalo, twenty-five 
miles southwest of Grand Rapids, and midway between Allegan 

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l8 CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGlf. 

and Grand Haven. It is therefore most desirably located havingr 
both land and water communications, and being near the shore of 
Lake Michigan, with which it is directly connected by Black 
Lake, itself a beautiful sheet of water. 

The College Buildinga are eight in number. The largest is 
Van Vleck Hall, mainly devoted to student's rooms, and the Li- 
brary. The grounds are beautifully located on a Campus of 
eighteen acres, well shaded with native trees, and being annually 
improved in appearance. 



TOKM OF BEQUEJST. 

" / ^ive and bequeath unto the Council of Hope College^ 

{at present located in Holland^ Michigan^ dollars^ 

to he applied to^ etc,^ or to be held in 

trust for^ etc,^ and they are safely to inv£st the 

principal^ and apply only the income to the said purpose.^'^ • 




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1883-84. 



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CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



or 



HOPE COLLEGE f 



HDLLANI], MICHIGAN. 



1883-'84 



An iNsrrrruTiON of the Reformed Church in America, 

7017Xri3S39 ZXT 18B1, 

Incorporated as Hope College, 186a 



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HOLLAND, MICH, 
WM. H, ROGERS, BOOK AND JOB PRINTER, 




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CALENDAR 



1885. 



Bee. 19, 
Jan. 5y 



June 25, Commencement. 
Sept. 17, First Term begins. 

Examinations for Admission. 
** " Eemoval of 

June Conditions. 

First Term ends. 

Second Term begins. 
March 27, Second Term ends. 
April IS, Third Term begins. 
April 29, Meeting of Council. 
April SO, Senior Examinations. 
June 17, Undergraduate Examinations. 
June 22, Rhetorical Exercises of the 

Preparatory Department. 
June2Sy Meeting of Council. 
June 24, Commencement. 
The First Term contains H weeks. 
The Second Term contaitis 12 weeks. 
The Third Term contains 11 weeks. 



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THE COUNCIL. 



EX-OFFICIO. 

Rkv. CisAS. Scott, D. D., - President of the College. 

ELECTED MEMBERS. 



7Z&02C O-aXTSXtJLZi 872ITOS. 



BE8IDENCB8. TBRH8 

Holland, Midi., 
Holland, Mich., 
Hudson, K Y., 
Grand Haven,Mich., 
Sioux City, la.. 



NAMB8. 

Ret. Nicholas M. Steffkns, 

Isaac Cappon, 

J. C. Benham, M. D., 

Klaas Brouwbb, 

Rev. Edwabd P. Livingston, 

7Br02C OZiJLSSZS 07 ZZjZ^XITOZS. 

Rev. John H. Jobalmon, Fairview, 111., 

Rkv. Egbert Winter, Pella, Iowa, 

7Zt02C OX«JLSSZS OX" -wzsoo^sz^. 
Rev. John H. Kabsten, Oostburg, Wis,, 

Rev. William Mobrdtk, South Holland, 111., 

7Z&02C CZjJLSSZS OX" 2CZOZZZa-JL2fr. 

Bev. Peter Mobrdtke, Grand Rapids, Mich., 

Rev. John W. Bbardslee, Constantine, Mich., 

7Xt02C OZjJLSSZS 07 Q-^^JlTSTT) K.zvsze*. 

Rev. Nicholas H. Dosker, Kalamazoo, Mich., 
Rev. Henry E. Dosker, Grand Haven, Mich., 

Txtoac cz^JLSSzs OS* ^oZiZiJLifrz:). 
Rev. Peter Lbpeltak, Overyssel, Mich., 

Rev. Dirk Broek, Holland, Mich., 



bxfirb. 

1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 

1886. 

1886. 

1886. 
1886. 

1887. 
1887. 

1888. 
1888. 

1889. 
1889. 



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OFFICERS OF COUNCIL 



Rev. Nicholas M. Steffens, 
Rkv. John AV. B&ABDSLESy 

RbV. PeTEB MOERDYKEy 

IsAJLc Cappon, Esq., 




President. ^^ 

Vice-President, j \ 

Secretary, v I 

TVeasurer. 



COMMITTEES OF COUNCIL. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Rev. Chas. Scott, Chairman. Rev. Disk Broek, Secretary. 

Rev. Peter Lepeltak, Rev. Nicholas M. Steffens, 

Isaac Cappon, Esq. 

INVESTMENT COMMITTER 

Isaac Cappon, Esq., Arend Visscheb, Esq., 

Rev. J. W. Beardslee, 

Id charge of the funds of the Council. 

HOPE FARM COMMITTEE. 

Pres. Charles Scott, Arend Visscher, Esq., 

' Isaac Cappon, Esq. 
In charge of a tract of land, at Point Superior, on Macatawa 
Bay, containing 837 acres. 

"DE HOPE.** 

Prof. C. Doesburg, Editor. Prof. G. J. Kollen, Manager. 

Rev. N. M. Stkffbns, ) ri^ ... ^ ^ ., 

. Rev. DiBK Bboek, ' \ CommttUe of Council. 




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Academic Department. 




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FACULTY. 



ACADEMIC. 

REV. CHARLES SCOTT, D. D., Breaidmt, exrofficio. 

Professor of Chemistiy and Natural History. In charge of Mental and 

Moral Philosophy, History, and Evidences of Christianity. 

REV. T. ROMEYN BECK, D. D., Secretary. 

Professor of Greek and Latin Languages and Literature. In charge of 

Logic and Sacred Literature. 

CORNELIS DOESBURG, A. M. 

Professor of Modem Languages and Literature, and of Art. 

WILLIAM A. SHIELDS, A. M. 

Professor of English Language and Literature, and Rhetoric. In charge 
of Latin in the Freshman Class. 

GERRIT J. KOLLEN, A. M. 

Professor of Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, and Astronomy. In 

charge of Didactics, Political Economy, and Civil Government. 



STUDENTS. 



ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



NAMES. 



RRSIDBNCEB. 



ROOMB. 



Simon Hogeboom, Clymer, N. Y., No. 2, Van Vleck Hall. 
Gerrit Henry Hospers, Orange City, Iowa, H. Toren. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Mary Eliza Alcott, Holland City, At Home. 

Gerrit John Hekhais, Holland, Mich., At Home. 

John Bernard Nykerk, Overyssel, Mich., Mrs. Alcott. 

Lizzie Phelps, Holland City, At Home. 

Albert Van den Berg, South Holland, 111., No. 1 1, V. V. Hall. 
Peter Wayenberg, Orange City, la., Mrs. Bolhuis. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

William John Duiker, Grand Haven, Mich., B. Kruidenier. 
Peter Holleraan, Drenthe, Mich., No. 16, V. V. Hall. 

Jeremias Kruidenier, Holland City, At Home. 

William Lamraers, Cedar Grove, Wis. No. 20, V. V. Hall. 
Ralph Schepers, Holland, Mich., At Home. 

Herbert Giles Sharpley, Mitchellville, la.. No. V, V. V. Hall. 
John William Visscher, Holland, Mich., At Home. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 



Cornelia Cappon, 
William A. Beardslee, 
Paul Raphael Coster, 
Emma Kollen, 
Harm an V. S. Peeke, 
Albertus Pieters, 
Charles Nelson Thew, 
John Trompen, 
Samuel M. Zwemer, 



Holland City, 
Constantine,Mich.,No. 
Holland, Mich., 
Overyssel, Mich., 
Centreville,Mich.,No. 
Holland City, 
Allegan, Mich., 
Vriesland, Mich., 
Graafschap, Mich., 



At Home. 

15, V.V.Hall. 

At Home. 

Prof. Kollen. 

19, V.V.Hall. 

At Home. 

H. Toren. 

H. Te Roller. 

Mrs. Boot. 




FRESHMAN CLASS. 



NAMES. 

Henry Geerlings, 
Henry Harmeling, 
Gen it Heneveld, 
Adrian C. Karsten, 
Foppe Klooster, 
Meinardus G. Mantingh, 
Arie Van Woerkoni, 
John Van Westenburg, 
Peter John Zweraer, 



REBIBRNCES. ROOMS. 

Holland City, At Home. 

Oostburg, Wis., No. 14, V. V. H. 
Graafschap, Mich., At Home. 
Holland City, At Home. 

Jamestown, Mich., Mrs, Bolhuis. 
Graafschap, Mich., At Home, 
G'd Haven, Mich., B. Kruidenier. 
GM Rapids, Mich., No. 3, V. V.H. 
Graafschap, Mich. H. Toren. 



Seniors, 
Juniors, 
Sophomores, 
Freshmen, 



SUMMARY. 



6 

6 

10 

9 



Total, 



31 



ADMISSION. 

For admission into the Freshman Class, a full certificate 
of graduation from the Preparatory Department is required; 
or an examination in the studies pursued in that Department; 
or in what the Faculty shall deem an equivalent. 

For admission into any advanced class of the Institution, 
it will be necessary for the applicant to pass an examination 
in the studies previously pursued by the class. If received 
on conditions, the conditions must be fulfilled before matric- 
ulation. 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPS COLLEGE. 



11 



Lanouaqe and Literature, — 

Greek, — Plato's Phaedc; Lectures on Greek Philosophy. 

Modem, — ^Teleraaqae; GrossmaDn's Handbuoh; Lectures 
on German Literature; Compositions iu French and German. 

Rhetoric. — Bascom's Aesthetics, with Essays; Delivery 
of Original Speeches. 

Logic, — Thompson's Laws of Thought. 

Ethics, — Wayland's Moral Science. 

History, — Guizot's History of Civilization. 

Natural Science, — Dana's Claas-Book of Geology. 

Political Science, — Wayland's Political Economy, 
(Chapin); Lectures on Civil Government. 

Sacred Literature, — Lectures on the Evidence* of 
Christianity. 



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Preparatory 

Department. 




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FACULTY. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Prop. CHARLES SCOTT, D. D., JPtesident, ex-officio. 

Pbop. T. ROMEYN beck, D. D. 
Greek and Mythology; A. Class. 

Prof. CORNELIS DOESBURG, A. M. 
Modern Languages and Art; A., B. and C. Classes. 

Prop. WILLIAM A. SHIELDS, A. M., Secretary. 
Grammar and Rhetoric; A. and B. Classes. 

Prop. GERRIT J. KOLLEN, A. M. 

Mathematics, Natural Philosophy and Didactics, A. Class; 
Astronomy, B. Class. 

HENRY BOERS, A. M. 

Assistant Professor of Latin and Mathematics. In charge of Greek 
and Roman History. 

JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, Jr., A. M. 

Assistant Professor of Greek and English. In charge of U. 8. 
History and Civil Government. 

PHILIP T. PHELPS, A. B., Tutor. 

Rev. NICHOLAS M. STEEPENS, D. D. 
In charge of Religious Instruction, A. and B. Classes. 

Rkv. JOHN H. KARSTEN, A. M. 

In charge of Religious Instruction, C. and D. Classes. 

Prop. G. C. SHEPARD. 

Instructor in Vocal Music and the Voice. 




Prop. GERRIT J. KOLLEN, Zibrarian. 
WILLIAM A. BEARDSLEE, } 

HARMAN V. S. PEEKE, 

GERRIT J. HEKHUIS, Chorister. 
G. TE LINDE, Organist. 
LOUIS DE WIT, Janitor. 



y Assistant Librarians. 



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STUDENTS. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



"A" CLASS. 



KAMB8. 

Josephine V. Kiekintveld, 
S^na Voorhoret, 
Henry Giebink, 
Herbert G. Keppel, 
Albert Knooibuizen, 
Gelmer Kuiper, 
Abraham Leenhoats, 
Martin Ossewaarde, 
Cornelias M. Steffens, 
William Stegeman, 
Gerrit te Linde, 
Anthony M. Van Dnine, 
Dirk J. Werkman, 



RB8IDBNCB8. BOOMS. 

Holland City, At Home. 

Overyssel, Mich., Mrs. Boot. 

Waupun, Wis., Rev. J. H. Karsen. 
Zeeland, Mich., No. 13, V. V. H. 
K Holland, Mich., No. 12, V.V.H. 
Graafschap, Mich., B. Slag. 

Zeeland, Mich., No. 17, V. V. H. 
Holland City, At Home. 

Holland City, At Home. 

New Groningen, Mich, At Home. 
Brandon, Wis., No. 12, V. V. H. 
Zeeland, Mich., No. 17, V. V. H. 
Patterson ville, la., R.£. Werkman. 



Katie Den Herder, 
Kate E. Herold, 
Ella M. Hunt, 
Martha M. Nyland, 
Ida N. Nies, 
Mary J. Schepers, 
Mary E. Steffens, 
Maggie Van Putten, 
Oscar Baert, 
Henry Bruins, • 
Wm. H. Bruins, 
Daniel G. Cook, 
Clinton Leroy Dayton, 



"B" CLASS. 

Zeeland, Mich., Rev. 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Holland, Mich., 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Zeeland, Mich., 
Brandon, Wis., 
Brandon, Wis.> 
Holland City, 
Berlin, Mich., 



N.M. Steffens. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

Mrs. Nies. 
J. Schepers. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

C. Landaal. 

G. Huizinga. 

At Home. 
Mrs. Kreraer. 



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^ CATALOGUB OF HOPS COLLSGB. 



HAMB8. 



RESIDENCES. 



ROOMS. 



Martin Flipse, 
Henry Wilson Harrington, 
John Huizinga, 
Herman S. Juistema, 
Henry Kleyn, 
Harry Kremers, 
Bernard J. Landaal, 
James Ossewaarde, 
Albert J. Rooks, 
Peter 6. Rooks, 
Peter H. Schravesande, 
Wm. W. Van der Haar, 
Derrick J. Walvoord, 
Aart Van Westrienen, 



Cedar Grove, Wis., Mrs. Pieters. 
Holland, Mich., . At Home. 

Holland City, At Home. 

Grand Haven, Mich., H. Toren. 
Holland City, At Home. 

Holland City, At Home. 

Waapun,Wi8., Rev. J.H. Karsten. 
Zeelanc), Mich., Mrs. Nibbelink. 



Holland, Mich., 
Holland, Mich., 
Holland City, 
Holland, Mich., 



At Home. 
At Home. 
At Home. 
At Home. 



Cedar Grove, Wi8.,;No. 20,V.V.H. 
Grand Haven, Mich., H. Toren. 



"C" CLASS. 



Anna' Mary Broek, 
Katie Maria Brower, 
Minnie Cappon, 
Sarah Cappon, 
Janie Dubbink, 
Sarah Lilian Jones, 
Anna Maria Meengs, 
Janie Nykerk, 
Minnie Cornelia Schaap, 
Fannie Steffens, 
Mary Thompson, 
Gerrit H. Albers, 
John Bode, 
Benjamin Brouwer, 
George Edward Cook, 
Albert De Vries, 
Henry J. De Vries, 
Rokas Chr. de Vries, 
Chas. Avery Docsburg, 
Gilbert Haan, 



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Holland City, 

Holland City, 

Holland City, 

Holland City, 

Overyssel, Mich. 

Holland City, 

Holland City, 

Overyssel, Mich., 

Holland, Mich., 

Holland City, 

Holland City, 

Overyssel, Mich., 

Holland, Mich., 

Overyssel, Mich., 

Holland City, 

New Groningea, Mich., At Home. 

New Groningen, Mich , At Home. 

Holland City, At Home. 

Holland City, At Home. 

Vriesland,Mich., No. 18, V. V. H 



At Home. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

Mrs. Boot. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

Mrs. Boot. 

J. Panels. 

At Home. 

At Home. 
Mrs. Bolhuis. 

At Home. 
Mrs. Bolhuis. 

At Home. 




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16 



CATALOOVB OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



HAKB8. 

Casper Lah 018, 
John L. Lubbers, 
Henry J. Luidens, 
John Nordhuis, 
Stanley Monroe, 
John DLrk Roelofs, 
John Sietsema, 
Cornelius Trompen, 
John Van der Meulen, 
MarinuH D. Van Heulen, 
Wra. Van Loo, 
Gerrit H. Veldhuis, 
Abraham Westveer, 
Jurry Winter, 




RESIDENCES. 

Zeeland, Mich., 
Drenthe, Micb., 
N. Holland, Mich 
Q'd Haven, Mich. 
Berlin, Mich., 
Drehthe, Mich., 
Cooper8ville,Mich 
Vriesland, Mich., 
Holland, Mich., 
E. Saugatuck, J. 
Zeeland, Mich., 
Overyasel, Mich., 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 



ROOMS. 

At Home. 

Mrs. Niewold. 

,No. 18,V.V.H. 

, J. A. Brouwer. 

Mrs. Geerlings. 

Mrs. Niewold. 

.,Mrs.Nrbbelink. 

H. Toren. 

Mrs. Kremer. 

C. Van Heulen. 

At Home. 

Mrs. Bolhuis. 

At Home. 

At Home. 



IN PARTIAL (^.OURSE. 



John J. Bolt, 
^ Aleck Ekkens, 
Abraham Thompson, 



6'd Haven, Mich., B. Eruidenier. 
G'd Haven, Mich., B. Kruidenier. 
Holland City, At Home. 



"D" CLASS. 



Winifred S. Bangs, 
Christina S. Broek, 
Frankie £. Coates, 
Gertie J. De Fj-el, 
Rosa M. Doyle, 
Santie M. Duiker, 
Annie C. Earsten, 
Christine M. J. Kremer, 
Lilla K. Nevius, 
Anna E. Nibbelink, 
George H. D. Baert, 
Albert Boeve, 
Edward Brandt, 
Herman Derks, 
Levi Felker, 



Holland City, 

Holland City, 

Holland City, 

Holland, Mich., 

Holland City, 

G'd Haven, Rev. 

Holland City, 

Zeeland, Mich, Rev 

Ottawa, Mich., 

Holland City, 

Zeeland, Mich., 

Holland, Mich., 

Vriesland, Mich., 

New Groningen, Mich., At Home. 

West Bay City, Mich., T.M.Clarke. 



At Home. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

At Home. 
. H. Earsten. 

At Home. 

J. H. Earsten. 

Wm* Swift. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

At Home. 
H. Geerlings. 



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f CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 17 ]\ 

i —^ r— r — 



NAMB8. 

Henry Gcerlings, 
AlbertUR C. V. R. Gilmore, 
Dirk Huizenga, 
Conrad H. Karsten, 
Henry M. Kiekintveld, 
John A. Kleis, 
John Luxen, 
Fred M. Rose, 
Edward B. Scott, 
Levinus Slotman, 
Tiemroen Smith, 
Paul Steketee, 
Riekus Steketee, 
John C. F. Tilbuscher, 
Herman Van der Ploeg, 
Homer Van Landegend, 
George W. Van O'Linda, 
Jacob F. Van Voorst, 
Plenry J. Veld man, 
Benjamin Veneklasen, 
Peter Veneklasen, 
Henry WynboflF, 



RESroSNCES. ROOMS. 

Holland, Mich., At Home. 

Holland City, At Home. 

New Groningen, Mich,, At Home. 
Holland City, At Home. 

Holland City, At Home. 

Nunica, Mich., £. Frik. 

Grand Haven, Mich., A. Vennema. 
Holland City;" At Home. 

Holland City, At Home. 

Overyssel, Mich., Mrs. Nibbelink. 



Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Chicago, 111., 
Auburn, 111., 
Holland City, 



At Home. 

At Home. 

At Home. 
Mrs. Geerlings. 
Mrs. Geerlings. 

At Home. 



Canajoharie,N. Y., Mrs.V.O'Linda. 
Holland, Mich., At Home. 

G'd Rapids, Mich., Mrs. Geerlings. 
New Groningen, Mich., At Home. 
New Groningen, Mich., At Home. 
Holland City, At Home. 



SUMMARY. 



"A'' Class, 
"B" Class, - 
"C" Class, 
"D'' Class, - 
Partial, 

Total, 
Academic, 
Theological, 



13 
27 
34 

38 
3 



116 

31 

5 



Total, in the Institution, - - - 151 



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ADMISSSION. 

For admission into the "D" Class, a common school edu- 
cation is required, upon the branches pursued in that year. 
The better their previous training, the more easily and prof- 
itably can pupils enter upon the Grammar School Course. 

For admission into any advanced class of the Institution, 
it will be necessary for the applicant to pass an examination 
in the studies previ^ously pursued by the class. If received 
on conditions, the conditions must be fulfilled before matric- 
ulation. 

PROBATION. 

New students, in either Department, remain on proba.tion 
for one terra, at the expiration of which, if their course prove 
satisfactory, they are admitted to matriculation in the usual 
manner. 



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CATALOGUB OF HOPS COLLEGE. 



21 



Oreek, — Arnold's Greek Prose Composition; Crosby's 
Xenophon's Anabasis; Seeman's Mythology. 

Modem, — Syntaxis, (Datch); Practical Exercises. 

JRhetoric, — Hart's Rhetoric; Essays; Declamations, (of- 
ten original); 'The Excelsiora," published by the Class. 

History. — Smith's Roman History, (abridged.) 

CrriL Government. — ^Toung's Government Class Book. 

Didactics. — ^Lectures on the Art of Teaching. 

Special. — Duffet's French Grammar, 2nd Part; Wor- 
man's German Grammar and Reader, (continued.) 

Note. — Special attention is given, during the whole of 
the Preparatory Course, to the grammars of the Languages 
studied. For those who pursue only English studies, or who 
design stopping at the end of the "A" year, the Faculty pro- 
vide such additional branches, as seem most expedient and 
profitable. Among theni may be named Physiology, Botany, 
Zoology, Chemistry, or Geology. Those generally make 
better progress, whose time is fully occupied in the work of 
the school. 





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REOPENING OF THE THEOLOGICAL 
DEPARTMENT. 



The Catalogue of 1882 gave the action of General Synod, 
in 1879, looking to the restoration of the Theological Depart- 
ment. At theif June meeting of 1883, the Synod adopted a 
report, naming the conditions on which the desired restora- 
tion might take place in 1884. The Chair of Didactic and 
Polemic Theology had been endowed, through the efforts of 
Rev. C. E. Crispell, D. D., to the amount of nearly ^7,000; 
and this Endowment was to be completed by the churches of 
the West up to the sum of 130,000 in cash; in which case 
the Synod would elect a Professor, to take the place of Dr. 
Crispell, resigned. The Endowment had so far advanced, in 
June 1884, that the Synod elected Rev. N. M. Steffens, of 
Holland, as Professor (»f Didactic and Polemic Theology, and 
authorized him to begin the work of instruction, so soon ad 
the full $30,000 was paid in to the Board of Direction. The 
western churches raised the needed $23,000, mainly through 
the exertions and zeal of Revs. P. Lepeltak, N. M. Steffens 
and H. E. Dosker, and completed the endowment in the 
month of November. Rev. Dr. Steffens was inaugurated, in 
the Third Reformed Church, Dec. 4th, 1884, by Revs. C. 
Scott and S. Bolks; and the next day, (Dec. 5th), the Theo- 
logical Department was formally re-opened, after a suspen- 
sion of seven years. 

The General Synod also provided for an additional Lector, 
to which position Rev. D. Van Pelt, of East New York, was 
elected by the C/Ouncii. He declined, and the Professor is 
assisted by temporary Teachers, as follows: 

Rev. PETER MOERDYKE, 

Id Greek, Exegesis and Archaeology. 

Rev. henry E. DOSKER, 

In Sacred and Church History. 



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Gerhard De Jonge, 
Simon Hogenboom, 
Gerrit H. Hospers, 
Pieter Ihrman, 



Dirk Scholten, Alton, la.. 

It yet remains for the next Synod to re-organize the 
Theological Department in full, and define its constitutional 
relations to the College. 




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Miscellaneous Information. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

In the Academic Department, there is a partial rather 
than a special course. Studies may be omitted, but as yet 
others have not been substituted in their place, and such a 
partial course entitles only to a certificate, not to a diploma. 

Most of the students seek what is called '^a liberal or clas- 
sical education," but a "partial" or "elective" course is offered 
to all who so desire, and facilities furnished through the 
regular instructors. German and French or Drawing and 
Painting can be studied at any time, as also the branches 
generally called "scientific." 

In 1878, the Institution was opened to women, and at 
once several young ladies availed themselves of the privilege. 
The number is increasing from year to year. They enter the 
regular classes, and attend the same lectures and recitations 
as the young men. Their homes will be with approved 
families in the city. 

SCHOOL YEAR. 

The Scholastic Year of forty weeks, begins on the third 
Wednesday in September, and ends with the General Com- 
mencement on the fourth Wednesday in June. 

The Winter and Spring vacations are fixed by the Gen- 
eral Faculty. (See the Calendar). 

EXAMINATIONS. 

The Yearly Examinations, before the Council or its 
Committees, begin on the third Wednesday in June. At 
other times. Special examinations may be held, and passed 
upon by the respective Faculties, subject to the approval of \ * 
Council or to a re-exaraination, if so desired. 






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The EuJes of Order are few and simple. In general, if 
the students do not improve their time and opportunities, or 
do not conduct themselves in a respectful and orderly man- 
ner, their connection with the Institution will be suspended. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

The exercises of each day begin with prayer in the Col- 
lege Chapel, at 8 o^clock a. m. 

On the Sabbath, the students are expected to worship 
regularly with one of the churches in the city or vicinity, un- 
less excused by the President. 

One of the Pastors of the Reformed Churches in Holland 
or vicinity, by appointment of the Council, gives religious 
instruction to the Grammar School classes. 

Although Hope College is denominational, and is under 
the patronage and support of the Reformed Church in 
America, yet, by the law of its incorporation, it can have no 
"religious test.'' The doors are open, and welcome is given 
to all who submit to its scholastic regulations. As a Chris- 
tian school, however, it inculcates gospel truths, and demands 
a consistent moral character and deportment. 

LIBRARY, ETC. 

A Library of over 6,000 volumes, and a Reading Roomy 
are free for the use of the students. Books and papers are 
constantly being added. 

The Laboratory^ Cabinet and Philosophical Apparatus 
are adapted to the use of the recitation- or lecture-rooms. 
They are gradually being made larger and more complete. 
It ig to be hoped that Maps, Charts, Instruments and Spec- 
imens of Natural Historv, as well as books, will be donated 
by the graduates and friends of the Institution. 

SOCIETIES, ETC. 

The Literary Societies^ viz., the Meliphone and the Fra- 
ternal, have now been maintained for years, and offer decided 



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26 



OATALOGUB OF HOPB COLLEGE. 



advantages to their respective members; and materially aid 
in the attainment of that culture, which it is the object of this 
school to promote. 

In 1883 the young lady students organized a society, 
called ZetcUetfiean: — similar to the Melephone. 

During the last year a literary Society, called SanqnOy 
has stimulated its members to a more careful and critical 
study of English authors. 

The Y. M. C. A., a society of over forty members, has 
carried on its work with much interest and activity. 

Connected with the Institution, a religious weekly is pub- 
lished, called De Hope, 

A Cmirae of Lectures, by the professors or others, is of 
almost yearly occurrence; usually at the invitation of one of 
the societies, and with the approval and financial aid of the 
Executive Committee. The Y. M. C. A. has secured six 
lectures for 1884-*86. 

MUSIC. 

Vocal Music is usually provided for. No charge is made 
for this. Lessons in Instrumental Mubia will be furnished, 
when desired, at the expense of the pupil. 

EXPENSES. 
Holland is surrounded by a rich agricultural region, and 
the cost of living is comparatively cheap. Good board may 
be had in families of the city, for from two and one-half 
dollars to three dollars per week; and without fubnishbd 
BOOMS at corresponding rates. 

There are some rooms in the College building, in the se- 
lection of which students for th6 ministry have the prefer- 
ence. These are furnished in part, and bear a charge of five 
dollars a year. 

As yet, no xumoN fees have been charged, but every 
student must pay to the Treasurer, in advance, an incidental 
fee of five dollars per term. 



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OATALOGUB OF HOPB COLLEGE. 




fB7 \\ 



The graduation fee is Sve dollars, and the cost of the 
diploma. No other charges are made. 

For books, clothing, washing, fuel, lights, travel, etc., 
those interested can best make the estimates. The bhtiks 
expenses need not exceed $200 per annum. 

LOCATION, ETC. 

Holland City is a central point on the Chicago and West 
Michigan Railway, and on the Ohio and Michigan R. R., (to 
Toledo), ninety miles north of New Buffalo, twenty -five miles 
southwest of Grand Rapids, and midway between Allegan 
and Grand Haven. It is therefore most desirably located 
having both land- and water-communications, and being near 
the shore of Lake Michigan, with which it is directly con- 
nected by Macatawa Bay, itself a beautiful sheet of water. 

The CoUege Buildings are eight in number. The largest 
is Van Yleok Hall, mainly devoted to Students' rooms, and 
the Library. The grounds are beautifully located on a 
Campus of eighteen acres, well shaded with native trees, and 
annually improving in appearance. 

REMARKS. 

It will be seen that we have at present two Departments 
in operation, and duly organized. 

By the action of the last General Synod, the Theological 
Department was restored, and when fully re-organized, will 
take its proper place in the Institution. 

Oar Library is rapidly increasing in the number of vol- 
umes and in value. It has already outgrown the rooms as- 
signed it, and requires more ample quarters. A Library 
building is one of our pressing necessities. With a spacious, 
fire-proof room, the collection would be safe and serviceable. 
Additions are being made every year of valuable works, 
which would be difficult and expensive to replace. Who will 
see that they have provided for them a safe and cheerful 



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CATALOOUB OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



room, where they can be consnlted, and their precious treas- 
nres made nsef nl to our students? 

A new 1>uilding for recitation rooms and similar purposes 
is also a great desideratum, and it would be a most decided 
step in adyanee, if such a Hal) should adorn our beautiful 
Campus. 

This catalogue shows a larger attendance of students than 
in any forn^er year. A list of the Academic Alumni, up to 
1884, will follow, and hereafter an annual Circular or Cata- 
logue will be published about the middle of each school year. 



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ALUMNI 



isee. 



NAME. 



Ale Buarsma, 
Gerrit Dangremond, 
William B. Gilmore, 
Peter Moerdyke, 
William Moerdyk, 
William A. Shields, 
John W. Te Winkel, 
Harm Woltman, 



Gerrit Bolks, 
James De Pree, 
Enne J. Heeren, Rev. 
John Huizenga, 
Albert T. Huizenga, 




OCCUPATION. 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

[Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Professor, 

(■lergymari, 

[Clergyman 

1S67. 

Merchant, 

Clergyman, 

[Missionary.] 

Clergyman, 

Teacher, 



Dirk B. K. Van Raalte,t Merchant, 



Orange City, la. 

Detroit, Mich. 

.] *April 24, 1884. 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 

South Holland, 111. 

Holland, Mich. 

E. Williamson, KY. 

.] *April 30, 1870. 



Orange City, la. 

Sioux Center, la. 

♦Oct. 16, 1878. 

Holland, Neb. 

Beaverdam, Mich. 

Holland, Mich. 



Harm Borgers, 

John Broek, 

Gerrit J. KoUen, 

Gerrit Van De Kreeke,Rev, 

William Visscher, 



Evert Van Der Hart, 

A. Wilson Van Der Veer, 

William Van Putten,J 



Henry K. Boer, 
William B. De Bey,t 



1868. 

Clergyman, Greenwood, Wis. 

Clergyman, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Professor, Holland, Mich. 

Merchant, Kalamazoo, Mich. 
[Miss'y Student.] *Feb. 11, 1872. 

1869. 



Clergyman, 

Merchant, 

Physician, 

1870. 

Clergyman, 
Physician, 



Jackson, Mich. 
Davenport, la. 
Holland, Mich. 

Albany, K T. 
Chicago, 111. 



I 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



NAME. 

Peter De Bruyo, 
John A. De Spelder, Rev. 
Charles E. Jones, 
James F. Zwemer, 



John Hoffman, 
Simon Kuyper, 
Nicholas Neerken, 
Peter D. Schipperas, 
Samuel Streng, 
James Ten Eyck, 
William Yeenschoten, 

Arend Visscher, 



Edwin Bedell, 
John Hoekje, 
Josias Meulendyk, 
Helenas E. Nies, 
Jacob Van Halteren, 
Harm Van der Wart, 

Cornelius Kriekaard, 
Joseph G. Millspaugh, 
Harm Van der Ploeg, 
Cornelis Wabeke, 

Henricus Baron, 
Lawrence Dykstra, 
Robert B. D. Simonson, 
Evert Smits, 
William V. Steele, 
John Visscher, 



OCCITPATION. 

Clergyman, 
Professor, 
Physician, 
lUergyman, 

1871. 

Clergyman, 

[Teacher.] 

Clergyman, 

Book-keeper, 

Clergyman, 

Lawyer, 

Clergyman, 

1872. 

Lawyer, 

187S. 

Lawyer, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Teacher, 

Clergyman, 

1874. 

Clergyman, 
Physician, 
Clergyman, 
[Clergyman.] 

1875. 

Physician, 

Clergyman, 

Principal, 

Clergyman, 

Lawyer, 

Clergyman, 



TBSBKST RESIDENCE. 

Rochester, N. T. 

Orange City, la. 

Albany, N. Y. 

Alto, Wis. 



Baldwin, Wis. 

♦Sept. 1, 1882. 

Sanders, Ind. Ter. 

Chicago, 111. 

Churchville, Penn. 

Fairview, III. 

Muitzeskill, N. T. 

Holland, Mich. 



Albany, N. Y. 

Cawker City, Kan. 

Fremont, Mich. 

Paterson, N. J. 

Clyde, Kan. 

Athens, N. Y. 



Danforth, 111. 

Garfield, Dak. 

Fulton, 111. 

♦Feb. 22, 1880. 

Forest Grove, Mich. 

Orange City, la. 

Troy, Mo. 

Tama City, la. 

Somerville, N. J. 

St. Paul, Minn. 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



Henry Elias Dosker, 
Frank Alanson Force, 
Albert A. Pfanstiehl, 



1876. 

OCCUPATION. PRESENT RESIDENCE. 

Clergyman, Grand Haven, Micb. 



Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 



Cornells y an Oostenbnigge, Clergyman, 



Douwe Tntema, 

Jobn Comelis Groeneveld, 
Lambertns Hekbuis, Rev. 
Mattbew Kolyn, 
Jobannes Visscher, 

Henry Boers, 
Jobn Gabriel Gebbard, 
Stepben Jobn Harmeling, 
Jobn Henry Kleinbeksel, 

Dirk Jobn De Bey, 
Elias De Spelder, M. D., 
Eiimage Eimura, 
George Niemeyer, 
Motoitero Obgimi, 
Ame Vennema, 

Willinm G. Baas, 
Jacob Peter De Jong, 
Bernard Jobn De Yries, 
Peter Marinas Elsenius, 
Abel Henry Huizenga, 
Abrabam Stegeman, 
Albert H. Strabbing, 
Jacob Jobn Van Zanten, 
Frederick James Zwemer, 



Manito, III. 

Troy, Mo. 

Raritan, 111. 

St. Jobns, Micb. 



Principal, 

1877. 

Clergyman, 
Missionary, M. D., 
Clergyman, 
Teacber, 

1878. 

Professor, 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Professor, 

1879. 

Clergyman, 

Physician, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

1880. 

Clergyman, Newark, N. Y* 

Clergyman, Greenleafton, Minn. 
Dentist, Holland City. 

J *July 20, 1881, 

Univ. Student, Baltimore, Md. 
Clergyman, Harrison, Dak. 

Teacber, Graafscbap, Micb. 

Teacber, Orange City, la. 

Tbeo. Student, Cbicago, 111. 



Alto, Wis. 

Arcot, India. 

Marion, N. Y. 

Holland, Micb. 



Holland City. 

Griggstown, N. J. 

Marion, Dak. 

Holland City. 

. Clymer, N. Y. 

Drentbe, Micb. 

Tokio, Japan. 

Vriesland, Micb. 

Sbisoo, Japan. 

New Paltz, N. Y, 



Ebenezer Van den Berge,t Tbeo. Student, Xenia, Obio. 

I Intended studying for the Ministry. 



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S2 



CATALOGUB OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



NAME. OCCUPATION. 

Gerrit John Diekema, 
Charbs Selwyn Dutton, 
John Gerardus Fagg, 
Rense Henry Joldersma, . 
Tinis John Kommers, 
John Riemersma, 
Bastian Smits, 
John George Van Hees, Jr., 
John W. Cross,! 

John William Bosnian, 
Gerhard De Jonge, 
Pietcr Ihrman, 
Johannes £; Matzke, 
Philip T. Phelps, 
Charles T. Steffens, 
Sarah G. Alcott, 
Frances F. C. Phelps, 

Evert J. Blekkink, 
Jacob Dyk, 
Henry Hulst, 
Tametsne Matsda, 
Albert Oltmans, 
John Abraham Otte, • 
Dirk Scholten, 
E. William Stapelkamp, 

Simon Hogenboom, 
Gerrit Henry Hospers, 



PRESENT BESIDENCE. 

1881. 

Lawyer, Holland Mich. 

Clergyman, Macon, Mich. 

Theo. Student, N. Brunswick, N.J. 
Clergyman, Spring Lake, Mich. 
Clergyman, Pompton, N. J. 

Clergyman, Rochester, N. Y. 
Clergyman, Stone Ridge, N. Y. 
Telegrapher, St. Joseph, Mich. 
Candidate, Princeton, N. J. 

1882. 

Med. Student, Ann Arbor, Mich. 



Holland City; 

Holland City. 

Silver Creek, 111; 

Holland City. 

Chicago, III. 

Holland City. 

Albany, N. Y, 



Theo. Student, 
Theo. Student, 
Teacher, 
Teacher, 
Book keeper, 
At Home, 
At Home, 

1888. 

Theo. Student, N. Brun8wick,N. Jl 
Theo. Student, N. Brunswick,N. J. 
Teacher, Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Teacher, Tkui, Japan. 

Theo. Student, N. Brun8wick,N. J. 
Med. Student, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Theo. Student, Holland City. 
Theo. Student, N. Brunswick,N. J. 

1884. 

Theo. Student, 
Theo\ Student, 



Holland City. 
Holland City. 




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CATALOGUE OF HOPS COLLBGE. 3S 



SUMMARY. 



ACADEMIC ALUMNL 

Clergymen and Candidates, - - - - 50 

Theological Students, - - - - 11 

Physicians or Medical Students, - - • 7 

Lawyers or Law Students, ... 5 

Teachers, - - - - - - 16 

Otherwise Employed, - - - - 10 

ToUl Alumni, (1866-1884,) ... 108 

of whom 7 are deceased. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL GRADUATES, 

Total number of graduates (1851-1884,) - - 275 

REFERENCES. 

* (Throughout the Catalogue,) Deceased. 

f (Alumni of Acad, and Prep. Dep's,) Partial Course. 

I (Alumni of Academic Dep.) A. B. Honorary. 




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Historical Sketch. 

For many years a desire had existed, to have a school of 
the Reformed Charoh established in the valley of the Missis- 
sippi. The way however did not seem to be open, until, in 
1847 and 1848, a Holland Colony was planted in Ottawa and 
the adjoining counties of Michigan, mainly through the 
agency of Rev. A. C Van Raalte, D. D., who devoted him- 
self assiduously to the moral and material interests of the en- 
terprise. This was an event, which God used as the origin 
of what is now Hope College. 

A PIONBBB SCHOOL. 

In I860, Rev. Dr. John A. Garretson, the Corresponding 
Secretary of the Board of Domestic Missions, R. C. A., made 
a visit to the Holland Colony in Michigan, and on his return 
drew up the plan of a "High School'* in that vicinity, whose 
object should be to prepare sons of the colonists, to be edu- 
cated in Rutgers College, and also to educate their daugh- 
ters. In accordance with this plan, a plot of five acres in the 
village of Holland was donated by Dr. Van Raalte. Mr. 
Walter R. Taylor, of Geneva, N. Y., was appointed to take 
charge of the School, and began his work in October, 1861. 
He took charge of the ordinary "District School," and in it 
formed his first Latin class. The latter we are to regard as 
the germ of an ecclesiastical Academy, for it was placed un- 
der the care of the Classis of Holland, and as such was 
reported to the Board of Education. 

In 1863, upon special application from Secretary Garret- 
son, the General Synod took this school, (that is the ecclesi- 
astical part of it,) under its care, and committed it to the 
charge of the Board of Education. The Board assumed the 
trust, and has ever since continued to make appropriations 
for its suppoi-t. Mr. Taylor remained until 1864, introducing 
higher branches, and preparing several students for the 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. SS 



Freshman class of Ratgers College. He was succeeded, for 
about one year, by Rev. F. B. Beidler, of South Bend, 
Indiana. 

APPOINTMENT OF BBV. JOHN VAN VLECK. 

The Boards of Education and Domestic Missions were 
instructed by the General Synod, in 1854, to unite in support- 
ing a minister, who could at the same time ^^preach the Gos- 
pel at Holland, and conduct the instruction of the Academy.'^ 
Accordingly Rev. John Van Yleck, of Shawangunk, N. Y., 
was appointed in 1855, upon his graduation from the Theo- 
logical Seminary at New Brunswick. Mr. Van Vleck had 
rare qualifications for his work. He separated the ^'ecclesi- 
astical germ'^ spoken of; used for his classes the building 
known as the ^'Orphan House,^ and distinctly called his 
school the "Holland Academy.^' He began with eighteen 
students, two of whom were girls. This number increased to 
thirty in 1857, and to a few more in 1858 and 1859. During 
this time Mr. Van Vleck had charge of a preaching service 
in English. In 1857, Mr. Abraham Thompson, of New 
Brunswick, N. J., was sent as an assistant teacher, and upon 
his resignation, in 1858, Rev. Giles Van De Wall succeeded 
him, to give aid in preaching, as well as in the Academy. 

THE FIRST BUILDING. 

The donation of five acres, for school purposes, has 
already been mentioned. This property was deeded to the 
General Synod. Additions were made to the plot by pur- 
chase, until, in 1859, the premises of the Synod became a 
beautiful campus of sixteen acres. In 1857, about 1 12,000 
had been secured, chiefly through the exertions of Dr. Van 
Raalte, and a brick edifice erected under the superintendence 
of Mr. Van Vleck, and now known as "Van Vleck Hall." 
The building was of brick, three stories high, besides the 
basement, and 40xt)0 feet on the ground. To this house the 
school was removed, and for over a year a part of it was 
used as a Refectory. But in 1859, the ill health of Mr. Van 




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Vleck forced him to resign his position. Not only were his 
labors onerous, but obstacles were placed in his way, trying 
to a sincere and earnest principal. He had done much to ad- 
vance the school, and is worthy of grateful remembrance on 
the part of his pupils and others. 

APPOINTMENT OP BEV. PHILIP PHELPS, JR. 

Rev. Philip Phelps, Jr., of Hastings, N. Y., was ap- 
pointed by the Board of Education to succeed Mr. Van 
Vlecky and entered on his work in the fall of 1859. He 
found thirty-three pupils in attendance. The regular organi- 
zation of the school into classes, and some more formal and 
efficient plan of superintendency by the Church, became his 
first care. Success crowned his efforts, in both respects, and 
the progress of the Academy became more marked. In 1862, 
the number of students was forty-five, divided into "Classical 
and Primary," and in the following year the General Synod 
approved of and appointed the ''Board of Superintendents." 

In the fall of 1862, another decided step was taken. By 
the approval of the Western Classes, and of the Synod of . 
Chicago, a "Collegiate Department" was introduced, and a 
"Freshman Class" of ten members was formed. From this 
time date the efforts to have a regular College incorporated, 
under the laws of Michigan, and these efforts culminated in 
the Institution as we have it to-day. The Board of Superin- 
tendents continued; the four "Academic" classes entered in 
order upon their course; the General Synod recommended 
the College in 1864, and its endowment in the sum of tlOO,- 
000; the collection of funds was prosecuted with success East 
and West; needed steps were taken, and just before the 
graduation of the first class, in 1866, were organized the 
"Council," Presidency, Faculty, and Departments of Hope 
College. In the seven yeare, since 1859, the number of stu- 
dents had increased from thirty-three to fifty, viz.: in the 
Academic classes, 23; and in those of the Grammar school, 27. 
The graduating Senior class contained eight members. 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPB COLLEGE. 



S7 



TKACHBBS. 



In the Bummer of 1861, Rev. Giles Van De Wall resigned, 
and accepted a pastoral charge in South Africa. Several 
students aided the principal during the next two years. In 
January, 1864, two new professors, viz: Rev. Peter J. Oggel 
and Rev. T. Romeyn Beck, having been appointed by the 
Board of Education, entered upon their work. The former 
was, at the time of his appointment, pastor of the Reformed 
Church, of Pella, la., and the latter had been an assistant 
professor at Rutgers College, N. J. Rev. John M. Ferris, of 
Grand Rapids, came weekly from that place to give instruc- 
tion in Rhetoric, Chemistry, Ac. He resigned in 1865. Be- 
ing thus assisted. Dr. Phelps could be absent more or less in 
soliciting endowment funds. Early in 1866 Rev. Charles 
Scott, of Shawangunk, N. Y., and somewhat later. Rev. 
Cornelius E. Crispell, Professor in Rutgers College, were ap- 
pointed, and they accepted their appointments. Mr. Cornelis 
Doesburg, of Holland, Mich., was made Tutor of the modern 
languages. Thus, in July, 1866, and just before the "Com- 
mencement" of that year, a Faculty of six members was 
formally constituted, and Rev. Philip Phelps, Jr., D. D., was 
inaugurated as the first President, by a committee of Synod 
appointed for that purpose. 

FUNDS, AC. 

Holland Academy had no endowment. For the proposed 
College, the amounts collected, up to 1866, were reported to 
be as follows, viz: {approximately) Collected by Prof. Oggel 
in the West, $18,000^ collected by Dr. Phelps, mainly in the 
East, (40,000. All moneys were at first paid to the Board of 
Direction in New York, and then, by order of the Synod, 
the sum of $30,000 was donated to the Council of the Col- 
lege, for the purpose of securing a legal incorporation from 
the State. In addition to this sum, the Council was vested 
with the use and benefit of all the Synod's property in the 
village of Holland. A fair foundation was therefore laid for 
a prosperous "school of the Church." Besides Van VIeck 
Hall there were, on the Campus, three other buildings: 



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CATALOGUB OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



1. A bailding, erected in 1857; used as a '^Laboratory'' 
after 1867, nxuch improved in 1870. 

2. A residence, bnilt for Rev. Mr. Van de Wall in 1860, 
and occupied by Prof. Oggel in 1864 — afterwards called the 
"Oggel House." 

3. A gymnasium, erected by the students in 1862, and 
changed into the "Chapel" of the College in 1872 — well 
adapted to this purpose, also for oratorical exercises. 

PBESIDBKCY OF DB. PHELPS. 

This continued for twelve years, or until July 1, 1878, 
and succeeded his seven years principalship, in Holland 
Academy. He labored assiduously for the welfare of the 
school, but encountered the difficulties so incident to young 
colleges. A cursory statement of these twelve years will be 
appended, in order to show the progress of the Institution. 

1866. A newspaper, called De Hopey was established, 
under the editorship of Prof. P. J. Oggel. The first Com- 
mencement was held July 17th. In September, Theological 
instruction began. The first class consisted of seven mem- 
bers, and the teaching was divided among the clerical mem- 
bers of the Falcnlty. This was arranged by the Council, ac- 
cording to a resolution of the General Synod. 

• 1867. Music Hall erected for recitation rooms. Profes- 
sor C. E. ( ViRpell, D. D., elected by General Synod, as "Pro- 
fessor of Didactic and Polemic Theology at Hope College," 
the other Professors being appointed as "Theological Lec- 
tors." The Theological examinations placed under the care 
of a branch of "the Board of Superintendents of the Theo- 
logical Seminary," Mr. Wm. A. Shields, A. B., (class of 
1866) appointed Tutor in the Grammar school. Rev. A. C. 
Van Raalte deeded to the Council about eighty acres of land 
within the city limits. Thirty acres of this were afterwards 
laid out as "Hope College Addition." A tract of thirteen 
acres purchased at Indian Village on the south side of Black 
Lake, and adjoining the Van Raalte donation. Point Superior, 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. S9 

a tract of 837 acres, purchased on the north side of Macatawa 
Bay. Afterwards a portion of the land was improyed and 
called "Hope Farm^'* the means being furnished by Mr. 
Wm. H. H. Moore. 

1869. The ^^Theological DepartmenC'* formally consti- 
tuted, and recognized as General Synod's "Theological Sem- 
inary in the West." The Superintendence of the same com- 
mitted to the Council. A gift of tlO,000 by Elder James 
Snydara; one-half in payment of debts, and one-half for com- 
pleting the purchase of Point Superior. For this reason, the 
tract, for some time, was called "Suydam Park." Prof. P. J. 
Oggel died December 1.3. Another structure erected, which 
afterwards, having added to it a seqond story and a wing, 
became known as the "Grammar School Building." 

1870. Richard Parsons, A. B., appointed Tutor. Re- 
signed in 1871* 

1871. "A Constitution for the whole School," adopted 
by the General Synod, recognizing three regular Depart- 
ments with an adjunct "Publication Department." Wm. 
A. Shields, A. M., luado Assistant Professor of Rhetoric and 
English Literature. Rev. Peter Moerdyk, A. M., (class of 
1866) elected as Assistant Professor of Latin and Greek. He 
resigned in 1873, to take charge of the First Reformed 
Church, of Grand Rapids, Mich. Gerrit J. Eollen, A. Mv 
(class of 1868,) elected as Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics. The greater part of Holland destroyed by fire, in 
October, including the residence of Prof. Scott. No College 
building burned, but indirectly much loss inflicted on the 
school. The devastated city greatly aided by the eastern 
churches. 

1862. Repairs, to a considerable extent, on the buildings 
of the College completed. The Holland Colony celebrated 
the tw^ty-fifth year of its settlement in America, and as a 
"Memorial," an "Ebenozer Fund" was started for the support 
of the Grammar School. This fund afterwards amounted to 
over (35,000 in notes and subscriptions, and was designed to 




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CATALOGUE OF HOPB COLLBGE. 



be (50,000. The "Zwemer House" completed on the "South 
Campus;" just west of the ^^ Printing Office^^ (once the "Or- 
phan House.") Cornells Doesburg, A. M., made Professor 
of Modern Languages. 

1875. Professors Beck and Scott regularly appointed as 
"Lectors" in the Theological Seminary at Hope College, and 
the salaries of the three Theological Teachers assumed by 
Synod. Prof. Crispeil began collections for the "Professor- 
ship of Didactic and Polemic Theology," and continued the 
work for two years. The money came mainly from the East. 

1876. The Council resolved to try a "Financial Agency" 
for the purpose of increasing the funds, and elected Assistant 
Professor EoUen to that ofSce. 

1877. The General Synod, finding that the Professors 
were not paid, and that the debt of the College, as well as of 
the Synod, was increasing, suspended the Theological Depart- 
ment after an operation of eleven years. Thirty candidates 
had graduated from it since 1869. Eight others completed 
their course in part. 

1878. The General Synod determined to re-organize 
Hope College, and sen% a Committee for that purpose, to 
meet with the Council. The debt of the Institution was 
found to be over $27,000, besides $4,100, due from the Gen- 
eral Synod to the Theological Teachers. Dr. Phelps resigned 
the Presidency, and Dr. Crispeil his College Professorship, 
to take effect July 1st. A new Constitution of the College 
was drafted. Rev. Giles H. Mandeville, D. D., of New York 
city, was elected Provisional President, and Prof. Ohas. 
Scott, D. D., Vice-President, to administer the College, while 
Dr. Mandeville collected funds in the East. Women were 
admitted to all the departments. Henry Boers, A. B., and 
John H. Kleinheksel, A. B., were appointed Tutors in the 
Grammar School. The number of students had gradually in- 
creased; the 50 of 1805 became 64 in 1872, (not including the 
Theological,) and 98 in 1878. In July, Assistant Professor, 
Wm. A. Shields, was made Professor of Rhetoric and English 




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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



41 



Literatare, and Assistant Professor, G. J. Kollen, resigned 
his Financial Agency, and was made Professor of Mathe- 
maticsy Natural Philosophy and Astronomy. 

PBOVISIOKAL PRESIDENCY. 

When Dr. Phelps resigned, the Council deemed it best to 
elect no permanent president, until the income and condition 
of the College might warrant such a step. Dr. Mandeville 
gave his services without salary, but continued to live in New 
York City. His earnest and successful efforts to collect funds 
continued until 1883. Prof. Scott assumed charge of the ad- 
ministration^ or the executive duties of the institution, from 
July, 1878. As before, a brief sketch from year to year will 
bring the history down to the present time. 

1879. The new constitution of the College was adopted 
by the General Synod, somewhat changed from that of 1871, 
and dropping the Theological Department, because not in oper- 
ation. Prof. C. E. Crispell resigned his Theological Profess- 
orship to the Synod, and became Pastor of the Reformed 
Church, of Spring Valley, N. Y. 

18H0. Rev. Dr. Mandeville having resigned. Prof. Charles 
Scott was appointed Provisional President. The debt dimin- 
ishing. The report to the Synod showed 50 students in the 
Academic, and 78 in the Preparatory Department, a total of 
128. 

1881. Agitation and division in several of the Reformed 
Churches of the Wertt. Both in funds and students the effect 
was detrimental to the (/ollege. 

1882. The debt finally liquidated. Over $35,000 had 
been donated, and paid for that purpose. In addition about 
115,000 had been added to the Endowment, Of the above 
sums, tl 3,000 came from Mr. Garret Kowenhoven, of New- 
town, L. I., and $10,000 from a lady in New York City. 

1883. Henry Boers, A. M., and John H. Kleinheksel, A. 
M., (Tutors since 1878,) appointed Assistant Professors. The 
Chapel materially improved, and used as their place of wor- 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



ship by the First Reformed Church, (the "Minority,) pending 
a suit in law for the recovery of the church edifice. 

1884. Rev. John A. De Baun, D. D., of Fonda, N. T., 
elected permanent President in May, and confirmed by the 
General Synod. He declined the •appointment. Prof. Scott 
continued as provisional President. General Synod met in 
Grand Rapids and made a visit to Hope College and the City 
of Holland, June 7th. $3,100 donated by members of Synod 
for a President's House. A successful effort begun to in- 
crease the " Professorship of Didactic and Polemic Theol- 
ogy," to the full amount of $80,000 in cash, whereupon the 
Synod elected Rev. N. M. Steffens, D. D., to the chair. He 
was duly inaugurated Dec. 4th, and on the next day the The- 
ological Department was formally re-opened with 5 students. 

1885. During the last four years all the streets around 
the College Campus have been graded and graveled, the ex- 
penses thereof falling upon the College, without any aid from 
the city; and for seven years the expenses have regularly 
been met without deficit or debt. The number of students 
from April, 1884, to April, 1885, are, in the Academic De- 
partment, 33; and in the Preparatory, 136, a total of 169; 
and nearly all pursue the full classical course. 

PUBLICATION. 

It has been stated that Be Hope was established in 1866. 
Prof. Oggel was assisted by Prof. C. Doesburg as Office 
editor. After Prof. Oggel's death, his brother. Rev. E. C. 
^ggel, was elected Editor, but resigned in 1871. Rev. C. 
Van der Veen succeeded, until, in 1874, he resigned, and the 
management of the paper was devolved upon a committee of 
the Council, with Prof. C. Doesburg as Managing editor. In 
July 1882, Professors Doesbuig ami Kollen took the paper 
by contract, for two years, but the contract being given up, 
in July 1884, Rev. John H. Karsten was elected by the 
Council as Editor. The brick Printing Office was built by 
voluntary contributions in 1876, and the Press was a dona- 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 4^ 



tion from Mr. Wm. H. H. Moore, in 1871. Circulation about 
fifteen hundred copies. 

CONCLUDING NOTE. 

It will be seen that this school, in almost all respects, has 
been steadily progressing. Before her is a fair prospect, if 
her Alumni stand by her good name, if her friends are at- 
tached to and not alienated from her interests, and if the 
Council do their duty as Chrintian men and faithful guard- 
ians for the Lord. She needs and prays for more ample en- 
dowments. May the future show more and more clearly that 
this is indeed a '^College of Hope." 




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CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



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I HOPE COLLEGE. 

HOLLAND, MICHIERN, 
1885-'86. 



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AN Institution of the Reformed Church in America, 
Incorporated as Hope College, 186a 



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HOLLAND, MICH. 
WM. H. ROGERS. BOOK AND JOB FRtKTEtl. 

1686. 



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CALENDAR. 



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1886. April 13y Third Term begins. 

" " ^<?, Meeting of Council. 

■ " " 29y Senior Examinations. 

" eTwne 16y Undergraduate Examinations. 

** " 21, Rhetorical Exercises. 

" " 21^ Examinations for Admission. 

" " 22 y Meeting of Council. 

" " 22 y Meeting of Alumni. 

" " 23y Commencement. 

VACATION. TWELVE WEEKS. 

" Sept. 16y First Term begins. 

" " 15 y Examinations for Admission. 

" Dec. 18y First Term ends. 

VACATION, TWO WEEKS. 

1887. Jan. 4y Second Term begins. 
" March 26y " " ends. 

VACATION, TWO WEEKS. 

The First Term cojitains H weeks. 
The Second Term contains 12 toeeks. 
77ie Third Term contaifis 11 weeks. 



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THE COUNCIL. 



EX-OFFICIO. 

Rev. Chas. Scott, D. D., - President of the College. 

ELECTED MEMBERS. 

RESIDENGKS. TEBM6 EXPIRE. 



Holland, Mich., 
Hudson, K Y., 
Newark, N. J., 



KAMES. 

Abend Visscheb, 

J. C. Benham, M. D., 

Rev. Wm. J. R. Taylor, D. D., 

♦Rev. E. p. Livingston, D. D., Sioux Falls, la.,' 

Rev. Jas. F. Zwemeb, Waupun, Wis., 

Isaac Cappon, Holland, Mich., 

Rev. Ale Buursema, Orange City, la., 

Rev. Lawrence Dykstra, Orange City, la., 

-WELOi^ OII-A.SSIS oy -wiscoisrsiisr. 
Rev. John H. Karsten, Holland, Mich., 

Rev. William Moerdyk, South Holland, 111., 

S*Z&OAC CX<JLSSXS 07 2£ZO£CX3-^XT. 

Rev. Peter Moerdykb, Grand Rapids, Mich;, 1888, 

Rev. Thomas W. Jones, Holland, Mich., 1888, 

Rev. Nich. H» Dosker, Kalamazoo, Mich., 1889. 

Rev. Henry E. Dosker, Grand Haven, Mich., 1889. 

-ws^oruL oZi^ss js os^ zzoXiiL^xrx). 
Rev. Peter Lepeltak, Overisel, Mich., 

Rev. Dirk Broek, Holland, Mich., 

-WEUC^ItlL CXi^SSXS 07 XX.r«X2TOXS. 

Rev. John S. Joralmon, Norwood Park, III, 

Rev. Wm. H. Phraner, Irving Park, 111., 



1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 

1886. 
1886. 

1887. 
1887. 



1890. 
1890. 

1891. 
1891. 



'Deceased. 






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OFFICERS OF COUNCIL. 



Rev. Peter Lepeltak, 
Rev, William Moerdyk^ 
Rev. Peteb Moebdyke, 
Isaac Cappon, Esq., 



JPresident. 

Vice President 

Secretary. 

IVecuturer, 



COMMITTEES OF COUNCIL. 

EXECUTIVE C^OMMITTEE. 

Pres. Ohas. Scott, Chairman. Rev. Dirk Bboek, Secretary. 

Rev. Peter Moerdyke, Rev. Thomas W. Jones, 

Isaac Cappon, Esq. 

INVESTMENT COMMITTEE. 

(In charge of the funds of the ('ouncil.) 

Arbnd Visscher, Esq., Isaac Cappon, Esq., 

Pres. Charles Scott. 

HOPE FARM COMMITTEE. 
(In charge of a tract of land, at Point Superior, on Macatawa 

Bay, containing 887 acres.) 

Pres. Charles Scott, AREiin) Visscher, Esq. 

Isaac Cappon, Esq. 



« DE HOPE. " 
Rev. John H. Karsten, 



Editor. 



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FACULTY. 



REV. CHARLES SCOIT, D. D., President, ex-officio. 

Profesaor of Chemistry and Natural History. In char/i^e of Mental and 

Moral Philosophy, History, and EvidenceB of Christianity. 

CORNELIS DOESBURG, A. M., Secretary. 
Professor of Modem Languages and Literature, and of Art. 

GERRIT J, KOLLEN, A. M. 

Proffesfior of Applied Mathematics, Physics and Political Economy. 
In charge of Logic and Rhetoric. 

HENRY BOERS, A. M. 

Professor of the English Language and Literature. 

JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, A. M. 

Professor of Mathematics. 

JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A. M. 

Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

REV. JOHN J. ANDERSON, A. M. 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. In charge of 

Bacred Literature. 




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STUDENTS. 



SENIOR CLASS, 



NAHE8. 

Ralph Bloemendaal, 
William J. Duiker, 
Peter Holleman, 
Jeremiafl Kruidenier, 
William B. Lammers, 
John W. E. Visscher, 



RE8IDBKGF8. 

Cedar Grove, Wis., 
Grand Haven, 
Drenthe, 
Holland C^ty, 
Cedar Grove, Wis., 
Holland, 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



Cornelia Cappon, 
Emma Kollen, 
Paul Raphael Coster, 
Harman V. S. Peeke, 
Albertus Pieters, 
Charles Nelson Thew, 
Samuel M. Zwemer, 



Holland City, 

Overisel, 

Holland, 

Centreville, 

Holland City, 

Allegan, Rev. 

Graafschap, 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



Henry Geerlings, 
Henry Harraeling, 
Adrian C. Karsten, 
Foppe Klooster, 
John Lamar, 
John Van Westenburg, 
Peter John Zwemer, 



Holland City, 
Oostburg, Wis., 
Holland City, 
Jamestown, 
Jennisonville, 
Grand Rapids, 
Graafschap, 



BOOUS. 

H. Toren. 
♦V.V.H., 7. 
V.V.H., 16. 

At Home. 
V.V.H., 20. 

At Home. 



At Home. 
Prof. Kollen. 

At Home. 

V.V.H., 2. 

At Home. 

J. H. Karsten. 

V.V.H., 19. 



At Home. 

V.V.H., 4. 

At Home. 

U. De Vries. 

V. V.H., 3. 

V.V.H., 15, 

V.V.H.,19. 



*V. V. H.— Van Vleck Hall. 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COi.L£GE. 



1 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 



NAMES. 



Henry Hospers, Jr., 
Herbert G. Keppel, 
Albeil Knooihuizen, 
Gelrner Kuiper, 
Abraham Leenbouti?, 
Meinardus G. Mantingh, 
T. W. Muilenburg, 
Martin Ossewaarde, 
William Stegeraan, 
Anthony Van Duine^ 
Dirk J. Werkman, 



RESIDENCES. 

Orange City, la., 
Zeeland, 
New Holland, 
Graafschap, 
Zeeland, 
Graafschap, 
Orange City, la., 
Holland City, 
New Groningen, 
Kalamazoo, 



ROOMS. 

S. Hogenboom. 

V.V.H., 13. 

V.V.H., 12. 

H. Geerlings. 

V.V.H., 14. 

At Home. 

H. Cook. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

V.V.H., 17. 



Pattersonvillo, la., R.E. Werkman. 



SUMMARY. 



Seniors. 
Juniors, 
Sophomores, 
Freshmen, 

Total, 



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ADMISSION. 

For admission into the Freshman Class, a fall certificate 
of graduation from the Preparatory Department is required; 
or an examination in the studies pursued in that Department; 
or in what the Faculty shall deem an equivalent. 

For admission into any advanced class of the Institution, 
it will be necessary for the applicant to pass an examination 
in the studies previously pursued by the class. If received 
on conditions, the conditions must be fulfilled before matric- 
ulation. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Mathematics. — Wentworth's Geometry and Trigonom- 



etry. 



Language and Literature, — 

English. — Suplee's Trench on Words. 

Latin. — De Aniicitia, Harper*8 Edition; Horace. Harper's 
Edition; Antiquities; Composition. 

Greek. — Goodwin's Herodotus and Thucydides; Good- 
win's Grammar; Jones's Greek Composition; Antiquities. 

Modern. — Mulder's History of Dutch Literature; Jager's 
Derivation of Dutch Words; Essays. 

RaETORiC. — Essays; Subjects outlined; Original Speeches; 
Elocution. 

History. — Anderson's New General History, Ist part; 
An Atlas of Classical and Mediaeval Geography. 

jVatural Science. — Hooker's New Physiology. 

Sacred Literature. — Robinson's Harmony of the 
Gospels. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Mathematics. — Olney's General Geometry and Calculus. 
Wentworth's Surveying and Navigation. 

Language and Literature. — 
English. — Language and Literature. 

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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



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Latin. — Tacitus, Gin7i and Heath* a Edition^ Cicero's 
Orations, Harper's Edition; Composition; Literature. 

Greek, — Lysias; Boise's Homer; Jebb's Literature. 

Modem, — Duffet's French Grammar, Ist part; Worman's 
German Grammar; Deutohes Lesebuch, 1. Tbeil. 

Rhetoric, — Essays; Original Speeches; Debates: Elocu- 
tion. 

History, — Anderson's New General History, 2nd part; 
Special Studies in History. 

Natural Science. — Eliot and Storer'a Manual of Chem- 
istry, (the Abridgment by Nichols.) 

Sacred Literature, — Introduction to the Scriptures. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics Applied,— OXmi^tQA'^fi Natural Philosophy. 

Language and Literature.— 

Latin. — Philosophy of Cicero; Academics or Tusculan 
Disputations, Harper's Edition; Plautur* or Terence, Chase 
and Stuarfs Edition. 

Greek. — Tyler's Apology and Crito; D'ooge's De Corona 
or Antigone; Zeller's Greek Philosophy. 

Modem. — Duffet's French Grammar, 2nd part; Duffet's 
Extracts from French Literature; Worman's German Gram- 
mar, (continued); Deutsches Lesebuch, 2. Theil. 

Rhetoric. — Bascom's Philosophy of Rhetoric; Essays 
and Discussion; Delivery of Original Speeches. 

History. — Anderson's New General History, 2nd part, 
(continued); Lectures on the Constitution and History of the 
United States. 

Natural aScvawcjf.— Chemistry, (Analysis, etc.) one 
term; Wood's Botany, two terms. 

Metaphysics.— Tovler's Elements of Intellectual Science. 
Sacred Literature. — Butler's Analogy. 



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CATALOGUE OP HOPE COLLEGE. 



11 



SENIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics,— Olmsted's Astronomy. 

Language and Literature, — 

Greek. — Wagner's Phaedo; A Comedy. 

Modem. — Rowan; Groszraann's Handbuch; Lectures on 
German Literature; Compositions in French and German. 

Rhetoric. — Essays; Delivery of Original Speeches. 

Logic. — McCosh. 

Ethics. — Wayland's Moral Science. 

History. — Guizot's History of Civilization. 

Natural Science. — Dana's (-lass-Book of Geology. 

Political /Sc/^^vrj^.—AVayland's Political Economy, 
(Chapin); Lectures on Civil Government. 

Sacred Literature. — Lectures on Evidences of Chris- 
tianity. 







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Department. 



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FACULTY. 

Prof. CHARLES SCOTT, D. D., President, ex-officio. 

Prof. CORNELIS DOESBURG, A. M. 

Modern Languages and Art. 

Prof. GERRIT J. KOLLEN, A. M. 

Natural Philosopliy and Astronomy. In charge of Civil 
Government and Didactics. 

Prof. HENRY BOERS, A. M. 

English. In charge of Greek History. 

Prof. JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, A. M., Secretari/. 
Mathematics. In charge of Mythology and Botany. 

Prof. JAMES G. SUTPIIEN, A. M. 
Latin. Roman History. 

Prof. JOHN J. ANDERSON, A. M. 

Greek. 

JOHN B. NYKERK, A. B., Tutor, 

Rev. p. MOERDYKE, A. M. 
In charge of Religious Instruction, A and B Classes. 

Rk\'. JOHN H. KARSTEN, A. M. 

In charge cf Religious Instruction, C and D Classes. 

JOHN B. NYKERK, A. B. 

Instructor in Vocal Music. 



Prof. GERRIT J. KOLLEN, Librarian, 
JOHN VAN WESTENBURG, 

HARMAN V. S. PEEKE, 



A sa istem t Librarians, 



HARMAN V. S. PEEKE, Chorister. 

MISS S. L. JONES, Organist, 



LOUIS DE WIT, Janitor, 



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STUDENTS. 



"A" CLASS. 



NAMES. 

Katie J. Den Herder, 
j Kate E. Herold, 
il Ella M. Hunt, 

Martha M. Nyland, 
Ida N. Nies, 
j Mary J. Sehepers, 
I Mary E. Steffens, 
I Maggie Van Putten, 
1 Wm. H. Bruins, 
I Clinton Leroy Dayton, 
I Martin Flipae, 
1 John G. Huizinga, 

Herman S. Juistema, 
j] Henry Kleyn, 
Harry Kremers, 
James Ossewaarde, 
Albert J. Rooks, 
Isaac Van Kampen, 
Aart Van Westrienen, 



Anna M. Broek, 
Katie M. Brower, 
Minnie Cappon, 
Sarah Cappon, 



RKSIDENCES. 

Zeeland, 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Holland, 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Brandon, Wis., 
Berlin, 

Cedar Grove, Wis., 
Holland City, 
Grand Haven, 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Zeeland, 
Holland, 
Grand Rapids, 
Grand Haven,* 

= B" CLASS. 

Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 



ROOMS. 

Prof. Steffens. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

Mrs. Nies. 

J. Sehepers. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

G. T. Huizinga. 

Mrs. Kremers. 

Mrs. Pieters. 

At Home. 

J. VandenBerge. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

J. VandenBerge. 

Wm. Rooks. 

W. Z. Bangs. 

H. Toren. 



At Home. 
At Home. 
At Home. 
At Home. 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



15 



"% 



NAHE8. 

Jennie Dubbink, 
Sarah L. Jones, 
Johanna Klumper, 
Magdalena H. Kollcn, 
Anna M. Meengs, 
Katie Nies, 
Janie Nykerk, 
Minnie C. Schaap, 
Fannie A. Steffens, 
Mamie Thompson, 
Gerrit H. Albers, 
Benjamin Brouwer, 
Daniel G. Cor)k, 
George E. Cook, 
Rokus Chr. De Vries, 
Gilbert G. Haan, 
Casper Lahuis, 
Henry J. Luidens, 
James Moerdyk, 
John Nordhuis, 
Adrian Pieters, • 
Dirk F. Plasman, 
John D. Roelofs, 
John Sietsema, 
John M. VanderMeuleii, 
Gerrit H. Veldhuis, 
Abraham Westveer, 
Jurry Winter, 



Dina Boik?, 
Christina S. Broek, 
Annie G. De Frel, 
Rosa M. Doyle, 
Belle. Felker, 



RESIDENCES. 

Overisel, 

Holland City, 

Overisel, 

Overiael, 

Holland City, 

Saugatuck, 

Overisel, 

Holland, 

Holland City, 

Holland City, 

Overisel, 

Overisel, 

Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Vriesland, 
Zeeland, 
North Holland, 
South Holland, 
<Trand Haven, 
Holland City, 
Holland, 
Di'enthe, 
Coopersville, 

Ebenezer, 
Overisel, 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 

"C" CLASS. 



B. Slag. 

At Home. 

B. Slag. 

Prof. KoUen. 

At Home. 

F. Wade. 

B. Slag. 

J. Schepers. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

U. De Vries. 

H. Cook. 

At Home* 

At Home. 

At Home. 

E. VanderVeen. 

At Home. 

V.V.H., 14. 

III., J. Panels. 

J. A. Brouwer. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

Mr. F. Niewold. 

Mrs. Nibbelink. 

Mrs. Kremers. 

U. De Vries. 

At Home. 

At Home. 



Overisel, 
Holland City, 
Holland, 
Holland City, 
West Bay ('ity. 



B. Slag. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

. M. Clark. 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 






UKS1DKNCK8. 



Annie C. Karsten, 
Christine M. J. Kreraer, 
Anna E. Nibbelink, 
May A. Priest, 
Sebia Van Zwalu wen burg, 
George H. D. Baert, 
Nicholas Bosch, 
Edward Brandt, 
Johannes De Beer, 
Herman Derks, 
David De Vriea, 
Jacob Geerlings, 
Albertus C. V. R. Gilmoro, 
John H. Heeren, 
Peter Iluyser, 
Conrad II. Karsten, 
Henry M. Kiekintveld, 
John A. Kleis, 
Geo. K. Kollen, 
John Luxen, 
Albert Oosterhof, 
Andrew J. Ree verts, 
Fred. M. Rose, 
Edward B. Scott, 
Levinus Slotman, 
Tiemmen Sn^th, 
Philip Soulen, , 
Herman Van der Ploeg, 
Homer Van Landegend, 
Henry J. Veld man, 
Albert Wilterdink, 



Holland City, 
Zeeland, Rev. J, 
Holland City, 
Saugatuck, J. J. 
Drenthe, 
Zeeland, 
Vriesland, 
Vriesland, 

TJith'meeden,Neth.Prof.Steffen8. 
New Groningeu, At Home. 



ROOMS. 

At Home. 

H. Karsten. 

At Home. 

Kruisenga. 

Dr. Kremers. 

U. De Vries. 

V.V.H., 5. 

H. Geerlings. 



Vriesland, 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Foreston, 111., 
Beaverdam, 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Nunica, 
Overiscl, 
Grand Haven, 
Spring Lake, 
Oregon, 111., 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Overisel, 
Holland City, 
Milwaukee, Wis., 
Holland City, 
Holland, 



J. Koning. • 

At Home. 

At Home. 

Rev. Karsten. 

Q. Huyser. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

E. Frik. 

U. De Vries. 

Rev. Karsten. 

H. Bremer. 

H. Cook. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

Mrs. Nibbelink. 

At Home. 

J. Panels. 

At Home. 

At Home. 



Grand Rapids, Mrs. v. d. Ploeg. 
At Home. 






Bernard Pos, 



Jennie A. Pieters, 



Holland, 
UNCLASSIFIED. 

Holland City, At Home. 

"D" CLASS. 

Holland City, At Home. 



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CATAI^OGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



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KAJfSS. 

Martha Prakken, 
C'Ornelia S. VanderMeulen, 
Dirk De Klein e, 
John Elenbaas, 
Garret Flikkema, 
Cornelius G. Haan, 
John Haan, 
Wirtje T. Janssen, 
Albert Kuiper, 
Reuben Maurits, 
William Miedema, 
Nicholas Pos, 
John Schaefer, 
Henry P. Schravesande, 
James Sterenberg, 
John H. B. Te Roller, 
Albert Van den Berg, 
Peter Van Kolken, 
George Van Land*>gend, 
Benjamin Veneklasen, 
Martin Verhage, 
Henry Wynhoff, 
Fred. Tonker, 



RESIDENCES. 

Holland City, 
Ebenezer, 
Jamestown, 
Zeeland, 
Fulton, 111., 
Vriesland, 
Vriesland, 
Foreston, 111,, 
Kalamazoo, 
Vriesland, 
Vriesland, 
Holland, 
Oregon, 111., 
Holland City, 
Fulton, 111., 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Grand Rapids, 
Holland City, 
Zeeland, 
Vriesland, 
'Holland City, 
Vriesland, 



SUMMARY. 



"A" Class, - 
«B" Class, 
«C" Class, - 
"D" Class, 
Unclassified, 

Total, 
Academic, 
Theological, 



BOOMS. 

At Home. 

Mrs, Pieters. 

H. Toren. 

H. Geer lings. 

A, Vennema. 

Mrs. Nibbelink, 

E. VanderVeen, 

Rev. Karsten. 

Mr. P. Niewold. 

J. Koning. 

J. Koning. 

At Home, 

H. Cook. 

At Home. 

A. Vennema, 

At Home. 

At Home. 

Mrs. Geerliugs. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

J. Koning. 

At Home. 

J. Koning. 



19 
32 
36 
24 
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112 
31 

8 



161 



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18 CATALOGUE OF HOPS OOLLBGB. 




ADMISSION. 

For admission into the '* D " Class, a common school eda- 
cation is required apon the branches pursued in that year. 
The better their previous training, the more easily and prof- 
itably can pupils enter upon the Orammar School course. 

For admission into any advanced class of the Institution, 
it will be necessary for the applicant to pass an examination 
in the studies previously pursued by the class. If received 
on conditions, the conditions must be fulfilled before matric- 
ulation. 

PROBATION. 

New students, in either Department, remain on probation 
for one term, at the expiration of which, if their course prove 
satisfactory, they are admitted to matriculation in the usual 
manner. 



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COURSE' OF STUDY: 



FIRST YEAR, "D" CLASS. 

Heading, Etc\ — National Fourth Reader; Penmanship; 
Harrington's Graded Spelling Book, Part IL 

Geography, — Harper's School Geography, Michigan 
Edition, 

Mathematics, — Olney's Practical Arithmetic 

Lanouaqb,— 

English. — Reed and Eellogg's Graded Lessons in English. 

* Rhetoric, — Written Essays through the year; Declama- 
tions. 

History. — Barnes's United States History, 

SECOND YEAR, "C" CLASS. 

BEADiNOy Etc. — National Fifth Reader; Penmanship; 
Westlake's 3,000 Words; Dictation Exercises. 

Mathematics, — Davies's Intellectual Arithmetic; Went- 
worth A Hill's Arithmetic; Bryant and Stratton's Common 
School Book-keeping, {aingU. entry,) 

Language, — 

English, — Reed and Eellogg's Higher Lessons in English. 

JLatin, — Six Weeks Preparation for reading Csdsar, Oinn 
<t HecUKs Editioni CsBsan 0inn A HeatKs New Edition, 



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20 CATALOGUE OP HOPE COLLEGE. 

Modern, — Van Dalen's Dutch Grammar; Van Dalen's 
Dutch Exercises. 

Rhetoric, — Essays, and Declamations, (continued). 

THIRD YEAR, "fi" CLASS. 

Reading, -Eire.— ^Selections; Penmanship, and Drawing. 

Matbema'iics, — Olney's First Principles of Algebra; 
Steele^s Astronomy, with the use of Globes; Bryant & Strat- 
ton's Common School Book-keeping, {double entry). 

Language.— 

English, — Hart's Rhetoric; Analysis of Sentences. 

Latin, — Ca?sar; Cicero's Orations; Jones's Latin Exercises. 

Greek, — Whiton's Preparation for Xenophon; Goodwin's 
Grammar, and The Anabasis. 

^ocfem.— Van Dalen's Dutch Grammar, and Exercises, 
(continued). 

Rhetoric, — Essays and Declamations, (continued). * 

History, — Smith's Greek History, (abridged). 

Special, — In place of Latin and Greek: Dutfet's French 
Grammar, Int Pait; Worman's German Grammar; Worman's 
German Reader. 

FOURTH YEAR, "A" CLASS. 

Dra wing,— 

Mathematics, — Wentworth's Elements of Algebra; 
VVentworth's Geometry (in part); Natural Philosophy, 
(Peck's Ganot, revised). 

Language,— 

English,— P&rsing Milton's Paradise Lost, (Sprague). 

Latin, — Cicero's Orations; Virgil; Jones's Latin Exercises. 



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CATALOGUE OP HOPE COLLEGE. 



Greek. — Goodwin's Grammar; Anabasis and Hellenica; 
I Jones's Greek Composition. 

Modem, — Syntaxis, (Dutch); Practical Exercises; Trans- 
lations. 

Rhetoric. — Hart's Rhtetoric; Essays; Declamations; "The 
Excelsiora," published by the Class. 

History. — Goodrich's English. History. 

Civil Government.— Yoxixig^^ Government Class Book. 

Didactics. — Lectures on the Art of Teaching. 

Physiology AND HroiENE.-^Steele^s. 

SPECiAL.^-DufteVs French Grammar, 2nd Part; Wor- 
man's German Grammar, and Reader, (continued). 

Note.— Religious Instruction is given by the Faculty in 
all the Classes. 

Special attention is given, during the whole of the Pre- 
paratory Course, to the grammars of the Languages studied. 
For those who pursue only English studies or who design 
stopping at the end of the "A" year, the Faculty provide such 
additional branches, as seem most expedient and profitable. 
Those generally make better progress, whosetime is fully 
occupied in the work of the School. 



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Depmtmeht QF Theolsgy. 



"The Western Theological Seminary of the 
Reformed Church in America," 



RE-OFEHED DEOEMBER itli, 1884. 



The first Commenoement af the Seminary was held, on 
the evening of April 29, 1886, on which occasion Mr. Dirk 
Scholten received the usual professorial certificate. 

The General Synod, of 1885, not only assigned a corporate 
name as above to the Department, but constituted for the 
same a separate " Board of Superintendents," distinct from 
the Council. This new Board met for the first time, and was 
duly organized, July, 1886. Rev. Chas. Scott was elected 
President, and Rev. A. P. Peeke, Secretary. 

At the same meeting Rev. H. E. Dosker, of Grand Haven, 
Mich., was appointed Lector, for one year, in the Seminary, 
according to resolution of the last General Synod. The ap- 
pointment was accepted. 

Revs. P. Lepeltak, J. F. Zwemer, and G. H. Mandeville 
area Committee of Synod, "to raise a permanent endowment 
for the chair of Biblical Languages and Exegesis; and also 
to secure funds to pay the Lector." 

The Theological year extends from the first Wednesday 
in September to the last Wednesday in April. 

A Committee of the Board will meet on the first Tuesday 
in September, of each year, for the admission of students. 



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Board of Superintendents. 



EXOFFICIO. 
Rev. Chas. Scott, D. D., - President of the College. 

FROM TEE STJ^OD OF NEW YORK. 
Rev. David Cole, D. D., - Yonkers, N. Y: 

FROM THE SYNOD OP ALBANY. 
Rev. Edward A. Collier, D. D., - Einderhook, N. Y. \\ 

FROM THE SYNOD OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 
Rev. E. Tanjore Corwin, D. D., - Millstone, N. J. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF CHIC AGO. 

Rev. N. H. Dosker, - - Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Rev. p. Moerdtke, • - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

J Rev. Balster Van Ess, - - Roseland, 111. 

Rev. Wm. H. Phraxer, - • - Irving Park, 111. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF HOLLAND. 

\ \ Rev. John Van der Meulen, - Ebenezer, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF GRAND RIVER. 
I Rev. Egbert Winter, - - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF MICHIGAN 
\ J Rev. a. Paige Peeke, - - Centreville, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF ILLINOIS. 
! Rev. Samuel L. Gamble, - - Pekin, 111. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF WISCONSIN 
Rev, Harm Van der Ploeg, - Fulton, 111. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF IOWA- 
Rev. Ale Buursma, - - - Orange City, la. 



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FACULTY. 




REV. NICHOLAS M. STEFFENS, D. D. 

Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theology. In charge of Hebrew, 

and Old Testament Exegesis, Biblical Criticism, and 

Practical Theology. 

REV. HENRY E. DOSKER, A. M. 

Lector. In charge of New Testament Exegesis, Historical Theology, 
Sacred Geography, and Archaeology. 



STUDENTS. 



NAMES. 

Gerhard De Jonge, 
Simoh Hogenboom, 
Gerrit H. Hospers, 
Peter Ihrman, 



SENIOR CLASS. 

RESIDENCES. ROOMS. 

Zeeland, At Home. 

Holland City, At Home. 
Orange City, la., S. Hogenboom. 

Kalamazoo, J. Van den Berge. 

MIDDLE CLASS. 



Gerrit J. Hekhais, 
Albert Van den Berg, 
Peter Wayenberg, 



Holland, 

South Holland, 111., 

Orange City, la.. 



Ralph Bloemendaal, 
Albert H. Strabbing, 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Cedar Grove, Wis., 
Holland City, 

Total, 9. 



At Home. 

V.V.H., 11. 

V.V.H., 6. 



H. Toren. 
At Home. 



All of the above students are graduates (and have the 
degree of A. B.) from Hope College. 

The recitation rooms of the Seminary are on the second 
floor of the Oggel House. 




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COURSE OF STUDY. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



L 



EXEGETICAL ThEOLOQY Aim HSRMENBUTICS. — Rudi- 

meDts of Hebrew; Oenesis, Meraianic Prophecies. TkeT- 
books, — Green's Hebrew Orammar; Hebrew Bible. New Tes- 
tament Oreek; Exegesis of portions of the New Testament. 
Textbooks. — McClelland's Manual; Winer's Grammar; Rob- 
inson's Harmony of the Gospels. Yestcott and Hort's Greek 
New Testament; Biblical Archjeology, and Sacred Geography^ 
(Barrow's Handbook). 

Historical Theology. — Eartz's Sacred History. 

Practical Theoloot, — Homiletioal Exercises. 

MIDDLE YEAR. 

ExBGETiCAL THEOLOGY AND Hermenexjtics. — Hebrew 
Etymology and Syntaxis; Studies in Prophetical Theology; 
Hebrew Poetry; Cursory reading of Historical Books; Bibli- 
cal Criticism, (New Test.); Schaff's Companion ; Studies in 
the Epistles of Paul. 

Historical Theology. — Kurtz's Church History; Lec- 
tures. 

Systematical Theology. — Introduction to Dogmatic 
Theology; History of the Science; Theology proper; Anthro- 
pology, and Christology. — Woodbridge's Analysis; Lectures. 

Practical Theology. — Homiletical Exercises, con- 
tinned; Pastoral Theology. — Shedd's Manual. 



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26 



CATALOGUE OP HOPE COLLEGE. 



SENIOR YEAR. 

EXEGBTICAL Tbbolooy AND ffsxifEni^mrTTCS.— Hebrew 
continued; Chaldaic; Studies in Prophetical Theology, and 
in Poetry; Cursory reading; Reading by sight; New Testa- 
ment Exegesis, continued; Biblical Criticism, (Old Testament). 
— Keil's Manual. 



JfflSTOSrCAL 

tinned. 



Thboloot, — Ecclesiastical History^ con- 



PRACTICAL Tbeoloqy. — Homiletical Exercises and Pas- 
toral Theology, continued; Catechetics, and Church GFovern- 
raent. 

All the Classes combined. — Essays on various topics; 
Polemical and Irenical Discussions, 



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Miscellaneous Information, 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

In tb« College Department, there is a^ partial rather than 
a apeeial coarse. Studies may be omitted, bat as yet others 
have not been sabstitoted, and sach a partial coarse entitles 
only to a certificate, not to a diploma. 

Most of the stadents seek what is called ^*a liberal or clas- 
sical education,'' bat a "partial" or "elective" course is offered 
to «11 who so desire, and facilities are furnished through the 
regular instructors. German and French, or Drawing and 
Painting, can be studied at any time, as also the branches 
generally called "scientific." 

In 1878, the Institution was opened to women. At once 
several young ladies availed themselves of the privilege, and 
their number has been steadily increasing. They enter the 
regular classes, and attend the same lectures and recitations 
as the young men. Their homes will be with approved fam- 
ilies in the city. 

SCHOOL YEAR. 

The Schola8ti6 Year, of forty weeks, begins on the third 
Wednesday in September, and ends with the General Com- 
mencement on the fourth Wednesday in June. 

The Wiiiter and Spring vacations are fixed by the Gen- 
eral Faculty. (See the Calendar). 

EXAMINATIONS, 

The Yearly jEoeaminaiionSj before the Council or its Com- 
mittee, begin on the third Wednesday in June. At other 



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CATALOGUB OP HOPE COLLEGE. 



n 



times. Special examinations may be held, and passed upon by 
the respective Faculties, subject to the approval of Council 
or to a re- examination, if so desired. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The Buks of Order are few and simple. In general, if 
the students do not improve their time and opportunities, or 
do not conduct themselves in a respectful and orderly man- 
ner, their connection with the Institution will be suspended. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

The exercises of each day begin with prayer in the Col- 
lege Chapel, at 8 o'clock, a. m. 

On the Sabbath, every student is expected to worship reg- 
ularly with one of the churches in the city or vicinity, unless 
excused by the" President. 

Religious Instruction is given in all the classes regularly, 
and now, like the other studies, is in charge of the Faculty. 

Although Hope College is denominational, and is under 
the patronage and support of the Reformed Church in Amer- 
ica, yet, by the law of its incorporation, it can have no "relig- 
ious test." The doors are open, and welcome is given to all 
who submit to its scholastic regulations. As a Christmn 
school, however, it inculcates gospel truths, and deniands a 
consistent moral character and deportment. 

LIBRARY, ETC., 

A Library of over 6,000 volumes, and a Reading Room, 
are free for the use of the students. Bookia and papers are 
constantly being added. Improved accommodations have 
recently been provided. . . 

The Laboratory, Cabinet, and Philosophical Apparatus 
are adapted to the use of the recitation, or lecture-rooms. 
They are gradually being made larger and more complete. 
It is to be hoped that Maps, Charts, Instruments, and Speci- 
mens of Natural History, as well as books, will be donated 
by the graduates and friends of the Institution. 



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CATALOQUB OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



SOCIETIES, ETC., 
The lAkrary SoeietieSy viz., the Meliphone and the Fra- 
ternal, have now been maintained for years, and offer decided 
advantages >to their respective n(sembers; and materially aid 
in the attainment of that culture, which it is the object of 
this school to promote. 

In 1888 the young lady stadente organized a society, 
called Zetaletheariy similar to the Meliphone. 

In 1886, a new literary society, called Uljilas Cltiby was 
organized by Prof. Doesbarg. The object of this club is to 
secure for its members greater proficiency in the use of the 
Holland language. 

The T. M. C A., a society of over seventy members, has 
carried on its work with much interest and activity. 

Connected with the Institution, a religious weekly is pub- 
lished, called De Mope. It is the organ of the College. 

A Course of ZectureSy by the professors or others, is of 
almost yearly occurrence; usually at the invitation of one of 
the societies, and with the approval and financial aid of the 
Executive Committee. 

MUSIC. 

Vocal Mtisic is provided for in the Grammar School.^ 
No charge is made for this. Lessons in InstrumenCal Music 
can be secured at the expense of the pupil. 

EXPENSES. 

Holland is surrounded by a rich agricultural region, and 
the cost of living is comparatively cheap. Good board may 
be had, in families of the city, for from two to three dollars 
per week; and without fu&xished itooMS at corresponding 
rates. 

There are seventeen rooms in Van Vleck Hall, in the se- 
lection of which students for the ministry have the prefer- 
ence. These are furnished in part, and bear a charge of five 
dollars a year. 




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CATALOGUE OF HOPS COLLEGE. 



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As yet, no tuition fees have been charged, bnt every 
stadent mast pay to the Treasurer, in advance, an incidental 
fee of five dollars per terra. 

The graduation fee is ^ve dollars and the cost of the 
diploma. No other charges are made. 

For books, clothing, washing, fuel, lights, travel, etc., 
those interested can best make the estimates. The entire 
expense need not exceed $200 per annum. 

LOCATION, ETC. 

Holland City is a central point on the Chicago and West 
Michigan Railway, and on the Ohio and Michigan R. R. (to 
Toledo), ninety miles north of New Buffalo, twenty-five miles 
south-west of Grand Rapids, and midway between Allegan 
and Grand Haven. It is therefore most desirably located, 
having both land- and water communicaticms, and being near 
the shore of Lake Michigan, with which it is directly con- 
nected by Macatawa Bay, itself a beautiful sheet of water. 

The College Buildings are eight in number. The largest 
is Van Vleck Hall, mainly devoted to Students' rooms, and 
the Library. The grounds are beautifully located on a 
Campus of eighteen acres, well shaded with native trees, and 
annually improving in appearance. 

REMARKS. 

It will be seen that at present we have three Departments 
in operation, and duly organized. 

Our Library is rapidly increasing in the number of vol- 
umes and in value. It has already outgrown the rooms as- 
signed it, and requires more ample quarters. A Library 
building is one of our pressing necessities. With a spacious, 
fire-proof room, the collection would be safe and serviceable. 
Every year there are made additions of valuable works, 
which it would be difiicult and expensive to replace. Who 
will see that they have provided for them a safe and cheerful 
room, where they can be consulted, and their precious treas- 
ures made useful to our students? 




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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE, 



31 



A new building for recitation rooms and similar purposes 
18 also a great desideratum, and it would be a most decided 
step in advance, if such a Hall should adorn our beautiful 
Campus. 

An annual Circular or Catalogue will be published about 
the middle of each school year. 

The funds of the Institution need much to be increased. 
Besides the gifts of the churches and of friends from year to 
year (mainly for support,) it is the trust and prayer of those 
who know the needs of "Hope,*' that the Legacies of the 
pious may begin to build it up for God, just as they have be- 
stowed so many thousands on Yale, Princeton, Union, etc., 
making them what they are to-day. 



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ALUMNI. 



NAME. 

Ale Buursma, 
Gerrit Dangremond, 
William B. Gilmore, 
Peter Moerdyke, 
William Moerdyk, 
William A. Shields, Prof. 
John W. Te Winkel, 
Harm Woltman, 

Gerrit Bolks, 
James De Pree, 
Enne J. Heeren, Rev. 
John Huizenga, 
Albert T. Huizenga, 
Dirk B. K. Van Raalte,t 



1S66. 

OCCUPATION. PBB8SNT BESIDBNCB. 

Clergyman, Orange City, la. 

Clergyman, East Saugatuck, Mich. 
[Clergyman,] ♦April 24, 1884. 

Clergyman, Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Clergyman, Pella, la. 

Photo- Artist, Macomb, 111. 

Clergyman, Alto, Wis. 

[Clergyman.] ♦April 30, 1870. 

1867. 



Merchant, 

Clergyman, 

[Missionary.] 

Clergyman, 

Teacher, 

Merchant, 

1868. 



Orange City, la. 

Sioux Center, la. 

♦Oct. 16, 1878. 

Holland, Neb. 

Beaverdam, Mich. 

Holland, Mich. 



Harm Borgers, Clergyman, Geenleafton, Minn. 

John Broek, Clergyman, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Gerrit J. Kollen, Professor, Holland, Mich. 

GerritVandeKreeke,Rev. Merchant, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

William Visscher, [Miss'y Student.] ♦Feb. 11, 1872. 

1869. 



Evert Van der Hart, Clergyman, 

A. Wilson Van Der Veer, Merchant, 
William Van Putten,J Physician, 



Rochester, N. Y. 
Davenport, la. 
Holland, Mich. 



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NAMB. 

Henry K. Boer, 
William B. De Bey,t 
Peter De Bruyn, 
John A. De Spelder, Rev, 
Charles ^£. Jones, 
James F. Zwemer, 

John Hoffman, 
Simon Kuyper, 
Nicholas Neerken, 
Peter D. Schipperirs, 
Samuel Streng, ' 
James Ten Eyck, 
William Veenschoten, 

Areod Visscher, 

Edwin Bedell, , 
John Hoekje, 
Josias Meulendyk, 
Helen us £. Nics, 
Jacob Van-Halteren, 
Harm Van der Wart, 

Cornelius Kriekaard, 
.Joseph G. Millspaugh. 
Harm Van derPloeg,^ 
Comelis Wabeke, 



OCCUPATION. 

Clergyman, 

Physician, 

clergyman. 

Professor, 

Physician, 

Clergyman, 

1871. 

Clergyman, 
[Teacher.] 
[Clergyman.] 
Book-keeper, 
Clergyman, 
' Lawyer, 
Clergyman, 

1872. 

Lawyer, 

187S. 

Lawyer, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Book-keeper, 

Clergyman, 

1874. 

Clergymen, 
Physician, 
Clergyman, 
[Clergyman.] , 

1875. 



Henricns Baron,* Physician, 

Lawrence Dykstra, Clergyman, 

Robert B. D. Simonson, Principal, 



Maurice, la. 

Chicago, 111. 

Rochester, N. Y. 

' Orange City, la. 

Albany, N. Y. 

Alton, la. 

Baldwin, Wis. 

*Sept..l, 188.2. 

♦Jan. 3, 1887. 

Chicago, II L 

Churchville, Penn. 

Fail-view, 111. 

Hudson, N. Y. 

Holland, Mich. 

Albany, N. Y. 

Cawker City, Kan. 

Fremont, Mich. 

Paterson, N. J, 

Clyde, Kan. 

, Hackensack, N. J. 

Danforth, III. 

Garfield, Dak. 

Fulton, 111. 

♦Feb. 22, 1880. 

Forest Grove, Mich. 

Albany, N. Y. 

Bowling Green, Mo. 



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CATALOOUK OF HOPE COUJIGB. 



NAME. 

Evert SmitSy 
William V. Steele, 
John Yisscber, 

Henry K Dosker, 

Frank A. Force, 

Albert A. PfaDstiehi, 

CornelisVan Oostenbmgge, Clergyman, 



OCCUPATION. PBESENT RESIDENCE. 

Clergyman, North Loup, Neb. 

Lawyer, Somerville, N. J. 

Ag't Charities, Chicago, III. 
187e. 

Clergyman, ) Holland 

(Lector in Theo. Sem.) | City. 
Clergyman, Manito, II 



Clergyn 
Clergyman, 



DoQwe Yntema, 

John C. Groeneveld, 
LambertDB Hekhuis, Rev. 
Matthew Kolyn, 
Johannes Visscher, 

Henry Boers, 
John G. Gebbard, 
Stephen J. Harraeling, 
John H. Kleinheksel, 

Dirk J. De Bey, 
Elias De Spelder, M. D., 
Kumage Kiraura, 
George Niemeyer, 
Motoitero Ohgimi, 
Arae Vennema, 

William G. Baas, 
Jacob P. De Jong, 
Bernard J. De Vries, 
Peter M. El sen i us, 
Abel H. Huizenga, 
Abraham Stegeman, 



Principal, 

1877. 
Clergyman, 
MiHsionary, M. D., 



III. 

Columbia, Mo. 
Troy, Mo. 
St. Johns, Mich. 



Alto, Wis. 
Arcot, India. 



Clergyman, 
Teacher, 

1878. 
Professor, 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Professor. 

1879. 
Clergyman, 
Physician, 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 

1880. 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Dentist, 

I 

Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 



Spring Lake, Mich. 
Holland, Mich. 

Holland City. 

Mellenville, N. Y. 

Marion, Dak. 

Holland City. 

Clymer, N. Y. 

Drenthe, Mich. 

Tokio, Japan. 

Cleveland, O. 

Tokio, Japan. 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Newark, N. Y. 

North Holland, Mich. 

Holland City. 

♦July 20, 1881. 

New Paltz, N. Y. 

Harrison. Dak. 



I Intended>tudyiQg for the Ministry. 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



85 



NAME. 

Albert H. Strabbing, 
Jacob J. Van Zanten, 
Frederick J. Zwemer, 
Ebeitezer Van den Berge,f 

Gerrit J. Diekema, 
Charles Dutton, 
John G. Fagg, 
Rense H. Joldersraa, 
Tinis J. Koromers, 
John Riemersma, 
Bastian Sraits, 
John G. Van Hees, Jr., 
John W. Cro88,f 

John W. Bosman, 
Gerhard De Jonge, 
Pieter Ihrman, 
Johannes £. Matzke^ 
Philip T. Phelps, 
Oharies T. Steffens, 
Sarah G. Alcott, 
Frances F. Q. Phelps, 

Evert J. Blekkink, 
Jacob Dyk, 
Henry Hnlst, 
Tametsne Matsda, 
Albert Oltmans, Rev. 
John A. Otte, M. D., 
Dirk Scholten, 
£. William Stapelkamp, 




OCCUPATION. Present besidence. 
Theo. Student, Holland City. 

Professor, Orange City, la. 

Clergyman, Castalia, Dak. 

Theo. Student, Xenia, O. 

1881. 
Lawyer, 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Telegrapher, 
Candidate. 



Holland City. 

Macon, Mich. 

Lawyerville, N. Y. 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 

New York City. 

Rochester, N. Y. 

Constantine, Mich. 

St. Joseph, Mich. 



Simon Hogenboom, 
Gerrit H. Hospers, 



1882. 
Physician, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Theo. Student, Zeeland, Mich. 

Theo. Student, Holland City. 

Univ. Student, Baltimore, Md. 
Theo. Student, N. Brunswick, N.Y. 
Book-keeper, Chicago, 111. 

At Home, Holland City. 

At Home, North Blenheim, N.Y. 

1883. 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Med. Student, 
Teacher, 
Missionary, 
Physician, 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 

1884. 
Theo. Student, 
Theo. Student, 



Lishas Kill, N. Y. 

Sodus, N. Y. 

Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Tokio, Japan. 

Nagasaki, Japan. 

Amsterdam, Neth. 

Philadelphia, Kan. 

Grand Haven, Mich. 

Holland City. 
Holland City. 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



NAME. 

Gerrit J. Hekhuis, 
John B. Nykerk, 
Albert Van den Berg, 
Peter Wayenberg, 
flVfary E. AJcott, 
(Mrs. G. J. Diekema, 
Xizzie Phelps; 



OCCUPATION. PRESENT BESIDENCB. 



,)} 



Ral{>h Bloemendaal, 
Win. J. Duiker, 
Peter Holleman,. 
Jeremias Kruirienier, 
William B. Lammers, 
John W. E. Visscher, 



1886. 

Theo. Student, 
Teacher, 
Theo. Student, 
Theo. Student, 

At Home, 

At Home, 

1886. 

Theo. Student, Holland City. 

Theo. Student, N.Brunswick, N.J. 
Med. Student, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Theo. Student, N. Brunswick, N.J. 
Theo. Student, N. Brunswick, N. J. 
Teacher, Holland, Mioh. 



Holland, Mich. 
Holland City. 
Holland City. 
Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Albany, N.'Y. 



SUMMARY. 

ACADEMIC ALUMNI. 

.Clergymen and Candidates, 

Theological Students, 
.Physicians or Medical Students, - -.• 

Lawyers or Law Students, 

Teachers, - - • • - , 

Otherwise Employed, 

Total AluiYini, (1866-1886,) - • . - 

of whom 8 are deceased. ' 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL GRADUATES. 
Total number of graduates (1851-1886,) 
REFERENCES. 
* (Throughout the Catalogue,) Deceased, 
t (Alumni of Acad, and Prep. Dep's.) Partial Course. 
J (Alumni of Academic Dep.) A. B. Honorary. 



15 
11 
5 
13 
14 

120 * 



304 




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I 



Historical Sketch. 

For many years, the Reformed (Dutch) Church had de- 
sired to have a school established, in the valley of the Missis- 
sippL The way however did not seem to be open, until, in 
1847 and 1848, a Holland Colony was planted in Ottawa and 
the adjoining counties of Michigan, mainly through the 
agency of Rev. A. C. Van Raalte, D. D., who devoted him- 
self assiduously to the moral and material interests of the en- 
terprise. This was an event, which God used as the origin 
of what is now Hope College. 

▲ PIOIfBEB SCHOOU 

In 1850, Rev. Dr. John A. Garretson, the Corresponding 
Secretary of the Board of Domestic Missions, R C. A., made 
a visit to the Holland Colony in Michigan, and, on his return, 
drew up the plan of a ^^High Schoor' in that vicinity, the ob- 
ject of which should be, to prepare sons of the colonists for 
Rutgers College, N. J., and also to educate their daughters. 
In accordance with this plan, a plot of ^ve acres in the village 
of Holland was donated by Dr. Van Raalte. Mr. Walter R. 
Taylor, of Geneva, N. Y., was appointed to take charge of 
the School, and entered upon his work in October, 1851. He 
began with an ordinary '^District School," and in it formed 
his first Latin class. The latter we are to regard as the germ 
of an ecclesiastical Academy, for it was placed under the care 
of the Classis of Holland, and as such was reported to the 
Board of Education. 

In 1858, upon special application from Secretary Garret- 
son, the General Synod took this school, (that is the ecdesi- 



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38 CATALOOUB OF HOPE COLLEGE. 

astical part of it,) under its care, and committed it to the 
charge of the Board of Elducation. The Board assumed the 
trust, and has ever since continued to make appropriations 
for its support. Mr. Taylor remained until 1854, introducing 
higher branches, and preparing several students for the 
Freshman class of Rutgers College. He was succeeded, for 
about one year, by Rev. F. B. Beidler, of South Bend, In- 
diana. 

APPOINTMENT OF BEV. JOHN VAN VLECK. 

The Boards of Education and Domestic Missions were in- 
structed by the General Synod, in 1854, to unite in support- 
ing a minister, who could at the same time "preach the Gos- 
pel at Holland, and conduct the instruction of the Academy." 
Accordingly Rev. John Van Vleck, of Shawangunk, N. Y., 
was appointed in 1855, upon his graduation from the Theo- 
logical Seminary at New Brunswick. Mr. Van Vleck had 
rare qualifications for his work. He separated the "ecclesi- 
astical germ" spoken of; used for his classes the building 
known as the "Orphan House," and distinctly called his 
school the "Holland Academy." He began with eighteen 
stU'lents, two of whom were girls. This number increased to 
thirty in 1857, and to a few more in J 858 and 1859. During 
this time Mr. Van Vleck had charge of a preaching service in 
English. In 1857, Mr. Ahraham Thompson, of New Bruns- 
wick, N. J., wab sent as an assistant teacher, and upon his 
resignation, in 1858, Rev. Giles Van De Wall succeeded him, 
to give aid in preaching, as well as in the Academy. In 1859, 
the ill health of Mr. Van Vleck forced him to resign his posi- 
tion. Not only were his labors onerous, but obstacles were 
placed in his way, trying to a sincere and earnest principal. 
He had done much to advance the school, and is worthy of 
grateful remembrance on the part of his pupils and others. 

THE FIRST BUILDING. 

The donation of five acres, for school purposes, has already 
been mentioned. This property was deeded to the General 
Synod. Additions were made to the plot by purchase, until. 



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CATA.LOaUB OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



S9 



in 1 859, the premises of the Synod became a beautifal cam- 
pus of sixteen acres. In 1857, about $12,000 had been 
secured, chiefly througb the exertions of Dr. Van Raalte, and 
a brick edifice erected under the superintendence of Mr. Van 
Vleck, and is now known as "Van VIeck Hall.'* The build- 
ing is three stories high, besides the basement, and 40x50 
feet on the ground. To this house the school was removed, 
and a part of it was used for a Refectory, and as a residence 
for the Principal. Besides recitation rooms, and a "refec- 
tory," were 18 chambers for students. 

APPOINTMENT OF REV. PHILIP PHELPS, JR. 

Rev, Philip Phelps, Jr., of Hastings, N. Y., was appointed 
by the Board of Education to succeed Mr. Van Vleck, and 
entered on his work in the fall of 1869. He found thirty- 
three pupils in attendance. The regular organization of the 
school into classes, and some more formal and efficient plan 
of superintendency by the Church became his first care. Sue* 
cess crowned his eflforts in both respects, and the progress of 
the Academy became more marked. In 1862, the number of 
students was forty-five, divided into "Classical and Primary," 
and in the following year the General Synod approved of and 
appointed the "Board of Superintendents,'' The Refectory 
was discontinued, when Mr. Phelps took charge. 

In the fall of 1862, another decided step was taken. By 
the approval of the Western Classes, and of the Synod of 
Chicago, a "Collegiate Department" was introduced, and a 
"Freshman Class" of ten members was formed. From this 
time date the efforts to have a regular College incorporated, 
under the laws of Michigan, and these efforts culminated in 
the Institution as we have it to-day. The Board of Superin- 
tendents continued; the four "Academic" classes entered in 
order upon their course; the General Synod recommended 
the College in 1864, and its endowment in the sum of llOO,- 
000; the collection of funds was prosecuted with success, 
East and West; needed steps were taken, and just before the 
graduation of the first class, in 1866, were organized the 



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40 CATAIiOGUB OF HOPS COLUSGE. 

^^Coancil/' Presidenojy Faculty, and Departments of JBbpe 
College, The act of incorporation was completed in the 
month of May; and the first meeting of the Oonneil 
assembled in July. In the seven years, since 1859, the num- 
ber of students had increased from thirty-three to fifty, viz.: 
in the Academic classes, 23; and in those of the Grammar 
school, 27. The graduating Senior class contained eight 
members, who received the title of A. B., at the first Com- 
mencement, July 17, 1806. 

TBACHERS. 

In the summer of 1861, Rev. Giles Van De Wall resigned, 
and accepted a pastoral charge in South Africa. Several 
students aided the principal during the next tviro years. In 
January, 1864, two new professors, viz: Rev. Peter J. Oggel, 
and Kev. T. Romeyn Beck, having been appointed by the 
Board pf Education, entered upon their work. The former 
was, at the time of his appointment, pastor of the Reformed 
Church, of Fella, la., and the latter had been an assistant 
profe88or at Rutgers College, N. J. Rev. John M. Ferris, of 
Grand Rapids, came weekly from that place to give instruc- 
tion in Rhetoric, Chemistry, Ac.' Fie resigned in 1865. Be- 
ing thus assisted, Dr. Phelps could be absent, more or less, in 
soliciting endowment funds. Early in 1866, Rev. Charles 
Scott, of Shawangnnk, N. Y., and somewhat later. Rev. 
Cornelius E. Crispell, Professor in Rutgers College, were ap- 
pointed, and they accepted their appointments. Mr. Cornelis 
Doesburg, of Holland, Mich., was made Tutor of the modern 
languages. Thus, in July, 1866, and just before the "Com- 
mencement" of that year, a Faculty of six members was 
formally constituted, and on the evening of the 12th, Rev. 
i Philip Phelps, Jr., D. D., was inaugurated as the first Presi- 
dent, by a committee of Synod appointed for that purpose. 

FUNDS, AC. 

Holland Academy had no endowment. For the proposed 
College, the amounts collected, up to 1866, were reported to 
be as follows, viz: {approximately) by Prof. Oggel in the 




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OATALOGUB OP HOPS COLLBOK. 




West, tlSyOOO; and by Dr. Phelps, mainly in the East, 
(40,000. All moneys were at first paid to the Board of 
Direction in New York, and then, by order of the Synod, the 
sum of 130,000 was donated therefrom to the Council of the 
College, for the purpose of securing a legal incorporation 
from the State. In addition to this sum, the Council was 
vested with the use and benefit of all the Synod's property in 
the Tillage of Holland. A fair foundation was therefore laid 
for a prosperous "school of the Church." Besides Van Vleck 
Hall there were, on the Campus at the time, three other 
buildings: 

1. A building, erected in 1857; used as a "Laboratory" 
after 1867, and much improved in 1870, and subsequently. 

2. A residence, built for Rev. Mr. Van de Wall in 1860, 
and occupied by Prof. Oggel in 1864; — afterwards called the 
"Oggel House." 

3. A gymnasium, erected by the students in 1862, and 
changed into the "Chapel" of the College in 1872, — well 
adapted to this purpose, as also for oratorical exercises and 
lectures. 

PBESIDBNCT OP DB. PHELPS. 

This continued for twelve years, or until July 1, 1878, 
and succeeded his seven years principalship, in Holland 
Academy. He labored assiduously for the welfare of the 
school, but encountered the difficulties so incident to young 
colleges. A cursory statement of these twelve years will be 
appended, in order to show the progress of the Institution. 

1866. A newspaper, called De Hope, was established, 
under the editorship of Prof. P. J. Oggel. The first Com- 
mencement was held July I7th. In September, Theological 
instruction began. The first cla^ consisted of seven mem- 
bers, and the teaching was divided among the clerical mem- 
bers of the Faculty. This was arranged by the Council, 
according to a resolution of the General Synod. 

1867. Number of students, 68. Charter Hall, erected for 
recitation rooms. Prof. C. E. Crispell, D. D., elected by Gen- 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLSGS. 



eral Synod, as "Professor of Didactio and Polemic Theology 
at Hope College," ihe other Professors being appointetl *afi 
"Theological Lectors." The Theological examinations, placed 
under the care of a branch of ''the Board of Superintendents of 
the Theological Seminary.*' Mr. Wm. A. Shields, A. B^ (class 
of 1866) appointed Tutor in the Grammar school. Rev. A. 
C. Van Raalte deeded to the Council about eighty acres of 
land within the city limits. Thirty acres of this were after- 
wards laid out as "Hope College Addition,'* pining the for- 
mer village plat on the West. A tract of thirteen acres pur- 
chased at Indian Village on the south side of Blaek Lake, 
and adjoining the Van Raalte donation. Point Superior, a 
tract of 837 acres, purchased on the north side of Macatawa 
Bay. Afterwards a portion of the land was improved and 
called ^^ Hope Farm^^ thjB means being furnished by Mr. Wm. 
H. H. Moore, of New York, who gave over l|;4,000 for the 
purpose, (the "Helrae donation.") The village of Holland, 
incorporated as a city. 

1869. The ^^Theological Departments^ formerly consti- 
tuted, and recognized as General Synod's "Theological Sem- 
inary in the West." The Superintendence of the same com- 
mitted tJthe Council. A gift of 1110,000 made by Elder 
James Suydam; one-half in payment of debts, and one-half 
for completing the purchase of Point Superior, for which 
reason, the tract was called "Suydam Park." Prof. P. J. 
Oggel died December 13. Another structure erected, which 
afterwards, being enlarged with a second story and a wing, 
became known as the "Grammar School Building." 

1870. Richard Parsons, A. B., appointed Tutor. Re- 
signed in 1871. Students, 103 in all. (See Min. G. S.) 

1871. "A Constitution for the whole School," adopted 
by the General Synod, recognizing three regular Departments 
with an adjunct "Publication Department." Wm. A. 
Shields, A. M., made Assistant Professor of Rhetoric and 
English Literature. Rev. Peter Moerdyke, A. M., (class of 



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CATALOGUE OP HOPE COLLEGE. ^ 

1866,) elected as Assistant Professor of Latin and Greek. He 
resigned in 1873, to take charge of the First Reformed 
Church, of Grand Rapids, Mich. Gerrit J. Kollen, A. M^ 
(class of 1868,) elected as Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics. The greater part of Holland, destroyed by fire, in 
October, inclading the residence of Prof. Scott. No College 
building burned, but indirectly much loss inflicted on the 
school. The devastated city greatly aided by the eastern 
churches. 

1872. Repairs, to a considerable extent, on the buildings 
of the College completed. The Holland Colony celebrated 
the twenty -fifth year of its settlement in America, and as a 
" Memorial," an "Ebonezer Fund" was started for the support 
of the Grammar School. This fund afterwards amounted to 
over $45,000 in notes and subscriptions, and was designed to 
be $50,000. Only a part of this fund is now productive. 
The "Zwemer House" completed on the "South Campus," 
just west of the old ^^ Printing Office^ (once the "Orphan 
House.") Cornells Doesburg, A. M., made Professor of 
Modern Languages. Number students, 72. 

1875. Professors Beck and Scott regularly appointed as 
" Lectors" in the Theological Seminary at Hope College, and 
the salaries of the three Theological Teachers assumed by 
Synod. Prof. Crispell began collections for the " Professor- 
ship of Didactic and Polemic Theology," and continued the 
work for two years^ The money came mainly from the East. 

1876. The Council resolved to try a "Financial Agency" 
for the purpose of increasing the funds, and elected Assistant 
Professor Kollen to that office. Students, 100. 

1877. The General Synod, finding that the Professors 
were not paid, and that the debt of the College, as well as of 
the Synod, was increasing, suapended the Theological Depart- 
ment after an operation of eleven years. Thirty candidates 
had graduated from it since 1869. Eight others completed 
their course in part. 




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44 



CATALOGUE OF HOPE OOLLSQE. 




1878. The General Synod determined to re-organize 
Hope College, and sent a Committee for that purpose, to 
meet with 'the Council. The debt of the Institution was 
found to be over $27,000, besides $4,100, due from the Gen- 
eral Synod to the Theological Teachers. Dr. Phelps resigned 
the Presidency, and Dr. Crispell his College Professorship, 
to take effect July 1st. A new Constitution of the College 
was drafted. Rev. Giles H. Mandeville, D. D., of New York 
city, was elected Provisional President, and Prof. Chas. 
Scott, D. D., Vice-President, to administer the College, while 
Dr. Mandeville collected funds in the East. Women were 
admitted to all the departments, and two young ladies 
entered the Freshman Class. Henry Boers, A. B., and John 
H. Kleinheksel, A. B., were appointed Tutors in the Gram- 
mar School. The number of students had gradually in- 
creased; the 50 of 1865 became 64 in 1872, (not including the 
Theological,) and 98 in 1878. In July, Assistant Professor 
Wm. A. Shields was made Professor of Rhetoric and English 
Literature, and Assistant Professor G. J. Eollen resigned 
his Financial Agency, and was made Professor of Mathe- 
matics, Natural Philosophy and Astronomy. 

PROVISIONAL PRESIDKKCY. 

When Dr. Phelps resigned, the Council deemed it best to 
elect no permanent president, until the income and condition 
of the College might warrant such a step. Dr. Mandeville 
gave his services without salary, but continued to live in 
New York City. His earnost and succest^ful efforts to collect 
funds continued until 1883. Prof. Scott assumed charge of 
the administration, or the executive duties of the institution, 
from July, 1878. As before, a brief sketch from year to 
year will bring the history down to the present time. 

1879. The new constitution of the College was adopted 
by the General Synod, somewhat changed from that of 1871, 
and dropping the Theological Department, because not in 
operation. Prof. C. E. Crispell resigned his Theological 
Professorship to the Synod, and became Pastor of the Re- 
formed Church, of Spring Valley, N. Y. Students, 111. 



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CATlXOaUB OF HOPS OOLLSOK. 




1880. Bey. Dr« Mandeville having resigned, Prof, Charles 
Scott wa« appointed ProviKional President. The debt dimin- 
ishing. The report to the Synod showed 50 students in the 
Academioy and 78 in the Preparatory Department, a total of 
138. 

1881. Agitation and division in several of the Reformed 
Churches of the West. Both in funds and students the effect 
was detrimental to the College, and so continued. 

1882. The debt finally liquidated. Over $35,000 had. 
been donated, and paid for that purpose. In addition, about 
$15,000 had been added to the JSkdotoment. Of the above 
sums, $13,000 came from Mr. Garret Kouwenhoven, of New- 
town, L. L, and $10,000 from a lady in New York City. 

(883. Henry Boers, A. M., and John H. Eleinheksel, A. 
M., (Tutors since 1878), appointed Assistant Professors. The 
Chapel materially improved, and used as their place of wor- 
ship by the First Reformed Church, (the ^'Minority''), pend- 
ing a suit in law for the recovery of the church edifice. 
Students, 127. 

1884. Rev. John A. De Baun, D. D., of Fonda, N. Y., 
elected permanent President in May, and confirmed by the 
General Synod. He declined the appointment. Prof. Scott 
continued as provisional President. General Synod met in 
Grand Rapids and made a visit to Hope College and the City 
of Holland, June 7th. $3,100 donated by members of Synod 
for a President's House. A successful effort made to increase 
the "Professorship of Didactic and Polemic Theology," to 
the full amount of $30,000 in cash, whereupon the Synod 
elected Rev. N. M. Steffens, D. D., to the Chair. He was 
duly inaugurated Dec. 4th, and on the next day the Theologi- 
cal Department was formally re-opened with 5 students. In 
September, Philip T. Phelps, A. B., was made Tutor in the 
Grammar School. 

1885. During the last four years, the four streets around 
the Campus have been graded and graveled, at considerable 



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i6 CATALOGUB OF HOPS OOLLEOK. 



expense, all of which falls apon the College. This year also, 
the improyeraents and repairs upon the Oggel Hoase, Zwe- 
mer House, Laboratory, Ssc.^ amounted to $1300. The second 
story of the Oggel House, assigned to the use of Theological 
School. In June, Charter Hall was consumed by an incendi- 
ary fire, and the Council inaugurated measures for the build- 
ing of a new Hall, at a cost of about I; 15000. Messrs. Arcnd 
Visscher and Gerrit J. Diekema being appointed a Central 
Committee to solicit funds for the purpose. The west thirty 
acres of the Van Raalte donation, and the Brayton purchase 
of thirteen acres, sold for a fair-ground, to the South Ottawa 
and North Allegan Agricultural Society. Number of stu- 
dents, from April 1884, to April 1885, 174," viz.; in College, 
33; in the Grammar School, 136; in the Seminary, 5. Those 
in the Grammar School after the C year, almost universally 
take Latin, and generally purpose to pursue a full College 
Course. 

. PRESIDENCY OP REV. CHARLES SCOTT, D. D. 

After a service of seven years as acting executive officer 
of the Institution, Prof, Chas. Scott was elected President, 
in April 1885, and in June, the election was duly confirmed 
by the General Synod. At his request, the inauguration was 
deferred for one year. 

At the June meeting, of the Council, the following 
changes took place in the Faculty, viz.: Professors T. R. 
Beck and Wm. A. Shields resigned their positions. James 
G. Sutphen, A. M., of Somerville, N. J., was elected Profes- 
sor of Latin, and Rev. John J. Anderson, A. M., of Tuska- 
loosa, Ala., Professor of Greek. Assistant Prof. Boers was 
placed in the chair of English Language and Literature, and 
Rhetoric; and Assistant Prof. Kleinheksel in that of Mathe- 
matics. Prof. Kollen was assigned to a new chair, viz.: that 
of Applied Mathematics, Physics and Political Economy. 
John B. Nykerk, A. B., was elected Tutor, in the place of 
Philip T. Phelps, A. M. Thus the Faculty was in fact reor- 
ganized. Rev. Dr. Phelps, having occupied the residence 



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part of Van Vleok Hall, since his resignation, in l8Y8, va- 
cated the same, and the w-hole building was converted into 
College uses, — recitation rooms, Ac. 

By the General Synod the Theological Department was 
made the "Weertern Theological Seminary of the R, C, A.", 
and placed under a distinct Board of Superintendents, but 
not separated from the College. Prof. Steffens assisted by 
Revs. Peter Moerdyke and Henry E. Dosker. 

1886. Prof. Scott inaugurated as President, June 22nd, 
in the Third Reformed Church. The President's House 
erected on the Campus, and finished as to the exterior. Van 
Vleck Hall painted and otherwise improved, at an expense of 
about $600, The Library removed into more ample and 
safer quarters, on the first flo<>r, and increased in size. The 
First. Reformed Church having worshiped in the Chapel, 
since 1881, removed to their new church edifice on the corner 
of Ninth and Market streets. Students from April 1885 to 
Apnl 1886, 183. 

1887. This year has been marked by a work of divine 
grace among the students, and at this date, March 5, fifty- 
two have professed conversion to Christ. This makes 100 in 
the Institution who trust that they are Christians. In attend- 
ance, since last April, a total of 186. 

PUBLICATION. 

It has been stated that De Hope was established in 1866. 
Prof. Oggel was assisted by Prof. C. Doesburg as Office 
editor. After Prof. OggePs death, his brother, Rev. E. C. 
Oggel, was elected editor, but he resigned in 1871. Rev. C. 
Van der Veen succeeded, until, in 1874, he resigned, and the 
management of the paper was devolved upon a committee of 
the Council, with Prof. C. Doesburg as managing editor. In 
July, 1882, Professors Doesburg and Kollen took the paper 
by contract, for two years; but the contract being given up, 
in July, 1884, Rev. John H. Karsten was elected by the 
Council as editor. Mr. Karsten resigned in July, 1886, and 



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4S 



CATALOGUE OF HOPS OOLLEGB. 



a contract for publiebing the paper was made with R. Kan- 
ters, Esq.^ of Holland City. Mr. 6. Van Scbelven became 
Managing Editor. The brick Printing Office was bailt in IS16 
through voluntory contributions secured through the exer- 
tions of Prof. Doesburg, and the Press was a donation from 
Mr. Wm, H. H. Moore, in 1871. Circulation about eighteen 
hundred copies. 

CONCLUDING NOTE. 

It will be seen that this school, in almost all respects, has 
been steadily progressing. Before her js a fair prospect, if 
her Alumni stand by her good name, if her friends are at- 
tached to and not alienated from her interests, and if the 
Council do their duty as Christian men and faithful guard- 
ians for the Lord. She needs and prays for more ample en- 
dowments. May the future show more and more clearly that 
this is indeed a ^^College of Hope.'' 



ERRATUM. 

Page 22. — Rev. A. Page Peeke was Secretary, p, Uy of 
the Board of Superintendents. The regular Secretary is 
Rev. p. Moerdyke. 



^ ^^^>S>^>^^^^y^,;;>A^^^^^^>^»^>^^^i<^»^5^i^i^^i^^i^^t^>tf^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



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1888. 


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ff^0»V %f»<y^Vii;fc<?^<yy^>^V^^f^^^y^ig»^»fw»f%^^^»P^^ 



CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



OF 



Hope College, 



HOLLAND, MICHI&AN, 

l887-'88. 

An Institution of the Reformed Church in America. 

FOUNDED IN 1851. 

Incorporated as Hope College, 1866. 



HOLLAND, MICH. 

WM. II. KIXiKHS, BOOK AMD JOB PKINTEH. 

I88S. 



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^»f^g^^^^^^^^yyy»<^wy^^^^»!V^^^^g^^y^^»<v^g»gv^?»^^^»^sff!^^^^^^^ 



CALENDAR. 



1888, April 16, Third Term begins, 

" " £6, Meeting of Council. 

" " 26, Senior Examinations. 

'' June 20-22, Undergraduate Examinations, 
" " 23, Examinations for Admission. 

'* " 25, Closing Exercises of the Gram- 

mar School. 
*' " 26, Meeting of Council, 

" " 26, Meeting of Alumnl 

" " 27, Commencement, 

vacation 
" Sept, 19, First Term begins, 
" " 19, Examinations for Admission. 

Dec, 21, First Term ends, 

VACATION. 

1889, Jan, 7, Second Term begins, 
March 29, " " ends, 

VACATION. 

The First Term contains H weeks. 
The Second Term contaitis 12 weeks. 
The Third Term contains 11 weeks. 



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THE COUNCIL 



EX-OFFICIO. 

Rkv. Cuas. Scott, D. D., - President of the College. 

ELECTED MEMBERS. 

NAHER. RESIDEXCE8. TERMS EXPIRE. 

Rev. Wm. J. R. Taylor, D. D., Newark, N. J., 1888. 

Rev. G. H. Mat^deville^ D. D., New York City, N. Y., 1889. 



Rev. Jas. F. Zwemer, 


Alton, la., 


1890 


Isaac Cappox, 


Holland, Mich., 


1891 


ArEND VlSSCHER, 


Holland, Mich., 


1892 


J. a BENHAJf, M. D., 


Hndson, N. Y., 


1893 



7Zt02tf: OZ«A.SSIS OS* XiCXOZXXOJLIT. 

Rev. Peter Moerdyke, Grand Rapids, Mich., 1888. 

Rev. Thomas W. Joxes, Holland, Mich., 1888. 

S^RObC OZiA.S8XS 07 GhXZ.A.lO'X) ZtZVSXt. 

Rev. Peter De Pree, Graml Rapids, Mich., 1889. 

Rev. Henry E. Dosker, Holland, Mich., 1889. 

9*X{.OarfC CZ<JL8SZS 07 ZXOZiZiAXTID. 

Rev. Peter Lepeltak, Overisel, Mich., 1890. 

Rev. Dirk Broek, Holland, Mich., 1890. 

S'XtOAf CZ<JLSSZ8 OS* ZO'^^JL. 

Rev. Ale Buursma, Orange City, la., 1891. 

Rev. William Moerdyk, Pella, la., 1891. 

s*K,osiC oZiJLSszs OS* zz<z<zin-ozs. 

Rev.'Joh.v. S. Joralmox, Norwood P.irk, III., 1892. 

Rev. Wm. H. Phraxer, Irving Park, III., 1892. 

s*z2rOM: aiiA.sszs os* -wzsooisrsziT. 

Rev. John Broek, Milwaukep, Wis., (89.3. 

Rev. Balster Van Ess, Roseland, 111., 1893. 



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OFFICERS OF COUNCIL. 



Rkv. Peter Lepbltak, - - - PresiderU. 

Rkv. William Mobrdyk, - Vice PresidefiL 

Rev. Petee Moebdyke, - - - Searetart/. 

Isaac Cappon, Esq., - - - Treasurer. 



COMMITTEES OF COUNCIL. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 
i Pres. Chas. Scott, Chairman, Rev. Dirk Broek, Secretary, 
Rev. PfifBR MoBRDTKE, Rev, Thomas W. Jones, 
Isaac Cappon, Esg. 

INVESTMENT COMMITTEE. 

(In charj^e of the funds of the ("ouncil.) 

I Abend Visscher, Esq., Isaac Cappon, Esq., 

Pres. Charles Scott. 

HOPE FARM COMMITTEE. 

(In charge of a tract of land, at Point Superior, on 
Macatawa Bay.) 

Pres. Charles Scott, Arend Visscher, Esq. 

Isaac Cappon, Esq. 

"DE HOPE." 

I Mr. R. Kanters, . - . . Publisher, 

Mr. G. Van Schelven, . - - - Editor, 



EDITORIAL COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL. 

l Prop. C. Doesburg, Rev. D. Broek, 

Rev. John Van der Meulen. 

J 



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FACULTY. 



REV. CHARLES SCOTT, D. D., President, ex-officio. \ 

Professor of Chemistiy and Natural History. In charge of Mental and 
Moral Philosophy, History, and Evidences of Christianity. 

CORNELIS DOESBURG, A. M., Secretary. 
Professor of Modem Languages and Literature, and of Art 

GERRIT J. KOLLEN, A. M. 

Professor of Applied Mathematics, Physics, and Political Economy. 
In charge of Logic. 

HENRY BGERS, A. M. 

Professor of the English Language and Literature, and Rhetoric. 

JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, A. M. 

E^fessor of Mathematics. 

JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A. M. 

Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. In charge of Greek, 
aft«r the First Term. 

♦REV. JOHN J. ANDERSON, A. M. 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. In charge of 
Sacred Literature. 



*Resignedin Jan., *88. 



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STUDENTS. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



NAMES. 

Henry GeerlingSy 
Henry Harmelingy 
Foppe Elooster, 
John Lamar, 
Martin Ossewaarde, 
John Van Westenburg, 
Peter J. Zwemer, 




BBSIDBNCBS. 

Holland City, 

Oostburg, Wis., 

Forest Grove, 

Jennison, 

Holland City, 

Grand Rapids, 

Orange City, la., V. V. H., 20. 



BOOMS. 

At Home. 

*V.V.H.,4. 

L.Cats. 

V.V.H.,7. 

At Home. 
C. E. Coates. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



Henry Hospers, Jr., 
Herbert G. Keppel, 
Albert Enooihuizen, 
Gelmer Euiper, 
Tennis W. Muilenbarg, 
William Stegeman, 
Anthony M. Van Duine, 
Dirk J. Werkman, 



Orange City, la., 
Zeeland, 
New Holland, 
Graafschap, 
Orange City, la., 
New Groningen, 
Ealamazoo, 
Hull, la.. 



J. Panels. 

L. T. Eanters. 

V.V.H.,8. 

H. Geerlings. 

V.V.H.,6. 

C. E. Coates. 

V.V. H., 16. 

R. B. Werkman. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



Dirk L. Betten, 
William H. Bruins, 
Clinton L. Dayton, 
Martin Flipse, 
Herman S. Juistema, 
Harry Eremers, 
James Ossewaarde, 
Albert J. Rooks, 
Isaac Van Eampen, 



Orange Cityja., J.Vanden Berge. 
Brandon, Wis., G. T. Huizinga. 
Berlin, J. Eramer. 

Cedar Grove, Wis., V.V. H., 2. 
Grand Haven, J. Van den Berge. 
Holland City, At Home. 

Zeeland, J.Van den Berge. 

East Holland, Wm. Rooks. 

Grand Rapids, Eremers A Bangs. 



*V. V. H — Van Vleck Hall. 




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CATALOGUE OP HOPE COLLEGE 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



NAMES. 

Fannie A. Steffens, 
Gerrit H. Albers, 
Herman J. Betten, 
Daniel G. Cook, 
Richard Gleysteen, 
Gilbert 0. Haan, 
Henry J. Luidens, 
John Nordhais, 
Adrian Pietent, 
Dirk F. Plasman, 
John Sietsema, 
John M. Van der Meulen, 
Jurry Winter, 




BESIDENCES. 

Holland Cily, 
Overisel, 

Orange City,Ia., J 
Holland City, 
Alton, la., 
Yriesland, 
North Holland, 
Grand Haven, 
Holland City, 
Holland, 
(^oopersville, 
Ebenezer, 
Holland City, 



BOOMS. 

At Home. 

U. De Vries. 

VandenBerge. 

At Home. 

H. Veohter. 

V.V.H., 18. 

V.V. H., 14. 

J. A. Brouwer. 

At Hume. 

At Home. 

J. Kramer. 

At Home. 

At Home. 



SUMMARY. 



Seniors, 
Juniors, 
Sophomores, 
Freshmen, 

Total, 



S*? 



ADMISSION. 



For admission into the Freshman Class, a full certifioate 
of graduation from the Grammar School Department is re- 
quired; or an examination in the studies puraued in that De- 
partment; or in what the Faculty shall deem an equivalent. 

For admission into any advanced class of the Institution, 
it will be necessary for the applicant to pass an examination 
in the studies previously pursued by the class. If received 
on conditions, the conditions must be fulfilled before matric- 
ulation. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Mathematics. — Wentworth'« Geometry and Plane 
Trigonometry. 

Language and Literature, — 

English, — Supine's Trench on Words; English Literature 
began. 

Latin. — De Amicitia, Harper*8 Edition; Horace Harper*B 
Edition; Antiquities; Composition. 

Oreek. — Goodwin's Herodotus and Thucydides; Good- 
win's Grammar; Jones's Greek Composition; Antiquities. 

Modem. — Mulder's History of Dutch Literature; Jager's 
Derivation of Dutch Words; Essays, and Translations. 

Rhetoric. — Essays, Subjects outlined; Elocution. 

History. — Pennell's Roman History; Anderson's New 
General History, 1st part; An atlas of Classical and Mediaeval 
Geography. 

Natural Science. — Cutter's Comprehensive Physi- 
ology; Packard's Zodlogy, Briefer Course. 

Sacred Literature. — Cadman's Harmony of the Gos- 
pels. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Mathematics. — Wentworth's Spherical Trigonometry; 
Olney's General Geometry and Calculus. Wentworth's Sur- 
ng and Navigation. 




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10 



CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



Language and Literature, — 

English. — Development of Eng. Literature and Language, 
WeUh. 

Z^r/.v.—Tacitus, Ginn ayid Heath's Editio)); Cicero 
Orations, Harper's Edition; Composition; Literature. 

Greek. — Lysias; Boise's Homer; Jebb's Literature. 

Modern.— Whitney's Practical French Grammar; Wor- 
man's German Grammar; Deutsches Lesebuch, L Theil. 

Rhetoric. — Essays; Original Speeches; Debates; Elocu- 
tion. 

History. — Anderson's New General History, 2nd part; 
Special Studies in History. ^ 

Natural Science. — Remsen's Chemistry, Briefer 
Course. 

Sacred Literature. — Introduction to the Scriptures. 
JUNIOR YEAR. 

Ma THE3IA TICS.— Qui CU I US. 

Mathematics Applied. — Olmsted's Natural Pinlosophy. 

Language and Lpierature. — 

Latin. — Philosophy of Cicero; Academics or Tusculan 
Disputations, Harper*s Edition; Plautus or Terence, Chase 
and Stuart's Edition. 

Greek. — Dyer's Apology and Crito; D'ooge's Antigone. 

Modem. — Whitney's Practical French Grammar, (con- 
tinued); Choix de Contes; Worman's German Grammar, 
(continued); Deutsches Lesebuch, 2. Theil. 

Rhetoric. — Bascom's Philosophy of Rhetoric; Debates; 
Essays, and Discussion; Delivery of Original Speeches; 
Raymond's Orator'? Manual. 



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CATALOGUB OF HOPE COLLEGE. 11 



History, — Anderson's New General History, 2nd part, 
I (continued) ; Lectures on the Constitution and History of the 
United States. 

Natural Science, — Chemistry, (Analysis, etc.) one 
term; Wood's Botany, two terms; Biology, Sedgwick and 
Wilson% Part I. 

Metaphysics, — Porter's Elements of Intellectual Science. 

Sacked Literatuhe, — Butler's Analogy. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics, — Olmsted's Astronomy. 

Langvaoe and Literature, — 

Greek, — Wagner's Phcedo; A Comedy. 

Modem, — Rowan's Moreeaux choisis; Groszmann's Hand- 
buch; Lectures on German Literature; Compositions in 
French and German. 

Rhetoric, — Essays, Delivery of Original Speeches. 

L QIC, — McCosh . 

Ethics, — Wayland's Moral Science. 

History, — Guizot's History of Civilization. 

Natural Science, — Dana's Class-Book of Geology. 

Political Science.—W BLyl^nd^s Politioal Economy, 
(Chapin); Lectures on Civil Government. 

Sacred Literature, — Lectures on Evidences of Chris- 
; tianity. 



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STUDENTS. 



*A" CLASS. 




NAMES. 

Dina Bolks, 
Christina S. Broek, 
Christine M. J. Kreiner, 
Sebia Van Zwaluwenburg, 
George H. D. Baert, 
Adrian Brandt, 
Johannes De Beer, 
Rokas Chr. De Vries, 
Gerrit H. Dubbink, 
Jacob Geerlings, 
John Haan, 
Peter Hayser, 
Geo. E. Kollen, 
John Luxen, 
Albert Oosterhof, 
Andrew J. Reeverts, 
Philip Soulen, 
Cornelias M. Steffens, 
Herman Van der Ploeg, 
Henry Van Engelen, 
Isaac J. Van Hee, 
Homer Van Landegend, 
Henry J. Veld man, 



RESIDENCES. 

Overisel, 

Holland City, 

Zeeland, 

Drenthe, 

Zeeland, 

Vriesland, Mrs. 

Emden, Germany, 

Holland City, 

Overisel, 

Holland City, 

Vriesland, 

Beayerdam, 

Overisel, 

Grand Haven, 

Spring Lake, 

Oregon, 111.. 

Milwaukee, Wis., 

Holland City, 

Holland City, 

Drenthe, 

Pultneyville, N.Y., 

Holland, 

Grand Rapids, Mr 



Orange C. Flanegan, 
Oren S. Flanegan, 



UNCLASSIFIED. 

Allegan, 
Allegan, 



ROOMS. 

J. Visscher. 

At Home. 

Prof. Steffens. 

Dr. Kremers. 

A. Schouten. 

Van O'Linda. 

H. D. Cook. 

At Home. 

H. D. Cook. 

At Home. 

J. Koning. 

Mrs. Huyser. 

J. Panels. 

V.V.H., 19. 

H. Bremer. 

V.V.H., 15. 

J. Pauels. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

J. Pauels. 

Prof. Steffens. 

At Home. 

s. V. d. Ploeg. 

H. Vechler. 
H. Vechter. 



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FACULTY 




Prof. CHARLES SCOTT, D. D., Fresidentj ex-officio. 
Pbof. CORNELIS doesburg, a. M., 

Modern Languages, and Art. 

Prof. GERRIT J. KOLLEN, A. M., 

Natural Philosophy, and Astronomy. In charge of Civil 
Government, and Didactics. 

Prof. HENRY BOERS, A. M., 

English and Rhetoric. 

Prop. JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, A. M., Secretary. 
.Mathematics. In charge of Botany, and Physical Geography. 

Prof. JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A. M., 

Latin, and Roman History. 

Prof. JOHN J. ANDERSON, A. M., {resigned,) 
Greek and Greek History. 

MISS SARAH E. SATTERTHWAITE, A. B., 

Temporary Teacher of Latin and Greek. 

JOHN B. NYKERK, A. B., 

Tutor, and Instructor in Vocal Music. 

MRS. C. VAN RAALTE GILMORE, 
Lady Assistant and Matron. 

Prof. PATROCLUS A. LATTA, 

In charge of the Normal Department. 

^^, THE FACULTY, 

In charge of Religious Instruction. 

Prof. Gerrit J. Kollbn, Librarian. 



' i Teunis W. Muilenburo, Chorister. 
Peter Swart, Organist. 

Bernard Bloemendaal, Janitor. 



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CATALOGUE OP HOPE COLLEGE. 15 



"B» CLASS. 

NAMES. BRSIDENCES. 

Aggie Hofma, Vriesland, 

Jennie Kollen, Overisel, 

Cornelia S, Van der Meiilen, Ebenezer, 



Egbert Boone, 

Dirk De Kleine, 

Cornelius 6. Haan, 

Henry Huizenga, 

Wirlje T. Janssen, 

Albert Euiper, 

Reuben Maurits, 

John J. Meraen, 

William Miedema, 

John Sohaefer, 

J.ames Slerenberg, 

John H. B. Te Roller, 

Wilhelraus V. Te Winkel, Alto, Wis., 

Albert H. G. Van den Berg, Holland City, 



New Groningen, 
Jamestown, 
Vriesland, 
Beaverdara, 
Foreston, 111., 
Kalamazoo, 
Vriesland, 
Marion, N. Y., 
Vriesland, 
Oregon, 111., 
Fulton, 111., 
Holland City, 



Henry Van der Ploeg, 
Martyi Van Duinen, 
John Vennema, 
Martin Verbage, 
William Zoethout, 



Holland City, 
Grand Rapids, 
Holland City, 
Vriesland, 
Roseland, 111., 

"C" CLASS. 



BOOMB. 

G. Dal man. 

Prof. Kollen. 

G. Dalman. 

At Home. 

Mrs. Sohols. 

A. Schouten. 

G. Ter Beek. 

V.V.H., 13. 

V.V.H., 12. 

H. D Cook. 

H. D. Cook. 

J. Koning. 

V.V.H., 16. 

J. Koning. 

At Home. 

Van den Berge. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

V.V.H., 3. 

At Home. 

H. U. Cook. 

J. Koning. 



Mamie De Vries, 
Effie Doornink, 
H. Harriet Hansen, 
Maria H. Huizenga, 
Julia J. Johnson, 
Maud R. Rogers, 
Mattie Van Putten, 
Asa Bonthnis, 
Albert Borst, 
George C. Dangremond, 
William Dehn, 



Holland City, 

Grand Rapids, Prof. H 

Holland, 

Holland City, 

Holland City, 

Holland City, 

Holland City, 

Eloseland, 111., C. 

Zeeland, 

East Saugatuck, H. J. 

Holland City, 



At I onie . 
E. Dosker. 
At Home. 
At Home. 
At Home. 
At Home. 
At Home. 
K. Coates. 
J. Pauels. 
Pietenpol. i | 
At Home. 1 ' 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



NAMES. 

John L. De Jong, 
Cornelius De Jong, 
Ralph P. De Vries, 
Klaas J. Dijkema, 
Arthur H. Farley, 
A. C. V. R. Gilmore, 
Edgar L. Jones, 
John Kloosterman, 
Charles H. McBridts 
Henry A. Meengs, 
Seine J. Menning, 
Henry J. Pietenpol, 
\alt Roelofs, 
Henry Sluyter, 
Peter Swan, 
Peter Tanis, 
G. Wakker Toren, 
Gerrit Tysse, 
Arthur Van Duren, 
Isaac A, Van Heulen, 
Albert Van Keiinpema, 
William G. Van Kersen, 
Zachary Veldhuis, 
Gerrit A. Wanrooy, 



BESTDENCBS. 

Roseland, 111., 
Zeeland, 
Zeeland, 
Fulton, 111., 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Zeeland, 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Alton, la., 
Holland City, 
Drenthe, 
Holland City, 
Roseland, III.,- 
Roseland, III., 
Holland City, 



ROOMS. 

U. De Vries. 

J. Eoning. 

Mi-8. Dokter. 

C. K. Coates. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

At Home 

Mrs. Dokter. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

VV.H., 17. 

At Home. 

H. J. Pietenpol. 

At Home. 

U. De Vries. 

H. Vechter. 

At Home. 



Fernwood, 111., Mrs. V. d. Ploeg. 
Holland City, At Home. 

East Saugatuck, E. Winter. 

New Groningen, At Home. 

Roseland, III., G. T. Huizenga. 
Overisel, U. De Vries. 

Holland City, At Home. 



Leila E. McBride, 
William Lamoreuz, 
Sherman Munger, 



UNCLASSIFIED. 

Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Denison, 



At Home. 

At Home. 

G. S. Bright. 



Isabella G. Steffens, 
Clara R. Van Dyk, 
Agnes Van Hovon, 
Jacob Alberti, 




"D" CLASS. 

Holland City, 
Muskegon, 
Vriesland, 
Holland City, 



At Home. 
Prof. Steffens. 
J. Visscher. 
At Home. 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPE OOLLEOE. 



17 



NAMES. 

Otto Augustine, 
Benjamin Bosman, 
Kestin W. Coaten, 
Cornelius Dekker, 
leke De Vries, 
Francis E. Doesburg, 
James V. Kiekintveld, 
Benjamin A. Mulder, 
Chai les Mulder, 
Henry Op 't Holt, 
Jacob Tempel, 
James Troxel, 
Henry Van der Lei, 
Peter Vennema, 
Lane Vissers, 
John M. Van Zoeren, 
Henry Walkotte, 



SUMMARY. 




RESIDENCES. 

Grand Rapids, 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Zeeland, 
Drenthe, 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Drenthe, 
Fulton, 111., 
Holland City, 
Fulton, 111., 
Holland City, 
Holland City, 
Vriesland, 
Drenthe, 



BOOMS. 

H. Te Roller. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

U. De Vries. 

Mrs. Nibbelink. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

Mrs. Nibbelink. 

Mrs. V. d. Ploeg. 

At Home. 

Mrs. V. d. Ploeg. 

At Home. 

At Home. 

H. Geerlings. 

Mrs. Schols. 



Total, in the Institution 




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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 

During the last year, it has been decided by the Council 
to open a Normal Department. This is not designed to take 
the place of the regular Course, but to give to the students a 
choice of needed Normal studies, in lieu of certain others. 
Continuing to educate^ it is proposed to adapt that education 
to the art of teaching. Prof. Latta will enter upon his duties 
in the month of March, and will open a Summer School in 
July and August. Among the text books to be used are 
Page's Theory and Practice of Teaching, and White's 
Elements of Pedagogy. 

This Department will develop more fully as circumstances 
shall permit. 

ADMISSION. 

For admission into the "D" Class, a common school edu- 
cation is required in the branches pursued in that year. The 
better their previous training, the more easily and profitably 
can pupils enter upon the Grammar School couree. 

For admission into any advanced class of the Institution, 
it will be necessary for the applicant to pass an examination 
in the studies previously pursued by the class. If received 
on conditions, the conditions must be fulfilled before matric- 
ulation. 

PROBATION. 

New students, in either Department, remain on probation 
for one term, at the expiration of which, if their course prove 
satisfactory, they are admitted to matriculation in the usual 
manner. 




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COURSE OF STUDY 




FIRST YEAR, "0" GLASS. 
Reading, Etc. — National Fourth Reader; Penmanship; 
Harrington's Graded Spelling Book, Part II. 

Geoohaphy, — Harper's School Geography, Michigan 
Edition. 

Mathematics. — Olney's Practical Arithmetic. 

Lanouaoe. — 

English, — Reed and Ke Hogg's Graded Lessons in English. 

Rhetoric. — Written Essays through the year; Declama- 
tions. 

History. — Barnes's United States History. 

SECOND YEAR, "0" CLASS. 
Reading, Etc. — National Fifth Reader; Penmanship; 
Westlake's 3,000 Words; Dictation Exercises. 

Mathematics. — Davies's Intellectual Arithmetic; Went- 
worth & Hill's Arithmetic; Sprague's Rapid Addition; Bry- 
ant an<l Stratton's Common School Book-keeping, {single 
entry.) 

Language.— 

English. — Reed and Kellogg's Higher Lessons in English. 

Latin. — Six weeks Preparation for reading Caesar, Oinn 
<jb HeaJtKs Edition; CsBsar, Oinn Jb HeaJtKs New Edition. 

Modem. — Van Dalen's Dutch Grammar; Van Dalen's 
Dutch Exercises. 



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^^0 CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 

Rhetoric, — Essays, and Declamations, (continned). 

THIRD YEAR "B" GLASS, 
Rbadtno^ Etc, — Seleclions; Penmanship, and Drawing. 

Mathematics, — Wentworth's Complete Algebra to Lo- 
garithms; Steele's Astronomy, with the use of Globes; Bry- 
ant & Stratton's Common School Book-keeping, (double 
entry). 

Language, — 

English. — Hart's Rhetoric; Analysis of Sentences. 

Latin, — CsBsar; Cicero's Orations; Jones's Latin Exer- 
> cises. 

\', Greek. — Whiton's Preparation for Xenophon; Goodwin's 

Grammar, and the Anabasis. 

Modem, — Van Dalen's Dutch Grammar, and Exercises, 
(continued.) 

Rhetoric, — Essays and Declamations, (continued). 

History, — Smith's Greek History, (abridged). 

Special, — In place of Latin and Greek: Whitney's Prac- 
tical French Grammar; Worman's German Grammar; Wor- 
man's German Reader. 

FOURTH YEAR •'>!" GLASS. 
Dra wing, — 

Mathematics. — Wentworth's Algebra; Went worth's 
Geometry (in part), Natural Philosophy, Peak^s Oanot, 
revised. 

Language, — 

Miglish, — Parsing Milton's Paradise Lost, Sprague. 



Latin, — Cicero's Orations; Virgil; Jones's Latin Exer- !> 




• 



cises. ( 



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Greek, — Goodwin's Grammar; Anabasis and Hellenica; 
Jones's Greek Composition. 

Modem, — Syntax, (Dutch); Practical Exercises; Trans- 
lations. 

Rhetoric. — Hart's Rhetoric, Essays; Declamations; 
'^ The Excelsiora," published by the Class. 

History, — Anderson's English History. 

Civil Government, — Young's Government Class Book. 

Didactics. — Lectures on the Art of Teaching. 

Physiology and Hygiene, — SteMs, 

Special. — Whitney's Practical French Grammar; Wor- 
roan's German Grammar, and Reader, (continued). 

Note. — Religions Instruction is given by the Faculty in 
all the Classes. 

Special attention is given, daring the whole of the Pre- 
paratory Course, to the grammars of the Languages studied. 
For those who pursue only English studies or who design 
stopping at the end of the "A" year, the Faculty provide 
such additional branches, as seem most expedient and prof- 
itable. Those generally make better progress, whose time is 
fully occupied in the work of the School. 



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Depsrtmest of Theology. 




"The Western Theological Seminary of the 
Reformed Church in America" 



RE-OPENED DECEMBER 4th, 1 884-. 



The first Coramencement, of the Seminary was held, on 
the evening of April 29, 1886, on which occasion Mr. Dirk 
Scholten received the usual professorial certificate. 

The General Synod, of 1886, not only assigued a corporate 
name as above to the Department, but constituted for the 
same a separate '* Board of Superintendents," distinct from 
the Council. This new Board met for the first time, and was 
duly organized, July, 1886. Rev. Chas. Scott was elected 
President, and Rev. P. Moerdyke, Secretary. 

At the same meeting Rev. H. E. Dosker, of Grand Haven, 
Mich., was appointed Lector, for one year, in the Seminary, 
according to resolution of the last General Synod. The ap- 
pointment was accepted. He was reappointed in April, 1887. 

Revs. P. Lepeltak, J. F. Zwemer, and G. H. Mandeville 
are a Committee of Synod, "to raise a permanent endowment 
for the chair of Biblical Languages and Exegesis; and also 
to secure funds to pay the Lector." 

The Theological year extends from the first \Yednesday 
in September to the last Wednesday in April. 

A Committee of the Board will meet on the first Tuesday 
in September, of each year, for the admission of students. 

The recitation rooms of the Seminary are on the second 
floor of the Oggel House. 




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Board of Superintendents. 



KX-OFFICIO. 
, Chas. Scott, D. D., - President of the College. 
FROM THE STNOD OF NEW YORK, 
David Cole, D. D., - - Yonkere, N. Y. 

FROM I HE 8TN0D OF ALBANY, 
£dwabd a. CoLLiBBy D. D., - Kmderhook, N. Y. 

FROM TEE SYNOD OF NEW BRUNaWlUE. 
E. Tanjobe CoBwm, D. D., - Millstone, N. J. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF OBICAGO. 
P. Lepeltak, - - - Overisel, Mich. 

P. MoBBDTKB, - - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Balsteb Van Ess, - - Roseland, 111. 

Wm. H. Phbaneb, - - Irving Park, 111. 

FROM THE CLA8SI8 OF HOLLAND. 
John Van deb Mbulbn, - Ebenezer, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSI8 OF GRAND RIVER. 
, Egbbbt Wintbb, - - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

FROM THE VLASSia OF MICHIGAN, 
A. Vennema, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

FROM THE 0LAS8I8 OF ILLINOIS 
Samuel L. Gamblb, - Pekin, 111. 

FROM THE 0LAS8IS OF W1800NSIN. 
J . Van Houtbn, Soath Holland, 111. 

FROM THE 0LAS8IS OF IOWA. 
Ale Buubsma, Orange City, la. 



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REV. NICHOLAS M. STEFFENS, U. D. 

Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theology. In cliarge of Hebrew, 

and Old Testament Exegesis. Biblical Criticism, and 

Practical Theology. 

REV. HENRY E. DOSKER, A. M. 

Lector. In charge of New Testament Exegesis. Historical Theology. 
Sacred Geography, and Archeeology. 



STUDENTS. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



NAMES. BEBIDBNGE8. BOOMS. 

Gerrit J. Hekhuis, Holland, At Home. 

Albert Van den Berg, South Holland, 111., V.V.H., 11. 

Peter ' Wayenberg, Orange City, la., V.V.H., 6. 

MIDDLE CLASS. 



Ralph Bloemendaal, 
Albert H. Strabbing, 



Cedar Grove, Wis , H. Vechter. 
Holland City, At Home. 

Total, 5. 



All of the above students are graduates (and have the 
degree of A. B.) from Hope College. 




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COURSE OF STUDY 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



EXEQETICAL ThBOLOQT AND MBRMBNEDTICS.—Rudl- 

raents of Hebrew; Genesis, Messianic Prophecies. TeoU- 
hooka, — Green's Hebrew Grammar; Hebrew Bible. New Tes- 
tament Greek; Exegesis of portions of the New Testament. 
TeoUbooka. — McClelland's Manual; Winer's Grammar; Rob- 
inson's Harmony of the Gospels. Westcott and Hort's Greek 
New Testament; Biblical ArchsBology, and Sacred Geography, 
(Barrow's Handbook). 

HiS'iORic^L Tbeoloqt. — Kurtz's Sacred History. 

Practical Theology. — Homiletical Exercises. 




MIDDLE TEAR. 

ExEGETiCAL Theoloot AND HERMENEUTica. — Hebrew 
Etymology and Syntax; Studies in Prophetical Theology; 
Hebrew Poetry; Cursory reading of Historical Books; Bibli* 
cal Criticism, (Old Test.); Keil's Manual; Studies in the 
Epistles of Paul. 

Historical Theology,— KviTtz^f\ Church History; Lec- 
tures. 

Systematical Theology. — Introduction to Dogmatic 
Theology; History of the Science; Theology proper; Anthro- 
pology, and Christology. — Woodbridge's Analysis; Lectures. 

Practical Theology. — Homiletical Exercises, con- 
tinued ; Pastoral Theology. — Shedd's Manual. 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPS COLLEGE. 

SENIOR- YE A.R. 

ExBQBTiCAL Theoloqy AND Mermeneutics.— Hebrew 
continued; Aramaic; Studies in Prophetical Theology, and 
in Poetry; Cursory reading; Reading by sight; New Testa- 
ment Exegesis, continued; Biblical Criticism, (Old Testa- 
ment). — Keil's Manual. 

Historical Theology. — Ecclesiastical History, con- 
tinned. 

Systematic Theoloo r.— -Soteriology, Ecclesiology, 
Eschatology. Apologetics. Ethics. Review of the entire 
system. 

Practical Theology, — Homiletioal Exercises and Pas- 
toral Theology, continued; Catechetics, and Church Govern- 
ment. 

All the Classes combined. — Essays on various topics; 
Polemical and Irenical Discussions. 



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Miscellaneous Information. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

In the College Department, there is a partial rather than 
a special coarse. Studies may be omitted, bat as yet others 
have not been sabstitated, and such a partial course entitles 
only to a certificate, not to a diploma. 

Most of the students seek what is called ^' a liberal or clas- 
sical education,'' but a "partial" or "elective" course is of- 
fertfd to all who so desire, and facilities are furnished throu^^h 
the regular instructors. Oerman and French, or Drawing 
and Painting, can be studied at any time, as also the branches 
generally called " scientific." 

In 1878, the Institution was opened to women. At once 
several young ladies availed themselves of the privilege, and 
their number has been steadily increasing. They enter the 
regular classes, and attend the same lectures and recitations 
as the young men. Their homes will be with approved fam- 
ilies in the city. 

SCHOOL YEAR. 

The Scholastic Tear, of forty weeks, begins on the third 
Wednesday in September, and ends with the General Com- 
mencement on the fourth Wednesday in June. 

The Winter and the Spring vacations are fixed by the 
General Faculty. (See the Calendar). 

EXAMINATIONS. 
The Yearly Mcaminations^ before the Council or its 
Committee, begin on the third Wednesday in Jone. At 



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CATALOGUS OF HOPE OOLLBOB. 




Other times, Special exaniinationB may be held, and passed 
upon by the respective Faculties, subject to the approval of 
Council or to a re-examination, if so desired. 

DISCIPLINE. 
The RiUee of Order are few and simple. In general, if 
the students do not improve their time and opportunities, or 
do not conduct themselves in a respectful and orderly man- 
ner, their connection with the Institution will be suspended. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

The exercises of each day begin with prayer in the Col- 
lege Chapel, at 8 o'clock, a. h. 

On the Sabbath, every student is expected to worship reg- 
ularly with one of the churches in the city or vicinity, unless 
excused by the President. 

Religious Instruction is regularly given in all the classes, 
and is, like the other studies, in charge of the Faculty. 

Although Hope College is denominational, and is under 
the patronage and support of the Reformed Church in Amer- 
ica, yet. by the law of its incorporation, it can have no 
"religious test." The doors are open, and welcome is given 
to all who submit to its scholastic regulations. As a Chris- 
tian school, however, it inculcates gospel truths, and demands 
a consistent moral character and deportment. 

LIBRARY, Ere. 

A Library of over 6,000 volumes, and a Reading Room^ 
are free for the use of the students. Books and papers are 
constantly being, added. Improved accommodations have 
recently been provided. 

The Laboratory, Cabinet^ and Philosophical Apparatus 
are adapted to the use of the recitation, or lecture-rooms. 
They are gradually being made larger and more complete. 
It is to be hoped that Maps, Charts, Instruments, and Speci- 
mens of Natural History, as well as books, will be donated 
by the graduates and friends of the Institution. 



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SOCIETIES, ETC., 

The Literary SoeietieSy viz., the Meliphone and the Fra- 
ternal, have now been maintained for years, and offer decided 
advantages to their respective members; and materially aid 
in the attainment of that culture, which it is the object of 
this school to promote. 

In 1886, a new literary society, called the U^ku Club^ 
was organized. The object of this club is to secure for its 
members greater proficiency in the use of the Holland 
language. 

The Y. M. C. A., a society of nearly eighty members, has 
carried on its work with much interest and activity. 

Connected with the Institution, a religious weekly is pub- 
lished, called De Hope. It is the organ of the College. 

A Course of Lectures is of almost yearly occurrence, 
usually at the invitation of on^ of the societies, and with the 
approval and financial aid of the Executive Committee. 

MUSIC. 
Vocdl Music is provided for in the Orammar School. 
No charge is made for this. Lessons in Instrumental Music 
can be secured at the expense of the pupil. 

EXPENSES. 

Holland is surrounded by a rich agricultural region, and 
the cost of living is comparatively cheap. Oood board may 
be had in families of the city, for from two to three dollars 
per week; and without fubnished booms at corresponding 
rates. 

There are seventeen rooms in Van Vleck Hall, in the se- 
lection of which students for the ministry have the prefer- 
ence. These are furnished in pait, and bear a charge of five 
dollars a yeisr. , 

As yet, no tuition fees have been charged, but every 
student must pay the Treasurer, in advance, an incidental 
fee of ^\e dollars per term. 



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CATALOGXTB OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



The irraduation fee is five dollars and the cost of the 
diploma. No other charges are made. 

For books, clothing, washing, fuel, lights, travel, etc., 
those interested can best make the estimates. The bnttbe 
expense need not exceed $200 per annum. 

LOCATION, ETC. 

Holland City is a central point on the Chicago and West 
Michigan Railway, and on the Ohio and Michigan R. R. (to 
Toledo), ninety miles north of New Buffalo, twenty-five miles 
south-west of Grand Rapidn, and midway between Allegan 
and Grand Haven. It is therefore most desirably located, 
having both land- and water communications, and being near 
the shore of Lake Michigan, with which it is directly con- 
nected by Macatawa Bay, itself a beautiful sheet of water. 

The College Buildings are eight in number. The largest 
is Van Vleck Hall, mainly devoted to Students' rooms, and 
the Library. The grounds are beautifully located on a 
Campus of eighteen acres, well shaded with native trees, and 
annually improving in appearance. 

REMARKS. 

It will be seen that at present we have three Departments 
in operation, and duly organized. 

Our Library is rapidly increasing in the number of vol- 
umes and in value. It has already outgrown the rooms as- 
signed it, and requires more ample quarters*. A Library 
building is one of our pressing; necessities. With a spacious, 
fire-proof room, the collection would be safe and serviceable. 
Every year there are made additions of valuable works, 
which it would be difficult and expensive to replace. Who 
will see that they have provided for them a safe and cheerful 
room, where they can be consulted, and their precious treas- 
ures made useful to our students? 

A new building for recitation rooms and similar purposes 
is also a greU desideratum, and it would be a most decided 



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step in advance, if such a Hall should adorn our beautiful 
Campus. 

An annual Circular or Catalogue will be published about 
the middle of each school year. 

The funds of the Institution need much to be increased. 
Besides the gifts of the churches and of friends from year to 
year (mainly for support), it is the trust and prayer of those 
who know the needs of "Hope,'^ that the Legacies of the 
pious may begin to build it up for God, just as they have be- 
stowed so many thousands on Tale, Princeton, Union, etc., 
making them what they are to-day. 



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PBBSBNT BBSIDBNCB8. 



Ale Baurstna, 
Oerrit Dangremond, 
William B. Oilmore, 
Peter Moerdyke, 
William Moerdyk, 
William A. Shields, Prof. 
John W. Te Winkel, 
Harm Woltman, 

Gerrit Bolks, 
James De Pree, 
Enne J. Heeren, Rev. 
John Haizenga, 
Albert T. Huizenga, 
Dirk B. K. Van Raalte,t 

Harm Borgers, 

John Broek, 

Gerrit J. Kollen, 

Gerrit Van de Kreeke, Rev. 

William Visscher, 

Evert Van der Hart, 

A. Wilson Van Der Veer, 

William Van Putten,J 



ALUMNI. 



isee. 

OOCUFATION. 

Clergyman, Orange City, la. 

Clergyman, East Saugatack,Mich. 
[Clergyman.] ♦April 24, 1884. 
Clergyman, Grand Rapids, Mich. 



Pella, la. 

Macomb, III. 

Alto, Wis. 

♦April 30, 1870. 

Maurice, la. 

Sioux Center, la. 

♦Oct. 16, 1878. 

Holland, Neb. 

Beaverdam, Mich. 

Holland, Mich. 



Clergyman, 
Photo-Artist, 
Clergyman, 
[Clergyman.] 

1867. 

Merchant, 

Clergyman, 

[Missionary.] 

Clergyman, 

Teacher, 

Merchant, 

1868. 

Clergyman, Greenleafton, Minn. 
Clergyman, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Professor, Holland, Mich. 

Merchant, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

[Miss'y Student.] ♦Feb. 11, 1872. 

1869. 

Clergyman, 

Merchant, 

Physician, 

1870. 



Henry K. Boer, Clergyman, 

William B. De Bey,J Physician, 

Peter De Bruyn, Clergyman, 

John A. De Spelder, Prof. Clergyman, 

Charles E. Jones, Physician, 

James F. Zwemer, Clergyman, 





Rochester, N. Y. 
Davenport, la. 
Holland, Mich. 

Maurice, la. 

Chicago, III. 

Rochester, N. Y. 

Orange City, la. 

Albany, N. Y. 

Alton, la. 



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CATALOOUB OF HOPE COLLEGE. 




NAMES. 

John Hoffman, 
Simon Kuyper, 
Nicholas Neerken, 
Peter D. Sohipperus, 
Samuel Strong, 
James Ten Eyck, 
William Veenschoten, 



Arend Vissoher, 



Edwin Bedell, 
John Hoekje, 
Josias Meulendyk, 
Helenus E. Nies, 
Jacob Van Halteren, 
Harm Van der Wart, 



Cornelias Kriekaard, 
Joseph G. Mtllspaugh,* 
Harm Van der Ploeg, 
Cornelis Wabeke, 



Henricus Baron, 
Lawrence Dyk8tra,f? 
Robert B. D. Simonson, 
Evert Smits, 
William V. Steele, 
John Visscher, 

Henry E, Dosker, 
Frank k. Force, 



1871. 

OCCUPATION. 

Clergyman, 

[Teacher.] 

[Clergyman.] 

Book-keeper, 

Clergyman, 

Lawyer, 

Clergyman, 

1872. 

Lawyer, 

187S. 

Lawyer, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Book-keeper, 

Clergyman, 

1874. 

Clergyman. 
Physician, 
Clergyman, 
[Clergyman.] 



PRESENT RESIDENCES. 

Clymer, N. T. 

♦Sept. 1, 1882. 

♦Jan. 3, 1887. 

Chicago, 111. 

Chnrchville, Penn. 

Fairview, 111. 

Greendale, N. Y. 



Holland, Mich. 

Albany, N. Y. 
Cawker City, Kan. 

Fremont, Mich. 

Paterson, N. J. 

Clyde, Kan. 

Hackensack, N. J. 



Danforth, 111. 

Garfield, Dak. 

Vriesland, Mich. 

♦Feb. 22, 1880. 



187S. 

Physician, 

Clergyman, 

Principal, 

Clergyman, 

Lawyer, 

Ag't Charities, 

1876. 

Clergyman, ) Holland 

(Lector in Theo. Sem.) j City. 
Clergyman, Elmira, Mich. 



Forest Grove, Mich. 

Albany, N. Y. 

Bowling Green, Mo. 

North Loup, Neb. 

Somerville, N. J. 

Chicago, 111. 



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SJff. CATALOGUE OP HOPE COLLEGE. 



NABiE8. OOCUFATION. 

Albert A. Pfanstiehl, Clergyman, 

Cornells Van Oo8tenbrngge,Clergyman, 



Douwe Yntema, 

John C. Groeuevekl, 
Lambertus Hekbuis, Rev. 
Matthew Kolyn, 
Johannes Visscher, 

Henry Boers, 
John G. Gebhard, 
Stephen J. Harineling, 
John H. Kleinheksel, 

Dirk J. De Bey, 
Elias DeSpelder, M. D., 
Kumage Kimura, 
George Niemeyer, 
Motoitero Ohgimi, 
Arae Vennema, 

William G. Baas, 
Jacob P. De Jong, 
Bernard J. De Vries, 
Peter M. Elsenius, 
Abel H. Huizenga, 
Abraham Stegeman, 
Albert II. Strabbing, 
Jacob J. Van Zanten, 
Frederick J. Zwemer, 
Ebenezer Van den Berge,t 

Gerrit J. Diekema, 



Principal, 

1877. 

Clergyman, 
Missionary, M 
Clergyman, 
Teacher, 

1878. 

Professor, 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Professor, 



PRESENT RESIDENCES. 

Columbia, Mo. 
Troy, Mo. 
St. Johns, Mich. 

Alto, Wis. 

D., Arcot, India. 

Spring Lake, Mich. 

Holland, Mich. 

Holland City. 

Mellenville, N. Y. 

Marion, Dak. 

Holland City. 



1879. 

Clergyman, 

Physician, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

1880. 

Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
JJentist, 

I 

Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Theo. Student, 
Theo. Student, 
Clergyman, 
Theo. Student, 

1881. 

Lawyer, 



Gibbsville, Wis. 

Drenthe, Mich. 

Tokio, Japan. 

Cleveland, O. 

Tokio, Japan. 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Newark, N. Y. 

Englewood, 111. 

Holland City. 

♦July 20, 1881. 

New Paltz, N. Y. 

Harrison, Dak. 

Holland City. 

Chicago, 111. 

Grand View, Dak. 

Gr. Rapids, Mich. 



I Intended studying for the Ministry. 



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Holland City. 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPS COLLEGE. 



35 



NAMES. 

Charles S. Dutton, 
John G. Fagg, Rev. 
Rense H. Joldersma, 
Tinis J. Kommei*!4, 
John Riemersma, 
Bastian Smits, 
John G. Van Hees, Jr., 
John W. Cross. f 

John W. Bosman, 
Gerhard De Jong, 
Pieter Ihrman, 
Johannes E. Matzke, 
Philip T. Phelps, 
Charles T. Steffens, 
Sarah G. Alcott, 
Frances F. C. Phelps, 
(Mrs. J. A. Otte,) 

Evert J. Blekkink, 
Jacob Dyk, 
Henry Hulst, 
Tametsne Matsda, 
Albert Oltmans, Rev. 
John A. One, M. D. 
Dirk Schoiten, 
E. William Stapelkarap, 

Siroon Hogenbcotji, 
Gerrit H. Hospers, 

Gerrit J Hekhuis, 
. John B. Nykerk, 
Albert Van Den Berg, 
Peter Wayenberg, 




OCCUPATION. PRESENT RESIDBNCE8. 

Clergyman, Raritan, III. 

Missionary, Arooy. China. 
Clergyman, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Clergyman, New York City. 

Clergyman, Rochester, N. Y. 

Clergyman, Constantine, Mich. 

Telegrapher^ Allegan, Mich. 



1882. 
Physician, 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Univ. Student, 
Theo. Student, 
Book-keeper, 
At Home, 

Missionary, 



Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Blendon, Mich. 

Waupun, Wis. 

Baltimore, Md« 

N. Brunswick, N.J. 

Chicago, III. 

Holland City. 

Sio-ke, China. 



1883. 

Clergyman, Li^has Kill, N. Y. 

Clergyman, Sod us, N. Y. 
Med. Student, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Teacher, Tokio, Japan. 

Missionary, Nagasaki, Japan. 

Missionary, Sio-ke, China. 

Clergyman, Philadelphia, Kan. 

Clergyman, Grand Haven, Mich. 

1884. 

Clergyman, Marion, N. Y. 

Clergyman, E. Williamson, N.Y. 

1885. 



Theo. Student, 
Teacher, 
Theo. Student, 
Theo. Student, 



Holland, Mich. 
Holland City. 
Holland City. 
Holland City. 



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CATALOGUE OP HOPE COLLEGE. 



NAMES. 

fMary E. Alcott, 
(Mrs. G. J. Diekema,) 
Lizzie Phelps, 

Ralph Bloemendaal, 
\Vm. J. Duiker, 
Peter Holleman, 
Jeremias Kraidenier, 
William B. Lammers, 
John W. E. Vissoher, 

Cornelia Cappon, 
Emma Kollen, 
Paul R.Coster, 
Harman V. S. Peeke, 
Albertus Pieters, 
Chas. N. Thew, 
Samuel M. Zweraer, 



OCCOPATION. 



At Home, 



PRESENT BB8IDEN0B8. 



Holland City. 
Artes' Fort, Penn. 



Teacher, 
1886. 

Theo. Student, Holland City. 
Theo. Student, N.Brun8wick,N.J. 
Med. Student, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Theo. Student, Xenia, O. 

Theo. Student, N.Brun8wick,N.J. 
Med. Student, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
1887. 

At Home, Holland City. 

Teacher, Orange City, Iowa. 

Drug Clerk, Holland City. 

Teacher, Nagasaki, Japan. 

Teacher, Orange City, Iowa, 

Law Student, Allegan, Mich. 

Theo. Student, N.Brun8wick,N.J. 



SUMMARY. 

ACADEMIC ALUMNI. 

Clergymen and Candidates, - . - 

Theological Students^ . . . . 

Physicians or Medical Students, - 
Lawyers or Law Students, . - . 

Teachers, -.---- 
Otherwise Employed, . - - - 

Total Alumni, (18661887,) 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL GRADUATES. 

Total number of graduates (1861-1887,) - - 326 

REFERENCES. 
* (Throughout the Catalogue,) Deceased, 
f (Alumni of Acad, and Prep. Dep's.) Partial Course. 
J (Alumoi of Academic Dep.) A. B. Honorary. 



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Historical Sketch. 

For many years, the Reformed (Dutch) Church had dc 
sired to have a school established, in the valley of the Missis- 
sippi. The way however did not seem to be open, until, in 
1847 and 1848, a Holland Colony was planted in Ottawa and 
the adjoining counties of Michigan, mainly through the 
agency of Rev. A. C. Van Raalte, D. D., who devoted him- 
self assiduously to the moral and material interests of the en- 
terprise. This was an event, which God used as the origin 
of what is now Hope College. 

A PIONBBB SCHOOL. 

It) 1850, Rev. Dr. John A. Garretson, the Corresponding 
Secretary of the Board of Domestic Missions, R. C. A., made 
a visit to the Holland Colony in Michigan, and, on his return, 
drew up the plan of a '^High School" in that vicinity, the ob- 
ject of which bhonld be, lo prepare sons of the colonists for 
Rutger^t College, N. J., and also to educate their daughters. 
In accordance with this plan, a plot of five acres, in the village 
of Holland, was donated by Dr. Van Raalte. Mr. Walter R. 
Taylor, of Geneva, N. Y., was appointed to take charge of 
the School, and entered upon his work in October, 1851. He 
began with an ordinary "District School," and in it formed 
his first Latin class. The latter we. are to regard as the germ 
of an ecclesiastical Academy, for it was placed under the care 
of the Classis of Holland, and as such was reported to the 
Board of Education. 

In 1858, upon special application from Secretary Garret- 
son, the General Synod took this school, (that is the ecclesi- 
astical part of it,) under its care, and committed it to the 



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38 CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 

charge of the Board of Education. The Board assumed the 
trust, and. has ever since continued to make appropriations 
for its support. Mr. Taylor remained until 1864, introducing 
higher branches, and preparing several students for the 
Freshman class of Rutgers College. He was succeeded, for 
about one year, by Rev. F. B. Beidler, of South Bend, In- 
diana. 

APPOINTMENT OF REV. JOHN VAN VLECK. 

The Boards of Education and Domestic Missions were in- 
structed by the General Synod, in 1854, to unite in support- 
ing a ministei, who could at the same time "preach the Gos- 
pel at Holland, and conduct the instruction of the Academy." 
Accordingly, Rev. John Van Vleck, of Shawangunk, N. Y., 
was appointed in 1866, upon his graduation from the Theo- 
logical Seminary at New Brunswick. Mr. Van Vleck had 
rare qualifications for his work. He separated the '^ecclesi- 
aatical germ" spoken of; used for his classes the building 
known as the "Orphan House," and distinctly called his 
school the "Holland Academy." He began with eighteen 
students, two of whom were girls. This number increased to 
thirty in 1867, and to a few more in 1868 and 1869. During 
this time Mr. Van Vleck had charge of a preaching service in 
English In 1867, Mr. Abraham Thompson, of New Bruns- 
wick, N. J., was sent as an assistant teacher, and upon his 
resignation, in 1868, .Rev. Giles Van de Wall succeeded him, 
to give aid in preaching, as well as in the Academy. In 1869, 
the ill health of Mr. Van Vleck forced him to resign his posi- 
tion. Not only were his labors onerous, but obstacles were 
placed in his way, trying to a sincere and earnest principal. 
He had done much to advance the school, and is worthy of 
grateful remembrance on the part of his pupils and others. 

THE FIRST BUILDING. 

The donation of five acres, for school purposes, has already 
been mentioned. This property was deeded to the General 
Synod. Additions were made to the plot by purchase, until, 
in 1859, the premises of the Synod became a beautiful oam- 



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pus of sixteen acres. In 1857, about $12,000 had been 
secured, chiefly tllrough the exertions of Dr. Van Raalte, and 
a brick edifice erected under the superintendence of Mr. Van 
VIeck, which is now known as "Van Vleck Hall." The build- 
ing is three stories high, besides the basement, and 40x50 
feet on the ground. To this house the school was removed, 
:in<] a part of it was used for a Refectory, and as a residence 
for the Principal. Besides recitation rooms, and a Refec- 
tory, there were 18 chambers for students. 

APPOINTMENT OF BEV. PHILIP PHELPS, JR. 

Rev. Philip Phelps, Jr., of Hastings, N. Y., was appointed 
by the Board of Education to succeed Mr. Van Vleck, and 
entered on his work in the fall of i8i>9. He found thirty- 
three pupils in attendance. 'The regular organization of the 
school into classes, and some more formal and efficient plan 
of superintendency by the Church became his first care. Suc- 
cess crowned his efforts in both respects, and the progress of 
the Academy became more marked. In 1862, the number of 
students was forty-five, divided into "Classical and Primary," 
and in the following year the General Synod approved of and 
appointed the "Board of Superintendents." The Refectory 
was discontinued, when Mr. Phelps took charge. 

In the fall of 1862, another decided step was taken. By 
the approval of the Western Classes, and of the Synod of 
Chicago, a "Collegiate Department" was introduced, and a 
"Freshman ("lass" of ten members was formed. From this 
time date the efforts to have a regular College incorporated, 
under the laws of Michigan, and these efforts culminated in 
the Institution as we have it to-day. The Board of Superin- 
tendents continued; the four "Academic" classes entered in 
order upon their course; the General Synod recommended 
the College in 1864, and its endowment in the sum of tlOO,- 
*000; the collection of fnnds was prosecuted with success. 
East and West; needed steps were taken, and just before the 
graduation of the first class, in 1866, were organized the 
"Council," Presidency, Faculty, and Departments of Hope 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



College. The act of incorporation was completed in the 
month of May; and the first meeting 'of the Council 
assembled in July. In the seven years, since 1859, the num- 
ber of students had increased from thirty-three to fifty, viz.: 
in the Academic classes, 23; and in those of the Grammar 
school, 27. The graduating Senior class contained eight 
members, who received the title of A, B., at the first Com- 
mencement, July 17, 1866. 

TEACHERS. . 

In the summer of 1861, Rev. Giles Van De Wall resigned, 
and accepted a pastoral chari^e in South Africa. Several 
students aided the principal during the next two years. In 
January, 1864, two new professors, viz: Rev. Peter J. Oggel, 
and Rev. T. Romeyn Beck, having been appointed by the 
Board of Education, entered upon their work. The former 
was, at the time of his appointment, pastor of the Reformed 
Church of Pella, la., and the latter had been an assistant 
professor at Rutgei-s College, N. J. Rev. John M. Ferris, of 
Grand Rapids, came weekly from that place to give instruc- 
tion in Rhetoric, Chemistry, etc. He resigned in 1865. Be- 
in&^ thus assisted, Dr. Phelps could be absent, more or less, in 
soliciting endowment funds. Early in 1866, Rev. Charles 
Scott, of Shawangunk, N. Y., and somewhat later, Rev. 
Cornelius E. Crispell, Professor in Rutgers Colh^jge, were ap- 
pointed, and they excepted their appointmerHs. Mr. Cornel is 
Doesburg, of Holland, Mich., was made Tutor of the modern 
languages. Thus, in July, 1866, and just before the "Com- 
mencement" of that, year, a Faculty of six members was 
formally constituted, and on the evening of the I2th, Rev. 
Philip Phelps, Jr., D. D., was inaugurated as the first Presi- 
dent, by a committee of Synod appointed for that purpose. 

FUNDS, AC. 

Holland Academy had no endowment. For the proposed 
College, the amounts collected, up to 1866, were reported to 
be as follows, viz: {approximately) by Prof. Oggel in the 
West, $18,000; and by Dr. Phelps, mainly in the East, 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPS COLLBOE. 



I 




t40y000. All moneys were at first paid to the Board of 
Direction in New York, and then, by order of the Synod, the 
sum of $80,000 was donated therefrom to the Council of the 
College, for the purpose of securing a legal incorporation 
from the State. In addition to this sum, the Council was 
vested with the use and benefit of all the Synod's property in 
the village of Holland. A fair foundation was therefore laid 
for a prosperous ''school of the Church." Besides Van Vleck 
Hall there were, on the Campus at the time, three other 
buildings: 

1. A building, erected in 1857; used as a ''Laboratory" 
after 1867, and much improved in 1870, and subsequently. 

2. A residence, built for Rev. Mr. Van de Wall in 1860, 
and occupied by Prof. Oggel in 1864, — afterwards called the 
"Oggel House." 

3. A gymnasium, erected by the students in 1862, and 
changed into the "Chapel" of the College in 1872,— well 
adapted to this purpose, as also for oratorical exercises and 
lectures. 

PBESIDKNCT OF DB. PHELPS. 

This continued for twelve years, or until July 1, 1878, 
and succeeded his seven years principalship, in Holland 
Academy. He labored assiduously for the welfare of the 
school, but encountered the d ifiiculties so incident to young 
colleges. A cursory statement of these twelve years will be 
appended, in order to show the progress of the Institution. 

1866. A newspaper, called J}e Hope^ was established, 
under the editorship of Prof. P. J. Oggel. The first Com- 
mencement was held July 17th. In September, Theological 
instruction began. The first class consisted of seven mem- 
bers, and the teaching was divided among the clerical mem- 
bers of the Faculty. This was arranged by the Council, 
according to a resolution of the General Synod. 

1 867. Number of students, 68. Charter Hall, erected for 
recitation rooms. Prof. C. £. Crispell, D. D., elected by Gen- 



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CATALOGITB OF HOPS COLLEOB. 



eral Synod, as "Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theology 
at Hope College," the other Professors being appointed as 
"Theological Lectors." The Theological examinations, placed 
under the care of a branch of "the Board of Superintendents of 
the Theological Seminary." Mr. Wm. A. Shields, A. B., (class 
of 1866) appointed Tutor in the Grammar school. Rev. A. 
C. Van Raalte deeded to the Council about eighty acres of 
land within the city limits. Thirty acres of this were after- 
wards laid out as "Hope College Addition," joining the for- 
mer village plat on the West. A tract of thirteen acres pur- 
chased at Indian Village on the south side of Black Lake, 
and adjoining the Van Raalte donation. Point Superior, a 
tract of 837 acres, purchased on the north side of Macatawa 
Bay. Afterwards a portion of the land was improved and 
called "JJojoe Farmy'* the means being furnished by Mr. Wm. 
H. H. Moore, of New York, who gave over 14,000 for the 
purpose, (the "Helme donation.") The village of Holland, 
incorporated as a city. 

1869. The ^^ Theologiiidl DepartmenV^ formerly consti- 
tuted, and recognized as General Synod's "Theological Sem- 
inary in the West." The Superintendence of the same com- 
mitted to the Council. A gift of $10,000 made by Elder 
James Suydam; one-half in payment of debts, and one-half 
for completing the purchase of Point Superior, for which 
reason, the tract was called "Suydam Park." Prof. P. J. 
Oggel died December 13. Another structure erected, which 
afterwards, being enlarged with a second story and a wing^ 
became known as the "Grammar School Building." 

1870. Richard Parsons, A. B., appointed Tutor. Re- 
signed in 1871. 

1871. "A Constitution for the whole School," adopted 
by the General Synod, recognizing three regular Departments 
with an adjunct "Publication Department." Wm. A. 
Shields, A. M., made Assistant Professor of Rhetoric and 
English Literature, Rev. Peter Moerdyke, A. M., (class of 
1866,) elected as Assistant Professor of Latin and Greek. He 



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CATALOOUB OF HOPS COLLSOB. 




resigned in 1873, to take charge of . the First Reformed 
Church, of Grand Rapids, Mich. Gerrit J. Kollen, A. M., 
(class of 1868,) elected a<) Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
The gi-eater part of Holland, destroyed by fire, in October, 
including the residence of Prof. Scott. No College building 
burned, but indirectly much lobS inflicted on the school. The 
devastaded city greatly aided by the eastern churches. 

1872. Repairs, to a considerable extent, on the buildings 
of the College co mpleted. The Holland Colony celebrated 
the twenty*fifth year of its settlement in America, and as a 
"Memorial" an "Ebenezer Fund" was started for the support 
of the Grammar School. This fund afterwards amounted to 
over t35,000 in notes and subscriptions, and was designed to 
be $50,000. Only a part of this fund is now productive. 
The "Zwemer House" completed on the "South Campus," 
just west of the old ^^PHnting 0!ffice^\ (once the "Orphan 
House.") Cornells Doesburg, A. M., made Professor of 
Modern Languages. Number students, 72. 

1875. Professors Beck and Scott regularly appointed as 
"Lectors" in the Theological Seminary at Hope College, and 
the salaries of the three Theological Teachers assumed by 
Synod. Prof. Cri spell began collections for the "Professor- 
ship of Didactic and Polemic Theology," and continued the 
work for two years. The money came mainly from the East. 

1876. The Council resolved to try a "Financial Agency" 
for the purpose of increasing the funds, and elected Assistant 
Professor Kollen to that office. Students, 100. 

1877. The General Synod, finding that the Professors 
were not paid, and that the debt of the College, as well as of 
the Synod, was increasing, suspended the Theological De- 
partment after an operation of eleven years. Thirty candi- 
dates had graduated from it since 1869. Eight others com- 
pleted their course in part. 

1878. The General Synod determined to re-organize Hope 
College, and sent a Committee for that purpose, to meet with 




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44. CA.TALOairB OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



the Coancil. The debt of the Institution whs found to be 
oyer $27,000, besides t4,100, due from the General Synod to 
the Theological Teachers. Dr. Phelps resigned the Presi- 
dency, and Dr. Crispell his College Professorship, to take 
effect July Ist. A new Constitution of the College was 
drafted. Rev. Giles H. Mandeville, D. D., of New York 
city, was elected Provisional President, and Prof. Chas. 
Soott, D. D., Vice President, to administer the Cbllejje, while 
Dr. Mandeville collected funds in the East. Women were 
admitted to all the departments, and two young ladies 
entered the Freshman Class. Henry Boers, A. B., and John 
H. Kleinheksel, A. B., were appointed Tutors in the Gram- 
mar School. The number of students had gradually in- 
creased; the 50 of 1865 became 64 in 1872, (not including the 
Theological,) and 98 in 1878. In July, Assistant Professor 
Wm. A. Shields was made Professor of Rhetoric and English 
Literature, and Assistant Professor G. J. Kollen resigned his 
Financial Agency, and was made Professor of Mathematics, 
Natural Philosophy and Astronomy. 

PBOVISIONAL PBSSIDENCY. 

When Dr. Phelps resigned, the Council deemed it best to 
elect no permanent president, until the income and condition 
of the College might warrant such a step. Dr. Mandeville 
gave his services without salary, but continued to live in 
New York City. His earnest and successful efforts to collect 
funds continued until 1883. Prof. Scott assumed charge of 
the administration, or the executive duties of the institution, 
from July, 1878. As before, a brief sketch from year to 
year will bring the history down to the present time. 

1879. The new constitution of the College was adopted 
by the General Synod, somewhat changed from that of 1871, 
and dropping the Theological Department, because not in 
operation. Prof. C. E. Crispell resigned his Theological 
Professorship to the Synod, and became Pastor of the Re- 
formed Church, of Spring Valley, N. Y. Students, 111. 



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1880. Rev. Dr. MaDdeville liaviog resigned, Prof. Charles 
Scott was appointed Provisional President. The debt dimin- 
ishing. The report toHhe Synod showed 50 students in the 
Academic, and IS in the Preparatory Department, a total of 
128. 

1881. Agitation and division in several of the Reformed 
Churches of the West. Both in funds and students the effect 
was detrimental to the College, and so continued. 

1882. The debt finally liquidated. Over $35,000 had 
been donated, and paid for that purpose. In addition, about 
1 15,000 had been added to the Michtoment. Of the above 
sums, 13,000 came from Mr. Oarrett Kouwenhoven, of New- 
town, L. I., and $10,000 from a lady in New York City. 

1883. Henry Boers, A. M., and John H. Kleinheksel, A. 
M., (Tutors since 1878), appointed Assistant Professors. The 
Chapel materially improved, and used as their place of wor- 
ship by the First Reformed Church, (the "Minority"), pend- 
ing a suit in law for the recovery of the church edifice. 
Students, 127. 

1884. Rev. John A. De Baun, D. D., of Fonda, N. Y., 
elected permanent President in May, and confirmed by the 
General Synod. He declined the appointment. Prof. Scott 
continued as provisional President. General Synod met in 
Grand Rapids and made a visit to Hope College and the City 
of Holland, June 7th. $3,100 donated by members of Synod 
for a President's House. A successful effort made to increase 
the "Professorship of Didactic and Polemic Theology," to 
the full amount of $30,000 in cash, whereupon the Synod 
elected Rev. N. M. Steffens, D. D., to the Chair. He was 
duly inaugurated Dec. 4th, and on the next day the Theologi- 
cal Department was formally re-opened with 5 students. In 
September, Philip T. Phelps, A. B., was made Tutor in the 
Grammar School. 

1885. During the last four years, the four streets around 
the Campus have been graded and graveled, at considerable 



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CATALOOUK OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



expense, all of which falls upon the College. This year also, 
the improvements and repairs upon the Oggel House, Zwemer 
House, Laboratory, Ac, amounted to $1300. The second story 
of the Oggel House, assigned to the use of the Theological 
School. In June, Charter Hall was consumed by an incendi- 
ary fire, and the Council inaugurated measures for the build- 
ing of a new Hall, at a cost of about 1(15,000. Messrs. Arend 
Visscher and Gerrit J. Diekema being appointed a Central 
Committee to solicit funds for the purpose. The west thirty 
acres of the Van Raalte donation, and the Brayton purchase 
of thirteen acres, sold for 9^ fair-ground^ to the South Ottawa 
and North Allegan Agricultural Society. Number of stu- 
dents, from April 1884, to April 1886, 174, viz.; in College, 
33; in the Grammar School, 136; in the Seminary, 5. Those 
in the Grammar School after the C year, almost universally 
take Latin, and generally purpose to pursue a full College 
Course. 

PRESIDENCY OF REV. CHARLES SCOTT, D. P. 

After a service of seven years as acting executive officer 
of the Listitution, Prof. Charles Scott was elected President, 
in April 1885, and in June, the election was duly confirmed 
by the General Synod. At his request, the inauguration was 
deferred for one year. 

At the June meeting, of the Council, the following 
changes took place in the Faculty, viz.: Professor T. R. 
Beck and Wm. A. Shields resigned their positions. James 
G. Sutphen, A. M., of Somerville, N. J., was elected Profes- 
sor of Latin, and Rev. John J. Anderson, A. M., of Tusca- 
loosa, Ala., Professor of Greek, Assistant P^of. Uoers was 
placed in the chair of English Language and Literature, and 
Rhetoric; and Assistant Prof. Kleinheksel in that of Mathe- 
matics. Prof. Kollen was assigned to a new chair, viz.: that 
of Applied Mathematics, Physics and Political Economy. 
John B. Nykerk, A. B., was elected Tutor, in the place of 
Philip T. Phelps, A. M. Thns the Faculty was in fact reor 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. ^7 

gantzed. Rev. Dr. Phelps, having occupied the residence 
part of Van Yleck Hal] since his resignation, in 1878, vacated 
the same, and the whole bailding was converted into College 
uses, — recitation rooms, Ac. 

By the General Synod the Theological Department was 
made the "Western Theological Seminary of the R. C. A.", 
and placed under a distinct Board of Superintendents, but 
not separated from the College. Prof. Steffens assisted by 
Revs. Peter Moerdyke and Henry E. Dosker. 

1886. Prof. Scott inaugurated as President, June 22nd, 
in the Third Reformed Church. The President's House 
erected on the Campus, and finished as to the exterior. Van 
Vleck Hall painted and otherwise improved, at an expense of 
about #600. The Library removed into more ample and safer 
quarters, on the first fioor, and increased in size. The First 
Reformed Church having worshipped in the Chapel, since 
1881, removed to their new church edifice on the corner of 
Ninth and Market streets. Students from April 1885 to 
April 1886, 183. 

1887. This year has been marked by a work of divine 
grace among the students, and at this date, March 6, fifty-two 
have professed conversion to Christ. This makes 100 in the 
Institution who trust that they are Christians. In attendance, 
since last April, a total of 186. 

1888. In June, 1887, the Council resolved to appoint, but 
failed to secure a Financial Agent. , Prof. Anderson resigned 
his Chair in January. During the year four graduates of 
Hope have entered upon the work of Foreign Missions. Two 
prizes were established in the College by George Birkhoff, 
Jr., Esq. 

PUBLICATION. 

It has been stated that De Hope was established in 1866. 
Prof. Oggel was assisted by Prof. C. Doesburg as Ofilce 
editor. After Prof. Oggel's death, his brother, Rev. E. C. 
Oggel, was elected editor, but he resigned in 1871. Rev. C. 



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CATAXOGUE OP HOPE COLLEGE. 



Van der Veen succeeded, until, in 1874, he resigned, and the 
management of the paper was devolved upon a committee of 
the Council, with Prof. C. Doesburg as managing editor. In 
July, 1882, Professors Doesburg and Kollen took the paper 
by contract, for two years; but the contract being given up, 
in July, 1884, Rev. John H. Karsten was elected by the 
Council as editor. Mr. Karsten resigned in July, 1886, and 
a contract for publishing the paper was made with R. Ran- 
ters, Esq., of Holland City. Mr. G. Van Schelven became 
Managing Editor. The brick Printing Office was built in 
1876 through voluntary contributions secured through the 
exertions of Prof. Doesburg, and the Press was a donation 
from Mr. Wm. H. H. Moore, in 1871. Circulation about 
eighteen hundred copies. 

CONCLUDING NOTE. 

It will be seen that this school, in almost all respects, has 
been steadily progressing. Before her is a fair prospect, if 
her Alumni stand by her good name, if her friends are at- 
tached to and not alienated from her interests, and if the 
Council do their duty as Christian men and faithful guardians 
for the Lord. She needs and prays for more ample endow- 
ments. May the future show more and more clearly that 
this is indeed a "College of Hope." 



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"SPERA IN DEO." 
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TWENTY-FOURTH YEAR 
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CATALOGUE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



HOPE COLLEGE, 



HDLLilNn, MICHIG-ilN, 



1888^-89. 



An Institution of the Reformed Church in America. 



FOUNDED IN 1851. 



Incorporated as Hope College, 1866. 






HOLLAND, MICH. 

De ORONDWET and Ut*t PRlNTINd HOU8E. 

1889. 



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l889-.'90. 



1889. April 16, Third Term begins. 
" " 2iy Meeting of Council. 

" ** 26, Senior Examinations. 

" June 19-21, Undergraduate Examinations. 

" " 21, EXAJflNATIONS for ADMISSION. 

Closing Exercises of the 

Grammar School. 
Meeting of Council. 
Meeting of Alumni. 
Commencement. 
vacation. 



26, 
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Sept. 18, 


EiRST Term begins. S 


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First Term ends. S 


1890. 


Jan. 6, 


VACATION. |U 

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THE COUNCIL. 



EX-OFFICIO. 



Bkt. Ghas. Scott, D. D., - President of the College. 

ELECTED MEMBERS. 

FROM- GENERAL SYNOD. 



KAMB8. 



RB8IDBNCBS. TBRMB BXPtRB. 



Bby. G. H. Mandbyillb, D. D., New York City, N. Y., 1889. 



HoUaad, Mioh., 
Holland, Mich., 
Holland, Mich., 
Hudson, N. Y., 
Newark, N. J., 



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Bky. Jab. F. Zwbmer, 

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J. C. Bjenham, M. D., 

Bby. Wm. J. R. Taylor, D. D., 

FROM CLA88IS OF GRAND RIVER. 

Bby. Fbtbb Db Freb, Grand Rapids, Mich., 

*Rby. Hbnry E. Doskbr, Holland, Mich., 

FROM CLAS8I8 OF HOLLAND. 

Bby. Peter Lbpbltak, Overisel, Mich., 

*Bby. Dirk Brobk, Holland, Mich., 

FROM CLASSIS OF IOWA. 
Bby. Ale Buursma, Orange City, Iowa, 

Bby. William Mobrdtk, Pella, Iowa, 

FROM CLASSIS OF ILLINOIS. 
Bby. Johk S. Joralmon, Norwood Park, HI., 

*Bey. Wm. H. Phranbr, Irving Park, 111., 

FROM CLASSIS OF WISCONSIN. 

Bby. John Brobk, Milwaukee, Wis., 

Bby. Balstbr Van Ess, Roseland, III., 

FROM CLASSIS OF MICHIGAN. 

Bby. Pbtbr Moerbtkb, Grand Rapids, Mich., 

Bby. a. Paiob Pbbkb, Centreville, Mich., 



1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 

1889. 
1889. 

1890. 
1890. 

1891. 
1891. 

1892. 
1892. 

1893. 



1894. 
1894. 



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BBV. FbTIBR liBFKLTAK, 

Rkv. William Mobrdyk, 
Bbv. Petbr Mobrdtkb, 
Isaac Caffon, Esq., 



PreridefU. 

Vice Prerident. 

Secretary. 

Treagurer. 



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COMMITTEES OF COUNCIL. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Prbs. Chas. Scott, Chaiirman. Bbv. Dirk Broek, Secretary. 

Bbv. Fbtbr Mobrdykb, Bbv. Fbtbr Lbfbltak, 

Isaac Cafpon, Esq. 

INVESTMENT COMMITTEE. 

(In char|<e of the funds of the Council.) 

Arbnd Visschbr, Esq., Isaac Caffon, Esq., 

Frbs. Charlbs Scott. 

HOPE FABM COMMITTEE. 

(In charge of a tract of land, at Point Superior, on 

Macatawa Bay.) 

>PrB8. CHARLB9 SCOTT, ARENB VISSCHBR, EBQ., 

Isaac Caffon, Esq. 



"DE HOPE.^ 



Mr. B. Kantbrs, 



PMiOier. 
EdUar. 



EDITOBIAL COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL. 

Prof. C. Dobsburo, Bby. D. Brobk. 

Bbv. Peter Lbfeltak. 



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College Qepartment. 



FACULTY. 



BEV. CHAS. SCOTT, D. D., President, eaH)fficux 

Prof easor of Chemistry and Natural History. In charge of Mental 

and Moral Fhiloeophy, History, and Evidences of Christianity. 

COBNELIS DOESBUBG, A. M., Secrekury. 
Professor of Modem Languages and Literature, and of Art. 

GEBBIT J. KOLLEN, A. M. 

Professor of Applied Mathematics, Physics, and Political Economy. 

In charge of Logic 

HENBY BOEBS, A. M. 
Professor of the English Language and Literature and Bhetoric. 

JOHN H. KLEINHEK8EL, A. M. 
Professor of Mathematics. * 

JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A. M. 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

BEV. JOHN H. GILLESPIE, A. M. 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. In charge of 

Sacred Literature. 



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STUDENTS. 



SENIOB CLASS. 



NAMES. 



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♦Clinton L. Dayton, 
Henry Hospers, Jr., 
Herbert G. Keppel, 
Albert Knooihuizen, 
Grelmer Eniper, 
Tennis W. Muilenbuig, 
William Stegeman, 
Anthony M. Van Pnine, 
Dirk J. Workman, 



RKSIDBNCBS. 

Berlin. 

Orange Oity^ la. 
Zeeland. 
New HoUand. 
Oractfschap, 
Onmge CUy^ la. 
New Qroningen. 
Kalamaxoo. 
Hull, la. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



Dirk L. Betten, 
Wmiam H. BruinB, 
Martin Flipse, 
Herman S. Juistema, 
Harry Kremers, 
James Ossewaarde, 
Isaac Van Kampen, 



Oramge City, la. 
Brandon, Wis. 
Cedar Qrove, Wis. 
Grand Haven. 
HoOand City. 
Zeeland. 
Grand Bapids. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



Pannie A. Steffens, 
Gtorrit H. Albers, 
Daniel G. Cook, 
Derk Gleysteen, Jr., 
Henry J. Luidens, 
John Sietsema, 
John M. Van der Meulen, 
Jnrry Winter, 



HoUand City. 
OveiHseL 
HoUand City. 
Alton, la. 
Naiih HoUand. 
CoopersviUe. 
Ebenezer. 
HoUand CUy. 



*In partial Course. 



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CATALOGITE OF HOPB COLLEGE. 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 



Leafy B. Harwood, 
JohanDes De Beer, 
Gerrit H. Dubbink, 
Orange G. Flanegan, 
Oren S. Flanegan, 
Peter Hnyser, 
Geo. £. KoUen, 
John Luxen, 
Albert Oosterhof , 
Andrew J. Beeverts, 
Philip Soulen, 
Ck)melius M. Steffens, 
Herman Van der Ploeg, 
Homer Van Landegend, 
Heniy J. Veldman, 



Kalamaxoo. 
Emden, Oermany. 
Overisd. 
AUegan. 
AUegan. 
Beaverdam, 
Overiael, 
EbUcmdOUy. 
Spring Lake. 
Oregon^ lU* 
MUvmikee, Wis. 
Holland QUy. 
HoUamd City, 
HoUand. 
Grand Bapida. 



3» 



g SUMMARY. 

n Seniors, . - . - 

H Juniors, - - . - 

u Sophomores, - - - . 

In Fieshmen, ... 

g Total, - - - - 
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ADMISSION. 

For admission into the Freshman Glass, a full certificate of 
graduation from the Grammar School Department is required; or 
an examination in the studies pursued in that Department; or in 
what the Faculty shall deem an equivalent. 

For admission into any advanced class of the Listitution, it 
will be necessary for the applicant to pass an examination in the 
studies previously pursued by the class. If received on conditions, 
the conditions must be fulfilled before matriculation. 



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i ^ 

3 ^ 

a c 

a COURSE OF STUDY. | 

3 ^^ B 

a B 

n FBESHMAN YEAB. n 

g MATHEMATICS.—WenthwoTth'B Solid Geometry, and Plane Q 

f| and Spherical Trigonometry. n 

3 LANQUAQS AND LITEBATUBB.^ B 

u i^^Zisfe.— Supl^e'8 Trench on Words; English Literature hegon, B 

a WMi. 

u Latin,— J>e Amicitia, De Senectute, Kdaey; Horace, Gfuue d u 

3 Stuart; Mythology and Composition. B 

il Greelk.— Goodwin's Herodotus and Thucydides; Groodwin's u 

3 Grammar; Greek Froee Composition, Sidgunck or WiOdns; B 

g Antiquities. Q 

3 Modem.— Dr. Te Winkel's History of Dutch Literature; Jager's B 

{I Derivation of Dutch Words; Essays, and Translations. Q 

3 ^lO^TOJBJC.— Essays, Subjects outlined, Discussions. Drill B 

{] in Elocution. Q 

3 JEfXS2X>^F.— Mommsen's (condensed) Boman History; Manual B 

{] of Ancient History, Thatheimer; An atlas of Classical and Medie- B 

g Tal Geography. |} 

3 NATURAL SCIJSNCE.—CntteT'B Comprehensive Physiology; § 

J Packard's Zoology, Briefer Ckntrae. fl 

1 8ACRED LITEBATUBE.—HmnoDy of the Gospels, and B 

Greek Kew Testament. ^ 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. B 

MATHEMATIC8.—Newcomh'B Analytic Geometry; Went- {{ 

worth's Surveying and Navigation. U 

LANG UAQE AND LITEBA TUBE.— B 

p 

English,— ^ng. Literature with study of Eng. Classics. n 

1} 



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Xotin.— Smithes Latin Selections with Literature; Livy, Capes; 
Antiquities; Composition. 

Greefc.— Lysias; Keep^s Homer, Greek Prose Composition, 
Sidgwick or WiUdns; Literature. 

Jlfcxiem.— Whitney^s Practical French Grammar; Fables 
d'Esope; Worman^s German Grammar; Deutsches Lesebuch, 1. 
TheU. 

RHET0EIC.--EBaAj9y Discussions, Orations, and Elocution. 

IfXSTOl^F.—Manual of MedisBval and Modern History, 
naJfheimeT. 

NATURAL SCIENCJS.'-Bemsen'B Chemistry, Briefer Ckmrse. 

SACRED LITERATURE.— IntToduction to the Scriptures, 
or Greek New Testament. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Jlf^rHEJf^rJC^.— Newcomb's Calculus. 
MATHEMATICS APPLIED.-Olmsted's Nat. Philosophy. 
LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE,— 

LaUn.—De Natura Deorum, Stidcney; Terence, Chase cfe Stuart; 
Latin Hymns, March; Composition. Latin Style. 

(?recik.— Dyer's Apology and Crito; A Tragedy, with practical 
Drill in Metre. 

JfocJem.— Whitney's Practical French Grammar, (continued); 
Choix de Contes; Worman's -German Grammar, (continued); 
Deutsches Lesebuch, 2. Theil. 

2?HET02?JC.— Bascom's Philosophy of Rhetoric; Debates, 
Essays, Discussions, and Orations. Shoemaker's Practical Elo- 
cution. 

inSITOBF.— Studies in History; Lectures on the Constitution 
and History of the United States. 

NATURAL SCIENCE,— Chemistry, one term; Woods Botany, 
two terms; Biology, Sedgwick and TTtteon's, Part I, 

METAPHYSICS,— Porter'B Elements of Intellectual Science. 

SACRED LITERATURE,— Bntlev'B Analogy. 

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1 



n The text-books, as above, are given, in order to guide the stu- 

^ dents in their purchases. The needed books should be ready on 
the opening day of each and every term; and will be as here printed. 



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10 CATALOGUB OF HOFE COLLEGE. 

d 

SENIOR YEAK. 

MATHEMATICS.— Ney^comh and Holden's Astronomy, Ad- 
vaneed Course. 

LANQVAQE AND LITEBATVBE.— 

Gfreefc.--Wagner's Fh»do; A Comedy. 

Ifodem.— Bowan^s Morceaux choisis; Groszman's Handbuch; 
Lectures on German Literature; Compositions in French and R 
German. ^ 

BHETOBIC.—Gwiiwimd. 

JLOGIC.-McCosh. 

E TiZiCiS.— Wayland's Moral Science. 

ifl/STOi^r.-Ouizot's History of Civilization; History of PW»- 
gogy, Compayre. 

NATUBAL SCIENCE.— Dmh's Class-Book of|Geology. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE.— Wvilkei'a Political Economy, Adr 
vaneed Course. Essays on the same. 

SACBED LITEBATUBE.—ljbf!X\aeA on Evidences of Chris- 
tianity. 



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FACULTY. 



Prof. CHARLES SCOTT, D. D., President, ex-officio. 

Prof, CORNELIS DOESBUBG, A. M., 
Modern Languages, and Art. 

Prof. GERRIT J. KOLLEN, A. M., 

Natural Philosophy, and Astronomy. In charge of 

Religious Instruction. 

Prof. HENRY BOERS, A. M., 
English, Rhetoric, and Greek History. 

Prof. JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, A. M., SecretaiT/, 
Mathematics. In charge of Botany. 

Prof. JAMES G. 8UTPHEN, A. M., 
Latin. 

Prof. JOHN H. GILLESPIE, A. M., 
Greek. 

MR. JOHN B. NYKERK, A. M., 
Tutor, and Instructor in Vocal Music. 

MRS. C. VAN RAALTE GILMORE, 
Lady Assistant and Matron. 

Prof. JAMES W. HUMPHREY, 
In charge of the Normal Department. 



Prof. Gerrit J. Kollen, Librarian, 

JOHK SiKTSEMA, ) 

Philip Soulen, V Assistant Librarians. 
Albertus Pietbrs, ) 



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TBtmis W. M01LBNBURG, Choriaer. 

Pbtbb Swart, Organist. 

Bernard Blobmbhdaal, Janitm: 

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STUDENTS. 


K 






j 


"A" CJ-ASS. 


1 


KASOBS. 


RBSIPKNCXB. 


1 


AgRie Hof ma, 


Vrkdand. 


1 

1 


Jennie KoUen, 


Overisel. 


Cornelia 8. Van aer Meolen, 


Ebenezer. 


Egbert Boone, 


BoUand, 


Dirk De Kleine, 


Jamegtoum. 


1 


Cornelius 6. Haan, 


Vriesland. 


I 


Henry Hnizenga, 


Beaverdam, 




Wirtje T. Janasen, 


ForesUm, lU. 


Albert Kuiper, 


Kalamazoo. 


Beuben Maurits, 


Vriesland. 


John J. Mersen, 


Jtfarion, N. Y. 


|3 


William Miedema, 


Vriedand. 


m 


John Schaefer, 


Oregwi^IlL 


m 


James Bterenberg, 


FuUon,ia. 


|H 


Wilhelmus V. Te Winkel, 


AUo, Wis. 


K 


Henry Van der Ploeg, 


Holland City. 


in 


John Yennema, 


Holland City. 


r 


Martin Yerhage, 


Yriesland. 


JQ 


Dirk J. Walvoord, 


Cedar Grove, Wis, 


In 


William Zoethout, 


Bo8eUmd,IU. 


P 


UNCLASSIFIED. 


r 


Leila E. McBride, 


Holland City. 


jo 


Henry J. Pietenpol, 


Holland City. 


m 


Seine J. Menning, 


Alton, la. 


1 


Wiley W.Mills, 


Holland. 


1 


Alva B. Towne, 


HiUiards. 


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"B" CLASS. 


u 

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Pearl C. Godfrey, 


HudsonvtUe. 


J 


H. Harriet Hansen, 


Holland. 



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Maria H. Huizenga, 
Maud B. Bogers, 
Mattie Van Putten, 
George E. Cook, 
George G. Dangremond, 
William Dehn, 
John L. De Jong, 
Klaas J. Dijkema, 
A. C. V. B. Gilmore, 
John EHoosterman, 
Charies H. McBride, 
Peter Swart, 
Gerrit Tysge, 

Albert H. G. Van den Berg, 
Arthur Van Duren, 
Isaac A. Van Ueulen, 
William J. Van Kersen, 
Zachary Veldhuia, 



Holland City. 

HoUand CUy. 

Holland CUy, 

HoUand CUy. 

Hospera^ la. 

HoUand CUy. 

Boseland, lU. 

FuUon, lU. ' 

HoUand CUy. 

Zedand. 

iloUand CUy. 

Boadand, lU. 

Femvoood, lU, 

HoUaM CUy. 

HoUand CUy. 

East Saugatuck. 

Boadand, lU. 

Overisel. 



*C" CLASS. 



Minnie Eoops, 
Isabella G. Steflens, 
Clare B. Van I>yke, 
Julia C. Van Baalte, 
Larena Van Wert, 
John Boer, 
Evert Boom, 
Harry Boone, 
John H. 9ooBe, 
Henry M. Bruins, 
Kestin W. Coates, 
Cornelius Dekker, 
leke De Vries, 
Harm Dijkhuizen, 
Francis E. Doesburg, 
Garret Flikkema, 
John A. Hellenthal, 
Edward Mills, 
Benjamin A. Mulder, 
Henry Op 't Holt, 
Evert J. Pruim, 
Charles H. Sharpley, 



Overisd. 
HoUand CUy. 
Mudcegon. 
HoUand. 
HoUand CUy. 
Grand Haven. 
AUo, Wi^. 
HciUa/nd. 
HolUxnd. 
AUo, Wis. 
HoUand CUy. 
Zeeland. 
Drenthe. 
Grand Bapidi* 
HoUand Oiy. 
FulUm, lU. 
FUlmm^ 
HoUand. 
HoUand CUy. 
Drenthe. 
Zedand. 
PeUa, la. 



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CATALOGT7E OF HOPB COLLBGS. 



Ni 



BBSIDENCBS. 



Jacob Tempel, Fulton, lU. 

Lambertus Tinholt, Qraafachap. 

James Troxel, HqUand City. 

Henry Van der Lei, FuUon, lU. 

Frederic Van Anrooy» Graafschap. 

John G. Yeldhuis, Overisd, 

Peter Vennema, HoUand City. 

George J. M. Van Zoeren, Vriesland. 

Henry Walkotte, I>renttie. 

UNCLASSIFIED. 



Sytze De Bruine, 



KoUum, Neth. 



'D" CLASS. 



Bessie Bamngartel, 
Lucy Blom, 
Clara £. Humphrey, 
Anna Schroetenboer, 
Bessie B. Scott, 
Jennie C. S. Van der Veen, 
Jacob Albert!, 
Hermanns Boone, 
Willie Coates, 
Laurens Dijkhuis, 
Gerrit Elferdink, 
Floris Ferwerda, 
Albert J. Klomparens, 
Frank J. Kuite, 
Frank S. Bichardson, 
Greradus Biddering, 
John L. Starken, 
Frank Thompson, 
Sheldon Vandeburg, 
Benjamin Van Baalte, 
William J. Wemes, 
Oscar B. Wilms, 
Cornells Witte, 



HcUand City. 
HoUand City. 
Holland City. 
Qraafschap, 
Dunningviile. 
HoUand City. 
HoUand City. 
Holland City. 
HoUand City. 
FiUnwre. 
HoUand City. 
Grand Rapids. 
Fillmore. 
HoUand City. 
HoUand CUy. 
Brenihe. 

Jamestown Centre. 
Holland City. 
Forest Grove, Wis. 
Holland. 
Kalamazoo. 
Holland City. 
Fremont. 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 15 



SUMMARY. 

"A" Class 20 

"B" Class ...... 20 

"C" Class 81 

"D" Class 28 

Unclassified ...... 6 

Total, .... 100 



ADMISSION. 

For admission into the *^D" Class, a common school education 
is required in the branches pursued in that year. The better their 
previous training, the more easily and profitably can pupils enter 
upon the Grammar School Course. 

For admission into any advanced class of the Institution, it 
will be necessary for the applicant to pass an examination in the 
studies previously pursued by the class. If received on conditions, 
tbe conditions must be fulfilled before matriculation. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 



FIRST YEAR, "D" CLASS. 

BEADING, £7X7.— National Fourth Reader; Penmanship; 
Beed's Word LiBSsons. 

GEOOBAPHT.—EArpet^B School Geography, Midiigan Edi- 
tion. 

MATHEMATICS.— Olney'B Practical ArithmeUc. 

LANQUAQE.— 

Engli^.—Baei and Eellogg's Graded Lessons in English. 

J2^£ZY)£/0.— Written Essays through the year, Declamations. 

HTSTOBr.— Barnes's United States History. 

SECOND YEAR. "C" CLASS. 

BEADING, JBTC.— National Fifth Beader; Penmanship; 
Westlake's 8,000 Words; Dictation Exercises. 

GEOGBAPHY.—GuyoVa Physical Geography. 

MATHEMATICS.— Dttviea'B Intellectual Arithmetic; Went- 
worth & Hill's Arithmetic; Sprague's Bapid Addition; Bryant and 
Stratton's Common School Book-keeping. 

LANGUAGE.— 

EnglMu—Baei and Kellogg's Higher Lessons in English. 

Latin.— Six weeks Preparation for reading Ceesar, Ginn di Com- 
pany; Cffisar, Ginn tt Company's New Edition; Composition. 

Dutch.— ya,n Dalen's Grammar; Yan Dalen's Exercises. 

JVewcft.— Whitney's Practical French Grammar. (Elective for 
Latin.) 

BHETOBIC.—'EBB&yB, and Declamations. 



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CATALOOTJS OF HOFB COLLEGE. 



17 



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THIRD YEAR, '^B*' GLASS. 

BEADING, JB7Y7.— Selections; Penmanship, and Drawing. 

MATHEMATICS.— yfenWoxth'f^ Elements of Algebra to Lo- 
garithms; Steele's Astronomy, with the use of Globes. 

LANGUAGE,— 

Englisk,—BATV^ Bhetoric; Analysis of Sentences. 

Xotm.— GsBsar; Cicero, Ginn d Company; Ck)mposition. 

G^reeJb.— White's First Lessons in jGreek; Goodwin's Grammar, 
and some easy Greek author. 

Duteh.—YsLn Dalen's Grammar; Exercises; Translations; Com- 
position. 

JFViencfe.— Whitney's Practical French Grammar. (EUctive.) 

German, — ^Worman's German Grammar; German Header. 
{Elective for Greek,) 

BHET0BIG,--E8asLjB and Declamations. 

HI8T0BY,--8mith'& Greek History. (Abridged.) 

FOURTH YEAR, ''A" CLASS. 
DB AWING.— 

MATHEMATICS.— Wentworth'a Elements of Algebra (fin- 
ished); Wentworth's Plane Geometry; Natural Philosophy, Pecfc'» 
Ganot, revised. 

LANGUAGE.— 

Engl%t^.—P2krBmg Milton's Paradise Lost, Sprague. 

Xotin.— Cicero; Virgil, Ginn & Company; Composition. 

G^^.— Anabasis and Hellenica; White's Lessons completed; 
Greek Prose Composition; Goodwin's Grammar. 

Dutch. — Syntax; Practical Exercises; Translations; Composi- 
tion. 

French, ) 

y Continued as Electives. 
German, ) 

BHETOBIC.—UsLTt^s Rhetoric; Essays; Declamations. The 
Class publishes a monthly Paper, called '^The Excelsiora." 



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j] 18 CATAIX>Gir£ OF HOPS COLLEGB. jj 

a c 

g HISTOBY,— Anderson's English History. g 

3 CIFIL OOVEBNMENT.— Young's Government Class Book, g 

3 DIDACTICS.— White's Elements of Pedagogy. If 

3 PHYSIOLOGY AND HY0II!NE.—8teeU's. B 

u P 

q iSPJ&OJ^i.— Whitney's Practical French Grammar, Worman's n 

j! German Grammar; German Reader. " 

n Note.— Beligious InstructioB is given by the Faculty in all the n 

fj Special attention is given, during the whole of the Preparatory n 

a'" Course, to the grammars of the Languages studied. For those who |{ 

^ pursue English studies only or who design stopping at the end of U 

u the ^'A" year, the Faculty provide such additional branches, as B 

{] seem most expedient and profitable. Those generally mbke better [} 

I progress, whose time is fully occupied in the work of the School. n 

il In general educational value, it is believed that the above ^ 

3 four years Course of Study is worthy of full recommendation, R 

n whether for entrance into College, or for a professional training, n 

n or for a business life. {{ 

n See note at the bottom of Page 10. n 

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II B 

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3 G 

3 G 

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3 B 

3 B 

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^ 



Horfflal Qepartnient. 



This Department was authorized in June, 1887, and was 
opened in March, 1888. It is now in full and regular operation. 
It is not designed thereby to supplant the usual Course of Study, 
or to change it materially; but to afford a choice of Normal 
branches, in lieu of certain others, to educate in the art and prac- 
tice of teaching. Special classes fbr teachers and those who seek 
soon to be teachers, are held twice in each year, beginning in Feb- 
ruary, and in July, and continuing for five or six weeks each. The 
Summer class in July and August, 1888, was attended as follows: 



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NORMAL STUDENTS. 



KAME8. 

Emma Adams, 
Eva L. AdamSy 
Bena M. Amea, 
ADoa M. Broek, 
Howard Brothertou, 
Adrian Brandt, 
John 8. Brower, 
Anna M. Benjamin, 
Helen A. Button, 
Charles J. Bell, 
Mrs. — Currie, 
Edie Chase, 
Nellie Cook, 
Badie G. Clark, 
Faol R. Coster, 
Geo. E. Cook, 
Albert J. Dann, 
Bena Docter, 
Anna Docter, 
Jennie Dubbink, 
Eva Daffget, 
Ida Ellen, 
Winnie Ellwood, 
Katie Ellen, 
Austin Fairbanks, 
Ettie Flietstra, 
Anna L. Fairbanks, 
Jessie M. Fairbanks, 
Mable Gordon, 
Elson E. Goodman, 
Flora Gillespie, 



BBSIDENCBS. 

Otsego. 

Otsego. 

Saugatuck, 

Holland CiHy. 

AUendale. 

Vriesland. 

New HoUand. 

ZeeHand, 

Hopkins, 

South Havm. 

Wayland, 

AUegan, 

Holland City* 

Holland. 

Holland City, 

Wayland, 

HoUand OUy. 

Holland City. 

Overisel, 

Otsego. 

HoUand. 

Diaimmd Springs. 

East Saugatuck, 

Holland. 

Coopermnlle, 

Holland. 

Holland. 

Nunica. 

South Monterey. 

Big Bapids. 



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GATALOOUX OF HOPE COLUBGB. $1 



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KAHJB8. 

Tadie Gardner, 
Nannie J. Gilmore, 
H. Wilson Heasley^ 
John Haan, 
Alice E. Hanna, 
Cora Hill, 
Maggie Hoekaema, 
Nellie Innels, 
Lulu Ingraham, 
Lena H. Eollen, 
Gerrit Eoopman, 
Gracie Eropsoott, 
Anna Klumper, 
Emma Lilly, 
Maggie Lent, 
Maggie Luidens, 
Emma E. Lillie, 
EfBe Mokma, 
Minnie M. Markham, 
Minnie Mohr, 
Wiley W. Mills, 
Jennie Mabbs, 
Leila E. McBride, 
Anna I. McGraitb, 
M. Ella Nash, 
Theresa Newman, 
Jennie Nykerk, 
Clara Odell, 
Ethel O'Brien, 
Nettie Owen, 
Mary Oosterhof, 
Mrs. Allie Odell, 
Ida L. Prescott, 
George Buple, 
Maggie Busscher, 
Mattie Bankans, 
Albert J. Books, 
Myrtle Stowe, 
Hattie N. Spencer, 
Minnie Schaap, 
May Schepers, 
Alva Sriver, 



BBBIDSNCjBS, 

Jbfarttn. 

Bfumips OomerS' 

Vrkskmd, 

BiMand. 

PUUfwoeU. 

Drenfhe. 

AUegcui, 

Bass Biver. 

HoUandCUy. 

Overiad. 

Overisd, 

Overiael. 

AUegan, 

WayUmd, 

New Holland. 

CoopersviUe. 

Graa/schap. 

Holland, 

HoUand CM^. 

Holland. 

AlUgan* 

HoUand City. 

Denniaon. 

Hartford. 

Dorr. 

OveriaeL 

AUegan, 

Cheshire. 

Ventura. 

Ferrysbvrg. 

AUegan. 

HudsonvUU. 

Dorr* 

HoUand. 

CoopersviUe. 

East HoUand. 

<Jhesk%re. 

Douglas. 

East HoUand. 

HoUand. 

Bumips Comers. 



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CATALOGUB OF HOFB COIiLEGB. 



NAHBS. 


BE8IDENCB8. 


Nellie Simpson, 


AUegan. 


Lyle C. Smith, 


Waykmd. 


Wm. Strait, 


Diamond Springs. 


Mrs. NetU Sooy, 


Wayland. 


Libbie Sooy, 


Waykmd. 


Mary Sheffield, 


HamiUon. 


Bertha Strait, 


Diamond Springs. 


Frankie Sulliyan, 


MiUOrow. 


Jessie Thew, 


AUegan. 


Beka Te Boiler, 


HoUand City. 


Emma Tyler, 


DunningviUe. 


Joseph J. Terry, 


Wayland. 




Holland. 


Senie Visscher, 


Holland. 


Minnie E. Wood, 


AUegcm. 


Lottie White, 


Bass Biver. 


Tillie Waddell, 


AUegan. 


Nettie Willet, 


Hollaikd. 


Hettie Wadswortb, 


PeadiBeU. 


Anna Wiersema, 


HoUand City. 


Flora Williams, 


AUegan. 


Carrie Williams, 


AUegan. 



ADMISSION- 

The Normal Department is open to all applicants who are 
deemed as prepared for it, by the Director and the President. The 
members, having selected their studies, are expected to be punctual 
and regular, and to comply with the scholastic regulations of the 
Institution. 



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C^ 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



FIRST YEAB. 



Orthography, Beading, Penmanship, Grammar, (Composition, 
Higher Arithmetic, Book-keeping, Latin or Electives, such as 
Physiology and Civil Government, Drawing, Dutch or French, 
Music, Review of U. S. History and Geography, Professional In- 
struction for the teacher. 

By taking Electives instead of Latin, the above forms a good 
one year English Course. 



SECOND TEAR, 

Rhetoric, Composition, Elocution, Drawing, Zoology, Algebra 
Astronomy, Latin and Greek History or Electives, Greek or 
Cterman and Electives, Datch or French, Music, Practice in studies 
of first year. 

Professional Instruction in the Art of Teaching, suitable for 
those who want a two years English Course. 

THIRD YEAR. 

English Language and English History, Composition and 
Elocution, Algebra, Physics, Latin and Roman History or Elec- 
tives, Greek or German and Electives, Dutch or French, Voice 
Culture, Greometty, Civil Government, Physiology, Moral Science. 

Professional Instruction in Practice of Teaching. The Elec- 
tives will give a full Literary or Scientific Course. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

English Literature, Composition and Elocution, Geometry, 
Greek or Cterman, Greneral History, Dutch or French, Chemistry, 
Mental Science, History of Education, Trigonometry, Physical 
Ctoography, Geology, School System, Practice of Teaching. 

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cataix)gue: of hops college. u 
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The Professional Instruction add the Reviews in the common 
branches will be conducted by the Principal of the Normal De- 
partment. 

The advanced studies will be pursued under the instruction of 
the College Professors, in their respective departments. 

A special Review Class will be organized Feb. 18, 1889, for the 
benefit of those, about to teach, and will continue six weeks. 

There will also be a Summer Normal Class from July 9, to 
Aug. 16, 1889, for those actually engaged in the work of teaching. 

In the Summer Normal Class Prof. P. A. Latta of Allegan, and 
Prof. A. W. Taylor of Nunica, Secy's of Allegan and Ottawa Co. 
Boards of School Examiners, will assist in the work. 

Those desiring to enter the class will bring such text-books as 
they have, as instruction will be given by topic. 

A course of lectures upon the various phases of school work 
will be given by prominent and practical educators. ji 

The teachers of Allegan, Ottawa, and adjoining Counties thus 
have an opportunity for a thorough review of the subjects required 
for first, second, and third grade certificates, together with a study 
of Principles and Methods. 

The Library and Apparatus of the College are free for the use 
of the special Classes. 



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Qepartment of Theology. 



"The Western Theological Seminary of the 
REFORMED Church in America," 

Bl 

Hope College had a Theological Department in operation from _ 
1866 to 1877, and graduated 80 Candidates for the Ministry; and 9 B 
others were thus trained in part. In June, 1877, the I>epartment ^ 
was suspended by the Greneral Synod, but was re-opened in 1884. 
In June, 1885, this Theological School received the corporate name 
of "The Western Theological Seminary of the Reformed Church 
in America," and was committed to the care of its own Board of 
Superintendents, and placed on the same footing as the Seminary 
at New Brunswick, N. J. As yet, however, only two Professors 
have been provided for, and appointed by the Synod. 



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Board of Superintendents. 



EX-OFFICIO. 
Rev. Chas. Scott, D. D., - Ftesident of the College. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF NEW YORK. 

Ret. David Cole, D. D., - - YoDkers, N. Y. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF ALBANY. 

Rev. Edward A. Collier, D. D., - Kinderhook, N. Y. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Rev. Wm. R. Gordon, D. D., - Manhasset, N. Y. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF CHICAGO. 

Rev. p. Lkpeltak, . - - Overisel, Mich. 

Rev. F. Moerdyke, - - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Rev. Balster Van Ess, - - Roseland, 111. 

Rev. Wm. H. Fhraner, - - Irving Fark, HI. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF HOLLAND. 

Rev. John Van der Meulen, - - Ebenezer, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF GRAND RIVER. 

Rev. Egber? Winter, - - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF MICHIGAN. 

Rev. a. Vennema, - - Kalamazoo, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF ILLINOIS. 

Rev. Samuel L. Gamble, - - - Fekin, HI. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF WISCONSIN. 
Rev. J. Van Hoitten, - - South Holland, 111. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF IOWA. 
Rev. Ale Buursma, - - Orange City, la. 



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FACULTY. 



REV. NICHOLAS M. STEFFENS, D. D. 

Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theology. In charge of His- 
torical Theology, Biblical Criticism, Pastoral Theology, 
and Catechetics. 

REV. JOHN W. BEARDSLEE, D. D. 

Professor of Biblical Languages and Literature. In charge of 

Sacred Creography, Antiquities, Church Government, 

and Homiletics. 



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STUDENTS. 



SENIOB CLASS. 

Balph Bloemendaal, A. B., Cedar Qrove^ W%9. 

Albert U. Strabbing, A. M., ffoliand CUy. 

MIDDLE GLASS. 

Jacob J. Tan Zanten, A. M., EoOand City. 

JUNIOB CLASS. 



Henry Harmeling, A. B., 
Foppe Klooster, A. B., 
JohD Lamar, A. B., 
Albertus Pieters, A. B., 
Hefnry Straks, 



Oastburg, Wis. 
Fore^ drove. 
Jenniaon. 
Holland City. 
Fcmpun, Wis. 



Total, 8. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

EXIQETICAL THEOLOGY AND HEBMENEVTI08.— 
Elements of Hebrew; Selections from Pentateuch; Harmony and 
Exegesis of the Gtospels; Reading Acts (G'reeib); Archi^ology; Sacred 
Geography. 

2]ssct-&oo^.— Harper's Method and Manual; Green's Hebrew 
Grammar; Robinson's (Riddle's) Harmony; Bissell's Biblical An- 
tiquities; Barrow's Sacred Geography; G^esenius's Lexicon; Winer'p 
N. T. Grammar. 

HISTORICAL THEOLOGY.— Kurtz's Sacred History. 

SYSTEMATIC TJJJ0OiO6?F.— Introduction; Encyclopedia; 
Symbols of the Church. 

PBACTICAL THEOLOGY.— Theory of Preaching; Analysis 
of Sermons; Homiletical Exercises. 

MIDDLE YEAR. 

EXEGETICAL THEOLOGY AND HEBMENEVTIC8.— 
Hebrew Etymology and Syntax; Studies in Prophetical Theology; 
Readings from Historical Books; Biblical Criticism, (O. T.); Eeil's 
Manual; Weis's Introduction to New Testament; Schaff's Com- 
panion to the New Testament; Exegetical Study of Epistles; 
Reading Acts; Westoott and Hort's Greek New Testament; 
Thayer's Lexicon. 

HISTORICAL THEOLOGY.— K\}rtz'B Church History. 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY.— Theology proper; Anthropol- 
ogy; Christology; A. A. Hodge's Outlines; Charles Hodge's Syste- 
matic Theology. 

PBACTICAL THEOLOGY— LectrxTes on preaching; Homi- 
letical Exercises; Church Government; Pastoral Theology; 
Lectures. 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



1 



SENIOR YEAR. 

EXEGETICAL THEOLOGY AND HEBMENEUTICS.— 
Hebrew Poetry; O. T. Theology; Historical reading; Aramaic Se- 
lections; Hermeneutics; New Testament Exegesis; PauPs Epistles; 
Biblical Criticism, (O. T.).~Eeirs Manual; Schafl^s Companion to 
New Testament; Weiss's Introduction to New Testament. 

HI8T0EICAL THJBOiOG F.— Ecclesiastical History (con- 
tinued.) 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGYSotQriology; * Ecclesiology; 
Eschatology; Apologetics; Ethics; Review of the entire System. 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY— llomi\et\cB,l Exercises; Pastoral 
Theology; Catechetics; Theory of Missions; Church Grovernment; 
Lectures on Preaching. 

ADELPHIC SOCIETY. 

This is a weekly gathering of the Professors and Students for 
the discussion of questions relating to the studies of the course, 
and to all matters bearing on the practical work of the ministry. 
The exercises embrace debates, essays, and general discussions. 

THE YEAR. 

The year includes eight months; from the first Wednesday in 
September to the last Wednesday in April.— -A short recess occurs 
during the Christmas holidays. 

COMMENCEMENT. 

The Theological Commencement exercises take place on 
Thursday evening, at the close of the year. Addresses are deliv- 
ered by the Seniors, in English and Dutch, and by some member 
of the Board of Superintendents appointed for the purpose. 

A Committee of the Board will meet on the first Tuesday in 
September, of each year, for the admission of students. 



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GRADUATES. 



1§69. 



NAMES. 

Ale Buursma, 
Crerrit DaDgremond, 

* William B. Gilmore. 
Peter Moerdyke, 
William Moerdyk, 
John W. Te Winkel, 

* Harm Woltman. 

James De Pree, 

* Enne J. Heeren. 
John Huizenga, 
Balster Van Ess, 

John Broek, 

Grerrit Van de Kreeke, 

•William Visscher. 



Harm Borgers, 
Evert Van der Hart, 

Henry K. Boer, 
Peter De Bruyn, 
John A. De Spelder, 
James F. Zwemer, 



John Hoffman, 
♦Nicholas Neerken. 



18TO. 



18T1. 



1§79. 



1§T3. 



1§74. 



BE8IDEKCES. 

Orange City^ la. 
Hospers^ la. 

Grand Bapids. 
PeUa^ la. 
Alto, Wis. 



Sioux Centre, la. 

HolUmd, Neb. 
Eoseland, lU. 



Milwavkee, Wis. 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 



OreenleafUm, Minn. 
Bochester, N. Y. 

Maurice, la. 
Bochester, N. Y. 
Orange City, la. 
HoUand City. 

Clymer, N. Y. 



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CATAL0GX7B OF HOPE COLLE6B. 



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NAMES. 



William P. Hazenberg, 
Andrew Wormser, 



Frederic P. Bakker, 
Josias Meulendyk, 
Helenus E. Nies, 



Harm Yan der Ploeg, 
♦ComeliuB Wabeke. 



1§75. 



18T6. 



1877. 



BBSmSNCBS. 



Johannesburg, TransvadL 
Qrand Haven, Jli%ck. 



Wayne, Neb, 
Fremont. 
Patterson, N, J. 



Vriesland, Midi, 



aa^^ended tOl 1884. 
18§6. 



Dirk Scholten, 



1887. 



Gerhard De JoDge, 
Simon Uogenboom, 
Gerrit H. Uospera, 
Peter Ihrman, 



Gerrit J. Hekhuis, 
Albert Yan den Berg, 
Peter Wayenbergf 



1888. 



Luetor, Kas, 



SoidhBlmdon. 
Marion, N. Y. 
East WUUamsoh, N. Y. 
Wavpun, Wis. 



Spring Lake. 
New Kirk, la. 
PyUneyviOe^ N. F. 



* Deceased. 



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COLLEGE ALMUNL 



KA1CE8. 

Ale Buursma, 
Gerrit Dangremond, 
William B. Gilmore, 
Peter Moerdyke, 
William Moerdyk, 
William A. Shields, (Prof.,) 
John W. Te Winkel, 
Harm Woltman, 



Gerrit Bolks, 
James De Free, 
Enne J. Heeren, Bev. 
John Huizenga, 
Albert T. Huizenga, 
Dirk B. K. Van Baalte, t 

Harm Borders, 

John Broek, 

Grerrit J. KoUen, 

Gerrit Van de Kreeke, Bev., 

William Yisscher, 



Evert Van der Hart, 
A. Wilson Van der Veer, 
William Van Putten, t 



Henry K. Boer, 
William B. De Bey, J 



1§66. 

OCCUPATION. 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

[Clergyman.] 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Photo-Artist, 

Clergyman, 

[Clergyman.] 

1§67. 

Merchant, 

Clergyman, 

[Missionary.] 

Clergyman, 

Teacher, 

Merchant, 

1§68. 

Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Professor, 
Merchant, 
[Miss'y Student.] 

1S69. 

Clergyman, 

Merchant, 

Physician, 

1870. 

Clergyman, 
Physician, 



PRESENT RBSmSNCB. 

Chrange City, la. 

Hospers, la. 

♦April 24, 1884. 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Pella, la. 

Macomb, 111. 

Fulton, ni. 

♦April 80, 1870. 

Maurice, la. 

Sioux Center, la. 

♦Oct. 15, 1878. 

Holland, Neb. 

Beaverdam, Mich. 

Holland, Mich. 



Greenleafton, Minn. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

Holland City. 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 

♦Feb. 11, 1872. 



Rochester, N. Y. 

Davenport, la. 

Holland City. 



Maurice, la. 
Chicago, 111. 



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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



Peter De Bruyn, 
John A. De Spelder, 
Charles E. Jones, 
James F. Zwemer, Rev., 



John Hoffman, 
Simon Kuyper, 
Nicholas Neerken, . 
Peter D. Schippems, 
Samuel Streng, 
James Ten Eyck, 
William Yeenschoten, 



Arend Visscher, 



Edwin Bedell, 
John Hoekje, 
Josias Meulendyk, 
HelenuB E. Nies, 
Jacob Van Halteren, 
Harm Van der Wart, 



Cornelius Kriekaard, 
Joseph G. Millspaugh, 
Harm Van der Ploeg, 
Comelis Wabeke, 



Henricus Baron, 
Lawrence Dykstra, 
Bobert B. D. Simonson, 
Evert Smits, 
William V. Steele, 
John Visscher, 



Henry E. Dosker, 



OCCUPATION. 

Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Physician, 
Fin'l Asent, 

1971. 

Clergyman, 

[Teacher.] 

[Clergyman.] 

Book-keeper, 

Clergyman, 

Lawyer, 

Clergyman, 

1979. 

Lawyer, 
1§73. 

Lawyer, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Book-keeper, 

Clergyman, 

1§74. 

Clergyman, 
Physician, 
Clergyman, 
[Clergyman.] 

1875. 

Physician, 

Clergyman, 

Principal, 

Clergyman, 

Lawyer, 

Ag't Charities, 

1§76. 

Clergyman, 



Frank A. Force, Clergyman, 



U1 



IK 



FBC8BNT RKSIDBNOE. 

Boche8ter,N.Y. 

Orange City, la. 

Albany, N. Y. 

Holland City. 



Clymer, N. Y. 
*Sept. 1, 1882. 
♦Jan. 3, 1887. 
Boseland, HI. 
Chiirchville, Penn. 
Fairview, 111. 
Greendale, N. Y. 



Holland, Mich. 



Albany, N. Y. 
Cawker City, Kan* 

Fremont, Mich. 

Paterson, N. J. 

Burr Oak, Kan. 
Hackensaok, N. J. 



Lafayette, Ind. 

Garfield, Dak. 

Vriesland, Mich. 

♦Feb. 22, 1880. 



Forest Grove, Mich. 

Greenbush, N. Y. 
Bowling Green, Mo. 

North Loup, Neb. 

Somerville, N. J. 
Chicago, 111. 



Holland City. 
Fife Lake, Mich, nf 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



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CATALOGUB OF HOFB OOLLEQK. 



^ 



KAMB8. 



OCCUPATION. 



Albert A. Pfanstiehl, Clergyman, 

€k>nieli8 Van Oostenbrugge, Clergyman, 
Douwe Yntema, Principal, 



PRB8BNT RESroSNCB. 

Columbia, Mo. 

Troy, Mo. 

St. Johns, Mich. 



John C. Groeneveld, 
Lambertns Hekhuis, Bey., 
Matthew Kolyn, 
Johannes Yisscher, 



1§7T. 

Clergyman, Alto, Wis. 

[Missionary, M. D.,] *Sept. 16, 1888. 
Clergyman, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Teacher, Holland, Mich. 

1§TS. 



Henry Boers, 


Professor, 


Holland City 


John G. Gebhard, 


Clergyman, 


Mellenville, N. Y 


Stephen J. Harmeling, 


Clergyman, 


Marion, Dak 


John H. Kleinheksel, 


Professor, 
1S79. 


Holland City. 


Dirk J. De Bey, 


Clergyman, 


Gibbsville, Wis, 


Ellas De Spelder, M. D., 


Physician, 


Drenthe, Mich. 


Kumage Kimura, 


Clergyman, 


Tokio, Japan. 


George Niemeyer, 


Clergyman, 


Cleveland, 0. 


Motoitero Ohgimi, 


Clergyman, 


Tokio, Japan 


Ame Yennema, 


Clergyman, 

i§§o. 


Kalamazoo, Mich 


William G. Baas, 


Clergyman, 


Newark, N. Y, 


Jacob P. De Jong, 


Clergyman, 


Englewood, III. 


Bernard J. De Vries, 


Dentist, 


Holland City 


Peter M. Elsenius, 


II 


♦July 20, 1881. 


Abel H. Huizenga, 


Clergyman, 


New Paltz, N. Y 


Abraham Stegeman, 


Clergyman, 


Harrison, Dak 


Albert H. Strabbing, 


Theo. Student, 


Holland City. 


Jacob J. Van Zanten, 


Theo. Student, 


Holland City. 


Frederick J. Zwemer, 


Clergyman, 


Armour, Dak. 


Ebenezer Van den Berge, t 


Clergyman, 
1§S1* 


Passaic, N. J. 


Gerrit J. Diekema, 


Lawyer, 


Holland City. 



Intended studying for the Ministry. 



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CATALOGUIB OF HOPE OOLLEOS. 



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1TAME8. 


OCCUPATION. 




Charles S. Dutton, 


Clergyman, 


Holland City. 


John G. Fagg, Rev., 


Missionary, 


Amoy, China. 


BeDse H. Joldersma, Bev., 


Sup'tDom.Miss., Gr. Bapids, Mich. 


Tinis J. Kommeis, 


Clergyman, 


Ouray, Col. 


John Biemeisma, 


Clergyman, 


Bochester, N. Y. 


Bastian Smits, 


Clergyman, 


Constantino, Mich. 


John G. Van Hees, Jr., 


Telegrapher, 


Allegan, Mich. 


John W. Croea. t 


1S89. 




John W. Bosman, 


Physician, 


Kalamazoo, Mich. 


Gerhard De Jong, 


Clergyman, 


Blendon, Mich. 


Pieter Ihrman, 


Clergyman, 


Waupun, Wis. 


Johannes £. Matzke, 




Baltimore, Md. 


Philip T. Phelps, 


Theo. Stndent, N. Brunswick, N. J. 


Charles T. Steffens, 


Book-keeper, 


Chicago, m. 


Sarah G. Alcott, 


At Home, 


Holland City. 


Frances F. C. Phelps, 


Mrs. J. A. Otte, Sio-ke, China. 




1§88. 




Evert J. Blekkink, 


Clergyman, 


Cobleskni, N. Y. 


Jacob Dyk, 


Clergyman, 


Sodus, N. Y. 


Henry Hulst, M. D., 


Physician, 


Grand Traverse, Mich. 


Tametsne Matsda, 


Teacher, 


Tbyama Kew, Japan. 


Albert Oltmans, Bev., 


Missionary, 


Nagasaki, Japan. 


John A. Otte, M. D., 


Missionary, 


Sio-ke, China. 


Dirk Scholten, 


Clergyman, 


Philadelphia, Kan. 


£. William Stapelkamp^ 


Clergyman, 
1884. 


Cedar Grove, Wis- 


Simon Uogenboom, 


Clergyman, 


Marion, N. Y. 


Gtorrit H. Hospers, 


Clergyman, 
1885. 


E. WilUamson, N. Y. 


Gerrit J. Hekhuis, 


Clergyman, 


Spring Lake, Mich. 


John B. Nykerk, 


Tutor, 


Holland City. 


Albert Van den Berg, 


Clergyman, 


New Kirk, la. 


Peter Wayenberg, 


Clergyman, 


Pultneyville, N. Y. 


Mary E. Alcott, t 


Mrs. G. J. Diekema, Holland City. 


Lizzie Phelps, 


Teacher, 


Antes' Fort, Penn. 



In 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CATALOOUS OF HOFB COLLBQB. 



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1886. 


^ 


NAHB8. 


OCCUPATION. 


PJUESKirr RBSIDBlfOB, 


Balph Bloemendaal, 


Theo. Student, 


Holland City. 


Wm. J. Duiker, 


Theo. Student, 


N.Brunswick, N.J. 


Peter HoUeman, 


Med. Student, 


Ann Arbor, Mich. 


Jeremias Kruidenier, 


Theo. Student, 


Xenia, O. 


William B. Lammers, 


Theo. Student, 


N. Brunswick, N. J. 


John W. E. Visscher, 


Med. Student, 
1887. 


Ann Arbor, Mich. 


Cornelia Cappon, 


Mrs. Wm. Brusse, Holland City, [jj 


Emma KoUen, 


Teacher, 


Orange City, Iowa. In 


Paul B. Coster, 


Teacher, 


Holland, Mich. |S 


Harman V. S. Peeke, 


Teacher, 


Nagasaki, Japan. HJ 


Albertus Pieters, 


Theo. Student, 


Holland City. ^ 

Allegan, Mich, n) 

N.Brunswick, N.J. H 


Chas. N. Thew, 


Law Student, 


Samuel M. Zwemer, 


Theo. Student, 




1888. 


Henry Geerlings, 


Theo. Student, 


Chicago, 111. K 


Henry Harmeling, 


Theo. Student, 


Holland City. ^ 


Poppe Klooster, 


Theo. Student, 


Holland City, m 


John Lamar, 


Theo. Student, 


Holland City, nl 

N.Brunswick, N.J. ^ 

N.Brunswick, N.J. W 

Orange City, la. K 


Martin Ossewaarde, 


Theo. Student, 


John Van Westenburg, 


Theo. Student, 


Peter J. Zwemer, 


Teacher, 


SUMMARY. 


ACADEMIC ALUMNI. 


Clergymen and Candidates, 


- 


. . 67 I 


Missionaries, 


- 


6 [ 


Theological Students, 


- 


16 H 


Physicians or Medical Students, 


- - 10 SI 
6 Si 

- 15 a 

14 g 


Lawyers or Law Students, 


- 


Teachers, 


. 


Otherwise Employed. 


- 






- 184 [9 


Total Alumni, (1866-1888,) 


- • . 



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S8 CATAIX>6X7B: OF HOPE COLLEGS. In 
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3 GRAMMAR SCHOOL GRADUATES. 

3 Total number of graduates (1851-1888,) - - - 851 

REFERENCES. 

* (Throughout the Catalogue,) Deceased. 

t (Alumni of Acad, and Prep. Dep's.) Partial Course. 

% (Alumni of Academic Dep.) A. B. Honorary. 



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Miscellai^eous Informatioq. 



LOCATION. 



Holland City is a central point on the Chicago and West 
Michigan Railway, and on the Ohio and Michigan B. B. (to 
Toledo), ninety miles north of New Buffalo, twenty-five miles 
south-west of Grand Bapids, and midway between Allegan and 
Grand Haven. It is therefore most desirably located, having both 
land- and water communications, and being near the shore of Lake 
Michigan, with which it is directly connected by Macatawa Bay, 
itself a beautiful sheet of water. 

GB0TJND8 AND BUILDINGJS. 

The College Campus lies mostly between Teath and Twelfth 
streets, in the center of the City, and contains eighteen acres. It 
presents a finely varied surface, Is well shaded with native trees 
and is annually improving in beauty and attractiveness. 

The Ck>Uege Buildings are eight in nimiber. The largest is 
Yan Yleck Hall, mainly devoted to Students* rooms, and the 
Library. It has been decided to build an ample Becitation Hall 
as soon as the requisite funds can be secured. 

SCHOOL YEAB. 

The Scholastic Tear, of forty weeks, begins on the third 
Wednesday in September, and ends with the General Commence- 
ment on the fourth Wednesday in June. 

The Winter and Spring vacations are fixed by the General 
Faculty. (See the Calendar.) 

COUBSE OF STUDY. 

Most of the students seek what is called "a liberal or classical 
education." A "partial" or "elective" course is offered to all who 
so desire, and facilities are furnished through the regular instruc- 



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JESESESSSBSESiSSSSBSBSESBSBSESESSSSSBSESBSSSBSBES^i 
40 CATALOOXTE OF HOPE OOLLBGIB. 

tors, but a partial Course entitles only to a certificate and not to a 
diploma. German and French, or Drawing and Fainting, can be 
studied at any time, as also the branches generally called ^^scien- 
tific"; fitting the students for Post-graduate courses in a Uni- 
versity. 

In 1878 the Institution was opened to women. At once 
several availed themselves of the privilege, and their number has 
been steadily increasing. They enter the regular classes, and 
attend the same lectures and recitations as the young men. 

Vocal Music is provided, and no charge is made for this. 
Lessons in InstrumerUdl Music can be secured at the expense of the 
pupil. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

The Yearly Examinational before the Council or its Committee, 
befiin on the third Wednesday in June. At other times, Special 
examinations may be held, and passed upon by the respective 
Faculties, subject to the approval of Council or to a re-examina- 
tion, if so desired. 

The Examinations are oral or in writing, as seems best to 
each professor. 

BELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

The exercises of each day begin with prayer in the College 
Chapel, at 8 o'clock, a. m. 

On the Sabbath, every student is expected to worship regularly 
with one of the churches in the city or vicinity, unless excused by 
the President. 

Beligious Instruction is given in all the classes regularly, and 
now, like the other studies, is in charge of the Faculty. 

Although Hope College is denominational, and is under the 
patronage and support of the Reformed Church in America, yet, 
by the law of its incorporation, it can have no "religious test." 
The doors are open, and welcome is given to all who submit to its 
scholastic regulations. As a Christian school, however, it incul- 
cates gospel truths, and demands a consistent moral character 

and deportment. 

LIBRARY, ETC. 

A Library of about 6,500 volumes, and a Reading Roam^ are 
free for the use of the students. Books and papers are constantly 
being added. Improved accommodations have recently been pro- 
vided. 



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The LaborcOory^ Gabinety and Philosophical Apparatus are 
adapted to the use of the recitation, or lecture-rooms. They are 
gradually being made larger and more complete. It is to be hoped 
that Maps, Charts, Instruments, and Specimens of Natural 
History, as well as books, will be donated by the graduates and 
friends of the Institution. 

SOCIETIES. 

The Literary SocUtiea^ viz., the Meliphon and the Fraternal, 
have now been maintained for years, and ofPer decided advantages 
to theirlrespective members, and materially aid in the attainment 
of that culture, which it is the object of this school to promote. 

In 1886, a new literary society, called the VJJUaa Cluh^ was 
organized by Prof. Doesburg. The object of this club is to secure 
for its members greater proficiency in the use of the Holland 
language. 

The Y. M. C. A., a society of from seventy to eighty mem- 
bers, has carried on its work with much interest and activity. 

SUNDEIES. 

Connected with the Institution, a religious weekly is published, 
called De Hope. It is the organ of the College, and was established 
in 1886. 

In 1887, a monthly, called The Anchor^ was established by the 
students, and is meeting with gratifying success. 

The '^A^' Class has always maintained a periodical, c»lled 
JSbKelnom. It is bound, year by year, and placed in the Library. 

The ''Oratorical Exercises'^ of the Grammar School, on the 
final Monday of the College year, are in lieu of a Commencement 
in that Department. The occasion is one of much interest to the 
public. 

Two prizes, called '*2T^ Qeorge Birkhoff^ Jr., Prizes,''^ have 
been established. One is for the Sophomore Class, in English Lit- 
erature, and the other for the Freshman Class, ic Dutch Literature. 
At the last Commencement they were awarded, by the Commit- 
tees, as follows: For best Essay in English, Herbert 6. Keppel; 
For best Essay in Dutch, Gilbert G. Haan. 

Other prizes will soon follow as a stimulus to labor in other 
branches of study. 

A Course of Lectures is of almost yearly occurrence, usually at 
the invitation of one of the societies, and with the approval and 
financial aid of the Executive Committee. 



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CATALOOTJE OF HOPE COLLEOB. 



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The moral, social, and literary advantages of Holland are 
comparatively good, 

EXPENSES. 

Holland is surrounded by a rich agricultural region, and the 
cost of living is comparatively cheap. Good board may be had, in 
families of the city, for from two to three dollars per week; and 
WITHOUT FURNISHED ROOMS at Corresponding rates. 

There are seventeen rooms in Yan Yleck Hall, in the selec- 
tion of which students for the ministry have the preference. These 
are furnished in part, and bear a charge of five dollars a year. 

As yet, no tuition fees have been charged, but every student 
must pay to the Treasurer, in advance, an incidental fee of five 
dollars per term. 

The graduation fee is five dollars, and the cost of the diploma. 
No other charges are made. 

For books, clothing, washing, fuel, lights, travel, etc., those 
interested can best make the estimates. The entire expense 
need not exceed $200 per annum. 

The fee of the students in the special Normal Glasses is five 
dollars for the session. Those who enter the College, for a regular 
Normal Course, are charged ten dollars, in advance for each 
semester or half-year. 

The Boarding Houses in the City are to be approved by the 
Faculty, and to be subject to such regulations, as are usual in 
such cases. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The Bales of Order are few and simple. In general, if the 
students do not improve their time and opportunities, or do not 
conduct themselves in a respectful and orderly manner, their con- 
nection with the Institution will be suspended. 

The students are required to be present, promptly^ on the first 
day of each and every term. The recUations will begin the next 
morning. 

A record is kept of the scholastic standing of each student, 
and a copy of the same is sent to the parent or guardian; if the 
average standing, in any term, does not exceed 70, on a basis of 
100, he may be dropped from his class. 

Term fees and room rent are to be paid strictly in advance^ 
and if not so paid, or within one month, the student, neglecting, 
forfeits his right to continue in the Institution. 



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The object of the Faculty is to develop a higher moral as well 
as intellectual culture and character. If they find, after due pro- 
bation and inquiry, that the influence of a student is bad and in- 
jurious to others, they claim the right to demand his withdrawal. 

Parents are requested not to ask or expect their children, in 
this School, to come home during term time, if it can be avoided. 
It seriously interferes with proper habits of study, and by our 
rules, none are to be absent from the Institution, without permis- 
sion of the President. 

A copy of the regulations of the College is given to each 
student, at the time of his or her matriculation. 

REMARKS. 

The Library is rapidly increasing in the number of volumes 
and in value, and a Library building is one of our pressing necessi- 
ties. With spacious, fire-proof rooms, the collection would be safe 
and serviceable. The same building could, for the present, be 
used as a museum, or Cabinet of Natural History. Who will 
supply this want? 

The funds of the Institution are sadly insufficient. Rev. Jas. 
F. Zwemer has accepted the agency, in the West, for raising 
$50,000 for the College, and $30,000 for the Theological Seminary. 
Rev. Daniel Van Pelt has accepted the agency for the East. Both 
agents are in the field, and earnestly laboring for success, having 
the endorsement of the Greneral Synod. 

And may the Legacies of the pious build up this ^^School of the 
Church," just as they have bestowed so many thousands on Yale, 
Princeton, Union, etc., making them what they are, for our country 
and the world. 

A FORM OF DEVISE. 

I give unto the Council of Hope College 

dollars, to be applied to (e. g. (^ increase of the 

Endowment fund of said CoUege.) 



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Beginning of Netherland immigration into WesHem 
Michigan, 

Village of Holland, laid out, 

The need of a School discussed; plat of five acres^ 
donated by Dr. A. C. Van Raalte, 

"Pioneer School'' opened, 

Placed under the care of the General Synod, 

Received the name of '^Holland Academy," 

Located in the "Orphan House," 

Meliphon Society organized, 

Van Vleck Hall erected on the 5 acres, 

Academy, more fully organized, 

Campus enlarged to 16 acres, 

The "Oggel House" erected, 

Students regularly classified, 

Gymnasium built, 

First Freshman Class formed, , 

Fraternal Society organized, 

A Board of Superintendents appointed. 

Plan of a College approved by the hynods. 

College incorporated as Hope College, with Council 
and Faculty, 

The first Commencement, and first Theological Class, 

A weekly newspaper, called "De Hope," established, 

Holland incorporated as a City, 

Charter Hall erected. 

Professor of Theology and three "Lectors" appointed, 

South Campus, two acres donated, 

Theological Department adopted by Synod as a Theo- 
logical Seminal^, 

Phelps Hall, Grammar School Building, erected, 

First Theological Class graduated, 



1847. 

1848. 

1850. 

Oct., 1851. 
June, 1863. 

1855. 

1856. 

1857. 

1857. 
1857-1858. 

1859. 

1860. 
1859-1860. 

1862. 

1862. 

1863. 

1863. 

1864. 

1866. 
1866. 
1866. 
1867. 

1867. 
1867. 
1868. 

1869. 
1869. 
1869. 



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Two BailioadB opened through Holland, 1869-1871. 

Holland destroyed by fire, Oct., 1871. 

Gymnasium repaired as a Ohapel, 1872. 

House finished on South Campus, 1878. 

Laboratory enlarged and finished, 1874. 

Death of Bev. A. G. Van Baalte, D. D., 1876. 

Brick Office for "De Hope" erected, 1876. 

Suspension of the Theological Department, 1877. 

Be-organization of the College, 1878. 

Division in some of the Beformed Churches, 1881-1882. 

Theological Instruction restored, 1884. 

Visit of General Synod to HoUand, 1884. 

Charter Hall burned, 1884. 
Separate Board of Superintendents for the "Western 

Seminary," 1886. 

President's House erected, 1886. 
All the streets around the Campusgraded and graveled, 1881-1886. 



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The Georxe Birkhoff, Jr., Frizes, establiah^. 
Normal Department opened, 
First Normal Summer School, 

PRINCIPALS. 
Mr. Walter E. Taylor, 
Rev. F. B. Beidler, 
Rev. John Van Yleck, A. M., 
Rev. Philip Phelps, Jr., A. M., 

Or untU the incorporation of Hope Ck)llege. 

PRESIDENTS. 
Rev. Philip Phelps, Jr., D. D., 
Rev. Giles H. Mandeville, D. D., Provisional, 
Rev. Charles Scott, D. D., Vice (and acting,) 
Provisional, 
" " " Elected, 

PROFESSORS AND TEACHERS. 

Mr. Abraham Thompson, A. M., ) AxsM^antA in the 

Rev. Giles Van De Wall, A. M., ) Academy. 

Rev. Peter J. Oggel, A. M., (died Dec., '69,) 

Rev. T. Romeyn Beck, A. M., 

Rev. John M. Ferris, A. M., 

Rev. Charles Scott, A. M., 

Rev. Cornelius E. Crispell, A. M., 

Mr. Cornells Doesburg, Tutor, 

A. M., Professor, 



1887. 
1888. 
July, 1888. 

1861-1864. 
1864-1866. 
1866-1869. 
1869-1866. 



1866-1878. 
1878-1880. 
1878-1880. 
1880-1886. 
1886 



i 1867-1868. 
i 1868-1861. 

1868-1869. 

1863-1886. 

1864r-1866. 

1866 

1866-1878. 

1866-1872. 

1872 





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CATAIiOGUB OF HOPE COLLBGB. 



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Mr. Wm. A. Shields, A. B., Tutor, 1867-1871. 

" " " " A. M., Assistant Professor, 1871-1878. 

" " " " Professor, 1878-1886. 

Mr. Richard Parsons, A. B., Tutor, 1870-1871. 

Bey. Peter Moerdyke, A. M., Assistant Professor, 1871-1878. 

Mr. Gerrit J. Kollen, A. M., Assistant Professor, 1871-1878. 

u a ii a Professor, 1878 

Mr. Henry Boers, A. B., Tutor, 1878-1883. 

" " " A. M., Assistant Professor, 1883-1886. 

" " " Professor, 1886 

Mr. John H. Eleinheksel, A. B., Tutor, 1878-1888. 

" " " " A. M., Assistant Professor, 1888-1886. 

" " " " Professor, 1886 

Mr. Philip T. Phelps, A. B., Tutor, 1884^1886. 

Mr. James Q. Sutphen, A. M., 1886 

Bev. John J. Anderson, A. M., 1885-1888. 

Mr. John B. Nykerk, A. B., Tutor, 1886 

Mrs. G. Van Baalte Gilmore, Lady Assistantand Matron, 1887 

Miss Sarah E. Satterthwaite, A. B., Tutor in Latin and 

Greek, Jan.-July, 1888 

Bev. John H. Gillespie, A. M., 1888 

Mr. John W. Humphrey, 1888 



Theological Department. 

Provisional Instruction givtin by Professors Phelps, 

Oggel, Beck, Scott, and Crispell, 
Rev. Cornelius C. Crispell, D. D., Prof., 
Rev. Philip Phelps, D. D., Lector, 
Rev. J. P. Oggel, Lector, 
Rev. T. Romeyn Beck, Lector, 
Rev. Charles Scott, Lector, 
Rev. Christian Van der Veen, Teacher piv tern. 
Rev. Roelof Pieters, Lector, 
Rev. Abel T. Stewart, Lector, 
Rev. Nicholas M. Steffens, D. D., Professor, 
Rev. Peter Moerdyke, pro tem.^ 
Rev. Henry E. Dosker, Lector, 
Rev. John W. Beardslee, D. D., Professor, 



No. 1, Van Yleck Hall, used for the Seminary, 
The Oggel House, do. 



1866-1867. 
1867-1879. 
1867-1871. 
1867-1869. 
1867-1886. 
1867-1886. 
1871-1873. 
1871-1875. 
1874-1875. 

1884 

1884-1886. 
1884-1888. 
1888 

1884-1886. 
1886 



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c 
c 

B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
C 
B 
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B 
B 
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C 
B 
B 
B 
B 

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B 
B 

B 
B 
B 
C 
C 
B 
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B 
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CATALOGUE OF HOPE COLLEGE. 



47 



SUMMARY OF STUDENTS, PRESENT 

DURING THE YEAR 1888-'89. 

Theological, ...-.- 8 

CJollege, ------ 39 

Grammar School, - - - - - 100 

Normal Class, ----- lOo 



Ck)uiit;ed twice, 
Total, 



247 
7 

240 



There have been added to the Endowment, during the year, in 
sums of $1000 and over, as follows: 

David Terhune, Hackensack, N. J., $1000 

A Lady, Kinderhook, N. Y., 1000 

Mrs. Alida Meenk, Alto, Wis., 1825 

Legacy of Feter Clement, Pittsford, Mich., 5000 



1^ 

B 
B 
B 
C 
B 
C 
B 
B 
G 
G 
G 
G 
C 
G 
B 
G 
G 
G 
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I 
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Quarter Centennial 



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OF 



ryvi^ 



: HOPe n eoLteGe. 



AT 



•:ttObbftND. MiettlGftN. 
TWESTT-FlFTH YE£R. 

1889-90. 



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QUARTER-CENTENNIAL 

OATAKOQUE 



OK TH^ 



OPPieeRS AND STWDeNTS 



OF 



Hope college, 

HDLLUND, MICHIGAN, 

4889-'90. 



AN INSTITUTION OF THE REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA. 



SOHOOU K017N13KU IN lHk31: 



BECAME HOPE COLLEGE IN 1865. 



HOLLAND, MICH. 

MI»BNBR A MULDER, PRINTERS. 

1890. 



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1800-'01. 

1890. April H, Third Term begins. 

** ** 30, Mebting of Council. 

" May 1,^ JSsmoR Examinations. 

" Jtme 18-20, Undergraduate Examinations. 

" " 20, Examinations for Admission. 

** ** 22^ Baccalaureate Sermon. 

" " 23, Closing Exercises of the Grammar 
School, 

Meeting of Council. 
A. M,, Commencement 
P. M., Meeting of Alumnl 

Q UA RTER- CeNTBNNIA L EXERCISES* 
VACATION. 

First Term begins. 
Examinations for Admission. 
First Term ends, 

VACATION. 

Second Term begins. 
" *' ends, 

VACATION. 



(( 


" H. 


(i 


" 25, 


C( 


« 25^ 


(( 


'• ^6, 


« 


Sept. 17, 


(( 


« 77, 


Cft 


2>ec. 19, 


1891. 


Jan. 5, 


(i 


JifarcA £7, 



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THB COUNCIL. 

EX-OFFICIO. 

Rev. Cha8. Scott, D. D.<» • - President of the College. 

ELECTED MEMBERS. 

FROM GENERAL SYNOD. 



NAMB8. 


RESIDENCES. 


TERMS EXPIRE. 


Rev. Jab. F. Zwembr, 


Holland, Mich., 




1890. 


Isaac Cappon, 


Holland, Mich., 




1S91. 


A REND VlBSCHBR, 


Holland, Mich., 




1892. 


J. C. Benham, M. D., 


Hudson, N. Y., 




1898. 


Rev. Wm. J. R. Taylor, D. D., 


New York City, N. 


Y., 


1894. 


Rev. 6. II. Manbeville, D. D., 


New York City, N. 


Y., 


1895. 


PROM OLA9SIS OF HOLLAND. 






Rev. Peter Lepeltak, 


Overisel, Mich., 




1890. 


Rev. John Van dbr Mevlen, 


Ebeneseer, Mich., 




1890. 


FROM CLA8ST8 OF IOWA. 






Rev. J. W. WARN8HUI8, 


Alton, Iowa, * 




1891 


tREV. William Mobrdyk, 


Muskegon, Mich., 




1891, 



FROM 0LASSI9 OF ILLINOIS. 

Rev. John 8. Joralmon, Norwood Park, 111., 1892. 



FROM CLASaiS OF WI900N8IN. 

Rev. John Broek, Milwaukee, Wis., 1898. 

Rev. Balster Van Ess, Roseland, III., 1898. 

FROM CLA8SIS OF MICHIGAN. 

Rev. Peter Moerdyke, D. D., Grand Rapids, Mich , 1894. 

Rev. a. Paige Peeke, Oentreville, Mich., 1894. 

FROM CLA8SI8 OF GRAND RIVER. 

Rev. Peter De Preb, Grand Rapids, Mich., 1895. 

Rev. Dirk Broek, Detroit, Mich., 1896. 



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OFFICERS OF COUNCIL. 

Rev. John Van DKR Meulen, .... PreMdent 

J. C. Benham, M. D.. ... . . ,,^p„,^,; 

Rev. Peter MOERDVKE g^^^ 

Isaac Cappon, Esq., - . ^ 

' " " - J'i^asurer. 

COMMITTEES OF COUNCIL. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 
PRE8. CHA8. Scott, Chairman. Bkv. P. Moerdyke, Sea-etanj. 
Rev. John Van der Mm len, Rkv. Peter Lepfltak, . 
Isaac Cappon, Esq. 

.INVESTMENT COMMITTEE. 
( In- ehuTge of tlie funds of the Council. ) 

Arend Visscher, Esq., to* .^ -r. 

^ ' Isaac Cappon, Esq., 

PRES. (Charles S(xyn\ 

HOPE FARM COMMITTEE. 

Pres. Charles Scott, ao-^^ i- 

' Arend A isschbr, Esq., 

Isaac Cappon, Esq. 

*'DE HOPE." 

Mr. R. Kanthrs, ... _ 
' - - - PuhWiher. 

Editor. 
EDIIXJRIAL COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL. 

Prof. C. Doesbur©^ ^ i> r. « 

llEV. P. De Prbs. 

Rev. John Van der Meulen. 



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COLLEGE DEPARTMENT. 



FACULTY. 

REV. CHA8. SCOTT, D. D., President. 

Professor of Chemistry and Natural History. 

In charge of Mental, Moral, and Christian Philosophy. 

CORNELIS DOESBUB6, A. M., Secretary. 

Professor of Modem Languages and Literature. 

In charge of Art Studies. 

GERRIT J. KOLLEN, A. M. 

Professor of Applied Mathematics, Physics, and Political Economy. 

In charge of Logic. 

HENRY BOERS, A. M. 
Professor of the English Language and Literature, and Rhetoric. 

JOHN H. KLEINHEK8EL, A. M. 
Professor of Mathematics. 

JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A. M. 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

REV. JOHN H. GILLESPIE, A. M. 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

In charge of Sacred Literature. 



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. \ 



STUDENTS. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



NAMES. 

DiiiK L» Bbttek, 
William H. Bruins, 
Martin Flipse, 
Herman S. Juistema, 
Harry Kremers, 
James Ossewaardb, 
Isaac Van Kampen, 



RESIPSNCES. ;^^ 

Orange City, la. 
Blundon, Wis. 
Cedar Grove, Wis. 
Grand Haven. 
Holland City. 
Zeeland. 
Grand Rapids. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Fannie A. Steffens, Holland City: 

Gerrit H. Albers, Overisel. 

Derk Gleystben, Jr., Alton, la. 

John Sietsema, Coopersville. 

John M. Van der Meflen, Ebenezer. 

J URRY Winter, *^ * * Holland City. 



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SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



Johannes Db Beer, 
Gerrit H. Dubbink, 
Orange C. Flaneoan, 
Oren S Flaneoan, 
Peter Huyser, 
Geo. E. Kollen, 
Henry J. Luidens, 
John Luxen, 
Albert Oosterhof, 
Andrew J. Reevkrts, 
Philip Soulen, 
Cornelius M. Steffens, 
II ERMAN Van der Ploeo, 



Emden, Germany. 
Overisel. 
Allegan.' 
Alleg^^n. ,rt' 
Beaverdam. 
Overisel. 
New Holland. 
•Holland City. 
Spring Lake. -, 
Stillman Valley, HI. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Holland City. 
Holland City. 



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COLLEGE STUDENTS, 



NAMES. RB8IDENCBS. 

Homer Van Landegend, HollaDd. 

Henbt J. Veldman, Grand Rapids. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Egbert Boone, Holland. 

Berend J. Brbthouwbr, Holland, Neb. 

Cornelius G. Haan, Fremont. 

Henry Huizinga, Beaverdam. 

WiRTJE T. Janpsen, Forestoff,'!!!. d 

Albert Kuifer, Kalamazoo. 

Seine J. Menning, Alton, la. 

William Miedema, Yriesland. 

Wiley W. Mills, Dorr. 

Henry J. PiBTBNPOL, » '^r > Holland •Ctty; 

John Schaefer, Oregon, III. 

James Sterenberg, Fulton, 111. 

ANTHONY Te Paske, Orange City, la. 
WiLHBLMUS V. Te Winkbl^ ^i '.• t^. Fulton, 111. 

Henry Van der Ploeg, Holland City. 
William O. Van Eyk, t.. tjanison, S.' Dak. 

JohnVennema, .,., , Holland City..; 

Dirk J. Walvoord, Cedar Grove, Wis. 

William Zobthottt, Koseland, 111. 

SUMMARY. 

Seniors, - - ,-,- -. -. -, 

Juniors, - - - - - - - 

Sophomores, .-.-.-- 

Freshmen, - - - -, ,-i/ ..n , : , i . i^ . 

Total, „ - 



'.""?:> 



-n?' 



7 

6 

15 

19 

47 



ADiyilSSION, . , ., , 

For admission into the Freshman Class, a full certi6cate of graduation 
from the Grammar School Depaitment is required; or an examination ip 
the studies pui-sued in that Department; or in what the Faculty shall deem 
an equivalent. j* •/ jr?\»'V '.*•>:'•.• 

In order to enter any advanced class of the Institiitlon, it will be 
necessary for the applicant to pass an examination in the studies previously 
pursued by the class. If received on conditions, these must be fulfilled^ 
before regular admission* 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 



FRESHMAN Y£AR. 

MATHEMATICS.— WenthwoTth'B Solid Geometry, and Plane and 
Spherical Trigonometry. 

LANOVAOE,— 

English.— SupUe^s Trench on Words; WeMi's English Literature begun. 

XottTi.— Capes' Livy; Wickham's Horace; Mythology and Composition. 

GreeJk.— Herodotus and Thucydides; Grood win's Grammar; Sidgwick's 
Greek Prose Composition; Antiquities. 

Modem.— Dr. Te Winkel's History of Dutch Literature; Essays and 
Translations. 

BHETORIC-EosAys, Subjects outlined, Discussions. Drill in 
Elocution. 

HISTORY.— hILommsen'B (condensed) Roman History; Thalheimer^s 
Manual of Ancient History; An atlais of Classical and Medieeval Geography. 

NATURAL SCIENCE.-<^utter'B Comprehensive Physiology; Pack- 
ard's Zoology. 

SACRED LITERATURE— U2kTmoj\y of the Gospels, and Greek New 
Testament. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

MATHEMATICS.— H^ewcomh's College Algebra; Newoomb's Analytic 
Geometry; Wentworth's Surveying and Navigation. 

LANGUAQE.- 

EnglWi.—Eng. Literature with study of Eng. Classics. 



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.COURSE OF STUDY. 9 

I^orftn.— Prichard & Bernard's Cicero's Lettres; Hardy's Juvenal; Kel- 
sey's De Amieitia, De Senectute; Antiquities; Literature. 

Greek.— LysiSLS or Demosthenes; Seymour's Homer; Sidgwick's Greek 
Prose Composition; Literature. 

3fodci*n.— Wliitney's Practical French Grammar; Super's French 
Beader; Worman's German Grammar; Joines' German Reader. 

RHETORIC— ^sahjAy Discussions, Orations,' and Elocution. 

JTJSTOi? r.—Thalheimer's Manual of Mediaeval and Modem History. 

NATURAL SCIENCE.— B^xnBen'sChemisxry. 

SACRED LITERATURE.— Introduction to the Scriptures, and Greek 
New Testament. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

MATHEMATICS.— mewcoxDh'B Calculus. 

MATHEMATICS APPLIED.— Olmsted's Nat. Philosophy. 

LANOUAQE.- 

Iffifin— Stickney's De Natura Deorum; Chase & Stuart's Terence; 
March 's Latin Hymns. 

Grccfc.— Dyer's Apology and Crlto; A Tragedy, with practical Drill in 
Metre. 

Ifodem.— Whitney's Practical French Grammar, (continued); Super's 
Souvestre's Confessions d'un Ouvrier; Worman's German Grammar, (con- 
tinued); Deutsches Lesebuch, 2. Theil; Van DaelPs Heine's Die Ilarzreise. 

RHETORIC— Bsiacom'a Philosophy of Rlietoric; Debates, Essays, 
Discussions, and Orations; Beer's American Literature. 

HISWRY.—Stii(\)e% in History; Lectures on the Constitution and 
History of the United States. 

NATURAL SCIENCE.— ChemxBtTy, one term; Wood's Botany, two 
terms; Sedgwick and Wilson's Biology. 

METAPHYSICS.— ToTtfiv's Elements of Intellectual Science. 

SACRED LITERATURE.— Bnilern Analogy. 



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10 HOPE COLLEQE. . 

SENIOR YEAR. 

MATHEMATICS.— ^evfiQX>vab and Holden'8 Astrooomy, Advanced 
Course, 

LANOVAGE — 

Greek,— A Ck)medy; Wagner's Phsedo. 

Jfodem.— Rowan's Morceaux choisis; Groszman's Handbuch; Lectures 
on (German Literature; Compositions in French and German. 

BHETORIC— Continued. 

LOGIC— McCosh. 

ETHICS —Way land's Moral Science. 

HISTORY.— GmzoVs History of Civilization; Lectures on the Consti- 
tution of the U. S. 

NATURAL SOZEi^TC^.-Dana's Class-Boolt of Geology, 

POLITICAL SCIENCE.— WaXker'a Political Economy, Advanced 
Course. Essays on the same. 

SACRED LITERATURE.— Ijectures on Evidences of Christianity. 

The needed books should be ready on the opening day of each- and 
every term; and will be as above printed. 



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GRAMMAR SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



FACULTY. 



Prof. CHARLES SCOTT, D. D., Pr&fidenL 
Some branch as needed. 

Prof. CORNELIS DOESBURG, A. M., 
Modern Languages, Drawing, and Painting. 

Prof. GERRIT J. KOLLEN, A. M., 
Natural Philosophy, Astronomy, Didactics, and Religious Instruction. 

Prof. HENRY BOERS, A M., 
English, Rhetoric, and Greek History. 

Prof. JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, A M., Secretmry, 
Mathematics, and Botany. 

Prof. JAMES G. ZUTPHEN, A. M., 
Latin. 

Prof. JOHN H. GILLESPIE, A. M., 
Greek. 

JOHN B. NYKERK, A. M., 
Tutor, and Professor of Vocal Music. 

MRS. C. VAN RAALTE GILMORE, 
Lady Assistant and Matron. 



Prof JAMES W. HUMPHREY, 
Director of the Summer School. 

Prof. A. W. TAYLOR, 
School Law, and Art of Teaching. 



Prof. Gerrit J. Kollbn, Librarian. 



John Sietsema, ) 

Philip Soulen, >■ Assifftant Librarians. 

AL.be RTUS PlETERS, ) 



Philip Soulen, Chorister. 

Peter Swart, Organist. 

Bernard Bloemenbaal, Janitor. 



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STUDENTS. 



'A" CLASS. 



NAMES. 

Pearl C. Godfrey, 
H. Harriet Hansen, 
Maria H. Huizinoa, 
Maud B. Roorrs, 
Mattie Van Putten, 
George E. Cook, 
George C. Dangremond, 
William M. Dehn, 
John L. De Jong, 
Klaas J. Dykema, 

A. C. V. R. GiLMORE, 

John Kloosterman, 
Charles H. McBrids, 
Peter Swart, 
GERRir Tysse, 
Arthur Van Durbn, 
William J. Van Kersen, 
Zachary Veldhuis, 



residences. 
HudsonviUe. 
HollaDd. 
Holland City. 
Holland City. 
Holland City. 
Holland City. 
Hospers, la. 
Holland City. 
Boseland, III. 
Fulton, 111. 
Holland City. 
Zeeland. 
Holland City. 
Fern wood. III. 
Fernwood. III., 
Holland City. 
Boseland, 111. 
Overisel. 



'B" GLASS. 



Margaret J. Kollen, 
Minnie Koops, 
Isabella G. Steffens, 
Clare B. Van Dyke, 
Julia C. Van Baaltb, 
Henry J. Albers, 
Evert Boom, 
Harry Boone, 



Overisel. 
Overisel. 
Holland City. 
Bayfield, Wis. 
Holland, 
Overisel, 
Alto, Wis. 
Holland. 



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GRAMMAR SCHOOL STUDENTS. 



IS 



NAMES. 

John II. Boone, 
Henry M. Bruins, 

Ck)RN£LIS DeKKER, 

Harm Dykhuizen, 
Garret Flikkema, 
John A. Hellenthal, 
Benjamin Hoffman, 
Gerrit Kooiker, 
Henry A. Meenos. 
William G. Ruple, 
Lambertus Tinholt, 
Frederick Van Anrooy, 
Jacob Van der Meulen, 
John G. Veldhitis, 
George J. M. Van Zoerbn, 



residences* 
Holland. 
Alto, Wis. 
Zee) and. 
Kalamazoo. 
Fulton, III. 
Zeeland. 
Overisel. 
Ovehsel. 
Holland City. 
Dorr. 

Graafschap. 
Graafschap. 
Westfleld, N 
Overisel. 
Vriesland. 



Dak. 



'*C" CLASS. 

Clara E. Humphrey, Holland City. 

Bessie B. Sco'it, Dunningville. 

Jacob Albbrtf, HoIUnd City. 

Hermanus B:>one, Holland City. 

Lawrence Dykiiuis, Holland. 

Floris Ferwerda, Grand Rapids. 

Edward Kelder, Grand ville. 

Albert J. K[X)mparbns, Fillmore Center. 

Henry H. Lucas, Lucas. 

Henry Nienhuis, Chicago, 111. 

Johannes J. Ossewaarde, Zeeland. 

Gerardus Ri DDE ring, Drenthe. 

Bernard L. Ten Eyck, Fairview, 111. 

Henry Van Ari^, Holland. 

Sheldon Vandeburg, Forest Grove. 

Benjamin Van Raalte, Holland. 

William Van Zanten, Graafschap. 
James G. Van Zwaluwenburo, Drenthe. 

William J. Wemes, Kalamazoo. 

Harry J. Wiersum, Chicago, 111. 

Oscar B. Wilms, Holland City. 



'D" CLASS. 



Annie Schrotenboer, 
William De Jonge, 



Graafschap. 
Holland City. 



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14 



HOPE COLLEGE. 



NAMES. 

Austin I. Fairbanks, 
Pbtbr G. Haan, 

PlETER HOLTMAN, 

Ralph Jansen, 
Henry Kleiman, 
Gerrit W. Kooijers, 
Gerrit H. Telder, 
Prederick Tinholt, 
John H. Van den Bero, 
Cornelius A. Van Raalte, 
Gerrit Veneklasen, 
Klaas Walkotte, 
Henry L Yonker, 



residences. 
Holland. 
Vriesland. 
Holland City. 
East Holland. 
Graafschap. 
Holland. 
Grand Rapids. 
Graafschap. 
Grand Haven. 
West Olive. 
Zeeland. 
Drenthe. 
Vriesland. 



UNCLASSIFIED. 

Ethel O'Brien, Cheshire. 

.Jennie C. S. Van der Veen, Holland City. 

M. Seward Doty, Holland City. 

Albert H. Flaneoan, Allegan. 

Peter L. Foss, Kalamazoo 

Arthur Odell, Allegan. 

John L. Star ken, Jamestown. 

Joseph J. Terry, Holland City. 



SUMMER NORMAL CLASS. 



NAMES. 

Zen A Albers, 
Allie M. Alavard, 
Blanche Ave rill, 
Charles F. Averill, 
Mary Babbitt, 
Cora Baker, 
Minnie Ballard, 
Barton E. Beamer, 
Alle L. Binqham, 
Wm. E. Bond, 
MyraJ Bowmaster, 
John S. Brouwer, 
Jennie Brown, 
JiiDA Brown, 



residences. 
Overisel. 
Uudsonville. 
Harrisburg. 
Grand Rapids. 
Spring Lake. 
Hilliards. 
Onota. 
Dorr. 
Abronia. 
Buriiips Corners. 
Hudsonville. 
New Holland. 
Hopkins. 
IIopkiuF Station. 



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SUMMER NORMAL STUDENTS. 



16 



NAMES. 

Cora E. Cairns, 
Lottie Calkins, 
Kate A. Cameron, 
Edward Chase, 
Jennie Clapp, 
Saddie Grace Clark, 
Julia M. Coburn, 
Sarepta Coburn, 
Daniel G. Cook, 
Josephine Cook, 
Paul R. Coster, 
Mrs. Louise Currie, 
Eva M. Daggett, 
Clinton L. Dayton, 
Dirk De Kleine, 
Fannie Dell, 
Teke De Vries, 
Mamie De Vries, 
Anna Dokter, 
Rbna Dokter, 
Kate Ellen, 
Sophia Ellen, 
LiLLiE Enos, 
Mart Eppink, 
Eugene A. Fairbanks, 
Jennie M. Fairbanks, 
Vancha Fales, 
Peter L. Foss, 
Jessie M. Friz, 
Fannie E. Giles, 
George L. Gillies, 

A. C. V. R. GiLMORE, 

Lizzie Gilmorb, 

WiNNlFRED GOODRICK, 

Mabel Gorden, 
Ora Haight, 
Urana Harrington, 
Phurna Harvey, 
Maud Haskin, 
Cora E. Hawk, 
H. N. Heasley, 
Dora Hewitt, 



RESIDENCES. 

Grand Haven. 

Allegan. 

Grand Haven. 

Martin. 

Cheshire. 

Holland City. 

Beaverdam. 

Beaverdam. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Holland. 

South Ua\eu. 

Allegan. 

]3erlin. 

Jamestown. 

West Olive. 

Drenthe. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 

East Sangatuck. 

Holland. 

Cheshire. 

Lucas. 

Holland. 

Holland City. 

Wayland. 

Kalamazoo. 

Elgin. 

Allegan. 

Hamilton. 

Holland City. 

Martin. 

Holland City. 

Nunica. 

Allegan. 

Holland. 

Holland City. 

Allegan. 

Allegan. 

Burnips Corners. 

Bloomingdale. 



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16 



HOPE COLLEGE, 



NAME8. 

Nellie S Hilltard, 
Frakk IIodob, 
Maggie Hoeksema, 
Aggie Hofma, 
Effa Hofma, 
Louise Hudson, 
Clara FIumphuey, 
Lulu Ingraiiam, 
Mary Kabiperman, 
Laura Keniston, 
Lottie E. Kinnerly, 
Gracie Kropscott, 
Kahper K. Lahuis, Jr., 
Edward A. Lampiiier, 
Jennie A. Lang. 
Julia A. Lawton, 
Ada Leighton, 
Anna Lindslky, 
Madge Mac Dougall, 
Orrie Mapes, 
VioRA Martin, 
Cena Mkengs, 
Maggie Mebuwsbn, 
Wiley W. Mills, 
Rose Mohr. 
Ella Mulder, 
Theresa Neuman, 
Anna E. Nibbelink, 
Marcia C. Nichols, 
Belle Noble, 
Allie Odkll, 
Clara Odell, 
Emma Olson, 
Mary Oosteriiof, 
Nei-tie Owen, 
Lewis C. Plant, 
Myrtle Plant, 
Klaas Poppen, 
Frances C. Post, 
Amy Randall, 
Anna Richardson, 
John Rigtbrink, 



RESIDENCES. 

Martin. 

Hopkins. 

Oakland. 

Drenthe. 

Drenthe. 

Wayland. 

Holland City. 

Ba86 River. 

Zealand. 

Nunica. 

Grand Rapids. 

Overisel. 

Zeeland. 

Martin. 

Ferrysbiirj?. 

Cooj^srsville. 

Bravo. 

Cheshire. 

Watson. 

Diamond Springs. 

Spring Lake. 

Noordelo<w. 

Holland City. 

Dorr. 

Holland City. 

Spring Lake. 

Dorr. 

Holland City. 

Robinson. 

Coopersville. 

Allegan. 

Allegan. 

Spring Lake. 

Ferryshurg. 

Holland. 

Nunica. 

Nunica. 

Drenthe. 

Holland. 

Kendall. 

Bradley. 

Overisel. 



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SUMMER NORMAL STUDENTS. 



17 



'?» 



NAMES. 

Gertrude Robinson, 

Eugene Roblyer, 

Grace Rogers, 

May Rogers, 

Anna Rooks, 

Millie Ross, 

ViRA Ross, 

Maggie Russcher, 

Minnie Schaap, 

Fannie Scholten, 

Bessie B. Scott, 

Laura E. Shields, 

Mary E. Shields, 

Herman D. Smith, 

Maude A. Smith, 

Rhoda Smith, 

Samuel B. Smith, 

Augustus R. Sooy, 

Frank H. Sooy, 

Mrs. Netta C. Sooy, 

Mortimer A. Sooy, 

Ralph M. Spuaque, 

Benjamin Stegink. 

Alt A SrocKDALE, 

Jennie Stockdalb, 

Myrtle Stowe, 

William Strait, 

James B. Stuck, 

Ella Sweet, 

Gertrude Takken, 

Rika Tb Roller, -') 

Minnie Thomas, 

Carrie ThorPs 

Ira Thorp, 

Jennie Thospb, 
. Maggie Toole, ' 

Alva BfRTON Townb, 

Mrs. Ada Dell Towne, 

Emma 'Pi!:LER,f' • ^ 

Jc^anna Van Ark, 
..BiNA Van den Bkrg, 

Lizzie Van den Berg, 



residences. 
Wayland. 
Hamilton. 
Allegao. 
Alle^i^D. 
Holland. 
Hopkins Station. 
Martin. 
Holland. 
Holland. 
Graafschap. 
Dunningville. 
Hilliards. 
Hilliards. 
Hopkins Station. 
Allegan. 
Hamilton. 
Wayland. 
Dowagiac. 
Wayland. 
Wayland. 
Wayland. 
Wayland. 
Holland. 
Wayland. 
Wayland. 
Cheshire. 
Diamond Springs. 
Hopkins Station. 
Hudson vi lie. 
Saugatuck. 
Holland City. 
Coopersville. 
Diamond Springs. 
Diamond Springs. 
Allegan. 
Tall mad ge. 
Hilliards. 
Hilliards. 
Dunningville. 
Holland. 
Holland City. 
Holland City. 



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18 



HOPE COLLEGE. 



NAMES. 

Ck)KN£LiA 8 Van dkr Meulen, 

Gertie Van der Veen, 

TiNNA Van Fleet, 

Prederica Viblkind, 

May V1S8CHER, 

Senie V18SCHSR, 

Jennie A. Walbrink, 

Henry Walcott, 

Mary Warner, 

Ella M. Welton, 

Ruth Westover, 

Lottie White, 

Carrie Williams, 

Flora £. Williams, 

Charles Williams, 



residences. 
Holland. 
Overisel. 
Allegan. 
Dorr. 
LansiniK. 
Holland City. 
Allendale Center. 
Drenthe. 
Allegan. 
Allegan. 
Nanica. 
Bass Blver. 
Allegan. 
Allegan. 
Hamilton. 



SUMMARY. 

"A" Class 

"B" Class .... 

"C" Class 

^*D" Class .... 

Unclassified ...... 

Summer Normal .... 

Total 



18 
28 
21 
16 
8 
153 



ADMISSION. 



For admission into the ''D^' Class, a common school education is 
required in the branches pursued in that year. The better their previous 
training, the more easily and profitably can pupils enter upon the Grammar 
School Course. 

In order to enter any advanced class, it will be necessary for the 
applicant to pass an examination in the studies previously pursued by the 
class. If received on conditions, these must be fulfilled before regular 
admission 

The Normal Department is open to all who present evidence of suf- 
ficient preparation. Members having selected studies and classes, are 
expected to comply with the scholastic regulations of the Institution. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 

First Year, "D" Class. 

BEADING. ^7X7.— National Fourth Reader; PeDmanship; Heed's 
Word IjessoDS, and Orthography. 

OjBOGiJ^P-HT.— Harper's School Geography, Michigan Editi(yn. 

MATHEMATICS,— Olney'a Practical Arithmetic. 

LANOUAGE.— 

English.— B^ed and Eellogg's Ghraded Lessons in English. 

BHETOBIC.—Wniten Essays through the year; Declamations. 

^/STOUF.— Barnes's United States History. 

Second Year, "C" Class. 

BEADING, ^2*0— National Fifth Reader; Penmanship; Westlake's 
3,000 Words; Orthoepy and Diacritical Marks. 

GEOGBAPHY.—GuyoVs Physical Geography. 

MATHEMATICS,— Weuty^OTih & Hill's Arithmetic; Sprague's Rapid 
Addition; Bryant and StrattOL's Common School Book-keeping. 

LANGUAGE.- 

Engli8h.—BjQed and Kellogg's Higher Lessons in English. 

IkUtn.— Collar & Daniell's Beginner's Latin Book; Allen & Greenough's 
Latin Grammar, Bevised Edition; Ginn & Company's Csesar, New Edition. 

l>u<c^.-^Readlng; Spelling; Translations. 

-French.— Whitney's Practical French Grammar. (Ekdivefor Latin.) 

BHETOBIC.—EsssLyB, and Declamations. 

Third Year, "B" Class. 

BEADING, J72X7.— Selections; Penmanship, and Drawing. 



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^ HOPE COLLEGE. 

MATHEMATICS.— WeutvroTth'a Elements of Algebra to Logarithms; 
Steele's Astronoiiy, with the use of Globes. 

LANQUAOE,- 

Eviglish.'-GmnmskT, coDtiimed; Aoalysls of Sentences. 

Latin,— CsdaBLv; Ginn & Company's Cicero; Composition. 

Grecfc.—White's First Lessons in Greek; Goodwin's Grammar, and 
some easy Greek author. 

Ih/tc/i.—Kat's Grammar; Exercises; Translations; Composition. 

l^nc/i.— Whitney's Practical French Grammar. (Elective for Latin.) 

(?6rr7icm.—Wormau's German Grammar; German Reader. (Elective for 
Greek.) 

. BHETOEJC— Hart's Rhetoric; Essays and Declamations. 

HISTOBY.— Smith's Greek History. (Alrridged,) 

Fourth Year, "A" Class. 

DBAWING.— 

MATHEMATICS.— WentwoTth's Elements of Algebra (finished); 
Wentworth's Plane Geometry; Peck's Gauot's Natural Pliilosophy, revised. 

LANGUAGE.— 

Enylvshi—PHiBrng Spragve's Milton's Paradise Lost, or other Author. 

Latm— Cicero; Ginn & Compati^'s Virgil; Composition. 

' GreeA:.— Anabasis and Ilellenica; White's Lessons completed; Good- 
win's Grammar. 

Dutch.— K&Vb Grammar ebntiiiuedt Practical Exercises; Translations; 
Composition. 

^French^ ) 

> Continued ^ Electives for Latin and Greek. 
Gei*hian, ) ' 

BHETOBIC—UMVa Rhetoric; E.«=8ays; Declamations. The Class 
publislies a monthly Paper, called *'The Excelsiora/' 

l/i/S2X>KF.— Anderson's English History. 

CIVIL GOVEBNMENT—Youvg'B Government Class Book. 

i)/7)^CT7C»S.— White's Elements of Pedagogy. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. et 

PHYSIOLOO Y AND HYGIENE.— Stee]e's. 

RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION AND MUSIC— lu all the Classes. 

Special attention is ^iven, during the whole of the Preparatory Course, 
to the grammars of the Languages studied. For those who pursue English 
studies only, or who design stopping at the end of the **A" year, the 
Faculty provide such additional branches, as seem most exi^edient and 
profitable. Those generally make better progress, Mhose time is fully 
occupied in the work of the School. 

In general educational value, it is believed that the above four years 
Course of Study is worthy of full recommendation, whether for entrance 
into College, or for a professional training, or for a business life. 



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REGULAR NORMAL. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Ortliography, Readiu^, Penmanship, Grammar, [Composition, Higher 
Arithmetic, Book-keeping, Latin or Electives, such as Physiology and Civil 
Government, Drawing, Dutch or French, Music, Review of U. 8. History 
and Geography, Professional Instruction for the teacher. 

By taking Electives instead of Latin, the above forms a good one year 
English Course. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Rhetoric, Composition, Elocution, Drawing, Zoology, Algebra, Astron- 
omy, Latin and Greek History or Electives, Greek or German and Electives, 
Dutch or French, Music, Practice in studies of first year. 

Professional Instruction in the Art of Teaching, suitable for those who 
want a two years English Course. 

THIRD YEAR. 

English Language and English History, Composition and Elocution, 
Algebra, Physics, Latin and Roman History or Electives, Greek or Ger- 
man and Electives, Dutch or French, Voice Culture, Geometry, Civil 
Government, Physiology, Moral Science. 

Professional Instruction in Practice of Teaching. The Electives will 
give a full Literary or Scientific Course. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

English Literature, Composition and Elocution, Geometry, Greek or 
Grerman, General History, Dutch or French, Chemistry, Mental Science, 



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BEGULAR NORMAL, 23 

Hiatory of Education, Trigonometry, Physical Geography, Geology, School 
System, Practice of Teaching. 

The above studies will be under the charge of the Faculties, and 
according to the regular Schedule of Instruction. 

THE SUMMER NORMAL. 

The studies, at this time, are designed to give an opportunity for a 
tl)oroui.>h review of the Subjects required for "first, second and tliird 
graded Certificates," in Michigan; and for gaining such general informa- 
tion as will better fit teachers for their needed and noble profession. 

The studies thus to be reviewed, with daily drill as to methods and 
principles, are: 

Orthogra])hy, Reading and Penmanship; Geography, Arithmetic, and 
Grammar; United States History and Civil Government; Book-keeping, 
Algebra, and Geometry; Physiology, Botany and Philosophy; School Law; 
Science and Art of Teaching; Question Drawer, and Practical Discussions. 

Extra Branches, such as Music, Crayon Drawing, Type Writing, and 
Short Hand, when a sufficient number for a class so desire. 

Each subject will he treated after approved '^normal" methods, with 
special reference to the needs of teachers in their district schools. Taking 
English Grammar, for example, the Programme will embrace a review of 
the parts of speech; parsing and diagraming; rules and forms both, oral 
and written; composition; and a careful analysis of the right use of the 
language. 

Those desiring to enter the School will bring their ordinary text- books, 
as instruction will be mainly given by note and topic. 

The next Summer School will be held for five weeks, from July 7th to 
August 8th, 1890. As in former years, competent instruction will be pro- 
vided. 

The Library and Apparatus of the College are free for the use of these 
Classes. 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



LOCATION. 

IloUand City is a crntral point od the Chica^ and West Michigan 
Railway, Dinety miles north of New Buffalo, twenty-five miles south-west 
of Grand Rapids, and midway between Allegan and Grand Haven. To all 
Eastern points the route by rail is direct. It ia theivfore most desirably 
located, having both land- and water communications, being near the shore 
of Lake Michigan, with which it is directly connected by a beautiful sheet 
of water, called Macatawa Bay, and making a popular ''suuniier resort.'^ 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 

The Ck)11ege Campus lies between Tenth and Twelfth streets, in the 
center of the City, and contains sixteen acrep, and an addition of two 
acres, on the south side of Twelfth street. It presents a finely varied snr- 
faee, well shaded with native trees, and is annually improving in beauty 
and attractiveness. 

The College Buildings are eight in number. The largest is Van Vleck 
Hall, mainly devoted to Students^ rooms, and the Library. It has been 
decided to build an ample Recitation Hall, as soon as the requisite funds 
can be secured. 

SCHOOL YEAR. 

The SchoUtstic Year, of forty weeks, begins on the third Wednesday in 
September, and ends with the General Commencement on the fourth 
Wednesday in June. 

The Winter and Spring vacations are fixed by the General Faculty. 
(See the Calendar.) 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. iS5 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

Most of ttie students seek what is called **a liberal or classical educa- 
tion." A "partial" or "elective" course is offered to all who so desire, and 
facilities are furnished through the regular instructors, but a partial Ck)urse 
entitles only to a certificate and not to a diploma German and French, or 
Drawing and Fainting, can be studied at any time, as also the branches 
generally called "scientific"; fitting the studepts for Post-graduate courses 
in a University. 

Since 1878 the Institution has been open to women. They enter the 
re^nilar classes, and attend the same lectures and recitations as the young 
men. 

• Vocal Music is provided without charge. Lessons in Instrumental Mxtsic 
can be secured at the expense of the pupil. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

The Yearly Examinations^ before the Council or its Committee, begin 
on the third Wednesday in June. Examinations at other times, may be 
held, and passed upon by the respective Faculties, subject to the approval 
of Council, or to a re- examination, if so desired. 

The Examinations are oral or in writing, as seems best to each profes- 
sor, or as may be directed by the Council. 

CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS. 

Members of the "A" Class, upon graduation, in full oourse, are entitled 
to a regular OeWil/Icote, signed by the Council and the Faculty; but said 
Certificate will be marked firsts secojid or third grade, as follows:— When the 
recor<)ed standing of the graduate is from 91 to lOQvthis will indicate the 
"First Grade"; when from 81 to 90,the;"8econd"; and wheri,from 71 to 80, 
the "Third"; reference being made to both recitations and examinations. 

Such students, as are admitted in partial course, or who fall below an 
average standing of 71, are entitled to a Certificate, from the Faculty, 
naming the studies in which they have sustained examinations. 

Graduates from the C'OUege, when recommended .*by the Faculty, 
receive a Diploma, with the degree of A. B., being a testimonial of general 
scholarship. The Course leading to it includes all the "liberal arts," usually 
taught in colleges. A "partial course" is sometimes chosen, and is entitled 
to a Certificate as adjudged by the Faculty. 

The degree of A. M., is conferred upon those who continhe their studies 
for three years after graduation, or who may satisfy the Council as to their 



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fSe HOPE COLLEGE. 

Scholastic attainments. By paying a fee of three dollars, an A. M. Diploma 
in such cases will be given. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. . 

The exercises of each day begin with prayer in the Ck)llege Chapel, at 
8 o^clock, A. M. 

On the Sabbath, every student Is expected to worship regularly with 
one of the churches in the city or vicinity, unless excused by the President. 

Religious Instruction is given in all the classes regularly, and, like the 
other studies, is in charge of the Faculty. 

Although Hope College is denominational, and is under the patronage 
and support of the Reformed Church in America, yet, by the law of its 
incorporation, it can have no '^religious test/' The doors are open, and 
welcome is given to all who submit to its scholastic regulations. As a 
Christian school, however, it inculcates gospel truths, and demands a con- 
sistent moral character and deportment. 

LIBRARY, ETC. 

A Library of about 7,000 volumes, and a Beading Room, are free for the 
use of the students Books and papers are cousluiitiy beiug added, and 
require increased accommodations. ' 

The Laboratory, Cabinet, and Philosophical Apparatus are adapted to the 

,U8e of the recitation, or lecture-rooms. They are gradually being maiie 

larger and more complete. It is to l)e hoped Ihat Maps, Charts, lusti u- 

ments, and Specimens of Natural History, as well as books, will be donated 

by the graduates and friends of the Institution. 

SOCIETIES. 

Three LUerary Societies, viz., the Meliphon and the Fraternal, and the 
Ulfilas Cliib have been maintained for years, and offer decided advantages 
to their respective members, and materially aid in the attainment of that 
culture, which it is the object of this school to promote. The object of the 
club is to secure for its members greater proficiency in the use of the Hol- 
land language. 

The Y. M. C. A., a society of from seventy to eighty members, con- 
tinues to carry on its work with much interest and activity. 

SUNDRIES. 

Connected with the Institution, a religious weekly is published, called 
De Hope, It was esiablished in J 866, and is under the direction of the 
Council. The paper has a circulation of nearly 2,000 copies. 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. ^ 

A monthly, called The Anchor^ is conducted by the students, and is 
meetins: with gratifyinj^ success. 

The ''A" Class maintains a periodical, called ^^The Excdsiora.^^ It is 
bound, year by year, and is placed in the Library. 

The "Oratorical Exercises'' of the Grammar School, on the final Mon- 
day of the College vear, is the Commencement of that Department, and 
marks the ^aduation of the "A" Class. 

Two prizes, called ''The Qem-ge Birkhoff, Jr. Prizes,^^ have been 
established. One is for the Sophomore Class, in English Literature, and 
the other for the Freshman Class, in Dutch Literature. At the last Com- 
mencement they were awarded, by the Committees, as follows: For 
Proficiency in English Literature, John M. Van der Meulen. For Pro- 
ficiency in Dutch Literature, John Luxen. 

It is expected that additional prizes will follow as a stimulus to labor 
in other branches of study. 

A Course of Lectures is of almost yearly occurrence, usually at the invi- 
tation of one of the societies, aLd with the approval and financial aid of 
the Executive Committee. 

The moral, social, and literary advantages of Holland are considered 
as yood. 

EXPENSES. 

The City is surrounded by a rich agricultural region, and the cost of 
living is comparatively cheap. Good board may be had, in families of the 
city, for from two to three dollars per week in clubs: and without fur- 
nished BOOMS at lower rates. 

There are seventeen rooms in Van Vleck Hall, in the selection of which 
students for the ministry have the preference. Tliese are furnished in part, 
and bear a moderate charge. 

As yet, no tuition fees have been charged, but every student must pay 
to the Treasurer, in advance, an incidental fee of five dollars per term. 

The graduation fee is five dollars in the College, and two and one half 
dollars in the Grammar School. No other charges are made. 

For books, clothing, washing, fuel, lights, travel, etc., those interested 
can best make the estimates. The bntikb expense need not exceed $200 
per annum. 

The fee of the students in the Summer Normal Classes is five dollars 
for the session. Those who enter the College, for the regular Normal 



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£8 HOPE COLLEGE, 

Course, are charged ten dollars, in advance for each semester or half-year. 
Boarding Houses and Clubbing arrangements in the City are to be 
approved by the Faculty, and to be subject to such regulations, as are 
usual in similar institutions. By a rule of the College, lady students are 
not to room in the same boarding houses with the gentlemen. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The BidoB of Order are few and simple. In general, if the students do 
not improve their time and opportunities, or do not conduct themselves in 
a respectful and orderly manner, their connection witli the Institution will 
be suspended. . 

The students are required to be present, promptly^ on the first day of 
each and every term. The recitations will begin the next morning. 

A record is kept of the scholastic standing of each student, and a copy 
of the same is sent to the parent or guardian; if the average standing, in 
any term, does not exceed 70, on a basis of 100, he is to be dropped froM his 
class. 

■„ Terms fees and room rent are to be paid strictly in advance, and if not 
so paid, or within one month, the student, neglecting, forfeits his right to 
continue in the Institution. 

The object of the Faculty is to develop in the pupils a higher moral as 
well as an intellectual culture and character. If they find, after diie pro- 
bation and inquiry, that the influence of a student is bad and injurious to 
otherti, they claim the right to demand his withdrawal. 

Parents are requested not to ask or expect their children, in this School, 
to come home during term time. It seriously iiiteifei-es with proper habits 
of study, and by our rules, none are to be absent from the Institution, 
without permission of the President. 

A copy of the regulations of the College is given to each student, at the 
time of his or her matriculation. 

BBMAHKS. 

The Library is rapidly increasing in value, and a Library building is a 
pressing necessity. With spacious, fit e-proof rooms, the collection would 
be safe and serviceable. 1 The same building oouM, for the present, be used 
aa a museum, or Cabinet of Natural History. Wbo>will supply this want? 

Rev. James F. Zwemer has continued his wmk as Financial agent of 
the College; and has now received, in the West, nearly $40,000, ol which 
one-half will be added to the Endowment Fund. 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. S9 

Hev. Daniel Van Pelt resigned his agency in tlie East, on the first of 
May, after a service of five months, which added nearly $5,000 to the funds 
for "Western Education,"— one-half a gain for Hope College. 

The legacy of Mr. P. Clement has been paid, but on account of the low 
value of land when sold, has only realized $3,452, instead of $5,000, as 
designed by the giver. Mr. Peter P. Schoonmaker, of Brooklyn, N. Y., has 
bequeathed $3,000 to Hoi)e College; and Miss Anna £. Gibson, deceased, of 
Hudson, N. T., has also made this institution one of her legatees. 

May the Legacies of the pious build up this '^School of the Church," 
just as they have bestowed so many thousands on Yale, Princeton, Union, 
etc., making them what they are, for our country and the world. . 

During the last year the Classisof Dakota has been organized; and 
has appointed Bev. Jacob Van der Meiilen and Rev. John A. De Spelder 
to be members of the Council. They can not however be received and 
enrolled as members, until after certain steps shall be taken to amend the 
Constitution of the Corporation. 

A FORM OF DEVISE. 

I give unto the Council of Hope College 

dollars, to be applied to (e. g. t^ increase of the Endow- 
ment fund of said College,) or (the erection of Library building for said CoUege,) 



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DEPARTMENT OF THEOLOGY. 



'^ThB WEstErn ThEDlngical SEminary nf tiiB 
RBfarniBd Cliiircliin AmBrica.'' 

ADMISSION. 

The Seminary is open for the admission of students from every denom- 
ination of Christians. 

A (Committee of the Board of Superintendents on tlie reception of 
students, meets on the Tuesday after the third Lord's day in September, at 
11 o'clock A. M. 

Every applicant is required to present a certificate of church member- 
ship and one of literary qualifications. One who has not pursued a regular 
Collegiate course, must ''give proof by testimonials or examination of such 
literary attainments as will enable him to enter upon Uie course of studies 
in the school." 

The requirement of the Constitution in regard to students preparing 
for the ministry in the Beformed Church is as follows: 

Every person contemplating the work of the ministry, before he com- 
mences his course of Theological studies, shall furnish satisfactory evidence 
of his l)eing a member in full communion and good standing of a Beformed 
Protestant Church; of his piety, ability and literary attainments; and 
thereupon shall be admitted into one of the Theological schools; and dur- 
ing the prosecution of his studies there, shall be subject to the rules and 
regulations thereof, aud when he shall have completed the prescribed 
course aud term of Theological studies, shall be admitted to an examina- 
tion according to the regulations of the school as established by the 
General Synod; and if found qualified, shall receive a professorial certifi- 
cate to that effect, which shall entitle him to an examination for licensure 
before the Classis to which he beXoBgs.— Constitution^ Art, 11. . Sec. 2, 



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BOARD OF SUPERINTENDENTS. 



EX-OFFICIO. 
Rev. Ghas. Scott, D. D., - - President of the College. 

PROM THE SYNOD OP NEW YORK. 

1890. Rev. David Cole, D. D., - - Yonkers, N. Y. 

PROM THE SYNOD OP ALBANY. 

1891. Rev. Edward A. Collier, D. D., - Kinderhook, N. Y. 

PROM THE SYNOD OP NEW BRUNSWICK. 

1892. Rev. Wm. J. Taylor, D. D., - New York City, N. Y. 

PROM THE SYNOD OP CHICAGO. 

1892. Rev. P. Moerdyke, D. D., - - GraDd Rapids, Mich. 

1892. Rev. Wm. Moerdyk, ... Muskegon, Mich. 

1892. Rev. Mati^hbw Kolyn, - - Kalamazoo, Mich. 

1892. Rev. Balster Van Ess, - - - Roseland, 111. 

PROM THE CLASSIS OP HOLLAND. 

1890. Rev. John Van der Meulen, - - Ebenezer, Mich. 

PROM THE CLASSIS OP GRAND RIVER. 

1890. Rev. Egbert Winter, - - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

PROM THE CLASSIS OP MICHIGAN. ' 

1890. *Rev. a. Vennbma, ... Kalamazoo, Mich. 

PROM THE CLASSIS OP ILLINOIS. 

1891. Rev. Samuel L. Gamble, - - - Pekin, 111. 

PROM THE CLASSIS OP WISCONSIN. 

1891. Rev. J. Van Houten, - - - South Holland, 111. 

PROM THE CLASSIS OP IOWA. 

1891. Rev. Jas. F. Zwemer, - - - Holland City. 

PROM THE CLASSIS OP DAKOTA. 

1891. Rev. John A. De Spelder, - - Orange City, la. 



*Hsis removed from this Classis. 



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OFFICERS. 

Rev. Edward A. Collier, D. D., - - - President. 

Rev. P Moerdyke, D. D., - . - . Stated Clerk. 

COMMITTEE ON RECEPTION OF STUDENTS. 

Rev. N. M. Stbffens, D. D., ' Rev. J. W. Beardsleb, D. D., 

Rev. John Van dbr Meulen, Rev. P. Moerdyke, D. D., 

Rev. Chas. Scott, D. D. 

FACULTY. 



REV. NICHOLAS M. STEFFENS, D. D. 

Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theology. In charge of Historical 
Theology, Homiletics, Pastoral Theology, and Catechetics. 

REV. JOHN W. BEARDSLEE, D. D. 

Professor of Biblical Languages and Literature. In charge of Sacred 
Geography, Antiquities, Church Government, and Ilermeneutics. 



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STUDENTS. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Peter Bauma, Holland City. 

John Lumkes, Uollabd City. 

Jacob J. Van Zantbn, A. M., Holland City. 

MIDDLE CLASS. 

FOPPB Klooster, a. B., Forest Grove. 

John Lamar, A. B., Jennison. 

Albertus Pieters, a. B., Holland City. 

Henry Straks, Waupun, Wis. 

JUNIOR CliASS. 
Anthony M. Van Duine, A. B., Kalamazoo. 

Total, - - - 8. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

EXIQETICAL THEOLOGY AND HERMENEUTICS— dements 
of Hebrew; Selections from Pentateuch; Harmony and Exegesis of the 
Gospels; Reading Acts; ArchiB«>logy; Sacred Geography; Hermeneutics. 

Text-books,— HtLTper^s Method and Manual; Green's Hehrew Grammar; 
Robinson's (Riddle's) Harmony; Bissell's Biblical Antiquities; Barrow's 
Sacred Geography; Gesenius's Lexicon; Winer's N. T. Grammar. 

HISTORICAL TH RJOLOOY,— Kmtz's Sacred History. 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY.— Introduction; Encyclopedia; Symbols 
of the Church. 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY— Theory of Preaching; Analysis of Ser- 
mons; Homiletical Exercises. 

MIDDLE YEAR. 

EXEGETICAL THEOLOGY AND HERMENEUTICS.— IJehrew 
Etymology and Syntax: Studies in Prophetical Theology; Readings fi-om 
Historical Books; Biblical Criticism, (O. T.); Keil's Manual; Weiss's Intro- 
duction to New Testament; Scliafif's Companion to the New Testament; 
Exegetical Study of Epistles; Heading Acts; Westcott and Ilort's Greek 
New Testament; Thayer's Lexicon. 

HISTORICAL THEOLOGY.— Kurtz's Church History. 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOG F.— Theology proper; Anthropology; Christ- 
ology; A. A. Hodge's Outlinns; Charles Hodge's Systematic Tlieology. 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY,— LiQctureB on preaching; Homiletical Ex- 
ercises; Church Government; Pastoral Theology; Lectures. 



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CO UESE OF STUD F. 35 



SENIOR YEAR. 

EXEOETICAL THEOLOGY AND HERMENEUTICS.— Hebrew 
Poetry; O. T. Theology; Historical readiDg: Aramaic Selections; New 
Testament Exegesis; Paul's Epistles; Scliaff's Companion to New Testa- 
ment; Weiss's Introduction to New Testament. 

HISTOBICAL rHJS;OLO(?F.— Ecclesiastical History {continued ) 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOQY.-Soienoiogy; Ecclesiology; Eschatology; 
Apologetics; Ethics; Review of the entire System. 

FB ACTIO AL THEOLOO Y.—Homileiical Exercises; Pastoral The- 
ology; Catechetics; Theory of Missions; Church Government; Lectures on 
Preaching. 

PREACHIN<5. 

The Students preach regularly before the Faculty and Studentt>, sub- 
ject to such criticism as may l)e appropriate. They also preach in the 
churches, especially such as are vacant or weak, under the direction of the 
Faculty. 

LECTURES. 

A course of Lectures, on subjects bearing on Ministerial work, is 
delivered annually under the direction of the Board of Superintendents. 

MISSION WORK. 

The Students are organized as a Mission Band and hold themsnlves in 
readiness to attend any calls to aduress meetings where they can advocate 
the cause of Missions. 

ADELPHIC SOCIETY. 

This is a weekly gathering of the Professors and Students for the dis- 
cussion of questions relating to the studies of the course, and to all matters 
bearing on the practical work of the ministry. The exercises embrace 
debates, essays, and general discussions. 

COMMENCEMENT. 

The Theological Commencement exercises take place on Wednesday 
evening, at the close of the year. Addresses are delivered by the Seniors, 
h\ English and Dutch, and by some member of the Board of Superinten 
dents appointed for the purpose. 



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S6 HOPE COLLEGE. 

A Cominittee of the Board will meet on the first Tuesday in September, 
of each year, for the admission of students. 

CALENDAR. 

1890. April 29, Meeting of the Board of Superintendents 
April 30, Examinations. 
April 30, Graduating Exercises. 

VACATION. 

1890. Sept. 2, Entrance Examinations. 
Sept. 2, Term opens. 

Dec. 19, Christmas Becess begins. 

1891. Jan. 6, Work resumed. 

SUMMARY OF STUDENTS. 

Seminary, ------- 8 

College, - 47 

Grammar School, ------- 96 

Summer Normal, ------- 163 

Total, 804 



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THEOLOGICAL ALUMNI. 



1869. 



NAMES. 

Alb Buursma, 
Gbrrit Danorbmond, 
William B. Gillmorb, 
Pbtbr Moerdtke, 
William Mobrdyk, 
John W. Tb Wikkbl, 
Harm Woltman, 



Jambs De Prbb, 
£nnb J. Hbbubk, 
John Huizenoa, 
Balstbr Van £ss, 



1870- 



1871. 



John Brobk, 

Gbrrit Van bb Krbbkb, 

William Visschbr, 



Harm Borobrs, 
EvBRT Van dbr Hart, 



Hbnrt K. Boer, 
Peter Db Bruyn, 
John A. De Spelder, 
Jambs F. Zwemer, 



1872. 



1873. 



RBSIBBNCES. 

Grand Rapids. 
Hospers, la. 
•April 24, 1884. 
Grand Rapids. 
Muskegon. 
Fulton, III. 
•April 30, 1870. 



Sioux Centre, la. 
♦Oct. 16, 1878. 
Holland, Neb. 
Roseland, 111. 



Milwaukee, Wis. 
Kalamazoo. 
•Feb. 11, 1872. 

Greenleafton, Minn. 
♦April 29, 1889. 



Maurice, la. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Orange City, la. 
Holland City. 



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S8 HOPE COLLEGE. 

I 874. 

John Hoffman, Clymer, N. Y. 

Nicholas Nebrkbn, *JaD. 8, 1887. 

1876. 

William F. Hazbnbbro, Johannesburg, Transvaal. 

Andrew Wormsbr, Grand Haven. 

1 876. 

Fredbrick p. Barker, Wayne, Neb. 

JosiAs Mbu£bndyk, Fremont. 

Helbnus E. Nibs, Patterson, N. J. 

1877. 

Harm Van der Plobg, Vriesland. 

CJoRNBLius Wabekb, *Feb. 22, 1880. 

Suspended m 1884. 

1886. 

Dirk Sgholtbn, Luctor, Kas. 

1 887- 

Gbrhard De Jonge, South Blendon. 

Simon Hogenboom, Marion, N. Y. 

Gerrit H. llosPERs, East Williamson, N. Y. 

Peter Ihrman, Waupun, Wis. 

1888. 

Gerrit J. Hbkhuis, Spring Lake. 

Albert Van den Berg, New Ki.k, la. 

Peter Wayenberg, Pultneyville, N. Y. 

1889. 

Balph Bloemendaal, New Holland. 

Albert H. Strabbing, Hamilton. 

Total, 

Deceased,' - - - - -.- 

Others, not Graduates, ------- 



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COLLEGE ALUMNI. 



NAMES. 

Ale Btjitrsma, 
Gbrrit Dangrbmond, 
William B. Gilmore, 
Peter Moerdyke, 
William Moerbtk, 
William A. Shields, (Prof.,) 
John W. Te Winkel, 
Harm Woltman, 



Gbrrit Bolks, 
Jambs Db Prbb, 
Ennb J. Heeren, Rev., 
John Uuizbnga, 
Albert T. Uuizbnga, 
Dirk B. K. Van Raaltb,! 



Harm Borgbrs, 

John Broek, 

Gbrrit J. Kollen, 

Gbrrit Van de Kreeke, Bey. 

William Visscher, 



Evert Van der Hart, 
A. Wilson Van der Veer, 
William Van Putten,! 



1866. 
OCCUPATION. 

Clergyman, 

ClerKyman, 

rClergyman.] 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Photo- Artist, 

Clergyman, 

[Clergyman.] 

1867. 

Business, 

Clergyman, 

[Missionary.] 

Clergyman, 

Farmer, 

Business, 

1868. 

Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Professor, 
Merchant, 
[Miss'y Student.] 



[Clergyman.] 

Merchant, 

Physician, 



PRESENT RESIDENCE. 

Grand Rapids. 

Hospers, la. 

♦April 24, 1884. 

Grand Bapids. 

Muskegon. 

Macomb, 111. 

Fulton, 111. 

♦April 80, 1870. 



Maurice, la. 

Sioux Center, la. 

♦Oct. 16, 1878. 

Holland, Neb. 

Beaverdam. 

Holland. 



Greenleafton, Minn. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

Holland City. 

Kalamazoo. 

♦Feb. 11, 1872. 



♦April 29, 1889. 

Davenport, la. 

Holland City. 



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¥> 



HOPE COLLEOi:. 



1870. 



Henry K. Boek, 


Clergyman, 


Coopersville. 


William B. De Bey.J 


Physician, 


Chicago, III. 


Peter Db Bruyn, 


Clergyman, 


Bochester, N. Y. 


John A. De Spelder, 


Clergyman, 


Orange City, la. 


Charles E. Jones, 


PliyBician, 


Albany, N. Y. 


James F. Zwemer, Rev., 


Fin'l Agent, 
1871. 


Holland City. 


John Hoffman, 


Clergyman, 


Clymer, N. Y. 


Simon Kuyper, 


[Teacher.] 


*Sept. 1, 1882. 


Nicholas Neerken, 


[Clergyman.] 


*Jan. 3, 1887. 


Peter D. Schipperus, 


Book-keeper, 


Fern wood. 111. 


Samuel Streng, 


Clergyman, 


Church ville, Penn. 


James Ten Eyck, 


Lawyer, 


Fairview, 111. 


William Veenschoten, 


Clergyman, 
1872. 


Hornellsville, N. Y. 


Arend Visscuer, 


Lawyer, 
1873. 


Holland. 


Edwin Bedell, 


Lawyer, 


Albany, N. Y. 


John Hoekje, 


Clergyman, 


Cawker City, Kan. 


JosiAs Meulendyk, 


Clergyman, 


Fremont. 


Helenus E. Nies, 


Clergyman, 


Paterson, N. J. 


Jacob Van Halteren, 


Book-keeper, 


Burr Oak, Kan. 


Harm Van der Wart, 


Clergyman, 
1874. 


Hackensack, N. J. 


Cornelius Kriekaard, 


Clergyman, 


Lafayette, Ind. 


Joseph G. Millspaugh, 


Physician, 


Park Eiver, Dak. 


Harm Van der Ploeg, 


. Clergyman, 


Vriesland. 


CORNELIS WaBEKE, 


[Clergyman.] 
1875. 


*Feb. 22, 1880. 


Henricus Baron, 


Physician, 


Forest Grove. 


Lawrence Dykstra, 


Clergyman, 


Bethlehem, N. Y. 


Robert B. D. Simonson, 


Principal, 


Louisiana, Mo. 


Evert Smits, 


Clergyman, 


North Loup, Neb. 


William V. Steele, 


Lawyer, 


Somerville, N. J. 


John Visscher, 


Ag^t Charities, 


Chicago, 111. 



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COLLEGE ALUMNL 



41 



Henry E. Dosker, 
Frank A. Force, 
Albert A. Pfanstiehl, 
CoRNELis Van Oostenbrugge, 
DOUWB Yntema, 



John C. Groeneveld, 
Lambbrtus IIekhuis, Rev., 
Matthew Kolyn, 
Johannes Visscher, 



1876. 

Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Principal, 

1877. 

Clergyman, 
[Missionary, M. D.,] 
Clergyman, 
Farmer, 



Holland City. 

Fife Lake. 

Kalamazoo. 

Lyons, Neb. 

St. Johns. 



Alto, Wis. 

*Sept. 16, 1888. 

Kalamazoo. 

Holland. 



Henry Boers, 
John 6. Gerhard, 
Stephen J. Harmelino, 
John H. Kleinhekpel, 



Dirk J. De Bey, 

Elias De Spelder, M. D.. 

KUMAOE KiMURA, 

George Niemeyer, 
Motoitero Ohgimi, 
Amb Vennema, 



William G. Baas, 
Jacob P. De Jonq, 
Bernard J. De Vries, 
Peter M. Elsenius, 
Abel H. Huizenga, 
Abraham Stegeman, 
Albert H. Strabbing, 
Jacob J. Van Zanten, 
Frederick J. Zwbmer, 
Ebenezer Van den Berge,! 



1878. 

Professor, 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
ProfeFsor, 

1879. 

Clergyman, 

Physician, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

1880. 

Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Dentist, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Theo. Student, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 



Holland City. 

Mellenville, N. Y. 

Marion, Dak. 

Holland City. 



Gibbsville, Wis. 
Drenthe. 

Tokio, Japan. 

Cleveland, O. 

Tokio, Japan. 
Rochester, N. Y. 



Palmyra, N. Y. 

Englewood, 111. 

Holland City. 

♦July 20, 1881. 

New Paltz, N. Y. 

Harrison, Dak. 

Hamilton. 

Holland City. 

Willow Lake, S. Dak. 

Passaic, N. J. 



y Intended studying for the Ministry. 



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J^ 



HOPE COLLEGE. 



1881. 



OeBBIT J. DiEKEMA, 


Lawyer, 


Holland City. 


Charles S. Button, 


Clergyman, 


Holland City. 


John G. Fagg, Rev., 


Missionary, 


Sio-khe, China. 


Rensb H. Joldersma, Rev., 


Sup't Dom. Miss. 


Chicago, III. 


TiNIS J. KOMMERS, 


Clergyman, 


Linden, N. J. 


John Riemersma, 


Clergyman, 


Rochester, N. Y. 


Bastian Smits, 


Clergyman, 


Constantine. 


John G. Van Hees, Jr., 


Telegrapher, 


Allegan. 


John W. Cross, t 


1882. 




JohnW Bosman, 


Phypician, 


Kalamazoo. 


Gerhard DeJong, 


Clergyman, 


Blendon. 


PlETER Ihrman, 


Clergyman, 


Waupon, Wis. 


Johannes E. Matzke, 


Professor, 


Brunswick, Me. 


Philip T. Phelps, 


Clergyman, 


Sharon, N. Y. 


Jacob Poppen, 1] 


Business, 


Prairie View, Kan. 


Charles T. Steffens, 


Book- keeper, 


Chicago, 111. 


Sarah G. Alcott, 


At Home, 


Holland City. 


Frances F. C. Phelps, 


Mrs. J. A. Otte, 
1883. 


Sio-khe, China. 


Evert J. Blekkink, 


Clergyman, 


Cobleskill, N. Y. 


Jacob Dyk, 


Clergyman, 


Sodus, N. Y. 


Henry Hulst, M. D., 


Physician. 


Grand Rapids. 


Tametsne Matsda, 


Teacher, 


Toyama Ken, Japan. 


Albert Oltmans, Rev.. 


Missionary, 


Nagasaki, Japan. 


John A. Otte, M. D., 


Missionary, 


Sio-khe, China. 


Dirk Scholten, 


Clergyman, 


Philadelphia, Kan. 


E. William Stapelkamp, 


Clergyman, 

1884. 


Cedar Grove, Wis. 


Simon Hogbnboom. 


Clergyman, 


Marion, N. Y. 


Gerrit H. Hospers, 


Clergyman, 
1885. 


E. Williamson, N. Y. 


Gerrit J. Hekhuis, 


Clergyman, 


Spring Lake. 


John B. Nykerk, 


Tutor, 


Holland City. 


Albert Van den Berg, 


Clergyman, 


New Kirk, la. 


Peter Wayenbebg, 


Clergyman, 


Pultneyville, N. Y. 


Mary E. Alcott,! 


Mrs. G. J. Diekema, Holland City. 


Lizzie Phelps, 


[Teacher.] 


♦June 1, 1889. 



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COLLEGE ALUMNL 



43 



1886. 



Ralph Bloembndaal, 


Cler^man, 




New Holland. 


Wm. J. Duiker, 


Clergyman, 




Albany, N. Y. 


Petbr Holleman, 


Ph3siciaD, 




Boseland, 111. 


jBRBSftlAS KRUIDEIiiriBR, 


Missionary, 




Assioot, Egypt. 


William B. Lammers, 


Clergyman, 




Hull, la. 


John W. E. Visscher, 


Med. Student, 
1887. 
Mrs. Wm. Brusse, 




Ann Arbor. 


Cornelia Cappon, 




Holland City. 


Emma Kollen, 


Teacher, 




Orange City, la. 


Paul K. Coster, 


Teacher, 




Holland. 


II ARM AN V. S. PeEKB, 


Teacher, 




Nagasaici, Japan. 


Albbrtus Pieters, 


Theo. Student, 




Holland City. 


Thas. N. Thew, 


Law Student, 




Allegan. 


Samuel M. Zwbmbr, 


Theo Student, 

1888. 


N. 


Brunswick, N. J. 


Henry Geerlings, 


Theo. Student, 




Chicago, III. 


Henry Harmbling, 


Theo. Student, 


N. 


Brunswick, N. J. 


FoppE Klooster, 


Theo. Student, 




Holland City. 


John Lama II, 


Theo. Student, 




Holland City. 


Martin Ossewaarde, 


Theo. Student, 


N. 


Brunswick, N. J. 


John Van Westenburg, 


Theo. Student, 


N. 


. Brunswick, N. J. 


Peter J. Zwbmer, 


Theo. Student, 
1889. 


N. 


Brunswick, N. J. 


Clinton L. Dayton, 


Teacher, 




Holland. 


Henry Hospers, Jr., 


Theo. Student, 


Amsterdam, Neth. 


Herbert 6. Keppel, 


Business, 




Zeeland. 


Albert Knooihuizen, 


Teacher, 




New Holland. 


Gblmer Kuiper, 


Law Student, 




Grand Rapids. 


Tbunis W. Muilenburg, 


Theo. Student, 


N. 


. Brunswick, N.J. 


WlLiLIAM StEGEMAN, 


Theo. Student, 


N. 


. Brunswick. N. J. 


Anthony M. Van Duine, 


Theo. Student, 




Holland City. 


Dirk J. Wbrkman, 


Med. Student, 




Ann Arbor. 



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SUMMARY. 



ACADEMIC ALrMNI. 

Clerpymon and CancliMates, --.-.. 75 

(Of whom 10 are Missionaries.) 

Theological Stmlents, -..-.. ],5 

Physicians or Medical Students, - .... 13 

(Of whom 1 is a Missionary ) 

Lawyers or Law Students, - - - - . 7 

Professors and Teachers, ------ 17 

(Of whom 2 are Missionaries.) 

Otherwise Employed, ------ ig 

Total for 24 years, - - - - - - 145 

To be added in 1890, ----- 7 

Total for 25 years, - - - - - - 152 

i^iving, 141 

Deceased, - - - - - - - 11 

Missionaries, ------- 13 



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ALUMNI OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 



NAMES. 

John Mokkelenkate, Vol., 
Edwakd II. C. Taylor, Vol., 
Jacob Van dek Meulen, A. M., 
Ciiu. Van deu Veen, A.M., D.D. 

John Van der Meulen, A M., 



Gerrit J Nykerk, 
John Van de JjUym^er, 



Adrian Zwemer, 



Mauinus IIoogesteger, 
John H. Karsten, A. M., 

ROELOF PlETKRS,. 
EgIIBRT WiNTEIt, A. M., 



L(:uis n. Bahler. a. M., 
H END u I K M . Bran dt, V^ol . 
Dirk Broek, A. M., 
Peter De Free, A. M.. 
Peter Lepeltak, A. M., 
Barend Van der Las, 
William H. Van Fleet, 



18.54. 

OCCUPATION. 

Farmer, 
Auditor, N. P. 
Clergyman, 
, Clergyman, 

1855. 

Clergyman, 

1857. 

Clergyman, 
[Clergynian.] 

Clergyman, 
1858 
[Editor] 

Clergyman, 
[Clergyman.] 

Clergyman, 

1850. 

Clergyman, 
CIert?yman, 
CUrgyman, 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Farmer, 



present residence. 

Otsego. 

R. R., St. Paul, Minn. 

Westtield, N. Dak. 

Olivet. 



Ebenezer. 



Overlsel. 

*Sept. 20, 1870. 

Zeelarid. 

Middleburg, la. 



*May31, 1879. 

Holland City. 

Alto, Wis. 

♦Feb. 14, 1880. 

Holland City. 

GramJ Rapids. 



Maiden, N Y. 

Netherlands. 

Detroit. 

Grand Rapids. 

Overisel. 

Holland, la. 



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46 



HOPE COLLEGE, 



1860 



Mannes Kibkintveld, a. M., ^[Clerjryman.] 



Adrian Kriekaakd, A. M., 
E. Chuistian Ogqel, A. M., 
Henry Uiterwijk, A. M., 
Arend Van der Veen, Vol., 



IWAN O. Bahler, 

Henry Jambs Brown, Jr., 
£uoENE Strong, 
Martin Van den Bero, 

Jacob Van der Veen, 
John W. Warnshuis, A. M. 
Adrian VVestveer, A. M., 
Sjoeri> Yntema, 



Ale BUUR8MA, A. M., Vol., 
Gerrit Danqremond, a. M., 
William B. Gilmore, A. M., 

William G. Ledeboer, Vol., 

William Mobrdyk, A. M., 
Peter Moerdyke, A M., D. D., 
Henry P. Oqgel, M. D.,i 
John Robert Putz, 

Warner Sempel, 

William A. Shields, Prof , AM. 

John W. Te Winkel, A. M., 

Nathan D. Ward,? 

Harm Woltman, A. M., 



Clergyman, 
Clerjcyman, 
Clergyman, 
Physician, 

1861. 

[Teacher.] 

Cler»rymaQ, 

Teacher, 

[Student.] 

Apothecaty, 
Clergyman, 
ClerjryiTian, 
Farmer, 

1862. 

Clerjfyman, 
Clen/yman, 
[Clergyman.] 



*May 80, 1889. 
Holian<l City. 
Grand Rapids. 
Piilman, III. 
Grand Rapids. 
Grand Haven. 



♦October 4, 1872. 

Ponghkeepsie, N. Y. 

Alliance Box, Neb. 



*Nov. 7, 1861. 

Grand Haven. 

Grand Haven. 

Alton, la. 

Stanton. N. J. 

Vriesland. 



Grand Rapids. 

ETospers, la. 

»April 24, 1884. 

Flavana, III. 

♦May 11, 18(5S. 

Bowling Green, Ky. 

Muskegon. 

Grand Rapids. 

Academ.Oranfre City. la. 

♦Oct. 27, 1866. 

' Milwankee, Wis. 

Muskeg^on. 

Macomb, III. 

Fulton, III. 

Grand Rapids. 

♦April 30, 1870. 

Grand Haven. 

Note.— From this time the Standard of regular graduation was 

advanced. A College class was begun, in Sept. 1862, into which ten of the 

last class above were entered; and thereafter a fxiU Grammar School 

Course became a preparation to enter the Freshman Class. 



[In the Union Anny.] 



Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Teacher, N.W 
[Teacher.] 

Business, 
Photo. Artist, 
Clergyman, 
Business, 
[Clergyman.] 



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GRAMMAR SCHOOL ALUMNI, 



47 



1863. 

Samuel M. Ashby, Merchant, 

PG Maximilian Bahler, A.M.,} Clergyman, 
Gbrrit Bolks, a. M., Business, 

Jamks Brandt,? Farmer, 

KiNZE i3uuR8MA,i [Student.] 



Lincoln, Neb. 
Clymer, N. Y. 
Orange City, la. 
Forest Grove. 
*Dec. 20, 1863. 
[Tolland 



Cornelius E. Clark, Vol., 
James Dk Free, A. M., 
£nne J. Heeren, A. M., Rev. 

Albert T. Uuizinqa, A. M., 
John Huizinoa, A. B.,t Vol., 
Gerrit John Stegeman, 
Peter Van den Bero, 



[In the Union Army.] 
Clergyman, 
[Mission a)7.] 
Arcot, India. 
Farmer, 
Clergyman, 
Business, 
[Student.] 



Dirk B. K. Van Ra alte, A . B. , t VoL.Business, 
Gerrit Wakker, Vol., Planter, 

Evert Wesiting, Clergyman, 

1864. 

Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
[Student.] 



Sioux Centre, la. 

*Oct. 16, 1878. 

Pueblo, Col. 

Beaverdam. 

Holland, Neb. 

Allegan. 

♦July, 14, 1866. 

Zeeland. 

Holland. 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Otley, la. 



Harm Boroers, A. M., 
John Broek, A. M., 
Berend W. Kleis,3 



Gerrit J. Kollen, A. M., Professor, 

Francois Ledeboer, Physician, 

Herman H. Schabero, Jr.,2 Physician^ 

6erritVanDeKrbeke,Rev.a.m., Merchant, 
William Visscher, A.M., Vol., [Missionary 



Sjoerd Werselius. 



Greenleafton, Minn. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

* 1864. 

- Sacramento, Cal. 

Holland City. 

Spearfish, S. Dak. 

Kalamazoo. 

Kalamazoo. 

Student.] *Feb. 11, 1872. 

New York City. 



1866. 



Cornelius Gardenier,! Lieut. U. S. Army, 

RiNZB Hyma,} Fanner,* 

Evert Van der Hart, A. M., [Clergyman.] 

William Van PUTTEN, A. B JVol., Physician, 

1866. 

Henry Boer, A. M., Clergyman, 

PsTBR Db Bruyn, a. M., Clergyman, 



San Antonia, Tex. 

Coopers ville. 

♦April 29, 1889. 

Rochester, N.Y. 

Holland City. 



Coopersville. 
Rochester, N. Y. 



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4S 



HOPE COLLEGE, 



John A. De Spelber, A. M., 
James F. Zwemer, A. M., 

Sylvester H. Brokaw, M. D.,i 
John Hofman, A. M., 
Nicholas Nrerken, A. M., Rev. 

Peter D. Schipperus, A.M., 
James Ten Eyck. A. M., L.L B , 
Howard H. Van Franken, A.M. 
Arend Visschbr, A.m., L.L.B. 



Cler^man, Oranfire City, la. 

Fin'l Ag't Hope College, Holland City. 

1867. 

Physician, Tloseville, III. 

Clergyman, Clymer, N. Y. 

[Missionary Teacher.] ♦Jan. 8, 1887. 
Indian Territory. 

Business, Fern wood, III. 

Lawyer, Falrview, III. 

Clergyman, Peotone. III. 

Lawyer, Holland City. 



Anthony J. Bbnjaminse, 
John Gilmore,3 
James Hamilton, 
Walter Hellenthal,? 



1868. 

Clergyman, 
BuHiness, 
Clergyman, 
[Bacc. Student,] 



Whitewater, Wis. 
Selma, Ala. 



Peter Huyssoon, A. M., Professor, 

Christopher Mowry,J Farmer, 

Jacob Van Halteren, A. M , Teacher, 



Edward A. Bedell, A. M., 
John Hoek.te, A. M., 
Uein Lankhebt,} 
.TosiAs Meulendyk, a. M., 
Helenus E. Nies, a. M., 

Albert Broek, M. D.J 

CoRNELis Kriekaard, A. M.. 
JosbphG.Mill8PAUGh,A.M.,M.D. 
Robert B. D. Simonson, A. M., 
Evert 8mits, A. M., 
Jacobus A. Smits, 
Gerrit J. Van Duren, A. M., 
Harm Van der Pix)eg, A. M., 
John Vaupell,? 
CORNELIS Wabeke, A. M., 



1869. 

Lawyer, 

Clergyman, 

Business, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

1870. 

[Physician.] 

Clergyman, 
, Physician, 
Sup't of Schools, 
Clergyman, 
Meclianir, 
Merchant, 
Clergyman, 
Business, 
[Clergyman.] 



♦ 1871. 

In the Netherlands. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mendon. 

Burr Oak, Kas. 



Albany, N. Y. 

Cawker City, Kas. 

Allegan. 

Frem<mt. 

Paterson, N. J. 



*Dec. 7, 1876. 

Holland. 

Lafayette, Ind. 

Park River, N. Dak. 

Ix)ui8iana, Mo. 

North Loup, Neb. 

Grand Rapids. 

Holland City. 

Vriesland. 

Grand Haven. 

♦Feb. 22, 1880. 

North Holland. 



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GRAMMAR SCHOOL ALUMNI. 



49 



1871. 



Hknricus Baron, A. M., M. D., 


Physician, 


Forest Grove. 


LAWItltNCE Dykstua, A. M., 


Clergyman, 


Bethlehem, N. Y. 


Henry M. Fkiiry, 


With Parke, Davis & Co., Detroit. 


Theodork. Kemink.J 


Ai)othecary, 


Grand Rapids. 


John Kolvuord,? 


E^litor, 


Battle Creek. 


Thomas Erygbu,3 


Business, 


Neligh, Neb. 


William V. Steele, A.M., L.L.B., Lawyer, 


Somerville, N. J. 


John Vennema, 


Teacher, 


Milwaukee, Wis. 


John Vist?cnKR, A. M., 


Ag't for Charities, 


Chicago, 111. 


DouwE Yntema, a. M., 


Sup't of Schools, 
1872. 
Clergyman, 


St. Johns. 


Freoerick Bakker,3 


Wayne, Neb. 


John Kerkhof,|1 


Supervisor, 


Holland. 


Matthew Kolyn. A. M., 


Clergyman, 


Kalamazoo. 


Albert A. Pfanstiehl, A. M., 


Clergyman, 


Kalamazoo. 


Cor. Van Oostenbrugqe, A. M. 


, Clergyman, 


Lyons, Neb. 


A ME Vennema, A. M., 


Clergyman, 


Rochester, N. Y. 


John Wabeke,|| 


Business, 


Zeeland. 


Andrew Wormser, 


Clergyman, 
1878. 
Clergyman, 


Grand Haven. 


John C. Groeneveld, A. M., 


Alto, Wis. 


Lambbrtus Hekhui8,Rev., A.M 


.,M.D.,[Miss'y in India.] *Sept. 16, 1888. 


Henry Kremers, M. D., 


Physician, 


Holland. 


Albert Van Zoerbn, 


[Teacher.] 


*Sept. 14, 1877. 
Zeeland. 


Johannes Visscher, A. M., 


Farmer, 

1874. 
Professor, 


Holland. 


Henry Boers, A. M., 


Holland City. 


Colin Chisholm, t i 


[Student.] 


*Aug. 16, 1887. 
St. Louis. Mo. 


Stephen J. Harmblino, A. M., 


Clergyman, 


Marion, 8. Dak. 


John H. Kleinheksbl, A. M., 


Professor, 


Holland City. 


RlO-ZO TUQAWA,t 


Merchant, 


Yokohama, Japan. 


Melle Veenboer, a. M., M. D., 


t Physician, 
1876. 
Clergyman, 


Grand Papids. 


DirkJ. DeBey, A. M., 


Gibbsville, Wis. 


Elias De Spelder, A. M., M. D.. 


, Physician, 


Drenthe. 


Herman A. Fortuin, M. D., 


Physician, 


Overisel. 



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60 



HOPE COLLEGE, 



Abel II. Uuizenga, A.M., Ph. 

KUMAZB KlMUKA,t A. M., 

John MYER,t 
George Niemeyer, A. M., 
MOTOITIRO Ohgimi, A. M., 
DiKK ScnoLTEN, A. M., 
Ebenezeii Van den Berge,! 
Walter C. WALsn,t 



William G. Baas, A. M., 
Jacob P. De Jong, A. M., 
Bernard J. De Vries, A. M., 
Jacob M. Doesburg, 
cuarles s. dutton, a. m., 
Peter M. Elsenius, A. B , 

Abel H. Klooster, 
Albert J. Kroeb, 
Albert Lahuis. 
William J. Lucasse,? 

Jacob Poppen, A. M., 
John Riemerfma, A. M., 
Charles B. Scott, A; M.J 
Abraham Stegeman, A. M., 
Albert Strabbing, A. M., 
Jannis a. Van db Luister,S 
Jacob J. Van Zanten, A. M., 
John Vinkemulder, 
Frederick J. Zwemer, A. M., 



GeRRIT J. DiEKEMA, A.M.,L.L.B. 
John G. Fagg, A. M., Rev., 
Bbnse H. Joldersma, A.M., Rev., 

TINI8 J. KOMMBRS, A. M., 

C0RNELI8 Lepeltak,J 
Benjamin Pyl, A. M., M. D.,t J 
Bastian Smits, a. M., 
Marinus Van DooRN,t 
John Van drr Laan, M. D.,? 
John G. Van Hees, Jr., A.M., 



D., Clerjryman, 
Clergyman, 
Merchaut, 
Clergyman. 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
Merchant, 

187(5. 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Dentist, 

BuHiness, 

Clergyman, 



New Paltz, N. Y. 

Tokio, Japan. 

Alton, la. 

Cleveland, Ohio. 

Tokio, Japan. 

Liictor, Kas. 

Passaic, N. J* 

Holland City. 

Palmyra, N. Y. 
Englewood, 111. 

Holland City. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Holland City. 



[Theological Student.] *June 20, 1880. 
Patei-son, N. J. 



Business, 
Clerk, 
Merchant, 
[I-Aw Student.] 



Business, 

Clergyman, 

Teacher, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Teacher, 

Theological Student, 

Farmer, 



Chicago, 111. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

Zeeland. 

*June 27, 1887. 

Kalamazoo. 

Philadelphia, Kan. 

Rochester, N. Y. 

St. Paul, Minn. 

Hairison, So. Dak. 

Hamilton. 

Zeeland. 

Holland City. 

Olive. 



Clergyman, Willow Lake. So. Dak. 



1877. 

Lawyer, 

Missionary, 

Sup't Dom. Missions, 

nipnryman, 

T**Hcher, 

P'lyaician, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Physician, 

R. R. Agent, 



Holland; City. 

Siokhe, China. 

Chicago, 111. 

Linden, N. J. 

Thnle, So. Dak. 

Grand H^ipids. 

Constantino. 

Newark, N. J. 

Muskegon. 

Allegan. 



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( 



ORAMMAE SCHOOL ALUMNI. 



51 



1878. 



Sarah G. Alcott, A. M., 
Frances F. C. Phelps, A. M., 
John W. Bowman, A. M., M. D., 
TeunisBoot, M. D.J 
John H. Brockmeier, Ph. C.,? 

CORNELIS DAMSTRA, 

James John Danhof, A. M.,|| t 
Geerhard De Jonqe, a. M., 
Peter Ihrman, A. M., 
Antuony Pauels, 
Philip Phelps, Jr., A. M., 
Frank Rykenboer,! 
Charles N. Steffens, A. M., 
John K. Strabbing,|| { 
Gerrit Wikkerink, M. D ,3 

Adrian P. Zwemer, 



At Home, 

Mrs. John Otte, 

Physician, 

Physician, 

Apothecary, 

Bookkeeper, 

Lawyer, 

Clergyman, 

Clergyman, 

Clerk, 

ClergymaD, 

Business, 

Bookkeeper, 

Business, 

[Physician.] 

Clerk, 



Flolland City 

M.D., Siokhe, China. 

Kalamazoo. 

Grand Rapids. 

Freeport, 111. 

Kalamazoo. 

Grand Rapids. 

Blendon. 

Waupun, Wis. 

Grand Rapids. 

Sharon, N. Y. 

Rochester, N. Y. 

Chicago, III. 

Drenthe. 

* 1888. 

Luxor, Kas. 
Sioux Falls, So. Dak. 



1879. 



Evert J. Blbkkink, A. 
Jacob Dyk, A. M.. 
George Hbneyeld,} 



M. 



. Henry J. Heusinkveld, M. D., 
Hbntiy Hulst, a. M.. 
Lambertus Kolvoord, 
Gerrit J. Koninq.J 
TambtsneMatsda, A. M. 
Albert Oltmans, A. M., Rev., 
John A. Otte, A. M., M. D., 
William U. Rauwerdink,J 
Evert E. Stapelkamp, A. M., 
Otto Stuit,? 



Clergyman, 
Clergyman, 
[Teacher.] 

Physician, 

Physician. 

Merchant, 

Farmer, 

Teacher. 

Missionary, 

Med. Missionary, 

Business, 

Clergyman, 

[Clergyman.] 



Albert Tillbma, Faimer, 

John Van Dellen, Express Agent, 

Nicholas Van den BELDT,l*H.C.,i AiK>thecary, 
Pjbtkr Venhuizen, Farmer, 

Sybrant Wesselius,? Lawyer, 



Cobleskill, N. Y. 

Sodus, N. Y. 

♦June 4, 1884. 

Laketown. 

Fulton, 111. 

Grand Rapids. 

Hamilton. 

Grand Rapids. 

Toyama Ken, Jap. 

Nagasaki, Japan. 

Siokhe, China. 

Rochester, N. Y. 

Cedar Grove, Wis. 

•July 1888. 

Cincinnati, O. 

Fulton, 111. 

Fulton, 111. 

Detroit. 

Zeeland. 

Grand Rapids. 



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5-2 



HOPE COLLEGE. 



1880. 

Mary E. Alcott, A. M., Mrs. G. J. 

Anna H. Becker.J Mrs. John 

Christina Pfanstiehl, Mrs. A. C. 

Eliza Phelps, [Teacher.] 

Peter H. Benjaminse, Business, 

John B. Nykerk, A. M., Teacher, 

Klaas Poppen.J Teacher, 

JohnL. Eademaker, Merchant, 

Jacob G. Van Zoeren, [Merchant. 

Corn elis Van Zw aluwenburg. Physician, 



Diekema, Holland City. 

Trompen, Grand Papids. 

Van Raalte, Holland City. 

*Junel, 1889. 

Antes Ford, Pa. 

Hamilton. 

Holland City. 

Drenthe. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

] ♦Sept. 3, 1887. 

Grand Rapids. 

Kalamazoo. 



Frances M. West veer, 
Annie Winter, 
Nellie Zwemer, 
Ralph Blobmendaal, A. M., 
John De Bruin, 
John H. Doebburo,^ 
Austin Harrington, 
Gerrit J. Hekhuis, A. M., 
Edward Hofma, M. D., 
Simon Hogenboom, A. M., 
John Lamar, A. M., 
Albert Van den Berg, A. M., 
Henry Vbnnema, M. D., 
Peter Wayenberg, A. M., 



Henrietta Boone, 
Anna Breyman, 
Ida Ellen, 
Emma Kollen, A. M., 
Dena Van den Berg,! 
Anna H. Van Raalte,! 
Senie Visscher, 
Annie Wiersema,! 
Henrietta Zwemer, 
William Duiker, A. M., 
William Fortuin, D. D. S.,t 



1881. 



Mrs. Rev. Q 

Clerk, 

Teacher. 

Clerjryraan, 

Business, 

Business, 

Business, 

Clergyman, 

Physician, 

Clerj^yman, 

Theological 

Clergyman, 

Physician, 

Clergyman, 

1882. 



Hekhuis, Spring Lake. 

Grand Rapids. 

Orange City, la. 

New Holland. 

Detroit. 

Chicago. 

Holland City. 

Sprinir Lake. 

Grand Haven. 

Manon, N. Y. 

Student, Holland City. 

Newkirk, la. 

Menominee. 

Pultneyville, N. Y. 



Mrs. Peter Veneklasen, 



Zeeland. 



At Home, 

Teaclier, 

Teacher, 

Teacher, 

Mrs. B. K< ppel, 

Teacher, 

Teacher, 

Teacher, 

Clergyman, 

Dentist, 



Milwaukee, Wis. 

East Sangatuck. 

Orange City, la. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 
Holland. 

Grand Rapids. 
Middleburg, la. 

Albany, N. Y. 

Grand Rapids. 



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GRAMMAR SCHOOL ALUMNL 



BS 



Henry Hjrnevbld, 



[At Home.] 



Petee noLLEMAN, A. M., M. D., Physician, 
JekemiasKkuidenikr, A. M.,R£V^, Missionary, 
William B. Lammeks, A. M., Glerfo^man, 
John IIozema, Lawyer, 

Ralph Schepers.; Farmer, 

John W. Visscher, A. M., Medical Student, 

1883. 



*July21,1886. 

Graafscbap. 

Koseland, 111. 

Assioot, Egypt. 

Hull, la. 

Grand Rapids. 

Holland. 

Ann Arbor. 



Mary E. Annis, 

Cornelia Cappon, 

Jennie Ranters, 

Kate E. Vaupell, 

William A Brardsleb, A. B., 

Henry J. Cook, 

Paul B. Coster, A. B., 

Harm AN V. S. Peeke, A. B., 

AlBERTUS PlEl'ERS, A. B., 

William Reefman, 
John P. Ten Haaf,|| 
Charles N. Thew, A. B., 
John Trompen.J 

HOBART K. WniTAKER, 

A. Van Zwaluwenberg, 
Samuel M. Zwemer, A. B.. 



Josephine Cook, 
Frances C. Post, 
Johanna Schravesande, 
Johanna Van Ark, 
Hbrmanus C. Brobk,|| 

Wietse F. Douwma, 
Henry B. Geerlings, A. B., 
Henry Harmelino, A. B., 
Gerrit Heneveld,{ 
Adrian C. Karsten,? 
FoppE Klooster, a. B., 
Charles KNooiHuizEN,t 
Meinardus G. M anting,? 
Arie Van Woerkom,! 



Medical Student, National City, Col. 
Mrs. Win. Brusse, Holland City. 

At Home, Holland City. 

Mr8.A.VanZwaluwenberf?,St.Louis,Mo. 
Theol. Student, New Brunswick, N. J. 
Teacher, Eastman ville. 

Teacher, Holland. 

Missionary Teacher, Nagasaki, Japan. 
Theological Student, Holland City. 
Mechanic, Overisel. 

Farmer, Graafschap. 

Law Student, Allegan. 

Business, Grand Rapids. 

Bacc Student, Amherst, Mass. 



Chemist, St. Louis, Mo. 

Theol. Student, New Biunswick, N. J. 

1884. 



Teacher, 
At Home, 
Teacher, 
Teacher, 
Student, 

Teacher, 

Theological Student, 

The(»l. Student, New 

Farmer, 

Tt-acher, 

Th< ological Student, 

Medical Student, 

Correspondent, 

Mechanic, 



Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Grand Rapids. 

Fillmore. 

♦March 80, 1884. 

Holland. 

New Holland. 

Chicago, III. 

Brunswick, N. J. 

Graafschap. 

Alto, Wis. 

Holland City. 

Ann Arbor. 

Holland. 

Grand Rapids. 



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54 



HOPE COLLEGE. 



John Van Westenbrugge,A.B., Theol. Student, New Brunswick, N. J. 
Chester WETMORE,t B. S., Teacher, Allegan. 

Peter J. Zwemer, A. B., Theol. Student, New Brunswick, N. J. 

1885. 



Josephine V. Kibkintveld, 
Sena Voorhorst, 
Henry Gibbink,|| 
Herbert G. Keppel, A. B., 
Albert Knooihuizen, A. B., 
Gelmer Kuiper, a. B., 
Abraham Leenhouts,! 
Martin Ossewaarde, A. B., 
William Stegeman, A. B., 
Gerrit Te Linde, 
Anthony M. Van Duine, A. B., 
Dirk J. Werkman, A. B., 



Kate J. Den Herder, 
Ka'J'E E. Herold, 
Ella M. Hunt,? 
Martha M. Nyland, 
Ida N. Nies, 
Mary E. Scheper8,|| 
Mary E. Steffens, 
Maggie Van Putten, 
William H. Bruins, 
Clinton L. Dayton, 
Martin Flipse, 
John G. Huizinga, 
Herman S. Juistema, 
Henry Kleyn, 
Harry Kremers, 
James Ossewaarde, 
Albert J. Rooks,{ 
Isaac Van Kampen, 
A art Van Westrienen, 



Mrs. Wm. Z. Ban^, 
Teacher, 
Teacher, 
Business, 
Teacher, 
Law Student, 
Medical Student, 
Theol. Student, New 
Theol. Student, New 
Merchant, 
Theol. Student, 
Medical Student, 

1886. 

At Home, Zeeland. 

At Home, Holland City. 

Mrs. Riekus Steketee, Holland City. 
At Home, Grand Haven. 

Mrs Edward Taylor,McMillan,Luce Co. 



Grand Rapids. 

Oveiisel. 

Waupun, Wis. 

Zeeland. 

New Holland. 

Grand Rapids. 

Ann Arbor. 

Brunswick, N. J. 

Brunswick, N. J. 

Waupun, Wis. 

Holland City. 

Ann Arbor. 



At Home, 

At Home, 

At Home, 

Bacc. Student, 

Teacher, 

Bacc. Student. 

Medical Student, 

Bacc. Student, 

Clerk, 

Bacc. Student, 

Bacc Student. 

Teacher, 

Bacc. Student, 

Mechanic, 

1887. 



Anna Mary Broek, Teacher, 

Minnie Cappon, At H«me, 

Sarah Cappon, At Home, 



Fillmore. 
Holland City. 
Holland City. 
Holland City. 
Holland. 
Holland City. 
Ann Arbor. 
Holland City. 
Holland City. 
Holland City. 
Holland City. 
East Holland. 
Holland City. 
Grand Haven. 



Detroit. 
Holland City. 
Holland City. 



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GRAMMAR SCHOOL ALUMNI. 



65 



JE?iNIK OrBBINK, 

Sauak L. Jokrs, 

MaGDAI.ENA 11. KOLLEN, 

Janik Nykekk. 
Fannie A Stkffens, 
Mamie Thompson, 
GEititiT n. Albeks, 
Daniel G. CooK.g 

GiLBEIlT G. llAAN,? 

JtnN J. Jackson, 
CaSI'EH Laiiui8.|| 
IIeNKY J LUIDEN.s, 

John N» rdhuis.? 

A Din AN J. PlETEKS.^ 

Dirk F. Plasman? 
John Sietsem a. 
Samuel Simpson, 
John M. \'an der Meulen, 
Gekuit it. Veldiiuis, 
JuKUY Winter, 

Dtna Bolks, 
Christina S. Broek, 
Chris-tine M. J. Kremer, 
Sebia Van Zwaluwenburq, 
George Fl. D. Baekt, 
AniiiAN Brandt, 
Johannes I)e Beer. 
KoKUS Chr. De Vries, 

GeRRTT II. DUBBINK, 

Jacou Geerlings, 
Orange C. Flaneoan, 
Oren S Flaneoan, 
John Ha an. 
Peter Hityser, 
Geo. E. Kollen, 
John Lttxen, 
Albert Oosteriiof, 
Andrew J. Reeveri^, 
Philip Soulen, 
Cornelius M. Steffens, 
Herman Van der Pl(»eo, 



Teacher, 
At Home, 
T«*acher, 
At HDine, 
Bhcc. Student, 
At Home, 
Bacc Student, 
Teacher, 
Stufleiit, 
Hkcc Siudent, 
li'acb»*r, 
Bacc. Student, 
ClerV, 

Medical Student, 
SaU'snian, 
Bacc. Stn«lci t, 
Bacc. Student, 
Bacc. Student, 
Student for D. D. 
Bacc Student, 
1888. 



s., 



Overisel. 

Bushnell, 111. 

Grand Rapids. 

Overisel. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Vriesland. 

Grand Rapids. 

Olivet. 

Fillmore. 

Holland City. 

Grand Haven. 

Avn Arbor. 

Grand Rapids. 

Holland City. 

Olivet. 

Holland City. 

Ann Arbor. 

Holland City. 



D.8., 



Mrs. Johannes Visscher, 

At Home, 

At Home, 

At Home, 

Medi, ill Student, 

Business, 

Bacc. Student, 

Student for D 

Bacc. Student, 

Printer, 

Bacc. Student, 

Bacc. Sturlent, 

Teacher, 

Bacc. Student, 

Bacc. Student, 

Bacc. Student, 

Bacc, Student, 

Bacc. Student, 

Bacc. Student, 

Bacc Student, 

Bacc. Student* 



Holland. 

Detroit. 

Zeeland. 

Drenthe. 

Ann Arbor. 

Grand Rapids. 

Holland City. 

Ann Arbor. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Port Townsend, Wash. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Holland City, 

Holland City. 

Holland City, 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 



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56 



HOPE COLLEGE. 



Henry Van Engelen, 
Isaac J. VanHee, 
Homer Van Landeqend, 
Henry J. Veldman, 



Business, 
Bacc. Student, 
Bacc. Student, 
Bacc. Student, 

1889. 



St. Lonis^Mo. 

New Brunswick, N. J. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 



aoote hofma, 

Jennie Kollen, 

Leila E. McBRroE,t 

Cornelia S. Van der Meulen, 

Egbert Boone, 

Dirk De Klkine, 

Cornelius G. Ha an, 

Henry Huizinga, 

WiRTJE T. Jansen, 

Albert Kuiper, 

Beubbn Maurits, 

Seine J. MENNiNG,t 

John J. Mersen, 

William Mibdema, 

Wiley W. Mills, 

Henry J. Pietenpol, 

John Schaefer, 

James Sterenberg, 

WiLHELMUS V. Te WiNKEL, 

Henr\ Van der Plobq, 
John Vennema, 
Martin Verhage, 
Dirk J. Walvoord, 
William Zoethout, 



Teacher, 
At Home, 
Coll. Student, 
At Home, 
Bacc. Student, 
Teacher, 
Bacc. Student, 
Bacc. Student, 
Bacc. Student, 
Bacc. Student, 
Medical Student, 
Coll. Student, 
Teacher, 
Bacc. Student, 
Bacc. Student, 
Coll. Student, 
Bacc. Student, 
Bacc. Student, 
Bacc. Student, 
Bacc. Student, 
Bacc. Student, 
At Home, 
Bacc. Student, 
Bacc. Student, 



Jamestown. 

Overisel. 

Olivet. 

Ebenezer. 

Holland City. 

Overisel 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Ann Arbor. 

Holland City. 

Marion, N. Y. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 

Vriesland. 

Holland City. 

Holland City. 



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SUMMARY. 



ALUMNI OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

From 1854— 1865. (Flolland Academy,) - - - - 73 

1866—1878, (Preparatory DepartmcDt,) - - - 120 

1879— 1890, (Grammar School,) - - - - 214 

— 407 

Clergymen and Students for the Ministry, - - - 169 

Physicians, Dentists, Apothecaries, - - - - 46 

Lawyers and Law Students, ----- 14 

Professors and Teachers, ----- 54 

In other Occupations, ------ 124 

Living, 384. Deceased, 28. ----- — 407 

REFERENCES. 

* Deceased. 

t In Partial Course. 

X Honorary Degree. 

II In the A Class, Full Course, but did not remain until the end of the 

year. 
2 Entered as Freshman, but did not complete the College Course. 
1 Completed the Course, but dit not graduate. 
Vol. Volunteer, in the U. S. Army. 



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CHRONOLOGICAL MEMORANDA, 



Beginnning of Netherland immigration into Western Michigan, 1847. 

Village of Holland, laid out. 1848. 

The need of a School discussed; plat of five acres, donated l^y 

Dr. A. C. Van Raalte, 1850. 

'•Pioneer School'' op- ned, Oct., 1851. 

Placed nnder the care of the General Syno<l, June, 1858. 

Received the name of ^'Holland Academy," 1855. 

Located in the '^Orphan- House,'' 1856. 

Meliplion Society organizHt, 1857. 

Van Vleck Hall erected on the 6 acres, 1857. 

Academy, nnore fully organized, 1857- 1858. 

Campus enlarged to 16 acres, 1859 

The ''Oggel House" erected, 1860. 

Students regularly classified, 1869-1860. 

Gymnasium built, 1862. 

Fiist Freshman Class formed, 1862^ 

Fraternal Society organized, 186.^. 

A Board of Superintendents appointed, 1803. 

Plan of a College approved by the Synods, 1864. 

College actually begun, with Council and Faculty, 1865. Incor- 
porated as Hope College, May, 1866. 

A wrekly newspaper, called De Hope, established. May, 1866. 

The first Commencement, July, 1866. Theological Class, Sept., 1866. 

Holland incorporated as a City, 1867. 

Charter Hall erected, 1867. 

Professor of Theology and three ^'Lectors" appointed, 1867. 

South Campus, two acres donated. 1868. 

Theological Depa-^tmeiit adopted by the General Syuod as the 

Theological Seminary, in the West, 1869. 

Phelps Hall, (Grammar School Building,) erected, 1869. 

First Theological Class graduated, 1H69. 

Two Railroads opened through Holland, 1869-1871 . 

Holland destroyed by fire, Oct., 1871. 



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CHRONOLOGICAL MEMORANDUM. 69 

Gymnasium repaired as a Chapel, 1872. 

House finished on South Canipns, 1873. 

Laboratory enlarged and finished, 1874. 

Deatli of Rev. A. C. Van Raalte, D. D., Nov.7,1876. 

Brick Office for De Hope erected, 1876. 

Sus^tension of the Theological Department, 1877. 

Re-organization of the College, 1878. 

Division in some of the Reformed Churches, 1881-1882. 

Theoliuical Instruction restored, 1884. 

Visit of General Synod to Holland, 1884. 

Charter Hall burned, 1884. 

Separate Board of Superintendents for the "Western Theologi- 
cal Suminary," 1885. 

President's House erected, 1886. 

L AH the streets around the Campus graded and graveled, 1881-1886. 

^ The George Birkhoflf, Jr., Prizes, established, 1887. 

Normal Department opened, 1888. 

First Normal Summer School, July, 1888. 

Rev. Jas. F. Zwemer, Financial Agent, 1888-1890. 

Quarter-Centennial Celebration. 1890. 



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CATALOGUE OF THE MEMBERS OF 
COUNCIL, 



NAMES. TIME OF SERVICE. 

Rev. Albeutus C. Van Raalte, D. D.,* 18G3-1876. 

Elder IIessel O. Yntema,* 1863-1874. 

Rev. John 8. Joralmon, ISOS-'TO and 1873- 

Rev. Peter J. Ogqel,* 18G3-1869. 

Rev. Cyrus J. Van Der Veer/ 18CxS-18(58. 

Rev. John Mason Ferris, D. I)., 1863-1866. 

Rev. N. D. Williamson, 1863--66 and 1879 1882. 

Rev. William Bailey, 1863-1864. 

Elder John Armitage, 1863-1864. 
Rbv. Jacob Van Dkr Meulen, 1863 -'64; 1870-^72; 1879-18as. 

Elder John N. Rogers, 1863-1867. 

Rev. John Van Dku Meulen, 1864-'78 and 1888-1890. 

Elder Jacoh Van Zantkn,* 1864-1871. 

Rev. Samuel J. Rogers, 1864-1866. 

Elder Geo. W. Force, M. D.,» 1864-18(>5. 

Elder Wm. G. Stewart,* 1864-18b5. 

Rev. Seine Bolks, 1866 1878. 

Elder Solomon Cummings, M. D.,* 1865-1867. 

Rev. Abel T. Stewart, D. D.,» 1866 1878. 

Rev. James Demarest, Jr., D. D., 1866 1873. 

Hon. Schuyler Colfax,* 1866-1869. 

Rev. Edward P. Livingston, I). D.,* 1866-T>9 and 1874-1885. 

Rev. Roelof Pieters,* 18(«i-*69 and 1875-1880. 

Elder Arie C. Kuiper,* 1866 1868. 

Rev. Henry E. Decker, 1866-1868. 

Elder Lodowicus S. Viele,* 1867-1879. 

Elder Bernardus Ledeboer, M. D.,* 1867-1878. 

Rev. Cornelis Van der Meulen,* 1868-187(>. 

Rev. ABRAIIA31 Thompson,* 1868-1874. 

Rev. John W. Beardslee, D. D., 1868-1884. 



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MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 61 



NAMES. TIME OF SEUVICE. 

Rev. E. Christian Ogoel, 1809-'73 and 1876-1878. 

Rev. John H. Karsten, 1HB9 1886. 

Rev. Uriah D. Gulick, 1809-1874. 

Rev. Christian Van Der Veen, D. D., 1869-1873. 

Rev. Cornelius E. Crispell, D. D., 1869-1871. 

Rev. John Mitller, 1870-1879. 

Rev. William A. FIoubolt,* 1870 1872. 

Rev. Adrian Kriekard, 1870-1879. 

Elder Klaas Brouwer, 1870 79 and 1883 1K8o. 

Rev. David Cole, I). D., 1871-1879. 

Elder Arend I)e Roo, 1871-1879. 

Rev. Adrian ;^\vemer, 1872-1874. 

Rev. James De Free, 1872-1877. 

Rev. Adam H. Van Vranken,* 1873-1879. 

Rev. Peter De Prke, 1873-'78 and 1887- 

Ref. Dirk Brokk, 1873-75 and 1877- 

Rev. Henry Uiterwyk, 1873-1878. 

Elder William McCormick,* 1873-1874. 

Elder Lemuel O. Hammond,* 1874 1875. 

Rev. Egbert Winter, • 1874 1885. 

Elder G. Jacobt's IIeeringa, 1874 1879. 

Rev. Nicholas M. Steffens, D. D.. 1874 75 and 1880-1885. 

Rev. Peter Lepeltak, * 1875- 

Elder Charles Sc^hoon, 1876-1878. 

Elder Henry Baum,* 1878-1879. 

Rev. Ale Buuhsma, 1877-79 ann 1885-1889. 

Rev Peter Moerdyke, 1878-79 and 1882- 

Rev. Evert Van Der Hart,* 1878 1879. 

Plder Gkrrit Van Noostrand, 1879-1880. 

Elder H. D Van Ouden, 1879-1881. 

Ei.DKuF J.HosFOHD,* 18791880. 

Rev. Wm R Duyek. D. D., 1879-1880. 

Rev. James F Zwemer, . I879-*81 and 1885- 

Rkv. William Moekdyk, 1879- 

Rev. Nicholas H Dosker, 1880-1887. 

Elder James C Knight,* 18S0 1881. 

Elder Horatio P Allen, 1880 1882. 

Elder John C. Benham, M. D., 1881- 

Elder Isaac Cappon, 1882- 

Uev. Henry E. Dosker, 1883 1889. 

Uev. Wm J. R. Taylor, I). D.^ 1885- 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



NAMES. 

Arend Vispcher, Esq., 

Rev. Thomas W. Jones, 

Rev. William H. Phraner, 

Rev. Lawrence Dykstra, 

Rev. G. Henry Mandeville, D. D., 

Rev. Balster Van Ess, 

Rev. John Broek, 

Rev. Alonzo P Peeke, 

Rev. John W. Warnshuis, 



TIME OF service. 

1885- 

1886-1888. 

1885-1889. 

1885-1887. 

1886- 

1886- 

1^86- 

1888- 

1889- 



EX-OFFICIO. 



Rev. John L. See, D. D., as Secretary of tbe Board of Educa- 
tion, R. C. A., 1863-1879. 

Rev. Philip Phelps, Jr., D. D., as Principal or President of 

the Institution, 1863-1878. 

Rev. Charles Scott, D. D., as Representing the Theological 

Faculty, 1871-1879. 

Rev. Charles Scott, D. D., as President of the College, but at 
first Provisional, 1879- 

Rev, G. FIenky Mandeville, D. D , as Provisional President. 1878-1880. 

NOTE. 

The new Classis of Dakota has elected Rev. Jacob Van der Meulen 
and Rev. John A. De Spelder. 

The Classis of Illinois has elected Rev. Thomas Walker Jones in the 
place of Rev. Wm. H. Phraner. 

PRINCIPALS. 



Mr. Walter T. Taylor, (♦Dec. 3, 1866.) 
Rev F. B. Beidler, 

Rev. John Van Vleck, A. M., (*March 15, 1865.) 
Rev. Philip I'helps, Jr., A. M,, 

Or until the incorporation of Hope College. 

PRESIDENTS. 

Rev. Philip Phelps, Jr., D. D., 
Rev. Giles II. Mandeville, D. D., Provisional, 
Rev. CnAULEs Scott, D. D., Vice and Acting, 
" " " " Provisional, 

" *' *' " Elected, 



1861-1854. 
1854-1855. 
1855-1869. 
1859-1866. 



1866-1878. 

1878-1880! 
1878-1880. 
1880-1885. 
1885- 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



g:j 



PROFESSORS AND TEACHERS. 

Mr. Abraham Thompson, A. M., (*Sept. 18, 1886.) 1857-1858. 

Rev. Giles Van De Wall, A. M., • 1858 1861. 

Rev. Peter J. Oggel, A. M., (♦Dec, 13, 1869.) 1863-1869. 

Rev. T. Romeyn Beck, A. M., 1863-1885. 

Rev. John M. Ferris, A. M., 1864-18()5. 

Rev. Charles Scott, A. M., 1866- 

Rev. Cornelius E. Crispell, A. M., 1866-1878. 

Mr. Cornelis Doesburo, Tutor, 1866-1872. 

A. M., Professor, 1872- 

Mr. Wm. a. Shields, A. B.; Tutor, 1867-1871. 

" '' '' A. M., Assistant Professor, 1871-1878. 

'' '' '' Professor, 1878-1886. 

Mr. Richard Parsons, A. B., Tutor, 1870-1871. 

Rev. Peter Moekdyke, A. M., Assistant Professor, 1871-1873. 

Mr. Gerrit J. Kollen, A. M., Assistant Professor, 1871-1878. 

Professor, 187&- 

Mr. Henry Boers, A. B., Tutor, 1878-1883. 

'' •' '* A. M., Assistant Professor, 1883-1886. 

Professor, 1886- 

Mr. John H. Kleinheksel, A. B., Tutor, 1878-1888. 

'' '' '' A. M. Assistant Professor, 1883-1886. 

'' '' '' Professor, 1886- 

Mr. Philip T. Phelps, A. B, Tutor, 1884^1886. 

Mr. James G. Sutphen, A. M., 1886- 

Rev. John J. Anderson, A. M., 1886-1888. 

Mr. John B. Nvkerk, A. B., Tutor, 1885- 
Mrs. C. Van Raalte Gilmore, Lady Assistant and Matron, 1887- 

Miss Sarah E. Satterthwaite, A. B., Tutor in Latin and 

Greek, Jan.- July, 1888- 

Rev. John II. Gillespie, A. M., 1888- 

Mr. James W. Humphrey, 1888-1889. 



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THEOLOCrCAL DEPARTMENT. 



Provisional Instruction jfiven by Professors Phelps, Oogel, 

Beck, Scoit, and Ckispell, 1866-1867. 

Rev. Cornelius C. Crispell, D. D., Professor, 1867-1879. 

Rev. Philip Phelps, D. D., Lector, 1867-1871. 

Rev. J. P. Oogel, Lector, 1867-1869. 

Rev. T. Romeyn Beck, Lector, 1867-1885. 

Rev. Charles ScdT, Lector, 1867-1885. 

Rev. Christian Van Der Veen, Teacher pro tern., 1871-1873. 

Rev. Roblof Pieters, Teacher pro tcwi., 1871-1875. 

Rev. Abel T. Stewart, Teacher pro tern,, 1874-1875. 

Rev. Nicholas M. Steffbns, D. D., Professor, 1884:- 

Rev. Peter Moerdyke, Lector, 1884-1886. 

Rev. Henry E. Dosker, Lector, 1884-1888. 

Rev. John W. Beardslee, D. D., Professor, 1888- 

Devised to, or received by the Ooflege during the last year, as dona- 
tions: 
Legacy of Rev. John Vanderveer, D. D., Eastern Pa., for 

the College, $ 500 00 

" Mr. Jacob Schoonmakbr, Brooklyn, N. Y., for the 

College, 8,000 00 

" Mrs. Anna Gibson, Hudson, N. Y., (condition not 

known), 1,000 00 

" Miss Jane Helen Elmendorf, Schenectady, N. Y., 

a Scholarship, 2,500 00 

Per Rev. Jas. F. Zwemer, Financial Agent, Cash, 1,4874 00 

" '' " Pledged, 2,5346 00 

Rev. Daniel Van Pelt, Cash, 3,276 00 

Rev. John W. Beardslee, D. D., Cash, 1,384 00 

" Pledged, 2,000 00 



(fc ifc 



Total, $53,880 00 

The last $46,880, (less the expenses), are thus apiiortioned, viz: To the 
College 5-10 or i; To the Theological Seminary, 3-10; And to the North 
Western Academy, 2-10. The total amount sought is $100,000. 

Donations to Contingent Fund, $ 1,270 00 

^^ for Completing the Synod's house for the President, 1,640 00 



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1890. 


-♦-« 


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-n^ 



CAT 




OF Hqp* College 



1 690-'9 1 . 



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CATALOGUE 



OF THK 



Officers and Students 



Hope College. 



+ioIlar2Gi, [Dief^i^an. 



1890-'91. 



An Institution of the Reformed Church in America. 



Holland r.rADF..nY, i ft/.^7. 



GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

EATON, LYON A ALLEN PRINTING CO. 

1891. 



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iS^aUnbav— 1 89 1 -^92. 



1891. April 13, Third Term begins. 

" 29, Meeting of Council. 

" 30, Senior Examinations. 

June 17-19, Undergraduate Examinations. 
" 21, Baccalaureate Sermon. 

" 22, Closing Exercises of the Grammar School. 

*' 23, Meeting of Council. 

" 23, Meeting of Alumni. 

*' 24, Commencement. 

VACATION. 

Sept. 16, First Term begins. 

" 16, Examinations for Admission. 
Dec. 23, First Term ends. 

VACATION. • 

1892. Jan*y 6, Second Term begins. 
Mar. 25, " " ends. 

VACATION. 



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®;h^ (S^onttciL 



EX-OFFICIO. 

Rev. Chas. Scott, D. D., President of the College. 

ELECTED MEMBERS. 

FROM GENERAL SYNOD. 

NAMES. RBSIDKNCKS. TKRMS RXPIRK. 

Isaac Cappon, Holland, Mich., 1891 

Arend Visscher, " " 1892 

J. C. Benham, M. D., Hudson, N. Y., 1893 

Rev. Wm. J. R. Taylor, D. D., New York City, N. Y., 1894 

Rev. G. H. Mandeville, D.D., « ** *• " 1895 

Rev. Jas. F. Zwemer, Orange City, Iowa, 1896 

Paul Stkketee, Grand Rapids, Mich., 1896 

FROM CLASSIS OF IOWA. 

Rev. J. W. Warnshuis, Alton, la., 189 1 

Rev. James De Free, Sioux Centre, la., 1891 

FROM CLASSIS OF ILLINOIS. 

Rev. John S. Joralmon, Norwood Park, III., 1892 

Rev. Thomas W. Jones, Bushnell, III., 1892 

FROM CLASSIS OF WISCONSIN. 

Rev. John Broek, Milwaukee, Wis., 1893 

Rev. Balster Van Ess, Roseland, III., 1893 

FROM CLASSIS OF MICHIGAN. 

Rev. Peter Moerdyke, D. D., Grand Rapids, Mich., 1894 

Rev. a. Paige Peeke, Centreville, Mich., 1894 

FROM CLASSIS OF GRAND RIVER. 

Rev. Peter De Pree, Grand Rapids, Mich., 1895 

Rev. Dirk Broek, ' Detroit, Mich., 1895 

FROM CLASSIS OF HOLLAND. 

-j-Rev. Peter Lepeltak, Overisel, Mich., 1896 

Rev. Henry E. Dosker, Holland Mich., 1896 

FROM CLASSIS OF DAKOTA. 

Rev. John A. De Spelder, Orange City, la., 1896 

-f Rev. Jacob Van der Meulen, Baldwin, Wis., 1896 



f Has remuved from this Classis. 



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OFFICERS OF COUNCIL. 



Rev. a. Paige Peeke, - - - President. 

Rev. Dirk Broek, - - - Vice President. 

Rev. Peter Moerdvke, - - Secretary. 

Isaac Cappon, - - - - Treasurer. 



COMMITTEES OF COUNCIL. 

executive committee. 

Pres. Chas. Scott, Chairman. Rev. P. Moerdvke, Sec'y. 
Rev. Peter De Pree. Arend Visscher. 

Isaac Cappon. 

investment committee. 

(In charge of the funds of the Council.) 

Arend Visscher. Pres. Chas. Scoit. Isaac Cappon. 

HOPE farm committee. 

Pres. Chas. Scott. Isaac Cappon. Arend Visscher. 

''DE HOPEr 

Mr. R. Kanters, - - - . Publisher. 

' - - - - Editor. 

editorial commitike of council. 

Prof. Cornelis Doesburg. Rev. Henry E. Dosker.. 

Rev. John Kremer. 



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Allege department. 




$actxltu^ 



REV. CHAS. SCOTT, D. D., President. 

Professor of Chemistry and Natural History. In charge of 
Mental, Moral, and Christian Philosophy. 

CORNELIS DOESBURG, A. M., Secretary. 

Professor of Modern Languages and Literature. In charge of 
Art Studies. 

GERRIT J. KOLLEN, A. M. 

Professor of Applied Mathematics, Physics, and Political 
Economy. In charge of Logic. 

HENRY BOERS, A. M. 

Professor of the English Language and Literature, and 

Rhetoric. 

JOHN H. KLEINHEICSEL. A. M. 
Professor of Mathematics. 

JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A. M. 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

REV. JOHN H. GILLESPIE, A. M. 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. In charge 
of Sacred Literature. 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



^tnbicnt^* 



SENIOR CLASS. 

NAMES. RBSIDENCES. 

FANNIE A. STEFFENS Holland. 

GERRIT H. ALBERS Overisel. 

DERK GLEYSTEEN, JR .Alton, la. 

JOHN SIETSEMA Coopersville. 

JOHN M. VAN DER MEULEN Ebenezer. 

JURRY WINTER Holland. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

JOHANNES DE BEER Emden, Germany. 

GERRIT H. DUBBINK Overisel. 

ORANGE C. FLANEGAN Allegan. 

OREN S. FLANEGAN Allegan. 

PETER HUYSER Beaverdam. 

GEO. E. KOLLEN Overisel. 

JOHN LUXEN Holland. 

ALBERT OOSTERHOF Spring Lake. 

ANDREW J. REEVERTS Stillman Valley, IIL 

PHILIP SOULEN Milwaukee, Wis. 

CORNELIUS M. STEFFENS Holland. 

HERMAN VAN DER PLOEG Holland. 

HOMER VAN LANDEGEND Holland. 

HENRY J. VELDMAN Grand Rapids. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

CORNELIUS G. HAAN Brookside. 

HENRY HUIZINGA Beaverdam. 

WIRTJE T. JANSSEN Foreslon, 111. 

ALBERT KUIPER Kalama;^oo. 

WILLIAM MIEDEMA Vriesland. 

WILEY W. MILLS Dorr 

JOHN SCHAEFER Oregon. IIL 

JAMES STERENBERG Fulion, IIL 

WILHELMUS V. TE WINKEI Fulion, IIL 

HENRY VAN DER PLOEG Holland. 



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COLLEGE ST LTD EM'S. 7 

WILLIAM O. VAN EYK Harrison, So. Dak. 

JOHN VENNEMA Holland. 

WILLIAM ZOETHOUT Roseland, IlL 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

GEORGE E. COOK Holland. 

GEORGE C. DANGREMOND Holland, Minn. 

WILLIAM M. DEHN Holland. 

JOHN L. DE JONG Roseland, 111. 

KLAAS J. DYKEMA FulUm, 111. 

CHARLES H. McBRIDE Holland. 

PETER SWART Fernwood, 111. 

GERRIT TYSSE Fernwood, 111. 

ARTHUR VAN DUREN Holland. 

WILLIAM J. VAN KERSEN Roseland, 111. 

SPECIAL. 
JOSEPH J. TERRY Holland. 

SUMMARY. 

Seniors 6 

Juniors 14 

Sophomores 13 

Freshmen 10 

Special i 

Total 44 

ADMISSION. 

For admission into the Freshman Class, a full certificate 
of graduation from the Grammar School Department is re- 
quired; or an examination in the studies pursued in that 
Department; or in what the Faculty shall deem an equivalent. 

In order to enter any advanced class of the Institution, it 
will be necessary for the applicant to pass an examination in 
the studies previously pursued by the class. If received on 
conditions, these must be fulfilled before regular admission. 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



QTour^je of §tuh»* 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Mathematics. — Wentworth's Solid Geometry, and Plane 
and Spherical Trigonometry. 

Language. — 

English. — Supl6e's Trench on Words; Welsh's English Lit- 
erature. 

Latin. — Capes' Livy; Wickham*s Horace; Mythology and 
Composition. 

Greek. — Herodotus and Thucydides; Allinson*s Greek 
Prose Composition; Antiquities. 

Modern. — History of Dutch Literature; Essays and Trans- 
lations. 

Rhetoric. — Essays, Subjects Outlined, Discussions, Drill 
in Elocution. 

Histor\. — Mommsen's (condensed) Roman History; An- 
cient History; An Atlas of Classical and Mediaeval Geography. 

Natural Science. — Cutter's Comprehensive Physiology; 
Packard's Zoology. 

Sacred Literature. — Harmony of the Gospels, and (Jreek 
New Testament. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Mai hematics. — College Algebra; Hardy's Analytic Geom- 
etry; Wentworth's Surveying and Navigation. 

Language. — 

English. — Eng. Literature with Study of Eng. Classics, con- 
tinued. 

Latin. — Prichard and Bernard's Cicero's Letters; Hardy's 
Juvenal; Kelsey's DeAmicitia, DeSenectute; Antiquities; Lit- 
erature. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 



Greek, — Lysias or Demosthenes; Seymour's Hofner; Lit- 
erature. 

Modern. — Edgren's French Grammar; Super's French 
Reader, or some French Author. 

Rhetoric. — Essays, Discussions, Orations, and Elocution. 

History. — Mediaeval and Modern History. 

Natural Science. — Remsen's Chemistry. 

Sacred Literature. — Introduction to the Scriptures, and 
Greek New Testament. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics. — Hardy's Calculus. 

Mathematics Applied. — Olmsted's Natural Philosophy. 

Language. — 

Latin, — Stickney's De Natura Deorum; Chase and Stuart's 
Terence; March's Latin Hymns. 

Greek. — Dyer's Apology and Crito; A Tragedy, with Prac- 
tical Drill in Metre. 

Modern, — Joynes' Meissner's German Grammar; Joynes' 
German Reader, or some easy German Author. 

Rhetoric. — Bascom's Philosophy of Rhetoric; Debates, 
Essays, Discussions, and Orations; American Literature. 

History. — Studies in History; Lectures on the Constitu- 
tion and History of the United States. 

Natural Science. — Chemistry, one term; Wood's Botany, 
two terms; Sedgwick and Wilson's Biology. 

Metaphysics. — Porter's Elements of Intellectual Science. 

Sacred Literature. — Butler's Analogy. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics. — Newcomb and Holden's Astronomy, ad- 
vanced course. 



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lO HOPE COLLEGE. 

Language. — 

Greek. — A Comedy; Wagner's Phsedo. 

Modern. — German Grammar, completed; Van Daell's 
Heyne's Harzreise, or some German Author; German Liter- 
ature; Compositions in German. 

Rhetoric. — Continued. 

Logic. — McCosh. 

Ethics. — Wayland's Moral Science. 

History. — Guizot's History of Civilization; Lectures on 
the Constitution of the United States. 

Natural Science. — Dana's Class Book of Geology. 

Political Science. — Walker's Political Economy, ad- 
vanced course; Essays on the same. 

Sacred Literature. — Lectures on Evidences of Christi- 
anity. 



^^ "The needed books should be ready on the opening day of each term. 



The following Schedule will show the method of carrying out the above 
College Curriculum. So far as may be the Junior and Senior Classes recite 
together to the President, e. g. in Philosophy. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 



11 



SCHEDULE OF collf:(;e recitations. 



< 

i 


Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday .... 

Thursday 

Fnday 


j FKESMMEN 

Latin 1 

Latin 


SOf'HOMORES 

Surveying 

Vlathematics 
Surveying ... 
Mathematics . 
Mathematics . 


JUNIORS SENIORS 

.. Botany 3 .German 

2 Butler'sAiialogy Hist'y of Civilz'n 
.. Mor'l Philosophy! Mental Philos'y 
.. Lectures 4 .Lectures 5 


as 


Latin 


ii 


Latin 


V 


' Latin 


.. Mor'l Philosophy Mental Philos'y 


eo 




i 



1 — Includes Roman History and Antiquities. 

2 — Embr.ices .Algebra, ist term; and Analytical (>eometry, .id and ^d terms. 

3— Biology, during the ad term. 

4 — C)n the United States Constitution. 

6 — On the Evidences ol Christianity. 



Monday.... 
Tuesday . . 
Wednesday 
Thursday .. 
Friday 



FKE.SHMEN 

Study ol words 

Zoology 

Study of Words 

Zoology 

Rhetoncals 



SOPHOMOKKS 



JL'NIOKS 



Greek (iei man [Geology 

Kng. Literature. I Greek 

Greek German .. . 

Eng. Literature. Greek 

GVeek German [Geology 



Geology 



6— English Literature, jd term. 



KKKSHMKN 



Monday 1 Sacred Literat'r 

Tuesday i j Greek , 

Wednesday , k>reek 

I hursday 'i Greek 

P'riday j Greek , 



SOa'HO.MOKEN 

French 

Modern History 

Chemistry 

Modern history 
Chemistry 



7 — American Literature, the last 12 weeks. 



JUM()K> 

Physics .... 
Rhetoric 7 

Phvsics 

Rhetoric 7 
Physics 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday .. .. 

Thursday 

Friday 



KRESHMKN 

.Mathematics 8 

I'Vench 

.Mathematics 8 

French 

Mathematics 8 



OPHOMORES 



jr. MORS 



Chemistry 1 Latin Greek 

Sacred Literat'r Calculus Political Econ'y 

French 1 Botany 3 Greek i 

Greek 'Calculus (Political Econ'y 

French CJreek lExerc's in Logic 



8 — Plane Geometry and Trigonometry, ist semester; Solid Geometry and Mensura- 
tion, 2d «emester. 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday ... 

Thursday 

Friday 



KRESH.MKN 

AncientHist'y 9 

Music 

.AncientHist'y 9 
Mathematics B 
Dutch 10.. .. 



SOrilOMORES 



JUNIORS 



SENIORS 



Latin Rhetoricais 1 Astronomy 

Engineering.... Latin E->saysordebat's 

Rhetoricais Latin Astronomy 

Latin Phy.sics Greek 

Latin j Botany 3 LAstronomy 



9 — Includes Ancient Geography. 
10 — Studies in Dutch Literature. 



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12 HOPE COLLEGE. 



©epartment. 




$(xcultyi. 



PROF. CHARLES SCOTT, D. D., President, 

Religious Instruction, or other branch as needed. 

PROF. CORNELIS DOESBURG, A. M., 

Modern Languages, Drawing, and Painting. 

PROF. GERRIT J. KOLLEN, A. M., 

Natural Philosophy, Astronomy? Didactics, and Religious Instruction. 

PROF. HENRY BOERS, A. M., 

English, Rhetoric, and Greek History. 

PROF. JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEI., A. M., 

Mathematics, and Hotany. 

PROF. JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A. M., Secretary, 

Latin, and Roman History. 

PROF. JOHN H. GH.LESPIE, A. M., 

Greek. 

JOHANNES VISSCHEK, A. M., Tutor. 

MRS. C. VAN RAALTE GILMORE, Lady Assistant and Matron. 

PHILIP SOULEN, Instructor in Music. 

PROF. JAMES W. HUMPHREY, Director of the Summer School. 

VkoV. GKRRIT J. KOLLEN, J<)HN Siktsrma. ) .... 

. Philip SoiTLR.N, > Assistant Librarians. 

Librarian. Albi:ktl's Pihters, ) 

Phm 11' Soui.KN, Chorister. Petkr Swart, Organist. Rrrnakd Bi.obmbndaal. Janitor. 



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GRAMMAR SCHOOL STUDENTS. 18 



fiituluento^ 



"A" CLASS. 

NAMBS. RESIDKNCKS. 

MARGARET J. KOLLEN Overisel. 

MINNIE KOOPS Overisel. 

ISABELLA G. STEFFENS Holland. 

CLARE R. VAN DYKE Bayfield, Wis. 

JULIA C. VAN RAALTE Holland. 

HENRY J. ALBERS Overisel 

EVERT BOOM Alto, Wis. 

HARRY BOONE Holland. 

HENRY M. BRUINS Alto, Wis. 

CORNELIS DEKKER Zeeland. 

HARM DYKHUIZEN Grand Rapids. 

GARRET FLIKKEMA Fulton, 111. 

JOHN A. HELLEN THAL Zeeland. 

BENJAMIN HOFFMAN Overisel. 

GERRIT KOOIKKR Overisel, 

HENRY H. LUCAS Lucas. 

LAMBERTUS TINHOLT Graafschap. 

FREDERICK VAN ANROOY Graafschap. 

JACOB VAN DER MEULEN Baldwin, Wis. 

JOHN G. VELDHUIS OveriseL 

"B" CLASS. 

CLARA E. HUMPHREY Holland, 

BESSIE B. SCOTT Dunningville. 

EDWARD D. DIMNENT Chicago, 111. 

,. LAWRENCE DYKHUIS Holland. 

FLOKIS FERWERDA Grand Rapids. 

>/GEORGE L. GILLIES Hamilton. 

EDWARD KELDER Grandville, 

HENRY NIENHUIS Chicago, 111. 

JOHANNES J. OS-»EWAARDE Zeeland, 

BERNARD L. TEN EYCK Fairview, 111. 

HENRY VAN ARK Holland 

SHELDON VANDEBURG Forest Grove, 



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14 HOPE COLLEGE. 

JAMES G. VAN ZWALUWENBURG Drcnthe. 

^ WILLIAM J. WEMES Kalamazoo. 

HARRY J. WIERSUM Chicago, IlL 

OSCAR B. WILMS Holland. 

UNCLASSIFIED. 
LEWIS P. PEEKE. CentrcviUe. 

«'C" CLASS. 

ANNA C. ROOKS East Holland. 

7 JOHN BELTMAN Holland. 

NICHOLAS BOER Dienlhe. 

y JELKE BRINK Graafschap. 

ALBERT BROENE Drenihe. 

JACOB BRUMMEL Ovcriscl. 

HENRY DE JONGE Holland. 

WILLIAM DE JONGE Holland. 

JOHN DE JONGH Grand Haven. 

JOHN H. DEN HERDER Vriesland. 

ROELOF DIEPHUIS Midland Park. N. J. 

RALPH JANSEN East Holland. 

GERRIT W. KOOIJERS Holland. 

' PETER J KRIEKARD Grand Rapids. 

WILLIAM PEEKS Holland. 

TONY ROZENUAL Chicago. 111. 

HENRY SAGGERS Graafschap. 

JOHN L. STARKEN Holland. 

JOHN B. STEKETEE Holland. 

JACOB E. TAKKEN Douglas. 

HUBERT C. TANIS Kalamazoo. 

• • JOHN H. VAN DEN BERG Grand Haven. 

JACOB G. VAN DEN BOSCH Zeeland. 

BENJAMIN VAN RAALTE Holland. 

• CORNELIUS A. VAN RAALTE Holland. 

JOHN K. VAN SLOOTEN Holland. 

HExNJAMIN J. VENEKLASEN Zeeland. 

HENRY L. YONKER Vriesland. 

KLAAS WALCOTT Drcnihe. 



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GRAMMAR SCHOOL STUDENTS. 16 

"D" CLASS. 

HATTIE B. ANDERSON Holland. 

HAT riE G. BOONE Holland. 

MINNIE BROEK Holland. 

VINNIE L. HARRINGTON Holland. 

' PEARL HINMAN Grand Ledge. 

AUGUSTA R. OTTE Holland. 

DENA N. PESSINK Holland. 

ALIDA J. PIETERS Holland. 

MARIA VAN DOORNE Grand Haven. 

CHRISTINE VAN DUREN Holland. 

GEORGE H. BAERT Zeeland. 

JOHN W. BEARDSLEE Holland. 

HARRY BERTSCH Holland. 

J- f GEORGE P. BREIDENSTEIN Hawkhead. 

: -J^ JOHN BRINK Holland. 

ABRAHAM L. CAPPON Holland. 

LIETSE J. DECKER Grand Rapids. 

DIRK J. DOOftNINK Grand Rapids. 

GEORGE H. HUIZINGA Holland. 

JOHN KEPPEL Zeeland. 

THOMAS KEPPEL ; Zeeland. 

..FREDERIC J. KIEFT Grand Haven. 

ENSING LANNING • • Drenihe. 

"/LEONARD LEMMEN Graafschap. 

X i CHARLES E. NIENHUIS Holland. 

LAMBERTUS A. PESSINK Holland. 

Jc RVK RIKSEN Holland. 

DIRK D. ROELOFS Drenthe. 

WILLIAM Sl.OTMAN Overisel. 

FRANK STOMPE Chicago, 111. 

GERRIT H. TELDER Grand Rapids. 

ISAAC THOMPSON Holland. 

CORNELIUS VAN DER VRIES Holland. 

CORNELIUS VAN DUREN Holland. 

SUMMER NORMAL CLASS. 

ZIENA ALBERS Overisel. 

MAUD ALDRICH Dorr. 



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16 HOPE COLLEGE. 

DORA BAILEY Allegan. 

CORA BAKER Milliards. 

LOTTIE E. BARNABY HudsonviUc. 

MINNIE BELL Gibson. 

ANNA BENJ AM IN Zecland. 

ALLIE BINGHAM Abronia. 

ELIZABETH E. BLAISDELL Allegan. 

MINNIE BROENE Drenihe. 

EGBERT BOONE Holland. 

LENZA BOWEN Georgetown. 

MYRA J. BOVVMASTER HudsonviUc. 

LILIAN H. BRENNAN Jenison. 

GEORGE BERKAW Parma. 

ALICE BROWN Hopkins. 

BELLE CAMPBELI Martin. 

GERTIE CHASE Martin. 

MARY P. CHASE Oisego. 

XANTHIPPE CHASE Oisego. 

CLOE E. CLAY Allegan. 

DANIEL G. COOK Holland. 

PAUL R. COSTER Holland. 

DIRK DE KLEINE Jamestown. 

JEGAR DE VRIES Drenihc. 

GERTIE DOBBIN East Saugatack. 

ANNA DOCTER Holland. 

RENA DOCTER .• Holland. 

JENNIE DUBBINK Overiscl. 

JE.SS1E M. FAIRBANKS Holland. 

JESSIE FAIRFIELD Allegan. 

ALBERT FLANEGAN Allcean. 

A. C. V. R. GILMORE Holland. 

OCTAVIA GRIGSBY Allegan. 

LYDIE M. GUEST Oisego. 

ALICE E. HANNA Richland. 

URANA HARRINGTON Holland. 

ISA HASHBERGER Zeeland. 

MAUD H ASKIN Allegan. 

WILLIAM G. HEASLEY Burnips Corners. 

SAIDEE A. HEKHUIS Fillmore. 

NETTIE HILLIA RD Martin. 

MAGGIE HOEKSEMA Oakland. 



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NORMAL CLASS STUDENTS. 17 



ANNA HUIZINGA Zeeland. 

H. OTIS J(^XES Burnips Comers. 

MARY KAMPERMAX Zceland. 

AG(iIE KENALEY Hopkins Station. 

JENNIE KOLLEN Overisel. 

CASPAR K. LAHUIS Zeeland. 

DELIA LAMPMER Martin. 

EDWARD A I.AMPHER Martin. 

ERANK LANGD()X South Monterey. 

DIRK LANTINC; Forest Grove. 

E\ A LINDSLEY Saugatuck. 

IJLANCHE LONSBURY Allegan. 

ELIZABETH L. LANDON Nunica. 

NETTIE A. LOVERING .' Jenison. 

JENNIE MABBS .- Allegan. 

VK )LA MARTIN Spring Lake. 

(lERRIT .MASSELINK Oakland. 

WILEY \V. MILLS Dorr. 

< JR-VCE MINES Nunica. 

AMELIA H. MONROE Otsego. 

ELLA MULDER Spring Lake. 

MARIA NEMIRE Grand Haven. 

JENNIE NYKERK Overisel. 

ETHEL O'BRIEN Cheshire. 

MRS. ALLIE ODELI .\Uegan. 

CLARA ODELI Ulegan. 

DELIA ODELI Allegan. 

MABEL ORCHARDSON Spring Lake. 

ABBIE ORR Allegan. 

HENRIETTA POELAKKER Overisel. 

E. C. RICHARDS Parma. 

(iEORGE RIDDERING Drenthe. 

SENIE RIGHTER Dunning. 

JOHN RIGTERINK Overisel. 

(;RACE R()(;ERS Allegan. 

.MAUD R. ROGERS Holland. 

MAG(;iE RUSSCIIER Holland. 

KATE SCOTT Nunica. 

CARRIE B. SHANK Mlegan. 

WINNIE SHERBOURNE Allegan 

HERMAN SMITH Hopkins Station. 



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18 HOPK COLLEGE. 



HERBERT N. SNELL Shelbyvillc. 

IVA SNOVER Lee. 

AMY SPENCER Birlamoni. 

ROSEY STAUFFER Gooding. 

FRANKTE SULLIVAN Mill Grove. 

PAUL V. TADNER Conklin. 

SAMUEL THEDE Middlcville. 

CARRIE A. THORP Hamilton. 

IDA G. THORP Hamilton. 

ALVA B. TOWNE Leighlon. 

ADA TOWNE HiUiards. 

JOHANNA VAN ARK Holland Cily. 

GERTIE VANDERVEEN Overisel. 

JAMES VAN HYNINCx . . .' Otsego. 

NELLIE VAN MIDDLESWORTH Moni-rey. 

MAGGIE VAN PUTTEN Holland Cily. 

EMMA VAN WYCK Otsego. 

LEWIS WALDA Forest Grove. 

ANNA M. WILTERDINK Holland City. 

NETTIE WILLETT Sand Lake. 

FLORA E. WILLIAMS Allegan. 

GRACE WILLIAMS Allegan. 

Total . •. 105 

SUMMARY. 

" A " Class 20 

" B " Class 16 

"C" Class 29 

"D" Class 34 

Unclassified i 

Summer Normal 105 

Total 205 

ADMISSION. 

For admission into the " D " Class, a common school edu- 
cation is required in the branches pursued in that year. The- 
better their previous training, the more easily and profitably 
can pupils enter upon the Grammar School Course. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 19 

In order to enter any advanced class, it will be necessary 
for the applicant to pass an examination in the studies pre- 
viously pursued by the class. If received on conditions, these 
must be fulfilled before regular admission. 

The Normal Department is open to all who present evi- 
dence of sufficient preparation. Members having selected 
studies and classes, are expected to comply with the scholastic 
regulations of the Institution. 



iftonv^e 0f ^tu&u* 



FIRST YEAR, " D '' CLASS. 

. Reading, Etc. — National Fourth Reader; Penmanship; 
Reed's Word Lessons; and Harrington's Spelling Book, Part IL 
Geography. — Harper's School Geography, Michigan Edi- 
tion, 

Mathematics. — Olney's Practical Arithmetic. 

Language. — 

English, — Reed and Kellogg's Graded Lessons in English. 

Rhetoric. — Written Essays, through the year; Declama- 
tions. 

History. — Barnes's United States History. 

SECOND YEAR, "C" CLASS. 

Reading, Etc. — National Fifth Reader; Penmanship; 
Westlake's 3,000 Words; Orthoepy and Diacritical Marks. 

Geography. — Guyot's Physical Geography. 

Mathematics. — Wentworth & Hill's Arithmetic; Sprague's 
Rapid Addition; Bryant and Stratton's Common School Book- 
keeping. 



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20 hopf college. 

Language. — 

English. — Reed and Kellogg's Higher Lessons in English. 

Latin. — Collar ^: Oaniell's Beginners' Latin Book; Allen 
& (ireenough's Latin (irammar, Revised Edition-, Ginn & 
Company's Cix^sar, N'eio Edition, 

Dutch, — Reading; Spelling; Translations. 

French. — Edgren's French Grammar. {Elective for Latin). 

Rhe roRic — Essays and Declamations. 

THIRD YEAR, ** B " CLASS. 

Reai^ing, I'.rc. — Selections; Penmanship and Drawing. 

Mathematics. — Wentworth's School Algebra; Steele's 
Astronomy, with the use of Globes. 

Langtage. — 

English. — (grammar, continued; Anafysis of Sentences. 

Latin. — Ci^sar; Ginn & Company's Cicero; Composition. 

Greek. — First Lessons in Greek; Hadley- Allen's Grammar, 
and some easy Greek author. 

Dutch. — Kat's Grammar; Exercises; Translations. 

French. — Edgren's French Grammar. {^Elective for Latin.) 

German. — Joynes' Meissner's German Grammar. Joynes' 
German Reader. {Elective for Greek.) 

Rhetoric. — Hart's Rhetoric; Essays and Declamations. 

History. — Smith's Greek History. {Abridged.) 

FOURTH YEAR, "A" CLASS. 

l)KA\\TN(i. — 

Mathematics. — Wentworth's School Algebra (finished); 
Wentworth's Plane Geometry; Peck's Ganot's Natural Phil- 
osophy, revised. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 21 



Language. — 

English, — Parsing Sprague's Milton's Paradise Lost, or 
other Author. 

Latin. — Cicero; Ginn & Company's Virgil; Composition. 

Greek, — Anabasis and Hellenica; First Lessons Completed; 
Hadley-Allen's Grammar. 

Dutch, — Kat's Grammar, continued; Practical Exercises; 
Translations; Composition. 

French, \ 

> Continued as Klectives for Latin and Greek. 
German^ ) 

Rhp:toric. — Hart's Rhetoric; Lssays; Declamations. The 
Class publishes a monthly paper, called The Excelsiora, 

History. — Anderson's English History. 

Civil (Government. —Young's Government Class Hook. 

Didactics. — White's F^lements of Pedagogy. 

Physiology and Hy(jiene. — Steele's. 

Religious Instruction, and Music. — In all the Classes. 

Special attention is given, during the whole of the Pre- 
paratory Course, to the grammars of the languages studied. 
For those who pursue English studies only, or who design 
stopping at the end of the "A" year, the Faculty provide such 
additional branches, as seem most expedient and profitable. 
Those generally make better progress, whose time is fully 
occupied in the work of the school. 

In general educational value, it is believed that the above 
four years Course of Study is worthy of full recommendation, 
whether for entrance into College, or for a professional train- 
ing, or for a business life. 

The Schedule of Recitations is attached. This serves to 
show: 

I. That the drill in the English branches is continued to 
the end of the four years course. Those who enter the **D" 



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22 HOPE COLLEGE. 



should have some previous knowledge of Arithmetic, Gram- 
mar and Geography. 

2. Beginning with the '*C'* year, Latin is almost daily, 
with about 500 recitations in all. 

3. Beginning with the "B" year, and including Greek 
History, there are nearly 400 recitations in Greek. 

4. As may be noticed, German, or French and German, 
can be substituted for Greek. All who desire a good educa- 
tion should study Latin. 

5. Those who take an English course only, select their 
studies, but not less than eighteen recitations per week are 
required. 



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COURSK OF STUDY. 



28 



SCHEDULE OF GRAMMAR SCHOOL RECITATIONS. 



8 



Nfonday ,., . 
Tuesday .. . 
Wednesday 

Tliiirsday | Bible Study 

Friday . ' | Orthography 



Arithmetic 

Orthography . ., 
Arithmetic 



Physical Geog'y 
Bible Study .... 
Physical (Jeog'y 
Orthography , .. 
Grammar 



Greek 
Greek . 
Greek . 
Greek. 
Greek . 



English 2 

Knglish 

English 

English 

Art of Teaching 



1 — German may be taken instead of Greek. 

2— English in the "A " year includes: a, Rhetoric, finished; /% Analysis of •* Paradise 
lx>st*' and " Lysidas;" r. Preparation of the " Excclsiora;" </, English History. 



Monday ^'Readrng j Arithmetic 

Tuesday ^Arithmetic 'Latin 

Wednesday.... Reading ! Arithmetic ^ 

Thursday 'Arithmetic 'Latin i Dutch 3 ICivil Govm't 4 

Friday i. Arithmetic 'Arithmetic ! Latin |Nat. Philosophy 



Latin I Nat. Philosophy 

iDutch 3 iCivil Govm t 4 

I Latin iNat. Philosophy 



3— For those who use it at their homes. 
4— Physiology, during the third term. 



Monday !iU. S. History 

Tuesday i Grammar 

Wednesday , U. S. History , 

Thursday , Grammar . . . . , 

Friday . I J. S. History 



Latin 

|Arithmetic , 
, Latin 

'Arithmetic . 
, Latin 



Rhetoric i Algebra 

Latin : Dutch 

Rhetoric .Algebra 

Latin Dutch 

Gram. Analysis. .Algebra 



5 — Plane Geometry begins in the second term. 



^! 



I D CLASS 

Monday ' (Grammar 

Tuesday ' | Penmanship 

Wednesday . ..ij Grammar 

I'hursday '. Penmanship 

Friday ,, Composition .... 

6— Orthography in ccnnection. 



Grammar . 
Reading 6 
Grammar .., 
Reading 6 
Rhetoricils 



, Astronomy . . . . 
, ) Greek History. 
, Astronomy . .. . 

, Greek History. 

, Bible Study ... 



Drawing 

Latin 

Latin 

Latin 

Latin 



5 j Monday 

w I Tuesday 

^ , Wednesday 

"^ I Thursday 

S I Friday 



(Geography | Book-keeping. 

Music Composition.. 

(Jeography ' Book-keeping. 

Geography ! Dutch 

Geography iDutch 



I B CI-ASS I A CL 

, I 

. Algebra iGreek 

. ! Algebra [Greek 

.Algebra Greek 

. iRhetoricals English 

. I Algebra Greek 



Note i. — A recitation in the afternoon, whenever deemed necessary. 
Note 2.— The Lady Principal meets all the young ladies twice a week, at 11:45 a. m., 
for such studies or exercises as she may select. 



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24 HOPE COLLEGE. 



^caxtlav %l0vtnal (£0Uv&!C^ 



FIRST YEAR. 

Orthography, Reading, Penmanship, Grammar, Composi- 
tion, Higher Arithmetic, Book-keeping, Latin or EUctives, such 
as Physiology and Civil Government, Drawing, Dutch or 
French, Music, Review of U. S. History and Geography, Pro- 
fessional Instruction for the teacher. 

By taking Electives instead of Latin, the above forms a 
good one-year English course. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Rhetoric, Composition, Elocution, Drawing, Zoology, 
Algebra, Astronomy, Latin and Greek History, or Electives^ 
Greek or German, or Electives^ Dutch or French, Music, 
Practice in Studies of first year. 

Professional Instruction in the Art of Teaching, suitable 
for those who want a two-year English course. 

THIRD YEAR. 

English Language and English History, Composition and 
Elocution, Algebra, Physics, Latin and Roman History, or 
Electives, Greek or German, or Electives y Dutch or French, 
Voice Culture, Geometry, Civil Government, Physiology, 
Moral Science. 

Professional Instruction in Practice of Teaching. The 
Electives will give a full Literary or Scientific Course, to the 
end of the *' A " year. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

English Literature, Composition and Elocution, Geometry, 
Greek or German, General History, Dutch or French, Chem- 
istry, Mental Science, History of Education, Trigonometry, 



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RF.llULAR NORMAL COrRSK. 25 

Physical (Geography, Geology, School System, Practice of 
Teaching. This last year embraces College studies. 

The above studies will be under the charge of the Facul- 
ties, and according to the regular Schedule of Instruction. 



THE SUMMER NORMAL. 

The studies, at this time, are designed to give an opportu- 
nity for a thorough review of the subjects required for ** first', 
second, and third grade Certificates," in Michigan, and for gain- 
ing such general information as will better fit teachers for their 
needed and noble profession. 

The studies thus to be reviewed, with daily drill as to 
methods and principles, are: 

Orthography, Reading, and Penmanship; Geography, Arith- 
metic, and Grammar; United States History, and Civil Gov- 
ernment; Book-keeping, Algebra, and Geometry; Physiology, 
Botany, and Philosophy; School Law; Science and Art of 
Teaching; Question Drawer, and Practical Discussions. 

Extra Branches, such as Music, Crayon Drawing, Type- 
writing, and Short-hand, when a sufficient number for a class 
so desire. 

P^ach subject will be treated after approved "normal" 
methods, with special reference to the needs of teachers in 
their district schools. Taking English Grammar, for example, 
the programme will embrace a review of the parts of speech; 
parsing and diagraming; rules and forms, both oral and writ- 
ten; composition; and a careful analysis of the right use of the 
language. 

Those desiring to enter the School will bring their ordinary 
text- books, as instruction will be mainly given by note and 
topic. 

The next Summer School will be held for five weeks, from 
July 6th to August 7th, 1891. As in former years, competent 
instruction will be provided. 

The Library and Apparatus of the College are free for the 
use of these classes. 



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26 HOPE COLLKGE. 



®lje ^lork in Retail. 



THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

The Grammar School prepares for a college course either 
here or elsewhere, be it in ancient languages or modern; in 
English branches, or those called literary and scientific. At 
the same time the curriculum has been prepared in view of a 
good '^secondary education,*' whatever be the future occupa- 
tion of a graduate from the "A" Class. 

The tutor attends to the instruction of the two lower 
classes in Reading, Orthography and Definitions, Penmanship, 
Composition and Book-keeping, Geography and United 
States History. So far as may be he assists also in the "B" 
and "A" Classes. The most of the teaching, however, is done 
by the college professors. 

ENGLISH LAN(;UAGE AND LITERATURE. 
Prof. Henry Boers. 

Beginning with the "D" year, English Grammar is studied 
daily to the close of the ist term '^B". By this time it is 
supposed to be well understood. Rhetoric follows until the 
close of the ist term **A," when the skill of the class is 
proved by a careful and critical examination and analysis of 
Milton's masterpieces. Paradise Lost and Lysidas. Composi- 
tion and Declamation are placed in the curriculum weekly. 
Every year the **A" Class publishes a monthly in manuscript, 
all original, and often very tastefully ornamented. These 
numbers are bound together in a volume, and each yearly 
volume is preserved in the College Library. 

The Freshman Class enters first upon Trench's "Study 
of Words," and then takes up English Literature until the end 
of the Sophomore year. As a stimulus, essays and criticisms 
upon British authors are often required, and all who wish may 
contend for the George Birkhoff prize for excellence in 
English Literature. The Juniors first study the ^'Philosophy 



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THK WORK IN DETAIL. 27 

of Rhetoric," and then enter upon a critical examination of 
American writers. Rhetorical exercises continue to the close 
of the Senior year. In all not less than one thousand class 
recitations are given, during the eight years, to the correct 
acquisition and use of the English language. Young men 
come from Europe to the school, and when they graduate, are 
often not to be distinguished from native Americans. 

MATHEMATICS.— Prof. j. H. Kleinheksel. 

Arithmetic continues through the **!)" and '*C" years. 
Three terms of the *'B" and one of the "A" are given to 
Algebra, followed by Plane Geometry until the end of the year, 
calling for 560 recitations. 

The Freshmen finish Plane Geometry in tht first term, and 
then give the balance of the year to Trigonometry and Solid 
Geometry, with Mensuration. In the ist term. Sophomore, 
Wentworth's College Algebra is made a study, after which 
Analytical Geometry and the Calculi finish the range of pure 
Mathematics in the second term of the Junior year. 

LATIN LANGl'AGE AND LITERATURE. 
Prof. Jamks G. Sutphen. 

Latin is begun with the "C" year and receives 425 recita- 
tions up to the end of the "A." For two terms the **Begin- 
ners* Latin Book" furnishes the grammar and a needed 
vocabulary. Several books of Cajsar with Latin Composition 
occupy the **B'' year, but cowards its end the Orations of 
Cicero are generally substituted and studied with much care. 
Virgil finishes the list of Grammar School Classics during the 
2d and 3d terms, "A." Grammar and Composition receive 
due attention throughout. 

In the College the Latin course continues until the close 
of the Junior year, and embraces Livy, Horace, Juvenal, 
Tacitus, Terence, several works of Cicero, and some Latin 
Hymns. Besides the continued use of Latin Composition 
are added Roman History and Antiquities. Reading at sight 
is often practiced. 



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28 HOPE COLLEGE. 

GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 
Prok. John H. Gillespie. 

The Greek occupies but two years in the Grammar 
School, but has allotted to it about 350 recitations. The "B's" 
begin with White's First Lessons, besides the Grammar, and 
follow with selections from Herodotus or from some other easy 
Greek author, and then practice on Anabasis and Hellenica. 
The object of the professor is to infuse a Greek or classic 
spirit, and to impart some portion of his own enthusiasm. 

In the College this study is continued through the Senior 
year, with as much attention as may be to Herodotus, Thucy- 
dides. Homer, Demosthenes, Plato, and some one of the tragic 
or comic poets. Combined with the above are Greek Com- 
position, Litera'ture, Philosophy and Antiquities. 

MODERN LANGUAGES. 

Prof. Cornelis Doesburg 

Many of the students at Hope come from Holland homes 
and use that language in common lite. For them instruction 
is given in the Dutch Grammar and Literature twice a week 
up to the Freshman Class. ' Those who select German in lieu 
of Greek, give their time to that study from the **B" Class 
onward, sometimes adding the French, and taking what may 
be called a scientific course. As a part of the regular or A. B. 
course, the French is assigned to the Freshman and Sopho- 
more classes, and the German to the Juniors and Seniors, 
giving nearly two hundred recitations to each language. The 
more diligent students read the French and the German with 
considerable facility, and may be able to use them subse- 
quently in their business. The text books used are varied but 
embrace only those of classic authority. 

PHYSICS AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS. 

Prof. Gerrtt J. Kollen. 

The ''B" class has a primary course in Astronomy, and 
the *'A's" in Natural Philosophy. 



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THK WORK. IN DKTAIL. 29 



The Sophomores study Surveying, and for electives add 
Field Work, Drafting and Engineering. The Juniors apply 
their Mathematics to Mechanics and other branches of Natu- 
ral Philosophy; while the Seniors seek to discover the 
scientific laws which lie at the basis of the astronomical 
system. 

CHEMISTRY AND NATURAL HISTORY. 

Prof. Chas. Scott. 

In the latter half of their year the "A" Class studies 
Physiology under the care of the tutor. The Freshmen take 
a higher course of the same, and also Zoology. The Sopho- 
mores have three recitations weekly in Systematic Chemistry; 
and the Juniors two terms in Botany and one in Biology. 
The Seniors follow with Geology and Mineralogy throughout 
the year. For classical students this course is sufficiently 
extended, but the College, as yet, has not furnished laboratories 
for more individual and scientific work in the above branches. 

HISTORY. 

There is no distinct Chair of History, and 'yet this most 
useful branch is by no means neglected. In the Grammar 
School all are required to complete abridged courses in the 
History of the United States, of Greece, and of England. 
Every College class has work in the same line, that is, the 
Freshman in Ancient History and Geography; the Sopho- 
mores in Modern History and Geography; the Juniors in the 
History and meaning of the United States Constitution; and 
the Seniors in the History of Civilization. The Library is 
fairly well supplied with works on this subject, and they are 
read by the students with an interest that is gratifying to their 
instructors. 

PHILOSOPHY, ETC. 

The Junior class uses Potter's Intellectual Science as a 
text book, but is constantly exercised in analytic thought, 
observation and judgment on the'whole subject of Psychology; 



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so HOPE COLLEGE. 



for which end discussion is invited. Ethical Science is 
similarly studied during the Senior year. The above branches 
are under the President, as is also Christian Philosophy, 
through lectures and the use of Butler's Analogy. Prof. Kol- 
len gives the Seniors a course in Logic and Political Economy, 
and in order to develop correct thought and reasoning calls 
for class debates or essays on civic or political subjects. 

It will be seen, therefore, that while Hope cafinot, at 
present, offer many "electives,'' it has and secures a regular 
liberal course, as English^ and as complete as can be found in 
most of our Western Colleges. 



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MISCKLLANKOUS INFORMATION. 31 



]^i§cellaneou§ Information. 



LOCATION. 

Holland City is a central point on the Chicago & West 
Michigan Railway, ninety miles north ot New Buffalo, twenty- 
five miles south-west of Grand Rapids, and midway between 
Allegan and Grand Haven. To all Eastern points the route 
by rail is direct. It is therefore most desirably located, hav- 
ing both land and water communications, being near the shore 
of Lake Michigan, with which it is directly connected by a 
beautiful sheet of water, Macatawa Bay, known as a popular 
summer resort. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 

The College Campus lies between Tenth and Twelfth 
streets, in the centre of the city, and contains sixteen acres, 
and an addition of two acres on the south side of Twelfth 
street. It presents a finely varied surface, well shaded with 
native trees, and is annually improving in beauty and attract- 
iveness. 

The College buildings are eight in number. The largest 
is Van Vleck Hall, mainly devoted to students* rooms and the 
Library. It has been decided to build an ample Recitation 
Hall, as soon as the requisite funds can be secured. 

SCHOOL YEAR. 

The scholastic year of forty weeks, begins on the third 
Wednesday in September, and ends with the general Com- 
mencement on the fourth Wednesday in June. 



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32 HOPE COLLEGK. 



The winter and spring vacations are fixed by the General 
Faculty. (See the Calendar.) 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

Most of the students seek what is called " a liberal educa 
tion," leading to the degree of A. B. or S. B. A "partial" or 
" elective " course is offered to all who so desire, and facilities 
are furnished through the regular instructors; but a partial 
course entitles only to a certificate, and not to a diploma. 
German and French, or Drawing and Painting, can be studied 
at any time, as also the branches generally called *< scientific," 
fitting the student for professional courses in a University. 

Since 1878 the Institution has been open to women. They 
enter the regular classes, and attend the same lectures and 
recitations as the young men. 

Vocal Music is provided without charge.. Lessons in In- 
strumental Music can be secured at the expense of the pupil. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

The yearly examinations before the Council or its Com- 
mittee, begin on the third Wednesday in June. Examinations 
at other times may be held and passed upon by the respective 
Faculties, subject to the approval of Council, or to a re-exam- 
ination, if so desired. 

The examinations are oral or in writing, as seems best to 
each Professor, or as may be directed by the Council. 

CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS. 

Members of the '* A " Class, upon graduation in full course, 
are entitled to a regular Certificate, signed by the Council and 
the Faculty; but said certificate will be marked yfrj/, secondy or 
third grade ^ as follows: When the recorded standing of the 
graduate is from 91 to 100, this will indicate the "First Grade;*' 
when from 81 to 90, the " Second ;'' and when from 71 to Zo\ 
the "Third;" reference being made to both recitations and 
examinations. 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 83 



Such Students as are admitted in partial coursei or who fall 
below an average standing of 71, are entitled to a Certificate, 
from the Faculty, naming the studies in which they have sus- 
tained examinations. 

Graduates from the College, when recommended by the 
Faculty, receive a Diploma, with the degree of A. B., or S. B., 
being a testimonial of general scholarship. The Course lead- 
ing to it includes all the " liberal arts," usually taught in col- 
leges. A " partial course " is sometimes chosen, and is entitled 
to a Certificate as adjudged by the Faculty. 

The degree of A. M. is conferred upon those who continue 
their studies for three years after graduation, or who may sat- 
isfy the Council as to their scholastic attainments. By paying 
a fee of three dollars, an A. M. Diploma in such cases will be 
given. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

The exercises of each day begin with prayer in the College 
Chapel, at 8 o'clock a. m. 

On the Sabbath every student is expected to worship regu- 
larly with one of the churches in the city or vicinity, unless 
excused by the President. 

Religious instruction is given in all the classes regularly, 
and, like the other studies, is in charge of the Faculty. 

Although Hope College is denominational, and is under 
the patronage and support of the Reformed Church in Amer- 
ica, yet, by the law of its incorporation, it can have no "relig- 
ious test.'' The doors are open, and welcome is given to all 
who submit to its scholastic regulations. As a Christian 
school, however, it inculcates gospel truths, and demands a 
consistent moral character and deportment. 

LIBRARY, ETC. 

A Library of over 7,000 volumes, and a Reading Room, 
are free for the use of the students. Books and papers are 
constantly being added, and require increased accommoda- 
tions. 

The Laboratory, Cabinet, and Philosophical Apparatus are 
adapted to the use of the recitation or lecture rooms. They 



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34 HOPE COLLEGE. 



are gradually being made larger and more complete. It is to 
be hoped that Maps, Charts, Instruments, and Specimens of 
Natural History, as well as books, will be donated by the grad- 
uates and friends of the Institution. 

SOCIETIES. 

Three Literary Societies, viz., the Meliphon and the Fra- 
ternal, and the Ulfilas Club, have been maintained for years, 
and offer decided advantages to their respective members, and • 
materially aid in the attainment of that culture which it is the 
object of this school to promote. The object of the Ulfilas 
Club is to secure for its members greater proficiency in the 
use of the Holland language. 

The Young Men's Christian Association, a society of from 
seventy to erghty members, continues to carry on its work 
with much interest and activity. 

SUNDRIES. 

Connected with the Institution, a religious weekly is pub- 
lished, called De Hope. It was established in 1866, and is 
under the direction ot the Council. The paper has a circula- 
tion of 2,500 copies. 

A monthly, called The Anchor ^ is conducted by the stu- 
dents with gratifying success. 

The "A" Class maintains a periodical, called The Excelsiora, 
It is bound, year by year, and is placed in the Library. 

The Oratorical Exercises of the Grammar School, on the 
fmal Monday of the college year, is the Commencement of that 
Department, and marks the graduation of the "A*' Class. 

Two prizes, called '-'The George Birkhoff, Jr., Prizes," have 
been established. One is for the Sophomore Class, in English 
Literature, and the other for the Freshman Class, in Dutch 
J,iterature. At the last Commencement they were awarded, 
t)y the Committees, as follows: For proficiency in English 
Literature, Herman Van der Ploeg. For proficiency in Dutch 
Literature, James Sterenberg. 

It is expected that additional prizes will follow, as a stim- 
ulus to labor in other branches of study. 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 35 



A Course of Lectures is of almost yearly occurrence, usu- 
ally at the invitation of one of the societies, and with the 
approval and rinancial aid of the Executive Committee. 

The moral, social, and literary advantages of Holland are 
considered as good. 

EXPENSES. 

The City is surrounded by a rich agricultural region, and 
the cost of living is comparatively cheap. Good board may 
be had in families of the city for from two to three dollars 
per week; in clubs, and without furnished rooms, at lower 
rales. 

There are seventeen rooms in Van Vleck Hall, in the 
selection of which students for the ministry have the prefer- 
ence. These are furnished in part and bear a moderate 
charge. 

As yet, no tuition fees have been charged, but every 
student must pay to the Treasurer, in advance, an incidental 
fee of five dollars per term. 

The graduation fee is five dollars in the College and two 
and one-half dollars in the Grammar School. No other 
charges are made. 

For books, clothing, washing, fuel, lights, travel, etc., 
those interested can best make the estimates. The entire 
expense need not exceed $200 per annum. 

The fee of the students in the Summer Normal Classes is 
hwQ dollars for the session. Those who enter the College, for 
the regular Normal Course, are charged ten dollars, in 
advance for each semester or half year. 

Boarding Houses and Clubbing arrangements in the city 
are to be approved by the Faculty, and to be subject to such 
regulations as are usual in similar institutions. By a rule of 
the College, lady students are not to room in the same board- 
ing houses with the gentlemen. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The Rules of Order are few and simple. In general, if the 
students do not improve their time and opportunities, or do 



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36 HOPE COLLEGE. 



not conduct themselves in a respectful and orderly manner, 
their connection with the Institution will be suspended. 

The students are required to be present, promptly^ on the 
first day of each and every term. The recitations will begin 
the next morning. 

A record is kept of the scholastic standing of each student, 
and a copy of the same is sent to the parent or guardian; if 
the average standing, in any term, does not exceed 70, on a 
basis of 100, he is to be dropped from his class. 

Term's fees and room rent are to be paid strictly in 
advance, and if not so paid, or within one month, the student 
neglecting forfeits his right to continue in the Institution. 

The object of the Faculty is to develop in the pupils a 
higher moral as well as an intellectual culture and character. 
If they find, after due probation and inquiry, that the influence 
of a student is bad and injurious to others, they claim the 
right to demand his withdrawal. 

Parents are requested not to ask or expect their children, 
in this school, to come home during term time. It seriously 
interferes with proper habits of study, and by our rules, none 
are to be absent from the Institution without permission of 
the President. 

A copy of the regulations of the College is given to each 
student at the time of his or her matriculation. 

REMARKS. 

The Library is rapidly increasing in value, and a Library 
building is a pressing necessity. With spacious, fire-proot 
rooms the collection would be safe and serviceable. The 
same building could, for the present, be used as a Museum, or 
Cabinet of Natural History. Who will supply this want? 

Rev. James F. Zwemer has continued his work as Finan- 
cial Agent of the College, and has now received, in the West, 
nearly $50,000, of which one-half will be added to the Endow- 
ment Fund. 

A FORM OF DEVISE. 

I give unto ike Council of Hope College Dollars ^ to be applied to 

(e. g. the increase of the Endowment Fund of said College,) or (the erection 
of a Library building for said College.) 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 37 



(E^ifvonolpQical ^entoranba* 



Beginning of the Netherland Immigration into Michigan, Iowa, etc 

Village of Holland laid out 

Five acres donated by Rev. A. C. Van Raalte, D. 1)., as a site (or an 
Academy 

** Pioneer School *' opened, Mr. W. T. Taylor, Principal Oct., 

Placed under the care of the General Synod June, 

Rev. F. B. Beidler, Principal 

Rev. John Van Vleck, Principal 

The school named the Holland Academy 

Located in the *' Orphan-House " 

Van Vleck Hall erected on ** the five acres *' 

The Academy more fully organized 1857 

Meliplion Society founded 

Rev. Philip Phelps, Jr., Principal 

Campus enlarged to 16 acres 

** Oggel House " erected 

Gymnasium built, very much by students 

A Freshman Class formed, 10 in number 

Fraternal Society founded 

A ** Board of Superintendents " appointed 

A College proposed, and approved by the Synods 

Over $40,000 contributed as an endowment 

Hope College begun, 1865; Incorporated May, 

The Board of Superintendents named ** The Council " 

Faculty appointed: Rev. P. Phelps, Jr., D. D., President July, 

First Commencement; Eight became A. B 

A weekly newspaper, De Hope, established 

Theological instruction begun, with a class of seven Sept., 

Rev. C. E. Crispell, D. D. , elected Professor of Theology 

Holland incorporated as a city 

Charter Hall (burned in 1884) erected 

Eighty acres within the city, donated by Dr. Van Raalte : . . . 

South Campus, two acres, donated by the same 

The Theological Department adopted by (General Synod as its *' West- 
ern Theological Seminary " 

Death ol Rev. Peter J. Oggel, Professor, and Editor of ''Del/ope^'' Dec, 

Council Hall (Grammar School building) elected 



847 
848 

850 
851 
853 
854 
855 
855 
856 

857 
•'58 
857 

859 
859 
860 
862 
862 
863 
863 
864 
865 
866 
866 
866 
866 
866 
866 
867 
867 
867 
867 
868 

869 
869 
869 



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38 HOPE COLLEGE. 

Firet Theological Class graduated seven 1869 

Railroads opened through Holland i869-*7i 

Firet Consliiutton for the College adopted 187 1 

Holland nearly destroyed by fire Oct. ,1871 

Cjymnastum repaired and made the Chapel 1872 

House finished on the South Campus 1873 

The Laboratory enlarged and repaired 1874 

Theological " Lectors " formally appointed by Synod 1 875 

Hrick priming office for De Hope erected . 1876 

Death o( Rev. Cornelius Van der Meulen Aug. 23, 1876 

Death of Rev. A. C. Van Raalte, D. D Nov 7^ 1876 

Suspension of the Theological Department 1877 

Death of Rev. A. T. Stewart, D. D., Sec. of Council for 12 years, May, 1878 

Reorgani/aiioM of the College; Dr. Phelps resigns 1878 

Rev. G. H. Mandeville, D. D., Provisional President and Financial 

Agent; Prof. C. Scott, Vice President 1878 

A new Constitution adopted 1879 

Prof. Charles Scott, D. D., Provisional President 1880 

Successful efforts to pay ofT a debt of $32,000 1879 '^2 

Donation of $10,000 by Gerrit Cowenhoven, Esq 1882 

Divisions in some of the Reformed Churches i88i-*83 

Theological Instruction Restored; a Professorship of $30,000 completed; 

Rev. N. M. SiefTens, 1). D., Prolessor 1884 

Visit of the General Synod to the College 1884 

A separate '• Bo.ard of Superintendents *' appointed for the Western The- 
ological Seminary .... 1885 

Election of Prof. Chas. Scott, D. D., as President 1885 

All the streets aiound the campus graded, etc i882-'86 

Synod's House (or the President erected I 1886 

The George BirkhofT, Jr., Prizes established 1887 

Normal I )epartment opened 1888 

Rev. Jas. F. Zwemer appointed Financial Agent 1888 

Invested Funds have increased to over $100,000 1889 

<^)uarter Centennial Celebration June 26, 1890 

For Faculties and Students, look at this Catalogue of 1891 



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QUARTER-CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION. 



The last Catalogue announced that " the twenty-fifth year " 
of the Institution would close in June, 1890, with an appro- 
priate celebration or festival. Accordingly, the Committee of 
the Council, Rev. J. F. Zwemer being chairman, made timely 
and suitable arrangements for the event, aided by the Alumni, 
the Faculty, and the citizens of Holland. Their plan embraced: 

1. On Tuesday evening, June 24, a Reunion of all the 
Graduates of the School since 1854. 

2. On Wednesday evening, June 25, the Quarter-Centen- 
nial Meeting of the College Alumni. 

3. On Thursday morning, June 26, the regular Quarter- 
Centennial Exercises in the College Grove. 

4. On Thursday afternoon, June 26, a Banquet, in the 
College Chapel, for the Council, the Faculty, the Alumni, and 
such Invited Guests as might be present. 

The plan of the Committee, as above, was carried out. 

L — THE ALUNfNI MEETINGS. 

At the Reunion, on June 24, the sons and daughters of the 
Institution gathered in goodly number at the Chapel, and re- 
called pleasant memories of Holland Academy, as well as of 
Hope College. Rev. Wm. Moerdyk presided. Addresses were 
made by Rev. C. Van der Veen, D. D., Prof. G. J. Kollen, 
Rev. J. Meulendyk, Rev. G. De Jong, and Mr. A. Pieters, in 
order to bring out the salient features of the successive periods 
of the School from 185 1 to 1890. 

The regular Alumni gathering was on Wednesday evening, 
June 25, in the Third Reformed Church. Rev. Philip Phelps, 
D. D., first President of Hope College, delivered an able ora- 
tion on " Unity in American Education." Before the close of 
the meeting, an excellent portrait of Dr. Phelps, in oil, was 
presented to the College, by the Association. The other 
addresses were, a ^oem by Prof. Wm. A. Shields, and a " Ne- 
crology " of the past twenty-five years, by Rev. James F. 
Zwemer. Before adjourning, the "Commencement Ode" of 
1866 was re-sung with much enthusiasm. 



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40 HOPE COLLEGE. 



II. THE QUARTER-CENTENNIAL PROPER. 

This was on Thursday, June 26, in the beautiful College 
grove, beginning at 9:30 a. m. Seats were provided for 1800 
people, under the spreading trees. ♦ 

All Holland awoke on Thursday morning, to the booming 
of twenty-five guns. Stores and buildings hung out their ban- 
ners, and a brass band paraded the streets. 

By request, the formal greetings of the General Synod had 
been given on the day before, (at the Commencement,) by 
Rev. Cornelius Brett, D. D. Hon. D. Bethune Duffield, of 
Detroit, Mich., had also delivered a fine address, entitled, 
" Quarter-Centennial Commencement in Hope College." 

In the grove, under the presidency of Rev. P. Moerdyke, 
D. D., the exercises embraced: 

Three historical addresses, viz.: "Pioneer Period," by 
Rev. John Van der Meulen; " Academy Period," by Rev. Ale 
Buursma; " College Period," by Rev. J. W. Beardslee, D. D. 

Cordial greetings came in person from Gov. Luce, State of 
Michigan; Revs. C. Brett, D. D., Ref. Church in America; P. 
Lepeltak, Part. Synod of Chicago; G. H. Mandeville, D. D., 
the Board of Education, R. C. A.; Wm. J. R. Taylor, D. D., the 
Institutions at New Brunswick, N. J.; J. W. Warnshuis, the N.- 
W. Classical Academy, Iowa; Pres't McElroy, Adrian College; 
Preset Clute, Agricultural College of Michigan; Pres't Butter- 
field, Olivet College. 

III. THE BANQUET. 

This was prepared at 1:30 p. m., in the Chapel, for 25a 
guests. Hon. G. J. Diekema, Speaker of the Michigan House of 
Representatives, presided, and acted as toast-master. Nearly 
three most pleasant hours were passed at the board, with fitting 
responses to several toasts, by Pres't Scott, Gov. Luce, Rev. 
Dr. Brett, Mayor Yates, Dr. Phelps, Lieut. C. Gardenier, 
U. S. A., Rev. A. A. Pfanstiehl, Rev. Josias Meulendyke, Rev. 
James I. Good, and Hon. G. J. Diekema. ' 

At 4:30 p. M. the assembly scattered to their homes, and 
left the College to feel that it had enjoyed a happy Quarter- 
Centennial. 



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WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 41 



Western Theological Seminary, 



OF THE 



REFORMED CHURCH 
IN HMERICfl. 

DEPARTMENT OF THEOLOGY AT HOLLAND, MICHIGAN. 



$acx%lt\i. 



REV. NICHOLAS M. STEFFENS, D. D. 

Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theology. In charge ot 
Historical Theology, Homiletics, Pastoral, Theology and 
Catechetics. 

REV. JOHN W. BEARDSLEE, D. D. 

Professor of Biblical Languages and Literature. In charge of 
Sacred Geography, Antiquities, and Hermeneutics. 



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42 HOPE COLLEGE. 



$aar> of ^xtpevintenhtnt0^ 



EX-OFFICIO. 
Rev. Chas. Scott, D. D., - President of Hope College. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF NEW YORK. 

1893. Rev. David Cole, D. D., - Yonkers, N. Y. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF ALBANY. 

1 89 1. Rev. Edward A. Collier, D. D., Kinderhook, N. Y. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 

1892. Rev. Wm. J. R. Taylor, D. D., New York City, N. Y. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF CHICAGO. 

1892. Rev. p. Moerdyke, D. D., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

1892. Rev. Wm. Moerdyk, - - Muskegon, Mich. 

1892. Rev. Matthew Kolyn, - Kalamazoo, Mich. 

1892. Rev. Henry E. Dosker, - Holland, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF HOLLAND. 

J 893. Rev. Peter Lepeltak, - - Overisel, Mich. 

FROM the CLASSIS OF GRAND RIVER. 

J 893. Rev. Egbert Winter, D. D., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

FROM the CLASSIS OF MICHIGAN. 

J 890. Rev. a. Paige Peeke, - - Centreville, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF ILLINOIS. 

4891. Rev. Samuel L. Gamble, - - Chicago, III. 

,FR()M THE CLASSIS OF WISCONSIN. 

1 89 1. Rev. J. Van Houte, - - South Holland, III. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF IOWA. 

1891. Rev. J as. F. Zwemer, - - Orange City, Iowa. 

FROM FHE CLASSIS OF DAKOTA. 

189 1. Rev. John A. De Spelder, - Orange City, la. 



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WESTKRN THEOLOGICAL SEMIXARY. 48 

OFFIOEBB OF THE BOARD. 

Rev. Edward A. Collier, D. D., President. 
Rev. p. Moerdyke, D. D., Stated Clerk. 



OOMMITTEE ON REOEPTION OF STUDENTS. 

Rev. N. M. Steffens, D. D. Rev, J. W. Beardslee, D. D. 
Rev. Egbert Winter, D. D. Rev. P. Moerdyke, D. D. 
Rev. Wm. Moerdyk. Rev. Chas. Scott, D. D. 



^tu^Jeltt0« 



SENIOR CLASS. 

FoppE Klooster, Forest Grove. 

Hope College, 1888. 
John Lamar, Jennison. 

Hope College, 1888. 

Albertus Pieters, Holland City. 

Hope College, 1888. 

Henry Straks, Waupun, Wis. 

Wisconsin Normal (Special). 

MIDDLE CLASS. 

Anthony M. Van Duine, Kalamazoo. 

Hope College, 1889. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Seine J. Menning, Alton, la. 

Henry J. Pietenpol, Holland City. 

Peter Siegers, Flushing, Netherlands- 

Gymnasium, Middleburgh. 



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44 HOPE COLLEGE. 



(S^ouvBie 0f §tui>tj* 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

ExEGETicAL THEOLOGY AND Hermeneutics. — Elements 
of Htbrew; Selections from Pentateuch; Harmony and Exe- 
gesis of the Gospels; Reading Pastoral Epistles; Archaeology; 
Sacred Geography; Hermeneutics. 

Text-books. — Harper's Method and Manual; Green's He- 
brew Grammar; Robinson's (Riddle's) Harmony; Bissell's 
Biblical Antiquities; Barrow's Sacred Geography; Gesenius's 
Lexicon; Simcox's N. T. Grammar. 

Historical Theology. — Kurtz's Sacred History. 

Systematic Theology. — Introduction; Encyclopedia; 
Symbols of the Church. 

Practical Theology. — Theory of Preaching; Analysis of 
Sermons; Homiletical Exercises. 

MIDDLE YEAR. 

Exegetical Theology and Hermeneutics. — Hebrew 
Etymology and Syntax; Studies in Prophetical Theology; 
Readings from Historical Books; Biblical Criticism, (O. T.); 
Keil's Manual; Schaff 's Companion to the New Testament; 
Exegetical Study of Epistles; Reading General Epistles; West- 
cott and Hort's Greek New Testament; Thayer's Lexicon. 

Historical Theology. — Kurtz's Church History. 

System.atic Theology. — Theology proper; Anthropology; 
Christology; A. A. Hodge's Outlines; Charles Hodge's Sys- 
tematic Theology. 

Practical Theology. — Lectures on Preaching; Homileti- 
cal Exercises; Church Government; Pastoral Theology; Lec- 
tures. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Exegetical Theology and Hermeneutics. — Hebrew Po- 
etry; O. T. Theology; Historical Reading; Aramaic Selections; 
New Testament Exegesis; Paul's Epistles; Schaff 's Companion 
to New Testament; Weiss's Introduction to New Testament. 



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WESTERN THEOLOCilCAL SEMINARY. 46 

Historical THEOLOGv.-Ecclesiastical History (continued). 

Systematic Theology. — Soteriology; Ecclesiology; Es- 
chatology; Apologetics; Ethics; Review of the entire System. 

Practical Theology. — Homiletical Exercises; Pastoral 
Theology; Catechetics; Theory of Missions; Church Govern- 
ment; Lectures on Preaching. 



^iftni^^iotu 



The Seminary is open for the admission of students from 
every denomination of Christians. 

A committee of the Board of Superintendents, on the re- 
ception of students, meets on the first Tuesday in September, 
at 1 1 o'clock A. M. 

Every applicant is required to present a certificate of 
church membership and one of literary qualifications. One 
who has not pursued a regular Collegiate course must "give 
proof by testimonials or examination of such literary attain- 
ments as will enable him to enter upon the course of studies 
in the school." 

The requirement of the Constitution in regard to students 
preparing for the ministry in the Reformed Church is as follows: 

Every person contemplating the work of the ministry, be- 
fore he commences his course of Theological studies, shall 
furnish satisfactory evidence of his being a member in full 
communion and good standing of a Reformed Protestant 
Church; of his piety, ability and literary attainments; and 
thereupon shall be admitted into one of the Theological 
schools; and during the prosecution of his studies there, shall 
be subject to the rules and regulations thereof; and when he 
shall have completed the prescribed course and term of Theo- 
logical studies, shall be admitted to an examination according 
to the regulations of the school as established by the General 
Synod; and if found qualified, shall receive a professorial cer- 
tificate to that effect, which shall entitle him to an examination 
for licensure before the Classis to which he belongs. — Consti* 
iuiion^ Art, 11^ Sec, 2, 



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46 HOPE COLLEGE. 



PREACHING^ 

The Students preach regularly before the Faculty and Stu- 
dents, subject to such criticism as may be appropriate. They 
also preach in the churches, especially such as are vacant or 
weak, under the direction of the Faculty. 

LECTURES. 

A course of Lectures, on subjects bearing on Ministerial 
work, is delivered annually under the direction of the Board 
of Superintendents. 

MISSION WORK. 

The Students are organized as a Mission Band and hold 
themselves in readiness to attend any calls to address meetings 
where they can advocate the cause of Missions. 

ADELPHIC SOCIETY. 

This is a weekly gathering of the Professors and Students 
for the discussion of questions relating to the studies of the 
course, and to all matters bearing on the practical work of 
the ministry. The exercises embrace debates, essays, and 
general discussions. 

COMMENCEMENT. 

The Theological Commencement exercises take place on 
Wednesday evening, at the close of the year. Addresses are 
delivered by the Seniors, in English and Dutch, and by some 
member of the Board of Superintendents appointed for the 
purpose. 

CALENDAR. 

1891. April 28, Meeting of the Board of Superintendents* 
April 29, Examinations, 
April 29, Graduating Exercises. 

VACATION. 

1891. Sept. I, Entrance Examinations. 
Sept. 2. Term opens. 

Dec. 18, Christmas Recess begins. 

1892. Jan. 5, Work resumed. 



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WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 



47 



®:i)je0i00ijcai JlUttnni^ 



1869. 



NAMES. 

Ale Buursma, 
Gerrit Dangremond, 
William B. Gillmore, 
Peter Moerdyke, 
William Moerdyk, 
John W. Te Winkel, 
Harm Woltman, 



RKSIDRNCRS. 



1870. 
James De Free, 
Enne J. Heeren, 
John Huizenga, 
Balster Van P::ss, 

1871. 
John Broek, 

Gerrit Van De Kreeke, 
William Visscher, 

1872. 
Harm Borgers, 
Evert Van der Hart, 

1873. 
Henry K. Boer, 
Peter De Bruyn, 
John A. De Spelder, 
James F. Zwemer, 

1874. 
John Hoffman, 
Nicholas Neerken, 

1875. 
William P. Hazenberg, 
Andrew Wormser. 



Grand Rapids. 
Holland, Minn. 
*April 24, 1884. 
Grand Rapids. 
Muskegon. 
Fulton, 111. 
♦April 30, 1870. 

Sioux Centre, la. 
♦Oct. 15, 1878. 
Holland, Neb. 
Roseland, 111. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 
Kalamazoo. 
*Feb. II, 1872. 

Greenleafton, Minn. 
*April 29, 1889. 

Coopersville, Mich. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Orange City, la. 
Orange City, la. 

Clymer, N. Y. 
*Jan. 3, 1887. 

Johannesburg, Transvaal. 
Grand Haven. 



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48 



HOPE COLLEGE. 



1876. 



Frederick P. Bakker, 
JosiAS Meulendyk, 
Helenus E. Nies, 



1877. 



Harm Van der Ploeg, 
Cornelius Wabeke, 



Suspended uniii 
1880. 



Dirk Scholten, 

Gerhard De Jonge, 
Simon HogenboOm, 
Gerrit H. Hospers, 
Peter Ihrman, 



1887. 



1888. 



Gerrit J. Hekhuis, 
Albert Van den Berg. 
Peter Wayenberg, 



1889. 



Ralph Bloemendaal, 
Albert H. Strabbing, 

Peter J. A. Bouma, 
John M. Lumkes, 
J. J. Van Zanten, 



1890. 



Wayne, Neb. 
Fremont, Mich. 
Patterson, N. J. 

Orange City, la. 
*Feb. 22, i88o. 

1884, 

Luctor, Kas. 

Vriesland. 
Cleveland, O. 
East Williamson, N. V. 
Waupun, Wis. 

Spring Lake. 
New Kirk, la. 
Maurice, la. 

New Holland. 
Hamilton. 

Grandville. 
Grand Rapids. 
Grand Haven. 



Total, 42. 



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CATALOGUE 



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1891 -'92. 



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'^■^/^ 



HOLLAND, MICH. 



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CATALOGUE 



— OF THE— 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



— OF- 



Hope College, 



HOLLAND, MIGHIGAN. 



15Q1-'Q2. 



An Institution of tlie Reformed Ctiurcli in America. 

Pioneer School, 1851. 
Holland Academy, 1857. 
Became Hope College, 18657 



HOLLAND, MICH. 
THE TIMES STEAM PRINTING HOUSE. 

1892. 



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GALEN DAR-1892-'93, 



1892. April II, Third Term beg^ins. 

'*" 27, Meeting^ of Council. 
*" 28, Senior Examinations. 
June 15-17, Undergraduate Examinations, 
** 19, Baccalaureate Sermon. 

"' 20, Closing- Exercises of the Grammar 

School. 
•' 21, Meeting- of Council. 

** 21, Meeting^ of Alumni. 

^^ 22, Commencement. 

VJICJIXION. 

Sept. 21, First Term beg-ins. 

** 21, Examinations for Admission. 
Dec. 23, First Term ends. 

VACATION. 

1893. Jan'y 9, Second Term beg-ins. 

'' 26, Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
Mar. 31, Second Term ends. 

VACATION. 



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THE COUNCIL. 



EX-OFFICIO. 
liEV. Chas. Scott, D. D.. President of the College. 

ELECTED MEMBERS. 
FROM GENERAL SYNOD. 



MAXB.H. KE8IDENCK8. TEllMt* 


EXPLIIE. 


Arend Visscher, Holland, Mich. 


1892 


J. C. Benham, M. D., Hudson, N. Y. 


1893 


*Rev. Wm. J. R. Taylor, D. D., New York City, N. Y. 


1894 


Rev.G. H. Mandeville, D. D., '' 


1895 


Rev. Jas. F. Zwemer, Orange City, Iowa. 


1896 


tPAUL Steketee, Grand Rapids, Mich. 


1896 


Isaac Cappon, Holland, Mich. 


1897 


prom CLASSIS op ILLINOIS. 




Rev. John S. Joralmon, Norwood Park, 111. 


1892 


Rev. Thomas W. Jones. Bushnell, III. 


1892 


FROM CLASSIS OF WISCONSIN. 




Rev. John Broek, Milwaukee, Wis. 


1893 


Rev. Balster Van Ess. Roaeland, 111. 


1893 


FROM CLASSIS OP MICHIGAN. 




Rev. J. Talmadge Bergen. Holland, Mich. 


1894 


Rev. Samuel Streng, Kalamazoo, Mich. 


1894 


FROM CLASSIS OF GRAND RIVER. 




Rev. Wm. Moerdyk, Muskegon, Mich. 


1895 


Rev. Dirk Broek, Detroit, Mich. 


1895 


FROM CLASSIS OF HOLLAND. 




Rev. Gerhard De Jonge. * Vriesland, Mich. 


1896 


Rev. Henry E. Dosker, Holland, Mich. 


1896 


FROM CLASSIS OP DAKOTA. 




Rev. John A. De Spelder, Orange City, la. 


1896 


Rev. S. J. Harmeling, Marion, S. D. 


1896 


FROM CLASSIS OP IOWA. 




Rev. J. W. Warnshuis, Alton, la. 


1897 


Rev. James De Pree. Sioux Centre, la. 


1897 


♦Deceased. 




tResijfiied. 





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OFFICERS OF COUNCIL. 



Rev. W. Moerdyk. 
Rev. B. Van Ess. 
Rev. Henry E. Dosker, 
Isaac Cappon, 



President. 

Vice President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 



COMMITTEES OF COUNCIL. 



executive committee. 
Pres. ChaS. Scott, Chairman. Arend Visscher. Secretary. 
Rev. W. Moerdyk. Rev. Henry E. Dosker. 

'investment committee. 

(In charRe of the fundH of the Council. > 

Arend Visscher. Pres. Chas. Scott. Isaacj (.'appon. 

HOPE FARM committee. 

Pres. Chas. Scott. Isaac Cappon. Arend Visscher. 



I)E irOPEr 



Mr. R. Kanters. 

Rev. N. ]Vr. Steffens. D. I)., i 

Rev. W. Moerdyk, 

Rev. Henry E. Dosker. ) 



Publisher. 
Editorial ('om. 



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QoLLEGE [Department. 



H-H^H-H-' 



FACULTY. • 



REV. CHAS. SCOTT, D. D.. President. 

ProfesHor of Chemistry and Natural History. In charufe of Men- 
tal, Moral, and Christian Philosophy. 

CORNKLIS DOESBURG, A. M., Secretary 

of this and of the General Faculty. 

I*rofessor of Modern Languages and Literature. In charjje of Art 

Studies. 

GERRIT J. KOLLEN, A. M., 

Professor of Applied Mathe^iiatics, Physics, and Political Economy. 
In charge of Log-ic. 

HENRY BOERS, A. M., 
Professor of the English Language and Literature, and Rhetoric. 

JOHN H. KLETNHEKSEL. A. xM., 
Profes.sor of Mathematics. 

JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

REV. JOHN H. GILLESPIE. A. M.. 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literatiu'e. In charge of 
Sacred Literature. 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 

STUDENTS. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

NAMEH. RB8IDENCBH. 

JOHANNES DE BEER Emden, Germany. 

OERRIT H. DUBBINK Overisel. 

ORANGE C. FLANEGAN Allegan. 

PETER HUYSER Beaverdam. 

GEO. E. KOLLEN Overisel. 

JOHN LUXEN Holland City. 

ALBERT OOSTERHOF Spring Lake 

ANDREW J. REEVERTS Stillman Valley. 111. 

PHILIP SOULEN Milwaukee, Wis. 

CORNELIUS M. STEFFENS Holland City. 

HERMAN VAN DER PLOEG Holland City. 

HOMER VAN LANDEGEND Holland City. 

HENRY J. VELDMAN Grand Rapids. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

JOHN L. DE JONG Roseland, 111. 

CORNELIUS G. HAAN Grand Rapids. 

HENRY HUIZINGA Beaverdam. 

WIRTJE T. JANSSEN Foreston, 111. 

ALBERT KUIPER Kalamazoo. 

WILLIAM MIEDEMA Vriesland. 

WILEY W. MILLS Dorr. 

ALBERT J. ROOKS .r East Holland. 

JOHN SCHAEFER Oregon, 111. 

JAMES STERENBERG Fulton, 111. 

WILHELMUS V. TE WINKEL Fulton, 111. 

HENRY VAN DER PLOEG Holland City. 

WILLIAM O. VAN EYK Harrison, So. Dak. 

WILLIAM Z0P:TH0UT Roseland, III. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

GEORGE C. DANGREMOND Holland, Minn. 

WILLIAM M. DEHN Holland City. 

KLAAS J. DYKEMA Fulton, 111. 

PETER SWART Fernwood, III. 

GERRIT TYSSE Fernwood, 111. 

ARTHUR VAN DUREN Holland City. 

WILLIAM J. VAN KERSEN Roseland, III. 



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(VLLEGE STUDENTS. 7 

SPECIAL. 
GEORGE E. COOK Holland City. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

JULIA C. VAN RAALTE Holland. 

HENRY J. ALBERS Overisel. 

EVERT BOOM Alto, Wis. 

HENRY M. BRUINS Alto, Wis. 

CONRAD DE JONG, JR Orange City, la. 

HARM DYKHUIZEN Grand Rapids. 

GARRET FLIKKEMA Fulton, 111. 

JOHN J. HHEREN Orange City, la. 

BENJAMIN HOFFMAN Overisel. 

JOHN J. MERSEN Marion, N. Y. 

FRED. K. NOORDHOFF Orange City, la. 

WILLIAM TALEN Maurice, la. 

JOHN W. TE SELLE Holland, Neb. 

FREDERICK VAN ANROOY Graafschap. 

ART VAN ARENDONK Harrison, So. Dak. 

JOHN VAN DE ERVE Hein, So. Dak. 

JACOB VAN DER MEULEN Baldwin. Wis. 

SPECIAL. 
JOHN W. TE PASKE Orange City, la. 

SUMMARY. 

Seniors 13 

Juniora 14 

Sophomores ! 7 

Freshmen 17 

Special 2 

Total 53 

ADMISSION. 

For admission into the Freshman Class, a full certificate of 
graduation from the Grammar School Dapartment is required: or 
an examination of the studies pursued in that Department; or in 
what the Faculty shall deem an equivalent. 

In order to enter any advanced class of the Institution, it will 
be necessary for the applicant to pass an examination in the studies 
previously pursued by the class. If received on conditions, those 
must be fulfilled before regular admission. 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Mathematics.— Wentworth's Solid Geometry, and Plane 
and Spherical Trifjonometry. 

Language.— 

English. — Suplee's Trench on Words: Shaw's New History of 
English Literature: Study of Eng. Classics. 

Lrt^2».— Capes* Livy: Vergil: Composition and Mythology. 

(7rer A'.— Steven's Lysias: Dyer's AiK)logy and Crito: Herodotus: 
Allinson's Greek Prose Composition. 

Moihrn. -—Hi^lory of Dutch Literature: Essays and Transla- 
tions. 

Rhetoric. — Essays, Subjects Outlined: Drill in Elocution. 

History. — Laighton's Roman History: Myer's Ancient His- 
tory: An Atlas of Classical and Mediaeval Geography. 

Natural Science.— Cutter's (Comprehensive Physiology: 
Packard's Z{K)logy. 

Sacred Literature.— Greek New Testament and Introduc- 
tion. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Mathematics.— College Algebi-a: Hardy's Analytic Geom- 
etry: Wentworth's Surveying and Navigation. 

Language.— 

i\?^//,s7i.— English Litei'ature, and Study of Eng. Classics, con- 
tinued. 

La/ni.-Page's Horace: Hardy's Juvenal: Kelsey's Cicero's De 
Amicitia: De Senectute : Antiquities and Literature. 

fr/YcA-.— Seymour's Homer's Iliad: Tarbell's Demosthenes' Phi- 
lippics: Thucydides: Allinson's CJreek Prose Composition com- 
pleted. 



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(VVRJSE OF STUDY. 



Modern. — Edgren'H French Grammar: Super's French Reader, 
or some French Author. 

Rhetoric. — Essaya, Debateu, Orations, and Elocution. 
History. — Media* val and Modern History. 
Natural Science.— Remsen's Chemistry. 
Sacred Literature. — Greek New Testament, and Harmony 
of the Gospels. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics.— Hardy's Calculus. 

Mathematics Applied.— Olmsted's Natural Philosophy. 
Language.— 

Latin. — Stickney's Cicero's De Officiis; Sloman's Terence; 
March's Latin Hymns. 

Greek. — Odyssey or Lyric Poets: Humphreys' Aristophanes' 
Clouds; Allen's Prometheus of Aeschylus: Literature. 

Modem. — Joynes' Meissner's German Grammar; Joynes' Ger- 
man Reader, and some easy German Author. 

Rhetoric— Bascom's Philosophy of Rhetoric: American Lit- 
erature (Hawthorne and Lemmon): Essays, Discussions, and 
Orations. 

History. — Studies in History: Lectures on the Constitution 
and History of the United States. 

Natural Science.— Chemistry, one term; Wood's Botany, 
two terms; Sedgwick and Wilson's Biolog-y. 

Metaphysics.— Porter's Elements of Intellectual Science. 

Sacred Literature.— Butler's Analogy. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics. — Newcomb and Holden's Astronomy, advanced 
course. '^ 

Language.— 

Greek. —PldkU}'^ Phaedo, and Republic. 



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10 HOPE COLLEGE. 

Modern. — WallenHtein, and some German Author: German 
Literature: Compositions in German. 

Rhetoric -Continued. 

Logic— McCosh. 

Ethics.— Wayland's Moral Science. 

History.— Guizot's History of Civilization. 

Natural, Science.— Dana's Class Book of Gaology. 

Political. Science.— Walker's Political Elconomy, advanced 
(jourse: Essays on the same. 

Sacred Literature.— Lecture's on Evidences of Chrisr 
tianity. 



l^ The needeil bookn should be ready on (he (»peiifng day of each term. 



The following Schedule will show the method of carrying out the above Col- 
lege Curriculum. So far as may be the .lunior and Senior ClaBftett recite together 
to the President, e. g. in Fhiloeophv. 



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COURSE OF mVDV. 



11 



SCHEDULE OF COLLEGE RECITATIONS. 
8:16 TO 0:00 A. M. 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday i j Latin 

Thursday 1 1 Latin 

Friday ! Latin 




SOPHOXOBES. 



Surveying 

Mathematics 2 

Surveying 

Mathematics . . 
Mathematics . . 



KoUny 3... 
Kutler's Anal'y 
Moral Phllos'y 
Lectures 4... 
Moral I'hilos'y 



German 

Hist'yofClvirn 
MentalPhiloB'y 
Lectures ft . . . 
Mental Philos'y 



0:00 TO 0:46 A. M. 



FRESHMEN. 



Monday (Study 'fwordsB 

Tuesday , .Zoology 

Wednesday -. . . Study of words 

Thursday * . "Zoology 

Friday 11 Rhetorlcals. 

Il 



SOPHOMOBES. 

Greek 

Kng. Literature 

Greek 

Kng. Literature 
Greek 



JUNIORS. 



German. 

Greek.. 

German. 

Greek... 

German. 



Geology.. 



Geology.. 



Geology., 



0:45 TO 10:30 A. M. 



■Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday. 
Thursday. . . 
Friday 



FRBSHMBN. 

Sacred Literat 

Greek 

Greek 

Greek 

Greek 



SOPHOMORES. 

French 

ModernHlstory 

ChemiBtr>' 

ModemHl8tor>' 
Chemistr}' 



JUNIORS. 

Physics 

Rhetoric 7... 

Physics 

Rhetoric 7.... 
Physics 



Logic — 
German. . 

Logic 

German. . 



10:30 TO I 1:16 A. M. 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday. . 
Thursday, . . . 
Friday 



FRESHMEN. 

Mathematics 8 


SOPHOMORES. 

Chemistry 

Sacred Literal. 
French 


JUNIORS. 

Latin 


SENIORS. 

Greek 


French 

Mathematics 8 


Calculus 

Botanv 3 

Calculus 

Greek 


Political Econ. 
Greek 


French 


Greek 


Political Econ. 


Mathematics 8 


French 


Exerc. In Logic 







I 1:16 TO 12:00 M. 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday. 
Thursday. . . 
Friday 



FRESHMEN. 

Anc. History 9 

Music 

.Vnc. History 9 
Mathematics 8 
Dutch 10. . 



SOPHOMORES. 



Latin 

Engineering. . 
Rhetorlcals. . . 

Latin 

Latin 



JUNIORS. 

Rhetorlcals. . 

Latin 

Latin 

PhjTjIcs 

Botany 3... 



SENIORS. 

Astronomy 

Es'ysordebat's 

Astronomy 

Greek 

Astronomy 



1— Includes Roman History and An- 
tiquities. 

S— Embraces Algebra, 1st term: Ana- 
lytical Geometry, 2nd * 8rd terms. 

3— Biology, during the 2nd term. 

4— On the t'nlted States' Constitution. 

ft— On the Evidences of Christianity. 

6— English Literature, 3rd term. 



7— American Literature, last 12 weeks. 
8 — Solid Geometr>' and Mensuration, 
tst term: Plane Trlgonometrj', 
2nd term: Spherical Trigonome- 
try* Srd term. 
9— Includes .Vnclent Geography. 
lO^Studlesln Dutch Literature. 



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(Grammar •^ ^GhOOL 

.; : " D E PA R T M E N T. ;-x< 

FAGULTY. 

PROP. (HARLES S(:OTT. D. D., President, 
Religioiuj Instruction, or other branch as needed. 

PROF. CORNELIS DOESBURG, A. M., 
Modern Languages, Drawing and Painting. 

PROF. GERRIT J. KOLLEN, A. M., 

Natural Philosophy, Astronomy, Didactics, and Religious 

Instruction. 

PROF. HENRY BOERS, A. M., 
English, Rhetoric, and Greek History. 

PROF. JOHN H. KLEINHP:KSEL, A. M.. 
Mathematics, and Botany. 

PROF. JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A. M., Secretary. 
Latin, and Roman History. 

PROF. JOHN H. GILLESPIP:, A. M.. 
Greek. 

JOHN B. NYKERK. A. M., 
Prof, of Music: Principal of Grammar School. 

MRS. (\ VAN RAALTE GILMORE, 
Lady Principal. 

PROF. JAMES W. HUMPHREY, 
Director of the Summer School. 

PROF. GKRRIT J. KOLLKN, PHILIP SOILKN, » vhhihtant 1 iRHAR.AK- 

Librarian. \VM. O. VAX kYK, r^'*'****^^'*^ Librariani*. 

Piui.if Soii.KN. rhori»«ter. Pktkh Swart, OTgaiitst. 

ItKKNARl) HU»KMKNl}AAL. .iHllitOt. 



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GKAMMAR SCHOOL STUDENTti. 13 

STUDENTS. 



*'A" (;lass. 

NAMES. RB8IDBMCK8. 

HERMAN J. BROEK Milwaukee, Wis 

EDWARD D. DIMNENT Chicago, 111. 

FLORIS FERWERDA Grand Rapids. 

EDWARD KELDER Grandville. 

HENRY NIENHUIS Chicago, 111. 

JOHANNES J. OSSEWAARDE Zeeland. 

BERNARD L. TEN EVCK , Fairview, 111. 

HENRY VAN ARK Holland. 

SHELDON VANDEBURG Forest Grove. 

J AS. G. VAN ZWALUWENBURG Drenthe. 

HARRY J. WIERSUM Chicago, 111. 

OSCJAR B. WILMS Holland. 

UNCLASSIFIED. 

JACOB BUURSMA Grand Rapids. 

FRANK G. DE BEY Fulton, 111. 

ADRIAN J. MELIS Rathbun, Wis. 

•*B" CLASS. 

CHRISTINA HOLKEBOER Holland City. 

ANNA C. ROOKS East Holland. 

NICHOLAS BOER Drenthe. 

ALBERT BROENE Drenthe. 

JACOB BRUMMEL Overisel. 

HENRY DE JONGE Holland City. 

WM. DE JONGE Holland City. 

JOHN DE JONGH Grand Haven. 

.JOHN H. DEN HERDER Vriesland. 

GERRIT J. HUIZINGA Beaverdam. 

RALPH JANSEN East Holland. 

GERRIT W. KOOYERS Holland. 

JAS. E. MOERDYK Muskegon. 

ALBERT NECKERS, JR Clymer, N. Y. 

WILLIAM PEEKS Holland. 

WILLIAM PRAKKEN Holland City. 

TONY ROZENDAL Chicago, 111. 



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U HOPE COLLEGE. 



HENRY SAGGERS Graafschap. 

JOHN L. STARKEN Holland City. 

JOHN B. STEKETEE Holland City. 

JACOB E. TAKKEN Holland City. 

JACOB VAN DEN BOSCH Zeeland. 

JOHN F. VAN SLOOTEN Holland. 

BENJAMIN VENEKLASEN Zeeland. 

A. LIVINGSTON WARNSHUIS Gano, 111. 

HENRY L. YONKER Vriesland. 

UNCLASSIFIED. 

MARINUS BRINKMAN Sheboygan Falls, Wis. 

WILLIAM S. GRUYS Middlebiirgh, la. 

BENJAMIN STEGINK Graafschap. 

JOHN G. THEILKEN Gei-man Valley, 111. 

JOHN VAN DER MUEILEN Holland City. 

**C" CLASS. 

HATTIE B. ANDERSON Richmond, Va. 

ANNA APPELDOORN Holland. 

HATTIE G. BOONE Holland. 

MINNIE BROEK Holland. 

JENNIE DE KLEINE Jamestown. 

VINNIE L. HARRINGTON Holland. 

HANNA ILLG Hamilton. 

AUGUSTA R. OTTE Holland City. 

ANNA S. PEEKS Holland. 

ALIDA J. PIETERS Holland City. 

BELLE E. TAKKEN Holland City. 

MARIA VAN DOORNE Grand Haven. 

CHRISTINE VAN DURP:N Holland City. 

JOHN J. BANNINGA Muskegon. 

JOHN W. BEARDSLEE Holland City. 

HENRY BOEVE Holland. 

ABRAHAM L. CAPPON Holland City. 

SIETSE DEKKER Grand Rapids. 

ROBERT DE BRUYN Grand Haven. 

DIRK J. DOORNINK Grand Rapids. 

WILBUR HARDIE Fennville. 

EDWIN HEERINGA East Saugatuck. 

G. CLAIR HEKHUIS Holland. 

GEORGE H. HUIZINGA Holland City. 

ROGER C. KANTERS Holland City. 



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GRAMMAR SCHOOL STUDENTS. lo 



JOHN KEPPEL Zaeland. 

THOMAS KEPPEL Zeeland. 

ENSING LANNING Drenthe. 

JOHN G. MEENGS New Holland. 

HARRY MOKMA Holland City. 

CASPER W. NIBBELINK Holland City. 

LAMBERTUS A. PESSINK Holland City. 

CHRISTOPHER PRANGE Waupun, Wis. 

DIRK D. ROELOFS Drenthe. 

JOHN R. RUTGERS Graafschap. 

WILLIAM SLOTMAN Overisel. 

FRANK STOMPE Chicago. 

DON C. TAYLOR Dunningville. 

GERRIT H. TELDER Grand Rapids. 

JACOB L. TEMPEL Fulton, 111. 

ISAAC THOMPSON Holland City. 

CORNELIS J. TON Fernwood, 111. 

BENJAMIN A. VAN DUINE Zeeland. 

CORNELIS VAN DUREN Holland City. 

JACOB VAN ESS Roseland. 

HENRY VAN SLOOTEN Holland. 

THEODORE VAN ZOEREN Vriesland. 

JOHN VERMEULEN Beaverdam. 

JURRY E. WINTER Holland City. 

UNCLASSIFIED. 

BENJAMIN DUVEN Waupun, Wis. 

SETH NIBBELINK Blendon. 

*^D" CLASS. 

ANNA ALBERTI Holland City. 

REKA ESSING Drenthe. 

DENA PESSINK Holland Cily. 

GERTIE POSTMA Holland City. 

SARAH VAN DER MEULEN Holland City. 

DENA VAN HAITSMA Zutphen. 

MINNIE WILTERDINK Holland. 

JACOB BOEVE Graafschap. 

PETER BRAAK Grand Haven. 

ABEL BRINK Holland City. 

ALBERT BORGERS Greenleafton, Minn. 

BENJAMIN H. BOS Holland City. 

GERRIT ELFERDINK Holland. 

ALBERT FEYEN Graafschap. 



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16 HOPE COLLEGE. 



ALDERT D. GERRITSEN Fernwood, III. 

BURTON HARRINGTON Holland. 

GERRIT H. KRAGT Holland. 

JERRY M. LAEPLE Holland City. 

FOLKERT MANSENS Roseland. 

PETER J. MARSILJE Holland City. 

WILLIAM J. MAURITS Vriesland. 

JOHN RIEMERSMA , Holland. 

WALTER SMITH Roseland 111. 

JOHN R. STEFFENS : Holland City. 

PHILIP STEPHAN Jamestown Center. 

EDWARD TAKKEN Holland City. 

PETER E. TAKKEN Holland City. 

CONRAD T. TASCHE Sheboygan, Wis. 

WINAND VANDENBERG North Holland. 

CORNELIS VANDEVRIES Holland City. 

JOHN VERWEY Englewood, 111. 

FREDERICK WIERSMA Roseland, 111. 

DAVID O. YNTEMA Drenthe. 

LOUIS ZOETHOUT Holland City. 

SUMMER NORMAL CLASS. 
( Names omitted this year.) 

SUMMARY. 

*'A'- Class , 12 

'^B" Class 2tt 

''C" Class 49 

*'D" Class 34 

Unclassified 10 

Summer Normal '96 

Total 227 

ADMISSION. 

For admission into the "D" Class, a common school education 
is required in the branches pursued in that year. The better their 
previous training, the more easily and profitably can pupils enter 
upon the Grammar School Course. 

In order to enter any advanced class, it will be necessary for 
the applicant to pass an examination in the studies previously pur- 
sued by the class. If received on conditions, these must be ful- 
filled before regular admission. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 17 



The Normal Department is open to all who present evidence 
of sufficient preparation. Members having selected studies and 
classes, are expected to comply with the scholastic regulations of 
the Institution. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



FIRST YEAR, '*D" CLASS. 
Reading, Etc.— Monroe's Fifth Reader; Reed's Word Lessons. 
Penmanship.— Spencerian System. 

Geography.— Harper's School Geography, Michigan Edition. 
Mathematics.— Olney's Practical Arithmetic, 
Language— 

English.— B^ed and Kellogg's Graded Lessons in English. 
Rhetoric— Written Essays through the year. 
History.— Barnes's United States History. 

SECOND YEAR, **C" CLASS. 

Readijig, Etc.— Choice Selections from Eng. Classics; Ortho- 
epy and Diacritical Marks. 

PENMANSHIP.- Spencerian System. 

Natural Science.— Eclectic Physical Geography. 

Mathematics.— Went worth and Hill's Arithmetic; Sprague's 
Rapid Addition. 

Bookkeeping.— May he w's Practical Bookkeeping. 

Language.— 

English.— Ueed and Kellogg's Higher Lessons in English. 

ix«ftn. —Gradatim; Ginn and Co.'s Caesar, Netc Edition; Allen 
and Greenough's Latin Grammar; Composition. 



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18 HOPE COLLEGE. 

/>t/?c/«.— Reading: Spelling: Translations. 

Fjt«c/?.— Ed^iv^n's Fronch Grammar. { Elect m^ftn' Lat'm). 

Rhetoric— Essays and D:elamations. 

THIRD YEAR. -B" CLASvS. 

Reading.— Choice Salections. 

D.-IAWING.— Fr3e Hand and Pjr.sp3ctivj. 

Mathematics.— Went>^'ortb-s School AljifeTwa: Stifle's As- 
tronomy, with the HH-j of (ilob?s. 

Language.— 

J^»^/i.s/^ -(rramniar cjntinu jd: Hart's I^etoric bjji^un. 

L(^tin.—V•ei^}^r\ Ginn and Co.'s C^icjro: Grammar and (J;)mposi- 
tion. 

6VwA\— Frost's Primor: Moss" First Reader: Hadley- Allen's 
Grammar. 

Duk'h.—KsiVs Grammar: Exercisos: Translations. 

/'V/';*c/j.— Edg-ren's French Grammar. [Elet'tivv for Latin), 

Gernmn. — Joynes' Meissner's German Grammar: Joynes' Ger- 
man Reader. {Elective for Greek.) 

Rhetoric— Hart's Rhetoric: Essays. 

History. — Smith 's Greek History. ( A bridged. ) 

Elocution.— South wick's Primer of Elocution and Action, 

FOURTH YEAR. "A" C^-.ASS. ' 
Drawing.— 

Mathematics. — Wentworth's S(!hool Al^jfebra ijini.shed]: 
Wentworth's Plane Geometry. 

Natural Science.— Peck's (Janot's Natural Philosophy, re- 
vised: Physiolofjfy and Hyijiene. 

LANGUAGE.-- 

A'/<(///>7/. — S])rajrue's Milt<m*s Paradise Lost, or some other 

Author. 



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iWHSE OF STUD y. Vt 

Ldtin.— Vic dro: Kelsey's Ovid; (rraramar and C';>mpo»ition. 

Cr'mA-.— Anabasis. Bks. Ill and IV; Hellenica, Bk. II; White's 
First Lessons, LVT to LXXX, or an equivalent; Hadley-Allen's 
Orammar. 

Dutch, — Kat's Grammar, continued; Practical Kxercis.»s; Trans- 
lations; Compo8iti(m. 

French. — i 

[•Ccmtinued as Electives for Latin and Greek. 
Germ (in. — 1 

V 

Rhetoric— Hart's Rhetoric; Essays: Declamations. The 
Class publishes a monthly paper, called Thf Excdahni. 

History.— Anderson's En^^lish History. 

Civil Government.— Younj^'s Government Class Book. 

Didactics.— White's Elements of Poda^otfy. 

Religious Instruction, and Ml'SIC— In all the Classes. 

Special attention is jjfiven, during the whole of the Prepara- 
tory C'ourse, to the grammars of the languages studied. For those 
who pursue English studies only, or who design stopping at the 
end of the "A" year, the Faculty provide such additional branches, 
as seem most expedient and profitable. Those, whose time is fully 
occupied in the work of the school, generally make better 
progress. 

During the entire course an average of six essays yearly, on 
assigned subjet^ts, is required of each student. 

In general educaticmal value, it is believed that the above four 
years' ('ourse of Study is worthy of full recommendation, whether 
for entrance into College, or for a professional training, or for a 
business life. 

The Schedule of Refutations is attached. This serves to show: 

1. That the drill in the English branches is continued to the 
end of the four yeai-s' course. Those who ent€»r the *'D" should 
have some previous knowledge of Arithmetic, (Jrammar. and 
Geography. 



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JO HOPE COLLEGE. 

2. Beginning with the ''C" year, Latin is studied almost 
daily, with about 500 recitations in all. 

i3. Beginning with the **B" year, and including Greek His- 
tory, thei*e are nearly 400 recitations in Greek. 

4. As may be noticed, German, or French and (^rman, can 
be substituted for Greek. All who desire a good education should 
study Latin. 

5. Those who take an English course only, select their stud- 
ies, but not less than eighteen recitations per week are i-equired. 
as shall be assigned by the Faculty. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 



21 



SCHEDULE OF GRAMMAR SCHOOL RECITATIONS. 
8:16 TO 0:00 A. M. 



Monday I Arithmetic 'Physical Geo*y'Greek 1 Kiiglish » 

Tuesday ' i Orthography.. . Uible Study . . . iGreek I English 

Wednesday i Arithmetic PhysIcalGeogr. Greek I English 

Thursday ; , Bible Study. . . . 'Orthography.. . IGreek English 

Friday , iOrthograpby.. . iGrammar iGreek 1 Arto"Teachlng 



9:00 TO 0:46 A. M. 

_ ^ 

I D CLASS I V CLASS R CLA.SS •A CLASS 

Monday ' IReading ' Arithmetic . . . ! Latin |N. Philosophy. 

Tuesday ' Arithmetic .... Latin : Dutch 3 CIvilGovenrt4 

Wednesday 11 Reading A rithmetlc . . . . ' Latin - N. Philosophy. 

Thursday I Arithmetic .... I Latin I Dutch 8 ('IvllGovernt4 

Friday 1 1 Arithmetic .... I Arithmetic . . .. | Latin jN. Philosophy. 



0146 TO 10:30 A. M. 



I 



Monday U. S. History ..i Latin iRhetoric 'Algebra 5. 

Tuesday i Grammar Arithmetic Latin 'Dutch 

Wednesday i r. S. History . . I I..atln j Rhetoric | Algebra 

Thursday i Grammar I Arithmetic , I^atin I Dutch 

Friday i T. S. Histor>' . . Latin JGram. AnalysisI Algebra 



10:30 TO I 1:16 A. M. 



il 



I 



Monday {Grammar Grammar ! Astronomy ....(Drawing 

Tuesday I Penmanship. . . IReading 6. . . , iGreek History-. I Latin 

Wednesday {Grammar iGrammar I Astronomy ILatin 

Thursday Penmanship. . . , Reading 6 . . . . iGreek History'. I Latin 

Friday I Composition. . . i Rhetoricals. . . . | Hlble Study. . . . | Latin 



I 1:16 TO 12:00 M. 



Monday . . . . 
Tuesday.... 
Wednesday 
Thursday 



Geography Book -keeping- 
Music i Com position. . . 

Geography . 
Geography 



Algebra Greek. . . , 

Algebra IGreek. . . . 

Hook'-keeping.. Algebra IGreek. , . . 

Dutch I Rhetoricals. ... English. . 



Friday MGeography .... {Dutch j Algebra. {Greek. 

Il 



1— German may be taken inst'd of Greek. 

2— English in the ".\" year includes: a. 
Rhetoric, finished: ^. Analysis of 
"Paradise Lost'* and "Lysldas"'; 
c. Preparation of the*vExcelsiora"; 



</. English History. 
3— For those who use it at their homes. 
4 — Physiology, during the third term. 
5— Plane Geometry begins second term. 
6 — Orthography in connection. 



XoTB 1.— Recitations in the afternoon whenever deemed necessary. 
NoTB 2.— The Lady Principal meets all young ladles twice a week, for such 
studies or exercises as she may select. 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



REGULAR NORMAL COURSE. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Orthography, Penmanship, Reading, G-rammar, Composi- 
tion, Higher Arithmetic, Book-keeping, Latin or "Electives." 
such as Physiology and Civil Government, Drawing, Dutch 
or French, Music, Review of U. S. History and Geography, 
Professional Instruction for the teacher. 

By taking Electives instead of Latin, the above forms a 
good one-year English course. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Rhetoric. Composition, Elocution. Drawing, Zo:logy. 
Algebra, Astronomy, Latin and Greek History, or "Electives," 
Greek or German, or ••Electives," Dutch or French, Music, 
Practice in Studies of first year. 

Professional Instruction in the Art of Teaching, suitable 
for those who want a two-year English course. 

THIRD YEAR. 

English Language and English History. Composition 
and Elocution. Algebra. Physics, Latin and Roman History, 
or "Electives." Greek or German, or "Electives." Dutch or 
French, Voice Culture. Geometry. Civil Government, Physi- 
ology. Moral Science. 

Professional Instruction in Practice of Teaching. The 
Electives will give a full Literary or Scientific Course, to 
the end of the "A" year. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

English Literature, Composition and Elocution. Geome- 
try, Greek or German, General History, Dutch or French, 
Chemistry, Mental Science*, History of Education, Trigo- 
nometry. Physical Geography, Geology, School System, 



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EEGVLAR NORMAL (VVRSE. :i3 

Practice of Teaching. This last year embraces College 
studies. 

The above studies will be under the charge of the Facul- 
ties, and according to the regular Schedule of Instructicui. 

THE SUMMER NORMAL. 

The studies, at this time, are designed to give an oppor- 
tunity for a thorough review of the subjects required for 
* -first, second and third grade Certificates", in Michigan, 
and for gaining such general information as will better fit 
teachers for their needed and noble profession. 

The studies thus to be reviewed, with daily drill as to 
methods and principles, are: 

Orthography, Reading, and Penmanship; Geography, 
Arithmetic, and Grammar; United States History, and Civil 
Government; Book-keeping. Algebra, and Geometry; Physi- 
ology, Botany, and Philosophy; School Law; Science and 
Art of Teaching; Question Drawer, and Practical Discussions. 

Extra Branches, such as Music. Crayon Drawing, Type- 
writing, and Short-hand, may be pursued, when a sufficient 
number for a class desire such instruction. 

Each subject will be treated after approved * -normal" 
methods, with special referenc'e to the needs of teachers in 
their district schools. Taking English Grammar, for exam- 
ple, the programme will embrace a review of the parts of 
speech; parsing and diagraming; rules and forms, both oral 
and written; composition; and a careful analysis of the right 
use of the language. 

Those desiring to enter the School will bring their ordi- 
nary text-books, as instruction will be mainly given by note 
and topic. 

The next Summer School will be held for four weeks, from 
July 5th to August 2nd, 1802. As in former years, compe- 
tent instruction will be provided. 

The Library and Apparatus of the College are free for 
the use of these classes. 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



THE WORK IN DETAIL. 



THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

In its four years' course, the Grammar School prepares 
students for the Classical Dep't in college or the university. 
Further, in order to meet the needs of those that do not ex- 
pect to enter college, the course is made more comprehen- 
sive than would otherwise be necessary. To this end, special 
studies in science, book-keeping, elocution, music, modern 
languages, theory and art of teaching, etc. , are introduced, 
thus laying the foundation for a liberal and practical educa- 
tion. 

The several departments receive the same careful atten- 
tion as in the college proper, being under the immediate 
care of the respective college professors; while the subsidi- 
ary branches and ' *electives'' are in charge of the Principal 
of the Department, assisted so far as may be necessary. 
Also those that desire to fit themselves for the teaching pro- 
fession obtain a first-class normal, as well fis academic train- 
ing, in the Grammar School. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROF. UKNRY BOERS. 

Beginning with the "D " class, English Grammar is reg- 
ularly studied until the close of the first term of the »*B" 
year, the classes having froni three to five recitations a week. 
Rhetoric is then taken up for five terms, during which time, 
however, Milton's Lycidas and Books I and II of Paradise 
Lost are also carefully studied. 

Gre3k History is placed in the *'B'" year, and English 
History in the 'A", in each of which studies there are two 
recitations a week. Composition and Declamation receive 
careful attention in all the Grammar School classes. 



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THE WOHK IX DETAIL. 



Every year the '"A" class publishes a "monthly," in manu- 
script form, often very tastefully ornamented. These num- 
bers are bound together in a volume and each year's volume 
is preserved in the College Library. 

The Freshman class enters first upon Trench's ' *Study of 
Words' ', and then takes up English Literature until the end 
of the Sophomore year. As much time as possible is given 
to the careful study of English Classics. Essays and criti- 
cisms on British authors are often required, and all who 
wish may contend for the ^'George Birkhoff Prize* for ex- 
cellence in English Literature. 

The Juniors first study the "Philosophy of Rhetoric," 
and then enter upon the study of American Literature. 
Rhetorical exercises continue to the close of the Senior year. 

MATHEMATICS.— Prop. J. H. Kleinheksel. 

Arithmetic continues through the *'D" and ^'C" years. 
Three terms of the *'B" and one of the "A" year are given 
to Algebra, followed by Plane Geometry, which is finished 
by the end of the "A" year, calling for 560 recitations. 

The Freshmen take Mensuration and finish Solid Geom- 
etry the first term. Plane Trigonometry the second, and 
finish Spherical Trigonometry the third term. In the first 
term. Sophomore, College Algebra is made a study, after 
which Analytical Geometry and Calculus finish the range of 
pure Mathematics in the second term of the Junior year. 

LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROF. JAMES (}. 8UTPHEN. 

In the Grammar School, Latin is begun with the "C" 
class, and continues through the "A", with daily recitations 
in the "C" and "B" years, and with four weekly recitations 
in the "A" year. — The Roman method of pronunciation is 
used. — The student is immediately introduced to the simple 
stories in "Gradatim", and familiarized with Inflection and 
Case relation. In Caesar and Cicero, while reviewing the 



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ae HOPE COLLEGE. 

Syntax of nouns, the rest is taken up and constant drill 
given in Sequence of Tenses, Conditional Sentences, Oratio 
Obliqua, and the Subjunctive mood Prosody is studied 
with the poetry. Graduated (^xercises are given in render- 
ing English into Latin. 

In the College, Latin is pursued through the first 
three years. The study of the Grammar, by analyzing sen- 
tences, is not neglected in the eifort to present the authors 
in their, literary character. Collateral instruction is given 
in Mythology, Antiquities, and Literature. Composition is 
taught by translating into Latin easy extracts from English 
authors. — Assistance is willingly offered to students who 
wish to broaden their knowledge of Latin Literature by 
reading other authors than those marked in the required 
Curriculum. 

GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

IMl(>F. J(HIN H. (ilLLKSFlK. 

While it is felt that thoroughness is indispensable, it is 
not deemed an absolute necessity, that even the study of 
elementary Greek be made unattractive. This belief has in 
part determined the choice of text-books adopted and authors 
read. The episode from the Hellenica is read preparatory 
to the study of.Ly.sias in the Freshman year. Much black- 
board work is required as essential to accuracy. 

In tTie College course effort is made, as far as practica- 
ble, to read at least one epochal classic author in history, 
oratory, epic and lyric poetry, drama and philosophy. But 
as this aim is not fully attainable, extra work on the part of 
those able and willing is encouraged and engaged in. In 
this way are read such works as Demosthenes on the Crown, 
Isocrates' Panegyricus, and a play from each of the two 
tragedians necessarily crowded out of the regular course. 

Once a week, for two years, the Greek New Testament 
is read and the same amount of time is allotted to Greek 
Prose Composition. 



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THE WORK IN DETAIL. 



MODERN LANGUAGES. 

PROF. COIINELIS DOESBTRi}. 

Many of the students at Hope come from Holland homes 
and use that language in common life. For them instruction 
is given in the Dutch Grammar and Literature twice a week 
up to the Freshman Class. Those who select German in lieu 
of Greek, give their time to that study from the '^B" Class 
onward, sometimes adding the French, and taking what may 
be called a scientific course. As a part of the regular or A. 
B. course, the French is assigned to the Freshman and 
Sophomore classes, and the German to the Juniors and Se- 
niors, giving nearly two hundred recitations to each lan- 
guage. The more diligent students read the French and 
the German with considerable facility, j^nd may be able to 
use them subsequently in their business. The text-books 
are varied but embrace only those of classic authority. 

PHYSICS AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS. 

PROF. (JKRRIT J. KOLLEN. 

The "B" class has a primary course in Astronomy, and 
the "A", in Natural Philosophy. 

The Sophomores study surveying, and for electives add 
Field Work, Drafting and Engineering. The Juniors apply 
their Mathematics to Mechanics and other branches of Nat- 
ural Philosophy, while the Seniors seek to discover the sci- 
entific laws which lie at the basis of the astronomical system. 

CHEMISTRY AND NATURAL HISTORY. 

PROF. CHAS. SCOTT. 

In the latter half of the year the ''A" class studies 
Physiology under the Principal. The Freshman take a 
higher course in Physiology, and also Zoology. The Sopho- 
mores have three recitations weekly in Systematic Chemis- 
try; and the Juniors two terms in Botany and one in Biology. 
The Seniors follow with Geology and Mineralogy throughout 



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JH HOPE COLLEGE. 



the year. For Classical students this course is sufficiently 
extended, but the College, as yet, has not furnished labora- 
tories for more individual and scientific work in the above 
branches. 

PHILOSOPHY, ETC. 

The Junior class uses Potter's Intellectual Science as a 
text-book, but is constantly exercised in analytic thought, 
observation and judgment on the whole subject of Psychol- 
ogy, for which end discussion is invited. Ethical Science is 
similarly studied during the Senior year. The above branches 
are under the President, as is also Christian Philosophy, 
through lectures and the use of Butler's Analogy. Prof. 
Kollen gives the Seniors a course in Logic and Political 
Economy, and in order to develop correct thought and reas- 
oning calls for class debates or essays on civic or political 
subjects. 

HISTORY. 

There is no distinct Chair of History, and yet this most 
useful branch is by no means neglected. In the Grammar 
School all ai^ required to complete abridged courses in the 
History of the United States, of Greece, and of England. 
Every College class has work in the same line, that is, the 
Freshmen in Ancient History and Geography; the Sopho- 
mores in Modern History and Geography; the Juniors in the 
History and meaning of the United States' Constitution; and 
the Seniors in the History of Civilization. The Library is 
fairly well supplied with works on this subject, and they are 
read by the students with an interest that is gratifying to 
their instructors. 

MUSIC. 

PROF. .J. B. NYKERK. 

In harmony with the progressive spirit that places Music 
in the curriculum of our public schools, Hope College fur- 
nishes, without expense to the pupil, a course in theory of 



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THE WORK IN DETAIL. 



Music, supplemented with elementary course in Harmony. 
Sight singing and Voice Culture in class receive special 
attention. A Glee Club and the Eupsalian Orchestra have, 
for the last three years, given added enthusiasm to this de- 
partment. All students, who are qualified, may become 
members of the above organizations. Private lessons in 
Voice Culture will be furnished at reasonable rates. 

It will be seen, therefore, that while Hope cannot, at 
present, offer many '^electives", it has and secures a regular 
liberal course, as English, and as complete as can be found 
in most of our Western Colleges, 



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MISGELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



LOCATION. 

Holland City is a central point on the Chicago & West 
Micliigan Railway, ninety miles north of New Buffalo, twen- 
ty-five miles south-west of Grand Rapids, and. midway be- 
tween Allegan and Grand Haven. To all Eastern points the 
route by rail is direct. It is therefore most desirably located, 
having both land and water communications, being near the 
shore of Lake Michigan, with which it is directly connected 
by a beautiful sheet of water, called Macatawa Bay, and on 
which are the popular summer resorts, Macatawa Park, and 
Ottawa Beach. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 

The College Campus lies between Tenth and Twelfth 
streets, in the centre of the city, and contains sixteen acres, 
with an addition of two acres on the south side of Twelfth 
street. It presents a finely varied surface, well shaded with 
native trees, and is annually improving in beauty and at- 
tractiveness. 

The College buildings are eight in number. The largest 
is Van Vleck Hall, mainly devoted to students' rooms and 
the Library. It has been decided to build an ample Recita- 
tion Hall and a Library, as soon as the requisite funds can 
be secured. 

SCHOOL YEAR. 

The scholastic year of forty weeks, begins on the third 
Wednesday in September, and ends with the general Com- 
mencement on the fourth Wednesday in June. 



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M1S< ELLA yEOrs INFORM A Tioy, ,n 



The winter and spring vacations are Jix(»d by th(» General 
Faculty. (See the Calendar.) 

COURSE OY STUDY. 

Most of the students seek what is called --a liberal edu- 
cation." leading to the degree of A. B. or S. B. A "partial" 
or -'elective" course is offered to all who so desire, and fa- 
cilities are furnished through the regular instructors; but a 
partial course entitles only to a certificate, and not to adip 
loma. German and French, or Drawing and Painting, can 
be studied at any time, as also the branches generally called 
^•scienttfic, " fitting the student for professional coursers in a 
University. 

Since' 1878 the Institutitm has been open to women. 
They enter the regular classes, and attend the same lectures 
and recitations as the young men. 

Vocal Music is providv'd without charge. Lessons in In- 
strumental music can be secured at the expense of the pupil. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

The yearly examinations before the Council or its Com- 
mittee, begin on the third Wednesday in June. Examina- 
tions at other times may be held and })assed upcm by the re- 
spective Faculties, subject to the approval of the Council, or 
to a n*-examination. if so desired. 

The examinaticms are ral or in writing, as seems best 
to each ])rof(\ssor. or as may b(» directed by th(» Council, 

CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS. 

Members of the "A" Class, uptm graduation in full 
course, are entitled to a regular Certificate, . signed by the 
Council and the Faculty; but said certificate will be marked 
"first." • -.second." or -third grade," as follows: When the 



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SJ HOPE COLLEGE. 

recorded standing of the graduate is from 90 to 100, this 
will indicate the "First Grade;" when from 80 to 90, the 
* 'Second;" and when from 70 to 80, the "Third;" reference 
being made to both recitations and txaminations. 

Such students as are admitted in partial course, or who 
fall below an average standing of 71, are entitled to a Cer- 
tificate, from the Faculty, naming the studies in which they 
have sustained examinations. 

Graduates from the College, when recommended by the 
Faculty, receive a Diploma, with the degree of A. B., or S. 
B. , being a testimonial of general scholarship. The Course 
leading thereto includes all the "liberal arts," usually taught 
in colleges- A "partial course" is sometimes chosen, and is 
entitled to a Certificate as adjudged by the Faculty. 

The degree of A. M. is conferred upon those who con- 
tinue their studies for three years after graduation, or who 
may satisfy the Council as to their scholastic attainments. 
By paying a fee of three dollars, an A. M. diploma in such 
cases will be given. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

The exercises of each day begin with prayer in the Col- 
lege Chapel, at 8 o'clock a. m. 

On the Sabbath every student is expected to worship 
regularly with one of the churches in the city or vicinity, 
unless excused by the President. 

Religious instruction is given in all the classes regularly, 
and, like all the other studies, is in charge of the Faculty. 

Although Hope College is denominational, and is under 
the patronage and support of the Reformed Church in 
America, yet, by the law of its incorporation, it can have 
no "religious test." The doors are open, and welcome is 
given to all who submit to its scholastic regulations. As a 
Christian school, however, it inculcates gospel truths, and 
demands a consistent moral character and deportment. 



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MLSCELLA NEO US IXFOHMA TIOX, .$.i 

LIBRARY. ETC. 

A Library of over 8,()0() volumes, and a Reading Room, are free 
for the use of the students. Books and papers are constantly being 
added, and require increased accommodations, and a fireproof 
building. 

The Laboratory, Cabinet, and Philosophical Apparatus are 
adapted to the use of the recitation or lecture rooms. They are 
gradually being made larger and more complete. It is to be hoped 
that Maps. Charts, Instruments, and Si)ecimens of Natural History. 
as well as books, will be donated by the graduates and friends of 
the Institution. 

SOCIETIKS. 

Four Literary Societies, viz., the Meliphon, and the Frater- 
nal, and the Ulfilas Club, have been maintained for years, and 
oflFer decided advantages to their respective members, and materi- 
ally aid in the attainment of that culture, which it is the object of 
this school to promote. The Ulfilas Club seeks to secure for its 
member's greater proficiency in the use of the Holland language. 
During the last year students who study German have organized a 
Society, called l)k Girmunin GeselUdutft; and the young ladies 
meet every two weeks mainly for religious and social purposes. 

The Young Men's Christian Association, having over one hun- 
dred members, continues to carry on its work with much interest 
and activity. 

SUNDRIES. 

Connected with the Institution, a religious weekly is published, 
called De Hope. It was established in 18()6, and is under the direc- 
tion of the Council, through its Editorial Committee. The paper 
has a circulation of 2,500 copies. 

A monthly, called Thv Anchor, is conducted by the students 
with gratifying success. 

The *'A" Class maintains a periodical in manuscript, called The 
ExcelMm^a. It is bound, year by yeai\ and is placed in the Library. 



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34 HOPE COLLEGE. 



The Oratorical Exercises of the Grammar School, on the final 
Monday of the College year, is the ( 'ommenccjment of that Depart- 
ment, and marks the ^J^raduation of the "A" Class. 

Two prizes, called "The Gaorg-e Birkhoflf, Jr., Prizes", have 
l)een established. One is for the Sophomore CUass, in English 
Literature, and the other for the Freshman Class, in Dutch Liter- 
ature. At the last C,-ommenc3ment they were awarded, T^y the 
(Committees, as follows: For proficiency in English Literature, to 
Henry Huizinga, while honorable mention was made of Wiley W. 
Mills and .fas. Sterenberg: for proficiency in Dutch Literature, to 
Klaas J. Dykema. and hcmorable mention was made of Gerrit 
Tysse. 

It is expected that additional priz^^s will follow, as a stimulus 
to labor in other branches of study. 

A Course of Lectures is of almost yearly occurrenc3, usually at 
the invitation of one of the societies, and with the ai)proval and 
financial aid of the Executive Committee. 

The moral, social, and literary advantages of Holland are con- 
sidered good, and are steadily advancing. 

EXPENSES. 

The City is suri-ounded by a rich agricultural region, and the 
cost of living is comparatively cheap. Good board and rooms may 
Ix; had in families of the city for from two to three dollai"s i>er 
week; in clubs, and without furnished rooms, at lower rates. There 
is no fixed rent for rooms. 

There are seventeen rooms in Van Vleck Hall, in the selection 
of which students for the ministry have the preference. These 
are furnished in part and bear a moderate charge. 

As yet, no TUITION fees have been charged, but every student 
must pay to the Treasurer, In <idr<tnce^ an incidental fee of five dol- 
lars per term. 

The graduation fee is five dollars in the College and two and 
one-half dollars in the Grammar School. No other charges are 
made. 



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MIS( 'ELLA XEOrs IN FORM A TION. So 



For books, clothing, washin^f, fuel, lights, travel, etc., those 
interested can b3st make the estimates. The entire expense need 
not exceed $200 i)er annum, and may be considerably less. 

The fee of the students in the Summer Normal Classes is five 
dollai*s for the session. Those who enter the College, for the reg- 
ular Normal (bourse, are charged ten dollars in advance for each 
semester or half year. 

Boarding Houses and Clubbing arrangements in the city are to 
be approved by the Faculty, and to ba subject to such regulations 
as are usual in similar institutions. By a rule of the College, lady 
students are not to room in the same boarding houses with the 
gentlemen. 

DISCilPLINE. 

The Rukii of OnUr are few and simple. In general, if the stu- 
dents do not improve their time and opportunities, or do not con- 
duct themselves in a respectful and orderly manner, their connec- 
tion with the Institution will be suspended. 

The students are required to be present, ynmiitiUj, on the first 
day of each and every term. The recitations w^ill begin the next 
morning. 

A record is kept of the scholastic standing of each student, and 
a copy of the same is sent to the parent or guardian; if the average 
standing, in any term, does not exceed 70, on a basis of 100, he is 
to be dropped from his class. 

Term's fees and room rent are to be paid strictly in advance, 
and if not so paid, or within one month, the student neglecting 
forfeits his right to continue in the Institution. 

The object of the Faculty is to develop in the pupils a higher 
moral as w^ell as an intellectual culture and character. If they 
find, after due pi'obation and inquiry, that the influence of a stu- 
dent is bad and injurious to others, they claim the right to demand 
his withdrawal. 

Parents are requested not to ask or expect their children, in 
this school, to come home during term time. It seriously inter- 
feres with proper habits of study, and by our rules, none are to be 
absent from the Institution without permission of the President. 



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./6 HOPE COLLEGE, 

A copy of the rejfulations of the ('olleffeisg'iven to each student 
at the time of his or her matriculation. 

RKMARKS. 

In April, 1891. the Council appointed a Committee to seeui-e 
I)lans for a suitable Library Building, and report the same to the 
.lune meeting, with suggestions as to the raising of the needed 
funds: said c unmittoe b3ing Prof. G. J. Kollen (the Librarian), 
Prof. .1. W. Beardslee, D. D., and H. D. Post, Esq. A building of 
fine appearand 3 has bjen planned provisionally, and Prof. Kollen 
is successfully appealing for funds to erect the same in so far as 
may b3 done without contraction of debt. 

Rev. James F. Zwemer has continued his work as Financial 
Agent of the College, and has now secured nearly $H0, 000, of which 
one-half will b3 added to the p]ndowment Fund. 

The Summer Sc'h(K)l of 1891 was conducted a» usual, from July 
() to Aug 7. Prof. J. W. Humphrey was Director, being assisted 
in the work of instruction by Prof. J. H. Kleinheksol, Hope Col- 
lege: Prof. A. W.Taylor, of Coopersville: MLssCora Goodenow, of 
Berlin: Miss (.-arrie Hotchkiss, who had charge of the Kindergar- 
ten class: Mr. Dirk J. Werkman, A. B., of Ann Arbor: Mr. Alva 
Towne, in Penmanship. The class numbered 9(5. and the school, 
notwithstanding some difficulties, was successful in securing its 
object, even beyond provious onis. The School of 1892 will be 
under the same direction, but Prof. P. A. Latta, Commissioner of 
Schools in Allegan County, will be regularly connected with the 
cor))s of instruction. It will b^gin July oth, and end August 2nd. 

Rev. William J. R. Taylor, D. D., a Trustee of the College, 
died at (lunnison. Colorado. <m the 12th of November. 1891: he was 
born at Schodack. N. Y., July 81,1823. 

Dr. W. J. R. Taylor was the s(m of Rev. Benjamin C. Taylor, 
1H22-1HH1 (years of his ministry in our Reformed Church): who was 
the son-in-law of Rev. James V. C. Romeyn. 1787-1840: who was 
the son of Rev. Thomas Romeyn, 1752 1794. From generation to 
generation the family has boen i)eculiarly ministerial and educa- 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. S7 

tional. He leaves three sons who are in the ministry, and one of 
them a professor in the Hartford Theological Seminary. Himself, 
his father, and grandfather, his uncle, and grand-uncle were trustees 
of Rutgers College, the lattar baing mainly instrumental in the 
founding of Union College. 

He was graduated as A. B. from Rutgers College, in 1841. and 
from the New^ Brunswick Theological Seminary, in 1844. After 
holding five pastorates, viz., at New Durham, Jersey City (twice), 
Schenectady, and Phlladelpl^ia, he became one of the secretaries 
of the American Bible Society, in 1862, and filled the position 
most ably for seven years. Being then urgently called to the 
Clinton Avenue Church, Newark, N. J., in 1869, he accepted the 
call and i-emained for over twenty years. In 1890 he was elected 
Secretary of the American Sabbath Union.and was most zealously 
carrying on the work of this noble Society. While on a journey 
across the mountains to Salt Lake City, he was suddenly called to 
the rest on high, after a ministry of 47 years. 

He was elected a Trustee of Rutgers College in 1878, and to the 
Council of Hope C;ollege,by the General Synod in 1888. In 1871, he 
was President of the General Synod, and has repeatedly been se- 
lected for important positicms. 

A man of varied scholarship: a iluent and popular speaker; a 
good writer and an author of many publications; an able and use- 
ful preacher and pastor; skilled in debate and versed in such busi- 
ness as belonged to the Church, the School, the Synod, the Board, 
or the Society, Dr. Taylor has well discharged an active steward- 
ship of nearly fifty years on earth, and his ministry is to be cher- 
ished by all who have known him in life, and who love the faith- 
ful servants of the Lord and His kingdom. 



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.yy HOPE COLLEGE. 



GliRONOLOGIGAL MEMORANDA. 



KeKinniii>i: of the Xetherland Inim&Kration lnt:> Mlchi^oiii. Iowa, etc- 1K4T 

VillBKe of HollaiHl laid out 18*** 

Five acres donated by Rev. A. ('. Van Raalte. l) I)., as* a hite for an Academy. liCi<> 

"IMoneer School" opened. M r. W. T. Taylor. Principal Oct.. 1851 

Placed under the care of the (iencral Synod June, 185» 

Mr. W. T. Taylor resi^fned * Oct., 18SS 

Rev. V. W. Heidler. Principal 18M 

Rev, John Van Vleck. Principal 18.V> 

The Hchool named the Holland .Vcademy IHSft 

Lwated in the "Orphan Ifoune " I8S6 

Van Vleck Hall erecte<l on "the five acres' 18S7 

The Academy more fully orprani ;ed 1857- "S8 

Meliphone Society founded 1857 

Rev. John Van Vleck, resiKned 1859 

Rev. Philip Phelps, Jr., Principal IK'^ 

( 'ampUR enlarjied to 16 a<*reH 1859 

"Oggel House" erected as a residence IHflD 

GymnAHium built, larpely by students 1802 

A Fr.'shtmin cIbkh formed. 10 in number 18fl2 

Fraternal Society founded 1883 

A "Board of Superintendents" appointed by General Syno*! 186S 

A CoUt\^t' proposed, and approved by the Synods I8M 

Over fK),000 contributed as an endowment 1865 

Hope ('ol]ej?e beKun, IWK: incorporate<l May. 1866 

48 students In all 1865-'66 

The Board of Superintendents, named "The Council" 1866 

Faculty of six appointed and onfanized: Rev. P. Phelps. Jr., I). I)., Pres. July, 1866 

First Commencement: elKht became .V. B 186ft 

A weekly newspaper. A- I1of>i\ established 1866 

Theological instruction begun , with a class of seven Sept., 1866 

Rev. C. K. Crispell, 1). 1).. elected Professor of Theology: Pnifs. Phelps, Oggel. 

Beck, and .Scott being "Lectors " 1867 

Holland lncori)orated as a city 1867 

Charter Hall (burned in IHHl) erected \mi 

Klghty acres, within the city, donated by Dr. Van Raalte 1887 

Point Superior ("Hope Farm"), H;fr acres, and the Blutf, I3>s acres, purchased 

1867--68 

South ( "ampus, two acres, donated by Dr. Van Raalte 1888 

The Theological Department a«lopted by General Synod as Its "Western Theo- 
logical Seminary" 1869 

Death of Rev. Peter J. Oggel. Profes.sor, and Kdltor of De Hoftc Dec., 186» 

Council Hall (Grammar School Building) erected 186P 

First Theological Class of seven graduated 1869 

Two railroads opened through Holland 1869-71 

First formal Constitution of the College adopte<l 1871 

Holland nearly destroyed by fire Oct., 1871 

Gymnasium repaired, nnd made the Chapel 18T2 

C. Doesburg, A. M.. elected Pnjfessor 1K72 

House finished on the South Campus 1873 



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MISCELLA XEOrs INFORM A TIOX. .>.o 



The LKb<jrat')r>' enlarged and repaired 1H74 

Theological "Lei'lors" regularly appointed by Synwl. viv. TrofK 'I'. K. Kerk 

and ('. Scott 1875 

I {rick printing olfire for /> /Av*** ere('le<l 1876 

I>eath of Rev. ('orneliu« Van der Meiilen Vug. :J3. 1876 

Death of Rev. A. C. Van Raalle, I). I) Nov. 7. 1876 

Suspension of the Theological Department June, 1877 

Ueath of R^'. A. T. Stewart. 1>. 1).. Se<'. of Council for 12 yearn May, 1878 

Reorganization of the (!oIlege: Dr. I*help« reslguH June, 1878 

Rev. (J. H. Mandevllle, D.D.. I^roviwlonal Pre«identand Financial Agent: Prof. 

( '. Scott, Vice I'reHident 1878 

Wm. A. ShleldK, A. M., and G. .1. Kollen, A. .M., elected l»rofe«sor» 1878 

Rev. (.'. K. CrlHpell, Professor of Theology, reslgnn 1879 

A new ( 'onKtltutlon adopted 1879 

rrof. Charles Scott, D. I).. l»rovi8lonal President 188f) 

Successful efforts to pay off a debt of .f:t».(KK) 1879-82 

IKmation of *I0,000 by Cierril ( owenhoven. K»t[ 1882 

DiviHlons in some of the Reformed Chun-hes l«8l- 83 

Theological Instruction Restored: a Professorship of ;h3'),000 conipleted: Rev. 

N. M. Steffens, 1). D., Professor of Theology 1884 

Visit of the (ieneral Symxl to the College 1884 

A separate 'Koani of Superintendents" for the Western Theological Semlnar>' 

ordered by Synod 188.T 

l»rofs. Beck and Shields resign 1885 

H. Hoers, A. .M.: .1. H. Kleinheksel. A. M.: .1. ii. Sutphen. A. M., and Rev. John 

.1. Anderson, .V. M., elected Professor* 1885 

Election of Pn)f. Chas. s<'ott, D. 1)., as constitutional President 1885 

I'resident Scott Inaugunited 1886 

A 11 the streets around the t 'ampus graded, etc 1882-86 

Synod's House for the Presitlent ere<*ted as to exterior 1886 

The George Hlrkhoff, Jr., Prizes established 1887 

Normal Department opened 1888 

Rev. James F. Zwemer appointed Financial .Vgent 1888 

l»rof. J. J. .Vnderson resigns 1H88 

Rev. J. II. (iillespie, A. M., and l*rin. J. W. Humphrey, ele<*te«l Professors... . 1888 

Rev. J. W. Hearilslee. 1). 1).. Theological l*rofessor 1888 

) nvested Funds have Increased to over *1(K),0<W 1889 

i^unrter Centennial Celebration y June 26, 1890 

254 Students in all H S^ i./ I891-'92 

For Faculties and Students, look at this Catalogue of 1892 



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WESTEBy THEOLOGICAL SEMIXARV. H 



WESTERN 

THEOLOGICAL •:• SEMINARY, 



— OF THE— 



REPORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA. 
Department of Theology at Holland. Mjchjqan. 



GALENDAR. 



1891. Sept. 1. Entrance Examinations. 

'• 2. Term opens. 
Nov. 26-28. Thanksgiving Recess. 

Dec. 18. Beginning of Christmas Recess. 

1892. Jan. 5. Work resumed. 

" 28. Prayer for Colleges. 

Mar. 9. Prayer for Crops. 

Apr. 26. Meeting of Board of Superintendents. 

*' 27. Examinations. 

27. Commencement exercises in evening. 

VXCXXION. 

Sept. 6. Entrance Examinations. 

7. Term begins. 



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4:1 HOPE COLLEGE. 



BOARD OF SUPERINTENDENTS. 



EX-OFFICIO. 

Rev. ('has. Sc:ott, I). D., - President of Hop^ ():)llege- 

FROM THE SYNOD OF KEW YORK. 

181«. Rev. David (;ole, 1). D., Yonkers. N. Y. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF ALBANY. 

1894. Rev. Edward A. Collier, D. D.. Kinderhook, N. Y. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 

1892. ♦Rev. Wm. J. R. Taylor, D. D., New York City, N. Y. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF CHICAGO, 

1892. Rev. p. Moerdyke. I). D.. Chicago. 111. 

1892. Rev. Wm. Moerdyk. Muskegon, Mich. 

1892. Rev. Matthew Kolyn, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

1892. Rev. Henry K. Dosker, Holland. Mich. 

FROM the CLASSIS OF HOLLAND. 

1893. Rev. JOHN Van Der Meulen, Holland, Mich. 

FROM the CLASSIS OF GRAND RIVER. 

189:^. Rev. P^gbert Winter. D. D., Grand Rapida, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF MICHIGAN. 

1893. tREV. N. I). Williamson, South Bend, Ind. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF ILLINOIS. 

181M. Rev. J. S. JORALMON, Norwood Park, 111. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF WISCONSIN. 

1894. Rev. .T. Broek. Milwaukee. Wis. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF IOWA. 

18t>4. Rev. .Tamp:s F. Zwemer. Orange City, Iowa. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF DAKOTA. 

189.3. Rkv. .lOHN A. De Spelder. Orange City. Iowa. 



*l)ecea«e<l. 

+ NoniinHte«l for vacancy. 



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WESTEUN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. is 

FAGULTY. 

REV. NICHOLAS M. STEFFENS, D. D., 
Profeswor of Didactic and Polemic Theologry . In charge of Histori- 
cal Theology, Homiletics. Pastoral Theology and Catechetics. 

REV. JOHN W. BEARDSLEE, D. D., 

Professor of Biblical Languages and Literature. In charge of 

Sacred Geography, Antiquities, and Hermeneutics. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

Rev. Edward A. Collier, D. D., President. 
Rev. p. Moerdyke, D. D., Stated Clerk. 



COA\/^ITTEE ON RECEPTION Or STUDENTS. 

Rev. N. M. Steppens, D. D. Rev. J. W. Beardslee, D. D. 
Rev. Egbert Winter, D. D. Rev. P. Moerdyke, D. D. 
REV^ Henry E. Dosker, Rev. Chas. Scott, D. D. 



STUDENTS. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Anthony M. Van Duine, Kalamazoo. 

Hope College, 1889. 

MIDDLE CLASS. 

Seine J. Menning, Alton, la. 

Henry J. Pietenpol, Holland City. 

Peter Siegers, Flushing, Netherlands. 

Gymnasium, Middleburg^h. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 
John Sietsema, Coopersville. 

Hope College, 1891. 
Jerry P. Winter, Holland Citv. 

Hope College, 1891. 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

ExEOETiCAL Theology and Hermeneutics.— Elements of 
Hebrew; Selections from Pentateuch; Harmony and Exegesis of 
the Gospals; Raading Acts of the Apostles; Archaeology; Sacred 
Geography; Hermeneutics. 

Tcxt-hookH.—^KTpQv'^ Method and Manual; Green's Hebrew 
Grammar: Robinson's (Riddle's) Harmony: Bissell's Biblical An- 
tiquities: Barrow's Sacred Geography: Gesenius's Lexicon; West- 
eott & Hort's Greek Testament: Thayer's N. T. Lexicon: Immer's 
Hermeneutics. 

Historical. Theology.— Kurtz's Sacred History. 

Systematic Theology.— Introduction; Encyclopedia: Sym- 
bols of the Church. 

Practical Theology.— Theory of Preaching: Analysis of 
Sermons; Homiletical Exercises. 

MIDDLE YEAR. 

Exegetical Theology and Hermeneutics.— Hebrew Ety- 
mology and Syntax: Messianic Prophecy: Readings from Histori- 
cal Books: Old Testament Introduction: Exegetical Study of 
Hebrews: Reading Acts of the Apostles. 

Historical Theology.— Kurtz's Church History. 

Systematic Theology.— Lectures: Theology proper; Anthro- 
pology: Christology: A. A. Hodge's Outlines: Charles Hodge's 
Systematic Theology. 

Practical Theology— Lectures on Preaching: Homiletical 
Exercises: Church Government;: Pastoral Theology: Lectures. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Exegetical Thf:ology and Hermeneutics. — Hebrew 
Prophecy and Poetry; O. T. Theology: Historical Reading: Ara- 
maic Selections: Exegetical Study of Romans; Introduction to 
New Testament. 

Historical Theology.— Ecclesiastical History (continued). 

Systematic Theoloc4Y.— Lectures: Soteriology: Ecclesiology: 
Eschatology: Apologetics: Ethics: Review of the entire System. 



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WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMIXARY. ^5 

Practical Theology.— Homiletical Exercises: Pastoral The- 
<ilog-y; Catechetica: Theory of Missions: Church Government: Lec- 
tures on Preaching. 



GENERAL IMFORMATION. 



ADMISSION. 

The Seminary is open for the admission of students from every 
denomination of Christians. 

A committee of the Board of Superintendents, on the reception 
of students, meets on the first Tuesday in September, at 11 o'clock 

A. M. 

Every applicant is required to present a cM'tificate of church 
membership and one of literary qualifications. One who has not 
pursued a regular C-oUegiate course must give proof by testimoni- 
als or examination of such literary attainments as will enable him 
to enter upon the course of studies in the school." 

PREACHING. 

The Students praach regularly before the Faculty and Students, 
subject to such criticism as may be appropriate. They also preach 
in the churches, especially such as are vacant or weak, under the 
direction of the Faculty. 

LECTUKES. 

A course of Lectures, on subjects bsaring on Ministerial work, 
is delivered annually under the direction of the Board of Superin- 
tendents. 

MISSION WORK. 

Tfie Students are organized as a Mission Band and hold them- 
selves in readiness to attend any calls to address meetings where 
they can advocate the cause of Missions. 

ADELPHIC SOCIETY. 

This is a weekly gathering of the Professors and Students for 
the discussion of questions relating to the studies of the course, 
and to all matters bearing on the practical work of the ministry. 
The exercises embrace debates, essays, and general discussions. 



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4b' HOPE COLLEGE. 



C'OMMENCRMENT. 

The Theolofjrical Commencement exercisea take placa on 
Wednesday evening, at the close of the year. Addresses ai*e de- 
livered by the Seniors, in English and Dutch, and by some mem- 
ber of the Board of Superintendents appointed for the purpose. 

BENEFICIARY AID. 

Instruction is entirely gratuitous. Young men are aided by 
the Board of Education as their circumstances require and the 
funds admit, not only while in the Seminary, but in the studies 
prepai-atory to entering it. Rooms are provided in Van Vleck 
Hall and charges for board are very moderate. 

The requirement of the Constitution in regard to students pre- 
paring for the ministry in the Reformed Church is as follows: 

Every person contemplating the work of the ministry, before 
he commences his course of Theological studies, shall furnish sat- 
isfactory evidence of his being a member in full communion and 
good standing of a Reformed Protestant Church; of his piety, 
ability and literary attainments; and thereupon shall be admitted 
into one of the Theological Schools; and during the prosecution of 
his studies there, shall ba subject to the rules and regulations 
thereof; and when he shall have completed the prescribed course 
and term of Theological studies, shall b3 admitted to an examina- 
tion according to the regulations of the school as established by 
the General Synod; and if found qualified, shall receive a professo- 
rial cartificate to that effect, which shall entitle him to an exami- 
nation for licensure bafore the Classis to which he belongs. — 
Count it lit ion. Art. IL Str. j. 



THEOLOGIGAL ALUMNI. 



1869. 

NAMES. RE8IDKNCE0. 

ALE BUURSMA Grand Rapids. 

GERRIT DANGRMEOND Holland, Minn. 

WILLIAM B. GILMORE *April 24, 1884. 

PETER M0P:RDYKE Chicago, 111. 

WILLIAM MOERDYK Muskegon. 



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WE:STERX TIIEOLOQIVAL SEMINAR T. 47 

JOHN W. TE WINKEL Fulton, 111. 

HARM WOLTMAN *Apnl 30, 1870. 

1870. 

JAMES DE FREE Sioux Cantre. la, 

ENNE J. HEEREN *Oct. 15, 1878. 

JOHN HUIZENGA Rock Valley, la. 

BALSTER VAN ESS Rossland, 111. 

1871. 

JOHN BROEK Milwaukee, Wis. 

GERRIT VAN DE KREEKE Kalamazoo. 

WILLIAM VISS(;HER *Feb. 11, 1872. 

1872. 

HARM BORGERS Greenleaf ton, Minn. 

EVERT VAN DER HART ♦April 2.9, 1889. 

1873. 

HENRY K. BOER (\)oper8ville, Mich. 

PETER DE BRUYN (Jrand Haven. 

JOHN A. DE SPELDER Orange City, la. 

JAMES F. ZWEMER Orange City, la. 

1874. 

JOHN HOP^FMAN (Uymer, N. Y. 

NICHOLAS NEERKEN Man. 3, 1887. 

1875. 

WILLIAM P. HAZENBERG Johannesburg, Transvaal. 

ANDREW WORMSER Montana, 

1876. 

FREDERICK P. BAKKER Constantine. 

JOSIAS MEULENDYK (Jrand Rapids. 

HELENUS E. NIES Paterson, N. J. 

1877. 

HARM VAN DER PLO?Xi Orange City. la. 

CORNELIUS WABEKE *Feb. 22, 1880. 

auaPENDBD UNTIL tHH*. 



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4S HOPE COLLEGE. 



1886. 

DIRK SC'HOLTEN Muscatine, la. 

1887. 

GERHARD DE JONGE Vriesland, 

SIMON H00GP:B00M Cleveland, O. 

GERRIT H. HOSPERS VjblsX. Williamson, N. Y. 

PETER IHRMAN Marion, N. V. 

1888. 

GERRIT J. HEKHUIS Roseland, 111. 

ALBERT VAN DEN BERG New Kirk, la, 

PETER WAYENBERG Maurice, la. 

1889. 

RALPH BLOEMENDAAL Ghicagro, 111. 

ALBERT H. STRABBING Hamilton. 

1890. 

PETER J. A. BOUMA.. Grand Rapids, 

JOHN M. LUMKES Grand Rapids. 

J. J. VAN ZANTEN Grand Haven. 

1891. 

POPPE KLOOSTER Galesburg, Iowa, 

JOHN LAMAR Grand Rapids. 

ALBERTUS PIETERS Nagasaki, Japan. 

HENRY STRAKS Cleveland, O. 



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/i y^ XT 5 1912 



>5^CATAL0G0et^ ' 



-of 1 



Hope K- 



QoLLe^e. 



\-> y^ 



1892 - *i*^?. 



^ Hoi V^, ^ CT^ick. K* 



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CATALOGUE 



— OF THB — 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



—or— 



HOLLAND, MICHIGAN. 



1892 - '93. 



An InstititwR of the RefomiMl Chnreh in Amerka. 



PiDiiBBr ScIlddI; IB 51. 

Halland ilcadeniy; 1867. 

HBcaniB Hope CdUbsbj IBBS. 



HOLLAKD, MICH. 
ORONDWET-NKWS PRINTING HOUSE. 



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CJlLBNDA.R—1898''9^. 



1883. April 17, Third Term begins. 
" 26, Meeting of Council. 
** 27, Senior Examinations. 
June 21-23, Undergraduate Examinations. 
*' 25, Baccalaureate Sermon. 
** 26, Closing Exercises of the Grammar School. 

** 27, Meeting of Council. 

'* 27, Meeting of Alumni. 

** 28, Commencement. 





VAOAOMON. 


Sept. 


20, First Term begins. 


it 


20, Examinations for Admission. 


Nov. 


30— Dec. 1, Thanksgiving Recess. 


Dec. 


22, First Term ends. 




VACATION. 



1894. Jan'y 8, Second Term begins. 

** 25, Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
Mar. 10, Second Term ends. 

VACATION. 



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TMB COUNCIL. 



•aeinoved from Classis; successor not yot appointed. 



EX-OFFICIO. 

llEV. Char. vScott, D. D. President of the College. 

ELECTED MEMBERS. 

FROM GENERAL SYNOD. 
MAMBS. BmiDKNOBB. TERMS SXPIRB. 

J. C. Benham, M. D., Hudson, N. Y. 1893 

Rev. Cornelius Brett, D. D., Jersey City, N. J. 1894 

Rev. G. H. Mandbville, D. D., New York City, K. Y. 1895 

Uev. Jas. F. ZwEMfeR, Orange City, la. 1896 

Rev. Peter Mobrdtke, D. D., Chicago, 111. 1896 

Hon. Isaac Cappon, Holland City, Mich. 1897 

Hon. Arend Vissch^r, Holland City, Mich. 1898 

FROM CLASSIS OF WISCONSIN. 

Rev. John Broek, Milwaulcee, Wis. 1893 

Rev. Balster Van Ess, Roseland, 111. 1893 

FROM CLASSIS OF MICHIGAN. 

Rev. Samuel Streng, . Kalamazoo, Mich. 1894 

Jas. Van der Sluys, Grand Rapids, Mich. 1894 

FROM CLASSIS OF GRAND RIVER. 

*Rev. Wm. Mobrdyk, Muskegon, Mich. 1895 

Rev. Dirk Broek, Grandville, Mich. 1895 

FROM CLASSIS OF HOLLAND. 

Rev. Gerhard De Jonge, Vriesland. Mich. 1896 

Rev. Henry B. Dosker, Holland City, Mich. 1896 

FROM CLASSIS OF DAKOTA. 

Rev. John A. De Spelder, Orange City, la. 1896 

Rev. S. J. Harmeling, Marion, S. D. 1896 

FROM CLASSIS OF IOWA. 

Rev. p. Lepeltak, - Alton, la. 1897 

Rev. James De Pree, Sioux Centre, la. 1897 

FROM CLASSIS OF ILLINOIS. 

Rev. J. S. JoRALMON, Norwood Park, 111. 

Francis J. Cushing, Irving Park, 111. 



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OFFICERS OF COUNCIL. 



Rkv. W. Mokbdyk, .... Presldent- 

Rbv. B. Van Ess, ... - Vice President. 

Rev. Henry E. Doskeb, ... - Secretary. 

Hon. Isaac Cappon, .... Treasurer. 



COMMITTEES OF COUNCIL. 



EXECUTIYE COMMITTEE. 

Pbes. Chas. Scott, Chairman. Hon. Arend Yisscher, Sec'y. 
Rev. W. Moerdyke. Rev. Henrt E. Dosker. 

Rev. Gerhard De Jonoe. 

INVESTMENT COMMITTEE. 

(In charg« of the funds of the Council.) 

Hon. Arend Yisscher. Pres. Chas. Scott. 

Hon. Isaac Cappon. 

hope farm committeb. 

Pres. Chas. Scott. Hon. Isaac Cappon. 

Hon. Arend Yisscher. 

"DJS HOPE." 
Mr. R. Kanters, .... Publisher. 

Prof C Doesbttro 

Rev.N.'m. Steffens, D. D., }• - Editorial Committee. 

Rev. J. Yan Houte, 



sis, D. D., > 



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(COLLEGE, pEPflRTMENT. 

JPJlCUJLTY. 



Rkv. CHAS. SCOTT, D. D., President. 

Professor of Chemistry and Natural History. In charge of Men<> 

tal, Moral, and Christian Philosophy. 

(Resigned the Presidency Sept. 1, ISM. By request of Council continues to 
act until a successor may be secured.) 

CORNELIS DOESBURG, A. M., Secretary. 

Professor of Modern Languages and Literature, In charge of 

Art Studies. 

GERRIT J. KOLLEN, A. M., 

Professor of Applied Mathematics, Physics, and Political Econo^ 

my. In charge of Logic. 

HENRY BOERS, A. M., 
Professor of the English Language and Literature, and Rhetoric* 

JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

JAMBS G. ZUTPHEN, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

REV. JOHN H. GILLESPIE, A. M., 

Prosessor of the Greek Language and Literature. In charge of 

Sacred Literature. 



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HOPE COLLEOJEf, 



STUDBNTS. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

HAMKS. BBHDKVOBB. 

JOHN L. DE JONG Roseland, 111. 

HENRY HUIZINGA Beaverdam. 

WIRTJET. JANSSEN Foreston, 111. 

ALBERT KUIPER Kalamazoo- 

WILLIAM MIEDEM A Grand Rapids 

WILEY W. MILLS Holland City. 

ALBERT J. ROOKS East Holland. 

JOHN SCHAEFER Oregon, 111. 

JAMBS STERENBERG Fulton, 111. 

WILHELMUS V. TE WINKEL Fulton, 111. 

HENRY VAN DER PLOBG Holland City. 

WILLIAM O. VAN EYK Holland City. 

WILLIAM ZOETHOUT Holland City. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

KLAAS J. DYKEMA Fulton, 111 

PETER SWA RT Fern wood, 111. 

GERRIT TYSSE Fernwood, 111. 

ARTHUR VAN DUREN Holland City. 

WILLIAM J. VAN KERSEN Roseland, 111. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

JULIA C. Van RAALTE Holland. 

HENRY J. ALBERS Ovensel. 

H ENRY M. BRUINS Alto, Wis, 

GEORGE C DANGREMOND Holland, Minn- 

HARM DYK HUIZEN Grand Rapids. 

(JARRET FLl KKEM A Fulton, III. 

JOHN J. HEEREN Orange City. la 

BENJAMIN HOFFMAN OveriseL 

JOHN J. MERSEN Marion, N. Y. 

FRED. K NOORDHOFF Oi'aoge City, la. 

WILLIAM TALEN Maurice, la. 

JOHN W TE SELLE Holland, Neb. ' 

FREDERICK VAN ANROOY Graafschap. 

JOHN VAN DE ERVE ileln, S. Dak. 

J4C()BVAN DERMEULEN Cawker City, Kas. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

HERMAN J. BROEK Milwaukee, Wis. 

S. BOLKS DE PREE Sioux Centre, la. 



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XX)LLEGE SIVDENTS. 



EDWARD D. DIMNENT Chicago, 111. 

BERT DYKSTRA Sioux Centre, la. 

FLORIS FERWBRDA Grand Rapids. 

EDWARD KELDER Grandville. 

FREDERIC LUBBERS Orange City, la. 

PETER MEYER Grand View, S. Dak 

ADRIAN J. MELIS Rathbun. Wis, 

HENRY NIENHUIS Chicago, 111. 

JOHANNES J. OSSEWA A RDE , . Zeeland, 

D. CORNELIUS RUIGH Holland, Neb. 

OERRIT A. VAN DIEST Luctor, Kas. 

JOHN VAN DER MBULEN Cawker City, Kas. 

JAS. G. VAN ZWALUWENBURG. , ., Holland City. 

BASTIAN WIERKS .Hospers, la 

OSCAR B. WILMS Holland City. 

HARRY J. WIERSUM Chicago, 111. 

BERNARDUS L. TEN EYCK Fairview, 111. 

SHELDON VANDEBURG J .Holland City. 

JOHN VAN DER VRIES Holland City. 

SPECIALS IN COLLEGE DEPARTMENT. 

WILLIAM M. DEHN >,:.,., Holland City, 

CHAS. H. McBRIDE Holland City. 

JOHN W. TE PASKE :.. Orange City, la. 

SUMMARY. 

Seniors 13 

Juniors 5 

Sophomores 16 

Freshmen 21 

Specials 8 



Total 57 

ADMISSIOK. 

For admission into the Freshman Class, a full certificate of 
graduation from the Grammar School Department is required; 
or an examination of the studies pursued in that department; 
or in what the Faculty shall deem an equivalent 

In order to enber aYiy advanced class of the Institution, it 
will he necessary for the applicant to pass an examination in the 
studies previously persued by the class. If received on condi- 
tions, these must be fulfilled before regular admission. 



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HOPE COLLEGS. 



Course of Study. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

MATHBMATicfs.— WcDtworth'ft SoUd Geometry, and Rane 
and Si^erical Trigonoiiietry. 

Lakouagr— 

English.— HdLWthoTQe's and Lemmon's American Literature; 
Shaw's New Hidtory of English Literature; Study of English 
Classics. 

Ixrtwi.— Capes' Livy; Vergil; Composition and Mythology. 

G^reefc.— Steven's Lysias; Oyer's Apology and CriLo; Herodotus; 
Allinson's Greek Prose Composition. 

Jfodem.— History of Dutch Literature; Essays and Transla- 
tions. 

RnEnoKic— Essays; Subjects Outlined; Drill in Elocution. 

History.— Anderson's Roman History; Myer's Ancient His- 
tory; An Atlas of Classical and Mediaeval Geography. 

Natttral Scibncb.— Cutter's Comprehensive Physiology; 
Packard's Zoology. 

Sacred LrrsRATURR. —Greek New Testament and Intro- 
duction. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Mathematics.-— College Algebra; Hardy's Analytic Greome- 
try; Wen tworth's Surveying and Navigation.' 

Lanquaoe.— 

£?^tglu/i. --English Literature, and study of English Classics 
continued. 

Z^iw.— Page's Horace; Hardy's Juvenal; Kelsey's Cicero's 
De Amicitia; De Senectiite; Antiquities and Literature. 

Greefc.— Seymour's Homer's Iliad; Tarbell's Demosthenes' 
Philippics; Thucydides; Allinson's Greek Prose Composition 
completed. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 



Modei-n — Ed g re n's French Grammar; some French Author. 
Rhetoric— Essays, Debates, Orations. 
History.— Med ijfival and Modern History. 
Natcral Science.— Remsen's Chemistry. 

Sacred Literature— Greejc New Testament, and Har- 
iiHiny of the Gospels. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics.— Hardy's Calculus. 

Mathematics Applied.— Olmsted's Natural Philosophy. 

Language.— 

La^iw.— Stick ney's Cicero's De OflBciis; Sloman's Terence: 
Seneca's Moral Essays. 

reek. —Ody^&ey or Lyric Poets: Humphreys' Aristophanes' 
Clouds: Allen's Prometheus of Aeschylus; Literature. 

Jtfodem— Joy ne's Meissner's German Grammar; some easy 
(Jerman Author. 

Rhetoric— Bascom's Philosophy of Rhetoric; American 
Literature; Essays, Discussions, and Orations. 

History.— Studies in History: Lectures on the Constitu- 
tion and History of the United States. 

Natural Science.— Chemistry, one term; Wood's Botany, 
two terras; Sedgwick and Wilson's Biology. 

ME'rAPHYsics —Porter's Elements of Intellectual Science. 

Sacred Literature.— Butler's Analogy. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics.- Newcomb and Holden's Astronomy, ad- 
vanced course. 
Language — 
Gfrecfc.— Plato's Phaedo, and Republic. 



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10 HOPE COLLEGE. 

Modem.—Some German Author; German Literature; Com- 
positions in German. 

Rhstobic— Con ti nued. 

Logic— McCosh. 

Ethics.— Wayland's Moral Science. 

HiSTOBY.— Guizot's History of Civilization. 

Natural Science.— Dana's Class Book of Geology. 

Political Science.— Walker's Political Economy, advanced 
course; Essays on the same. 

Sacred Literature.— Lectures on Evidences of Chris- 
tianity. 



4^The needed books should be ready ou the opening day of each term. 

The following Schedule will show the method of carrying out the above 
Coilege Curriculum. So far as may be the Junior and Senior Classes recite 
together to the President e. g. in Philosophy. 



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COURSE OF STUDY, 



11 



SCHEDULE OF COLLEGE ^RECITATIONS. 
8:15to0:00 A.M. 



Monday 

Tuesday.. . 
Wednesday, 
Thursday .. 
Friday 



PliESHMEN. 



Latin 1. 

Latin 

I Latin .... 

Latin 

iLatin .... 



SOPHOMORES. 



Surveying. 
Math. 2 . 
Surveying.. 

Math 

Math 



JUNIOBS. 



SENIORS. 



Botany 3 German 

Butler'sAnal. Hist. ofClv.. 
Moral Phil.... Mental Phil. 
Lectures 4... I Lectures 5.. 
Moral Phil.... Mental Phil. 



0:00 TO 9:46 A. M. 



Mondny 

Tuesdav.... 
Wednesday, 
Thursday .. 
Friday 



TRESHMEN. 

Am Lit. 6.. 

Zottloiry 

Am. Lit 

7iO»lo«y 

Khetorlcals 



SOPHOMORES 

Greek 

Ens. Lit 

Greek 

EnK. Lit 

Greek 



JUNIORS. 

German 

Greek 

German 

Greek 

German 



SENIORS. 

Geology 

Geology .... 
Geology 



9:45 TO 10:30 A. M. 



I! 



Monday . 
Tuesday — 
Wednesday 
Thursday .. 
Friday 



FRESHMEN, 

Sacred Lit.. 

<4reek 

Greek 

Greek 

Greek 



SOPHOMORES. 



ITrench 

vtodern Hist. 
Chemistry ... 
Modern Hist 
Chemistry . .. 



JUNIORS. 

Physics — 
Rhetoric 7 
Phy^iC8.... 
Rhetoric . . 
Physics — 



SENIORS. 

Logic 

German 

Logic 

German 



10:30 TO 1 1 :15 A M 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday .. 
Thursday .... 
Friday 


1 FiiBSHMBN. 

.. iMath.S 

...liFreiu-h 

...IjMath. .. 

...1 Frenrh 

...; .Math 

h 


SOPHOMORES. 

('hemlstry ... 
Sacred Lit.... 

French 

Greek 


JUNIORS. 
Latin 


SENIORS. 

Greek 


Calculus 

Boiany 

Calculus 

Greek 


Pol. Rcon 

Greek 

Pol. Econ 


French 


Logic 





1 :15 TO 12:00 M. 



1 1 INB^HMBX. 

Monday Anrt Hist. 9 

TueR'lay ; Mu»il(* 

Weilnesday A»ict. Hist ... 

Thursday ;Mjith 

Friday Dutch lO.... 



SOPHOMORES. 

Latin 

Engineering . 
Khetoricals .. 

Latin 

Latin 



JUNIORS. 

Rhetoricals . . 

Latin 

Latin 

Physics 

Botany 



SENIORS. 

Astronomy. 
Rhet.Ex.... 
Astronomy. 

Greek 

Astronomy. 



1 —Includes llomnn History and An- 
tiquities. 

2— E'nl)rai'es Algebra. 1st lerm; Ana 
lytlcal Geomoti y. 2rul * 'm\ terms. 

3 - Bloloiry. during tJie2rid term. 

4 -On the rTnitedStates'(!()iiHtitution. 

5— On the Evidences of Christianity. 

6— English Literuture. :ird term. 



7— .American Literature, last 12 
weeks. 

8— Solid Gfometry and Mensura- 
tion. 1st term: Plane Trigonom- 
etry. 2nd t^'rtn: Spi'crlcal Trig- 
onometry. :Jrd term 

9— Includes Ancient Geosrraphy. 
I O— Studies in Dutch Literature. 



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QMMMflR SgggOL. DIg&RmENL 



I^A.CUJLTY. 

PROF. CHARLES SCOTT, D. D., President, 
Religious iDstruction in the **A" and **B'' Classes. 

PROF. CORNELIS DOESBURG, A. M., 
Modern Languages, Drawing and Painting. 

PROF. GERRIT J. KOLLEN, A. M., 

Physics, Didactics, and Religious Instruction in the 
•*C" and '*D» Classes. 

PROt^. HENRY BOERS, A. M., 
Rhetoric and History. 

PROF. JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, A. M., 
Mathematics and Botany. 

PROF. JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A. M., Secretary, 
Latin. 

PROF. JOHN H. GILLESPIE, A. M.. 

Greek. 

JOHN B. NYKERK, A. M., 
Prof, of Music; Assistant Prof, of English. 

MRS. C. VAN RAALTE GILMORE, 
Lady Principal. 

PROF. JAMP:S W. HUMPHREY, 

Director of the Summer School. 

PuoF. Gerrit J. Kollen, Wm. O. Van Eyk, ( Assistant 



,1 



Librarian. Harm Dijkhuizen, ) Librarians. 

(iERRiT TiJSE, Chorister. Herman J. Broek, Organist. 

Bernard Bloemendaal, Janitor. 



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UHAMMAB SCHOOL STL'I>ENTS. 1.1 



STUDBNTS. 



"^A" CLASS. 
NAVBB. SB9IDBNCBB. 

CHRISTINA HOLKEHOER... Holland City. 

ANNA C. ROOKS East Holland. 

NICHOLAS HOER Drenthe. 

ALBERT BROENE Drenthe. 

JACOB BRUMMEL..,, OveriseK 

WM. DE JONG Holland City. 

JOHNDEJONGH ...Grand Haven. 

OERRIT J. HUIZINGA Holland City. 

RALPH JANSSEN East Holland. 

OERRIT W. KOOYERS Holland. 

JAMES E. MOERDYK Kalamazoo. 

WILLIAM PEEKS Holland. 

WILLIAM PRAKKEN Holland City. 

TONY ROZENDA L Chicago, 111. 

HENRY" SAGGERS Graafschap. 

JOHN B. STEKETEE. Holland City. 

JOHN G. THEILKEN German Valley, UK 

JACOB G VAN DEN BOSCH Zeeland. 

JOHN F. VAN SLOOTEN Holland. 

A.LIVINGSTON WARNSHUIS Gano. UK 

HENRY L. Y^ONKER Vriesland. 

'*B" CLASS. 

AN N A A PPEL DOORN Holland. 

HATTIE G. BOONE Holland. 

MINNIE BIIOEK Holland. 

JENNIE DEKLEll&E Jamestown. 

AUGUSTA R. OTTE Holland City. 

ANNA S. PEEKS Holland. 

ALIDA j; PIETKRS Holland City. 

BELLE E. TAKKEN Holland City. 

CHRISTINE V A N DUREN Holland City. 

JOHN J. BANNIXGA Muskegon. 

JOHN W BKAR[)SLEE, JR Holland City. 

HENRY BOE VE, JR Holland. 

JOHN S. BROIT VVER New Holland. 

ABRAHAM L. CAPPON Holland City. 

SIETZE J. DEKKER Grand Rapids. 

ROBERT P. DE BRUYN Grand Haven* 



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U HOPE COLLEGE. 



NA,lfB8. BESIDE V0B8. 

BENJAMIN DUVEN Alto, Wis, 

G. CLAIR HEKHUIS Fillmore 

JOHN H. HINKEN East Saugatuck. 

JOHNKEPPEL Zceland. 

THOMAS KEPPEL Zeeland. 

GEORGE KLEYN Holland City. 

ROBERT E. KREMERS Holland City. 

ENSING LANNING Drenthe. 

JOHN G. MEENGS New Helland, 

HARRY MOKMA Holland City. 

CASPER W. NIBBELINK Holland City. 

SETH NIBBELINK South Blendon. 

LAMBERTUS A. PESSINK Holland City. 

CHRISTOPHER PRANGE Waupun, Wis 

JOHN G. RUTGERS, JR Graafschap. 

DON C. TAYLOR Dunningville. 

GERRITH. TELDER Grand Rapids. 

CORNELIS J. TON Fernwood, 111. 

BENJAMIN A. VAN DUINE Zeeland. 

CORNELIS VAN DUREN Holland City. 

JACOB VAN ESS Roseland, 111. 

HENRY F. VAN SLOOTEN Holland. 

THEODORE VAN ZOEREN Vriesland. 

JOHN VERMEULEN Boaverdam. 

JURRY E. WINTER .Holland City. 

"C" CLASS. 

ANNA ALBERTI Holland City. 

SARAH E. VAN DER MEULEN Holland City. 

MINNIE WILTERDINK Holland. 

HARRY G. HIRCHBY Holland City. 

WM N. BIRCHBY Holland City. 

PETER BRAAK Grand Rapids. 

HENRY D. BRINK Fillmore. 

ALBERT B. BORGERS Gnenleafton, Minn. 

HENRY BOUWENS Zeeland. 

JACOB D. BROEK Grandville 

ROBERT M. DE BRUYN Zeeland. 

J ACOB F. DE JONG Roseland, 111. 

PETER C. DE JONG Fernwood. Ill, 

ROBERT W. DOUMA Fillmore. 

GEORGE DOr WSTRA Overisel. 

ISAAC J . FLES Musk<Kon. 

ALDERT I). GERRITSEN Fernwood. 111. 



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GRAMMAR SCHOOL STUDENTS, IS 

VAUEa. RESIDENCES. 

GERRIT H. KRAGT Holland. 

EBEX E. KIEKINT VELD Holland City, 

JOHN E. KUIZENGA. Muskegon. 

JERRY M. LAEPLE Holland City, 

FOLKERT MANSENS Roseland, 111. 

PETER J. MARvSILJE Holland City. 

W3I J. MA URITS , Vriesland. 

JACOB 8CIIEPERS Vogel Centre. 

HENRY SGHIPPER Grand Rapids. 

HENRY SLUITER Grand Rapids. 

JOHN R. STEEPENS Holland City. 

EDWA RD T AKKEN Holland City. 

PETER E. TAKKEN Holland City. 

CONRAD T. TASCHE Sheboygan, Wis. 

JOHN H. TER A VEST Hamilton. 

WINAND VAN DEN BERG North Holland. 

CORNELIS VAN DER VRIES Holland City. 

JOHN VAN ESS Roseland, HI. 

GERRIT VAN HOUTE Holland City. 

THOMAS A. VANSCHELVEN Holland City. 

JOHN VERWEY Englewood, 111. 

FED I)E WIERSM A • Roseland, 111. 

LOUIS ZOETHOUT Holland City. 

"D" CLASS. 

ROSE AYKENS George, Iowa. 

JENNIE DOCTER Holland City. 

MAGGIE GRUTTRUP Holland City. 

HELENA JANSSEN East Holland. 

JENNIE H. MULDER Holland City. 

GERTIE POSTM A Holland City. 

JENNIE C. STEFFENS Holland City. 

JENETTE M. VAUPELL Holland City. 

ALBERT BEKMAN Holland. 

JOHN G. DINKELOO Holland City. 

FRANKLIN DE KLEINE Jamestown. 

ALBERT DE VRIES Holland City. 

BENJAMIN EEFTING Englewood, lil. 

ALBERT FEYEN Graafschap. 

YASUHARU KATO Tokyo, Japan. 

JOHNE. KIEIvINTVELD Holland City. 

CHARLES W. LOBDELL South Blendon. 

JOHN A. NIENHUIS Lucas. 

BENJAMIN PLASMAN Holland. 



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/^ HOPM COLLKOK 



NAMBS. RB8IDF.NCKS. 

ALBERT G. ROOKS East Holland. 

JOHN J. ROOK& East Holland- 

LEONARD J. ROOKS East Holland 

ALBERT J. STRYKER Grand Rapids^ 

HILDEBRAND G. SLUITBR Lucas. 

FRANK A. SLOOTER Holland City. 

HARRY T.THOMASMA Grand Rapids. 

HENRY J. VAN DEN BERG New Holland. 

MEINB VANDERHEIDE Graafscliap, 

CORNELIS VAN PER MEULEN Holland City. 

ADRLVN VAN QEVEREN Holland City. 

JOHANNES VELDHOFF East Saugatuck. 

ANDREW E. VERSCHURE Holland City. 

i^^EORGE WEST VEER Grand Rapids. 

WILLIE J. WESTVEER Holland City. 

ALBERT E. WILTERDINK Holland. 

CORNELIS WOLDRINC; Holland City. 

SPKCIALS IN GRAMMAR SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

JOHA NNES ENGELSM AN .Chicago, 111. 

WILLIAM S. GRUYS ^ Middleburgh, la. 

HENRY JURGENS Roseland, 111. 

BENJAMIN MASSELIN K Oakland. 

TIES MULDER .' Grand RapidSv 

JACOB TAKKEN Holland City. 

OrERRIT TELLMAN Muskegon. 

RALPH VAN RA ALTE Holland City. 

SUMMER NORMAL CLASS. 
(Nanifs omitted this year.) 

SUMMARY. 

•'A'- ClaiH 21 

• ir Class 41 

"C" Class 40 

••[)" eiass 35 

Unclassified 8 

Summer Normal 5^ 

Total 199 



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ayURSE OF STUDY. V 

ADMISSION. 

For admission into the ''D^' Glass, a common school education 
is required in the branches pursued in that year. The better 
their previous t-raining, the more easily and profitably can pupils 
enter upon the Grammar School Course. 

In order to enter any advanced class, it will be necessary for 
the applicant to pass an examination in the studies previously 
pursued by the class. If received on conditions, these must be 
fulfilled before regular admission. 

The Normal Department is open to all who present evidence 
of sufiicient preparation. Members having selected studies and 
classes, are expected to comply with the scholastic regulations 
of the Institution. 



Courso of Study. 



FIRST YEAR, "D" CLASS. 

Readinq, Etc.— Monroe's Fifth Reader; Orthography-Reed^s 
Word Lessons. 

Penmanship.— -Spencerlan System. 

Geography.— Harper's School Geography, Michigan Edition. 
Mathematics.— Olney's Practical Arithmetic. 
Language.— 

Engluth.—SouthwoTth and Goddard^s Elements of Compos)'^ 
tion and Grammar; Written Esi^ays through the year. 

History.— Montgomery's Leading Facts of American History. 

SECOND YEAR, **C" CLASS. 

Reading, Etc.— Choice Selections from English Classics; Or- 
thography, Orthoepy, and Diacritical Marks. 

Penmanship.— Spencerian System. 

Natural Science.- Eclectic Physical Geography* 

Mathematics.— Harper's Advanced Arithmetic; Sprague^s 
Rapid Addition. 

Bookkeeping.— Mayhew's Practical Booklceepingi 



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1& HOPE COLLEGE, 



Language— 

j&/)^{i8^.— Whitney's Essentials of Enfirlish Grammar; Essays, 
and Declamations. 

Lahn.— Gradatim; Glnn & Co 'sCseaar, New Edition; Allen and 
(ireenough's Latin Grammar: Composition. 

i)M«c/i.— Heading; Spelling; Translations. 

French— Edgre n 's French Grammar. ( Elective for Latin . ) 

THIRD YEAR, "B" CLASS. 

READiNo.—Choice Selections. 

Drawing.— Free Hand and Perspective. 

Mathematics.— Wen tworth*s School Algebra; Steele's As- 
tronomy, with the use of Globes. 

Language — 

j&«yZi«/i.— Grammar continued; Hart's Rhetoric begun; Essays. 

Xafin.— Ca?sar; Ginn and Co.'sCicoro; Grammar and Composi- 
tion. 

(?rceA-.— Frost *s Primer; Moss' First Reader; Hadley-Allen 
(irammar. 

Dufc/i.- Kat'H Grammar; Exercises; Translation:*. 

French — Edgren's French Grammar. (Elective for Latin). 

Oerman — Joynes' Meissner's German Grammar; Joynes' Ger- 
man Reader. (Elective for Greek.) 

Elocution -Emerson's Evolution of Expression, Vols. I 
and IL Emerson's Physical and Aesthetic Culture. 

HISTORY.— Smith's Greek History. (Abridged). 

P^OURTH YEAR, "A" CLASS. 

Drawing.— Free Hand and Perspective. 

Mathematics.- Wentworth's School Algebra (finished '^ 
Wentworth's Plane Geometry. 

Natural Science.- Peclc'sGanot's Natural Philosophy, re- 
vised; Physiology and Hygiene. 

Language.— 

JK»(//i«/i.— Sprague's Milton's Paradise Lost, or some other 
Author; Hart's Rhetoric continued; Essays, The class publishes 
a monthly paper, called The Excclsiora. 



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CO URSE OF STUD Y. lif 

iarin.— Cicero; Kelsey's Ovid: Grammar and Composition. 

Crccfc.— Anabasis, Books I and II; Hellenica, Book II; 
Woodruff's Greok Prose Composition: Padley-Allen Grammar. 

I>w<c/i.— Kat's Grammar, continued; Practical Exercises; 
.Translations; Compositions. 

French, — ) 

> Continued as Electives for Latin and Greek. 
German. -^ ) 

Elocution.— Emerson's Evolution of Expression, Vols. Ill 
and IV; Physical and Aesthetic Culture, continuea. 

History.— Montgomery's Leading Facts of English History. 

Civil Government.— Young's Government Class Book. 

Didactics.— White's Elements of Pedagogy. 

Religious Instruction, and Music— In all the Classes. 

Special attention is given, during the whole of the Prepara- 
tory Course, to the gramraarsof tl»e languages studied. For those 
who pursue English studies only, or who design stopping at the 
<»nd of the **A" year, the Faculty provide such additional branches 
as seem most expedient and profitable. Those, whose time is fully 
occupied in the work of the school, generally make better 
progress. 

In general educational value, it is believed that the above four 
years' Course of Study is worthy of full recommendation, whether 
ffir entrance into College, or for a professional training, or for a 
business life. 

The Schedule of Recitations is attached. This serves to 
sliow: 

1. That the drill in the English branches is continued to th.' 
ontl of the four years' course. Those who enter the **D" class 
should have some previous knowledge of Arithmetic, Grammar 
and Geography. 

2. Beginning with the "C" year, Latin is studied almost 
daily, with about 500 recitations in all. 

3. Beginning with the**IV' year, and Including Greek His- 
tory, there are nearly 40O recitations in (rreek. 

4- As may be noticed, German, or French and German, can 



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90 HOPE VOLLEOK 

be substituted for Greek. All who desire a good education should 
study Latin. 

5. Those who take an Bnffllsh course only, select their stud- 
ies, but not less than eighteen recitations per week are required^ 
as shall be assigned by the Faculty. 



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COURSE OF STUDY, 



gl 



SCHEDULE OF GRAMMAE SCHOOL RECITATIONS. 
8:16toOtOO A.M. 



Monday . . . . 

Tuesday 

WediieMlay 
Thursday .. 
Friday 



Arithniettc... 
Orthography . 
A.rlthnietic... 
Bible Rtudy.. 
Orthograyhy 



Phys. Oeoiic... 
Bible Study.. 
Phys. Oeo]?... 
Orthojrraphy. 
Uramniar 



B CLASS 

Greek I . . 

(ireek 

Greek 

Greek 

Greek 



A CLASS 

English 2... 

English 

English 

English 

Art of Teach g 



9:OOTO 9:4'5 A. M. 



Monday .... 
Tuesday.... 
Wednesday, 
Thursday .. 
Friday 



D CLASS 



Reading 

Arithmetic... 

Reading 

Arithuietic... 
Arithmetic... 



O CLASS 

Arithmetic 

Latin 

Arithmetic... 

Latin 

Arithmetic... 



B CLASS 

Latin 

Dutch 3 . 

Latin 

Dutch ... 
Latin 



A CLASS 

Nat. Phil ., 
Civ. Gov't 4- 
Nat. Phil... 
Civ. Gov't.. 
Nat. Phil .. 



Qi^S TO I0:30 A. M. 



Monday .. ■ 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 
Thursday .. 
Friday 



D CLASS 

Am. Hist.. 
Grammar., 
Am. Hist.. 
Grammar.. 
Am. Hist.. 



C OLA£B 

Latin 

Arithmetic... 

Latin 

Arithmetic. .. 
Latin 



B CLASS 

Rhetoric 

Latin 

Rhetoric 

Latin 

Gram. Anal.. 



A CLASS 

Algebra 5. 

i>utch 

Algfbra 

Dutch 

Algebra , 



I 0:30 TO I I : 1 5 A. M. 



Monday .... 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 
Thursday . . 
Friday 



D CLASS 



'Grammar 

Penmanship.. 

Grammar 

Penmanship.. 
Composition . 



C CLASS 

Grammar 

Reading 6 .. 

raniti.ar 

Reading 

Rhetoricals . 



Astronony... 
Greek Hist .. 
\9tronomy .. 
Greek Hist.. 
Bible Study. 



A CLASS 

Drawing 

ratin 

Latin 

Latin 

Latin 



I 1:16 TO I2:00 M. 



Monday .... 
Tuesday ... 
Wednesday 
Thursday .. 
Friday 



D CLASS 

Geoirraphy . 

MuhIc 

Geography . 
•<eography . 
Geography . 



Bonk keeping 
(^umposition . 
Book -keep'ng 

Dutch 

Dutch 



B CLASS 

Algebra 

Algebra ... . 

Algebra 

Rhet^irlcals . 
Algebra — 



A CLASS 

Greek 

Greek , 

Greek 

English 

Greek , 



. 1 —German may be taken instead of 
Greek. 
2— English In the "A" year includes: 
a. Rhetoric, finished: 6. Analy- 
sis of ' Paradise Lost" and "Ly 
sldas": e. Preparation of tlie 
**Excelslora" ; 



d English HlHtory. 
3^For those who use it at their 

nomes. 
4— Physlolojry durlnsj the third t-erni. 
5— PlaneGeom try begin *< Snd term. 
6— Orthoi^raphy in connection. 



Note 1.— Recitations in the afternoon whenever deemed necessary 
Note 2.— The Lady Principal meets all young ladies twice a week, 
such studies or exercises as she may select. 



for 



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fy HOPE COLLEGE. 



Regular Normal CotirsOm 



FIRST YEAR. 

Ortbograpliy, Penmanship, Reading, Grainmar, Comix)si- 
tion, Higiier Arithmetic, Book-keeping, Latin or **Electlves," 
such as Physiology and Civil Governmenl, Drawing, Butch or 
French, Music, Revtew of U. S. History and Geography, Profes- 
sional Instruction for the teacher. 

By taking Electives instead of L^tin, the above forms a good 
one-year English course. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Rhetoric, Composition, Elocution, Drawin|ir) Zoology, Alge- 
bra, Astronomy, Latin and Greek History, or "Electives," Greek 
or German, or **Electives," Dutch or French, Music, Practice io 
Studies of first year. 

Professional Instruction in the Art of Teaching, suitable for 
those who want a two-year English course. 

THIRD YEAR. 

English Langtiage and English History, Composition and 
Elocution, Algebra, Physics, Latin and Roman History, or 
"Electives,*^ Greek or German, or '*Electives," Dutch or French, 
Voice Culture, Geometry, Civil Government, Physiology, Moral 
Science. 

Professional Instruction in Practice of Teaching. The 
Electives will give a full Literary or Scientific Course, to the 
end of the "A" year. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

English Literature, Composition and Elocution, Geometry, 
Greek or German, General History, Dutch or French, Chemistry, 
Mental Science, History of Education, Trigonometry, Physical 
Geography, Geology, School System, Practice of Teaching. 
This la«5t year embraces College studies. 

The above studies will be under the charge of the Faculties, 
and according to the regular Schedule'of Instruction. 



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BEQULAR NORMAL COVRSE, W 



THE SUMMER NORMAL. 

The studies, at this time, are designed to give an opportune 
ity for a thorough review of the subjects required for "first, sec* 
ond and third grade Certificates." in Michigan, and for gaining 
«uch general information as will better fit teachers for their 
needed and noble profession. 

The studies thus to be reviewed, with daily drill as to meth> 
ods and principles, are: 

Orthography, Beading, and Penmanship; Geography, Aritb* 
metic, and Grammar; United States History, and Civil Govern- 
ment; Boole-keeping, Algebra, «nd Geometiy; Physiology, Bot- 
Hny, and Philosophy; School Law; Science and Art of Teaching; 
Question Drawer, and Practical Discussions. 

Extra Branches, such as Music, Crayon Drawing, Typewrit- 
ing, and Short-hand, may be pursued, when a sufficient number 
for a class desire such instruction 

Each subject will be treated after approved **normar' meth- 
ods, with special reference to the needs of teachers in their dis* 
trict schools. Talcing English Grammar, for example, the pro- 
gramme will embrace a review of the parts of speech; parsing 
and diagraming; rules and forms, both oral and written; compo- 
sition; and 9 careful analysis of the right use of the language. 

Those desiring to enter the School will bring their ordinary 
text-books, as instruction will be mainly given by note and topic. 

The next Summer School will be held for four weeks, from 
July 5th to August 2nd, 1893. As in former years, competent 
instruction will be provided. 

The Library and Apparatus of the College are free for th« 
use of these classes. 



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^4 HOPE COLLEGE. 



The Work in Detail. 



THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

In its four years' course, the Grammar School prepares stu- 
dents for the Classical Department in college or the university. 
Further, in order to meet the needs of those that do not expect 
to enter college, the' course is made more comprehensive than 
would otherwise be necessary. To this end, special studies in 
science, book-keeping, elocution, music, modern languages, 
theory and art of teaching, etc., are introduced, thus laying the 
foundation for a liberal and practical education* 

The several departments receive the same careful attention 
as in the college proper, being under the immediate care of the 
respective college professors; while the subsidiary branches and 
'*electives" are in charge of the Principal of the Department, as- 
sisted so far a« may be necessary. Also those that desire to fit 
themselves for the teaching profession obtain a first-class normal, 
as well as academic training, in the Grammar School. 

HISTORY AND ENGLISH LITERATURE. 

PROF. HENRT BOERS. 

In the Grammar School the study of Rhetoric is begun in 
the **B" class and continued for five terms, during which time, 
however, Milton's Lycidas, and Books I. and II. of Paradise Lost 
are also carefully studied. 

The study of History begins in the "D" class, with an' 
abridged course in the history of our own country. In the **B" 
class the History of Greece is taken up, followed in the "A" class 
by the History of England, in each of which studies there are at 
least two recitations a week. 

The study of History is continued in the College. Beginning 
in the Freshman year Ancient, Mediasval, and Modern History, 
and Geography are taken up in order. 

The Freshman class enters first upon the study of American 
Literature, and then takes up English Literature until the end 
of the Sophomore year. As much time as possible is given to 
the study of Englisli Classics. Essays and criticisms on British 
authors are part of the work required during these two years. 

The Juniors study the *Thilosophy of Rhetoric." Rhetor 
ical exercises continue throughout the coursd. 



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THE WORK IN DETAIL. 25 

ENGLISH, ELOCUTION, AND MUSIC. 

PROF. JOHN B. NTKERK. 

The Study of English comprises the following departments: 
Idiom, the Law of Construction, Etymology, Phonology, Ortho- 
epy, etc. Composition and analytical study are pursued con- 
jointly, hy requiring original essays from time to time, on the 
one hand, and hy a critical analysis of some of the best English 
classics, on the other. To promote the study of the different 
forms of composition in journalism, the **A" class publishes in 
manuscript form a **monthly," called The Excelsiora. This 
paper is illustrated and eml>ellished with original sketches and 
drawings by such members of the class as study art, while at the 
end of the college year, It is neatly bound and placed in the Col- 
lege Library. 

Some li\ tie attention is given from week to week to the prin- 
ciples of Elocution and Oratory. The instruction in Interpreta- 
tion and Rendering rests on a psychological basis— working from 
within outwards. The voice, the chief organ of expression, is 
"placed" and developed by approved methods. Public recitals 
and contests take place during the year. 

To such as desire it a four years' course in Vocal Music is 
furnished, comprising Voice Culture in class, Sight-Singing, Ex- 
pressive Rendering, and the principles of Theory, Harmony and 
Counterpoint. This course is given to regular students, and 
is provided without extra tuition. 

MATHEMATICS.— Prof. J. H. Kleinhekskl. 

Arit'.imetic continues through the *D" and '^C" years. 
Three terms of the **ir and one of the "A" year are given to 
Algebra, followed by Plane Geometry, which is finished by the 
end of the **A" year, calling for uQO recitations. 

The Freshmen take Mensuration and finish Solid Geometry 
the first term, Plane Trigonometry the second, and finish Spher- 
ical Trigonometry the third term. In the first term. Sopho- 
more, College Algebra is made a study, after which Analytical 
(Jeomctry and Calculus finish the range of pure Mathematics in 
the sccQnd term of the Junior year. 

LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROF. JAMES O. 8UTPHBN. 

In the Grammar School, Latin is begun wilh the **C" class, 
and continues through the *'A," with daily recitations in the 
**C" and **B'' years, and with four weekly recitations in the '*A** 



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S6 HOPE COLLEGE, 

year.— The Roman method of pronunciation is used.— The stu- 
dent is immediately introduced to the simple stories in **Grad- 
utim," and familiarized with Intlection and Case relation. In 
Cajsar and Cicero, while reviewing the Syntax of nouns, the rest 
of the Grammar is taken up and a>nstant drill given in Sequence 
of Tenses, Conditional Sentences. Oratlo Obliqua, aind the Sub- 
junctive mc)o:l. Prosody is stu lied with the poetry. Graduated 
exercises are gi .en in rendering English into Latin. 

In the College, Latin is pursued through the first three 
years. The study of the Grammar, by analyzing sentences, is 
not neglected in the effort to present the authors in their liter- 
ary character. Collateral instruction is given in Mythology'. 
Antiquities, and Literature. Composition is taught by trans- 
lating into Latin easy extracts from English authors —Assistance 
is willingly offered to students who wish to bro-iden their knowl- 
edge of Latin Literature by reading other authors than those 
marked in the required Curriculum. 

GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROF. JOHN H. GILLESPIE. 

While it is felt that thoroughness is indispensable, it is not 
deemed an absolute necessity, that even the study of elementary 
Greek be made unattractive. This belief has in part determined 
the choice of text-books adoDted and authors read. The episode 
from the Hellenica is read preparatory to ihe study of Lysias in 
the Freshman year. Much blackboard work is required as es- 
sentia] to accuracy. 

In the College cuurse effort is made, as far as practicable, to 
read at least one epochal classic author in history, oratory, epic 
and lyric poetry, drama and philosophy. Kut as this aim is not 
fully attainal»le. extra work on the part of those able and willing 
is encouraged and engaged in. In this way are read such works 
as Demosthenes on the Crown, Isocrates' Panegyricus, and u 
play from each of the two tragedians necessarily crowded out of 
the regular course. 

Once a week, for two years, the Greek New Testament is 
read and the same amount of time is allotted to Greek Prose 
Composition. 

MODERN LANGUAGES. 

PKOF. C0UNELI8 l>OESDUHO. 

Many of the students at llopf* come from Holland homes 
and use that language in common life. For them instruction is 



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THE WORK IN DETAIL, 21 

given in the Dutch Grammar and Literature twice a week up to 
the Freshman Class. Those who select German in lieu of 
Greek, give their time to that study from the "B" Class onward, 
sometimes adding the French, and taking what may be called a 
scientific course. As a fwirt of the regular or A. R course, 
the French is assigned to the Freshman and Sophomore classes, 
*md the German to the Juniors and Seniors, giving nearly two 
hundred recitations to each language. The more diligent stu- 
dents read the French and the German with considerable facil- 
ity, and may be able to use them subsequently in their business.' 
The text-b«ioks are varifd but embrace only those of classic- 
iiuthority. 

PHYSICS AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS. 

PROF. OEURIT J. KOLLEN. 

The *'B" class has a primary course in Astronom}', and the 
vA." in Natural Philosnpliy. 

The Sophomores study surveying, and for electives add 
Field Work, Drafting and Engineering. The Juniors apply 
their Mathematics to Mechanics and other branches of Natural 
Philosophy, while the Seniors seek to discover the scientific laws 
which lie at the basis of the astronomical system. 

CHEMISTRY AND NATURAL HISTORY. 
riioF. cuAULEs scon. 

In the latter half of tho year the *'A" class studies Physiol- 
ogy under the Principal. The Freshmen take a higher coui*se in 
Physiology, and also Zoology. The Sophomores have three reci- 
tations weekly in Systematic Chemistry; and the Juniors two 
terms in Botany and one in Biology. The Seniors follow with 
(Ecology and Mineralogy throughout the year. For Classical 
students this course Is sutflciently extended, but the College, as 
yet, has riot furnished laboratories for more individual and scien- 
tific work in the above branches. • 

PFIILOSOPHY, ETC. 

The Junior Clas? u^?^ PjLter's Intellectiiil Scientv* as a 
text-book, but is constantly exercised in analytic thought, obser- 
vation and judgment on the whole subject of P.sychology, for 
which end disc^.ission i; invited Ethical Science is similarly 
studied during the Senior year. The above branches are under 
the President, as is aUo Christian Pliilosopliy. throu^rh lecturo 



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fS HOPE COLLEGE. 



and the use of Butler's Analogy. Prof. KoUen gives the Seniors 
H course in Logic and Political Economy, and in order to develop 
correct thought and reasoning calls for class debates or essays on 
civic or political subjects. 

The President gives the Juniors written lectures on the 
History of the United States' Constitution; and the Seniors 
have the History of Civilization. 

It will be seen, therefore, that while Hope cannot, at pres- 
ent, offer many * 'elect! ves," it has and secures a regular liberal 
course, as English, and as complete as can be found in most of 
our Western Colleges. 



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LOCATION. 



Holland City is a central point on the Chicago & Wes^ 
Michigan Railway, ninety miles north of New BufTalo, twenty- 
fly e miles south-west of Grand Rapids, and midway hetween 
Allegan and Grand Haven. To all Eastern points the route by 
rail is direct. It is therefore most desirably located, having both 
land and water communications, being near the shore of Lake 
Michigan, with which it is directly connected by a beautiful 
sheet of water, called Macatawa Bay, and on which are the pop- 
ular summer resorts, Macatawa Parle, and Ottawa Beach. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 

The College Campus lies between Tenth and Twelfth 
streets, in the centre of the city, and contains sixteen acres, 
with an addition of two acres on the south side of Twelfth 
street. It presents a finely varied surface, well shaded with 
native trees, and is annually improving in beauty and attract- 
iveness. 

The College buildings are nine in number. Van Vleck Hall 
is mainly devoted to Uormitory purposes. It has been decided 
to build an ample Recitation Hall, as soon as the requisite funds 
can be secured. A fine Library building is now in process of 
erection, which will furnish some additional recitation rooms* 

SCHOOL YEAR. 

The scholastic year of forty weeks begins on the third 
Wednesday in September, and ends with the general Commence 
meat on the fourth Wednesday in June. 

The winter and spring vacatiots are fixed by the General 
Faculty. (See the Calendar.) 



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m SOPE COUjEQK 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

Most of t^ studento seek what \% called "^^ Ulieral educa* 
Uion," leading to the degree of A. B , or S. B. A "^partial'' or 
^elective" course is offered U> al> wlio so desire, and facilities are 
furnished through tl*e regular instructorsr but a part kil course 
entitles only to a certifieate, and not to a diploma. German andl 
French, or Drawing and Painting, can be studied at any time, 
as also the branches generally called **Bcientiflc,'' fitting the 
student for professional courses in a University. 

Since 1878 the Institution has l>eeB open to women. Thej" 
enter the regular classes, and attend the same lectures ami reci- 
tations m the yomig men. 

Vocal Music is provided without charge. Lessons in In^- 
strumental music can be secured at the expense of the pupil. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Examinations, mainly in writing, are held at the end of 
♦^ach term. 

CERTIFICATES AND DIl'LOMAS, 

Members of the *'A" Class, upon graduation in full course, 
are entitled to a regular Certificate, signed by the Council and 
the Faculty; bat said certificate will be marked "First," 
**Second," or "Third Grade." as follows: When the average 
standing of the graduate is fron> 91 to 100, this will indicate the 
*'First Grade;" when from 81 to 9i>, the '"Second;" and when from 
71 to 80, the **Third;" reference being made to both recitations 
and examinations. 

Such students as are admitted in partial course, or who fa' I 
below an average standing of 71, are entitled to a Certificate, 
from the Faculty, naming the studies in which they have sus- 
tained examinations. 

Graduates from the College, when recommended by the 
Faculty, receive a Diploma, with the degree of A. H., or S. B., 
l3eing a testimonial of general scholarship. The C/Ourse leading 
thereto includes all the "liberal arts," usually taught in col- 
leges. A partial course is sometimes chosen, and is entitled to a 
Certificate as adjudged by the Faculty. 

The degree of A. M. is conferred upon those who continue 
their studies for three years after graduation, or who may satis- 
fy the Council, by a thesis, as to their scholastic attainments 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATmK M 

By paying a fee otdkree dollars, an A. M. diploma id such casejs 
Millbeg^vea. 

KELIGIQUS SERVICES. 

The exercises of each day begin with jpraj^er in the College 
<Jhapel, at 8 o'clock a. m. 

On the Sabbath every student is expected ta worship reg^ 
iilarly with one of the churches in the city or vicinity, unless ex- 
cused by the President. 

Religious instruction is given in M t/ae classes regularly^ 
^nd, like all the other studies, is in charge of the Faculty. 

Although Hope College is denominational, and is und^r the 
patronage and support of the Reformed Church in America, yet^ 
by the law of its incorporation, it can have no "religious test " 
The doors are open, and welcome is given to all who submit to 
its scholastic regulations. As a Cnristian school, however, it in- 
culcates gospel truths, and demands a consistent moral charac^ 
cer and deportment. 

LIBRARY, ETC. 

A Library of oTer S,000 volumes, and a Reading Room, are 
free for the use of the students. Books and papers are constant' 
ly being added, and rv^quire increased accommodations, and a 
^reproof building. 

The Laborat(»ry, Cabinet, and Philosophical Apparatus arc 
5idapted to the use of the recitation or lecture rooms. They are 
gradually being made larger and more complete. It is to be 
tiopt'd that M<ips, Charts Instruments, and Specimens of Nat- 
ural History, as well as books will be donated by the graduates 
and friends of the Institution. 

SOCIETIES. 

Four Literary Soclettej-', viz., the Meliphon, and the Fraternal^ 
and the Ulfilait Club, have bf^cri maintained for years, and offer 
decided advantages to their nvspective members, and materially 
i\U\ in the attainment of that culture, which it is the object of 
this school to promote. Th(i Ulfitas Club seeks to secure for its 
HI mbers greater proflciency in tiie use of the Holland language 
During the last year students who study German have org-^nized 
n S iciety, called Die Gennnnui Gn^elUicknft; and the young ladies 
meet every twf» weeks mainly for religious and social purposes^ 
tlie name of the Society being the Sororal, 



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Sf HOPE COLLEGE. 



The YouDg Men's Christian Associationi having over one 
hundred members, continues to carry on its work with much in- 
terest and activity. 

SUNDRIES. 

Connected with the Institution, a religious weelcly is pub- 
lished, called De Hope. It was established in 1866, and is under 
the direction of the Council, through its Editorial C')mmittee. 
The paper has a circulation of about 3,000 copies. 

A monthly, called Th& Anchor, is conducted by the students 
with gratifying success. It has reached its sixth year. 

The ''A'' Class maintains a periodical in manuscript, called 
The Excelsiora. It is bound, year by year, and is placed in the 
Library. 

The Oratorical Exercises of the Grammar School, on the 
ttnal Monday of the College year, is the Commencement of that 
Department, and marks the graduation of the "A" Class. 

Two prizes, called **The George BIrkhofif, Jr., Prizes," have 
been established. One is for the Sophomore Class, in English 
Literature, and the other for the Freshman Class, in Dutch 
Literature. At the last Commencement they were awarded, by 
the Committees, as follows: For the best English Essay, ti> 
Gerrit Tysse; for the best Dutch Essay, to John Van de Erve. 

It is expected that additional prizes will follow, as a stim- 
ulus to labor in other branches of study. 

A Course of Lectures is of almost yearly occurrence, usually 
at the invit<itlon of one of the societies, and with the approval 
and financial aid of the Executive Committee. 

The moral, social, and literary advantages of Holland are 
considered good, and are steadily advancing. 

EXPENSES. 

The City is surrounded by a rich agricultural region, and the 
cost of living is comparatively cheap. Good board and rooms 
may be had in families of the city for from two to three dollars 
per week; in clubs, and without furnished rooms, at lower rates. 
There is no fixed rent for rooms. 

There are seventeen rooms in Van Vleck Hall, in the selec- 
tion of which students for the ministry have the preference. 
These are furnished in part and bear a moderate charge. 

As yet, no tuition fees have been charged, but every student 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. SS 

must pay to the Treasurer, in advance, an incidental fee of five 
dollars per term. 

Tlie graduation fee is five dollars in the College and two and 
one-half dollars in the Grammar School. No other charges are 
made. 

For books, clothing, washing, fuel, lights, travel, etc., those 
interested can best make the estimate. The entire expense need 
not exceed $200 per annum, and may be less. 

The fee of the students in the Summer Normal Classes is 
five dollars for the session. Those who enter the College, for the 
regular Normal Course, are charged ten dollars in advance for 
each semester or half year. 

Boarding Houses and Boarding Clubs in the city are to be 
approved by the Faculty, and to be subject to such regulations 
as are usual in similar institutions. By a rule of the College, 
lady students are not to room in the same boarding houses with 
the gentlemen. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The Rules of Order are few and simple. In general, if the 
students do not improve their time and opportunities, or do not 
conduct themselves in a respectful and orderly manner, their 
connection with the institution will be suspended. 

The students are required to be present, promptly, on the first 
day of each and every term. The recitations will begin the 
next morning. 

A record is kept of the scholastic standing of each student, 
and a copy of the same is sent to the parent or guardian; if the 
average standing, in any terra, does not exceed 70, on a basis of 
100, he is to be dropped from his class. 

Term-fees and room- rent are to be paid strictly in advance, 
and if not so paid, or within one month, the student neglecting 
forfeits his ri^ht to continue in the institution. 

The object of the Faculty is to develop in the pupils a higher 
moral as well as intellectual culture and character. If they 
find, after due probation and inquiry, that the influence of a 
stud3nt is bad and injurious to others, they claim the right to 
require his withdrawal. 

Parents are requested not to ask or expect their children to 
com3 home during term time. It seriously interferes with 
proper habits of study, and by our rules, none are to be absent 
from the institution withmt p:»rmission of the President. 

A copy of the regulations of the College is given to each stu- 
dent at the time of his or her matriculation. 



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^4 HOPE COLLEGE. 



REMARKS. 

R?v. James F. Zweraer has continued his work as Financial 
Aijent of tiie C.)llej:e, and has now nearly secured the $103,000, of 
whicn one-half will h3 added to th3 Endowment F'und. 

In April, 1891, tlie Cnuicil appointed a Committee to secure 
plans for a suitable Library Uuilding. and to report the same to 
\jh'\ June meeting, with sujfjf est ions as to the raising? of the 
needed funds. As such committee were reported Prof. G.J. Kol- 
len. the Librarian, Prof. J. W. Beardslee, L). D., and H. D. Post, 
E^q. The report was made and approved, and Prof. KoUen was 
appointed by the Council to secure funds for the erection of the 
building. His efforts met with most j^ratifying success. 

In September, 1S92, the erection of the designed building, 
GiiAVK>» LiBR.VKY and Winants Chapel, a cut of which illus- 
trates ttis catilo^fue, was b?gun. The corner stone was 
laid on Oct. 12th with appropriate ceremonies. The walls 
are about half way up, and the building will be completed this 
year. 

The College authorities feel profoundly thanltful to the 
Hon N. F. Graves, of Syracuse. N. Y., and to Mrs. G. E. Wi- 
nants, of Bergen Point, N. J., and to others who have so gener- 
ously aided the College in this direction. The friends of the 
College will ever lool< with pride and gratitude upon that build- 
ing as it perpetuates among us the honored and beloved names 
of Graves and Winants. 

AVe sincerely hope that there will yet be others, who will 
also attach either their own name, or the name of some depart- 
ed dearone, to this instiuition, so rich in fruition and so iflorious 
in hope; and thereby cDmbine perpetual usefulness with perpet- 
ual reujembrance. 

The Summer School of 1892 was conducted as usual, from 
July 5 to Augusts. Prof J. W. Humphrey was Director, being 
assisted in tlie work of instruction by Prof. J. H. Kleinhelisel, of 
Hope College, and Sec. P A.Latta, of Allegan The class numbered 
53 and the school, notwithstanding difficulties, arisiii'^ from sur- 
rounding competing schools, was carried on with usj.il success. 
The School of 1893 will be under the same directitii, but new 
teachers may be connected with the corps of instruction. It 
will begin July 5th, and end August 2nd. 

During the last twelve years, the condition of Hope College 
has inilicated not a rapid but a continued and sure rate of prog- 
n»sF, justifying the use of its fitting and inspiring motto, Spera 
in Dm. In 18S2-83 the paralyzing debt of $33,000 resting on the 



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MISC'EL LA NEO US IX FOB MA TIG K SJi 



institution was llqnidatefl, and the funds for its support have 
since j^rown from $(52,o()J to over $150,000. True, a small deficit is 
again recorded, for tlve or six years, but this is due to the unex- 
pecU^d failure of aid from tiie lioard of Education. II. C. A. The 
Campus has added new attractions to its previous great natural 
boauty, and a fairer abode of learning, ''seat of the Muses," does 
not exist in Michigan. As to buildings, the President's house is 
a model of its kind, and the new Libra»*y and Chapel, in process 
of erection, must surely be an object of worthy pride The 
book-stack will contain over 20,000 volumes at the first, and the 
Museum is destined to grow rapidly lK)th in value and impor- 
tance. Perhaps the citizens of Holland will begin to manifest a 
special interest in Natural History. 

The attendatice of students in regular courses has doub- 
led, and besides there is a Summer School which averages one 
hundred. As may be seen from the ciitaloguo, the professors 
do all the work of instruction and drill, do it with zeal Hnd 
completeness, whatever labc^r this may involve, and it must be 
said of this College that its instruction, from the lowest class 
in the Grammar School, is in the hands of experienced teach- 
ers, and these come into direct personal contact with every 
pupil almost daily. Educators appreciate the advantages of this 
feature in any school. 

The curriculum of study, the time and schedule of recita- 
tions, the best plans of scholastic work for the best results have 
been studied and improved by the Faculty, until It is felt that 
p:irt*nts and others, upon due examination, must in general 
approve The Institution is thoroughly English; is religious, 
but not in any senate sectarian; is so moderate in expenses, that 
its advantages are open to the poor, that is. to depend for an 
education upon their own exertion. The graduat:s are deemed 
"Workmen that need nnt be ashamed", wherever they practice 
their profe.ssi<»ns. and especially be it noted that many pulpits 
in the land are ably manned by the alumni of Hope. Who then 
can mark its widening circle of influence upon mankind? 

But this proirress must continue even more rapidly. A n am- 
ple Recitation Hall comes first, and this should soon be ir the 
name of some honored donor of the needed funds. Next c jmes 
a nevT Dormitory and a Ladies Hall,— would that some 
lady could furnish the latter in 1893. A well equipped (''iiemlcal 
and Physical Laboratory should follow, and within ten years 
an endowment of $3Oj.O00. The retiring President bus all this in 
hope, sees it as a vision, not a dream, and feels that his succes- 
sor will witness the accomplishment, and yet more in prosixrt. 



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w HOPE COLLEGE. 



but dependent upon the divine injunction, *'Except the Lord 
build the house they labor in vain that build it." 

Besides the nearly $30,000 raised for the Library and Chapel 
during the year, and the addition to the Endowment Fund by 
the Financial Agent, there have been donated to the College: 

1. Two scholarships of $1,000 each. 

2. A legacy of $2,000 which has not yet been paid into the 
Treasury. 



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MISCELLANEOVS INFORMATION. S7 



Chronolosical Memoranda. 



Beginning of the Netberland Immigration into Michigan^ Iowa, etc 3847 

Village of Holland laid out 1848 

Five acres donated by Bev A. C. Van Raalte, D. D., as a site for an 

Academy 1856 

**Pioneer School" opened, Mr. W. T . Taylor, Principal Oct., 1851 

Placed under the care of the General Synod June, 1853 

Mr. W. T. Taylor resigned Oct., 1853 

Rev.F. B.Beldler, Principal 1*^54 

Rev. John Van Vleck. Principal 1855 

The school named the Holland Academy ....1855 

Located in the **Orpban House" 1856 

Van Vleck Ha 1 erected on "the five acres" 1S57 

The Academy more fully organized 1857-'58 

Melephone Society founded 1867 

Rev. John Van Vleck, resigned 1850 

Rev. Philip Phelps. Jr.. Prii cipal 18S0 

Campus enlarged to 1G acres 18.%9 

*Oggel House" erected as a residence 1860 

Gymnasium built, largely by students 1RQ2 

A fVvis/fman Class formed, lU in number 1869 

Fraternal Society founded 1863 

A "Board of Superlnte ndents" appointed by General Synod 1863 

A Co/ltfa« proposed, and approved by the Synods 1864 

Over $4U OOU contributed as an endowment 1865 

Hope College begun. 18&'): incorporated lflay.1866 

48 8tud^itsin all 18fl6-'fi6 

The Board of Superintendents, named '^TheOouncH" 1866 

Faculty of six appointed and organized: Rev. P. Phelps, Jr , D. D., 

Pres July, 1866 

First Commencement; eight became A B 1HJ6 

A weekly newspaper. DeHttpe^ established 1866 

Theological Instruction begun, with a class of seven Sept. 1866 

Rev. C. E. Crlspell, D. D., elected Professor of Theology; Profs. Phelps. 

O^sel. Beck, and Scott being "Lectors" 1867 

Holliind Incorporated as af ity Ih67 

Charter UalKburned In 1884) erected 1867 

Eighty acres, within the city, donated by Dr. Van Raalte 1867 

Point Superior r'Hope Farm"), 8;i7 acres, and the BlulT, 134 acres, pur- 
chased; part of which has since been sold 1867— '68 

South Campus, two acres, donated by Dr. Van Raalte 1868 

The Theological hepurtment adopted by General Synod as its **Western 

Theological Seminary" I860 

Death of Rev. Peter J. Oggel, Professor, and Editor of DeHope Dec, Ihoo 

Council Hall (Grammar School Building) ei-ected I860 

First Theological Class i»f .se ven grad uated 1869 

Two railroads opened tnrouuh Holland 1860— '71 

First Formal Constitution of the C«»llege adopted 1871 

Holland nearly deRtn.yed by fire.... Oct., J871 

Gymiia.sium repaired, and made the Chapel 18712 

C. Docsburg. A. M., elected Professor 1872 



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JS HOPE COLLEGE, 



House finished on the South Campus 187:^ 

I'he Laboratory enlar^d and repaired 1874 

Theological 'Lectors" regularly appointed by Synod, viz. Profs. T.R. 

Beck and O. Scott IfiT.V 

Bricic printing office for De Hope erected". 1876- 

Death of Rev. Cornelius Van der Meulon Aug. 23, 1876 

DeathofKer. A, C Van Raalte, D. I) N^cv. 7. 187ft 

Suspension of the Theological Dcpartnient Juno, 1877 

Death of Rev. A. T. Stewart, D. T) , Sec. of Council for 12 years May. J878 

Reorganization of the College; Dr. Plielps resigns June. 187b 

Rev. G. H. Mandevllie, D. D.. Provisional President and Financial Agent: 

Prof O. Scott. Vice President ... I878 

Wm. A. Shields. A. M., and G.J. KoUen. A M., elected Professors 1878 

Rev, C. E. Crispell, Professor of Theology, resigns 187J>^ 

A new Constitution adopted 187!> 

Prof . Charles Scott. D. D.. Provisional President 1880* 

Successful efforts to pay off a debt of $ a.OO') 1879— 'OS" 

Donation of $10,000 by GerrltCowenhoven, Es(i 188^ 

Dlvsislon In some of the Reformed Churches 1881— *8:j 

Theological Instruction restored ; a Professorship of $:i6.000 completed; 

Rev. N. M. Steffeiis, D. D., Professor of Theology 188# 

Visit of the General Synod to the College 1884- 

Rev. W. R. Gordon. D. D., donates bks Library to the CoMege— to be 

sent when It can have room and shelves 1881 

A separate "Board of Superintendents" for the Western Theological 

Seminary ordered by Synod 188.5^ 

Profs. Beol« and Shields resign 188,> 

H. Boers. A. M.; J. H. Klelnheksel. A. M. ; J G. Sutphen, A. M., and Rev. 

John J. Anderson, A. M , elected Professors ISS.'V 

Electton of Prof. Chas. Scott. D. D.. as constitutional President 1883 

President Scott Inaugurated 1886 

All the streets around the Campus graded, etc 1882— '8& 

Synod's House for the President e recced as to exterior Irt8<; 

First number of The^ Anchor issued «.ay. 1887 

■•The George Birkhoff. Jr.. Prizes" e.stabllshed 188? 

Normal Department opened 188.S' 

Bev. James F. Zwemer appointed Financial Agent 18SK 

Prof. J.J. Anderson resigns 1881* 

Rev.J. H. Gillespie, A. M., elected Professor i88K 

Rev. J. W. Beardslee, D. D., Theological Professor 1888 

Invested Funds have increased to over $100,000 188J> 

Quarter Centennial Celebration June 26. 18!M» 

Syn(Kl's House for the President, finished 180? 

J. B. Nykerk, A. M.. appointed Assistant Professor 1802 

Graves Library and Winants Chapel begun; cornerstone laid Oct. \2. 180? 

President Scott resigns; taking effect \mi 

For Faculties and Students, see Catalogue of I8ft»-'0i 



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WESTERN 



THB 



REFORMED GHURGH IN AMERICA. 



CALSnPAR. 



1892, Sept. 6. Entrance Examiaations. 

** 7. Term opens. 

Nov. 24-26. Thanksgiving Recess. 

Dec. 2S. Beginning of Christmas Becesa. 

1^3, Jan. 10. Work Resumed. 

*• 26. Prayer for Colleges, 

Apr. 25. Meeting of Board of Superintendents. 

*' 26. Examinations. 

" 26. Commencement exercises in evening. 

VACATION. 

Sept. 5, Entrance Examioation^ 

*• 6. Term begins* 
:Nov. 22-28. Tbaoksgiving recess. 
Dec. 22. Beginning of Christmas Rece8S% 
1894. Jan. 9. Work resumed. 



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40 HOPE COLLEGE. 



BOARP OF sopsRinrenpenTS. 



BX-OFFICIO. 

Rev. Chas. Scott, D. D., - President of Hope College. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF NEW YORK. 

1893. Rev. David Cole, D. D., Yonkers, N. Y. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF ALBANY. 

1894. Rev. Edward A. Collier, D. D., Klnderhook, N. Y. 

FROM the synod OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 

1895. Rev. Anson Du Bois, D. D., Athenia, N. J. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF CHICAGO. 

1895. Rev. P. Moerdyke, D. D., Chicago, 111. 

1895. Rev. Matthew Kolyn, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

1895. Rev. A. Buursma, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

1895. Rev. J. Van Houte, Holland, Mich. 

from THE CLASSIS OF HOLLAND. 

1893. Rev. John Van Der Meulen, D. D. Holland. Mich. 

from the CLASSIS OF GRAND RIVER. 

1893. Rev. Egbert Winter, D. D., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

FROM the CLASSIS OF MICHIGAN. 

1893. Rev. N. D. Williamson, South Bend, Ind. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF ILLINOIS. 

1894. Rev. T. W. Jones, Chicago, 111. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF WISCONSIN. 

1894. Rev. J. Broek, Milwaukee, Wis. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF IOWA. 

1894. Rev. James F. Zwemer, Orange City, Iowa. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OK DAKOTA. 

1893. Rev. John A. De Spelder, Orange City, Iowa. 



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W£:STERN THEOLOOICAL SEMINARY, 41 



FACOLTY. 



REV. NICHOLAS M. STEFFENS, D. D., 

Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theoloj^y. In charge of His- 
torical Tlieology, Horn i let ics, Pastoral Theology 
and Catechetics. 



REV. JOHN W. HEARDSLEE, D. D., 

Professorof Biblical Languages and Literature. In charge of 
Sacred Geography, Antiquities, and Herniencutics. 



JOHN B. NYKERK, A. M. 
Instructor in Elocution. 



Officers of fKc Boe^ni. 



Rev. John Van Der Meulen, D D.. President. 
Rev. H. E Dusker, Stated Clerk. 



Corf\raif fee ot\ R<)ce^f iorv of Sf\j<ief\fs« 



Hev. N. M. Stekfeks, D. 1).. Rev. J. W. Beaudslee, D.D 
liEV.J. Van Der Meulen. D. D., Rev. W. Moerdyk. 
Kev. Henry E. Dosker, Rev. Ciias. Scott, D. I). 



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4^ 



HOPE COLLEGE. 



STOPenrs. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Heine J. MenninO|. Alton, la. 

Henry J. PietenpoI/, Holland. 

Peteu Sieoerh, Flushing^ Netherlands. 

Gyninasiani, Middleburgh. 



John Sietbema, 
Jersy p. Winter, 

GKRRIT H. DUBIHNK, 

John Luxen, 

Al/HERT OOSTERHOF, 



MIDDLE CLASSw 
Hope College, 1891, 
Hope College, 1891. 
JUNIOR CLAS& 
Hope College, 1892. 
Hope College, 1892. 
Hope College, 1892. 



Coopereville. 
Holland. 

Overisel. 

Holland. 

Spring Lake. 

Stlllman Valley, 111. 



ANDKEW J. ReEVERTS, 

Hope Collejjre, 1892. 
Elbrrt S. SCH1L8TRA, Rochester, N. Y. 

Gymnasium Rotterdam. 
Cornelius M. Steffenp, Holland. 

Hope College, 1892. 
Herman Van der Ploeo, Holland. 

Hope C()ll(»ge, 1892. 
Henry J. Veldman, Grand Rapids. 

Hope College, 1892. 



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WESTERN THEOLOGICAL BEMINABY, 4S 



covRze OF STVpy. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

ExEOETiCAL Theology and Hermkneutics.— Elements of 
Hebrew; Selections from Pentateuch; Harmony and Exegesis of 
the Gospels; Reading Acts of the Apostles; Archaeology; Sacred 
Geography; Hermeneutics. 

T€x^6ooJlM.— Harper's Method and Manual; Green\s Hebrew 
Grammar; Robinson's (Riddle's) Harmony; BissePs Biblical An- 
tiquities; Barrow's Sacred Geography; Gesenius's Lexicon; West- 
cott & Hort's Greek Testament; Thayer's N. T. Lexicon; Ferry's 
Hermeneutics. 

Historical THEOLOOY.—Kurtz's Sacred History. 

Systematic Theology.— Introduction; Encyclopedia; Sym- 
bols of the Church. 

Practical Theology.— Theory of Preaching; Analysis of 
Sermons; Homiletical Exercises. 

MIDDLE YEAR. 

EXEGETICAL THEOLOGY AND HERMENEUTICS.— Hebrew Ety- 

mology and Syntax; Messianic Prophecy; Readings from Histori- 
cal Books; Old Testament Introduction; Exegetical Study of 
Hebrews; Reading Revelations. 

Historical Theology.— Kurtz's Church History. 

Systematic Theology.— Lectures; Theology proper; Anthro- 
pology; Christology; A. A. Hodge's Outlines; Charles Hodge's 
Systematic Theology. 

Practical Theology.— Lectures on Preaching; Homiletical 
Exercises; Church Government; Pastoral Theology; Lectures. 



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U HOPE COLLEGE, 



SENIOR YEAR. 



ExEGETicAL Theology and Hkrmenbutics.— Hebrew 
Prophecy and Poetry; O. T. Theology; Historical Reading: Ara- 
maic Selections; Exegetical Study of Romans; Introduction to 
Xew Testament; Reading Pastoral and General Epistles. 

Historical Theology.— Ecclesiastical History (continued). 

Systematic Theology.— Lectures; Soteriology; Ecclesiology: 
Eschatology; Apologetics; Ethics; Review of the entire System. 

PiiAcn^iCAL Theology.— Homilelical Exercises; Pastoral The- 
ology; Cathechetics; Theory of Missions; Church Government; 
Lectures on Preaching. 



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WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. J^ 



I mfont>a^hc 



!ervera^l it\\ ont>a^l lorv. 



ADMISSION. 

The Seminary is open for the admission of students from every 
denomination of Christians. 

A Committee of the Board of Superintendents, on the recep- 
tion of students, meets on the first Tuesday in September, at 11 
o'clock a. m. 

Every applicant is required to present a certificate of church 
membership and one of literary qualifications. One who has not 
pursued a regular Collegiate course must give proof by testimon- 
ials or examination of such literary attainments as will enable 
him to enter upon the course of studies in the school. 

PREACHING. 
The Students preach regularly before the Faculty and Stu- 
dents, subject to such criticism as may be appropriate. They 
also preach in the churches, especially such as are vacant, 
under the direction of the Faculty. 

LECTURES. 
A course of Lectures, on subjects bearing on Ministerial work 
is delivered annually under the direction of the Board of Super- 
intendents. 

MISSION WORK. 
The Students are organized as a Mission Band and hold them- 
selvt'S in readiness to attend any calls to address meetings where 
they can advocate the cause of Missions. 

A DELPHIC SOCIETY. 

This Is a weekly gathering of the Professors and Students for 

the discussion of questions relating to the studies of the course, 

and to all matters bearing on the practical work of the ministry. 

The exercises embrace debutes, essays, and general discussions. 



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^ SOPE COLLEOK 



COMMENCEMENT. 
The Theological ComtDencement exercises take place ont 
Wednesday evenlDg, at the close of the year. Addresses are de- 
livered by theSenk>rs, in English and Dutcb, and" by sonae mem'- 
Iter of the Board of Superintendents appointed for the purpose.. 

BENEFICIART AID. 

Instructfon fs entirely gratuitous. Young men are aided b}^ 
the Board of Education as their circumstances require and the 
funds admit, not only while in the Senunary, but in the studies- 
pre|)aratory to entering it. Booms are provided in Van Vleclc 
Hall and charget^ for board are very moderate. 

The requirement of the Cbnstitwtion ia regard tcstudents pre- 
paring forthe miinistry in the Reformed Church is as follows: 

"Every person contemplating the work of the ministry, before 
he commences hiS'Courseof Theological studies, shall lurnish sat- 
isfactory evidence of his being a member in full communion and 
good standing of a Reformed Protestant Church; of his piety^ 
ability and literary entertainments; and thereupon shall be ad- 
mitted into nne of the Theological Schools; and during the prose- 
cution of his studies there, shall be subject to the rules and 
regulations thereof; and when he shall have comi)leted the pre- 
scribed course and term of Theological studies, shall be admitted 
to an examination according to the regulations of the school as 
established by tbc General Synod; and if found qualified, shall 
receive a professorial certificate to that effect, which shall entitle 
him to an examination for licensure before the Classis to which 
he belongs."— Con^tfttt^wm, Art, II, dec, 2, 



THSOLOGiCAL ALOmnL 



1969. 



llTAlfES. REBIDENCE8. 

4LE BUURSMA Grand Rapids. 

GERRIT DANGRUMOND Holland, Minn, 

WILLIAM B. GILMORE •April 24, 1884. 



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WESTERN TBEOLOOICAL 8EMINABT. 47 

VAUEA. BB8IDSN0K8. 

PETER MOERDYKE Chicago, 111. 

WILLIAM MOERDYK Kalamazoo, 

^OHN W.TE WINKEL Fulton, llL 

BARM WOLTMAN ♦April 30, 189a 

1870. 

JAMES DE FREE , ISioux Centre, la. 

ENNE J. HEEREN •Oct. 15. 1878. 

JOHNHUIZENGA.,,- Rock Valley, la. 

BALSTER VAN ESS Roseland,!!!, 

1971. 

JOHN BROEK South Hoiland, Ilk 

OERRITVANDE KREEKE Kalamazoo. 

WILLIAM VISSCHER •Feb. 11, 1872. 

1879. 

HARM BORGERS GreenleaftOD, Minn. 

EVERT VAN DER HART ♦April 29, 1889. 

1973. 

HENRY K. BOER Grand Rapids. 

PETERDEBRUYN Grand Haven. 

JOHN A. DE SPELDER Orange City, la. 

JAMES F. ZWEMER Orange City, la. 

1874. 

JOHN HOFFMAN Clymer, N. Y. 

NICHOLAS NEERKEN ♦Jan. 3, 1887. 

1875. 

WILLIAM P. H AZENBERG Johannesburg, Transvaal. 

ANDREW WORMSER Montana^ 

1876. 

FREDERICK P. BAKKER Constantine. 

JOSIAS MKCLENDYK Waupun, Wis. 

HELENUSB. NIES Paterson, N. J. 

1877. 

HARM VAN DERPLOEG ♦Jan. 13,1892. 

CORNELIUS W A BEKE ♦Feb. 22, 1880* 

SUSPENDED UNTIL 1884. 



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48 HOPE COLLEGE. 



1996. 

N A.MB8. BKBIDEN CE8 . 

DIRK SCHOLTEN Muscatine, la, 

1997. 

GERHARD DE JONGE Vriesland. 

SIMON HOOGEBOOM Cleveland, O, 

GERRIT H. IIOSPERS Muskegon. 

PETER IHRMAN Marion, N. Y. 

1999. 

GERRIT J. HEKHUIS * Roseland, 111. 

ALBERT VAN DEN BERG Overisel. 

PETER WAYENBERG Maurice, la, 

1999. 

RALPH BLOEMENDAAL Chicago, 111. 

ALBERT H. STRABBING Hamilton. 

1990. 

PETER J. A. BOUMA Grand Rapids. 

JOHM M. LUMKES Grand Rapids. 

J. J. VAN ZANTEN Grand Haven, 

1991. 

FOPPE KLOOSTER Galesburg, Iowa. 

.JOHN LAMAR Grand Rapids. 

ALBERTUS PIETERS Nagasaki, Japan. 

HENRY STRAKS Cleveland, O. 

1993. 
ANTHONY M. VAN DUINE Holland,Neb. 



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Spera In Deo« 



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CATALOGUE 



HOPE COLLEGE, 



HOLLAND. MICH. 



1 89 



^ • A 


1894. 




APRIL. 


MAY. 


JUNE. 




S 


M 


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CATALOGUE 

OF THE 

OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 

OF 

HOPE COLLEGE, 

HOLLAND MICH. 

i893--'94. 

AN INSTITUTION OF Tr.E REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA. 



PlanGBr Schaol, 1851. 
Holland Academy, 1357. 
BecaniE Hope CalleaB, 1BB5. 



HOLLAND, MICH. 

HOL.L.AKD CiTT NEWS PBINT. 

1894. 



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1895- 



CALENDAR— 1894-'95. 



1894. April 16, Third Term begins. 

'* 25, Meeting of Council. 

** 26, Senior Examinations. 
June 21-22, Undergraduate Examinations. 

'' 24, Baccalaureate Sermon. 

** 25, Closing Exercises — Grammar School. 

'* 26, Meeting of Council. 

*' 26, Meeting of Alumni. 

** 27, Commencement. 

VACATION. 

Sept. 18, Examinations for Admission. 
** 19, First Term begins. 



Nov. 29, 


Thanksgiving Day. 


Dec. 21, 


First Term ends. 




VACATION. 


Jan'y 7, 


Second Term begins. 


- 31, 


Day of Prayer for Colleges 


Mar. 29, 


Second Term ends. 




VACATION. 



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THE COUNCIL. 

-% 

EX-OFFICIO. 
Prof. G. J. Kollen, President-elect of the College. 

ELECTED MEMBERS. 

FROM GENERAL SYNOD. 
NAMES. BE8IDSHCES. TEBUS BZPIBB. 

Rev. Cornelius Brett, D.D., Jersey City, N. J. 1894 
Rev. G. H. Mandeville, D.D.,New York City, N. Y. 1895 

Rev. Jas. F. Zwemer, Orange City, la. 1896 

Rev. Peter Moerdyke, D.D:, Chicago, 111. 1896 

Hon. Isaac Cappon, Holland City, Mich. 1897 

Hon. Arend Visscher, Holland City, Mich. 1898 

Hon. Gerrit J. Diekema, Holland City, Mich. 1899 

FROM CLASSIS OF MICHIGAN. 

Rev. Samuel Streng, Kalamazoo, Mich. 1894 

Jas. Van der Sluys, Grand Rapids, Mich. 1894 

FROM CLASSIS OF GRAND RIVER. 

Rev. p. De Bruyn, Grand Haven, Mich. 1895 

Rev, Dirk Broek, Grandville, Mich. 1895 

FROM CLASSIS OF HOLLAND. 

Rev. Gerhard De Jonge, Vriesland, Mich. 1896 

Rev. Henry E. Dosker, Holland City, Mich. 1896 

FROM CLASSIS OF DAKOTA. 

*Rev. John A. De Spelder, Orange City, la. 1896 

Rev. S. J. Harmeling, Marion, S.D. 1896 

FROM CLASSIS OF IOWA. 

Rev. p. Lepeltak, Alton, la. 1897 

Rev. James De Pree, Sioux Centre, la. 1897 



* Removed from Classts, successor not yet appointed. 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



FROM CLASSIS OF ILLINOIS. 



NAMB8. RS8IDENCCS. TEBMS EXPIRE. 

Rev. J. S. JoRALMON, Norwood Park, 111. 1898 

Francis J. Gushing, Irving Park, 111. 1898 



FROM CLASSIS OF WISCONSIN. 



Rev. John H. Karsten, Oostburg, Wis. 1899 

*Rev. J. P. De Jong, Englewood, 111. 1899 

OFFICERS OF COUNCIL. 



Rev. D. Broek, . . . . . President. 

Rev. S. Streng, Vice President. 

Rev. Henry E. Dosker, - - - - Secretary. 

Hon. Isaac Cappon, - - - -' - Treasurer. 



COMMITTEES OF COUNCIL. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Pres. -ELECT G. J. KoLLEN, Chairman. 

Hon. Arend Visscher, Sec'y. 

Rev. p. De Bruvn. Rev. Henry E. Dosker. 

Rev. Gerhard De Jonge. 

investment committee. 

(In charge of the funds of the Council.) 

Hon. Arend Visscher. Pres. -elect G. J. Kollen. 

Hon. Isaac Cappon. 

HOPE FARM COMMITTEE. 

Pres. -ELECT G. J. Kollen. Hon. Isaac Cappon. 

Hon. Arend Visscher. 

^'DE HOPE.'' 

Prof. C. Doesburg, ) 

Rev. N. M. Steffens, D. D., > Editorial Committee. 

Rev. J. Van Houte, j 

Mr. R. Ranters, Publisher. 



^Removed from classis, successor not yet appointed. 



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College Department. 



FACULTY. 

GERRIT J. KOLLEN, A. M., President-elect, 
In charge of Ethics and Psychology. 

By special resolution of Council, adopted at the time of his election, Prof. 

KoUen was requested at once to take charge of the duties 
• of the Presidency.) 

*REV. CHAS. SCOTT, D. D., 
Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

CORNELIS DOESBURG, A. M., Secretary, 

Professor of Modern Languages and Literature. In charge 

of Art Studies. 

HENRY BOERS, A. M., 
Professor of Histor)'. 

JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, A. M., Vice President, 
Professor of Mathematics. 

JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

REV. JOHN H. GILLESPIE, A. M., 
Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 



'Died Oct. 31st, 1898. 



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HOPE COLLEGE, 



JOHN B. NYKERK, A. M., 
Professor of Music. Assistant Professor of English. 

DOUWE B. YNTEMA, A. M., 
Professor of Chemistry and Physics. 

ERASTUS A. WHITEN ACK, A. B., 
Professor of English Literature. Instructor in French and 

German. 

Hon. G. J. DiEKEMA, A.M., LL.B., 
John C. Post, LL.B., 
Arend Visscher, A.m., LL.B., 
Geo. E. Kollen, A.B., LL.B., 

Lecturers on Political Economy. 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



STUPENTS. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

NAMES. BB8IDBVCES. 

Klaas J. Dykema Fulton, 111. 

Peter Swart Fernwood, 111. 

Gerrit Tysse Fernwood, 111. 

Arthur Van Duren Holland City. 

William J. Van Kersen Roseland, III. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Julia C. Van Raalte Holland. 

Henry M. Bruins Alto, Wis. 

George C. Dangremond Holland, Minn. 

Harm Dykhuizen Grand Rapids. 

John J. Heeren Orange City, la. 

Benjamin Hoffman Overisel. 

John J. Mersen Marion, N. Y. 

Frederick Van Anrooy Graafschap. 

John Van De Erve Hein, S. Dak. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Edward D. Dimnent Chicago, 111. 

Bert Dykstra Sioux Centre, la. 

Edward Kelder Grandville. 

Frederic Lubbers Orange City. la. 

Peter Meyer Grand View, S. Dak. 

Johannes J. Ossewaarde Zeeland. 

D. Cornelius Ruigh Holland, Neb. 

Sheldon Vandeburg Holland City. 

John Van Der Meulen Cawker City, Kas. 

John Van Der Vries Holland City. 

J AS. G. Van Zwaluwenburg Holland City. 

Harry J. Wiersum Chicago 111. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Nicholas Boer Drenthe. 

Albert Broene Drenthe, 



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S COLLEGE STUDENTS. 

Jacob Bjummel Overisel. 

John De Jongh Grand Haven. 

Gerrit J. HuiziNGA Holland City. 

Ralph Janssen East Holland. 

<jERRiT KooiKER Ovcrisel. 

F .V. W. LehxMan Sprakers, N. Y. 

James E. Moerdyk Kalamazoo. 

Tony Rozendal Chicago, 111. 

Henry Saggers Graafschap. 

Jacob G. Van Den Bosch Zealand. 

Louis Van Den Burg Alton, la. 

John F. Van Slooten Holland. 

A. Livingston Warnshuis Gano, 111. 

<justav Watermulder Foreston, 111. 

Henry L. Yonker Vriesland. 

SPECIALS IN COLLEGE DEPARTMENT. 

Cora Van der Meulen Holland City. 

Jacob Buursma Grand Rapids. 

William De Jong Holland City. 

William S. Gruys Middleburgh, la. 

John F. Heemstra Orange City, la. 

Levi C. J acokes Holland City. 

Oerrit W. Kooyers Holland. 

J. William Kots Maurice, la. 

Bernard L. ten Eyck Fairview, 111. 

John W. Te Selle Holland, Neb. 

John G Theilken German Valley,. 111. 

James M. Te Winkel .Fulton, 111. 

Aart Van Arendonk. Harrison, S. Dak. 

summary. 

Seniors 5 

Juniors 9 

Sophomores , 12 

Freshmen 17 

Specials 13 

Total .""56 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Mathematics. — Wentworth's Solid Geometry, and Plane 
and Spherical Trigonometry. 

Language. — 

English. — Hawthorne and Lemmon's American Liter- 
ature; Study of American Classics; Essays. 
Latin. — Vergil; Capes' Livy; Mythology. 

Greek. — Anabasis, Books H and HI: Hellenica, Book 
H; Bristol's Lysias; Allinson's Greek Prose Composition. 

Modern. — History of Dutch Literature; Essays and 
Translations. 

French. — Edgren's Grammar; some French Author. 

Elocution. — Fulton and Trueblood's Practical Elocu- 
tion. 

History. — Myer's Ancient History; Allen's History of 
th2 Roman People. 

Natural Science. — Cutter's Comprehensive Physiol- 
ogy; Packard's Zoology. 

Bible Study. — Greek New Testament. 
SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Mathematics. — College Algebra; Hardy's Analytic Ge- 
ometry; Wentworth's Surveying and Navigation. 

Language. — 

English. — Shaw's New History of English Literature; 
Study of English Classics; Essays. 



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JO COURSE OF STUDY. 

Latin, — Page's Horace; Kelsey's Cicero*s De Amicitia; 
De Senectute; Antiquities and Literature. 

Greek, — Herodotus; Seymour's Homer's Iliad. 

Modern, — Edgren's French Grammar; some French 
Author. 

Elocution. — Orations and Forensics. 

History. — Emerton's Introduction to the Middle Ages; 
Myer's Mediaeval and Modern History begun. 

Natural Science. — Williams' Chemical Science; Wil- 
liams' Laboratory Manual of General Chemistry. 

Bible Study. — Greek New Testament. 
JUNIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics — Hardy's Calculus. 

Mathematics Applied. — Olmsted's College Philosophy, 
Fourth Revision J Sheldon. 

Language. — 

Latin, — Stickney's Cicero's De Officiis; Sloman's Ter- 
ence; Seneca's Moral Essays. 

Greek, — Plato's Apology and Crito; Aristophanes' Clouds. 

Modern, — Joyne's Meissner's German Grammar; some 
easy German Author. 

Rhetoric — 6ascom!s Philosophy of Rhetoric; Essays, 
Discussions, and Orations. 

History. — Myer's Mediaeval and Modern History con- 
tinued. 

Natural Science. — Wood's Botany, two terms; Sedg- 
wick and Wilson's Biology. 

Metaphysics. — Porter's Elements of Intellectual Science. 
Sacred Literature. — Butler's Analogy. 



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HOPE COLLEGE, ii 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics. — Newcomb and Holden's Astronomy, 
advanced course. 

Language. — 

Greek, — Tarbell's Demosthenes' Philippics; Antigone. 

Modern, — Some German Author; German Literature; 
Compositions in German. 

Rhetoric. — Orations and Essays continued. 

Logic — McCosh. 

Ethics. — Wayland's Moral Science. 

History — Guizot's History of Civilization. 

Natural Science. — Dana's Class Book of Geology. 

Political Science. — Walker's Political Economy, ad- 
vanced course. 

Sacred Literature. — Evidences of Christianity. 



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12 



COURSE OF STUDY, 



College Department. 



Fresh. 8:20-9. 


9-10. 


10-11. 


11-12. 


French, 

14 weeks. 
Zoology. 

12 weeks. 
Botany, 

10 weeks. 


Dutch Lit., 

14 weeks. 

Greek, 

4 times a wk. 
22 weeks. 


Eng. Hist. 
4 time>i a wk. 
10 weeks. 
Mathematics 
4 times awk. 
26 weeks. 


Latin, 

22 weeks. 

American Lit. 
14 weeks. 


Soph. 8:20^-9. 


9-10. 


• 10-11. 


11-12. 


French, 

24 weeks. 

Surveying and 
Navigation, 
10 weeks. 


Anal. Geom. 
College Algebra. 
10 weeks. 

Chemistry, 

26 weeks. 


Greek, 
4 times a wk. 
22 weeks. 

Modern Hist. 
1 4 weeks. 


English Lit., 
22 weeks. 

Latin. 

14 weeks. 


JuN. 8:20-9. 


9-10. 10-11. 

1 


11-12. 


Latin, 

10 weeks. 
Butler's Anal., 

12 weeks. 
German, 

12 weeks. 


Greek, 

4 times a wk. 
14 weeks. 
Latin, 8 wks. 

4 times a wk. 
Logic, 8 wks. 


Biology, 10 w. 
Phil.ofRhet. 
4 times a wk. 
12 weeks. 
Calculus, 

10 weeks. 
1 


Physics, 

4 times a wk. 

24 weeks. 
Moral Phil., 
4 times a wk. 

14 weeks. 


Sen. 8:20-9. 


9-10. 


10-11. 


11-12. 


Astronomy, 

14 weeks 
Geology. 

8 weeks. 
Internat'l Law, 
6 weeks. 


Mental Phil., 

14 weeks. 
Hist, of Civ.'n, 

6 weeks. 
German. 

8 weeks. 


German, 

12 weeks. 

Political Econ., 
16 weeks. 


Greek and 
Evs- of Chris- 
tianity, 
4 times a wk. 

28 weeks. 



The above Schedule shows the method of carrying out the Colllege Curri- 
culum. 

The Freshman and Sophomore classes have Bible Study once a week. 

Each class has rhetorlcals once a week. 

There are five recitations a week In each branch, unless otherwise speci- 
fied. 



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7\ 




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Qrammar School Department. 



FACULTY. 

PROF. GERRIT J. KOLLEN, A. M., President, 
Religious Instruction in all the Classes. 

PROF. CORNELIS DOESBURG, A. M., 
Modern Languages, Drawing and Painting. 

PROF. HENRY BOERS, A. M., 
History and Civil Government. 

PROF. JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, A. M., Vice Pres., 
Mathematics and Botany. 

PROF. JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A. M., Secretary, 
Latin. 

PROF. JOHN H. GILLESPIE, A. M., 

Greek. 

PROF. JOHN B. NYKERK, A. M., 
Music and English. 

PROF. DOUWE B. YNTEMA, A. M., 
Physics and Pedagogy. 

PROF. ERASTUS A. WHITENACK, A. B., 
English and Modern Languages. 



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14 , HOPE COLLEGE. 

MRS. C. VAN RAALTE GILMORE, 
Lady Principal. 

PROF. JAMES W. HUMPHREY, 
Director of the Summer School. 

Prof. John H. Gillespie, John Sietsema, ) . . 

Librarian. Harm Dijkhuizen, V Jbrarians. 

Fred. Lubbers, ) 

Gerrit TijssE, Chorister. WxM. J. Van Kersen, Organist. 
Bernard Bloemendaal, Janitor. 



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GRAMMAR SCHOOL STUDENTS. 15 



STUDENTS. 



'*A" CLASS. 



Hattie G. Boone Holland. 

Minnie Broek Holland. 

Jennie De Kleine Jamestown. 

Augusta R . Otte Holland City. 

Anna S . Peeks Holland. 

Alida J . PiETERS Holland City. 

Christine Van Duren Holland City. 

John J. Banninga Muskegon. 

John W . Beardslee Holland City. 

John S . Brouwer North Holland. 

SiETZE J. Dekker Grand Rapids. 

Robert P . De Bruyn Grand Haven . 

Johannes Engelsman Chicago, 111. 

G. Clair Hekhuis Filmore. 

John H. Hinken East Saugatuck. 

Thomas Keppel Zeeland. 

George Kleyn Holland City. 

Robert E. Kremers Holland City. 

John G. Meengs North Holland. 

Ties Mulder Grand Rapids. 

Casper W. Nibbeling Holland City. 

John G. Rutgers Graafschap. 

Don C. Taylor Dunningville. 

Jacob Van Ess Roseland. 

Henry G. Van Slooten Holland. 

TrfEODORE Van Zoeren Vriesland. 

John Vermeulen Beaverdam. 

J urry E . Winter Holland City . 



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i6 HOPE COLLEGE, 



''B" CLASS. 

Gracie Hazenberg Holland City . 

Jennie Krokkee Holland City. 

Belle E. Takken Holland City. 

Sara E. Van der Meulen Holland City. 

Minnie Wilterdink Holland . 

Ellen Winter Holland City . 

Harry G. Birchby Holland City . 

William N. Birchby Holland City. 

Peter Braak Holland City. 

Henry Bouvvens Zeeland. 

Henry D. Brink Fillmore. 

Albertus F . Broek Grandville . 

Jacob D . Broek Grandville . 

Peter C. De Jong.... Femwood. 

Robert W . Doum a Fillmore . 

Benjamin Eefting Chicago. 

Isaac J. Fles Muskegon . 

Gerrit H . Kragt Holland . 

Eben E . Kiekintveld Holland City^ 

John E . Kuizinga ... Muskegon. 

Folkert Mansens Roseland, 111 . 

Peter J. Marsilje Holland City. 

Wm. J. Maurits Vriesland. 

Harry Mokma Holland City. 

Cornelis D. Mulder Spring Lake. 

Jacob Schepeks Vogel Centre. 

Henry Schipper Grand Rapids. 

Henry Sluiter Grand Rapids. 

John R. Steffens Holland City. 

Edward Takken Holland City. 

Peter E. Takken Hollpnd City. 

Conrad T. Tasche Sheboygan, Wis. 

John H. TekAvest Hamilton. 

WiNAND Van den Berg North Holland. 



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GRAMMAR SCHOOL STUDENTS. 17 

Henry Van deji Haar Holland City. 

John Van Ess Roseland, 111. 

Gerrit Van Houte Holland City. 

Thomas A. Van Schelven Holland City. 

John Verwey • Englewood, 111. 

Fedde Wiersma Roseland, III. 

**C" class. 

Rose Aykens George, la. 

Jennie Docter Holland City. 

Maggie Gruttrup Holland City. 

Helena Janssen East Holland. 

Katie Rooks East Holland. 

Jennie C. Steffens Holland City. 

Minnie Van Slootfn Holland. 

Maris E. Van Zwaluwenburg Holland City. 

Jenette M. Vaupell Holland City. 

Jennie Wielandt East Holland. 

Walter H. Ballard. Holland City. 

Freddie Beeuwkes Holland City. 

Albert Herman Holland. 

Harry Boot Fulton, 111. 

George F. Brouwer New Holland. 

John Brouwer New Holland. 

John G. De Bey Fulton, III. 

Franklin DeKleine Jamestown. 

Avery G. Densmore Hudsonville. 

Albert De Vries Holland City. 

Abraham De Jong Fernwood, III. 

John G. Dinkeloo Holland City. 

Almon T. Godfrey Hudsonville. 

Gerrit Hondelink Grand Rapids. 

John E. Kiekintveld Holland City. 

John Maurits Vriesland. 

Richard Overweg Holland. 

Benjamin Plasman Holland. 



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i8 HOPE COLLEGE, 



Albert G. Rooks East Holland. 

John J. Rooks East HolJand. 

Leonard J. Rooks East Holland. 

Albert J. Stryker Grand Rapids. 

Henry Stryker Grand Rapids. 

Frank A. Slooter Holland City. 

HiLDEBRAND G. Sluiter Lucas. 

John Tanis Vriesland. 

Harry T. Thomasma Grand Rapids. 

Henry J. Vandenberg North Holland. 

James Van der Heide Graafschap. 

Meine Van der Heide Graafschap. 

CoRNELis Van der Meulen Holland City. 

CoRNELis Van der Vries Holland City. 

Adrian Van Oeveren Holland City. 

Johannes Veldhoff East Saugatuck. 

Andrew Vewschure Holland City. 

George Westveer Grand Rapids. 

Willie J. Westveer Holland City. 

Albert E. Wilterdink Holland. 

CoRNELis WoLDRiNG Holland City. 

*'D" class. 

Christine D. Broek '. Holland. 

Ida D. Nies East Holland. 

Anna Sprietsma Holland City. 

Nicolaasina Van Goor Holland City. 

Theodora Van Houte Holland City. 

Katie Vyn Overisel. 

Senie WiELANDT. East Holland. 

SvTZE Baron East Holland. 

John R. Bouws Graafschap. 

Henry Brink Holland City. 

John Brinkman Graafschap. 

Jacob Brouwer New Holland. 

Derk Bruins, Jr Alto, Wis. 



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GRAMMAR SCHOOL STUDENTS, 19 

H ENRY J. Elferdink Holland. 

William Elfers New Holland. 

Alva J. Fairbanks Holland. 

John Geerlings Holland. 

Albert Hoeksema Holland. 

Edwin C. Hofmeister Lenox, S. Dak. 

Martin Koster Kalamazoo. 

Benjamin J. Lugers Holland. 

John Meulpolder Grand Rapids. 

John A. Nixon Holland City. 

] OHN Nywenning St. Anne, 111. 

Gerrit Prins Enkhuizen, Netherlands. 

Edwin R. Rupert Pekin, 111. 

Gerrit J. Rutgers Graafschap. 

John Steunenberg Grand Rapids. 

Daniel Ten Gate Holland City. 

Gerrit Van Leeuwen Holland City. 

Oswald Visscher. Holland City. 

Jacobus Wayer Englewood, 111. 

Jacob J. Weersing • East Holland. 

John Winter Holland City. 

William Wolters Fillmore. 

unclassified. 

Addie J. Beli Gibson. 

Jacom Adams Oroomiah, Persia. 

Levy C. Jacokes Holland City. 

James Johnson Sturgeon Bay, W'is. 

Benjamin Masselink , Oakland. 

Fred. A. Steketee Holland City. 

Geo. N. Williams Holland City. 

summary. 

''A" Class 28 

*'B" Class 40 

* *C" Class 49 

*'D" Class 35 

Unclasssified 7 

Total 159 



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20 HOPE COLLEGE. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



FIRST YEAR, '«D" CLASS. 

Reading, Etc. — Masterpieces of American Literature; 
Orthography. 

Penmanship. — Spencerian System. 

Geography. — Harper's School Geography, Michigan 
Edition, 

Mathematics. — Olney's Practical Arithmetic. 

Language. — 

English. — South worth and Goddard's Elements of Com- 
position and Grammar; Written Essays through the year. 
Dutch. — Reading; Spelling. 

History. — Montgomery's Leading Facts of American 
History. 

SECOND YEAR, ''C" CLASS. 

Reading, Etc. — Choice Selections from English Au- 
thors; Orthography, Orthoepy, and Diacritical Marks. 

Penmanship. — Spencerian System. 

Natural Science. — Eclectic Physical Geography. 

Mathematics. — Wells' Academic Arithmetic; Went- 
worth's School Algebra. 

Bookkeeping. — Mayhew's Practical Bookkeeping. 

History. — Swinton's Outlines of the World's History. 

Language. — 

English. — Whitney's Essentials of English Grammar; 
American Classics; Essays, and Declamations. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 21 

Latin. — Collar and Danieirs Beginner*s Latin Book; 
Viri Romae; Allen and Greenough's Latin Grammar; Com- 
position. 

Dutch. — Reading; Spelling; Translations. 

French. — Edgren's French Grammar, (^Elective for 
Latin.) 

THIRD YEAR, **B" CLASS. 

Reading. — Choice Selections. 

Drawing. — Free Hand and Perspective. 

Mathematics. — Wentworth's School Algebra finished; 
Steele's Astronomy, with the use of Globes. 

Natural Science. — Physiology and Hygiene. 
Language. — 

English. — Grammar continued; Hart's Rhetoric;.Essays. 
Latin. — Ginn and Co.'s Caesar; Grammar and Compo- 
sition. 

Greek. — White's Beginner's Greek Book. 

Dutch. — Kat's Grammar; Exercises; Translations. 

French. — Edgren's French Gra.Timar. {Elective for 
Latin. ) 

German. — Whitney's Brief German Grammar; Joynes' 
German Reader. {Elective for Greek.) 

Elocution. — Readings and Declamations. 

History. — Smith's Greek History. {Abridged.) 

FOURTH YEAR, '*A" CLASS. 

Drawing. — Free Hand and Perspective. 

Mathematics. — Wentworth's Plane Geometry. 

Natural Science. — Carhart and Chute's Elements of 
Physics; Gage's Physical Lab. Manual and Note Book. 



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22 HOPE COLLEGE, 



Language. — 

English, — Sprague's Milton's Paradise Lost; Abbott's 
How, to Write Clearly; some Classics; Essays. 

l^atin, — Cicero; Grammar and Composition. 

(7;-^^y^. -^White's Beginner's Greek Book; Anabasis, 
Book I; Woodruff's Greek Prose Composition. 

Dutch, — Kat's Grammar continued; Practical Exerci- 
ses; Translations; Compositions. 

French, — ) . 

V Continued as Electives for Latin and Greek. 
German.- ) 

Eloci'tion. — Emerson's Evolution of Expression, Vols. 
Ill and IV; Physical and Aesthetic Culture continued. 

History. — Montgomery's Leading Facts of English 
History. 

Civil Government. — Young's Government Class Book. 
Didactics. — White's Elements of Pedagogy. 
Religious Instruction, and Music. — In all the Classes. 

Special attention is given, during the whole of the Pre- 
paratory Course, to the grammars of the languages studied. 
For those who pursue English studies only, or who design 
stopping at the end of the *'A" year, the Faculty provide 
such additional branches as seem most expedient and prof- 
itable. To do the best work, it is necessary that the stud- 
ent's time is fully occupied in the work of the school. 

Those who take an English course only, select their 
studies, but are required to take at least fifteen recitations 
per week, as shall be assigned by the Faculty. 

In general educational value, it is believed that the 
above four years' Course of Study is worthy of full recom- 
mendation, whether for entrance into College, or for a pro- 
fessional training, or for a business life. 



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COURSE OF STUDY, 



23 



Qrammar School. 



'*D" 8:20-9. 



9-10. 



Arithmetic, Reading. 

26 weeks. Geography, 
Penmanship 
Dutch, 36 weelcs. 

10 weeks 



10-11. 



11-11 



English and 
Orthography, 

36 weeks. 



U. S. History, 
4 times a wk. 
26 weeks. 
Mental Arith. 
4 times a wk. 
10 wks. 



"C" 8:2a-9. 


9-10. 


10-11. 


11-12. 


English, 

26 weeks. 

G.eek Hist. 

lu weeks. 


Roman Hlsior\', 
10 weeks. 

Arithmetic, 

26 weeks. 


Latin, 

4 times a week, 
36 weeks 


Orth. and R'g, 
10 weeks. 

Dutch, 

14 weeks. 

Phys. Geog., 
12 weeks. 


••B" 8:20-9. 


9-10. 10-11. 


11-12. 


Gen'l Hist., 

10 weeks. 

Latin, 

26 weeks. 


English, Physiology, 

j 12 weeks. 
4 times awk. Dutch, 

' 10 weeks. 
36 weeks. iGreek, 

14 weeks. 
1 


Drawing and 
Penmanship, 
10 weeks. 

Algebra, 

26 weeks. 


"A" 8:20-9. . 


9-10. 


10-11. 


11-12. 


Greek, 
4 times a wk. 
36 weeks. 


Latin, 

20 weeks. 
Dutch, 

6 weeks. 
Civil Gov't, 

10 weeks. 


Nat. Phil., 

26 weeks. 

Pedagogics. 

10 weeks. 


Mathematics, 
10 weeks. 

English, 

26 weeks. 



The above Schedule shows the method of carrying out the Qramuuir 
School Course. \ 

Five recitations a week are given to each branch, unle.ss otherwise 
sp eclfled. 

Every class has one recitation a weelv In Bible Study. 

English In the Grammar School Includes Rhetorlcalsonce a week. 

The Lady Principal meets the j'oung ladies every week for such studies 
or exercises as she may select. 



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24 HOPE COLLEGE, 



Regular Normal Course. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Orthography, Penmanship, Reading, Grammar, Com- 
position, Higher Arithmetic, Book-keeping, Latin or **E- 
lectives," such as Physiology and Civil Government, Draw- 
ing, Dutch or French, Music, Review of U. S. History and 
Geography, Professional Instruction for the teacher. 

By taking Electives instead of Latin, the above form a 
good one-year English course. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Rhetoric, Compositioa, Elocution, Drawing, Zoology, 
Algebra, Astronomy, Lal.n and Greek History, or **Elec- 
tives," Greek or German, or *<Electives," Dutch or French, 
Music, Practice in Studies of first year. 

Professional Instruction in the Art of Teaching, suita- 
ble for those who want a two-year English course. 

THIRD YEAR. 

English Language and English History, Composition 
and Elocution, Algebra, Physics, Latin and Roman His- 
tory, or * 'Electives," Greek or German, or * 'Electives," 
Dutch or French, Voice Culture, Geometry, Civil Govern- 
ment, Physiology, Moral Science. 

Professional Instruction in Practice of Teaching. The 
Elective will give a full Literary or Scientific Course, to the 
end of the "A" year. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

English Literature, Composition and Elocution, Geom- 
etry, Greek or German, General History, Dutch or- 
French, Chemistry, Mental Science, History of Education, 



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REGULAR NORMAL COURSE. 23 

Trigonometry, Physical Geography, Geology, School Sys- 
tem, Practice of Teaching. This last year embraces Col- 
lege studies. 

The above studies will be in the charge of the Fac- 
ulties, and according to the regular Schedule of Instruc- 
tion. 

THE SUMMER NORMAL. 

This is a permanent Summer School for Teachers and 
those preparing to teach, annually held in connection with 
the College, pleasantly located on the shores of Macatawa 
Bay, with its fine summer resorts* 

The studies, at this time, c.re designed to give an op- 
portunity for a thorough review of the subjects required for 
**first, second and third grade certificates," in Michigan, 
and for gaining such general information as will better fit 
teachers for their needed and noble profession. 

The studies thus to be reviewed, with daily drill as to 
methods and principles, are: 

Orthography, Reading, and Penmanship; Geography, 
Arithmetic, and Grammar; United States History, and Civ- 
il Government; Book-keeping, Algebra, and Geometry; 
Physiology, Botany, and Philosophy; School Law; Science 
and Art of Teaching; Question Drawer, and Practical Dis- 
cussions. 

Extra Branches, such as Music, Crayon Drawing, Type- 
writing, and Short-hand, may be pursued, when a sufficient 
number for a class desire such instruction. 

Each subject will be treated after approved ''normal" 
methods, with special reference to the needs of teachers in 
their district schools. Taking English Grammar, for ex- 
ample, the programme will embrace a review of the parts 
of speech; parsing and diagraming; rules and forms, both 
oral and written; composition; and a careful analysis of the 
right use of the language. 

Those desiring to enter the School will bring their or- 
dinary text-books for reference; but the instruction will be 



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26 HOPE COLLEGE. 

mainly given by note and topic. 

The next Summer School will be held for five weeks, 
from June 28th to August 3rd, 1894. As in former years, 
competent instruction will be provided. 

The Library and Apparatus of the College are free for 
the use of these Classes. 

All inquiries and communications relating to the Sum- 
mer Normal should be addressed to the conductor, Com. 
J. W. Humphrey, Wayland, Mich., or to the President of 
the College. 



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THE WORK IN DETAIL. 27 



The Work in Detail. 



THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

In its four years* course, the Grammar School prepares 
students for the classical Department in college or the uni- 
versity. Further, in order to meet the needs of those that 
do not expect to enter college, the course is made more 
comprehensive than would olherwis'e be necessary. To 
this end, special studies in science, book-keeping, elocu- 
tion, music, modern languages, theory and art of teaching, 
etc., are introduced, thus laying the foundation for a liber- 
al and practical education. 

The several departments receive the same caieful at- 
tention as in the college proper, being under the in" mediate 
care of the respective college professors. Those desiring 
to fit themselves for teaching obtain a first-class normal as 
well as academic training, in the Grammar School. 

HISTORY. 

PROF. HENRY BOERS. 

The study of History begins in the '*D" Class with that 
of our own country. This is followed by some abridged 
course in General History, as *'Swin ton's Outlines,'* in the 
*'C" Class. In the ^*B" Class the History of Greece is 
taken up, followed in the **A" Class by the History of Eng- 
land. In connection with this history work the **A" Class 
also takes up the study of the Civil Government of the 
United States. 

In the four college classes the study of history is con- 
tinued. Ancient History, some introductory work to the 
study of the Middle Ages, — as Emerton's, — Mediaeval His- 
tory, Modern History, and Guizot's History of European 
Civilization^ are taken up in the order named. 



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28 HOPE COLLEGE, 

ENGLISH LITERATURE. 

PROF. ERASTUS A. WHITENACK. 

In the **C," *'B,"and * 'A" classes preparation is made for 
studies in Literature by the use of masterpieces, to illus- 
trate the principles of Gran:mar and RhetOMC. 

One hour a day is given to the study of American Litera- 
ture throughout the last twelve weeks of the Freshman 
year. This work embraces a rapid survey of the entire 
field, a close 'Study of some leading production, and essays 
on the historical development of American thought. 

English Literature is studied the first twenty-four weeks 
of the Sophomore year. Here as every where the basis of 
work done is the original text, first, last, and always. Biog- 
raphy is not neglected. Special attention is directed to the 
development and growth of thought and style, while the re- 
lation of Literature to History is carefully traced from the 
early sources onward, A writer is the reflection of his age. 

ENGLISH, ELOCUTION, AND MUSIC. 

PROF. JOHN B. NVKERK. 

The Study of English comprises the following depart- 
ments: Idiom, the Law of Construction, Etymology, Pho- 
nology, Orthoepy, etc. Composition and analytical study 
are pursued conjointly by the preparation of original 
essays from time to time, on the one hand, and by a critic- 
al analysis of some of the best English classics, on the 
other. 

Some attention is given from week to week to the prin- 
ciples of Elocution and Oratory. The instruction in In- 
terpretation and Rendering rests on a psychological basis — 
working from within outwards. The voice, the chief organ 
of expression, is **placed" and developed by approved 
methods. Public rt citals and contests take place during 
the year. 

To such as desire it a four years' course in Vocal Music 



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THE WORK IN DETAIL. 29 

is furnished, comprising Voice Culture in class, Sight-Sing- 
ing, Expressive Rendering, and the principles of Theory, 
Harmony and Counterpoint. This course is given to reg- 
ular students, and is provided without extra tuition. 

MATHEMATICS. 

PROF. J. H. KLEINHEKSEL. 

The Preparatory course in Mathematics embraces Arith- 
metic, Algebra and Geometry. In the '*D" year, Olney's 
School Arithmetic is made a thorough study; in the *'C,'' 
Advanced Arithmetic is taken up, finishing the subject of 
Arithmetic at the close of the second term. 

Algebra is taken up the third term of the '*C", and 
continued four terms, finishing at the end of the **B" year. 

In the *'A" year Plane Geometry is completed. 

In all these both facility in computation, and thorough- 
ness and breadth of information are made the aim of the in- 
struction, so as to lay a broad foundation for future study 
in Mathematics. 

The Freshmen take Mensuration and finish Solid Geo- 
metry the first term, Plane Trigonometry the second, and 
finish Spherical Trigonometry the third term. In the first 
term, Sophomore, College Algebra is made a study, after 
which Analytical Geometry and Calculus finish the range of 
pure Mathematics in the second term of the Junior year. 

LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROF. JAMES G. SUTPHEN. 

In the Grammar School, Latin is begun with the **C" 
Class, and continues in the '*B" and '*A" years. The Ro- 
ii,.m method of pronunciation is used. The student is, as 
soon L -Hcable, introduced to the simple stories in **Viri 

Romae" am! carefully drilled in the rudiments of the Gram- 
mar. In Caesar and Cicero, the study of the Grammar is 
continued and particular attention is given to Sequence of 
Tenses, Conditional sentences, Oratio Obliqua, and the 



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30 HOPE COLLEGE. 

Subjunctive Mood. Throughout the course, exercises are 
given in rendering English into Latin, based upon the 
texts read. 

In the College, Latin is studied during parts of the first 
three years. The study of the Grammar, by analyzing sen- 
tences, is not neglected in the effort to present the authors 
in their literary character. Collateral instruction is given 
in Mythology, Antiquities and Literature. Assistance is 
willingly offered to students who wish to broaden their 
knowledge of Latin Literature by reading other authors 
than those marked in the required curriculum. 

GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROF. JOHN H. GILLESPIE. 

In the Preparatoiy Course oral and blackboard work 
are daily required as essential to fluency and accuracy. In 
the College, extra work on the part of those able and wil- 
ling is encouraged and engaged in, and in this way are read 
important works crowded out of the regular course. Once 
a week for about four terms in the college course one of 
the Gospels is read. 

MODERN LANGUAGES. 

PROF. CORNELIS DOESBURG. 

Many of the students at Hope come from Holland 
homes and use that language in common life. For them 
instruction is given in the Dutch Grammar and Literature 
up to the Sophomore Class. Those who select German in 
lieu of Greek, give their time to that study from the **B" 
Class onward, sometimes adding the French, and taking 
what may be called a scientific course. As a part of the 
regular or A. B. course, the French is assigned to the 
Freshman and Sophomore classes, and the German to the 
Juniors and Seniors. The more diligent students read the 
French and the German with considerable facility, and may 



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THE WORK IN DETAIL 31 

be able to use them subsequently in their business. The 
authors read are varied but embrace only those of classic 
authority. 

PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY. 

PROF. DOUWE B. YNTEMA. 

During the Fall and Winter terms the '*A" Class in the 
Grammar School have daily recitations in Physics, and 
work in the Laboratory at least two hours each week. 
Thorough class-room work is considered an essential feat- 
ure in pursuing this study, while careful laboratory work by 
each student, verifying the laws and principles discussed is 
deemed equally important. 

For the Junior Class an advanced course in Physics is 
provided, beginning with the Fall Term, and continuing 24 
weeks. This course can not be pursued with profit, by 
students who have not a thorough knowledge of Trigonom- 
etry. 

The Course in Chemistry for the Sophomore Class con- 
sists of daily recitations and 4 hours laboratory work each 
week for 26 weeks. There is sufficient table room to ac- 
commodate 24 students at the same time. Each student 
is required to make an accurate record of all the experi- 
ments performed by him in the Laboratory, giving all the 
reactions involved, and conclusions reached from personal 
observation. 

BIOLOGY. 

In the Preparatory Course a term's work is given to Hu- 
man Physiology. In the College Course, the Freshman 
Class takes one term's work each in Botany and Zo6logy, 
and the Sophomore one term in General Biology. 



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32 HOPE COLLEGE. 



PHILOSOPHY, ETC. 

Ethical Science is studied in the Junior year; and Psy- 
chology in the Senior year. The President is in charge of 
these branches. The text-books used are supplemented by 
free discussions on these subjects, and by the practical ap- 
plication of acquired knowledge in preparing essays. 

A course is given in Logic in the Junior year; while the 
Seniors are made acquainted with the subject of Political 
Economy by means of text-book, discussions, and lectures. 



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REQUISITES FOR ADMISSION, 33 



Requisites For Admission. 

COLLEGE. 

For admission into the Freshman Class a full certifi- 
cate of graduation from the Grammar School Department 
is required, or an examination of the studies pursued in 
that department, or in what the Faculty shall deem an 
equivalent. 

Students may enter an advanced class either at the be- 
ginning of the College year or at other times, provided they 
sustain a satisfactory examination both on the preliminary 
studies and on those already passed over by the class which 
they propose to enter. If received on condition, students 
may in certain cases be permitted to recite with the class, 
but all conditions must be removed before regular admis- 
sion. 



Grammar School. 

For admission into the '^D" Class, a common school 
education is required. The better their previous training, 
the more profitably can pupils enter upon the Grammar 
School Course. 

In order to enter any advanced class, it will be necessary 
for the applicant to pass an examination in the studies 
previously pursued by the class. If received on conditions, 
these must be fulfilled before regular admission. 

The Normal Department is open to all who present evi- 
dence of sufficient preparation. Members having selected 
studies and classes, are expected to comply with the scho- 
lastic regulations ot the Institution. 



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34 HOPE COLLEGE. 



niscellaneous Information. 



LOCATION. 



Holland City is a central point on the Chicago & West 
Michigan Railway, ninety miles north of New Buffalo, 
twenty-five miles south-west of Grand Rapids, and midway 
between Alllegan and Grand Haven. To all Eastern points 
the route by rail is direct. It is therefore most desirably 
located, having both land and water communications, being 
near the shore of Lake Michigan, with which it is directly 
connected by a beautiful sheet of water, called Macatawa 
Bay, and on which are the popular summer resorts Maca- 
tawa Park, and Ottawa Beach. 

GROUND AND BUILDINGS. 

The College Campus lies between Tenth and Twelfth 
street, in the centre of the city, and contains sixteen acres, 
with an addition of two acres on the south side of Twelfth 
street. It presents a finely varied surface, well shaded with 
native trees, and is annually improving in beauty and at- 
tractiveness. 

The College buildings are nine in number. Van Vleck 
Hall is mainly devoted to dormitory purposes. The fine 
new fire proof Library building is now completed, and the 
new Chapel ready for occupancy as soon as the requisite 
furniture shall have been put in. These welcome additions 
and improvements will also contain a President's room, a 
Y. M. C. A. room, and four large lecture rooms. 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORM A TION. 35 

SCHOOL YEAR. 

The scholastic year of forty weeks begins on the third 
Wednesday in September, and ends with the general Com- 
mencement on the fourth Wednesday in June. 

The winter and spring vacations are fixed by the General 
Faculty. (See Calender.) 

NEW DEPARTURE. 

During the present year, several new features were in- 
troduced in the curriculum. The forty-five minute recita- 
tion periods have been changed to full hour recitations, 
making twenty lessons per week the maximum number of 
recitations any student can have. The recitations were 
further made consecutive, so that in any branch the student 
has not, as formerly, two or three recitations a week, but 
five recitations; the effect of this change is that no student 
can pursue more than four different branches at any one 
time. 

The chemical and physical apparatus has been largely 
increased and the Laboratory removed to new quarters, of- 
fering much improved facilities for science studies. 

ADVANTAGES OFFERED. 

Besides the advantages of location, easy communica- 
tion, and inexpensive living, it is believed Hope College 
may justly call attention to equally important advantages 
of a very different nature. 

It is true the Institution is growing, but the classes are 
not so large as to preclude that personal acquaintance, and 
contact and influence of each member of the Faculty with 
every student coming under his instruction, which parents 
are apt to consider in making choice of an institution. This 
personal element, made possible in a smaller institution, is 



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36 HOPE COLLEGE, 



a factor of great educational value both morally and intel- 
lectually. 

Hope College has a large constituency. The members 
of the present Junior class hail from six different States, and 
this is not an unusual thing. The students are in the main 
the best pupils from many public schools and in general 
possess a high order of ability and a laudable ambition to 
make their way in the world. This makes them desirable 
companions inviting their fellows to friendly competition 
and industrious study. 

By a division of the work peculiar to Hope College, the 
same experienced.instructors teach in both Grammar School 
and College, placing the student in Latin or Greek etc. for 
six consecutive years or more under the same man. Thus 
practically making a six years' instead of four years' course. 

It is a r//^/'/^/7'// Institution, incorporated under the laws 
of the State and legally entitled to grant certificates and di- 
plomas. 

It offers- great improvements in science teaching, but it 
is no less a classical school than in former years. The 
change means more of science but not less of classics. 

Under the new law relative to the granting of certifi- 
cates by Denominational Colleges, Hope College is in a po- 
sition to offer, besides the usual Diploma, a legal certificate 
authorizing the holder thereof to teach in ^any of the Public 
Schools of Michigan. 

It will be seen, therefore, that Hope College offers and 
secures a regular liberal course of training as complete as 
can be found in most of our Western colleges. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

Most of the students seek a * liberal education/' leading 
to the degree of A. B., or S. B. — A ^'partial" or * 'elective" 
course is offered to all who so desire, and facilities are fur- 
nished through the regular instructors; but a partial course 



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MISCELLANEOUS IX FORM A TION. 37 

entitles only to a certificate, and not to a diploma. Ger- 
man and French, or Drawing and Painting, can be studied 
at any time, as also the branches generally called **scien- 
tific," fitting the student for professional courses in a Uni- 
versity. 

Since 1878 the Institution has been open to women. 
They enter the regular classes, and attend the same lectures 
and recitations as the young men. 

Vocal music is provided without charge. Lessons in 
instrumental music can be secured at the expense of the 
pupil. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

In both departments, written examinations are held at 
the close of each term. When practicable, the examina- 
tions at the close of the year, or whenever a branch of study 
is finished, cover the entire text-book. The next examina- 
tion for admission will be held the day before the new 
school year opens; viz. on Tuesday, Sept. i8th, 1894, at 8 
o'clock A M. 

CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS. 

Members of the **A'* Class, upon graduation in full 
course, are entitled to a regular Certificate, signed by the 
Council and the Faculty; but said certificate will be marked 
* 'First, " "Second," or "Third Grade," as follows: When 
the average standing of the graduate is from 91 to 100, this 
will indicate the -^First Grade;" when from 81 to 90, the 
''Second;" and when from 71 to 80, the "Third:" reference 
being made to both recitations and examinations. 

Such students as are addmitted in partial course, or who 
fall below an average standing of 71, are entitled to a Cer- 
tificate, from the Faculty, naming the studies in which they 
have sustained examinations. 



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jS HOPE COLLEGE, 

Graduates from the College, when recommended by the 
Faculty, receive a Diploma, with the degree of A. B., or S. 
B., being a testimonial of general scholarship. The course 
leading thereto includes such branches as are usually taught 
in similar Institutions. A partial course is sometimes chos- 
en, and is entitled to a Certificate as adjudged by the Fac- 
ulty. 

The degree of A. M. is conferred upon those who con- 
tinue their studies for three years after graduation, or who 
may satisfy the Council, by a thesis, as to their scholastic 
attainments. By paying a fee of three dollars, an A. M. 
diploma in such cases will be given. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

The exercises of each day begin with prayer in the Col- 
lege Chapel, at 8 o'clock a. m. 

On the Sabbath every student is expected to worship 
regularly with one of the churches in the city or vicinity, un- 
less excused by the President. 

Religious instruction is given in all the classes regular- 
ly, and like all the other studies, is in charge of the Facul- 
ty- 

Although Hope College is denominational, and is under 
the patronage and support of the Reformed Church in 
America, yet, by the law of its incorporation, it can have 
no '^religious test." The doors are open, and welcome is 
given to all who submit to its scholastic regulations. As a 
Christian school, however, it inculcates gospel truths, and 
demands a consistent moral character and deportment. 

LIBRARY, ETC. 

The Library which already numbers over 8000 volumes 
is, by a munificent donation of a friend of education, about to 
be increased to over 20,000 volumes — all free for the use of 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMA TION. 39 

the students. Books and pamphlets, as well as magazines 
and papers, are constantly added. The friends of Hope 
College may be assured that their gifts of valuable books 
to the library will be taken care of, and appreciated, and 
made useful by giving them a place upon the ample shelves 
of the magnificent fire proof Library building. 

Laboratory and Philosophical Apparatus for lecture room 
use is growing in value and completeness. Donations, by 
the graduates and friends of the Institution, of maps, charts, 
instruments and specimens of Natural History, are solicited, 
with the assurance that all such will materially add to the 
efficiency of the work which Hope College is doing. 

SOCIETIES. 

Four Literary Societies, viz., the Meliphon, the Cosmo- 
politan, the Fraternal and the Ulfilas Club, have been main- 
tained for years, and offer decided advantages to their re- 
spective members, and materially aid in Jhe attainment of 
that culture, which it is the object of this school to promote. 
The Ulfilas Club seeks to secure for its members greater 
proficiency in the use of the Holland language. 

The Young Men's Christian Association, having nearly 
one hundred members, continues to carry on its work with 
much interest and activity. 

PUBLICATIONS. 

Connected with the Institution, a religious weekly is 
published, called Z>r Hope, It was established in 1866, and 
is under the direction of the Council, through its Editorial 
Committee. The paper has a circulation of over 3100 
copies. 

A monthly, called The Anchor, is conducted by the stu- 
dents with gratifying success. It has reached its seventh 
year. 



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40 HOPE COLLEGE. 

PRIZES. 

The Oratorical Exercises of the Grammar School, on the 
final Monday of the College year, is the Commencement of 
that Department, and marks the graduation of the **A" 
Class. 

In 1887 were established the two **George Birkhoff, 
Jr., Prizes," each of twenty-five dollars. One is for the 
Sophomore Class, in English Literature, and the other for 
the Freshman Class, in Dutch Literature. At the last 
Commencement they were awarded by the Committees, as 
follows: For the best examination in English Literature, 
to John Van de Erve; for the best examination in Dutch 
Literature, to Bert Dykstra. 

During the present year two new prizes were added to 
the list of annual awards, one of Si 5. 00 for the best., and 
the other of $10.00 for the second best examination in En- 
glish Grammar and Orthography, open to all the members 
of the '*C" class. These were established by a '*Friend" 
who resides west of the meridian of Holland, but who 
insists upon withholding his name from the public. Such 
**friends" are appreciated and we would like to publish 
their names. 

It is expected that additional prizes will follow, as a 
stimulus to labor in other branches of study. 

EXPENSES. 

The City is surrounded by a rich agricultural region, 
and the cost of living in Holland is cheap. Good board 
and rooms may be had in families of the city for from two 
to three dollars per week; in clubs, and without furnished 
rooms, at lower rates. 

There are seventeen rooms in Van Vleck Hall, in the 
selection of which students for the ministry' have the pref- 
erence. These are furnished in part and bear a moderate 
charge. 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 41 

As yet no tuition fess have been charged, but every 
student must pay to the Treasurer, in advance^ an incident- 
al fee of five dollars per term. 

The graduation fee is five dollars in the College, and 
two and one-half dollars in the Grammar School. No other 
charges are made. 

The fee of the students in the Summer Normal Classes 
is five dollars for the session. 

Young people of noble aspirations but'of limited means 
need not be discouraged. At Hope College you will find 
many like you, some of whom have come a great distance 
seeking an education. Such as these are in earnest, con- 
tent with plain living, and, by practicing the economies 
that are possible in this place, succeed in reducing their ex- 
penses within marvelously narrow limits. 

Here is an estimate of the necessary expenditure, exclu- 
sive of clothing and travel, which each can determine for 
himself, for one year in the Preparatory Course: 

Board (at the Club) S 60 00 

Room rent (two rooming together) 20 00 

Books Sio, Washing $10, Light $3 23 00 

Fuel $7, Fees §15 22 00 

Total S 125 00 

The above estimate is an answer to those who want to 
know how much money is absolutely needed, and is intend- 
ed as a reply to that oft-repeated question. Of course 
most of the students spend more money. 

Many parents also having children to educate, find it to 
their advantage to come to this city to live. To such it may 
be truthfully said, that Holland is a growing, enterprising 
city — one of the most prosperous and beautiful in Michi- 
gan. With its broad, straight, and shady streets, its water 
works, and its electric illumination, Holland is equally well 
adapted to the life of quiet retirement, and to that of the 
active business man. 



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42 HOPE COLLEGE, 

DISCIPLINE. 

It is gratifying to observe that the moral and spiritual 
tone of the students is such that the matter of discipline is 
reduced to a minimum. General opinion is on the side 
of right and reasonableness, and lends its powerful support 
to the interest of good order and efficient work. To de- 
velop this high mofal culture and character of the student, 
it is the aim of Hope College to cultivate no less than to 
advance his intellectual development. 

In general, however, if it appears that students do not 
improve their time and opportunities, or do not conduct 
themselves in a respectful and orderly manner, their connec- 
tion with the institution is suspended, or if it should be found, 
after due probation and inquiry, that the influence of a stu- 
dent is bad and injurious to others, the right is exercised of 
requiring the withdrawal of such student. It is proper to 
add that within recent date no such case has occurred. 

The students are required to be present, promptly^ on 
the first day of each and every term. The recitations will 
begin the next morning. 

A record is kept of the scholastic standing of each stu- 
dent, and a copy of the same is sent to the parent or guar- 
dian; if the average standing, in any term, does not exceed 
70, on a basis of 100, he is to be dropped from his class. 

Term fees and room rent are to be paid strictly in ad- 
vance, and if not so paid, or within one month, the student 
neglecting forfeits his right to continue in the institution. 

Boarding houses and boarding clubs in the city are to 
be approved by the Faculty, and to be subject to such re- 
gulations as are usual in similar institutions. By a rule of 
the College, lady students are not to room in the same 
boarding houses with the gentlemen. 

Parents are requested not to ask or expect their children 
to come home during term time. It seriously interferes 



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MISCELLANE O US IN FORM A TION. 43 

with proper habits of study, and by our rules, none are to 
be absent from the institution without permission of the 
President. 

TO ALUMNI AND FRIENDS. 

Hope College is grateful to the Reformed Church in 
America, whose she is, and whom she so loyally serves by 
the men she is furnishing both for the Domestic and the 
Foreign Field. 

Hope College is grateful to her Alumni and to all who 
were at any time connected with the College as students, 
for the faithful work they are doing; wherever they are 
practicing their professions, they show that they are, * 'Work- 
men that need not be ashamed"; — grateful for the growing 
interest they manifest by making known the merits of their 
Alma Mater, and by inspiring deserving young men to seek 
the same educational advantages. 

Hope College is grateful to royal and liberal friends who 
here invest their money, not in dead and fleeting things, 
but in brain and character and souls of men. Be assured, 
nowhere else will your well-earned money yield larger re- 
turns, in no other way can you render better service for 
your Church and for your Country. 

With such encouragements as these, Hope College feels 
hopeful for the future. She will try to still deserve your 
favor and your liberality. You have young friends, — con- 
tinue to send us their names if they are studious and deserv- 
ing, especially the names of such as are not likely otherwTse 
ever to receive a good education. 

REMARKS. 

At its June meeting, in 1893, the Council elected Prof. 
G. J. Kollen President of Hope College. According to 
the Constitution of the College, the confirming power of 
this office rests with the General Synod of the Reformed 
Church in America. 



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44 HOPE COLLEGE, 

Upon his acceptance the President-elect was requested 
by the Council at once to assume the active duties of the of- 
fice. 

At the same meeting two members were added to the 
Faculty, whereby a greatly improved division in the general 
curriculum of the College has been made possible. 

Through the generosity of some of the medical fraterni- 
ty, who are especially interested in the natural sciences, 
and who had been connected with Hope College as stu- 
dents, a Science Fund has been started, which has enabled 
the Council to fit up, and fully equip a laboratory. The 
improved facilities, offered m this direction, are highly ap- 
preciated by the students. 

As will appear from the catalogue, the attendance of 
students is at least ten per cent larger this year than ever 
before. This increased attendance has been somewhat em- 
barrassing to us this year, but we trust that by next year we 
will be in possession of larger and better class-room accom- 
modations. 

The present financial stringency has somewhat retarded 
the progress of our new building, Graves Library and 
WiNANTS Chapel. With the exception of the furnishing 
and heating apparatus, it is now, however, complete and 
ready for occupancy. 

The students have been faithful in their studies and 
commendable in their deportment. As we see how these 
students are gathering large stores of valuable knowledge, 
and how they are constantly developing in manly, Chris- 
tian character, then we take courage, and do not hesitate to 
invite other young people to come also, and avail them- 
selves of these advantages, here held out to them. 

On the 31st of October last it pleased Almighty God to 
take to Himself ex-President Scott. In his death the 
Church sustains a great loss; the College is bereaved of a 
broad scholar and successful administrator; the Students 
are deprived of a wise counsellor and kind teacher; the 
Faculty mourns a true friend and beloved associate. 



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CHRONOLOGICAL MEMORANDA. 45 



Chronological Memoranda. 



Bej^lnnlDR of the Netherland Immigration Into Michigan, Iowa, etc 1847 

Village of Holland laid out 1848 

Five acres dooated by Rev. A. 0. Van Raalte. D-D., as a site for an 

Academy 18M 

"Pioneer School" opened. Mr. W. T. Taylor. Principal < ct.. 1K81 

Placed under the c.ire of theGeneial Synod June, 1853 

Mr. W.T.Taylor res'cned Oct., la^S 

Rev. F. B. Beldler. Principal 1854 

Rev. John Van Vleck, Principal 1S55 

The school named the Holland Academy 1855 

Located In the "Orphan House"... IS.'iO 

Van Vleck Hall erected on "The five acres" 18ft7 

The Academy more fuUy organized 1857- '58 

Melephon Society founded 1W7 

Rev. John Van Vleck. resigned 1S59 

Rev. PhlUp Phelps, Jr.. Principal 1859 

Campus enlarged to 16 acres 1HS9 

"Oggel House" erected as a residence 18fl0 

Gymnasium built. largely by students 1862 

A FrcA/rnianOlHss formed. 10 in number 1862 

Fraternal Society founded 186S 

A "Bf^ard of Superintendents" appointed by General Synod 1863 

A CV>Mcf/c proposed, and approved by the Synods 1864 

Over $l«\ooo contributed a» an endowment 1865 

Hope (College be^un, l81->; incorporated Mny. 1866 

4« .students In all 1865 66 

The Board of Superintendents, named "The (•ouncU" 1866 

Faculty of six appointed and organized: Kev. P. Phelps, Jr.. D. D.. 

Preis July, 1866 

First Commencement; eight became A. B 1866 

A weekly newspaper. De Hnpe. established 1866 

Theological instruciion begun, with a class of .«seven Sept. 1866 

Rev. O. E. Crlspell. 0. D.. elected Professor of Theology; Profs. Phelps. 

Oggel. Beck, and Scott being "Lectors" 1867 

Holland incorporated as a city 1-67 

Charter Hall (burned in 1884) erected 1867 

Eighty acres, within the city, donated by Dr. Van Raalte 1867 

Point Superior, "Hope Farm", 8o7 acres, and the Bluff, i: h acres, pur- 
chased; part of which has since been pol^ l.''67-'«8 

South Campus, two acres, donated by Dr. Van Raalte 1808 

The Theological Department adopted by General Synod as Its "Western 

Theological Semlr ary " 1869 

Death of Rev. Peter J. Oggel. Professor, and Editor of De Hope. ...Dec. i^69 

Council Hall (Gran mar School Bulldlngi erected 1869 

First Theological Class of seven graduated 1869 

Two railroads opened throuuli Hnlland .. 1869- '71 

First Formal Constltul Ion of the College adopted 1871 

Holland nearly destroyed by fire Oct., is71 

Oymnaiium repaired, and made the Chapel 1872 



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46 HOPE COLLEGE. 

C. Doesburg, A. M., elected Professor 1872 

Hr use fl Dished on the South Campus 1873 

The Laboratory enlarged and repaired 1874 

Theological "Lectors" regularly appointed by Synod, viz Profs. T. R. 

Beck and C. Scott 1875 

Brick prlDting ofSce for De Hope erected 1870 

Death of Rev. Cornelius Van der Meulen Aug. 23. 1876 

Death of Rev. A. C. Van Raalte. D.D Nov. 7, lb7e 

Suspension of the The<^logical Department June. 1877 

DcHth of Rev. A. T. Stewart. D. D.. Sec. of Council for 12 years May. 1878 

Reoighnization of the College; Dr. Phelps res ig us June. 1878 

Rev. G. H. Mandeville. D D.. Provisional President and Financial Agent: 

Prof. C. Scott, Vice President 1878 

Wm. A. Shields, A. M . and G. J. Kollen. A. M.. elected Professors 1878 

Rev. C. E. Cflspell. Professor of Thcolo# y. reslgnn..' 1870 

A new Constliiitton adopted 1879 

^ Prof. Charles Scott. D. D.. Piovislonal President 1880 

Hucce.«»sfuIeff')rtstopay wfT adebt of$;{2.0C0 r 1870- '82 

Donation of $lO.0O0by Gerrlt Cowenhoven. Esq 1882 

Division in some of the R-forrned (Miurches 1881-'83 

ThcologlcMl Instruction restored; a Professorship of $30.(00 Completed; 

Rev. N. iM. Steffens, D. D., Professor of Theology 1884 

Visit of the Cenersil Synod to the College 188* 

Rev. W. R. Gordon, D. I)., donuies his Library to the College— to be sent 

when it can liave room and shelves 1884 

A separate "lioatcl nf Siiperlntenclents" for the Western Theological 

Sfiiiinaiy ordered by Synod 18S5 

Profs. He. k and Shielcis resi:n 1S8> 

H B. ers. A. .M.; J. H. Kleinlieksel. A. M.: .1. U. Suijjhen. A. M..and Rev. 

Juhn T. Ander>on. -X. M . elected Pi of essors 1885 

Election of Pjof. Charles S.-oit. H D., a^ constitutional President 188.5 

President Scott Inaus-'urated 1886 

AH the streets around tlieCjiinpus graded, etc 1882-'8fi 

Synod's House for llie President i rected as to e.xterior 1S86 

First number of T/ic .4 iif/ifr Issu ea May. 1Wn7 

• Tlie Geoi-;:e Biikhotf, Jr., Prizes" established .• 1887 

Norniiil Dep:. itnient opened 1888 

Rev. .lames F Zwemer appointed Financial Agent 1888 

Prof. J. J. Anderson ie:ji.;ns 1888 

Kev. J If. Gillespie. A.M., elected Professor 1SS8 

Rev .1. W. Beardslee.D. I).. Theolojii.-al Professor ia«8 

Invesied Funds have Increasi d to over $100.000. 1880 

Quarier Centtnniul Celebraiion June2C. 18U0 

Synod's House for the President, finished 1802 

J. B. NyUerk. A. M . anpointed Assistant Profe8«»or 18W 

Graves Library and Winants Chapel bepun; corner stone laid... Oct. 12, 1802 

President Soon re* Uns; taking etfect 189:i 

Pn.f G.J. Kollen. A. M.. elected President June 20 1803 

I). B. Yntrma. A. M.. elected Pr.>fes.sor ..18"3 

Erastus A. Whitenack. A. B., elected Professor 1803 

Death of Prof. Cha"*. Scott, I). D Oct. 3L 1803 

English Grammar and Or. ho. raphy Prizes established 180 



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FORM OF BEQUEST. 47 



Form of Bequest. 



I give and bequeath unto the Council of He pe College, a 
corporation located at Holland, Michigan, for the use and 
benefit of said Institution the sum of 

. Dollars. 



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WESTERN 



Theological Seminary, 



OF THE 



Reformed Church in America. 



CALENDAR. 

1893. Sept. 5. Entrance Examinations. 

•' 6. Term opens. 
Nov. 30-Dec. 5. Thanksgiving Recess. 
Dec. 23. Beginning of Christmas Recess. 

1894. Jan. 9. Work Resumed. 

*' 31. Prayer for Colleges.' 

Apr. 24. Meeting of Board of Superintendents. 

** 25. Examinations. 

*^ 25. Commencement Exercises. 

VACATION. 

Sept. 4. Entrance Examinations. 

** 5. Term begins. 
Nov. 28-Dec. 4. Thanksgiving Recess. 
Dec. 21. Beginning of Christmas Recess. 

1895. Jan. 8. Work Resumed. 



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WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 49 



Board of Superintendents. 



EX-OFFICIO. 

Gerrit J. KoLLEN, President of Hope College. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF NEW YORK. 

1896. Rev. F. S. Schenck, D.D., Hudson, N. Y. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF ALBANY. 

1894. Rev. Edward a. Collieh, D.D., Kinderhook, N. Y. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 

1895. Rev. Anson Du Bois, D.D., Athenia, N. J. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF CHICAGO. 

1895. Rev. p. Moerdyke, D.D., Chicago, 111. 

1895. Rev. Matthew Kolyn, Orange City, la. 

1895. Rev. a. Buursma, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

1895. Rev. J. Van Houte, Holland, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF HOLLAND. 

1896. Rev. j. Van der Meulen^D.D., Holland, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF GRAND RIVER. 

1896. Egbert Winter, D.D., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF MICHIGAN. 

1893. Rev. Wm. Moerdyk,* Kalamazoo, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF ILLINOIS. 

1894. Rev. J. S. JoRALMON, Norwood Park, 111. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF WISCONSIN. 

1894. R^v- John Broek, South Holland, 111. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF IOWA. 

1894. Rev. James F. Zwemer, Orange City, Iowa. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF DAKOTA. 

1896. Rev. John A. De Spelder, Orange City, Iowa. 

•Appointed for Vncncy. 



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so HOPE COLLEGE. 



FACULTY. 



REV. NICHOLAS M. STEFFENS, D.D., 

Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theology. In charge 

of Historical Theology, Homiletics, Pastoral 

Theology, and Cathechetics. 

REV. JOHN W. BEARDSLEE, D.D., 

Professor of Biblical Languages and Literature. In charge 

of Sacred Geography, Antiquities, 

Hermeneutics. 



Officers of the Board. 

Rev. Edward A. Collier, D.D., President. 
Rev. Peter Moerdyke, D.D., Stated Clerk. 



Committee on Reception of Students. 

Rev. N. M. Steffens, D.D., 
Rev. J. W. Beardslee, D.D., 
Rev. Chas. Scott, D.D.,* Rev. J. Van Houte, 

Rev. J. Van Der Meulen, D.D., 
Rev. E. Winter, D. D, 



^Peceased. 



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V^ESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. S' 



STUDENTS. 



John Sietsema, 
Jerry P. Winter, 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Hope College, 1891. 

Hope College, 1891. 
MIDDLE CLASS. 



Coopersville. 
Holland City. 

Overisel. 

Streator, 111. 

Holland City. 

Spring Lake, 



GeRRIT H. DUBBINK. 

Hope College, 1892. 

John R. Jones, 

Park College, 1890. 

John Luxen, 

Hope College, 1892. 

Albert Oostbrhof, 

Hope College, 1892. 

Andrew J. Reeverts, Stillman Valley, 111. 

Hope College, 1892. 

Elbert S. Schilstra, Rochester, N. Y. 

Gymnasium, Rotterdam. 

Cornelius M. Steffens, Holland City. 

Hope College, 1892. 

Herman Van der Ploeg, Holland City. 

Hope College, 1892. 

SiETSE Van der Werf, Grand Rapids. 

Theological School, Grand Rapids. 

Henry J. Veldman, Grand Rapids. 

Hope College, 1892. 



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5^ HOPE COLLEGE. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Henry Huizinga, Holland City. 

Hope College, 1893. 

WiRTjE T. Janssen, Foreston, 111. 

Hope College, 1893. 

William MiEbEMA, Vriesland. 

Hope College, 1893. 

John Schaefer, Oregon, 111. 

Hope College, 1893. 

John W. Te Paske, Orange City, Iowa. 

Hope College, (special) 1893. 

William Wolfius, Grand Rapids. 

Theological School, Grand Rapids. 

summary. 

Senior Class 2 

Middle Class 10 

Junior Class 6 

18 



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WESTERN THEOLOCICAL SEMINARY. jJ 



General Information. 



ADMISSION. 



The Seminary is open for the admission of students from 
every denomination of Christians. 

A Committee of the Board of Superintendents, on the 
reception of students, meets on the first Tuesday in Sep- 
tember, at II o'clock, A. M. 

Every applicant is required to present a certificate of 
church membership and one of literary qualifications. One 
who has not pursued a regular Collegiate course must give 
proof by testimonials or examination of such literary attain- 
ments as will enable him to enter upon the course of stud- 
ies in the school. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

ExEGETiCAL Theology AND Hermeneutics, — Elements 
of Hebrew; Selections from Pentateuch; Harmony and Ex- 
egesis of the Gospels; Reading Acts of the Apostles; Archae- 
ology; Sacred Geography, Hermeneutics; O. T. Theology. 

Text-books, — Harper's Method and Manual; Green's He- 
brew Grammar; Robinson's (Riddle's) Harmony; Bissel's 
Biblical Antiquities; Barrow's Sacred Geography; Gese- 
nius's Lexicon; Westcott & Hort's Greek Testament; 
Thayer's N. T. Lexicon; Terry's Hermeneutics. 

Historical Theology. — Kurtz's Sacred History. 

Systematic Theology. — Introduction; Encyclopedia: 
Symbols of the Church. 

Practical Theology. — Theory of Preaching; Analysis 
of Sermons; Homiletical Exercises. 



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54 HOPE COLLEGE. 

MIDDLE YEAR. 

ExEGETiCAL Theology AND Hermeneutics. — Hebrew 
Etymology and Syntax; Messianic Prophecy; Reading from 
Historical Books; Old Testameat Introduction; Exegetical 
Study of Hebrews; Reading General and Pastoral Epistles. 

Historical Theology. — Kurtz's Church History. 

Systematic Theology. — Lectures; Theology proper; 
Anthropology; Chiistology; A. A. Hodge's Outlines; 
Charles Hodge's Systematic Theology. 

Practical Theology. — Lectures on Preaching; Hom- 
iletical Exercises; Church Government; Pastoral Theol- 
ogy; Lectures. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Exegetical Theology and Hermeneutics. — Hebrew 
Prophecy and Poetry; Historical Reading; Aramaic Selec- 
tions; Exegetical Study of Romans; Introduction to New 
Testament; Reading Book of Revelation. 

Historical Theology. — Ecclesiastical History (con- 
tinued). 

Systematic Theology. — Lectures; Soteriology; Ec- 
clesiology; Eschatology; Apologetics; Ethics; Review of 
the entire System. 

Practical Theology. — Homilectical Exercises; Pas- 
toral Theology; Cathechetics; Theory of Missions; Church 
Government; Lectures on Preaching. 

preaching. 

The students preach regularly before the Faculty and 
Students, subject to such criticism as may be appropriate. 
They also preach in the churches, especially such as are 
vacant, under the direction of the Faculty. 

lectures. 

A course of Lectures, on subjects bearing on Ministe- 
rial work is delivered annually under the direction of the 
Board of Superintendents. 



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WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 55 

MISSION WORK. 

The students are organized as a Mission Band and hold 
themselves in readiness to attend any calls to address 
meetings where they can advocate the cause of Missions. 

ADELPHIC SOCIETY. 

This is a weekly gathering of Professors and Students 
for the discussion of questions relating to the practical 
work of the mirtistry. The exercises embrace debates, es- 
says, and general discussions. 

COMMENCEMENT. 

The Theological Commencement exercises take place on 
Wednesday evening at the close of the year. Addresses 
are delivered by the Seniors, in English and Dutch, and by 
some member of the Board of Superintendents appointed 
for the purpose. 

BENEFICIARY AID. 

Instruction is entirely gratuitious. Young men are 
aided by the Board of Education as their circumstances re- 
quire and the funds admit, not only while in the Seminary, 
but in the studies preparatory to entering it. Rooms are 
provided in Van Vleck Hall and charges for board are very 
moderate. 

The requirement of the Constitution, in regard to stu- 
dents preparing for the ministry in the Reformed Church, 
is as follows: 

**Every person contemplating the work of the ministry, 
before he commences his course of Theological studies, 
shall furnish satisfactory evidence of his being a member in 
full communion and good standing of a Reformed Protest- 
ant Church; of his piety, ability and literary attainments; 
and thereupon shall be admitted into one of the Theologi- 
cal Schools; and during the prosecution of his studies there, 
shall be subject to the rules and regulations thereof; and 
when he shall have completed the prescribed course and 



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S6 HOPE COLLEGE. 

term of Theological studies, shall be admitted to an exam- 
ination according to the regulations of the school as estab- 
lished by the General Synod; and if found qualified, shall 
receive a professorial certificate to that effect, which shall 
entitle him to an examination for licensure before the Clas- 
sis to which he belongs.'* — Constitutiony Art, II, Sec, 2. 

THE YEAR. 

The Seminary opens on the first Tuesday in September, 
when the Committee meets for the reception of students, 
and closes on the last Wednesday in April, with the annual 
Commencement 



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CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



tiP 



Hope College 



HOLLAND, MICH. 



1894-95. 



AN INSTITUTION OF THE REFORMED CHURCH 
IN AMERICA. 



PIONEER SCHOOL, 1851. 
HOLLAND ACADEMY, 1S37. 
BECAME HOPE COLLEGE, 1S65. 



HOLLAND, MICH. 

Ottawa County Tixeh Prik«> 

1886. 



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CALBNnAR-1893-'90. 



1805. April ir>. Spring Term begins. 
* 22-2H. Senior Examinations. 
** 24. Meeting of Council. 
June 20-21. Undergraduate Examinations. 
2'J. Baccalaureate Sermon. 

24. Closing Exercises of the Grammar School. 

in Winants Chaiiel, 2 P. M. 
" 25. Meeting of Council. 

25. Meeting of Alumni in Winants Chapel, 

7:30 P. M. j 

•* 2(5. Commencement Exercises' in Winants 1 

Chapel. I 

VACATION. 

Sept. 17. Examinations for Admission, beginuing 
at 9 A. M., in Graves Hall. 
•» 18. Fall Term begins at t) A. M. 
Nov. 2S. Thanksgiving Recess. 
Dec. 20. Fall Term ends. 

VACATION. 

ISIM). Jan'y 6. Winter Term begins. 

' ' 30. Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
March 27. Winter Term ends. 

VACATION. 



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THB COUNCIL. 



EX-OFFICIO. 
Prof. G. J. Kollen, LL. D., - President of the College. 

ELECTED MEMBERS. 

FROM GENERAL SYNOD. 

NA1IE8. RBBIDBNCEH. TERMS EXPIBE. 

Rev. G. H. Mandeville. D. D., New York City, N. Y. 181)5 

Rev. Jas. P. Zwemer, Orange City, Iowa. 1890 

Rev. Peter Moerdvke, D. D., Chicago, 111. 1896 

Hon. Isaac Cavpon, Holland City. Mich. 1807 

Hon. Arend Visscfter, Holland City, Mich. 1898 

Hon. Gerrit J. Diekema, Holland City, Mich. 1899 

Rev. Cornelius Brett, D. D., Jersey City, N. J. 1900 

Hon. N. F. Graves, LL.B., Syracuse, N. Y. 1900 

FROM CLAS8I8 OF GRAND RIVER. 

Rev. p. De Bruyn, Grand Haven, Mich. 1895 

Rev. Dirk Brqek, Grandville, Mich. 1895 

FROM CLA88I8 OF HOLLAND. 

Rev. Gerhard De Jonge, Vriesland, Mich. 189G 

Hon. Jacob Den Herder, Zeeland, Mich. 1890 

FROM CLA88IS OF DAKOTA. 

*Rev. John A. De Spelder. Orange City, Iowa. 1890 

Rev. S. J. Harmelino, Marion, S. D. 1890 

FROM CLASSIS OF IOWA. 

Rev. p. Lepeltak, Alton, Iowa. 1897 

Rev. James De Pree, Sioux Centre, Iowa. 1897 

FROM CLASSIS OF ILLINOIS. 

Rev. J. S. JoRALMON, Norwood Park, 111. 1898 

Francis J. Cushing, Irving Park, 111. 1898 



♦Removed from Classis, successor not yet appointed. 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



FROM CLAS8I8 OF WISCONSIN. 

KAXEH. REBinVNCKS. TERMS BXPlltli:. 

Rev. John H. Karsten, Oostburg, Wis. 1899 

Rev. B. Van Ess, Roseland, III. 1899 

FROM CLAS8IS OF MirHIOAN. 

Rev. Samuel Streng, Kalamazoo, Mich. 1990 

Rev. Wm. Hall Williajison, Grand Rapids, Mich. 1990 

FROM CLA8SIS OF PLEASANT PRAIRIE. 

Rev. D. Schaefer. Parkersburgh, la. 1900 

Rev. a. F. Beyer, German Valley, 111. 1900 

OFFICERS OF COUNCIL. 



Rev. Cornelius Brett, D. D. , - President. 

Rev. Ja8. F. Zwemer. - - Vice President. 

Hon. G. J. Diekema, - - - Secretary. 

Hon. Isaac Capp<»n. - - - Treasurer. 

COMxMITTEES OF COUNCIL. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Pres. G. J. KoLLEN, Chairman. 

Hon. a rend Visscheu, Secy. 

Rev. p. De Bruyn. Hon. G. J. Diekema. 

Rev. Gerhard De Jonge. 

INVESTMENT COMMITTEE. 
(In cbar^e of the Funds of the CounclL) 

Hon. Arend Visscher. Pres. G. J. Kollen. 

Hon. Isaac Cappon. 

HOPE FARM COMMITTEE. 

Pres. G. J. Kollen. Hon. Isaac Cappon. 

Hon. Arend Visscher. 

^DE hope: 

Prof. C. Doesburg, \ 

Rev. N. M. Steffens, D. D., - Editorial Committee. 

Rev. J. Van Houte, ) 

Mr. R. Kanters, - - - Publisher. 



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Collee^e Dep^rtiriGnt. 



GERRIT J. KOLLEN.LL.D.. President, 
In charge of Ethics and Psychology. 

CORNELIS DOESBURG. A.M.. Secretary, 

Professor of Modern Languages and Literature. In charge 

of Art Studies. 

HENRY BOERS. A.M., 
Professor of History. 

JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, A. M., Vice President. 
Professor of Mathematics. 

JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A.M., 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

REV. JOHN H. GILLESPIE, A. M. , 

R.\LPH VooRHEES Profcssor of the Greek Language and 

Literature. 

JOHN B. NYKERK, A.M., 
Professor of Music. Assistant Professor of English. . 



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HOPE COLLEGE, 



DOUWE B. YNTEMA, A.M., 
Professor of Chemistry and Physics. 

ERASTUS A. WHITENACK, A.B., 
Professor of English Literature. Instructor in French and 

German. 

Hon. G. J. DiEKEMA, A.M., LL. B., 
John C. Post, LL. B., 
Arend Visscher, a. M., LL. B., 
(>EO. E. Kollen, a. B., LL. B., 

Lecturers on Political Economy. 



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HOPE COLLEGE 



STUDBNTS. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

NAMBtt. UEHIDENCEk. 

Julia C. Van Raalte Holland. 

Henry M. Bruins Alto, Wis. 

George C. Dangrkmond Holland, Minn. 

Harm Dykhuizen Grand Rapids. 

John J. Heeren Orange Citj-, la. 

Benjamin Hoffman Overisel. 

John ,1. Mersen Marion, N. Y. 

Frederic Van Anrooy Graafschap. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Henry J. Albers Overlsel. 

Edward D. Dimnent Chicago, 111. 

Bert Dykstra Sioux Centre, la. 

John F. Heemstra Oraage City, la. 

Edward Kelder Grandville. 

Frederic Lubbers Orange City, la. 

Peter Meyer Bolivar, Mo. 

D. Cornelius Ruigh Holland, Neb. 

Sheldon Vandeburg Grand Rapids. 

John Van der Meulen Luctor, Kan. 

John N. Van der Vries Holland City. 

Harry J. Wiersum Chicago, 111. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Nicholas Boer Drenthe. 

Egbert Boone Holland. 

Albert Broene Drenthe. 

Jacob Brummel Holland. 

John De Jongh Grand Haven. 

Floris Ferwerda Grand Rapids. 

Gerrit J. HuiziNGA Holland City. 

Gerrit Kooiker Overisel. 

F. V. W. Lehman Sprakers. N. Y. 

James E. Moerdyk Milwaukee, Wis. 

Tony Rozendal Chicago, 111. 

Henry Saggers Graafschap. 

Jacob G. Van den Bosch Zeeland. 

Louis Van den Burg Alton, la. 

Jacob Van der Meulen Luetor, Kan. 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



John F. Van Slooten Holland. 

A. L Warnshuis Chicago, 111. 

Gus. Watermuelder Forreston, HI. 

Henry L. Yonker Vrieeland. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Eerko Aeilts Holland City. 

John J. Banninga Chicago, III. 

John W. Beardslee, Jr Holland City. 

Robert P. De Bruyn Grand Haven. 

Richard Huizeng a Rock Valley, la. 

Martin Hyink New Kirk, la. 

Abraham Klerk Holland, Neb. 

Robert E. Kremers , Hol.and City. 

Cornelius Kuyper Orange City, la. 

John G. Meengs ^ New Holland. 

Ties Mulder ! Grand Rapids. 

William Prakken Holland City. 

John G. Rutgers Graafachap. 

John B. Steketee Holland City. 

Jacob Van Ess Chicago, III. 

Henry F. Van Slooten Holland. 

JURRY E. Winter Holland City. 

UNCLASSIFIED. 

Martha Van Landegend Holland City. 

Jacob Buursma Grand Rapids. 

William De Jong Holland City. 

.Iohannes Engelsman Chicago, III. 

William S. Gruys Middleburg, la. 

Thomas Keppel Zeeland. 

George Kleyn Holland City. 

(iERRiT W. KooYERS Holland. 

.[. William Kots Maurice, la. 

Gerrit Masselink Oakland. 

John G. Theilken German Valley, 111. 

James M. Te Winkel Fulton, III. 

Gerrit J. Veldhuis Overisel. 

summary. 

Seniors 8 

Juniors 12 

Sophomores 1^ 

Freshmen 17 

Unclassifier 13 

Total B9 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



COURSB OF STUDY. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Mathematics.— Wentworth's Solid Geometry, and Plane and 
Spherical Trigonometry. 

Language.— 

English.— 'Rawthovne and Lemraon's American Literature : 
Study of American Classics; Essays. 

Latin. — Cicero's Orations : DeSeneetute: Vergil. 

TyrftA:.— Xenophon's Anabasis; Woodruff's Greek Prose Com- 
position. 

Modern.— Uistovy of Dutch Literature; Essays and Transla- 
tions. 

French. — Edgren's Grammar; some French Author. 

Elocution.— Fulton and Trueblood*s Practical Elocution. 

Rhetoric— Gen ung's Practical Rhetoric. 

History.— Allen's History of the Roman People. 

Natural Science.— Cutter's Comprehensive Physiology; 
J'ackard's Zoology. 

Bible Study.— Greek New Testament, 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Mathematics.— College Algebra; Hardy's Analytic Geome- 
try ; Wentworth's Surveying and Navigation. 

Language.— 

Enylitth.—ShAVf^s New History of English Literature ; Study of 
English Classics; Essays. 

Latin. — Livy ; Page's Horace. 

Greek.— Homer's Iliad or Odyssey. 

J/otZcni.— Edgren's French Grammar; some French Author. 

Elocution.— Fulton and Trueblood's Practical Elocution fin- 
ished ; Orations and Forensics. 

History.— Myer's Mediaeval History. 

Natural Science.— Williams' Chemical Science; Williams' 
Laboratory Manual of General Chemistry, 

Bible Study.— Greek New Testament. 



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30 HOPE COLLEGE, 



JUNIOR yp:ar. 

Mathematics.— Hardy's Calculus. 

Mathematics A pplieik -Olmsted's CciUege Philosophy. 
Fourth Revisum, Sheldon. 

Language,-- 

JU/^*M.— Stick ney's Cicero's De Otticiis: SlomanV Terence: 
Seneca's Moral El&says. 

Greek,— Herodotus ; Plato's Apology and Crito. 

Mode r n. -~ 3 oyne 6 Meissner's German Gran^mar : some German 
Author. 

Rhetoric --Essays, Discussicms. and Orations. 

History.- -Myer's Modern History. 

Natural Science.— Wood's Botany, two terms: Sedgwick 
and Wilson's Biology. 

Metaphysics.- Porter's Elements of Intel lecmal Science. 

Sacred Literature.— Butler's Analogy. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics. — Newcomb and Holden's Astronomy, advanced 
course. 

Language. - 

('r r^'eA*.— Tarbell's Demosthenes' Philippics ; Antigone. 

Modern. — Some German Author ; German Literature: Compo- 
sitions in German. 

Rhetoric— Orations and Essays continued. 

Logic. -McCosh. 

Ethics. —Way land's Moral Science. 

History.— Guizot's History of Civilization. 

Natural Science.— Dana's Class Book of Geology. 

PoLiTU!AL Science.— Walker's Political Economy, advanced 
course. 
Sacred Literature.- -Evidences of Christianity. 



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n 






.1 









*'eekN. 



*eck«. 



/i 



'^./ ^^.r>..^,, ,^ ^,,. 



'.>-».^ I ' 



IT., 

veelcs. 



veeks 



week . 
eks. 



•reeks. 

Lx, 

week. 



Kv. 

.'eeks. 



*eek. 



jlum. 



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10 



Fin 



Sei 



Au 



»iti 



cot 



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^VVHSE OF STUDY. 



n 



GoUego JDepartnient. 



Fresh. 



8:20-9:10. 



9:10-10:5. 



10:5-11. 



11-12. 



SOPH. 



'Axekican Lit., I French. iRoxak Hiat.. jLatjn. 

I U weeks 14 weeks. > 4 times a week, 'i-i^eeks. 

I 10 weeks. I 

j/«<»I-OGV, I iMATHEMATlCe, t 

1, weeks. lyjjgg,^ - 4 tiroe8a weekJDvTCH Lit , 

HoTANV, I 22 week.s. ' 28 weeks. ; 1 1 w cekn. 

10 weeks. I Riietoricalh. i 

> , once a week. ! 



8:20 9:10. 



9:10-10:5. 



10:5 11. 



Anal. Geom., 

14 weeks. 

Fkbncm. 

; 12 weeks 

IGbrman. 

10 weeks. 



JUN. 



8:20-9:10. 



SURVEYINO AJTD 

Navigation. 
10 weekti 

('HE.MI8TRY. 

26 weeks. 



(iREEK. 

4 ttmeea week. 
22 weeks. 

MEU. HlHT.. 

14 weeks. 
Rhetorical^. 
once a week. 



9:10-10:5. 



11-12. 



F.KaiJBH Lit., 

22 weektt. 



Latin. 



14 ueeks. 



10:5-11. 



; Latin. .Greek. 

10 weeks., 14 weeks. 

Look. German, 

'"• >*^**eKs. ^ weeks. 



(lERMAN, 

10 weeks. 



Latin. 



16 weeks. 



I BlOLOGT, 

10 weeks. 

liMOD. Hl8T., 

I 4 times a week, 
I 12 week.s. 

I Moral Phil.. 
14 weeks. 



Sen. 



I 

8:20-9:10. l 9:10-10:5. 



11-12. 



PnVMCH, 

4 times a week. 
24 ^eeks. 

Greek, 

10 weeks. 

Rhetorical^, 
once a week. 



10:5 11. 



11-12. 



. !_ 



Mental Phil.. .Vhtronoxy, 

14 weeks.} 10 weeks. 

Hiht. ok Civ., 
„ ., ' 10 weeks. 

POLIT. KcoN.. I . 

14 weeks, *J"B*AN 

8 weeks. 



jGERMAN, 

10 weeks. 
I Geology, 
I 12 weeliK. 

I Klocutiok, 

-6 weeks. 



Greek and Ev. 
of Christian lly. 

28 weeks. 

RmKToricals, 
once a week. 



The above Schedule shows the method of carrj'ing out the College Ctirrlculum. 

The Freshman and Sophomore clas.ses have Klble Study once a week, 

Kach cla.ss has Rhetorlcals once a week. 

There are live recitations a week In each branch, unless otherwl.>e siH?cll1e<l. 



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Grammar School Uopartment. 

PROF. (iERRlT J. KOLLEN, LL. D., President. 

PROF. CORNELIS DOESHURG, A. M.. 
Modern Luncruages. Drawing and Painting. 

PROF. HENRY BOERS. A.M.. 
History, and Civil Government. 

PROF. JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL. A. M., Vice President. 
Mathematics, and Botany. 

PROF. JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A. M., Secretary. 
Latin. 

PROF. JOHN H. CJILLESPIE, A. M. , 
(J reek. 

PROF. JOHN B. NYKERK. A.M.. 
English, and Music. 

PROF. DOUWE B. YNTEMA, A.M.. 
Physics, and Pedagogy. 

PROF. ERASTUS A. AVHITENACK, A. B., 
English, and Modern Languages. 



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FACULTY. 



MRS. C. VAN RAALTE GILMORE. 
Lady Principal. 

PROF. JAMES W. HUMPHREY, 
Director of the Summer School. 

Prof. C. Doesburo, W. T. JAnssen, ") 

Librarian. D. C. Rttigh, ^ Ass't Librarians. 

J. W. Beards LEE, Jr., ) 

J. J. Hkeren, Cliorister. E. D. Dimnent, Organi.st. 

Bernard Bloemendaaj., Janitor. 



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14 HOPE COLLEGE, 



STUUBNTS. 



*A" CLASS. 

NAMEK. REKIDENCEi*. 

Anna Appeldoorn Holland. 

Gracie Hazenberg Holland City. 

Jennie Krokkee Holland City. 

Sara E. Van der Meulen Holland City. 

Minnie Wilterdink Holland. 

Ellen Winter Holland City. 

Harry G. Birchby Holland City. 

William N. Birchby Holland City. 

Peter Braak Grand Rapids. 

Henry Bouwens Zeeland. 

Henry D. Brink Fillmore. 

Albertus T. Broek Grandvllle. 

Jacob D. Broek Grandvllle. 

Peter C. De Jong Chicajfo, 111. 

Robert W. Douma Fillmore. 

Benjamin Eefting Englewood, 111. 

Isaac J. Fles Muskegon. 

John E. Kuizenga Muskegon. 

FoLKERT Mansens .' Chicago, 111. 

Peter J. Marsilje Holland City. 

William J. M aurits Zeeland. 

Cornelius D. Mulder Spring Lake. 

Jacob Schepers Vogel Centre. 

Henry Schipper Grand Rapids. 

Henry Sluyter Grand Rapids. 

Edward Takken Holland City. 

John H. Ter Avest Hamilton. 

John Van Ess Chicago, III. 

John Verwey F^nglewood, 111. 

Pedde Wiersma Chicasro, 111. 



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GUAM MAR SCHOOL STVDEXTS. 



**B- CLASS. 

Rose A ykens Georgre, la. 

Jennie Docter Holland City. 

Maggie Gruttrop Holland City. 

Katie Rooks Ea«t Holland. 

Minnie Van Slooten Holland. 

Marie E. Van Zwaluwenburg Holland City. 

Jeannette Vaupell Holland City. 

Manus Albers Overibel. 

Harry Boot Pulton, 111. 

George F. Brou wer New Holland. 

John Brouwer New Holland. 

John G. De Bey Chicago, III. 

Avery G. Densmore Hudsonville. 

Abraham De Jong Chicago, 111. 

Gerhard J. Dinkeloo Holland City. 

Almon T. Godfrey Hudsonville. 

Benjamin Gunneman Overisel. 

Gerrit Hondelink Grand Rapids. 

John E. Kiekintveld Holland City. 

John M aurits Viiesland. 

Harry Mokma Holland City. 

Richard Overweg, Holland. 

Benjamin Plasman Holland. 

Albert G. Rooks East Holland. 

John J. Rooks East Holland. 

Leonard J. Rooks East Holland. 

Henry Stryker Grand Rapids. 

HiLLEBRAND G. Sluiter Cadillac. 

John Tanis Vriesland. 

Peter Takken Holland City. 

Henry J. Van den Berg New Holland. 

James Van der Heide Graafschap. 

Meine Van der Heide Graafschap. 

Cornelis Van der Meulen Holland City. 

Gerrit Van Route Holland City. 

Adrian Van Oeveren Holland City. 

Andrew Verschure Holland City. 

Willie J. Westveer • Holland City. 

Albert E. Wilterdink Holland. 



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16 HOPE COLLEGE, 



••C" CLASS. 

Annie Alberti Holland City. 

Christina J. Broek Holland. 

Ida D. Nies East Holland. 

Elizabeth Otto Chicago, III. 

Anna Sprietsma Holland City. 

Minnie Van der Ploeg Holland City. 

NicoLASiN a H. Van Goor Holland City. 

Theodora Van Houte Holland City. 

Katie Vyn Holland City. 

Sytze Baron East Holland. 

John Brinkman Graafschap. 

Jacob J. Brouwer New Holland. 

Derk Bruins, Jr Alto, Wis. 

Jacob F. De Jong Chicago, 111. 

Richard De Jong Chicago, 111. 

Marinus Den Herder Vriesland. 

Matthias J. Duven Waupun, Wis. 

Henry J. Elferdink Holland. 

Alva J. Fairbanks Holland. 

John H. Geerlings Holland. 

Albert Hoeksem a Holland. 

Albert Hym a Holland. 

Peter O. Kramer Holland City. 

F^dward D. Kremers Holland City. 

Philip Kollen Overisel. 

Martin Ko.ster Oakdale Park. 

Benjamin J. Lugers Holland. 

John Meulpolder Grand Rapids. 

Adrian J. Neerken Graafschap. 

John Nywening Wicherd, III. 

Gerrit J. Rutgers Graafschap. 

Frank D. Scott Holland. 

John Steunenberc; Grand Rapids. 

Henry Telman Overisel. 

Daniel Ten Cate Holland City. 

Gerrit Van Leeuwen Pillmoi-e. 

Oswald W. Visscher Holland City. 

Jacobus Wayer Muskegon. 

.Jacob J. Weersing East Holland. 

John G. Winter Holland City. 



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GliAMMAR SCHOOL STVBENl'^. 77 



*D" CLASS. 

Anna H. Hesselink Holland, 

Elizabeth Hyma Holland. 

•Gertrude Klomparens Fillmore, 

Regina M. Wetmore Holland City, 

Amy Yates Holland City. 

JosiE ZuiDEWiND Holland Cit>. 

Jacob Adams « , Oroomiah. Persia. 

William Bekman Holland City, 

John R. Brink Hollaed City. 

Jacob G. Bloemers .' Holland. 

James Dykema Chicago, 111. 

Henry Kooyers Holland, 

John H, Moeke Borculo. 

Oeorge Stompe Chicago, 111, 

Henry J. Steketee Muskegon. 

John Spitsbergen Zeeland, 

Peter Vkrburg Hamilton. 

Fred. C. Warnshuis Chicag<», 111, 

John Vork . / Holland City. 

UNCLASSIFIED. 

Belle E. Takken Holland City. 

Allie C. Wheeler. , . . Holland City. 

GUS. Bachman B*irnips Corners. 

Arthur P. BrouweK Oakland. 

John S. Brouwer New Holland. 

Stephen J. Brouwer : Grand Havea. 

Derk Lanting Forest Grove. 

Leonard Legters Clymer, N. Y. 

Fred. A. Pool Holland. 

Fred. Reeverts Stillm&n Valley, III. 

Fred. A. Steketee Holland City. 

Geo. N. Williams, Jr Holland City. 

summary. 

**A" Class ^l 

*'B'' Class : 39 

*'C" Class 40 

*'D" Class 19 

Unclassified 11 

Total 1 40 



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18 HOPE COLLEGE. 



COURSB OF STUUY. 



FIRST YEAR, *»D' CLASS. 

Rbadino, Etc. — Masterpieces of American Literature: 
A Book of Famous Verse (Repplier) ; Orthography. 

Penmanship. — Spencerian System. 

Mathematics. — OIney's Practical Arithmetic. 

Language. — 

English. — South worth and Goddard's Elements of Com- 
position and Grammar; Written Essays through the year. 

Butch. — Reading; Spelling. 

History. — Montgomery's Leading Facts of American 
History; Meyer's General History begun. 

Bookkeeping. — New Introductive Bookkeeping, by Wil- 
' liams & Rogers. 

SECOND YEAR, ^'C' CLASS. 

Reading, Etc — Choice Selections from English Au- 
thors : Orthography. Orthoepy, and Diacritical Marks. 

Natural Science. — Eclectic Physical Geography. 

Mathematics. — Wells' Academic Arithmetic; Went- 
worth's School Algebra begun. 

History. — Meyer's General History. 

Language. — 

English. — Whitney's Essentials of English Grammar; 
American Classics ; Essays, and Declamations. 



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COURSE OF STUDY 19 



Latin, — Collar and DanielFs Beginner's Latin Book ; 
Viri Romae ; Allen and Greenough's Latin Grammar ; 
Composition. 

Dutch. — Beading; Spelling; Translations. 

French. — Edgren's French Grammar. (Elective, for 
Latin.) 

THIRD YEAR, -B" CLASS. 

Drawing. — Free Hand and Perspective. 

Mathematics. — Wentworth's School Algebra finished; 
Steele's Astronomy, with the use of Globes. 

Natural Science. — Physiology and Hygiene. 

La.nguaoe. — 

English. — Grammar continued ; English Classics ; Hart's 
Rhetoric; Essays. 

Latin. — Gin n and Co. 's Caesar ; Grammar and Compo- 
sition. 

Greek. — White's Beginner's Greek Book. 

Dutch, — Kat's Grammar; Exercises; Translations. 

French. — Edgren's French Grammar. (Elective for 
Latin. ) 

Gerfnan. — Sheldon's Short German Grammar; Joynes' 
German Reader. (Elective for Greek. ) 

Elocution. — Readings and Declamations. 

History. — Smith's Greek History. 

FOURTH YEAR, "A" CLASS. 
Drawing. — Free Hand and Perspective. 
Mathematics.— Wentworth's Plane Geometry. 



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^20 HOPE COLLEGE 

Natural Science. — Carhart and Chute's Elements of 
Physics; Gage's Physical Lab. Manual and- Note Book. 

Language. — 

English, — Rhetoric completed: Parsons' Versification; 
English Classics ; Essays. 

Latin. — Caesar; Cicero; Grammar and Composition. 

Greek. — White's Beginner's Greek Book. 

Dutch. — Kats Grammar continued; Practical Exercises : 
Translations ; Compositions. 

French. — ) 

■- Continued as Electives for Latin and Greek. 
Germ(in.~ i 

Elocution. —Readings and Declamations. 

History. — Montgomery's Leading Facts of English 
History. 

Civil Government. — Young's Government Claims Book. 
Didactics. — White's Elements of Pedagogy. 
Religious Instruction, and Music. — In all the Classes. 

Special attention is given, during the whole of the Pre- 
paratory Course, to the grammars of the languages studied. 
For those who pursue English studies only, or who intend to 
discontinue at the end of the '-^A'' year, the Faculty provide 
such additional branches as seem most expedient and profit- 
able. To do the best work, it is necessary that the student's 
time is fully occupied in the work of the school. 

Those who take an English course only, select their 
studies, but are required to take at least fifteen recitations 
a week, as shall be approved by the Faculty. 

In general educational value, it is believed that the above 
four years' Course of Study is worthy of full recommenda- 
tion, whether for entrance into College, or for a profes^onal 
training, or for a business life. 



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COUliSE OF STUDY. 



'21 



Grammar School. 



^D" 



8:2()-«:I0, 



9:10-10:5. 



10:5-11. 



11 12. 



Mathematich. 
36 weeks 



iRkauinc}. 



i Ditch, 



Penmakhiiip. ! 3 times a \vet»k. 



and Essays 



10 weeks. 



36 weeks. Hnci.ihh. 

26 weekt*. 



r. S. Hist., 

and 
Book- Keeping. 
fi times a week. 
36 weeks. 



8:20-9:10. I 9:10 10:5. 



10:5 11. 



I 



11-12. 



Knolihii. 

36 weeks. 



(lEX. Hist 



Latin, 



Ditch. 



14 week.s. 



B'^ 



8:20-9:10. 



, 4 times a week,! 
10 weeks. I S8 weeks IDrawiho. 

, WJweeKs, I 10 weeks. 

MATUE.VATICS, iKlBLE STUDY, PnYS. GEOG.. 

26 weeks. once a week. 12 weeks. 



9:10-10:5. 



10:5 11. 



11-12. 



! {knmlish. I Physiology, |matiiexatics. 

Greek Hist., 4 1,,,,^^ ^ ^.^^^k.! 12 weeks. 

10 weeks.! , 1 

I 36 weeks. Ditch. 

Latin '^ weeks. 

1 ' 26 weeks, "'"le Study, Igkekk. 

i once a week.' 14 weeks. 



^A" ' 8:20-9:10. 



9:10 10:5. 



10:5-11. 



20 weeks. 



German. 

16 weeks. 



11-12. 



Greek. | Latin, I Nat. Phil., 

4 times a week.i 20 weeks. og weeks. 

36 weeks. !kxolish Hist., 
I 8 weeks. 



UiBLE Study. 



once a week.i 



Civil Gov't, 



8 weeks. 



Pedagogics, 

10 weeks. 



Knglish, 

20 weeks. 



Mathematics. 

16 weeks. 



The above Schedule shows the method of carrvinKOut the Grammar School 
Course. 
Five Recitations a week are given to each branch, unless otherwise specified. 
Every class has one recitation a week in Bible Study. 
Kngllsh in the Grammar School includes Rhetorlcals once a week. 
The Lady Principal meets the young ladles every week for such studies or exer- 
cises as she may select. 



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S2 HOPE COLLEGE, 



The Summer Normal. 



This is a permanent Summer School, annually held in 
connection with the College, for Teachers and those pre- 
paring to teach. It is pleasantly located near the shores of 
Macatawa Bay, with its fine summer resorts. 

A successful session of this School was held during the 
Summer of '94 with an attendance of 11.5 students. The 
studies pursued are designed to give an opportunity for a 
thorough review of the subjects required for "first, second, 
and third grade certificates", in Michigan, and for gaining 
such general information as will better fit teachers for their 
needed and noble profession. 

The studies thus to be reviewed, with daily drill as to 
methods and principles, are : 

Orthography, Beading, and Penmanship ; Geography, 
Arithmetic, and Grammar; United States History, and 
Civil Government ; Book-keeping, Algebra, and Geometry ; 
Physiology, Botany, and Philosophy ; School Law ; Science 
and Art of Teaching ; Question Drawer, and Practical Dis- 
cussions. 

Extra branches, such as Music, Crayon Drawing, Type- 
writing, and Short-hand, may be pursued, when a sufficient 
number for a class desire such instruction. 

Each subject will be treated after approved *' normal" 
methods, with special reference to the needs of teachers in 
their district schools. Taking English Grammar, for ex- 
ample, the programme will embrace a review of the parts 
of speech ; parsing and diagraming ; rules and forms, both 
oral and written ; composition ; and a careful analysis of 
the right use of the language. 



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THE SUMMER NORMAL, SS 



Those desiring to eater the School will bring their ordi- 
nary text-books for reference; but the instruction will be 
mainly given by note and topic. 

The next Summer School will be held for five weeks, 
from July 5th to August 9th, 1895. As in former years, 
competent instruction will be provided. 

The Library and Apparatus of the College are free for 
the use of these Classes. 

All inquiries and communications relating to the Sum- 
mer Normal should be addressed to the conductor, Com. 
J. W. Humphrey. Way land. Mich., or to the President of 
the College. 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



The WorR in JDat^iL 



THE GHAMMAH SCHOOL. 

In its four years' course, the Grammar School prepares 
students for the Classical Department in college or the uni- 
versity. Further, in order to meet the needs of those that 
do not expect to enter college, the course is made more- 
comprehen.*^ive than would otherwise be necessary. To thi.s 
end, special studies in Science, Book-keeping, Elocution. 
Music, Modern Languages, Theory and Art of teaching, etc. , 
are introduced, thus laying the foundation for a liberal and 
practical education. 

The several departments receive the same careful atten- 
tion as in the college proper, being under the immediate 
care of the respective college professors. Those desiring to 
fit themselves for teaching can so select their studies as to 
obtain a first-class normal as well as academic training, in the- 
Grammar School. 

HLSTOHV. 

PKOF. HENRY BOEKS 

The study of History l^egins in the "D" Class with that 
of our own country. This is followed by a course in 
General History, which continues throughout the "C" year. 
In the ''B" Class the History of Greece is taken up, followed 
in the ^^A" C!a«s by the History of England. In connection 
with this history work the ^^A" Class also takes up tlu* 
study of the Civil Government of the United States. 

In the four college cla.9ses the study of history is contin- 
ued. Roman History, some introductory work to the study 
of the Middle Ages, — as Emerton's, — Mediaeval History, 
Modern History, and Guizot's History of European Civiliza- 
tion, are taken up in the order named. 



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THE WORK IN DETAIL. 2^ 



ENGLISH LITERATURE. 

PROF. ERASTUS A. WHITENACK, 

In the **C," '*B," and **A" classes preparation is made 
for studies iu Literature by the use of masterpieces, to illus- 
trate the principles of Grammar and Rhetoric. 

One hour a day is given to the study of American Liter- 
ature throughout the last twelve weeks of the Freshman 
year. This work embraces a rapid survey of the entire 
field, a close study of some leading production, and essays 
on the historical development of American thought, 

English Literature is studied the first twenty- four weeks 
of the Sophomore year. Here, as everywhere, the basis of 
work done is the original text, first, last, and always. 
Biography is not neglected. Special attention is. directed 
to the development and growth of thought and style, while 
the relation of Literature to History is carefully traced from 
the early sources onward. A writer is the reflection of his 
age. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND RHETORIC. 

PROF. JOHN B. NYKERK. 

The course in this department includes the study of 
Formal Grammar, Literature, and Composition, The first 
is not made a culture study exclusively, but is taught inci- 
dentally throughout the whole course. Analytical study of 
some of the masterpieces of English Literature is deemed 
highly necessary, both for the application of the principles 
of grammar, and the development of critical thought and 
taste. In order to get an adequate idea of an author's 
style and method, complete works are usually studied. A 
brief course in Poetics precedes the study of poetry, to ena- 



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26 HOPE COLLEGE. 



ble the student to pursue this esth^'tic branch of literature 
more intelligently. To supplement the study of Formal 
Rhetoric, careful attention is given to Composition, and 
Essays and Orations are corrected in both the Grammar 
School and College. Orthography is taught incidentally, 
but a high standing is required. 

Some little attention is given to the principles of Elocu- 
tion and Oratory. Plain Reading, combined with Orthoepy 
and Orthography, is taught 175 hours in the Grammar 
School. This is followed by a limited course in Rendering, 
Dramatic Interpretation, Public Speaking, and Forensics, 
as much attention as jwssible being given to the proper use 
and development of the Voice, the chief organ of expres- 
sion. 

MATHEMATICS. 

PROF. J. H. KLKINHEKSEL. 

The Preparatory course in Mathematics embraces Arith- 
metic, Algebra, and Geometry. In the '*D" year, Olney's 
School Arithmetic is made a thorough study ; in the **C,*' 
Advanced Arithmetic is taken up, finishing the subject of 
Arithmetic at the close of the second term. 

Algebra is taken up the third term of the "C,** and con- 
tinued four terms, finishing at the end of the **B" year. 

In the **A" year Plane Geometry is completed. 

In all these both facility in computation, and thorough- 
ness and breadth of information are made the aim of the in- 
struction, so as to lay a broad foundation for future study 
in Mathematics. 

The Freshmen take Mensuration and finish Solid Geome- 
try the first term. Plane Trigonometry the second, and fin- 
ish Spherical Trigonometry the third term. In the first 
term. Sophomore, College Algebra is made a study, after 
which Analytical Geometry and Calculus finish the range of 
pure Mathematics in the second term of the Junior year. 



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THE WORK IN DETAIL, 57 



LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROF. JAMES G. SUTPHEN. 



1 ?> 



In the Grammar School, Latin is begun with the ''C 
Clas», and continues in the *^B" and '*A" years. The Ro- 
man method of pronunciation is used. The student is, as 
soon as practicable, introduced to the simple stories in 
••Viri Romae" and carefully drilled in the rudiments of the 
Grammar. In CaBsar and Cicero much attention is given to 
the Sequence of Tenses, Conditional Sentences. Oratlo Obli- 
qua, and the Subjunctive Mood. Throughout the course, 
exercises are given in rendering English into Latin, based 
upon the texts read. 

In the College, Latin is studied during parts of the first 
three years. The study of the Grammar, by analyzing sen- 
tences, is not neglected in the effort to present the authors 
in their literary character. 

GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROF. JOHN H. GILLESPIE. 

Until the end of the Freshman year exercises in Prose 
Composition, oral or written, are required daily as essential 
to fluency and accuracy. Though it is believed that the 
'^Natural Method" alone in the acquisition of such a lan- 
guage as the ancient Greek would be the method of a ''na- 
tural," yet simple conversations are frequently carried on 
as a useful auxiliary. The aim throughout is to make the 
course thorough and, as far as possible, interesting. 

In the advanced work introductions to Oratory, Philoso- 
phy, and the Drama, are given in the form of familiar talks. 
Where classes are prepared for it important portions of the 
author with which they have become familiar are read to 
them. 



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f8 HOPE COLLEGE. 



Once a week, for about four terms in the College course^ 
one of the Gospels is studied in the original. Besides this 
an extra class is formed by which any student who desires 
to complete the Greek New Testament before graduation 
may do so. 

M(3DERN LANGUAGES. 

PROF. CORNBLIS DOKSBURG. 

Many of the students of Hope come from Holland homes 
and use that language in common life. For them instruc- 
tion is given in the Dutch Grammar and Literature up to 
the Sophomore Class. Those who select German in lieu of 
Greek give their time to that study from the *B" Class 
onward, sometimes adding the French, and taking what 
may be called a scientific course. As y. part of the regular 
or A. B. course, the French is assigned to the Freshman 
and Sophomore Classes and the German to the Juniors and 
Seniors. The more diligent students read the French and 
the German with considerable facility. The authors read 
are varied but embrace only those of classic authority. 
Throughout the course the recitation of the lesson and the 
conversation about it is, as far as possible, carried on in the 
language studied. 

PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY. 

PROF. DOUWE B. YNTKMA. 

During the Fall and Winter terms the ''A" Class in the 
Grammar School has daily recitations in Physics, and 
work in the Laboratory at least two hours each week. 
Thorough class-room work is considered an essential feat- 
ure in pursuing this study, while careful laboratory work 
by each student, verifying the laws and principles discussed, 
is deemed equally important. 

For the Junior Class an advanced course in Physics is 
provided, beginning with the Fall Term, and continuing 24 



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THE WORK IN DETAIL, ^9 



weeks. This course can not be pursued with profit by 
students who have not a thorough knowledge of Trigo- 
nometry. 

The Course in Chemistry for the Sophomore Class con- 
sists of daily recitations and 4 hours laboratory work each 
week for 26 weeks. There is suflficient table room to ac- 
commodate 24 students at the same time. Each student 
is required to make an accurate record of all the experi- 
ments performed by him in the Laboratory, giving all the 
reactions involved, and conclusions reached from personal 
observation. 

BIOLOGY. 

In the Preparatory Course a term's work is given to 
Human Physiology. In the College Course, the Freshman 
Class takes one term's work each in Botany and Zoology, 
and the Sophomore one term in General Biology. 

PHILOSOPHY, ETC. 

Ethical Science is studied in the Junior year ; and Psy- 
chology in the Senior year. The President is in charge of 
these branches. The text-books used are supplemented by 
free discussions on tliese subjects, and by the practical ap- 
plication of acquired knowledge in preparing essays. 

A course is given in Logic in the Junior year ; while the 
Seniors are made acquainted with the subject of Political 
Economy by means of text-books, discussions, and lectures. 



From this **Work in Detail," as well as from the 
< 'Courses of Study," outlined on pages 9 and 20, it will be 
seen that Hope College is, first of all. offering a liberal 



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so HOPE COLLEGE. 



Classical course, which will serve as an adequate foundation 
upon which to build professional courses, which, in turn^ 
prepare for the more active and practical duties of life. 

The time is fast coming, and we shall hail the day. when 
such a foundation of a liberal classical course will be gener^ 
ally required as a preparation for all professional studies. 



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ADMISSION SI 



A.dmi&&ion. 

COLLEGE. 

For admission into the Freshman Class a full certificate 
of graduation from the Grammar School Department is re- 
quired, or an examination of the studies pursued in that 
department, or in what the Faculty shall deem an equiva- 
lent. 

Students- may enter an advanced class either at the be- 
ginning of the College year or at other times, provided they 
sustain a satisfactory examination both on the preliminary 
studies and on those already passed over by the class which 
they propose to enter. If received on condition, students 
may in certain cases be permitted to recite with the class, 
but all conditions must be removed before regular admis- 
sion. 



GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

An elTort is being made to raise the standard of the in- 
stitution, and, accordingly, the requirements for admission 
to the **D" Class have been advanced. 

Pupils holding a so-called "Eighth Grade Diploma" will 
be admitted to the above class without examination; while 
applicants not holding such certificate, will be subjected to 
a strict examination in the common school branches, includ- 
ing Arithmetic, English Grammar and Composition, United 
States History, Geography, (not including Physical), Read- 
ing and Orthography. The examination will be graded 
according to the requirements of the aforesaid diploma. 

In order to enter any advanced class, it will be neces- 
sary for the applicant to pass an examination in the studies 
previously pursued by the class. If received on conditions, 
these must be fulfilled before regular admission. 



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Sir HOPE COLLEGE 



MiscellanGOus Information. 



LOCATION. 

Holland City is a central point on the Chicago & West 
Michigan Railway, ninety miles north of New Buffalo, 
twenty-five miles south-west of Grand Rapids, and midway 
between Allegan and Grand Haven. To all Eastern points 
the route by rail is direct. It is therefore most desirably 
located, having both land and water communications, being 
near the shore of Lake Michigan, with which it is directly 
connected by a beautiful sheet of water, called Macatawa 
Bay, and on which are the popular summer resorts Maca- 
tawa Park, and Ottawa Beach. 



GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 

The College Campus lies between Tenth and Twelfth 
streets, in the centre of the city, and contains sixteen acres^ 
with an addition of two acres on the south side of Twelfth 
street. It presents a finely varied surface, well shaded with 
native trees, and is annually improving in beauty and at- 
tractiveness. 

The College buildings are nine in number. Van Vleck 
Hall is mainly devoted to dormitory purposes. 

The new Graves Library and Win ants Chapel Building, 
in which are also found a President's room, a reading room, 
a Y. M. C. A. Hall, and four lecture rooms, affords such suita- 
ble and improved accommodations, that every one connected 
with the College cannot but feel grateful to the kind friends 
whose generosity made the erection of it a possibility. 



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< 
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MISCELLA^'EOlJS INFORMATIOX. ^3 



SCHOOL YEAR, 

The scholastic year of forty weeks begins on the third 
Wednesday in September, and ends with the general Com- 
mencement on the fourth Wednesday in June. 

The winter and spring vacations are fixed by the General 
Faculty. (See Calendar.) 



ADVANTAGES OFFERED. 

Besides- the advantages of location, easy communica- 
tion, and inexpensive living, it is believed Hope College 
may justly call attention to equally important advantages 
of a very different nature. 

It is true, the Institution is growing, but the classes are 
not so large as to preclude that personal acquaintance, and 
contact and influence of each member of the Faculty with 
every student coming under his instruction, which parents 
are apt to consider in making choice of an institution. This 
j3ersonal element, made possible in a smaller institution, is 
a factor of great educational value both morally and intel- 
lectually. 

Hope College is not a local institution. Its students 
represent an extensive territory, extending East as far as 
the State of New York, and West as far as the Dakotas. 
The students are in the main the best pupils from many 
public schools and in general possess a high order of ability 
and a laudable ambition to make their way in the world. 
This makes them desirable companions inviting their fel- 
lows to friendly competition and industrious study. 

By a division of the work peculiar to Hope College, the 
same experienced instructors teach in both Grammar School 
and College, placing the student in Latin or Greek, etc., for 



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^ HOPE COLLEGE 



six consecutive years or more under the same man. Thus 
practically making a six years' instead of four years' course. 

It is a chartered Institution, incorporated under the laws 
of the State and legally entitled to grant certificates and 
diplomas. 

It offers great improvements in science teach ing^ but it 
is no less a classical school than in former years. The 
change means more of science but not less of classics. 

Under the new law relative to the granting of certifi- 
cates by Denominational Colleges, Hope College will soon 
be prepared to offer, besides the usual Diploma, a legal cer- 
tificate authorizing the holder thereof to teach in any of the 
Public Schools of Michigan. 

It will be seen, therefore, that Hope College offers and 
secures a regular liberal course of training as complete as 
can be found in most of our Western colleges. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

Most of the students seek a ''liberal education, '' leading 
to the degree of A. B. — A '* partial" or ^'elective" course 
is offered to all who so desire, and facilities are furnished 
through the regular instructors; but a partial course enti- 
tles only to a certificate, and not to a diploma. German 
and French, or Drawing and Painting, can be studied at any 
time, as also the branches generally called ' 'scientific," fit- 
ting the student for professional courses in a University. 

Since 1878 the institution has been open to women. 
They enter the regular classes, and attend the same lectures 
and recitations as the young men. 

Vocal mu.sic is provided without charge. Lessons in 
instrumental music can be secured at the expense of the 
pupil. 



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MISCELLA NJSO US INFORM A TION. SS 



EXAMINATIONS. 

In both departments, written examinations are held at 
the close of each term, or whenever a subject is completed. 
When practicable, the examinations at the close of the year, 
or whenever a branch of study is finished,, cover the entire 
text-book. The next examination for admission will be held 
the day before the new school year opens, viz , on Tuesday, 
September 17th, 1895, at 9 o'clock, A, M. 



CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS. 

Members of the *^A" Class, upon graduation .in full 
course, are entitled to a regular Certificate, signed by the 
Council and the Faculty; but said certificate will be marked 
* ' First, " "Second, "or ** Third Grade," as follows; When 
the average standing of the graduate is from 90 to 100, this 
will indicate the -First Grade;" when from 80 to 90, the 
^'Second;" and from 70 to 80, the *'Third;" reference being 
made to both recitations and examinations. 

Such students as are admitted in partial course, or who 
fall below an average standing of 70, are entitled to a Cer* 
tificate, from the Faculty, naming the studies in which they 
have sustained examinations. 

Graduates from the College, when recommended by the 
Faculty, receive a Diploma, with the degree of A. B., 
being a testimonial of general scholarship. The course 
leading thereto includes such branches as are usually taught 
in similar Institutions, A partial course is sometimes 
chosen, and is entitled to a Certificate as adjudged by the 
Faculty. 

The degree of A. M. is conferred upon those who con- 
tinue their studies for three years after graduation, or who 
may satisfy the Council, by a thesis, as to their scholastic 
attainments. By paying a fee of three dollars, an A. M, 
diploma in such cases will be given. 



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Sb' HOPE COLLEGE, 



RELIGIOUS SERVICES 



The exercises of each day begin with prayer in Winants 
Chapel, at 8 o'clock, A. M. 

On the Sabbath every student is expected to worship 
regularly with one of the churches in the city or vicinity, 
unless excused by the President. 

Religious instruction is given in all the classes regular- 
ly, and like all the other studies, is in charge of the Faculty. 

Although Hope College is denominational, and is under 
the patronage and support of the Reformed Church in 
America, yet, by the law of its incorporation, it can have 
no -'religious test". The doors are open, and welcome is 
given to all who submit to its scholastic regulations. As a 
Christian school, however, it inculcates gospel truths, and 
demands a consistent moral character and deiX)rtment. 



LIBRARY, READING ROOM, ETC. 

The Library which already numbers over 9000 volumes 
is, by a munificent donation of a friend of education, about 
to be increased to over 20,000 volumes — all free for the use 
of the students. Books and pamphlets, as well as maga- 
zines and papers, are constantly added. The friends of 
Hope College may be assured that their gifts of valuable 
books to the library will be taken care of, and appreciated, 
and made useful by giving them a place upon the ample 
shelves of the magnificent fire proof Library building. 

In connection with the Library is a Reading Room, sup- 
plied with many valuable periodicals and leading journals on 
politics, religion, science, and literature. These can 
be consulted on any day when the college is in session, but 
may not be withdrawn from the room. 



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MISCELLA NEO US IN FOR MA TION, 



Laboratory and Philosophical Apparatus for lecture 
room use is growing in value and completeness. Donations, 
by the graduates and friends of the Institution, of maps, 
charts, instruments, and specimens of Natural History, are 
solicited, with the assurance that all such will materially 
add to the efficiency of the work which Hope College is doing. 



MUSIC. 



A large class, under the direction of Prof. J. B. Nykerk, 
meets once a week, and receives drill in Voice Culture, 
and Choral Singing. A primary class in Theory and 
Sight-singing is conducted by Mr. J. J. Heeren. To these 
classes all students are admitted without charge. 

Further, fine opportunities are afforded for the study 
of Piano and Voice. Messrs. Post and Campbell of Grand 
Rapids, two of the most prominent and competent musicians 
in the State, each have large classes of private pupils in 
their respective departments. For terms, etc., apply for 
special circulars to Prof. J. B. Nykerk. 



SOCIETIES. 

Four Literary Societies, viz., the Meliphon^ the Cosmo- 
politan^ the Fraternal, and the Ulfilas Club, have been main- 
tained for years, and offer decided advantages to their re- 
spective members, and materially aid in the attainment of 
that culjture, which it is the object of this school to promote. 
The Ulfilas Club seeks to secure for its members greater 
proficiency in the use of the Holland language. 

The Young Men's Christian Association, having about 
one hundred members, continues to carry its work with 
much interest and activity. 



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38 HOPE COLLEGE, 



PUBLICATIONS. 

Connected with the Institution, a religious weekly is 
published, called De Hope. It was established in 1866, arid 
is under the direction of the Council, through its Editorial 
Committee. The paper has a circulation of over 3100 
copies. 

A monthly, called The Anchor, is conducted by the stu- 
dents with gratifying success. It has reached its eighth 
year, and, owing to the excellent spirit with which it is 
managed and edited, it is very helpful to the College, and 
is calculated to awaken an *tsprit de corps among its Alumni. 



PRIZES. 

The Oratorical Exercises of the Grammar School, on the 
final Monday of the college year, is the Commencement of 
that Department, and marks the graduation of the *'A" 
Class. 

In 1887 were established the two » 'George Birkhoff, Jr. 
Prize?," each of twenty-five dollars; one for the Sopho- 
more Class, in English Literature, and the other for the 
Freshman Class, in Dutch Literature. At the last Com- 
mencement they were awarded by the Committees, as fol- 
lows: For the best English Essay to John Van der Meulen; 
for the best Dutch Essay to Jacob G. Van den Bosch. 

In 1894 two new prizes were added to the list of annual 
awards, one of $15.00 for the best, and the other $10.00 
for the second best examination in English Grammar and 
Orthography, open to all the members of the '*C" class. At 
the last Commencement the first prize was awarded to Harry 
Boot, and the second to Gerrit Hondelink. These were es- 
tablishe^d by Mr. Henry Bosch, of Chicago, III. Other 
friends have given prizes for Drawing, from year to year. 
Last year the first, second, and third prizes were awarded 
respectively to F. Mansens, Miss G. Hazenberg, and R. W. 
Douma. 



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MISCEL LA 'SEO VS INFORM A TION SO 



We trust that additional prizes will follow, as a stimulus 
to labor in other branches of study. 



EXPENSES. 
,The city is surrounded by a rich agricultural region, 
and the cost of living in Holland is cheap. Good board and 
rooms may be had in families of the city for from two to 
three dollars per week; in clubs, and without furnished 
rooms, at lower rates. 

There are nineteen rooms in Van Vleck Hall, in the selec- 
tion of which students for the ministry have the preference. 
These are furnished in part and bear a moderate charge. 

As yet no tuition fees have been charged, but every 
student must pay to the Treasurer, in adt^ance, an incidental 
fee of six dollars per term. 

The graduation fee is five dollars in the college, and two 
and one-half dollars in the Grammar School. No other 
charges are made. 

The fee of the students in the Summer Normal Classes 
is five dollars for the session. 

Young people of noble aspirations but of limited means 
need not be discouraged. At Hope College they will find 
many like themselves, some of whom have come a great dis- 
tance seeking an education. Such as these are in earnest, 
content with plain living, and, by practicing the economies 
that are possible in this place, succeed in reducing their 
expenses within marvelously narrow limits. 

Here is an estimate of the necessary expenditure, ex- 
clusive of clothing and travel, which each can determine for 
himself, for one year in the Preparatory Course: 

Board (at the Club), $60.00 

Room rent (two rooming together), - - 20.00 

Books $10, Washing $10, Light $3. - - 23.00 

Fuel $7, Fees $18, 25.00 



Total, - - $128.00 



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40 HOPE COLLEGE. 



The above estimate is an answer to those who want to- 
know how much money is absolutely needed, and is intended 
as a reply to that oft-repeated question. Of course the 
expense of most of the students exceeds this amount. 

Many parents having children to educate, find it to 
their advantage to come to this city to live. To such it 
may be truthfully said, that Holland is a growing, enter- 
prising city — one of the most prosperous and beautiful in 
Michigan. With its broad, straight, and shady streets, its. 
waterworks, and its electric illumination, Holland is equally 
well adapted to the life of quiet retirement, and to that of 
the active business man. 



DISCIPLINE. 

It is gratifying to observe that the moral and spiritual 
tone of the students is such that the matter of discipline is 
reduced to a minimum. General opinion is on the side of 
right and reasonableness, and lends its powerful support to 
the interest of good order and efficient work. To develop 
this high moral culture and character of the student, it is 
the aim of Hope College to cultivate no less than to advance 
his intellectual development. 

In general, however, if it appears that students do not 
improve their time and opportunities, or do not conduct 
themselves in a respectful and orderly manner, their connec- 
tion with the Institution is suspended, or if it should be 
found, after due probation and inquiry, that the influence 
of a student is bad and injurious to others, the right is ex- 
ercised of requiring the withdrawal of such student. It 
is proper to add that within recent date no such case has 
occurred. 

The students are required to be present, promptly, on 
the first day of each and every term. The recitations will 
begin the next morning. 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. M 

A record is kept of the scholastic staadiog of each stu- 
dent, and a copy of the same is sent to the parent or guar- 
dian; if the average standing, in any term, does not exceed 
70, on a basis of 100, he is to be dropped from his class. 

Term fees and room rent are to be paid strictly in ad- 
vance, and if not so paid, or within one month, the student 
neglecting forfeits his right to continue in the Institution, 

Boarding houses and boarding clubs in the city are to 
be approved by the Faculty, and to be subject to such reg- 
ulations as are usual in similar institutions. By a rule of 
the College, lady students are not to room in the same 
boarding houses with gentlemen. 

Parents are requested not to ask or expect their children 
to come home during term time. It seriously interferes 
with proper habits of study, and by our rules, none are to 
be abs**nt from the Institution without permission of the 
President. 



TO ALUMNI AND FRIENDS. 

Hope College is grateful to the Reformed Church in 
America, whose she is, and whom she so loyally serves by 
the men she is furnishing both for the Domestic and the 
Foreign Field. 

Hope College is grateful to her Alumni and to all who 
were at any time connected with the College as students, 
for the faithful work they are doing; wherever they are 
practicing their professions, they show that they are 
* ' Workmen that need not be ashamed ' ' ;■ — grateful for the 
growing interest they manifest by making known the merits 
of their Alma Mater, and by inspiring deserving young 
men to seek the same educational advantages. 

Hope College is grateful to royal and liberal friends who 
here invest their money, not in dead and fleeting things, 
but in brain and character and souls of men. Be assured, 



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h2 HOPE COLLEGE. 



nowhere else will your well-earned money yield larger re- 
turns, in no other way can you render better service for 
your Church and for your Country. 

With such encouragements as these, Hope College feels 
hopeful for the future. She will try to still deserve your 
favor and your liberality. You have young friends, — con- 
tinue to send us their names, if they are studious and de- 
serving, especially the 7iames of stick as are not likely oth- 
eririse ever to receive a good education. 



REMARKS. 



At a meeting of General Synod of the Reformed Church 
in America, held at Asbury Park, N. J., during the first 
week in June, 1894, the election by the Council of Prof. G. 
J. Kollen as President of Hope College, was approved. On 
the 27th of Juae he was duly inaugurated. Addresses were 
made by Rev. Philip Phelps, D. D., LL. D., first President 
of the College; and Rev. Giles H. Mandeville, D. D., Pro- 
visional President for two years. The keys were delivered 
to the new President by the President of Council, Rev. Cor- 
nelius Brett, D. D., after which the inaugural address was 
made. 



On June 26th, 1894, the new building, Graves Library 
and Winants Chapel, was dedicated with appropriate exer- 
cises. Dr. Austin Scott, President of Rutgers College, and 
Rev. Peter Moerdyke, D. D., made addresses; and Rev. 
Henry E. Dosker, D. D., gave a historical sketch. 

Hon. N. F. Graves, LL. D. , in whose honor the Library 
is named, was prevented from attending this ceremony. 



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MISCELLA NEOUS INFOKMA TION. kS 



For a long time it was felt that, if our students were to 
attain to the greatest possibility of usefulness in life, at- 
tention should be paid to their physical as well as to their 
mental and moral culture. In order to encourage the stu- 
dents in this matter, they were told that the old Chapel 
would be reverted to its original purpose, that of a Gym- 
nasium, provided they would equip it with the necessary 
apparatus. 

They have taken hold of this work with a commendable 
vigor, equal to that evinced by the students of '61 and 'G2, 
when they erected this building, being aided only by one 
skilled carpenter, as superintendent. 

Classes in dumb-bells, Indian clubs, chest-weights, etc., 
are held daily at such hours as best to accommodate the 
students. Many of our students derive as much good from 
this gymnasium as they could, if the Council had put it 
there at an expense of many thousands of dollars to the 
College. 



By the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Voorhees a 
Professorship has been established. 



Another year of successful labor is closing. By the fidel- 
ity of the students in performing their daily tasks, they 
were enabled to do justice to the curriculum, and thus 
have they strengthened and encouraged the College in hold- 
ing out to the young, seeking an education, that best of all 
courses, a liberal classical course. 

All who desire a liberal education, and who wish to ac- 
quire it, surrounded by a wholesome Christian influence, will 
find in Hope College a foster-mother that will not disappoint 
them. 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



HONORARY DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1894. 

LL. D.— Rev. Phiup Phelps. D. D. 
LL.D. — Hon. Nathan F. Graves. 
D. D. — Rev. Peter De Pree. 
Mrs. D. — Edward A. Brdell, LL. B. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 

President — Dr. John A. Otte. 
Vice President — Dr. Charles E. Jones. 
Secretary — Prof. John H. Kleinhbkseu 
Treasurer — Hon. Asend Visschkr. 



jPoriri of Boquost. 



J give and bequeath unto the Council 
of Hope College, a corporation located at Holland, Michi- 
gan, for the use and benefit of said Institution, the sum of 
Dollars. 



I 

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CHRONOLOGICAL MEMORANDA. 



Chronological Memoranda. 



lieKiuning of the Netberland Immigration into Michigan, Iowa, etc 1847 

Vlllageof Holland laid out 1848 

Five acres donated by Rev. A. C. Van Raalte, I). D . as a site for an Academy. . 1850 

*• Pioneer School • opened, Mr. W. T.Taylor, Principal Oct., 1851 

Placed under the care of the General Synod June, 1853 

Mr. \V. T. Taylor resigned Oct., 1853 

Rev. F. B. Beidler, Principal 1854 

Rev. John Van Vleck. Principal 1855 

The school named the Holland Academy 1865 

Located in the "Orphan House" 1856 

Van Vleck Hall erected on '* The five acres" 1857 

The Academy more fully organized 1857-1858 

Mel iphon Society founded 1857 

Rev. John Van Vleck resigned 1859 

Rev. Philip Phelps, Jr . Principal 186» 

Campus enlarged to 1« acres 1869 

"Oggel House" erected as a residence ISeo 

Gymnasium built, largely by students 18^3 

A Freshman Class formed, 10 in number 18(J2 

Fraternal Society founded 1863 

A •' Hoard of Sui>erintendent8" appointed by General Synod 1863 

A College propot»ed, and approved by the Synods 1864 

Over 840,000 contributed ah an endowment 1865 

Hope College begun. 1865: incor;>orated May, 1866 

Forty-eight students in all 1865 1866 

The Hoard of Superintendents named ' The Council " 1866 

Faculty of six appointed and organized; Rev. P. Phelps, Jr., D. D.. Pres.. July, 1866 

First Commencement: eight became A. B 1866 

A weekly newspaper. De Hope, established 1866 

Theological instruction begun, with a class of seven Sept.. 1866 

Rev. C. E. Crispell. D. D., elected Professor of Theology; Profs. Phelps. Oggel, 

Beck, and Scott being elected •' Lectors" 1867 

Holland incorporated as a city 1867 

Charter Hall (burned in 1884) erected 1867 

Eighty acr.s, within the city, donated by Dr. Van Raalte 1867 

Point Superior. "Hope Farm," 837 acres, and the Bluff, Hi acres, purchased: 

part of which has since been sold 1867 1868 

South Campus, two acres, donated by Dr. V«n Raalte 1868 

The Theological Department adopted by General Synod as Its " Western Theo- 
logical Seminary" 1869 

Death of Rev. Peter J. Oggel, Professor, and Editor of De Hope Dec, 1869 

Council Hall (Grammar School Building) erected 1869 

First Theological Class of seven graduated 1869 

Two railroads oi)ened through Holland 1869-1871 

First Formal Constitution of the College adopted 1871 

Holland nearly destroyed by Are Oct. , 1871 

Gymnasium repaired, and made the Chapel 1873 

C. Doesburg. A. M., elected Professor 1872 

House finished on the South Campus 1873 



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46 HOPE COLLEGE, 



The Laboratory enlarged and repaired 1874 

Theological "Lectors" regularly ap))oUited by Synod, viz. Profs. T. R. Beck 

and C. Scott 1875 

Brick printing office for De Hopt erected 1876 

Death of Rev. CorneliuB Van der Meulen Aug. liSS. 1876 

Death of Rev. A. C. Van Raalte. D. D Nov. 7. 1876 

Suspension of the Theological Deiwrtment June, 1877 

Death of Rev. A. T. Stewart, D. D., Sec. of Council for 12 years May, 1878 

Reorganization of the College; Dr. Pheli^u resigns June, 1878 

Rev. G. II. Mandeville, D. D., Provisional President and Financial Agent: 

Prof. C. Scott, Vice President 1878 

Wm. A. Shields, A. M., and G. J. Kollen, A. M.. elected Professors 1878 

Rev. C. K. Crlspel, Profe6.sor of Theology, resigns ^ 1879 

A new Constitution adopted 1879 

Prof. Charles Scott, D. D.. Provisional President 1880 

Successful efforts to pay off a debt of *32,000 1879 18K 

Donation of $10,000 by Gerrlt Cowenhoven, Esq 1882 

Division in some of the Reformed Churches 1881^1883 

Theological Instruction restored; a Professorship of S30,000 completed; Rev. 

N, M. Steffens, D. D., Professor of Theology 188* 

Visit of the General Synod to the College 1884 

Rev. VV. R. Gordon. D. D.. donates his Library to the College— to be sent when ^ 

it can have room and shelves 1884 

A separate -'Board of Superintendents'* for the Western Theological SemIna^^' 

ordered by Synod 188ft 

Profs. Beck and Shields resign 1885 

H. Boers. A. M.; J. II Kleinheksel, A. M.: .1. G. Sutphen, A. M., and Rev John 

J. Anderson, A. M.. elected Professors 1885 

Election of Prof. Charles Scott, D. D.. as Constitutional President 1885 

President Scott inaugurated 1886 

All the streets around the Campus graded, etc 1882-1886 

Synods House for the President erected as to exterior 1886 

First number of The Anchor issued Maj', 1887 

" The George Birkhoff, Jr.. Prizes" established 1887 

Normal Department opened 1^8 

Rev. James F, Zwemer apix>Inted Financial Agent 1888 

Prof. J J. Anderson resigns 1888 

Rev. .1. H. Gillespie, A. M., elected Professor 1888 

Rev. J. W. Beardslee, D. X)., Theological Professor 1888 

Invested Funds have Increased to over JIOO.OOO 1889 

Quarter Centennial Celebration June ai, 1800 

Synod's House for the President, finished 1892 

J. B. Nykerk, A. M., appointed Assistant Professor 1802 

Graves Library and Winants Chapel begun; corner stone laid Oct. 12, 1882 

President Scott resigns: taking effect 1893 

Prof. G. J. Kollen, A. M., elected President June 20, 1898 

D. B. Yntema. A. M.. elected Professor 1893 

Erastus A. VVliitenack. A. B., elected Professor 1883 

Death of Prof. Charles Scott, D. D Oct 31, 1803 

English Grammar and Orthography Prizes established 1894 

Rev. Henry E. Doskcr, D. 1).. Theological Professor 1894 

Graves Librarj' and Winants Chapel dedicated June 26, 1894 

President Kollen inaugurated June 27, 1804 

Old Chapel reverted to its original punK>se and fitted up as a Gymnasium 1805 



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WESTERN 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

OF THE 

Reformed Church in America. 



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48 HOPE COLLEGE. 



CALBNDAH. 





1894. 


Sept. - - 4. 


Entrance Examinations. 


- 5. 


Term Opens. 


Nov. 28-Dec. 4. 


Thanksgiving Recess. 


Dec. - - 21. 


Beginning of Christmas Recess. 




1895. 


Jan. - - 8. 


Work Resumed. 


- 31. 


Prayer for Colleges. 


April - - 23. 


Meeting of Board of Superintendents. 


- 24. 


Examinations. 


- - - 24. 


Commencement Exercises in Evening. 




VACATION. 


Sept. - - 3. 


Entrance Examinations. 


4. 


Term Begins. 


Nov,27-Dec.3. 


Thanksgiving Recess. 


Dec. - - 20. 


Beginning of Christmas Recess. 




1896. 


Jan. - - 7. 


Work Resumed. 



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WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 49 



Board of Suporintendonts. 



EX OFFICIO. 

Gerrit J. KOLLEN, LL.D., - President of Hope College. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF NEW YORK. 

1898. Rev. P. S. Schenck, D.D., - Hudson, N. Y. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF ALBANY. 

1899. Rev. H. D. B. Mulford, - Syracuse, N. Y. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 

1897. Rev. Anson Du Bois, D. D., - - Athenia, N.J. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF CHICAGO. 

1899. Rev. P. Moerdyke, D. D., * - - Chicago, IlL 

1898. Rev. A. Buursma, - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

1897. Rev. J. P. De Jonge, - Zeeland, Mich. 

1898. Elder D. J. De Jonge, - - Roseland, IlL 

1899. Elder P. J. Gushing, - Irving Park, 111. 

1900. Elder John Snitzler, - Grand Rapids. Mich. 

FROM the CLASSIS OF DAKOTA. 

1899. Rev. S. J. Harmeling, - Westfield, N. Dakota. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF GRAND RIVER. 

1896. Rev. Egbert Winter, D. D., - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

FROM the CLASSIS OF HOLLAND. 

1898. Rev. J. Van der Meulen, D. D., - Holland, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF ILLINOIS. 

1897. Rev. J. H. Van den Hook, - Chicago, 111. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF IOWA. 

1899. Rev. J. P. Zwemer, - Orange City, Iowa. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF MICHIGAN. 

1899. Rev. John A. DeSpelder,* - Constantine, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF PLEASANT PRAIRIE. 

1898. Rev. J. Muller, - - German Valley, 111. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF WISCONSIN. 

1899. Rev. John Broek, - - South Holland, 111. 
* Appointed for vacancy. 



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BQ HOPE COLLEGE 



FJICULTY. 



REV. NICHOLAS M. STEFPENS, D. I>., 

Pi*ofes8or of Didactic and Polemic Theology. In charge of 

Practical Theology. 

REV. JOHN W. BEARDSLEE, D D., 
Professor of Biblical Languages and Literature. 

REV. HENRY E. DOSKER, D.D., 
Professor of Historical Theology. 

REV. JOHN W. BEARDSLEE, D. D., 
Secretary of the Faculty. 



OFFICERS OF THE FOARD. 

Rev. E. Winter, D. D., President. 

Rev. Peter Moerdyke, D. D., Stated Clerk. 



COMMITTEE ON RECEPTION OF STUDENTS. 

Rev. N. M. Steffens, D. D., 

Rev. J. W. BeardsltEe, D. D., 

Rev. H. E. Dosker, D. D., 

Rev. J. Van der Meulen, D. D., 

Rev. E. Winter, D. D., 

Rev. a. Buursma, 

Rev. J. Van Houte. 



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WESTUBN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 



51 



STUDBNTS. 



Cerrit H. Dubbink, 
John Luxen, 
Albert Oosterhof, 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Hope College, 1892. 
Hope CoUege, 1892. 



OveriseL 
Sti'eator, 111. 
Spring Lalpe. 



Hope OoUege, 1892. 
Andrew J. Reeverts, Stillman Valley, Ilk 

Hope College. 1892. 
Elbert S. Schilstra, Rocbester, N. Y, 

GymDasium, Rotterdam. 
Cornelius M. Stepfens, Holland. 

Hope College, 1892. 
Herman Van der Plobg, Holland. 

Hope College, 1892. 
SiETSE Van der Werf, Grand Rapids. 

Theological School, Grand Rapids. 
Henry J. Veldman, Grand Rapids, 

Hope College, 1892. 



Henry Huizinga, 
WiRTJE T. Janssen, 
William Miedema, 
John Schaefer, 



MIDDLE CLASS. 

Hope College, 1893. 
Hope College, 1893. 
Hope College, 1893, 
Hope College, 1893. 



Hollands 

Pores too, Ilk 

Vriesland, 

Oregon^ Ilk 



Orange City, Iowa, 



John W. Te Paske, 

Hope College, (special) 1893. 

William Wolfius, Grand Rapids* 

Theological School, Grand Rapids. 



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6e HOPE COLLEGE. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Mart*inus E. Brookstra, Hospers, Iowa. 

Theological School, Kampen. 
DOUWE De Groot, Holland, Mich. 

Cornelius A. Jongewaard, Orange City, Iowa. 

Iowa College, 1893. 
Peter Swart, Chicago, 111. 

Hope College, 1894. 
John W. Te Selle, Holland, Neb. 

Hope College, (special) 1894. 
Aart Van Arendonk, Harrison, S. Dakota. 

Hope College, (special) 1894. 

John Van de Erve, Hein, S. Dakota. 

Hope College, 1894. 



SUMMARY. 



Senior Class 9 

Middle Class 6 

Junior Class 7 

22 



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WESTEKN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 53 



Ganaral Information. 



ADMISSION. 



The Seminary is open for the admission of students from 
every denomination of Christians. 

A Committee of the Board of Superintendents, on the 
reception of students, meets on the first Tuesday of Septem- 
ber, at 11 o'clock a. m. 

Every member is required to present a certificate of 
church membership and one of literary qualifications. One 
who has not pursued a regular Collegiate course must give 
proof by testimonials or examination of such literary attain- 
ments as will enable him to enter upon the course of studies 
in the school. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

ExBOETicAL Theology and Hermeneutics. — Elements 
of Hebrew ; Selections from Pentateuch ; Harmony and Ex- 
egesis of the Gospels ; Reading Acts of the Apostels ; 
ArchaBology; Sacred Geography; Gesenius's Lexicon; 
Westcott & Hort's Greek Testament; Thayer's N. T. Lexi- 
con ; Terry's Hermeneutics. 

Historical Theology. — Kurtz's Sacred History. 

Systematic Theology. — Introduction ; Encyclopedia; 
Symbols of the Church. 

Practical Theology. — Theory of Preaching; Analysis 
of Sermons ; Horailetical Exercises. 



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5If HOPE COLLEGE. 



MIDDLE YEAR. 

ExEOETicAL Theology and Hermeneutics. — Hebrew 
Etymology and Syntax, Messianic Prophecy; Reading from 
Historical Books ; Old Testament Introduction ; Exegetical 
Study of Hebrews and Paul's Minor Epistles ; Reading 
General and Pastoral Epistles. 

Historical Theology. — Kurtz's Church History. 

Systematic Theology. — Lectures; Theology proper; 
Anthropology; Christology ; A. A. Hodges Outlines; 
Charles Hodge's Systematic Theology. 

Practical Theology. — Lectures on Preaching; Homi- 
letical Exercises ; Church Government ; Pastoral Theology ; 
Lectures. 

senior year. 

Exegetical Theology and Hermeneutics. — Hebrew- 
Prophecy and Poetry; Historical Reading; Aramaic Se- 
lections; Exegetical Study of Romans and writings of John ; 
Introduction to New Testament ; Reading Book of Revela- 
tion. 

Historical Theology.— Ecclesiastical History (continued. ) 

Systematic Theolo(}Y. — Lectures; Soteriology; Eccle- 
siology ; Eschatology ; Apologetics ; Ethics ; Review of the 
entire System. 

Practical Theology. — Homiletical Exercises ; Pastoral 
Theology; Cathechetics ; Theory of Missions; Church Gov- 
ernment ; Lectures on Preaching. 

PREACHING. 

The students preach regularly before the Faculty and 
Students, subject to such criticism as may be appropriate. 
They also preach in the churches, especially such as are 
vacant, under the direction of the Faculty. 



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WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 55 

LECTURES. 

A course of Lectures, on subjects bearing on Ministerial 
work, is delivered annually under the direction of the Board 
of Superintendents. 

MISSION WORK. 

The Students are organized as a Mission Band and hold 
themselves in readiness to attend any calls to address meet- 
ings where they can advocate the cause of Missions. 

ADELPHIC SOCIETY. 

This is a weekly gathering of the Professors and Stu- 
dents for the discussion of questions relating to the practi- 
cal work of the ministry. The exercises embrace debates, 
essays and general discussions. 

COMMENCEMENT. 

The Theological Commencement Exercises take place on 
Wednesday evening, at the close of the year. Addresses 
are delivered by the Seniors, in English and Dutch, and by 
some member of the Board of Superintendents appointed for 
the purpose. 

BENEFICIARY AID. 

Instruction is entifely gratuitous. Young men are aid- 
ed by the Board of Education as their circumstances require 
and the funds admit, not only while in the Seminary, but in 
the studies preparatory to entering it. Rooms are provided 
in Van Vleck Hall and charges for board are very moderate. 

The requirement of the Constitution in regard to stu- 
dents preparing for the ministry in the Reformed Church, 
is as follows : 

'•Every person contemplating the work of the ministry, 
before he commences his course of Theological studies, shall 
furnish satisfactory evidence of his being a member in full 



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66 HOPE COLLEGE. 



communion and good standing of a Reformed Protestant 
Church ; of his piety, ability, and literary attainments ; and 
thereupon shall be admitted into one of the Theological 
Schools ; and during the prosecution of his studies there, 
shall be subject to the rules and regulations thereof ; and 
when he shall have completed the prescribed course and 
term of Theological studies, shall be admitted to an exami> 
nation according to the regulations of the school as estab- 
lished by the General Synod ; and if found qualified, shall 
receive a professional certificate to that effect, which shall 
entitle him to an examination for licensure before the Clas- 
sis to which he belongs." — Constitution, Art. II.. iSec. 2. 

THE YEAR. 

The Seminary opens on the first Tuesday in September, 
when the Committee meets for the reception of students, 
and closes on the last Wednesday in April, with the annual 
Commencement. 



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CATALOGUE 

OF 

HOPE COLLEdD 

AT 

Holla»\c|, - JHIcKigaK. 



illSSM 

..Lj..! ij 2! 3i 4 
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13:14:15! 16:171181 
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CATALOGUE 



OP THE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



OP 



- lioPE College- 



HOLLAND, MICHIGAN. 



l895-'9e. 



AN INSTITUTION OP THE REFORMED CHURCH 
IN AMERICA. 



PIONEER SCHOOL, iSs'- 
HOLLAND ACADEMY, i8s7. 
BECAME HOPE COLLEGE, 1865. 



HOLLAND, MIOH. 
mntn or Thk Ottawa Oountv Timu. 

1886. 



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CaMat-— 16<i6-^'<l7. 



1896. 



1897. 



April 


13. 


Spring Term begins. 


*' 20-21. 


Senior Examinations. 


(< 


22. 


Meeting of Council. 


June 18-19. 


Undergraduate Examinations. 


a 


21. 


Baccalaureate Sermon. 


li 


22. 


Closing Exercises of the Grammar 
School, in Winants Chapel, 2 P. M. 


u 


23. 


Meeting of Council, 10 A. M. 


(I 


23. 


Meeting of Alumni in Winants Chapel, 
7:30 P.M. 


(( 


24. 


Commencement Exercises in Winants 
Chapel. 

VACATION. 


Sept. 


15. 


Examinations for Admission, beginning 
at 9 A. M., in Graves Hall. 


iC 


16. 


Fall Term begins at 9 A. M. 


Nov. 


26. 


Thanksgiving Recess. 


Dec. 


18. 


Fall Term ends. 

VACATION. 


Jan'y 


4. 


Winter Term begins. 


(C 


28. 


Day of Prayer for Colleges. 


March 


26. 


Winter Term ends. 

VACATION. 



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TKe G>uKcil. 



EX-OFFICIO. 
Prop. G. J. Kollen, LL. D., - President of the College. 

ELECTED MEMBERS. 

FROM GENERAL, SYNOD. 

HAMES. BBSIDSMCSB. TSRM8 EXPIRS. 

Rev. Ja8. F. Zwemer, Orange City, Iowa. 1896 

Rev. Peter Moerdyke,D.D., Chicago, 111. 1896 

Hon. Isaac Cappon, Holland City, Mich. 1897 

Hon. Arend Visschbr, Holland City, Mich. 1898 

Hon. Gerrit J. Diekema, Holland City, Mich. 1899 

Rev. Cornelius Brett, D. D., Jersey City, N. J. 1900 

Hon. N. F. Graves, LL. D., Syracuse, N. Y. 1900 
Rev. G. H. Mandeville, D. D. , LL. D., New York City. 1901 

FROM CLASSIS OF HOLLAND. 

Rev. Gerhard De Jonge, Vriesland, Mich. 1896 

Hon. Jacob Den Herdrr, Zeeland, Mich. 1896 

FROM CLASSIS OF DAKOTA. 

*Rev. John A. De Spelder, Macon, Mich. 1896 

Rev. S. J. Harmeling, Marion, S. D. 1896 

FROM CLASSIS OF IOWA. 

Rev. P. Lbpeltak, Alton, Iowa. 1897 

Rev. James De Pree, Sioux Centre, Iowa. 1897 

FROM CLASSIS OF ILLINOIS. 

Rev. J. S. JoRALMON, Norwood Park, 111. 1898 

Francis J. Gushing, Irving Park, III. 1898 

FROM CLASSIS OF WISCONSIN. 

Rev. John H. Karsten, Oostburg, Wis. 1899 

Rev. B. Van Ess, Roseland, III. 1899 

FROM CLASSIS OF MICHIGAN. 

Rev. H. Gough Birchby, Holland, Mich. 1900 

Rev. Wm. Hall Williamson, Grand Rapids, Mich. 1900 



•Removed from Classli. 



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HOPE COLLEGE, 



FROM CLASSIS OE PLEASANT PRAIRIE. 

Rbv. D. Sohaefer, Parkersburgh, la. 1900 

Rev. a. F. Beyer, German Valley, III. 1900 

FROM CLASSIS OF GRAND RIVER. 

Rev. p. De Bruyn, Grand Haven, Mich. 1901 

Rev. Dirk Broek, Grand ville, Mich. 1901 



OFFICERS OF COUNCIL. 



Rev. Peter Moerdyke, D. D. , - President. 

Rev. Jas. F. Zwemer, - - Vice President. 

Hon. G. J. DiEKEMA, - - Secretary. 

Prof. C. Doesburg, - - Treasurer. 



COMMITTEES OF COUNCIL. 



executive committee. 

Pres. G. J. KoLLEN, Chairraan. 
Hon. Arend Visschbr, Sec'y. 
Rev. p. De Bruyn. Hon. G. J. Diekema. 

Rev. Gerhard De Jonge. 

investment committee. 

(In charge of the funds of the Council.) 

Hon. Arend Vissoher. Pres. G. J. Kollen. 

Hon. Isaac Cappon. 

HOPE FARM committee. 

Pres. G. J. Kollen. Hon. Isaac Cappon. 

Hon. Arend Visscher. 

''DE HOPE.'' 
Prop. C. Doesburg, \ 

Rev. J. Van Houte, V - Editorial Committee. 

Rev. D. Broek, j 

Mr. R Kanters, - . - . Publisher. 



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College De)3aH:rT\eKt. 



Facviky, 

GERRIT J. KOLLEN, LL.D., Presideat. 
In charge of Political Economy. 

CORNELIS DOESBURG, A.M., Secretary and Registrar, 

Professor of the Dutch Language and Literature. 

In charge of Art Studies. 

HENRY BOERS, A. M. , 
Professor of History. 

In charge of Zoology. 

\ 

JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, A.M., Vice President, 

Professor of Mathematics. 

In charge of Botany and Biology. 

JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A.M., 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

REV. JOHN H. GILLESPIE, A. M., 

Ralph Voorhbbs Professor of the Greek Language 

and Literature. 

JOHN B. NYKERK, A.M., 

Professor of the English Language and Literature. 

In charge of Vocal Music. 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



DOUWE B. YNTEMA, A.M., 

Professor of Chemistry and Physics. 

In charge of Pedagogy. 

ERASTUS A. WHITENACK, A.B., 
Professor of French and German. 

REV. JOHN TALLMADGE BERGEN, A.M., 
Robert Sghell Professor of Ethics and Evidences of Chris- 
tianity. In charge of Mental Science. 



Hon. G. J. DiEKEMA, A.M., LL.B., 
John C. Post, LL. B., 
Arend Visscher, a. M., LL. B., 
Geo. E. Kollen, A. M., LL. B., 

Lecturers on Political Economy. 



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5TUDENT5. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

NAMES. BS8IDBNCBB. 

Henry J. Albers Overisel. 

Edward D. Dimnent Chicago, 111. 

Bert Dykstra Sioux Centre, la. 

Edward Kelder GrandvlUe. 

Frederic Lubbers Orangfe City, la. 

D. Cornelius Ruigh Holland, Neb. 

Sheldon Vandeburg Grand Rapids. 

John N. Van der Vries Grand Rapids. 

Harry J. Wiersum Cliicago, III. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Nicholas Boer Drenthe. 

Egbert Boone Holland. 

Jacob Brummel Overisel. 

John De Jongh Grand Haven. 

Floris Ferwerda Grand Rapids. 

Gerrit J. HuiziNGA. Holland City. 

Gerrit Kooiker Overisel. 

James E. Moerdyk M ilwaukee. Wis. 

John J. Ossewaarde Zeeland. 

Tony Rozendal Chicago, 111. 

Henry Saggers Graafschap. 

Jacob G. Van den Bosch Zeeland. 

Louis Van den Burg Alton, la. 

Jacob Van der Meulen Luctor, Kan. 

John F. Van Slooten Holland. 

A. L. Warnshuis Grand Rapids. 

GUSTAVE Watermuelder Forreston, 111. 

Henry L. Yonker Vriesland. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Eerko Aeilts Holland City. 

John J. Banninga Chicago, 111. 

John W. Beardslee, Jr Holland City. 

Robert P. De Bruyn Grand Haven. 

Martin Hyink Newkirk, la. 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



Abraham Klerk Holland, Neb. 

Robert E. Kremers Holland City. 

Cornelius Kuyper Orange City, la. 

John G. Meengs New Holland. 

Ties Mulder Grand Rapids. 

William Prakken Holland City. 

John B. Steketee Holland City. 

Jacob Van Ess Chicago, 111. 

Henry F. Van Slooten Holland. 

JURRY E. Winter Holland City. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Anna Appeldoorn Holland. 

Anna S. Peeks Holland. 

Minnie Wilterdink Holland. 

William N. Birchby Holland City. 

Peter Braak Grand Rapids. 

Sydney S. Gushing Chicago, 111. 

Arthur C. V. Dangremond Newark, N. Y. 

J. Jas. De Pree Sioux Center, la. 

Seine B. De Pree Sioux Center, la. 

Peter C. De Jong Chicago, III. 

Robert W. Douma Fillmore. 

Benj. Eepting Englewood, 111. 

John H. Eefting Englewood, 111. 

Isaac H. Hgspers Orange City, la. 

John E. Kuizenga Muskegon. 

Folkert Mansens Holland City. 

Peter Marsilje Holland City. 

Cornelius D. Mulder Spring Lake. 

Henry Schipper Grand Rapids. 

Henry Sluyter Grand Rapids. 

Cornelius Spaan Orange City, la. 

John H. Teh Avest Hamilton. 

Edward Takken Holland City. 

Gerrit Te Kolstb Holland, Neb. 

John Van Ess Chicago, 111. 

Bernard Van Heuvelen Thule, S. Dak. 

John Verwey Holland City. 

Fedde Wiersma Chicago, 111. 



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COLLEGE STUDENTS, 



UNCLASSIFIED. 

Harry G. Birchby Holland City. 

Geo. E. Cook Holland City. 

Gerrit W. Kooyers Holland. 

J. William Kots Maurice, la. 

Fred. Reeverts Stillman Valley, 111. 

John G. Rutgers Graafschap. 

John G. Theilken German Valley, 111. 

Meine Van der Heide Graafschap. 

Oscar Wilms Holland City. 

summary. 

Seniors 9 

Juniors 18 

Sophomores 16 

Freshmen 28 

Unclassified © 

Total 79 



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10 HOPE COLLEGE. 



G>\ir-.se of -Stxicly. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Mathematics. —Wentworth's Solid Geometry, and Plane auJ 
Spherical Trigonoroetr3\ 

Language— 

Xa^trir—Cicero's Orations; Vergil. 

G?'ccA:— Xenophon's Anabasis; WoodruflTs Greek Prose Com- 
position. 

jSfodem.— History of Dutch Literature; Eissays and Transla- 
tions. 

^enc/i.— Edgren's Grammar; Easy Selections from French 
Authors. 

Elocution.— Fulton and Trueblood's Practical Elocution. 
Rhetoric— Genung's Practical Arithmetic ; Essays. 
History.- Allen's History of the Roman People. 
Natural Science.— Cutter's Comprehensive Physiology; 
Holder's Zoology ; Gray's Botany. 

Bible Study.— EllicotVs New Testament. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Mathematics.— College Algebra; Hardy's Analytic Geome- 
try ; Went worth's Surveying and Navigation. 

Language.— 

JS?ngfiw/j..— Shaw's New History of English Literature : Study 
of English Classics ; Essays. 

Xotin.- Livy ; De Senectute. 

Gr€cfc.— Homer's Iliad or Odyssey. 

Jtfo€?em.— French Classics ; Outlines of French Literature. 

Elocut^ion.— Pulton and Trueblood's Practical Elocution fin- 
ished ; Orations and Forensics. 

History.— Myer's Mediaeval History. 

Natural Science.— Williamg' Chemical Science ; Williams' 
Laboratory Manual of General Chemistry. 

Bible Study. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 11 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics.— Hardy's Calculus. 

Mathematics Applied.— Olmsted's College Philosophy, 
Fourili Becmmiy Sheldon. 

Language — 

Latin. — Horace ; Stickney's Cicero's De Officiis. 

Grccfc.— Herodotus ; Plato's Apology and Crito. 

Modem. — Whi tney's Brief German GratDmar; Easy Selections 
from Grerman Authors. 

Rhetoric. — Essays, Discussions, and Orations. 

History.— Myer's Modern History. 

Natural Science.— Sedgwick and Wilson's Biology. 

Metaphysics— Porter's Psychology. 

Logic. —McCosh. 

Ethics.— Porter's Elements of Moral Science— dcfifMn. 

Bible Study. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics.— Newcomb and Holden's Astronomy, advanced 
course. 

Language.— 

Greefc.—Tarbell's Demosthenes' Philippics; Antigone. 

Modern.— German Classics ; Outlines of German Literature ; 
Composition.' 

Rhetoric— Orations and Essays continued. 

Ethics.— Porter's Elements of Moral Science— competed. 

History.— Guizot's History of Civilization. 

Natural Science.— Dana's Class Book of Geology. 

Political Science.— Walker's Political Economy, advanced 
course. 

Sacred Literature.— Fisher's Evidences of Christianity. 



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IS 



HOPE COLLEGE. 



College De|>artmeht. 



Fresh. 


8:20—9:10. 


9:10-10:5 


10:5—11. 


11—12. 

r 




Rhbtoric, 

14 weeks. 
Zoology, 

12 weeks. 
Botany, 

10 weeks. 
Rhbtoricals, 
on Friday. 


Grbek, 

22 weeks. 

Frbnch, 

14 weeks. 


Roman Hist., 
10 weeks. 

Mathbmatics. 
26 weeks. 


Latin, 

22 weeks. 
Dutch Lit., and 
Rhbtoricals, 
on Friday. 

14 weeks. 
Bible Study, 
on Thursday of 
of each week. 


Soph. 


8:20—9:10 


9:10-10:5. 


10:5-11. 


11—12. 




SuRVBYiNo and 
Natioation, 
10 weeks. 

Anal. Obok., 
14 weeks. 

Frbnch, 

li weeks. 


Gbrkan, 

10 weeks. 

Chbmistry, 

26 weeks. 

BiBLB Study, 
Wednesday of 
each week. 


Grbbk, 

10 weeks. 

Qbrman. 

12 weeks. 

Mbd. Hist., 

14 weeks. 


Enolisu Lit. A 
Rhbtoricals. 

22 weeks. 
Latin. 

14 weeks. 

RUBTORlCia.S. 

on Friday. 


JUN. 


8:20—9:10. 


9:10—10:5. 


10:5-11. 


11—12. 




BiBLB Study, 
6 weeks. 

Physics, 

20 weeks. 

Latin, 

10 weeks. 


Latin. 

16 weeks. 

Elocution, 

weeks. 

Grbbk, 

14 weeks. 


Biology. 

10 weeks. 
Mod. Hist., 

12 weeks. 
Mbntal Phil., 

14 weeks. 
Rhbtoricals, 
on Friday. 


Grbbk. 

8 weeks. 

Logic, 

12 weeks. 

German, 

16. weeks. 


Sen. 


8:20—9:10. 


9:10—10:5. 


10:5—11. 


11—1?. 




Gbbxan, 

16 weeks. 

Gbolooy, 

12 weeks. 


Astronomy, 

10 weeks. 
Hist, of Cit., 

10 weeks. 
Ets. op Chris- 
tianity, 

8 weeks. 
Rhbtoricals 
on Friday. 


Ethics. 

14 weeks. 

POLIT. ECON., 

14 weeks. 


Elocution, 

8 weeks. 

Grbbk, 

20 weeks. 



The above Schedule shows the method of carrying out the College Curriculum. 

The Freshman and Sophomore classes haTe Bible Study once a week. 

Each class has Rhetorlcals once a week. 

There arc fiTe recitation a week in each branch, unless otherwise specified. 



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<jrahf\hf\ar -ScKoo) DeJDartmeKt. 

Facxiky. 

PEIOF. GERRIT J. KOLLEN, LL. D., President. 

PROP. CORNELIS DOESBURG, A. M., 
Dutch Language and Ldterature, Drawing, aad Painting. 

PROF. HENRY BOERS, A. M., 
History. 

PROP. JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, A. M., Vice President. 
Mathematics. 

PROB\ JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A. M., Secretary. 
Latin. 

PROF. JOHN H. GILLESPIE, A. M., 
Greek. 

PROF. JOHN B. NYKERK, A. M., 
English, and Music. 

PROF. DOUWE B. YNTEMA, A. M., 
Physics, and Pedagogy. 

PROF. ERASTUS A. WHITENACK, A. B., 
Modern Languages. 

PROF. JOHN TALLMADGE BERGEN, A. M., 
Bible Study. 

A. F. HARVEY, A. B., 
Tutor in English, and Civil Government. 

MRS. C. VAN RAALTE GILMORE, 
Lady Principal. 

Prof. C. Doesburg, J. W. Bbardslee, Jr., ) 

Librarian. Peter Braak, > Ass't Librarians. 

Harry Boot, ) 

F. Perwbrda, Chorister. Wm. N. Birchby, Organist. 

Bernard Bloemendal, Janitor. 



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U HOPE COLLEGE. 



5TUDENT5. 



'*A" CLASS. 



NAMX8. RK9IDXNCBS. 

Jbjnnie Docter Holland Cit}'. 

Maggie Gruttrup Holland City. 

Jennie Krokkee Holland City. 

Minnie Van Sr.ooTEN Holland. 

Jeannette Vaupeli. Holland City. 

M ANUS Albers Overiael. 

Harry Boot Fulton, III. 

ALBERTUS Broek ,. Grandvllle. 

George P. Brouwer New Holland. 

John G. De Bey Chicago, 111. 

Abraham De Jong Chicago, 111. 

Gerhard J. Dinkeloo Holland City. 

Almon T. Godfrey Holland City. 

Benjamin Gunneman Overisel. 

Gerrit Hondelink Grand Rapids. 

Richard Overweg Holland. 

Albert G. Rooks East Holland. 

John J. Rooks East Holland. 

Leonard J. Rooks East Holland. 

Hildebrand G. Sluiter Cadillac. 

John Tanis Vriesland. 

Peter Takkrn Holland City. 

James Van der Heide Graafschap. 

Cornelius Van der Meulen East Holland. 

Gerrit Van Houte Holland City. 

Andrew Verschure Holland City. 

Willie J. Westveer Holland City. 

Albert E. Wilterdink Holland. 



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GRAMMAR SCHOOL STUDENTS. 15 



*'B" CLASS. 

Elizabeth Otto Chicago, 111. 

Anna Sprietsma Holland City. 

Minnie Van der Ploeg Holland City. 

NicOLASlNA H. Van Goor Holland City. 

Katie Vyn Holland City. 

Arthur Birchby Holland City. 

Jacob De Jong Chicago, III. 

Richard De Jong Chicago, 111. 

M arinus Den Herder Vriesland. 

John H. Dupree Zealand. 

Matthias J. Duven Waupun, Wis. 

Henry J. Elperdink Holland. 

Alva J. Fairbanks Holland. 

Orville E. Fisher Manito, III. 

John H. Gberlings Holland. 

Albert Hoeksema Holland. 

Albert Hyma Holland. 

Edwajrd D. Kremers Holland City. 

Martin Koster Kalamazoo. 

Barney Lubben Coopereville. 

Benjamin J. Lugers Holland. 

John Meulpolder Holland City. 

Adrian J. Neerken Graafschap. 

John Nywening Wichert, III. 

John S. Raum Holland City. 

Frank D. Scott Holland City. 

John Stexjnenberg Grand Rapids. 

Martin J. Stormzand Grand Rapids. 

Henry Telman O verisel. 

Daniel Ten Cate Holland City. 

William E. Van der Hart Holland City. 

Oswald W. Visscher Holland City. 

Jacobus Wayer Muskegon. 

Jacob J. Weersing East Holland. 

John G. Winter Holland City. 

**C" CLASS. 

Anna H. Hesselink Holland. 

Minnie Van Hours Holland City. 



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16 HOPE COLLEGE. 



William Bekman Holland. 

Jacob G. Bloemrrs Holland. 

WiETSE H. BosCHKER Westfield, N. Dak. 

John Y. Broek Grandville. 

Gerrit J. Brouwer New Holland. 

J ACOB J. Brouwer New Holland. 

William H. De Kleine Foi-est Grove. 

Simon Hellenthal Holland City. 

Henry Kooyers Holland. 

John H. Moeke Borculo. 

Henry J. Steketee Muskegon. 

John Spitsbergen Zeeland. 

John a. Van Zoeren Vriesland. 

Peter Verburg Hamilton. 

John Vork Holland. 

Fred. C. Warnshuis Grand Rapids. 

Hessel Yntema Forest Grove. 



*'D" CLASS. 

Anoklina Horning Keno, Mich. 

Georgianna Luqers Holland. 

Minnie IIooks East Holland. 

K. Jennie Toren Holland City. 

Janet Van den Beldt .Holland. 

Josie Zuidewind Holland City. 

Cornelius K. Bareman Zeeland. 

Henry K. Boer Drenthe. 

John a. De Hollander Rochester, N. Y. 

John J. De Young ".Chicago, 111. 

Leonard C. Heyboer Grand Rapids. 

John Itterbeek Fillmore. 

Derk J. Grul Battle Creek. 

John Lahman Grand Haven. 

Henry G. Pelgrim — Grand Haven. 

Arthur Henry Post Buffalo, N. Y. 

Nicholas E. Van Dam Drenthe. 

Jacob Vav Houte Holland City. 

Andrew Wagemaker Grand Rapids. 

Joe. a. Wiggers Drenthe. 



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GRAMMAR SCHOOL 8TUJXENT8. 17 



UNCLASSIFIED. 

CiNA Meengs North Holland. 

Minnie Mokma Holland City. 

Reoina Wbtmore HoUalid City, 

Amy Yates Holland City. 

Jacob Adams Persia, Asia. 

Gus Bachman Burnips Corners. 

John Brinkman Graafschap. 

Arthur P. Brouwer Oakland. 

Allan Kuhne Germany. 

Gertrude Klomparens Fillmore. 

Leonard Legters Clymer, N. Y. 

Fred A. Pool Holland. 

Harry Post Holland City. 

William Regenmorter Holland. 

Theodora Van Houte — Holland City. 

Adrian Van Oeveren Holland City. 

summary. 

** A" Class 27 

**B"*t51as8 ; 36 

**C" Class 19 

'*D" Class. 20 

Unclassified 16 

Total 117 



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18 HOPE COLLEGE. 



Covir.se of 5t\ic|y. 



FIRST YEAR. ^'D" CLASS. 

Mathematics. — Olney's Practical Arithmetic. 

Lanouaqe. — 

English. — Rigdon's Grammar of the English Sentence; 
Repplier's A Book of Famous Verse ; Cooper's Last of the 
Mohicans ; Hawthorne's The House of the Seven Gables ; 
Essays. 

Dutch. — Reading; Spelling. 

History. — Montgomery's Leading Facts of American 
History; Myer*s General History begun. 

Bookkeeping. — New Introductive Bookkeeping, by Wil- 
liams 4& Rogers. 

Penmanship. — Spencerian System. 
Bible Study. — Old Testament. 

SECOND year! -^C CLASS. 

Drawing. — Free-hand and Perspective. 

Natural Science. — Eclectic Physical Geography. 

Mathematics. — Wells' Academic Arithmetic: Went- 
worth's School Algebra begun. 

History. — Myer's General History. 

Language. — 

English. — The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in the Spec- 
tator; Goldsmith's \ icar of Wakefield; Southey's Life of 
Nelson; De Quincey's The Flight of a Tartar Tribe; Tenny- 
son's The Princess ; Orthoepy and Diacritical Marks ; Es- 
says and Declamations. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 19 



Latin, — Tuel and Fowler's First Book in Latin ; Gra- 
datim; Viri Romae; Bennett's Latin Grammar; Composition. 

DiUch, — Reading; Spelling; Translations. 

French. — Edgren's French Grammar; Easy Reading and 
Con versation . ( Elective for Latin. ) 

' BiBLK Study.— Old Testament. 

THIRD YEAR. ^*B" CLASS. 

Mathematics. — Wcntworth's School Algebra finished; 
Steele's Astronomy, with the use of Globes. 

Natueal Science. — Physiology and Hygiene. 

Language. — 

English, — Shakespeare's As You Like it: George Eliot's 
Silas Warner; Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America; 
Hawthorne's Twice Told Tales; Mead's Rhetoric; Essays. 

Latin. — Viri Romae; Nepos ; Ginn & Co. 's Caesar; Gram- 
mar and Composition. 

Gretk. — White's Beginner's Greek Book. 

Dutch. — Kat's Grammar; Exercises; Translations. 

French, — Reading and Conversations. (Elective for Lot. ) 

German. — Whitney's Brief German Grammar ; Easy 
Reading and Conversations. (Elective for Greek.) 

Elocution. — Readings and Declamations. 

History. — Smith's Greek History. 

Bible Study. — Old Testament. 

FOURTH YEAR. *'A'' CLASS. 
Mathematics. — Wentworth's Plane Geometry. 

Natural Science. — Carhart ind Chute's Elements of 
Physics; Gage's Physical Lab. Manual and Note Book. 



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so HOPE COLLEGE, 



Language. — 

English. — Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, 
and The Merchaot of Venice; Macaulay's Essay on Milton; 
Parsons' Versification; Essays. 

Latin. — Caesar; Cicero; Grammar and Composition. 

Greek. — White's Beginner's Greek Book. 

French. — Selections from French Authors. ) L^tj^nd^ 
German. — Selections from German Authors. ) Greek. 

Elocution. — Readings and Declamations. 

History. — Montgomery's Leading Facts of English His- 
tory. 

Civil Government. — Young's Government Class Book. 

Didactics. — White's Elements of Pedagogy. 

Bible Study. — Old Testament. 

Music. — In all the Classes. 

Special attention is given, during the whole of the Pre- 
paratory Course, to the grammars of the languages studied. 
For those who pursue English studies only, or who intend 
to discontinue at the end of the **A" year, the F.iculty pro- 
vide such additional branches as seem most expedient and 
profitable. To do the best work, it is necessary that the 
student's time is fully occupied in the work of the school. 

Those who take an English course only, select their 
studies, but are required to take at least fifteen recitations 
a week, as shall be approved by the Faculty. 

In general educational value, it is believed that the above 
four years' Course of Study is worthy of full recommenda- 
tion, whether for entrance into College, or for a professional 
training, or for a business life. 



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COURSE OF STUDY, 



tl 



dramtivatr ^cKool Dct^aKmcKt. 



D 


8:20—9:10. 


9:10—10:5 


10:5—11. 


11-12. 


1-2. 




U. S. History, 
10 weeks. 

Mathematics. 
16 weeks. 

Mathematics. 
10 weeks. 


Mathematics. 
10 weeks. 

English, 

26 weeks. 


Dutch. 

10 weeks. 

Reading, Pen- 
manship, and 
Essays, 

26 weeks. 


Phvs. Geog.. 
10 weeks. 
U.S Hist, 

6 weeks. 
[See afternoon 

10 weeks.] 
Eng. Hist., 
10 weeks. 


Book - Keep- 
ing. 

10 weeks. 
Singing, 
on Friday. 

Bible Study, 
on Friday. 


C 


8:20-9:10 


9:10—10:5. 


10:5-11. 


11-12. 


1—2. 




Dutch, 

16 weeks. 
Drawing, 

10 weeks. 

Phys. Geog., 
10 weeks. 


Gen. Hist., 
10 weeks. 

Mathematics, 
26 weeks. 


Latin, 

36 weeks. 

German. (S.C.) 
36 weeks. 


English, 

.36 weeks. 

11-12.. 


Bible Study, 
on Tuesday, 
throughout 
the year. 


B 


8:20-9:10. 


9:10—10:5. 


10:5-11. 


1-2. 




Latin. 

86 weeks. 

[German, (S.C.) 
in afternoon.] 


English, 

36 weeks. 


Physiology. 
10 weeks. 

Greek. 

26v(eekB. 

TFrench. (8.C.) 
36 weeks 


Greek Hist.. 

10 weeks. 
Dutch. 

6 weeks. 

Mathematics. 
20 weeks. 


Bible Study, 

Wednesday 

of each wk. 

French, 
26 weeks. 


A 


8:20-9:10. 


9:10—10:5. 


10:5-11. 


11—12. 


1—2. 




Greek, 

S6 weeks. 


Civil Govt, 
to weeks. 

English. 

6 weeks. 
Latin. 

20 weeks. 


Nat. Phil , 

22 weeks. 
English. 

4 weeks. 

^"^T^eeks. 


Mathematics. 

16 weeks. 
Eng. Hist.. 

10 weeks. 

English. 

10 weeks. 


Bible Study, 

on 

Thursday 

of 
each Week. 



The above Schedule shows the method of carrying out the Grammar School 
Course. 

Five Recitations a week are given to each branch, unless otherwise specified. 

Every class has one recitation a week in Bible Study. 

English in the Grammar School includes Rbetoricals once a week. 

The Lady Principal meets the young ladies every week for such studies or ex- 
ercises as she may select. 



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2t HOPE COLLEGE, 



TKe Work \w Detail. 



THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Iq its four years' course, the Grammar School prepares 
studeots for the Classical Department in the college or the 
university. Further, in order to meet the needs of those 
that do not expect to enter college, the course is made more 
comprehensive than would otherwise be necessary. To this 
end, special studies in Science, Book-keeping, Elocution, 
Music, Modern Languages, Theory and Art of Teaching, 
etc., are introduced, thus laying the foundation for a liberal 
and practical education. 

The several departments receive the same careful atten- 
tion as in the college proper, being ander the immediate 
care of the respective college professors. Those desiring to 
fit themselves for teaching can so select their studies as to 
obtain a first-class normal as well as academic training, in 
the Grammar School. 

HISTORY. 

PROF. HKNRY BOERS. 

The study of History begins in the **D" Class with that 
of our own country. This is followed by a course in Gen- 
eral History, which continues throughout the *'C'' and *»B" 
years, followed in the **A" Class by the History of England, 
In connection with this history work, the **A*' Class also 
takes up the study of Civil Government of the United 
States. 



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THE WORK IN DETAIL. 2S 



In the four college classes the study of history is con- 
tinued. Roman History, Mediaeval History, Modern His- 
tory, and Guizot's History of European Civilization, are 
taken up in the order named. 

In addition to the required reading, and the daily recita- 
tion work the members of each class are expected to use 
the library authorities in special study of topics embraced 
m the period under consideration. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROF. JOHN B. NYKERK. 

The course in the Preparatory Department is in accord- 
ance with the recommendations of " The Michigan Associa- 
tion of Colleges,' made at its meeting May 25, 1895. These 
recommendations are as follows: 1. That the several col- 
leges of the Association in their Entrance Requirements in 
English conform to the recommendations of ^*The English 
Conference of the Eastern and Middle States." 2. Further, 
that in the.se requirements they seek to develop in the pu- 
pils of the secondary schools the power of extempo- 
raneous speaking. 

Formal Grammar, Rhetoric, and Poetics are taught both 
directly, from text-books, and incidentally, in the analytical 
study of the classics of literature, critical study is comple- 
mented by constructive work, and the careful correction of 
essays is deemed of the highest importance. 

In the College, the history and development of English 
Literature is studied in the Sophomore year with the aid of 
a manual, supplemented by reports furnished by the dififer- 
ent members of the class. The above work is pursued, 
however, for the purpose of giving direction to the thor- 
ough study of the great masterpieces, and has for its ulti- 
mate object the development, in the student, of a critical 
taste and literary consciousness. 



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S4 HOPE COLLEGE. 



MATHEMATICS. 

PROP. J. H. KI^EINHEKSEL. 

The Preparatory course in Mathematics embraces Arith- 
metic, Algebra, and Geometry. In the "D" year, Olney's 
School Arithmetic is made a thorough study; in the **C," 
Advanced Arithmetic is taken up, finishing the subject of 
Arithmetic at the close of the second term. 

Algebra is taken up the third term of the **C," and fin- 
ished at the end of the '*B" year. 

In the **A" year Plane Geometry is completed. 

In all these both facility in computation, and thorough- 
ness and breadth of information are made the aim of the 
instruction, so as to lay a broad foundation for futui-e study 
in Mathematics. 

The Freshmen take Mensuration and finish Solid Geome- 
try the first term, Plane Trigonometry the second, and fin- 
ish Spherical Trigonometry the third term. In the first 
term, Sophomore, College Algebra is made a study, after 
which Analytical Geometry and Calculus finish the course 
of pure Mathematics in the second term of the Junior year. 

LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROF. JAMBS G. SUTPHEN. 

In the Grammar School, Latin is begun with the "C 
Class, and continues in the **B" and **A" years. The Ro- 
man method of pronunciation is used. The student is, as 
soon as practicable, introduced to the simple stories in 
**Viri Romae*' and carefully drilled in the rudiments of the 
Grammar. In CsBsar and Cicero much attention is given to 
the Sequence of Tenses, Conditional Sentences, Oratio Obli- 
qua. and the Subjunctive Mood. Throughout the course, 
exercises are given in rendering English into Latin, based 
upon the texts read. 



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JHE WOBK IN DETAIL. £S 

In the College, Latin is studied during parts of the first 
three years. The study of the Grammar, by analyzing sen- 
tences, is not neglected in the effort to present the authors 
in their literary character. 

GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROP. J. H. GILLESPIE. 

Until the end of the Freshman year excercises in Prose 
Composition, oral or written, are required daily as essential 
to fluency and accuracy and simple conversations are fre- 
quently carried on as a useful auxiliary. The aim through- 
out is to make the course thorough and as far as possible, 
interesting. Where classes are prepared for it important 
portions of the author with which they have become familiar 
are read to them. A list of the authors read may be seen 
under **Course of Study" in tnis catalogue. 

MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE. 
PROF, e: a. whitenack. 

In the Grammar School, German may be substituted for 
Greek, and French for Latin, hour for hour, by those who 
desire to take the Scientific Course. 

In the College, French is studied during portions of the 
Freshman and Sophomore years; German, portions of the 
Junior and Senior years. 

In both French and German considerable attention is 
given to the ** Natural Method," — to easy, elementary read- 
ing, and to conversation. 

DUTCH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 
PROF. C. DOESBURG. 

Many students of Hope College come from Holland 
homes, and use that language in common life. Moreover, 



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£6 HOPE COLLEGE. 



said language will, for many years to come, continue in use 
in the pulpits and in religious meetings in nearly all of the 
Reformed churches in the particular Synod of Chicago, and 
in many of our churches East. Hence, it is deemed neces- 
sary that instruction in the Dutch Grammar and Literature 
be given in Hope College as follows : In the "D, '* *'C,'* 
and »*B'' Classes of the Grammar School, and in the Fresh- 
man Class of the College Department. 

PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY. 

PROF. DOUWK B. YNTHMA. 

In connection with preparatory Physics two hours labor- 
atory work is required each week. 

A course in Trigonometry should precede the course in 
College Physics. 

The Course in Chemistry for the Sophomore Class con- 
sists of daily recitations and four hours' laboratory work 
each week for 26 weeks. Each student is required to make 
an accurate record of all the experiments performed by him 
in the Laboratory, giving all the reactions involved, and con- 
clusions reached from personal observation. 

ETHICS AND EVIDENCES OF CHRISTIANITY. 
PROF. J. TALLMADGE BERGEN. 

The Bible is studied as the inspired book of the Kingdom 
of God. This is begun in the Grammar School with the 
**D" Clats, and the Old Testament is covered during the 
four years of the course. The only text-book used is the 
English translation. (Students are advised to purchase the 
^'Parallel Bible," the authorized and rpsvised versions). 
Lectures are given to introduce each book, and the Scrip- 
tures of the Old Testament are taught in their relation to 
the Kingdom of God and Redemption. 



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THE WORK IN DETAIL, 27 

The New Testament is begun in the Freshman year. 
The history of the English versions of the Bible and Intro 
duction to the books of the New Testament are studied from 
'^Ellicott's Books of the Bible." Running parallel with 
this is a course in the life of Jesus Christ, which continues 
during the PVeshman year. The Introduction to the Acts, 
the Epistles, and Revelation, and studies in their text con- 
tinue throughout the Sophomore and Junior years. With 
this foundation the Seniors study Evidences of Christianity, 
using ' ' Fisher's Manual." The purpose of this course is not 
only a scientific knowledge of Scripture and Christianity, 
but also effort is made to lay them upon the heart and make 
them the rule of life. 

Pending the establishment of the Chair of Mental Sci- 
ence, Logic and Psychology are taught in this department 
in the Junior year. The text-book of Ethics is Porter's 
** Elements of Moral Science. " This is begun in the last 
term of the Junior year and continued during the first term 
of the Senior. A thesis is required of each Senior at the 
close of the second term. 

BIOLOGY. 

In the Preparatory Course a term's work is given to Hu 
man Physiology. In the College Course, the Freshman 
Class takes one term's work each in Botany and Zoology, 
and the Sophomore one term in General Biology. 

PHILOSOPHY, ETC. 

Ethical Science is studied in the Junior year ; and Psy- 
chology in the Senior year. The President is in charge of 
these branches. The text-books used are supplemented by 
free discussions on these subjects, and by the practical ap- 
plication of acquired knowledge in preparing essays. 



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U HOPE COLLEGE. 



A course is given in Logic in the Junior year; while the 
Seniors are made acquainted with the subject of Political 
Economy by means of text-books, discussions, and lectures. 

ELOCUTION AND ORATORY. 
PROFS. NYKERK AND BBRGBN. 

Attention is given to voice, gesture, and rendering in all 
the Classes. The aim is to learn to speak with ease and 
grace, so that one may speak with comfort to himself and 
with pleasure to the hearer. 



From this << Work in Detail, ' ' as well as from the 
'^Courses of Study," it will be seen that Hope College is, 
first of all, offering a liberal Classical course, which will 
serve as an adequate foundation upon which to build pro- 
fessional courses, which, in turn, prep.re for the more 
active and practical duties of life. 

The time is fast coming, and we shall hail the day, when 
such a foundation of a liberal classical course will be gener- 
ally required as a preparation for all professional studies. 



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ADMISSION. 29 



ADMI55ION. 



COLLEGE. 

For admission into the Freshman Class a full certificate 
of Graduation from the Grammar School Department is re- 
quired, or an examination of the studies pursued in that De- 
partment, or in what the Faculty shall deem an equivalent. 

Students may enter an advanced class either at the be- 
ginning of the College year or at other times, provided they 
sustain a satisfactory examination both on the preliminary 
studies and on those already passed over by the class which 
they propose to enter. If received on condition, students 
may in certain cases be permitted to recite with the class, 
but ail conditions must be removed before regular admis- 
sion. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

An effort is being made to raise the standard of the in- 
stitution, aiid, accordingly, the requirements for admission 
to the <'D" Class have been advanced. 

Pupils holding a so-called <* Eighth Grade Diploma" will 
be admitted to the above class without examination, pro- 
vided that the general average stands at 85 or over, and 
the standing in any one branch be not under 75 ; while ap- 
plicants not holding such certificate, will be subjected to 
a strict examination in the common school branches, includ- 
ing Arithmetic, English Grammar and Composition, United 
States History, Geography, (not including Physical). Read- 
ing and Orthography. The examination will be graded ac- 
cording to the requirements of the aforesaid diploma. 

In order to enter any advanced class, it will be neces- 
sary for the applicant to pass an examination in the studies 
previously pursued by the class. If received on conditions, 
these must be fulfilled before regular admission. 



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so ' HOPE COLLEGE, 



Mi^scellaKeoM^ iKfomvatioK. 



LOCATION. 



Holland is a city of nearly 8,000 inhabitants, and is cen- 
trally located on the Chicago &West Michigan railway. Three 
or more daily trains afiford direct connection with the lead- 
ing cities East, and as many with Chicago and other points 
West. Tt is on a straight line from Grand Rapids to Chica- 
go, distant from the former city 25 miles, and from the 
latter 110 miles. When navigation is open, it also has con- 
nection with Chicago by a daily line of steamboats. It is 
therefore most desirably located, having both land and water 
communications, being near the shore of Lake Michigan, 
with which it is connected by a beautiful sheet of water, 
called Macatawa Bay, and on which are the popular summer 
resorts, Macatawa Park and Ottawa Beach. 



GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 

The College Campus lies between Tenth and Twelfth 
streets, in the centre of the city, and contains sixteen acres, 
with an addition of two acres on the south side of Twelfth 
street. It presents a finely varied surface, well shaded with 
native trees, and is annually improving in beauty and at- 
tractiveness. 

The College buildings are eight in number. Van Vleck 
Hall is mainly devoted to dormitory purposes. 

The new Graves Library and Winants Chapel building, 
in which are also found a President's room, a reading room, 
a Y. M. C. A. Hall, and four lecture rooms, affords such 
suitable and improved accommodations, that every one con- 
nected with the College cannot but feel grateful to the kind 
friends whose generosity made the erection of it a possi- 
bility. 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFOBMATION. SI 



SCHOOL YEAR. 

The scholastic year of forty weeks begins on the third 
Wednesday in Septemb r, and ends with the general Com- 
mencement on the fourth Wednesday in June. 

The winter and spring vacations are fixed by the General 
Faculty. (See Calendar.) 



ADVANTAGES OFFERED. 

Besides the advantages of location, easy communication, 
and inexpensive living, it is believed Hope College may 
justly call attention to equally important advantages of a 
very different nature. 

It is true, the Institution is growing, but the classes are 
not so large as to preclude that personal acquaintance, and 
contact and influence of each member of the Faculty with 
every student coming under his instruction, which parents 
are apt to consider in making choice of an institution. This 
personal element, made possible in a smaller institution, is 
a factor of great educational value both morally and intel- 
lectually. 

Hope College is not a local institution. Its students 
represent an extensive territory, extending Kast as far a.s 
the state of New York, and West as far as the Dakotas. 
The students are, in the main, the best pupils from many 
public schools and in general possess a high order of ability 
and a laudable ambition to make their way in the world. 
This makes them desirable companions, inviting their fel- 
lows to friendly competition and industrious study. 

By a division of the work peculiar to Hope College, the 
same experienced instructors teach in bqth Grammar School 
and College, placing the student in Latin or Greek, etc., for 
six consecutive years or more under the same man ; thus 



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Sg HOPE COLLEGE. 



practically making a six years' instead of four years' course. 

It is a chartered Institution, incorporated under the laws 
of the state and legally entitled to grant certificates and 
diplomas. 

It offers great improvements in science teaching, but it 
is no less a classical school than in former years. The 
change means more of science but not less of classics. 

Under the new law relative to the granting of certifi- 
cates by Denominational colleges, Hope College will soon be 
prepared to offer, besides the usual Diploma, a legal certifi- 
cate authorizing the holder thereof to teach in any of the 
Public Schools of Michigan. 

It will be seen, therefore, that Hope College offers and 
secures a regular liberal course of training as complete as 
can be found in most of our Western colleges. 



COURSE OP STUDY. 

Most of the students seek a ''liberal education, " leading 
to the degree of A. B. — A ''partial" or "elective" course is 
offered to all who so desire, and facilities are furnished 
through the regular instructors; but a partial course enti- 
tles only to a certificate, and not to a diploma. German 
and French, or Drawing and Painting, can be studied at any 
time, as also the branches generally called '^scientific," fit- 
ting the student for professional courses in a University. 

Since 1878 the institution has been open to women. 
They enter the regular classes, and attend the same lectures 
and recitations as the young men. 

Vocal music is provided without charge. Lessons in in- 
strumental music can be secured at the expense of the 
pupil. 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFOEMATION, 33 

EXAMINATIONS. 
In both departments, written examinations are held at 
the close of each term, or whenever a subject is completed. 
When practicable, the examinations at the close of the year, 
or whenever a branch of study is finished, cover the entire 
text-book. The next examination for admission will be held 
the day before the new school year opens, viz., on Tuesday, 
September 15th, 1896, at 9 o'clock A. M. 



CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS. 

Members of the "A" Class, upon graduation in full 
course, are entitled to a regular Certificate, signed by the 
Council and the Faculty; but said certificate will be marked 
**First," *»Second," or *' Third Grade," as follows: When 
the average standing of the graduate is from 90 to 100, this 
will indicate the ''First Grade;" when from 80 to 90, the 
**Second;" and from 70 to 80, the * 'Third;" reference being 
made to both recitations and examinations. 

Such students as are admitted in partial course, or who 
fall below an average standing of 70, are entitled to a Cer 
tificate, from the Faculty, naming the studies in which they 
have sustained examinations. 

Graduates from the College, when recommended by the 
Faculty, receive a Diploma, with the degree of A. B., being 
a testimonial of general scholarship. The course leading 
thereto includes such branches as are usually taught in 
similar Institutions. A partial course is sometimes chosen, 
and is entitled to a Certificate as adjudged by the Faculty. 

The degree of A. M. is conferred upon those who con- 
tinue their studies for three years after graduation, or who 
may satisfy the Council, by a thesis, as to their scholastic 
attainments. By paying a fee of three dollars, an A. M. 
diploma in such cases will be given. 



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34 HOPE COLLEGE. 



RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

The exercises of each day begin with prayer in Winants 
Chapel at 8 o'clock A. M. 

On the Sabbath every student is expected to worship 
regularly with one of the churches in the city or vicinity, 
unless excused by the President. 

Religious instruction is given in all the classes regularly, 
and like all the other studies, is in charge of the Faculty. 

Although Hope College is denominational, and is under 
the patronage and support of the Reformed Church in 
America, yet, by the law of its incorporation, it can have no 
'^religious test." The doors are open, and welcome is given 
to all who submit to its scholastic regulations. As a Chris- 
tian school, however, it inculcates gospel truths, and de- 
'mands a consistent moral character and deportment. 



LIBRARY, READING ROOM, ETC. 

The Library which already numbers over 9000 volumes 
is, by a munificent donation of a friend of education, about 
to be increased to over 20,000 volumes — all free for the use 
of the students. Books and pamphlets, as well as maga- 
zines and papers, are constantly added. The friends of 
Hope College may be assured that their gifts of valuable 
books to the library will be taken care of, and appreciated, 
and made useful by giving them a place upon the ample 
shelves of the magnificent fire proof Library building. 

In connection with the Library is a Reading Room, sup- 
plied with many valuable periodicals and leading journals on 
politics, religion, science and literature. These can be con- 
sulted on any day when the college is iu session, but may 
not be withdrawn from the room. 

Laboratory and Philosophical Apparatus for lecture 
room use is growing in value and completeness. Donations, 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. SH 



by the graduates and friends of the Institution, of maps, 
charts, instruments, and specimens of Natural History, are 
solicited, with the assurance that all such will materially 
add to the eflBciency of the work which Hope College is doing. 



MUSIC. 

The Glee Club, under the direction of Prof. J. B. Nykerk, 
meets once a week, and receives drill in Voice Culture, and 
Choral Singing. A primary class in Theory and Sight- 
singing is conducted by Mr. Floris Ferwerda. To these 
classes all students are admitted without charge. 

Further, fine opportunities are afforded for the study of 
Piano and Voice. Messrs. Post and Campbell of Grand 
Rapids, two of the most pt-ominent and competent musicians 
in the state, each have large classes of private pupils in 
their respective departments. For terms, etc., apply for 
special circulars to Prof. J. B. Nykerk. 



SOCIETIES. 

Five Literary Societies are found in the Institution: 
The MeliphoHy the Cosmopolitan, the Fraternal, and the 
UlJUas Club have been maintained for years, and offer de- 
cided advantages to their respective members, and materi- 
ally aid in the attainment of that culture, which it is the 
object of this school to promote. The Ulfilas Club seeks to 
secure for its members greater proficiency in the use of the 
Holland language. And the G. M. S. Society has recently 
been organized by the young ladies, for the purpose of en- 
joying free discussion and obtaining experience in conduct- 
ing more public meetings. 

The Young Men 's Christian Association has an active 
and associate membership of one hundred and twenty-five. 



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^6- HOPE COLLEGE. 



It continues to be a great blessing to the students, and 
proves to be very helpful to the College. 



PUBLICATIONS. 

Connected with the Institution, a religious weekly is 
published, called De Hope. It was established in 1866, and 
is under the direction of the Council, through its Editorial 
Committee. The paper has a circulation of over 3100 
copies. 

A monthly, called The Anchor, is conducted by the stu- 
dents with gratifying success. It has reached its eighth 
year, and owing to the excellent spirit with which it is man- 
aged and edited, it is very helpful to the College, and is cal- 
culated to awaken an esprit de corps among its Alumni. 



PRIZES. 



The Oratorical Exercises of the Grammar School, on the 
final Monday of the college year, is the Commencement of 
that Department, and marks the graduation of the **A" 
class. 

In 1887 were established the two * 'George Birkhoff, Jr.. 
Prizes," each of twenty-five dollars; one for the Sophomore 
Class, in English Literature, and the other for the Fresh- 
man Class, in Dutch Literatare. At the last Commence- 
ment they were awarded by the Committees, as follows: 
For the best examination passed in English Literature to 
Gustave Watermuelder; for the best examination passed in 
Dutch Literature to Corn. Kuyper. 

In 1894 two new prizes were added to the list pf annual 
awards, one of $15.00 for the best, and the other of $10.00 
for the second best examination in English Grammar and 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. S7 

Orthography, open to all the members of the *»C" class. At 
the last Commencement the first prize was awarded to John 
Steunenberg, and the second to Oswald W. Visscher. These 
were established by Mr. Henry Bosch, of Chicago, III. Other 
friends have given prizes for Drawing, from year to year. 
Last year four prizes were awarded respectively to Miss 
Maggie Gruttrup, Henry J. Van den Berg, John Nywen- 
ning and Miss Katie Vyn. 

We trust that additional prizes will follow, as a stimulus 
to labor in other branches of study. 



EXPENSES. 

The city is surrounded by a rich agricultural region, and 
the cost of living in Holland is cheap. Good board and 
rooms may be had in families of the city for from two to 
three dollars per week; in clubs, and without furnished 
rooms, at lower rates. 

There are twenty rooms in Van Vleck Hall, in the selec- 
tion of which students for the ministry have the preference. 
These are furnished in part, and bear a moderate charge. 

As yet no tuition fees have been charged, but every 
student must pay to the Treasurer, in advance^ an incidental 
fee of six dollars per term. 

The graduation, fee is five dollars in the college, and two 
and one<half dollars in the Grammar School. No other 
charges are made. 

Young people of noble aspirations but of limited means 
need not be discouraged. At Hope College they will find 
many like themselves, some of whom have come a great dis- 
tance seeking an education. Such as these are in earnest, 
content with plain living, and, by practicing the economies 
that are possible in this place, succeed in reducing their 
expenses within marvelously narrow limits. 



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S8 HOPE GOLLEOE. 



Here is an estimate of the necessary expenditure, ex- 
clusive of clothiug and travel, which each can determine for 
himself, for one year in the Preparatory Course: 

Board (at the Club), - - $ 60.00 

Room rent (two rooming together), - 20.00 

Books $10, Washing $10, Light $3, - - . 23.00 

Fuel $7, Fees $18, - - - 25.00 



Total, - $128.00 

The above estimate is an answer to those who want to 
know how much money is absolutely needed, and is intended 
as a reply to that oft-repeated question. Of course the ex- 
pense of most of the students exceeds this amount. 

Many parents, having children to educate, find it to 
their advantage to come to this city to live. To such it 
may be truthfully said, that Holland is a growing, enter- 
prising city — one of the most prosperous and beautiful in 
Michigan. With its broad, straight, and shady streets, its 
water works, and its electric illumination, Holland is equally 
well adapted to the life of quiet retirement, and to that of 
the active business man. 



DISCIPLINE. 

It is gratifying to observe that the moral and spiritual 
tone of the students is such that the matter of discipline is 
reduced to a minimum. General opinion is on the side of 
right and reasonableness, and lends its powerful support to 
the interest of good order and efficient work. To develop 
this high moral culture and character of the student, it is 
the aim of Hope College to cultivate no less than to advance 
his intellectual development. 

In general, however, if it appears that students do not 
improve their time and opportunities, or do not conduct 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. SB 

themselves in a respectful and orderly manner, their connec- 
tion with the Institution is suspended, or if it should be 
found, after due probation and inquiry, that the influence 
of a student is bad and injurious to others, the right is ex- 
ercised of requiring the withdrawal of such student. It 
is proper to add that within recent date no such case has 
occurred. 

The students are required to be present, pnnnptly^ on 
the first day of each and every term. The recitations will 
begin the next morning. 

A record is kept of the scholastic standing of each stu- 
dent, and a copy of the same is sent to the parent or guar- 
dian; if the average standing, in any term, does not exceed 
70, on a basis of 100, he is to be dropped from his class. 

Term fees and room rent are to be paid strictly in ad- 
vance, and if not so paid, or within one month, the student 
neglecting forfeits his right to continue in the Institution. 

Boarding houses and boarding clubs in the city are to 
be approved by the Faculty, and to be subject to such reg- 
ulations as are usual in similar institutions. By a rule of 
the College, lady students are not to room in the same 
boarding houses with gentlemen. 

Dancing and card-playing is prohibited, and also the use 
of tobacco on on the College Campus. 

Parents are requested not to ask or expect their children 
to come home during term time. It seriously interferes 
with proper habits of study, and by our rules none are to 
be absent from the Institution without permission of the 
President. 



TO ALUMNI AND FRIENDS. 

Hope College Is grateful to the Reformed Church in 
America, whose she is, and whom she so loyally serves by 



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40 HOPE COLLEGE. 



the men she is furnishing both for the Domestic and the 
Foreign Field. 

Hope College is grateful to her Alumni and to all who 
were at any time connected with the College as students, 
for the faithful work they are doing ; wherever they are 
practicing their professions, they show that they are 
'* Workmen that need not be ashamed ; " — grateful for the 
growing interest they manifest by making known the merits 
of their Alma Mater, and by inspiring deserving young 
men to seek the same educational advantages. 

Hope College is grateful to royal and liberal friends who 
here invest their money, not in dead and fleeting things, 
but in brain and character and souls of men. Be assured, 
nowhere else will your well-earned money yield larger re- 
turns, in no other way can you render better service for 
your Church and for your Country. 

With such encouragements as these, Hope College feels 
hopeful for the future. She will try to still deserve your 
favor and your liberality. You have yonng friends, — con- 
tinue to send us their names, if they are studious and de- 
serving, especially the names of such as are not likely to 
othenjoise ever receive a good education. 



GYMNASIUM. 

Classes in dumb-bells, Indian clubs, chest- weights, etc. , 
are held daily at such hours as best to accommodate the 
students. The gymnasium proves very helpful to the physi- 
cal development of the the students. By a proper use of 
the advantages offered in this direction, they acquire the 
physical strength needed to endure the mental strain inci- 
dent to student life. 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 41 

MUSEUM. 

Valuable gifts are, from time to time, received from 
Alumni and friends of the Institution. Others, desiring to 
enrich this department, are only waiting till the College 
shall have a suitable building for the safekeeping of such 
collections. 

Here is a grand opportunity for some lover of natural 
history, and a friend of Christian education, to immor- 
talize his name by erecting such a building. 



PROFESSORSHIP. 

By the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Voorhees, a 
Professorship of Greek has been established. 

And by the liberality of Mr. Robert Schell the College 
now has a Professorship of E&hics and Evidences of Chris- 
tianity. 

Other friends are considering the endowing of Profes- 
sorships. 



BEQUESTS AND DONATIONS. 

The corporate name of the College is : * * The Council of 
Hope College," a Corporation located at Holland, Michigan. 

Bequests and donations are invited to found Scholarships 
to aid worthy students, to endow Professorships, to estab- 
lish a Library fund, and for additional buildings. 



The past year has been a prosperous one in the history 
of the College. The enlargement of the Faculty has especi- 
ally strengthened the Institution as a Christian school. 

It is the aim of the College to offer to young people an 
opportunity to acquire a liberal education at a moderate 
expense, and to surround them with wholesome Christian 
influences. 



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^ 



4g HOPE COLLEGE, 



HONORARY DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1895. 

LL. D. — Rsv. Giles H. Mandeyills, D. D. 
D. D.— Rev. Julius W. Geteb. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 

President, Rev. W. G. Baas. 

Vic5e President, - Dr. B. J. De Vbies. 

Secretary, - • Prof. J. H. Kleinheksel. 
Treasurer, - Hon. Abend Vissoheb. 



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CKroKological Mehtxol-aKcia. 



Beginning of the Netherland Immigration into Michigan, Iowa, etc 1847 

Village of Holland laid out 1848 

Flye acres donated by Rev. A. C. Van Raalte, D. D., as a site for an Academy . .1860 

*'Plone€r School'' opened, Mr. W. T. Taylor, Principal Oct., 1861 

Placed under the care of the General Synod June, 1863 

Mr. W. T. Taylor resigned Oct, 1858 

Rev. F. B. Beidler, Principal 1854 

Rev. John Van Vleck, Principal 1856 

The school named the Holland Academy 1855 

Van Vleck Hall erected on "The five acres" 1867 

The Academy more fully organized 1867-1858 

Rev. John Van Vleck, resigned 1869 

Rev. Philip Phelps. Jr., Principal 1869 

Campus enlarged to 16 acres 18h9 

"Oggel House" erected as a residence 1800 

Gymnasium built, largely by students 1862 

A Freshman Class Formed, 10 in number 1868 

A "Board of Superintendents'* appointed by General Synod 186S 

A C?/^^ proposed, and approved by the Synods 1864 

Oyer 840.000 contributed as an endowihent 1865 

Hope College begun, 1865; incorporated May, 1866 

Faculty of six appointed and organized; Rev. P. Phelps. Jr., D. D., Pres., July, 1866 

First Commencement; eight became A. B 1866 

A weekly newspaper, Dg Hofe, established 1866 

Theological instruction begun, with a class of seven Sept., 1866 

Rev. £. C. Crispell, D. D., elected Professor of Theology; Profs. Phelps, Oggel, 

Beck, and Scott being elected "Lectors" 1867 

The Theological Department adopted by General Synod as its "Western Theo- 
logical Seminary" .-..1869 

Death of Rev Peter J. Oggel, Professor, and Editor of De Hope Dec, 1869 

First Theological Class of seven graduated 1869 

First Formal Constitution of the College adopted 1871 

C. Doesburg, A. M., elected Professor 1872 

Brick printing office for Z>« ^<i!/»r erected 1876 

Death of Rev. A. C. Van Raalte, D. D Nov. 7,1876 

Suspension of the Theological Department. . ^ June, 1877 

Reorganization of the College: Dr. Phelps resigns June, 1878 

Rev. O. H. MandevlUe, D. D., Provisional President and Financial Agent; 

Prof. C. Scott. Vice President 1878 

Wm. A. Shields, A M., and G. J. Kollen, A. M. elected Professors 1878 

Prof. Charles Scott, D. D., Provisional President 1880 

Theological Instruction restored; a Professorship of 830,000 completed; Rev. 

N. M. Steffens, D. D., Professor of Theology 1884 

H. Boers, A. M.; J. H. Kleinheksel, A. M.; J. G. Sutphen, A. M. and Rev. John 

J. Anderson, A. M., elected professors 1885 

Election of Prof. Charles Scott, D. D., as Constitutional President 1886 



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U HOPE COLLEGE. 



President Scott Inaugurated 1880 

Synod's House for the President erected 1888 

First number of TAe Anchor issued May, 1887 

Rev. James F. Zwemer appointed Financial Agent 1888 

Rev. J. H. Gillespie, A. M., elected Professor 1888 

Quarter Centennial Celebration June 26^ 1880 

Graves Library and Winanta Chapel begun; comer stone laid Oct. 12, 1802 

President Scott resigns; 1899 

Prof. G. J. Kollen, A.M., elected President ..June 29. 1898 

D.B.Yntema, A.M., elected Prof eesor 1808 

ErastusA. Whltenack, A. B., elected Professor 188S 

Death of Prof . Charles Scott, li. D Oct81.1808 

Graves Library and Winants Chapel dedicated June 26, 189i 

President Kollen inaugurated. June 27, 1884 

J. B. Nykerk, A. M., elected Professor 1896 

J. T. Bergen, A. M., elected Professor 1806 

A. F. Harvey, A. B., elected Tutor 1896 



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WE5TCi^N 
Tl\eologlcal ^mlKairy 

or THE 

l^efortivecl CKxircK Ik Ahxerica. 



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1 



46 HOPE COLLEGE. 



Calehclar. 



Sept. 3. Entrance Examinations. 

" 4. Term Opens. 

Nov. 27. Thanksgiving Recess begins. 

Dec. 20. Beginning of Christmas Recess. 

1896. 

Jan. 7. Work Resumed. 

" 30. Prayer for Colleges. 

Apr. 28. Meeting of Board of Superintendents. 

'* 27-29. Examinations. 

'* 29. Commencement Exercises in Evening. 

VACATION. 

Sept. 1. Entrance Examinations. 

'' 2. Term Begins. 

Nov. 26. Thanksgiving Recess begins. 

Dec. . 18. Beginning of Christmas Recess. 

1897. 

Jan. 5. Work Resumed. 



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WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 47 



Board of 5u^riKtehclchtA. 



EX-OFPICIO. 
Oesrrit J. KOLLEN, LL. D., - President of Hope College. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF NEW YORK. 

1808. Rev. p. S. Schenok, D. D., - - Hudson, N. Y. 

FROM THE SYNOD CfF ALBANY. 

1899. Rev. E. a. Collier, D. D., - - Klnderhook, N. Y. 

FROM THE SYNOD OP NEW BRUNSWICK. 

1897. Rev. A. Paige Peeke, - - East Millstone, N. J. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF CHICAGO. 

1899. Rev. P. Moerdyke, D.D., - - - Chicago, 111. 

1898. Rev. A. Buursma, - - - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

1897. Rev. J. P. De Jonge, - - . . Zeeland, Mich. 

1898. Elder D. J. De JONGE, .... Roseland, III. 

1899. Elder F. J. Cushing, - - - Irving Park, 111. 

1900. Elder John Snitzler, - - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF DAKOTA. 

1899. Rev. S. J. Harmeling, - - Westfield, N. Dakota. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OP GRAND RIVER. 

1896. *Rbv. E. W. Stapelkamp, - - Kalamazoo Mich. 

FROM the CLASSIS OF HOLLAND. 

1898. Rev. J. Vander Meulen, D. D., - Holland, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF ILLINOIS. 

1897. Rev. J. H. Van den Hook, - - - Chicago, 111. 

FROM the CLASSIS OF IOWA. 

1899. Rev. J. P. ZWBMER, - - - Orange, City, la. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF MICHIGAN. 

1899. Rev. John A. De Spelder, - Constantine, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF PLEASANT PRAIRIE. 

1898. Rev. J. Muller, - - - German Valley, 111. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF WISCONSIN. 

1899. Rev. J. Broek. .... South Holland, III. 
*Appoiiited for vacancy. 



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48 HOPE COLLEGE. 



Facxiky. 



REV. JOHN W. BEARD8LEE, D. D., 

President of the Faculty and Professor of Biblical Languac^es 

and Literature. 

REV. HENRY E. DOSKER, D. D., 
Seretary of the Faculty and Professor of Historical Theology. 
In charge of Hermeneutics and Harmony of 
the Gospels. 

REV. EGBERT WINTER, D. D., 

Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theology. In charge of 

Practical Theology. 



OFFICEBS OF THE BOARD: 

Rbv. E. Winter, D. D., President. 
Rev. p. Moerdyke, D. D., Stated Clerk. 



COMMITTEE ON RECEPTION OF STUDENTS 
AND EXAMINATIONS. 

Rev. J. W. Beardslee, D. D., 
Rev. H. E. Dosker, D. D., 
Rev. E. Winter, D. D., 
Rev. a. Buursma, 
Rev. J. P. De Jonqe. 



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WESTERN THEOLOGICAL 8EMINABY. 



49 



^t\ic|eht3« 



Henry Huizinga, 
WiKTjE T. Janssen, 
William Miedema, 
John Schaefer, 



SENIOR class. 
Hope College, 1893. 
Hope College, 1893. 
Hope College, 1893. 
Hope College, 1893. 



Holland, Mich. 

ForestOD, 111. 

Vri68laz>d, Mich. 

Oregon, 111. 

Orange City, la. 



John W. Te Paske, 

Hope College (special), 1893. 

William Wolvius, Grand Rapids, Mich 

Theological School, Grand Rapids, 1893. 



middle class. 

Martinus E. Broekstra, Hospers, la. 

Theological School, Kampeo. 



DOUWE De Groot, 



Cornelius A. Jongewaard, 

Iowa College, 1893. 

Peter Swart, 

Hope College, 1894. 

John W. Te Selle, 

Hope College (special), 1894. 

Aart Van Arendonk, Harrison, S Dakota. 

Hope College (special), 1894. 



Holland, Mich. 
Orange City, la. 
Chicago, 111. 
Holland, Neb. 



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60 HOPE COLLEGE, 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Albert W. De Jonqe, Grand RapidB, Mich. 

National Educational Diploma, Netherlands. 

Harm Dykhuizen, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Hope Ck>llege, 1896. 

Johannes Enqelsman, Chicago, 111. 

Hope Ck>l]ege (special), 1895. 

Harke Frxelinq, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Theological Schoolf Grand Rapids, 1895. 

WlLlilAM GBUYS, Midddlehurg, la. 

Hope Gollego (special), 1895. 

BtatfAMiN Hoffman, GTerisel, Mieh. 

Hope €k>llege, 1886. 



SUMMARY. 

Senior Class 6 

MmlXLB Class (T 

Junior ClasCi 5 

18 



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WE8TEBN THEOLOGICAL 8EMINABY. 61 



CoMr-Ae of vii\«4y. 



JUNIOI^ YEAR. 



PROF. BEARDSLEE. 

EXEQETICAL THEOLOGY. 

Elements of Hebrew. Grammatical Forms, Inductive 
Study, based on reading of t)ie te^t. Selections from the 
Pentateuch. 

In Greek. — Acts of the Apostles. 

PROF. DOSKEi^, 

Greek Harmony and Exegesis of the Qospels. Araheol- 
ogy. Sacred Geography Hermeneutics (Terry's). Orgai^ie 
Unity of the Sacred Scriptures. Biblical Syml:K>Usm. 

HISTORICAL. THEOLOGY. 

Sacred History (Kurtz). General Scope of Revelation. 
Contrast between Judaeism aQd Paganism. Rise and Devel- 
opment of the Kingdom of God. Comparative Data of Sa- 
cred and Profane History. 

PROF. WINTER. 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY. 

Introduction . Encyclopedia. Symbolics. 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY. 

Theory of Preaching. Analysis of Sermons. Homileti- 
cal Exercises. 



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62 HOPM COLLEGE. 



MIDDLE YEAR. 



PROP. BEARDSLEE. 
EXEGETICAL. THEOLOGY. 

Hebrew Etymology and Syntax. Old Testament Intro- 
duction. Messianic Prophecy. Readings from Historical 
Books. 

In Greek. — Exegetical Study of the Epistle to the 
Hebrews, and Corinthians. Sight Reading. Book of Reve- 
lation and PauFs Minor Epistles. 

PROP. DOSKER. 

HISTORICAL THEOLOGY. 

Primitive History of the Church. Christ and His 
Apostles. Ancient and Mediaeval Church History. Struggle 
between the Roman Empire and the Church. Victory of 
the latter. Contact between Philosophy and Theology. 
Life and Morals of the Church. Sects, Schools, and Heresies 
Ascetisism and Fanaticism. The Dawn of the Reformation. 

PROP. WINTER. 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY. 

Lectures. Theology Proper. Anthropolgy. Objective 
Soteriology. 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY. 

Homiletics. Church Government. Pastoral Theology. 
Lectures. 



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WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 5S 



SENIOR YEAR. 



PROP. BEARDSLEE. 

Hebrew Prophetical and Poetical Books. Selections 
from Historical Books. Aramaic. 

In Greek. — Introduction to New Testament. Exegetical 
Study of Romans and Writings of John. Sight Reading 
from Pastoral and Catholic Epistles. 

PROF. DOSKER. 
HISTORICAL THEOLOGY. 

The Reformation. The Age of Symbols. Doctrinal 
struggles in the Protestant Church. Catholic Reaction. 
Deformation and Protestant Scholasticism. Rise and 
Development of Rationalism. Deism and Atheism. Sec- 
tarianism. Missions. The Church of Christ and Christian 
Society in the 19th Century. 

PROP. WINTER. 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY. 

Lectures. Subjective Soteriology. Ecclesiology. Escha- 
tology. Apologetics. Ethics. Review of the whole System. 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY. 

Homiletics. Homiletical Exercises. Pastoral Theology. 
Catechetics. Church Government. Theory of Missions. 



N. B.— Church Government, Ethics, Catechetics, Theory of Mis- 
sions, and Homiletics are divided between Middle and Senior Year. 



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deheral iKfomxatioK. 



ADMISSION. 

The Seminary is open for the admission of students 
from every denomination of Christians. 

A Committee of the Board of Superintendents, on the 
reception of students, meets on the first Tuesday in Sep- 
tember, at 11 o'clock a. m. 

Every applicant is required to present a certificate of 
church membership and one of literary qualifications. One 
who has not pursued a regular Collegiate course must give 
proof by testimonials or examination of such literary attain- 
ments as will enable him to enter upon the course of studies 
in the school. 

The requirement of the Constitution in regard to students 

preparing for the ministry in the Reformed Church, is as 

follows : 

** Every person contemplatiDg the work of the ministry, before 
he commences hid course of Theologicq.1 studios, shall furnish sat- 
isfactory evidence of bis being a member in full cbipmunion and 
good standing of a Reformed Protestant Church; of his piety, 
ability, and literary attainments: and thereupon shall be admitted 
to the Theological Schools; and during the prosecution of his 
studies there, shall be subject to the rules and regulations thereof; 
and when he shall have completed the prescribed course and term 
of Theological studies, shall be admitted to an examination aooord- 
to the regulations of the school as established by the General Syn- 
od; an^ if found qualified, shall receive a professorial certificate 
to that efiPect. which shall entitle him to an examination for li- 
cense before the Classis to which he belongs.''— Obn., Art 11^ See, t. 

THE YPAR. 
The Seminary opens on the first Tuesday in ^^pt^mt)ep, 
when the Committee meets for the reception of Students, 
and closes on the last Wednesday in April, with the annual 
Commencen^ent. 

PREACHING. 

The students preach regularly before the Faculty and 
Students, subject to such criticism as may be appropriate. 
They also preach in the churches, especially such as are 
vacant, under the direction of the Faculty. 



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WESTERN THEOLOGICAL 8EMINABY. 55 

LECTURES. 

A cotirse of Lectures, on subjects bearing on Mihisteriiil 
work, is to be delivered annually under the direction of the 
Board of Superintendents. 

Mission WoRfi. 

I'he students are organized as a Mission Band and hold 
them^eWes in readiiiess to attehd atiy calls to address meet- 
ings, where tbejr catl advocate the cause of Missions. 

Mh Peter Senidlink has established a Scholarship of 
$2,000, the income of which is to be paid to a student in 
the Seminary, preference being given to one looking forward 
to the Foreign Missionary Work. 

LibRARY. 

Besides the reference Library in Semelink Family Hall, 
students have free access to the Graves Library abd Read- 
ing Room of Hope College. 

ADELPIIIC SOCIETY. 

This is a weekly gdtbering of the Professors and Stu- 
dents for the disciission of (juedtions reflating to the practi- 
eal work of the ministry. The exercises embrace debates, 
essays, and general discussions. 

ddMMtlNCEMttNT. 
The Theological Commencement Exercides take place on 
Wednesday evening, at the close of the year. Addresses 
are deiiver^d by tbe Seniors, iii English and tKitcli, atid by 
som6 ineihbef of the Bdiird of Superintendents appoints 
iot th^ ^ufT)6s^. 

BENEFICIARY AID. 

iBStruotion is entirely gratuitous. Young men are aided 
by the Board of Education as their circumstances require 
and the funds admit, not only while in the Seminary, but in 



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56 HOFE COLLEGE. 



the studies preparatory to entering it. Rooms are provided 
in Van Vleck Hall, and board can be obtained in the city or 
at the Students' Clubs at from $1.75 to $2.50 per week. 

SEMELINK FAMILY HALL. 

This building, erected By Mr. Peter Semelink, contains 
Recitation Rooms, Library and Chapel; is erected on one 
of the most desirable lots in the city, just South of the Col- 
lege Campus; and contains every convenience for Seminary 
work. 

LOCATION. 

Holland is situated at the head of Mace^tawa Bay, which 
opens into Lake Michigan, giving it all the attractions of 
boating, with daily steamers for Chicago and other points. 
It has good railroad facilities, and offers many attractions 
as a place of residence. 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 
I give unto the General Synod of ike Beformed Church in 

America, Dollars^ for the maintenance 

and support of the Theological Seminary of said Churchy located at 
Holland, Idich., and they are to invest the principal and apply the 
income to said purpose. 

OR 

1 give unto the General Synod of the B^ormed Church in 

America, Dollars, for the establishment of a 

Professorship in the Theological Seminary of said Church, located 

at Holland, Mich., to he nximed 

OR 

I give unto the Cfeneral Synod of the Beformed Church in 

America, Dollars, for 

in, or in connection with the Theological Seminary of said Church, 
located at Holland, Mich. 



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" 


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I 


CATALOGUE 

OF 

HOPe COLLGGe 

AT 

Holland* Michigan, 

1826-^97. 




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12 


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17 


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28 


29 


27 


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JULY 




AUGUST 


SEPTEMBER 










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6 


7 






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14 


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16 


17 !i5 


16 


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CATALOGUE 

OF thb: 

OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 

OF 

HOPE College, 

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN, 
1896-'97, 



AN INSTITUTION OF THB BEFORMKD CHURCH 
IN AHJBBICA. 



PIONEER SCHOOL, 18B1. 
HOUiAlO) ACADEMY, 1867. 
BECAME HOPE COLLEQE, 1866. 



HOLLAND, JMICH. 

Hollaod City Ncwf PrcMM. 

18^. 



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1897. 



1898. 





G 

• 
12. 


alcadai--1897/98. 


April 


Spring Term begins. 


«* 26 


.27. 


Senior Examinations. 


.(( 


28. 


Meeting of Council. 


June 17 


-18. 


Undergraduate Examinations. 


it 


20. 


Baccalaureate Sermon. 


t€ 


21. 


Closing Exercises of the Grammar 
School, in Winants Chapel, 2 P. M. 


ti 


22. 


Meeting of Council, 10 A. M. 


tt 


22. 


Meeting of Alumni in Winants Chapel, 
7:30 P. M. 


ti 


23- 


Commencement Exercises in Winants 
Chapel, 7:30 P. M. 

VACATION. 


Sept. 


14. 


Examinations for Admission, begin- 
ning at 9 A. M., in Graves Hall. 


ti 


15- 


Fall Term begins at 9 A. M. 


Nov. 


25. 


Thanksgiving Recess. 


Dec. 


17. 


Fall Term ends. 

VACATION. 


Jan'y 


3. 


Winter Term begins. 


(( 


27. 


Day of Prayer for Colleges. 


March 


25- 


Winter Term ends. 

VACATION. 



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The Council. 



EX-OFFICIO. 

Prof. G. J. Kollen, LL. D., - President of the College. 

ELECTED MEMBERS. 

FROM GENERAL SYNOD. 



Hon. Isaac Cappon, Holland City, Mich. 1897 

Hon, Arend Visscher, Holland City, Mich. 1898 

Hon. Gerrit J. Diekema, Holland City, Mich. 1899 

Rev. Cornelius Brett, D. D., Jersey City, N. J. 1900 
*HoN. N. F. Graves, LL. D. 

Rev. G. H. Mandeville, D. D., LL. D., New York City. 190 1 

Rev. J as. F. Zwemer, Orange City, Iowa. 1902 

Rev. Wm. Moerdyk, Milwaukee, Wis. 1902 

FROM CLASSIS OF IOWA. 

Rev. p. Lepeltak, Alton, Iowa. 

Rev. James De Pree, Sioux Centre, Iow2^. 1897 

FROM CLASSIS OF ILLINOIS. 1 897 

Rev. J AS. Ossewaarde, Pella, Iowa. 1898 

Francis J. Cushing, Irving Park, 111. 1898 

FROM CLASSIS OF WISCONSIN. 

Rev. John H. Karsten, Oostburg, Wis. 1899 

Rev. B. Van Ess, Roseland, 111. 1899 

FROM CLASSIS OF MICHIGAN. 

Rev. H. Gough Birchby, Holland, Mich. 1900 

Rev. Wm. Hall Williamson, Grand Rapids, Mich. 1900 

^Deceased. 



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HOFB COLIiBGB. 



FROM CLASSIS OF PLEASANT PRAIRIE. 

Rev. D. Schaefer, Parkersburgh, la. 1900 

Rev. a. F. Beyer, German Valley, 111. 1900 

from CLASSIS of GRAND RIVER. 

Rev. p. De Bruvn, Grand Haven, Mich. 1901 

Rev. Dirk Broek, Grandville, Mich. 1901 

from CLASSIS OF HOLLAND. 

Rev. G. De Jonge, Vriesland, Mich. 1902 

Hon. Jac. Den Herder, Zeeland, Mich. 1902 

FROM CLASSIS OF DAKOTA. 

♦Rev. Wm. Stegeman, Armour, So. Dakota. 1902 

Rev. S. J. Harmeling, Marion, So. Dakota. 1902 



OFFICERS OF COUNCIL. 



Rev. Peter De Bruyn, - - President. 

Rev. Wm. Moerdvk, - - Vice President. 

Hon. G. J. Diekema, - - Secretary. 

Prof. C. Doesburg, - - Treasurer. 



COMMITTEES OF COUNCIL. 



executive committee. 

Pres. G. J. Kollen, Chairman. 

Hon. Arend Visscher, Sec'y. 

Rev. p. De Bruyn. Hon. G. J. Diekema. 

Rev. Gerhard De Jonge. 

investment committee. 

(In charge of the funds of the OonncU.) 

Hon. Arend Visscher. Pres. G. J. Kollen. 

Hon. Isaac Cappon. 



*SemoTed from Olasei*. 



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THB COUNCIL. 



HOPE FARM COMMITTKE. , 

Pres. G. J. KoLLEN. Hon. Isaac Cappon. 

Hon, Arend Visscher. 



''DE hope:' 
Prof. C. Doesburg, \ 

Rev. H. E. Dosker, D. D., >• - Editorial Committee. 
Rev. D. Broek, ) 

Mr. R. Kanters, - - - Publisher. 



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College Def^a^rfrcvenf. 



Faculty, 

GERRIT J. KOLLEN, LL. D., President. 
In charge of Political Economy. 

CORNELIS DOESBURG, A.M., Secretary and Registrar. 

Professor of the Dutch Language and Literature. 

In charge of Art Studies. 

HENRY BOERS, A. M., 

Professor of History. 

In charge of Zoology. 

JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, A. M., Vice President, 

Professor of Mathematics. 

In charge of Botany and Biology. 

JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

REV. JOHN H. GILLESPIE, A. M., 

Ralph Voorhees Professor of the Greek Language 

and Literature. 

JOHN B. NYKERK, A. M., 

Professor of the English Language and Literature. 

In charge of Vocal Music, and Geology. 



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HOPE COLLBGB. 



DOUWE B. YNTEMA, A. M., 

Professor of Chemistry and Physics. 

In charge of Pedagogy. 

ERASTUS A. WHITENACK, A. B., 
Professor of French and German. 

REV. JOHN TALLMADGE BERGEN, A. M., 

Robert Schell Professor of Ethics and Evidences of 

Christianity. In charge of Mental Science. 

Hon. G. J. DiEKEMA, A. M., LL. B., 
Geo. E. Kollen,'A. M., LL. B., 

Lecturers on Political Economy. 



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STUDENTS, 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Nicholas Boer Drenthe. 

Egbert Boone Holland. 

Jacob Brummel Overisel. 

John De Jongh Grand Haven. 

Floris Ferwerda Grand Rapids. 

Gerrit J. HuiziNGA Holland City. 

Gerrit Kooiker Overisel. 

James E. Moerdvk Milwaukee, Wis. 

John J. Ossewaarde Zeeland. 

Tony Rozendal Chicago, 111. 

Henry Saggers Graafschap. 

Jacob G. Van den Bosch Zeeland. 

Louis Van den Burg Alton, la. 

Jacob Van der Meulen Graafschap, Mich. 

John F. Van Slooten Holland. 

A. L. Warnshuis Grand Rapids. 

GusTAVE Watermuelder Forreston, III. 

Henry L. Yonker Vriesland. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Eerko Aeilts Holland City. 

John J. Banninga Chicago, 111. 

John W. Beardslee, Jr Holland, Mich. 

Robert P. De Bruyn Grand Haven. 

Martin Hyink Newkirk, la. 

Abraham Klerk Holland, Neb. 

Robert E. Kremers Holland City 



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STVDKNTS. 9 



Cornelius Kuyper Orange City, la, 

John G. Meengs New Holland. 

Ties Mulder^. Grand Rapids. 

John G. Rutgers Graafschap. 

John B. Steketee Holland City. 

Jacob Van Ess Chicago, 111. 

Henry F. Van Slooten Holland. 

JuRRY E. Winter Holland City. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Minnie Wilterdink Holland. 

William N. Birchby Holland City. 

Peter Braak Grand Rapids. 

Arthur C. V. Dangremond '. Newark, N. Y. 

J. Jas. De Pree Sioux Center, la. 

Seine B. De Pree Sioux Center, la. 

Benj. Eefting Englewood, 111. 

John H. Eefting Englewood, 111. 

Andrew Ganzevoort Hospcrs, la. 

Isaac H. Hospers Orange City, la. 

John E. Kuizenga Muskegon. 

FoLKERT Mansens .* Holland City. 

Peter Marsilje ^ Holland City. 

Cornelius D. Mulder Spring Lake. 

Fred. Reeverts Stillman Valley, 111. 

Henry Schipper Grand Rapids. 

Henry Sluyter Grand Rapids. 

Cornelius Spaan Orange City, la. 

John H. Ter Avest Hamilton. 

Gerrit Te Kolste Holland, Neb. 

John Van Ess Chicago, 111. 

Bernard Van Heuvelen Thule, S. Dak. 

John Verwey Holland City. 

Fedde Wiersma Chicago, 111. 



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10 HOPE COLLEGE. 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Hattie a. Zwemer Orange City, la. 

Louis Benes Holland, Neb. 

Harry Boot Fulton, III. 

Henry D. Brink Hamilton. 

Albertus T. Broek Grandville. 

John G. De Bey Fulton, 111. 

Abraham DeJong Chicago, 111. 

Gerard J. Dinkeloo Holland City. 

Almon T. Godfrey Holland City. 

Gerrit Hondelink Grand Rapids. 

Leonard L. Legters Clymer, N. Y. 

SiEBE C. Nettinga Le Mars, la. 

Richard Overweg Holland City. 

SiERT F. RiEPMA Kalamazoo. 

William Rinck Holland City. 

Albert G Rooks East Holland. 

John S. Straks Maurice, la. 

Peter Takken Holland City. 

John D. Tanis Vriesland. 

James VanderHeide Graafschap. 

Cornelius VanderMeulen Holland. 

Aart B. Van Zanten Pella, la. 

Albert E. Wilterdink Holland. 

UNCLASSIFIED. 

Minnie Mokma Holland City. 

Grace W. Yates Holland City. 

Harry G. Birchby Holland City. 

George E. Cook Holland City. 

Melvin Meengs Holland City. 

John J. Rooks East Holland. 

Henry P. Schuurmans Holland City. 

Meine VanderHeide Graafschap. 



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STtTDBNTS. 11 

SUMMARY. 

Seniors i8 

Juniors 15 

Sophomores 24 

Freshmen 23 

Unclassified 8 

Total 88 



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12 HOPE COLLEGE. 



Course of Study. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Mathematics. — Wentworth*s Plane and Spherical Trig- 
onometry, and College Algebra. 

Language — 

Latin — Cicero's Orations; Vergil. 

Greek — Homer's Iliad or Odyssey; Herodotos; Greek 
Prose Composition. 

Modern. — History of Dutch Literature; Essays and 
Translations. 

French, — Edgren's Grammar; Super's Reader; Easy 
, Composition. 

Elocution. — Fulton and Trueblood's Practical Elo- 
cution. 

Rhetoric — Genung's Practical Arithmetic; Essays. 

History. — Allen's History of the Roman People. 

Natural Science. — Cutter's Comprehensive Physiol- 
ogy; Holder's Zoology; Gray's Botany. 

Bible Study. — Ellicott's New Testament. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Mathematics. — Surveying and Navigation, end Hardy's 
Analytical Geometry. 

Language. — 

English. — Shaw's New History of English Literature; 
Hale's Longer English Poems; Garnett's English Prose; 
Essays and Reports. 

Latin. — Livy; De Senectute. 

Greek. — Lysias; Greek Prose Composition. 

Modern. — French Classics; Verb-drill, and Composi- 
tion; Outlines of French Literature. 



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COUE8E OF STUDY. 13 



German. — Whitney's Brief German Grammar; Easy 
Reading; Elementary Composition. 

Elocution. — Fulton and Trueblood's Practical Elocu- 
tion finished; Orations and Forensics. 

History. — Myer's Mediaeval History. 

Natural Science. — ^Williams* Chemical Science; Wil- 
liams' Laboratory Manual of General Chemistry. 

Bible Study. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics. — Hardy's Calculus. 

Mathematics Applied. — Olmsted's College Philoso- 
phy, Fourth Revision^ Sheldon. 

Language. — 

Latin. — Horace; Stickney's Cicero's De Officiis. 

Greek. — Plato's Apology and Crito; Tarbell's Demos- 
thenes' Philippics. 

Modern. — Whitney's Brief German Grammar continued; 
Selections from German Authors; Composition. 

Rhetoric — Essays, Discussions, and Orations. 

History. — Myer's Modern History. 

Natural Science. — Sedgwick and Wilson's Biology. 

Metaphysics. — Porter's Psychology. 

Logic — McCosh. 

Ethics. — Porter's Elements of Moral Science begun. 

Bible Study. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics. — Newcomb and Holden's Astronomy, 
advanced course. 

Language. — 

Greek. — Aristophanes' Clouds; Sophocles' Antigone. 

Modern — German Classics; Outlines of German Lit- 
erature; Composition. 



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14 HOPS COXiLSGE. 



Rhetoric. — Orations and Essays continued. 

Ethics. — Porter's Elements of Moral Science com- 
pleted. 

History. — Guizot's History of Civilization. 

Natural Science. — Dana's Class Book of Geology. 

Political Science. — Walker's Political Economy, ad- 
vanced course. 

Sacred Literature. — Fisher's Evidences of Chris- 
tianity. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 



15 



College Department 



Frbsh. 


8:20-9:10. 


' 9:10—10:5. 


10:5-11. 


11—12. 




aa weeks. 

FBKZrCB, 

14 weeks. 


BOMAH HUTOBT, 

10 weeks. 

MATHnCATXOB, 

36 weeks. 


DxTTCB Lit. * 
Bhxt., 14wks. 

Latin, 

33 weeks. 

on Thursday. 


Bhbtobic, 

Istterm. 

ZOOLOOT, 

3d term. 

BOTAKT, 

Sdterm. 
Bbbtobioals, 

on Monday. 


Soph. 


8:20-9:10. 


9:10—10:6. 


10:6-11. 


11—12. 




Nayigatiom, 

10 weeks. 
U weeks. 


OHXMlSYKTf 

Istterm. 

3d and 8d term. 

Rhktobioaul 
on Wednesday. 


Latik, 

14 weeks. 

Gkbmak, 

23 weeks. 


BiXD. Hibt. 

Istterm. 
Ak. GaoM., 

Sdterm. 
Chxxutbt. 

Sdterm. 
BiBZA Study 

on Friday. 


JUN. 


8:20—9:10. 


9:10—10:5. 


10:5-11. 


11—12. 




Pbtcbouwt, 

Istterm. 
Bloovtzok, 

1st term on 
Tuesday. 
PHTnoB, 3d term. 
Mod. Hxbt., 

Sdterm. 

3d* Sdterm 
on Friday. 


OAixnn.uB, 

10 weeks. 

MoDSBN Hist., 
4 weeks. 

Looio A Eu)0., 
onTues.,3dterm. 

Phtozob, 

Sdterm. 


QXBMAN, 

14 weeks. 

PSTOHOIiOeT, 

4weeks. 

Gbbik, 

18 weeks. 


Latin, Ist and 

3d terms. 

Biou>aT, 

Sdterm. 

Bhntobicaxjb, 
on Wednesday. 


Sbn. 


8:20-9:10. 


9:10—10 


10:5-11. 


11—12. 




aiBMAxr, 

13 weeks. 
Vaoaht, 

Sweeks. 

8 weeks. 

8OCZOX<00T, 

6 weeks. 


8 weeks. 
Ethiob, 6 weeks. 

13 weeks. 

ElX)OI7TIOII,3wkS. 

Shktobzoaub, 

on Friday. 


18 weeks. 

FOUTIOAI.EOOir., 

10 weeks. 


ABTBONOICT, 

10 weeks. 

FOUTIOAI. EOON., 

4 weeks. 

OXOZXMT, 

14 weeks. 



Lady Frlndpal will meet all the lady students on Monday of each week from 1 to 
1:30 p. H. 

AU the classes meet for Instruction in Music on Friday afternoon of each week. 



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PrefiS^ra^forY Detia\rf^f\e4^f• 



Faculty, 

PROF. GERRIT J. KOLLEN, LL. D., President. 

PROF. CORNELIS DOESBURG, A. M., 
Dutch Language and Literature, Drawing, and Painting. 

PROF. HENRY BOERS, A. M., 
History. 

PROF. JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, A.M., Vice President. 
Mathematics. 

PROF. JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A. M., Secretary. 
Latin. 

PROF. JOHN H. GILLESPIE, A. M., 
Greek. 

PROF. JOHN B. NYKERK, A. M., ^ 

English, and Music. 

PROF. DOUWE B. YNTEMA, A. M., 
Physics, and Pedagogy. 

PROF. ERASTUS A. WHITEN ACK, A. B., 
Modern Languages. 



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PREPARATORY DKPABTMENT. 17 ' * 

PROF. JOHN TALLMADGE BERGEN, A. M., 
Bible Study. 

A. F. HARVEY, A. B., 
Tutor — English, and Civil Government. 

MRS. C. VAN RAALTE GILMORE, 
Lady Principal. 

T^ r- T>. T- W. Beardslee, Tr., ) A »x 

Prof C DoESBURG, Jp^^^^ Braak, ^ [j -J"^^^ 
Librarian. ^^^^^ g^^^^ j" Librarians. 

J. Genant, Chorister. Wm. N. Birchbv, Organist. 

Bernard Bloemendal, Janitor. 



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STUDENTS. 



'A" CLASS. 



NAMBfl. RX8ZDKKGK8. 

Minnie Van dkr Ploeg Holland City. 

"Lizzie Van Zwaluwenbu-rg Holland City. 

Katie Vyn Holland City. 

Arthur Birchby Holland City. 

Richard De Young Chicago, 111. 

Marinus Den Herder Vriesland. 

John H. Dupree Zeeland. 

Matthias J. Duven Mauricfe, la. 

Henry J. Elferdink Holland. 

Orville E. Fisher Manito, 111. 

John H. Geerlings Holland. 

Albert Hoeksema Holland. 

Martin Koster Grand Rapids. 

Edward D. Kremers Holland City. 

Benjamin J. Lugers Holland. 

John Meulpolder Holland City. 

Adrian J. Neerken Graafschap. 

John Nywening Wichert, 111. 

John S. Raum Holland City. 

Frank D. Scott Holland City. 

John Steunenberg Grand Rapids. 

Martin J. Stormzand Grand Rapids. 

Henry Telman Overisel. 

Daniel Ten Cate Holland City. 



^ 



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STUDENTS. 19 



Oswald W. Visscher Holland City. 

Jacobus Wayer Muskegon. 

Jacob J. Weersing East Holland. 

John G. Winter Holland City. 

'*B" CLASS. 

Gertrude Klomparens Fillmore. 

Minnie Van Houte Holland City. 

William Bekman Holland City. 

Elmer A. H. Blanchard Coopersville. 

Jacob G. Bloemers Holland. 

WiETSE H. BoscHKER Wcstficld, N. Dak. 

John J. Broek Grandville. 

Gerrit H. Brouwer New Holland. 

Jacob G. Brouwer New Holland. 

William H. DeKleine Forest Grove. 

Henry Depree Zeeland. 

Derk Grul Holland City. 

Simon Hellenthal Holland City. 

Benjamin Kleinhesselink Oostburg, Wis. 

Harry Post Holland City. 

Henry J. Steketee Muskegon. 

John Spitsbergen Zeeland. 

William E. Van der Hart Holland City. 

John A. Van Zoeren Holland City. 

Peter Verburg East Saugatuck. 

John Vork Holland City. 

Fred. D. Warnshuis Grand Rapids. 

Hessel Yntema Forest Grove. 

''C" CLASS. 

Jennie Huizinga Holland City. 

Sena Kooiker Overisel. 

Georgianna Lugers Holland. 



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20 HOPE COLLEGE. 



Minnie Rooks * Holland. 

Jennie K. Toren Holland City. 

Janet Van den Beldt Holland. 

JosiE ZuiDEwiND Holland. 

Cornelius K. Bareman Zeeland. 

Henry K. Boer Drenthe. 

John A. De Hollander Rochester, N. ¥• 

Abraham DeKleine Forest Grove. 

John J. De Young Chicago, 111. 

John Itterbeck Fillmore Centre. 

Joseph Genant * Avon, So. Dak. 

Anthony Karreman Holland City. 

John Laman Grand Haven. 

John H. Moeke Borculo. 

Henry G. Pelgrim Grand Haven. 

Edward C. Stanton Forest Grove. 

Jacob J. Steffens Holland City. 

Edward J. Strick Forest Grove. 

Nicholas E. Van Dam Drenthe. 

Cornelius Van der Mel Grand Rapids. 

Nicholas J. Van Goor Holland City. 

Jacob E. Van Houte '. . Holland City. 

Andrew Wagemaker Grand Rapids. 

Joe a. Wiggers Drenthe. 

''D" CLASS. 

Antoinette Boer Hamilton. 

Mary Kroon Boer Hamilton. 

Ella Feenstra Vriesland. 

Lottie Hoyt Holland City. 

LiLLA Thurber Holland City. 

Louis Baar Chicago, 111. 

Chester Beach Holland City. 

William H. Cooper Muskegon. 



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8TUDBNT8. 21 



Martin De Goede Holland. 

Daniel De Lelys Rochester, N. Y. 

William H. Giebel Williamson/ N. Y. 

Leonard C. Heyboer Grand Rapids. 

James Kleinheksel Fillmore Centre. 

Edward Kruizenga Ferrysburg. 

Philip Meengs New Holland. 

Elisha E. Sayad Oroomiah, Persia. 

John K. Van den Beldt Fillmore Centre. 

John Van Eyck Zeeland. 

Andrew H. Van Goor Holland City. 

John Van Zomeren Fremont. 

John A. Wagner New Holland. 

Albert Wubbena - Harper, 111. 

UNCLASSIFIED. 

Zona Arleth Holland City. 

Nellie Notier , Holland City. 

Anna Sprietsma Holland City. 

Amy Yates Holland City. 

Jacob Adams Holland City. 

Stephen Bradford Holland City. 



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22 HOPE COLLEGE. 



Course of Study. 



FIRST YEAR. ''D" CLASS. 

Mathematics. — South worth's Essentials of Arithmetic, 
Book II, 

Language. — 

English, — Rigdon's Grammar of the English Sentence; 
Repplier's Book of Famous Verse; Goldsmith's The Vicar 
of Wakefield; Cooper's Last of the Mohicans; Readings, 
and Essays. « 

Dutch. — Reading; Spelling. 

History. — Montgomery's Leading Facts of American 
History; Montgomery's English History. 

Bookkeeping. — New Introductive Bookkeeping, by 
Williams & Rogers. 

Penmanship. — Spencerian System. 

Bible Study. — Old Testament. 

SECOND YEAR. ''C" Class. 
Drawing. — Free-hand and Perspective. 
Natural Science. — Eclectic Physical Geography. . 
Mathematics. — Wentworth's School Algebra. 
History. — Myer's General History begun. 
Language — 

English. — Scott's va nhoe; Lowell's Vision of Sir 
Launfal; Tennyson's The Princess; Burke's Speech on 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 23 



Conciliation with America; Essays; Readings, and Recita- 
tions. 

Latin — Tuel and Fowler's First Book in Latin; Gra- 
datim; Viri Romae; Bennett's Latin Grammar; Composition. 

Dutch. — Grammar; Reading; Spelling; Translations. 

Bible Study. — Old Testament. 

THIRD YEAR. *'B" CLASS. 

Mathematics. — Algebra, and Wentworth's New Plane 
and Solid Geometry. 

Natural Science. — Physiology and Hygiene. 

Language. — 

English. — The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in the 
Spectator; Dryden's Palamon and Arcite; Milton's Para- 
dise Lost, Books I and ii; Mead's Rhetoric; Essays; 
Readings, and Recitations. 

Latin. — Viri Romae; Nepos; Ginn & Co.'s Caesar; 
Grammar, and Composition. 

Greek, — White's Beginner's Greek Book. 

German. — Whitney's Brief German Grammar; Easy 
Reading, and Easy Composition. 

History. — Myer's General History. 

Bible Study. — Old Testament. 

FOURTH YEAR. ''A" CLASS. 

Mathematics. — Plane and Solid Geometry finished. 

Natural Science. — Carhart and Chute's Elements of 
Physics; Gage's Physical Lab. Manual and Note Book. 

Language. — 

English. — Milton's Paradise Lost, Books i and ii; 
Pope's Iliad, Books i and xxii; Shakespeare's Macbeth; 
Parson'^ Versification; Essays; Readings, and Recitations. 



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24 HOPE COLLEGE. 



Latin, — Caesar; Cicero; Grammar, and Composition. 

Greek, — White's Beginner's Greek Book; Xenophon's 
Anabasis; Woodruff's Greek Prose Composition. 

German, — Selections from German Authors; Grammar 
continued; Composition. 

History. — Allen's Roman History. 

Civil Government. — Young's Government Class Book. 

Didactics. — White's Elements of Pedagogy. 

Bible Study. — Old Testament. 

Music. — In all the Classes. 

It will be noticed that the Council has introduced in 
the Preparatory Department three parallel courses. The 
student may select any one of them when he enters. 

Special attention is given, during the whole of the Pre- 
paratory Course, to the grammars of the languages studied. 
For those who pursue English studies only, or who intend 
to discontinue at the end of the '*A" year, the Faculty pro- 
vides such additional branches as seem most expedient and 
profitable. To do the best work, it is necessary that the 
student's time is fully occupied in the work of the school. 

In general educational value, it is believed that the 
above four years* Course of Study is worthy of full recom- 
mendation, whether for entrance into College, or for a pro- 
fessional training, or for a business life. 



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Tr. 



Courses in Prq>aratory Department 

Term. CLASSICAL. LATIN. SCIENTIFIC. 



< 



c/) 

< 

U 

u 



English Grammar. 
Arithmetic. 
U. S. H Istory. 
Drawing. (4) 



H Drawlng.(4) 4 Dutch. 
Eng. Grammar. 
Algebra. 

U.S. Hist, Yt English 

HJst. (4) 



Dutch. 

Ent(. Grammar. 

Algebra. 

Eng. Hist. (4) 



Latin. 
Dutch. 
Algebra. 
English. (4). 



Latin. 

'4 Dut<jh.(4) Vt ] 

Algebra. 

Ancient Hist 



g.(4) 



Latin. 
Physiology. 
Physical Geog. 
English. (4) 



<*" 



^ 



<y 



^' 






C/) 

< 

O 




Latin. 
Greek. 
Engll8h.(4) 
Gen. Hist. 


Latin. 
German. 
English. (4) 
Physiology. 


German. 
English. (4) 
Physiology. 


Latin. 
Greek. 
Algebra. 
English. (4) 


Latin. 
German. 
Gen. Hist. 
EngUsh. (4) 


Book-keep., Com. Law. 

German. 

Gen. Hist. , 

English. (4) 


CQ 


Latin. 
Greek. U) 
Geometry . 
Civil Gov»t. 


Latin. 

German. (4) 
Geometry. 
Civil Gov> 


Botany. 
German. (4) 
Geometry. 
CivU Gov't. 


c/i 
< 
o 

>• 


i 

i 

3 


Latin. (4) 
Greek 
Geometry. 
Physics. 


LaUn. (4) 
German. 
Geometry. 
Physics. 


Botany. (4) 
German. 
Geometry. 
Physics. 


Latin. 
Greek. 
English. (4) 
Physics. 


Latin. 
German. 
English. (4) 
Physics. 


Geology. 
German. 
English. (4) 
Physics. 


Latin. 
Greek. 
English . (4) 
Pedagogy. 


Latin. 

English. (4) 
Pedagogy. 


Astronomy. 
German. 
English. (4) 
Pedagogy. 



Bible study once a week in place of those marked (4). 

The Lady Principal will meet all the lady students on Monday of each week from 
1 to 1:80 p. M. 

All the classea meet for instmctlon In Music on Friday afternoon of each week. 



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26 HOPE COLLEGE. 



1 f>e vVorK m Defa^IU 



THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

In its four years' course, the Preparatory Department 
prepares students for the college or the university. Further, 
order to meet the needs of those that do not expect to enter 
college, the course is made somewhat more comprehensive 
than would otherwise be necessary. To this end, special 
studies in Science, Book-keeping, Elocution, Music, Mod- 
ern Languages, Theory and Art of Teaching, etc., are 
introduced, thus laying the foundation for a liberal and 
practical education. 

The several departments receive the same careful at- 
tention as in the college proper, being under the immediate 
care of the respective college professors. Those desiring 
to fit themselves for teaching can so select their studies as 
to obtain a first-class normal as v ell as academic training, 
in the Preparatory Department. 

HISTORY. 

PROF. HENRY BOERS. 

The Study of History begins in the '*D" Class with 
that of our own country, and of England. This is followed 
by a course in General History, which continues through- 
out the '*C" and "B" years, followed in the '*A" Class by 
the History of Rome. In connection with this history 
work, the "A" Class also takes up the study of the Civil 
Government of the United States. 



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THE WOUK IN DETAIL. 



In the college classes the study of history is contin- 
ued. Mediaeval History, Modern History, and the History 
of European Civilization, are taken up in the order 
named. 

In addition to the required reading, and the daily reci- 
tation work the members of each class are expected to use 
the library authorities in special study of topics embraced 
in the period under consideration. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROF. JO^K B. NYKERK. 

The course in the Preparatory Department is in ac- 
cordance with the recommendations of **The Michigan 
Association of Colleges," made at its meeting May 25, 1895. 
These recomendations are as follows: i. That the several 
colleges of the Association in their Entrance Requirements 
in English conform to the recommendations of **The Eng- 
lish Conference of the Eastern and Middle States." 2. 
Further, that in these requirements they seek to develop in 
the pupils of the secondary schools the poyver of extempo- 
raneous speaking. 

Formal Grammar, Rhetoric, and Poetics are taught both 
directly, from text-books, and incidentally, in the analytical 
study of the classics of literature, critical study is comple- 
mented by constructive work, and the careful correction of 
essays is deemed of the highest importance. 

In the College, the history and development of English 
Literature is studied in the Sophomore year with the aid of 
a manual, supplemented by reports furnished by the differ- 
ent members of the class. The above work is pursued, 
however, for the purpose of giving direction to the thor- 
ough study of the great masterpieces, and has for its ulti- 
mate object the development, in the student, of a critical 
taste and literary consciousness. 



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28 HOPE COLLEOE. 



MATHEMATICS. 

PROF. J. H. KLEINHEKSEL. 

The Preparatory Course in Mathematics embraces 
Arithmetic, Algebra, and Geometry. For admission to the 
**D" Class an examination in Arithmetic is required equiv- 
alent to that which entitles to a Third Grade Teacher's Cer- 
tificate in this state; after which the first term is devoted to 
a review of the whole subject and the introduction to such 
advanced work as shall find direct practical application in 
the different courses of this Institution. 

Algebra is commenced the second term of the **D" 
year, continued for four consecutive terms and concluded 
with an extended general review of the subject at the end 
of the second term of the *'B" year. 

Plane and Solid Geometry are beg.un and completed 
the last term of the **B" and the first of the "A" year. 

In all these both facility in computation, and thorough- 
ness and breadth of information are made the aim of the 
instruction, so as to lay an adequate foundation for future 
study in Mathematics. 

The Freshm2n Class takes up Plane and Spherical 
Trigonometry, and College Algebra. 

In the Sophomore year follows the application of the 
principles of Trigonometry to Surveying, Navigation and 
Astronomy, after which Analytical Geometry and Calculus 
finish the course of pure Mathematics in the Junior year. 

LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROF. JAMES G. SUTPHEN. 

In the Grammar School, Latin is begun with the *'C" 
Class, and continues in the *'B" and "A" years. The Ro- 
man method of pronunciation is used. The student is, as 
soon as practicable, introduced to the simple stories in 



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THE WORK IN DETAIL. 29 



*'Viri Romae" and carefully drilled in the rudiments of the 
Grammar. In Caesar and Cicero much attention is given to 
the Sequence of Tenses, Conditional Sentences, Oratio 
Obliqua, and the Subjunctive Mood. Throughout the 
course, exercises are given in rendering English into Latin, 
based upon the texts read. 

In the College, Latin is studied during parts of the 
first three y^ars. The study of Grammar, by analyzing 
sentences, is not neglected in the effort to present the 
authors in their literary character. 

GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROF. J. H. GILLESPIE. 

Studies in Homer are not attempted in the time given 
to Greek in the Preparatory Department, as it is believed 
that a thorough knowledge of the language of the Anabasis 
will lay a better foundation for future work than a super- 
ficial acquaintance with both poetry and prose. 

Until the end of the <*A" year exercises in Prose Com- 
positions, oral or written, are required daily as essential to 
fluency and accuracy and simple conversations are fre- 
quently carried on as a useful auxiliary. The aim through- 
out is to make the course thorough and as far as possible, 
interesting. Where classes are prepared for it, important 
portions of the author with which they have become famil- 
iar are read to them. A list of the authors read may be 
seen under "Course of Study" in this catalogue, although 
the particular books chosen are varied from year to year. 

MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE. 

PROF. E. A. WHITENACK. 

The German Language is studied in the Preparatory 
Department by special students of the **A" and ''B" 
classes. In the College, by the Sophomore, Junior and 
Senior classes. 



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30 HOPE COLLEGE. 



The French Language is studied in the Freshman and 
Sophomore years. In both Languages the course is the 
same. The. grammar is studied thoroughly, and classes are 
drilled in the declention and conjugation and the rules of 
Syntax. They then advance as far as possible the study of 
Literature. Considerable attention is given to elementary 
'and advanced composition, and in German com.position 
German script is. partly used. 

DUTCH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROF. C. DOESBURG. 

Many students of Hope College come from Holland 
homes, and use that language in common life. Moreover, 
said language will, for many years to come, continue in use 
in the pulpits and in religious meetings in nearly all of the 
Reformed churches in the particular Synod of Chicago, and 
in many of our churches East. Hence, it is deemed neces- 
sary that instruction in the Dutch Grammar and Literature 
be given in Hope College as follows: In the '*D" and **C" 
Classes of the Preparatory Department, and in the Fresh- 
man Class of the College Department. 

PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY. 

PROF. DOUWE B. YNTEMA. 

In connection with preparatory Physics two hours 
laborator}' work is required each week. 

A course in Trigonometry should precede the course 
in College Physics. 

The Course in Chemistry for the Sophomore Class con- 
sists of daily recitations and four hours* laboratory work 
each week for 26 weeks. Each student is required to make 
an accurate record of all the experiment performed by him 
in the Laboratory, giving all the reactions involved, and 
conclusions reached from personal observation. 



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THE WORK IN DBTATL. 31 

ETHICS AND EVIDENCES OF CHRISTIANITY. 

PROF. J. TALLMADGE BERGEN. 

The text-book of Ethics is Porter's * 'Elements of Moral 
Science." This is begun in the last term of the Junior 
year and continued during two terms of the Senior. A 
thesis is required of each Senior at the close of the 
second term. 

The Bible is studied as the inspired book of the King- 
dom of God. This is begun in the Preparatory Department 
with the '*D" Class, and the Old Testament is covered dur- 
ing the four years of the course. The only text-book used is 
the English translation. (Students are advised to purchase 
the ''Parallel Bible," the Authorized and Revised Versions). 
Lectures are given to introduce each book, and the Scrip- 
tures of the Old Testament are taught in their relation to 
the Kingdom of God and Redemption. 

The New Testament is begun in the Freshman year. 
The history of the English versions of the Bible and Intro- 
duction to the books of the New Testament are studied 
from ''Ellicott's Books of the Bible." Running parallel 
with this is a course in the life of Jesus Christ, which con- 
tinues during the Freshman year. The introduction to the 
Acts, the Epistles, and Revelation, and studies in their 
text continue throughout the Sophomore and Junior years. 
With this foundation the Seniors study Evidences of Chris- 
tianity, using "Fisher's Manual." The purpose of this 
course is not only a scientific knowledge of Scripture and 
Christianity, but also effort is made to lay them upon the 
heart and make them the rule of life.. 

Pending the establishment of the Chair of Mental 
Science, Logic and Psychology are taught in this depart- 
ment in the Junior year. 



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32 HOPE COLLEiiE. 



BIOLOGY. 
In the Preparatory Course a term's work is given to 
Human Physiology. In the College Course, the Freshman 
Class takes one term's work each in Botany and Zo6logy, 
and the Sophomore one term in General Biology. 

ELOCUTION AND ORATORY. 

PROFS. NYKERK AND BERGEN. 

Attention is given to voice, gesture, and rendering in 
all the classes. The aim is to learn to speak with ease 
and grace, so that one may speak with comfort to himself 
and with pleasure to the hearer. 



From this '*Work in Detail," as well as from the 
**Courses of Study," it will be seen that Hope College is, 
first of all, offering a liberal Classical course, which will 
serve as an adequate foundation upon which to build pro- 
fessional courses, which, in turn, prepare for the more 
active and practical duties of life. 

The time is fast coming, and we shall hail the day, when 
such a foundation of a liberal classical course will be gener- 
ally required as a preparation for all professional studies. 



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ADMISSION. 33 



ADMISSION, 



COLLEGE. 

For admission into the Freshman Class a full certifi- 
cate of Graduation from the Preparatory Department is re- 
quired, or an examination of the studies pursued in that De- 
partment, or in what the Faculty shall deem an equivalent. 

Students may enter an advanced class either at the be- 
ginning of the College year or at other times, provided they 
sustain a satisfactory examination both on the preliminary 
studies and on those already passed over by the class 
which they propose to enter. If received on condition, 
students may in certain cases be permitted to recite with 
the class, but all conditions must be removed before regular 
admission. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

An effort is being made to raise the standard of the 
institution, and, accordingly, the requirements for admission 
to the **D" Class have been advanced. 

Pupils holding a so-called '^Eighth Grade Diploma" 
will be admitted to the above class without examination, 
provided that the general average stands at 85 or over, and 
the standing in any one branch be not under 75; while ap- 
plicants not holding such certificate, will be subjected to a 
strict examination in the common school branches, includ- 
ing Arithmetic, English Grammar and Composition, United 
States History, Geography, (not including Physical), Read- 
ing and Orthography. The examination will be graded 
according to the requirements of the aforesaid diploma. 

In order to enter any advanced class, it will be neces- 
sary for the applicant to pass an examination in the studies 
previously pursued by the class. If received on conditions, 
these must be fulfilled before regular admission. 



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M HOPE COLLEGE. 



Miscellaneous Information* 



LOCATION. 
Holland is a city of nearly 8,000 inhabitants, and is 
centrally located on the Chicago & West Michigan railway. 
Three or more daily trains afford direct connection with 
the leading cities East, and as many with Chicago and 
other points West. It is on a straight line from Grand 
Rapids to Chicago, distant from the former city 25 miles, 
and from the latter no miles. When navigation is open, 
it also has connection with Chicago by a daily line of 
steamboats. It is therefore most desirably located, having 
both land and water communications, being near the 
shore of Lake Michigan, with which it is connected by a 
beautiful sheet of water, called Macatawa Bay, and on 
which are the popular summer resorts, Macatawa Park 
and Ottawa Beach. 



GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 

The College Campus lies between Tenth and Twelfth 
streets, in the centre of the city, and contains sixteen 
acres. It presents a finely varied surface, well shaded with 
native trees, and is annually improving in beauty and at- 
tractiveness. 

The College building*^ are eight in number. Van Vleck 
Hall is mainly devoted to dormitory purposes. 

The new Graves Library and Winants Chapel build- 
ing, in which are also found a President's room, a reading 
room, a Y. M. C. A. hall, and four lecture rooms, affords 
such suitable and improved accommodations, that every 
one connected with the College cannot but feel grateful to 
the kind friends whose generosity made the erection of it a 
possibility. 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 35 

SCHOOL YEAR. 

The scholastic year of forty weeks begins on the third 
Wednesday in September, and ends with the general Com- 
mencement on the fourth Wednesday in June. 

The winter and spring vacations are fixed by the Gen- 
eral Faculty. (See Calendar.) 



ADVANTAGES OFFERED. 

Besides the advantages of location, easy communica- 
tion, and inexpensive living, it is believed Hope College 
may justly call attention to equally important advantages 
of a very different nature. 

It is true, the Institution is growing, but the classes 
are not so large as to preclude that personal acquaintance, 
and contact, and influence of each member of the Faculty 
with every student coming under his instruction, which 
parents are apt to consider in making choice of^an institu- 
tion. This personal element, made possible in a smaller 
institution, is a factor of great educational value both mor- 
ally and intellectually. 

.Hope College is not a local institution. Its students 
represent an extensive territory, extending East as far "as 
the state of New York, and West as far as the Dakotas. 
The students are, in the main, the best pupils from many 
public schools and in general possess a high order of ability 
and a laudable ambition to make their way in the world. 
This makes them desirable companions, inviting their fel- 
lows to friendly competition and industrious study. 

By a division of the work peculiar to Hope College, 
the same experienced instructors teach in both Preparatory 
Department and College, placing the student in Latin or 
Greek, etc., for six consecutive years or more under the 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



same man; thus practically making a six years' instead of 
four years* course. 

It is a chartered Institution, incorporated under the 
laws of the state and legally entitled to grant certificates 
and diplomas, and to confer degrees. 

It offers great improvements in science teaching, but it 
is no less a classical school than in former years. The 
change means more of science but not less of classics. 

Under the new law relative to the granting of certifi- 
cates by Denominational colleges, it is expected that Hope 
College will next year be prepared to offer, besides the 
usual Diploma, a legal certificate authorizing the holder 
thereof to teach in any of the Public Schools of Michigan. 
^ It will be seen, therefore, that Hope College offers and 

secures a regular liber 1 course of training as complete as 
can be found in most of our Western colleges. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

Most of the students seek a **liberal education," lead- 
ing to the degree of A. B. — A "partial" or '^elective" course 
is offered to all who so desire, and facilities are furnished 
through the regular instructors; but a partial course en- 
titles only to a certificate, and not to a diploma. German 
and French, or Drawing and Painting, can be studied at 
any time. 

Since 1878 the institution has been open to women. 
They enter the regular classes, and attend the same lec- 
tures and recitations as the young men. 

Vocal music is provided without charge. Lessons in 
instrumental music can be secured at the expense of the 
pupil. 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 37 

EXAMINATIONS. 
In both departments, written examinations are held at 
the close of each term, or whenever a subject is completed. 
When practicable, the examinations at the close of the 
year, or whenever a branch of study is finished, cover the 
entire text-book. The next examination for admission will 
be held the day before the new school year opens, viz., on 
Tuesday, September 14th, 1897, at 9 o'clock A. M. 



CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS. 

Members of the '*A" Class, upon graduation in full 
course, are entitled to a regular Certificate, signed by the 
Council and the Faculty; but said certificate will be marked 
**First," **Second," or ''Third Grade," as follows: When 
the average standing of the graduate is from 90 to 100, this 
will indicate the ''First Grade;" when from 80 to 90, the 
"Second;" and from 70 to 80, the "Third;" reference be- 
ing made to both recitations and examinations.. 

Such students as are admitted in partial course, or who 
fall below an average standing of 70, are entitled to a Cer- 
tificate, from the Faculty, naming the studies in which they 
have sustained examinations. 

Graduates from the College, when recommended by the 
Faculty, receive a Diploma, with the degree of A. B., being 
a testimonial of general scholarship. The course leading 
thereto includes such branches as are usually taught in 
similar Institutions. A partial course is sometimes chosen 
and is entitled to a Certificate as adjudged by the Faculty. 

The degree of A. M. is conferred upon those who con- 
tinue their studies for three years after graduation, or who 
may satisfy the Council, by a thesis, as to their scholastic 
attainments. By paying a fee of three dollars, an A. M. 
diploma in such cases will be given. 



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38 HOPE COLT.EOE 



RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

The exercises of each day begin with prayer in Winants 
Chapel at 8 o'clock A. M. 

On the Sabbath every student is expected to worship 
regularly with one of the churches in the city or vicinity, 
unless excused by the President. 

Religious instruction is given in all the classes regular- 
ly, and like all the other studies, is in charge of the Faculty. 

Although Hope College is denominational, and is un- 
der the patronage and support of the Reformed Church in 
America, yet, by the law of its incorporation, it can have no 
''religious test." The doors are open, and welcome is given 
to all who submit to its scholastic regulations. As a Chris- 
tian school, however, it inculcates gospel truths, and de- 
mands a consistent moral character and deportment. 



LIBRARY, READINGROOM, ETC. 

The Library which already numbers over 9000 volumes 
is, by a munificent donation of a friend of education, about 
to be increased to over 20,000 volumes — all free for the use 
of the students. Books and pamphlets, as well as maga- 
zines and papers, are constantly added. The friends of 
Hope College may be assured that their gifts of valuable 
books to the library will be taken care of, and appreciated, 
and made useful by giving them a place upon the ample 
shelves of the magnificent fire proof Library building. 

In connection with the Library is a Readingroom, 
supplied with many valuable periodicals and leading jour- 
nals on politics, religion, science and literature. These can 
be consulted on any day when the college is in session, but 
may not be withdrawn from the room. 

Laboratory and Philosophical Apparatus for lecture 
room use is grpwing in value and completeness. Donations, 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFOKMATION. 39 

by the graduates and friends of the Institution, of maps, 
charts, instruments, and specimens of Natural History, are 
solicited, with the assurance that all such will materially 
add to the efficiency of the work which Hope College is 
doing. 



MUSIC. 

The Glee Club, under the direction of Prof. J. B. Ny- 
kerk, meets once a week, and receives drill in Voice Cul- 
ture, and Choral Singing. A primary class in Theory and 
Sight-singing is conducted by an assistant in the Prepara- 
tory Department. To these classes all students are admit- 
ted without charge. 

Further, fine opportunities are afforded for the study 
of Piano, Violin and Voice. Messrs. Post, Force and Camp- 
bell of Grand Rapids, three of the most prominent and com- 
petent musicians in the state, each have large classes of 
private pupils in their respective departments. For terms, 
etc., apply for special circulars to Prof. J. B. Nykerk. 



SOCIETIES. 
Seven Literary Societies are found in the Institution: 
The Meliphoriy the Cosmopolitan^ the Fraternal^ and the 
Ulfilas Club have been maintained for years, and offer de- 
cided advantages to their respective members, and materi- 
ally aid in the attainment of that culture, which it is the 
object of this school to promote. The Ulfilas Club seeks to 
secure for its members greater proficiency in the use of the 
Holland language. During the year the Phi Beta Epsilon 
Club was organized for the study of Belles-lettres; and the 
German Society to afford its members an opportunity to 
speak the German, and thus acquire greater fluency in the 
language. And the Z. Z. Z. Society has recently i been 



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40 HOPE COLLEOE. 



organized by the young ladies, for the purpose of enjoying 
free discussion and obtaining experience in conducting 
more public meetings. 

The Young Men's Christian Association has an active 
and associate membership of one hundred and six. It con- 
tinues to be a gr,-at blessing to the students, and proves to 
be very helpful to the College, not alone, but is also doing 
a blessed work in maintaining four Sunday Schools in the 
country, where about 350 scholars are taught every Sunday. 



PUBLICATIONS. 

Connected with the Institution, a religious weekly is 
published, called De Hope, Ir was established in 1866, and 
is under the direction of the Council, through its Editorial 
Committee. The paper has a circulation of over 3100 copies. 

A monthly, called The Anchor, is conducted by the stu- 
dents with gratifying success. It has reached its ninth 
year, and owing to the excellent spirit with which it is 
managed and -edited, it is very helpful to the College, and 
is calculated to awaken an esprit de corps among its Alumni. 
No alumnus who wishes to keep himself informed in regard 
to his Alma Mater, and who desires to keep in touch with 
her, can afford to be without this paper. 



PRIZES. 

The Oratorical Exercises of the Preparatory Depart- 
ment, on the final Monday of the college year, is the Com- 
mencement of that Department, and marks the graduation 
of the "A" Class. 

In 1887 were established the two ''George Birkhoff, 
Jr., Prizes,** each of twenty-five dollars; one for the Sopho- 
more Class, in English Literature, and the other for the 



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MISCELLANEOTTS INFORMATION. 41 

Freshman Class, in Dutch Literature. At the last Com- 
mencement they were awarded by the Committees, as fol- 
lows: For the best Essay in English to J. W. Beardslee, 
Jr.; for the second best to C. Kuyper; for the best Essay 
in Dutch to Benjamin Eefting. 

In 1894 two new prizes were added to the list of an- 
nual awards, one of J 15.00 for the best, and the other of 
$10.00 for the second best examination in English Gram- 
mar and Orthography, open to all the members of the *'C*' 
class. At the last Commencement the first prize was 
awarded to Peter Verburg, and the second to Wietse H. 
Boschker. These were established by Mr. Henry Bosch, 
of Chicago, 111. Other friends have given prizes for Draw- 
ing, from year to year. Last year two prizes were awarded 
respectively to H. Yntema and Miss G. Klomparens. 

Through the liberality of Mr. A. V. W. Van Vechten 
the Foreign Mission Prize was established last year. The 
sum of twenty-five dollars to be awarded to the one writing 
the best essay on Foreign Mission. This prize is open to 
the whole College. We trust that additional prizes will 
follow,' as a stimulus to labor in other branches of study. 



EXPENSES. 

The city is surrounded by a rich agricultural region, 
and the cost of living in Holland is cheap. Good board 
and rooms may be had in families of the city for from two 
to three dollars per week; in clubs, and without furnished 
rooms, at lower rates. 

There are twenty rooms in Van Vleck Hall, in the se- 
lection of which students for the ministry have the preference. 
These are furnished in part, and bear a moderate charge. 

As yet no tuition fees have been charged, but every 
student must pay to the Treasurer, in advance ^ an incidental 
fee of six dollars per term. 



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42 HOPE COLLEGE. 



The graduation fee is five dollars in the college, and 
two and one-half dollars in the Preparatory Department. 
No other charges are made. 

Young people of noble aspirations but of limited means 
need not be discouraged. At Hope College they will find 
many like themselves, some of whom have come a great 
distance seeking an education. Such as these are in earn- 
est, content with plain living, and, by practicing the econo- 
mies that are possible in this place, succeed in reducing 
their expenses within marvelously narrow limits. 

Here is an estimate of the necessary expenditure, ex- 
clusive of clothing and travel, which each can determine 
for himself, for one year in the Preparatory Course: 
Board (at the Club), - - J 60.00 

Room rent (two rooming together), - 20.00 
Books Jio, Washing $10, Light J3, - - 23.00 
Fuel J7, Fees $18, - - - 25.00 



Total, - $128.00 

The above estimate is an answer to those who want to 
know how much money is absolutely needed, and is intend- 
ed as a reply to that oft-repeated question. Of course the 
expense of most of the students exceeds this amount. 

Many parents, having children to educate, find it to 
their advantage to come to this city to live. To such it 
may be truthfully said, that Holland is a growing, enter- 
prising city — one of the most prosperous and beautiful in 
Michigan. With its broad, straight, and shady streets, its 
water works, and its electric illumination, Holland is equal- 
ly well adapted to the life of quiet retirement, and to that 
of the active business man. 



DISCIPLINE. 
It is gratifying to observe that the moral and spiritual 
tone of the students is such that the matter of discipline is 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 43 

reduced to a minimum. Gei>eral opinion is on the side of 
right and reasonableness, and lends its powerful support to 
the interest of good order and efficient work. To develop 
this high moral culture and character of the student, it is 
the aim of Hope College to cultivate no less than to ad- 
vance his intellectual development. 

In general, however, if it appears that students do not 
improve their time and opportunities, or do not conduct 
themselves in a respectful and orderly manner, their con- 
nection with the Institution is suspended, or if it should be 
found, after due probation and inquiry, that the influence 
of a student is bad and injurious to others, the right is ex- 
ercised of requiring the withdrawal of such student. It is 
proper to add that within recent date no such case has 
occurred. 

The students are required to be present, promptly, on 
the first day of each and every term. The recitations will 
begin the next morning. 

A record is kept of the scholastic standing of each stu- 
dent, and a copy of the same is sent to the parent or guar- 
dian; if the average standing, in any term, does not exceed 
70, on a basis of loo, he is to be dropped from his class. 

Term fees and room rent are to be paid strictly in ad- 
vance, and if not so paid, or within one month, the student 
neglecting, forfeits his right to continue in the Institution. 

Boarding houses and boarding clubs in the city are to 
be approved by the Faculty, and to be subject to such reg- 
ulations as are usual in similiar institutions. By a rule of 
the College, lady students are not to room in the same 
boarding houses with gentlemen. 

Dancing and card-playing is prohibited, and also the 
use of tobacco on the College Campus. 

Parents are requested not to ask or expect their chil- 
dren to come home during term time. It seriously inter- 



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44 HOPE COLLEGE. 



feres with proper habits of study, and by our rules none are 
to be absent from the Institution without permission of the 
President. 



TO ALUMNI AND FRIENDS. 

Hope College is grateful to the Reformed Church in 
America, whose she is, and whom she so loyally serves by 
the men she is furnishing both for the Domestic and the 
Foreign Field. 

Hope College is grateful to her Alumni and to all who 
were at any time connected with the College as students, 
for the faithful work they are doing; wherever they are 
practicing their professions, they show that they are 
"Workmen that need not be ashamed;'* — grateful for the 
growing interest they manifest by making known the merits 
of their Alma Mater, and by inspiring deserving young 
men to seek the same educational advantages. 

Hope College is grateful to royal and liberal friends 
who here invest their money, not in dead and fleeting things, 
but in brain and character and souls of men. Be assured, 
nowhere else will your well-earned money yield larger re- 
turns, in no other way can you render better service for 
your Church and for your Country. 

With such encouragements as these Hope College feels 
hopeful for the future. She will try still to deserve your 
favor and your liberality. You have young friends, — con- 
tinue to send us their names, if they are studious and de- 
serving, especially the names .of such as are not likely other- 
wise ever to receive a good education. 



GYMNASIUM. 
Classes in dumb-bells, Indian clubs, chest-weights, 
etc., are held daily at such hours as best to accommodate 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 45 

the Students. The gymnasium proves very helpful to the 
physical development of the students. By a proper use of 
the advantages offered in this direction, they acquire the 
physical strength needed to endure the mental strain inci- 
dent to student life. 



MUSEUM. 

Valuable gifts are, from time to time, received from 
Alumni and friends of the Institution. Others, desiring to 
enrich this department, are only waiting till the College 
shall have a suitable building for the safekeeping of such 
collections. 

Here is a grand opportunity for some lover of natural 
history, and a friend of Christian education, to immortalize 
his name by erecting such a building. 



^ PROFESSORSHIPS. 

By the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Voorhees, a 
Professorship of Greek has been established. 

And by the liberality of Mr. Robert Schell the College 
now has a Professorship of Ethics and Evidences of Chris- 
tianity. 

Other friends are considering the endowing of Profes- 
sorships. 



BEQUESTS AND DONATIONS. 

The corporate name of the College is: **The Council of 
Hope College," a Corporation located at Holland, Michigan. 

Bequests and donations are invited to found Scholar- 
ships to aid worthy students, to endow Professorships, to 
establish a Library fund, and for additional buildings. 



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46 HOPE COLLEGE. 



It is the aim of the College to offer to young people an 
opportunity to acquire a liberal education at a moderate 
expense, and to surround them with wholesome Christian 
influences. It would seem but fair and proper to state that, 
as a direct or indirect result of these influences, the 40 per 
cent, of professing Christians of the members that consti- 
tute the lowest class, has grown to a ratio of 95 per cent, 
in the Senior Class. 



HONORARY. DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1895— 
LL.D. — Rev. Giles H. Mandeville, D. D. 
D. D. — Rev. Julius W. Geyer. 
A. M. — James W. Humphrey. 

IN 1896 — 
A. M. — Hon. George Birkhoff, Jr. 
A. M. — Capt. Cornelius Gardener. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 
President, - - Rev. J. P. DeJong. 

Vice President, - - Rev. E. W. Stapelkamp. 
Secretary, - - Prof. J. H. Kleinheksel. 

Treasurer, - - Hon. Arend Visscher. 



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Chronological Memoranda^ 



Beginning of the Netherland Immlfpratlon into Michigan, Iowa, etc 1847 

VUIage ol Holland laid out / 1848 

Five acres donated by Bov. A. C. Van Baalte, D. D., as a site for an Academy 1860 

"Pioneer School" opened, Mr. W. T. Taylor, Principal Oct, 1861 

Placed under the care of the General Synod June, 1868 

Mr. W. T. Taylor resigned Oct., 1868 

Bev. F. B. Beldler, Principal 1864 

Bev. John Van Vleck, Principal 1866 

The school named the Holland Academy 1866 

Van Vleck Hall erected on "The live acres" .1867 

The Academy more fully organized 1867-1868 

BeT. John Van Vleck, resigned 1869 

Bev. Philip Phelps, Jr., PrincipaL 1869 

Campus enlarged to 16 acres 1869 

"Oggel House" erected as a residence 1860 

Gymnasium built, largely by Students 1962 

A fVes^man Glass Formed, 10 in number 1862 

A "Board of Superintendents" appointed by Oeneral Synod 1663 

A Coil«00 proposed, and approved by the Synods 1864 

Over $40,000 contributed as an endowment 1866 

Hope College begun, 1866; incorporated May, 1866 

Faculty of six appointed and organized; Bev. P. Phelps, Jr., D. D., Pres., July, 1866 

First Commencement; eight became A. B 1866 

A weekly newspaper, De Hope^ established 1866 

Theological instruction begun, with a class of seven Sept., 1866 

Bev. E. C. Grispell, D. D., elected Professor of Theology; Profs. Phelps, Oggel, Beck, ' 

and Scott being elected "Lectors" 1867 

The Theological Department adopted by General Synod as its "Western Theological 

Seminary" 1869 

Death of Bev. Peter J. Oggel, Professor, and Editor of De Hope Dec 1869 

First Theological Class of seven graduated 1869 

First Formal Constitution of the College adopted 1871 

0. Doesburg, A. M., elected Professor 1872 

Brick printing (Alee for Z>« Hope erected 1876 

Death of Bev. A. C. Van Baalte, D.D Nov. 7, 1876 

Suspension of the Theological Department June, 1877 

Beorganization of the College; Dr. Phelps resigns June, 1878 

Bev. G. H. Mandevllle, D. D., Provisional President and Financial Agent; Prof. C.> 

Stott, Vice President i 1878 

Wm. A. Shields, A. M., and G. J. Kollen, A. M., elected Professors 1878 

Prof. Charles Scott, D. D., Provisional President 1880 

Theological Instruction restored; a Professorship of $80,000 completed; Bev. N. M. 

Steffens, D.D., Professor of Theology 1884 

H. Boers, A. M.; J. B. Kleinheksel, A. M.; J. G. Sutphen, A. M., and Bev. John J. 

Andeoson, A. M., elected Professors 1886 

Election of Prof. Charles Scott, D. D., as Constitutional President 1886 



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48 HOPE COLLEGE. 



President Soott Inangnrated 1888 

Synod^s House for the President erected 1886 

First number of The Anchor Issued May, 1887 

Ber. James F. Zwemer appointed Financial Agent 1888 

Rev. J.H. GlUesple, A. M., elected Professor 1888 

Quarter Centennial Celebration June 36, 1880 

Graves Library .and Winants Chapel begun; comer stone laid Oct 13, 1803 

President Scott resigns 1888 

Prof. G. J. KoUen, A. M., elected President June 39,1898 

D. B. Yntema, A. M., elected Professor '. 1888 

Erastus A. Whltenack, A. B., elected Professor 1898 

Death of Prof . Charles Scott, d'. D Oct 81, 1898 

Graves Library and Winants Chapel dedicated June 36, 1804 

President Kollen Inaugurated June 27, 1894 

J. B. Nykerk, A. M., elected Professor 1806 

J. T. Bergen, A. M., elected Professor 1896 

A. P. Harvey, A. M., elected Tutor 1896 

Death of Hon. N. F. Graves, LL.D July 31, l696 

Death of Bev. Philip Phelps, Jr., D. D., LL.D Sept. 4, 1896 



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WESTERN 

i keologlce^l 3e«\me^ry 

OFTHB 

Reformed Church in America^ 



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50 HOPE COLLBQB. 



CALENDAR 







1896. 


Sept. 


I. 


Entrance Examinations. 


tt 


2. 


Term Opens. 


Nov. 


26. 


Thanksgiving Recess begins. 


Dec. 


i8. 


Beginning of Christmas Recess. 
1897. 


Jan. 


5- 


Work Resumed. 


tt 


28. 


Prayer for Colleges. 


Apr. 


26. 


Meeting of Board of Superintendents. 


tt 


26-28. 


Examinations. 


' tt 


28. 


Commencement Exercises in Evening. 

VACATION. 


Aug. 


31- 


Entrance Examinations. 


Sept. 


I. 


Term Begins. 


Nov. 


24. 


Thanksgiving Recess begins. 


Dec. 


17- 


Beginning of Christmas Recess. 
1898. 


Jan. 


4- 


Work Resumed. 



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WBSTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 61 



Board of Superintendents. 



EX-OFFICIO. 

Gerrit J. KoLLEN, LL.D., President of Hope College. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF NEW YORK. 

1898. Rev. F. S. Schenck, D D., - Hudson, N. Y. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF ALBANY. 

1899. Rev. E. A. Collier, D. D., - Kinderhook, N. Y. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 

1897. Rev. A. Paige Peeke, - East Millstone, N. Y. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF CHICAGO. 

1899. Rev. p. Moerdyke, D. D., - - Chicago, 111. 

1898. Rev. A. Buursma, - - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

1897. Rev. J. P. De Jonge, - - Zeeland, Mich. 

1898. Elder D. J. De Jonge, - - Roseland, 111. 

1899. Elder F. J. Cashing, - - Irving Park, 111. 

1900. Elder John Snitzler, - - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF DAKOTA. 

1897. Rev. S. J. Harmeling, - Westficld, N. Dakota. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF GRAND RIVER. 

1 90 1. Rev. Dirk Broek, - - Grandville, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF HOLLAND. 

1898. Rev. A. Van den Berg, - - Overisel, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF ILLINOIS. 

1897. Rev. J. H. Van den Hook, - - Chicago, 111. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF IOWA. 

1899. Rev. J. F. Zwemer, - - Orange City, la. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF MICHIGAN. 

1899. Rev. John A. De Spelder, - - Macon, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF PLEASANT PRAIRIE. 

1898. Rev. J. Muller, - - German Valley, 111. 

FROM THE CLASSIS OF WISCONSIN. 

1899. Rev. John Broek, - - South Holland, 111. 



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1 



52 HOPS COLLBOE 



Facultyr 



REV. JOHN W. BEARDSLEE, D. D., 
President of the Faculty and Professor of Biblical Lan- 
guages and Literature. 

REV. HENRY E. DOSKER, D. D., 

Secretary of the Faculty and Professor of Historical 

Theology. In charge of Hermeneutics and Harmony 

of the Gospels. 

REV. EGBERT WINTER, D. D., 

Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theology. In charge 

of Practical Theology. 

REV. J. TALLMADGE BERGEN, 
Instructor in Elocution. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

Rev. a. Buursma, President. 

Rev. p. Moerdyke, D. D., Stated Clerk. 



committee on reception of students 
and examinations. 
Rev. a. Buursma, 
Rev. J. p. De J once, 
Rev. E. W. Staplekamp, 

PrES. G. J. KOLLEN, LL.D., 

Rev. J. W. Beardslee, D. D., 
Rev. H. E. Dosker, D. D., 
Rev. E. Winter, D. D. 



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WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 



53 



Students* 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Martinus E. Broekstra, - - - Hofepers, la. 

Theological School, Kampen. 

DouwE De Groot, - - - Holland, Mich. 

Cornelius A. Jongewaard, - " - Orange City, la. 

Iowa OoUege, 1898. 

Peter Swart, ----- Chicago, 111. 

Hope College, 18M. 

John W. Te Selle, - - . - Holland, Neb. 

Hope OoUege (Special), 18M. 



Art Van Arendonk, 



Harrison, S. Dakota. 



Hope College (Special), 1994. 



MIDDLE CLASS. 

Albert W. De Jonge, - , Holland, Mich. 

Katlonal Edacatlonal Diploma, NetherlandB. 

Harm Dykhuizen, - - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Hope College, 1806. 

Johannes Engelsman, - - Chicago, 111. 

Hope College (Special), 1896. 

Harke Frieling, - - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Theological School, Grand Baplds, 1896. 

J. H. E. Te Grootenhuis, - - Hospers, la. 

Theological School, Kampen. 

William Gruys, - - Wormser, Montana. 

Hope College (Special), 1896. 

Benjamin Hoffman, - - . Overisel, Mich. 

Hope College, 1896. 



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54 HOPE COLLEGE. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Edward D. Dimnent, - - Chicago, 111. 

Hope College, 1896. 

Edward Kelder, - - - Grandville, Mich. 

Hope College. 1886. 

J. William Kots, . - - - Maurice, la. 

Hope CoUoge (Special), 1896. 

Frederic Lubbers, - . - Orange City, la. 

Hope College, 1896. . 

John G. Theilken, - - German Valley, 111. 

Hope CoUege (Special), 1896. 



SUMMARY. 

Senior Class 6 

Middle Class 7 

Junior Class 5 

18 



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WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 55 



COURSE OF STUDY, 



Junior Year, 



PROF. BEARDSLEE. 

EXEGETICAL THEOLOGY. 

Elements of Hebrew. Grammatical Forms. Induc- 
tile Study, based on reading of the text. Selections from 
the Pentateuch. 

In Greek. — Acts of the Apostles, 

PROF. DOSKER. 
Greek Harmony and Exegesis of the Gospels. Archeol- 
ogy. Sacred Geography Hermeneutics (Terry's). Organic 
Unity of the Sacred Scriptures, Biblical Symbolism. 

HISTORICAL THEOLOGY. 

Sacred History (Kurtz). General Scope of Revelation. 
Contrast between Judaeism and Paganism. Rise and De- 
velopment of the Kingdom of God. Comparative Data 
of Sacred and Profane History. 

PROF. WINTER. 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY. 

Introduction. Encyclopedia. Symbolics. 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY. 

Theory of Preaching. Analysis of Sermons. Homil- 
etical Exercises. 



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56 HOPE COLLKOB. 



Middle Year. 



PROF. BEARDSLEE. 

EXEGETICAL THEOLOGY. 

Hebrew Etymology and Syntax. Old Testament In- 
troduction. Messianic Prophecy. Readings from Histor- 
ical Books. 

In Greek. — Exegetical Study of tbe Epistles to the 
Hebrews, and Corinthians. Sight Reading. Book of 
Revelation and Paul's Minor Epistles. 

PROF. DOSKER. 

HISTORICAL THEOLOGY. 

Primitive History of the Church. Christ and His 
Apostle. Ancient and Mediaeval Church History. 
Struggle between the Roman Empire and the Church. 
Victory of the latter. Contact between Philosophy and 
Theology. Life and Morals of the Church. Sects, Schools, 
and Heresies. Asceticism and Fanaticism. The Dawn 
of the Reformation. 

PROF. WINTER. 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY. 

Lectures. Theology Proper. Anthropology. Objec- 
tive Soteriology. 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY. 

Homiletics. Church Government. Pastoral Theol- 
ogy, Lectures. 



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WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 57 



Senior Year. 



PROF. BEARDSLEE. 

Hebrew Prophetical and Poetical Books. Selections 
from Historical Books. Aramaic. 

In Greek. — Introduction to New Testament. Exegeti- 
cal Study of Romans and Writings of John. Sight Reading 
from Pastoral and Catholic Epistles. 

PROF. DOSKER. 

HISTORICAL THEOLOGY. 

The Reformation. The Age of Symbols. Doctrinal 
Struggle in the Protestant Church. Catholic Reaction. 
Deformation and Protestant Scholasticism. Rise and De- 
velopment of Rationalism. Deism and Atheism. Sectari- 
anism. Missions. The Church of Christ and Christian 
Society in the 19th Century. 

PROF. WINTER. 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY. 

Lectures. Subjective Soteriology. Ecclesiology. Es- 
chatology. Apologetics. Ethics. Review of the whole 
System. 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY. 

Homiletics. Homiletical Exercises. Pastoral Theol- 
ogy. Catechetics. Church Government. Theory of 
Missions. 



N B.— Church Government, Ethics, Catechetics, Theory of 
Missions and Homiletica are divided betweeen Middle and 
Senior Years. 



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General Information* 



ADMISSION. 

The Seminary is open for the admission of students 
from every denomination of Christians. 

A Committee of the Board of Superintendents, on the 
reception of students, meets on the Tuesday before the 
first Wednesday in September, at ii o'clock a. m. 

Every applicant is required to present a certificate of 
church membership and one of literary qualific2tions. One 
who has not pursued a regular Collegiate course must 
give proof by testimonials or examination of such literary 
attainments as will enable him to enter upon the course of 
studies in the school. 

The requirement of the Constitution in regard to stu- 
dents preparing for the ministry in the Reformed Church, 
is as follows: 

"Every person contemplating the work of the minis- 
try, before he commences his course of Theological studies, 
shall furnish satisfactory evidence of his being a member in 
full communion and good standing of a Reformed Protes- 
tant church; of his piety, ability, and literary attainments; 
and thereupon shall be admitted into one of the Theological 
Schools; and during the prosecution of his studies there, 
shall be subject to the rules and regulations thereof; and 
when he shall have completed the prescribed course and 
term of Theological studies, shall be admitted to an exami- 
nation according to the regulations of the school as estab- 
lished by the General Synod; and if found qualified, shall 
receive a professorial certificate to that effect, which shall 
entitle him to an examination for licensure before the Classis 
to which he belongs." — Constitution; Art, ii. Sec. 2, 



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wester:^ theological seminary. 59 

THE YEAR. 

The Seminary opens on the Tuesday before the first 
Wednesday in September, when the Committee meets for 
the reception of students, and closes on the last Wednes- 
day in April, with the annual Commencement. 

PREACHING. 

The Students preach regularly before the Faculty and 
Students, subject to such criticism as may be appropriate. ' 
They also preach in the churches, especially such as are 
vacant, under the direction of the Faculty. 

MISSION WORK. 

The Students are organized as a Mission Band and hold 
themselves in readiness to attend any calls to address meet- 
ings, where they can advocate the cause of Missions. 

Mr. Peter Semelink has established a Scholarship of 
|2,ooo, the income of which is to be paid to a student in 
the Seminary, preference being given to one looking for- 
ward to the Foreign Missionary Work. 

LIBRARY. 

The Chambers Library, in the Semelink Family Hall, 
is now an efficient working Theological Library, of about 
4,000 volumes. For general literature the Students have 
free use of the Graves Library of Hope College. 

ADELPHIC SOCIETY. 

This is a weekly gathering of the Professors and Stu- 
dents for the discussion of questions relating to the practi- 
cal work of the ministry. The exercises embrace debates, 
essays, and general discussions. 

COMMENCEMENT. 

The Theological Commencement Exercises take place 
on Wednesday evening, at the close of the year. Ad- 



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60 HOPE COLLEGE. 



dresses are delivered by the Seniors, in En(5lish and Dutch, 
and by some member of the Board of Superintendents ap- 
pointed for the purpose. 

BENEFICIARY AID. 

Instruction is entirely gratuitous. Young men are 
aided by the Board of Education, as their circumstances 
require and the funds admit, not only while in the Semi- 
nary, but in the studies preparatory to entering it. Rooms 
are provided in Van Vleck Hall, and board can be ob- 
tained in the city or at the Students' Clubs at from $1.75 to 
^2.50 per week. 

SEMELINK FAMILY HALL. 

This building, erected by Mr. Peter Semelink, con- 
tains Recitation Rooms, Library and Chapel; is erected on 
one of the most desirable lots in the city, just south of the 
College Campus; and contains every convenience for Sem- 
inary work. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

At the close of the year a written examination of all 
the classes, and on all the branches of study, is held be- 
fore a committee of the Board of Superintendents, be- 
ginning Monday, April 26, at 11 o'clock a. m., and this 
is followed by an oral examination before the full Board 
on the Tuesday and Wednesday of the same week. 
Special written examinations are held during the year as 
the work requires. 

LOCATIOK. 

Holland is situated at the head of Macatawa Bay, 
which opens into Lake Michigan, giving it all the attrac- 
tion of boating, with daily steamers for Chicago and other 
poins. It has good facilities, and offers many attractions 
as a place of residence. 



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^\ 



^^^^^^^B^^^^ 




i^^^™^^^^^^^^^^H 




CATALOGUE 

OF 1 

Hope Gollege 

AT I 

Holland, - Michigan. 

18©T-'9S. 


^^^^^^^1 




^^H 



1808. 



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1899. 








JANUARY 


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MARCH 


^ il 2 3 


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CATALOGUE 



OF THB 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



OF 



Hope College, 

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN. 
1897-'98. 



AN INSTITUTION OF THK REFORMED CHURCH 
IN AMERICA. 



PIONEER SCHOOL, 1861. 
HOLLAND ACADEMY, 1867. 
BECAME HOPE COLLEGE, 1866. 



HOLLAND, MICH, 

Holland Qty News Presses. 

169& 



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Calendar— 1898^*99, 



1898. 



April 


4- 


(< 


27-28. 


(( 


27. 


June 


9-IO. 


<( 


12. 


(( 


13- 


<< 


14. 


f ( 


14. 



15- 



Spring Term begins. 
Senior Examinations. 
Meeting of Council. 
Undergraduate Examinations. 
Baccalaureate Sermon. 
Closing Exercises of the Grammar 

School, in Winants Chapel, 2 P. M. 
Meeting of Council, 10 A. M. 
Meeting of Alumni in Winants Chapel, 

7:30 P. M. 
Commencement Exercises in Winants 

Chapel, 7:30 P. M. 



VACATION. 



Sept. 



Nov. 
Dec. 



20. 



21. 
24. 
23. 



Examinations for Admission, begin- 
ning at 9 A. M , in Graves Hall. 
Fall Term begins at 9 A. M. 
Thanksgiving Recess. 
Fall Term ends. 



1899. Jan'y 



9- 
26. 

March 31. 



VACATION. 



Winter Term begins. 

Day of Prayer for Colleges. 

Winter Term ends. 



VACATION. 



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The Council. 



^^ 



EX-OFFICIO. 

Prof. G. J. Kollen, LL.D., - President of the College. 

ELECTED MEMBERS. 

FROM GENERAL SYNOD. 
KAMS8. KESnamamB. TXBltB kxfzrx. 

Hon. Arend Visscher, Holland, Mich. 1898 

Hon. Gerrit J. Diekema, Holland, Mich. 1899 

^ Rev. Cornelius Brett, D. D., Jersey City, N. J. 1900 

I^ Mr. a. a. Raven, Brooklyn, N. Y. 1900 

i Rev. G. H. Mandeville, D. D., LL.D., New York City. 190 1 

Pi Rev. Jas. F. Zwemer, Orange City, Iowa. 1902 

^ Rev. Wm. Moerdyk, Milwaukee, Wis. 1902 

<^ Hon. Isaac Cappon, Holland, Mich. 1903 

FROM CLASSIS OF ILLINOIS. 

Rev. Jas. Ossewaarde, Pella, Iowa. 1898 

^ Francis J. Cushing, Irving Park, 111. 1898 

^'J FROM CLASSIS OF WISCONSIN. 

i Rev. John H. Karsten, Oostburg, Wis. 1899 

■*^ Rev. B. Van Ess, Roseland, 111. 1899 

A 



FROM CLASSIS OF MICHIGAN. 

Rev. H. Gough Birchbv, Holland, Mich. 1900 

Rev. Wm. Hall Williamson, Grand Rapids, Mich. 1900 

FROM CLASSIS OF PLEASANT PRAIRIE. 

Rev. D. Schaefer, Parkersburgh, la. 1900 

Rev. a. F. Beyer, German Valley, 111. 1900 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



FROM CLASSIS OF GRAND RIVER. 

Rev. D. J. DeBey, Grand Rapids, Mich. 1901 

Rev. Dirk Broek, Grandville, Mich. 1901 

FROM CLASSIS OF HOLLAND. 

Rev. G. De Jonge, Vriesland, Mich. 1902 

Hon. Jac. Den Herder, Zealand, Mich. 1902 

from classis of dakota. 

*Rev. Wm. Miedema. 

Rev. S. J. Harmeling, Marion, So. Dakota. 1902 

FROM CLASSIS OF IOWA. 

Rev. p. Lepeltak, Alton, Iowa. 1903 

Rev. James De Pree, Sioux Centre, Iowa. 1903 



OFFICERS OF COUNCIL. 



Rev. Wm. Moerdyk, - - President. 

Rev. Wm. Hall Williamson, - Vice President. 

Hon. G. J. Diekema, - - Secretary. 

Prof. C. Doesburg, - - - Treasurer. 



COMMITTEES OF COUNCIL. 



executive committee. 



Pres. G. J. Kollen, Chairman. 
Hon. Arend Visscher, Sec*y. 
Hon. Jac. Den Herder. Hon. G. J. Diekema. 

Rev. Gerhard De Jonge. 



*Bemoved from Clasels. 



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THE COUNCIL. 



INVESTMENT COMMITTEE. 
(In charge of the fniidB of the OonDClL) 

Hon. Arend Visscher. Pres. G. J. Kollen. 

Hon. G. J. DiEKEMA. 



Hon. Isaac Cappon. 



HOPE farm COMMITTEE. 

Pres. G. J. Kollen. Hon. Isaac Cappon. 

Hon. Arend Visscher. 



'DE hope: 



DF. C. DOESBURG, ) 

V. H. E. DosKER, D. D., V 
\\ D. Broek, ) 



Prof. C. Doesburg, 

Rev. 

Rev. 

Mr. R. Kanters, 



Editorial Committee. 
Publisher. 



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College Depa^rfrcvervf. 



Faculty* 

GERRIT J. KOLLEN, LL.D., President. 
In charge of Political Economy. 

CORNELIS DOESBURG, A.M., Secretary and Registrar. 

Professor of tbe Dutch Language and Literature. 

In charge of Art Studies. 

HENRY BOERS, A. M. 
Professor of History. 
In charge of Zoology. 

JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, A. M., Vice President. 

Professor of Mathematics. 

In charge of Botany and Biology. 

JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A. M., 
Rodman Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

REV. JOHN H. GILLESPIE, A. M., 

Ralph Voorhees Professor of the Greek Language 

and Literature. 

JOHN B. NYKERK, A. M., 

Professor of the English Language and Literature. 

In charge of Vocal Music. 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



DOUWE B. YNTEMA, A. M., 

Professor of Chemistry and Physics. 

In charge of Pedagogy. 

REV. JOHN TALLMADGE BERGEN, AM., 

Robert Schell Professor of Ethics and Evidences of 

Christianity. In charge of Mental Science. 

HENRY VEGHTE, A. M., 
Professor of the French and German Languages, and 

Literatures. 

EDWARD D. DIMNENT, A. B., 
Instructor in Geology. 

Hon. G. J. DiEKEMA, A. M., LL.B., 
Geo. E. Kollen, A. M., LL.B., 

Lecturers on Political Economy. 



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STUDENTS. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

John J. Banninga Chicago, III. 

John W. Beardslke, Jr City. 

Robert P. De Bruyn City. 

Martin Hyink Newkirk, la. 

Abraham Klerk Holland, Neb. 

Robert E. Kremers City. 

Cornelius Kuyper Orange City, la. 

John G. Meengs New Holland. 

Ties Mulder City. 

William Prakken City. 

John G. Rutgers, Jr Graafschap. 

John B. Steketee City. 

Jacob Van Ess Chicago, 111. 

Henry F. Van Slooten Holland. 

JuRRY E. Winter City. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Minnie Wilterdink Holland. 

William N. Birchby City. 

Peter Braak Grand Rapids. 

Arthur C. V . Dangremond Newark, N. Y. 

J. Jas. De Pree Sioux jCenter, la. 

Seine B. De Pree Sioux Center, la. 

Andrew Ganzevoort Hospers, la. 

Isaac H. Hospers Orange City, la. 

John E. Kuizenga Muskegon. 



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STUDENTS. 11 



FoLKERT Mansens City. 

Peter J. Marsilje City. 

Cornelius D. Mulder Spring Lake. 

Fred. Reeverts Stillman Valley, 111. 

Henry Schippkr Grand Rapids. 

Henry Sluyter Grand Rapids. 

Cornelius Spaan Orange City, la. 

John H. Ter Avest Hamilton. 

GpRRiT Te Kolste Holland, Neb. 

John Van Ess Chicago, 111. 

Bernard Van Heuvelen City. 

John Verwey City. 

Fedde Wiersema Chicago, 111. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Haitie a. Zwemer Orange City, la. 

Harry Boot Fulton, 111. 

Henry D. Brink Hamilton. 

Albertus T. Broek Grandville. 

Abraham De Young Chicago, 111. 

Gerard J. Dinkeloo City. 

Almon T. Godfrey City. 

Gerrit Hondelink Grand Rapids. 

Leonard L. Legters Clymer, N. Y. 

SiEBE C. Nettinga LeMars, la. 

SiERT F. RiEPMA Benton Harbor. 

William Rinck City. 

John H. Straks Maurice, la. 

John D. Tanis Vriesland. 

Cornelius Van der Meulen Holland. 

Aart B. Van Zante Pella, la. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 
Henry Arends, Jr Chancellor, S. Dak. 



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12 HOPE COLLEOE. 



William Bekkering Leota, Minn. 

Arthur Birchby City. 

William J. Damson City. 

Marinus Den Herder Vriesland. 

Richard De Young Chicago, 111. 

John H. Dupree Zeeland. 

Matthias J. Duven Maurice, la. 

Garrelt N. Heeren German Valley, 111. 

Albert Hoeksema Holland. 

John H. Hospers Orange City, la. 

George H. Korteling Chicago, 111. 

Martin I. Koster Grand Rapids. 

Edward D. Kremers City. 

Benjamin J. Lugers Holland. 

Adrian J. Neerken Graafschap. 

John Nywening Wichert, 111. 

John S. Raum City. 

John Steunenberg Grand Rapids. 

Martin J. Stormzand Grand Rapids. 

Henry Telman Overisel. 

John Van Peursem Maurice, la. 

Allen Van Wechel Orange City, la. 

Oswald W. Visscher City. 

Jacobus Wayer Muskegon. 

Jacob J. Weersing, Jr East Holland. 

John Wesselink Sioux Centre, la. 

Egbert Winter City. 

John E. Winter City. 

John G. Winter City. 

UNCLASSIFIED. 

Christina Holkeboer . ' City. 

Helena J ANSSEN Zeeland. 

Qrace W. Yates City. 



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STUDENTS. 13 



Manus Albers Overisel. 

Harry G. Birchby City. 

WoLBERT Denekas German Valley, 111. 

Henry Huenemann Lester Prairie, Minn. 

Melvin Meengs City. 

SUMMARY. 

Seniors 15 

Juniors 22 

Sophomores 16 

Freshmen 30 

Unclassified 8 

Total 91 



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14 HOPB COLLB6K. 



Course of Study. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Mathematics — Wentworth's Plane and Spherical 
Trigonometry, and College Algebra. 

Language — 

English — Genung's Outlines of Rhetoric; Anderson's 
Study of English Words; Essays. 

Latin — Cicero's Orations; Vergil. 

Greek — Homer's Iliad or Odyssey; Herodotos; Greek 
Prose Composition. 

Dutch — History of Dutch Literature; Essays and 
Translations. 

French — Edgren's Grammar, complete; Edgren's Rea- 
der; Heath's New Dictionary; French Literature, Popular, 
Classical, and Scientific. 

German — Joynes-Meissner's Grammar; Joynes-Meiss- 
ner's Reader; Heath's New Dictionary; German Literature; 
Onkel und Nichte; Immensee. 

History — Allen's History of the Roman People. 

Natural Science — Holder's Zoology; Gray's Botany. 

Chemistry — Williams' Chemical Science, revised edi- 
tion; Williams' Laboratory Manual. 

Elocution — Fulton and Truetlood's Practical Elocu- 
tion. 

Bible Study — Ellicott's New Testament. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 15 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Mathematics — Surveying and Navigation, and Hardy's 
Analytical Geometry. 

Language — 

English — Pancoast's Introduction to English Liter- 
ature; Hale*s Longer English Poems; Garnett's English 
Prose; Essays and Reports. 

Latin — Livy; De Senectute. 

Greek — Lysias; Greek Prose Composition. 

German — German Literature, Popular, Classical, and 
Scientific; German Composition and Discourse. 

History — Myer's Mediaeval history. 

Natural Science — Chemistry. 

Elocution — Fulton and Trueblood's Practical Elocu- 
tion finished; Orations and Forcnsics. 

Bible Study. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics — Hardy's Calculus. 

Mathematics Applied — Olmsted's College Philosophy, 
Fpurth Revision^ Sheldon. 

Language — 

Latin — Horace; Stickney's Cicero's De Officiis. 

Greek — Plato's Apology and Crito; Tarbell's Demos- 
thenes' Philippics. 

German — Gern^an Literature, Popular, Classical, and 
Scientific; German Composition and Discourse. 

History — Myer's Modern History. 

Natural Science — Sedgwick and Wilson's Biology. 

Metaphysics — Porter's Psychology. 

Logic — McCosh. 



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16 HOrE COLLEGE. 



Ethics — Porter's Elements of Moral Science begun. 
Rhetoric — Essays, Discussions, and Orations. 
Bible Study . 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics — Newcomb and Holden's Astronomy, 
advanced course. 

Language — 

Greek — Aristophanes' Clouds; Sophocles' Antigone. 

German — Cierman Literature, Popular, Classical, and 
Scientific; German Composition aud Discourse. 

Ethics — Porter's Elements of Moral Science com- 
pleted. 

History — Guizot's History of Civilization. 

Natural Science — Dana's Class Book of Geology. 

Political Science — Walker's Political Economy, ad- 
vanced course. 

Rhetoric — Orations and Essays continued. 

Sacred Literature — Fisher's Evidences of Christi- 
anity. 

Four parallel courses have been introduced in the Col- 
lege: the Classical, the Philosophical, the Scientific, and 
the Normal. The last course to he pursued with a view to 
securing a State Certificate. 

It will be understood that it will take four years to in- 
troduce the courses in all the Classes. This year the four 
courses are the same in the Freshman Class and the courses 
of the other classes will be modified from year to year. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 



College Department 



FitESH. 


8:20-9:10. 


9:10-10:5. 


10:5^11. 


11-12. 




FBEHCfl, 

34 weeks, 
la weeks. 


Roman Histoby, 
10 wee^s. 

Mathematxos. 

ae weeks. 


Dutch Lit. a 
Bhst., 14 wks. 

GniCAN, 

aa weeks. 

BiBLX Stui>t, 
on Thursday. 


Bhbtoric, 

14 weeks. 
Bioloot, 

la weeks. 
Botany, 

10 weeks. 
Bhbtosicals, 

on Monday. 


Soph. 


8:20-9:10. 


9:10-10 5. 


10:5—11. 


11-12. 




SuBTKTiHO and 
Natioatiok, 

la weeks. 
Obbbk. 

10 weeks. 

Fbxmoh. 

14 weeks. 


Ghxxistry, 

1st term. 

Eho. Lrr. & rbst. 
2d and 8d terms. 

BHXTORIOAIiS, 

on Wednesday. 


Latin, 

14 weeks. 

aa weeks. 


MXD. BL.T. 

1st term. 
Ohxiobtrt, 

ad term. 
An. Gkom.. 

Sdterm. 
BiBiJB Study 

on Friday. 


JUN. 


8:20-9:10. 


. 9:10-10:5. 


10:5-11. 


11-12. 




PSYCHOUMY, 

1st term. 
ELoccmoH, 

1st term on 
Tneeday. 
Physios, ad term. 
Mod. Hist., 

Sdterm. 

ad A Sd terms 
on Friday. 


BXOLOOY, 

10 weeks. 

MoDKRH Hist., 

4 weeks. 

Logic A E1.00., 
on Tues., ad term. 

Sdterm. 


QSBMAN, 

14 weeks. 

Psyoholoot. 

4 weeks. 

Obkxk, 

18 weeks. 


Latin, 1st and 

2d terms. 

Calculus, 

ad term. 

Rhstoricau, 
on Wednesday. 


Sen. 


8:20-9:10 


9:10—10:5 


10:5-11 


11:12. 




OXBMAir, 

la weeks. 
Vacavt, 

2 weeks. 

ETHioa, 

8 weeks. 

SoaOLOOY, 

6 weeks. 


Evs. of Ohbist'y., 
8 weeks. 
Ethics, 6 weeks. 
Political Eooh., 
la weeks. 
Elocution, a wks. 
Rhntobioals, 

on Friday. 


aBXBK 

18 weeks. 

Hist, or Oivil'n., 
10 weeks. 

Hkbxxw. 


ASTBONMY, 

10 weeks. 

Political Econ., 
4 weeks. 

OaOLOOY, 

14 weeks. 



Lady Principal will meet all the lady students on Monday of eac 
1:30 P. M. 

All the classes meet for Instruction in Music on Friday afternoon 



»h week from 1 to 
of each week. 



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HrefiO|ra^forY DefiO|rfrfvem 



Faculty, 

PROF. GERRIT J. KOLLEN, LL.D., President. 

PROF. CORNELIS DOESBURG, A. M., 
Dutch Language and Literature, Drawing, and Painting. 

PROF. HENRY BOERS, A. M., 
History. 

PROF. JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, A.M., Vice President. 
Mathematics. 

PROF. JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A. M., Secretary. 

Latin. 

PROF. JOHN H. GILLESPIE, A. M., 
Greek. 

PROF. JOHN B. NYKERK, A. M., 
English, and Music. 

PROF. DOUWE B. YNTEMA, A. M., 
Physics, and Pedagogy. 

PROF. JOHN TALLMADGE BERGEN, A. M., 
Bible Study. 



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PREPARATOKY DEPARTMENT. 19 

PROF. HENRY VEGHTE, A. M., 
Modern Languages. 

EDWARD D. DIMNENT, A. B., 
Tutor — English, Latin, and Mathematics. 

MRS. C. VAN RAALTE GILMORE, 
Lady Principal. 



Peter Braak, 
Prof. C. Doesburg, Harry Boot, 
Librarian. John S. Raum, 

Arthur Birchby, 



Ass*t 
Librarians. 



GarreltN. Heeren, Chorister. Wm. N. Birchby, Organist. 
Bernard Bloemendal, Janitor. 



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STUDENTS. 



'A" CLASS. 



HAKU. BCfODBltCBfl. 

Gertrude Klomparens Fillmore. 

Minnie Van Houte City. 

William Beckman City. 

J ACOB G. Bloemers Holland. 

John Y. Broek Grandville. 

Gerrit H. Brouwer New Holland. 

Jacob G. Brouwer New Holland. 

William H. De Kleine Forest Grove. 

H ENRY De Free Zeeland. 

Dirk Grul City. 

Bfrnard Kleinhesselink .' Oostburg, Wis. 

Henry J. Steketee Muskegon. 

John A. Van Zoeren City. 

Peter Verburg East Saugatuck. 

John Vork City. 

Hessel Yntema Forest Grove. 

*«b" class. 

Jennie Huizinga City. 

Sena Kooiker Overisel. 

Georgianna Lugers Holland. 

Janet Van den Beldt Holland. 

Cornelius K. Bareman Zeeland. 

Henry K. Boer Drenthe. 

William H. Cooper Muskegon. 



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STUDENTS. 21 



John A. De Hollander Rochester, N Y. 

John J. De Young Chicago, 111. 

Ned. C. Hessenius Parkersburg, la. 

John Itterbeck Fillmore Center. 

Joseph Genant Avon, So. Dak. 

Anthony Karreman City. 

John Laman. . . . : Grand Haven. 

John H. Moeke Borculo. 

Henry G. Pelgrim City. 

Sidney Sandstra Chicago, 111. 

Edward C. Stanton Forest Grove. 

Jacob J. Steffens City. 

Edward J. Strick Forest Grove. 

Nicholas E. Van Dam Drenthe. 

Conelius Van der Mel Grand Rapids. 

Nicholas J. Van Goor City. 

Jacob E. Van Houte City. 

Andrew Wagemaker Crosby. 

Joe a. Wiggers Drenthe. 

**C" CLASS. 

Antoinette C. Boer Hamilton. 

Mary Kroon Boer Hamilton. 

Alice Kollen Overisel. 

Lottie Hoyt City. 

LiLA Thurber City. 

Anna Weurding City. 

Frank J. Bruins Alto, Wis. 

Martin De Goede \ Holland. 

Robert M. De Pree City. 

Herman De Witt Ferrysburg. 

William H. Giebel Williamson, N. Y. 

Edward Kruizenga Ferrysburg. 



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22 HOPS COLLBGB. 



Philip Meengs New Holland. 

Theodore P. Moerdvk Milwaukee, Wis. 

Elisha E. Sayad Orootniah, Persia. 

John K. Van den Beldt Fillmore Center. 

John Van Eyck Zeeland. 

Andrew H. Van Goor City. 

John Van Zomeren Fremont. 

John A. Wagner New Holland. 

Albert Wubbena Harper, 111. 

''D*' CLASS. 

Mary Hilarides Holland. 

Dena Meulpolder Grand Rapids. 

Nellie Smith New Holland. 

Hubert T. Birchby City. 

Simon Blocker Chicago, 111. 

August Breyman City. 

Herman De Witt Ferrysburg. 

John W. Douma Fillmore Center. 

John A. Dyk Hamilton. 

Bernard J. H yink .... Sioux Centre, la. 

James Kleinheksel Fillmore Centre. 

Philip E. Kollen Overisel. 

Henry Kuyper Kalamazoo. 

Ray Mabbs City. 

Henry A. Naberhuis Sioux Centre, la. 

Jacob Pelgrim City. 

Martin Ruisaard DeMotte, Ind. 

Charles B. Stilman City. 

Wilbert Van Appkldoorn Holland. 

John Van der Ark Grand Rapids. 

Cornelius Van der Schoor Grand Rapids. 

HiELTjE Van Dyk Noordeloos. 



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STUDENTS. 23 



CoNARD Van Zee Leighton, la. 

John Van Zee Kalamazoo. 

Raymond Visscher City. 

UNCLASSIFIED. 

Jennie Janssen Zeeland. 

Winifred Kendal City. 

Lena M. Keppel Zeeland. 

Amy Yates City. 

Norman Buegge Burnips Corners. 

Peter Brouwer North Holland. 

LoREN E. Heasley Burnips Corners. 

Gerrit Kamper Holland. 

SUMMARY. 

'*A" Class i6 

**B" Class 26 

"C** Class 21 

''D" Class 25 

Unclassified 8 

Total 96 



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24 HOPE COLLEGE. 



Course of Study. 



FIRST YEAR. ''D" CLASS. 

Mathematics — Southworth's Essentials of Arithmetic, 
Book II. 

Language — 

English — Baskervill and Sewell's English Grammar; 
Repplier's Book of Famous Verse; Stopford A. Brooke's 
Primer of English Literature; Scott's Ivanhoe; Cooper's 
Last of the Mohicans; Readings, and Essays. 

Dutch — Reading; Spelling. 

History — Montgomery's Leading Facts of American 
History; Montgomery's English History. 

Bookkeeping — New Introductive Bookkeeping, by 
Williams & Rogers. 

Penmanship — Spencerian System. 

Bible Study — Old Testament. 

SECOND YEAR. "C" CLASS. 

Drawing — Free-hand ind Perspective. 

Natural Science — Eclectic Physical Geography. 

Mathematics — Wentworth's School Algebra. 

History — Myer's General History begun. 

Physiology — Brands' Physiology and Hygiene. 

Language — 

^«^//jA— Macaulay's Essays on Milton and Addison; 
Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield; Coleridge's Rime of the 
Ancient Mariner; Tennyson's Princess; Readings and Re- 
citations. 



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COURSE OF 8TUDT. 25 



Latin — Tuel and Fowler's First Book in Latin; Gra- 
tatim; Viri Romae; Bennett's Latin Grammar; Composition. 
Dutch — Grammar; Reading; Spelling; Translations. 
Bible Study — Old Testament. 

THIRD YEAR. "B" CLASS. 

Mathematics — Algebra, and Wentworth's New I'lane 
and Solid Geometry. 

Natural Science — Physiology and Hygiene. 
Language — 

English — Macaulay's Essays on Milton and Addison; 
Dryden's Palamon and Arcite; De Quincey*s the Flight of 
a Tartar Tribe; Scott and Denney's Composition — Rhetoric; 
Essays; Readings, and Recitations. 

Latin — Viri Romae; Nepos; Ginn & Co.'s Caesar; 
Qrammar, and Composition. 

Greek — White's Beginner's Greek Book. 

German — Joynes-Meissner's Grammar and Reader; 
Heath's New Dictionary; German Literature. 

HisTORY — Myer's General History finished. 

Bible Study — Old Testament. 

FOURTH YEAR. *'A" CLASS. 
Mathematics — Plane and Solid Geometry finished. 
Natural Science — Carhart and Chute's Elements of 
Physics; Gage's Physical Lab. Manual and Note Book. 
Language — 

English — Milton's Paradise Lost, Books i and ii; 
Pope's Iliad, Books i and xxii; Shakespeare's Macbeth; 
Parson's Versification; Essays; Readings, and Recitations. 

Latin — Caesar; Cicero; Grammar, and Composition. 



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26 HOFB COLLEQB. 



Greek — White's Beginner's Greek Book; Xenophon's 
Anabasis; Woodruff's Greek Prose Composition. 

German — Continuation of above; German Literature; 
German Composition, and Discourse. 

Civil Government — Young's Government Class Book. 

Didactics — White's Elements of Pedagogy. 

Bible Study — Old Testament. 

Music — In all the Classes. 

It will be noticed that the Council has introduced in 
the Preparatory Department three parallel courses. The 
student may select any one of them when he enters. 

Special attention is given, during the whole of the Pre- 
paratory Course, to the grammars of the languages studied. 
For those who pursue English studies only, or who intend 
to discontii\|ue at the end of the "A" year, the Faculty pro- 
vides such additional branches as seem most expedient and 
profitable. To do the best work, it is necessary that the 
student's time is fully occupied in the work of the school. 

In general educational value, it is believed that the 
above four years* Course of Study is worthy of full recom- 
mendation, whether for entrance into College, or for a pro- 
fessional training, or for a business life. 



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Tr. 



Courses of Preparatory Department 

Term, CLA.SSICAL. LATIN. SCIENTIFIC. 



C/) 
C/) 

< 



C/) 

< 
u 



English Grammar. 
Arithmetic. 
U. S. History. 
Drawing. (4) 



H Drawing. (4) % Dutch. 
Eng. Glnunmar. 
Algebra. 

% U.S. Hist., % English 
Hist. (4) 



Datch. 

Eng. Orammar. 

Algebra. 

Eng. Hist. (6) 



Latin. 
Datch. 
Algebra. 
English. (4) 



Latin. 

4 Dutch. (4) Vt ] 

Algebra. 

Ancient Hist, 



. (4) 



LatlD. 
Physiology. 
Physical Gleog. 
English. (41 



^ 



&' 



^' 



/ 



cf" 



J-' 



< 
u 



Latin. 
Qreek. 
English. (4) 
Qen. Hist. 



Latin. 
German. 
English. (4) 
Qen. Hist 



Latin. 
Greek. 
Algebra. 
English. (4) 



Latin. 
Greek. (4) 
Geometry. 
ClvU Gov't. 



Latin. 
German. 
Algebra. 
English. (4) 



Latin. 

German. (4) 
Geometry. 
ClvU Govt. 



Book-keeping. 
German. 
Engll8h.:(4) 
Gen. Hist. 



Book-keep., Com. Law. 

German. 

Algebra. 

English. (4) 



Botany. 
German. (4) 
Geometry. 
ClvU Gov't 



C/) 
(f) 
< 

U 



Latin. (4) 
Greek 
Geometry. 
Physics. 



Latin. 
Greek. 
English, f 4) 
Physics. 



Latin. 
Greek. 
English. (4) 
Pedagogy. 



Latin. (4) 
German. 
Geometry. 
Physics. 



Latin. 
German. 

English. (4) 
Physics. 



Latin. 
German. 
English. (4\ 
Pedhgogy. 



Botany. (4) 
German. 
Geometry. 
Physics. 



Geology. 
German. 
English. (4) 
Physics. 



Astronomy. 
German. 
EnffUsh. (4) 
Pedagogy. 



Bible study once a week In place of those marked (4). 

Lady Principal wlU meet all the lady students on Monday of each week from 1 to 
1:80 p. M. 

All the classes meet for Instruction in Music on Friday afternoon of each week. 



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28 HOPS COLLEGE. 



* he vVorK m t)efB^Il 



THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

In its four years' course, the Preparatory Department 
prepares students for the college or the university. Further, 
in order to meet the needs of those that do not expect to enter 
college, the course is made somewhat more comprehensive 
than would otherwise be necessary. To this end, special 
studies in Science, Book-keeping, Elocution, Music, Mod- 
ern Languages, Theory and Art of Teaching, etc., are in- 
troduced, thus laying the foundation for a liberal and prac- 
tical education. 

The several departments receive the same careful at- 
tention as in the college proper, being under the immediate 
care of the respective college professors. Those desiring 
to fit themselves for teaching can so select their studies as 
to obtain a first-class normal as well as academic training, 
in the Preparatory Department. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROF. JOHN B. NYKERK. 

In the Preparatory Department the course in English 
conforms to the recommendations of **The English Con- 



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THE WOKK IX DETAIL. 29 

ference of the Eastern and Middle States." A thorough 
course is furnished in the prescribed Classics, in which the 
aim is, first, to arouse the esthetic faculty and to inculcate 
in the student a love for beauty and truth; secondly, 
through the study of ideal forms of expression, to help him 
to give utterance to his appreciation and insight with idiom- 
atic force and fluency. In connection with this critical 
study much manuscript work is required, which receives 
the careful criticism of the instructors. Neither is the com- 
mitting to memory of choice selections of literature neg- 
lected. 

While Formal Grammar is thoroughly reviewed during 
a part of the first year, further linguistic study is only in- 
cidental. Practical Rhetoric and the art of Composition 
are taught early in the course, to the accompaniment of 
daily paragraph-work and incessant theme-writing. This 
course is supplemented by a short study of Poetics. 

In the College, the Freshman Class takes up the ad- 
vanced study of Rhetoric, the chief aim still being practical 
— to teach the student the various methods of developing 
thought, and how to acquire the art of expressing himself 
with graceful facility and logical cogency. 

In the Sophomore year, the study of the history and de- 
velopment of English Literature is begun. Here consider- 
able independent research is required of the student, the 
end being to gain insight and power. In the study of 
Poetry, substance and form each receives due attention, on 
the one hand, by an inquiry into the poet's theory and in- 
terpretation of life; on the other, by the study of artistic ex- 
pression in its various forms. It is further the aim of this 
department to help the student to discriminate between the 
different schools of poetry and fiction, and to trace the de- 
velopment of prose predication. 



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HOPE COLLEGE. 



MATHEMATICS. 

PROF. J. H. KLEINHEKSEL. 

The Preparatory Course in Mathematics embraces 
Arithmetic, Algebra, and Geometry. For admission to the 
**D" Class an examination in Arithmetic is required equiv- 
alent to that which entitles to a Third Grade Teacher*s Cer- 
tificate in this state; after which the first term is devoted to 
a review of the whole subject and the introduction to such 
advanced work as shall find direct practical application in 
the different courses of this Institution. 

Algebra is commenced the second term of the ,,D" 
year, continued for four consecutive terms and concluded 
with an extended general review of the subject at the end 
of the second term of the '*B" year. 

Plane and Solid Geometry are begun and completed 
the last term of the '*B" and the first of the "A" year. 

In all these both facility in computation, and thorough- 
ness and breadth of information are made the aim of the 
instruction, so as to lay an adequate foundation for future 
study in Mathematics. 

The Freshman Class takes up Plane and Spherical 
Trigonometry, and College Algebra. 

In the Sophomore year follows the application of the 
principles of Trigonometry to Surveying, Navigation and 
Astronomy, after which Analytical Geometry and Calculus 
finish the course of pure Mathematics in the Junior year. 

HISTORY. 

PROF. HENRY BOERS. 

The study of History begins in the **D" Class with 
that of our own country, and of England. This is followed 



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THE WORK IK DETAIL. 31 

by a course in General History, which continues through- 
out the «*C" and **B" years. 

In the college classes the study of history is pursued 
throughout the four years. The History of Rome, Me- 
diaeval History, Modern History, and the History of Euro- 
pean Civilization, are taken up in the order named. 

In addition to the required reading, and the daily reci- 
tation work, the members of each class use the library au* 
thorities in special study of topics embraced in the period 
under consideration. 

LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE* 

PROF. JAMES G. SUTPHEN. 

In the Grammar School, Latin is begun with the *C** 
Class, and continues in the **B" and **A" years. The Ro- 
man method of pronunciation is used. The student is, as 
soon as practicable, introduced to the simple stories in 
**Viri Romae" and carefully drilled in the rudiments of the 
Grammar. In Caesar and Cicero much attention is given 
to the Sequence of Tenses, Conditional Sentences, Oratio 
Obliqua, and the Subjunctive Mood. Throughout the 
course, exercises are given in rendering English into Latin, 
based upon the texts read. 

In the College, Latin is studied during parts of the 
first three yea. s. The study of Grammar, by analyzing 
sentences, is not neglected in the effort to present the au- 
thors in their literary character. 

(}REEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROF. J. H. GILLESPIE. 

Studies in Homer are not attempted in the time given 
to Greek in the Preparatory Department, as it is believed 



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32 HOPE COLT^EGE 



that a thorough knowledge of the language of the Anabasis 
will lay a better foundation for future work than a super- 
ficial acquaintance with both poetry and prose. - 

Until the end of the **A" year exercises in Prose Com- 
positions, oral or written, are required daily as essential to 
fluency and accuracy and simple conversations are fre- 
quently carried on as a useful auxiliary. The aim through- 
out is to make the course thorough and, as far as possible, 
interesting. Where classes are prepared for it, important 
portions of the author with which they have become famil- 
iar are read to them. A list of the authors read may be 
seen under * 'Course of Study" in this catalogue, although 
the particular books chosen are varied from year to year. 

MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE. 

PROF. HENRY VEGHTE. 

German is studied in the Preparatory Department by 
special students of the *'A" and **B" classes. In the Col- 
lege, French is studied during the greater part of the 
Freshman year; German a part of each of the four years of 
the college course. The aim of the course in Modern Lan- 
guages is to give such an acquaintance and familiarity with 
these Languages and their Literature as belongs to the 
highest culture; and enables one to use them for the prac- 
tical affairs of life as easily and as naturally as the ver- 
nacular. 

DUTCH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROF. C. DOESBURG. 

Many students of Hope College come from Holland 
homes, and use that language in common life. Moreover, 
said language will, for many years to come, continue in use 



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THE WORK IN DETAIL. 33 

in the pulpits and in religious meetings in nearly all of the 
Reformed churches in the particular Synod of Chicago, and 
in many oi our churches East. Hence, it is deemed neces- 
sary that instruction in the Dutch Grammar and Literature 
be given in Hope College as follows: in the *'D" and **C'* 
Classes of the Preparatory Department, and in the Fresh- 
man Class of the College Department. 

PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY. 

PROF. DOUWE B. YNTEMA. 

In connection with preparatory Physics two hours 
laboratory work is required each week. 

A course in Trigonometry should precede the course in 
College Physics. 

The Courses in Chemistry consist of daily recitations and 
four hours* laboratory work each week. Each student is 
required to make an accurate record of all the experiments 
performed by him in the Laboratory, giving all the reac- 
tions involved, and conclusions reached from personal ob- 
servation. 

ETHICS AND EVIDENCES OF CHRISTIANITY. 

PROF. J. TALLMADGE BERGEN. 

The text-book of Ethics is Porter's "Elements of Mor- 
al Science." This is begun in the last term of the Junior 
year and continued during two terms of the Senior. A 
thesis is required of each Senior at the close of the second 
term. 

The Bible is studied as the inspired book of the King- 
dom of God. This is begun in the Preparatory Depart- 
ment with the **D" Class, and the Old Testament is 
covered during the four years of the course. The only 



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34 HOPE COLLEGE. 



text-book used is the English translation. (Students are 
advised to purchase the "Parallel Bible," the Authorized 
and Revised Versions, or the Oxford Combination Bible.) 
Lectures are given to introduce each book, and the Scrip- 
tures of the Old Testament are taught in their relation to 
the Kingdom of God and Redemption. 

The New Testament is begun in the Freshman year. 
The history of the English versions of the Bible and Intro- 
duction to the books of the New Testament are studied 
from **Ellicott's Books of the Bible." Running parallel 
with this is a course in the life of Jesus Christ, which con- 
tinues during the Freshman year. The introduction to the 
Acts, the Epistles, and Revelation, and studies in their text 
continue throughout the Sophomore and Junior years. ^ 
With this foundation the Seniors study Evidences of Chris- 
tianity, using **Fisher's Manual." The purpose of this 
course is not only a scientific knowledge of Scripture and 
Christianity, but also effort is made to lay them upon the 
heart and make them the rule of life. 

Logic and Psychology are taught in this department in 
the Junior )'ear, and Sociology in the Senior. 

BIOLOGY. 

In the Preparatory Course a term's work is given to 
Human Physiology. In the College Course, the Freshman 
Class takes one term's work each in Botany and Zo6logy, 
and the Sophomore one term in General Biology. 

ELOCUTION AND ORATORY. 

PROFS. NYKERK AND BERGEN. 

Attention is given to voice, gesture, and rendering in 
all the classes. The aim is to learn to speak with ease and 



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THE WORK IN DBTAIL 



grace, so that one may speak with comfort to himself and 
with pleasure to the hearer. 



From this "Work in Detail," as well as from the 
"Courses of Study," it will be seen that Hope College is, 
first of all, offering a liberal Classical course, which will 
serve as an adequate foundation upon which to build pro- 
fessional courses, which, in turn, prepare for the more 
active and practical duties of life. 

The time is fast coming, and we shall hail the day, when 
such a foundation of a liberal classical course will be gener- 
ally required as a preparation for all professional studies. 



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36 HOPE COLLEGE. 



ADMISSION, 



COLLEGE. 

For admission into the Freshman Class a full certifi- 
cate of Graduation from the Preparatory Department is re- 
quired, or an examination of the studies pursued in that 
Department, or in what the Faculty shall deem an equiv- 
alent. 

Students may enter an advanced class either at the be- 
ginning of the College year or at other times, provided 
they sustain a satisfactory examination both on the pre- 
liminary studies and on those already passed over by the 
class which they propose to enter. If received on condition, 
students may in certain cases be permitted to recite with 
the class, but all conditions must be removed before regular 
admission. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

An effort is being made to raise the standard of the in- 
stitution, and, accordingly, the requirements for admission 
to the **D" Class have been advanced. 

Pupils holding a so-called ''Eighth Grade Diploma" 
will be admitted to the above class without examination, 
provided that the general average stands at 85 or over, and 
the standing in any one branch be not under 75; while ap- 
plicants not holding such certificate, will be subjected to a 
strict examination in the common school branches, includ- 



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ADMISSION. 37 



ing Arithmetic, English Grammar and Composition, United 
States History, Geography, (not including Physical), Read- 
ing and Orthography. The examination will be graded 
according to the requirements of the aforesaid diploma. 

In order to enter any advanced class, it will be neces- 
sary for the applicant to pass an examination in the studies 
previously pursued by the class. If received on conditions, 
these must be fulfilled before regular admission. 

Applicants for admission will not find it convenient to 
enter a class, if they have not studied all the branches which 
the class has pursued. For instance, if one has met all the 
conditions for entering the Freshman Class with the excep- 
tion of Greek, then he will find it very difficult to make up 
this deficiency. It would have been better for the appli- 
cant to have come two years earlier, and entered the **B" 
Class, where Greek is begun. 

Requirements for entrance into "C" Class: 

English — All applicants for the **C" Class will be re- 
quired to pa^s a satisfactory examination in English Gram- 
mar, with particular reference to the principles of Analysis 
and Syntax; this involves a thorough knowledge of the 
parts of speech, their uses, and modifications. Applicants 
for examination will be required to write a paragraph of 
from two to four hundred words on one of ttiree assigned 
subjects and show proficiency in orthography and sentence 
structure together with a general knowledge of the prin- 
ciples of punctuation and capitalization. 

The text-books used are the following: 

Baskervill and SewelPs English Grammar; Repplier's 
Book of Famous Verse; Stopford Brooke's Primer of Eng- 
lish Literature; Scott's Ivanhoe; Cooper's Last of the Mo- 
hicans; Readings and Essays. 

History — A satisfactory examination will be required 



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38 fiorifi cotLEOfl. 



from all applicants for the **C" Class, in American History, 
and in English History. The text-books now used are: 
Montgomery's Leading Facts of American History, and 
Montgomery's Leading Facts of English History. 

Mathematics — Applicants for this class must also be 
prepared in Arithmetic and in Algebra to Quadiatics. The 
text-books now in use are: Southworth's Essentials of 
Arithmetic, B0ok ii\ and Wentworth's Algebra. 

This will be a guide to those^ who desire to enter the 
•*C" Class. 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 30 



Miscellaneous Information. 



LOCATION. 



Holland is a city of nearly 8,000 inhabitants, and is 
centrally located on the Chicago & West Michigan, and the 
Detroit, Toledo & Milwaukee railways. A number of daily 
trains afford direct connection with the leading cities East, 
and as many with Chicago and other points West. It is on 
a straight line from Grand Rapids to Chicago, distant from 
the former city 25 miles, and from the latter no miles. 
When navigation is open, it also has connection with Chi- 
cago by a daily line of steamboats. It is therefore most 
desirably located, having both land' and water communica- 
tions, being near the shore of Lake Michigan, with which 
it is connected by a beautiful sheet of water, called Maca- 
tawa Bay, and on which are the popular summer resorts, 
MacatawA Park and Ottawa Beach. 



GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 

The College Campus lies between Tenth and Twelfth 
streets, in the centre of the city, and contains sixteen acres. 
It presents a finely varied surface, well shaded with native 
trees, and is annually improving in beauty and attractive- 
ness. 

The College buildings are eight in number. Van Vleck 
hall is mainly devoted to dormitory purposes. 



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40 HOPE COLLBQB. 



The new Graves Library and Winants Chapel build- 
ing, in which are also found a President's room, a reading 
room, a Y. M. C. A. hall, and four lecture rooms, affords 
such suitable and improved accommodations, that every one 
connected with the College cannot but feel grateful to the 
kind friends whose generosity made the erection of it a 
possibility. 



SCHOOL YEAR. 

The scholastic year of forty weeks begins on the third 
Wednesday in September^ and ends with the general Com- 
mencement on the third Wednesday in June. 

The winter and spring vacations are fixed by the Gen- 
eral Faculty. (See Calendar.) 



ADVANTAGES OFFERED. 

Besides the advantages of locatibn, easy communica- 
tion, and inexpensive living, it is believed Hope College 
may justly call attention to equally important advantages of 
a very different nature. *^ 

It is true, the Institution is growing, but the classes 
are not so large as to preclude that personal acquaintance, 
and contact, and influence of each member of the Faculty 
with every student coming under his instruction, which 
parents are apt to consider in making choice of an institu- 
tion. This personal element, made possible in a smaller 
institution, is a factor of great educational value both mor- 
ally and intellectually. 

Hope College is not a local institution. Its students 
represent an extensive territory, extending East as far as 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 41 

the State of New York, and West as far as the Dakotas. 
The students are, in the main, the best pupils from many 
public schools and in general possess a high order of abil- 
ity and a laudable ambition to make their way in the world. 
This makes them desirable companions, inviting their fel- 
lows to friendly competition and industrious study. 

By a division of the work peculiar to Hope College, 
the same experienced instructors teach in both Preparatory 
Department and College, placing the student in Latin or 
Greek, etc., for six consecutive years or more under the 
same man; thus practically making a six years' instead of 
four years' course. 

It is a chartered Institution, incorporated under the 
laws of the state and legally entitled to grant certificates 
and diplomas, and to confer degrees. 

It will be seen, therefore, that Hope College offers and 
secures a regular liberal course of training as complete as 
can be found in most of our Western colleges. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

Most of the students seek a "liberal education," lead- 
ing to the degree of A. B. — A "partial" or "elect ve' 
course is offered to all who so desire, and facilities are fur- 
nished through the regular instructors; but a partial course 
entitles only to a certificate, and not to a diploma. Ger- 
man and French, or Drawing and Painting, can be studied 
at any time. 

Since 1878 the Institution has been open to women. 
They enter the regular classes, and attend the same lec- 
tures and recitations as the young men. 

Instruction in vocal music is provided without charge. 
An orchestra has been organized, and is under the compe- 



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42 HOPS COLLEGE. 



tent leadership of a member of the Faculty, and also with- 
out expense. 



EXAMINATIONS. 

In both departments, written examinations are held at 
the close of each tetm, or whenever a subject is completed. 
When practicable, the examinations at the close of the 
year, or whenever a branch of study is finished, cover the 
entire text-book. The next examination for admission will 
be held the day before the new school year opens, viz , on 
Tuesday, September 20th, 1898, at 9 o'clock A. M. 



CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS. 

Members of the *'A'* Class, upon graduation in full 
course, are entitled to a regular Certificate, signed by. the 
Council and the Faculty; but said certificate will be marked 
"First," "Second," or "Third Grade," as follows: When 
the average standing of the graduate is from 90 to 100, this 
will indicaterthe "First Grade;" when from 80 to 90, the 
"Second;" and from 70 to 80, the "Third;" reference being 
made to both recitations and examinations. 

Such students as are admitted in partial course, or who 
fall below an average standing of 70, are entitled to a 
Statement, from the Faculty, naming the studies in which 
they have sustained examinations. 

Graduates from the College, wheti recommended by the 
Faculty, receive a Diploma, with the degree of A. B., be- 
ing a testimonial of general scholarship. The course lead- 
ing thereto includes such branches as are usually taught in 
similar Institutions. A partial course is sometimes chosen 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 43 

and is entitled to a Certificate as adjudged by the Fa- 
culty. 

The degree of A. M. is conferred upon those who con- 
tinue their studies for three years after graduation, or who 
may satisfy the Council, by a thesis, as to their scholastic 
attainments. By paying a fee of three dollars, an A. M. 
diploma in such cases will be given. 



RELIGIOUS SERVICES AND WORK. 

The exercises of each day begin with prayer in Wi- 
nants Chapel at 8 o'clock A. M. 

On the Sabbath every student is expected to worship 
regularly with one of the churches in the city or vicinity, 
unless excused by the President. 

Religious instruction is given in all the. classes regular- 
ly, and like all the other studies, is in charge of the Faculty. 

Although Hope College is denominational, and is un- 
^ der the patronage and support or the Reformed Cnurch in 
America, yet, by the law of its incorporation, it can have no 
"religious test." The doors are open, and welcome is given 
to all who submit to its scholastic regulations. As a Chris- 
tian school, however, it inculcates gospel truths, and de- 
mands a consistent moral character and deportment. 

The Young Mens Christian Association has an active and 
associate membership of ninety-seven. It has a vigorous 
life, and continues to be a great blessing to the students. 
It offers a splendid opportunity to secure Christian growth 
and to do personal religious work. 

Under the auspices of the Association, twenty-three of 
its members conduct four flourishing Sunday Schools in the 
country, numbering 325 scholars. • 



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44 HOPE CCiLLBGE. 



The students also support a weekly prayer meeting, 
from which the Institution continues to reap much spiritual 
fruit. 

The young women meet for praj^er once a week, and 
derive much spiritual help from it. 

A strong religious spirit is found among the students, 
and God has so blessed the religious work, that from year 
to year many hopeful conversions have been witnessed. 

This condition has naturallj' developed a deep interest 
in Christian Missions. A Mission Class composed of twen- 
ty students meets every Sunday morning, at 8 o'clock, to 
study the History and Methods of Missions, and Missionary 
Biographies, relating more particularly to the mission 
fields of our own Church. Ten of this class have joined 
the Student Volunteer Movement, and purpose to enter the 
foreign field. Of the class of eighteen that graduated last 
June, fourteen are now studying theology, and seven have 
the foreign field in view. 



LIBRARY, READINGROOM, ETC. 

The Library which already numbers over 10,000 vol- 
umes is, by a munificent donation of a friend of education, 
about to be increased to over 20,000 volumes — all free for 
the use of the students. Books and pamphlets, as well as 
magazines and papers, are constantly added. The friends 
of Hope College may be assured that their gifts of valuable 
books to the library will be taken care of, and appreciated, 
and made useful by giving them a place upon the ample 
shelves of the magnificent fire proof Library building. 

In connection with the Library is a Readingroom, in 
which are found many books of reference and which, by 
the liberality of Mr. Wm. L. Brower, of New York City, is 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 46 

supplied with many valuable periodicals and leading jour- 
nals on politics, religion, science and literature. These 
can be consulted on any day when the college is in session, 
but may not be withdrawn from the room. 

Laboratory and Philosophical Apparatus for lecture 
room use is growing in value and completeness. Dona- 
tions, by the graduates and friends of the Institution, of 
maps, charts, instruments, and specimens of Natural His- 
tory, are solicited, with the assurance that all such will ma- 
terially add to the efficiency of the work which Hope Col- 
lege is doing. 



MUSIC. 



The Glee Club, under the direction of Prof. J. B. Ny- 
kerk, meets once a week, and receives drill in Voice Cul- 
ture, and Choral Singing. A primary class in Theory and 
Sight-singing is conducted by an assistant, Mr. Ties Mul- 
der. To these classes all students are admitted without 
charge. 



SOCIETIES. 

Seven Literary Societies are found in the Institution: 
The Meliphon^ the Cosmopolitan^ the Fraternal^ and the 
Ulfilas Club have been maintained for years, and offer de- 
cided advantages to their respective members, and materi- 
ally aid in the attainment of that culture, which it is the 
object of this school to promote. The Ulfilas Club seeks to 
secure for its members greater proficiency in the use of the 
Holland language. The German Society affords its mem- 
bers an opportunity to speak the German, and thus acquire 



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46 HOPE COLLEGE. 



greater fluency in the language. And the Z. L. Z. So- 
ciety has been organized by the young ladies, for the pur* 
pose of enjoying free discussion and obtaining experience in 
conducting public meetings. 

We have no Greek letter fraternities. 

As the student life is largely the formative period of 
the professional man's character; and as a man's influence 
and usefulness depend much upon his sympathy with men, 
irrespective of classes, it is therefore desirable that a dem- 
ocratic spirit should characterize the Christian College. 
Moreover, plain, economical living is encouraged, in order 
that the young, not favored with an abundance of this 
world's goods, may yet be able to acquire a liberal education. 



PUBLICATIONS. 

Connected with the Institution, a religious weekly is 
published, called De Hope, It was established in 1866, 
and is under the direction of the Council, through its Edi- 
torial Committee. The paper has a circulation of over 3100 
copies. 

A monthly, called The Anchory is conducted by the 
students with gratifying success. It has reached its tenth 
year, and owing to the excellent spirit with which it is 
managed and edited, it is very helpful to the College, and 
is calculated to awaken an esprit de corps among its Alum- 
ni. No alumnus, who wishes to keep himself informed in 
regard to his Alma Mater, and who desires to keep in touch 
with her, can afford to be without this paper. 



PRIZES. 
The Oratorical Exercises of the Preparatory Depart- 
ment, on the final Monday of the college year, is the Corn- 



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MISCICLLANEOUB INFORMATION. 47 

mencement of that Department, and marks the graduation 
of the **A" Class. 

In 1887 were established the two '*George Birkhoff, 
Jr., Prizes," each of twenty-five dollars; one for the Sopho- 
more Class, in English Literature, and the other for the 
Freshman Class, in Dutch Literature. At the last Com- 
mencement ('97) they were awarded by the Committees, as 
follows: For the best examination passed in English Liter- 
ature to William N. Birchby; and for that in Dutch Liter- 
ature to Siebe C. Nettinga. 

In 1894 two new prizes were added to the list of an- 
nual awards, one of $15.00 for the best, and the other of 
$10.00 for the second best examination in English Gram- 
mar and Orthography, open to all the members of the **C" 
Class. At the last Commencement ('97) the first prize was 
awarded to Andrew Wagemaker, and the second to Ed- 
ward J. Strick. These were established by Mr. Henry 
Bosch, of Chicago, 111. Other friends have given prizes 
for Drawing, from year to year. Last year two prizes were 
awarded respectively to Miss Janet Van den Beldtand Miss 
Minnie Rooks. 

Through the liberality of Mr. A. V. W. Van Vechten 
the Foreign Mission Prize was established last year. The 
sum of twenty-five dollars to be awarded to the one writing 
the best essay on Foreign Missions. This prize is open to 
the whole College, and at the last Commencement C97) 
was awarded to Cornelius Kuyper. 

The subject for 1897 was: The Hand of God in the 
History of China during the present Century. 

For this year, 1898, it is: Protestant Missions in the 
Turkish Empire during the last 50 years. 

And for 1899 it will be: What Protestant Missions 
have done for India. 



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48 HOPE COLLEGB. 



The subject of the English Essay for the "Geo. Birk- 
hoff, Jr., Prize," in the Sophomore Class, 1898, is: ^^Ma- 
caulay*'\ that of the Dutch Essay, in the Freshman Class, 
1898, is: ^^De Tachiigjarige Oorlog — zijn Invloed op enzij- 
ne Gevohen voor Nederland,^' 

We trust that additional prizes will follow. Here is 
an excellent opportunity to give a stimulus to labor in other 
branches of study. 



EXPEiNSES. 

The city is surrounded by a rich agricultural region, 
and the cost of living in Holland is cheap. Good board 
and rooms may be had in families of the city for from two 
to three dollars per week; in clubs, and without furnished 
rooms, at lower rates. 

There are twenty rooms in Van Vleck Hall, in the se- 
lection of which students for the ministry have the pref- 
erence. These are furnished in part, and bear a moder- 
ate charge. 

As yet no tuition fees have been charged, but every 
student must pay to the Treasurer, in advance^ an inciden- 
tal fee of six dollars per term. 

The graduation fee is five dollars in the college, and 
two and one-half dollars in the Preparatory Department. 
No other charges are made. 

Young people of noble aspirations but of limited means 
need not be discouraged. At Hope College they will find 
many like themselves, some of whom have come a great 
distance seeking an education. Such as these are in earn- 
est, content with plain living, and, by practicing the econo- 
mies that are possible in this place, succeed in reducing 
their expenses within marvelously narrow limits. 



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HISCBLLANBOUS INFORMATION. 49 

■ -. ■ ^ 

Here is an estimate of the necessary expenditure, ex- 
clusive of clothing and travel, which each can determine 
for himself, for one year in the Preparatory Course: 

Board (at the Club), - - $ 60.00 

Room rent (two rooming together), - 20.00 

Books 1 1*0, Washing |io, Light $3, - - 23.00 

Fuel J7, Fees $18, - - - 25.00 



Total, - $ 1 28. 00 

The above estimate is an answer to those who want to 
know how much money is absolutely needed, and is intend- 
ed as a reply to that oft- repeated question. Of course the 
expense of most of the students exceeds this amount. 

Many parents, having children to educate, find it to 
their advantage to come to this city to live. To such it 
may be truthfully said, that Holland is a growing, enter- 
prising city — one of the most prosperous and beautiful in 
Michigan. With its broad, straight, and shady streets, its 
water works, and its electric illumination, Holland is equal- 
ly well adapted to the life of quiet retirement, and to that 
of the active business man. 



DISCIPLINE. 

It is gratifying to observe that the moral and spiritual 
tone of the students is such that the matter of discipline is 
reduced to a minimum. General opinion is on the side of 
right and reasonableness, and lends its powerful support to 
the interest of good order and efficient work. To develop 
this high moral culture and character of the student, it is 
the aim of Hope College to cultivate no less than to ad- 
vance his intellectual development. 

In generaly however, if it appears that students do not 



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50 HOPE COLLEOE. 



improve their time and opportunities, or do not conduct 
themselves in a respectful and orderl}' manner, their con- 
nection with the Institution is suspended, or if it should be 
found, after due probation and inquiry, that the influence 
of a student is bad and injurious to others, the right is ex- 
ercised of requiring the withdrawal of such student. It is 
proper to add that within recent date no such case has oc- 
curred. 

The students are required to be present, promptly^ on 
the first day of each and every term. The recitatioils will 
begin the next morning. 

A record is kept of the scholastic standing of each stu- 
dent, and a copy of the same is sent to the parent or guar- 
dian; if the average.standing, in any term, does not exceed 
70, on a basis of 100, he is to be dropped from his class. 

Term fees and room rent are to be paid strictly in ad- 
vance, and if not so paid, or within one month, the student 
neglecting, forfeits his right to continue in the Institution. 

Boarding houses and boarding clubs in the city are to 
be approved by the Faculty, and to be subject to such reg- 
ulations as are usual in similar institutions. By a rule of 
the College, lady students are not to room in the same 
boarding houses with gentlemen. 

Dancing and card-playing is prohibited, and also the 
use of tobacco on the College Campus. 

Parents are requested not to ask or expect their chil- 
dren to come home during term time. It seriously inter- 
feres with proper habits of study, and by our rules none are 
to be absent from the Institution without permission of the 
President. 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 51 

TO ALUMNI AND FRIENDS. 

Hope College is grateful to the Reformed Church in 
America, whose she is, and whom she so loyally serves by 
the men she is furnishing both for the Domestic and the 
Foreign Field. 

Hope College is grateful to her Alumni and to all who 
were at any time connected with the College as students, 
for the faithful work they are doing; wherever they are 
practicing their professions, they show that they are 
* 'Workmen that need not be ashamed;" — grateful for the 
growing interest they manifest by making known the merits 
of their Alma Mater, and by inspiring deserving young men 
to seek the. same educational advantages. 

Hope College is grateful to royal and liberal friends 
who here invest their money, not in dead and fleeting 
things, but in brain and character and souls of men. Be 
assured, nowhere else will your well-earned money yield 
larger returns, in no other way can you render better service 
for your Church and for your Country. 

With such encouragements as these Hope College feels 
hopeful for the future. She will try still to deserve your 
favor and your liberality. You have young friends, — con- 
tinue to send us their names, if they are studious and de- 
serving, especially the names of such as are not likely other- 
wise ever to receive a liberal education. 



GYMNASIUM. 

Classes in dumb-bells, Indian clubs, chest-weights, 
etc., are held daily at such hours as best to accommodate 
the students. The gymnasium proves very helpful to the 
physical development of the students. By a proper use of 



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52 HOPE COLLEGE. 



the advantages offered in this direction, they acquire the 
physical strength needed to endure the mental strain inci- 
dent to student life. 

While physical culture is valued highly, it is not en- 
couraged at the expense of education and morality. Be- 
lieving that intercollegiate athletics have a strong tendency 
to interfere with the regular college work, and that they are 
generally not helpful to the development of moral Christian 
character, it is held that a denominational college like ours 
can not afford to support them. 



MUSEUM. 

Valuable gifts are, from time to time, received from 
Alumni and friends of the Institution. Others, desiring to 
enrich this department, are only waiting till the College 
shall have a suitable Building for the safekeeping of such 
collections. 

Here is a grand opportunity for some lover of natural 
history, and a friend of Christian education, to immortalize 
his name by erecting such a building. 



CONTRIBUTIONS. 

The following donations made to the Endowment 
Fund of the College since the publishing of last year's cata- 
logue are most gratefully recorded — 

Mr. and Mra. Balph Voorhees $ 00,000 

E. 8 90,000 

Samuel Sloan 9,000 

A. A. BaTon 6,000 

TwoStetera 4,000 

AUdaVan Schalck 2,000 

A.T 2,000 

Abb7 T. Lansing 1,000 



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MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 53 

Susan Y. Lansing 1,000 

Helen MiUer Gould 1,000 

H. O'Neill .• 1,000 

AnnB.Cook 500 

Ann Burning 600 

Abble Brown 200 

J, B.Jermaln 126 

S. B 100 

H. W 100 

Unknown Prtend 100 

Mra.John Orhham 100 

O.H.Harrls 100 

M.D 60 

Francis Marvin 60 

J. Pryer 60 

E.M. Rapalje 26 

SUBSCBIPnONS. 

A. B 1,000 

W.J 1,000 

J. L 500 

A Friend (guaranteed) 8.600 

Total $ 100.000 

The above mentioned generous, noble-hearted donors 
have done a great thing for our College; and it is hoped 
that for tnany years they will witness large and blessed re- 
sults of their investment. Hope College owes its existence 
and prosperity to the kind help of such friends of Christian 
education. It believes that the number of those who pro- 
pose to give to meet its necessities is ever increasing. It 
is far better for these also to carry out their intention while 
living, as then they are sure that their gifts reach the de- 
sired object. • 

The College is still in need of endowments of profes- 
sorships and scholarships, a laboratory building, and a 
dormitory for young women. Here is an opportunity for 
philanthropists who have an honorable ambition to connect 
their names permanently with an Institution that has long 
ceased to be an experiment, and which promises to become 
increasingly a power for good in Church and State. 



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54 HOPE COLLEOE. 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 

The corporate title of the College is: "The Council of 
Hope College." 

I give and bequeath to The Council of Hope College, 
located at Holland, Michigan, the sum of $ to be ap- 
plied in such manner as the Council may deem most useful 
to the College. 

Those making specific bequests may vary the above 
form by inserting the special object desired. 



Degrees Conferred in 1897. 



HONORARY DEGREES. 

DOCTOR OF DIVINITY. 

Rev. Alfred H. Brush, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rev. Jacob Van der Meulen, Graafschap, Mich. 

DOCTOR OF MUSIC. 

Louis R. Dressler, Jersey City, N. J. 



DEGREES IN COURSE. 

master of arts. 

Klaas J. Dykema, Class of 1894 

Peter Swart, 
Gerrit Tysse, 
Arthur Van Duren, 
William J. Van Kersen, 



<< 



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MISCELLANB0U8 INFOBMATION. 



55 



BACHELOR OF ARTS. 



Nicholas Boer, 
Egbert Boone, 
Jacob Brummel, 
John De Jongh, 
Floris Ferwerda, 
Gerrit J. HUIZINGA, 

Gerrit Kooiker, 
James E. Moerdyk, 
John J. Ossewaarde, 



Tony Rozendaal, 
Henry Saggers, 
Jacob G. Van den Bosch, 
Louis Van den Burg, 
Jacob Van der Meulen, 
John F. Van Slooten. 
A. Livingstone Warnshuis 
Gustave Watermuelder, 
Henry L. Yonker. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 



President, 
Vice President, 
Secretary 
Treasurer, 



Rev. John Lamar. 

- Rev. Abraham Stegeman. 
Prof. J. H. Kleinheksel. 

- Hon. Arend Visscher. 



^ 



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Chronological Memoranda. 



Beginning of the Netberland Immigration Into Michigan, Iowa, etc 1 847 

VlUage of Holland laid out 1W8 

Five acres donated by Rev. A. G. Van Baalte, D. D., ae a site for an Academy 1(60 

"Pioneer School" opened, Mr W. T. Taylor, Principal Oct., 1861 

Placed under the care of the General Synod Jane, 1868 

Mr. W. T. Taylor resigned Oct, 1868 

Kev. P. B. Beldler, Principal 1864 

Rev. John Van Vleck, Principal 1866 

The school named the Holland Academy 1865 

Van Vleck Hall erected on "The five acres" 1867 

The Academy more fully organized 1867-1868 

Bey. John Van Vleck, resigned 1869 

Bev. Philip Phelps, Jr., Principal 1869 

Campus enlarged to 16 acres 1869 

"Oggel House*' erected as a residence I860 

Gymnasium built, largely by students lf>6!l 

A Fnthman Class formed, 10 In number 1862 

A "Board of Sui>erintendent8" appointed by General Synod 1868 

A CoI2ei7« proposed, and approved by the Synods 1864 

Over $40,000 contributed as ah endowment 1866 

Hope College begun, 1866; Incorporated May, 1^66 

Faculty of six appointed and organized; Rev. P. Phelps, Jr.. D. O., Pree., July, 1^$^ 

First Commencement; eight became A.'B 1866 

A weekly newspaper, De Hope, established 1866 

Theological Instruction begun, with a class of seven Sept., 1866 

Rev. E. C. Crispell, D. D., elected Professor of Theology; Profs. Phelps, Oggel, 

Beck, and Scott being elected "Lectors" 1867 

The Theological Department adopted by General Synod as Its ''Western Theologi- 
cal Seminary" 1869 

Death of Rev. Peter J. Oggel, Professor, and Editor of De Hope Dec.. 1K69 

First Theological Class of seven graduated 1869 

First Formal Constitution of the College adopted It^ 

Doesburg, A. M., elected Professor 1872 

Brick printing office for 2)0 Hope erected 1876 

Death of Bev. A. C. Van Raalte, D. D Nov. *, 1876 

Suspension of the Theological Department June, 1877 

Reorganization of the College; Dr. Pbelps resigns a Jane, 1878 

Rev. G. H. Mandeville, D. D., Provisional President and Financial Agent; Prof. C. 

Scott, Vice President 1878 

Wm. A. Shields, A. M., and G. J. KoUen, A. M., elected Professors 1878 

Prof. Charles Scott, D. D., Provisional President 1880 

Theological Instruction restored: a Professorship of 180,000 completed; Bev. N. M 

SteffenSfD. D., Professor of Theology 1884 

Rev. P. Moordykeand Henry £. Dosker elected Lectors 1884 



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CHRONOLOGICAL MEMORANDA. 57 



H. Boers, A. M.; J. H. Klelnheksel, A. M.; J. O, Satphen. A. M., and Rev. John /. 

Anderson, A. M.« elected Professora 1885 

Election of Prof. Oharlee Scott, D. D., as Ooustltutional President 1885 

President Scott Inaugurated 18)>6 

Synod's House for the President erected 1886 

First number of The Anchor issued May, 1887 

Rev. J. W. Beardslee, D. D., elected Prof, of Biblical Languages and Exegesis in 

the Theological Seminary 1888 

Rev. James F. Zwemer appointed Financial Agent 1888 

Rev. J. H. Gillespie, A. M., elected Professor 1888 

Quarter Centennial Celebration June 96, 1890 

Graves Library and Wlnanto Chapel begun; comer stone laid Oct. 12, 1802 

President Scott resigns 189S 

Prof. G. J. KoUen, A. M., elected President June 29, 1898 

D. B. Yntema, A. M., elected Profeesor. 1898 

Death of Prof . Charles Scott D D Oct. 81, 1898 

Graves Library and Winants Chapel dedicated June 26. 1894 

President KoUen inaugurated June 27, 1894 

Rev Henry E. Dosker, D. D., elected Proferaor of Histor. Theology, in the Semi- 
nary 1894 

J. B. Nykerk, A. M., elected Professor 1896 

J. T. Bergen, A. M., elected Professor 1895 

Rev £. Winter, D. D., elected Professor of Theology in the Seminary, in the 

place of Rev. N. M. Steflens, D. D.. resigned 1896 

Death of Hon.N.P. Graves, LL.D July21, 1896 

Death of Rev. PhlUp Phelps, Jr., D. D., LL.D Sept. 4, 1890 

Henry Veghte, A. M., elected Professor 1897 

Edward D. Dimnent, A. B , elected Tutor 1897 

Endowmenl Fu nd increased by $100,000 1897 



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WESTERN 

T^SeoIoglce^I Se^fvIrve^^Y 

OP THE 

Reformed Church in America. 



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60 WKSTKRN THBOLOOICCL SEMIKAUY. 



CALENDAR- 



1897. 



Aug. 31. Cntfatice Examinations* 

Sept. I. Term Begins. 

Nov. 24. Thanksgiving Recess begins. 

Dec. 17. Beginning of Christmas Recess* 

1898. 

Jan. 4. Work Resumed. 

Jan. 27. Prayer for Colleges. 

Apr. 25. Meeting of Board of Superintendents. 

Apr. 25-27. Examinations. 

Apr. 27. Commencement Exercises in Evening. 

Vacation. 

Sept. 6. Entrance Examinations. 

Sept. 7. Term Begins. 

Nov. 23. Thanksgiving Recess begins. 

Dec. 23. Beginning of Christmas Recess. 



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WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINAHY. 61 



Board of Superintendents 



EX-OFFICIO. 

Gerrit J. KoLLEN, LL.D., President of Hope College. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF NEW YORK. 

1898. Rev. F. S. Schenck, D. D., - New York City. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF ALBANY. 

1899. Rev. E. A. Collier, D. D., - Kinderhook, N. Y. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 

1902. Rev. A. Paige Peeke, - East Millstone, N. J. 

FROM THE SYNOD OF CHICAGO. 

1899. Rev. P. Moerdyke, D. D., - - Chicago, HI. 

1898. Rev. A. Buursma, - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

1902. Rev. J. Lamar, - - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

1898. Elder D. J. De Jonge, - Roseland, 111. 

1899. Elder F. J. Cushing, - Irving Park, 111. 

1900. Elder John Snitzler, - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

FROM THE CLASSES. 

CXAflflXS. HAMS. TXBK XXFIBSB. 

Dakota, Rev. S. J. Harmeling. 1902. 

Grand River, *' D. Broek. 1901. 

Holland, ♦* A. Van den Berg. 1898. 

Illinois, ** P. F. Schuelke. 1902. 

Iowa, *' J. F. Zwemer. 1899. 

Michigan, " J. A. De Spelder. 1899. 

Pleasant Prairie, ** }. Muller. 1898. 

Wisconsin, '• J. Broek. 1899. 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

Rev. D. Broek, President. 

Rev, Peter Moerdyke, D. D., Stated Clerk. 



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^2 WBSTEUN THBOIiOOICAL SBMINABT. 



Faculty. 



REV. JOHN W. BEARDSLEE, D. D., 
President of the Faculty and Professor of Biblical Lan- 
guages and Literature. 

REV. HENRY E. DOSKER, D. D., 
Secretary of the Faculty and Professor of Historical Theo- 
logy. In charge of Hermeneutics and Harmony 
of the Gospels. 

REV. EGBERT V^INTER, D. D., 

Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theology. In charge 

of Practical Theology. 

REV. J. TALLMADGE BERGEN, 
Instructor in Elocution. 



committee on reception of students and examinations. 

Rev. a. Buursma, 

Rev. a. Van den Berg, 

Rev. D. Broek, 

Pres. (j. J. Kollen, LL.D., 

Rev. J. W. Beardslee, D. D., 

Rev. H. E. Dosker, D. D., 

Rev. E. Winter, D. D. 



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WB8TBRN THBOLOGICAL SBMIKAJtT. 03 



Students* 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Albert W. De Jonqe, - - - Holland, Mich. 

National Education I>lplonu^ Netherlands. 

Harm Dykhuysen, - - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Hope College, 1886. 

John Engelsman, . . - - Chicago, 111. 

Hope College •special), 1805. 

Harke Frieling, . - - - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Theologloal School, Orand Baplds, 1896. 

J. H. E. Te Grootenhuis, - - Hospers, la. 

Theological School at Kampen. 

William Gruys, - - - Wormser, Montana. 

Hope College (special) 1896 . 

Benjamin Hoffman, - . . Overisel. 

Hope CoUege, 1996. 



MIDDLE CLASS. 

Edward D. Dimnent, - - - Chicago, 111. 

Hope College, 1896. 

Edward Kelder, ... - Grandville. 

Hope College, 1896. 

J. William Kots, - - - Maurice, la. 

Hope College, (special), 1896. 

Frederic Lubbers, - - - Orange City, la. 

Hope CoUege, 1896. 

John G. Theilken, - - German Valley, 111. 

Hope College, special), 1896. 



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64 



WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Hope College (fpeclul), 1897. 

Hope College. 1897. 

Hope College, 1897. 

Hope College, (special), 1897. 

National Educational Diploma, Netherlands. 

Hope College, 1897. 

Hope College, 1896. 

Hope College, 1897. 

Hope College, 1897. 



Eerko Aeilts, 
Nicholas Boer, 
Jacob BrUxMmel, 
George E. Cook, 
B. De Jonge, 
John De Jongh, 
B. D. Dykstra, 
Gerrit J. Huizenga, 
Gerrit Kooiker, 
Tony Rozendal, 

*^ Hope College, 1897. 

Henry P. Schuurmans, 

Hope College, (special) 1879. 

Jacob Van der Meulen, 

Hope College, 1897. 

Henry L. Yonker, 

Hope College, 1897. 



Holland, Mich. 

- Drenthe. 

Overisel. 

Holland. 

Holland. 

Grand Haven. 

Sioux Centre, la. 

Holland. 

Overisel. 

- Chicago, 111. 

Holland, Mich. 

Graafschap. 

Vriesland. 



SUMMARY. 

Senior Class 7 

Middle Class 5 

Junior Class 13 

Total 25 



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Western theolooical seminary. 65 



COURSE OF STUDY, 



Junior Year, 



PROF. BEARDSLEE. 

EXEGETICAL THEOLOGY. 

Elements of Hebrew. Grammatical Forms. Inductive 
Study, based on reading of the text. Selections from the 
Pentateuch. 

In Greek. — Acts of the Apostles. 

PROF. DOSKER. 

Greek Harmon)' and Exegesis of the Gospels. Archeo- 
logy. Sacred Geography, Hermeneutics (Terry's). Organic 
unity of the Sacred Scriptures. Biblical Symbolism. 

HISTORICAL THEOLOGY. 

Sacred History (Kurtz). General Scope of Revelation. 
Contrast between Judaeism and Paganism. Rise and De- 
velopment of the Kingdom of God. Comparative Data of 
Sacred and Profane History. 

PROF. WINTER 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY. 

Introduction. Encyclopedia. Symbolics. 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY. 

Theory of Preaching. Analysis of Sermons. HomiU 
etical Exercises. 



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WESTERN THEQLOGICAL SEMINARY. 



Middle Year. 



PROF. BEARDSLEE. 

EXEGETICAL THEOLOGY. 

Hebrew Etymology and Syntax. Old Testament In- 
troduction. Messianic Prophecy. Readings from Histori- 
cal Books. 

In Greek. — Exegetical Study of the Epistles to the 
Hebrews, and Corinthians. Sight Reading. Book of Revel- 
ation and Paul's Minor Epistles. 

PROF. DOSKER. 

HISTORICAL THEOLOGY. 

Primitive History of the Church. Christ and His Apos- 
tles. Ancient and Mediaeval Church History. Struggle 
between the Roman Empire and the Church. Victory of 
the latter. Contact between Philosophy and Theology. 
Life and Morals of the Church. Sects, Schools, and Here- 
sies. Asceticism and Fanaticism. The Dawn of the Re- 
formation. 

PROF. WINTER. 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY. 

Lectures. Theology Proper. Anthropology. Ob- 
jective Soteriology. 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY. 

.Homiletics. Church Government. Pastoral Theology, 
Lectures. 



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WB8TKRN THJBOLOGICi^L SEMINARY. 67 



Senior Year, 



PROF. BEARDSLEE. 

Hebrew Prophetical and Poetical Books. Selections 
from Historical Books. Aramaic. 

In Greek. — Introduction to New Testament. Exege- 
tical Study of Romans and Writings of John. Sight Read- 
ing from Pastoral and Catholic Epistles. 

PROF. DOSKER. 

HISTORICAL THEOLOGY. 

The Reformation. The Age of Symbols. Doctrinal 
Struggle in the Protestant Church. Catholic Reaction. 
Deformation and Protestant Scholasticism. Rise and De- 
velopment of Rationalism. Deism and Atheism. Sectar- 
ianism. Missions. The Church of Christ and Christian 
Society in the 19th Century. 

PROF. WINTER. 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY. 

Lectures. Subjective Soteriology. Ecclesiology. Es- 
chatology. Apologetics. Ethics. Review of the whole 
System. 

PRACTICAL THKOLOGY. 

Homiletics. Homiletical Exercises. Pastoral Theo- 
logy. Catechetics. Church Government. Theory of Mis- 
sions. 



N. B.— Church Qoverninent, EthloB. Oatechetlcs, Theory of HlaaloiiB, and Homile- 
tics are derided between Middle and Senior Tear. 



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WESTERN THEOI/OGICAL SfiMlNARY. 



General Information. 



ADMISSION. 

The Seminary is open for the admission of students 
from every denomination of Christians. 

A Committee of the Board of Superintendents, on the 
reception of students, meets on the Tuesday before the first 
Wednesday in September, at ii o'clock a. m. 

Every applicant is required to present a certificate of 
church membership and one of literary qualifications. One 
who has not pursued a regular Collegiate course must give 
proof by testimonials or examination of such literary at- 
tainments as will enable him to enter upon the course of 
studies in the Scnool. 

The requirement of the Constitution in regard to stu- 
dents preparing for the ministry in the Reformed Church, 
is as follows. 

^iErery person contemplatlDg the work of the ministry/ before be oommenoee hiif 
course of Theological studies, shall furnish satisfactory evidence of his being a mem-* 
ber in fall communion and good standing of a Reformed Protestant Church; of his 
piety, ability, and literary attainments; and thereupon shall be admitted into one of 
the Theological Schools; and during the prosecution of his studies there, shall be sab' 
ject to the rules and regulations thereof; and when he shall have completed the pre^ 
scribed course and term of the Theological studies, shall be admitted to an examination 
according to the regulations of the school as established by the General Synod; and if 
found qualified, shall receive a professorial oertiflcate to that effect which shall entlUe 
him to an examination for licensure before the Classis to which he beloniffr/*^ — Conati-- 
iution, AH. 11. See, 9. 

THE YEAR. 

The Seminary opens on the Tuesday before the first 
Wednesday in September, when the Committee meets for 
the reception of students, and closes on the last Wednes- 
day in April, with the annual Commencementi 

PREACHING. 

The Middle and Senior Classes preach regularly three 
times each year before the Faculty and Students, subject to 



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WfiSTttRit TltfiOLOGlCAL SEMINAKY. 69 

^■i a >« I < r . - • 

such criticism as may be appropriate. They also preach 
in the churches, especially such as are vacant, under the 
direction of the Faculty. The Junior Class preach in turn 
before the Professor of Homiletics. 

MISSION WORK. 

The Students are organized as a Mission Band and 
hold themselves in readiness to attend any calls to address 
meetings, where they can advocate the cause of Missions. 

Mn Peter Semelink has established a Scholarship of 
f 2,000, the income oi which is to he paid to a student in 
the Seminary, preference being given to one looking for- 
ward to the Foreign Missionary Work. 

LIBRARY. 

The Chambers Library, in the Semelink Family Hall 
is now an efficient working Theological Library, of about 
6,000 volumes. For general literatuje the students have 
free use of the Graves Library of Hope College. 

ADlELPHIC SOCIETY. 

This is a weekly gathering of the Professors and Stu^ 
dents for the discussion of questions relating to the practi- 
cal work of the ministry. The exercises embrace debates, 
essayS) and general discussions. 

PATRIA. 

This is a Dutch Society, organised for the study of 
Dutch language and literature, especially for such students 
as intend to labor among the Dutch speaking Churches. 

COMMENCEMENT. 

The Theological Commencement exercises take place 
on Wednesday evening, at the close of the year. Addresses 
are delivered by the Seniors, in English and Dutch, and by 



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70 WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 

some member of the Board of Superintendents appointed 
for the purpose. 

BENEFICIARY AID. 

Instruction is entirely gratuitous. Young men are 
aided by the Board of Education as their circumstances re- 
quire and the funds admit, not only while in the Seminary, 
but in the studies preparatory to entering it. Rooms are 
provided in Van Vleck Hall, and board can be obtained in 
the city or at the Students* Clubs at from J 1.75 to $2.50 per 
week. 

SEMELINK FAMILY HALL. 

This building, erected by Mr. Peter Semelink, con- 
tains Recitation Rooms, Library and Chapel; is located on 
one of the most desirable lots in the city, just south of the 
College Campus; and contains every convenience for Semi- 
nary work. • 

EXAMINATIONS. 

At the close of the year a written examination of all the 
Classes, and on all the branches of study, is held before a 
Committee of the Board of Superintendents, beginning 
Monday, April 25, at 11 o'clock a. m., and this is followed 
by an oral examination before the full Board on the Tues- 
day and Wednesday of the same week. Special written 
examinations are held during the year as the work requires. 

LOCATION. 

Holland is situated at the head of Macatawa Bay, 
which opens into Lake Michigan, giving it all the attrac- 
tion of boating, with daily steamers for Chicago and other 
points. It has good railroad facilities, and offers many at- 
tractions as a place of residence. 



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AiENlRAl UOTARY, 

UNIV. OF MICH. 

APR 34 1899 



Hope College 



HOLLAND, MICHIGAN. 



1898-'0Q. 



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CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



OP 



Hope College, 

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN. 

1898-'99. 



AN INSTITUTION OF THE RBPORMED CHURCH 
IN AMERICA. 



PIONEER SCHOOL, 1851. 
HOLLAND ACADEMY, 1857. 
BECAME HOPE COLLEGE, t8bb. 



HOLLAND, MICH. 

OTTAWA COUMTT TUfSB PRE88IB. 
1890. 



J 

1 



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Calendar— 1899-1900. 



1899. April 10. 

*[ 26-27. 

•' 26. 

June 15-16. 

18. 

19. 

20. 
20. 

21. 



Spring Term begins. 

Senior Ex ami nations. 

Meeting of Council. 

Undergraduate Examinations. 

Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Closing Exercises of tb^ Gram mar Scbool 

in Winants Chapel, 2 P. M. 
Meeting of Council, 10 A. M. 
Public Meeting of Alumni in Winants 

Chapel, 7:30 P. M. 
Commencement Exercises in Winants 

Chapel, 7:30 P. M. 

VACATION. 



Sept. 19. Examinations for Admission, beginning at 
9 A. M., in Graves Hall. 
" 20. Fall Term begins at 9 A. M. 

Nov. 30. Thanksgiving Recess. 
Dec. 22. Fall Term ends. 

VACATION. 

1900. Jan. 8. Winter Term begins. 

** 25. Day of Prayer for Colleges. 

March 30. Winter Term ends. 

VACATION. 



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The Council. 



EX-OFFICIO. 
Prop. G. J. Kollen, LL, D. , . President of the College. 

ELECTED MEMBERS. 

FROM GENERAL SYNOD. 

NAKBS. BESIDBMCXfl. TERMS EXPIRE. 

Hon. Gerrit J. Diekema, Holland, Mich. 1899 

Rev. Cornelius Brett, D. D., Jersey City, N. J. 1900 

Mr. a. a. Raven, Brooklyn, N. Y. 1900 

Rev. G. H. Mandevillb, D.D,, LL. D., NewYorkCity. 1901 

Rev. Jas. F. Zwemer. Grand Rapids, Mich. 1902 

Rev. Wm. Moerdyk, Milwaukee, Wis. 1902 

Hon. Isaac Cappon, Holland, Mich. 1903 

Hon. a. Visscher, Holland, Mich. 1904 

FROM CLASSIS OF WISCONSIN. 

Rev. John H. Karsten, D. D. Oostburg, Wis. 1899 

Rev. B. Van Ess, Roseland, III. 1899 

FROM CLASSIS OF MICHIGAN. 

Rev. H. Gough Birchby, Holland, Mich. 1900 

*Rev, Wm. Hall Williamson, Grand Rapids, Mich. 1900 

FROM CLASSIS OF PLEASANT PRAIRIE. 

Rev. D. Schaefer, Parkers burgh, la. 1900 

Rev. a. F. Beyer, German Valley, III. 1900 

FROM CLASSIS OF GRAND RIVER. 

Rev. D. J. De Bey, • Grand Rapids, Mich. 1901 

Rev. Dirk Brobk, Grand ville, Mich. 1901 

^Remffvtd from CUunt, 



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6 HOPE COLLEGE. 



PROM CLASSIS OP HOLLAND. 

Rev. G. DbJongb, Vriesland, Mich. 1902 

Hon. Jac. Den Herder. Zeeland, Mich. 1902 

prom classis op dakota. 
*Rev. Wm. Miedema. 
Rev. S. J. Harmelino, Marion, So. Dakota. 1902 

PROM CLASSIS OP IOWA. 

Rev. p. Lepbltak, Alton, Iowa. 1903 

Rev. Jambs De Free, Sioux Centre, la. 1903 

PROM CLASSIS OP ILLINOIS. 

Rev. Peter Moerdykb, D. D. , Chicago, III. 1904 

Rev. Jesse W. Brooks, Ph. D., Chicago, III. 1904 



OFFICERS OF COUNCIL. 

Rev. Wm. Moerdyk, - . . . President. 

Rev. B. Van Ess, . - . . vice President. 

Hon. G. J. DiEKEMA, . . . . Secretary. 

Prof. C. Dobsburo, ----- Treasurer. 



COMMITTEES OF COUNCIL. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Pres. G. J. EoLLEN, Chairman. 
Hon. ArendVisschbr, Secretary. 
Hon. Jac. Den Herder. Hon. G. J. Dibkbma. 

Rev. Gerhard Db Jongb. 

*Removed from Clastii. 



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THE COUNCIL. 



INVESTMENT COMMITTEE. 
(In charge of the funds of the Council). 

Hon. Abend Vissgher. Pbes. G. J. Kollen. 

Hon. Isaac Cappon. Hon. G. J. Diekbma. 

HOPE FARM COMMITTEE. 

Prbs. G. J. Kollen. Hon. Isaac Cappon. 

Hon. Arend Visscheb. 

'^DE HOPE.' 

Prop. C. Doesburq, ) 

Rev. H. E. Dosker, D. D. , C - Editorial Committee. 

Rev. D. Broek, ) 

Mr.R. Kanters, ... - Publisher. 



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College Department. 



Faculty. 

GERRIT J. KOLLEN, LL.D., President. 
In charge of Political Economy. 

CORNELIUS DOESBURG, A.M., Secretary and Registrar. 

Professor of the Dutch Language and Literature. 

In charge of Art Studies. 

HENRY BOERS, A. M. 

Professor of History. 
In charge of Zoology. 

JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, A. M. , Vice President. 

Professor of Mathematics. 

In charge 9f Biology. 

JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A. M., 
Rodman Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

JOHN B. NYKERK, A. M., 

Professor of the English Language and Literature. 

In charge of Vocal Music. 

DOUWE B. YNTEMA, A. M. 

Professor of Chemistry and Physics. 

REV. JOHN TALLMADGE BERGEN, A. M., 

Robert Sghell Professor of Ethics and Evidences of 

Christianity. 

In charge of Logic. 



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THE FACULTY. 9 



HENRY VEGHTE, A. M., 

Professor of the French and German Languages, and 

Literatures^ 

EDWARD D. DIMNENT, A. B., 

Ralph Voorhebs Professor of the Greek Language 

and Literature. 

ADONIRAM J. LADD, A B., 
Professor of Psychology and Pedagogy. 

JAMES G. VAN ZWALUWENBURG, B. S., 
Instructor in Natural Sciences. 

MRS. C. VAN RAALTE GILMORE. 
Lady Principal. 

HON. G. J. DIEKEMA, A.M., LL.B., 
GEO. E, KOLLEN, A. M., LL.B., 
Lecturers on Political Economy. 

Standing Committees of the Faculty. 

courses of study. 
Props. Kleinheksel, Yntema, Nykbrk, Sutphen. 



contests and prizes. 
Profs. Bergen, Dimnent, Nykbrk. 



LIBRARY. 

Props. Doesburg, Veghte, Sutphen, Boers. 



cataloaue and commencement. 
Profs. Boers, Doesburg, Dimnent. 



advertising. 
Profs. Nykbrk, Yntema, Kleinhbksbl. 



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STUDENTS. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

NRmei. Residences. 

Hal G. Birchby City. 

William N. Birchby City. 

Peter Braak Grand Rapids. 

Arthur C. V. Dangremond Newark, N. Y. 

J. Jas. De Pree Sioux Center, la 

Seine B. De Pree , Sioux Center, la. 

Andrew Ganzevoort Hoepers, la. 

John E. Kuizinga Muskegon. 

Folkert Mansens City. 

Peter J. Marsilje Ciiy. 

Cornelius D. Mulder Spring Lake. 

Fred. Reeverts Stillman Valley, III. 

Henry Schipper Grand Rapids. 

Henry Sluyter Grand Rapids. 

Cornelius Spaan Orange City, la. 

John H. Ter AvesT. City. 

Gerrit Te Kolste Holland, Neb. 

JOHN Van Ess Chicago, 111. 

Bernard Van Heuvelen City. 

John Verwey City. 

Fedde Wiersema Chicago, III. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Hattie a. Zwemer Grand Rapids. 

Harry Boot. Fulton, III. 

Henry D. Brink Hamilton. 

A. T. Broek Grandville 

Abraham De Young Chicago, 111. 

Gerard J. Dinkeloo City. 

Almon T. Godfrey City. 

Gerrit Hondelink Grand Rapids. 

Henry Huenemann Lester Prairie, Minn. 

Leonard L. Legtbrs Clymer, N. Y. 

SiebeC. Nettinga LeMars, la. 



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STUDENTS 11 

SlERT F. RiEPMA Benton Harbor. 

William Rinok City. 

John H. Straks Orange City, la. 

John D. Tanis Vriesland, 

Cornelius Van dbr Meulen, City. 

Aart B. Van Zante Pella, la, 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Henry Arbnds, Jr Chancellor, S. Dak. 

Arthur Birchby City. 

William J Damson City, 

Wolbert Denekas German Valley, III. 

Marinus Den Herder Vriesland- 

Richard De Young Chicago, 111, 

Matthias J. Duven Maurice, la. 

Albert Hoeksema Holland. 

John H Hcspers Orange City, la. 

George H, Korteling Chicago, III. 

Martin I Koster Kalamazoo, 

Edward D. Kremers : City. 

Benjamin r. Lugers Holland. 

Adrian J. Neerken Graafschap. 

John J. Nyweninq Wichert, 111. 

John S. Raum City. 

John Steunenberg Grand Rapids. 

Martin J. Stormzand Grand Eiapids, 

Henry Tblman Overisel. 

John Van Peursem Maurice, la. 

Oswald W. Visscher City. 

Jacobus Wayer Muskegon. 

Jacob J. Weersing, Jr East Holland. 

John Wesselink Sioux Center, la. 

Egbert Winter City. 

John E. Winter City. 

John G. Winter City. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Minnie De Feyter City. 

Minnie Van der Ploeg City. 



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12 HOPE COLLEGE. 



William Beckman City. 

Jacob G. Bloemers Holland. 

John Y. Broek Grandville. 

Bernard Bruins Boyden, la. 

William H. De Kleine Forest Grove. 

Henry De Pree Zeeland. 

James J. Hoffman West Say ville, L. I , N. Y. 

Berend Kleinhesselink Oostburg, Wis. 

John Schaap Parkersburgrh, la. 

Henry J. Steketee Muskegon. 

Don. C. Taylor Dunningville. 

John Van der Beek Pella, Neb. 

Jacob Van PuTTEN City. 

John A. Van Zoeren City. 

Peter Verburg Holland. 

Hessel S. Yntema ForestGrove. 

UNCLASSIFIED. 

Lena M. Keppel Zeeland. 

Anna Riemens City. 

Garrelt N. Heeren German Valley, III. 

James Van der Heide Graafschap. 

SUMMARY. 

Seniors 21 

Juniors 17 

Sophomores 27 

Freshman 18 

Unclassified 4 

Total 87 



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j 



Course of Study. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Mathematics — Went worth's Plane and Spherical Tri- 
gonometry, and College Algebra. 

Language — 

English — Genung^s Outlines of Rhetoric; Anderson's 
Study of English Words; Essays. 

Latin — Cicero 's Orations ; Vergil. 

Greek — Homer's Iliad or Odyssey; Herodotus; Greek 
Prose Composition. 

French — Edgren's Grammar, complete; Edgren's Rea- 
der; Heath's New Dictionary; French Literature, Popular, 
Classical, and Scientific. 

German — Joynes-Meissner's Grammar; Joynes-Meiss- 
ner's Reader; Heath's New Dictionary; German Literature; 
Onkel und Nichte; Tmmensee. 

HiSTOEY — Allen's History of the Roman People. 

Natueal Science — Holder's Zoology; Gray's Botany. 

Chemistry — Williams' Chemical Science, revised edition ; 
Williams' Laboratory Manual. 

Elocution — Fulton and Trueblood's Practical Elocution. 

Bible Study — Ellicott's New Testament. 



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14 HOPE COLLEGE. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Mathematics — Surveying and Navigation, and Hardy's 
Analytical Geometry. 

Language — 

English — Pancoast's Introduction to English Literature; 
Clark's Study of English Prose Selections; George's Chau- 
cer to Arnold; Essays and Reports. 

Latin — Livy; De Senectute. 

Greek — Lysias; Greek Prose Con>position. 

German — German Literature, Popular, Classical, and 
Scientific; German Composition and Discourse. 

History — Myer's Mediaeval History. 

Natural Science — Chemistry. 

Elocution — Fulton and Trueblood's Practical Elocution 
finished; Orations and Forensics. 

Bible Study. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics — Hardy's Calculus. 

Mathematics Applied — Olmsted's College Philosophy, 
Fourth Revision, Sheldon. 

Language — 

Latin — Horace; Stickney's Cicero's De Officiis. 

Greek — Plato's Apology and Crito; Tarbell's Demos- 
thenes' Philippics 

Dutch — History of Dutch Literature; Essays and Trans- 
lations. 

German — German Literature, Popular, Classical, and 
Scientific; German Composition and Discourse. 

History — Myer's Modern History. 

Natural Science — Sedgwick and Wilson's Biology. 

Logic — McCosh. 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 15 



Ethics — Porter's Elements of Moral Science. 
Psychology — Ladd. 

Pedagogy — Psychology applied to Education. 
Rhetoric — Essays, Discussions, and Orations. 
Bible Study. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Mathematics — Newcomb and Holden's Astronomy, ad- 
vanced course. 

Language — 

Grreek — Aristophanes' Clouds; Sophocles* Aixtigone. 

German — Grerman Literature, Popular, Classical, and 
Scientific; German Composition and Discourse. 

Ethics — Porter's Elements and Moral Science com- 
pleted. 

History — Judson's Europe in the 19th Century. 

Natural Science— Dana's Class Book of Geology. 

Political Science — Walker's Political Economy, ad- 
vanced course. 

Rhetoric — Orations and Essays continued. 

Pedagogy — Compayre's Lectures on Pedagogy; Com- 
payre's History of Pedagogy; Lecture Courses. 

Sacred Literature — Fisher's Evidences of Christianity. 

Pour parallel courses have been introduced in the Col- 
lege: the Classical, the Philosophical, the Scientific, and 
the Normal. The last course is to be pursued with a view 
to securing a State Certificate. 



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16 



HOPE COLLEGE. 



SCHEDULE— CLASSICAL COURSE. 



8:20—9:10. 



9:10—10:5. 



10:5—11. 



11—12. 



FRESHMAN. 







Lalin, 


Rhetoric. 


French, 


Roman His., 


H weeks. 


U weeks. 


36 weeks. 


10 weeks. 




Zoology, 






Gbbman, 


12 weeks. 






22 weeks. 


Botany, 


Cbemistjit, 


Mathematics. 




10 weeks. 


K) weeks. 


26 weeks. 


Bible Study. 


Rhetobicals, 






on Thursday. 


ou Monday. 



SOPHOMORE. 



(JREKK, 



86 weeks. 



Cheiiibtby, 

14 weeks. 

Eno. Lit., 

fti weeks. 

Rhetobicals, 
on Wednesday. 



Latin, 



36 weeks. 



Geology, 

14 weeks. 
German. 

12 weeks. 
Medieval His.. 

10 weekBw 
Bible Study, 

on Friday. 



JUNIOR. 





Calculus, 


Gbbman or Dutch. 




Psychology, 


10 weeks. 


14 weeks. 


Latin, 


1st term. 






1st A 2Qd term. 


Elocution, 


Mod. Hist., 


Psychology, 




1 St tm. on Tuesday. 


4 weeks. 


4 weeks 


Biology, 


Physics, 


Logics Eloc., 
on Tuesdajt 


Obbbk, 


3d term. 


2d term. 


18 weeks. 




Mod. Hist.. 


2ud term. 


Bible Study, 


Rhetobicals. 


3d term. 


Physics, 


on Tuesday 


on \Vednesday. 




3d term. 


2nd as 3d terms 





SENIOR. 





Eys. of Chbis., 






ASTBONOMY, 


8 weeks. 


Gbeek, 


German, 


10 weeks. 


Ethics, 


18 weeks. 


14 weeks. 


Pol. EcoN.. 


6 weeks. 






4 weeks. 


Hist, of Eub. in 






Ethics, 


19thCen., 12 wks 






8 weeks. 


Elocution, 






Sociology, 


2 weeks. 


Pol. Kcon, 


Geology, 


6 weeks. 


Rhetobicals, 

on Friday. 


10 weeks. 


12 weeks. 



The four courses. Classical, Philosophical, Scientific, and Normal, all alike, 
lead to the degree of Bachelor of Arts (A. B.) 

For Normal or State Certificate Course, in Freshman, Sophomore, and Jun- 
ior years, any one of the other three may be selected. 



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CX>URSE OF STUDY. 



Schedule -PHILOSOPHICAL COURSE. 



8:20—9:10. 



9:10—10:5. 



10:5—11. 



11—12. 



FRESHMAN. 



Frbrch. 26 wks. 



CBBmSTBY. 



10 wks. 



Roman History. 

10 wks. 
Mathbxatics, 

36 wks. 



Latih, 14 wks. 
Gbbxan, 22 wkH. 

BiBLB Study, 

Thursday. 



Rhbtoric, 14 wks. 
ZooLOOY, 12 wks. 
Uotamy, 10 wks. 
Rhbt. on Monday. 



SOPHOMORE. 



SuRTETiNo A Nat. 

COLLEOB Algebra. 

Anal. Geometry. 

36 wks. 



Chemistry, 

14 wks. 
English Lit. 

22 wks. 
Bhbt. on Wed. 



Latin. 36 wks. 



Gbolooy, 14 wks. 
Germ&n, 12 wks. 
Med. Hist., 10 wks. 
Bible, on Friday. 



JUNIOR. 



Pstchobogy, 

1st term 

Elocution, Tues- 
day. Isttprm. 

Physics, 2Dd term. 

Modern History, 
8rd t«rm. 



Calculus, 

10 weeks. 
Mod. History, 

4 weeks. 
Logic a Eloc, 
Tuesday, 2d term. 

Physics, 3rd term. 



German, 14 wks. 

Psychology. 

4 wks. 

Greek, 18 wks. 

Bible, Tuesday, 
2d ana 3d terms. 



Latin. 

1st A 2nd term. 

Biology, 3rd term. 

Rhbtoricals, 
on Wednesday. 



SENIOR. 



Astronomy, 

10 weeks. 

POLITIOAL EOON., 

4 weeks. 
Ethics, 8 weeks. 
Sociology, 

6 weeks. 



Eyid. of Christ., 
8 weeks. 
Ethics, 6 weeks. 
Hist, of Europe, 
19tbCeDt., 12 wks. 
Elocution. 2 wks. 
Rhbtoricals, 

on Friday. 



Greek, 18 weeks. 
Political Econ.. 
10 weeks. 



German. 14 weeks. 

Geology, 

12 wejeks. 



Lady Piliicipal will meet tbe lady students on Monday of each week from 
1:00 to 3:00 p.m. 

All the classes meet for instruction in Music on Friday afternoon of each week. 



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18 



HOPE COLLEGE. 



Schedule— SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 



g;20— 9:10. 



9:10—10:5. 



10:5—11. 



11—12. 



FRESHMAN. 



Frknch. 26 vfka. 



CHEMI8TBT, 



10 vfkB. 



Roman Histobt, 
10 wks. 

MATHB1IATI09, 

30 wks. 



CONSTITUTIOM U. S. 

14 wks. 
German, 22 wks. 
Bible Stodt. 

Tnursday. 



Rhetoric, 14 wks. 
Zoology, 12 wks. 
Botany, 10 wkg. 
Rhbt. on Monday. 



SOPHOMORE. 



SOBYSTINO & NAV. 

College A loebra. 
Anal. Geometby. 
Se wks. 



Chemistry, 

14 wks. 
English Lit. 

22 wks. 
Rbet. on Wed. 



Bryce*8 American 
Commonwealths, 
14 wks. 
Chemistry, 

22 wks. 



Geology, 14 wka. 
German, 12 wks. 
Med. Hist., Sdtim. 
Bible, on Friday. 



JUNIOR. 



Psychology, 

Ist term. 

Elocution, TuErf- 
DAY. ist t*-rm. 

Physics, 2nd term. 

Modern History, 
3rd term. 



Calculus, 

10 weeks. 
Mod. History, 

4 weeks. 
Logic a Eloc, 
Tuesday, 2d term. 

Physics, 8rd term. 



German, 14 wks. 
Ist term. 

Psychology, 

4 wks. 

Greek, 18 wks. 

Bible, Tuesday, 
2d and 3d terms. 



Latin, 

Ist A 2nd term. 

Biology, Srd term. 

Bhetoricals, 
on Wednesday. 



SENIOR. 



Astronomy, 

10 weeks. 
Political Econ., 

4 weeks. 
Ethics, 8 weeks. 
Sociology, 

weeks. 



Eyid. 07 Christ., 

8 weeks. 
Ethics, 6 weeks. 
Hist, of Europe, 
10th Cent., 12 wks. 
Elocution, 2 wks. 
Rhetorigals. 

on Friday. 



Greek, 18 weeks. 
Political Econ., 
10 weeks. 



German. 14 weeks. 

Geology, 

12 weeks. 



Lady Principal will meet the lady students on Monday of each week ltx>m 
1:00 to 3:00 P.M. 

All the classes meet for instruction In Music on Friday afternoon of each week. 



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Preparatory Departmetit. 



Faculty. 

PROF. GERRIT J. KOLLEN, LL.D., President. 

PROF. CORNELIUS DOESBURG, A.M., 
Dutch Language and Literature, Drawing, and Painting. 

PROF. HENRY BOERS, A. M., 
History. 

PROF. JOHN H. KLEINHEKSEL, A. M., Vice President. 
Mathematics. 

PROF. JAMES G. SUTPHEN, A. M., Secretary. 
Latin . 

PROF. JOHN B. NYKERK, A. M., 
English, and Music. 

PROF. DOU WEB. YNTEMA, A. M., 
Physics. 

PROF. JOHN TALLMADGE BERGEN, A. M., 
Bible Study. 

PROF. HENRY VEGHTE, A. M., 
Modern Languages. 



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20 HOPE COLLEGE. 



PROF. EDWARD D. DIMNENT, A. B., 
Greek. 

PROF. ADONIRAM J. LADD, A B., 
Psychology and Pedagogy. 

PROF. JAMES G. VAN ZWALUWEN BURG, B. S., 
Instructor in Natural Sciences. 

MRS. C. VAN RAALTE GILMORE, 
Lady 'Principal. 



PaoF^a D0.8B0K0. Ii;"^^!-^:;^' I Ass't 

Librarian. j,^ j g^^^^^;^ C Librarians. 



i.K, -\ 



John E. Winter, Chorister. Hattie Zwemer, Organist. 
Bernard Bloemendal, Janitor 



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STUDENTS. 



**A» CLASS. 
NAmes. Resldenoes. 

Jennie Huizinga City. 

Sena Kooiker civerisel. 

Georgiana Lugers . . ., Holland. 

Janet Vandenbelt May. 

Evelyn Vissoher Forestburg, S. Dak. 

Cornelius K. Bareman Zeeland. 

Henry K. Boer Drenthe. 

William H. Coop