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Full text of "Yearbook, 1964"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/yearbook196400phil 



\; 



DA CAPO 



1963-1964 




Philadelphia Musical Academy 

1617 Spruce Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103 

Member of National Association of Schools of Music 



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Founded 1870 



FROM THE LIBRARY OF 

KENT CHRISTENSEN 

PHILADELPHIA MUSICAL ACADEMY 



Associated Schools 

Philadelphia Conservatory of Music 

Philadelphia Dance Academy 



CONTENTS 




Messages 



Faculty 




Activities 




Classes 



Dedication 




DEDICATION 

With proud pleasure the yearbook staff 
dedicates Da Capo to Dean Abe Pepinsky. 
Students seek his unfailing and friendly 
counsel. His understanding helps us to 
resolve conflicting personal problems. We 
gratefully recognize his deep sense of 
responsibility toward the Academy. His life 
should be a model for our own. 









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In Memoriam 




IN MEMORIAM 

To the memory of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, a great patron 
of the arts, we, the students of the Philadelphia Musical 
Academy, offer this tribute. During his lifetime, he encouraged 
all who aspired to the difficult heights an artist must attain. 
While President, he invited many artists to perform at the White 
House and many in the other arts to exhibit their works. His 
insatiable desire to develop United States resources to their 
fullest, encompassed the arts especially. The expression of 
his cultural ambitions we may also adopt as our own: "To further 
the appreciation of culture among all the people, to increase 
respect for the creative individual, to widen participation by all 
the processes and fulfillments of art — this is one of the fascin- 
ating challenges of these days." 





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Messages 




PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 

Graduating Class of 1964, you have 
now to meet the challenge of making a career 
in which your love of music will ever be an 
important aspect. May the pursuit of excel- 
lence, high ideals, and solid values contin- 
ually guide you in your chosen profession. 
As your life work continues, be it teaching, 
listening, or performing, see that your ex- 
periences enrich you as well as those you 
contact. 

The Faculty and Friends at the Phila- 
delphia Musical Academy wish you the best 
of success. We welcome an exchange of 
ideas with our Alumni-to-be through the 
years to come, and the pleasure of sharing 
mutual interests in this marvelous world of 
music. 

Maria Ezerman Drake, President 



DIRECTOR'S MESSAGE 

It is with pride that the faculty, stu- 
dents, and administration can look back on 
the current year that is just now coming to 
an end. Recent examination of the record 
shows that our students rank favorably in 
academic achievement with those in colleges 
and universities across the nation. This 
has been shown to be true of both the fresh- 
men newly admitted and the seniors about 
to graduate. 

When we also consider the Academy's 
fine musical standards, it becomes apparent 
that we can already boast of offering a very 
high quality education. 

However, as I look forward to coming 
years, I see further accomplishments and 
improvements at the Academy as interest 
in and support for our program grows. With 
the dedication and committment that you 
have already demonstrated this year, I am 
sure that in the future the Academy will 
soon become in reputation as well as in 
deed one of the nation's leading music 
colleges. 

A. Hendrik Drake, Director 




DEAN'S MESSAGE 




There is but little doubt that the Phi- 
ladelphia Musical Academy falls heir to 
some fine talents in the field of musical 
endeavor and that some of them develop 
their potentials to the fullest. However, 
there is another serious responsibility that 
every student here must accept: the prepar- 
ation for better citizenship. It is to this 
purpose that our Academy is dedicated 
when requiring courses of a cultural and 
general academic nature. The excuse that 
there is not enough time to adequately 
practice is hardly a reason. It is merely an 
excuse. Look about you between classes 
and you will better understand. 

Be honest with yourselves, please. If 
you truly desire undergraduate recognition 
you must be willing to strive for it. Other- 
wise, consider the wisdom of registering 
as a special student and give yourself ample 
opportunity to do what you really want to 
do. Many of you have come for help and 
guidance. If you passed through prescribed 
admissions channels, we know a lot about 
you which will help us to help you. \'our 
problems may not be merely musical, nor 
even academic. They may be personal. We 
respect you as a person, and you will find 
us understanding. 

We wish you well, 
Abe Pepinsky 



DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR'S MESSAGE 

Looking back over the past four years 
you must be aware of the tremendous changes 
that have taken place at the Philadelphia 
Musical Academy. You have been part of an 
institution whose ideals and standards 
have been heightened by the addition of 
outstanding new faculty members. 

The past four years have been transitory 
ones and we, as well as you, have learned 
from them. Future classes will take advan- 
tage of our experiences and will benefit 
from them. 

May the role you played in the develop- 
ment of the school develop you also as a 
responsible, dedicated, and outstanding 
musician. I hope you will remember us as 
the years go by, and allow us to share with 
you the pleasures of your musical expe- 
riences. 

Maurice Kaplow, Director of Development 




Office Staff 




MARY K. TOMKINS 
Registrar 




LOUISE KLEIN 
Secretary 



LEAH FARBER 

Business Manager 





JANI SZANTO 
String Dept. 
President Emeritus of the Phila- 
delphia Musical Academy and 
leader of Munich String Quartet; 
Concertmaster of several renowned 
orchestras 




Faculty 



ABE PEPINSKY 
Dean and Director of Admissions 
Head of Psychology Dept. 




KENT C. CHRISTENSEN 

Humanities Dept. 
Advisor to Yearbook Staff 




CLEMENT C. PETRILLO 

Piano and Theory Dept. 

Concertized in Europe and 

United States 




ADELE NEWFIELD 

Voice Dept. 

Work in Vocal Coaching 



Faculty 





HAROLD PARKER 
Voice Dept. 
Performer on Radio and T.V. 



NICHOLAS De COLLIBUS 

String Dept. 

Member of American Society of 

Composers, Authors and Publishers 





CAROLYN D. DENGLER 

Voice Dept. 

Vocal Coaching 




AN TIN RUDNYTSKY 

Vocal Dept. 

Concert pianist, conductorof operas 

and symphony orchestras in many 

European countries 



ALLISON R. DRAKE 

Piano Dept. 

Recitalist, Chamber Performer 

and Two Piano Work 



Faculty 





JOSEPH CASTALDO 

Head of Composition Dept. 

Chairman of Music Committee of 

Philadelphia Composer's Forum 



DONALD CHITTUM 

Theory Dept. 

Conductor of the 

Ventnor Summer Youth Symphony 



Faculty 




MARIA SOKIL 

Vocal Dept. 

Soloist throughout theUnited States, 

Europe and Canada and as soloist 

with NBC Symphony Orchestra 




GENIA ROBINOR 

Piano Dept. 

Concertized extensively in Europe 

and America as soloist and in 

chamber music recitals 





J. EARL NESS 

Organ Dept. 

Director of the 

Philadelphia Oratorio Choir 



DOROTHY SHAW WEIR 
Music Education Dept 
Instrumental director and con- 
ductor at the Philadelphia High 
School for Girls 




F 
A 
C 
U 
L 
T 
Y 




MILDRED PEARL PARKER 

Musicology Dept. 

Concert Pianist, Chamber Music 

Player and Accompanist 



CLAIRE POLIN 

Composition and Flute Depts. 

Awards in composition and life 

member of Delta Omicron 





JOSEPH S. BUTTERWECK 

Music Education Dept. 

Consultant to the Pennsylvania 

State Council of Education 



NATALIE L. HINDERAS 
Piano Dept- 
Lecturer and recitalist, inter- 
national radio and T.V. appearances 




Faculty 



MARGARET GARWOOD 

Piano Dept. 

Concertizes as soloist and 

accompanist 




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NADIA CHILKOVSKY 

Dance Dept. 

Founded Philadelphia Dance 

Academy 



ROBERT SUDERBURG 

Composition and Choral Dept. 

Director of Chorus 




Philadelphia 
Dance 

Academy 



Composer James DePreist, former Conservatory 
student, Nadia Chilkovsky, choreographer and 
Nicholas Nahumck scenic designer, prepare a Phi- 
ladelphia Dance Academy program. 



The Philadelphia Dance Academy is located not far from the Philadelphia Musical Academy. 
It is supervised by Nadia Chilkovsky, and presently enrolls fourteen students. The principles of 
teaching are based on strict discipline of technical study combined with complete freedom of the 
imagination. Special attention is given to the talented student who is guided in a highly personal 
manner so that he may mature as an individual artist with an independent style of dance expres- 
sion. Upon graduation the student is ready to become a dancer, a choreographer, a teacher and 
notator. 

On Wednesday evening, March 4, 1904, the Philadelphia Dance Academy was featured at the 
Plays and Players Theater. The program was divided into three parts: "Chopiniana"; "Sprig of 
Lilac", a fascinating dance based on the poem "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloomed" by 
Walt Whitman, and communicating the emotional climate at the time of Lincoln's assassination; 
and an exciting jazz ballet "Bagatelles''. 



James Jamieson, with Phyllis 
Dersh '64 and Lidia Kryzanowsky 
'63, members of the faculty of the 
Philadelphia Dance Academy, re- 
hearsing CHOPINIANA for per- 
formance at Plays and Players. 

Photo by Biagio Pinto 




Philadelphia 
Dance 



Academy 




Final moment in CORTEGE from the Philadelphia Dance Academy 
production of BAGATELLES. Lidia Kryzanowsky is being carried by 
Joseph Alston (left) and William Parker. Other dancers are left to right 
front row: James Lentini, Nora Winokur, William Moorehouse; back row: 
Lida Nelson, Cicely Johnston, Rose Dickerson. 

Photo by Nicholas Nahumch 




Phyllis Dersh (on the box), and Louise Rubenstein (far 
left), members of the class of 1954, appear with Dyane 
Gray (third from left) and Suzanne Lewis (center back) 
class of 1963 in a scene from CHINESE FLUTE, a work 
choreographed by Nadia Chilkovsky, with music by Ernst 
Toch. 

Photo by Biagio Pinto 



A scene from Nadia Chil- 
kovsky's SPRIG OF LILIAC, 
inspired by Walt Whitman's ode 
to Abraham Lincoln. The music 
is by James DePreist. (left to 
right Helen Truehart, faculty, 
Joseph Alston, Judy Jamison, 
Lidia Kryzanowsky - alumna and 
faculty, James Lentini, and Lida 
Nelson, faculty.) 





Parents' 
* Organization 



A group newly formed at the Academy 
this year is the Parents' Organization. 
Essential to the richest development of 
school "family life" and school reputation, 
this group will incorporate itself as an 
integral part of social activities, musical 
functions, and Academy benefits for stu- 
dents individually and for the school gen- 
erally. Judging by the enthusiastic support 
and cooperation shown at the Covered Dish 
Dinner on February 13, we can be sure of a 
most active and successful Parents' Organi- 
zation in the future. 



Alumni 



Association 



The Alumni Association has risen 
from the fact that the alumni body is the 
Academy's largest constituent body 
whose success in the profession of music 
is forever identified with the current 
stature of the school. Thus, it is easy 
to see that the alumni body has much to 
gain by helping the Academy in its plans 
of advancement. The Association hopes 
to sponsor the interests of the Academy 
and inaugurate and maintain cooperation 
among the Association, officers, and 
trustees. 

The Association will create scholar- 
ships for worthy and needy students and 
it will print a newsletter that will keep 
alumni informed of the most recent de- 
velopments at the Academy. The Alumni 
Association is, then, one of the best 
devices to make the Academy a first 
class music college. 




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Chamber Orchestra 



The Philadelphia Musical Academy's 
Chamber Orchestra, formerly called the 
Collegium Musicum, is composed of eight 
to twenty members, depending on the works 
to be performed. It is directed by Maurice 
Kaplow. This group, like other school 
organizations, has been very successful 
this year in regard to their performances: at 
the Van Pelt Auditorium of the Philadelphia 
Museum of Art, December 15th and March 
22nd, an din Cheltenham High School, March 
5th, as a feature demonstrating musical 
form in the third of a series of five concert- 
lectures given by Joseph Castaldo. They 
also performed Gluck's Orfeo on May 7th 
with the school's chorus and soloists. The 
highlight this year was the Chamber Or- 
chestra's WHYY television performance of 
Wagner's "Siegfried Idyll" and a composi- 
tion by Corelli over the Christmas Holidays. 
Among the works they have played are 
"Octet for Winds" by Stravinsky, "Morgen- 
musik" by Hindemith, "Brandenburg Con- 
certo No. 5 in D major" by Bach, "S>'m- 
phony No. 5 in B flat major" by Schubert. 
The members of a small group such as this 
gain excellent experience in learning to 
appreciate tones of individual instruments 
rather than in hearing a mass sound. 




The Philadelphia Musi- 
cal Academy String Quartet, 
under the artistic direction 
of Dr. Jani Szanto, has in a 
short time become a popular 
Chamber group. The Quartet 
performed for the Grace 
Bumbry Reception at the 
Bellevue Stratford, and has 
been playing in various con- 
certs around Philadelphia 
with much success. 




String Quartet 



Woodwind Ensemble 




The Academy's Woodwind En- 
semble, under the direction of 
VCayne Raper, is not new, but it has 
accomplished much this year in 
gaining good sound and professional 
ease. It is comprised of eleven 
pieces: three clarinets, one bass 
clarinet, four flutes, one French 
horn, one bassoon, and one oboe. 
The ensemble is working on such 
compositions as Hindemith's "Klei- 
nekammer", "Trois Pieces" by 
Jacques iDert, and Beethoven's 
"Quintet". 



Orchestra 




The Philadelphia Musical Academy's sixty- five-piece 
symphony orchestra, directed by Maurice Kaplow, has performed 
admirably this season. The first concert, presented Thursday 
evening, November 4th, at the Fleischer Auditorium, Y. M. H. A., 
included works by Wagner, Mozart, Ravel, and Hindemith. 
Cheltenham High School was the scene of the next concert when 
the orchestra appeared March 19th and performed compositions 
by Wagner and Mozart, as an added feature to the fourth in a 
series of five concert lectures by Joseph Castaldo. 

In existence now for ninety-four years, this widely known, 
active organization has been valuable to students in helping 
them to become familiar with the literature of the master com- 
posers. Equally important are the confidence and experience 
gained in performing for the public. Also, the publicity the 
orchestra receives through these appearances has benefited the 
Philadelphia Musical Academy. 



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Maurice Kaplov 
Conductor 



Metfibers of the Orchestra 



VIOLINS 

Rosalind Corwin, Concerimaster 

Paul Ginsberg 

Bridgett Pumpous 

Julian Meyer 

Bernard J. Berman 

Pamela Schaeffer 

Hai Eun Hyun 

William Steck 

Elnore Anderson 

Thomas Lindsay 
Peter Nocella 
Janet McCabe 
Peggy Merlin 
Kenneth Dockray 

YUMI NiNOMlA 

Joseph Lanza 
Herbert Light 

VIOLA 
Auce Lindsay 
Arnold Radel 
Donald Lukacs 
Roselyn Weidringer 
Evelyn Poole 
Carl Anderson 
Sidney Curtiss 

CELLO 
Martha Brons 
Carol Reftenbaugh 
Joyce A. Irons 
Jay HUME5T0N 
Russel Smith 
Bert Philups 
William Stokkino, Jr. 

BASS 

Austin Wallace 
Thomas Brennand 
Richard Muehlmann 
Richard Schlecker 
Michael Renner 

FLUTE 
Jay Magidman 
William Turner 
Judith S. Davis, Piccolo 

OBOE 

Robert M. Stewart 

Jerry Jerome 



ENGLISH HORN 
William Webster 

CLARINET 
Birdis Coleman 
Nicholas Cassizzi 
Kenneth Weiner 

BASS CLARINET 
Allen Halber 

BASSOON 
Shirley Curtiss 
John LaSalandra 

CONTRA BASSOON 
Thomas Woodhams 

TRUMPET 
Evan Solot 
Howard Lipman 
Howard Smoyer 

FRENCH HORN 
William Koren 
Candy Bliss 
Jeffrey Langford 
Richard Gardiner 

TROMBONE 
Roger Jansen 
S. Ginsberg 
Charles Schupak 
John S. Collins, III 

TUBA 

Jonathan Dornblum 



BATTERIE 
Sonny Casella 
Warren E. McLendon 
James Valerio 
Eric Henderson 
Ted Zimmerman 

LIBRARIAN 
Arnold Radel 



Philadelphia Musical Mddemy Orchestra 

Maurice Kaplow, Conductor 

Ann Hobson, Harp 
Toby Rotman, Flute 



Program 

PRELUDE: MASTERSINGERS OF NURENBURG . . . Wagner 
CONCERTO IN C MAJOR FOR HARP AND FLUTE. . Mozart 
Ann Hobson 
Toby Rotman 
ALLEGRO 
ANDANTINO 
ALLEGRO 

htermissioii 

MOTHER GOOSE SUITE Ra\-el 

I. Pavane of The Sleeping Beauty 
II. Hop O' My Thumb 

III. Laideronnette, Empress of the Pagodas 

IV. Beauty and The Beast Converse 
V. The Fairy Garden 

SYMPHONIC METAMORPHOSES Hindemilh 

On Themes of Carl Maria Von Weber 

ALLEGRO 

TURANDOT, SCHERZO 

ANDANTINO 

MARSCH 




Music 
Educators' 



National 
Conference 



MENC Officers: Mary Bourne, President; 
Alex Ragsdale, Vice-Presi- 
dent; James Fay. Secretary; 
Dimitri Kauriga, Treasurer. 



The Music Educators' National Conference is a pro- 
fessional organization for music educators and music 
students who are united in one corporate purpose: the 
advancement of music education. The chapter has already 
participated in the biennial national convention recently 
held in Philadelphia. Academy students who are members 
will have the opportunity to further their education by 
participating in campus, state, division, and national 
meetings, and they will have the opportunity to become 
acquainted with professional leaders. While the Academy 
chapter has just started, there are many indications the 
chapter will growrapidly in strength and numbers because 
there is enthusiastic student interest. The Da Capo staff 
sincerely hopes that the Academy chapter will grow in 
stature under Miss Weir's capable guidance. 





Library Staff 



Mrs. Virginia Emerson, 
Head Librarian 



THE LIBRARY 

The Academy library has become a center 
for study, listening and reading. The library has 
expanded its facilities through numerous gifts 
and purchases, including nearly 2,000 volumes 
from the University Club. 

The library has about 5,200 books, 1016 re- 
cordings and 200 miniature scores. The library 
has two record machines which are available to 
students for listening. Mrs. Virginia B. Emerson 
assumed the position of head librarian last 
August. Since taking her position, she has worked 
vigorously to make the library completely up-to- 
date. Miss Mary Lee serves as assistant librarian. 
She is a student at Drexel for her Master in 
Library Science. 






Academy 
Choir 



Robert Suderburg 
Conductor 



Zhe Academy Choir 



(•members of small choir 



SOPRANO 

Mary Elizabeth Bennett* 
Kathleen Butts 
La Deva Dams* 
Ellen Dunmore' 
Alice Eyler* 
Frances Fanelli* 
Mary Ann Gallas 
Carolyn Hill* 
CUNTA Keris' 
Gail Loos' 
Eileen Loughrey 
Maria Murowany 
Victoria Myers* 
Carol Pownall* 
Florence Quivar* 
Carole Reitenbaugh 
Irmeen Rosenberg 
Gainor Shoemaker 
Caroline Sutkus 
Barbara Vaughn* 
Sylvia Walton* 
Eugenia Wasylenko 
Sheila Weinstein 

ALTO 
Diane Bew* 
Mary Bourne* 
Claudia Brown 
PiiYi lis Casner* 
Marie Forgrave* 
Ellankay Funk 
Lois Geurin 
Beverly Hoefnlan 
Patricia Ingersoll 
Janice Jones* 
Virginia Kjieszswick 
Patricia Kriebel* 
Barbara Mylett 



ALTO (Continued) 
Barbara Ray* 
Teresa Shepanski 
Jeanette Wilson* 
Lll YEH Wu 

TENOR 
Taylor Bell' 
John Dulik' 
William Koren* 
Anthony Lupica* 
David Paige' 
Alexander Ragsdale* 
William Smith* 
Wayne Triplett* 
Lewis Wright* 

BASS 
Weldon Adams 
Frederick Brown* 
John Collins 
Raymond Costanzo* 
Tedd Didden* 
Walter Dunlap 
Robert Frederick* 
Jack Heller, Jr. 
Edward Kalehoff 
Dimitri Kauriga* 
Craig Mann 
Kenneth McConnell 
John McMenamin 
Edward Neifeld 
Roman Pawlowski* 
Ronald Rothermel* 
Howard Smoyer 
Raymond Syzc* 
Ira Tucker* 
Henry Varlack 
Austin Wallis* 



Assistant Conductors: Roman Pawlowski 
Raymond Syzc 

CHORUS OFFICERS 

Francis Fanelli, President Raymond Syzc, Vice-President 

Alice Eyler, Secretary Ellen Dunmore, Treasurer 



Philadelphia Musical Jeademi/ Choir 

Robert Suderburg, Director 
Y.M.H.A., February 13, 8:15 P.M. 

IN ECCLESIIS Giovanni Gabrieli 

For eight part chorus, so'oisls, brass and continuo 
Brass parts realized by R. Pawlowski 
Victoria Myers, Soprano Frederick Brown, Bass 

Alexander Ragsdale, Tenor 
Mary Elizabeth Bennett, Piaiw 
Evan Solot, Trumpet William Koren, Horn 

Howard Lipman, Trumpet Charles Schupak, Trombone 

Howard Smoyer, Trumpet Jonathan Dornblum, Tuba 

MISSA PANGE lingua Josquin de Pres 



Kyrie 
Gloria 



NANIE, op. 82 Johannes Brahms 

For chorus and piano (orchestral reduction) 
Mary Elizabeth Bennett, Piano 



intermission 

LES NOCES (The Wedding) /gor Slra\-insky 



Part One, Scene I 
Scene II 
Scene III 

Part Two: 



The Bride's Chamber 
The Bridegroom's Home 
The Bride's Departure 
The Wedding Fe 



(The scenes follow one another without pause) 

Soloists 
Elizabeth Suderburg, Soprano Rita Dreyfus, Mez:o-Soprano 
Wayne Conaway, Tenor Harold Parker, Bass 



Allison Drake 
LiLBURN Dunlap 



Pianists 

Joseph Arcaro 
Herbert Siegel 



William Smith 



Librarians 
Henry Varlack 



La Deva Davis 



Percussion 
Mickey Bookspan Allen Abel 

Lee Gurst Mathew Hopkins 

RussEL Hahtenberger Ben Harms 

The Academy Small Choir 




A vital part of the Academy's performing life is our excellent 
Academy Choir. L'nder the inimitable and challenging direction of 
Robert Suderburg, the chorus has attained new heights. Outstanding 
performances have marked the career of the relatively new group. In 
the future, the Choir will tour more extensively and shows promise of 
becoming one of the most accomplished groups in and around Phila- 
delphia. 




For certain works requiring 
fewer voices, a special small 
chorus has been formed. These 
members, chosen qualitatively, 
have sung Stravinsky's Les 
Noces with great success and 
will, in the future, perform other 
compositions suited to their 
special talents. 




There has been someching new at 
the Philadelphia Musical Academy this 
year in the realm of activities. Football 
and basketball teams, managed and 
organized by Sheldon Kohan and compris- 
ed of our school's male students, appear- 
ed on the scene in good form and pro- 
ceeded to tie Philadelphia Museum Col- 
lege of Art twice in football on Nov. 31 
(12-12) and December 13 (2-2), and they 
vanquished this same team in basketball 
(72-65) on April 4. Philadelphia Electric 
also suffered defeat at the hands of 
P.M.A.'s Supersports on April 8. There 
are a few softball games scheduled for 
the end of the year and a picnic following 
that. These sports activities have con- 
tributed to the development of school 
spirit and a sense of fair play among the 
participants. 




Sports 






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Social 
Life 



Besides the expected socializing at 
concerts and recitals, Philadelphia 
Musical Academy also sponsors many 
parties and- get-togethers in its social 
life. Hallowe'en, Christmas, Valentine's 
Day, and the Spring Formal mark special 
days on the social calendar. School and 
class outings provide relaxation for both 
students and faculty. Whatever the oc- 
casion, though, everyone enjoys it, even 
if it be just a casual chat on the campus. 







Performance Hour 



The Performance Hour offers students an opportunity to perform in 
public, giving them valuable experience that will help them in their senior 
recital. Performance Hour gives other students the opportunity to criticize 
constructively other students. That skill when matured will make the 
student a better teacher in the future. The Academy hopes to develop both 
performance and critical skills. Performance Hour is, for these purposes, 
a center of exchange between performer and audience. 




Student Orp;anization 




student Organization Officers: Evan Solot, Piesidunt, Victoria Myers, 
/ice-President; Frances Fanelli, Secretary; Gail Loos, Treasurer. 



The voice of the students may always be heard at PMA through 
the elected representatives of the Student Organization. The President, 
Vice-president, Secretary, and Treasurer, along with representatives 
from each class and the Student Activities Committee, act as liaisons 
with the administration. They govern in accordance with school 
policies and supervise school activities. Effective and successful 
efforts of the Organization have earned the respect of students and 
faculty alike. 



Class Representatives: Birdis Coleman, Senior Class; Barbara Mvlett, 
Junior Class; Raymond Costanzo, Sophomore Class; Dimitri Kauriga, 
Freshman Class. 






Da Capo Staff 




YEARBOOK STAFF 

The main purpose of a yearbook is to re- 
cord the life of a school. The task of planning 
a clear, logical vearbook is complex. Co-oper- 
ation is necessary to secure results. The 
editors must co-ordinate the activities of the 
staff. The staff must have initiative to keep 
its job on schedule. With such a spirit of co- 
operation and initiative the staff has made Da 
Capo a yearbook that is comprehensive in its 
coverage of activities at the Academy. 



Da Capo Staff 
Co-Editors: 



Frances FanelU 
William Smith 



Copy Editor: Gail Loos 

Business Manager: Alexander Ragsdale 

Cover Design: Judith Davis 

Production: Gainor Shoemaker 

Teresa Shepanski 
Carrole Smythe 

Photography Editor: Dimitri Kauriga 

Photographers: Wayne Triplett 

Edward Kalehoff 
William Koren 

Faculty Adviser: Kent Chnstensen 





Special 



Events 



Grace Bumbry with PMA students 



In addition to the many activities, concerts 
and recitals held at the Academy, special out- 
side events involving students and faculty mem- 
bers are scheduled throughout the year. Per- 
formances for the Philadelphia Museum of Art, 
the Composers' Forum, the Academy of Music, 
Station \\'FIL-T\', Station WNYC, Cheltenham 
High School's "Domain of Music," the Music 
Teachers' Forum, and the Matinee Musical Club 
of Philadelphia number among these feature pro- 
grams. In this way, the Academy extends its 
influence in the aural arts to many and varied 
audiences. 



^^ 





David Arben,violin soloist at the Art Museum. 
with Hendrik Drake, Director, and Maurice 
Kaplow, Conductor. 



Mr. Joseph Castaldo, Chairman of 
the music Committee of the Phila- 
delphia Composers' Forum. 




Delta 



Omicron 



Delta Omicron: (Standing) GiT;ildinc Fluvd. Chaplain, Ellen Dunmore, 
Treasurer; Gunta Keris, President, Alice Eyler, Treasurer; Gail Loos, 
Publicity Chairman, Frances Fanelli. Music Director; (Seated) Victoria 
Myers. Warden; Sheila Weinstein, First Vice President, Caroline Sutkus, 
Second Vice President, Paulette Rush, (Not shown) Carol Povvnall, 
Historian, Barbara Mylett. Secretary. 




Delta Omicron, founded in UJOP at the C^incinnati Conservatory of Music, 
is an international tnusic fraternity for women with collegiate and alumnae 
chapters throughout the U, S. and the Orient. As a professional fraternity 
it is a charter member of the Professional Panhellenic Association. Its 
student membership is limited to professional education in music; its ac- 
tivities promote professional competency and achievement. The Omicron 
Rho Chapter of Delta Omicron, installed in April 1963, has in its young 
life successfully presented various programs and activities, including 
public concerts, a reci tal on WNYC, and a debate on modern music. As the 
Chapter and the Fraternity continue to grow, so, too, will the close bond of 
friendship between P.M. A.'s Delta Omicron sisters. 





c 



L 



A 



E 



FRESHMEN 




First Row: (Left to Right) Virginia Kreszwick, 
Theresa Shepanski, Barbara Vaughn, Barbara 
Joseph, Theresa Friday, Sylvia Walton. 
Second Row; Jacqueline Bradley, Gainor 
Shoemaker, Theodore Redden, Allen Halber, 
Jack Heller, Kenneth Dockray, Dimitri 
Kauriga, Craig Mann, William Doyle, Barry 
Necowitz, Beverly Arrington, Carole 
Reitenbaugh. Third Row: Henrietta Musto- 
koff, Kenneth Weiner, Manfred Abrahamson, 
Stephen Wilensky. Ronald Jeremicz, Fred. 
Silver, William Parker, Gaia Hopman. 



Freshmen not shown: Joseph Akten, Gary 
Anderson, Murray Cohen, Eileen Cohen, F. 
Delvishio, Catherine Deraco, M. DiCicco, 
Ted Didden, C. Elliott, Albert Fry, R. 
Gilotti, E. Henderson, Patricia Ingersoll, 
J. Jamison, S. Johnson, C. Johnston, Edward 
Kalehoff, A. Kaufman, T. Kelly, William 
Koren, A. Latella, J. Lentini, Warren 
McLendon, William Moorhouse, Barbara Ray, 
J. Reese, J. Scarpa, T. Stanton, J. Valerio, 
Barbara Voken, S. Wilensky, and B. 
Youngblood. 



■- .1 '' 






■ 





n 






First Row: (Left to Right) Madelyn Okolowski, Janet 
McCabe, Mary Ann Gallas, Irmeen Rosenberg, Caroline 
Sutkus, Sheila Weinstein. Second Row: Maria Murowany, 
William Smith, Robert Stewart, Walt Dunlap. Kenneth 
McDougald, Evan Solot, Weldon Adams, John McMenamin, 
Alice Eyler. Third Row: Ronald Rothermel, William 
Turner, Ted Zimmerman, Henri Mamet, Alexander 
Ragsdale, V. Trombetta, Robert Frederick. 
Sophomores not shown: Taylor Bell, Claudia Brown, 
Nicholas Cassizzi, N. Colligan, Raymond Costanzo, 
Helen Doreng, Ellen Dunmore, Helen Esposito, James 
Fay, Marie Forgrave, Judy Kim, Gail McArdle, Peggi 
Merlin, Carl Mortellite, Edward Neifeld, Florence 
Quivar, Paulette Rush, Eloise Sears, Carol Smythe, 
Howard Smoyer, Ira Tucker, Austin Wallace, and Lewis 
Wright, N. Winokur. 



JUNIORS 



SOPHOMORES 



First Row: (Left to Right) Barbara Mylett, Mary Bourne, 
Carolyn Hill, Eileen Loughrey, Mary Bennett, Sister 
Peter. Second Row: Frances Fanelli, Julian Meyer, Gail 
Loos, Sheldon Kohan, Phyllis Casner, John Dulik, Lois 
Geurin, Fred Brown. 

Juniors not shown: Louis Adelizzi, James Amadie, 
Diane Bew, Richard Bew, K. Boone, Sonny Casell, 
Judith Davis, LaDeva Davis, J. Diamen, Herb Heffner, 
E. Hemingway, Robert Jones, George Latella, Tony 
Lupica, Jay Magidman, Ihor Staruch, Raymond Syzc, 
Wayne Triplett, and Lii Yeh Wu. 




Graduates 




PATRICIA ANN BIRD 

Composition Major 

Woodbury, N. J. 



LOLITA BROWN 

B. M. Ed., Piano Major 

Camden, N. J. 



JOHN S. COLLINS 3RD 
Composition Major 
Moorestown, N. J. 




BEVERLY DAVIS 

Organ Major; Honor roll 

Palmyra, N. J. 



BIRDIS COLEMAN 

B. M. Ed., Clarinet Major 

Philadelphia, Pa. 






ROBERT COHEN 

Clarinet Major 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Graduates 



DONNA DORN 

Trumpet Major 

Telford, Pa. 




JANICE JONES 

Piano Major 
Collegeville, Pa. 




GUNTA KERIS 

History and Literature 

Major; Honor Roll; 

Delta Omicron 

Quakertown, Pa. 





GERALDINE FLOYD 

B.M.Ed., Voice Major 

Delta Omicron 

Philadelphia, Pa. 




BEVERLY HOFFMAN 

Harp Major; Honor Roll 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



f5 










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Im 



A. PATRICIA KRIEBEL 

Piano Major and 

Harpsichord 

Honor Roll 

Allentown, Pa. 




Graduates 





GERALDINE MILLER 

Piano Major 

Bala Cynwyd, Pa. 



ADRIENNE LEDGER MUSICANT 

Piano Major 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



HOWARD LIPMAN 

M. Ed., Trumpet Major 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



JOHN C. MELTON 

B. M. Ed., Trumpet Major 

Student Council 

Kingston, Pa. 



VICTORIA MYERS 

B. M. Ed., Voice Major 

Student Council; Delta Omicron 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



ROMAN PAWLOWSKI 

Composition Major; Honor Roll 

Student Council 

Collingswood, N. J. 




V i 








ARNOLD RADEL 

5. M. Ed., Viola Major 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



PHYLLIS DERSH RUDZITIS 

Dance Major 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



SAMUEL J. BROWN 

Master of Music in Piano 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



LOUISE RUBENSTEIN 

Dance Major 

Elkins Park, Pa. 



ANTON KIEHNER 
Ph. D. in Musicology 
King of Prussia, Pa. 



FRITZ KRUEGER 

Master of Music in Voice 

Havertown, Pa. 





Run and run, little child. 

Hold, so tightly to all your gay, colored balloons 

That nothing, 

Not any thing can break; 

Neither the wind, nor the cold; 

Not even the pinpoint of reality. 

Let the wet leaves brush your tear-streaked face, 

And taste the salt. 



To the bridge- 
Running! 

And nothing can catch you... 
A hand, maybe. 
For only a moment 
In your cold, clutching one. 
To lean over 

Search the black, still water. 
The wind—cold. 
Challenging the balloons, 
Biting your face and aching eyes. 
And shiver. 
And laugh. 



Welcome raindrop. 
Come, and kiss me. 



G. L. 




A LETTER 

See, here is a gap in time and space: 

An abyss, deep, dark and misty. 

Look in! 

There, is no figure— no heart. 

But reach. 

And fingers entangle your groping hand. 

A step, breathe — 

Walk into that fog 

With open eyes that cannot see. 

Wait. Hide in the dark leaves. 

There— no, here is a valley of sun and light: 

Blue, free. 

Pause here— look, and be filled. 

No. A step that way is back to the mist; 
Through the mist. 

The other side of the circle waits— clamors. 
Hold the hand tightly, so tenderly. 
Brush the tear away. 

See— how deep and green this valley, how gentle- 
Intrinsic music. 
Sunny raindrops on a shining grass. 

Listen! A voice outside the mist speaks— my name. 

Run from the valley, back 

With feet possessed by love. 

Smile to old beloved images. 

Touch and touch. 

Love— trees, not so green without the valley, 

Alas, forgive these. 

They have not known. 

Look. Something wants to remove the mist. 

No. . . . 

It turns leaves in the valley black and shadowed; 

Makes grotesque wintery trees. 

Love then, even this. 

It sees only misty shadows. 

Not the green and sun. 

It cannot quite reach. 

Nothing means to be clumsy. 

Be silent How quiet is the valley, 

So full and complete. 

To know this, for one moment; 

Live, love forever— outside. 

With eyes, kinder now. 

The hands— they are never separate. 

G. L. 



AUTOGRAPHS 



AUTOGRAPHS 



^P* The University of ilie Arts 

Alber. M. GPS.^.Sdd librar}' (333) 
320 S BAMdS&a^l 
Philadaiphi&,PA Bm^49>^M 



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