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I 




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1918 YEAR BOOK 

of the 




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^v 



A COMPLETE Tabular Presentation of Pro- 
duction, f Distribution, Prices of Commodi- 
ties, Imports and Exports, in the Reporter 
Markets, with Abstracts of Legislation affecting the 
same ; together with Price Comparisons of Quota- 
tions since the Beginning of the War, August, 1914, 
to December, 1918, inclusive; as well as related 
matter having to do with the changes incident to the 
Conduct of Business in War-time, and the Develop- 
ment of New Industries to meet War-time Demands, 
with Special Analyses of the Movement of Some of 
the More Important Commodities; and a general 
Resume of all markets which the Reporter repre- 
sents. •- ' 



*«: 



# 



Published by the 




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INC. 



1 
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100 WILLIAM STREET, NEW YORK 



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Copyright, 1919, by the 

OIL. PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER, INC. 

100 William Street, New York 

All Rights Reserved 



C Like the giant dynamo which supplies the prodigious driving power for 
the wheels of big industry, just so, the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter sup- 
plies the greatest individual motive power existent for forcing ahead your 
prestige and sales. 

C For nearly fifty years, the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter has held the 
unique position for a trade publication of being practically the only publi- 
cation in its field. 

C For nearly fifty years it has been helping to breathe the breath of life 
into new-born businesses and to advance still further the interest of busi- 

« 

nesses already established. 

C For nearly fifty years its market reports, news and advertising pages 
have been read from week to week with intense interest by executives and 
buyers in the Chemical, Dye, Drug, Paint, Oil, Varnish, Fertilizer and 
Naval Stores industries ail over the world. 

C Are YOU not already convinced that it is more important than any 
other one step you can take to have your business represented in its adver- 
tising pages? 

C Are you not grateful for the opportunity it offers, permitting you to 
dominate in YOUR field at such trifling publicity cost in but one publica- 
tion? 

C Do you not see the 'wisdom of immediately shackling and harnessing 
up this most mighty and marvelous of all powerful plants to your particu- 
lar inerest? ' 

€L This year is to witness a further advance in the industries the Oil, Paint 
and Drug Reporter represents, and it will probably break all records for 
any one year. 

C This, therefore, is the year of all years to have your goods and business 
properly represented in the advertising columns of the Oil, Paint and Drug 
Reporter. 

C There is no question about the additional prestige and business this ad- 
vertising will create for you — there is no uncertainty as to the aid it will 
be to your salesmen in doubling, tripling or maybe, quadrupling their sales. 

C We will gladly furnish our advertising rates on application. 

OIL, PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER, INC., 

1 00 William Street, New York 



X 



3^0iS<:i^</^jp'i{y^ 



A FOREWORD PERSONAL. 



\ 






v. 



>; 



DID you ever stop to consider just how much in actual service you have received year by year as a sub- 
scriber to and advertiser in the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter? Is not the completeness of this 
service brought home to you anew in this Year Book, with its complete record of imports, exports, 
prices, production, Federal regulation, etc., covering not alone the years when the United States was a 
participant in the world war, but also in all important items the price records just prior to and during the 
conflict— from August 14, 1914, to December 31, 19181 

• ■ 

The 1918 Year Book is the culmination of the Reporter's yearly service, but it is simply one of 
many varieties of such service rendered every subscriber as his due under our subscription contract. This 
is what the Reporter returns to you in return for the subscription price of $5 a year : — 

Fifty-two copies of the Reporter, one each week — $5.00. 

Five and sometimes six extra numbers without extra charge: — The N. W. D. A.; I. O. M. A.; N. P., O. and V. 
A.; and Chemical Exposition convention numbers. 

The Green Book for Buyers, issued twice yearly, which contains more than 400 pages of names and addresses of 
manufacturers, importers and handlers of products in Reporter markets, alphabetically arranged and revised 
semi-annually. 

The 1918 Year Book of 332 pages. 

And this does not include personal service to you, by letter or otherwise, in the giving of specific infor- 
mation as to prices, imports, exports, names of producing or distributing firms, etc., etc., which is a day by 
day feature of our regular publication office work. 

All this is offered you for $5.00 a year, domestic subscription; $7.00 a year in Canada, and $10.00 
a year in foreign countries, postpaid. 

The Year Book a Permanent Record. 

The presentation of the Annual Review Number of the Reporter in the form herewith is the natural 
outcome of the demand for a permanent record of the market and price changes incident to war-time 
adjustment and the substitution of commodities from new sources for those hitherto obtained from enemy 
countries, or manufactured in commercial quantities in this country for the first time as a result of war 
embargo, or of unusual demand by our Allies. There has never been a period in American industrial his- 
tory of such momentous change, of such development, or of such restriction of both output and distribution. 
And in the coming months of readjustment, of return to the normal, and of the re-establishment of war 
industries upon a permanent basis as a new peace industry it is essential that all data as to changes in 
prices and sources of commodities should be retained in permanent and readily available form. 

This the Year Book seeks to accomplish, as will be seen by a study of the following pages. In addi- 
tion, by close classification, and by a double system of indexing the details of prices, imports, exports, pro- 
duction, etc., can be turned to at once. In a Year Book of this description, which must, of necessity, cater 

(iii) 



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4 



iv 1918 YEAR BOOK 



to specific industries and to men interested in specific markets, all the data concerning such markets must be 
kept together. 

Market Sections Provided. 

This has been accomplished by dividing the Book into market sections — each with its own index — 
and by classifying the general index on pages VII to X by major divisions of the subject matter and by 
markets. This in general is as follows: — 

Pages. 

Government Regulation, the War Revenue Law, the Activities of the Enemy Alien Custodian, etc ... . 9-16 

War-time Market Price Studies. 1914-1918 1 7-37 

Imports Into the United States for the Fiscal Years, by Items, 1913-18 38-56 

Exports from the United States for the Fiscal Years, by Items . ; 56-62 

Imports Into the United States for the Calendar Years, by Items, 1913-1918 63-65 

Exports from the United States for the Calendar Years, by Items, 1913-1918 '. 66-67 

Chemical Market Section 87-1 1 6 

Dyestuffs Market Section 1 1 7-1 42 

Drug Market Section 143-182 

Oil Market Section • 183-202 

Paint Market Section 203-219 

Fertilizer Market Section 221 -228 

Naval Stores Market Section v • 229-235 

Petroleum Section 237-324 

In addition to these regular features will be found the complete list of enemy-owned patents for dyes, 
chemicals, and coal-tar and other pharmaceuticals ; special studies of shellac, camphor, quinine, potash, air 
fixation of nitrates, sulphuric acid, paint materials, and Federal paint specifications, petroleum and prod- 
ucts and petroleum products specifications, companies incorporated in Reporter industries in 1918, ne- 
crology for the year, and special market reviews from foreign countries, the latter an important subdivi- 
sion of the major market divisions. 

The objective of the editors and of the staff of Reporter correspondents has been as complete and 
as definitive a presentation of this data as possible, without padding and without extraneous material. The 
Year Book is a ready-to-hand, all-the-year industrial encyclopedia for desk use, and the material, the bind- 
ing, size of page and size of type has been selected with the sole end — service. 

OIL. PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER, INC. 

, 100 William Street, New York City. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



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/ 



How United States Legislated to Meet World 

War 1-3 

« 

New Taxes on Reporter Trades in War Revenue 

Bill 3 

How Production and Distribution Were Controlled - 3-4 

Alien Property Seizures and Sales, and Report of 

Custodian A. Mitchell Palmer 5-16 

War-Time Market Prices. 1914-1918:— 

.Animal, Vegetable, Fish and Mineral Oils 30-33 

Arimal Oils 30 

Copra 31 

Fish Oils 31 

Greases, Lard, .Stearines and Tallow 31 

Oil Cake- and Meal 31 

Vegetable Oils 31 

Coal-Tar Bases, Intermediates and Colors 19-21 

Coal-Tar Color 20-21 

Drug Market 21-30 

Botanicals 21-25 

Balsams ,21-22 

Barks 22 

Beans 22 

Berries 22 

Flowers , 22 

Herbs and Leaves 23 

Roots 23-24 

Seeds 24 

British Seed Prices ' 24-25 

Drugs and Pharmaceutical Chemicals 25-28 

British Pharmaceutical Chemical Prices 28 

Essential Oils 29-30 

British Essential Oil Prices 30 

Gums 28-29 

Perfume Bases 30 

Waxes 30 

fertilizer Materials 36-27 

Ammoniates 36 

Phosphates, Potashes, Pyrites 37 

Industrial Chemicals 17-18 

-Acids 18 

British Industrial Chemical Prices 18 

Mineral Oils, Crude and Refined 32-33 

Crude Prices at the Wells 32 

Illuminating Oils, Export Quotations 32-33 

Foreign Quotations 33 

Jobbing Quotations at New York 33 

Lubricating Oils 33 



Natural Dyestuffs 18-19 

Dye Extracts - 19 

Naval Stores^ ., 37 

Faint- Materials 34-36 

Colors in Oil: — Blacks, Blues, Browns, Greens, 

Reds, Yellows 35 

Dry Colors: — Blacks, Blues, Browns, Greens, 

Reds 34 

Yellows y 35 

Glues 36 

Metals 36 

Other Paint Materials - 35 

Shellac ' 36 

Varnish Gums 35-36 

Imports Entered for Consumptibn Into the United 
States for Fiscal Years 1913, 1914, 1915, 

1916, 1917, 1918 38-56 

Imports Into the United States Calendar Years 

1915, 1916, 1917, 1918 63-65 

Calender Year Imports Into United Kingdom . . 65 

Import and Export Regulations Affecting Com- 
modities N 68-69 

Import and Export Statistics Reclassified by Gov- 
ernment 69 

Domestic Exports from the United States for the 
Fiscal Years 1913, 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917, 

1918 56-60 

Mineral Oil Exports for Fiscal Year 1918 60-61 

Exports from Gulf Ports by Companies by 

Months 61-62 

Paint, Color and Varnish Exports, Fiscal Year 

1918 62 

Vegetable Oil Exports for Fiscal Year, 1918.. 62-63 

Exports from United States for Calender Years 

1915, 1916, 1917, 1918 66-67 

Foreign Coins with U. S. Equivalents 70 

Enemy-Owned Chemical, Dye and Drug Patents. 71 

Bleaching and Dyeing 71-75 

Chemicals 75 



(v) 



VI 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



Foreign Weights and Measures Table . . 
Conservation List Cut to Small Size. . . 
Necrological Record for 1918 N . 



77 

228 
220 



Chemical Market Section 87-1 1 6 

Chemistry in the War — The History of Federal 

Achievement 89-91 

Chemistry in 1918 — Conditions Underlying the 

Market .'. 93-95 

Industrial Chemicals, High and Low Prices, 1917- 

1918 97-101 

London Chemical Market Prices 10 1 



Dyestuffs Market Section 1 1 7-142 

Coal -Tar Bases, Intermediates and Colors, High 

and Low Prices, 1917-1918 127-136 

Coal -Tar Crude, Intermediate and Color Produc- 
tion, 1917 127-135 

Development of Coal-Tar Dye Industry in 1918.. 123-127 

Natural Dyestuff Scarcity Reflected in High 

Prices in 1918 119 

Natural Dyestuffs, High and Low Prices, 1917- 

1918 119-123 

Dyewood Extracts, High and Low Prices, 1917- 

1918 ..'. 123 



Drug Market Section 



Drug Factors in the Year 1918 

Castor Oil Production in the United States, an 

Experiment 

Quinine an International Factor in 1918 

Camphor Reflects Reduce'd Output and Heavy 

Demand '. 

Drug Market High and Low Prices for Years 

1917-1918 

Acids 

Botanicals, Balsalms, Barks 

Beans 

Berries, Herbs and Leaves 

Roots 

Seeds, Spices 

Drugs and Pharmaceutical Chemicals 

British Drug Prices 

Essential Oils 

- London Essential Oil Prices, 1918 

Gums ' 

Camphor 

TV axes 

Newfoundland and Norwegian Codliver Oil 

Review 



143 

145-147 

147-149 
149-151 

151-153 

155-161 

155 
155 
157 
159 
161 
163 

165-171 
173 

173-175 
175 
175 
177 
177 

177 



Fertilizer Market Section 221-228 

Fertilizer Market Reflected Federal Control 223 

The Search for Nitrate by the United States 223-225 

Potash Production in U. S. Estimated at 60,000 

Tons in 1918 225-226 

Fertilizer Materials, High and Low Prices, 1917- 

1918 226-228 

Atlanta 227 

Baltimore 227-228 

Chicago 228 

Sulphuric Acid Produced in United States in 

1915, 1916, 1917 228 



Naval Stores Market Section i .229-235 

Naval Stores Prices in 1918 Unprecedented .. 

British Naval Stores' Imports in 1918 ). 

Naval Stores Market, High and Low Prices, 
1917-1918 

Graphite Production and Consumption in United 
States, 1918 

Potash Production in United States in 1918, 52,135 
Tons , 

1,898 Companies Incorporated in United States 
in 1918 

Metric Weights and Measures, Legal or Oblig- 
atory 235-236 



231 
231 

233 

234 

234 

235 



Oil Section 183-202 

Edible Oil Industry Expanded by War Demands. 185-187 

British Edible Oil Industry in 1918 187-189 

Cottonseed Oil Price Stabilization by Government 189 

Vegetable Oil Production in Eleven Months, 1918. 191 
. Animal and Fish Oils Brought Gratifying Prices 

to Sellers . .• •. {. 191-193 

Animal, Fish, Vegetable Oils, High and Low 

Prices, 1917-1918 193-200 

Linseed Oil Prices in 1918 Set Record — Argen- 
tine's Position 200-201 

Minneapolis, Chicago and Winnipeg .Seed Mar- 
kets 201-202 



Paint Market Section 203-219 

Government Paint Consumption Advanced Prices 205 
Paint Specifications Established by the U. S. 

Government J 205-207 

Shellac Problems in 1918 and How They Were 

Solved 207-209 

Paint Materials, Glues, Varnish Gums, High and 

Low Prices, 1917-1918 209-219 

Window Glass in 1918 228 



Petroleum Section 237-324 



Petroleum in 1918 — A Record of Efficiency...... 

Petroleum Export Conditions During 1918 

Petroleum Marketed in the United States, 1891- 

1918, in Barrels of 42 Gallons 

British Import Prices of Refined Petroleum, 1918. 
British imports and Exports of Petroleum Prod- 
ucts, 1916-1918 

Classification of Oil Fields in United States 

Characteristics of Crude Oils 

Refining Products of the Various Fields 

Gravity of Oils in Various Fields , . . 

Total Output of Refineries in the United States 

for 1917 '. 

Output of Refineries in the United States by 

Months, 1918 

Stocks on Hand at Refineries in United States 

by Months, 1918 

Natural Gas Produced and Consumed in the 

United States in 1916-1917 

Pipeline Statistics in the Eastern Fields for 1918 . 
Per Capita Increase of Petroleum from 1860-1919. 



239-243 
243-245 

243 
245 

245-257 

245-247 
245 

247 
247 

247 

247-251 

251-255 

255 

255-257 

259 



Field Reports for the Year 1918 259-31 1 

Eastern Fields 259-290 

Pennsylvania 261-263 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



vu 



West Virginia • 283-271 

Southeast Ohio 271-276 

Central Ohio 275-281 

Northwest Ohio 281-283 

Indiana 283-285 

Illinois 285-286 

Kentucky 287-290 

Tennessee 290 

Highest and Lowest Prices Pennsylvania 

Crude, per Barrel, from 1859 to 1918 290 

Texas and Gulf Coast 292-300 

North Central Texas 292-295 

Refinery Development In North Central 

Texas 295 

Gulf Coast, Texas and Louisiana 296-297 

How Crude OH is Refined In Gulf Coast 

Fields 299 

* California , 300-301 

Wyoming 302-304 

Mid-Continent 304-306 

\ — — — — 

Movements of Crude Petroleum for December, 

1918 306 

Canada Petroleum Report for 1918 307-308 

Mexican Report for 1918 Shows Gains 309-310 

V/orld Production of Petroleum for 1917 311 

State Laws Governing Gasoline Inspection.... 311-312 
6,740,000,000 Barrels of Petroleum Still Avail- 
able 312-313 

Available Oil Remaining in the Ground 313 

Calendar Year Exports of Mineral Oils, 1916- 

1918 313-314 

Calendar Exports of Parafflne Waxes, 1916- 

1918 '. 314 



Calendar Year Imports of Mineral Oils, 1916- 

1918 815 

Conservation to Prevent Losses of Petroleum. 815 

Petroleum Production, 1857-1918 819 

U. S. Specifications for Mineral Oils 316-319 

Army: — 

Liberty Aero Oil .316 

Motor Oil for Gasoline Engines 816 

Airplane Machine Gun Oil 316 

Transmission Lubricant 816 

Non-Fluid Transmission Lubricant 816 

Medium Cup Grease 816 

Gun Oil 317 

Gear, Chain and Wire Rope Lubricant 317 

Mineral Cylinder Oil 817 

Compounded Cylinder Oil. 317 

Navy: — 

Gasoline 317 

Aero Gasoline 317 

Export Gasoline 817 

Domestic Gasoline 817 

Interdepartmental Committee: — 

Export Gasoline 317 

Motor Gasoline 318 

Navy Fuel Oil 318 

Gas OH for Diesel Engines 818 

Water White Kerosene 818 

Kerosene for U. S. Navy 319 

Long-Time Burning OH 819 

300 -Degree Mineral Seal Oil 319 

Signal Oil 319 

» 



V1U 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



Alexander & Co., Inc., G. S 222 

American Alkali and Acid Company 90 

American Asphalt Association 218 

American Can Company 181 

American Lead, Zinc and Smelting Company 212 

American Metal Company, Ltd., The 204 

American Process Company 224 

Anchor Can Company 104 

Aniline Dyes and Chemicals, Inc 140 

Arnold, Hoffman & Co., Inc 126 

« 

Balra & McGuire, Inc 124 

Baker Castor Oil Company, The 182 

Balfour, Williamson & Co 170 

Balfour, Williamson & Co 188 

Barber Agency Company, W. H 232 

Beaver Refining Company 276 

Berry's Sons Company, Inc., James B 254 

Blery Oil Company.- 270 

Binney & Smith Company 212 

Borne, Scrymser Company 274 

Brode & Co., F. W 196 

Buchanan Chemical Company, C. G 98 

Buftalc Foundry and Machine Company 113-116 

Bush & Co., Inc., W. J 174 

Campbell, C. W 110 

Campbell & Co., John 141 

Caravel Company, Inc 109 

Carrier Engineering Corporation 112 

Chadeloid Chemical Company 214 

Coatesville Boiler Works 288 

Coif -Garrod Company, Inc 118 

Commonwealth Chemical Corporation 158 

Cor.ewango Refining Company, The 248 

Continental Refining Company 270 

Cook & Swan Company, Inc 192 

Cooper & Co., Charles 107, 162 

Cosden & Co 260 

Cragin Products Company 166 

Crystal Oil Works 278 

Cundill, Francis A.. . , ; 168 

Do Vries & Sons, G HI 

Diamond Alkali Company 106 

Digestive Ferments Company 181 

Elmer & Amend 112 

Emery Manufacturing Company 252 

Empire Refineries Company, Inc 286 

Falk Company 190 

Feigcl & Bro., Inc., M 218 

Finck Mineral Milling Company, J. C 210 

Florasynth Laboratories, Inc 164 

Fougera & Co., Inc., E 160 

Francesconi & Co., J. C 184 

Franco -American Chemical Company, Inc 110 

Fried lander Chemical Company, 104 

Fritsche Brothers 174 

Frost & Cundill, Inc 166 

Fuller & Co., Inc., Ralph L 105 

Ge rrigues Company, Chas. F 96 

General American Tank Car Corporation 240 

General Chemical Company 88 

Globe Oil Company 274 

Goodrich Company, William 219 

Grove Chemical Company, Ltd., The 216 

Gulf Refining Company 280 

Holliday-Kemp Company, Inc 128 

Hopkins & Co., J. L 160 

Huisking & Co., Inc., Charles L 156 

Huron Chemical Company 106 

Imperial Dyewood Company, Inc 132 

Independent Refining Company 284 

Industrial Chemical Company, Inc 142 

Innis, Speiden & Co 107 

Johnston Brokerage Company 216 

Johnston Paint Company, R. F., The 219 

Jordan, Inc., William E 141 

Kansas City Refining Company, The 282 

Kansas City Testing Laboratories 134 

Katzenbach & Bullock Company 98 

Klipstein & Co., A 108 

Knight, Maurice A 103 

Kohnstamm & Co., H 128 

Krebs Pigment and Chemical Company 208 



Lanman & Kemp 162 

Lathrop & Co., Inc., H. A 154 

Lawson. John D. & Co., Inc 182 

Lazard-Godchaux Company of America, Inc 138 

Leitch & Co., John W 139 

Liberty Brokerage Company 280 

Lubrite Refining Company 286 

Magnus, Mabee & Reynard, Inc 172 

Marden, Orth & Hastings Corporation 137 

Marquardt & Co., Inc., H 168 

Mathleson Alkali Works, Inc., The 126 

McCombs Producing and Refining Company 282 

Mente & Co 194 

Merck & Co 146 

Meyer Brothers Drug Company 164 

Milwaukee Linseed Oil Works 219 

Mitsui & Co., Ltd 186 

Monmouth Chemical Company 109 

Monsanto Chemical Works 102 

Monsanto, H. J. M 180 

Montgomery & Co., W. L 192 

National Aniline and Chemical Company, Inc 124 

National Products Company 288 

National Transit, Pump and Machine Company 242 

Natural Products Refining Company 120 

New York Oversea Company, Inc 176 

New York Quinine and Chemical Works, Inc., The 152 

Nulsen, Klein & Krausse Manufacturing Company 210 

• 

Oklahoma Producing and Refining Corporation 262 

Pacific Coast Borax Company 180 

Penick & Co., Inc., S. B 144 

Penn-American Refining Company 250 

Pennsylvania Oil Products Refining Company 284 

Perfection Oiler Company 266 

Pfizer & Co., Inc., Chas 148 

Pforzheimer & Co., Carl H 272 

Pittsburgh Can Company 206 

Pittsburgh Oil Refining Company 256 

Powell Company, The William 136 

Pride of the Kitchen Company 104 

Progressive Glue Company 218 

Provost Engineering Corporation 188 

Rice & Lyons 278 

Riker, Inc., J. L. & D. S Ill 

Rockhill & Vietor 176 

Rosin and Turpentine Export Company, Inc 230 

Roxana Petroleum Company of Oklahoma 258 

Rush, H. G • 268 

Scott & Co., Ernest 130 

Seaboard Chemical Company 158 

Seneca Oil Works 272 

Seydel Manufacturing Company 134 

Smith & Nichols, Inc x 178 

Solvay Process Company, The 92 

Southern Oil and Chemical Company 232 

Sperry & Co., D. R 194 

Standard Chemical Company 182 

Suter & Co., Eugene : 122 

Suzuki & Co., Ltd., S 100 

Taylor Commission Company, George F 222 

Tide Water Oil Company 264 

Trageser Steam Copper Works, John 196 

Ultro Chemical Corporation 206 

Universal Petroleum Company 268 

U. S. 'Industrial Alcohol Company 150 

Van Dyk & Co., Inc 178 

Warner Chemical Company 105 

Warner Chemical Company, The 108 

Whitaker-Glessner Company 244 

Whitelaw Brothers Chemical Company 100 

Williamson & Co 94 

Wing & Evans, Inc 92 

Winkelman & Co., L. L 276 

Winterbourne & Co., S 214 

Wooden Barrel Association 246 

Youngstown Chemical Company, Inc., The 170 



Nineteen Eighteen Year Book 

of the 

Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter 



HOW UNITED STATES LEGISLATED TO MEET WAR NEEDS 



THE war had great influence upon legislation relating to 
oil, paint and drugs, and the allied materials and 
products of the trade during the last year. Among 
the measures put through by Congress bearing the stamp 
of war were the bill for the stimulation of production of 
certain minerals, not as a rule produced in this country 
and which were needed for war purposes, and the war 
revenue bill fixing the taxes which will be levied in order 
to raise money to pay war expenses. 

There was other important legislation passed by Con- 
gress, or initiated, bearing upon the oil, paint and drug 
trades, including the coal, oil and phosphate lands leasing 
bill, which for many months was deadlocked in conference 
between the Senate and the House. The conference report 
finally drafted by the conferees was a compromise. Both 
Senator Pittman of Nevada, chairman of the Senate con- 
terees, and Representative Ferris . of Oklahoma, chairman 
of the House conferees, Issued statements urging the adop- 
tion of the repcrt by Congress, warning their colleagues 
that if the report failed it might be years before legislation 
was enacted looking to the development of the vast natural 
resources of the public domain now fast locked from devel- 
opment because of lack of legislation. " 

The conferees finally accepted the provisions of the House 
bill with regard to naval reserves. In substance, it prevents 
all development in the naval reserves except through ex- 
isting flowing wells. These wells may be leased to the 
parties who sunk them, where no fraud exists, upon a 
royalty to be fixed by the department of not less than one- 
eighth of the oil produced. 

A bona fide claimant who is guilty of no fraud may sur- 
render all claims or title and receive a lease upon his claim 
upon such royalty as the government may fix. 

The conferees have finally agreed on each and every pro- 
vision in the bill.' In so doing they feel certain they have 
preserved the rights of the government and secured for 
the government everything it is entitled to under the law, 
and the equities of the case, both as to the naval reserves 
and as to the pending suits by the Department of Justice. 
The salient features of the bill so far collect one -eighth 
royalty for the government on all impounded moneys and 
oils removed from the land prior to the passage of the 
bill. They reserve to the government the right to exact as 
royalty for all oil taken out in the future under leases not 
less than one -eighth, and they may exact as high a royalty 
on future production as the case may warrant. 

Strong, drastic fraud provisions are incorporated in the 
bill so that the government in each case may deny any 
relief whatever to the claimant who has been guilty thereof. 

War Revenue Bill Effective When Signed. 

The war revenue bill, which will become a law as soon 
as signed by the President, which must be by noon, March 
4, when the life of the present Congress expires, levies the 
following taxes: — 

Alcohol, distilled spirits, non-beverage, $2.20 per gallon; no addi- 
tional floor tax on non-beverage alcohol. Perfumes containing distilled 
spirits Imported into United States, $1.10 per gallon. Distilled spirits 
or wine hereafter rectified, additional tax, 30 cents on each proof 
gallon. Chewing gum, 3 per cent. Medicines, patent, a tax of 1 cent 
for each 25 cents value or fraction thereof, payable after May 1, 
1919. Perfumes, essences, extracts, toilet waters, cosmetics, a tax of 
1 cent for each 25 cents of value or fraction thereof, payable after May 
1, 1919. Pipeline, transportation of oil, 8 per cent, of the amount paid 
for such transportation after April 1, 1919. Toilet soap and toilet pow- 
ders, 3 per cent. 

Narcotic Law Amended. 

The revenue bill also amends the Harrison narcotic drug 
law in the following manner: — 

That section 6 of such act of December 17, 1914, is hereby amended 
to read as follows:— 

8ec. 6. That the provisions of this act shall not be construed to apply 
to the manufacture, sale, distribution, giving away, dispensing, or pos- 



session of preparations and remedies which do not contain more than 
two grains of opium or more than one-fourth of a grain of morphine or 
more than one-eighth of a grain of heroin or more than one grain of 
codeine, or any salt or derivative of any of them in one fluid ounce, or, 
If a solid or semi-solid preparation, in one avoirdupois ounce; or to lini- 
ments, ointments or other preparations which are prepared for external 
use only, except liniments, ointments and other preparations which con- 
tain cocaine or any of its salts or alpha or beta euoaine or any of their 
salts or any synthetic substitute for them: Provided, That such remedies 
and preparations are manufactured, sold, distributed, given away, dis- 
pensed or possessed as medicines and not for the purpose of evading the 
Intentions and provisions *f this act: Provided further, That any manu- 
facturer, producer, compounder or vendor (including dispensing physi- 
cians) of the preparations and remedies mentioned in this section snail' 
keep a record of all sales, exchanges or gifts of such preparations and 
remedies in such manner as the commissioner of internal revenue, with 
the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, shall direct. Huch 
record shall be preserved for a period of two years in such a way 
as to be readily accessible to inspection by any officer, agent or em- 
ploy of the Treasury Department duly authorized for that purpose, 
and the State, Territorial, district, municipal and Insular officers named 
in section 5 of this act, and every such person so possessing or dis- 
posing of such preparations and remedies shall register as required in 
section 1 of this act and, if he is not paying a tax under this act, he 
shall pay a special tax of $1 for each year, or fractional part thereof. 
In which he is engaged In such occupation, to the collector of internal 
revenue of the district in which he carries on such occupation as pro- 
vided in this act. The provisions of this act as amended shall not 
apply to decocalnized coca leaves or preparations made therefrom, or 
to other preparations of coca leaves which do not contain cocaine*. 

Gas and Oil Well Owners Given Deductions. 

Certain deductions are allowed for the owners of gas and 
oil wells in connection with the payment of the income tax. 
That applying to the individual Income surtax is as fol- 
lows: — 

In the case of a bona fide sale of mines, oil or gas wells, or any 
Interest therein, where the principal value of the property has been 
demonstrated by prospecting or exploration and discovery work done by 
the taxpayer, the portion of the tax imposed by this section attributable 
to such sale shall not exceed 20 per centum of the selling price of such 
property or interest. 

In the case of corporations, the deductions allowed in 
computing the income tax are as follows: — 

In the case of mines, oil and gas wells, other natural deposits, and 
timber, a reasonable allowance for depletion and for depreciation of 
improvements, according to the peculiar conditions In each case, based 
upon cost including cost of development not otherwise deducted: Pro- 
vided, That in the case of such properties acquired prior to March 1, 
1913, the fair market value of the property (or the taxpayer's interest 
therein) on that date shall be. taken In lieu of cost up to that date: 
Provided further. That in the case of mines, oil and gas wells, dis- 
covered by the taxpayer, on or after March 1, 1018, and not acquired 
as the result of purchase of a proven tract or lease, where the fair 
market value of the property is materially disproportionate to the cost, 
the depletion allowance shall be based upon the fair market value of the 
property at the date of the discovery, or within (twelve months) thirty 
days thereafter; such reasonable allowance in all the above cases to 
be made under rules and regulations to be prescribed by the commis- 
sioner with the approval of the Secretary. In the case of leases the 
deductions allowed by this paragraph shall be equitably apportioned 
between the lessor and lessee. 

Minerals Production Stimulated. 

The law to encourage the production of minerals needed 
for war purposes, which was put through largely through 
the efforts of Senator Henderson of Nevada, chairman of 
the Senate Committee on Mines, and in accordance with 
the recommendations of the War Industries Board, set 
forth: — "By reason of a state of war, it is essential to the 
national security and defense, and to the successful prose- 
cution of the war and for the support and maintenance of 
the army and navy, to provide for an adequate and in- 
creased supply to facilitate the production and to provide 
for an equitable, economical and better distribution of the 
following named mineral substances and ores, minerals, 
intermediate metallurgical products, metals, alloys and 
chemical compounds thereof, to wit: — 

Antimony, arsenic, ball clay, bismuth, bromine, cerium, chalk, 
chromium, cobalt, corundum, emery, fluorspar, ferro silicon. Puller's 
earth, graphite,* grinding pebbles, iridium, kaolin, magnesite, man- 
ganese, mercury, mica, molybdenum, osmium, sodium, platinum, palla- 
dium, paper clay, phosphorus, potassium, pyrites, radium, sulphur, 
thorium, tin, titanium, tungsten, uranium, vanadium and zirconium. 



I 



I 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



Wide Authority for President 

Under the provisions of the law, which did not become ef- 
fective until December 5, 1918, or just a short time before 
the armistice was signed, the President was authorized to 
purchase such minerals and ores, etc., and to enter into, 
accept, transfer and assign contracts for the production or 
purchase of the same, to provide storage facilities and to 
store them, to provide or improve transportation facilities 
for them, to use, distribute ox sell them at reasonable prices, 
but during the war the sale price could not be less than the 
cost of production. 

The President also was authorized to fix tariff duties on 
imported minerals and ores, etc., referred to in the bill, 
sufficiently high to protect the United States against loss 
from competition with these imported articles. 

Under another section the President was given the power 
to requisition, take over and make use of these needed ma- 
terials, to develop deposits, to take over mines and smelters, 
etc. Provision was made for just compensation to the 
owners should their property be taken over. 

$50,000,000 to Enforce Provisions. 

A revolving fund" of $50,000,000 was made available for 
use by the President in enforcing the provisions of the act. 
He was authorized to organize a corporation or corporations 
to aid in carrying out the law. In any case, the aggregate 
capital stock of these corporations was not to exceed the 
$50,000,000 made available under the act. The President was 
authorized to determine the directorate and organization of 
the corporations, and the capital stock was to be held and 
voted for the exclusive benefit of the United States through 
such person or persons as the President should designate. 

The act provided that upon the proclamation of peace the 
President should proceed as rapidly as possible to wind up 
the transactions under the law. No further contracts were 
to be entered into after the proclamation of peace, and the 
act is to become ineffective two years after the proclama- 
tion of peace*. I 

Through the enactment of the law itself, and the agitation 
for such a law, many persons were persuaded by the gov- 
ernment to go into the production of these minerals and 
metals needed for war purposes. Millions of dollars were 
put into these enterprises by them. When the armistice 
was signed the bottom dropped out of the market for these 
materials, both because they were no longer needed for 
war purposes and because of the expectation of early im- 
portations of such materials at considerably reduced prices. 

Contract Validation Relief. 

In an effort to obtain relief for these persons, bills were 
introduced in the Senate by Senator Henderson and in the 
House by Representative Foster of Illinois. Finally Senator 
Henderson succeeded in having an amendment inserted in 
, the bill providing for the validation of informal war con- 
tracts, providing for settling of just claims of persons who, 
to aid the government, had gone into the production of these 
materials. This amendment was retained in the bill by 
the conferees of the Senate, and House. 

The bill validating informal contracts for war supplies 
made by agents of the government by wire or over the 
phone or in informal written agreements was of the greatest 
importance to scores of manufacturers and contractors in 
this country. It was estimated that more than $1,600,000,000 
was tied up in these informal contracts in this country 
alone. • Under the measure these informal contracts were 
legalized so that they might be settled by compromise. The 
settlements will be made by officials of the War Depart- 
ment, and if the contractors be dissatisfied they may appeal 
to the United States Court of Claims. 

Under the whip and spur of the prohibitionists. Congress 
put through a measure ostensibly designed to conserve 
foodstuffs, but in reality to bring about nation-wide prohi- 
bition. It was known as the war-time prohibition law, and 
under it, during the war and until the demobilization of the 
armies of the United States has been accomplished, the sale 
or manufacture or Importation of alcoholic beverages were 
prohibited on and after July 1, 1919. The law specified dates 
upon which the manufacture of beer and wine was to stop, 
but the President, under the power vested in him by the 
food control act of 1917, in December, 1918, put an end to the 
further manufacture of beer and wine. 

Prohibition Act. * 

This war-time prohibition act, it was expected, will be 
operative until the constitutional amendment for nation- 
wide prohibition becomes effective in January, 1920 — the 
16th of that month — one year from the day on which the 
thirty- sixth State ratified the amendment. Bills to enforce 
nation-wide prohibition under the war-time prohibition act 
were introduced in the Senate and House by Senator Shep- 
pard of Texas and Representative Barkley of Kentucky, 
respectively. They were drafted by the Anti- Saloon League 
and were drastic measures, providing for entry, search and 
seizure and wiping out all property rights in any distilled 
spirits, beer, wine, etc., which might be found on the prem- 
ises in violation of the law; that is, manufactured or kept 
for sale for beverage purposes. Any still, worm or other 
apparatus for the manufacture of distilled spirits also could 



be seized. Fines ranging from $500 to $1,000 and imprison- 
ment from one month to a year were provided where viola- 
tions of the law were proven. 

A bill authorizing the Secretary of the Interior to make 
investigations, through the Bureau of Mines, of lignite 
coals and peat to determine the practicability of their use 
as a fuel and introducing commercial products was put 
through the Senate and House, and was expected to become 
law at an early date, in fact as soon as the President had 
an opportunity to sign it. It carried an appropriation of 
4100,000 for making the investigation. The appropriation 
was to be used particularly to determine the economic 
practicability of the use of lignite coals and peat in pro- 
ducing fuel oil, gasoline substitutes, ammonia, tar, solid 
fuels, gas for power, and for other purposes. 

Sale of Coal and Asphalt Deposits. 

A law was enacted in February, 1918, providing for the 
sale of the coal and asphalt deposits in the segregated 
mineral land in the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations, Okla- 
homa. The law provided that the lands shall be offered for 
sale by the Secretary of the Interior after due notice and 
after appraisal had been made, the sale to be made at pub- 
lic auction. The Secretary of the Interior was given the 
right to reject all bids if unsatisfactory. Provision was 
made that 20 per cent, of the purchase price must be paid 
down and the remainder must be paid in four equal annual 
installments. 

Another law enacted permits the use of certain refined 
products of petroleum as stores on vessels carrying passen- 
gers. It provided that section 4472 of the revised statutes 
of the United States be amended by adding the following 
provision: — "Provided, however, that kerosene and lubri- 
cating oils made from refined products of petroleum which 
will stand a fire test of not less than 300 degrees Fahren- 
heit may be used as stores on board steamers carrying pas- 
sengers, under such regulations as shall be prescribed by 
the Board of Supervision Inspectors, with the approval of 
the Secretary of Commerce." 

Large appropriations were made during the year for the 
Chemical Warfare Service, among them an item of $100,- 
000,000 for the purchase, manufacture and test of chemical 
warfare gases or other toxic substances, gas masks and 
other appliances required for gas warfare purposes, car- 
ried in a deficiency act approved shortly before the armis- 
tice was signed. The same bill authorized the War De- 
partment to enter into contracts amounting to $150,090 000 
additional for the same purposes. 

Investigation of Navy Fuel Needs. 

In the naval appropriation act, $60,000 was provided for 
an investigation of fuel oil and gasoline adapted to naval 
requirements, including the question of supply and storage 
and the availability, economically and otherwise, of such 
supply as may be afforded by the naval reserves on the 
public domain, and for the extension of the- naval fuel test- 
ing plant at the Philadelphia navy yard. 

Under the sundry civil act the following appropriations 
were included: — 

To regulate the propagation and sale of viruses, serums, toxins, and 
analogous products. $80,000. This money was to be used by the Public 
Health Service. 

^PwJ^S^ < ?t mI ? aI and , P hy8ica l researches relating to the geology 
of the United States, including researches, with a view to determining 

£2?5ft .1 E2 ndltlon £ f^ ^ 1 ? *? t*£ Presence of deposits of potash, 
$40,000, to be used by the Geological Survey. 

To Investigate mineral fuels and unfinished mineral products be long - 
ln Jf . to . or V*. th6 use of tne United States, with a view to their most 
efficient mining, preparation and treatment and use, and to recommend 
to various departments such changes in selection and use of fuel as 
may result In greater economy, $135,000, to be used by the Bureau of 
Mines. 

*T,° investigate concerning the mining, preparation, treatment, and 
utilization of petroleum and natural gas, with a view to economic 
development and conserving resources through prevention of waste, to 
inquire into economic conditions affecting the industry, $100,000. to be 
expended by the Bureau of Mines. 

To provide for the enforcement of the act to prohibit the manufac- 
ture, distribution, storage, use, and possession in time of war of explo- 
sives, etc., $300,000, to be used by the Bureau of Mines. A provision 
was added as follows:— 

That platinum, iridium, and palladium and compounds thereof are 
hereby made subject to the terms, conditions, and limitations of said 
act of October 6, 1917, and the director of the Bureau of Mines is hereby 
authorized, under rules and regulations approved by the Secretary of 
the Interior, to limit the sale, possession, and the use of said material. 

Food and Drug Provisions. 

In the agriculture appropriation act, for the Bureau of 
Chemistry, were included the following items: — 

For the biological investigation of food and drug products and sub- 
stances used in the manufacture thereof, including investigations of the 
physiological effects of such products on the human organism, $15,000. 

For the study and improvement of methods of utilizing by-products 
of citrus fruits, and the investigation and development of methods for 
determining maturity in fruits and vegetables, In co-operation with the 
Bureau of Plant Industry and the Bureau of Markets, $18,000. 

For investigation and experiment in the utilization, for coloring 
purposes, of raw materials grown or produced In the United States, 
In co-operation with such persons, associations, or corporations as may 
be found necessary, $70,720. 

For the investigation and development of methods for the manufac- 
ture of table sirup, $7,000. 

For enabling the Secretary of Agriculture to carry into effect the 
provisions of the act of June 80, 1006, entitled "An act for preventing 
the manufacture, sale, or transportation of adulterated, or misbranded, 
or poisonous, or deleterious foods, drugs, medicines, and liquors, and 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



for regulating traffic therein, and for *ither purposes," and to co-operate 
with associations and scientific societies in the revision of the United 
States Pharmacopoeia and development of methods of analysis, $589,081. 

For investigating the grading, weighing, handling, transportation and 
uses of naval stores, the preparation of definite type samples thereof, 
and for the demonstration of Improved methods or processes of pre- 
paring naval stores, in co-operation with individuals and companies, 
$10,000. 

For the investigation and development of methods of manufacturing 
insecticides and fungicides, and for investigating chemical problems 
relating to the composition, action, and application of Insecticides and 
fungicides, $25,000. , 

For the Bureau of Soils: — 

For exploration and investigation within the United States to deter- 
mine possible sources of supply of potash, nitrates, and other natural 
fertilizers, $81,340. 



Road Making Chemicals. 



For the Bureau of Public Roads:— 

For investigations of the best methods of road making, especially 
ordinary sand-clay and dirt roads, and the best kinds of road making 
materials, and for furnishing expert advice on road building and maln- 
. tenance, $141,000. 

For Investigations of the chemical and physical character of road 
materials. $01,220. 

For conducting field experiments and various methods of road con- 
struction and maintenance, and investigations concerning various road 
materials and preparations; for investigating and developing equipment 
intended for the preparation and application of bituminous and other 
binders; for the purchase of materials and equipment; for the employ- 



ment of assistants and labor; for the erection of buildings; such experi- 
mental work to be confined as nearly as possible to one point during 
the fiscal year, $60,000. 

For the enforcement of the insecticide act by the department, $121,240. 

The following provision was included in the agriculture 
appropriation act also: — 

That section 6 of the act entitled "An act defining butter, also 
imposing a tax upon and regulating the manufacture, sale, importation, 
and exportation of oleomargarine," approved August 2, 1886, be amended 
so as to read as follows:— 

Sec. 6. That all oleomargarine shall be packed by the manufacturer 
thereof in flikins, tubs, or other wooden or paper packages not before 
used for that purpose, each containing not less than ten pounds, and 
marked, stamped, and branded' as the Commissioner of Internal Rev- 
enue, with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, shall pre- 
scribe; and all sales made by the manufacturers of oleomargarine, and 
wholesale dealers in oleomargarine shall be in original stamped 
packages. 

Retail dealers in oleomargarine must sell only from original stamped 
packages, in quantities not exceeding ten pounds, and shall pack the 
oleomargarine sold by them in suitable wooden or paper packages, 
which shall be marked and branded as the Commissioner of Internal 
Revenue, with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, shall 
prescribe. 

Every person who knowingly sells or offers for sale, or delivers or 
offers to deliver, any oleomargarine in any other form than in new 
wooden or paper packages as above described, or who packs in any 
package any oleomargarine in any manner contrary to law, or who 
falsely brands any packages or affixes a stamp on any package denoting 
a less amount of tax than that required by law, shall be fined for each 
'offense not more than $1,000, and be imprisoned not more than two 
years. 



New Taxes on Reporter Trades in War Revenue Bill 



THE War Revenue Bill passed both Houses and was sent 
to the President for his approval soon after the first 
of February. 

When the bill, passed the House, it was the desire of the 
administration to have a revenue law which wou\d raise 
$8,000,000,000 of revenue. Before the bill was presented to 
the Senate however, the armistice had been signed and 
conditions entirely changed. On recommendation of former 
Secretary McAdoo, of the Treasury Department, the amount 
of revenue to be raised in 1919 was cut to $6,000,000,000, 
and the Senate added a provision reducing the amount to 
be collected in 1920 and thereafter to $4,000,000,000. 

Those taxes in 'the bill which deal particularly with the 
commodities in which the readers of the Reporter are in- 
terested, as adopted by the House and by the Senate in 
conference, are shown in the following table: — 

Alcohol (distilled spirits), non-beverage, $2.20 per gallon; beverage, 
$6.40 per gallon. Floor tax on non-beverage alcohol, $3.20 per gallon. 
On beverage alcohol, $4.80 per gallon. 

Perfumes, containing distilled spirits Imported Into the United States, 
$1.10 per gallon. 

Distilled spirits or wine hereafter rectified (additional tax), 30 cents 
on each proof gallon. 

Wines, still, Including vermuth, etc., containing not more than 14 
per cent, of absolute alcohol, 16 cents per wine gallon; containing more 
than 14 per cent, absolute alcohol, 40 cents per wine gallon; containing 
more than 21 per cent, absolute alcohol and not more than 24 per cent., 
$1 per wine gallon; containing more than 24 per cent, absolute alcohol 
shall be taxed as distilled .spirits and taxed accordingly. 

Grape brandy or wine spirits withdrawn for fortification of wine, 
60 cents per proof gallon. 

Champagne or sparkling wine, 12 cents on each half pint or fraction 
thereof. 

Artificially carbonated wine, 6 cents on e^ch half pint or fraction 
thereof. 

Liqueurs, cordials or similar compounds, 6 cents on each half pint 
or fraction thereof. 

Floor tax on sweet wines, 30 cents per proof gallon on grape brandy 
or wine spirits used in fortification of such wine. 



Chewing gum. 3 per cent. 

Gasoline* naphtha, etc., ? cents per wine gallon. 

Harrison narcotics act amended in both Senate and House bills. 

Medicines, patent, a tax of 1 cent for each 26 cents value or fraction 
thereof, payable after May 1, 1919. 

The provisions relating to deductions allowed for oil, mines and gas 
wells agreed to in conference were as follows:— 

In the case of a bona fide sale of mines, oil or gas weMs, or any 
interest therein, where the principal value of the propert/ has been 
demonstrated by prospecting or exploration and discovery work done by 
the taxpayer, the portion of the tax imposed by this section attribut- 
able to such sale shall not exceed 20 per centum of the selling price of 
such property or interest. 

In the case of mines, oil and gas wells, other natural deposits, and 
timber, a reasonable allowance for depletion and for depreciation of 
Improvements, according to the peculiar conditions in each case, based 
upon cost Including cost of development not otherwise deducted: Pro- 
vided, That in the case of such properties acquired prior to March 1, 
1913, the fair market value of the property (or the taxpayer's interest 
therein) on that date shall be taken in lieu of cost up to that date: 
Provided further, That in the case of mines, oil and gas wells, dis- 
covered by the taxpayer, on or after March 1, 1013, and not acquired 
as the result of purchase of a proven tract or lease, where the fair 
market value of the property is materially disproportionate to the cost, 
the depletion allowance shall be based upon the fair market value of 
the property at the date of the discovery, or within thirty days there- 
after; such reasonable allowance in all the above cases to be made 
under rules and regulations to be prescribed by the commissioner with 
the approval of the Secretary. In the case of leases the deductions 
allowed by this paragraph shall be equitably apportioned between the 
lessor and lessee. 

Perfumes, essences, extracts, toilet waters, cosmetics, a tax of 1 cent 
for each 25 cents of value or fraction thereof, payable after May 1, 1919. 

Pipeline, transportation of oil, 8 per cent, of the amount paid for such 
transportation after April 1, 1919. 

Soda fountains, 1 cent for each 10 cents or fraction thereof paid to 
any person conducting after May 1, 1919. 

Soft drinks, except fruit or berry juice, 10 per cent, of the price for 
which it is sold. 

Toilet soaps and toilet powders, 8 per cent. 

Waters, natural mineral or table, in bottles or other closed containers* 
at over 10 cents per gallon, a tax of 2 cents per gallon. 



How Production and Distribution Were Controlled 



PRODUCTION, distribution and consumption of hun- 
dreds of commodities in Reporter industries were under 
strict control during the year 1918, with the activities 
of the War Trade Board, the War Industries Board, the 
Shipping Board and the Railroad Administration direct 
factors in the conduct of practically every business in the 
United States. 

This control took the form of. preferential treatment of 
firms engaged in the manufacture of commodities for war 
purposes, such treatment calling for the delivery of basic 
materials, coal, fuel oil, etc., as well as special preference 
on railroads and shipping lines, while in many instances 
the government allocated material to such manufacturers 
and established prices covering, the finished products. 

This method of Federal oversight had been- brought to 
more or less complete effectiveness early in the year, the 
government of articles in foreign export trade having been 
made permanently effective for the duration of the war by 
Presidential proclamation of February 16, 1918, which 
placed all articles not previously included in the export 
conservation lists under his personal control, which he 
later delegated to the War Trade Board. 



Exports and Imports. 

The machinery of such export and import regulation 
was a system of licenses which covered shipments to the 
following countries: — 

Albania, Austria-Hungary, that portion of Belgium occupied 
by the military forces of Germany, Bulgaria, Denmark, tier 
colonies, possessions, or protectorates, Greece, Leichtenstein. 
Luxembourg, the kingdom of the Netherlands, Norway. Spain 
her colonies, possessions or protectorates, Sweden, Switzerland' 
or Turkey (excluding any portion of the foregoing occupied by 
the military forces of the United States or the nations asso- 
dated with the United States in the war), or any teiritory 
occupied by the military forces of Germany or her allies^ 
Abyssinia. Afghanistan. Argentina, that portion of Belgium 
not occupied by the military forces of Germany or the colonies 
possessions, or protectorates of Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, China 
Chile. CoJpmMa, Costa Rica. Cuba, Dominican liepublic 
Ecuador. Egypt, France her colonies, possessions or protect 
torates, Guatemala. Haiti, Honduras, Italy, her colonies, pos- 
sessions, or protectorates. Great Britain, her colonies, posses- 
sions or protectorates, Japan, Liberia, Mexico, Monaco; Mon- 
tenegro, Morocco. Nepal Nicaragua, the colonies, possessions 
or protectorates of the Netherlands. Oman, Panama Paraguay 
Persia, Peru. Portugal, her colonies, possessions, or protector^ 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



ates, Roumanian Russia, Salvador, San Marino, Servia, Siam, 
Uruguay, Venezuela (excluding any portion of the foregoing 
occupied by the military forces of Germany or her allies), or 
any territory occupied by the military forces of the United 
States or by the nations associated with the United States in 
the war. 

From time to time the original list was enlarged, until 
the signing of the armistice, since which time the regula- 
tions have been gradually rescinded until at the time of 
going to press with the Year Book there were but a score 
or so of items in Reporter markets still under Federal 
export and import regulation. 

Control of Domestic Industry. 

For the first time in the history of American creative 
industry the United States Government entered the field, 
not alone as a regulator per se but as a dictator of prices, 
of quantity production and of distribution totals. In ad- 
dition, as is related in detail in other sections of the Year 
Book, it sought to promote under Federal direction the 
production of such important items as nitrates, potash, 
pyrites, castor oil, petroleum and its products, etc. Huge 
plants costing millions of dollars were erected, laboratories 
for the development of manufacturing processes for war 
chemicals and gases were perfected, and, as in the. case 
of castor beans, basic materials were furnished and guar- 
antees made for the purchase of the desired production. 
The result was that when the armistice was signed and the 
necessity for these materials was ended, the disposition of 
oversupply available and of the specialized plants for the 
manufacture of such articles became one of the most im- 
portant factors in the necessary reorganization of American 
industry to bring the nation back to a peace basis. 

The story of the potash and castor bean industries has 
been told in detail on other pages of this issue; the develop- . 
ment of gas and nitrogen fixation production is also related 
elsewhere. Suffice it to say that where additional supplies 
were required the government first sought to develop exist- 
ing industries, and when such were not available began 
under strictly Federal control the manufacture of the re- 
quired products. 



v 



Co-operation with Business. 



A feature of the commercial history of the paint, oil, var- 
nish, chemical, fertilizer, dye and allied industries during 
the year just closed was the close interrelation and co-oper- 
ation of the government as represented by the War Indus- 
tries Board, and the industries themselves as represented 
by* the hundreds of advisory committees named from the 
industries. The committees formerly affiliated with the 
Council of National Defense in the majority of instances 
continued their affiliation with the War Industries Board 
under the chairmanship of B. M. Baruch, after the dis- 
continuance of the so-called Advisory Committees of the 
Council of National Defense, with the result that questions 
of detail affecting the industries were first considered by 
members of that industry before final action in regulation, 
restriction of output^ etc., was taken by the national body. 

Petroleum Co-operation. r 

This was particularly true in the case of the National 
Petroleum War Service Committee, made up of the most 
prominent men in the country affiliated with the production 
of petroleum and its products, who during the year labored 
with the experts of the Oil Division of the Fuel Administra- 
tion to increase production, stabilize prices, stabilize the 
products, and conserve such commodities as were in espe- 
cial demand, to the end that the demands of our allies 
should be filled without delay. Working with the Oil Divi- 
sion and its several important subdivisions were advisory 
committees for every crude oil producing field and for every 
branch of the industry, from barrel making to refining, 
and from tank car shipping to the pretention of waste and 
the conservation of the natural gas supply. 

Paint Production Control. 

Similar steps were taken in 'regard to the production and 
distribution of 'paints, varnishes, enamels, etc., through the 
Paint and Pigment Section of the Chemicals Division of the 
War Industries Board, and the raw materials entering into 
the manufacture of these commodities, linseed, menhaden 
and soya bean oils, as well as pigments and colors, were 
placed under close control. 

On the initiative and suggestion of the Conservation Sec- 
tion, the Paint and Pigment Section took up with the man- 
ufacturers of paint and varnish a plan for conservation of 
tin by the elimination of certain sizes of cans, of stock by 
the reduction of the number of colors, and for the release of 
capital and material investment in the discontinued items. 
This suggestion was put out to the trade and the super- 
vision of its operation conducted by this section. It re- 
ceived the cheerful acquiescence of the manufacturers. The 
plan was so sensible and practical that it will, doubtless, 
to a large extent be practiced after the war is over. Sug- 
gestions as to the conservation of lead, chrome greens and 
chrome yellows, linseed oil and other materials were made 
by the section to the various government buying agencies, 
which resulted in the saving of a considerable quantity of 
these materials by the substitution of other articles in their 
formulae. 



At the suggestion of the Shipping Board, the War Trade 
Board, in conference with the Paint and Pigment Section, 
issued an order reducing the importations of shellac from 
Calcutta to the United States for the period of October 1, 
1918. to March 31, 1919, to a maximum of 5,000 tons. The 
allocation of th.s maximum was to be made by the War 
Trade Board on the suggestion of the Paint and Pigment 
Section. After a conference with a committee of the shellac 
importers the Paint and Pigment Section decided to allocate 
only 4,000 tons of this maximum. The allocation was then 
made and accepted by the importers. 

Regulation of Gums. 

Under 'an order of the War Trade Board licenses for the 
shipment of Kauri gum. to be issued for the period October 
lt», 1918, to December 31, 1918, were restricted to a maxi- 
mum of 3,000,000 pounds, and, in conference with a Com- 
mittee of the Varnish Gum Importers and the War Trade 
Board, it was decided to allocate to the importers 2,000,000 
pounds of this maximum, which was accordingly done. The 
remaining 1,000,000 pounds were reserved for later action. 

On November 20, 1918, the Paint and Pigment Section, 
after a conference with the importers of varnish gums, 
made the following recommendation to the Shipping 
Board: — 

That, during the three (3) months' period of January 1 
to March 31, 1919, they be granted licenses to ship a total 
of 5,000,000 pounds of all varnish gums, exclusive of Kauri 
and Congo, which have already been especially provided for, 
as indicated below. This 5,000.000 pounds the committee -~ 
figures is about 50 per cent, of the normal shipments to the 
United States, not taking into consideration the three 
months' embargo— October, November and December — 
"which has already depleted stocks in this country. This 
5,000,000 pounds to be allocated in the same way that 
shellac and Kauri were allocated. 

Shipments of Kauri gum are provided for in Ruling No. 
290, W." T. B., and are not hereby disturbed. 

Applications for licenses to import Congo gum are to be 
determined in each particular case by the War Trade Board, 
who will consider same with reference to the existing 
shipping situation. But any such special licenses issued 
are not to be counted against the allocation of the 5,000,000 
pounds of other varnish gums above mentioned. 

Paints and Varnishes. 

The War Conference Committee of the Paint, Varnish and 
Allied Trades on September 18 asked a hearing before the 
seciion, and presented to it a statement of the conditions of 
their industries, with request that it "be given a place on the 
preiorence list, which request was referred to the prioritieis 
commissioner. Steps were then taken by the Paint and 
Pigment Section to secure the necessary data as to satis- 
tica) conditions, to enable the priorities commissioner to 
give the matter an intelligent hearing. A questionnaire was 
sent out to develop the information, but before results were 
obtained the armistice was signed and, as preferences were 
removed, the matter was dropped. 

Work of Chemical Alliance. 

Created under the Council of National Defense Act of 
August 29, 1916, in May, 1917, an advisory committee known 
as the Chemical Committee was organized, to be made up 
in turn of sub-committees on acids, coal- tar products, fer- 
tilizers, alkalies, miscellaneous, chemicals, electro -chemicals 
and foreign and domestic pyrites. Late in December, 1917, 
these committees of the council were all discontinued, but, 
following its incorporation in July of that year, the Chem- 
ical Alliance, Inc., seemed the logical successor to these 
chemical sub-committees, and late that year all the work 
heretofore done by these committees was formally trans- 
ferred to the Alliance. The sections of the Alliance included 
the following: — Acids, by-products of coal and gas, foreign 
pyrites, electro- chemicals, fertilizer, miscellaneous chem- 
icals, alkali, domestic pyrites and sulphur, dyestuffs and 
intermediates sections. Each section had for its chairman 
an expert in his particular line, with equally competent 
associates, and from time to time during the year formal 
recommendations and regulations were issued, and an at- 
tempt was made to conserve materials where necessary, to 
insure preference movement and to stabilize both production 
and price conditions. 

General Results of Supervision. 

There was a shortage of tin for containers, and canners 
and paint men met the suggestions of the government and 
reduced the number of different sizes of such containers to 
conserve the supply of tin. There was a long- continued 
shortage of fuel, and industry met the government in re- 
ducing output to essentials. There was a shortage of gaso- 
line and the consumers agreed readily to go without gaso- 
line for motor cars for a succession of "gasoline less Sun- 
days,' with the result that the decline of stocks to the 
danger point was checked. 

The history of the past year has been one of adjustment 
ana of continued readjustment to meet conditions as they 
aiose, and it is to the credit of both American producers 
and consumers that, through intelligent co-operation and 
by skilled direction of thousands of business men and pro- 
ducers who gave their services to the government gratis, 
the ciisis of the draft months and overseas shipment period 
was passed successfully. 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



How Enemy Owned Property Was Taken Over* Administered or 

Sold by the United States. 



OF the many governmental agencies having an important 
influence of far-reaching effect by their activities 
primarily intended to aid in the winning of the war, 
probably none waa of greater moment to the industries 
represented in the Reporter than the work of the office of 
the Enemy Alien Property Custodian, A. Mitchell Palmer. 
The "A. P. C." as he was most familiarly known to those 
who had business with his office and who desired brevity 
in the title, seized property valued at about one billion 
dollars in 1918, and of that amount $42,739,420 was the aggre- 
gate sum included as the capital and holdings of chemical, 
dye, paint, oil, fertilizer and allied trades which were de- 
clared by the A. P. C. to be owned by alien enemies, princi- 
pally residents and citizens of Germany and Austria. The 
number of individual properties seized in this group aggre- 
gated 234 on December 31 last, with twenty-five still under 
investigation. Of that number, a small percentage had 
been sold at public auction by the end of 1918 to American 
citizens, while the balance remained in the control and 
under the operation of Mr. Palmer and his assistants, pend- 
ing a final sale to Americans. Among those sold were some 
of the largest in their particular line of manufacture. Such 
properties as were not sold were being operated by trustees 
representing the Alien Property Custodian, and when the 
armistice was signed, many of these plants were providing 
the American forces with valuable stores of necessities, 
principally dyes for cloth for uniforms, the cloth also, medi- 
cines, surgical dressings and apparatus, optical apparatus, 
glycerine for the making of high explosives, coconut, char- 
coal for gas masks, and many other varied products. 

Activities Began in October, 1917. 

While the work of the Alien Property Custodian started 
not long after the United States entered the war in Europe, 
it was not until the latter part of October, 1917, that his ac- 
tivities were extended over enemy -owned companies in the 
Reporter industries, particularly chemicals, drugs and dyes. 
About that time his scope of authority was considerably 
broadened by a Presidential proclamation in conformity 
with section 2 of the trading with the enemy act. And this 
was further enlarged later by an act of Congress in grant- 
ing numerous additional powers to Mr. Palmer which had 
not been included in the original bill creating the office of 
Alien Property Custodian, which was enacted on October 
6, 1917. 

With sufficient powers granted to him, Mr. Palmer, 
through his bureau of investigation under the direction of 
Francis P. Garvan, having headquarters in New York, 
from time to time unearthed German or Austrian holdings 
in various concerns, and these were seized and added to 
the ever -swelling total under his control. 

Holdings December 31, 1918. 

A synopsis of the trust accounts of the Alien Property 
Custodian as catalogued up to December 31, 1918, gives the 
following as the character of the holdings and the valua- 
tions attached to each kind: — 
Cash deposited with Secretary of Treasury : — 
Invested in government securi- 
ties 164,658.736.24 

Uninvested 3.601.743.61 

: $68. ''60.479.85 

Cash with depositaries 1.113.923.92 

Stocks 161.008.026.25 

Bonds — other investments made by Secretary 

of Treasury 58.334.089.33 

Mortgages 11.650.6?3.74 

Notes receivable 6.263:539.83 

Accounts receivable 59.799.720.09 

Real estate 9,152,355.07 

General business and estates in operation or 
liquidation, merchandise, miscellaneous in- 
vestments, etc 84.884,308.25 

Enemy vessels 34.193.690.00 

Total $494,680,756.33 

The number of trusts reported to the Alien Property 
Custodian totaled 32,296, and the number of trusts opened 
to the Alien Property Custodian aggregated 27,274 on Feb- 
ruary 15, 1919. 

After a large number of these companies had been taken 
under control, Mr. Palmer perfected a system for the sale 
of the properties. In order that these sales might be 
strictly legal, and such as to give the purchaser a clear title 
to the property, the necessary powers were granted to Mr. 
Palmer, who formed a sales force and an Advisory Sales 
Committee. The first was created to conduct auction sales 
of the property, and the last named to scrutinize the bid 
which had been accepted and to see that the sale became 



a binding one, and in accordance with the best interests of 
the government, the buyer and the seller, in so far as tne 
latter might be given a fair valuation for his property ana 
his rights protected. 

Joseph F. GufTey. of Pittsburgh, formerly on the Petro- 
leum Committee of the Council of National Defense and in 
charge for a time of all petroleum interests connected witn 
war activities for the government, was named as sales 
manager of the selling organization. 

This selling organization was given complete control over 
the sale of the one hundred and fortyt<140) German-owned 
corporations then in the custody of the Alien Property 
Custodian, the value of which was approximately $250.- 
000,000. 

Advisory Committees. 

Tn addition to the Alien Property Custodian, the selling 
organization • consisted of a Washington committee, an 
Advisory Committee in New York, a sales manager in New 
York, representatives of the Alien Property Custodian in 
charge of each property to be sold (called local representa- 
tivee). and an attorney representing the Alien Property 
Custodian in respect of each property to be sold (canea 

local attorney). mm _. , .i.* A * 

The Advisory Committee named by Mr. Palmer consisted 

of the following: — 

Chairman. Otto T. Bannard. chairman of the Bon™ oT ^1 
rectors of the New York Trust Company, president of the Yaie 
Club and member of the Yale Corporation. A«m»n«itA 

George L. Ingraham. former presiding justice of the Appellate 
Division of the New York State Supreme Court. 

Cleveland H. Dodsre. well known *Jew York banker and bus- 
iness man : classmate of President Wilson at Privet. ": and 
prominent in ciVc and philanthropic ^work .in New York city. 

Benjamin H. Griswold. Jr.. head of the banking firm of Alex- 
ander Brown & Sons, of Baltimore. 

Ralph Stone, president of the Detroit Trust Corn^ny Mr 
Stone was formerly director of the Bureau of Trustsof the Alien 
Property Custodian's office, the work of the bureau having 
been organized under his supervision. 

Washington Committee. 

The Washington committee consisted of members of the 
Alien Property Custodian's organization, as follows: — 

Chairman, Lee C. Bradley, general counsel; Bradley W. 
Palmer, associate general counsel: Homer A. Dunn, director 
of • Bureau of Audits: J. Davis Brodhead. chief of Depart- 
ment of Corporation Management; Joseph A. Bower, chief 
of General Business Department. 

George P. Wagner was secretary of the Washington com- 
mittee, with an office at Sixteenth and P streets, N. W.. 
Washington. 

Ralph J. Baker, of Harrisburg. Pa., and Spier Whitaker. 
of Birmingham. Ala., assistant general counsel to the Alien 
Property Custodian, were assigned as counsel for the sales 
manager and Washington committee, respectively, with 
headquarters at Washington. 

The Washington committee prepared the German -owned 
property for sale. 

The purpose of the Advisory Committee was tp give the 
Alien Property Custodian appropriate and adequate advice 
and recommendations with regard especially to: — 

1. The advisability or propriety in the public interest of sell- 
ing any specific property. 

2. The manner of selling any specific property, with recom- 
mendations as to any special conditions or details respecting the 
same 

3. The minimum or up-set price, and whether or not the 
same should be announced, either before or at the sale. 

4. The manner of advertising, and any special class of pur- 
chasers to be invited to bid. 

5. The acceptance of the highest bid. or recommendations to 
reject all bids, with the reasons therefore. Under the act of 
Congress, the Allen Property Custodian may reject all bids, but 
only on the order of the President, statmg the reasons therefor. 
The reasons must be sufficient to justify the President in making 
such order. 

The two principal considerations for the Advisory Committee 
concerned : — 

1. The possibility of favoritism or unfairness in the sale. 

2. The qualifications of the purchaser. 

Sales Made Outright 

It was stated that sales of alien- owned property by the 
government's representatives would be outright and title to 
the property so sold would rest in perpetuity with the pur- 
chaser in the event that the organization of the company in 
question is for perpetuity and in any event entire and out- 
right ownership to the property so sold should be vested in 



1 



1918 YEAR BOOk 



the purchaser at such sales. Any peace treaty which the 
United States might negotiate, it was unofficially stated, 
would undoubtedly contain some provision protecting such 
sale of enemy -owned property/ Should a question arise 
after the signing of peace treaties relative to an assertion 
by the enemy interests that their American proprties had 
been sold below a true and fair valuation by the Alien Prop- 
erty Custodian, recourse could be had by the claimant to the 
United States Court of Claims, and should the claimant be 
successful the award would have to be paid by the govern^ 
ment with funds to be voted for that purpose by Congress. 

Dates were set from time to time for sales by Mr. Palmer, 
and in many cases when those dates arrived it was found 
necessary for various reasons to postpone the sales to an- 
other time, and as a result there were many large property 
interests to be disposed of by Mr. Palmer when the end of 
the year arrived. Among the properties which had been 
disposed of, however, up to the date of writing, may be in- 
cluded the Bayer Company, of Rensselaer, N. Y., which was 
sold for $5,310,000; the Heyden Chemical Works, of Gar- 
field, N. J., bringing $605,000 bid, with the bidder to pay 
$550,000 back taxes; the G. Siegle. Company, of Rosebank, 
Staten Island, sold A f or $509,600; the International Ultra- 
marine Works, of* Staten Island, $255,000; the Bronze 
Powder Works of Elizabeth, N. J., sold for $217,500, and the 
New Brunswick Chemical Company, sold for $22,100, the 
works of George Benda, manufacturer of bronze powders, of 
Boonton, N. J., and the firm of Berger & Wirth, of New 
York, makers of printing inks, sold for $4,025, and the WTiite 
Metal Manufacturing Company, of Hoboken, N. J. 

Enemy Stock Owners Named. * 

The properties seized — by properties being meant, in 
many cases, majority stock — included the following, here- 
with being given the names of the alien individuals owning 
the stock in industries represented by the Reporter; — 

Rudolph Plochman, of Frankfort, Germany, and Bronze Far- 
benwerke Aktlen Gesellschaft, of Barnsdorff, shareholders of 
Bronze Powder Works Company, of Elizabeth, N. J. ; W. Wolf 
A Sons, of Stuttgart, Germany, shareholders of the New Eng- 
land Waste Company, American Linters Company, American 
Products Company and Overseas Trading Company, of Boston, 
Mass. ; Nlcolaus B. Jungeblut, of Gronlngen, Holland ; Max 
Kypke, residence unknown ; Adolph Pohl, Hans Arnold and 
Alfred Urbach, of Germany; Otto Urbach, of Austria, and Max 
Asch, of Germany, shareholders of the General Ceramics Com- 
pany, of New Jersey, with offices in New York city; Bernhard 
Thurmauer, of Nuremberg, Germany, shareholder of the Amer- 
ican Lava Company, of Chattanooga, Tenn. ; Carl Leverkus, Br., 
of Cologne, Geruany, shareholder of the International Ultra- 
marine Works, Ltd., of New Jersey, with offices in New York 



city ; Charles Dulsburg, Christian Hess and Rudolph Mann, of 
Leverkusen, Germany, shareholders of the Synthetic Patents 
Company, of New York city, and the Bayer Company, Inc., of 
New York city; Bauer A Cie., of Berlin, Germany, shareholders 
of the Bauer Chemical Company, of New York city; Adolph 
Richter, of Rudolstadt, Germany; Dr. Oscar Richter, of Vienna, 
Austria ; Dr. Kurt Richter, of Rudolstadt ; Dr. Johanna Richter, 
of Berlin ; Mrs. Clara Zoeth, of Nurenburg ; Mrs. Elsa Kampe. 
of Nurenburg, and Mrs. Lina Balzar, of Rudolstadt, Germany, 
shareholders in F. Ad. Richter A Co., of New York city, dealing 
in toys and medicines; A. W. Faber, Stein, Germany, share- 
holder in A. W. Faber, a copartnership composed of Alexander 
Count von Faber-Caatell, and / or Ottilie Countess von Faber- 
Castell, Stein, Germany, U. S. address, Newark, N. J. ; H. Otto 
Traun, of Hamburg, Germany, shareholder of Traun Rubber 
Company, of New Jersey, with offices in New York eity ; Robert 
Bosch, of Stuttgart, Germany, and the heirs, legatees, divisees 
and distributees of the estate of Gustav Klein, shareholders of 
Bosch Magneto Company, of New York city; Chemische Fabrik 
von Heyden, R Vorlaender and A. von Heyden, of Radebeul, 
near Dresden, Germany, shareholders of the Heyden Chemical 
Company, of New Jersey, with offices in New York city ; FT. 
Rost & Co., Dr. F. Lampert, Mrs. Anna L. Lampert, Mrs. Caro- 
line Soltau and Mrs. Olga J. C. Schrumpf, of Hamburg, Ger- 
many, shareholders in Robert Soltau & Co., Inc., of New York 
city, gutta percha producers; various citizens of Germany who 
are shareholders of the German American Portland Cement 
Works (now La Salle Portland Cement Company), of Chicago, 
111. ; Treibacher Chemische Werke, of Treibach, Austria, share- 
holders of the American Pyrophor Company, of New York city ; 
Marc Fuchs Riedel. estate of Fritz Riedel and estate of Ludwig 
Friedrich Riedel, of Berlin, Germany, shareholders of Riedel A 
Co.. Inc.. of New York city, drugs and chemicals ; Robert Bosch 
and associates, of Stuttgart, Germany, holders in Boonton Rub- 
ber Manufacturing Company, of Boonton, N. J.,. and of the Eise- 
mann Magneto Company, of Brooklyn, N. Y. ; R Bernheim, I. 
Bernheim, Adolph Bernheim, Siegfried Bernheim and Rudolph 
Nathan, of Augsburg, Germany, holders in the New Brunswick 
Chemical Company, of New Brunswick. N. J. ; various citizens of 
Berlin, Hamburg. Bonn and other places in Germany, holders 
in the Tropon Works, of New York; Richard G. .oiumenthal 
(interned) and Richard Heyder (interned), holders in the Wil- 
liamsburg Chemical Company, of Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Paul Mecke, 
Leop. Heppe, estate of von der Heide, of Unna, Germany, hold- 
ers in the Ceresit Waterproofing Company, of Chicago, 111. ; 
Isaac Straus (interned at Fort Oglethorpe. Ga.), holder in the 
Chromos Chemical Company, Inc., of New York oity ; Alsen'sche 
Portland Cement Fabriken, of Hamburg; W. Muller. Lucien 
Alsen, estate of H. Weasel. W. Willms, of Hamburg, and H. 
Wulf, of Altona, Germany, holders or owners of stock in Alsen's 
American Portland Cement Works, of New York city. 

The total number of shareholders mentioned in the proc- 
lamation of the President was 324 on/ December 1, 1918, 
their holdings being representative of many classes of in- 
dustries in this country, all of which have passed to the 
control of the United States Government. 



Custodian Palmer's Report on Chemicals and Dyes. 



THE subject matter of the following pag> s is the section 
of the report to the Senate and House of Alien Prop- 
erty Custodian A. Mitchell Palmer Insofar as this re- 
port relates to the activities of aliens in the dyestuff and 
chemical industry, together with details of enforced reor- 
ganization or sales of firms or stock interests in such com- 
panies under the trading with the enemy act: — 

The great field of chemical industry presented, at the 
outset, perhaps the most difficult of the many problems 
which the Alien Property Custodian was expected to solve. 
It was, or had been until importations ceased, saturated 
through and through with German influence. In regard to 
no branch of human endeavor was the myth of German 
invincibility more firmly fixed in the public mind. The 
country was flooded with German chemists; and those who 
were not German by origin were mostly German, directly 
or indirectly, by training. A vast proportion of the persons 
engaged in the business bore German names. Connections 
more or less close between American and German houses 
were frequent and obvious. There was unquestionably a 
considerable German interest in such manufacturing as was 
being carried on. In view of the well-known and uniform 
policy of the great German government -aided combinations 
to embark in foreign manufacture only when export from 
Germany was not feasible, this interest seemed unlikely to 
be large; but, unless it could be discovered and rooted out, 
no substantial Americanization of the industry was possible. 
The German chemical industry, which had so thoroughly 
penetrated and permeated our own, was gigantic, perhaps 
the strongest, and certainly the most remunerative of all 
Teutonic industries. The task of identifying and taking 
over its property in the United States was thus a direct 
attack upon a most formidable opponent; while the infor- 
mation on which the work had to be based, had to be de- 
rived, to an exceptional extent, from men hostile by birth 
or tradition. 

German Chemical Industry. 

In order to give a fair understanding of the situation it is 
necessary to sketch briefly the history of the German chem- 
ical industry. From about the middle of the nineteenth 
century the practical application of chemical science began 



to occupy the attention of a constantly increasing number, 
of the best scientific and industrial minds of Germany. A 
combination of natural advantages and national character- 
istics led to rapid advance. The industrial districts, in 
which the necessary materials and other facilities were 
found or developed, were exceptionally compact. Distances 
were short and transportation easy. Labor was cheap, 
docile and stable. On the other hand, the national habit of 
mind was peculiarly fitted for chemical research work, and 
particularly for the interminable tasks presented, .by such 
research, in the way of exhausting the immensely numerous 
possible combinations available within a particular field. 
From the first, scientific attainment, and particularly ac- 
complishment in the field of research, appealed strongly to 
the public mind. Men of science, and particularly research 
workers, were more highly regarded than in other countries. 
This tendency was strongly fostered by the government, 
which, by conferring honors and titles, did everything pos- 
sible to exalt the position of the successful scientist. 

As a consequence of these conditions, the universities 
were at an early date provided with the most elaborate and 
advanced equipment for research work, and attracted to 
themselves an extraordinary proportion of the ablest young 
men of the nation. They accordingly proceeded to turn out 
a constantly increasing number of highly trained technical 
men, whose services were available to the rising chemical 
industry. The number of these men was such that the in- 
evitable competition between them for places made the av- 
erage saiaries exceedingly small. Highly skilled service 
was, therefore, available to the German chemical manufac- 
turer at extraordinarily low cost. In this respect, he had 
a marked advantage over the manufacturers of any and 
every other country in the world. 

These advantages were made use of to an extent nowhere 
else approached, because from a comparatively early date 
the Importance of research work to practical industry was 
firmly grasped by both the industrial and governmental 
ruling classes. The alliance of the manufacturer and the 
university professor became constantly closer and more 
complete. To meet the needs pointed out by the industrial 
leaders, armies of plodding, but nevertheless skillful, chem- 
ists completed hundreds of thousands of separate re- 
searches. The results of theso kept the German chemical 
manufacturers constantly in the van — always somewhat 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



ahead of their competitors in other countries in the way of 
new processes and products. 

•' . German Advantages. 

While all that has been said above applies in a measure 
to every form of chemical activity, the German advantages 
were naturally less in the manufacture of the heavy chem- 
icals than in the more difficult and complicated processes 
involved in other forms of the industry. Chemicals which 
are consumed in great quantities, like sulphuric acid or soda 
ash, are produced at prices so low that costs of transporta- 
tion are often a controlling factor. Accordingly, in this 
branch of the trade, the Germans never attained supremacy. 
The natural tendency was for each country to supply itself 
with these essential materials, and this natural tendency 
had not; at least so far as the United States was concerned, 
been overcome. 

In two other great branches of chemical industry* how- 
ever, the Germans had attained not only the first place, but 
to all intents and purposes a world monopoly — that is to 
say, in the practical application of organic chemistry to the 
manufacture of dyestuffs and mediclnals. Although the 
first coal-tar dye was made in England by an English chem- 
ist and the next important step in the development of the 
industry — the production of fuchsine or magenta — was the 
work of a Frenchman, the Germans almost immediately ad- 
vanced beyond the rest of the world in the development of 
this Infinitely complex industry. 

This complexity of the manufacture of dyestuffs as a 
business proposition is almost beyond belief. Tens of 
thousands of distinct dyes were produced in the German 
factories, and over 900 of these were actually sold in ap- 
preciable quantities, in the American market -aldtie, before 
the war. Each of these 900-odd products required a sep- 
arate and distinct process of manufacture, one differing 
from the next, in many cases, as widely as if the products 
had been those of unrelated industries. While all these 
dyestuffs and a host of pharmaceuticals have a common 
source, in that they are" derived originally from coal-tar, 
they descend from this common ancestor by an enormous 
number* of separate family lines. From the hundreds of 
distinct substances found in coal-tar, ten so-called crudes 
form the starting points of substantially all the processes 
which result in dyes. From these more than 300 so-called 
intermediates are produced by a variety of more or less 
complex chemical reactions. Most of these reactions re- 
quire the use of large quantities of acids, and other chem- 
icals not produced from coal-tar. From the intermediates 
thus obtained, an infinite number of possible dyestuffs can 
be produced. Many thousand such dyestuffs have been 
actually produced and marketed. 

Coal-Tar Dye Extraction. 

In carrying out the processes which result in the ex- 
tractions of the crude from the coal-tar, the conversion of 
crudes into intermediates, and of intermediates into dyes, 
'the quantities of each substance produced depend not upon 
the will of the manufacturer, but upon the inexorable laws 
of chemistry. The proportion of the various substances 
obtained can be varied slightly by skillful manipulation, 
but only to a small extent. The manufacturer cannot avoid 
producing large quantities of certain materials in order to 
secure perhaps smaller quantities of others. Again, at 
the very starting point of the industry, in extracting the 
crudes from, the original coal-tar, an analagous situation 
arises. The tar contents of anthracene, from which the 
most valuable of all modern dyes are derived, are relatively 
small; that of naphthalene, for instance, is immensely 
larger. The tar distiller cannot obtain anthracene with- 
out producing or wasting much greater quantities of naph- 
thalene, benzol and other crudes. The same truth holds 
good in every subsequent step of the immensely complex 
processes' of dye manufacture. At each step by-products 
are produced in addition to the products sought. The 
obvious result is that, unless the final product can be sold 
at a colossal price, uses or markets must be found for most 
of these innumerable by-products. Many of them, fortunate- 
ly, are useful in the manufacture of intermediates and dyes. 
Many have been found to have important medicinal effects 
and have taken permanent rank as pharmaceuticals. - For 
others, no use has been found, and the unavoidable pro- 
duction of these represents pure waste. 

The most important, feature however, of this produc- 
tion of by-products is" the relation which it bears to the 
explosive industry. All the most important explosives of 
the present day are either coal-tar products or the result 
of chemical processes requiring the use of coal-tar products. 
In a large dyestuff factory there is an unavoidable pro- 
duction of considerable quantities of substances which are 
directly available for conversion into explosives. 

A still more striking example is that of paramononitro- 
toluol. This is an intermediate necessarily made in quanti- 
ties often beyond the needs of the dye-makers. To the end 
of the last century many thousand tons of this substance 
had accumulated in the German dye-works, which were 
making frantic efforts to find uses for it in dye -making. 
About 1904 these efforts suddenly ceased. Trinitrotoluol 
(T. N. T.) had been adopted as a military explosive, and 
every pound of the accumulation was directly available for 
easy conversion into this most formidable of high explosives. 

Moreover, in addition to these by-products which can be 
used for manufacture of explosives, many of the materials 



which are not by-products but ar » directly useful for the pro- 
duction of dyes can also, by slight alterations in the processes 
employed, be converted into explosives. For example, in 
the production of sulphur black, one of the most important 
black dyes, a slight variation in the final step of the long 
and complicated process of manufacture will transform 
the ultimate product into picric acid. More important still, 
the technical skill required for the manufacture of ex- 
plosives is precisely that possessed by the chemical staff 
of a successful dyeworks and' is to be found nowhere else. 

Conduct of Business. 

Three things are apparent in regard to a business con- 
ducted under such conditions. One is that, unless limited %6 
the manufacture of a very few carefully selected products, it 
must be carried out on a large scale with the aid of immense 
resources in the way of capital and technique. Another is 
that, if carried out on a large scale, one of its most im- 
portant features will inevitably be the maintenance of large* 
research laboratories to work out the infinite problems 
raised by the necessity of disposing of by-products. A third 
is that the connection with the explosive industry is so close 
that no government which gave any serious consideration 
to the possibilities of war could fail to see the necessity of 
aiding and controlling the industry. The truth of each of 
these propositions was at onoe demonstrated in the history 
of the German dyestuff industry. From an early period, the 
manufacture became concentrated in a few important com- 
panies. These companies, ultimately six in number, de- 
veloped into enormous establishments producing practically 
complete lines of dyes and manufacturing most of their own 
crudes and intermediates, as well as many of their acids 
and heavy chemicals. Several of these establishments also 
became large producers of pharmaceuticals in order to pro- 
cure an outlet for their by-products. Outside of these very 
large houses, the industry was confined for the most part 
to small establishments . producing only a limited number 
of carefully selected dyes, so chosen as to minimize the by- 
product difficulty, and so organized as to enable the owners 
to save most of the overhead expense by themselves fur- 
nishing the. required technical skill and superintendence. 
Thest, indeed, were mostly little more than assembling 
plants. In the great establishments the research laborato- 
ries became large and highly efficient institutions. In these 
laboratories hundreds of chemists were constantly employed. 
Their facilities were placed at the disposal of research 
chemists from universities — often men who had no connec- 
tion with the dye industry whatever. Many of the manu- 
facturers' own chemists were allowed and encouraged to 
proceed with researches which had no probable immediate 
commercial utility, but which tended to increase the existing 
supply of knowledge in those general regions of the world 
of organic chemistry in which the dyestuff concerns were 
operating. The result of all this Inevitably was the accu- 
mulation of an immense mass of scientiftc data which 
usually afforded a quick and easy solution to each indus- 
trial problem as it arose. The results were sometimes 
startling. The most striking instance perhaps is the case 
of the Pfleger patent. The invention covered by this pat- 
ent solved, by the use of sodium amide, of which an over- 
production was available, the problem of producing indigo 
direct from aniline, and thus afforded a process far simpler 
than, and at le'ast as cheap as, any theretofore known * As 
an instance of how closely such matters are followed by 
the German public, It may be noted that the announcement 
of the purchase of this patent by the great Hoechst works, 
one of the largest German dye manufacturers, advanced the 
company's stock one hundred and fifty points on the stock 
exchange in a single day. The importance of this research 
branch of the industry is thus hard to overestimate. Finally, 
the connection with the explosives industry resulted, as is 
well known in constant governmental assistance to, and 
control of, the dye industry. Much was done by the Ger- 
man Government to insure the prosperity of the dye indus- 
try and its immediate convertibility to the production of 
munitions. 

Results in Dye Industry. 

These conditions soon produced in the dye industry cer- 
tain results similar to those which occurred in all the other 
important German industries during the great period of ex- 
pansion at the end of the nineteenth century. The improve- 
ments in processes brought about by research laid heavy 
emphasis on the value of quantity production. Quantity 
production, carried on by competing houses, led to over-pro- 
duction. Over-production led to a determined effort to es- 
tablish and maintain a large export trade. The natural ad- 
vantages of the German industry, as compared to the indus- 
try in other countries, prevented serious competition in Ger- 
many itself. The government's tariff and other policies en- 
abled home prices to be kept up. It was then evidently to 
the advantage of any manufacturer to produce far more 
than he could sell in the home market, even if his export 
trade had to be carried on at a loss, when by doing so he 
could use a process so economical that his profits on home 
trade would be largely increased. Accordingly, German dye- 
stuffs began to appear in every country at prices which 
domestic manufacturers could not meet. The inevitable 
result was that in country after country the domestic man- 
ufacture was destroyed or stifled in its cradle. As soon as 
this had been accomplished it was no longer necessary for 
the German exporters to sell at or below cost. Prices were 



8 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



\ 



immediately raised and handsome profits realized. The 
tendency to this result was "recognized by the German Gov- 
ernment from the first, and every facility was afforded to 
the growing export trade. It was fully realized by both the 
civil and military authorities that, if a world monopoly in 
the dyestuff industry could be built up, the military 
^ strength of Germany would be colossally enhanced, since 
it alone of all the great powers would then be in a position 
to secure immediate supplies of the vast quantities of muni- 
tions likely to be needed in a modern war. 

The methods under which this dumping policy was con- 
ducted, and its extent, may be illustrated by a few specific 
instances. Most of these occurred in branches of the 
chemical industry other than the manufacture of dyes, for 
the simple and sufficient reason that in this country, at 
least, the dyestuff industry never reached a point where it 
required much discouragement. When, however, in 1910 
the first determined effort was made in this country to 
establish the manufacture of an important intermediate, 
when, that is to say, the Benzol Products Company was 
organized by a group of men interested in the heavy chem- 
ical industry, to manufacture aniline oil on a large scale, 
the German hand was immediately shown. The price of 
aniline oil at the time of the establishment of this com- 
pany averaged 11 %c. As soon as its manufacture was fairly 
under 'way, the German exporters commenced to cut the 
price. Apparently, no definite . prices were made by the 
Germans, but they adopted the simple policy of offering any 
customer of the new concern supplies at less than the 
price he was paying. For example, one of their most im- 
portant customers refused an advantageous contract at 
8%c, stating that he had assurance from the Germans that 
whatever price the Benzol Products Company made would 
be met and bettered by them. Accordingly, the new com- 
pany struggled on, conducting its operations without profit, 
and only because it was supported by a group of men of 
exceptional determination and insight was it able to sur- 
vive until the war gave it an opportunity to establish its 
business on a firm foundation. Among other examples are 
the following: — In 1903. there were in the United States 
five manufacturers of salicylic acid. By 1913, three of these 
had failed. Of the two survivors, one was the Heyden 
Chemical Company, a mere branch of a German house, 
which, as such, I have since taken over. During the latter 
part of the decade referred to. salicylic acid was selling in 
Germany at from 26%c. to 30V»c. During the same period, 
the German houses were selling it in this country after 
paving a duty of 5c, at 25c, or from 6c. to 10c. below what 
they were getting at home. A similar situation developed 
n the manufacture of oxalic acid. In 1901, when there was 
no American manufacture, it was sold by the Germans at 
6*\ In 1903. when the works of the American Acid and 
A'kali Company were started, the price was immediately 
dropped to 4 7-10c, at about which figure it remained until 
1907. when the American factory was shut down for a num- 
ber of months. During this shut-down period, the price 
was instantly raised to 9c. When the factory reopened, 
the price was again dropped, until in 1908. when the com- 
pany failed. It was then reorganized and in 1909 secured 
the imposition of a 2c. duty on the acid, from which time 
up to the beginning of the war the price ran at about 7 He. 
a pound. The same process was carried on in regard to 
bicarbonate of potash. In 1900 there was no American 
manufacture and imports ran about 160.000 pounds. In 
1901, American manufacture began. This succeeded so well 
that in 1906 imports had dropped to 45,000 pounds. At this 
time the American manufacturer's price was 6 He. while 
the import value waa given at 4 9 -10c. In the following 
year the Germans made a determined and successful on- 
slaught. Their import value was lowered to 2 2 -10c. with a 
result that, instead of 45,000 pounds, 310.000 pounds were 
imported. Accordingly, in 1908. the American manufacturer 
failed. The price was immediately raised to 7 He and re- 
mained thereabouts thereafter until the war. Many sim- 
ilar instances might be cited, but these sufficiently indicate 
the method and its results. 

Six-Firm Dye Combination. 

This determined onslaught upon the competing industries 
of other countries, this definite attempt to secure world 
monopoly naturally created a strong tendency toward com- 
bination. As has been stated, by the end of the nineteenth 
century, the real manufacture of dyes on a large scale was 
concentrated almost exclusively in six great firms. These 
were the following: — 

Badische Anilin und Soda Fabrik, Ludwigshafen-on-the- 
Rhine, hereinafter known as Badische 

Farbenfabriken vorm. Friedr. Bayer & Co. in Leverkusen, 
hereinafter referred to as Bayer. 

Actien-Gesellschaft fur Anilin -Fabrikation in Berlin, 
hereinafter referred to as Berlin. 

Farbwerke vorm. Meister Lucius & Bruning in Hoechst - 
am-Main. hereinaffer referred to as Hoechst. 

Leopold Cass el la G. m. b. H. in Frankfort. 

Kalle & Co., Aktien-Gesellschaft in Biebrich 

Each of these six great companies had attained enormous 
proportions long before the war. Only two other concerns 
have carried on manufacture on a scale in any sense com- 
parable. These are the following: — 

Chemische Fabrik Griesheim Elektron of Frankfort A. M.. 



a company which has absorbed a number of smaller manu- 
facturers, and Chemische Fabriken vorm als Weiler-ter- 
Meer, Uerdingen. 

It will be noted that all of these establishments with the 
single exception of Berlin are concentrated in a narrow 
strip of territory near the Rhine and its tributaries. Their 
growth may be illustrated by a few figures as to two of the 
largest. Hoechst was organized in 1863 and started with 
five workmen. By 1880, it employed 1,860 workmen and 57 
chemipts, using 1,840 horsepower. It then produced 1,750 
different colors. In 1912, it employed 7,680 workmen, 374 
foremen, 307 chemists and 74 engineers and used 30.000 
horsepower. The number of colors reached 11,000. The 
works of the Badische which was organized in 1865, covered, 
in 1914, 500 acres, with a water-front of a mile and a half 
on the Rhine. There were 100 acres of buildings, 42 miles of 
railway within the works, and the power plants comprised 
368 steam-engines and 472 motors; 11,000 workmen were 
employed and the company was capitalized at 54,000.000 
marks. The establishment of Bayer was on a scale entirely 
comparable with these two giants of the industry. The 
works of Cassella and Berlin were slightly smaller, while 
those of Kalle were the least important of the six. Weiler- 
ter-Meer was important largely because . of its connection 
with the great Swiss house of Geigy & Company. Griesheim 
Elektron. prior to the war, had enormous works chiefly 
devoted to the manufacture of electrolytic chemicals and 
became an important factor in the dyestuff business only 
within recent years, when by absorption of the Oehler 
Works and the Chemikallen Werke Griesheim, its color pro- 
duction reached a scale approaching that of the larger 
houses. Of these eight great concerns, each had active 
agent houses in the United States, which were among the 
most important factors in the American industry and ac- 
cordingly in. the work of the Alien Property Custodian in 
connection therewith. 

Dye Cartel Organization. 

The tendency toward combination, however, by no means 
exhausted itself in the creation of these giant enterprises. 
The same causes which produced the enormous concentrations 
of capital in other German industries in the form pf cartels 
were also working in the chemical industry. By 1904, two 
such immense combinations had been formed in the dyestuff 
Industry, each including three of the largest six houses. 
One of these comprised Bayer, Badisch and Berlin; the 
other Hoechst, Cassella and Kalle. Indirectly, through their 
financial transaction with the great banks and also directly, 
each of these cartels was aided and guided by the imperial 
government. By pooling profits, by so arranging capitaliza- 
tion that each company held stock in the other companies 
of its own cartel, and by other familiar means, the risks in- 
cident to the enormous expansion of the "business and the 
immense increase of export trade were minimized. The 
centripetal tendency, however, did not stop here. In 1916. 
the two pre-existing cartels were combined with Griesheim 
Elektron, Weller-ter-Meer and various smaller companies in 
one gigantic cartel, representing a nationalization of the entire 
German dye and pharmaceutical industry. The combina- 
tion is extremely close. Profits of the companies are pooled 
and after being ascertained each year on common principles, 
are divided according to agreed percentages. Each factory 
maintains an independent administration, but they keep each 
other informed as to processes and experiences. To stimu- 
late and keep up a spirit of competition between the fac- 
tories it has been arranged that each product shall be man- 
ufactured by two or more factories. There is also an agree- 
ment that in order to circumvent tariff obstacles in other 
countries, materials are to be produced outside of Ger- 
many by common action and at common expense whenever 
and wherever desirable. 

At the time of the formation of his enormous organiza- 
tion, the capitalization of each of the principal component 
companies was largely increased. Hoechst, Badische and 
Bayer each increased their capitalization by 36.000,000 
marks, bringing the capital of each up to 90.000.000 marks. 
The new stock was offered to the old stockholders at 107, 
which was a melon of some magnitude, since the last avail- 
able quotations for the stock of one at least, of these corn- 
companies at the end of 1716 was 490. Berlin increased Its 
capital from 19,800,000 to 33.000.000 marks. Other increases 
brought the total nominal capital of the group to over 383,- 
000,000 marks. For many years, a large part of the enor- 
mous profits of these concerns had been put back into the 
works with the result indicated by the stock quotations. 
The real capitalization is thus much greater than this 
nominal figure. In fact, it is estimated that the actual in- 
vestment in the works comprising the cartel is not less 
than $400,000,000. It cannot be doubted that this enormous 
engire of commercial warfare has been created expressly 
for the expected war after the war, and that it is intended to 
undertake still more efficiently and on a larger scale the 
various methods by which German attacks upon all com- 
petition were carried on. 

Employment of Patent Lavts. 

In addition to the favorable effects of the foregoing fac- 
tors, an important aid to the success of German export 
trade in dyes and pharmaceuticals was the advantage taken 



»» 



r 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



of the patent laws of the several countries. Owing to the 
immensely greater number of research chemists engaged 
in this work in Germany than in other countries, far more 
patentable inventions in organic chemistry were made by 
the Germans than by the chemists of any other nation. In 
the United States alone they took out patents by the thou- 
sand. For example, Bayer alone accumulated in the neigh- 
borhood of 1,200 such patents which were placed in the 
hands of one of its subsidiary companies. The Badische 
had approximately 600 such patents, while each of the other 
members of the cartel held patents by the score. As there 
was substantially no effort (with small exceptions) by any 
of the German concerns to manufacture in the United 
States, patents were obviously obtained and held in order 
to prevent the formation of an American dye industry and 
to make impossible importation from other countries. The 
latter of these two purposes seems to have been the more 
important in the German mind. They seem to have had no 
fear that any American industry could be established on a 
competing basis. They had, however, some respect for the n 
Swiss, French and English industries, though at the time 
of the commencement of the European war, Germany was 
supplying approximately nine-tenths of the world's needs 
in dyes. With the aid of the patents, especially the product 
patents, they could and did exclude all importations of com- 
peting dyes in the most Important classes. 

As if the legitimate advantages of the German industry, 
supplemented by the ruthless if legal tactics of dumping and 
destructive underselling, were not enough, the methods of 
the great German houses in carrying on their business in 
this country were from the first honeycombed with corrup- 
tion. Bribery of dyers was carried on almost universally 
and on a large scale. The head dyers of the various mills 
and other chief customers of the dye manufacturers were 
subsidized in many direct and indirect ways. These dyers 
frequently controlled the situation, since if any one of them 
wished to have his superiors cease using the dye of one 
manufacturer and buy instead the. dye made by some other 
company, nothing was easier than to control the complicated 
process of dyeing in such a way that the dyes furnished by 
the house which was the least liberal to the dyer would 
produce wretched results. It would then be an easy matter 
for the dyer to get the manager of his mill to try the dyes 
offered by the more liberal briber and, with the exercise of 
a little care, the new dye would be sure to produce satisfac- 
tory results. So extensive was this corruption that I came 
across only one American consumer which had escaped its 
ill-effects. This concern, the United Piece Dye Works of 
liodi, N. J., avoided the difficulty by having all Its dyes pur- 
chased by the head of the company himself, under contracts 
providing that no barrel or package should show the name 
of the manufacturer. The company was thus able to desig- 
nate the dyes which its dyers were to use solely by its own 
arbitrary numbers, and the dyers were thus unable to deter- 
mine, whose dyes they were using and to whom they should 
look for their graft. Against these illegitimate methods 
practiced by concerns having such resources and compelled 
by such an Imperious necessity to seek and maintain su- 
premacy in foreign fields, honest domestic competition, found 
the utmost difficult in maintaining itself, and it is therefore 
flot strange that, until the outbreak of the war, the American 
industry was of little importance. 

Organized Anti-American Propaganda. 

Besides the obstacles, legitimate and illegitimate, thus 
placed by the Germans in the way of the establishment of 
an American industry, it would appear that there was con- 
siderable organized propaganda intended to discourage 
American attempts. It seems to have been regarded as the 
duty of a good German chemist in the United States to 
preach the doctrine of the invincibility of the German chem- 
ical industry, the impossible difficulty of the processes in- 
volved in the manufacture of many important dyes, and the 
hopelessness of procuring the necessary technically trained 
men and skilled labor outside of Germany. How far this 
was an intentionally organized movement and how far 
merely a sample of the prevalent German megalomania it is 
difficult to say; but the results were analogous to those of 
the well-known potash propaganda by which it would seem 
that the farmers and to some extent even the scientific men 
of the United States were persuaded that far more potash 
was required for our soil than was actually needed. Whether 
intentional or not, this propaganda had its effects. At all 
events prior to the war only a few Americans had the temer- 
ity to believe that anything could be done in this country 
against the German advantages in the way of technical skill, 
cheap labor, governmental support and unscrupulous 
methods. 

Indeed, up to August, 1914. the American industry in dye- 
stuffs and medicinals consisted of little more than a series of 
rather small assembling plants. In spite of the fact that 
enormous supplies of coal-tar were available and that sev- 
eral of the crudes could be secured in this country under 
most advantageous conditions, hardly any of the necessary 
intermediates were made here, and the manufacture of dyes 
was almost entirely confined to working upon intermediates 
imported from Germany. 



At one time the industry seemed to have taken a real 
start. Between 1879 and 1888 nine establishments had com- 
menced the manufacture of dyes, and were 'apparently 
prospering. In 1888, however, there was a sudden reversal 
of conditions, and within a year five of the nine shut down. 
The other four continued on a close margin and were still 
in existence at the outbreak of the war. Of these by far the 
largest was the Schoellkopf Aniline and Chemical Works, of 
Buffalo. This company, organized and maintained by an 
American family of German origin, which had at its disposal 
very large resources derived from other business, has con- 
tinuously made a strenuous and honest effort to establish a 
real dye industry. From time to time they commenced the 
manufacture of various Intermediates, including at one 
period aniline oil, which was manufactured on a large scale. 
In every instance, however, the manufacture was almost 
immediately brought to an end by German price cutting 
and at the time of the war the dyes made by this establish- 
ment were the product of intermediates imported from Ger- 
many. The company, nevertheless, had established a con- 
siderable business, and while operating on a very small ratio 
of profit supplied the greater part of the non -German dyes 
consumed by the trade. Of the other three concerns Heller 
& Merz had likewise established a fair business in a few 
colors also made from German intermediates. The same 
may be said of the Central Dye Works and the Consolidated 
Color and Chemical Company, which were operating on a 
still smaller scale. The latter of these companies, it may be 
noted, was owned almost exclusively by Mr. Herman A. 
Metz, the American representative of Hoechst, one of the 
largest German dye works, and since the outbreak of the 
war Mr. Metz has likewise become the controlling factor 
in the Central Dye Works. In addition to these four, a fifth 
plant was established a few years before the outbreak of 
the war, at Albany, by the American subsidiary of the great 
German house of Bayer. These five concerns comprised the 
entire American industry, and it will readily be seen that, 
operating as they did on German intermediates, they existed 
purely on sufferance and were absolutely at the mercy of 
the German producers. They made neither alizarin nor an- 
thracene colors nor synthetic indigo, which, being the fastest 
known dyes, are the most valuable product of the industry. 
The exclusive ability to provide these fast colors, most of 
which were protected by patents, would have placed the 
entire trade in the hands of the Germans, even if no other 
factors favorable to them had been present. These dyes 
were indispensable to, the textile manufacturers, and, by 
refusing to supply them except to houses which would buy 
their other supplies from the German manufacturers — that 
is, by the familiar process of '"full-line forcing"— the latter 
could have retained complete control of our market, even if 
our manufacturers had been otherwise fully able to compete 
in the manufacture of the simpler colors. The 80 per cent, 
duty payable on almost all of the coal-tar colors apparently 
afforded no real protection, nor, as will be shown, was it 
possible for the American industry to secure any relief under 
the Sherman act. 

American Chemical Industry. 

The condition of the other branches of the American 
chemical industry was, as has been 'stated, not quite so 
bad. The manufacture of acids and heavy chemicals was 
well established on a profitable basis, though even in this 
manufacture the employment of numerous German chem- 
ists and processes gave a certain Teutonic color to the in- 
dustry. In the manufacture of fertilizers there was, in a 
measure, a balance of power. The Germans had a com- 
plete monopoly of potash and its salts owing to their own- 
ership of the onlv considerable known easily worked 
potash deposits. This was somewhat offset by our posses- 
sion of phosphates, of which the Germans had no consid- 
erable supply. There was a certain amount of German 
ownership in companies operating in the phosphate field, 
most of which ownership has been unearthed and taken 
over. In nitrates, of course, the United States, like the 
rest of the world, was mostly dependent upon the Chilean 
supply. 

In the manufacture of chemicals in which electrical proc- 
esses, reaulrincr large and cheap supplies of electric power, 
played an important part, the situation was such that the 
Germans had been induced to enter to some extent into 
manufacture in this countrv. They had organized and 
owned the Niagara Alkali Company which, utilizing the 
cheap electric power of Nlaeara, became the largest do- 
mestic manufacturer of caustic potash, the latter produced 
from German raw materials. This comnanv also supplied 
the chlorine gas. which was the raw material used by the 
only considerable American manufacturer of liquid chlo- 
rine. In the same wav the great Frankfurt chemical 
works, known as the Deutsche Gold and Sllber Scheide 
Anstalt. had throuerh its American subsidiaries, the Roos- 
ter & Haf««lacher Chemical Comnanv, the Niagara Electric 
Chemical Coin pan v. and the Perth Ambov Chemical Works, 
established the only large American production of cyanides 
and the largest American production of formaldehvde and 
wr»od distillation products. The importance of these indus- 
tries will be recognised when it is remembered that cyan- 
fdes are Indispensable to the mining and electroplating In- 
dustries, while formaldehyde as the basis of the only new 



i 



10 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



and important chemical industry of American origin, the 
manufacture of synthetic resin products such as Bakelite, 
Condensite, and Redmanol. 

Coal-Tar Medicinals in United States. 

In medicinals very little real American manufacture ex- 
isted. A few of the coal-tar pharmaceutical products were 
produced by two American houses in St. Louis, the Mal- 
linckrodt Chemical Works and the Monsanto Chemical 
Works. By far the most Important factor in this field, 
however, was the New York house of Merck & Co., which 
was a branch of the world famous firm of E. Merck, of 
Darmstadt, and has accordingly as such been taken over. 
The enormous dispensing and distributing business of such 
firms as Parke, Davis & Co., Lilly & Co., and Powers - 
Weightman-Rosengarten Company, successful and efficient 
as it was beyond comparison with similar businesses in any 
other country seems to have involved very little real man- 
ufacture, and the materials used very largely imported. 
There seems to have been but little, if any, German interest 
in this branch of the industry, except among small brokers 
. and dealers. 

From all the foregoing it will be seen that the all -impor- 
tant portion of the chemical industry, the branch in which 
the work of the Alien Property Custodian would necessarily 
be most arduous, and in which its results might be most 
beneficial, was the dye Industry. The vital character of 
that industry was due not to its financial importance, since 
the consumption of dyes in the United States at the time 
of the outbreak of the war did not exceed $25,000,000 a year 
in cost to the consuming Industries, nor to the fact that 
these dyes were absolute essentials to industries producing 
perhaps $2,600,000,000 of goods annually, but most of all to 
the fact that the technical skill and equipment provided by 
a successful dye industry, furnished the means and almost 
the sole means, to which every nation must look for ad- 
vances in the application of chemical science to practical 
undertakings. No other Industry offers a livelihood to any 
such large numbers of highly trained scientific chemists nor 
any such incentive to continuous and extended research. 

Bayer & Co., Inc. 

As has been stated, the opening of the year 1914 found 
nine-tenths of the dyes used in our industries supplied by 
German houses, and the great bulk of these by the largest 
six German houses. At this time each of these six giants 
was represented in this country by a subsidiary American 
corporation. The agent of Bayer was Bayer & Co., Inc., 
a New York corporation, while in the Synthetic Patents 
rnnmaTiv. Inc.. another subsidiary, was vested the owner- 
whin of the 1.200 American patents taken out by the parent 
house. This New York company also owned other subsid- 
iaries, including the Hudson River Aniline Works, through 
which it had established its Albanv factory. Berlin was 
represented by the BerHn Aniline Works, also a New York 
Corporation. Kalle & Co. were operating through a third 
New York corporation, also called Kalle & Co. In these 
three cases all of the stock of the American house was ad- 
mittedly owned outright by the parent organization. All 
three were accordingly taken over at the outset. The great 
Badlscbe Companv acted through the Badlsche Comoanv, of 
New York, the stock of which appeared on the books to be 
owned hv Messrs. Adoloh TCuttroff. Carl Pickhardt and their 
chief emnloves. Leopold Casella A Co. were represented by 
the Casella Companv. also a New York corporation, the 
strv»i< of which appeared to he owned bv 1+s president. Mr. 
William J. Matheson. and its vice-president. Mr. Shaw. 
Hoechst operated throusrh a New York comnanv known as 
Farbwerke Hoechst. of which the stock stood in the name of 
«t* president. Mr. Herman A. Metz. Of these gentlemen 
Messrs. .Kuttroff and Pickhardt were Germans bv birth and 
Americans hv naturalisation. Messrs. Matheson and Rhaw 
American hv birth and tradition, and Mr. Metz American 
bv bH*th. .An extensive investigation was instituted bv anv 
Bureau of Investigation under the direction of Mr. Francis 
P. Garvan. and as the result of a long continued and strenu- 
ous effort, it was at last shown that the ostensible owner- 
ship of the stock of these three branches was not eenuine 
but that each remained In fact owned hv its German pro- 
genitor. As will hereinafter appear in the detailed account* 
of these proceedings, each of these three companies has also 
been taken over. 

Cutting Off of Importations. 

The outbreak of the war cut off the importation of dyes 
from Germany. There Immediately sprang up a number 
of American companies, mostly small, organized to embark 
in the manufacturing business. By strenuous efforts these 
companies contrived to avert the threatened dye famine 
which the curtailment of the German supply apparently 
rendered inevitable. Commencing with those dyes which 
were easiest to produce, and gradually extending to a lim- 
ited number of the more essential and well known of the 
non-patented colors, the production increased until at the 
time when I took office the requirements of the textile trade 
were being met and a considerable export business had 
sprung up. The Quality of dyes produced was, except in 
the matter of standardization, comparable with the Ger- 



man dyes of similar character, but the fast alizarin and 
anthracene colors were not being produced nor was syn- 
thetic indigo, the consumption of which is larger than that 
of any other dye. The largest of the existing producers, 
that is to say, Schoelkopf Aniline and Chemical Works, W. 
Beckers Aniline Company, and Standard Aniline Company 
of Wappingers Falls, have been combined with the aniline 
oil works of the Benzol Products Company and with the 
appropriate portions of the business of the Genera) Chem- 
ical Company, the Semet Solvay Company and the Barrett 
Company into a single large corporation known as the 
National Aniline and Chemical Company. This combina- 
tion has since produced considerably more than half of the 
dyes consumed in America. During the same period the 
Du Pont Company had begun to construct an .enormous 
plant at Deepwater, Delaware, established on immense lab- 
oratory employing approximately 200 chemists, and had 
bought the plant of the United Piece Dye Works in which 
the latter company had succeeded in producing a -number 
of the most valuable dyes applicable to silk. Among other 
important concerns the Dow Chemical Company, Messrs. 
Ault and Wiborg, the Sherwin-Williams Company and the 
Newport Chemical Works were preparing for the produc- 
tion of colors on a large scale, while many other companies 
were turning out appreciable quantities. The prices, of 
course, rose enormously and the results for a time were 
correspondingly profitable. 

In the meantime the German agencies had been making 
every effort to retain their organization and their customers. 
They had on hand in 1914 a considerable stock of German 
materials. One or two of the companies, notably Bayer & 
Co., Inc., sold out at once at a colossal profit. The others, 
apparently determined to retain their customers and their 
German connection at whatever cost, peddled out what 
they had in limited quantities, allowing each customer only 
a small quantity per month. These concerns made their 
sales at slight advances in price, hoping by this treatment 
to retain their customers' good will until the resumption of 
imports could be brought about. This process was assisted 
by the two voyages of the submarine Deutschland, each of 
which brought to the representatives of the six great houses 
a supply of the most essential dyes. Baver & Co., Inc., 
increased its production somewhat, as did Mr. Metz (the 
American agent of Hoechst) in his Consolidated Color and 
Chemical plant', while the Cassella Company organized a 
'new subsidiary known as the Century Color Company to 
commence manufacture under the familiar C. C. C. trade- 
mark, under which it had sold the goods of its parent Ger- 
man house. 

Position of American Dye Industry. 

At the time when I took office, therefore, the American 
dye Industry was active and profitable and in almost undis- 
turbed possession of the field; but it required only the 
slightest investigation to show that the new born industry's 
hold on life was of the most insecure description. • The supply 
of crudes had been so expanded by the needs of the explo- 
sive industry and the conseouent increase in the number of 
by-product coke plants and recovery installations in gas 
works that our supply of raw materials was . unsurpassed. 
We were, however, producing only a few of the essential 
intermediates. We had a plentiful lack of even such tech- 
nical knowledge as was reauired to produce dyes in the 
laboratory, to say nothing of the vastly greater amount of 
similar knowledge required to translate laboratory into 
commercial production. In the case of all the faster dyes 
Germany's patents had prevented every attempt at Ameri- 
can production, and while the trading with the enemy act 
authorized Issuance of licenses under these patents, the 
terms were such that no licensee could hope to continue the 
manufacture in competition with the Germans after the war. 
In the meantime the representatives of the great German 
houses were holding their organizations together and keep- 
ing their trade as best they could by doling out their remain- 
ing stocks and by selling under their own names American 
products, sometimes mixed with their own German goods. 
These representatives were waiting for the end of hostilities 
and were ready at a moment's notice to re- embark in the 
importing business and assist their German parent houses 
to destroy the new American industry. It was, therefore, 
one of the most vital tasks before me to ascertain every 
trace of German ownership in the new industry and particu- 
larly in the American representatives of the German trust. 
Unless the Germans could be deprived of the benefit of these 
branch houses, their re- entrance into the field would be 
all too easy. 

This proved to be a hard task. Every variety of camou- 
flage had been resorted to by the Germans to conceal their 
interests. A favorite method in this, as In other industries, 
was of course that of a fictitious transfer of stock. In a few 
cases such transfers were carried out after the severance 
of relations and before the declaration of war. In these 
cases the character of the transaction was fairly obvious 
and our course correspondingly simple. In other cases, 
however — and this was true of two of the three representa- 
tives of the great German houses which were ostensibly 
American owned — the apparent transfer took place at a 
period before the war was thought of, at least by anyone 
outside of Germany, ' In these cases the transfer was the 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



11 



result of an attack made by persons ostensibly Interested 
In the textile business upon the representatives of the Ger- 
man houses under the Sherman law. 

Up to about 1910 all the great German houses shipped 
their goods to their American representatives on a pure 
consignment basis. The compensation of the American 
representative was wholly by way of commission. The 
American company in these cases was a mere selling agency 
or branch. In 1912 a group of Philadelphia lawyers brought 
about the prosecution of an officer of the Bayer & Co., Inc. 
(or its .predecessor. Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld, another 
New York corporation), for some of the corrupt practices in 
the way of bribing buyers, which, as has been stated, had 
become universal among the German houses. In the course 
of this prosecution the lawyers in question became familiar 
with the general history of the German industry and at once 
realized that it might be made a subject of an attack under 
the Sherman law, on the theory that each of the German 
companies was, through its agent, actually doing business 
in this country* and that the two great cartels were con- 
spiracies in restraint of trade. Acting on this theory suits 
were commenced for triple damages against most of the 
American representatives. The institution of these suits, 
which were subsequently settled, resulted, in at least two 
cases, in a transfer by the Germans of their stock in the 
American company to the officers of that company. In the 
case of Badische Company, the stock of which was already 
in the names of the American representatives, it was only 
necessary to change the basis of the business from con- 
signment to sale. This was done in all the cases, so that 
the German house might appear not to be doing business 
in this country through its representative, but to be merely 
selling to an apparently independent American corporation. 
There was on the surface no apparent reason why these 
transfers should not have been genuine. Eaeh German 
house really controlled the situation with reference, to its 
agent because it could instantly ruin its agent's business by 
withdrawing supplies. Accordingly for a considerable period 
these houses escaped more than mere general suspicion, 
and it was not until the Bureau of Investigation of my 
department had acquired considerable familiarity with Ger- 
man methods of camouflage that the true situation could 
be disclosed. 

Work of Investigation. 

This investigation, of course, ran parallel with the similar 
investigations of several other departments of the govern- 
ment and the Bureau of Investigation received valuable aid 
from the offices of Military Intelligence, Naval Intelligence 
and War Trade Intelligence as well as from the Department 
of Justice and from the British, French and other allied 
authorities. All these bodies worked in close co-operation 
and their'mutual assistance was of inestimable value. In 
formation derived from these sources demonstrated that 
the chemical industry was a natural center for espionage 
and that this had been true long before we entered the 
war — indeed, before .the war began. The relation between 
the German Government and the great German chemical 
houses was so close that representatives of the industry 
were naturally almost direct representatives of the govern- 
ment, and their work in this country gave them unequaled 
opportunities for examining our industries from within. 
Customers of the German, import houses were constantly 
in need of expert advice in regard to the processes in which 
their goods were used. The. advising expert supplied by the 
German houses naturally saw everything there was to see, 
and what he learned was seldom concealed from his gov- 
ernment. 

Center of Propaganda. 

After the war began, the industry became a center not 
only of espionage, but of propaganda and of direct gov- 
ernmental activity. The number of striking Instances of 
this development is so great that only a few can be de- 
tailed, but these appear sufficiently striking. Among the 
early examples unearthed by the Bureau of Investigation 
was that of the by-product coke plant established by the 
Lehigh Coke Company. The latter was a corporation or- 
ganized by a syndicate represented by the Deutsche Bank. 
At the time the war broke out, it had been in operation 
for a number of years and was promising considerable 
success. It had not, however, gone extensively into the 
manufacture of coal-tar and its derivatives. In 1915, 
however, it established a considerable plant for these pur- 
poses. Every ounce of toluol and benzol which was pro- 
duced was sold under contracts binding the purchaser not 
to use or permit the use of the product for the manufacture 
of explosives or for the benefit of the allies. 

An examination of the correspondence between Hugo 
Schmidt, the agent of the Deutsche Bank in this country, 
and the bank, shows that the entire undertaking represent- 
ed by this by-product plant was a direct effort by the 
German Government to prevent the making of these valu- 
able materials for' explosive manufacture in the United 
States, or rather, to prevent their use for the benefit of 
Germany's enemies. The undertaking was decided on be- 
cause the Deutsche Bank had ascertained that the Bethle- 
hem Steel Company, which had a contract with the Lehigh 
Coke Company for the latter's coke and gas, had practically 
determined to build such a plant for its own purposes, but 



that this decision might be changed if forestalled by the 
erection of a plant by the Lehigh Coke Company. 

This actually occurred, with the result that large sup- 
plies of these invaluable coal-tar products were kept out 
of the munition industry while the demand for them from 
other Industries was prevented from having its natural 
effect in bringing into existence American plants which 
would have been free to supply the allies. This condition 
continued until just before we entered the war, when the* 
Deutsche Bank, doubtless better informed than most as to 
the probabilities, sold out the Lehigh Coke Company to a 
nominee of the H. Koppers Co., which in turn immediately 
resold to the Bethlehem Steel Company. 

"Chemical Exchange Association* 
A still more striking instance, uncovered by the Bureau 
of Investigation under the direction of Mr. Garvan, wttn 
important aid from the Department of Justice _ and the .Se- 
cret Service, was that of the organization known as Tne 
Chemical Exchange Association." The Purpose .and ; *£ 
a time, the efTect, of this enterprise was to corne r the ™PPly 
in the United States of phenol, an essential of the explosive 
industry; and to prevent its use for the manufacture ot high 
exp^wAicric acid ^^tj^iiol. or £ M .J > This 
undertaking was apparently initiated by Dr. ^^22? 
financial adviser of the' German ^ernment ^ tMj oonrtbry. 
in direct collaboration with von Berastorff. Dr. Albert car 
riedo^t toe scheme through Dr. Hugo Schweitzer, toe 
chemist and leading spirit of Bayer & Co.. Inc.. the American 

^e°L^Z^t^rl^l^ instantly stopped fl the im- 
portation of phenol, which was not manufactured to any 
Axtent m this country. Mr. Thomas A. Edison, who re- 
quired l^g'e s^ppues^f phenol for the manutocture of h£ 
ShonoaraDh records, which were made of a synthetic resin 
S?wh^phe^fand formaldehyde were the chiel ^ingredi- 
ents, immediately set to work to solve the difficulties in- 
volved in the manufacture of this sV^f^i^Loratortli 
strenuous work, toe problem was solved in his ^ratories 
in a few weeks, and he commenced the manufacture oi 
ler£ Salable quantities, producing a large surplus be- 
vSnd his own requirements. This surplus would normally 
hive suDDlied toe means for the manufacture of fairly large 
™ V «t?H?!? of toe most valuable explosives. To prevent 
?hi^ iS ^we^e^on JunV22, 1916, entered into a con- 
^ct^tntor^eric^ Oil and Supply Company, which 
wtfthY selling agency of the Edison Work* for practically 
toV entire surplus of phenol available for sale. 

As security for the faithful performance of this con- 
tract, Dr^hweitzer put up $100,000 in ^j K ^ ic ^?f 
furnished to him by Dr. Albert, and also a $25,000 surety 
complny bbnd. A week later, Dr. Schweitzer made a con- 
££t wfth toe Heyden Chemical Works (a mere branch of 
^%^mUr house of Chemische Fabrik von Heyd en of 
Radebeul), of which George Simon, a German subject, was 
tv^ manaier by which the entire supply of phenol thus 
nurch^df was to be taken by the Heyden Company and 
everted tat? salicylic acid and other harmless medicinal 
and flavoring products. The arrangement was that the 
HeydeS wSks were to return to Schweitzer one pound ot 
MLlfcvlic acid for each pound of phenol and keep the sur- 
ptus or th^ concerted product. This involved a very large 

Pr Xm£j£?t avoid doing ^,1^^- under W. own 
„««L QnhwPitzer registered as a trade name tne unemi- 
^EKdS^ooteSon." which wy described m a co- 
SrtMMWD consisting ot himself and Richard «»:£_ *£* 
partnersoip ouu»w «e George Simon, of the Heyden 

?£m£al Co£p£y, £id wa¥ toe ostensible proprietor of 
Chemical company, «» important manufac- 

2Ei?Tn u£ country of surgical Instruments. This com- 
tUr fI i S„ u»e Heyden Chemical Works, was a purely Ger- 
nta^ow^ed^nce™? a£d both have since been taken over 

by me. 

Schweitzer and Kny. 

The net result of all this was a profit to the Chemical ^ Ex- 
change Association of $816,000, which was *PP*Xi?^sK 
divided between Schweitzer and Kny. Schweitzer sjbwe 
of the profits seems to have gone straight to the German 
Government, but for some unexplained reason Kny appears 
^ave been allowed to keep his. The attempt to prevent 
the use in explosive manufacture of American phenol was 
completely successful for a time. The success of the ven- 
ture was celebrated in the latter partof 1916 by a dinner 
given by Schweitzer and Kny at the Hotel Astor in honor 
of Dr. Albert. Among other guests were Cteorge Simon, F. 
A Borgemeister, Norvin R. Lindheim and Captain Wolf 
von Igel, of the German Embassy— a typical gathering of 
the most active German propagandists in the country. 

Less striking examples of the same sort of thing migftt 
be cited by the score. An interesting instance is the case 
of Dr. Isaacs Strauss, organizer and president of the 
Chromos Chemical Company. Dr. Strauss arrived in this 
country in September, 1914, apparently with a direct man- 
date from the German Government for propaganda among 
the Jews. He proceeded to establish a periodical known as 
the "American Jewish Chronicle." Funds to the amount of 
$85,000 were supplied for his activities by Dr. Albert, and 
$15,000 by von Bernstorit, and his chemical company, profit- 



12 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



ing by the enormous war demand and prices, rapidly began 
to supply further sinews of war. Shortly after the entry of 
the United States into the war, his conduct attracted the at- 
tention of the military authorities, and the ensuing investi- 
gation led to his internment, whereupon his Chromos Cehm- 
ical Company and the "American Jewish Chronicle" were 
taken over by me. 

At the tjme when I took office, it, of course, became the 
duty of all companies in which any alien enemies held stock 
to report such ownership. About half of those American 
chemical enterprises which are now known to be German 
owned complied more or less promptly with this require- 
ment. The rest, mostly relying upon pretended transfers 
by which the stock had ostensibly been put in the hands of 
American citizens, paid no attention to the act until the 
activities of the Bureau of Investigation had disclosed the 
true facts. In some cases, however, the camouflage which 
concealed the true ownership was of a much subtler and 
more effective description. .In the case of more than one of 
the companies which promptly reported themselves as en- 
tirely German owned, measures had been taken to transfer 
to companies which were presumably beyond the reach of 
the trading with the enemy act the essential value of the 
German property and business. 

Bayer & Co., Inc. 

The most conspicuous instance of this method was Bayer 
& Co., Inc. This company at an early date reported all its 
stock as held by one of the officers, Mr. Seebohm, for three 
trustees, who, in turn, held for the benefit of. the German 
parent house. It was, on the wholes the most important of 
all the German branches. Besides representing, as sales - 
agent, one of the three-equal giant concerns at the head of 
the German industry, it was the only German branch which 
had established any considerable manufacture in this coun- 
try. Through the purchase of the stock of the Hudson 
River Aniline Works, it had acquired and greatly expanded 
a considerable plant near Albany, N. Y., in which it pro- 
duced a few of the simpler coal-tar colors and considerable 
quantities of pharmaceuticals, especially the most valuable 
single product of the German house — the drug known 
throughout the world by its trade name of aspirin. This 
was a patented coal-tar product on which enormous profits 
had been made. Practically the entire management of this 
company was *n the hands of German subjects. The lead- 
ing spirit, Dr. Hugo Schweitzer, was, as has been stated, 
among the most ardent propagandists and German agents 
in the country. The Albany plant represented the expendi- 
ture of many hundred thousand dollars, and the enterprise 
was exceedingly flourishing. 

To conceal the profits for the purpose of taxation another 
company was organized, known as Synthetic Patents Com- 
pany, Inc., all the stock of which was also held by the Ger- 
man concern, to which were conveyed all the American pat- 
ents of the German house, approximately twelve hundred in 
' number, and all the real estate, including the plant By 
contracts between Bayer & Co., Inc., and Synthetic Patents 
Company, Inc., almost all of the profits of the former were 
diverted to the latter in the form of rentals and royalties 
The investigation also- covered a number of less legitimate 
evasions of the tax-laws, and resulted in the recovery of a 
large sum by the Treasury. 

Militant German Character. 

The militant German character of the men in control of 
this company was so obvious that the ease with which they 
surrendered its stock was a matter of some surprise. The 
explanation was not unearthed until the very thorough ex- 
amination of the company's affairs by the Bureau of Inves- 
tigation had proceeded to great lengths. It was then ascer- 
tained that on the entrance of the United States into the 
war the men in control of the company had foreseen the 
danger of sequestration of the property. In casting about 
for a means of meeting this emergency, they hit upon a 
small company which had recently been organized in Con- 
necticut to manufacture dyes. This was the Williams & 
Crowell Company, established by two gentlemen who had 
some knowledge but little capital. 

They had succeeded in producing two or three valuable 
sulphur colors, notably, one highly suitable for khaki, of 
which enormous quantities were obviously going to be re- 
quired. The situation of these gentlemen was such that, al- 
though their company had been able to produce profits out 
of all proportion to its capitalization, they were not unwill- 
ing to sell, and accordingly the idea was conceived of buy- 
ing this company with a view to the gradual transfer to it 
of such of the facilities of Bayer & Co., Inc., as could be 
turned over. The plan was laid before the counsel of the 
company, Mr. Charles J. Hardy, of New York, who was the 
chief adviser of most of the German houses in this line of 
business. He appears to have advised that the company 
itself could not safely make the purchase owing to the 
danger of its being taken over by the government, and that 
for the same reason the stock of the Williams & Crowell 
Co. should not be bought by the Bayer directors themselves, 
since they were alien enemies. 

At his suggestion a new corporation, known as Wil- 
liams & Crowell Color Co., Inc., was organized in New York 
and the stock taken in the names of American citizens' 



Williams & Crowell Co. was at this time making profits at 
the rate of $50,000 a month, and, with the aid of the scien- 
tific and business knowledge which could be supplied by the 
Bayer staff, was in a fair way to Immediate and immense 
success. Indeed, by this simple method it would have been 
possible, under our very noses, to drain the life blood out 
of Bayer & Co., and to transfuse it into the new organiza- 
tion, which the Alien Property Custodian apparently could 
not touch. 

The purchase of Williams & Crowell Company, however, 
required a substantial sum in cash, approximately $.100,000, 
and it was at last possible to prove that the $100,000 thus 
paid was money of Bayer & Co., Inc., and, therefore, of the 
German parent house. 

Source of Propaganda Funds. 

This was ascertained only after the Bureau of Investiga- 
tion had discovered that the treasury of Bayer & Co., Inc., 
was one of the great sources from which German propa- 
ganda funds in this country were derived. The parent 
German house had enormous business connections all over 
the world. It supplied immense quantities of its products to 
the East, especially to China. After the outbreak of the 
war in 1915, payments for these goods could hot be trans- 
mitted directly to Germany. As many of the goods had 
been sold on long credit, very large sums still remained 
payable to the German house many months after deliveries 
had ceased. The Eastern debtors of the German house 
were, therefore, directed to make their payments to Mr. 
Seebohm, of Bayer & Co., Inc., New York. These funds, 
amounting to millions, were . accordingly received by him 
and disposed of without being put through the books of 
Bayer & Co., Inc. What became of most of them cannot 
now be ascertained, as all of such records as may have 
been kept were promptly destroyed. It was possible, how- 
ever, to demonstrate that part of the payment for the 
Williams & Crowell stock came from this source. I ac- 
cordingly insisted that the stock be turned over to Bayer 
& Co., Inc. This was done, and the Williams & Crowell 
Company thus formed a part of the assets of Bayer & Co., 
Inc., at the time of the sale of the latter. 

Among other interesting facts in regard to Bayer & Co., 
Inc., disclosed by the investigation was the great care 
exercised by the parent house to restrain the manufacture 
of dyes by its American subsidiary. The purpose appar- 
ently was to limit this manufacture absolutely to colors in 
which genuine American manufacture was already well 
established. The German house was very glad to increase 
in this manner the competition with which the American 
infant industry had to struggle, but it was determined that 
American manufacture in other lines should not be com- 
menced, even under its own control. When the cessation 
of imports after 1914 threatened a dye famine in this coun- 
try, Bayer & Co., Inc., commenced to manufacture a few 
new colors, or, rather, colors which were new to the Amer* 
lean industry* No sooner did this reach the ears of the 
German house than the most peremptory letters were writ- 
ten, absolutely forbidding any further extension of the 
business in this line. The enormous profits possible from 
such manufacture had no weight with the Germans when 
compared with the risk that such manufacture might aid 
the development of a real American industry. 

Sale at Public Auction. 

The stock of Bayer & Co., Inc.', and of Snythetic Patents 
Company was sold by me at public auction, the successful 
bidder being the Sterling Products Company, a West Vir- 
ginia corporation dealing in propriety medicines. This 
company had previously agreed to dispose of the dye plant 
and patents in case it secured the property, to Grasselli 
Chemical Company, one of the largest makers of heavy 
chemicals in the country. The price paid was $5,310,000, 
plus back taxes and other obligations of many hundred 
thousands more. Both purchasing companies appear, on 
careful investigation, to be thoroughly American. 

Two other of the American branches of the six great 
German dye companies were also taken over at the outset. 
These were the ^Berlin Aniline Works and Kalle & Co. 
These companies were, however, little more than shells, 
each consisting almost solely of a selling organization with- 
out plant or other valuable fixed capital. In the case of 
the Berlin Aniline Works there was an attempt to duplicate 
on a small scale the Williams & Crowell episode, but the 
resources available were insufficient. Neither of these com- 
panies, accordingly, had anything of great value to sell, 
and it has therefore been deemed the wiser course to 
liquidate them. The patents of the German concerns were 
in each case held in its own name and not transferred to 
the American branch. 

Having taken over these three of the six American rep- 
resentatives of the German giants, my activities in this 
direction seemed to have been brought to a halt. The other 
three did not report any German ownership, and on a pre- 
liminary investigation seemed to be American owned. A 
very careful examination of all available materials, how- 
ever, sufficed to raise sufficient doubt in each case to force 
the company in question to offer to submit its entire books 
and records to our inspection and to provide an audit at 
its own expense. An immensely thorough investigation was 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



13 



thus made possible, and in each case it has resulted in a 
demonstration that the stock of the branch was actually, 
in part at least, German owned. 

Cassella Color Company. 

In its relation to the American industry, the most im- 
portant of these companies was the Cassella Color Com- 
pany. This concern, the agent of Leopold Cassella & Co. 
G. m b. H. f was managed by W. J. Matheson and Robert 
A. Shaw. Both of these gentlemen*are American by birth 
and tradition, but both of them had been for many years 
wholly or chiefly engaged in the business of marketing the 
products of the Cassella works. The stock stood on the 
books of the company in their name, and appeared to have 
been purchased for actual cash at par in 1913. The tran- 
scendent Importance of this company was due to two facts; 
first its selling organization had been absorbed by the 
. National Aniline and Chemical Company, Inc., which up to 
the present has been by far the largest American manu- 
facturer of dyes; and, secondly, that the headship of the 
new all-inclusive German cartel, including all the great 
companies, is vested in Mr. Carl von Weinberg, who was 
for many years president, of {Leopold Cassella & Co., and 
closely associated with Messrs. Matheson and Shaw. 

Cassella as Selling Department. 

The importance of these facts was emphasized when the 
former Cassella organization became the selling department 
of the National Aniline and Chemical Company, and when 
Mr. Matheson assumed its presidency. A storm of rumor 
immediately arose, and it was suggested to me from every 
side that the National company was at least in part Ger- 
man owned. The facts, however, were found to be as fol- 
lows: — Prior to 1913, the majority of the stock of the Cas- 
sella company of New York was owned by the German 
house. In that year, the an ti- trust suits above referred to 
convinced all parties interested that it was unsafe to allow 
the New York agency to continue even in part to be owned 
by a member of the German trust. Accordingly, the re- 
maining stock was transferred to Messrs. Matheson and 
Shaw and paid for in cash. An option was, however, re- 
served. This was reduced to writing so far as it conferred 
upon the German house the right to take the stock at the 
book value on the death of either Matheson or Shaw. It 
was, however, orally agreed that the stock might be taken 
on the same basis at any time. In the meantime, the con- 
tract between the German and American companies was so 
framed that the profits of the company continued to be 
divided as before, 67 per cent, going to the. German house 
and 43 per cent, to the American house. The sale, there- 
fore, made substantially no difference in the relative rights 
of the parties. Messrs. Matheson and Shaw gained nothing 
which they did not already have in the way of theoretical 
control of the American house. The German company re- 
tained complete practical control of the American house 
because it could at any moment, by withdrawing supplies, 
render the American business worthless. The American 
patents owned by the German house had been assigned to 
the American company. In most cases, however, reassign- 
ments had been executed, but not recorded, so that the 
real though not the ostensible ownership of the patents 
was in fact still vested in the Germans. 

The correspondence shows an understanding the legal 
effect of which appears to continue the German ownership 
to the extent of 57 per cent, in the American company, and 
I have accordingly demanded and taken over 57 per cent, 
of the stock. 

When the dye famine began in 1914, Messrs. Matheson 
and Shaw determined to commence manufacturing, and for 
that purpose organized the Century Colors Corporation, this 
name being selected in order to retain the'C. C. C. trade- 
mark of the Cassella goods. This company was organized 
with a capital of only $500, and Messrs. Matheson and Shaw 
* took all the stock. The operations of the company were 
financed to a considerable extent out of the funds of Cas- 
sella Company of New York. 

In August, 1917, Messrs. Matheson and Shaw desiring to 
disassociate themselves from the Cassella name, caused 
the Century Colors Corporation to purchase from the 
Cassella Company all its tangible assets. On the 
same date the capital stock was Increased from $500 
to $200,004, Messrs. Matheson and Shaw paying in the dif- 
ference. The tangible assets represented everything owned 
by the Cassella corporation except its patents, good will 
and contract with Leopold Cassella G. m. b. H. for sale 
and purchase of their German products. On September 
11, 1917, Messrs. Matheson and Shaw sold to the National 
Aniline and Chemical Company, Inc., all of the stock of the 
Century Colors Corporation. Under this contract, Messrs. 
Matheson and Shaw agreed to subscribe for $200,000 worth 
of the National Company's stock and to place their own 
services at the disposal of the National, in return for 
which the National Company agreed to give them four 
thousand full paid shares of preferred stock and forty 
thousand shares of common stock having no par value. It 
was also agreed that the existence of the Century Colors 
Corporation should be continued for at least one year. At 
this time, in explaining the failure to convey the Cassella 
company's intangible assets, Messrs. Matheson and Shaw 
stated in a letter to the National company that they did 



not feel at liberty to dispose of the Cassella company's in- 
tangible assets without first consulting the German house. 

National Aniline and Chemical Company. 

After this sale to the National, the personnel taken over 
from the Cassella and Century Colors companies rapidly 
became increasingly important in the National organization. 
When Mr. Matheson assumed the presidency, the Century 
staff became to all intents and purposes the National's 
sales department. All this undoubtedly gave to the new 
organization a color which afforded considerable justifica- 
tion to the rumors of German ownership. Accordingly, the 
correspondence was examined with the utmost care. This 
correspondence, including, as it does, many of the letters 
which passed between Messrs. Shaw and Matheson them- 
selves at a time when neither could have imagined that 
their transactions would be under investigation, shows that 
at the time of the sale to the National both desired not to- 
sacrifice their German connection, and that neither believed 
with any great confidence in the success of the American 
manufacturing industry, though they may have believed 
that the formation of the National Company offered an 
opportunity for success in Ameriea not heretofore available. 

In October, 1917, the Cassella Color Company, in spite of 
the feeling previously expressed by Messrs. Matheson & 
Shaw that they could not properly transfer any of its 
intangible assets without consulting the German house, 
transferred to the National Company a number of impor- 
tant patents. This was done without regard to the exist- 
ence of the unrecorded reassignments to the German house. 
This transfer appeared to be invalid and these patents, 
together with all other patents known to be the property 
of the German house, have been accordingly demanded and 
are vested in the Alien Property Custodian. 

Holders of Stock. 

At the present time there appears to be no German 
ownership In the stock of the National Aniline and Chemi- 
cal Company, Inc. The great majority of the stock is held 
by the following: — 

Schoelkopf .Aniline and Chemical Works (or Its stock- 
holders, chiefly members of the Schoelkopf family). 

General Chemical Company. 

Barrett Company. 

Semet-Solvay Company. 

W. Becker's Aniline Works, 

W. J. Matheson. 

Eugene Meyer, Jr. 

A complete working majority of the stock has been placed 
in the voting trust, of which the trustees are' as follows: 

Wm. H. Nichols, president of the General Chemical Com- 
pany. 

H. S. Handy, of the Semet-Solvay Company. 

Wm. H. Childs, president of the Barrett Company. 

W. J. Matheson. 

Eugene Meyer, Jr. 

A contract has been entered into which will result in the 
gradual elimination by purchase of the Beckers interest, 
which has been thought desirable because of Dr. Becker's 
German origin. The Cassella Color Company of New York 
has been partially liquidated and its stock has been reduced 
from $200,000 to $500. The taking over of 57 per cent, of 
this stock will, at least, permit the elimination of the Cas* 
sella name. 

H. A. Metz, Inc. 

The American branch of the great Hoechst company had 
for many years been conducted by Mr. Herman A. Metz. 

Prior to 1912, the New York corporation was known as 
H. A. Metz, Inc., and a majority of its stock was always 
owned by the parent house. In that year the German 
company took over all but ten (10) shares of the minority 
stock which had previously stood in the name of Mr. Metz, 
leaving him the record owner of these ten, the only shares 
not held by them. At the same time the name of the New 
York corporation was changed to Farbwerke-Hoechst, so 
that the value of the good will might be firmly fixed in the 
German name. 

At about this time the anti- trust proceedings above 
referred to were commenced against these companies also. 
Mr. Metz settled for $40,000 the suit commenced against his 
company, and proceeded to make strong representations to 
the German house to the effect that the stock ought to be 
owned by him, so that it could no longer be asserted that 
the German house was doing business in America. A pro- 
longed negotiation ensued, the Germans being very reluc- 
tant to make any change. At last, in the summer of 1913, 
it was arranged that the 1,990 shares held by the German 
concern should be transferred on the books to Mr. Metz; 
that in return he should execute a demand promissory note 
without interest for the sum of $597,000; that the note 
should be delivered to the German company, and the stock, 
together with a suitable transfer properly executed, should 
be deposited to the sole order of the German concern in a 
Montreal bank as security for the note. 

At this time and for many years previous, the American 
company had been operating under a contract by which the 
German house appointed it its sole American sales agent, 
and agreed to furnish it with goods, in return for which the 
profits were to be divided according to an arbitrary scale, 



14 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



Irrespective of stock ownership. Under this arrangement 
the Germans were to have one- half the profits of the color 
business and 76 per cent, of the profits of the pharmaceuti- 
cal business, which, owing to the development of salvarsan 
and novocaine, had become of great importance. In return, 
and as a check on possible overcharges by the German 
house, Mr. Metz was to receive a percentage of their profits 
on the sales to the American company. An irrevocable 
power of attorney was given to Mr. Metz to vote the stock 
owned by the German company in the New York house, 
and an option was reserved to the German company to pur- 
chase the stock in the event of Mr. Metz's death or retire- 
ment. 

This contract was continued unaltered after the stock 
transaction of 1913, and under it the profits were divided 
as long as it was possible to remit moneys to Germany. 
There was also an oral understanding between the parties 
that the note should not be payable except out of the stock 
or its proceeds and that it could not be demanded as long as 
Mr. Metz should remain president of the company. It will 
thus be seen that the whole stock dealing produced no 
change whatever upon the rights of the parties. After it, as 
before, the share in the profits of each party remained the 
same; power to secure «Rid pass title to the certificates 
remained as before in the hands of the German company 
alone; the voting power remained as before in Mr. Metz's 
. hands; in fact, none of the incident of ownership was in 
any way affected by the transaction. 
* At the outset, Mr. Metz filed reports stating the existence 
of the note and the fact that certain stock was deposited 
as security for the same, but it was not until the asser- 
tainment of the entire history of the transaction that 
the proof could be obtained that the transfer was not, and 
was not intended to be, of any effect. At last, however, the 
investigation thoroughly demonstrated this and the stock 
has accordingly been taken over by me. 

Salvarsan and Novocaine. 

During the course of the year 1916, Mr. Metz, finding 
that he could no longer secure from Germany supplies of 
pharmaceuticals, especially salvarsan and novocaine, which 
formed the most profitable part of his business, determined 
to enter upon their manufacture in this country. Corre- 
spondence with the German house proving unsatisfactory, 
he sent his brother, Dr. G. P. Metz, to Germany to secure 
the necessary permission. This permission was refused, but 
the latter came home with a sufficient knowledge to permit 
the commencement of the work. A new company was or- 
ganized under the name of H. A. Metz Laboratories, Inc., 
a New York corporation, and his company commenced the 
manufacture of these two invaluable medicinals, which 
has been continued since our entrance into the war under 
license from the Federal Trade Commission. 

' The Badische Company. 

The agency of the largest of all the German houses, the 
great Badische Company of Ludwigshaven, presents per- 
haps the most striking example of the German methods of 
camouflage as applied to stock ownership. For many years 
this company has been represented in this country by 
Mr. Adolf Kuttroff, who was born in Germany, but who 
came to this country at a very early age, and was natural- 
ized in 1867. In a succession of partnerships and incor- 
porations with various members of the Pickhardt family 
this gentleman has always conducted the business of the 
Badische in the United States. In 1906, shortly after the 
formation of the first German dyestuff cartels, when the 
parent houses of Bayer and Badische became members of 
the same body, an attempt was made to combine their 
agencies in this country. 

A company called the Continental Color and Chemical 
Company was organized in New York and took over the 
Badische business of Kuttroff & Pickhardt, and the Bayer 
business of the Bayer Company's New York subsidiary, 
then known as Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld. At the end of 
the year dissensions led to the dissolution of this company 
and the Badische agency was then taken over by the 
Badische Company of New York, a New York corporation. 
The stock of this company appeared to be entirely owned 
by Messrs. Kuttroff and Pickhardt and on Its books con- 
tinued so down to its dissolution in 1917, except for small 
quantities of stock Issued from time to time to the prin- 
cipal subsidiary officers of the company. All this stock, how- 
ever, was held subject to an option permitting the German 
company to acquire it at par and there was an oral under- 
standing that no dividends exceeding of 6 per cent, should 
be paid. The balance of the profits, which were consider- 
able, was distributed according to an arbitrary scale ar- 
ranged by Mr. Kuttroff from time to time among the chief 
officers of the company. The company was dissolved in 
1917 and a new corporation organized under the name of 
Kuttroff & Pickhardt, Inc., which ostensibly took over only 
the physical stock-in-trade of the old company and its 
officers. The stock of this new company is held substan- 
tially in the same proportions by the same persons who 
held the stock of the Badische Company of New York. 

Stock Ownership Unchanged Until 1917. 

It will thus be seen that the ostensible stock ownership 
of this agency remained unchanged from 1909 until after 
our entrance into the war. It had thus been so arranged 
that no change was necessary in order to avoid the Sherman 



law suits, nor In order to escape the attentions of the 
Alien Property Custodian on casual examination of the 
books. Indeed, the true facts were only ascertained after 
a most elaborate analysis of the books by highly skilled 
accountants, and of the available correspondence and in- 
tercepted cables by trained lawyers. Suspicion of the com- 
pany was generally prevalent, but the first definite evidence 
was derived from correspondence obtained by the British 
authorities, which demonstrated that the New York com- 
pany had been in the habit of asking questions for the 
decision of the German blouse on even such intimate ques- 
tions of domestic policy as the increase or decrease of 
minor salaries of the staff. 

This correspondence indicated a degree of control far 
beyond that which was attributable to the mere power to 
stop supplies. It was then ascertained by the accountants 
that the original $25,000 paid into the treasury of the com- 
pany for the first issue of $25,000 of stock came out of the 
moneys of the German house in the Continental Company 
at the time of the liquidation of the latter concern. An 
intricate analysis also showed that at a time when the 
original capital stock of the New York Badische Company 
was decreased the sums paid out went not to the ostensible 
stockholders, but to the German house. Finally it ap- 
peared that on three separate classes of transaction very 
large sums out of the earnings of the New York house were 
transmitted to the German house when there was no pos- 
sible obligation to do so, and that this was done by the 
personal drection of Mr. Kuttroff without consultation with 
the directors or stockholders. For example: — During the 
years 1915 and 191$ the sum of $701,944.34 was credited 
on the books of the German house and subsequently re- 
mitted under the head of indanthrene royalties. 

Indanthrene Dye Sales. 

The company had been selling for the German house for 
years its high-grade indanthrene dyes, which it received 
from the German house at fixed prices, which did not in- 
clude the sums described as royalties. As the goods were 
manufactured in Germany and nothing was done to them 
here, no royalty, properly speaking, could possibly be due. 
If any was payable It must have been merely as an en- 
hancement of the price. There was no understanding be- 
tween the companies to any such effect. Obviously, then, 
if the companies had been really independent, the president 
of the New York concern would never have dared to de- 
prive his own stockholders of any such sums without legal 
obligation and without even consulting them beforehand. 
In like manner in 1914 the sum of $477,100 was credited 
and remitted ostensibly as a return of advances made years 
before by the G&rman house for expenses of the New York 
concern. Here again there was no previous understanding 
or present authorization requiring or permitting anything 
of the kind. At the time the alleged advances were made 
by the German house the New York company was operating 
merely as an agency on commission. There was no con- 
ceivable reason why a part of the agency's expenses should 
not have been met by the principal in the usual way. 

Sums Taken from Stockholders. 

Yet again, without consulting any one, Mr. Kuttroff caused 
these large sums to be taken out of the hands of the 
ostensible stockholders and put in those of the real owners 
of the company. Finally, in the case of the goods received 
by the submarine Deutschland, the same process was car- 
ried on. These goods when originally received were entered 
on the books like all other shipments of the German house 
on a sales basis; that is to say, they were treated as the 
property of the New York house and the German house 
was credited with the price, approximately $800,000. Set- 
tlements with the custom house appear to have been 
made on this basis. Some months afterward a profit of 
about $400,000 had been realized. Jhe book entries were 
then reversed so as to bring the transaction back to a con- 
signment basis, in which the German house would be 
entitled to all these profits except a commission. 

This change was made by Mr. Kuttroff without the au- 
thority of the stockholders or directors, and, accordingly, a 
sum of nearly $400,000 was made available for a remittance 
to Germany and was so remitted. These and kindred 
transactions have so clearly demonstrated that the German 
company was the real owner of the stock of the American 
concern that the fact has been practically admitted, and, 
accordingly, it is understood that a demand which Is to 
be issued forthwith will be immediately complied with. 
This demand, owing to the fact that the company has been 
dissolved, will result in the taking over of only the assets 
of the company which, however, are considerable; but these 
will Include certain profits realized, since the dissolution, 
by the new corporation of Kuttroff & Pickhardt, Inc. The 
latter is still under investigation. 

From the foregoing it will be seen that the American 
agent companies bearing the names of each of the six 
great German dye companies have been taken over. This, 
it is to be hoped, may Interpose some difficulties in the way 
of any attempt on the part of the latter to re-establish them- 
selves In this country. 

German Dye Agencies of Second Rank. 

The situation presented by the agencies of the German 
dye companies of the second rank has been less satis fac- 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



15 



tory. The great Griesheim Elektron Company was repre- 
sented in this country by two concerns, Gelsenheimer & Co., 
a partnership between American citizens now dissolved, 
and A. Kllpstein, a corporation of which all the stock was 
held by two unrelated Kllpstein families, all citizens. No 
trace of real German ownership could be discovered after 
the most prolonged and laborious investigation, both here 
' and abroad by all the departments Interested, in either of 
these companies, though the business of both had been 
largely derived from German sources throughout their ex- 
istence. * 

The house of Weiler Termeer was represented in this 
country by the Geigy-Ter-Meer Company, now with Geigy 
Company, in which, prior to the beginning of 1917, the Ger- 
mon house owned 20 per cent, of the stock. This stock was, 
however, transferred before our entrance into the war to 
the Swiss house of J. R. Geigy A Co., a firm in good stand- 
ing with the allied governments. It has been impossible 
, to ascertain whether this transfer was in any respect for 
the benefit of the German house, but in any case the great 
majority of the stock of this company is in Swiss and not 
in German hands. 

Among the chemical companies in which German inter- 
ests existed outside of the dyestuff business, by far the 
most important was the Roessler A Hasslacher Chemical 
Company. This was a branch of the great Frankfort gold 
and silver refining company known as the Deutsche Gold 
und Silber Scheide-Anstalt vormals Roessler, was organ- 
ized by Messrs. Roessler A Hasslacher, two old Scheide- 
Anstalt employes, who came to this country to introduce 
the goods of the parent house. From the first the German 
concern and its officers and employes owned about three - 
fourths of the stock of the American house. The latter 
prospered enormously and built up a very large business. 
Besides selling the products of the Scheide-Anstalt, con- 
sisting chiefly of cyanide of sodium and cyanide of potas- 
sium, it built up a very large Jobbing business. 

Niagara Electro-Chemical Company. 

In 1895 the Niagara Electro -Chemical Company was 
founded to manufacture metallic sodium by means of the 
electric power available in Niagara Falls. The sodium thus 
produced was used for the manufacture of cyanide of so- 
dium in this country, a business which immediately became 
exceedingly profitable. 

The stock of this company was divided so that one- third 
of it went to the Scheide-Anstalt, one-third to Roessler A 
Hasslacher and one-third to English interests. This com- 
pany had a capitalization of $100,000, made fabulous profits, 
and for the five years before our entrance into the war 
averaged over 900 per cent, in dividends annually. Mean- 
while the Perth Amboy Chemical Works had been estab- 
lished with a capital of $400,000 to manufacture formalde- 
hyde and wood distillation products. One thousand, nine 
- hundred and sixty of the 4,000 shares of this company were 
held by the Roessler & Hasslacher Company, a similar 
amount by another outside German corporation, the Holz- 
verhoklungs Industrie A. G., and a casting vote was left 
in the remaining eighty shares with Roessler A Hasslacher. 
In the summer of 1916 the officers of the Roessler & 
Hasslacher Chemical Company began to ask the authori- 
ties of their parent house to transfer to them more of the 
stock. 

The first request was made in a letter which contained 
a distinct intimation that this change of holdings need not 
be permanent In subsequent letters they insisted, as rea- 
sons for the proposed sale, that the political situation was 
very acute; that German-owned property in this country 
might be sequestered and that if any of their goods were to 
be imported and were to get by the British, they woul'd 
have to be able to say that the company which did the 
importing was not German owned. This position met no 
response. On the contrary, the Scheide-Anstalt officers 
replied that they did not understand what Messrs. Roessler 
A Hasslacher wanted; that what* they proposed must either 
be a real or a pretended sale; that if a pretended sale was 
what was suggested the idea was dangerous; and that if a 
real sale was meant a price would have to be charged which 
Messrs. Roessler A Hasslacher would, under no circum- 
stances, be willing to pay. They then suggested that a 
confidential man should be sent over to explain just what 
was wanted. The letters of Mr. Hasslacher had, however, 
left no doubt on this score as they had asked in the simplest 
possible language for a sale of the stock and had requested 
the Scheide-Anstalt to name their price. 

Roessler & Hasslacher Stock Transfer. 

In general the letters outlined the proposition as clearly 
as it could be stated, and the Scheide-Anstalt people can- 
not have avoided fully understanding just what was wanted, 
except on the supposition that the letters didn't mean what 
they said and that the real proposition was one which it 
was dangerous to put on paper. Their refusal, at all 
events, even to name a price, was unequivocal. They said 
in substance "rather than part with 'the best cow in the 
barn/ we ought to take every risk of the political situation 
and trust to fighting our rights in free America." Not- 
withstanding this discouraging statement, Messrs. Roessler 
A Hasslacher did send over a confidential man as was 
suggested. This emissary, Mr. Oscar R. Seitz, a New York 
lawyer of Swiss descent, with some German connections. 



reached Frankfort on February 1. He brought no letters 
of introduction, power of attorney, or means of identifi- 
cation. 

v The Scheide-Anstalt people did not know for certain 
that a confidential man was coming, or that if so, it was to 
be Mr. Seitz. Yet, he says that after a few brief inter- 
views in which he offered no argument, other than those 
which had already been stated in the letters from Mr. 
Hasslacher to his German intimates, the Scheide-Anstalt 
people agreed to Bell to the American representatives the 
following stock:— 

3,800 shares of Roessler A Hasslacher at 200 

140 shares of Niagara Chemical Electric Co. at. . . . 400 
80 shares of Perth Amboy Chemical Works at.... 200 
No counter-offer was apparently made, ani there seems 
to be no hesitation about the price, nor was there any sug- 
gestion of the purchase of the balance of the German hold- 
ings. A wireless was then, on February 6, 1917, sent to 
the New York office and, upon this wireless, the stocks 
were transferred on the books of the companies and the 
necessary $860,000 was remitted to the German house. The 
stocks thus sold carried with them control of all three of 
the companies. The price paid represented a book-value 
approximately twice as great, and the average annual divi- 
dends for the preceding five years on the three blocks of 
stock combined figured out at over 39 per cent, on the 
purchase price. As regards the Niagara stock, the fcook- 
value was nearly four times the purchase price, while the 
average dividends for five years figure out an annual re- 
turn of 225 per cent, on the purchase price. 

These facts and a host of additional circumstances like- 
wise pointing inevitably to the conclusion that this sale 
was not genuine were brought out in a prolonged proceed- 
ing conducted by my representative before the Attorney 
General of the State of New York, who had the power to 
subpoena witnesses. In the meantime, the 47 per cent, of 
the stock of the Roessler A Hasslacher Chemical Company 
which was admittedly still German owned, had already 
been taken over. I thereupon determined, by virtue of the 
authority conferred upon me by the trading with the enemy 
act and by the Presidential proclamations thereunder, that 
the stock ostensibly transferred in February. 1917, was, in 
fact, still German owned; and accordingly I thereupon is- 
sued demands for it. This proceeding will result in the 
Americanization of the most important German owned 
chemical companies outside of the dye industry. 

Heyden Chemical Works. 

Next to Roessler A Hasslacher In importance among 
companies of the same class is the Heyden Chemical 
Works; this was the subsidiary of the Chemische Fabrik 
von Heyden, of Radebeul, Germany, and manufactures 
salicylic acid and its derivatives, formaldehyde, saccharine, 
the medicines usually known by their proprietary names 
Aspirin and Urotropm, benzoate of soda, and many other 
valuable products. Of late years it has become enormously 
successful. Prior to the year 1917 all the stock was owned 
by the German company and in addition the American 
concern was tied by a contract with its parent house under 
which all the earnings of the American concern over 8 per 
cent went to the German house in payment for processes 
and information. 

When my investigation commenced, all of the stock ex- 
cept three shares stood In the name of T. Bllett Hodgskln, 
a New York lawyer, who had for some time represented the 
firm After considerable examination it was ascertained 
that this stock, which had been transferred just before 
our entrance into the war, had been paid at par with a 
sum of $149,000 borrowed by Mr. Hodgskln for the purpose 
from Richard Kny, father-in-law of George Simon, a Ger- 
man subject and the manager of the company, under an 
agreement contained in a letter from Mr. Hodgskln to the 
effect that he would thereafter retransfer it at cost. 
Richard Kny, it will be remembered, was the partner of 
Schweitzer in the Chemical Exchange Association, and he 
was also the ostensible owner of the Kny-Scheerer Chemical 
Company, which also turned out to be a purely German - 
owned concern and has been taken over as such. Thorough 
investigation resulted in the practical admission that this 
transfer was mere camouflage, and accordingly the stock 
has been demanded and taken over. Mr. Hodgskln is now 
under indictment for his participation in similar proceed- 
ings in respect to another company. This stock and other 
rights of the German house In the American company have 
been sold at public auction to the Monsanto Chemical 
Works for $605,000 plus taxes and the profits of 1917 and 
1918, but the sale has not yet been confirmed by the Sales 
Committee. 

Bauer Chemical Company. 

An almost exactly similar situation was disclosed by 
the investigation of the Bauer Chemical Company, a much 
smaller concern manufacturing pharmaceuticals, especially 
the widely advertised "Sanatogen" and "Formamint" In 
this company also the stock, which was really the property 
of the Berlin house of Bauer A Company, appeared by a 
fictitious transaction, to have passed into the hands of 
Mr. Hodgskln. The fictitious character of the transaction 
in this company also has been admitted, and the stock has 
been taken over. 

Another method of concealment was disclosed in the 



V 



16 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



investigation of the American Pyrophor Company, Inc. 
This company was organized in December, J917, by Charles 
Ganz, former agent of the Treibacher Chemische Werke, 
of Treibacher, Austria, and to it Ganz transferred, without 
authority, the entire business of the Treibacher Company in 
this country, a business consisting of the manufacture of 
pyrophor, an alloy of iron and cerium, which, when struck 
or scratched, produces Are and is used for cigar lighters, 
' etc. Here, after investigation, the unauthorized character 
of the transfer was so clearly shown that it was admitted, 
and upon demand the stock of the company was turned 
over. In this as in many other like cases it was impossible 
to determine whether the ostensible new owner of the 
business meant to keep it for the alien enemies or to steal 
it for himself. 

E. Merck of Darmstadt 
In pharmaceuticals, the most important concern in the 
world was that of E. Merck of Darmstadt. This was rep- 
resented in this country by Merck & Company, a New York 
corporation, which had an enormous and very profitable 
business in all kinds of medicinal preparations. The stock 
of this company appeared on the books to be owned ex- 
clusively by George Merck, a member of the family which 
owns the house of E. Merck of Darmstadt. Investigation, 
however, showed that the profits of this company had 
always been remitted to the German house in a manner 
utterly inconsistent with the apparent stock ownership, 
and it now stands admitted that the stock was paid for 
with money of the German house and belongs to the latter. 
Mr. George Merck insists that he is the real owner of one- 
flfth of this stock by virtue of the fact that he owns 20 
per cent, interest in E. Merck of Darmstadt. I am of the 
opinion, however, that indirect ownership of this kind can- 
not be recognized under the trading with the enemy act, 
and I have, therefore, determined that the whole of this 
stock is enemy owned and it has accordingly been taken 
over. 

Other Companies Under Control. 

In addition to the above, I have taken over all or part of 
the stock of the following less important companies en- 
gaged in various lines of chemical activity: — 

Charles Helmuth & Company, Inc.; International Ultra- 
marine Works, G. Siegele & Company, Willlamsburgh Chem- 
ical Company, New Brunswick Chemical Company, Fahlberg 
Saccharine Company, Phillipp Bauer & Company, Inc.; 
Amid -Duron Company, Haarmann-de Laire-Schaefer Co., 
Jarecki Chemical Works, Riedel & Co., Inc.; Rohm & Haas, 
Somerset C&emical Company, Tropon Works, Gerstendorfer 
Bros., German Kali Works, F. Ad Richter Co. 

The liquidation of the German interests in these com- 
panies is proceeding in due course. 

Amendment to Act % November 4, 1918. 

The amendment of November 4 to the trading with the 
enemy act presented for the first time an opportunity for 
what appears to me to be the most important peace basis 
of constructive work which has been possible in my depart- 
ment. Until the enactment of this amendment it had not 
been possible to take over German patents. These patents, 
as has been already indicated, formed a colossal obstacle to 
the development of the American dyestuff industry. Evi- 
dently they had not been taken out with any Intention of 
manufacturing in this country, or from any fear of Ameri- 
can manufacture, which the Germans apparently thought 
could not be successfully carried on under conditions pre- 
vailing in this country in regard to costs and to the supply 
of technicians and skilled labor. 

Upon consideration, however, it seemed that these patents 
offered a possible solution for the problem, hitherto un- 
solvable, of protecting the new American dye industry 
against German competition after the war. If they were 
not taken out in order to prevent American competition, 
they must have been obtained as a weapon against compet- 
ing imports. If they were sufficient to stop Importation of 
competing Swiss, French and English dyes, they would pre- 
sumably serve, in American hands, to stop the importation 
of German dyes. This was particularly probable in the 
case of the product patents, since most of the coal-tar dye- 
stuffs are definite chemcial combinations to which a product 
patent is entirely applicable. 

The idea was accordingly conceived that if the German 
chemical patents could be placed in the hands of any 
American Institution strong enough to protect them, a real 
obstacle might be opposed to German importation after 
the war, and at the same time the American industry 
might be freed from the prohibition enforced by the pat- 
ents against the manufacture of the most valuable dyestuffs. 

Americans Form Chemical Foundation, Inc. 
Accordingly, these considerations were laid before va- 
rious associations of chemical manufacturers, notably the ' 
Dye Institute and the American Manufacturing Chemists' 
Association. The suggestion was met with an instanta- 
neous and enthusiastic approval, and as a result a corpora- 
tion has been, organized to be known as the Chemical 
Foundation, Inc., in which practically every important 
American manufacturer will be a stockholder, the purpose 
of which is to acquire by purchase these German patents 
and to hold them as a trustee for American industry "for 



the Americanization of such institutions as may be affected 
thereby, for the exclusion or elimination of alien interests 
hostile or detrimental to the said industries, and for the 
advancement of chemical and allied science and industry 
in the United States." The voting stock is to be placed in 
a voting trust, of which the trustees are to be the five 
\ gentlemen who for months have been acting as the Sales 
Committee, which passes, upon sales made by my depart- 
ment, that is to say: — 

George L. Ingraham, former presiding justice of the 
Appellate Division, First Department, New York Supreme 
Court ; 

Otto T. Bannard, president of the New York Trust 
Company; 

Cleveland H. Dodge; 

Benjamin H. Griswold, senior partner of Brown Brothers, 
bankers, Philadelphia; 

Ralph Stone, president of the Detroit Trust Company, 
and the charter is so framed that under the patents non- 
exclusive licenses only can be granted and must be granted 
to the United States and on equal terms to all proper 
applicants. The company is capitalized at $500,000, of 
• which $400,000 is to be 6 per cent, cumulative preferred 
stock and $100,000 common stock, also limited to 6 per cent, 
dividends. 

4,500 Patents Sold to Company. 
By executive order obtained under the provision of the 
act, I have sold to thjs company for the sum of $26*0,000 
approximately 4,500 patents, the remaining $250,000 has been 

, provided for working capital so that the company may be 
able to commence immediately and prosecute with the 
utmost vigor infringement proceedings whenever the first 
German attempt shall hereafter be made to import into 
this country- The charter of the corporation provides that 
surplus income is to be used for the retirement of the pre- 
ferred stock and thereafter for the advancement of chem- 
ical and allied science and industry. The price thus paid 
was necessarily determined somewhat arbitrarily; the great 
majority of the patents were presumably valueless. The 
value of the remainder was entirely problematical and 
impossible to estimate. Substantially the entire industry 
having combined for the purpose of this purchase, it would 
have been impossible on public sale to find as a bidder 
any legitimate manufacturer. No other bidder could, there- 
fore, have been found on public sale except some specu- 

- lative individual who might have bought them for purposes 
practically amounting to commercial blackmail. The com- 
bination was not objectionable to public policy since it was 
so organized that any genuine American, whether a stock- 
holder of the company or not. could secure the benefits of 
the patents on fair and equal terms. 

Will Protect Neu> Industry. 

It Is submitted that the organization of this institution 
constitutes the most iniportant step that has been taken 
for the protection of the new industry. Tariff protection 
has proved utterly unavailing in the past. The German in- 
dustry has hitherto organized, and still more as now or- 
ganized, has had so much to gain by extending its foreign 
trade and by destroying the industry in other countries 
that It would undoubtedly give away Its goods in this 
country for nothing in order to recover the American 
market. The Chemical Foundation, however, should prove 
a power sufficient to discourage in a most effective man- 
ner any German attempts in this direction. If, as their 
newspapers boast, the Germans have during the war worked 
out entirely new dyes superior to their past productions, 
the protection afforded by it will be invaluable. It has been 
the uniform experience of the industry that the introduc- 
tion of new classes of dyestuffs follows only several years 
after the patenting of the original invention on which their 
manufacture depends. Accordingly, the later dyes of today 
depend largely upon the patents of three or four years ago. 
The patents transferred to the Chemical Foundation in- 
clude many German patents of 1917 and even of 1918, and 
also many applications still pending. 

These patents undoubtedly include the results of the 
research upon which must be based the manufacture of 
any new dyes which the Germans are now able to produce 
and market. Accordingly, at the very least, the institution 
will be able to protect the American industry for a con- 
siderable period and this should be all it needs. It appears 
to be the universal view of the more competent manufac- 
turers in this country that given five years of freedom from 
German competition, the American Industry can hold its 
own. Probably only a measure such as the embargo which 
appears to have been imposed by the British and French 
against all foreign dye importations can furnish this pro- 
tection to the degree necessary to insure the safety of the 
American industry; but short of such an embargo, the 
Chemical Foundation would seem to furnish all the aid that 
possibly can be given. 

At the same time the new institution promises an in- 
calculable benefit not only to the dye and chemical indus- 
tries but to the whole American manufacturing world. The 
opportunities which it can offer, and the rewards which it 
can hold out to competent research scientists should far 
exceed those of any institution unconnected with industry, 
and it may well, therefore, form the nucleus of the greatest 
research organization in the country. 



For list of Enemy Owned Patents see pages 71-86. 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



17 



WAR-TIME MARKET PRICES, 1914-1918 

Prices in Domestic Markets on August 14, 1914; January 1, 1915; January 1, 1916; January 1, 

1917; January 1. 1918; December 31. 1918 



INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS 



Alum, ammonia, lump lb. 

ground 

powdered 

potash, lump 

chrome ammonia 

chrome potash 

Alumina sulphate. Iron free lb. 

commercial • 

Aluminum hydrate— 

light lb. 

heavy 

Ammonia, aqua, carboys— 

16 deg lb. 

20 dec 

26 deg 

anhydrous 

chloride. (See ammoniac, sal.) 

nitrate 

Ammoniac, sal, gray i....lb. 

granulated, white 

lump 

Antimony- 
crimson lb. 

golden 

needle 

oxide 

sulphuret, red 

Argois »lb. 

Arsenic, white lb. 

red 

Barium chloride lb. 

Bleaching powder, 85038% lb. 

Blue vitriol, 99% lb. 

Brimstone long ton 

Bordeaux mixture, paste lb. 

Cadmium sulphide, yellow lb. 

Calcium chloride, 70075%, fused.... ton 

Carbon tetrachloride, in dmi lb. 

Chlorine gas, liquid lb. 

Chrome acetate, 20 deg lb. 

Copper, carbonate lb. 

Sulphate. (See blue vitriol.) 

Cream tartar, crystals lb. 

2>wdered 
uber's salt cwt. 

Iron, nitrate of, commercial lb. 

true 

Lead, acetate, brown, broken lb. 

granular 

white, broken 

white, crystals 

arsenate 

nitrate, C. P 

Lime, acetate cwt. 

Lime, sulphur solution gal. 

Nickel oxide lb. 

salts, single 

double 

Phosphorus, red lb. 

yellow \ 

Potash, bichromate. (See Natural Dye- 
stuffs.) 

chlorate, crystals lb. 

powdered 

carb., calcined^ 80986% 
calcined, 85 
calcined, 
calcined, 
calcined, 
hydrated, 
caustic, 88992%, works 

70^76%, works 

nitrate 

permanganate, technical 

U. S. P. (See Pharmaceutical 
Chemicals.) 

Prussiate. (See Natural Dyestuffs.) 

Salt cake, ground, bbls ton 

unground 

Saltpeter, granulated lb. 

powdered 

crystals 

Soda, acetate. (See Natural Dyestuffs.) 
ash, light, 58%, bags cwt. 

dense, 58%, bags 

bicarbonate lb. 

bichromate. (See Natural Dyestuffs.) 
bisulphite, powdered 

85988%, liquid 

caustic, 76%, solid, drums 

76%, ground 

76%, flake 

74% 

60% 

chlorate 

cyanide •. 

fluoride 

hyposulphite. (See Natural Dye- 
stuffs.) 

nitrite. 96998% 

phosphate, commercial. (See Natural 
Dyestuffs.) 

prussiate, yellow. (See Natural Dye- 
stuffs.) 

sal ..... ..... .. ...... .. .cwt. 

silicate,' W deg..7.7.7. . .7. .7.7. . . .lb! 
40 deg 

sulphide, 60%, fused 

90%, crystals 

sulphite 





2%< 





61 





Not quoted prior to 191C 
12.00912.00 -911.70 

797% 14915 

Not quoted until 1917. 
Not quoted prior to 1918. 
18*915 18915 



.00659.0076 




7 

1.5091.56 

Not quoted prior 

Not quoted prior 

Not quoted prior 

Not quoted prior 

4591-60 ' 

8591.60 




191 



2. 

to 

to 1918. 

to 1918. 

to 1918. 
8591.00 
25990 






11.00918.00 
8.0099.00 

5*<_ 

MB* 



57*< 
67*9721 
191* 

ft* 
J2* 

No offers 
1 ^S 1 5r 

Not quoted prior to 1917. 
Not quoted prior to 1918. 





6%95% 



25928 



60980 60980 

Not quoted prior to 1918. 

292ft 202* 

2*92* 2*§2* 

1*91% 1*91% 

2*92% 2*92% 




14915 
5*97 




Nominal 

5*9- 
12914 



22 



14*915* 
00922.50 



8*96 

—911.78 
18920 




859100 
25990 





1.7592.00 
1.8592.10 

1*91% 




18921 



859100 

292* 
6%9 — 

2®2* 
2*92% 







28.00926.00 
85987 




U*< 
Wt912% 



1.009— 
809— 





18921 



1.1091.25 





Nominal 
18915 

1 #S* 





Nominal 
Nominal 




27981 
Nominal 




82*940 




1918- 










2.0092.25 
2.9094.OO 
9*94 




19920 




16 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



1914. 

Aug. 
Sugar of lead. (See acetate of lead.) 

Sulphur, refined cwt. LUg&M 

TlnT bichloride vvS" 1-WJ \ ' "ttW"* 

cnrstala. (See Natural Dyeatuff a.) ^^ 

dust. (See' Natural Dyeatuff a.) 2 «t«2*t 

aulphate ^%W*% 



1915. 
Jan. 

1.8502.60 
9%01O 

88040 
2%02% 



1916. 
Jan. 

1.8502.61 



1917. 
Jan. 



18%< 



18 



70 



Jan. 

8.7004.60 

28*024* 



-1918- 



46048 

18015 

808* 

6*07 



48060 
24026 
18014 

6*07 




607 



August, 


1914. 


£ a. 


d. 


i 6 7 


6 


10 10 





17 





18 








10* 


5 2 


6 


10 15 





42 


6 


27 





o 


3 





3* 


28 





Nominal * 





3* 





5% 


88 





6 12 


6 


44 





26 





2 17 


6 


5 7 


6 


9 7 


6 


45 





Nominal 


6 15 





10 15 





6 15 





6 7 


6 



■J 



Industr 


ial 


Chemical Market 


Jan., 1916. 


Jan., 1917. 


£ a. 


d. 


£ 


a. 


d. 


10 10 





21 


10 





16 





16 


10 





95 





60 








80 





45 








1 


OH 


i 


1 


0* 


Nominal 


32 








45 10 





65 








90 








160 





69 








75 





1 


3 





1 


. 7 


1 


4 





1 


1 6 


180 





120 








820 





305 








1 


6 





2 


6 


3 


6 





4 





155 








145 





16 12 


6 


18 


15 





55 





75 








48 








65 





2 17 


6 


4 


15 





6 





8 








20 





28 


10 





62 


6 





80 








10 








11 


18 





15 








16 5 





20 








10 10 





20 








11 10 





19 


V 






Alum. lump. . . •■•••••••; }° n 

Ammon. aulph. (London) ton 

Antimony, Chin. . crude ton 

Araenic, En* ••.•;••;•••. 'i ? 

Benzol, 90 p. c. (naked) gal. 

Bleaching powder Jon 

Copper sulphate ton 

Iron sulphate ton 

Lead acetate cwt. 

Oxalic acid }£• 

Potash, bichrom • id- 

Potaah, carb., 90092 p. c ton 

Potaah, cauatlc, 88090 p. c.ton 

Potaab. chlorate |b. 

Potaah, pruaaiate, yellow id. 

Potaahea. .Montreal cwt. 

Quicksilver not- 

Sal ammoniac, flrata ton 

Saltpeter, Bng., ref cwt. 

Soda aah, 58 p. c Jon 

Soda, bicarb., cka ton 

Soda, cauatlc, 70072 p. c Jon 

Soda, cryatala ton 

Soda, cyanide • ID - 

Soda, hypo, (pea) Jon 

Soda, nitrate, ref ton 

Sulphur, flowera Jon 

roll ton 

flF. o. b. Liverpool. 



•-•V-... * ACIDS. 

1814. IMS. 

Auk. Jan. 

Acetic. 28%. bbl. ">• «4g|* J*g2 

«g. «*™ m * V." "V.V.V.V.V.' Noffi&tod prior to WC 

^SSP« < &. A SK& .». mem tMg 

38 deg 4uSKc 4*832 

40 deg JaSe 4«06 

42 deg ••.:• 4 ?2?w iSiu 

Battery, 66 deg., ■u'Pburlc.. ....... .lb. 101* -iwi» 

Benzoic, ex-toluol. (See Coal-Tar In- 

tr ^ m ^ late8 ;> 1.8001.98 1.5002.00 

Boric, cryatala, "bbla".'. lb. 708 7 

granulated 7*08 7 

Bu?#cT?ech.; • 6b»:'.:::".'.".::: - .'.:".:K: Not ,uotjd prior to » 

Camphoric • ••- *• 'JSSJSi 1 "* prlor to iSr- 

afe %•&& ???'■ "& Notfed prior to fi[ 

Chromic tecnnicai Not quoted prior to 1918. 

fflaST * ::::;:;:: ': ::::::::::::& ™ VSA £5 S. iSi?: 

SH^wlS" C ° al " Tar ™ W ™"" e i*. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

S-X *t? 8 ' P lb Not quoted prior to 1916. 

Hydrofluoric. 80%. bbla lb. 303* Wtt 

48%, carboya 6%I? 6*87 

52%, carboya ■•• Jgg' VSaMk 

Lactic acid. 22% . .••«>• 1%|2 TS* 

a?? ^Viiinn * 'ti " a " p! "........."•-" " Not Quoted prior to 1918. 

oft HvKSn U S P Not quoted prior to 1918. 

MliV Go^mtnt S aUnoaVd.V. . .V. lb. Not quoted prior to 191* 

Muriatic, 18 deg.. carboya lb. I*®** i2fii8 

20 deg l52l$ 1*01* 

22 deg 5? «t?a7iz 

N irJP **■ Be " carboyB .::. , .*.".' ,b : 5388. loSk 

So SeS — ::::::::iii;; 4*04% *jSo4% 

J? 2$* 4*05* 4T *2H* 

** oeg 505* 506% 

oSum. eK 2b%; 'tank caVs.7 .7.7.7.7.7/. lb! 1*01* iflg* 

°9S&4E^:::::: ■ • • •* ■ • • • n& p^ to m:* 

Picric. (See Coal-Tar Intermediates.) . m^oou, 

Phosphoric, 85% ;;;.;;.v.v.v. lb ; 8.6084$ 8.^% 

Pvrokail'ic' ' reaub.. . .7. .". lb. 1.2001.40 J'22S?S2 

cmtala 1.0501.40 1.6001.75 

Salicylic. (See Coal-Tar Intermediatea) 

Sulphuric, 60 deg.. bulk, tank.; -.lb. ttgl^ fcgl^ 

sunxpSJui' •;:.7.7.:.:.7;:..::: £ Not quoted P nor * m 

Tannic, U..S. P »>• JOgol 75076 

technical*..... •;• 85 t«L 4M$fi. 

Tartaric, cryatala lb. -0 30* 4H&47 

powdered 48 @°° * w * 7 

• price per cwt. fixed by government. 

t Based on government price per cwt. tor raw materials. 

1 Government price for all aalea by infra. 



1916. 
Jan. 
607 
10012 

80085 





4.5006.00 
10*011 

10010* 
10*010% 



1.3501.40 



59059* 
59*060 



85090 

308* 
606* 
6*07 

2*02* 
605 ft 




28081 

3.6004.60 

1.2501.46 

1.060— 

1*01% 
202* 

80081 

45050 

62055 

88*038% 



1917. 
Jan. 
4*05 
12014 

30040 

5*06* 
5*05% 
9%06 

1*02 



12.00015.00 
11*016 




55055* 



40 
.20 

* 



6. 
4. 

65 
65* 



1.2801.30 

505* 
110— 
190— 

707* 
14015 



1*01% 
1%02 

202* 
5*05% 
5%06 

606* 
6*06* 
6*06% 

202* 
47050 



30034* 
47050 
3.250— 
3.000— 

11012 
101* 

1.0001.01 
65080 
66070 
63065 



NATURAL DYESTUFFS. 



Jan., 1918. 


£ a. 


d. 


19 10 





15 15 





45 





150 





1 


0* 


22 





48 





210 





130 





1 


7 


2 


6 


Nominal 


Nominal 


2 


5 


8 


6 


240 





Nominal 


80 





65 





Nominal 


7 





Nominal 


72 


6 





11 


35 





27 





32 





26 






1914. 
Aug. 

Acetate of soda jb- 8%04* 

Albumen, •"■•■^v;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;^ » 

vegetable " " ". Not quoted prior 

irranular ekz yolk Not quoted prior 

fp?^egg e %k y . :..... Not quoted prior 



1915. 
Jan. 
506 
50075 
40045 
to 1918. 
to 1918. 
to 1918. 



1016. 

Jan. 

9409% 

88090 

30035 



Nominal 

13*015 

13*016 

18*015 

1.4501.65 

4.3004.60 

68065 
1.2001.26 
1.2601.50 
6.2006.40 
4.9006.20 

75*« 

360— 
1.55^)1.60 

606* 

90— 

100- 

5*06* 

15016 

2.400— 

2.650— 

80- 

l%r^- 




7*0- 

7*08 

8*09* 

8*09% 

2%03 

45046 

600- 



26< 
3.1503.26 

3.0503.20 

1*02 
202* 
303* 
1.8001.40 

55070 
78*079* 
77*078* 



Dec. 81. 

8.2004.26 
26*026 




5*06 



Dec. 31, 


1918. 


£ 


a. 


d. 


18 


10 





16 


5 





57 


10 





91 











1 


0* 


16 


10 





60 











280 





165 











1 


41 





2 





Nominal 


Nominal 





2 


2 





2 


11 





250 





22 








105 











65 





Nominal 


22 








105 








Nominal 








10 


46 








Nominal 


34 








28 










1918- 



Dec. 31. 

•4. 91 05. 16 

•9.8209.57 

•15.15015.40 

•19.60019.75 

•6%06% 

•7*07% 

•7%08 

•8*08% 

Nominal 



Nominal 
18*016 
18*015 
13%016 
11.55 
1.60 

m 

U.25 
)1.50 
1.40 
8.00010.00 
1.2501.25* 
1.2501.26 

86088 
1.6001.65 
Nominal 
808* 

11011* 
12012* 

6*07* 

15016 

2.1502.66 




2.15 
2 30 
t2.5502!8O 
•6.6006.85 
•7.1507.40 
•7.7508.00 
•8.5008.75 
•8.9009.15 
•28.00 ton 
86038 
410— 

45050 

86040 

8.2508.60 

2.9603.20 

£16.00 ton 

$25.00 ton 

006* 

1.4001.50 

65080 

81086 

, 81086 



1917. 
Jan. 


Jan. 


-1918- 


Dec. 81. 


9011 


16016* 




19020 


76078 
33048 


1.0001.10 




1.4501.55 


650— 




80086 




62065 




68070 




40045 




55060 




60063 




75080 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



19 





1914. 
Auk. 

Alizarine, red lb. 15%016% 

Alumina, chloride lb. 1%01% 

Annatto, fine lb. 82085 

»eed 707% 

Antimony, sait, 75%..'.'.'....'. ib! 14014% 8 

65% 11%012% 26 

47% 9%0ia 24 

Barwood chips lb. 202% 2 

Bichromate of potash lb. 6%07 12 

Bichromate of soda lb. 4*04* A% 

Brazil wood ton Not quoted prior to 191 

Camwood chips lb. 607 

Cochineal, Teneriffe, silver lb. 42048 

rosy, black 44045 

gray, black 48050 

Cuba wood. (See Fustic.) 

Cudbear, concentrated lb. 23028 

English '. 7*010 

French .... •. 12013 

Cutch, bales lb. 5 

boxes 608 

slabs 7 

Dextrine, Imported, potato lb. 

British gum 8*03% 

domestic, potato 5"* 

corn 30836 

Divi-divl ton 45.00065.00 

Flavine lb. 

Fustic, stick ton 12.00028.00 

young root —045.00 

chips lb. 1%02 

Gambler, common lb. 4*04% 

plantation 8 

Java, cubes 

Singapore, cubes 5% 

Hypo, of soda, bbls cwt. 1.8001.50 

kegs 1.4001.60 

Indigo, Bengal lb. 67% 

Guatemala 65080 

Kurpaha 

Madras 58065 

synthetic, 20%, paste 18020 

Indigotlne lb. 9501.80 

Logwood, stick ton 15.00020.00 

roots 11.00014.00 

chips lb. 1*01% 

Madder, Dutch lb. 12014 

Myrabolans ton 27.00084.00 

Nitrate o*. iron, commercial lb. 1*01* 

true 404* 

Nutgalls, blue, Aleppo lb. 16016% 

Chinese 15015% 

Orentine ton Not quoted 

Phosphate of soda, com lb. 2*02% 

Prusslate of soda lb. 8"! 

Prussiate of potash, yellow lb. 12*012% 

red 21 

Quercitron ton 22.00020.00 

Red sanders, chips lb. * -8 

Sago flour lb. 2 

Soluble oil, 50% lb. 6*010 

75085% 11012 

Starch, corn cwt. 2.0902.20 

Japanese potato lb. 6*05% 

rice -. 7 

wheat 4*05% 

domestic potato, bags 5*07 

Sumac, Sicily, 28% tannin ton 62.00068.50 

domestic, ground 40.00045.00 

Tapioca flour Ib. 1*02% 

Tin. crystals Ib. 28 

Turmeric, Aleppy lb. 4*04% 

China 3*04* 

Madras 4*04% 

Pubna 5*05% 

Turkey red oil lb. 5*09 

Zinc, dust lb. 5*06 



1916. 
Jan. 






17t 
prior to 1918. 
2> 




305 

2%02% 
6*010 
11012 




6*012 
9010 





40050 
15020 
254 




>65.00 
?80 
>.00 
15.00 
507 
If 

16016% 
12*014% 
19*022 
2.7508.00 
2.9008.10 
3.0008.50 
8.0003.50 
Nominal 




24025 

89.00040.00 

1*02, 

404% 

If 

17025 




11012 
2.0502.16 




DYE EXTRACTS. 



1914. 
Aug. 

Archil, double lb. 14015 

concentrated 8010 

Barberry^ French lb. 22028 

Brazil wood. (See Hypernic.) 

Chestnut, ordinary, 25% tannin.... Ib. 8*04 

clarified, 25% tannin 404% 

Cutch, liquid lb. Not quoted prior 

Divi-di vi, 25% basis lb. Not quoted prior 

Fustic, solid lb. 8011 

liquid, 51 deg 608 

crystals Nominal 

Gall lb. 12015 

Gambler, liquid. 25% tannin... lb. Not quoted prior 

Hematlne crystals Ib. Not quoted prior 

extract, solid Not quoted prior 

liquid, 51 deg Not quoted prior 

Hemlock. 25% tannin lb. 2*08* 

Hypernic, solid lb. Not quoted prior 

Unuid, 51 deg Not quoted prior 

Indigo lb. 6010 

Logwood, solid lb. 6012 

llauid. 51 deg 5010 

42 deg 406 

crystals 10015 

Oak lb. 808* 

Osage orange, 51 deg., liquid lb. Not quoted prior 

Palmetto lb. 2%«?2% 

Persian berry lb. 12^14 

Quebracho, solid lb. 4*05% 

liquid, 51 deg 3*<g>4 

42 deg 2*f?3 

Quercitron, solid lb. 2*04 

liquid, 51 deg 1*02 

Spruce, 25% tannin lb. Not quoted prior 

Sumac, Sicilian lb. 3*06% 

domestic, 51 deg Not quoted prior 

42 deg Not quoted prior 




5« 
5%< 
to 191i 
to 1917. 
8011 
608 
10012 
12015 
to 1917. 
to 1917. 
to 1917. 
to 1917. 

2*08% 
to 1917. 
to 1917. 
6010 
6012 
5010 
406 
10015 
8@8% 
to 1918. 
2*02% 
12<S14 
4*05* 
3404 
2*4/33 
2*4 <M 
1*02 
to 1918. 

3*06* 
to 1018. 
to 1918. 



1916. 

Jan. 

44045 

50055 

35040 

505% 

5! 8S* 

550— 
400— 
58060 
100— 



5*0- 



50060 
900— 
50080 
500— 
1.150— 
808* 

304 

12014 
200— 
150— 
140— 
300— 
14015 

10017% 







2.1502.80 
. 8.5005.00 

3.0004.50 

Nominal 

1.080^- 

1.600- 
Nomlnal 
26.00088.00 
28.00035.00 

60.00065.00 
2%< 

Nominal 
18020 




Nominal 



8*09 

Nominal 
10024 
20038 



1917. 

Jan. 
250- 
450— 
85040 

308% 




17020 
12018 
87040 

17019 
404% 
25028 
12014 
30045 
80035 
15020 
10016 
85040 
404% 

405 

20025 
14016 

708 

6*0— 

11012 

506 

7013% 



Jan. 
9.00012.00 
404% 

88085 

110- 

No offers 

68070 

No off era 

608 

42C 

17018 

40.00060.00 

P20 



-1918 






18ti 
No offers 

14 1|8~ 
65.00070.00 
1.0001.10 



Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 
18020 
26027 
No offers 
No offers 
6*07% 




Nominal 
805 
27029 
60.000— 
202% 



1)6.48 
10*010* 
8010 
506 
Nominal 
95.000100.00 
60.000- 





4.0006.00 
10*011% 
Nominal 

11012% 
U%012% 
120.000130.00 
86.00090.00 

15015% 

65070 

13018% 

12%018 

9*010 

15020 

13015 



Jan. 
10018 
300- 
85040 



-1918 





11 
15016 
80033 
80083 
17017% 
25030 
20*022% 
12015 
5*06 
45045% 
80088 
26080 
28025 
14016 
9*010% 
25030 
4*05 

ig 5 2 * 
Nominal 
0*010 
Nominal 
Nominal 
18014 
707% 
101% 
Nominal 
6*08 
Nominal 



COAL-TAR BASES, INTERMEDIATES, AND COLORS. 



1914. 1915. 

Aug. Jan. 

Acid, bensoic, ex-toluol lb. 23024 75080 

cresotlnlc Not quoted prior to 1918. 

cresylic, 95097% gal. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

07099% Not quoted prior to 1918. 



1916. 
Jan. 
4.0004.60 



1917. 

Jan. 

8.5009.00 



Jan. 
3.400— 



1.1001.15 
-0- 



-1918- 



Dec. 31. 

2.2502.40 

1.8001.85 

—01.20 

1.1001.20 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



Aipnanepblnol. crude. 



ADtr-nweno. 80% 

Beoialdenyoe. lech . 

f. r. c 

u. b. p 

BenaMloa. 1-4*- 

■nlptatte 



Btnwpbttial 

HfU-o«i-1ith);»n 
•;,..■<■■ -:'t.'-. 
Creeoie oil. SS% 



I 



i. U. S. 1 



Din»ita¥Mni;iti 

|>,r.l-r .■>. mill 
|i,- -i ,. M..-I . 






Not quoted prior to 191 . 
Not quoted prior to IBIS. 
Not quoted prior to 101 
Not quoted prior to 1™ 
Not quoted prior to 1 



Not quoted prior to 191 , 
Not quoted prior t- "" 
Not auoted prior t 
Not quoted prior t 

Not quoted prior t 
HUH 



Not quoted prior to 
Not quoted prior to 
Not quoted prior to 
Not quoted prior to 



uotad prior to 101 . 



Not quoted prior to 
Not quoted prior to 

Not quoted prior to 
Not quoted prior to _._ . 
Not quoted prior to 191 . 



Not quoted prior to 191 



..«; 



HwMM'lni, flake - lb. 

NmpblhVl»niin'oi«uipi»'nu)*"»craV. 
NUronaphUuUioe 

unha-nliro-plu 



a" 

■JW? 



sm 




Not quoted pr or to 1018. 



Not quoted pr or to IBIS. 
Not quoted prior to 1913. 
Not quoted prior to 1918. 
Not quoted prior to lttlfi. 
Not quoted prior to 1918. 
Not quoted pr or to 1918. 
Not quoted pr or to li>18. 
"-* quoted prior to 1918. 



loted prior to 1918. 



quoted prior to 1918. 



COAL TAR COLORS. 













































*gj....;:::: 


.ID 


X 




























Aroerauth 0... .. 


.ID 


i 


Almoin* _ yellow... 


■ lb 


* 








green B 






Anthracene brown 


' ' 




Aurarolne O 


II, 


























B "i C oi 4""-. .„ *' 


'.' U 


i 




OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



21 



/ 1918 » 

January. December. 

Chrysoldine lb. 1.109— 1.100 2.00 

yellow 2.00^- 2.009— 

Chrysophenlne lb. 9.009— 6.009 8.00 

Chrysophenlne O... lb. 10.75912.00 10.75912.00 

Ciba violet lb.50.009— Nominal 

Cibannon brown.... lb. 9.00910.00 9.00910.00 

Congo red lb. 2.259 8.00 2.009 2.75 

red W 8.259 4.20 8.259 4.25 

Cotton "blue lb.25.00928.00 25.00928.00 

red 56 4.259 5. 00 4.259 5.00 

Crocelne scarlet.... lb. 1.759 &.50 1.759 8.60 

scarlet R 2.769 8.50 2 759 8.00 

Crystal violet lb. 7.609 9.50 4.009 9.00 

Cyanlne blue lb. 4.009 6.00 4.209 5.00 

Cyanol blue lb. 7.009 8.00 Nominal 

Diamine blue BB.. lb. 2.009 4.50 2.009 4.60 

brown 5.009 6.00 5.009 6.00 

Bordeaux 5.009 6.00 4.509 6.00 

. Bordeaux B 4.759— 4.76< 

fast yellow 4.609— 4.60<i 

green 3.859 4.00 8.859 4.00 

pink 9.00914.00 9.00914.00 

rose 1.009 1.75 1.009 1.75 

scarlet 6.259 8.00 6.259 8.00 

skyblue FF 7.009 8.00 7.009 8.00 

yellow 2.759 8.00 2.759 8.00 

Diamond black lb. .909 1-10 1.109 1.20 

Direct black lb. 2.009 6.00 2.009 6.00 

blue 2.509— 2.509 8.50 

blue B 4.109— 1.159 1.50 

blue BB 2.259— 2.259 2.75 

blue H 8.009 4.00 2.759 8.00 

blue 8 3.259 4.50 3.259 4.56 

blue 2B 2.009 2.75 2.009 2.75 

brown 1.759 2.50 2.759 3.00 

brown 20 3. 1*9 4.00 8.159 4.00 

brown MB 2.509 8.50 2.509 8.50 

brown No. 22 2.759— 2.75« 

brown R 3.009— 8.009 8.25 

Bordeaux 2.009 4.00 2.009 4.00 

fart yellow 8.009 3.50 3.009 3.25 

fast pink 4.009 4.75 4.009 4.75 

green 2.509 3.50 2.009 8.50 

green J BB Y 3.359— 3.851 

gray 4.009 4.50 4.009 4.50 

orange 2.759 3.25 2.509 3.75 

orange 8Q 2.909— 3.509— 

orange R 2.509— 2.509— 

pink 2.009 5.00 2.009 5 00 

red 2.759 8.50 2.009 5.00 

red 4B 6.009— 5.750— 

red maroon 2.759— 2.759 3 25 

red imperial 3.309— 3.309— 

red salmon 3.309— 8.30s> 4.0ti 

rubine 4.009 4.50 3.759 4.25 

sky blue, fast to acid 4.009 -5.00 5.009 0.00 

sky blue FF 11.759— 11.75®— 



, 1918 » 

January. December. 

yeUow .♦. 2.509 4.00 1.509 8.50 

yellow 4. .. 8.009 8.50 3.009 8.50 

yellow R 2.009 8.00 2.009 8.00 

violet 2.509 4.00 2.759— 

violet B cone 2.759 3.75 2.759 3.75 

violet R. cone 2.909— 2.909— 

yellow C 4 2.509 8.00 2.509 2.75 

Bosine lb. 10.00915.00 9.00915.00 

J 9.009— 9.009— 

Brythrosine Ib.12.609— 12.509— 

Fast blue lb. 4.009 5.00 4.009 5.00 

add brown (red 

shade) 4.269— 4.259— 

crimson 8.009 4.00 8.009 4.00 

light yellow 2G 3.509 4.50 3.759— 

Ponceau orange. . . . 2.009 2.50 1.609 2.75 

red 1.659 2.50 1.659 2.50 

red A 6.259— 3.009— 

yellow G 2.009— 1.509 2.00 

Fur black lb. 8.009 4.00 3.009 4.00 

olue 7.009 8.00 7.009 8.00 

brown 3.009 5.00 3.009 5.00 

Induline base lb. 2.009 8.00 2.009 3.00 

oil, sol., lumps 1.609— 1.509— 

water sol., R 2.009— 2.009— 

water sol., C 1.409— 1.409— 

spirit sol., R 1.759— 1.759— 

spirit sol., c 1.159— 1.159— 

blue 3.009— 2.509 3.00 

Magenta crystals. .lb. 7.509— 7.50910.00 

powder 18.75914.50 7.759 9.00 

Malachite green pow- 
der lb. 7.75912.00 5.009 6.00 

crystals 11.75$— 7.259 7.75 

Metanil yellow ...lb. 2.259— 2.409— 

Methyl violet base. lb. 8.259— 3.259 8.2!f 

violet base cone... 5.009— 5.009— 

violet B 3.509— 3.509— 

violet 2B 8.509— 3.509— 

violet 8B 8.509— 3.509 - 

violet 4B Ex 3.759— 2.909 4.00 

violet 4B 3.759— 3.75< 

violet 5B 5.359— 5.85< 

6 B 6.509— ^ 6.50< 

6B Bx 7.509— 7.5( 

6B crystals 7.259 8.00 7.259 8.00 

Methylene blue lb. 3.259— 3.009 5.00 

B 8.509— 8.509 8.75 

B cone 4.009 4.50 4.259 4.50 

BB (A) 3.259 5.00 8.259 5.00 

green 8.00910.00 8.009 9.00 

Naphthol blue 3K. .lb. 12. 009- 11.50912.00 

Naphthol green lb. 8.509 6.60 2.259 5.00 

yellow S 2.009 2.25 2.009 2.25 

Naphthylamine red. lb. 6.009 7.00 6.009 7.00 

Nlgrosine jet, base. lb. .909— 

oil sol., lumps (R 559 — .559— 

oil sol., lumps C 659— .659— 

spirit sol., R 809— .809— 

spirit sol., C 859— .859 1.00 



, 1918 » 

I January. December. 
Nlgrosine blue, base. lb. 

blue oil sol., lumps R. .559— .654 
blue oil sol., lumps C. 

blue water sol., R.. .869— .659 .80 
blue water sol., C 

blue spirit sol., R.. .759— .759 1*10 
blue spirit sol., C. 

Oil black lb. .951 

green 2.000 8.00 2.609 8.00 

orange 2.009 8.00 2.009 8.00 

'scarlet 2.009— 2. 

yellow 2.009 2.60 2.009 2.60 

Oxamine blue BS..lb. 7.259 8.60 7.269 8.60 

red B 6.75A7.75 6.759 7.75 

Patent blue Ib.20.00o26.00 17.00920.00 

blue A (type) 18.00920.00 20. 

Ponceau GO lb. 2.009 2.00 2.009 2.60 

Primullne lb. 6.509 6.00 5.609 6.50 

Prussian blue, C. P. lb. .859 .90 .909 1.10 

Red, for leather lb. 4.259— 8.759 4.00 

brilliant scarlet shade 3.009— 2.609 8.00 

Rocceline lb. 12. 50966.00 Nominal 

Rhodamlne lb. 65.009— 80.00990.00 

B extra cone 7.25910.00 14.00916.00 

B6 80.009— Nominal 

6O 759— .759 2.00 

Scarlet pulp lb. 1.259 2.00 1.259 2.00 

2R 6.00914.00 6.00914.00 

Silk blue 8 lb. 2.259— 2.509 4.50 

black P. X 1.909- 1.9049- 

Soluble blue R lb. 6.759— 6.769— 

blue type 9.75910.26 9.75910.25 

Sulphur black lb. .509 1.00 .409 .60 

blue 2.509 8.00 2.509 8.00 

blue 50 1.009 1-60 1.259 1.50 

blue R 1.509 8.00 1.509 8.00 

brown 859 1.45 .859 1.45 

green 1.509 1.75 1.009 2.00 

green 86 2.859 2.70 2.359 2.70 

khaki 909 1.20 .909 1.25 

khaki R 909 1.25 .909 1.25 

olive 909 1.25 .909 1.25 

yellow 909 2.00 .909 2.50 

yellow 8.509— 8.009 8.50 

Tartrazlne lb. 1.509 2.00 1.509 2.00 

Ultramarine blue.... lb. .2591.00 .289 1-00 

Union navy blue... lb. 8.759 4.75 8.009 4.00 

dark blue 3.009— 2.759 8.50 

dark green 8.509— 8.009 4.50 

Vesuvine B lb. 1.759 2.25 1.759 2.25 

Victoria blue lb. 15.00920.00 8.00@15.00 

blue B 16.509— 8.009 9.00 

blue R 9.00910.00 8.509 9.50 

blue 4R 11.00912.00 U.00912.00 

green 14.00920.00 4.75920.00 

red 7.009 8.00 7.009 8.00 

violet 4BS 4.509 6.00 4.509 6.00 

yellow 7.009 8.00 7.009 8.00 

Wool, green S lb. 7.009 8.50 5.809 7.00 

green W. (mixture). 4.509 6.00 4.509 6.00 



\ 



DRUG MARKET. 



BOTANICALS. 




Agar agar, No. 1 lb. 41 

no! 8"!"!""lll!"l!l!!m!!"!ll! zii_ 

Agaric, white ...lb. Nominal 

Almonds, bitter, bags lb. Nominal 

sweet, 28-lb. boxes Nominal 

meal Nominal 

Aloin lb. 68970 

Areca nuts lb. 696tt 

Balm of Oilead buds lb. 24925 

Cantharides, Chinese lb. Nominal 

Chinese, powdered 1.609— 

Russian 2.0092.10 

Russian, powdered 2.2592.50 

Cassia, fistula lb. 6%97 . 

Colocynth apples, Spanish lb. 18920 

Trieste ..:.. * 19920 

pulp, U. S. P 28924 

Dragon's blood, mass lb. 2( 

reeds ............................... 45947 

Ergot, Spanish lb. 75980 

Russian 65970 

Grains of paradise lb. 15916 

Ouarana lb. 1.8091.90 

Iceland moss lb. 5%< 

Irish moss, ordinary lb. 697 

bleached 8915 

Isinglass, Russian lb. 3.5098.75 

American 71976 

Kamala, U. S. P lb. Nominal 

Kola, nuts, West Indian lb. 899 

Lupulln, N. F lb. 1.7592.00 

U. 8. P Nominal 

Lyoopodlum lb. 41942 

Manna flakes, large lb. 85990 

small 39942 

Nux vomica, whole lb. 495 

powdered 7H98 

Papain lb. —9— 

Poppy heads lb. 25935 

Quassia chips lb. —9 — 

St. John's bread, grinding lb. 2%93 

Tamarinds lb. 4%95 

by the keg 2.4092.75 




Nominal 
4.5094.75 
596 
80982 
35640 
85940 
25{f05 
72*/ 75 
90995 
909921a 
20925 




8.25< 
354 

59— 
12012V4 
8%94 
2.5092.75 



1916. 

Jan. 
55958 
45900 

251 



22tj 




35940 
798 
3%94 

3^93% 
2.23@2.50 



201 



.654 



H.85 

1.00 

P1.80 

J95 

6*97% 

11911H 

3.5094.00 

759— 

697 

697 

595H 
2.2592.50 



2.4 



29< 



8.1 



4.< 



P1.00 



us 

»1.50 
>8.00 



9091.00 
798 



00 




-1918- 




70976 
Nominal 




51.50 

►1.00 

51.25 

.60 

.85 

J20 

4C 

Nominal 
45990 
80986 
Nominal 
2.0092.00 
2.0092.00 
1.8591.40 





1.5091.55 

798 
Nominal 
15916 

798 



1914. 
Aug. 
Copaiba, South American lb. 41 

Fir, CanadaV.".'.".V.V.V.".V.V.V. . .V.V.gaY. 9 

Oregon 75 

Peru lb. 1.50 

Tolu lb. 




Balsams. 




1016. 

Jan. 

45946 

48945 
5.0095.25 

65975 
5.2595.50 

88940 



1917. 

Jan. 

65908 

48950 
5.5096.50 

75985 
8.6593.75 

86987 



Jan. 


Dec. 81. 


90997% 


75980 


66067% 


57%900 


0.7596.26 


8.0098.50 


1.1591.25 


1.609170 


8.7594.00 


3.5093.50 


9591 00 


1.2091.20 



22 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



Barks. 



1914. 1915. 

Aug. Jan. 

Angostura lb. 14%018 25026 

Basswood lb. Not Quoted prior to 1917. 

Bayberry lb. 505% 608 

Barberry lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Black haw. bark of root lb. 17018 17020 

bark of tree 4%05 9%01O% 

Blackberry, of root lb. 5%06 5%06 

Buckthorn, true lb. 20022 18019 

Callsaya lb. 17025 19028 

Canella, abla lb. 8010 15020 

Cascara aagrada lb. 8010% 7%09% 

Cascarllla quills, long lb. 22024 250— 

quills, medium 18019 Nominal 

slf tings 11012 12015 

Cinchona, red, quills lb. 20028 20025 

broken 12018 17019 

chips — 0— — 0— 

yellow quills 18028 25028 

broken Nominal 250— 

Loxa, pale, bales «r% 200— 210— 

Loxa, pale, powdered, boxes 10017 180— 

Maracaibo, yellow, powdered 14015 15018 

Condurango lb. 12%014 12018 

Cottonroot lb. 6%©7 7%08 

Cramp, so-called lb. 6%07 607 

genuine Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Dogwood , lb. 506 607 

Elm, bundles, select lb. 17019 22023 

grinding 909% 16018 

Lemon peel lb. 6%07 506 

Mesereon lb. 9010 12018 

Oak. red v lb. 809 809 

white 305 305 

Orange peel, Curacao %s, sweet lb. 405 3%04 

Malaga, ribbons 8010 607 

quarters Nominal Nominal 

sweet Trieste 607 —010 

Prickly ash Northern lb. 14016 12018 

Southern 14016 12013 

Pomegranate of root lb. 12013 250-- 

of fruit 607 200— 

Sassafras ordinary lb. 12015 11013 

•elect 10018 15016 

Simarubra lb. 11012 15018 

Soap whole lb. 9010 9010 

cut 1O%011 12012ft 

crushed 9%01O 12012% 

Tagalder lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Tonga lb. 40042 45050 

Wahoo of root lb. 42050 36040 

o* tree 15018 12015 

Witch hazel lb. 8%04 3%04 

Wild cherry lb. 708 506 

White pine lb. 405 S%05 

White poplar lb. 3%04 8%04 



1914. 

Calabar lb. 25080 

Castor India lb. Not quoted prior 

Manchuria Not quoted prior 

South American Not quoted prior 

St. Ignatius lb. 18020 

Tonka Angostura lb. 1.5001.60 

Para Nominal 

Surinam, crystallized 1.1001.15 

Vanilla Mexican whole lb. 4.0005.00 

cuts 8.12%©8.50 

Bourbon 3.37*04.00 

South American 3.5003.75 

Tahiti white label Nominal 

green label 2.25(92.85 

yellow label Not quoted prior 



1915. 

Jan. 

20025 
to 1918. 
to 1918. 
to 1918. 

20021 
1.5001.60 

85095 
1.10 




Nominal 
1.9002.00 
to 1918. 



1916. 
Jan. 
25026 

607 

17020 
9%01O% 
5%06 
>55 



6%09 
250— 

Nominal 
12015 
25028 
22023 

28025 

250— 
25026 
18018% 
15018 
25030 
7%08 

5%9o 

607 
18019 
14015 

35040 

809 

805 

8%©4 

4%05 

120— 

—010 

10012 

10012 




Beans. 



1916. 
Jan. 
20025 



18020 

9001.05 

65070 

75080 
P5.00 
.50 
pS.50 
MJ.50 
»1.87% 
1.4501.50 




1917. 

Jan. 
40050 
18022 

607 

18%014 

9%01O% 

6%08 

30032 

19028 

18020 

8%#10 

25< 

220— 
12015 
35040 
27085 

85040 
30035 
25026 
18018% 
30035 
14015 
808% 
14016 






14016 

606% 
3%04 



1917. 

Jan. 

22025 



20022 

90095 

55060 

60065 

4.7506.50 

3.7504.25 

2.5008.50 

3.2503.50 

1.6501.75 

1.5501.60 




650— 





10010% 

50— 
50065 
42047 
16017 
405 
11012 

8%04 



9%ge% 

23024 

9001.00 

65070 

70075 

4.7506.50 

8.5004.00 

2.0002.75 

8.7504.00 

1.4501.55 

1.3501.45 

1.42%01.45 



-1918- 



-1918- 



Dec. 81. 




85040 
12018 
22023 
65070 



18014 
21022 
16018 

45048 

46048 

25026 

80- 

22023 

608 

804 



Dec. 31. 

75080 
909% 

9*0- 

9%09% 
20029 
1.2501.30 
Nominal 
Nominal 
4.5006.00 
3.0003.25 
2.2503.00 
3.0003.25 
1.500— 
1.400— 
1.460— 



Berries. 



1914. 
Aug. 

Cubeb, ordinary lb. 38040 

XX 42044 

powdered 42044 

Fish (cocculus indicus) lb. 3%04 

Horse nettle, dry lb. 11%012 

Juniper lb. 3%©4 

Laurel lb. 506 

Prickly ash lb. 25030 

Saw palmetto lb. 9010 

Sloe lb. . 10017 



1915. 

Jan. 

47050 

52%055 

50060 



12012% 

3%#4 

15017 

809 

40050 



1916. 
Jan. 
42%045 
47%05O 
45(3*0 
4%05 
12>?@13 
404% 
506 
13014 
809 
46048 



Flowers. 



1014. 
Aug. 

Arnica lb. 12012% 

Borage lb. Nominal 

Calendula petals lb. 40043 

Chamomile, Roman lb. 15&16 

Hungarian, true 350 — 

Hungarian style Not quoted prior 

Italian Not quoted prior 

Clover topa lb. 809 

Elder lb. 11013 

Insect, open lb. 18020 

closed 32034 

powdered, flowers and stems ' 14016 

powdered, flowers 22040 

Kousso lb. Nominal 

Lavender, ordinary lb. 20022 

select 28031 

Linden, with leaves lb. 350— 

without leaves Not quoted prior 

Mai va, blue lb. Nominal 

black Not quoted prior 

Mullein lb. Nominal 

Orange ...lb. Nominal 

Poppy, red lb. 40045 

Rosemary lb. Not quoted prior 

Saffron, American lb. 44047 

Valencia 11.50011.75 



1915. 

Jan. 

16%017% 

0501.00 

55060 

450— 

28030 
to 1916. 
to 1916. 

10012 

16017 

22024 

32^34 

24026 

28040 

50055 

21023 
S2%035 

40050 
to 1918. 

500— 
to 1918. 
1.600— 
1.000— 

850— 
to 1918. 

35038 
11.75012.00 



1916. 

Jan. 
84036 
1.0001.05 
45060 
30032 
60065 

45048 
14016 
16018 
500— 
550— 
26028 
40045 
55060 
16018 
20022 
40050 

1.500— 

2.500— 

1.000— 

40045 

1.250— 
11.15011.50 



1917. 
Jan. 
42%045 
47%05O 
45050 
4%05 
12%013 
505% 
506 
12014 

608 
70075 



1917. 
Jan. 
1.2001.50 

80090 

1.000— 

48050 

50060 

35040 

24030 

25030 

500— 

550— 

22030 

40043 

55060 

16018 

22(330 

85040 

1.2001.25 

8.000— 

1.000— 

50055 

75080 
11.40011.50 



t X 

Jan. 


WAD —» 

Dec. 31. 


950— 


1.3001.85 


1.1001.15 


1.3501.40 


1.0001.10 


1.3501.40 


1O%011 


65070 


35036 


65067 


6%07 
809 


809 


12013 


11013 
160— 


12013 


13015 


1.500— 


35036 



, 0.1 

Jan. 


WAD —> 

Dec. 31. 


1.700— 


75080 


55060 


55060 


8.7504.00 


1.0002.50 


1.1501.50 
55060 


85087 


Nominal 


45050 


50052 


45050 


45050 
13014 


32036 


30035 


82ra33 


28030 


32033 


34 (a 35 


44045 


80035 


86038 


40050 


38039 


55060 


Nominal 


10018 


25026 


25030 
36040 


80035 


85037 


50060 


' 630(14 


4.250— 
55060 


2.5002.60 


39040 


3.000— 


1.8001.90 


1.250— 


2.000— 


1.0001.25 


1.15^/1.25 


50055 


7W75 


48GT52 


40042 


11.50012.00 


15.00ft 16.00 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



23 



Herbs and Leaves. 



Aconite lb. 

Bay, true lb. 

Boneset herb lb. 

Buchu, short , lb. 

long 

Belladonna lb. 

Cannabis indica, Imported lb. 

domestic, U. S. P 

Chlretta lb. 

Coca, Huanoco .lb. 

Coltsfoot N . lb. 

Conlum * . .lb. 

Corn silk lb. 

Damlana lb. 

Deer tongue lb. 

Digitalis, domestic lb. 

foreign 

Eucalyptus lb. 

Euphorbia pillufera lb. 

Grindella robusta lb. 

Henbane. German lb. 

Russian 

Henna 1 lb. 

Horehound lb. 

Jaborandi lb. 

Laurel lb. 

Liverwort , lb. 

Lobelia / lb. 

Matico lb. 

Marjoram, French lb. 

German 

Pennyroyal leaves lb. 

Peppermint, American lb. 

German 

Plchi lb. 

Pulsatilla lb. 

Princess pine lb. 

Rose, red lb. 

Rosemary lb. 

Rue lb. 

Sage, Austrian, stemless lb. 

fair grinding 

domestic 

Greek 

Spanish, stemless 

Savory lb. 

Skull cap, leaves lb. 

Senna, Alex., whole leaf lb. 

half leaf 

siftings 

powdered 

Tinnevelly 

powdered 

pods 

Spearmint, American lb. 

Stramonium lb. 

Thyme, Spanish lb. 

French 

Uva ursl lb. 

Wltchhasel lb. 

Wormwood, foreign lb. 

Yerba santa lb. 

Sidrltis, cut lb. 

Tansy lb. 

Squaw vine lb. 

Thyme lb. 



1014. 

Aug. 
708 

10® 15 
Nominal 
1.40© 1.45 
1.8001.85 

50055 
1.5501.65 
Not quoted prior 

14016 

250- 

606% 
»% 



7%08 

Not quoted prior 

7%08% 



1915. 
\ Jan. 
7010 
Nominal 

596 
1.4501.50 
1.3001.86 
L5O0— 
1.60&1.70 
to 1918. 
180- 
85040 
20 
11 





9%01O 

25080 

10010*4 

18021 

405 




1.71 
8i 
8W 
404% 
808% 
Not quoted 
Not quoted 
Not quoted 
8%§4% 
20022 
35038 
30083 
18016 
Not quoted 

6011 
Not quoted 
506 
15025 
7%08% 
Not quoted 
Not quoted 
3%04 
505% 
7% 



prior 
prior 
prior 



prior 
prior 



prior 
prior 



Nominal 
Nominal 

809 
4%05 



135 
15020 
14015 

9010 
18020 

5f5tt 

708 

200— 

12%012% 

28041 

405 

12014 

42045 

11012 

Nominal 

8010 
1.7502.00 
4%©5 
40050 
12%013 
11%011% 
to 1918. 
to 1916. 
to 1916. 
9*010 
22022% 
50« 
40< 
22< 
to 1911 

9012 
to 1918. 
8010 
20025 
16%018 
to 1918. 
to 1918. 
5%06 
405 
5%06 
6%07 
14016 
8010 
1P012 
6%07 








12014 
85040 

3.000— 

5%0- 
40050 
50055 
39042 

12%018 

10%Sll 

2OH021 

22022% 

45050 

19020 

20025 

12014 
18020 
22028 






520 




17027 




19020 

7%©6% 

14016 

8010 

11018 

1O%011 




» 



86 

10012 
7.000- 

10012 
1.2501.85 
12%0- 

40050 
Nominal 
Nominal 




220— 
8%09% 
12%013 

5V 

6%07 
25035 
6%07% 
335 
8*09% 
Nominal 
8%012% 



-1918- 



Dec. 81. 

45050 
Nominal 

18019 
2.6002.75 
2.6002.75 

750L6O 
2.5003.60 

ro 



Nominal 





a 10 
1.50 
1.10 
80035 
22023 
37038 
11012 
85086 
12013 
85036 
Nominal 
Nominal 
18019 
25080 
Nominal 
10011 
8.2504.00 

KS0 

1.2501.85 

14016 

>50 

Nominal 

Nominal 




14015 
24025 
11014 



Roots. 



1914. 
Aug. 

Aconite, U. S. P lb. 11012 

Aletris lb. 26030 

Alkanet lb. 606% 

Althea, whole lb. 16018 . 

cut 22024 

Angelica, European lb. 18020 

American 15016 

Arnica, Montana lb. 40045 

Arrowroot, Bermuda lb. 45050 

St Vincent, bbls 809 

Belladonna, atropa .lb. 10011 

Berberis aquifolium lb. 11012 

Beth lb. Nominal 

Bitter lb. 24028 

Blood lb. 909% 

Blueflag lb. 13015 

Bryonia lb. 120— 

Burdock lb. 708 

•Calamus, bleached lb. 23025 

ordinary 9010 

Cohash, black lb. 404% 

blue 506 

•Colchlcum lb. 11012 

Colombo lb. 607 

powdered 405 

Culvers lb. 14017 

Dandelion, German lb. 1O%011 

domestic Not quoted 

Doggrass, IT. S. P., cut lb. 6%07 

Echinacea lb. 22024 

Elecampane lb. 3%0J 

Galangal lb. 809 

Geranium lb. 405 

Gelsemlum lb. 506 

Gentian, whole lb. 6%06% 

Ginger. (See Spice Market.) 

Ginseng, wild, southern lb. 6.0006.25 

northwestern 6.2507.00 

eastern 6.2507.00 

cultivated 5.0005.50 

Golden seal lb. 4.5004.75 

powdered 5.1505.25 

Hellebore, white, Imported lb. 9010 

black 606J4 

domestic, white Not quoted 

powdered, white 10011 

Ipecac, Cartagena, whole lb. 1.42%01.45 

powdered * Not quoted 

Rio. whole lb. 2.0002.10 

powdered Not quoted 

Jalap lb. 21018 

Kava kava lb. 18020 

Lady slipper lb. 24025 




10012 

7%01O 

400— 

14015 

505% 

506 

15016 

608 

405 

14016 

20025 

prior to 1918. 

15018 

17018 

7%08 

35038 

506 
7%08% 

7.0007.25 

7.2507.50 

7.0007.25 

5.0005.50 

4.2004.80 

4.5504.60 

—010 

608 

prior to 1918. 

12013 
1.9502.00 
prior to 1918. 

Nominal 

prior to 1918. 

10011 

24025 

2402P 



1916. 

Jan. 
18020 
21028 




42045 




7.0007.25 
7.2507.50 




20025 
8.2503.50 

4.000- 

8%09% 
18020 
33035 




8( 

80065 
j>60 
J52 
7< 
2.7505.00 
12013 
15020 
22024 
11012 
12014 
»50 
21023 
2.5008.50 
25026 
4%05 
4%05 
2.0002.10 
12012% 
11012 
11012 
30032 

1.4501.50 




6.2506.50 
6.5006.75 
6.2506.50 
4.2505.50 
5.0005.10 
5.5005.75 
40045 
35040 

20023 
2.2502.50 

8.0008.25 

12013 
20022 
38040 



Jan. 

45050 

38038 

2.0002.50 

40045 




2.5002.75 
22025 
24025 
14016 




10011 
14017% 




L.00 
98024 

20028 
3.1003.25 

8.1003.15 



-1918- 



Dec. 81. 
H5 
p63 
3.0003.50 
87088 
P82 




J21 
35086 
17020 
12014 
14015 

1.5002.00 
24026 
24025 
19020 

Nominal 
27028 

87038 
12« 





7.50012.00 

12.00015.00 

14.00016.00 

2.5009.00 

5.2505.80 

5.8006.00 

Nominal 

Nominal 

22028 

24025 

4.2504.50 

4.5004.75 

4.0004.50 

4.5004.75 

19020 

85090 



24 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



1914. 1913. 

Aug. * Jan. 

Licorice. Spanish, in bales lb. 4%05% 507 

•elected Hgii 12014 

powdered Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Russian and peeled Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Lovage, American lb. 80050 35038 

German 22625 Nominal 

Manaca lb. 60070 60070 

Mandrake lb. 11013 8010 

Musk, Russian lb. 12013 40042 

Orris, Florentine, whole lb. 19020 17019 

powdered Not quoted prior to 1918. 

small 17018 14015 

Verona 14015 12018 

Angers .............. 750— — 0— 

Pareira brava lb. 14016 20022 

Petitory lb. 20022 20022 

Pink, true lb. 65075 40050 

Pleurisy lb. 15016 14020 

Poke lb. 5%06 708 

Rhatany lb. 11912 10012 

Rhubarb, Shensl lb. 800— 800— 

high dried 15016 17019 

cuts 19020 19020 

Sarsaparilla, Honduras lb. 63070 48050 

Mexican 80032 10012 

Scammony root lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Senega, Northwestern lb. 50060 38040 

Southern 600— 45050 

Serpentarla lb. 42044 38042 

Skunk cabbage lb. 10012 10012 

Snake, Canada lb. 14080 20022 

Spikenard lb. 10012 10012 

Squills, white lb. 4%04% 4*05% 

powdered Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Stlllingia lb. 607 5%06 

Stone lb. 607 607 

Turmeric. (See Naturfd Dyestuffs.) 

Unicorn, false (helonias) lb. 50055 9001.00 

true (aletris) 26030 38040 

Valerian, Belgian lb. 707% 11%012 

English 25080 70075 

Wild yam lb. 606% 606% 

Yellow dock lb. 607 708 

Zodeary lb. 4%05 5010 



1916. 

Jan. 
12018 
15016 




12H018 

11%012% 

1.5001.60 





506 
607 




1917. 

Jan. 
16018 
25026 



50055 
80035 
28025 
7%08 
2.7508.00 
16017 

14015 

12014 

1.5001.75 



Jan. 



-1918- 





85037 
19021 





14015 



22< 



>12 



85045 

88038 

1.1001.15 

Nominal 

606% 

12014 

400- 




Nominal 





50055 

60063 

1.650— 

Nominal 

809 

12013 

400- 



Seeds. 



1914. 
Aug. 

Anise, Spanish lb. 10010% 

star, actual weight 19%019% 

Levant Not quoted prior 

Italian 12012% 

Canary, Spanish lb. Nominal 

Smyrna 606% 

South American 606% 

Dutch Nominal 

Caraway, Dutch lb. 808% 

'African Not quoted prior 

Cardamoms, bleached lb. 1.8001.75 

decorticated 1.1601.80 

Celery lb. 17%018 

Colchicum .., lb. 20021 

Comlum lb. 9010 

Coriander, natural lb. 4%o5 

bleached 606 

Cummin, Malta lb. 10011 

Levant Not quoted prior 

Morocco Not quoted prior 

Dill lb. 7%08 

Fennel, French lb. Nominal 

German, large 10012 

small 808% 

Roumanian Nominal 

Flax, whole, bbls lb. 10.00010.26 

ground Not quoted prior 

Foenugreek lb. 308% 

Hemp, Manchuria lb. 2%ti)3 

Russian 2%03 

Job's tears lb. Nominal 

Larkspur .....lb. 25030 

Lobelia lb. 25027 

Millet, natural lb. 1%02% 

hulled 4%04% 

Mustard, Barl, brown lb. 606% 

California, brown 505% 

Sicily, brown 5%06% 

Trieste, brown 606% 

Bombay Not quoted prior 

English, yellow 606% 

Dutch, yellow Not quoted prior 

Parsley lb. 20021 

Poppy, Dutch lb. 6%06% 

India Not quoted prior 

Russian Not quoted prior 

Pumpkin lb 12015 

Quince lb. 60070 

Rape, English lb. 5*06% 

Bulgarian * Not quoted prior 

Japanese, large Not quoted prior 

Sabadllla lb. 15016 

Staveacre lb. 1O%011 

Stramonium lb. 808% 

Strophantus, Kombe lb. 40042 

Hispldus 88040 

Sunflower, large lb. 404% 

small 8%04 

"Worm, Levant lb. 36088 

American 9%01O 



1915. 
Jan. 
11%012 
2O%021 
to 1916. 
Nominal 
6%07 
7%08 
6%07 

606% 

8*09% 

to 1918. 

1.3001.50 

1.1501.25 

14015 




4% 
18% 
to 191 
to 1918. 



14% 




250— 

18%014 

to 1917. 

to 1917. 

12015 

"0 

tolOlf 
to 1916. 
22024 





1916. 
Jan. 
12*018% 

27030 

11011% 

Nominal 

5%06% 

5*07 

4*05% 

4%06 
12%018 

8501.40 

75080 

30081 

9501.00 
10015 

4%04% 
23024 



6%06% 
12013 

'16020 
15017 
8.5008.75 • 




22fl 

_T% 

6%07 
11%012 

12012% 
12%013 

Nominal 

18%014 
18%013% 

21022 
24%025 



Jll% 
70075 
909% 
8*09% 
61 _ 
>21 




1917. 

Jan. 

21%022 

23024 

18019 

21022 
5%06 
7%08 
6%05% 
5%06 
51053 

8001.35 
65070 
18%019 
1.6501.75 

18020 
15%016 
16%017 
21%022 



20021 
16018 



220— 

18020 

11.00011.50 

7%0S 
6%07 

6 HTo 

28025 
22024 
3%08% 
7%07* 

12%012% 
14%014% 
Nominal 

18%014 
18%014 
21022 
4CT 

!8 
35038 
11011% 
75080 




Jan. 
28%024 
31%032% 
Nominal 
Nominal 
8%0- 
Nominal 

Nominal 

8 §1P 50 

27%028 
8.7504.00 

45060 
15*016 
17017% 



-1918- 




1701? 

16016% 

17018 

17018 

14%016 

16%017 

16%017 

Nominal 
89040 
65068 
12018 
85095 
12014 
11012 

1O%011 
16019 
25( 




Dec. 31. 

24025 

24025 
Nominal 
Nominal 

17019 
Nominal 

15017 
Nominal 
Nominal 

52053 
>1.50 

m 

55056 

8.5003.73 

85040 

11%012 
Nominal 
Nominal 
11%012 

16017 

16017 

Nominal 

Nominal 

16%017 

20.00021.00 

11012 

7*08 
Nominal 




»%09% 

Nominal 

30081 

Nominal 

Nominal 

24025 

40041 

Nominal 

24025 

Nominal 

36037 

70071 

14018 

1.2001.25 

Nominal 

Nominal 

909% 




British Seed Market. 



Anise, Spanish .....cwt. 

Russian cwt. 

Canary, Morocco qr. 

Caraway, Dutch cwt. 

Celery owt. 

Coriander cwt. 

Cumin cwt. 

Dill cwt. 

Fennel cwt. 

Fenugreek cwt. 

Unseed, Calcutta qt. 



August, 


1914. 


£ 


s. 


d. 





85 








26 


6 





96 








80 








75 








12 








46 








12 


6 





26 








9 


8 





52 






Jan.. 1916. 


£ 


8. d. 





45 




None 





83 





57 6 





90 





17 





87 6 





28 





28 6 





11 6 





74 



Jan.. 1917. 


£ 


8. 


d. 





90 
None 








82 








125 








125 








57 


6 





87 


6 





28 








32 


6 





34 








110 






Jan., 1918. 

£ s. d. 

None j 

80 

180 

None 

145 • 

69 

75 

59 

57 6 

56 
£80 ton 



Dec. 81. 1918. 



£ 



80 

800 















82 
55 


52 
24 
Fixed. 



d. 





6 


6 
6 







1 

A 
IS 

Ma 

184 
11W 


14. 












quoted yrloc 




















































!K 










OIejit. CocblD. "A., it. C".. 


..-.lb. 
































*£-* 


















Nut':.-*.. ..:,, (o UO* 


....lb 


i 
































!!!* 










111* 










§ 















OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 

Spices. 




26 



| 1918 YEAR BOOK 



1914. 1315. 

Aug. Jan. 

Castor oil, A. A., bbls lb. 8%08% 8%08% 

cases 909% 909% 

No. 8 barrels 808% 8%4ft8% / 

Chloroform, U. S. P lb. 21026 80085 ' 

Cerium lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Chalk, precipitated, light, casks... lb. 404% 4%05% 

heavy 803% 3%05 

Charcoal, willow, pwd lb. Nominal 405 

Chloral hydrate lb. 81048 65000 

Chlorine, liquid lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Chrysarobln lb. Not quoted prior to 1917. 

Citrates, iron, U. S. P lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

iron and amnion., U. S. P Not quoted prior to 1918. 

green scales Not quoted prior to 1918. 

iron and ammon., B. S Not quoted prior to 1918. 

iron phosphate Not quoted prior to 1918. 

iron pyrophosphates Not quoted prior to 1918. 

iron strychnine Not quoted prior to 1918. 

potash Not quoted prior to 1918. 

soda, 8th revision Not quoted prior to 1918. 

9th revision Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Civet lb. 1.5002.00 2.0002.25 

Cocaine, hydrochloride, granular and 

flakes 6s. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

large crystals 2.6008.10 4.0004.25 

Cocoa butter, bulk lb. 33%035 82035 

fingers 31%083 28029 

Codeine, sulphate, 100-oz. lots ox. 5.5005.65 6.4506.50 

phosphate 5.2505.40 \ 5.8505.90 

nitrate 5.5005.65 6.4506.50 

hydrobromide 5.5005.65 0.4506.50 

alkaloid 5.7505.90 6.4506.50 

acetate 5.5005.65 6.4506.50 

muriate (hydrochloride) 5.5005.65 6.4506.50 

salicylate 5.2505.40 5.8505.90 

Cod liver oil, Newfoundland bbL 62.50065.00 — 4ft— 

Norwegian 16.00020.00 20.50022.00 

Collodion, U. S. P lb. Nominal Nominal 

flex., U. S. P Nominal Nominal 

Corn syrup, 42 deg cwt. 2.160— 2.214ft— 

. 48 deg 2.260— 2.810— 

) sugar, brewers' 2.100— 2.250— 

' Cotton, soluble lb. 8001.00 8001.00 

Coumarin lb. 8.1003.35 3.2003.50 

Cream of tartar, crystals lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Cresol. U. S. P lb. Nominal 1.0001.50 

Creosote, U. S. P lb. 58055 70075 

carbonate Not quoted prior to 1917. 

wood • 53056 70075 

Cuttlefish, Trieste lb. 14%©15 22026 

French 12%018 20022 

Jewelers', large 70075 74%075 

small 50052 50055 

Cyanide, chloride, mixture lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Dover's powder lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Emetine, alk., 15 gr. vials lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Epsom salt, tech ..cwt. 1011-10 1%©2 

U. S. P Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Ether, U. S. P., 1900 lb. 18024 15020 

washed 18027 18027 

U. S. P.. 1880 22028 22028 

nitrous, concentrated, 1 to 21 Not quoted prior to 1916. 

acetic, 95 per cent. , carboys Not quoted prior to 1916. 

U. S. P., 8th and 7th Not quoted prior to 1916. 

Eucalyptol lb. 75080 65070 

• Formaldehyde, gov. price, f. o. b...lb. 8%4ft9% 8%4ft9% 

Fusel oil, crude gal. 1.1001.15 2.2002.30 

refined 1.GO01.65 2.6002.75 

Gelatine, silver lb. 26029 85040 

gold 85037 40042 

Glycerine, C. P., in bulk lb. 1O%0— 22022% 

C. P.. candle, crude 14%015 16016% 

C. P., In cans 20*0— 23028% 

dynamite, drums Included 19019%/ 21022)* 

SO deg., yellow, distilled 19019% 21022% 

soaplye, loose 13013% 14%016 

saponification, loose 1434015 16016% 

Glycerophosphate, calcium lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

soda, crystals ' Not quoted prior to 1918. 

soda, liquor, 75 per cent Not quoted prior to 1018. 

potash, liquor. 75 per cent Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Gualacol, liquid lb. 1.7001.80 2.300— 

Haarlem, gross bottles lb. 1.6501.70 2.3002.35 

Hexamethylene-tetramlne lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Honey, California lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Hydrogen peroxide, per gross bots. 4.0009.00 6.00016.00 

Hydroquinone lb. Nominal Nominal 

Hypophosphite, calcium lb. 52064 77079 

manganese Not quoted prior to 1918. 

iron Not quoted prior to 1918. 

potash 57069 92094 

soda 57059 82084 

Ichthyol lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Iodine, ammonium lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

arsenous Not quoted prior to 1918. 

arsenous and mercuric solution. . .... Not quoted prior to 1918. 

barium Not quoted prior to 1918. 

bismuth sublodide Not quoted prior to 1918. 

cadium Not quoted prior to 1918. 

copper Not quoted prior to 1918. 

ethyl Not quoted prior to 1918. 

iodoform Not quoted prior to 1918. 

iron Not quoted prior to 1918. 

iron iodide syrup Not quoted prior to 1918. 

lead Not quoted prior to 1918. 

lithium Not quoted prior to 1918. 

magnesium Not quoted prior to 1918. 

manganese Not quoted prior to 1918. 

mercury, green and yellow Not quoted prior to 191b. 

red Not quoted prior to 1918. 

potassium 2.9503.00 3.1508.20 

resubllmated iodine 8. 5503. 60 8. 7503. 80 

sodium Nominal 8.5003.65 

starch Not quoted prior to 1918. 

strontium Not quoted prior to 1918. 

sulphur Not quoted prior to 1918. 

thymol Not quoted prior to 1918. 

25 oss., one delivery Not quoted prior to 1918. 

sine Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Iodoform lb. 4.0004.05 4.2004.25 

Ketone, ethyl methyl gal. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Lac, sulphur, domestic lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

foreign Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Lanollne, hydrous, U. S. P lb. Nominal Nominal 

anhydrous Nominal Nominal 

Licorice, powder, compound, U. S. P. 16%02O 16018 
Spanish licorice in powdered form was quoted early 1917, when it 

extract Not quoted prior to 1918. 

stick, Corigliano 24025 23025 



1916. 

Jan. 

16016% 

16%4ftl6 

14%4ftl5% 

60065 

4%05% 



8%05 
506 
1.8702.10 



2.0002.25 



3.5008.75 
88088% 
88040 
6.5508.60 
6.350— 
7.500— 
0.5508.60 
8.5008.60 

7.'5O0— 
6.350— 
62.50066.00 
78.00085.00 
80032 
35040 
2.f 
2. 

2.: 

.00 
7.0007.60 

1.1501.26 
8.000— 

8.000— 
82086 

18%019 
70075 
500— 



8%04% 

15020 
18027 
22* 





754 
52%4_ 

42043 
68%056 

45056 




13.750— 
2.0002.10 



8.00024.00 

6.0006.08 

77079 



92094 
82084 



3.7003.75 
4.2504.80 
3.5003.56 



4.6004.66 




1.28%< 
6.2506.50 



2.0002.25 




1.00 
11.26 



1.3601.50 

2.0002.25 

7.5008.50 

2.0002.25 

26028 

26028 

65070 

520— 



1.7501.85 

15020 
18027 
22028 
484 
194_ 
50062 
1.0001.10 
12012% 




15.00016.00 
3.0003.25 



0.50018.00 

2.0002.25 

77079 



1.504ft— 
82084 



8.5403.60 
4.2504.80 
3.5008.65 



6.0005.06 



1.0001.05 35040 

1.4001.45 52055 

12014 210— 

replaced with Syrian goods. 



Jan. 

26027 
27%0- 
25*026% 

684 



-1918- 




9.4 
9.254 

22< 

294 
8.1 
8.3( 
9.95( 
8.854 
11.054 
9.96< 
9.954 
8.801 
76.004 
136. 

454 

7( 
5.64( 
5.74< 
6.7( 

71 
24.4 

544 

194_ 
1.9002.00 
26.00028.00 
Nominal 

40( 

401 
1.8001.85 
1.1501.20 

32035 

2.8503.06 

2.7503.00 

3.37%03.5O 

8.62%03.9O 

27C 




4.500— 

5.2505.85 

1.4501.50 

680— 
67%©69 
Nominal 

69070 

64065 

674ft— 
44%045% 
48%©49% 

1.7001.75 
2.5502.60 
1.3501.40 
2.1502.20 
15.00016.00 
7.0008.50 
1.000— 

22026 
7.50020.00 
2.0002.10 
1.0001.06 
2.0002.10 
2.0002.10 
2.1502.20 
1.1001.15 
30.00036.00 
4.1504.20 
6.000— 

200— 
5.250— 
5.300— 
4.400— 
4.950— 
5.250— 
5.0005.05 
4.050— 

81032 
2.954ft- 
4.800— 
4.850— 
4.850— 
4.1004.15 
4.2004.26 
8.7503.80 
4.2504.80 
3.9003.95 
2.000— 
8.5003.56 
3.750— 
16.55016.65 
1.0801.12 
4.000— 

5.000— 





.25 




10.00010.15 
10.00010.15 
8.8508.50 
96.00097.00 
186.000160.00 
41045 
65070 
8.984ft— 
4.080— 
4.260— 
7901.00 
18.75014.50 
69069% 
18024 
2.0002.10 
26.00028.00 
Nominal 
65070 
65070 
1)5001.75 
1.5001.75 




82038 

244926 

1.1001.11 




1. 

1.1 

16%0— 

2.50&2.60 

4.2504.50 

1.2501.80 

Nominal 

20021 
Nominal 
22023 
17018 
f%018 



17 



94 
114 



)10 
)12 



25032 



30048 



25030 



2 
55 



1.8001.90 
2.2002.80 
1.2001.80 
1.7501.80 
18.00019.00 
4.5007.50 
1.054? 1.10 

26028 
7.2500.25 
2.5002.85 
1.0001.05 
2.0002.10 
2.0002.10 
2.1502.20 
1.1001.15 
Nominal 
4.1504.20 
5.000— 

200— 
6.250— 
5.6005.65 
4.400— 
4.950— 
5.250— 
5.0005.06- 
4.050— 

81032 
2.950— 
4.800— 
4.850— 
4.850— 
4.1004.15 
4.2004.25 
8.5003.56 
4.2504.80 
3.0003.95 
2.000- 
8.5003.65 
8.754ft- 
15.90016.00 
1.0801.12 
4.000— 

4.9005.00 
20020% 

9010 
89040 
35036 
45046 
25080 

904ft- 
82%08& 



/ 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



27 



1914. 1915. \ 

. . ^ . . Aug. Jan. \ 

Lithium, carbonate..-. lb. 65070 1.0001.10 

citrate Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Magnesia, carb., U. S. P., barrels.. lb. 5ft06 4ft05ft 

technical, barrels Not quoted prior to 1918. 

calcium Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Manganese, glyoerophos lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

peroxide j Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Mentfcol , lb. 2.9508.00 2.5002.00 

Mercurials: — , 

calomel lb. 60006 80090 

corrosive sublimate 51061 81066 

mercury bisulphate 42046 72074 

red precipitate 75080 1.0001.10 

white precipitate 75080 1.0501.10 

blue mass, U. 8. P , 40045 57058 

mercury and chalk Nominal Nominal 

mercurial ointment, 38ft per cent... 85036 520— 

mercurial ointment, 50 per cent 45046 620— 

citrine ointment Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Methyl acetone lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

salicylate, U. S. P Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Methylene blue, medicinal lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Milk powder 11018 12014 

Morphine, 25-oz. lots, acetate oz. 5.800— 5.65©— 

alkaloid Not quoted prior to 1918. 

diacetyl hydrochloride 5.5005.90 5.9506.80 

diacetyl alkaloid Not quoted prior to 1918. 

ethyl hydrochloride 0.4506.55 7.1507.85 

hydrochloride \ . .. . 5.800— 5.550— 

sulphate, 25-oz. lots 4.950— 5.000— 

Musk, pods, Cab lb. 8.0008.50 8.0008.60 

Tonquin 13.00015.00 18.00015.00 

grain. Cab 12.00015.00 12.00015.00 

Tonquin 16.00019.00 16.00019.00 

druggists' „ 16.00016.50 16.00016.50 

synthetic 1.7503.00 4.0005.00 

Myrbane oil, refined, drums lb. 6ft0? 15017 

Naphthaline. (See Coal-Tar Bases.) 

Nitrate of silver oz. 83%085% 31ft0S8ft 

Olive oil, yellow gal. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

green Not quoted prior to 1918. 

edible Nominal 1.1001.15 

Opium, cases, U. S. P lb. 7.7007.75- 8.900— 

Jobbing lots 7.7507.80 8.950— 

powdered 8.6508.75 10.500— 

granular 8.7508.85 11.000— 

Orthoform oz. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Oxgall, U. S. P lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Petrolatum, bbls., amber lb. 803ft 303ft 

cream white 4%06 4%06 

lily white 709 709 

pale, yellow Not quoted prior to 1918. 

snow white 10ft 11 10011 

Phenolphthaleln lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Phosphorus, yellow lb. 450— 350— 

red 1.000— 1.000— 

Pilocarpine oz. 4.0005.00 4.0005.00 

Podophylin, U. S. P lb. Nominal 2.9503.00 

Potash, permanganate lb. 9^010 14015 

acetate Not quoted prior /to 1916. 

bicarbonate Nominal 25026 

citrate, bulk Nominal 69070 

cyanide, U. S. P 19022 Nominal 

Quicksilver, per flask (75 lbs.) Not quoted prior to 1916. 

jobbing lots lb. 52054 80085 

Quinine, sulp. and bisulp., 100-oz. 

tins oz. 260— 260— 

50-oz. tins 26ft©- 26ft0— 

25-oz. tins 270— 270— 

5-oz. tins 280— 280— 

1-oz. tins 310— 310— 

second hands, American 25026 200 — 

Java 25026 254026 

cinchonine, alkaloid 80— 254^26 

sulphate 70— 130— 

cinchonidine, alkaloid 180- 240— 

sulphate • 160— ' 160— 

Resorcin, crystals, U. S. P lb. 80085 1.1001.15 

Rhodol lb. Nominal Nominal 

Rochelle salts, powdered lb. 174018 200— 

crystals 18018ft 20ft©— 

Rose water, triple, demj. (Oft gals.)... 6.500— 6.500— 

Russian white paraffin oil, medicinal, 

8860890 deg gal. 30045 Nominal 

8700875 deg Not quoted prior to 1918. 

American, medicinal Not quoted prior to 1918. 

American, cold cream Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Saccharin, soluble lb. 1.1501.20 2.8503.00 

Salacine, bulk lb. 8.7508.85 4.2504.50 

Salol, manufacturers' prices lb. 55057ft 1.0001.05 

second hands Nominal Nominal 

Santonin, crystals, bulk lb. 29.70030.00 40.00042.00 

powdered 80.20030.60 42.00044.00 

Seidlits mixture lb. 14014ft 164017ft 

Soda, benzoate, U. S. P lb. 23%® 24 50055 

cyanide Nominal Nominal 

nitrite, technical 5ft05ft 25028 

U. S. P Not quoted prior to 1916. 

salicylate 27028 65070 

sulphocarbolate Not quoted prior to 1917. 

Strontium, carbonate, tech lb. Not quoted prior to 1018. 

pure Not quoted prior to 1918. 

nitrate 7ft©8 15017 

Strychnine and salts. 100-oz. lots:— 

alkaloid, crystals, bulk os. Not quoted prior to 1917. 

alkaloid, powder, bulk Not quoted prior to 1917. 

sulphate, cryst. and powd., bulk.... 46056 40046 

acetate, bulk Not quoted prior to 1918. 

nitrate, bulk, oz Not quoted prior to 1918. 

phosphate, bulk, oz Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Sugar coloring (caramel), bbls. . . .gal. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Sugar of milk, powdered lb. 12018 15016 < 

Sulfonal, 100-oz. lots Nominal 5001.15 

Sulphur, precipitated, U. S. P lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Sulphomethane lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Sulphomethylmethane, U. S. P lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Sulphur, roll or brimstone cwt. 1.8502.15 1.8502.15 

refined flour 2.0002.40 2.0002.40 

flowers, sublimed 2.2002.60 2.2002.60 

Tartar emetic, tech., casks lb. 22ft023 35040 

U. S. P Nominal Nominal 

Theobromine, alkaloid lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Terpineol, cp Nominal 35045 

Terpinhydrate lb. Not quoted prior to 1917. 

ThymoL lb.. 2.7508.00 6.5007.00 

iodide os. Nominal 1.0001.55 

Toluol (see also Coal -Tar In termed i- 

diates), 90 per cent gal. Nominal Nominal 

Trkmal os. Nominal 5001.30 

Vanillin '• os. 33034 84036 



1916. 

Jan. 

9001.00 

14015 



3.2503.80 

1.6101.62 

1.580- 

1.8901.40 

1.7401.84 

1.8401.89 

81088 

88084 

89090 

9901.00 



12014 
6.950— 

5.9506.80 

7.154 

8.954 

5.5005.60 

8.0008.50 
13.00015.00 
12.00015.00 
16.00019.00 
16.00016.50 

8.5009.00 
81035 

34ft036ft 



1.9002.10 
11.00011.25 
11.05011.80 
12.25012.30 
12.50012.60 



8ft04 
5ft05ft 

7407% 

Hft011% 

350— 
1.000— 





Nominal 



140.000150.00 
1.8501.90 

750- 

7540- 

760— 

770- 

800— 
1.0501.15 
1.0501.10 

180— 

100— 

99<fr— 

50©— 
6.0008.00 
6.5006.75 
294030 

30030ft 
7.500— 

Nominal 




22023 



70078 



14015 
5001.15 



1.8502.15 
2.0002.40 
2.2002.60 

47047ft 

35054 

5001.00 

12.00014.90 
01062 

4.7505.00 
6001.80 
57060 



1917. 
Jan. 
1.0201.00 

20028 



8.2008.40 



Jan. 



-1918- 




18016 
7.0007.80 

7.9508.20 




46%048% 




8%04ft 
606ft 
808ft 

llft012ft 

800— 
1.000— 
18.00020.00 
2.7002.80 
2.7508.00 , 
1.2501.26 
1.4001.00 
1.500— 
2.2502.80 

80.00082.00 
1.0501.10 




55060 

55060 

234 

15d 

59080 

35000 

22.00020.00 

6.5006.75 

600— 
6040- 
7.500— 

2.5003.00 



20.50021.00 


16,00< 


017.00 


2.501 




2.8& 


©2T50 


86.001 


987.50 


87.004 


988.00 


260— 
8.7509.00 


1.901 


92.00 


184 


021 




924 


1.254 


91.85 



93098 



40040 




32030 
1.2501.50 



1.9502.25 

2.1002.50 

2.8002.70 

55055ft 

61068 






14.00 



).00 
ftO.OO 
>19.00 
>32.00 
P80.00 
513.00 
18020 





2.0502.15 

1.8001.50 

06060 



124 
9.1 
2.14 
1.7( 
18.00020.00 
8.7504.00 
Nominal 
1.500— 
1.2501.50 
1.600- 

60070 

115.000— 
1.8240— 

754 
754« 

76(j 

77< 

800— 

83085 

83088ft 

510— 

350— 

934 

554 
9.50010.10 
6.5006.75 

39039ft 
894040 
7.500— 

8. 
2. 
1.254 

554 
46 254 
19. 00017.00 
1.6501.75 
2.3502.50 
86.50037.60 
87.00038.00 

80030ft 
2. 9503.20 

35040 

40048 

48050 

85090 

65070 

40045 

55060 

25030 

1.450— 

1.350— 

1.1001.20 

1.4501.00 

1.400145 

1.5501.60 

1.0001.10 

46048 

1.2501.50 

40041 

18.00014.00 

15.00016.00 

8.7004.15 

3.8504.40 

4.0504.60 

61061ft 

67069ft 

Nominal 

55060 

17.00018.00 

1.5001.75 

1.9002.00 

1.2501.30 

85089 





18.00015.00 

14 
Nominal 
16.000— 
15.700- 
17.4f 





42.00048.00 
Nominal 
80.000— 
18019 

65ft©66ft 
4.0000.00 
4.0000.00 
7.0009.00 
22.1 
22. 
24.000— 
20.000— 
Nominal 
1.500— 
8409 
808ft 
18014 
7ft©8 
15016 
5.0005.50 
1.8501.40 
1.700— 
16.00020.00 
5.0005.10 
1.8001.40 
1.1001.15 
65070 ' 
1.780— 
60070 

110.000115.00 
1.8001.35 

900— 

910— 

920— 

94< 

984 
1.154 
1.150— 

610— 

350— 
1.060— 

700- 
7.7508.00 
6.5006.75 
46ft047 

47047ft 
11.50012.00 

Nominal 
Nominal 
1.350— 

6501.85 
6.00O10. 50 




05060 
25080 



1. 



1.700— 
1.400— 
1.800— 



1.800- 
1.800— 
1.0501.10 

58063 
1.1501.20 
40041 
18.00014.00 
16.00017.00 
8.200- 
8.850— 
8.550— 
67067ft 
73078ft 
28.000— 
Nominal 
48050 
18.50018.75 
1.2901.88ft 

25080 

1.25#1.85 

80085 



28 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



1914. 1916. 

Aug. Jan. 

Venioe turpentine, art lb. 8%09 10011 

true 28%025 

Witch hasel extract gaL Not quoted prior to 19l£ 



1916. 

Jan. 
12012% 
70075 



1917. 
Jan. 
11012 



8.254 



British 



Acetanlllde .lb. 

Acetic acid, glacial ton 

Acety lsallcy lie acid lb. 

Amldopyrln lb. 

Atropine sulph os. 

Barbltone , .lb. 

Blamuth metal lb. 

Bismuth carb. (2 cwt.) lb. 

Bismuth aubnit. (2 cwt.) lb. 

Borax cwt. 

Boric acid cwt. 

Bromides— 

ammon. J lb. 

potash xtals lb. 

soda lb. 

Caffeine, pure lb. 

Calomel (cwt. lots) lh. 

Camphor, monopoly, B.B cvt. 

Camphor, IBng. ref. bells lb. 

Camphor, Jap. slabs lb. 

Carbolic acid, crude sal. 

40 p. c. xtalB lb. 

Chloral hydrate (duty paid).... lb. 

Chloroform* B. P lb. 

Citric add lb. 

Cocaine hyd os. 

Codeine, pure os. 

Corrosive sub. (1 cwt.) lb. 

Cream of tartar, 98 p. c cwt. 

Eserine gram 

Formaldehyde, 40 p. c cwt. 

Glycerin, c. p ton 

Ouaiacol carb ..lb. 

Hexamine .lb. 

Hydroquinone lb. 

Iodine, crude os. 

resub lb. 

Iodoform lb. 

Llthia carbonate lb. 

Llthla citrate lb. 

Menthol lb. 

Methyl salicylate lb. 

Milk sugar cwt. 

Morphine hydrochlor. os. 

Paraldehyde lb. 

Phenacetin lb. 

Phenasone lb. 

Phenolphthaleln lb. 

Potash Iodide cwt. 

Potash permanganate cwt. 

Pyrogallic acid, resub lb. 

Quinine sulphate os. 

Reaorcin lb. 

Saccharin (duty paid) lb. 

Salicylic acid lb. 

§alol lb. 

Santonin lb. 

Soda salicylate lb. 

Strychnine os, 

Sulphonal lb. 

Tartaric acid lb. 

Thymol lb. 

Vanillin i D . 



1914. 

Aloes, Curacao, cases I lb. lOOli 

in gourds 9%01O 

Barbados, true 1.1501.20 

Cape 809% 

Socotrlne 22028 

Ammoniac, tears lb. 20025 

Arabic, firsts lb. 25085 

seconds 10028 

thirds 15025 

sorts, amber, cleaned 10*4011 

white 15016 

Asafoetlda, lump lb. 2501.20 

powdered Nominal 

Benaoin. Slam lb. 1.5002.00 

Sumatra 84040 

Camphor, Amer., ref., bbls., bulk.. lb. 44ft 

cases of 100 blocks 45i 

squares of 4 oss 45%< 

16s, In 1-lb. cartons 460— 

10s, bulk 450— 

24s, in 1-lb. cartons 47%048 

24s, bulk 48%047 

82a, in 1-lb. cartons 47V6048 

32a, bulk 46%047 

Japan, refined, 2%-lb. slabs 44%048 

1-lb. blocks Not quoted prior 

ounce tabs Not quoted prior 

24a Not quoted prior 

Chicle lb. 60065 

Euphorblum lb. 12014 

Oalbanum lb. 60070 

Gamboge, mass and pipe lb. 66070 

powdered 65067% 

Guaiac lb. 27030 

powdered Not quoted prior 

Karaya, whole lb. 9017 

powdered t 15022 

Kino lb. 22085 

Mastic lb. 62065 

Myrrh, select lb. 16020 

sorts 15016 

slftings 18016 

Ollbanum siftlngs lb. 4%05 

sorts 9%01O 

tears 10012 

Sandrac lb. 19020 

Scammony resin lb. 1.7502.00 

Aleppo 2.5002.75 

Virgin 8.5006.50 

Senegal, picked lb. 14022 

sorts 11%012% 

tsrcv lb. 8501.15 



August, 1914. 


£ 


8. 


d. 








10 


28 











1 


8 





9 


6 





21 


9 





20 








7 


6 





8 


4H 





7 


r> 





17 


«/ 





27 





C 


2 








1 


0% 





" 


10 





l.« 


\ 


k/ 


«» 


• 





142 







2 


1! 





1 


s 





1 


* 








«% 





8 


i> 





1 


6 





2 


6 





4 


5 





12 


10 





2 


1 





98 








4 


8 





40 





95 











7 








1 


10 





2 











9 





18 


8 





16 








2 


6 





8 


6 





10 


8 





1 








58 


6 





9 


6 





1 


6 





2 


9 





6 


6 





5 


6 





12 


6 


a 


50 








8 


10% 





1 


0% 





2 


6 





25 











11 





1 


10 





115 








1 


2 





1 


6 





9 








1 


1 





7 


6 





15 






atrm 


ace 


utica] 


Chemical N 


larl 


Jan., 1916. 


Jan.. 1917. 


£ 


s. 


d. 


£ 


8. 


d. 





6 


9 





2 


8 


150 








110 











48 








20 








75 








.60 








120 








115 








52 








95 





Nominal 


Nominal 





11 








12 








9 


10 





10 


9 





25 








34 








48 








57 








22 








6 








24 








7 


6 





18 








5 








50 


6 





47 


6 








1% 





6 


6 





147 


6 





174 


6 





2 


9 





2 


11 





2 


6 





8 


4 





8 


6 





8 


4 





1 


4 





1 


8 





14 


9 





8 


9 





2 


6 





2 


9 





2 


8 





2 


6 





14 








21 








22 








21 








6 


7% 





6 


7% 





190 








182 


6 





7 


6 





8 








60 








75 





114 








114 











75 








108 








5 


8 





2 


9 





80 








. 11 











10% 








10% 





17 


8 





17 


3 





19 


2 





19 


2 





5 


8 





5 








6 


8 





6 








12 








18 


6 





18 


6 





8 








75 








167 








18 


6 





18 


6 





16 








10 


6 





60 








95 








75 








83 


6 





40 








80 








15 








14 


6 





5s. 


lb. 





lis lb. 





12 








15 








8 








2 


6 





70 








140 








78 








250 








20 








5 


9 





45 








10 








155 








160 








22 








5 


9 





2 


9 





8 


4 





40 








82 








2 


6 





2 


6 





45 








35 








46 








45 






GUMS. 




1.7502.00 
85086 

44%0- 

450— 

45%0— 

470— 

460- 

47%048 

46%047 

47%048 

«j^7 

to 191* 

to 1918. 

to 1918. 
60062% 
200— 
70075 
70072% 
70075 
224 

to 191* 
10026 
18027 
40046 
75080 



1916. 
Jan. 
14015 
15017 
1.0001.10 
8} 

22028 

—030 

30035 

28030 

25028 

28024 

25027 

60065 

75080 

1.5001.75 

824 

424_ 

42%f- 

480— 

44%®- 

43%0- 

45045% 

44046 

47%048 

48%047 

42%0- 



384 



164 
824 



>87 








ll.OO 


1.604 


|2.00 


1.604 


§2.10 


264 


930 


124 


£18 


164 




384 




25* 




124 


»12% 


85fi 




144 


STs 


284 


&30 


2.504 


p2.76 


8.00G 


fa.25 


8.504 


1)6.50 


224 


»24 




1918- 



Jan.. 1918. 
£ s. d. 
4 6 

None 
• 18 6 
70 
180 
120 
Nominal 
12 6 
11 4 
87 
62 

5 
6 6 
8 
60 
Nominal 
210 nom. 
8 8 
8 10 
8 4 
18 
10 6 
8 2 
8 2 
60 
80 
Nominal 
862 6 
8 6 
150 

None 

140 

5 

11 



16 

19 

7 

6 

18 

4 









• 







6 
8 

10% 
4 
2 
6 
10 

8 
• 276 

Nominal 
15 6 














40 
66 
66 

18 

16 
18 
8 
60 
820 
6 
9 
160 
6 












4 
70 

8 
42 
60 






10 


8 



6 

0» 
9 
6 

1 
6 




m 



18020 
661 



40050 

18014 

Nominal 

14018 

3.0008.25 

Nominal 

8.5006.00 

85040 

31034 



Dec. 81. 

13014 
) 5.7506.00 
' 1.1001.18 



Dec. 81, 1918. 



£ 

180 





4 

16 
70 
105 
82 
Nominal 
15 8% 
18 11% 
45 
94 



d. 
6 

6 


6 



4 

5 

4 

48 

6 10 

881 

6 10 

6 

8 

1 



6 

6 
6 



9 
6 
9 



lis In bond 
4 4 










4 
60 
80 

6 



120 
























400 
7 
160 




75 

6 
14 


16 
19 
12 

9 
20 

5 



8 


7 

6 





10% 

2 

6 
6 




2s 3d lb. 
19 



6 
16 
57 
82 



6 

6 




17 
2 

40 
200 
3 
7 
205 
5 
7 
135 



13 10 
9 6 



40 
62 




11 


6 
9 

8 
8 

8 10 








Jan. 

15016 

1.0001.10 

1O%011 

400— 

80085 

62055 

Nominal 

Nominal 

46050 

l.*8O01.86 

1.4001.60 

81040 

76%0- 
770— 

77* " 



-1918- 



Dec. 81. 

8%09 
15%016 
1.0001.10 
18%014 

90095 
1.5001.55 

60052 
Nominal 
Nominal 

2.7502.80 
3.0008.10 
1.5001.75 

81042 
Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 
2.4002.60 
Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 
1.8001.86 

24026 
1.4001.50 
1.8502.00 
2.1002.15 
Nominal 
2.1002.15 
Nominal 




>80 

ro 

18%014 
Nominal 
15016 

3.0003.25 

Nominal 

Nominal 




OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



29 



1914. 
Aug. 

Styrax, artificial, cams lb. 18020 

Thua per 280 lbs. 9.00010.00 

Tragacanth lb. 8.1001.20 

seconds 

thirds 65075 

sorts 8( 

Turkey, firsts 

seconds 00070 

thirds 40050 






Jan. 



-1918- 




Dec. 81. 
1.8501.90 
18.00019.50 
4.0004.15 
3.5008.00 
Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 



ESSENTIAL OILS. 



1914. 

Almond, bitter lb. 8.5006.50 

bitter, a P. A Not quoted 

artificial 40045 

sweet, true 80090 

peach kernel 25026 

Amber, crude lb. 12014 

rectified 20022% 

Angelica lb. Not quoted 

Anise lb. 1.5501.80 

Bay lb. 2.4002.50 

Bergamot lb. 5.0005.25 

synthetic Nominal 

Birch tar, crude ..lb. Not quoted 

refined Not quoted 

Bols de rose lb. 4.0004.50 

Cade lb. 16020 

Cajeput lb. 57*065 

Calamus lb. Not quoted 

Camphor, heavy gravity.. lb. 18014 

Japanese, native 12*013 

Cananga, native lb. Not quoted 

rectified Not quoted 

Capsicum oleoresln lb. Nominal 

Caraway lb. Nominal 

Carvol lb. Not quoted 

Cassia, tech., 75080 per cent lb. 82*085 

lead free 97*01.07* 

redistilled, U. 8. P 1.8001.40 

Cedar leaf lb. 

wood 14015 

Celery lb. Not quoted 

Cinnamon, Ceylon, heavy lb. 6.50014.00 

Citronella, Ceylon, drums lb. 48049 

cans 49050 

Java 1.2501.80 

Cloves, cans lb. 97*01.00 

bottles 1.0001.02* 

Copaiba lb. 

Coriander lb. 6.5007.50 

Cassia, 75080 per cent tech lb. 82 

leao. xroe, u. s. x» • «...<. .*>>*•»...• i.7i7v0l.oO 

Croton lb. 9001.10 

Cubeb lb. 2.7502.85 

Cumin lb. Nominal 

Dill lb. Not quoted 

Brigeron lb. 1.8001.40 

Buealyptus, Australian lb. 45050 

Fennel seed, sweet: lb. 1.9002.00 

Geranium. Turkish lb. 8.0008.25 

rose, Africa, Algeria 4.7505.00 

Bourbon 8.2508.85 

Ginger lb. 4.2504.40 

oleoresln Not auoted 

Gingergrass lb. 1.7502.00 

Hemlock lb. 

Juniper berries, rectified lb. 7501.00 

twloe rectified 8501.00 

wood 28025 

Lavender flowers lb. 8.7504.00 

spike, French 9001.10 

spike, Spanish Not quoted 

garden 52*070 

Lemon lb. 1.9002.25 

Lemongrasa lb. 1.0501.10 

Lime, expressed lb. 8.2508.50 

distilled 75080 

Linaloe lb. 8.7504.00 

Mace, distilled lb. 70075 

expressed 75080 

Makefern lb. 1.9002.20 

Mustard, natural lb. 8.5004.00 

artificial 1.2501.80 

expressed Not quoted 

Neroli. petale lb. 51.00055.00 

bigarde 40.00050.00 

synthetic Not quoted 

Niobe lb. Not quoted 

Nutmeg lb. 70075 

Orange, sweet Italian lb. 2.1502.40 

West Indian 2.0502.10 

bitter Nominal 

Origanum 17045 

Parsley lb. Not quoted 

Patchouli lb. 4.0004.85 

Pennyroyal, American lb. 1. 7502.00 

French 1.0501.25 

Peppermint, tins lb. 2.7508.10 

one brand, in bottles 4.1504.20 

rectified Not quoted 

Petit grain, French. 4.7505.00 

South American 8.2508.50 

Pimento lb. 1.7002.00 

Pine, needle, Sylvestris lb. 86088 

Rose, natural os, 10. 00012. 00 

artificial 2.0008.00 

Rosemary flowers, French lb. 70075 

Saffrol 27028 

Sandalwood, Bast India lb. 4.6506.10 

West Indies (Amyris) 1.1501.25 

Sassafras, natural, U. S. P lb. 55065 

artificial 22028 

safrol Not quoted 

Savin lb. 1.8001.90 

Snake root..../ lb. Not quoted 

8pearmlnt lb. 2.7503.00 

Spruce lb. 45055 • 

Tansy lb. 8.7504.00 

Terplneol, drums lb. Not quoted 

Thyme, red, French lb. 1.8001.40 

white, French 1.4001.50 

Wmtergreen (sweet birch lb. 1.4502.00 

synthetic '. 27*030* 

leaf (gaultherla) 4.2504.50 



1915. 
Jan. 
4.7506.75 
prior to 1918. 

1.0001.25 

75080 
27*< 
12*t 

" r % 

prior to 191f 

1.4501.50 
2.4002.50 
8.750— 
Nominal 

prior to 1918. 

prior to 1917. 

4.2504.40 

Jioo 

prior to 191* 

15016 
15016 
prior to 1918. 
prior to 1918. 
3.260— 
1.750- 
prior to 1918. 

, 80082* 
1,0001.20 
1.4001.50 
62» 




14.75 
1.50 



60080 
1.1001.25 

9501.00 
8.0003.10 
1.8501.40 
2.7502.86 



prior 



prior 
prior 




to 1911 
60.000- 
55.000- 
to 1917. 
to 1918. 
850— 
1.6001.75 
1.5001.60 
Nominal 
18025 
LOlft. 



prior to 191 



prior 



prior 
prior 

prior 




814 

4. 

1.: 

65< 

25( 

to 1911 

2.2502.50 
to 1918. 
1.5001.60 

45050 
2.9003.00 
to 1918. 
9501.15 
1.1001.25 
2.000— 
55060 
4.1504.25 



1916. 

Jan. 

9.00011.00 





12*013 
14015 



2.8504.00 
2.0002.25 

1.2001.25 
1.2501.80 
1.6501.70 
J52* 
14016 




9001.05 
47*050 




45.00060.00 
85.00050.00 



1.9002.00 

1.5001.60 

2.0002.10 

18025 

8. 

1.7501.85 

1.60<j 






1917. 
Jan. 
12.00018.50 




1.0501.15 
2.5002.75 
6.2506.50 
2.7503.00 




12018 
16018 



4.500- 
8.5008.' 



75 




7.7508.00 

1.7502.00 
62*066 
15.00016.50 
16.00017.50 
1.6508.50 
8.9004.25 
1.2001.40 







6.0006.50 
1.9002.00 




4.2504.50 



1.8001.60 
1.5001.55 
2.7502.96 
1.1501.20 
4.0004.80 



Jan. 

12.75013.00 

14.00014.25 

Nominal 

.00 



>54 

m 



.00 
).00 
►80.00 
LOO 



Nominal 




-1918- 



Dec. 31. 




Nominal 



8.50 
►5.25 
►1.10 



9501.00 
80.00082.00 
2.7502.80 
2.9002.95 




.00 

1.50 

P11.50 

J10.50 

>7.25 

.00 

.80 

a. 10 

HL1.00 

511.25 

LOO 

r.oo 

J1.80 
J1.30 
U.10 
1.8502.00 
1.4001.45 
4.9005.00 
1.6501.75 
4.2504.50 
2.2502.30 
Nominal 




80.000120.00 
20.00080.00 
4.8504.90 
2.2502.80 
2.9008.00 
1.7501.80 




1.6501.80 
1.2001.25 




3.0003.10 
Nominal 
24.00025.00 
2.5003.00 
1.4001.50 

• ^ «■ 
12.75013.00 

6.5007.00 

2.8002.50 




6.0006.50 
15.00020.00 
5.0005.50 
1.0501.10 
4.0004.10 

90095 
1.8501.90 
2.0002.15 
4.7505.00 

85090 
5.7507.50 



30 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



1914. 1015. 

Aug, Jan. 

Wormseed, Baltimore lb. 1.40O1.50 1.4001.50 

Wormwood lb. 3.2503.40 2.4002.60 

Ylang ylang. Manila ib. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Bourbon Not quoted prior to 1918. 



1916. 

Jan. 
2.0002.25 
2.2502.60 



1917. 

Jan. 
8.5003.75 
2.9098.00 



Almond. B. P lb. 

Anise, star Ib. 

Apricot or peach kernel lb. 

Bergamot lb. 

Cajuput bot. 

Caraway lb. 

Cassia. 80085 p. c lb. 

Citronella. Cey., small drums.. lb. 

Clove Ib. 

Eucalyptus.. B, P lb. 

Lemon lb. 

Lemongrass oe. 

Lime, W. I., dist lb. 

hand-pressed lb. 

Mint, Japanese .lb. 

Orange lb. 

Peppermint. American lb. 

H. G. H lb. 

Sandalwood. E. I lb. 



August, 


1914. 


£ 


8. 


d. 





2 


5 





5 


3 





1 


1* 





14 


6 





3 


1 





4 


6 





2 


9 





1 


6 





8 


9 





1 


8 





6 


9 








2* 





8 


8 





10 


'0 





8 


11 





7 


6 





18 








21 








19 


9 



British Essential Oil Market. 



/an., 1916. 
s. d. 
2 
8 

1 
11 

4 
18 

4 
1 
5 

1 
4 

4 
8 
4 
7 

























9 
4 
5 




9 

& 

2 
9 

2 




Jan., 1917. 
£ 8. d. 

2 

8 

1 
17 

4 
19 
4 
2 
5 
2 
4 

8 



















8 10 
14 6 
82 











Nominal 



6 
5 
4 



8 

8 



1% 
3 



4 
11 
10 
14 
50 



8 
8 
6 





Jan. 

8.75O9.00 

4.5004.75 

80.00040.00 

10.00020.00 



-1918- 



Jan., 1918. 


£ 


8. 


d. 





8 


1 





4 


3 





1 


10 





18 


6 





5 


1 





21 


6 





6 


3 





2 


6 





17 


6 





2 


6 





8 


10 








5 





7 








16 








3 


4* 





9 


6 





16 








14 








52 






Dec. 31. 

4.0004.50 

5.5005.75 

26.00028.00 

16.00020.00 



Dec 


.81. 


1918. 


£ 


8. 


d. 





8 


4 





6 


3 





26 

















12s lb. 





23 








8 


6 





8 


10 





19 








4 


9 





5 


9 








7 





6 








16 








6 


6 





12 


6 





28 








34 


6 





50 






PERFUME BASES. 



Jan. 



-1918- 



Almond meal, French, powd- 
ered lb. 

Bergamot peel, whole.... lb. Nom. 
powdered Nom. 

Cassia flowers, whole.... lb. 1.500— 
powdered 2.000— 

Lavender flowers, French, 
selected lb. 350— • 



Deo. 81. 




Jan. 



-1918- 



Bayberry lb. 

Beeswax, white, pure lb. 

crude, light 

dark 

refined, light 

dark 

yellow, crude 

yellow, refined 

Candelilla lb. 

Carnauba, flor lb. 

No. 1 

No. 2, regular 

No. 2, North Country 

No. 3, chalky 

No. 8, North Country 

Ceresln, yellow lb. 

white 

Japan lb. 

Montan, crude lb. 

bleached 

Ozokerite, crude, brown lb. 

green 

refined, white 

refined, yellow 

American, refined, white 

black 164 deg .•••••••«.•••.•••«..••. 

Paraffine, crude, 1080105 deg., m. p. lb. 

1180120 deg., m. p 

1240126 deg., m. p 

refined, domestic, 1180120 deg.. m. p. 

125 deg., m. p 

128 deg., m. p 

1380185 deg., m. p 

1850187 deg., m. p 

refined, foreign, 125 deg 

180 deg 

185 deg 

140 deg 

Spermaceti, block lb. 

cakes • • 



350- 



Oak moss, whole, select- 
ed lb. 750— 

powdered i l.T 

Orange flowers, whole... lb. l.i 

Patchouly leaves, whole. lb. l.< 

powdered l.i 

Red rose leaves, French, 

whole lb. 1.250— 

powdered ' 1.850— 




Dec. 81. 

Nom. 
Nom. 




WAXES. 



1914. 

Aug. 

27080 

47*< 




1915. 

Jan. 

25027 

45055 

28029 

80081 
28030 
80085 
Nominal 
50055 
150 
K5 



88083% 

29030 

12022 

1' 

Hi 
6%< 

24< 

21< 

25i 

25l 

25030 

Not quoted prior 
Not quoted prior 
Nominal 







>5% 

_*% 
Not quoted prior 
4*04% 

5*06 

29030 
80081 



8( 
2E 
to 191! 
to 1918. 
Nominal 
8*03% 
8%f8% 
4*04% 
4%05 
5%05% 
6%®6% 
to 1918. 
4*04% 
505% 
5*06 
8*09 
24*026 
25*027 




226 



>65 
55065 
40045 



8%08% 
»04 




607 

708 

809 

8*09 

24025 

25026 



1.250— 
1.350— 

\ 



, 1918 , 

Jan. Dec. 31. 
Sandalwood, selected, powd- 
ered lb. 500— 800— 

Vetivert root, whole lb. 1.250— 1.250— 

powdered 1.750— 1.750— 

White rose buds, French, 

whole lb. 500— 500- 

powdered 750— 750— 



1917. 
Jan. 
20*021% 
"150 



29C 

J30 
14018 



>16% 



4: 

80090 
75080 
60065 



4*05 
5*06 




607 

708 

809 

8*09 

24025 

25026 



Jan. 
28028 
56060 
Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 
871 




585 
70080 
7501.00 
750— 
7*07% 
10*0— 
9*0- 

1O%0H 
11*012 

12*0- 

150— 

18*014* 

Nominal 

12*013* 

14014* 

170— 

230— 

240— 



-1918- 



Dec. 81. 
85086 




W 

m 

Nominal 

64065 

70071 

16018 

18025 

28023* 

85036 

Nominal 

35086 

Nominal 

Nominal 

Nominal 

Nominal 

9%01O 
10*011 
12*013 

mn 

15015* 
15*015% 
Nominal 

15016 
15*016 
20025 
30031 
31082 



ANIMAL, VEGETABLE, FISH AND MINERAL OILS. 



ANIMAL. 



1914. 

Degras, American '. .lb. 2%03% 

English 3*03% 

Neutral 5*05% 

Horse gal. 6*07 

Lard, prime, winter, edible gal. 92008 

off prime 66068 

extra No. 1 62063 

No. 1 53055 

No. 2 51052 

Neatsfoot, 20 deg. cold test gal. 96098 

30 deg. cold test 08(3)90 

40 deg. cold test 82084 

prime, un pressed 640B5 

dark 58061 

Oleo. extra gal. 809% 

prime Not quoted 

Red elaine lb. 6*06* 

saponified 6%07 

Bod oil gal. 34035 

Stearic acid, single pressed lb. 8%01O* 

double pressed Not quoted 

triple pressed Not quoted 



1915. 
Jan. 

404* 
4%05 
Nominal 
6*06% 
90092 
68072 
62064 
53(® 56 
51® 53 
960-98 
88*2>90 
82084 
64065 
580*61 
74013 
prior to 1918. 

6*06* 
6*407 
40045 
9011 
prior to 1916. 
prior to 1916. 



1916. 
Jan. 
606* 

6%@7% 

1.1001.20 

909* 

94098 

78084 

70075 

60064 

56059 

95097 

90092 

84086 

68072 

63066 

8012 

8*06 
0*406% 

707* 
12012* 
14015 
150 10 



1917. 
Jan. 



707% 

32042 

1O%011% 

1.3001.40 

1.1001.15 

9801.02 

94096 

87090 

1.2001.80 

1.1501.20 

1.1001.15 

1.0001.03 

90095 

15019 

9*010 

9010 

909* 

IS 1 ' 2 14 

14% 01 5 

15**016% 



Jan. 
19020 
19020 
30034 

17*017% 



2.20 
1.75 
1.49 
1.40 
1.88 
2.50i 
2.35 



2.25 
11.80 
>1.50 
11.42 
H.40 
12.60 
2.40 



2.3002.35 
1.7001.75 
1.100— 
23024 

22*023*, 
16016% 
16016% 
10012 
23026* 
24024* 

25*026 



-1918- 



Dec. 31. 
16018 
15*016 
25028 
16*017 
2.250— 
1.600— 
1.3601.40 
1.3101.82 
1.2101.22 
2.250— 
1.9301.95 
1.7101.73 
1.470— 
1.000— 
31*032 
80*0- 
15016 
15016 
900— 
20*021 
21 'i022 
22*024 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



31 



1917. 

Jan. 

10*011 

9010 

If 



GREASES. LARD. STEARINES AND TALLOW. 

* J 1914. 1916. 1916. 

1 Aug. Jan. Jan. 

Candles, adamantine, 6s 16 ozs. 1O%011 1O%011 1O%011 

paraffins, 6s, 12s 14 ozs. 9010 9010 9010 

stearic acid, plain, 4s, 6s, 8s 120— 120— 120— 

Grease, brown lb. 5%06% 696 5%05% 

house 5%06% 5%06% 606% 

yellow 6%07% 697 «H#Tft 

Lard, city steam lb. 94409% 10%©— —09% 

compound 8%08% 7%07% 9%09% 

Middle West cwt. 10.8750- 10.8750— 9.90010.00 

neutral —0— 13*014 18%014% 

Stearine, lard lb. 1 W$* 1 tt 11 ^2 12 "3&1 1 

Tallow, special, loose lb. —06% --06% —08% 

Tallow, acidless, bbls gal. 64065 62068 78080 

regular 62068 60061 75077 



16.00016.10 
18%©- 

r«%©i7% 

14%©- 
ll%g- 

1.0401.06 
1.0401.05 




t 

Jan. 
16024 
15*028 



-1918- 




19 
18% 
1.60 
1.55 



Dec. 81. 
26026% 
15016% 
30%©— 

11012 
11012 

28024% 
24.50025.00 

800— 

270— 

180— 
14%©- 
1.850— 
1.830— 



FISH. 



1914. 
At 

Cod, Newfoundland gal. 86%087% 

domestic, prime 82084 

Menhaden, Southern, crude gal. 82%4 

dark, pressed 874 

light, pressed 33089 

yellow, bleached 41042 

white, bleached, winter 48044 

Porpoise, body gal. 40045 

jaw 18.00020.00 

Sperm, bleached, 88 deg. cold test.. gal. 700— 

45 deg. cold test 

natural, 88 deg. cold test 674 

■ 45 deg. cold test 654 

Whale oil, natural, winter gal. 

bleached, winter 

extra bleached, winter 524 








1918- 



Dec. 81. 
1.5101.65 
1.4501.50 
1.100— 
1.1001.15 
1.210— 
1.2801.80 
1.8101.82 
Nominal 




VEGETABLE. 

1914. 1915. 1916. 

Aug. Jan. Jan. 
Castor oil. (See Drug Market.) 

China wood oil, in bbls lb. 6%06% 6%©7 909% 

Cocoanut, Cochin, domestic, bbls.... lb. 1O%011 150— 15015% 

edible, in bbls Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Ceylon, domestic. In bbls 909% 11011% 18018% 

Corn oil, crude, in bbls cwt. 6.8506.40 5.7005.75 7.8507.90 

refined, in barrels Not quoted prior to 1916. 8.4508.50 

Cottonseed, crude, t. o. b. mills... gal. 41042 36%©87 —055 

prime summer yellow, In barrels.. lb. 6%©6% &H5P8 8.5008.60 

Linseed, raw, car lots gal. 590— 480— 660— 

5-barrel lots 60®— 4 &4p— 670— 

tank cars, t. o. b. Minneapolis.... 58%©— 450 — 650— 

boiled, car lots 600— 500 — 670 — 

5-barrel lots 810- 510— 680— 

double boiled, car lots 610— 510— 680— 

5-barrel lots 620— 520— 690— 

refined, car lots . 620— 520— 690— 

6-barrel lots 620— 580— 700— 

varnish oil, according to grade, car 

lots .? 63065 51057 70074 

Olive, denatured gal. 78082 9501.10 92094 

edible, bbl Not quoted prior to 1918. 

foots lb. 7*407% 9%01O 9%01O 

Palm Lagos, spot lb. 707% 7%07% 0%©9% 

prime, red, spot 6%06% 6%07 8%09 

Palm kernel lb. 8%09 120— 11%012 

Rapeseed, blown gal. 680— 74076 9901.08 

refined 590— 71078 96097 

Sesame, edible gal. 60068 75085 1.0001.10 

Soya bean, Manchuria, spot lb. 6%0— 5%05% 7%0— 

* NOTE— Per pound, government fixed price. 



1917. 
Jan. 

12*013 
17018 

14%015 
12.25012.50 
18.01018.06 

81082 
11.954 




9601.00 
1.0501.10 

10010% 
13013% 




Jan. 




17%018 
1.7001.75 
1.6501.70 
8.2508.40 

17%017% 



-1918- 



Dec. 81. 

27028 

18%©- 

20%g21 

15%016 
11.75018.00 
21.i 




1.610— 
1.580— 
1.610— 

1.500— 
Nominal 
4.5005.00 
42045 



21025 
17%©- 
1.650— 
1.6001.70 
2.97%©- 
16%016% 



COPRA 



1914. 1915. 

Aug. Jan. 

Copra, Java, sun-dried lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Macassar, mixed Not quoted prior to 1918. 

South Sea Island, sun-dried Not quoted prior to 1917. 



1916. 
Jam. 



1917. 
Jan. 



808% 



Jan. 
9%01O 
9%01O 
9%01O 



-1918- 



Dec. 31. 

8%0- 

8%0— 

7%07% 



OIL CAKE AND MEAL. 

1914. 1915. 1916. 

Aug. Jan. Jan. 

Corn cake short ton 28.00029.00 28.00029.00 28.504 

meal Nominal Nominal 80. 

Cottonseed cake. f. o. b. mill, Tex.. ton Nominal 24.60025.60 28.50029.50 

t. o. b. New Orleans — 0— 19.750— —029.00 

meal. f. o. b. Atlanta —0— 21.00021.50 88.00034.00 

f. o. b. New Orleans — <&— 23.75024.75 33.50034.50 

Linseed cake short ton 30. 00<fr 32. 00 85. 50036.50 87. 50039. 00 

meal 33.50<&— 36.000— 89.00040.00 

Note :— Government prices in producing States varying according' to per cent, of protein. 





87.< 

41. 
41. 

Nominal 
85.00036.00 
37.50040.00 
46.000— 
47.000— 



Jan. 
87.00040.00 
41.00042.00 
See Foot Note. 
See Foot Note. 
47.500— 
47.00049.00 
Nominal 
55.00057.00 



-1918- 



Dec. 81. 
60.000— 
55.260— 



See Foot Note. 
See Foot Note. 

66.000— 

56.000— 



32 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



WELLS. 



August, January* January, January* January. *>«c- 81. 

« Flel i d ' , ww, l? 14 i J 1915 - 191 «- 1817. 1918. 1918. 

Pennsylvania bbl. 81.55 8L45 82.25 82.86 88.75 84*00 

Cabell. Pa.. 1.15 *1.05 T78 *2i22 *2.72 1.77 

Mercer, black 1.12 1.02 1.75 2.80 2.28 2.28 

New Castle 1.12 1.02 1.75' 2.15 Not quoted after 1917. 

Corning*. Obio 90 .85 1.75 2.25 2.80 2.85 

Wooster, Ohio..... 1.28 1.15 1.50 1.80 2.88 2.60 

Somerset, Ky...>. 80 .85 1.68 2.05 2.55 1.25 

Rag-land 67 ' .65 .75 .95 1.20 2.58 

North Lima, Ohio 1.06 .98 1.88 1.58 - 2.08 2.88 

South Lima. Ohio 1.01 .88 1.88 1.58 2.08 2.88 

Indiana 1.01 .88 1.18 1.48 1.98 2.28 

Princeton 1.02 .89 1.47 1.62 2.12 2.42 

Illinois 1.02 .89 1.47 1.62 2.12 2.42 

Plymouth ... 1.88 . 1.88 2.08 2.88 

Oklahoma-Kansas. 

All grades except Bealdton 75 .55 1.20 1.40 2.00 2.25 

Xealdton 50 .40 .60 .60 1.20 1.45 

■ 

Northwestern Louisiana. 

Caddo, La., 89 deg. up 95 .80 1.20 1.40 2.00 2.25 

35 deg 85 .70 1.10 1.80 1.90 2.15 

82 deg 80 .65 1.05 1.25 1.85 2.10 

heavy 45 .45 .75 .85 1.00 1.55 

De Soto 90 .80 1.10 1.20 1.90 2.15 

Crichton. light ... .85 1.00 1.40 1.75 

North Texas. 

Corsicana, light 75 .55 1.20 1.40 2.00 2.85 

heavy 50 .50 .60 .50 1.05 1.80 

Blectra 75 .55 1.20 1.40 2.00 2.26 

Henrietta 75 .55 1.20 1.40 2.00 2.26 

Strawn Not quoted till 1916. 1.05 1.40 2.00 2.25 

Thrall ... 1.05 1.85 2.00 2.25 

Moran ... 1.05 1.40 2.00 2.25 

Yale • ... ... ... 2.00 2.25 

Gulf Coast. 

Humble ... .60 .80 1.00 1.80 

gTeen 85 .85 Classification not used after 1915. 

black • .50 .80 ...\ ••• ... ... 

Saratoga 40 .40 .60 * .70 1.00 1.80 

Sour Lake 40 .40 .60 .80 1.00 1.80 

Spindletop 40 .40 .60 1.05 1.05 1.85 

Batson ., 80 .40 .60 .70 1.00 1.80 

Vinton 40 .40 .60 .80 1.00 1.8* 

Dayton 45 .80 .60 .70 1.00 1.80 

Goose Creek 40 .40 .60 .70 1.00 1.80 

Jennings 40 .40 .60 .80 1.00 1.80 

Markham 40 .40 .60 .75 1.00 1.80 

Edgerly ... .60 .95 1.00 1.80 

Wyoming. 

Grass Creek Not quoted prior to 1918. ... ... 1.70 1.85 

Elk Basis ... ... ... 1.70 1.85 

Big Muddy ... ... .<> 1.20 1.50 

Salt Creek ... ••• ... ... 1.50 

Lander, heavy..... ..........•.•••.• ... ... ... ... ... 1.25 

California. 

Kern River. Coallnga. Belridge, Sunset-Midway, 
Lost Hills— 

14-20.9 deg. 40 .87*6 

21-26.9 deg. 42% .50 

27-80.9 dec 45® .55 .60 

81 and lighter « 650.70 .75 

Ventura County— mm ^ 

21-26.9 deg 55© .60 .50 

27-80.9 deg. 60© .75 .60 

81 and lighter 85 1.00 (See Second Table. Method 

Fullerton and Whittler— _ of quotation by gravity 

18-20.9 deg 50 .40 changed.) 

21-26.9 deg 55 .42% 

27-30.9 deg 75 .52% 

81 deg. and over 70 .60 

Santa Maria— 

20 deg .40 .40 

80 deg 1.00 1.00 

Salt Lake-Los Angeles— 

18 deg. and less... pj •(*? 

28 deg. and over 7;L M _ .80 

(Changed method of 

Kern River, Midway-Sunset, McKittrick. Lost quotation. See first 
Hllls-Belridge. Coallnga— table.) 

14-17.9 deg -•• .48 .78 .98 1.28 

18-18.9 deg. ••• ••• .4* .74 .99 1.24 

(Add 1 cent for each increase of one full degree 

above 18 degrees.) 

Ventura County— __ 

25-25.9 deg ••* ••« .82 1.07 1.82 

(Add 1 cent for each Increase of one full degree 

above 18 degrees.) 

Fullerton and Whittler— . 

14-17.9 deg .... .4g -JJ Jg 4-28 

18-18.9 deg. ••• • .49 .74 .99 1.24 

(Add 1 cent for each Increase of one full degree 

above 18 degrees.) M _ 

25-25.9 deg »•• •• ••• ••• ••• ,8a 1,0T l'*> 2 

Canada. 

Canada 1.46 1.86 1.78 1.98 2.48 2.78 

Petrolla •»• ••■ ^ *** zr*££ ~tL 2.58 

Oil Springs Not quoted until 1918. ... 1.95 2.15 2.88 

EXPORT QUOTATIONS— ILLUMINATING OILS. 

These quotations are based on the following quantities:— Bulk, tank steamer lots, ranging from 80,000 to 70,000 barrels, aocordlng to 

steamer capacity; barrels, cargo lots, about 80.000 barrels; cases, cargo lots, averaging from 10.000 to 20,000 barrels. 

August. January. January, January, January, Dec. 81, 

1914. 1915. 1916. 1917. 1918. 1918. 

Bulk. New York 4.75 4.60 5.00 4.50 6.50 8.25 

Barrels. New York, cargo 8.25 8.00 8.65 8.65 12.60 J7.25 

Cases, New York 10.75 10.50 10.75 11.75 16.50 19.25 

(These prices are for standard white; water white 1 oent a gallon higher.) 

* 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



33 



1916. 


1016. 


Jan. 


Jan. 


10.60 


10.75 


10.65 


10.00 


10.75 


11.00 


10.80 


11.06 


10.00 


11.16 


11.00 


11.25 


11.10 


11.85 


11.40 


11.66 


12.00 


12.26 


12.50 


12.75 



1014. 
Aug. 
Cases, 110 test- 
Two five low screw lots 10.75 

5,000 to 10.000 10.00 

1,000 to 8.000 11.00 

600 to 700 11.05 

600 to 600 11.15 

400 to 500 11.26 

800 to 400 11.86 

200 to 800 11.65 

100 to 200 12.25 

10 to 100 12.75 



Naphthas, Gasoline, Etc* 

(In 10~gallon drums.) 
Under 100 Cases. 

Benzine, 50-62 deer 28% 

Gasoline, stove 26% 

Naphthas— 

Auto. 60-72 deg 28 

78-76 dec 88 

Benzine, 58-62 deg 2834 

Gasoline, stove. 26 

Naphthas— 

Auto. 68-72 deg 28% 

78-76 deg 82% 



1017. 
Jan 



11.75 
11.86 
12.06 
12.10 
12.15 
12.25 
12.86 
12.80 
18.26 
18.76 



Jan. 


Deo. 81. 


16.50 


18.26 


16.70 


10.62 


16.80 


10.75 


16.85 


10.80 


16.80 


18.80 


17.00 


18.86 


17.10 


20.15 


17.66 


20.66 


18.00 


20.80 


18.50 


21.40 



Benzine, 50-62 deg 18% 

Gasoline, stove 21% 

Naphthas— 

Auto. 60-72 des; 24 

78-76 des; 28 

Benslne, 58-62 deg 18% 

Gasoline, stove 21% 

Naphthas— 

Auto, 50-62 deg 28% 

78-76 deg 27% 

Benzine, 60-62 deg 18% 

Gasoline, stove 21 

Naphthas— 

- Auto, 50-62 deg _ 

78-76 deg 27! 

* All gasoline and naphtha prices for export wit 



:£8 


tt 


•34% 


■n 


• • • 
... 


.29 


.84 


.88 


.51% 
.55% 


• • . 

• • • 


.88 


.88 


.42 


... 


100 Cases or Over. 










.28% 


.20% 


.88% 


.45 


• • • 


.26 


.81 


.84 


.45% 


• • • 


M 


.88% 

.87*4 


.87% 
.41% 


A 


• • • 
. • • 
• . . 


(In cans and cases. 


) 








Under 100 Cases. 










jft 


.25% 
.26% 


:S& 


.88% 
.88* 


... 
• • • 


.24 


.20 


«' 


.89 


• • • 

• • • 


.28 


.88 


.48 


• • ■ 


100-199 Cases. 










m 


.25 
.26% 


»& 

•*•)■ 


.88 
.88% 


• a . 

• . • 


.28% 
.27% 


:S8 


.88 
.87 


.38% 
.42$ 


• . • 
• ■ • 
... 


200-299 Cases. 










.18% 


•3£* 


.28 


.82% 


• . • 


.21 


.26 


.28% 


.88 


• . . 


M 


.28% 
.82* 


*ft 


:88 


. . • 
... 
• ■ • 


lay 81, 1018. 











London, pence... 
Liverpool, pence. 



FOREIGN QUOTATIONS 

Refined Oil. 

St 



1* 

8% 



10 
10% 



18% 
18% 



19% 
20% 



20% 
18% 



JOBBING QUOTATIONS AT NEW YORK. 

(In cents per gallon.) 



August, 

Field. 1014. 

Crude oil. steel barrels 15 

wooden barrels 

Fuel oil, 28-81 deg 8 

Gas oil, 84 deg 9 

188 Are test, S. "WV. barrels 11% 

160 fire test, W. w., barrels 12 

tank wagon 9 

Motor gasoline, garages only* steel barrels 18 

to consumers 15 

Naphtha. V, M & P., deodorised, steel barrels.. 10 

wooden barrels * 12 

Gasoline, gas machine— 

78-76 deg., steel barrels 

wooden barrels 25 

70-72 deg., steel barrels 

wooden barrels 28 

68-70 deg., steel barrels 

wooden barrels 28 



January, 
1915. 
13% 

a ■ 

8 
9 



January, 
1916. 
15 



Illuminating Oils. 



12 
9 



8 
9 



18 
9 



Naphthas, Gasoline, Etc 



18 

15 

9 

11 



24 

• • 

23 

• ■ 

22 



21 
28 
20 
28 

29 
82 
27 
80 
2« 
29 



January, 
1917. 
15 
18 

• • 

9% 



9 



22 
24 
22 
24 

81 
84 

29 
82 



81 



January, 
1918. 
15 
19 
18 
18% 



14 
16 
11 



24 
26 
23 

83 
87 
81 
85 
80 
84 



Dec. 81, 

1918. 

16 

22 

15 

16% 



17% 
11% 



LUBRICATING OILS. 



Natural, West Virginia, 80 deg., carloads.... Not quoted 

29 deg 28 ©— 

28 deg Not quoted 

Black, reduced, 29 grav., 25030 cold test, gal.. 18%014 

28 grav., 15 cold test 14 $14% 

summer 18 018% 

Cylinder, light, filtered. 21%©88 

dark, filtered 18 026 

ex. cold test 27 034 

dark, steam refined 14%025 

Bloomless, 80081 grav Not quoted 

white, 80631 grav 16 OJ8H 

Paraffine, high grav 27 028 

908 spec, grav 15 016% 

866 spec, grav 18 $18% 

red paraffine 15 ©18 

Spindle, No. 200 18 5l9 

No. 180 Not quoted 

No. 150 Notquoted 



prior to 1918. 
prior to 1918. 




24%02& 

12%018 
18 014 



26%027 



prior to 1918. 
prior to 1918. 




18% 


©14 


14 


015 


18 


©14 


21 


026 


18 


019 


26 ( 


081 


15 


919 


88 




29% 




21% 




18% 


019 


18 


019 


24 








34 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



PAINT MATERIALS. 



PIGMENTS. 



1914. 1915. 

Auff. Jan. 
Alumina hydrate. (See Chemicals.) 

Barytea, prime white, foreign ton 19.00028.00 19.00028.00 

domestic, pure white, floated. In bag*. 17.00018.00 17.00018.00 

off color, in bags 18.00dl5.00 18.00015.00 

Blanc flxe. pulp ton 40.00648.00 40.00048.00 

dry (in bbls., 600 lbs.) lb. 8%04 3%04 

Flake white lb. 8010% 8010% 

Litharge, American, powdered, casks, 

net : lb. 5%05% 505% 

English glassmakers' 9%09% 9%09% 

Ltithopone lb. 8*04% 8%©4% 

Orange mineral, American lb. 7%08% 7%08% 

English 10018 10018 

French 12%018 12%01S 

German 12013 12018 

White lead, basic carbonate, American, 

dry, casks lb. 5%05% 505% 

basic sulphate, casks 505% 4%©5 

White lead in oil lb. 6%07 6« 

English, in oil 1O%0— 10%< 

Red lead, dry, casks lb. . 5%06 5%06 

Red lead, in oil lb. I 707% 707% 

Zinc oxide: Leaded grades:- 

commercially lead free lb. Nominal Nominal 

5 p. c. lead sulphate Not quoted prior to 1917. 

10 p. c. lead sulphate Not quoted prior to 1917. 

20 p. c. lead sulphate Not quoted prior to 1917. 

85 p. c. lead sulphate Not quoted prior to 1917. 

French process, red seal 6%0— 70 — 

green seal 70 — 7%0— 

white seal 7%0— 80— 




1916. 
i Jan. 




9%09% 



160— 

16%0— 

170— 



1917. 
Jan. 

88.00040.00 
25.00085.00 
22.00024.00 
80.00085.00 

9%f^ 




8%0- 

flE 

120— 

9%0- 

1O%0- 




Jan. 

40.00050.00 
28.00086.00 
22.00024.00 
85.00040.00 
8%04 
18020 

9%0U% 
Nominal 

^4 

Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 

9010 
8%09 

10*011 
Nominal 
10011% 
11%011% 



-1918- 




18018% 

18%013% 

14014% 



Dec. 81. 

Nominal 
82.00086.00 
24.00026.00 
50.00055.00 




1O%011% 
Nominal 

14%015% 
Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 

10010% 

#* 



111 _ 

Nominal 

11%011% 

18%0- 




12%dtfg 



DRY COLORS. 



Bone, powdered ' lb. 

Carbon gas r lb. 

Charcoal, willow, powdered lb. 

Drop lb. 

Ivory lb. 

Lampblack lb. 

Mineral blacks, car lots ton 

Vine lb. 

Bronse, ton lots lb. 

Celestial, 500-lb. lots lb. 

Chinese, 500-lb. lots lb. 

Mllorl, 500-lb. lots lb. 

Prussian, 500-lb. lots lb. 

Soluble, 250-lb. lots lb. 

Ultramarine, in barrels lb. 



Blacks. 



1914. 
Aug-. 

Not 



1915. 

Jan. 

2%05 

406 



Suoted prior to 1918. 
I 508 



1916. 
Jan. 

S%8«tt 




8012 

18.00025.00 18.00025.00 

Not quoted prior to 1918. 




Blues. 




8%018 



46048 
Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 
18 
J55 
3%#18 



Nominal 
18020 
Nominal 
Nominal 
1.500— 
1.500— 
5022 



Browns. 



Sienna, Italian, burnt and powdered, 

ton lota, barrels lb. 407 405 

burnt, lump, ton lots, in barrels 8%06 8%06 

raw, powdered, ton lots, in barrels.. 407 407 

raw, lump, ton lots, in barrels 306 805 

American, burnt and powdered, ton 

lots, in barrels 2%08 2%08 

raw, in ton lots, in barrels 2%03 2%08 

Spanish browns, high grades ton 10.00020.00 10.00020.00 

low grades Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Umber, Turkey, burnt, powdered, in 

ton lots lb. 808% 803% 

burnt, lump, selected, ton lots 304% 804% 

raw and powdered 2 %%P S 2%08 

raw, in lumps 804% 804% 

American, burnt, powdered, car lots, 

in barrels 202% 202% 

raw, car lots. In barrels 2%08 2%08 

Vandyke brown, domestic, ton lots, in 

barrels lb. 2%08 2%08 




2%08 
2%08 
10.00020.00 




202% 
2%03 

304 



1917. 
Jan. 
408 
14020 




l.( 

2( 

1.5001.80 

Nominal 

1.0001.75 

1.5002.00 

20040 




208 
2%08 
16.00020.00 




8%05 



100— 




1918 



7001.50 

15025 

7001.50 

70085 

6701.50 

7201.50 

17050 




208 

24.000— 
16.000— 

4%©6% 

4%06 
4%06% 
405 

3%04 
803% 




5.00 





507 

506 

Nominal 

Nominal 

8%04 
303% 

3%04 



Greens. 



Chrome, chemically pure, light lb. 17025 

medium Not quoted prior 

dark Not quoted prior 

Commercial lb. Not quoted prior 

Grinders' lb. 6010 

Jobbers' lb. 4%05% 

Paris greens, in bulk, arsenic, kegs... »11® — 

Verdigris, in barrels Not quoted prior 



22080 
to 1918. 
to 1918. 
to 1918. 
6010 
4%05% 
— 012 
to 1918. 



Reds. 



Alizarine, lake, concentrated lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Carmine, No. 40, bulk, 110-lb. tins.. lb. 2.5002.75 3.5003.75 

Amaranth Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Crocus martus (purple oxide) lb. 1.5503.50 1.5503.50 

Indian red, English, pure 1.5001.60 1.5005.00 

American, pure Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Oxide red. copperas, in casks lb. 24&01O 2010 

native, in lump (In casks) Not quoted prior to 1918. 

powdered (in casks) Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Para red, toners, concentrated, per 

100-lb. lots lb. 60070 8001.00 

commercial 7fa45 7045 

Rose, pink lb. 8010'* 8012 

Toluidine toner lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Tuscan red lb. 7010 4012 

Venetian red lb. 1.1501.75 7501.75 

Vermilion, quicksilver, English lb. 55059 — 0— 

Chinese 9001.00 9001.00 



80040 


40065 


30050 


89045 






Nominal 


45055 






44060 


55065 






8010 


8012% 


160— 


16020 


12020 

9012 


12020 


100— 


13015 


9014 


Nominal 


23024 


41050 


40042 






12%02O% 


15017 






2.750— 

4.600— 


Nominal 


3.5003.75 


4.7505.50 


5.6006.00 






5.5006.00 


5.5006.00 


1.5503.50 


303 


40 — 


40— 


2.5005.00 


709% 


15017 


20<fr24 






12015 


8012 


2U09 


308% 


13016 


15020 






8% 04 


8%04 






3fc04% 


3ft@4U 


Nominal 


2.2502.50 


1.5001.80 


1.7001.90 


16070 


40000 


35050 


20050 


22030 


80045 


20040 


85040 






5.7500.50 


5.5000.50 


10018 


25030 


200-35 


22030 


7502.00 


202% 


2%©4 


2W06 


1.750— 


1.50ft 1.00 


1.0502.00 


2.0002.10 


9501.00 


9501.00 


Nominal 


Nominal 



\ 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



35 



Chrome, chemically pure, ton lota.. lb. 

Dutch or English, pink lb. 

Ocher, French, . superior lb. 

domestic, high-grade..., ton 



Yellows. 



1014. 1915. 

Aug. Jan. 

10*012 10*012 

Not quoted prior to 1918. 

12.OoSl6.00 12.OoSl6.00 



1916. 
Jan. 
18017 



202% 
14.00920.00 



1917. 
Jan. 
25028 

20.00080.00 



COLORS IN OIL. 



Jan. 
28080 

15018 

80.00050700 



-1918- 



Dec. 81. 

80082 

15018 

Nominal 

80.00060.00 



Per pound in I -lb. and 5-ft. cans. 

Blacks. 



1914. 1915. 

* ._ ^. . Aug. Jan. 

Coach black, in japan lb. 20080 20080 

to oil 14018 14018 

f Drop black in oil lb. 14016 14016 

Lampblack In oil lb. 12014 12014 

Chinese lb. 86046 86046 

Prussian lb. 82086 82086 

Ultramarine lb. 18016 18016 

Imitation cobalt lb. Not quoted prior to 1918. 




Blues. 



1.5001.60 

1.6001.70 

15020 



Browns. 



Sienna, Italian, burnt or raw, best 

grades lb. 12015 12015 

Turkey umber, burnt or raw, best 

grades lb. 11014 11014 

Vandyke, genuine brown lb. 11014 11014 

Chrome, chemically pure lb. 12016 12016 

commercial, 25 p. c. color Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Paris green, French lb. —024 —024 

Indian -..lb. 12014 12014 

Tuscan \lb. Not quoted rior to 1918. 

Venetian lb. 609 608 

Chrome, chemically pure lb. 16020 16020 

Ocher, French lb. 608 608 



Greens. 



Reds. 



Yellow. 



12015 

11014 
11014 

86045 
—024 

12016 
8010 



80040 
8010 




1.5001.75 

1.4501.70 

40050 



16022 

15021 
25080 



700- 
—085 

15020 
10012 

80088 
11018 



Jan. 



•1918- 




Dec. 81. 





18024 

17028 
25080 



65075 
28082 
50060 



1.8001.60 

1.2001.50 

45060 

50065 



26028 
>27 





24026 
82040 
15018 



82040 
15018 



8804 
1501 



5 
16 



OTHER PAINT MATERIALS. 



1914. 
Aug. 

Bronze powders, gold, 50-lb. cans... lb. 4508.15 

aluminum Not quoted 

Casein lb. Nominal 

Chalk. English lb. 2.7508.00 

French 8.1008.50 

Clay, China, imported, lump ton 14.00016.00 

domestic, lump 8.0009.00 

Cobalt oxide lb. 1.0001.06 

Feldspar ton 8.00012.00 

Fuller's earth, powd cwt. 80085 

Marble flour ton 8.0008.60 

Manganese, car lots ton 65.00070.00 

Magnesite, raw ton 10.00011.00 

calcined, powdered 80.00085.00 

Naphtha, deodorized lb. Not quoted 

Plaster of parts lb. 1.5001.70 

dentists* 1.5001.85 

Pumice stone, original, casks lb. 204 

selected, lumps, In bbls 4%06 

powdered, pure, lbs 1%03 

Putty, com'l, in 1 and 5-lb. tins... cwt. 2.6503.25 

linseed oil, in do 4.2504.60 

colored, in do 4.2504.60 

white lead, in do 4.2504.60 

commercial. In 120-lb. tubs 2.0502.20 

pure, in do 2.9508.85 

linseed oil, in do 3.8508.50 

Rotten stone, original, casks lb. *§ 7 4 

selected, lumps 5H02O 

powdered, in barrels 2 M&* 

Soapstone, powdered, in bags ton 10.00012.00 

Silex ton 12.00040.00 

Smalt, blue lb. 6010 

super, black 4®7 

Talc, American ton 15.00020.00 

French 15.00025,00 

Italian 85.00040.00 

Terra alba, Am., No. 1 cwt. 75080 

No. 2 SStfL 

English 88SJ-S8 

French Sflx 00 

Whiting, commercial, car lots.... cwt. 45050 

gilders' bolted SS®25 

extra gilders* bolted Z*®* 8 .* 

English cllffstone IWh 10 

American, paris white 70075 



1915. 
Jan. 
4508.15 
prior to 1918. 

Nominal 
8.500- 
Nominal 
14.00016.00 
8.0009.00 
1.0001.05 
8.00012.00 




8.0008.50 

65.00070.00 

10.00011.00 

80.00085.00 

prior to 1918. 

1.5001.70 
1.5001.85 




8.8503.60 

407tt 
5H02O 




(1.00 
8001.00 
45050 
55065 
554*68 
7501.10 
70075 



1916. 

Jan. 

8504.00 

17018 
Nominal 
Nominal 
11.00016.00 




8.3508.50 
407* 
5H02O 
2H04 
10.00012.00 
12.00040.00 
6< 
4< 

9.00018.00 
15.00020.00 
18.00080.00 
>80 

9001.00 

8001.00 

60055 

60065 . 

65070 

7501.10 

70075 



1917. 

Jan. 

9505.00 

17026 
Nominal 
Nominal 




10.00011.00 
80.00085.00 




2H04 
10.00012.50 
20.00086.00 

6010 

407 
10.00^18.00 
15.00022.00 
85.000— 

70075 
1.0001.10 

9001.10 

950— 
1.150— 
1.250— 
1.5001.80 
1.250— 



Jan. 
1.0001.75 
1.1508.00 

18028 
Nominal 
Nominal 



-1918- 




4. 
4.1 

6.0006.50 
7010 
6025 
2*404% 
10.00012.60 
20.00036.00 
6010 
407 
15.00022.00 
Nominal 
Nominal 
1.17%0— 
85090 
1.0001.25 
9001.10 
1.100— 
1.2501.30 
1.400— 
1.7502.75 
1.5001.75 




Nominal 
Nominal 




506 
7010 
508 
4.7006.10 



8.3 

7.4 



7.250— 
8.100—' 
4.500— 
6.750— 
7010 



75 
00 



6025 

%04% 



2%4_ 
15.00025:00 
22.00040.00 
Nominal 
Nominal 
20.00040.00 
Nominal 
Nominal 
1.250— 
1.000- 
Nomlnal 
Nominal 
1.250— 
1.8001.85 
1.35(0)1.50 
1.7502.75 
1.5001.75 



Egyptian asphaltum lb. 

Cuban ton 

Mexico ton 

Barbados lb. 

California ton 

Texas ton 

Trinidad ton 



1914. 

Aug. 

15030 

30.004f60.00 

25.00fJft0.00 

5478UL 
22.504730:00 
16.004720.00 
25.004130.00 



VARNISH GUMS. 



1915. 

Jan. 

20030 

30.00tfrfl0.00 

25. 00® BO. 00 

54i«H 
22.50Tj30.00 
18.0O47-20.0O 
25.00030.00 



1916. 

Jan. 
204735 
30.00660.00 
25.004fc00.00 

54? si^ 

22. 504? 30. 00 
16. 004i 20.00 
25.00^30.00 



1917. 

Jan. 
204725 
80. 004* 00. 00 
25.0041(10.00 

22.504730.00 
16.004P20.00 
25.00030.00 



Jan. 

204725 

45.0041 90.00 

40.004JSO.00 

!»4i13 
22.504)30.00 
16.004/ 20.00 
25.001; 80.00 



-1918- 



Dec. 31. 

184/20 
45. 0O*i 00.00 
40.0041 SO. 00 

9*# IS 
80.0mi 40.00 
16.004i 20.00 
25.00@b0.00 



36 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



Malta lb. 25A— 25< 

Gllsonlte ton 86.00050.00 86. 

Manjak ton 25.00060.00 25. 

Zansibar. bean, pea, white lb. 25080 25< 

pea white 200— 25< 

sorts 55058 

bean pea 24026 2f 

Manila, pale lb. 15018 18(3 

dark, hard 150— 17< 

bright, amber 14015 1< 

standard sorts A 808ft 1< 

pale, nubs, No. 1 8ft0— 9ft< 

pale, chips. No. 1 707ft 8%< 

Congo, copal, picture lb. 80084 854 

white 25080 25080 

amber 18028 18028 

dark 12017 12017 

Pontinak, selected, fine lb. 22024 22024 

No. 1 18ft015 13ft©15 

No. 2 9011 9011 

nubs 7@8 708 

chips 707* 707* 

sel.. fine, straight 16017 16017 

Damar, Batavia lb. 17ft0— 

Singapore, No. 1 —0— — 0— 

Singapore, No. 2 140— 190— 

Singapore, No. 3 809ft 12018 

Kauri, No .1 lb. 500- 500— 

No. 2 820— 320- 

No. 8 17018 17018 

ordinary chips 15ft016 18 #i 9 

B x.... 80038 80033 

B 1, ordinary 20022 20022 

B £ .. 18 ^$i e 18ft©16 

brown chips, ordinary 7ft09 9010 

brown chips, extra 14020 16022 

bright dust 10012 1°9 U 

brown dust 8ft04 8ft04 

ordinary dust, white 708 708 

brown. No. 8 8011 • 8011 

X dark 55060 65060 

XX pale A 

XXXpale 65070 65} 

XXXX extra pale 75080 75< 

XXXXX picture quality 80090 

East Indian, bold Not quoted prior to 1911 

nubs Not quoted prior to 1918. 

chips ^ Not quoted prior to 1918. 








1917. 


Jan. 


86.50C 


MO.O0 


26.00f 


£50.00 


254 




58i 


£62 


281 




18ft2 


[uft 


152 


118 


154 


he 


7*3 


&8 


8%ti 


pft 


7ftjj 


P 


29| 




8fti 




12< 


WL7 


22ti 


124 


184 


m 


i2i 


m 


•1 


p 


184J 


m 



Jan. 



-1918- 



Dec 81. 






86.00060.00 
80.00060.00 
Nominal 
25<_ 
J2 



22< 



no* 



184 


»19 


124 


his 


lifti 


Il6 


lit 


m 


214 






m 


12* 


|13 


46< 




82{ 


$36 


171 


§20 


18€ 


m 





47.50067.50 
40.00080.00 
Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 
22023 
22028 
J28 
16016ft 
>17ft 
>16 



14015 
15016 
27029 

17018 
16016ft 
15ft016 
26027 
28030 
83035 
25026 
14016 
550— 
82040 
18020 
28r~ 




82« 

18020 

13014 

16022 

18025 

10012 




1.000— 
1.200— 
240— 
18ft0- 
14ft9l5ft 



SHELLAC 



1914. 

D. C lb. JOffl 

V. S. O lb. 2Oft021 

Diamond I : lb. -J89£± 

Fine orange lb. ISftOlB 

second orange -JJJJS 

T. N lb. 15ft016 

A. C. garnet lb. 16017 

Kala button lb. *£&* 

Button lb. 23024 

Bleached commercial lb. 1$$16 

bone dry 20021 




17019 
15ft016 
14ft015 

15015ft 
Nominal 





1917. 


Jan. 


49C 
48t 


m 


m 


ggft 


424 




39i 


fw 


874 


|37ft 


844 


M5 


48< 


p50 


89ft« 


(40ft 


484 


W 



-1918- 




Dec. 8L 

82084 

80081 

Nominal 




GLUES. 



Extra white lb. 

Medium white lb. 12 

Cabinet lb. 18 

low grade 1< 

Foot stock lb. 12 

brown 

Common bone lb. 7ft 1 

Irish lb. 18 

French lb. 1 

Fish, liquid (In barrels, 50 gals.).. gal. 7 






7001.40 




*— —XI 

Jan. 


Dec. 81. 


86045 


36045 


80085 


81036 


80040 


28040 


25028 


22026 


22024 


15020 


20025 


16020 


18022 


14018 


Nominal 


Nominal 


Nominal 


Nominal 


1.0001.80 


1.0001.50 



Pig lead lb. 

Quicksilver. (See Drug Market.) 
Spelter, prompt Western shipment, 
New Tork . lb. 



1914. 
Aug. 
8.900— 



5.0005.10 



METALS. 



1915. 
Jan. 
8.800— 



5.7005.80 



1916. 
Jan. 
6.400— 



17.00017.20 



1917. 

Jan. 

7.500— 



10.000— 



Jan. 
6.500— 



7.82ft07.92ft 



-1918- 



Dec. 81. 
6.000— 



8.450— 



FERTILIZER MATERIALS. 



1914. 
Aug. 

Ammonia, sulphate cwt. 2.600— 

futures 2.650— 

Fish scrap, dried, 11 p. c. ammonia 
and 14 p. o. bone phosphate, f. o. 

b. factories unit 8.00010.00 

Tankage, 11 p. c and 15 p. 0., f. o. b. 

Chicago unit 2.87ft0— 

Tankage, 10 and 20 p. c, f. o. b. Chi- 
cago, ground unit 2.95010.00 

Tankage, 9 and 20 p. c, f. o. b. Chi- 
cago, ground unit 2.95010.00 

Tankage, concentrated, f. o. b. Chi- 
cago. 14 to 15 p. c unit 2. 87 HO— 

Garbage tankage, f. 0. b. Chicago.. unit 9.000— 

Hoof meal, f. o. b. Chicago unit 2.6002.70 

Dried blood, 12013 p. c. ammonia. unit 8.000— 
12618 p. c ammonia, f. o. b. Chi- 
cago unit 2.850— 

Nitrate of soda, 95 p. c, spot cwt. 2.O7ft0— 

future 2.O2ft0— 



AMMONIATES. 



1915. 

Jan. 
2.5502.80 
2.550- 



8.85010.00 
2.95010.00 
8.05010.00 
8.05010.00 




8.150— 
1.900- 
1.900— 



1916. 

Jan. 
4.000— 
4.000— 



8.75010.00 
8.20010.00 
8.20010.00 
8.20010.00 




1917. 

Jan. 
4.500— 
4.500- 



4.60&10 

8.90&10 

8. 76*10 

3.90&10 

8.700— 
15.00(1 
4.00< 
4.0C 





Jan. 
7.2607.86 
Nominal 



Nominal 
6.50*10 
6.50&10 
6.50A10 



-1918- 




Dec. 81. 
5.000— 
4.750— 

. 7.25&20 

6.50&10 

6.50A10 

6.50&10 

6.600— 
4.250— 
6.4006.45 
6.500— 

6.500— 
4.42ft0— 
Nominal 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 

\ 

PHOSPHATES. 



37 



1014. 
Aug. 

Add, phosphate, bulk. ton 45060 

Bones, rough, hard ton 22.80024.00 

soft, steamed, unground 21.60922.00 

ground, steamed, 1ft P. c. ammonia 

ft 60 p. c. bone phosphate ton 20.00021.00 

ditto. 4 and 60 p. o 28.60O24.00 

raw, ground, 4 p. c. ammonia & 80 

p. 'c bone phosphate 28.60080.00 

South Carolina, phosphate rock, kiln 

dried, f. o7b. Ashley River ton 8.5008.75 

Florida land pebble, phosphate rock, 

68 p. c, f. o. b. Tampa, Fla...ton 8. 0008.25 

Florida land pebble phosphate rock, 76 

p. c, f. o. b. Tampa ton 4.0004.25 

high grade, phosphate hard rock. 77 
p. c, f. o. b. Florida ports 5.7506.25 

Tennessee phosphate rock, f. o. b. Mt. 

Pleasant, domestic, 78080 p. c.ton 5.0005.60 
76 p. c. guaranteed, ton.... 2,240 lbs. 4.7505.00 
68072 p. c, ground, so that 90 p. c 
will pass through 100-mesh screen. 

ton 4.2504.60 



1016. 
Jan. 

45O50 

22.60024.00 
21.60022.00 

20.00021.00 
28.60024.00 

28.60080.00 

8.6008.76 

8.0008.25 

4.0004.25 
5.7506.25 

6.0005.50 
4.7505.00 

4.2504.50 



1916. 
Jan. 

80085 

22.50024.00 
21.50022.00 

20.00021.00 
23.50024.00 

28.50080.00 

8.60O8.75 

2.7603.00 

8.6008.75 
5.0006.26 

5.00O5.60 
4.7605.00 

4.2504.60 



+iorr. 

Jan. 
11.60012.00 

22.60024.00 
21.50022.00 

20.00021.00 
28.50024.00 

28.60080.00 

8.6008)75 

2.0002.26 

2.6002.75 
5.0006.25 

5.00O5.60 
4.7605.00 

4.2504.60 



Jan. 

16.000— 

80.00082. 
26.000- 



27.00085.00 
88.00086.00 

85.00040.00 

Nominal 

8.2608.60 

4.6005.00 
5.6006.00 

5.50O6.00 
5.6006.00 

6.00O— 



-1918- 



Dec. 81. 

17.000— 

80.000— 
24.000- 

81.000— 
86.000- 

45.000— 
Nominal 



5.4 

7.5008.00 
0.00010.00 

7.S0O8.00 
7.5008.00 

7.5008.00 



POTASHES. 



Muriate of potash, 38042 p. c., basis 
40 p. c. In bags ton 

Muriate of potash, 80085 p. c, basis 
80 per cent.. In bags ton 

Muriate of potash, min., 00095 p. c, 
basis 80 p. c, in bags ton 

Muriate of potash, mln. t 98 p. c, basis 
80 p. c, in bags ton 

Sulphate of potash, 00005 p. c* basis 
90 p. c, in bags ton 

Double manure salt, 48068 p. c, basis 
48 p. c. in bags ton 

Manure salt, min. 20 p. c KjO, in 
bulk ton 

Hard salt, min. 16 p. c. KgO, In bulk. 

ton 

Kainit, min. 12/4 p. c. KgO, in bulk. 

ton 



1914. 
Aug. 


1916. 
Jan. 


Not quoted prior to 1918. 


89.070— 


89.570— 


40.750— 


41.250— 


41.650— 


42.150— 


47.570— 


48.070— 


25.040— 


25.540— 


18.580— 


13.780— 


10.870— 


11.070— 


8.860— 


8.560— 



1916. 
Jan. 



475.000500.00 
Nominal 
Nominal 
440.000— 
106.000— 
60.000— 
40.00050.00 
40.00050.00 



1917. 
Jan. 



450.000460.00 
875.000— 
Nominal 
275.000800.00 
105.000— 



1 



Jan 
182.000— 

860.000— 

Nominal 

Nominal 
850.000400.00 



-1918- 



Dec 31. 
182.000— 

260.000310.00 

260.000325.00 

260.000826.00 

800.000— 



50.00060.00 { (Not quoted after 1017, being of 

f foreign origin.) 

40.00060.00 I 

40.00050.00 J 



PYRITES. 



1014. 

Aug. 
Spanish, crude, unwashed, fines, per 
unit, averaging 48052 p. c of sul- 
phur, ex ship unit lOftOll 

Spanish smalls, washed, fines unit lOftOU 

Furnace size lump ore, washed, aver- 
aging 48062 p. c. sulphur unit —013 

high grade, practically non-arsenical; 

less than W p. c. arsenic unit 18018% 

Spanish, lump, washed — ^ 18 

lump, unbroken ore 18018% 

Domestic concentrates, f. o. b. mill. unit 700ft 



1015. 
Jan. 



lOftOll 
lOftOll 

—018 

13013% 

—013 
13018% 

700ft 



1016. 
Jan. 



15015ft 
15015ft 

-015ft 
160— 

11012 



1917. 
Jan. 



16016ft 
16016ft 

—015ft 

160— 

-015ft 
160— 

11012 



Jan. 

160— 
170— 

16016ft 

16016ft 

16016ft 
16016ft 

26080 



-1918- 



Dec. 81. 

no- 
no— 

17017ft 

17017ft 

17017ft 
17017ft 

27028 



NAVAL STORES. 





1914. 
Aug. 

Spirits of turpentine gal. 47ft048 45} 

Wood turpentine, steam distilled 42043 42 

destructive distilled 36088 

Rosin, common to good, strained 

280 lbs. 4.0004.10 8.700— 

Large Florida graded rosins (bbls., 280 
lbs.):— 

B 4.200— 8. 

C 4.200— 3.1 

D 4.80&- 8. 

E 4.80O— 8.800— 

F 4.800— 3.800— 

G 4.400— 8.800— 

H 4.400— 8.800— 

I 4.450— 8.95r 

K 4.7004.85 4.50< 

M 5.15O5.30 5.( 

N 6.0006.25 5.1 

W. Q 6.2006.80 6.25< 

W. W 6.750- 6.- 

Pitch, barrels 200 lbs. 8. 7504.00 ' 8.7504.00 

Tar, kiln burned, bbls 200 lbs. —06.60 —06.00 

Retort —06.60 —06.00 

Pine oil, white steam gal. 84088 84036 

amber steam Not quoted prior to 1918. 

yellow steam, distilled 82085 80088 

destructive Not quoted prior to 1918. 

Rosin oil, first rectified gal. —027 —025 

second, rectified —088 —086 

third, rectified — 048 —045 

fourth, rectified —060 —055 

Tar oil, genuine, distilled gal. 38031 38081 

commercial 18020 18020 




1916. 
Jan. 

56ftO— 
520— 
420— 

6.000— 




6.0006.50 
6.0006.60 

—065 
—060 




1917. 
Jan. 

65065ft 
510- 
46ft9- 

6 650— 




88081 
20022 



4.2504.76 

9.0000.26 
0.2500.50 

Nominal 
000— 

—038 
—048 
-060 
—070 

88046 
21ft#- 



Jan. 

47ft048 
450- 
400— 

6.05O— 




4.7505.00 

18.000— 
14.000- 

57058 
68055 
640— 
45058 

850— 
450- 
550— 
650— 

88084 
270— 



-1018- 



Dec. 31. 

70071 
62065 
58060 

14.200— 




8.0008.25 

13.00018.50 
14.00014.50 




38 



1918 YEAk BOOK 



^ 



IMPORTS ENTERED FOR CONSUMPTION INTO THE 

UNITED STATES 

For the Fiscal Years 1913. 1914, 1915. 1916, 1917, 1918 



vfc: 



Abrasives, Corundum Grains 
factored. Ground, Etc. 

/.... 



1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 



Pounds. 
1,803.400 
1.118.961 
832,900 
663.826 
2,354,274 
3.411.464 



Dollars. 
87.187 
61.026 
39.398 
29,471 

J 31,758 
89,674 



Abrasives, Crude, Artificial. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
190,057 
235.465 
256,474 
647.848 
1.867,251 
1.855,734 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
886.315 
846,191 
629,802 
458,581 
136,949 
475,234 



Abrasives, Emery Grains Manufac- 
tured, Ground, Etc. 

Dollars. 
36,906 
33,949 
25.040 
18,497 
7,889 
31,171 

Files, 

Dollars. 
15,000 
20,505 
17,342 
85.042 
34,620 
44.930 

Abrasives, Pumice Stone, Unmanu- 
factured. 



Abrasives, Emery Wheels, 

ir. Etc. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Papei 



1918. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 
5,558 
7,065 
6.060 
8,650 
7,205 
3,900 



Dollars. 
44,474 
57,427 
47,469 
69.311 
76,620 
34.062 



Abrasives, Pumice Stone, Wholly or 
Partially Manufactured. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
3,845,326 
6,484,875 
6.013,747 
5,616,012 
7.796.173 
3.238,776 



Abrasives, Rottenstone and Tripoli. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Acetone. 



1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

2.760 

235.917 

179.497 

• •••■• 

148.082 



Not stated prior to 1914. 

Acetanilid. 



1914 

1915 

1918 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1914 



Pounds. 
1,060 
800 



15 



1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1915. 



Acetphenetidin. 

Pounds. 

89,990 

203 

3.280 



Acid, Acetic Anhydrid. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1018. 



Pounds. 

309,643 

150,892 

3.652 

18,177 

9,060 

13.112 



Manu- Acid, Acetic or Pyroligneous. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 39,648 8,036 

1914 27.750 1.952 

1915 312,860 16.419 

1916 604,858 68,969 

1917 201.604 28,492 

1918 264.997. 47,073 

Acid, Acetylsalicylic (Aspirin). 

Pounda Dollars. 

1914 22,841 11,873 

1915 112,602 53,792 

1916 229 311 

1917 501 2,136 

1918 1,100 3,300 

Not stated prior to 1914. 

Acid, Arsenic or Arsenious. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 5,164,766 203,525 

1914..., 3,034,351 110,179 

1915 2,789,531 106,630 

1916 2,458,694 104,988 

1917 1,984,480 159,429 

1918 3,746,246 384,964 

Acid, Benzoic. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 863,015 138,887 

1914 278,896 61,701 

1915 132,666 25,442 

1916 25.155 79,856 

1917 13,547 52.988 

1918 2,354 16,390 

Acid, Boracic. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 362,400 13,897 

1914 527.201 22,390 

1915 401,684 18,002 

1916 424.219 22,145 

1917 404,210 24,590 

1918 195,650 14,087 

Acid, Carbolic (Phenol). 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 8,345.631 688.771 

1914 8,393,216 631,535 

1915 3,106,445 179.685 

1916 2,246,256 154.841 

1917 772,667 56,878 

1918 660,276 62,326 

Acid, Chromic. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 8,522 1,682 

1914 7,778 1,220 

1915 6,505 1,394 

1916 

1917 

1918 9,512 1,857 

Acid, Citric. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 8,677 2,916 

1914 652,210 204,847 

1915 722.484 447,131 

1916 171,877 107,603 

1917 157,628 91,463 

1918 196.590 126,066 

Acid, Fluoric and Hydrofluoric. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 12 5 

1914 305 22 

1915 150 11 

1916 17 83 

1917 

1918 1 2 

Acid, Formic. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 502.686 22.414 

DoHars. 1914 1,119,745 48,826 

27,356 1916 534,895 30/641 

1.JJ2 1916 131,719 19,627 

40.352 iei7 385,463 95,074 

1918 

Acid, Gallic. 

Dollars. Pounds. Dollars. 

51.632 1918 51,326 17,086 

23,240 1914 61,636 20,429 

1,019 1915 41.558 14,992 

10,013 1916 5,101 1,965 

7,485 1917 

16.633 1918 8.643 9.708 



Dollars. 
17,417 
28,280 
27,162 
44,186 
64,865 
84,262 



Dollars. 
80,621 
20,858 
24,796 
88,613 
28,815 
14,651 



Dollars. 

307 

21,105 

14,424 

• ••••• 

26,910 



Dollars, 
164 
389 



22 



Acid, Glycerophosphoric, Salts and 



Compounds. 



1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Not stated prior to 1914. 



Pounds. 

24,789 

15,933 

7,668 

5.853 

961 



Dollars. 

23.066 

17,678 

8,242 

9,249 

1,884 



Acid, Hydrochloric or Muriatic. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
440 
254.480 
3.532,076 
4,215.491 
1,108.808 
2.254.210 



Acid, Lactic. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

158,754 

276,237 

148.291 

17,845 

100 

330 



Dollars. 

14 

1.450 

20,884 

27,292 

8,191 

18,449 



Dollars. 
19.029 
30,423 
26,787 
10.980 
160 
544 



Acid, Nitric. 



1913. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
100 



Dollars 



8 



356,558 

224.699 

13 

9.444,028 



Acid, Oxalic. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
8,046,380 
8.780.857 
4.496,679 
522,549 
1,183,256 
757,565 



Acid, Phosphoric. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

504,388 

528.827 

266.193 . 

71,668' 

18.666 

17,711 



Acid, Phthalic. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1017. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
75.695 
63.574 
17,925 



17,776 

11,487 

2 

665,071 



Dollars. 
402,960 
433,783 
262,422 
166,117 
627.827 
311,290 



Dollars. 
76,907 
63,222 
39,120 
12,937 
4,225 
7.644 



Dollars. 

20,511 

15,597 

4,498 



Acid, Picric, or Nitro Picric. 



1913. 
1914. 
1015. 
1916. 
1017. 
191$. 



Pounds. 
85,068 

• •■■•■ 

20,091 



Dollars. 
18.339 



4,278 



Acid, Pyrogallic. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1016. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

9,512 

23.615 

10.564 

169 

r 275 



Dollars. 

9,278 

20.496 

9.514 

227 



Acid, Salicylic. 



1918. 
1914. 
1015. 
1916. 
1917. 
1018. 



Pounds. 
31,844 
18.821 
82,617 
160 
5,033 
21,854 



Acid, Silicic. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1»1<J. 
1917. 
191 S. 



Pounds. 
121,344 



547 



Dollars. 

6.500 

4,425 

24.408 

886 

8.114 

20,883 



Dollars. 
6.486 



3.086 
15 



586 
6 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



39 



Acid, Stearic or Stearin. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1910. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

119,619 

100,088 

82,795 

40.979 

588 



Dollars. 

12,100 

9,598 

8,460 

6,029 

75 



Acid, Sulphuric, or Oil of Vitriol. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 84,624 512 

1914 6,725.999 40.559 

1915 7.882.189 44,008 

1910 6.286.490 61,852 

1917 667,008 6,617 

1918 2.822,527 858.904 



1918. 
1014. 
1915. 
1910. 
1917. 
1918. 



Acid, Tannic or Tannin. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1,540 7PS 

12.802 4.326 

49,498 17.047 

2,229 684 

160 41 

5,442 1,424 



Acid, Tartaric. 



1918 

1914 

1915 

1916 • 

xvx ••••••• 

1918 



Pounds. 
78,942 
848,575 
820,105 
198.878 
268,180 
884,262 



Acid, Valerianic. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pound 8. 

1,019 

1.161 

2,168 

600 

50 

645 



Dollars. 

. 15,747 
208,850 
278,880 
• 84,373 
162,478 
281.099 



Dollars. 
860 
750 

1,774 
399 
491 

5,011 



Acids, All Other Not Specially Pro- 
vided For. 



1918. 
1914. 
1913. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Aconite. 



1918. 
1014. 
1915. 
1910. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

12.946 

4,267 

8.821 

6,720 

34.285 

475 



Dollars. 
86,589 
94.078 
78.848 
86,480 
85,257 
510,091 



Dollars. 

1.065 
821 
962 
588 

8.724 
119 



Acorns, Raw, but Unground. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
7.165 
8,618 
4,895 



Dollars. 
216 
208 
198 



2.420 
550 



1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Agar-Agar. 

Pounds. 



Not staled prior to 1914. 



189,232 
844.119 
882,981 
431,622 
246,988 



Albumen, Blood. 



1913 

1914 

Not stated after 1914. 



Pounds. 

177.795 

90.380 



1913 

1914 

Stated 
classes. 



Albumen, Egg. 

Pounds. 

1,246.744 

1.574.271 

separately after 1914; 



41 
86 



Dollars 

54,319 

92,809 

110,410 

162,527 

91.442 



Dollars. 
27,847 
13,239 



Dollars. 

406.594 

487.905 

following; 



Albumen, Egg, Dried. 



1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
1.269.398 
1.670,996 
2.669.254 
3,727,998 



Dollars. 

402,996 

751,976 

1.443.936 

2,450,148 



1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 



Albumen, Egg, Frozen or Liquid. 

Pounds. 

691,081 

1.451.876 

2.989.685 

2.014,629 



Dollars. 

92,807 

201,509 

816,762 

250,182 



Albumen, Not Otherwise Provided 



For. 



1913.. 

1914... 

1915... 

1916.. 

1917... 

1918.. 



Pounds. 

15,881 

382.589 

258,057 

81.787 

106.200 

671 



Dollars. 
8.421 
58,175 
48.941 
25,615 
84,057 
260 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Alcohol, Grain. 

Proof gallons. 

185.250 

109,880 

40.582 

59.198 

4 

69 



Dollars. 

22.780 

VL9.865 

r 5,707 

7,285 

8 

20 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Alcohol, Methyl or Wood. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

362 387 

109,022 42,598 

39,485 11,880 

46,829 9.490 

11,267 4,502 

205.276 202.994 



Alizarin, Natural or Artificial, and 
Dyes Derived Therefrom. 



1918 

1914 

Stated 
1918. 



as following; 



Pounds. 
8,219,087 
806,764 
class after 



Dollars. 

r, 824, 973 

246.196 

October 3. 



Alizarin and Derivatives, Natural or 
Synthetic, and Dyes Derived from. 



Pounds. 

X%fX4 ••••••••••«••■•• l|O«0|v74 

Xcf X«J • « ■ • • •*• •••••••»• Oflvtf^t*MO 

X«fXO» •«••••«•**••*•• llfWT 

1917 99,057 

Stated separately after 1917. 

Alizarin, Natural. 

Pounds. 
1918 115.188 



1918. 



Alizarin, Synthetic. 

Pounds. 
19,180 



Dollars. 

599.648 

1,586,867 

44,282 

127,240 



Dollars. 
160,775 



Dollars. 
55.179 



Alizarin, Colors and Dyes from. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 5,099 21,544 

Alum, Alum Cake, Patent Alum, Sul- 
phate of Alumina and Alum- 
inous Cake. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
4.129,160 
4,119,481 
8.904.561 
2,482,668 
1.686.989 
996,798 



Dollars. 
89,944 
47,759 
41,166 
45,491 
56,768 
82.779 



Alumina, Hydrate of. 

Bauxite. 



or Refined 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

2,252,156 

1.639.027 

202.968 

418 

• ■■••• 

94.278 



Dollars. 

87,812 

26,328 

3.680 

200 



7,562 



Aluminum, in Crude Form, Scrap and 

Alloys of Which Aluminum 

Composes Chief Value. 



Pounds. 

1918 26.642,112 

1914 16.421,076 

1915 18,925.919 

1916 8.208,895 

1917 1,904,000 

1918 1.508,860 



Aluminum Leaf. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



100 leaves. 
3,581 
1.385 
15.249 
39,920 
19.161 
50,880 



Dollars. 
4,247,580 
2,801.911 
2.864.044 
1.828.106 
558,897 
480,782 



Dollars. 
1.811 
141 
1,901 
5.466 
3.706 
11.686 



Amber, Manufactures of. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
7.202 
9.882 
4,516 
5,486 
248 
721 



Ambergris (Not Containing Alcohol). 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
19J0. 
1917. 
1918. 



Ounces. 

608 

82 

1 



Dollars. 
10,964 
695 
87 



10 
14 



2.771 
8,648 



Ammonia, Carbonate of. 



1918. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
258.376 
891,981 
784,821 
857,280 
244.840 
76,160 



Dollars. 
16,178 
25,195 
49,122 
25,018 
18.264 
6.782 



1913. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Ammonia, Liquid Anhydrous. 

Pounds. Dollars. 



807 



85 



200 
2,698 



46 
1,089 



Ammonia, Muriate of, or Sal Am- 



moniac. 

Pounds. 

1913 10.887,148 

1914 9,254.589 

1915 4,788,325 

1916 1,965,464 

1917 1,856.696 

1918 1,000,262 



* Ammonia, Nitrate of. 



1014. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Ton* 
1,883 
1,687 

• ••■•• 

87,300 
74,101 



Dollars. 
604.880 
470.566 
241,718 
122.174 
178.274 
97.994 



Dollars. 
132,849 
198.907 



4,015 
4.287 



* Ammonia, Percolate of. 



1014.. 
1915. . 
1916. . 
1917.. 
1918.. 



• ■ • • 

• • • • 



Pounds. 
70.253 
72,576 



Dollars. 
6.337 
6,515 



275 
465 



58 

165 



Ammonia, Phosphate of. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

7.488 

205,764 

71.782 

810 

1,000 

1,316 



Dollars. 

498 

18.462 

5,394 

40 

206 

886 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Ammonia, Sulphate 

Tons. 

61,118 

83,597 

64,417 

19,404 

8,176 

x 8,988 



of. 



Aniline Oil. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

2.015,818 

1,444,772 

1,407.305 

104.886 



Dollars. 
8,660,064 
4,900,058 
3,215,139 
1.871,007 
647,271 
467,999 



Dollars. 

171,047 

116.628 

240.165 

28.180 



Aniline Salts. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

4.976.108 

8.088,467 

895.489 

16.084 

• ••••• 

21,273 



Dollars. 

871.198 

222.728 

130,280 

3,978 



8.250 



Annatto, Roucou, Rocoa or Orleans, 
and All Extracts of. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
405.024 
507.250 
809,008 
608.271 
669,445 
749,782 



Dollars. 
19.991 
25.841 
58.174 
69,811 
78,017 
73.294 



Anthracene and Carbazole Derivatives 

(except oil) and Colors and 

Dyes Derived Therefrom. 



1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
399,800 
86,788 



Not separately stated prior to 1917. 



Dollars. 

426.198 

28,018 



Anthracene and Anthracene Oil. 



1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 11,900 

Stated separately after 1917. 



Dollars. 

82.175 

49.949 

2,551 

2.258 

2.010 



Anthracene Oil. 



1918. 



Gallons. 
11.900 



Antimony Oxide, Salts 

pounds of. 

Pounds 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 



1.819,828 

2,623.084 

1,797.265 

511,848 

192,099 

87,724 



Dollars. 
2.010 

and Com- 



Doiiars. 

97.447 

248.164 

219.605 

109.814 

46.190 

18.744 



• Not stated prior to 1914. 



40 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



1914. . 
1915.. 
1916. . 
1917. . 
1918.. 
Not 



stated 



Antipyrine. 

Pounds. 

7,686 

606 

222 

6.429 

22,786 

prior to 1914. 



/ 



Dollars. 

11,008 

1.086 

2.202 

46.110 

92,688 



Antitoxins, Vaccine Virus, and All 

Other Animal Serums Used for 

Therapeutic Purposes. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Apatite. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 

2,930 

92 



Dollars. 

5,082 
19,019 
12,826 

8,225 
11.460 

6.009 



Dollars. 

22.535 

796 



Argols or Crude Tartar, 
Lees, Crude. 

Pounds. 

1918 29.476.172 

1014 5,712.667 

Class dropped under 1918 tariff; 



or 



Wine 



Dollars. 
2,621.491 
545,105 
below. 

Argols or Crude Tartar, or Wine 
Lees Crude or Partly Refined. 

-#k- „ Pounds. Dollars. 

}JJ4 23,810,048 2,664,618 

1018 28,814,957 8,122,826 

JgJJ 84.602,184 5,288.516 

JWJ 24,142,078 8.886.854 

1018 80,864.588 5,812,836 



Arrowroot, Unmanufactured. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 
1913. 



Pounds. 

11,827 

8.615 

184 

5,987 

80,776 

15,998 

11,827 



Dollars. 

688 

816 

5 

802 

1.613 

2.993 

688 



Arsenic, and Sulphide of, or Orpi- 

ment 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
8,475,592 
4.148,928 
8,981.661 
2,794,254 
2.378,701 
7,691,028 



Dollars. 
854.284 
169.614 
178.756 
122.795 
176,811 
654,282 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Articles Manufactured in the United 

States Returned — Quicksilver 

Flasks or Bottles, and Drums 

Used in Exporting Acids. 

*^,« Dollars. 

JS« 259.128 

1WJ 280.620 

1J15 180.676 

Jgl$ 204,642 

JSH 168,955 

IMS 898,528 

Artists' Colors, in Tubes, Pans, Cakes, 

Etc. 

Dollars. 

136.894 

211,805 

186.728 

129.658 

168.958 

91.220 

Ashes, Wood and Lye of, and Beet 
Root Ashes. 

__,_ Dollars. 

1018 86.493 

1J1* 27,884 

JJJ5 41,522 

}JJ? 43,889 

!»!1 55.226 

WIS 47,982 

Asphaltum and Bitumen, Crude, Ex- 
cept Limestone Rock Asphalt. 

_ Tons. Dollars. 

1913 188.725 750,685 

1014 45,876 171,981 

1W8 79,561 465,717 

1916 130.089 700,940 

1917 161.622 896.989 

1018 189,618 851.688 

Aspirin. 

See "Add, Acetylsallcylic." 



Balsam Copaiba, Crude. 

I Pounds. Dollars. 

1018 206.447 66.861 

1914 245.486 71.889 

1915 273,616 59,921 

1J1« 204,464 70,868 

1917 808,545 124.122 

1918 878,862 202,847 

Balsam Fin or Canada, Crude. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1»18 8.691 1,827 

1914 13.864 12,505 

1915 18,610 14,636 

1016 7 » U8 *.084 

10JJ 4,178 8.897 

1018 8,698 1,404 

Balsams, Fir or Canada, Advanced in 
Value by Any Process. 

mMm Pounds. Dollars. 

1915 205 154 

1916 10 18 

1917 25 43 

1018 86 151 

Not stated prior to 1915. 

Balsam Peru, Crude. 

-M . Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 48,996 61.702 

1914 25,021 29,701 

1915 27.506 82,785 

1916 40,657 112,270 

1017 58.988 176,855 

1918 44,082 115.085 



Balsams, Peru, Advanced in Value 
by Any Process. 

.-.,„ Pounds. Dollars. 

1018 570 1,465 

Balsam Storax, or Styrax, Crude. 

m ^ m Pounds. Dollars. 

1018 35,861 5.228 

1014 5,607 798 

1015 11.445 1.550 

1016 11,696 5.528 

1917 10.892 26,550 

1018 14.788 22.616 

Balsam Tolu, Crude. 

.^. Pounds. Dollars. 

101? 57,277 29,552 

1014 42.188 19.063 

1015 89,750 18,993 

1010 63.579 17.288 

10" 62.820 18,255 

1018 49.869 28.996 

Balsam, All Other, Crude. 

.... Pounds. Dollars. 

1018 46,000 12.149 

1014 33,811 12,410 

101B 5,999 4,214 

10J2 2,503 1,312 

1017 12,649 4,235 

1018 84,773 48.560 

Barium, Carbonate of. Precipitated. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1018 22,182,617 20,143 

1914 4.995,451 46,425 

1915 344.588 7.864 

1916 6 2 

1917 804 177 

1918 106.288 1,437 

Barium, Chloride of. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 2,926,159 26,841 

1914 6,110,386 64,563 

1915 4,686,029 60,532 

1916 50 10 

1917 6.614 608 

1918 

Barium, Dioxide (Binoxide) of. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 8,507,508 215,500 

1914 6,085.798 329,139 

1815 4.084.144 817.262 

1016 546,442 48,451 

wis!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!! !!!!!! 

Bark, Cinchona or Other, from Which 
Quinine May Be Extracted. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 3.829.973 354,593 

1914 3,654,968 464,411 

1915 8.951.196 561,802 

1916 3,967.820 777,637 

1917 2.531.397 685,986 

1918 8^121,958 779,408 

Bark Extracts, for Tanning (Except 

Hemlock.) 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 4.623,086 170,595 

Not stated prior to 1918. 



Bark, Hemlock. 



1918. 
1914. 
1015. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Cords. 
5.602 
4,488 
3,672 
8.888 
1,118 
270 



Dollars. 
81,965 
25.665 
19,967 
17.865 
7.027 
2,624 



Baryta, Sulphate of, or Barytes, Un- 
manufactured. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 

28.858 

82.550 

9,616 

15 



Dollars. 

68.345 

68.270 

21,087 

245 



68 



Baryta, Sulphate of, or 
Manufactured. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 
4.594 
5.879 
1.755 

*2i6 



Barytes, 



Dollars. 

86.81* 

42,62? 

14,997 

2 

8,818 



Bauxite, Crude. 



1913... 
1914... 
1915... 
1916... 
1917... 
1918. . . 



Tons. 

80,868 

28,576 

12.870 

8.450 

6.403 

2.238 



Dollars. 
119,848 
86.871 
50.557 
17,194 
22.568 
10,045 



Bay Rum, or Bay Water. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Proof gallons. 



488 

608 
885 
249 
641 



Beeswax. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
828.287 
1,412.696 
1.565.888 
2.284.288 
2,711,514 
1,950,518 



Benzol. 



1917.. 
1918.. 
Not 



separately 



Pounds. 

8.175,906 

8.073,948 

stated prior to 



1917. 



Binitrotoluol. 



1917.. 

1918.. 

Not 



Pounds. 
110,461 

t m m £4 gon 

separately stated prior to 



1917. 



Dollars. 
707 
620 
678 
841 
278 
796 



Dollars. 
294,704 
477,745 
440,047 
618,856 
904,557 
678.148 



Dollars. 

273.108 

S216.640 



Dollars. 
18.612 
5,726 



Bismuth. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
151.030 
138.190 
84.237 
64.281 
88,466 
75,611 



Blanco Polish. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
257,176 
241.448 
72,587 
155.925 
196.113 
207,098 



Dollars. 
21,854 
17.997 
17.748 
21.229 
68.468 
24,821 



Blanc Fixe, or Artificial Sulphate of 
Barytes, and Satin White a Ar- 
tificial Sulphate of Lime. 

Pounds. Dollars. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



4.808.726 

4.752.474 

2.238.869 

492,728 

408.168 

179.200 



Bleacher's Blue. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Bloodchar. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1918. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

2,954 

26,674 

14.167 

15 



58.499 
60.641 
25.748 
11.528 
10,029 
2.876 



Dollars. 

4,143 
14,922 
14.125 
14,922 
19.048 

5.166 



Dollars. 



1.789 

1,196 

16 



■ 



/ 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



41 



Blood, Dried. 



1MB. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
86,461 
891,947 
227.648 
196,600 
879,067 
479,518 



Blue, Berlin, Prussian, Chinese, Etc., 

in Pulp, Dry or Ground In, or 

Mixed with Oil or Water. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
198,886 
275,174 
547,299 
185,294 
878,074 
18.867 



Dollars. 

84,476 

50.149 

112,904 

110.901 

209,524 

15,009 



Bone Black, Lamp Black, Eke. 

Dollars. 

1013 81,056 

1014 27,604 

1915 24,45© 

JJJS 2,896 

1917 6.888 

1018 '279 



Bone Char, or Bone Black, Not Suit- 
able for Use as Pigment. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Bones, Crude. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
12,484 
77,717 
120,715 
86.724 
80,168 
11,865 



Dollars. 
565.566 
829.780 
756.015 
755,700 
826.142 

1.010,871 



Bone and Horn, Manufactures of. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
95.918 
81.666 
68.468 
59.846 
79,748 
74,966 



Bone Dust, or Animal Carbon and 
Ash, Fit Only for Fertilizer. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 
88,919 
41,446 
28.440 
20.595 
14.805 
8.428 



Borax, Crude. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

11,768 

686 



Dollars. 
818,807 

1.086.493 
584.748 
527.079 
888.541 
285,882 



Dollars. 

882 

93 



88 



Bottle Caps, Collapsible Tubes and 
Sprinkler Tops, Not Decorated, 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
24.128 
50.425 
28.420 
15.166 
18.899 
9,607 



Bottle Caps, Collapsible Tubes and 
Sprinkler Tops, Decorated, Etc. 

Dollars. 

1918 208,857 

iwA4. .••..•».•.•.... ...... 04T,Uo4 

IViO. ............... ...... 214.022 

1916 178,081 

1917 190.864 

1918 55,582 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Bristles, Crude, Not Sorted. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

18,913 18.806 

27.036 25,280 

45,467 3.336 

92,800 15,239 

128,894 52.431 

88.488 44,145 



Bristles, Sorted, Bunched, or Pre- 



pared. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
3,479.666 
3.551,081 
8.726.625 
8.514.809 
4,456.284 
8,878,252 



Dollars. 
8.319.904 
8,255,554 
8,848,538 
8,456.452 
4.678,801 
4.648.042 



Bronze, or Dutch Metal, in Leaf. 



100 le 

1918 768.071 

1914 792.578 

1915 896,038; 

1916 291,8V 

1917 806.497 

1918 478.885 



Bronze Powder, Brocades, 
and Metallic*. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

1.405,502 

1,403,091 

1,068,206 

161.409 

524,082 

61,785 



Dollars. 
104,829 
110,816 
110,168 
88,559 
81,277 
186,894 



Flitters 



Dollars. 
420,808 
406.249 
288,064 

96,852 
288,976 

34,153 



Brown, Spanish, Indian Red and Col- 
cothar, or Oxide of Iron. 



1918. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
108.604 
186,476 
188.088 
221.209 
292,122 
838,516 



Brown, Vandyke, Cassel Earth 
Cassel Brown. 



or 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
1,881 
2,668 
1,497 

865 
2.584 

854 



Brushes, Feather Dusters and Hair 

Pencils. 



1918., 
•1914. 



Dollars. 

2,074.141 

568.160 



•Figures cover period from July 1 to October 
3, 1913. 
Stated separately after October 8, 1918. 



Brushes. 



1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Buchu Leaves. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
105.810 
125,868 
120,704 

94,520 
100.809 

50,685 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Cadmium. 



Pounds. 

1,000 

1,548 

264 

5 



Dollars. 
1,605,984 
1.667,289 
1,809.428 
2,188,084 
2,979,414 



Dollars. 

114.682 

180,852 

115.689 

85.452 

85.807 

42,484 



Dollars. 

1.508 

1.289 

278 

6 



Caffeine. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

59.778 

80.860 

54.828 

1.267 

1.601 

6.471 



Caffeine Compounds. 



1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1914. 



Dollars. 

211,861 

260.828 

186.557 

15.228 

17.219 

64.529 



Dollars. 

9.712 

4,071 

605 



Calcium, Acetate, Chloride, Carbide 
and Nitrate. 



1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1914. 



Dollars. 
58.455 
1.208.894 
8,206,869 
8.808,281 
8,422,190 



Calcium Cyanamid or Lime Nitrogen. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 
14,656 
29.586 
20,564 
88.028 
44.146 
48.070 



Dollars. 

777,774 
1.590,004 

919.574 
1.688,866 
1,951,104 
2,297,475 



1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Calcium, Tartrate, Crude. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

118,256 8.849 

1,755.954 161.566 

1,101,255 185,688 

871.910 51,418 

118.855 19,716 



Not stated prior to 1914. 



Calomel, Corrosive Sublimate and 

Other Mercurial Medicinal 

Preparations. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Camomile Flowers. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Camwood. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 

i 

80 



Dollars. 
42,728 
37,589 
25,694 
18.158 
9,974 
2,124 



Dollars. 
14,176 
6,252 
18,118 
27,810 
64,482 
41,886 



Dollars. 
191 



209 
5,991 



Candle Pitch or Tar, and Palm 
Other Vegetable Stearin. 

Pounds. 

8,047.020 

2,208,222 

1,262.725 



or 



1918 
1914 
1915 
1£16 
1917 
1918 



853.140 
467,958 
108,349 



Dollars 
56,970 
40,004 
28,400 
21,596 
14.446 
7.068 



Candles and Tapers, Wax and Other. 

Dollars. 

1913 .\... 22,990 

1914 14,848 

1915 8,688 

1916 9.118 

1917 4.515 

1918....^ 8.916 



Cantharides. 



3918. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
.1918. 



Pounds. 

8,788 

5,648 

14.047 

32,608 

25.625 

6,949 



Carbon Tetrachloride. 



1914 

1915 

1918 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1914 



Pounds. 
572,910 
342,854 



Dollars. 

5.582 

4,485 

12,266 

26,923 

• 47.857 

6,677 



Dollars. 
28,300 
18,139 



1913. 
1914. 
1945. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Cassia Buds, Unground. 

Pounds. Dollars, 

28,867 2,449 

178,449 10.101 

193.882 10,894 

197.066 16,585 

218.563 14,181 

178,202 16,271 



1917.. 

1918. . 

Not 



Cassia Buds, Ground. 

Pounds. 

139,224 

0,400 

stated prior to 1917. 



DoHara 

21.672 

844 



Cassia, and Cassia Vera, Unground. 

Pounds. Dollar*. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



7,151,005 
5,216.426 
5.658,154 
7.487,156 
9.019,850 
5,817,654 



Castor or Castoreum. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Ounoes, 
9,245 
6,888 
18.086 
19,657 
24,427 
28,578 



1913.. 
1914.. 
1915.. 
1916.. 
1917. . 
1918.. 



Castor Beans or Seeds. 

Bushels. 

824.674 

1.043,928 

924,605 

1,071.969 

767,075 

1,262.488 



647,116 
868.218 
848,698 
498.161 
808.079 
429,841 



Dollars. 
5,884 
3,468 
5.844 
6,694 
8,250 
7,961 



Dollars. 

918,608 
1.154,065 

998,680 
1.566.466 
1,186,775 
2,842,206 



42 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



Catgut, Whipgut or Wormgut, Un- 
manufactured. 



1013. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
139,125 
123,551 
198,081 
253,678 
816,491 
216,810 



Catgut, Whipgut or Wormgut, Manu- 
factures of. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 

3,427 

62,466 

68,492 

9,790 

4,867 

8.602 

Cellophone (Manufacture of Cel- 
lulose) . 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1918. 



Dollars. 
5,046 



Cement, Roman, Portland and Other 

Hydraulic. 

100 pounds. 

313,092 

374.471 

342,292 

19,960 

4,196 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



8,426 



Dollars. 
124.395 
163.460 
132,864 
9,182 
2,929 
6,020 



Chalk, Unmanufactured. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 
150,010 
128,947 
120,225 
181,368 
148,216 
107,391 



Dollars. 
120,049 
102,907 
91.188 
95,861 
181,885 
120,792 



Chalk, When Ground, Precipitated, 

or Otherwise Prepared, Including 

Tailor's, Billiard, Red or 

French. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1910. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 



Dollars. 
79,731 
52.656 
86,621 
46.185 
89,819 
42,890 



Quantity not stated after 1913. 



Chamois Skin. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Charcoal. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
149,057 
107.324 
64.267 
108,346 
176,578 
86,923 

collars. 
25,557 
60,266 
39,978 
45,174 
78,583 
10,915 



Chicory Root, Raw but Unground. 



, Pounds. 

1913 2.203,057 

1914 1,580,925 

1915 471,966 

1916 

1917 241,299 

1918 4,577 



Dollars. 

82,939 

22,028 

6,717 



29,181 
501 



Chicory Root, Burnt or Roasted, 
Ground or Granulated. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
469.301 
765,066 
409,234 
5,657 
111.972 
824 



Dollars. 

19,355 

31,988 

13.991 

260 

8,252 

97 



China Clay, or Kaolin. 



1913. 
3914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 
263,688 
241,936 
230,484 
228.936 
206,729 
192,705 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Chloral Hydrate. 

Pounds. 



Dollars. 
1,753,822 
1,590,054 
1,506,555 
1,376,990 
1,212,099 
1.803,668 



Dollars. 



644 
112 

1 



241 

25 

2 



1,057 



1,599 



Chloroform. 



Pounds. 
942 
2,444 
26 



Dollars. 
1,643 
990 
43 



1918 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 1 1 

2,274 pounds of the 1914 figures were valued 
at only 25 cents a pound; 170 -pounds at $2.48 
per pound. 



..j 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Cloves, Unground. 

Pounds. 



2,784,992 
5.064.621 
5,846,665 
7,066,287 
8,867,851 
5,521,919 



Dollars. 
481,751 
597,310 
595,546 
791,708 
532,345 

1,166,879 



Clove Stems, Unground. 



Chlorophyll, Extract of. 



1912. 
1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

4,461 

7,508 

10,125 

3,490 

190 



Dollars. 
3,586 
8,544 
8,503 
3,671 
192 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

32,830 

268 

4,391 

57,160 

1,120 

46,432 



199 



163 



Chrome, Yellow or Green, and All 
Other Chromium Colors. 



Coal-Tar Colors or Dyes 
Specially Provided For. 



Dollars. 

1.333 

20 

760 

4,009 

174 

6,990 

Not 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

148,299 

134,460 

124,638 

27,929 

28,078 

1,310 



Dollars. 

23.406 

22,412 

21.171 

5.586 

4.202 

459 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
6,902,066 
7.537.924 
6,858,509 
2,997,924 
2,919,554 
2,240,558 



Coal-Tar Distillates, Not Medicinal, 
and Not Colors or Dyes. 



Chromium, Hydroxide, Crude. 



1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 



Dollars. 

5,859 

12,444 



1914.. 
1915. . 
1916.. 
1917.. 
1918. . 
Not 



stated prior to 1914 



Dollars. 

188,686 

31.979 

858,836 

78,665 

7.571 



1914. 



Cinchona Bark, Alkaloids or Salts of. 

All Other, Except Sulphate 

of Quinia. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Ounces. 
648,865 
462,292 
203,880 
231,100 
623,947 
3,131,958 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Cinchonidiai 



Ounces. 
309,395 
205,006 

69,487 
181,481 
221,272 

86.482 



Dollars. 

131,692 

117,915 

66,004 

1 82.167 
824.438 
769,403 



Dollars. 
43,680 
19,502 
8,223 
15.814 
17,590 
20,708 



Coal-Tar' Preparations, Medicinal. 

Dollars. 

1917 381,256 

1918 314,188 

Not stated prior to 1917. 

Cobalt and Cobalt Ore and Zaffer. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
310,961 
197,009 
24.095 
144.170 
136,883 
161.695 



Cobalt, Oxide of. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



y 



Pounds. 
28,729 
109,584 
109,155 
238,984 
236,822 
220,798 



Dollars. 

. 30,718 
115.038 
8,226 
186.124 
191,966 
306,310 



Dollars. 
14,405 
95,026 
180,087 
228,746 
220,263 
248.172 



Cinnamon, and Chip. of. Unground. Q^^ Ecgoninet ^ Sa i te Q f. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds 
1,405,832 
303,967 
528,254 
410,594 
664,248 
686,466 



Civet. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Ounces. 
11.269 
2,761 
1,820 
9.600 
9,230 
9,766 



Dollars 
188,267 
44.304 
74,081 
50,026 
77,272 
311,004 



Dollars. 
15.557 
3,978 
2,086 
12,099 
13,148 
11,877 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Ounces. 
3,715 
8,291 
179 
4,276 
19,388 
8,597 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Cocculus Indicus. 

Pounds. 



Dollars. 

4.885 

4,101 

422 

5,887 

88,627 

35,858 



Dollars. 



4,446 
9,550 

7,*4i6 



Clay, Common Blue and Gross-Al- 
merode for Manufacturing Cru- 
cibles and Glass Melting Pots. 



Cochineal. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 

28,218 

20,587 

12,274 

8,488 

412 

64 



Dollars. 

211,005 

180,524 

107,146 

16,088 

0,353 

869 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
109,089 
138.139 
155,430 
772.416 
124,745 
160,547 



Coca Leaves. 



Clay, Plasticene and Other Modeling. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
8,619 
9.424 
6.641 
7,978 
12.468 
7.083 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

1,175,780 
711.564 

1,048.312 
947.587 
634,982 

1.059,484 



121 
388 

2,818 



Dollars. 
44,249 
62,260 
88,464 
858,914 
4,6802 
75,924 



Dollars. 

189,085 
91.384 
98.870 

100.627 
90.181 

179,312 



Clays or Earths, Not Specially Pro- 
vided For. 



Cocoa Butter, or Butterine, Refined. 

Deodorized Cocoanut Oil, and 

All Substitutes for Cocoa 

Butter. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
A917. 
1918. 



Tons. 
37,370 
87,672 
86,072 
84.677 
30,942 
24,474 



Dollars. 




167,614 


1918 


210,574 


1914 


158,041 


1915 


148,916 


1916 


138,171 


1917 


144,666 


1918 



Pounds. 


Dollars. 


3.634,986 


990,568 


2,876.967 


801,259 


126.028 


85.868 


69,888 


15,824 


24.289 


7,581 


14.512 


4,569 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



43 



Cocoamit Meat, or Copra, Not 
Shredded, Desiccated or Prepared. 



Pounds. 

1918 84,288,592 

1914 44,469.158 

1915 88,090,892 

1916 108,007,765 

1917 247,048,127 

1918 486.883,808 



Dollars. 
1.681,864 
2,896.105 
8,890,157 
4.551.422 
12.680.112 
26.937.621 



Collodion and Celluloid and All Com- 
pounds of Pyroxylin. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Colombo Root. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds 
27,565 
4.587 
8,751 
48,867 
92.849 
20.759 



Dollars 
288,689 
688,891 
371,714 
127,627 
68,698 
58,054 



Dollars. 

794 

184 

458 

8,442 

4,999 

3.061 



Coloring for Brandy, Wine, Beer or 
Other Liquors. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 

1.925 

1,628 

842 

192 

225 



Color Foils. 



1013. 
1914. 
1915. 
19M. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 

10,926 

7.847 

2.516 



1.747 
5,743 



Copperas, or Sulphate of Iron. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 

191 »;. 

1917. 
10IS. 



Pounds. 
6,196 
1,120 
4,750 



Dollars. 

174 

18 

95 



Copper, Sulphate of, or Blue Vitriol. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 


Dollars. 


11.051 


728 


114,780 


5,486 


45,239 


2,156 


184.182 


17,661 


15,952 


2,283 


98.148 


9.085 



Corks. 



Pounds. Dollars. 

1013 2.511,285 2,187,867 

Stated separately after 1913; see below. 



1914. 
1915. 
1910. 
1917. 
1918. 



Cork Stoppers. 

Pounds. 

888.500 

326,887 

269.806 

437.550 

365.877 



Dollars. 
728,317 
250,842 
170.746 
275.161 
198,378 



Cork Disks, Wafers or Washers. 



1914 

lVlo. . . , . 

1916 

1917 

1918 



Pounds. 
2.065,567 
1.926,864 
695.776 
2,815.515 
2,316,018 



Cork Insulation. 



Pounds. 

1917 4.038.372 

1918 3,771.294 

Not stated prior to 1917. 



Cork Paper. 



1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1917. 



Dollars. 
1.675,688 
1.165,540 
487,588 
1,973.342 
1,445,851 



Dollars. 
181.698 
181,402 



Dollars. 
138,214 
107,462 



Cork Waste, Shavings and Cork 
Refuse of All Kinds. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1917 120.677.624 1,743.184 

1918 95,031,164 1.682,765 

Not stated prior to 1917. 

Corkwood, or Cork Bark, Unmanu- 
*"* factured. 

Pounds. _ Dollars. 

1913 188,227.878 «* 8,152,070 

1914 88.282,629 2,646.018 

1916 24.897.808 1,420,581 

1916 32.866,700 1,517,366 

1917 40.273,005 2,125.633 

1918 80,750,497 1.479,072 



Cotton Batting. 



1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Not stated prior to 1914. 



Pounds. 


Dollars. 


42.102 


4.378 


87,655 


8.506 


105.169 


10,458 


160,612 


15,610 


107.286 


14,882 


e> 1914. 





Crayons, Including Charcoal Crayons 
. or Fusains. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Cream of Tartar. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1017. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
66,718 
812,857 
764.868 
88.588 
98.609 
68.586 



Cresol. 



1017. 
1918. 
Not 



Pounds 

4,790,699 

7.531.607 

separately stated prior to 1917. 



Dollars. 
12.925 
18,859 
15*090 
11.585 
12,945 
10,282 



Dollars. 
11.797 
166.987 
166.922 
18.479 
28.488 
16,068 



Dollars. 
829,738 
646,300 



Crucibles of Stone and Earthenware. 



1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1914. 



1918. 
1914. 
1015. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Cryolite, or Kryolith. 

Tons. 

2,519 

2,157 

4,569 

8.962 

8.885 

4,888 



Cubebs. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

166.307 

106,665 

87.588 

89,800 

128,558 

76,895 



Cudbear. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
27,971 
15.658 
24,827 
55.948 
49.163 
62,504 



Dollars. 

10,974 
6,764 
7.641 

58,161 
7,860 



Dollars. 
52.440 
47,435 
91,417 
84.497 
168,475 
218.600 



Dollars 
58.668 
82,466 
28.451 
28.566 
48,442 
45,084 



Dollars. 
1.775 
1.061 
1,680 
6,512 
6,106 
10,166 



Curry and Curry Powder. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



CuttleBsh Bone. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
218.817 
809,540 
282,239 
214.659 
230,271 
247.250 



Dandelion Root. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
108.434 
109,658 
U2.814 
29.378 
108,713 
149,088 



"Dollars. 

12.087 

11.807 

9.872 

8,669 

10.624 

9.248 



Dollars. 
80.855 
56.051 
52,041 
36,576 
52,888 
67.586 



Dollars. 

8.269 

9,889 

12,137 

6.487 

23,912 

87.773 



Decalcomanias, in Ceramic Colors. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

80.094 144,890 

45.999 92,528 

22.411 62.462 

11,176 32.882 

8,471 27.398 

5,195 22.200 

Except 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Decalcomanias, All Other, 

Toys. 

Pounds. 

1913 41,870 

1914 182.805 

1915 90.040 

1016 51,840 

1917 66.513 

1918 34.858 



Dollars. 
42.001 
131.494 
87.641 
56.634 
69,844 
41,300 



Divi Divi. 



Pounds. 

1913 814.491 

1914 29.032 

1915 4,513,219 

1916 16,407.465 

1917.. 15,969,144 

1918.* 15.789,381 



Dragon's Blood. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
14,558 
26.288 
28.110 
20,218 
48.026 
10,887 



Eggs, Dried. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
20.284 
88,061 
30.575 
88.993 
1,590,568 
1.598.630 



Dollars. 

4,148 

481 

71.867 

810.572 

298.191 

274.891 



Dollars. 
5,916 
9.407 
8,446 
10.602 
19,187 
6.198 



Dollars. 

7.587 

12.640 

10,885 

9.875 

417.417 

429,167 



Eggs, Frozen or Otherwise, Prepared 
or Preserved, in Packages. 

Dollars. 
805.282 
198,664 
248,997 
178.627 
168.870 



1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 



Not stated prior to 1914. 



Pounds. 
2.647.974 
2,815.511 
3,756.188 
2.171.888 
1,260.574 



Eggs, Yolks of. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
227,457 
675.058 
1.382,408 
2.919.019 
6.924.071 
8.077,730 



Dollars. 

87.027 

168.972 

257.607 

873.152 

1.882.095 

2,029.420 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Enamel, Fusible and Glass. 

Dollars. 

11,997 

18.028 

10,975 

3.731 

12,078 

8,062 



Enamel, Glass, White, for Watch and 
Clock Dials. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Enamel Paints. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
59.457 
96.174 
86,078 
54,546 
118,571 
2,470 



Ergot 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
223.793 
185.704 
141.915 
128.015 
165.701 
140,474 



Ether, Ethyl Chloride. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

11.241 

9.014 



Dollars. 
15.855 
13,284 
7,881 
4.980 
18.604 
10,465 



Dollars. 

11.877 

17,316 

6,504 

8,987 

18.902 

386 



.Dollars. 
208,864 
102.640 
92,459 
78.896 
80.647 
81,267 



Dollars. 

7.908 

10,046 



2,780 
8,917 
1,274 



5.198 
5.207 
2,411 



Ether Fruit, Containing Not More 
Than 10 Per Cent. Alcohol. 



1018. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 


Dollars. 


81tt 


106 


1.331 


1,737 


117 


1.070 



Ethers, Containing More than 10 Per 
Cent. Alcohol. 



Pounds. 
1918 


Dollars. 
7.029 


1914 


1.868 




64 


1918 140 


169 


1917 




1918 880 


182 


Quantity not stated prior to 1915. 





44 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



Ethers, Sulphuric. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 765 120 

1914 915 181 

1915 849 189 

1916 62 28 

1917 

1918 8 7 

Ethers, Not Specially Provided For. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 508 808 

1914 12.086 5,049 

1915 6,801 4.500 

1916 598 1,410 

1917 25 68 

1918 

Extracts of Vegetable Origin for Dye- 
ing, Not Elsewhere Specified. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 1.711,896 101,888 

Not stated prior to 1918. 

Feather Dusters and Hair Pencils. 

Dollars. 

1914 2,491 

1915 8,590 

1916 5.754 

1917 7,685 

1918 7,967 

Not separately stated prior to 1914. 

Fertilizers Not Specially Provided 
For. (Used only for Manure.) 

Tons. Dollars. 

1913 116,257 2,190.816 

1914 197,165 4,241.285 

1915 100,155 2,208.198 

1916 78,252 1,591,517 

1917 71,874 1.521,307 

1918 68.815 1,772,684 

Fish Sounds. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1916 396,081 96,201 

1917 456,738 104.654 

1918 881.248 78.499 

Not stated prior to 1916. 

Filter Tubes. 

Dollars. 

1918 6.088 

1914 7.487 

1915 6,639 

1916 2.769 

1917 7,359 

1918 8,135 

Filter Masse or Filter Stock. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 429,920 49.042 

1914 486,476 53,974 

1915 849.498 41,880 

1916 54,849 8.356 

1917 65.062 10.804 

1918 48,210 13,917 

Flavoring Extracts. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 4,988 6.383 

Not stated prior to 1918. 

Flaxseed or Linseed Screenings. 

Dollars. 

1914 4,748 

1915 678 

1916 4.506 

1917 2,052 

1918 37,818 

Not separately stated prior to 1914. 

Floral Essences Containing No 

Alcohol. 

Dollars. 

1914 87.086 

1915 145.973 

1916 265,956 

1917 408.936 

1918 250,531 

Not stated prior to 1914. 

Floral or Flower Waters Containing 
No Alcohol. 

Dollars. 

1918 31,710 

1914 50,297 

1915 22,216 

1916 34,461 

1917 29,279 

1918 52,258 

Formaldehyde, Solution Containing 

Not More Than 40 Per Cent. 

Formaldehyde or Formaline. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

xVlS ................ ...... ...... 

1914 14,228 1,448 

1915 7.700 814 

1916 79.857 8.064 

1917 28.985 2,849 

1918 228.402 40.691 



Fluorspar. 

Tons. Dollars. 

1913 28,786 77,585 

1914 18,668 50,948 

1916 6.925 27.951 

1916 8,808 82,482 

1917 12,008 87.880 

1918 10,986 117,279 

Fuller's Earth. 

Tons. Dollars. 

1911 15,818 125,899 

1912 16.175 188,111 

1918 16,866 145,588 

1914 19,867 174,276 

Subdivided after 1914; see below. 

Fuller's Earth, Unwrought or Un- 
manufactured. 

Tons. Dollars. 

1915 745 5,268 

1916 1,067 7.825 

1917 975 7,846 

1918 1.348 14,552 

Fuller's Earth, Wrought or Manufac- 
tured. 

Tons. Dollars. 

1915 18.754 168.540 

1016 14,973 185,845 

1917 15,077 159.071 

1918 18.435 177.102 

Fustic. 

Tons. Dollars. 

1913 8,785 58,808 

1914 7,121 100.501 

1915 12,854 179.959 

1916 17.469 289.918 

1917 5,195 142,481 

1918 16.259 485.428 

Galalith (Artificial Ivory) and Manu- 
factures of. 

Dollars. 

1918 12,786 

1914 15,060 

1915 10,048 

1916 10,028 

1917 80,762 

1918 45,368 

Gambier, or Terra Japonica. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 17.087.805 784,981 

1914 16,449,663 625,855 

1915 14.169.250 542,200 

1916 12,602,251 888,985 

1917 10,861,904 853,675 

1918 8,956,082 958,000 

Gas Liquor, Ammoniacal. 

Dollars. 

1918...., 35.245 

1914 29,336 

1915 81,466 

1916 26,788 

1917 28,885 

1918 5,059 

Gelatin. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 1.085.940 279,892 

1914 2,439.440 768,215 

1915 2,708.862, 916,368 

1916 1,657.065 819.178 

1917 967,920 809,524 

1918 869,115 188,878 

Gentian Root. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 1.796,928 88,281 

1914 2,181,935 109,119 

1915 1,022,252 55.558 

1916 788,807 68,240 

1917 1.780,044 218,877 

1918 882,590 46,616 

Ginger Root, Unground, Not Pre- 
served or Candied. 

Pounds. Dollars* 

1918 7.856.401 406,197 

1914 8,006,132 146,792 

1915 8,810,391 156,973 

1916 5,593,845 891,965 

1917 4,307,279 411,965 

1918 5.157.581 431,245 

Glass Bottles, Vials and Jars, Plain 
Green or Colored, Molded or 
Pressed, and Flint, Lome, 
and Lead, Empty. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 205.267 

1914 214,180 

1915 8.561,200 88.688 

1916 1,851,813 24,049 

1917 850.946 19,281 

1918 114,725 5,686 

Quantity not stated prior to 1915. 



Glass, Cylinder and Crown, Unpol- 
ished, Silvered. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1914 v 56.494 8,998 

1915 54,893 2.021 

1916 12 1 

1917 429 45 

1918 8,846 1,159 

Glass, Cylinder and Crown, Polished. 

Sq. feet. Dollars. 

1913 579,129 119,395 

1914 615,887 121,814 

1915 196.274 86,788 

1916 108,578 19,898 

1917 , 

1918 255 867 

Glass, Cylinder and Crown, Polished 
When Bent or Decorated. 

Sq. feet. Dollars. 

1918 247.428 60,269 

1914 147,482 86.116 

1915 48.885 10,076 

1916 5.321 1,858 

1917 89 67 

1918 

Glass, Cylinder and Crown, Polished, 

Silvered. 

Sq. feet. Dollars. 

1914 90.657 20.405 

1915 89.846 19.597 

1916 8.798 1.905 

1917 

1918 16 15 

Not stated prior to 1914. 

Glass Demijohns and Carboys, Cov- 
ered or Uncovered, Empty. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 6.481 

1914 8,899 

1915 27,990 890 

1916 4,731 298 

1917 

1918 2.528 209 

Quantity not stated prior to 1915. 

Glass, Plate, Fluted, Rolled, Ribbed 
or Rough, or the Same Contain- 
ing a Wire Netting Within 
v Itself. 

Sq. feet. Dollars. 

1913 379.219 14,812 

1914 436,587 16,207 

1915 307,516 12,742 

1916 69,272 4.526 

1917 18,240 2,002 

1918 17.656 2,289 

Glass, Plate, Fluted, Rolled, Ribbed 

or Rough, Ground, Smoothed or 

Otherwise Obscured. 

Sq. feet. Dollars. 

1918 9,617 2.247 

1914 614,012 126.917 

1915 • 4,872 1,074 

1916 489 124 

1917 5,952 402 

1918 8.996 891 

Glass, Plate — Cast, Polished, Fin- 
ished or Unfinished, Unsilvered, 
or the Same Containing a 
Wire Netting Within Itself. 

Sq. feet. Dollars. 

1918 1.068.427 247,015 

1914 2,819,386 631.596 

1915 440,718 100,400 

1916 12,782 3,778 

1917 13,484 18,787 

1918 

Glass Plate — Cast, Polished, Unsil- 
vered When Bent or Dec- 
orated, Etc. 

Sq. feet. Dollars. 

1913 88,169 47,449 

1914 140,808 62,228 

1915 27,121 14.681 

1916 7.147 2,726 

1917 8,834 1.542 

19J8 ...... ...... 

Glass, Plate — Cast, Polished, Silvered 

and L. G. Plates, Exceeding in 

Size 1 44 Square In&ies. 

Sq. feet. Dollars. 

1918.... T 882 627 

1914 18,229 4,888 

1915 2.692 994 

1916 2,557 515 

1917 85 116 

1918 181 . 88 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



45 



Glass, Plate — Cast, Polished, Silvered 
When Bent or Otherwise Dec- 



Gold Leaf. 



orated. 



8q. feet. 

1918 1.610 

1914 19.669 

1916 6,822 

1916 2,670 

1917 14 

1918 104 



Glass, Window — Cylinder, 
Unpolished. 

Pounds. 

1913 20.468,971 

1914 81.197.681 

1915 16.682.210 

1916 1.401.672 

1917 2.694.979 

1918 '672.614 



Dollars. 
1.004 
6.864 
2.152 
2.185 
86 
94 



Crown, 



Dollars. 
804,782 

1,212,586 

679,228 

140,262 

277.222 

84.018 



Glass, Window — Cylinder, Crown 

and Common, Unpolished When 

Bent or Decorated. 



Pounds. 

1913 1,778.028 

1914 1,708.186 

1915 460.017 

1910 889.009 

1917 870,522 

1918 -. 181.189 



Dollars. 
158.728 
149.208 
56.228 
52.051 
47.069 
19.010 



Glass, Window — Cylinder and Crown 

Polished, Silvered When 

Ground, Bent or Decorated. 

Sq. feet. Dollars. 

1913 17 28 

1914 188.158 88.084 

1915 107.711 26.286 

1916 20.528 5,087 

1917 

1918 25 14 

Glauber Salts. 

Tons. Dollars. 

1913 240 5,686 

1914 228 5,567 

1915 58 1.118 

1016 1 88 

1917 

1918 



Glazes, Fluxes, Enamels and Colors, 
Ceramic and Glass. 



1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1914. 



Dollars. 
88,527 
70,782 
64,188 
48.421 
26.588 



Glucose. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

212.635 

262,228 

52.799 

1,288 

7.696 

105.551 



Glue. 

Pounds. 

1918 5.099,661 

1914 22.545.681 

1915 8.086.288 

1916 8,050,794 

1917 6.801.826 

1918 2.018,812 



Gly< 



Crude. 



rcenne. 

Pounds. 

1918 84,899,129 

1914 86,280,888 

1915 18,661.929 

1916 10.875,058 

1917 4,078,808 

L918 1,925,815 



Glycerine, Refined. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
482.889 
551.806 
860,567 
808,468 
187,128 
19,750 



Dollars. 
7.166 
9,025 
1,880 
818 
881 
6,482 



Dollars. 
672.266 

1,792,612 
702,850 
219.177 
954.678 
842.017 



Dollars. 
4.247.082 
4.478.178 
2,185.868 
2,209,610 
1,260.464 
880.145 



Dollars. 
78.386 
90,562 
60.908 
182.469 
76.861 
17,438 



Gold Beaters* Molds and Skins. 



1913. 
1014. 
1915. 
191ft. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
26.408 
26.634 
13.944 
23.131 
38.651 
22,609 



1913. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



100 leaves. 
80,902 
87.627 
18.614 

1.647 
14.870 

8,472 



1918. 

1914. 

1916. 

1916. 

1917. 

1918. 



Grape Sugar. 

Pounds. 

4,338 

98 

861 

110 



Dollars. 
28,288 
82,482 
12,540 
778 
12.403 
6,884 



Dollars. 

698 

48 

61 
62 



Grease Enfleurage, Not Containing 

Alcohol. 



1918. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
92.446 
40.688 
28.407 
5.246 
26,686 
28,620 



Dollars. 

124,196 

51.417 

81,578 

8,624 

88,946 

167.861 



Grease, Soluble, Used in Processes of 
Softening, Dyeing or Finishing. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Grease, Wool, Crude* 



Pounds. 

1918 14,478,661 

1914 12,284,248 



1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



9.281.278 
7.617,718 
4,861.796 
4,481,486 



Dollars. 

4,886 

4,401 

2,860 

684 

77 

66 



Dollars. 
828.991 
292,988 
286.706/ 
860.686 
294.826 
888,877 



1918. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Vool, Refined. 




Pounds. 


Dollars. 


2.009.018 


86,474 


2.691,691 


121,847 


467,761 


28.418 


214,699 


14.794 


816,149 


24.819 


81,218 


2,662 



Grease and Oils, Sulphur Oil or Olive 

Foots. 



- Pounds. 

1918 18,698,862 

1914 11.714,796 

1916 12,946.066 

1916 12.684,986 

1917 12.188,516 

1918 1.712,640 



Dollars. 
874,114 
772,066 
886,810 
1,066,292 
1.108,099 
176,814 



Grease and Oils, All Other (Except- 
ing Fish Oils), Used in Soap 
Making, Etc 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 7,884.605 291.984 

1914 10,684,016 449.561 

1915 17.800,866 709.880 

1916 11,824,636 482,479 

1917 8,428,689 482,086 

1918: 26,845,640 2,591.044 

Grease, All Other Not Specially Pro- 
vided For. 

Dollars. 

14,207 

106,041 

84,764 

81,289 

28.718 

6,867 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Guano. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



• • • * . 



Tons. 
16,462 
21.858 
20.950 
15.782 
8.568 
10.668 



Guiacol Carbonate. 



1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Not stated prior to 1914. 



Pounds. 

1.687 

6.907 

469 

200 

9.492 



Gum, Aloes. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

909.279 

918.402 

953.186 

1.597.811 

1.236.381 

1.280,595 



Dollars. 
818.891 
754,727 
584.371 
425.210 
78.894 
808.268 



Dollars. 
2,645 

11.125 
1.160 
6.458 

74.818 



Dollars. 
77.938 
64,983 
90,081 
152,146 
97.607 
95.846 




Gum, Amber and Amberoid, Crude. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 85.646 889,984 

1914 22.486 117,875 

1915 9.866 108,186 

1916 448 8,599 

1917 86 824 

1918 784 1.280 

Gum, Arabic. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1912 6,586.787 568.681 

1918 7,111,854 698.126 

1914 2.727.447 182,870 

Included In "Arabic or Senegal" after Oc- 
tober 8, 1918. 

Gum, Arabic or Senegal. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1914 8.492.682 240.066 

1915 5.184.266 402,607 

1916 7.617.494 679.928 

1917 7.478.284 881.846 

1918 6.088.841 1,242,281 

Gum* ^m«ivviivi«. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 184.579 66.868 

1914 106,888 27.193 

1915 61,727 12.686 

1916 115.866 80.126 

1917 107,486 82.877 

1918 57.398 44.741 

Gum, Benzoin, Gamboge and Mastic. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 105.967 41981 

1914 41.975 17.886 

1915 108.606 42,940 

1916 219,266 78,848 

1917 170,960 68,806 

1918 186,120 70,601 

Mastio shown separately after 1917. 

Gum, Camphor, Crude, Natural. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 8,477,760 979.356 

1914 3,476,908 929,726 

1916 8,715.387 998,666 

1916 4.674.530 1.268.288 

1917 6,606,630 1,991.408 

1913 8,688,884 1,461,060 

Gum, a m "^r, Refined. 

Pound* Dollars. 

1918 463,410 168.020 

1914 624,608 201,992 

1916 1,140.788 406.697 

1916 2,804,197 764,498 

1917 4.638.918 2,068.177 

1918 1.146.244 800,818 

Gum, Camphor, Synthetic. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1916 16 8 

1916 

1917 469 174 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1916. 

Gum, Chicle. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1911 5.368.666 2,661.844 

1912 5.266,286 2,438.924 

1918 6,920,416 8.069.116 

•1914 7,998,187 2.902,464 

•Under provisions of law of 1909; Imported 
between July 1 and October 8. 1918; stated 
separately after 1914. 

Gum, Chicle, Crude. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1914 1.080.686 889,717 

1915 2,466,400 839,812 

1916 2,728,159 915,817 

1917 4,435,149 1.467,917 

1918 4.580.601 2,076,148 

Gum, Chicle, Refined. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1914 472,766 214,267 

1916 1.934.760 962.889 

1916 2.302,186 1.288.899 

1917 8.935.093 2.371,834 

1918 2,028.867 1,473.992 

Gum, Copal. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1914 18.006.926 938,002 

1916 12.628.887 813,986 

1916 24,100.156 1,440.238 

1917 25,621.685 1.583.070 

1918 16,690.609 1,147.004 

Gum, Copal, Kauri and Damar. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1912 24,824.390 2,017.737 

1913 81.513.330 2,828. R40 

•1914 9,207,797 989.808 

•Under provisions of law of 1909; Imported 
between July 1 and October 3, 1913; stated 
separately after 1914. 



•- 



46 

Gum, Damar. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1914 3,854,698 337,246 

1915 5,388.644 668.066 

1916. 10,819,590 790.776 

1917...... 9.200,064 797,116 

1918 5,942.638 689.308 

Gum, Dextrine, Etc. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 5.096,891 180.296 

1914 6.684,666 213.301 

Stated separately after 1914. 

Gum, Dextrine, Made from Potato 
Starch or Potato Flour. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

lftl4 5,226,421 162,688 

SS ....... 4.696 949 154,387 

iSs ;:::::: 720106 40,552 

JSJ? ;;;.. 210,948 17,832 

1918. .'.'.*. '.'......'... W-228 9.116 

Gum, Dextrine, Dextrine Substitutes, 
Burnt Starch or British Gum. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

lfil4 471,491 18,180 

J55 274668 12,028 

S16 "........ 154882 10.049 

SI?::::::::::::.... 32,773 2,855 

1918 o 06 ou 

Gum, Kauri. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

lfll4 6,554,887 1 . 00 !'??? 

\l\i 9630267 1,444.315 

iSjS •/. 9 968 963 1.394.527 

ffi? :::::::: 6,667474 i^ss 2 

Sis: :::::: : : . ::..:. £867.216 1.029. 03« 

Gum. Lac. Crude. Seed, Button and 

Stick. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

19ia 293,010 36,832 

iSJ:::::::::::::... ,«j« ^m 

iou 1,126,167 88,^»3 

1S&::::::::::::.:: s.'«gm «&»• 

1017 5,478,174 637,846 

1918. : : : : : : . . . : : . : . • 1:715.791 312.584 

Mastic 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 <*'** 9 ' 075 

Gum, Rosin, Crude. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1fila 299,983 12,605 

SB::::-::::::::::.. 2.742.083 ^ 

im?"" "I." .. 129,848 £,380 

8S::::::::.::..... ***** 2 ^ 

Gum, Senegal. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

101a ... 172,528 18,264 

I19I4::::::::.:::::: 1*0;097 10,609 

•Included In "Arabic or Senegal" after Oc- 
tober 3, 1913 ____ 

Gum, Shellac. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

101 , ... 22.069,610 8.046.760 

JJiJ 16824180 2,686.480 

S ::::::::::: . : . :: . : fogs ass 

Gum, Spruce, Crude and Refined. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1 918 274 294 

Not" stated prior to 1918. 

Gum, Tragacanth. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1ftl3 1,401.721 463.800 

ISJ ■/. 1 301 545 460,364 

1915 * " '. : 1 025081 356,119 

1916 " . . • 1 129,704 690. 123 
1917 ' "".......• 473 656 320.751 

wis::::.:::::..:::: 525,445 279.284 

Gum, Tragasol. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

lfils 1.028,804 23.998 

1914* ' " .' • 813.077 20.310 

ISit .... 761,390 16.295 

llll 931508 21.587 

Jji? :;.:;...... 882,914 21,563 

1918. " ". 1 . . : . . . ...... 503,045 22,297 

Hemlock Bark Extract for Tanning, 
Not Containing Alcohol. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1915 5.263,296 173.998 

1916 5,577,989" 890,287 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1915. 



1918 YEAR BOOK 

Hide Cuttings, Raw, and Other Glue 

Stock. 

Pounds. 



1918 

1914 

1915. 

1916 

1917 83.681,982 

1918 21,415,845 

Quantity not stated prior to 1917. 



• « • • • 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Honey. 

Gallons. 
118,792 
49.168 
268,912 
124,288 
277,345 
159,839 



Dollars. 
1,778,786 
2,126.682 
1.504.826 
970,818 
1,451,819 
927,923 



Dollars. 

64,718 

80,291 

107,172 

56,592 

171,616 

218,006 



Hoofs, Horns, and Parts of. Unman- 
ufactured, Including Horn Strips 

and Tips. Dollars. 

1918 320.192 

1914 254.872 

1915 156.126 

1916 110,169 

1917 171.718 

1918 357,399 



Hop Extract and Lupulin. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Hop 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



S. 

Pounds. 

8.471,776 

5.860,748 

11,710.534 

664,284 

212,029 

112,811 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1018. 



Ichthyol. 

Pounds. 
44,347 
66,957 
51,847 
69,227 
91.884 
65,982 



Incense. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 

84,888 

49,451 

24,407 

8,805 

1.759 

174 



Dollars. 

2,843,299 

2.775.882 

2.788,644 

147,688 

54,701 

61,207 



Dollars. 
61,796 
92.485 
70.664 
59,470 
60,757 
43.541 



DollarV 

14,687 

24.882 

4.328 

5.481 

9.968 

12.951 



India Rubber and Substitutes for, 



Crud< 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Balata. 

Pounds. 
1.818,598 
1,525,851 
2.478,228 
2,549.303 
8,284,533 
2,468,408 



Dollars. 
768,772 
789.261 
968.884 
997,827 
1.647.908 
1.285.869 



Indi 



la 



1918. 
1014. 
1915. 
1916-. 
1917. 
1918. 



Rubber and Substitutes for. 
Crude; Guayule Gum. 

- Pounds. 

10,504,945 

1.475,804 

5,116,165 

2,826,960 

2,872.872 

3,242,340 



Dollars. 

4,864.400 
607,076 

1.442.464 
881.028 
764.484 

1,087,080 



India Rubber and Substitutes for, 
Crude; Gutta-Joolatong. 



Pounds. 
1918 45,444,282 



1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



24.224.955 
14,765,765 
28,881.105 
23,788.004 
16,109,009 



Dollars. 
2,197,948 
1,175,335 

704,613 
1.847,176 
1,058,577 

969,144 



Indi 



la 



1913. 
1014. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Rubber and Substitutes for, 
Crude; Gutta Percha. 

Pounds. 

1.818.755 

, 1,552,857 

1,776,851 

2.751,839 

, 2,044,728 

891.140 



Dollars. 
271,741 
302,623 
258,132 
327.039 
855,572 
118.668 



India Rubber, Crude, and Milk of. 



1918... 
1014... 
1915... 
1916... 
1917... 
1918... 



Pounds. 
118.218,678 
131.988,593 
171,429,176 
268,101,692 
332.911,448 
390.888,588 



Dollars. 

90,110,606 

71,228.667 

82,812,928 

155,112,203 

190,201,904 

203,122,748 



India Rubber, Scrap or Refuse. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 44,479,429 

1914 21.228.498 

1915 10.584,494 

1916 18.968,782 

1917 17.665.403 

1918 18.627.185 



3.675.824 

1.616.786 

827,778 

982,644 

1.187.118 

789.800 



India Rubber, Reclaimed. 

Pounds. 
1914 4,767,914 


Dollars. 
449,291 


1915 919,628 


112,220 


1916 2,288,867 


880,979 


1917 2,887,280 


407,746 


1918 425,668 


296.528 


Not stated prior to 1914. 





Indigo, Carmined. 

, Pounds. 

1912 9,047 

1918 16,829 

1914 2,180 

Not stated after October 8, 1918. 



Dollars. 
5,908 
9,986 
1.888 



Indigo, Crude, Natural, or Synthetic. 

Pounds. Dollars. 



1918. 
i914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 



7.712,488 
8,252.528 
7.988.112 
6.794,518 
•545,105 



1,102,898 
1,115,128 
1,604,767 
8,461.601 
960.088 



•Figures cover period July 1 to September 8, 
1916; stated separately afterward. 



Indigo, 



1917. 
1918. 



Natural. 

Pounds. 
1.281,986 
2.141.882 



1917. 
1918. 



Indigo, Synthetic. 

Pounds. 

886,700 

, 942.946 



Dollars. 
2.449.861 
3.261.978 



Dollars. 
559,166 
553,246 



Indigo, Dyes Obtained From. 

Dollars. 

1914 84,842 

1915 76,258 

1916 155,264 

1917 147,744 

1918 

Stated as "Indigolds, etc.," after 1917. 



Indigo, Extracts or Pastes. 

Pounds. Dollars 

1912 228,687 

1918 242,998 

1914 11.998 

Not stated after October 8, 1918. 



45.984 

43.417 

2.540 



Indigoids Obtained from Indigo or 

Otherwise. 



Pounds. 

1018 13.087 

Stated as "Indigo Dyes, etc.," 



Ink, Printers* . 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 

40,984 

prior to 1918. 



Dollars. 

7,820 
24,999 
15,022 
17.884 
19.026 

4.685 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Ink, Writing and Copying. 

Dollars. 

28,518 

18,941 

22,765 

21.981 

26.400 

11,962 



Ink, All Other, Including Ink Powders 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1018. 



Insulating Compounds. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
4,918 
6.981 
6,196 
8.481 
5.095 
8.629 



Dollars. 
8.080 
117 
1,192 
8,871 
8,068 



Iodine, Crude. 



1913 

1914 

1915 

lVlu •■••••■•*•••••■ 
1 V J. 4 • « • •••••■■••••• 

1918. 



• • • • • 



Pounds. 
351,256 
280.391 
631.510 

1,044.84* 

1,726,9« 

253 ,i31 



Dollars. 

739,784 

588.447 

1,284.895 

2.447,764 

4.381.817 

586,799 



• i 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



47 



Iodine, Resublimed. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

40 

57 

8 



Dollars. 

96 

205 

7 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



2,610 
15,450 

Iodoform. 

Pounds. 
16 

10 



9.088 
41,789 



Dollars. 

57 

801 

40 



Ipec 



1918 

1914 

AW-AM •••••••*••••■•• 

A Ww •••••••■•••«••« 

1917 

1918 



ac. 

Pounds. 
54,648 
78,654 
187.927 
208,784 
84,672 
60,972 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Iridium. 

Ounces, troy. 
5,841 
2,185 
8,801 
2.496 
8,899 
2,815 



Iron in Pig*. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 
155.900 
187.192 
108.698 
117.857 
118,241 

54,278 



Dollars. 
86,118 
110,816 
248,408 
484,828 
146,505 
122,281 



Dollars. 
848.888 
154,842 
220,828 
146.055 
855,206 
807,954 



Dollars. 
6,418,582 
4,891,810 
4,218,964 
7,418,840 
10,042,854 
6,581,880 



Isinglass and Prepared Fish Sounds. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
225,165 
146.364 
11,906 
18,750 
85.728 
31,490 



Jalap. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
227,276 
208,901 
176,047 
201.888 
168.689 
126,511 



Kainite. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Lac, 



1918. 
1914. 
101ft. 
1916. 
1917, 
1918. 



Tons. 
866,184 
526,112 

79.124 
64 



Dye. 

Pounds. 



Dollars. 
72,540 
56,488 
9,008 
14.498 
85.476 
28.889 



Dollars. 
44.682 
28,942 
18,485 
13.642 
14,815 
84,288 



Dollars. 

2,149,689 

2,679,619 

444,996 

1,795 



Dollars 



89,600 



18,804 



Lactarene, or Casein. 

Pounds. 

1918. 8.808,689 

1914 10,799.851 

1915 7,919.742 

1916 10,876,641 

1917 12.819,111 

1918 12.106,855 



Dollars. 
651.062 
706,805 
498.897 
984,899 
1.848,492 
1,765,658 



Lakes, Dry or in Pulp, Not Specially 
Provided For. 



1914 

1915 , 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1914. 



Lanolin. 



1918. 
,1914. 
1 1915. 

1916. 

1917. 

1918. 



Pounds. 



Dollars. 

59,608 

158.430 

29,839 

11,280 

8,301 



Dollars. 



91.477 

89,588 

13,842 

710 

4,268 



9,622 

10,448 

6,853 

267 

1,088 



Lard, Lard Compounds and Lard 

Substitutes. 



Pounds. 

1914 124,885 

1915 729,792 

1916 2,405 

1917 66,682 

1918 1,181,998 



Dollars. 

13,665 

79,632 

289 

7.522 

266,806 



Lard. 



Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 4,117 496 

1914 1.251 169 

Included In next class after October 3, 1918. 



Lead, Acetate of — Brown, Gray or 

Yellow. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

42 

* 17,477 



Dollars. 

8 

957 



124 

225 



17 
97 



Lead, Acetate, White. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 


Dollars. 


21,599 


1,177 


110.986 


10.768 


31,096 


1,809 



Lead, Nitrate. 



1013 

1914 

JLmwAv m ■■■•••■•••••*• 

JLVJLO «••*«•»■«■•■••• 

1917 

1918 



ounds. 


Dollars. 


11.305 


605 


11,812 


712 



2,205 
224, 



280 
22 



Lead Compounds, Not 

Specified. 



1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

102,899 

86,514 

89,828 

32,887 

4,510 



Elsewhere 



Dollars. 
9,348 
7.471 
3.644 
8.069 
242 



Lead, Pigs and Bars, Old Refuse Run 
Into Bars, Etc. 



1913. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
6,905,760 
1,309,204 

961,999 
1,794,889 
6,369.189 

345.861 



Dollars. 
147.838 
86,807 
81,885 
90,815 
828,951 
16,155 



Lead Pipes, Shot, Glaziers* Lead and 
Lead Wire. 



1918 

1 Vl4 ........ q(\ ...... 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 



Pounds. 
38,786 
64,904 
24.042 
198,775 
644 
19,818 



Leeches. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
2,404 
4,611 
1.687 
16,486 
155 
8,231 



Dollars. 
5,587 
7,876 
1.884 
2,810 
16,899 
9.035 



Lemon, Lime and Sour Orange Juice. 

Dollars. 

1918 116,870 

1914 110.860 

1915 139.605 

1916 152,575 

1917 180.088 

1918 114,404 

Licorice, Extract of, in Paste, Rolls 
or Other Forms. 



Pounds. 

1918 832,277 

1914 946,016 

1915 1.080,718 

1916 1,702,927 

1917 1.156,800 

1918 734,976 



Licorice Root. 

Pounds. 

1913 105.032,429 

1914 86,754.245 

1915 82,289.410 

1916 52.784,042 

1917 59,398,644 

1918 27.051,021 

Lime. 

100 Pounds. 

1913 77.819 

1914 65.086 

1915 66,634 

1916 92.821 

1917 160.778 

1918 147.080 



Dollars. 
106,288 
122,219 
152.756 
280.129 
253,671 
229,812 



Dollars. 
1.806,756 
1,526,057 
1,557.442 
1,792,573 
2,189.441 
1.863.886 



Dollars. 
42.839 
42,926 
29,518 
42,537 
74.487 
77.783 



Lime, Chloride, or Bleaching Powder. 

. Mn Pounds. Dollars. 

JW-J 76.092,327 619,492 

1WJ 48.497.239 416.898 

1§15 18,402,180 ' 197,975 

8,289,790 80.418 



1916. 



1917 
1918 



66,664 
636 



Lime, Citrate. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
5.526,964 
8,119,924 
6,242,244 
8,127,364 
6,861,468 
4.013.606 



1918. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Litharge. 

Pounds. 
34,022 
43,166 
14,779 
20,160 
220 
100 



Lithopone. 



1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds;. 
7,245,161 
6,185,346 
5,122,063 
231.869 
448.000 



Not separately stated prior to 1914. 



Litmus. 



• *•••■•••••• 



1913. 

1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



1913. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Logwood. 

Terns. 

86,962 
30,172 
64,704 
184,819 
121,762 
55.364 



8.888 
83 



■Dollars. 

766,309 

496,617 

1.102.629 

1,763,662 

1,664,677 

814,073 



Dollars. 

1,649 

2,365 

774 

1,417 

42 

12 



Dollars. 

21S, 188 

196.828 

414,578 

20,591 

29,199 



Dollars. 
216 
263 
69 
280 
648 
44 



Dollars. 

476,484 

879,764 

722,410 

8,487,388 

4,127,081 

1,175,049 



Logwood and Other Dyewood Ex- 
tracts. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
2,258,206 
1.228.178 
2.061,868 
2.652,787 
1.147,448 
215,964 



1014 

ivl* ••••••• •»••••«•• 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 



Mace, Unground. 

Pounds. 



611.006 
287,976 
342.618 
426,096 
436.346 
371.746 



Dollars. 
111,575 

77,119 
144,207 
316,872 
164.711 

24.698 



Dollars. 
244.177 
112,178 
124.128 
130.796 
145,12* 
118.168 



Mace, Bombay, or Wild, Unground. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1915 5,714 771 

1916 22,400 6,720 

1917 40,984 4,090 

1918 1,791 624 

Not stated prior to 1915. 



Madder, or Munjeet, or Indian Mad- 
der, Ground or Prepared. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 80,602 2.808 

1914 47.068 3,817 

1915 29.827 3,524 

1916 68.381 9,087 

1917 78,862 12,472 

1918 2,193 253 



Magn 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



iesia, Calcined. 

Pounds. 
72,579 
109,396 
145.806 
46,008 
56,656 
12.166 



Dollars. 
12,502 
1M18 
16,012 

7,660 
17,576 

4.483 



Magnesia, Carbonate of. Precipitated. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
77,190 
58,683 
49.731 
19.888 
25.092 
5.681 



Magnesia, Sulphate of, 

Pounds. 

1918 9.346,099 

1914 13.550.599 

1915 7,006.598 

1916 1,456,264 

1917 64,200 

1918 48,640 



or 



Dollars, 
8,811 
3,972 
2,554 
1,414 
6,077 
1.906 

Epsom 

Dollars. 

85.739 

48.742 

82.862 

8,503 

875 

915 



48 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



Magnesite, Crude. 

Pounds. 

1913 38,654,280 

^1914 81,090.60ft 

1915 87,468,009 

1916 101.091,409 

1917 179,292,688 

1918 18.502,767 

Magnesite, Calcined. 

Pounds. 

1913 845,822,105 

1914 288,989,577 

1910 '125,898,407 

1916 82,872,610 

1917 9,448,817 

1918 22,764,029 



Meat Extracts, All Other. 



1918. 
1914. 
1910. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Malt, Barley. 

Bushels. 



10.181 

11.807 

0,187 

274 

1.770 

7,608 



Dollars. 
111.276 
46,611 
80,625 
281,951 
748,901 
104,947 



Dollars. 
1,731,448 
1,485,278 
701,766 
282,768 
182,087 
685,202 



Dollars. 

14,612 

16,065 

5,884 

418 

2,584 

4,809 



Malt Extract, Fluid, in Bottles or 



Jugs, 



1918. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Gallons. 

1,406 

1.284 

818 

64 

616 



Dollars. 

2.376 

2,087 

589 

92 

485 



Malt Extract, Fluid, in Casks. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1918 9,191 9.661 

1914 10,838 10,050 

1915 4.124 8,951 

1916 2,488 2,818 

1917 10.788 10,606 

1918 

Malt Extract, /Solid or Condensed. 

Dollars. 

1913 888 

1914 ,767 

1916 7,006 

1916.\ U.S34 

1917 Tl 

1918 44 

Manganese, Oxide and Ore of. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



1918. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
L918. 



Tons. 


Dollars. 


407.169 


2,195,565 


288,837 


1.841.472 


206,918 


1,494,965 


492,967 


5,358,087 


656,026 


10,542,672 


557.711 


11,944,515 


na. 

Pounds. 


Dollars. 


30,869 


16,308 


88,240 


32,848 


86.888 


12,276 


68.447 


82,434 


75.836 


48,618 


98,097 


51,062 



Manure Salts, Including Double Ma- 
nure Salts, Not Specially Pro- 
vided For. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 

172.667 

260.977 

66,411 

2,278 

324 



Dollars. 

1.798,773 

2,767,013 

707.151 

42,868 

7,794 

9,047 



Marshmallow or Althea Flowers or 

Leaves. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
661 



Dollars. 
27 



4.695 

8.161 

21,713 

10,779 



245 
1,126 
2,033 
1.239 



Marshmallow or Althea Root, Crude. 



1913. 
1914. 
1910. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
4,270 
6,049 
6.646 
7,242 
23,120 
24.246 



Meat Extracts, Fluid. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

29.091 

3,768 

8,738 

172 

1,990 

12 



Dollars. 
538 
514 
1,209 
1,926 
6,846 
6.824 



Dollars. 

11.096 

8.956 

4.428 

204 

8,632 

22 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

106,818 

180,6/2 

97,656 

78,614 

98,108 

1.401 



Dollars. 
186,489 
198; 187 
139.986 
100.652 
156.766 
1.411 



Meerschaum, Crude or 

tured. 



Unmanufac- 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 

119.457 

102,803 

18,966 



Menthol. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

49.898 

27.924 

11.020 

145.208 

172,767 

172.450 



671 
717 



Dollars. 
289,008 
408.954 
286,759 
800.589 
898,191 
446,888 



Metacresol, Orthocresol and Para- 
cresol — Purity Less Than 90 Per 

Cent. 



1918.. 
Not 



Pounds. 
20,708 
1918. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



stated pzfor to 

Mica, Ground. 

Pounds. 

577,061 

401.608 

878.768 

486.087 

102,968 

111,087 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Milk, Sugar of. 

Pounds. 

9,026 

678,727 

250,212 

22,400 



Dollars. 
1,404 



Dollars. 
6,592 
4,002 
4,148 
4.802 
1,684 
1,884 



Dollars. 

2,582 
67.901 
28.154 

8,101 



Mineral Salts Obtained by Evapora- 
tion from Mineral Waters. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

103.887 

82.569 

10,757 

425 

626 

4.699,785 



Dollars. 

85.420 

40,840 

9.642 

213 

818 

14.280 



Monazite Sand and Thorite. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
1,145,010 
170,792 
1,498.028 
2.468.146 
4,020.028 
4.961.885 



Dollars. 
94.425 
12.984 
188,819 
191.576 
268.881 
882.888 



Morphia, or Morphine, Sulphate of. 

Ounces. Dollars. 

24.797 141.221 

5.805 14,220 

1,888 8,800 

2.685 8,906 

5,684 22,675 

25,115 202,268 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Mustard, Ground or Prepared/ in 
Bottles or Otherwise. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
1,483.118 
1,927,686 
1,089.400 
1,886.402 
1.080,971 
1.662,876 



Musk, in Grain. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1018. 



Musk, in Pods. 



lcfXo •••••••••••••••• 

1*7 J. 4 •■••••••«•••*••• 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 



Ounces. 
12,994 

8.331 
10,115 

7,890 
12,415 

5,516 



Myrabolans Fruit 



Pounds. 

1913v 19.736.724 

1914 24,256,373 

1915 18.417,434 

1916 25,612,765 

1917 16,087,463 

1918 4.408.522 



Dollars. 
888,710 
519,888 
299,444 
654.880 
895.162 
480.572 

Dollars. 

7.699 

8,991 

665 

584 

68,804 

29,246 



Dollars. 
124.855 
80,873 
65,882 
62,094 
80,026 
33,970 



Dollars. 
195,264 
438.672 
198,347 
875.401 
421,824 
110.444 



Naphthalene, Solidifying at Less Than 
79 Degree C. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 8,579,187 146,666 

Not stated prior to 1918. 

Naphthalene, Solidifying at 70 Degree 
G or Above. 



Pounds. 

1918 92.888 

Not stated prior to 1918. 



Naphthylamine. 

Pounds. 

1918 11.761 

Not stated prior to 1918. 



Dollars. 
4.998 



Dollars. 



6, 



Nickel Oxide. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 


Dollars. 


1,124 


898 


2.720 


1,246 


1.071 


606 


497 


180 


21,488 


6.478 


5,584 


1,408 



Nuts and Nutgalls for Dyeing and 

Tanning. 

Dollars. 

1918 126.486 

1914 177,788 

1915 187,972 

1916 ...... 420,080 

1917 214,668 

1918 872,178 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Nutgall, Extract 

Pounds. 



145.919 

205,180 

157,084 

61.055 

45.760 

86,475 



Nutmegs, Unground. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
8,468,889 
1.756.658 
2,879,986 
8,590.959 
4,201,872 
8.487,056 



Nux Vomica. 



1918. 
1914. 
2915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
2.806,785 
1,891,072 
2,246.888 
4,866,964 
2,445,984 
2,789.804 



Oakum. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
1,826.876 
1,884,489 
1,509,155 
1,288,984 
797.290 
97,115 



Dollars. 
18,228 
26,017 
28,262 
11,444 
9,867 
12,761 



Dollars. 
868,984 
184,779 
288.861 
420,508 
661.012 
628,960 



Dollars. 

89.880 

82.988 

-51.507 

184,866 

86,018 

111,711 



Dollars. 
64,851 
94,796 
78,079 
78.198 
87.225 
12,748 



Oak Extract for Tanning, Not Con- 
taining Alcohol. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1914 148,094 6,589 

1915 65,298 2,628 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1914. 

Ocher, Ground in Oil or Water. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 16,988 970 

Included In following class after 1918. 



Ocher and Ochery Earths. 



Pounds. 

1913 17,588.272 

1914 21,641.976 

1915 17.480,128 

1916 18,049,875 

1917 17,878,109 

1918 7,087,557 

Oilcake, Cocoanut. 

Pounds. 

1917 29,867 

1918 34,824 

Not stated prior to 1917. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Oilcake, Corn. 

Pounds. 

• 102.700 

91.700 

37,500 

10,900 

15.200 

86,520 



Dollars. 
162.887 
154,547 
124,859 
158.880 
218.272 
181.055 



Dollars. 
400 
856 



Dollars. 

1,282 

1,227 

682 

191 



2,967 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



49 



Oilcake, Cottonseed. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 400.686 8,322 

1914 5,744,090 58,214 

1915 1,748,113 15.706 

1916 10,289.886 108,418 

1917 84,281.702 872,812 

1918 29,877,055 456.848 

Oilcake, Cottonseed and Linseed 

(Bibby's). 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 2.571,694 87,455 

1914 2.406,035 24.832 

1915 2.996,201 38,238 

1916 10,810.746 129.843 

1917 6.570,668 82.898 

1918 2,751,880 84.985 

Oilcake, Rapeseed. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 

1914 .•... ...•.«.•".. ...... •••... 

1915 47.278 11,204 

1916 \ . 4,125 75 

1917 2,000 26 

1918 2,240 101 

Oilcake, Soya Bean. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 7,004.803 93.002 

1914 3,168,260 38,255 

1915 5,975,502 64.307 

1916 10,468,001 103.081 

1917 11.760.935 186,064 

1918 686.820 9.964 

Oilcake, All Other Bean. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 1679,794 5,914 

1914 142,878 1.685 

1915 724,072 13,035 

1916 4,802.119 68,178 

1917 895.079 • 11.400 

1918 1,389,484 17,628 

Oil, Alizarin, Assistant. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1913 137,187 62.928 

1914 186.234 72,480 

1916 48.876 18.820 

1916. 7,882 4,184 

1917 5.198 3.010 

1918 , 24 24 

Oil, Almond, Bitter. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 10.442 25,629 

$14 T.525 21.954 

1915 2,711 9.184 

1916 .... 8,602 18,400 

1917 .... 4128 27,751 

Sis..:::::......... > i:«w 18.154 

Oil, Almond, Sweet 

Pounds. Dollars. 

lois 152.800 68.583 

M14......... 52.550 22,777 

1916 . 48.»21 23,495 

191« 68,838 86,400 

1917 38.989 28,481 

Sis:::.:::. »«.283 25.052 

Oil, Amber. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 18,707 1.027 

1914 15.648 1,058 

Sis.:::::: 2.720 » 

1916 674 250 

191?..:. J.gg ^932 

1918 1.080 458 

Oil, Animal, Rendered and Combina- 
tions, Not Specially Provided For. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

19U 4.030 2,028 

1914 ... 115.871 28.527 

1915 140,815 30.464 

Sl6 .. »M5 81.985 

8l7 • .... 66.915 40.243 

1918.........../.... 23.028 19.757 

Oil. Anise, or Anise Seed. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

■ma 127.501 178,078 

1914 42.672 55,692 

Sfi: : : . . . . ~ . m.iw 119.972 

1916 .... 208.609 l^ll 

19}? :::::. 266.686 150,849 

1918:::.:.:... .:.-.. ieo.774 122,459 

Oil, Bergamot. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 64.259 310.835 

19M 38.647 148.753 

5l5...... 58,621 157,519 

1916 . 69,440 178.300 

1917 50,684 179.182 

1918...... 57.689 241.465 

Oil, Birch Tar. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1914 40,123 1.898 

1916 , 12.098 571 

1916 "...-1 47.757 3.183 

5J5.. 24,073 3,717 

19lJ 110,055 22,443 

Not stated prior to 1914. 



Oil, Cajeput 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 9.148 8.224 

1914 14.110 4.757 

1915 19,243 6.999 

1916 ♦. 98.626 18.992 

1917 79,585 29,585 

1918 10,563 8,588 

Oil, Camomile. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 4ft 88 

1914 12 247 

1915 a 67 

1916 7 

1917 

1918 5 60 

Oil, Camphor. 

Pounds. Dollars, 

1918 ........ a. ...... ...... ...... 

1914 18.874 8.160 

1916 68 12 

1916 8.388 5,708 

1917 224 899 

1918 286,000 21.245 

Oil, Caraway. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 10,107 10.458 

1914 3,669 5,068 

1915 18,107 20,780 

1916 15.567 28.586 

1917 3.728 4.208 

1918 4,982 22,482 

Oil, Cassia and Cinnamon. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 128,645 97,438 

1914 79,155 49.528 

1915 54.962 84.411 

1916 121.084 85.974 

1917 153.244 130.112 

1918 109,178 114,796 

Oil, Castor. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1913 5,241 6.396 

1914 189.588 88,053 

1916 63,005 29,206 

1916 258,077 228.130 

1917 823.703 286,068 

1918 1.175.064 1.866.573 

Oil, Cedrat. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 115 555 

1914 159 770 

1915 788 3,721 

1916 438 1,966 

1917 

1918 20 158 

Oil, Chinese Nut. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1913 6,004,045 2,788,000 

1914 4.878,764 1.980,426 

1915 4,723.584 1.649.270 

1916 4.968.262 1,977,823 

1917 6.846.681 4.046.182 

1918 4,818.740 4.038,072 

Oil, Citronella and Lemongrass. 

i Pounds. Dollars. 

1913.: 885.486 287,549 

1914 702,516 268,149 

1915 865,376 307.676 

1916 1,054,211 887.681 

1917 1.082,085 445.782 

1918 900.858 869.234 

OilTOvet 

Ounces. Dollars. 

1913 1,155 1,688 

1914 250 392 

1915 5.181 7 865 

1916 

1917 

1918 3,277 5,136 

____ • 

Oil, Cocoanut, Not Refined or De- 
odorized. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 50.498.858 4,182.654 

1914 74,588,195 6.726,107 

1915 68.249.424 5,480.681 

1916 66.574.349 6.052.225 

1917 79,359,009 9,141.586 

1918 259.004.748 80.919.783 

Oil, Cod. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1913 466.494 185,969 

1914 *. . . . 1,091,246 882.992 

1915 1.372.418 483.142 

1916 1,578,227 678.327 

1917 1,163,566 728.804 

1913 1,747,791 1,526,332 

Oil, Codliver. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1013 262,516 137,872 

1914 371,567 262,927 

1915 264,680 157.0»0 

1916 170,876 834,006 

1017 265.557 650.192 

1918 264,108 -585.172 



Oil, Cottonseed. 

Povnds. 

1918 8.888,906 

1914 17.510,918 

1915 15,162,860 

1916 17,516,891 

1917 12,961,889 

1918... i 14,378.013 

Oil, Creosote, or Dead. 

Gallons. 

1913 68,997.602 

1914 59.271.677 

1915 87.852.840 

1916 40.496.987 

1917 29.066.915 

1918 8.857,869 

Oil, Croton. 

Pounds. 

1018 4,873 

1914 6,186 

1915 4.010 

1916 

1917 500 

1918 1,200 

Oil, Eucalyptus. 

Pounds. 

1913 31,047 

1914 68,063 

1915 99.218 

1916 110,786 

1917 230,035 

1918 269,275 

Oil, Fennel. 

Pounds. 

1013 5,702 

1914 4,078 

1915 409 

1916 610 

1917 

1918 2.094 



Dollars. 
185,396 

1.046. 70S 
728,961 
924,654 
985,616 

1.689.882 



Dollars. 
8.711,328 
8.822.919 
2.541,845 
8.206,780 
2.183,859 
829,846 



Dollars. 
4,414 
6.649 
8.481 



508 
1.274 



Dollars. 
7.206 
21.079 
27,095 
29,998 
88,111 
97.874 



Dollars. 

4,160 

2.416 

441 

789 

...... 

2,612 



Oil, Fish (Not Specially Provided 
For), Including Sod Oil. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1013 519.121 152,808 

1914 517,562 154,775 

1915 489,741 108,789 

1916 720.033 235.536 

1917 2.280,018 868,069 

1918 1,532,512 772,721 

Oil, Fusel or Araylic Alcohol. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 5,116.660 1.188,872 

1914 5.679.801 888.869 

1915 8.298,228 699.512 

1916 2.162,617 695,196 

1917 1.614,507 629.414 

1913. 1.706,528 646.589 

Oil, Hempseed. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1918 ...... 

1914 875 128 

1915 

1916 10 5 

iyi (•••••••••*■••••« *■•••« ••••■• 

1918 25.900 21,664 

Oil, Jasmine. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 f. 3,416 89,554 

1914 .'. 611 14,860 

1915 261 5,160 

1916 978 27,592 

1917 848 8.866 

1918 5.840 89,810 

Oil, Juniper. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 17.356 18.037 

1914 14.545 8.691 

1915 10.388 7.637 

1916 975 1.988 

1917 4,661 21.514 

1918 21,346 67.147 



Oil, Lavender, and Aspic 

Lavender. 

Pounds. 

1913 227,013 

1914 64.541 

1915 72,989 

1916 198.205 

1917 144.663 

1918 122,958 

Oil, Lemon. 

Pounds. 

1918 410.003 

1014 ......>......•.. 3ZW, 440 

1915 561.387 

1916 435,030 

1917 557,288 

1918 577,600 



or 



Spike 



Dollars. 
482.779 
100,481 
133,375 
271.815 
237.081 
273.466 



Dollars. 
704,215 
752.714 
630.338 
300.802 
459.179 
452.681 



/ 



50 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



Oil, Limes. 



Pounds. 

1918 13.076 

1914 16.659 

1915 9.164 

1916 19.765 

1917 26,551 

1918 29.137 



Dollars. 
15.025 
28,828 
9.279 
29,694 
49.001 
78,686 



Oil, Linseed or Flaxseed, Raw, Boiled 
or Oxidized. 



* Gallons. 

1918 172.522 

1914 187.988 

1916 637,810 

1916 56,899 

1917 110.809 

1918 51.271 



Oil, Mace. 



Pounds. 

1918 5.787 

1914 2.652 

1915 4,776 

1916 8.400 

1917 8,000 

1918 



Dollars. 
110,840 
91,544 
249,611 
86.899 
76.530 
84,370 



Dollars. 
2.611 
1,880 
2,605 
2,224 
2,414 



Oil, Neroli, or Orange Flower. 



Pounds. 

1918 38,865 

1914 15.928 

1915 13,261 

1916 84,447 

1917 23.689 

1918 82,687 



Dollars. 
171,982 
73,265 
81.478 
66.768 
66,394 
72,870 



Oil, Olive (for Manufacturing Pur- 
poses Only). 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1918 725,100 488.829 

1914 799,260 603,093 

1916 717,361 498,689 

1916 919.633 711,468 

1917 787.348 786.520 

1918 166,115 148,672 



Oil, Olive, Edible. 

1918 

1914 

1916 

1916 

1917 

1918 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Gallons. 
.... 4,772,775 


Dollars. 
6.227,526 


6,891,827 


8,201,881 


.... 6,622,246 


8,119,012 


.... 6.924,606 


9.324,361 


.... 7,707,094 


10.769,754 


.... 2.562,588 


2,935,457 


Oil, Orange. 

Pounds. 
.... 77,797 


Dollars. 
155,299 


.... 104.491 


222,118 


.... 97,014 


140,246 


97,859 


134.025 


.... 170,722 


822.873 




880,507 



Oil, Origanum, Red or White. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 8,822 8,502 

1914 507 630 

1915 14,849 15,111 

1916 24,222 24.291 

1917 54.671 45.859 

1918 3.851 3,424 



Oil, Palm. 

Pounds. 

1913 48.442.662 

1914 61,753.482 

1915 81.482.292 

1916 40.621.318 

1917 86.074,059 

1918 27,408,494 

Oil, Palm Kernel. 

Pounds. 

1918 23,570,152 

1914 80,588,958 

1915 4.908,702 

1916 6.273,340 

1917 1.857.088 

1918 18,018 



Oil, Paraffin. 



Gallons. 

1913 116,192 

1914 167,384 

1915 60.412 

1916 774.250 

1917 409,740 

1918 24.628 



Oil, Peanut 



Gallons. 

1913 1,221,676 

1914 1,332,108 

1915 880,688 

1916 1,466,043 

1917 8.018,468 

1918 8.279,927 



Dollars. 
8.868,815 
4,118,077 
2,024,827 
2,918,523 
8.316,417 
2,527,872 



Dollars. 

1,850,270 

2,826, OT2 

446,979 

479.788 

197.237 

' 2,583 



Dollars. 
35.193 
55.928 
11.609 
149,625 
40.710 
7.502 



Dollars. 
820,859 
915,489 
565,747 
824,327 
2.028.096 
7,296,214 



Oil, Peppermint 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 8,529 18.097 

1014 18,794 41,867 

1915 9,200 . 8.969 

1916 17,086 12,578 

101T 28,159 87,784 

1018 29,360 28.958 

Oil,~PeriUa. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

~J* - ? «•»••••••••••••• ...... ..a... 

1914 117,898 6,090 

1JJ5 69,174 5.485 

1018 65.509 6.504 

JJJ7 442,619 89.276 

1W8 1^15,963 105,723 

Oil, Poppy Seed, Raw, Boiled or 

Oxidized. 

.„.„ Gallons. Dollars. 

IJl? 9.605 7.788 

1914 7,973 6.422 

1915 11,045 7,072 

1018 6.387 6,816 

JSJI 2,789 3,734 

1918 20 112 

Oil, Rapeseed. 

„ M _ Gallons. Dollars. 

101? 1,564,658 784.750 

10JJ 1.468,099 ' 704,747 

10J5 1,491.999 784.285 

1016 2.684,670 1,414,022 

1017 1.095.891 661.814 

1018 2J51.875 2,697.162 

Oil, Rosemary, or Anthross. 

^^ Pounds. Dollars. 

101? • 284,144 100,030 

J01J 85,248 30,177 

101« 93,663 44,636 

101« 95,816 80.644 

101J 228.080 71.035 

1018 2 04.106 7l!641 

Oil, Roses, Attar of. 

,_.. Ounoea Dollars. 

1J18 183.826 791,370 

10" 40,464 801.000 

1015 60.011 262.692 

10J5 40.887 169.744 

101J 11,286 86.678 

1018 22,663 89.049 

Oil, Seal 

_ -Jk Gallons. Dollars. 

1913 8.972 8.131 

1914 179,734 64,963 

1916 479.571 166,886 

1916 610,062 271,979 

1917 618,667 801.138 

1918 148,262 108,328 

Oil, Sesame, or Sessamum Seed. 

._ Pounda Dollars. 

1018 1,986,647 158,442 

1914 1,389,649 118,075 

1915 341,645 28,668 

1916 257.874 22,298 

101J-. •. 76,057 11.874 

1018 846.211 51,178 

Oil, Soya Bean. v 

Pounda Dollars. 

1913 12,440,406 686,882 

1914 16,863.645 830,870 

1915 19,210,028 901,643 

1916 98,171,275 6,181,582 

1917 162,734,010 11,410,606 

1918 336.999,646 32.886.084 

Oil, Thyme. 

Pounda Dollars. 

1918 138.972 106.296 

1916 99,580 88.498 

S918 02,097 85,913 

917 91,163 90,868 

918 206.185 242.254 

Oil, Valerian. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 40 124 

1914 6 12 

1915. 15 36 

1916 

1917 

1918 366 8.690 

Oil, Whale (Includes Sperm Oil Prior 
to October 3, J 91 3). 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1913 1.166.339 278.208 

*1914 82.756 26.553 

•July 1 to October 8. 1913. Stated separately 
after October 3, 1918. 

' Oil, Whale, Sperm. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1914 157,142 66.652 

1915 92,083 88,612 

1916 69.816 25.191 

1917 48.178 87,512 

1918 60,828 70,229 



Oil Whale. All Other. 

Gallons. 

1914 290,745 

1915 604,508 

1916 280,762 

1917 415,168 

1918- 1,134,021 

Oleo Stearin. 

Pounda 

1918 9.540,347 

1914 6,679,636 

1915 2,644.460 

1916 910,478 

1917 i;il3,277 

1918 6,675,879 



Dollars. 

94,424 
215,644 

79,569 
234,097 
674,907 



Dollars. 
967.000 
497,978 
226.661 
61.280 
114,640 

1,118.418 



Opium, Aqueous Extract of, and 
Tinctures of, as Laudanum. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 

671 

5,279 

5,565 

6 



Opium, Crude, or Unmanufactured, 
Not Adulterated. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounda 
441,277 
441.621 
858,006 
117,870 
48.016 
21.841 



Dollars. 

2,180.154 

1,781.689 

1.699,217 

538,183 

880,652 



Opium, Dried, rowdered, or Other- 
wise Advanced. 



JL17XO •••■•••»••••■*«» 
^vH • •••■•••••••»••• 

1915 

1918 

1917 

1918 



Pounds. 
49,071- 
82.095 
88,977 
44,062 
77,990 
98,496 



Dollars. 
389,864 
205.684 
308.928 
248,790 
640,668 

1,614,127 



Opium Salts and Other Alkaloids of, 
Not Specially Provided For. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Ounces. 

9,672 

11.598 

8,626 

2,860 

84,179 

20,479 



Orange Mineral. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounda 
287.536 
862,968 
166,202 
108.275 
54.884 
9,606 



Dollars. 

28,587 

64,628 

49,584 

9.981 

165,028 

126,882 



Dollars. 
18,695 
24,692 
12,279 
10,589 
7,852 
1,407 



Orchil, or Orchil Liquid. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Orris, or Iris, Root. 



« M . Pounda 

HI? 857.963 

Igjjf 680,484 

J0JS 654.126 

101« 602,289 

J2JI 527,639 

1018 465,060 

Osmiridium. 

iM A Ounces, troy. 

1014 666 

1916 911 

1916 302 

1917 833 

1918 158 

Not stated prior to 1914. 



Dollars. 
27,886 
21.569 
37.802 
114.608 
98,906 
55,612 



Dollars. 
87,326 
71,941 
52,898 
62,662 
61,494 
56.728 



Dollars. 
43,659 
58.014 
9,654 
24,298 
16,016 



Palladium. 

, M . Ounoes. troy. Dollars. 

J?}} 0.577 401.707 

"" 8,086 169,171 

1915 40 2.779 

}»1« 8.011 804:559 

Jg}J 1.663 95,881 

1918 .1.817 liSioSS 

Papers, Filtering and Crepe. 

,_, a Pounda Dollars. 

KJJ 665.136 116.582 

}»}* 984.697 844,538 

™}J 875.497 114.390 

JgJJ 672,402 128,808 

}0}J 629.541 21*3* 

U1 8 688.246 ^260 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



51 



Papers* Greaseproof and Imitation 
Parchment. 



1914. 
1910. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

4,011,250 

8,907,097 

687,009 

697.562 

287.212 



Dollars. 

205,797 

200.108 

45.977 

70,493 

26,746 



Not separately stated prior to 1914. 

Paraffin and Paraffin Wax. 

(Not including- oil.) 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 11,521.205 608.802 

1914 7,501,463 827,402 

1915* 5.628.811 254.389 

1916 8,526,929 418,862 

1917 10.641.404 654,186 

1918 8.881.023 666,474 

Paris Green and London Purple. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 165,820 > 7.692 

1914 88.878 8,572 

1916 16,800 2,975 

1916 31,917 8,163 

1917 

1918 . 48 189 

Pearl Hardening for Paper Makers' 



Use. 



191S. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 

8,612 

6.294 

8,609 

598 

183 

80 



Pepper, Blapk or White, Unground. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 27.568,317 2,855,184 

1914 21.809.875 2,179.995 

1916.... 26.620,992 2.685,522 

1916 82,174.546 8,789,466 

1917 26,586,256 4.085,410 

1918 82,182,958 4,928.562 

Pepper, Cayenne, Capsicum or Red 
Pepper, Ground or Unground. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 4,022.755 412,828 

•1914 984,716 130,076 

♦FJgnrei are for July 1 to October 3, 1918. 
Stated separately after October 8, 1913. j 

Pepper, Capsicum, Red or Cayenne, 

Unground. 



1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
6,622,468 
8,098,282 

4,854,041 
4.784,881 
2.712,857 



Dollars. 
711,966 
882.616 
477,044 
47.348 
815,481 



Pepper, Capsicum, Red or Cayenne, 

Ground. 



1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
1,822.808 
1,827,666 
2.265,154 
8,686,876 
1,891,744 



Dollars. 
165,807 
207,879 
271,244 
455,897 
280,071 



Perfumery, Alcoholic, Toilet Waters, 

Etc. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
286,026 
801.448 
240.075 
281,887 
859,200 
267.788 



Dollars. 
819,685 
771*58 
689,980 
828,727 
1,085,869 
1,014.647 



Perfumery, Cosmetics and Toilet 
Preparations Not Containing Al- 
cohol, Not Specially Provided 
For. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
1,026.869 
1,086,211 
1.542.181 
1,271.614 
1.702,989 
1,502,718 



Persian Berry Extracts for Dyeing. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 64.888 7.178 

1914 115.886 12,924 

1915 92,876 12,245 

1916 17.858 4.227 

1917 8,507 1,887 

1918 



Petroleum, Crude. 



Qallona. 

1918 450,542,222 

1914 848,080.788 

1915 668,757,824 

1916 889,786,962 

1917 1,086.417,009 

1918 1,848.419,498 



Dollars. 

7,608,796 
11,779.988 

8,918,188 
12,226.179 
14,181,849 
18,289,207 



/ Petroleum, Refined, Benzine. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1918 14,162.428 1,266,896 

1914 16.152,167 1,899,680 

1915 6,788,627 727,856 

1916 5,100 2,150 

Not stated separately after 1916. 

Petroleum, Refined, Gasoline and 

Naphtha. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1913 «™ »18 

1914 14.175 1.992 

1915 1,186,797 84,701 

1916 2.688 458 

Not stated separately after 1916. 

Petroleum, Refined — Benzine, Gaso- 
line and Naphtha. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1917 10,744,692 1,896,101 

1918 11,069,898 1,478,027 

Petroleum, Refined, All Other. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1913 1.464.412 307,479 

1914 1.796.098 480,664 

1915 496.968 98.696 

1916 1.727,683 184,815 

1917 82.259.588 2.221,816. 

1918 48.927,718 2.406,764 

Pewter and Britannia Metal, Old and 
Fit Only to Be Remanufactured. 

• Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 22,270 6,099 

1914 10,408 2,219 

1915 28.039 5,897 

1916 28.294 8,002 

1917 17,608 v 10,192 

1918 16,838 9,841 

Phenolic Resin (Synthetic). 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1917 184,690 11.889 

1918. . : 12 257 

Not stated prior to 1917. 

Phenolphthalein. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1914 14,076 14,090 

1915 49,826 46.295 

1916 11.482 9.740 

1917 3,576 7.794 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1914. 

Phosphates, Crude. 

Tons. Dollars. 

1918 28,478 184,204 

1914 28,551 177,888 

1915 2,601 26,982 

1916 8,190 69,820 

1917 96 1,420 

1918 6 60 

Phosphorus. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 650 270 

1914 605 264 

1915 612 251 

1916 

1917 4,010 2,806 

1918 88,692 57.572 

Photographic Chemicals (Coal Tar). 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1917 11,822 108,580 

1918 11,492 80.868 

Not stated prior to 1917. 

Pimento (Allspice), Unground. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 7.212,109 259,508 

1914 1.517,971 54,506 

1915 1.880.158 86,769 

1916 1.856,575 46,241 

1917 8,277,678 118,401 

1918 4,064,666 182.847 

Pitch, Burgundy. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 977.629 48,799 

1914 1,055,827 40,480 

1915 181.967 4.051 

1916 14.756 678 

1917 25 8 

1918 100 12 

Pitch, Marine Glue. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 808.186 * 14,892 

1914 317,506 15,154 

1915 56.582 8.807 

1916 481,638 20,496 

1917 827,811 18,447 

1918 276,702 18,860 

Plaster Rock, or Gypsum, Crude. 

Tons. Dollars. 

1913 886,927 462,889 

1914 417,580 482,820 

1915 260,161 816,308 

1916 806,757 872,808 

1017 280,892 276,952 

1918 141.106 176,959 



Plaster Rock, or Gypsum, Ground or 

Calcined. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 
8,910 
4.292 
3.948 
6.494 
12.821 
11,828 



Dollars. 
26,228 
80,226 
80,888 
86.822 
107.999 
79,885 



Plasters, Healing, or Curative, and 

Court Plaster, Dollars 

1918 4,689 

1914 . 10,929 

7,171 
8,094 



1915 
1916 



1917. 
1918. 



Plumbago or Graphite. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 
25.288 
24,866 
17,067 
30,988 
42.270 
25,440 



7,571 
5,581 



Dollars. 
1,972,177 
1,846,074 
1,887,878 
4,298.580 
9.678,160 
6,018,662 



Polishing and Cleaning Creams. 

Dollars. 

1914 6,085 

1916 11,600 

1916 14,188 

1917 7,208 

1918 22,879 

Not stated prior to 1914. 



Potash, Bicarbonate of, Refined. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
311,645 
478,858 
888,534 
2.062 
10.058 
171,528 



Dollars. 
14.295 
22,767 
20.841 
614 
6.271 
84,881 



Potash, Bichromate and Chromate of. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

27,671 

84,860 

40.227 

2,291 

2.404 

20 



Dollars. 

2.601 

2,822 

8,817 

891 

962 

8 



Potash, Carbonate of. Crude. 



Pounds. 

1913 10,068,912 

1914 9,046,802 

1915 6.620,504 

U16 444,241 

1917 1.069,408 

1918 9,188,741 



Dollars. 
295,066 
240,451 
291,341 
27,689 
185,910 

2,928,288 



Potash, Carbonate of. Refined. 



Pounds. 

1918 14,035.111 

1914 10.421.005 

1915 2,377.940 

1918 174,587 

1917 202,885 

1918 446,282 



Dollars. 

412,587 

368.958 

92 'J59 

9'j.604 

J.3.170 

124,019 



Potash, Caustic or Hydrate of, Un- 
refined. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1912 8.422.007 . 880.684 

1918 8,094.440 348.501 

1914 8.565,451 826.650 

Included In "Potash, Hydrate of, etc.," after 
1914. 



Potash, Caustic or Hydrate of. 

Refined. 



1912 

1913 

1914 

Included 
1914. 



Pounds. Dollars. 

77,184 8,097 

112,822 11,920 

18.751 1.977 

in "Potash, Hydrate of., etc.." after 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Potash, Chlorate of. 

Pounds. 



1,285,782 
40.819 
27,419 

• ••■•» 

487.339 
1,029,980 



Dollars. 

66,609 

8,408 

4,614 

• ••••• 

194.008 
610.702 



Potash, Crude, or Black Salts. 

^ M Pounds. Dollars. 

1914 2.599,883 52.454 

1915 4,076,788 88,502 

1916 1,504,149 68,762 

1917 2,819.285 288,111 

1918 727.588 112,285 

Not stated prior to 1914. 



Potash, Cyanide of. 



xu XB •••••••♦•*•••••• 

XVX4 •»■••••••••••••• 

1915 

1916 

1917 

19:8 



Pounds. 

960.890 

1.286,799 

747.627 

48.706 

70,147 

18,455 



Dollars. 

187.686 

188,259 

148,881 

9,811 

49,518 

8,160 



/ 



52 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



Potash, Hydrate of. Containing Not 

More Than 1 5 Per Cent of 

Caustic Soda. 

Pound*. Dollars. 

1015 4,898,471 225.002 

1916 89,770 9,222 

1917 74,780 88,648 

1918 : H.782 4,398 

See "Potash, Caustic, Etc." 

Potash, Muriate of. 

Tons. Dollars. 

1918 228,887 6,787,757 

1914 284.856 7,925,781 

1915....: 102.882 M2P.358 

1916 i 2,126 460,888 

1917 606 174,806 

1918.. 596 166.979 

Potash, Nitrate of. Crude. 

(See Saltpeter, Crude.) 



\ 



Potash, Nitrate of, Refined. 

Tons. Dollars. 

1913 197 22,142 

i9h:::::.:::. ....... ig6 20.173 

1915 34 4,222 

1916 2 749 

1917 .. 288 85.143 

IMS..:::::..: 48 * 16.193 

Potash, Permanganate of. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 857,366 25,314 

1914 1,361,855 91,065 

1915 ... 1039 804 78.924 

1916... 214,291 67,306 

191? 6»46 11,727 

Sis::: 43,826 106,104 

Potash, Prussiate of, Red. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 65.316 11.302 

1914 89,976 15,325 

1916 83.574 14,922 

1916 2,560 8,520 

1917 4,528 10,425 

1918 9,824 18,496 

Potash, Prussiate of, Yellow. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 2,812,408 809,802 

1914 8.508,228 890,021 

1915 2,816,786 255,711 

1916 44.156 31,651 

5l7 41,128 82,251 

1918 " 184,688 111,096 

Potash, Sulphate of. 

Tons. Dollars. 

1913 t '48,023 1,798,869 

1914 44,986 1,887,491 

1915 21,705 1.071,623 

1916 2,427 197,808 

1917 656 20.538 

1918 136 19,837 

Potassium, Iodide. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 120 289 

1914 270 491 

5l5 4 13 

1916 809 1.032 

1917 24,857 58,752 

1918 65,992 133,611 

Pyrethrum or Insecticide Flowers. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 2,298,476 422,751 

Not stated prior to 1918. 

Pyridine and Quinoline. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 H.W1 1.051 

Not stated prior to 1918. 

Putty (Whiting and Paris White), 
Ground in Oil. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 86,434 881 

1914 87,020 911 

1915 18.078 848 

1916 16,082 386 

1917 83,286 1.472 

1918... 36.398 8.781 

Quebracho Extract. 

v Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 63,604,814 1,672,314 

1914 99,605,839 2,699,104 

1915 125,565.857 3,676.749 

1916 81.501,892 5,432,458 

1017 61,977,849 5,382,433 

1918 101,523,282 4,917,212 

Quebracho Wood. 

Tons. Dollars. 

1918 101,869 1,300,126 

1914 73.957 900,880 

1915 54,715 750,873 

1916 106.864 1,598,465 

191? 95,211 1,086.946 

1918 53,871 848,671 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Quicksilver. 

Pounds. 

380 

444.678 

561,924 

554,852 

.... 242,526 

580,460 



Quill Toothpicks. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
887 
192.609 
292.244 
595,057 
289,401 
641,816 



Dollars. 
18,646 
10,041 
8.519 
21,543 
26.256 
10,532 



Quill, Other Manufactures of. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



1913. 
JL914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1018. 



Quinia, Sulphate 

Oounces. 

2,279,784 

, . . . .* 2,224,765 

1,508.931 

1.409.228 

623,947 

1.256,172 



if. 



Dollars. 
5,959 
11,641 
9,342 
t T 347 
1,648 
2,179 



Dollars. 
397,409 
486,641 
378,511 

1,022,821 
324,488 
698.019 



Radium, and Salts of, and Radio- 
active Substances. 



1914 

1915... 

1916 

1917... 

1918... 

Not stated 



Dollars. 

29.983 

29,988 

3.712 

50 



prior to 1914. 



Red Lead. 



1913. , 
♦1914. 
1915. . 
1916.. 
1917.. 
1018. . 



Pounda 

145.478 

69,867 

6,697 

196 

20.471 

5 



Dollars. 

7,223 

5.674 

842 

43 

5,296 

1 



* 29,940 pounds, $3,681, came In free of duty 
for construction and equipment of vessels. 



Rennets, Raw or Prepared. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Rhubarb Root. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
121,701 
181,240 
233,699 
155,924 
238,601 
190.962 



Rose Leaves. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Rosin, Violin. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Saccharin. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

47 

8 

5,617 

• 12,954 

1,596 

1 



Dollars. 

129,588 

129,720 

106,614 

86,694 

13,154 

62,178 



Dollars. 
16.554 
22,854 
24,592 
17,701 
82,084 
20,879 



Dollars. 
67 
1,434 
484 
1.060 
4.199 
4.164 



Dollars. 
80,621 
11,625 
6,532 
4,893 
2,872 
3.746 



Dollars. 

64 

30 

6,737 

76,789 

18.270 

48 



Saffron, Safflower, and Extract of, and 

Saffron Cake, Not Containing 

Alcohol. 



1913. 
1914. 
1015. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
93,146 
85.678 
70,132 
111.420 
124,235 
54,109 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Sage, Unground. 

Pounds. 

1,299,120 

....... 2,005,469 

822,088 

1.865,815 

1,528.828 

1,364,295 



Dollars. 

19,898 

89,809 

' 48,454 

130,464 

92.409 

150.004 



Sago, Crude, and Sago 

Pounds. 

1918 12.389,192 

1914 9,970,717 

1915 6,630,400 

1916 10.999,587 

1917 7,898,055 

1918...' 22,178.761 



Flour. 



Salep or Salop. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
280,992 
160.924 
106.090 
284.073 
204.864 
654,261 



Dollars. 

44 

75 

2,782 



Salicin. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

8,274 

4,129 

1,800 

453 

390 

319 



Salol. 



1914..- 660 

1915 23,430 

1916 4,069 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1914. 



Dollars. 
12,146 
14,982 
6.560 
2,135 
2,307 
2,845 



219 

11.445 

2.182 



Salt. 



1912 

1913 

1914 

Stated 
classes. 



separately 



Pounds. 

100 pounds. 
2.901.815 
2,508,561 
3.397,496 

after 1914; 



Dollars. 

Dollars. 

879,540 

856,911 

456.426 

following 



Salt in Bags, Barrels or Other Pack- 



1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



ages. 

100 pounds. 

620,462 

• 552,616 

375,658 

26S.426 



Salt in Bulk. 



1915. 
1016. 
1917. 
1918. 



100 pounds. 

1,959,638 

1.591.032 

1,808,867 

755,044 



Dollars. 
213.676 
195,791 
176,784 
158,832 



Dollars. 
172,888 
134,975 
158,096 
145.640 



.Salt Cake (Sulphate of Soda) . 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1017. 
1918. 



Tons. 
189 
206 
189 
91 
216 
468 



Saltpeter, Crude. 

Pounds. 

1913 10.989,382 

1914 8,547,252 

1915 677,785 

1916 5.412,130 

1917 10,171,654 

1918 8.715,327 



Dollars. 
4.771 
2,486 
3.566 
6,892 
4,122 
8,382 



Dollars. 
288.995 
115,470 
22,483 
734,128 
904.506 
956,853 



Santonine, and Its Combination with 
Acids, Not Subject to Duty. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

1,982 

5,230 

912 

20,925 

111 

223 



Saponin. 



1914 

1915 

191C 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1914. 



Dollars. 

44,858 

125,128 

25,558 

580,850 

3.966 

7,502 



Dollars. 

6,643 

5,967 

413 



Sarsaparilla Root. 



1913. 
1014. 
193 .V 
1910. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
301.308 
224,070 
250.178 
201,270 
140.047 
110,700 



Dollars. 
38,860 
86,284 
36,065 
41.489 
18,994 
81.454 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



53 



1918.. 
1014.. 
1915.. 
1010.. 
1017.. 
1918. . 



Seed, Anise. 




Pounds. 


Dollars. 


1,250,831 


84.941 


281,117 


15,412 


..... 432.863 


80.932 


780,487 


68.713 


475,100 


67,221 


364,406 


61,380 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Seed, Beet (Except Sugar) . 

Pounds. Dollars. 

, 887,339 188,895 

, 1.076,525 119,410 

, 901,208 112,092 

783,807 99.494 

, 483,112 83.468 

, 447,878 191.355 



Seed, Canary. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
6,219,623 
4.503,280 
4,911,298 
5,368.551 
4,909.107 
8,242,223 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Seed, Caraway, 

Pounds. 

8,691,831 

1,009,300 

2,895,418 

.:. 2,978,581 

505,804 

635,677 



Seed, Cardamom. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
113.461 
80,782 
152,679 
225,687 
214,464 
258,328 



Seed, Coriander. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
1,824,735 
1,238,430 
1,496,288 
1,587,923 
1,111.127 
1.820.183 



Seed, Cotton. 



Pounds. 

1918 8,264,114 

1914 8,891,303 

1915: 22,724,868 

1016 30,113,684 

1917 53.862.927 

1918..... 35,435,460 



Seed, Cummin. 



Pounds. 

1913 529,667 

1914 580,550 

1015 694,344 

19J6 1,446.006 

1917 1,159,598 

1018 .'... 1,520,691 



Seed, Fennel. 



Pounds. 

1913 187,665 

1914 207,1* 

1915 293,810 

1916 312,927 

1917 :.i ' 443.704 

1918 218,091 



Seed, Fenugreek. 

Pounds. 

1913 : 1,044.407 

1914 1,610,230 

1915 1,434,826 

1916 811,270 

1917 1,052,843 

1918 851,532 



Dollars. 
184.096 
190,530 
208,885 
181,898 
166,774 
201,460 



Dollars. 
234,294 
107,599 
172,742 
280,146 
71,745 
247,409 



Dollars. 
104,287 

72.148 
106.180 
119,162 

88.605 
108,505 



Dollars. 
35,817 
46,158 
36.851 
54,870 
124,098 
255.270 



Dollars. 

56,315 

66,035 

114.083 

251,568 

932,335 

1.047.637 



Dollars. 
•27,178 
31,709 
83.534 
225.672 
207,012 
198.855 



Dollars. 
14.410 
12,299 
13,622 
20,751 
48,497 
24,133 



Dollars. 
37,434 
29,601 
30,205 
20,672 
71.102 
841,504 



Seed, Flaxseed or Linseed. 

Bushels. Dollars. 

1913 5,274,922 8,118,319 

1914 8,052.022 10,571,656 

1015 10,378,902 12,983,548 

1916 14,637,543 20,151,633 

1917 12.484, 850 25,205.231 

1918 12.785,034 83,830,735 



Seed, Millet, Prepared. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 

16.977 

26,680 

1,700 

240 



Seed, Mustard. 

Pounds. 

1913 12.719.682 

1914 11,548.941 

1915 10,157.034 

1916 10.402.112 

1917 0.002.122 

1918 13,035,837 



301 



Dollars. 
417,370 
370,964 
543.586 

1,070,567 
77fl.5Jfl 
688,096 



Seed, Poppy. 

Bushels. 

1913 77.396 

1014 56,322 

1915 , 52,899 

1916 26,648 

1917 3,878 

1918 180,024 

Seed, Rape. 

Pounds. 

1918 4,808,750 

1914 5,970,987 

1915 5,194,132 

1916 9,977,853 

1917 4.819,860 

1918....^ 12,678,276 

Seed, Soya Bean. 

Pounds. 

1914 1,929,435 

1915 3,837,865 

1916 3.008,065 

1917 5,334,384 

1918 31,805,997 

Not stated prior to 1914. 



Dollars. 
287,069 
126,744 
172.018 
176,776 
25.565 
215,840 



Dollars. 
169,684 
211,801 
230.280 
811.212 
186,877 
741,810 



Dollars. 

49,507 

87.306 

78,963 

182,572 

692,964 



Soap, Toilet, Perfumed. 



Seed, Sugar Beet. 

Pounds. 

1918 14,783,060 

1914 10,490.089 

1915 15,892,831 

1916 9.047,902 

1917 14,465,635 

1918 15,636,541 

Selenium and Salts of. 



1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Not slated prior to 1014. 



Senna Leaves. 



Pounds. 

1013 2,634,117 

1014 2.454,772 

1015 2,180,288 

1016 2,704.400 

1017- 5,116,315 

1018 3,575,066 



Sheep Dip. 



1913. 
1014. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
1,066,549 
804,200 
1,410,328 
1,031.186 
1,684.572 
4,541,499 



Dollars. 

363 

43 

16 

302 

2.286 



Dollars. 
150,655 
178,054 
209,818 
861,881 
844.733 
771.067 



Dollars. 
63,527 
16,842 
32,963 
21,198 
017,185 
26.989 



Sienna and Sienna Earths. 

Pounds. 

1018 3,962.601 

1014.. 6,489,329 

1915 6.656,031 

1916 5,206,292 

1917 2,000,972 

1918 2.731.181 

Silver Leaf. 

100 leaves. 

1913. 17,130 

1914 34,070 

1915 31,208 

1916 6,445 

1917 1,125 

1918 1.750 



Dollars. 
57,358 
55,925 
64,658 
83,428 
61.163 
61,301 



Dollars. 

2.122 

4.358 

8,718 

802 

135 

882 



Slag, Bas 


ic, Ground or Ungyund. 

Tons. Dollars. 
5,124 146.477 


1914 


0.509 


108,565 


1915 


561 


7.809 


1018 


' 81 

, . 41 

2 


1,031 

549 

54 


1013 


Soap, Castile. 

Pounds. 
4,656,365 


Dollars. 
857,888 


1914 


4,604,995 


868,810 


1915 


4.067.921 


341,107 


1916 


8.245.5RO 


385.580 


1917 


...... 2,300.356 


306,126 




1.027.148 


147.286 



Soap, Medicinal. 



1013. 
1014. 
1015. 
1016. 
1017. 
1018. 



Pounds. 
42.318 
74,182 
32.048 
16.455 
4.287 
16,844 



Soap Powder. 



1014.. 
1015.. 
1916.. 
1017.. 
1018.. 
Not 



stated prior to 1914. 



Dollars. 

14,734 

29,306 

14,082 

3.523 

1,975 

7,412 



Dollars. 

211 

8,302 

19,568 

7,800 

12,744 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1018. 



Dollars. 
824.207 
248,194 
198.646 
147,819 
184.618 
125,275 



Soap, Toilet, Unperfumed. 



H914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1914. 



Dollars. 

100,650 

140,048 

82,057 

64,570 

13,685 



Soap, All Other, Not Specially Pro- 
vided For. 



1018. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Soda, Ash. 



Pounds. 

Xvlo •■•»*•••••■••••« 3» 1 UUj TWO 

1015 2,127,542 

1016 i. 878,175 

1017 1,047,295 

1918 1.514,765 



Soda, Arsenate of. 



Pounds. 

1918 1.267,998 

1914 228,270 

1915 85,850 

1916 36,176 

1917 23.296 

1918 35 



Soda, Benzoate of. 

Pounds. 

1914 190 

1915 40,908 

1916 35,188 

1917 80,755 

1918 1,869 

Not stated prior to 1914. 



Dollars. 
58,526 
84,745 
58.940 
18,245 
21,406 
81,630 



Dollars. 
85,461 
28,100 
29,022 
20,718 
29,239 
56,281 



Dollars. 
55,941 
8,267 
8.188 
8.486 
2,404 
88 



Dollars. 

97 

19,188 

100,195 

889.868 

4,742 



Soda, Bicarbonate of. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 80,699 2,238 

1914 88,873 2,324 

1915 93,318 2,584 

1916 129,414 2,867 

1917." 34,742 1,821 

1918 20,444 944 

Soda, Bichromate and Chromate of. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 9 3 

1914 11,056 585 

1915 

1916 6.154 8.630 

1917 

1918 27,127 5.259 

Soda, Borate of, or Borax, Refined. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1914 4.522 641 

1915 2,265 814 

1916 682 112 

1917 614 109 

1918 * 2 1 

Not stated prior to 1914. 



Soda, Chlorate of. 



Pounds. 

1913 v 50 

1914 f 469 

1915 62 

1917 33.600 

1918 44,800 



Dollars. 

10 

84 

6 

8.105 

1,080 

8,064 



Soda, Crystal Carbonate of. 



Pounds. 

1918 169,174 

0.914 .-. 807,488 

1915 144.452 

1916 40,231 

1917 60.464 

1018 70,110 



Soda, Cyanide of. 

Pounds. 

1014 7.856,611 

1015 6,187,418 

1016 684.108 

1917 1,875.824 

1018 84,052 

Not stated prior to 1014. 



Dollars. 
2,928 
8,328 

2.748 

889 

1,299 

2,028 



Dollars. 

1,120,789 

953,907 

115,186 

861.777 

39,405 



Soda, Hydrate of, or Caustic. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 671,480 25,364 

1014 • 665,320 23,914 

1015 444,185 19,318 

1010 225,189 20,981 

1917 100,083 21.052 

1018 13.976 &M1 



V 



1 



54 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Soda, Hyposulphite of. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

7,299 228 

928,185 128,828 

1,855,228. 268.698 

5,125 166 

1,886 1,198 

6,980 6,728 



Soda, Nitrate of. 



1918. 
1914. 
1910. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 

088,815 

004,048 

575,371 

1,072,888 

1,261,998 

1,608,069 



Soda, Nitrite of. 



1918. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Founds. 
1,269,544 
1.844,879 
1.696,567 
2,698,880 
3,675,179 
2,755,088 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Soda, Phosphate of. 

Pounds. 



80 

1,864,789 

485,800 

1,066 

1,561 

.112 



Dollars. 
20,718,875 
17,926,165 
16.240,010 
82,129,926 
44,428,196 
70,077,674 



Dollars. 

07.595 

76,818 

74,268 

170,160 

261,555 

226,294 



Dollars. 

14 

24,975 

7,765 

JT9 

521 

69 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Soda, Prussiate of, Yellow. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1,887.869 118,475 

2,295,724 171,884 

1,629,958 120,477 

527,180 186,250 

175,980 96,592 



Soda, Sal, or Soda Crystals. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

128,027 

168,626 

104.800 

67.210 

50 

75 



Soda, Silicate of. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
1.032,118 
1,046,569 
1,587.902 
1,567,617 
1,208,844 
707,588 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Soda, Sulphid of. 

Pounds. 



951,664 

2,529.911 

1,263,866 

80.513 

844,617 

117,582 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Soda, Sulphite of. 

Pounds. 



27.152 

382,540 

165.594 

435 

68.224 

20,206 



Sponges. 



1912 

1013 

Stated separately after 1918. 



Dollars. 

1,010 

1.274 

606 

834 

4 

8 



Dollars. 
9,400 
10,881 
16,292 
18.694 
18,498 
12,784 



Dollars. 

13,068 

86,888 

18,228 

4,616 

7.214 

1.707 



Dollars. 

400 

5.627 

4.816 

60 

1.221 

228 



Dollars. 
811,647 
289.909 



Sponges, Not Advanced by Chemical 

Process. 



1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
279.211 
834,202 
454.626 
698.258 
510.874 



Sponges, Bleached and Advanced by 
Chemical Process. 



1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Starch, Potato. 

Pounds. 

1918 14.180.806 

1914 18.984.741 

1915 10,941,257 

1916 2.237.717 

1917 17.545.689 

1918 13,195,079 



Dollars. 
88.800 
42.042 
58,797 
55,077 
27.682 



Dollars. 
875.718 
288.661 
268,859 
72.736 
797.827 
902.499 



Starch, Soluble or Chemically Treated. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 821,071 18.845 

1914 1,697.892 54,604 

1915 569.297 21.569 

1916 7.420 417 

1917 44,788 8,244 

1918 

Starch, All Other. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 677,785 40,645 

1914 962.814 52,160 

1915.... 902,984 02,087 

1916 1.242,918 78,888 

1917 888.340 62,182 

1918 090,469 67,800 

Steel Wool, or Shavings. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 41,486 8.177 

1914 27,118 8,698 

1915 17,059 2,189 

1916 .'. 148 26 

1917 

1918 6,000 120 

Strontia, Oxide of. 

Dollars. 

1913 474 

1914 1,969 

1915 7,268 

1916 8,811 

1917 21,184 

1918 6,873 



Sumac, Unground. 



Strychnia, or Strychnine, and Its Com- 
bination with Acids Not Sub- 
ject to Duty. 



Ounces. 

1918 966,575 

1914 846,905 

1915 26,967 

1916 59,278 

1917 83,328 

1918 9,688 



Dollars. 

4,112.007 

8.768,879 

11.449 

37,652 

25,617 

9,726 



Sulphur Ore, as Pyrites or Sulphuret 

of Iron, Containing Not in Excess 

of 25 Per Cent. Sulphur. 

Tons. Dollars. 

1918 532 877 

1914... 17,419 5,408 

1915 26,967 11.449 

1916 1.870,059 7,121,614 

1917 935,749 5,855,913 

1918 807,084 4,526,563 

Sulphur or Brimstone, Crude. 

Tons. Dollars. 

1918 19,258 374,024 

1914 20,286 346,875 

1915 25,842 442,975 

1916 22.539 872.699 

1917 11.819 205,080 

1918 282 8.677 

Sulphur Lac or Precipitated. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 715,876 13,723 

1914 233.896 13,636 

1915 208,568 13,187 

1916 217,997 16,628 

1917 69,145 7,009 

1918 84.224 10.797 



Sulphur, Refined. 

Tons. Dollars. 

1913.... S> 1,742 41,626 

1914 7. 1,528 89,634 

1915 1,296 86,275 

1916 850 26,778 

1917 

1918 

Sulphur, Sublimed or Flowers of. 

Tons. Dollars. 

1918 6,104 122.093 

1914 509 15,841 

1915 060 31,202 

1916 200 7,612 

1917 *. 295 13,817 

1918 

Sumac, Extract. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1913 1,270.825 44,568 

1914 1,468,297 59.022 

1915 727.449 85,066 

1916 36.008 4,108 

1917 161,507 18.944 

1918 23,706 * 2,616 

Sumac, Ground. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 14.112,112 289,255 

1914 9,678,719 231.580 

1915 12.048.917 294.484 

1916 20.411,022 527,102 

1917 10,877,008 887,404 

lft J ft 10.557.920 855,192 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

621,866 
1,335,566 
1,258.204 
1,131,368 

760.015 
8.619,439 



Talcum, Ground, Etc. 



Pounds. 

1918 28,660,095 

1914 82,498.066 

1915 80,484.850 

1916 83.738,087 

1917 # 84.288.429 

1918 27.550,409 

Talcum, Steatite and French 

Crude. 

Pounds. 

2,807.974 

3,478,711 

4,681.165 

3,786.899 

4 721 980 

Not stated prlor'to 1914. 

Tallow. 

-«,« Pounds. 

1913 490.605 

JJIJ 8,871,838 

JWg 12,684.594 

JJ16 4.779,076 

1JJ7 81,186.627 

1918 98,176,660 



1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
12,420 
82.288 
82,618 
28,164 
27.769 
141.063 



Dollars. 
122,628 
178,028 
187,871 
207,179 
288,479 
267.265 

Chalk, 



Dollars. 
28,869 
15,822 
9.708 
11,477 
10,628 



Dollars. 

41.710 

281,924 

828,958 

396,787 

8,108.274 

14,865,676 



Tanks, or Vessels, Cylindrical or 

Tubular, for Holding Gas, Liquids, 

or Other Material. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 

499.081 
459.842 
226.911 
242,778 
234,217 
153,716 



Tapioca, Tapioca Flour, Cassava or 

Cassady. 



.«..* Pounds. 

1918 71,356.085 

1»14 71,804,728 

1915 60,080.060 

1J16 64,888,470 

1817 100.517,107 

1918 92,351,460 



Dollars. 
1.955,169 
1,590,614 
1.324,184 
1.992.399 
_8,508,479 
4,754,860 



Tar, Coal, Crude, and Pitch of. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 



Barrels. 
14,093 
17,515 
16,891 
19,206 
5.594 



Stated separately after Sept. 8, 1916. 



Dollars. 
28.691 
25.140 
28,874 
32,685 
10,702 



Tar, Coal, Crude. 



1917. 
1918. 



Barrels. 

5,864 

10,031 



Dollars. 
10,881 
15,608 



Tar, Coal, Pitch Of. 



1917. 
1918. 



Barrels. 

7,258 

15,838 



Tar and Pitch of Wood. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 




Dollars. 

8,146 

32,582 



Dollars. 
2,777 
7,946 
1,551 



5,908 
214 



Tartrate of Soda, or Potassa, or Ro- 
chelle Salts. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

138,115 

186,805 

253,609 

187-* 

17,840 

31,160 



Dollars. 

16,927 

28.419 

19.244 

47 

4.862 

8,614 



Tea, Impure, Waste, Siftings or 

Sweepings, for Manufacturing 

Purpose. 

Pound* 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 



7,168.410 

5,218,956 

4,789,208 

4.796,766 

7,626,688 

1918 10.887,595 

Terpin Hydrate. 

Pounds. 

1914 6,929 

1915 4,477 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1914. 



Dollars. 
215,988 
178,802 
158,860 
201,607 
478,826 
782,478 



Dollars. 
1,020 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



55 



Thorium, Nitrate of. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pound*. 

112,105 

144,418 

73,516 

22.291 

1,877 



Dollars. 

212.263 

809.260 

186,885 

68.496 

5,268 



Thorium, Oxide and Other Salts of. 



1914. . 
1915. . 
1916. . 
1917. . 
1918.. 
Not 



Pounds. 

2*405 

82 

2.612 

1,616 



Dollars. 

4.075 

859 

6,092 

8,984 



1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



stated prior to 1914. 

* Thymol. 

Pounds. 

19,045 

4,772 

443 

1,759 

84,978 



Not stated prior to 1914. 



Dollars. 

24,765 

12.921 

1.978 

18,741 

118,279 



Tin, Black Oxide of, or Cassiterite. 



N 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
82,963 
19,549 
49,068 
40,588 
54,807 
29,014 



Tin Foil. 



1913 

1914 y . . . . 

191 ft * 
1917 

loior: 



Toluol. 



1917 

1918 

Not stated 



Pound* 
135,000 



Dollars. 
18,536 

8,022 
10,798 

8,184 
12.816 

8,914 



Dollars. 

430 

649 

1.216 

1,508 

2,283 

212 



Dollars. 
81.000 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



prior to 1917. 

Tonka Beans. 

Pounds. 

788,888 

545,156 

132,119 

143,821 

222,754 

406.429 



Turmeric. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Turpentine, Spirits of. 

Gallons. 



56,457 
72,679 
18.680 
20.675 
18.286 
1,433 



Turpentine, Venice. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounda 

00,678 

112,010 

20,904 

7,901 

1.045 



Dollars. 

1,140,409 

677,196 

95,222 

94,700 

156,974 

204,260 



Dollars. 

88.785 

22,978 

10,145 

180,948' 

112,372 

602 



Dollars. 

19,295 

28.818 

6,095 

8,252 

6.271 

664 



Dollars. 

9.169 

17,434 

8,172 

772 

248 



Ultramarine, Dry, in Pulp or Mixed 
With Oil or Water. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
4918. 



Pounda. 


Dollars. 


695,938 


62,260 


901,208 


78.892 


641,881 


02,715 


401,005 


44,709 


888,201 


86,488 


359,186 


85,210 



Umber, Crude, Not Powdered, 
Washed or Pulverized. 



1918.. 

•1914. 



Pounds. 
5,256,077 
1.069.059 



Dollars. 

29,391 

7.138 



Umber, Ground in Oil or Water. 

Pounda Dollars. 

1912 5,468 899 

1918 6,088 380 

•1914 2,538 156 



•Covers period July 1 
only. Stated as "Umber 
after October 3. 1918. 



to October 
and Umber 



8 f 1918, 

Earths" 



r 



Umber, Powdered, Washed or Pul- 
verized. 



1912.. 
1913. . 
•1914. 



Pounda 
702,772 
817,500 
151,718 



Dollars* 

11,288 

11,217 

2,478 



Umber and Umber Earths. 



1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Included In 
prior to 1914. 



the 



Pounda 

8,881,919 

7,225.587 

8.914,889 
. 9.211.112 
I 665,195 
three preceding* 



Dollars. 
25,798 
36,128 
65,076 
06,217 
18,850 
classes 



Uranium, Oxide and Salts of. 



1913 

1914 

xviu* •••••*••«•••■•• 

Xvav ••■«•••••••••«•• 

XVX v« •■••*•**••••••• 

1918 



Dollars. 
21,435 
5.782 
1,969 
2,099 
8,018 



•Urea. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 



Dollars. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



1918 

Avl»i •••■•■»•• 

1915 

1916. . 
1917. . 
1918.. 



■ ••••• i 



17,961 
05.464 
79,172 
56.429 
22,777 


8,798 
81.994 
32.496 
80.248 
17,479 


11a Beans. 




Pounds. 

1,049,617 
094.581 
749,140 
790,890 
788.505 
759.090 


Dollars. 
2,041,574 
1,739.074 
1.889.995 
1,474.228 
1.583,325 
1,202,413 


aloma. 

Pounds. 
5,295,702 
7,054,050 
0,352,190 


Dollars. 

79,610 

116,406 

88,061 



Vanillin. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Ounces. 

880 

88,668 

451 



Dollars. 

171 

6.446 

98 



Varnish, Gold Size, or Japan. 

Dollars. 

1914 8,706 

1915 10,228 

1916 428 

1917 2,504 

1918 1,217 

Not stated prior to 1914. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Varnish, Spirit 

Gallons. 



1,475 
10,127 
581 
1.818 
2,771 
1,280 



Varnish, All Other. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Gallons. 
25,093 
18,888 
27,043 
25,542 
20,366 
10,923 



Venetian Red. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1910. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
2,989,104 
8,858.611 
2.478.959 
1,087,010 
885,161 
488,088 



Dollars. 

4,078 
24,829 

1,937 

6,874 
13,425 

3,033 



Dollars. 
51,710 
81.082 
51,791 
62,776 
47,740 
24,345 



Dollars. 
28,649 
83,077 
20,677 
12,947 
8,296 
5,135 



Verdigris, Acetate and Sub-Acetate 

of Copper. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 55,465 7,053 

1014 19.009 2,580 

1915 17,569 2.491 

1916 81,005 15,048 

1917 50,218 13.052 

1918 26,887 8.094 



Vermilion Reds. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1918. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
85,887 
72.881 
95,659 
71,515 
17,557 
f.<MO 



Dollars. 
44,753 
84,879 
58,097 
92,990 
24,170 
10.110 



Wafers, Unleavened, or Not Edible* 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1910. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
28,504 
82,818 
26.556 
28.786 
27,417 
7,258 



Wash Blue Containing Ultramarine. 



1913 , 

1914 , 

1915 , 

1916. • . . • 

1917 , 

1918 



Wax, Mineral. 



1913. , 

1914. 

1915. 

1916. 

1917. 

1918. 



• • ■ • • 



Pounds. 
6,440,878 
7.974.157 
6,284,757 
2,081.088 
2.054.722 
1,708,514 



Wax, Vegetable. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
5.542,474 
4,836,276 
6,888,898 
9.594, 111 
7,210,108 
8,686.881 



Dollars. 
18,882 
12,906 
0,485 
4,907 
25,280 
15,688 



Dollars. 
507,056 
587,084 
401.500 
141,589 
150,241 
185,920 



Dollars. 
1,152,788 
1,048,887 
999.585 
1,551.996 
1.742.040 
2.670.022 



Whalebone, Unmanufactured. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1918. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
8,998 
9,024 
40,088 
27,855 
10,221 
36,107 



Dollars. 
12.086 
11.781 
08,262 
17,986 
6,007 
10,477 



White Lead, and All Pigments Con- 
taining Lead. 

Pounds. 



1913. 
1914. 
1916. 
1910. 
1917. 
1918. 



078,078 
050.884 
514.870 
153,474 
57,045 
887 



Dollars. 
48,527 
44,480 
85.748 
11,970 
5,054 
239 



Whiting and Paris White, Dry. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

8,580.747 14,032 

2.301,005 10,453 

5,887,038 15,705 

8,655,128 14,459 

2,147,895 11.292 
4.9 08,295 81,033 

Wicking, Lamp, Stove or Candle, 
Made of Cotton or Other Vege- 
table Fiber. 



1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 



XVaO ••■••«•■••••«••« 
JLVJLm, ••»•••■•••••••«• 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 



** 



Pounds. 
44,658 
47,208 
37,932 
20,074 
21,871 
17.600 



Witherite. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915, 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
2,109,842 
1,223,926 
888.292 
1,714,414 
1.420,752 
1.194,268 



Wood Flour. 



Pounds. 

1913 11,795,852 

1914 15,171,972 

1915 11,482,934 

1916 18,731,979 

..1917 8,703.664 

1918 3,738,486 



Xylol. 



1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1917 



Pounds. 
181.104 



Dollars. 

18,771 

15,988 

11,758 

5,105 

6,918 

8,871 



Dollars. 
15,224 
7.927 
6.074 
20.440 
10,071 
20,140 



Dollars. 
02,447 
84,751 
60.181 
74,479 
57,521 
48.862 



Dollars. 
8.836 



Zinc Bearing Ores, Includes Calamine. 

Tons, 

gross 

weight. 

1913 27,481 

1914 14,402 

1915 17,341 

1916 86,611 

1917 327.280 

1918 33,447 



Zlno 

contents, 

pounds. 

25,214.528 

11.702.801 

14.259.170 

81,779,564 

298.958.919 

81,822,890 



Dollars. 
626.178 
109,980 
321,185 
8.878.166 
8,186,015 
580,758 



Zinc, Chloride of. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 

1.252,319 

789,296 

194,250 

12,648 

6.216 

197,570 



Dollars. 

87,078 

28,508 

5,805 

408 

029 

15,881 



56 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



Zinc Dust. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
5.615,766 
4,788,488 
2,278.533 
1,365,705 
522,587 
263.428 



1912 
•1913 
1914 
Figures 



Dollars. 
817,492 
223,775 
132,822 
255,192 
83,016 
25,109 



Zinc Oxide, Dry. 

Pounds. 

4.842,948 

, 6,148,120 

1,408,162 

are for July 1 to October 
Stated separately after October 3. 1913. 



Dollars. 

310,362 

389,485 

88.410 

3, 1913. 



1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 



Zinc, Oxide of, Ground, Dry. 

Pounds. Dollars.' 

5.815.807 809,106 

2.565.434 148,148 

1,441,299 244,934 

285,433 65.683 

294.736 55.302 



Zinc, Oxide of, Ground in or Mixed 
with Oil or Water. 



1914 . 

XvXO • • ••■••••■••••■ ft • 

1916 

1917 

1918 



Pounds. 

292,571 

156.451 

66.347 

14,089 

273 



Dollars. 

21,595 

11,525 

7.187 

1,225 

57 



fi 



i 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
.1917. 
1918. 



Zinc Sulphate. 

Pounds. 



23,778 

107.065 

68.940 

""28 
21 



Dollars. 

817 

2.176 

1,027 



44 
35 



Zinc, Sulphide of. White. 



• Pounds. 

1913 5,163,642 

1914 1,888.999 

1915 283.356 

1916 96.402 

1917 : 53,587 

1918 \. 7.098 



Dollars. 
144,812 
42.180 
8.970 
7.368 
8.451 
4,535 



^ 



DOMESTIC EXPORTS FROM THE UNITED STATES 

For the Fiscal Years 1913, 1914, 19J5, 1916, 1917, 1918 



4: 



it 



Acid, Carbolic. 



Pounds. 

1918 8,688,554 

, Not stated prior to 1918. 

Acid, Nitric. 

Pounds. 

1918 961,494 

.Not stated prior to 1918. 

Acid, Picric. 

Pounds. 

1918 56,193,952 

Net stated prior to 1918. 

Acid, Sulphuric. 

/ Pounds. 

/1913 9.790,532 

1914 12.131.750 

1915 40,771,510 

1916 82.020.246 

1917 58.604.048 

1918 67,654,722 



Dollars. 
4,286,288 



Dollars. 
101.040 



» Dollars. 
85,357.010 



Dollars. 

89,788 

125,892 

516.436 

1.990,532 
968.888 

1,119,907 



Acids, All Other. 



1013. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Alcohol, Wood. 

Proof gallons. 

1,837.173 

1,598.776 

944.374 

1,472,258 

825.394 

2.538,001 



Dollars. 

364,347 

857.035 

2,611,741 

22,717,835 

54.725.124 

5,673,707 



Dollars. 
788,143 
652,486 
438.846 
857,161 
646,939 

2,070.026 



Alcohol, All Other, Including Pure, 
Neutral or Cologne Spirit. 



Proof gallons. 

1918 151,232 

1914 187.845 

1915 200.455 

1916 24.433.243 

1917 51,941.634 

1918 8.351.142 



Dollars. 

58.346 

' 67,728 

108,985 

8,784,742 

1<L027,867 

1,610.878 



Aluminum, Ingot Metal and Alloys. 



Pounds. 

1918 21,256.641 

Not stated prior to 1918. 



Dollars. 
8.746,451 



Aluminum, Plates and Sheets. 



1918. 



Not stated prior to 1918. 



Pounds. 
1.633,854 



Dollars. 
743,836 



Asbestos, Ore and Unmanufactured. 



1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 
219 
822 



Not stated prior to 1917. 



Dollars. 

21.851 

118,484 



Asphaltum, Unmanufactured. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 
54,560 
49.831 
28.558 
42,754 
34,423 
22.052 



Dollars. 
1,164,486 
1.131.086 
616,240 
830,946 
712,051 
548,271 



Asphaltum, Manufactured. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
191ft. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
475,541 
362.347 

400,154 
510.290 
554,68' 
488.892 



Babbitt Metal. 



1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Not stated prior to 1915. 



Pounds. 

657.520 

1,941,976 

2.808.688 

2,290,878 



Dollars. 
122,597 
419,633 
783,004 
610,979 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



g Powder. 




Pounds. 


Dollars. 


2,844,575 


844,826 


2,725,964 


790,274 


8,876,780 


881.879 


3,969,985 


860,118 


4,836.844 


1,028,352 


6,046,455 


1.840,251 



Bark, for Tanning. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 

1,633 

1,212 

825 

5,226 

.1,830 

194 



Dollars. 
46,499 
26,939 
21,424 

123,675 
49,907 

• 5,857 



Bark for Tanning, Extract of. 

(See Tanning Extract.) 



Bauxite Concentrates. 



1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1915. 



Tons. 
11,949 
19,317 
18.495 
21.399 



Beeswax. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1910. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pound 8. 
116.296 
96.215 
181,328 
147,772 
383.067 
189,871 



Dollars. 

531.404 

929,309 

1,118,777 

1.464,493 



Dollars. 
38.181 
27.292 
57,971 
48.252 
131.691 
68,117 



Benzol. 

(See "Coal Tar Distillates.") , 

Blacking and Polishes. 



1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1915 



Dollars. 

503,629 

784,552 

1,086.234 

1,003,100 



Bones, Hoofs and Horns, Unmanu- 
factured. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Brushes. 



1915 

1010 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1915. 



Dollars. 

102,706 
61,180 
16,182 
37.558 
39.804 

338.642 



Dollars. 
604.916 

1.132,262 
863,630 
984,085 



Calcium Carbide. 



Pounds. 

1913 33,419,375 

1914 32.84.1.049 

1915 35,772,867 

1010 87.878.692 

1917 31.278.971 

1918 28.869,686 



Dollars. 
990,027 
962. (HO 
1,097,952 
1,211.267 
1.001,861 
1,328,437 



Candles. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
2.595,912 
3,047.756 
4.230.026 
6,120,695 
6,576.632 
6,761,767 



Dollars. 
246,274 
283,018 
417,845 
575,659 
749,369 

1.031,184 



Celluloid and Manufactures of. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Cement, Hydraulic. 

Barrels (380 lbs.) 
3,999,715 



2,391,453 
2,801,451 
2.740,596 
2,345,952 
2.575,205 



Dollars. 
1,639,046 
1.387,541 
722,850 
2.328,142 
3, 112,441 
8,744,745 



Dollars. 
5,822,107 
2,382,282 
8.241,686 
8,780,564 
4.111,550 
5,989,081 



Chalk, Manufactures of. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1910. 
1917. 
1918. 



Charcoal. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Chewing Gum. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Clays, Fire Clay. 



Tons. 

1917 44.098 

1918 50,529 

Not stated prior to 1917. 



Clays, All Other. 



Tons. 

1917 26,078 

1918 • 22,267 

Not stated prior to 1917. 



Dollars. 
49,478 
40,154 
51,175 
60,417 
105,202 
186.711 



Dollars. 

78,030 

81,997 

105,009 

94,096 

155,470 

186.221 



Dollars. 
186,944 
178.680 
281,483 
574,423 
1,084,782 
1,896,135 



Dollar*. 
201,898 
810,527 



Dollar*. 
169.544 
188.055 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



al Tar. 




Barrels. 


Dollars. 


121.168 


152,273 


22.150 


43.145 


21,317 


39,647 


74.809 


129,220 


62,674 


145.574 


53,955 


147,765 



Coal Tar Distillates — Benzol. 



Pounds. 

1918 25.400,852 

Not stated prior to 1918. 



Dollars. 
2,152,315 



Coal Tar Distillates — All Other. 



1918 

Not stated prior to 1918. 



Dollars. 
5,620,851 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



57 



Copper, Pigs, Ingots and Bars. 



Pound*. 

1013 740,840,812 

1914 864,802,721 

1915 681,773,687 

Subdivided after 1915. 



Dollars. 

120,666,914 

128,187,408 

81,946,622 



Egg Yolks, Canned Eggs, Etc. 



Copper, Unrefined, Slack, Blister and 

Converter Copper in Bars, 

Pigs or Other Forms. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
67.864 
47,968 
88.866 

210,266 
72.491 

525,880 



Emery and Other Abrasive Wheels. 



Pounds. 

1916 4,921,089 

1917 18,200,897 

1918 26,650,026 

Not stated prior to 1916.' 



Dollars. 
1,187,770 
6,609,818 
6,920.687 



1918. 
1914, 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Copper, Refined, in Ingots, 
Other Forms. 

Pounds. 

1916 667.891,844 , 

1917 '. 988,102,168 • 

1918 889,004,470 

Not stated prior to 1916. 



Bars 



or 



Explosives, Dynamite. 



Dollars. 
147,809,798 
267,255.689 
285,717,071 



Pounds. 

1915 7,712,999 

1916 19,561,654 

1917 16.254,201 

1918 18,911,668 

Not stated prior to 1915. 



Dollars. 

809.720 

665,778 

736.879 

1,680.265 

8,846,001 

4.697,443 



Dollars. 

924,070 

8,656,658 

8,488,143 

4,991,508 



Copper, Old and Scrap. 



\ Pounds. 

1916 \ 312,585 

1917 1.510,476 

1918 520,659 

Not stated prior to 1916. 



Dollars. 

66.020 

412,104 

110,811 



1918. . 
Not 



Copper, Pipes and Tubes. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

9,565,504 4,056,841 

stated prior to 1918. 



Explosives, Gunpowder, 

Smokeless. 

Pounds. 

1915 7,686.480 

1916 212,821,076 

1917 404,668.874 

1918 340,516,883 

Not stated prior to 1915. 

Fertilizers, Phosphate High-Grade 
Hard Rock. 



Including 



Dollars. 

5,091.442 
173.786,374 
380,664,927 
262,201,813 



Copper Plates and Sheets. 



Pounds. 

1913 61,060,138 

1"1t» ••••«••»■«»••«• (l.fODD|ivO 

1915 • ••« 34, 866 1 789 

1916 24,091,274 

1917 34,641,227 

1918 87,448,757 



Dollars. 
10,028.960 
10,690,504 
5,103,778 
5,268.736 
10,086.918 
11.404,664 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 
494,200 
475.385 
46,050 
44,380 
14,968 
25,652 



Dollars. 
4,942,000 
4,753.350 
460,050 
429,180 
150.505 
217,650 



Fertilizers, Phosphate Roci, Land 

Pebble. 



Copper, Rods and Wire. 

Pounds. 

1?13 , 41.459.901 

1914 32,508,236 

1015 53,605,157 

Subdivided after 1915. 



Dollars. 
7,217,166 
6,298.685 
8.004.628 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 
777.898 
1.000,680 
222.472 
255,206 
178,094 
110,909 



Dollars. 
4,577.962 
5,857,969 
1,276,759 
1,324,877 
705.251 
456.883 



Copper, Sulphate of (Blue Vitriol). Fertilizers, 



„_._ Pounds. 

1913..'. 5,052,680 

1914 7,375,775 

1815 10,238.808 

1916 17.978,242 

1917 28.128.190 

1918 15,164,078 



Dollars. 

262.561 

830.007 

445,580 

2; 469,487 

3.012.954 

1,481,262 



Phosphate Rock, All 
Other. 



Copper, Wire (except insulated). 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1017. 
1918. 



Tons. 
794 

1.906 
887 
350 

8,108 
25,798 



Dollar*. 
4,127 
6,516 
5,888 
3.058 
255,389 
336,880 



-«..<. Pounds. 

1916 24,369,832 

1917 28,958.007 

1918 18,607,822 

Not stated prior to 1916. 



Cork, Manufactures of. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1913. 



Dollars. 
5,208,750 
9,269,688 
5,703,719 



Dollars. 
839,436 



Fertilizers, Superphosphates. 



Tons. 

1917 6,508 

1918 6,155 

Not stated prior to 1917. 



Fertilizers, All Other. 



211,795 
456,424 
541,579 
847.377 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916, 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 
74,834 
61,601 
89,224 
124,979 
216.222 
84.410 



Cornstarch (except for table use) . 



Ferrovanadium. 



Pounds. 

1918 38.670,203 

Not stated prior to 1918. 



Dollars. 
2.221,969 



Druggists* Rubber Sundries. 



1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Not stated prior to 1915. 



Pounds. 

755,905 

1,113,076 

2,613,387 

2,089,847 



1918 

Not stated pr.lor to 1918. 



Dyes and Dyestuffs. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 



Dollars. 
884,245 



Dollars. 

847,656 

866,919 

1.775.925 

5,102,002 

11.710,887 



Fire Extinguishers. 



1917 

1918 % 

Not stated prior to 1917. 



Dollar". 

67,489 

202,268 



Dollars. 
1.875.999 
1.360.908 
2.128,190 
3,580,643 
6.056,887 
4.626,958 



Dollars., 

641,792 

1.018.121 

2,831,669 

2,577,670 



Dollars. 

895,591 

1,688.963 



Stated separately after 1917; see following 
classes. 

Dye* and Dyestuffs — Aniline. 

Dollars. 
1918 7,298,298 

Dy cs and Dyestuffs — Logwood Ex- 



Flavoring Extracts and Fruit Juices. 

Dollars. 

1918 183.990 

1914 106,892 

1915 136.742 

1916 466,914 

1917 581,550 

1918 1.018.102 



Fly Paper, and Fly Traps. 



tract. 



1918. 



Dollars. 
2,339,480 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
178,175 
217.857 
115,921 
75.155 
77,426 
102,979 



Dyes and Dyestuffs — All Other. 



Formaldehyde (Formalin). 



1918. 



Dollars. 
7.284.110 



1918 

Not stated prior to 1918. 



Dollars. 
866.038 



1913. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Ginseng. 

Pounds. 
221,901 
224,606 
108,184 
266,062 
198. 483 . 
269,892 



Glass Bottles, Demijohns, 

and Jars. 



1913.. 
1914.. 
1915.. 
1916.. 
1917.. 
1918. . 



Glassware, Chemical. 



1918 

Not stated prior to 1918. 



Dollars. 
1.666.731 
1,832.686 
919.931 
1.597.608 
1.386.208 
1.716.548 

Carboys 



Dollars. 

808.327 

711.363 

772,427 

2,168,244 

2,435,610 

2,671,892 



Dollars. 
162,937 



Glass, Common Window. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Boxes (50 *q. ft.) 



489,288 
894,793 
942,648 
716,443 



Quantity not stated prior to 1915. 



Dollars. 
484.861 
311.339 
1,443.113 
8,123.916 
8.483,596 
3,396,184 



Glassware, Cut or Engraved. 

Dollars. 

1918 157,669 

Not stated prior to 1918. 



Glass*. Plate, Unsilvered. 



1913. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Square feet. 
165,129 
74,867 
2.730,046 
5,149,512 
6,117.955 
5,610.199 



Glass, All Other. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1913. 



Dollars. 

68.830 

36.767 

881.727 

1.568.181 

2.223,329 

2.456,896 



Dollars. 
2,892,124 
2.671,164 
2,511.450 
5,460,997 

t .411,996 
.177,279 



Glucose (Corn Syrup). 



Pounds. 

1913 156,366,604 

1914 162,680,878 

1915 126.434,878 

1016 148,523,098 

1917 170,026,606 

1918 80,970,744 



Glue. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1018. 



Pounds. 
2,644,932 
2.351,770 
2,874,226 
4,946.298 
4.064,231 
4.935,251 



Glycei 



srin. 

Pounds. 

1918 21.046.991 

Not stated prior to 1918. 



Dollars. 
3. 682. 3H 
3,766,284 
3,103,561 
8,772,860 
5.960,686 
4,949,159 



Dollars. 
276,619 
258,611 
298.136 
531.329 
513,775 
839,197 



Dollars. 
10,587.681 



Grape Sugar (Corn Sugar). 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 41,783,642 970,025 

1914 36.850,496 799,635 

1915 33,027.630 781.672 

1916 37.863.084 962,101 

1917 44.947,709 1,396,146 

1918 16,887.567 1,046,512 



Grease, Lubricating. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
2,339.016 
2,394,918 
2,384.396 
3,ifv4,43o 

2.816.958 
2,986.816 



Grease, Soap Stock and Other. 

Dollars. 

1913 4.844.842 

1914 5,046.959 

1915 4.266,097 

1916 8,158,568 

1917 3,405,227 

1918 2,612,448 

Hair, Animal, Unmanufactured. 

Dollars. 

1913 1,449,157 

1914 1,086.038 

1916 1,402.189 

1916 2.088,863 

1917 1.451,364 

1918 1,080.624 



■ 

i 



58 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



Honey. 

Pounds. 

1813 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1018 16,000,672 

Quantty not stated prior to 1918. 



Lime. 



Hope. 



Pounds. 

1918 17,591,196 

1914 24.282.896 

1915 16,210,448 

1916 22,409,818 

1917 4.824,876 

1918 8,494,579 



Infants' Food. 



1918 

Not stated prior to 1918. 



Ink, Printers*. 



1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1915. 



Ink, All Other. 



1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1915. 



Iron, Pig. 

Tons. 
287.022 
201,995 
180,594 
286,728 
833,528 



1918 

S14 
16 

1916 

1917 

Stated separately after 1917; see 
classes. 



Dollars. 
182,262 
135,669 
114.088 
262,487 
736,189 

2,509.670 



Dollars. 
4,764.713 
6,968.529 
8,948.020 
4,888,929 
778,926 
998,773 



Dollars. 
1,908,141 



Dollars. 
884,847 
682,166 
751,411 
882,062 



Dollars. 
154,874 
285,277 
877,446 
407,098 



Dollar* 
4,141,210 
2,859,830 
2,071.808 
5,846,989 
24.729.424 
following* 



1918. 



Iron, Pigs — Ferromanganese. 

Tons. Dollars. 
4,985 1,064,548 



Iron, Pigs — Ferrosilicon 



1918. 



Tons. 
8,599 



Dollars. 
917,686 



1918. 



Iron, Pigs — All Other. 

Tons. Dollars. 
863.478 13,729.612 



Lard. 

Pvunda Dollars. 

1913 519,025,884 68,187.886 

1914 481,457,792 54,402,911 

1915 475,581,908 52,440,188 

1916 427,011,388 47,684,376 

1917 444,769,540 77,608,913 

1918 892.498,486 98,214.348 

Lard Compounds and Other Substi- 
tutes for Lard. 

Pounds. 

1918 67,466,882 

1914 58,308,564 

1915 69,980,614 

1916 52,848,311 

1917 56,369,898 

1918 31.278,882 



Dollars. 
5,915,759 
6,489,139 
6,046,762 
6,147,434 
8,269,844 
6,613.640 



Lard, Neutral. 



Pounds. 

1913 44,777,692 

1914 29,828,786 

1915 26,021,054 

1916 84,426,590 

1917 17,676,240 

1918 4,268,529 



Dollars. 
6,129,899 
3,270,236 
8,022,821 
4,050.397 
8.168.089 
1,074,608 



Lead, Pigs and Bars. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1914 40,328,662 1,511,800 

1915 193,024,221 7,926,604 

Stated as following- classes after 1916. 

Lead, Pigs and Bars, Produced from 
Domestic Ore. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1916 158.941,629 9.190,802 

1917 159,678,426 11,721,920 

1918 180,808,894 10,411,589 

Lead, Pigs and Bars, Produced from 
Foreign Ore. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1*16 62,265.948 2,114,692 

1917 28,254,608 2,108,150 

1914 64,260,273 6,985.492 



1918. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Barrels. 
284,665 
285,749 
169.078 
268,588 
168,521 
142,626 



Lime, Acetate. 



Pounds. 

1918 80,579,838 

1914 68,160.224 

1915 , 24,678.247 

1916 18,804,972 

1917 12,959.222 

1918 15.090.032 



Dollars. 
214,648 
200,487 
117,644 
148,162 
126.266 
150,197 



Dollars. 
2,221.427 
1.560,938 
486,406 
961.645 
607,847 
797,996 



Lime, Chloride of (Bleaching; 
Powder) 



Pounds. 

1918 18,060.401 

Not stated prior to 1918. 



- Malt. 



1018. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Bushels. 
870,957 
330.608 
2,163,060 
3.682.248 
4,381.297 
2.641.270 



Matches. 



1017 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1917. 



Dollars. 
558.066 



Dollars. 
300.480 
270,069 
2,301.585 
8.881,700 
5.881.267 
4.776.847 



Dollars. 
480.650 
471,885 



Medical and Surgical Instruments. 



1013. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
222.650 
206.421 
560.741 
855.170 
516.355 
671.250 



Medicinal and Pharmaceutical Prep- 
arations. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Metal Polish. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars 
7.110,493 
6,721,978 
7,180,879 
8,897.971 
8.613.202 
10,190,188 



Dollars. 
127,898 
162.504 
167.277 
225.783 
214,800 
192.691 



Mica and Manufactures of. 



1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1917. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
3917. 



Mucilage. 



Included In following class after 1917. 



Dollars. 
88,651 
71,285 



Dollars. 
26,238 
26,182 
14.604 
30.149 
84,508 



Mucilage and Paste. 



1918. 



Dollars. 
899,295 



Nickel, Nickel Oxide and Matte. 



Pounds. 

1915 29,599.612 

1916 25,649.996 

1917 31.005,606 

1918 18,818.212 

Not stated prior to 1915. 



Nickel Silver. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Oakum. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Pounds. 
1,458,128 
1,260,681 
1,018,286 
1,828,951 
1,541,260 
2,878.686 



Oilcake, Corn. 



Pounds. 

1918 76,262,845 

1914 59,080,628 

1915 45.026.125 

1916 18.996.490 

1917 15,757,612 

1918 457.584 



Dollars. 
11,110,699 

9.876.403 
12,270.854 

7,680,502 



Dollars. 

66.362 

88.691 

80.699 

278.828 

410.295 

270.708 



Dollars. 
66,614 
57,205 
51.081 
89.740 
172,529 
888,662 



Dollars. 

1,181.880 
909,407 
798,206 
297,041 
289.547 
10,246 



Oilcake, Cottonseed. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 1,128,092,867 15,226,798 

1914 799.974.252 11.007.441 

1915 1,222,699,889 15.482, 126 

1916 980,664,672 14.749,489 

1917 864,862.875 16,059,920 

1918 11.048.268 218.642 

Oilcake and Meal, Flaxseed or Lin- 
seed. 

t Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 838.119.654 12.982.428 

1914 662,868,689 9,650,879 

1915 624.794,484 9,048,061 

1916 640,916,204 11,986,180 

1917 586,976.419 10,256,856 

Subdivided after 1917. 

Oilcake, Flaxseed or Linseed. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 126.184.029 8.210,784 

Oilcake and Meal, All Other. 

Pounda Dollars. 

1913 6.886,270 104,701 

1914 8.484.986 100,446 

1915 9.900,878 126,414 

1916 28.876,867 410.166 

1917 21.558.676 898.681 

1918 4,865,602 104,866 

Oilcake Meal, Cottonseed. 

' Pounds. Dollars. 

1915 256,865,126 8.474,244 

1916 77.256.997 1,149.478 

1917 285.297.316 5,221,091 

1916 88,685,680 770fl92 

Not stated prior to 1915. 

Oilcake Meal, Linseed or Flaxseed. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 25,215.948 684,614 

Not stated prior to 1918. 

Oil, Animal, Fish. • 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1913 1,901.953 501,227 

1914 448,366 125,575 

1915 88.880 29,802 

1916 '146,643 69,411 

1917 123.848 31.556 

1918 464,936 448,710 

Oil, Animal, Lard. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1913 154,983 118,665 

1914 110,199 87.364 

1915 104,019 111.637 

1916 419,969 306.642 

1917 329,244 821,721 

1918 91,586 126.672 

Oil, Animal, Oleo. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 92,849,757 10,866.258 

1914 97.017,065 10.156.665 

1915 80,481,496 9.341,188 

1916 102,045,914 12,519,115 

1917 67,110,111 11,065,019 

1918 56,648,102 12,166,482 

Oil, Animal, Not Otherwise Specified. 

Gallons. ^ Dollars. 

1918 1,603.825 ^ 970.717 

1914 891.085 609,294 

1915 559.197 405.635 

1916 655.587 492.964 

1917 416.213 378.294 

1918 442.496 579,681 

Oil, Mineral, Crude. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1918 195,642.935 7.750,767 

1914 146.477,342 6,812,672 

1915 152,514,129 4,911,684 

1916 163,734,200 5,754,279 

1917 177,748,832 7.809,990 

1918 183.672.778 9.107,619 

Oil, Mineral, Illuminating. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1913 1,048,894,297 66,189,266 

1914 1,167,288,310 74,500,162 

1915 886.316,740 53.607.082 

1916 828,164.882 54.288,788 

1917 838.969,012 642,877 

1918 528.806,501 47,488,426 

Oil, Mineral, Lubricating and Heavy 

Paraffin. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1918 218.671.499 29.574.410 

1914 196.884,696 27.852.959 

1916 214.429,099 28,499,788 

1916 250,892,768 87.451,607 

1917 271,028,546 48,649,557 

Stated as following classes after 1917. 

Oil, Mineral, Lubricating, Paraffin. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1918 10.287,896 2.181,292 

Oil, Mineral, Lubricating, All Other. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1918 259.879.249 64,015,586 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



59 



i 
I 



Oil, Mineral, Naphthas, Etc., Gaso- 
line. 



Gallons. 

1918 81,698,917 

1914 161,611,087 

1916 156,860.666 

1916 100,148.564 

1917 226.164.660 

1918 260,800.887 



Dollars. 
10,981.490 
21,699,475 
17.608,317 
16.297,661 
46,982,967 
61,447,882 



Oil, Mineral, Naphthas, Etc, All 

Other. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Gallons. 
101,821,572 
40,840,780 
94,885,128 
194.644,803 
199,568,862 
207,905,009 



Oil, Corn. 



Pounds. 

1918 19,789.622 

1914 18,281,576 

1915 17,789,686 

1916 8.967,826 

1917 8.779,760 

1918 1.831.114 



Oil, Cottonseed. 



Pounds. 

1918 815,282,892 

1914 192,963.079 

1915 818,866,526 

1916 266.529,960 

1917 168.911.767 

1918 100.005,074 



Oil, Linseed. 



1913... 
1914... 
1915. . . 
1916... 
1917. A 
1918. . . 



Gallons. 
1,733,925 

239,198 
1,212,188 

714,120 
1,201.564 
1,187,850 



Dollars. 
14,269,878 

5,658,210 
10,296,928 
29.472,288 
41.057,840 
52,408,880 



Dollars. 

1,292.009 

1.807.204 

1.302,169 

770,076 

998.106 

808,129 



Dollars. 
20.736.972 
18.848,179 
21,872,940 
22,669,800 
19,878,825 
18,142,988 



Dollars. 
874,461 
134,640 
660,089 
479,230 
1,632,307 
1.582,807 



Oil, Mineral, Residuum. ' 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1913 27,513.568 496,237 

1914 113.870,245 1.907,715 

1915 9,952.970 280.552 

1916 18,538.835 888.175 

1917 536.270 30,165 

1918 1,879,425 206,940 

Oil, Mineral, Gas Oil and Fuel Oil. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1914. 475,148.205 13,747,868 

1915 672.981.878 18,648.976 

1916 897.853.438 24.770.296 

1917 1.040.671.713 82,329,617 

1918 1,224,807.405 61.889,504 

Not stated prior to 1014. 

Oil, Mineral, Gas Oil and Fuel Oil 



for Vessels 



Engaged 
Trade. 



in Foreign 



1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Not stated prior to 1915. 



Barrels. 
2,898,898 
4,582,822 
5,924,460 
5,929,546 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Oil, Peppermint 

Pounds. 



144,668 
117,809 
184.981 
154.096 
100.062 
76.247 



Dollars. 
2,567,017 
4,195,808 
6,418.474 
8,779.961 



Dollar*. 
395,561 
897,060 
884,598 
828.070 
218,627 
283,899 



» _ 

Oils. Vegetable. All Other. Fixed or 

Expressed. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
420,860 
888.956 
1,198,852 
2.280,002 
8,004,283 
8,948,483 



Oils, Vegetable, All Other, Volatile 
or Essential. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
825.040 
280,557 
418.104 
705,087 

1,062,809 
867.044 



Oleomargarine, Imitation Butter. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 2.987.582 811.485 

914 2,582,821 263.458 

915 5.252,188 617.085 

1916 5.426,221 640,480 

1917 5,651,267 901,659 

1918 fl.404.896 1.681.267 



4 



Optical Instruments. 



1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1915. 



Dollars. 
1.018.016 
2,698,509 
2,945,920 
1,078,389 



Paints, Dry Colors, Lampblack. 



1913. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



.« • • . * 



V 



Dollars. 
606.748 
421.648 
868.826 
521.468 
917.808 

1,111,265 



Paints, Dry Colors, All Other. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
785,907 
690,886 
1,072,786 
1,591.918 
1.810.893 
1,907,667 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917, 
1918. 



Paints, Ready Mixed. 

Gallons. 

961,946 

662,910 

708,494 

1,099,721 

1.216.062 * 

1.621.688 



Paints, Red Lead. 



1918. 



Not stated prior to 1918. 



Pounds. 
4,792.330 



Paints, White Lead. 

Pounds. 

1918 15.736.488 

1914 16.846,164 

1915 19.700,810 

1916 29,107,449 

1917 21.888,988 

1918 18,235.788 



Dollars. 
1.211,680 
1,096.885 
884.700 
1,884,226 
1,766,898 
2,899,688 



Dollars. 
667,854 



Dollars. 
944.205 
1,018,506 
1.070,646 
1.861.780 
1.944.145 
2,072,362 



Paints Not Elsewhere Specified. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
1.802,049 
1.779.868 
1,527,494 
8,259,689 
4,418,649 
4,875,006 



Paraffin and Paraffin Wax. 

Founds. Dollars. 

•1918 290,678,861 9.679,278 

1914 186,857,728 6,616,888 

1915 880,874,056 10,589,843 

1916 860,650,114 12,878,250 

1917 848,743.908 16,088,811 

Stated as following classes after 1917. 



Paraffin, Unrefined. 



Pounds. 
1918 84,657,140 



Paraffin, Refined. 



Pounds. 
1918 162,003,480 



Dollars! 
4,867,981 



Dollars. 
18,683,597 



Paste. 

Dollars. 

69,082 

68,881 

91.522 

298,587 

299.586 

Included in "Mucilage and Paste" after 1917. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 



Peanuts. 



Pounds. 

1915 6,875,076 

1916 8,669.480 

1917 22,418,297 

1918 12,488.209 



Dollars. 

325,725 

450,765 

1,886,638 

1.517.831 



Perfumeries, Cosmetics and All Toilet 
Preparations. 



1918. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Petroleum Jelly. 



1918. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
1.441.982 
1.620.872 
1,716.069 
2.908,068 
8.618,620 
8,966,465 



Dollars. 
686.637 
681,889 
838,842 

1,099,315 
989,867 

1,278,658 



Plaster, Builders* and Common. 

Dollars. 

1915 189,418 

1916 187.574 

1917 142,270 

1918 150,399 



Plaster of Paris. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
15,728 
14.799 
12.868 
12,486 
28,144 
82,619 



Platinum, Unmanufactured. 

Oounces, troy. Dollars. 

1913 1,299 57,071 

1914 278 12,977 

1915 1.897 68,268 

1916. 1.088 92.388 

1917 8.264 207,662 

1918 468 50.697 



Platinum, Manufactures of. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
126.015 
71,172 
27,101 
82,929 
77,265 
88,657 



Plumbago or Graphite, Unmanufac- 
tured. 



1912. 
1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Founds. 
8,986,884 
4.603,569 
5.876,880 
2,324,081 
986,869 
2,500,067 
4.912,780 



DoMara 
286.597 
821.679 
887,075 
152,446 
46,907 
168,888 
881,869 



Plumbago or Graphite, Manufactures 



of. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Potash, Chlorate. 

Pounds. 

1918 1.564.662 

Not stated prior to 1918. 

Potash, All Other. 



1918 

Not stated prior to 1918. 



Quicksilver. 



1913 

1914 

1915 4 

Xtflv» ••••••••••«•••■ 

iVl •■•»#••■••«•••••* 

1918 



Pounds. 

40.410 

64,190 

222.927 

232,768 

1,018.094 

602,088 



Roofing Felt. 



1918. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
176,583 
269.499 
868,388 
846,729 

1,296,806 
716,638 



Dollars. 
661,128 



Dollars. 

961,989 



Dollars. 

21,886 

82,241 

166,089 

274,086 

1,071,825 

679.414 



Dollars. 
1,427.696 
1,029,127 
880,944 
1,662,686 
8,165,142 
4,680.762 



Roots, Herbs and Barks, Crude, Not 
Elsewhere Specified. 



1918. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Rosin. 



1918. 
1914. 
1916. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



2,806,046 
2,417,960 
1,872,816 
1.571,279 
1,688*590 
1,078,889 



Salt. 

Pounds. 

1918 128,035.915 

1914 148,931.265 

1016 165.619,386 

1916 166,687,801 

1917 194,151,466 

1918 267,045,840 

Seaweed. 



1917 

1918 

Not stated prior to 1917. 



Dollars. 
424,312 
513.071 
470.090 
768,977 
852,266 
784,614 



Dollars. 
17,859,146 
11,217,816 

6,220,821 

8.874,818 
10,706.972 

7,876,718 



Dollars. 
441,678 
542,788 
616,182 
600,648 
726,761 

1.416,798 



Dollars. 
26,087 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Seed, Cotton. 

Pounds. 

24.048.647 

16,842,884 

6,814,489 

2,476,907 

1,001,869 

1.666.062 



Dollars 
828,988 
216,116 
94,287 
87,811 
85334 
67.698 






60 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



/ 



1913. 
1914. 
1910. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Seed, Flax. 

Bushels. 

16,884 

306,546 

4,145 

2.614 

1,017 

21,481 



Soap, Toilet or Fancy. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 

26.699 

436,874 

9,748 

6,501 

3,671 

101,163 



Dollars. 
2,132.683 
2,141,633 
1,777,342 
2.610,481 
2,122,674 
2,246,258 



11913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 



Soap, Except Toilet or Fancy. 

Pounds. Dollars 

51,292.554 

- 58,547,763 

63,367,750 

75.548,686 

73,049,219 



1918 82,726,757 



2,496,904 
2,797,369 
3,080,957 
3,709.277 
4,169,117 
6,894,464 



Soda, Salts and Preparations of. 

Dollars. 

1915 3,141,022 

1918 12,649,854 

1917 18,381,450 

Not stated prior to 1915 and subdivided after 
1917; see following classes. 



1918. 



Soda, Caustic. 

Founds. 
134,729,691 



Soda, Sal Soda.. 



1918. 



Founds. 
14,076,264 



Soda, Silicate of. 



1918. 



Pounds. 
26,127,870 



Soda Ash. 



Founds. 
1018 198.902,457 



Soda, Other Salts of. 



1918. 



Sperm 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



aceti. 

Pounds. 

216.629 
65.414 

167,385 
72,562 
47,780 
56,972 



Spices/ 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Sponges. 

Pounds. * 
205,804 
209,470 
117,618 
197,826 
116,131 
130,471 



Dollars. 
8,629,086 



Dollars*. 
205,489 



Dollars. 
375,110 



Dollars. 
6,074,879 



Dollars. 
7,421,521 



Dollars. 
44,744 
13,302 
21,522 
11.387 
10,357 
16,483 



Dollars. 

92,962 

84,427 

76,297 

250,827 

287,484 

607,712 



Dollars. 
177,059 
173,866 
109,635 
165,884 
129,063 
177,210 



Starch. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1913 110,987,591 , 2,609,716 

1914 76,713,779 1,826,280 

1915 107,086.688 2,939,458 

1916 210, 185,192 5,576,914 

1917 146,423,822 4,721.588 

1918 35,465,390 2,827,005 

Includes "Cornstarch (except for table use)" 
prior to 1918. 

Stearin from Animal Fats. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1015 11,457,907 1,083,665 

1916 18,062,247 1,461,661 

1917 12,986.357 1,798,817 

1018 10,252,522 2,180.485 

Not Stated prior to 1915. 



Stearin, Vegetable. 



Pounds. 

1917 1,821,778 

1918 1,298,827 

Not stated prior to 1917. 



Dollars. 
179.092 
298.591 



Sulphur or Brimstone, Crude. 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tons. 

78.861 
110,022 

48,391 

68,460 
177,548 
140,125 



Dollars. 
1.853,810 
2,018,724 
885.756 
1.314.290 
8.595,512 
8,842,904 



Surgical Appliances (Not Including 
Instruments) . 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
973,733 
1,228,467 
4.418.303 
8,166,718 
2.999,809 
11.293,791 



Tallow (Beef Tallow). 



Pounds. 

1913 30.586.800 

1914 15.812.881 

1915 20.239,988 

1916 16.288.743 

1917 15,209,369 

1918 5,014.964 



Tanning Extracts. 



1918. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Dollars. 
1.910,439 
1,002,011 
1,886,445 
1,826,472 
1,800,909 
981,941 



Dollars. 
524,063 
689,941 
2.226,457 
5.902.799 
8,908.758 
8,804,568 



1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 



Tar, Turpentine and Pitch. 

Barrels. Dollars. 

62,346 817.491 

851,352 568,891 

289,661 480,612 

67,963 291,781 

108,397 561.566 

82,080 598,211 



Tin, Pigs and Oxide. 

Pounds. 

1917 798,288 

1918 209,391 

Not stated prior to 1917. 



Dollars. 
427,709 
127,219 



Tungsten and FerrotungsUn. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1917 1,784.806 8,597.426 

1918 2,184,769 4,056,487 

Not stated prior to 1917. 

Turpentine, Spirits of. 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1918 21,039.597 8,794,656 

1914 18,900.704 8,095,968 

1915 9,464.120 4.476.306 

1916 9,3X0.268 4.887,568 

1917 8.841.875 4.318.670 

1918 5,100,124 2,697,805 

Varnish^ 

Gallons. Dollars. 

1918 1,279, 777- 1.267,860 

1914 1,069,501 1,088,864 

1915 781.604 682.852 

1916 '.. 846,862 838,889 

1817 891,812 1,104,698 

1918 736,949 1,209,762 

Washing Powder and Fluid. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 9.928,700 456.TO2 

1914 12.761,958 585,635 

1915 14,695,817 635,476 

1916 7,875,817 855.926 

1917 8,517,441 197,614 

1918 4.754,084 248,184 

Waste, Cotton Mill. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1916 4,763.456 209.305 

1917 50,865,551 6,027,327 

1918 57,770,837 9,829,867 

Not slated prior to 1916. 

Whalebone. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 106,174 182,988 

1914 35,084 58,165 

1915 28,111 32,648 

1916 44.984- 53.400 

1917 40,717 53.717 

1918 81,140 °6,870 

Yeast. 

Dollars. 

1917 1,021.651 

1918 918,842 

Not stated prior to 1917. 

Zinc Dross. 

Founds. Dollars. 

1913 102,569 8,271 

1914 572,477 29,084 

1915 10,861.840 557,247 

1916 2.526,288 164.649 

1917 10.692.766 886.017 

1918 81.104,163 2,283.843 

Zinc Ore. 

Tons. Dollars. 

1913 17,308 687.680 

1914 14.294 539.786 

1915 3.34r. 138.071 

1916 168 12,277 

1917 71 2,850 

1018 1,203 64 N .>870 

Zinc, Oxide of. 

Pounds. Dollars. 

1918 31,045,147 1,164.589 

1914 29.197,790 1.215.860 

1915 37,580.411 1,808.970 

1016... 31.222.228 1.960.589 

1917 31.486.877 3.096.019 

1918 2o.S62.063 2,750,610 



Mineral Oil Exports for Fiscal Year 1918. 



Crude Oil. 



Customs district. 
Maine and New Hamp- 
shire 



Massachusetts 

New York 

Porto Rico 

Florida 

Mobile 

New Orleans 

Sabine 

Arizona 

El Paso 

San Antonio 

Alaska 

San Francisco 

Southern California.... 

Washington 

Buffalo 

Dakota 

Michigan 

Montana and Idaho... 

Ohio 

St. Lawrence 



Gallons. 

159,901 

100 

2,456,851 

512 

247,926 

26,282 

17,104,999 

2.480,670 

2,968,116 

6.880 

1,595 

272,692 

1,100 

83,404 

410,081 

12.136 

29,521,016 

96,626,277 

12 

32,678.308 

10.126 



Value. 

$14,891 

11 

355,496 

133 

6,328 

865 

1,242,477 

358.142 

118,087 

354 

168 

11.042 

03 

3,608 

15.232 

750 

740,978 

4.846,183 

1 

1,574,290 

405 



Refined or Manufactured. 
Fuel and 



Totals 185,069.674 $9,288,979 



Customs district. 

Maine and New Hamp- 
shire 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Porto Rico 

Virginia 

Florida 

Galveston 

Mobile 

New Orleans 

Sabine 

Arizona . . . . , 

El Paso 

San Antonio 

Alaska 

Hawaii 

Oregon 

San Francisco 

Southern California 

Washington 

Buffalo 

Chicago 

Dakota 

Duluth and Superior... 



Gas Oil. 




Gallons. 


Value. 


2,467,278 


$188,848 


25,977,516 


1,660,888 


11.141,108 


894,747 


228.015,037 


13.217,413 


134,051,604 


10,520,837 


504 


175 


3,404,844 


233,766 


30,037 


867 


17,089,866 


516,077 


536 


51 


49,114.555 


2.102,974 


444,027.280 


17,107,368 


10.592,723 


428,007 


4.300 


420 


87.604 


3.788 


4,361 


101 


1.030 


57 


29,667 


1.335 


153.023.533 


5,412.443 


55,332,082 


1,010,888 


7.352,173 


211,808 


7.207.973 


400.454 


4,001,272 


203,324 


740.083 


70. 153 


86.510 


2.046 



Customs district. Gallons. 

Michigan 58.492,802 

Montana and Idaho 186.831 

Ohio >.., 2,980,639 

St. Lawrence 6,879,400 

Vermont 19,064 

Totals 1.223,283,641 

Illuminating Oil. 

Customs district. GallonB. 
Maine and New Hamp- 
shire 15,551 

Maryland 4,312.181 

Massachusetts 284.840 

New York 321.632,670 

Philadelphia 70.L>.-»1,49« 

Porto Rico 81,160 

Virginia 520 

Florida 13,108 

Mobile 211,470 

New Orleans 18,765.034 

Sabine 48.135.280 

Arizona 118,800 

El Paso 20.306 

San Antonio 84,135 

Alaska 8.510 

Hawaii 7.000 

San Francisco 50.248.146 

Southern California 81,338 



Value. 

3,156,358 

18,519 

178,839 

472.835 

1,262 

* 61. 137.007 



Value. 

$1,707 

382,892 

45.684 

30.353.008 

5.713.020 

7,097 

94 

2.875 

34,847 

1,410.479 

3.899,756 

27,353 

4,810 

6.204 

1.3fc. 

4,588.893 

11,145 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



61 



Customs district. Gallons.' v £ lu £ 

Washington 60,897 T.7» 

Buffalo 3,049,573 373,454 

Dakota 1.887.195 IW.Ogg 

Duluth and Superior.. 1,114,242 77,820 

Michigan 1,385,574 95,687 

Montana and Idaho.... 810,912 10'2°2 

Ohio 812,208 22,647 

St. Lawrence 104,492 18,629 

Vermont 20,910 8,612 

Totals 528,217,669 347.261,782 

Lubricating Oil (Parafine). 

Customs district. Gallons. Value. 
Maine and New Hamp- 
shire 4.878 31,192 

Maryland 5,010,584 1,089,038 

Massachusetts 493 224 

New York 1.672,884 267,048 

Philadelphia 2,494,059 512,557 

Florida 50 45 

Mobile 30 13 

New Orleans 780,508 197.628 

Arizona 2,919 868 

El Paso 26 17 

San Antonio 4,698 1,694 

Alaska 400 228 

Hawaii 20 10 

San Francisco 18,091 6,047 

Southern - California 750 211 

Washington 83,605 18,333 

Buffalo 50.079 11.142 

Dakota 30,041 7,875 

Duluth and Superior.. 147,492 38.181 

Michigan 15,385 5,164 

Montana and Idaho.... 20,159 3.804 

St. Lawrence 55 13 

Vermont 525 

Totals 10,287,896 $2431,292 

Lubricating OiT(All Other). 

Customs district. Gallons. Value. 

Georgia 121 371 

Maine and New Hamp- 
shire 41,984 11,893 

Maryland 861.852 1,208,444 

Massachusetts 707,910 206,138 

New York 164,941,791 42,849,991 

Philadelphia 65,515,781 14.418,459 

Porto Rico 1,416 642 

Virginia 50,974 15,822 

Florida 49,851 28.672 

Galveston 929,351 263,866 

Mobile 263.181 99,882 

New Orleans 2,241,575 419,914 

Sabine '. 1,551.257 550,198 

Arizona 98,908 34,927 

El Paso 28,176 8,512 

San Antonio 167,806 47.754 

Alaska 2,060 831 

Hawaii 1,273 652 

San Francisco 12.018,074 2,742,188 

Southern. California. . . . 87,647 18,757 

Washington 649,617 217,488 

Buffalo 8.815,350 850,787 

Dakota 781.827 187,221 

Duluth and Superior... 42,508 10,885 

Michigan 492,006 108,289 

Montana and Idaho.... 9,881 1,805 

Ohio 189,864 81.259 

Rochester 218,801 49,512 

St. Lawrence 518,406 181,878 

Vermont 167.226 60,198 

Totals 259,885,874 364,030,825 

Naphthas and Light Products of Dis- 
tillation. 
Gasoline. 

Customs district. Gallons. Value. 
Maine and New Hamp- 
shire 35,502 $9,598 

Maryland 826,705 65,388 

Massachusetts 156,845 43,229 

New York 87,150,193 21,728,042 

North Carolina 11.925 2,767 

Philadelphia 75.415,166 18,228,207 

Porto Rico 23,826 10,899 

Virginia ,... 11.418 8.310 

Florida . M \... 56.546 22.043 

Galveston . .?. 1,408,951 258.611 

Mobile 77.828 19.411 

New Orleans 23,696.704 6.877,888 

Sabine ,.... 27,063,127 5,800,883 

Arizona 256,874 72,925 

El Paso '.. 60,403 17,729 

San Antonio 140,062 41.804 

Alaska 43,313 9.429 

Hawaii 4.460 1,027 

San Francisco 19.67l.673 6,219,012 

Southern California.... 8,420,130 691,758 

Washington 17,774 3,683 

Buffalo 1,896,836 407,945 

Chicago 2.388,408 406,029 

Dakota 9,804,914 1,761,809 

Duluth and Superior... 189,513 86,556 

Michigan 8,153,626 644,031 

Montana and Idaho.... 3,785.355 658,647 

Ohio 170,790 40.043 

St. Lawrence 423,892 78,793 

Vermont 18.363 3,863 

Totals 260,880,122 $61,642,859 

AlCoiher. 

Customs district. Gallons. Value. 

Maryland 263.250 386,780 

Massachusetts 545 90 

New York 184,652,603 34,922.812 

Philadelphia 49,339,130 12,306, 8M 

Virginia 500 63 

New Orleans. 12,519,713 8.188.635 

Sabine 6,891,162 1.415,727 



Customs district. Gallons. Value 

Arisona 11.908 2,040 

El Paso 921 104 

San Antonio 468 99 

Alaska 2,870 884 

San Francisco 8,185,729 558,817 

Southern California ... . 1,272,810 146,819 

Washington 520,819 15,190 

Buffalo 268,837 44,571 

Dakota 247,972 41,988 

Michigan 128,667 21,853 

Montana and Idaho 10,982 1,584 

Ohio 120,068 21,318 

St. Lawrence 101,786 19,529 

Vermont 441 125 

Totals 209,029,477 352,789.227 

Residuum. 

Customs district. Gallons. Value. 
Maine and New Hamp- 
shire 2.100 3432 

New York 822,849 . 19.819 

Galveston 800 25 

Mobile 24.839 730 

New Orleans 41,751 2,608 

Sabine 250 27 

Arizona 83,075 2,988 

San Antonio 500 50 

San Francisco 12.909 • 1.879 

Southern California 9,726 1,062 

Washington 50,090 46.059 

Buffalo 105,121 7,279 

Michigan 199.784 12,674 

St. Lawrence 20,521 858 

Totals 881,875 396.480 



Beaumont — Magnolia Petroleum Com" 



GULF COAST EXPORTS. 



Shipments by Months During 

1918 by Ports and by 

Companies. 

There was approximately an increase 
of 1,500,000 barrels crude and refined 
oil movement from the Gulf ports of 
Port Arthur, Baton Rouge. Beaumont 
and Sabine during 1918, with a total of 
51.301.429 barrels last year, as against 
49,811,039 barrels In 1917. This was di- 
vided as follows: — 

1918. 1917. 

Crude oil. bbls 6,510,887 7,194.941 

Refined oil, bbls 44,791,042 42,616,098 

Totals t 51,801,429 49,811,089 

The detailed statement of movement 
by companies, water shipments and ex- 
port summary for the year is as fol- 
lows : — 

Movement by Companies. 
Port Arthur — Texas Company. 



Month. 
January , 
February 
March . . . 
April .... 
Alay • . . . 
June ... 
July 



Refined. 
807,666 
555,769 
957,689 
901.292 

1.068.192 
916.830 

1,689,664 



August . .T 1,070,117 

September .... 1,275,494 

October 1,099,784 

November .... 1,061,011 

December .... 871,211 

Totals 12,224.669 

Total for 1917 



Crude. 

6,871 
82,691 

4,762 
116,517 



9.286 



9.274 
228.801 



Total. 

814.807 

688,860 

962,401 

1,017.192 

1,068.192 

916,880 

1,649,050 

1,070.117 

1,275,491 

1.099,784 

1,081,011 

880,485 

12,458,470 
12,990,160 



Port Arthur — Culf Refining Company. 



Month. 
January 
February 
Marcs; .. 
April . . . 
May .... 
June . . . 
July . . 
August 
September 
October 
November 
December 



• ■ • • • 



• ••■••• 



Refined. 
862,094 
711,992 
1,356.425 
1.288.446 
1,390.218 
1,281.991 
1,878.714 
1.424.865 
1,827,568 
1,306,018 
1,308,780 
1,237,838 



Crude. 
14.407 

• ••«•• 

80,881 



76,872 
88.151 
76,582 
80,058 
81,006 
127,725 
80,058 



Total 
876.501 
711.992 
1,487.306 
1,288.446 
1.890.218 
1.858.863 
1.466.865 
1,501,897 
1,407,626 
1,387,021 
1,436,455 
1,817,891 



Totals 14,874,896 

Total for 1917 



705,785 15.580,581 
17,065,899 



Baton Rouge — Standard Oil Company 



of Louisiana. 



Month. 
January . . 
February . 
March . . . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . , 
September 
October . . 
November 
December 



Refined. 
778.320 
834.387 

1,148.319 
837,513 

1,280,672 
747.091 
800.119 
695.822 
686,949 

1,081.902 
485.072 
816,036 



Crude. 

184,855 
69.930 
83.804 
78,276 

• ■•••• 

82,429 



20,400 

86,455 

106,222 

134,817 



Total. 
848,250 
834,387 

1.231.623 
910.789 

1,280.672 
779,520 
800.119 
605.322 
637.349 

1,118.357 
591,294 
950.873 



Month. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September .... 

October 

November .... 
December .... 

Totals 

Total for 1917. 



pany. 

Refined. 
571.045 
446,252 
477,707 
691,468 
457,868 
556,166 
765,476 

1,198.772 
848,545 
484,809 
632.024 
125,888 

7,550,455 



Crude. 



s • % • • • 

84,982 
82,869 
82.161 
80.172 

• • • • • • 

65\950 



Total. 
571,045 
446,252 
477,707 
691.463 
457.868 
556,166 
850,458 
1,281,141 
935.706 
564.981 
682,024 
491.788 



895.684 7,946,289 
6,098,465 



Sabine — The Sun Company. 



Month. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September .... 

October 

November .... 
December .... 

Totals 

Total for 1917. 



Company-Port 
The Texas Co., 

Port Arthur.. 
Oulf Ref. Co., 

Port Arthur.. 
Standard Oil Co. 

of Louisiana, 

Baton Rouge. 
Magnolia Pet., 

Beaumont . . . 
The Sun Co., 

Sabine 



Refined. 



Crude. 
184,855 
818.251 
197,540 
495.052 
448,089 
851,877 
476,922 
811,176 
582.976 
471,726 
808,551 
857,929 

4.607,894 



Total. 
184,855 
818.251 
197,640 
495,052 
448.089 
351,877 
476.922 
811,176 
582,976 
471,726 
308,551 
357,929 

4,507,894 
5,293,930 



Summary. 

Refined. Crude. Total. 



12,224,669 
14,874,896 

10,141,022 
7,550,455 



228,801 12,458,470 

705,685 15,580.581 

672,878 10,813.895 

890,684 7,946,289 

4.507,894 4.507,894 



Totals 

Totals for 1917. 



44.791.042 6,510,887 51,801,429 
42,616.098 7,194,941 49,811.089 



Summary of Water Shipments. 
By Monihslor 1918. 

Month. Refined. 

January 3,219,125 

February 2,948,400 

March 8,940.090 

April 3,718,714 

May 4,196,416 

June 2,551,012 

July 4,584,073 

August 4,889,076 

September 4,188,556 

October 3,927,510 

November 3,486.887 

December 8,850,988 

Totals 44,791,042 6,510.887 51,801,629 

Summary of Exports for 1918. 
From Port Arthur — Texas Co. 



Crude. 


Total. 


275,560 


8.294,688 


400,842 


2,949,242 


366,487 


4,806.577 


684,845 


4.408,559 


491,288 


4,687,678 


465,667 


8,011,679 


659,841 


5.248,414 


498.265 


4.887.841 


869,868 


4,952.924 


669,859 


4,641,869 


542,498 


4,029.885 


648,028 


8,996,961 



Month. 
January . 
February 
March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . 
September 
October . . , 
November 
December 



Refined. 
68,548 
253,278 
827.602 
470,660 
512,481 
422,718 
884,897 
496.956 
681,712 
472,528 
610,788 
345,051 



Crude. 
6,371 



1.905 
10,510 
...... 

9.286 



... w 



2,686 



Totals 6,491,580 



80.728 



From Port Arthur — Culf Refining Co. 



MoYith. 
January . . 
February , 
March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . , 
September 
October . . , 
November 
December 



Refined. 

278,590 

149.878 

578,115 

728,647 

667.088 

599,992 

719,754 

624,262 

645,198 

536,652 

438,583 

428,582 



Crude. 



Totals 6,885.841 



From Baton Rouge — Standard Oil of 

Louisiana. 



Totals 10,141.022 

Total for 1917 



672.878 10.818.895 
7.336.007 



Month. 
January . . 
February , 
March . . . 

April 

May 

June 

July , 

August ... 
September 



Refined. 
2.965 

104.887 
15,387 
13,246 

114,611 
15,815 
49.766 

• ■•••• 

48,164 



Crude. 
69,986 



73,276 
82,429 



20,400 



62 



I9I« YEAR BOOK 



Month. Refined. Crude. 

October 51,008 

November *..••• • . • ...... ...... 

December 102,410 184,817 

Totals 518,428 881.252 



From Beaumont — Magnolia Petroleum 

Company. 

Month. Refined. Crude. 

July 84,082 

August 28,185 

September 20,400 

October , 86,455 

Total* 



From Sdbme — The San Company. 



Month. 
Amruit . . , 
September 
October . . , 
November 
December 



Refined. 



Totals 



Crude. 
114.157 
828.608 
271,858 
58.444 
56,066 

829,628 



Summary of Export Shipments. 

Company-Port. Refined. Crude. Total. 
The Texas Co 

Port Arthur.'! 5,401,589 80,728 5,522,817 

Gulf Ref. Co., ,».„„.„.. 

Port Arthur.. 6,885.841 6.885.841 

Standard Oil Co. 

of Louisiana, 

Baton Route. 618,428 881,252 849,680 

Magnolia Pet., 

Beaumont 170,022 170,022 

The Sun Co., 

Sabine 829,628 829.628 

Totals, 1918.. 12,890,868 1,881,680 18,726,988 

Totals, 1917 18,804,064 



Paint, Color and Varnish Ex- 
ports, Fiscal Year, 1918. 

Dry Colors. 

, CARBON." BONE AND LAMPBLACK. 

Customs district. Pounds. Value. 

Georgia *2MHZ 

Maryland ^'SS 

Massachusetts *'22* 

New York ^MS 

Philadelphia 8,688 

Porto Rico M jfS 

Virginia 58,126 

Florida '.... 1 

Galveston 12 

New Orleans 179 

Sabine 4 

Arizona 171 

Bi Paso »} 

San Antonio 754 

Alaska 1 

San Francisco B*' 2 !^ 

Southern California.... 68 

Washington 154,055 

Buffalo 56.662 

Dakota • 27.497 

Duluth and Superior... 122 

Michigan 47 '°£5 

Rochester 89 

St. Lawrence 24,986 

Vermont 16,500 

Totals $1,111,265 



All Other. 

Customs district. Pounds. Value. 
Maine and New Hamp- 
shire $695 

New Orleans 1.862 

Massachusetts 4.468 

New Tork 1.002.284 

Philadelphia 62,506 

Porto Rioo 1.850 

Virginia 1.418 

Florida 104 

Mobile 886 

New Orleans 6.820 

Sabine 48 

Arizona 2,869 

El Paso • 705 

San Antonio 21.985 

Alaska 5 

Hawaii _ 155 

San Francisco ...... 286,667 

Southern California.... 1,714 

Washington 92,897 

Buffalo 212,866 

Dakota 4,746 

Duluth and Superior... 54,729 

Michigan 108,267 

Montana and Idaho.... 82 

Ohio 44 

Rochester 78 

St. Lawrence 52,874 

Vermont 51,161 

Totals $1,907,667 



Red Lead. 

Customs district. Pounds. 

Maryland 6.796 

Massachusetts 7,062 

New Tork 2,999,408 

Porto Rico 1,510 

Galveston 100 

Mobile 181 

New Orleans 11,889 

Sabine 625 

Arizona 6,681 

El Paso.. 187 

San Antonio 1,040 

Alaska 170 

Hawaii 560 

San Francisco 1,220,566 

Southern California 4,956 

Washington 10,525 

Buffalo 155,880 

Dakota 50,745 

Duluth and Superior... 2.000 

Michigan 281.891 

Ohio 18,000 

St. Lawrdnce 52.808 

Vermont 14,956 

Totals 4.792.880 

White Lead. 

Customs district. Pounds. 

Connecticut 826,825 

Maine and New Hamp- 
shire 4.425 

Maryland 14,870 

Massachusetts 84,945 

New York 10.529.197 

Porto Rico 4,825 

Florida , 465 

Galveston 694 

New Orleans 887,887 

Sabine 501 

Arizona 32,176 

El Paso 7,166 

San Antonio 52,780* 

Alaska 875 

Hawaii 8,546 

San Francisco 6,426,054 

Southern California 4,625 

Washington 87,775 

Buffalo 190,018 

Dakota 29,486 

Michigan 151,248 

Ohio 1,800 

St. Lawrence 59,644 

Vermont 20,621 

Totals 18.285,788 



Value. • 

$797 

694 

861,285 

201 

12 

16 

1,870 

81 

848 

82 

128 

29 

60 

144,859 

540 

1,202 

16,688 

4,788 

196 

25,895 

1,420 

5,656 

1,567 

$567,854 



Value. 
$84,527 

824 

1.518 

8.088 

1,167,277 

481 

70 

66 

49,090 

65 

3,890 

1,015 

6,158 

51 

1.180 

761,862 

684 

4.667 

17.288 

2,892 

12,650 

214 

5,549 

1,906 

$2,072,852 



Vegetable Oil Exports for Fiscal 
Year 1918. 



Ready Mixed Paints. 

Customs district. Gallons. Value. 
Maine and New Hamp- 
shire 4.456 $6,218 

Maryland 16,817 17.589 

Massachusetts 29,292 40,708 

New Tork 874,725 1,581,200 

Philadelphia 180 869 

Porto Rico 8,200 6,546 

Florida 608 1,149 

Galveston 8,218 4,615 

Mobile 8.744 10,101 

New Orleans 74,095 99,404 

Sabine 2,584 4,180 

Arizona 9,408 12,778 

El Paso 3,116 4,078 

San Antonio 24,065 85,828 

Alaska 61 118 

Hawaii 1,818 2,811 

San Francisco 806.751 405,525 

Southern California.... 2,121* 8,411 

Washington 52,726* 71,648 

Buffalo 19,891 29.269 

Chicago 8 5 

Dakota 80.295 87.922 

Duluth and Superior... 1,821 4,297 

Michigan 29,027 88,862 

Montana and Idaho.... 80 182 

Ohio 1,598 2,748 

Rochester 888 560 

St. Lawrence 10,971 17,789 

Vermont 9,488 14,048 

Totals 1,519,472 $2,898,882 

— \ 

Varnish. 

Customs district. Gallons. Value. 
Maine and New Hamp- 
shire 956 $2,861 

Maryland 602 894 

Massachusetts 4,112 6,617 

New York 529,589 787.166 

Porto Rico 78 166 

Florida 17 45 

Galveston 142 408 

Mobile 168 209 

New Orleans 26,249 27,128 

Sabine 180 277 

Arizona 1,785 2,889 

El Paso 609 1,880 

San Antonio 0,219 10,027 

Alaska 21 122 

Hawaii 50 108 

San Franclsoo 49,741 71,025 

Southern California.... 2,694 1,972 

Washington 22,055 81.607 

Buffalo 64,582 230,802 

Dakota 9,128 14,871 

Duluth and Superior... 107 811 

Michigan 10,916 12,544 

Montana and Idaho.... 2 4 

Ohio 85 219 

St. Lawrence 5,469 6,722 

Vermont 2,544 2,998 

Totals 786,949 $1,209,762 



Fixed or Expressed. 
j Corn. 

Customs district. Pounds. 

New York 1.802,858 

New Orleans 18,146 

Buffalo 1.500 

Michigan 11,701 

St. Lawrence 1,914 

Totals 1,831.114 

Cottonseed* 

Customs district. Pounds. 

Georgia 8.410.670 

Maine and New Hamp- 
shire 878,086 

Maryland 1,261,506 

Massachusetts 4,618 

New York 85,205,998 

Porto Rico 10,270 

Virginia 2,250,000 

Florida 77,800 

Galveston 456,200 

Mobile 1 27.407 

New Orleans 16.917,148 

Sabine 20 

Arizona 6,764 

El Paso 2.986 

San Antonio 2,968 

Alaska 75 

San Francisco 215,279 

Southern California.... 44,479 

Washington 98,562 

Buffalo 828,861 

Dakota 2,048,810 

Michigan 87,168,761 

St. Lawrence 291,994 

Vermont r 98,886 

Totals 100.779,981 

Linseed or Flaxseed. 

Customs district. Pounds. 

Maryland 204 

Massachusetts 15,881 

New York 844,001 

Philadelphia 80 

Porto Rico 1,280 

Florida , 49 

Galveston 2,058 

New Orleans 18,952 

Sabine N 1.669 

Arizona 8,980 

El Paso ....(.. 1,024 

San Antonio 9,651 

Alaska 119 

Hawaii 789 

San Francisco.* 269,046 

Southern California.... 1,448 

Washington 1,601 

Buffalo 10,918 

Dakota 647 

Duluth and Superior... 100 

Michigan 1,096 

Montana and Idaho.... 1 

Ohio 2,104 

Rochester 5 

St. Lawrence 819 

Vermont 528 

Totals 1,187,850 



All Other. 



Customs district. 

Maine and New Hamp- 
shire 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Porto Rico 

Florida 

Galveston 

Mobile 

New Orleans 

Sabine 

Arizona 

El Paso 

San Antonio 

Alaska 

Hawaii 

San Francisco 

Southern California.... 

Washlngtox. 

Buffalo 

Dakota 

Duluth and Superior... 

Michigan 

Montana and Idaho.... 

St. Lawrence 

Vermont 



Pounds. 



• . . w» . 



Total 



Value. 

$801,804 

2.152 

178 

1.822 

268 

806,219 



Value. 
$686,901 

70.688 

226,889 

1,017 

6,871.229 

2,095 

472,157 

18,716 

76,488 

6.889 

8.891,503 

8 

1,129 

622 

698 

24 

48,698 

7,741 

16,190 

152,908 

862,625 

6,881,742 

46.894 

17,058 

$18,809,854 



Value. 

240 

21,025 

1,060,852 

' 81 

1,755 

88 

2.882 

26,576 

1,964 

6,856 

1,668 

12,275 

156 

1,005 

875,107 

1,982 

2,090 

11,966 

618 

118 

1,577 

1 

2,792 

4 

296 

601 

$1,532,807 



Value. 

$80,018 

6,582 

20,882 

2,288,710 

6,431 

1,014 

85,668 

13 

1.444 

88.006 

1,108 

9,887 

4,809 

2,862 

80 

88 

79,752 

2,520 

115,865 

298,901 

81.826 

1,960 

559,878 

1,812 

112.279 

298,7a 

$8,951,659 



Volatile or Essential. 
Peppermint. 

Customs district. Pounds. 
Maine and New Hamp- 
shire 432 

New York 57,843 

Florida 8 

New Orleans 20 

Arizona - 18 

El Paso 1 

San Antonio 1 

San Francisco 1,249 

Washington 458 

Buffalo 8,887 

Dakota 885 

Duluth and Superior... 100 



Value. 

f 1.819 
9,725 
8 
68 
81 
8 
1 
4.114 
1,076 
9,240 
1.688 
400 



/ 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



63 



Customs district. Pound*. 

Michigan 8,461 

St. Lawrence 8,752 

Vermont 137 

Totals 76,247 

AUOther. 

Customs district. 
Maine and New Hamp- 
shire : 

Massachusetts 



Value. 

25,737 

10,011 

488 



$288,899 



Value. 

H.464 
184 



Customs district. 
New York 

Philadelphia ..... 

Porto Rico 

Florida 

Mobile 

New Orleans 

Arizona 

El Paso 

San Antonio .... 

Alaska 

Hawaii 



Value. 
082,181 

2,050 

1,169 

1,702 

462 

1,812 

201 

172 

2,630 

6 

48 



Customs district. 
San Francisco ........ 

Southern California.... 

Washington 

Buffalo 

Dakota 

Duluth and Superior... 

Michigan 

Rochester 

St. Lawrence 

Vermont 

Totals 



Value. 

29,687 

88 

7,667 
46,036 
82,126 

541 
41,005 

122 
89*869 
12,822 



1807.044 




Abrasive materials— 

•Corundum ore and grains, tons. 

•Crude artificial abrasives 

•Emery ore, tons 

•Rottenstone and tripoll 

•All other 



Quantity. 



-1915- 



Dollars. 



Aluminum, crude, scrap, etc., lbs 

Antimony- 
Ore (antimony contents), lbs 

Matte, regulus, or metal, lbs 

•Apparatus, philosophical and scientific.-... 

Asbestos, unmanufactured, tons >•••• 

Asphaltum and bitumen, tons. . ...S. 

Beeswax (see Waxes). 

•Blood, dried 

Bones, hoofs, and horns, unmanufactured.. 

Sago, tapioca, etc 

Bristle*— 

Not sorted, bunched or prepared, lbs... 
Sorted, bunched, or prepared, lbs 

Broom corn, tons 

•Brushes, feather dusters and hair pencils. 

Cement- 
Roman, Portland and other hydraulic, 

100 lbs 

•All other 

Chalk— 

* •Unmanufactured, tons 

•Ground, precipitated, etc 

Chamois skins 



8,034,834 

8.374,012 
17,484,030 

88.041 
128,486 



48,767 

8,522.000 

21 



160,890 



Chemicals, drugs, dyes and medicines- 
Acids (except carbolic)— 

Oxalic, lbs 

All other 

Ammonia, muriate of, or sal ammoniac, 

lbs 

Argols, or wine lees, lbs 

Arsenic, and sulphide of, or orpiment, lbs. 
Bleaching powder (see Lime, chloride of). 

•Calcium acetate, lbs 

Casein (see Lacterene). 

Cinchona bark, and alkaloids or salts of— 

Barks, cinchona or other from which 
quinine may be extracted, lbs.... 

Qulnla, sulphate of, and all alkaloids 
or salts of cinchona bark, oss.... 

Coal tar and pitch, bbls 

Coal tar distillates, preparations or 
products— 

Asia, carbolic, lbs 

•Aoid, carbolic (phenol), lbs 

Alizarin and alisarin dyes, lbs 

Aniline salts, lbs 

•Benzol, lbs 

Colors or dyes 

•Cresol, lbs 

Dead or creosote oil, gals 

Medicinal preparations 

•Naphthalene, lbs 

All other 

Extracts for tanning- 
Quebracho, lbs 

All other, lbs 

Fusel oil or amyllc alcohol, lbs 

Glycerin, crude, lbs 

Gums— 

•Arabic, lbs 

Camphor, crude and natural, lbs.... 

Camphor, refined and synthetic, lbs. 

Chicle, lbs 

Copal, kauri and damar, lbs 

Gambler or terra japonica, lbs 

Shellac, lbs 

Ail other 

Indigo, natural and synthetic, lbs 

•Natural, lbs 

•Synthetic, lbs 

Iodine, crude or resublimed, lbs 

Laetarene or casein, lbs 

Licorice root, lbs 

Lime, chloride of, or bleaching powder, 

lbs. 

Lime, citrate of, lbs 

Magneslte, not purified, lbs 

Medicinal preparations 

Opium, containing 9% and over of 

morphia, ' lbs 

Potash (see also Fertilizers)— 

Carbonate of. Including crude or 
black salts, lbs 

Cyanide of, lbs 

Hydrate of, containing not over 10% 
caustic soda, lbs 

Nitrate of, or saltpeter, crude, lbs.. 

AU other 



2,059,531 



2,542.592 

81,901,215 

8,078,624 



4,044,882 
1,442,691 



2,055,790 

3,128,206 
261,097 



84.442,028 



82,182,141 
5.296.142 
8,738,282 

15,616,900 



8,712,328 
1,205,287 
7.916,898 

82,227,609 
9,668,963 

26,840.107 
...... 

7.832,908 



612,926 

7,606,680 

01,049,615 

7,564.473 

6,310,327 

55,146,407 



Cyanide of, lbs 

Nitrate of, tons 

All other salts of 

Sulphur or brimstone, tons 

Sumac, ground or unground, lbs. 

Vanilla beans, lbs 

All other chemicals, etc 

•Collodion and manufactures of 

Castor beans (see Seeds). 



351,965 



9,484,590 
872,207 

2,087,942 

127,270 

2.214,361 

4.178,058 
772.190 

• •*•«• 

24.647 

14,008,174 

901,183 



1,011,988 

301.040 
8.688,420 

• ••••• 

1,981,483 
680,807 



638,140 
1,097.080 

8,086 
8,300,801 

1,082 
1,279,607 



07.149 



00,722 



174.290 
890.898 

184.200 

8,767,870 

104,017 



096,678 
670,619 

126,092 

827.992 
60,319 

• ••«•• 

8,896.094 

• • • • • • 

2.676.430 



8,145,819 
272,242 
951,278 

1,976,882 



989.928 
890.866 
2,908,018 
2.772,838 
461.042 
8,010,290 
1,603,940 
4,078.428 



• ■ • • • 



1.882,887 

514,206 

1,244,768 

102,570 

1.118.569 

399.866 

243,500 

1,735,485 



818.808 
134.210 

100.869 

28.095 

282.791 

600.559 

22.969.997 

460.883 

406.990 

849.549 

1.442.674 

12.628.602 



-1916- 



Quantlty. Dollars. 



89.260 
940,219 
102,409 
104,837 
166.660 

1,729,298 



7.611 



6.646.385 

9,480.428 
19,749.880 

■••see 

103.716 
131,011 



8.917,636 

1.880,001 
27,716 



0.654.281 

8,011,078 

7,250,386 

48,848,828 

18,780,169 

81.182,820 

...... 

8,558.860 

229,295 

141.990 

2,088,068 

12,819,559 

59,132,814 

1,606,086 

8,542,880 

18.539.704 



90,608 



2.992.753 
2.705 

48,700 

11,587.038 

170.064 

488.811 
1,218.428 

e • e • ■ • 

21,610 

17.454.996 

801.922 



1,049.806 
5,219,885 

103,865 
3,808,470 

735.102 



229.026 

922,567 

2,668,173 

123,583 45,281 

4,410,612 4,801,027 

158 24,646 

1,574,963 

6.855 4.924 
19.960 

133.188 112.670 
82.714 

160.969 

870.269 421,809 
741.888 

1.603,804 123,002 

80,141,032 5,108,606 

2,180.321 124,844 



982,071 

794,891 
41,827 



1,871,848 181,531 

219,748 16,917 

45,124 70,291 

20 4 

4,420.147 

46.848.417 8,528*008 

• • * e e e •#•••• 

742,491 

67,088,978 5,828,096 

8,216,067 258,558 

1,991,646 751,568 

7,026.044 2,079,196 



1,570,785 
1,190,498 
8,198,158 
3,680,861 
1,042,842 
5,075.885 
2,407.790 
6.036.819 
425,788 
121,250 
5,158,265 
1,570,076 
2,821,381 

52,628 

1,982,828 

204,188 

892,629 

648.063 



262,878 
803 

16,754 

1,519,875 

106,038 

102,663 

88,131.962 

784,884 

864,787 

472,590 

1.734,906 

18.800,915 

77.761 



Quantity. 



-1917- 



Dollars. Quantity. 



-1918- 



1.344 
"650 



58,708 

11,920.448 
85.649,118 

• ••••• 

119,789 
167,809 



65,187 

4,051,755 

877 



8,829 
129,698 

885.450 



2.146.564 

28,467,482 

5.553,045 



2,159.827 

1,113,555 
12,696 



664,927 

513.673 

21,629 



9,818,208 



106,998,077 

2,875,299 

978,754 

2.964,968 



5,512,807 

3,108,240 

6,117,992 

39,891,806 

11,321,569 

27.460,757 



2,280.492 

1,411,998 

609,641 

13,078,228 

88.460,490 

4,000 
6,075,714 
7.925,879 



124,764 



145,689 

1,758,910 

8,875 

17,864 

280,491 

18,084 

1.081.998 

4,297,680 

64,067 

4,621,172 

998,668 

512,721 
1.602,213 
4,615,265 

79,857 

4,499,652 

149.892 

2,861,618 



8,261 

52,128,821 

4,956 

186 



6, 
81 



1.07JL 
,406* 



1,800,486 

2.719,062 
27,748.818 

• ••••■ 

122,675 
102,428 

11,169,649 

14,760,486 

31,987 

4,119,076 

1,766 

88,425,119 



1.14|i 



126,605 
43,957 

155,446 



868,812 
2,860,628 

212,558 

4,714,498 

410,841 



83,983 
636,954 



608,480 



284,904 
27,687.478 
11,802.056 

46.840,225 



574,160 8,507.974 



450,594 
22,784 



48.910 
89.016 
82,865 



2,750.708 

• ••••• 

787.848 



788.558 

7.192.666 
170.788 
892.429 

1,114.812 



1,849.674 
1.664,106 
3,073,484 
8,447.916 
1,145.081 
9,040.248 
2,234,229 

4,205.200 
896.468 
1.868.468 
1,992,481 
1.196,576 

140 

1,425,484 

282,098 

873,152 

1.588,803 



2,447,784 
26,550 



155,286 

288,387 

20,892 

21,278 

1.816,696 

• ••••• 

4.728,187 
1,545,247 

• •••*•• 

1,752,648 



181,109,789 
8,115,170 
2,155,922 

1,444,847 

4,460.812 

8.474.282 
947.144 

7,251,022 
88,664,048 

8,764.020 
18,668,717 



1,747,074 
777,029 
407,833 

6,318.766 
27,100,809 

589,881 

2,961.645 

19.718 



8,708,969 1,385,653 

104,316 76.803 

61.097 26.013, 

9,217.004 687.209 

2.143.476 787.894 

1,604.117 808.604 

1.555.889 60.288.900 

724.847 

973 20.176 

12,906,647 419,692 

916,378 1,669.541 

18,819,612 

47.829 



9,256,168 
141,808 



Dollars. 

871.968 

-.956,528 

148.228 

11,128 

141.453 

569,150 

176.188 

2,664.268 

79,495 

6,387,585 

627,495 

638,670 

680,100 

8,908.221 

66.061 

6,639,700 

864,986 

8,108,673 



1,185 
13,123 

118,965 
40.674 

28,558 



218,883 
2,829,517 

20,889 

4,824.504 

998,011 

1.880,494 



792.078 

1.292,486 
49,755 



17,260 

62,497 

70,890 

8,250 

88,803 

2,469,489 

458,038 

162,869 

212,741 

57,793 

226,158 

5,698,618 
276,180 
609,977 
618,681 

816,009 

1,547,180 

769,882 

8,917,104 

3,249.788 

962.828 

9,029.139 

1,908.849 

..... • 

2,194.867 

416.008 

848,802 

964,766 

1,997,269 

11,407 
778,851 
916,825 
365,174 



159.621 2.675,963 



2.387,132 
47,460 



•••••• . ...... 

9,844,826 906.549 

697,898 440.784 

m W.279 12.616 

1.845.112 90,879,285 

...... 411.336 

65 1,692 

13.809.948 424.798 

759.401 1,195.632 

18.134.488 

53,247 



64 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



Clays or earths— 

China clay or kaolin, tons 

Common blue and bauxite, crude, tone. 

All -other, tons, 

Cocoa, crude, lbs 

Cocoanut meat, broken, or copra not shred- 

/ ded, desiccated or prepared, lbs 

Colors (see Paint). 
Copper- 
Ore (copper contents), lbs 

Matte and regulus (copper contents), lbs. 

Concentrate (copper contents), lbs...... 

Cork- 
Manufactures of— 

*Disks, wafers or washers, lbs 

*Waste, shavings, etc 

•AH other 

Wood or bark, unmanufactured 

Cosmetics (see Perfumery). 
Dyewoods in a crude state— 

.Logwood, tons 

AH other, tons. 

•Eggs, dried or frozen, lbs <, 

v Explosives- 
Fulminates, gunpowder, etc 

All other 

Fertilisers- 
Ammonia, sulphate of, tons 

Bone dust, bone ash and bone meal, tons 

'Calcium cyanamid, tons 

Quano, tons 

\Kalnit, tons 

Manure salts, tons • 

Potash, n. e. s.— 

Muriate Of. tons 

Sulphate of, tons 

All other substances used only as fer- 
tilizers, tons 

•Fish sounds, lbs 

Flaxseed (see Seeds). 

'Fluorspar, tons 

Gelatin, unmanufactured, lbs 

Glass and glassware- 
Bottles, vials, demijohns, carboys and 
Jars • 

Bottles, decanters, and other glassware 
cut or ornamented 

Optical instruments, Including lenses 
and spectacles 

Sheet and plate glass- 
Cylinder, crown, and common win- 
dow glass, unpolished, lbs 

Plate glass, cast, polished, unsil- 

vered, sq. ft 

Plates or disks, rough-cut or un- 
wrought, for optical purposes.... 

All other 

Glue and glue size lbs 

Grease and oils, n. e. s. — 

Sulphur oil or olive foots, lbs 

All other 

Hair- 
Horse, lbs • 

Other animal, lbs 

Human, uncleaned, lbs 

Hide cuttings, raw, and other glue stocks, 

lbs • 

•Honey, gals 

Hops, lbs • • ■ • 

India rubber, and substitutes, unmanufac- 
tured— 

Balata, lbs 

Guayule gum, lbs 

Gutta-Joolatong, lbs 

Gutta-percha, lbs 

India rubber, lbs 

India rubber scrap or refuse, fit only for 

remanufacture, lbs 

Iron ore, tons 

Pig iron— 

Ferro-manganese, tons 

Ferro-silicon, tons 

All other, tons 

Lead ore (lead contents), lbB 

Lead, bullion and base bullion (lead con- 
tents), lbs 

Lead, pigs, bars and old, lbs 

Linseed (see Seeds). 

Logwood (see Dyewoods). 

Mangrove Bark (see Tanning Materials). 

Matches, friction or lucifer 

Metals and metal compositions, n. e. s. — 

Chromate of iron or chromic ore, tons.. 

•Cobalt and cobalt ore, and zaffer, tons. 

Ferro alloys, n. e. s. , tons 

•Iridium and osmium, ozs., troy 

Manganese, oxide and ore, tons 

Nickel ore and matte (nickel contents), 
lbs 

•Tungsten-bearing ore, tons 

Mica— 

Unmanufactured, lbs 

•Cut, split and manufactured 

•Monazite sand and thorite, lbs 

•Oil cake, lbs 

Oils- 
Animal— 

Cod and cod liver, gals 

All other, gals 

Mineral — 

Crude, gals 

Refined— 

Benzine, gasoline and naphtha, 

gals 

All other, gals 

Vegetable — 
Expressed — 

Chinese nut, gals 

Cocoa butter or butterine, lbs.... 

Cocoanut, lbs 

Cottonseed, lbs 

Linseed or flaxseed, gals 

Olive, fit only for manufacturing 
or mechanical purposes, gals. 

Olive, edible, gals 

Palm, lba 

Palm kernel, lbs 

Peanut, gals 

Rapeseed, gals 

Soya bean, lbs 

All other 



Quantity. 

186,414 

11,889 

40,825 

280,525.001 



-1915- 



Dollars. 

1,151,551 

79.676 

267,571 

81,818,876 



, 1916 » 

Quantity. Dollars. 



226,682 

2,284 

54,585 

242,617,054 



1,325,647 

12,187 

808,066 

33,926,029 



Quantity. 

214,505 

7,760 

89.947 

890,047,655 



-1917- 



Dollars. Quantity. 



-1918- 



1.810,849 

29,488 

807,748 

41.415,854 



151,700 

3,765 

41,288 

859,959,761 



Dollars. 

1,178,085 

15,774 

885,269 

37,955,200 



108,294,881 8,756,526 158,770,903 7,735,048 866.510.860 19,167.058 430*,649,832 26.262,895 



92,058.517 

19.531.787 

2,741,187 



} 



60,958 
23,168 



32,477 
21,322 



9,974 
674 
947 



$?* 



57.744 
11,344 



2,613,250 



2,807,762 
15,865 



6,523,921 
10,950,237 



4,324,905 

9,698,281 

725.477 



6,767,160 



2,802,684 

4,966,464 

21.820,028 

2.281.246 

221.481,921 

12,842,117 
1,841,281 



5,226 

84,610 

18,185,140 

83,986.988 
819,282 



76,455 

56 

813,985 

56,352,582 



779,922 



• . . . • 



1.613,859 
1,243,318 



10,721.948 

2.798.076 

401,859 



2,411,521 



832.196 
357,908 



402,173 
260,410 

1,934,625 
540,197 

• ••••■ 

220.860 

95,440 

207,674 

2,297,149 
663,399 

2,922,914 



820,968 

657,299 
361,546 
172,963 

282,798 

7,805 

887,881 

1,085,771 

596,974 

777,951 
1,035,771 

1,484,181 
932,289 
267.673 

1.048,375 

1,640.533 



864.694 

1,445,453 

979.786 

258,948 

111,031,144 

877,026 
4,181,645 

310,130 

3,798,050 

605,075 

2,826,754 
28,154 



653,529 

780,061 

12,942 

2,633,286 

7.615.999 



244,292 



760.780 
411,733 



124,878,905 
17.165,075 
82,753,874 



186,816 

15,076 

7,669,350 



12,962 
18,194 

■ ••••• 

12,997 

86 

1,104 

1,161 
1.514 



446,645 

10,499 
1,031.650 



8,267,681 
11,860 



2,063,564 
14,245,778 



7,194.325 
8,838,861 
1,112,209 

27.497.835 
222,020 
630,669 



2,748.207 

2,537,167 

24,792,820 

3,176.010 

270.090,205 

16,084,053 
1,325,730 

90,928 

6,739 

37,682 

35,086,100 

24.262,435 
11,310,718 



115,886 

136,870 

165 

10.263 

576,321 

72,611,492 
3,635 

1,151,494 

1,221,399 
44,913,239 



1,463.014 
3,116,635 



19.284,011 
3,382.911 
7.182.659 



1,504,915 
3,509,934 



6,007,576, 

840.727 
1,226,982 

7,489,008 
1,171,473 

954,815 
487,857 

• ••••« 

378,109 

1.173 

21,273 

348,961 
81,684 

3,223.724 
102,088 

52,976 
282,903 



865,437 
295,244 
159,749 

350,742 

10,160 

253,855 
479,049 
184,371 

1,251,729 
752,974 

2,484,910 
904,001 
555,464 

1,104,486 
107,845 
144,700 



1,265.896 

693,251 

1,286.502 

349.727 

159,745,475 

1,226.157 
4.566,514 

9.240,528 
884,258 
615,082 

1,428,714 

1,504,808 
761,537 



1,543.328 

1,548,402 
175,236 
172.860 
550,856 

8,666.179 

9,889.122 
7,853,691 

471,204 
655,067 
120,077 
522,502 



1,187,786 
1,251.050 



116,500,582 
21,048.943 
38,197,682 



61,785 

14,335 

17,268,879 



>*•••• 



7.268 
10,519 

• ••••* 

6,500 

""lW 

737 
203 



381,558 

12,156 
826,115 



1.044,645 
8,504 



0,755,192 
8,807,868 



5,798,374 
5,788,594 
1,765,906 

84,499,825 
538,229 
193,630 



3,193,887 

4.852,581 

24,414,867 

1,476.426 

405,638,278 

22,357,173 
971,663 

45,381 

9,740 

21,665 

41,292,876 

103.664,970 
11,585,974 



72,063 

225,171 

96 

5,566 

629,972 

75,510,798 
4,357 

760,134 

4,598,926 
43,188,260 



2,215,693 
8,128.514 



19.790.916 
5,562,565 
9,297,852 



2,075,069 
8,915,931 

1,519,878 

864.822 

8,559.504 

4,468.890 
580.997 

649,125 
808,497 

• ••••■ 

140,101 

' 8,872 

196,585 
21,702 

4,456,863 
82,401 

114,598 
804,249 

605.067 
275,094 
120,377 

141,750 

6,503 

223,805 

564.545 

1.048,828 

820.880 
1.614.196 

1,907,371 
804,852 
732,344 

1,660,673 

484.450 

57.077 



1,607,848 

1.487,978 

1,144.948 

289,802 

288,220,904 

1,717,861 
8,654.842 

6,107,379 

691.684 

1,073,042 

2,267,799 

6,612.181 
649,205 



2,884,060 

1,098.659 

369,950 

8,857 

547,652 

10,262,949 

9,612,400 
4,407,608 

419,815 
948,205 
267.898 
539,687 



2.185,071 
1,477,308 



76,872,018 
34,076,694 
46,267,874 



[567,298 



29,841 

81,158 

6,752,458 



2,998 

5.188 

26.191 

8.206 



379 
90 

28,262 
282.804 

11.225 
•82.766 



433.766 
278 

• ••••• 

732.824 
159,200 



1.678,620 
3,475.588 
1,479.980 

9.381.629 

405.682 

76.775 



1.547,888 
1,376,085 
9.932,476 
1,207,986 
825,959.308 

8,526.420 
787,466 

27,168 

5,540 

2.008 

87,070,804 

149,668,889 
10,480.531 



100,142 
504,401 
177,800 
1,898 
491.303 

73,193,205 
10,868 

691,520 

3,187,221 
87,780.061 



1,191,926 
2,797.858 



15,164,026 

7,659.201 

11,511,598 



441,958 
668,370 
171.690 
594.814 



668.141 
796,297* 
2,459,552 

14,108,771 
989,448 

425,881 

154.281 

1,860,557 

280,544 



102,100 
15,829 

2.659,456 
56,890 

169,854 
82,55a 



114,438 
228,367 
150,446 

54,072 

210 

841.724 
467,265 
172,642 

6,518 
8,152.269 

997,704 
816.852 
792.190 

454.833 

655.700 

50.862 



886,888 
413,484 
688,551 
225,922 
146.378,813 

645.581 
8.464,304 

4,258,745 
424.982 
284,879 

1,968,487 

8,240,279 
645,281 



8.675,723 

2,891,725 

628,099 

64,193 

208,619 

15.095,867 

11,517.546 
11.409,287 

635,596 

909,500 

224,507 

1,764,574 



1,632,671 
2,234,888 



761,852,180 10,387,553 873,468.333 12,574,266 1,265,820,676 16.255.279 1,584,896,931 21,819,464 



1,146,678 
706,840 



4.530,091 

24,561 

63,165,102 

11,675,427 

88,462 

631,501 

6,368,872 

34,390,130 

5,312,367 

834.581 

1,545.789 

21,335,213 



38.756 
137.319 



1,483,515 

7.866 

6,334.271 

488.241 

49.475 

438.628 
8,105,834 
2,169.208 
391,813 
650,814 
857.302 
931.791 
153.292 



2,703.375 
14,682,142 



7,686,593 

5r>8,148 
64.349,208 
16.597,785 

103,753 

844.595 
7.382,353 
29,270.063 
4.323,735 
2,089.801 
2,690,755 
145,409,269 



185,286 
1.227,711 



3,977,141 
181,957 

6,816.685 

954.714 

71,206 

081.423 

10.407,608 

2,457,376 

412.707 
1.178.846 
1,508,604 
8,212.738 

632,402 



10.494,619 
48,842,521 



5,478.798 

815 

163,091,008 

13,622,028 

84,403 

590.815 

6.807,280 

84,257,390 

306 

3,653,038 

1,350,892 

264,925,782 



1,411,453 
2,937,874 



4.006.143 

193 

18,852.780 

1,211,880 

60,578 

569.534 

9,441, 2Ci4 

8,561,025 

31 

2,672.506 

981,927 

21,191,262 

876,500 



12,899,350 
87,800.864 



6,695.751 

3,049 

356,088,738 

18,372,867 

26,129 

357 

171.161 

20,993,085 

34.164 

9,128.860 

8,077,203 

885,984,148 



1,921,895 
2,428,436 



6,886,576 

872 

44,290,112 

2,215,299 

87.246 

140 

450.793 

1,651,241 

4,855 

8.530,80* 

8,096.074 

38,454,730 

2,505,595 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



65 



Quantity. 



-1915- 



476.161 

• •••■• 

1,718,478 



56,729 
20.606 



0110, Continued:— 

Distilled and essential— 

Birch tar and cajeput 

Lemon, lbs 

All other 

Oleo stearlne, lbs 

Paints, colors and varnishes— 

*Zlnc paints, lbs.........** •*.*.. ...*..• ? 

Ail oth er •..«.««••••«•••*••.*•••••••••••} 

•Paraffin (except oil), lbs 

Peanuts- 
Shelled, lbs 11,609,695 

Unahelled, lbs 10,818,624 

Perfumeries, cosmetics and all toilet prep- 
arations 

'Plaster rock, or gypsum, crude, unground 

or calcined, tons 

Platinum- 
Unmanufactured, oss. , troy 

Plumbago, or graphite, tons 

Pyrites (see Sulphur). 

•Diamonds, glaciers' and engravers, unset 
and miners' 

Quebracho (see Tanning Materials). 

'Rennets, raw or prepared 

Salt. 100 lbs 

jSOOuS - "' 

Castor beans or seeds, bush 

Flaxseed or linseed, bush 14,606,628 

Sugar beet, lbs 

Soap- 
Castile, lbs 

All other 

Spices- 
Capsicum — 

•Unground, lbs 

•Ground, lbs 

Cassia and cassia vera, unground, lbs.. 

Cloves, unground, lbs 

Ginger root, unground, not preserved, lbs. 

Mustard, ground or prepared, lbs 

Nutmegs, unground, lbs - 

Pepper, black or white, unground, lbs.. 
All other, lbs 

Sponges 

Starch, lbs 

Sulphur ore as pyrites, containing in excess 



2,471,520 

696,815 
,606,628 
4,029,022 

8,522,842 



of 25 per cent, of sulphur, tons, 
lie, groun 
•Tallow, lbs. 



•Talc, ground, or prepared, lbs 



f 



974,616 



15,897 
81,251 



Tannins; materials, crude- 
Mangrove bark, tons 

Quebracho wood, tons 

All other 

Tin— 

•Ore, tons , 

Bars, blocks, pigs, or grain, or gran- 
ulated, lbs 115,636.882 

Varnish (see Paints). 

Wax— 

•Beeswax, lbs 

Mineral, lbs 

Vegetable, lbs 

Zinc- 
Ore and calamine (sine contents), lbs 

Blocks and pigs, or old, lbs 

Dust, lbs 



••■••• 
2,845,304 
6,565,059 

115,887,046 
1.808.964 
1,712,878 



Dollars. 



11.864 

418,588 

2,898,084 

158,987 



•1916- 



Quantlty. Dollars. 



881.869 
856,740 

2,699.988 



2,077,586 
2,241,168 



866,475 

988.628 

18,688.658 

404,991 

310,687 
282.189 



889,948 

• ••«•■ 

226,994 



8,427,205 

2,482,062 

510.448 

97,889 

4.817,977 



411,490 

1,182,152 

479,748 



88.736.909 



•••■•• 

214,4911 
1,088.278 

4.510.546 
181.468 
179,825 



628,881 

• •>••• 

648,675 

9,258,115 

8.842.427 
17.178,888 



287,856 

41.286 
88.408 



2.439.389 

1,034,822 
13,098,004 
19,024,829 

2,737.827 



10,724,813 
6,079,503 



32,605,823 
27,840,795 

5,538,309 

1.244,519 
33,364,896 



20,014 
79,048 



8,307 
138,078.293 



1,955,646 
3.047,843 
7,895.823 

296,298,158 
1,368.560 
1.867.702 



27,089 

498,610 

2.815,016 

58.282 

2.248.645 
510.689 

827,826 
668,084 

8,371,868 

847,385 

2,506,581 
7,278.884 

840,735 

24,681 
342,588 

1.560.122 

20,438.408 

1.988.247 

826.469 
269,741 



758.861 
477,289 

4,400,211 

3,585,419 

605,592 

266,583 

0.728.318 
218.180 



565.805 

1,205.898 

932,868 

4,036.821 

51.808.884 



556,074 

200,877 

1,340,558 

12.121,885 
119,000 
888.844 



Quantity. 

669,986 
...... 

5,655.448 



-1917- 



Dollars. Quantity. 



-1918- 



9,708,694 

7.688,699 
42,578.009 



227.768 

'26,146 
88,044 



1.816.800 

1,041.017 

9.894,287 

15.422,076 

2.080,729 



8,951.896 
3,798,293 



85,829,674 
26,232,042 

25,347,956 

967,340 
82,263,255 



68,51 



8,084 
143,687,087 



2,858,190 

899,405 

8,001,286 

142,494,169 
518,153 
801.887 



24,822 

434,997 

8,915.906 

986,561 

1,288.104 
688,700 

826.869 
2,011,976 

3,851,224 

875,152 

2,095,890 
8,961,988 

1.098,102 

21,884 
280,185 

1,829.481 

25,445,704 

3.869,811 

285,225 
271,288 



824,661 
862,955 



5.460,478 
8,785,880 
. 639,905 
1,309.160 

5,981,457 
257,454 



107,844 

1,206.018 

623,023 

4,743.099 

68,629,321 



994,150 

90.510 

2,050,885 

4,874.058 
25.849 
88.896 



587,969 

■ ••«•• 

1.558,789 

f 64.899 

f ••••■• 

5,647,118 

1,970,791 
67,746.881 



50,289 

45,888 
17,409 



806,292 

688,248 

12,974,476 

4,297,376 

822.988 



1,788,488 

1,449,678 

12,571,074 

1.684,140 

5,691,046 

460,206 

2.274,679 

48,869,487 

16,167,745 



26,481.150 

489.786 

25,394.885 

5,895,406 

2.863 
22,802 



16.428 
142,487,893 



1.558.048 
1,809,459 
0,878,448 

49,617,974 
70.555 
28,046 



Dollars. 



29,970 

486.080 

2.765.488 

260,122 

15.675 
465,880 
662,886 

128,628 
4,275,781 

8,179,749 

125,032 

4,184.740 
3.092,475 

718.397 

78.590 
284.082 

1.757.186 

32,998,786 

1,841,068 

144.552 
170,889 

200.021 

415,434 
1,145,085 

052,360 
,. 611,808 
- 210,354 

896.182 
8,042,814 
2.625,041 

528,992 
2,108.260 

2,767,448 
251,102 
702,075 

96,867 
357,190 
161,447 

H-,444,401 

98,144,218 



584.194 

147.805 

3,681,685 

1,578,969 
4,953 
2,661 



• Not separately stated where figures are not shown. 



Calendar Year Imports Into United Kingdom. 



\ 



Oilseeds- 
Castor cwt. 

Linseed— 

From * Russia qrs. 

From U. S. A qrs. 

From Argen. Rep.. qrs. 

From Brit. E. Ind. .qrs. 

From Canada qrs. 

From oth. countries, qrs. 
Rape— 

From Brit. E. Ind.. qrs. 

From oth. countries, qrs. 

Sesame qrs. 

Soya beans qrs. 

Oil nuts and kernels- 
Copra tons 

Groundnuts ...' tons 

Palm kernels tons 

Other sorts tons 

Fish olla— Train, blubber 

and sperm tuns 

Coconut oil, unref...cwt. 

Olive oil, unref tuns 

Palm (not inoluding palm 

kernel oil unref .. ..cwt. 1, 

Coconut oil, ref cwt. 

Cottonseed oil tons 

Olive oil tuns 

Petroleum- 
Lamp oils gals.127. 

Motor spirit gals. 139, 

Lubricating oils. . .gals. 87, 

Gas oil., gals. 31, 

Fuel oil gals. 440, 

Seed oil— 

Cottonseed oil, unref.. 

tons 

Linseed oil, pure... tons 

Rapeseed oil tons 

Soya bean oil tons 

Other seed oils tons 

Oilseed cake, unsweetened- 
Cottonseed cake tons 

Linseed cake tons 

Stearlne cwt. 

•Tallow, unrefined— 

From China cwt. 

From U. S. A cwt. 

From Uruguay cwt. 

From Argent. Rep.. cwt. 

From Australia cwt. 

From New Zealand.. cwt. 
From oth. countries, cwt. 



Quantities. 
1917. 1918. 



Value. 
1917. 1918. 



3.172 


86,805 


53,805 


907 


11 


16,584 


406,452 


950.596 


2.458,836 


870,060 


8,957.855 


5,115,123 


12,651 


10.178 


245.543 


17,036 


432,685 


274,808 


290,869 


1,464,971 


1,658.086 


1,573 


15,774 


8.972 


659 


509.960 


8,843 


26.418 


284,948 


216.528 



898,557 1,598,497 £1,281,075 £2,556,351 



5,282 

2 

196,746 

752,026 

962 

48.463 

802.260 

8.245 

102,284 

42,748 

52,400 

187,758 

248,160 

0,218 

52,726 

403,946 

2,522 

461,710 

27,665 

8.537 

2,179 

958,665 
270,181 
779,737 
808.820 
562,168 



200 

84 

2,151 

3,502 

9,771 

181,898 
76,860 
89.542 

26,683 
2,132 

13,949 

27.411 
828.508 
190,025 

21,591 



7,917 
135.766 
294,614 

4.379 

64,421 

1,130,743 

1.646 

1.696,882 

33,571 

17,264 

2,970 

148.021,284 
198.074,560 
102.244,220 
41.079.752 
842,356.837 



1,912 
124 
207 
596 

2,471 

2,719 

8,109 

49.563 

2,559 

124 

44,124 

177.356 

113,645 

42,168 

22,815 



2,229.696 

3.807.892 

6,800.788 

278,416 

2,279,142 

1.810,280 

168,081 

8.209.004 
106,459 
789,841 
205,848 

6,074.060 
11,024,001 
7,147,980 
1,213,446 
9,427,449 



9,363 

4,802 

120.585 

196.572 

618.929 

2,092.801 

1,483.833 

168,714 

79.051 
5,895 

42,531 

82,296 
980,412 
549,996 

70,379 



365,891 
4,409,169 
7.698,656 

204,774 

4,050.311 

4.060,296 

244,065 

3,935,496 
117,930 

1,902,995 
602,200 

8,601.126 
18.489,762 
10,837,866 

2,307.894 
23,984,600 



141,618 

5.981 

13,145 

28.880 

225.641 

45,628 
164,786 
251,692 

8,503 
486 
153,190 
648,865 
403.497 
151,493 
80,697 



1917. 
Gum— 

Arabic cwt. 132,142 

Kauri cwt. 28,486 

Lac-dye, seedlac, shellac, 

and sticklao cwt. 29,666 

Manures- 
Bones (burnt or not). tons 8,870 
Nitrate of soda (cu. 

nitre) tons 1,190 

Phosphate of lime and 

rock phosphate tons 276.017 

Paraffin wax cwt. 1,452,836 

Chemicals- 
Acetic acid (other than 

for table use) cwt. 104,347 

Bleaching materials. cwt. 8,247 
Boracite, borate of lime, 
borate of magnesium, 

and borax cwt. 270,442 

Brimstone cwt. 587,835 

Carbide of calcium, .cwt. 376.408 

Coal products, not dyes.. 42,762 

Cream pf tartar cwt. 38,388 

Glycerin, crude cwt. 7.900 

distilled cwt. 15,831 

Potash compounds- 
Saltpeter (nit. pot.)cwt. 897,418 

Other sorts 

. Soda compounds cwt. 122,571 

Tartaric acid cwt. 15,732 

fUnenumerated 

Dyestuffs, etc. — 

Cutch cwt. 47,513 

Extracts for dyeing 

Indigo cwt. 13,501 

JUnenumerated cwt. 256,057 

Tanning substances 

Paints, colors, pigments— 

Barytes cwt. 27,979 

Nickel oxide cwt. 23,608 

White lead cwt. 51,718 

Zinc oxide cwt. 201,625 

Unenumerated cwt. 819,653 

Rosin cwt. 1,726,558 

Turpentine cwt. 221,192 

Starch, etc cwt. 1,598,921 

Glue, size and gelatine. cwt. 51,618 



Quantities. 



1918. 

191.256 
1,402 

92,268 

5,144 

300 

464.747 
1,164,660 



89.753 
68 



1917. 

445.074 
108,098 

168.467 

41,623* 

19,500 

1,172,667 
2,506,816 



667.894 
6.459 



Value. 



186,658 3221686 

1.454.898 290,045 

517,262 425.849 

18,665 517,431 

39,701 389,277 

63.490 43.618 

29.785 128.824 

383.689 841.029 

829.155 

98,597 388.098 
14.980 207.898 
9.875,076 

59,367 96.635 

1,102,783 

5,541 749.507 

225,561 2.582,280 

8.371.956 

20.604 9.426 

19.573 182.298 

4,597 112,256 

79.786 603. 7S8 
186.408 850.206 
752,423 2,466.134 

63,326 620,747 

1,304.140 2,973.113 

63.425 276,872 



1918. 

775,23* 
4,992 

878,925 

121,982 

6,000 

1,947,987 
3.348,187 



573.878 
195 



258.452 
973.920 
836,846 
142.087 
604.527 
491.404 
376,937 

835,921 
450,057 
418.237 
223,868 
19,450,820 

161,414 

783.263 

277,680 

2.389,395 

4.748,709 

18.890 

109.694 

9.448 

240.117 

508.300 

1,808,604 

326.197 

4.480.063 

528.437 



• Including vegetable tallow. 

t Including acetate of lime, acetone, muriate of ammonia, and sul- 
phuric acid. 
X Including dyes and dyestuffs obtained from coal tar. 



66 



1918 YEAR BOOK 




Abrasives— 

Wheel8, emery and other 

All other 

Alcohol, grain, including pure, neutral and 

cologne spirits, pf. gals 

* Aluminum, Ingots, and alloys, lbs 

•Asbestos, ore and unmanufactured, tons.. 

Asphaltum, unmanufactured, tons 

Bark for tanning, tons 

Bauxite concentrates, tons 

Beeswax (see Waxes). 

Blacking and polishes 

Bone black (see Paints). 

Bones, hoofs and horns, unmanufactured. . . . 

Broom corn, tons 

Brushes 

Candles, lbs 

Carbon black (see Paints). 

Celluloid and manufactures of 

Cement, hydraulic, bbls 

Chalk, manufactures of 

•Chemicals, drugs, dyes, and medicines- 
Acids— 

•Carbolic, lbs 

•Nitric, lbs 

•Picric, lbs 

Sulphuric, lbs 

All other 

Alcohol, wood, gals 

Baking powder, lbs 

Bleaching powder (see Lime, chloride of). 
. Blue vitriol (see Copper sulphate). 

Calcirc carbide, lbs 

Coal-tar distillates, n. e. s.— 

Benzol, lbs 

All other 

Copper, sulphate of, or blue vitriol, lbs. 

Dyes and dyestuffs 

•Aniline dyes 

•Logwood extract 

•All other 

Extracts for tanning 

•Formaldehyde (formalin) 

•Glycerin, lbs 

•Infants' food. . . . , 

Lime- 
Acetate of, lbs '. 

♦Chloride of, or bleaching powder, lbg. 
Medicinal and pharmaceutical prepara- 
tions 

Petroleum Jelly 

Potash— 

•Chlorate, lbs 

•All other v 

Roots, herbs and barks- 
Ginseng, lbs 

All other 

Soda salts, and preparations of— 

•Caustic, lbs 

•Sal soda, lbs 

•Silicate of soda, Lbs 

•Soda ash, lbs 

All other salts of 

Sulphur or brimstone, tons 

Washing powder and fluid, lbs 

All other chemicals, etc 

•Chewing gum 

Clays— 

•Fire, tons « 

•All other, tons 

•Coal tar, bbls 

Copper- 
Ore (copper contents), lbs 

Concentrates, matte, and regulus (cop- 
per contents), lbs 

•Cork, manufactures of 

Cosmetics (see Perfumery). 

Cotton mill waste, lbs 

Dental goods- 
Teeth 

AH other , 

•Dry colors (see Paints). 

•Druggists' rubber sundries 

•Egg yolks, canned eggs, etc 

Fertilisers- 
Phosphate rock, ground or unground— 

High-grade hard rock, tons 

Land pebble, tons 

All other, tons 

•Superphosphates, tons 

All other fertilisers, tons 

Flavoring extracts and fruit Juices 

Glass and glassware- 
Bottles, demijohns, carboys and Jars.... 

•Chemical glassware 

Common window glass (50 sq. ft.), 

boxes 

•Cut or engraved glassware 

Plate glass, unsllvered, sq. ft 

All other 

Glucose and grape sugar- 
Glucose (corn syrup), lbs 

Grape sugar (corn sugar), lbs 

Glue, lbs • 



Quantity. 



-1915- 



875,648 

• ••«•• 

88,208 

• •«••• 

16,082 



4,882 
5,802.864 

• ••■■• 

2,565,081 



77,889,429 

• •••«• 

1,280,011 
8,550,289 



87,887,085 
18,988.8i9 



19,767,874 



J 

210.825 



87,271 
12392,481 



1,556.189 
811,442 



84,572 

218,942 

877 

• ••••• 

114.205 



686.518 

• ••••• 

5,028.598 



151,487,876 

86,842,686 

8,774.010 



Lubricating 

Soap stock and other 

Hair, animal, unmanufactured 

Honey • •• ...... 

Hops, lbs 20.864.260 

Ink- 
Printers* 

All other 

Instruments for scientific purposes- 
Medical and surgical 

Optical 

All other 

Iron ore, tons 707,641 

Pig iron— 

Ferromanganese, tons 

Ferrosillcon, tons 

All other, tons 224,509 



Dollars. 

1,200,421 
1,408,796 



-1916- 



Quantlty. Dollars. 



Quantity. 



-1917- 



-1918- 



Dollars. Quantity. 



2,240,227 
2,085.951 1 



178,269 60,185,160 19,560,548 



735,952 

• ••••• 

717,186 

649,278 

29.816 
444.808 
962,814 
497,888 

1.402,044 
8,361,451 



279 

86,403 

4,742 

18,082 



8382 

0.465,848 



2,563,976 



6.133 
759,769 
113,166 
987,454 

908,052 

89,678 
558,097 

1,017,747 
652,961 

2,626,685 

3,828,281 

108,995 



20,289,918 

9,470,206 

810 

27,289 

908 

21,791 



3,150 
6,469,182 

• ••••• 

2,586,850 



998,249 

9.005,898 

682,242 

856,474 



66,468,501 

1,242,829 
4,544,881 



1,847,995 

48,167,469 

814,252 

982,868 



1.158,609 40.862,419 1.228.958 



680.966 
2.510.650 



• ••••• 



19,469.565 2.808,883 
2.254.260 



7,298.880 

485,868 

26,609,548 

63,542,980 

1,126,891 
5.988,756 



81,054,854 
15,860,496 
29.067,694 



« • • • • 



4,210,898 



5,593,524 



9,615.000 



552.862 17.192,090 1,034.694 



8.110.672 
1,034,254 



1,538,789 
756,467 



261.705 



14.878,082 
8.848,789 



8,292,964 
1.241,144 



1.054,986 



1,785.187 
647,182 



7.111,187 

724,679 

588,590 

89,778,260 



128,755 
5,048.848 



290,918 
55,005 



40,850 
24.808 
48,558 

4.818,828 

965,940 



17.008,998 
2,505,857 

236,067 
68.885,141 

942,511 

144,552 

154,168 

96,219 

1,006.826 

282.241 
582.674 



205,884 

s • • • • • 

89.994.978 

7,442,608 

14,560.624 

98.421,008 

152,888 
4,458,250 



48,285 
28,070 
72.769 

4.969,083 

821.477 



4.881.600 
1,941,512 

7,652,209 

4,269,648 

108.807 

617.848 

26.288 

1,828,926 

1,057.281 

178.159 
941,582 
910.746 
842,564 

8,861,808 

5,829,588 

166,281 



8,476.521 

46,060 

17,285,019 

1,006,125 
80,981,915 

1.177,822 

1,587,425 



1,065,317 

1,446,250 
2,855,894 
8.088.845 

• ••••• 

8,502,218 
1,404,709 
4,046,745 
8.872.417 

894,609 
4,747,928 

763,066 

655,865 
421,897 

9,740,812 
1,246.801 

475.484 
688,768 

1,897,067 
956,185 

5,882,652 

99,821 

217,668 

2.884.569 

4,080.196 

8,504.661 

250,910 

62.881,607 

1.408,888 

268,086 
178.928 
184,143 

1.870.878 

206,888 
655,765 



8,657,165 
20.152,798 

20,097 

618 

19,711 



...... 



4,848 
6,552,870 



• • • • • 



2,252,446 



68,755 
21.789 
58,564 

2,887.275 

* 872,564 



44.789.174 8,051,899 47,420,206 4,894,771 62,551,212 9,015,829 46,868,882 



190,042 
1,680,818 



881,524 

1,269,659 

2.668 



...... 



2,785.804 



28.681 

214.858 

854 

• ••••• 

149,121 



1.801.460 



222,718 
1,842,656 



79,287 



286,948 

868.078 

8,915 

5,007.967 
578.800 

2,491,866 



12.431 
187,610 

16,478 

8,479 

168,586 



2,802,687 

1,500,727 
8,961,767 

4,107,547 
945,288 
888,950 

8.275,562 
4,064.456 
1,466,728 



1,169,142 
5,064,458 



186,879,198 

88,684,628 

5,147,060 



4,797,848 18,505,655 



487.862 
202,127 

620.801 
1.725.075 
1,299.918 
2,181.629 



1.188,952 



4.158,705 

...... 

1.868,117 
5,941,888 

8,295,828 
998.478 
686,188 

8,546,816 
8.045,921 
2,012.724 
225.817 
2,113,776 

798,777 
844,905 

458,288 
8,252.247 
3.638.344 
3,692,496 



728.778 
5,941,708 



152,076.927 

25.822,125 

4,127.702 



4,118,254 



8,607,167 



612,241 15,817.085 



1,141,048 

6.468 

6.868 

265,840 



296,493 
1,808,402 

k 469,284 
171,112 



113,531 
547,278 
187,677 
528,108 
5,181,580 
781,019 

2,542,804 
65,386 

2,891,455 

96.088 

2,869.945 

4Qii flifl 
,on,DW 

7,168,670 
965,658 
687.528 

8.021.948 
8.051,879 
1,583,887 
1,888.672 
916,650 

829.498 
422,717 

585,162 
1,896,670 
2,617,143 
4.496,309 

570,370 

704,056 

9,771,979 



57,771 
64,559 
21.561 
7,041 
78,629 



688.215 
6,022,088 



42.740.417 

14,591,783 

5,910.405 



8,670.852 



L256.431 

8,577 

4.107 

261.848 



Dollars. 

8,862,589 
1,982,822 

4.704.748 
7,478.149 

51,058 
581,466 

18,807 
1,528,688 

1,186,961 

807.671 
1,896,848 
1,099,016 
1,274,788 

4,680,947 

6,912,166 

172,165 



6.477.641 2.666.684 

1,018,196 • 118,617 

89,584,858 28,281,892 

80.294.648 1,278,027 

4,218.868 

2.624,812 2.035,960 

4,795,751 1,538,249 

16,146,289 1,847,458 

88,294.577 1,904,860 

5,867.880 

14,477.889 1396,946 

!'.!!'.'. 8,629.6ii 

1,557,880 

6,686,909 

8,125,842 

...... 7v6,71o 

21,754,728 . 11.766,686 
2,450,102 

15,682,813 758,622 

9,450,798 810,268 

10.824,068 

1,629.990 

1,899.668 584,591 
887,679 

226.781 1.872,586 
728,148 

97,878,884 5.602,818 

12,717.298 214,012 

28,251,754 404,998 

288,484,992 7,805,650 

6,586,982 

181.092 8,626,688 

4,141,497 210,186 

43.231,772 

1,695,908 



883,880 
192,058 
168,720 

678.165 

211,892 
996.821 

9,488.664 

881,845 
1,427.969 

772,689 

718,866 



445,419 
808.758 
188.885 
259.803 
8,888,045 
987.421 

2,781,076 
179,682 

8,812,658 

189,449 

8.155,627 

5,401,895 

2,558.687 

906.290 

1,110.887 

8,008.889 
2,780.288 

680.766 
2,228.896 

970,598 

1.040.892 
488.181 

771.282 

787.042 

2.921.474 

5,586,842 

806.087 

443.456 

10.325.426 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



67 



Quantity. 



-1918- 






176.012,208 
42,468,467 



Lampblack (see Paint*). 
Lead, pigs, bars, etc.— 

Produced from domestic ore, lbs 

Produced from foreign ore, lbs 

•Lime, bbls 

•Malt, bush 

•Matches .' 

Meat products— 

Oleo oil, lbs 100,186,788 

Beef tallow, lbs 26,668,075 

Lard, lbs 461,286,489 

Neutral lard, lbs 86,889,918 

Lard compounds and other substitutes 

for lard, lbs 68,869,985 

•Metal polish 

Metals and metal compositions, n. e. s.— 

Babbitt metal, lbs 1,061,647 

Ferrovaaadium, lbs....: 840,265 

•Nickel silver 

•Tin, pigs and oxide of, lbs 

^•Tungsten and ferrotungsten, lbs....... ...... 

•All other 

•Mica and manufactures of 

Nickel, nickel oxide and matte, lbs 

•Mucilage and paste 

Naval stores— 

Rosin, bbls 1,888,684 

Tar, turpentine and pitch, bbls 67,060 

Turpentine, spirits of, gals 10,618,575 

•Oakum, lbs 

Oilcake and oilcake meal — 

Corn, lbs 81,187,289 

Cottonseed—! 

(Jake, ids. ...>..•..•....«..**.«>..«. •x,«V8,1ao,u«i3 

Meal, lbs 165.710,917 

Linseed or flaxseed 606,886,285 

•Cake, lbs 

•Meal, lbs 

All other, lbs 17.771.898 

Oils- 
Animal— 

Fish, gals 

Lard, gals 

Oleo oil (see Meat products). 

All other animal, gals . 

Mineral- 
Crude, gals 

Refined or manufactured— 

Fuel oil, gals ) _ 

Oas oil, gals ) 779,589.047 

Illuminating . oil, gals. 886,958,665 

Lubricating oil— 

Paraffin, gals \ 

All other, gals 5 289.678,725 

Naphthas and llgftt products of 
distillation- 
Gasoline, gals , 112,562,929 

All other, gals 169,046.152 

Residuum, gals 12,627,162 

Tegetable, fixed or expressed— _ 

Corn, lbs 16.870.14y 

Cottonseed, lbs 852.489,401 

Linseed or flaxseed, gals 1,889.294 

All other 

Volatile or essential- 
Peppermint, lbs 189,008 

All other 

Paints, colors and varnishes- 
Dry colors- 
Carbon, bone and lampblack 

All other 

Lead— 

•Red, lbs 

White, lbs 25,810,869 

Ready-mixed paints, gals 925,527 

Varnish, gals 810,818 

Zinc, oxide of, lbs 89,978,569 

All other 



Dollars. 



7,928,518 
1.695,627 



-1916- 



Quantlty. Dollars. Quantity. 



-1917- 



Dollars. Quantity. 



-1918- 



200.980.689 
19,805,109 

289,725 

5,102,729 



13,011,789 

1,902,189 

48.842,444 

.4,006,840 



88,891,672 

15.888,057 

426.659,599 

27,814,774 



125,500 
851.894 

086,772 

158,268,069 



Unrefined, lbs \ 

Refined, lbs 5 886,914.211 

Perfumeries, cosmetics and all toilet prep- 
arations s 

Phosphate rock (see Fertiliser). 

Plaster, builders' and common 

Platinum, unmanufactured, oss., troy 

Plumbago or graphite, unmanufactured, lbs. 1,057,764 

Quicksilver, lbs 252,852 

Red lead (see Paints). 

Roofing, felt and similar materials 

Rosin (see Naval stores). 

Salt, lbs 160,948,077 



Cotton, lbs 2,068,096 

Flaxseed or linseed, bush 5,069 



Toilet or fancy 

All other, lbs 74,886,400 

•Spices ._ • 

Sponges, lbs 149.152 

Starch — 

Cornstarch, except for table use. lbs..) 

All other, lbs J 178,806,224 

•Stearin, vegetable, lbs 

Surgical appliances, not including instru- 
ments 

Tin (see Metals). 

Turpentine (see Naval stores). 

Varnishes (see Paints). 

Vulcanised fiber and rnfrs. of 

•Wax, beeswax, lbs 

White lead (see Paints). 

Zinc- 
Ore, tons 748 

Dross, lbs 8,888.518 

Oxide (see Paints). 

Spelter, cast in pigs, slabs, etc. — 

Produced from domestic ore, lbs.... 88,708,889 
Produced from foreign ore, lbs 14,142,981 



5.519.281 49,821,769 



204,894 
741,085 



2,678.455 
2.081.087 

« • • « • • 

812,538 
574,821 



18.508,208 
1,078,970 

182,769 

5,826,164 

541,526 

11.481,682 
1.578.196 

56.089.641 
8.687,286 

5,930.841 
217,815 

670,640 

2,085,276 

887,680 

895,206 

1,852.681 



26.418,550 10,128,514 88.404.011 



6.597,570 

286.521 

4,844,252 



1,842.818 

76,690 

9,548,688 

1.294,100 



562,889 21,802,208 



17,581.819 

2,296.858 

10,764,884 



1,027,845,871 
204,594,620 
667.645,566 



78,671 

12,952,493 

886,419 

11.825,881 

866,687 

4,596.475 

118,207 

846,604 

16,556,246 

8,458,519 

12,888,607 



212,215 80,252,885 



54,607 
210.118 

457,187 

4,282,827 



21,961.176 
49.988,597 



127,218 
367,076 

560.855 

172.029,908 



967,518,417 
854,408,818 



504,675 

67,826 
299,865 

457,815 

7,080,928 



27,002,087 
55,845,103 



89,469.641 260,779,127 48,022,468 



13.164.159 

20.720.888 

864.881 

1.808,280 

25,288.350 

786.995 

1.841,277 

884.966 
601.819 



392.997 
1.448.310 



1.409.622 
1,141.875 
785,272 
2.068.428 
2,156,402 



767,928,262 

188.288.868 

6,543.324 

9.118,812 

188,213.816 

824,052 



146,278 



...... 

27,485,054 

1,081,806 

828,179 

27,928,712 



12,585,480 876,892,904 
2,182,086 



218,416 

.52,583 
225,509 

1,062.896 

613,847 

38,988 
11,834 

2,831.654 
8,579.488 



1.145 

1.597,550 

666,027 



168.129,201 

1,580,799 
1,640 



• • • ■ ■ 



69,797.549 



187.289 



6,080.542 



198,799 



112,418,810 
64,514,449 

187,984 

4,156.597 



83,402,858 

7,505.880 

878,849,328 

9,895,404 

50,800,048 



2,843,895 
2,480,424 

• ••••• 

412,445 
2,211,808 



21,996.412 



1,491.657 

142,884 

6.529,408 

2,048,911 

5.519.086 

280.018.566 
125.894.067 

116.811,774 
18,916.126 
12.285,825 



119.281 
254,767 

808,588 

171,258,809 

(507.196,708 

I. 82,806,889 

652,710,188 

I 6,878,787 
\ 185,695,628 



9,816,876 
2.808,863 

168,671 

6,788,485 

477,588 

6,799,482 

1,196.805 

75,859,055 

2,011,403 

8.582.820 
211.845 

668,806 

2,914.660 

891,746 

282.401 

8,897,287 

1,255,666 

74.485 

8,940,512 

429,746 

10,889,178 

677.968 

8,888,727 

256,149 

115,784 

5,477.479 
2.758.648 



128,887,808 
68,848.804 

71.905 

896.807 



Dollars. 

9.208.276 
4,298,701 

105,808 

1.694.651 

481.180 



• ••••• 



2,975,588 
857,854 
245,658 



92,885 
276,118 

820.418 

7,680,868 

27,607,8631 
1,781,048 J 
48,548,224 

1,219,072 
80,812,001 



69,106,850 15,498,821 

4,222,654 745,977 

548.817.901 144.988.151 

6.307.164 1.612,780 

43,975.610 10,258**0 
163,198 

2.240.190 659,882 

1,512.784 1,774.062 

...... JSHt ,4oV 

40,088 31,952 

1,282,260 2,540.084 

8,645,888 

74,529 

17.469.500 6.927.041 

868,916 

778.774 7,566.262 

58.696 410,596 

8,717,298 2,276.584 

2,958.154 489,801 

69,870 • 2,966 

1,884.250 82,412 

10,288,046 256.068 

•#•••• • ••••*• 

45,892,709 1,115,129 

40,561.798 1.184,154 

9.881,786 244.749 



666.768 
46,468 

794.808 

205,829.030 



1,200,806,865 
491,109.815 

7.059.121 
250.256.6U 



202.220.751 

1,411,174 



4,059.755 



459.814 



85,006 
506.956 



13,806,824 
2,019,158 



I 

255,643 



70 
965,575 



297,778,217 
86.457,195 



88.614,957 

35,055,589 

161,486 

911,865 

19,890,435 

606,828 

2,897,644 

810.459 
989.088 



784,882 
1,606,787 

2,187,072 
1.470,208 
941,202 
2,894,789 
4,177.488 



14,820.440 
8,526,i95 

129,872 
97.988 
98,488 

670,475 

2.071.979 
567.441 

28.371 
4,804 

2,455,727 
8,660.854 

266,888 

177.550 



5.295.145 
167.589 

2,964,584 



794,876 
85.880 



8.992 
10.801 



46.228,847 
8.080.038 



224,811.186 49,049,580 

191.487,877 44,117,112 

719,586 47,192 

4,709,108 700,140 

124,816,577 17,800,066 

1,588,817 1.699,857 

3,428,820 

72,841 190,841 
1,068.797 

1,149,069 

2.018,996 

2,171,482 267,238 

19,788,669 2.089.717 

1,420,299 2.133.087 

911,658 1,803,955 

80,925,120 8,177.178 

....... 4.792,898 

541,528,156 2,044.726 

{92,776,900 7.045.087 

8.847,150 

159.865 

8,445 234,488 

5,151,689 849,617 

842,186 998,470 

4,890,577 

228.188.622 1,011,578 

870,282 80,476 

5,199 24,828 



72,462,496 



114,808 

24,862,680 

22,861,194 

1.261.504 



265.422 



1,179 
26,610.262 



276,784.658 
127.777.499 



1,921,860 
5.004,887 

449.717 

188.767 

1.422.974 

1.508.816 

202,799 

6.019.808 



1,022,175 
95,751 



68.043 
2,286,122 



82.945,891 
12,715,580 



116,987,119 



85.957 



688,757 
75,545 

881,812 

12,084.250 



66.642.628 
50.864,414 

1,464,827 
74,147,612 



851,918,889 85,205,410 

207,207.001 54.887.866 

244.780 14,442 

170,948 86,540 

119,066,976 28,184,829 

774,192 1,162.054 

4.087.982 

59,606 202.856 
774.997 

788.408 

2,100,886 

5.789,819 662,584 

15,589,614 1*766.998 

1,992,484 8.828,768 

698.152 1,218.710 

24,641.747 2,779.507 

4,890.824 

64,250.788 4.886,161 

171,185.925 17.426.617 

8.902,656 

174.481 

119 18,511 

1,907,719 121,665 

282,864 888,680 

4,801,849 

278,565,496 1.677.577 

1,741.499 69,707 

25,508 184,985 



88,619,821 

15,084,688 

1,019,560 



278,582 



55 
81,681,864 



182,736,529 
39,709,871 



2,567,442 
10,871.507 

480,508 

147,519 

1,758.557 

1,820,671 

288.909 

17,613,820 



1.014,765 
75,636 



2.480 
2,238,913 



12,469.622 
3.522,449 



\ 



• Not stated separately where figures are not shown. 



68 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



Import-Export Regulations Affecting Commodities. 



THE year ' 1918 was marked by the development of a 
system of world-wide control of foreign and domestic 
trade and industry which was unparalleled in history. 
While some restrictions had been established by the Allied 
nations previous to the entrance of the United States into 
the war as an incident of their blockade against Germany, 
these restrictions were gradually extended to practically all 
business conditions, and from the start that was made by 
this country in 1917, under the War rade Board which was 
established in the course of that year, the system was per- 
fected in 1918, when the board exercised a tremendous 
power. 

The American position in trade matters was emphasized 
through the fact that this hemisphere was recognized as 
the great source of raw materials, and during the height of 



\ 

the war, the participation of a large proportion of the popu- 
lation of Europe in either warfare or war industries left the 
manufacturing field to a great extent to this country. 
Goods were not shipped without the permits of the govern- 
ing officials, and then only as they were recognized as ccn-» 
tributing to the winning of the war. How well this work 
has been done can be testified by the representatives of 
publications in Washington, who found that all actions of 
the War Trade Board were kept scrupulously secret until 
officially promulgated, in order that business men generally 
might be treated with Impartial justice. 

The trades represented by the Reporter have been affected 
to a large extent, for their products' have been recognized 
as necessary to the war industries. The various orders 
affecting these trades were as follows: — 



IMPORTS. 



j 



ASPHALT put on restricted import 
list, June 16, 1918. Imports for calendar 
year 1918 limited to 30,000 tons from 
Venezuela and 32,000 .tons from the 
island of Trinidad. 

CACAO < cocoa beans) put on list of 
restricted imports, July 11, 1918. Amount 
imported not to exceed 30,000 tons for re- 
mainder of calendar year. Of amount so 
licensed requirements of army and navy 
to be met in full and remainder allocated 
by Bureau of Imports of the War Trade 
Board. All import restrictions removed 
December 23, 1918. 

CAFFEINE, CAFFEINA, THEINE and 
TRIMETHYLXANTHINE, Hcenses for 
importation revoked June 16, 1918, as to 
shipment from foreign ports after June 10, 
1918. 

CANARY SEED, import of, restricted 
September 16, 1918. Total prohibition of 
Importation by ocean shipment from 
abroad after that date. 

CASTOR BEANS and CASTOR OIL, all 
licenses outstanding on June 16, 1918, for 
importation from West Indies, Mexico, 
Central America, Colombia and Ven- 
ezuela revoked except those consigned to 
United States Government, effective after 
June 10 as to ocean shipment. All sub- 
■ sequent applications for licenses except 
where government is consignee to be re- 
ferred to Bureau of Aircraft Production 
for approval. 

CASTOR SEEDS, individual license re- 
quired for Import of, January 27, 1918. 

CHROME ORE and CHROMITE, June 
13, 1918, imports from Cuba, Guatemala, 
Newfoundland and Brazil by sea per- 

Sitted, not exceeding 43,500 tons, up to 
arch 31, 1919, and from New Caledonia 
up to 10,000 tons prior to December 31, 
1918. Shipments overland or by lake 
from Canada, overland from Mexico, or 
as return cargo from European ports per- 
mitted. Outstanding import licenses for 
overseas revoked as to shipments made 
after June 15, 1918. Licenses for im- 
ports except those coming from Cuba, 
Canada or Brazil revoked as to ship- 
ments from abroad after November 11, 
1918. 

COCONUT MEAT, broken (shredded, 
desiccated or prepared ; otherwise known 
as Ceylon copra), restricted. Licenses 
for limited amount of copra (not shred- 
ed, desiccated or prepared) for shipment 
after June 30, 1918, from Australasia, 
the East Indies, the West Indies Cen- 
tral America and Mexico. Amount li- 
censed allocated by Bureau of Imports 
in co-operation with Food Administration. 
Limitation on copra rescinded July 17, 
1918, and licenses reinstated. Shredded, 
desiccated or prepared removed from list 
of restricted imports December 23, 1918. 

CREOSOTE OIL, importation from 
Japan of 2,000,000 gallons during re- 
mainder of calendar year permitted Au- 
gust 15, 1918. Must be shipped on ves- 
sels approved for purpose by Shipping 
Board and be allocated by Bureau of Im- 
ports of War Trade Board. 

DYEWOODS, and other natural dye- 
stuffs, including logwood, fustic, gambler, 
cutch, nut galls and mangrove bark ex- 
tract, import restrictions removed De- 
cember 23 

FLAXSEED and LINSEED, all out- 
standing licenses for Importation by sea 
revoked July 5, 1918. 

GRAPHITE CRUCIBLES, outstanding 
licenses for Importation revoked as to 
ocean shipments after July 15, 1918. No 
licenses to be granted after that date for 
rest of calendar year. 

GUTTA-JOOLATONG, restriction mod- 
ified to permit importation of limited 
amount for essential purposes In this 
country during remainder of calendar 
year from August 15, 1918. Amount to 
be allocated by Bureau of Imports of War 
Trade Board among manufacturers in ac- 
cordance with their requirements for 



production of commodities essential to 
successful prosecution of war. < 

HAIR, ANIMAL, on list of restricted 
imports, September 12, 1918, with excep- 
tion of hprse hair, or hair of angora goat, 
camel or other like animals, licenses re- 
voked as to ocean shipment from 
abroad, but permitting shipments from 
Canada or Mexico by other than ocean 
transportation, or those coming from Eu- 
rope and Mediterranean Africa when 
shipped from convenient ports where 
loading can be done without delay. 

INDIGO, synthetic, removed from list 
of restricted imports, December 23. 

KAPOK, licenses for importation re- 
voked June 16, 1918, except such as may 
be consigned to U. S. Government, Tex- 
tile Alliance to allocate kapok necessary 
for government purposes to manufactur- 
ers. 

LACTERINE tor casein) on restricted 
import list June 16, 1918, except ship- 
ments overland or by lake from Canada, 
overland from Mexico, or backhaul from 
convenient ports In Europe. August 23, 
1918, those to Canada to be subject to 
'import license from Canada Food Board. 

LICORICE root removed from list of 
restricted imports December 20. 

LIME JUICE, citrate of lime and other 
fruit concentrates removed from list of 
restricted imports June 16, 1918. 

LIMES and LIME PRODUCTS (not In- 
cluding citrate of lime), removed from 
list of restricted imports, December 20. 

LINOLEUM and oilcloth on list of re- 
stricted imports June 27, 1918. Restric- 
tion removed December 20. 

MEAT TALLOW removed from list of 
restricted imports December 20. 

MINERAL WATERS, importation 
from France, United Kingdom and Italy 
permitted when shipped from a con- 
venient port where loading can be done 
without delay, August 5, 1918. 

OIL CAKE removed from list of re- 
stricted imports December 20. 

PALM OIL, removed June 16, 1918, 
from list of restricted imports. 

PLUMBAGO or GRAPHITE, imports 
restricted for calendar year 1918 On July 
2, no licenses to be issued, continuing 
previous restriction. Modified October 17 
to read : — 

No licenses for the Importation of amorphous 
graphite (plumbago) shall be Issued hereafter, 
except such shipments as are of Canadian 
origin and come overland or by lake from 
Canada, or of Mexican origin and come over- 
land from Mexico.. Licenses may be issued 
for the importation of graphite of • crucible 
grade when the applications are otherwise in 
order, and where the chemical section of the 
War Industries Board has approved the issu- 
ance of said license, and has certified that the 
ultimate consumers of the said graphite have 
been using at least 20 per cent, of domestic 
or Canadian flake graphite in the manufacture 
of their products. 

RUBBER, CRUDE, control of importa- 
tion and distribution established April 
23, 1918. On May 7 limited issuance of 
licenses for importation overseas to 25,- 
000 tons from May 6 to July 31. Require- 
ments for production of goods for United 
States and Allies to be met first. 

RUBBER GOODS, manufactured, all 
import licenses revoked June 19, 1918. 
Prom Canada or Newfoundland, individ- 
ual licenses required after November 11. 
Licenses Issued freely after December 19. 
RUBBER, substitutes for. Imports of 

futta percha and balata restricted from 
une 1, 1918, to May 31, 1919, to 650 tons 
of gutta percha and 1,400 tons of balata. 
These of gutta joolatong and gutta siak 
restricted entirely. Later gutta siak li- 
censed for 900 tons up to December 31, 
1919, in addition to an authorization of 
740 tons. Allocated. 

Rubber substitutes (balata, gutta 
percha, gutta joolatong and gutta siak) 
Import restrictions removed December 
23, 1 niR. 

SHELLAC, button lac, seed lac, garnet 
lac, and keerie or refuse lac put on re- 
stricted import list August 15, 1918, with 



exception of shipments from Canada or 
Mexico by other than ocean transporta- 
tion ; shipments from Calcutta between 
October 1, 1918, and March 31, 1919, not 
exceeding 5,000 tons; or shipments on U. 
S. naval vessels for military or naval use. 
Restriction removed December 20. 

TANNING MATERIALS placed on list 
of restricted imports June 30, 1918, with 
following exceptions: — (1) Shipments of 
Canadian or Mexican origin not specific- 
ally restricted when coming by other than 
ocean transportation; (2) not otherwise 
restricted when coming from Europe arid 
shipped from a convenient port where 
loading can be done without delay; (3) a 
limited quantity of solid quebracho ex- 
tract of mangrove bark from Central 
and South America, of divi-<llvi and of 
wattle bark. The allocation of tanning 
materials covered by the last division to 
be made in accordance with recommenda- 
,. tions of tanning section of chemical di- 
vision of War Industries Board. Sumac, 
ground or unground removed from list 
December 23, 1918. 

TIN, PIG, ORE, and concentrates, or 
any chemical extracted therefrom, li- 
censes revoked as to ocean shipment from 
abroad on and after October 20» 1918, 
and none to be issued except to cover 
shipments to United States Steel Prod- 
ucts . Company. Modified November 6 by 
permitting licenses for tin ore, tin con- 
centrates or chemicals extracted from tin 
ore, licenses to - provide for indorsement 
of bill of lading to American Iron and 
Steel Institute. 

VANILLA BEANS removed from list 
of restricted imports December 20. 

VARNISH GUMS restricted October 9. 
1918. Restriction removed December 20. 
1918. Original restriction limited ship- 
ments to those for government; from 
Mexico or Canada by other than ocean 
transportation ; from Europe or Mediter- 
ranean Africa as return cargo; Manilla 
gum from Philippines, or kauri gum not 
exceeding total of 3,000,000 pounds dur- 
ing 1918. 

WOOD CHEMICALS, Individual Im- 
port license required after November 11 
from Canada or Newfoundland. 



EXPORTS. 

BARLEY MALT, licenses to export to 
Canada, West Indies, Cuba, Mexico, Cen- 
tral and South America and Japan con- 
sidered after December 9. 

BUTTER and OTHER PATS, exports 
to Cuba may be licensed In limited quan- 
tities. 

CAUSTIC SODA, special regulations an- 
nounced May 21, 1918, relating to appli- 
cations for licenses to export: Conditions 
imposed are (1) importation of glycerine, 
t/i DUrcnas er abroad operates sugar 
mill, meat packing plant or petroleum 
plant, (3) soda for Par East, India or 
Australasia has been made west of Rocky 
Mountains for shipment through Pacific 
coast .ports, or (4) in form of sticks, or 
case soda lye, packed in tins or small 
packages or caustic soda in small quanti- 
ties packed for pharmaceutical, scientific 
or household use or as part of equtp- 
!E ent f , or electric-storage batteries. Ad- 
ditional regulations July 25, 1918, for- 
bade contracts for sale of caustic soda 
for export until export license has been 
obtained. After August 1 applicants for 
licenses required to agree not to ship 
any other caustic soda than that speci- 
fied. 

CHEMICALS and DRUGS, Including 
acetanilid, acetate of cellulose, glacial 
acetic acid, acetic anhydride, acid phos- 
phate, carbolic acid and its derivatives, 
nitric acid and its salts, phosphoric acid, 
salicylic acid, sulphuric acid and its 
salts, antiphlogistine. soda ash, naphtha- 
lene balls, benzene (from coal tar), ben- 
zine oil, benzoic acfd and its salts, benzol 
and its derivatives, all bichromates, all 
bromides, carbon tetrachloride, carbon- 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



69 



ate of soda, acetate of cellulose, chlorates, 
chlorine, chloroform, chromic acid and 
its salts, chemical compounds of chro- 
mium, cyanamid, formaldehyde, formalin, 
hexamethylenetetr&mlne, mexamite, hy- 
drate of soda, hydroxide of soda, iodine, 
ipecac and derivatives, mercury and its 
compounds, molybdenum and compounds, 
nitro compounds, oxide of antimony, phos- 
phides, phosphrus, sesqulsulphide, sen- 
ega root, saltpeter, radium, sodium com- 
pounds, alum, sulphonated castor oil, re- 
moved from export conservation list De- 
cember 18. 

COCOA and beans removed from ex- 
port conservation list December 18. 

COCOA BUTTER, removed from con- 
servation list December 16. 

COCONUT, desiccated, removed from 
export conservation list December 16. 

COTTONSEED MEAL licenses to be 
granted from December 19 for limited 
quantity to Canada. 

COTTONSEED OIL* applications for 
exportation considered on and after 
August 10, 1918, licenses to expire Oc- 
tober 1, 1918. Shipments to West Indies 
in limited quantities allowed, February 
21 11)18. 

FATS,' ANIMAL, and ANIMAL OILS, 
removed from export .conservation list 
December 18. 



FERTILIZERS, including manure, 
mixed, tankage and wood ashes removed 
from export conservation list December 
18. 

GLUCOSE removed from export con- 
servation list December 22, effective Jan- 
uary 15, 1919. 

GLYCERINE substitutes removed from 
export conservation list December 22, ef- 
fective January 16, 1919. 

GREASES, soft, applications for li- 
censes to export animal and vegetable 
fats and creases testing; 40 titer, and be- 
low considered on and after October 31. 
Withdrawn December 6, and licenses for 
inedible animal greases substituted ; with- 
drawn from conservation list December 
16. • 

HAIR, animal, licenses to export con- 
sidered after December 4. AJso hog 
bristles. 

LARD COMPOUNDS, exports to West 
Indies allowed in limited quantities Feb- 
ruary 21, 1918. "Exportation to all coun- 
tries in North, Central and South Amer- 
ica and West Indies allowed August 28, 
1918, those to Canada to be subject to 
import 4icense from Canada Food Board. 

LINSEED oil cake and meal, exports 
to Canada licensed from August 13, 1918. 
when Canadian import permit is issuec} 
by Canada Food Board. 



OILS, including benzine oil, sulphon- 
ated castor oil, oil of cloves, artificial oil 
of bitter almond, oil of -myrbane, rape- 
seed, red oil and turkey-red oil removed 
from export conservation list, December 
18. 

OLEOMARGARINE, exports to West 
Indies allowed from February 21, 1918, 
in limited quantities. Limited quantities 
to Canada licensed from April 1, 1918/ by 
co-operation with Canadian Bureau of 
Imports and Exports. 

PEANUT BUTTER removed from con- 
servation list December 16. 

RADIUM added to export conservation 
list May 2, 1918. 

RUBBER GOODS, manufactured, all 
commodities containing, put on conserva- 
tion list February 6, 1918. Removed 
from list November 27. 

STEARINE, except vegetable, removed 
from export conservation list December 
18. 

TIN PLATE and terne plate, export 
licenses from March 7, 1918, granted only 
for shipment to Canada, South and Cen- 
tral America, Mexico, West Indies. China 
and Japan under certain restrictions as 
to war or food or fuel purposes. 

WAX, PARAFFIN, removed from ex- 
port conservation list December 18. 



Import and Export Statistics Reclassified by Government. 



ONE of the most important developments of the year 
to the foreign and domestic trade of the United States 2 . 
was the undertaking of several governmental agencies 
jointly to work out a comprehensive reclassification of 
statistics of import and export statistics. The purpose of 
the undertaking was fourfold, namely:— to give a more 
logical arrangment of trade statistics of the nation, to 
facilitate both the tabulation and the utilization of such # 
statistics, to increase the comparability of the import and" 
export figures by having a common classification of both, 
• and to give a greater amount of detail regarding the par- 8 - 
ticular article, point of origin as to foreign sources, amount 
and value of commodities, production and consumption. 

This tremendous work had been well advanced by the 
end jot the year, but it was then self-evident that the entire 
proposition could not be completed for a number of months 
more. Working in co-operation toward its ultimate com- . 
pletion were the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Com- . 
merce of the Department of Commerce, the Customs Service 
of the Treasury Department, the Shipping Board, War 4. 
% Trade Board. Tariff Commission, the Bureau of Mines of 
the Department of the Interior, and a number of other 
Federal agencies. While nominally under the direction of 
the chief of the Department of Commerce, the great bulk 
of the work was done under the personal supervision of 
Dr. E. R. Pickrell, ch.ef chemist of the United States Ap- 
praisers' Laboratory, v* ho completed the first comprehensive 
section of the program. That was the gathering together 
and presentation of a detailed statement of Imports of 5 
chemicals, oils, drugs and allied products, reports of which 
were from time to time published in the Reporter . Dr. 
Pickrell's work was the compilation of import statistics 
covering the period from July 1, 1913, to June 30, 1914, or 
the twelve months prior to the start of the war in Europe. 
It was designed chiefly to show detailed statistics as to 
imports of products in the trades mentioned, which have 
heretofore been generally grouped under the all-inclusive 
term "all others," as used in monthly statistical reports of <>• 
the Department of Commerce. Usage of that term elim- 
inate many facts of vital importance t^ ^jnerican man- 
facturers when they sought to gather information as to 
foreign competition when the war shut off German goods. 
While Dr. Pickrell's work is but a part of the plan outlined, 
it is regarded as one of the more important, in that it em- 
braces a great bulk of the country's t.>reign trade. 

The new classification will be on a decimal basis and 7. 
all commodities are to be divided into ten main groups, 
with each yf these groups in turn subdivided. For export 
statistics the subdivision will be carried into four parts, 
while for Imports there will be five subdivisions. 

Following will be found a classification of the main 
headings, which will indicate the general scheme of group- 
ing commodities: — 

0. Vegetable product* used principally for foods and beverages. Q 

00. Grains, flours, and Btarches. °- 

01. Vegetables. 

02. Fruits and nuts. 

08. Vegetable oils, fats and waxes, and oil seeds. 

04. Tea, coffee, cocoa, and spices. 

05. Sugars, molasws, syrups, and confectionery. 

06. Fodders. 
07. 

08. Beverages. 

09. Miscellaneous vegetable food products. 

1. Animals and animal products (except fibers). 9 

10. Live animals. 

100 food animals. 

100 other live animals. 

11. Meats and meat products. 

12. Dairy products and eggs. 

18. Fish and fish products. > 

14. Animal oils, fats, waxes, and greases. 

1.1. Hides and akina. 

16. Leather, and manufactures of. 

IT. Furs and fur skins. 

N 



18. 

10. Other animal products. 
Fibers and textile products. 

20. Cotton and cotton manufactures. 

21. Flax and linen. 

22. Hemp and ramie. 

28. Jute and Jute products. 

24. Hard vegetable fibers. 

25. Other vegetable fibers. 

26. Wools, and manufactures of. 

27. Silk, and manufactures of. 

28. Other animal fibers. 

29. Miscellaneous textile products. 
"Wood, wood products, and paper. 

30. Logs, hewed and sawed timber. 

31. Lumber, lath, and shingles. 

32. Unmanufactured or partly manufactured wood (piling, cooper- 

age stock, railroad ties, veneers, etc.). ' 

38. Manufactures of wood. 
34. 

35. 

36. Paper, base stocks. 

87. Paper, and manufactures of. 

38. 

39. 'Miscellaneous. 

Plant products, other than foods, fibers, and woods. 

40. Rubber, gutta percha, and similar hydrocarbon gums, and 

manufactures of. 

41. Other gums, resins, and balsams. 

42. Essential oils. 

43. Tobacco. 

44. Seeds /or sowing. 

45. Plants, trees, shrubs, and vines. 

46. * 
47. 

48. 

49. Other plants and plant products. 
Chemical and chemical products. 

50. Chemicals. 
Coal-tar chemicals. 
Natural dyes and tanning materials. 
Pigments, paints, and varnishes. 
Drugs and medicines. 

Soaps, perfumery, cosmetics, and other toilet preparations. 
Fertilizers. » 

57. Explosives. 

58. * 

59. Other chemicals and chemical products. 
Ores, metals, and metal manufactures. 

60. Iron and steel. 

61. Manganese, chromium, vanadium, tungsten, molybdenum, etc. 

62. Nickel and cobalt. 

63. Aluminum, tin, and antimony, 

64. Lead and sine. 

65. Copper, brass, and bronze. 

66. Precious metals, and manufactures of. 

67. Mercury. 
68. 

69. All other ores, metals, alloys, and manufactures. 
Machinery, tools, and vehicles. 

70. Farm equipment. 

71. Metal -working machinery.. 

72. Electrical machinery and electrical apparatus. 

73. Engines and parts. 

74. Mining, excavating, and road machinery. 

75. Textile machinery. 

76. Factory and other industrial machinery. / 

77. Other machinery.* '' 

78. Vehicle. 

79. Tools, cutlery, and miscellaneous hardware. 
Non metal lie minerals and products. 

80. Coal, petroleum, and other fuels. 

81. Building stone. 

82. Cement, gypsum, and asphalt. 

83. Sand, clay, and other glass and ceramic raw materials. 

84. Brick, pottery, and glass. 

85. Chemical and fertilizer raw materials. 

86. Abrasives, materials, and products. 

87. Refractory materials and products. 

88. Rare minerals and products. 

89. Other. 
Miscellaneous. 

90. Toys, games, athletic and sporting goods. 

91. Musical instruments. 

92. Dental and surgical instruments. 

93. Firearms and ammunition. 

94. Cameras, moving-picture machines, supplies and accessories. 



51. 
52. 
58. 
54. 
55. 
56. 



95. 

9>l. 
97. 
U8. 
09. 



Scientific apparatus. 



All other. 



70 



1918 YEAR BOOK 




U.S. 
equiv- 
alents 
Denominations. Where used. at par. 

Anna ; : Afghanistan 90.0161 

M British East Africa....... 0.02 

•• * India 0.02 

Turkey 0.0008 

, Siam 0.0043 



Aapre 

At 

Balboa Panama 1.000 

Bano (plural, Banl) Roumania 0.0019 

Blankeel Morocco 0.0015 

Bolivar Venezuela r..... 0.193 

Boliviano Bolivia 0.3893 

Candareen China 0.00708 

Cash China 0.0007 

Cash or Mil Hong Kong.. 0.00046 

.Korea 0.0009 



22.272 
0.0074 
0.0048 
0,0046 
0.0046 



«• 
i« 



4* 



** 



4* 



i« 



Catty Siam 

Caveer Arabia 

Cent Annam 

4i British Labuan 

* K British North Borneo.... 

" ^. ...Canada ; 0.01 

" Ceylon 0.0032 

" i Danish West Indies 0.0097 

" Dutch East Indies 0.00402 

" Hon* Kong. 0.00464 

" Korea .' 0.0049 

Mauritius 0.0032 

.Netherlands 0.00402 

. Newfoundland 0.01 

.Sabak 0.0046 

.St. Bartholomew 0.0097 

.Sandwich Islands 0.01 

.Sarawak 0.0046 

.Society Islands 0.0096 

.Straits Settlements 0.0046 

.Sultanate of Brunei 0.0046 

.Sultanate of Sulu 0.0046 

.Zanzibar 0.0084 

Centavo Argentine Republic 0.0096 

Bolivia 0.0042 

British Honduras 0.01 

Chile 0.0036 

Colombia 0.0042 

Ecuador 0.0048 

" Guatemala 0.0097 

.Haiti 0.0096 

.Mexico 0.0046 

.Nicaragua 0.004 

.Paraguay 0.0099 

.Peru 0.0048 

.Salvador 0.0097 

.Santo Domingo 0.01 

.Uruguay 0.01034 

.Venezuela 0.0096 

Centeslmo (plural, Centesimi).. Italy 0.0019 

Centime Belgium, Prance 0.00193 

Haiti 0.0025 

Centime or Rappe Switzerland i. 0.00193 

" Tunis 0.0019 

Centimo Costa Rica 0.0046 

Gibraltar, Spain 0.0W9 

Philippine Islands 0.0019 

Colon Costa Rica 0.465 

Dinar Servia 0.193 

Dollar Annam 0.486 

Dollar or Peso Argentine Republic 0.966 

Dollar British Labuan 0.464 

British Honduras 1.00 

British North Borneo.... 0.464 

.Canada 1 1.00 

.Chile 0.365 

.Colombia 0.428 

Dollar Danish West Indies 0.972 

Dollar, Piastre or Peso Guatemala 0.972 

Dollar Honduras 1.00 

Hong Kong 0.464 

Korea 0.4976 

Liberia 1.00 

Mexico 0.464 

M Newfoundland 1.00 

, Nicaragua 0.40 

.Paraguay 0.998 

Peru 0.487 



•« i 



Dollar or Peso. 



' a 



Dollar 
Dollar 



or 
or 



Peso. 

Sol. 



Dollar Sabak 0.464 

St. Bartholomew 0.97 

Sandwich Islands 1.00 

Salvador 0.972 

" Santo Domingo 1.00 

** Sarawak 0.464 

Dollar or Piastre. ..!.....!.!!!... Society Islands.".".""."."."."."."". 0.9604 

Dollar Straits Settlements, Bru- 

nal, Sulu 0.464 

Dollar or Peso. Uruguay 1.034 

Zanzibar 0.849 

Drachma (plural, Drachmla) . . . Greece 0.193 

Ducat (single) Austria-Hungary 1.94 

,T Netherlands 2.311 

Dwougrivnlok (20 Kopecks) Russia *... 0.103 

Escudo Portugal 1.06 

Farthing Great Britain 0.0051 

Florin or Guilder Dutch East Indies 0.402 

" Netherlands 0.402 

Florin or Gulden Austria- Hungary 0.406 

Flue Morocco 0.00025 

Franc Belgium, France, Switz- 
erland, Tunis 0.193 

Siam 0.0348 

Haiti 0.26 

Russia 0.0615 

Abyssinia 0.0584 

Florin Dutch East Indies 0.402 

Netherlands 0.40B 



Fuang 

Gourde 

Griwnlck (It Kopecks) 
Guerch . . . 
Guilder or 



Denominations. Where used. 

Gulden or Florin Austria-Hungary . 

Haikwan Tael China 

Heller Austria-Hungary ., 

Keran or K'ran Persia 

Kopeck Russia 

Krona (plural, Kronor) Sweden 

Krone (plural, Kronen) Austria-Hungary . 

Krone (plural. Kroner) Denmark, Norway 

Leo (plural. Lei) : Roumania 



U.S. 
equiv- 
alents 
at par. 
. 0.406 
. 0.703 
. 0.00208 
, 0.079 
. 0.00615 
. 0.268 
. 0.203 
. 0.268 
0.193 



ei) 

Leptoh (plural, Lepta) Greece 0.0019 

Lev (plural. Leva) Bulgaria 0.198 

Liang Korea 0.0995 

Lira (plural. Lire) Italy 0.193 

Lira Turca or Medjidie Turkey 4.40 

Mace China 0.0708 

Mahbub Tripoli 1.01 

Maria Theresa Thaler Austria-Hungary 0.8644 

Mark Finland 0.193 

Mark or Relchsmark Germany 0.238 

Medjidie or Lira Turca Turkey 4.40 

Mil or Cash Hong Kong 0.00046 

Mill Canada 0.001 

Milrels Azores Islands, Madeira, 

Portugal 1M 

,....Brasil 0.546 

Mlthkal or Rial Morocco 0.0616 

Mocha Dollar or Piastre Arabia 0.5984 

Mozambique Milrels Portuguese East Africa. . 0.303 

Ochr'-el-guerch Egypt 0.00494 



Ore 



Ounce 
Para . 



or Okia. 



•» 



Penni 



Denmark 0.00268 

Norway 0.00268 

Sweden 0.00068 

Morocco , 0.0061 

Cyprus 0.0006 

Servia 0.0015 

Tripoli 0.0012 

Turkey 0.0011 

Finland 0.00193 



** 

** 



Penny ureat Britain 0.0203 

Malta 0.0203 

Peseta Cuba 0.186 

" Gibraltar, Spain 0.193 

Philippine Islands 0.193 

, Porto Rico (1186 

Peso or Dollar Argentine Republic — ... 0.965 

Peso Chile 0.365 

Peso or Dollar Colombia 0.428 

Peso Cuba 0.926 

Peso Piastre, or Dollar Guatemala 0.972 

Peso or Dollar Paraguay 0.998 

Peso Porto Rico 0.926 

Peso or Dollar Uruguay 1.034 

Peso or Venezolano Venezuela J?-J25L 

Pfennig Germany 0.0028 

Pialachak (5 Kopecks) Russia itiSK 5 

Piastre or Mocha Dollar Arabia 0.5984 

Piastre Cyprus 0.0266 

".:;:;;:;;;::;:;;;;;:::;;;. :;;Egypt 0.0494 

Piastre. Peso or Dollar Guatemala 0.972 

Piastre or Dollar §° ole tf Mamto 0.9604 

Piastre Tripoli 0.05 

Turkey 0.044' 

Piatinnick (15 Kopecks) ?l* s * la , •; 5*25? 

Pice .. . .... Afghanistan 0.0018 

British East Africa 0.0016 

India 0.0016 

" Siam 0.0087 

Pound '(UraE^Kiana'/u'EO'.'.lBgypt J-M* 

Pound Sterling:...'..... ....S reat Britain 4.8666 

Purse Turkey 28.00 

Rappe or Centime....;.;;.!!..!!! Switzerland 0.00191 

Ree (plural, Rels) £ zo J e8 l8 T la i nds V J-ffiS 

« Madeira Islands 0.0108 

•« «• Portuguese East Africa.. 0.0008 

•• Portugal 0.0108 

Brazil 0.00064 

Germany 0.238 

'Morocco 0.0616 

Japan 0.00049 

Russia 0.515 

'Afghanistan 0.268 

' British East Africa 0.324 

'Ceylon 0.824 

ilndia ii 0.324 

Mauritius 0.323 

.Siam 0.0696 

.Annam 0.0009 

Japan 0.00498 

Persia 0.0039 



Max 



Rei (plural, Rels] 
Relchsmark or Mark. 
Rial or Mithkal, 

RIn 

Ruble 

Rupee 



Salung . 
Sapeque 
Sen 
Shahi 



ShilUng ....:.................. .....Great Britain 0.2438 

« Malta 0.2433 

Sol or Dollar.'. '..*.... *.".'.... '."..'..'... Peru ........ 0.487 

Sovereign Great Britain 4.86K 

•• Malta 4.866© 

Stotinki ..„ Bulgaria , 0.0019 

Sucre "n Ecuador 0.487 



China 0.706 

Abyssinia 0.969 

biam 1.1136 

Bokhara , 0.10 

Khiva, KhokandV 0.10 

Slam 0.2784 

Bokhara *.... 

Khiva t. . . . 

•• Khokand t.... 

Toman Persia 0.79 

Venezolano or Peso Venezuela 0.965 

Yen Japan 0.498 



Tael (Haikwan) 

Talaro 

Tamlung 

Tanga 

Tical ..'.".".'.V.'.'.*.' 
Tillah 



* Varies from 2.673 to 3.159. 



t Varies from 2.024 to 2.064. 
t Varies from 2.124 to 2.187. 



\ 



<- 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



71 



^ 



ENEMY^OWNED CHEMICAL, DYE AND DRUG PATOMTS. 

Official List of Foreign Processes Available to American Manufacturers Under Trading-with-the- 

Enemy Act. 



117HAT was regarded as one of the most constructive 
VV undertakings of the government in connection with 
the seizure of enemy-owned property in the United 
States was the plan adopted by the Alien Property Cus- 
todian to make available to American manufacturers the 
great list of enemy -owned patents for the production of 
coal-tar colors, dyes, chemicals and intermediates, as well 
as various processes for the production of paints, oils and 
other products of the Reporter trades. Under a system 
of special licenses these were made available to all comers, 
provided they were bona fide Americans, and up to the 
close of the year several hundred such patents had been 
taken out by producers under these licenses. 

The number which was taken over by such was small, 
however, when it was considered that there were some 
16,000 patents issued tiy foreign patentees, now enemies, in 
the past seventeen years. Part of the reason for this has 
been given as being due to the fact that many of the smaller 
producers have not been in a position to ascertain satis- 
factorily just what patents had been issued in the past 
to foreign patentees, subsequently listed as enemies, and 
which were such as they desired to undertake the pro- 
duction of as an American product. 

For this reason the publication of the complete list of 
these patents (such as are of interest to Reporter trades) 
by the Reporter may be considered of exceptional value. 
They have been included herewith. In connection with 
this list it must be stated that the patentees named were 



given as the official record at the time of the filing of the 
patent and some are therefore subject to changes in owner- 
ship since made through assignment by the patentee or 
through license of the Federal Trade Commission. > 

A number of former enemy-owned patents for phar- 
maceutical chemicals, coal-tar dyes, colors and in- 
termediates have been acquired by American owners virtu- 
ally outright through the sale by the Allen Property Cus- 
todian of large former German or Austrian interests in 
some large chemical companies originally established here 
as branches of the parent concerns in those countries and 
which were subsequently seized by the Alien Property 
Custodian. Just one of the properties so acquired brought 
a price of $6,000,000 when disposed of at public auction by 
the government's representatives. This particular property 
owned or controlled scores of patents and processes for 
the production of valuable chemicals, etc., chief among 
which might be mentioned such leading products as for- 
maldehyde, salol, salicylic acid and benzoate of soda. In 
disposing of these properties, as well as making available 
to American manufacturers through a license system the 
valuable patents mentioned, the Alien Property Custodian, 
A. Mitchell Palmer, acted under the sweeping powers con- 
ferred by Presidential proclamation signed by President 
Wilson on November 12, 1918. 

Subjoined will be found the entire list of patents avail- 
able to American producers of chemicals, oils, paints and 
allied products: — 



Class 8. — Bleaching and Dyeing. 

Sub class 6; No. 688,708; date, February 18, 
1902; inventor, Haagen; invention, feoro- 
ohrome colors and making same. 

5* 700,021; May 20, 1902; Luratl; fixing dyes 
on indigo. 

5; 708.429; September 2, 1902; Voetter; point- 
Ins with sulfur dyes. 

1; 721,961; March 8, 1908; Marckwold; nalo- 
genlsing onranile fluids. 

5; 724,081; April 7, 1908; Voetter; dyeing 
with sulphur dyes. 

1: 724,789; April 7, 1908; Bonn; blue dyes 
and making same. 

0; 727,292; May 9. 1908; Cleff; dyeing and 
printing anilin black. 

1; 729.217; May 26, 1908; Rahtgen; making 
brown indigo. 

18; 786,509; August 4. 1903; Schrader; proc- 
esses of mordanting wool, etc. 

18; 761,107; May 81, 1904; Roth; reducing 
valves. 

1; 764.788; July 12, 1904; Lauch; black sul- 
fur dyes and making of same. 

1; 764,784; July 12, 1904; Lauch; direct 
cotton sulfur dyes and making same. 

1; 764,786; July 12, 1904; Lauch; making 
sulfur dyes stable. 

6; 779,228; January 8, 1909; Mann; dyeing. 

17; 803,421; October 81, 1909; Kubler; dyeing. 

9; 808,899; November 7, 1909; Rlbbert; dye- 
ing indigo resists. 

8; 819,671; March 20, 1906; Becke; produc- 
ing multicolored dye effects on woolen fabrics. 

6; 880,082; September 4, 1906; Konitzer; dye- 
ing wool black. 

. 1; 881,002; September 11, 1906; Isler; anthra- 
cene derivatives and making same. 

1; 842,948; January 29, 1907; Hers berg; aso 
is«s and making same. 

18; 849.686: April 9. 1907; Obermaler; textile 
fibers with liquids and gases. 

1; 849.690; April 9, 1907; Laska; yellow 
wool dyes. 

1; 890,444; April 16, 1907; Rahtjen; making 
Indigo. 

18; 861,897; July 80, 1907; Schmlts; mfg. of 
fatty compounds for use as Turkey red oils. 

1; 868.290; August 18, 1907; Laska; black 
mordant aso dyes. 

1; 878,798; December 17, 1907; Schule; red 
nno dyes and making same. 
. 1; 879,424; February 18, 1908; Sulsberger; 
' Making aso dyes containing radicals of higher 
fnttjr acids. 

1; 900,802; October 6, 1908; Ostrogovich A 
Bilbermann; producing indulin colors. 

18; 908,888; November 17, 1908; Blumenthal; 
aaordanting fibrous material. 

1;. 909,264; December 1, 1908; Winter; mak- 
ing lake colors. 

1; 910,889; January 26, 1909; Wlnmer; stable 
indigo white and making same. 

1; 911,186; February 2, 1909; Wericka; red 
soono-aso dyes. 

1; 942,916; December 14, 1909; Koenig; red 
nno dyes for lakes and making same. 

20; 994,810; April 9, 1910; Lederer; producing 
ncatyl-cellulose-cpated material. 

1; 998.464; May 17, 1910; Bauer A Herre; 
blue vat dyes. 

1; 960,979; June 7, 1910; Llchtensteln; fixing 
•nlfld colors. 

6; 961,241; June 14, 1910; Knoevenagel; dye- 
ing acetyl cellulose. 

18; 864,969; July 19. 1910; Schmlts; making 
fatty compounds for use as turkey red oils. 

9; 979,966; December 27, 1910; Knoevenagel; 
dyeing aoeiyl-eellulose. 

1; 981,974;' January 10, 1911; Knoevenagel; 



treatment of acetyl-cellulose to enhance its 
elasticity and its power of absorption. 

1; 993,992; May 80, 1911; Herzbergle Bruck; 
vat dyes of the anthroqulnone series. 

20; 994,076; May 80, 1911; Hahn; merceris- 
ing levetin, preferably in form of skeins. 

1; 999,998; August 1, 1911; Hangwits; poly- 
aso dye and processes of making same. 

9; 1,002,408; September 9, 1911; Knoevenagel; 
dyeing acetyl-cellulose. 

18; 1,002,685; September 9, 1911; Bratkowski; 
apparatus for measuring and regulating the 
concentration of dye liquors. 

1; 1,008.268; September 12, 1911; Just A 
Wolff; anthracene dyes and processes of mak- 
ing same. 

9; 1.009,981; November 28, 1911; Dessar; dye- 
ing with bensoquinone derivations. 

1; 1.028,199: April 16, 1912; Elbel; mfg. new 
beta naphthol ortho, oxy-aso-dye. 

2; 1,028,287; April 16, 1912;- Wilsing; mfg. 
bleaching liquids. 

18; 1,087,280; September 8, 1912: Matter; 
apparatus for removing lye from fabrics. 

5; 1,041,910; October 19, 1912; Pils: produc- 
ing fast brown resists on vegetable fibers. 

18; 1.059.740; April 22, 1918; Liebknecht A 
Blumenthal; making auxiliary mordants con- 
taining 1 Itanium and glycollc acid. 

18; 1,099.741; April 22, 1918; Liebknecht A 
Blumenthal; making auxiliary mordants, etc. 

2; 1,061,892; May 18, 1918; Matheslus A Frel- 
berger; bleaching. 

2; 1,135,808; April 18, 1919; Lehmann; 
bleaching solutions. 

6; 1,144,829; June 22, 1919; Erlenbach; prep- 
arations for dyeing hairs, furs, and the like. 

9: 1,149.846; July 6, 1919; Pester; producing 
melange-like dyed yarns, hosiery and weaving*. 

1: 1,197,489; October 19, 1919; Wray; mfg. 
of black vat dyestuffs. 

1; 1,169,844; January 29, 1916; Neelmelr, Jor- 
dan & Heusner; blue disaso dye. 

1; 1,200,099; October 8, 1916; Woetter; mak- 
ing sulfur dyes. 

1; 1,207,762; December 12, 1916; Isler; anthra- 
quinone dyes and making same. 

1: 1,248.170; October 16, 1917; Hers; vat dyes 
and T"«^i"g same. 

1: 1,248,171; October 16, 1917; Hers; vat dyes 
and making same. 



Assigned Patents. 



8; 692,775; February 4, 1902; Althausse; cel- 
lulose lakes and making same; assignee, Dr. 
Richard Sthamer. 

1; 707,813; August 26, 1902; Ach; triphenyi 
methane dyes and making same; C. F. Boehr- 
inger A Soehne. 

1; 767,069; August 9, 1904; Laska; dark 
brown wool dyes; K. Oehler Anilin A Anllmeit. 

1; 767,070; August 9, 1904; Laska; brown 
mordant dyes: K. Oehler Anilin A Anllmeit. 

1; 779,970; November 22, 1904; Laska; dark 
blue sulfur dyes; Oehler. 

1; 789,679; March 21, 1909; Laska; orange 
sulfur dyes and prooess of making same; K. 
Oehler, Anilin, etc. 

1; 787,046; April 11, 1909; Laska; claret red 
mordant dyes and making same; K. Oehler, 
Anilin, etc. 

1; 798.808; September 9. 1909; Laska: blue 
aso wool dyes and making same; K. Oehler, 
Anilin, etc. 

1; 888.086; May 19, 1908; Rls A Haager; blue 
disaxo dyes; Carl Jager. 

1; 908,980; January 9, 1909; Koenig; monoaso 
dyes and making same; Karl Mers. 

1; 918.244; April 18. 1909; Wurthner: lakes 
from sulfonated aso dyes; Q. Slegle A Co. 



1; 998.329; May 17, 1910; Schmidt A Krans- 
lein; means of the anthorquinone serfes and 
making same; Farbwerke vorm Meister, Luc- 
ius A Brtlning. 

1; 960,671; June 7, 1910; Mugden A Her- 
mann; martin* indoxyl, etc.; Consortium fttr 
Electrochemlscne Industrie, Oes. 

1; 968,877; July 9, 1910; Liebknecht; mfg. 
of Indigo leuco bodies; Deutsche Gold A Silber 
Schelde Anstall. 

1; 1,006.929; October 24, 1911; Freimann; aso 
dyes; Company Carl Jager. 

1; 1.016.688; February 6, 1912; Laska; vat 
dyes and process: C. F. Orleshelm Blektron. 

1; 1.126,881; May 21, 1912; Rheinhardt; mfg. 
black sulfurised coloring matters; Farb vorm 
Meilester Meer. 

6; 1,179,984; March 14, 1916; Iliinsky; vat 
dyestuff compound! suited for dyeing and 
printing; Wedeklnd A Co. 

1; 1,261,894; April 2, 1918: Iliinsky; vat dye- 
stuffs and their formation; R. wedeklnd A Co. 

1; 724,894; April 7, 1908; Laska; red to violet 
dyes and methods of making same; K. Oehler, 
Anilin, etc. 

1; 724,893; April 7, 1908; Laska; violet aso 
dyes and method of making same; K. Oehler, 
Anilin, etc. 

1; 724.894; April 7, 1908; Laska; red or violet 
dyestuffs and methods of making same; K* 
Oehler, Anilin, etc. 

1; 728,477; May 19, 1908; Laska; blue disaso 
dye; K. Oehler, Aniiln, etc. 

1; 729.874; June 2, 1903; Laska; olive green 
sulfur dyes and processes of making same; K. 
Oehfer, Anilin, etc. 

1; 740,767; October 6, 1908; .Laska; mordant 
disaso dyes and processes of making same; K. 
Oehler, Anilin, etc. 

1; 740.768; October 6. 1908: Laska; black 
mordant dyes and processes or making same; 
K. Oehler, Anilin, etc. 

1; 969.804; July 26, 1910; Franke; allsarin 
preparations and processes of making; Chem- 
Ische Fabrlk Qrunau Laudshoff A Meyer. 

Patents Issued to Actien Cesellschaft 
fur Anilin Fabrikation, Assignee. 

The following patents were issued to Actlen 
Oesellschaft fur Anilin Fabrikation as as- 
sismee * 

1; 704,829; July 7, 1902; Hersberg A Slebert; 

1; 704.829; July 19, 1902; Herbberg A Slebert; 
red aso dyes. 

1; 717,990; January 6, 1908; Dedichen; mak- 
ing black polyaso dyes. 

1; 786,880; August 18, 1908; Oley; blue sulfur 
dyes and making same. 

1; 736.403; August 18, 1908; Kaltwasser A 
Gaumer; Indigo blue sulfur dyes and making 
same. 

1; 738,027; September 1, 1903; Gley; yellow 
sulfur dyes and making same. 

1; 800,914; September 26, 1909; Hersberg; 
yellow red aso dyes. 

1; 741,029; October 13. 1903; Gley A Slebert; 
red azo lakes. 

1; 741,030; October 18, 1908; Giey; green sul- 
fur dyes and making same. 

1; 996,489; June 27, 1911; Hersberg A Bruck; 
sulfurised vat dyes of the anthraquinone se- 
ries. 

1; 997,061; July 4, 1911; Hersberg et al.; 
tetrakiseaso dye. 

1;. 748,071; November 8, 1903; Gley A Slebert; 
monoaso dyes and making same. 

1; 770,430; September 20, 1904; Hersberg A 
Slebert; red hikes. 



72 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



1: 772.981; October 25, 1904; Oley; making 
lakes from sulphur dyes. 

1; 782,906; February 21, 1905; Oley; orange 
sulphur dyes and making same. 

1; 808,592; October 81, 1905; Herzberg; 
monoazo dyes. 

1: 813,048; February 27, 1906; Gley;. orange 
yellow sulphur dyes and making" same. 

1; 820,052; May 8, 1906; Klrchboff ft Ker- 
kovius; violet color lakes and making same. 

1; 835,682; November 18, 1906; Herzberg A 
Scharfenberg; trippenylmethane dyes and mak- 

tnff seywfl 

1; 842,560; January 29, 1907; Klrchboff; or- 
anee lakes and making same. 

3; 864,644; Hersberg, Scharfenberg ft Ronuse; 
sulphur dyes and making same. 

1; 865,587; September 10, 1907; Herzberg ft 
Spengier; red orange monoaso dyes and mak- 
ing same. 

1; 866,359; September 17, 1907; Hersberg & 
Sharfenberg; triphenylmethan dyes and mak- 
ing same. 

1; 872,815; December 3, 1907; Helmann; 
safranin dyes and making same. 

1; 880,292; February 25, 1908; Geldermann; 
red aso dyes and making same. 

1; 880,298; February 25, 1908; Geldermann; 
yellow tretazo dyes and making same. 

1; 906,421; December 8. 1908; Herzberg ft 
Spengier; ortho-oxy-monoaso dyes and making 
same. 

1; 906,422; December 8. 1908; Hersberg ft 
Oster; yellow monoaso dyestuffs. 

1; 912,138; February 9, 1909; Lauch; orange 
lake dyes and making same. M 

1; 934,302; September 14, 1909; Gley ft Dle- 
terle; brown sulfur dyes. 

1; 934.803; September 14, 1909; Gley ft Dle- 
terle; olive sulfur dyes. 

1; 048.536; December 14, 1909; Geldermann; 
mordant-dyeing azo dye. 

1: 053,008; March 22; 1910; Haussmann; 
compounds of sulphur dyes soluble in water. 

1; 954.960; April 12, 1910; Herzberg ft Ron us; 
red azo dyes and making same. 

1; 955.068; April 12, 1910; Hersberg ft Ronus; 
azo dyes and making same. 

1; 958.640; May 17, 1910; Haugwitz; sulfur 
dyes and making same. 

1; 961,047; June 7, 1910; Ullmann; anthra- 
quinone acridones. 

1; 9*1,048; June 7, 1910; Ullmann; anthra- 
quinone-d! -acridones. 

1; 982,050; January 17, 1911; Geldermann; 
yellow pyrazolone dyes for wool. 

1; 988,132; January 31, 1911; Geldermann ft 
Oster; monoaso dyestuff for lehrome-mordante. 

1; 983.805; February 7, 1911; Bethold; mono- 
aso dyes. 

1; 984,900; February 21, 1911; Geldermann; 
monoaso dyestuffs and making same. 

1; 986,287; March 7, 1911; Herzberg ft Schar- 
fenberg; monoazo dyes for wool. 

1; 987,862; March 21, 1911; Herzberg; mono- 
azo dyes for wool. 

1; 988.870; April 4, 1911; Geldermann; yellow 
monoago dyes and making same. 

5; 992,947; May 23, 1911; Brlenbacb; dyeing 
hair and furs and the like. 

1; 998,915; May 30, 1911; Ullmann; halo- 
genized car boxy lie acid of the phenylaninoan- 
thraquinone. 

-1; 1.003,266; September 12, 1911; Jaesschin ft 
Kattwassu; monoazo dyes. 

1; 1,003.298; September 12. 1911; Pollkier; 
monoazo dyes for wool. 

1; 1,008,906; November 14, 1911; Herzberg ft 
Bruch; vat dyes for the anthraquinone series. 

1; 1,008.007; November 14. 1911; Herzberg, 
Ronus ft Schwable; monoazo dyes. 

1; 1,011,770; December 12, 1911; Geldermann; 
aso dyes for wool. 

1: 1.038;884; September 17, 1912; Herzberg 
& Scharfenberg; azo dye. 

1; 1,042,198; October 22, 1912; Cantor; red 
disazo dyes. 

1; 1,050.829; January 21, 1913; Hersberg ft 
Brbck; anthraquinone vat dyes. 

1; 1,078,503; November 11, 1913; Hersberg ft 
Laage; diazotizable disazo dyes for cotton. 

1; 1.078.505; November 11, 1914; Hersberg ft 
Hoppe; blue dyes for anthraquinone series. 

1; 1,078,504; November 11, 1918; Hersberg ft 
Lange; diazotizable disazo dyes for cotton. 

1; 1.096,715; May 5, 1914; Helmann; sulfur- 
iaed dyes and making same. 

1; 1,086,155; February 8, 1914; Geldermann, 
etc.; yellow azo dyes. 

1; 1,098.259; May 26, 1914; Helmann; sulphur- 
ised dyes and making same. 

1; 1,098,260; May 26, 1914; Helmann; sulphur- 
ized dyes and making same. 

1; 1,099.039; September 2, 1914; Helmann ft 
Virck; sulfur dyes and making same. 

1; 1,102,171; June 80, 1914; Scharfenberg ft 
Hersberg: sulfurized dyes and making same. 

5; 1.105.447; July 28, 1914; Marx; dyeing 
furs, hairs, etc. 

5; 1,105.501; July 28. 1914; Erlenbach ft 
Mark; dyes for dyeing furs, hairs, etc. 

1; 1.105,515; July 28, 1914; Helmann; sul- 
ferized dyes and making same. 

6; 1.105.554; July 28, 1914; Erlenbach; prep, 
dyeing hairs, furs, etc. 

1: 1.131.516; March 9. 1915; Herzberg ft 
Hoppe; greenish blue dyes of anthraquinone 
series. 

6; 1,144,181; June 22, 1915; Erlenbach ft 
Marx; dyes for furs, hairs, etc. 

1; 1,166,846; December 28. 1915; Geldermann 
& Haas; yellow disazo dyes. 

1; 1,173.077; February 22, 1016; Ackermann; 
disazo dyes. 

1; 1,180.985; April 25, 1916; Dedlchen ft 
Lange; blue tetrakisazo dyes. 

6; 1,183.748; May 16, 1916; Marx; dyeing 
skins, hairs, etc. 

1; 1.183,831; May 16. 15)19: Dedichen ft 
Lange; green substantive triazo dyes. 



1; 1,199,697; September 26, 1916; Helmann; 
dyes and making same. 

1; 1,200,154; December 19, 1916; Haugwitz; 
triazo dyes. 

li 1.200,580;. December 19, 1918; Herzberg ft 
Sctiarfenberg; sulfur dyes. 

1; 1,213,075; January 16, 1917; Clauslus, 
Sohoner & Siebert; disazo dyes. 

1; 1,251,868; December 25, 1917; Helmann; 
sulfur dyes and their manufacture. 

1; 1,251,869; December 25, 1917; Helmann; 
dyes and manufacture thereof. 

1; 1,255,739; February 5, 1918; Grunhagen; 
haiogenated dyes of acrid in series. 

1; 1,255,740; February 5, 1918; Grunhagen; 
dyes of benzene nathalene series and manu- 
facture of same. 



Farbiverke vornu Meister, Lucius & 
Bruning, Assignee. 

The following patents were Issued to Farb- 
werke vorm. Melster, Lucius ft Bruning, as 
assignee *~ 

U 698,"670; February 6, 1902; Schirmacher; 
disazo wool dyes and making same. 

1; 778,036; December 20, 1904; Hepp ft Uhlen- 
buth; anthraquinone dyes and making same. 

1; 694,149; February 25, 1902; Hoffmann; 
acldyl dialkyluho damin and making same. 

13; 695,238; March 11, 1902; Scholl; orange 
red dyes and making same. 

1; 697,765; April 15, 1902; Winter; red cotton 
dyes and making same. 

1; 701,051; May 27, 1902; Kelbe; black sulfur 
dyes and making same. 

6; 702,730; June 17, 1902; Homolka; purify- 
ing raw indigo. 

1; 704,798; July 15, 1902; Hartmann; blue 
anthraquinone dyes and making same. 

1; 704,804; July 15, 1002; Homolka ft Liele- 
kneth; making lndoxyl, etc. 

6; 706,921; August 12. 1902} Gallols; making 
bomindlgo. 

1, 710,766; October 7, 1902; Dollfus; blue 
sulfer dytes and making same. 

5; 710.800; October 7, 1902; Feterhauser; 
dyeing indigo. 

1; 711,810; October 14, 1902; Hepp; polya- 
midoanthraquinone sulfo acids and making 
same. 

1; 712,421; October 28, 1902; Sohst; yellow to 
red acrlndin dyes and making same. 

1; 714,882; December 2. 19J92; Ernst; monoazo 
dyes and making same. 

1; 714.883; December 2, 1002; Ernst; orange 
yellow azo dyes and making same. 

1; 720,920; February 17. 1903; Hoffman; alky- 
lated auranlus and making same. 

1; 724,743; April 7. 1903; Schirmacher; red 
azo dyes and making same. 

1; 726,688; April 28, 1903; Homolka; indigo 
mixtures and making same. 

1; 728.021; May 12, 1903; Schmidt; black azo 
dyes and making same. 

1; 728,623; May lb, 1908; Schmidt and Beth- 
mann; blue sulfur d>es and making same. 

1; 731.670; June 23. 1903; Dollfus and Ha gen - 
bach, yellow mono azo dyestuffs and making 
same. 

1; 788.280; July 7, 1903; Schirmacher; red azo 
dyes and making same. 

1; 734,325; July 2L 1903; Hess; green anthra- 
quinone dyes and making same. 

1; 734,866; July 28, 1903; Hepp •& Hartmann; 
blue anthraquinone dyes and making name. 

1; 787.967; September 1. 1903; Schmidt; violet 
red azo dyes and making same. 

1; 739,069; September 15, 1903; Ernst ft 
Scholl. red mordant azo dyes. 

1; 739,117; September 15, 1903; Sohst; yellow 
acrldlnium dyes and making same. 

1; 789,118; September 15, 1903; Sohst; mqno 
azo dyes and making same. 

1; 741,552; October 18. 1903; Scholl; making 
azo dyes. 

5; 742.530; October 27. 1903; Ulrich ft Fuss- 
gauger, processes of printing black. 

1; 748,375; December 29. 1903; Hepp A Hart- 
mann; blue anthraquinone dyes and making 
same. 

1; 754,768: March 15. 1904; Hepp ft Wolpert; 
making anthraquinone dyes. 

1; 757.109; April 12. 1904; Gullbransson; blue 
red lakes and making same. 

1; 760,110; May 17, 1904; Emmerich; orange 
sulfur dyes. 

1: 763,198; June 2L 1904; Mathe; blue sulfur 
dyes and making same. 

1: 766.540; August 2. 1904; Sohst; orange 
dyes and making same. 

1; 758.455; August 28, 1904; Homolka ft von 
Bolzano; glycollic acid anilid, antho carboxylic 
acid and making Indigo. 

1; 773.846; October 25. 1904; Schmidt ft Rho- 
dius; yellow sulphur dyes and making same. 

1; 778.610; December 27. 1904; Schumacher; 
black dlazo dyes and making same. 

1; 778.713; December 27, 1904; Schmidt; vio- 
let sulphur dyes and making same. 

1; 794.052; July 4. 1905; Sohst; orange red 
Acrid In a dv6S 

1; 795,058; July 18. 1905; Otto; bisulfite com- 
pound. 

5; 796,715; August 8, 1905; Fussganger; dye- 
ing violet to black. 

1; 805,143; November 21, 1905; Konig; cyanin 
dyes and making same. 

1; 807.782; December 19, 1905; Schmidt; bro- 
minating indigo. 

A: 808.443; December 26, 1905; Gallois; proc- 
ess of printing with indigo. 

1; 812.508: February 13, 1906; Schmidt & 
Kronholz: chlorinating indigo. 

5: 816.457; March 27. 1906; Fussganger; blue 
fibrous material and dyeing same. 

1; 818.980; April 24, 1906; Schmidt; sulphur 
dyes and making same. 



1; 818.981; April 24. 1906; Scholl; yeUow dyes 
and making same. 

1; 823,294; June 12. 1906; Schirmacher; vat 
dyes and making same. 

1; 826,279; July 17. 1906; Schirmacher ft 
/ Schmidt; ortho oxyazo dyes. 

1; 826,280; July 17. 1906; Schirmacher & 
Schmidt; ortho oxymonoazo dyes. 

1; 826,281; July 17. 1906; Schirmacher A 
Schmidt; ortho oxymonazo dyes. 

1; 826,282; July 17, 1906; Schirmacher ft 
Schmidt; ortho oxyazo dyes. 

1; 827,468; July 81. 1906; Schirmacher A 
Schmidt; ortho oxymonazo dyes and making 
same. 

1; 829,740; August 28, 1906; Schmidt; Bor- 
deaux red sulphur dyes and making same. 

1; 830.812; September 4, 1906; Ernst; red 
lakes. 

1; 887,128; November 27, 1906; Schirmacher: 
azo dyes and making same. 

1; 889.590; December 25. 1906; Homolka ft 
Elber; comps. of org. colors with fatty acids 
and making same. 

1; 839,605; December 25. 1906; . Kuecheu- 
becker; yellow azo dyes. 

1; 844,304; February 19. 1907; Homolka; blue 
qulnolin dyes and making same. 

1; 844,845; February 19, 1907; Becke; yellow 
and orange pigment colors. 

1; 846.511; March 5, 1907; Schumacher; ortho 
oxy monoazo dyes. 

1; 858,065; June 25. 1907; Ernst ft Gullbraus- 
son, monoazo dyes for lakes and making same. 

1; 867,305; October 1. 1907; Schirmacher A 
DIecke; vat dyestuffs. 

1; 867,679; October 8. 1907; Sohmidt ft Ber- 
tram, red » violet vat dyes and making same. 

1; 868.295: October 15, 1907; Schmidt; vat 
dyes and making same. 

1; 872.085; November 26, 1907; Schmidt; 
brown vat dyes. 

1; 872.086; November 26. 1907; Schmidt: 
green-black vat dyes. 

1; 872.585; December 3. 1907; Schmidt ft Pet- 
.zell; orange vat dyes and making same. 

1: 877.743; January 28. 1908; Schmidt ft Bryk. 
violet dyes and making same. 

1; 807,306; October 7, 1907; Schirmaker & 
Leopold; vat dyestuffs. 

1; 878.964; February 11, 1908; Konlg; red 
color lakes. 

1; 881,157; March 10, 1908; Schirmacher ft 
Leopold; dark-green black dyes. 

1; 881,158; March 10, 1908; Schirmacher ft 
Delcke; dark blue violet dyes. 

1; 881.159; March 10, 1908; Schirmcaher A 
Brunner;. red vat dyes. 

1; 881.624; March 10, 1908; Schmidt ft Bryk; 
making vat dyestuffs. 

1; 888.887* May 26. 1908; Muller ft Otto; red 
azo dyes. 

1; 888,852; May 26, 1908; Schirmacher ft 
Brunner; brown vat dyes. 

1; 888.981; May 26. 1908; Ernst ft Pretzell; 
making red azo dye lakes. 

1; 892,897; July 7. 1908; Schirmacher ft 
Lauder; red vat dyes. 

1; 893.499; July 14, 1908; Homolka ft Welde; 
making sulfur dyes and their leuco bodies. 

1; 894.004; July 21, 1908; making alfllia oxy- 
thlonaphtenes. 

1; 894,005; August 21. 1908; making sulfur- 
lzed dyes. 

1; 894.006; August 21, 1908; sulfurous leuco 
bodies and making same. 

1: 898.738; September 15, 1908; Homolka; 
oxids of thiolndigo dyes. 

1; 901,746; October 20, 1908; Schmidt ft 
Schwab; making concentrated liquid dyestuffs. 

6; 906.307; December 8. 1908; Schmidt; man- 
ufacturing of indigo white preparations suit- 
able for fermentation vates. 

5; 907,937; December 29, 1908; Woscher; dye- 
ing sulfur dyes. 

1; 916,029; March 23. 1909; Schmidt ft Bryk; 
red violet dyes and making same. 

1; 910.080; March 28, 1909; Schmidt ft Bryk; 
vat dyes and making same. 

1; 918,920; April 20. 1909; Schmidt, Rossner 
ft Balborn; highly brominated halogen idigoes 
and making same. 

1; 982.334; August 24. 1909; Schmidt ft Voss; 
brominated betanapnthyllndigo. 

1; 941.088; November 23, 1909; Muller; aso 
dyes and making same. 

1; 943.678; December 21. 1909; Homolka ft 
Welde; leuco bodies containing sulfur and 
making same. 

1; 943.717; December 21. 1909; Uhlenhuth; 
brown anthroqulnone dyes and making same. 

1; 947,080; January 18, 1910; Schmidt A 
Bryk; vat dyes and making same. 

1; 955.699; April 19, 1910; Schmidt ft Treiss; 
thioindigo vat dyes. 

1; 988,774; May 24. 1910; Scholl; blaok mono- 
azo dyes and making same. 

1; 959.617; May 31, 1910; Schmidt ft Bryk; 
vat dyes and making same. 

1; 963,818; July 12, 1910; Schmidt ft Bryk: 
red halogenized dyes and making same. 

1; 968,697; August 80. 1910; Schmidt. Bryk A 
Voss; vat dyes and making same. 

1; 075.863; November 15, 1910; Hepp ft Hart- 
mann; anthraquinone derivations and making 
same. 

1; 978.865; December 20. 1910; Ernst ft Eich- ' 
wede: monoazo dyes and making same. 

1; 983.486; February 7, 1911; Ernst ft Eich* 
wede monoazo dyestuffs and making same. 

16; 983,530; February 7, 1911; Berger app. 
for dyeing loose material. 

2; 983,951; February 14, 1911; Thels; proc- 
esses for bucking or bleaching vegetable fibers 
dyed with vat dyestuffs. 

1; 990,224; April 25. 1011; Brunner; fluores- 
cein dyestuffs and making same. 

1; 999.785; August 8. 1911; Hessenland; vat 
dyestuffs. 



' I 



OIL PAINT ANJ> DRUG REPORTER 



73 



1; 1,001.457; August 22, 1911; Schirmacher & 
Leopold; green to black vat dyestuffs. 

1; 1.001,458; August 22. 1911; Schirmacher A 
Leopold; bluisle red azo dyestuffs. 

5; -1,002,118; August 29, 1911; Beche; produ- 
cing multicolored affects In spun and woven 
goods. 

1; 1,002.270; September 5, 1911; Hessenland; 
vat dyeatuffs of the anthraquinone series and 
making same. ' 

6; 1.005,481; October 10, 1911; Schmidt; prep- 
arations suitable for the Indigo vat. 

1; 1.006,788; October 24, 1911; Emmerich; 
red acid dyeatuffs of the triphenylanthane 
series and making same. 

1; 1.007.104; October 81, 1911; Hessenland: 
vat dyeatuffs of the anthraquinone series and 
making same. 

5; 1.012.619; December 26, 1911; Ernst & 
Elchnede; producing dlschargable dyeings on 
cotton. 

1; 1,015,829; January 28, 1912; Maag; vat 
dyeatuffs and process. 

1; 1.018,488; February 27, 1912; Maag; brown 
vat dyeatuffs and process. 

1; 1,028.84,7; April 28, 1912; Hessenland; ali- 
zarin red vat dyestuffs and process. 

5; 1.024.668; April 80. 1912; Becke: producing 
peculiar color effects on textile fabries. 

1; 1.025.188; May 7. 1912; Hoffa; violet blue 
vat dyeatuffs. 

1; 1.025,147; May 7. 1912; Maag; vat dye- 
stuffs and process. 

1; 1,025,174; May 7, 1912; Welde A Homolka; 
blue vat dyestuffs and process. 

1; 1.035.854; January 23, 1912; Sohst; tri sul- 
fonic acid of safranln series and process. 

1; 1.025.1&5; May 7. 1912; Kranzlein; salmon- 
colored vat dyestuffs and process. 

6; 1,027,441; May 28, 1912; Schmidt; Isolated 
alkali salts of Indoxyl and process. 

1; 1*028.189; June 4. 1912; Schmidt A Kranz- 
lein; manufacturing azo dyestuffs of anthra- 
quinone. -series and process.. 

1; 1.028,140; June 4, 1912; Scholl; black dls- 
azo dyestuffs and process. 

1; 1.028,911; June 11, 1912; Schmidt A Thless; 
reddish blue vat dyestuffs and process. 

1; 1.029.639; June 18. 1912; Scholl; black dis- 
azo dyestuffs and process. 

1; 1,031,832; July 9. 1912; Stachlin A Zech- 
entmayer: color lakes and process. 

1; 1,082,488; July 16. 1912; Scholl; black 
monoaso dyestuffs and process. 

1; 1.041,146; October 15, 1912; Muller A 
Luther, dyestuffs. 

1; 1,041,919; October 22. 1912; Wagner A Er- 
ber; dyestuffs and making same. 

1; 1.042.498; October 29, 1912; Stock & Helm; 
dyestuffs of triphenylmethane series and mak- 
ing same. 

1; 1,043,271; November 5, 1912; Stock; yel- 
lowish green pigment dyes and making same. 

1; 1,043,468; November 5, 1912; Schmidt, 
Rossner & Balhorn; mfg. of brominated blue 
indigo dyestuffs. 

1; 1,043.873; November 12, 1912; Scholl A 
Tropp; brown azo dyestuffs and making same. 

1; 1,045,196; November 26, 1912; Schlrmer; 
azo dyestuffs. 

1; 1,046,498; December 10, 1912; Schmidt A 
Kranzlein; halogenized condensation prod- 
ucts of anthracene series and making same. 

1; 1,047.940; December 24, 1912; Hessenland; 
vat dyestuffs of the anthracene series and mak- 
ing same. 

1; 1,060,179; January 14, 1913; Stock; violet 
tetrachtorlndlgo and making same. 

I; 1,052,480; February 11. 1918; Hepp & Uh- 
lenhuth A Rolmer; dyestuffs of anthraquinone 
series and making same. 

1; 1,052.520; February 11, 1913; Schmidt A 
Kranzlein; condensation products of anthracene 
series and making same. 

6; 1,054,039; February 25, 1913;' Schmidt A 
Stelndorff; stable Indigo white preparations 
and making same. 

5; 1,056,080; March 18, 1918; Wuck; produc- 
ing dyeing on cotton. 

1; 1.057.886; April 1. 1913; Scbmidt A Steln- 
dorff; mfg. a new form of synthetic indigo. 

1; 1,057.887; April 1. 1913; Schmidt A Steln- 
dorff; mfg. finely divided colloid like Indigo. 

1; 1.058,019; April 1, 1913; Schmidt; synthetic 
indigo in new form and making same. 

1; 1,058,020; April 1, 1913< Schmidt; synthetic 
indigo in new form and making same. 

6; 1.058,021; April 1, 1913; Schmidt; dry col- 
loid like indigo and making same. 

1; 1.059.571; April 22, 1913; Schmidlin; yel- 
low to brown wool dyestuffs and making 
same. 

1; 1,061,781; May 13,% 1913; Schmidt A Thelss; 
greenish blue hexabromlndigo. 

1; 1.070,541; August 19, 1918; Schmidt A 
Thelss; pentabromindigo. 

1; 1,065,405; June 24, 1913; Stock A Helm; 
dyestuffs of triphenylmethane series and mak- 
ing same. 

1; 1,065.068; June 17. 1918; Maag A Jorg: 
benzoqulnone derivatives and making same. 

1; 1.065,950; July 1, 1913; Luther & Muller; 
red azo dyestuffs and making same. 

16; 1,071,022; August 26, 1913; Berger; app. 
for dyeing loose textile goods. 

1: 1.071,832; September 2, 1913; Wagner A 
Kohlhaas; color lakes. 

1; 1.071,888; September 2, 1913; Wagner A 
Kohlhaas; red wool dyestuffs and making same. 

1; 1,076,821; October 14, 1913; Schirmacher 
St Elvert: brown azo dyestuffs. 

1; 1.077,492; November 4, 1918; Schirmacher 
St Elvert; brown azo dyestuffs. 

1; 1,082.719; December 30. 1913; Wagner; 
xnonoazo dyestuffs and making same. 

1; 1,088,489; January 6, 1914; Hahenkamm; 
sulfur dyestuffs and making same. 

1; 1,085,178; January 27. 1914; Strupker; 
color lakes and making same. 

1; 1,085,861; January 27, 1914; Schmidt & 



Stelndorff; mode of preparing finely divided or 
colored Indigo dyes. 

1; 1.094.688; April 28, 1914; Schmide A Steln- 
dorff; preparing finely divided colloid indigo 
dyestuffs. 

0; 1.090.287; May 0, 1914; Schmidt A Steln- 
dorff; ieuco alkali preparations of sulphur dye- 
stuffs. 

6; 1,096,060; May 12, 1914; Schmidt A Steln- 
dorff; preparations suitable for the indigo vat. 

5; 1,128,268; January 5, 1015; Elchwede; pro- 
ducing dyeings on cotton. 

1; 1,128.890; January 5, 1916; Schirmacher & 
Voss; vat dyestuffs and process of making 
same. 

1; 1,123,480; Januavy 5, 1915; Tropp; red wool 
dyestuffs. \ 

1; 1.128.868; February 16, 1916; Schmidt, 
Thless & Bryk; vat dyestuffs and making 
same. 

1; 1.128.871; February 16. 1915; Schmidt A 
Kronolln; sulphur dyestuffs an* making same. 

1; 1,188.670; May 11, 1915; Kranzlein, Hagen- 
bach A Oilroy; arylamino anthraquinone dye- 
stuffs and making same. 

1; 1,139,540; May 18. 1915; Kranzlein; aryl- 
amino antbraquinone dyestuffs. 

6; 1.141,148; May 1, 1915; Schmidt A Steln- 
dorff; Ieuco comps. and making same. 

1; 1,145.984; July 18, 1915; Stelndorff A 
Welde; finely div. vat dyestuffs and making 
.same. 

1; 1.149,281; August 10. 1915; Wagner, Erber 
A Hoffa; yellow chrome mordant dyestuffs 
and making same. 

1; 1,151.628; August 31, 1915; Thelss; vat 
dyestuffs and making same. 

1; 1.154,826; September 28. 1915; Wulff; red 
wool dyestuffs and making same. 

1; 1.155.765; October 5, 1915; Stachlin; mor- 
dant azo dyestuffs. 

1; 1,160.471; November 16, 1915; Wagner A 
Erber; yellow dyestuffs and making same. 

1; 1,162.109: November 30, 1915; Schmidlin; 
brownish yellow wool dyestuffs and making 
same. , 

6; 1.176,997; March 21, 1916; Schmidt; prep- 
arations from quinone vat dyestuffs. 

1; 1,188,421; June 27. 1916; Elchwede; blue 
monoazo dyes and making same. 

1; 1.196.422; August 29, 1916; Becke A Swlda; 
brown dyestuffs for dyeing wool. 

1; 1,197.682; September 5, 1916; Hoffa; qul- 
noph thai one sulfonic acid containing halogen 
and making same. 

1; 1,197,638; September 5. 1916; Hoffa; procs. 
prod. Vellow insoluble azo' dyes on fiber. 

1; 1.217,238; February 27. 1917; Stock A Nico- 
demus; dyes of the triphenylmethane series and 
process of making same. 

1-1.239,526; September ' 11. 1917; Schmidt; 
stable concentrated preparations for the In- 
digo fermentation vats. 

1; 995,481; June 20, 1911; Beckel A Bell; 
processes of dyeing half-woolen goods. 

1; 905,494; June 20. 1911; Stock A Helm; 
blue trlphenylonethane dyestuffs. 

1; 998.772; July 25, 1911; Hessenland; blue 
dyestuffs and processes of making same. 



Badische Anilin & Soda Fabrik, 

Assignee. 

The following patents were Issued to Bad- 
ische Anilin A Soda Fabrik, as assignee:— 
1; 692,174; January 28. 1902; Abel A Kalkou; 

^^"HS?* l yee and making same. 

6; 692.720; February 4. 1902; 8eidel; Indigo 
paste. 

xrli S 92 ^ 7 " 5 February 4. 1902; Julius A 
Kats 2& Ji 1 ** dyea and making same. 

1; 692.676; February 4. 1902; Julius A Oun- 
ther; disazo wool dyea and making same. 

1: 692.762: February 4, 1802; Bahn; blue 
sulfonated dyes. ^ 

1; 695 811: March 18, 1902; Julius A Oun- 
ther; red azo dyes. 

1; 695.812; March 18, 1902; Julius A Morltz; 
chloranisldin. 

1: 695.835; March 18, 1902; Reubold; black 
sulfur dyes and making same. 

1; 698,328; April 22, 1902; Seidel; making 
indigo from indol. 

5: 699.033: April 9. 1902; Stiegelmann; mak- 
ing resist white under Indigo. 

1; 700,565: May 20. 1902; Schraube A Buch- 
erer; azo dyes and making same. 

1; 707.373; August 19. 1902; Bally; anthra- 
cene dyes and making same. 

1: 707.874; August 19, 1902; Bally; anthra- 
cene dyes and making same. 

1: 710.059: September 80, 1902; Julius; brown 
violet azo dyes. 

A: J! 8 ' 48 I : November 11. 1902; Holt; sub- 
stituted indoxyl and making same. 

1; 713.447; November 11, 1902; Julius A Oun- 
ther; compounds suitable for producing color- 
ing matter. 

1; 718.507: November 11, 1912; Schraube A 
L 2 tzl L e . , L : J®* d| **zo dyea and making same. 

1; 715.074: December 2, 1902; Holt; Indigo 
colors and making same. 

1; 715,662: December 9, 1902; Isler; anthra- 
clne dyes and making same. 

1; 716.242; December 16, 1902; Julius; disazo 
dyes and makinsr. 

1: 716,264; December 16, 1902; Muller A 
Schmld: acrldin dyes. 

1: 716.289; December 16, 1902; Schraube, 
Schleicher A Bacherer; azodves. 

1: 718.032: January 6. 1808; Votgtlander A 
Fltzner: azo dyes and making same. 

1; 718,028; January 6. 1903; Schraube. Voigt- 
lander A Fltzner; mixed disazo dyes and mak- 
ing same. 

6; 718.342; January 13. 1908: Haas; sulfurlzed 
cotton dyes and making same. 

6; 718,356; January 18, 1903; Julius; red azo 
dyes. t 

1; 718.389; January 13. 1903; Schraube A 
Voigtlander, etc. ; red azo dves. 



18; 719,720; February 8, 1908; Baslen; hydro- 
sulfltes for reducing indigo. 

18: 720.501; February 10, 1908; Stiegelmann; 
increasing the fastness of Indigo dyeings. 

1; 728,125; March 17, 1908; Ballv; green 
anthracene dyes and making same. 

1; 730.148; June 2, 1908; Oberrelt; indigo 
coloring matter containing halogen and proc- 
esses of making same. 

1; 785,775; August 11, 1908; Julius A Ren- 
bold; substantive sulfur dyes. 

1: 787,445; August 25, 1908; Munch; red- 
dish brown azo dyea 

1; 788,614; September 8, 1908; Isler; anthra- 
cene dyes and making same. 
• 1; 789.145; September 15, 1908; Bonn; anthra- 
cene dyes. 

1; 789,579; September 22, 1908; Bonn; blue 
coloring matter. 

5; 744.601; November 17. 1908; Dehoff; dis- 
charging with hydrosulfite paste. 

1; 741.986; October 20, 1908; Schleicher A 
Dorrer; disazo coloring matter. 

6; 744,417; November 17, 1908; Seidel; light 
indigo powder. 

5; 746,784; December 15, 1908; Bonn; dye- 
ing textile fiber blue. 

1; '746.081; December 15, 1908; Muller; 
acrldin dyes and making same. 

1; 749,918; January 19. 1904; Bally; anthra- 
quinone dyes and making same. 

1; 750,118; January 19, 1904; Luttrlnghaus; 
green dyes. 

1; 752,562; February 10. 1904; Julius; red 
azo dyes. 

1; 758,657; March 1, 1904; Bally; anthracene 
dyes and making same. 

1; 758,659; March 1, 1904; Bohn; anthracene 
derivatives and making same. 

1; 754,264; March 6, 1904; Welts: anthracene 
dyes and making same. 

1; 754.815: March 8. 1904; Julius A Fussen- 
egger- azo dyes and process of making same. 

1; 754,856; March 15, 1904; Dorrer; red violet 
azo dyes. 

1; 755,428; March 22, 1904; Abel Luttrlng- 
haus: blue sulphur dyes and making same. 

1; 756,571; April 5, 1904; Bohn; black dyes 
and making same. 

1: 759.716; May 10, 1904; Julius A Haeckel; 
red azo dyes. 

5: 760.817: May 24, 1904: Stiegelmann & 
Relnk; discharging halogen indlgoes. 

1: 761,007; May 24, 1904; Oberrelt; chlorinated 
Indigo and making same. 

1; 768,288; June 21, 1904; Weltz; anthracene 
dyes and making same. 

1; 765.079; July 12, 1904; Winter; red azo 
dyes. 

1; 765.080; July 12. 1904; Julius A Osthelder; 
yellow red azo dyes. 

1; 765.581; July 19. 1904; Julius A Haschel; 
azo dyes and process of making same. 

1; 765,590; July 19, 1904; Oberrelt; purifying 
Indigo. • 

1; 767,259; August 9, 1904; Bohn; anthra- 
thene dyes. 

1; 770,177; September 13. 1904; Julius, Reln- 
deke A Ounthe; azo dyes and process of mak- 
ing same. 

5; 772,287; October 11, 1904; Jenmaire A 
Bohn: printing with indanthrene. 

1; 777,828: December 18, 1904; Abel A Lut- 
trlnghaus; blue dyes and making same. 

1; 778,175; December 20, 1004; Dehoff A 
Wessbecker; compound dyes. 

1; 778,725; December 27, 1904; Voilander & 
Siedel; acylated indoxyl and making same. 

1; 778,752; December 27, 1904; Kniteseh, 
Siedel A Graul; making indigo. 

1; 779,825: January 10, 1905; Weltz; anthra- 
quinone dyes and making same. 

1; 779,860; January 10. 1905; Luttrlnghaus; 
violet sulphur dyes and making same. 

6; 780,886; January 24, 1905; Hutsler; puri- 
fying Indigo. 

1; 786, 0R5; March 28, 1905; Bally; violet 
anthracene dyes and making same. 

1; 780.767; April 4. 1906; Julius A Eussen- 
egger; blue red azo dyes. 

1; 787,767; April 18, 1905; Julius A Eussen- 
egger; orange red azo dyes. 

1; 787,768; April 18, 1905; Julius A Eussen- 
egger; blue red azo dyes. 

1; 787.824; April -18, 1905; Bohn; making 
blAck dves. 

1; 787,850- April 18, 1905; Scholl A Bally; 
anthracene compound and making same. 

1; 789,006: May 2. 1905; Julius A Fussen- 
e«*eer; azo dyes. ^ „ 

1; 790.167; May 16, 1005; Abel A Luttrlng- 
haus; blue sulphur dyes and making same. 

1; 791.869; June 6, 1905; Bohn; brown 
anthracene dyes. 

1; 792,421; June 13, 1905; Julius A Fusse- 
negger; azo dyes adapted to form lakes. 

1; 793.658; June 27, 1905; Bally & Wolff; 
anthracene dyes and making same. 

13; 793,559; June 27, 1905; Balzen A Wohl- 
fahlt; formaldehyde sulfoxylate and making 
same. 

13; 793,610; June 27. 1905: Reinking. Dehnel 
A Labhardt; discharging compounds. 

1; 794,040; July 4, 1905; Seidel A Wirnmer; 
making indigo white. 

5; 794.050; July 4. 1905; Sellet; hydrosulfite 
indigo vats. 

1; 796.393; August 1, 1905; Bally; anthracene 
color matters and processes for producing 
same 

1; 798,098: August 29, 1905; Ounther; yellow- 
ish azo dyes. 

1; 798.077; August 29, 1905; Seidel; making 
lndol ic bodies. 

1; 799.058; September 5, 1905; Immerheiser; 
azo dyes, lakes, and making same. 

1; 806,053; November 28, 1905; Bohn; naph- 
thalene dyes and mak'ng same. 

1; 800,077; November 28, 1905; Fussenger; 
azo coloring matters. 

1: 800.802: January 0. 1906; Bally A Isler; 
violet dves and making same. 



74 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



\ 



1; 809,898; Jandary 9, 1906; Bally ft Wolf; 
anthracene compi. and making same. 

1; 809.894; January 9, 1908; Bally * Wolff; 
anthracene oompa. and making same. 

1; 811,471; January 80, 1906; Bally ft Wolff; 
anthracene dyes and making same. 

1; 818,886; April 17, 1906; Bally ft Wolff; 
anthracene dyes and making: same. 

1; 818.992; April 24, 1906; Bally * Isler; 
anthracene dyes and making same. 

1; 820,879; May 8. 1906; Bally ft Isler; 
anthracene dyes and making; same. 

1; 820,601; May 16, 1906; Julius ft Munoh; 
green blue sulphur dyes and making same. 

1; 820,868; May 15, 1906; Holt; indigo color- 
ins; matter. 

18; 820,889; May 16, 1906; Re inking; dis- . 
charge pastes and making same. 

6; 820,900; May IS, 1906; Wimmer; produc- 
ing indigo coloring matters. 

1; 821,462; May 22, 1906; Bernthsen; rhad- 
amin dyes and making same. 

5; 826.428; July if. 1906: Stalay, Holt * 
Relnking; printing indigo coloring matter. 

1; 838,602: October 16, 1908; Immerheiser; 
coloring matter lakes. 

1; 888,605; October 16, 1906; Julius; blue red 
azo dyes. 

1; 888,664; October 16, 1906; Wimmer; alkali 
salts of indigo white and making same. 

1; 885,462; November 6, 1906; Oberrelt; mak- 
ing halogenated indigo white. 

2: 837,780; December 4, 1906; Relnking, 
Dennet & Labhardt: bleaching. 

1; 887,840; December 4, 1906; Isler; anthra- 
cene dyes and making same. 

5: 840,419; January 1, 1907; Bally; dyeing 
textile fiber violet blue. 

1; 848,666; February 5, 1907; Wimmer; re- 
ducing Indigo coloring matters. 

1; 844,914; February 19, 1907; Bonn; mak- 
ing an anthracene dye. 

1; 855,248; May 28, 1907; Isler; anthracene 
dye. 

1; 866,811; June 11. 1907; Scholl; dyes for 
anthraquinone series and making same. 

1; 860,480; July 16, 1907; Isler; anthracene 
dyes and making same. 

1; 860,575; July 16, 1907; Schraube ft 
Schleicher: azo dyes. 

1; 868,896; August 18, 1907; Immerheiser; 
coloring matter lakes. 

1; 863.897; August 18, .1917; Isler ft 
Kacer; anthraquinone compounds and process 
of producing same. 

1; 863.401; August 18, 1907; Kacer; anthra- 
cene dyes and making same. 

3; 863,761; August 20, 1907; Schmid; pro- 
ducing of brown shades on fiber. 

1; 868,899; October 15, 1907; Bonn; anthra- 
cene dyes and making same, 
making red lakes. 

13; 871,620; November 19, 1907; Relnking; 
discharging pastes. 

1; 872,181; November 26, 1907; Immerheiser; 
making red lakes. _ __ .. ^ m 

1; 837,775; December 4, 1906; Bally; halo- 
genated dyes and making same. 

1; 876,190; January 7, 1908; Isler; anthracene 
dyes and making same. 

7; 876,679: January 21, 1908; Bally ft Wolff; 
nltrogensanthrone compounds and making 
same. 

1; 876,810; January 21, 1908; Kunz; anthra- 
cene dyes and making same. 

1; 876,889 January 21, 1908; Pummerer; red 
dyes and making same. 

1; 879.058: February 11, 1908; P. Julius ft 
E. Fussenegger; azo dyes and making same. 

1; 885,577; April 21, 1908; Boner; making 
alizarin. 

3: 886,816; May 5, 1908; Julius; green dyes 
and making same. 

5; 898,384; July 14, 1908: Schlegel; dyeing. 

1; 893.412; July 14, 1908; Wolff; anthracene 
dyes and making same. 

1; 893,508; July 14, 1908; Isler; anthracene 
dyes and making same. 

1; 909,800; January 12, 1909; Isler; anthra- 
cene dyes and making same. 

1; 910,839; January 26, 1909; Munch; mak- 
ing thioindigo leuco compounds. 

1; 913,633; February 23, 1909; Fourneaux; 
obtaining paranitranilln red, etc. 

1; 913,634; February 23, 1909; Fourneaux; 
obtaining paranitranilln red, etc. 

1; 914.144; March 2, 1909; Immerheiser; azo 
dyes and making same. 

1; 914,146; March 2, 1909; Julius ft Fussen- 
egger; azo dyes and making same. 

1; 921.546; MAP 11. 1909; Paul ft Ernst Fus- 
senegger; azo dyes and making same. 

1; 922,282; May 18, 1909; anthracene dyes and 
making same. 

1; 925,917; June 22, 1909; Kacer; compounds 
of the anthracene series and making same. 

1; 922,282; May 18. 1909; Isler; anthracene 
dyes and making same. 

1; 929.442; July 27, 1909; Isler; anthracene 
dyes and making same. m 

1; 929.448; July 27, 1909; Isler, Wolff ft 
Kacer; anthracene dyes and making same. 

1; 906,867; December 8, 1908; Bally ft Wolff; 
anthracene dyes and making same. 

1; 935,870; September 28, 1909; P. & B. Fus- 
senegger; pyrazolom dyes and making same. 

1; 931.598; August 17, 1909; Haas; sulfur 
dyes and making same. 

1; 931,618; August 17, 1909; Kacer; anthra- 
cene dyes and making same. 

1; 932,266; August 24, 1909; Fussenegger; 
yellow dyes and making same. 

1; 932,289; August 24, 1909; Julius ft Blan- 
gey; azo dyes and making same. 

1; 932,290; August 24, 1909; Kacer; ' 
pounds of the anthracene series and m**..,.* 
same. 

1; 985,371; September 28, 1909; Fussenegger 
ft Fussenegger; azo dyes. 

1; 986,951; October 12, 1909; Schmidt; azo 
dyes. 

1; 941,820; November 28, 1909; Isler, Lutt- 



ringhaus ft von Diesbach; halogenated nap- 
thanthraquinon and process of making same. 

1: 948.560; December 14, 1909; Munch; thio- 
salicyllc compounds and making same. 

1; 948.561; December 14, 1909; Munch; thlo- 
salicyllc compounds and making same. 

1; 948,204; February 1, 1910; Bonn; indaa- 
threne monosulfonlc add and making same. 

1; 948,241; February 1. 1910; Oberrelt, Vllll- 
ger ft Naurasky; halogenated indigo and mak- 
ing same. 

1; 949,592; February 15, 1910; Munch; mak- 
ing thioindigo dye. 

1; 955.080; April 12, 1910; Julius ft Fusseneg- 
ger; yellow dyes and making same. 

1; 955,105; April 12, 1910; Gratz ft Mannheim; 
anthracene dyes and process of making same. 

1; 955,410; April 19, 1910; Julius, Vllliger ft 
Naurasky; atrachlor, Indigo and process of 
making same. 

1; 9577,688; May 10, 1910; Julius, Vllliger ft 
Naurasky; dichlor-dlbrom-indlgo and making 
same. s 

1; 961.612; June 14, 1910; Isler ft Wolff; 
anthracene compounds and making them. 

1; 963,656; July 5, 1910; Schmid; producing 
brown, olivd and green shades on fiber. 

1; 968.376; August 23, 1910; Luttrlnghaus; 
pigments. 

1; 970,340; September 13, 1910; Kacer; anth- 
racene compounds and making same. 

1; 970,878; September 20, 1910; Bohn; vat 
dyes and making same. 

2; 984,312, February 14, 1910; Stiegelmann ft 
Dehnel; bleaching compositions. 

1; ,990,173; April 18, 1911; Vllliger ft Fus- 
senegger; yellow azo dyes. 

1; 992.567; May 16, 1911; Kunz. anthracene 
dyes. 

1; 995,936; June 20, 1911; Wolff; green anth- 
racene dyes and process of making same. 

1; 999,055; July 25, 1911; Oberrelt; reducing 
indigo coloring matters. 

1; 1.001.408; August 22, 1911; Isler; anthra- 
ceno compounds and making same. 

1; 1,002,066; August 29, 1911; Luttrlnghaus; 
vat dyes. 

1: 1,010,919; December 5, 1911; Fussenegger 
ft Fussenegger; pyrazolone dyes and making 
same. 

1; 1,010,930; December 5, 1911; Luttrlnghaus; 
vat dye. 

1: 1,011,068; December 5, 1911; Luttrlnghaus; 
vat dye. 

5; 1,011,084; December 6, 1911; Schmid; pro- 
ductions of brown to violet to black shades. 

5: 1,011,085; December 5, 1911; Schmid; pro- 
duction of brown shades on fiber. 

1; 1,012.368; December 19, 1911; Kalb; indi- 
go coloring matters and derivations thereof and 
making them. 

1; 1.104,483; September 26, 1911; Isler; dl- 
anthraqulnonyl-dlaldehydes and making them. 

1; 1,016.604: February 6, 1912; Bally; anthra- 
cene dyes and process. 

1; 1,018.836; February 27, 1912; Luttrlnghaus 
ft Diesbach: orange red vat dye. 

1; 1,018,837; February 27, 1912; Luttrlnghaus 
ft Diesbach; yellow vat dye. 

1; L 026, 557; May 14, 1912; Boner ft Bally; 
anthracene comp. and process. 

1; 1,026,588; May 14. 1012; Isler; anthracene 
dyes and process. 

1; 1.026,621; May 14, 1912; Bally; halogenated 
vat dyes and process. 

1; 1,027,836; May 28. 1912; Gaus; reducing 
indigo coloring matters. 

2; 1.027,958; May 28, 1912; Wlckham; bleach- 
ing straw. 

1; 1.028,045; May 28, 1912; Mansfeld; gallo- 
cyanln comp. and process. 

1; 1,032,215; July 9. 1912; Isler; anthraqui- 
none vat dyes and process. 

1; 1,032,216; July 9. 1912; Isler; anthraqui- 
none vat dyes and process. 

1; 1.034,898; August 6, 1912- Fussenegger; 
azo dyes and making same. 

1; 1,035.023; August 6, 1912; Luttrlnghaus ft 
Baaren; vet dyes and making same. 

1; 1.037.410; September 8, 1912; Bally; anth- 
racene dyes and making same. 

1; 1.042.679; October 29, 1912; Holt; halo- 
genlzed Indigo compounds and making such 
bodies: 

1; 1,044,678; November 19, 1912: Luttrlng- 
haus & von Diesbach; orange-yellow vat dyes. 

1; 1,044.674; November 19, 1912; Luttrlng- 
haus & Schwarz; yellow vat dyes. 

1; 1.044,675; November 19, 1912; Luttrlng- 
haus & Schwarz; yellow vat dyes. 

1; 1,047,813; December 17, 1912; Isler; 1.1' 
dlanthro quinony 1—2.2' dialhyde bodies and 
process of making such compounds. 

1; 1.052,507; February 11, 1913; Hereshelmer; 
vat dyes of the antraquinone series. 

1; 1.054,888; March 4, 1913; Wolff; blue-green 
vat coloring matter. 

1; 1,055,701; March 11, 1918; Bohn; pig- 
ments and making same. 

1; 1,057,243; March 25, 1913; Isler ft Nawla- 
sky; anthracene coloring matter and making 
samo. 

1; 1,058,604; April 18, 1918; Kunz; anthracene 
compounds and making same. 

1; 1,061,714; May 13, 1913; Wolff; dyes con- 
taining sulfur, making them. 

1; 1,062.975; May 27, 1918; Isler; coloring 
matters of anthraquinone series. 

1; 1,062,990; May 27. 1913; Nawiasky; anth- 
raquinone dyes and making them. 

1; 1.062,988; May 27, 1913; Muller ft Isler; 
anthraquinone dyes. 

1; 1,063,000: May 27, 1918; Wolff; anthra- 
cene dyes and making same. 

1; 1.065.102; June 17, 1918; Bally; anthra- 
cene compounds and coloring matter and proc- 
ess of making same. 

5; 1,066.987; July 8. 1918; Bohn ft Nawiasky:* 
gray to black shades on vegetable fiber and 
process of producing them. 

1; 1,067,046; July 8, 1913; Luttrlnghaus ft 
Braren; anthraquinone acrldones. 



5; 1,071.874; August 26, 1^13; Stiegler; pro- 
ducing brown shades on fiber. 

1; 1,078,905; September 28, 1918; Julius ft 
Immerheiser; azo dyes. 

1; 1,078.902; September 23, 1918; Julius ft 
Immerheiser; azo dyes. 

1; 1,078,908; September 23, 1918; Julius ft 
Immerheiser; aso dyea. 

1; 1,078,904; September 28, 1918; Julius ft 
Immerheiser; azo dyes. 

1; 1,078,951; September 28, 1913; Blancey ft 
Immerheiser, azo dyes. 

1; 1,075,305; October 7, 1918; Schmidt; aso 
dyes and making same. 

1; 1,076,756; October 28, 1918; Fussenegger; 
azo dyes. 

1; 1,077,115; October 28, 1918; Bally; green 
anthraquinone dyes and making same. 

1; 1,088,110: December 80, 1913; Luttrlng- 
haus, Diesbach ft Schwarz; blue coloring mat- 
ters containing sulfur. 

1, 1,086.123; February 8, 1914; Bally; anthra- 
cene dyes and making same. 

1; 1,090,128; March 10, 1914; Born ft Immer- 
heiser; chromium compounds of oxyanthra- 
quinone sulfonic acids and process of making. 
1; 1,090,686; March 17, 1914; Luttrlnghaus, 
Lohse & Sapper; brown vat dyes. 

5; 1,092,542; April 7, 1914; Schmid; producing 
brown shades on fiber. 

1; 1,093,427; April 14, 1914; Isler ft Bally; 
anthraqulmne dyes and making same. 

1; 1.095,731; May 5, 1914; Facer; producing 
anthraquinone- thia soli s. 

1; 1,095,780; May 5, 1914; Bally ft Wolff; 
reddish brown vat dyes. 

20; 1,095,793; May 5, 1914; Bohn; composi- 
tions of matter suitable for bucking. 

1; 1.106,970; August 11, 1914; Relnking ft 
Stleglemann; compound of leuco vat dyes with 
aralkyl compounds and making same. 
'1; 1,089,221; March 8, 1914; Isler; anthraqui- 
none coloring matters and making same. 

1; 1,122.790; December 29, 1914; Munch vat 
coloring matters and producing same. « 

1; 1,126,475; January 26, 1915; Isler; yellow 
to brown vat dyes. , 

1; 1,126,656; January 26, 1915; Reindel; aso 
dyes. 

1; 1,128,836; February 16, 1915; Oscar Bally; 
vat dyes. 

1; 1,183,081; March 28, 1915; Hutsler; treat- 
ing insoluble indlgold dyes. 

1; 1.138,081; March 23, 1915; H. Wolff; pro- 
ducing coloring matters of anthraquinone se- 
ries. 

1; 1.160,863; August 24. 1915; Just ft Bok- 
hara ; pigments and making same. ' 

20; 1,150.048; October 12, 1915; Bohn; buck- 
ing vegetabe material. 

1; 1,165,581; December 28, 1915; Muller ft 
Stober; brown sulfur dyes. 

1; 1,166,808; January 4, 1916; Blangey; pig- 
ments. 

1; 1,169,404; January 25, 1916^ Isler; blue- 
gray to green-gray vat dyes. 

5; 1,176,363; March 21, 1916; Gunther; pro- 
ducing colorations on fiber. 

5; 1,185,948; June ,6, 1916; Schlegel; proc e ss e s 
for dyeing yarn. 

1; 1.188,543; June 27, 1916; Hutsler; treating 
insoluble indlgold dyes. 

1; 1,188,545; June 27, 1916; Julius, Fusseneg- 
ger ft Blangey; azo dyes. 

I; 1,196,127; August 29, 1916; Luttrlnghaus; 
vat dyes and process. 

1; 1,200,848; October 10, 1916; Kardos ft 
Nawiasky; vat dyes and process. 

1; 1,201,968; October 17, 1916; Isler; rat 
coloring matters and making them. 

1; 1,202,260; October 24, 1916; Bally; rat 
dyes and process of making them. 

1; 1,204,689; November 14, 1916; Melsger; 
producing vat dyes. 

1; 1,207,981; December 12, 1916; Hereshelmer; 
antraquinone dyes and process of making. 

1; 1.207,982; December 12, 1916; Hereshelmer; 
antroquinone dyes and process of making. 

1; 1,216,184; February 18, 1917; Kardos; 
green vat dyes and making them. 

1; 1,216.921; February 20. 1917; Bally ft 
Wolff; yellowish-brown vat dyes. 

1; 1,232,552; July 10, 1917; Immerheiser ft 
Beyer; color lakes and producing same. 

1; 1,232,651; July 10, 1917; Immerheiser; 
coloring matter lakes and producing same. 

1; 1,238,982; September 4, 1917; Nawiasky; 
anthraquinone compounds. 

1; 1.047.812; December 17, 1912; Isler; an- 
thracene dyes and making same. 

1; 1,258,252; January 15, 1918; Kardos; mak- 
ing bluish-green vat dyes. 

1; 1,264,604; April 30, 1918; Bohn ft Nawia- 
sky; chronium compounds and azo dyes. 

1; 1,280,648; October 8, 1918; Bohn; new 
anthracene dyes and malflng same. 

Chemisette Fabrik Ctiesheim-Elektron, 

Assignee. 

The following patents were Issued to Chem- 
lsche Fabrik Grlesheim-Elektron, as as- 
sisrnee "~— 

1; 882,393; October 2, 1906; Laska; black 
polyazo dyes and making same. 

1; 839,489; December 25, 1906; Laska; black 
mordant dyes and making same. 

1; 841,877; January 15, 1907; Laska ft List; 
blue sulfur dyes and making same. # 

1; 848.166; February 5, 1907; Laska; green 
sulfur dyes. 

1; 849,789; April 9, 1907; Laska; yellow 
monoaso dyes. 

,1; 860,220; July 16, 1907; Laska; blue cotton 
dyes and making same. 

1; 860,221; July 16, 1907; Laska; blue disaso 
dyes and making same. 

1; 887,848; May 12, 1908; Schnltsspahn ; mor- 
dant aso dyes and making same. 



/• 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



75 



1; 889,936; June 2, 1908; List; brown sulfur 
dyes and m*.iring game. 

1; 969.078; Kay 24. 1910; Sohnltsspahn; or- 
ange aso dyes. 

1; 960.662; June 7, 1910; List; brown sulfur 
dyes and making same. 

1; 964.918; July 19, 1910; Laska; bluish-red 
dlsaso ayes. » 

1; 964,919; July 19, 1910; Laska; brown mor- 
dant aso dyes. 

1; 964,920; July 19, 1910; Laska; dlsaso 

1; '971,761;' October 4, 1910* Laska; yellow 
dlsaso dyestuffs for wool. 

1; 971,762; October 4. 1910; Laska; yellow 
aso dyestuffs for wool. 

1; 976,401; November 22, 1910; Schnttspahn; 
monoaso dye for lakes. 

1; 982,609; January 24, 1911; Laska; dlsaso 
dyestuffs. 

1; 988.000; March 28. 1911; Laska; substan- 
tive dlsaso dyestuffs. 

1: 087.999; March 28, 1911; Laska; making 
ortho-oxymonoaso dye. 

1; 996,160; June 18, 1911; Laska; orange cot- 
ton dyes. 

1; 999.046; July 26, 1911; Laska; manufac- 
ture of brown sulfurtsed vat dyestuffs. 

1; 999,680; August 1, 1911; Singer; vat dye- 
stuffs of the anthracene series. 

1; 1,001.286; August 22. 1911; Laska; dlsaso 
dyes and making them. 

18; 1.002,026; August 29, 1911; Bortigu; 
treatment of mercerised cotton goods. 

1; 1,084.858; August 6, 1912; Winther, Laska 
A Zitscher; aso dyes for lakes. 

1; 1,042,866; October 22, 1912; Laska, Zit- 
scher A Kunert; dlsazo dyes and making them. 

1; 1,042.031; October 20. 1912; Laska; Zit- 
scher A Path; vat dyestuffs of anthracite se- 
ries and process of making same. ' 

1; 1.044,988; November 19, 1912; Singer; 
making vat dyes of the anthracene series. 

1; 1.049.109; December 31, 1912; Laska; 
violet cotton dyes. 

1; 1.070,196; August 12, 1913; Singer; vat 
dyes and making same. 

1; 1.079.668; November 26, 1913; Laska A 
Rath; vat dyestuffs. 

1; 1.C91.148; March 24, 1914; Laska A Zit- 
scher; dlsaso dyestuffs. 

1; 1,094,448; April 2$ 1914; Laska; yellow 
disaso dyes for cotton and process of making 
same. 

6; 1.099,106; June 2, 1914; Winther, Laska. 
. Zitscher, Kunert A Acker; production ioe 
\ colors. 

1; 1,121,026; December 15, 1914; Laska A 
Zitscher; aso dyes from arylanids of 2.3-oou- 
naphthollc acid and process. 

1; 1,122,564: December 29, 1914; Zitscher, 
Kunert A Acker; condensation products from 
arylanids of 2.3-osynaphtbollc acid and for- 
maldehyde and azo -dyestuffs and process. 

6; 1,127,027; February 2, 1915; Kunert A 
Acker; producing dyestuff on fiber by means of 
one bath method. 

1; 1,145.072; July 6, 1915; Laska A Zitscher; 
aso dyestuffs Insoluble in water and process of 
making them. 

1; 1,150,152; August 17, 1915; Singer; making 
alizarin. 

5; 1,189,267; January 25, 1916; Kunert; dye- 
ing artificial silk. 

5; 1,175,539: March 14. 1916; Merkel; dyeing 
pelts, Jiairs, feathers and the like. 

6; 1,198,566; August 18, 1916; Kunert; com- 
pound used in production of dyestuffs. 

1; 1,200,726; October 10, 1916; Hankel; man- 
ufacturing alkali salts of nltrosamlns of pri- 
mary aromatic amlns. 

1, -982,507; January 24, 1917; Laska; dlsaso 
dyestuffs. 

1; 982,508; January 24, 1917; Laska; disaso 
dyestuffs. 

Leopold' Cassella & Co., Assignee. 

The following patents were issued to Leopold 
Cassella A Co., as assignee: — 

1; 698.653; February 18, 1902; Kertess; dye- 
ing sulfur colors. 

1; 693,632; February 18, 1902; Weinberg A 
Herz; blue sulfur dyes and making same. 

1; 693,633; February 18, 1902; Weinberg A 
Hers; making blue sulfur dyes. 

1; 701,435; June 3, 1902: Weinberg; brown 
violet sulphur dyes and making same. 

1; 708.105; June 24. 1902; Weinberg; blue 
wool dyes and making same. 

1: 709.151; September 16, 1902; Nerz; blue 
sulfur dyes and making same. 

1; 709.186; September 16, 1902; Weinberg, 
etc.; blue dyes and making same. 

1; 709,187; September 16. 1902: Weinberg, 
etc.; yellow acridln dyes and making. 

6; 711,953; October 28. 1902; Engan; dyeing 
add colors. 

1; 714 542; November 25, 1902; Weinberg A 
Lange; orange brown dyes and making same. 

1; 718.181; January 13. 1908; Weinberg; blue 
woo) dyes and making same. 

1; 728.154; March 17. 1903; Hers; blue sulfur 
dyos and making same. 

1; 742.189; October 27. 1903; Herz; blue sul- 
fur dyes and making same. 

Kalle & Co. % Assignee. 

The following patents were issue to Kalle A 
Co. as wwirisTiee* 

1; 696.688; March 18. 1902; Bonatl; sulfur 
dyes and making same. 

1; 696.684; March 18, 1902; Bonatl; sulfur 
dyes and making same. 

1; 728,448; March 24. 1908; Ebellng; brown 
sulphur dyes and making same. 

1; 778.478; December 27, 1904; KHbel; blue 
sulphur dyes and making same. 



1; 778.476; December 27, 1904; flllbel; beta 
napthol aso dyes nad making same. 

1; 796,448; August 8. 1906; Muchall; red vio- 
let sulfur dyes and making same. 

1; 897,422; December 12, 1905; Elbel; sine 
aso napthol dyes and making same. 

1; 819.848; May 1. 1906; Friedlander; red 
sulphur dyes and making same. 

1; 850,827; April 16, 1907; Friedlander; thio 
'chrdoxyl derivatives and making same. 

1; 874.649; December 24. 1907; Albrecht; thio 
Indoxyl derivatives and making same. 

1; 958,912; May 24. 1910; Elbel; nitrp-ortho- 
ozy-azo colors and making same. « 

1; 965.170; July 26, 1910; Elbel; condensing 
reduction products of acenaphthene-tuinone, 
etc 

1; 999,489; August 1, 1911; Elbel A Wray; 
vat dyeing coloring matters. 

1; 1.022,010; April 2, 1912; Bucherer; amino 
ozy naphthalene sulfonic acid and process. 

1; 1.024,808; April 23. 1912; Bucherer; manu- 
facturing azo coloring matters containing car- 
basole derivatives. 

1; 1.026,257; May 14, 1912; Elbel; manufac- 
turing new pyrazolone azo dyes. 

1; 1.0241902; May 21, 1912; Bucherer; manu- 
facturing azo coloring matter. 

1; 1.028,006; May 28. 1912; Elbel; manufac- 
turing and production of fast ortho-ozy-azo 
dyestuffs. 

1; 1,108,056; August 18. 1914; Wray; manu- 
facturing vat dyes. 

1; 1.108,057; August 18, 1914; Wray; manu- 
facturing vat dyestuffs. 

1; 1.118.468; October 13, 1914; Muller; manu- 
facturing an azo dyestuff which may be de 
veloped on fiber. 

1; 1,144,577; June 29, 1915; Wray A Hess 
manufacture of vat dyestuffs. 

1; 1.209.212; December 19, 1916; Schmidt 
manufacture of vat dyestuffs or initial prod- 
ucts of same. 

1: 1,261.858; April 9, 1918; Schmidt; manu- 
facture of vat dyestuffs of the carbazol nap- 
thooulnone series. 

Wulfing Dahl & Co., Acitengesell- 
schafi, Assigee. 

The following patents were issued to Wulfing 
Dahl & Co., Actlengesellschaft, as assignee:— 

1; 890,254; June 9, 1908; Ulricas; making 
lakes. 

1; 910.030; January 19. 1909; Ulrichs; azo 
lakes and making same. 

1; 936,260; October 5, 1909; Ulrichs; making 
red aso dves 

1; 911,186; 'February 2. 1909; Ulrichs; red- 
mono-azo dyes. 

1; 937.741; October 19, 1909; Ulrichs; azo 

1; 1,014,589; January 9, 1912; Ulrichs; man- 
ufacture of lakes. 

1; 1.022,612; April 9, 1912; manufacture of 
lakes. 

1; 1.028.239; June 4, 1912; Ulrichs; color 
lakes and manfacture of same, 



Other Assignees. 



(Chemische Fabrik von Heyden, A. O.), As- 
signee. 

1; 714,042; November 18. 1902; Seifert. 
Phllipp A Gmelner; making indigo and Inter- 
mediate products. 

1; 737.836; September 1, 1903; Heutsohel; 
processes of making indoxyl and indigo prepa- 
rations. 

(Chemische Fabrlken vorm. Weiler-ter-Meer.) 

1; 796.514; August 8, 1905; Hoerlin; making 
a yellow sulphur dye. 

1; 895,689; August 11. 1908; Schlenk; making 
lndophenol-llke condensation products. 

(R. Wedeklnd & Co.) 

1; 996,487; June 27. 1911; Iljlnsky; process 
of making acid dyes of the anthracene series. 



Chemicals. 



18; 725.861; April 14. 1902; Polbenlnsa; mak- 
ing nitrogen compounds. 

1; 729.785; June 2. 1908; Clemm A Hasen- 
bach; manufacture sulfuric anhydrld. 

24; 729.876; June 2, 1908; Lesser; making 
substitution products of aromatic acid. 

1; 729.648; June 2. 1908; Uenmann; making 
sulfuric acid. 

18; 783,590; July 14. 1908; Meurer; obtaining' 
metal sulfates from matter. 

24; 786,959; August 25. 1908; Clock; obtaining 
pure pyrollgenous acid. 

24; 741.585; October 18, 1908; Liebrelch; pro- 
ducing glycerin and addylated derivatives of 
aromatic bases and the products thereof. 

24; 741.615; Octboer 20, 1908; Behrens A Beh- 
rens; making aoetie add. 

24; 745.097; November 24, 1908; Eberhard; 
preparing fat-free casein. 

18; 747,271; December 15, 1908; Tcherrlac; 
mfg. hydrocyanic acids and cyanlds. 

24; 748,101; December 29. 1908; Rltsert; 
aromatic esters and making same. 

18; 764.474; March 15, 1904; Mehner; making 
nitrogen compounds from atmospheric nitro- 
gen. 

24; 767.870; April 12, 1904; Velmar; making 
monobensoyl arbutin. 

18; 758.450; April 26, 1904; Joseph; preparing 
highly diluted solutions. 

18; 764.448; July 5, 1904; Fold; making hy- 
drocyanic acid. 

1; 758.774; May 8. 1904; Pauling; mfg. nitric 
dioxide and nitric acid. 

13; 760.819; May 17. 19C4; Drehr; making 
comps. of titanic and lactic ucids. 

24; 761.412; May 81. 1904; Bchrader; org, 
acids from beet root molasses and making 



Sub-class 24; No. 691,182; date, January 14, 
1902; inventor, Oerreshium; invention. *redu-. 
ctng nitro compounds. 

3; 691.249; January 14, 1902; Dieterlch; test- 
ing papers and making same. 

13; 693,878; February 18. 1902; Courant; 
triple salts and making same. 

13; 698,899; April 22. 1902; Fuhrmann; mak- * 
Ing magnesium peroxid comp. 

18; 701.604; June 8. 1902; Ottermann; making 
cyanlds. 

24; 703.104; June 24. 1902; Wedeklnd; chlori- 
nated methyl ethers of menthol. 

18; 704.036; July 8. 1902; Hopfner; separat- 
ing alkali metol sulfates from mixed solutions. 

24; 706.411; August 5. 1902; Helnemann; ex- 
tracting ellagic acid. 

13; 708,333; September 2. 1902; Erlwein A 
Frank; cyanld compounds and process of 
making. 

18; 709.086; September 16, 1902; Elias; mak- 
ing peroxid of magnesium. 

13; 709,570; September 23, 1902; Zuck- 
schwerdt; cyanate of potassium. 

24; 710.648; October 7. 1902; Wohl; making 
acetyl chloride. 

24; 714,847; November 25, 1902; Wiens; mak- 
ing oxalates. 

24; 714,428; November 25, 1902; Wirth; re- 
ducing aromatic nitro comp. 

24; 714.484; November 25. 1902; Hochstetter; 
making acids of the fatty acid series. 

24; 715.748; December 16, 1902; Boessneck; 
making acetic acid. 

1; 716.985; December 30, 1902; Clemm; mak- 
ing sulfuric anhydrld. 

18; 720,402; February 10. 1908; Bueb; produ- 
cing cyanogen compounds. 



18; 764.251; July 5, 1904; Naumann; produ- 
cing nitrate of ammonium. 

18; 767,291; August 9, 1904; Knoevenagel; 
making odoriferous compounds. 

8; 767,835; August 9. 1904; Evsrs; denltrating 
plants. 

24; 768,744; August 80. 1904; Gartner; poly- 
choral and making same. 

24; 778,670; December 27, 1904; IUlnsky; 
ortho dloxyanthraquinone sulfo adds and 
process of making same. 

24; 778,980; January 8, 1906; Liebrelch; pro- 
ducing fatty acids. 

24; 779,187; January 8. 1906; Schmidt; alpha 
beta methylinone and making same. . 

13; 781,472; January SL 1906; Tonernlac; 
making cyanlds. 

13; 785.161; March 21, 1905; making nitrogen 
compounds. 

18; 789,671; May 9, 1905; Reich; making alka- 
line fiusicicate8. 

24; 790.138; May 16, 1905; Koelllker; obtain- 
ing nlcotln. 

1; 791.806; May 18, 1905; Westhausser; mak- 
ing hydohalogenic acids. 

1; 792,889; June 20, 1906; Feld; making hy- 
drocyanic acid from Iron cyanogen comps. 

18; 797.823; August 16. 1905; Romer; making 
chromats. 

21; 797.962; August 22, 190^; Kaiser; making 
ammonia. 

1; 798,205; August 29, 1905; Nledenfuhr; mak- 
ing nitric add. 

18; 798.208; August 29. 1905; Petri; making 
sodium ferrocyanlde. 

24; 799.955; September 19. 1905; Weber; mak- 
ing guanin. 

24; 801.158; September 26, 1905; Relss A 
Schmatolla; making Insoluble allumlnum ace- 
tote. 

24; 806,660; December 5. 1906; Hamel; mak- 
ing concentrated formic adds. 

24; 802.835; October 24. 1906; Voswinkel; 
double salt of ferric chlorid and cotarnin hy- 
drochlorate and making same. 

24; 803,774; November 7. 1905; Mayer; mak- 
ing dialkyl malonyl urea. 

1; 804.515; November 14. 1905; Askenasy A 
Mudgan; making and separating hydrochloric 
and sulfuric acids. 

24; 804.616; November 14. 1905; Mudgan; 
making acetylene tetrachlorld. 

13; 806.467; December 5, 1905; Feld; recover- 
ing ammonia and hydrocyanic add. 

24; 806.932; December 4 12, 1905; Sommer; 
making organic acid anhydride. 

24; 811.829; February 6. 1906; Conrad A 
Beckh; making pyrlmldln derivatives. 

24; 811,826; February 6, 1906; Conrad A 
Beckh; making 4 imino-2-6 dloxypyrimldin. 

24; 811.827; February 6. 1906; Conrad A 
Beckh; making pyrlmldln derivatives. 

24; 811.828; February 6. 1906; Conrad A 
Beckh; making pyrlmldln derivatives. 

24; 811.884; February 6. 1906; Valentine; sal- 
icylic acid methylene acetate and makmg same. 

24; 812.608; February 18. 1906; Stephan; 
making a formic aldehyde comp. 

24; 817.159; April 10. 1906; Conrad; making 
dlalkylbarblturic acids. 

24; 817.188; April 10. 1906; Precht; making 
acetylene chlorid. 

24; 822,165; May 29. 1906; Fraube; making 
dlalkylbarblturic acids. 

13; 822,444; June 5. 1906; Haber, Ordt; mak- 
ing buyl-luim hydroxide. 

10; 825.883; July 10. 1906; Heinricl; stable 
solutions of peroxid of hydrogen. 

24; 826.166; July 17, 1906; Hesse; magnesium 
compounds pinene haloids and making same. 

22; 828.759; August 14. 1906; Mdser; making 
alkali metal oxids. 

24; 828.908; August 21. 1906; Toswinkle A 
Lauch; bromln substituted tannin-urea deriv- 
atives and making same. 

24; 880,048; September 4, stOB: BIbus A 
Schenble; producing salicylic acid, methol, 
ether. 



76 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



18; 832.466; October 2, 1006; Fold; producing 
ferro-cyantdes from gas. 

1; 884.2S7; October 80, 1006; Brunler; making 
nitric acid. 

1; 884,077; November 6, 1006; Hasenback; 
purification of hydrochloric acid gas. 

22; 885,771; November 18, 1006; Behrens; 
manufacturing alkaline bicarbonate*. 

1; 886,084; November 18, 1006; Hasenbach; 
purifying liquids. 

21; 830.741; December 25, 1007; Feld; pro- 
ducing ammonium nitrate. 

13; 842,452; January 22, 1007; Flugge; mak- 
ing ferrous carbonate. 

18; 845,854; March, 5, 1007: Clemm; manu- 
facturing alumina and alkali compounds of 
sulfur. 

24; 848,280; March 26, 1007; Fischer; bromln 
derivatives of fatty acids. 

13; 854,560; May 21, 1007; Bran & Oordt; sep- 
arating beryUla from alumina and iron. 

18; 848,612; March 26, 1007; Clemm; manu- 
facturing alumina and alkali sulfur salts. 

24; 848,701; April 2, 1007; Weber; pyrimidln 
derivatives. 

11; 848,060; April 2, 1007; Braun; desiccating 
material. 

24; 840,815; April 0, 1007; Rosenberg; pro- 
ducing formaldehyde preparations. 

21; 851,848; April 23, 1007; Feld; extraction 
of ammonia from gases. 

24; 851,428: April 28, 1007; Iljlnsky; anthra- 
chinone disuffonlc add. 

1; 858,004; July 2, 1007; Ostwald; manufac- 
turing nitric acid. 

24; 861,845; July 80, 1007; Wultze; manu- ' 
facturlng lead acetate. 

18; 861,218; July 23, 1007; Majert; stable 
nydrosulflt.ee mixtures and making same. 
. 21; 862.^76; August 18, 1007; Koppers; ob- 
taining- ammonia, etc. 

1; 864J217; August 27, 1007; WolfTensteln; 
concentrating nitric acid. 

10; 870,148; November 6, 1007; Wolffensteln; 
producing hydrogen peroxid. 

13; 870,601; November 12, 1007; Schuiae; 
producing porous barium oxld. 

10; 876.170; January 7, 1008; HelnricI; solu- 
tions of hydrogen peroxide and making same. 

24; 876,311; January 7, 1008; Hildebrandt; 
manufacturing condensation products from 
formaldehyde, tannin and aromatio monohy- 
droxyl compounds. 

10; 881,806; March 10, 1008; Kublerschky; re- 
moving chlorine from raw bromin. 

21; 882.500; March 24. 1008; Sorger; manu- 
facture of salicylic acid glycerine esters. 

24; 880,700; June 2. 1008; Miersch; approxi- 
mate separation of reaction products resulting • 
from the sulfonation of aromatic bodies. 

21; 892,178; June 80, 1908; Naumann; pro- 
ducing ammonium chlorid. 

13; 802,180; June .30, 1008; Schmidt; dehydrat- 
ing sodium hydrosUlflte. 

24; 892,414; June 30, 1008; Freund; prepara- 
tion of phthalic acid salts of cotarnin and 
product resulting therefrom. 

24; 804,140; July 21, 1008; Imbert; producing 
glycerin derivatives. 

,24; 894,148; July 2 i, 1908; Imbert; produc- 
ing dlchlog, ethoxy, ethylene. 
• 24; 804,904; August 4, 1008; Wolfes; manu- 
facturing barbituric acid. 

3; 805,798; August 11, 1008; Schatz; auto- 
matic apparatus for gas analysis. 

1; 000,471; October 6, 1008; Bender; making 
nitric acid. 

1; 900.688; October 6, 1008; Bender; making 
sulfuric acid. 

24; 001,009; October 13, 1008; Imbert; making 
chloracetic ether. 

24; 001.203; October 13, 1008; Hertkorn; prep- 
aration of borneol esters from turpentine. 

24; 001,208; October 13, 1008; Kapff; produc- 
ing diformin. 

24; 001,708; October 20, 1008; Hertkorn; mak- 
ing camphor. 

24; 001.700; October 20. 1008; Hertkorn; mak- 
lnk lodln products. 

24; 001.005; October 20, 1008; Imbert; pro- 
ducing hydroxy, fatty acids. 

24; 002,098; October 27, 1908; Lederer; sep- 
arating cellulose esters from solutions. 

13; 903,135; November 3, 1008; Hasenbach; 
making sodium thiosulfate. 

13; 003,136; November 8. 1008; Hasenbach; s 
producing sodium hydrosulfld. 

1; 004.147; November 17. 1008; Petersen; 
manufacture of sulfuric acid. 

24; 006,918; December 15. 1008; Ostermann; 
making neutral oxychlnolln salts. 

24; 007,041; December 29, 1008; Zeltschel; 
manufacture of acid esters of cyclical terpene 
alcohols. 

13; 014,271; March 2. 1000; Hasenbach; mak- 
ing Infusible sodium sulfld. 

1; 014,818; March 0, 1000; Dieffenbach & 
Moldenhauser; producing nitric oxids and nitric 
acid. / 

24; 015,680; March 16. 1009; Kosters & Otte- 
mann; manufacture of aurids and higher fatty 
acids 

13; 020,601; May 4, 1000; Meurer; making 
metal sulfates. 

18; 021,820; May 11, 1000; Zahn; making so- 
dium sulfate and sulfuric acid. 

13; 922.409; May 18. 1909; Feld; recovering 
hydrocyanic acid. 

24; 923,761; June 1, 1000; Botters & WolfTen- 
steln; producing nitro compounds. 

24; 924,804; June 8, 1909; Askenasy & Mug- 
dan; making dichlorethylene. 

1; 028,545; July 20. 1009; Schmidt; making 
nitric acid. 

13; 932.067; August 24, 1009; Stro bach; mak- 
ing iron free alum. 

24; 085.006; September 28. 1000; Imbert; ob- 
taining chlor-acetic acid. 



24; 985,815; October 5, 1009; Rademacher; 
preparing sine formaldehyde sulfoxylate. 

24; 037.104; October 10, 1800; Stephan & 
Rant Jen; making sulfurous acid compounds of 
alphaisatln anilid. 

24; 041,778; November 80, 1000; Fischer & 
Bergell; making a neutral sodium salt of lac- 
talbumin. 

24; 842,674; December 7, 1000; Schneider; 
making diphenyl-ortho-oxalic esters. 

21; 045,832;- January 4, 1010; Koppers; ob- 
taining ammonia from gas. 

10; 046,520; January 18, 1910; Arndts; mak- 
ing durable solutions of peroxid of hydrogen. 

24; 047,078; January 18, 1810; Klapproth; 
manufacturing lactic acid. 

24; 050,086; March 1, 1810; Luders: making 
N-propyl ester of P-amlnobenaoic acid. 

22; 051,243; March 8, 1010; Hasenbach; mak- 
ing sodium carbonate. 

24; 053,677; March 20, 1010; Kapff; cellulose 
formates. 

21; 058,050; April 5, 1910; Koppers; recover- 
ing ammonia sulfate from gas. 

24; 055,082; April 12, 1010; Kapff; cellulose 
formates. 

13; 857.761; May 10, 1010; Friedrich & 
Hirsch; making sodium sulfite and ammonium 
chlorid. 

13; 058,086: May 24, 1010; Weber; regenerat- 
ing tannic- chlorid solutions. 

1; 061,350; June 14, 1010; Hausser; making 
nitric acid. 

24; 062,753; June 28, 1010; Fischer & Bergell; 
making a neutral sodium salt of lactalbumln. 

11; 067,272; August 18, 1010; Venter; purify- 
ing waste mercerization lyes. 

jlB; 969,381; September 6, 1910; Loesekmann; 
making artificial cryolite. 

21; 070.888; September 20, 1010; Caro; ob- 
taining ammonia. 

24; 072,528; October 11, 1010; Fischer, iron- 
albumln-glycerophosphate and making same. 

21; 073.164; October 18, 1810; Burkheiaer; 
obtaining ammonium salts from gas. 

13; 075,618; November 15, 1810; Gartenmeis- 
ter; purifying chlorates. 

21; 077,000; December 6, 1010; Wagener; re- 
moving tar in recovering ammonia. 

24; 080.648; January 3, 1011; Lllienfeld; pro- 
ducing stable soluble cellulose derivatives from 
viscose. 1 

24; 082.010; January 81, 1011; Well; tannin 
silver albumen compounds. 

24; 085,528; February 28, 1011; Halfer & 
Mucdan; producing acetylene tetrachlorid. 

24; 005.038; June 18, 1011; Sorger; acid fer- 
, ric phosphor tartrate. 

10; 085.6(17; February 28, 1911; Feld; ob- 
taining sulfur. 

24; 087.133; March 21,' 1811; Habermann & 
Ehrenfeld; obtaining leclthia-lecith albumin 
and their by-products. 

1; 087.375; March 21. 1011; Kaiser; making 
nitrogen oxygen. 

24; 087,771; March 28, 1011; Sulzberger & 
Speigel; esters of salicylic acid derivatives and 
making same. 

24; 080,651; April 18, 1011; Schmitz & Stal- 
mann; mfg. of camphor. 

24: 091.874: May 0, 1011; Morgenstern; ob- 
taining alcohols or alcoholic matters from 
wool- fat 

10; 002,265; May 16, 1011; Schlaugk; preserv- 
ing hydrogen peroxid solutions. 

24; 993,331; May 23. 1911; Wiens; mfg. of 
formates. 

24; 995,088; June 13, 1011; Sorger; acid fer- 
ric P. phosphor tartrate. 

24; 009.23G; August 1, 1011; Lederer; pre- 
paring cellulose esters in definite forms. 

13: 000,420; August 1, 1011; Waunschaff & 
Savelsberg; separating zinc or zinc oxid. 

24; 006.274; June 27, 1011; Mueller; yohimbin 
preparations and mfg. same. 

24; 005,510; June 20. 1011; Witt; producing 
transparent camphor or shaped pieces. 

24; 005.388; June 18, 1911; Sorger; acid fer- 
ric araen tartrate. 

13; 906,773; July 4, 1011; Klager & Somner; 
stable perborate mixtures yielding hydrogen 
• peroxid. 

24; 000,055; August 8. 1011; Callsen; mono- 
cinnanic ester of glycerin. 

18; 1,000,298; August 8, 1011; 8arason; prep- 
arations for slowly liberating oxygen. 

1; 1.000,732; August 15, 1011; Hausser; mak- 
ing nitric acid. 

24; 1,001,247; August 22. 1011; Buer; ex- 
traction of lecithin from the seeds of lupines 
and other pulses. 

13; 1,001.480; August 22, 1011; Ulzer & Som- 
mer; extracting radium compounds. 

21; 1,004,861; September 26, 1011; Bueb; 
making calcium cyanamid. 

1; 1,008,600; November 14, 1011; Brauer; 
concentrating nitric acid. 

13: 1,008.927; November 14, 1011; Schick; 
makir calcium cyanannid. 

18; 1.010,177; November 28, 1011; Raschig; 
mfg. of alkali earth salts of hydroxylamin 
disulfonlc acid. 

1; 1,011,014; December 5, 1011; Bender; mfg. 
oxide of nitrogen. 

21; 1,011,043; December 8. 1011; Feld; mak- 
ing ammonium sulfate and sulfur from gas. 

1, 1.013,181; January 2, 1912; Klages & Woll- 
berg; making chlorosulfonic acid. 

21; 1,013.404; January 2, 1912; Koppers; re- 
covering ammonia from gases. 

10; 1,013.701; January 2, 1012; Loewenstein; 
making hydrogen peroxid from impure persul- 
furic acid solutions. 

13; 1,015,286; January 23, 1012; Bergius; 
making alkali earth peroxid. 

24: 1.017.261; February 13, 1012; Hempel; 
producing formates. 

24; 1,017,560; February 13. 1012; Klein: pro- 
ducing 1 derivatives of cantharidic acid contain- 
ing iodin and mercury. 



1; 1.018,402; February 27, 1012; Albert; 
making sulfur trioxid. 

24; 1,018.788; February 27, 1812; Weber; mfg. 
anhydride of fatty acids. 

1; 1,018,746; February 27, 1012; Dittmar; 
phosphoric acid. 

10; 1,018,470; February 27, 1012; Burkhelser; 
recovering sulfur from gas. 

24; 1.018,820; February 20, 1012; Tilienfeld; 
producing sulfu/ derivatives for glycerin. 

24; 1,018,786; February 27, 10l2; Alsleben; 
formaldehyde comp. and prods. 

21; 1,018,406; February 27, 1012; Bueb; mfg. 
ammonium carbonate. 

24; 1,010,045; March 12, 1012; Buer; produc- 
ing lechithin. 

18; 1,020,208; March 12, 1012; Kllngblll; 
making phosphates potash and ammonia. 

24; 1,025,460; May 7. 1012; Hoering & Kippe; 
producing albuminates or organomineral acids. 
24; 1,027,844; May 28, 1012; Hoering; mak- 
ing soluble comp. of iron glycerophosphate 
combined with milk or milk albumin. 

13; 1,028,505; June 4, 1012; Olszemski; tin- 
oxidizln<r furnaces 

24; 1.030,016; July 2, 1012; producing acetyl- 
ene tetrachlorid. 

24; 1,080.177; June 18, 1012; Hertkorn; prod, 
ketones of high boiling points from acetone 
and homologues. 

13; 1,032.088; July 16, 1812; Bueb; obtaining 
cynogen and its comps. 

21; 1.034,074; August 6, 1912; Burkhelser; 
converting ammonium sulphite into ammonium 
sulfate. 

24; 1,036,087; August 20, 1012; Flemming; 
halogenphenolalkall bs.jb and mfg. of same. 

13; 1,036.705; August 27, 1012; von Part- 
helm; production of anhydrous hydrosulfites. 

13; 1,030,356; September 24, 1012; Brann- 
lich; making anhydrous tetrachlorid of tin 
from dloxid of tin. 

18; 1,040.665; October 8. 1012; Orueter & 
Pohl; mfg. of a stable preparation from 
hydrogen peroxid and urea. 

24; 1,041,587; October 15, 1012; Dorzykowski; 
producing dyed cellulose ester. 

21; 1,043,452; November 5, 1012; Mueller; 
direct recovery of tar and ammonia from dis- 
tillation gases. 

11; 1,045.082; December 8. 1012; Jersch; ob- 
taining emulsions in combination with solid 
substances. 

24; 1,048,600; December 81, 1012; Immen- 
dorff & Kappen; mfg. urea. 

13; 1,040,740; January 7, 1013; Ley; purify- 
ing sodium phosphate waste liquors. 

21; 1,053,456; February 18, 1018; Uhde; 
prod, of ammonium nitrate from ammonlacal 
gases. 

18; 1,054,141; February 25, 1013; Platsch; 
purifying sulfites cellulose lye. 

13; 1,054.460; February 25, 1013; Schweikert; 
revivifying or restoring permitil. 

24; 1.054,735; March 4, 1013; Wolff; prepara- 
tion of formates of chronium, etc. 

24; 1,056,815; March 25, 1013; Merllng & 
Kohler; producing isoprene. 

13; 1,056,340; March 18, 1813; Kaufler & 
Chwalu; producing arsenate of lead. 

24; 1,057,437; March 25. 1013; Llebreght; mfg. 
of glycoheptontic acid. 

13; 1,050.531; April 22, 1013; Ebler; prepara- 
tion, isolation and enrichment of radium and 
other radio-active substances. 

24; 1,058,004; April 15, 1013; Richter; forma- 
tion of calcium salt of acetylsalicylic acid. 

24; 1.060,765; May 6. 1918; Kaufman; or- 
ganic antimony compounds and making same. 
24; 1,0(U.587; May 18, 1013; Bart; producing 
organic derivatives of arsenic acid. 

24; 1.061,889; May 18, 1918; Wassermann & 
Wassermann; preparation of colored sllenlf- 
erous and tellurlferous substances. 

24; 1,062.351; May 20, 1018; Meyer & Bergius; 
mfg. of monovalent phenolgbrom monochoro 
substtiution prod., etc. 

1; 1,063.025; May 27, 1913; Gellen; recovery 
of acid used in refining oils. 

24; 1,063.009; May 27, 1013; Wolffensteln; 
acetylsalicylic acid esters and making same. 

24; 1.003,173; May 27, 1913; Rampini; pro- 
ducing amino anthraquinones and derivatives. 
10; 1,063,883; June 3, 1013; Pletzsch & 
Adolph; making hydrogen peroxid. 

3; 1.066.301; July 1. 1913; Eiken; prods, of 
inert gases. 

10; 1,063,670; June 3, 1913; Hartmann & 
Jacoby; producing stable hydrogen peroxid 
compounds. 

24; 1,066,758; July 8, 1013; Ruder; mfg. of 
camphor from borneol or isoborneol. 

24; 1,070,800; August 10, 1013; Hempel; mak- 
ing' oxalates. 

28; 1,070,138; August 12, 1813; Kast; prep-4 
aration of catalytic substance In a minutely 
divided state 

72; 1,072.010; September 2, 1013; Kersten; 
producing alkali metal hydroxide directly from 
alkali metal chlorids. 

24; 1,072.289; September 2, 1918; Wolffen- 
steln; esters of polyhalogen compounds of alco- 
hols with therapeutically active acids. 

21; 1.078.247; September 16, 1913; Koppers; 
producing sulfate of ammonia from ammonla- 
cal gases or vapor. 

24; 1,074.030; September 23, 1013; Wolfes; 
N-halogenalkyl C. C. dialkyblar blturic acids 
and prep. 

24; 1,074.633; 1013; Lillienfeld; mfg. of 
diethyl sulphate. 

24; 1,074,881; October 7. 1013; Lyncke; dry 
viscose in granular, soluble stable condition 
and preparing same. 

13; 1.073,032; September 23, 1013; Rupprecht; 
mfg. of fluorescent substances. 

22; 1.076.ri08; November 14, 1013; Messer- 
schmidt; extracting alkali metals in form of 
nitrates from minerals. 

10; 1.079,291; November 18, 1913; Feld; proc- 
ess of obtaining sulfur from hydrogen sulfld 
and sulfur dioxld. 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



n 



21; 1.079,703; November 25, 1018; Hlavti; 
synthetically preparing ammonia and other 
compounds containing; nitrogen and hydrogen. 

24; 1,081,178; December 9, 1918; Werner; 
strontium salt of ahollc acid. 

21; 1,088,708; January 6, 1914; Rothe; meth- 
ods producing ammonia and compounds of 
ammonia. 

24; 1,085,708; February 8, 1914: Steinkopf; 
producing sulfur derivatives of hydrocarbon. 

22; 1.087,132; February 17. ,1914; Messer- 
schmidt; obtaining alkali metal compounds 
from silicates containing same. - 

24; 1.087.261; February 17, 1914; Ruder; 
making coprene. 

22; 1,089,716; March 10, 1914; Messerschmidt; 
extracting alkalies from natural rock. 

80; 1,089,464; March 10, 1914; Eppens; sac- 
charometers. 

24; 1,090,074; March 10, 1914; Knoevenagel; 
compounds of oellulose and obtaining same. 

21; 1,090,874; March 24, 1914; Pier; bring- 
ing hydrogen or hydrogen containing gas mix- 
tures to reaction. 

22; 1,091,280; March 24. 1914: Messerschmidt; 
extracting potassium and sodium compounds 
from silicates which contain alkalies. 

18; 1,091,825; March 24, 1914; Friedrich ft 
Hirsch; mfg. of solid sulfites or blsulfltes of 
homogeneous chemical constitution. 

18; 1,091,429; March 24, 1914; Friedrich A 
Hirsch; mfg. of sulfites or blsulfltes. 

24; 1,097.099; May 19, 1914; Kalkow; lead 
salts of acetic acid. _ . . M „ 

10; 1.098.306; May 26. 1914; Torley A Mat- 
ter; mfg. nitrous oxld. __ 

8; 1.008,811; June 2. 1914; Loebel Franz; 
mixing powders or concentrated solutions with 
a liquid or dissolving them in same. 

24; 1.099,107; June 2, 1914; Weissberger A 
Keller; mfg substance resembling natural rub" 

be IT 

1; 1.099,368; June 9, 1914; Hof; means for 
distilling acids. m _ 

1; 1.099.451; June 9. 1914; Meyer A Klages; 
continuous production of dry hydrochloric and 
potassium blsu fate. 

1; 1.099.452: June 9, 1914; Klages; continuous 
production of nitric acid. 

24; 1.099,761; June 9, 1914; Ostermann; proc- 
ess of formation of diary 1 ethers. 

24; 1,100,076; June 10, 1914; Hachstetter; 
making formaldehyde. 

18; 1.100.518; June 16. 1914; Borzykowskl; 
producing cuprammonlum solutions. 

24; 1.100.720; June 28, 1914; Enrich A Ber- 
theim; polyarseno compounds and, making 
same. 

13; 1.101,424; June 23, 1914; Frank A Flncke;- 
mfg. nitrogen compounds. 

13; 1.101,440; June 28, 1914; Kemmerlch; 
m stabilised oxidizing agents. 

18; 1,101.455; June 23, 1914; Kreidl; cloud- 
ening agents producing cloudening effects In 
white enamels and producing same. 

18; 1,104,918; July 28, 1914; Loffler; mfg. 
radium bisulfate indirectly calciuable form. 

24; 1,108.455; August 11, 1914; Karczag A 
Ropetschin; producing acid chloride oxyacids. 

18; 1,105,902; August 4, 1914; Ooldschmldt; 
mfg. stannic chlorid from materials containing 
oxld of tin. 

24; 1,105.878; July 28. 1914; Ruder; produc- 
ing mixture of camphene and chobornyl acetate 
from plnene hydrochlorid. 

24; 1.106,047; August 4. 1014; Kanfler; pro- 
ducing amyl acetate and its homologues. 

24; 1.108,676; August 25, 3914; Beckmann; 
mfg. the carbonic acid ester ot dlchlorhydzin. 

24; 1,111,821; September 29, 1914; Berthelm A 
Karrer; arsenic antimony compounds and mak- 
ing same. 

10; 1,102.911; July 7. 1914; Hansen; produc- 
ing sulfur and sulfates of Elberfeld, Germany. 

24; 1,118,288; November 24, 1914; Schecken- 
bach; mfg. fusel oil. 

24; 1.188,376; June 20, 1916; Lillenfeld; alkyl 
ethers of cellulose and making same. 

10; 1,120,486; December 8, 1914; Bergfeld; 
separation of oxygen from air. 

24; 1,128,522; January 5. 1915; Halle; 
paring nlcotln. 

8; 1,128,542; January 5, 1915; Janensch; agi- 
tating and aerating substances. 

24; 1.128.572; January 5, 1915; Newmann St 
Zeltnor; prod, esters of tertiary alcohols. 

18; 1,128.760; January 5, 1915; Kreidl; mfg. 
opaqulng agents for white enamel. 

24; 1,124,776; January 12, 1915; Marmedel; 
continuous reduction of aromatic nltro bodies. 

1; 1,130.104; March 2, 1915; Fritz Raschig; 
production of nitric acid. 

18; 1.138,446; March 80, 1915; Rlchter; mfg. 
substances for purifying waste water, etc. 

24; 1.138,961- March 30, 1915: I,. Hess; or- 
thononadic acid esters and their solutions. 

10; 1.184,328; May 6, 1915; Farago; prevent- 
ing decomposition of hydrogen peroxid. 

18; 1.140,262- May 18, 1915; Glaus- mfg. base 
exchanging substances. 

1; 1,141,994; June 8. 1915; Uebel; nitric acid. 

1, 1.144.457; June 29, 1915; Belndl; produc- 
ing cyanogen compounds. 

24; 1.145.634; July 6, 1915: Uhl; preparations 
of soluble heavy metal compounds of thio pro- 
tein bodies. 

18; 1,142,153; June 8, 1915; Bbler; m'g. iso- 
lation and enrichment of radio active sub- 
stances. 

13; 1,142,154; June 8, 1915; Ebler; methods 
treating radio active ores and intermediate 
products. 

18; 1,147,515; July 20. 1915; Kobelt; obtain- 
ing base exchanging substances. 

1; 1,151,294; August 24, 1915; Schliebe; meth- 
ods for producing sulfuric acid. 

10; 1,152,066; August 81. 1915; Wolff; prepar- 
ing a solution of peroxide of hydrogen with a 
high content of ozone and oxygen. 

24; 1,153,402; September 14. 1915; Muller; 
of organic acid anhydride or of mixtures of 
such anhydride with their acids. 



pre- 



21; 1,157,268; October 19, 1915; Pier; mfg. of 
ammonia and its elements. 

24; 1.157.848; October 19, 1915; Portheim; 
producing oxalic acid. 

24; 1.157,402; October 19, 1915; Landau; mfg. 
pure lactic add. 

18; 1,161.200; November 28, 1915; Brunn; 
mfg. of zeoiites. 

13; 1,162,180; November 130, 1915; Buchner; 
producing pure ammonia from clay, etc. 

22; 1,162.617; November 30. 1915; Klingblel; 
mfg. of potassium and sodium salts from kelp 
ashes. 

1; 1,168,174; December 7, 1915; Raschig; proc- 
ess for concentrating dilute nltrio acid. 

13; 1,168,475: December 7, 1915; Sllbermann; 
basic magnesium carbonate and preparing 
same. 

3; 1,168.698; December 14. 1915; Sagi A Sagi; 
methods of testing liquids and other materials. 

18; 1,165,358; December 21, 1915; Kochendoer- 
fer; mfg. nitrogen compounds. 

1; 1,165,816; December 28, 1915; Thelen A 
Wolf; mechanical sulfate furnaces. 

18; 1.166,160; December 28, 1915; Portheim; 
anhydrous hydrosulflltes. 

24; 1.169,341; January 25. 1916; Merllng A 
Chrzesciuski A Pf offer; alkali metal acetones. 

1; 1.172,863; February 22. 1916; Bender; pro- 
ducing nitrogen compounds. 

1; 1.178,440; April 4. 1916; Classen; mfg. of 
nitric acid or nitrates from nitrogen acid. 

24; 1,181.697; May 2, 1916; Szarvasy; sapon- 
ification of the chlorin derivatives of alephetlc 
hydrocarbon 8. 

24; 1.205.493; November 21. 1916; Portheim; 
producing oxalic acid. 

24; 1,205,138; November 14, 1916; Wlllstatter* 
phosphorus and oxygen containing organic 
compounds. 

13; 1,207,416; December 5. 1916; Kochen- 
doerfer; mfg. nitrogen compounds. 

21; 1,208,877; December 19, 1916; Wollen- 
weber: mfg. acid ammonium phosphate. 

10; 1,210,651; January 2, 1917; Jahl; making 

?iure, highly concentrated hydrogen peroxid 
rom the peroxid of an alkalin earth. 

24; 1.210,681; January 2, 1917; Paal; hydro- 
genlzlng oleflnlc terpene derivatives. 

24; 1,210,792; January 2, 1917; Gorhau; puri- 
fying acetic acid. 

13; 1,212,504; January 16, 1917; Krauas & 
Stachelin; preparing nitrogen compounds. 

24; 1,217,862; February 27, 1917; Gerugross 
A Kast; salts of acetylsallcylic acids and mfg. 
of same. 

24; 1,218,332; March 6, 1917; Stern; mfg. of 
Jioleflus (Isophem) caoutchouc and caoutchouc- 
like substances. 

24; 1,218,718; March* 18. 1917; Stern; produc- 
tion of caoutchouc-like bodies. 

24; 1,280,600; June 19. 1917; Pollak; mfg. of 
crystalline polymerization products of formal- 
dehyde. 

13; 1.232.384; July 3, 1917; Kreidl; separat- 
ing thorium from soda solutions containing 
thorium oxalate. 

24; 1,234,156; July 24, 1917; Grunsteln; mak- 
ing aldol. 

10; 1,284,380; July 24, 1917; Patek; mfg. hy- 
drogen peroxid. 

24; 1.237,076; August 14. 1917; Matter; mfg. 
polyvalent alcohols. 

13; 1,287,840; August 21, 1917; Terwelp; di- 
rect production of pure oxld of tin. 

24; 1,240.523; September 18. 1917; Wolff; pro- 
duction of sulfonic acid salts from mineral oil 
waste liquors. 

24; 1,241.153; September 25, 1917; Schule; 
disazo dyestuff and processes of making same. 

24; 1,244,901; October 30, 1917; Sc heller; pro- 
ducing acetaldehyde. 

24; 1,244,902; October 80, 1917; Scheller; pro- 
ducing acetaldehyde. 

. 24; 1,252,212; January 1. 1918; Wieland; pro- 
ducing novel addition compounds of desoxy- 
chollc acid. 

24; 1.254,083; January 22. 1918; Eberle; prep, 
of amino cornp. by fermentation. 

13; 1,262.589; April 9. 1918; Llebknecht; pro- 
ducing hydrogen peroxid. 



Assigned Patents. 



81; 814,917; March 18. 1906; P. A H. Paul- 
ing; process of making nitric acid from air; 
assignee, Chemlsche Fab ri ken, Gladbeck, Ges. 

24; 1,109,512; September 1, 1914; Colllschonn 
A Ruppert; process making cellulose acetate 
soluble in ethyl acetate; Verein fur Chemische 
Industrie in Mains. 

1; 1,115,192; October 27, 1914; Hausmann; 
process of concentrating nitric acid; Verein 
Chemlscher Fabriken. 

24; 1,201,260; October 17. 1916; Colllschonn; 

?>rocess -for the mfg. of cellulose esters; Verein 
ur Chemlsche Industrie in Mainz. 

24; 699.423; May 6. 1902; Sternberg; dlmethy- 
lene tartrate and making same; E. Sobering. 

24; 707.270; August 19. 1902; Step nan; mak- 
ing camphene; E. Scherlng. 

24; 707.271; August 19, 1902; Stephan; mak- 
ing camphene; E. Scherlng. 

24; 1.069,445; August 5. 1918; Loose; acety- 
latlng cellulose and Its products transforma- 
tion; E. Scherlng. 

13; 779.210; January 3. 1905; Eghy; producing 
barium oxld from barium carbonate; Gebruder 
Siemens A Co. 

24; 913,426; February 23, 1909; Osbom A 
Schupp; converting catechin into a catechin 
tannic acid; Ludwlg Sausbure. 

13; 994.095; May 30. 1911; Erlwein A Warth; 
making nitrogenous compounds; Siemens A 
Halske A. G. 

3; 1,138.556; March 30. 1915; Gerdien; quan- 
titatively analyzing gas mixtures of known 
constituents, etc. ; Siemens & Halske, A. G. 

24; 1.027.967; May 28. 1912; Zuckmayer; art 



of preparing Iron albuminous comp. containing 
phosphorous; Dr. Walther Wolff A Co. 

24; 1,027,968: May* 28, 1912; Zuckmayer; pre- 
paring iron albuminous comp. containing; phos- 
phorous; Dr. Walther Wolff A Co. 

24; 1.086.405; August 20, 1912; Zuckmayer; 
making Iron albuminous compounds; Dr. Wal- 
ther Wolff A Co. 

13; 867.146; June 18. 1907; Askenasy A 
Stockem; producing calcium hydride; Electro 
Chemische Werke Ges. 

24; 973.832; October 25. 1910; Wiens; making 
oxalates from formates; Electro Chemlsche 
Werke Ges 

13; 1,069.959; August 12. 1918; Koss; obtain- 
ing thorium; Chemische Fabzik Germanla 
Gesell. 

18; 1.070.070; August 12, 1918; Rothe; pro- 
duction of nitrates; Blektrochemische Werke. 

24; 1.135.792; April 18. 1915; Hartmann; mfg. 
explosives; Sprengstoff A. G. 

1; 1,149.585; August 10, 1915; Jahn; denitra- 
tlon of waste acids; Sprengstoff A. G. 

1; 920,224; May 4, 1909; Valentiner; mfg. 
nitric add; Valentiner & Schwarz. 

24; 953.187; March 29. 1910; Valentiner; pro- 
ducing a sulfur compound of qulnin; Valen- 
tiner & Schwarz. 

22; 1.058,686; April 8. 1918; Gellerl; obtain- 
ing potash and cement clinker; Dr. Anton 
Hambloch. 

22; 1,078.495; November 11. 1918; Gellerl; 
recovering alkalies from silicate rocks; Dr. An- 
ton Hambloch. 

22; 1.078,496; November 11. 1913; Gellerl; 
recovering alkalies from silicate rocks; Dr. An- 
ton Hambloch. 

24; 1,086.224; August 20. 1912; Haberland A 
Schaeffer; making pen tax and hexa. chlore- 
thanes; Salzbergwerk Neu 8trassfurt und. etc. 

22; 1,050.453; January 14, 1913; Haberland; 
making high percentage crystallized potassium 
hydrate; Salzbergwerk Neu Strassfurt und, 
etc 

24; 709,821 i September 16. 1902; Helmers; 
separating sulfonic acids; Ichthyol Ges. Corde. 
etc. 

24; 722.506; March 10, 1903; Helmers; sul- 
fonic acid salts and making same; Ichthyol 
Ges. Corde, etc. 

24; 722,507; March 10, 1908; Helmers; sul- 
fonic salts of alkaline earthy metals and 
metals proper and making same; Ichthyol Ges. 
Corde, etc. 

24; 715.896; December 16, 1912; Strebel; 
making lonone; Haarmann 4b Reimer. 

24; 762,705; June 14. 1904; Schmidt; homo- 
logues of lsoionone and making same; Haar- 
mann A Reimer. 

24; 775,251; November 15. 1904; making 
homologues of ionone; Haarmann A Reimer. 

18; 1.158.769; November 2, 1915; Askenasy; 
producing white zirconium oxld free of Iron; 
Chemische Metallurgische. 

18; 1.175,587; March 14, 1916; Blickle; recov- 
ery of metal oxlds and hydroxlds; Mefallbank 
A Metallurgische ges. 

24; 1,268,119; April 16, 1918; Ruppert; cellu- 
loseacetate and making same; Chem. Industrie 
In Mainz. 

24; 944.372; December 28. 1909; Mugdan, 
preparing organio compounds containing the 
acetyl group; Consortium fur Elektrochemische 
Industrie. 

24; 1.096,667; May 12, 1914; Baum A Mug- 
dan; preparing acetaldehyde; Concortlum fur 
Elektrochemische. 

24; 1,179,420; April 18. 1916; Galltzensteln & 
Mugdan; mfg. of organic acids, especially 
acetic acid; Concortlum fur Elektrochemische. 

24; 1,179,421; April 18, 1916; Galitzenstein & 
Mugdan; mfg. of peracids from aldehydes; 
Concortlum ful Elektrochemische. 

24; 1,220.746; March 27. 1917; Herrmann A 
Mugdan; mfg. of aldol; Concortlum fur Elek- 
trochemische. 

24; 748.791; January 5, 1904; Rleche; making 
oxalates; Rutolph Koepp & Co. 

24; 820.159; May 8. 1906; Welse et al.; mak- 
ing formates; Rudolph Koepp A Co. 

24; 820.873; May 8, 1906; Welse et al.; mak- 
ing formates; Rudolph Koepp A Co. 

24; 1,043.985; November 12. 1912; Welse; 
preparation of formic acid from formation and 
mineral acid; Rudolph Koepp A Co. 

lfc 1.098,139; May 26, 1914; Welse A Relche; 
procking mixtures of nitrogen and hydrogen 
suitable for mfg. of ammonia; Rudolph Koepp 
A Co. 

24; 1,204,938; November 14. 1916; Bredlg; 
making formates; Rudolph Koepp A Co. 

13; 1,211.564; January 9, 1917; Eyer; pro- 
duction of antimonates; Rudolph Koepp A Co. 

24; 1,235.426; July 31. 1917; Bredlg; produc- 
tion of formic acid; Rudolph Koepp & Co. 

10; 1.035.756; Auirust 13. 1912; Stauck; mak- 
ing stable compounds containing hydrogen 
peroxid; Chemische Fabrlk. 

24; 1.045.451; November 26. 1912; Stanek; 
making solid stable compounds containing hy- 
drogen peroxid; Chemische Fabrlk. 

24; 1,011,075; December 5, 1911; Werklng; 
mfg. of harmless combinations of sulfocyanlo 
acid; Chemische Fabrik. 

24; 1.011.075; December 5, 1911; Werklng; 
mfg. of harmless combinations of sulfoxyanio 
acid; Chemlsche Fabrik Reisholz. 

24; 8G7.046; June 18. 1907; Finke; producing 
concentrated formic acid from formates; Chem- 
lsche Fabrik und Graunau Landshoff. 

13; 1,047.077; December 10. 1912; Kirchner; 
mfg. of barium oxld; Chemlsche Fabrik und 
Graunau Landshoff. 

24; 1.174.663; March 7. 1916; Brauer; dis- 
tilling formic acid; Chemische Fabrik und 
Graunau Landshoff. 

24; 1.196,329; August 29. 1916; Brauer; dis- 

« 



78 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



tilling acetic acid; Chemische. Fabrik and 
Gr&unau Landshoff. 

21; 1.023,648; April 16, 1012; Brenner;, recov- 
ering* ammonia' in cuprammonium cellulose 
precipitation; Verelnigte Glansstoff Fabriken 
A. G. 

24; 1,046,729; December 10, 1012; Bronnert; 
producing formylcellulose; Verelnigte Glanz- 
■toff Fabriken A. G. 

24; 1.061,977; May 20. 1913; Bronnert; pro- 
ducing formylcelluloae; Verelnigte Qlansstoff 
Fabriken A. G. 

10; 1,898.878; September 8, 1908; Kohler; 
mfg. of sulfur, etc.; Rutgerswerke A. G. 

24; 1,028,074; Kay 28, 1912; Kahl; ortho 
oxalic acid esters of metal cresol and mfg. 
same; Rutgerswerke A. G. 

1; 702,877; June 17, 1902; Meyer; making 
hydrogen chlorid and sodium sulfate; K. Oeh- 
ler Anilin ft Anllin Fabrik. 

24; 798,807; September 5, 1905; Laska; indo- 
phenol sulfonic acids and mfg. same; K. Oeh- 
ler Anilin ft Anilin Fabrik. 

18; 1.100,743; June 28. 1914; Keetman ft Jost; 
obtaining salts of mesotborium and radium 
thorium bearing materials; Deutsche Gasgenh~ 
Uoht A. G. 

13; 1.151,187; August 24, 1915; Keetman ; ob- 
taining radlothorlum and solutions therefrom 
containing thorium -X; Deutsche Gasgenhlicht 

▲.a. 

24; 1,186,500; June 6. 1916; Romer; tanning 
substances and methods of preparing same; 
Deutsche Kolonlale Gert. ft Farbstofl A. G. 

24; 1,222,683; April 10. 1917; Romer; mfg. of 
products adapted to precipitate glue or like 
substances; Deutsche Kolonlale Gert. ft Farb- 
stoff A. G. 

10; 1.108,752; August 25, 1914; Henkel ft 
Weber; mfg. hydrogen perozid; Henkel ft Cie. 

13; 1,121,428; December 15, 1914; Weber; 
procs. -mfg. perborate of sine; Henkel ft Cle. 

13; 1.124,081; January 5, 1915; Weber; mfg. 
magnesium perborate; Henkel ft Cie. 

18; 1,237,128; August 14. 1917; Weber ft Noll; 
mfg. of sodlcum percarbonate; Henkel & Cie. 

24; 692,487; February 4. 1902; Fuchs; hydro- 
chlold of cinnamyl-qulnln and process of mak- 
ing same; Kalle ft Co. 

24; 778.477; December 27, 1904; Elbel; mono- 
chloro alpha napthol and procs. of making; 
Kalle ft Co. 

24; 1,132,709; March 28, 1915; Blchelbaum; 
manufacturing aluminum acetate compound; 
Kalle ft Co. A. G. 

24; 1,076,840; October 28, 1918; Reinhardt; 
manufacturre of diacidyl and acidulated com- 
pounds from amino aso bases; Kalle & Co. 
A. G. 

'24; 692,497; February 4, 1902; Althausse; 
making acetyl cellulose; Dr. Richard Sthamer. 

24; 692,598; February 4. 1902; Baun; sepa- 
rating orthotoluncesulfacnlorid; Fabriquesde 
Eroduita Chem. tie Ghan. and de Mulhouse. 

24; 711,572; October 21, 1902; Kahl, oxalic 
esters of paracresol and making same; Rudolf 
Ruetgera. 

24; 712,747; November 4, 1902; Weinberg, 
Lange; yellow dyes and making same; Leopold 
Casella ft Co. 

24; 747,629; December 22, 1908; Naschold; 
purifying plnene hydrochlorid; one-half to 
Chemische Fabrik Uerdingen Lienau ft Co. 

10; 804,555; November 14, 1905; Schenck ft 
Marquart; making red phosperous; Marquart 
ft Schulze. 

24; 804,682; November 14, 1905; Sommer; 
making protocatecluric aldehyde; F. Fritssche 
ft Co. 

18; 861.826: July 80, 1907; Fuhrmann; pro- 
ducing metal peroxids; Kirchhoff & Neirath 
A. C. Co. 

24; 886,085; April 28, 1908; Stalmann; manu- 
facturing protacat technio aldehyde; Schlmmel 
ft Co. * 

24; 801,753; June 23, 1908; Unruh; oxidation 
of methane; Sauerstoff ft Stlckstoff Industrie. 

24; 903,588; November 10, 1908; Llebnecht; 
manufacture of sodium anylmlne; Deutsche 
Gold-Sibber Scheideanstalt vorm. Roessler. 

13; 903,967; November 17, 1908; Fritsche; so- 
dium perbonate containing borax and produce 
ing same; Stolle ft Kopke. 

21; 922,008; May 18, 1909; Krauas; mating 
ammonia; Ges. fur Stickstoffdunger. 

24; 924,494; June 8, 1909; Noerdlinger, Cara- 
selle ft Berg; preparing pure lactic acid; 
Chemische Fabrik Florsheim 'Dr. H. Noerd- 
linger. 

10; 927,842; July 6, 1909; Feld ft Jahl; re- 
covering sulfur; Walther Feld. 

10; 984,400; September 14, 1909; Goldachmldt 
Spitsler; separating and concentrating chlorln; 
Th. Goldschmidt. 

18; 941.071; November 28, 1909; Huber; mak- 
ing thorium sulfld; Kunheim ft Co. 

22; 952,660; March 22. 1910; Caro; obtaining 
ammonia sulfite from gases; Gewerkschaft der 
Steinkohlenzeche. 

18; 952,704; March 22, 1910; Boeasneck; mak- 
ing antimony compounds; M. B. Vogel. 

21; 969,907; September 13, 1910; Roelofsen; 
recovering ammonia from coal gases and the 
like; Act. Fuer Kohlendcstlllatloni 

24; 979,645; December 27, 1910; Busch; albu- 
men preparations from albuminoids and salts 
of gusicolsulfonlc acids; Bauer ft Cie. 

10; 984.605; February 21, 1911; Relchel ft 
Braun; methods of producing nitrogen and 
carbon dloxld from gaseous products of com- 
bustion; Nitrogen Ges. 

24; 1.006.793; October 24, 1911; Reithof; pro- 
ducing aldehyde sulfoxylates; Blumberg ft 
Rlndskopf Zuckmantel. 

24; 1,009.864: November 28, 1911; Schneider; 
producing verdigris'; Eugen abresch. 

1; 1,012.421; December 19, 1911; Opl; manu- 



facture of sulfuric acid; Erste Oesterriechische 
Soda Fabrik. 

13; 1,015,220; January 16, 1912; Telsler; 
making sodium aluminum fluroid; Alex Hu- 
mann. 

10; 1,015,566; January 28, 1912; Kassner; 
obtaining and separating oxygen and nitrogen 
from atmosphere; R. Dampfkessel ft Mason. 
Fabrik Buttner. 

24; 1,023,758; April 16, 1912; Raschlg; man- 
ufacturing chlorinated phenol esters and oxy- 
bensel alcohols, oxybensaldehydes, etc.; Frledr. 
Raschlg. 

24; 1,030,884; June 25. 1912; Schmits ft Stal-. 
mann; manufacturing camphene; Dr. Schmits 
ft Co. 

24; 1.039,875; October 1, 1912; Wolff; prepa- 
ration of formic esters; Mrs. Maria Stein- 

Iff QsTQr 

13; 1,041,583; October 15. 1012; Bornemann; 
obtaining porous and fairly pure barium oxid 
from barium carbonate; Chemische Fabrik 
Cos w lsranhalt 

13; 1.049,201; December 81. 1912; Brannert: 
recovering copper from wash liquors employed 
in cuprammonia cellulose process; Verelnigte 
Glanzstoff Fabriken A. G. 

24; 1,055,518; March 11, 1913; Bronnert; vis- 
cous cellulose solutions; Verelnigte Qlansstoff 
Fabriken A. G. 

21; 1,061,949; May 18, 1913; Rottmann; re- 
covery of by-products from gases of fuels; 
Dr. C. Otto ft Co. 

24; 1.074,708; Friedberger; making lactic 
acid; Eugene A. Byrnes. 

24; 1,075,581; October 14, 1918; Kopetschni 
Karozag ft Todor: anhydrid salicylic acid and 
preparing same; Paul Karczag. 

24;. 1,101,873; June 23, 1914; Wolff; manu- 
facturing aliphatic alkyl sulfates; Cnlnoin 
Gyogyszer es Vegyessetl. 

10; 1,105,789; August 4, 1914; Wunsche; sta- 
ble mixtures containing perborates; Pearson 
& Co. Ges. 

21; 1,119,534; December 1, 1914; Pier; prepa- 
ration of ammonia from elements; Dynamit 
Action Ges. 

24; 1,120,233; December 8. 1914; Onerlach ft 
Korner; cocain isonalerlan; Theodor Telch- 
grabben. 

18; 1,121,490; December 15, 1914; Gaus; pro- 
ducing aluminum silicates; Permitlt A. G. 

24; 1,152,098; August 81, 1915; Kaufler; prep- 
aration of acetic acid anhydrid; Boenische 
Elecktrlche, etc. 

21; 1,160.836; November 16, 1915; Burkhelser; 
purifying gases of dry distillation and recov- 
ering the by-products thereof;. Burkhelser ft 
Co. Ges. 

24; 1,178,229; April 4, 1016; Ederer; produc- 
ing salts of fatty acids; Holsnerkohlings In* 
dustrie A. G. 

24; 1,180.694; April 26, 1916; Buchtala; mer- 
cury preparations of therapeutic purposes and 
process of producing same; Dr. Bayer's Tarsa. 

31; 1,211,450; January 9, 1917; Jacob; wash- 
ing devices for guncotton and similar products; 
Selwlg & Lange. 

18; 1,268,240; June 4, 1918; Grenllch ft 
Rjukan; manufacture of metal nitrogen com- 
pounds; Gebruder Gullini. 

24; 1,144,270; June 22, 1915; Walther; process 
for the production of antlseptically acting 
bodies; T. D. Biedel A. G. 

To Badischc Anilin, Assignee. 

The following patents were issued to Badlsche 
Anilin und Soda Fabrik as assignee:— 

18; 692,760; February 4, 1902; Bazlen; mak- 
ing hydrosulfites. 

24; 608,355; April 22, 1902; Baslen; making 
aromatic aldehyde and acid. 

24; 699.581; May 6, 1902; Seldel; indigo' 
diacetlc acid and making same. 

13; 711,377; October 14, 1902; Baslen; solid 
alkaline hydrosulfites and making same. 

24; 715,680; December 9, 1902; Meiser; aro- 
matic derivatives of ansldo comp. of fatty 
series. •* 

24; 718,840; January 18, 1908; Graul; making 
cyanmethyl derivatives of aromatic amids. 

24; 731,385; June 16, 1908; Oberreit; making 
indoxyl. 

24; 746,965; December 16, 1903; Knitsch ft* 
Holt; making indoxyl and derivatives thereof. 

24; 752,947; February 28, 1904; Bauml; mak- 
ing organic acid compounds. 

24; 756.171; March 29. 1904; Knietsch, Seidel 
ft Meiser; making indoxyl derivatives. 

11; 756.769; April 5, 1904; Wolf; comp. of 
matter and producing same. 

24; 765.576; July 19. 1904; Graul; making 
omegar cyanmethyl antnranillc acid. 

24; 765,697; July 19, 1904; Sapper ft Reubold; 
sulfo acid esters and making same. 

24; 772.775; October 18, 1904; October 18. 
1904; Behaghel ft Schumann; making indox- 
ylic compounds. 

1; 774,083; November 1, 1904; Knietsch; app. 
for making sulfuric anhydrid. 

24; 778,656; December 27, 1904; Graul; mak- 
ing acid nitrites. 

24; 778,772; December 27, 1904; Behaghel ft 
Schumann; making hydoxylalkylanilln. 

24; 780,404; January 17, 1906; Bazlen ft Lab- 
hard t; oxidlz, methyl groups In aromatic hy- 
drocarbons. 

1; 782,782; February 14, 1906; Knietsch ft 
Scharff; revivify platinum contact substances. 

24; 785,003; March 14, 1905; Julius; dlehlor 
methyl fluorene and making same. 

1; 794.512; July 11. 1905; Knietsch; catalytic 
substances and making same. 

24; 795,751; July 25. 1905; Bally; comps. of 
anthracene series and making same. 

18; 795,755; July 26, 1906; Baslen; making 
stable dry hydrosulfites. 

22; 798,103; September 29, 1906; Hutsler; 
making alkaline metal oxids. 



24; 798,104; August 29, 1905; Isler; anthra- 
cene comps. and making same. 

1; 798,802; August 29, 1906; Scharff ft 
S lamer; removing arsenic from gases. 

1; 800,218; September 19, 1905; Knietsch; 
making sulfuric acid. 

24; 814.187; March 6, 1906; Isler; anthro- 
quinone comps. and process of making. 

41; 818.841: April 17. 1906; Behaghel ft Schu- 
mann; making phenylglycin salts. 

18; 821.467; May 22. 1906; Bosch; prod, of 
cyanogen compounds. 

24; 828,741: August 14. 1906; Isler; anthra- 
quinone aldehydes and making same. 

24; 828,778; August 14, 1900; Scholl; oomps. 
of anthraquinone series and making same. 

24; 838,666; October 16, 1906; Bergs; prod, 
of camphene. 

18; 887,777; December 4, 1906; Baslen; man- 
ganese peroxid sulphate and making same. 

24; 845.129; February 26, 1907; Scholl; pre- 
paring anthraquinone compounds. 

18: 861.014; July 23, 1907; Baslen; prod, of 
stable dry hydrosulfites. 

13; 869,555; October 29, 1907; Rlnokenberger; 
stable dry hydrosulflte mixtures. 

24; 871,600; November 19, 1907; Labhardt; 
making zinc formaldehyde hydrosulflte. 

18; 871,640; November 19, 1907; Schonheu ft 
Gaus; making nitrites. 

13: 879,030; February 11, 1908; Bosch ft Mit- 
tasch; prod, of barium cyanide. 

24; 885,566: April 21, 1908; Bazlen; prod, of 
aldehyde sulfoxylates. 

24: 885,567; April 21, 1908; Becker; prod, of 
aldehyde sulfoxylates. 

24; 891,708; June 23, 1908; Labhardt; produc- 
ing indoxyllc compounds. 

24; 892/900: July 7. 1908; Schraube ft Hau- 
dlen; polychloranmidius and making same. 

24; £98,507; July 14, 1908; Isler; Omega 
halogen methyl anthraquinone comps. 

12; 903,047; November 8, 1908; Bergs; prod, 
borneol esters. 

21 i 911,468; February 2, 1909; Bosch; sapon- 
ification of alkaline earth cyanides. 

18; 928,012; May 25, 1909; Bosch ft Mtttasoh; 
productions of cyanide and cyanamlds. 

24; 926,028: June 22. 1909: Schraube ft Lau- 
dlen; polychloranllln derivatives. 

21; 957,848; May 10, 1910; Bosch; making 
ammonia. 

18; 957,842; May 10, 1910; Bosch; productiitn 
of titanium nitrogen compounds. 

21; 971.501; September 27. 1910; Haber ft 
Rosslgnol; production of ammonia. 

22: 988,834; February 7. 1911; Obernelt ft 
Moritz: dehydration of caustic alkali. 

13; 896,610; August 18, 1908; Bazlen ft Wohl- 
fahrt; making stable sine hydrosulflte. 

21; 990,191; April 18, 1911; Bosch; produc- 
ing ammonia. 

21; 990.192; April 18, 1911; Bosch; producing 
ammonia salts. 

21: 998.144; May 23, 1911; Bosch ft Mlttasch; 
producing ammonia. 

21; 999,025; July 26, 1911; Habor ft Le 
Rossignol, making ammonia. 

24; 1,003.289: September 12, 1911; Munch; 
4.4' dibrom-diphenyldieulfld-2.2' dicarboxyllc 
acid and obtaining such bodies. 

21; 1,006.206; October 17, 1911; Haber ft Ros- 
signol; production of ammonia. 

18; 1,013,984; January 1, 1918; Bosch & Wild; 
making nitrates. 

18: 1,022.851; April 2, 1912; Bosch ft Mlt- 
tasch; prod, cyanids and oyanamids. 

24; 1,025,662: May 7, 1912; Schmidt; chlor. 
aralkyl sulfonic acids and process. 

24; 1,026,418; May 14, 1912; Webel; prod, 
dloleflns. 

24; 1,026,419; May 14, 1912; Webel; prod, 
dloleflns. 

24; 1.026.420; May 14, 1912; Webel; prod, 
dloleflns. 

18: 1,027,812; May 21, 1912; Bosch ft Mlt- 
tasch; production or nltrids. 

24; 1.027.908: May 28. 1912; Schmidt; chlor. 
aralkyl chloride and processes. 

24; 1,032.822; July 16, 1912; Graul ft 
Hanschke; prod, halogenated paraffin hydro- 
carbons. 

24; 1.086,241; September 20, 1912; Holt ft 
Schmidt; automatic ammonium compounds and 
making same. 

21; 1,043,798: November 12, 1912; Bosch ft 
Mlttasch; producing ammonia and aluminum 
compounds. 

24; 1,045,189; November 26, 1912; Graul; 
making chlorinated hydrocarbons. 

10; 716,248; December 16, 1912; Knietsch ft 
Scharff; making sulfuryl chlorid. 

21; 1,053,951; February 18, 1913; Bosch ft 
Mlttasch; making ammonia. 

21; 1,053,952; February 18, 1913; Bosch ft 
Mlttasch; mfg. ammonia. 

13: 1,054,901; March 4. 1918; Bosch ft Mlt- 
tasch; compounds containing silicon and 
nitrogen and producing such compounds. 

13; 1,001,725; May 13, 1918; Bosch ft Mlt- 
tasch; compound containing silicon and nitro- 
gen and producing such compounds. 

18; 1,061.725; May 18. 1913; Bosch ft Mlt- 
tasch; prod, molybdenum nitrid. 

24; 1.063.004; May 27, 1913; Baslen, Rleger 
ft Wohlfahrt; crystalline monozlng formalde- 
hyde sulfoxylate. 

21: 1,068,007; May 27, 1918; Bosch, Mlttasch 
ft Hecht; production of ammonium sulfate. 

24; 1,068,172; May 27, 1918; Rampim; prod, 
amino anthraquinone and derivatives thereof. 

21; 1.068,966; July 29, 1913; Bosch, Mlttasch. 
Wolf ft Stein; prod, of ammonia and catalytic 
agents for use therein. 

21; 1.068,967; July 29, 1918; Bosch, Mlttasch, 
Wolf ft Stein; prod, of ammonia andcatalytie 
agent for use therein. 

21; 1,068,968; July 29. 1918; Bosch. Mlttasch, 
Wolf ft Stein; prod, of ammonia and catalytic 
agents for use therein. 



/ 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER- 



79 



i 



24; 1,065.182; June 17. 1918; Staudinger; 
producing isoprene. 

21: 1.068,969; July 29. 1918; Bosch, MiV- 
tasch, Wolf A Stein; prod, of ammonia and 
catalytic agents for use therein. 

24; 1.070.294; August 12. 1918; Schmidt; pro- 
ducing butadiene and derivatives thereof. 

21; 1,078,085; Bosch A Lappe; working with 
hydrogen under pressure. 

21; 1.077,034; October 28, 1918; Bosch; work- 
ing with hydrogen under pressure. 

24; 1.088.051; December 80, 1918; Boner; pro- 
ducing anthraquinone compounds. 

24; 1,088,164; December 80, 1918; Webel; 
producing isoprene. 

24; 1,088,165; December 80, 1918; Webel; 
producing laoprene. 

21; 1,083,585; March 6, 1914; Bosch A Mit- 
tasch; catalytic production of ammonia. 

21: 1.089,185; March 8, 1914; Bosch A Mit- 
tasch; producing ammonia. 

21; 1,091.284: March 24, 1914; Mittasoh A 
Morawits; producing ammonium sulfate. 

24; 1,091,276; March 24, 1914; Bergs; prod, 
unsaturated terpene hydrocarbons. 

1; 1,094,182; April 21, 1914; Wolf; produc- 
ing oxide of nitrogen. 

21; 1,094.194; April 21, 1914; Bosch et al., 
production of ammonia. 

24; 1,098,858; June 2, 1914; Webel; produc- 
ing chlorln derivatives of anyl series. 

24; 1,098.859; June 2, 1914; Webel; produc- 
ing isoprene. 

34: 1.104.611; July 21, 1914; Blangey; dini- 
tro-diamino benzophenone. M , 

24; 1,102,654; July 7, 1914; Oraul: producing 
2.8. dihalogen 2-methylbutane and homolognes 
thereof. 

24; 1,102,655; July 7, 1914; Oraul; producing 
tso olefins. 

18; 1.102,715; July 7, 1914; Bosch * Mlt- 
tasch; purification mixtures containing nltrids. 
21; 1.118.628; November 24, 1914; Bosch A 
Mittasch; prod, ammonia. 

21; 1,128.848; February 16, 1915; Bosch A 
Mittasch; prod, ammonia. 

21; 1,188,086; March 28, 1915; Bosch; prod, 
of ammonium sulphate. 

28* 1,148.570; August 3, 1015; Bosch et al.; 
catalytic agents for use in producing ammonia. 
21; 1,149,510; August 10, 1915: Haber. Bosch 
A Mittasch: producing ammonia. 

24; 1,168,070; January 11, 1916; Holt; mfg. 
of isoprene and hemologues thereof. 

21; 1.152,980; September 7, 1915; Bosch et 
al.; production of ammonia. 

18,-1,157,668; October 26. 1915; Boner; pro- 
ducing chromium salts. „-..„„ ,_ - «-.» 
21: 1,158,167; October 26, 1915; Bosch A Mit- 
tasoh; the production of ammonia. 

28; 1,178,582; February 29, 1916; Mittasch; 
catalytic agents and m a k i n g them. 

24; 1,178/560; February 29, 1916; Bosch; mfg. 
of urea. « __ 

24; 1,188,544; June 27. 1916; Julius A Fus- 
sennegger A Blanchey; derivatives of 1-amlno 
7-nanhthol. 

24; 1.201.850; October 17, 1916; Mittasch A 
Schneider; producing compounds containing 
carbon and hydrogen. 

21; 1,202,995; October 81, 1916; Haber A 
Rossignol; production of ammonia. 

1; 1,207.706 December 12, 1916; Bosch A 
Mittasch A Beck, mfg. of oxides of nitrogen. 

1; 1,207,707; December 12, 1916; Bosch A 
Mittasch A Beck; mfgs. of oxide of nitrogen. 

1; 1,207,708; December 12, 1916: Bosch & 
Mittasch & Beck; mfgs. of oxids of nitrogen. 

24; 1,207,802; December 12, 1916; Schmidt; 
producing aromatic amlns and catalyst* there- 
for 

2i; 1,211,898; .January 9, 1917; Bosch; mfg. 
of carbonic acia compounds of ammonia. 
28: 1,211,894; January 9, 1917; Bosch, Mit- 
l tasch A Beck; catalyzers. 

28; 1,215,834: February IS, 1917; Bosch A 
Mittasch A Schneider; hydrogenlzation and 
dehydrogenization of compounds containing 
carbon. 

28; 1,215,385; February 18, 1917; Bosch. 
Mittasch A Schneider; hydrogenisatlon and 
dehydrogenisation of carbon compounds. 

28; 1,215,896; February 18, 1917; Mittasch, 
Schneider A Morawitz; catalytic agents. 

21; 1.216.059; February 13. 1917; Bosch; ab- 
sorbing ammonia and apparatus therefor. 

20: 1,216,983; February 20, 1917; Bosch, Mit- 
tasch A Schneider; hydrogenlzation and de- 
hydrogenization of carbon compounds. 

24; 1,221.882; April 8. 1917; Schmidt, Hoch- 
schwender A Elchler; producing partially hy- 
drogenlzed monocyclic hydrocarbons. 

21; 1,225,755; May 15, 1917; Bosch A Mit- 
tasch; catalyltc production of ammonia. 

14; 1,287,828; August 21, 1017; Schmidt A 
Blankenhorn; effecting catalytic hydrogenlza- 
tions. 

21; 1,243,882; October 16, 1917; Bosch; pro- 
ducing ammonia. 

21: 1,244,580; October 80, 1917; Bosch A Mit- 
tasch; producing ammonia. 

24; 1,254.864; Schmidt A Andres; compounds 
suitable for tanning. 

24; 1,202.282; October 24, 1916; Oraul; pro- 
ducing 2 chlor. isopentane. 

28; 1,256.082; Mittasch A Schneider; cata- 
lytic agents. 

28; 1,271,018; July 2, 1918; Bosch. Mittasch. 
Krauch; hydrogenisatlon and dehydrogeniza- 
tlon of carbon compounds. 

24: 1.274.508; August 6, 1918; Bosch, Mit- 
tasch A Neresheimer; mfg. of urea. 

24; 1,278,229; September 10, 1918; Schmidt A 
Gunther: production water soluble condensa- 
tion products of naphthalene series. 

18; 1,278,580; September 10, 1918; Bosch A 
Mittasch; production compounds containing 
tungsten and nitrogen. 



C. F. Boehringer & Sohne, Assignee. 

The following patents were issued to C. F. 
Boehringer A Sonne as assignee:— 

24; 707.812; August 26. 1902; Ach; alkoxy 
caffein and making. 

24; 708.511; July 9, 1902; Ach; paramethyl 
amldophkuly-gyoxyllo acid and process of 
making same. 

24; 708,512; September 9, 1902; Ach; disacetyl 
dlamms and making. 

24; 788,404; September 8, 1908; Buchner; re- 
ducing nitro compounds. 

24; 802,792; October 24, 1905; Ach; making 
camphor. 

24; 802,793; October 24. 1906; Ach; making 
camphor. 

24; 922,995; May 25, 1909; Ach A Sutter; 
salicylic acid derivatives and making same. 

24; 988,182; October 26. 1909; Elnhorn; gual- 
acol carbonate sulfo acid derivatives. 

24; 948,084; February 1, 1910; Ach; esters of 
dialy collie acid and preparation of same. 

24; 1,082.642; July 167 1912; Ach; tasteless 
qulnln comp. and process. 

24; 1,075,279; Ach A Rothxnan; arsenic acids 
and making same. 

24; 1,081,079; December 9, 1918; Ach A Roth- 
man; art making of dinitro methylnltramtno 
and acids. 

24; 1,129.165; February 28. 1915; Max Buch- 
ner: chlorinating. 

24; 1,239,867; September 11, 1917; Blagden; 
hydrogenating organic substances. 

24; 708,513; September 9, 1902; Ach; thioxan- 
thius and process of making. 

24; 1,061,189; May 6, 1913; Straub; art of 
preparing alkaloid salts. 



Johann A. Wulfing, Assignee. 

The following patents were Issued to Johann 
A. Wulfing as assignee:— 

24; 852.993; May 7. 1907; Bergell; bexa- 
methylenetetramin sodium acetate double salt. 

24; 1,003,151; September 12, 1911; Inade; pro- 
ducing non -hygroscopic albuminous preps. 

24; 1,030/747; June 25. 1912; Inade; produc- 
ing water-soluble crystalline aluminum for- 
mate and prod, obtained thereby. 

24; 1.055.405: March 11. 1918: Lauch A 
Zuade; producing comp. of formaldehyde with 
sugars. 

24; 1,062,501; May 20, 1918; Zuade; producing 
compounds of formaldehyde with sugars. 

24; 1,129,958; March 2, 1915; Albert Busch; 
mfg. lithium acetylsallcylate. 

24; 1.225.407; May 8, 1917; Busch A Lauch; 
mfg. of calcium acetyl salicylate. 



/. D. Riedel Aktiengesellschaft, As- 
signee. 

The following patents were Issued to J. D. 
Riedel Aktlengesellschaft as assignee:— 

24; 780,619; January 24, 1906; Pschorr; mor- 
phine comp8. and process of making same. 

24; 811,193; January 30. 1906; Worner; mer- 
cury salts of chollc acid and making same. 

24; 1,079.246; November 18. 1918; Houben; 
process mfg. of derivatives of pheny-clycin. 

24; 1.094,296; .April 21, 1914; Bergell; phar- 
maceutical of medicinal compounds and process 
for producing same. 

13; 1,131,508; March 9, 1915; Rabert Gaus; 
process for prod, of hydra ted aluminoailicates, 
etc. 

24; 1.133,916; March 80. 1915; Boedecker; 
comp. hexamethylen tetramln. 



Saltpetersawe Industrie Cesellschaft, 

Assignee. ' 

The following patents were issued to Salt- 
petersauer Industrie Gesellschaft as assignee:— 

13; 991,356; May 2, 1911; Pauling; mfg. ni- 
trites and nitrates. 

13; 1,061,680; May 18, 1918; Pauling; absorb- 
ing dilute nitrous gases. 

1; 1,081,864; July 9, 1912; Pauling; concen- 
trating nitric add. 

1; 1,031,865; July 9, 1912; Pauling; concen- 
trating nitric acid. _ 

1; 1,037,977; September 10, 1912; Pauling; 
absorbing nitrous gases. 



manufacture of harmless combinations of sul- 
focyanic acid. 

24; 1.051,165; January 21, 1918; Selfert A 
Todtenhaupt; mfg. of cellulose esters of fatty 
acids. 

21; 1,148,194; July 27, 1915; Selfert A Lei- 
brock; mfg. of alkali anid. 

18; 1,149,712; August 10, 1915; Bleckwenn: 
mfg. of salts of formaldehyde sulfurous acid 
with aluminum oxid. 

24; 1,260,707; March 26, 1918; Philips A 
Schmitt: mfg. aromatic stlblnic acid. 



,R. Wedekind & Co., Assignee. 

The following patents were Issued to R. 
Wedeklnd A Co. as assignee:— 

3; 826.509; Jury 17, 1908; Ilkinsky; alizarin 
sulfo acid and making same. 

3; 826.510; July 17, 1906; Ilkinsky; anthra- 
florin dlsulfonic acid and making same. 

24; 847.078; March 12, 1907; Ilkinsky; pro- 
duction of organic acids. 

21; 864.513; August 27. 1907; Goldschmldt, 
Caspari A Nydegger; prod, of ammonium ni- 
trate. k 

21; 986.204; March 7, 1911; Nydegger; mak- 
ing pure ammonium nitrate. 

13; 1.003,875; September 19. 1911; Caspari; 
making granular sodium bichromate. 
• 1; 1.008.847; November 14, 1911 J Meyer; mak- 
ing sulfur dloxld. 

Chemische Werkevorm Dr. Heinrich 
B$k* Assignee. 

The following patents were issued to Chem- 
ische Werkevorm Dr. Heinrich Byk as as- 
signee;— 

24; 919,161; April 20, 1909; Gruter; theophyl- 
lln compounds. 

13; 975,129; November 8, 1910; Gruter & 
Pohl; stable mixtures for producing hydrogen 
peroxid. 

13; 975.358; November 8. 1910; Gruter A 
Pohl; stable mixtures for producing hydrogen 
peroxid. 

24; 1,095,205; May 5. 1914; Gruter A Pohl; 
manufacture of lactld. 

24; 1,160,595; November 16, 1915; Gruter A 
Pohl; manufacture of esters of oxy fatty acids. 

13; 975,854; November 8. 1910; Gruter A 
Pohl; stable mixture for producing hydrogen 
peroxid. • 

13; 999,497; August 1, 1911; Gruter; making 
stable calcium perborate. 

E. Merck, Assignee. 

The following patents were issued to B. 
Merck as assignee:— 

24; 705,546; July 22, 1902; Smith; clneol 
arsenate and making same. 

24; 782,789; February 14, 1906; Fischer; C. C. 
Dlalkyl barbituric acids and making same. 

24; 782,740; February 14, 1906; Fischer; 
dipropyl barbituric acid analogous derivatives 
and making same. 

24; 782.741; February 14, 1905; Fischer; dl- 
substituted barbituric acids and making same. 

24; 782,742; February 14, 1905; Fischer; tri- 
substltuted barbituric acids and wyfttng same. 

24; 814,496; August 6, 1906; Wolfes; making 
barbituric acids. 

24; 856.622; June 11, 1907; Conrad; manufac- 
turing dlalkylbarbituric acid. 

24; 893,308; July 14, 1908; Conrad; making 
dlalkyl barbituric acid. 

24; 907,664; December 22, 1908; Wolfes; man- 
ufacturing dlalkyl barbituric adds. 

24; 907,665; December 22. 1908; Wolfes; man- 
ufacturing barbituric acids. 

24; 913,311; February 23, 1909; Selfert; man- 
ufacturing new stable iodln compounds of fats. 

24; 763,008; June 21. 1904; Kobert; saponins 
and making same. 

24; 770,748; September 27, 1904; Fischer; 
making dlalkylbarbituric acids. 

24; 773,251; October 25, 1904; Fischer von 
Mering; ureids of dlalkyl acetic acids and 
making same. 

24; 1.185.687; June 6, 1916; Dlehl; compounds 
of qulnln and dlalkylbarbituric acids. 



Chemische Fabrik von Hejfden Actien- 
gesellschaft, Assignee. 

The following patents were Issued to "Chem- 
ische Fabrik von Heyden Actiengesellschaft • 
as assignee:— 

24; 712,190; October 28. 1902; Hentschel; 
making phenylglydn. 

24; 740,702; October 6. 1908; Slefert A En- 
gel hard t; acetylsallcylate of sodium. 

24; 749,634; January 12, 1904; Selfert; acetyl 
para cresotlnlo acid. 

24; 779,377; January 8, 1905; Selfert A 
Philipp; bornyl esters and making camphor, 
etc. 

24; 808,407; December 26, 1905; Selfert; mak- 
ing guanyl dlalkyl barbituric acid. 

24: 809,588; January 9, 1906; Selfert; bismuth 
disalicylate and making same. 

24; 849,018; April 2, 1907; Philipp; camphor 
from lsoborneol. 

24; 919,762; April 27, 1909; Philipp; produc- 
ing isobornyl esters. 

24; 962,108; June 21, 1910; Selfert A Hahle; 
** making pure ortho and para guaiacol sul- 
fonic salts. 

24; 1.010.447; December 5. 1911; Working; 



Actiengesellschaft fur Anilin Fabrika- 
tion. Assignee. 

The following patents were issued to Aotien- 
gesellschaft fur Anllln Fabrikatlon as as- 
signee:— 

24; 798,868; September 5, 1905; Altschul; 
making dlalkyl barbituric acid. 

24; 800,785; September 26, 1905; Geldermann; 
dlamidodiphenylamin sulfonic acids and mak- 
ing same. 

24; 808.541; October 81, 1905; Bergell; bromo 
lecithin and making same. 

24; 813.272; February 20, 1906; Altschul; 
making silk flblvin peptone. 

24; 851,444; April 28, 1907; Schul these; anido 
oxy sulfonio acids of phenylnaphthinldosol. 

24; 800,918; September 26, 1907; Hersberg A 
Thou; nitrating aromatic amlns. 

24; 869.078; October 22, 1907; Erdmann; para 
amldodephenylamin sulfonic acid and produc- 
ing same. 

24; 869.686; October 29. 1907; Mankiwlcs A 
Altschul; borates of hexamethyleneamin and 
making same. 



>80 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



24; 988,089; November 2. 1909; Altschul; new 
mercury salt of paramlnophenylarsenlc acid. 

24; 1.016,092; January 80, 1912; Reinioke; 
para alkyloxyphenylethylamlna and their n. 
alky] derivatives. 

24; 1,016,784; February 6, 1912; Schott; or- 
ganic mercury compounds. 

24; 1.098,667; April 14, 1914; Witt; stable 
nltrobensene diasonium derivatives. 

24; 1,168,164; January 11, 1916; Clement A 
Riviere; derivatives of cellulose containing* the 
residue of an organic acid and nitrogen and 
process of making same. 

24; 1,188.711; May 16, 1916; Altschul A Ur- 
ban; compounds of safranln dyes especially 
adapted for Internal use. 

24; 1,219.226; March 18, 1917; Berganl A Sae- 
mann; manufacture of Detain from vinassee. 

24; 1.219.904; March 20. 1917; Kirchhoff A 
Lougi; ortbo oxy monoazo dyes. 



Knoll & Co., Assignee. 

The foJ lowing patents were Issued to Knoll 
A Co. as assignee:— 

24; 742,582; October 27. 1908; Vieth; cotarnin 
phthalate and giaking same. 

24; 862,867; August 6, 1907; Vieth; santalo;* 
carbonates. 

24; 862.858; August 6, 1907; Vieth; insipid 
sandalwood oil preparations. 

24; 891.218; June 16.- 1908; Knoevenagel A 
Lebach; cellulose derivatives. 

24; 914,518; March 9. 1909; Saam; alpha 
halogen isonaleryl urea and making same. 

24; 998,726; July 25, 1911; Vieth; phenol- 
phthalein dissovalerate. 

24; 1,037,686; September 8. 1912; Lambach; 
casein derivatives and manufacture of same. 

24; 1,241,005; October 2, 1917; Knoevenagel; 
modifying acetyl cellulose. 



Vereinigte Ckininfabriken Zimmer & 
Co., Assignee. 

The following patents were issued to Verel- 
nlgte Chlnlnfabrlken Zimmer A Co. as as- 
signee:— 

24; 695.591; March 18. 1902; Mrou; anlsac 
acid ethers of cinchona alkaloids. 

24; 696,609; April 1. 1902; Throu; susslnic 
acid ethers of cinchona alkaloids. 

24; 697.042; April 18, 1902; Mrou; cinnamic 
ethers of cinchona alkaloids. 

24; 697.079; April 22, 1902; Throu; salicylate 
of salicyl quineu, etc. 

24; 701,528; June 3, 1902; Throu; making 
alkyl ethers of cinchona alkaloid carbonic 
acids. 

24; 1.077,442; November 4. 1918; Throu; hy- 
droganlzlng organic compounds. 

1; 752.165; February 16, 1904; Hazenbach; 
contact appl. for prod, of sulphuric anhy. ' 

24; 841.738; January 15. 1907; Throu; boracic 

24; 888,857; May 26, 1908; Spoongerts; brom- 
valeric acid menthol ester. 

24; 917.096; April 6. 1909; Mezger A We Her; 
theobromin double salts. 

24; 922.538; May 25, 1909; Sprongerts; sana- 
tol esters. 

24; 978.792; December 18, 1910; Throu; tuinuo 
esters. 

24; 989,664; April 18, 1911; Throu; manufac- 
ture of hydrocinchona alkaloids. 

24; 1,016,977; February 18. 1912; Throu, 
Sprongerts and Freund; manufacture of car- 
bl nates of tertiary alcohols. 

24; 1,019,285; March 5, 1912; Throu; quinln 
esters aromatic amino acids and processes. 

24; 1,038,027; September 10, 1912; Throu; 
manufacture of hydroquenln. 

24; 1.041.528; October 15, 1912; Throu; man- 
ufacture of esters of hydrocinchiona alkaloids. 

24; 1.049,172; December 31, 1912; Throu; 
manufacture of esters of the hydrocinchona 
alkaloids. 

24; 1,062,208; May 20, 1913; Throu; manu- 
facture of products of alkyl derivatives and 
substituted alkyl derivatives of hydrocupreine. 



Chemische Fabril? Griesheim Elektron, 

Assignee. 

The following patents were issued to Chem- 
ische Fabrik Griesheim Electron as assignee:— 

24; 716.776; December 23, 1902; Spiegel; salts 
of yohimbine. 

18; 784.640; March 14, 1905; Suchy; making 
chromates. 

1; 819,262; May 1. 1906; Baither; concen- 
trating diluted nitric acid. 

1; 841.278; January 8, 1907; Suchy; manufac- 
turing chromic acid. 

12; 888.122; May 19, 1908; Schultxe; manu- 
facture of chlorinated compounds of lime. 

1; 891,708; June 28, 1908; Jonas; removal of 
arsenic -from liquid and gases. 

1; 891.775; June 23, 1908; Jonas; removal of 
arsenic from liquid and gases. 

24; 908,051; December 29, 1908; Volgt; man- 
ufacture of acetylene tetrachlorld. 

13; 934,467; September 21. 1909; Schulze; 
manufacture of chlorln compounds of lime. 

22; 971.144; September 27, 1910; Reits; pre- 
paring caustic soda. 

22; 971.145; September 27, 1910; ReiU; pre- 
paring caustic potash. 

28; 971.149; September 27, 1910; Schick; cat- 
alytic bodies and making same. 



24; 999.062; July 25, 1911; Suiger; manufac- 
ture of anthranol. 

24; 1.011,500; December 12, 1011; Schnlts- 
pahn; making; phenylgylcin salts. 

24; 1,028.521; June 4. 1912; Zitscher A Rathr 
anthracene derivatives and process. » 

24; 1.044.169; November 12, 1912; Orunsteln; 
manufacture from acetylene, of acetaldehyde 
and condensation of polymerization products 
thereof. 

1; 1,048.953; December 81, 1912; Fulda; man- 
ufacture of sulfuric acid. 

10; 1.054,250; February 25. 1913; Stock; ob- 
taining pure phosphorous sesqulsulfld. 

24; 1.066,777; July 8, 1913: Zitscher A Rath; 
making nltro derivatives of the anthraquinon 
series. 

13; 1,068,522; July 29, 1918; Munch; manu- 
facture of zinc sodium hydrosulflte. 

24; 1,081.959; December 28, 1918; Orunsteln; 
manufacturing acetic acid. 

24; 1,101,111; June 23, 1914; Zitscher; proc- 
ess arylamlds of 2.3 oxy naphthoic acid. 

24; 1.103,388; July 14, 1914; Singer A Milarch; 
making anthraquinone. 

13; 1,207,782; December 12, 1916; Marburg 
A Munch; production of anhydrous hydrosul- 
fltes from aqueous hydrosulfltea solutions. 

24; 1,119,546; December 1, 1914; Singer; mak- 
ing anthraqulne. 

13; 1,166.107;. October 12, 1915; Specketer & 
Munch; prod, of anhydrous hydrosulfltes from 
aqueous hydrosulflte solutions. 

24; 1,162,496: November 80. 1915; Laska A 
Rath: dyes of the anthraquinone series and 
making same. 

13; 1,169,365; January 25, 1916; Specketer A 
Marburg; mfg. of reduction products of sul- 
furous acids and salts thereof. 

24; 1.174,250; March 7, 1916; Grunstein; pro- 
ducing acetic acid. T 

24; 1,184,177; May 28, 1916; Grunstein; mfg. 
of acetaldehyde. 

24; 1,206.232; November 28, 1916; Laska; axo 
dyestuffs and producing same. 

13; 1,212.702; January 16, 1917; Specketer A 
Hofmann; mfg. of alkali and alkaline earth 
metal suflids. 

18; 1,236,978; August 14, 1918; Plstor A 
Reltz; mfg. of calcium hypochlorite. 



Farbwerke vorm. Meister, Lucius & 
Bruning, Assignee. 

The following patents were issued to Farb- 
werke vorm. Meister Lucius and Breunlng as 
assignee :— 

24; 691,157; January 14, 1902; Merling; 
trimethyl hexahydraoxy bensylanllln, etc. 

24; 697,780; April 15, 1902; Llebrecht; isoval- 
eramld. 

1; 700,512: May 20, 1902; Krauss A Berneck; 
making sulfuric acid and sulfur anhydrld. 

24; 701,044; eMay 27, 1902; Homolka A 
Sohwan; making phenylamlds acetonltrile. 

24; 712.246; October 28. 1902; Bolzano; mak- 
ing formylmethylanthranillo acid. 

24; 712,798; November 4, 1902; Homolka A 
Bolzano; making indoxyl. 

24; 713.482; November 11, 1902; Hepp; mak- 
ing polyamldo anthraquinone sulfa acid. 

24; 714.000; November 18. 1902; Liebknecht 
A Homolka; making indoxyl. 

24; 714,981; December 2, 1902; Merling; 
hydrobenzaldehydes and making same. 

1; 720,361; February 10, 1908; Krauss A 
von Berneck; regenerating platinum contact 
substances. 

1; 726,076: April 21, 1908; Blanc A Krauss; 
making sulfuric anhydrld. 

24; 727,889; May 5. 1908; Laubmann; blue 
dyes and making same. 

24; 743,306; November 8, 1908; MeNing A 
Welde; trimethyl cyclohexewon oarboxylic acid 
esters and making same. 

24; 757,186; April 12, 1904; Moest; oxidizing 
organic compounds. 

24; 761.998; June 7. 1904; Rikert A Epstein; 
alkyl esters of 2-3 dlamido benzoic acid and 
making same. 

24; 768.756; June 28, 1904; Homolka A Erber; 
reaction on nitramlns with formaldehyde and 
products thereof. 

24; 768,389; August 23, 1904; Merling, etc.; 
cyclogeraniolidenaee tones and making same. 

24; 768,898; August 28, 1904; Overlach; pyra- 
solone comps. and making same. 

24; 777,962; December 20, 1904; Liebrecht; 
Indoxyl comps. and making same. 

24; 782,679; February 14, 1905; Merling A 
Welder; pseudo cydocltralldene acetone and 
making same. 

24; 784,411; March 7, 1905; Merling & Welde; 
materials for perfumes and making same. 

24; 784,412; March 7, 1905: Merling A Welde; 
materials for perfumes and making same. 

24: 790,116; May 16, 1905; Elnhorn; making 
diethyl barbituric acids. 

24: 795.495; July 25. 1905; Einhorn; making 
alkyl barbituric acids. 

13: 804.157; November 7, 1905; Mueller; mak- 
ing hydrosulflte preparations. 

24; 805.800; November 28, 1905; Sohst; dla- 
midoformyl. 

24; 805.924; November 28, 1905; Merling A 
Skiter; cyclogeranic acid. 

24; 812,554; February 13. 1906; Elnhorn; 
alkimin esters of para-anlnobenzoic acid. 

24; 815,653; March 20. 1906; Stolz; alkyl - 
amlnoacetopyrocatechol and making same. 

24; 820,830; May 15, 1906; Stolz A Reuter; 
alkaminesters. 

24; 822.672; June 5, 1906; Kell; making 
dialkylmalonyl ureas. 

24; 828.071; August 7, 1006; Stolz A Korn- 
dorfer; alkamln esters. 



1; 889,500; December 25, 1908; Muller; hyro- 
sulflte preparations. 

24; 841,466; January 15, 1907; Schmldlln; 
making phenylglyoin. 

24; 841,999; January 22, 1907; Muller A Wol- 
lenberg; making formaldehyde sulfoxylates. 

24; 862,674; August 6. 1907; Stolz A Flaecher; 
making ortho-dtoxypbenylethanolethylamln. 

24; 862,675; August 6. 1907; Stolz A Flaecher; 
ortho-dioxyphenylethanolamine. 

24; 868,294; October 16, 1907; Schmidlin; 
prod, phenylglycln and its homologues. 

24; 871,607; November 19, 1907; Homolka A 
Erber; anthrachrysone derivatives. 

24; 877.702; January 28. 1908; Bryk; making 
arylthioglycollic orthocarboxylic acids. 

24; 888.821; May 19. 1908; Ehrllch A Bert- 
helm; arsenoarylglyclns. 

24; 889,010; May 26, 1908; Homolka A 
Welde; making methylthtophenol ortho oar- 
boxylic acids. 

24; 907.016; December 15, 1908; Ehrlich A 
Bertheim; acyl derivatives of para amino - 
phenylarsinlc acid. 

24; 907,017; December 15, 1908; Einhorn; 
dlaminobenzoic add alkamln esters. 

24; 907.978; December 29, 1908; Ehrllch A 
Bertheim ; hydroxyarylarsenoxlds. 

24; 909,880; January 12, 1909; Ehrlich A 
Bertheim; arsenopbenols. 

24; 909,708; January 12, 1909; Stock; ketone 
sulfoxylate and making same. 

24; 918,940; March 2, 1909; Benda; mfg. of 
homologues of para aminophenylarsinic acids. 

24; 936,880: October 12. 1909; Stolz A Streit- 
wolf; para dialkylaminoaryl-2.4 dialkyl-8 oxy- 
methyl 5-pyrazolona, 

24- 937,929; October 26, 1900; Ehrllch A Bert- 
heim; derivatives of aminoarylarsinlc acids. 

24; 968,126; July 6, 1910; Ehrlich A Bert- 
heim; arsenoaryglycolMc acids. 

24; 986,148; March 7, 1911; Ehrlich & Bert- 
heim; derivatives of oxyarlylarsinic acids and 
making same. 

24; 988,082; March 28, 1911; Rossuer A Cot- 
ton; mfg. new organic fatty acid compound. 

24; 990,810; April 26. 1911; 8tole; 1. 'para- 
dimethylamenophenyl 2. 8. 4-trmethyl 6. pyraz- 
olone and processes of making same. 

24; 1,002,248; September 6, 1911; Ehrllch A 
Bertheim; aminooxyarylarsenoxlds and making 
same. 

24; 1,017,657; February 20, 1912; Ehrllch A 
Bertheim; arsenobenzene derivatives. 

24; 1,017,699; February 20, 1912; Stolz; 1-P- 
dlmethylanlnophenyl-3. 4. -4-trlvaethyl-5-pyraz- 
olone and processes. 

24; 1.024,993; April 80, 1912; Karndoerfer; 
derivatives of diaminedioxyarsenobenzene. 

24; 1,026,094; May 14, 1912; Kahn; arseno 
oomp. and making same. 

24; 1,028,101; June 4. 1912; Ehrllch A Benda; 
arseno comp. 

24; 1.033,904; July 80, 1912; Kahn; arseno 
comps. and processes. 

24; 1,036,784; August 27. 1912; Benda; 5- 
nltro-2-amlnobenzene 1 arsenic acid. 

24; 1,038,003; September 10, 1912; Schmidt 
A Kranzleln; pure-B-anthraqulnoxyl urea- 
chlorid and processes of making same. 

24; 1,040,260; October 8, 1912; Benda; 2.6- 
diaminobenzene arsinio acid. 

24; 1,048,002; December 24, 1912; 8tolz A 
Flaecher; derivatives of dioxydiamino arseno- 
benzene and process of making same. 

1; 1,049,754; January 7, 1918; Moest A Bern- 
eck; mfg. of nitric acid. 

1; 1,050,160; January 14, 1918; Moest, Bern- 
eck A Opl; mfg. concentrated nitric acid. 

24; 1,063,240; February 18, 1918; Stolz; pyraz- 
olone derivatives. 

24: 1.058,800; February 18, 1918; Korndorfer 
A Reuter; derivating of diamin and making 
same. 

24; 1,056,881; March 25, 1918; Bockmuhl A 
Elbert; alkylsulfltes of amino substituted 
pyrazolones and making same. 

24; 1,069,988: April 29, 1918; Ehrlich A 
Bertheim; alkali compounds of dioxy, etc. 

24; 1,064.227; June 10, 1918; Kircher; salt of 
feexamethyleretKramln and making same. 

24; 1,069.296; August 5, 1918; Schwabe; deriv- 
atives of phenylcinchoninic acid. 

24; 1,075,587; October 14, 1913; Benda; nltro- 
aminophenylaic acid. 

24; 1,077.462; November 4, 1913; Ehrllch A 
Bertheim; derivatives of acldylamlnooygarsen- 
obenzene and making same. 

24; 1,087.157; February 17, 1914; Ehrllch A 
Bauer; colored compounds of seleno-azin series 
and making same. 

24; 1,091,881; March 81, 1914; Ehrlich, Reuter 
A Karrer; arseno metal preparations and mak- 
ing same. 

10; 1.096,892; May 12, 1914; Rohmer; prod, 
nitrogen simultaneously with oxides of ni- 
trogen. 

1; 1,096,393; May 12, 1914; Rohmer; produc- 
ing nitrogen simultaneously with oxides of 
nitrogen. 

24; 1,104,149; July 21, 1914; Spless; auric 
compounds from cantharldylethlendlamln and 
making same. 

24; 1,104.943; July 28. 1914; Unlenhuth; pro- 
ducing amino anthraqulnones. 

24: 1,108,154; August 25, 1914; Ehrllch A 
Karrer; arsenostiblno compounds and making 
same. 

24: 1,115,608; November 3, 1914; Spless A 
Feldt; double salts of gold hydrocyanic acids 
and process. 

24; 1.115.009; November 8, 1914; Spless A 
Feldt; dlcantharldyletbylene diaminmono- 
aurocyanid and process. 

24; 1,115,010; November 8. 1914; Spless «e 
Feldt: salts of aurothiosulfuric acid and 
process. • 

24; 1.116.898; November 10, 1914; Ehrich A 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



81 



Bertheim; dihydrochlorid of dlamlnodioxyar- 
senobenzene. f 

24; 1,117.852; November 17, 1914; Ehrllch A 
Karrer; alkali . metal salts of 8.3 diamino 4.4 
dioxyarsenobenzene combined witb copper, 
etc. 

24; 1,120.700; December 15, 1014; Ehrllch A 
Karrer; araeno azo comp. ana prueem. 

1; 1.121,004; December 15, 1914; Emrich; 
scathers or scrapers for stirring app. in sul- 
phate furnaces. r 

24; 1,125,811; January 10. 1015; Hahnen- 
kamm; arylated naphthylanln sulfonic acids 
and procs. 

24; 1,127,608; February 9. 1915; Ehrllch A 
Karrer; alkali salts of 3.8' diamino dioxyar- 
senobenzene and silver, eto. 

24; 1.128.369; February 16, 1915; Schmidt A 
Kronlein; carbazol-sulfonlo acids and making 
same, 

24; 1.128,870; Schmidt A Kronlein; indo- 
phenolsulfonio acids and making; same. 

1; 1,145.162; July 6, 1915; Moest & Eck- 
hardt; preparing; nitric acid of high concen- 
tration. 

24; 1,151,928; August 81, 1915; Duden A 
Peters; preparing acetaldehye from acetylene. 

24; 1.151.929; August 81, 1915; Duden A 
Peters; preparing acetaldehyde from acetylene. 

24; 1.156.044; October 12. 1915; Ach A Roth- 
mann; preparing amimo arsenobenzenes. 

24; 1.156.045; October 12. 1915; Ach, Roth- 
mann A Dieter! ch; preparing 2 cholo. 4 mino- 
benzene 1 arslnic acids. 

24; 1,161,866; November 80, 1916; Kautzsch; 
compound of silver glyoocholate readily soluble 
in water. 

24; 1,161,867; November 30, 1915; Kautzsch; 
compound of silver glycochlate readily soluble 
in water and making same. 

24; 1,168.496; December 7, 1915; Ach. Roth- 
mann A Hartzlg; preparing nitrated amino- 
benzol arslnic acid. 

24; 1,180.627; April 25. 1916;. Ach; preparing 
organic compounds containing arsenic. 

24; 1,181,485; May 2. 1916; Schwab© ; oxy- 
phenylglunolin-dlxarboxylic acid and making 
same. 

24; 1,207,284; December 5. 1916; Feldt & 
Fritzche; auromercaptobenzenes and making 
same. 

24; 1,209.168; December 19, 1916; Homolka; 
vat dyestuffs and making same. 

24; 1,214,924; February 6, 1917; Karrer; com- 
plex arseno compounds and process of making 
same. 

24; 1.230,185; June 19. 1917; Luders; 1 lodo- 
2.8 dlhydroxypropane nad making same. 

24; 1.076.160; November 14, 1913; Schwabe; 
hexamethylenetetramln salts of the carboxylic 
acids. 



Chemische Fabrik auf Actien, 

Assignee. 

The following patents were issued to Chem- 
ische Fabrik auf Actlen (E. Sobering as as- 
signee) :— 

24; 690,804; January 7, 1902; Wichmann & 
Oabler; salt of hexamethylentetramin and 
qulnlc acM and making same. 

24; 692,656; February 4. 1902; Harries; acidyl 
derivatives of unsymmetrical acetonol kamlns 
and making same. 

24; 699.422; May 6. 1902; Sternberg; methy- 
lene citric acid and making same. 

24; 725.890; April 21. 1903; Stephan; making 
camphene. 

24; 726,126; April 21, 1908; Wichmann A 
Kippenberg; mercury salts of ethylenedtamlne 
bases and making same. 

24; 748.986; November 10, 1903; Nicolaier A 
Hunsals; methylene hlppurio acid and making 
same. 

24; 751.216; February 2, 1904; Stephan & 
Kaiser; acidyl derivatives of refulgaiuc acid 
and ethers and making same. 

24; 761,260; May 31, 1904; Sternberg; comps. 
of formaldehyde. 

24; 770.940; September 27, 1904; Stephan & 
Hunsalz; making camphor. 

24; 780.241; January 17. 1905; Stephan & 
Hunsalz; making dialkyl barbituric acid. 

24; 790.601; May 28. 1905; Stephan A Hun- 
salz; making camphor. 

24; 801,483; October 10, 1905; Hunsalz; mak- 
ing camphor. 

24; 801.484; October 10. 1905; Emllewicz; 
methylenglycerusallcylicacldester and making 
same. 

24; 801.485; October 10. 1905; Rehlander; 
making camphor. 

. 24; 817,164; April 10. 1906; Emilewicz; ben- 
zoylalkylaminoethanols and making same. 

24; 826.165; July 17. 1906; Hesse; making 
bormeol. 

24; 887,899; December 4. 1906; Emilewlez; 
alkylamlnoethylpentyl benzoates. 

24; 879.499; February 18, 1908; K. Stephen & 
P. Hunsals; mfg. dialkyl barbituric acids. 

24; 922,040; May 18, 1909; Rehlander; aralkl- 
para-amino phenols. 

24; 980,054; August 8, 1BP9; Dohrn; bromi- 
sovalerlc esters of the borneols. 

24; 979,887; December 27, 1910; Rehlander; 
vanadium acid oxalate and making same. 

24; 994.487; June 6, 1911; Aschan & Kempe; 
preparing camphor. 

24: 994.445; June 6, 1911; Dohrn A Thlele; 
methoxymethylmentbol. 



24; 1.001.988; August 29. 1911; Dohrn & 
Thiele ; methoxymethy 1 sanatol. 

24; 1,002,547; September 5, 1911; Wichmann; 
alkaline albumose-silver compounds. 

24; 1,002,548; September 6, 1911; Wichmann; 
albumose-silver-ammonia products. 

24; 1,027.790; May 28. 1912) Zuelzer; pan- 
creas preparations suitable for treatment of 
diabetes. 

24; 1.082,128; July 9. 1912; Dohrn A Thlele; 
mfg. phenylated 6.6 dlqulnolyl-4.4-dicarboxyllc 
add and homologues. 

24; 1,084.856; August 6. 1912; Zuelzer; bio- 
logical preparations for prod, of intestinal peri- 
stalsis. 

24; 1,045.877; November 26, 1912; Dohrn; 
methyl esters of 8-methoxy-2-phenylqulnolln 4- 
carboxylio acid. 

24; 1.045,378; November 26. 1912; Dohrn;' 
ethyl esters of 8-methoxy-2-phenylqulnolin-4- 
carboxyilc acid. 

24; 1,045,870; November 26, 1012; Dohrn; 
methyl esters of 8-methyl-2-phenylquinolin-4- 
carboxylic acid 

24: 1.045.759; November 26, 1912; Thiele; 
ethyl esters of 6-methyl-2-phanylquinolln-4- 
c&rboxvlic acid 

24; 1,053.690; February 18. 1018; Witte; mfg. 
of acetyl derivatives of alkylated iminopy- 
rimidlns. 

24; 1,057,680; April 1* 1918; Stephan; prod, of 
lsoprene. 

24; 1,075,171; October 7, 1913; Thlele A Wick- 
mann; mfg. of 2 phenylquinolin 4 carboxylic 
acid.- 

24; 1,082,780; December 80. 1913; Thlele; 
pharmaceutical compounds. 

24; 1.086.881; February 10, 1914; Zollner; 
glycolic acid esters of 2 phenylquinolin 4 car- 
boxylic acid. 

24; 1,001.870; March 81. 1914; Thiele; sulfo 
compounds of quinolin-4-carbonylic acids ary- 
lated in the 2 position. 

24; 1.148.637; August 3, 1915; Thiele; pyro- 
lidin derivatives. 

24; 1.185.265; May 20. 1916; Thiele; pharma- 
ceutical compounds. 

24; 1,197,462; September 6, 1916; Dohrn; 2 
naphthylquinolln-4-carboxyllc acid. 



Class 71 — Fertilizers. 

Sub-class 8; No. 691.865; date. January 1, 
1902; inventor, Dlttler; invention, app. for. 
clarifying fecal matter. > 

7: 786.730; August 18, 1903; Hoyermann; 
processes of rendering the phosphoric acid in 
natural phosphates soluble in citric acid. 

7; 721,489; February 24, 1903; Walters; 
procs. of making citrate soluble phosphates. 

7; 789.647; May 9, 1905; Arena; procs. of 
making dibasic calcium phosphate. * 

9; 824,791; July 8, 1906; R. and J. Jenker A 
Pleyl; insecticide fertilisers. 

6; 838.108; December 11, 1906; Hammer* 
schlag; procs. of prepar. manure. 

7; 852,371; Bergmann; producing dlcalcium 
phosphate. 

7; 852,872; April 80, 1907; Bergmann; produ- 
cing dlcalcium phosphate. 

7; 872,757; December 3. 1907; Schlutlus; 
proc. of making nitrated superphosphate. 

9; 962.278; March 15, 1910; Pohl; process of 
preparing mineral fertilizers. 

7; 977,819; December 6, 1910; Mehner; proc. 
of making phosphatic slag and iron. 

7; 991.096; May 2, 1911; Schroeder; processes 
of making bhosphates. 

7; 1,001,850; August 22, 1911; Caw A Schule; 
ammonium phosphate fertilizers. 

7; 1,025,619; May 7. 1912; Oiese A Wolters; 
procs. mfg. phosphoric acid compounds. 

9; 1,070,808; August 19, 1913; Hiltner; procs. 
for destruction of animal and vegetable para- 
sites In soil. 

9; 1,088,558; January 16, 1914; Messerschmidt ; 
methods prod, of fertilizers. 

6; 1.092.074; March 31, 1914; Molse; making 
manure from tanned leather shavings or cut- 
tings. 

9; 1,108,189; August 25, 1914; Knosel; fertil- 
izers and procs. mfg. same. 

9; 1,125.818; January 19, 1915; Herzsfeld A 
Hauser; procs. mfg. artificial fertilizer. 

9; 1,185.387; April 16. 1915; Messerschmidt; 
nitrate fertilizers and proc. of making. 

9; 1,145.370; July 6. 1915; Kern; methods for 
producing manure. 

9; 1,144.905; June 29. 1915; Kern; fertilizer 
and procs. of mfg. same. 

9; 1,205.820; November 21, 1916; Wllkenlng; 
proces. of producing a staple fertilizer. 

7; 1,214,846; January 80, 1917; Messerschmidt; 
the mfg. of an artificial manure or fertilizer. 

9; 993,463; May 80, 1911; Schacke; methods 
of making manure. 



Assigned Patents. 



8; 693.316; February 11, 1902; Trails; procs. 
of purifying sewage; assignee, Edward Bur- 
meister. 

9; 724,565; April 7. 1908; Frank A Freuden- 
berg; fertilizers; Cyanid-Oelleschaft. 

7; 1,104,326; July 21. 1914; Stoltzenberg non- 
hygroscopic manure stuff and procs. of same; 
Melasse Schlempe. 

9; 1,185,781; June 6, 1916; Stutezer; processes 
for improving the fertilizing action of semi- 
nitrogen; Bayerische Stickstoff Werke A. O. 

9; 1.200,806; October 10, 1916; Bosch; proc. of 
fertilizing; Badlsche Anilin und Soda Fabrik. 

9; 1.280,650; October 8, 1918; Bosch; fertil- 
izer and fertilizing; Badlsche Anilin und Soda 
Fabrik. 



Class 87 — Oils, Fats, and Glue. 

Sub-class, 12; No. 692.157; date, January 2b, 
1902; inventor. Luide; invention, procs. of re- 
fining oils. 

6; 706,790; August 12, 1902; Wolpers; clean- 
ing paste and procs. of making. 

5; 719,074; January 27, 1908; Beck; metal pre- 
serving and cleaning compound*. 

7; 721,852; March 8. 1903; Arens; procs. of 
making glue. 

12; 722.882; March 17. 1903; Fresonlus; meth- • 
ods of purifying fats. 

19; 785,588; July 4. 1908; Lewy; artificial 
wax. 

4;' 786,007; August 11, 1903; Perrelt A 
Decker; methods of decomposing tallow, etc. 

7; 738.709; September 8, 1908; Weiss; procs. 
of making glue and gelatin. 

13; 741.584; October 13, 1908; Llebrelch; proc. 
of making fatty substances. 

21; 746.638; December 8. 1908; Llebrelch; 

fatty substances and processes of making same. 

21; 748,511; December 20, 1903; Llebreich; 

fat-like substances and processes of making 

same. 

17; 757.387; April 12, 1904; Nettl of A. H.; 
proc. of making adhesives. 

7; 757,658; April 19, 1904; Hilbert; procs. of 
making glue and gelatin from bones. 

16; 760,018; May 17, 1904; Reiss; process of 
making medicated soaps. 

5; 774,121; November 1, 1904; Wergelt; procs. 
of polishing and finishing limestone, marble, 
etc. 

7; 784,340; March 7, 1905; Rlebensahm; procs. 
of mfg. limpid solutions of agar-agar and 
product of same. 

16; 786.496; April 4. 1900; Horn; procs. of 
making neutral soap. 

5; 786,556; April 4. 1905; Qiessler ft Bauer; 
soaps and methods of making same. 

12; 794,373; July 11, 1905; Mensol; procs. of 
chem. modifying oils. 

19; 802.169; October 17. 1905; Lewy; artificial 
wax. 

6; 805,407; November 21, 1905; Born; procs. 
of removing oil, etc.. from wool, hair, bristles, 
etc. 

21; 809.121; January 2. 1906; Lewy; illumi- 
nants. 

17; 818.647; February 27, 1906; A. A H. 
Haake; procs. of preparing sol. starch. 

7; 888,053; October 0, 1906; Hilbert; methods 
of mfg. glue and gelatin from bones. 

7; 884.806; October 80. 1906; Hilbert ;i methods 
of mfg. glue and gelatine from bones. 

7; 837,016; November 7. 1908; Weiss, Jr.: 
proc. for detannlng mineral of chrome tanned 
leather or leather wastes. 

5; 845.822; February 26, 1907; Stockhanson; 
carbon tetrachlorid prep, and procs. of produc- 
tion. , 

17; 845,681; February 26. 1907; Bernstein; 
procs. making glue substitutes. 

18; 851.153; April 22, 1907; Berberlch; mixing 
or combining liquids. 

16; 858,295; June 25. 1907; Krebitz; mfg. of 
soap. 

0; 868,141; September 24, 1907; Kosers; emul- 
sions of oils and like. 

9-, 875,665; December 81. 1907; Kosters; emul- 
sions of oils and like. 

5; 800.785; September 26, 1907; Becker; soaps 
and procs. making same. 

5; 875,764; January 17, 1908; Alf. Zucken 
comp. for prodct. aromatic baths. 

9; 877.289; January 21, 1908; Blass; proc. for' 
solidifying fats, oils, tar, resin, etc. 

7; 882,481; March 17, 1908; Weiss, Jr.; proo. 
for extraction of glue from mineral dressed or 
chrtme tanned leethrer. 

16; 888,360; March 81, 1908; Stohr; proc, for 
manf. of floating soap. 

16; 896,551; August 18, 1908; Jargons; meth- 
ods of cooling soaps. 

12; 902.177; October 27. 1908; Schwoerer; app. 
for treating oleic acid. 

18; 910.827; January 26, 1909; Kolesche; veg- 
etable butter capable of being spread. 

6; 918.500; February 23. 1909; Hirzel; proc* 
for recovering purifying materials. 
6; 915.169; March 16, 1909; Frank; proc. of 
- extracting fatty substances from fresh oil 
fruits. 

9; 919,884; April 27. 1909; Klewer; the manu- 
facture of lubricating and antl -corrosive oils. 

5; 954,486; April 12, 1910; Weiss; saponaceous 
compounds. 

5; 965,016; July 19, 1910; Roser; proc. for pro- 
ducing sodium peroxid composition for bleach- 
ing purposes. 

5; 966,186; August 2, 1910; Stockhausen; 
compounds or emulsions and production of 
same. 

5; 968,428; August 28, 1910; Range; procs. for 
the manufacture of albumose soap. 

21; 984,029; February 14. 1911; Scheuble; 
candles emitting a colored light. 
5; 986.527; Maroh 14. 1911; Welter: soaps. 
12; 986.562; March 14, 1911; Qenthe; proc. of 
mfg. linoxn, etc. 

16; 1,007.531; October 31, 1911; Canel; proc. 
for manufacturing crude-oil soap. 

9; 1,012.830; December 26. 1911; Engel; raw 
tallow substitute for lubricating purposes and 
processes for manufacturing the same. 

9; 1.014.108; January 9, 1912; Wallbaum; hy- 
drocarbon emulsions. 

5; 1.020,624; March 19, 1912; Rulke; proc. 
mfg. disinfectant substances and prod, pro- 
duced thereby. 

12; 1.026.267; May 14. 1912; Zauffmann; proc. 
renovating cotton waste. 

6; 1,035,816; August 13, 1912; Stockhausen; 
proc. of removing fat and impurities from veg- 
etable and animal materials. 

6; 1,070,828; August 19, 1918; Mers; extract- 
ing apparatus. 



82 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



12; 1,072,084; September 2, 1913; Richter & 
Orth; process for bleaching solid and semi- 
solid fats of all kinds. 

19; 1,072,085; September 2, 1918; Richter ft 
Orth; process of purifying and bleaching wax 
of all kinds. 

6; 1,050,696; November 14, 1918; Host; proc. 
for rapidly sep. emulsions formed aqueous 
liquids with fatty sub. of any kind. 

17; 1.055,454; March 11, 1913; Ebhardt; gum 
pencils. 

16; 1,057,931; April 1, 1918; Gastenhols; 
process of making soap In form of tablets, etc. 

12; 1,082,707; December 80, 1913; Schllnck; 
manufacture of solid fatty substances from oil. 

16; 1,102,129; June 80, 1914; Benediz; fatty 
taphonaceous products and methods of manu- 
facturing same. 

12; 1,104,906; July 28, 1914; Lach; treatment 
of oils. 

17; 1,105,567; July 28, 1914; Kantorowicz; 
process of manufacturing adheslves giving 
with a cold water strong cementing masses. 

12; 1,106,509; August 11, 1914; Hofmann; 
process for deodorising oleic and fatty acids 
derived from train or fish oils. 

16; 1,085.487; January 27, 1914; Klopfer; 
manufacturing milled soap. 

7; 1,086,149; February 8, 1914;/ Low ft 
Fischer; process of manufacturing glue, gel- 
atin and the like. 

12; 1,087,064; February 10, 1914; Kaempfe; 
process of manufacturing oil, varnish substi- 
tutes from animal oils. 

17; 1.089,064; March 8, 1914; Lehmann ft 
Stocker; process for manufacturing vegetable 
glues. 

17; 1,089.960; March 10, 1914; Rampichini; 
adhesive material for gluing purposes. 

6; 1,117,194; November 17, 1914; Koch: meth- 
ods for purification of raw wool. 

6; 1,114,598; October 20, 1914; Fischer; proc- 
ess for extraction of fat from bones; materials 
suitable for glue manufacture. 

12; 1,121,925; December 22, 1914; Kaempfe; 
process for manufacture of polymerized prod- 
ucts from animal oil. 

12; 1,121,926; December 22, 1914; Kaempfe; 
process for manufacture of polymerized prod- 
ucts from animal oil. 

5; 1,122,400; December 29, 1914; Kaempfe; 
process for manufacture of polymerized prod- 
ucts from animal oil. 

5; 1,138,280; May 4, 1915; Leimdorfer; proc- 
ess for manufacture of hard soaps. 

5; 1,143,499; June 15, 1915; Buckel; manu- 
facture of emulsion and substances for use 
therein. 

17; 1,146,455; July 13, 1915; Schumacher; 
binding means for briquets. 

6; 1,151.801; August 81, 1915; Kublerschky; 
apparatus for separating liquid mixtures into 
two components. 

5; 1,165,498; August 7, 1905; Frank ft Fend- 
ler; process of rendering tetrachlorld of car- 
bon and other halogen hydrocarbons soluble 
in dilute solutions of soap. 

17; 1,168,187; January 11, 1916; Wiese; proc- 
ess for making an adhesive. 

9; 1,200,617; October 10, 1916; Hulsberg; 
manufacturing lubricating grease. 

26; '1.252,591; January 8, 1918; Llfschutz; 
process of obtaining wax-like substances from 
lanolin. 

12; 1,275,289; August 18, 1918; Morgenstern; 
refining fats and oils. 



Assigned Patents. 



12; 719,014; January 27, 1908; assignee, 
Kleinont; process of purifying fats; Emanuel 
Khuner and solm. 

4; 762,026; June 7, 1904; Connstern; process 
of making ratty acids; Vereinigte Chemlsche. 

9; 805,443; November 28, 1905; Bo ley; proc- 
ess for preparation of water soluble vaseline; 
Ges. zur Verwentwig, etc. * 

9; 850,898; April 16, 1907; Bo log; prepara- 
tion of water soluble hydrocarbon derivatives; 
Oes. Verwertung, etc. 

5; 862,305; August 6, 1907; Braun; manufac- 
ture of a cleaning and protecting material for 
metals; Saponia Works Ferdinand Boehm. 

7; 867,167; September 24, 1907; Stelgelmann 
ft Delurel; bleaching glues; Badlsche Anilm 
and Soda Fabrlk. 

16; 890,078; June 9, 1908; Luring; process 
for production of soap powder; Gebr. Kortlng 
A. Ges. 

12; 901,718; October 20, 1908; Ludecke; proc- 
ess for 'bleaching fats, oils, resins, waxes and 
the like; Vereinigte Chemlsche Werke. 

5; 917.828; April 13. 1909; Woeffenstein ; 
process for the manufacture of soaps contain- 
ing peroxids; P. Beirsdorf ft Co. 

16; 940,898; November 16, 1909; Luring; 
process for the production of soap powder; 
Gebruder Korting A. Ges. 

5; 967,840; August 16, 1910; Schoeller ft 
Schrouth; medicinal soaps; Friedr. Bayero Co. 

16; 968,438; August 23, 1910; Wldermann; 
process for manufacturing of bleached soap; 
Vereinigte Chemlsche Werke. 

5; 1,000,487; August 15, 1911; Blagden ft 
Mueller; the art of preparing fatty acid com- 
pounds; C. F. Boehringer ft Soehne Mannbelm. 

4; 1,015,994; January 30, 1912; Connstein; 
process for manufacture of fatty acids from 
their esters: V. C. Werke Actienges. 

5; 1,027.707; May 28, 1912; Engelmann; dis- 
infecting soap; Farb-Friedr Bayer & Co. 

5; 1,040.708; October 8, 1912; List ft Schmidt; 
hydrocarbon soap and process of making 
same; I. Simon ft Durk. 

4; 1,058,638; April 8, 1913; Schonthan; proc- 
ess for dissociating fats, oils and waxes; 
Vereinigte Chemlsche Werke A. Ges. 

12; 1,063,746; June 8, 1913; Skita; process of 



preparing hydrogenized products from unsat- 
urated compound; C. F. Boehringer ft Shoehre. 

12; 1,081.775; December 16, 1918; Rubs; 
methods for obtaining sulforated oils and 
fats; Stolle ft Kophe. 

12; 1,089,253; March 8, 1914; Muller; bleach- 
ing fats and oils; Badlsche Anilin and Soda 
Fabrlk. 

4; 1,089.775; March 10, 1914; Lindner; de- 
colorizing glycerin; Badlsche Anilin and Soda 
Fabrlk. 

17; 1.095,058; April 28, 1914; Wolff; adhesive 
roslnos preparations and process of the same; 
Geburden Schubert. 

4; 1,107,175; August 11, 1914; Mennier; 
methods of treating distillery wash; August 
Lederer ft Eml Lederer. 



Class 1 34 — Liquid Coating 
Compositions. 

Sub-class 26; No. 698,741; Date, April 29, 
1902; Inventor, Schaal; Invention, hardening 
rosin. 

9; 699,541; May 6, 1902; Lutz; making pre- 
servatives for violin strings. 

19; 706,967; August 12, 1902; Lehmann; pol- 
ishing blocks for laundry purposes. • 

51; 718,190; November 11, 1902; Zimmer; 
mfg. of insulating or protective compounds. 

30; 732,226; June 30, 1903; Seuft; composi- 
tions of painting cement. 

26; 737,249; August 25, 1903; Kronstein; con- 
verting solidified oils into soluble oils. 

51; 738.456; September 8, 1903; Kollinger, 
paint and making same. 

60; 741,726; October 20, 1903; Sembdner; 
making lampblack. 

86; 744,263; November 17, 1903; Train; mfg. 
oil varnish. 

58; 746,909; December 15, 1903; Zand; pro- 
ducing iridescent scales. 

56; 750,675; January 26, 1904; Blume; mfg 
varnish substitutes. 

26; 760,641; May 24, 1904; Ludwlg; substi- 
tutes for shellac. 

58; 778,703; December 27, 1904; Peters; util- 
izing waste ends of carbons. 

21; 781,506; January 31, 1905; Eifurt; emul- 
sifying resin soap in water. 
'23; 793,600; June 27, 1905; Mo Her, Holtkamp; 
mfflj sijre 

26*; 799.065; September 5, 1905; Kronstein; 
making varnish gum. 

75; 799,770; September 19, 1905; Wultze; 
making lead carbonates. 

75; 801.430; October 10, 1905; Wultze; mfg. 
white lead color. 

79; 804,960; November 21, 1905; Lederer: 
compounds suitable as lacquer or varnish. 

60: 807.646; December 19, 1905; Begelin; app. 
for making lampblack. 

26; 809,279; January 2. 1906; Braun; process 
for production of stove polish. 

54; 815,600; March 20, 1906; Lilienfeld; pro- 
ducing metallic or lustrous colors for print 
fabrics. 

7; 821,260; May 22, 1906; Schowalter; oil 
dressings for leather. 

86; 824,475; June 26, 1908; Friedmann; com- 
position of matter. 

26; 820»S60; July 24, 1906; Kronstein; process 
for hardening and solidifying oils and un- 
saturated organic compounds. 

26; 833,063; October 9,; 1906; Kronstein 
treating wood oil with oxidizing agents. 

1; 834,739; October 30, 1906; Lilienfeld; col- 
oring matter for producing silk-like or pearl 
luster effects. 

1; 842,636; January 29, 1907; Dressier; dust 
binding compositions and making same. 

26; 843,401; February 5, 1907: Kronstein: 
mfg. varnishes, balsams and resins. 

58- 845.256; February 26. 1907; Peters; util- 
izing waste ends of carbons for arc lamps. 

50; 847.580; March 19. 1907; Ulrich; lime 
color. 

78; 854,011; May 21, 1907; Albertl; prep, of 
llthopones. 

1; 855,860; June 4, 1907; Mat tar & Funcks; 
mfg. means from wood tar for preventing 
dust on streets, etc. 

45; 858,586; July 2, 1907; Plonnls; waterproof 
paints. 

20: 861,847; July 80, 1907; Herblg; varnishes 
for producing mat surfaces. 

57; 964,175; August 27, 1907; Leffer; process 
for making a siccative. 

0; 868,008; October 15, 1907; Relnhold* pul- 
verulent coloring matter for leather. 

59; 868,385; October 15, 1JM)7; WuMing; oxids 
of iron 

60; 872,049; December 3, 1907; Machtolf; 
prod uci ng amorphous carbon. 

60; 872,950; December 8, 1907; Bachtolf ; pro- 
ducing carbon. 

23; 882,916; March 24, 1908; Schmiedel; llqufd 
composition to be used in mfg. of fancy stained 
papers. 

78; 884.874; April 14. 1908; Stuckle; zinc 
sulfld pigments and producing same. 

5; 895,800; August 11, 1908; Schmled; mfg. 
of brewers' pitch. 

66; 897.439; September 1, 1908; Wegelin; app. 
for making lampblack. 

26; 898,882; September 8. 1908; Meyer; pre- 
paring substitutes tor shellac. 

41; 898,476; September 15, 1908; Horn; ship 
paints. 

78; 916.004; March 28, 1909; Ostwald; proc- 
esses of rendering lithopone more stable 
against light. 

24; 921.382; May 11, 1909; Elkeles ft Kile; 
furniture polish and producing same. 

23; 937,095; October 19, 1909; Rassi; sizing 
compositions. 

78.6; 938,128: October 26, 1909; Diamand; 
neutralizing solutions of salts. 



45; 944,957; December 28, 1909; Eberhard; 
water glass compounds and making same. 

57; 953.621; March 29, 1910; Jaeger; liquid 
coating compositions. 

78; 955,918; April 26, 1910; Steinau; lithopone 
white and treating same. 

11: 957,196; May 10, 1910; Evers; making 
paper and similar materials pliable. 

1; 960,100; May 31, 1910; Lilienfeld; com- 
pounds for producing silk-like effects. 

78.6; 971,194; September 27, 1910; Hassel- 
mann; wood preserving solutions. 

78.6; 974,962; November 8, 1910; Hartmann 
ft Schwerdtner; methods of preserving wood. 

79; 982,870; January 24, 1911; Kurz; com- 
positions for making gold leaf. 

J; 992,313; May 16, 1911; van Westrum; mfg 
watery solutions of oils, fats, tar, asphalt, 
etc. 

78.6; 999,013; July 25, 1911; Dehust; prepar- 
ing wood impregnating liquids. 

26; 1,003,741; September 19, 1911; Hesse; 
solutions of resins and manufacturing same. 

2; 1,018,187; January 2, 1912; Diamand; 
tightening casks, barrels, etc. 

26- 1.019,666; March 5, 1912; Lender ft Koch; 
paint and varnish bases. . 

9; 1,036,728; August 27, 1912; Schafer; com- 
pounds for polishing leather, etc. 

r.2; 1,049,916; January 7, 1918; Raschlg; tar 
paint and process of making. 

67; 1,052,924; February 11, 1913; Jansen; 
mfg. of products from which red lead can be 
burnt. 

26; 1,663,870; June 3, 1913; Gopper ft Gerger; 
making viscous, stringy and adhesive sub- 
ststncGN 

23; l'066,852; July 8, 1918; Schwab; prod, 
solutions of insoluble gums. 

26; 1,080,100; December 2, 1913; Cohn; mfg. 
lacquers and varnishes. 

26; 1,095,988; 'May 6, 1914: Roth; mfg. of 
coating and impregnating materials. 

85; 1.096,198; May 12, 1914; Schutze ft 
Fischer; printing colors. 

58; 1,137,467; April 27, 1915; Eibner; mfg. 
of cinnabar. 

40; 1,145,186; July 6, 1915; Eberhard; mak- 
ing anti-corrosive paints and the like. 

39; 1.175,751; March 14, 1916; Hackl ft 
Bunzel; making paint. 

11; 1.177,156; March 28. 1916; von der Heide; 
water proofing and weather proofing composi- 
tions. 

26; 1,179,176; April 11. 1916; Grunbald; paint 
for protecting metals from rustlrg. 

26; 1,135,514; May 80. 1910; Behmann ft 
Stocker; mfg. sacs from derivatives of cellu- 
lose 

26; 1.195,673; August 22, 1916; Qmter; var- 
nishes, lacquers, etc., and process. 

50; 1,201 625; October 17, 1916; Rebs; drying 
oil and making same. 

26; 1,205.081; November 14, 1916; Berend; 
mfg. phenol aldehyde resins, soluble in oil, 
and varnishes therefrom. 

78.6; 1,248,022; November 27. 1917; Selden- 
schnur; solutions for preserving wood. 

26; 1,259,347: March 12, 1918; Berend; mfg. 
fusible and soluble synthetic resins from non- 
fusible phenolaldehyde resins. 

26; 1,262,302; April 9, 1918; Boecklng; oil 
varnish and mfg. same. 

23: 1.276.206; August 20. 1918; Fues; absorb- 
ent material sizing material: 



Assigned Patents. 



23; 703,841; June 24, 1902; Glass; impregnat- 
ing paper or pasteboard; assignee, Julius Back. 

36; 710,233; September 30, 1902; Adelaberger 
ft Friedmann; printing colors for lithographic, 
etc. ; Simon Wechsler. 

76; 726,932; May 5, 1903; Huth; manufac- 
turing bronze powder; Bronxefabrlckerke A. G. 
vorm. Carl Schenck. 

23; 770,202; September 18, 1904; Voigt; pro- 
duction of binding mediums for colors; Louise 
Voigt. 

5; 867,757; October 8, 1907; Rucker; pitch 
substitutes and making same; Deutsche Con- 
servier ungs Ges. fur Nahrungs. 

28; 849,418; April 9, 1907; Morpurgo; manu- 
facture of sizing and finishing media; Erste 
Tr tester Relsschal, etc. 

23; 972,068; October 4, 1910; Donauer; the 
manufacture of sizing or finishing mediums; 
Erste Trlester Relsschal, etc. 

28, 971,280; September 27, 1910; Kasseker; 
inks for ceramic transfer pictures; Schmidt 

58; 894,159*; July 21, 1908; Lorlncs; produc- 
ing paints and other coatings; Lorlncz Fes- 
tekgyarbetlti Tarasag. 

23; 900,274; October 6, 1908; Frltsche; pro- 
ducing soluble gum; Stolle ft Hopke. 

35; 929,913; September 8, 1909; Charles ft 
Fanjat; printing medium; Joe Livingston. 

25; 1,001,825; August 22, 1911; Ullmann: 
products of the anthraquinone series and mak- 
ing same; Act. Ges. fur Anilin Fabrlkatlon. 

79; 1.178,931; February 29, 1916; Celment ft 
Riviere; producing coating compositions of 
acetyl cellulose; Act. Ges. fur Anilin Fabrl- 
katlon. 

23; 1,021.744; March 26, 1912; Reimann; pre- 
paring paste used as weavers' glus, etc.; 
F. W. Rogler. 

79; 1,045,895; December 3. 1912; Schmidt, 
Lutz ft Eichler; cellulose ester solutions; Ba- 
dlsche Anilin ft Soda Fabrlk. 

30; 1,057.199; March 25, 1913; Wunnenberg; 
composition of matter to be used as an oil 
plant; A rota Ges. mit Beschrankter Haftung. 

40; 1,087,144; February 17, 1914; Schoeller ft 
Schrauth; preserving preparations; Farben- 
fabriken v. Friedr. Bayer Co. 

40; 1,087,145; February 17. 1914; Schoeller ft 
Schrauth: preservative coating compositions; 
Farbenfabriken v. Friedr. Bayer Co. 



/ 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



83 



66; 1,108.473; July 14. 1914; Beringer & Zim- 
mer; process of preserving wood oil from con- 
gealing on being subjected to beat; Reichhold 
Flugger & Beecklng mfgs. 

89; 1,165,222; December 21, 1915; Buohner; 
materials for coating and impregnating pur- 
poses; C. F. Boehrlnger, etc. 

79; 1,166,790; January 4, 1916; Schmidt, 
Blchler, Allemann; liquid compositions for 
laquering purposes; Badische Anllin, etc. 

21; 1,194,866; August 15, 1916; Muth; paper 
size and process of making; Dr. Graf & Co. 

40; 967,841; August 16, 1910; Schoeller & 
Schrauth; anti-foullng paints and varnlsbes; 
Fried. Bayer Co. 

40; 967,842; August 16, 1910; Schoeller & 
Schrauth; anti- fouling paints and varnishes; 
Friedr. Bayer St Co. 

40; 906,668; December 15, 1908; Ullrich; anti- 
f outing paints and varnishes; F. Bayer & Co. 

79; 988,965; April 11, 1911; Becker; solvents 
for acetyl cellulose; Farbenfabrik vorm. 
Friedr. Bayer & Co. 



Class 167 — Medicines. 

Sub-class No. 9; No. 694,945; Date, March 
11, 1902; inventor, Cohn; invention, manufac- 
turing iodin preparations. 

8; 701.620; June 8, 1908; Rother; making dis- 
infectant powder. 

8; 705,667; July 29. 1902; Groppler; solidify- 
ing formaldehyde. 

4; 708,880; September 2, 1902; Eichelbaum; 
obtaining food extract. 

4; 712,274; October 28, 1902; Eberhard; mak- 
ing milk extracts. 

4; 720,157; February 10, 1903; Klenk; making 
decolorised tannin extracts. 

4; 727,798; May 12, 1908; Honlg; making tan- 
ning extracts. 

4; 728.885; May 19, 1908; Flakier; making 
albumose. 

4; 784,352; July 21, 1908; Nesso; producing 
mussel extracts. 

4; 784,889; July 28, 1908; Klenk; tannin ex- 
tracts and making same. 

7; 788,461; September 8, 1908; Lewy; prepar- 
ing oils for medicinal use. 

4; 788,905; September 15, 1903; Honlg; ex- 
tracting tannin. 

4; 740,288; September 29, 1903; Klenk; mak- 
ing tannin extracts. 

3; 740,424; October 6, 1908; Groppler; pro- 
ducing compounds for disinfecting. 

4; 762,032; June 7, 1904; Evers; extracting 
Juice from dried licorice root. 

7; 762.256; June 7, 1904; Schneider; mixtures 
for treating tuberculosis. 

8; 765.291; July 19, 1904; Matzka; prepar- 
ing composition for sulfur baths. 

9; 766,154; July 26. 1904; Matzka; prepar- 
ing composition for sulfur baths. 

7; 768.886; August 80, 1904; Spiegel; soluble 
compositions of iron and arsenic and making 



7; 781,868; January 81. 1905; Rilter; making 
medicaments from plant Juice. 

6; 792,502; June 18*1900; Homann; remedies 
for tree cancer. 

4; 794.847; July 18, 1905; Bogel; extracting 
tanning substances. 

7; 809,101; January 2, 1906; Dieterich; mak- 
ing stable non-alcoholic iron compounds. 

7; 809,847; January 8, 1906; Welchardt; anti- 
toxins for fatigue and making same. 

7; 820,587; May 15, 1906; Mastell; phospho- 
rous compounds and making same. 

7; 824,589; June 26, 1906; Griesse; making 
interna! remedies. 

8; 882,621; October 9. 1906; Plro; sticking 
plaster. 

8; 801,028; September 26, 1907; Loebell; mak- 
ing plasters. 

7; 842,612; January 29, 1907; Bergell & 
Meyer; obtaining solutions of bacterial poisons. 

4; 846,896; March 5, 1907; Baner; medicinal 
extracts. 

9; 862,768; August 6, 1907; Sensburg; medi- 
cated bougies. 

7; 864.219; August 27, 1907; Werner; manu- 
facture of easily emulalflable fatty matter. 

7; 868,204; October 15, 1907; Mendel; thlo- 
slnamln compounds. 

9; 869,610; October 29, 1907; Zucker; car- 
bonic acid baths. 

6; 891,567; June 23, 1908; Rumm; compounds 
for combating fungoid diseases of plants. 

7; 896,807; August 25, 1908; Dieterich; agar- 
agar cascara products and making same. 

9; 897,546; September 1, 1908; Lebram; pre- 
paring carbonic acid baths. 

7; 898.811; September 8, 1908; Busch; mfg. 
new compounds of protelds with bismuth iodld. 

9; 901,177; October 18, 1908; Keil; radio ac- 
tive compositions. 

7; 906,207; December 8, 1908; Deutschmann; 
obtaining curative animal serum. 

7; 914,644; March 9, 1909; Deutschmann; ob- 
taining animal serum. 

7; 925,658; June 22, 1909; Schleich; prepare. - 
arations of chloroform in a solid condition. 

8; 928.088; July 13, 1909; Fusch; atomizing 
solid medicaments. 

8; 929,883; July 27, 1909; Brick; mfg. of 
disinfectants. 

7; 929,452; July 27, 1909; Lanes; soluble Iron 
albuminate preparations. 

8; 980,836; August 10, 1909; Busch; mfg. sol- 
uble compounds of mercuric salts with hexa- 
methylene tetranln. 

8; 934,844; September 21, 1909; Schneider; 
disinfectants. 

6; 989,097; November 2. 1909; Rosenbach: 
preparing a preventive for tuberculosis. 

4; 989,742; November 0, 11)09; Redlich & 
Wladika; treatment of quebracho extracts. 

4; 940.394; November 16, 1909; Krumpf miller; 
tannln-contalnlng extracts and processes of 
producing same. 



7; 941,423; November 30. 1900; Krafft; mak- 
ing preventive and curative lymph. 

9; 941,785; November 30, 1909; Knopf; pro- 
ducing of mineral oil emulsion. 

9; 944,788; December 28. 1909; Loose; medi- 
caments for diseases of the mucous mem- 
brane. 

5; 946,633; January 18. 1810; Beyer; hair 
tonics. 

7; 948,930; February 8, 1910; Meyer; pre- 
paring medicaments. 

8; 969,661; September 6, 1910; Schneider; 
generating formaldehyde. 

9; 971,681; October 4, 1910; Knopf; making 
artificial ointment bases. 

9; 072,316; October 11, 1910; Zehetner; pre- 
paring a tooth healing preparation. 

8; 977,312; November 29, 1910; Immermann; 
fumigators. 

8; 077,780; December 6, 1910; Guttmann; 
plasters. 

6; 978,807; December 18, 1910; Knopf; trans- 
forming \ substances soluble in alcohol into 
emulsions or water. 

10; 079,054; December 12, 1910: Bader; reme- 
dies for swine fever, plague, etc. 

4; 979.656; December 27, 1910; Damkohler & 
Schwlndt; clarifying extracts containing tan- 
nin, t 

3; 989,822; April 11, 1911; Berwheineuer; dis- 
infecting composition. 

7; 994.660; June 6, 1011; Schmidt; processes 
of breeding microbes. 

9; 1.000,852; August 15. 1911; Stapler; solid 
perfume mixtures containing artificial musk. 

8; 1.008,161; September 12, 1911; Lenfel; 
plaster bandages. 

7; 1,005,076; October ,3, 1911; Schultz; bac- 
terial products. 

7; 1,005,077; October 3. 1911; Schultz; bac- 
terial products. 

8; 1.005,834; October 10, 1911; Schwarzhaupt; 
disinfecting apparatus. 

4: 1,006,977: October 24, 1911; Paessler ft 
Arnold!; colorizing tannin extracts. 

3; 1.010,210; November 28, 1911; Zimmer; 
disinfectants. 

7; 1,014,198; January 9, 1912; Zuelzer; non- 
toxic suprarenal preparations. 

3; 1,017.669; February 20, 1912; Hesse; solu- 
tions of perfumes and making same. 

6; 1,021.095; March 26, 1912; Grether; para- 
si tiades for plants. 

7: 1,021,67*; March 26. 1912; Horomitz; 
medicinal tabets. 

9; 1.022.627; April 9, 1912; Hempel; medi- 
cinal baths. 

9; 1.032,779; July 16, 1912; Schmidt; radio 
actine materials. 

0; 1,032,951; July 16, 1912; Schmidt; radio 
actine materials. 

7; 1,086.622; August 27. 1912; Hoennlcke; 
producing thyroid-gland extracts. 

9; 1,041,857; October 15, 1912; Sarason & 
Haller; producing effervescent baths. 

3; 1,042, 057; October 22, 1912; Wlbasch; 
making bodies for sulfuring casks and the 
like. 

7; 1,043,007; October 29. 1912; Hoennlcke; 
obtaining inner secretion of thyroid glands 
and other organs in a pure state. 

4; 1.043,209: November 5, 1912; Dlefenbach; 
preparing refined extracts from cascara sa- 
grada. 

7; 1.048,185; December 24, 1912; Lewy; mak- 
ing clear and durable hemaglobln prepara- 
tions. 

7: 1.051,520; January 28, 1918; Schlndler; 
high per cent, salvarsan emulsions. 

4; 1,055,475; March 11, 1918; Koolman & 
Poundo'rf ; hop. extracting app. 

7; 1.057,673; April 1, 1913; Sames; removal 
of inert substance? from blood serums. 

8; 1.069.980; August 12. 1913; Relsmann; va- 
porizing medicaments. 

9; 1,076.708; October 28, 1918; Ri enter; pre- 
paring oil. 

6; 1,085,898; February 3, 1914; Fischer; in- 
secticides for plants and making same. 

2; 1.094,740; April 28. 1914; Nerlinger; waf- 
ers for encapsulating medicines. 

8; 1,098,861; May 12, 1914; Flamming; pro- 
duction of disinfectants. 

4; 1.098,848; May 26. 1914; Hamel; making 
tanning extracts. 

8; 1,100,944; June 23, 1914; Benarto; adhesive 
plasters. 

7; 1,122.370; December 29, 1914; Fornet; 
preparation of vaccine. 

8, 1,129.271; February 28, 1915; W. Boehm; 
devices for sterilizing medical instruments. 

3; 1,151,586; August 24, 1915; Abderhalden; 
potentiated sera and making them. 

8; 1,162,162; November 30, 1915; Flemming; 
disinfectants. 

7; 1.191.551; July 18, 1916; Abderhalden; 
serum mixtures. 

7; 1,196,065; August 29. 1915; Abderhalden; 
serum therapy. 

7; 1,204,479; November 14. 1916; Nohring; 
therapeutically active substances. 

6; 1,205.924; November 21. 1916; Noord linger; 
improving antiseptic fungicidal, etc. 

9; 1,205.957; Novmber 28. 1916; Albrecht; 
preparations for treating teeth. 

9; 1,286,213; October 7. 1917; Saubermann; 
rendering liquids radio-active. 

9; 1,289.227; September 14, 1917; Sauber- 
mann; app. for impregnating water with ra- 
dium emanations. 



Assigned Patents. 



7; 691.681; January 21, 1902; Weber; aseptic 
preparations from pancreas and prod, same; 
assignees, Chemische Fabrik. 

7; 695,254; March 11, 1902. Weber; pancreas 
preparations and prod, same; Chemische 
Fabrik. 

7; 705.638; July 29. 1902: Blum; glycosuria 
antidotes and prod, same; E. Merck. 



2; 710,060; September 30. 1902; Kami; cap- 
sules for medicines; Arthur Freured. 

7; 740,855; October 6. 1908; von Hoessle; 
mercurous chlorid; Chemische fabrik von 
Heyden A. Ges. 

7; 745,888; December 1, 1908; Dunbar; serum 
and preparing same; Ichthyol Ges. Cordes 
Henna. 

7; 742.429; October 27, 1903; von Hoessle; 
soluble mercurous iodide; Chemische fabrik 
von Heyden A. Ges. 

7; 745,888; December 1. 1908; Dunbar; serum 
and preparing same; Ichthyol Ges. Cordes Her- 
man nit Co. 

7; 745,848; December 1, 1908: von Hoessler* 
chromates of silver; Chemische fabrik von 
Heyden A. Ges. 

7; 774,224; November 8. 1904; Winternitz; 
solidified helegenized fats; E. Merck. 

4; 785,784; Marc* 28, 1905; Hess; obtaining 
the contents of yeasjt cells; Gans. 

7; 806,615; December 5, 1905; Altschul; pep- 
sin preparations; A. Ges. fur Amden Fabri- 
katlon. 

7; 816,547; March 27, 1906; Gross; making 
medicines; Ferro-Phosphat, etc. 

7; 846,849; March 15, 1907; Hlrsch; solutions 
of mercurous oxycyanld and dlamoyl, etc., 
Hayden A. Ges. 

9; 871,495; November 19, 1907; Fuhrmann; 
making mercury salves, ointments; Klrchhoff 
& Nelrat. 

3; 880.204; February 25, 1908; Bichengrun; 
compositions for generating formaldehyde; 
Farben Friedr. Bayer & Co. 

9; 880,641; March 8, 1908; Evers: mfg. of 
artificial aromatic balsams; Chemische Fabrel: 
Relsholz, Ges. 

7; 884,025; April 7, 1908; Langer; mfg. blood 
albumin preparations; Llngner. 

4; 889,050; May 26, 1&6; Stelgelmann & 
Dehnel; decolorlzation of extracts' containing 
tannin; Badische Anilln & Soda Fabrik. 

4; 900,088; September 29, 1908- Pollak; treat- 
,n J? ^S&^J 8 qu«bracho; A. Redlich. 

7; 902,284; October 27. 1908; Jagelki; prod, 
of an organic soluble iron preparation; Dr. 
Degan & Kuth. 

8; ^03,858; November 17. 1908* Gartner; proc. 
of disinfection: A. Scherl. v 

*lLl£i'3%: N° v f m be»: 17 ' 190S ' Hugendubel; 

a^SWEI t £ nnln ^tracts; Carl Feuerleln. 
t SL^iJE' r > eceinb «r 1». 1808; Lowenthal & 

Q^ivJfSi ." 8 ^™ m*""**: Radlogen Ges 

9; 907,948; December 29, 1908; Zucker; car- 
bonated ferruginous bath compositions; Max 

JfilD. 1x08. 

7; 920,881; May 4, 1909; Reitz; radium com- 
^ nd £» an ,2 . makln * ■*■»•: Pa«l Simon. 
rt£..*? ,63, 5i Ju P e *• 1909 J Hrdenance; hair 
dy 4 e " : oA c i^«, 0c f fur Amlln fabrikation. 

4; 930.900; August 10. 1909; Wiegand; mak- 
ing extracts; Richard Rieder. ' 

8; 941,888; November 80, 1909; Liebrecht: 

an , tlse J?}i cs i- Far i >werke vorm - Meister Lucius. 

7; 948.168; December 14. 1909; Schmidt: 
^^IS^?*" !™ 1 Products; Chemische fabrik 
^tL S? 8 - 578 ; E>«cember 14, 1909; Lambach; 
digitalis extracts; Knoll & Co. ' 

7; 957,683; May 10, 1910; Taub, esters from 
chaulmoogra oil; Farbenfabriken vor. Friedr. 
Bauer & Co. 

9; 959,605; May 81. 1910; Quelsser; stable 

PeTrSnVco. C oS Inln * hydrOSen P6r0Xld ' 

9; 966.820; August 9. 1910; Friedlaender; ren- 
dering hydroxyl derivatives or aromatic hydro- 

^J^SSS 5?i uble ,n TOter; Arthur Norowltz. 

7; 967.584; August 16. 1910; Tambach; casein 
derivatives or compounds and procs. of making 
same; Knoll & Co. ^ 

7; 972,845; October 11, 1910; Deycke; prepara- 
tion of a fat-like substance from bodies of 
bacteria; Kalle & Co. ««««■ «« 

6; 979.704; December 27, 1910; Possett; moth- 

de / tro £ n £« co 2? posltIon8 : Wllhalm Roeder. 
4; 979.080; December 20. 1910; Mechlenburg: 

N I itichfabrik annIferOU8 materlal for extraction; 

7; 988.733;' April 4. 1911; Osborne; formaldy- 
hyde compounds making same; Chem. Pharem 
Laboratories. 

9; 991.261; May 2. 1911; Von Arlt; pharma- 
Fatolka prepar * tlona; A - °««- *w Amilen 

3; 1.001.964; August 29. 1911; Leonhardt; 

7; 1.008.347; September 12. 1911; Ehrmann; 
d, f e8 J Iv £. m £ dlclneg ; Jonann A. Wulflng. 

4; 1.004.499; September 26. 1911; Lambach: 
extracts of ergot; Knoll & Co. 

7; 1.081.897; December 16. 1918; Bhrlich & 
Bertneim; medicinal preparations; Meister 
Lucius A. Brunlng. ««-w 

5: 1,019,576; March 6. 1912; Wolffensteln & 
Colman; hair dyes; A. Ges. fur Amlln Fabrt- 
kation. 

7; 1.087.997; September 10, 1912; Ruppel; pro- 
ducing a remedy for tuberculosis; Farbwerke 
Meister Lusclus & Bruning. 

7; 1,050.299; January 14. 1918; Ruppel; pro- 
ducing a remedy for tuberculosis; Meister 
Lucius & Bruning. 

9; 1,057,281; March 25. 1918; Sarason & 
Frunke «L \ y f en baths; Sarason. 

7 L ^J 6 *- 988 ; July L 1918; Umber; efferves- 
cent cltric-actd-hexamethylene tetramin tablets; 
Jonann Abraham von Wulfin*. 

9; 1.077.854; November 4, 1913; Paal & Am- 
berger; ointment containing colloidal com- 
pounds; Kalle & Co. 

9; 1.077.891; November 4. 1918; Paal & Am- 
berger; preparation containing colloidal com- 
pounds; Kalle & Co. A. Ges. 

7; 1,078.135; November 11. 1913; Ehrllch ,• 
Renter; pre alkali salto of 3.3 framino 4-4 
dloxyarseno benzene and processes same; 
Farbeweke vorm Meister Lucius & Bruning. 

7; 1.081.592; December 16. 1913; Ehrlich & 
Bert helm; medicinal preparations; Meister 
Lucius & Bruning. 



84 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



6; 1.097,406; May 19, 1914; Erlenbach; de- 
stroying insects; A. Gea. far Amilin Fabrica- 
tion. 

' 4; 1,100,730; June 23. 1914; Hamel; prep, of 
gallic acid; Nltrltfabrlk A. Gee. 

4; 1.138.108; March 81. 1915; Dehnel; produ- 
cing soluble tanning agents; B. Amilin & S. 
Fabrik. 

9; 1,160.092; November 16, 1915; Bugarszky; 
mfg. of light-colored tar calloid; Lajos Torok 
Dr. Kereszty Dr. Oyar. 

7; 1.167,622; January 11. 1916; Buchtala; 
mercury preparation for therapeutic purposes; 
Dr. Bayer Bs Tarsa, etc. 

9; 1.170,056; February 1, 1916; Engelxnann; 
therapeutic preparations; Farbenfabrlken 
vorm, etc. 

6; 1.178.941; April 11, 1916; Palma; prepara- 
tion for infecting vermin with disease; Chem-.- 
lklle & Lerun Therapnatiscmis Laboratories. 

7; 1.191.997; July 25, 1016; Reuter & Streit- 
wolf; mixture of alkali Bait of 4.4 dloxy 3.3 
dlamlna arsenobengene and procs. ; Melster, 
Lucius & Bruning. 

3; 1,232.187; July 8. 1917; Bechhold; disin- 
fectants; Chemische Fabrik. 

4; 1,241,950; October 2. 1917; Franke; treat- 
ing farming substances soluble with din*, cont. 
in crude quebracht liquors; Albert Redlick., 



Patents Issued to Friedr. Bayer & Co., 

Assignees: 

9; 852.544; May" 7, 1907: Degner; compounds 
of silver and nucleinjc acids. 

9; 852.545; May 7. 1907; Degner; compounds 
of silver and formonucleinlc acids. 

3; 866.850; September 24. 1907; Eichengrun; 
paraformaldehyde and peroxide mixtures. 

3; 866,851; September 24. 1907; Eichengrun; 
generation of formaldehyde eas. 

3; 875,415; December 31. 1907; Eichengrun; 
generating formaldehyde. 

8; 885,238; April 21, 1908; Eichengrun; comp. 
for generating formaldehyde. 

7; 1,034.161; July 80. 1912; Stern; cholesterln 
preparations. 

9; 1.071,186; August 26, 1913; Stern; stabil- 
ized urea-hydrogen peroxid comps. 

7; 1.113,714; Octboer 13, 1914; Faub & Fick- 
enwith; substances isolated from apocynacae 
and making same. 



Class 196 — Mineral Oils. 

Sub-class No. 24; No. 690,693; Date, January 
7, 1902; Inventor, Bayen; invention, manufac- 
turing mineral wax from bituminous brown 
coal. / 

26; 788,916; February 28, 1905; Wirkner; 
manufacturing pitch. 

3; 810.637; January 23, 1906; Ouhardt; appa- 
ratus for contln. distill, benzin, etc. 

25; 848,903; April 2, 1907; Hirzel; distilling. 

25; 878,370; February 4, 1008; Fischer; appa- 
ratus for chemical purification of oils. 

3; 898,980; September 15, 1908; Lowensteln; 
fractional condensation of vapors. 

16; 981,958; January 17, 1911; Stclnschneider; 
apparatus for distilling oils of the petroleum, 
tar, etc., using a high vacuum. 

25; 001,205; May 2, 1011; Hirzel; distilling 
apparatus. 

3; 1,011,079; December 5, 1911; Porges; stills 
for use with a high vacuum. 

24; 1,020,678; March 19, 1912; Wintersteln & 
Nitsch; separating solid constituents from 
liquid constituents of fats or fatty substances. 
6; 1,078,802; September 16, 1918; Still; coolers 
for condensing mixtures of hydrocarbon and 
steam. 

26; 1.002,448; April 7, 1914; Melamld; treat- 
ing mineral oils. 

5; 1,095.165; April 28, 1914; Ockel; coolers, 
extracting apparatus, etc. 

26; 1,008,763; June 2, 1914; Rlchter; purify- 
Ing hydrocarbons. 

26; 1,008,764; June 2, 1014; Richter; purify- 
ing liquid hydrocarbons. 

26; 1.112,602; October 6, 1014; Dehnst; treat- 
ii\g mineral oils. 

16; 1,141.265; June 1, 1015; Raschlg; process 
and apparatus for continuous distillation. 

26; 1,183.740; May 16. 1016; Melamld; pro- 
ducing pure tar distillates. 

25; 1,183,266; May 16, 1016; Zerning; obtain- 
ing gasolene substitute. 

26; 1,205,578; November 21, 1016; Strache & 
Porges; converting heavy hydrocarbons Into 
light hydrocarbons. 

26; 1.201,601; October 17, 1016; Melamld; 
producing pure tar distillates. 

28; 1.211,721; January 0, 1017; Landsburg; 
manufacturing of asphalt-like masses and de- 
rivatives therefrom. 

20; 1,214,259; January 80, 1017; Artmann; 
continuous distillation of tar. 

25; 1,220.067; March 20, 1017; Borrmann; 
processes and apparatus for continuously dis- 
tilling mineral oils, etc. 

21; 1.251,054; January 1, 1018; Bergins & 
Blllwiller; producing liquid or soluble organic 
combinations from hard coal, etc. 

22; 761.030; June 7. 1004; Boleg; making 
watery solutions of mineral and rosin oils; 
assignee. Gelleschaft zur Vewerting. 

25; 1.013,881; January 0, 1012; Kohn; meth- 
ods and apparatus for vaporizing volatile con- 
stituents of liquids; Ernst Munster. 
. 24; 1,010,102; March 6, 1012; Tanne; manu- 
facturing paraffin; (one-half) Q. Oberlander. 
20; 1,042,915; October 29, 1912; Hirschberg; 



manufacturing oils soluble in water; Chem- 
lBche Fabrik. 

21; 1,079,004; November 18, 1913; Golodetz; 
separating mixtures of liquids; Bernhard Ben- 
edlx. 

24; 1,092.629; April 7, 1914; Boyen; refining 
and decolorizing mineral wax; Wachsund- 
Ceroslnwerke. 

26; 1,103,499; July 14, 1914^-Freese; regene- 
rating oil used for electrical purposes; Sie- 
mens-Schuckertwerke. 

24; 1,128,494; February 16, 1915; Karl Opl; 
fractional separation of paraffin and like sub- 
stances; (one-half) Trlester Mineral Oel Raf- 
finerie. 

28; 1,092,386; April 7, 1914; Pau & Eber- 
hardt; working up acids and liquid produced 
by products of washing of mineral oils; Rut- 
gerswerke, A. O. 

25; 1,162,729; November 80, 1915; Seiden- 

schnur; treating crude petroleum; Rutgers- 
werke j^ m q_ 

16; 1,102,581; July 25-, 1016; Steinschneider; 
apparatus for distilling petroleum, tar, etc., 
under vacuum; (one-half) Phllipp Porges. 



Class 204- — Electrochemistry. 

Sub-class 40; No. 600,710; Date, January 7, 
1002; inventor, Erny; invention, galvanic bat- 
teries. 

6; 693.918; February 25, 1902; Steinweg; 
forming bodies by electrodeposition. 

64; 608,081; April 20, 1002; Luhne; electric 
furnaces for making glass, etc. 

64; 600.833; May 6, 1002; Ludwig; vessels 
for the reception of high pressure gases. 
0; 700,671; May 20, 1002; Buchner; reduction 

of azo compounds. 

0; 700,672; May 20. 1002; Buchner; reduction 
of nltro compounds. 

29; 700,860; May 27, 1002; Wilde; electrodes. 

20; 701,380; June 3. 1002; Poppenburg; stor- 
age batteries electrodes. 

64; 702,081; June 10, 1002; Voelker; manu- 
facturing glass by electrical heating. 

15; 704,680; July 15, 1002; Hoepfner; leaching 
and extraction of metal from their ores. 

20; 704,744; July 15. 1002; kelnicke; electric 
accumulators. 

20; 705,680; July 20, 1002; Katz; separators 
for electric accumulator plates. 

20; 708.884; September 2, 1002; Fischer; 
electric accumulator plates. 

29; 715,832; December 0, 1902; Katz: accu- 
mulator electrodes. 

62; 716,008; December 16, 1902; Dorsemagen; 
working zinc and substances containing silicic 
acid In electric furnaces. 

1; 716,306; December 16, 1002; Strecker; 
electrolytically metals and alloys for litho- 
graphic purposes. 

50; 718,240; January 13, 1908; Haas; electro- 
lytic apparatus. 

29; 718,774: January 20, 1903; Kranshaar; 
accumulator plates. 

1; 720,186; February 10. 1003: Schwerin; ap- 
paratus for electroendosmotically freeing ma- 
terials from fluids. 

24; 723.028; March 31, 1003; Schwerin; elec- 
tro-endosmotic processes of extracting sugar. 

20; 724.610; April 7, 1003; Schmidt & Predarl; 
electric accumulators. 

20; 724,856; April 7. 1003; Hahmann; sec- 
ondary battery electrodes. 

10; 738,578; July 14, 1008; Egly; smelting 
metals and metal compounds. 

42; 734,826; July 28, 1003; Cranyl; electric 
batteries. 

8; 737,882; September 1, 1008; Strecker; 
electroeytically preparing lithographic plates. 

31; 780,020; September 20, 1008; Pauling; 
apparatus for treating gases.. 

31; 780,021; September 20, 1903; Pauling; 
apparatus for treating gases. 

29; 743,188; November 8, 1903; Peppenburg; 
accumulator plates or grids. 

29; 744,758; November 24, 1903; Heym; 
pocket batteries. 

29; 745,274; November 24, 1908; Bulme; accu- 
mulator plates. 

18; 745,378; December 1, 1008; Pameck; 
electroeytlc refining of zinc. 

80; 748,185; January 12, 1004; Hager; elec- 
trodes. 

24; 751,170; February 2, 1004; Kollrepp & 
Wohl; electrolytically purify Juices. 

81; 758,775; May 8, 1904; Pauling; apparatus 
for the treatment of gases. 

0; 750,887; May 17, 1004; Hinz; manufactur- 
ing peroxids. 

88; 760,561; May 24, 1004; Porscke & Wedc- 
kind; manufacturing hard porous electrodes 
for batteries. 

64; 764.044; July 5, 1004; Dlesler; smelting 
and reducing metals. 

34; 768.180; August 23. 1004; Jaebsen; gal- 
vanic batteries. 

7; 772,717; October 18, 1004; Klttler; app. for 
removing water from peat. 

1; 772.801: October 18. 1904; Klttler; app. for 
removing water from peat. 

59; 773,041; November 1. 1004; Kellner; mfg. 
of cellulose. 

20; 774,049; November 1. • 1904; Dlamant; 
electrolytically producing lead, peroxid layers 
byaon pos. accumulator plates. 

31; 776,543; December 6, 1904; Pauling; mfg. 
amm. formate. 

31; 777,485; December 18. 1904 Pauling; heat- 
ing air. 



31; 777.486; December 18, 1004; Pauling; mfg. 
nitric acid. . 

0; 777.660; December 20, 1004; Frank; produ- 
cing salts of hydromlphmous acid. 

88; 778,012; January 8, 1005; Stockigt; dry 
cells. 

20; 782.656; February 'l4. 1005; Hobel; mfg. 
or storage battery or accumulator electrodes. 

84; 701.685; June 6. 1005; Mann A Ooebel; 
electrodes for primary batteries. 

0; 798.020; September 5, 1005; Portheim; re- 
ducing oxalic acid and derivatives by electro- 

5; 700,061; September 5, 1005; Kellner; elec- 
trolytic app. and electrodes of herefor. 

25; 801.480; October 10, 1005; Uthemann; pro- 
tecting metal surfaces. 

81; 804,021; November 7. 1005; Marquardt & 
vurtel; means for producing oxids of nitrogen. 

1; 804.429; November 14. 1005; Petz; making 
contracts. 

10; 806,006; November 28, 1005; Ruff & Plato; 
mfg. calcium. 

64; 806.600: December 5. 1005; Weieer; elec- 
trical ring furnaces. 

-XL 807 '.!!?'" ^©mber 10. 1005; Pauling; 
making nitric acid. 

10; 808,066; December 28. 1005; Borchers & 
Stockem; prod, of metallic calcium. 

0; 808,005; December 26, 1905; Laag; organl- 
compounds by oxidation. 

11; 800,116; January 2, 1006; Koller & As- 
kenasy; producing circulation in electrolytic 
procs. 

18; 800.402; January 9, 1906; Classen; elec- 
trolytic production of lustrous metal, coatings* 
etc 

1; 810,889; January 23. 1006; Strecker; dec. 
prepar. metals or alloys for lithograph, pur- 
poses. 

10; 813.582; February 27. 1006; Futer & Red- 
lich; electrolytic production of metals and 
earthy alkalies. 

20; 818,730; February 27, 1006; Muller; stor- 
age batteries. 

0; 815,548; March 20, 1006; Mettler; prod, 
aromatic alcohols and their deriva. 

1; 815,875; March 20, 1006; O. & H. Strecker; 
deep etching of zinc by electrolysis. 

11; 817.410; April 10, 1006; Dieffenbach; elec- 
trolytic mfg. of metal tubes. 

58; 810,410; May 1, 1006; Clemm; mfg. of 
chlorin. 

15; 826,485; July 17, 1006;- Lenart, Jr., ex- 
tracting metals by electrolytic means from 
ores. 

57; 830.680; September 11, 1006; Borchers & 
Frank & Ounther; electrolsetlc production of 
copper. 

0; 838.513; Octboer 16, 1006; Dieffenbach; 
hydroazo derivatives. 

81; 850,892; April 16, 1007; Neuberger; oxi- 
dizing atmospheric nitrogen. 

26; 855,440; May 28. 1007; Dorn; ameliorat- 
ln & w i nes and "Pirits and sterilizing liquids. 

20; 859,753; July 0, 1007; Diamaut; building 
up of spongy lead plates for electric storage 
batteries. * 

11; 862,400; August 6. 1007; Muller; treating 
sheet metal by electrolysis. 

1; 868.720; October 22. 1007; Trunkhahn; 
baths for obtaining electrolythe metallic de- 
posist. 

57; 875,250; December 81, 1007; Ounther & 
Franke; extracting metallic ores and matter. 

64; 877.730; January 28. 1008; Rochbing & 
Rod en ha user; means for obtaining their liquid 
dross in electric furnaces for metallurgical pur- ■ 
poses. 

52; 870,688; February 18. 1008; Gunther & 
FranI S e , : tr *»tlng metallic ores or matters. 

0; 880.373; February 25, 1008; Escales & 
Novak; accelerating the separation of nitro- 
glycerine from acids. 

50; 880.405; February 25. 1008: Schmidt: pro- 
ducing poreless and well adhering electro de- 
posits. 

50; 880.570; March 3, 1908; Schoop; carbon 
electroids for electrical bleaching apparatus. 

9; 880,599; March 8, 1908; Tiechmer & As- 
kenasy; electrolytically producing persulfates. 

31; 884.010; April 14. 1008; Grau & Rush; 
making nitrogen oxids from air. 

31; 884.020; April 14, 1008; Grau & Russ; 
making nitrogen oxids from air. 

57; 890.249; June 0, 1008; Steiner; obtaining 
pure tin from crude tin or tin aloys eectrolyt- 
lcally. 

14; 801.082; June 80, 1008; Classen; electro- 
lytic proc. for production of metallic dark coat- 
ings upon metals. 

20; 804.288; July 28. 1008; Strasser; accumu- 
lator electroids. 

50; 896.184; August 18. 1008; Wei chert; app. 
for the electrolysis of fluids. 

4; 000,502; October 6. 1008; Ferchland A 
Nussbaum; electrodes for electrolytic purposes. 

6; 000,507; October 6. 1008; Salzer; prod, an 
electrolytic deposit of a metallic chromium. 

41; 001,445; October 20. 1008; Heintz; pri- 
mary battery. 

58; 003.951; November 17, 1008; Bill iter; elec- 
trolysis of liquids. 

63; 004,263; November 17, 1008; Kaiser; ob- 
taining metals from their ores. 

59; 906.669; December 15, 1908; Vogelsang; 
electrolytic apparatus for use in mfg. of 
bleaching liquors. 

29; 912.851; February 16, 1000; Ziegenberg; 
charging head-peroxid zinc storage batteries. 

63; 015,172; March 16, 1909; Goldschmldt; 
manufacture of alloys of silicon. 
64; 915,488; March 16, 1000; Schumann & 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



85 



Brown; furnaces for the Brown treatment of 
metals. 

29; 918,980; March 23, 1909; Luckon; regu- 
lating; electric accumulators. 

6; 916,088; March 28. 1909; Schmidt; produ- 
cing electrodeposiu which can be removed from 
their base. 

9; 916,900; March 80, 1909; Teichuer; elec- 
trolytically producing perozid of hydrogen. 

51; 919,457; April 27, 1909; Porscke; galvanic 
cells. 

64; 920,078; April 27, 1909; Nathusius; elec- 
trical furnaces. 

29; 924,508; June 8, 1909; Schneider; cylin- 
drical positive electrodes. 

58; 928,784; July 20, 1909; Billitzer; electro- 
iysis of alkali chloride. 

68; 980,844; August 10, 1909; Borchers; treat- 
ing tltaniferous Iron ores. 

64; 981,945; August 24. 1909; Mehner; melt- 
ing and working quarts glass. 

64; 982,986; August 31, 1909; Helberger; 
transforming smelting furnaces. 

88; 934.885; September 14, 1909; Billitzer; 
app. for the electrolysis of alkali chlorlds. 

29; 984,839; September 2l, 1909; Roloff; iron 
electrodes. 

11; 986,472; October 12. 1909; Pfauhauser; 
mechanical arrangements for electroplating ob- 
jects. 

64; 987,486; October 19, 1909; Thallner; pro- 
ducing steel free from protoxide. 

88; 941,416; November 80, 1909; Hell; primary 
electric cells or batteries. 

64; 941,768; November 80, 1909; Dieffenbaoh 
ft Moldenhauer: electric furnaces for gas re- 
actions. 

64; 942,068; December 7, 1909; Helfenstein; 
electric furnaces with raised charging i its. 

52; 942,704; December 7, 1909; Benko; se- 
curing metal contacts to carbon electrodes. 

64; 948.408; December 14, 1909; Grlmwald; 
melting hearths for electric induction furnaces. 

29; 948,689; February 8, 1910; Schneider; ac- 
cumulators. 

64; 949,895; February 22, 1910; Helfenstein; 
electric furnaces. 

8; 962,901; March 22, 1910; Heller; produc- 
ing conductive layers on ceramic wares. 

81; 954,080; April 15, 1910; Dieffenbach ft 
Moldenhauer: producing hydroganlc acid. 

1; 966,764; May 8, 1910; Gerb; producing lith- 
ographic printing plates. 

58; 978,171; October 18, 1910; Clemm; treat- 
ing barium chlorid and strontium chlorid for 
producing chlorin and hydroxld of said metals. 

1; 9757835; November 15, 1910; Damkohler 
ft Schwindt; electrolytically treating tannic in- 
fusions of plants. 

64; 980.940; January 10, 1911; Grunwald; 
electric induction furnaces. 

19; 984,442; February 14, 1911; Rahtzen; pre- 
paring indoxyls and Indigo coloring matters. 

81; 984,925; February 21, 1911; Kaiser; proc- 
esses of oxidizing nitrogen of air by means of 
electric discharges. 

1; 987,318; March 21, 1911; Pranhauser; mfg. 
of thin electrolytic iron plates of large area. 

64; 969,671; April 18. 1911; Voeleer; electric 
furnaces. 

29: 990,661; April 25, 1911; Luckow; methods 
of regenerating storage batteries. 

81; 991,174; May 2, 1911; Schonherr ft Hess- 
berger; production of reactions in gases. 

8; 992.600; May 16, 1911; Bumpier; treating 
alelncenium art. for formation of galvanic me- 
tallic coatings. 

1; 992,951; May 28, 1911; Fischer; mfg. of 
ductile electrolytic iron. 

1; 992,952; May 23, 1911; Fischer; process of 
mfg. ductile electro, iron. 

63; 993,270: May 25, 1911; Nleake ft Muller; 
production of metals and alloys. 

1; 998.888; May 80, 1911; Schwerln; separat- 
ing substances in suspension. 

31; 999,587; August 1, 1911; Pauling; elec- 
tric furnaces for treating gases. 

64; 1,000.805; August 15. 1911; Helfenstein; 
electric furnaces. 

64; 1,000.888; August 15, 1911; Mathulslus; 
electrical furnaces. 

64; 1.002,843; September 12, 1911; Helfen- 
stein; electric furnaces. 

63; 1,002,968; September 12, 1911; Helfen- 
stein; utilizing the gases resulting from re- 
duction operations carried out in electric fur- 
naces and electric furnaces for carrying out 
the same. 

61; 1,006.889; October 17, 1911; Luckow; elec- 
trolytic mfg. of difficultly soluble salts of heavy 
metals. 

58; 1.009.061; November 21, 1911; Frank; 
app. for mercurial decomposition of alkaline 
chlorlds. 

64; 1,010,404; November 28. 1911; Frank; app 
for producing nitrogen compounds from car- 
bids. 

84; 1,011,485; December 12, 1911; Pflaiderer; 
electric batteries. 

81; 1,012.149; December 19, 1911; Pfelfer ft 
Szawasy; production of halogen derivatives of 
hydrocarbons. 

20; 1,014,560: January 9, 1912; Becker ft 
Becker; electroplating aluminum and its al- 
loys. 

64; 1.015.489; January 23, 1912; Helfenstein; 
smelting furnaces with electric refining hearths 
connected thereto. 

82; 1,017,258; February 13, 1912; Fuss; ozon- 
izing app. 

44; 1,022,276; April 2, 1912; Szpor; primary 
batteries. 

8; 1,023,612; April 16, 1912; Penslnger; mfg. 
galvanic metal reprod. of articles of plastic 
arts. 

49; 1,028.354; June 4, 1912; Hell; galnamio 
batteries. 

64; 1.081,900; July 9. 1912; Burchhardt; mfg. 
hollow bodies from quartz. 



29; 1,082,158; July 9, 1912; Parscke ft Achen- 
bach; electrodes for secondary galnamic cells. 

31; 1,038.126; July 28. 1912; Slebert; methods 
prod, endothermlo compi from their comp. 

81; 1,087,061; August 27, 1912; Schweitzer ft 
Hauff; mfg. nitrogen compounds. 

86; 1,087,480; September 8, 1912; Hoeller; 
charging devices for furnaces or gas genera- 
tors. 

58; 1,087,585; September 8, 1912; Billiter; 
electrolysis of liquids. 

28; 1,039,266; September 24, 1912; Delffen- 
bach; dlaphragus for electrolysis. 

64; 1.040,818; October 8, 1912; Vogel; electric 
furnaces. 

1; 1,041.790; October 22, 1912; Herrmann; 
electrolytic cleansing. 

9; 1.042.605; October 29, 1912; Rosenheim; 
mfg. of hypophospheric acid and its salts. 

1 27; 1,048,709; December 81, 1912; Lehmann: 
treatment of skins and hides for the removal 
of fat. 

64: 1.051,035; January 21, 1018; Voelker; 
making transparent quartz glass. 

64; 1,051,086; January 21, 1918; Voelker; 
electric-resistance melting furnaces. 

29; 1,051,261; January 21, 1918; Ricks; elec- 
tric storage battery plates. 

58; 1.054,497; February 25, 1918; Billiter; 
app. for the electrolysis of saturated solu- 
tions. 

32; 1,054,589; February 25, 1918; Mestern; 
devices for production of pure air. 

31; 1,055.881; March 11, 1913; Kochmann; 
app. for carrying out gas reactions, particu- 
larly for production of oxld of nitrogen in 
electric rec 

5; 1,055,504; March 11, 1918; Albrecht; salt- 
ing app. 

64; 1,057,289; February 25, 1913; Helfenstein; 
electric furnaces. 

31; 1,068,658; April 8, 1918; Andriessens; car- 
rying through chemical gas reactions by 
means of an enlarged elec. discharge. 

9; 1,069,809; April 22, 1918; Adolph ft 
Pietssch; mfg. of persulfates. 

64; 1,062,481; May 20. 1918; Billiter; purify- 
ing carbon for carbon filaments. 

39; 1.065,651; June 24, 1918; Arndt; air py- 
rometers. 

15; 1,065,855; June 24, 1918; Weiss; mfg. al- 

2*9; 1.066,651; July 8, 1913; Porscke ft Achen- 
bach; electrodes for secondary galvanic cells. 

64; 1,068,716; July 29, 1918; Voelker ft 
Meuser; app. for producing hollow quartz 
bodies. 

1; 4.069,151; August 5, 1918; Loewenthal: 
prod, of an Insulating coating on electrical con- 
ductors. 

64; 1,069,252; August 5, 1918; Helfenstein; 
electric furnaces. 

1; 1,076,424: October 14. 1913; Held; treating 
large fermentation vessels. 

31; 1.079,727; November 25, 1913; Scherieble; 
bleaching and thickening oils and fats. 

1; 1,082,058; December 28, 1818; Wlenand; 
casting artificial teeth. __ m 

64; 1.082.195; December 28, 1918; Helfen- 
stein; electric furnaces. 

64; 1,082,196; December 23, 1918; Helfen- 
st«tn; electric furnaces. * 

28; 1,088,132; December 80, 1918; Pietssch, 
A.; electrodes for preventing cathodlo reduc- 
tion. 

64; 1,089,951; March 10, 1914; Otto; proc. and 
high-pressure furnaces direct prod, of iron 
and steel. 

84; 1,090,872; March 17, 1914; Achenback; 
dry batteries. 

64; 1,093.328; April 14. 1914; Helfenstein; 
electric induction heaters or furnaces. 

29; 1,096,751; May 12. 1914; Porsckr ft Schen- 
back; negative electrodes for alkalin secondary 
batteries. __ 

5; 1,096,786; May 12, 1914;Kammerer; meth- 
ods of and app. for prod, filled precious metal 
wires. . ._ . 

38; 1,098,606; June 2, 1914; Achenbach; elec- 
tric batteries. 

64; 1.099.118: June 2. 1914; Boehm; prod, 
fireproof materials from quartz and like. 

64; 1,099.211; June 9, 1914; Specketer; proc- 
ess to app. prod, zinc and similar metals. 

64; 1,099.934; June 16, 1914; Rahn ft Schmid- 
mer; coating flexible objects of organic origin 
with metal. ^ 

33; 1,108,688; August 25, 1914; 8tille; elec- 
tro-optical cells. 

11; 1,115,671; November 8, 1914; Herrman; 
electrolutlc app. 

4; 1,117,240; November 17, 1014; Pressor ; in- 
sulating wire of aluminum, etc. 

58; 1,118.882; November 24, 1914; Clemm; 
ammonia soda process. 

64; 1,118,878; November 24, 1914; Rafn; coat- 
ing flexible objects of organic origin with met- 
als. 

29; 1,119,318; December 1, 1914; Parscke ft 
Achenbach; secondary galnamic batteries. 

38; 1.123,848; January 5. 1915; Burger; de- 
polarizers for galnamic cells. 

31; 1,124,560; January 12, 1915; Utescher; sat- 
urating unsaturated fatty acids and thin glyc- 
erids by combining with hydrogen. 

8; 1.126,211; January 26, 1915; Heller; proc- 
ess and means securing metallic coats on 
ceramic surfaces. 

29; 1,127.025; February 2. 1915; Krannich- 
feldt; prod, perforated tubular electrodes for 
accumulators. 

33; 1,148.926; August 8, 1916; Stllle; electro- 
optical cells. _ 

64; 1,157,691; October*l6, 1915; Guggenheim; 
electric furnaces. 

28; 1.160.847; November 16. 1915; Clemm: 
electrolysis of alkali chlorlds or alkali-earth 
chlorlds. 



15; 1,162,150; November 80, 1915; Ks telle; 
treating metallic ores. 

63; 1,167,998; November 11, 1916; Helfen- 
stein; obtaining metals, such as lead or zinc, 
in an electric furnace. 

31; 1,169,817; February 15, 1916; Helfenstein; 
carrying out gas reactions in an electric fur- 
nace 

63;' 1,173,012; February 22, 1916; Meyer ft 
Kerstein; reduction of chloride. 

58; 1,176,651; March 21, 1916; Heinemann; 
app. for decomposing alkali-chlorid solutions. 

64; 1,189,866; July 4, • 1916; Byermann; 
electrical furnaces. 

65; 1,199,220; September 26, 1916; Szarnasy; 
production pure retort carbon. 

81; 1,201.607; October 17, 1916; Moscicki; elec- 
tric furnaces. 

11; 1,204.898; November 14. 1916; Bots; elec- 
trodeposltlon of metal rotation bodies. 

6; 1,211,687; January 9, 1917; Dohmen; app. 
for the electrolytic decomposition of water. 

64; 1,212,426; January 16, 1917; Volgthander 
ft Lohmann; producing homogeneous bodies of 
chemically pure tungsten metal of any desired 
shape. 

64; 1.220,111; March 20. 1917; Helfenstein; 
app. for refining metal by heating. 

64; 1,281,084; June 26, 1917; Specketer; app. 
for producing zinc and other similar metals. 

64; 958.757; May 24, 1917; Nathusius; elec- 
tric melting and refining furnaces. 

81; 1,256,875; February 19, 1918; Classen; 
producing ammonia. 

65; 1.268,488; June 4, 1918; Nathusius; elec- 
trode for use in electric furnaces or other pur- 
poses. 



Assignees. 



81; 757,185; April 12. 1904; Erlwein; mfg. of 
cyanamid salts; assignee, Cyanld Ges. 

64; 708.809; September 2, 1902; Bronn; mfg. 
of glass by means of electricity; Ges. Zus 
Verwertung dor Patente fur Glaserzeung auf 
Blectrischem Wege Becker ft Co. 

29; 714.201; November 25, 1902; Laszcsynski; 
storage batteries; Litus von Mlchalowski. 

15; 748.608; November 10. 1908; Suchy ft 
Specketer; extracting chronlum from chrome 
iron ore; Chemische fabrek Grelshelm Block- 1 
ton. 

64; 1,078,684; September 28, 1913; Hess; elec- 
tric furnaces; Bomische Electric, etc. 

29; 762.847; June 14. 1904; Schneider; stor- 
afe batteries; Bersbarth. 

29; 766,078; July 26. 1904; Walter; secondary 
batteries; Pfluger Accumula. 

29; 796,485; August 8. 1906; Langelaan; sec- 
OI iS ary ~J? at ! erieB ; Pfluger Accumulators. 

64; 800,181; September 19, 1905; Specketer; 
P^'oS^S!?* 16 *' Chemische Fabrek, etc. 

1; 888.757; December 19, 1906; Suchy; con- 
vert chromates Into bichromates; Chemische 
Fabrek. etc. 

88; 848,549; February 5, 1907; Porscke; re- 
ceptacles for elements; Wedekind. 

64; 864,728; August 27, 1907; Boiling; pro- 
duction pf electric resistance bodies; Chem. 
Electrische Fabrik. 

64; 866,444; September 17, 1907; Egly; manu- 
facturing of solid forms; Gebruder Siemens 
& Co. 

50; 870,985; November 12, 1907; Mollenbruck 
tl ~-I ca-rben electrodes for galvanic elements; 
H. Peltzer. 

81; 882.058; March 24. 1908; Pauling; manu- 
facturing of nitric acid by means of super- 
heating; Westdentche Thomas Phosphat- 
Werke. 

32; 909.809; January 12, 1909; Kolle; appa- 
ratus for generating ozone; one-third to Wm. 
Elworthy and onethlrd to Christian Held. 

4; 984,988; September 28, 1909; Adolph ft 
Prltzsch; making durable carbon electrodes 
for electro lytical purposes; Chemische Fabrik 
Bucken. 

38; 937,730; October 19, 1909; Wedekind ft 
Poerscke; battery electrodes; Gustav A. Wede- 
kind. 

64; 942,379; December 7, 1907; Egly; manu- 
facturing dynamo brushes, etc.; Gebuidn Sie- 
mens ft Co. 

57; 961.924; June 21. 1910; Wohlwill; refin- 
ing gold; Norddentscbe Afflnerie. 
% 48; 968.852; July 12, 1910; Benko; galvanic 
batteries; Co. Ltd. for Exploitation of In- 
vention Stephen Benko. 

68; 973.732; October 25, 1910; Wiens; reduc- 
tion of ores containing sulfur iron; Elektro- 
chemlscke ft Werpe G. M. B. H. 

48; 974.016; October 25, 1910; Benko; hollow 
carbon electrodes for galvanic elements; Ste- 
phen Benko. 

4; 976,819; November 22, 1910; Vlertel ft 
Egly; protective coating for carbon bodies; 
Gebrueder Siemens ft Co. 

9; 981,900; January 17, 1911; Telchner; pro- 
duction of compounds of persulfuria acid; 
Consortium fur Elektrochemlsche, etc. 

50; 1,011.559; December 12, 1911; Benko; 
carbon electrodes for galvanic elements; Co. 
Ltd. for Exploitation of Invention by Stephen 
Benko. 

64; 1,012,581; December 19, 1911; Egly; man- 
ufacturing of solid fashioned bodies contain- 
ing silicin carbid; Ge. Siemens ft Co. 

64; 1.018.003; February 20, 1912; Redllch; 
carbon electrodes for electrical purposes; 
Plamawerke Ektien fur Kohlenf. 

81; 1,018,990; February 27. 1912; Rothe: 
methods and apparatus for producing and 
utilising disk-like electric arcs, etc.; Elecktro- 
chemische Werke G. M. B. H. 

29; 1,034,887; August 6, 1912; Delnlein; re- 
generating storage battery plates; Trautmann 
ft Mayer. 

64; 1,048,581; December 31, 1912; Redllch; 



86 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



carbon electrode* for electric furnaces; Plania- 
werke A. Fur Kohlenfabrikation. 

64; 1.049,624; January 7, 1913; Viertel A 
Vlertel; means for joining electrodes; Gebrue- 
der Siemens A Co. 

62; 1,075.684; October 21, 1913; Egly; pro- 
duction of refaotory electorlcal conducting; 
molded bodies; Oebruder Siemens A Co. 

9; 1.055,103; March 4, 1913; Vagh; produc- 
tion sulfonic acids of naphthalene series; 
Frledl Bayer A Co. 

9; 1,094.589; April 28. 1914; Delbruck & 
Melsenburg; producing 1.8 butyleneglycol; 
Fried! Bayer A Co. 

64; 1.056,456; March 18, 1913; Schemmann A 
Bronn; electric furnaces for melting and 
liquefying ferro alloys; Rombacher Hutten- 
werke. 

64; 1,061,016; May 6, 1913; Schrmmann; proc- 
ess of melting ferro alloys and keeping in 
liquid state; Rombancher Huttenwerke. 

81; 1,073.870; September 23, 1913; Tlebert; 
devices for synthesizing gases; Elektrochem- 
tsche Werke. 

5; 1,074.549; September 80, 1918; Henflel A 
Weber; electrolytic apparatus; Henkel A Co. 

9; 1,076,141; January 14, 1918; Meltner; prep- 
aration of radiothorlum; Dr. O. Knofler A Co. 

9; 1.081,191; December 9, 1913; Arndt; elec- 
trolytic jnanufacturlng of perborates; Chem- 
lsche Fabrik. 

6; 1,082,200; December 23, 1918; Knaebel; 
manufacturing hollow bodies; Rhemische 
Metallwaaren, etc. 

64; 1,094,854; April 21, 1914; Wilmowsky; 
electric furnaces; Mrs. Olga Pleper. 

31; 1,094.355; April 21. 1914; Wllmozsky; 
electric furnaces and process for heating sub- 
stances uniformly at a controllable tempera- 
ture; Mrs. Olga Pleper. 

64; 1,094.881; April 21, 1914; Wilmowsky; 
electric furnaces and process for heating sub- 
stances uniformly at a controllable tempera- 
ture electric arc; Mrs. Olga Pleper. 

64; 1,088,784; March 8, 1914; Schroers; car- 
bon electrodes having protective covering and 
process of producing same; Oes. Teerverwer- 
tung. 

9; 1,102,827; July 7, 1914; Vagt; process for 
producing tulforic acids; Farbenfabrlken vorm. 
Freidr. 

9; 1,128.966; February 16, 1915; Franz Fis- 
cher; making peroxld of hydrogen; Henkelt 
A Cie. 

64; 1,129,877; February 23, 1915; Bronn A 
Schemmann; methods and apparatus for pro- 
jecting electrodes In arc furnaces; Rombacher 
Huttenwerke. 

9; 1,188,519; May 4, 1916; Weber; manufac- 
turing peroxld of hydrogen; Henkel A Cie. 

9; 1,188,520; May 4, 1915; Weber; process 
for manufacturing peroxld of hydrogen; Hen- 
kel A Cie. 

8; 1,144,271; June 22, 1915; Weber; appa- 
ratus for the continuous production by syn- 
thesis of hydrogen peroxide; Henkel A Cie. 

9; 1,169,708; January 25, 1916; Weber; proc- 
ess for the cathodlc production of solid peroxld 
compounds; Henkel A Cie. 

54; 1,170,818; February 1, 1916; Weber; proc- 
ess of burning carbon electrodes; Georg Mend- 
heim. 

88; 1,192,061; July 25, 1916; Hickmann; proc- 
ess for regenerating waste products of gal- 
vanic batteries; C. Fabrik Ouesheim Elektron. 

64; 1,234,946; July 81. 1917; Sperling; elec- 
trode packings for melting furnaces; Fried 
Krupp A. Ges. 

64; 1,284,947; July 31. 1917; Sperling; cooled 
bottom electrodes for electric smelting fur- 
naces; Fried Krupp A. Ges. 

41; 1,240,885; September 25, 1917; Schuster; 
galvanic batteries; Schuster Patent Ges. 

40; 1,240,886; September 25, 1917; Schuster; 
galvanic batteries; Schuster Patent Ges. 



Badische Antlin and Soda Fabrik* 

Assignees. 

The following patents were issued to Ba- 
dische Anllln and Soda Fabrik as assignees:— 

21; 1,258,529; March 5, 1918; Brode; process 
and apparatus for producing alkali metals. 

31; 812,038; February 6, 1906; Hessberger; 
regulation of electric currents that fled elec 
arcs. 

9; 815,193; March 18, 1906; Mettler; produc- 
tion of aromatic alcohols. 



31; 1,032,782; July 16, 1912; Schonherr & 
Hessberger; processes and apparatus for pro- 
duction of compound of nitrogen. 

50; 1,126,627; January 26, 1915; Gans; proc- 
ess for electrolysing alkali chlorld solutions. 

21; 1,191,798; July 18, 1918; Labhart; produc- 
tion of alkali metals. 



Patents Issued to Cesellschaft fur 
Elcktro-Osmose* Assignee. 

.i?ii-l ,0 # 50 ' 80 ?'\ J ^ nT3 ! ary 14 » IMS; • Schwerin; 
articles for electrolytical purposes. 

5; 1,138,967; March 30, 1915; Olllg A Schwe- 
rin; apparatus for electro-osmotic process. 

t&£$£&£?%L% 1915 '' Sch ^i?Telec- 

forUlect^Smo"sS: Ch ? ' 1916; ° Ui * ; apparatu » 

w ; - 1 U? 9 ' 208; J . m *J> 1917 ' # Schwerin; purify- 
ing and separating finely divided substances. 

Patents Issued to Siemens & Halsku 

Assignees. 

nJn? * f °»if S&SUZl* ^ees:-^ 

fymg'Sn^lum^xneSr "' 19 ° 5; *>»*" *■*- 

tJ!£L 8 . 17 i: 738; AprI1 10 - 1906 » Werner A Von 
tor? metoS megeneOU1 bodl6 " of highlj refr ^ 

elec^^ Engelhardt; 

e&trTO 19 °* Nu "*»-: 

tiSZ'' JFt^ 00 '* Marcn *• HW: Pirani; produc- 
tion of homogeneous bodies from tantalum! 

a5SL?? 8 ; 88 5 ; .Member 17, 1907; Pirani; pro- 
duction technically pure ductile tantalum. 

64; 878,958; December 17. 1907; Pirani- nm. 

ass? ssasrsJK* from sssLre 

ir^S. 904 ' 881 ' November 24. 1908; Bolton- mak~ 
JFo^KSz^^^ tantalum^ 

P^t» P^cfngTmo^neo^^ucfff; 
bodies from metal, of a highly^efractor^ 

ralii/for^o^.^ 111 ^ 28 ' 1909 '' Huth; appa- 
^ £l « e - electroly8l » of aqueous solutions. 
18; 985,250; September 28, 1909; Engelhardt 

tS'tSSSSL "* "• W10: Sohmta »: *«*»«- 

aqueous solutions of metallic wilts e,ectroIy zln * 

^B^^^^ 1912 '' HUUi; 
^L\T^^^^^ Baike; appa- 

W; 1.138 400; May 1 1915; Ochs; apparatus 
t0 L 9 \ e SS > i^f u ^ Valine chlorids. * pparatu * 
-i!if 1, 2 09 ' 7 i 0; Docember 26, 1916; Huth- wire 
M^SJo^Ta el r tro , lytlc Purposes. ' WlW 

58; 1,222,239; April 10, 1917V Ochs; electrol- 
ysis of alkaline haloids. 

Patents Issued to C. F. Boehringer & 
Soehne, Assignees. 

9; 700,670; May 20, 1902; Buchner; electro- 
lytic reduction of nltro or other compounds. 

of'cJm'phidon^ °' 1903; Tafel; »«***«• 

b&JgtfSL""* 5 ' 1908; Tafel: producl »* 

an 9 4 p^parlng^ 1908; *"' — *«» 

ti?£ !5 6,2 !? ; Au * u « t *J. 1W8; Buchner; reduc- 
tion of nltro-compounds. 

9; 736.206; August 11, 1903; Buchner; reduc- 
tion of aromatic nltro-compounds. 

tJ?A n? 1,1 ? 84 '' ** 7 81 % 1904 » Buchner; reduc- 
tion of nltro-compounds. 

o^zo^es? May 81, 1904; L ° Ch; Dre ^ r ^on 



9: 888,661: March 81, 1908; La Blanc; elec- Patents Issued to Flfhlm r>. m *.~ 
trolytlc production of chomic acid. «*"»«• izzucu io n*iei(iro-KJsmose 



81; 980.288; August 8, 1909; Schonherr A 
Hessberger; production of long stable electric 
arcs. # 

31; 988.816; October 26, 1900; Haber A 
Koenlg; process and apparatus for the produc- 
tion of compounds of oxygen and hydrogen. 

81; 976.002; November 15. 1910; Schonherr A 
Hessberger; production of long stable electric 
arcs. 

81; 1.008,299; September 12, 1911; Schonhen 
A Hessberger; processes and apparatus for 
producing long stable electric arcs. 

31; 1.028,516; June 4, 1912; Unelgolaski A 
Schonherr; production of continuous electric 
arcs and apparatus therefor. 



Akiien Ges., Assignees. 

1; 1,121,409; December 15, 1914; Schwerin; 
removing liquid from organic and inorganic 
substances. 

9; 1,132,394; March 16, 1915; Schwerin; man- 
ufacturing chemically pure soluble silicic 
acid. 

27; 1,174,903; March 7. 1916; Schwerin; 
treatment of materials for impregnating them 
electro-osmolically. £ 

1; 1,216.371; February 20, 1917; Schwerin; 
manufacturing of hydroxld of aluminum. 

27; 1,229,150; June 5, 1917; Schwerin; tan- 



ning and impregnating materials by means of 
electricity. 

1: 1.280.524: June 19, 1917; Schwerin; sepa- 
ration of finely divided substances from coarse 
and foreign matters. 

1; 1,285,063; July 81, 1917; Schwerin; elec- 
tro-osmotic process of treating liquid mix- 
tures. 

1; 1,285,064; July 81, 1917; Schwerin; electro- 
osmotic purification of gelatinous substances. 

1; 1.266.829; May 14, 1918; Schwerin; electro- 
osmotic extraction of water from animal, veg- 
etable and mineral substances. 



Patents Issued to Farb&erke vorm. 

Meister, Lucius & Bruning, 

Assignees. 

1; 728,007; March 17. 1903; Muller A Schwab; 
reducing indigo. 

9; 729,502; May 26, 1908; Moest; oxidizing 
organic compounds. 

9; 742,797; October 27. 1903; Moest, Hertlein 
A Coppermann; electrolytic reduction of or- 
ganic compounds by means of titanium com- 
pounds. 

9; 828,485; June 12, 1906; Oppermann; treat- 
ing organic • substances in presence of vana- 
dium compounds. 

9; 765,996; July 26. 1904; Schmidt A Muller; 
manufacturing of bromlnated indigo. 

1; 892,188; June 30, 1908; Schwerin; sepa- 
rating and simultaneously extracting water 
from mineral, vegetable and animal sub- 
stances. 

1; 894,070; July 21, 1908; Schwerin; extract- 
ing water or other liquid from vegetable sub- 
stances and minerals. 

9; 1,021,284; March 26. 1912; Muller, Moest 
A Graf; manufacturing pure nitric oxid. 

1; 1,040,379; October 8, 1912; Moest and von 
Berneck; treating nitric acid by electrolysis. 

Patents Issued to Chemische Fabrik 
Criesheim Electron, Assignees. 

9; 727,792; May 12, 1908; Hickmann; produc- 
tion of permanganates. 

9; 728,778; May 19. 1903: Specketer: produc- 
tion of chronlum compounds and alkali. 

9; 784,950; July 28, 1903; Inedenfeldt; man- 
ufacturing of peroxld of lead. 

62; 801.296; September 26. 1905; Boiling; 
molded blocks of silicon carbld. 

64; 981.518; August 17, 1909; Specketer; elec- 
trodes. * 

31; 981,727; January 17, 1911; Weber and 
Schreiber; means for electric arc reactions on 
gases. 

81; 1,042,179; October 22, 1912; Weber and 
Weber; process and furnaces for producing 
gas reactions. 

88; 1,173,965; February 29, 1916; Hickmann; 
galvanic batteries. 

1; 1,185,499; May 80, 1916; Grunstein; re- 
generating mercury catalysts. 

1; 1.185.500; May 30. 1916; Grunstein; re- 
generating mercury catalysts. 

Patents Issued to Saltpetersaure- Indus- 
trie~Ces. 9 Assignees. 

81; 878,891; December 17, 1907; Pauling; pro- 
ducing of nitric acid or nitric acid from at- 
mospheric air. 

31; 877,446; January 21, 1908; Pauling; appa- 
ratus for manufacturing nitric acid for oxide 
from air. 

81; 877.447; January 21, 1908; Pauling; pro- 
ducing pure nitric acid. 

81; 877,448; January 21, 1908; Pauling; pro- 
ducing voltaic strong current arcs. 

1; 887,266; May 12, 1908; Pauling; concen- 
trating nitric acid. 

31; 896,144; August 18. 1908; Pauling; elec- 
trodes. 

31; 898.183; September 8. 1908; Pauling; ap- 
paratus for producing vol tain high ourrent 
arcs. 

9; 898,890; September 8, 1908; Pauling; proc- 
ess of concentrating nitrosulferic waste acid. 

81; 989,441; November 9. 1909; Pauling; ap- 
paratus for producing electric discharges. 

81; 989,442; November 9, 1909; Pauling; pro- 
duction of voltaic high current arcs. 

81; 991,357; May 2. 1911; Pauling; producing 
nitric oxid from mixtures of nitrogen and 
oxygen. 

31; 999.586; August 1, 1911; Pauling; electric 
furnaces. 

81; 1.029,885; June 18, 1912; Pauling; elec- 
trodes producing gas reactions by means of 
electric arc. 

81; 1,029,886; June 18, 1912; Pauling; electric 
furnaces for producing gas reactions. 

81; 1,035,878; August 20, 1912; Grohmann; 
producing endothermlc gas reactions and ap- 
paratus therefor. 



J 



r 



CHEMICAL MARKET SECTION 

(Pages 87-116) 

Chemistry in the War — The History of Federal .Achievement 89-9 1 

Chemistry in 191 8 — Conditions Underlying the Market 93-95 

Industrial Chemicals, High'and Low Prices, 1917-1918 97-101 

London Chemical Market Prices* 1918 101 



88 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



GENERAL CHEMICAL COMPANY 

MAKERS OF 

STANDARD CHEMICALS 

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BRIDGEPORT CLEVELAND NEW YORK PITTSBURGH SAN FRANCISCO 

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New York Office: 25 BROAD STREET 

Cable Address: "Lycurgus" New York 

Our works and distributing warehouses are so located in various sections of the country 
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Chlorsulphonic 

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Hydrochloric 

Hydrofluoric 

Hydrofluosilicic 

Mixed 

Muriatic 

Nitric 

Oil Vitriol 

Oleum ' 

Phosphoric 

Propionic 

Sulphuric 

Sulphuric-Fuming 

Valeric 

White 

ALUM U. S. P. 



AMMONIA 

Aqua ' 
Bifluoride 

ACETYL CHLORIDE 

COPPER 

Sulphate— 'Triangle" 
Sulphate — Granular 
Nitrate 



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Lump (Ammonia Alum) 

Ground 

Powdered 



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ALUMINUM SULPHATE 

Filter 
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DIMETHYLSULPHATE 

IRON 

True Nitrate 
Copperas Nitrate 
Sulphide 
Sulphate 

LEAD 

Acetate 
Acetate-— Solution 

MAGNESIUM 

Fluosilicate 

Sulphate U. S. P.— (Epsom 

Salt) 
Sulphate — Technical 

PHOSPHOROUS 

PENTACHLORIDE 



SODIUM 

Acetate 
' Bisulphate 
Bisulphite 
Carbonate 

Disodium Phosphate 
Fluoride 
Hydrate 
Hyposulphite ., 
Pyrosodium Phosphate 
Silicate 
Sulphate 
Sulphite 
Sulphide . 
Trisodium Phosphate 

SODIUM ALUMINUM SUL- 
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SULPHUR REFINED 

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Flour 

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OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



89 



CHEMISTRY IN WAR-HISTORY OF FEDERAL 

ACHIEVEMENT. 



117ITHIN one year the chemical talent of the United States 

* * was mobilized for war, contributed an entirely new 

branch to the military organization, beat Germany at 
its own game of chemical warfare and produced tremendous 
quantities of gases more noxious than any other nation 
ever devised. , 

The achievements of the Chemical Warfare Service are 
due basically to the way in which the chemical forces of 
the country were mobilized. England and France did not 
exempt their chemists at the beginning of the war and 
many of the best men of these countries were sent into 
the trenches and there killed. This was a terrible economic 
and scientific sacrifice. . When Germany started gas war- 
fare, therefore she had the Allies at a very grave disad- 
vantage, for she had from the very first very carefully 
conserved her best chemical and scientific experts. In des- 
peration England tried to get chemists from all over the 
world, and especially from Canada and the United States. 

Mobilizing Chemical Man Power. 

When the United States entered the war, one of the very 
first things this nation was called upon to do therefore 
was to mobilize and conserve the chemical man -power of 
the country. 

Under the direction of Major F. E. Breithut this work 
proceeded mainly along three lines — 

First — The census of talent. ^ 

Second — Taking the personnel from the various camps, 
with the War Department granting authority for this new 
branch of the service to request that men with chemical 
training be transferred to the Chemical Warfare Service 
of* other branches of the War Department which needs them. 

Third — The commissioning of expert chemists and assign- 
ing them to duties where they were most needed. The 
allocation of chemists to industries, colleges and govern- 
ment departments. This was done under the direction of 
Colonel M. T. Bogert. 

As regards the^development of. the service: — 

(1) The Bureau of Mines for some years had a chemical 
force working on poisonous gases in mines and on the 
means of protecting the working forces against them.- The 
Bureau of Mines soon realized the importance of this work 
in connection with gas warfare and established a research 
laboratory at the American University for the purpose of 

• investigating all problems in connection with gas warfare. 

(2) As soon as war was declared the Ordnance Depart- 
ment took over the job of manufacturing gas shells and 
all offensive material. 

(3) At the same time the Medical Department of the 
army took over the matter of providing gas masks and all 
defensive apparatus. 

(4) When American troops actually got to France it was 
soon apparent that there would have to be troops specially 
trained in gas defense — to be detailed to the various com- 
panies to train the men for gas warfare. That led to the 
authorization of a regiment of gas and flame troops — 
the famous 30th Engineers, who have been leaders at the 
front in all gas warfare. 

In September, 1917, the need for co-ordination to bring 
all these branches together was very keenly felt. General 
Pershi-g would send a cablegram from France asking in- 
formation about gas material and gas warfare, which would 
concern various divisions and there was no one individual 
officer to whom the request could be referred. 

Achievements of Army Chemical Unit. 

Then in the latter part of September, 1917, General 
Pershing requested that a completely equipped chemical 
laboratory should be sent to France, including apparatus 
and personnel for use of the American Expeditionary Forces. 
There was no organization that could handle this, and so 
it led, on November 1, 1917, to the organization of the 
Chemical Service, the first chemical unit in any army. Its 
chief achievements were the following: — 

First — It was assigned the task of providing a chemical 
laboratory for France. This was done as rapidly as pos- 
sible and completed at a cost of about $125,000. The labora- 
tory filled seven freight cars when transported from Pitts- 
burgh, where it was assembled by the Scientific Materials 
Company. It was placed under command of Dr. Raymond 
F. Bacon from the Mellen Institute of Pittsburgh. 

Major Aud of the British service, who is one of the fore- 
most chemists of Great Britain, said this was the most 
complete chemical laboratory he had ever seen, and was of 



such importance that the ship carrying it should be con- 
voyed all the way across. 

Second— The next big work of the Chemical Warfare 
Service was to conserve the chemical talent. This was 
accomplished by getting the War Department to give special 
orders for the detailing of chemists and chemical students 
for special duties and the privilege granted the section ot 
requesting the transfer of chemists who had already en- 
listed or entered the service under the selective draft, and 
also the right of the industries to retain chemists through 
the action of the Chemical Service Section. 

Third — Came the establishment of close relations with 
the chemical institutions and departments of colleges and 
' universities, so as to get the best use of the chemical faculties 
and talents of the country. 

The Chemical Service Section existed from November 1, 
1917, to June 28, 1918. All during its existence it was tre- 
mendously handicapped by want of authority and definite 
organization. It was little more, so far as the army was 
concerned, than a co-ordinating unit for providing in- 
formation and advice. For that reason its requests were 
frequently not considered and all of its undertakings were 
greatly handicapped. 



Made Independent Unit 

When the immensity of the undertaking Jhat America 
had upon her hands was finally realized, it was seen that 
chemical warfare was destined to be one of the most im- 
portant features in the conduct of the war. It was there- 
fore realized that this form of warfare would have to be 
given greater authority, greater emphasis and opportunity 
for expansion. This led to general order No. 62, which 
created the Chemical Warfare Service. 

The service thus became an independent unit of the Army 
and placed it on a status with ordnance, engineers or any 
other of the independent units of the military establishment. 
The development of ohemical warfare production and the 
preparing for training troops was very rapid after the crea- 
tion of this- unit, because then there was a fixed policy 
which was adhered to. As one of the division chiefs of th€ 
Chemical Warfare Service remarked, "General Sibert could 
make a decision and then stick to it," and only in that way 

could things/ be accomplished. 

•The organization of the QJiemical Warfare Service was 
as follows:— Director, Maj. G*m. William L. Sibert; assistant 
director, Brig. Gen, H. C. Newcomer; staff. Col. W. , J. Lys- 
ter, Lieut. Col. C. B. Thummel and Maj. J. H. Brightman. 
The nine divisions were:— Administration, Maj. Gen. Will- 
iam Sibert; Training, Lieut. Col. G. N. Lewis; European, 
Brig. Gen. A. A. Fries; Research, Col. G. A. Burrell; Med- 
ical; Col. W. J. Lyster; Development, Col. F. M. Dorsey; 
Proving, Maj. W. S. Bacon; Gas Defense 1^™*^ .££- 
Bradley Dewey; Gas Offense Production, Col. W. H. Walker. 
The Administration Division was organized in twdro sec- 
tions, as follows: — Ofl&ce administration, Maj. W. W. mar- 
ker; personnel, Maj. F. E. Breithut; training, Lieut. Col. G. 
N. Lewis; requirements and progress, Capt. S. M. Cadwell, 
procurement, Lieut. Col. W. J. Noonan; transportation .Capt. 
H. R. Sharkey; relations, Col. M. T. Bogert; medical, Col. 
W. J. Lyster; ordnance, Lieut. Col. C. B. Thummel; financev 
Maj. C. C. Combs; contracts and patents, Capt W. K. JacK- 
son, and confidential information, Maj. S. P. Mulliken. 

Duties of Divisions. 

The duties of the respective divisions deserve special 

m ^e°need for the Administration Division was imperative. 
One of the disadvantages in the Chemical Service from 
the start was the lack of organization and unwillingness 
of many of the civilians engaged in various branches of 
chemical warfare to come under military jurisdiction. It 
was only after General Sibert, who is an excellent admin- 
istrator, and the group of men he had gathered into tne 
administration division had created an organization that 
was smoothly working that chemical warfare succeeded 
and was beginning to achieve its best Scientists are prone 
to neglect administration and to hoot at mere administra- 
tion, but the history of chemical warfare proved that admin- 
istration is absolutely indispensable for accomplishment of 

results 

Training Division.— Its duties were to train officers and 
men to go to various camps and there train every soldier 
who should go to France in the use of his gas mask and 
hand grenades and give him all the information necessary 
for his best service in the trenches under present war con- 
ditions as far as gas is concerned. 

European Division.— It represents the organization of all 
branches of gas warfare in the American Expeditionary 
Forces. It has been in miniature the whole organization 
in this country. 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



American Alkali & Acid Co. 

FACTORY AND OFFICE: 

BRADFORD, PA. U. S. A. 



PRODUCTS: OXALIC AGlD 

We are the pioneers and largest manu- 
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American Alkali & Acid Company's Plant at Bradford, Pa., U. S. A. 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



91 



Research Division. — It was occupied in the study and de- 
velopment of new gases, the improvement of gas masks, 
the production of smoke screens and all other problems 
of Investigation in gas warfare. 

Medical Division. — It dealt with the resuscitation and 
treatment of the victims who had been gassed and the 
hygienic safeguards in plants manufacturing gas. 

Development Division. — It dealt with the developing, 
procurement and problems of manufacture of various ma- 
terials connected with gas warfare — as, for example, the pro- 
curement meant sending men to the Orient to get cocoanut 
shells to be burned for the carbon to make gas masks. Its 
chief function was to serve as intermediary between the Re- 
search Division and the Gas Defense and Gas Dffense Divi- 
sions in that it took up the problems of supply, manufac- 
ture and production. 

Gas Defense Production Division. — Had the problem of 
manufacturing gas masks and achieved phenomenal success. 

Gas Offense Production Division. — It manufactured poison 
gases and filled them into gas shells, hand grenades and 
other devices which were to be burled against the Germans. 

Much of what was achieved in gas production is still a 
strict military secret. 

History of Gas Warfare. 

Just when the Chemical Warfare Service was about to 
amaze the world by the magnitude and deadly sweep of 
her gas attack the war ended. A number of new gases 
had been developed which the chemists had hoped to try 
out in war, but the war came to a conclusion just as 
quantity production was being delivered in France. So, no 
new gases were actually used in American shells, grenades, 
etc. The service simply manufactured and used the stand- 
ard gases manufactured and used by all the Allies and by 
Germany. 

Chlorine gas was first used by the Germans in their first 
gas attack at Ypres. Its use fell off, however, and there 
was little of it used toward the end of the war, because 
it is visible, of greenish color, and because the means of 
protection against it are easier than against other colorless 
poison gases. 

The two gases principally used are phosgen and mustard 
gas. Both contain chlorine, but united with other chemical 
agents. 

Greater Output Than Allies. 

At the time the armistice was signed, America was pro- 
ducing more than England and France combined, and if 
the war had continue)} by January the production would 
have been greater than that of all the belligerents combined. 

Edgewood arsenal produced all the poison gas and filled 
it into shells, hand grenades and other containers. In all 
about $70,000,000 was spent on that plant. From this 
arsenal was being delivered completed materials in France 
at an extensive rate two weeks before the armistice was 
signed, and on the day it was signed a cargo of American 
shells loaded with American gas was landed in France. 
Much American gas had previously been loaded into British 
and French shells. 

The American gas mask was an improvement on any of 
the masks in its finally developed form. It did not require 
the soldier to use a mouthpiece and therefore gave him 
greater freedom of action when in an engagement. The 
rate of production was such that every American soldier 
who went to France could be provided with an American 
gas mask. The production was the largest and they were 
•used more in their completed form than any production of 
American manufacture was used in the war. 

There are at least half a dozen poison gases that have 
been extensively experimented with and which have proved 
wonderfully efficient. It is the regret of the men working 
upon them that they did not have a chance to try them 
out on an actual war scale. There is every reason to be- 
lieve that a -big surprise was in store for' the Germans and 
that they would have proved tremendously efficient. 

One plan was to take a ton mustard gas container in an 
airship and explode- it 600 to 1,000 feet above a fortified 
city. The mustard gas, being heavier than air, would sink 
and kill everything in the country beneath. As an illustra- 
tion of how deadly mustard gas is: — Out at the Edgewood 
Arsenal an officer came into an office wearing the rubber 
gloves with which' he had been handling the gas. He 
moved a chair to a desk to sit down. He was called to 
the telephone. Another officer came in and. sat down in 
the chair. A little of the mustard gas had gotten off the 
gloves onto the chair. It ate through the second officer's 
cloning and into his spinal column. He was dead before 
midnight. 

Mustard Gas. 

Because of its deadliness it has been impossible to use 
mustard gas when the American troops are going to make 
an attack over the same territory. It poisons the whole 
country and clings; it is not dissipated as quickly as other 
gases, chlorine for example. If a soldier should lie on the 
ground where there has been a mustard gas attack and a 
few drops of the gas gets on his clothing, when he goes 
into a dugout or other warm place the gas will kill every- 



one, and the soldier himself will be blistered where it eats 
through his clothing. It produces a nasty wound, because 
it spreads and makes a very bad sore. 

During August the casualties at the Edgewood plant 
amounted to 3% per cent, of the entire force working ther 
on poison gas, almost as great as for the same number o 
troops in active service. 

The Chemical Warfare Service had thousands of tons 
of these poison gases ready for shipment Some of the 
best chemists of the country are now engaged on deciding 
what to do with it. Endeavors are 'being made to find some 
peace time, some industrial use to which they can be put, 
but as yet none has been found. Colonel Walker, who has 
been in charge of their production, has advocated dumping 
them into the Atlantic where, as they are heavier than 
water, they will sink to the bottom of the sea. 

Achievements of Service. 

The achievements of the Chemical Warfare Service will 
be of importance to the chemical industry, not from the 
actual production of anything for chemical warfare, but 
through broader vision and intensified co-operation, some- 
thing as follows: — 

First— Through having led men to find themselves, by de- 
veloping confidence in their ability to produce and manu- 
facture chemicals. Many men who have been engaged in 
the Chemical Warfare Service have heretofore been college 
professors or instructors or consulting chemists. By their 
experience in production for the government they have a 
broader and wider knowledge of the chemical problems. 
Therefore, they will be more ready to undertake the manu- 
facture of chemicals. This should have a decided influence 
on the chemical Industry. 

Second — It is going to lead those who go back to the 
teaching profession to realize more fully than ever before 
the industrial needs and conditions — emphasizing the prac- 
tical side — and they will better train the students to deal 
with the practical industrial problems. - 

Third— The Chemical Warfare Service has brought to- 
gether into personal contact hundreds of leading chemists 
of the country who probably before knew of one another 
only by reputation. It has thus given a unity to the pro- 
fession which it never had before and it is hardly possible 
to think that from the close personal contact of these keen 
minds that there will not be important results for chemical 
science and chemical Industry. 

Fourth — The needs of the American chemical industry 
have been greatly emphasized by the war, which has cut 
the United States off from the German producing centers. 
At the same time the government's experiment in chemical 
manufacturing and the use of the chemical talent of the 
country in that manufacturing is going to give the capital 
of the country confidence in the ability of American chem- 
ists. Capitalists are going to be more ready to invest their 
money upon the judgment and under the direction of the 
chemists than ever before. 

Fifth — The gas mask will continue to be of importance 
and all of the means that have been discovered and de- 
veloped for protection in gas infected air will be equally 
useful for protecting the American worker in industry after 
the war just as it protects the American soldier. That is 
the only important industrial feature of the manufactur- 
ing end of the Chemical Warfare Service that will have 
an after-the-war good influence on the industry. 

Major General Sibert, chief of the service, stated to the 
House Appropriation Committee that the future of the 
Chemical Warfare Service depends on action at the world 
peace table at Versailles. He advocated, however, that 
whatever the action of the Peace Conference might be as 
regards gas warfare, that the United States military es- 
tablishment should maintain an up-to-the-minute research 
laboratory to keep abreast of the times as regards gases 
and chemicals and scientific devices so as to be well in- 
formed to meet an emergency promptly, and to profit by 
the advance* of science and chemical genius. 

Need of Permanent Organization. 

The advantage of keeping a permanent organization 

would be: — 

In having a central organization which would keep in 
close touch with the chemical talent and production of 
the country. The census of chemical talent and all It has 
stood for could be expanded and made more complete and 
be kept constantly up-to-date so that if any emergency 
should arise in the future the chemical forces of the country 
could be very promptly mobilized. 

It should be an organization that could be expanded and 
could thus incorporate any proportion of the civilian popu- 
lation that the emergency might require. 

It could carry on research in connection with chemical 
warfare, improve and develop the new gases already dis- 
covered, attempt and probably discover other new gases, 
try them out and work on the problems of manufacturing 
them on a large scale, study the problems of procuring the 
materials from which they are obtained, learn where the 
material can be obtained, in what quantities, what diffi- 
culties there would be in obtaining it, and all problems that 
would be of military importance in case of an emergency. 

The same points would equally be true of gas defense 
measures for peace-time study by a permanent organization 
of the Chemical Warfare Service. 



92 , 1918 YEAR BOOK 



B= 



The Solvay Process Company 



Manufacturer of 





ALKALI 

Detroit, Mich. Syracuse, N. Y. Hutchinson, Kansas 



Our War Work and Your War Work are over, and 
we can now devote ourselves 100% to our mutual in- 
terests, without infringing on the needs and the rights 
of the government. 

Particularly, experts from our Technical Service De- 
partment are again available to offer any suggestions de- 
sired on the use of Alkalies, and to help solve any prob- 
lems connected with their industrial application. 

If you have any difficulties whatever in making 
Alkalies serve your purpose as they should, write us. 
We know Alkalies and their uses from A to Z. 

Address Technical Service Department, The Solvay 
Process Co., Syracuse, N. Y. 



turn 



LIGHT - SODA ASH - DENSE 

CAUSTIC SODA-ALL TESTS 

Solid and Ground 

MODIFIED SODAS-BICARBONATE of SODA 

SOLVAY SNOW-FLAKE, CRYSTALS 

V 



WING & EVANS, Inc., Selling Agents 

22 WILLIAM STREET NEW YORK 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG' REPORTER 



93 



Review of Conditions in 1918 Chemical Market. 



THE story of the chemical industry for the year 1918 is 
one of remarkable progress. The war condition which 
obtained throughout the year made necessary an al- 
most complete reorganization in many lines of this industry 
and the beginning of production in many others. The war 
not only caused a greatly Increased consumption of many 
chemicals and the consequent shortage, but also closed off 
for the time being many sources of supply which had here- 
tofore been open and thus necessitated a complete organi- 
zation of the machinery of production for items which/ had 
previously been imported altogether. The achievements of 
the government in coping with this problem will constitute 
a remarkable page in the history of the United States. 

Besides the matter of the control of certain commodities 
by the War Industries Board and its various sections, nu- 
merous developments along the lines of new processes and 
systems of production were taken up by the several branches 
of the government. Committees and bureaus for the investi- 
gation of conditions in the chemical field were formed and ' 
their endeavor produced notable results in many instances. 
Among the achivements of the government experts the 
following seem to be worthy of particular notice: — 

Gas Testing Laboratory. 

An experiment station was established at the American 
University, near Washington, D. C, for devising and testing 
the various gases used in chemical warfare. A staff of 
chemical engineers was organized to develop the processes 
for the manufacture of gasses. Engineers and chemists 
were organized into a body to investigate the available 
supplies of nitrates, magnesite, nickel, tin and other neces- 
sary commodities, and how they could be obtained. A proc- 
ess for obtaining nitric acid by the oxidation of ammonia 
was developed. It was determined that the sulphur mines 
of the country were abundantly able to furnish the sup- 
plies . necessary for the production of sulphuric acid. A 
cheap process for the recovering of zinc from zinc sulphate 
was discovered. A large chemical plant was erected at 
Saltville, Va., which contributed extensively toward the 
requirements of the government along certain lines. An- 
other remarkable achievement was the methods for pro- 
ducing potash from kelp and extracting it from the air, 
methods which have brought the United States to the fore 
among the potash producers of the world. 

Government Control. 

The history of the general chemical market and of con- 
ditions in the chemical business during the year rests al- 
most wholly on the subject of government control. At the 
opening of the year, 4he matter of the Increasing govern- 
ment requirements for the manufacture of products which 
were directly concerned in the military establishment was 
engaging the attention of the entire country. American 
troops in considerable numbers were being trained and sent 
to Europe as rapidly as possible and the supplying of this 
army with ordnance, munitions, chemical apparatus and 
many other items was a problem worthy of the efforts of 
the best chemists and chemical producers of the country* 
Some action to supply these needs was imperative in order 
not only to secure the best possible results from the army, 
but to do this without seriously crippling the other indus- 
tries which depended upon the efforts of the chemical pro- 
ducers for their raw material. 

Government control of some sort was an imperative 
necessity and action was taken early in the year to put this 
control on a satisfactory basis. Steps had already been 
taken in this direction in 1917 when the War Industries 
Board was organized, but this board had been engaged 
almost entirely with the matter of making investigations 
and little of a more tangible nature had resulted. Congress 
had given the President almost unlimited powers in the 
control of Industries essential to the prosecution of the 
war, and early In the year definite action under these powers 
began to materialize. 

Demand for Munitions. 

The increased demand for chemicals for the production 
of munitions was being felt at the close of the year. Con- 
sumers In less essential lines of business were having diffi- 
culty in securing supplies. Compulsory orders from the 
government were taking up the supplies of manufacturers 
as rapidly as they could be offered. As a result of this 
other lines of business were forced to depend upon the 
supplies which reached the maiicet through second hands, 
and a period of excessively high values resulted. Specu- 
lation by second hands forced many commodities up to 
levels four or five times as high as normal. An instance of 
this is the case of carbon tetrachloride. This commodity 
was sold in the New York market as high as 75c. per pound 
by second hands, while government requirements were being 
handled by the producers at 17 He. 

One of the first steps taken by the President was the 
taking over and placing in the hands of the Department of 



Agriculture of the entire machinery for the production and 
sale of the various grades of ammonia. This action was 
taken as the result of the serious shortage of this com- 
modity and the resulting exorbitant prices which obtained. 
Its result was the steadying of the market at more nearly 
normal levels and a decided Increase in the production of 
ammonia of all kinds. 

The stimulation of the production of many of the items 
was one of the most difficult problems which faced the 
government at this time. It was not the desire or Intention 
of officials to cut off the supply of chemicals from the regu- 
lar consumers any more than was absolutely essential. In 
every case, before any direct action leading to the limiting 
of supplies was taken, the greatest efforts toward the pro- 
motion of large scale production were made. Two ways of 
securing this increased production were available. One was 
to employ and enlarge the plants of manufacturers already 
producing the commodity. The other was to construct new 
plants at the expense of the government to be devoted to 
its production under the direction of the then existing 
manufacturers, if possible, or in the hands of qualified 
agents of the government when there was no more satis- 
factory method. In February contracts were let for the 
construction of a plant in Tennessee for the production of 
acetate of lime and wood alcohol. In May two plants for 
the making of picric acid were projected at a total cost of 
$11,000,000. Contracts were let for these plants and con- 
struction was started at Little Rock, Ark., and Brunswick, 
Ga. These are only two instances of plants of the latter 
class which were erected or projebted by the government 
during the year. 

Curtailment of General Consumption. 

In spite of the activities of the government in the matter 
of production, it was soon evident that there would be a 
serious shortage of many of the chemicals most necessary 
for the successful prosecution of the war. The matter of 
curtailing the 'consumption of these materials was taken up 
with considerable reluctance. After considering several 
plans for arriving at an equitable solution of this problem, 
it was .decided to issue a series of questionnaires to cover 
the various points which must be considered in fixing the 
amount necessary for the consuming trade for the several 
items which were in deficient supply. The first of this 
series was issued by the War Industries Board early in 
February* It was sent to the producers and largest handlers 
of the various kinds of ammonia and consisted of a request 
for information as to what amount of ammonia In terms of 
NH, was used In 1917 by makers of pharmaceutical prep- 
arations, and fine chemicals, in the research work of chem- 
ical laboratories, the baking industry and as ammonium 
phosphate for fireprooflng. . Early in March a second ques- 
tionnaire was sent out to the producers of sulphuric acid 
asking for a detailed statement as to their rate of produc- 
tion, stocks on hand, shipments and deliveries on Allied 
and government contracts. Those among the manufactur- 
ers who were depending upon the government for supplies 
of the raw materials were also requested to furnish an 
estimate as to their needs in these lines for the subsequent 
three months. 

Questionnaires Employed. 

These questionnaires proved to be a most useful source 
of information to the board when the matter of limiting 
supplies and of fixing an equitable price was taken up. 
As the first direct result of this method came the news 
on* March 1 that the Food Administration had taken over 
the matter of the supplies of ammonia and had fixed 
minimum prices for the various grades on the basis of 8%c. 
per pound for the 26 -degree aqua and 80c. per pound for 
the anhydrous varieties. 

The question of the transportation of men and supplies 
to Europe began to be pressing with the completion of 
the training of the National Army early in the spring. 
The result of the necessity v for tonnage for the supplies 
and transports for the men was a serious one when it 
was considered that the taking over of this necessary ton- 
nage would necessarily mean the shutting off of its use 
for the general import and export trade of the country. 
In spite of the necessity for such materials as the various 
acids and soda salts of all kinds, it was found that tonnage 
for these could not be provided in the face of the urgent 
necessity of rushing men and supplies to Europe. As a 
result, at the end of March the War Trade Board placed 
a practical embargo on the importation of an of these goods 
to release tonnage for other needs. The immediate result 
of this action was a cutting off of all quotations on these 
items by the importers and the consequent need of still 
further stimulating production, or of regulating to a greater 
degree the sale of these commodities. 

1 Caustic Soda. 

In April a new section of the War Industries Board to 
take control of bleaching powder, soda salts of all kinds 
and chlorine and its products was formed. The urgent 
necessity for such a section was apparent. Supplies of all 
these products, but more especially of bleaching powder 
caustic soda and chlorine gas were needed at once by the 



1918 YEAR BOOK 





-" ~ ■'-•■- — *v 

i 1 1 i 


- 




W I'll hi " 




-_■ _ 


li 




* * 5 a a 3 3 


3,aB u a j j 
- _ El a 1 a a 


■ ' 


"A Reliable Service" 

"pXPORTERS and DEALERS in Chemicals are offer- 
•*-"' ed the facilities of a fully equipped organization for 
buying and selling Chemicals on a strictly brokerage basis. 

Twenty-three years of brokerage experience combined 
with the closest connections with houses of the highest re- 
pute enables us to supply a service without equal. 

We are Brokers and Manufacturers' Selling Agents ex- 
clusively and do not deal in or merchandise any goods 
whatsoever. 

Our advice and experience is at your command. 

'Pbene: ESTABLISHED CabU Aidrtss: 
Jtk*3161 1895 Ktmwil 

Williamson & Company 

28 and 30 Burling Slip, New York 
Chemicals : Foodstuffs : Metals 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



95 



government for war work. The problem of supplying this 
demand without interfering more than was necessary with 
the ordinary consumption was the one which confronted this 
section at the very outset. The production of caustic soda 
at the time the section took charge was approximately 
418,000 tons annually. To offset this the immediate require- 
ments were about as follows: — Military purposes, 70,000 tons 
per year; industries not directly connected with the military 
establishment, 448,000 tons; a total consumption of 518,000 
tons per year and a deficit in the supplies of 100,000 tons. The 
production was stimulated to the fullest extent possible 
and exports were cut down to about 8,500 tons per month 
to take care of this situation. A price of $3.50 per cwt. 
was set for the 76 per cent, grade in bags, with prices for 
the other grades 'in proportion. This temporarily took care 
of the* situation, but the military requirements Increased 
rapidly, until at the close of hostilities the government was 
taking up nearly 50 per cent of the total output. As a 
result other consumers were being cut down and an arbi- 
trary schedule of reduction had been prepared and would 
have been put into effect before the end of the year had 
the armistice not put a virtual end to the government's 
requirements. 

Bleaching Powder and Soda Ash. 

The situation in soda ash was somewhat better. Con- 
sumption by the glass making trade, due to the natural 
result of the war condition, had been curtailed to about 
50 per cent, of their normal requirements. This fact served 
to prevent any serious shortage and the only action taken 
by the board was the fixing of a price to prevent profiteer- 
ing. This was set at $1.67 per cwt. for the 68 per cent, 
light in bags. Bleaching powder was in very short supply 
early in the year, due to the requirements of the military 
establishment, which were approximately 4,500 tons per 
month at that time. A considerable stimulation in the 
production was, however, accomplished by the co-operation 
of the manufacturers with the board, and at the same time 
the consumption was cut almost in half by an arrange- 
ment with the leading users. The price was first estab- 
lished at 2c. per pound. Manufacturers, however, found 
that they could not keep their cost below that figure, and 
as a result a revision to .0235 per pound was made, which 
was the price which obtained at the time that the restric- 
tions were removed. 

Chlorine Gas. 

A survey of the available supply of liquid chlorine was 
taken in May. This showed the serious condition that ex- 
isted in this commodity. At that time the military re- 
quirements alone were 30 per cent, greater than the entire 
output of the material. Accordingly, all consumption of 
this material' was shut off excepting supplies for the purifi- 
cation of drinking water, and the entire available supply 
was taken over for the use of the military establishment 
and the requirements of the Allies. The same shortage, 
however, prevailed throughout the entire period. The 
price was fixed at 7%c. per pound in agreement with the 
four producers. 

Carbon Tetrachloride. 

There was little of this material available at the time 
when the section took charge. It was necessary to stimu- 
late the production considerably and to induce manufac- 
turers of other materials to take up its manufacture. As 
a result of this shortage it was necessary to immediately 
take over the entire supply of all producers. The price 
was set at 14 He. per pound for the dry material and 16 He. 
per pound for the fire extinguisher liquid. This provision 
went into effect in August and continued throughout the 
period. Acids. 

The matter of supplies of the various acids which are 
essential to the production of munitions was another of 
the important problems handled. As early as April and 
even before that time a serious shortage in the available 
supplies of the commercial acids was in evidence. The 
government demand for munition and chemical warfare 
work was rapidly increasing and the matter of taking 
over the control of muriatic and nitric acids was considered 
as early as May. High price/ prevailed in all the grades. 
Nitric, for example, sold in May, 1918, at a price twice that 
which was quoted in 1914. There was considerable agita- 
tion concerning the fixing of prices before action was finally 
taken in this matter and several rumors as to government 
action in the case of sulphuric acid caused mild flurries 
in the market. On June 29, the War Industries Board finally 
announced the completion of their investigation in this mar- 
ket and fixed the price of sulphuric acid as follows: — 

Per Ton. 

50 degree Baume acid $14.41 

61 degree Baume acid 14.75 

52 degree Baume acid 15.09 

63 degree Baume acid 15.44 

54 degree Baume acid 15.79 

55 degree Baume acid 16.14 

66 degree Baume acid 16.49 

57 degree Baume acid 16.89 

68 degree Baume acid 17.23 

69 degree Baume acid 17.61 

60 degree Baume acid 18.00 

66 degree Baume acid 28.00 

20 per cent oleum 32.00 

These prices were f. o. b. seller's works in tank cars. The 



price in carboys, carload lots, was %c. per pound more; 
for carboys, less than car lot, %c. per pound more, and in 
drums, any quantity, %c. more per pound. 

Nitric acid prices were fixed on the basis of 8 He. per 
pound for the 42 -degree Baume acid. 

These schedules were to take effect immediately and to 
terminate on September 30. Any deliveries taking place 
after that date were subject to any subsequent revisions 
of these prices which the government might make. 

Late in July the matter of supplies on contract were 
taken up by the government. Supplies more than adequate 
Xor the demand were reaching consumers through the con- 
tract channels and in some cases these supplies were made 
the basis of manipulation by second hands in the market. 
As a result the government took control' of all contracts 
and placed the direction of this new department in the 
hands of the general staff, where it was efficiently admin- 
istered. 

Mixed Acids. 

Further control of the acid situation was taken up at 
this time and on July 22 the War Industries Board an- 
nounced the taking over of supplies and distribution of 
mixed acids and announced the following schedule of 
prices: — No. 1, $6.90 per cwt.; No. 2, $3.10 per cwt. 

As stated above, the prices fixed for the sale of sulphuric 
and nitric acids expired on September 30, as did those in 
the mixed acid group. At that time acid manufacturers 
were consulted as to their costs of production on the 
schedules of production which had so much increased since 
the time of the original action in the matter. As a result 
it was decided that the fixed price on sulphuric acid should 
be reduced slightly. The new schedules were set at: — 

Per Ton. 

60 degree Baume $16.00 

66 degree Baume 25.00 

20 per cent oleum 28.00 

Schedules for the sale of nitric acid were not corre- 
spondingly revised. A new ruling was made, however, in 
the case of mixed acids to the effect that there should be 
no charge made for the mixing and that the price should 
be computed on the basis of the actual acid content. 

These developments in the market and the government's 
efforts in the matter of the stimulation of production were 
for the most part highly successful. Production increased 
to a remarkable level and the spirit of co-operation which 
was displayed by producers and consumers alike showed 
the high patriotism of the American business man. Con- 
ditions in the government industries Improved steadily, 
and at the close of the period of government control the 
prospects were bright for a successful handling of the 
war demands. 

Potash Production. 

One of the most serious matters which engaged the 
attention of the government during the year was the prob- 
lem of securing supplies of potash sufficient for the con- 
suming demands of the country. Almost the entire supply 
of this material which was consumed in the United States 
prior to the war was imported directly from Germany. 
This supply was, of course, entirely cut off by the war 
and a very serious shortage was the result. The first 
action of the government was to take a survey of the avail- 
able potash supplies of the country. This survey was 
completed early in the year and the report of the experts 
engaged in making it was published in the latter part of 
June. The conclusion drawn from this report was that 
the production of potash in the United States at that 
time was not more than half the amount necessary and that 
there was little or no chance of bettering this situation. 
New sources of supply were, however, discovered and 
rapidly developed and new processes for the production of 
potash from the Pacific coast kelp beds and for its ex- 
traction from the air were perfected, with the result that 
early in October Secretary Lane announced that it was the 
opinion of his department that the United States would 
produce enough of the material within two years to take 
care of the entire domestic demand. Whether the pro- 
duction, however, can take place on a competing basis with 
that of Germany after the war is problematical. It la 
probable that some form of protection of this industry in 
the way of anti-dumping laws will be devised. 

Reorganization of Business. 

With the coming of the armistice and the consequent 
return to conditions more nearly normal, a complete reor- 
ganization and return to the pre-war basis became neces- 
sary. In this matter the government again co-operated 
with the producers. Fixed prices were abandoned as soon 
as was practicable. As early as November 20 restrictions 
on the sale of chlorine and bleaching powder were removed 
and the fixed prices cancelled. Acids were released at the 
close of the year, as were caustic soda and carbon tetra- 
chloride. The release of government requirements and the 
cancellation of contracts at once had the effect of making 
the domestic market rather dull, and this dullness was still 
in evidence at the close of the year. The anticipation of 
the speedy return to more normal levels was the primary 
cause of this absence of buying interest. 

There were two outstanding features in the market dur- 
ing the year. The first was the enormous increase in the 



1918 YEAR BOOK 




Heavy Chemicals, Industrial Chemicals, 

Vegetable Oils, Petroleum Oils and 

Products, Coal Tar Products.Wood 

Pulp, Drugs, Spices, Metals 

and Ores, Canned Goods 

and Foods, Industrial 

Eq u i pment. 

AGENTS FOR 

LIQUID SULPHUR DIOXIDE 

Manufactured by VIRGINIA SMELTING CO. 



STEEL DRUMS 

Manufactured by DRAPER MANUFACTURING CO. 



SPECIALISTS 

GLYCERINE, NITRATE OF SODA 

QUICKSILVER, ACIDS, AND 

FERTILIZERS 



CHAS. F. GARRIGUES COMPANY 



NEW YORK 



Brandies Office). 



European Connection*. 




OIL I>AINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



production of nearly ovary Item on the list. The production 
of Bulphurlc acid, for example. Increased from about 8.760.- 
000 tons In 1914 to over 6,000,000 tons in 1918. Other Items 
showed oven greater proportions of Increase. 

Increase in Foreign Trade. / 
Even more remarkable waa the Increase In foreign trade 
In chemicals which developed during the war period. Im- 
ports of chemicals and allied products for 1914 showed a 
total value of approximately 6T0 -millions of dollars, while 
In 1918 this total had grown to over 1,176 millions of 
dollars. Figures for exports of chemicals In 1914 showed 
a total value of about 490 millions of dollars, while In 1918 
the surprising increase to MS 5 millions of dollars was seen. 
To further emphasize the remarkable growth of exports, 
the following short table, is given: — 



1914. 1918. 

Acids (482,947 146,187,862 

Potash salts 1,949.117 

Soda salts 22,706,086 

To make this growth permanent is now the problem 
which com fronts the American manufacturers. Govern- 
ment assistance has aided in the development of the In- 
dustry; It must now aid to perpetuate It, Steps ntust be 
taken to hold the foreign trade In competition with Eng- 
land, Prance and Japan, who are making ovary effort to 
secure and hold a part of this business. Co -operation, 
which has been of such great value In the immediate past, 
must be continued and developed to a greater extent than 
ever. It is only In this way that American products can 
keep the high place they now hold In the markets of the 
world. 



Industrial Chemicals, High and Low Prices, 1917-1918. 



Alum, Lump Ammonia. 



Arsenic, White. 



Febmsry . 
Much .... 



.044 



Alumina Sulphate, Iron Free. 



February . 
March .... 

ay 



04 SO.OStt so. 

& IS 

04 .03? 

.04 .OS* 

s a 

04u .<■£ 

^2 .« 

















































... .04% 






. n.Oftfc 


... .17 











































Alumina Sulphate, Commercial. 











1419, 












































































































"ill! 












\ ■;■!■"! 










































































Bleaching Powdc 
















Per pouoa — , 






























«r... 










'.»*V, 




































.08 




Copper Sulphate (Blue Vitriol), 99 
Per Cent. 




1918 YEAR BOOK 



K ATZENBACH & BULLOCK CO. 

IMPORTER S-M ANUFACTURER S-E XPORTERS 




QUALITY Plfifl SERVICE 



DRY COLORS-CHEMICALS 

DYESTUFFS-MINERALS-NAVAL STORES 
FOR ALL INDUSTRIAL PURPOSES 

A SECTION OF OUR CATALOG IS DEVOTED TO YOUR SPECIAL TRADE 

WIRE- WRITE -CALL 

CABLE ADDRESS, KABOCK, NEW YORK-CODES, ABC 5th EDITION, LIBBER'S, SIMPLEX 
STOCKS CARRIED AT CONVENIENT POINTS 

BOSTON-TRENTON-AKRON-NEW YORK-CHICAGO-SAN FRANCISCO 



Jobbers and Retailers: 

ATTENTION!! 

Here Is Your Chance. Your customers want a reliable product to 
use in their metal finishing departments, for Oxidized Copper, Sil- 
ver and Gold. The Liver N of Sulphur that has held the record for 
sales in these United States is 

<£ SULPHURETTE 

and for three reasons: Quality, Price and Delivery. We want 
new jobbers' accounts. Write now. 

C. G. BUCHANAN CHEMICAL COMPANY 

MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS 
CINCINNATI, OHIO - U. S. A. 



/ 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



Glauber's Salt 



January . 
February 
March ... 

April 

May 

Juno 

July 

August . . 
September 
October .. 
November 
December 
Year 



H. 

10.65 
.65 
.70 
.70 
.70 
.70 
.90 
.90 



1917. 



-Per pound 



25 
25 
35 
26 
85 



L. 
90.60 
.60 
.60 
.60 
.65 
.65 
.65 
.80 
.90 
.75 
1.00 
.90 
.60 



H. 
$1.00 
1.75 
1.15 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
8.00 
8.00 
8.00 
8.00 
8.00 
2.50 
8.00 



1918. 



!•. 

$0.90 
1.25 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.75 
.90 



Lime, Acetate. 



-Per hundredweight— 
1916. 



1915. 



H Tl« ft 

Jn nnary $206 $2.00 $7.05 

February 2.05 2.00 7.05 

March 2.05 2.00 7.05 

April 2.56 2.50 7.05 

May 8.05 2.50 7.05 

June 3.55 8.M> 7.05 

July 8.55 3.50 7.03 

.August 3.80 8.75 7.05 

September 4.05 4.00 5.05 

October 4.55 4.00 8.55 

November 5.10 4.50 8.55 

December- 0.10 5.00 .8.55 

Year 3.10 2.00 7.05 



1917. 

H. L. 

January $3.55 $8.50 

February 3.55 8.50 

March 3.55 8.50 

April 4.55 4.50 

May 4.55 4.50 

June 4.55 4.50 

July 5.30 5.25 

August 5.80 5.25 

September 6.05 5.25 

October 6.05 6.00 

November 6.05 6.00 

December 6.05 6.00 

Year 6.05 8.50 



-Per hundredweight- 



H. 
$6.05 
6.05 
6.05 
4.05 
4.05 
4.05 
4.05 
4.05 
4.05 
4.05 
4.05 
4.05 
6.05 



1918. 



L.. 

$6.00 
6.00 
6.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
8.00 
3.00 



Nickel Salts, Single. 



H 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November $0.16 

December 16 

Year 16 



1917. 



-Per pound- 



L. 
$0.14 
.14 
.14 
.14 
.14 
.14 
.14 
.14 
.14 
.14 
.13 
.18 
.18 



H. 
$0.15 
.15 
.15 
.15 
.15 
.15 
.15 
.15 
.17 
.17 
.17 
.17 
.17 



1918. 



L.. 

$0.18 
.14 
.14 
.14 
.14 
.14 
.14 
.14 
.14 
.16 
.16 
.16 
.18 



Potash Carbonate, Calcined, 80@85 

Per Cent. 



H. 

January $0.40 

85 

45 

45 



1917. 



-Per pound 



February 
March ... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . 
September 
October .. 
November 
December 
Year .... 



.50 



.70 
.68 
.70 



L,. 
$0.30 
.80 
.80 
.85 
.45 
.45 
.45 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.80 



H. 
$0.60 
.55 
.45 
.50 
.50 
.45 
.45 
.88 
.41 
.41 
.41 
.41 
.60 



1918. 



L,. 

$0.55 
.45 
.85 
.40 
.40 
.40 
.85 
.80 
.40 
.40 
.40 
.40 
.80 



Potash. Caustic, 88@92 Per Cent. 



January.. 
February. 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . 
September 
October... 
November 
December. 
Year 



1916. 
H. L. 
$0.70 $0.62 
1.00 .65 



1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

.95 

.90 

.90 

.90 

.90 

.96 

.95 

1.00 



.95 
.90 
.85 
.84 
.86 
.85 
.85 
.83 
.85 
.87 
.62 



— Per pound- 
1917. 

H. la. 

$0.95 $0.86 
•90 .86 
•90 .86 
.90 .86 
.90 .86 
.89 .84 

>cK) .94 

.90 .84 

.90 .85 

.85 .83ft 

.90 .83 

.85 .82ft 

.95 .82% 



1918. 
H. L. 
$0.84 $0.88 
.85 .82ft 
.85 .88ft 
.85 .83ft 
.88 .82 
.88 .82 
.88 .75 
.77ft .70 
.72 .70 
.72 .67 
.70 .67 
.70 .67 
.85 .67 



Potash, Caustic, 70@75 Per Cent 



(At Works.) 

Per pound- 



1917. 
H. L, 

January 

February ....... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October $0.05 $0.63 

November 70 .05 

December 65 .03 

Year 70 .6? 



1918. 
H. L. 

$0.64 $0,621* 
.65 .82ft 



.65 
.65 



62ft 
62% 



• 63ft .62 

.62ft .82 

.62ft .60 

.01 .60 



.62 
.62 
.00 
.60 
.65 



.60 
.55 
.55 
.55 
.51 



Potash, Chlorate. 

t — — Per pound ^ 

m 1916. 1917. WIS. 

H. L. H. L,. H. L,. 
January. . $0.50 $0.45 $0.70 $0.64 $0.45 $0.42 

February. .65 .50 .70 .68 .42 .40 

March 75 .65 .70 .60 .42ft .40 

£P rtl J8 J5 70 .58 .42ft .41 

May 75 .70 .75 .56 .42 .41 

June 70 .58 .75 .55 .42 .89 

July 70 .47 .76 .51 .42 .89 

August... .70 .45 .75 .55 .41 .89 

September .70 .51 .75 .55 .88 85 

October... .70 60 .60 .50 .88 !S5 

November .70 .67 .55 .49 .88 .85 

December. .70 .66 .54 .40 .88 .28 

Year 75 .45 .75 .40 .45 .28 

Saltpeter, Crystals. 

t—r—- Per pound , 

1916 I9ir 1918. 

H. L. H. L. H. L. 
January . . $0.88 $0.85 $0.85 $0.81 $0.81% $0.81 
February. .88 .85 .85 .81 * .81$ .81 

March 38 .85 .88 .81 .81% 81 

April 86ft .85 .88 81 Sift ifi 

May 86ft .85 .88 .31 81ft 81 

J*™ 86ft .29% .88 .81 .81ft 81 

July 30% .25 .88 .81 .3l2 11 

August... .25 .25 .88 81 81% 81 

September .82 .25 .88 28 31ft 81 

October... .32 .81 .88 .28 8l2 *81 

November .88 .31 81ft 28 31ft Si 

December. .35 .81 .8$ .28 .JlS 11 

Koar 38 -25 88 .28 .81ft .31 

Soda Ash, Light, 58 Per Cent 

/—In bags, per hundredweight— <> 

Hi, H 1917 " L 1918, 

May 03ft .02% 8.40 2 80 2 AX iVi 

June 08~ .02$ 8.25 2 65 8 00 2 3ft 

August... .08ft .08 4.10 2 SB ftftA o n« 

September .03ft .08 4.26 4 00 275 *& 

October... ,03% .08 8.80 8 10 8 00 2S 

November .03ft .03ft 3 50 2 85 2 75 2 60 

Ytar m ^. r : 'Sflt fiS IS IS ¥4 2:08 

wr "*?» .01 % 4.2 5 2.65 8.10 2.00 

Soda, Bicarbonate. 

' , ■ — Per hundredweight . 

1916. 1917. • ma. ' 

H. Li. H. Li. H L. 

January.... $1.50 $1.20 $1.90 $1.75 $2.9012' 25 

SSSSh" 7 --- iS IS 1X2 175 ^00*2 50 

f*™b 1.65 1.60 1.90 1.75 8.00 2.00 

.^Prtl 1.85 1.65 2.00 175 3 00 2 60 

May 165 1.60 2.25 1.90 8 00 2 50 

*«?« 1-65 1.60 2.50 2.00 8.60 2 50 

July... 165 1.65 2.50 2.25 3 50 8 00 

August..... 1.65 1.65 2.65 2.25 3*60 £90 

September.. 1.65 1.65 2.65 2 50 875 Ann 

October 1.65 165 £?5 2 50 4 50 2*22 

November.. 1.65 1.65 2.75 fcSO 4 50 4 00 

December... 1.75 1.65 2.75 2 25 4 00 8 25 

Y ** r 1.75 1.20 2.75 1.75 JS) 2%6 

Soda, Caustic, 76 Per Cent. Solid. 

t Per hundredweight » 

1916. 1917. 1918. 

H. Li. H. Li. H. Li. 

fSZ" 22* 2L °J** - 04 * 5M *°o 

tffj" 25 -25* -25* - 04 * 525 *-75 

May.. .06 .05 .06ft .05% 4.75 4.00 

July... .05 .08ft .07& .06% 4.25 8.85 

Aug... .04 .08ft .09% 7.20 4.85 8.85 

Sept.. .04% .08ft .10ft .09 4.75 4.18 

Oct... .04% .04 .08% .07% 4.75 4.25 

Nov... .05 .04% .08% .07? 4.50 8 75 

Dec... .04% .04* .08% .OO? 4 50 8 50 

Year.. .06ft .08 ft .10 ft .04% 7.00 ISO 

Soda, Chlorate. 

t P er poun d ■ ■* 

1916. 1917. 1918. 

H. L. H. L. H. L.. 

January... $0.25 $0.25 $0.85 80.25 $0.25 $0.18 

February... .85 .25 .85 .25 .26 .28 

March 85 .85 .27 .24 .27 .28 

Aprtl 85 .85 .80 .24 .26 .24 

May 85 .85 .28 .25 .26 .25 

J^e 85 .85 .26 .24 .26% .18 

July 85 .27 .26 .28 .25 .18 

August..... .85 .80 .25 .28 .24% .18 

September.. .35 .28 .25 .24 .24 .18 

October. 35 .28 .25 .28 .24 .18 

November.. .85 .27 .25ft .28 .20 .18 

December.. .35 .26 .25% .24 .20 .18 

*•*"• 35 .25 .85 .28 .27 .18 

Soda, Cyanide. 

i Per pound * 

1917. 1918! 

H. Li. H Li. 

January $2.00 $1.65 $0.45 $0.87 

February 1.85 1.50 .41 .89 

March 1.85 1.05 .42 40 

April 1.05 .85 .42 .40 

May 1.05 .75 .42 .40 

Juno 80 .55 .42 .40 

July 60 .55 .42 .87 

August 60 .50 .42 .80 

September 60 .50 .40 .80 

October 60 .57% .40 .80 

November 60 .45 .40 .80 

December 52 .37 .40 .30 

Tear 2,00 .87 .45 .80 



Soda, Nitrite, 



99 
96 and 98 Per Cent 

•Per pound- 



± 



1917. 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October .. 

November 

December 

Year 





Soda, 



January. . . 

February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . 

October 

November. . 
December... 



1916. 
H. L. 
$1.00 $0.85 

1.10 1.00 



Per hundredweight 



1917. 1918. 

H. I.. H. L. 

$1.25 $1.10 $1.85 81.15 



1.26 
1.50 
1.50 
1.25 
1.15 
1.15 
1.15 
1.15 
1.15 
1.10 
1.50 



1.10 
1.25 
1.26 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.10 
.85 



1.25 
1.25 
1.25 
1.25 
1.25 
1.25 
1.25 
1.25 
1.25 
1.25 
1.85 
1.85 



1.10 
1.10 
1.10 
1.10 
1.10 
1.10 
1.10 
1.10 
1.10 
1.15 
1.15 
1.10 



1.36 
1.50 
1.80 
1.50 
1.60 
1.50 
1.76 
2.00 
2.00 
2.50 
2.50 
2.60 



1.1* 
1.85 
1.85 
1.85 
1.86 
1.85 
1.85 
1.40 
1.40 
1.40 
1.60 
1.18 



Soda, Silicate, 60 Degrees. 

Per pound- 



• ••••■• • 

V • • • • • • 

• ••••••••• 



1917. 
H. L. 
January 
February 
March 
April 
May 

• unfj •••«•••■••»• ••• * * • 
*J uiy ••■••■•»•••» •■■ • • • 
AU§iMi ■•••••••• • • • ••■ 

September 

October $0.04% $0.08 

November 04% .08% 

December 04% .08% 

* wtta ■•••••••■•■■ • • • ■»■ 




1918. 
H. 
$0.05 
.04 
.05 
.05 
.05 
.05 
.06 .OS 
.07 .05% 
.06 .05% 
.08 .07 
06% .05% 
.06 .05 
.06 .08% 



Note.— Not quoted prior to October, 1917. 

Soda, Silicate, 40 Degrees. 

-Per pound- 



1917. 1918. 

i XT T^ TX T 

January $0.02% $0.02% $0.02% $0.01 

February 02ft .02* 

March 02ft 

April 02% 

May 02ft 

June 02ft 

July 

August 

September 

October 02% 

November 02% .01% 

December 02% .01% 

Year 02% " 





.01% 



.01% 

02% .01% 

.02% 

• e • 

.02% 
.02% 

08% .08 



03ft . 
08% . 

Soda, Sulphide, 60 Per Cent 



01% 



1917. 

H !•. 

January $0.08% $0.03 

February 03% .03 

March 08% .08 

April 08% .08 

May 08% .08 

June 04% .08 

July 04ft .04 

August 04% .08% 

September 04 .08% 

October 04% .04 

November 05% .04 

December 05% .04 

Year 05% .08 



-Per pound 



1918. 

H. L 

$0.04% $0 04 

05 3» 




Soda, Sulphide, 30 Per Cent. 



1917. 
H. L. 

January $0.02% $0.02 

February 02% .02 

March 02% 

April 02% 

May 02% 

June 03 

July 03 

August 08 

September 08 

October 04 

November 04% 

December 03% .01 

Year 04V» .01 



-Per pound- 




1918. 
H. L.. 
$0.02ft $0.02 
•08ft .02^ 
.08 
.03' 
.08 




Soda, Sulphite, ^{s ; 111 ^ 



H. 

January $0.06 

.06 
.06 
.06 
.06 
06 
06 
06 



February 
March .. 
April ... 
May ... 
June . . . 
July ... 
August . 

September 06 

October oq 

November 06 

December 06 

Year 06 

Note.— Not quoted In 1917. • 



L. 
$0.05ft 

!oag 

•Oftft 

.05'4 

.or,ft 

•ORft 
.05ft 

!o.tft 

.05% 
.05% 
.05ft 



100 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



WWTELAW BROTHERS CHEMICAL COMPANY 



ESTABLISHED 1853 



INCORPORATED 1915 



309, 311, 313 AND 315 SOUTH WHARF 
OFFICE, 316 SOUTH COMMERCIAL STREET 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 



Distributors of 

SOLVAY PRODUCTS 

SODA ASH, CAUSTIC SODA, SNOW FLAKE CRYSTALS, CALCIUM CHLORIDE, ETC. 

PHILADELPHIA QUARTZ CO'S 

SILICATE OF SODA 

Also 

REFINED and COMMERCIAL NITRATE SODA, SULPHUR, BLUE VITRIOL, 
EPSOM SALTS, BICARBONATE SODA, CHLORIDE LIME, ALUM, COPPERAS, 

ROSIN, ACIDS, ETC. 

WAREHOUSE STOCKS AT 

OMAHA KANSAS CITY TOPEKA HUTCHINSON 

TULSA FORT WORTH HOUSTON 



Cable address: SUZUSAN, NEW YORK. 
Codes used: Bentley's, A B C 5th Edition 

and Private 



Home Office, Tokio, Japan 



S. SUZUKI & CO., Ltd. 

15-21 Park Row, Established 1887 N ew York City 

MANUFACTURERS 



Chlorate of Potash, 99% 
Carbonate of Potash, 99%, U.S.P. 
Bicarbonate of Potash, U.S.P. 
Muriate of Potash, 80-90% 
Iodide of Potash, U. S. P. 

S.O.3 3% under 
Wheat Starch 



up, Crystal or Powder 
Crude Iodine 90% up 
Resub limed Iodine, U.S.P. 
Yellow Stick Phosphorus 
Yellow Prussiate of Potash 
Red Prussiate of Potash 
Dextrine 



All other HEAVY CHEMICALS 
and PHARMACEUTICAL DRUGS 

Inquiries Solicited 



J 



. OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



101 



Tin, Bichloride. 

/——-Per pound > 

1917. 1018. 

H. L. H. L- 

January 60.14 80.18ft 80.24% 30.28% 

February 14 .18% .24ft .23% 

March 14 .13% .24ft .28% 

April 18 .13% Nominal 

May' 18 .17% Nominal 

June t .18 .17% .29 .28 

July : .19% .19% .29 .28 

August 20% .19% .29 .28 

September 20% .19% .29 .26 

October 20% .19% .29 .28 

November 21% .20% .29 .25% 

December 24% .23% .26 

Tear 24% .13% .29 



Tin, Oxide. 

/ P er pound * 

1917. 1918. 

xi L. H. L. 

January 30.60 30.46 30.85 30.75 

February 60 .48 .85 .75 

March 58 .54 .85 .80 

April 64 .58 .. .80 

May 66 .62 .. .80 

June 66 1.00 .95 

July 64% 1.10 1.00 

August 64% 1.10 1.00 

September 64% 1.10 .90 

October 65 .64% 1.00 .90 

November .72 .64% 1.00 .90 

December 85 .72 1.00 v .90 

Year 85 .46 1.10 .75 



Zinc, Carbonate. 

t ■ — Per pound > 

1917. 1918. 

H- L. H. Li. 

January $0.26 30.24 ' 30.25 $0.22 

February 26 .24 .30 .25 

March 27 .24 .80 .25 

April 27 .25 .80 .25 

May 27 .23 .80 .28 

June 25 .23 .30 .28 

July 2f. .23 .24 .18 

August 25 .28 .20 .18 

September 25 .23 .20 .18 

October 25 .23 .20 .18 

November 85 .. .20 .16 

December 35 .22 .20 .18 

Tear 35 .22 .30 .18 



f 



Zinc, Chloride. 



-Per pound- 



1918. 
H. t,. 



January $0.15% 

Febinary 16% 

Marcta J5% 

/prtl 16% 

May 17 

June 17 

July 17 . 

August * .17 

September 17 

October 17 

November 11% 

December 11% 

Tear 17 




Zinc, Sulphate. 

, Per 

1917. 

H. L. 

January $0.07 $0.06 

February 07 .06 

March 07 

April 07 

May 07 .06 

June 07 .06 

July 07 .06% 

August 07 .06% 

September 07 .06% 

October 07 .05% 

November 06 .05% 

December 07 05% 

Year 07 .05% 



Nitric, 42 Degrees. 



pound 



1918. 




ACIDS. 



Acetic, 28 Per Cent. 

, P er cwt. * 

H. L. H. L,. H. L. 

1916. 1917. 1918. 

January.. $0.10 $0.06 $0.05 30.08% $6.00 $6.60 

February. .10 .06 .04% .08% 6.50 6.60 

March 10 .08% .04% .03% 6.50 5.60 

April 08% .07% .05 .04% 9.00 6.00 

May 07% .05% .05 ... 9.00 6.00 

June. 06% .05% .06 .06 12.00 6.00 

July 06 .06% .08 .05 6.11 5.96 

August 06 .05 .07% .05% 6.16 4.91 

September .05 .08% .07% .07 6.16 4.91 

October. . . .04 .08% .07% .06% 6.16 4.91 

November .04 .03% .07 .05% 5.16 4.91 

December .05 .04 .07 .05% 6.16 4.91 

Tear .10 .03% .07% .03% 12.00 4.91 

Acetic, GlacialT99 Per Cent 

t Per poun d \ 

1917. 1918. 

H. L,. H. L. 

January $0.40 30.25 $0.88 30.82 

February 26 .25 .86 .85 

March 80 .25 .88 .35 

April 81 .28 .40 .88 

May 85 .80 .42 .40 

June .40 .85 .40 .87 

July 40 .37% .19% .19% 

August 40 .87% .10% .19% 

September. 40 .38 .19% .19% 

October 50 .40 .19% .19% 

November 45 .36 .19% .19% 

December 46 .34 .19% .19% 

Tear 60 .25 .42 .19% 

Price fixed in July, 1918, .by Government 
agreement with producers. 

Muriatic, 22 Degrees. 

t Per cwt. ^ 

1916. 1917. 1918. 

TI T^ TT T^ TT T 

Jan.. $0.08% $0.02% 30.02% $0.02 $2.60 $2.26 

Feb.. .03% .08 .02% .02 2.60 2.26 

Mar.. .08% .08 .02% .02 8.60 2.26 
Apr... .08% .03 .02% .01% 8.60 

May.. .04 .03 .02 .01% 8.60 8.00 

June.. .06 .03% .02% .01% 8.26 2.50 
July.. .04 .08% .02% .02 8.00 2.50 

Aug.. .08% .02% .02% .02 8.00 2.60 
Sept. .02% .02% .02% .02 8.00 2.56 
Oct.. .02% .02% .08% .02% 2.80 2.66 
Nov... .02% .02% .03 .02% 2.80 2.66 
Dec... .02% .02 .02% .02% 2.80 2.56 
Tear.. .05% .02 .03J4 .01% 8.60 2.26 



1916. 
H. I* 



-Per pound- 



1917. 
H. L. 



Jan... 

Feb.. 

Mar.. 

Apr... 

May.. 

June.. 

July.. 

Aug.. 

Sept.. 

Oct... 

Nov.. 

Dec... 

Tear.. 



$0.09% $0.08% $0.06% $0.06^ 
.09% .08% .06% .06% 
.09% 
.09% 
.09% 
.08% 



/-Per cwt.-* 

1918. 

H. L. 



.08% 
.08% 
.08% 
.08 
.08% .08 
.08 .07% 
.07% .07 
.07% .06% 
^06% .06% 
?06% .06 
.09% .06 



.08 
.08% 



.06% 
.07 



.08% .07 

.08 .07% 

.08% .08 

.08% .06% 

.08% .08% 

.10% .08% 

.10% .09 

.09% .08% 

.10% .06% 



39.60 
9.50 
9.60 

S.50 
.75 
9.75 
9.75 
8.50 
8.75 
8.75 
8.75 
8.75 
9.75 



$8.60 
9.18 
9.13 
9.18 
9.60 
8.60 
8.60 

e • •» 

8.60 
8.60 
8.50 
8.50 
8.50 



Oxalic 



1916. 





H. 


Jan... 


$0.60 


Feb.. 


.64 


Mar.. 


.80 


Apr... 


.80 


May.. 


.75 


June.. 


.72 


July.. 


•66 


Aug.. 


.61 


Sept.. 


.62 


Oct... 


.62 


Nov.. 


.59 


l^OC • •• 


.64 


Tear.. 


.80 



L. 
$0.50 
.60 
.64 
.75 
.71 
.65 
.68 
.58 
.60 
.57 
.54 
.47 
.47 



—Per pound—- 
1917. 
H. Lb 

30.50 $0.43 
.48 .48 
.48 .46 
.47 .44 
.47 .46 
.47% .46 
.47 .46% 
.47 .46% 
.49 .46% 
.49 .45 
.48 .48 
.46 .45 
.50 .48 



1918. 

H. L. 

$0.46% $0.46 



.47 
.46 
.46 
.46 
.44 
.44 
.44 
.42 
.42 
.42 
.41 
.47 



.46 
.45 
.44 
.42 
.42 
.42 
.41 
.41 
.40 
.89 
.86 
.36 



Sulphuric, 66 Degrees. 



1916. 



Jan. 

Feb.., 

Mar. 

Apr.. 

May. 

June. 

July. 

Aug. 

Sept., 

UCCt * i 

Nov., 
Tear. 



-Per pound- 

1917. 
R. L. 



1918. 

$0.08 30.02 $0.02 30.01% $0.02% $0.02 
.03 .02% .02 .01% .02% .02% 



.03 
.08 
.03 
.03 



.02% .02% .01% 
.02% .02% .01% 
.02% .02% 

.023 




.02% 



.02% 



.02% .01% .02% .01% 
.02 .01% .02% .01% 



.01% .02% .02) 

.01% .02 .01* 

.02% 



.02 
.02 
.02 
.02 
.08 



.01% .02% .01% 

.01% .08 .01% 

.01% .08 

.01% .03 

.01% .08 




.01% .02% 
.02 .02% 



.01% .02% .01% 



Tannic, U. S. P. 



1317. 



-Per pound- 



Lt. 

January $1.00 $0.96 

February 96 .96 

sMarch 96 .96 

April 96 .96 

May 1.15 1.15 

June 1.26 1.16 

July 1.80 1.26 

August 1.80 1.80 

September 1.80 1.80 

October 1.80 1.80 

November 1.80 1.80 

December % 1.80 1.80 

Tear 1.80 .96 



1918. 
H. L. 



$1.40 
1.40 
1.40 
1.40 
1.40 
1.46 
1.68 
1.68 
1.60 
1.60 
1.60 
1.60 
1.58 



$1.80 
1.80 
1.80 
1.80 
1.80 
1.80 
1.40 
1.40 
1.40 
1.40 
1.40 
1.40 
1.80 



London Chemical Market in 1918. 

The record for the year in the London market for the more important chemicals is shown herewith, with the open- 
ing and closing and the high and low prices for the year: — 

Open. 

Article. £ s. 

Acetio acid, glacial lb. 8 

Alum, lump ton 20 

Ammonium, carbonate, lump lb. 

muriate ton 89 10 

sulphate ton 16 7 

Antimony, Chinese, crude ton 46 

regulus 80 

Arsenic, white ton 150 

Bleaching powder ton 20 

Boraclc acid, powd cwt. 64 

Borax, powd cwt. 88 

Carbolic acid, crude gal. 8 

89 deg. crystals lb. 1 

Citric acid lb. 3 

Copper sulphate ton 67 10 

for agriculture 48 

Cream ox tartar cwt. 847 

Hydroquinone lb. 12 

Iron sulphate ton. 220 

Oxalic acid lb. 1 

Potashes, Montreal, firsts cwt. 250 

Potassium acetate lb. 3 

bichromate lb. 2 

chlorate lb. 2 

carbonate, 80082 per cent ton 200 

permanganate lb. 15 

prussiate lb. 3 

Pyrogallio acid, resub lb. 17 

Quicksilver, 2d hds flasks 25 

Sal ammoniac cwt. 80 

Saltpeter, Bng., ref cwt. 65 

Sodium bicarbonate »..ton 9 10 

hyposulphite, crys ton 45 

nitrate, ref ." ton 27 

Sulphur flowers ton 32 

rolls ton 28 

Tartaric acid lb. 8 







Close. 






High. 






Low. 




d. 


£ 


s. 


d. 


£ 


s. 


d. 


£ 


8. 


d. 

2 


8 





8 


3 





3 


8 





8 





18 


10 





20 








18 


10 





7% 








7ft 








7ft 








V* 





60 








60 








89 


10 





6 


16 


5 





16 


7 


6 


15 


5 





• 


57 


10 





70 








48 











60 








80 








60 











91 








160 








91 











16 


10 





20 





. 


16 


10 











94 








94 








64 











45 








46 








88 





4 





8 


6 





8 


6 





2 


6 


8 





1 


9 





2 








1 


*2 


2 





4 


8 





4 


9 





8 


2 





60 








' 67 


10 





60 











• 52 








52 








48 








6 





400 








430 * 








847 


6 








14 








19 








12 











280 








800 








220 





7 





1 


4 





1 


7 





1 


4 








250 








280 


. 





260 





8 





4 


3 





4 


8 





8 


7 


6ft 





2 








2 


7 





2 





5 ^ 





2 


2 





2 


5 





2 


2 


0, 





180 








220 








160 





0^ 





9 


6 





15 








9 


6 


6 





2 


11 





8 


6 





2 


11 


6 





17 








19 








17 








22 








26 








20 














105 








105 








85 











65 








65 








66 








22 








22 


0. 





9 


10 








45 








60 








45 











27 








27 








27 











34 








36 








80 











28 








80 








28 








1 





3 


10 





3 


11 





8 


1 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



Sulphuric Acid Muriatic Acid Zinc Chloride 

Oleum Nitric Acid Mixed Acids 

Salt Cake Phenol 




WORKS, EAST ST. LOUIS, ILL. 
Owned and Operated by Monsanto Chemical Works, St. Louis, Mo. 




Acetanilid 
Acetphenetidin 

(Phenacetin) 
Acetyl Salicylic 

Acid (Aspirin) 
Caffeine 
Chloral Hydrate 



Coumarin 
Chrome Sulphate 
Glycerophosphates 
(Calcium Sodium 
Potassium, Iron 
Magnesium, etc.) 



Phenol 

Phenolphthalein 

Saccharin 

Salicylic Acid 

Salicylate Soda 

Salol 

Vanillin 



MONSANTO CHEMICAL WORKS 



NEW YORK: Piatt and Pearl Streets 



SAINT LOUIS 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



It Is the Body Itself 

Our clay and method of manufacture is NOT 
the same as used by others in our district 

Our ware is NOT the cheapest, nor U it fancy, but it is GUARAN- 
TEED to be acid proof, free from defects, not to leak or sweat, and 
to be perfectly satisfactory in every respect. 






ACID-PROOF DISTRIBUTING PLATE 

Made in many size* and design) 



ACID-PROOF TOWER BOTTOM SECTION 

Showing 10" Y and Ring for supporting perforated 
plate, or at top section for distributing plate 




STANDARD NO. 3—2" BORE VALENTINER COIL 

We make coils or norms in any length or bore pipe 



ACID-PROOF SUCTION FILTER "A" 

Made in moat any capacity up to 100 gallons. 
Furnished with faucet and cover if desired 



Knight Acid -Proof Chemical Stoneware 
does not depend on glaze, enamel or veneer 



MAURICE A. KNIGHT, ^"ivSST Eaat Akron, Ohio 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



PRIDE of the KITCHEN CO. 

277 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK CITY 

Established 1878 



Factory: Brooklyn, N. Y. 




Manufacturers of the famous 

"Peekay" Polish 
Scouring Soap 

Scouring Powders 
Soap Powders 

ALSO 

P. K. Liquid Bleach 
P. K. And Sour Blue 
P. K. Pearl Tint Blue 

Ammonia Powders 



Export Inquiries 
Solicited 



DEPENDABLE SERVICE 
MATERIAL OF MERIT 



Cable Address: "Fried them" 



0. FRIEDLANDER 
CHEMICAL CO. 

277 BROADWAY 

NEW YORK CITY 



Works and Warehouses : Brooklyn 

s-* FRIEDCO "*«• 
Caustic Soda 

Solid Ground 

Soda Ash 

Light and Dense 

Bleaching Powder 
Bicarbonate of Soda 

All Size Containers 

/rife 
- IP 

CHEMICALS FOR 
ALL PURPOSES 

Bichromates 

Sal Ammoniac 

Oxalic Acid 

Epsom Salts 

Glauber Salts 

Formaldehyde 

Carbonate Ammonia 

Alums 

Copper Sulphate 

.Sodium Sulphide 

White Arsenic 

Acids, Oils, Waxes, Dyes 

Manufacturers of 

Laundry Supplies 
Laundry Blues, Starches 

Send for Catalogue 



Plant and Foundry: Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ANCHOR CAN COMPANY 

277 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK CITY 

Durable Drums 
of Light Weight 

For EXPORT and 
DOMESTIC Use 

Made up in all sizes and various 
descriptions 



We carry a large stock of 
the following uniform sizes : 

12 x 12 x 18 
15 x 15 x 21 
20 x 20 x 36 

Our extensive manufacturing facilities 

enable us to handle your patronage 

efficiently and expeditiously 




Estimates Furnished Upon 
Request 

Black or Iron Galvanized 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 

l 



105 



The Warner Chemical Co 

Manufacturers of the following 

products: 



Acetic Anhydride; 85% 

Acetyl Chloride 

Acid Phosphoric, 50%; Sp; Gr. 
1,400. Meets all requirements 
of Pure Food Laws 

Lead and Arsenic Free 

Aluminum Hydrate, light, 96%, 
For Printing Ink Trade 

Calcium Phosphate Monobasic 
(Acid Calcium Phosphate) 

Carbon Bisulphide . 

Carbon Tetrachloride 

Phosphorus Oxychloride 



Phosphorus Trichloride 
Soda Caustic Liquid 
Soda Caustic Solid, 76% 
Sodium Hypochlorite Solution 

(Bleach) 
Sodium Phosphate Monobasic, 

100% 

(Acid Sodium Phosphate) 

Sodium Phosphate Monobasic 
Pyro. For Metal Platers' use 

Sodium Phosphate (Dibasic) 
U.S.P. Granular 



Sodium Phosphate (Dibasic) 
U.S.P. Anhydrous 

Sodium Phosphate Tribasic 

(Tri Sodium Phosphate) 

Snowhite 
Water Softener and Soap Sub- 
stitute. For Laundries, Dair- 
ies, Hotels, Etc. 

Sulphur Chloride, Red and Yel- 
low. Largely used in the manu- 
facture of Rubber Substitutes 
and in Vulcanizing Rubber 






EXECUTIVE OFFICES: 



52 VANDERBILT AVENUE, NEW YORK 

TELEPHONE: MURRAY HILL 262 

Plants: CARTERET, N. J., South Charleston, W. Va. 



CHEMICALS 



Medicinal 



Coal Tar Products 

Dyestuffs & Intermediates 



Sulphur Blue 
Sulphur Black 
Sulphur Brown 
Fuchsine 



Aniline Oil 
Diaitrochlorbenzol 
Dinitrophenol 
Monochlorbenzol 



Heavy — 

Acids— All Kindt 
Acid Acetyl Salicylic 
Alumina Sulphate 
Arsenic 
Benzoates 
Benzol. 

Bleaching Powder 
Carbon Tetrachloride 
Caustic Soda 
Chloroform 
Creosote U. S. P. 
Epsom Salts 

PAINT and VARNISH MATERIALS 

OILS WAXES GREASES 



Photographic 



Rubber Makers Supplies 
Whiting 

(Crystal White Brawl) 



Sulphur, Lithopone, Zinc Oxide Mag- 
nesia* Carbonate & Calcined Fillers — 
Dry Colors, SoWents, Accelerators 



Gums 

Naphthalene Flakes 

Naphthas 

Paramidophenol Hydro- 
chloride 

Paraphenylenediamine 

Phenol U. S. P. 

Pitch I 

Soda Ash 

Soda Nitrate & Nitrite 
Soda Sulphide & Sulphite 

NAVAL STORES 
CREOSOTES 



CORRESPONDENCE IN ALL LANGUAGES 

Cable AddrtM RALFULLER. N. Y. 



RALPH L Ft) LLER & CO 



INC 



NEW YORK 

8 Rector Street 



CLEVELAND 

Guardian Building 



PHILADELPHIA 

Real Estate Trust Banding 



ENGLAND 
LONDON 

17 Colonial House, Tooley Street, S. EI. 



ITALY 
GENOA 

186 Palazzo Nuova Borso 



106 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



/ * 



HURON CHEMICAL COMPANY 

47-49-51-53 BERGEN STREET 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

TELEPHONE MAIN {™\j 

Manufacturers 



CHEMICA LS-DR UGS 

OILS 



SPOT AND CONTRACT 

WRITE as FOR QUOTATIONS 



DIAMOND ALKALI GO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 




SODA ASH 58% 



CAUSTIC SODA 76% 



FACTORIES AT ALKALI (Near Painesville), OHIO 

Address Inquiries and Communications to 

GENERAL OFFICES AT 



PITTSBURGH 



PENNSYLVANIA 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



Charles Cooper & Company 



104 Worth S*r*et, New York Ci 



. Muriatic. " ' 
I 1 . unci Technical 



Kthyt Chloride, V. S. P. 
" 1 (HI, Purified, Tech. 

Halt Kan eM.' Uur,iii:. 



A Full l-ine of 



Medicinal, Photographic and Technical 

CHEMICALS 



INNIS, SPEIDEN & CO. 

. 1 11 cor porn ted 

Importers Exporters 

Manufacturers 

Industrial Chemicals 

GUMS OILS WAXES 

46 Cliff Street, New York 

Factories : 
NIAGARA FALLS, N. Y. JERSEY CITY, N. J. MURPHYSBORO, ILL 

Branch Offices : 
120 W. KINZIE STREET, CHICAGO, ILL. 

219 SO. FRONT STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
84 HIGH STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

641 LONG AVENUE, CLEVBLAND, OHIO 



Eatabliahad 1816 



Incorporated 1906 



1918 YEAR BOOK 







FOR THE 

PRODUCTION 

OF 



Chlorine 

Gas and 

Caustic 

Soda 



The. above illustration is typical of one of many installations of NELSON ELECTROLYTIC 
CELLS dow in operation. Write for further information and lint of important uteri. 

THE WARNER CHEMICAL COMPANY 



52 VANDERBILT AVENUE 



NEW YORK 



Importers, Exporters and Dealers in 

Chemicals - Colors - Dyestuffs - Glycerins - Gums 

Oils - Egg Products - Tanning Materials 

And Raw Materials for Ail Industries 

Selling Agents for 
E. C. Klipstein & Sons Company Bulls Ferry Chemical Company 

So. Charleston, W. Va. Chrome, N. J. Edgewater, N. J. 



Sulphur Black 
Sulphur Green 
Muriatic Acid 



Sulphur Brown 
Sulphur Tan 
Indigo Extract 



Manufacturers of: 

Oxi-Tan Chrome Acetate 

Chrome Sulphate Soluble Oils 

Turkey Red Oil, Resinates, Lineolates 



Society of Chemical Industry in Basle, Switzerland 

Manufacturer* of Coal Tar Dyes of Every Description 

Ciba Indigo (Synthetic) Ciba Fast Vat Dyes Cibanone Fast Vat Dyes 



A. KLIPSTEIN & COMPANY 



Branches: 
Providence Philadelphia 

Bolton 

Charlotte 



ESTABLISHED 1872 

644-52 GREENWICH STREET 
NEW YORK CITY 

Send for Booklet tf Spttialtits 



Represented in Canada by 

A. Klipstein & Company, Ltd. 

12 St. Peter Street 

Montreal 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 




Manufacturers and Importers 



Chemical Department 

Industrial Chemicals 

Industrial Acids 

Drugs and Pharmaceuticals 

Dyestuff Department 

Aniline Dyes for Cotton— Silk— Wool 

Acid and Basic Colors for Paper Industry 

Basic Colors for Ink Industry 

Colors for Paints and Oils 



Coal Tar Intermediates 

Laundry Blue 

(Ultramarine Blue) 

Forms: Cubes, Bulla, Powdered 

Packings: 2 oz. 4 oz. S oz. 1 lb. and Bulk 



Oils— Waxes — Gums 

Animal, Fish and Vegetable Oils 
Essential Oils 
Industrial Gums Medicinal Gums 
Industrial Waxes Paraffine Waxes 



: personal representative! now (raveling in Mexico, 
Central and South America, the Far East, Australia, 
South Africa and Europe are in direct connection with 
Foreign Manufacturers. 

Our Import Department 
Is at Your Service 

Write for our Catalogue and Price List 





MONMOUTH 

CHEMICAL 

COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Four Arrow Brand 

Chlorate »/Potash 



•When the United States Army Ordnance 
Arsenals set out to make the best ammunition 
possible for the best Army in the world they 
needed a Chlorate of Potash purer anrJ 
finer than had ever before been produced 
in America. It was a big job, but the Mon- 
mouth Chemical Company agreed to make 
this chlorate and they are proud to say that 
they have succeeded. 

No better chlorate than our Four Arrow 
Brand is now made anywhere. 

American Exporters who want an All-Amer- 
ican brand, which their friends abroad will 
want again, will find the Monmouth Chemical 
Company anxious to serve them. Domestic 
dealers and consumers will find trials of our 
brand worth their while. 



SALES OFFICE: 

106 WALL STREET 
NEW YORK 

WORKS AND WAREHOUSES: 

KEYPORT, N. J. 





110 1918 YEAR BOOK 



CHLORATE OF POTASH 

Amorphous Phosphorus 

Yellow Stick Phosphorus 

Sesquisulphide of Phosphorus 

Ammonia Chrome Alum Yellow Prussiate of Soda Red Prussiate of Potash 

Bichromate of Potash Caustic Potash Chlorate of Soda 

Bichromate of Soda Formaldehyde Caustic Soda 

Sal Ammoniac Camphor Oxalic Acid 

Soda Ash Quinine Citric Acid 



All Goods Guaranteed Standard American Make 

C. W. CAMPBELL, SS8B8SS Cliff and John Sts., New York, U. S. A. 

Telephones, Beekman 1720-1721-1722 Cable Address, "CAMBEL NEW YORK" 



\ 



Franco- American Chemical Co., inc. 

Eight Gold Street, New York City 

Telephones: John 1358-1359 Cable Address: "Coeurfranc"— New York 



Silico-Fluoride of Sodium 

Ground Manganese Dioxide 

French White Oxide of Antimony 

Japanese Needle Antimony (Powdered) 

ALSO HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Ores, Minerals, Colors, Heavy Chemicals 

and Other Raw Materials for 
Technical Manufacture 



OIL PAINT AND 


DRUG REPORTER 111 


• 

J. L. & D. S. Riker, Inc. 


19 Cedar Street 


New York 


i 

Bicarbonate of Potash 


Formaldehyde 


Bichromate of Soda 


Indigo 


Bleaching Powder 


Methyl Acetone 


Carbonate of Ammonia 

« 


Muriate of Ammonia 


Caustic Potash 


Phosphoric Anhydride 


Caustic Soda 


Phosphorous 


Chlorate of Potash 


Silicate of Soda 


Chlorate of Soda 


Soda Ash 


Chrome Alum 

• • 


Wood Alcohol 



/ 



Telephone: Bl. Green 9613 



G. DE VRIES & SONS 



New York Office : 
44 WHITEHALL STREET 



Amsterdam, Holland 



IMPORTS: 


EXPORTS: 


Rubber 


Heavy Chemicals 


Copra 


Pharmaceuticals 


Cocos Oil 


Furs 


Palm Oil 




x aim v/ii 

Coca Leaves 


Caustic Soda 


Hard Woods 


Potash 


Kapoc 


Soda Ash 


Gum Copal 


Acetic Acid 


Sesame 


Chloride of Lime 


Hemp 


Calcium Bichromate 


Piassava Fibre 


Bicarbonate of Soda 


Quinine 


Glauber Salts 


Tanning Extracts 


Formaldehyde 


Waxes 


Dyestuffs, Etc., Etc. 


Other East Indian Products 





112 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



arrie 

•Eng ineering cor poration 

M PADTI ANDT QTDFPT NPV VADIf Bo8ton Buffa, ° Chicago, in. 

<KJ tUKILAnill OlKLLI, HClf IUKH 1 76 Federal St. Prudential Bldg. Transportation Bldg. 





Philadelphia 
Land Title Bldg. 



wUPPOSE you could phone the Weather Bureau and order the exact atmospheric 
^ conditions best suited to the manufacture of your product, whether your diffi- 
culty is a matter of process or labor ? 

r I ^HE Carrier Engineering Corporation is an Industrial Weather Bureau. Your 
-*- exact requirement — temperature humidification or dehumidification — is guar- 
anteed by the installation of Carrier equipment. A constant condition in your en- 
tire plant or different conditions in separate departments, positively and automatically 
controlled from one set of apparatus. 

lY/TORE than one hundred distinctly different industries have profited* by Carrier 
***' methods, whether the requirement involved drying, control of moisture regain, 
or other requirement of process efficiency, or air conditioning for the promotion of 
labor efficiency. 

I^ARRIER Engineering Service, backed by Carrier equipment, insures an appli- 
^-^ cation best suited to your own problem; and Carrier guarantees results — 
not merely apparatus. 



( 



" Contractors for Results '" 



MULTIPLE SERVICE 



Our facilities are so diversified that we are able to render unequalled ser- 
vice along many lines. 

Our APPARATUS DEPARTMENT maintains the largest stock of 
laboratory apparatus in the countFy, enabling chemists to procure their supplies 
with the minimum delay. 

Our CHEMICAL DEPARTMENT is headquarters for the celebrated 
"E. & A. T. P." chemicals, consisting of materials from our own factory sup- 
plemented by selections of the choicest products of other manufacturers. 

Our WHOLESALE DRUG and CHEMICAL DEPARTMENT con- 
ducts a general trading business in Drugs and Chemicals, and is prepared to 
handle inquiries in that line. 

In what way can we serve you? 

EIMER & AMEND 

FOUNDED 1851 

Third Ave., 18th and 19th Streets 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 
Pittsburgh Branch, 2011 Jenkins Arcade 



OIL, PAINT & DRUG REPORTER 



213 



"BUFLOVAK" 
EVAPORATORS 



" Buflovak " Evaporators embody every essential element 
required for efficient and economical evaporating. Some of 
the important features are: 

Mechanical Strength, with ample thickness of metal for 
all important parts. 

Uniform Circulation of the boiling liquid in order to pre- 
vent coating of the tubes. 

Proper Distribution of Steam over the whole heating 
surface. 

Proper Proportions of the evaporator, so as to avoid 
losses by entrainment and foaming. 

Simple Construction, so that the equipment can be oper- 
ated by unskilled labor. 

" Buflovak " Evaporators include types for handling al 
solutions in any capacity. The most important types are as 
follows : — 

Horizontal Tube Evaporator for common solutions which 
are to be distilled or concentrated to a higher density with- 
out the separation of salts, and which have no tendency to 
foam or produce scale. 




Horizontal Tube Evaporator 




Vertical Tube Evaporator of the crystalliz- 
ing type with salt filters, for solutions con- 
taining salts which become insoluble during 
the concentration. 

High Concentrator of the special vertical 
tube type for liquors which, on account of 
their boiling point or increased viscosity re- 
quire a high steam pressure combined with 
quick circulation. This type is used for the 
high concentration of Caustic Soda, Potash, 
Ammonium Nitrate and Electrolytic Caustic 
Solutions above 36 Be. 

Rapid Circulation Evaporator of the verti- 
cal or inclined type for solutions which have 
a tendency to foam or produce scale. Also 
used for delicate liquors which should be ex- 
posed to the heat for a short time only. 




Rapid Circulation Evaporator 



Ask for specifications to cover 
your requirements. 



Vertical Tube 
Evaporator 



Buffalo Foundry & Machine Company 

1393 Fillmore Avenue, Buffalo, N. Y. 

NEW YORK OFFICE ■ 17 BATTERY PLACE 



(continued on next page) 



1918 YEARBOOK 



66 



BUFLOVAK 



99 



" Buflovak " Vacuum Dryers present an economical, safi 
and positive means for drying all classes of materia! 
terials that would be injured by excessive heat or can be 
dried otherwise only at prohibitive cost may be dried eco- 
nomically in these dryers. An extremely low temperature 
is assured by the maintenance of a high vacuum in the ap- 
paratus. The drying is done very rapidly and material 
be dried in a few hours that otherwise would require days 
or weeks. 

" Buflovak " Vacuum Dryers are also far more eco- 
nomical because of the extremely low operating cost 
and quick drying time. They enable you to obtain an 
improved quality in the dried product. 
The tow temperatures at which materials 
can be dried in "Buflovak" Dryers per- 
mit the drying of many materials without 
injury or danger of overheating that can- 
not be satisfactorily dried by any other 
method. 



VACUUM DRUM DRYER 

The " Buflovak " Vacuum Drum Dryer is the 
ratus for drying liquid solutions, emulsions and 
as dyewood and tanning extracts, white lead, 
acids, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and many other 
containing solids. 

This apparatus enables the most delicate liquid 
materials to be converted into dry form without the 
slightest danger from overheating or other injury 
and at a very low cost of operation. Owing to the 
high vacuum maintained in the dryer the material 
is always kept at an extremely low temperature. In 
most cases the dried material is produced as a pow- 
der, so that further grinding is unnecessary. 

While the vacuum drum dryer has, in theory, been 
considered the ideal apparatus for drying liquids, 
satisfactory commercial results were not attained 
until our patented devices and methods for applying 
the liquid to the drum were perfected. 




Vacuum Drum Dryer 



All sizes are so constructed that they may be 
easily cleaned and kept in sanitary condition, which 
is a vital consideration when handling food products. 

Built in various sizes to meet any capacity desired. 
We will gladly make tests on your material without 
charge or obligation except for transportation ex- 
penses. 

ATMOSPHERIC DRUM DRYER 

The principles of the Vacuum Drum Dryer are 
also used in the construction of our Atmospheric 
Drum Dryers, which are used for drying many liquid 
materials that do not require a vacuum. 



BUFFALO FOUNDRY & 

1S93 FILLMORE AVENUE, 
NEW YORK OFFICE i 



OIL, PAINT & DRUG REPORTER 



215 



VACUUM DRYERS 




Vacuum Shelf Dryer 

This dryer consists of a rectangular chamber con- 
taining hollow, steam or hot water heated shelves. 
"The materia] to be dried is loaded in pans or trays 
which are placed on the shelves. The apparatus is 
then closed, the vacuum produced, and the drying 
commenced. If desired, the volatile matter or sol- 
vents removed from the material may be reclaimed. 
This type of dryer is used very extensively in many 
industries and particularly for drying rubber, drugs 
and pharmaceutical products. It is adapted to the 
drying of a large class of materials. 

VACUUM ROTARY DRYER 

Used for materials that can be mixed or tumbled. Interior 
contains revolving heating tube with mixing arms and paddles 
attached. Jacketed shell is made of lapwelded steel tubing, a 
distinctive feature of the "Buflovak" dryer. 
This allows paddles to be set closer to the 
shell than in the welded or riveted steel plate 
construction, thereby obtaining a higher effi- 
ciency. Built in many sizes. 

OTHER VACUUM APPARATUS 

Dry Vacuum Pumps, Condensers, Vacuum 
Drying and Impregnating Apparatus, 
Vacuum Crystallizers, Solvent Recovery Ap- 
paratus, etc. 

Send for new catalog. 



VACUUM SHELF DRYER 

The Vacuum Shelf Dryer is adapted to the drying 
of any material that must be handled in pans or trays 
such as sheet and reclaimed rubber of all kinds, rob- 
ber compounds, paints, dyes, extracts, pastes, glue, 
soap, salts, albumens of all descriptions, starch, glu- 
trin, rosin, vegetables, fruits, sugars, small electrical 
apparatus, plates, chemicals, various by-products, 
and liquid substances. 

A distinctive feature of the "Buflovak*' Shelf 
Dryer is the construction of the chamber casting, 
which, in all sizes is made in one piece. This elimi- 
nates many joints which would otherwise be neces- 
sary. The metal used is a special quality of air 
fumace iron known as "gun-iron," a dense, homo- 
geneous metal, high in tensible strength; qualities 
that are essential in the construction of dryers for 
high vacuum work. 




vacuum Rotary Dryer 



MACHINE COMPANY 

BUFFALO, NEW YORK 
17 BATTERY PLACE 



(continued on next page) 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



"BUFLOKAST" 

CHEMICAL APPARATUS 



"Buflokast" includes apparatus 
used in producing Heavy Chemicals, 
AHds, Caustic Soda and other Alka- 
lies, Organic Chemicals, Coal-Tar 
Intermediates and kindred materials. 
Apparatus furnished for standard 
chemical operations, such as nitra- 
tion, denitration, reduction, sulpho- 
nation, caustic fusion, crystallization, 
etc. Only a few of the many types 
of apparatus are shown here. 




"Buflokast" Crystallizer 




Our years of observation, research, analysis and 
specialized experience in building chemical apparatus 
have enabled us to manufacture a product that is the 
topmost interpretation of the needs of the chemical 
industry. The benefit of this experience is yours for 
the asking. 



A Partial List of ' 

Nitrators 
Reducers 
Autoclave* 

Sulphonators 
Caustic Pots 
Nitric Retorts 
Denitrators 
Acid Eggs 



'Buflokast** Apparatus 

Crystallizing Pans 
Hydrochloric Pans 
Vacuum Stills 
Beta Naphthol Stills 
Phenol Stills 
Fusion Kettles 
Drum Dryers 
Jacketed Kettles 




Catalog mailed on request. 




A Single Shipment of Caustic Pots 



Buffalo Foundry & Machine Company 

1593 Fillmore Avenue, Buffalo, N. Y. 

NEW YORK OFFICE t 17 BATTERY PL4CE 



See Preceding Pages 



DYESTUFFS MARKET SECTION 

(Pages 117-142.) 

Natural Dyestuff Scarcity Reflected in High Prices in 1918 119 

Natural Dyestuffs, High and Low Prices, 1917-1918 1 19-123 

Dyewood Extracts 123 

Development of Coal-Tar Industry in .1918 123-127 

Coal-Tar Crude, Intermediate and Color Production, 1917 127-135 

Coal-Tar Bases, Intermediates and Colors, High and Low Prices, 

191 7-1918 127-136 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



ANILINE COLORS 

["OFF' @ j^RROfT I lOMPAKY-l! 



=1 





C H E M I CALS 
WOOLWORTH BLDG. NEW YORK 




IAIN OMIOBs 
WOKTH BlILDlNli 
NSW YORK 



MANUFACTURERS, EXPORTERS and IMPORTERS 

AGENTS 
CHAS. LENNING & CO. 

Inc or po ruled 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



We specialize in the following: 

Copper Sulphate 
Epsom Salts 
Glauber Salts 
Manganese Dioxide 
Quinine 
Sal Ammoniac 
Sal Soda 
Silicate of Soda 
Sulphur 
Etc. 

DRUGS AND PHARMACEUTICALS 

OILS AND WAXES 

GLUES AND GELATINES 

DYES AND COLORS 



Acetic Acid 
Lactic Acid 
Muriatic Acid 
Nitric Acid | 
Sulphuric] Acid 
Ammonia Alum 
Arsenic 

Barium Chloride 
Chrome'AIum 



Soluble Blue B 
Ink Blue 

Brilliant Blue B-R 
Victoria Blue 
Alkali Blue B 
Methylene Blue 
Acid Fuchsine 
Safranine Y 
Eosine J N 
Croseine Scarlet 
Congo Red 4-B 



Acid Green B-Y-G 
Wool Green S. 
Malachite Green Crystals 
Methyl Violet 
Acid Violet 
Tartrazine 
Diamine Yellow 
Chrome Black 
Acid Black 
Direct Black 
Etc. 



*~ ANILINE COLORS .._ 

r OFF" ^VRROCT Q ^OMPANY-INC 





C H EM I CALS 
WOOLWORTH BLDG. NEW YORK 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



!!9 



NATURAL DYESTUFF SCARCITY FORCES HIGH PRICES. 



THE history of the year in the market for the natural dye- 
stuffs Is one of extreme shortages and consequent high 
prices. As soon as the supply of chemical and coal-tar 
dyes had been cut off by the British blockade of Germany im- 
porters and producers of the several natural dyewoods began 
to experience a much larger demand for their products than 
had been in evidence at any previous time in the history of 
the industry. Consumers of dyeing materials found it neces- 
sary to seek acceptable substitutes for the aniline colors 
which they had been using. They turned naturally to the 
only industry which could at all satisfy their demands, and 
as a result the producers of the natural dyeing extracts were 
almost overwhelmed with immediate orders. 

The condition of this market at the opening of the past year 
was one of considerable activity. The demand was stronger 
than ever before in the history of the trade and had been 
strong for some months back. As a result a marked scarcity 
of some of the most important items on the list was already 
being felt. Logwood in particular was hard to obtain and the 
demand for this important item was unusually heavy. Early 
in the year the call for shipping to 4ake care of the supplies 
and men for the military establishment became acute. The 
government accordingly Inaugurated a policy of taking over 
bottoms in use for various classes of import and export trad- 
ing. The handlers of natural dyestuffs were among the first 
to suffer from the regulations thus going into effect. 

Imports Restricted. 

In March regulations for imports of dyeing and tanning 
materials Were adopted by the War Trade Board. These reg- 
ulations placed a practical embargo on all shipments of dye- 
woods from the principal sources of supply in the West Indies 
and in South America. The British embargoes on the ex- 
portation of materials from their possessions in India and the 
Far East, coupled with the American embargo and the scar- 
city of chemical dyeing materials immediately had the effect 
of producing a situation of extreme shortage in practically 
the entire natural dyestuff market. Prices rose to unprece- 
dented figures in some instances, and there were few offerings 
of importance in any of the items. 

This condition led to the institution of an extended investi- 
gation into the nature of supplies of sumac, logwood, que- 
bracho, and others of varying importance which could be 
obtained from our immediate neighbors in Central America 
and the neutral East Indies. The reports on these investi- 
gations brought out several sources of supply of more or less 
importance and some other facts of considerable interest in 
overcoming the shortage to some extent. 

Among these facts were the following: — Due to the work of 
the Marine Corps in Haiti supplies of logwood obtained from 
that island were larger and of better quality than before; 
that logwood was being produced in greater volume in the 
Dominican republic and could be imported in larger quantities 
during the year; that quebracho extract could be shipped 
from South America as a finished" product, thus releasing 
more tonnage by effecting a saving in space, and that various 
woods grown in the southern portion of the United States 
could be utilized for the manufacture of dye which had never 
been so utilized before. 

Markets Bare of Stocks. 

These developments, however, did not to any extent relieve 
the Immediate urgency of the demand for the various com- 
modities which were in serious shortage. The embargoes on 
the several items and the continued and growing shortage of 
shipping practically stopped the importation of the various 



materials, so that on \he first of June the market was practi- 
cally bare of all raw tanning and dyeing materials. To relieve 
this situation several importers hit upon the scheme of 
bringing in supplies of logwood sticks as deck cargoes on 
small coastwise schooners carrying other cargoes below 
decks. 

While this plan served to somewhat relieve the situation 
these supplies were not large enough to ease the market to 
any marked extent. They were, for the most part, already 
sold on arrival at the prevailing high figures. But even this 
source of supply was not to last long. Early In July the new 
rules of the Navy Department with regard to the movements 
of all vessels engaged in the coastwise trade were made public. 
They practically put an end to all trading with the Eastern 
island in the Caribbean, and also stopped for the time being 
the movements of sailing vessels trading with the principal 
South American ports. This served to cut off the importation 
of . divi-dlvi, logwood, quebracho wood and other items alto- 
gether. As a result several of the leading factors withdrew 
their quotations on logwood and logwood extract altogether. 

This action on the part of the leading producers of the 
goods was, of course, productive of rumors. One of the most 
persistent of these was to the effect that the War Trade 
Board was refusing to issue any import licenses for logwood. 
and other dyeing materials of a similar nature. This was 
emphatically denied by the authorities, who stated that the- 
shortage of shipping was the only factor which entered into 
their actions in the matter. By the middle of July the matter 
had reached such a serious point that some action on the part 
of the officials was imperatively necessary. 

W. T. B. Allocates Materials. 

Accordingly the War Trade Board took matters in hand 
and applied to the other items on the list the same plan which 
had been in effect since May on quebracho extract. The 
entire volume of the imports of this material was taken over 
under options by the government on May 15 at a fixed price 
of 6% cents per pound, based on a freight rate of $20 per ton, 
and allocations were made according to the urgency of the 
demand for the material. With other items, notably logwood, 
the same procedure was taken, and the shortage was in some 
degree relieved by this action. No attempt was made, how- 
ever, to set a price on logwood or the other items. 

The condition of scarcity and the prevailing high prices, 
however, featured the market throughout the entire period. 
With the signing of the armistice came the expectation of 
immediate relief from this condition. In this, however, the 
trade was more or less disappointed. While it was true that 
restrictions were for the most part removed almost at once, 
thare was little improvement in the general situation before 
the close of the year. 

First action was taken when restrictions on tanning mate- 
rials received from domestic sources were removed on De- 
cember 2. This was followed on the 14th of the same month 
by the removal of the restrictions on goods from Guatemala, 
and at the close of the year by the removal of all restrictions. 
The matter of shipping, however, was slow in reaching an 
adjustment, and while every load of returning soldiers meant 
that the requirements of the government was measurably 
less, it was evident that it would be some time before normal 
conditions prevailed. As a result natural dyestuffs were still 
scarce and prices high. There was, however, a feeling of 
optimism among the trade, and the general belief was that, 
with the return of more normal conditions, values would ad- 
just themselves and a period of activity and prosperity 
ensue. 



NATURAL DYESTUFFS, HIGH AND LOW PRICES. 1917-1918. 



Albumen, Egg. 

/ P er pound » 
1917. 1918. 

TT T. XT T. 

January $0.80 $0.76 $1.10 $1.00 

February 80 .76 1.10 1.00 

March 90 .80 1.10 1.00 

April 86 .82 1.10 1.00 

May 90 .84 1.85 1.00 

June 1.08 .88 1.85 1.20 

July 1.05 1.00 1.85 1.20 

August 1.06 1.00 1.50 1.25 

September 1.05 .98 1.50 1.20 

October 1.10 1.00 1.25 1.20 

November 1.10 1.00 1.00 1.20 

December 1.10 1.00 1.00 1.25 

Tear 1.10 .76 1.60 1.00 

Annatto, Seed. 

f Per poun d » 
1917. 1918. 

H Li H I. 

January $0. 17 $0. 15 $0. 11% $0. li 

February 17 .16 .11% .11 



mi. wis. 

March 17 .16 .11% .11 

April 17 .16 .11% .11 

May 17 .16 .12 .10 

Jane 17 .16 .18 .09 

July 17 .16 .11 .09 

August 17 .16 .18 .11 

September 17 .16 .18 .08% 

October 17 .16 .11 .08% 

November 17 .18% .11 .08% 

December 14% .18% .11 .08% 

Tear % .17 .18% .18 .08% 

Antimony Salts. 

/——Per poun d » 
1917. 1918. 

ft T TT T 

January $0.50 $0.45 $0.70 $0.68 

February 50 .45 .70 .68 

March 50 .45 .70 .68 

April 50 .45 .70 .68 

May 50 .45 .70 .68 

June 50 .45 .70 .68 

July 50 .45 .70 .68 

August 50 .45 .72 .68 



1917. 

September 65 .45 

October 68 .62% 

November 65 

December 70 .67 

Tear 70 .45 



1918. 

.72 .70- 

.72 .70* 

.75 .70- 

.75 .TO- 

.75 .69 



Cochineal, Rosy Black. 

t Per pound % 

1917. 191& 

-J 1 - -J- H - ** 

January $0.90 $0.85 $0.59 $0.55 

February 90 .86 .59 .55 

March 90 .85 .56 .55 

April 90 .85 .56 .55 

May 90 .85 .69 .56 

June 90 .85 .70 .69 

July 90 .85 .80 .70 

August 90 .85 Nominal 

September 90 .85 Nominal 

October 69 .63 Nomina] 

November 87 .55 1.00 .95 

December 59 .55 1.00 .95 

Tear 90 .55 1.00 .5* 

• 



120 1918 YEAR BOOK 



Natural Products Refining 




ompany 



Sole Mfrs. of 



"NAPROCO" BRAND 



Registered U. S. Patent Office 



Bichromate of Soda 



Crystals and Granular 



Bichromate of Potash 



Crystals and Precipitated 



Office and Works, 

902-912 GARFIELD AVENUE, 

JERSEY CITY, N. J., 

U. S. A. 



Cable Address, Naproco Jersey City. 



INQUIRIES SOLICITED. 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



121 



Cutch, Boxes, Rangoon. 



1917. 



-Per pound 



H. 

January $0.16 

February 16 

March 16 

April 16 



May 

June 

July 

August .. 
September 
October .. 

November ^.17 

December 21 

Year 21 



.16 
.16 
.16 

12% 



L. 
$0.12 
.12 
.12 
.12 
.12 
.12 
.12 
.12 

►a 

.11 

.12 
.15 
.11 



H. 
$0.20 
.20 
.20 
.20 
.20 
.22 
.26 
.26 
.24 
.24 
.27 
.27 
.27 



1018. 
L. 
$0.18 
.18 
.17* 
.10 
.19 
.19 
.21 
.22 
.22 
.22 
.26 
.26 
.17% 



Dextrine, Corn. 

-Per pound- 



1917. 

H. L.. 

February 

March ... 

April ••• 

nay ...... ...«<. ... . • . 

•i une ••••#••••••• ... • • • 

July 

AUgUSt .. ....... ... • . . 

September ••• 

October $0.07 

November 07 

December 08 $0.07 

X QcLa *•■••••••••• • ■ • ••• 



1918. 
H. I* 
$0.08 $0.07 



.08 

.08% 

.08% 

.08% 

.09 

.09 

.08% 

.08% 

.08% 

.07 

.08 

.09 



07 
.07% 
.07% 
.07% 
.08 
.07% 
.07% 
.07% 
.08 
.06% 
.05% 
•05% 



Note.— Not quoted until October, 1917. 

Divi Divi. 



1917. 



—Per ton- 



1918. 



H. 

January $55.00 

February 58.00 

March 66.00 

April 65.00 

May 65.00 

June 62.00 

July 62.00 

August 62.00 

September 70.00 

October 70.00 

November 70.00 

December 70.00 

Year 70.00 



$62.00 
65.00 
60.00 
58.00 
55.00 



H. 
$70.00 
70.00 
70.00 
75.00 
75.00 
76.00 
85.00 
85.00 
80.00 
80.00 
78.00 
78.00 
85.00 



L. 
$65.00 
65.00 
65.00 
70.00 
70.00 
78.00 
78.00 
80.00 
70.00 
70.00 
70.00 
70.00 
65.00 



Fustic, Sticks. 



1917. 

H. L. 

January $35.00 $80.00 

February 85.00 80.00 

March 35.00 80.00 

April 35.00 80.00 

May 35.00 80.00 

June 85.00 80.00 

July 35.00 30.00 

August 35.00 80.00 

September 60.00 30.00 

October 60.00 50.00 

November 58.00 50.00 

December 58.00 45.00 

Year 60.00 80.00 



-Per ton- 



1918. 



H. 
$50.00 
50.00 
45.00 
60.00 
60.00 
60.00 
55.00 
55.00 
80.00 
70.00 
80.00 
80.00 
80.00 



L. 
$45.00 
40.00 
88.00 
88.00 
38.00 
88.00 
40.00 
45.00 
50.00 
50.00 
55.00 
55.00 
88.00 



Gambia*, Common. 



January . 
February 
March . . . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . 
September 
October .. 
November 
December 
Year 



1917. 
H. L. 
$0.12 $0.11% 
.13% .12 
.15% .18% 
.15% .15 
.16 .15 
.16% .15% 



-Per pound- 



1918. 
H. L. 
$0.23 $0.21 
.25 .21 



.17 

.17 

.16 

.17% 

.19 



.16% 
.15% 
.15% 
.15% 
.16 



.21% .20 
.21% .11% 



.27 

.26 

.27 

.27 

.26 

.25 

.23 

.28% 

.23% 

.28% .20 

.27 .20 



.22 

• • • 

.26 

.23 

.24 

.22% 

.21 

.21 

.21 



Gambier, Singapore Cubes. 



1917. 
H. L. 

January 
February 
March .. 
April ... 
May .... 
June 
July 

August . . 
September 
October .. 

November $0.31 $0 

December 31 



-Per pound- 



1918. 



• • • • • 



m m • • < 



22 
23* 



H. 
$0.88 
.33 
.83 
.35 
.35% 
35% 
.35 
.32 
.31 
.28 
.28 
.28 
.35% 



L. 
$0.30 



.33 
.82 
.85 
.30 
.28 
.25 
.27 
.27 
.27 
.25 



Note.— Not quoted until November, 1917. 



Indigo, Bengal. 



January 
February 
March .. 
April ... 
May .... 
Jane . . . . 



/ 


——Per pound — 


\ 


1917. 


1918. 


H. 


L. 


H. 


L. 


$5.00 


$3.50 


$2.75 


$2.50 


4.00 


3.75 


2.75 


2.50 


4.00 


8.75 


2.75 


2.50 


4.00 


8.75 


2.75 


2.50 


4.00 


3.75 


3.25 


2.75 


4.00 


3.75 


2.75 


2.25 



1917. 

July 4.00 8.75 

August 4.00 3.75 

September 4.00 8.75 

October 4.00 8.75 

November 4.00 3.00 

December 8.25 2.50 

Year 5.00 2.50 



1918. 
8.75 
8.75 
8.75 
8.75 
8.70 
8.50 
3.75% 



2.25 
8.00 
8.00 
8.00 
8.00 
8.25 
2.50 



Logwood, Sticks. 

/— Per 

1917. 

H. I*. 

January $42.00 $25.00 

February 42.00 80.00 

March 42.00 80.00 

April 40.00 80.00 

May 40.00 80.00 

June 42.00 28.00 

July 35.00 30.00 

August 35.00 80.00 

September 48.00 30.00 

October 48.00 37.00 

November 48.00 87.00 

December 43.00 86.00 

Year 48.00 25.00 



ton- 



H. 
$40.00 
40.00 
40.00 
88.00 
40.00 
45.00 
50.00 
60.00 
55.00 



1918. 



L. 
$36.00 
36.00 
86.00 
86.00 
86.00 
40.00 
45.00 
42.00 
60.00 



Nominal 
50.00 45.00 
50.00 45.00 
55.00 36.00 



Myrabolans. 

, Per 

1917. 

H. L* 

January $65.00 $57.00 

February 68.00 62.00 

March 65.00 64.00 

April 66.00 64.00 

May 65.00 64.00 

June 65.00 64.00 

July 65.00 64.00 

August > . . 65.00 64.00 

September 65.00 64.00 

October 65.00 60.00 

November 65.00 60.00 

December 65.00 

Year 68.00 57.00 



ton- 



1918. 



L. 
$60.00 
60.00 
60.00 



H. 
$65.00 

66.00 

65.00 

65.00 
Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 
Nominal 

65.00 60.00 

65.00 60.00 

60.00 

65.00 60.00 



Potash, Bichromate. 

, Per pound » 

1917. 1918. 

■r| T XJ T 

January $0.48 $0.40 $0.45 $0.42 

February 41 .38 .44 .43 

March 40 .85% .45 .48 

April 88 .86 .45 .48% 

May 38 .85 .46 .44 

June 87 .36 .47 .45 

July 37 .36 .48 .45 

August 39 .86% .46 .43 

September 50 .88 .46 .42 

October 46 .45 .44 .41 

November 46 .45 .44 .39 

December 46 .48 .42 .89 

Year .50 .85 .48 .39 

Potash, Prussiate, Yellow. 

, Per pound— — — > 

1917. 1918. 

January $0.95 $0.91 $1.80 $1.25 

February 98 .89 1.80 1.27 

March 93 .90 1.80 1.27 

April 95 .92 1.30 1.27 

May 96 .95 1.27 1.10 

June 1.05 .96 1.15 1.05 

July 1.10 1.00 1.15 1.05 

August 1.10 1.08 1.15 .95 

September 1.27 1.08 1.10 .96 

October 1.30 1.25 1.00 .90 

November 1.85 1.25 .95 .80 

December 1.80 1.25 .85 .80 

Year 1.85 .89 1.80 .80 

Sago Flour. 

/ Per pound * 

1917. 1918. 

XI T XT L 

January $0.05 $0.04% $0.07% $0.06% 

February 05 .04% .07% .06% 

March 05 .04% .07% .07 

April 05 .04% .09% .07% 

May 05 .04% .10 .09 

June 05 .04% .10 .09 

July 05 .04% .10 .09% 

August 05 .04% .10% .09% 

September 05 .04% .10% .09% 

October 05 .04% .10% .09% 

November 07% .04% .10% .09% 

December 07% .06% .10Vt .09% 

Tear 07% .04% .10% .06% 



Soda, Acetate. 

r Per pound * 

1917. 1918. 

IT T XT T- 

January $0.14 $0.09 $0.17 $0.16 

February 12 .09% .17 .16 

March 10 .09 .17 .16 

April 10 .09 .26 

May 10 .09 .26 

June 10 .09 Nominal 

July 10 .09% .35 .30 

August 12 .09% .30 .28 

September 12 .10* .30 

October 13% .11% .80 .22 

November 15 .11V4 .28 .22 

December 16% .14 .25 .19 

Year 16% .09 .35 .16 

Soda, Bichromate. 

, Per pound > 

1917. 1918. 

H. L. H. L. 

January $020 $0.18 $0.20 $0.17 

February 20 .17 .20 .19 

March 20 .10% .22 .20 



1917. 191 & ' 

April 20 .14 .25 .28 

May 16 .18% .26% .24% 

June 17 .15% .28% .26 

July 17 .15% .29% .26% 

August 16 .15% .26% .24% 

September 28% .15% .25% .28 

October 28% .28% .24 . .21 

November 18% .16 .24 .16% 

December 18% .17% .20 .17 

Year 28% .18% .29% .17 

Soda, Prussiate, Yellow. 

, Per pound ■■ >• 

1917. 1918. 

H. L. H. L. 

January $0.86 $0.84 $0.86% $0.86 

February 35 .82 .88 .86 

March 34 .80 .88 .87 

April 34 .80 .40 .88 

May 84 .30 .70 .46 

June 84 .30 .76 .60 

July 38 .82 .64 .68 

August 38 .34 .53 .42 

September 38 .34 .48 .40 

October 38 .86 .42 .40 

November 86 .35 .89 .81 

December 86 .85 .86 .88 

Year 88 .80 .75 .81 

, Starch, Corn. 

,— — — — Per cwt. ■ » 

1917. 1918. i 

H. I* H. X* 

January $2.91 $2.85 $6.48 $6.80 

February 8.28 2.85 6.48 6.80 

March 8.28 8.25 6.48 6.80 

April 5.11 8.66 6.48 6.80 

May 4.99 4.75 7.00 6.80 

June 4.99 4.70 7.00 6.50 

July 5.18 6.05 7.00 5.60 

August 6.48 6.80 7.00 5.60 

September! 6.46 6.30 7.00 6.00 

October ..' 6.48 6.30 7.00 6.00 

November 6.48 6.30 6.60 5.75 

December 6.48 6.30 5.26 8.75 

Year „ 6.48 2.85 7.00 8.75 

Starch, Japanese Potato. 

, . Per pound ■ ^ 

1917. 1918. 

H. L.. H. \* 

January *0.10% $0.10% 

February • • -;x2r m zEr 

March }0% .}0% 

April }J •}?> 

May JJ •}* 

June • • * 15 '*m 

July }* -}J* 

AugUSt .JJ -JJ 

September • . -if* • *• 

October .14 •}* 

November • • «18 .lfTi 

December $0.18% $0.10% .11% .10 

Year -16 -10 

Note.— Not quoted until December, 1917. 

Starch, Domestic Potato. 

f Per pound * 

1917. 1918. 

H. L. H. la. 

January $0.08% $0.06 $0.18% $0.12 

February 13 .12% .18% .12 

March : IS 12% .12% .12 

April 13 -12% .15% .12 

May. 18 .12% .15% .15 

jTne ............ .13 , .12% .18% .12% 

July 13 .12% .18% .12% 

August 18 .12% .18 .12% 

September 18 .12fe .18 .12v* 

October 13 .12% .18 .12% 

Novembei 13 .12% .13 .12 

December 18 .12% .12% .11 

Year 13 .08 .15% .11 

Sumac, Sicily. 

, P er to n > 

1917. 1918. 

H. L. H. L. 

January $90.00 $80.00 $100.00 $95.00 

February 90.00 80.00 106.00 95.00 

March 90.00 100.00 98.00 

April 90.00 98.00 98.00 

May 90.00 95.00 102.00 95.00 

June 96.00 102.00 98.00 

July 88.00 85.00 100.00 98.00 

August 88.00 86.00 100.00 95.00 

September 96.00 86.00 95.00 98.00 

October 90.00 87.00 125.00 95.00 

November 90.00 125.00 115.00 

December 100.00 95.00 185.00 115.00 

Year 100.00 80.00 135.00 98.0J 

Tapioca Flour. 

/ Per poun d » 

1917. 1918. 

H. L. H. L. 

January $0.08 $005% 

February -08 .06% 

March ' 12 .05% 

April ••• ••• -1^ .09% 

May • • • '\ifi "if^ 

June ••• «18 .14 

July ••• .18 .15 

August •■■ *18 .14% 

September • • • "JS^ 'lift 

October . • • .15% .15 

November ••• .15% .111 

December $0.08 $0.05% .15% .15 

Year ... ... . in .00^% 

Note.— Not quoted until December, 1917. 



1918 YEAR B06K 



The Organization of ' 
Eugene Suter & Company 

WHEN this business was founded five years ago to specialize in Potash 
Salts, it had an organization competent to handle these products on a large scale. 
That organization knew Potash Salts. It knew the best sources of supply and the 
advantageous channels for its distribution — and Eugene Suter, its founder, had strong 
banking connections, justifying safe transactions of any magnitude. 

The business grew, the scope of activities was broadened to include other 
heavy chemicals, and the organization was expanded and strengthened adequately to 
develop the new fields. 

Meanwhile the European War caused a temporary upheaval. Many business 
enterprises were compelled to adjust. Opportunities came for a more extended busi- 
ness in buying and selling chemicals and oils for export. At this juncture, the thorough 
experience previously acquired in international banking and commerce through long 
association with leading European institutions, permitted the immediate application of 
the firm's comprehensive methods to foreign fields— and the business kept on growing. 

During all that time, while the foreign buyer was seeking our sellers, the one 
and only policy of this house has been to render conscientious service and to maintain 
the highest possible standards of American business, without regard for opportunities 
to immediate gains— with the net result that it can justly pride itself today on its 
possession of powerful and time-proven connections in every important market of the 
world— thus presenting an organization of truly international scope. 

Naturalization of American foreign trade (as purported by the Webb- 
Pomerene A ct) cannot be built on theory. Its future must not depend 
on a struggle for cheapness; it rather hinges on the sale oflOOfy A merican 
values, at a fair price, through scientific up-building of distribution. 
But this is a policy radically different from that of the much 
advertised German methods, which the intended combines for foreign 
trade are to imitate; the adaptability of such combines to American 
business therefore is, to say the least, pery doubtful. 
In the meantime, foreign business is going on with new impetus 
through heretofore established and well tried channels of export 
merchant houses, and we propose to push it on the old proven 
principles— and harder than ever before. 

We are prepared to discuss all kinds of buying and selling propositions in 

CHEMICALS AND OILS 

DOMESTIC AND EXPORT 




April 


Tin Crystals. 

law. 
n. u 




Jab/ 


ssu m 


Normber 


.... u .so 

u .u 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 

' DYEWOOD EXTRACTS. 
Fustic, Solid. 



Turmeric. Aleppy. 

' mi. "" ibis. 

H. I,. H. ) 

January SO.10 (0.0SU 10.11* S0.1I 

February 10 .osu Jl* J- 

Keren 10 .00% .11* . 

tfitr .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. !l0 '.<JV& 

Jen* 10 .084 

Jnly 10% .10 

utiii loa .10 

Bapumber 10U .10 

October lotf .10 

November 11* .09* 

WTT..:- .i|S_:K 

Zinc Dust. 



SEC.: 



So|>tomber . 




Nat*.— Not quolod 



January . 
Fabruur 

B«ptemb»r 



-JH* DecamMr . 



:: .a 



DEVELOPMENT OF THE COAL-TAR INDUSTRY IN 1918. 



THE year 1818 was featured by a remarkable growth of the 
coal-tar Industry of the country. Probably no Industry 
has ever recorded such progress In bo short a period. 
Production of all of the colors as well as of the crudes and 
Intermediates soared, and from a condition of serious shortage 
the situation became one of surplus. A large volume of ex- 
port business was done. Production nearly doubled during 
the year, and amounted to nearly 80,000 tons for the period. 
Exports show the remarkable value of 812,000.000, as against 
approximately 87,000,000 for the year previous. The export 
total for 1918 alone was ..four times as great as the entire 
production In 1914. 

The taking over of foreign owned patents was the feature 
of the year's developments. About 400 of these patents cov- 
ering various processes In the production of colors were taken 
up In 1918. One arm alone now controls more than 200 of 
them. Not only were the original processes used, but the 
genius of the American chemists was utilized In still further 
developing and perfecting the processes until at the close of 
the year better colors were being offered In the domestic mar- 
ket than had been obtainable from foreign firms before the 
war. This brought about a feeling of more confidence In the 
American products among the textile dyeing trade, with tlie 
immediate result of Increasing the consumption of American- 
made goods and the encouragement of the American manu- 
facturer to still further extend his efforts toward making the 
production of coal-tar colors and Intermediates a permanent 
part of our chemical Industry. 

Industry a War Development. 
Up to the time of the outbreak of the European war, In 
1914, there had been In this country little or no incentive for 
the development of the Industry of extracting dyestulfa and 
medicinal drugs from coal. In the year 1SB8 a firm in Albany, 
N. T., began the manufacture of these products on a small 
scale, but at that time the entire Idea of coal-tar dyes was so 
new that they had considerable difficulty In disposing of the 
products of their enterprise, small as was the volume of their 
output. It was not until 1880 that any further activity along 
the lines of the distillation of coal tar and the securing of the 
valuable by-products of this process took place. In that year 
the matter of the manufacture of these products In the United 
State* was brought to the attention of Congress by the con- 
sumers of the dyes. Such colors of this class as were used 
at that time were Imported, and on account of the absence of 
domestic competition prirts as a whole were exorbitant. 
As a result of this agitation a new tariff schedule went 



Into effect which placed high duties upon the finished 
products of the stills but admitted the crude tar and some of 
the more Important Intermediates, such as benzol and anthra- 
cene, free. 

Stimulation Followed Tariff. 

This action on the part of Congress resulted in a remark- 
able stimulation of the business, and during the three follow- 
ing years there sprang up no less than ten firms with plants 
of various sizes for the manufacture of coal-tar dyes. In 
1S8S, however, some of the consumers who had been anxious 
enough to aid In the inception of the Industry began to look 
with longing eyes upon the foreign products which were 
being offered to the European trade. They accordingly began 
to agitate In favor of the removal of the protective tariff 
under which the manufacture of coal-tar colors had sprung 
up and was having such satisfactory progress. This agitation 
had the desired effect, and In that year the adequate duties 
which had prevailed were removed, and Immediately the In- 
flow of foreign products began on an extensive scale. The 
factories of England and Germany, which had been on a 
paying basis before the beginning of the Industry In this 
country, were, of course, able to sell at lower figures than 
could possibly be quoted by the American producers, and as a 
result American products were speedily replaced by those of 
foreign make. 

Domestic Market Lost. 

The result of this rather unfair competition was to drive 
domestic producers out of their own markets. Several of the 
ten firms then In existence were forced out of business alto- 
gether. Some of the others turned their attention to other 
lines of chemical endeavor and within five years from the 
reduction of the tariff there were only four concerns left In 
the field of production In the United States, and these firms 
were forced to confine their efforts entirely to the production 
of two or three of the colors for which conditions offered 
special advantages. 

From that time until the outbreak of the European war 
every attempt to establish an adequate tariff was met by the 
determination of the consumers of the goods to hold it at its 
existing low levels. This effort on their part was due to their 
very natural belief that the operation of a higher tariff would 
immediately raise the price of the materials which they were 
using, with a consequent disadvantage to them. This would 
undoubtedly have been the case for a short time, but recent 
events have shown the short-sightedness of their policy. In 



124 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



Coal Tar Disinfectants 



ALL GRADES 



Cresol U. S. P. 

Cresol Compound U. S. P. 



Cresylic Acid 
Cresol Compounds 



ARSENICAL DIP FOR SHEEP AND CATTLE 



QUOTATIONS PROMPTLY FURNISHED FOR DOMESTIC 
OR EXPORT TRADE IN ANY SIZE PACKAGE. 



BAIRD & McGUIRE, Inc. 



HOLBROOK 






MASS. 



NEW YORK OFFICE 41 PARK ROW 



National Aniline & ' Chemical Company 



INCORPORATED 



Largest Manufacturers of Aniline Colors 

in America 

A full line of Drugs, Gums, Chemicals and Essential Oils 



FAST AMERICAN COLORS 

ACID COLORS 
VAT COLORS 
SULPHUR COLORS 
CHROME COLORS 
DEVELOPED COLORS 
ALIZARINE 

NATIONAL FOOD COLORS 

Certified 



BARIUM PEROXIDE, 90? 

CALOMEL, Howard's 

CHALK PRECIPITATED, Sturgc's Eng. 

COD LIVER OIL, Newfoundland 

MENTHOL 

SPERMACETI 

GUMS: Arabic, Tragacanth 
EGG ALBUMEN 
OLIVE OIL 



AGENTS FOR TOMBAREL FRERES 



Works: Buffalo, Brooklyn, Marcus Hook Main Sales Office: 21 Burling Slip, New York 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



125 



fact, it was pointed out at that time that, while foreign colors 
in some instances were cheap, this condition appeared in only 
those colors which were also manufactured in this country, 
and hence was traceable directly to the results of domestic 
competition, while other items not made in this country were 
held at exceedingly high prices by their European makers, 
making the general average of all of the coal-tar commodities 
considerably higher than would he probable under a more 
protective form of tariff. 

Ninety Per Cent Imported. 

Conditions continued to grow steadily worse until the 
outbreak of the European war. At that time practically 90 
per cent, of the coal-tar colors which were being used by 
American manufacturers were imported, and the principal 
source of these imports was Germany. 

There has always been among the consuming trade a con- 
siderable prejudice against American coal-tar products of 
all grades. This has -been due largely to the fact that 
producers of the goods on this side of the Atlantic have 
never had the incentive to the production of the finer 
grades of colors. Textile makers who have been fortunate 
in securing the products of years of untiring research have 
demanded that the goods which they secured from the 
domestic manufacturers should measure up in all respects 
to those which they have been using. Many of these are 
special grades of colors made almost wholly to the speci- 
fications of the consumers on special orders and failure 
to match on the first attempt has led to condemnation of 
American goods as a whole, which is hardly justified by 
the facts of the case. Another cause for the failure of 
American products to satisfy in the past is traceable to 
the difficulty of obtaining the proper intermediates for the 
manufacture of the finer colors. These Intermediates can 
be produced in this country. They were never produced 
here prior to the war because the small number of firms 
which would use them did not justify their distillation on 
a large scale. Producers of aniline dyes have long been 
pleading for adequate duties on these products. 

Only 100 Colors Made Here in 1914. 

The result of prejudice and of the ungoverned competi- 
tion of foreign products was such that at the outbreak 
of the war, out of a list of over 900 colors and dyes used 
by the trade in America, a bare 100 were actually pro- 
duced here. Of this 100, scarcely a dozen were manufac- 
tured in anywhere near sufficient quantities to take care 
of the consumers. Census reports showed that the pro- 
duction of dyes in the United States in 1913 was less than 
15 per oent of the requirements of the consuming trade. 
This means that about 85 per cent, of the dyes used in tjiis 
country in 1913 were brought over from Europe, and of 
this 85 per cent probably 80 per cent, were produced in 
Germany. 

The outbreak of hostilities in August, 1914, had an im- 
mediate and Important effect on the importation of these 
materials. The German Government at once took over the 
operation of their railways as a matter of military necessity 
and shipments from the interior of the country and the 
manufacturing centers were curtailed in a large measure, 
and in some cases stopped altogether to make room for the 
transportation of troops and supplies. The flow of colors 
to this countryi however, was not stopped altogether at that 
time. It fras the intention of the German Government to 
maintain their foreign trade in so far as that was possible 
as a matter of vital importance to the life of the nation. 
Shipments were greatly curtailed and a serious shortage be- 
gan to be apparent, especially in some of the finer colors, of 
which there was no appreciable surplus on hand. 

Prices Increased by Leaps. 

The demand upon domestic producers Increased rapidly 
and orders piled up so fast that there was no prospect of 
filling them. Foreign colors rose in price, many of them 
as much as 600 per cent. The consumers were most in- 
sistent that these demands should receive prompt attention, 
wholly forgetting the fact that it was in large measure 
due to their agitation that no independent dyeing industry 
had been established in this country. Imports gradually 
declined and the shortage became more and more serious, 
until the British blockade went into effect in 1915 shut 
off the importation of material from Germany altogether. 

In November, 1914, a committee of the American Chem- 
ical Society recommended to the United States Tariff 
Commission that a more adequate schedule of duties on 
this class of materials be speedily enacted in order that 
the production of these much needed commodities be stim- 
ulated and firms be encouraged to engage in their manu- 
facture. The recommendations were to the effect that the 
duties existing should be raised and in addition to the 30 
per cent, ad valorem duty a specific duty of 7%c. per pound 
should be placed on finished colors, and that the duty on 
intermediates or half manufactured products should be 
raised to 16 per cent, ad valorem and 3%c. per pound 
specific. Their report pointed out the fact that in 1914 
there were employed in the textile, leather and other allied 
industries, depending upon the use of coal-tar colors, more 
than 2,000,000 persons, and that a stimulation of the coal- 
tar industries was essential for the support of these other 
classes of business if the war lasted for any length of time. 
Prices of Imported colors had enormously advanced and 



American producers had also been forced to advance their 
own prices on account of the shortage of the intermediates, 
many of which were necessary for the production of muni- 
tions as well. Consumers representing the textile trades 
also came to the support of this measure, but no action 
was as yet forthcoming and the entire matter was turned 
over to the Department of Commerce early in 1916. An- 
other recommendation which came to naught was advanced 
at this time. It was that the government should establish 
at some convenient point a factory for the production of 
anilines and agree to sell their product to consumers ac 
cost, or at least in competition with the pre-war prices of 
the German producers. 

Twenty-eight Finns in 1915, 

In spite of the absence of protection, the dye industry 
of the United States progressed rapidly under the demand 
which the war brought on, and in October, 1915, there 
were twenty- eight firms engaged in the production of coal* 
tar colors as against five in August, 1914. The production 
of these factories totaled more than four times the total 
for the year previous. In some items the entire consuming 
demand of the country was being taken care of by this output. 
The one item, naphthaline, may be taken as a representative 
of the entire class for. purposes of comparison. The pre- 
war production of this item was about 2,500,000 pounds 
annually. By the end of 1910 these figures had grown to 
nearly 7,000,000 pounds, and were still increasing. No 
phenol at all was produced in this country prior to the war, 
while at the end of 1916, fifteen firms were producing at the 
rate of 64,146,499 pounds annually, with a total value of 
$23,715,805. These are only two of the many items showing 
similar remarkable increases. 

The agitation for more adequate tariff schedules con- 
tinued to be pressed both by the producers of the aniline 
products and by their consumers in the textile, leather and 
allied lines of business. Hearings were repeatedly held and 
various suggestions were received by the Tariff Commis- 
sion. The suggestions were gone into in detail, and during 
the summer of 1916 were embodied in the bill which was 
passed by Congress on September 8, 1916. This act pro- 
vided for an ad valorem duty of 30 per cent, plus a specific 
duty of 5c. per pound on the finished products of coal-tar 
distillation and an ad valorem duty of 15 per cent, plus 
an additional specific duty of 2 He. per pound on inter- 
mediates or semi-manufactured products derived from coal 
tar. Exceptions were made in the cases of indigo, indigoids, 
alizarin and vat dyes, the manufacture of which had not 
up to that time been started in the United States. 

There is no doubt that producers were greatly encouraged 
by the passage of this bill. Many of the then existing pro- 
ducers of these products at once made plans for greatly 
extending their efforts, and new firms sprang up on every 
side to engage in the manufacture of dyestuffs. At the 
end of 1916 there were 120 firms engaged in the manufac- 
ture of these products, an increase of nearly 100 within two 
years. The production in a like period had increased from 
800 tons per year in 1913 to over 26,000 tons in 1916. 

Synthetic Indigo. 

Late in 1916 a large plant for the production of synthetic 
indigo was erected, and thus still another important product 
was added to the list of American products. Up to the end 
of that year there was no production of alizarin or vat 
colors in the United States, but these items were soon to 
be added. The exemption of these products in the tariff 
schedules probably had the effect of delaying their taking 
up, although the scarcity of the materials necessary to 
their manufacture was the controlling factor in this matter. 

In July, 1917, another important step toward the placing 
of the American dye industry in its present prosperous 
position was taken. At that time the Trading with the 
Enemy Act was passed by Congress. The law, which took 
effect upon the approval of the President on October 6, 1917, 
provided that during the war any American manufacturer 
might apply for a license to manufacture any article con- 
trolled by a patent or copyright issued to an enemy or 
enemy ally. Applications for these patents should be madv 
to the Federal Trade Commission and a fee of $100 for each 
patent so secured must be paid. This section of the act 
further provided for a reserve fund into which the manu- 
facturer must pay annually 6 per cent, of the gross sum 
received from the sales of the product for which the patent 
was issued, this sum to be turned over to the original 
holder of the patent at the close of the war. This action 
released approximately 16,000 patents, and of this number 
about one -third governed processes for the production of 
chemicals and coal-tar products of interest to the dye 
manufacturer. 

On account of the difficulty connected with investigating 
the nature and utility of these patents, comparatively few 
of them have as yet been taken up, but at the time of 
going to press, classified lists by title of the patents had 
just been issued, enabling the smaller manufacturer to 
secure his share of them without the necessity of a large 
organization for research and study. (These lists are con- 
tained herein.) Although only a few hundred of these 
patents were taken up during the year, and these in the 
main by two large firms, the release of them gave the 
American producers the means of securing at little expense 



126 



/ 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



The Mathieson Alkali Works 



INCORPORATBD 



Saltville, Virginia, and Niagara Falls, N. Y. 



Manufacturers of 



Eagle -Thistle Brand 

Pure Alkali, S8% 

Soda Ash, 48 # and 58^, all densities 

Caustic Soda, 60%, 70%, 74%, 76% 



Solid in drums and Ground in barrels 



Caustic Soda, 78%, Electrolytic, Solid 

Bicarbonate of Soda 
Bleaching Powder, high test K 

In domestic and export drums 

Liquid Chlorine, pure, anhydrous 



Quotations Promptly Furnished for Spot or Forward Delivery 

j 

ARNOLD, HOFFMAN & CO., Inc. 



PROVIDENCE 
R. I. 



BOSTON 
MASS. 



SOLE AGENTS 

61 Broadway, 

NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA 

N. Y. PENN. 



CHARLOTT E 

N. C. 



I 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



127 



the results of years of inquiry and research and stimulated 
the interest in the dyeing Industries remarkably. 

Nearly 900 Essential Colors Made Here. 

The business has continued to increase throughout 1918. 
At the present time nearly all of the 900 colors necessary 
for the American dyeing trade are being manufactured. 
American alizarin and vat colors are coming into the 
market, and recommendations to Congress by the Tariff 
Commission are now being made to include these two items 
in the list of articles subject to the extra specific duty of 
5c. per pound. Some such action looking toward the further 
protection of this class of manufacture will doubtless take 
place in the near future. 

This, then, is the present condition of the coal-tar in- 
dustry. From nothing it has become a strong, progressive 



and active business, ready and willing to meet the com- 
petition of the post-war period. Production has increased 
from about 800 tons annually in 1913 to nearly 30,000 tons 
in 1918. Imports before the war were valued at about 
$7,250,000 and there were no exports. At present there are 
practically no imports and exports for 1918 are valued at 
nearly $12,000,000, a sum more than four times as great as 
the value of the entire production in 1914. In place of five 
struggling firms producing coal-tar colors in 1914, we now 
have a list of over 200 concerns engaged in this business, 
many of them with investments running into the millions. In 
short, here is an industry which in a few short years and 
in the face of the • most adverse conditions has so remark- 
ably developed that it is today a source of pride not only 
to its own sponsors but to the whole industrial organiza- 
tion of the United States. 



Coal-Tar Crude, Intermediate and Color Production, 1917. 



At the instance of the Federal Tariff 
Commission a special investigation 
was made during the year just closed 
in respect to the production in the 
United States of coal-tar crudes, 'in- 
termediates and colors. This indus- 
try* first developed since the outbreak 
of the world war, has made marvelous 
progress during the five years, 1914- 
1918, with the result that while there 
were but seven establishments in 1914 
with an output of but 8,619,729 pounds 
of colors, valued at $2,470,096, in 1917 
there were 190 firms, exclusive of 
coke-oven plants and gas houses, en- 
gaged in the manufacture of coal-tar 
chemicals. These firms employed 1,733 
chemists and 17,910 men not tech- 
nically trained. More than $2,600,000 
was spent in jthat year in research 
work alone. 



The production of coal-tar products 
is divided into three groups: — Crudes, 
intermediates and finished products, 
and the status of the industry in 1914 
and 1917 can be seen at a glance from 
the following tables: — 

American Dye Industry, 1914. 



Number of establishments 

Persons engaged in manufacture... 

Salaried employes 

Wage earners (average number) .... 

Primary horsepower 

Capital 

Services 

Salaries 

Wages 

Materials 

Value of products 

Coal-tar colors- 
Pounds 

Value 

All other, value 

Value added by manufacture 



52S 

180 

898 

1,876 

18,886,212 

129,070 

78,688 

. H.487 
81,986,982 

$8,596,795 

6,619,729 
82,470,096 
$1,126,690 
$1,659,818 



Crudes. 
Byproducts Obtained in the Manufacture of Coke in 1913. 1914 a«J 1915. 



Products obtained and t 1918 1 

sold. Quantity. Value. 

Surplus gas, M cubic feet 64,558.941 85,694,691 

TarT gallons 115,145,025 2.880,158 

Ammonia, sulphate, or 

reduced to equivalent 

in sulphate, lbs 178,842,849 5,824,444 

Ammonia liquor, gals.... 4,102,448 587,418 

Anhydrous ammonia,* »„..-.- 

lbs! 28,668,986 ^185,666 

Other by-productsf 408,579 

Total value of by-prod- 

nets $16,925,941 

Coke, net tons 12,714,700 48.687,852 



-1914- 



Value. 
61.864,875 86.009,588 
109,001,815 2,867,274 



Quantity. 
1,871 



-1915- 
Quantity. Value. 
84,855,914 $8,624,809 
188,414,601 8,568,884 



170,768,906 
5,988,288 

25,870,509 



4,606.590 
658.497 

2,800.187 
997.007 



199.900,487 
10.626.612 

80.002.198 



5,648,958 
1.240.478 

2,978,044 
7.768,821 



Grand total 



865.568,798 



$17,529,088 

11.210,948 88.080.167 



$55,609,255 



$29,824,579 

14,072,895 48.558.825 



$78,882,904 



• Mainly ammoniacal liquor and sulphate sold on pound basis of anhydrous ammonia, 
t Mainly bengal .products. 

B^Products Obtained in the Manufacture of Coke in 1916 ancf 191 7.* 

, 1916 > * 1917- 



Products obtained and sold. JSflftEttHTj 

Oas produced, M cubic feet 201.991,844 

Surplus gas sold or used— 

Illuminating, M cubio feet ^'HHIS 

Domestic fuel, M cubic feet JhSSrSS 

Industrial fuel, M cubic feet •5»25i , SI 

Tar obtained and sold, gals 185,606,024 

Ammonia obtained and sold— 

SSSFSJBT-. v.v.v.v::::.: : :::::::::::::::: "iS§j 

Anhydrous or free ammonia, lbsf 47,789,602 

Benzol products, gals.— lirtiUi 

Crude light oil 16 '52'SJ 

Secondary light oils 767.878 

Bansol • 21,079,000 

TDtaSl 8.989.686 

Other refined oils, gals •Vk'iAi 

Solvent naphthas, gals I'SX'iX 

Naphthalene, lbs 8,820,405 

Other products* ••• lii 

Coke breeze, net tons J'JSS'S? 

Coke, net tons 19,069.861 



Value. 



Totals 



$8,689,821 
2.849.909 
4.289.478 
4.865,921 

8,496,278 

602,241 

5.058,724 

4.962,055 

257,800 

18.159,874 

11,288,268 

• ••••• 

888.584 

289.688 

148,898 

1.700.056 

75,878,070 

$187,804,665 



Quantity. 
887.728,251 

21.476,162 

7,840,240 

102,469,044 

221,999,264 

852,722.848 

7,055,089 

47.784,845 

7,516.695 

826.540 

86.804.228 



Value. 



$8,828,169 
8.216.745 
5,290,752 
5.666.802 

11,978.468 
1,106.950 
4,828.446 

1.490.788 
80.588 
16,576,865 



7.896.174 10.140.01S 

229.118 65,925 

2,115,516 851*180 

17.276,044 669.449 

1,267,822 

1.495.545 2,848,208 

22,489,280 188.643.158 



. $206,789,168 
S. Geological 



•Prom advanced sheets of Mineral Resources of the United States. U. 
Survey for 1916 and 1917, published by permission. 

t Includes liquor and sulphate sold on pound basis of anhydrous ammonia. 

I Includes drip oil, spent oxide, sodium fe rrocyanide, domestic coke and coke dust retort 
carbon and xylol. 

By-Products of Coal Cos, Water Gas and Oil Cos Plants. 1917. 

Value. 
$1,142,493 



Quantity. 

Bensol, refined, gals SSS'Sa 

Toluol, refined, gals.. . 1,0 5o?u2 

Other refined oils, gals t2i ooS' 

Bensol, crude, gals « 781 Err . 

Drip and holder oils, gals. T'SwtS 

Other crude light oils, gals U SL'm } 

Crude naphthalene, lbs aw.w? 



Totals 



936,735 

9.687 

$2,088,915 



(See Cols. 1-2, next page.) 



COAL TAR BASES, INTERME- 
DIATES AND COLORS. 

High and Lot* Prices. 
Acid, Benzoic, Technical. 

z P er poun d » 

1917. 1918. 

H. Ll H. L. 

January $9.00 $8.25 $5.50 $8.40 

February 8.75 8.25 6.00 5.50 

March 8.50 8.00 5.60 4.50 

April 8.50 6.50 4.75 4.15 

May 7.00 6.00 4.25 2.80 

June 6.50 5.00 4.00 8.50 

July 5.00 8.75 8.60 8.00 

August 8.75 8.00 8.40 2.65 

September 8.00 1.80 2.90 2.60 

October 2.05 1.75 3.00 2.75 

November 2.25 8.00 2.70 

December 8.25 2.75 2.75 2.25 

year 9.00 1.75 6.00 2.25 

Acid, Cresylic, 95@97 Per Cent. 

, Per gallon— —\ 

1917. 1918. 

H. I*. H. I* 

January $0.80 $0.75 $1. 15 $1.10 

February 85 .75 1.15 1.10 

March 100 .75 1.15 1.10 

April 1.00 .90 1.20 1.10 

May 1.15 .90 1.20 1.15 

June 1.10 1.05 1.20 1.00 

July 1.10 1.05 1.20 1.00 

August 1.10 1.05 1.25 1.15 

September 1.10 1.00 1.20 1.15 

October 1.15 1.00 1.20 1.15 

November 1.15 1.05 1.20 1.15 

December 1.15 1.10 1.20 ... 

Tear 1.15 .75 1.25 1.10 

Acid H. 

, P er pound— > 

1917. 1918. 

H. L. H. L. 

January $2.75 $2.50 $2.75 $2.25 

February 2.50 2.75 2.25 

March 2.75 2.50 2.75 2.25 

April 3.00 2.50 2.75 2.25 

May 8.00 2.50 8.00 2.80 

June 8.50 2.50 8.00 2.80 

July 3.50 2.80 8.00 2.45 

August 8.50 2.80 8.40 8.00 

September 8.50 8.00 8.40 8.20 

October 8.25 2.25 8.40 8.20 

November 8.25 2.75 8.40 3.20 

December 8.25 2.50 8.25 2.80 

Year 8.50 2.25 8.40 2.25 

Acid, Phthalic, Anhydride. 

/ P er pound t 

1917. 1918. 

H. I* H. L. 

January 83B.OO $5.75 

February 6.60 5.00 

March 5.50 5.00 

April 5.60 5.00 

May 8.50 4.50 

June • « • 8.00 8.60 

July *• j»0 8.50 

August *«50 8.75 

September 4.60 4.00 

October 4.50 4.00 

November • •• 4.25 4.00 

December $6.00 $5.75 4.25 8.60 

Year , T • •• 8«00 3.50 

Note.— Nbt quoted till December, 1917. 

Acid, Picric. 

f — P er poun d v 

1916. 1917. 1918. 

H. L. H. L. H. I* 

Jan... $1.60 $1.00 $0.96 $0.75 $1.08 $0.80 

Feb.. 1.00 1.00 .96 .70 LOO .80 

Mar.. 1.00 1.00 .95 .75 1.25 .80 

Apr... 1.00 1.00 .95 .70 1.25 .89 

May.. 1.50 1.00 .90 .80 Nominal 

June.. 1.50 1.50 .90 .75 Nominal 

July.. 1.50 1.50 1.00 .75 Nominal 

(Continued Page 129, Col. 3.) 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



Holliday-Kemp Company 

INCORPORATED 

Works: Woodside, Long Island, N. Y. 



Manufacturers of 

Aniline Colors 

Dyestuffs 

Extracts 

and Chemicals 

Acid, Direct, Basic and Chrome Colors 

Offices: 

90 William Street, New York Gty 

114 State Street, Boston, Mass. 151 N. Front Street, Philadelphia 



H. KOHNST AMM & GO. 



ESTABLISHED 1851 




Lakes antTFine Colors No. 40 Carmine 
Soluble*Prussian and Chinese Blues 



MINIFACKKKKN OF 



Certified and Vegetable Food Colors 
Genuine Concentrated Fruit and 
other Flavoring Extracts 



83-93 Park Place, NEW YORK, N. Y. 11-13 E. Illinois St., Chicago, III. 

FACTORIES) Columbia, Bar, Creamer and Hlrko Slrccla, BROOKLYN, X. Y. 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



129 



Coal Tar and Light Oils. 

The following table gives the output 
of distillers of coal tar, crude light oils, 
drip and holder oil, and plants operat- 
ing pyrogenie processes ("cracking") 
from petroleum oils or heavy coal-tar 
oils. The outpiit of stills owned and 
operated by concerns which operate 
coke ovens or gas plants is not included 
because such firms reported to the 
Geological Survey: — 

Production of Coal Tar Crudes Dur- 
in 1917 by Firms Not Primarily 
Engaged in the Operation of Coke" 
Oven Plants and Cos Houses. 



Quantity. 
Solvent naphtha, gala... 1,126,277 
Dead or creosote oil, 

gal* 42,701,962 

Anthracene oil 

Pitch of tar. tona 440,804 

Other distillates, sale.. 8,069,071 
Refined tars, bbls 1,188,376 



Total crudes 



Value. 
1,041,672 

8,789,806 

• • • • e • 

649,287 

1,065,882 

627,207 

$18,892,882 



PRICES— (Continued.) 



Intermediates. 



Quantity. 

Benzol, gala 8,082,774 

Toluol, sals 1,788,848 

Xylol, aals 92,898 

Naphthalene 

Anthracene 

Cresol 

Pyridin 



Value. 
$1,686,496 
2,978,702 
68,772 



Before successful manufacture of 
dyestuffs could be brought about in the 
United States it was first necessary to 
manufacture the intermediates hereto- 
fore brought from Germany, Switzer- 
land and Belgium. The success of the 
American intermediate manufacturer is 
shown in the list of intermediate made 
in this country at the close of 1917. No 
less than 134 intermediates were manu- 
factured by 118 firms. A single firm 
made 53 different intermediates. The 
table of intermediate production fol- 
lows: 



Production of Intermediates During 1917. 

Name. t — Total production — * 

Quantity 

(pounds). Value. 
Total intermediates 822,745,868 8106,966,760 



Aver- 
age 
price 
per 

pound. 



176.087 
44,178 



Acetanilid 1,897,708 

p-Aoetoluidin 

Acetparaphenylenediamin 

Acids:— 

Amldonaphthol sulphonic 410,445 

1, 8, 8, 6 amldonaphthol disulphonlo (H-acid) 8.089,278 

Amidosalicyllc 

Anthranilio , 

Benzene sulphonic 

Benzoic, U. B. P 

Benzoic, technical 

o-Sulphobetisoio 

Cinnamlo 

Metanilic 

Naphthol sulphonic (R. and O.) and salts of**** .......... 

Naphthol sulphonio (Shaeffer and Crooeln) ana Milts of 

Naphthylamin sulphonic 

Naphthylamin dlsulphonlc 

Phthalic and anhydride of 

Picramio 

' Salicylic, U. 8. P 

Salicylic, technical 

Sulphanlllc 

o and p-Amidophenols and p-amldophenol sulphate 

Amino&zobenzol 

Amlnoasotoluol • 

Anllln oil 

Anilln salt (and sulphate) 

Aniaol t 

Anthracene having- a purity of 26 per cent, ormore 

Benzalchloride 

Bensaldehyde 

Benzidin. base and sulphate 

Benzoylchlorlde 

BenzylcbJoride . . , 

Bensy laloohol 

Binitrobensol (dlnltrobensol) 

Binitrochlorobensol (dinltrochlorobensol) 

Blnltronaphthalene (dinltronaphthalene) 

Binitrotoluol (dinitrotoluol) « . . . 

Brombenzol 

Chlorbensol (mono) ... » 

Chlornaphthalene • 

o-Creeof, having * purity of 90 per cent, or more 

Cumidin 

Diamldopbenol 

Diamidostllben disulphonlo acid 

Dianisidin 11,762 

Dtehlorbensol 

Diethylanllln ..:. : 8,966 

Dlmetbylanllin 2,847.098 

Dimethyparaphenylenedlamine 

Dinltronaphthylamln ...» • 

Dlnltrophenor and sodium salt of 

Diphenylamin 

Diphenylene orange..... 

Bthyl bensyl anilln 

Methylnaphthylamia 

Methylbenzylanllln 

Mlchler's ketone 

Monoethylanilln 

Monoethylbetanaphthylamln 

Naphthalene (refined flake) 

O-Naphthol 

B-Naphthol, TJ. S. P 

J9-Naphthol, technical , 

o-Naphtnylamin 

B-Naphthylamln f 

o*Nitroanlsol 

o-Nitranllln p-sulphonio acid 

nvNttranllln 228,279 

p-Nltranllin and sulphonio acid of 1,724,008 

p-Nltracetanllid 

m-Nltrobenzaldehyde , 

Nitrobensol (oil of myrbane) 

Nitrochlorobenzol (ortho and para) and sulphonic acids of.... 

Nitronaphthalene 

Nltrophenol 

o-Nitrophenol 

p-Nltrophenol 

NttrosodlmethylanlUn 

Nitrosophenol 

Nltrotoluol 

m-Nltrotoluol 

o-Nttrotoluol 

p-Nttrotoluol 

p-Nitrotoluol sulphonio acid 

m-Nitroparatoluidia 



879,790 80.46 



674,760 
6,912,578 



785,608 
100,647 



24,624,099 4,928,848 



12,687 
1.684.697 



86,842.911 

72,829 

88,926 

5.918,846 

8.516,686 



2,884,802 

86,776 

88,071 

8,960.166 

1,588.109 



•••««• 



220.848 
1.952,229 



42,978,656 
602,192 



5.970,498 
175,866 



58,128 

418.216 

96,166 



1,002,822 
567,814 



89,462 

266,786 

76.801 



722.898 
704,541 



1.64 
2.24 



4.20 
2.28 



488,859 


496,062 


1.02 


1.108,049 


978,746 


.88 


8.081,265 


1,819.610 


.60 


71,948 


51,768 


.72 


188,857 


587,240 


4.28 


• ••••• 

2,495,285 


1,660,574 


.... 
.67 


960,889 


686,084 


.66 


1,184,412 


864,598 


.80 


244,889 


689.842 


2.62 


141,888 


105,466 


.74 


14,856 


11,246 


.78 


28.806,624 


6,758,685 


.28 


1.842,878 


446,080 


.88 

• • • ■ 


• ••••• 

182.886 


869,506 


• • • • 

• • • • 

2.72 


1,766.582 


2,912,849 


1.66 


20,621 


102,092 


4.96 


186,179 


168,998 


1.20 


10,408 


47,888 


4.56 


2,888,192 


751,208 


.82 


6,078,687 


2,514,924 


.41 



.20 



177,515 15.09 



8.20 
.59 



.07 
1.20 
.98 
.67 
.44 



.97 
1.18 



.14 
.29 

.... 

.... 

1.54 
.62 
.80 



.... 

.72 

1.24 



Aug.. 
Sept.. 
Oct... 
Nov.. 
Dec... 
Tear.. 



H. 

1.60 

1.00 
.90 
.90 
.80 

1.50 



1916. 



I* 
1.25 
1.00 
.90 
.90 
.80 
.80 



1917. 
H. 

.90 

.80 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 



1918. 

I* H. I*. 

.75 Nominal 

.75 Nominal 

.75 1.80 1.56 

.85 1.80 1.60 

.86 1.00 .85 

.70 1.80 .80 



Acid, Salicylic, Technical. 



Jan.. 

Feb.. 

Mar.. 

Apr... 

May.. 

June.. 

July.. 

Aug.. 

Sept. . 

Oct. . . 

Nov.. 

Dec... 

Year.. 



H. 
84.00 
8.90 
4.00 
4.25 
8.75 
8.40 
2.25 
2.25 
1.75 
1.50 
1.86 
1.00 
4.25 



1916. 



-Per pound- 
1917. 



L. 
88.90 
8.90 
4.00 
4.26 
8.50 
8.40 
2.26 
2.10 
1.50 
1.60 
1.20 
1.00 
1.00 



H. 

$1.10 

1.06 

.85 

.88 

.85 

1.86 

1.86 

1.46 

1.40 

1.40 

1.40 

1.86 

1.45 



I* 
11.00 
.80 
.75 
.78 
.80 
.85 
.86 



■ ■ **\ 
1918. 
H. L. 
81.86 80.90 



.80 
.90 
.70 



L86 

1.10 

1.10 

.90 

.90 

1.00 

.76 

.86 

.85 

.80 

.80 

1.85 



90 

90 

.82 

.86 

£ 



/ 



.70 
.TO 
.70 
.70 
.70 



Acid, Sulphanilic. 

t Per pound— —^ 

1917. 1918. 

H. L. H. L.. 

January 80.46 60.40 80.82 80.80 

February 45 .40 .82 .80 

March 40 .86 .82 .80 

April 42 .88 .82 .80 

May 42 .88 .82 .80 

June 40 .86 .84 .80 

July 87 .82 . .84 

August 84 .82 .84 

September .86 .82 .84 

October 86 .81 .84 .82 

November 84 .81 .86 .88 

December 84 .80 .86 .81 

Tear 45 30 .86 .80 



Alpha-Naphthykunine. 

/ ■ ■ P er poun d \ 

1917. 1918. 

H. I*. H. L. 

January 81.86 $1.25 80.70 80.60 

February 1.80 1.26 .70 .60 

March 1.26 .70 .60 

April 1.26 1.15 .70 .60 

May 1.26 1.00 .66 .60 

June 1.26 1.00 .66 .60 

July 1.00 .65 .60 

August 1.00 .80 .66 .60 

September 1.00 .68 .70 .60 

October 80 .68 .66 .55 

November 70 .65 .60 .66 

December 70 .65 .60 .60 

Year 1.85 .68 .70 .60 



Aniline Oil. 

/ ' Per poun d ■ \ 

1917. 1918. 

H. Ix H. I*. 

January 60.29 80.28 80.80 80.26 

February 29 .28 .27 .26 

March 80 .27 .80 .28% 

April 80 .28 .27 .24 

May 82 .80 .28 .26 

June 82 .80 .28* .27 

July 81 .28 .81 .28 

August 80 .28 .80 .28 

September 80 .28 .80 .27 

October 80 .26* .82 .80 

November 28 .26 .82 .80 

December 80 .26 .82 .27 

Year 82 .28 .82 .28* 



1918. 


R. 


L. 


80.84 


80.81 


.84 


.81 


.86 


.81 


.88 


.21 


.88 


.82 


.86 


.88 


.46 


.85 


.45 


.40 


.46 


.48 


.46 


.48 


.45 


.48 


.46 


.40 


.46 


.81 



(See Cols. 1-2, next page.) 



Aniline Sak 

', 9m 

1917. 
BT It 

January 80.84 86.27 

February .84 .27 

March 84 .29 

April 84 .82 

May 80 .84 

June 86 .34 

July .35 .32 

August 30 .88 

September ...... .86 .32 

October 86 .83 

November .84 .81 

December .34 .83 

Year 86 .27 



Benzaldehyde, Technical 

/ ■ P er poun d ■ ■% 

1917. wia 

H. I* H. L. 

January 86.00 36.03 34.00 36.30 

February 6.00 6.60 4.50 8.50 

March 6.00 8.50 4.75 4.26 

April 6.00 4.26 6.60 4.75 

May 4.75 4.00 6.60 5.00 

June 4.90 4.00 5.50 8.00 

July 4.50 4.00 0.50 8.60 

August 4.60 4.09 4.00 8.60 

September 4.60 4.00 4.26 8.75 

October 4.50 8.00 4.00 350 

November 4.60 3.00 8.80 360 

December 8.75 9.76 8.60 2.50 

Year 6.09 2.75 5.60 2.60 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



ERNEST SCOTT & CO. 



FALL RIVER, MASS. 



72 OXFORD ST., LONDON, ENG. GLASGOW BUENOS AIRES COLOMBO SINGAPORE 

Also in Canada: c | o Prooesi Engineers, McGill Building, MONTREAL, P. Q. 




VACUUM 
EVAPORA- 
TORS: 

For economi- 
cally and rap- 
Idly concen- 
trating all li- 
quors. Any 
liquors dealt 
with. Several 
thousand In- 
stallations now 
at work. 

These plants 
are specially 
adapted for re- 
covering cans- 
tic soda In 
pulp and paper 
mills and ex- 
plosive plants 
and for treat- 
ing the spent 
washings of 
mercer Izing 
plants. 

IN "SCOTT" 



Distillery Slo 



Woe 






Etc. 



tlllation: from "Dlat 



, Olyoi 





gine wipes, linters, cotton waste and residues of all 
kinds. Our plant can handle wet, sloppy materials 
without passing them through preliminary drying 
equipment. 



GLYCERINE RECOVERY: 

From soap lyes and Twitchell sweet water at a 
cost as low as 17.50 per ton of glycerine, this allow- 
ing for fuel, labor and chemicals. Recovery can be 
obtained even more economically where exhaust 
steam is available. Multiple effect apparatus supplied 
for larger sixes. Each equipment is a complete plant 
including tanks, pipes, filter press, steam-driven force 
pump, patent evaporator with all fittings Including 
salt extractor, vapor pipes, catch vessel and fittings, 
Jet condenser and steam-driven vacuum pump. 

GLYCERINE REFINING: 

These plants will yield dynamite glycerine in one 
distillation from Soap Crude Glycerine and C. F. Gly- 
cerine in two distillations; from "Saponification Gly- 
cerine" C. P. Glycerine can be obtained in i 



partly C. P. 
Ql y cerlne 

and partly 

Glycerine 

tained in 
one distilla- 
tion at a 
cost of dis- 
tillation of 
about f5.00 

yield being 
within 2% 
of the ac- 
tual quan- 
tity treated. 



Oils and 


■MiiBaia HHTV 






obtained 


IBufl ^m 'Lm 


from fresh 




mater ials 




are suitable 




for refining 








facture into 


, 


edible 




products. 




More oil 






and grease 






at less cost 






for operat- 






ing. 






Method is 






clean, sani- 






tary and 




safe. 




Residu e s 




are suitable 




for fertiliz- 




er and ani- 




mal feeds. 





ERNEST SCOTT CO.'S PRODUCTS 
are Vacuum Evaporators, Distilling Apparatus. Vac- 
uum Dryers, Vacuum Melting and Digesting Ap- 
paratus, Vacuum Condensers, Vacuum Pump, Solvent 
Extractors, Mixers, Digesters, Dryers, Insulators, 
Filters, Impregnators, Autoclaves, Stills, Rotary In- 
cinerators, Glycerine Recovery Apparatus, Glycerine 
Refining Apparatus, Caustic Soda Recovery Appara- 
tus, Paper-Makers' Liquor Recovery Apparatus, Sol- 
vent Recovery Apparatus. Oil Extraction and Recov- 
ery Apparatus and Apparatus for Recovery of Coke- 
Oven and Coal-Tar Products, Benzol, Toluene. Sul- 
phate of J 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



131 



Name. 



Nltroxylol 

Oxyasobenzol 

p-Phenetldin 

Phenol (TJ. S. P.) and tech.) 

Phenyl&lphanaphthyl&min 

m-Phenylenedlamm 

f-Pbenylenedlamln 
henylglydne .' 

Ptonylnydraslne 

Pbenylroslndulln 

Reeorcin, U. 8. P. and tech 

p-Roseanllin, baae 

Sodium benioate 

Thlocarbanllid 

Tolldin 

Toluidln 

o-Toluidln 

o-Toluidln sulphonate 

p-Toluidln 

m-Toluylenediamin 

o-Toluol sulphamid \ 

o and p-Toluol sulphochloride 

Toluol sodium sulphonate 

Xylidine, oil and aalt of 

Trlaulphonlo acid (unidentified) 



r— Total production— > 
Quantity 

(pounds). Value. 
688.514 118,551 



64.146.499 28.715,805 



220.956 
272.056 



299.099 
765,471 



Aver- 

pnce 

pound. 
.19 



.87 

• a a a 

1.85 
2.81 

.... 

• • • • 

• • • • 



188.809 



. • • • • • 

1.868.821 

886,965 

•••••• 

228,778 
802,596 



604,177 8.80 



a • a a • > 



1.087,998 

824.551 

•■•••• 

404.262 

420.252 



425.878 276,758 



• • • • 
.76 
■96 

• • • • 
1.81 
1.89 

• • . • 

. * . a 

a a . a 

.65 



Finished Products. 

The production of finished products in the coal-tar chemical industry 
includes dyes, color lakes, photographic chemicals, medicinals, flavors, per- 
fume materials, synthetic phenolic resins, synthetic tann ing materials and 
explosives. The production and variety of these products in 1917 by manu- 
facturers in the United States is shown in the following; table. The list of 
manufacturers of all varieties totaled 178: — 

Output of Finished Coal-Tar Products During 1917. 

[The number in the first column identifies the dye according to the 1914 edition of the 
Schults tables. The second column gives the comnmn name of the dye. Blanks In the 
third and fourth columns indicate that there was actual production during 1917, but that the 
figures cannot be published without revealing Information in regard to the output of indi- 
vidual firms. The figures thus concealed are, howevoi. Included In the totals.] 
Schults 
No. 
(1914 
edi- 
tion). Common name. 

Total finished coal-tar products 



— Total production — * 
Quantity 

(pounds). Value. 
54.550.107 $68,790,856 



Aver- 
age 

price 
per 

pound. 
$1.26 



4 

7 

9 

11 

28 

81 

82 

88 

84 

86 

87 

88 

89 

40 

41 

42 

48 

56 

58 

61 

64 

65 

67 

70 

78 

76 

77 

79 

82 

88 

88 

89 

102 

105 

108 

111 

112 

126 

127 

182 

184 

187 

141 

148 

144 

145 

147 

148 

151 

154 

158 

160 

161 

168 

164 

166 

167 

168 

169 

178 

174 

176 

177 

180 

181 

184 

188 

188 

189 

200 

201 



Naphthol green 

Naphthol yellow < . . . 

Direct yellow 

Direct orange * 

Tartrasine 

Monaco Dyes. 

Amidoazobensene 

Oil yellow 

Chrysoldine 

uhrysoidine R 

Sudan I 

Crocein orange 

Crystal orange 

Ponceau 2 O 

Chromotrope 2 R 

Fast acid fuchsine B 

Amido naphthol red G 

Allsarin yellow O 

Paranitranllin red 

■smlllStxVaV lu y©IIO W Jk»« eeaeaaaaaeaaaaeeeaaaeaaaaaaaaaaaaaa 

Victoria violet 

Lanaf uchslne 

Asocoralllne 

Chromotrope 6 B ,. 

Brilliant orange O 

Hellio fast red 

Sudan II 

Azo coccine 2 R 

Xylidine orange R 

Scarlet 2 R 

Ponceau 8 R 

Acid anthracene brown R 

Metachrome brown 

uiamono navine ..a. ..a. ............... a. ...... ....... 

punan nrown. ............... ....... ......... ......... 

Autol red 

Fast red B. T 

aHOrOOailJfc D .aa. a.............. .a.. ...... .............. 

lnQOine DIUO a...«a.....«a«««.«.>a«*aa..«........,.. a .. 

siotnyi inooine js ..................................... 

Metanll yellow 

Acid yellow 

Aso yellow 

Tropaeollne 

Orange I 

Orange II. , . 

Azo fuchsine 

Fast orange O 

Orange R 

Palatine chrome brown 

Chrome brown R. R 

Fast brown N.. 

Fast red A . 

Aso rubine 

Fast red 

Naphthol red G. R 

Coccine 

Amaranth 

Cochineal red 

Llthol red R 

Double brilliant scarlet 

Scarlet 2 R 

Mordant yellow 

Brtochrome blue black 

Sallclne black 

Sriochrome black A r 

Lanacyl violet 

Sulphon acid blue R... ...a..... 

Sulphon acid blue B 

Lake red D 

Pigment scarlet O 



75,850 


$125,585 


$1.66 


a • a a ■ a 

420,085 


1,071,687 


a a a a 

2.55 

a a a a 


• ■■•■• 

88,180 

195,756 

58,115 

82,455 


• ■•••• 

64,007 

218.590 

70,834 

71.184 


a • • a 

1.98 
1.09 
1.22 
1.19 

a a a • 

9*99 


• • • a • a 

1,452,622 


a ■ a a a a 

852.902 


a a « • 

9 

• a a a 

.59 


a • • a • a 

215.468 


a a ■ a • a 

179.012 


a a a a 

.88 

a a a a 
• • • • 

9 9^9 


27.595 


a a a a a a 

89.900 


• a a a 

a a a a 

1.45 


a a • a a a 

688,429 


• a ■ a a a 

726.249 


V.is 

a a a • 

a a a a 

m • • • 


a a a a a • 
a a a a • a 

120,595 


a a a a • ■ 
a • a a • • 

175,984 


• • a e 
a • • • 

a a a » 
a a » a 

1.46 

a a • a 


• • • 9 • m 


a a a a a a 

a a a a a a 


• m • m 
a • a a 

a a a • 
a a a a 


• ••••• 

712,586 


• a • a a a 

701,842 


a a a a 
* a a a 
a • • • 

.98 

a a a a 

a a a a 


• ■•••» 

191.424 
197,621 


• •••*• 

227.5H4 
584,055 


• m • 9 

a a a a 
a a a a 

1.19 
2.71 

a a a a 


a a • a a a 

66,069 


86,635 


a a a a 
a a a a 

1.81 

a a a a 
• a a • 


9,326 


2%. 740 


• • a a 

a a a a 

a a a a 

2.76 

a a a a 


a a • * a • 


a • • a 


a a a a 
a a a a 


a a • • • « 


a a • a a a 


a a a 
a a a a 
a • a a 



Total of monaso dyes................... 6.518.427 $8,e74,135 

. (See Cols. 1*2, next page.) 



PRICES— (Continued.) 
Benzidine Base. 

kXSS, ::::::: ^iS *8 4& fe 

s.pE£iW* :::: i." HS Jig J?s 
z j2 w 1 - 88 i-w 

Benzol, Water-White. 

JR: S S S I t i 

S 1 I 3 s * s J 

Aug.. ,68 .68 .60 .BS M Si 

S :: * * :S :S •» i§ 

i ear.. .w .60 .60 .46 .45 .22 

Benzyl Chloride. 

< — P er pound , 

1917. 1918. 

January |8.20 $8.00 6L70 8190 

Pebruary *8.20 *8 00 Tso 170 

€■»• 210 2.00 Z70 260 

i ul * " 2.10 2.00 270 248 

August 2.00 1.75 270 fiS 

September 2.00 176 lie? 260 

O/tober 2.00 1.60 2 65 260 

Number 1.7B 1.60 2 65 2 60 

£*ember 1.75 1.B0 2!o8 260 

Year *.20 1.50 2.70 lilo 

Beta Naphthol, Sublimed. 

' — ; ■ P t pound -> 

H V j* 191 *- 

January $1.05 $0.90 tog* ^p. 

Pebruary 1.00 .90 K 88 

jSR? g -JJ .90 .85 

September 90 75 m m 

gotober 90 85 So "so 

November .90 85 80 *75 

December 90 X *S *I2 

Yw 1.05 :?5 :S :?g 

Creooote Oil, 25 Per Cent 

* — - - P er gallon * 

«". 1918. 

January *** u J?^ J*^ 

February . •••JJ ^.85 

March J2 m 

April 1 JJ -JS 

\fA. v .40 .86 

jSI .40 .89 

» y •••••■•••••• .. KfC ao 

August $0.88 80 81 kS *5S 

September ... . S 80 S S 

October ..... S fl m S 

Novembpr ....I iJg ;g g g 

?2 c ? mbep *0 .86 :tS :$ 

rear .55 .85 

Note— Not quoted until August. 1917. 

Cre5ol,~U S. P. 

H I. n 19 ^ 

January $1.R0 $il0 80 20 tn'ia 

Pebruary 'i.so .20 f °|o l* 

Map oh 22 18 20 is 

April 21 16 '20 *lS 

M*^ 20 .18 20 i2 

June on JS *S. » 18 

T„itr r" «*8 .20 i« 

J UJ y • • 20 .18 20 i2 

Autrust on iS 'iflf .- 18 

September £ •}! .20 .19 

November ....i: !20 [if S J! 

r ^W * 15 - 20 -15 

Diethylaniline. 

' ,_,„ — Per pound . 

gr.:::::::::: JS « « ttS 

j-i :::::::::::: I » SIS ig} 

(Contmued Page 1 33, Co/. 3.) 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



ImperialDyewoodCompany,inc. 

GLENS FALLS, N. y! 

Affiliated with 

JOHN H. HEALD & CO., Lynchburg,, Va. 

LOGWOOD 

FUSTIC -OSAGE 

HEMATINE 

QUERCITRON 

HYPERNIC 

PASTE-CRYSTALS-SOLID 



Factories 
LYNCHBURG, VA. 
E. RADFORD, VA. 



Branches 
NEW YORK 
BOSTON 
CHICAGO 
SAN FRANCISCO 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



133 



Schults 

No. 

(1914 

edl- 

tlon). 



Common nam*. 



r— Total production— % price 
Quantity per 

(pounds). Value. pound. 



211 
218 
217 
221 
228 
227 
228 
282 



246 
247 
267 
261 
266 
266 
269 
278 
276 
288 
284 
289 
808 
804 
807 
811 
812 
818 
822 
888 
887 



840 
841 
842 
861 



866 
866 
882 
886 

891 
897 
404 
426 



488 

462 
464 

474 
478 
476 
477 



602 
694 
612 
616 
616 
617 
621 
628 
680 
686 
648 



689 



•78 
686 

687 



616 
617 
619 



648 

649 
669 



672 
678 
679 



681 



700 



Disaso Dyes. 

Resorcln brown 

Fast brown 

Naphthylamine black 10 B.... 
Anthracene acid brown 8..... 

Sudan III 

Brilliant oroceine 

Erythrine P 

Sudan IV 

Wool red B , 

Cloth scarlet G 

Scarlet 

Sulphoncyanlne 

Buffalo black 10 B 

Sulphoncyanlne black 

Naphthylamine black 

Add black 

Diaminogen blue 

Diamond black 

Bismarck brown T 

Bismarck brown 2 R 

Palatine chrome black 

Renol brilliant yellow 

Chrysophenine 

Congo red... i 

Orange T. A. , 

Congo corinth 

Congo rubine 

Trlsulphon violet B 

Diaso black 

Benso blue 2 B 

Naphthamine blue 

Benso-orange R , 

Crumpsall direct fast red R.. 

Crysamine O 

Cresotlne yellow 

Benxopurpurine 4 B 

Bensopurpurine B 

Delta purpurine 5 B 

Azo mauve B. 

Benso blue 

Diamine blue 8 B 

Direct blue R , .... 

Diamine yellow N 

Bensamine pure blue , 

Direct blue 



Total diaso dyes. 



Trlsaso Dyes. 



Melagene blue 

Direct black B. W. t ... 
Brie direct green B. T. 

Oxamine green B 

Oxamine green O. X.. 

Bensamine brown 

Congo brown 



Tetrakisaso. 

Benso brown O 

All other aso dyes which could not be identified. 



Total of aso dyes 

Diphenylmethana. 



496 Auramlne 



Tziphenylmethaae. 

Malachite green 

Ouineau green ■ - 

Light green , 

Magenta (fuchsine) 

Methyl violet 

Crystal violet 

Bensyl violet 

Anllin blue 

Fast acid violet 

Add violet 

Alkali blue 

Patent blue 



Total trlphenylmethane. 



Diphenyl Naphthyl Methane. 

Victoria blue B 

Wool green B. S 



Rhodamlne 
Uranine ... 
Bosine 
Brythrosine 
Phlozine P. 
B. 



Xan thrones. 



697 Bengals 



698 Phosphlne 



Acridlnes. 



Prlmullne . 
Chloramine 
Indophenol 



Thlo BensyL 



Oxasine and Thiamine. 

Delphine blue B , 

Oallocyanine 

Phenocyanine 

Cotton blue or Meldola's blue 

Methylene blue 



Aslnes. 

carmine 

Fast neutral violet B 

Safranlne 

Methylene violet 

Nlgrisine 

Indullne (spirit soluble)... 
Nigrosine (spirit soluble).. 
Indullne (water soluble)... 
Nigrosine (water soluble).. 



• •■••■ 

629,218 


• ••••• 

8668,487 


18,884 


• ■•■•• 

88.466 


• ••••• 

809,867 
262,600 


■ ••••• 

868,824 
888,282 


1,446,069 


• ■••■• 

2,886,784 


26,061 


61,894 


• •••*• 

14,688 


• ••*•• 

88,721 


• ••••* 

14.828 


17,282 


6,200,660 


118,148,478 


22,269,210 


881,649,216 


180,229 


8817,278 


• ••••• 

17.789 
876.107 


• ••••• 

161,426 
1,488,844 


609.016 


88.296,868 


■ • • • • • 

68.496 
666 


■ •••■• 

687,408 
6,710 


72,461 


8880,776 


■ ••••• 

268,488 


• 

• •••«• 

8829,081 



$1.08 



2.61 „ 



• • • • 

• • • • 

• * • • 

• • • • 
e • ■ • 

1.17 
1.48 

» • • « 

• • • • 

• • • • 

• • • ■ 

• * ■ e 

• e • • 

• • • • 

• « « • 

• • • • 

2.00 



1.97 



• • • • 

• • • • 

• • • ■ 

2.82 



1.16 



e • • 

• • • 



86.28 

• • • • 

• • • • 

9.10 
8.84 



e * • e 
• • • « 



8.68 

11.81 



PRICES— (Continued.) 

September 8.60 8.00 4 26 

October 4.26 8.00 JS 

November 4.26 8.76 400 

gecember 5.00 4.00 400 

*«•* 6.00 8.00 6!00 



I*. 

8.78 

8.76 

8.60 

8.26 

8.25 



Dimethylaniline. 

^^ r Perpound 1 _-. 

r8^-:::::::*4 *«j *? $o> 
JjSj* I :S :?S ;g 

Cp l 66 .60 .70 tft 

August ..... :S S sg 11 

September 66 60 & Jn 

October g R '52 -JO 

November ....... 62 69 m S 

December 70 '.X 'to re 

Year to^-.So :I8 ;5? 

Dinitrobcnzol. v 

,-_p erpomd ___ > 

SgSSr ::::::: *>% "H «&• *g 

March 85 82 S *25 

mS? 1 /. I 1 :5o :S 

J»ly V 86 .88 S '& 

August 86 IS *S '•5 

September .... 50 » S £2 

gptober ;K ;g JJ JO 

November 86 88 '51 "52 

£2 n ^: «s. | :« :« 

w .80 .42 .88 

Dinitrochlorbenzol. 

* — -— — Per pound -^ 

H TV ***** 

j»-:::::::*8 "a •*• »g£ 
¥£8* « .60 ill .So* 

S5? :::::::::::: S S % % 

August :: 48 !46 45 '2 

September 48 44 'X "S 

October 45 'In S i? 

November ..42 \Q 'tt 12 

xear M .40 .46 .86 

Dinitronaphthalene. 

r—- — Per pound -^ 

H L. ^^ 

January . . .„ $0.75 . . . $0.65 80.55 

Sj!f, h f0 .75 .60 .45 

August .::::: :7o :So :g S 

September 70 60 «n SS 

October 70 §5 *£ 'S 

November 62 M 60 S 

Tear «0 .65 k .70 .45 



84.48 



Diphcnylaminc. 

i P er 

1917. 

H. It. 

January $1.10 80.90 

February 1.10 .90 

March 1.10 .90 

April 1.10 .90 

May no .90 

J«?« 1.10 .90 

July 1.10 .90 

August 1.10 .90 

September 1.10 .90 

October 1.10 .90 

November 1.10 .90 

December 1.10 1.00 

1.10 .90 



pound- 



H. 
$1.10 
1.10 
1.10 
1.10 
1.10 
1.10 
1.10 
1.10 
1.10 
1.10 
1.10 
1.10 
1.10 



1918. 



L. 

$1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

.90 

.90 

.90 

1.00 

1.00 

1.05 

LOO 

1.00 

1.00 

.90 



88.99 



(See Cols. 1-2, next page.) 



802,706 

188,789 

1,968,466 



8884.570 

278,899 

1,568,906 



81.11 
1.51 



Metanitraniline. 

/ P er pound * 

1917. ins. s 

_ H. It. H. L. 

January $ 1# 5o 8X.15 

5JKSW 180 1.15 

M*"; 11 1.80 1.16 

April i,80 1.15 

May 1.80 1.15 

JUS 6 1.50 1.80 

J" 1 * ; 1.45 1.26 

AoiHMt 1.45 12 6 

October 1.45 1<a5 

November 1.50 1.25 

December $1.60 ... 1.60 1.26 

^**' ••• ••• ••• ... 1.60 1.15 

Note.— Not quoted until December, 1917. 



134 



1918 YEAR BOOK 






THE SEYDEL MFG. CO 

Eitablithed 1903 

HALLADAY and FORREST STREETS 
JERSEY CITY, N. J. 




PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
SPARTANBURG, S. C. 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



European Branch ; 
BRUSSELS, BELGIUM 



Sizings, 



Soaps and 

For 



Finishings 



COTTON 
WOOL 



JUTE 
LINEN 



PAPER 
SILK 



Benzoic Acids and all Benzoates 

Free from Chlorine, U. 5. P., B. P. 

For 



» / 



PRESERVING 
MEDICINES 



SURGERY 

DYES 

PERFUMES 



PRINTING 
RUBBER 



Furamine Dyes and Special Chemicals 



Kansas City Testing Laboratory 

Chemists, Assay era, Chemical and Inspecting Engineers. 

The service of this laboratory includes the following: 

(a) Sampling, testing and inspection of materials. 

(b) Examination of samples submitted. 

(c) Inspection of fabrication of materials. 

(d) Commercial research on manufacturing problems, formulae and economies. 

(e) Private scientific research for the development of new processes later to 

be sold or commercialized. 
(r) Services in Patent solicitation and litigation. 
(g) Reports on value and utilization of natural resources. 
(h) Placing financiers and owners of processes or properties in touch with 

one another. 

Petroleum Engineering and Petroleum Chemi*t*y is given special attention. 



Office and Main Laboratory 
1013 Grand Avenue Kansas City Missouri 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



Naphtha Solvent. 



Su:phur brown - 
Hulpbur kt»k. 

8u;pb»r ?^- -' 



aulpbui black. . 



a*uB<ai ii. Me no tou 

WM.TS* tU.MS -W 

iM.aas Vii.aai "m 

2S3.U0 fta.iu .M 

0.MB.SS1 S.Wl.MO .BO 



728 Irnmao'lal bloa 

Antbroqulneo* nad belaud Color* 

TT8 AIIMIb 

180 Allaaj-ln r»d 

838 Indaolbreoe blue R**s""!. II"! !!!"!! 



Dlbromlndico 

tdui ma>co via oer 

t'nclaaained ■!;•• of u 



i.ilbol ™- 
l-urpl- I 



!.1«l« H.1M202 

— st.sra imosot 



n.34« 1HT.1w.22s 



m!mo 



ritotoirapMp Coomlcale. 



... .netMlo . 
AonUMtorlta » 



<apbtb.it aallcrlate 

liamutlt belanapbthol 

Hiemutb tribroro phenol ... 
\ui--.?i'T- f. uo. U. a. P... 
n." ..[.|,il,„;.lo *.... 

« mm!!!! 



Ml. 018 

>7aa 



HOt. SSI 

ll*.WI 



lit* 



Totaaaa paraei 



rneoo lau ! plmoa ub i ha ;• I o 

T),y«i..lia]pbonepbtbalelo, 

T.i rabro mp h-not o I plmneph iha I e 
1 1 1 ero m ™i Ian I v *• • n arbt ha i M n 



Oll.romtbirmoll 











1 


flcl la 


Cuumar 





:n».r:4 tS.tS0.M7 



tl.M2.4M (I M 



la. MO liat.MI H ** 



PRICES— (Continued.) 
M e tanitropai atoluid ine. 



Monoethy 1 aniline. 



5 to too Auanwt ■ 



Monom ethyl anil in 



Metaphenylenediamine. 



. |i.«) li.so 



SB 1 :.:::: 

Judo ...... 

S»P'rmb«r 



to' to "*... 



I*>brtiar7 


W S8 

80 


Ju"» *.'."., 


.28 


oSbraa?** 


» 




38 




Naphlhaliw 



Fl.lt. 
Sir „,_ 



January.. Mi i . tO.lOH 10 00 IO.Uni t0.M« 

February. 1. M .10 .00 .13 .00% 

Mareo.... I ;« .10* OS .12 .10 

SXf. . ! ': :S 9 HS !!« 

June r.„ t:\i.to ,00« .1014 OS 



■ ■- <■» -WW, ,00 .10 .1 

■ • i.s Mil oo .oo\t .« 
- ■- omE .o» .osS .< 



■a 



« i ■"H .10 .Of 
- -10H 09 

Nitrobenzol. 



S'.V 






Otthonitrophenol . 



r. -iriiMij 
Marcb . ... 

SB?::::: 





OrthonitrotoluoL 




January . 
Marcb . 


1011 

H. i. 
*l3a II no 

... IIS 100 


1018. 

H. L. 
11.00 »0.7 
1.00 .7 




1.8 l.no 


.80 .7 



.Hi. 



1916 YEAR BOOK 



Panunidophenol. 



July .... 



P ar a nitro acctanil i d . 



February ■ 
Marcb .... 
April 



iff. 



JtarohTT. 


Phenol, t 

H. 

40 


J. S. P. 

T. T wn ^^ 
I* ' H. I* 

(0.SS |0.H 
80.47 .87 .51 
.48 .87 .02 
.40 .as .02 
.40 .84 .02 
.41 .84 .48 
.40 .60 .44 

!«> M M 

.42 .48 .42 

'M '.4T .16 
.40 .ST .10 

"echnical. 


















July .... 
September 

November 


48 

M 

to 


July 




•November 

•December 




Resorcin, 


•Nominal. 


ftgJEL 


18 

(8.00 

8.00 


7. " 1018. 

L. H. L. 

::: W W 

•is a U 

8.00 7.00 B.OO 

7! 00 TOO S.OO 
8.00 7.00 S.OO 

aisO 4>6 4.00 

8.00 4.7S 4.80 

B.BO 8.00 4.00 

Per pound , 

'U H. L. 

(2.70 S2.B0 

'.'.'. Sit 2.M 
2.70 2.80 

S.OO ZOO 

s.00 s.00 

S.OO 3.00 
S.OO 2.00 

sioo 2.w 

82.80 S.OO 2.80 


Jar-oary 


















Jul, ... 








8.00 

8.00 

8.00 




!■■■'■ 1 bar 




dZSSSE 




Toli 

H. 
8.00 




January 
February 

Maxnb .. 


Marcb 












July .... 


8.00 


July 


oSSS?" 








8.00 

2711 





Xylidine. 



Xylol. 



(Price* on we n>u/« variety of aniline colors quoted after January 1, 1918, mil be found in (fte Fbn-Yeer Tablet on 
Paget 20-21.) 




POWELL "WHITE STAR" 

GATE VALVE BOOKLET 

SENT ON REQUEST 



POWELL VALVES 

( Especially TheWhile StarVah x) 



We manufacture a complete line of Gate 

Valves for Oil, Paint, Drug and Chemical 

Plants. 

In Rising and Non-rising Spindles. 

They are made in sizes from i" to 16" inch 

Brass and iron body, screw and flange ends. 

Can furnish them in Anti-acid and Monel 

metal. 

Send us your specifications or requirements 

on that next requisition. 



TheaWm. Powell Co. 

ICPENDMLE &WKUMI SMCiAines. 
CINCINNATI, a 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



137 



Marden, Orth { Hastings Corp. 



(Established 1837) 



136 LIBERTY ST., NEW YORK CITY 



Aniline Dyestuffs 
Coal-Tar Intermediates 

Chemicals 

Edible Oils 

Animal Oils 

Vegetable Oils 

Fish Oils 



BOSTON, 225 Purchase Street 
CLEVELAND, Illuminating Bid*. 
SAN FRANCISCO, 316 Clay St. 



BRANCHES : 

CHICAGO, 130 N. Wells Street 
LOUISVILLE, 1303 Shelby Street 
CINCINNATI, Union Trust Building 
ST. LOUIS, Syndicate Trust Building 

PLANTS : 



PHILADELPHIA, Drexel Building 
SEATTLE, Hoge Building 
DETROIT, Dime Bank Building 
MONTREAL, 137 McGill Street 



BOUND BROOK, N. J. NEWARK, N. J. MILFORD, N. J. WOODBRIDGE, N. J. 

JERSEY CITY, N.J., (2PUnts) PERTH AMBOY, N. J. BURLINGTON, N. J. BLUE POINT, N. J. 

LOUISVILLE, KY. BOSTON, MASS. MT. PLEASANT, Tenn. CHICAGO, ILL. 

NORTH SYDNEY, N. S. BURNT ISLAND, NFLD. 



1918. YEAR BOOK 




I 



\ 
'1 



i! 



The Lazard-Godchaux Co. 
of America, Inc. 

JTS5. 100 William Street, New York c : b Lw*" 



SHANGHAI 

17 Kiaugie Road 



OFFICES: 
BRUSSELS VIEUX-CONDE 

Rue de M erode 



MANCHESTER 

Prudential Bldgi. 



MONTREAL 

Read Bid*. 



ANILINE DYES 

FOR EXPORT 

Our extensive export experience enables us to 
take the best care of all inquiries to any country 

French, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese Correspondence 
Full Line of Colors for 

COTTON, WOOL, UNION and SILK 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



I3< 



JOHN W. LEITCH & CO 

MILNSBRIDGE CHEMICAL WORKS 
nr. HUDDERSF1ELD, ENGLAND 

CABLES: "LEITCH MILNSBRIDGE HUDDERSFIELD" 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Pure Toluol. Pure Benzol. Pure Xylol. 

Solvent Naphtha. Heavy Naphtha. 

Nitric Acid. Nitre Cake. Salt Cake. Hydrochloric Acid 



Nitrotoluols (Ortho and Para). Nitrobenzol. 

Myrbane Oil. Nitroxylol. Xylidine. Nitronaphthalene. 

Binitrotoluol. Trinitrotoluol. Bi nitrobenzol. 

Binitroxylol. Binitronaphthalene. 



M. TOLUYLENE DIAMINE 



M. PHENYLENE DIAMINE 



TOLUIDINES (ORTHO AND PARA) 



TOLIDINE BASE 



BENZIDINE BASE 






140 1918 YEAR BOOK 



Aniline Dyes and Chemicals, Inc. 



Selling Agents for 



Dyestuffs and Intermediates 

Manufactured by 

THE AULT & WIBORG CO., Cincinnati, Ohio 



Synthetic Indigo 20# Paste 



Synthetic Indigo Powder 



Midland Blue R 20* Paste 

Midland Blue R Powder 
Midland Vat Blues 

Manufactured by 

THE DOW CHEMICAL CO., Midland, Mich. 

Sulphur Blue Sulphur Black 

Manufactured by 

THE ATLANTIC DYESTUFF CO., Boston. Mass. 



Cedar and Washington Streets 

Boston New York Philadelphia 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



RECOGNITION 



The artist is recognised by his masterpiece — 
The artisan by his most useful product — 
The sculptor by his rarest statue — 
The cuisiniere by his piece de resistance — 
The composer by his grandest symphony — 

Why Not American Made 
Dyestuffs, by their Results? 

ESTABLISHMENT 

SINCE 1876 we have been engaged in 
serving the needs of dyestuff users. \ 

PRODUCTION 

Our factory CONCENTR VTES upon 
the production of dyestuffs. 




MATERIALS 

We insist on the use of the highest grade 
raw materials and intermediates at all 
times. We employ the best labor obtain- 
able. 

SERVICE 

The Slogan of our laboratories is 

SERVICE! 

WHEN may we Serve you ? 



JOHN CAMPBELL & CO. 

75 Hudson Street, New |York, N. Y. 

EstnblitLed 1870 Incorporated I90T 

Branch Officii: Providence, Philadelphia, Toronto 



William E. Jordan, Inc. 



11 Cliff Street 



New York 



Jordan Coal Tar Products Co., Inc. 

13 Cliff Street Hew Vork 

TBLBPHONB BBBKMAN 1758 
CABLE ADDRESS "DANJOR" NEW YORK 



Importers 

Manufacturer! 

and Exporters 

COAL TAR 
PRODUCTS 

Aniline Intermediates 

Coal Tar products 
Acid, Cresylic 

Cresol 

Acid, Carbolic 

Beta Naphthol 

Toluol 

Solvent Naphtha 



Phenol 
Crepsote 
Benzol 
Xylol 

Naphthalene 

Beta Naphthylamine 

Acic, Carbolic Crude 

Acid, Carbolic Crystal 

Disinfectants 

Cresol Compounds 



142 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



Industrial Chemical Company 



Telephones 

3242 1 _ 

3243 f Gramercy 

Cable Address : 
"Kemieo", 

N. Y. 



INCORPORATED 



Head Office : 



FIFTH AVENUE BUILDING 

Analytical and Research Laboratories : 

36-38 W. 37TH STREET 

NEW YORK CITY 




/ 



Manufacturers of 



V 



Acetone : 

C. P. and Commercial 

Acetone Oils 
Ketones 

Alcohol: 

Completely and Specially 

Denatured 
Wood Alcohol : 

Refined 95% and 97% 
Bark Extracts: 

Liquid and Powdered 

Hemlock and Larch 
Dyewood Extract: 

Aurantine (Osage Orange) 

Liquid 51° tw. and Powder 



Blacks 

Decolorizing and Deodorizing 
Carbons 

Powdered Charcoal 

Gymene Oil 

Agricultural Lime 

Monohydrate of Soda 

Sulphate of Ammonia 

Whiting 

Precipitated Chalk : 
Extra Light 
Light 
Heavy 



^ 



The NEW DECOLORIZING and DEODORIZING CARBON 

A Product of the U. S. A. 

&UPER-FILTCHAR 

Surpassing in Efficiency the Highest Grades of Imported or Domestic Carbon 



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DRUG MARKET SECTION 

(Pages 143-182.) 

Drug Factors in the Year 1918 145-147 

Castor Oil Production in the United States an Experiment 147-149 

Quinine an International Factor in 1918 149-151 

Camphor Reflects Reduced Output and Heavy Demand 151-153 

Drug Market. High and Low Prices for Years 1917. 1918 155-171 

Acids 1 55 

Botanicals, Balsams, Barks 155 

Beans 157 

Berries-, Herbs and Leaves 159 

Roots 161 

Seeds, Spices 1 63 

Drugs and Pharmaceutical Chemicals 165-1 71 

British Drug Prices 1 73 

Essential Oils 1 73-1 75 

London Essential Oils Prices, 1918 1 75 

Gums 1 75 

Camphor 177 

Waxes 1 77 

Newfoundland and Norwegian Codliver Oil Review I 77 

Foreign Weights and Measures Table 182 



i' 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



S. B. Penick & Company, inc. 

DRUG IMPORTERS, EXPORTERS and MILLERS 



WE ARE EXPORTERS OF AND HEADQUARTERS FOR AUL. 

AMERICAN BOTANICAL DRUGS 




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OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



145 



DRUG MARKET FACTORS IN THE YEAR 1918. 



THE predominant features in the 1918 drug market may 
be briefly stated as follows: — 

1. Government consumption of crude and manufac- 
tured drugs. 

2. Curtailment of raw material supplies. 

3. Shortage in labor and shipping space. 

4. Commodity control, regulation and price fixation 
through the War Trade Board and the War Industries 
Board. 

The net result brought about by these factors was a 
constant advance in prices up to the signing of the 
armistice. Following that event, a declining market de- 
veloped. Reduction of prices was not abrupt. Manufac- 
tured drugs showed the greatest revision while crude ma- 
terials achieved the least. All divisions of the market were 
affected. The botanicals, gums and essential oils held 
firm and showed but few lower quotations. Drugs and 
pharmaceutical chemicals, seeds, spices, waxes and shellac 
weakened steadily when hostilities ceased. 

Effect of Government Contracts. 

From the beginning of the year business was stimulated 
by government demands. Adopting a policy of buying 
through competitive bids, the government awarded con- 
tracts for extraordinary amounts. In order to secure sup- 
plies on the scale needed, awards were distributed among 
practically all the manufacturing chemists in the country. 
Factories were built, plants expanded and production pushed 
to the farthest limits of capacity. The following is a typical 
example chosen from one list on which bids were asked: — 

Cathartic pills 32,000,000 pills 

Chloride of mercury 8,000,000 tablets 

Chloroform 625,000 tins 

Codeine sulphate 7,700,000 tablets 

Ethyl alcohol 300,000 gallons 

Ether 500,000 tins 

Morphine sulphate 9,500,000 tablets 

Potassium iodide 12,000,000 tablets 

Domestic Consumers Paid More. 

After the government had its plans well developed, bids 
on the above scale were awarded on an average of once 
each month for the army and navy. The magnitude to which 
production was expanded may be Inferred. Manufacturing 
chemists were heavy consumers of raw materials and left 
the open market well drained of supplies. After meeting 
their government contracts, ordinary customers were sup- 
plied, and owing to the scarcity of goods such buyers paid 
constantly increasing prices. Raw materials became scarcer 
as the year passed. Supply was unequal to the demand 
and prices advanced steadily. 

The curtailed supply of various raw materials was due 
in no small part to a shortage in labor and shipping space. 
This was especially true with crude drugs. Foreign 
botanicals from Europe reached the Ufrited States in 
miscroscopic lots. Labor abroad was centered in munition 
factories and such crude drugs as could be gathered by 
old men and women, together with children, were needed 
for European consumption. 

Lack of Labor and Shipping Facilities. 

In the Far East, production and gathering of botanicals 
were abandoned for the far more remunerative item of 
foodstuffs. To further complicate matters, shipping space 
on the Pacific and other Far Eastern water routes was re- 
duced to a minimum when the cargo carriers were thrown 
into transatlantic service. The net result of minimum sup- 
plies from the Far East was natural and productive of 
constant increase in spot market valuations. The same con- 
ditions ruled on South American products and for pre- 
cisely the same reasons. 

Labor shortage in the crude drug centers of the United 
States was at the bottom of the strong market which pre- 
vailed throughout the year. The original slow unfolding 
of the war program of this country was abandoned early 
in the period. Under forced draught, the War Department 
expanded its plans a hundredfold. Labor from the country 
districts sought the factories, where big wages gave a re- 
turn 100 per cent, higher than that to the crude drug gath- 
ering. Upon the older people and children fell the work 
of supplying the market with roots, herbs, leaves and 
flowers. 

The situation paralleled that of the crude drug centers 
of Europe and the Far East. The result was also the same. 
Shortage, or at least reduction, of stocks brought the high 
prices both in the primary and New York markets steadily 
to the fore. After the signing of the armistice, November 
11, the same condition continued, and, in fact, grew more 
acute. Until a new crop should permit replacement of ma- 
terials, it seemed certain that the conditions of strength, 
firmness and solidity which prevailed at the end of the year 



would continue the basis and foundation of the market. 
This applies equally to foreign and domestic crude drugs. 

Federal Control Under License. 

In order to cope with these national and international 
conditions the Federal Government early in the year under- 
took control of commerce by means of a license system ap- 
plied to both exports and imports. Further, to assure ade- 
quate supplies of chemicals, drugs, pharmaceuticals — both 
raw and manufactured — it commandeered freely of supplies 
and output in this country. It reduced importations to the 
point where only two classes of production were assured 
supplies. 

Federal Classification of Business. 

After canvass of the various trades through investiga- 
tions by the War Industries Board, the government classi- 
fied business under the following heads: — 

i: — Essential industries. These consisted solely of indus- 
tries directly related to the production of war material. 

2: — Less essential industries, consisting of industries con- 
tributing indirectly to the war needs of the government. 

After the requirements of these two classifications nad 
been thoroughly met and provided for, non-essential indus- 
tries were permitted supplies. 

Lists of "Essentials.** 

The policy of license control was expanded constantly 
until, at the time of the armistice, cargo space could be ob- 
tained only after a license to import had been granted by 
the War Trade Board. The same was true for exports. 
Unless materials were needed for work directly or indirect- 
ly related to the government's war needs, licenses were for 
the most part refused. Several lists were compiled by the 
War Trade Board. Among others, the list of absolutely 
probihited imports and exports, and the conservation import 
and export list were influential to a marked degree in the 
drug market. 

A further step was taken when the policy of price-fixation 
was applied to materials withil! the drug market. After 
thorough canvass made by the War Industries Board, the 
War Trade Board and the United States Shipping Board, 
recommendations were made to the Price -Fixing Commit- 
tee. In arriving at their conclusions, the various govern- 
ment bodies worked so far as possible through such bodies 
as the Castor Oil and Shellac Importers' Associations, 
and the Chemical Alliance, which had been formed at Fed- 
eral request. The basis of procedure was, in every case, 
founded upon (1) measures needed to assure raw and man- 
ufactured supplies; (2) elimination of speculation; (3) es- 
tablishment of just and equitable prices stimulative of pro- 
duction and guaranteeing fair return to sellers. 

Price-Fixed Commodities. 

In the drug market the following materials were sold to 
the government at a price fixed by the committee: — 

Acetone, C. P. 

Alcohol, wood, 95 per cent. 

Alcohol, wood, 97 per cent. 

Castor beans, per pound on importations. 

Castor beans, per pound on domestic cultivation. 

Castor oil, per pound on importations. 

Formaldehyde. 

Glycerine, dynamite. 

Methyl acetate. 

Methyl acetone. 

Quicksilver, per flask for government consumption. 

In addition to fixed prices and commandeered supplies, 
the Federal authorities entered in many agreements as to 
prices on different articles. 

Market Weakened After Armistice. 

Up to the signing of the armistice drugs in general were 
strong in all divisions of the market. When it became cer- 
tain that government consumption and control no longer 
were the principal features to trade, the soft spots devel- 
oped rapidly. Price declines came principally in the man- 
ufactured drugs and were extended somewhat to imported 
materials, such as seeds and spices. 

Consumers apparently were unable to hold optimistic con- 
victions as to the market's future and withdrew entirely or 
adopted a policy of buying as the need of the moment dic- 
tated or made necessary. Production at the manufacturing 
plants continued and stocks increased rapidly. They were 
further augmented by cancellation of government contracts. 
In their desire to move supplies, producers began to shade 
quotations. At the end of the year prices had become vir- 
tually nominal on manufactured drugs. Manufacturers be- 
gan to compete sharply for business and the buying price 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



MERCK&CQ 

NEW YORK 

St. Louis Montreal 




Works at RAHWAY, N. X, along (ho Pennsylvania Railroad 



MEDICINAL ANALYTICAL 



nemfcal. 




PHOTOGRAPHIC TECHNICAL 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



147 



was dictated largely by the sagacity of the purchaser and 
the extent to which he asked for bids. Manufactured prod- 
ucts ended the year in a declining market. 

Crude Drug Stocks Depleted. 

Crude drugs and raw materials held up well. Apparently 
the position which they occupied at the close of the war 
was sufficiently sound to make impossible any considerable 
decline. Stocks were narrow, replacements were either im- 
possible or on a most limited scale, and conditions of health 
sprang up which brought to the fore a heavy consumping 
demand. The Spanish influenza epidemic took up heavy 
supplies of the expectorant botanicals, quinine, acetphenetl- 
din, aspirin, acetanilid, camphor, asafoetida, etc. In these 
materials there developed a series of sharp advances in the 
resale and manufacturers' markets and the end of the year 
found them either higher or else strongly entrenched as to 
prices. 

In December government control of industry began to 
relax. Licenses to export and import were granted more 



freely and the lists of articles under government control 
were materially reduced. Shipping space became easier to 
obtain with the virtual stopping of shipment of government 
supplies. However, the markets of the world had been 
thoroughly drained by the war needs of the Allied nations. 
The greater freedom of international shipment relieved but 
slightly the shortages in supplies which were responsible 
for the high prices which ruled throughout the year. Ocean 
freight rates remained high, and this discouraged shipment, 
as exported expected reductions, and reduced shipments 
until such were effective. 

The year was filled with vexations, both to producers and 
consumers. At its close, business was generally in a state 
of suspended animation. Pharmaceutical chemicals, manu- 
factured drugs, seeds and spices closed the year weak in 
the midst of a declining market. Crude drugs, essential 
oils, gums and similar materials remained firm and, for the 
most part, in strong position. All factor! tried to view the 
coming period of reconstruction with optimism, but under- 
neath, the market was filled with an unrest which would 
not be quieted. 



Castor Oil Production in the U. S. an Experiment. 

WHEN the United States entered the world war, the at- acres of castor beans were being swept away by the "army" 

tention of the War Department was centered on the worm and that the crop was jeopardized. The worst dam- 

airplane. For three years, the Allied Nations had experi- age was reported from the. Florida East Coast, and into this 

mented with many types of air motor lubricants and had section, as well as into others, the Department of Agricul- 

selected castor oil as being the least affected by extremes ture sent a force of its agents. 

of heat and cold of any lubricant in such use. The great About this time announcement was made of the "Lib- 

problem of the United States became to secure castor oil *rty Aero Oil" — a mineral oil invented for use in the Lib- 

and to provide sufficient reserve supplies. «rty motor. 

Arrangements were made with the British Government Earlv Croo Renorts 

to secure castor beans from India for seed purposes, since y v^rvp rvcporu. 

the British Board of Trade had placed an embargo on ship- As late as September the Department of Agriculture 

ments of castor beans to countries other than Great Britain announced that the government was assured of a yield of 

and her allies. This seed supply was essential to the do- approximately 2,000,000 gallons of oil from domestic plant - 

mestic cultivation of the castor bean in Texas, Florida, the ings. By the middle of October failure of the crop to 

Southwest generally And California, under Federal guar- mature, shortage of labor in the producing districts and 

antee. heavy transportation costs in view of the higher freight 

A F^rU-allv Fn*t+r+A fmn rates brou * ht discouragement to the growers, who threat - 

A rederauy rostered Crop. ented to allow the crop to go unharve * ted un i ess the ~ e 

This plan called for the planting of more than 100,000 guarantee should be advanced materially. The growers 

acres of land in the Southwestern States, with Florida demanded $10 a bushel for the castor beans, but a com- 

plantings more concentrated than elsewhere. The growing promise was made at $5.25 a bushel. A reduction in rail- 

centers were organized as districts, and contracts were road rates as well as shipment priority was secured also, 

made with the growers under a guarantee of $3 per bushel The first definite reports as to actual yield came from 

on contracts directly with the government, and $3.60 per Florida under date of October 4. Miami reported the crop 

bushel for beans grown by sub -contractors. The govern- in Dade county to be much less than the original esti- 

ment pledged Itself to buy castor beans at these figures, no mate. One planting of 25 bushels of beans involving the 

matter what the outcome of the war. expenditure of $2,000 in labor and fertilizer yielded a har- 

Growers at the time considered the price liberal enough vest of less than one pint of beans. Ninety acres, culti- 

to stimulate production by assuring them a fair return on vated at a total cost of $3,000, yielded 25 sacks; 40 acres 

their investment. The government supplied all beans and at another location made 72 sacks; the acreage in the 

the 100,000 acres were seeded. Late in 1917 favorable crop district was half a bushel to the acre. Foreign seed and 

reports were circulated by agents of the Department of unsuitable weather and soil conditions were held respon- 

Agriculture, and so favorable, did the crop prospect appear sible. 

that government officials considered a permanent crop On November 9 the government admitted the poor crop 

would result. As the bulk of the castor beans used in the In Florida, where 30 bushels to the acre had been prom- 

United States had hitherto been imported from India, it ised, the actual production averaged 2ft bushels. On the 

was felt that the United States was to be freed from such same day the government announced beans to be con- 

dependence. stantly coming in from India, and that 1,400 tons were 

This was the situation at the beginning of 1918. In Jan- then en route to the United States. Co-operation between 

uary, of that year, to facilitate the receipt from foreign Federal war boards to secure a sufficient amount of for- 

sources of a castor bean supply — should the domestic crop eign -origin oil to carry out the aviation program became 

not meet expectations — an association in the castor oil necessary, and the Food Administration, the War Indus - 

trade was formed at Federal request. This was an official tries Board, the War Trade Board, and the Shipping 

body, representative of all interests in the trade, through Board united in measures to meet this "essential" de- 

which all government business might be transacted. mand. 

Through this association, complete control of castor beans p «h\w»»** T~~ ns • •.• 

and castor oil was vested in the government. Imports and c-snmaies 1 oo Uptimistic. 

exports were placed under license regulation through the At the end of the year, when all domestic sources of 

War Trade Board, and the government established an au- castor oil had been accounted for, the government was 

tomatic option on importations for a period of thirty days. not in possession of one gallon of oil from beans grown 

The option figures were .098c. a pound for beans and .244c. in the United States. By December complete estimates of 

a pound for No. 1 oil. the results of the castor bean -growing experiment of the 

r\ *• tit i * r\ i .. j government were as follows: — 

Domestic Market Depleted. _ . . , p . • Q • 7 

While establishing a price at which oil might be bought „ .. A J ^ ttmated '<««"*. 1917. 

for government use, the price at which supplies could be vi m country 2,000,000 gallons of oil. 

sold to the consuming trade by importers and crushers was xiew per acre 25 bushels of beans, average. 

left uncontrolled. The market was depleted in supplies, a -i tt -i fx,. ft ?# # iQift 

and as American crushing interests could offer little oil for nciuai i\c3uiw, i^io. 

medicinal and technical use, a speculative market resulted. Entire country 200,000 gallons of oil. 

Consumers paid as high as 45c. and rarely less than 30c. a Yield per acre 6 bushels of beans, average. 

pound for No. 1 oil. Such is the crop history of the Federal experiment in 

Shortly after January 1 adverse reports came from the castor bean production. There are related features in the 

growing districts in Florida, and it was feared that the arrangements made for producing castor oil from the ex- 

ftrst Federal estimates had been too liberal. Official state- pected crop. Government bureau chiefs and their ad- 

ments had announced that "two million gallons of oil for visors had not favored the crushing of the domestic beans 

the first year" were assured; that the yield would average at plants already in existence— or in enlarged plants to be 

"twenty-five bushels to the acre"; and that in the "solution erected by such crushers— although such facilities had 

of the problem of securing millions of gallons of castor oil, been freely offered, but made arrangements for the erec- 

a lost American Industry had been revived." Yet in advices tion of a large plant at Gainesville, Fla., to crush all the 

from the growing districts it was intimated that a yield of beans grown In the so-called Southern classification dis- 

ten bushels per acre would probably be the maximum. trict. Delays Incident to the testing of the type of ma- 

The first official intimation of the crop breakdown came chinery to be employed, together with other factors inci- 

in a public statement issued in August to the effect that dent to such an experimental plant prevented the cm- 



1918 YEAR BOOK 





Chas. Pfizer & Co., Inc. 



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Strychnine and Its Salts 

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OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



149 



pletion of the Gainesville crushing plant in time to be 

effectively utilized, and no beans were crushed up to the 
end of the year. But part of the small crop has been con- 
verted into oil and cake there, and the future of the ex- 
periment is extremely doubtful. 

With the signing of the armistice on November 11 the 
government found itself in possession of a considerable 
stock of No. 1 castor of J, crushed from India beans imported 
by American crashers — an amount which would be consid- 
ered large under normal peace conditions. It became nec- 
essary to dispose of this oil, and. the Bureau of Aircraft Pro- 
duction turned to American crushers as a market for the 
beans and oil from the domestic crop. A series of confer- 
ences was held, and an agreement had been negotiated — 
virtually — through the War Industries Board, when the Air- 
craft Bureau officials stipulated that crushers should pay 
the government a price equivalent to an advance of $1 a 
bushel above the price named in the negotiations. These 
negotiations had been upon a 25-cent-a-pound basis for the 
oil, but the second Federal price named was more than 30 
cents a pound. 

' Crushers Held Prices Down. 

The position of the American crushers can be seen from 
the fact that during the year 1918 they had sold castor oil to 
their trade at 30 cents a pound for the exceedingly limited 
supplies on hand, despite the fact that the open market 



price had been 45 cents f and that second hands offered the 

crushers 40 cents a pound for all the oil they could deliver. 

By the middle of January, 1919, producers offered No. 1 
oil at 26 cents a pound, and speculative resellers were forced 
into the background by the establishment of a normal 
market. 

The attitude of the Federal officials toward the American 
crushers is also illustrated by the fact that while negotia- 
tions were being carried on with the crushers as to the 
taking over of the government stocks of domestic oil and 
beans, a Federal board had allowed the British War Mission 
priority on the shipment of a 500,000 -ton crushing plant to 
be erected in India, admittedly the first of a series of such 
plants for the manufacture of oil at the source of the raw 
material. This endangering of our raw material supply was 
nullified by the refusal of American manufacturers of 
crushing machinery to accept the order for the plant. 

The year 1918 was the worst ever experienced by the 
American consuming trade. At the close of December 
stocks of castor oil were at the low point, since very little 
of the imported product was permitted to enter ordinary 
consumption, through the exercise of the government option 
on both beans and oil. In addition, practically every pound 
of oil produced by domestic refiners was taken by the gov- 
ernment, and this left the market dependent upon such 
stocks as had been left in the hands of dealers, and upon 
such importations of Oriental oil as the government released 
from option. 



Quinine an International Factor in 1918. 



THROUGHOUT the year 1918 the quinine market dis- 
played national and international phases which were 
closely related both as to causes and effects. Demand 
for the material was never greater during the past decade 
than it was in 1913, and several times during the year 
supplies were placed in jeopardy through the develop- 
ment of international relations with the Netherlands Gov- 
ernment. Early in the period, Importations of both cinchona 
bark and Java sulphate of quinine were sharply below 
those of 1917 and considerably less than normal. To fur- 
ther complicate matters, the Netherlands Government 
(Dutch East Indies) in May placed an embargo on all 
shipments of these materials. 

Investigation by the Government of the United States 
developed the fact that this action was a trading measure 
in line with the license system of import and export control 
which all countries had put Into effect. Eventually, our 
government worked out an informal modus operandi with 
Holland, and by the end of the year the effort of the United 
States to bring imports up to normal had been fairly 
well realized. 

Seizure of Dutch shipping, the export embargo in the 
Dutch East Indies and the alleviation of the same through 
reciprocal agreement were the basic factors which more 
or less controlled developments in the New York market 
for sulphate of quinine. Under the arrangements made, the 
East India possessions of Holland were to receive favorable 
license treatment by the War Trade Board on normal ex- 
ports from the United States to Java and Sumatra 

Few Price Changes in First Quarter. 

During the first quarter of the year the market was 
comparatively quiet as far as price fluctuation was con- 
cerned. Importations of both bark and sulphate were ex- 
ceedingly light during January, but considerable improve- 
ment was noted in sulphate in the next month. American 
manufacturers and Java selling agents held their quotations 
steady throughout the quarter. During this period cinchona 
bark arrivals improved steadily and the American manu- 
facturer quoted at 75c. per ounce. Java sulphate fluctuated 
widely as to arrivals. 

In February, 420,000 ounces were Imported, and in March, 
40,000 ounces. Despite this selling agents quoted evenly at 
82 @ 86c. per ounce. In April imports again rose to ap- 
proximately 420,009 ounces. This irregular movement of 
the importation curve featured arrivals of quinine sulphate 
' throughout the year. 

Dutch Prohibit Exports From East Indies. 

In the month of May a cable dispatch from the Dutch 
East Indies stated that an embargo against shipment of 
East Indian products in general had been placed by the 
Netherlands Government. Quinine sulphate and cinchona 
bark were mentioned speciflclally. The effect on the spot 
market was electric. By the middle of the month quinine 
touched $1.65 per ounce with sales reported at this figure. 
The price movement affected American sulphate to an 
extent greater than it did the Java product, as it was con- 
sidered that while shipments of Java sulphate would 
probably be arranged, it was thought doubtful that cinchona 
bark shipments to American manufacturers would be 
permitted. 

For about two weeks the market was rather demoralized. 
American manufacturers turned over their interests to our 
government and negotiations with Holland were at once 
opened up. Further, on being approached, the Netherlands 
Legation at Washington stated that shipment was not pro- 
hibited, but the materials had been placed under control 



through the adoption of the license system as applied to 
both exports and imports. Nothing could be shipped from 
the Dutch East Indies unless an export license had been 
granted by the Colonlajl Government. 

Netherlands Needed Other Commodities. 

Importers were reassured. To them it was clear that 
the seizure of Dutch shipping and the difficulty which 
Holland was having in securing even normal imports from 
various countries — the United States included — had brought 
about a situation out of which the Netherlands Government 
sought a way through the pressure of the bargaining power 
of an embargo. Holland and the Dutch East Indies needed 
such things as caustic soda, soda ash, etc. In order to 
secure these and other materials. Holland applied the 
pressure of an embargo in order that, when negotiations 
came up, she would have a lever whereby exchange of 
needed commodities might be forced. In a large measure 
she was successful, as no nation at that time had enough 
quinine to cover its Immediate needs, to say nothing of 
those of the future. 

On spot, the effect of this semi-clearing up of the situa- 
tion was evidenced by an abrupt drop in prices to a basis of 
$1.2S per pound in second hands for American sulphate. Java 
goods also declined to 90c. per ounce, but recovered by the 
end of May to $1.05 per ounce. 

American Manufacturers Raise Prices. 

American manufacturers, under the pressure of circum- 
stance mentioned above, raised their quotations to 90c. per 
ounce at the beginning of June and held this quotation 
throughout the rest of the year. This is noteworthy be- 
cause importations of cinchona bark were very irregular 
for the balance of the year. During the last six months 
of 1918 they never exceeded 400,000 pounds and reached 
this figure but once — in November. They fell as low as 
116,000 pounds in June and fluctuated between this amount 
and 100,000 pounds, barring the November import of 400,000 
pounds. For the entire year, Imports of bark totaled 3,507,- 
974 pounds, as against 2,159,327 pounds in 1917. The im- 
portations of sulphate of quinine for the twelve months 
totaled 2,447,734 ounces, as compared with those of 1017 
at 1,113,555 ounces. 

Another development of the year hot directly related to 
the 1918 market in the United States, but far-reaching in its 
ultimate results, was the refusal of British companies to 
renew the ten -year agreement which formerly existed be- 
tween British, French, Dutch and German Interests. The 
United States was not a direct member of this international 
cartel, but participated to the extent that guarantees had 
been made as to certain apportionments to be made dur- 
ing the life of the coalition agreement. 

British Company Withdraws From Cartel. 

pn January 15', 1918, the British company to the agree- 
ment gave notice to Holland that when renewal of the 
agreement came up on July 15, 1918, it would withdraw 
entirely, owing to the fact that English plantings had so 
Increased in the Dutch Bast Indies as to make possible 
contracts between such growers and the British company. 
Notice was also given the French and American companies 
that Great Britain in the future would go it alone. 

Behind this situation rested the fact that Germany had 
extended her influence over the Holland quinine interests 
to the extent that other countries were more than likely 
to be placed at the mercy of the German interests. The 
effect on the United States was problematical. Two Ameri- 
can producing companies were ottered rather favorable 



150 



19,18 YEAR BOOK 



ALCOHOL TAX FREE 

FOR USE IN THE MANUFACTURE OF 



Acetate of Lima 


Embalming Fluids 


Acetone 


Ether j 


Acetaldehyde 


Ethyl Anilines 


Acetphenetidin 


Ethyl Acetate 


Aconite 


Ethyl Butyrate 


Alterin 


Ethyl Propionate 


Aloin 


Essential Oil Orris 


Alkaloids 


Ethyl Sulphate 


Antipyrin 


Ethyl Chloride 


Apocynin 

Aft M • 


Ethyl Esters 
Explosives 


Arbutin 


Filaments for Incandescent 


Asclspiadin 


Lamps 


Atophan 


Formaldehyde 


Avenin 


Formaldazone 


Artificial Flowers 


Fulminating Caps 


Acetic Ether 


Gelatine Capsules 


Adeps Lanae 


Qaduol 


Beta Naphthol 


Gentian (Solid Extract of) 


Baptitin 


Glycero- Phosphates 


Beta Naphthol Benzoate 


Gum and Pyrozylin Solu- 


Barometer and Thermom- 


tions 


eter tubes 


Guaiacol Carbonate 


Benzoic Acid 


Hats 


Benzaldehyde 


Heliotropin 


Brushes 


Hydrazoanisol 


Celluloid 


Hydrastis (Alkoloid of) 


Celery Oil 


Inks 


Chloralhydrate 


Inulin 


Chloroform 


Irisin 


Chelonin 


Jalapin (Concentration of) 


Cimicifugin 


Lacquers 


Collinsonin 


Lanolin 


Cigars and Cigarettes 


Leather— Artificial 


Collodion 


Liniments 


Confectioners Colors 


Jewelry and Watches 


Concentrations 


Mirrors 


Coumarin 


Milk Protein 


Cutlery 


Moldings and Frames 


Cutting Oils 


Moving Picture Films 


Dental Alloys 


Monobromated Camphor 


Dichlorethane 


Moth Repellent 
Nitrous Ether 


Diethylaniline 


Deodorants 


Orthotoluolsulfamid 


Disinfectants 


Patent Leather 


Dyes 


Paints 


Door checks 


Phenacetin 


Dry Extracts for Food 


Phytolaccin (Concentration 


Products 


of) 



Phenolphthalein 

Photographic Films and 
\ Dry Plates 

Photographic Chemicals 

Post Cards and Colors 

Polish Preparations for 
Furniture or Metal 

Photo Engraving 

Pepsin. Rosin 

Pyroxylin Plastics 

Pepophyllin and Similar 
Products 

Pyralin Articles 

Paraphenetidin 

Photographic Collodion 

Resorcin 

Rubber and Rubber Goods 

Silks— Artificial 

Soaps — Transparent and 
Liquid 

Santonine 

8hellac 

Sodium Ethyl Sulphate 

/Sodium Benzoate 

Salol 

Sulphonmethane 

Sulphuric Ether 

Smokeless Powder 

8moking and Chewing To- 
bacco 

Shampoo Pastes 

Strychnine 

Shampoo Liquids 

Surgioal Ligatures 

Shoe Polish 

Soldering Flux 

Surgical Goods 

Tannic Acid 

Terpin Hydrate 

Trinitrotoluol (T. N. T.) 

Varnishes 

Viburnin . (Concentration 
of) 

Viscaloid 

Varnish Remover 

Water Colors, 

Wood Finishing Materials 



U. S. INDUSTRIAL ALCOHOL CO. 

Executive Offices: 27 William Street, New York 



REFINERIES: 

New York Baltimore Boston New Orleans Peoria 



Warehouses in all Principal Cities 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 




Movement of Cinch- 



agreements by the Dutch planters Involving a certain supply 
of cinchona bark, but the balance of the contract was for 
manufactured quinine at a low price. 

The positive reaction in the United States to the. general 
International situation was -to stimulate Investigation as 
to other sources of supply. Scientists were sent Into South 
American countries and brought back favorable reports an 
to the possibility of Colombian forests being so developed 
as to assure the United States Independence of the Dutch 
Bast Indies. This became of vital Importance in view of 
the fact that In September. ISIS, the agreement between 
Java planters and Dutch manufacturers was renewed for 
a period of five years. 

Bark and Sulphate on Allotment Basis. 

Under the new contract cinchona bark and sulphate of 
quinine were placed on an allotment basis, the makers 
pledging themselves to take each year a minimum amount 
equal to 1,133,000 pounds of sulphate. It was felt that this 
agreement strengthened the Netherlands' control of quinine 
— In fact, established a monopoly similar In nature to the 
Japanese Government control of camphor. 



Further, Japan loomed up as a possible factor in the 

markets of the United States. The Japanese Government 
in July, 1918, announced that it had started growing 
cinchona trees in the southernmost prefectures of Kyushu. 
In addition to this, Japan's proximity to the Dutch East 
Indies rendered possible Importation of bark feasible, and 
by the end of the year Japan was putting out a fairly good 
product. As labor is materially cheaper in Japan as com- 
pared with the United States, the American manufacturer 
at the close of the year was anticipating competition from 
this direction. 

As compared with other war years in the United States, 
the price of quinine was kept rather well In hand. In the 
Civil War quinine Is said to have sold as high as $5 per 
ounce, as compared with the second hand market high 
price of 11.66 per ounce in 1918. This despite the fact that 
at one time the government bought 125,000 ounces for the 
army while an epidemic of the influenza created a heavy 
demand. The International changes in quinine production, 
manufacture and distribution were thought to contain 
possibilities far-reaching In character and directly affecting 
the interests of the United States. 



- Camphor Reflects Reduced Output and Heavy Demand. 



menta in gum camphor, both crude and reined. These 

1. The Japanese Monopoly Bureau and Its consistently 
carried out plans. 

2. Dowered production of both crude and refined cam- 
phor in Japan. 

8. The Spanish influenza and a world-Wide call for cam- 
phor as a combative agent. 

These factors operated in close co-ordination and brought 
about at least one result— namely, a pronounced and genu- 
ine shortage in refined camphor which affected the markets 
of the world generally, and that of the United States specifi- 
cally. Proof positive of the extent to which the United 
States was affected was to be found In the extraordinary 
high prices which ruled at the end of 1918. 

In January, camphor was quoted at 74c per pound; in 
December, at (2.50 per pound. Speculation played but a 
small part In the advance — a minor role which was almost 
entirely eclipsed by those played by the Japanese Monopoly 
Bureau, under-production in Japan, and heavy consumption 
In the United States by reason of the influenza epidemic. 

Early In the year of 1918 what seemed like a new policy 
on the part of the Monopoly Bureau was announced. It was 



a two -fold plan, which affected both the American refiner 
of crude camphor and the vendor of the Japanese refined 
product. The phase which directly reduced the importa- 
tions of crude camphor by the American refiners was the 
frankly acknowledged intent of the Monopoly Bureau to 
reduce shipments of crude camphor to a minimum, so far 
as the refiners in tbe United States were concerned. The 
Bureau admitted that it was Its ultimate intention to ship 
crude camphor to the American celluloid interests only, so as 
to eliminate domestic refiners entirely. 

The second phase, which reacted directly upon the Im- 
portations of Japanese refined camphor, was the adoption of 
a system of quarterly allotments. As an example of the 
working of this system in actual practice, the following 
official allotment notice Is presented: — 



mphor I 



■f Jul*. * 



1 BepHmfcsr. 1111. 
n and (St ffflnUB 
plcnl tuamlrn 111% 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



<s& 




Certainty 

WHEN you buy Quinine, Strychnine, Mor- 
phine, etc., you must be sure that what 
you get is pure, that it is of the highest grade and 
that it is no higher than the market in price. 

Specify N. Y. Q. and you know that you are 
making a purchase in which all DOUBT is 
missing. 

N. Y. Q. means unsurpassed quality! 



The New York Quinine and Chemical 
Works, Inc. 

100 William Street, New York 



Acetaitilide L\ 5. V. 
Bismuth Subnitrabe and 
other Bismuth Salts 
Codeine and its Salts 



Maker* qf 

D hi ce t y 1 - M or pb in e 

Iodoform 

Morphine and its Salts 

Potassium Iodide 



Quinine 
Sti7ch.i 
Salts 
Thvniol Iodide 



<d its SsJtj 

and us 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



153 













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Movement of Importations of Japanese Refined Camphor and of Nev> York and Japanese Market Prices for the Year 

1918. 



or should tonnage be unavailable, or If Import Into the United 
States la restricted or prohibited. 

3. If permission to import la necessary, shipment will be sus- 
pended until such permission is obtained. 

Beginning- with the July shipment, the selling price will be ad- 
vanced 10 shillings per hundredweight — from 362 shillings to 262 
shillings — owing to an increase In export charges. 

Exports to U. S. Curtailed. 

From the above it will be readily seen that not onlyvwere 
shipments materially reduced, but protection of the widest 
and all inclusive variety was afforded the Japanese exporter. 
The extent to which curtailment of exports to the United 
States was effective is represented clearly by the total im- 
portations of crude camphor for 1918, as compared with the 
three previous years: — 

IMPORTS OP CRUDE CAMPHOR. 

1918 3,474,282 pounds 

1917 6,612,807 pounds 

1916 6,664,281 pound* 

Such were the methods whereby absolute and rigid con- 
trol of distribution of crude camphor by the Monopoly Bu- 
reau was achieved and made an operative force in the mar- 
ket developments in the United States during 1918. An 
under- production in the camphor groves of Taiwan was im- 
plied by the greatly reduced exportations of Japanese re- 
fined camphor. Had it not been for the fact that the 
Japanese shipped less of their refined product in 1918 than 
during any of the past five years^ — and probably for even a 
much longer period of years — it might have been supposed 
that exports of crude were arbitrarily reduced in further- 
ance of an acknowledged intention of Japan to ship less 
crude to the end that eventually she might ship nothing but 
refined camphor to this country; celluloid manufacturers 
alone to receive crude camphor, with the resulting elimina- 
tion of American refining. 

Production Below Normal. 

As Japan's exports of refined camphor to the United 
States showed a greater reduction in 1918, as compared 
with previous years, it was admitted production was below 
normal, and this was one of the prime causes in the eventu- 
ation of price advances to an almost unprecedented position 
at the close of 1918. 

The following comparison of importations into the United 



States of refined camphor for the past three years may 
prove of interest: — 

IMPORTATIONS OF RUFINBD CAMPHOR. 

1918 947,144 pounds 

1917 8,108,240 pounds 

1916 8,011,072 pound* 

With importations of crude camphor reduced S6 per cent, 
and those of refined camphor, 69% per cent., the stocks in 
this country were exceedingly light throughout the year. 
The crisis came in October, 1918. Following the arrival of a 
Norwegian steamer, upon which were a number of fully de- 
veloped cases of Spanish influenza, the disease spread rap- 
idly. After attacking the army camps, it spread to the 
civilian population of the country. Camphor had been 
found to be an effective combatant in fighting the disease 
abroad, and with its spread in the United States demand for 
camphor developed quickly. 

Influenza Increases Demand Sharply. 

The New York market first noticed inquiry on this ac- 
count coming from New England, which therstofore had 
been supplied largely by American refiners. In October, the 
American refiners withdrew all quotations, owing to their 
being unable to secure sufficient crude camphor to keep 
their refineries running. The demand for camphor for use 
in fighting the epidemic came almost simultaneously with 
the withdrawal of quotations by the Amer|pan refiners, and 
served to demonstrate thoroughly that the refiners were In 
bad shape as to crude supplies. 

Demand spread rapidly from New England throughout the 
East, South and West, and with the American refiners able 
to supply but the most limited amount, Japanese refined 
goods alone were available. As the overwhelming request 
came at a time when stocks were of the narrowest propor- 
tions, the effect may well be Judged. 

The graphic accompanying this review tells the entire 
story. Affording as it does a striking commentary upon the 
developments of the entire year, it may well be understood 
that at the close of 1918 the camphor market was in a 
strong position. The outlook for 1919 was particularly un- 
favorable to consumers and especially favorable for the 
plans of the Japanese Camphor Monopoly Bureau. In com- 
paring the prices at New York and Japan, 10c. per pound 

representing ocean and overland freight, duty, insurance 

and war risk— should be added to the Japanese quotations. 



154 



1918 YEAR BOOK 



E R. LATHROP 




CO 



INCORPORATED 



International Merchants 



CRUDE DRUGS 



3 



SPECIALTIES 



Camphor, Japanese Refined 
Menthol, Crystals 
Cascara Sagrada Bark 
Arabic Gum, Amber 
Buchu Leaves, Short 
Cod Liver Oil 
Orris Root, Powdered 
Belladonna Root 
Jalap Root, High Test 
Ginger Root, Jamaica 
Dandelion Root 



Vegetable Wax, Japanese 
Insect Powder, 100% Pure 
Cinchona Bark, Java .. 
Balsam of Fir, Oregon 
Nux Vomica Cochin 
Digitalis Leaves, U. S. P. 
Precipitated Chalk 
White Pine Bark 
Bees Wax, Yellow 
Wild Cherry Bark 
Senega Root, Northwestern II 



am 



iiiwMuiwiiiiniHnmwmuim«iHimt«WHimiii 
MWWMWiliiimtiMi M w n i nm w n iMi»iM Hmn miM H wiHMi 



MinuiminnMmHnNiininniitimuiMiiiMiiiunmmim 

*IMNImmilMHHIMHIHMn<IIHIIIMnlUUIMIMUIHniMM«MMMMn 



MroimnnwHi m i wmw mnnii H iii i iiwH. 



il 
I! 



HEAD OFFICE: 



110-116 BEEKMAN ST., NEW YORK CITY 



Cable Address: "SISCOSTAL," New York 



Branches or Agents in 

Buffalo, New York Philadelphia, Pa. Chicago, Illinois St. Louis, Missouri 

Greenville, S. C. Kansas City, Mo. Toronto, Canada San Juan, Porto Rico 

Manila, Philippines Havana, Cuba Marseille, France London, England 

Christiania, Norway Amsterdam, Holland Mexico, Mexico Bombay, India 

Kobe, Japan Torino, Italy Barcelona, Spain Shanghai, China 



OIL PAINT AND DRUG REPORTER 



155 



\ 



DRUG MARKET, HIGH 
ACIDS. 

Carbolic. 

(See Acids, Chemical Market!.) . 



Citric, Crystals. 

•—Per pound 
1917. 

H. L. 

January $0.65 $0.66 

February 72 .68 

March 72 .72 

Aurll 72 .72 

May 72 .72 

June 72 .72 

July 72 .72 

August 72 .72 

September 72 .72 

October 72 .72 

November 72 .72 

December 75 .75 

Year 75 .65 



In barrel*— * 
IMS. 
H. L. 
S0.75 $0.76 
.75 .75 



.82 

.82 

.82 

.82 

.82 

.82 

.82 

.92 

1.25 

1.25 

1.25 



.75 
.82 
.82 
.82 
.82 
.82 
.82 
.82 
1.25 
1.25 
.75 





Tartaric 


, Crystals. 






' 1915. 


1916. 1917. 


1918. 




H. I*. 


H. 


L. 


H. 


L. 


H. L. 


Jan .... 


40% 87ft 


62 


52 


70 


66 


79% 75 


Feb.... 


«I 


70 


55 


78 


66 


77 76 


March. 


77 


66 


84 


75 


77 75 


April.. 


89 88 


85 


66 


82 


76 


80% 75 


May... 


40% 89 


79 


66 


80 


76 


88 88 


June... 


48 48 


76 


66 


80 


78% 
78% 


60 86 


July... 


48 44 


72 


66 


82 


95 86 


Aug... 


46% 46% 


70 


66 


81 


78% 


95 86 


Sept. . . 


46% 46% 


70 


66 


81 


78% 


95 86 


Oct. ... 


47 46% 


70 


66 


81 


78% 


95 86 


Nov. . . 


52 47 


70 


66 


81 


78% 


95 86 


X^OC m m m • 


55 49 


70 


66 


78% 76 


87 86 


Year. . . 


55 87% 

BO 


85 

TA 


52 


84 

:al 


66 
S. 


95 75 




NIC 





Balm of Gilead. 

t Per poun d \ 

1917. 1918. 

H. L. H. L. 

January S0.20 $0.20 $0.50 $0.50 

February 4 .20 .20 .60 .45 

March 20 .20 .45 .40 

April 20 .20 .88 .87 

Maf 26 .21 .87 .87 

June 26 .24 .50 .46 

July 28 .26 .45 .45 

August 29 .28 .75 .45 

September 30 .29 .95 .75 

October 55 .30 1.25 1.10 

November 6f- .55 1.40 1.25 

December &0 65 1.50 .80 

Year 80 .20 1.50 .37 

Ergot, Russian and Spanish. 

1917. 

t Per poun d ■ ■ ^ 

Russian. Spanish. 

H. L.. H. L. 

January $0.68" $0.68 $0.68 $0.68 

February 70 .68 . <0 .68 

March 72 .68 .72 .6ft 

April 72 .70 .72 .72 

May 75 .70 .72 .72 

June • 75 .75 .72 .72 

July 15 -75 .73 .72 

August 75 .75 .73 .78 

September ...... .75 .75 • .i3 .7- 

October 75 .73 .72 .70 

November 75 .73 .75 .70 

December "8 .75 .78 .75 

Year 78 .68 .78 .68 

1918. 

, Per pound » 

Russian. Spanish. 

H. L. H. L. 

January $0.82 $0.78 $0.85 $0.78 

February 82 .82 .85 .85 

March 85 .82 .85 .82 

April 85 .85 .85 .85 

May 90 .85 .90 .85 

June 95 .95 .95 .95 

July 1.05 1.05 1.05 1.05 

August 1.20 1.10 1.20 1.10 

September 1.75 1.50 1.75 1.50 

October 1.95 105 1.95 1.95 

November 2.25 2.00 2 25 2.00 

December 2.50 2 50 2.50 2.50 

Year 2 50 .78 2.50 .78 



Lycopodium. 



1917. 

H. L- 

January $1.20 $1.15 

February 1.20 1.20 

March 1-20 1.20 

Aprl 1.20 1.20 

May 140 1.20 

June 1.50 1.45 

July 1.60 150 

August 1.80 1.60 

September 2.40 8.20 

October 2.40 2.00 

November 2.00 2.00 

. December 2.00 1.85 

* Year 2.40 1.15 



Per pound- 



H. 

$1.80 
1.75 
1.80 
1.75 
1.75 
1.70 
1.70 
1.60 
1.65 
1.65 
1.75 
1.75 
1.80 



1918. 



L. 
$1.75 
1.75 
1.70 
1.70 
1.75 
1.70 
1.60 
1.60 
1.60 
1.65 
1.70 
1.75 
1.60 



Manna, Flake. 

1917. 

, P er poun d- ■» 

Ijarge. Small. 

H. L. H. Ij. 

January $1 «5 $100 $0.90 $0.75 

February 1.00 1.00 .80 .76 

March T 1.10 1.00 .80 .75 

April 100 1.00 .76 .75 

May 100 1.00 .75 .75 

Juno 1.00 .95 .75 .72 

July 95 .95 .72 .72 

August 95 .96 .72 .72 

September 96 .95 .72 .70 

October 95 .95 .70 .70 

November 95 .95 .78 .70 

December 96 .95 .78 .78 

Year 1.66 .95 .90 .70 

1918. 

, i P er pound > 

Large. Small. 

H. L, H. Ij. 

January $0.95 $0-95 $0.75 $0 78 

February 95 .95 .76 .75 

March 82 .82 .68 .68 

April 90 .85 .72 .65 

May 90 .90 .72 .72 

June 1.00 .90 .76 .72 

July 1.00 1.00 .75 .65 

August 1.00 1.00 .62 .62 

September 1.00 .85 .68 .62 

Octobor .75 .75 .68 .62 

November 75 .75 .62 .58 

December 75 .75 .58 .68 

Year 1.00 .75 .75 .58 

Nux Vomica, Buttons. - 

r—Per pound > 

1917. 1918. 

H. L. H. Ij. 

January $0.07% $0.06% $0.12 $0.11% 

February 12 .08 .11% .11% 

March 13 .12 .11% .11% 

April 18 .12% .11% .11% 

May - 13 .12% .14 .12% 

June 13% .12 .14% .13% 

July 12 .11% .15 .14% 

August 12 .12 .15 .18 

September 12 .12 .13 .13 

October 12 .12 .12 .12 

November 12% .12% .12 .11 

December 12% .12% .11 , .U 

Year 18% .06% .16 / .11 

Tamarinds. 

, Per ke g \ 

1917. 1918. 

H. 'Ij. H. Ij. 

January $2.60 $2.50 $4.00 $8.75 

February 2.75 2.50 4.00 4.00 

March 2.75 2.75 4.00 4.00 

April 5.00 8.00 4.00 4.00 

May 5.50 5.00 4.50 4.00 

June 5.50 5.50 4.90 4.50 

July 5.50 5.50 5.00 4.90 

Auguat 5.50 5.60 5.00 5.00 

September 5.50 4.00 5.00 5.00 

Octobor 4.50 8.75 6.00 5.00 

November....... 3.75 8.75 7.00 6.00 

December 3.76 8.75 7.00 7.00 

Year 5.50 2.50 7.00 8.75 

BALSAMS. 



Capaiba, Para. 

. P er poun d \ 

1917. 1918. 

H. Ij. H. Ij. 

January $0.60 $0.48 $0-67% $0.66 

February 50 .50 .67% .67% 

March 50 .50 .75 .70 

April 52% .50 .75 .70 

May 55 .52% .60 .60 

June 60 .60 .60 .00 

July 63 .58 .60 .60 

August 68 .66 .60 .60 

September 65 .05 .60 .60 

October 65 .65 .60 .57% 

November 65 .65 .67% .57% 

December 66 .65 .67% .67% 

Year 68 .48 .75 .57% 

Capaiba, South American. 

, Per poun d » 

1917. 1918. 

H. L.. H. Ij. 

January $0.70 $0.65 $0.97% $0.96 

February "5 -.70 .97% .97% 

March 75 .70 .97% .96 

April 75 .75 .95 .95 

May 85 .75 .90 .87% 

June »5 .90 .87% .86 

July 90 .90 .85 .80 

August 95 .90 .80 .80 

September 92% .92% .80 .75 

October 95 .92% .75 .75 

November 95 .92% .75 .75 

December 96 .96 .75 .75 

Year 95 .66 .97% .76 

Fir, Canada. 

/——Per gallon- » 

1917. , 1918., 

H. Ij. H. L. 

January $5.50 $5.50 .$5.75 $5.75 

February 6.50 5.50 5.75 5.75 

March 5.50 5.50 6.76 6.76 

April 5-60 5.50 5.75 5.75 

May C.OO 5.50 6;75 5.75 

June. co ° eo ° ° 75 215 

Silly 6.00 6 00 6.00 6.00 



YEARS 



, -Per gallo n ■ 

1 5IT ^ wis. 

August v... 6.00 6^0 6.00 

September 6.00 6.76 6.00 

October 5.76 5.75 6.00 

November 5.76 P.75 9.00 

December 5.75 5.75 9.00 

Year 6.00 5.60 9.00 



L. 

6.00 

6.00 

6.00 

7.25 

9.00 

5.75 



Fir, Oregon. 

, Per gallon——- * 

^917. — 1W8 \. 

H. Ij. H. Ij. 

January $0.85 $0.80 $1.25 $1.15 

February 85 .85 1.25 1.26 

MwSh;.. 53 .90 1.76 1.60 

aotS .::: 1.00 .95 i.w i.» 

May 1.00 .95 1.60 1.60 

June 96 .90 1.60 1.60 

July 90 .90 1.75 1.75 

August 90 .90 1.76 1.76 

September 90 .90 1.76 1.76 

October 96 .90 1.75 1.76 

November 1.16 1.10 1.76 1.76 

December 1.16 1.16 1.75 1.60 

Year 1.15 .80 1.75 1.16 

P