(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The 1933 yearbook of the Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing"

Sx J2ibris 




The Nurses' Library 
Hahnemann Hospital 



FOR REFERENCE 



NOT TO BE TAKEN FROM THE ROOM 

(ttfas 012 



Haheemaee Hospital 
School of Nursing 



CLASS OF 1933 




MOTTO: — Enter to Learn — Go Forth to Serve 



FOREWORD 

"A book may be amusing with numerous errors — 
Or it may be dull without a single absurdity." 
Without a Year Book the memory of the three years" 
existence and experience of the Class of 1933 would never 
grow dim to its members, but it is our aim to convey some 
idea of our characteristics to anyone who is interested. 

Please, we ask you — Do not compare this literature 
with the works of Shakespeare. 



Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing 



SARA M. D. SHORHLEY, R.N. 

It seems like only yesterday 

When we started on our career; 
And as we've lived from day to day 
The time, so quickly passed away, 

Has given us someone dear. 

Tall and fair, with silvery hair 

Under a cap of white, 
As she stood at our head, 
Whatever she said, 

We knew that it must be right. 

She has built a foundation, a firm foundation, 
As she spoke with no effort to boast; 

For did she not say 

That beauty unadorned — 
Is beauty adored the most? 

And now, in our portals, 

We know we are lacking 
Those efforts she used to inspire; 
And though far away, we always shall say 

She still is to us "our own Mrs. Dyer. 1 ' 

H. Schwartz. 



The Hahn-O-Scope, 1933 




We, the nurses of the Class of 1933, humbly dedi- 
cate this volume: 



TO SARA M. D. SHORHLEY, R.N. 

Instructress in Theory 



Florence Nightingale Pledge 

"I SOLEMNLY PLEDGE MYSELF BEFORE 
GOD AND IN THE PRESENCE OF THIS ASSEM- 
BLY TO PASS MY LIFE IN PURITY AND TO 
PRACTICE MY PROFESSION FAITHFULLY. I 
WILL ABSTAIN FROM WHATEVER IS DELE- 
TERIOUS AND MISCHIEVOUS AND WILL NOT 
KNOWINGLY ADMINISTER ANY HARMFUL 
DRUG. I WILL DO ALL IN MY POWER TO 
ELEVATE THE STANDARD OF MY PROFESSION 
AND WILL HOLD IN CONFIDENCE ALL PER- 
SONAL MATTERS COMMITTED TO MY KEEP- 
ING AND ALL FAMILY AFFAIRS COMING TO 
MY KNOWLEDGE IN THE PRACTICE OF MY 
CALLING. WITH LOYALTY WILL I ENDEAVOR 
TO AID THE PHYSICIAN IN HIS WORK AND 
DEVOTE MYSELF TO THE WELFARE OF THOSE 
COMMITTED TO MY CARE." 




Hahnemann Hospital 



Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing 




S. Annabelle Smith, R.N. 
Superintendent of T^urses 



To the Class of 1933 

If you have built castles in the air your work need 
not be lost. That is where they should be. Now put 
the foundations under them. 



The Hahn-O-Scope, 1933 




V 

Ellen Wisler, R.N. 
Class Sponsor 

When ,i smile or cheerful greetin' 
Means so much to fellows -ore, 

Seems we ought to keep repe.it in". 
Smiles an" praises more an" more 



Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing 





Lois I. Bausman, R.N. 

Instructress in Elementary pursing 



Eleanor T. Cotillis, R.N. 
Instructress in Elementary T^ursing 




Goldie D. Harker, R.N. 
Instructress in Theory 



10 



The Hahn-O-Scope, 1933 




Stai i of Supervisors 



Top Row: Left to Right 

Emily Azinger 
Be vtrice Hervey 

Florence Potts 
I'm line Young 
Helen Kramer 
Helen Deakyni 
Anna Richmond 
Alice Guiney 
Margaret William- 
Mary V. GORMLI ^ 



Bottom Row: Left to Right 

Virginia Lowe 
Lillian Freas 
Maude Graham 
Sara Fine 
Sophie Saskovitz 
Ellen Wisler 
Miriam Hennj 
Claire Kreiser 



11 



Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing 



President Anne Keyser 

Vice-President Margaret Sharpless 

Secretary Mary Frances Gray 

Treasurer Anne Fox 



Class Book Staff 

Editors Edith Detterline 

Nora King 

Assistant Editors Gertrude Schuck 

Hilda Schwartz 

Business Managers Jo Marie Rider 

Ann Kaplan 

Art Editor Treina Lord 

Prophecy Margaret Shaw 

Annabel Longacre 

Will Bertha Messinger 

Ida Border 

Humor Dorothy E. Fisher 

Mary E. Dissinger 



12 



The Hahn-O-Scope, 1933 



HELEN BERGER 



\\ "inthrop, Mass. 



"Bi R(,l r" 



Quick and lively, happy and gay, 
A smile for all who come her way, 
She drives that old man. Gloom, away: 
What more of Berger could one say? 





FLORENCE BLEIM Bisbee, Arizona 

"Flossie" 

"Men may come and men may go, but I go on forever" 

Floss is a resourceful young lady with a keen sense of 
humor. An extravert from birth, especially interested in 
the dashing young Lochinvar that roam in the vicinity. 
May the veil of mystery forever stay! 



IDA BORDER 



Lebanon, Pa. 



"Bubbles" 



Hahnemann without Border may be likened unto a 
King's Court without the jester. 

Moral — A sense of humor will carry its possessor over 
many rough spots in the world. 




13 



Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing 




CELIA BUDICH 



Perkiomenville, Pa. 



"Cel" 



Only we who have been her friends are privileged to 

opine because the lack of knowing so often means the 

lack of understanding. Celebrating on New Year's Eve 
seems to be her hobby. 



EMELIA MARIATTA CHRISTY 

"Mellie" 



Rossiter, Pa. 



A smile — A flash of teeth — Five feet of good-natured' 
ness — There you have Christy! Do you all know why she 
watches the scale so closely? Perhaps her incentive may 
be that dread fear (so predominating) Avoirdupois! Here's 
hoping she may never be sidetracked in her pursuit of 
ideals. 





LEILA COOK Quincy, Pa. 

"Cookie" 

"Blessings on thee, Little One" 

A little girl, who is always gay, 
A mind all her own, in work or play 
Kind hearted, cheerful, never sad, 
A better friend, one never had. 



14 



The Hahn-O-Scope, 1933 



FLORENCE MEDA COOPER Lykens, Pa 

"Flow" 

"Wor^ ic/iiJc you wor\ — Play while you play" 

Speed is Floss' outstanding characteristic. Why worry 
ibout a tiling 1 "Do it and get it off your chest." With 
this as her guiding line how can she fail to meet success? 





KATHERINE CORL 



State College, Pa. 



'Kitty' 



"To persevere in one's duty and to be silent is the best 
answer to calamity' 

Kitty is so quiet, and always the good listener, rather 
than the ready talker; she is sincere in all she undertakes. 
In her own way she has won our hearts 



LaRUE CUPPER Tyrone, Pa. 

"Billy" 

"A rose bud set with hllle wilful thorns" 

Billy assumes an air of innocence, hut we are inclined 
to hclieve otherwise. However, she has a very disarming 
smile — to which few have proven immune. 




15 



Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing 




ALMA CHRISTINE DAVIS West Philadelphia, Pa. 

"Al" 

Patoii, alack! has found his rival. Generous with her 
belongings, helpful to her co-workers. We have enjoyed 
Alma among us. 



EDITH DETTERLINE 



Norristown, Pa. 



'Edie' 



"Plan your wor\, and then wor\ your plan" 

Edith's kindness speaks volumes. In her we find qual- 
ities that everyone would like to possess. Her efficiency 
and happy disposition are hard to duplicate. 





MARY ELIZABETH DISSINGER 
"Dizzy" 



Lebanon, Pa. 



Ripples from a hidden, forgotten, half-known self began 
to flow from remote recesses; forming with geological slow- 
ness -it changed into rivulets that became in turn tribu- 
taries o| hte's stream. My answer — Your answer — Claude! 



16 



The Hahn-O-Scope, 1933 



MARION ELY Lykcns, Pa. 

"Marion" 

"Steam is a capricious ariel difficult to harness" 

It is just this very feeling of reality that has been 
responsible for our increasing interest. For we believe that 
we have known the real Marion "Sans camouflage." 





DOROTHY E. FISHER 



Lebanon, Pa. 



"Dotty" 

"Hahnemann's little woman" 

Why walk a mile.' Here's Dot! Her sweet disposition 
is luck, and her presence satisfies. Sports and Dotty go 
hand in hand — proven to us by her ability on the basket' 
hall floor. 



ANNE ELIZABETH FOX Burlington, N. J. 

"Anne" 

"Giggle and the u»orId giggles with you" 

Ann possesses that indescribable something that you've 
got to like besides being a most versatile conversationalist. 
She attained her highest mark in Obs. — even though it was 
blacl{ and blue. 




17 



Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing 




MARY FRANCES GRAY Bethlehem, Pa. 

"Frankie" 

"It is good to live, to love, to laugh, to suffer and to labor" 

A word in explanation — 

To live — just life. 

To love — your guess! 

To laugh — who wouldn't with Stan and Mover. 

To suffer — two feet. 

To labor — seven 'til seven. 



ETHEL GREAVES 



Frankford, Pa. 



'Etts" 



Curly hair, lovely dark eyes, a winning smile — a deter- 
mination to overstep difficulties at any cost, bubbling over 
with enthusiasm. We present for your approval — our 
Ethel. 





SARAH LONG GROFF 



Lancaster, Pa. 



"Sally' 



'Only the truly wise can have a great deal to say 
and \eep silent" 

Patience and loyalty 

Do the person enhance, 

Sweetness and light, 
Do friends entrance. 



18 



The Hahn-O-Scope, 1933 



LOUINE A. HAINES Lancaster, Pa. 

"Speed" 

"Sull waters run deep" 

Quiet is Limine, but with merry dignity and humor al! 
her own. 





VERNA HARTRANFT 



Reading, Pa. 



"Verna" 



Of all the things of Heaven and earth, 

That she would wish to own, 

There's just one thing that's biggest and best — 

And that isn't life of possession and rest, 

But of joy in the service of man. 



MARY ELLEN HARTZELL 

"Hartzell' 



Hatfield, Pa 



"We are not here to play, to dream, to drift, 
We have worl{ to do, and loads to lift." 

Along with many other admirable qualities, Ellen's pleas- 
ant smile denotes a successful nurse and a happy future. 




19 



Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing 




ROBERTA HICKERNELL 

"Hick" 



Middletown, Pa. 



"Hick" seems the quiet sort until you really learn to 
know her. And knowing her is loving her. . . . We hear 
those wedding bells. 



ARLENE JACOBS 



Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



'Jake' 



"The gods have given her rare treasures." 

Everyone knows Jake, that charming bit of femininity, 
one of those winsome, modest, yet rougish girls, admired 
by everyone. But in spite of her many dreams she has one 
weakness, that is listening to Rudy Vallee croon. Rudy 
should feel honored to have such a strong supporter as 
"Jake." 





ANNE NADIA KAPLAN 

"Anne" 
"To be or not to he. 



New York, N. Y. 



Efficiency — individuality- that's Anne. Always co-oper- 
ative, possessing an abundance of energy, wit and good 
sportsmanship. We know that -he will succeed in any 
undertaking. 



20 



The Hahn-O-Scope, 1933 



ANNE JANE KEYSER 



Coatesville, Pa. 



"Ki" 



"It's nice to be natural ij you are naturally nice" 

Who is there just like Anne, her ready smile and con- 
ns laugh are an inspiration to everyone. May the 
volatile gods smile upon her! 





NORA MARIE KING 



Hollidaysburg, Pa. 



"Kincie" 



Gee! what an example to the world! What a triumph 
over obstacles has been achieved by this grand little nurse 
who lives so that she may help others to "wrap the drap' 
eries of their couches about them and lie down to pleasant 

dreams." 



LUBO KOHUT McAdoo, Pa. 

"Lovi v" 

"Laugh and the world laughs with you' 

Lovey smashes the world's fastest walking record daily 
— a quick smile lor everyone but always ready to take time 
or a little orange juice, 




21 



Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing 




MARY MALINDA LENTZ York, Pa. 

"Lentz" 

"What I do concerns me most, not what people thin\" 

Quiet, unassuming, 
Not offensive to any man 
Mary always does her duty — 
.The very best she can. 



M. ESTELLE LEVERING Jenkintown, Pa. 

"Stell" 

"Wells are deep" and so is Estelle 

That quiet air disguises an enthusiasm that is quite con- 
tagious. Though small herself, she goes in for things in a 
big way. Hard to know, but, once known, the best of 
friends. A real Pal! 





RUTH ELIZABETH LOESLEIN 
"Ruth" 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



When you watch another student nurse go about her 
usual routine, do you ever wonder what is going on 
beneath the lines she speaks and the things she does? 



22 



The Hahn-O-Scope, 19S3 



ALICE MAREA LOFINK Elkton, Md. 

"Al" 

"The eyes have it" 

We thought that Ally's stay at Hahnemann would he 
short — hut, to the contrary, it has lasted over a period of 
three years, plus — ? 

But what would we do without those great, big, beauti- 
ful, gorgeous eyes? One glance is enough! 





MARION ANNABEL LONGACRE Mount Union, Pa. 
"Pete" 

We don't have to go into theory to prove how virgil 

sharpens the wits. It's a fact! 

Just so (with apologies for the tautology) one may say — 
"We don't have to probe into Petey's depths to prove 

she's genuine." It's a fact. 



TREINA LUCILLE LORD Phoenixville, Pa. 

"Treine" 

"Great, wide, wonderful, beautiful world" 

This seems to be Treine's estimation of life; supported 
by a sunny disposition, a timely patience, and an immacu- 
late appearance — we may tip our hats to "an excellent 
nurse." 




23 



Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing 




DOROTHY MacTAGUE 



Overbrook, Pa. 



"Dot" 



"1/ only we were able to conceive the survival of 
intelligence beyond death . . ." 
By different methods, different ones excel, 
But we've found one who can do 'most all things well. 



BERTHA MESSINGER 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



"Bert' 



One deep in thought, and very well read, 

Is Bert, there is no doubt; 
Her generous ways, her kindness of heart, 

A true friend — throughout! 





HELEN MIDLEN West Philadelphia, Pa. 

"Tiny" 

"Ever willing, ever hurrying, 
Happy-goAuc\y , never worrying" 

What a combination — wit, personality, pep and capa- 
bility! 



24 



The Hahn-O-Scope, 1933 



FRANCES MOYER 



Pottsville, Pa. 



'Fran" 



"To be li\ed by everyone is a rare gift" 

W'c wonder what our Fran would do were she stranded 
on some "foodless" land. A charming companion and a 
perfect Pollyanna. 





CATHERINE MULLINEAUX 

"DlDDv" 



Norristown, Pa. 



Diddy Mullineaux — clean cut from tip to toe, 

Full of reliance; 
We fear from what we know that soon her hand will go 

In holv alliance. 



RUTH CATHERINE RAUSH 

"Ruth" 

Fragile fragility, 
Seemingly Aims} , 
Grace and ability, 
Mental agility, 
Seasoned with whimsy. 
R-U-T-H. 



Philadelphia, Pa 




25 



Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing 




JO MARIE RIDER 



Waynesboro, Pa. 



"Jo" 



"Let your conscience be your guide" 

Night after night, 

The lights burned bright. 

Our enthusiast — over jig-saws!! 



GERTRUDE SCHUCK Pottsville, Pa. 

"Gert" 

Old friends and new friends, 
Tried friends and true friends, 
Are to be had — but — 
For a good every-day friend 
"Gert" certainly will do. 





MARGARET M. SHAW 



Wilmington, Del. 



"Pec," 



Blue eyes, brown hair, 

A hearty laugh and a big smile there; 

Keen mind and dancing feet 

This combination is hard to beat. 

We tender a compliment of the highest sort: 

"Here's to Peg, a darned good sport." 



26 



The Hahn-O-Scope, 1933 



MARGARET SHARPLESS Catawissa, Pa. 

"Marni v" 
"Tall, trustworthy, true" 
"For she was jes' the quiet kind whose nature never 





ELIZABETH SHEARER 

"Bessie" 



Hazelton, Pa. 



Who is honest and hearty, and true to the core? 

Who wisecracks just once — and then wisecracks some 

more? 
Now, if we befog you, let's make ourselves clearer, 
We're speaking — in fact — of one Bessie Shearer! 



HILDA SCHWARTZ 

"Schwartzy" 



Hazelton, Pa. 



"All the arts of comfort and delight revolve 
around the care of life" 




27 



Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing 




LAURA SEEBER 



Camden, N. J. 



"Seeber" 



The demand for blondes has consistently increased from 
year to year. Hence — Laura! 



JULIA ELEANOR SEKELLICK Pottsville, Pa. 

"Julia" 

Content to do her duty, 

And find in duty done a full reward! 





jP^^H 




4^^ I 1 

m 




^i^m 




SALENA STANLEY 



Spring City, Pa. 



"Stan" 



Too much planning is a waste of time- 
Too much thinking a lolly — 

Why not do the best you can? 
Win or lose he jolly. 



28 



The Hahn-O-Scope, 1933 



ADA WHITEHEAD 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



'Ada' 



Her natural reserve and disregard for inferiority make 
her hard to meet. But humor, understanding and unfalter- 
ing loyalty make a companion sought under all circum- 
stances. 





ISABEL ADELE WILBON 

"Issy" 



Pottsville, Pa. 



"Troubles are often lif{e clouds that part to reveal 
a brighter s\y" 

Although Issy is quiet and dignified she does not forget 
duty or class work: loyal and devoted to her circle of 
friends — likewise, to her patients. 



ROSE YANNI Rossiter, Pa 

"Rose" 

"The everlasting optimist" 

No matter how difficult her work, how trying the day. 
Rose will be sure to say, "I love it." 




29 



Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing 



Great Staff 

A MULTITUDE of surgeons and physicians have drifted into the lives of the fifty- 
one student nurses in our graduating class. It was easy, as time went by, to 
differentiate between the physician who was apt to be a trifle careless in his 
dress, slow in speech, and the surgeon who, on the other hand, tended to talk too 
swiftly, dress meticulously, gesture boldly. But physician and surgeon alike, we nurses 
feel that so rare an opportunity to give well-earned praise, must not be overlooked. 

We have seen their ceaseless, unselfish efforts to lessen pain and bring a smile to 
the faces of the suffering, and many of us have learned valuable lessons in caring for 
the sick by their examples. Here the futility of our own feeble words fuse us to quote 
from the more gifted pen of the great Elisha Bartlett: 

"There is no process which can reckon up the amount of good which the science 
of art of medicine has conferred upon the human race. There is no moral calculus 
that can grasp and comprehend the sum of their beneficent operations. Ever since the 
first dawn of civilization and learning, they have been true and constant friends of the 
suffering sons and daughters of men. They have dispelled the gloom of the sick room. 
They have called back the radiance of the lusterless eye and the bloom of their fading 
cheek. 

"And finally, when exhausted in all their other resources, and baffled in their skill, 
handmaids of philosophy and religion, they have blunted the arrows of death and 
rendered less rugged and precipitous the pathway to the tomb. 

"His daily round of labor is crowned with beneficence, and his nightly sleep is 
broken that others may have better rest. His whole life is a blessed ministry of conso- 
lation and hope." 

Class of '33. 



30 



The Hahn-O-Scope, 1933 



WHO can say what the future will bring forth.' It is not within the power of us 
mere mortals to predict or to prophesy just what the members of our outstand- 
ing class will be doing several years hence, but a feeble attempt must be made 
to portray by the use of words what we think would be the ideal field of work for 
these future nurses. 

To comply with the old saying — women and children first — we will begin with 
the "tots"- -Dotty Fisher and Leila Cook. Can't you picture these inseparables as 
managing a Children's Hospital — they being the bait? 

Be not surprised to hear glorious reports of a nurses' Olympic basketball team 
headed by the stars, Alice Lofink and Helen Berger. 

Of Anne Keyser we have a vivid picture in the role of wife to a rising young 
physician. 

Ada Whitehead we see as chief bouncer by grace of her ability to down one by 
her glances. 

Estelle Levering has a floating hospital for stray cats and dogs. Not yet has she 
overcome her love of aqua pura and sailboats. 

National Directress of Nurses, alias Dorothy MacTague, keeps the wheel of 
nursing profession rotating. 

Gertrude Schuck, due to her enforced love of medical duties, is now prescribing 
original remedies. 

That "music hath charm to soothe the savage beast" is verified by the sweet 
strains of the Nurses" Glee Club, with Anne Fox, Bessie Shearer, Hilda Schwartz, 
Arlene Jacobs, Mary Frances Gray, Marion Ely and Louine Haines as the choristers. 

We see Margaret Sharpless holding spellbound a multitude of nurses by the far- 
reaching quality of her voice. 

Verna Hartranft's mate sense of humor has gained for her the enviable position 
of "hospital jester." 

"Stan" and "Fran" — the eighth wonder of the world — the nursing Siamese twins. 

Catherine Mullineaux is now of the House of David. 

Although Nora King had set as her goal School Nursing, she seems well content 
to do family nursing. 

Treina Lord, whose artistic abilities are not to be denied, is now illustrator tor a 
Nurses' Fashion Book. 

Jo Rider, with the peg leg, is specializing in the application of plaster pans casts. 

Tiny Midlen's ability to let off steam has been directed toward the final awakening 
of the Chinese. 

To all and sundry we anticipate success in her chosen field with the ultimate goal 
■ t glorifying the fascinating, not-so-easy-but-oh-so-gr*nd nursing profession 

M. Shaw, 

M. A. Longa< RE. 



31 



Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing 



ON this, the twenty-seventh day of January, in the year of our Lord, Nineteen 
Hundred and Thirty-three, A. D., the benevolent old Seniors of your Alma 
Mater wish to bequeath, in just division, our most outstanding and worthy 
possessions, personal and otherwise. 

To begin with, we want at this time to express to Miss S. Annabel Smith, our 
Superintendent of Nurses, the greatest esteem and appreciation for her many kind and 
helpful hints, during our three years at Hahnemann. 

To Miss Wisler, who has been so bearing and patient with our class, we bequeath 
our extreme gratitude and thanks for her many good advices. 

We bequeath to the Department of Instruction our many unsolved examination 
papers for further class quizzes. 

To Mrs. Dyer, Miss Bausman and Miss Cotellis we bequeath many thanks for 
the good start of our probationary period, which has carried us through to this day. 

To the Supervisors of our Alma Mater, who had many times lost their all with 
us, we bequeath apologies and hopes for better Juniors and Freshmen, to say the least 
of probationers. 

To the Juniors we bequeath the following: 

1. Seniors' poise and dignity. 

2. The duties of upholding and raising the morals and teachings of 

our school. 

To the Freshmen: 

1 . Our old uniforms and accessories. 
To the Probationers we bequeath some respect for their fellow co-workers. 
The following honorable mentioned shall receive special bequests, which the 
Seniors feel are most useful to them : 

1 . To. H. Ivory we will Julia Sekellik's many giggles. 

2. To A. Bauser we will Estelle Levermg's grace and poise. 

3. To M. Stelik we will Ada Whitehead's calmness and nonchalance. 

4. LaRue Cupper's spontaneous grin we bequeath to A. Czabator. 

5. Ruth Raush's supply of bath salts we will to Hazel Eck. 

6. To Lu Chance we give Verna Hartranft's natural complexion. 

7. Dotty Fisher's ambitions we will to Carol Coffee. 

8. For Eunice Ryan we give Anne Keyser's disposition. 

9. To Anna Moses we will Marty Sharpless's ability to keep calm. 

10. Laura Seeber's success in obtaining blonde hair to Evelyn Brough and M 
Ritzel. 



32 



The Hahn-O-Scope, 1933 



To Garnctta Keller we will Marian Ely's gift oi gab. 

To Miss Rapp we will Dot MacTague's brains — she needs them. 

To Mary Geisinger we will a few of Frankie Gray's hoy friends. 

Nora King's ability to sleep m elass we bequeath to Margaret Kinnear. 
To Dot Gordon we will Frances Mover's and Selena Stanley's ambition to 
go out until 9 P. M. every night. 

To Caroline Bell we will Alma Davis's "IT" with the staff. 
Lovie Kohut's height we bequeath to "Snitz" Snyder. 
"To Isabelle Rogers we will Ethel Greaves' famous Garbo bob. 
To G. Herbst we bequeath Kitty Corl's whispering voice. 
Peg Shaw's dancing feet we will to Maria Harbeson. 
Jo Rider's peg leg we will to M. Fisher — maybe that will cut her speed. 
To J. Kupiac we will Mary Lcntn's sense of humor. 

To those who are not herewith mentioned, we leave the use of the telephone in 
the Nurses' Home, between 7 and 9 P. M. 

Signed, witnessed and sealed, on this twenty-seventh day of January, Nineteen 
Hundred and Thirty-three, in the presence of: 



16 

17 
18 
19 

20 

21 



Signed: Bertha Messinger, 
Ida Border. 



Witnesses: 



Anne Keyser, 
Ada Whitehead, 
Estelle Levering. 



SEAL. 




33 




OS 

w 
Z 

o 

H 
< 

03 
O 
ai 



The Hahn-O-Scope, 1933 



To tlie Graduating Class 

IN all well written sermons, the texts should be quoted first, then the proper morals 
drawn. Let us be orthodox: 
Text No. 1 : — "Language is a medium for recording one's sensations. It is gesture 
translated into sound, it is a noise with a meaning. Language is the symbol whereby 
one lady in a back street makes audible her impression of the lady who lives on the 
same floor — it is often extremely sinewy. Speech is the particular form of noise made 
by Congressmen. Talk may be described as the crime of people who make one tired. 
It is my opinion that people talk too much. On every day that passes there is regis- 
tered over all the earth a vast amount of language which has not the slightest bearing 
on anything anywhere." 

"Grasshoppers are a fine, sturdy race of people; they do not speak with the same 
machinery we use — they convey their ideas to each other by rubbing their hind legs 
together, whereupon noises are produced of exceeding variety and interest. As a 
method of speech this is simply delightful. Perhaps we shall live to see the day when 
newspapers will chronicle that Mr. Borah had rubbed his legs together for three hours 
and was removed frothing at the feet, but after a little rest was enabled to return and 
make more noise than ever.'' 1 

Moral: — Don't talk too much. 

Text No. 2 : — "Nero neglected all the duties of a prince and wasted his time 
in painting, engraving, singing and driving chariots." 

"Philip of Macedon gave lectures on music and even undertook to correct the 
masters of it, which led one of them to say: 'God forbid, sir, that you should be so 
unhappy as to understand this subject better than I do.' '' 

Moral: — It is a false ambition which leads individuals to aim at excellencies, 
however valuable in themselves, that are inconsistent with their station, character or 
profession, or which in the acquisition must interfere with other pursuits of more 
importance. 

Text No. 3 : — "Surtonius relates that a young officer to whom Vespasian had 
given a commission, perfumed himself when he went to court to thank the emperor 
for the honor conferred upon him. 'I should have been less offended if you had smelled 
of garlic,' said Vespasins, who was so disgusted with his foppery that he immediately 
dismissed him from his employment." 

Moral: — Don't make yourself obnoxious by being odious. 

Text No. 4 : — "Once upon a time a master asked his servant to have one of the 
storks prepared for dinner. The cook, a pretty maid, who was much enamored of the 
servant, persuaded him, against his better judgment, to have a leg of the fowl before 
it was served. The master, gazing on his repast, angrily said: This stork has but one 



Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing 



leg.' 'But, master, all storks have but one leg.' 'After lunch,' said the master, 'I shall 
prove to you all storks have two legs, then you shall be beheaded.' So they strolled to 
the pond where storks were standing as storks are wont to do, on one leg. The 
servant triumphantly said, 'You see!' The master replied, 'Wait!' Whereupon he 
shouted at the storks, who put down their other legs and fled. 

' 'But master,' said the servant, 'you did not shout at the stork on the table.' ' 

Moral: — Mistakes may be explainable, but are not justifiable. The servant lost 
his head — don't lose yours. 

As every dinner is followed by dessert, so I offer the following sweet after the 
rather solid fare above: 

The Class of 193 3 is undoubtedly one of the best, and we can pay you no higher 
compliment than to say we hope every following class will be as good. 

A year of association makes for friendships and estranges. To know one inti- 
mately and yet have respect for them is an evidence of the fact that they have mutually 
"worn well." 

Our year of contact with you has developed a regard which is hard to explain. 
Happy in the thought you have finished your course, we are unhappy to realize it shall 
no longer be our privilege to meet with you in delightful daily success or failure, storm 
or strife, but always for a common good. 

We hope this separation will not be long and that soon we shall again review the 
old relationship of a case in common — this time on the private floors. 

Good luck to you all. 

The Internes, 



Herman Lubowitz, M.D. 




There ought to be a Lau/ ayawsf tfr/s 

36 



The Hahn-O-Scope, 1933 



Anne — "I learned singing by mail." 

Frankie — "Well, what are you going to do about it? Sue the post office?" 

* * * 

Senior — "You say you flunked anatomy? Why, I can't understand it." 

Probie — "Same here — that's why I flunked it." 

* * * 

Jo — "What do you think of the Hahnemann Hospital Drive?" 

D. Fisher — "Oh, I know a much better place to park than that." 

* * * 

Dr. Lubowitz — "Did you know I was a life saver at the Camden pool last 
summer 1 " 

Seybert — "Lemon flavor, I suppose." 

* * * 

Gray — "Girls, what's the matter with your eyes, don't you get enough sleep?" 
Stan and Moyer — "No, it's not that. It's the dazzling city lights." 

He (romantically in moonlight) — "Don't you ever feel as though there were some 
strange undefinable weight, some vague force oppressing you?" 

Keyser — "Yes, I know; it's that chicken salad I had in Minter's cafeteria." 

* * * 

Atz — "Miss Guiney wants to know how long babies should be nursed." 

Border — "Tell her the same as short ones." 

* * * 

Harbeson — "Do you punish girls for things they don't do?" 

Miss Gormely — "Certainly not." 

Harbeson — "Eureka! I didn't give that new patient a bath." 

Mrs. Boyden — "You've noticed that the white of eggs in this recipe are beaten 
by hand?" 

Senior — "Yes; shall I wash my hands and start now?" 

* * * 

Davis — "This school will certainly miss me when I'm gone." 

Lord — "Yes; especially the man from the power house." 

Davis — "Why the man from the power house?" 

Lord — "He'll have a hard time heating the building with all the 'hot air' gone?" 

$ $ $ 

Recked 'lei — No Near Killed 'Inn 

I am em-barr-assed as can be, 

This rubber hose stunt's new to me, 

You hide it up behind my spine 

And say "breathe deeply, that is fine." 

My stomach rumbles, my head it aches, 
My whole darned system quakes and quakes, 
You say "now hold it like a man, 
And sit me on that cold tin pan. 

The storm is o'er, the roaring ceases, 
My body lies all torn to pieces. 
My head is clearing, gee, I feel swell, 
Answer the bell, girls, answer the bell! 

A Patient 



Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing 



Dr. 


Ash 


"Russ" 


Dr. 


Barron 


"Herb" 


Dr. 


Buck 


"Bill" 


Dr. 


Finney 


"Mike" 


Dr. 


Lots 


"Andy" 


Dr. 


Lubowitz 


"Bo-Bo" 


Dr. 


McGlynn 


"Sunshine 


Dr. 


McKeown 


"Mack" 


Dr. 


Kinsell 


"Larry" 


Dr. 


Oliva 


"Steve" 


Dr. 


Richie 


"Don" 


Dr. 


Riemann 


"Freddie" 


Dr. 


Rothrock 


"Vance" 


Dr. 


Sail 


"Mannie" 


Dr. 


Sloan 


"Mac" 


Dr. 


Sheppard 


"Shep" 


Dr. 


Witwer 


"Fritz" 


Dr. 


Barnes 


"Russ" 


Dr. 


James 


"Paul" 



Could he beautify an incision? 

The man with the cigar. 

"Got any oranges?" 

"Hello, there, gal!" 

Always the unexpected. 

"Splendid! Splendid!" 

"Everything's under control." 

"Pull your chairs up, girls, and listen. 

"Righto!" 

Who caters to our patients? 

Spelled "R'l-OH'I'E." 

"Greetings and Salutations." 

He just can't take it. 

"How about a drink?" 

Safety in numbers. 

Silence is golden. 

What a line! 

A perfect gentleman. 

Very obliging. 



At last I'm through with OBS 

And I can't say that Pm glad, 
'Cause when I think of leaving 

It really makes me sad. 

And when I shall hear no more 

That familiar combination; 
Membranes ruptured, para six, 

I'll think Pm in a new creation. 

No more heads on perineuritis, 

No more paras one'to-five, 
No more membranes in our faces, 

Pll just think Pm not alive. 

No more making patients pant 

And listen to them howl, 
While the doctor in his anger 

Screams, "Quickly, nurse, a sterile towel." 

No more rectal anaesthesia, 

No more sodium amytol, 
No more chloroform, gas or ether; 

But don't you think Pll miss it all? 

And as I leave for Medical, 

With diabetics and cardiacs, 
Think of me and please remember 

That Pm longing to be back. 



I. Border. 



40 



The Hahn-O-Scope, 19.33 



Come in late? 

Forget to make your bed in the A. M.? 

Lose your late pass? 

Cram the night before exams? 

Wait for a phone call? 

Get off medical on time? 

Grab someone's hair net when called to the nursing office? 

Get caught in Gene's? 

Throw anything out the window? 

Mend your uniform with adhesive? 

Let the bathtub overflow? 

Send stringbeans up on an Eber No. 2? 

Hide when Dr. Sappington made rounds? 

Let the egg cooker overflow in the kitchen? 

Get hot water on Monday morning? 

Chisel Butts? 

Give Mag. Sulph. without an order? 

Get your lights out on time? 

Have a midnight feed? 

Celebrate New Year's Eve in Nurses' Home by blowing horns? 

Send a patient to the O. R. with her false teeth? 

Attend Public Health Lecture? 

No! Boloney! 



FINALLY I DIED 

I never had such a tough time in my life. First I got angina pectoris, followed by 
arteriosclerosis. Just as I was recovering from these I got tuberculosis, double pneu- 
monia and phthysis, then they gave me hypodermics. Appendicitis was followed by 
tonsilectomy; these gave way to aphasia and hypertrophic cirrhosis. I completely lost 
my memory for a while, but I know I had diabetes and acute indigestion, besides 
gastritis, rheumatism, lumbago and neuritis. I don't know how I pulled through it — 
it was the hardest spelling test I've ever had. 



41 



The Hahn-O-Scope, 1933 



Rest*Cure 

I'm all right. Sure I am. I'm fine, I am. I've been a little nervous, but I'm all 
right now. I'm having a rest-cure. That's what they tell me. I'm having a rest-cure 
and I can't see anybody. Only the doctor and the day nurse and the night nurse and 
the floor nurse and the head nurse and the trav boys and three or four orderlies. And 
all I have to do is eat and sleep and not worry about anything and rest. And that's 
just what I'm doing. I may not look it, but that's just what I'm doing. And a 
hospital is just the place to do it in. No one disturbs you. Not till seven o'clock in 
the morning they don't. And then all they do is wash you and give you some break- 
fast and wash you and clean the room and then you can rest. You can till they wash 
the windows. And then you can rest till they want to clean the bathroom. You can 
rest while they clean the bathroom. You can. I can't. Not while hospitals use tin 
basins I can't. Certainly I'm not jumpy. I'm fine. I li\e hearing tin basins banged 
around. And I don't mind a bit if the nurse sings while she does it. It doesn't make 
me nervous — it makes me sick, but it doesn't make me nervous. And after they get 
the floor scrubbed I can rest while they clean the rugs. They'll take them outside to 
clean them, and that's very considerate. They understand. They know I'm resting. 
They'll wait till I'm asleep and bring them back and drop them beside the bed with a 
nice dull thud. But I don't mind. I'm fine. And then I'll get my rub and that's 
grand. All up and down my spine and I get sleepy again. And then the nurse tip- 
toes over and opens the window and tip-toes over and pulls down the shade and then 
she moves all the furniture and washes a few tin things and then she goes to lunch. 
Well, supposing she does leave the door open. I can get up and shut it, can't I? I'm 
not sic\, am I? I'm just in for a rest. And after I shut the door I can go fast asleep. 
I can till they ring the telephone. I know they have orders not to, but anyone can 
make mistakes. And they have to send up flowers. Even if there is a sign on the 
door that says "PATIENT SLEEPING" it doesn't say don't wa\en her, does it? I'm 
not complaining. After lunch I can rest. Unless the doctor comes. Well — I can rest 
when he goes. I ought to be able to. It's quiet here. It says so in the street, "HOS- 
PITAL STREET QUIET." There is a little riveting next door, but who minds that? 
I do, but I can't stop it, can I? I can't stop progress, can I? And I can't stop the 
radios. It certainly was a swell idea to put radios in a hospital. I wonder who thought 
that up? I'd like to meet him some day and slip him a nice little kiss. But I don't 
mind them, and I don't mind the visitors across the hall. They have to shout. That's 
cheering the patient up. They can't come in a hospital and let a patient think he's 
sic\, can they? They have to be hearty. Sure they do. So stop biting the bed clothes. 
After dinner you can rest. After dinner and after your bath and after your milk of 
magnesia. Then you can rest. You aren't nervous, are you? You aren't going to let 
a little thing like a rest-cure upset you, are you? Certainly I'm not. I'm calm. I'm 
swell. I'm not screaming. I'm resting. 



4? 



Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing 



66 A Night In the Hospital" 

ALL quiet on the western front, the hurry and scurry of the day is over, the tired 
day nurses have gathered up the loose threads of the day and have been replaced 
by the trim little night nurses, fresh and ready for the unexpected, which always 
happens in those eerie hours between darkness and dawning. 

The halls are hushed and quiet, and the patients breathe a sigh of relief as they 
realize another day has been checked off the calendar. A day — what is a day more or 
less, to those who have lost track of time? It's only twenty-four more hours, endless 
hours of pain and homesickness, twentyfour hours of birth and death. Who mourns 
that a day is dead? 

The elevator door opens and one hears voices and the roll of carrier wheels across 
the floor as another blanketed figure is wheeled by, escorted by the emergency interne. 
A few moments of renewed activity, perhaps a bit of telephoning, a hurried consulta- 
tion, then another bit of the flotsam and jetsam of life loses its identity and becomes 
just another number, filed away in a bed, like a card in a catalogue. 

Lights are out, save for the flashing of the doctor's call numbers in the corridor, 
and one waits for sleep to come with its mantle of forgetfulness. 

Eleven — and the chimes in a nearby tower toll out the ballad, Auld Lang Syne, 
like a benediction over this city of brotherly love. 

One — two — three o'clock — a spasm of coughing penetrates the stillness, and the 
moan of another sufferer, roused from a fitful sleep, moves the heart to pity. A light 
flashes and the little nurse hurries in with her flashlight to bring whatever relief she can. 

Quiet again, broken only by the rumble of a snore, which by its very intensity, 
one can almost know its owner is one of those who enjoy imaginary insomnia, and that 
in the morning she will swear by all the gods she never slept a wink all night. "Oh, 
well" — one thinks and smiles to oneself, "let each one have their little folly; why try 
to rob them of their one bid for sympathy." Roll over and try to woo again the great 
god, Morphia. 

Six o'clock and dawn is breaking, the hurried step of the nurses breaks the quiet 
of the ward, and as their cheery "good morning" penetrates the semi-consciousness, 
mouths automatically open to receive the thermometer for the morning temperature. 
Try and go to sleep again! 

Seven o'clock — and suddenly the world comes to life again. All is activity and 
the return of the busy, hustling little day nurses ushers in another day. 

A day — what is a day more or less to those who have lost track of time? 

A Patient. 



44 



The Hahn-O-Scope, 1933 




Top Row — ■ 

E. St. John, Side Center 

D. Seybert, Guard 
B. Shearer, Center 

E. Greaves, Guard 

Miss A. Guiney, Manager 

Bottom Row — 

H. CCKWARTZ, Forward 

H. B^c.R, Forward 

D. FlSHER, Side Center. Captain 

N Lufink, Guard 

M. Fisher, Forward 



4? 



Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing 



Gray without Stanley and Moyer. 

Our caps an inch from the hairline. 

Raush without a date. 

Gordon making a break in technique. 

Adams in a hurry. 

"Diz" not getting her daily letter 

Gravatte wearing a hair net. 

Ritzel getting "on duty" on time. 

"Droopy Drawers''' using lipstick. 

None of us gripping. 

Eck in a night club. 

Not moving beds on medical. 

Cooper not raving about "Herm". 

Yanni not saying "My Word." 



* * 



6 As Yoia Like It 9 



Brightest — MacTague. 
Dumbest — Most of us. 
Slowest — Christie. 
Sleepiest — Lofink. 
Biggest — Messinger. 
Longest — Kohut. 
Laziest — Loesleine. 
Craziest — Stanley. 
Dizziest — Midlen. 
Biggest feet — Sharpless. 
Weakest knees — Davis. 
Wise Cracker — Border. 
Biggest flirt — Raush. 
Close second — Cupper. 
Most popular — Keyser. 
Boldest — Kaplan. 
Most Efficient — ? 



46 



The Hahn-O-Scope, 1933 



A hospital is the only place you can get into without having baggage or payim 
in advance. They don't hold the trunk like a hotel does — they just hold the body. 



Darkness tell upon the earth, 
And he walked to and fro — 

Hours, yes, hours passed away, 
Why must he suffer so? 

He could not sleep — his care was great, 
But, after all, it was his fate. 
The dawn brought forth another day, 
Anguish and worry still held sway. 

But, after all, life is short, 

And the words were heard with joy 
As he sunk into a nearby chair — 

Congratulations — it's a boy. 



Miss Freas — "How is the rectal case in 957?" 

Christie — "Fine, but there's quite a bit of epistaxis on the dressings.' 



MacTague — "What is your worst sin?" 

Whitehead — "Vanity — I spend hours before the mirror adoring my beauty." 

MacTague — "That's not vanity — that's imagination." 

* ♦ # 

IN FOURTH FLOOR NURSERY 

Kupiek — "Did you hear that noise?" 

Gravatte — "What noise?" 

Kupiek — "A baby's cord dropped." 

* * * 

THE ZERO HOUR 

"I shall now announce the marks of the Senior Class." 

* * * 

"Imagine Tiny Midlen's embarrassment when she pushed a T and A reserve into 

rectal clinic." 

* ♦ # 

Miss Gormely — "Did the patient in 640 have a bath?" 

Watterson — "Yes, she did, Miss Gormely." 

Miss Gormely — "Well, she certainly doesn't smell it." 

* * * 
Keep that school girl affection. 

47 



Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing 



Comnmeeceiineiit 

'Tis nineteen hundred and thirty-three, 

For us — commencement day; 
Experience gained bids us recall 

Three years have passed away — 
When we approached with fear and hope 

A door high and open wide, 
Which we did enter and sat within, 

From dawn till eventide. 

The dawn is gone; the day has passed; 

And eventide is here: 
And from that door we shall go forth — 

Go forth on our career. 
The door that was flung open 

Shall close forever more, 
We set upon life's highway, 

Our training days are o'er. 

What has been done is finished: 

'Tis late our ways to mend, 
Our future is upon us — 

The beginning, not the end. 
Not the end, but the beginning 

Of greater tasks ahead; 
Willing hearts and hands for service, 

By a heavenly spirit led. 

May our minds reach for the best, 

Not for riches, glory, fame; 
But for the comfort and uplifting 

Of souls in agony and pain. 



H. M. Schwartz. 



48 




fWUf- 




Extend their best wishes to 1933 Graduates. 




No matter where you may be located in the future, 
please bear in mind that our service is at your 
disposal at all times. 

BUXBAUM'S UNIFORMS 

247-249 N 12th Street Philadelphia, Pa. 



WM. E. MARTIN 

MAKER OF 

PINS AND RINGS 
OF CLASS OF 1933 

1908 Chestnut Street 

PHILADELPHIA 



Compliments 
of 

BACHELORS' 
LAUNDRY 



Compliments 


Compliments 


of 


of 


JOHN A. BORNEMAN 


GENE'S 


Manufacturer of 


Specialising in 


Fine Homeopathic Remedies 


Sandwiches and Sundaes 


248 N. 15th Street, Philadelphia 


238 N. 15th Street, Philadelphia 


Sittings Telephones: 
By Appointment Pennypacker 6190 

Pennypacker 8070 


ZAMSKY STUDIO, INC. 


902 CHESTNUT STREET PHILADELPHIA, PENNA. 


This year we have completed the photographic work lor over a hundred schools and colleges, 
and the photographs in this book are an example of our uniform quality and fine workmanship. 


A telephone call will bring our representative to your school, or, if you prefer, write for 


particulars about our special school rates, and contracts lor school publications. 


Sittings may be made at home, at school, or at the Studio, by appointment. 


E. A. WRIGHT COMPANY 




PHILADELPHIA 


Compliments of 


(TVfr^S) 


"ABE'S" 




Nurses' Supplies 


PRINTERS 




OF 
THE 1*>33 HAHN-O-SCOPE 


15TH AND RACE STREETS 



A. WrtlQHT COM